Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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— Havbado















ESTABLISHED 1895 TDES? AY, JULY 15, 1952 PRICE : CENTS {
“[Jnite d States” Br e aks. RIDGWAYS AT DEDICATION CEREMONY IN PARIS“ No Treason Case

aes 3



Against ‘Red’ Dean

LONDON, July 14.
The British Government refused on Monday to bring a
| treason charge against the “Red” Dean of Canterbury on
the grounds that there was not enough evidence against him.
| Attorney General, Sir Lionel Heald said that “in my opinion
the evidence available does not disclose a prima facie eause
| of treason.” i ar, ii er

' ‘Trans-Atlantic Record|

‘Queen Mary’s’ Time Cut
By 9 Hours, 36 Minutes



Hotel Fire

Kills One

i Heald’s statement came in
answer to the Conservative M.P. New C.D.
FAIRBANKS, Alaska Miss Irene Ward She asked
x . i siag ABOARD S.S. UNITED STATES OFF AMBROSE ind “eicea's a Ce visit LIGHTSHIP. Pioneer Hotel Here Monday o the Far East and of his ac-

The American super liner United States captured the

killing at least one man and ; cusations abroad and in whip coun-

°
second Atlantic Blue Riband when she made the crossing leaving four or more un- try, prejudicial to the interests of W.L. Discussed
from Euro in thr d t 1 h dt 1 : accounted for. Twelve per- Her Majesty’s subjects, Heald
pein three days, twelve hours and twelve min-}} Sons were hospitelined, eg had considered prosecuting him| rom Out Own Coenemondent) f
* utes. z ; > in a critical condition with on a charge of treason for spread- / duly 14. a3
This cut nine hours and 36 minutes off the fourteen- burns ing enemy propaganda.” The C.D.C, Regional Controller
year-old record held by Britain’s Queen Mary. Bill Vanderpool, 45, was “Miss Ward told Sir Lionel to] of the Caribbean, Anderson, who

The average speed was 34.51 knots only slightly slower the only known fatality. He bear in mind that if a treason|leaves London by air for Jamaica







S teal Lok “ahs she charge could be brought it would] Wednesday night has been di
than the record speed rolled up when the United States ee our ae eae ae give an invaluable opportunity of} cussing at the Corporation’s H.Q.
shattered the west to east record last Monday. building in a mass of flame ; Fioving the falsity of the evi-/during the past week three or four
or was cal and there was} —————--___ —_U.P | dence of “this wicked and irre-]MeW projects in his area. In an
a si breeze this perfect sum- : ,

| sponsible old man.” “I find that]interview this afternoon, he said
mer day as the United States



Swept toward Ambrose Light, of-
fici ve > the Blue Riband run
ip’s welcome started
half mile before she came to tha
lightship. A small motor boat ap-
proached and came so perilously
near that Commodore Harry
Manning, the skipper, ordered
four warning blasts. The motor-
boat scooted to safety. The Unit-
ed Staies began slowing then.
The destroyer sent to escort
her in blinked “Welcome Home’!

in Morse and the Uni State
said Phanie You”! wet Cony

Receives Ovation



Korea War Has
Its Good Side

SEOUL ,Korea, July 14.
General Lawton Collins, United
States army Chief of Staff, said on
Monday the U.S, are better pre-
pared to resist aggression now as
a result of the Korean war. Col-
lins said, however, that the Unitea



FRENCH GENERAL MAXIME WEYC \ND (right) shakes ha: ds with Gen. Matthew B. Ridgway, SHAPE chief-
tain, at the Polytechnic School i): Paris. In background is Mrs. Ridgway chatting with Marshal Alphonse

Juin, The group was on hand to : eclicate statues of Marshals Foch, Joffre and Fayolle,



Commissioner Of Police

,â„¢my decision had been
1 the unfortunate faet
portunity,” Heald replied.
tive questioner that he had con-
siaered all the evidence put before
him but that he was prepared to
consider any further evidence
that might be submitted,

(Internationa!)

—UP.



Summoned on Contempt Writ) Russia Plans

based | be could not at this stage give any
that|@etails of these proposed schemés
it would not provide such op-| 0° where it is intended to operate

them, but they would be in part

He then told another Conserva-~|®¢rship with local people.

Asked whether there was the
likelthood that any C.D.C. schemes
for the West Indies were being
closed down in view of comment
upon them in the recent annual
report of the Corporation, Ander-
son said there were one or two
still under critical review: Their
future depended on their progress
in the next few months. He em-

| phasised that in closing down any

a bee ee transport Gen- Nations price everything in its a Soci ism r scheme caution was 6s importer?

era! ¥y outward b power “to end this damnable war.” > / as caution in approac Oo new

New York was ha first shin ce He told correspondents: We are / wpocate O- e endant 0: schemes. In either case intense
exchange the official greetings of better prepared today than

the sea—three blasts on the ship’s

horn,
Answered
The United States answered

we
would, had there been no Korean
war,

Collins refused to comment on
jwhat steps the United Nations



The Writ for Contempt of the Court of Grand Sessions
obtained by Fitz Harold Hacldock against Colonel R. T.

Kast Germany

BERLIN, J uly 14

investigation was the Corporation's
} today

No Comment

: ; ae : : ny ‘ Regarding the Jamaican Sugar
and the crowds Gn ded iceman forces in Korea might have taken Michelin, Commissioner of Police and the Advocate Co., Reds Request German Communists on peers ing the Ja ican Sugar
and waved. Planes flew over— to engage in a 2-year-old war. “It Ltd., in connection with portions of a speech made by promised that Marshal! confirmed that no approach at-all

army bombers, navy planes
planes and private planes. The
lightship itself saluted, and the
liner answered back.

The Meyer Davis orchestra,
one of the three aboard the ship,
struck up “The Star Spangled
Banner” and the 1,650 passengers

sea

jcosts us money, ammunition and
equipments,"he said. “It is drain-
ing. But is not serious. What had
to be done, had to be done.”
—U.P.

s B.G’s First Festival





Colonel Michelin and prinicd by the Advocate newspaper

on June 13 was begun in the Court of Common Pleas before |

a Special Jury yesterday morning.

Haddock obtained the Rule of the Court after submit-
ting affidavits alleging that part of the speech tended to
prejudice him in his defence in a prosecution for man-
slaughter now pending against him as defendant.

stalin would create Soviet-styled
socialism in the Soviet Zone and
turn East Germany into an armed |

ople’s democracy, The Com-|
inunists said in a cable “the work-
ing class will make the strongest
fYorts to strengthen the principles
ff the People’s Democracy in the

|
|
Two-Day Halt ox
In Truce Talks

MUNSAN, Korea, July 14,

The secret Korean armistice

had been made to date to the
Corporation which in the cireum-
stances eould make no comment
on the matter

Referring to the British Guiana
rice scheme, Anderson expressed
himself as “very hopeful’ of its
going ahead shortly.

; East) German Democratic re- | . h beén
\talks were recessed Mond at the ‘ ” Broad agreement ad
and 1,000 créwmen on deck ° E His Lordghi » Chi aden ok a Fey oe ee | Dt. . reached with the B.G. Govern-
cheered and shouted. The or- Herbert Hoover Of Music Opens Sir Allan Collomone, Bt hee ete | communist request, raising specu-|' "The cable was sent by the Bagi Teacnes Ww eal aeotl
chestra played “Dixie” in honour ‘

of Virginia State in which the

HERBERT HOOVER, 77, theonly liv- bn Guy Own Correspondent

issued a|lation that the deadlock over the | ,

ment on how the scheme should be
carried out and it was now under

: : joa : re Communist Party Conven-
: e Rule of the Court on the 25th | prisoner exchange was nearing a ae aaa 3a ; 1
mighty ship was built. Commo-| ingformerPresidentoftheUnited | non GEroWN, BG. July 14 £500,000 Fire sive caning upon Colonel Miche: climax, ‘The Rea request. for a| Neturday’ ond, prbliniel by tae —_—
. ‘ rTEORGE > Te ‘ "og . nOcate ‘ anv |\two-day recess wae r- M ” ‘ .
dore Manning received the next| States, watches as delegates give British Guiena’s fret festival és lin and the Advacate Company |two-day recess was made 24 hours | wast German news service A.D.N

honour. The band played “I’m
Just Wild About Harry” and the
crowd shouted and sang and
threw confetti. The skipper may

him an ovation at the GOP Con-
vention in Chicago. Hoover, in
what he described as likely to be
the last time he would address the

| Music was Officially opened on

Sunday afternoon at the Plaza
ane by Lady Woolley due to
} e

In Toulouse

of Grand

Limited, the defendants, to show before the truce delegates were |
ause why they should not be at- tO meet at Panmunjom for their!
tached for contempt of the Court\!!th consecutive

1 a new platform adopted by the

seeret Convention, they would gradually

session. |
\No reason for the recess wag an-

Monday, Communists revealed |

Schooner Captain

unavoidable ab: . TOULOUSE, July ts py M )-urn the Communist Bast German,
not have heard this th was! Republican convention, strongly | Charles Woolley whe ‘wna oe Fire swept trough an thd fe Conducting the ease for plaintify aon see ee a vtate into a full fledged “People’s } Lost At Sea
op. the bridge three and @ halt) ‘attacked both the domestic and | posed. trial district of Toulouse today 1/*ddock is Mr. E. K. Walcott, Q.C., listening to a lengthy review bf Democracy” through the creation
elty blocks away. foreign policies of the Truman | The Bishop's High School Old razing about a /M.C.P,, associated with Mr. G. L. |} ngthy review of |

The crowd drank champagne

(Internetional)



50 houses and i

the U.N. Command position. The |°! Lenin, Mie aenaee and

The Schooner Emeline which

Girls’ Guild with conductor Reggie |number of factories and causing |/8rmer and instructed by Messrs od would raise the national armed /jeft British Guiana ten days ago
and toasteq the ship and the Adenbaistration. ‘McDavid, the only ladies choir |more than £500,000 Sh hi of Hutchinson and Banfield, | ren OF selina Tt citeee aot ORI. { ite [10% Barbados, arrived yesterday
skipper. u with a male conductor was placed} damage, according to first estim-|©°licitors. | troversy and asked that it be dis-; ,,.V¢st Berlin police meanwhile] apout 4.30 p.m. without its eap-
nee. was still going! W Of N | first by adjudieator Vernon Evans ates. ’ The defendant Colonel Michelin} ...)ceq in secret sessions whioh ne i Te : to on avy — tain—Hilary Clarke—after being

xe 4 inte ‘ , ; ‘os j epresente: " ; ; cage ~!| border ’ ea estern| : .
or ied ie tuner eaent ame ages ew with 85 points; the Trinity Girls Dozens of families were left |!* "epresented by Mr. D. H. L.| gan July 4,—CP), pri yk fay aces lg overdue for some days. Clarke

tine where she will spend the
night in preparation for a gala
welcome to New York on Tues-



Zealand Workers
Raised

| Wishart came second with 177
points; the Teachers’ Choir, con-
ductor Madame Vesta Lowe-Pres-

| League with conductor Miss Nellie homeless.

The blaze started as a
fire which spread to a shoe fac-

grass .
{the Advocate Co. Ltd., by Mr. W.

iW.

|Ward, instructed by Messrs. Year- |
!wood and Boyce, Solicitors and |

| sectors from the Soviet Zone after



lmight make more kidnapping

| Italian Company

Communists threatened that they]

who used to live at Queen Street,
City, was drowned on Sunday,
Clyde Deterville, a St. Lucian and

ece . structe , raids into West Berlin, : q
day morning.—U.-P, cod and the Carnegie Senior Choir |tTY- In a short time a big area | ‘-, Lag a ace by} —uU.P. joe of the crew of ten told the
—Miss Lucille Fraser, tied for }WaS burning fiercely. ™ ‘Memt ae ae , oS ee | D ® rar ne ___ | Advocate,
WELLINGTON, July 14. |i place with 12pm eah-| a1 ayaaple. ens aided bya Sadat Meat eet| Determined To | sincaPORE RELAXES |" ‘the Bineine was brought
An arbitration court Monday in- Be, SECTOR: ROM | By ; : ’

Adams Receives
C.M.G. Today

The test piece was Schubert's ‘The
creased the standard minimum } Lord Is My Shepherd”.

wage for New Zealand workers.

troops and police were rushed to|¢vinced great interest in the case,
the scene. After a desperate battle |and for more than an hour be-

RESTRICTIONS ON JAPS
SINGAPORE, July 14.

Ship Persian Oil

port by the mate James Rice.
It left B.G. with only 60 tons of
wood aboard as ballast, to come

ini shirley Garr: y ints B S » fire }fore the scheduled hour of 10.30 iE This British col has relaxed|to dock here, On her voyage she
Minimum wages for men go up Shirley Garraway with 85 points |they managed to stop the fire | fore GE July 14, | is British colony has re
by 12 shillings and for eit by | was the first of seven finalists in]from spreading further m. for the case to begin, specta- | Italian binding ne July plane} its restrictions on visits by|ran out of fuel and had to tack
(From Our Own Correspondent) 10 shillings a week. the Open Pianoforte Competition. “U.P. ors filled the Court Room, send another tanker to | Japanese businessmen. In a move|in at St, Lucia for two days,
LONDON, July 14. The new rates go into effect |Joan McDavid came second with

Mr. Grantley Adams goes to
Buckingham Palace to-morrow to
receive his C.M.G. which he was
or in ;the last Honour’s

st. %



September 1 and will provide a|83 points, Norma Romalho third
minimum of five shillings an hour | with 81 points. A Police male voice
for skilled workers and slightly | choir gave what the adjudicator
more than four shillings for un- termed ‘a very excellent perform-
skilled workers.—CP). ance” of Elgar’s “It’s To Be A
Wild Wind”, and “As Torrents In
Summer” to gain first place with
1172 points, Queen's College Senior





Five Witnesses
During the day’s hearing,

Union Jack Hoisted
At Helsinki

HELSINKI, July 14
Under heavy skies and falling

Mr.

Walcott, Counsel for the plaintiff
called upon five witnesses to give
Support of his case,
Morris,

evidence in
These were George
Clerk of the Public Library, Fitz
Haddock, the plaintiff, Mr. P, A

Mr,

Dalle Kurope according tol ive been changed to permit
Japanese businessmen to remain
as long as three months on each
trip. Formerly they » were
stricted to two weeks.

Any Japanese who was

Count Zonea, chairman of
EPIM Company, charterers of the
tanker Rose Mary 6,322 tons now
being held at Aden with its cargo
of Persian

re-

oll on a court in

junction, (EPIM stands for Ente here



Deterville said.

It was while it was coming from
\St. Lucia that Clarke fell over-
\board, Deterville said that he had
jnot seen when Clarke actually
fell overboard, but he believed
that he was hit with the sail.
When they got out the life boat, he



e : and Maranatha Male Vous Choirs ero the Union dack was hye Vanterpool, a Reporter of the Ad-|Petrole Italia Medio Oriente, a oemeabian® See = ee ee Pe
ained 153 points each. roisted in e ympic village?! nin Meusnenan . oP on sad. /compan hose shares are held by | °C ‘ a e boat ce
Mid-East omman Certificates were distributed by|The British contingent, number- wooate Mewepeges, My. T. T. Hand nee eames are held by | ysoanese may take up residence|yesterday evening, the Police were
r ley st } sha NV ‘ ars

May Omit Egypt

Lady Woolley. Sessions are contin-

evening at the Town Hall. The
Grand Finale is fixed for next
Sunday.



ee



ing about 50 and including repre-

uing daily in the morning and |sentatives of every sport is already |e Writ on the defendants, and

in Helsinki. Captain E. Simmons, Superinten-

They stood in mackintoshes, as |4ent of ‘Police Area No, 4 in which
the British flag went up the mast |the accident in connection with the
to the playing of the National An-| matter took place.

By K. C. THALER ‘é s °° them. The Union Jack was the After this, Mr,
LONDON, July 14. ‘Admiral

British press reports have in the past few days been re British Minister Sir Andrew

claiming persistently that arrangements are being made to Eisenhower Noble was among those who
proceed with the projected Mid-East Defence Command MELBOURNE Australia watuhed (6.628 raleed ater the evidence in chief. At this stage
without Egypt, now that prospects for an early settlement July 14. | parade point.—U.P. His Lordship adjourned further
of the Anglo-Egyptian dispute appear to be fading. | Bisenhower Street in the Gov- hearing until 10.30 this morning,
i Pp Pp’ ernment housing settlement of vhen Mr. Walcott will begin his



; These rumours first emerged fast Preston was flooded Monday



‘ ross examination of Colone

ling to
Persia in an attempt to run Per-|'2, Tesume political and _ trade
sian oil to| relations with Japan, regulations

in Singapore.
Count Della Zonca arrived here

during the week-end for talks with
»usinessmen and ship owners who

—C.P.

ire interested in his company



taking statements from some mem-
bere of the crew.

| after a secret meeting of British

Michelin. Peron’s Condition

U.S. Navy Lays heck dexter after the most sustained rainstorm | Truman Confined The ruta, aiid |







Keel Of World's
Biggest Warship

NEWPORT NEWS, vir ;

The United States Navy today
laid the keel of the 60,000-ton air-
craft carrier Forestal which will
be bigger than any existing war-
ship. The Forestal whose cost has
been estimated at $218,000,000
should be ready late in 1954 at the
normal rate of construction.

Speaking at the keel
ceremony,
Secretary of Defence said, the
U.S.S. Forestal will be able to
carry the naval air power of the
United States to any part of the
world to promote security and
peace for ourselves and “ur allies.

“Let those misguided iteaders of
enslaved peoples who may con-

platq aggression weigh well
the fact that not even in their
innermost lairs can they escape
the devastating forces of this
mighty weapon.”

he, aircraft carrier is being
built here by the company which
built the liner United States, the
new holder of the Blue Riband
record for the Atlantic.

43,800,000 PEOPLE IN

ENGLAND AND WALES

LONDON, July 14.
The total population of England
and Wales at June 30 last year
was 43,800,000. Estimates issued



today by the Registrar General
show that women outnumbered
men by 1,702,000, and that child-



ren under 15 represented
cent of the population cx
with 32.4 per cent 50 vear

2 per
rec



| Mideastern diplomats
‘in June and they have grown in
jintensity since the latest cabinet
jchange in Cairo which British
officials consider as a setback to
efforts for a settlement.

Official quarters neither confirm
nor deny that moves are in pro-
| gress to set up a Mideastern Corm-
mand but they admit in any case
there is a long way to go before
anything concrete is likely to
‘emerge,

No Decisions

The Mideastern defence ques-
tion was discussed last week by
General Matthew B. Ridgway and
British Chiefs of Staff but Ridgway
himself said afterwards that no
decisions or conclusions had been
reached. This followed upon in-
conclusive discussion a fortnight
ago on the same question between
U.S. Secretary of State Dean
Acheson and British Foreign Sec-
retary Anthony Eden. It has
emerged in both sets of diseus-
‘sions that the Mideastern Com-
mand question cannot be solved
as an isolated issue, and thet it
must await settlement of the
Mediterranean Command structur
on which the Anglo-American dif-
ference remains as wide as ever.
if arrangements for the Mideast
Defence Command were to pro-
ceed without Egypt, as suggested
by the latest recurrent reports,
some sort of skeleton structure
would be set up with headquar-
probably in Cyprus for its]
organizational planni
h a view to its

laying |
W. C. Foster, Deputy |

ters




ubsequent
if and when Egypt



eady to join, ifr

—U.P

boards |

in Melbourne in 61 years.
The newspaper Argus said res-

idents are suggesting that the
street should ‘have been named
after an Admiral rather than a

General. —U.P,



TURKEY HOPES TO
PURCHASE $10M FROM
MONETARY FUND

WASHINGTON, July 14.

The International Monetary

fund on Monday announced that |S. Kerr who is seeking Demy-{ present IT IS ORDERED that thx

he Government of Turkey
fo purchase $10,000,000 from
Fund with Turkish Liras.

The announcement said that in |8@id Truman became ill on Sun-|jhereafter as

its onl

‘ previous transaction with
the

und, Turkey sed

$5,000,000 in 1947 and made full |jstay in his quarters today” Short|tempt of the Court of Gran

repayment of
this year.-—U.P.

obligation earlier

Umrigar First Indian To Se

n Correspondent!
; LONDON, July 14
Against Yorkshire at Sheffield
today Polly Umrigar became the

first member of the Indian team to

ompiete 1,600 rums this season.
He did so after seoring 87 and
was 137 not out at close. It was

his third century of the tour. As
a result of Umrigar’s effort backed
up by fine batting by Mantri (80)
Adhikari (82) both of whom
their highest score this sea-
on, the Indiar
se 18
x

made



8 ahez with five

It zener

§ finished on the |

To Private
| Quarters

WASHINGTON, July 14
The White HouSe announced
Monday that President Tru-
man is confinéd to his
juarters suffering from
virus infection.”
Truman cancelled
ments for the
conference with

on
}

priva‘e
a “mild
his engage-
day including 4
Senator Robert
cratic Presidential nomination.
Press secretary Josepf Short

day. “The President ha
virus infection and

a mild
is going to

told reporters.
—UP

Forty-year-old Charlie Elliott
led the way with an unbeaten 15!
for Derby against Somerset at
Taunton where there promises to
be an interesting struggle for ‘rst
innings points tomorrow

At the Oval Peter May celebrat-
| éd his first appearance for Surrey
this season by making 124 off the

Kent attack. He reached his hun-
dred in three and three-quarter
hours with the aid of ten fours and
was batting four and a half hours
all told for his fifth century of the
enson
De ni Compton re na en
opped from Er nd’s test rr
bowle for two tham
- Se os *

Walcott closed After the talks he announced
|}23rd flag to be run up at the en-|the case for the plaintiff, and Mr Msby We _ > mate pngther
trance to the village D. H. L. Ward opened the case |. eoaa 2 = : suse me = ’

’ jfor the defendant Colonel Michelin oil Me plier ton Persia UP.
who this evening completed his supplies m sla,’— *
No. Change In Eva

writ was mad BUENOS AIRES, July 14.

m the 25th of June, 1952, and it condition

states that “Upon reading the
iffidayits of Fitz Harold Haddoc
ind Patrick Anthony Vanterpoo!
filed herein the 18th day of June,
1952, and the exhibit therein
ireferred to, marked “A” and upon
jhearing Mr. E. K. Walcott, @.C
of Counsel for the plaintiff, Mr
Ip H. L. Ward, of Counsel for
defendant Michelin, and Mr. W
for
being

The
‘eron,

of Senora Eva
ailing wife of President
’eron had not undergone any
hange “in the last 24 hours’, ac-
ording to an official communique
sued last night. The Senora is
bserving medical advice to main-
iin “complete rest.” ,

Fears for her survival were
roused by the announcement last
Wednesday night that her condi-
\ion* was “unsatisfactory.” There
had been no change since. Senora
Peron never recovered completely
from an unspecified major oper-
‘tion last November. The Senora |
made her last public appearance
on June 4 when her husband ,
was inaugurated for the second |
term as Presidcnt. But she
has not been at her office in the
Ministry of
once worked

W. Reece,
| the

of Counsel]
Company

Qc.,
defendant

jdefendants shall on Monday th
i4th day of July, 1952 at 10.5¢
|o’clock in the forenoon or so soon
can be

Counsel :
heard, show cause why they

should not be attached for con

Labour where
10 months,
UP.

sha}
Session of Oyer and Termine

@ On page 3

for



ore 1,000 This Tour'|

437 at|4; Brookes
128 not out
Somerset vs. Derby—Somerset!
426 for 7 declared, Derby 305

of chasing Lancashire's 136 sarrick
Manchester. Mainly as a result of
a patient century by W. J. Edrich

|who batted just over four hours

not out,



}for 109, Middlesex averted a fol- |for 3, Elliott 151 not out, Revil)|
low on and finished 124 behind | 68. - j
with three wickets in hand Surrey vs Kent—Kent 192|
HP Z and 106 for 2, Evans 65 not out;}
- SCOREBOARD Surrey 325, May 124, Dovey
Glamorgan vs Gloucester for 82
tlamorgan 2 a . ry, 5 Ti” : + an!
Con a et 185 Cook 51 Warwick vs. Notts—Notts 170!
for 74, 2 ; 7 Muncer “land 100 for 4. Warwick 329,|
Hant Leicester—Leicester Gardner retired Hurt et 197 a |
379. Hants 213 and 155 for 8 jler 5 for 86
Lancast Middlesex—Lan-| Worcester vs Sussex—Sussex
eashire 437 for 7 declared: Middle- |367, Worcester 376, Bird 130
ex 313 Broadbent 84
ort t Essex-—Es

ex 428 Yorkshire vy India York

hare Northant 236 19 licy 2 ‘ i



Raleigh

vith the veal

American tlavour





rae holiday

PAGE TWO

ee

Carub Calling

HE ST. GEORGE’S SOCIAL

CENTRE at Ell n will be

opened by His Excell: the Gov-
ernor on Wednesday, July 30

On Routine Visit

ING COMMANDER L. A.
EGGLESFIELD, Director
Géneral of Civil Aviation in the
Caribbean Area, left on Saturday
by the s.s. Golfite for Prinidad on
a routine visit, He is expecied to

return to-day«

Attended Economics Talks

ISS BETTY ARNE, Social
Welfare Officer, returnec
over the week-end by B.W.LA.

from Trinidad after attending th:
Conference on Home Economics
Education and Nutrition at Kent
House, Port-of-Spain.

For Summer Holidays
R, JOHN HOYOS who has just
AY completed his second year ir
Science at the University College
of the West Indies, arrived on Sun-
day by the Colombie from Jamaica
to spend the summer holidays

with his relatives at Cheapside,

Married in Trinidad

D* AND MRS. PETER BOYD
who were married in Trini-
dad.on-Saturday, July 5, at the
Romatr Catholic Church, San Fer-
nando, -passed through here on
Sunday by thé Colombie on their
way to Dominica where they will
reside. ’

Dr. Boyd is District Medicat
Officer of Marigot in Dominica.
His wife, the former Miss Angela
Ramoutar, is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Samuel Ramoutar of San
Fernando, She returned to Trini-
dad in May from the United King-

dom where she was doing a course}



POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

“Don’t look now, darling,
but I chink that’s the
man who sponsored the
programme for sponsored
programmes,”



Attended Oils And Fats
Conference

ON'BLE AUSTIN WINSTON, Sttute of * +»

a retired Civil Servant and
his son, Mr. Gerald Winston,
Manager of the Marketing Depot,
Dominica, returned home on Sun-
day by the S.S. Colombie after at-
tending the Oils and Fats Con-

“ference which concluded at
Hastings House last week.
Delegates returning yesterday

were Hon'ble V. C, Bird President
of the Antigua Trades and Labour
Union, Mr. G, E, Luck, Acting
Financial and Economic Advise

in Business Education at Pitman ;to the Government of the Wind-

Central College in London.

Intransit For U.K.

R. AND MRS. C, B. CART-

WRIGHT and their two chil-
dren Elizabeth and Mary of Trini-
dad, are now on their way to
England to spend four months’
holiday. They were among the
intransit passengers arriving here
on Sunday by the s,s, Colombie.

Mrs. Cartwright is the daughter

of Mr. C. R, Tudor of “Staten”,
Hastings.

To Further His Studies

R. DARNLEY NILES who had

been working in Curacao for
the past six years as .a chemist
employed with Suffisant Company,
arrived here on Sunday by* the
Colombie for a few hours which he
spent with his relatives and left
later in the evening by the. same
opportunity for England,

A son of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene
Niles.of Vauxhall, Christ Church,
he has now gone up to the U.K.
to further his studies,

Freight Solicitor
FTER spending about ten days’
in Barbados as a
“guest of Cacrabank Hotel, Mr,
-Hamesh Gordon returned to Trini-
dad on Saturday by the SS.
_ Golfito. He is Freight Solicitor of
Messrs Alstons Ltd., of Port-of-
Spain, ‘

Back From U.K.

R. AND MRS. L. C. WRIGHT

were among the passengers
arriving here on Saturday by the
S.S. Golfito from England where
they had spent two and a half
months’ holiday, They will be re-
maining until Thursday as guests
at the Ocean View Hotel when
they leave for Antigua where Mr.
Wright is Traffic Manager of the
Antigua Sugar Factory.

CLEAR









ward Islands with headquarters in
Grenada and Hon’ble E, Hughes,
Barrister-at-Law, St. Vincent.

They were guests at the Marine
Hotel,

Senior Accountant

R. STANLEY COBHAM,

Senior Accotntant of Als-
tons Ltd., Port-of-Spain, arrived
here on Sunday afternoon by the
French S.S. Colombie for four
weeks’ holiday which ‘he is spend-
ing with his relatives at Hinds-
bury Road,

To Reside in U.S.A.

J EAVING on _ Saturday by

~ B.W.LA, for Trinidad was
Miss Joyce Sealy of Martindale's
Road who has gone to spend two
weeks’ holiday before going on to
the U.S.A, to reside with her
mother, Mrs, Pearl Geraud of New
York City,

eerie ethene orm © eemienen mime women

reach the
Bear has
gone, and is no longer in sight.
‘Oh, well, | may as well take my
lantern, It has gone out anyway,"
says Willie. a ht-ho, and then
I'll go and nelp Daddy to mend
Mrs. Bunn's notice board,"’ says

ING

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TRADING

“Wakefield,”
row night, July 16.

maica College,
Sunday by the Colombie to spend
six weeks’ holiday with his parents,
Mr. and Mrs, C. B. Jackman of
Water Street, Christ Church, He
was accompanied by his wife,

same opportunity from Jamaica
was Mr. J, A. W. Crick, Assistant
Master of Kingston College and
son of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Crick
of “Weston House,” St. James, He
will be here until August 24 when



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. Were $7.48 now $5.00
BOYS and YOUTHS WHITE POLO SHIRTS ....

SOLE



BARBADOS





By Beachcomber |

Gramophone Concert

OREIGNERS must be readin,
At B.C, with interest the retainer |
EETHOVEN'S Sonata in F. of the abominable things that are!
Minor, Op. 57 (‘Appas- done to living horses in this coun-
sionata”); Trio No. 7 in B, Flat try in order that Escalope de
Major. Op. 97 (The Archduke) and Veau may appear on restaurant
Quartet in F. Major. Op, 135 are Menus. d
some of the works which will be Since nobody but the analytical
heard. during the Gramophone Chemist can know what he is eat-
Concert at the British Council, ing to-day, there will pronaity be

an increase of vegetarianism, You
will still not know what process-
ed vegetable you are eating, but
at any rate your conscience will
be at ease—until somebody dis-
covers a method of using horse-
meat to make a new health-giving
vegetable. '

White Park to-mor-

The programme begins at 8.15.

School Masters Return

Home
R. .CARL JACKMAN, As-
sistant Master at the Ja-

Is Mimsi i ?
arrived here on limsie miscast:

é h- great difficulty is to make
Mimsie Slopcorner realise |
that she is an ancient Queen of
the Britons, not a silly little oaf
standing on a hay-cart. When
told to look regal, she simpers.
When told to advance on foot and
tilt her head haughtily, she drops
her spear ,and shakes her helmet
awry, so that she looks like an
intoxicated “extra” in an opera
crowd. With infinite patience she
has been coached to hold igs

Also arriving on Sunday by the

he leaves for England to take his shield defiantly. but she still ho
Diploma in Education at the In- it as a timid sandwichman mi

mm. hold an advertisement for a tea-
shop. Yesterday her queenly robe
cot caught in the prongs of Father
Neptune’s trident, and the red#
faced deity, lowering the impleg
ment to disentangle it, had the
air of a man trying to toast some-
thing on an enormous fork, Pib-
ney is enjoying all this so much
that everyone hopes it will be all
wrong on the day.

A memory of Semolina

O* reading of a singer with a
very wide throat who can
produce two voices at a time, I
recalled the astonishing Semolina.,
She not only sang duets by her-
self, but accompanied them with a
third sound. The third sound re-
sembled an oboe so closely that
the audiences did not "know
whether to laugh or cry. A medi-
cal examination revealed the fact
that she had once swallowed an
oboe during a_ brawl with the
Huddersfield olian Orchestra.
The doctors’ report added: “So
wide was her throat that only
some private scruple could have
prevented her from swallowing a
trombone.” “One swallow does
not make a singer,” commented a
critic with a face like a broken
shutter,

Going Back Home
ETER INCE, 11-year-old son
of Mr. and Mrs, Herbert Ince

of Trinidad who has been having
medical attention at Dr.\ Bayley’s
Clinie for the past two weeks will
be returning to Trinidad on Fri-
day.

Mr. Herbert Ince is manager of
the Royal Bank of Canada Port-
of “Spain.

For Two Months
RRIVING from Venezuela on
Sunday by the Colombie
were Mrs, Milton C, Hagen and
her three children, Cyril, Chris-
topher and Freddie, They will be
here for two months’ holiday
which they are spending as guests
at Paradise Beach Club,

On Business

R, L. FRIEDMAN, Manager

of the British Bata Shoe Co.,
is now o1 his way to England on
a three-month business visit. He
left on ‘sunday ‘sy the Colombie
and was accompanied by his wife
and little con, Peter.

For U.K. Holiday

Mimsie’ under fire again

EAVING on Sunday by the
S.S. Colombie for England : ;
were Mr. and Mrs, William H. HE Pibney St. Vitus and Fob-

sett Evening Echo, :n another
leading article, says:

. . . Who is ultimately respon-
sible for making Pibney a laugh-
ing-stock all over Europe by
importing Miss Slopcorner to play
Boadicea? Her ludicrous antics
on the hay-cart are the ribaldjest
of every ale-house, and things
have come to a pretty pass when
our band, which won the Halford
Cup at the King’s Knucklefurther
Band Festival in 1949, spends
more time in laughing at Boadicea
than in playing the spirited march
specially composed for it by Mn
Huxtable. Either the Boaditea in=
cident should be struck off the
programme ruthlessly, or some
more fitting exponent should be;
found before it is too late. We in-
tend no discourtesy to Miss Slop-
corner when we say, in the racy
and homely phrase of Councillor
Townsend, “She is enough to
make a cat sick.”

Grannum who have gone up for
three months’ holiday,

Mr. Grannum is an Attorney of
Messrs Robert Thom Ltd.



ee ee

But :
moved when something swishes

Rupert. hardly have they
past their heads, ‘‘It's the Toy
Scout,"’ gasps the little bear.
‘He's going to land. Let’s ask
him what happened here last night.
He’s sure to be able to tell us
evervthing.”’

Wisdom of the ages

Preise of the crocodile’s son to
its mother is excusable insincerity
jin the traveller who has a river

to cross,
(African proverb.)

| YES SIR!

S&SRUM

It's the Flavour—
A Distinctive Flavour
Always Right—





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ADVOCATE

—It Could Talk as Well as Write —

BY THE WAY! A Very Remarkable Pencii | |

By MAX TRELL

THE house was dark, and every-

e in it —from cellar to attic—had
already gone to bed. All except
Koarf, the shadow-boy with the
turned-about name. He was sitting
on the edge of the desk near the
window, watching the moon climb
up over the trees.

For attite a while Knarf sat there,
not hearing a sound or seeing any-
thing move inside the room when
all at once he heard a,sharp little
voice saying: “Pardon me, sir!
You’re sitting on me!”

Knarf instantly sprang off the
desk. He peered closely at the spot
where he had been sitting. All he
could see was a small yellow pencil,
no larger than a clothespin. Its
point was broken.

Edge of Desk

Knarf had just about decided
that he had only imagined he hac
heard someone speaking to him. He
was starting once more to sit on the
edge of the desk when the same
voice broke out again, only this time
louder and sharper than before.
“No! No! Keep off!”

It was certainly not Knarf’s im-|

agination! Now he was certain that
someone close by was speaking. He
peered very hard at the pencil.

“Well,” said the Pencil, ‘ what
are you looking at me for?”

“Did you say something to me
just now?”

“I did,” said the Pencil, “and 1
meant it. You were sitting on me,

you were! And you were about to

sit on me again!”

“Oh!” exclaimed Knarf. Then he |ing about somebody else, say ‘UW’.
Pencils {And if you're talking about your

added:
talk?”

“Don’t be

“Since when do

silly,”

shouldn’t we be able to talk?”

“Pencils don’t write,” said Knarf.

“People do.”

“Nonsense. People just hola us.
We do the writing. I’d like to see
anyone write anything by just mov-
ing his finger up and down on a
sheet of paper. All he would get is
smudges, Pencils write words that| dashes, too. And above all,” said
other people can read. That’s real | the Pencil, “don’t sit on top of the

writing,

“And of course,” the Pencil weit ready. I don’t think that’s consider-
;|ate at all!”

“since we know all the words, we |
ean also talk. Pens talk too—only | Knarf ever heard a Pencil talk like
when they get excited they make! that!

on before Knarf could interrupt



Listening Hours

TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1952

1.00—7.15 p.m, 19, 76M, 26.53M

4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily
Service, 4.15 p.m. New Records, 5 p.m.
Cricket, 5.05 p.m. Interlude, 5.15 p.m
B.B.C. Symphony Orchestra, 6 p.m, Ulster
Magazine, 6.15 p.m, Meet the Common-
wealth, #45 p.m. Sports Round-up and
Programme Parade, 7 p.m. The News,
7.10 p.m, Home News from Britain
7.15—10,30 p.m, 25.53M, 31 2M





7.15 p.m. Rendezvous, 7.45 p.m. Per-
onal Portrait, 8 p.m. Take it Eamy, 8.15

m. Radio NeWsreel, 8.30 p.m. Report
rom Britain, 8.45 p m. Interlude, 8.55
1m. From the Editorials, 9 p.m. Bed-
ime with Braden, 9.30 p.m. The Dancing
English, 10 p.m, The News, 10.10 p.m
News Talk, 10.15 p.m. Moray McLaren
Talking, 10.30 p.m. Northern Journey.





In passing

F anyone doubts that we are all
‘to-day units of an unending
series of scientific experiments
let him consider the recent reve-
lation of an American committee.
Of 704 substances used in food, 207
have not yet been established as
narmless. An article before me
deals with the “toxicity of food
additives,” and admits that the
chemicals used in food reduce the
nutritive value, and that little is
known of their effects. Ye gods
and little toxic fishes!

or amazingly relieved

in 3 out of 4 cases
in doctors’ tests!

* Here’s wonderful news for
women and girls who — each
month — suffer the tortures of
“bad days” of functionally-

~} caused menstrual cramps and

pain — headaches, backaches,
and those “no-good,” dragged-
out feelings.

It’s news about a medicine
famous for relteving such suf-
fering!

Here 1s the exciting news.
Lydia E. Pinkham’s Vegetable
Compound — gave complete or
striking relief of such distress
in an average of 3 out of 4of the
cases in doctors’ tests!

Yes! Lydia Pinkham’s has been
roved to be scientifically modern
tn action!

This news will not surprise the
thousands of women and girls who
take Lydia Pinkham’s regularly and
know the relief it can bring.

And it should encourage you (if
you're not taking Lydia Pinkham's)
to see if your experience doesn’t
match theirs to see if you, too,
don’t avoid the nervousness and
tension, weakness, irritability—and

napped the | about insects that make honey say
Pencil. “We write ton’s ee Why |‘B’. And if you're talking about the



Pains, distress of ‘‘those days” stopped





1
\“Of course I ean talk,” the pencil
said,

| blots and they splutter. And some-
times they suddenly stop. They
can’t say another word.” b
| “Why not?” Knarf wanted to
know.

“Because they run out of ink. b
They dry up.”

“Oh,” said Knarf again.

“It seems to me,” said the Pencil,
“that you’re full of ‘O’s.’ Don’t. you
| know any other letters?”

Whole Alphabet

“I know the whole alphabet,”
said Knarf indignantly.

“Then use them, silly. Instead of
saying ‘O’ all the time, say ‘G’!”
| “You mean Gee,” said Knarf.

“I mean ‘G’. And if you ask a
question, say ‘Y’. And if you’re talk







self say ‘I’. And if you're talking

| ocean, say ‘C’. And if you’re talking
|about a certain kind of bird, say
|‘J’.. And if you're talking about
something hot you drink, say
‘T’, Learn to use your letters.
Knowing the alphabet isn’t enough.
And learn your commas, and semi-
colons, and periods, and question
marks and exclamation points, and

\desk. You’ve broken my point al-

Never in his whole life had

Teeth Loose
Gums Bleed

leeding Gums, Sore Mouth and
Loose Teeth mean that you may
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save your teeth or money back
on return of empty package, Get
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guarantee protects you.



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THE TANKS ARE COMING

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“ROPE”
Granger — James Stewart

“CITY for CONQUEST”
James CAGNEY

Farley



Lee

How Lydia Pinkham’s works














It has a “calming” and soothing 4
effect on the uterus... quieting b>
the contractions (see the chart) %
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pain, cramps, other distress. x
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VIVA Z2Z

(Marlon BRANDO

SSOSSSSSSSOSSSSSOSSSS SOO POO OOPOP SPP LSPS SPOS

GLOBE

TODAY—MATINEE & EVENING—Last Shows - - -




APATA

— Jean PETERS)







& Continuing Daily
Exciting Adventure
Gary Cooper in

DISTANT DRUMS

(Technicolor)








CASA

Robert

Thurs. Special 1.30 p.m.



Leo Gorcey & system by Western
| ) GOLDEN STALLION |]___ Dead End Kids Electric
Re Rogers and Thurs. Special 1.90 p.m aaa aa
| star . iY RAND RE-OPENING
| (WELLS FARGO a Sen ass TOMORROW
GUNMASTER || JoseP2 COTTON & Also THURS

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Rocky Lane



CLOSE TO MY HEART





TOMORROW—4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
| SUN VALLEY SERENADE
John PAYNE — Sonja HENIE — NICHOLAS BROS.

AND *S@ESTER 880 .pURT LANCASTER

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TO-DAY 445 & 830 p.m.|| To-day & To-morrow

4.45 & 8.30 p.m

Virginia WELLS

MASTER MINDS

__Robert MITCHUM _

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yee, ee APPOINTMENT HEART &

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Due to
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TO-DAY LAST 2 SHOWS 4.45 & 8.15
COLUMBIA PICTURES Presents
Barbara HALE—Richard GREENE i
“LORNA DOONE”
Color By Technicolor

FLASH

To-day last 2 445 & 8.20
Paramount Presents -
Joan FONTAINE—John LUND

Mona FREEMAN ir
DARLING HOW COULD x0U FLAS!

Extra:— Short— ‘Tar With A Star’
and latest British News Reel

H ndisesy ee 3%

TOMORROW AT 8.30 pm.

Dr. J. V. Henson Presents Mada

O’Lindy and her unforgettable Troupe
i



in
“CARACAS NIGHTS OF li"

OLYMPIC with
‘Sam’ Midget, Dopie and Lord Coffee
Tolday only 4.30 & 8.15
Paul ROBESON—Leslie BANKS TOMORROW 4.30 THURS. & FRI.
in 4.30 & $15

“IN A LONELY PLACE”
With
Humphrey BOGART
and
“COWBOY AND THE INDIANS”

ROYAL

TODAY Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8.30
Rod Cameron in “PANHANDLE”

SANDERS OF THE RIVER

and

THINGS TO COME
Starring: Ramond MASSEY
Ralph RICHARDSON

Wed. & Thurs. 430 & 8.15





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TDESDAY, JULY 15,

Contempt of

@ From Page 1

and General Gaol Delivery that
the defendant Michelin at a pub-
lic meeting of bus drivers and
conductors held at the Empire
Theatre in the City of Bridgetown
in this island on the 12 day oi
June, 1952, did make, and the de-
fendant Company did publish in
the Barbados’ Advocate News-
paper of the 13th day of June,
1952, the following statements
which are calculated to prejudice
the plaintiff in his defence to a
prosecution for manslaughter
which is now pending against the
plaintiff as a defendant and are
calculated to prejudice the fair
trial thereof, namely:—

“So far this year, 10 persons
have been killed as a result of
road accidents. All these lives
might have been saved if the
drivers of the vehicles concerned
had not been in such a hurry and
had driven with more care. One
of the most ghastly accidents took
place a few weeks ago on a
Sunday afternoon. Three little
ehildren were sitting quietly on
the’ steps of their home waiting
their father to bring the car
around and take them for a drive.
Suddenly a car coming along the
Toad crashed into them and
knocked them unconscious. They
Subsequently. died in hospital.
Think of these young lives being
brought abruptly to an end. It is
appalling and it should be possi-
ble to prevent accidents of this
nature.”

Both defendants, Col. Michelin,
and Mr. Ian Gale, representing
Yhe Advocaje Co., pleaded not
guilty te the charge aileged
against them.

A special jury of 12 was
selected to try the issue, and Mr.
E. K..Waleott, counsel for the
plaintiff, asked that His Lordship
make a ruling as to who should
commence ip the matter.

ure

The Jury was ordered to retire
and Mr. Walcott addressing His
Lordship said:— “The difficulty,
My Lord, in this case, is as all
of us know, that we have a
Special Act of 1891—26, whicn
loes not follow the procedure in

land.”

His Lordship. said that the
matter “had also given him much
concern,” and Mr. Walcott ex-
plained that, he had said to His
Learned Friends, counsel for the
defendants, that the matter also
presented a difficulty to him. He
Said it was not like the usual
procedure where they fought one
Way as against another. They,

the lawyers concerned in the
issue, realised that they were
dealing with an entirely new
procedure.

His Lordship queried whether it
oes save time if he, subject to
egal argument, gave his view as
to how the matter should proceed,
and pointed out that he was not
making a ruling at that particular
time. But as it appeared to him
under Section 4, Sub-Sections
1 & 5 of the Act of 1891-26, in view
of the fact that on the hearing of
actions, the course under Sub-

tion 5, and as showing cause
appears under Sub-Section 1, the
course to pursue in order to get
the matter before the jury, would
be for the plaintiff to open the
ease briefly, put such proof orally
as was done by affidavit and the
Tule obtained, and then the onus
would shift to the defendants to
show cause, the plaintiff being en-
titled if needs be to call evidence
in rebuttal to anything which oc-
curred,

Counsel on all sides agreed with
the course which His Lordship
suggested and on the jury’s re-
turn to the Court, Mr. "Walcott
opened the case for the Plaintiff.

Mr. Wflcott said that the matter
before the jury were proceedings
under an Act called the Contempt
of Court Act, and quoted Section
4, Sub-Sections 1 and 5 which
read, respectively, as follows: —

“All contempts of a superior
Court other than those committed
in the presence and hearing of the
Court when sitting, shall be dealt
with and determined only by
means of a Rule of the Court of
Common Pleas which may be ap-
plied for by any person whomso-
ever, calling upon the defendant
to show cause why he should not
be attached for contempt of court;”
and “on the hearing of such Rule
of Court, the defendant shall
plead and thereupon, evidence
Shall be taken on both sides orally
and the defendant shall be a com=
patent witness in his own be-

Law And Fact
Mr. Walcott said that the jury
concerned to try the issues botir
of law and fact in such Rule “shall















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1952

not guilty upon the whole matter
both of law and fact of any issue
upon such rule, and shall not be
required or directed by the Court
or Judge before whom such Rule
shall be tried to return any other
verdict or anything whatsoever.”
He explained that on the 25th of
June, 1952, the plaintiff, Fitz
Harold Haddock obtained a Rule
from His Lorship the Chief Judge
in the Court of Common Pleas,
after submitting affidavits alleg-
ing that certain portions of the
speech were made by Col Miche-
lin st a Public Meeting of Bus
Drivers amd Coné@uctors, held at
the Empire Thatre on the 12th of
May, 1952, and published on the
following day by the” defendant
Company. ~
After reading the Rule to the
jury, Mr, Walcott went on to ex-
plain, citing supporting legal re-
ferences from Halsbury what was
meant by contempt of Court. He
poinigd out to the jury, that they
shoukl not take the law from
either himself or is Learned
Friends, counsel forthe defend-
ants, but from His Lordship the
Chief Justice on the Bench, ant
added that it was still their duty
as counsel, especially in opening
a case, to explain to them the law
reise ts the particular matter.
Mr. Walcott submitted that the
jury was not in any way concerned
except as to the charge in the
Rule, with the charge of man-
slaughter against his client, which
latter matter was to be tried at
the Court of Grand Sessions, and
emphasised upon the jury that they
were not “sitting there to try the
manslaughter charge. Mr. Walcott
warned the jury that they should
east away from their minds preju-
dice one way or the other, or any
thought as to whether Mr. Had-
dock should be convicted for
manslaughter or not. That was not
what they were there for, he said;
and he added that the law re-
quired a jury to be summoned in
cases of alleged contempt of Court.
Mr. Walcott referred to Hals-
bury, Vol. 7, p. 2, Para. 1 which
deals with the various kinds of
contempt, and read other relevant
passages from the same volume.
During the course of these re-
ferences, Mr. Walcott commented
to the jury that in the case which
was before them, at the time of the
alleged contempt, his client had
not yet been committed for trial
at the Court of Grand Sessions.
He submitted after making fur-
ther reference to sections of the
law which he was adopting, that
it was not whether the alleged
contempt did in effect interfere
with, but whether it tended to in-
terfere with the true course of
justice. On the same principle, he
Said, it was contempt to make a
speech tending to influence the r@e
sult of the pending trial, whethar
civil or criminal, or to deliver a
sermon with the same tendency.

The Speech

Mir. Waleott quoted law to show
that it was also contemptuous to
publish an article in a Newspaper
commenting on the proceedings in
a pending criminal prosecution or
civil action, and referring to the
Order which “has already been
granted”, and on which they were
“now carrying on these proceeds
ings.” He said that against t
article which was put in th
Advocate of the 13th June, and
which was in effect part of a
speech made by Colonel Michelin
at a public meeting of ’bus drivers
and conductors held at the Empire
Theatre, the plaintiff alleged that
at the time he ‘was being charged
with manslaughter in that he was
driving a motor car which was
involved in an accident in which
3 children had been killed and
that, as must be alleged in a case
of manslaughter, it was due to
his neglectful or careless driving,
which could not be otherwise.
That when that case was before
the police magistrate, the defend-
ant not being yet committed,
Colonel Michelin ..... it was
a police case with the Super-
intendent of the District of
St. James, Superintendent Sim-
mons, as complainant
got up in front a meeting of
"bus drivers and _ conductors
and as they would prove, handed
to one of the Advocate Reporters,
a typescript of what he was going
to say, and that in that Colonel
Michelin said the words to which
his client takes objection.

The Law
Mr. Walcott said that his sub-
mission would be that it was going
to be a matter of law, although
funnily enough, the Act says that
the jury should try the issue on
both’ question of law and fact.
His submission was, however, that
they try the question of fact and
as far as the law was concerned,
they would take into account the
law as it was given to them by tha
Judge.
The law they could not devise,



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Court Case

$2 matter of fact neither he
noi ; learned friends coukid do
so, What that meant was that
they would have to take the law
from the learned judge. It gb-
viously meant that having he gâ„¢
the law, and taking that law into
account as they received it fgam
the judge. He would even go the
distance of saying they could note
go away from what the judge told
them, they had simply to apply
that law as directed and given to
them by the judge to the facts.

Mr. Walcott submitted further
that the facts which they woud
have to find would be very simple.
It was not whether Haddock was
guilty or whether he drove care-
lessly, but they would be con-
cerned with whether Michelin did
make the speech, and if he made
that speech, whether the Advecate
Company printed it. and whether
it tended to prejudice Haddock’s
case. Those were the questiens of
fact, and they had no more after
that.

His submission was, that if, as
the Judge would tell them, that
tended io prejudice, or if not, it
did prejudice, or was intended to
prejudice .. . nothing to do with
their function itself... the foun-
tain of justice, according to the
different law Lords, must be kept
pure .. the fair trial of any once
it constituted a contempt of the
Court. It was laid down, and the
Court im this case was the Court
of Grand Sessions, that the pro-
ceedings which were brought in
the particular case by Haddock,
could be brought by anyone else.

Haddock was the person most
concerned, and it was to be ex-
pected that he would be the one
most willing to bring it,

They, the jury were trying the
facts, and they were dealing with
contempt of Court. They would be
called upon to say if the facts as
alleged, that the Colonel made the
speech and that the Advocate
Newspaper printed it, tended to
prejudice the trial of the man who
was going to be tried for man-
slaughter . an ingredient of
which was the careless driving
of a motor car.

Prejudicial

Mr. Walcott said his submission
was, that a jury would have to be
devoid of honour or ‘brains, neither
of which the present jury were
likely to be, to sit there and with-
out hesitation find that if those
were the facts, that it did not
tend to be prejudicial,

He emphasised that they (the
jury) were nothing to do with the
question of punishment, and that
in the case before them, they
would find merely guilty or not
guilty. If they found the defend-
ants guilty, it was a matter for
the judge, and if they found them
not guilty, it was merely for the
judge to discharge the two de-
fendants.

He told them that no argument
would be addressed to them con-
cerning that point, and all they
would be concerned with would be
to find on the question of fact
whether the defendant Colonel
Michelin did deliver the speech,
and the question of law which
probably both his learned friends
and himself might submit,

He submitted that the facts were
so clear and easy that they should
need no particular law, and for
anyone, and particularly the Com-
missioner of Police in commenting
on a police prosecution before a
man has had a chance to be tried,
to get up and gay such words as
they were alleging that Colonel
Michelin said, must tend to be
prejudicial to the trial, The higher
the office of the person making
the comment, the more likely he
was to be believed, Mr. Walcott
said.

Mr. Walcott suggested to the
jury that when the Commissioner
of Police, va a police prosecu~
tion before e man was ,
made remarks such as Colonel
Michelin alleged did make, and
the very speech which was the
matter of the trial, he was telling
the bus drivers and the Advocate
was repeating to the public what
he had said: “Look at Haddock.
Those three qahildren would not
have been dead if he had driven
with more care and had not been
in such a hurry.”

He submitted that after the;

Commissioner of Police had
that, he was putting it in
minds of any juryman that this
man by the driving of the car
avhich he did drive, was guilty of
a ghastly accident, because he did
not use care, and because he
drove too fast, and it might have
been avoided.

Mr. Walcott asked the
that did not tend to prejudice
the plaintifi’s fair trial, what else
on page 5

said
the

Now !



4616





jury it!

BARBADOS ADVOCATE




SEA AND Al
TRAFFIC

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In Carlisle Bay
Seh. Frances W. Smith, Sch. Lady
Joan, S. Bruno, S.S. Elene, M.V
Jenkins Roberts, Sch. Sunbeam, Sch
Lucile Smith, Seh. Everdene, §
Mary M. Lewis, Seh. Eunicia, Sch, Zita

Wonita, Sch. Rainbow M., Sch. Enter-

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Van Shuytman, Sch’ Linsyd Ib, Sch. Lach;
Noleen, Seh” Gardenia, Sch. Gloria B
ARRIVALS
Sch. Gloria B. from Martinique
DEPARTURES
H.M.S. Burghead Bay for Trinidad

ARRIVALS BY BWA. ON SATURDAY
From Tri®idad-—-E. Waterman, I. Allo,
A. Armstrong, 3%. Cave, S. Atwell, J
Wiliams, D. Ibberson, S. Wright, J.
Wright, P. Wright, J. Aird, M. Rogers.
Frem St. Kitts—Mrs, Mary Buffong.

DEPARTURES By B.W.LA. ON
SATURDAY

Por Grenada—W) Julien. D
A. Young, M. Young. G
Napier, 1. Newton.

Por Trinidad—J, Murdoch, E, Murdoch,
J. Sealer, O. Papfieau

Fer Venezyela—Prank Braisted, Mar-
jorie Braisted, - Braisted, Daniel

Mitechetl,
mihett, BR

Braisted, Michae Braisted, Leslie
Robringer, Olga Rohringer, Nora
Mohringer, Ruth | Farmen, Elizabeth
Buckley, Lewis paratt, Jean Lund,
Henry Martin, rtha Maftin, Trina
Mago, Gaston Par®, Requel Pars, Flor
Chapellin, Noemi ~Chapellia, Barnardo
Klein, Gertrude fletn Hugh = Lucte-

Smith

ARRIVALS By By
From Trinidad

A. Johnson, G.

L. Johnson, B

EB. Baird I §

Gooding. E. Ferrgjra, B. Williams
From Grenada . Barrett, G

Gale, D Munro, FP, Piel
thal

DEPARTURES | By B.W.LA. ON

su AY

AA. ON BUNDAS
. Lahee, 1. Johnson,
. Johnson,
t, J. Porter
Criek, N

Wer-
Strisiver) M

For
wan, W
Por §t. Lucia—E, Filiott; M. Barnard,

Trinidad— Phillips, C
Rand, J.” Aird

Minor-

W. Fealing, O. Small, L. Rae, H
Piggott, G. Gordon, C. Lacorbiniere, G
Webdale, R. Farman, &. Buckley, 1
Sborrat, J. Lund, M. White

7.58 p.m.



L.E. Smith Returns
From U. K.

Mr. L. E. Smith, Chairman of
Committees in the House of As-
sembly, returned home last night
from the United Kingdom
Trinidad by B-W.1.A. where he
spent the past three weeks as one
of the delegates representing the
Barbados Branch of the Common
wealth Association at a series of
talks on parliamentary procedure.

The other delegate, Mr. M. E.
Cox, M.C.P. who is a Member of
the Executive Committee, is ex-
pected to arrive later in the week-



Man Burnt As Gas
Drum Explodes

Chesterfield Bayley of Mt, Gay
Village, St. Lucey, was carried to
the General Hospital and detained
on Sunday after he was ba
burnt when a gasolene drum ex-
ploded in the ’bus §S 58 on which
he was travelling while it was
going along Mile ‘and Quarter
about 9.45 a.m,

The drum was in the rear part
ot the ’bus. No other person was
injured

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Home
Training



For W.L1.

Seminar Theme

PORT-OF-SPAIN, JULY 3.

Home Economics Training for the Caribbean was the
central theme of the seminar held Wednesday evening at
Whitehall as a feature of the Conference on Home Econo-

mies and Education in Nutr

ition convened jointly by the

Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations
and the Caribbean Commission.

Following a review of t
Dora Ibberson, Social Welfar

nial Development & Welfare

of* three international agencies discussed the technica!

he regional situation by Miss

-e Adviser of the British Colo-

Organisation, representatives

assistance programmes of each in the field of home econo-
mics. Miss Maude Barrett, Social Welfare Adviser, spoke |

for the United Nations, Mrs.

gional Nutrition Representat

ture Organisation, and Dr, |

Health Organisation,

In the discussion which followed
the talks, Dr, de Caires warned
against setting up a long-range
project involving recurring exnen-
diture beyond the capacity of the
government concerned. To int:c-
duce a people to a service whicii
they hed never before known, and
then to withdraw it, was, he said,
“a eruel thing.” He pointed out
that it was desirable, therefore, to
thedse technical assistance pro-
#rammes which, when assistance
eame to an end, could be carried
on by an existing agency wiih-
out an undue increase in overhead
costs. He considered the ideal
project to be one which, in attack-
ing a problem, would bring about
a reduction in government ex-
penditure. The BCG campaign
against TB was such a programme
he said, since it had the effect
of cutting down the cost of main-
taining public medical and hospital
facilities.

“Arrant Nensense

In the course of her talk, Miss
Tbberson deseribed as “arrant non-
sense” an attempt to impose nor-
mal standards of living in homes
with only one room. She outlined
the wide scope of Home Economics,
aod defined its ultimate goal as a
“complete and stable family
home.” Training in Home Eco-
nomics, she emphasised, should be
“rooted in reality.” Trainees
should reside among those with
whom they were to serve, In dis-
cussing training facilities in the
British West Indies, she mentioned
the vocational school in British
Guiana, and said that there was
hope of the establishment of a
small Home Economics training
jnstitute in Jamaica, although the
project was now dormant for
reasons of economy, She suggested
that wider use should be made

of the Home Economics Workshop ~

maintained by the University of
Puerto Rico.

Mrs, Sismanidis spoke of the
wide interest in Home Economics,
as indicated by the enthusiasm
shown by delegates to the FAO
Conference in Rome last Novem-
ber, in discussing Home Economics

roblems, She considered it signi-
ficant that the delegates were
men. Among the Home Economics
projects of FAO proposed or
underway, she mentioned the es-

Sap. Its dcep-

FRESHNESS

Andromache Sismanidis, Re-
ve for the Food and Agricul-
*. F. de Caires for the World

ablishment of a training college
in Israel, and the assignment of
xperts to make dietary surveys
in Kevuadcor, In Turkey, she said,
00,000 girls and women are
taking courses in some form of
tidome Economics—-thanks, in part,
» technical assistance given by
Â¥AO. Fellowships may prove par-
eularly useful as the means. oj
training personnel to carry on a
wogramme after FAQ: has with-
drawn,
Technical Assistance

The United Nations’ technical
ssistance programme, with special
eference to social welfare, was
uiscussed by Miss Barrett. Among
many other facts, she brought out
‘hese: The United Nations gives
echnical assistance in three fields:
~onomic development; social de-
velopment; public administration.
\ Technical Assistance Board co-







erdinates the activities of all
United Nations agencies in the
iechnical assistance field, The

Hoard co-ordinates the employ-
ment standards for Technical As-
sistance personnel as well as the
handling of requests for asslisiance,
ithe United Nations ‘holds Seminars
n various subjects in which many
ternational organisations parti-
cipate. Seminars last from 6
weeks to 3 months and are at-
tended by delegates from 10 or
more countries Special mention
was made of a Seminar on health
veld in the Middle East.

In speaking of une tellowships
provided by the United Nations,
Miss Barrett revealed that the
Caribbean is being used as an ob;
servation centre for scholarship
holders, In passing, she mentioned
as significant and impressive, the
impact made by the fellowship
programme on the host country.
A difficulty mentioned by Dr. de
uires in discussing the training
programme of the World Health
wganisation in the Caribbean is
that territories are sometimes loth
to accept an instructor from a
neighbouring territory, notwith-
standing the fact that he is emi-
nenthy qualified, It was necessary,
he said, “to break down the idea





that what you have in your own

backyard is not good enough.”

Miss Elsa Haglund, who is in
charge of conference arrangements
joy FAO, acted as Chairman,



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PAGE FOUR

BIRADOS eis AD

AREADY. VOCAT

antonlf «= > 3s Poacww we
Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St, Bridsetews
-





‘Tuesday, July 15, 1952



Poor Salesmanship

ONE of the most interesting consequen-
ces of the British Council’s activities in
Barbados is the increasing number of per-
gons in the country districts who are
becoming cinema-minded. The activities’
of the British Council in taking films to
the people of St. Andrew, St. Joseph and
into other country parishes not served by
cinemas have been supported by those of
the visual aid section of the Department

of education.
Immediate reaction to these film-show-

ing activities of the British Council and of
the Department of Education might well
be that something beneficial to the com-
munity is being done thereby. Benefit is
of course done at the time of showing be-
cause the majority of films shown by the
British Council and the Department of
Edueation have some cultural educational
or instructional value.

But after the immediate benefit has been
experienced on one or two occasions an
appetite for films is created amongst per-
sons who otherwise would be little inter-
ested in seeing films. It is no exaggeration
therefore to state that the British Council
and the Department of Education albeit
unwittingly are both serving the interests
of the commercial cinema in Barbados.

This may be a novel point of view which
may not have occurred before either to
the British Council, the Department of
Education or to the Managers of commer-
cial cinemas. / 7

But the reactions of cinema audiences in
outlying parishes of Barbados su gest un-
mistakably that the interest in films once
awakened appears.insatiable. This inter-
est in moving pictures almost for the sake
of the motion is worthy of investigation.
Because simp%e country audiences ex-
press satisfaction with films which are not
processed for the tittivation of sophistica-
ted cinema audiences but which are mace
for educational, cultural or instructional
purposes.

The significance of this interest must be
stressed. Too often in the past when prc-
tests have been made by public-spirited
citizens against the prevalence of films
designed to appeal to the lowest common
factor of intelligence the commerciol
cinema interests in this region have re-
torted that the cinemas give the people
what they want and that what is good
enough for the American movie goer is
good enough for the local patron of the
cinema,

Much appeal has also been made to the
protection of public morals provided by
the United States’ censorship,

The attitude of those responsible for the
buying and distribution of films in the
region is understandable. It is the normal
attitude which any buyer or seller of any
product in the Caribbean or in any other
country might be expected to adopt.

But the influence of the cinema on the
life of a community ought to be fully
recognised. While it is true, as cinema
agents and representatives have not been
slow to point out that people’s morals and
ways of life left much to be desired before
the invention of commercial films the in-
(uence of films on a community’s life can-
not be denied.

The younger generation of Britons in
the United Kingdom today is a generaticn
which thinks and speaks the language of
Amevigan movies to a degree which wou’
have beeh auite impbdssible fot. the-r
parents, Whether this is a good or bad
thing is irrelevant to the present argu-
ment. What must be admitted is the infu-
ence of the American film.

Here in Barbados it might appear quite
futile to attempt any criticism of the quali-
ties of locally shown films on the grounds
that these films were produced for atci-
ences all over the world and that Barba-
dians are no different from other people.
But this argument although seemingly un-
assailable is one hundred per cent. off the
mark,

In almost every: iarge country of the
world where cinemas show the types of
films which are shown locally there exist
alternative forms of cultural entertain-
ment. Theatre, opera, musical concerts,
exhibitions, art galleries are only. some of
the infinite varieties of European cultural
life which is the common heritage of all
those born or resident in Europe. In North
America, India,.North Africa and Asia
new and old civilisations have impressed
indelibly on the lives of their people cul-
tural values which are other than those of
Hollywood.

In Barbados the cinema reigns supreme
and the culture of the cinema represents
the major culture of the people who in-
habit this small island.

This is an arresting thought, and it has
for many years been exercising the minds
of public-spirited. citizens who recognise
the influence which the cinema has and
increasingly continues to have in mould-
ing the minds of Barbadians.

Yet the United Kingdom Government which
spends considerable sums of money each ‘year
in trying to hold up the British way of life.as
the best example for Her Majesty’s British Car-
ibbean people to follow has either not tried or
has failed ivnominiously to interest the pro-
ducers of British films to sell their films to Brit-
ish Caribbean film distributors.

So poorly advertised are British films locally
that even when one comes here on the quota
system (unless it happens to be sdmething quite
“epoch-making” in the Californian sense of the
word) hardly anyone will go to see it because
there is little to indicate its British origin.

The British film producers have made and

continue to make films as good as any, but they
either do not want to or do not try to sell them
in British Caribbean territories, Lack of sales-
manship in the United Kingdom is the major
1 n why British films get so little display in
the British Caribbean.

ee

, Overnight they



“I will tell you a good joke,”
said the Yugoslavian Minister,
“a Yugoslavian joke.”

There were half a dozen of us
dining at Lord Beaverbrook’s
London flat and we received the
Minister’s pronouncement with
what might be described as
modified rapture, A good joke
needs no bush.

“Stalin,” said our friend in his
picturesque English, “had a yard
of cloth and sent for a Bulgarian
tailor to make him a suit out of
it. But the Bulgarian said he
could not do it with so little
cloth, Therefore he was liquid-
ated. So there comes a Ruman-
ian tailor but he is also unable
and he is liquidated. It happen~
ed the same with the Hungarian
tailor. Now comes the joke and
it is good, Stalin for a
Yugoslavian tailor who says
“Yes! I will make you a suit
out of the cloth and an overcoat
as well” Stalin was very sur-
prised and says to him: “How
you can do this?” Then the
Yugoslavian answer him: “You
see, in Yugoslavia you are such
a little man”.”*

We all laughed and agreed
that it was indeed an excellent
story. But listening to him with
his twinkling eyes and his zest
I began to realise as never be-
fore the tremendous blow which
Marshal Tito administered to the
Kremlin when he broke off rela-
tions with the Soviet, | More and
more it becomes evideht that the
secession of Yugoslavia from
Comintern was the heaviest
feat that Stalin has suffered
since he began the cold war.

Yet the situation is full of
paradox. Tito is a Communist,
Yugoslavia is Communist, The
country is ruled by the secret
police, and freedom as we know
it does not exist, Therefore
when Marshal Tito startled the
world by denouncing Moscow the
wise men said that this was just
a cunning device arranged by
him and Stalin to fool the West.

“Tito needs industrial equip-
ment,” these wise ones said. “He
is dollar hungry and is not
proud to hold out his hat. If we
make the mistake of building up
Yugoslavia you will find that at
a given moment she will be used
as the spearhead of Russia’s
attack against the West.”

No one can deny a measure of
logic in those words, It was
right to proceed cautiously. Un-
doubtedly Stalin had denounced
Tito for his “grandee-ism” and
Tito had replied that he would
not take orders from the up-
starts in the Kremlin, but it was
still hard to believe that the
break, if it actually existed,
would not be bridged.

The implications of Tito’s de-
cision had to be faced, There in
the cockpit of Europe was his
country surrounded by hostile
satellites and facing the over-
whelming military strength of
Russia. To maintain even a
measure of security it meant the
creation of an immense army.
And since a man cannot carry a
rifle and a spade it meant that
the labour force would have to
be cruelly reduced. In addition
the army could be a challenge
in itself to the rule of Tito if
some of the generals were seized
with grandee-ism on their own
account, or if they were seduced
by Stalin,

But Tito took these risks, He
faced the threat of assassination,
of a military coup d'etat, of an
attack by the satellites inspired
by the Russians, An American
insurance man said at the time.
that if Tito wanted a life policy
of a million dollars for a year
the company would ask a pre-
mium of 999,999 dollars,

Now sufficient time has elaps-
ed for us to put the pieces of the
puzzle together, Tito’s defiance
of the Kremlin was not a mere
rush of blood to the head. Ib
was a decision taken in cold
blood, or at any rate as cold as
Yugoslavian blood can be. He
saw that Russia was going to
drain the satellites of their pro-
duce and* minerals and make
them slaves to Russian expan-







BARBADOS. ADVOCATE

LONDON LETTE § | Dihibition Tribute To

By Beverley Baxter

sion. They would be modelled
and organised for one purpose,
and one only—to sustain and
enrich the Soviet. Bulgaria,
Hungary, Rumania and Czecho-
slovakia had taken the yoke
without protest, so why should
Yugo-slavia not do the same?
The answer of course was—
the Serbian people; and Tito

knew his Serbs better than
Stalin.

When in the distant past the
Turks invaded Europe and
threatened to over-run the
civilisation which Rome had
created it was the Serbs who

held them in the final battle and
then threw them back. It was in
the town of Sarejevo in 1914
that a young man named Princip
fired the assassin’s shot that
plunged the whole world into
war. The Austro-Hungarian
Empire, ruled over by Franz-
Josef was a work of genius in its
construction but the Serbs put
freedom first.

After the 1914-1918 war had
ended and Woodrow . Rilson
brought to his task all the acade-
mic wisdom and lack of practical
experience which he could com-
mand to re-design Europe and
free the minorities of the chains
that held them down. With the
connivance of Lloyd George and
Clemenceau Austria was reduc-
ed to a truncated territory of a
great capital with nothing but
scenery and history to sustain
it.

But Serbia emerged as the
Yugoslavia we know today, The
assassin of Sarajevo had done
well for his people. The throne
was firmly established, and the
country which had so resented
inclusion in the Austrian Empire
now had its own minorities.

Then on an October day in
1934 the assassin’s revolver was
heard again. It was in Marseilles
but the victim was King Alex-
ander of Serbia. He was on an
official visit to France, but a
Croat exile who had organized a
body of terrorists waited for him,
Another minority had spoken
with a bullet instead of words.

Last Saturday at Claridges the
exiled King Peter of Yugoslavia
told me how he heard the news
of his father’s assassination.
Peter was eleven years of age at
the time of the assassination and
he mounted the troubled throne
as amere child mourning the
father whom he deeply loved.
Naturally he could only be a
king in name, and his Uncle
Prince Paul (brother-in-law of
the Duchess of Kent) was made
Regent,

Incidentally, the exiled Peter
is now writing his reminiscences.
If he writes as vividly as he talks
it should be a book that will stir
the waters more than somewhat.

The Serbs and their conglom-
erate minorities rallied to the
young king when he mounted
the throne. They are an emo-
tional people with a peasant
poetry of their own and they
were moved by the youth of the
boy whose father had been so
cruelly murdered, In fact the
maternalism of their feeling
roused their protective instincts.
It seemed that at last Serbia
would have a real period of
internal and external peace,

But there was a mad Austrian
painter of bad sunsets, a ranting
agitator with a fruity baritone,
a cruel creature with a devilish
knowledge of the weaknesses
and cupidity of human nature.
Step by step Hitler built his
kingdom on brutality and fear.
And so there came Der Tag once
more. This time it was Poland
that met the German thrust,

Yugoslavia was not at war! It
was incredible but true. Almost
for the first time in European
history they were not involved

in the battle. Wisely, if inglor-
iously,. Prince Paul’s Govern-
ment conceded everything that
Germany demanded in the way
of economic benefits, Their
hatred of Germany was intense
but they recognised the weak-
ness of their isolation. Neither
Britain nor France could send



Our Readers Say :

Tourism °

To the Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—Every now and _ then
some well-meaning individual,
high or low, stresses how well
off Barbados would be if it were
converted into anovher Bermuda,
undoubtedly, one of the greatest
teurist resorts im the world.
say, We would

become exceedingly Prosperous
and in consequence e
of this island would ome ex-
ceedingly happy.

IT quite agree that m has
been and can be # Ni tioean
benefit to Barbados, but let. me
sound a note of warnings: Be-
yond a certain point we in Bar-
bados camnot afford to go.

There is a vast difference be-
tween Bermuda and Barbados,
Bermuda is essentially a tourist
resort. Dame Nature in a wanton,
lascivious mood fashioned Ber-
muda for “love to sigh in, for
bards to live and saints to die
in.” as the Irish poet Tor: Moore
wrote over a hundred years ago.
Apart from its meay attractions,
its unadulterzied beauty, its

‘ proximity t the United States

of America
dollar affords
what is decidedly in favour of
Bermuda ag a tourist resort is
its lack of population,

(the

Here in Barbados it is quite
different. This is essentially an
agricultural country with a teem-
ing population that depends on
the ‘and and sea for sustenance.
If wé were to make Barbados an
all-the-year round tourist resort,
what would happen? Exactly the
same thing that happened in
Bermuda,

Pardon, I spent a whole year
in Bermuda writing for two
newspapers. The third I had to
turn down. There was no ques-
tion of earning money, but I
could not. earn enough to buy
a pound of fresh fish when the
hotels were in full swing—eleven
months year. The

every only

America
ample miter da

time I tasted fresh fish was
during the month of August,
cleaning-up time, Strange, the
piece of fish I tasted was called
Rock fish, believe me no mis-
nomer, Do you think the agri-
cultural labourer and the sugar
industry could carry on and
‘thrive under such conditions?
Let us forget the Middle Class.
They do not count nowadays.

For an island (or group of
islands) with such a wonderful
climate—where North and South
have iI have never seen
so many stomachs on strike, The

only time in | hen my
stomach ref! iw the line
was when I” Gn Bermuda.

Canned meat and fish, iced beef
and crystal-white sugar—sugar
bleached of all its virtue! Twenty
years ago the people of Bermuda
already knew that black sugar
w2s more nutritious than white.
As a side line, tourism is
for Barbados. It has helped and
can help tremendously, As a
substitute for the sugar cane in-
dustry and a virile population—
that is a horse of another colour.
But my greatest objection to
wholesale tourism as_ carried
on in Bermuda is the permanent
amage done to its spiritual and
moral assets,

2 C. B, ROCK.

“ Boys’ Week”

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,— We, the undersigned
crave your indulgence in the
publication of this letter which
we fee! will appeal favourably
to the youth and to a certuin
extent, the matured of this
island.

Five years ago in American Co-
educational High Schools there
was introduced a (scheme system)
known as “Boys’ Week”. It was
received so -well that it was
adopted widely by the general
public and each year now, flour-
ishes with er success. The
system 1s





them a single grenadier if they
engaged in war. Also the great
bear was Germany’s ally, or at
any rate Germany's stooge. The
infamous nen-ggression pact
had joined Germany and Rus-
sia in unholy matrimony.

But in 194] German arrogance
was out of hand, German forces
were in Rumania, Hungary and
Bulgaria, and Hitler summoned
Prince Paul and his principal
ministers to Berlin, “1 demand
passage across your territory,”
said Hitler. Prince Paul no doubt
did his best but he was wester-
nised in thought and tempera-
ment and was no match for the
ranting all-conquering Caesar
of Berlin.

Prince Paul returned home
and declared that he had given
in to Hitler in order to save
Serbia from being crushed. In a
matter of hours there was a
palace revolution. A group of
Serbian officers and politicians
with the Young King at thei
head, overthrew the Govern
ment and sent Prince Paul int«
ignominious exile.

The Germans did not hesitate
Without even a declaration o
war they sent a savage bombing
raid on MSBelgrade and_ ther
attacked with such fury that the
end was only a matter of days
While the Serbs were still fight-
ing with unimaginable braver)
the heroic Italians thought the)
had better come in on a_ sure
thing, so they attacked Serbii
from the West. In 10 days it wa:
all over. Or so Hitler thought
How was he to know then tha
large forces of Serbs, later to be
called Partisans, had escaped t
the mountains where they were
to harass the Germans by day
and by night until Hitler and
the Third Reich had gone down
in flames.

In the meantime the King
and his advisers had flown to
London where they joined the
ever enlarging group of emigres
governments. "London in those
days was in fact the very seat
of world government — or at
any rate that portion of the world
that was at war with Hitler.

About a year later the mother
of King Peter asked me to come
and see her. She was worried
about her son and wanted me to
advise her. For what my advice
was worth I gave it to her, The
young king should be flown to
the Serbian mountains and join
the partisans, If he did not do
so he would find that the men
who had conducted the reésis-
tance movement would seize
power when the war was over.

The conflict was obvious. the
conflict between the Queen and
the mother, Her husband had
been assassinated. Was she to
lose her son in the desperate
fighting of the partisans? Peter
did not go. When the war was
over Tito declared himself dic-
tator and the Monarchy was at
an end. No doubt it will tive
again but not while Tito rules.

I have told this strange story

of the Se a because to-

day they hav
in Europe,
most
that the West possesses. While
France and Britain, with the aid
of America and some participa-
tion by Western Germany, try
to build up a European Army,
Yugoslavia has more divisions
jin Europe than all the rest of
them put together, With tre-
mendous courage Tito faces not
only Russia, but the satellites
that support her.

Yet even that does not con-
clude the story, As a Communist
he ‘has enunciated the theory
that Communism need not be
subservient to Russia, He has
shown the way to others.

Therefore I claim that the
story of the tailor, as told to us
in London by the Yugoslavian
Minister, has significance, Ridi-
cule is a@ weapon that every
despot fears, The Yugoslavians
laugh at the Kremlin, and in
Stalin's ears that laughter may
sound moze menacing than gun-
fire.

the largest Army





Starting from the first Sunday
in October, gentlemen are re-
quested to leave their wallets,
bill-folds and what-nots at
home and the girls take over.
They organise parties at no cost
to the boys; they pay the fare
at movies and for the chocolate
end popeorn that follow after—
then there are the dances, visits
to the Soda Fouritains etcetera. .
The fun that results makes the
week a “hat” one. The boys
enjoy it (they would of course)
and so do the girls, If it's a hit

in the U.S., it can be one here} June Sir Waldron Smithers (Conservative,
- Orpington) asked the Under-Secretary of

What do you think girls. .
shall we try it?

Yours truly,
PEGGY HART,
FRANK COZIER,
LI WILKINSON.
Hastings,
Ch., Ch,
11th July, "52.

Thanks
'

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,— Kindly allow us on
behalf of the Barbados Youth
Movement; to say “Thanks” to
the officers and men
H.MLS. Burghead Bay; for the
kind hospitality shown to the
youths during the visit on board
on Saturday evening last.

We beg to state Sir, that the|the policy of Her Majesty’s Government of

members were very pli
with what they saw, and heard,
especially being a first time for
the majority of them;

Again Sir

saying many

thanks, and wishing the entire!
staff success in their endeav-!
ours; and last but not least those |tha

who arranged for the trans-
portation to and from the skip.
Yours,
L, BRUCE-CLARKE,
J. B, GRANT,
OLGA BROWNE.
The Youths Centre,
Tudor Bridge,
St. Michael
Barbados

14.7.52.

















and constitute the
important military ally

of thejof the Commonwealth is a matter not for





Benefactor Of Blind

By J. C. COLLIGAN
Secretary-General to Britain’s National
Institute for the Blind, London.

BLIND people all over the world, as well
as their seeing friends and helpers are this
year commemorating the centenary of the
death of their greatest benefactor, Louis
Braille who died — at the age of 43 — be-
lieving that he had utterly failed in his pur-
pose,

The debt of gratitude which the world
ywes to this Frenchman is strikingly illus-
rated in the Braille Centenary Exhibition
vhich the Duke of Edinburgh opened at the
National Institute for the Blind in London,
‘or it serves to show the rich variety of
levelopments to which that almost magical
iulphabet of dots has been put. A life-size
ttatue looks down the length of the hall to-
yards another statue of a great United King-

lom benefactor of the blind — Dr, Thomas
Armitage who founded the National Insti-

ute in 1868 for the express purpose of devel-
ping the use of Braille among the blind
hroughout Europe and the English-speaking
vorld.

The Exhibition also foreshadows far-
eaching developments of Braille by the use
f electronics for printing which will pro-
ide cheaper, less cumbersome and easier to
ead literature. On show for instance, was
the prototype of an entirely new Braille
printing machine which uses a facsimile
stencil for the application of solid dots of
specially prepared plastic ink on to much
thinner and therefore cheaper paper. In this
branch of Braille production research Britain
can claim to be ahead of all other countries.















Braille and Armitage helped to overcome
the yoid of mental darkness that for cen-
turies confronted the blind. It was therefore
particularly fitting that a party from France,
including two distinguished blind leaders in
French blind welfare, went to London to
attend the opening of the Exhibition. Britain
for her part is sending to Paris a delegation,
headed by General Lord Ismay, to attend the
ceremonies of tribute to the name and mem-
ory of Louis Braille. The United Kingdom
delegation includes Mr. John Wilson, the
blind Secretary of the British Empire Soci-
ety for the Blind, a body created in 1949 for
the purpose of tackling the problem of
blindness in Colonial territories.

The world story of Braille is without end
and knows no frontiers. So flexible is this
system that the,United Nations Educational,
Scientific and Cultural Organisation is mak-
ing it capable of representing any language
phonetically; and the National Institute for
the Blind in Britain is constantly called upon
to give advice to fresh pioneers who are
now carrying the system to the farthest
corners of the earth.

In Britain today, for the first time, there
are mdre blind workers employed in the
same occupations as sighted workers than
are working in sheltered workshops. Since
World War II more than 2,000 blind workers
with technical skill have been placed in
sighted industry in the United Kingdom and
their courage, steadfastness and craftsman-
ship is making them many friends.

The field of operation is wide and more
than 40 occupations normally regarded as
essentially reserved for the sighted are now
followed by blind persons in Britain. Who
can estimate how much of this is due to the
invention of that young blind Frenchman
who died in 1852 and who shall question the
fact that he rises like a colussus from among
that devoted body of. people, so many of
them sightless themselves, who have striven
to assist the blind to enter into the fullness
of life.

Freedom Of Movement
In Commonwealth

LONDON.
IN the House of Commons on the 26th









State for Commonwealth Relations if he
will consult with Commonwealth countries
with a view to making reciprocal arrange
ments to permit the unrestricted movement
of members of the British Commonwealth
between Commonwealth countries,

The Under-Secretary of State for Com-
monwealth Relations, Mr. John Foster re-
plied :

The question of restrictions on the entry
of citizens of British Commonwealth coun-
tries into the territories of other members











Her Majesty's Government in. the United
Kingdom but for the Governments of the
countries concerned.

Sir Waldron Smithers: In order to help

trade, not aid, will my hon. and learned
Friend do all in his power to facilitate the
free movement of goods and persons all over}
the world? |

Mr. John Foster: I have given the position
in regard to the independent countries of
Commonwealth.

Sir Waldron Smithers: Will my hon, and
learned Friend use whatever influence .he
has got?

Mr. Thomas Driberg (Labour, Maldon): I
could not understand whether the hon. and
learned Gentleman indicated assent to the
last supplementary; if so, may I ask whether
that includes Seretse Khama?

Mr. John Foster : I did not indicate assent.

—B.U.P.












TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1952

PHOTOGRAPHS
Copies of Local Photographs
Which have appeared in the
ADVOCATE NEWSPAPER
Can be ordered from th
ADVOCATE STATIONERY

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TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1952



Contempt of Court Case

@ from page 3
= they think it could tend ta

o.

For them to say not guilty, they
would have to say that it did not
tend to prejudice, as it was said
in the law, did not tend to influ-
ence the result of the pending
trial.

The question as to whether it
was merely indiscreet was not
one for them. The mere question
was whether that statement
prejudiced, or did it tend to
prejudice, but not whether it was
intended.

At this stage Mr. Walcott cited
Oswald on Contempt at page 86,
and drew attention to the pro-
visions made there as against the
Special Act made under the Laws
of Barbados, and then proceeded
‘to call witnesses,

Evidence

First witness to be called on be-
half of the plaintiff was Mr.
George Morris, Clerk of the Pub-
lic Library. Mr. Morris produced
a copy of the Advocate Newspaper
of the 13th June, 1952 which con-
tained on page 3 a report of the
article referred to in the Writ.

Cross-examined by Mr. Ward,
Mr. Morris said that it was not
within his knowledge that Colone]
Michelin made other _ similar
speeches at other times, and at the
request of Mr. W. W. Reece,
Counsel for the Advocate Co., read
the article part which forms the
subject of the case.

Fitz Haddock, plaintiff next gave
evidence, and said that at the time
of the speech, he was pending
trial on a charge of manslaughter,
He had been charged and evidence
had been taken. Complainant in
that case was Superintendent of
Police Captain E. Simmons who
was in charge of the ee
in which the accident rred,
He said that the case was brought
for manslaughter for the driving
of a motor car on Prospect Road.

In answer to Mr. Ward he said
that he complained of that part
of the article which “tends to pre-
judice” a fair trial of the man-
Slaughter case in which he was
charged.

Mr. Ward:—‘Does that article
at any point suggest that you
were guilty of criminal negli-
gence. ...?”

Judge:—“He would not know
what the law is...

Mr. Ward: “Every man in the
street is supposed to know thd
Jaw. ...Is there any word there
Which suggests criminal negli
CROCE hi os 7
_ Judge:—“In the article, there
is No suggestion of criminality, . .?”

Witness: +-“From what I have
read in the Newspaper concerning
the speech made, there are many
things which were said and which
I feel were wrong and should not
be said... .”

Mr. Ward:—“Is the word crim-
inal used in any part of that
article, ...”

Judge:—‘“In the speech there is
no suggestion of criminality. It
does not say that . . when it
comes to the jury later you may
deal with that... .”

To Mr. Reece:—I read the ar-
ticle. I do not see my name in this
article. I do not see the mention
of any Court in this article.
Neither the Police Magistrate’s
Court at Holetown nor the Court
of Grand Sessions. The name of
the prosecutor, Inspector Simmons
or any other prosecutor does not
appear in the article. I do not see
the names of any children in the
article. I do not see the name of
any Police Magistrate appearing in
the article. I object to the state-
ments in the article to which I re-
ferred in my affidavit and which
is annexed to the Rule of the
Court. It is a fact that there was
an accident on a Sunday after-
noon, and three children lost their
lives as a result of that accident.
It is a fact that the accident hap-
pened with a car. I was driving
that car.

Mr. Reece:—“Mr. Haddock, 3
children lost their lives, Do you
think that it is appalling. Put
yourself out of the picture. Thred
young lives brought suddenly to
an_end. Dovyou think it is ap-
palling Ti

Witness:—“Accidents will hap-
Ea

Mr. Walcott:

“Mr. Reece just

cannot ask the question, You can-’

not at one time. .

Matter For Jury

Judge:—“Tt is a matter entirely
for the jury. It is an appalling
thing.

Mr. Walcott:—“Is it
nalling to say it is appalli
the trial takes place... .?

Mr. Reece:—“That is what my
‘learned friend is saying. I will

”

not ap-
ng before



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tell the jury something different.
I am dealing with the question of
fact and comment here... .”

Judge:—“It is a thing every- ©

body says. It is
unfortunate, a tragic occurrence
and so on. But the question is
does it tend to prejudice the trial?

Mr. Reeve:—That is a point
whieh will come to the jury later.

Judge:—I quite agree.

Mr. Reece:—“I am going to sub-
mit that there is nothing whicn
tends to prejudice any trial. Mr.
Haddock look at the last words
there which say “It should be
possible to prevent accidents of
this nature?” I take it that it
goes without saying that you and
everybody else would not like to
see any accidents at all.”

Witness.—Nobody would like to
see .accidents particularly where
lives are lost but that cannot pre-
vent accidents from happening.

The article appearing in the
Advocate reports a speech made
by Colonel Michelin. If a speech
of the kind was made in further-
ance of a Safety First campaign Tf
do not think that the party shouid
nave included such comment. The
speech began to the effect that it

appalling and

was a Safety First campaign
speech. It ended that way,
Mr. : The whole gist of

the speech is advocating greater
care on the part of drivers on the
public highways, is it not?

Safety First Campaign

Witness: When this speech was
made.....,....., pe!
Mr. Reece: I am_ not asking

when the speech was made, I am

asking you the nature of the
speech,

Witness: “Safety First Cam-
paign,”

Judge: “Mr. Reece the jury can
see all that. Anybody who reads

it can see that it is for the safety
of users of the road.” ;

Mr. Reece: I agree My Lord. I
notice in that speech the Colonel
is purported io have said he
made speeches along similar lines.

Judge: “Is that in the speech
or is that comment?”

Mr. Reece In the speech, sir,

Judge: Ask the witness to look
at the article where it appears,

_Mr, Reece: At the very begin-
ning it says it has been my custom
for the past two years to have a
talk with you at the end of the
licensing year before you renew
your licenses,

Witness: “Yes sir. I only saw
this particular speech. Colonel
Michelin is the Commissioner of
Police of Barbados. The proper
driving of road vehicles and road
manners are things which I as a
citizen would expect him to look
into. The Advocate newspaper is
the only daily newspaper in the
island.

Mr. Reece: One would expec!
the only daily newspaper........I arn
using the words loosely......., sup-
port a Safety First campaign,”

Mr. Walcott: “I must object
that is thoroughly irrelevant.”

Judge “All right Mr. Walcott”

Mr, Reece: “How can I bring
the circumstances out?”

Judge: The circumstances to
which these testify about whether
the Advocate is the only daily
p.per or not has that got any-
thing to do’with whether the parts
of the speech complained of tend
to prejudice this man’s trial?

Mr, Reece: I see what Your
Lordship is driving at. I was not
getting at that at the moment.; T
was asking whether or not it
should not be expected that the
dvily newspaper of the prominence
of the Advocate should not sup-
port a Safety First campaign?

Judge: One hopes that it would.

Mr. Walcott: I submit that
these things should not go before
the jury.

Mr. Reece: I am submitting
that they should go before the jury.

Judge: How does that say
whether jit tends to prejudice the
trial or not?

Mr, Reece: Yes sir, If the
person making the speech or
writing the article or articles on a
particular subiect and that article
shows more than once that it is
the policy of that paper or speaker
to make that given type of speech
or write that type of article
vnd I am going to submit that is
material when it comes to the
question as to whether the article
now in court prejudices or tends
1o preiudice the fair trial or avert
the course of justice.

Judge: I do not quite follow.

Mr. Reece: I am submitting
and I am prepared to cite authority
to show that where there is the
publication of a series of articles
of any particular speech the mere
fact that the narticular article is
pertinent to facts in issue hefore
the court that that is not sufficient.

Judge: How do you mean
pertinent?





RACES
BEACH
OCCASIONS

Colours, and Dots

Cotton and Art Silk,

ET—

DIAL 2352







St. Joseph

Mr. Reece: Totrching upon it.
Judge: I will see the cases in e
due course, You siy that because
am Tae § Collection

and in the pursuit of that policy
it does something wrong in that
line that that will excuse them,
Mr, Reece: If it is established
that they turn aside to do sor



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Vestry To

Enquire Into Non-

Of Taxes

The St. Joseph Vestry have instructed their clerk to
get a written opinion from their Solicitors as to why taxes
on the Spa Plantation have not been collected. The decision

ean wrong there is no hope for a5 made fellowing Mr. J, A. Haynes questioning the taxes
Iudge: I do not see how this not being collected for three years. Verbal opinion has

witness can talk about the policy
of the paper. ;

Mr. Reece: I was not getting at
him on policy I was only asking
the witness whether or not he
would not expect a paper of the
prominence of the Advocate to
pursue the policy of a Safety First
campaign. Whether it is guilty
or not is a different matter, “We are not in a position to

Mr. Walcott: You were goinc allow three years taxes to lie dor-
to say something when my learn- mant,” he said. “It is going to
ed friend interrupted. bring trouble in the parish. The

Witness: I was going to sav law says every land owner must
when Counsel asked me the ques- pay his rates and as it is if you go
tion about the ten persons having to collect taxes from some people
been killed that a man making a after others do not pay they
speech on Safety First campaign may want to ask questions.”
should not introduce such com- After he had been informed of
ment. He should not have made the nature of the verbal opinion
reference of the item that three that had been given, Mr Haynes
children were killed and I was at first suggested that an outside
asking if that was supposed to be opinion should be asked for, but
in the speech at the time. afterwards agreed that the writ+

Mr, Walcott: He did in answer ten opinion should be obtained.

to my learned friend say three Dispenser’s Commission

children were killed in the ac- Mr. Haynes ry : ‘
cident in which I was involved on ee cg Ng paper cade

this particular Sunday afternoon. out the Commission

of the Spa, the taxes cannot
Business, said that it was t

Andrew and the Parochial
every year.

Judge: ey is se i ; ? which the
aan oe setting The that dig parochial dispenser receives, He
answer to Mr. Reece he said he did this when the Vestry were

i i i ith Considering the Statement of
was involved in an accident with SOPS!« ;
a motor car and in which three “ccounts of the Dispensary,

dhildren wets killed, He feels that the commission of

Mr. Walcott: This article did $1,216 which the dispenser would
refer to you? . receive, is not worked out on a
Mr. Reece: How can he ex- Tight basis. The clerk has there-

press an opinion? fore been instructed to check the

Judge: He has already im Minutes of a meeting of 1942
answer to you said he was in- When the basis of arranging for
volved in a ear accident with the the Commission was decided, The
ear which he was driving and in adoption of the Statement has

‘which three children were killed therefore been postponed.

‘at Prospect. Mr. Haynes said that years ago
Mr. Reece: He is now express- the dispenser was paid 10% on
ing an opinion, gross profits, It was found that
Judge: He is not expressing he was losing money and they

‘any opinion at all. He says IT com- got Hon. H. A. Cuke’s suggestion
plain of the word appalling m as to what should be done. He
reference to the accident. He also
agrees that it is appalling when
things of this nature occur.
Mr, Walcott: Read the para- Published in the Advocate news-
graph you complain of. paper, They were on the subject
Witness: I complain of the of Safety First campaign,
whole statement which T put in _ Among those present were: Mr.
the affidavit. I do know that three R. Garner and Mr. G. Archer of
children were killed in an ac- the Department of Highways and
cident with a car on a Sunday Transport, Capt. F. C. Parris,
afternoon. Superintendent of Police in charge
Mr. Reece: The last part of my ef Traffic, Mr, Kenneth Sandiford,
learned friend’s examination did Secretary of the Bus Owners’
not arise out of cross-examination Association. Mr, FE. Massiah and
Judge: The Rule is there, The Mr. H. A. Tudor, Concessionaires.
affidavit is sworn and the whole
matter is before the jury and the Served Order
contempt of court Act says that



; ¥ Mr. T. TT, Headley, Provos

the proceedings can! be brought by ' .

anvbody whomsoever. Marshal said that on June 28, he
Mr. Reece: I am only saying Wsoually served on Colonel

that the last part of my learned Michelin and Miss Ruby Chenery,
friend’s examination did not arise Secretary of the Barbados Advyo-
out of cross-examination. cate Company, L'd., an order to

Judge: He has simply put in "PPear in the Court of Common
" at Ai Pleas as defendants in the matter.
another form what that did. Captain E. Simmons, Super-

Mr. Reece: I respectfully sub- tendent of Police in charge oi
mit no. He went on to read other “"€® No, 4 said he wag the com-
narts of the article. plainant in a case of manslaughter

Judge: He is entitled-to read (rough! against Haddock in the
other parts of the article. It ig Police Magistrate's Court at Hole-
what is in this Rule, stown.

Mr. Reece: I will not worry . The case began on the 2ist of
with it. " tune. Haddock was arrested on

Next witness to be called on be- the 19th June, By June 12
half of the plaintiff was Mr. P. A. evidence had been taken. He was
Vanterpool, a reporter of the charged with m nslaughter for
Advocate newspaper. Mr. Vanter- killing three children by. driving
pool said that he swore to an ® motor vehicle. He had a record
affidavit before the Deputy book in which was kept the de-
Registrar on June 18, 1952, He ‘tails of accidents which happened
said that except for the part of the e ae Area. He did not have it in

m arti erre in Court,
‘which = ie ae peo the Mr. Waleott pointed out that
names cf those present at the fae enone was sesamonas

j f - by a Sub poena to produce ve
mre rere ecu eae hook. Mr. Ward obiected to the
speech made by Colonel Michelin Sub poena on the ground that the
ion that occasion, A copy of that Commissioner of Police was the
speech had been handed to him in Head of a Government Depart-
advance and he had before hand- ment. and certain matters which
ing it in to be set made a dupli- the Sub poena called upon him to
cate copy which he read word for Produce were treated 1S coe
word behind Colonel Michelin gone and should not go before

or ivers. ie *) i Ww NuHtic, J
Cable Fa pct adi apeRAis oe It was agreed on a sugeestion

In answer to Mr. Ward be said from the Jude that Colonel
he received the original copy of the Michelin could be questioned on
sneech shortly after 11 o’clock., the particular points required
The first parigraph of the news-
naner article was an extract of =
Colonel Michelin’s speech. He
said he was a revorter at the
Advarate for more than four years

Captain Simmons said he knew
7 aecidents, and enumerated
six which had taken place in his
Area. The other he said he could
; ser addresses NOt remember. He had read the

We Bag RT Rel Michelin on article which appeared in the
previous occasions. Those speeches Advocate Newspaper, and to which
had been reported in the Advocate the matter in Court related. ‘
newepaner ond on one oecasion he He did not knew anything of
knew as a certainty that a com) the nature of what the Colenel
of the speech was handed to an- said until he read the Newspaper,



f

‘other reporter. s iter ( .ptain Simmons had giv-
To Mr. Reece: The articles were en his evidence, Mr. Walcott closed
. , 4 the case for the plaintiff. His

94669604

%
%

:
:

ao d@re@ern




POO SODPDAGHE-SODHSDOSDDSHO HHO HS HSHOMH HSH

PERSONS PODS SH

LADiES’ HANDBAGS
Reduced to .............

Reduced to



if you're

CHILDREN’S HANDBAGS

already been given that with the present state of the affairs

be collected.

Mr. Haynes who introduced the subject under General

hree years that the taxes had

not been collected. The Spa also had some land in St.

Treasurer of that parish sued

advised that a commission of
234% on the net profit should be
paid and at the time that was
cone
A Loan
The Vestry avreed to advance
the Social Committee of the
Bathsheba Community Centre a
loan to cover expenses ineurred
in the running of the Centre
money will be repaid when

money is gained from the activi-
ties al the Centre. The Vestry
ceme to this agreement after re-
ceiving a letter from’ the Com-
mittee asking for the advance.
Granted Exhibitions

Ten-year-old Joyce Celeste
Marshall of Sugar Hill, St, Jos-
eph, has been granted a Vestry
exhibition at Queen's College.
Marshe!! was one of seven appli-
cants and received 205 marks out
of 300 in the examination test.

Margo A. Newton who is 12
years, 5 months, and is already a
pupil of the school, received 255,
but the exhibition was given to
Marshall partly because of her
age, her circumstances and the
fact that Newton who lived in §t.
Joseph for some years, has not
been living in that parish for the
past two years,

The other vacant Vestry exhi-
bition, this one to Lodge School,
was given to ll-year-old Karl
O’Brien Stuart of Coffee Gully.
Stuart gained the highest marks
in the examination test.





Lordship adjourned for lunch,

On resumption Mr. Ward, Coun-
sel for defendant Colonel. Michelin
opened his case, and after citing
case law in support of his argu-
ment, called upon Mr. George
Morris to produc copies of the
Barbados Advocate of June 2, of
1950 and 1951, in which appeared
articles in connection with similar
speeches made by Colonel Miche-
lin to Bus Drivers and Conduct-
ors.

Colonel Michelin then gave evi-
dence in his own behalf, He ad-
mitted making the statements to
which reference was made in the
Rule of the Court, and further
that he had handed a typescript
of what he said to Mr, Vanterpool,
He said that the newspaper arti-
cle of 13th June, 1952 was correct
with what he said at the Public
Meeting at the Empire Theatre,
nnd added that it was part of his
Safety First Campaign by which
means he endeavoured to empha-
sise upon bus drivers and con-
ductors the need for more care on
the road.

He said that when he made that
wpeech, he did not intend that it
should prejudice the fair trial of
anyone, nor did he think that it
would tend to do so,

The comment which he used,
and to which the plaintiff took
»bjection was used only as an il-
luctration to show what could
happen when drivers of motor
vehicles were not constantly tak-
ing care in their driving, He had
not the slightest idea that any-
thing which he said then would
prejudice the fair trial of anyone,
ind had he any idea to the con-
trary, he would never have said
anything which would in any way
prejudice anybody’s trial.

In other and previous articles
he had made reference to the
number of accidents, and com-
mented on the general conduct of
drivers and conductors of "buses
This was with a view to empha-
eising upon drivers that they
—$—$—$_$—$—$_

WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Common Pleas ....
10,00 a.m.

Police Courts ..., 10,00 a.m,

Basketball at Y.M.P.C. .....-.
7,30 p.m,



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$40,000 H
Can't Spend

A German 100,000 mark of
1923 was brought inte the Advo-
eate a few days
Jones of Brighton, Black Rock,
an employee of Alleyne Arthiu
& Co. By present values, this

would be worth $40,000, B.W.1.

but this type of note is out of

circulation,

Jones was thrilled at the i ‘ea
of owning this much money, but
es it is now unredeemable its
only value to him is as a kind
of curio.

Jones said he got the note
ifrom a little boy two weeks »#0,
but he does not know how the
boy came by ut.

‘Burghead Bay’
Leaves For T’dad

The H.M.S. Burghead Bay
under the command of Captain
J. A. Tevers, O.B.E.; R.N., left
Carlisle Bay yesterday afternoon
for Trinidad, The Burghead Bay,
a 2,400 ton Bay Class frigate
ealled here on July 12 from Mar-
tinique.

She is now on hurricane petrol
duty in the West Indies and has
her base in Bermuda.

‘Gloria B’ Here
Krom Martinique

The schooner Gloria B, arr ved
in Carlisle Bay yesterday morn-
ing from Martinique under Cap-
tain M. Hall, The Frances W.
Smith which called at this port
on Sunday from British Gusang
brought in 1,000 bags of rice, 527
pieces of green heart and 380
bunches of fresh fruit.

The Lady Joan arrived the
same day from St. Vincent with
318 bags of copra, eight bags of
peanuts and two bags of pears.
These schooners ara consigned
to the Schooner Owners’ Associa-
tion.









“should drive more carefully so 1°

to reduce the number of accide.ts
In his speech at the Empire Thea-
tre on the 12th June, 1952, he dia
say that 10 persons were killed as
the result of road accidents, and
went on to say that one of the
most ghastly accidents took pl ice
a few weeks ago. That acciden.
to which he referred as one of thy
most ghastly was included in the
10 referred to in his speech,

Mr. Wat ott at this stage agreed
{hat there was no need to press
that the Sub poena be enforced,
in view of the fact that the
Colonel had in his evidence given
the information which he requir-
ed.

Mr. Ward at this stage complet-
ed his examination af Colonel
Michelin, and upon an intimation
from Mr. Walcott that he would
be some time in his cross-examin-
ation of this witness, His Lords\\ip
adjourned further hearing until
10.30 o'clock this morning,



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'SCSSOCSOSS SSS GOS DOGO FOS SP FOV GSES OOOO GOS

Shortage Of Rice
Felt In Speightstown

A rice shortage is being felt in Speightstown, For about
a week now, shoppers have not been getting their quotas
from their dealers. ;

Some are getting half. Some small shop-keepers of the
town have no rice to sell and so everybody is going to the
big dealer for his supply.

English potatoes which are in full supply are filling up
the gaps caused by the shortage of rice and other ground
provisions. : ;

Flying fish have become scarce tco, but some days fish-
ermen bring in small catches of fish-pot fish. :

* * . all their fishing boats to the

Young cane crops and vegetable Speightstown moorings,
crops are looking green and fresh About eight of the boats have
everywhere in the parish. Plant- been added to the Speightstown
ers are happy and are taking every fleet. Cove Bay fishermen now
opportunity to till their fleids. have to take their boats to the

Vegetables—with the exception banks from the Speightstown
of breadfruits—are still scarce. mooring and bring in their catches
There are nr potatoes and yams. to the Speightstown market.
Planters say that the *howers of
rain raised their hopes of having
. full market of potatoes soon.

n

The Speightstown Methodist
Church held their annual Mis-
sionary Meeting at their church
on Monday night at 7.30 o’clock.
A packed church made successful



Fishing boat owners of Cove
Bay met with heavy losses when
high winds and heavy seas lashed
the western coast last year. Cove
Bay is not a safe anchorage during
such weather, and that has a 4
the boats to be brought to
Speighitstowr.

‘the big occasion” for Methodists. * s
The Rev. Parker of Grenada The St. Lucy’s Parish Church
was the Guest Speaker of the is getting a “new look.” The

walls are being washed on the
outside and the roof painted. The
outside of the Church was dirty
from ash from Fairfield’s sugar

night.

Ceve Bay, St. Lucy, is no more
mooring for fishing boats. In
response to a suggestion from the factory during the crop.
Fisheries Department, boat The Rectory has also been
owners of Cove Bay have brought recently repaired.

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fecominending REDIFFUSION. Obtain | onempion Vam Ex Holga of Germania,







particulars irom the KEDIFFUSION Jrour months. Write C$ Kelly,

gence. 1.7,52—-6n: Tcastleton, Dominica. 12.7.52—2m.
, TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bonus BULL~-One nedisree, Jer

m Rediffusion for 25 recommenda i ola, mother oa Sareea on

dons in one calendar month siege gave lic with first calf.

§2--6n. TF ether *, Talenheln at Pine Livestock

eer ienenannnanane 4 ‘ation, Sturges Plantation, St. ; «Thomas.

. 7” " ‘Vclephone 4807, 2—-3n
EDUCATIONAL nn

ONE MULE — Apply Constant Planta-

tien. 14.7, 62—6n.



“Combermere School

VACANCY FOR MODERN LANGUAGE:
“| ““ADDING MACHINES—New shipment

~ MASTER
Applications.are isivited from Graduates Me eee gioco eh wh Gee
" 9.7.52—6n.

MECK ANICAL



for the post of Aso'stont Master qualifi Phoi
“teach French and Spnnish up fe fp arant a =e

te
sevel of the GC-E., and | “puPLICATORS—Roneo Rotary Dupli-
; h to Advanced Level. Some ex- | ators, several models, from $60.00 gh
| alas ny aati aac A ae will Mg Get a'demonstration to-day at ?, Geddes

Aen On uy no! sent

SALARY Se res # Grant Ltd., Bolton Lane.” .7.62—8n.
Grantor ¥1 000 % 120—2,880 X ldt—{ SOPpPICE EQUIPMENT—Roneo Filing
Cabinets, Roneo Stationery Cup-

Graduste ist or 2nd Class Honours:
#0 2080 st 456 2 ioe oeards, now available trom stock at T.

Geddes Grant Ltd.
renner © Diploma $240 pe in addition | v7.8 a
the foregoing seales. t of Living PEWRITER Type-
Aliewance .§ pavable at the prevailing | iter — innit rare perfect
rates. kta aah position on the! -oudition. G. ey Hutchinson’ 2c Co.,
experience in recognised Secondary eh
Sehools and War Service,

Salary scale will be adjusted by previous! ) 4).
The grant of Leave Passages after a ant Bead pe tow le T: vpgerriters,
" eral ae







Fy
3
z
5
if



Geddes Grant
consideration hig authorities. 62—6:
Previous iacened this advertise- “e. ss
os oe cohditions of Leave Passage | |
cancelled,
Successful applicant should be avail- MISCELLANEOUS

able to assume y as from September
next, but under special circumstances
von be delayed until January 1953. AMERICAN
Application ino spccial form) accom-]| Crime, Mike Barnett
panied by three testimonials and aj} Tex Ritter, We He Captal
ograph should be submitted to jhe} Marvel, on a le
eadmaster, Combermere Sehool, “St.] Coptain hi , ll Boyd,
ichael, Barbados, as early as possibic| six Gun Heroes. cents each,
and in any case not later than 3ist dJuly,] Club Building 58, Swan t.
12.7,52—3n, 18.7. 52—3n.

EMBROIDERY SPUN—Heavy quality
wn with beautiful embroidery in four
colours 36 inches wide. Usually $1 s
. Reduced to $1.51 at Kirpala
swan Street, 16, 7.62—-1n

, GALVANIZED SHEETS. 26 Gauge, in

With arrypeeee Want

TEBOKS t ‘4. Now is ‘the time to ee: Har-
- THERMOSTATIC CONTROL | ‘bon's, Bilal 2964, 2.7,.52—8n.

and it-eagy to keep clean. “\IXER—One or ae
See th@n ‘before ivs too late, Aiaster, practic:
At you “Gay "Showroom, Bay At Courtesy Garage

Ss
ONLY A FEW LEFT.













THE GAS COOKER ~









SUBSCRIBE now the Drily
TY legraph, England's leading Daily News-
2oper now arriving In Barbados ty Air
only a few days after publication ih
ondon, Contact Ian Gale, C/o. Adyo-
nat . Ltd, Leoeal Representative
Yel. 8118. 14.5210

TEE ee Cn ee
WEDDING GIFT—A few tromng board

and No-cord iron sets, subject to speciai

wedding-gift allowance, A Barnes
mo, Dita 3.%,52—t.f.n.



10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

en: re awe nee te ene

Johnson's Stationery

° will be CLOSED
on THURSDAY







1ith for P WAYPLE PIQUE —Excelien
* wality ‘affeta in nine charm:

ies STOCK-TAKING hedes 36 inches w 1.39 yard, nearky
; inished at Kir “Swan Street.

y jOUTH ORGANS ketone



Just ived by—
JOHN ae STATIONERY

LOST & FOUND



LOST

SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—Series P.P.

inder please return same to Ivan

®, Grazettes Road, St. Michael.
15. 7.52—1n,

_®WEEPSTAKE TICKET-—Series WW.













Finder please return same to
¢ on Thompson, My Lord's Hjil,
ticorish Village, St. Michael,

1S. 7. 52—In;





This Week's
Special



£ZARN BIG MONEY by selling Redif-
susion in your spare time. Get a supply
ot farms today. 1.7,52--6n.

JELLY DOUGHNUTS ' It not saved but seeking
|

6 ¢ each Salvation, please write for
TREE HOOK
Which Makes
“GOD'S WAY OF
SALVATION PLAIN”

8. Roberts, Gospel
Book & Tract Service, 30
Central Ave., Bangor, N.I. &





Also a Variety of |

_ DANISH PAS PASTRIES !
R
y



Wp ARBANNS -

AKERIES Math. |],

BIAL 4758
JAMES STREET

eR ae



POOSSSSSSOS SPOS OOS

:

iNNOUNCEMENTS |



PUBLIC SALES |



REAL ESTATE

“ARTRAMON: situate at Flint Hall,

St. Michael, stonding on 2 acres 3 roods| DECISIONS made under Sections 10, 11 and 12 of the Wages Board

6 wehes of jand

house is built of stone and con-
tains 2 galleries, large drawing and aoe,
rooms, hallway, 4 bedrooms upstairs,
bedrooms downstairs and several ot!
rooms, kitchenette snd usual ne
veniences.

Garage and servants rooms in yard i
Numerous fruit trees.

ALSO

5 acres 2 roods of land adjoining tie

— (excellent building sites).
every day (except Sunday«
barwion 4 and 6 p.m.

The above wiil be sct up for Sale at
Public Competition on Friday the 18th
July, 1962 at 2 p.m. at the office of the
undersigned

























































CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Lucas St.
Solicitors





CALCUCHIMA-—-On the Rockie; Coast.
Dial 2036. 28.6 S2—tin.

LAND—13,605 square feet of land with
the Wall standing thereon at Benny
Hall, St. Peter. Several Breadfruit and
other fruit trees thereon, situate on
Public Road, Iden) site. Offers will he
received by Messrs. Maynes & Griffith,
No. 1 Tigh Street. Dini 4173.

12.7.52—4n



LAND— 6.186 pquare feet of land at
Knights Land, Lower Westbury Road,
with bearing truit trees and water well,
Price $1,500.00. D'Arcy A. Seott, Middle







Street. 15.7.52-2n.
LAND—Two House Spots Land on
Blue, Waters ‘terrace near

each Areag 11,366 and 8,120 Square
feet adjoining one ie Apply
a. B. Kinch, 185, Roebuck. S'

io. 7. $9—t.t.n.

-_————$—$

The eae will offer for sale
et their office, No. 17, High Street,
Bridgetown, on Friday, the 25th July
1962, at 2 Pee

‘The dwellinghouse called “VENTNOR”
with the land whereon the same stands
containing by ddmeasurement 4,093
‘quare feet or thereabouts situate at
the Corner of Pine Road and Ist Avenue,
Belleville.

inspection on Mondays, Wednesdays
aud Pridays between the hours of 4 and
6 p.m. on application to the tenant

Wor further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to:
Cc , CATFORD & CO,
10,7.52—3n.





NO. 2%, BROAD STREET
The undersigned will offer for saie
at their Office, No. 17, High Street,
Bridgetown, on Friday the 25th July,

1953, at 2.30 eed
AGE .OR STORE known
as No. 27, Broad Street, Bridgetown,
standing on 4,340 square feet or there-
abouts and at present occupied by
Messrs. T. R. Evans,
Inspection on application on the
premises.
For further particulars and conditions
of sale, apply to:—
COTTLE, PATFORD, & CO.
13,7,52—7n,

AUCTION



REALTORS LIMITED
AUCTION SALE

AT 11.30 A.M.

On Tuesday the 22nd July, by order
of Mr. Elton Millet, we will sell the
furniture and household effects Mr. B. A.
Brooks’ residence “ADULO” Ventnor
Hill, Rockley, which includes Drawi
room suite consisting of three chairs
settee to seat two, plastic top table, three
carved pedestal Ashtrays tables,
dining room chairs, all in at
birch table with enamel top,









| Wages Board Act, 1943, and Wages Board Regulations, 1944.

of June, 1952.



the Department of Education, Garrison.

—_

1951 to investigate the system of
communications between Trinidad
and Tobago has now made its re-
four bert; and what it has recommend.

The
nial Affairs, Mr. H. L.. d’A, Hop-



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



GOVERNMENT NOTICE | OFFICIAL NOTICE

DECISIONS





Act, 1943 (194325) by the Wages Board established under the |!" "= "ove
Wages Board (Bridgetown Shop Assistants) Order, 1950 eanene eae

b terest in or any Men or incumbrance
1: feecting all that certain piece or parcel
; 0! land situate at Hothersal Turning in
lt tre parish of Saint Michael and Island





Wages Board (Bridgetown Shop Assistants) (Amendment)
Decisions, 1952, No. 2





B SEEDS
ASSISTANT COURT OF
APPFAL




WENDELL CLA v

FRCELL IOLA SEALY
IN pursuance of an Order in this Court
action made on the 10th
i t give notice to all

‘oresaid containing by greg |
t\vo roods or thereabouts abutting and













Defendant
S.S. “GLOUCESTER”

estate, right or

Perbsdos sbout August

fvomen cargo.



ii from Port Pirie Mey 3ist. Devonport
Tune 5th, Melbourne June 14th, Svdney
June 24th, Brisbane July 5th, arriving at

Tn addition to genera! cargo this vessel
has ample space for chilled and bard

TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1952



SHIPPING NOTICES

—

MONTREAL, aUSTEALI“, NEw SEIS SV ALEEVSESLPPLOSD,
sclietion ZEALAND LINE LAMITED.
IFFITH, Plaintiff (M.A.NZ LINE)

The M/V “MONEKA” will
fe eubeduled to accept Cargo and Passengers for

Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, }
Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Mon-
6th. day i4th inst.,
The M/V ‘CARIBBEE” will
accept Carg nad Passengers jor
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,

Nevis and St. Kitts Sailing Fri-

Cargo accepted on through Bills of day i6th imet.
Lading fer tramshipment et Trinidad to

4 oundin land late of Mabel ana, LL a Wi yard 4 * 2 ERS’
These Decisions may be cited as the Wages Board (Bridgetown r Lenssen Mba Hi ar late oF Camilla ips Ge Be Lgerere ae sivas WL asOCTARION auc} a
Shop Assistants) (Amendment) Decisions 1952, No. 2 and shall| © See teeth ce, tant oe ne ae ofl For further partlealars apply — eae ee ae, an
pose cingy ne | one with the Wages Board (Bridgetown our it » Estate of Donald Cuarke, datsssed, L| FURNESS WITHY &@ CO. LTD. : :
9 wud of a road over whic! ere is w TRINIDAD. “
istants ) isions, 1950, No, 2 (hereinafter referred to as the | right of way to the public road or how- ite j
Principal Decisions) . ever else the same may abut and bound

Sub-paragraph (1) of paragraph 3 of the Principal Decisions is

hereby repealed and the following new sub-paragraph substituted |
therefor: —

Zz ents



Made this 6th day of June, 1952

R. NICHOLAS JACK,

Labour Commissioner.
Chairman, Wages Board for Shop Assistants in Bridgetown.
Approved by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this 26th day



j day.

By Command,
J. C. KING,
_ Clerk, Executive Committee. er eee
_ 11.7. Sag Clerk

~ LONDON CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE—AUTUM
EXAMINATIONS, 1952

Forms of entry for the above exa:ninations may be obtained from







Higher Stage — for each single subject, except
Foreign Languages

Barbados. 5.7.52,—3n.



RATES OF EXCHANGE

ft JULY 14, 1952



COMMUNICATIONS



CurbvourDiles

no longer necessary to ouffer



tehing and torment from Vilea
vince ‘the discovery of Hytex (formeriy


































to bring before me an account of their
suid claims with their witnesses, docu-

by me on any “Tuesday, or Friday be-
“() Th ini h hid i srere the nates of
© minimum holiday with pay for shop assistants|© clock im the afternoon,
i i | of the Clerk of the Assistant Court o1
m= vie ae por 8), an accordance with the Holidays with | appeal at the Court House, Eames
‘a l- »” | Defore the 24th day of September, 1
7 c ), Qnd Barf Act amending the same. in order that such claims may be ranked
according nature and priority
) thereof
; persons
| benefit



precluded from the
said Decree,
| deprived of all claim on or against the
aid property.

Claimants « also notified they
must attend the said Court on ednes-
» 24th day of September, 1952, at
. when their said claims
wlll be ranked.

Given under my hand this 10th day of

G. TALMA,
of the Assistant Court of

10 o'clock a,

OFFICIAL SALE

BARBADOS.
IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF
APPEAL

noon on Friday,

aforesaid containing by admeasirement
two roods or thereabouts abutting and
Garrison, together with a copy of the | bounding on lands now or late of Mabel
Bonnett on lands now or late of Camilla
G. Sandiford on lands now or late of
Manoah Morris on lands now or late of
the Estate of Donald Clarke, deceased,
}and on a road over which there is a
right of way to the public road or how-
ever else the same may abut and bound
and if not then sold the said property| WV
will se set up for sale on every succeed~
ing Friday between the same hours until
+ the same is sold for a sum not less than
NEW YORK £166.





No appetite? No pep? The
rich, blood-building proper-
‘ties of YEAST-PHOS will
restore lost energy and will











DA COSTA & CO., LTD.,

SESSA ALI EE FON



to be examined

12 (noon) and 3
at the Office

Â¥ =




otluswise such
and be

The S/S *

Appeal, Ag.

15.7.52-—-8n SOUTRBOUND



|
wou

2

é

SOUTHBOUND
A STEAMER"

‘Equitable Jurisdiction)
WENDELL CLARON GRIFFITH, Plaintiff

ENTRY FEES :— ERCELL, IOLA SEALY Defendant

. tary Stage — for each single subject... w $ 1.68] Nortcr is hereby given that by virtue

Certificate Stage — for each single epee « except of an. Order of The Assistant Coat of

# ea dated cat a oOo. iy ie

Foreign languages . . . neve 2.28 sees will be set up for sale to ei est

a bidder @ e of the Clerk of the

For’ each Foreign Language .... ih r 4.00 Aisiave mt Court of Appent at the Court
is » Sehool Certificate of Commercial Education... 2.00 | House, between the hours rep

of 12 (noon) and 2 o'clock in the after-

the 26th day of Septem-

7: 00 | ber, 1952, all that certain piece or parcel
of land situate at Hothersal Turning in
Forms must be completed and returned to the Honorary Secre-|the parish of Saint Michael and Island

tary, Local Education Committee, London Chamber of Commerce at |‘
the Department of Education,
Girth/Baptismal Certificate and the fees on or before Friday, Ist |
August, 1952.

Department of Education,

“BRUNO”









ge, Alcoa.

Sen eee remo eerne

From Montreal and I Halifax





Steamahip lo

Gnc.



NEW YORK SERVICE.

A STEAMER sails 20 June—errives [.;bodos lst July.
NEW ORLEANS SEBVICE.

sails 6th June—arrives Barbados 2Ist June.

“THEMISTOCLES”
A STEAMER sails 19th June—arrives Barbados Sth July.

CANADIAN SERVICE



oe

SAILS FROM
Montreal Aftrives Barbados
June 28th duly 15th
July 11th July 28th
July 28th Augwit lith
August 12th August th

DUE BARBADOS
August Sth gor ST. JOHN, N.B. and
ST LAWRENCE RIVER PORTS



ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
Apply:— DA COSTA & CO., LED CANADIAN SERVICE



CAN ADIAN SERVICE









Expected Arrival

Montreal Halifax Dates
Bridgetown, Barbados

28 June 3 July 4 July

15 July 21 July 6 August

30 July 4 August 22 August

14 August 19 August 3 September







72.0% 7 bi inkers 73.4 9 4 f Jul 1962. ry * ~
BETWEEN TRINIDAD 1" Sissf"0r lemane | Dated this 10th doy of Jay) UNITED KINGDOM SERVICE
cee 11.2% pr Clerk of the Assistant Court ag | F
19.1% r, Cabi 5 tame Appeal, Ag. | " *
AND TOBAGO Han hs Bo eee esr peat Ot rom South Wales, Liverpool and Glasgow
N N | A er aise 69.2% pr ces eed
LONDON. © 7 eT aie ee
Including Newfoundland) Sou Expected Arrtval
oan July a oe a on. 17.4% ca + eaves eee Dd pr. | Wales Liverpool Glasgow Dates Bridgetown,
, nson man nfts 7 pr ‘ " 2
\Sonearenteye Blackpool) asked 75.3% pr ana ca + 80 June § July 9 July 23 July
e Secretary of State for. the fats LARRINAGA’ io Saly. hh ;
% 26 July 31 Jul 5 August 19 August
Colonies whether the Coastal | i in BA Be. $.8. “STUGARD” .. (1:5 ug. 21 ‘August 26 Angust 9 Senterober
Steamer Committee appointed in | s.S. “SEBABREEZE” ..Early September. Mid Sept. Mid October
PP:

Co elnubiiels Graig teeubies nicsgrstemureeune toate aeaisaci tte ks eee et
UNITED KINGDOM AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE
From Antwerp, Rottexdam and London

Expect
Antwerp otterdam London weed Szeient





mahogany table, painted din | B .
tsble,“one ‘simmons double bed, a | Mork ta 10 minutes and ot only etope keep you fit! S.S. “SPURT” . Mid July End July meena Atul
shumberking kk tal St
spring, two singl: ingon replied: The Coastal Stearn= | or ete enn tes put the avrctl: 2+ 2S. “ESsr ; .. Mid August End August Mid Sept.
ae remap sabe: Chine ten ‘re, ers and Island Launch Services | ing, stops bleeding and combate nerve S.S. “SUNADELE” .) Mid Sept, End Sept. Mid October
items of was see ad. ‘ Painted bedside c has ; eee two! Uritation ery Sree oe YE it
ble, of drawers, i i reports. 1 am ing in é . ,
vba, manos burner oil stove, one oven | th of the House a £0 By | iiery thoes. Backache, Go tipation. GENERAL TONIC Agents: PLANTATIONS. LUMITED — Phone 4703
7 cubie foot general electric the a Tnidad Legislative Council } iisposttion Get. Mf acu trom your -
vox of tools, small high speed drill, their interim re- druggist today under the positive .
table lamp and standing lamp, rest chair, | P4Per Asnsattng e guarantee Mytex must sop your pile %
kitehen utensils and many other items, |commendations and a report of the! find ang troubles or money back o# | se
Terms @aah, , faction taken thereon by the Gov} saturn of empty package. ; »
: wowed So mes STEADY NERVES {}' Sarbados Amateur | oxing Assn.
PUBLIC NOTICES 3 Under the patronage of
FILM SHOW MEAN iS CANADA DRY
NOTICE OUTSTANDING % Invite
THE PARISH OF ST. ANDREW - ¢ ‘ HAMPIONSHIPS
Applications for two vacant veste | THE BARBADOS STEADY SLEEP }}\; Entries for the 1952 C oO
oe a AQUATIC CLUB 3 soe hs
hue ig a ge up to Saturday, (Local and Visiting if THE MODERN HIGH SCHOOL STADIUM
uly pplications mus Members only) I later
« led by birth Certificat during the month of August at a date to be announced la
ipplcante must present “Gheabelves, to Through the courtesy of the oo sreghare wane: 1% Championships will be contested { in the following divisions:
on Monday Sis ed fo : aoe V A] UES British Counell there wil Flyweight — under 112 Ibe.
ern hf a the — ” ”
Vestry Clerk, St. Featherweight — , 126 ,
a. Ser ls FILM SHOW : Lightwolsh se ge a
eras E ano pholstered (Ne plece MORRIS in the Ball Room N UTROPHOS % Welterweight ei sae RM wae ’
OTIC SUITE in arm) ‘overing . 54 ae | — 160
ARIS Spring Seat ARMCHAIRS, 2 on | Middleweight _ a ie
Appligenore tie Guat "he are, vacgnt pairs Shy, Extra comfortable from Wednesday, July 16 You eat well, sop well, \ Light Heavyweight— , 175 ,
Vestry Exhibitions at the Coleridge their Shape and Size. at 8.30 p.m. » when you 1% Heavy — over 175
Porny School will be received by the , take NUTROPHOS. |% Intending competitors are asked to call at Modern High School
\ndersigned up to the 25th of July 1952 SIMMONS DOUBLE BED- The programme includes e 1 for Entry Forms any afternoon 4—5 p.m.
Applicants mus¢ be the sons of Parish- STEADS. ~- Good / New. | British News: The 1948 1% v :
Srp ino Latte ia a CE tte oF Without Springs, ; '%5 SSCCSCSBESSS 666560000 O0OOO"
ust be between the ages of 7 & 13 Olympic Games; Edinburgh’ Pb chia fats ew “s
years Of age; rege es ES A








Applicants must present themselves to
toe headmaster for examination to be
held on July 18th at 9.30 a.m.

\ppiication forms can be obtained at
th» Parochial eet as office.

. §. CORBIN,
Vory y Clerk,

>

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

TRANSFER

The application of Lawrence Greenidge
of St, Simon’s, St. Andrew, the pur-
chaser of uor License No, 265 of 1952,
gianted to Evelyn Cumberbatch, in re-
spect of a board and shingle shop at
SU Simon's, Bt) Andrew, to remove said
Licevse to & board aid shingle _
vith galvanized reof, attached to a







residence at St, Simon's, St. Andrew, and
to use it at h last described premises.





$
h
Dated this Uth day of July 1962 5
To J. R, BDWi , Bea, x
Folice x
na “BP, g
GREENIDGE, %
a Be onal, ‘
Lucia gh |
lice cr
Brille ith day are oe ms "Eelany ve
% 5, Sears,
Police Magistrate, om

PERSONAL |



The public are hereby warned, against
a.ving credit to my — wife Ee
SURINGER (nee AN) as I do not
held myself responsible for her or any-
one else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order

jgned by me.

NAAMAN SPRENGER,
Sarjeant’s Village,
Ch. Ch.
15.7,52—2n

The public are hereby warned against
uiving credit to any person” or persons
whomseever in my name as I do not
holt myself responsible for anyone con-
tracting any debt or debis in my name
unless by a written order signed by me.

OSCAR MURRAY,
Two Mile Hill,
St. Michael.
1§,7.52-2n.




















NOTICE
‘Austin's Menu Parlour



To allow the Staff their
Annual Holiday the business
will bé closed from TO-DAY
and reopened on SATUR-
DAY, 26th instant.

Cc. M. R. AUSTIN,
Proprietor.











2000-04

LOQPOPPOHP HS



ported. Brilliant and Decorative
with lots of Bevelled Mirrors and
Carving, $48 up.

BUY NOW AT MONEY-SAVING
PRICES

NS monies of England.
Shas aed 8 Members are cordially
L.S. WILSON § aaneee.
‘ % No Admission Charge
SPRY STREPT. DIAL 40 18.7.52—3.n.

“REDIFFUSION will pay in addition a bonus of $25.00

PODDE-DDOPDOOOOMDD DDO HOOD POPOOHOHOOHH-HOHH.DSOHPHOHDHOS

“Royal Mile”; and a Colour
Film — “The Bridge of
Time”, showing some of the

3 LARGE CH EFFONIERES, Im-
& traditional public cere-







WATER COOLERS (Ice Cans)
Now Obtainable at

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

AT ATTRACTIVE PRICES







_ NOTICE

R. M. JONES & CO., LTD., beg to notify the public
that, until further notice. due to building alterations
the entrance to their office will be on McGregor Street
instead of Prince Wm. Henry Street.










POOOOO®,

REDIFFUSION

Offers a Commission of $1.50 in CASH for every New
Subscriber brought to and accepted by the Company.






to any person who brings in twenty-five New Subscrib-
ers in one Calendar month who are accepted by the
Company. RIE








Have always a supply of Recommendation Forms ready
THEY CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE OFFICE
REDIFFUSION Trafalgar Street.







HUNDREDS oi
with them in the past three years
CUSTOMERS have been satisfied.

Buy from us and you will not be
Disappointed.

Buildings

reépse OO WMURO OZ

OTHERS MAW

CONCRETE PRODUCTS LTD.

LODGE HILL, —

—_—_—~o—_—_

Use HOLLOW CONCRETE BLOCKS

when building or
GUARANTEE
STANDARD QUALITY and are REGULARLY TESTED
NEW HOMES, have been built

the blocks

=e

The CHEAPEST and BEST way to build to-day

Tests in MIAMI] have shown that Concrete Block
WITHSTOCD HURRICANE DAMAGE
better than any other type of building.

Visit our Factory and let us comvince you.

>





4x8x16 20c.
8x8x16 Sle.
Corners 33c.
Double End 34c.

Halves 17¢c.

Te Reape Se ee are



renovating your home.









COPY but WE STILE.

each

Telephone 2798

We
we make are of a

and ALL OUR

MOAW>r OOH wmmuUMO cz

LEAD



. Ex Factory



m8 ToS



TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1952



HENRY







FLINT OF -THE FLYING SQ



CHEER UP FOR MY SAKE.
(M 21 TOMORROW AND
MARK'S GOING TO

ANNOUNCE PUR
ENGAGEMENT.








YOURE SO
VERY MUCH
LIKE SOMEONE
ELSE | KNEW..



FORGIVE THIS i
BEARER OF EVIL
{ TIDINGS, MAJESTY/
BUT WE SHALL
HAVE WO TANIUM
TO SAVE OuR

WHAT IS IT THAT
TIES YOUR TONGUE
INTO SENSELESS
KNOTS? SPEAK UP,
OR MO-LOK SHALL
HAVE YOUR. WITHERED

ae - RNR RA Gb

SS. THANKS,..IF YOU'RE
SURE THE CHAIR ISN'T

WIRED THE WAY YOUR _ as

Pp SIT DOWN,
HERR HAZARD}

BRINGING UP FATHER







I'M QUITE PROUD THAT THE
CIVIC CLUB PICKED M ~

AS THE TOWN'S OUTST. NDING
CITIZEN !/-- NOW _T'LL PRACTICE
THE SPEECH I'LL MAKE
WHEN THEY AWARD ME J
THE MEDAL: ‘jf

GENTLEMEN -
WORDS TO

HEY LL BE WAITING



DISTINGSLIBHED Abies AND
Reeth FOR ME ete FING

GRATITUDE FOR THIS OnEAT
HONOR --

VAD....

4 DON'T SUPPOSE

YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT
(T'S LIKE TO BE iN LOVE...
YOU CAN'T KNOW...




WHAT ARE
YOU SAYING?

SIMPLY THIS — WE HAVE
LOST CONTACT WITH OR,
CARSON'S PARTY. THEY
SENT A DISTRESS SIGNAL

FROM THEIR DISTANT PLANET...

MTHEN WERE CUT OFF/ THEY
ARE LOST! THEY ARE
P NOT RETURNING!

" Kt *

\



Ne

NOT AT ALL / _
NOTHINGI LIKE BETTER
THAN HOLDING A CHEERFUL
CONVERSATION AT THE
POINT OF A GUN!

I HOPE THE GUN p
DOESN'T BOTHER YOU...
IT COMFORTS ME SO



A
4 i
VE,

HERR HAZARDP,,.BUT
NOT FOOLHARPY, I



BARBADOS



BY CARL ANDERSON



BAKERY

WEDDING caalcali |
A SPECIALTS





YOU HAVE

pire THAT WOULD-FIT ME ,* 3}
VE GOT NOTHING BUT THIS OLD =
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IS DUE TOMORROW!







YOU ARE BRAVE, A NOT A BIT! TELL

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MAYOR -
IT IS_ INDEED
EXPRESS



IN A SCORE OF. CROWDED GAMING ROOMS FAT WALLETS
IND LEAN ONES ALIKE ARE QUICKLY EMPTIED BY
ee WHEELS, THE Monat AND THE DICE.

FOR US poesle WE ‘LL Be

AT Bride THIS IS OUR

THEY'LL BE WAI

| DONT LIKE THIGe~ }”
a aa tu

NI 4 ie re = J











SHUT UP -YOU PINHEADY/
DON'T YOU KNOW FIFI IS

TAKING HER NAP ? yOu'LL.
WAKE UP THE POOR DOG
WITH YOUR SHOUTING /”

PRACTICE THAT SPEECH
IN YOUR OWN ROOMY,

FACE ARRIVES ON THE SCENE.









BY ALEX. RAYMOND

A TRAIN PULLS IN FROM THE EAST AND A NEW
. THE MANGLER! |

WAITING, AFTER TH

BE MORECAREFUL | | I

WITH YOUR TOYS.





MADAM @LINDY



ADVOCATE

PAGE SEVEN



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PAGE EIGHT



3rd Series In Intermediate
Cricket Fixtures Finish

NO OUTRIGHT VICTORIES ~

The last day’s play in the Third Series of Intermediate
ericket matches ended on Saturday. No outright victories

were scored, but batsmen

made good scores. Again the

weather was ideal and there were good wickets at all

grounds.

In the Mental Hospital-Pickwick fixture at Mental Hos-
pital, the game ended with Mental Hospital securing points
for a first innings lead. Mental Hospital in their first innings
scored 254 runs and dismissed the Pickwick team for 118

runs in their first venture.

The Mental Hospital slow right
arm bowler J. Wiltshire did havoc
with the Pickwick batsmen
and ended with an analysis of 13
oyers, one maiden, 51 runs and

\ Todd 8 4

[ 7 3 8 i
J 13 1 61 7
3 9

\ 4 18



atson 4 16
PICKWICK 2ND INNINGS

seven wickets. He ‘bowled at a ©. Moore Lb.w. b R. Chase 13
good length and used his head ©. Greenidge not out 4
against the batsmen, C. Green- ‘: "yelyn not out =
idge topscored with 29 for Pick- ,
wick in their first innings. Total: (for 1 wkt.) 58
Sent back, Pickwick scored 59 POLICE vs. WINDWARD 50
runs for the loss of one wicket
when stumps were drawn. ee a
At Queen’s Park, Police who fe eee Se tea _
made 161 runs in their first inn- Cc. Sealy c&b R. Atkinson 10
ings, bowled out Windward for Denny ¢ Farmer b R. Atkinson 27
152. runs to give themselves ay) qQeeepan retired #
first innings lead. In their second |. Warner c&b R. Atkinson 4
innings Police were all out for 120 ©. Sprinwer e&b R. Atkinson 9
n ss F. Forde e Atkinson b R, Farmer 16
runs, four of their batsmen } smith ¢ Thornton b R Farmer 5
reaching double figures. Skipper Ss. Howard not out 6
Denny and Cheltenham each got © GriMith b R. Farmer 0
27 while Forde scored 15 and “ }ujbnen PR. Parmer :
Sealy 10. -
Best Bowling ia ae re
Best bowling performance for oO M R w
Windward was given by R. Atkin- M. Farme 2 4
son who captured four of the ) Qu. ; os
Police wickets for 50 runs after Atkinsen 9 50 4
bowling nine overs. When stumps Farmer 5.1 14 2
were drawn Windward had lost {iaycciq pen : ae
four of their wickets for 101 WINDWARD 2ND INNINGS
runs in their second innings. ¢ Thornton ¢ Griffith b F. Smith 35
Empire gained a first innings {7 [°poe ?.? Sm 7
> H. I, Farmer b Smith 4
lead over Combermere when they R. Atkinson not out 2
scored 182 runs for the loss of six 5 ¥. Farmer stpd (wh ) b Smith 0
wickets declared in reply to the " {!. Farmer not ou 4
Combermere total of 133 runs
W. Drayton who has scored a Total (for 4 wkts.) 101
century since the season has ;
started, topscored for his team COMBERMERE vs. EMPIRE
with 68 before he was bowled by nae es
Lewis. Next best score came from SQmnnMME it, Rey
. Arm o s unde- Decld i . 182
feated with 39. . ‘ COMBERMERE ¢nd INNINGS *
Combermere in their second jimiss run out ©... ”
innings scored 136 runs for four Wilkinson Lb.w. b Beckles 6
wickets when play ended. Brathwaite c & b Kirton 67
Despite a patient knock by R. Seen not out 0
ps not out i
Marshall who topscored with 62, Extras 5
Carlton failed to gain a first 3
innings lead over Wanderers Total (for 4 wkts.) 190
and were bowled out for 208 in BOWLING ANALYSIS
reply to the Wanderers total of | | Oo. M. R. W.
296 made on the first day of play. © [eckles Bie ae ee
Carlton batted the whole day on M. Armstrong 6 23
Saturday. G. Harding who went ©. Challenor . 5 &
at number six in the Carlton *.,Aâ„¢mory ee ae
batting order, scored the second G. Kirton Beceem

best score of 55. Browne got 36.

J. Corbin bowling at medium
pace, had a good speil and sent
down 28 overs, capturing five
wickets and conceding 69 runs.
G. Skeete took three for 23.

Spartan Saved

Time was the only factor that
saved Spartan from being
defeated by Cable & Wireless.
Spartan dismissed Cable & Wire-
less for 68 rungs in their first inn-
ings on the first day of play and
at the end of that day Spartan
had replied with 150 runs for the
loss of nine wickets,

On Saturday they declared at
this total, thus sending Cable &
Wireless on a good wicket in
their second innings. Cable &
Wireless did not collapse as they
had done in their first innings,
but went on to score 212 run
for the loss of eight wickets.

The Cable & Wireless opening
batsman B, Matthews helped his
team by scoring 63 runs. H. King
scored 56 before he was bowled
by Medford. For Spartan C. Skin-
ner took three wickets for 23
runs while Medford and Cum-
berbatch got two each.

A good bowling performance
was given by fast bowler King
and he was mainly responsible
for Spartan losing eight of their
wickets for 49 runs in their
second innings. King took five of
the Spartan wickets for 22 runs
and if there was more time Cable
& Wireless would have gained
their first outright victory.

Spartan however, got points
for a first innings lead. The

Fourth Series starts on Saturday.
MENTAL HOSPITAL vs, PICKWICK

MENTAL HOSPITAL Ist Innings 254
PICKWICK 1ST. INNINGS
C. G. Greenidge ¢ Williams b J

Wiltshire 29
H. Kidney ¢ R. Chase b B. Hope 5
Cc, Evelyn run out n
M. Foster c Williams b Wiltshire 16
Cc. White b Wiltshire 2
G. Moore c&b Wiltshire 9
R, Clarke b Wiltshire 21
H. Jordan Lb.w. b Wiltshire 4
V. Greenidge not out 6

H. Marshall stpd. (wk) Gaskin b
Wiltshire 1
O. Lashley run out 0
Extras: 14
Total: 118
Fall of wickets: 1—7, 2—24, 3-4.
4—51, 5—71, G—97, 7—101, 8-114, 9—118

BOWLING ANALYSIS

o. M R w.
Cc. Knight 5 3 2 -



| They'll Do It Every Time





Bacone IS VE

BIGHEARTED WHEN Ir
COMES TO THOSE
FUND-RAISING
CHARITY DRIVES...

UT— LET OL'
FAITHFUL ASK
FOR A TWO-,
BUCK RAISE !
AT'S ul
DIFFERENT...





THANX AND A
HATLO HAT- OFF
3 â„¢T!
HERBERT JASON, 5
CONCORD, j
NEW HAMPSHIRE





MR, BIGDOMEsT'VE BEEN
HERE
I HAVEN'T HAD ACGutP!D

RAISE IN 1O YEARS-I-UH=;



WANDERERS vs. CARLTON
AT CARLTON

WANDERERS tst Innings . eysse
CARLTON Ist INNINGS

Burke |.b.w. b Corbin

Matthews b Skeete . 1

Hi

«. Marshall ¢ Packer b Corbin 62
kK, Hutchinson b Skeete 3
C. Standford b Corbin 6
G. Harding ¢ Ramsey b Corbin 55
C. Goodridge c Lawless b Corbin 5
Browne b Skeete 36
BE, Gill Lb.w. b Proverbs 6
Burke not out is
A. Nicholson c Alleyne b Packer 13
Extras &
Total . 208
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R Ww,
J. Corbin 28 & oo 5
M. Proverbs 10 3 32 1
G. Skeete 12 4 23 8
Cc. Patterson 6 2 —
H, Ramsey 2-_- 15 -
A. Seale 15 2 a7 -
R,. Packer 7 34 1
CABLE & WIRELESS ys.
SPARTAN
CABLE & WIRELESS Ist Innings 68
SPy AN Ist Ennings, for 0 wkts.



Decld, eehterees « : 1m

CABLE & WLRELESS Ynd INNINGS
B. Mathews ec Medford b Skinner .. 63
R. MeKenzie hit wkts. b Cumber

batch 39
C. Cozier ).bow. Skinner : 3S
R. Croney 1Lb.w. Cumberbateh 21
—&. Branker c Skinner b Chase 7

H King b Medford 56
ri Skeete b Skinner 0
C. Seale lLb.w. Medford 9
M. L. Clarke not out 6
D. Archer net out 3
Tony King did not bat 0
Extras “ 8
Total (for 8 wkts.) aie
BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M. R. W
Skinner is 6 23 3
M. Medford 9 2 32 2
8S. Parris , 6 WwW
Chase i ay i
Wood 2 7
f Wood 4 20
Cumberbatch . 7 38 2
SPARTAN’S tnd INNINGS
Wood b H, King i
Wood b Mathews 5
D. Morris Lb.w. King °
Chase b Branker il
Medford Lb.w. King 6
W. Jemmott ce Archer b King . i
Roach Lb.w, King 9
c. Matthews not aut 8
Skinner wot out gcbibans esa es 1
Cumberbateh did not bat ...... 0
Parris b Branker ‘ 7
Total (for 8 wkts.) a9
BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M R w
H. A. King 7, a
Mathews 2.1438
F. Branker . 3 = i 2
a







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Y °* «#e
Second Division
Central defeated Combermere
by six wickets when their Second
Division cricket match ended on
Saturday, the last day in the
Third Series of these matches.
Central in their first innings
scored 128 runs in reply to the
Combermere total of 172 runs,
Mr. Hughes having made 40.

Combermere in their second
innings collected 110 runs, F.
Scott topscoring with 23 runs.
Needing 155 runs for vietory
Central scored 159 runs for the
loss of four wickets when play
ended and thus secured an out-
right vietory. C. Goddard was
10t out with 75.

At Beckles Road, Y.M.P.C.
secured a first innings lead over
Pickwick whom they dismissed
for 85 runs. Y.M.P.C, batting first,
seored 156 runs. In their second
innings Y.M.P.C. declared when
the score was 65 for four wickets
and at the end of play Pickwick
had lost three of their wickets for
90 runs.

In
fixture,
points

the College—Wanderers
Wanderers only got
for a first innings lead.
Batting first Wanderers scored
158 runs and = dismissed the
schoolboys for 90, J. Peterson
taking four of the Harrison Col-
lege wickets for eight runs.
Wanderers scored 85 for five
wickets in the second innings and
declared but at the end of play

College had collected 156 runs
for five wickets.
Empire-Erdiston

Empire tried to force an out-
right victory over Erdiston but
failed ir. the attempt. After hit-
ting 321 runs in their first innings
on the first day of play, Empire
dismissed the Erdiston batsmen
for 121 runs, four of the
wickets going to K. Hutchinson.
In their second innings, Erdiston
scored 51 runs for the loss of
four wickets when play ended,
Three of the wickets were taken
by J. Bynoe.

The Scores; —

Y.M.P.C, VS. PIOKWICK
AT BECKLES ROAD

Y.M.P.C; 156 and 65 for four
wickets decld. (O. Edghill 29.)
Pickwick 85 (N. Lashley 22, L.
Branker four for 21) and 90 for
three wickets (N. Lashley 41 not
out.)

COLLEGE VS. WANDERERS
AT WANDERERS
Wanderers 158 and 84 for five
wickets decld. College 90 (J.
Peterson four for eight) and 156
for 5 wickets (L. Waithe 44 not
out.)

CENTRAL VS. COMBERMERE

Combermere Ist Innings 172
(Mr. Hughes 40) and 110 (F. Scott
23.) Central 128 and 159 for four
wickets (C. Goddard not out 75.)

ERDISTON VS. EMPIRE
AT ERDISTON
Empire 321 (J. Bynoe 86).
Erdiston 121 (F. Deane 29, K.
Hutchinson four for 42,) and 51
for four wickets (J. Bynoe three
for 13).

Royal B’dos Yacht
Club Tennis Tournanient

there was no





Owing to rain
play yesterday.

TODAY’S FIXTURES
Men’s Singles Semi Finals
Dr. F. G. Reader vs. Mr. L, St.

Hill,
Ladies’ Doubles—Finals.

Mrs, P. Patterson and Mrs.
R. 8. Bancroft vs. Miss D. Wood
and Miss G, Pilgrim.

Men’s Doubles,

Mr, P. Patterson and Mr. G. H.
Manning vs. Mr. J. W. McKin-
stry and Mr. J. Patterson.

Mixed Doubles

Mr, and Mrs, D, E, Worme vs,
Miss L, Branch and Mr, V.
Roach,

THE WEATHER
REPORT

YESTERDAY
Rainfall from Codrington:

in,

Total Rainfall for Month to
Date: 1.82 ins.

Highest Temperature: 85.5° F.

Lowest Temperature: 74.5° F.

Wind Velocity: 12 miles per
hour,

Barometer: (9 a.m.) 20.995
(3 p.m.) 28 986.

TO-DAY
Sunrise: 5.48 a.m.
Sunset: 6.19 p.m.
Moon: Last Quarter, July 13.
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.



28

High Tide: 11.14 a.m. 11 p.m.
Low Tide: 4 59 a.m. 4 44 p.m.



__By Jimmy Hatlo |










TREMBLE:
AT THIG Tie!



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

7) Entered For Turf Club
Summer Meet



The entries for the Summer
Meeting of the Barbados Turf
Club closed yesterday with 75
horses the same number which
entered for the March meeting.

Following are the entries :--

FIRST DAY
iST RACE—Summer_ Stakes—

Classes C and C2 Only Maidens

5% Furlongs.

Baby Girl, ~The Thing les
Match, Abu Ali, Darham Jane
Devil's Sympony, Trimbrook

Aim Low, Dim View, Magic Gaye,

Cantaquisine, Racton, Street
Arab.
2ND RACE—Planters Stakes—

Classes F and F2 Only 8-Year-

Olds and Over 51% Furlongs.

May Day, Betsam, Cardinal
First Admiral, Miracle, April
Flowers, Soprano, Viceroy, Marc!
Winds, Caprice, Will O’ the Wis;
Rambler Rose,
3RD RACE—Stewards Stakes—

Classes A & B Only 7% Fur-

longs

Slainte, Pepper Wine, Notonite
Flying Dragon, Firelady, Harro-
ween, Red Cheeks, Rebate, Bélle
Surprise, Lunways, Landmark.
iTH RACE—Barbados Derby

Stakes & Cup Nominated 9

Furlongs

Cardinal, Dunquerque,
Admiral, Seedling, Bright
Rambler Rose.
5TH RACE-—North Gate Stakes—

First
Light,

Classes C and C2 Only Tz
Furlongs
Careful Annie, Flieuxce, Dol-

drum, Embers, Dashing Princess
6TH RACE—OISTIN STAKES—
Class G and Lower 5) Fur-
longs
Gavotte, Cottage, Twinkle,
Joan’s Star, Blue Diamond, Meer-
schaum, Sea Foam,
7TH RACE—Trafalgar Stakes—
Classes D and Lower 7) Fur-
longs,
Top Flight, Mary Ann, Apollo,
Cross Bow, Will O’ the Wisp, Col-
leton, Watercress.

8TH RACE—Stafforg Stakes—

Class B and Lower 5% Fur-
longs.

Pepper Wine, Careful Annie,
Flying’ Dragon, Demure, Vectis,

Spear Grass, Aim Low, Castle in
the Air, High and Low, Sweet
Rocket, Lunways, Mrs. Bear.

, SECOND DAY
9TH RACE — Carlisle Stakes —

Classes A & B Only, 5% Fur-

longs.

Pepper Wine, Flying Dragon,
Demure, Harroween, Red Cheeks
Spear Grass, Rebate, Castle in the
Air, Sweet Rocket, Belle Surprise
Lunways, Mrs. Bear.
10TH RACE—Merchants’ Stakes—

Classes F and F2 Only, 744 Fur-

longs.

Apronusk, May Day, Cardinal,

Colombus, Soprano, Viceroy,
March Winds, Caprice, Rambler
Rose,

11TH RACE—Victoria Stakes







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Classes F and F2 Only, 744 Fuf-

longs.

First Admiral, Seedling, Betsam.
Miracle, April Flowers, Will O
the Wisp.

i2TH RACE—Champion Stakes—
Class A and Lower, 11% Miles.

Slainte, Notonite, Flieuxce, Fire-
lady, Doldrum, Red Cheeks, Re-
bate, Embers, Tiberian Lady,

Landmark.
i3TH RACE—South Point Stakes

—Classes © &- C2 Only, 7%

Furtongs.

Test Match, Abu Ali,
Jane, Trimbrook, The Thing,
Devil’s. Symphony, Aim Low
Dim View, Magic Gaye, Canta
quisine, Racton, Street. Arab,
MTH RACE—Oistin Handicap—

Darham

Closs G and Lower, 5% Fur-

longs.

Gavotte, Cottage, Twinkle,
Joan's Star, Blue Diamond,

ISTH RACE—Beckwith Stakes—
Class D and Lower, 51% Furlongs.
Top Flight, Dunguerque, Mary

Ann, Will O° the Wisp, Water-

cress,

16TH RACE—Bush Hill Stakes-
Classes C & C2 Only, 7% Fur-

longs.

Careful Annie, Doldrum, Bright
Light, High and Low, Dashing
Princess

THIRD DAY

17TH RACE—Juvenile Stakes —

Classes F2 and Lower, 54% Fur-

longs.

Super Jet, Apple Sam, Jim La
Rue, Bow Tie, Howitzer, Sea
Foam
18TH RACE—Staferd Handicap

Class B and Lower—7% Fur-

longs,

Slainte, Flying Dragon, Demure
The Thing, Pepper Wine, Careful
Annie, Firelady, Vectis, Red
Cheeks, Castle in the Air, Spear
Grass, High and Low, Sweet
Rocket, Belle Surprise, Lunways,
Mrs. Bear,
19TH RACE—NURSERY STAKES

—Class F2 and Lower—7% Fur-

longs.

Stirling Flush, Faerie Queene,
Meerschaum, Jealousy.
20TH RACE—Trafalgar Handicap

—Class D and Lower, 9 Furlongs

Mary Ann, May Day, Top
Flight, Dunquerque, Apollo,
Cross Bow, Colleton, Watercress.

21ST RACE—Merchants’ Handi-

cap—Classes F and F2 Only,
—7\% Furlongs
May Day, Cardinal Colombus,

Apronusk, Soprano, Viceroy,
March Winds, Caprice, Rambler
Rose,
22ND RACE—Summer Handicap
—Classes C and C2 Only, 9 Fur-
longs. ui
Abu Ali Darham Jane, Trim-
brook, The Thing, Test Match,
Careful Annie, Devil’s Symphony,
Flieuxce, Aim Low, Doldrum,
Embers, Cantaquisine, Racton,
Dashing Princess, Tiberian Lady.

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23RD KACE—Stewards’ Handicap

—Classes A & B Only, 9 Fur-

longs.

Slainte, Firelady, Pepper
Notonite, Harroween,
Landmark, Mrs. Bear.

FOURTH DAY
24TH RACE—Juvenile Handicap

—Class F2 and Lower, 5% Fur-

longs.

Stirling Flush, Super Jet,
Apple Sam, Jim La Rue, Faerie
Queene, Bow Tie, Howitzer,
Meerschaum.
25TH RACE—Victoria Handicap—

Class F and F2 Only, 9 Fur-

First Admiral,

longs.
Betsam, April

Flowers, Seedling.

26TH RACE—August Handicap—
Class B and Lower, 9 Furlongs.
Slainte, Pepper Wine, Flieuxce,

Firelacy, Dashing Princess, Belle

Sqrprise, Flying Dragon, Lun

ways, Landmark and Mrs. Bear.

27TH RACE—Turner Hall Handi-
cap, Class G and Lower, 74 Fur-
longs.

_. Gavotte, Cottage, Twinkle,

Joan’s Star, Blue Diamond.

28TH RACE—Beckwith Handicap
—Class D and Lower, 7! Fur-

Wine,
Rebatey

longs.
Top Flight, Dunquerque, Mary
Ann, Apollo, Cross Bow, March

Winds, Will O’ the Wisp, Colle-
ton, Watercress.
29TH RACE—North Gate Handi-

cap—Classes C and C2 Only, 742

Furlongs,

Baby Girl, The Thing, Abu Ali,
Test Match, Careful Annie,
Darham Jane, Devil’s Symphony
Flieuxce, Trimbrook, Aim Low,
Dim View, Cantaquisine, Dol-
drum, Bright Light, Embers Rac-
ton, High and Low, Dashing
Princess, Street Arab.
30TH RACE—Planters’ Handicap

—Classes F and F2 Only, 5'4

Furlongs.

May Day, Betsam,
Miracle, Seedling, Viceroy,
Soprano, March Winds, Caprice,
Rambler Rose, Will O’ the Wisp.
31ST RACE—Carlisle Handicap—

—Classes A and B Only, 742

Furlongs.

Pepper Wine, Notonite, Flying
Dragon, Demure, Firelady, Har-
roween, Vectis, Red Cheeks, Re-
bate, Castle in the Air, Spear
Grass, Sweet Rocket, Belle Sur-
prise, Lunways, Landmark, Mrs.

Cardinal,

Tre

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Rayon Satins 36 ins. wide ................
Pink, Blue, Lemon and White

Rayon Satins (White only) ................
Printed Cotton Prints 36 ins. wide ....
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Speckled Cream 6 x 6,4x 4,3 x3.

GLAZED WALL TILES for Bathrooms & Kitchens

ALUMINIUM MOULDING for counter edges
TEMPERED HARDBOARD for partitions,

RED HAND ‘S’ GLOSS PAINTS
RED HAND MATINTO FLAT WALL PAINTS for

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GUIDE FOR WOMEN



BROAD STREET

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Alweys brush your teeth
right ofter eating with

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oor panels





eo



Full Text

PAGE 1

•ARE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, JULY 15. 152 Qahib Calling. T HC ST. GBOROrfl SO I \l I \ NT1 B u n will bopened b> ll: ) %  • rftior cii %  '. 30. On Routine VUit W OOMHAKOn L. EOOUSFICLD, •ui 1( f Ch Dil the Caribbean Area, lift a t... %  (... %  tat Trinidad ou i ten He i. %  %  return in-day. Attended Econcmici Talks M ISS BETTY ARNE BoeJal W.ir.,.. Qfllear, relurne.i uver the week-end by B.W I A. from Trinidad aftrr ;iii<>ndinn th> Conference on Hume Economics ;ind Nutrition at Krni House. Port-of-Spa in. For Summer Holidays M R. JOHM HOYOS who has just completed his second year ti Bojanrg .1 the University Collegi of the West Indie*, arrived on Sunday by the Catombte from Jamaica lo spend the summn %  with hi-, relatives at Cheapstde. Married in Trinidad D R. AND MRS PETER BOY!> who were married in Ti midad on Saturday, Julv 5, at the Roman Catholic Church. San Ferth rough here or ble on tholi man thexwill Ii BY THE WAY By Beachcomber %  Toman) C with in Cr.mophone Concert po „ KK;N[:BS mu „ ^ ni D **— with interest the revelation* Sonata in F. of U hmgs tn „, ^ Op. 5? C*Appasdone lo living horse* in this counsionata Trio NO, I n. B, Flat try in order lhal Escalope de Major <>p 7 (The Archduke) and "* ">ay appear on restaurant Qu.iru-i in F Major. 0. 13.1 are menus. the worki which will bo Sl ,r <>ndy but the analytical •... Qromophoiw %  "' % %  "' k,, w wh * h* a eat%  Mii inobanly be k to-nor'';, ."'VM' 1 *' '.'', ** u "'""""•>• You r.,w niarhi Inlv Ifl Wl "'" wt "now what processSchool Ma.ter. Return Sv* ^US' -"SSfJJS: Home meat to make n new health-giving \*H CARL JACKMAN, A"-'>"; •">" | ...-ngoi in DISH which concJudod ma wife, the ronner HIM Angola %  %  ""-> Houai i Ramoutir, is the daughter of Mr. DtaWWi rttucttnc .vewtcid; Tando, passed Sunday by the %  U 10 Domlnli rvsidc. Dr. Boyd is Offlcer of Ma Sunday by the ColomMe to spend T^K *?"* d j mcul,y ls lo m ke six weeks'holiday with his parents, ,f", M m Slopcorner realise Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Jackman of :? %  *".* %  an *"*'cnt Queen of Water Street. Christ Church. He %  • Britons, not a silly little oaf was accompanied by his wife. ?^Tj ng , L "•>'ca '" t When Atao amving on Sunday by the ^^{* £*.%* fiCt^nd !" U?7A% y cS£ ASEZ S h r nd haughtl^she d^S Master of Kingston College and iwrv> w lha! ne |ookl hkp g %  Otl of Mr. und Mrs. J M. Crick intoxicated "extra" In an opera of "Weston House," St. James. He crowd. With infinite patience she will be here unUl August 24. when has been coached to hold r. he leaves for England to take his Ihjajbj daftanUy. but she 'all ted Diploma In Education at the Ini: as a timid sandwlchman mit stitute of hold an advertisement for a teashop Yesterday her queenly robe Going Back Home i %  I i ught m the promt* ot I t% t I >i<-rai.i wo • %  DtrM | [Nd ti-yoai i | ...>' % %  "%  "H.M.III. and UM soda he MaiRcting |V|*i. if „_ rhprt ,_„ faced deitv, lowering the implo* ST2 X" S S,, T 5 Tnn":id ,, ^"ha/boe^hav. ng "}-"' ". disentangle it. had "tn? S C olambir gffbjr at—-J,—, -.._.,,,_, „, i r R.,levs alr of man ,r Ving to toast some*'1or't^pas. 'If ioSjwW W!L?!ff!f^ ^T Attended Oil. And FoU Conference JJON'ILE AUSTIN WINSTON. %  sne 1J: >ugTrt A Very Remarkable Pencil — It Could Talk as Well as Whie — || MJ|1 Mil I I Til Ki>ue was dark. I from cellar to attic -had MM to bed. A! !.. %  .hadow-hoy with the i rned about name. He was aitting [ i;:e of the desk near the v.niching the moon climb Ittta wWll Knarf *ai UsffO, uRd ii Metal J "'>. i ...in whoa all at OBfO • heard u^harp little voice saying: 'Pardon me. air! You're alum* on mc!" Knarf inaiantly tprang M the desk. He peered rlosely at the spot where he had beti aitting. All he could aee was a small yellow pencil, no larger than a clotheapln. Its i-iil'it was broken. Kdge of l>e>k Knarf had Just about decided blots and they splutter. Arliday before going Mimsie unili-r /inti/rain liter in the evening by the saiiv opportunity for England. A son of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Nile or Viiuxhall. Christ Church. he has now gone up to the UK to further his studies. Freight Solicitor A FTER spending about ten days' holiday In Barbed i guest of Caerabanl; Hotel. Mr, llamesh Gordon returned to Trinidad on Saturday bv the S.S. Golhlo. He is Fi eight Solicitor of Messrs Alstons Ltd.. t Port-ofSpoin Back From U.K. M R. AND MRS. L. C. WRIGHT were among the passengers arriving here on Saturday by the S.S. Oolflto from England where they had spent two and n half months* holiday. They will b* iemamlng until Thursday as guests at the Ocean View Hotel when they leave for Antigua where Mr. Wright is Traffic Manager of the Antigua Sugar Factory. her three children, Cyril, Christhird sound. T/he third sound tophor end Freddie They will be sembled an oboe so closely that hero for two months" holiday the audiences did not know Which they aie spending as guests whether to laugh or cry A medi%  t Ilirodisc Reach Club. <"*' examination revealed the fart here ..n Sunday afternoon by the ** of thr i'ritlsh Bala Shoe Co.. wide waB ncr throa| ih „ t ST Firm I, SS Calomble for four is now oi his way to England on somc pr i vo te scruple could have weeks' holiday which he Is spenda three-nonth business visit. He prevented her from swallowing a ing with his relatives at Hindsleft on Sunday J> ihe ('alembic trombone." "One swallow does bury Road. and was sceO nt pa n tod by htl 'vife no t make a singer." commented a aw as, .. ..„ %  ""' hvAv 'Peter. critic with a face like a broken To Reside rn U.S.A. .,,.,.. I RAVING on Saturday by For U.K. Holiday B W.I.A. f_ Huxtablc Either the Boadicen In* rident should be -truck off ihi programme ruthlessly, or some more fitting exponent should he found before it is too late. We tend no discourtesy to Miss Slopcorner when we say, In the racy and homely phrase of Councillor Townstnd, "She is enough make a cat sick." the U s A mother. Mr York City, Grnnnum who have gone reside" with her three month.*' holiday. Pearl OOrBud of New Mr. Grannuin is an Atto; Messrs Robert Thorn Ltd. Rupert and the Ton Scout^tO no longri in sight, nuy ... well tabs my *t gone om anywj*." KigiM-li. ind (hen %  tip I)iilJv to nwnd nonce board." MTS Popen. Bui lurdlv have ihey moved when tonu-dnnf awiahct It*. Ih* Toy *jpt the liiilc b*4i. Hc't going to Und Let'a %  • %  (um *'lin hjpprned lureUii miilii. He's aurt to be Mt to tell ua tvervthiae." meant it. You were sitting on me, I "You mean Gee," said Knarf. vou were! And you were about to ( "1 mean 'ti' And if you n-k s sit on me again!" question, aay'V. Anil if you re talk "Oh!" exclaimed Knarf. Then he ing about somelioily elae. added: "Since when do Pencils; And if you're talking about your talk?" self say T. AnJ if you're talkinif "Don't be sdly," snapped the %  boot insects that make honey say Pencl. "We write, don't we? Why 'B". And ,f you're ta king about the shouldn't we be able to talk?" " %  ">' *; %  An J. lf /"! talking „_ „ tl „ . „ _, about a certain kind nf bird, say "Petieils don't write, aaid Katst JV AaA it ^-^ ,., kl! „. tbp :I Pe P l do something hot you drink, say "Nonsense. People just holo ua. -j\ Learn t" "*e your letter!.. We do the writing. I'd like to see Knowing the alphabet isn't enough. anyone write anything by just roov-1 And learn your commas, and sending bis finger up and down on a colons, and period*, and question sheet of paper. All he would get Is m arks and exclamation points, and smudges. Pencils write words that dashes, too. And ibOTC all," said other people can read. That's real | nP Pencil, "doal ait on top of the writing ,i,.,k. You've broken my point sl"And of cournc." the Pencil wei.t ready. I don't lliink that's consideron before Knarf could interrupt; ate at all!" "since we know all the words, we I Never in his whole life had tan also talk. Pena talk too—only | Knarf ever heard a Pencil talk like when they get excited they make I that! Listening Hours 0—tJI •>.... IS MM. 'W UH I p m Th* New. itOpm The Dally rvtc*. t 11 p in New Recordi. S p m IckoL t 06 p m Interlude. 5 IS p m HC Symphony Orchetlra. 6 p.in. Ulater nMJinc. anrlna Ujll.h. 10 p m The Newa. 10 10 p n. m Talk. 10 IS p m Moray MclJiren T.iian s. 10 p m Mirthern Journey. Wimlom / the ugvn Praise of ihe (Tocodilc's son to its mother It r.reusable Intincerito I in the Irat't'llcr who hat a riper to cross. B| (African proverb.) In /mating I F anyone doubts that we are all to—day unlta of an unending series of scientific experiments let him consider the recent revelation of an American committee. Of 704 substances used In food. 207 haue not ye( been established as narmltfs*. An article before me deals with the "tuxicity of food additives." and admits that the chemicals used in food reduce the nutritive value, and that little ll known of their effects. Ye gods ind little toxic fishes! Teeth Loose Gums Bleed Blaadlnt Ouna. Soro Mouth and LOOM Taeth mean thai you may have Pyorrbea, Tranch ilouili .-r paehapa a-ima had dlaaaaa that will •oenar or latar catua your tooth to Tall out and nay alao cause ItheumatUnt and Itaart Troubla. Amoaaa atops aTiim blaadlnf tha nrat il.y, oada aoro moatb and quickly ttghiaaa lia> Uoth. Iron olad (uaranle* rmiiin BBwat aaaka your mouth wail aaat SO*"* yoar tooth or money back sa return of empty parka**. i;i K iaan from your rh-mlai today, guaninlee pi 41 Ifl vu Cvll | V The (iardfn—St. Jaaons -••tar a !..„,.,( %  .. IN • %  lion Packed Wat Drama' THE TANKS ARE COMING Pains, distress of "those days" stopped tii: \Ki\u MEN'S WIIITK PIQCK DRESS SHIRTS (ci.llnr nllachrd) MEN'S BLUE QUALITY POPLIN SHIRTS (two collars) MEN'S Hl.l'E STRIPE" QUALITY POPLINSHIRTS (two collars) BOYS and YOUTHS WHITE POLO SHIRTS — ALSO — MEN'S ALL WOOL WORSTED TROUSERS BROWN. FAWN, BLUE Waist Silos U to 38 wore $5.43 now $3.0ft mrl J5.6S now $3.50 wore MM now $5,110 wrro OM now .85 were $17.85 now $14.00 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS niAi HIP YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606 YES SIR/ S&SRUM US the Flavour— A IMstlnrttvc Flavour Always Right— THAT IS ? will be yours always A Just try it and it | STUART & SAMPSON (1938) LTD. J M. ilqu .i is l,,r Rrat Itiiin $ SOLE AGENTS INTERNATIONAL TRADING CORPORATION LIMITED *-f? '* *••*.*„ "fty WomiA today nsajd th b*nfit fliiured by u*tfi| Kendcli* Producu. Th uir wiy to avoid mental and social itrsln. 10 keep food health snd n,oy ilidiOua Iraahrrau, Ii to adopt tha method >ppraved by tha Medkal Prolssslon. Aaklor RENDELLS A#*ra^4 k-r Doaori and x>M *j all OaaMta Sia OaMiibeum THE INTERNATIONAL TRADING CORPORATION. LTD.. Itco Building. Colcridgs Street. BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS, B.W.I. ( w-*<** ^- b4— li „* -***" Jr> *" Jjj£*ssfI m i '.^."-"'-" or amazingly relieved In 3 out of 4 cases in doctors'levtst a Here's wonderful news for women and girls who — each month — suiter the tortures of %  bed days"* of funcilonallycausod mt'ns'rtial crnmpa and pain — headaches, backaches, and those no-good." draimedout feelings It's news about a medicine famous for reJierlno such suffering! Here is the exciting news, l.ydla E Plnkham's Vegetable Compound — gave compiWe or striking relief of such distress in an average of 3 out of 4 of the cases in doctors' tests! Yeet Lydla Plnkruun'a haa been moved lo be icicnfiffcal'* modern in action/ Thinews will not aurprUe Hie ila*ands of women and girls wh Mrl vdie Plnkham'a regularly and *• %  •* 'he relief It can bring And It al.ould encourage t>ou (If vou'renot Inking l.ydla Pfnkham'"' to ate If vour experience doesn't match theito see If sou. too. don't avoid i..r nervouaness and UILIIOU. " ""i' irritability — and *=l> Hew I ,*-o.., MENTHOLATUM ASK FOR REAL MEN-THO-LAY-TUM Ma* Only 1/ lit Hintholitum Co. Ltd.. (tit. 18891 Sleuth. Clllini ia M a M aaaa MM iM INTERNATIONAL TRADING CORPORATION, LTD. j PRESENTS jj^* % % % 7.30 — 7.4S |ii" Wednesday Niuhls over Kediffusion Commencing — 16th July WIN V. "ii CASH PRIZE FOB SOLUTION TO SIMPLE ((11/ QUESTION EACH WEEK ii". -i unsolved ? Then it's S10.00 in the JACK-POT next week Bar* For Women Only What d'you like to bet a mere male is the winner ITCH. STAFF MIT ELIGIBLE FOU QUIZ :VVV*V/V/V*V*'.V/V*VwV.V/,'.V///,VAV,',V,*,V*V/V,' WE HA VE . C I O B E I TODAY—MATINEE i EVENING—Last Shows VIVA IA r A T A (Marlon BRANDO — Jean PETERS) TOMORROW—4.45 Ii 8 30 P.M. BJN >4lir% SI III Sim John PAYNE — Sonja HENIE — NICHOLAS BROS AND Mi*sB aaa .BURT LANCASTER PLAZA THEATRES mam BKHHi.TOWN ISHal tSltl BBS a DISTANT DRUMS GOLDEN STALLION WELLS FARGO GUNMASTER Opt nil.. I KIIH > 1-IU I l*|l Ra. Mlll4M..t Gene Turtle' in ICLOSE TO MY HEART CASA MANANA MASTER MINDS Lao Ooico S> Dead End Kid. I.r. -pe. .1 I •> ,, m • WALK HOITI.V iTIlMil K Jixrph COTTOW a "NSVABA" vr-mu-M oarBiHi i Kin it 4 U A S. 9 m. APPOINTMENT WITH DANGER I ADD WtSllN IDUI B4M> SPECIAL NOTICE i I.04I; DOWN TOIiti SO SHOW %  ew projection Si aound *u m is m~m R K O a DOUBLE MY FOOLISH HEART ft THE BIG STEAL rrcv lliml i 1 111 Materials including : a Aluminum Sheets a Galvanized Sheets • Everite Sheets • Rubberoid Roofing a Aluminum Guttering • Etc.. Etc. See Us Now and Slop those Leaks PLANTATIONS LTD. llAKI.INt. BOW COt'LD lOU OLYMPIC TaaaUr unl. %  iMni" or We* Tkarv iM Jt A ll HWendell COHXV — Mclooald CAMV in nil GBKAT MIUOIII KAMI and ( Ml \1\ ( HT t' a A. Allan 1.ADD Wanda HKNDBIX PICTVH IX -Rlehd CBIXNt I in:'. > in HIM oloiBy Tathrucoior rLAHH FLASH TOSOISOW AT SJBi p Dr J. V. llcnaon JPmenta h O'l.Hidi • and hrr untorarttabla 1 'TABACAS NIGHTS OF IB %  n Bam' Midecl. Dopla and Lord Cottr*] TOMOBBOW I ao THIRI FH 4 M at i-, "IN A LONBLT FLACK With Humpnrvy BOOART ... inn AND mi IMHAVS ROYAL TODAY 1.1 S aaew. 4M A • Rod Cimnon In -FANBANDLl JT.C U-'rcn.e Tfina. %  DBJJNGEJt HTAMFIDI" and %  TBS BtNTSD"



PAGE 1

I1AR1SADOS ,\lVi>CATF. TUESDAY, JULY 15, 19SJ BA^j&^VSCATE | o \ IH> \ LETTER I tba A*i.U Oh, Itt. DMi I TUMI:IV. July 1 -", 1952 Poor Salesmanship moll interesting consequen* ,h Council's activities in Barbados is the increasintf number of persons n the country districts who *r bee,,, KHnladed. The activity „f (ll uncil in taking films to lho pi Andrew. St. Joseph and into Other country parishes not served l>y cinemas have been supported by those of the visual aid section of the Department of tduefjl ., i_ Immediate reaction to these film-showing activities of the British Council and of the Department of Education might well be that something beneficial to the community is being done thereby. Benefit is of course done at the time of showing because the majority of films shown by the British Council and the Department of Education have some cultural educatioral or instructional value. But after the immediate benefit has beer experienced on one or two occasions a, appetite for films is created amongst persons who otherwise would be little Iniei ested in seeing films. It is no exaggeration i. ihnt the British Count i the Department of Education albi it unwittingly are both serving the interests of the commercial cinema in Barbados. This mav be a novel point of view which may not have occurred before either to the British Council, the Department of Education or to the Manager of commercial cinemas. But the reactions of cinema audiences in outlving parishes of Barbados suggest unmistakably that the interest in films once %  wakened appears insatiable. This interest in moving pictures almost for the sake of the motion is worthy of investigation. Because simple country audiences express satisfaction with films which are not processed for the tittivation of sophisUccted cinema audiences but which are ma< 8 for educational, cultural or instructional purpoees, The significance of this interest must be stressed. Too often in the past when pretests have been made by public-spirited citizens against the prevalence of bin I designed i.) appeal to the lowest corr.nv n factor of intelligence the commcrci. I tma interests in this region have itort.-d thai the cinemas give the peo| e what they want and that what li I enough for the American movie goer is | enough for the local patron of tne iincina Much appeal has also been made to the protection of public morals provided by the United States' censorship. iMitude of those responsible tor the buying and distribution of films in the region is understandable. It is (he normal %  :de Which any buyer or seller of any product in the Caribbean or in any oth, r country might be expected to adopt. But the influence of the cinema on the life of a community ought to be fully recognised. While it is true, as cine: agents and representatives have not be* n It to point out that people's morals ai I ways of life left much to be desired benie tbt Invention of commercial films the influence of films on a community's life cannot be denied. ::• generation of Britoni in the I'nited Kingdom today is a genei.a: i and speaks the language of An. ei to a eVfiif wWdi Le impossible fof th r ,. ,, hi | da Li %  good or u id thing is irrelevant to the present argument What must be admitted is the iul.usnoe of the American film. i .idus it might appear quite futile w attempt any criticism of the quob,f locally shown films on the groin.. ; tl, || %  were produced for ani ivcr the world and that Barhi00 dilferenl from other peoph But this argument although seemingly unhtl %  M hundred per cent, otf IhS mark. In almost every large country of the |. :, %  iiiumas show the types of shown locally there i > It forms of cultural entertain%  i musical & ii %  diaries are only some if the (l letles of European cultural life which is the common heritage Ox ill those born or resident in Europe. In North America, India, North Africa and Asia new and old civilisations have UnpMSl 1 indelibly on the lives of their people cultural values which are other than those of Hollywood. In Barbados the cinema reigns supreme and the culture of the cinema represents the major culture of the people who inhabit this small island. an arresting thought, and it has for mar.y years been exercising the minds of public-spirited citizens who recognise the Influe ce which the cinema has and Increasingly continues to have in mouldthe minds of Barbadians. Yet ilir United Kingdom Government which spends considerable sums of money each year in try ; ?i to hold up the British way of life as the bet isumpl' for Her Majesty's British Caribbean people to follow has either not tried or has failed lennmlniously to interest the producers of i to sell their films ish Caribbean film distributors. So poorly advertised are Urilish films locally that even when one Comet here on the quota %  tn {unless it : -i to be something quite "epoch-making" in the Callfonuao sense of the word) hanil I W lo ieo it because i -tie to Indicate its British origin. The British lllm producer* have made and continue to make film* as cood as any, but they dn not want to or do net try to MO them tea I-ark of sales1 ttM l.'nited Kingdom ithe nmjur II films get so U >>ean. "1 will tell you a gmd |oke.' siiid the Yugoslavian Minister, "a Yugoslavian Joke.' There were half a dozen of us dining at Lord Beaverbrook's London flat and we received the Minister's pronouncem'-: what might be described as modified rapture. A good jokeneeds BO bush. "SUlin." said our friend In his picturesque English, "had a yanl of ckXh i.nd %  •etit for a Bulgarian tailor to make him a suit out of II. But the Bulgarian said he could (Ml do It with so Uttlo cloth. Therefore lie wim liquidated. So there cornea a Rumanian tailor but he is also unable and he 1* liquidated. It happened the same with the Hungarian tailor. Now comes the )<*e and it is good. Stalin sends for a Yugoslavian tailor who says "Yea! I will make you a suit out of the cloth and an overcoat as welL" Stalin was very surprised and says to him: "How vou can do this?" Then the Yugoslavian answer him: "You see. in Yugoslavia you an auch a lltUe man"." We all laughed and agreed that it was Indeed an excellent story. But listening to him with his twinkling eyes and his seat I begun to realise as never before the tremendous blow which Marshal Tito administered to the Kremlin when he broke off relations with the Soviet More and more it becomes evideht that the session of Yugoslavia from the Comintern *-JS tat heaviest dele*! that Stalin has suffered since he began the cold war. Yet the situation is full or paradox. Tito is a Communist. Yugoslavia is Communist. The country is ruled by the secret police, and freedom as we know it does not exist. Therefore when Marshal Tito startled the world by denouncing Moscow the wise men aald that this was Just a cunning device arranged by him and Stalin to fool the west. "Tito needs Industrial equipment," these wise ones said"He u dollar hungry and is not proud to hold out his hat If wo make the mistake of building up Yugoslavia you will find that at a given moment she wtU be used as the spearhead of Russia's attack against the West." No one can deny a measure of logic in those word*. It was right to proceed cautiously. Undoubtedly Stalin had denounced Tito for his "grandee-ism" and Tito had replied that he would not take orders from the upstarts in the Kremlin, but it was still hard to believe that the break, if it actuaUy existed, would not be bridged. The implications of Tito's decision had to be faced. There in the cockpit of Europe was his country surrounded by hostile satellites and facing the overwhelming military strength or Russia. To maintain even a measure of security It meant the creation of an Immense army. And since a man cunnot carry a rid* iiml a apude It meant that the labour force would have to be cruelly reduced. In addition the army could be a challenge In RaBtf to the rule of Tito if some of the generals were seized with grandee-Ism on their own account, or if they were seduced by Stalin. But Tito took these risks. He faced the threat of assassination. pi a military coup d'etat, of an ottack by the satellites inspired by the Ruarians. An American insurance man said at the time that if Tito wanted a life policy of | million dollars for a year the company would ask a premium of 998,999 dollars. Now sufllclent time has elapsed (or Ul t put the piece* of the ywrh:i>r.Hher. Tito's defiance of the Kremlin was not a mere rush at bl."*t to the head. It was a daclslon taken in cold blood, or til any rate as cold as i -.1 can be. lie saw that Russia was going to cVain the satellites of their product' and minerals and make them slaves to Russian expanBy Beverfey Baxter sion. They would be modelled and orssni-ed 'or one purpoK-. and one or.ly—to sustain and enrich the Soviet Bulgana, Hungary, Rumania and Chechoslovakia had taken the yoke without protest, so why should Yugo-slavia not do the same? miwtr of course was— ,.i, and Tito knew Ul Serb* better than Statta, Wh.Ti ,n the distant past the Turks uivuded Europe and threatened to over-run the civilisation which Rome had created it was Uio Serbs who held thvm in the final battle and then threw them buck. It was in Hal town of Sarejevo in 1914 that a young rnan named Prlncip fired the assassin's shot that plunged the whole world into war. The AustroHungarian Empire, ruled over by FranzJosef was a work of genius in Its construction but the Serbs put freedom first. After the 1914-1918 war had ended and Wood row Hilson brought to his task .ill the academic wisdom and lack of practical experience which he could command to re-design Europe and minorities of the chain* that held them down. With the connivance of Lloyd George and CaMssafWaau AuJrtrin was reduced to a ti.ii.. v.'.l t-nv.ory of a gnat i.ipital with nothing but nd history to sustain it. But BsrMa taaer s ad as the Yugoslavia we know today. The assassin of Sarajevo had done well for his people. The throne was firmly established, and the country which had so resented inclusion in the Austrian Empire now had iu own minorities. ThMI on U October day In 1934 the assassin's revolver was heard again. It was in Marseilles but the victim was King Alexander of Serbia. He was on an official vi:al to France, but a Croat exile who had organized a hod* of terrorists waited for him. Another minority had spoken with a bullet instead of words. Last Saturday at ciaruiges the exiled King Peter of Yugoslavia told me how he heard she news of bis father's assasslnaUon. Peter was eleven years of age at the time of the assassination and ho mounted the troubled throne as a mere child mourning the father whom he deeply loved. Naturally he could only be a king In name, and his Uncle Prince Paul (brother-in-law of the Dticheis of Kent) was made Regent. Inc-denTiilly, the exiled Peter Is now writing his reminiscences. If he writes ns vividly as he talks it should be a book that will stir the waters more than somewhat. The Serbs and their conglomerate minorities rallied to the young king when he mounted the throne. They are an emotional people with a peasant poetry of their own and they were moved by the youth of the boy whose father had been so cruelly murdered. In fact the maternal Hm of their feeling roused their protective insUncts. It seemed that at last Serbia would have a real period of internal and external peace. But there was a mad Austrian pthTrT of bad sunsets, a ranting agitator with a fruity baritone, a cruel creature with n devilish knowledge of the weaknesses and cupidity of human nature. Step by .stfp Hitler built his kingdom on brutality and fear. And so there came Der Tag once more. This time it was Poland that met the German thrust. Yugoslavia was not at war! It was Incredible hut true. Almost (Of ttw first Ume in European history they were not involved in the battle. Wisely. If Inglorious! y. Prince Paul's Government ecAeadad avarytbiiui that Oat litany demanded in the way i BOmk benefit-*, Their Mfntsny wag intense Init UaV recognised the weak%  | of their Isolation. Neither Britain nor France could send them a single xrniadier if they engaged in war. Also the great bear was Germany's ally, or at any rate Germany's stooge. The infamous nen-jafgreaslon pact had joined Gent.any and Rus%  'uiiony. But in 1941 German arrogance was out of hand. German forces were In Rumania. Hungary and Hitler summoned Prince Paul and hi* principal v r> Un. %  I i passage acron. your said Hitler. Prince Paul no doubt did his best but he was westernised in thought and temperament and was no match for the ranting all-o : qui'nng Caesar <r what my advice was worth I *>ve It lo her. The young king Saould be llown to the Serbian mountains and join the partisans. If he did not do so hi would Hud that the men who had conducted the resistance movement would seize power when the war was ove Thu conflict was obvious the conflict between rhe Queen and the mother. Her husband had been assassinated. Was she b lose her son in the despcrati fighting of the partisans? Peter did not go. When the war over Tito declared himself dictator and the Monarchy was at Exhibition Tribute To Benefactor Of Blind By J. C. I (HI K.AN Secreliirv-fleneral to Britain's National Institute for the Blind, London. BLIND people all over the world, as well as their ssclng Mstsaal and helpers are this year CORUnaSDaaTatlng Ifas centenary of the death <>f their greatest benefactor. Louis gsfatUc who dfcsd — at the age of 43 — beicvinK that he had utterly failed in his purpose. The debt of gratitude which the world we* to this Frenchman is strikingly illusraud in the Braille Centenary Exhibition t'hich the Duke of Edinburgh opened at the National Institute for the Blind in London, or it serves to show the rich variety of levelopments to which that almost magical dphabet of dots has been put. A life-size tatue looks down the length of the hall tor yards another statue of a great United King|nj bsffsal : the blind — Dr. Thomas \rmitage who founded the National Insiiute in 1B66* for the express purpose of develping the use of Braille among the blind hroughout Europe and the English-speaking vorld. The Exhibition also foreshadows far eaching developments of Braille by the use f electronics for printing which will proide cheaper, less cumbersome and easier lo| ead literature. On show for instance, was the prototype of an entirely new Braille printing machine which uses a facsimile 3tencil for the application of solid dots of specially prepared plastic ink on to much thinner and therefore cheaper paper. In this branch of Braille production research Britain can claim to be ahead of all other countries. Braille and Armilage helped to overcome the void of mental darkness that for centuries confronted the blind. It was therefore particularly fitting that a riarty from France, including two distinguished blind leaders in French blind welfare, went to London attend the opening of the Exhibition. Britain for her part is sending to Paris a delegation, headed by General Lord Ismay, to attend the ceremonies of tribute to the name and memory of Louis Braille. The United Kingdom delegation includes Mr. John Wilson, the blind Secretary of the British Empire Soc ety for the Blind, a body created in 1949 for the purpose of tackling the problem of blindness in Colonial territories. The world story of Braille is without end Z^&yjySSrtoJS. U* I"""" " "<>''*"• So flexible is this I have told this strange story [system that the,United Nations Educational, w ~ Scientiiic and Cultural Organisation la making it capable of representing any language phonetically; and the National Institute for the Blind in Britain is constantly called upon to give advice to fresh pioneers who are now carrying the system to the farthest corners of the earth. PHOTOGRAPHS Copies of Local Photographs Which have appeared in the ADVOCATE NEWSPAPER t Can be ordered from the %  ADVOCATE STATIONERY ^sS, f/X-UP WiihihiA Aplondid Acteclw/i of Tbuv Joch! C. S. PITCHER & CQs Chisels Gouges Ratchet Screwdrivers Braces Hatchets Spanners Saws Hammers* Planes Masons' Squares dsy they hiiv* the largest Army In Europe, and constitute the most Important military ally that the West possesses. While Fiance and Britain, with the lid of America and some participation by Western Germany, try to build up a European Army, Yugoslavia has more divisions in Europe than all the rest of them put together. With tremendous courage Tito faces nut only Russia, but the satellites that support her. Yet even that docs not condude thj story. As a Communist ho nas enunciated the theory that Communism need not be lean to Russia. He has shown the way to others. Tin-ret.".1 claim that the story of tho tailor, ns told lo us in Uuidon by the Yugoslav! Minister, ha. significance. Ridicule is a weapon th;u every team The Yugoslavians d il.e Kiemlin, and i" Stalin's ear* that laughter r jot,nd mo.e menacing than auu[Ue. Our Readers Kay; len.e UW peoph I'mii i-in To Ike rdilor. Tlic Adeocate, SIR.—Every now and then %  OHM v!l-im:intuK individual, high or low, -trews how well off Barbados, would be if u wer.' %  i mi,, enovtasr Bs*rauoa, undoiibledly. one of the greatest I ratlin "i the world. t MI. v • Kceedliigl: on.! in eorssfquence of this island wuul 1 becime exceedingly happy. I quite agree that Ujlirl^m hn< been and can be of immense lienetlt to Barbados, hut let msound a note of warning": Beyond a certain point we In Barbados cannot afford to go. There Is a vast dificrem.between Itermudu and Barbados. Bermuda Is essentially a tourist I. sort Dame Nature in a wanton, lascivious mood fashioned Bermuda for 'love to sigh in. ?| what Is decidedly in favour of. t>crmuda as a tourist resort is its lick of population. Here In Barbados it is quite different. This is essentially an agricultural country with a teeming population that depends on the 'ind ani sea for sust en a n ce e to make Barbados an %  .ti round tourlsl resort, what wottM happen? K**na) thing that happen"* in Bermuda. Pardon. I spent a whole year In Bermuda writing for two newspapers. The third I bed to rn. there an lion of earning money, but 1 could oot earn enough to buy a pound of fresh fish arneq the ',,11 swing—eleven months every year. The only time I tasted fresh Asa wns during the month of August. cleaning-Up tune. Strong. 1 '. Usl piece of fish l lasted anu caltod hook Bssh, believe ma no misnomer. Do you think t'~o n;*ricultural labourer and Uv industry could cany on and thrive under such con Let us rorlsrt the M&dfl They do r..>l count DOWI For an island (or group of islands) with such .i wonderful climate—where North and South have kissed—I have never seen so many stomach* on strike. The stomach irfuSM av the Mnc tanned meal and fish. Iced beel and crystal-white sugar—sugar bleached oi' all its virtue! Parent* years ago the people of Bermuda knew that black sugar w_ more nutritious than white. As a side line, tourism Is good for Barbados It has helped and can help tremendously. As %  Milwtltute for the sugar cane industry and a virile population •.(mi is %  borse W another colour. Hut my greatest objection to wholesale Ua rka on in Bermuda Is aha perm inssnl damage done tu its spiritual and moral assets. C. B. ROCK. o Tfce EsStor, The Advocate— SIR,— We, the undersigned crave your Indulgence In the publication of this letter Which we feel will appeal favourably to the youth and to n rrrt....i extent, the matured i* this island. 1 ears BIO '" Amci a nigh Sch..'; vss introduced a (scheme system) known a* "Boys' Week". It was %  0 woll that it wa" adopted widely by the public and esch year now. flourishes with greater success. The ... simple. Here'> Starting fiom the ilrsl Sunday in October, gentlemen are relo leave their wallet*, bill-folds und what-nots home and the girl* tuke n They organise parties at no cost to UN boys; they pay she fare und for ihe chocolate end popcorn that follow after— than (here tn the dances, visit* t.. tha Sod.. Fouri :,. IT i. .Ul! make; tin: )v4" one The l-c enjon It [tney v A 1 1 : and so do the girls, if Us a rnr in he U.S.. It can be one here What do you think girls. . shall we try It? Yours truly, PEGCY HART. FRANK COZIER. USIX WILKINSON. Hastings. I'h.. Ch. lllh July. '58. Thanks To The F.ditnr, The Advocate— SIR.— Kindly allow us or behalf of the Barbados Youth Movement. !o s-v "Thanks" to the ofllceis ana men of the HALS. Bi.'.jhec! Bnyi for the kind noipslasst) shown lo fche youths during the visit on board (Mi Saturday evening last. We beg to state Sir, that the members fNVS very pleased with what t!ey saw. and h^ard. especially being a first time for the majority of them; Analn Sir saying many thanks, and wishing the entire staff surest* In their endeavours; and las', but not least those who arranged for the Transportation to and from I k In Britain today, for the first time, there are mdre blind workers employed in the same occupations as sighted workers than working in sheltered workshops. Since World War II more than 2,000 blind workers \ with technical skill have been placed in sighted industry in the United Kingdom and their courage, steadfastness and craftsmanship is making them many friends. The field of operation is wide and more than 40 occupations normally regarded as tlalty reserved for the sighted are now followed by blind persons in Britain. Who ;an estimate how much of this is due to the Invention ol that young blind Frenchman who died in 1852 and who shall question the fact that he rises like a colussus from among that devoted body of people, so many of them sightless themselves, who have itrtvati to assist the blind to enter into the fullness of life. Yours. I. nRLCF.-CLARKE. B GRANT, OLOA BROWNF The Youths Centre. I ige. Barbados. H 7 52. Frefdom Of Movement In (onimonwealth LONDON. IN the House of Commons on the 26th June Sir Waldron Snuthers (Conservative. Orpington) asked the Under-Secretary of State for Commonwealth Relations if ha will consult with Commonwealth countries with a view to making reciprocal arran, %  ments to permit the unrestricted movement of members of the British Commonwealth between Commonwealth countries. The Under-Secretary of State for Commonwealth Relations. Mr. John Foster replied : The question of restrictions on the entry of citizens of British Commonwealth cou itries into the territories of other numbers |of the Commonwealth is a matter no) I I Her Majesty's Governmsjkl in the United Kingdom but for the Covernments of tha countries concerned. Sir Waldron Smithcrs : In order to help the policy of Her Majesty's Government ol trade, not aid, will my hon. and learned Friend do all tn his power to facilitate the free movement of good-; and persons all over :ld? Mr. John Foster: I have given the position [ard to the independent countries of the Commonwealth. Sir Waldron Smithers • Will my hon. and learned Friend use whatever influence he has got? Mr. Thomas Driberg (Labour, Maldon): I could not understand whether the hon. and learned Gentleman indicated assent to the last supplementary; if so. may I ask whether i dudes Seretse Khama? Mr. John Foster : I did not indicate assent. —B.U.P. 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TUESDAY. JULY IS, 1*52 BARBADOS ADVOCATE P\fiE rfVE Contempt of Court Case ... m. •. t 1 ^* ""**, S I"" 11 ,h If wnwthing different. : upon it. did they think it could Mod to I am dealing with the question ao > a dy *ay*. It i* appalling an it polxv tend to prejudice, as it was said unfortunate, a tragic occurrence >' In the Uw, did not tend to inllujad o on. But the question i* Una ence the result of the pending does it tend to prejudice the Mat? It* Ram tl %  tablishcd trial. Mr. Reeea —That is a point th.r !o sonuTh.* question an to whether it w "u-h will come to the jury la:.-was merely indiscreet was not Judge:—I quite agree. them. one for thrm. The mere question Mr Roe**:—"I am going to sul I do not see I was whether that statement n,lt lna * hc "* nothing whicn witness can talk about tra prejudiced, or did it tend to !V n i4 lt t P. re * UM "* tr >al. Mr. ol the naper. prejudice, but not whether It was [i* ^J 0 *?,, "^ al ft" '" l I* 0 **" , M ,,.^..,.,,.1 there which say "It should be> M on poUej 1 ... At this .itagc Mr Walcott cited K* ;b, to prevent accidents %  % %  her or not he Oswald on C^temnt S^igelS Hi!l "* £E \ I l ,k f %  ,h:,: ll "^ ; ; Xl r B ; ** aJ.^ h^fi !" A**^* 0, 8*" w "hout saying that you and prominence of the Advaeate o JCdori m^.di ST-. U i^.t P ?^: •n*06> elge would not like to pursue the pollcv | SS^fi^rl,2i^^! a *S n ? *! anv ecldents at all." ampalgn. Whether it is guiltv S^-IM"*^ U ^ dM lhe Ls^ Witness.-Nobodv would like to or not is i different gutter" of Barbados, and then proceeded ata acelaatna particular., where Mr. Waleofe You were going St. Joseph Vestry To Enquire Into NonCollection Of Taxes $40,000 Be Can't Spend \ent accidents from happening. ed friend intemiptvd. be. The article appearing in the Witness: I w:.s p>lne to %  Mr. AaVeeate reports a speech made when Counsel nsk. to call witnesses. Evidence First witness to be called half of the plaintiff George Munis, lie Library a copy of the Advocate Newspaper •"• r 1 Safct> Firat campaign I of the 13th June. 1952 which conf 10 not think th it the partv shou.d tulned on page 3 a report of the l,avc included such comment. The article referred to in the Writ. speech began to the effect that It Cross-examined by Mr. Ward, was a Safetv First c.impaipt: Mr. Morris said that It wag not speech. It ended that way within hb knowledge that Colonel .Mr. Reece The whole gist of A German 100.000 I 1929 was brought Into the Autb' at" a f^w day* ago b) „,,-,,,. % %  "!. Black link. H Jotjeph Vestry hi led their clerk I M amjkyaa of Alleys I tt< n upiniun from their Solicitors as to why UX< ft Co. By praseni va.huonthi Ilectd. The decision *-ouia u-wortn no.ooo. B.w i :. Uowiruj Mr J. A. Haynas quetfoning the tax. •/ ;. ,... in ypt of noU " advised that a % %  Blkra Jhrea years uxe to lie dor33|^l on ;he net profit should be lives are lost but that cannot pre'" fay -tomelhlng when my le*inRHUlC he said. Hi is i(.>ing I tlOH 'hat wa* %  pa Yi. law says every land ownrr mu^i pay hu rale* an i \ I-oan _. Clerk of the Pubbv Colonel Michelin. ~'lf"a"speeeii tlnn a>oiil the ln pane '>! Va ?hMr. Morris produced "' th,kind was made in furtherl**n killed that n nu naUi Communltv C speech on Safety First campign maj nranl to l i 0 ,q to cover esnensai netimH should not introduce such ment. He should ml h m m M Ou reference of the item I had been given. Mr tfayaa chUdren were killed and I wit* at Disi uggestc %  . * 'tturghead Bay' Leaves /or fdad Miriielln nMdc other dmllar "" >P~h Is advpcaUn eroatcr spcocht-i nl other times, and at th ra !" h •"" "' <n. „. ,. evidence, and said that at the time whin inrToeecl. u.T. !" , "" ,., the ,„ T -h. he wa. pendln, tSS^WTt nmu", "V S trial on n charge of manslaughter, vpeech. tie had been charged and evidence ffltneas: -Safetv First rawhad been taken. Complainant In paign.* Cam that case was Superintendent of Judge: "Mr. Reece the jurv c in afterwards agreed that thw.-.xten opinion should be obtained. The H M S Burghead H) under the eenunandj of Captain J. A. levers, O.B E.. R N„ left i l :Baj yesterday afternoon i '• repaid aria lad 'i he Burghead H*>. I gained Iron, th* acUvia 2,400 ton Bay Class frignv %  > il'Centra The Vestry culled hero on July 12 from Vai .--mp to this agreement after retlmque Dispenser'-. Comniiv tin !,. Baynea expressed dissati Police Captain E. Simmons who "ce all that. Anybody" who" reach. P 1 !" an was in charge of the PollcajArea '* can see that It is for the safetv Judge Ian BiAliV '* 'Jn^I S 1 l.f ll.r.i. -.( % %  __ 1 .1 which the accident occarrcd. of users of the road.'' He T>aid that the case was brought Mr. Reece; I agree My Lord. I in the speech at the tii Mr. Walcotl: He did in learned friend say thre.ehDdren arere kiikd La %  which 1 eras H this particular Suncly afternoon Judge: There i* no uaa o4 b i name or laythloj IDta U I but inawar In Mr. Re> i i. *| !" n wtten L was involved in '"•" "' ; motor car and in which three Accounts of i|„. !),.,.: %  were killed. ..,,.'''' '"'" "*•. comn Mr. Walcott: Thi-article did l "*l fl "' %  '" Uw diapensci would refer to youl ipll of the school, received 255, mg fr Mr. Reece: How en he e\"* %  % %  fha Clark hatlui. i .. [ha Munition was gtven to t.. He has %  out the letter (mm .1 kin| iiu tna advanea. Inhibitions itivTew rear-old Joyce Celeste jut the beau of worsaas ICarahatl ot Sugar Mill, > %  i> Ion which the eph. hat U-en grxnled ;• ' %  Queen*! College. %  hi || %  as %  oa ol M V WI %  ppU%  rks out .it 30 lion test A. Newton *l, ithi. and is alreadi BOW on hurrlcana p. lhe wOai Indie* and his her base in Bermuda. 'Gloria B % Here t rom Martirtiqtt < %  The schooner OUrla B, an >•' In Carliale Bav yesterday m< nM..iiiiiu.iie under %  .i.ill The trance* W. an insttuctcil to check th. Ms because of her KmiUi which called at Uu port I meeting of If* .. M nd tie> on Sunday train British %  '•>• • % % %  nrer lO you said he was in•*•" *he beshl ot anuiig.ng f.r i ac t'that Newton frhO UVOd in St Wed In . ear aactdenl \< th the ne LomniLSMoM was decided the Joseph for *omc yean, ha* not for manslaughter" for "the" driving; f' oti n that spVcVh the Colonel ca r f*Jl2! ,H JIK ***• %  Bnd ,n f^X'"' h^ of a motor cor on Prospect Road. „ J P u^ P 0 ^! e, '? have __ said he h iSHj l i u ^' ch,ldp "> •* ki,,c,1 Ul ? w *9?? been P^'Pon^. Lreught in UM)" bags of Joseph for some years, h-v nol pieces of green hean and SUtaSMni Dai ban Uvuig In Ihat parish for the bunches of frcfh Inn' past two years. The Lady Jean arrtffd 1 '"-* made speeches along similar lines. t Preepect Mr. Haynes said that years ago The other vacant Vestry exhlsame day from St. Vincent \ titha? he^omolauvd nf thaf ^rt JurtB '' : Is thlt %  > *be specen Mr R, T c f : llt ,s noA expressthe dispenser was paid 10% on billon, this one to Lodge %  cnooL 318 bags of copra, eight bagof SMJJ .'n^S i^! ?Z?S P ^ or ls lhal comment?" ing an opinion. gross profits. It was found th..' was given to 11-year-old Karl peanuts and two bags of pei rs. Li^r? -, w ,,, lenusiopreMr. Reece In the speech, sir. Judge: He is not expressing be was losuig money and they O'Brien Stuart of Coffee Cully. These schooner* ara consist ied iaTTXk* I 1 ?f J t man Judge: Ask the witness to look ay opinion at all. Hi lysl MOVgot Hon. H. A. Coke's suggestion Stuart gainwd the highest marks to lhe Schooner Owners' AWK,IBtaUfhter case in which he was at the article where it appear" P' ain f ,BC W rd J %  * >U 1 in , m lo what should be done. He in the examinat.on lest NOB. haisy-i M r< Reece: At the verv liin. reference to the accident. He also Mr. Ward:—"Does that article ning it soys it has been mv custom a K rp ea that it is appalling when — — ^— =>t any point suggest that you for the past two vcar* to hnve -. ihings of this nature occur. .Mr. Walcott: Read the parapublished in lhe Advocate newsLordship adjourned for lunch. should drive more carrfu|i> i I ( % %  mpliln of. paper. They were on the subject On resumption Mr. Ward. Cnunto reduce the number ol aoc i dOiti Witness: I complain of the of Safety First campaign. sel for defendant r n In his speech at the Empire TTMMwhole 5tntrment which put li. present wereMf. opened liis case, and after cuing tre on the 12th June, 1II&2, he d> > the nffidavit. 1 do know that three "• Carrier and Mr. G. Archer of t „ %  Uw in support of his argusay that 10 persons were killed a were killed in .-MI Cthe Department of Highways and menl. railed upon Mr. George the result of road accidents, and eiricnt wilh a car on a Sunday transport. Capt. F. C. Parn Morrtl u, produce" copies of the v ,.m on to say that one "I Rl ifernoon. Superintendent of I'olice ,, ch.rge Barbados Advocate ..f Jun 2. of moit -hastly acctdenU took pi Mr. Reece: The last part of mv '; f rrafflc. Mr. Kenneth Sandlforo " learned friend's cxaminnlion did Bacretory of the Bus Owners not arise out of cross-examinatton 'ion Mr. E. Massiah anu Judge: The Rule is there. The Mr. H. A. Tudor. Concessionaire!. affidavit is sworn nnd the whole „ matter is before the jury and the Nerved Order contempt of court Act says that ., — — ,,,, the proceedings can he brought tu —M r % %  ^**g* v ?__ p By o J nvbody whomsoever. Marshal said ihat ON June . h. Mr. Reece: I am only saying L. V*".'.'"-' ."e^ert. *> n t'olonc were guilty of criminal naglitalk with you at the end of the gence. . .?" licensing veor before vou renew Judge:—"He would not know your licenses, what the law Is. . Witness: "Yes sir. 1 only i Mr. Ward: "Every man in tho f hi p irticular speech. Colonel street is supposed to know tho "' c helln >* ,h e Commissioner <>f Jaw. ... Is there any word there P" Uc e of Barbados. The proper which suggesu criminal melis; driving of road vehicles and road ence ?*• manners are things which I as n Judge:—"In the article, there eltizen would expect him to look is no suggestion of criminality ?" ml Th" Advocate newspaper Is Witness:^"From what 1 have I'V nl> da ly newspaper in the read in the Newspaper concerning m2?* the speech made, there arc many .. Mr Rcc ,^ ne would expec things which were said and which ,he onl >' dHl,v M W Sp iper I i I feel were wrong an^ should not '" wnr * loosely to supbe said. . ," 1*" Safety First campaign," 1I0 and li>5t. In which appeared articles in connection i tti umllar bpeeches made by Colonel Michelin to Bus Drivers ami Conductfew weeks ago. That SCCld*. to which be referred as one of th must ghastly was Included In lb 10 referred to in his speech. Mr. Ward: is the word crim,. Mr : ; X alcol,: .. f "!"** n, ,oc inal used in any part of that l ". Is u or ughly irrelevant." article. . ." Jud & "All right Mr. Walcott Mr. Reece: "How can I bring the circumstances out?" Judge: The circumstances to which these testify about whether the Advocate Is the onlv dally To Mr. Recce;-! read the orPui^.^" 01 ..^,. 1 ^ 1 E* an l' tide, I do not see my name in this ^ to £2£*5££££ that the 1 >st part of m MtcheUn and Ml Judge:— M In the speech there i_ no suggcslion of criminality. It does not say that . when it comes to the jury later you may deal with thai friend"! examination did not nrisi BOCTetsry of the BarbadiM Advoout of cross-examination. r ale c omnany. I.'d.. an Offaar • Judge: He h.is sir. ply Court of Common another form what that did. '''. ' matter. Captain K. BlaunODS, fcuperMr. Reece: I respectfully %  lb' f PeUoa in charge ot mlt no. He went on to read other i Ho. I : plain ant in article. I do not )f any Court Neither th, Poll In of the speech complained of tend to prejudice ihls man's trial? Mr. Reece: I see what Your Magistrate'* %  "cece. i see Court at Holetown nor the Court }~?$* hlp l \>' itW ,, }Z t ti l WM no I of Grand Sessions. The name of tKUln a 1 >"-t ut the moment.; r the prosecutor, Inspector Simmons *"n,k • whether or not I or any other prosecutor docs not appear In the article. 1 do not see oarts of the article. Judge: He Is entitled to ra other parts of the nrtlele. It Is " %  what is In this Rule. ''"" Mr. Reece: I will not WOTTy r J" e "i >:•'" I'SI'-SS to be called on bethe 19th June r. ahould not" be exiled'IhaT'the J" %  >' <><-, P'^""" •• •* \2"££t illy now..paoer of lhe cromlncnc. InfipplA. WpO tWr oC^ttf mtilor vehicle. Ri llM •• I 1 "' book In which wa. keni the HeJu 1 niiU ..r^iuilire Ih OiS^S anTVhli^hVS. fJjfcrj A 5T= {g^mr-WJr^Vjnto^.•.^..*"l! "2?S5 he article. I do nol see the name ot I'"" j 1 S *y ?'< camnalim? ?! 50 '' 1 Color* M Ml WtiMt at llila IUIP ame d I Oil own behall. He j..lthat mere • %  > im need 1„ |,i %  Wktm lhe .lal.ji,. i, lhal me Sub noena be rnforrril. whloh ratal till on made in uM In **• or me tact that lhe Rub '.I me Court, and further t>...i.el had in Ma cvid.n. that ho had handed a Ijliotilliil lhe UuTornutUOB whkn I" said lo Mr. V<:nlei|"'l. %  ', He nld lhal the newspaper artlaft. W.irn id mts stage ctinn-'-icle ol 13lh June. I52 wa. corre. I cd his camlnalion o( ( .1 .. wilh whal he raid al the Public Michelin. and upon an, Intimation Mcellnn al lhe Empire Thci.lie. '""" Mr. Wa coll thai he would iddod that ll wa. pan A In Uaa BuMT rirrit Campaign by which b 's Court a; Molesasaai he endeavoured to emph.%  upon bus drivers and eonof du tan Iha n* d frr more care 1 i irrested on %  road ,ui he Isusbt be some lime in his cross-examtnittioit 't Oilwtli.ets, Hi. lord-'.i adjourned further hearing Unti in M ,,-, io,h 0,1, morning. Judge: One hopes that it would. i fflH 'Y' 1 r e "lie Deputv any Police Magistrate appearing In the article. I object to the statements in the article to which I referred in my affidavit and which Is annexed to the Rule of the Court. It is a fact that there was nr. accident on a Sunday afternoon, and three children lost their lives as a result of that accident. It is a fact thnt the accident hapBrtJ a car x w drlvlng 2w*foVBSmi Mr. Iteece:—"Mr. Haddock. 3 particular nibjeci and thai erticVidenls Mr.'Welcoll."l sulmil tint elrr on June IB. v. these thlnts should not no before 'd 'hat MteaW for the part of the BIJU the lurv newsnaper arlicle referred m In Court. Mr Betw I am lUbmlUllul wh'=h ir mad menl;..,, %  toott pointed I thTtthcv^ouldlorSorertSlun" •"""<*> • %  ,hosc '' ros ,, •' ** % % %  o^rth h l t 'v BhPlr. Theatre the >.,,,, n, rtt ,"ra?or"no',^ n IS 0 ""'^ "" "peeeh' XSTcSff* "" ""TKinrihe^s^'h "or ^'iSZl. %  ",", "",'" j*JS _*3 — J -_ %  —i i—#~— u—j.a>i ,. %  ) wrifiin unit in ru uii.'-fi (irejuoice the fair tliSJ of snyonc. Hs nld :i d grhen ha made thsl each, he did not hdend that ll fair trial nl did he think that B would tmd lo do so. i mment which he used, .ind to which the plainllir loot .hjectlca %  I as an UtO ShOw what eou! I happen when drivers %  ...:,• u.it lonstantly taking c!ire in their driving. Ho ha.l the slighu-st idea that anyIS I be By idea to the conry he would never have said 1. and should not go beforo ^nvul'lng which would In any way lice anybody's trial. Imr it In to he set mnd" n dupUuSe Sub poei i upon h %  hlldrcn lost their live.:" bo"you &" ihan once mVt It £ ^'^^f "" r : 1 "^ think that it la apSbif KS &J^&*SLSHS2*JtSZZ Z&i tsTfflLI i i ..', • ttuneesnon lhal Col sial |„ other and previous artlcl bo questioned on h( rsrenos to the ..—-Aeeld-m^ ^ question as to wneiner me anic:e xnoru* wi mta WQaaWd nin.b. r or aecidents imd eomitness. Accidents will hap^ .„ rn))r rrrlU(](cM nr ,„ n ,i s The ffrst t ., lA n Simmons said he knew ments I on the esnei 1 nduel i Mr/Walcott"Mr lieecr iust '" r the fair trlsl or saesi ' : anumeroted Hvors and a1oelBTl o* BUfi -u. n ,s „_,„„ ,.,„ %  j. < 'ZTSSStg*'* Mr. Wolcott:—"h it not A pfo? % %  •• the nn^ieulsr artlel. ' anything '.f pilllncio snv it l appalling tofor.' pertinent to facts In Issue hefore knew as a certainty thtt n com the nature of whii lh Cohnel the court that thi I" not sufTirient .• the trial takes place. Mr Reece—-That in what mv '. learned friend is saying. I will Judge: pertinent" &f •OiSOO How do vou mean other reporter To Mr. Feelad to .insaid until he read lhe Newspaper. !es w MM %  FROCKS FOR THE THE ALL RACES BEACH OCCASIONS FHOCKS in NYLON, ART SILK and COTTON BEACH FROCKS in Stiippe., Plain Colours and Dots TAILORED FROCKS in Small. Medium and Large Sizes AFTERNOON FROCKS a smart selection of the popular "BARBARA JOYCE" Dresses in several styles and materials HOUSECOATS n .small selection in Cotton and Art Silk, moderately priced HARRISON'S BROAD STREETDIAL 2352 &f WHAT'S ON TODAY Court of Common Fleas 10.00 a.m. Police Courts .... 10.00 a.m. Basketball at YM.P.O 7 30 p.m. WILL "COUNTING SHEEP" HELP YOU TO SLEEP? Shortage Of Rice Felt In Speightstown A rice shortage is being felt in Spei^ 1 .bout a week now, shoppers have not been getting their quotas from tht tr dealers. Some are getting half Some small shop-keepers ol the tuvvn have no rice to sell and so everybody is going to the big dealer for his supply. tUffWl potatoes which anin full supply are filling up lhe gaps caused by the shortage of rice and other ground provisions. Flying fish have become scarce Ico, but aome days fishermen bring in small catches of fish-pot fish. all their (.shins boats to the Younc cane crops and \c"-i<>'" Speightstown moorings, crops jre looking green and rrrsu About eight of the boots have everywhere* In the parish. Plantbeen added to the Sp*Igii.stn Monday night at 730 ofoloak. th.. boats to be brought to V pockey i3j: II deeplrwCM i overtirnl, nrrv.11*, rminumn am worried — i( lakes moc thai "muniing shtep" |o help SsNp. 1 hough you toe* 1 hour alter I. ifl |M >-n't "win yrnvfasf tosUepI Many find (hat taking a b .1. rfuUi'i>i ii li,rluul -and liri).. iliem raat More aaafrf %  nigl An.) I>r. i !... .'. N.rv. I firs' .hoire ,th ili..i,-..i. %  he Vaassla Hi, mm ..MI ad. needed minerals it cooiaina t • •om.tioies Just what your tyetra lacks. An I Dr. ChaFnal does *) DIIKII loleasi —by jncreaiinK api'tite and improving digestion. Soilworry. amiely, a run-i]. %  condition 'H the tn-nu.>us peer .>i nvlasj is upsesiin. your nerveso yu can l rein 1 -try taking Dr. j I, il.iw" IS >OlU iUUlalllF. ll / %  Her pti.in Simmons had gl Mr. Walcott closet %  for %  • psalntlff ;i IS you're We otter Quite u tetr DRUGS MUST BE PURE. PURE FRESH, and of the HIGHEST QUALITY in order to obtain the maximum effectiveness. Wa Carry the Finest Range and all Drugs ore dispensed by %  careful and competent staff. Send your next Prescription to . KNIGHT'S DRUG STORES LADIES' IIANDIIACS Krdii


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TUESDAY, II I S 15. IM2 HARRUMK U>vm All I'M. I -IMS HtNRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES CHCSt* OPOfl MV SAKE *M*fS MW/Vti TO t)l'OO^rWHnMT rr~st.mt root v LOVC .. BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS V\\ QUCTE POOL THAT '-i OV)C CLUB CKED W fc Ulri DVtNVCUTCI -r>"*5 CITIZEN A--SOW lU-PeACTCE THE SPFECx I LL MAKE ^^ HtaM TMBV WWD ME ) THE MEDAL,? Ga I RIP KIRBY f**B. GOVERNOR MR. MANOR ( PTNdLUSMffD LAC*£C AN l aNTUSMCN iT iff iNOBWO / ^CCICULT PpR ME TO F=iNO VNCWDC TO oPRsee MV GRATITUDE *OR TH QREATy HONOO, BY ALEX RAYMOND yjoumstx..uj4 eoo*rrowij IN THI) [IN A tccacc caxcto u look at the prire log, that you can't get finer value. Minis a Twa-tone Brogue. Tied to every pair i* the John White (Guarantee Shield—the t>ign which in..in'just right'! Look for it ut leading; itorea in Uarbadoa. made by JOHN WHITE means made just right QOOD CARE COUNTS SO BUY dEisol PRODUCTS IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only M"M I VI III I I UN r IIVJ. OVAI.TISI: RISKS OVAI.TINK BISCUITS JACOB'S CRACKKRS—Tim —Pku. MARTINI CBACKBBS P. P. COCKTAIL BISCUITS I". r, CIIP.P.SP.1.KTS—Tins P. F. CHKBSEI.BTS—Pfcgi, CLUB i III I si STRAW ('AUK'S CHEESE CRISPS CAKR'S TAI1I.K WATKR UPH.I.IT BISCUITS IliaIII oill IPl III. Ill • %  \\ liili I'll k. I nnilsiilY. S|llilslo % %  mill Snail Slr--l Usually KKAPT MACARONI CIIKISl: —Tins .52 III .M I HI M 1.55 .70 1.12 i :.v: I.5H .1.11 V Now IIIII \M AST ROI.I. II \T( III I CHI s HAS VAN HIM II N s COCOA .41 M 4t ,:IB HIIITIAVAV'S DEVON CIIIP.K 1.12 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street ill It I IIII.Y eoMB Ittt. ./. I. Ill \SO\ I'M SIMS MAIIAM OI.IMIV anil III It I \l OII4.I: IT \lll.i: I KIM CARACAS NIGHTS Ol 1952" Tin: mr.f.i.vr, cjRl \IIM -.MOW OI IIII.M MI. WITH THt BIOOE8T. L ITTLE MAN IN ALL \MI Kit A .1 Troupe, i uhlans TIIK I 11 i I 'i* fish %  CRITCI %  '> %  HART %  CalypMM-v Hnml>A, Rhumb JM-IIIIIH.V %  a**, MartMt THIS is THI -in )ws At ROXY THEATRE \\iiini>ii..< niiii ini> i i M I Btalli M ll' '"* %  • M> llalfMI I' Bo* SI M %  AM MIIMiFT' 11.11 II r. Acrobat Pmk Tl.krU llti Sjl.. From H a WATCH Kill DATES OF 111 III K SHOWN AT I Ml 11:1 III 1 Mill KOI M HAVE YOU SECURED YOUR COPY QF CRICKET CRUSADERS YET ? Buy this valuable book by HAROLD DALE and read about the West Indies Australia Tour. 93.56 AT ADVOCATE STATIONERY



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fUESDAT. JUI.Y 15. 1132 BARBADOS ADVOf\TF HIKKL Contempt of Court Case • Fros* rage 1 :n>t guilt r upon iht whole maltot ixitii of law and fad of any issue upon auch rule, and shall not bv i. %  %  %  so What that DHMII WII lha' ..* to take the liw H judge. It obviously muni t i-i ha* the law, and taking thai law tote %  the defendant Miehelm at a pubrrqiurc d or directed by the Court lie meeting of bus driven* ami or Jud : Ue as directed and SEA AND AIR TRAFFIC In Carlisle Bav log that %  purtiwna of the them by the judge to the foci*, made by Col M .hotit W-LvU sseaittsaj mrther l-ubiu Meeting ol Hut i. Drivers and Conductor*, held at have to Unit wi.uhi be very simple ire ThMre on the 12th ol j t WM n oi whether Bad Hay, 1152. and published on the gU| i ly or whelncr ht drove earefollowmg day by lb*'defendant „sl% but they would bo conCompany, ccrned with whether Miehelm did gimlet*. Srh, It K-1..1*,.. M arh tut* I Bhaa si.. Mi na I *.h IUr..J |V *VI< I* l-l I (Nil Kl UiqOM-ad B* 1. SEAWtLL Which are calculated to prejuUi.the piamtill in his defence tu i |Wus ex, ih, AdvcaUroad accidents. All these lives plain, ftiiac supporting legal recompany printed il and whether ' % *, P w.ihi7 might have been savd if tinrareness frnm Halsbury what was (t iendcd to prejudice Haddock's rHm "' *"*•--*>'• M.r drivers of th.vehicles concerned meant by canternpt of Court. He caso< Those w.: mn.i.. M aw .. had not been in such a hurry and IKMII d out to the jury that they (ac -x ( .„ % had driven with more nuv. On.-h'Hil.i not tak, the law from ,__, IT .-.<* i Aft i ."SF'KJ"' Rule ' Th mHK lne *P**hsd ne m*d *J %  Bl\ U'lll Rill ov -All HI \ \ lr— i TlfBHSkS—B Walen Home Economics Training For W.l. Seminar Theme I\>RT-OF-SPA1N. JULY 3 Hume Economics Training (or the Caribbean was the central theme of the seminar held Wednesdav r\.nin. | I Whitehall us a feature of the Conference on Home Economies and Education in Nutntion convened jointly by the Food and Aaricultura Hi...,ition of the United Watioru and Ifat ruubU-.m GDB**BV Following a review of Ihe ngsonal situation bv Miv* Dora lbberson, Social Welfaiv Adviser of the Bntish Colonial Development & Welfare Organisation. represen'.iiM of three international ... cussed the uvhtuou' mre programmes of each in the field <>f home cconoMiia Maude Barrett, ciaj Welfare Ad\ er, spok> for (he United Nations. Mrs. Andromache Sismanidis. Re glonal Nutrition Represent;: ve tor the r\'. '" '** "• %  around and take them for a d... .. .' ,',' ^;, 1 ,;'* Suddenly a ear coming along th Mr. Wglcoti nibinitted ti-..i ;he Mld "JSJ ,u ,hem na )urj was not In any way knocked the* unconscious. They J^p, B lo tne ( nni;< „, subsequently un-d m hospilui. Rule, with the charge of manThink of these young lives bein,; slaughter against his client, whl.-h brought abruptly to an end. li M tatter matter was to be tried at appalling and IT siiould be possithe Court of Grand Sessions, and bk> to prevent accidents of mis emphasised upon the jury that they nature." were not "sitting there tt> try the Both defendants. Col. Miehelui, manslaughter charge. Mr Wnlci>tr that I. M I nd Mr. Ian Gale, representing %  ned the thai they should that d. as tended >•> la erB d l ::, nded i" C ludice . nothing lo do with ir funtuon itseit . the toun^ni -.t ,u..i,„. li ,„ij U>r N'I li-i.-f PratitM. Hill tfii. Ui-' Hdnaiser. Nan sun -n....„ %  <*i H^.rt ON -I M, .'. I J Pahnaoti. I. J.iim.. C J. rottrr 12 and Mr. E. K WaU-ou. counsel for the alaimirr, asked that His Lordship snake a ruling as lo who should .'ommencc in the mailer. Procedure The Jury was ordered to ratlra Hid Mr. Walcott addreuuig 11 i i [lected that Inwould !> %  • the one dice one way or lhother, or any m '** wllnn* to bring it. thought as to whether Mr. HadThey, the (ury were trying the aB dock should be convicted for ' <>' W were dealing wilh „ manslaughter nr no'. That was not '-ontempi ..f Court. They would be what inev were there for, he said; ued upon lo say if the facts as and he added that the law realleged, thai the Colonel made Ihe quired a jury to be summoned in speech and that ihe Advocate cases of alleged contempt of Court. Newspaper printed it. tended to Mr. W.ilrolt referred to Halsprejudice ihe trial of the i'i.i:i gfho bury. Vol. 7, p. 2, Para. 1 which was iming to be tried for she Advocate fat.' pleaded no* % %  •* ?f*rjm thabnAnds prejuguilty uthe charge afk Mphil nun. A special jury of tea i U HI |-\Hll HI %  1 l,l hare Organisation, and Dr. which i"ii <*t*\ ire talks, Dide I I %  %  It) .i uv %  %  (hey aed uown, an i 'lien to willMtt ..,<. i ti i *ta %  ii. thai it :*• ibeoke IrvaMlcal ITMinmes whl.fi. wtt,,i i and, ..'itu i.. %  >n by an ssnating agm %  • i !!• %  < "nwdered the ideal I'mtec* lo be one which in gtBeJj| fcU/LD HEALTHY APPETITES and STRONG BODIES lg college nrnenl ut %  i am) vonicn an •king oou in part. %  CAO !'• Iki %  h ma) pi %  i Lo can? .i .. 1 h has "lUiIMI). TerhnicHl Aasislanrr rhe i . ttanea prosjrainmt, sftwi gpseail II I Uua Itarrett Annmc %  f Pan* it %  I i H t M i deals with the various kinds .ind read other relevnnl iiausjbter U.rd.h.p^ %  !*-Th. difficulty. "•"''" ^ <1\ > volun ingredient of i-arcles driving My Lord, in this case, is as all of us know, that we have a Special Act of 1891—26. whlct does not follow ihe procedure m England." His Lordship said thai the matter "had also given him much Concern." and Mr. Walcott ext lauMd iiui be had said to His MTMd Mondfl. counsel for the During the course of these retei.nn-s, Mr. Walcotl commented lo the Jury that In the case which was before them, at the time of the Ueged contempt, his client had LEa Smith ltd urns From U. K. In Prejudicial Mr Walcott i ivas, that i Id pis ubmlsaion ould have t„ he not yel been committed for trial devoid of honour or brains, neither at the Court of Qrand Sessions. ( .f which Ihe pi-esenl jury were Iron i lr. udad United Kingdom via !" "' by BW.I.A. where he He submitted after making furi )k Hy to be. lo St "there and with"", %  '' l the past ilire*. weeks as on-defendants, thai Ihe reference to sections of the law which he was adopting. ;liai it was no' whether the aliened presented a difficulty lo him. He said it was not like the usual procedure where they foughl one way as against another Thev, the lawyers concerned in the Issue, realised thai they were dealing with an entirely new procedure. His Lord*hlp queried whether it would save lime If he. subject lo legal argument, gave bis view as lo how fhe matter should proceed. Her also contempt did In effect interfere with, but whether it tended to interfere with the true course of justice. On the same principle, he said, it was contempt to make a speech 'ending to Influence the rar f the delegates reprsert1inn the KrHM .|, ,„ (ll Barbados Branch of Ihe CommonK -veallh Association t ark ol talks on parliamentary procedure. Thother deleg.de. Mr M. E. Cox. M.C.P. who Is a Member of the Executive Committee, is exJ ,l '"">*. ,/efore them, they would tlnd merely guilty or not guilty. K they found the defendants guilty, it was a matter for the judge, and if they found them not guilts, it W.C merely for Ihe I idge to discharge ihe two defendants. He told them Lhai no argument would be addressed to iheS con,.V'£ d ? Ba > le >' o1 "'J^ cerousg thst point, and all they \;! la £^Jii Lucy< w carried to would*) %  i-h would be to tlnd on the question of fact I ','_ whether Uie defendant Colonel MlcheUn did deliver the speech. ON in a problem, would bring about assay other fad!., she brought ou; these, lbs Uolted Nations give* i hotaal -i*tatu-e in three ucldl. • mk .i -ticlal de'< liipiiHitt. public admin \ reehnlosl Assaifcaooi Board cod l n a t se the aoUvttlaa of all. I idled Nation* ..gcmies in she ftcaeal Bsfkttanca m-id rtu itoard co-<'idin %  : cut Slandail DM TacbBioal iSparstaanal as well aa the i.' in which many lernalional organisaliopji parti%  %  delegate* fcfom 10 at e • ..'. m.ide ..f ., Sent mar on hi-allh l Mi.Idle East. eductinii i-i govern i iten i i. dltura. The mx; eumpaign d. against TB WHS such a pe >:< he said, sine it | of cutting down Ihe cull M Lulling puhlir madk Si and hucpitX l;icilities. "Arrant Nanseiise he course .if her Ulk. Mka) described aa "arrant amaensa" an attempt to impose normal standard* of living In home; .. m um. ^ L .with only one room. She outlined Mr L E binjlh, Chalrmai. of n te wide ir.ipr of Home Eommittcs in the House of AsUllli ( i,.,.ned n, ultimate s oaI as a embly. returned home last night .. tomp eIP jnd rtabie family rntaUral m lastni Ecuhc osnphjjaigad, wilfc CHtWICAL FOOD r/13 Complete VITAMIN ond MINERAL FOOD SUPPLEMENT Pleasant tailing Economical # Available al all leading Drug Sforei *aM-;.<*-%  %  l ,_j. Always a time saver. .A. lealily Trainee..imong those with hum they wculo serve. In di 1 .CUSsaQg tniiniiiii fanhties in the BritftSb WPI Indies, ihe n aSkl the questloi which Me>, Walcotl quoted law lo show , iha: I* was also ronuniptuous to andl pointed out thai he was not publisli an article in a Newsp.ipei rnaklne %  ruling at that particular commentina on the proceedings In time. But as It appeared to him a pending criminal proscution or under Section 4. Sub-Sectinncivil %  ctloo, and refcrrini! lo the I S of the Act of 1891-2C, in view llrdrrvhich 'has aha of the fact diet on the hearing of ar-imed". and on which they action-, the course under Subnow carrying on these proceedBoetion 5. and as aAourlnp cautc Insg," He said lhai again*! ihe probably both Ida learned friend* appears under Sub-Sect Ion 1. Ihe ..itiile which wa.i put In Hie n !" < himself mighl submit. course lo pursue in order lo get Advocate v f the 13ih June, anri He submitted thai Ihe facia were the matler before the Jury, would which was in effevl part of .. *o dear and easy that th'-y should be rartha plaintiff to open the speech made by Colonet MlcheUn need no particular Isw. and for case briefly, put such proof orally _i %  public moStlna at "buJ drivers i nyone, and parhcularty the Comas was done by amdavlt and the ; ,nd conductors held „l the Empire rnlaskmsr of Police In commenting rule "blamed and then the onus 'metre, tin %  .1 . a police prosecution before a would shift to the defendants to ;it the time he was tu d man has had a chance lo be Hied, KK 5T5 ; np P la "> l i being env in manslaughter m thai he was to get up and say such words as In reh.tt".iT*ilT.£ f l^ nce ( '",vln B ""' tor c; whlch "a? they were alleging that Colonel Mir^S anything which ocinvolved In an accident In which MlcheUn said, must lend to be Counsel n ll .M-. „,.~i .v. 3 ^ nUdr n had *" kllled aDl preludlcial to the trial. The hlghc. the eourie^ which HiflS ,nal u moAbt alleged in a case £e omce of he person making hich fits Ifrdship of man ,,| I hi romnwntt the morr nkeiy Iw his n.glcctful or careless cnvlng. wa8 to be believed, Mr. Walcott which could not be otherwise. ._ That when that case was before the police magistrate, the defendMr. walcott suggested to the ant not being yet commuted. )urv that when the Conuiussloner Colonel Miehelm i t was 0 [ "police, with a police prosecu,i poUce case with the Superllu(l before the man was tried, intendem of the DUtrict of luatle remarks such as Colonel St. James. Superintendent SimSOch elin alleged did make, and nions, as complainant ( „,,..<. n which wss the got up in front a meeting of SmTei ftVsttlsL"WM tafflng and conductor* „ ie bua driver8 m^ the Adoocoie Man liuriil Aa Gas Drum Explodes ii speakit.* .i KM lellowshipi %  vlded by Ih United Nations, vocational school In British Mi * Barrett raytalad thai .nd said that Ihenan Iboaan is bel0| used .is an obi hope df the e-labliahrnoiit of a orvatton eantra {or i-holarsh1p small Home Economics training l.'Ulcr*. In passing, slve im-niiow u hisUUite in Jamaica, .iithough I ml and Lcspreaaiva, the pioject wss now dormant for rnpacl rneds b) lh reasons of economy. She suggested iiogranime on the host country. |ha| wider use should be made A daaanilta naatsttonad by Dr. da at ihiHum. Boaaasaasaa Work*op one In n lie General Hospital and detained on Sunday alter M was badly nurnl when a gasolene drum exploded in Ihe 'bus S Ml on which no was travelling while it was luting along Mile and Quarter nboul a.m. The drum was in the I the 'bus. No other person njured maintained by the Uialvcrsitv Puerto Itico. Mi Sismanidis spoke of the wide uveraM In Home Economies, us Indicated by the enthusiasm i by delegate* to the FAO < ntileicncc in Home last NaeaBO ll. in UlH'OOHilia HiiliM' Kt'Oltiiiiili" '-problems. She (onsldered It slgnlioaai Uini the delegates were l Ainon projecls of FAO proposed or I underway, she mentioned the asof ate w.i,i.i iiooitii 'i*gankation In the Caribbean i* hat lerrllorioH are luailoUincs loth n accept an instructor from a ighbouring territory, nolwlthmling the fact llutt he is winlaattf aualiilvd H ws neccsnaiy, • -said, "to break dt>wii the idea ist what you have In your owi K'kynrd irml good enough." Miss Rlsa Ifiiglund. who is In targe of conference nrrangementa FAO. acted as Chairman. suggested and on Ihe jury's return lo the Court, Mr. Walcott opened ibe cose for the Plaintiff. Mr Wllcott said lhai the matter before the Jury were proceedings under an Act -oiled Ihe Contempi Of Court Act. and quoted Section 4, Sub-Sections I and 5 which read, respectively, as follows: — "All contempts of a superior Court other than Ihose committed In the praaanca and hearing of the 'bus Court when silting, shall be dealt nn -"*• -nd determined only by %!, r>f a Dili. Bf %  -*. r-^-._. %  *** with means of a Rule of the Court of Common Pless which mav be applied for bany person whomsoew. .ahing upon the defendant to show cause why he should not be attached for contempt of court;" ond "on the hearing of such Rule of Court, plead i shaU be and the defendant shall be petent witness in his ot i they would prove, handed • of Ihe Advocate !: a typescript of what be was going to lay. and that in thai Colonel ajnrn I n said the words In which his elitnt takes objection The Law Walcott said that repeating to the public whal he had said: "Look at Haddock. Those three children would not have been dead if he had driven with more care and had not been in mch a hurry." He submitted that after the Commissioner of Police had said illy combe Law And Fact Mr. Wal funnily enough, the Act gays lliui r iv -Iviuld iry th( ..l"i miestinn r.f law and fact. i' ibmission was, howevw, thn: Ussy try ih > urscciUil lor nal • Tying of niinv i**i of good. llandUnc H ^•• %  r vi.cUani naeavy EM tm dnvcr uilinulliu! i tab firtr.i %  i 4 great ulriv and time uvui 'mure. Larsri! hwd tp*oMv In tt* das* ijo oabk te*i' Lea • lifts, hand dnve Wide npeaing r soon and low loading line iaic nine mi %  lr.-. ,' i drhvery. TkUMorn*tkanmci..*! MORRIS SSBCtti FORT ROYAL GAGAGE LTD. Phone 2385 Sole Dialriliutori Phone 4504 ZV&6* Use LIFEBUOY TOILET SOAP You'll feel M> frch md rr.rgctic tA uved^ LiTchuoy Toilet Siap. It' cleanving Isther rcalle fi c-jou orwearinc."., keeps you fmh *o r.-.i. ne* all day and evej I ifehuoy Toilei Soap FOR PERS01S il FRESHNESS tin os (k^tV fft&l *L There is the matter of • COLOUK HARMONY and a beautifully ereatest rolour iuterior— like the exterior—matchlees* Itni !i schemed from the superiur quality interior and exterior Paints, und DfatCmpar Water Painlt—all hosed on the splendid Wall Sealer und Primer coab. sold here! To cover, colour und complete the all important details, this Paint Display K made to order— for yon! BARBADOS iO-OP. COTTON FACTORY LTD;



PAGE 1

PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY. JULY IS. 1JS2 3rd Series In Intermediate Cricket Fixtures Finish NO OlTKIGIiT VICTORIES 75 Entered For Turf Cluh Summer Meet The last day's play in the Third Series of Intermediate cricket matches ended on Saturday. No outright • %  h were scored, but batsmen made good scores. Anain the weather was ideal and there were Rood wicket?, at ill grounds. In the Mental Hospital-Pick wick fixture at Mental Hospital, the name ended with Mental Hospital securing points for a first innings |aaj Eft spital in their first innings scored 2M runs and dismissed the Pickwick team I runs in their lust venture. Win Bin ia 4 |K I'K'KWKK 1M> • %  i. It Chat* lirn-nKlsr not nut %  %  I I wkt | Mil I. | i S-h (At. 11 AtUflSon Dimity c Farmrr t> II Atkn," Sktppar En US. fatal WINDWARD INK INNINGS (Ml Karmw IB. b Smith TtuMcut.11 Hi>s|>it.il alow right arm bowh-i J v, havoc j with the Pickwick batsmen < and ended with an analysis of 13 J overs, one maiden, 51 runs and •even wicket*. He bowled at a r Rood length and usrd Ms head against the biiUmen ( I IrtjtP ti4iiml with UK toi Pickwick In their tint Inning". Sent back. Pickwick scored 59 runs for the loss of wh*n tumps were drawn. At Queen's Park. Police who 161 run* in thatr tin* inni ings, bowird out Windward RM l52 runs to give first Innings lead. In their innings Police were all out for 120 runs. four of ihcir botsRMa. i rc.'it'hiiijj double Meurea. Denny and Cheltenham 27 Wsalil %  Mil 10. Best Bowling Betit bowl 1111: pi fO Windward was givwi b> H. Alainson who captured four of the Police wickets for 50 runs after bowling nine over*. When stumps were drawn Windward had V m four of their wtckato for 101 runs in their second innings. Empire gained a flret bu lead over Combermere when thc> scored 1S2 runa for the loas of six wickets declared in reply to the Combormentotal <>r m runt W. Dra.vion who has scored a century since the season ha* started, topacored for his team with 68 before he was bowled by Lewis. Next best score came from M. Armstrong wtho was imdrfeated with SO. Combermere in their second innings acored 136 runs for turn wickets when play ended. Despite 0 patient knock by R Marshall who topscorcd with 62. Carlton failed to gain a first innings lead over Wandarafi and were bowled out for 208 In reply to the Wanderers total of 296 made on the flrst day of play Carlton batted the whole .lav on Saturday. G. Harding who went at number six In the CarlU.n jj batting order, scored the second .' wirtaa beat score of 55. Browne got 36. J. Corbin bowling at medium pace, had a good >.peil and sent down 28 overs, capturing five wickets and conceding 69 runs. C. Skcote look three for 23. Spartan Kttved Time was the only fuctor that saved Spartan from being defeated In Cable & Wireless. Spartan dismissed Cuble .v Wireless for 68 runs in their first innings on the first day of play and at the end of t.'uit day Spartan had replied with 150 runs for tin loss of nine wickets. On Saturday thev declared at tliis total, thus sending Cable Wireless on a good wlckel in their Kccond Innings. Cable & Wireless did not eollapse as they had done in their first Inning?. but went on to score 212 run fi>r the loss of eight ri The Cable & Wireless opening batsman B. Matthews helped hiteam by scoring 03 runs. II. King scored 58 before he was by Medford. For Sp.ut.in C. Skinner took three wtckata for n runs while Medford and Cumberbatch got two each. A good bowling jwrf.inu.nu %  was given by f..-.i bosrtar King and he was mainly rsspo for Spartan losing tight of wicket* for 49 runs In theii g second innings. King took live of Tons Kins did p.i u. the Spartan wickets for 22 runs Rsuas and if there M m-> ft Wireless would have gained their first outright victory. Spartan however, got pobtt for a first innings lend 11. Fourth Series starts on Saturday. %  Psnris MI.MM. mi-rim . i-n KI< k MENTAL UOSIMTA1 %  i. PICKWICK 1ST INNINOS C O OitiMi.tK1 Will],,,,, b J II Kldnty c H Chaw > m V. I--1.U Mill r Atkin I I I li II Fm in. irmi-t xpd iwti ()>WI;KMKHI; V . IMIMHI % % %  aSNBBB M i.,-.ir|. is HI'lHI I.I l %  ".!„,. i,„ ., .,|. <•*>* la '"""M.'IIHI t.H INMNO* ToUl 'lur .kli HOW I IMS ANALYSIS WAMltRKRS vs. CARLTON AT CARLTON win ai ss mi i Bn i a| s 1 AUION 1*1 INNIKUH n,.rr I lil> 1 M-llhr— D SkMU M-r.lt.LI rSCkfl "i e.iitain I UI.I II. s res vr as %  1 1 Allrv,.r ti PacUrr Estraa Total %  oarumi AN \i.vsis I'ron-ilo Iitta 1 IUII.M-V Mil I A WIRELkhS k SI'AKTAN „4 IKNIKItH .iili-^t c Madlurd li Hkinnai .>fct. t. Cunibvf •tea a %  'Hi' in w. Hhiuna* 1 i) 11. CumlMibtlch 1 Unkrt 0 Skn Km* b afaaaaM • •' %  lW I. Skmnri 1 ;.,.!.I b Mrdd.rd I lu>WlJM(l ANALYSIS Second Division by MX wi.-keLs w)im iheir Sacond mutch ended on the Ui day In the tea of these matches. in their first miungs scored 128 runs In reply to the Combermere total of 172 run*, Mr. Hughes basing mads) to. Here in their second inning, COlktCSSSj 110 runs, F. pacorbaj orlth 23 runs NtM'duig 1S5 runs for victory >9 runs for the loss of four wickets when play secured an outright victor) I i.'-idard was int out with 75. At Heckles Rood, V.M.P.C. linings lead over IVkwick whom they dismissed i Y M PC. batting llnrt. scored 1&C runs. In their second innings YMPC Uwlared when 1 araa 65 for four wicket*. liend of play pakwick l.iid lost three of then wickets for In lot College--Wamlerars nxture. Waixlereis only gut •r a first innings load. Batting first Wandeiers s.-ored : W rum •'"*' dtenlaaad lha %  Choolboya for B0, J. Peterson taking four of the Harrison Col' r eight runs. eron acorad 5 for five wickets in the second innings and declared bail ; %  (he end of play Codaa* bad cotleeted 166 runs (or live wickets. I ni|.ir-I t.li-h.ii Empire tried to force an outnght vtctory over En;: f.nlrd ir. the itttempt. Alter hitling 3X1 runs In their tint innings (.11 the first day of play. Empire itismlised the Erdiston batsmen for 121 runs, four of the wKkels going to K. Hutehlnson. In their second innings, Erdiston w-orcd 51 run* for the loss of four wickets when play ended. Three of the wickets were inken by JBynoe. The Scores: — Y.MP.C. VS. PICKWICK AT HECKLES ROAD Y.M.P.C. 156 and 65 for four wickets decld. (O. Edghill 29.) Pickwick 85 (N. LashU-y 22. L. Ilr.inkor four for 21) and 90 for •hi-ee wickets (N. Ijishlev 41 not out.) COLLEGE VS. WANDERERS AT WANDEREKH Wanderers 188 and 84 for five wickets decld. College 90 (J. Paterson four for eight) and 156 for 5 wlcketn (L. Waithe 44 not out.) CENTRAL VS. COMRERMERE i Combermere 1st Innings ITJ (Mi KughM 40) and 110 (F. Scott as.) Central 12s and iso for foot I wlrketi IV Clndd.-ird not out 75) \ ERDISTON VS. EMPIRE AT ERDISTON Empire .121 (J. Bynoe 80).! Erdiston 121 (F. Deane 29. K. \ llutchin'on four for 42.) and 11 < for (our wicket\I I i May Day, Betsnm < First Adi Winds. Caprice. Will o I %  IBO H At t\— Stewards -i ,k.Classes A A B Only 7 1 FurIMK Slalnta. Pappw Whs Flying DrMKim. I %  %  %  i mi.uk. Illl K \( I—IL.tlM.lus Derti* suke A (up Nominates) Moan Admiral, 8oedllng. 1 %  -. ight Ugh" .111 RACE— NsrUi Gate sukasClaasea C and C* Onl ? %  f-hwae, E sawl Tt Osl>. 7Lj FarUmt*. Seedling. Betsam. Miracle. April Flower*. Will U 12TH RACt —< h. lurletus. Pepper Wine. Careful Annie. Flying Dragon, Demure, Wctr %  the A r. High and Low. Sweet Rocket, Lunways, Mr. Bear. UCOTTD lAY STII RAt^E — CaHWe Stakrs Classes A A B Only. 5"-, Fwrjgakts, Peppei WtDO, Flying DragOT. IJemure, HatTOWi an. Spear Gr,iss, Rebate. Castle in tin Air, Sweet Rocket. BelliSurprise l.unway*. MrBeBl IrtTII RACE—MerchanU' SUkes— Claaseo I and E2 tlnlv, 7'j Furlongs. Apr-musS. Mny Day, Cardinal. Colombus Soprano Viceroj. .M..reh Winds. Caprice, Rambler Boaa 1ITII RACE—Victoria Stake* %  ten. Abu All. Durham Plfalbroefc, The Thing gtlm Lov Dun View, Magic Gaye. CanU Street Arab. Ill RA< E—Otstln Handicap— ( is* t. and Luwei :.< I in Ionia. Cottage. Twinkle Star, Blue Diamond. I III RAt I— Herkwilh Ktakes— P mdl.oHrr. VKntlwu; nie. Mary B p, Water II Til HACK—Bui.h Hill Stakes C g Cl 0*ly, 7 1 .. Fur bines. ll Annie. Doldnim. Bright end Law, Dashing linen im :; l li RAtT PuvriiiltKUkcs — (I.,,,, I-.! uid Lower. 5j Farlongs. lei, Apple Sam, Jim La Tie, Howtttar, Sc-i 1HTII RACE glofsswd llsedirap Class B ind Lower— T 3 Fur("I1KV Dragon. Demure The Thine, Pepper Wine. Careful Vectls, Red Mr, Spsei Oraaa, Klgta and Low, Sweet Rocket, Bella Surprise. Lunways, Mrs. Bear. IflTH RACE—Nt RSERV STAKES —Class F2 and Lower—7' j Ferlongs. ir Queene. nil I \CE—Trifalgar Handlrar —Class D and I-owrr. 9 Furlonn\nn. May Day, Top Might. Dunqueniue. Apollo. Cross Bow. Colleton. Watei 21 ST RACE Merchants' Handicap—Classes F and Ft Only. —7' %  llirlims.* Mav Day, Cardinal Colombus. prano, Viceroy. March Winds, Caprice. Rambler ;. E*ja> RAt L—Sumaser IUndlca|> —Classes C and it Only. 9 Far I ones. Abu All Diirhiim JBAB, liuni.rook. The Thing. Test Match. Careful Annie. Devil's Symphony. Aim Low, Doldrum. Embers, CanUqulstoe, Racton, Dashing Princess, Ttberian Lady. ItTsI RAt L—Vlrtarla lLtndU-.>t> Class F and Ft Only, FarlonssFirst Admiral, April F lower*, Seedling. Jolll RACE—August lUndlcap— < li-II imi Lowrr %  t iirlmn: -. Peppei Wine. Flieuxce, Firelat*v. Da^dung Pnncess, Belle 3' me W ion. Wiitorcreaa. fNIII RACE—North Gate llandirap—Classes C and CS Onlr. T PisrtaajajB, B.tby Girl, The Tlung. Abu All. i t Hat) li t'.uffui Annie. Darhani Jane. De%il's S llleuxea, Trlmbruok, Aim Low, .v. Caiilai|uisuie. Doldrum, Bright Litfn Embers Rac'on, High and Low, Dashing Princess, Street Arab. StlfJ RACE—Planters' IUndi Wltt-hli. II Clarkr b Wilt.hn r H Jsrdsn lbs. b WUlnhi'r V QlvPniUs* mil mil II MarUuIl >lpS iwki f!fcm fa Wiltshire O La.hlfv run out festtss ol WK-k.1. I 7 1—St. Tl i. 1 101 IM nowLiNu ANAI van II -tMITAM MS SHNIMOS W,d h M Kls A....I I. M.lh**> I) MnrrU lb* Klhl rssussi i lb* KliiS Anhei Kln Kuaj .. i nol awl Bslnnsr inn uul ...uiv-b-wh dig not bsi .. Total iloi • III i AMAtvirata A Kins HaUkssv* Bi-nkPT THE WEATHER REPORT V ESTER IIA V Rainfall from Oodringten: 38 In. Total Rainfall for Monti, to Data1 8S IDS Highe*t Temperature IS 6* F. Lowast Tempersturc 7* 6 B FWind Velocity: 12 nils* par boor. BsroBsetsr: (9 a..) St 996 13 pal 29 OSS. TO-DAF Suarise: 6 48 am HuiiM'l 6.19 p.m. Moon Last Quarter, July 19. UitiUiiK 7 00 p.m. Hiali Tlds: 11.14 LI. m 11 p.in Low Tide: 4 68 s.m. 4 44 p.m. Thcyli Do It Every Time By Jimmy Hallo Blue' Chambray 36 ins. wide Rayon Satins 36 ins. wide ... 70c. yd. 74c. yd. Pink. Blur. I i Rayon Satins (White only) 70c. yd. Printed Cotton Prints 36 ins. wide 72c. yd. Rayon Crepe 36 ins. wide 81c. yd. CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. K). 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STRUT RINS0 for all your wash f NEW ,,_TW NEWS I • OUR Black Suedette "BALLERINa4S" •a taste saaj every wliarv you aK> aa eosBSort PRICED AT ONLY f^.tta GARDEN ANI> QAIatsssU FI'RNITtiRF In all-metal Our nrw Storr Invites tour Insprrtlon — Is slnaost r>ertaln of our purt4iaar These M\KAB1K . OBSSJBU M malfh Ihr allmetal, round or squarr Tahl^s. arr In Red.









— Havbado















ESTABLISHED 1895 TDES? AY, JULY 15, 1952 PRICE : CENTS {
“[Jnite d States” Br e aks. RIDGWAYS AT DEDICATION CEREMONY IN PARIS“ No Treason Case

aes 3



Against ‘Red’ Dean

LONDON, July 14.
The British Government refused on Monday to bring a
| treason charge against the “Red” Dean of Canterbury on
the grounds that there was not enough evidence against him.
| Attorney General, Sir Lionel Heald said that “in my opinion
the evidence available does not disclose a prima facie eause
| of treason.” i ar, ii er

' ‘Trans-Atlantic Record|

‘Queen Mary’s’ Time Cut
By 9 Hours, 36 Minutes



Hotel Fire

Kills One

i Heald’s statement came in
answer to the Conservative M.P. New C.D.
FAIRBANKS, Alaska Miss Irene Ward She asked
x . i siag ABOARD S.S. UNITED STATES OFF AMBROSE ind “eicea's a Ce visit LIGHTSHIP. Pioneer Hotel Here Monday o the Far East and of his ac-

The American super liner United States captured the

killing at least one man and ; cusations abroad and in whip coun-

°
second Atlantic Blue Riband when she made the crossing leaving four or more un- try, prejudicial to the interests of W.L. Discussed
from Euro in thr d t 1 h dt 1 : accounted for. Twelve per- Her Majesty’s subjects, Heald
pein three days, twelve hours and twelve min-}} Sons were hospitelined, eg had considered prosecuting him| rom Out Own Coenemondent) f
* utes. z ; > in a critical condition with on a charge of treason for spread- / duly 14. a3
This cut nine hours and 36 minutes off the fourteen- burns ing enemy propaganda.” The C.D.C, Regional Controller
year-old record held by Britain’s Queen Mary. Bill Vanderpool, 45, was “Miss Ward told Sir Lionel to] of the Caribbean, Anderson, who

The average speed was 34.51 knots only slightly slower the only known fatality. He bear in mind that if a treason|leaves London by air for Jamaica







S teal Lok “ahs she charge could be brought it would] Wednesday night has been di
than the record speed rolled up when the United States ee our ae eae ae give an invaluable opportunity of} cussing at the Corporation’s H.Q.
shattered the west to east record last Monday. building in a mass of flame ; Fioving the falsity of the evi-/during the past week three or four
or was cal and there was} —————--___ —_U.P | dence of “this wicked and irre-]MeW projects in his area. In an
a si breeze this perfect sum- : ,

| sponsible old man.” “I find that]interview this afternoon, he said
mer day as the United States



Swept toward Ambrose Light, of-
fici ve > the Blue Riband run
ip’s welcome started
half mile before she came to tha
lightship. A small motor boat ap-
proached and came so perilously
near that Commodore Harry
Manning, the skipper, ordered
four warning blasts. The motor-
boat scooted to safety. The Unit-
ed Staies began slowing then.
The destroyer sent to escort
her in blinked “Welcome Home’!

in Morse and the Uni State
said Phanie You”! wet Cony

Receives Ovation



Korea War Has
Its Good Side

SEOUL ,Korea, July 14.
General Lawton Collins, United
States army Chief of Staff, said on
Monday the U.S, are better pre-
pared to resist aggression now as
a result of the Korean war. Col-
lins said, however, that the Unitea



FRENCH GENERAL MAXIME WEYC \ND (right) shakes ha: ds with Gen. Matthew B. Ridgway, SHAPE chief-
tain, at the Polytechnic School i): Paris. In background is Mrs. Ridgway chatting with Marshal Alphonse

Juin, The group was on hand to : eclicate statues of Marshals Foch, Joffre and Fayolle,



Commissioner Of Police

,â„¢my decision had been
1 the unfortunate faet
portunity,” Heald replied.
tive questioner that he had con-
siaered all the evidence put before
him but that he was prepared to
consider any further evidence
that might be submitted,

(Internationa!)

—UP.



Summoned on Contempt Writ) Russia Plans

based | be could not at this stage give any
that|@etails of these proposed schemés
it would not provide such op-| 0° where it is intended to operate

them, but they would be in part

He then told another Conserva-~|®¢rship with local people.

Asked whether there was the
likelthood that any C.D.C. schemes
for the West Indies were being
closed down in view of comment
upon them in the recent annual
report of the Corporation, Ander-
son said there were one or two
still under critical review: Their
future depended on their progress
in the next few months. He em-

| phasised that in closing down any

a bee ee transport Gen- Nations price everything in its a Soci ism r scheme caution was 6s importer?

era! ¥y outward b power “to end this damnable war.” > / as caution in approac Oo new

New York was ha first shin ce He told correspondents: We are / wpocate O- e endant 0: schemes. In either case intense
exchange the official greetings of better prepared today than

the sea—three blasts on the ship’s

horn,
Answered
The United States answered

we
would, had there been no Korean
war,

Collins refused to comment on
jwhat steps the United Nations



The Writ for Contempt of the Court of Grand Sessions
obtained by Fitz Harold Hacldock against Colonel R. T.

Kast Germany

BERLIN, J uly 14

investigation was the Corporation's
} today

No Comment

: ; ae : : ny ‘ Regarding the Jamaican Sugar
and the crowds Gn ded iceman forces in Korea might have taken Michelin, Commissioner of Police and the Advocate Co., Reds Request German Communists on peers ing the Ja ican Sugar
and waved. Planes flew over— to engage in a 2-year-old war. “It Ltd., in connection with portions of a speech made by promised that Marshal! confirmed that no approach at-all

army bombers, navy planes
planes and private planes. The
lightship itself saluted, and the
liner answered back.

The Meyer Davis orchestra,
one of the three aboard the ship,
struck up “The Star Spangled
Banner” and the 1,650 passengers

sea

jcosts us money, ammunition and
equipments,"he said. “It is drain-
ing. But is not serious. What had
to be done, had to be done.”
—U.P.

s B.G’s First Festival





Colonel Michelin and prinicd by the Advocate newspaper

on June 13 was begun in the Court of Common Pleas before |

a Special Jury yesterday morning.

Haddock obtained the Rule of the Court after submit-
ting affidavits alleging that part of the speech tended to
prejudice him in his defence in a prosecution for man-
slaughter now pending against him as defendant.

stalin would create Soviet-styled
socialism in the Soviet Zone and
turn East Germany into an armed |

ople’s democracy, The Com-|
inunists said in a cable “the work-
ing class will make the strongest
fYorts to strengthen the principles
ff the People’s Democracy in the

|
|
Two-Day Halt ox
In Truce Talks

MUNSAN, Korea, July 14,

The secret Korean armistice

had been made to date to the
Corporation which in the cireum-
stances eould make no comment
on the matter

Referring to the British Guiana
rice scheme, Anderson expressed
himself as “very hopeful’ of its
going ahead shortly.

; East) German Democratic re- | . h beén
\talks were recessed Mond at the ‘ ” Broad agreement ad
and 1,000 créwmen on deck ° E His Lordghi » Chi aden ok a Fey oe ee | Dt. . reached with the B.G. Govern-
cheered and shouted. The or- Herbert Hoover Of Music Opens Sir Allan Collomone, Bt hee ete | communist request, raising specu-|' "The cable was sent by the Bagi Teacnes Ww eal aeotl
chestra played “Dixie” in honour ‘

of Virginia State in which the

HERBERT HOOVER, 77, theonly liv- bn Guy Own Correspondent

issued a|lation that the deadlock over the | ,

ment on how the scheme should be
carried out and it was now under

: : joa : re Communist Party Conven-
: e Rule of the Court on the 25th | prisoner exchange was nearing a ae aaa 3a ; 1
mighty ship was built. Commo-| ingformerPresidentoftheUnited | non GEroWN, BG. July 14 £500,000 Fire sive caning upon Colonel Miche: climax, ‘The Rea request. for a| Neturday’ ond, prbliniel by tae —_—
. ‘ rTEORGE > Te ‘ "og . nOcate ‘ anv |\two-day recess wae r- M ” ‘ .
dore Manning received the next| States, watches as delegates give British Guiena’s fret festival és lin and the Advacate Company |two-day recess was made 24 hours | wast German news service A.D.N

honour. The band played “I’m
Just Wild About Harry” and the
crowd shouted and sang and
threw confetti. The skipper may

him an ovation at the GOP Con-
vention in Chicago. Hoover, in
what he described as likely to be
the last time he would address the

| Music was Officially opened on

Sunday afternoon at the Plaza
ane by Lady Woolley due to
} e

In Toulouse

of Grand

Limited, the defendants, to show before the truce delegates were |
ause why they should not be at- tO meet at Panmunjom for their!
tached for contempt of the Court\!!th consecutive

1 a new platform adopted by the

seeret Convention, they would gradually

session. |
\No reason for the recess wag an-

Monday, Communists revealed |

Schooner Captain

unavoidable ab: . TOULOUSE, July ts py M )-urn the Communist Bast German,
not have heard this th was! Republican convention, strongly | Charles Woolley whe ‘wna oe Fire swept trough an thd fe Conducting the ease for plaintify aon see ee a vtate into a full fledged “People’s } Lost At Sea
op. the bridge three and @ halt) ‘attacked both the domestic and | posed. trial district of Toulouse today 1/*ddock is Mr. E. K. Walcott, Q.C., listening to a lengthy review bf Democracy” through the creation
elty blocks away. foreign policies of the Truman | The Bishop's High School Old razing about a /M.C.P,, associated with Mr. G. L. |} ngthy review of |

The crowd drank champagne

(Internetional)



50 houses and i

the U.N. Command position. The |°! Lenin, Mie aenaee and

The Schooner Emeline which

Girls’ Guild with conductor Reggie |number of factories and causing |/8rmer and instructed by Messrs od would raise the national armed /jeft British Guiana ten days ago
and toasteq the ship and the Adenbaistration. ‘McDavid, the only ladies choir |more than £500,000 Sh hi of Hutchinson and Banfield, | ren OF selina Tt citeee aot ORI. { ite [10% Barbados, arrived yesterday
skipper. u with a male conductor was placed} damage, according to first estim-|©°licitors. | troversy and asked that it be dis-; ,,.V¢st Berlin police meanwhile] apout 4.30 p.m. without its eap-
nee. was still going! W Of N | first by adjudieator Vernon Evans ates. ’ The defendant Colonel Michelin} ...)ceq in secret sessions whioh ne i Te : to on avy — tain—Hilary Clarke—after being

xe 4 inte ‘ , ; ‘os j epresente: " ; ; cage ~!| border ’ ea estern| : .
or ied ie tuner eaent ame ages ew with 85 points; the Trinity Girls Dozens of families were left |!* "epresented by Mr. D. H. L.| gan July 4,—CP), pri yk fay aces lg overdue for some days. Clarke

tine where she will spend the
night in preparation for a gala
welcome to New York on Tues-



Zealand Workers
Raised

| Wishart came second with 177
points; the Teachers’ Choir, con-
ductor Madame Vesta Lowe-Pres-

| League with conductor Miss Nellie homeless.

The blaze started as a
fire which spread to a shoe fac-

grass .
{the Advocate Co. Ltd., by Mr. W.

iW.

|Ward, instructed by Messrs. Year- |
!wood and Boyce, Solicitors and |

| sectors from the Soviet Zone after



lmight make more kidnapping

| Italian Company

Communists threatened that they]

who used to live at Queen Street,
City, was drowned on Sunday,
Clyde Deterville, a St. Lucian and

ece . structe , raids into West Berlin, : q
day morning.—U.-P, cod and the Carnegie Senior Choir |tTY- In a short time a big area | ‘-, Lag a ace by} —uU.P. joe of the crew of ten told the
—Miss Lucille Fraser, tied for }WaS burning fiercely. ™ ‘Memt ae ae , oS ee | D ® rar ne ___ | Advocate,
WELLINGTON, July 14. |i place with 12pm eah-| a1 ayaaple. ens aided bya Sadat Meat eet| Determined To | sincaPORE RELAXES |" ‘the Bineine was brought
An arbitration court Monday in- Be, SECTOR: ROM | By ; : ’

Adams Receives
C.M.G. Today

The test piece was Schubert's ‘The
creased the standard minimum } Lord Is My Shepherd”.

wage for New Zealand workers.

troops and police were rushed to|¢vinced great interest in the case,
the scene. After a desperate battle |and for more than an hour be-

RESTRICTIONS ON JAPS
SINGAPORE, July 14.

Ship Persian Oil

port by the mate James Rice.
It left B.G. with only 60 tons of
wood aboard as ballast, to come

ini shirley Garr: y ints B S » fire }fore the scheduled hour of 10.30 iE This British col has relaxed|to dock here, On her voyage she
Minimum wages for men go up Shirley Garraway with 85 points |they managed to stop the fire | fore GE July 14, | is British colony has re
by 12 shillings and for eit by | was the first of seven finalists in]from spreading further m. for the case to begin, specta- | Italian binding ne July plane} its restrictions on visits by|ran out of fuel and had to tack
(From Our Own Correspondent) 10 shillings a week. the Open Pianoforte Competition. “U.P. ors filled the Court Room, send another tanker to | Japanese businessmen. In a move|in at St, Lucia for two days,
LONDON, July 14. The new rates go into effect |Joan McDavid came second with

Mr. Grantley Adams goes to
Buckingham Palace to-morrow to
receive his C.M.G. which he was
or in ;the last Honour’s

st. %



September 1 and will provide a|83 points, Norma Romalho third
minimum of five shillings an hour | with 81 points. A Police male voice
for skilled workers and slightly | choir gave what the adjudicator
more than four shillings for un- termed ‘a very excellent perform-
skilled workers.—CP). ance” of Elgar’s “It’s To Be A
Wild Wind”, and “As Torrents In
Summer” to gain first place with
1172 points, Queen's College Senior





Five Witnesses
During the day’s hearing,

Union Jack Hoisted
At Helsinki

HELSINKI, July 14
Under heavy skies and falling

Mr.

Walcott, Counsel for the plaintiff
called upon five witnesses to give
Support of his case,
Morris,

evidence in
These were George
Clerk of the Public Library, Fitz
Haddock, the plaintiff, Mr. P, A

Mr,

Dalle Kurope according tol ive been changed to permit
Japanese businessmen to remain
as long as three months on each
trip. Formerly they » were
stricted to two weeks.

Any Japanese who was

Count Zonea, chairman of
EPIM Company, charterers of the
tanker Rose Mary 6,322 tons now
being held at Aden with its cargo
of Persian

re-

oll on a court in

junction, (EPIM stands for Ente here



Deterville said.

It was while it was coming from
\St. Lucia that Clarke fell over-
\board, Deterville said that he had
jnot seen when Clarke actually
fell overboard, but he believed
that he was hit with the sail.
When they got out the life boat, he



e : and Maranatha Male Vous Choirs ero the Union dack was hye Vanterpool, a Reporter of the Ad-|Petrole Italia Medio Oriente, a oemeabian® See = ee ee Pe
ained 153 points each. roisted in e ympic village?! nin Meusnenan . oP on sad. /compan hose shares are held by | °C ‘ a e boat ce
Mid-East omman Certificates were distributed by|The British contingent, number- wooate Mewepeges, My. T. T. Hand nee eames are held by | ysoanese may take up residence|yesterday evening, the Police were
r ley st } sha NV ‘ ars

May Omit Egypt

Lady Woolley. Sessions are contin-

evening at the Town Hall. The
Grand Finale is fixed for next
Sunday.



ee



ing about 50 and including repre-

uing daily in the morning and |sentatives of every sport is already |e Writ on the defendants, and

in Helsinki. Captain E. Simmons, Superinten-

They stood in mackintoshes, as |4ent of ‘Police Area No, 4 in which
the British flag went up the mast |the accident in connection with the
to the playing of the National An-| matter took place.

By K. C. THALER ‘é s °° them. The Union Jack was the After this, Mr,
LONDON, July 14. ‘Admiral

British press reports have in the past few days been re British Minister Sir Andrew

claiming persistently that arrangements are being made to Eisenhower Noble was among those who
proceed with the projected Mid-East Defence Command MELBOURNE Australia watuhed (6.628 raleed ater the evidence in chief. At this stage
without Egypt, now that prospects for an early settlement July 14. | parade point.—U.P. His Lordship adjourned further
of the Anglo-Egyptian dispute appear to be fading. | Bisenhower Street in the Gov- hearing until 10.30 this morning,
i Pp Pp’ ernment housing settlement of vhen Mr. Walcott will begin his



; These rumours first emerged fast Preston was flooded Monday



‘ ross examination of Colone

ling to
Persia in an attempt to run Per-|'2, Tesume political and _ trade
sian oil to| relations with Japan, regulations

in Singapore.
Count Della Zonca arrived here

during the week-end for talks with
»usinessmen and ship owners who

—C.P.

ire interested in his company



taking statements from some mem-
bere of the crew.

| after a secret meeting of British

Michelin. Peron’s Condition

U.S. Navy Lays heck dexter after the most sustained rainstorm | Truman Confined The ruta, aiid |







Keel Of World's
Biggest Warship

NEWPORT NEWS, vir ;

The United States Navy today
laid the keel of the 60,000-ton air-
craft carrier Forestal which will
be bigger than any existing war-
ship. The Forestal whose cost has
been estimated at $218,000,000
should be ready late in 1954 at the
normal rate of construction.

Speaking at the keel
ceremony,
Secretary of Defence said, the
U.S.S. Forestal will be able to
carry the naval air power of the
United States to any part of the
world to promote security and
peace for ourselves and “ur allies.

“Let those misguided iteaders of
enslaved peoples who may con-

platq aggression weigh well
the fact that not even in their
innermost lairs can they escape
the devastating forces of this
mighty weapon.”

he, aircraft carrier is being
built here by the company which
built the liner United States, the
new holder of the Blue Riband
record for the Atlantic.

43,800,000 PEOPLE IN

ENGLAND AND WALES

LONDON, July 14.
The total population of England
and Wales at June 30 last year
was 43,800,000. Estimates issued



today by the Registrar General
show that women outnumbered
men by 1,702,000, and that child-



ren under 15 represented
cent of the population cx
with 32.4 per cent 50 vear

2 per
rec



| Mideastern diplomats
‘in June and they have grown in
jintensity since the latest cabinet
jchange in Cairo which British
officials consider as a setback to
efforts for a settlement.

Official quarters neither confirm
nor deny that moves are in pro-
| gress to set up a Mideastern Corm-
mand but they admit in any case
there is a long way to go before
anything concrete is likely to
‘emerge,

No Decisions

The Mideastern defence ques-
tion was discussed last week by
General Matthew B. Ridgway and
British Chiefs of Staff but Ridgway
himself said afterwards that no
decisions or conclusions had been
reached. This followed upon in-
conclusive discussion a fortnight
ago on the same question between
U.S. Secretary of State Dean
Acheson and British Foreign Sec-
retary Anthony Eden. It has
emerged in both sets of diseus-
‘sions that the Mideastern Com-
mand question cannot be solved
as an isolated issue, and thet it
must await settlement of the
Mediterranean Command structur
on which the Anglo-American dif-
ference remains as wide as ever.
if arrangements for the Mideast
Defence Command were to pro-
ceed without Egypt, as suggested
by the latest recurrent reports,
some sort of skeleton structure
would be set up with headquar-
probably in Cyprus for its]
organizational planni
h a view to its

laying |
W. C. Foster, Deputy |

ters




ubsequent
if and when Egypt



eady to join, ifr

—U.P

boards |

in Melbourne in 61 years.
The newspaper Argus said res-

idents are suggesting that the
street should ‘have been named
after an Admiral rather than a

General. —U.P,



TURKEY HOPES TO
PURCHASE $10M FROM
MONETARY FUND

WASHINGTON, July 14.

The International Monetary

fund on Monday announced that |S. Kerr who is seeking Demy-{ present IT IS ORDERED that thx

he Government of Turkey
fo purchase $10,000,000 from
Fund with Turkish Liras.

The announcement said that in |8@id Truman became ill on Sun-|jhereafter as

its onl

‘ previous transaction with
the

und, Turkey sed

$5,000,000 in 1947 and made full |jstay in his quarters today” Short|tempt of the Court of Gran

repayment of
this year.-—U.P.

obligation earlier

Umrigar First Indian To Se

n Correspondent!
; LONDON, July 14
Against Yorkshire at Sheffield
today Polly Umrigar became the

first member of the Indian team to

ompiete 1,600 rums this season.
He did so after seoring 87 and
was 137 not out at close. It was

his third century of the tour. As
a result of Umrigar’s effort backed
up by fine batting by Mantri (80)
Adhikari (82) both of whom
their highest score this sea-
on, the Indiar
se 18
x

made



8 ahez with five

It zener

§ finished on the |

To Private
| Quarters

WASHINGTON, July 14
The White HouSe announced
Monday that President Tru-
man is confinéd to his
juarters suffering from
virus infection.”
Truman cancelled
ments for the
conference with

on
}

priva‘e
a “mild
his engage-
day including 4
Senator Robert
cratic Presidential nomination.
Press secretary Josepf Short

day. “The President ha
virus infection and

a mild
is going to

told reporters.
—UP

Forty-year-old Charlie Elliott
led the way with an unbeaten 15!
for Derby against Somerset at
Taunton where there promises to
be an interesting struggle for ‘rst
innings points tomorrow

At the Oval Peter May celebrat-
| éd his first appearance for Surrey
this season by making 124 off the

Kent attack. He reached his hun-
dred in three and three-quarter
hours with the aid of ten fours and
was batting four and a half hours
all told for his fifth century of the
enson
De ni Compton re na en
opped from Er nd’s test rr
bowle for two tham
- Se os *

Walcott closed After the talks he announced
|}23rd flag to be run up at the en-|the case for the plaintiff, and Mr Msby We _ > mate pngther
trance to the village D. H. L. Ward opened the case |. eoaa 2 = : suse me = ’

’ jfor the defendant Colonel Michelin oil Me plier ton Persia UP.
who this evening completed his supplies m sla,’— *
No. Change In Eva

writ was mad BUENOS AIRES, July 14.

m the 25th of June, 1952, and it condition

states that “Upon reading the
iffidayits of Fitz Harold Haddoc
ind Patrick Anthony Vanterpoo!
filed herein the 18th day of June,
1952, and the exhibit therein
ireferred to, marked “A” and upon
jhearing Mr. E. K. Walcott, @.C
of Counsel for the plaintiff, Mr
Ip H. L. Ward, of Counsel for
defendant Michelin, and Mr. W
for
being

The
‘eron,

of Senora Eva
ailing wife of President
’eron had not undergone any
hange “in the last 24 hours’, ac-
ording to an official communique
sued last night. The Senora is
bserving medical advice to main-
iin “complete rest.” ,

Fears for her survival were
roused by the announcement last
Wednesday night that her condi-
\ion* was “unsatisfactory.” There
had been no change since. Senora
Peron never recovered completely
from an unspecified major oper-
‘tion last November. The Senora |
made her last public appearance
on June 4 when her husband ,
was inaugurated for the second |
term as Presidcnt. But she
has not been at her office in the
Ministry of
once worked

W. Reece,
| the

of Counsel]
Company

Qc.,
defendant

jdefendants shall on Monday th
i4th day of July, 1952 at 10.5¢
|o’clock in the forenoon or so soon
can be

Counsel :
heard, show cause why they

should not be attached for con

Labour where
10 months,
UP.

sha}
Session of Oyer and Termine

@ On page 3

for



ore 1,000 This Tour'|

437 at|4; Brookes
128 not out
Somerset vs. Derby—Somerset!
426 for 7 declared, Derby 305

of chasing Lancashire's 136 sarrick
Manchester. Mainly as a result of
a patient century by W. J. Edrich

|who batted just over four hours

not out,



}for 109, Middlesex averted a fol- |for 3, Elliott 151 not out, Revil)|
low on and finished 124 behind | 68. - j
with three wickets in hand Surrey vs Kent—Kent 192|
HP Z and 106 for 2, Evans 65 not out;}
- SCOREBOARD Surrey 325, May 124, Dovey
Glamorgan vs Gloucester for 82
tlamorgan 2 a . ry, 5 Ti” : + an!
Con a et 185 Cook 51 Warwick vs. Notts—Notts 170!
for 74, 2 ; 7 Muncer “land 100 for 4. Warwick 329,|
Hant Leicester—Leicester Gardner retired Hurt et 197 a |
379. Hants 213 and 155 for 8 jler 5 for 86
Lancast Middlesex—Lan-| Worcester vs Sussex—Sussex
eashire 437 for 7 declared: Middle- |367, Worcester 376, Bird 130
ex 313 Broadbent 84
ort t Essex-—Es

ex 428 Yorkshire vy India York

hare Northant 236 19 licy 2 ‘ i



Raleigh

vith the veal

American tlavour


rae holiday

PAGE TWO

ee

Carub Calling

HE ST. GEORGE’S SOCIAL

CENTRE at Ell n will be

opened by His Excell: the Gov-
ernor on Wednesday, July 30

On Routine Visit

ING COMMANDER L. A.
EGGLESFIELD, Director
Géneral of Civil Aviation in the
Caribbean Area, left on Saturday
by the s.s. Golfite for Prinidad on
a routine visit, He is expecied to

return to-day«

Attended Economics Talks

ISS BETTY ARNE, Social
Welfare Officer, returnec
over the week-end by B.W.LA.

from Trinidad after attending th:
Conference on Home Economics
Education and Nutrition at Kent
House, Port-of-Spain.

For Summer Holidays
R, JOHN HOYOS who has just
AY completed his second year ir
Science at the University College
of the West Indies, arrived on Sun-
day by the Colombie from Jamaica
to spend the summer holidays

with his relatives at Cheapside,

Married in Trinidad

D* AND MRS. PETER BOYD
who were married in Trini-
dad.on-Saturday, July 5, at the
Romatr Catholic Church, San Fer-
nando, -passed through here on
Sunday by thé Colombie on their
way to Dominica where they will
reside. ’

Dr. Boyd is District Medicat
Officer of Marigot in Dominica.
His wife, the former Miss Angela
Ramoutar, is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Samuel Ramoutar of San
Fernando, She returned to Trini-
dad in May from the United King-

dom where she was doing a course}



POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

“Don’t look now, darling,
but I chink that’s the
man who sponsored the
programme for sponsored
programmes,”



Attended Oils And Fats
Conference

ON'BLE AUSTIN WINSTON, Sttute of * +»

a retired Civil Servant and
his son, Mr. Gerald Winston,
Manager of the Marketing Depot,
Dominica, returned home on Sun-
day by the S.S. Colombie after at-
tending the Oils and Fats Con-

“ference which concluded at
Hastings House last week.
Delegates returning yesterday

were Hon'ble V. C, Bird President
of the Antigua Trades and Labour
Union, Mr. G, E, Luck, Acting
Financial and Economic Advise

in Business Education at Pitman ;to the Government of the Wind-

Central College in London.

Intransit For U.K.

R. AND MRS. C, B. CART-

WRIGHT and their two chil-
dren Elizabeth and Mary of Trini-
dad, are now on their way to
England to spend four months’
holiday. They were among the
intransit passengers arriving here
on Sunday by the s,s, Colombie.

Mrs. Cartwright is the daughter

of Mr. C. R, Tudor of “Staten”,
Hastings.

To Further His Studies

R. DARNLEY NILES who had

been working in Curacao for
the past six years as .a chemist
employed with Suffisant Company,
arrived here on Sunday by* the
Colombie for a few hours which he
spent with his relatives and left
later in the evening by the. same
opportunity for England,

A son of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene
Niles.of Vauxhall, Christ Church,
he has now gone up to the U.K.
to further his studies,

Freight Solicitor
FTER spending about ten days’
in Barbados as a
“guest of Cacrabank Hotel, Mr,
-Hamesh Gordon returned to Trini-
dad on Saturday by the SS.
_ Golfito. He is Freight Solicitor of
Messrs Alstons Ltd., of Port-of-
Spain, ‘

Back From U.K.

R. AND MRS. L. C. WRIGHT

were among the passengers
arriving here on Saturday by the
S.S. Golfito from England where
they had spent two and a half
months’ holiday, They will be re-
maining until Thursday as guests
at the Ocean View Hotel when
they leave for Antigua where Mr.
Wright is Traffic Manager of the
Antigua Sugar Factory.

CLEAR









ward Islands with headquarters in
Grenada and Hon’ble E, Hughes,
Barrister-at-Law, St. Vincent.

They were guests at the Marine
Hotel,

Senior Accountant

R. STANLEY COBHAM,

Senior Accotntant of Als-
tons Ltd., Port-of-Spain, arrived
here on Sunday afternoon by the
French S.S. Colombie for four
weeks’ holiday which ‘he is spend-
ing with his relatives at Hinds-
bury Road,

To Reside in U.S.A.

J EAVING on _ Saturday by

~ B.W.LA, for Trinidad was
Miss Joyce Sealy of Martindale's
Road who has gone to spend two
weeks’ holiday before going on to
the U.S.A, to reside with her
mother, Mrs, Pearl Geraud of New
York City,

eerie ethene orm © eemienen mime women

reach the
Bear has
gone, and is no longer in sight.
‘Oh, well, | may as well take my
lantern, It has gone out anyway,"
says Willie. a ht-ho, and then
I'll go and nelp Daddy to mend
Mrs. Bunn's notice board,"’ says

ING

MEN’S WHITE PIQUE DRESS SHIRTS (collar

attached)

MEN’S BLUE QUALITY POPLIN SHIRTS (two

collars)

MEN’S BLUE STRIPED QUALITY POPLIN

SHIRTS (twe

collars)

— ALSO —

MEN’S ALL WOOL WORSTED TROUSERS ..
BROWN, FAWN, BLUE Waist Sizes 2% to 38

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

MIAl

4790



INTERNATIONAL





YOUR SHOE STORES

TRADING

“Wakefield,”
row night, July 16.

maica College,
Sunday by the Colombie to spend
six weeks’ holiday with his parents,
Mr. and Mrs, C. B. Jackman of
Water Street, Christ Church, He
was accompanied by his wife,

same opportunity from Jamaica
was Mr. J, A. W. Crick, Assistant
Master of Kingston College and
son of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Crick
of “Weston House,” St. James, He
will be here until August 24 when



corsieniiieeniereaie Rocmainieemienstanaindantiiemeene on oemmeeaerionendaneetmamaanmeens ieaiiaineee

. Were $7.48 now $5.00
BOYS and YOUTHS WHITE POLO SHIRTS ....

SOLE



BARBADOS





By Beachcomber |

Gramophone Concert

OREIGNERS must be readin,
At B.C, with interest the retainer |
EETHOVEN'S Sonata in F. of the abominable things that are!
Minor, Op. 57 (‘Appas- done to living horses in this coun-
sionata”); Trio No. 7 in B, Flat try in order that Escalope de
Major. Op. 97 (The Archduke) and Veau may appear on restaurant
Quartet in F. Major. Op, 135 are Menus. d
some of the works which will be Since nobody but the analytical
heard. during the Gramophone Chemist can know what he is eat-
Concert at the British Council, ing to-day, there will pronaity be

an increase of vegetarianism, You
will still not know what process-
ed vegetable you are eating, but
at any rate your conscience will
be at ease—until somebody dis-
covers a method of using horse-
meat to make a new health-giving
vegetable. '

White Park to-mor-

The programme begins at 8.15.

School Masters Return

Home
R. .CARL JACKMAN, As-
sistant Master at the Ja-

Is Mimsi i ?
arrived here on limsie miscast:

é h- great difficulty is to make
Mimsie Slopcorner realise |
that she is an ancient Queen of
the Britons, not a silly little oaf
standing on a hay-cart. When
told to look regal, she simpers.
When told to advance on foot and
tilt her head haughtily, she drops
her spear ,and shakes her helmet
awry, so that she looks like an
intoxicated “extra” in an opera
crowd. With infinite patience she
has been coached to hold igs

Also arriving on Sunday by the

he leaves for England to take his shield defiantly. but she still ho
Diploma in Education at the In- it as a timid sandwichman mi

mm. hold an advertisement for a tea-
shop. Yesterday her queenly robe
cot caught in the prongs of Father
Neptune’s trident, and the red#
faced deity, lowering the impleg
ment to disentangle it, had the
air of a man trying to toast some-
thing on an enormous fork, Pib-
ney is enjoying all this so much
that everyone hopes it will be all
wrong on the day.

A memory of Semolina

O* reading of a singer with a
very wide throat who can
produce two voices at a time, I
recalled the astonishing Semolina.,
She not only sang duets by her-
self, but accompanied them with a
third sound. The third sound re-
sembled an oboe so closely that
the audiences did not "know
whether to laugh or cry. A medi-
cal examination revealed the fact
that she had once swallowed an
oboe during a_ brawl with the
Huddersfield olian Orchestra.
The doctors’ report added: “So
wide was her throat that only
some private scruple could have
prevented her from swallowing a
trombone.” “One swallow does
not make a singer,” commented a
critic with a face like a broken
shutter,

Going Back Home
ETER INCE, 11-year-old son
of Mr. and Mrs, Herbert Ince

of Trinidad who has been having
medical attention at Dr.\ Bayley’s
Clinie for the past two weeks will
be returning to Trinidad on Fri-
day.

Mr. Herbert Ince is manager of
the Royal Bank of Canada Port-
of “Spain.

For Two Months
RRIVING from Venezuela on
Sunday by the Colombie
were Mrs, Milton C, Hagen and
her three children, Cyril, Chris-
topher and Freddie, They will be
here for two months’ holiday
which they are spending as guests
at Paradise Beach Club,

On Business

R, L. FRIEDMAN, Manager

of the British Bata Shoe Co.,
is now o1 his way to England on
a three-month business visit. He
left on ‘sunday ‘sy the Colombie
and was accompanied by his wife
and little con, Peter.

For U.K. Holiday

Mimsie’ under fire again

EAVING on Sunday by the
S.S. Colombie for England : ;
were Mr. and Mrs, William H. HE Pibney St. Vitus and Fob-

sett Evening Echo, :n another
leading article, says:

. . . Who is ultimately respon-
sible for making Pibney a laugh-
ing-stock all over Europe by
importing Miss Slopcorner to play
Boadicea? Her ludicrous antics
on the hay-cart are the ribaldjest
of every ale-house, and things
have come to a pretty pass when
our band, which won the Halford
Cup at the King’s Knucklefurther
Band Festival in 1949, spends
more time in laughing at Boadicea
than in playing the spirited march
specially composed for it by Mn
Huxtable. Either the Boaditea in=
cident should be struck off the
programme ruthlessly, or some
more fitting exponent should be;
found before it is too late. We in-
tend no discourtesy to Miss Slop-
corner when we say, in the racy
and homely phrase of Councillor
Townsend, “She is enough to
make a cat sick.”

Grannum who have gone up for
three months’ holiday,

Mr. Grannum is an Attorney of
Messrs Robert Thom Ltd.



ee ee

But :
moved when something swishes

Rupert. hardly have they
past their heads, ‘‘It's the Toy
Scout,"’ gasps the little bear.
‘He's going to land. Let’s ask
him what happened here last night.
He’s sure to be able to tell us
evervthing.”’

Wisdom of the ages

Preise of the crocodile’s son to
its mother is excusable insincerity
jin the traveller who has a river

to cross,
(African proverb.)

| YES SIR!

S&SRUM

It's the Flavour—
A Distinctive Flavour
Always Right—





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ADVOCATE

—It Could Talk as Well as Write —

BY THE WAY! A Very Remarkable Pencii | |

By MAX TRELL

THE house was dark, and every-

e in it —from cellar to attic—had
already gone to bed. All except
Koarf, the shadow-boy with the
turned-about name. He was sitting
on the edge of the desk near the
window, watching the moon climb
up over the trees.

For attite a while Knarf sat there,
not hearing a sound or seeing any-
thing move inside the room when
all at once he heard a,sharp little
voice saying: “Pardon me, sir!
You’re sitting on me!”

Knarf instantly sprang off the
desk. He peered closely at the spot
where he had been sitting. All he
could see was a small yellow pencil,
no larger than a clothespin. Its
point was broken.

Edge of Desk

Knarf had just about decided
that he had only imagined he hac
heard someone speaking to him. He
was starting once more to sit on the
edge of the desk when the same
voice broke out again, only this time
louder and sharper than before.
“No! No! Keep off!”

It was certainly not Knarf’s im-|

agination! Now he was certain that
someone close by was speaking. He
peered very hard at the pencil.

“Well,” said the Pencil, ‘ what
are you looking at me for?”

“Did you say something to me
just now?”

“I did,” said the Pencil, “and 1
meant it. You were sitting on me,

you were! And you were about to

sit on me again!”

“Oh!” exclaimed Knarf. Then he |ing about somebody else, say ‘UW’.
Pencils {And if you're talking about your

added:
talk?”

“Don’t be

“Since when do

silly,”

shouldn’t we be able to talk?”

“Pencils don’t write,” said Knarf.

“People do.”

“Nonsense. People just hola us.
We do the writing. I’d like to see
anyone write anything by just mov-
ing his finger up and down on a
sheet of paper. All he would get is
smudges, Pencils write words that| dashes, too. And above all,” said
other people can read. That’s real | the Pencil, “don’t sit on top of the

writing,

“And of course,” the Pencil weit ready. I don’t think that’s consider-
;|ate at all!”

“since we know all the words, we |
ean also talk. Pens talk too—only | Knarf ever heard a Pencil talk like
when they get excited they make! that!

on before Knarf could interrupt



Listening Hours

TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1952

1.00—7.15 p.m, 19, 76M, 26.53M

4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily
Service, 4.15 p.m. New Records, 5 p.m.
Cricket, 5.05 p.m. Interlude, 5.15 p.m
B.B.C. Symphony Orchestra, 6 p.m, Ulster
Magazine, 6.15 p.m, Meet the Common-
wealth, #45 p.m. Sports Round-up and
Programme Parade, 7 p.m. The News,
7.10 p.m, Home News from Britain
7.15—10,30 p.m, 25.53M, 31 2M





7.15 p.m. Rendezvous, 7.45 p.m. Per-
onal Portrait, 8 p.m. Take it Eamy, 8.15

m. Radio NeWsreel, 8.30 p.m. Report
rom Britain, 8.45 p m. Interlude, 8.55
1m. From the Editorials, 9 p.m. Bed-
ime with Braden, 9.30 p.m. The Dancing
English, 10 p.m, The News, 10.10 p.m
News Talk, 10.15 p.m. Moray McLaren
Talking, 10.30 p.m. Northern Journey.





In passing

F anyone doubts that we are all
‘to-day units of an unending
series of scientific experiments
let him consider the recent reve-
lation of an American committee.
Of 704 substances used in food, 207
have not yet been established as
narmless. An article before me
deals with the “toxicity of food
additives,” and admits that the
chemicals used in food reduce the
nutritive value, and that little is
known of their effects. Ye gods
and little toxic fishes!

or amazingly relieved

in 3 out of 4 cases
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This news will not surprise the
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And it should encourage you (if
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don’t avoid the nervousness and
tension, weakness, irritability—and

napped the | about insects that make honey say
Pencil. “We write ton’s ee Why |‘B’. And if you're talking about the



Pains, distress of ‘‘those days” stopped





1
\“Of course I ean talk,” the pencil
said,

| blots and they splutter. And some-
times they suddenly stop. They
can’t say another word.” b
| “Why not?” Knarf wanted to
know.

“Because they run out of ink. b
They dry up.”

“Oh,” said Knarf again.

“It seems to me,” said the Pencil,
“that you’re full of ‘O’s.’ Don’t. you
| know any other letters?”

Whole Alphabet

“I know the whole alphabet,”
said Knarf indignantly.

“Then use them, silly. Instead of
saying ‘O’ all the time, say ‘G’!”
| “You mean Gee,” said Knarf.

“I mean ‘G’. And if you ask a
question, say ‘Y’. And if you’re talk







self say ‘I’. And if you're talking

| ocean, say ‘C’. And if you’re talking
|about a certain kind of bird, say
|‘J’.. And if you're talking about
something hot you drink, say
‘T’, Learn to use your letters.
Knowing the alphabet isn’t enough.
And learn your commas, and semi-
colons, and periods, and question
marks and exclamation points, and

\desk. You’ve broken my point al-

Never in his whole life had

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leeding Gums, Sore Mouth and
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TDESDAY, JULY 15,

Contempt of

@ From Page 1

and General Gaol Delivery that
the defendant Michelin at a pub-
lic meeting of bus drivers and
conductors held at the Empire
Theatre in the City of Bridgetown
in this island on the 12 day oi
June, 1952, did make, and the de-
fendant Company did publish in
the Barbados’ Advocate News-
paper of the 13th day of June,
1952, the following statements
which are calculated to prejudice
the plaintiff in his defence to a
prosecution for manslaughter
which is now pending against the
plaintiff as a defendant and are
calculated to prejudice the fair
trial thereof, namely:—

“So far this year, 10 persons
have been killed as a result of
road accidents. All these lives
might have been saved if the
drivers of the vehicles concerned
had not been in such a hurry and
had driven with more care. One
of the most ghastly accidents took
place a few weeks ago on a
Sunday afternoon. Three little
ehildren were sitting quietly on
the’ steps of their home waiting
their father to bring the car
around and take them for a drive.
Suddenly a car coming along the
Toad crashed into them and
knocked them unconscious. They
Subsequently. died in hospital.
Think of these young lives being
brought abruptly to an end. It is
appalling and it should be possi-
ble to prevent accidents of this
nature.”

Both defendants, Col. Michelin,
and Mr. Ian Gale, representing
Yhe Advocaje Co., pleaded not
guilty te the charge aileged
against them.

A special jury of 12 was
selected to try the issue, and Mr.
E. K..Waleott, counsel for the
plaintiff, asked that His Lordship
make a ruling as to who should
commence ip the matter.

ure

The Jury was ordered to retire
and Mr. Walcott addressing His
Lordship said:— “The difficulty,
My Lord, in this case, is as all
of us know, that we have a
Special Act of 1891—26, whicn
loes not follow the procedure in

land.”

His Lordship. said that the
matter “had also given him much
concern,” and Mr. Walcott ex-
plained that, he had said to His
Learned Friends, counsel for the
defendants, that the matter also
presented a difficulty to him. He
Said it was not like the usual
procedure where they fought one
Way as against another. They,

the lawyers concerned in the
issue, realised that they were
dealing with an entirely new
procedure.

His Lordship queried whether it
oes save time if he, subject to
egal argument, gave his view as
to how the matter should proceed,
and pointed out that he was not
making a ruling at that particular
time. But as it appeared to him
under Section 4, Sub-Sections
1 & 5 of the Act of 1891-26, in view
of the fact that on the hearing of
actions, the course under Sub-

tion 5, and as showing cause
appears under Sub-Section 1, the
course to pursue in order to get
the matter before the jury, would
be for the plaintiff to open the
ease briefly, put such proof orally
as was done by affidavit and the
Tule obtained, and then the onus
would shift to the defendants to
show cause, the plaintiff being en-
titled if needs be to call evidence
in rebuttal to anything which oc-
curred,

Counsel on all sides agreed with
the course which His Lordship
suggested and on the jury’s re-
turn to the Court, Mr. "Walcott
opened the case for the Plaintiff.

Mr. Wflcott said that the matter
before the jury were proceedings
under an Act called the Contempt
of Court Act, and quoted Section
4, Sub-Sections 1 and 5 which
read, respectively, as follows: —

“All contempts of a superior
Court other than those committed
in the presence and hearing of the
Court when sitting, shall be dealt
with and determined only by
means of a Rule of the Court of
Common Pleas which may be ap-
plied for by any person whomso-
ever, calling upon the defendant
to show cause why he should not
be attached for contempt of court;”
and “on the hearing of such Rule
of Court, the defendant shall
plead and thereupon, evidence
Shall be taken on both sides orally
and the defendant shall be a com=
patent witness in his own be-

Law And Fact
Mr. Walcott said that the jury
concerned to try the issues botir
of law and fact in such Rule “shall















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1952

not guilty upon the whole matter
both of law and fact of any issue
upon such rule, and shall not be
required or directed by the Court
or Judge before whom such Rule
shall be tried to return any other
verdict or anything whatsoever.”
He explained that on the 25th of
June, 1952, the plaintiff, Fitz
Harold Haddock obtained a Rule
from His Lorship the Chief Judge
in the Court of Common Pleas,
after submitting affidavits alleg-
ing that certain portions of the
speech were made by Col Miche-
lin st a Public Meeting of Bus
Drivers amd Coné@uctors, held at
the Empire Thatre on the 12th of
May, 1952, and published on the
following day by the” defendant
Company. ~
After reading the Rule to the
jury, Mr, Walcott went on to ex-
plain, citing supporting legal re-
ferences from Halsbury what was
meant by contempt of Court. He
poinigd out to the jury, that they
shoukl not take the law from
either himself or is Learned
Friends, counsel forthe defend-
ants, but from His Lordship the
Chief Justice on the Bench, ant
added that it was still their duty
as counsel, especially in opening
a case, to explain to them the law
reise ts the particular matter.
Mr. Walcott submitted that the
jury was not in any way concerned
except as to the charge in the
Rule, with the charge of man-
slaughter against his client, which
latter matter was to be tried at
the Court of Grand Sessions, and
emphasised upon the jury that they
were not “sitting there to try the
manslaughter charge. Mr. Walcott
warned the jury that they should
east away from their minds preju-
dice one way or the other, or any
thought as to whether Mr. Had-
dock should be convicted for
manslaughter or not. That was not
what they were there for, he said;
and he added that the law re-
quired a jury to be summoned in
cases of alleged contempt of Court.
Mr. Walcott referred to Hals-
bury, Vol. 7, p. 2, Para. 1 which
deals with the various kinds of
contempt, and read other relevant
passages from the same volume.
During the course of these re-
ferences, Mr. Walcott commented
to the jury that in the case which
was before them, at the time of the
alleged contempt, his client had
not yet been committed for trial
at the Court of Grand Sessions.
He submitted after making fur-
ther reference to sections of the
law which he was adopting, that
it was not whether the alleged
contempt did in effect interfere
with, but whether it tended to in-
terfere with the true course of
justice. On the same principle, he
Said, it was contempt to make a
speech tending to influence the r@e
sult of the pending trial, whethar
civil or criminal, or to deliver a
sermon with the same tendency.

The Speech

Mir. Waleott quoted law to show
that it was also contemptuous to
publish an article in a Newspaper
commenting on the proceedings in
a pending criminal prosecution or
civil action, and referring to the
Order which “has already been
granted”, and on which they were
“now carrying on these proceeds
ings.” He said that against t
article which was put in th
Advocate of the 13th June, and
which was in effect part of a
speech made by Colonel Michelin
at a public meeting of ’bus drivers
and conductors held at the Empire
Theatre, the plaintiff alleged that
at the time he ‘was being charged
with manslaughter in that he was
driving a motor car which was
involved in an accident in which
3 children had been killed and
that, as must be alleged in a case
of manslaughter, it was due to
his neglectful or careless driving,
which could not be otherwise.
That when that case was before
the police magistrate, the defend-
ant not being yet committed,
Colonel Michelin ..... it was
a police case with the Super-
intendent of the District of
St. James, Superintendent Sim-
mons, as complainant
got up in front a meeting of
"bus drivers and _ conductors
and as they would prove, handed
to one of the Advocate Reporters,
a typescript of what he was going
to say, and that in that Colonel
Michelin said the words to which
his client takes objection.

The Law
Mr. Walcott said that his sub-
mission would be that it was going
to be a matter of law, although
funnily enough, the Act says that
the jury should try the issue on
both’ question of law and fact.
His submission was, however, that
they try the question of fact and
as far as the law was concerned,
they would take into account the
law as it was given to them by tha
Judge.
The law they could not devise,



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Court Case

$2 matter of fact neither he
noi ; learned friends coukid do
so, What that meant was that
they would have to take the law
from the learned judge. It gb-
viously meant that having he gâ„¢
the law, and taking that law into
account as they received it fgam
the judge. He would even go the
distance of saying they could note
go away from what the judge told
them, they had simply to apply
that law as directed and given to
them by the judge to the facts.

Mr. Walcott submitted further
that the facts which they woud
have to find would be very simple.
It was not whether Haddock was
guilty or whether he drove care-
lessly, but they would be con-
cerned with whether Michelin did
make the speech, and if he made
that speech, whether the Advecate
Company printed it. and whether
it tended to prejudice Haddock’s
case. Those were the questiens of
fact, and they had no more after
that.

His submission was, that if, as
the Judge would tell them, that
tended io prejudice, or if not, it
did prejudice, or was intended to
prejudice .. . nothing to do with
their function itself... the foun-
tain of justice, according to the
different law Lords, must be kept
pure .. the fair trial of any once
it constituted a contempt of the
Court. It was laid down, and the
Court im this case was the Court
of Grand Sessions, that the pro-
ceedings which were brought in
the particular case by Haddock,
could be brought by anyone else.

Haddock was the person most
concerned, and it was to be ex-
pected that he would be the one
most willing to bring it,

They, the jury were trying the
facts, and they were dealing with
contempt of Court. They would be
called upon to say if the facts as
alleged, that the Colonel made the
speech and that the Advocate
Newspaper printed it, tended to
prejudice the trial of the man who
was going to be tried for man-
slaughter . an ingredient of
which was the careless driving
of a motor car.

Prejudicial

Mr. Walcott said his submission
was, that a jury would have to be
devoid of honour or ‘brains, neither
of which the present jury were
likely to be, to sit there and with-
out hesitation find that if those
were the facts, that it did not
tend to be prejudicial,

He emphasised that they (the
jury) were nothing to do with the
question of punishment, and that
in the case before them, they
would find merely guilty or not
guilty. If they found the defend-
ants guilty, it was a matter for
the judge, and if they found them
not guilty, it was merely for the
judge to discharge the two de-
fendants.

He told them that no argument
would be addressed to them con-
cerning that point, and all they
would be concerned with would be
to find on the question of fact
whether the defendant Colonel
Michelin did deliver the speech,
and the question of law which
probably both his learned friends
and himself might submit,

He submitted that the facts were
so clear and easy that they should
need no particular law, and for
anyone, and particularly the Com-
missioner of Police in commenting
on a police prosecution before a
man has had a chance to be tried,
to get up and gay such words as
they were alleging that Colonel
Michelin said, must tend to be
prejudicial to the trial, The higher
the office of the person making
the comment, the more likely he
was to be believed, Mr. Walcott
said.

Mr. Walcott suggested to the
jury that when the Commissioner
of Police, va a police prosecu~
tion before e man was ,
made remarks such as Colonel
Michelin alleged did make, and
the very speech which was the
matter of the trial, he was telling
the bus drivers and the Advocate
was repeating to the public what
he had said: “Look at Haddock.
Those three qahildren would not
have been dead if he had driven
with more care and had not been
in such a hurry.”

He submitted that after the;

Commissioner of Police had
that, he was putting it in
minds of any juryman that this
man by the driving of the car
avhich he did drive, was guilty of
a ghastly accident, because he did
not use care, and because he
drove too fast, and it might have
been avoided.

Mr. Walcott asked the
that did not tend to prejudice
the plaintifi’s fair trial, what else
on page 5

said
the

Now !



4616





jury it!

BARBADOS ADVOCATE




SEA AND Al
TRAFFIC

R

In Carlisle Bay
Seh. Frances W. Smith, Sch. Lady
Joan, S. Bruno, S.S. Elene, M.V
Jenkins Roberts, Sch. Sunbeam, Sch
Lucile Smith, Seh. Everdene, §
Mary M. Lewis, Seh. Eunicia, Sch, Zita

Wonita, Sch. Rainbow M., Sch. Enter-

prise S., M.V, Blue Star, Sch. Timothy
Van Shuytman, Sch’ Linsyd Ib, Sch. Lach;
Noleen, Seh” Gardenia, Sch. Gloria B
ARRIVALS
Sch. Gloria B. from Martinique
DEPARTURES
H.M.S. Burghead Bay for Trinidad

ARRIVALS BY BWA. ON SATURDAY
From Tri®idad-—-E. Waterman, I. Allo,
A. Armstrong, 3%. Cave, S. Atwell, J
Wiliams, D. Ibberson, S. Wright, J.
Wright, P. Wright, J. Aird, M. Rogers.
Frem St. Kitts—Mrs, Mary Buffong.

DEPARTURES By B.W.LA. ON
SATURDAY

Por Grenada—W) Julien. D
A. Young, M. Young. G
Napier, 1. Newton.

Por Trinidad—J, Murdoch, E, Murdoch,
J. Sealer, O. Papfieau

Fer Venezyela—Prank Braisted, Mar-
jorie Braisted, - Braisted, Daniel

Mitechetl,
mihett, BR

Braisted, Michae Braisted, Leslie
Robringer, Olga Rohringer, Nora
Mohringer, Ruth | Farmen, Elizabeth
Buckley, Lewis paratt, Jean Lund,
Henry Martin, rtha Maftin, Trina
Mago, Gaston Par®, Requel Pars, Flor
Chapellin, Noemi ~Chapellia, Barnardo
Klein, Gertrude fletn Hugh = Lucte-

Smith

ARRIVALS By By
From Trinidad

A. Johnson, G.

L. Johnson, B

EB. Baird I §

Gooding. E. Ferrgjra, B. Williams
From Grenada . Barrett, G

Gale, D Munro, FP, Piel
thal

DEPARTURES | By B.W.LA. ON

su AY

AA. ON BUNDAS
. Lahee, 1. Johnson,
. Johnson,
t, J. Porter
Criek, N

Wer-
Strisiver) M

For
wan, W
Por §t. Lucia—E, Filiott; M. Barnard,

Trinidad— Phillips, C
Rand, J.” Aird

Minor-

W. Fealing, O. Small, L. Rae, H
Piggott, G. Gordon, C. Lacorbiniere, G
Webdale, R. Farman, &. Buckley, 1
Sborrat, J. Lund, M. White

7.58 p.m.



L.E. Smith Returns
From U. K.

Mr. L. E. Smith, Chairman of
Committees in the House of As-
sembly, returned home last night
from the United Kingdom
Trinidad by B-W.1.A. where he
spent the past three weeks as one
of the delegates representing the
Barbados Branch of the Common
wealth Association at a series of
talks on parliamentary procedure.

The other delegate, Mr. M. E.
Cox, M.C.P. who is a Member of
the Executive Committee, is ex-
pected to arrive later in the week-



Man Burnt As Gas
Drum Explodes

Chesterfield Bayley of Mt, Gay
Village, St. Lucey, was carried to
the General Hospital and detained
on Sunday after he was ba
burnt when a gasolene drum ex-
ploded in the ’bus §S 58 on which
he was travelling while it was
going along Mile ‘and Quarter
about 9.45 a.m,

The drum was in the rear part
ot the ’bus. No other person was
injured

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Home
Training



For W.L1.

Seminar Theme

PORT-OF-SPAIN, JULY 3.

Home Economics Training for the Caribbean was the
central theme of the seminar held Wednesday evening at
Whitehall as a feature of the Conference on Home Econo-

mies and Education in Nutr

ition convened jointly by the

Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations
and the Caribbean Commission.

Following a review of t
Dora Ibberson, Social Welfar

nial Development & Welfare

of* three international agencies discussed the technica!

he regional situation by Miss

-e Adviser of the British Colo-

Organisation, representatives

assistance programmes of each in the field of home econo-
mics. Miss Maude Barrett, Social Welfare Adviser, spoke |

for the United Nations, Mrs.

gional Nutrition Representat

ture Organisation, and Dr, |

Health Organisation,

In the discussion which followed
the talks, Dr, de Caires warned
against setting up a long-range
project involving recurring exnen-
diture beyond the capacity of the
government concerned. To int:c-
duce a people to a service whicii
they hed never before known, and
then to withdraw it, was, he said,
“a eruel thing.” He pointed out
that it was desirable, therefore, to
thedse technical assistance pro-
#rammes which, when assistance
eame to an end, could be carried
on by an existing agency wiih-
out an undue increase in overhead
costs. He considered the ideal
project to be one which, in attack-
ing a problem, would bring about
a reduction in government ex-
penditure. The BCG campaign
against TB was such a programme
he said, since it had the effect
of cutting down the cost of main-
taining public medical and hospital
facilities.

“Arrant Nensense

In the course of her talk, Miss
Tbberson deseribed as “arrant non-
sense” an attempt to impose nor-
mal standards of living in homes
with only one room. She outlined
the wide scope of Home Economics,
aod defined its ultimate goal as a
“complete and stable family
home.” Training in Home Eco-
nomics, she emphasised, should be
“rooted in reality.” Trainees
should reside among those with
whom they were to serve, In dis-
cussing training facilities in the
British West Indies, she mentioned
the vocational school in British
Guiana, and said that there was
hope of the establishment of a
small Home Economics training
jnstitute in Jamaica, although the
project was now dormant for
reasons of economy, She suggested
that wider use should be made

of the Home Economics Workshop ~

maintained by the University of
Puerto Rico.

Mrs, Sismanidis spoke of the
wide interest in Home Economics,
as indicated by the enthusiasm
shown by delegates to the FAO
Conference in Rome last Novem-
ber, in discussing Home Economics

roblems, She considered it signi-
ficant that the delegates were
men. Among the Home Economics
projects of FAO proposed or
underway, she mentioned the es-

Sap. Its dcep-

FRESHNESS

Andromache Sismanidis, Re-
ve for the Food and Agricul-
*. F. de Caires for the World

ablishment of a training college
in Israel, and the assignment of
xperts to make dietary surveys
in Kevuadcor, In Turkey, she said,
00,000 girls and women are
taking courses in some form of
tidome Economics—-thanks, in part,
» technical assistance given by
Â¥AO. Fellowships may prove par-
eularly useful as the means. oj
training personnel to carry on a
wogramme after FAQ: has with-
drawn,
Technical Assistance

The United Nations’ technical
ssistance programme, with special
eference to social welfare, was
uiscussed by Miss Barrett. Among
many other facts, she brought out
‘hese: The United Nations gives
echnical assistance in three fields:
~onomic development; social de-
velopment; public administration.
\ Technical Assistance Board co-







erdinates the activities of all
United Nations agencies in the
iechnical assistance field, The

Hoard co-ordinates the employ-
ment standards for Technical As-
sistance personnel as well as the
handling of requests for asslisiance,
ithe United Nations ‘holds Seminars
n various subjects in which many
ternational organisations parti-
cipate. Seminars last from 6
weeks to 3 months and are at-
tended by delegates from 10 or
more countries Special mention
was made of a Seminar on health
veld in the Middle East.

In speaking of une tellowships
provided by the United Nations,
Miss Barrett revealed that the
Caribbean is being used as an ob;
servation centre for scholarship
holders, In passing, she mentioned
as significant and impressive, the
impact made by the fellowship
programme on the host country.
A difficulty mentioned by Dr. de
uires in discussing the training
programme of the World Health
wganisation in the Caribbean is
that territories are sometimes loth
to accept an instructor from a
neighbouring territory, notwith-
standing the fact that he is emi-
nenthy qualified, It was necessary,
he said, “to break down the idea





that what you have in your own

backyard is not good enough.”

Miss Elsa Haglund, who is in
charge of conference arrangements
joy FAO, acted as Chairman,



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PAGE FOUR

BIRADOS eis AD

AREADY. VOCAT

antonlf «= > 3s Poacww we
Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St, Bridsetews
-





‘Tuesday, July 15, 1952



Poor Salesmanship

ONE of the most interesting consequen-
ces of the British Council’s activities in
Barbados is the increasing number of per-
gons in the country districts who are
becoming cinema-minded. The activities’
of the British Council in taking films to
the people of St. Andrew, St. Joseph and
into other country parishes not served by
cinemas have been supported by those of
the visual aid section of the Department

of education.
Immediate reaction to these film-show-

ing activities of the British Council and of
the Department of Education might well
be that something beneficial to the com-
munity is being done thereby. Benefit is
of course done at the time of showing be-
cause the majority of films shown by the
British Council and the Department of
Edueation have some cultural educational
or instructional value.

But after the immediate benefit has been
experienced on one or two occasions an
appetite for films is created amongst per-
sons who otherwise would be little inter-
ested in seeing films. It is no exaggeration
therefore to state that the British Council
and the Department of Education albeit
unwittingly are both serving the interests
of the commercial cinema in Barbados.

This may be a novel point of view which
may not have occurred before either to
the British Council, the Department of
Education or to the Managers of commer-
cial cinemas. / 7

But the reactions of cinema audiences in
outlying parishes of Barbados su gest un-
mistakably that the interest in films once
awakened appears.insatiable. This inter-
est in moving pictures almost for the sake
of the motion is worthy of investigation.
Because simp%e country audiences ex-
press satisfaction with films which are not
processed for the tittivation of sophistica-
ted cinema audiences but which are mace
for educational, cultural or instructional
purposes.

The significance of this interest must be
stressed. Too often in the past when prc-
tests have been made by public-spirited
citizens against the prevalence of films
designed to appeal to the lowest common
factor of intelligence the commerciol
cinema interests in this region have re-
torted that the cinemas give the people
what they want and that what is good
enough for the American movie goer is
good enough for the local patron of the
cinema,

Much appeal has also been made to the
protection of public morals provided by
the United States’ censorship,

The attitude of those responsible for the
buying and distribution of films in the
region is understandable. It is the normal
attitude which any buyer or seller of any
product in the Caribbean or in any other
country might be expected to adopt.

But the influence of the cinema on the
life of a community ought to be fully
recognised. While it is true, as cinema
agents and representatives have not been
slow to point out that people’s morals and
ways of life left much to be desired before
the invention of commercial films the in-
(uence of films on a community’s life can-
not be denied.

The younger generation of Britons in
the United Kingdom today is a generaticn
which thinks and speaks the language of
Amevigan movies to a degree which wou’
have beeh auite impbdssible fot. the-r
parents, Whether this is a good or bad
thing is irrelevant to the present argu-
ment. What must be admitted is the infu-
ence of the American film.

Here in Barbados it might appear quite
futile to attempt any criticism of the quali-
ties of locally shown films on the grounds
that these films were produced for atci-
ences all over the world and that Barba-
dians are no different from other people.
But this argument although seemingly un-
assailable is one hundred per cent. off the
mark,

In almost every: iarge country of the
world where cinemas show the types of
films which are shown locally there exist
alternative forms of cultural entertain-
ment. Theatre, opera, musical concerts,
exhibitions, art galleries are only. some of
the infinite varieties of European cultural
life which is the common heritage of all
those born or resident in Europe. In North
America, India,.North Africa and Asia
new and old civilisations have impressed
indelibly on the lives of their people cul-
tural values which are other than those of
Hollywood.

In Barbados the cinema reigns supreme
and the culture of the cinema represents
the major culture of the people who in-
habit this small island.

This is an arresting thought, and it has
for many years been exercising the minds
of public-spirited. citizens who recognise
the influence which the cinema has and
increasingly continues to have in mould-
ing the minds of Barbadians.

Yet the United Kingdom Government which
spends considerable sums of money each ‘year
in trying to hold up the British way of life.as
the best example for Her Majesty’s British Car-
ibbean people to follow has either not tried or
has failed ivnominiously to interest the pro-
ducers of British films to sell their films to Brit-
ish Caribbean film distributors.

So poorly advertised are British films locally
that even when one comes here on the quota
system (unless it happens to be sdmething quite
“epoch-making” in the Californian sense of the
word) hardly anyone will go to see it because
there is little to indicate its British origin.

The British film producers have made and

continue to make films as good as any, but they
either do not want to or do not try to sell them
in British Caribbean territories, Lack of sales-
manship in the United Kingdom is the major
1 n why British films get so little display in
the British Caribbean.

ee

, Overnight they



“I will tell you a good joke,”
said the Yugoslavian Minister,
“a Yugoslavian joke.”

There were half a dozen of us
dining at Lord Beaverbrook’s
London flat and we received the
Minister’s pronouncement with
what might be described as
modified rapture, A good joke
needs no bush.

“Stalin,” said our friend in his
picturesque English, “had a yard
of cloth and sent for a Bulgarian
tailor to make him a suit out of
it. But the Bulgarian said he
could not do it with so little
cloth, Therefore he was liquid-
ated. So there comes a Ruman-
ian tailor but he is also unable
and he is liquidated. It happen~
ed the same with the Hungarian
tailor. Now comes the joke and
it is good, Stalin for a
Yugoslavian tailor who says
“Yes! I will make you a suit
out of the cloth and an overcoat
as well” Stalin was very sur-
prised and says to him: “How
you can do this?” Then the
Yugoslavian answer him: “You
see, in Yugoslavia you are such
a little man”.”*

We all laughed and agreed
that it was indeed an excellent
story. But listening to him with
his twinkling eyes and his zest
I began to realise as never be-
fore the tremendous blow which
Marshal Tito administered to the
Kremlin when he broke off rela-
tions with the Soviet, | More and
more it becomes evideht that the
secession of Yugoslavia from
Comintern was the heaviest
feat that Stalin has suffered
since he began the cold war.

Yet the situation is full of
paradox. Tito is a Communist,
Yugoslavia is Communist, The
country is ruled by the secret
police, and freedom as we know
it does not exist, Therefore
when Marshal Tito startled the
world by denouncing Moscow the
wise men said that this was just
a cunning device arranged by
him and Stalin to fool the West.

“Tito needs industrial equip-
ment,” these wise ones said. “He
is dollar hungry and is not
proud to hold out his hat. If we
make the mistake of building up
Yugoslavia you will find that at
a given moment she will be used
as the spearhead of Russia’s
attack against the West.”

No one can deny a measure of
logic in those words, It was
right to proceed cautiously. Un-
doubtedly Stalin had denounced
Tito for his “grandee-ism” and
Tito had replied that he would
not take orders from the up-
starts in the Kremlin, but it was
still hard to believe that the
break, if it actually existed,
would not be bridged.

The implications of Tito’s de-
cision had to be faced, There in
the cockpit of Europe was his
country surrounded by hostile
satellites and facing the over-
whelming military strength of
Russia. To maintain even a
measure of security it meant the
creation of an immense army.
And since a man cannot carry a
rifle and a spade it meant that
the labour force would have to
be cruelly reduced. In addition
the army could be a challenge
in itself to the rule of Tito if
some of the generals were seized
with grandee-ism on their own
account, or if they were seduced
by Stalin,

But Tito took these risks, He
faced the threat of assassination,
of a military coup d'etat, of an
attack by the satellites inspired
by the Russians, An American
insurance man said at the time.
that if Tito wanted a life policy
of a million dollars for a year
the company would ask a pre-
mium of 999,999 dollars,

Now sufficient time has elaps-
ed for us to put the pieces of the
puzzle together, Tito’s defiance
of the Kremlin was not a mere
rush of blood to the head. Ib
was a decision taken in cold
blood, or at any rate as cold as
Yugoslavian blood can be. He
saw that Russia was going to
drain the satellites of their pro-
duce and* minerals and make
them slaves to Russian expan-







BARBADOS. ADVOCATE

LONDON LETTE § | Dihibition Tribute To

By Beverley Baxter

sion. They would be modelled
and organised for one purpose,
and one only—to sustain and
enrich the Soviet. Bulgaria,
Hungary, Rumania and Czecho-
slovakia had taken the yoke
without protest, so why should
Yugo-slavia not do the same?
The answer of course was—
the Serbian people; and Tito

knew his Serbs better than
Stalin.

When in the distant past the
Turks invaded Europe and
threatened to over-run the
civilisation which Rome had
created it was the Serbs who

held them in the final battle and
then threw them back. It was in
the town of Sarejevo in 1914
that a young man named Princip
fired the assassin’s shot that
plunged the whole world into
war. The Austro-Hungarian
Empire, ruled over by Franz-
Josef was a work of genius in its
construction but the Serbs put
freedom first.

After the 1914-1918 war had
ended and Woodrow . Rilson
brought to his task all the acade-
mic wisdom and lack of practical
experience which he could com-
mand to re-design Europe and
free the minorities of the chains
that held them down. With the
connivance of Lloyd George and
Clemenceau Austria was reduc-
ed to a truncated territory of a
great capital with nothing but
scenery and history to sustain
it.

But Serbia emerged as the
Yugoslavia we know today, The
assassin of Sarajevo had done
well for his people. The throne
was firmly established, and the
country which had so resented
inclusion in the Austrian Empire
now had its own minorities.

Then on an October day in
1934 the assassin’s revolver was
heard again. It was in Marseilles
but the victim was King Alex-
ander of Serbia. He was on an
official visit to France, but a
Croat exile who had organized a
body of terrorists waited for him,
Another minority had spoken
with a bullet instead of words.

Last Saturday at Claridges the
exiled King Peter of Yugoslavia
told me how he heard the news
of his father’s assassination.
Peter was eleven years of age at
the time of the assassination and
he mounted the troubled throne
as amere child mourning the
father whom he deeply loved.
Naturally he could only be a
king in name, and his Uncle
Prince Paul (brother-in-law of
the Duchess of Kent) was made
Regent,

Incidentally, the exiled Peter
is now writing his reminiscences.
If he writes as vividly as he talks
it should be a book that will stir
the waters more than somewhat.

The Serbs and their conglom-
erate minorities rallied to the
young king when he mounted
the throne. They are an emo-
tional people with a peasant
poetry of their own and they
were moved by the youth of the
boy whose father had been so
cruelly murdered, In fact the
maternalism of their feeling
roused their protective instincts.
It seemed that at last Serbia
would have a real period of
internal and external peace,

But there was a mad Austrian
painter of bad sunsets, a ranting
agitator with a fruity baritone,
a cruel creature with a devilish
knowledge of the weaknesses
and cupidity of human nature.
Step by step Hitler built his
kingdom on brutality and fear.
And so there came Der Tag once
more. This time it was Poland
that met the German thrust,

Yugoslavia was not at war! It
was incredible but true. Almost
for the first time in European
history they were not involved

in the battle. Wisely, if inglor-
iously,. Prince Paul’s Govern-
ment conceded everything that
Germany demanded in the way
of economic benefits, Their
hatred of Germany was intense
but they recognised the weak-
ness of their isolation. Neither
Britain nor France could send



Our Readers Say :

Tourism °

To the Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—Every now and _ then
some well-meaning individual,
high or low, stresses how well
off Barbados would be if it were
converted into anovher Bermuda,
undoubtedly, one of the greatest
teurist resorts im the world.
say, We would

become exceedingly Prosperous
and in consequence e
of this island would ome ex-
ceedingly happy.

IT quite agree that m has
been and can be # Ni tioean
benefit to Barbados, but let. me
sound a note of warnings: Be-
yond a certain point we in Bar-
bados camnot afford to go.

There is a vast difference be-
tween Bermuda and Barbados,
Bermuda is essentially a tourist
resort. Dame Nature in a wanton,
lascivious mood fashioned Ber-
muda for “love to sigh in, for
bards to live and saints to die
in.” as the Irish poet Tor: Moore
wrote over a hundred years ago.
Apart from its meay attractions,
its unadulterzied beauty, its

‘ proximity t the United States

of America
dollar affords
what is decidedly in favour of
Bermuda ag a tourist resort is
its lack of population,

(the

Here in Barbados it is quite
different. This is essentially an
agricultural country with a teem-
ing population that depends on
the ‘and and sea for sustenance.
If wé were to make Barbados an
all-the-year round tourist resort,
what would happen? Exactly the
same thing that happened in
Bermuda,

Pardon, I spent a whole year
in Bermuda writing for two
newspapers. The third I had to
turn down. There was no ques-
tion of earning money, but I
could not. earn enough to buy
a pound of fresh fish when the
hotels were in full swing—eleven
months year. The

every only

America
ample miter da

time I tasted fresh fish was
during the month of August,
cleaning-up time, Strange, the
piece of fish I tasted was called
Rock fish, believe me no mis-
nomer, Do you think the agri-
cultural labourer and the sugar
industry could carry on and
‘thrive under such conditions?
Let us forget the Middle Class.
They do not count nowadays.

For an island (or group of
islands) with such a wonderful
climate—where North and South
have iI have never seen
so many stomachs on strike, The

only time in | hen my
stomach ref! iw the line
was when I” Gn Bermuda.

Canned meat and fish, iced beef
and crystal-white sugar—sugar
bleached of all its virtue! Twenty
years ago the people of Bermuda
already knew that black sugar
w2s more nutritious than white.
As a side line, tourism is
for Barbados. It has helped and
can help tremendously, As a
substitute for the sugar cane in-
dustry and a virile population—
that is a horse of another colour.
But my greatest objection to
wholesale tourism as_ carried
on in Bermuda is the permanent
amage done to its spiritual and
moral assets,

2 C. B, ROCK.

“ Boys’ Week”

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,— We, the undersigned
crave your indulgence in the
publication of this letter which
we fee! will appeal favourably
to the youth and to a certuin
extent, the matured of this
island.

Five years ago in American Co-
educational High Schools there
was introduced a (scheme system)
known as “Boys’ Week”. It was
received so -well that it was
adopted widely by the general
public and each year now, flour-
ishes with er success. The
system 1s





them a single grenadier if they
engaged in war. Also the great
bear was Germany’s ally, or at
any rate Germany's stooge. The
infamous nen-ggression pact
had joined Germany and Rus-
sia in unholy matrimony.

But in 194] German arrogance
was out of hand, German forces
were in Rumania, Hungary and
Bulgaria, and Hitler summoned
Prince Paul and his principal
ministers to Berlin, “1 demand
passage across your territory,”
said Hitler. Prince Paul no doubt
did his best but he was wester-
nised in thought and tempera-
ment and was no match for the
ranting all-conquering Caesar
of Berlin.

Prince Paul returned home
and declared that he had given
in to Hitler in order to save
Serbia from being crushed. In a
matter of hours there was a
palace revolution. A group of
Serbian officers and politicians
with the Young King at thei
head, overthrew the Govern
ment and sent Prince Paul int«
ignominious exile.

The Germans did not hesitate
Without even a declaration o
war they sent a savage bombing
raid on MSBelgrade and_ ther
attacked with such fury that the
end was only a matter of days
While the Serbs were still fight-
ing with unimaginable braver)
the heroic Italians thought the)
had better come in on a_ sure
thing, so they attacked Serbii
from the West. In 10 days it wa:
all over. Or so Hitler thought
How was he to know then tha
large forces of Serbs, later to be
called Partisans, had escaped t
the mountains where they were
to harass the Germans by day
and by night until Hitler and
the Third Reich had gone down
in flames.

In the meantime the King
and his advisers had flown to
London where they joined the
ever enlarging group of emigres
governments. "London in those
days was in fact the very seat
of world government — or at
any rate that portion of the world
that was at war with Hitler.

About a year later the mother
of King Peter asked me to come
and see her. She was worried
about her son and wanted me to
advise her. For what my advice
was worth I gave it to her, The
young king should be flown to
the Serbian mountains and join
the partisans, If he did not do
so he would find that the men
who had conducted the reésis-
tance movement would seize
power when the war was over.

The conflict was obvious. the
conflict between the Queen and
the mother, Her husband had
been assassinated. Was she to
lose her son in the desperate
fighting of the partisans? Peter
did not go. When the war was
over Tito declared himself dic-
tator and the Monarchy was at
an end. No doubt it will tive
again but not while Tito rules.

I have told this strange story

of the Se a because to-

day they hav
in Europe,
most
that the West possesses. While
France and Britain, with the aid
of America and some participa-
tion by Western Germany, try
to build up a European Army,
Yugoslavia has more divisions
jin Europe than all the rest of
them put together, With tre-
mendous courage Tito faces not
only Russia, but the satellites
that support her.

Yet even that does not con-
clude the story, As a Communist
he ‘has enunciated the theory
that Communism need not be
subservient to Russia, He has
shown the way to others.

Therefore I claim that the
story of the tailor, as told to us
in London by the Yugoslavian
Minister, has significance, Ridi-
cule is a@ weapon that every
despot fears, The Yugoslavians
laugh at the Kremlin, and in
Stalin's ears that laughter may
sound moze menacing than gun-
fire.

the largest Army





Starting from the first Sunday
in October, gentlemen are re-
quested to leave their wallets,
bill-folds and what-nots at
home and the girls take over.
They organise parties at no cost
to the boys; they pay the fare
at movies and for the chocolate
end popeorn that follow after—
then there are the dances, visits
to the Soda Fouritains etcetera. .
The fun that results makes the
week a “hat” one. The boys
enjoy it (they would of course)
and so do the girls, If it's a hit

in the U.S., it can be one here} June Sir Waldron Smithers (Conservative,
- Orpington) asked the Under-Secretary of

What do you think girls. .
shall we try it?

Yours truly,
PEGGY HART,
FRANK COZIER,
LI WILKINSON.
Hastings,
Ch., Ch,
11th July, "52.

Thanks
'

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,— Kindly allow us on
behalf of the Barbados Youth
Movement; to say “Thanks” to
the officers and men
H.MLS. Burghead Bay; for the
kind hospitality shown to the
youths during the visit on board
on Saturday evening last.

We beg to state Sir, that the|the policy of Her Majesty’s Government of

members were very pli
with what they saw, and heard,
especially being a first time for
the majority of them;

Again Sir

saying many

thanks, and wishing the entire!
staff success in their endeav-!
ours; and last but not least those |tha

who arranged for the trans-
portation to and from the skip.
Yours,
L, BRUCE-CLARKE,
J. B, GRANT,
OLGA BROWNE.
The Youths Centre,
Tudor Bridge,
St. Michael
Barbados

14.7.52.

















and constitute the
important military ally

of thejof the Commonwealth is a matter not for





Benefactor Of Blind

By J. C. COLLIGAN
Secretary-General to Britain’s National
Institute for the Blind, London.

BLIND people all over the world, as well
as their seeing friends and helpers are this
year commemorating the centenary of the
death of their greatest benefactor, Louis
Braille who died — at the age of 43 — be-
lieving that he had utterly failed in his pur-
pose,

The debt of gratitude which the world
ywes to this Frenchman is strikingly illus-
rated in the Braille Centenary Exhibition
vhich the Duke of Edinburgh opened at the
National Institute for the Blind in London,
‘or it serves to show the rich variety of
levelopments to which that almost magical
iulphabet of dots has been put. A life-size
ttatue looks down the length of the hall to-
yards another statue of a great United King-

lom benefactor of the blind — Dr, Thomas
Armitage who founded the National Insti-

ute in 1868 for the express purpose of devel-
ping the use of Braille among the blind
hroughout Europe and the English-speaking
vorld.

The Exhibition also foreshadows far-
eaching developments of Braille by the use
f electronics for printing which will pro-
ide cheaper, less cumbersome and easier to
ead literature. On show for instance, was
the prototype of an entirely new Braille
printing machine which uses a facsimile
stencil for the application of solid dots of
specially prepared plastic ink on to much
thinner and therefore cheaper paper. In this
branch of Braille production research Britain
can claim to be ahead of all other countries.















Braille and Armitage helped to overcome
the yoid of mental darkness that for cen-
turies confronted the blind. It was therefore
particularly fitting that a party from France,
including two distinguished blind leaders in
French blind welfare, went to London to
attend the opening of the Exhibition. Britain
for her part is sending to Paris a delegation,
headed by General Lord Ismay, to attend the
ceremonies of tribute to the name and mem-
ory of Louis Braille. The United Kingdom
delegation includes Mr. John Wilson, the
blind Secretary of the British Empire Soci-
ety for the Blind, a body created in 1949 for
the purpose of tackling the problem of
blindness in Colonial territories.

The world story of Braille is without end
and knows no frontiers. So flexible is this
system that the,United Nations Educational,
Scientific and Cultural Organisation is mak-
ing it capable of representing any language
phonetically; and the National Institute for
the Blind in Britain is constantly called upon
to give advice to fresh pioneers who are
now carrying the system to the farthest
corners of the earth.

In Britain today, for the first time, there
are mdre blind workers employed in the
same occupations as sighted workers than
are working in sheltered workshops. Since
World War II more than 2,000 blind workers
with technical skill have been placed in
sighted industry in the United Kingdom and
their courage, steadfastness and craftsman-
ship is making them many friends.

The field of operation is wide and more
than 40 occupations normally regarded as
essentially reserved for the sighted are now
followed by blind persons in Britain. Who
can estimate how much of this is due to the
invention of that young blind Frenchman
who died in 1852 and who shall question the
fact that he rises like a colussus from among
that devoted body of. people, so many of
them sightless themselves, who have striven
to assist the blind to enter into the fullness
of life.

Freedom Of Movement
In Commonwealth

LONDON.
IN the House of Commons on the 26th









State for Commonwealth Relations if he
will consult with Commonwealth countries
with a view to making reciprocal arrange
ments to permit the unrestricted movement
of members of the British Commonwealth
between Commonwealth countries,

The Under-Secretary of State for Com-
monwealth Relations, Mr. John Foster re-
plied :

The question of restrictions on the entry
of citizens of British Commonwealth coun-
tries into the territories of other members











Her Majesty's Government in. the United
Kingdom but for the Governments of the
countries concerned.

Sir Waldron Smithers: In order to help

trade, not aid, will my hon. and learned
Friend do all in his power to facilitate the
free movement of goods and persons all over}
the world? |

Mr. John Foster: I have given the position
in regard to the independent countries of
Commonwealth.

Sir Waldron Smithers: Will my hon, and
learned Friend use whatever influence .he
has got?

Mr. Thomas Driberg (Labour, Maldon): I
could not understand whether the hon. and
learned Gentleman indicated assent to the
last supplementary; if so, may I ask whether
that includes Seretse Khama?

Mr. John Foster : I did not indicate assent.

—B.U.P.












TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1952

PHOTOGRAPHS
Copies of Local Photographs
Which have appeared in the
ADVOCATE NEWSPAPER
Can be ordered from th
ADVOCATE STATIONERY

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TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1952



Contempt of Court Case

@ from page 3
= they think it could tend ta

o.

For them to say not guilty, they
would have to say that it did not
tend to prejudice, as it was said
in the law, did not tend to influ-
ence the result of the pending
trial.

The question as to whether it
was merely indiscreet was not
one for them. The mere question
was whether that statement
prejudiced, or did it tend to
prejudice, but not whether it was
intended.

At this stage Mr. Walcott cited
Oswald on Contempt at page 86,
and drew attention to the pro-
visions made there as against the
Special Act made under the Laws
of Barbados, and then proceeded
‘to call witnesses,

Evidence

First witness to be called on be-
half of the plaintiff was Mr.
George Morris, Clerk of the Pub-
lic Library. Mr. Morris produced
a copy of the Advocate Newspaper
of the 13th June, 1952 which con-
tained on page 3 a report of the
article referred to in the Writ.

Cross-examined by Mr. Ward,
Mr. Morris said that it was not
within his knowledge that Colone]
Michelin made other _ similar
speeches at other times, and at the
request of Mr. W. W. Reece,
Counsel for the Advocate Co., read
the article part which forms the
subject of the case.

Fitz Haddock, plaintiff next gave
evidence, and said that at the time
of the speech, he was pending
trial on a charge of manslaughter,
He had been charged and evidence
had been taken. Complainant in
that case was Superintendent of
Police Captain E. Simmons who
was in charge of the ee
in which the accident rred,
He said that the case was brought
for manslaughter for the driving
of a motor car on Prospect Road.

In answer to Mr. Ward he said
that he complained of that part
of the article which “tends to pre-
judice” a fair trial of the man-
Slaughter case in which he was
charged.

Mr. Ward:—‘Does that article
at any point suggest that you
were guilty of criminal negli-
gence. ...?”

Judge:—“He would not know
what the law is...

Mr. Ward: “Every man in the
street is supposed to know thd
Jaw. ...Is there any word there
Which suggests criminal negli
CROCE hi os 7
_ Judge:—“In the article, there
is No suggestion of criminality, . .?”

Witness: +-“From what I have
read in the Newspaper concerning
the speech made, there are many
things which were said and which
I feel were wrong and should not
be said... .”

Mr. Ward:—“Is the word crim-
inal used in any part of that
article, ...”

Judge:—‘“In the speech there is
no suggestion of criminality. It
does not say that . . when it
comes to the jury later you may
deal with that... .”

To Mr. Reece:—I read the ar-
ticle. I do not see my name in this
article. I do not see the mention
of any Court in this article.
Neither the Police Magistrate’s
Court at Holetown nor the Court
of Grand Sessions. The name of
the prosecutor, Inspector Simmons
or any other prosecutor does not
appear in the article. I do not see
the names of any children in the
article. I do not see the name of
any Police Magistrate appearing in
the article. I object to the state-
ments in the article to which I re-
ferred in my affidavit and which
is annexed to the Rule of the
Court. It is a fact that there was
an accident on a Sunday after-
noon, and three children lost their
lives as a result of that accident.
It is a fact that the accident hap-
pened with a car. I was driving
that car.

Mr. Reece:—“Mr. Haddock, 3
children lost their lives, Do you
think that it is appalling. Put
yourself out of the picture. Thred
young lives brought suddenly to
an_end. Dovyou think it is ap-
palling Ti

Witness:—“Accidents will hap-
Ea

Mr. Walcott:

“Mr. Reece just

cannot ask the question, You can-’

not at one time. .

Matter For Jury

Judge:—“Tt is a matter entirely
for the jury. It is an appalling
thing.

Mr. Walcott:—“Is it
nalling to say it is appalli
the trial takes place... .?

Mr. Reece:—“That is what my
‘learned friend is saying. I will

”

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tell the jury something different.
I am dealing with the question of
fact and comment here... .”

Judge:—“It is a thing every- ©

body says. It is
unfortunate, a tragic occurrence
and so on. But the question is
does it tend to prejudice the trial?

Mr. Reeve:—That is a point
whieh will come to the jury later.

Judge:—I quite agree.

Mr. Reece:—“I am going to sub-
mit that there is nothing whicn
tends to prejudice any trial. Mr.
Haddock look at the last words
there which say “It should be
possible to prevent accidents of
this nature?” I take it that it
goes without saying that you and
everybody else would not like to
see any accidents at all.”

Witness.—Nobody would like to
see .accidents particularly where
lives are lost but that cannot pre-
vent accidents from happening.

The article appearing in the
Advocate reports a speech made
by Colonel Michelin. If a speech
of the kind was made in further-
ance of a Safety First campaign Tf
do not think that the party shouid
nave included such comment. The
speech began to the effect that it

appalling and

was a Safety First campaign
speech. It ended that way,
Mr. : The whole gist of

the speech is advocating greater
care on the part of drivers on the
public highways, is it not?

Safety First Campaign

Witness: When this speech was
made.....,....., pe!
Mr. Reece: I am_ not asking

when the speech was made, I am

asking you the nature of the
speech,

Witness: “Safety First Cam-
paign,”

Judge: “Mr. Reece the jury can
see all that. Anybody who reads

it can see that it is for the safety
of users of the road.” ;

Mr. Reece: I agree My Lord. I
notice in that speech the Colonel
is purported io have said he
made speeches along similar lines.

Judge: “Is that in the speech
or is that comment?”

Mr. Reece In the speech, sir,

Judge: Ask the witness to look
at the article where it appears,

_Mr, Reece: At the very begin-
ning it says it has been my custom
for the past two years to have a
talk with you at the end of the
licensing year before you renew
your licenses,

Witness: “Yes sir. I only saw
this particular speech. Colonel
Michelin is the Commissioner of
Police of Barbados. The proper
driving of road vehicles and road
manners are things which I as a
citizen would expect him to look
into. The Advocate newspaper is
the only daily newspaper in the
island.

Mr. Reece: One would expec!
the only daily newspaper........I arn
using the words loosely......., sup-
port a Safety First campaign,”

Mr. Walcott: “I must object
that is thoroughly irrelevant.”

Judge “All right Mr. Walcott”

Mr, Reece: “How can I bring
the circumstances out?”

Judge: The circumstances to
which these testify about whether
the Advocate is the only daily
p.per or not has that got any-
thing to do’with whether the parts
of the speech complained of tend
to prejudice this man’s trial?

Mr, Reece: I see what Your
Lordship is driving at. I was not
getting at that at the moment.; T
was asking whether or not it
should not be expected that the
dvily newspaper of the prominence
of the Advocate should not sup-
port a Safety First campaign?

Judge: One hopes that it would.

Mr. Walcott: I submit that
these things should not go before
the jury.

Mr. Reece: I am submitting
that they should go before the jury.

Judge: How does that say
whether jit tends to prejudice the
trial or not?

Mr, Reece: Yes sir, If the
person making the speech or
writing the article or articles on a
particular subiect and that article
shows more than once that it is
the policy of that paper or speaker
to make that given type of speech
or write that type of article
vnd I am going to submit that is
material when it comes to the
question as to whether the article
now in court prejudices or tends
1o preiudice the fair trial or avert
the course of justice.

Judge: I do not quite follow.

Mr. Reece: I am submitting
and I am prepared to cite authority
to show that where there is the
publication of a series of articles
of any particular speech the mere
fact that the narticular article is
pertinent to facts in issue hefore
the court that that is not sufficient.

Judge: How do you mean
pertinent?





RACES
BEACH
OCCASIONS

Colours, and Dots

Cotton and Art Silk,

ET—

DIAL 2352







St. Joseph

Mr. Reece: Totrching upon it.
Judge: I will see the cases in e
due course, You siy that because
am Tae § Collection

and in the pursuit of that policy
it does something wrong in that
line that that will excuse them,
Mr, Reece: If it is established
that they turn aside to do sor



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Vestry To

Enquire Into Non-

Of Taxes

The St. Joseph Vestry have instructed their clerk to
get a written opinion from their Solicitors as to why taxes
on the Spa Plantation have not been collected. The decision

ean wrong there is no hope for a5 made fellowing Mr. J, A. Haynes questioning the taxes
Iudge: I do not see how this not being collected for three years. Verbal opinion has

witness can talk about the policy
of the paper. ;

Mr. Reece: I was not getting at
him on policy I was only asking
the witness whether or not he
would not expect a paper of the
prominence of the Advocate to
pursue the policy of a Safety First
campaign. Whether it is guilty
or not is a different matter, “We are not in a position to

Mr. Walcott: You were goinc allow three years taxes to lie dor-
to say something when my learn- mant,” he said. “It is going to
ed friend interrupted. bring trouble in the parish. The

Witness: I was going to sav law says every land owner must
when Counsel asked me the ques- pay his rates and as it is if you go
tion about the ten persons having to collect taxes from some people
been killed that a man making a after others do not pay they
speech on Safety First campaign may want to ask questions.”
should not introduce such com- After he had been informed of
ment. He should not have made the nature of the verbal opinion
reference of the item that three that had been given, Mr Haynes
children were killed and I was at first suggested that an outside
asking if that was supposed to be opinion should be asked for, but
in the speech at the time. afterwards agreed that the writ+

Mr, Walcott: He did in answer ten opinion should be obtained.

to my learned friend say three Dispenser’s Commission

children were killed in the ac- Mr. Haynes ry : ‘
cident in which I was involved on ee cg Ng paper cade

this particular Sunday afternoon. out the Commission

of the Spa, the taxes cannot
Business, said that it was t

Andrew and the Parochial
every year.

Judge: ey is se i ; ? which the
aan oe setting The that dig parochial dispenser receives, He
answer to Mr. Reece he said he did this when the Vestry were

i i i ith Considering the Statement of
was involved in an accident with SOPS!« ;
a motor car and in which three “ccounts of the Dispensary,

dhildren wets killed, He feels that the commission of

Mr. Walcott: This article did $1,216 which the dispenser would
refer to you? . receive, is not worked out on a
Mr. Reece: How can he ex- Tight basis. The clerk has there-

press an opinion? fore been instructed to check the

Judge: He has already im Minutes of a meeting of 1942
answer to you said he was in- When the basis of arranging for
volved in a ear accident with the the Commission was decided, The
ear which he was driving and in adoption of the Statement has

‘which three children were killed therefore been postponed.

‘at Prospect. Mr. Haynes said that years ago
Mr. Reece: He is now express- the dispenser was paid 10% on
ing an opinion, gross profits, It was found that
Judge: He is not expressing he was losing money and they

‘any opinion at all. He says IT com- got Hon. H. A. Cuke’s suggestion
plain of the word appalling m as to what should be done. He
reference to the accident. He also
agrees that it is appalling when
things of this nature occur.
Mr, Walcott: Read the para- Published in the Advocate news-
graph you complain of. paper, They were on the subject
Witness: I complain of the of Safety First campaign,
whole statement which T put in _ Among those present were: Mr.
the affidavit. I do know that three R. Garner and Mr. G. Archer of
children were killed in an ac- the Department of Highways and
cident with a car on a Sunday Transport, Capt. F. C. Parris,
afternoon. Superintendent of Police in charge
Mr. Reece: The last part of my ef Traffic, Mr, Kenneth Sandiford,
learned friend’s examination did Secretary of the Bus Owners’
not arise out of cross-examination Association. Mr, FE. Massiah and
Judge: The Rule is there, The Mr. H. A. Tudor, Concessionaires.
affidavit is sworn and the whole
matter is before the jury and the Served Order
contempt of court Act says that



; ¥ Mr. T. TT, Headley, Provos

the proceedings can! be brought by ' .

anvbody whomsoever. Marshal said that on June 28, he
Mr. Reece: I am only saying Wsoually served on Colonel

that the last part of my learned Michelin and Miss Ruby Chenery,
friend’s examination did not arise Secretary of the Barbados Advyo-
out of cross-examination. cate Company, L'd., an order to

Judge: He has simply put in "PPear in the Court of Common
" at Ai Pleas as defendants in the matter.
another form what that did. Captain E. Simmons, Super-

Mr. Reece: I respectfully sub- tendent of Police in charge oi
mit no. He went on to read other “"€® No, 4 said he wag the com-
narts of the article. plainant in a case of manslaughter

Judge: He is entitled-to read (rough! against Haddock in the
other parts of the article. It ig Police Magistrate's Court at Hole-
what is in this Rule, stown.

Mr. Reece: I will not worry . The case began on the 2ist of
with it. " tune. Haddock was arrested on

Next witness to be called on be- the 19th June, By June 12
half of the plaintiff was Mr. P. A. evidence had been taken. He was
Vanterpool, a reporter of the charged with m nslaughter for
Advocate newspaper. Mr. Vanter- killing three children by. driving
pool said that he swore to an ® motor vehicle. He had a record
affidavit before the Deputy book in which was kept the de-
Registrar on June 18, 1952, He ‘tails of accidents which happened
said that except for the part of the e ae Area. He did not have it in

m arti erre in Court,
‘which = ie ae peo the Mr. Waleott pointed out that
names cf those present at the fae enone was sesamonas

j f - by a Sub poena to produce ve
mre rere ecu eae hook. Mr. Ward obiected to the
speech made by Colonel Michelin Sub poena on the ground that the
ion that occasion, A copy of that Commissioner of Police was the
speech had been handed to him in Head of a Government Depart-
advance and he had before hand- ment. and certain matters which
ing it in to be set made a dupli- the Sub poena called upon him to
cate copy which he read word for Produce were treated 1S coe
word behind Colonel Michelin gone and should not go before

or ivers. ie *) i Ww NuHtic, J
Cable Fa pct adi apeRAis oe It was agreed on a sugeestion

In answer to Mr. Ward be said from the Jude that Colonel
he received the original copy of the Michelin could be questioned on
sneech shortly after 11 o’clock., the particular points required
The first parigraph of the news-
naner article was an extract of =
Colonel Michelin’s speech. He
said he was a revorter at the
Advarate for more than four years

Captain Simmons said he knew
7 aecidents, and enumerated
six which had taken place in his
Area. The other he said he could
; ser addresses NOt remember. He had read the

We Bag RT Rel Michelin on article which appeared in the
previous occasions. Those speeches Advocate Newspaper, and to which
had been reported in the Advocate the matter in Court related. ‘
newepaner ond on one oecasion he He did not knew anything of
knew as a certainty that a com) the nature of what the Colenel
of the speech was handed to an- said until he read the Newspaper,



f

‘other reporter. s iter ( .ptain Simmons had giv-
To Mr. Reece: The articles were en his evidence, Mr. Walcott closed
. , 4 the case for the plaintiff. His

94669604

%
%

:
:

ao d@re@ern




POO SODPDAGHE-SODHSDOSDDSHO HHO HS HSHOMH HSH

PERSONS PODS SH

LADiES’ HANDBAGS
Reduced to .............

Reduced to



if you're

CHILDREN’S HANDBAGS

already been given that with the present state of the affairs

be collected.

Mr. Haynes who introduced the subject under General

hree years that the taxes had

not been collected. The Spa also had some land in St.

Treasurer of that parish sued

advised that a commission of
234% on the net profit should be
paid and at the time that was
cone
A Loan
The Vestry avreed to advance
the Social Committee of the
Bathsheba Community Centre a
loan to cover expenses ineurred
in the running of the Centre
money will be repaid when

money is gained from the activi-
ties al the Centre. The Vestry
ceme to this agreement after re-
ceiving a letter from’ the Com-
mittee asking for the advance.
Granted Exhibitions

Ten-year-old Joyce Celeste
Marshall of Sugar Hill, St, Jos-
eph, has been granted a Vestry
exhibition at Queen's College.
Marshe!! was one of seven appli-
cants and received 205 marks out
of 300 in the examination test.

Margo A. Newton who is 12
years, 5 months, and is already a
pupil of the school, received 255,
but the exhibition was given to
Marshall partly because of her
age, her circumstances and the
fact that Newton who lived in §t.
Joseph for some years, has not
been living in that parish for the
past two years,

The other vacant Vestry exhi-
bition, this one to Lodge School,
was given to ll-year-old Karl
O’Brien Stuart of Coffee Gully.
Stuart gained the highest marks
in the examination test.





Lordship adjourned for lunch,

On resumption Mr. Ward, Coun-
sel for defendant Colonel. Michelin
opened his case, and after citing
case law in support of his argu-
ment, called upon Mr. George
Morris to produc copies of the
Barbados Advocate of June 2, of
1950 and 1951, in which appeared
articles in connection with similar
speeches made by Colonel Miche-
lin to Bus Drivers and Conduct-
ors.

Colonel Michelin then gave evi-
dence in his own behalf, He ad-
mitted making the statements to
which reference was made in the
Rule of the Court, and further
that he had handed a typescript
of what he said to Mr, Vanterpool,
He said that the newspaper arti-
cle of 13th June, 1952 was correct
with what he said at the Public
Meeting at the Empire Theatre,
nnd added that it was part of his
Safety First Campaign by which
means he endeavoured to empha-
sise upon bus drivers and con-
ductors the need for more care on
the road.

He said that when he made that
wpeech, he did not intend that it
should prejudice the fair trial of
anyone, nor did he think that it
would tend to do so,

The comment which he used,
and to which the plaintiff took
»bjection was used only as an il-
luctration to show what could
happen when drivers of motor
vehicles were not constantly tak-
ing care in their driving, He had
not the slightest idea that any-
thing which he said then would
prejudice the fair trial of anyone,
ind had he any idea to the con-
trary, he would never have said
anything which would in any way
prejudice anybody’s trial.

In other and previous articles
he had made reference to the
number of accidents, and com-
mented on the general conduct of
drivers and conductors of "buses
This was with a view to empha-
eising upon drivers that they
—$—$—$_$—$—$_

WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Common Pleas ....
10,00 a.m.

Police Courts ..., 10,00 a.m,

Basketball at Y.M.P.C. .....-.
7,30 p.m,



SEP APL PLP LLLPLPPLPLOTD

$2.00

Reduced

GLOVES









We offer

Quite a few

NYLON STOCKINGS
(Light Colour for Evening)

O00 ea
CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.,, LTD.

$40,000 H
Can't Spend

A German 100,000 mark of
1923 was brought inte the Advo-
eate a few days
Jones of Brighton, Black Rock,
an employee of Alleyne Arthiu
& Co. By present values, this

would be worth $40,000, B.W.1.

but this type of note is out of

circulation,

Jones was thrilled at the i ‘ea
of owning this much money, but
es it is now unredeemable its
only value to him is as a kind
of curio.

Jones said he got the note
ifrom a little boy two weeks »#0,
but he does not know how the
boy came by ut.

‘Burghead Bay’
Leaves For T’dad

The H.M.S. Burghead Bay
under the command of Captain
J. A. Tevers, O.B.E.; R.N., left
Carlisle Bay yesterday afternoon
for Trinidad, The Burghead Bay,
a 2,400 ton Bay Class frigate
ealled here on July 12 from Mar-
tinique.

She is now on hurricane petrol
duty in the West Indies and has
her base in Bermuda.

‘Gloria B’ Here
Krom Martinique

The schooner Gloria B, arr ved
in Carlisle Bay yesterday morn-
ing from Martinique under Cap-
tain M. Hall, The Frances W.
Smith which called at this port
on Sunday from British Gusang
brought in 1,000 bags of rice, 527
pieces of green heart and 380
bunches of fresh fruit.

The Lady Joan arrived the
same day from St. Vincent with
318 bags of copra, eight bags of
peanuts and two bags of pears.
These schooners ara consigned
to the Schooner Owners’ Associa-
tion.









“should drive more carefully so 1°

to reduce the number of accide.ts
In his speech at the Empire Thea-
tre on the 12th June, 1952, he dia
say that 10 persons were killed as
the result of road accidents, and
went on to say that one of the
most ghastly accidents took pl ice
a few weeks ago. That acciden.
to which he referred as one of thy
most ghastly was included in the
10 referred to in his speech,

Mr. Wat ott at this stage agreed
{hat there was no need to press
that the Sub poena be enforced,
in view of the fact that the
Colonel had in his evidence given
the information which he requir-
ed.

Mr. Ward at this stage complet-
ed his examination af Colonel
Michelin, and upon an intimation
from Mr. Walcott that he would
be some time in his cross-examin-
ation of this witness, His Lords\\ip
adjourned further hearing until
10.30 o'clock this morning,



WILL
"COUNTING SHEEP”
HELP YOU TO

SLEEP?

If sleeplessness is caused by beiny
overtired, nervous, run-down anc
worried — it takes more than
“counting sheep" to help you
sleep. Though you toss and tury,
hour after hour, you can’t ‘wisi’
yourself to sleep!

Many find that taking a toni
regularly is beneficial~and helps
them rest more easily at night.
And Dr, Chase's Nerve Food j
first choice with thousands! Fu.
the Vitamin Bi, iron and. othe,
needed minerals it contains ate
sometimes just what your systen
lacks. And Dr. Chase's Nerve
Food does so much to build you up
—by increasing appetite and im-
proving digestion.

So if worry, anxiety, a run-down
condition or the strenuous pace ot
modern living is upsetting your
nerves eo you can’t relax and res(

—try taking Dr, Chase's Nerve
9 food fora while, The name “Dr
Chase” is your assuvance.

Vv



to



ago by Raiph;



'SCSSOCSOSS SSS GOS DOGO FOS SP FOV GSES OOOO GOS

Shortage Of Rice
Felt In Speightstown

A rice shortage is being felt in Speightstown, For about
a week now, shoppers have not been getting their quotas
from their dealers. ;

Some are getting half. Some small shop-keepers of the
town have no rice to sell and so everybody is going to the
big dealer for his supply.

English potatoes which are in full supply are filling up
the gaps caused by the shortage of rice and other ground
provisions. : ;

Flying fish have become scarce tco, but some days fish-
ermen bring in small catches of fish-pot fish. :

* * . all their fishing boats to the

Young cane crops and vegetable Speightstown moorings,
crops are looking green and fresh About eight of the boats have
everywhere in the parish. Plant- been added to the Speightstown
ers are happy and are taking every fleet. Cove Bay fishermen now
opportunity to till their fleids. have to take their boats to the

Vegetables—with the exception banks from the Speightstown
of breadfruits—are still scarce. mooring and bring in their catches
There are nr potatoes and yams. to the Speightstown market.
Planters say that the *howers of
rain raised their hopes of having
. full market of potatoes soon.

n

The Speightstown Methodist
Church held their annual Mis-
sionary Meeting at their church
on Monday night at 7.30 o’clock.
A packed church made successful



Fishing boat owners of Cove
Bay met with heavy losses when
high winds and heavy seas lashed
the western coast last year. Cove
Bay is not a safe anchorage during
such weather, and that has a 4
the boats to be brought to
Speighitstowr.

‘the big occasion” for Methodists. * s
The Rev. Parker of Grenada The St. Lucy’s Parish Church
was the Guest Speaker of the is getting a “new look.” The

walls are being washed on the
outside and the roof painted. The
outside of the Church was dirty
from ash from Fairfield’s sugar

night.

Ceve Bay, St. Lucy, is no more
mooring for fishing boats. In
response to a suggestion from the factory during the crop.
Fisheries Department, boat The Rectory has also been
owners of Cove Bay have brought recently repaired.

GEORGE PAYNE'S
S

GOOD COCOA

DRUGS
MUST

BE

PURE.

PURE FRESH, and of the HIGHEST QUALITY in
order to obtain the maximum effectiveness. We carry
the Finest Range and all Drugs are dispensed by a
careful and competent staff.



Send your next Prescription to...

KNIGHT’S DRUG STORES

ooo




SSS






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QUALITY
PERFORMANCE
RELIABILITY

Your Guarantee of
trouble-free Motor
Cycling



eee

ECKSTEIN BROS.














* PAGE SIx



CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2%08
sog ai ae
IN MEMORIAM FOR SALE
DA COSTA—In ever tender memory of;

gur dearly loved cider son Darniey,| ~~
Sane. Leicester and Chindits, on onthe |





emniversary of his death in AUTOMOTIVE
Tuy Mth, ae —
RP. ' CAR—Morris Oxford—In excellent con+
His ever sorrewing Father & Mother. | dition, low mileage. Dial 4616 Courtesy
15.7.52--1n | Garage. 13.7.52—3n,

Siliitnemonntiientinetabtihitiipipmnantes | eapmnmnanienanngemaienniiamatnatatteee
HARDING—ig loving memory of Phylis, CAR—One Morris Minor Saloon done
jorie Herding who died on 15th} 10,000 miles. Excellent condition. Can

1951, ~ | be seen at Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616.
Her kind offectionate words, her | 13.7.52—3n.
loving ways, | ae



CAR--One (1) Wolseley 8 H.P. only
44,000 miles. Owner driven. Phone 3944,
15.7.5%—in! 13.7.52—t.f.n.

SMITH—In joving memory of my Gear “CAR—One (1) Singer Sports Car O-159
sister Josephine Smith who fell asleep in perfeet coridition. Apply to C. 8s.
15th of July, 1952. Greaves ¢/o B'dos Knitting & Spinning

Some may think I have forgotten! \iills Co., Ltd. Spry Street.
!

How can “we ever forget her |
Williarn SienGlt and her children.







at times they see me smile 13.7.52-—2n.

God only knows the tears | icopeaiiedlesidilhiaeiabadindesnench Ottis
Those smiles hide all the time. \. CAR-—Vauxhall Velox in A-l, condi-
Helena Smith (sister), Daisy, Esmay,/iion. Oniy reason for selling owner
Doreen (nieces). 15.7 .52-—An. j feaxinat island. Conant Davee: aie
13 n

18-7.82-1n | ¢."B Rise &

leg
WEEKES—in loving memory of our! CAR—Ford 10 h.p. in good worki
Beloved uncle Jobs Nathaniel Weekes, | condition. Price $450.00. Phone | F:







Who died July 15th 1950. evelen’ 200 : la eee?
Two. years have past, since that sad | ii eee seperate =
day | GAR—One @) Prefect Ford Car in
foees ‘the one we joved, has passed’ .4@ condition. F..F. Gandert, Sand-
e at. \. 2.7.652--3n.
we miss him now, our hearts are i os Pulp B .
» S0ns, | “CAR—Ford V-8 Super -. Deluxe 90
time goes by we miss him more, o:¢e-power 6 seater grey sedan, K-54.
loving smiles, his gentle face, §.-ellent ondition, always owner
ene can fill his vacant place. |‘ \iven. ‘otal mileage 29,000. Just
Dottin's family. *15.7.52—In. | ‘tiped with first new set 1
. ‘ones. R. D. Stewart, Dial ra
£OR RENT be era al Sh ane
« er ae 1% Saloon, practically
£ “wery Uttle mileage. reason
7 - 3 “gelling owner going to England, and
. HOUSES i. rehasing ANOTHER ROVER to be

GE L hone 4
nA 12.7, 52—an



ah ne a a
Attractive seaside Flat main road Jias-
eomfortebiy furnished, Fnglish

Bane Open Verandah facing sea. Suite oe

one nm (or couple). ean ath
Teleprone 2949. n





‘ONE ry Austin ¢) two ton truck and one

1) Austin A.4@ Car, Telephone 4821,
12. V. Seott & Co., Ltd

STORE—That patt of the Red Store, 20.6.52—t.f.m,

Street, now opeupled by 7. ; a
es Grant, will bo vacant on the Sst VROTALL VELOX 194° ‘Wodet “New
(August. Can be leased for 5 years, } ‘res and in A-i condition e eae .
Apply: Professor Weekes. Dis i GARAGE igi sag Si

TRUCM-—Chevrolet truck, no reason-
ibie offer refused. A tarnes & €9..



lt

TO AN APPROVED TENAN®





ee Wotan sittin bedrooms with run-} itd. 5,7,52—t. fn.

ining water, sitting room, and kitchen, SUE nEEE
if required. Apply by letter oF ELECTRICAL

moet Mrs. B. L. Barrow, Leono: ha

19.7,52-—2n J ist received new aceite 8 is

‘2 Automatic ers. Ai

F afte & Co. Ltd. Ratio Em-

15.6.52—t.f.n.

m5
viam.
wiki | 7
JUST ARRIVED “Pye” De Luxe
sUlira-Modern Radio-Grams (with Gar-
rang ed changers) Two Pickup Heads
oy needie ae in attractive walnut
Umited quantity only
ve. é S. MAFFEI & CO., LTD,,
Pry Henry Street.
" 26.0.52—t.f.n.



MISCELLANEOUS
Air Rifle BSA. Simon.







WANTED TO RENT —————
“BUNGALOW Three Room Bunogalow.| -EONARD REFRIGERATORS—17 eu.
furnished. Situated on sea coast Sealed units 5 year guarantee. 2

s, St. Lawrence or Rockley. ae frozen food and ice reer

Lease preferred, from ment. Vegetable bin, Price $555
Apply: EK. PD. Edwards, P.O. i67,| fort Reyal Telephone
a, 10.7, 52—4n, | 2568. 10.7.52-—dn.

ne
50 POCKET MONEY earned BATTERY SETS—Just a few left. |
# hesdunenning 25 new subseribers AFFErs RADIO EMPORIUM.

a

Garage Lid

ae



IFFUSION in one month, 15.6,52—t.t.n.
are 1.7,52—6n.
eee RY Seti
“ REDIFFUSION offers $1.50 cash for LIVESTOCK

nh new Subscriber recommended by
Fou. ‘ 1.7.52—6n.







es ROXERS—Two brindled bitch puppies
SUPPLEMENT YOUR ¥NCOME by | j,. sale. Sire son of triple Swiss

fecominending REDIFFUSION. Obtain | onempion Vam Ex Holga of Germania,







particulars irom the KEDIFFUSION Jrour months. Write C$ Kelly,

gence. 1.7,52—-6n: Tcastleton, Dominica. 12.7.52—2m.
, TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bonus BULL~-One nedisree, Jer

m Rediffusion for 25 recommenda i ola, mother oa Sareea on

dons in one calendar month siege gave lic with first calf.

§2--6n. TF ether *, Talenheln at Pine Livestock

eer ienenannnanane 4 ‘ation, Sturges Plantation, St. ; «Thomas.

. 7” " ‘Vclephone 4807, 2—-3n
EDUCATIONAL nn

ONE MULE — Apply Constant Planta-

tien. 14.7, 62—6n.



“Combermere School

VACANCY FOR MODERN LANGUAGE:
“| ““ADDING MACHINES—New shipment

~ MASTER
Applications.are isivited from Graduates Me eee gioco eh wh Gee
" 9.7.52—6n.

MECK ANICAL



for the post of Aso'stont Master qualifi Phoi
“teach French and Spnnish up fe fp arant a =e

te
sevel of the GC-E., and | “puPLICATORS—Roneo Rotary Dupli-
; h to Advanced Level. Some ex- | ators, several models, from $60.00 gh
| alas ny aati aac A ae will Mg Get a'demonstration to-day at ?, Geddes

Aen On uy no! sent

SALARY Se res # Grant Ltd., Bolton Lane.” .7.62—8n.
Grantor ¥1 000 % 120—2,880 X ldt—{ SOPpPICE EQUIPMENT—Roneo Filing
Cabinets, Roneo Stationery Cup-

Graduste ist or 2nd Class Honours:
#0 2080 st 456 2 ioe oeards, now available trom stock at T.

Geddes Grant Ltd.
renner © Diploma $240 pe in addition | v7.8 a
the foregoing seales. t of Living PEWRITER Type-
Aliewance .§ pavable at the prevailing | iter — innit rare perfect
rates. kta aah position on the! -oudition. G. ey Hutchinson’ 2c Co.,
experience in recognised Secondary eh
Sehools and War Service,

Salary scale will be adjusted by previous! ) 4).
The grant of Leave Passages after a ant Bead pe tow le T: vpgerriters,
" eral ae







Fy
3
z
5
if



Geddes Grant
consideration hig authorities. 62—6:
Previous iacened this advertise- “e. ss
os oe cohditions of Leave Passage | |
cancelled,
Successful applicant should be avail- MISCELLANEOUS

able to assume y as from September
next, but under special circumstances
von be delayed until January 1953. AMERICAN
Application ino spccial form) accom-]| Crime, Mike Barnett
panied by three testimonials and aj} Tex Ritter, We He Captal
ograph should be submitted to jhe} Marvel, on a le
eadmaster, Combermere Sehool, “St.] Coptain hi , ll Boyd,
ichael, Barbados, as early as possibic| six Gun Heroes. cents each,
and in any case not later than 3ist dJuly,] Club Building 58, Swan t.
12.7,52—3n, 18.7. 52—3n.

EMBROIDERY SPUN—Heavy quality
wn with beautiful embroidery in four
colours 36 inches wide. Usually $1 s
. Reduced to $1.51 at Kirpala
swan Street, 16, 7.62—-1n

, GALVANIZED SHEETS. 26 Gauge, in

With arrypeeee Want

TEBOKS t ‘4. Now is ‘the time to ee: Har-
- THERMOSTATIC CONTROL | ‘bon's, Bilal 2964, 2.7,.52—8n.

and it-eagy to keep clean. “\IXER—One or ae
See th@n ‘before ivs too late, Aiaster, practic:
At you “Gay "Showroom, Bay At Courtesy Garage

Ss
ONLY A FEW LEFT.













THE GAS COOKER ~









SUBSCRIBE now the Drily
TY legraph, England's leading Daily News-
2oper now arriving In Barbados ty Air
only a few days after publication ih
ondon, Contact Ian Gale, C/o. Adyo-
nat . Ltd, Leoeal Representative
Yel. 8118. 14.5210

TEE ee Cn ee
WEDDING GIFT—A few tromng board

and No-cord iron sets, subject to speciai

wedding-gift allowance, A Barnes
mo, Dita 3.%,52—t.f.n.



10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

en: re awe nee te ene

Johnson's Stationery

° will be CLOSED
on THURSDAY







1ith for P WAYPLE PIQUE —Excelien
* wality ‘affeta in nine charm:

ies STOCK-TAKING hedes 36 inches w 1.39 yard, nearky
; inished at Kir “Swan Street.

y jOUTH ORGANS ketone



Just ived by—
JOHN ae STATIONERY

LOST & FOUND



LOST

SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—Series P.P.

inder please return same to Ivan

®, Grazettes Road, St. Michael.
15. 7.52—1n,

_®WEEPSTAKE TICKET-—Series WW.













Finder please return same to
¢ on Thompson, My Lord's Hjil,
ticorish Village, St. Michael,

1S. 7. 52—In;





This Week's
Special



£ZARN BIG MONEY by selling Redif-
susion in your spare time. Get a supply
ot farms today. 1.7,52--6n.

JELLY DOUGHNUTS ' It not saved but seeking
|

6 ¢ each Salvation, please write for
TREE HOOK
Which Makes
“GOD'S WAY OF
SALVATION PLAIN”

8. Roberts, Gospel
Book & Tract Service, 30
Central Ave., Bangor, N.I. &





Also a Variety of |

_ DANISH PAS PASTRIES !
R
y



Wp ARBANNS -

AKERIES Math. |],

BIAL 4758
JAMES STREET

eR ae



POOSSSSSSOS SPOS OOS

:

iNNOUNCEMENTS |



PUBLIC SALES |



REAL ESTATE

“ARTRAMON: situate at Flint Hall,

St. Michael, stonding on 2 acres 3 roods| DECISIONS made under Sections 10, 11 and 12 of the Wages Board

6 wehes of jand

house is built of stone and con-
tains 2 galleries, large drawing and aoe,
rooms, hallway, 4 bedrooms upstairs,
bedrooms downstairs and several ot!
rooms, kitchenette snd usual ne
veniences.

Garage and servants rooms in yard i
Numerous fruit trees.

ALSO

5 acres 2 roods of land adjoining tie

— (excellent building sites).
every day (except Sunday«
barwion 4 and 6 p.m.

The above wiil be sct up for Sale at
Public Competition on Friday the 18th
July, 1962 at 2 p.m. at the office of the
undersigned

























































CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Lucas St.
Solicitors





CALCUCHIMA-—-On the Rockie; Coast.
Dial 2036. 28.6 S2—tin.

LAND—13,605 square feet of land with
the Wall standing thereon at Benny
Hall, St. Peter. Several Breadfruit and
other fruit trees thereon, situate on
Public Road, Iden) site. Offers will he
received by Messrs. Maynes & Griffith,
No. 1 Tigh Street. Dini 4173.

12.7.52—4n



LAND— 6.186 pquare feet of land at
Knights Land, Lower Westbury Road,
with bearing truit trees and water well,
Price $1,500.00. D'Arcy A. Seott, Middle







Street. 15.7.52-2n.
LAND—Two House Spots Land on
Blue, Waters ‘terrace near

each Areag 11,366 and 8,120 Square
feet adjoining one ie Apply
a. B. Kinch, 185, Roebuck. S'

io. 7. $9—t.t.n.

-_————$—$

The eae will offer for sale
et their office, No. 17, High Street,
Bridgetown, on Friday, the 25th July
1962, at 2 Pee

‘The dwellinghouse called “VENTNOR”
with the land whereon the same stands
containing by ddmeasurement 4,093
‘quare feet or thereabouts situate at
the Corner of Pine Road and Ist Avenue,
Belleville.

inspection on Mondays, Wednesdays
aud Pridays between the hours of 4 and
6 p.m. on application to the tenant

Wor further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to:
Cc , CATFORD & CO,
10,7.52—3n.





NO. 2%, BROAD STREET
The undersigned will offer for saie
at their Office, No. 17, High Street,
Bridgetown, on Friday the 25th July,

1953, at 2.30 eed
AGE .OR STORE known
as No. 27, Broad Street, Bridgetown,
standing on 4,340 square feet or there-
abouts and at present occupied by
Messrs. T. R. Evans,
Inspection on application on the
premises.
For further particulars and conditions
of sale, apply to:—
COTTLE, PATFORD, & CO.
13,7,52—7n,

AUCTION



REALTORS LIMITED
AUCTION SALE

AT 11.30 A.M.

On Tuesday the 22nd July, by order
of Mr. Elton Millet, we will sell the
furniture and household effects Mr. B. A.
Brooks’ residence “ADULO” Ventnor
Hill, Rockley, which includes Drawi
room suite consisting of three chairs
settee to seat two, plastic top table, three
carved pedestal Ashtrays tables,
dining room chairs, all in at
birch table with enamel top,









| Wages Board Act, 1943, and Wages Board Regulations, 1944.

of June, 1952.



the Department of Education, Garrison.

—_

1951 to investigate the system of
communications between Trinidad
and Tobago has now made its re-
four bert; and what it has recommend.

The
nial Affairs, Mr. H. L.. d’A, Hop-



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



GOVERNMENT NOTICE | OFFICIAL NOTICE

DECISIONS





Act, 1943 (194325) by the Wages Board established under the |!" "= "ove
Wages Board (Bridgetown Shop Assistants) Order, 1950 eanene eae

b terest in or any Men or incumbrance
1: feecting all that certain piece or parcel
; 0! land situate at Hothersal Turning in
lt tre parish of Saint Michael and Island





Wages Board (Bridgetown Shop Assistants) (Amendment)
Decisions, 1952, No. 2





B SEEDS
ASSISTANT COURT OF
APPFAL




WENDELL CLA v

FRCELL IOLA SEALY
IN pursuance of an Order in this Court
action made on the 10th
i t give notice to all

‘oresaid containing by greg |
t\vo roods or thereabouts abutting and













Defendant
S.S. “GLOUCESTER”

estate, right or

Perbsdos sbout August

fvomen cargo.



ii from Port Pirie Mey 3ist. Devonport
Tune 5th, Melbourne June 14th, Svdney
June 24th, Brisbane July 5th, arriving at

Tn addition to genera! cargo this vessel
has ample space for chilled and bard

TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1952



SHIPPING NOTICES

—

MONTREAL, aUSTEALI“, NEw SEIS SV ALEEVSESLPPLOSD,
sclietion ZEALAND LINE LAMITED.
IFFITH, Plaintiff (M.A.NZ LINE)

The M/V “MONEKA” will
fe eubeduled to accept Cargo and Passengers for

Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, }
Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Mon-
6th. day i4th inst.,
The M/V ‘CARIBBEE” will
accept Carg nad Passengers jor
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,

Nevis and St. Kitts Sailing Fri-

Cargo accepted on through Bills of day i6th imet.
Lading fer tramshipment et Trinidad to

4 oundin land late of Mabel ana, LL a Wi yard 4 * 2 ERS’
These Decisions may be cited as the Wages Board (Bridgetown r Lenssen Mba Hi ar late oF Camilla ips Ge Be Lgerere ae sivas WL asOCTARION auc} a
Shop Assistants) (Amendment) Decisions 1952, No. 2 and shall| © See teeth ce, tant oe ne ae ofl For further partlealars apply — eae ee ae, an
pose cingy ne | one with the Wages Board (Bridgetown our it » Estate of Donald Cuarke, datsssed, L| FURNESS WITHY &@ CO. LTD. : :
9 wud of a road over whic! ere is w TRINIDAD. “
istants ) isions, 1950, No, 2 (hereinafter referred to as the | right of way to the public road or how- ite j
Principal Decisions) . ever else the same may abut and bound

Sub-paragraph (1) of paragraph 3 of the Principal Decisions is

hereby repealed and the following new sub-paragraph substituted |
therefor: —

Zz ents



Made this 6th day of June, 1952

R. NICHOLAS JACK,

Labour Commissioner.
Chairman, Wages Board for Shop Assistants in Bridgetown.
Approved by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this 26th day



j day.

By Command,
J. C. KING,
_ Clerk, Executive Committee. er eee
_ 11.7. Sag Clerk

~ LONDON CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE—AUTUM
EXAMINATIONS, 1952

Forms of entry for the above exa:ninations may be obtained from







Higher Stage — for each single subject, except
Foreign Languages

Barbados. 5.7.52,—3n.



RATES OF EXCHANGE

ft JULY 14, 1952



COMMUNICATIONS



CurbvourDiles

no longer necessary to ouffer



tehing and torment from Vilea
vince ‘the discovery of Hytex (formeriy


































to bring before me an account of their
suid claims with their witnesses, docu-

by me on any “Tuesday, or Friday be-
“() Th ini h hid i srere the nates of
© minimum holiday with pay for shop assistants|© clock im the afternoon,
i i | of the Clerk of the Assistant Court o1
m= vie ae por 8), an accordance with the Holidays with | appeal at the Court House, Eames
‘a l- »” | Defore the 24th day of September, 1
7 c ), Qnd Barf Act amending the same. in order that such claims may be ranked
according nature and priority
) thereof
; persons
| benefit



precluded from the
said Decree,
| deprived of all claim on or against the
aid property.

Claimants « also notified they
must attend the said Court on ednes-
» 24th day of September, 1952, at
. when their said claims
wlll be ranked.

Given under my hand this 10th day of

G. TALMA,
of the Assistant Court of

10 o'clock a,

OFFICIAL SALE

BARBADOS.
IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF
APPEAL

noon on Friday,

aforesaid containing by admeasirement
two roods or thereabouts abutting and
Garrison, together with a copy of the | bounding on lands now or late of Mabel
Bonnett on lands now or late of Camilla
G. Sandiford on lands now or late of
Manoah Morris on lands now or late of
the Estate of Donald Clarke, deceased,
}and on a road over which there is a
right of way to the public road or how-
ever else the same may abut and bound
and if not then sold the said property| WV
will se set up for sale on every succeed~
ing Friday between the same hours until
+ the same is sold for a sum not less than
NEW YORK £166.





No appetite? No pep? The
rich, blood-building proper-
‘ties of YEAST-PHOS will
restore lost energy and will











DA COSTA & CO., LTD.,

SESSA ALI EE FON



to be examined

12 (noon) and 3
at the Office

Â¥ =




otluswise such
and be

The S/S *

Appeal, Ag.

15.7.52-—-8n SOUTRBOUND



|
wou

2

é

SOUTHBOUND
A STEAMER"

‘Equitable Jurisdiction)
WENDELL CLARON GRIFFITH, Plaintiff

ENTRY FEES :— ERCELL, IOLA SEALY Defendant

. tary Stage — for each single subject... w $ 1.68] Nortcr is hereby given that by virtue

Certificate Stage — for each single epee « except of an. Order of The Assistant Coat of

# ea dated cat a oOo. iy ie

Foreign languages . . . neve 2.28 sees will be set up for sale to ei est

a bidder @ e of the Clerk of the

For’ each Foreign Language .... ih r 4.00 Aisiave mt Court of Appent at the Court
is » Sehool Certificate of Commercial Education... 2.00 | House, between the hours rep

of 12 (noon) and 2 o'clock in the after-

the 26th day of Septem-

7: 00 | ber, 1952, all that certain piece or parcel
of land situate at Hothersal Turning in
Forms must be completed and returned to the Honorary Secre-|the parish of Saint Michael and Island

tary, Local Education Committee, London Chamber of Commerce at |‘
the Department of Education,
Girth/Baptismal Certificate and the fees on or before Friday, Ist |
August, 1952.

Department of Education,

“BRUNO”









ge, Alcoa.

Sen eee remo eerne

From Montreal and I Halifax





Steamahip lo

Gnc.



NEW YORK SERVICE.

A STEAMER sails 20 June—errives [.;bodos lst July.
NEW ORLEANS SEBVICE.

sails 6th June—arrives Barbados 2Ist June.

“THEMISTOCLES”
A STEAMER sails 19th June—arrives Barbados Sth July.

CANADIAN SERVICE



oe

SAILS FROM
Montreal Aftrives Barbados
June 28th duly 15th
July 11th July 28th
July 28th Augwit lith
August 12th August th

DUE BARBADOS
August Sth gor ST. JOHN, N.B. and
ST LAWRENCE RIVER PORTS



ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
Apply:— DA COSTA & CO., LED CANADIAN SERVICE



CAN ADIAN SERVICE









Expected Arrival

Montreal Halifax Dates
Bridgetown, Barbados

28 June 3 July 4 July

15 July 21 July 6 August

30 July 4 August 22 August

14 August 19 August 3 September







72.0% 7 bi inkers 73.4 9 4 f Jul 1962. ry * ~
BETWEEN TRINIDAD 1" Sissf"0r lemane | Dated this 10th doy of Jay) UNITED KINGDOM SERVICE
cee 11.2% pr Clerk of the Assistant Court ag | F
19.1% r, Cabi 5 tame Appeal, Ag. | " *
AND TOBAGO Han hs Bo eee esr peat Ot rom South Wales, Liverpool and Glasgow
N N | A er aise 69.2% pr ces eed
LONDON. © 7 eT aie ee
Including Newfoundland) Sou Expected Arrtval
oan July a oe a on. 17.4% ca + eaves eee Dd pr. | Wales Liverpool Glasgow Dates Bridgetown,
, nson man nfts 7 pr ‘ " 2
\Sonearenteye Blackpool) asked 75.3% pr ana ca + 80 June § July 9 July 23 July
e Secretary of State for. the fats LARRINAGA’ io Saly. hh ;
% 26 July 31 Jul 5 August 19 August
Colonies whether the Coastal | i in BA Be. $.8. “STUGARD” .. (1:5 ug. 21 ‘August 26 Angust 9 Senterober
Steamer Committee appointed in | s.S. “SEBABREEZE” ..Early September. Mid Sept. Mid October
PP:

Co elnubiiels Graig teeubies nicsgrstemureeune toate aeaisaci tte ks eee et
UNITED KINGDOM AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE
From Antwerp, Rottexdam and London

Expect
Antwerp otterdam London weed Szeient





mahogany table, painted din | B .
tsble,“one ‘simmons double bed, a | Mork ta 10 minutes and ot only etope keep you fit! S.S. “SPURT” . Mid July End July meena Atul
shumberking kk tal St
spring, two singl: ingon replied: The Coastal Stearn= | or ete enn tes put the avrctl: 2+ 2S. “ESsr ; .. Mid August End August Mid Sept.
ae remap sabe: Chine ten ‘re, ers and Island Launch Services | ing, stops bleeding and combate nerve S.S. “SUNADELE” .) Mid Sept, End Sept. Mid October
items of was see ad. ‘ Painted bedside c has ; eee two! Uritation ery Sree oe YE it
ble, of drawers, i i reports. 1 am ing in é . ,
vba, manos burner oil stove, one oven | th of the House a £0 By | iiery thoes. Backache, Go tipation. GENERAL TONIC Agents: PLANTATIONS. LUMITED — Phone 4703
7 cubie foot general electric the a Tnidad Legislative Council } iisposttion Get. Mf acu trom your -
vox of tools, small high speed drill, their interim re- druggist today under the positive .
table lamp and standing lamp, rest chair, | P4Per Asnsattng e guarantee Mytex must sop your pile %
kitehen utensils and many other items, |commendations and a report of the! find ang troubles or money back o# | se
Terms @aah, , faction taken thereon by the Gov} saturn of empty package. ; »
: wowed So mes STEADY NERVES {}' Sarbados Amateur | oxing Assn.
PUBLIC NOTICES 3 Under the patronage of
FILM SHOW MEAN iS CANADA DRY
NOTICE OUTSTANDING % Invite
THE PARISH OF ST. ANDREW - ¢ ‘ HAMPIONSHIPS
Applications for two vacant veste | THE BARBADOS STEADY SLEEP }}\; Entries for the 1952 C oO
oe a AQUATIC CLUB 3 soe hs
hue ig a ge up to Saturday, (Local and Visiting if THE MODERN HIGH SCHOOL STADIUM
uly pplications mus Members only) I later
« led by birth Certificat during the month of August at a date to be announced la
ipplcante must present “Gheabelves, to Through the courtesy of the oo sreghare wane: 1% Championships will be contested { in the following divisions:
on Monday Sis ed fo : aoe V A] UES British Counell there wil Flyweight — under 112 Ibe.
ern hf a the — ” ”
Vestry Clerk, St. Featherweight — , 126 ,
a. Ser ls FILM SHOW : Lightwolsh se ge a
eras E ano pholstered (Ne plece MORRIS in the Ball Room N UTROPHOS % Welterweight ei sae RM wae ’
OTIC SUITE in arm) ‘overing . 54 ae | — 160
ARIS Spring Seat ARMCHAIRS, 2 on | Middleweight _ a ie
Appligenore tie Guat "he are, vacgnt pairs Shy, Extra comfortable from Wednesday, July 16 You eat well, sop well, \ Light Heavyweight— , 175 ,
Vestry Exhibitions at the Coleridge their Shape and Size. at 8.30 p.m. » when you 1% Heavy — over 175
Porny School will be received by the , take NUTROPHOS. |% Intending competitors are asked to call at Modern High School
\ndersigned up to the 25th of July 1952 SIMMONS DOUBLE BED- The programme includes e 1 for Entry Forms any afternoon 4—5 p.m.
Applicants mus¢ be the sons of Parish- STEADS. ~- Good / New. | British News: The 1948 1% v :
Srp ino Latte ia a CE tte oF Without Springs, ; '%5 SSCCSCSBESSS 666560000 O0OOO"
ust be between the ages of 7 & 13 Olympic Games; Edinburgh’ Pb chia fats ew “s
years Of age; rege es ES A








Applicants must present themselves to
toe headmaster for examination to be
held on July 18th at 9.30 a.m.

\ppiication forms can be obtained at
th» Parochial eet as office.

. §. CORBIN,
Vory y Clerk,

>

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

TRANSFER

The application of Lawrence Greenidge
of St, Simon’s, St. Andrew, the pur-
chaser of uor License No, 265 of 1952,
gianted to Evelyn Cumberbatch, in re-
spect of a board and shingle shop at
SU Simon's, Bt) Andrew, to remove said
Licevse to & board aid shingle _
vith galvanized reof, attached to a







residence at St, Simon's, St. Andrew, and
to use it at h last described premises.





$
h
Dated this Uth day of July 1962 5
To J. R, BDWi , Bea, x
Folice x
na “BP, g
GREENIDGE, %
a Be onal, ‘
Lucia gh |
lice cr
Brille ith day are oe ms "Eelany ve
% 5, Sears,
Police Magistrate, om

PERSONAL |



The public are hereby warned, against
a.ving credit to my — wife Ee
SURINGER (nee AN) as I do not
held myself responsible for her or any-
one else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order

jgned by me.

NAAMAN SPRENGER,
Sarjeant’s Village,
Ch. Ch.
15.7,52—2n

The public are hereby warned against
uiving credit to any person” or persons
whomseever in my name as I do not
holt myself responsible for anyone con-
tracting any debt or debis in my name
unless by a written order signed by me.

OSCAR MURRAY,
Two Mile Hill,
St. Michael.
1§,7.52-2n.




















NOTICE
‘Austin's Menu Parlour



To allow the Staff their
Annual Holiday the business
will bé closed from TO-DAY
and reopened on SATUR-
DAY, 26th instant.

Cc. M. R. AUSTIN,
Proprietor.











2000-04

LOQPOPPOHP HS



ported. Brilliant and Decorative
with lots of Bevelled Mirrors and
Carving, $48 up.

BUY NOW AT MONEY-SAVING
PRICES

NS monies of England.
Shas aed 8 Members are cordially
L.S. WILSON § aaneee.
‘ % No Admission Charge
SPRY STREPT. DIAL 40 18.7.52—3.n.

“REDIFFUSION will pay in addition a bonus of $25.00

PODDE-DDOPDOOOOMDD DDO HOOD POPOOHOHOOHH-HOHH.DSOHPHOHDHOS

“Royal Mile”; and a Colour
Film — “The Bridge of
Time”, showing some of the

3 LARGE CH EFFONIERES, Im-
& traditional public cere-







WATER COOLERS (Ice Cans)
Now Obtainable at

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

AT ATTRACTIVE PRICES







_ NOTICE

R. M. JONES & CO., LTD., beg to notify the public
that, until further notice. due to building alterations
the entrance to their office will be on McGregor Street
instead of Prince Wm. Henry Street.










POOOOO®,

REDIFFUSION

Offers a Commission of $1.50 in CASH for every New
Subscriber brought to and accepted by the Company.






to any person who brings in twenty-five New Subscrib-
ers in one Calendar month who are accepted by the
Company. RIE








Have always a supply of Recommendation Forms ready
THEY CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE OFFICE
REDIFFUSION Trafalgar Street.







HUNDREDS oi
with them in the past three years
CUSTOMERS have been satisfied.

Buy from us and you will not be
Disappointed.

Buildings

reépse OO WMURO OZ

OTHERS MAW

CONCRETE PRODUCTS LTD.

LODGE HILL, —

—_—_—~o—_—_

Use HOLLOW CONCRETE BLOCKS

when building or
GUARANTEE
STANDARD QUALITY and are REGULARLY TESTED
NEW HOMES, have been built

the blocks

=e

The CHEAPEST and BEST way to build to-day

Tests in MIAMI] have shown that Concrete Block
WITHSTOCD HURRICANE DAMAGE
better than any other type of building.

Visit our Factory and let us comvince you.

>





4x8x16 20c.
8x8x16 Sle.
Corners 33c.
Double End 34c.

Halves 17¢c.

Te Reape Se ee are



renovating your home.









COPY but WE STILE.

each

Telephone 2798

We
we make are of a

and ALL OUR

MOAW>r OOH wmmuUMO cz

LEAD



. Ex Factory



m8 ToS
TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1952



HENRY







FLINT OF -THE FLYING SQ



CHEER UP FOR MY SAKE.
(M 21 TOMORROW AND
MARK'S GOING TO

ANNOUNCE PUR
ENGAGEMENT.








YOURE SO
VERY MUCH
LIKE SOMEONE
ELSE | KNEW..



FORGIVE THIS i
BEARER OF EVIL
{ TIDINGS, MAJESTY/
BUT WE SHALL
HAVE WO TANIUM
TO SAVE OuR

WHAT IS IT THAT
TIES YOUR TONGUE
INTO SENSELESS
KNOTS? SPEAK UP,
OR MO-LOK SHALL
HAVE YOUR. WITHERED

ae - RNR RA Gb

SS. THANKS,..IF YOU'RE
SURE THE CHAIR ISN'T

WIRED THE WAY YOUR _ as

Pp SIT DOWN,
HERR HAZARD}

BRINGING UP FATHER







I'M QUITE PROUD THAT THE
CIVIC CLUB PICKED M ~

AS THE TOWN'S OUTST. NDING
CITIZEN !/-- NOW _T'LL PRACTICE
THE SPEECH I'LL MAKE
WHEN THEY AWARD ME J
THE MEDAL: ‘jf

GENTLEMEN -
WORDS TO

HEY LL BE WAITING



DISTINGSLIBHED Abies AND
Reeth FOR ME ete FING

GRATITUDE FOR THIS OnEAT
HONOR --

VAD....

4 DON'T SUPPOSE

YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT
(T'S LIKE TO BE iN LOVE...
YOU CAN'T KNOW...




WHAT ARE
YOU SAYING?

SIMPLY THIS — WE HAVE
LOST CONTACT WITH OR,
CARSON'S PARTY. THEY
SENT A DISTRESS SIGNAL

FROM THEIR DISTANT PLANET...

MTHEN WERE CUT OFF/ THEY
ARE LOST! THEY ARE
P NOT RETURNING!

" Kt *

\



Ne

NOT AT ALL / _
NOTHINGI LIKE BETTER
THAN HOLDING A CHEERFUL
CONVERSATION AT THE
POINT OF A GUN!

I HOPE THE GUN p
DOESN'T BOTHER YOU...
IT COMFORTS ME SO



A
4 i
VE,

HERR HAZARDP,,.BUT
NOT FOOLHARPY, I



BARBADOS



BY CARL ANDERSON



BAKERY

WEDDING caalcali |
A SPECIALTS





YOU HAVE

pire THAT WOULD-FIT ME ,* 3}
VE GOT NOTHING BUT THIS OLD =
DRESS AND 1 DO WANT TO
400K NICE TOMORROW,
IT'S GOING TO BE
SO EXCITING! ¥

1 THINK | HAVE.
PETA, SOMETHING
EXACTLY YOUR
S/ZE.. YESS THINK,

TOMORROW

WILL BE VERY

EXCITING...

4 DON'T CRY, ELMO +>.
Oe ANOTHER PIECE
ter ey BREAD +5
OR YOU ,

BY DAN BARRY

NO TANIUM/ THEN WE

ARE DOOMED! THE FROST-

MACHINE WILL STOP

WITHOUT FUEL! AND

ANOTHER THERMAL-QUAKE FSax
IS DUE TOMORROW!







YOU ARE BRAVE, A NOT A BIT! TELL

r ME, WHAT ELSE | 1S NEW

HOPE /















MAYOR -
IT IS_ INDEED
EXPRESS



IN A SCORE OF. CROWDED GAMING ROOMS FAT WALLETS
IND LEAN ONES ALIKE ARE QUICKLY EMPTIED BY
ee WHEELS, THE Monat AND THE DICE.

FOR US poesle WE ‘LL Be

AT Bride THIS IS OUR

THEY'LL BE WAI

| DONT LIKE THIGe~ }”
a aa tu

NI 4 ie re = J











SHUT UP -YOU PINHEADY/
DON'T YOU KNOW FIFI IS

TAKING HER NAP ? yOu'LL.
WAKE UP THE POOR DOG
WITH YOUR SHOUTING /”

PRACTICE THAT SPEECH
IN YOUR OWN ROOMY,

FACE ARRIVES ON THE SCENE.









BY ALEX. RAYMOND

A TRAIN PULLS IN FROM THE EAST AND A NEW
. THE MANGLER! |

WAITING, AFTER TH

BE MORECAREFUL | | I

WITH YOUR TOYS.





MADAM @LINDY



ADVOCATE

PAGE SEVEN



—_ good looks tell you they're just right.

You know, too, when you look at the price
tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated
is a Two-tone Brogue. Tied to every pair is
the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign
which means ‘just right’! Look for it in
leading stores in Barbados.









made by

JOHN WHIT



means made

just right










BUY







IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

———————————e Oona SS aaa 0 0 0 Oe5 aaaaSoe
SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only



soe

SPECIAL OFFERS are now aveilaiie at our ranches White Park,
Tweedside, Speightstown and Swan Street









-~



OVALTINE RUSKS ........... .... a Le iL ee ee Usually Now

OVALTINE BISCUITS oo... thi 52 KRAFT MACARONI CHEESE

JACOB'S CRACKERS—Tins ..... Le aauaiih iilbineav one 1.44 —Tins Al 36
—Pkgs 4 asd acds bomasoubtoneeate 36

MARTINI CRACKERS . an i tek 0 avg) Le 1.81 BREAKFAST ROLL. ........... ... 64 60

4 , Ad Se . + ©

oS cae seis ee _ BATCHELOR’S PEAS ......... 39 36

P. F. CHEESELETS—Pkgs. sessveseoenere 16 JAN OUTEN’S © ‘oO 6 42

CLUB CHEESE STRAW... 112 VAS ree a Sree ”

CARR’S CHEESE CRISPS. 1.32 MMM ig kel ire es hee) 65 60

CARR’S TABLE WATER..... 1.58

UFILLIT BISCUITS oooocccccceccccccscesceteeeseteees 1.44 WHITEWAY’S DEVON CIDER — 1.12 1.00

WTI 43





MERE THEY COME
DR. J. V. HENSON PRESENTS
and HER UNFORGETTABLE

HAVE
YOU





TROUPE
4

SECURED







YOUR
COPY
OP

CRICKET
CRUSADERS

YET ?










“CARACAS NIG HES OF 1952”

THE ae



OF THEM ALL

EST SHOW
4 ALL SOUTH AMERICA

1 MAN IN

Buy this valuable

















Reinforced by the bi uns of our Allied Troupe,

Lord Coff Te ll Calypsonians book by HAROLD
THE FIRE-FLY, from the land of the Flying Fish abt dieunai
SLIM JIM, Sensatior Pap-Dancer DALE and read
CRITCH IVAN, Comedian Extrao

eo about the West
aE RE Oe eee eee Indies Australia

Calypsoves, Sambas, Rhumbas, Mambos,

Bote, Maricos Tour.
THIS IS THE SHOW OF SHOWS p
d =
$3.50
ROXY THEATRE ee
AT.
Wednesday 6th
“pa ADVOCATE




Sully |
PRICES : Stalls 36c., House 48¢ Balcony |
i

SAM ‘MIDGET’
36 inche a all

DOPIE

STATIONERY



Musician, Comedian, Singer, Dancer, Acrobat
T World’s Rarest Freak

Box $1.00 |
DATES OF OTHER Picci AT

The Tickets On Sale From 8 a.m
WATCH FOR EMPIRE, OLYMPIC, ROYAL




PAGE EIGHT



3rd Series In Intermediate
Cricket Fixtures Finish

NO OUTRIGHT VICTORIES ~

The last day’s play in the Third Series of Intermediate
ericket matches ended on Saturday. No outright victories

were scored, but batsmen

made good scores. Again the

weather was ideal and there were good wickets at all

grounds.

In the Mental Hospital-Pickwick fixture at Mental Hos-
pital, the game ended with Mental Hospital securing points
for a first innings lead. Mental Hospital in their first innings
scored 254 runs and dismissed the Pickwick team for 118

runs in their first venture.

The Mental Hospital slow right
arm bowler J. Wiltshire did havoc
with the Pickwick batsmen
and ended with an analysis of 13
oyers, one maiden, 51 runs and

\ Todd 8 4

[ 7 3 8 i
J 13 1 61 7
3 9

\ 4 18



atson 4 16
PICKWICK 2ND INNINGS

seven wickets. He ‘bowled at a ©. Moore Lb.w. b R. Chase 13
good length and used his head ©. Greenidge not out 4
against the batsmen, C. Green- ‘: "yelyn not out =
idge topscored with 29 for Pick- ,
wick in their first innings. Total: (for 1 wkt.) 58
Sent back, Pickwick scored 59 POLICE vs. WINDWARD 50
runs for the loss of one wicket
when stumps were drawn. ee a
At Queen’s Park, Police who fe eee Se tea _
made 161 runs in their first inn- Cc. Sealy c&b R. Atkinson 10
ings, bowled out Windward for Denny ¢ Farmer b R. Atkinson 27
152. runs to give themselves ay) qQeeepan retired #
first innings lead. In their second |. Warner c&b R. Atkinson 4
innings Police were all out for 120 ©. Sprinwer e&b R. Atkinson 9
n ss F. Forde e Atkinson b R, Farmer 16
runs, four of their batsmen } smith ¢ Thornton b R Farmer 5
reaching double figures. Skipper Ss. Howard not out 6
Denny and Cheltenham each got © GriMith b R. Farmer 0
27 while Forde scored 15 and “ }ujbnen PR. Parmer :
Sealy 10. -
Best Bowling ia ae re
Best bowling performance for oO M R w
Windward was given by R. Atkin- M. Farme 2 4
son who captured four of the ) Qu. ; os
Police wickets for 50 runs after Atkinsen 9 50 4
bowling nine overs. When stumps Farmer 5.1 14 2
were drawn Windward had lost {iaycciq pen : ae
four of their wickets for 101 WINDWARD 2ND INNINGS
runs in their second innings. ¢ Thornton ¢ Griffith b F. Smith 35
Empire gained a first innings {7 [°poe ?.? Sm 7
> H. I, Farmer b Smith 4
lead over Combermere when they R. Atkinson not out 2
scored 182 runs for the loss of six 5 ¥. Farmer stpd (wh ) b Smith 0
wickets declared in reply to the " {!. Farmer not ou 4
Combermere total of 133 runs
W. Drayton who has scored a Total (for 4 wkts.) 101
century since the season has ;
started, topscored for his team COMBERMERE vs. EMPIRE
with 68 before he was bowled by nae es
Lewis. Next best score came from SQmnnMME it, Rey
. Arm o s unde- Decld i . 182
feated with 39. . ‘ COMBERMERE ¢nd INNINGS *
Combermere in their second jimiss run out ©... ”
innings scored 136 runs for four Wilkinson Lb.w. b Beckles 6
wickets when play ended. Brathwaite c & b Kirton 67
Despite a patient knock by R. Seen not out 0
ps not out i
Marshall who topscored with 62, Extras 5
Carlton failed to gain a first 3
innings lead over Wanderers Total (for 4 wkts.) 190
and were bowled out for 208 in BOWLING ANALYSIS
reply to the Wanderers total of | | Oo. M. R. W.
296 made on the first day of play. © [eckles Bie ae ee
Carlton batted the whole day on M. Armstrong 6 23
Saturday. G. Harding who went ©. Challenor . 5 &
at number six in the Carlton *.,Aâ„¢mory ee ae
batting order, scored the second G. Kirton Beceem

best score of 55. Browne got 36.

J. Corbin bowling at medium
pace, had a good speil and sent
down 28 overs, capturing five
wickets and conceding 69 runs.
G. Skeete took three for 23.

Spartan Saved

Time was the only factor that
saved Spartan from being
defeated by Cable & Wireless.
Spartan dismissed Cable & Wire-
less for 68 rungs in their first inn-
ings on the first day of play and
at the end of that day Spartan
had replied with 150 runs for the
loss of nine wickets,

On Saturday they declared at
this total, thus sending Cable &
Wireless on a good wicket in
their second innings. Cable &
Wireless did not collapse as they
had done in their first innings,
but went on to score 212 run
for the loss of eight wickets.

The Cable & Wireless opening
batsman B, Matthews helped his
team by scoring 63 runs. H. King
scored 56 before he was bowled
by Medford. For Spartan C. Skin-
ner took three wickets for 23
runs while Medford and Cum-
berbatch got two each.

A good bowling performance
was given by fast bowler King
and he was mainly responsible
for Spartan losing eight of their
wickets for 49 runs in their
second innings. King took five of
the Spartan wickets for 22 runs
and if there was more time Cable
& Wireless would have gained
their first outright victory.

Spartan however, got points
for a first innings lead. The

Fourth Series starts on Saturday.
MENTAL HOSPITAL vs, PICKWICK

MENTAL HOSPITAL Ist Innings 254
PICKWICK 1ST. INNINGS
C. G. Greenidge ¢ Williams b J

Wiltshire 29
H. Kidney ¢ R. Chase b B. Hope 5
Cc, Evelyn run out n
M. Foster c Williams b Wiltshire 16
Cc. White b Wiltshire 2
G. Moore c&b Wiltshire 9
R, Clarke b Wiltshire 21
H. Jordan Lb.w. b Wiltshire 4
V. Greenidge not out 6

H. Marshall stpd. (wk) Gaskin b
Wiltshire 1
O. Lashley run out 0
Extras: 14
Total: 118
Fall of wickets: 1—7, 2—24, 3-4.
4—51, 5—71, G—97, 7—101, 8-114, 9—118

BOWLING ANALYSIS

o. M R w.
Cc. Knight 5 3 2 -



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THANX AND A
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HERBERT JASON, 5
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NEW HAMPSHIRE





MR, BIGDOMEsT'VE BEEN
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I HAVEN'T HAD ACGutP!D

RAISE IN 1O YEARS-I-UH=;



WANDERERS vs. CARLTON
AT CARLTON

WANDERERS tst Innings . eysse
CARLTON Ist INNINGS

Burke |.b.w. b Corbin

Matthews b Skeete . 1

Hi

«. Marshall ¢ Packer b Corbin 62
kK, Hutchinson b Skeete 3
C. Standford b Corbin 6
G. Harding ¢ Ramsey b Corbin 55
C. Goodridge c Lawless b Corbin 5
Browne b Skeete 36
BE, Gill Lb.w. b Proverbs 6
Burke not out is
A. Nicholson c Alleyne b Packer 13
Extras &
Total . 208
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R Ww,
J. Corbin 28 & oo 5
M. Proverbs 10 3 32 1
G. Skeete 12 4 23 8
Cc. Patterson 6 2 —
H, Ramsey 2-_- 15 -
A. Seale 15 2 a7 -
R,. Packer 7 34 1
CABLE & WIRELESS ys.
SPARTAN
CABLE & WIRELESS Ist Innings 68
SPy AN Ist Ennings, for 0 wkts.



Decld, eehterees « : 1m

CABLE & WLRELESS Ynd INNINGS
B. Mathews ec Medford b Skinner .. 63
R. MeKenzie hit wkts. b Cumber

batch 39
C. Cozier ).bow. Skinner : 3S
R. Croney 1Lb.w. Cumberbateh 21
—&. Branker c Skinner b Chase 7

H King b Medford 56
ri Skeete b Skinner 0
C. Seale lLb.w. Medford 9
M. L. Clarke not out 6
D. Archer net out 3
Tony King did not bat 0
Extras “ 8
Total (for 8 wkts.) aie
BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M. R. W
Skinner is 6 23 3
M. Medford 9 2 32 2
8S. Parris , 6 WwW
Chase i ay i
Wood 2 7
f Wood 4 20
Cumberbatch . 7 38 2
SPARTAN’S tnd INNINGS
Wood b H, King i
Wood b Mathews 5
D. Morris Lb.w. King °
Chase b Branker il
Medford Lb.w. King 6
W. Jemmott ce Archer b King . i
Roach Lb.w, King 9
c. Matthews not aut 8
Skinner wot out gcbibans esa es 1
Cumberbateh did not bat ...... 0
Parris b Branker ‘ 7
Total (for 8 wkts.) a9
BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M R w
H. A. King 7, a
Mathews 2.1438
F. Branker . 3 = i 2
a







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Y °* «#e
Second Division
Central defeated Combermere
by six wickets when their Second
Division cricket match ended on
Saturday, the last day in the
Third Series of these matches.
Central in their first innings
scored 128 runs in reply to the
Combermere total of 172 runs,
Mr. Hughes having made 40.

Combermere in their second
innings collected 110 runs, F.
Scott topscoring with 23 runs.
Needing 155 runs for vietory
Central scored 159 runs for the
loss of four wickets when play
ended and thus secured an out-
right vietory. C. Goddard was
10t out with 75.

At Beckles Road, Y.M.P.C.
secured a first innings lead over
Pickwick whom they dismissed
for 85 runs. Y.M.P.C, batting first,
seored 156 runs. In their second
innings Y.M.P.C. declared when
the score was 65 for four wickets
and at the end of play Pickwick
had lost three of their wickets for
90 runs.

In
fixture,
points

the College—Wanderers
Wanderers only got
for a first innings lead.
Batting first Wanderers scored
158 runs and = dismissed the
schoolboys for 90, J. Peterson
taking four of the Harrison Col-
lege wickets for eight runs.
Wanderers scored 85 for five
wickets in the second innings and
declared but at the end of play

College had collected 156 runs
for five wickets.
Empire-Erdiston

Empire tried to force an out-
right victory over Erdiston but
failed ir. the attempt. After hit-
ting 321 runs in their first innings
on the first day of play, Empire
dismissed the Erdiston batsmen
for 121 runs, four of the
wickets going to K. Hutchinson.
In their second innings, Erdiston
scored 51 runs for the loss of
four wickets when play ended,
Three of the wickets were taken
by J. Bynoe.

The Scores; —

Y.M.P.C, VS. PIOKWICK
AT BECKLES ROAD

Y.M.P.C; 156 and 65 for four
wickets decld. (O. Edghill 29.)
Pickwick 85 (N. Lashley 22, L.
Branker four for 21) and 90 for
three wickets (N. Lashley 41 not
out.)

COLLEGE VS. WANDERERS
AT WANDERERS
Wanderers 158 and 84 for five
wickets decld. College 90 (J.
Peterson four for eight) and 156
for 5 wickets (L. Waithe 44 not
out.)

CENTRAL VS. COMBERMERE

Combermere Ist Innings 172
(Mr. Hughes 40) and 110 (F. Scott
23.) Central 128 and 159 for four
wickets (C. Goddard not out 75.)

ERDISTON VS. EMPIRE
AT ERDISTON
Empire 321 (J. Bynoe 86).
Erdiston 121 (F. Deane 29, K.
Hutchinson four for 42,) and 51
for four wickets (J. Bynoe three
for 13).

Royal B’dos Yacht
Club Tennis Tournanient

there was no





Owing to rain
play yesterday.

TODAY’S FIXTURES
Men’s Singles Semi Finals
Dr. F. G. Reader vs. Mr. L, St.

Hill,
Ladies’ Doubles—Finals.

Mrs, P. Patterson and Mrs.
R. 8. Bancroft vs. Miss D. Wood
and Miss G, Pilgrim.

Men’s Doubles,

Mr, P. Patterson and Mr. G. H.
Manning vs. Mr. J. W. McKin-
stry and Mr. J. Patterson.

Mixed Doubles

Mr, and Mrs, D, E, Worme vs,
Miss L, Branch and Mr, V.
Roach,

THE WEATHER
REPORT

YESTERDAY
Rainfall from Codrington:

in,

Total Rainfall for Month to
Date: 1.82 ins.

Highest Temperature: 85.5° F.

Lowest Temperature: 74.5° F.

Wind Velocity: 12 miles per
hour,

Barometer: (9 a.m.) 20.995
(3 p.m.) 28 986.

TO-DAY
Sunrise: 5.48 a.m.
Sunset: 6.19 p.m.
Moon: Last Quarter, July 13.
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.



28

High Tide: 11.14 a.m. 11 p.m.
Low Tide: 4 59 a.m. 4 44 p.m.



__By Jimmy Hatlo |










TREMBLE:
AT THIG Tie!



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

7) Entered For Turf Club
Summer Meet



The entries for the Summer
Meeting of the Barbados Turf
Club closed yesterday with 75
horses the same number which
entered for the March meeting.

Following are the entries :--

FIRST DAY
iST RACE—Summer_ Stakes—

Classes C and C2 Only Maidens

5% Furlongs.

Baby Girl, ~The Thing les
Match, Abu Ali, Darham Jane
Devil's Sympony, Trimbrook

Aim Low, Dim View, Magic Gaye,

Cantaquisine, Racton, Street
Arab.
2ND RACE—Planters Stakes—

Classes F and F2 Only 8-Year-

Olds and Over 51% Furlongs.

May Day, Betsam, Cardinal
First Admiral, Miracle, April
Flowers, Soprano, Viceroy, Marc!
Winds, Caprice, Will O’ the Wis;
Rambler Rose,
3RD RACE—Stewards Stakes—

Classes A & B Only 7% Fur-

longs

Slainte, Pepper Wine, Notonite
Flying Dragon, Firelady, Harro-
ween, Red Cheeks, Rebate, Bélle
Surprise, Lunways, Landmark.
iTH RACE—Barbados Derby

Stakes & Cup Nominated 9

Furlongs

Cardinal, Dunquerque,
Admiral, Seedling, Bright
Rambler Rose.
5TH RACE-—North Gate Stakes—

First
Light,

Classes C and C2 Only Tz
Furlongs
Careful Annie, Flieuxce, Dol-

drum, Embers, Dashing Princess
6TH RACE—OISTIN STAKES—
Class G and Lower 5) Fur-
longs
Gavotte, Cottage, Twinkle,
Joan’s Star, Blue Diamond, Meer-
schaum, Sea Foam,
7TH RACE—Trafalgar Stakes—
Classes D and Lower 7) Fur-
longs,
Top Flight, Mary Ann, Apollo,
Cross Bow, Will O’ the Wisp, Col-
leton, Watercress.

8TH RACE—Stafforg Stakes—

Class B and Lower 5% Fur-
longs.

Pepper Wine, Careful Annie,
Flying’ Dragon, Demure, Vectis,

Spear Grass, Aim Low, Castle in
the Air, High and Low, Sweet
Rocket, Lunways, Mrs. Bear.

, SECOND DAY
9TH RACE — Carlisle Stakes —

Classes A & B Only, 5% Fur-

longs.

Pepper Wine, Flying Dragon,
Demure, Harroween, Red Cheeks
Spear Grass, Rebate, Castle in the
Air, Sweet Rocket, Belle Surprise
Lunways, Mrs. Bear.
10TH RACE—Merchants’ Stakes—

Classes F and F2 Only, 744 Fur-

longs.

Apronusk, May Day, Cardinal,

Colombus, Soprano, Viceroy,
March Winds, Caprice, Rambler
Rose,

11TH RACE—Victoria Stakes







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Classes F and F2 Only, 744 Fuf-

longs.

First Admiral, Seedling, Betsam.
Miracle, April Flowers, Will O
the Wisp.

i2TH RACE—Champion Stakes—
Class A and Lower, 11% Miles.

Slainte, Notonite, Flieuxce, Fire-
lady, Doldrum, Red Cheeks, Re-
bate, Embers, Tiberian Lady,

Landmark.
i3TH RACE—South Point Stakes

—Classes © &- C2 Only, 7%

Furtongs.

Test Match, Abu Ali,
Jane, Trimbrook, The Thing,
Devil’s. Symphony, Aim Low
Dim View, Magic Gaye, Canta
quisine, Racton, Street. Arab,
MTH RACE—Oistin Handicap—

Darham

Closs G and Lower, 5% Fur-

longs.

Gavotte, Cottage, Twinkle,
Joan's Star, Blue Diamond,

ISTH RACE—Beckwith Stakes—
Class D and Lower, 51% Furlongs.
Top Flight, Dunguerque, Mary

Ann, Will O° the Wisp, Water-

cress,

16TH RACE—Bush Hill Stakes-
Classes C & C2 Only, 7% Fur-

longs.

Careful Annie, Doldrum, Bright
Light, High and Low, Dashing
Princess

THIRD DAY

17TH RACE—Juvenile Stakes —

Classes F2 and Lower, 54% Fur-

longs.

Super Jet, Apple Sam, Jim La
Rue, Bow Tie, Howitzer, Sea
Foam
18TH RACE—Staferd Handicap

Class B and Lower—7% Fur-

longs,

Slainte, Flying Dragon, Demure
The Thing, Pepper Wine, Careful
Annie, Firelady, Vectis, Red
Cheeks, Castle in the Air, Spear
Grass, High and Low, Sweet
Rocket, Belle Surprise, Lunways,
Mrs. Bear,
19TH RACE—NURSERY STAKES

—Class F2 and Lower—7% Fur-

longs.

Stirling Flush, Faerie Queene,
Meerschaum, Jealousy.
20TH RACE—Trafalgar Handicap

—Class D and Lower, 9 Furlongs

Mary Ann, May Day, Top
Flight, Dunquerque, Apollo,
Cross Bow, Colleton, Watercress.

21ST RACE—Merchants’ Handi-

cap—Classes F and F2 Only,
—7\% Furlongs
May Day, Cardinal Colombus,

Apronusk, Soprano, Viceroy,
March Winds, Caprice, Rambler
Rose,
22ND RACE—Summer Handicap
—Classes C and C2 Only, 9 Fur-
longs. ui
Abu Ali Darham Jane, Trim-
brook, The Thing, Test Match,
Careful Annie, Devil’s Symphony,
Flieuxce, Aim Low, Doldrum,
Embers, Cantaquisine, Racton,
Dashing Princess, Tiberian Lady.

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23RD KACE—Stewards’ Handicap

—Classes A & B Only, 9 Fur-

longs.

Slainte, Firelady, Pepper
Notonite, Harroween,
Landmark, Mrs. Bear.

FOURTH DAY
24TH RACE—Juvenile Handicap

—Class F2 and Lower, 5% Fur-

longs.

Stirling Flush, Super Jet,
Apple Sam, Jim La Rue, Faerie
Queene, Bow Tie, Howitzer,
Meerschaum.
25TH RACE—Victoria Handicap—

Class F and F2 Only, 9 Fur-

First Admiral,

longs.
Betsam, April

Flowers, Seedling.

26TH RACE—August Handicap—
Class B and Lower, 9 Furlongs.
Slainte, Pepper Wine, Flieuxce,

Firelacy, Dashing Princess, Belle

Sqrprise, Flying Dragon, Lun

ways, Landmark and Mrs. Bear.

27TH RACE—Turner Hall Handi-
cap, Class G and Lower, 74 Fur-
longs.

_. Gavotte, Cottage, Twinkle,

Joan’s Star, Blue Diamond.

28TH RACE—Beckwith Handicap
—Class D and Lower, 7! Fur-

Wine,
Rebatey

longs.
Top Flight, Dunquerque, Mary
Ann, Apollo, Cross Bow, March

Winds, Will O’ the Wisp, Colle-
ton, Watercress.
29TH RACE—North Gate Handi-

cap—Classes C and C2 Only, 742

Furlongs,

Baby Girl, The Thing, Abu Ali,
Test Match, Careful Annie,
Darham Jane, Devil’s Symphony
Flieuxce, Trimbrook, Aim Low,
Dim View, Cantaquisine, Dol-
drum, Bright Light, Embers Rac-
ton, High and Low, Dashing
Princess, Street Arab.
30TH RACE—Planters’ Handicap

—Classes F and F2 Only, 5'4

Furlongs.

May Day, Betsam,
Miracle, Seedling, Viceroy,
Soprano, March Winds, Caprice,
Rambler Rose, Will O’ the Wisp.
31ST RACE—Carlisle Handicap—

—Classes A and B Only, 742

Furlongs.

Pepper Wine, Notonite, Flying
Dragon, Demure, Firelady, Har-
roween, Vectis, Red Cheeks, Re-
bate, Castle in the Air, Spear
Grass, Sweet Rocket, Belle Sur-
prise, Lunways, Landmark, Mrs.

Cardinal,

Tre

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PAGE 1

"United States" Breaks Trans-Atlantic Record 'Queen Mary's 1 Time Cut By 9 Hours, 36 Minutes RIDGWAYS AT INDICATION CEREMONY IN PARIS ABOARD SS. UNITED STATES OFF AMBROSE __ LIGHTSHIP The American super liner Untied Stales captured th second Atlantic Blue Riband when she mad*. the crominK from Europe In three day*, twelve hours and twelve minutes. This cut nine hours and 36 minutes off the fourteenyear-old record held by Britain's. Queen Mary The average speed was 34.51 know only slightly slower than the record speed rolled up when the United States shattered the west to east record last Monday i there — The sea was call -* Blight breeze this perfect summer day .* thCnU*d State* .swept toward Ambrose Light, oflietHl end of the Blue Riband run The ship's welcome started half mile before she came to the lightship. A small motor boat approached and came to perilously near that Commodore Harry Manning, the skipper, ordered four warning blasts The motorbout scooted to safely The United SUlrs began slowing then. The destroyer sent u> eeeoit ner In blinked "welcomeHome' 1 n Morse ami the United States said "Thank You"! The U-S Navy transport Gen Vfr 5, outward bound from New Yjrk was the first ship to exchange the official greeting* of the sea—three blast* on the ship's horn. Answered The United State* %  wnrjUil and the crowds on deck cheere d and waved Planes Hew over army bombers, navy plans*. *ea planws and private planes. The lightship itself saluted, and the 1 ner answered back The Meyer Davis orchestra, one of the three aboard the ship, struck up "The Star Spangled Banner" and the 1.830 passengers and 1,000 crewmen on deck cheered and shouted The orchestra played "Dixie" in honour of Virginia State In which the mighty ship was built Commodore Manning received the next honour. The band played Tm Just Wild About Harry" and the crowd shouted and sang and threw confetti The skipper may not have heard this though, he was up on the bridge three and a half rrty block* awj.v The crowd drank champagne find toasted >he ship and the %  kipper Celebration was still going 1 strong when the eaeortlng destroy-1 er led the liner toward quarantine where she will spend the night in preparation for a gala welcome to New York on Tuesday morning—r.P. Receive! Ovation Herbert Heover HOOVM. T7, the only living former President of the United States, watches ss delegates give him an ovation st the GOP Convention in Chicago. Hoover. In what he described as likely to bo tha last unit ha would addrsss the Republican convention, strongly attacked both the domestic ami foralsa policies of the Truman Adsnlniatrstlon. f in trmst ton all Hotel lire Kills One PAIItKANKS. Alaska. Jul> 14 fire ravaged the Wstark %  Hotel tore U killing at least on* tnmn and Waving row or inure unaccounted for. Twelvt par. %  I, two In .. crii burn^i Bill \ tha onl) known fat..in> ti, diMi III lioi.pit.il after he out of the blazing butldliii In .i M ass 0 f t...n.,— r.p. Adams Receives C.M.G. Today LONDON. July 14 Mr. Giantley Adams goes ._ Buckingham Palace to-morrow to receive his C.M.G. which he waa awarded in ;tho last Honour's List Wages Of New Zealand Workers Raised WELLINGTON, July 14. An arbitration court Monday increased the standard minimum wage for New Zealand workers. Minimum wages for men go up by 12 shillings and for women b> 10 shillings a week. The new rales go Into effect September I and will provide %  minimum of five shillings an houtfor skilled workers and slightly more than four shillings for unskilled workers—-4tP>. Mid-East Command May Omit Egypt Korea War J las Its Good Side SEOUL .Korea. July 14 General Lawli.n ColUns, United States army Chief ,.f Staff, said on Monday lb. l.s. arc belter prepared lo resist aggression now as a result of th? Korean war. Collins said, however, that the United ild da aval tiling in its powea "to end this damnable war'" He told correspondents; We are better prepared today than we ould. had there been DO Korean war. Collins refused to comment 00 i the United Nations forces in Korea might have taken to engage in a 2-year-old war It costs us raonev. ammunition and equipments, "he said, "ll || %  *ng. Rut Is not serious. What had lo be done had lo l>e dune —I'.P B.G's First Festival Of Music Qpasa July 14. British Ciuianj'a fl|-t festival Music was orncidly opened mi Sunday afternoon at the Plan • y Lady WooUey due to the unavoidable IBM j sti Charles Woolluy who was ND (nillill ak.M ha. ,1s with Oca. Malllicw D. Ridgway. SHAI'K l,„ tain. At th. Polytachnle School t. I iris. In barVfruund' ta Mrs. Rldaw.i' ebattlag with Marshal A Juln. Th. group was on hard to Bdieatc ftnturs of Marshals Forh, Jolti. and Fayoll*. (fnttrnatfonn! Commissioner Of Police -in.the Conservative M i 1 whethi tne visit 'if the Dean of Canteiiui, ba ra bat and of hi %  eusetuins abroad slid In WUs c v. ureju lb ml to u*e Interests ot fajesty's wbtrcta, tleald piOMfcnUng hi on a charge al iieason for sstreadi landa. "Miss Ward told Bir Lionel to i < ii ii mini that if a treason charge could be brought it would glVO .in invaluable opportunity of i Lcnruu lh falsity ..r in. evi"ttiii wicked *"d irrei "Id man." "1 And that Am I aw bad been basod the uufurluilute f.i. t th„i WOUld nol pKrSldSJ -wU DD..itunlty," Hr.ihl repbed. He than told ^noth.MCboosanra%  tei that ha had eonKierett aii tinssrtdanoi out bolors Im but tiijt lu> wa% preiMred to SI) furthar i-vldenc* hat might be Iice and the Advwate Co Mil. in connection with ;>u lions of a speech made by Colonel Michelin and prin'> rl by the Advocate newspaper on June l.f was begun in th* Court of Common Pleas before a Special Jury yesterday n; ruing. Haddock obtainssj the ule of the Court uftei subnutlinn aflidavits alleKinR thai part of the speech tended to prejudice him in his defc < in a prosecution for manslaughter now pending agiuM him as defendant. His laordship one chief Justice s i Allan Coiiymoi... KI ., hsjued % %  Rule of the Court on Ihe 25lh June ealUni upon Colonel MU-h*and th* Com] Reds Requesl Two-Day Hall In Truce Talks By K. C. THALER LONDON. July 14. British press reports have in the past few days be. claiming persistently that arrangements are being made t<> proceed with the projected Mid-East Defence Command without Egypt, now that prospects for an early settlement of the Anglo-Egyptian dispute appear to be fading. These U.S. Navy Lay8 Keel Of Worid-s Biggest Warship NEWPORT NEWS. Virginia. July |4. fte The United States Navy today 1 ythiiig emerge" • 0MI %  !.likely to Mideastei n diplomats here tail; Ir. June god they tuive grown in : intensity itnee the latest cabinet change in Cain, which British officials consider as a wtback U> I efforts for a settlement. Official quarters neither conltrm ^ tor deny that moves are in prolaid the keel of the 60.000-ton air,gto set up a Mideastem Cotran carrier Formal which will n.and but the> admit In any case l>e bigger than any existing warthere i< a long way lo go before ship. The Forrstal whose cost has been estimated at $318,000,000 should be ready late in 1954 at the normal rate oi construcUon \„ Derisions Speaking al the keel laying ceremony. W. C Foster. Deputy The MldeaUn-n detent* M ucsSevrctary of Defence said, the i, ( ,n was discussed List week by V.S.S. Ffyrmtal will be able to General Matthew B Ridgway and carry the naval air power of the i,, U HII Chiefs ..f Staff lut Hidfway United States to any part of the i liinBe if Mul ut te, ward* tti.d no world to promote security and decisions or conclusions had been innermost lairs can they escape Acheson and Bntish Foreign Beethe devasuUng forces of this reUr > A nthony Ed r lt has Ihtv weapon emerged In b h rets oi discushe. aircraft carrier Is botng 'Sions thst ihe Mldeaslein Cum built hec* by the company which mand question e.innot be solved built the Uner Vntted Stores, the as an lacUted issue, and thot it new holder of Ihe Blue Riband must awuu settlement of the record for the Atlantic M.-diti i i-.n.e.ui • 'onunand structur 43,800,000 PEOPLE IN '.nmce remains as wide as over. ENGLAND AND WALES '' -rran^tnent. for the Mioooat inimnw tut. r bT Ihe Hulrtrar r.enral wou 1 %  "" f* "" !" h n 'lQ""'w that woman outnumbornl <— tmlmblf in Cyiiruii tor lu mn bv 1.702,000 imn fhi.i rhIM'iltunlzamonat planning boaarda ren undrr la raprajMnttd 22 2 per ; '"d stfith a vlw to lti subsequent cent of the population compared broadening If and when Egyp' with 12 4 per tent SO vears ago i ready to Join. -IP "Admiral" Eisenhower HELDOUKNE AagMUl July 14, Kise.ih.-wv, Street In the Go*" rmment housing -eltlemem rumoura first emerged East Preston wa flooded Mond: et meetlne ot Bntish £500.000 Fire In Toulouse MUNSAN Kor..i. July 14 Ihe were) Korean armistice ilkWere recessed Mm oninitiuist requesl. raising specu%  iUon th.it tba ricadlo.k over the %  ''•' %  %  '' %  %  %  %  %  %  %  Witt The Red requesl for a wo-day recess was madu 2| hours lied, tin* <|efeiidants. to show before ihe truee delegates were .1. HI meet at t'aiimunjoni tor the! Socialism For Baft Germany I1EHMN. July K.i I t .<>i m.iri < i. inn inlatl 1 t fFtor. O. g„ i„,r.f|i, ( .| LOITOOW, July 14 The CDC. Regional Controller tif the Caribbean. Anderson, srtio 1-ares London bv air tot J.imaie.i Wedne*dn> night ha. i usslng at the Corporation's H.Q during the psst week three or four new projects in hi> area In en Interview thiaftei riutm. he s,.ld ould not at this stage give arty d 'tails of these proposed >chems oi where it is Intended tu operate tl em, but they would he in partn Tihip with local people. Asked whether there was the hKellhniHt that -ny C D.C scheme* tot the West Indies were besfil Wised down in view uf comment upon them In the recent annum teport of the Corporation. Anderson said Ihere were one Off twtt Mill under srtUeal irvrw Thru I tun ie*jM nded oi th* It pnsjr*ss| • few urn: tru H M l haslsed thai In closing down any ^ heme eaulion was a* importan* caution in approach In neat hemes. In either ease intense I i.or t ion's --heti for cintempt of the Oourt llh i illi\ r lion t. .•p|atntlrt* n IBP The I K Wale-Kt. Q.C.. P. ..ssoelatcd with Mr. G i* n ."KJUKU .ii trial diMuet at Toulous -ul 50 houses and .. number of factories mid causing more than £ 500.000 damage, according to flint esllmlam Dosens of families wenlet' homeless. The blazestarted as a trust •e which spread to a torv. in a short time n big area as burning fiercely. All available fangfl aided by troops and police were rushed to After a desperate battle IhOy managed to stop ihe fire from spreading further II' isked for 'niim Jurk Ihii-lrif At Hdninki HEUilNKI. July 14 Under heavy skies and fall tm %  ain the Union Jack was h-lay hoisted in the Olymni 1 he Mriti. i Melbourne in til years The Daspaper Arsua said relents me >uitiieating that the add 'havi> been named AdmfrsJ rather tiian a —D.P. TtfttA'tV} HOPES rtt Ft RCHASE $I0H FROM MO YET\Ri FUND WASHINGTON, July 14. The lotei national Monetary r und on Monday announced thai ipeot of Turkey bopas o purchase $10,000,000 from lb* Fund with Turkish Liras. The announcement said that In i only previous transaction with %  *..^ r,,nn Tl "k*7 purchased 5,000,000 in 1047 and made full %  epayment of obligation earlier Ihis year.--U.P. INIIKUI CottfijlfUl Co IVivul. QoaVteni WA.SIII'.i. !>.;. ... 4 The WhlU* House, in.nouii.u. an Monday that Pre.dent T*u%  i luartars surTeriug from ssj a virus infection." Truman cancelled his engagedefendant Ktehelia inenb. foi tha day including XWiferenee witj. Senator Koberi B. Kcii wtat i' %  Ming li R %  crmtic Pre*itier,tiai nomhution. Prase MttfLuj • Si n said Truman became ill on Si.ndaj. "Th. Ih-esidunt )u. a ir Id virus Infection and is MMUI, la stay In his quartertoday" SI rt 'old reporter' -IM" F'arnwr and instructed try Met*. Hutchlnson and H,inllel.l. %  I Mi. helm l> Ii I. Word. Instrurted by Messrs. YearIDQOd glUl llo.-i'. Solicitor-, n.il % %  Co Ltd bj Mi w .v lit.ee. yc.. instructed by Messrs. Yearwood and Boyce. Members of Ihe I.eg| |. .t is w.ll SI the general public vfneed mot Int s re ai m tini %  .-. ad (or inoie than ..n hMi be" oie the aclieduletl hour of 1030 iii for the ease to begin, spectaI i MM Court Houtii Five Witneases During the day's hcsiring, Mi. waleoN, cminsei f,„ u>. wKneasea to give %  These wen M i ,. %  Mine., i intiff. Mr. p, A .' %  |--<. .. I(e|<.irtei of tii,. AdI Ml Mi T T. Headv. I'lMvwt Marshal who avrved he Wnt on the defendants, and %  '., %  %  -. i. I %  iperwatn* tent of PoUo Ana No 4 in wtueh .' in < otiiMt-tiun with the ill place. Afler tlds. Mr. Waloott closexl Nil Lha yluntilf. and Mi II 1. w -il opsm d the cose Michelin thi.-. Dieted nil l*rtdanoe in ohitf. At trm stuge His Lordship adjourned furthii hearing until 10.30 this Mi Wale.-it aril] wsm bU exaafl ^lichelui. ule I". UH ^ I it v 25th of /un* suites that "Upon foOilIng tie %  mdeviU of nu Harold Hsddot %  fid I'atnek Anthony V7i %  KUi day of Jin.. • Kh) 41 thereio vfcriexi lo, marked "A" and Upon hearing Mr K. K Wakolt. ^X of Counsel fur Ihe plaintiff. M. H. L. Ward, Pi Counsel foi Mr. V. W Iteece, g.C, of Counsel for : %  d ml I empany bem^ IT IS (JitDERim> that the Jefendanti ill Monday th* Hth day of July. 15J at 10-Vl o'clock in USB forenoon or so P0u*l as Counsel can lie IUM why they MsOtl l d o'd be attach*-*! rai "-i tempt of the Court of Ores* Soaslon of Oyer and Termin' • On pave S Communists lust recess on July 2 after —" %  MB "• a lengthy revu w of lie I'N loniMuind posllion The exl day the Hedti proposed a new Inn for .settling the prisoner conloversy and asked thai It be erman news service A.D.N Hi Monday. Communists reveah i a new platfarni adapted by th. SohfMint'r Cttntniii ., would gradual!. ^*-"*:r '-**/"# II virn the Communist Enst Geimuiu %  t ,, lab Into B rufl lledg.-l People's I LA)9l .41 0f*0 ociacv" through Ihe creation Nil l .oniii. nl rig Ihe Jamaican Sugar Factory Scheme at Hanover, he ennnrmeri that no approach at all had been made to date to the Corporation which in the ciretim-t.mres could make no comment on the mstter Kefrtrlng lo Ihe British Guiana nee scheme. Anderson expressed himself ss "very hopeful'' of It' going ahead shortly riroad sgreement had been n iched with the BG r.overatnent on how the scheme should be c .rrled out and II was now under consideration bv the Colonial Office Italian Com/xiny Determined To Ship Persian Oil GKNOA. July 14. Italian buslne %  nan end another t.mkei to I'ersia in an ..ttempi to run PerU) Europe according to DOUnt lX-lla Zunc. i Ii i II in..-, .: EPIM ompany. charterers uf ih Kl'IM sland.s for Knt I'etiole It.ilia Me.i.o One,,!,., eoinpnny whose shares .in h-hi W Italian llnnnclers). Count in. la Zonca arrived heie .veek-end for talk* with mm tea men and ship owners who "' ii his company \fler the talks he R] oilOini to have another •'.'•:. |-. r ..t ,,TI foi aver blocking fioi I'ei i. "— |tp„ t l*iiln. Marxist socialism and would raise Ihe nations! armed West Ber l in POUee meanwhile nished lo .•in.;.lei on the steel • lorder barriers to seal off Western %  eton from the Soviet Zone after i'. nununlsls threatened that they might make more kidnapping i .ii.iInto West Her) The Schooner Cmelpse which left British Guiana ten days ago for Barbados, arrived yesterday about 4 30 p.m without its caplaln Hilary Clarke—ait. %  erdue for some days. Clarke srno used u. live at ijueeti sti-ert. ( iiy. w; drowned on Sunday. Clyde Detervilie. a St LuetU VKJ — UP. I' i |i, of the crew of ten told the %  ule. HlfiCAFOKE RKLAXES '• The a^urtas ws brought RESTRICTIONS W JAPS W ft W8W£ SINGAPUHE. July 14. Iwnod sbnnrd v ballaot. to come llrltish colony has relaxed I to dock here. On her voyage she I'M restrictions on visits by mn out of fuel and had to tack ,:..%  <• i. 'i.Li. %  Mnen In II nu.-. in at St UltHl DBI twO ,;.*> to resume political and trade 'Detervilie said. relations wltli Japan, regulations It was while H was coming from ii ve been changed lo permit St. Lucia rhot Clarke tell ovei JapaOen businessmen to remain .board. Detervilie said thai he had as long as three months on each not seen when Clarke actually trip, Formerly they were rej fell overboard, but he believed ti ictod lo two weeks. that he was hit with the sail. Any Japanese who was here I When ihey got out the life boot, he .'tiring Ihe second world war .could not be found In the water upetlon '•• ben i and noj loon after the boat ceann In INBI JapantJg may lake up residence yentenlay evening. Ihe Police were 1 Slngspore. |taking statements from some mrm—C.P. berr of ttte crew \u Cliant^tIn Eva Peacn*! Couditiou UUI-aNtXS AUItS. July 14. Iho ofidition of S(. %  %  if. %  ( I'M „!. %  ,, 'eron had not uiidetgone an) the last 24 hours", acii mi Lai •Miiiiuiu<|uc %  '-I l.i t night Tlit Sen. u.i i Iswrving medical advice to maln|.lete rest." DM her survival were loused *.y no announcasnent last Wednesday night that her condiunsatisfactory." Tlieie i been no change since. Senor-. ei recovered complete!, 'rom an unspecified major ouer.'ion last Nnveniber. The Senors made her last public appearance on June 4 when her husband, was Inaugurated for the second 'term as Pres.ucnt. But sh i has not been S| '.. %  Ministry of l-abour whore sha| tked for 10 months v.r. Umrigar First Indian To Score 1,000 This Tour! %  IXJN. Agalmt Yorkshire at Shefflel Forty-year-old Chari l-u.. ushire's 137 at i .ed the way with an ..:. .! %  %  • M.nnly as a result of todsv Poliv t; -inr l^Z^T. ?£. fo Derby against Son bj W J. Ednrh first member [ 1? Indlen STm K r6unU,n f ' 1 bOUTI romphT l 000 runsThu? T? ** ,n ln "r l '"-K^ <"•* -verted I folHe did so '.aftet^^earlne 7 imd ,nnln s points tomorrow on and llnlshed 124 behind hif ,h 3 H ^ ^ *, ^ !" M ** v 1 P^ May celebrtt*"" "*"" WlckeU in hand a rAuIt of V^'--^ ie ^ L?3 ^. *"* ""' S *" nrf f r ***** M^lltMIOABD 7 Q Z IS.V^ J!^5 .^'SS SJ 1 5 *>" by maklntt II % %  morgsn vs. Gloucester %  Xs^hTka^ SSf ""^ He reached r ,ran 2b. and .; CooJ sir highest scoi. son. the li ••! on the .ihead with P-s Kood day >nd apart I from Umrlgar's effort seven other Individual centuries wer. f the three and threehours with the aid "f ban foi was batting four and a half all told for his fifth century season. Denis C has been dropped from England's/as bowled for two b. when Middlesex began 184;" Muneer ;.rid for 74 •vgfi Hants vs. Leicester—Leleestei 379. Man' III and 155 for 8 Middlesex—Lsnesshire 437 for 7 declared; Middlesex 313 for 7 North ants 4. Brookes 118 not out, Barrlck i 28 not out Somerset vs. Derby -Somerset j 428 lor 1 declared. Derby tO* for 2. Elliott 151 not out. RevllI I 68 Surn-y vs Kent—Kent I"!* and 108 f.a2 Evans 8s not out | Surrey 325. May 124. Dovey 7, (or 82 Warwick va. NottsN and 100 for 4. Wai-we k 32** I Gardner rettrag hnrl M 147. But-1 tor 5 for 86 Woreestsr vs. .tussex—Seaeex 367. Worcester 376. Illrd 130.' Broad bent 84. Yorkshire vs. Indian* — York-Here's nMhtheud ..ted Northant 336 for shire 192. Indians I 9



PAGE 1

PACE MX CLASSIFIED ADS. BARBADOS ADVOCATE n ESOA1 HIV 15, 152 lamoiii ?'o# IN MKMOKIAM BA COSTA —In evor teni **.( dearly kivM alder arm Darolci | Cnpt Leicester Bad ChindlU. on the i •w'"" *c hideath ID hw' FOR SALE AUTOMOTIVE %  as UMI %  U-. 15 I 81in "it,," in ~wr rv forget her n"YJ an* Mr dour**. %  it**. Earn*?, I Ik at— IK IS 7 511.. < %  Memory of our' i ,.. 1U> 1MB ... l.ave part, -ince (hat MX! ; da* ow -. M-veo. ha* PM< CAR-klonla OaJoe-i—In enrol tent ran dittos, law mU*M> Dial MM lourinv OakWgo n 1 in—3* i \K rap* .- BJBB*V. • %  %  Ml : .1 -H ..: %  :. .,.-i -. i %  %  .:.!,.„. | HTU 3n AH One .ior.1 mile* .1. Wotonke* %  n oavner ertven FtMn* MM M.f Ut 1 B. 1 AW On* 11 U4*t Sparta Car O-19* .1 pertcet rortdiUOn Apply In ( S lircovnJ e o UMi Knitting A Spinning !l< Co.. Ltd Tpr* afreet U.I M—In i him :*... ran KtaD> lami o. our hwu 6i. radMi place IB.1.U-lu CAR-Vauxha'.l Vclox In A-l. londl"O Onlv r— ion loi aetling ownti >vt-is ai.and. Contact David %  Rice. B Rare Co. 11 1 M—I f n t'ARrFwld 10 h.p In poo.1 Bill alga; .dliion Prate S4M W l-hene F. lyn H0 or 3034 U 1 U -Ju "AtV-On* !• "tired Ford ('a.in .J ,-iaaliHrai r t QandeM. ftondi M Philip frm it*:vi HOUSES j, roaloiMbU l.mni.-fl. rnfl-m , On-n VeranUah /acii* a* V-k Super Deluxe ** pan *t S "ui (re• itwnar -Oil Total <.laNi.t*n> JttM : now eat %  U-v on Dial vW p r oonV'j •TORE—Tr. p %  ; ..< th* Hod Stora. S2& (ffSfwuTCs v'TSSt^t to? aSi Angutl < an bo leaied for D year. A**'} froilWI WMn DIM BUI i HEItAN K/M.l 1TD Pli'no 4438 *ly roan* cm. I A.ja*.n 'wo t.* trueK and on* t, '.40 Cat TetePhOI.e Of .. i tc Ud %  %  SI II VAUXTMU vrmx n*i % %  is T M TO AN At>rOVIf> TSNAM .PARTMI'-NT bodnOflM . 'tin*, room, %  %  ml nllclun, I ,r*d Apply by IMI-I w |>kn, li 1Harrow. Loonor K.I.KCTHII.AI %  I MAMXEV I *i>o*ol A s BaM ml of Oarrard v r-nna!r [d H-ii-to Cm 13 S3—t . AllSCKi.LANKOUS Itlflf USA LI. Simon 'J8T AfttUVED .'.-Moo>rn Hadln:rd J-op"!! chan>n> Two Pickup llci • infio. A limited uuanlltr onb Arn.m. r c s M*rm a, co LTD.. 'I Worn. IIonr .Mioal. WANTF.ri TO HTPIT %  UNiiALO'A -Th-eHouOa Buoaab tnluin.i..' "l.iiiaiod on on ro*i H*ni*f %  %  Lttwionro or Rocklaiy !•"! !.>. %  H'X..r,d I.,., o.l->.r Applr: K rEdward* rVO Boa City IO 7 ia-1 tN.M POCKI.r MOWTV rofclly oarn.*.! M rttommnidlng 33 new niiMcnbarro to WrnifTUOdON In ono monlb. 1 T.U-#o i HONAIU) nrniGMfA-i-Sealod unit* S year iiuaionteo m odhown lood and K. corriparf, i TM lUa itarn • .ii Royal Oarigo Lid Trleonm Hxr^'-rrusmv oft.r, 11. tO Caoh toi I BBRRM I.I-I I II -;. StrPTTAfBNT VOtrH aMCOUr M >ndln BX'JlSTHSluM. obtain Kill paiucula.o .i-o, ID* hUJirrUBlON i : ft-** tlV < ATIOXAI. Combermere School VtCANl T roR M.ii.ii, ijtx ktASYI I I h II. Q#! %  Fe tl.. \ %  ketch. Hi ...„ ., n **.. 0 c *.. ana Ad...r> 1 n Some ax^PCODdai) Schonli will b, .. ;..Uil.'..i bill la niil fj.Miiui 5AJ-Ar.v BCAIJBS'llh— M._k..HU 1 J 0 1 JM Ua— Urad...uM „r Ind CUoa Honour. •J.I'JO 3.8ari x |*—J.4S4 IK UK T'ai... U-PI..MM 1340 p* In addni.. In Cool oi LlMna %  '1 the pnTVaLllKh ratoC>ii.inetic<-in>iil poMlion on H. Kill be admotid a* pOVWMt ekpeilem-.' In neumifrt 5...T.II.I> •oiioult I.IKI War Service Tfco flraol at Ceov* I'WIIH attar a ," *d -r ...l, lo udor %  ctHrklsker aathoriUei % % %  .Io IMa ..T-.IIU. %  I** i „| i ... I laUed. i ... I .liould bo availi duty oa liom Heplrmo-i arr m .. fjapn %  li.-uid be oubrmiiod tw th •Onwitoi. Comliermoro kWhool. St ichael. nail'.tdoa. no etui* so pu.mli, 1 In Mkf toao not lot -r man JUI July. LIVESTOCK OXr.flS Two brindled bileh puf. oala. niro -m of triple Hwlaa implon Vain Ex llolfa of Q.nn ir anouthf WHlo C S K flUtL ono L One pedigree Jcrtoy Hull ot Id. mokbor Jrom Importad o(k. M Mnta -nill .>N HUt* Appk' Cor MECi: \NICAL AI'PeNC; MACI1INKBNow .hlpii^e. AJ1I.1 Adding Machlnei ;.M rocel\o< j.id and Eleelrirally ou-roled T Goddo i.nl Lid Phono *k41" 7 S3*o "DUI-LICATUIIS—koneo notary DupUitdks. oovoral modoli. from kaO.oo uj -t a demonotrollon lo-day al T Oedd< ...ami Ltd.. Bollon Uao." k Tat—0 • ttl-r roi.'H-MKNT Rnre.. Flllnif %  iMDttf, RODOO Deaka, Stationary Cupp.v.rd" now njil.b'a from itoek at T dde* Grant Lid. Phono ****.' %  l*.i.at—an ill! GAM IOOKJLK "* WilhEvm1hii)|(IWul LOOKS %  TM*J:I-. WTA1H 'uNTMOI.I And 11 $ ONLY hrior* ir'*ton' Tata! Oao lowroom. Bay Slfcel A FEW LEFT ;J =^^s^aaaaBBB, -DAVS iNEWS CLASH Johnson's Slalionrry wiU b • %  .. I-.K.I) THURSDAY 17th fo. STOCK-TAKING MOUTH OCGANS Juki rci.v ^ by— JOHNSONS STATlONfcBV L HARDWARE ^-^^^'s Spvviat JEllY DOUGHNUTS ^ ooch Aka ., '. 'j.irtv ..I DAMSII V \' BTM 3 \iiinnii!i I Aiii:ii!r..'i JLJ Tl iflAi 4758 JAMF.S STREFT •miitiy lined — O. W. Mutcrtkaooao Co., U 1 51m TYrEWHITEIUI Now In otock new II Standard ind Portable T-. pew : u.i* Geddoo Gran Lid. Phone 444i %  • T kl fin MISCFJ.i.ANfcOUS me. Mike Darnell Itoal Clue. Tn.n. i Ritta-r. WootaTh Hero, Captain rarvol, Whlir Th* Mar.el Family. Plain Mrdill Sopor Bo>, Bell Ib.yd, Oun Hornoi 30 ronlo oaelt. Prbaa 1 i. ; the li.,.. |o buy. Hat on-. Dial am. 111.53—3n IIXF.R— OI.P bunooiwi IK. Lu..Mix praclKaHy now Can I* -eon i OOPIT Ik T H—Id Courtox Uonii %  fHM.ll.Uk. BOW IO U0 I I'I'aph. Enaland'i leading Dalb hori. per now arrtvinc in Patt-i. 1 i j few davo alter pmi •idon Contact tin dale <"o Advoe CO. I.lri. local R., SHI li*w11 %  I IDiNO Oms-A le* I -d No-eacd Iron reia. oublt %  Id'nU-gUI alhtwai 3.1.Ut f 01 .A.ITI.E PlgUE TAFTTTA-Fs.e I -.on TalteU In nine chin PI-ILK SAI I S BEAL ESTATE ARTKASIUM. irtuata .1 I SI kllchool ilanaint on 1 acroa 3 roodi •" porihoa of land Tfco hou-e .i h-iiH o* atone, and tonli.o t oir..:UtrM irawlng and oHninf -.on. hal:wo>. 4 l-drooma upakBara, 1 idrooma iiwnMt %  • d ev a owl okifr d 3 cooinomi in yard vrnlenooe Ooraao and aer* i.rneii>" l.ult I GOVERNMENT NOTICE DMISIUNs Waxm Bord Act, IM3. and Wan-* Board Krirulations. IW4. IlaXUIONB —dr under nr.Uam. M i, ..d it rf the WM<* B-nl \rl. 1*44 (IMt—25) b< ta WaM PUrd nUWIk**. under ihe Wk|c Board (BrMgrlourt Shop \aoManlo Order. ItH (Votes Hoard oohlni.a. lft. No. Z A Lao ic'oo I roodo of land adj.ilnlnt I e •• %  reliant buildta* -Moo. oretaon even %  - .evi-epi HuriUa' ARJ11N',' <-*.WT> iiooa oauar* t-ol of Und *.th (.• Wall alaiidU'i itioieiMi ..i pan H-U. Bt. Pot,r. ae-eor. I Mr. Pubtor Hood lav .i .i. Oa* U Ililt*, MI. M Dial 411 K-.l. Mloe.0. la*.. V Ih I. .rinf li l hw lee ki.katoa D Al. A I AND—Ton M<. if Spot* I-and "InWalei -...ror. nonr RorlO-y li M o..j UN •^oaro %  • % %  Applil Ii Klnrh. 13*. Moghucfc Si. 10 7 M|.fj Thetf Dtfciuotu nvajr be tiiwi a* the Wage>. Board l Bridgetown Snop AialslanU) iAnifi^lmtnl, TJeiisioiu 152. No. 2 and shall be construed as oiiv *ilh the W-ges Board 4 Bridgetown Shoj. Aawtianu) Decision,., ivbo Nn. 3 .bertHnafter referred to at the Principal Decision*) :• Sub-paragraph (I) at pnrugr.ti.ii 3 of the Principal Decisions ir hereby repealed and the foliowine new sub-paragraph kubttitult'ii therefor; — ,. _. i mean ine nuuro 01 la 'nuoni ana Kl) The minimum honday with pay for shop astittanU'' l "* v ,h %  ** ki aao n .*t the offl, in Bridgeuiwn shall be ,n tendance with the HoUday, , £2%S&A Pay Act, 1931 <19fi]-n), nd My Act im ending the f•nw."i•• hr • "* ^** ^ 7 ** %  ^"**^Made this flth dnv of Juno, lffej R NICHOLS JACK, l-abour Cotniruaaiuiii'i. M 1 li-.n.aii. Waga Board |aa shop As^hrtanu, In Bridgetown i Approvad by the aovrii.oi-lii-h> l ., llllv ,. CoiiuidtU-e this 2th d||| f June. 1152 By ContMiund, J. C. KING. Clark. Executive Commiitff. ""* 11." ,52—Jn Clerk 1 rhe .mdei ajapg arM 'iiui.ioon. on Friday, 1 p m. i"Ol reel. July F* 1 dwefllr.ihonoe railed 'VEMTNOP.' uhi; %  coolamln* bv odrr>eair*ment 4. : ,.it let 1,1 11.,:. ui... :> .dual, ll.e Corner o( Pino Rood and I I Avon n aa M..hd*> 1 au.| Fndaj. m a w — ih. noura of 4 and Cum on appilrnl.i i.. ror turlhe) pmt,. Of tote apply la i lyrn*: C-ATHUMI .. ro M NO ri. HHOMI >III The undrttitned will oeTer tor al their Office Nn IT. High Street. Biidfletown. on FTIO>> the lath Jui. I-I, ,n 3 30 p m T"F Mf>o.l'A;r OR STORF known as No 37. Brood Street. Bri.iseto*" •tandlna on 4.340 %  ojutire feet or Uie>ibouU and ai prevent ocrnpled bT R i MM Inapectlon on appllcallon On II. | PI HI'* > For further particular* and condition: 1 .tie apply to:— COTTLF, CATTORD A CO AUCTION REALTOKS LIMITED AUCTION SALE AT II M A.M On Tuoodav the 32nd July, by order >f Mr. Elton Millet, wo will .ell th .nutura ond houaehold rBecl. Ml R A I ^ikoreildonre "ADIXO" Vcnlnnr nil Hocblev. which Indud-o Drawin* m -uiu coniiatint ol Ihroe rhabra and ot'oo to aeot two, plaetle lop table. Ihno -i.vod pedealal Athtray* lablei, four i.irob table with enamol lop, one araall ..hodanv table, palnled dining room lila. one olmmoni double bed, with .•nborklnt opclng, two imgl bad*. iv Birch draaabiK table. China lu l-d bowU. irull dlahaa and vai i ma ol alaaa and China, polo tad bodalda *.l-. mahoaanv cheat ol draw***, %  ble fi ml aenoral iMlm refrliterator, lool*. .TH. 11 high ipeid drill. and otandln*. lamp, real rnalr, ilonolla and man* other Item*. IHIHLH NOIMKS NOTICE in PARIIH OF HT ANDXIVt Applicatloni for two vacant Vc All..i,. tkth. Hh.ol. will ha iiy tkth ias>. Applw-tiona mu*l bo .n.pnnta.1 by birth Or tinea le and .lU-anla mini preaenl thernaoUi'tc ll.iiil Mulei Of Ihe Alia lie S. riuOi Monday Hot, ikoa to be CXAH med aitnod C A SK1NNKK Vealry Clerk. 8t Peb-r l.T 13—4n NOTICE FAkiaii ot ar PETva i.plKauona (or ono or i-mi try Kvhlbltlona at the I ..; ( iiitj. n^ Kchool will be received b> ihr lrr*lgi.ed up lo the tsth of July IkSJ i.nlu.nl. muas bo the ooaia vf PariahIn itraitciird '.I be between tic i m of age. H>plicania mual pie -lor for %  J on July ||Ul al M>i"i'-Jt'."i form* CJ i %  i-..ii ita atai of u -i rr>RBlK Veotry Cletk. IS.7 SI—Jr. I IQUOR UCENSE NOTICE TBANsriR lit • application of LawieQco Ciraeui 'SI. Sum... Ai"lie-o Hie | ao No. 3 of I aJM 11 .i. B Bj -.1 ..( ab.*-,,i • imonl, M. Andrew, io .>muv *ald InaV --Tcp , l\Hl.-o MagUltate Dirlrki %  • %  *•. i.AWRENL'l. uni : I Hi. ippU L-..1H.S v"oi Dtowl.-I U..i wiu be i I R. aaOWARDB, i.lMr.iW, Drat 'T' Ik T M~ OFFICIAL NOTICE %  til \r< al m i HI \-M-i.*N t i M ar or *uon I'LNDtlJ. CITRON r.HirFTTU PUinllfl Defendant IN puraui.ee o( n urde. M Una Court r..jd. ;n the 10th al July iau. I live notice to all Baeaokia having art catatc i n.i aj : %  <.. %  '-cling all that n I i laeat artuate al Mother.*! Ttu.ni., He pariah of Saint Mtcl i' o roods or thereoboul. abuttlag and .-'uiidms on landi now or la l.nda n-.w n. lale of Camilla i Sand I ford on linda I null Mom. an *nd> now or late Of <1a< rated. awd on • nad tl there la ov" i .M oi ... io the public road or how. %  el*e Ih* *ome may intut aood bouno lo nriiiK bclorr me an account of thai: II rot! %  nti a-.d .oicher.. to Dv me on ana Tuoada.. m Fnd.a %  aasa uoh claiona mar bo laukod -nd a plbperh LONDON lllA.IBHls 01 tOMMLKll EXAMINATIONS. lto2 AtllMN 2.211 4 00 12.00 3.00 tbrre will be a Forms or entry f r the above exunlnatlons may be obtained from '[je Department of Education, Garrison. Evntr utH:lletBenUry 8Uge — for each singla subject $ I 68 ( erlUiiavc Stage for each single subject except Foreign i languages For eacli Foreign Language School Certificate of ('. mmerctal Education. Higher Htage — lor each singl<'iibject^ except Foreign Languages Forms must be completed and iciurned to the Honorary Secre'.iry, Local Education Committee, I undoo Chamber of Commerce at he Department of Education. Gan iton, together with o copy of the i Mirth/Baptismal Cert.flcate and the feei on or before FrUay. lit c"''saj^ierd "on .artd."' i usual. IMS. ,Manoah Morria on land* icpartment of Education, Barbados. 5.7J2.—3n. re alan ...t.ded UhJand the .^id C'u.irt on W-anr. lath day ot SatNendrer Itnt. at %  r.nk.d. und. r ni> h.nd thl' lath dai.l SHIPPI X NOTICES s -otxitTi -m, i rW ., uhednoed to It Deviintnrt 14th Sedniy July Kb. arrhrma; al \.ig\rat i cener.' Baaam tbla i BJ *mnl< *eoee far chfOod and faMO %  : h Oi. %  h Bill* of Truc*)d to Leeward aV v. twatd t o laffl. BA COoTA a >.;;'.-.'. %  .'.::'*~,'.'Ss**mBlk -MOMXA 11 -nd I i.iri4-n lor \;ot>erral. BWI. araooMEB owss• i \ rtoM !*•• On.iiow.1. Tola. —. a — tall '-.'-*,->*We'. mM ..;..-•Stsam&hip fa. 9nc. NEW YORIt HEEVICE. I Jiaoe arrlTea K'W ORLEANrI skgVICK VAl-MA. lanl Cou.t ..! laaw .. ^ OFFICIAL SALE UARalADOS is TMr tni coi'ET or AFFKA1. I" WaNDBLL Cl-ARON OolFFI ii. .: |OI.A Sl^l.v Dr'andant i .... Oftlc.' ., % % % % %  Houae Bridgetown, balwoen Ihe hour* ol 13 .noon, and I o'rlock in the aile.1.0.0. on Friday, the JWi dJ^ %  h-r, I"f. all thai certain piece .a parcel at and attwata -1 H k tta a aal TUTW. ai the pnrlah of Saint Mir hot. j.'orconld containing by adn -*•• rooda or (heieabouU abutting, a'.u .te of Mm,..) P ol CanuMo ; 01 la o; I > or Uta ol i daca — 1 %  OUTSMIM, %  HO" "AaWOBEC CANADIAN dERVICI sana rum Mor.tre.1 Juno Mth ArrUt. Earaa.iee Jol> IBUl July Stlh Aufurt 1101 Augilw aWM in 1 hAnmnor .. ST JiHII. ol f LAWl'gMCl: HIVTJ! PORTS RDBFIT rUDaf LTD.— NEW YORK A GIXI SEKVK t Apply:— DA COSTA CO I.TD^i ONADIAN SERVICE SAGUENAY TER COMMUNICATIONS BETWEEN TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO lX)NDON. In tinHouse of Commons on ~nd July, Mr. Roland Robinson k Conservative. Blackpool) aikaxi ii.Secretary of Suite for the Colonies whether the Coastal simmer Committee appointed In liir,i to Investigate thr. system of n.Tiunicutlons between Trinidad i Tobago has now tnade pert; and wht it has lecommend•d. Ifawtw The Minister of Stale for Coloaig| Aflalrs. Mr. 11 L. d'A. Hopit inson replied: The Coastal Steam %  n and Island Launch Services Cirtnmittee has submitted two .tnrlm raporta. 1 am ptacmg io Library of the House a copy I a Tr-nidad Legislative Cou ...iper containing their commendations and a report of the Ion taken thereon by the Government of Trinidad and Tobago. I —B.CP. KATES OF EXCHAXGK 14. ISM sin loan %  t>r.i(i 71 'I pi I pi CmMm U pr Cum net •> > in Cotopon.. OS pr CANADA loclodlai NewfaaodUnri • pr Cheque* on Barker • 1 Demand Ehwrtt iktk pr Sight Draf n 1 p* 4 pr Coble o-. pr Curreno. M H pr IT CurbYourPi.es a* It I* nn longer .... e •ry to .uflac Op1 \nown a< h.narvidl Hyta* PUrfS M ". work in Hi rrlnol.and not <.r.ly otopa tna pain but a."o taken out Ui* owll%  ces Jig oiopab'-'l.ng and ..1 ilnla 01 rva two orilaltan il.*i-by curbttui dher irvu\ ml yUaciosja I by Ptlaa owch no H*adacbe. f l 1 -**a of energy, rfoblllty \nd Irrllaole ncll %  iiapnoltlon. Oal My I* a from your re. or-ifBtat today under the p'lvi KUU ot Donald Clarke, on 0 road over which mere a* o ; ( .t aaXf to the public rood or how1 ,,., e|ao the aame mn> aout end bound —— (and If not then oold Ih. asld propertv CANADIAN SERVICE From Monlrt'Rl nil llitlilax 1 betw OOld I SIM. 13 4 I'm lOlh 1 tbe .-vary > ^ %  1 BSUNO %  -l.-UAK .IIU-.',I. A '. IJhSEl Lipert.a Arrtral Monica) Balllaa Hale* nrldl'taww. Bar Bod.. aa J.I„1 ju v 14 July at July Ausii*l SO Jidy 4 Auguat a Aufust 14 Aunii 1 IV Auguot 3 Reptendter ,1 a ..( .1. r a TAIMA. Cot.'l "I Appeal. As 1ST n-sr UMTKII KlN4iI)OM SERVICE tmm South Wales, Liverpool aud (ilas^ow K laranlee Hytta 1 lino and II .iibl-* or lion. .urn ol amply packnae p^all: )'• ir plla back OB OUTSTANDING FURNITURE FFAtiTiPl'li MAHOOAMY IprUtg Uohnlirtcred 3-plece MORRIS SUITE in Charming Covering Spring eot ARMCIIA1IIS p irtonly Etia romtortalil. iletr Shape and Hire. SIMMON-! DOtrat-F S^iXADS 1. .*! With or V. I Spnm. I 1.AROK • 1 -rFONlFCK.I.upoited Brllli 11 mil i' v.llh lOtt ol ltevelle.1 Ma I C..ri-g. k*k up 111". MOW \T MONEY-RAVkS'O LS. WILSON FILM snev at THE BARBADOS AQUATIC 1MB (Lex-al and Visiting Members only) Through the courtesy of the British Council there will be • FILM SHOW In tbe H tl Room — on — Wednesday. Jaly 18 ai I.St p.tB. The programme includes Brltlah News; The IMS Olympic Games; Edinburgh' "Royal Mile"; and a Colour Film — "The Bridge of Time", showing some of the traditional public ceremonies of England. Members are cordially invited. No Admlaalou Charge :T:.'2 an ''-•,''.*, ',:'^'.:'s,' r '*:','.'s.*,'i t appetite.' No pep.' The h. Mood-building proper. of YEAST-PHOS will .tore lo energy >nd iU keep \ on in rr %  SUNWH1T' MARIA DE lATIHINACAk -STUOARD'S -SEArllli:!-/. Sooth wwaSt 30 Juno IfMBSal (.ii.nw July a July D j"jy II July k Aviguoi Ik Auguot .1 A iu-i M Auiuat B Wpti>ber tcmbcr. Mid bvpt Mid Ootohei UNITED KINGDOM AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE From Antwerp, Rotterdam and London -a Raraado* *UJ /.ilaTuat MM Sept. Mid October STEADY NERVES MEAN STEADY SLEEP Why not make Bare your nerves are steady. Take . NUTROPHOS Yen eal well, sleep well, feel well, when yea lake NUTROPHOS. Barbados Amateur Boxing Assn. ii:,'. 1 of DRY (•rider the pair! CANADA Invite Entrieg for the 1952 CHAMPIONSHIPS IHE MODERN HIGH SCHOOL STADIUM during the month of August at a date to be announced latex C.iu.HpioNamps u-ill be coiiU'ttcd in Ihe following dltHJioiu: Flyweight — under 112 lbs. Bantamweight — ,. lit „ Font her weight — .. 126 „ Lightweight — „ IN N Weltcrwelgh: — .. 147 ,. Middleweight — „ 180 ., Light Heavyweight— ,. 17& „ Heavy — over 17S ., Intending rompefilo-. are asked fo call at Modem Hioh School for Entry Forms any afternoon 4—5 p.m. ,AV///^/.V//'.V/.yV/.V//y,'///////-V/,V/*We^ %  i CONCRETE PRODUCTS LTD. LODGE HILL, — Telephone 2798 *>**'. '* J > *e*>OB>O0iTJ0\>0>OaBBt*aa M \lllt riMii i us lire Canal Now ObUinabl* l AT ATTRAt I'lVF. PRICES LOST A. I Ol VII LOST (•tJ-J-STAKr TICKET Series F P M kinder plea*.n turn oaine lo lean a. Oiainte. Road. St Michael IS T M -In. IKI TltKIT-i..i.WW I I 15 Tol-)B. i'j;uso.\.\i Hie public are herebv warned agaliKt f.ing credll to no* wife OLIVE -ItlNOER .nee FREEMANi a* 1 do not r-.il .nyaolf reaponilbto for hoc or anyOOC rloe controcting anv debt or debt* "NAAMAN sI'HINOER. Sar|ertt'* Vlltag. II X M ',. ..'win .*JI I:MK>TS If not saved bat Basking Salvation, platuto write for FSZEiE HOOK Whirl: Makes "GOD'S WAY OF SALVATION PLAIN" 8. Boborta. Gospel Book Tract Sonic*. SO Genual Ave„ Baagor, NX 1 >e>*0<-OSX^XeVVl.C.*,-i,-,'>, public are herebv warned kgalna ..:>„ cr.d'1 lo unv peramor peraon ... I it" 1.0 %  old myaell reponBlble lor anyone con %  uv debt or doVil* In my nan" • by a written c irler "'aned by ma OflCAR MURRAY. Two Mile HJIL St Michael II 1 tw-pn Austins Mfnu Parlovr NOTICE To allow the S:..IT then Ar.ntidl llolid.iv the husin *ill be closed from TO-nsY and reopertad on s.-vTI'RI> \V. ?fllh instant. C. M. R. AUSTIN. Proprietor R. M. JONES & CO.. LTD., beg io notify the public that, until further notice, due to building alterations the entrance to their office will be on McGregor Street instead of Prince Wm. Henrv Street. REDIFFUSI0N Offers a Commission of SI JO in CASH lor every New Subscriber brought to and accepted by the Company. UEDIEFUSION will pay j.. addition a bonus of $25.00 to any person who brings in twenty-five New Subscribers in one Calendar montli who are accepted by the Company. Have alwuys o supply of Ri mmmendation Forms ready THEY CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE OFFICE REDIFFirslON Trafalgar Street k tM MMM H> I MMM I M | M I M I M M > MIMH N ; o L o a R D E R T O O S M A L L Use HOLLOW CONCRETE BLOCKS when building or renovating your home. We GUARANTEE ihe blocks we make are of a STANDARD QUALITY and are REGULARLY TESTED HUNDREDS oi NEW HOMES, have been built with them in Ihe past three years and ALL OUR CUSTOMERS have been satisfied. Buy from u . .''•'" trill not uv Diaappointiti. The CHEAPEST and BEST to build to-day way Tests in MIAM; have shown that Concrete Block Buildings WITHSTOOD HURRICANE DAMAGE better than any other type of building. I .'sir owe gVJBM lory and lot BW ronrinnyon. Ol III US MA 4 x 8 x 16 8 x 8 x 16 Corners Double Knd Halves BanHBaaanBanaovna ivr. COPY 20c. 31c. 33c. 34c. 17c. km w i mxi, i.K %m each Fx Factory N O O R D E R T O O L A R G E i