Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
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E



; swing toward Eisenhower.





|
'

Pav bavos

ESTABLISHED 1895



Coalition Likely

Decisive Balloting

Gives Taft Time To Regroup

CHICAGO, July 10,

A stop Taft coalition likely to nominate General Eisen-
hower for President of the United States was in control of
the Republican National Convéntion to-day. Eisenhower, !
Senator Robert A. Taft and “favourite sons” whose stars!
have faded, will be matched in nomination this afternoon
or to-night.

But decisive balloting on the Presidential nomination
probably will be postponed until to-morrow. That would
give Tait followers time to re-group their forces anid devise
strategy for recovery from the walloping they suffered in
the “battle of the stolen delegates.”

The comparative standing of the candidates on the
fourth Convention day was Taft 497 votes, Eisenhower 532,
favourite sons and others 111, unknown 66. Necessary votes
to nominate are 604. This unofficial tabulation was based
on pledges and known first Presidential ballot preferences.

Yesterday's standings of leaders were Taft 550, Eisen-
hower 454.

Those figures tell the story of a of those of Eisenhower. They

They were on the losing side.

measure the punishing effect of |

the rapid fire series of decisions} are Laughter

which deprived Taft of 45 votes, Printing of the list of Puerto

from the southern states. | Rican delegates and the difficulties
Taft’s losses began yesterday'of temporary Convention Chair-

when the Convention’s Creden-!man Walter Hallan in pronounc-

tials Committee threw 13 contest-'ing the Spanish Names sent the

ed Louisiana delegates to Eisen-;convention into gales of laughter

hower. But the big break came'and enabled Marcedino Romany

last night when the Convention! not certified as a delegate by the

itself added 32 Texas and Georgia; Credential Committee to cast a

—





FRIDAY, JULY



» Probably Friday,
BR... ldots Kr orces

E. German Reds
Block Canals

BERLIN, July 10,

East Germany's waterways administration has banned all
Berlin barges from ‘East Berlin canals and the river Spree Western
cfficials said to-day. Barges owned by Government and used for
inter-city transport have been stopped and searched at. East Berlin
‘ocks recently they said.

The New East German measure was nut into effeet yesterday
One barge carrying Canadian wheat from a United States sector
harbour to a Freneh séetor store was confiscated two days ago but
was released several hours later. ‘We regard this as another pinprick
measure directed against West Berlin” a transport official said.

The West Berlin police establisheq 13 bases on the border of
on Berlin and East Germany to prevent Communist raids nto the

est. .
The West Berlin city administration implemented the plan to
halt the kidnapping of Anti-Communists as East Germans barred
West Berlin barges from Eas* Berlin waters. The waterways between
West Berlin and West Germany running through the Soviet zone sti!!
were open, .

Police sent three-man armed squads to noints along the 70-mile
Zonal border with orders to use arms to prevent a repetition of Tues-
aay’s daylight kidnapping by Communist agents, of a leading West
Berlin anti-Communist. Police still had not carried out the ity
Government's order to erect barricades on streets connecting West
Berlin and East Germany.—U.P.



a?

To Nominate

| On Fighting








delegates to Eisenhower's total.
The Credentials Comittee had|
ruled for Taft in the Texas and |
Georgia contests, But its finding |
was rejected by 607 to 531 in the;
Georgia roll call and by a roe
vote on the Texas showdown., |

Surrendered

The General roll call revealed |
the dominant strength of the stop
Taft coalition. The Senator’s |
managers surrendered on Texas.
The Convention must adopt per-
manent rules and a party platform
today, and even hear a couple or}
three more speeches before nomi-|
nating speeches begin.

There was a rattle of dispute on
one platform plank—Civil Rights.
Some Southerners think it went
too far, several negro delegates
thought not far enough. But few
have their minds on speeches or
platforms. Their whole attention
was focussed on the desperate
clevant hour sohep ting, wish

Ww ‘aft can
snap tack into the delegate lead
which -he, held for so many
months before the Convention.

Taft is a fighter and a danger-
ous man to count out too soon, but!
he has been giving ground for}
nearly a fortnight. i

The Puerto Rican three man





delegation to the Republican
National Convention last night!

voted two to one in the midst of
the greatest confusion to seat Taft
supporters from Georgia instead{

"CONFER ON PANMUNJOM TRUCE |

pres s Z



lone Puerto Rican vote for Eisen-
hower, It all started when Hector

Gonzales Blanes, Chairman of the

recognized delegation certified by
“ @ On Page 3



Earthquake Jars
Los Angeles Area

LCS ANGELES, July 10.

A slight earthquake jarred the
Los Angeles area shortly before
2 am. today but there were. no
reports of damage. The quake
gave,downtown Los Angeles only
a slight shaking but in nearby
Long Beach, police said it was
preceded hy an_ explosion-like
sound that frightened many resi-
dents,

They said that in one nearby
community, several persons who
heard windows of their homes
rattle, called headquarters to. re-
port prowlers in the area.—wU.P.

re nteeees
P.N.P. MEMBER
SUSPENDED
KINGSTON, July 10
Beccuse Allan Coombs, P.N.P.
member of the House of Repre-
sentatives would not withdraw the
remark that another member was
the most stupid member in the
House when he was called on by
the Speaker to do so, he has been
suspended from sitting for. a
month.
This is a holiday for Coombs
who. will draw his salary.—C.P.

AT AU. N. FORWARD CAMP in Korea, Rear Admiral R. E, Libby (left)
confers with Rear Admiral J. Daniel on the present status of the Pane .



West Deliver
Notes To Russia

PARIS, July 10.
The text of the Western Powers’ reply to the last Soviet
note on Germany will be delivered to Russia today. This
announcement was made yesterday by French Foreign
Minister Robert Schuman after the meeting of Cabinet
Ministers when he said a copy of the note had been sent
to West Germany Chancellor Konrad Adenauer accom-
panied by an explanation why some recommendations have
been omitted and others adopted.
ee eres The note will be handed to
Soviet Russia today by Ambassua-
’ dors of the United States, Britain
Quads’ Father
Schuman told the meeting of
Suffers Shock Ministers that only “some editorial
: adjustments” had been made to
PORTLAND, Maine, ,the Western note since it was
Silas Pinkham jm . }t. The identical notes will tell Rus-
ie carpder hier ate A vin that the West is prepardd to
gave birth w quadruplets meet the Soviet to discuss the set~
Monday is in hospital suff- ting up of an impartial commis-
tion, prospects in East and West Ger-
“He has not been able to | many.
sleep since the quads were |! Informed sources said the notes
born” said Dr. Stanley will be made public tomorrow
four babies all at once and
carrying on his daily work
was too great for him. 6 Mi Di
The doctor said he would Iners 1e |
| In Explosi
n xp osion
GLACE BAY Nova Scotia,
July 10,
j day crawled to the surface with
- the bodies of six miners killed in
an undersea coal mine explosion
three miles off the Atlantic Coast.

—————



several days “so he can rest,”
Pinkham collapsed last night
while visiting his wife at
hospital.—U.P.



and France in Moscow.

July 10, ‘drawn up in London on June 27.
ering from nervous exhaus- sion for investigating election
Rowe. “The shock of having | | morning —U.P.
keep Pinkham in bed for

| . Dust choked rescue workers to-

Prisoners Clash:
24. Injured

t Grim rescue teams sweating

PUSAN, Korea, July 10. from the blistering heat, also

It has been learned that 24 war brought a critically injured
prisoners were injured, one seri-



seventh miner from the crumpled

ously, in a fight between two hat

; ; att. An ambulance whisked to
prisoner groups in a compound at ; ; ; /
Munsan Camp. The compound hospital the surviving miner whose

brother had been killed in the
explosion. Doctors said he had
euffered third degree burns.

The explosion which rocked the
city of 30000 people shortly be-
fore midnight, filled the mine with
debris and as and made rescue
operations almost unbearable.

Authorities did not know the
cause Of the blest.—U.P.

held North Koreans who had de-
i themselves anti-Commun-
ists.

The clash started shortly after |
‘midnight yesterday, when some 40
prisoners, armed with clubs made
|from tent poles and stakes, began
tearing tents apart and attacking
; other prisoners,
lus. guards armed with tear gas
and bayonets broke up the fight
shortly after, without using their
;weapons, In all, 130 jelee. |





Concern For Eva

became involved in the melee. ;
During the fighting 16 prisoners , Peron Deepens
crawled under the. barbed wire
surrounding the enclosure and BUENOS AIRES, July 10.
sought refuge with prison guards.’ An official medical bulletin is-
U.S. doctors treated the injured } ‘sued last night disclosing that Eva
at the compound. Fourteen were | Peron’s health was “momentarily
in hospital at Taijon, There were!not satisfactory” was suppressed
no U.S. personnel hurt. teday in all Buenos Aires papers



—UP. with the sole exception of the
English language “Buenos Aires
° Herald.”
Twenty Injured They instead printed editorial

articles stating that though Eva
was not physically present at yes-
terday’s Independence festivities
in compliance with doctors’ ad-
vice, that she should have absolute

In Collision

HAVANA, Cuba, July 10






“veported 50

munjom truce talks, The latter, a destroyer flotilla commander, a
feplace Libby as Navy delegate on the truce team. (nterna



Battle Opens Over

More than 20 persons were in-
jured, about half of them seri-
ously, when a loaded bus and a
small train collided near Ran:ho
Boyeros International airport ‘ast
night. All the injured were bus
passengers,

First reports said the bus driver

rest, she was still there in spirit
in the hearts of the ple.
Concern for Eva Peron’s health
‘Was expressed today in quarters
close to Government House. The
unexplained fact that Peron did
not go to his office this morning
strengthened the view that her

W. German Treaty

BONN, Germany, July 10.

Chancellor -*Konrad Adenauer
believes that West Germany can
remain free only if it wholeheart-
edly joins the Western military
Alliance. The Socialist opposi-
tion contends that Russia has not
yet shown its intentions towards
Germany.

The West German Government
says that the only chance of ever
winning a peaceful agreement
with the Russians on Germany
on anything but Kremlin terms,
is for the West to rearm, but
Socialists insist that if Germany
joins in Western rearmament,
Russia will go to war.

Adenauer claims Germany
nas received fair treatment from
the West particularly from the
United States, while Socialists
contends that the Westerr

nov"

ers have maltreated Germany.

These are the lines drawn in
the battle to ratify the West
German Peace Treaty and the
European Army Pact which
opened in the Lower House of
the Bonn Parliament yesterday.

If the two teams remain lined
up as they were at the start
Adenauer shou!4 have little trou-
ble in winning Lower House ap-
proval when the third reading is
completed sometime in Septem-
ber or October.

But he has two even bigger
hurdles. The Opposition controls
the Senate which has the power
of veto over both treaties. Worse
it is now reported that the Con-
stitutional Court may decide that
rearmament is unconstitutional.
If this happens Adenauer would
have no alternative but to resign

—UP,

attempted to beat the train to “| condition may have worsened.

UP.



The Navy Takes A Hand

SEOUL, July 10,

Bae ARMY HEADQUARTERS said the First Marine Division

is in action on the Western anchor of the Korean front including
the truce site at Panmunjom. It was formerly on the eastern front |
around “the punchbowl” area.
, Marines staged a heavy attack three days ago against deeply dug-
in Chinese two or three miles southeast of Panmunjom. Marines said
pon gg had burrowed bunkers out of sheer rock off Korea’s west
coast.

British naval units teamed up for one of the most active days in
these waters in months. Surface ships including the British cruiser
Belfast and the Australian Warramunga, pounded anti-aircraft guns
on the shore to keep them from firing. At the same time the British
j aircraft carrier Ocean, launched Sea Furies and Fireflies to bornb
jeer and strafe occupied buildings, villages and military installa- |
| tions.

Most of the attack was aimed at the peninsula wast of the North
Korean capital of Pyongyang. Spans were knocked out of three rail
and two highway bridges, three coastal guns were hit and a trans-
‘former station damaged.—U.P.





1, 1952

}

Van Fleet To |
Concentrate

SEOUL, July 10.
General James A. Van Fleet
Was ordered to-day to ignore all |
qf nis routine duties and concen- |
vate on his mos} important job—
lighting the Korean War In a]



j@ajor streamlining of his United

Nations Command, General Mark |
W. Clark announeed the creation |
ft a “Combat Zone’ Command in|
Ss) tar tO take over a multitude of |

West * s» formesiy held by Van Ficet

meral Clark announced from
h&® Tokyo Headquarters that the
rear, ation “will permit Gen-
\@fal Van Fleet to give full time
ard attention to the vigorous
prosecution of the United Nations

j military effort against Communist
ite Ne in Korea.” ;

The New Command which will
include all Korean territory south |
of.the combat zone, will operate
and defend supply, evacuation, |
transportation service and other
agencies supporting fighting units

—U.P.



50 Communist

Rebels Killed |

SAIGON, Indo-China, July 10.

Franco Vietnam troops fighting
an important offensive in Annam
Communist rebels
killed and 57 taken prisoner, The
French High Command announced
the first report’ on Operation
“Quadrilie’ launched on Monday ,
ight. with forces numbering sev-|
@ral Dattalions to attack Commu-
Nist strong points near the Cau
Hiay lagoon, 21 miles south-east
af the Annamese capital of Hue.

They said all the killed anc}
prisoners were regular Vietminh
troops. They said 30 Vietn m|
foldiers taken prisoner by Com-
munist forces during earlier en-|
counters were also freed

The Annam front in central |
Indo-China has been the “for
gotten" front with only a com-
parative handful of French end
native troops holding some, 20,000

rebels.—U.P,

Another Fire At
Warner Brothers
Filnt Studio

BURBANK, Celifornia,
July 10

Detectives are searching for
evidence of arson in the back lo
of the Warner Brothers’ Film
Studio where more than $4,500,-|
000 worth of sets and equipment |
were destroyed by flames that!
finally burned out in the nearby;
hills,

The fira
worse than



described as much}
the blaze that razed |
25 acres of studio property la tl
May 16, was brought under con- |
trol late last night after it cover-
ed about 75 acres and swept into
the hills behind the studio, }

Total damage was estimated at
between $4,500,000 and, $6,000,000.
Officers of the Sheriff's arson
squad investigated the possibility
that the fire was started yesterday
by an arsonist and pointed out that
it apparently began simultaneous-
ly in two. different locations on
the studio back lot.—U.P.

Canadian, U.S. § |

MONTREAL, July 10

The United States dollar Wednes-
day closed at.a discount of 2 12/1
per cent, in terms of Canadian
funds up 15/16 from Tuesday's
close.

That is, it took 97 3/16 cents
Canadian to buy $1 American,
The pound sterling was $2.71, uy
from Tuesday.

In New York, Canadian dollar
was down by 11/32 cent at a
premium of 2 15/16 per cent. i
terms of United States funds in
closing foreign exchange dealings
Wednesday. The pound sterling
was down } of a cent at $2.79,

(CP)

PRINCE IS W. GERMAN |
AMBASSADOR TO SPAIV |







MUNICH, July 10
Prince Adalbert of Bavaria, a
member of the former Royal
House of- Wittelsbach, has accept-
ed the post of West German Am-

kassador to Spain a West German]

News Agency said today. There,

has been no official confirmation so}

far that the Prince
the post.—U.P.

offered

was



WASHINGTON, July 10.

United States Airforce Secre-
tary Gilpatrig, told newsmen to-
day that the slow down in jet
fighter shipments to Europe has
enabled the United States Al'r
force to boost jet strength in the
Korean war by 30 to 40 per cent
He said large reinforcements of
F 86 Sabres and F 84 Thunder
jets are being dispatched to the

Far East He used the tern
“several hundreds’
It was learned that a great rn
jority of these planes—the F 84’
originally were destined for
European airforces under the



inight approv







Eisenhower

TAFT GETS READY FOR SHOWDOWN i.

S



SMILING CONFIDENTLY, Sen. Robert A. Taft grasps the hand of a well-
wisher shortly after his plane alighted in Chicago, Atright,ina wheel-
chair, is his wife, Although still suffering the aftermath of a stroke, |
she insists upon being at her husband's side, (International) |

Truce Talks inter
Second Year

PANMUNJOM, July 10. |

Korean armistice negotiations entered their second
year today with a 40-minute secret session described by a,
United Nations spokesman as “just another day.”

|

There is no ceremony or any kind of observance at Pan-
munjom to mark the occasion. Truce talkers walked into |
the green conference tent, talked for 40 minutes and walked

|
: ie |
out again. Negotiators meet again at 11 a.m. tomorrow.

Brigadier General Nuckols who
has served as Liaison Officer be-!

House Approve |e the truce talks team and the

press gave his impressions toda)
. - oy
Pay Raise

E the armistice talks which Rad
For Queen

begun amid high hopes at Kaesong
on July 10, 1951.

He said manoeuvring at the
“in the
officers,
have

was not
States

should
manuals as

Conference table
book" for United
but he believed it
military

LONDON, July 10

The House of

Commons last

da pay raise for the] place in

Queen, giving her £475,000 a year} result of Korean truce talks ex-
to run the Royal household. The [| perience

decision increasing the Royal bud-

eet by £865,000 over that of the It hae become important for
late

demands by a seore of Labour] tevious and nefarious working

Members of
to £250,000

Parliament for a cut} Sommunist mind” he svid. “This
knowledge is essential for military
»perations against the Communists
is well as for

hem,”

After the Conservative Govern-
ment’s majority defeated
to trim the

approved it

negotiating with

Labour
budget,
without

amendments
the House .
vote 1¢ added Communists had shown

themselves to be “counter punch-

‘
King cume despite 2 li military men to understand the

During the Korean truce talk |



! Government now will draft a ers” rather than «constructive
ill covering the new budget. Its| negotiators, He described Com-!
iwceeptance by the killed. crafty

nons is only a formality,

In-a lively debate, Socialist
Members attacked the whole pomp
nd pageantry of the a chanae |

House of Com-j}munist delegates as
aa unprincipled”’.—U.P,

nd said it was time for a change A N D P R

Left Winger Emrys Hughes even |
uggested amid shocked cries from
ervative benches that Buck-
ingham Palace be turned into an
apartment house,

ons

R. A. Butler, Chancellor of the}
Exchequer retorted that the idea
would be opposed by the majority
of Britons

Arguing for the budget increase



Butler iid the simplification of

the Queen’ official functions
vould be welcomed,-—(CP)

|

nol 2 |

Barbadian |

Dies In Canada

TORONTO, July 10.

Noel Gaskin Barrow, 59, Secre-
tary of the famous Players Cana
dian Corporation, died here Wed-!
nesday Born in Jarbados,;:
Barrow came to Canada in 1918
when he became Secretary of the
Canadian Paramount Corporation
in Torontg, Canadian forerunner
f the famous Players. He
Secretary of about a dozen affili~
ates of the famous Players, and
was a charter member of the Cor-}
poration’s 25-year Club.—C.P.



was

With Bergertex, cthere’s new beat

tone

| | wea 2 aster, brick
Kurope’s Loss ines
Is Korea’s Gain

} part of the wall on which it is pai
fre



Be
ting funds in Europe. The air del
force readily turned the situa-
tion to good advantage loading out
the fighters aboard navy aircraft
carriers for the Orient

The shipment of F 86 and Vl
F 84's is believed to total about
200 plane They will not be
used to form new 1 bi il B
be distributed among two bre
ind three Thunder jet wings no
in the Far East to provide the
with ample spare rceraft some-

thing that been’ lach

unit ince





military aid programme. But ac juadron +

cord'‘ng to reliable reports, it was out that with the reinforceme AT ALL HARD
necessary to slow down Trans- r at hand, squa

Atlantic hipment owi kk te

shortage f air bases and C



has arrived
installed at
expected th
month the s
operation.

srr iA



PRICE : FIVE CENTS

New Wireless
Equipment
For Police

The
nent

new VHF wireless equip-
for the Police Department
and is now being
Headquarters. It is
yal by the end of this
will be put into full







The ins ion is beipg super-
vised by @ rts from the Gov-
ernment ectrice Engineers’

Department, and Mr, D, E. Stuart,
Pye’s Barbados Representative.
Prior to the arrival of the set

about two weeks ago, wireless
masts were erected at strategic
points throughout the island, and

smaller tranfmitting and receiving

sets will be linked up. with the

main set at Headquarters. One

of the large sets will be installed

at Castle Grant for relaying mes-

sages through the country areas.
999 Svstem

Linked with this equipment wil!
be the 999 telephone system. The
layout at headquarters provides
for the installation of a P.B.X.
near which is situated an up-to-
date map control unit. There will
be the VHF set with its 999 Switch
Board and in very close proximity
will be forms on which
will be recorded ‘all messages re-
ceived and transmitted,

In the centre of the room is a
map of the city area, .and not
many feet away another map of
the entire island, on both of which
operators will plot the exact
position of their mobile unjts and
so on. The 999 exchange and the
08 Police exchange which will be
for regular use are in close prox-
imity, and nearby there is a Dial
Director,

Now that the equipment ha:
arrived and is being installed, new
and more mobile units will be
brought into service arid these will
be linked up with -ireless at
Headquarters and the larger out-
stations

Radioman
Gels 5 Years
For Spying

JONDON, July 10.

The young British Foreign Office
radio operator, William Martin
Marshall, has been convicted of
passing secret information to a
Russian diplomat and sentenced
to five years imprisonment. A
12-man jury found Marshall, 24.
guilty on four charges of betray-
ing his country, but cleared him at
\the direction of Justice Sir Patrick
Barry on a fifth ‘count, a

The jury asked for the “utmost
leniency” on the ground that
Marshall had been “led astray”.
Barry pronounced the five-year
sentence after clearing the court-
voom at the start of the afternoon
ession to hear further secret evi-
dence

The operator who served in the
British Embassy in Moscow where
he acquired a liking for the Soviet
way of life, tapped his foot lightly
1s Barry read the tense five-min-
ute summing up before announc-
ing the sentence.—U.P.
ee eeeceSeScnensesnstnsheeeipnenssistusanis aetna



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PAGE TWO



Caub ¢

MACNIE

Secretary of

Mâ„¢ 0: -





€ Isla uy throu
i esterday morning by T-
Trinidad en reute to Van
couver f au holiday
M Maenie is now Managin
Director of the Sugar Producers’
A-sociation in British Guiana
Medico Returns
WYER. agd Mrs. Charlie M
DD Mrs, M. Tupper and her iwo
idien from the U.S.A. were
rrival from Canada yesterday
morning by T.CA
°
Dr. Manning who left here two
weeks ago for a holiday in Can-
ada, hoq to cut it short own: )
the illness of his father.
Mrs. Tupper whe is Dr, Char-
lie Manning's sister, has com
down to see her father.

Canadian Pilot

R. AND MRS. A. SMITH

Montreal, returnéd to Ca-
ada yesterday morning by TA
after spending two weeks’ holi-
day as guests at Rockley B cn
Club. They were accompanied by
their little son, Richard.

Mr. Smith is a pilot with T.C.4

in Montreal,

To Reside In U.S.A.

RS. ELIZABETH HONE
CHURCH of Gomier Estat
Dominica, left yesterday
T.C.A. for Bermuda on her
to the U.S.A. to reside with her

wuy





A. R. STARCK

U.K. Trade Commissioner
] NTRANSI'’ from Trinidad by

T.C.A,. yesterday morning wis
Mr. Aubrey R. Starck, O,.B.E
U.K. Trade Commissioner for the
British West Indies. He has gone

up to Bermuda on an official
visit and will be returning next
Whursday
On Business
R. A. D. PvAGE, Service
Representative for the Aus-

tin Motor Company of England,
children in Connecticut. She was operating from their Caribbean
here for the past two weeks as 1 Office in Kingston, Jamaica, left
guest of her son-in-law and yesterday morning by 3B.W.1.A.
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Frank for Antigua and Puerto Rico be-
Collymore of Chelsea Road. fore he returns to his headquar-
ters. He spent about three daiys
Spent Two Weeks in Barbados on business and was
n guest at the Ocean View Hotel.
FTER spending two weeks’ Mr. E. Rogers, Factory Repre-
holiday in Barbados as 1 sentative cf the same Company
guest at the Cosmopolitan Guest who came out with Mr. Page, is
House, Mr. Byron M, Devonish 91 remaining here until Tuesday
Brooklyn, New York, returned when he returns to Jamaic:
home yesterday morning by 4 at
B.W.LA. via Antigua and Puerto Marketing Officer
Rico. AYING his first visit to Bar-
A Barbadian, Mr. Devonis? had Johr og ‘aiatiehind ra B
been residing in the U.S... since N issaU bahamas. He is the eldest
1922. His last visit to the island other j Canon A. W. Johnson,
wae 10 1934. He ro wholesaic Ree .cr of St James, Rev A. I

clerk working with the

and is also Executive Secretary
of the Uniteq Action Democrati
Society.

Medical Student

ETURNING
yesterday morning

Bert Reece, a first year medical
Btudent at the University College
He is a on of Mr. C. Nigel Reece
of Society, St. John, and has come
over to spend his summer holidays
with his relatives.



The Last Girl BY ‘THE WAY . ... 8) Beachcomber |

To Leave
Aly’s Party

Lovely Lise Stays Till

The Dawn

From SYDNEY SMITH
PARIS,

exclusive and most
expensive party of the Paris
summer season, given by Aly
Khan, ended at 4.45

The first birds were stirring
and the sky was brighter than
the crystal chandeliers in, the res-
taurant among the trees of the
Bois de Boulogne. on the outskirts
of Paris, when the last two people
left. They were Aly Khan him-

Tae most

firm of
Jaxton Clothing Co. of New Yerk

from Jamaica

by
B.W.LA. via Trinidad was Mr.

Johnson, *
Canon A. C
Grenad

Mr. . on arrived yesterday
morning by B.W.I.A. via Trinidad
and will b> spending four weeks’
holiday with his brothers. He was
accompanied bh sister, Miss
Dorothy Johnson.

car of St. David’s and
Johnson of Gouyave,

American Consul

R. H. O. RAMSEY,
ean Consul

Ameri-
stationed here,
returned from Trinidad yester-
day morning by B.W.LA. after
a very short business visit.



MA® nurses at a hospital are
complaining that the braid
on their trousers gets them mis-

taken for hospital porters, That
is nothing.
The gorgeously dressed com-

missionaire outside a certain fim
theatre was mistaken for a Peru-
vian Admiral by a _ diplomat
On leaving the theatre, the diplo-
mat insisted on taking the Admiral
home with him for a drink. The
commissionaire played up, until
the diplomat’s wife said; “Have
your people built a new ship late-
ly”? “‘No fear!” said the Admiral.
“My people run a_ tobacconist’s
shop in Hounslow. Why should
they build ships’? A diplomatic
silence greeted this thunderbolt
Pibney St. Vitus
ROFESSOR O. K. McTOOT-

self and lovel Lise, ¢ "
France’s No, 1 Siveraai Tee ZIE met Mimsie Slopcorner
This was the biggest party Aly for the first time today, and

has yet given for his annual cele-
bration of the Grand Prix race at
Longchamp, just a mile away.

There were 180 guests, and it
lasted eight hours,

The Aga Khan, defying doctor's
orders in a wheel-chair, presided
at a table decorated with a model
in lace of Longchamp racecourse.

The Duke of Windsor, in a mid-
night blue dinner jacket, presided
at a second table, decorated with
models of Elizabethan warships.

And France’s first soldier and
only marshal, Alphonse Juin, was

at the head of the third table,
which had model cannons.
The Duchess of Windsor was

there in a white off-the-shoulder

dress; Across it-was-a-great scarlet

sash pinned with rubies.
The Begum Aga Khan

was

there and the jewelled Mahara-
nees of Baroda and Jaipur in
saris.

Paris society women, eagle-eyed
for signs of “romance,” watched
Aly Khan dancing.

I heard one woman guest say :
“But, my dear, he dances with
every woman as though she is the
only one he could possibly love—
how can you tell?”

Well—partner Lorraine Dubon-
net, 23-year-old wine heiress,
left well before the stars began to
pale. Singer Dany Dauberson flew
straight back to the South. But 27-
year-old Lise Bourdin, who stayed
tili sunrise, is still in Paris,

—L.E.S.

$1.00 $1.00 $1.00



showed her drawings of the kind
of helmet he thought Boadicea
shoula wear. He did not disguise
the fact that he found her in-
tensely stupid She said, “Isn't
it very heavy?” “Every thing wa*

heavy in those days’, snapped
MeTootzie., “And what's the
shield for?” asked Mimsie, “In

case they pelt you with things,”
replied the professe savagely.
“No need to be rude,” said Mim-
sie, “Every need,” said MeTootzie
And at that point Mrs. Golbrand
averted a scene by talking of her
spaniel, Esmond,
Twenty years of uproar
T READ of a conductor that “He
showed little sympathy with
the singers,” and even “ignored
their attempts to make themselves
heard.” That gives me an ex-
quisite picture of a tenor trying to
attract the conductor’s attention,
shouting “Hi!” between bars, and
making grimaces eloquent of
anger and frustration. If I were
a conductor, not only would T have
no sympathy with these queer
people, but I would be actively
hostile, as Ni‘wity was to Rusti-
guzzi, When he d-liberntely sub-
stituted Act II of Lohengrin for
Act Ul of La Bohe ne. There was
Mimi, lost and du

founded, and
looking very sil) ’ wrong
costume,
Education
OURGOUILLOU! Such igno-
rance f the el/ments 9 of
polite living! “The Riv Ariége,”

——- arene

CLEARING ODD LOTS DRESS GOODS

CREPES,

PLAIN,

SPUNS,
FLOWERED,

STRIPED,

Back From St. Vincent
ye 5 DOROTHY BARROW of
- B Hal] returned

Road



morning by B.G. Air-
from St. Vincent where she
t t he nnual holiday
Arrivil by the same oppor-
nity frem St, Vincent was Mi
Barrow of River Road who
is holiday! 1g there for the past
x weeks,

Kector Returns
1 EV. H.V
TM f St
Canada
returned
T.C.A,
by Mrs

B.G. Civil Servant

R. E. S. DOUGLAS, Super-

vieor of the Co-operative
Credit Banks ettached to the De-
partment of Agricul‘ure in British
Guiana, errived here yesterday
norning by B.W.LA. via Trini-
dad for two weeks’ holiday. He
was accompanied by Mrs. Doug-
1s and they are guests at “Leaton-
n-Sea”, The Stream.

To Study Nursing

RRIVING from St. Vincent

yesterday morning by BG.
Airways was Miss Margaret Ab-
bott, daughter of Mr. and Mrs,
W. J. Abbott of Kingstown, She
will be here until Sunday as a
guest of Rev. and Mrs. W. Harvey-
Read of Garden Gap, Worthing,
when she leaves by the Colombie
for England to study nursing at
the Royal Surrey County Hos-
pital.

‘ Philip
for
yesterday m¢
He wa accom-
Armstrong.

who went
ip to
ealth

by
panied

Enjoyed Holiday

FTER what he described as

very enjoyable holiday, Mr.
Max Erdwurm of New York left
yesterday morning by B.W.LA.
for Puerto Rico intransit for St.
Thomas where he will spend a
few days before returning to
New York. He was accompanied
by his wife. They had spent one
month haere as guests at Maresol
Flats, St. Lawrence Gap,

Mr. Erdwurm is working for
the Naticnal Advertising Depart-
ment of the Néw York Times. He

id that he was certainly not
ooking forward to the heat in
New York, but hopes to be baci
here soon again for a hceliday

Intransit
JAMES FORBES, Man-
ager of the Cocoa Planters
Association in Trinidad, was in-
transit yesterday morning by
T.C.A, on his way to Toronto for
medical treatment.

Talking Point

Don't forget to speak scornfully
of the Victorian age. There will
be time for meekness when you
try to better it.—J. M. Barrie.

R.

it says, “rises in the lake of
Naguilles.” It does) no such thing.
Naguilles is above the ancient
forge of Orlu, the oldest forge
in the world, Ariége, my own
Ariége, risés in the lake of Font-
Négre, 7,600 feet up, I know its
boyhood, as it goes leaping along
by Hospitalet and down to Ax
and les Cabannes, where it meets
the Aston. Together they go chat-
tering along to Tarascon (not
Tartarin’s), and so to Foix and
Pamiers. There used to be gold
in these parts, and as late as the
eighteenth century people were
ecarching for it in the mountains.
{ would sooner have the dark
wine they drink in Vicdessos,







CROSSWORD



Across
1. ty ied cord amended. of course
)

5. Found tn all c!b oarsmen,
Â¥. You're
(5)
0. [t's played to an audience, (4)
. And tf played well will this (9)

(4)
4 falr way out in this

t

11

13. Ruminants take tea, (5)

15, Semi-round but unsound. (4)

18, Produces a sticky wicket ? (5)

20. Open; able before accomplished
, 1 22. Ragged penetrator. (6)

24. He ts used to turnover, (3)

24. Chilly but I'd follow the gel. (5)

Down
Way to tend the race. (4)
Way to an outer. (5) Z
At the bar .t’s darmming. (4)
On many farme either explosive
or earthy. (9)

. It could be a eiuse tie. (4
Let's Drag about boats. (5
Hoider, (4)

Start of rags anc

. Pardon the merit.

eRe

tatters,

(

Rated as commerce, (5)
. The sap belongs to me,

Cold dice, (4)

Unytetding. (4)

Mare that will carp. (3)
Solution of Saturday's purzle.—Across
\ Neglect; 8. Orgatiged, 11, Trait; 12
tha 15. Boa; 15, Crown; 17 Wh

ann 24, Sheep dog;
Down. 1

(4)

(4)

KSIGe SIS





$1.00

SILKS.
CUECKS,

ALL AT ONE DOLLAR YARD.

PLAIN VOILES AND FANCY ORGANDIES



T. R EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE

STORES



DIAL 4606

ARMSTRONG, Rev-|

reasons of!

oO

BARBADOS



Knart, Hanid Heard a Noise

—And They Decided to Investigate It—

By MAX TRELL

KNAREF heard the noise first,
and went and told his sister Hanid
about it. “It sounds like digging,”
he sa “It comes from the o*'i-r

of the garden wall, Buc when
look ad over the wat J couldn't

nything being dug. So f don"t

} iknow what % can be.”
Hanic decided to take a look ry,
elf. Knarf went with her Yo

nunother look

A few minutes later they were
oth looking down at the ground
| (rom the top ef the wall. The sound |
ot ewing came up quite cleariy
| But nothing eould be seen. The
| trees, che bushes and the vines ail
remained still, Only the grass
moved a little just beside the fallen |
| trunk of the old apple tree. But |
that, as Knarf said, “might just be
| the wind.”
| Vhe Other Side

Then Hanid climbed down off the
wail and dropped on the other side,
with Knart following right after
her. They both walked over to the
trunk of the old apple tree and care-
fully watched the grass.

“There isn’t a bit of wind and |
it w moving!” exclaimed Hanid.

“Yes, it is!”

“Someone’s digging under
Knarf!”

“Who can it be?”

Hanid put her ear on the erofna,
at just the spot where the trass
was moving, “I hear the noise! It’s |
right under here!” At that Knarf |
and Hanid both started digging!
with their hands. A few moments
later the whole top of the ground
fell in, grass und all; fell into a
hole. The next instant Blinky Mote’s



it,

head came up, He looked around, |

rubbing his eyes in the bright li¢ht,
trying to see who had broken into
his house, and what for?

“Who's here?” said Blinky. “Who
just made a hole in my roof?”

“Oh! Blinky!” said Hani. “We
didn’t know it was you duwn there,
digging!”

“We heard the noise,” said Knart,
“but we couldn’t see anybody.”

By this time Blinky’s eyes finally
got used to the bright light a little,
and he was able to see Knarf and
Hanid. He smiled. “Oh, it’s all right.
Not too much damage. | can build
another room just as good. | should

sky.
| 55-year-old
Airways.
Until he exchanged his cockpit
seat for an administrative chair
in the corporation’s operations de-
partment at the end of the war,
Captain Armstrong was one of
Britain’s best-known civil air
pilots,

He pioneered the London-Paris
route just after the 1914-18 war.
He made historic flights for
Imperial Airways between the
wars, and flew on many diplo-
matic flights, including trips to
Russia, during the last war.

Poverty

Now Captain Armstrong
written a book* telling
became a flier.

In 1911 he
wanted to fly.

“But quickly I put away this
thought,” he says. “I would not
fly; it was out of “the question.
Why should I think of doing such
a thing? I, who was the son of
people living in poverty.

“My parents’ home, like so
many thousands of others in the
industrial north country, was
small and cramped; and I knew
that my mother found it difficult
|to make ends meet,
| Young Armstrong worked in
factories, and hated it. He seeth-
ed with rebellion against the
| conditions,

Finally, he was lucky enough to
be engaged by a firm of pharma-
ceutical chemists. In 1917 he
| joined the Royal Flying Corps and
became a bomber pilot.

Collapse
In 1919, Armstrong flew for Air

Opening To-day 2.30 & 8.30
and Continuing daily 4.45 & 8.30
at



has
how he

realised that the







it’s the midnight
affair that shook
Washington
| Square

| » «with
| laughter!






starriog
JOAN

| AOA

JOUN



J

| ai

| FAWN
7 NATOHELL LEISHN

pRooeCTION

2

Produced by HARSY TUGEND
' Brrecte MITCHELL LEISE®
OUNT PICTUR







ad Lesser Saments
TRY. THE FIRE, by



Extra:
Short:— TAR WITH A STAR
and Latest British News Reel

ADVOCATE




At Work. Then you would have
known.” b

Knart and ‘Hanid asked Blinky
why he was building more rooms
to his house. “You've got fifteen or | feet,
twenty rooms already,” said Hanid. | look narrower, wear shoes built;
“And you live in them all alone
Why do you need more?”

“Expecting guests,” said Blinky,
sitting down and lighting his pipe.
He struck his match on the bottom
of his shovel,

“Guests, Blinky?”

“They'll -be here in a few weeks.”
“My goodness,”
“You’re the busiest person 1 know
You work day and night all through
the Spring, and Summer and Fall.
And then, when the winter comes
and you have a chance to rest, you
invite a house-full of guests.”
Blinky nodded. “But they’re no
trouble, no trouble at all, They’ll |
come,* they'll say hello, I’ll show
them to their bedrooms, and they'll
go to sleep. They won’t wake up
until the Spring. Then they'll say
good-bye and
away again.
You see,” he said, “it’s Frog, and
Willy Toad, and Blackie the Beetle,
and Cricket, and maybe a grass-
hopper or two, and a few spiders.”
Willy chuckled. “Very sleepy win-
guests.
Well—I'd better get to work again.”
And he knocked the ashes out of
his pipe, smiled, and went down inte |
have put up a sign,” he said. “Mole | his hole

The Flying Pharmacist ea

Became Ace
Now He Is A B.O.A.C. Chief

JAMES STUART

FORTY-ONE years ago a 14-year-old poor Tyneside lad
watched one of the earliest airplanes plodding through the
Now he is Captain William (“Tim”) Armstrong, DFC,
airfields superintendent

ter



Transport and Travel, one of the
original airlines operating between
Hounslow and Paris.
of the first twelve civil pilots.
Then came collapse. The Gov-
ernment were not prepared to do
anything for aviation, and civil

{lying temporarily closed down. : vate
Armstrong, newly married, re- ete oe an a a deainee a ie Sen kaaetel Pare

turned to pharmacy. PARAMOUNT Presents _ on, Oe oEnee
He studied hard and qualified Joan FONTAINE—John LUND and

as a pharmacist, then accepted a
job at £3 10s. a week.

But in 1924, however, he joined
the new
flew again on the European routes,

And to cover
a second failure of civil aviation,
Armstrong set up a pharmacy and
put a manager into it.

new routes,

: : . : na ;

Armstrong went on flying until | storting vs “RAINBOW OVER TEXAS" (

2 ww ta ” a
1930 when for a short time he be-| ANN GENE ee ate Or MANZO" ss -_———--
came Imperial Airways’ manager 5 EV, ROYAL
in Cairo. The following year he| DVORAK ANS OLYMPIC ; To-day only 440 & 8.15
returned to England and started gm F : To-day to Monday 4.30 & 8.15 Scott BRADY—Richard BASEHART
A CCC CCEULONM Creal MARK W. CLARK ‘The Four MASS Brent cad te “HE WALKED BY NIGHT”
survey flights over the Far East eins agree tenie AFLAMING FEATHER” — Mo te and
in preparation for the opening of MEMORY LANE”
stn DOUGLAS KENNEDY - RICHARD LOO + LISA FERRADAY + PHILIP AWN

is i Produced . io Sunda 4.20 & BW
‘alee. heesdtaeas Sine el aoe, ‘Sect SEO sy Ne eet te ROAD’ and “Pail” ROBESON Leni ne
Ss " in
Slovakia from England to Ru: ee. “DON'T FENCE ME IN" i river”
in January, 1944," = PLAZA PARBAREES agro or: Sere! a
William Armetrono | iam rmstrona and for ® RICHARDSON
Hieem, 1883 fi TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.30 p.m. | Balph Seal

“Who's there?” Blinky asked.

es,
high bows or ‘apron’ fronts give

a A Few Weeks - Hengtn anc slimness to a short,
“Winter guests,” said Blinky, |proad foot. Four-holé lace-up



SENSATIONAL J



a8 Captain Quincy Wyatt, |

wm MARL ALDON _.
as the captive beauty “."

coun ne wl VEN BUSCH © MARTIN RACKIN

onesie oWARNER BROS,
PLAZA
{

; TO-DAY 2.30, 4.45 and 8-30 p.m.)
j and Continuing Daily 4.45 and)

« UNITED STATES PICTURES marron |



FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1952

“a

- BEAUTY
WITH SHOES}

THE DESIGN of a shoe ean change the look of a foot



OCSSSSOOS OSORIO ODOOES.
THE GAS COOKER

With Everything U Want

SIZE!
LCOKS !

THERMOSTATIC CONTROL |
and it’s easy to keep clean.
See them before it’s too late.

your Gas Showroom, Bay



At
3 Street
as completely as a hair-style can a face. A large foot can) % ONES A. Fee eee
| appear sizes smaller, a broad foot much narrower, in the] 4¢¢ 2DOPOBOHSE 7D OW
| OOo", FREES PSO



right shaped shoe. These are good basic rules to follow Gc Al & a ¥

The Garden—St, James
Te-day & Te-morrow 8.30 p.m.
‘iuetud?OW 18 ANOTHER DAY’

Steve COCHRAN &

INLY the VALIANT Gregory PECK
MIDNITE (Specia.) SAT.
GOLDEN STALLION’ Roy ROGERS
“WELLS FARGO GUNMASTER”
hocky LANE
Sun. & Mon. 890 p.m
Mat. Sun. 5 p.m
“DODGE crry”

Erro! FLYNN

| when choosing shoes from the point of view of their beauty,
| but don’t forget that this comes second to good fit.

} For Long, Narrow Fett. High the ankle. High built shoes, in-
heels, open toes, sling backs, step—and especially ankle straps
‘asymmetric, straps, trimmings or —fore-shorten the leg and make
strappings runnimg across rather the ankle appear thicker. Plaia
than down the foot, flat bows and dark shoes are the most slender-
other ornaments detract foot ising.

jlength. dn the low heeled shoes, — as a last word, bare legs look
| wedges, brogued tongues and low~ mich TOO bare unless they are
jcut Oxfords, or three hole Derby |tanned. Substitute cosmetic stock-
lacings help to fore-shorten the | ings for your real ones.

apparent length of 4 foot.
GLOBE

For Leng, Broad Feet.
OPENING TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 P.M. & CONTINUING

same rules apply
but to make

BUG MT CCR ChC CMC IU

CU LCC LES









The
as for narrow
a broad foot






























up at the sides. A low cut shoe
éxpeses too much instep to be
flattering. Choose straps or trim-
mings which run aslant, or down,
the broad part of the foot

For Short, Plump Feet. Designs
built up in front, pointed tongu

designs are lengthening. Medium
te low heels are better than very
high enes, which are inclined to
emphasise the width of a short
foot.

For A Broad Fronted Foot-
Large or small, the need here is
to slim the front part of the foot,
while keeping a snug fit round
the heel. This can be done by %
court cut with a ‘sweetheart’ front
line, also by an asymmetric ton-
gue, strap or trimming. Again
avoid designs which cut straight
across the braad front of the feet.

Sltimmer-Looking Ankles. Court
shoes are the most slimming ‘to

said Hanid

thank-you, and go
No trouble at all.

Not a bit of trouble. |




























———_——_——_.
BRIDGETOWN BARBAREES
(Dial 2310)

‘Vo-day 2,304.45 & 8.30 p.m
end continuing dai 4.45
and 8,30 p.m,
Exciting Adventure

Gary Cooper in

DISTANT DRUMS

(Technicolor)



CUCU Lar
Cee CMe ih
woman ever

aL

















Sat. Special 1.30 p.m
“CHEROKEE

Sat. Special 9.30 & 1.30
IN OLD AMARILLO

Roy Rogers and

WYOMING BANDIT

Rocky Lane

(Dial 6170) (Dial 8404)
To-day 4.45 & €30 p.m To-day & To-morrow
ana continuing daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m

| WAS AN FLYING
AMERICAN SPY |} LEATHERNECK
Ann DVORAK saa
Gene EVANS Robert Ryan
SAT. Special 1.30
"RannanY BBS
UPRISING” Donald
“Return of the
: Whip Wilson and DURANGO KID"
"WESTERN Charles/ STARRETT
RENEGADES" |) =————————————————
Johnny Mack Brown
ee

MIDNITE (Special)
Sat. 12th
“The DALTON GANG
Don BARRY &
“OUTLAW COUNTRY’
Lash LA RUE

“Sin, & Mon.
TOP HAT

of British Overseas

Midnite Special Sat.

Zane Grey's
“THUNDER MOUNTAIN”
‘Tim Holt-—Richard Martin
“LEGION of the .
LAWLESS”

Midnite Special Sat,
2 New Westerns!
“OUTLAWS of
TEXAS"
Whip Wilson and
“TRAIL'S END"
Johnny



He was one





Brown



‘Mack





“EM!

Mona FREEMAN in -
“DARLING HOW COULD YOU"
tra: Short: “TAR WITH A STAR”
and Latest British News Reel

“THE HUNTED”



..Opening To-morrow 4.45 & 8.15.
COLUMBIA PICTURES Presen
Barbara ae ee GR

in



Imperial Airways and Saturday 1.30

-m.
“SHERIFF OF REDWOOD VALLEY’



“LORNA DOONE”

himself Color By Technicolor

against | and me
“SAN FERNANDO VALLEY







Saturday Midnite

ey ger erie ‘TWILIGHT ON THE RIO GRANDE!

ROGERS —Dale




an MCIED ARTISTS Prcrume EVANS

Roy











Starring:
Sterling HAYDEN—Forrest TUCKER
A



—L.E.S.



and Continuing D



ily



JUST OPENED!

YOU'LL BE
DELIGHTED
WITH THEM









dN \ eae

cee



_ }
=
>





Aru eg alc
Ls -







—AHFTES_FGEO_™”_ P—OEeFE>&=q~—OmBEFQerO0WcrccKTW[cT[o”""”D=@["[€T=—"€>"2"Soq0DhWNSSS

oweero RAQUL WALSH



mune oF
Rr STEER

B'TOWN
DIAL 230! |



|



aoe ee ee eee

STORE



|

8.30 p.m.













FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1952

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Firsi eye-witness story
of the raid the whole



SUIHO PLANT serve
40% OF NORTH KOREA
AND ANTUNG & DAIREN
AREAS OF MANCHURIA

‘To begin with,
the Ack-Ack was
thick, but then—'

i9st Was votsuivea oy the raid

che Yalu civer

Six days of diplomatic
crisis in the world’s

Ounk

clou

r

—

opposit:
Seane Diss and climbed into the

2
guing
<2 Pe * <

capitals” have passed At. 300: miles -an nou: ines

since the Americans first OC: Wb Onna er ASE TADS

* The first bomp fel) or tne

bombed the Yalu river mighty Suino plan atesone

power plants, close to cose past four in the »fter-
on.

the border of Manchuria. Ohe-tomsotiie Abpeecuaies

I
But amid all xi tae concrete | roofs. Delve
discusston, |: hardly Rene cate winders
Taipeey . 2 through the obdiusted window
anything -has been said came black smoke ano cherrs
of the operation itself. "ed ames
What happened on BRITISH THERE
that raid, and why did = go, 99° minutes tne race
the military minds went 408. the chombere un-
i i ” moles except or yn e
consider it necessary ‘ debris which they themsei* ss

Here is the first complete





reated.
answer is arees aay ae force }é
gnters—including ritis' uit
From RALPH Meteors “covered them . Th
wai in vain to be chalienge
WALLING by Red MiGs jihough these
were based 30 miles away
: TOKYO, Saturday Simultaneously raids were
HE clouds lay heavy made on four piaes power
» ale stations 1wo at Fuson on the
the Meee kee over — Songehon fiver aud (wo at
‘ Thugen on the n ive
Of the nofth-east coast Aliogether 500 alrerait ‘were
ot Korea steamed the, US La ron 9 ji ae oa
aircraft ~ carriers B zie} a me ;
Princeton * Philippine. “Sea “The ack-ack looked rough when
Bon Homme, and Richard the Orst plages went in to attack
Swiftly, thet? course set to the the plants, After their runs

west. 36 Skyraider dive-bombers "ee Was nothing to it.”




took olf. Piloting one was

Lieutenant Tom Dreis, of 49-MiLE STRETCH

Chicago. who tater described the Sutho, the. keystone of the

raid to ine. Yalu's mammoth hydro-electric
So began the most important

‘ , : system, has a chequered story
air mission of the Korea war— ae

the bombing of the Yalu river
power plants. hat afternoon
they put out the lights in North
Korea



It was built oy the Japanese in
1937 and completed in 1941. It
cost nearly
the fourth targest plant in the
world,







«

;

1O@oOo-OS



236,000,000 and is

DODGED RADAR The great Gam-burruge 1s
828ft. high 3,000ft tong
For 200 miles the Skyraiders creating u 40-mile long reservoir
flew west. almost clipping the Generating capacity of the
mountain tops to get below the plant was poosted by Soviet
Communist radat warning technicians from 400,000 kilo-
écreens. watts to 600,000. Now its switch-
At fixed poimts U.S. Fifth aj: Yards, transtormer yards, and
Force fighter-bombers from ‘urbine buildings are blasted
South Korean airfields joined and
them Before the raid a Jwpanese
Together they swung in alone engineer in chetge at Sutho in
.



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oi Tb Gagy But
bombs of 1952 crumpled it.

about

k



Korea fea by ine Yulu's nydro

blanners, electric system. They knew that
“Suiho is ouijlt to withstana hundreds of wrecked trucks and
nombing.” he said So it was railcars were being pulled back,

the mighty imto those caves repaired. and

gol back on to the. roads and

tailways they were constantly
‘WELL DONE’ hammering

fi Time und again they nud
aiiTe ate the verdicts on the gown over the power plants and

Gansta i Mack Clar left them unscathed
Amertcan Supreme Conk Admiral Briscoe, ot the U.S
manderin Korea: “The attack \® und Air Force Genera
contributed materially to the ‘Weyland studying their tosses
reduction oO! the enemy's war. bo recotamended that Sulh

making potential.

General Weyland, U.S. Air
Force : “Nothing, not a single
detail went astray.”
nin aemeoe : ; sae

went o without ‘2
hitch,”

and other plants should be hit
—not by any piecemen! method
but in one big blow

TACTICS CHANGED

Genera! Ridgway the torme
United Nations Commander-n

Vice- " ¥ ‘
ice-Admiral Clark signalled Oliief. egtecd

“Well done” to all hands and





aided: “It was like old Hig recommendations w. the
times.” Washington Chiefs of Staff und
State Department got nowhere

* * * Apprehensions of a Man

churian “incident”
proved too strong.
Then the tactics of the attack
were revised. General Mark
Clark, the new Onited Nutions
C.-in-C., verted them and sough)

developing

Now what the stor

ochind this raid ? On what

the american

hk command justify it as a
military necessity ?

To unde that 1 must tei) Washington apprevai to apply
you the Of the “cave them.’ Not unti! Sunday test
worl was this approval wi ven

Allied air rations designed Such Wus the ruig on Mondas
to strangle one Red armies which tn a4 few hours was to set
Supply lines were not succeeding ‘the world talking. Three times
because first-class repairs were ‘Since then the plants have beer
being done at workshops in ‘tacked.
caves in North Korea he Op Friday 150 planes again pit
sources of power for these work- the four subsidiary stations

were the Yalu river They are still burning

C,

ti





et

D.& W. Funds Running Out

Money Allocated
_ But Not Spent

LONDON.

niy about £5,000,000 vemains in reserve in the Colo-

and another

schemes.
/ Phis is reported in the
rreturn of schemes uhdey me
Colonial Development ané Wel-
ifare Aeis, which has just been

}
|

published in ‘London.

last year's total of £14,470,682
fpaid cut under the Acts was the ,

largest. sum





; paid eut in any one

year since the scheme came into

eperation in 1946, bringing th

total fo six years up to
£ 56,346,571.

1951 Grants

The 951 Srauts inchide

| £25,867 for cocoa development ia

British Guiana; £418,226 for

saad development in Britisa Hoa-
turas; 249,000 for survey and
soll conservation work in Domin-

iea; and: &31,530 gor mixed farm- :

ing in St. Vincent.

There is also a smal! item of
£50, ,concerning the visit. to St.
Lucia of Dr. Gunnar Bodvarsson,
of the Geothermal Department
of the State Electricity Authority
of Iceland. He was {nvestigatitg
the feasibility of harnessing ener-
gy derived from Volcanic fuma-
roles for the generating of elec-
tricity.

Commenting on the pep. i,
London Times draws «
the fact that not onl) wo ands
running low, but also (hat ic re-
cipients of these’ funds are wader-
pending. It adds; “In \the sixth

ear of the ten allotted by the
Act, less than half the allocations
have been spent, in spite of rises
in world war prices, This is due
partly to world shortage of men

the
PQ. 49

and materials and partly to the *

difficulty which countries’ like
Malaya have in cafrying out
ordered development among civil
unrest.”

The paper points out that the

funds have noi always been judi-

ciously applied. Initial errors were
made in 1946, soon after the Act
came into foree, There was too
mueh unproductive expenditure
and colonies were saddled witn
social services which they could
not afford to maintain, Later, a
new policy was adopted to give
precedence to schemes that would
benefit the colonies economically.

“The hew policy does, however,



raise the question of how far these
grants tread the same ground as
the Colonial Development Cor-
poration,” the paper adds. “In gen-

eral, the policy is to restrict them

to basic economic necessities,
buch as building roads or draining
swamps, whieh while they will
prove an asset to the colony’s
economic advancement in general,
will never pay an investor’s divi-
dend. Private enterprise, or the
Colonial Development Corpora-
tion for that matter, can then





nial Developmient.and Welfare Fund, to last until 1950. O1
the original £140,000,000 mace available to be spent ove:
;. ten years fram 1946, some £

U,000,000 has now been spe

£ 79,000,000 has been earmarked for various

id upon these basic services

No Limit

the Times suggests that no

mit sould be set to the. dii-

sement f funds under the

and that a further mail

ant towards the reserves should
be made before 1956,

\ comparison with the work of
tha Colonial Development Corpor-
xiion is also drawn by the London
liaily Telegraph in a leading ar-
ticle’ on the port. Both organi-
mations are pursuing the same ui-
iyuyate objective, it says. But one
ie managed directly by the various
eeionial gevernments, while the
other is run from London.

“The pattern to be aimed at i
triple partnership in which the



Sritish Government draws the
blueprint of development and
Colonial authorities provide the

Jocal management; while private
enterprise (American as well as
British) helps public funds to
build upon these foundations,” it
says. But it adds:

“Tt should be realised that, as
a #eneral rule, the development of
Celonial agriculture depends upon
the improved skill and enterprise
of the local peasantry rather than
upan the substitution of a sort of
industrialised agriculture.”

—B.U.P.

EISENHOWER

@ From Page 1

the Committee announced that his
rrowup was voting three to zero in
favour of sealing the Taft dele-
gates from Georgia, Gonzales
Blanes, Celestino Triante and
Ricardo Colon were approved
Tuesday by the Credentials Com-
mniitee,

lighting to firm up his lines,
YT. ft called about 40 of his state
tesders into a strategy conference
today. He told newsmen he is
still very much in the race and
repeated his claim of winning
nomination “on an early ballot.”

Jubilation spread through Eisen-
hower's headquarters in the peak
of the smashing victory in the
“Stolen Delegates” issue. Eisen-
hower himself did not know until
this morning that he had his big-
gest political victory to date,

General Douglas MacArthur's
name is being heard as a remotely
possible candidate. Satisfactory
jo some Taft supporters but
heard only faintly.

Eisenhower and Harold E, Stas-
sen were to meet at, or before
breakfast. Some of Stassen’s best
friends are urging him to abandon
the race and throw his support to
Eisenhower on the ballot,





U.P.





‘Ne Senate Majority
Yor Mossadegh

TEHERAN, July 9.
The Iranian Senate refused to
tive Mohammed Mossadegh the
majority vote he demanded as a
condition of forming a new gov-
ernment. Mossadegh resigned the;
premiership when the new parlia-
rent took over last week. He re-
ived an overwhelming “vote of
clination” from the Majlis las.
week to resume the post but the

oate baulked,

Called back into session to-day |

iiemribia hedidiosene

oaly 14 of 38 members of the
\ pper House voted for him. Three}
members voted for other candi-
dates and 19 abstained.—wU.P.

|
SEA AND AIR |



TRAFFIC

In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Timothy Van

‘ Sluytman, Sch
ivond Star, Sch. Marion Belle 'Woife,
Sch. Rainbow M. Sch. Lucille M.

Smith, M.V. Jenkins Roberts, Sch. Ev-
erdene, Sch. Turtle Dove, 6ch. United

Pilyrim, Seh. D’Ortac, Seh. Linsyd I,
Sen Triumphant Star, Sch. Hariett
Whittaker, M.V. Blue Star, M.V. Will-
emstad, MLV, Lady Jey, S.S. Feggen,

®S. Tribesman, Sch. Enterprise $. Sch.
Mary M, Lewis, Sch, Lady Noleen, Sch.
Parma D,
ARRIVALS -
Seh. Burma D, with drums of colas
trom Trinidad, Sch, Lady Noleen under
Capt, Caesar from Dominica with fresh









frult, Sch. Enterprise from St. Lucia,
Mary M. Lewis from British Guiana,
3s.

Tribesman, agents DaCosta & Go.,
from Trinidad,

DEPARTURES
Steamship Trader with general caigo
for the United Kingdom,

SEAWELL

Arrivals by B.W.LA. on Tuesday
From 8ST. LUCIA

Mr, — Watson, Mrs,
son, . Kelth Hicks, . Reginaid
Wateridge, Mrs, Kitty Wateridge, Miss
Huth Wateridge, Mr. Garnet Gordon,
Hon, Carl La Cordinene, Mr. Melvin
Bernard, Mr, Charles Manoram, Mr.
Lionel Gittens,

From AD
D. MeCauley, V. Manhin, E. Manhbin,
©, Manhin, BE. Holder, G, Yvonett, J,
Bell, R. Bayley, A. Page, E. Rogers,
N. Hoyland, ©, Rolland, B, Donaldson,
, Donaldson, 8S. Donaldson,
\arivals by BW.LA. on Wednesday
From TRINIDAD
*. Bermudez, BE. Bourne, E. Horton, F.
Lyneh, EB, Haynes, G. Legall, D, Blackett,
fr, Doppa, 8. Downes.
Departures om Wednosday
ianct Be Mamelain J Profit, O.
J, Hinds, R. rat . Profit .
litcher, J. Pitcher, Nee Searl, MH. Ham-
tay, P. Deminico.

Lid.,

Elaine Wat-

—> —————
r ve
RATES OF EXCHANGE
JULY 10, 1052
Selling NEW YORK Buying
73 1/10% Pr, Cheques or. 71 4/10% Pr.
Bankera
Sight or Demand 71 2/10)6 Pr.
Drafts :
781/10% Pr. Cable —*—s—is ss aw nits oe teen
716/10) Pr, Qurrency 69 9/10% Pr.
. Coupons 69 2/10 % Pr,
£00; Pr Silver 20% Pr,
OANADA
16 3/10% Pr.

78 2/10% Pr, ee on



cceccesces Sight Drafta
78 2/10% Pr, Cable bsevesere
"6 7/10% Pr, Currency 14 8/10%
Coupons
Silver 20%

GO% Pr.

d

a Broad St. and

plants.

The plants also supplied power
to the Red air bases in Man-
churia. whien are immune from

OTHER LIGHTS



And today the lights may o¢
bombing. out i other plac in Asia
For months young men iike [t 18 possible that they hi
Lieutenant Dreis und his com. been dimmed as tar uway us
rades had returned from flak. Mukden "ip Mun ra Or 4
tossed raids on the Red armies’ the Sino-Soviet Ouse of Pur
Tear areas asking :-~“ Arthur, or even at Siberta’s

“What's the use of these V edivostoe
supply line raids if we are for- Por that is how tar the Yalus
bidden to hit the plants which two-way flow af electricity
are pumping power back into extends

the enemy's arteries?"
They had seen a thousund ana

It is probuble the world otters
Mo other single target of such

one cave

workshops in Norti complex range

Londen Express Service

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PAGE THREE

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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS gif ADVOCATE

Viaad

fsaes Parasia?

Printed by the Advecate Co., Ltd., Broad 8t., Bridgetown

ee | Friday, “July 11, 1952

aN TERFERENCE

MR G..H. ADAMS, C.M.G., who
distinguished himself some years ago at a
meeting of the United Nations in Paris by
making it clear that the West Indies would
regard United Nations trusteeship as a step
backward last week was saying the same
thing at a general council meeting of the
International Confederation of Free Trade
Unions in Berlin,

An original draft had been submitted to
the council suggesting that non-selfgovern-
ing Territories should be put under United
Nations trusteeship as a means of forward-
ing their progress te self-government. Be-
cause of criticism from colonial represen-
tatives including Mr. Adams, this draft was
revised to say that trusteeship should be
called for cnly when metropolitan coun-
tries had failed to fulfil their obligations,
From this distance it would be unwise to
comment on this news from Berlin prema-
turely and until the draft is available in-
formed comment is impossible. But the
community of Barbados and the community
of the West Indies, the majority of whom
are not members of any trade unions. are
entitled to ask whether an international
confederation of trade unions is not exceed-
ing its rights in discussing a question which
could only be decided after careful explan-
ation to the more than ihree and a half
million inhabitants of the area had been
followed by a referendum,

Mr. Adams is to be congratulated on his
forthright expression of opinion that the
West Indies would regard United Nations

trusteeship as a step backward, but the
West Indian community may well be an-

noyed at a recommendation calling for
trusteeship “when metropolitan countries
had failed to fulfil their obligations” Trade
Unions have a function to fulfil in their
countries but they have no mandate from
the people in those countries to decide con-
stitutional relationships. In democratic
countries the people’s representatives in
Parliament debate constitutional issues and
Mr. Adams has not been attending the
General Council of I.C.F.T.U., as a repre-
sentative of the Barbados House of Assem-

bly but as a representative of the Barbados
Workers’ Union.







PRODUCTIVITY
OTHER reports from the Free Trade
Union conference in Berlin are less disturb-
ing. Mr. T. O’Brien of the British Trade
Union Congress has been advising colonial
peoples not to place their trust in national-
ist politics, because economic development
and the building up of strong trade unions
were of equal importance. When in the past
such advice has been offered by non-Trade
Unionists in the West Indies it has been
suspect and the givers of such advice have
been labelled as reactionaries or as‘enemies
of the Trade Union movement. When a
member of the T.U.C., offers such advice
West Indian Trade Unionists have no ex-
cuse for ignoring it.

West Indian Trade Unions might also pay
heed to the fact that at Berlin the General
Council of L.C.F.T.U., broke new ground by
discussing the importance of increased
productivity. Normally wages and im-
praved conditions of work are the dominant
note of trade union conferences but the
General Council of I.C.F.T.U., reflects the
realisation in Socialist circles generally
today that increased wages can only be paid
for by increased productivity. Even Mr.
Aneurin Bevan, British Socialism’s ultra
left-winger has been warning workers in

the United Kingdom recently that they
must double their production before they
can expect increased wages,

The position of Great Britain is especially
dangerous but it is a welcome sign that
trade unionist ‘ leaders. throughout the
countries with membership of LC.F.T.U.,

_ are stressing the importance ef produc-
tivity.

At the Berlin conference it was pointed
out that workers could benefit in two ways,
both dependent on productivity. Either
prices would fall as a result of increased
productivity or increased productivity
would allow higher wages to be paid.

Another British delegate the chairman of
the T.U.C, economic committee took the
argument yet further. He stressed that the

standard of living in any country depended
in the last analysis on productivity. And

he pointed out that productivity was not a
matter for the employers alone.

These outspoken and timely statements from
prominent Trade Unionists in Berlin will be wel-
comed in the British West Indies, where unions
have not yet freed themselves from the dominant
pre-occupation of higher wages. They now have
to give serious attention to the question of pro-
ductivity. Because unless greater productivity
results existing inflationary spirals will be exag-
gerated and real improvement in wages, for which
‘West Indian trade unions claim some of the credit,













will not be sustained. Shifts in political power
eannot add one cent to national revenue. And
efore any further improvement in social ser-
ind living standards can be made in Barba-

fos during the next six ye s the Government
has to find more than two million dollars to main-
tain « ling serv ¥ importance of pro-
y to trade Un ssed at Berlin will

n the hands rade unionists wha

ore the Berl erence were begin-

) understand how times have changed.















aliret
| lar idea, pretty



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

‘l Have Seen Fear

Growing Like This Elsewhere. ..
Near-bankruptcy Is The Spur’

But This Time

Esrael in Torment

TEL AVIV.
TODAY, as for the past fort-
night, a line of patient Israelis
has been filing past a stack of
food erates, empty gin bottles,
and sugar sacks which grace the
entrance to her Britannic Maj-

esty’s Legation in austerity-pack-
ed Tel Aviv.

Do they come to buy gr es
from Britain's NAAFI-fed diplo-
mats? No, These anxious men
and women come to register as
Britons,

They queue for hours to make
sure thoy are still entitled to
British passports granted when
they fled from Hitler,

Similar queues besiege Ameri-
can, French, and other consu-
lates.

Fear

Now, believe me, this rush for
reinsurance by passport is a
significant gesture from people
who have come here to find a
national home with their own
race,

It is an open expression of a
fear 1 thave found lurking in
almost every conversation I have
had with Israelis on this visit.

This is the fear that they are
caught up in a slow, strangulat-
ing proeess of economic bank-
ruptey. From it say pessimists,
not even the shameful millions
from the loathed and abominated
Germans are going to save them.

They foresee ‘that tens, per-
haps hundreds of thousands of
- searcely reunited with
their traditional homeland to
which they have directed their
prayers during 2,000 years, may
have to abandon it again in a
new exile. Those who remain in
the country will have to accept
® standard of living much lower
than that of today.

(And this is drastically de-
baged in comparison with that
of 1945 and even 1950.)

Paradox

The fact is that already, today,
disappointment in the economic
situation of the country is re-
sponsible for the entirely new
phenomenon in this country’s
post-war history: more Jews are
now leaving the country week
by weck than are coming in to
settle,

Many more would go if the
Israel authorities did not stop
them—by refusing exit visas and
-— licences for their prop~
erty.

The paradox is that outwardly
and superficially Tel Aviv and
Jerusalem and all the rest of the
country I have been over look
to be booming. Cafés and res-
taurants are crowded. Long,
elegant motor-cars glide down
Tel Aviv boulevards allowing a
peep at the young women dressed
in the latest Paris élegance.

Whole new suburbs of resi-




*o} dential flats have been added to
Tel Aviv since I was here. last .

year. When I drove out into the
Northern Negeb Steppe this time
I passed endless new villages anid
settlements, New immigrants
were busy by the roadside plant-
ing avenues of shady eucalyptus
trees,

Our Readers Say:

Why And How?

To The Editor,:The Advocate—

SIR,— The Government Bill
to increase to a big and even
startling degree the emoluments
of the ‘Experts’ and Civil Service
Heads, resulting in such heavy
and acditional charges upon the
Island Treasury, and the lively
and rebellious attack upon it in
the House of Assembly, 17th
June, aroused very trouble-some
questions in the minds of the
ordinary citizens, and although
it is too late to hope for any
‘road block’ to the plan the
on | press for expres-
on,

And perhaps some wise and
instructed person may be able
to put them to rest or at least
relieve the troubled minds, The
lucid and instructive addresses
of the Hon. Colonial Secretary
and Mr. Cuke in the council did
not, unfortunately deal with
the “Why and How” troubling
the Man-in-the-street, or the
painful problem; where is the
the great sum of additional
money to come from?

Here are some.of the chief
perplexities:

(1) Why do we need
many ‘Experts’ in Barbados?
It is a small place and its
affairs are not so complex and
mysterious and difficult, surely.
Take for example the Fiscal
Survey. The delay in producing
which has been so often men-
tioned as a main hindrance to
action, Is there anything to be
discovered and revealed of such
‘size and importance which was
not provided in the pamphlet
‘The National Income of Barba-
dos’, compiled by Dr,

ten years ago.

so

Or take another and very
homely glance at this aspect of
affairs. I know what I earn and
how I spend it. And I suppose
the sugar factory or. business
firm knows'what its income is
and what it pays for salaries
and wages and upkeep etc. And
the Income Tax Department
gathers the figures of income
from all citizens—3,404 in 1942
reported Dr, Benham, nearly pil
of them small people with fs-
comes under £400 a year, and
the rest of us just earning a bare
living below the income ‘tax
evel—or no living at all, Indeed,
or take the Teaching Profession.

It is so difficuit to catry the
boys and girls as far as they ‘need
to go in History, or Mathematics
or Lanhgueges—Modern or An-
cient and so on? And for those
who have to go further there are
plenty of people around with
School Certificates even a good
number with University diplo-

1as. a t a ehibdren need to

mainly, is 1 ‘roi useful











officials,
> popu-
provided



accordir





Sefton Deimer

BEGINS TODAY A FULL-SCALE SURVEY OF THE
ANXIETIES FACING THE YOUNG STATE OF
ISRAEL. IT IS A NEWS STORY THAT MAY BE
CONSIDERED CALMLY FROM AFAR TODAY...
BUT ITS IMPORTANCE IS IN THE DARK
POSSIBILITIES IT HOLDS FOR STABILITY AND
PEACE OF THE WHOLE MIDDLE EAST



Energy
Yes, the energy and imagina-
tion the Israelis are putting in to
making Negeb productive is as
impressive as anything I have

seen in Southern
Rhodesia,

But look undér the surface.
Everywhere, even in the busy
desert, portents of grim danger
at once manifest themselves.

A pipe factory was working
only one shift a day because of
lack of steel plates, Israel just
hasn’t the foreign currency to
buy them, When the faetory
runs out of its present supplies
it will have to close down. until
the Government can afforti to
buy more steel, And this project
is number one priority, *

In the town long queues were
waiting in front of ‘the banks.
They were queuing to change
their big-money notes into new
ones issued by the Government,
The only snag was that the Gov-
ernment was taking off ten per
cent. by way of a forced loan.

Street-corner black marketeers
in the Boulevard Rothschild
offered me ‘treble the official price
for my British pounds, I could
not replace my worn out itype-
writer: ribbon: “Sorry, .we have
none, They come from abroad,
There is no foreign exchange to
buy them,”

Tottering . . .

Schoolchildren are unable to
carry on their studies for latk of
English textbooks, Lawyers
cannot keep up with the law
because they do not get the latest
legal books from London,

In small things, and in big
‘ones the wihole of Israel seems

go-ahead

to be slowly tottering to a
standstill for lack of foreign
exchange.

The worst hit, as I have indi-
cated are the factories.

Some under construction are
having to be left uncompleted.
Others just finished are unable
to start producing for lack of
raw materials. Yet others which

have been producing are forced
to go on half-time or close down
altogether,

What is the reason for all this?
Just the age-old cause of most
bankruptcies: they have been
Spending more than they earn,
Statistics show that they are
importing eight times as much
as they export—£125 million
against’ £16,000,000 last year.

Embarrassing

In previous years the gap has
been bridged by generous Amer-
ican help plus ample use of
sterling balances which piled
up in favour of Palestine durings
the war. But even this was not
so. to take care of all
israel’s heavy expenditure, much
of it spent on projects which
cannot start earning money for
many years yet.

So they have taken up short-
term loans Many of these are
now falling due and causing
acute embarrassment. The exact
figure of short-term indebted-
ness ‘is a State secret. But I am
told an amount of at least 150
million dollans (£53,571,428) is
involved.. Sterling balances are
exhausted.

No Credit

The British Treasury and Brit-
ish cil firms, who supply two-
thirds of Israel’s oil needs have
refused to give credit.

Only by the forced sale of
their nationals remaining ster-
ling securities has the Israel Gov-
ernment managed to pay the oil
bill and assure supplies for what
fa top Israel Treasury official
vaguely described to me as “the
next couple of months”

Without oil life in Israel stops:
without oil the pumping sta-
tions stop pumping water. With-
out pumped water, the orange
groves Which provide 60 per cent,
of Israel’s export wither and die.

Yet it seems crazy that Pre-
mier Ben-Gurion and his semi-
Sccialist Government should have-
pushed all-out immigration and
fall-out industrialisation to the
point where the whole future of
the country is threatened. Is
(there any sense in this madness?

—L.E.S.



for, with tenure of position and
pensions in, the ‘offing—as Mr.
Cuke emphasised—should
their incomes substantially in-
creased, while such numbers. of
other people are left in a hard-
up position? ,

Ido not have. in wid the
Civil Service employees in the
lower grades—it is announced
that their pay will be dealt with
very soon—-with a further big
increase in public expenditure—
but the great company of ordin-
ary people with no relief in pros-
pect. And think of the old and
disabled people with parochial
allowances of less than 5/-+ per
week, which is the munificent
Old Age Pension!

(3) Why is it that a propor-
tion of the Barbados people
should be placed, above the need
for economy and hardship, when
such large numbers have to con-
tend with them and endure them
continually?

Should we not ali share
and share together? And is not
economy an excellent exercise
for everybody, in hard times?

And this is not a question for
people in Barbados only, by any
means, It applies very correctly
and forcibly to people in Britain.
and other lands as well. It’
seems to some of us that there is
a strong and unhealthy desire
and determination in many
places and circles to keep up the
old conditions of comfort and
even luxury, of pleasure and
sport, in spite of all. the talk
about ‘austerity’ , ‘tightening the
belt’ and the like.’ ‘To cut down.
one’s spending on the old
pleasant lines instead of striking
for higher pay would be an ex-
cellent plan, for reducing the
cost of goods of all kinds and the
high cost of living in general.

Increased production at lower
prices, and everybody at work
are the slogans of political lead-
ers, but the rank and toa
large extent do not really agree,
nor yet the higher grade and
more instructed sections.

(4) How is it supposed by
those in authority that small
people are to live at all and pay
their way, even without the
additions to taxation and costs,
such as must be required to pay
for the big increases in the upper
grades now approved and under-
taken}

This is a question which, we
think, requires no exposition
or illustration. But it does re-
quire serious attention by those
who have authority and the
control of the purse.

MAN-IN-THE-STREET.

Vegetables And Prices
To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Kindly allow me space
in your valuable paper to ex-
press my views oh ‘High P:
f tables,’ which



that if

wke
the joabia ‘from when

a

have «

they buy (meaning the growers)
would let them get the goods at
a reasonable price they would
be able to sell at lower prices
too, and with the Control Market,
ithe growers would not be able to
rob them.

Mr, Editor, these I would
quote, are the prices the majority
of growers usually seli to the
hawkers. For instance, you sell
Carrots at 16c. to 20c. a pound,
they sell at 36c. Beans the
same price. Cucumbers at 6c.
or 8c. per pound, they sell at
fourteen and sixteen cents each
and a good size cucumber
scarcely weighs more than three
quarters of a pound. This situa-
tion is preposterous. Those
people buy two to three dollars
‘in goods, catch the bus to town
and if they cannot make 100%
on the goods or more, they say it
‘cannot pay them. This, Mr.
Editor, is no joke, these are cold

facts. Growers have to pay tu
make up their beds, buy seeds,
eare their vegetables from

worms ete. Water them for may-
be three or four months before
they can see.any signs of their
labours. These exploiters as
goon as they sense the time of
fulfilment, come down on you
like Locusts, grab vegetables as
cheaply as they can and off to the

“market place of Massacre”
where — the power over
Econ

But witha Central Market run
by the Government. when all
prewere would be able to send
their praduets and get remuner-
ation priceg the rich and poor

alike coul? vurchase these
nutricious _ at reasonable
_ prices, inst@ad of having to eat
day in and day out foods of a

‘starchy nature,
nny j 3
Day of reckoning

To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,— It is regrettable that
such a labourite as the Hon,
Senior member for St. George,
one whom the labouring classes
are looking forward to lead
them in the not too distant
future, shonld have made such
a blundering mistake as to ask
to make the motion that rule 45
of the standing rules of the
House be brought into force.

This rule! seeks to eject visi-
tors from the Visitors’ Gallery
during any special debate. If
this rule were brought into
force on Tuesday last, it proves
beyond any reasonable doubt
that. the present representatives
of the people or I should state,
representatives of the Labour
Party are seeing after their own
interest. For, there must have

been something in that debate
not

that this gentleman
want the visi

did

tors to hear.



alana cal la il aaa i tii iil inl claimant iii ii i iii a



' Schools Rebel Against
| Lessons On UNO

From R, M. MacCOLL |

i WASHINGTON.

ALL over America a rising tide of oppo-
sition to UNO generally, and UNESCO—the
United Nations Educational, Scientific, and
Cultural Organisation—in particular, is
niaking itself felt in the schools and univers-
ities.

Some schools have discarded study courses
about UNO and others are preparing to a
the same. olay, 1 |

In places as far apart as Houston, Texas,
and Los Angeles school’ authorities have
abruptly refused to co-operate, as hitherto,
in an annual essay contest conducted by the
American Association for the United Na-
tions.

The contest has suddenly becotne a con-
troversial issue, and there are suggestions
that anything to do with UNO is now un-
American.”

Miss Dozothy Robbins, educational direc-
tor of the association, reports that 100 fewer
schools have taken part in the essay contest
this year and she flatly attributes this to
“fear of having anything to do with the
United Nations.”

The association rushes out a statement
saying “There is a strange attitude in some
communities, where objections have been
raised to teaching about UNO. Such oppo-
sition is founded on misinformation, fear,
and prejudice,”

The sharpest opposition is centred on
UNESCO.

The critics openly say that this agency is

going to “step in and tell the teachers how
to run their own schools.”

And when, some time back, it was an-
nounced that the University of Florida plan-
ned to hold a summer course on UNESCO,
fierce opposition developed, with charges
that the whole thing was “subversive,” and
now the university board is thinking of call-
ing it off.







































In eet ac ‘President Truman an-
nounces that he is appointing 57-year-old
Mrs. Margaret Daly, of Highland Park, New
Jersey, to be Controller of Customs in New
York,

William Benton, ex-advertising million-
aire, now a Senator representing Connecti-
cut, and a very close personal friend of Tru-
man, says he is sure the President . will
change his mind and run for re-election if
the Democrats find themselves in danger of
getting stuck with an unsuitable nominee at
the convention.

While America throws its hats into the air
over the debut of the liner United States, the
New York Times reminds that the overall
merchants marine picture is gloomy.

For while in 1939 America possessed 123
passenger ships, totalling 1,000,000 tons, to-
day she has only a scant 51, of 600,000 tons.

* * *

The blasé habitués of New York’s Second
Avenue are nonplussed to see a man wear-
ing only pyjama trousers pursuing another
man and firing revelover shots over his head.

The pursuer turns out to be a young po-
liceman, in hot pursuit of a burglar who
picked the cop’s own flat for a raid.

Later he tells the magistrate: “I was em-
barrassed—there was no place for me to pin
on my badge.”

A familiar word in America is “kibitzer,”
meaning the chap who watches other people
playing cards, and dishes out advice to the
gamblers on how to play their hands.

And Harlan Cleveland, assistant director
in Europe of the Mutual Security Agency,
tells a gathering of the New York State ee ee
Association that ‘the’ 75,000 Americans at
present administering the foreign aid pro-
gramine in many parts of the world are
“kibitzers at every crisis, large or small, that
presents itself, and involved in nearly every-
body’s business.”

The day of the trained diplomat has gone.

Says Cleveland : “Most of our foreign rep-
resentatives now are not trained for diplo-
macy—and many of them are not particu-
larly diplomatic.”

More and more Americans are building
their own homes.

It’s quite the “done thing” these days for
comfortably off families to form “working
parties,” father, mother and junior ali in
biue jeans, anc set to at the week-end to lay
the foundation or build another wall togeth-
er.

And “Build-It-Yourself” has brought big
changes for business. One maker of power
tools, who deliberately went after the ama-
teur market, has boosted sales from
£6,000,000 to £ 10,700,000.

Not only is it fun—but building it your-
self saves you a great deal of money.

“Lazy Susan” is no lady, but the American
term for a casserole set on a revolving wood-
en base, and surrounded by gaily-coloured

= 4





ee i FRIDAY, JULY J, 1958
PHOTOGRAPHS

Copies of Local Photographs

Which have appeared in the

ADY OCATE NEWSPAPER
ordered from the ..

} ADVOCATE. § STATIONERY ERY

“These I must remember — !”
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FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1952

Colonies Must

Surmount

Hardships

Renison Opens Home

Economics

Conference

PORT OF SPAIN, July 1.

IN OPENING A CONFERENCE on Home Economics
and Education in Nutrition at Kent House, Monday, His
Excellency the Acting Governor of Trinidad and Tobago,

Hon. P, M. Renison, warned
government to surmount diffic

cost of living.

ainst depending only on
ties caused by the rising

Delegates are present from nine Caribbean territories,

and several international

organisations, including ‘the

United Nations, World Health Organisation and the Holy

See, have sent delegates or

observers. The two delegates

from Barbados are Miss Betty Arne, Social Welfare Officer
and Miss I. 3. C. Alleyne, Organiser of the Government

Housecraft Centre.

The Conference is under the joint

sponsorship of the Food and Agriculture Organisation of

the United Nations and the

“With all the will in the world”,
His Excellency said, “this govern-
ment cannot spare very large
sums of money for extension
work. We are doing our best and
the work is growing, but I think
that we have got to find ways of
teaching people to help them-
selves.” He foresaw the need for
the better organisation of educa~
tion and extension services, and
for improving housing conditions,
and considered it in order that
the conference should meet in
‘Trinidad at a time when not only
were these problems being con-
sidered, but also when a food
production programme ‘was in full
swing. His Excellency also called
attention to the fact that the gov-
ernment had received advice on
aided-self-help housing from
Point IV technicians assigned to
the Caribbean Commission, and
expressed the view that the con-
ference was complementary to the
aided-self-help method.

“Conferences of itis ature ure
of enormous value,” he said: “I
think there is extraordinary value
in pooling knowledge and expe-
rience so that we can all improve
our own methods.”

In greeting detegales and others
on behalf of th.e Commission, Mr,
E. F. H. de Vriendt, Secretary
General, referred to the long
record of close co-operation be-
tween the Commission and tha
Food and Agricultufe Organisa-
tion. He mentioned joint action
in the field of co-operatives
which culminated in a Co-opera-
tives Conference last year, and
announced that negotiations to
obtain the services of an FAO
Agricultural Economist. for the
Commission are well advanced.
He described the meeting as “‘the
largest and most representative
technical conference ever held
under the quspices of the Com-
mission.”

Mr. de Vriendt further said:
“While the Caribbean Commis-
sion, realising the wide fields of
activities that lie open to it, has
jately found it necessary, for
practical and financial reasons, to
impose on iwelf a considerable
measure of retrenchment and
limitation of programme, it is
gratifying to note that this con-
ference, both in scope and popu-
larity. indicates that emphasis on
technical questions and on eco-
nomic development need not
necessarily exclude the human
factor or considerations of social
welfare.”

Particular mention was made of
Miss Maude Barrett, United Na-
tions representative, Dr. P. F..de
Caires, representative of the
World Health Organisation; Dr.
Lydia Roberts, delegate from the
United States, and a representa-
tive of the Organisation of Amer-
ican States, and Miss Dora Ibber-
son and Mr. J. L. Nicol, of the
Colonial Development and Wel-
fare Organisation, delegates of the
United Kingdom.

Miss Elsa Haglund, Home Econ-
omist, who with Mrs. Andro-
mache Sismanidis, Regional Nu-
trition Representative, was
assigned by FAO to help prepare
and conduct the conference, told
of the keen interest of the Organ-
jisation in the conference. Speak~
ing for Dr. W. R. Aykroyd, Direc-
tor of FAO’s Nutrition Division,
she expressed his sincere wish for
its success,

She stated that FAO realises
‘that “in order to make full use of
improvements in the field of food
and agriculture, it is essential that

Caribbean Commission.

and family life”. She went on to
say: “One of the aims of the Food
and Agriculture Organisation of
the United Nations is to raise the
standards of living and raising
standards of living goes hand in
hand with the work in the field of
Home Economics.”

Following the opening talks,
Dr. Roberts was unanimously
elected Chairman,

The agenda stresses the educa=
‘tional aspects of the problem.
Special attention will be given to
extension services, both govern-
ment and non-government, and
the question of better integration
of these activities will be consid-
ered. Other related subjects to be
studied include: Education
through Schools; Training of Ex-
tension Workers, Teachers and
Leaders of Non-Governmental
Organisations; Publications and
Other Teaching Aids; Educational
Value of School and Community
Feeding Programmes,

Possibilities in the direction of
technical co-operation both with-
in and from outside the Caribbean
Area will be explored. Particular
points to be covered include:
facilities for advanced training;
short training courses and ‘“work~
shops”; training schools for sev-
eral territories in the Caribbean
Area; fellowships and surveys.

The present conference is the
outgrowth of @ survey of home
economics education and exten-
sion in the Caribbean conducted
in 1949 jointly arranged by FAO
and the Caribbean Commission,
The report of the survey, which
embodies the observation of an
FAO Home Economics Officer in
ten selected Caribbean territories,
is included in the documentation
for the conference. In addition,
the FAO Secretariat has prepared
special papers dealing with vari-
ous items of the agenda, whilst
the Commission’s Secretariat has
prepared statements on the posi«
tion in the territories with respect
to the several items of the agenda.

Lady Noleen
Brings Firewood

Four schooners arrived in Car-
lisle Bay yesterday morning, All
of them were towed into the
Careenage by the Lord Comber-
mere. They were the Schooner
Lady Noleen from Dominica,
Schooner Mary M., Lewis.’ from
British Guiana, Schooner Burma
D, from Trinidad and Schooner
Enterprise S, from St. Lucia.

The Lady Noleen brought in
9,000 cocoanuts, 16 cords of wood,
one bag of bark, 64 bags of sugar
and 10 packages of fresh fruit.
Eighty tons of firewood, 600 bags
of charcoal, 327 bags of rice, 64
wallaba posts, 108 bunches of
fresh fruit and 90 pumpkins were
brought in by the Mary M, Lewis.

The Mary M. Lewis left British
Guiana on July 6 and encountered
bad weather in getting here. The
Emeline which left B.G. on July 4
has not yet reached Barbados.

The Burma D, came in with 525
drums of colas while Enterprise
S, which was the last schooner to
be towed in the Careenage by the
Lord Combermere, brought six
bags of cocoanuts, 113 packages of
fresh fruit, 427 bags of copra, 60
drums of cocoanut oil and seven
bunches of fresh fruit. All of
these Schooners are consigned to



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BARBADOS

ADVOCATE



FISHERMAN SENTENCED TQ NINE
MONTHS’ IMPRISQGNMENT



Ch. Ch. Poor Law
Inspector Resigns

A letter of resignation from Mr.
Roland Eversley, Poor Law In-
spector of Christ Church,

was
accepted by members of the
Christ Church Vestry at their

meeting yesterday. é

Mr. Eversley was appointed
Pcor Law Inspector in 149
after having served as Assessor
for five years.

At the last Vestry meeting Mr.
Eversley’s letters were circulated.
In his letter Mr, Eversley asked
that he be allowed three months’
pre-retirement leave.

Mr. C- M. Drayton agreed that
the letter of resignation should be
accepted, but he did not agree
with Mr. Eversley asking for
three months’ leave.

He said that Mr. Eversley was
given one month’s leave every
year and as far as he knew, he
(Eversley) always took this leave.

Mrs. H. A: Talma corrected Mr.
Drayton. She said that she knew
of two years when Mr. Eversley
did not take his leave.

Mr. H. StG. Ward said that the
Board of Guardians had appcint-
ed Mr. Eversley and that same
Board had asked Mr. Eversley to
produce his birth certificate. This
Mr. Eversley failed to do.

He said that the Board of
Guardians would have to consider
the post vacant as from July 24.

He felt that Mr. Eversley should
be paid a pensicn in accordance
with the number of years’ ser-
vice he had put in in the parish.

Mr. C. B, Brandford said that!
the question of resignation was
one motion and that of the pen-
sion another. They should first ac-
cept the resignation and then dis-
cuss the question of pension. He
then moved that the resignation be
accepted as from August 24 and
that he be given one month's”
leave from July 24 to August 23.

He also suggested that one’ of
the other employees in the ser—
vice should be promoted, and
asked that Mr. Ashby, the store-
keeper, be appointed to act as
Poor Law Inspector.

Before discussing the question
of pension, Mr. Wood Goddard,
Vestry Clerk, read from records
Mr. Eversley’s term of service.

On the motion of Mr. C., B.
Brandford, the Vestry decided that
before fixing Mr. Eversley’s pen-
sion, legal opinion should ,be
sought.

T.B. PATIENT LEAVES
CH. CH. ALMSHOUSE

The T.B. patients at the Christ
Church Almshouse have present-
ed the Christ Church Vestry with
a problem. At a meeting yester-
day members discussed ways and

“means of keeping these patients

inside the Almshouse.

Mrs. H. A. Talma, Church-
warden, drew the matter to the
attention of the Vestry. She said
that these patients could be seen
walking up and down the streets.

Other Vestrymen spoke of see-
ing the patients offering food to
children along the streets and of
seeing them gambling in ~the
Isolation Ward.

Mrs- Talma said that there
were formerly three T.B. patients,
but one left the institution with-
out notifying anyone.

“Soon Christ Church will be
full of T.B.”, Mr. C. B- Brandford
said. He suggested that immedi-
ate action be taken,

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

CABLE AND WIRELESS (West #ndies)
Ltd. advise that they can now commu-
nicate with the following shirs through
their Barbados Coast Station:—

8.8. Alwaki, Abbeydale, Ariguani,
Golfito, Carrabuile, Acropolis, Tribes-
man, Themistokles, Esso Philadelphia,
Biographer, Vestfoss, Tartar, Tagalam,
Koligrim, Rio Jachal, Thorshov. S. A
Ipedro, Katrina Luckenbach, Cha'lenger,
Barfleur, English Prince, Hyeres, Lina,
Queen Mary, Queen of Bermuda, Brazil,
Latia, Rio de la Plata, Uruguay, Ora,
Jean Lykes, Presidente Dutra, Lady
Nelson, Scorton, Noordzee, Regent Leo-
pold, Belpareil, Alcoa Clipper, Jeusie
Stove, Alcoa Fartner, Dewdale, Tindra
Tekla, Hoegh Silverwave,, Gabbiano
Agamemnon, Canadian Cruiser, Regent
Springbok, as, Esso Salvador,
Teines, Ganymedes, Kaban, Atheiiic,
Thorshavet, Amakura, Corona, Algoa
Polaris, Couneil Grove, Mercator,
Sibilla, General San Martin, Casablanca,
Sunwalt, Agusta S8., Ambrosio S.,
Cirilo, Eeone, Hermes, Regent Caribgu,
Geologist Silverwake Trade, Stentor,
Mormacdale, Puerto Rico and E. W.
Sinclair,

2364 or 3142

|



SDE DD ADAP OOMOOE
6: .

$6$599999S

WHITFIELD JONES %

fisherman of Bay Street, was’

vesterday sentenced to aine months’ imprisonment with
hard labour by Mr. Justice’G. L. Taylor after an assize jury
found him guilty of having maliciously damaged clothing
and household articles on April 20. The articles were the
property of Jones’ reputed wife, Gwendolyn Rock, and

were valued $345,49.

Jones was also charged with inflicting bodily harm on
Rock’s mother, Geraldine Hinds, the same day, but the jury

did not find him guilty.

Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C.,

Solicitor General, prosecuted

for the Crown. Jones was not represented.

The offence was committed
after Jones amd Rock had a row
and when Rock had left hom:
and gone to the Police Station to
make a complaint. Among the
items damaged were sixteen
dresses and five pairs of shoes
The dresses were torn up and th:
shoes cut up.

Rock told the Court that Jones
and she had been living together
for about a year before the occurs
rence. They had a row on April
20 and she left home to go to the
Police Station. On her way there
she met her mother and the two
of them returned to her quarters.
Jones abused the two of them
when they arrived and she again
left for the Police Station. She
had made a report and was about
to leave ,;when her mother came
in the station bruised about her
bedy. Jones, too, came to the
Station soon after, showed a
bruise, and complained that her
mother and her had beaten him.

When she returned home, she
discovered that 16 of her dresses
were torn up, five or six pairs of
shoes cut up, glassware broken,
her machine and stove damaged
and her groceries were mixed
together, ’

Mother's Evidence

The eviderce of the mother,
Geraldine Hinds, corroborated
Rock’s as to the events after they
met, Hinds added that when Rock
left Jones and her together and
went to the station, Jones threw
the stove on the floor and stepped
upon it. She remonstrated,. and
he gave her two lashes with a
sticl) -eross her shoulders.

Ciyde Hinds and Lucy Odle of
Thomas Gap, Westbury Road,
also gave corroborated evidence
Ole said she was at a house near-
by and saw when Jones tore up
some of the dresses.

That was the case for the Prose-
eution,

Jones in evidence told the Court
of a row taking place between
Rock and him the night before the
offence, and Rock’s telling him to
leave the quarters, The row
which concerned another woman,
continued next day and Rock cut
hirt with a knife and threw hot
water upon him,

When Rock’s mother came, she
abused him and when he retorted,

she took a stick and struck him. ©

A scuffle followed.
Professional Witness

He gave no evidence concerning
the dresses, shoes or household
items, but under cross-examina-
tion said that Odle was a profes-
sional witness. He knew that
because she had given evidence
or his mother sometime before
He said that Clyde Hinds who haa
also given evidence against him,
had done so with the hope that
Rock would give evidence for him

He called a witness, Leotta
Yearwood, who gave a_ similar
story of the row as had been
given by Prosecution witnesses,
but said nothing of the damage
being done by Jones. She said she
had seen the stove fall.

She said that neither Hinds nor
Odle had been on the seene at
the time of the row, but she had
heard Hinds promise to give evi-
dence for Rock.

In his address to the jury, Jones
invitea them to believe that the
evidence of Hinds and Odle had
been false and that Hinds’ was
necessarily biased, she ° being
Rock’s mother. He questioned
Rock’s not getting witnesses who
lived at the same building where
they had quarters at the time, in-
stead of getting Hinds and Odle
who lived in Westbury Road.

It was ail a frame-up against
him, he said.

After hearing a review of the
evidence from His Lordship, the
jury setired 20 minutes and then
returned the verdict of guilty of
malicious damage but not of in-
flicting bodily harm.

PLLC GLELEL ALL LD LV PVELEED PLL LPLLPLCLLPLLE ISLS LPL LVLAELLPEPIOR

31 Piece DINNER

SET

6,46

4 -
LLG OCOCCRCC O08

PPL EPSPFIPS SPIES IPDS FD?

GOLA COF,



Husband Guilty Of
Injuring Wife

Ethel Trotman of Gibbons
8, Christ Church, sobbed yes-
y before Mr. Justice G. L,
Taylor and asked for a “break”
for her husband Ethelbert who
along with Pearline, Philip and
Hutson Jones pleaded guilty at
the Court of Grand Sessions to
the charge of inflicting grievous
bodily harm upon her on Decem-
ber 4 last year.

Included among her injuries
was a fracure of her left twelfth
rib.

Hutson Jones (16), the youngest
of the defendants, was put on 18
months’ probation, The other
three were bound over in the sum
of £50 and a similar surety to
keep the peace for 18 months.

After Ethel Trotman told His
Lordship that she and her hus-
band wete living together again
since the incident, and that she
did not wish him to be sent to
prison, Mr, W. W. Reece, Q.C.,
Solicitor General, who was prose-
cuting for the Crown, said that if
any extra leniency was shown. to
the husband, he would also have
to ask for leniency towards the
other defendants,

Besides giving evidence as to
her fractured rib, Dr. E, L. Ward
also spoke of many abrasions and
contusions.



Be





‘







T. Van Shaytman
On Dock

The Schooner Timothy Van
Sluytman which came in port a
few days ago from British Guiana
is now undergoing repairs on
dock, During her voyage here
a fire broke out in the engine
room where minor repairs were
being carried out on the auxiliary
engines.

The Van Shiwytman is expected
to come off dock on July 22
and sail the same day for British
Guiana without cargo.

S.S. Trader Takes
Sugar For U.K.

The Steamship Trader yester-
day took 5,970 gallons of water
from the Lord Combermere, The
Trader was also loaded with
sugar and left the same day for
the United Kingdom.

This steamship was
to DaCosta & Co., Ltd.



consigned



RACEHORSES
RETURN HOME

Sixteen racehorses from Barba-
dos which took part in the T.T.C.|
Meeting in Trinidad were brought
into the port yesterday when the!
Steamship Tribesman consigned to,
DaCosta & Co,, Lid., arrived here
at 10 a.m. from Trinidad,

The horses were Mary Ann,

First Admiral, Land Mark, Lun-!.

ways, Colleton, Frenah Flutter,,
Appollo, Rosette, Magic Coye,
Embers, Harroween, Castle-1:1-The
Air, Durham Jane, Columbus,
Canta Quisine and Bright Li tht.
The Tribesman is now being!
loaded with a cargo of sugar.

es

CANADIAN CRUISER C. .LLS

The Qanadian Cruiser, 3,935
tons whose agents are Ge «diner
Austin & Co,, Ltd. called ‘a this
port on Wednesday afternoon from
es and left later the same

ay.

‘The Cruiser brought 156 boxes
of cheese, 639 boxes of flour,
4,800 bags of pollard ar 130
cans of paint,



33. ,, DINNER SET
i er BROAREASLASET os. ccc cscs $30.00
Reid CI TOL 5 bis vine 0 6 000 ba oe nab iawn $15.37
AO gh RM SUID, ny aia cso 0 $10.95
Bo PRI Fk sis 0's ibis cae AND $ 4.76
AO iy SCORNED SUT e ciety os. ens $10.82
THERMOS FLASK
1 pt. at Reika e's Meera Hd apa ip doe ac agia Kis $1.64
BP AB iene) PEP Cot er fete kil $2.65
Ree Mas screed ss Rev Ove, a wnn cde ecaack $6.63
THERMOS 1 pt. JUGS a $3.28
Less 16% Cash Discount en all complete sets purchased

FPS

_capacity for 48 but at one time



ib 6A A OA AD OA 4AM A AOA Me
OO OSOOR GOCSCO5 OOOO

ee
St. Joseph Round-up

Not Depend Only On Governments To

——— eee

28 Patients
At St. Joseph
Almshouise

The Fever Ward at the St.
Joseph Almshouse has been un-
eccupied for many years. Many
people of the district are wonder-
ing whether it would not be better
to make some use of the building
instead of allowing it to remain
as it is at present,

The Almshouse at present has
28 patients—13 males, 11 females
and four children. It has a













there were 49 patients on the roll.

Nurse Winifred Williams has
been Matron for the past 19 years.
Prior to this appointment she
worked with the institution as 4
Staff Nurse.

Nurse Williams is ably assisted
by Nurse Springer, and she has
a staff of two other nurses and
two probationers. Because of her
length of service with the institu-
tion, Miss Williams is well ac-
quainted with the ways of patients.

The Quarters of the Matron and
Nurses, which are attached:‘to the
Almshouse itself, are very con-
gested.

At the back of the Almshouse,
a dangerous looking cliff stands
many feet in the air. Should any
part of this cliff break away, it
would completely demolish the
Almshouse.

The institution is kept in a very
sanitary condition, but many
people are looking forward to the
day when it will be removed to a
better site.

The Members of the Cleavers
Hill Boys’ Club have a_ lovely
kitchen garden, In it they have

planted beet, cabbage and butter];)

beans.
At this Club there are 55 mem-
bers. Twenty-four are active,

The activities are table tennis,
draughts, dominoes, football and
cricket, It is expected that three
trades, carpentry, shoemaking and
tailoring will soon be started.

P.C. 360 Victor Layne is in
charge of the Club which also
takes the form of a Police Post in
the area, He patrols the area and
keeps order in the district.

At the Girls’ Club opposite,
members are putting much effort
into a flower garden, but the best
results are not yet evident,

Miss Audrey Payne is in charge
of this Club, Members do mat«
making and needlework. This
Club has 31 members and all are
active,

A resident of Cleavers Hill told
the Advocate: “The Clubs. have
been of great benefit to the area.
Formerly groups of children were
seen sitting along the road, This
does not occur to-day.”

A perking area is now being
built around the Bathsheba Social
Centre at St. Joseph. The work
is being supervised hy Leon Payne
and he has a staff of three,

The Centre was officially opened
last month by His Excellency the
Governor,

Labourer Guilty Of
Indecent Assault

George Forde, a forty-two year
old labourer of Nelson Street wag
yesterday found guilty by an
Assize jury on a charge of indecent
assault on a twelve-year-old girl.
Sentence was postponed,

Forde who was arraigned on a
two-count indictment was acquit-
ted on the first count of carnal
knowledge. He was represented by
Mr. F. G, Smith. Mr. W. W, Reece,
Q.C., Solicitor General, prosecuted
on behalf of the Crown,

BILE BEANS

keep her
ATTRACTIVE

YOUTHFUL

—full of

vigour









Why betired,
constipated
or liverish¥
or suffer indigestion? Bile Beans
will make you vitally fit, full of
energy, bright-cyed and happy

BE SURE TO GET THESE MEDICALL’
TESTED AND APPROVED BILE BEANS

ER Ae EL AE TT

IN OUR
HARDWARE
DEPARTMENT



| CAVE
SHEPHERD
& CO., LTD.

13 BROAD ST



0



SCL OSS OES SS SOS FE POOSSS

+
CF

t 64» .
er ee “Sy LAPD FP o> o> s
















































CYCLE TYRES (3)



RE i BT EE I TT



MONEY

Use MALF as much Fat
as Soap of Soay Fiakes

FAB Washes
FAST

4
i}

PAGE FIVE

MARMITE,

iS EVERYONE’S



The vitamins in Marmite keep everyone fitter. By
adding Marmite to our meals every day, we strengthen
our bodies to resist chills and diseases; we get more
goodness from everything we eat; and children are
assured of a vital ‘extra’ to help them grow
up sturdy and fit. Marmite is delicious in
meat dishes, soups, ‘savouries — and

sandwiches. Cooks like Marmite also

because a jar lasts such a long time.

MARMITE

THE VITAMIN B FOOD
FOR FAMILY FITNESS

y=} en

WITH

ropavs | PRUNE
secu} CREAMS

THE FINEST PLACES FOR ICES

KNIGHTS

PHOENIX & CITY PHARMACY SODA FOUNTAINS







4
%
A NEW TYRE
DESERVES A NEW
OUNLOP TURE
Z

DUNLOP
honcdset



oP
From Stockists throughou: BARBADOS aoe



—

Distributors ECKSTEIN BROS.—Bay Street









WASHES |
White Shirts
WHITER!

Fab contains a new ingredient that washes white |
things whiter and colours brighter! Your whole
wash looks fresher. more attractive =

Clothes last longer too:
NO SCRUBBING
NO BOILING

NO BLEACHING



ev

0

oe est

ER, CLEANER than ANY



’



PAGE SIX

CLASSIFIED ADS.






































































/ PUHLIC SALES PUBLIC NOTICES



BARBADOS ADVOCATE
FOR BENT

FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1952

SHIPPING NOTICES









Vampires Spread




































































a |
we
eee o * ’
aa y ‘sla B.G
TELEPHONE 2508 NOTICE ‘Horse Rabies In B.G. peteionnees ts S
aati a | REAL ESTATE All male citieens of the Pnited States | HOUSES j s ROY NETHERLANDS FVOCG SSIS SS SIOSSSISIOS,
i ah ee . * | m the wmesOf 15 arid 6 seciding ene | (Pre Our Gwn Correspondent) } AL =
e : 686 | Barbados a reguesk ractiv . SETOWN
DIED i epee SALE | SONT™ coasts at Flim Man, i”, Vakhaden ake re sd to, gall at oftt active weaside F j GEORGETOWN, July 9. | STEAMSHIP CO. agg a ge ee
;$t. Michael, stand ng on 2 acres @ roods 952 for errs R ing dad oe Bath’ Open Verandah British Guiana cattlemen are The M/V. MON wil %
ea ae S eg 16 perches of ) ‘ inane ereiioe person tor Com le). slarmed over the discovery of SAILING FROM EUROPE teens Cates and Fee =}
Wednesday, 9th July 1 G UTOMOTIVE The Goss is ee oF stone ant coh- 1 Miltary’ Trewing Felgpincne ‘ , ak ‘< Mlses yy ad | At 8. sTemgon wth 1858 . Peninie, eee eka. <
Resrew. His funeral takes place to-day ts | gaits ns 2@fallerigs, Jarge drawing enc dir ' itizens of the United States Permanent ~ pnammes cymes Hom a disease calle OTTICA ith July, 1952. aay 14th saat —ee eS
ra Barrow, Edith BHITISI SHAGULL GUTBOARD- | 200@S baliway, ¢ Ledroos> he. attain the age of 1% years su —t FLAT No. 5. Abergeldie. Fury [equine alytic rabies caused by j}i'S. NESTOR oth July, 1952. if save s row, 2BiTL SHAG ‘ UTBOARD- ‘ hs S at 4 ae er. ivar . sats se i “CA a
ina Berrow, Srnemt | MOTOR, the New Model No, 102 Mark V,| Pedrams, dew Seeley Sha se Neon i 2Muemt MaPuly M4, 3662, are required |{urpitbed fer 3 months from ist. Octoher./vampire bats. The disease orig M.A. setting to. LU _ accept: Cargo and Passengeetifer
, i be seem at. The International | Pe iterteps (to xegister upon the day they. attain the Phgme 4537. ee jinally believed to be encephalo-} 4, < ORANJESTAD lea, Antigua, Montscrat, >
$ . =| ‘orporation Titd., _ Coleridge | " Garage and sorvants Teoms in Yard, , srebteenthy Ney bey no. | MAT Kive soemed fat, fur-jroyelitis was diagnosed as equine} saiminG To TDAD, doth 3 vis and St. Kitts Sailing %
On valde =. F waco at her : ole as a a = east | ww nerous fruft trees fe teth, or. within fwe deys ther sisfied. located in Balmoral Gap From | 552 aralytic rabies by the Bureau & BRITISH Sues day 18th inst. = x
esidience “Midget”, Palm Beach, Hast-;Simpie to operate, asy to move, . ’ q pare : ’
ings, Christ Chureh, Gertrude Rose] SEAGULL js the answer in OUTBOARL It pnanee roads of land adjoining the! , 702 further mtorihatiOn, consult the} Aug. ist for two or three months icf Anis, Husbandry in Wash-|™! 5, STENTO? an den’ ee B.W.L SCHOONER OWNERS’ ©
Meats Ree fre ae Clete eee aa = ©! shove (excelent buiidipg sites) SEE ee Oe aes eet toes jington to whom the brain of a/nis. NESTOR 6th August, 1952. ASSOCIATION (INC) x
lace at 5.00 p.m. to-day at 1e West- | informatio 7.52-—in. | Lik” he 4 texeent Su e Z 24, i acme ranean epsenatieainesirsim aan ‘4 c rho , .
bury Cemetery where friends are! {een eae except dimipsath on oe aot yee reneute Sante bod Entrance | ead horse was sent for investiga- ore ae TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO a oe en
asked to attend. * PSE ud } CAR Pore 10 Dips i gooe wari “| The khove will bé eet, up tht. sal NOTr lo eacons Road, Dial 2461, 11 7mein.{tion. Brazil reports that white |™ EReD BA Ss Tey, eee - :
De eee ee Meets 4g Se abe ae ames 947 | in Gocwpelven. on miday, tam ea * cmenn Mencia es }wi} are the vampire’s greatest] s. HESTIA Sst July, 2082, %
| ~ [Eeedighes Meret tere aleaihingiing > ~~ tegen et 4 ROOMS—Two furnished rocms, running | enemy and the disease was arrest-| 8. P. MUSGON, SON @ CO., LTD. ate mdee bbe
SPENCER-—On July 10, 195%—Geors GAR—Tord 10, Excellent condition, | HAGEPMMERPE Nang @ ivmech ts foes S crven that ert | Mater, WHR or without tenkfast. In) 4 sowing a ban on shooting Agents GOCE OR GOEIO EOE
Edward Lloyd Spencer (late of the' Apptr: «Mighténgale, Hingsbury Rend j aioe ple nd EASE HIVEN that 81!) Woodside Gardens, 10 minitus walk to|Cd fo i
Imperial College of Tropical Agricai Ge; 3.20 p.m. 10 ' rere hav ing any debts or claims acne | °° Club, or City. Dial 3356. jowls ‘but white owls are unknows 1} iecinaelgn niche -
ture, ‘Peinided?.. His funerad leaves! “Melwi”, Brown's Gap at 4.30 o'clock ONE (3) Austin two toa truck anc one | Boe sae ceekon ak eth oy tn ~ te
this afternoon for the Westoury Cem-F (1) Austin A:40 Car. ‘Telephone 402i, | Meee ree end prin s > parich ot Che ist Charen whe died | ANT ae. oe but has now spread a ‘a nadian ationa came Ips
etery. Friends are asked to attend. BD, V. Scott. d& Co., Ltd, Wools = io cat Chigaatins eamacenieds a ten. "7 f fh 4 ED o oTses.
Blanche Spencer (wife); Gardner! 26.6.52—t.f.n bees one a ass ae Shee feckiey a NESEPY, required wo ia in parmene | a a
aid Harry Spencer, Gertrude Tmitiss, | res i ie . sdjoining che. apoueee an pory. m= o eet bene on atte: TUDOR 10 DIE IN BUS !
Aubrey W. Smith, Jes, N. Smith, TRUC™—Chevrolet truck, no. Preason- Ns B ki h, 128, Roebuck St. oer Roebuck Street Aa cae ee ’ | SOUTHBOUND Balls Sutls Arrives Salls
1.7.52! nite offer tefused. A Barnes & To., |S Mine, te, P naaninn Teta ee: 7 Senn HELP UCK CRASH Halifax Boston B'dos Rides
nae ! {Ltd 3.1.428—t.hn. $0.7 .82 shin. | 0 # fore the 2 ote rain CANADIAN CRUISER -+ $9 June siuly 9July 9 July
phim renena=intego beste is dk ee ‘ceed : AN CONSTRUCTOR @ Suly 14 July 14 July
i A f +3 : 5 OFFERS for a briek wall to be de-' the assets of the estate among the parties Cook--First class cook (woman) for MEXICO, July 9. aa DNE ub
GOVERNMENT NOTICE | a % ree a ly ‘aoe GM, | beolished ond fr from our ontitied thereto having regerd to the debts | hotel hear City, appky by letter stating Police said ten persons ioe 2 = ‘oe * duly 14 ia 8 Juy am duly 3% July
| scent my Or ee ote xe | Cavans Stroet Store will be received and cléims only cf which I shall then | experience. A. B. Ltd. c/o Advocate.| Police Sag oak na tikes | % .
New L. N. Hutthinson, Clarendos | : “ 9.7.52—3 killed anq six critically injured!.
*Biack Rock or phone 4908 by Twelth July. DaCOSTA & Se ee are nee notice and. th " ; a a be + 7. n.} k . d 3 oo Sem tote ieee aul’ "RGaen ~ . See — ears eto
cs a ‘In «| r assets so distribute ae ee nan ren eee eee nana ryhen a bus cra ¥ BOU Arete:
Visit oe os ~— FO. Eto Stapp \paesort of Whose debt or claim 1 shal nXQUNG MAN—A capable, | ene | a parked cattle truck early to- Hace” St. Sonn “ir'des Gostom = Mallfar Montreal
“H.M.S. Burghea ay” will es - ; 2) | SHARES—1190 Shares, GawitaryLauadry | ot have had notice at the tlme of such | hardworking young man to hehe =
: i~Qne (1) Fotdsén Van (M1962) f 7 deubedze a} da The truck was parked on] ¢ TAN
be visiting Barbados trom the { ey working eee mae ‘West “Enata dann tin entre Ral "Co. winnie’ | ‘hes Mi pees indebted to the said aor for aks man. heeled ne. highway without lights. The CARONSTRUCTOR %4 July @ uty 6 Aug. 8 Aug. 10 Aug.
1th to 14th July, and will be open | ivic"'c/o He Torte Bouting CO,” Rogbucx | Wert Sadie, me Memmer eGo tics | ests ‘ure “renuestea, to" settle” thet {iether Bow XK. c/o Advocate | front of the bus was sheared and| LADY ROOMS. 9 Aug. 19 Aug 20 Aug. 23 Aug.
to organised parties of limited | “rect. ee: | Biscuit Co. Limited (at $16.25 per share). | xceounts without delay. ; 2s the truck’s platform telescoped by| por"gurther particulars, apply 40>
numbers from Youth Organisations " . All shares cum dividend. | “Dated this 29th day of May, 1952. r tremendous impact.
; : ELECTRICAL R. 8. NICHOLIZ & CO., | JOSEPH ONLSIMUS TUDOR, (Sar.)
such as Scouts, Guides etc., from} _ nae iat aeaaties Soltettors. Quatified Executor, MISCELLANEOUS GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD.—Agents.
2 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday the} ace’ WASHING MACHINES —Britain's Phone 2925, 7.52—$n, | Estate, George Arlington Payne, decd. deca. a enna U.S —JAP AIRLINE
~ 4 @astest Electric Washers $217.29 Less 5% } ME. hor t well ire r jit ill macdaaiat atlantis wvtteieliaitatan
12th July. Mouds of Youth ores sash discount, Cave Shepherd & Co.,y SPRINGVALE NTATION, Sate te eae cat Honale gxedlent| PLANNED i
isations who wish to arrange for}; iq 11.7.52--3n. }Amdrew, About arable acres and mouset, Phone 2222. 11.7.52—1n. TOKYO, July 9
parties to visit the ship, are asked | —-——___________ rer about 60 acres in pastures, roeds, etc. Tide. Ade bbidibinhadcabhobbnlineemlins anaes aa hippin 4 pa de
i r Just received new shipmen arrard | Manager's jouse, Overseer’s ouse, a c ily red apanese sh ie
to get in touch with the Harbour | sce speed Automatic Changers at fusnal oottai gs, two horves, cart, ete. NOTICE Satreneaapeetting ey subscribers tc| and a United States airline, are
and Shipping Master who will], Maffei & C td. Radio Em- be : Re Estate of ae q 2
e. ¢. 8. 2 ei & Co. Li The above Plantation will offered REDIFFUSION in one month 7 her rT link
arrange transport. porium 15.6,52—t.f.n. }for sale at auction on Friday, the Lith WILLIAM gp ps csi’ WORRELA in on n. gse—en,| Working together on plans to li
9 Rites | perenne te ann July next, unless Breviously sold bY! NOTICE is he aoe eas thet ai Gee depen nod Srael by air beginning
abe ee JusT R “Pye” e Uxe |} private treaty. inquiries ou e avi 4 3S e Hexcy . ; re nex ictober.— U.P.
Ultra-Modern Radio-Grams_ (with Gar- {directed to the undersigned im the first | °O"* having any debt or claim against REDIFFUSION offers $1.50 cash for t

rard 3.speed changers) Two Pickiip Heads | instance.
LOST & FOUND no needle worries, in attractive walnut j
esbinets. A mited: quantity only
$120.00. P. C. S. MAFFEI & CO., LTD.,
Pr: Wm. Henry Strect.

CARRENGTON & SEALY,
a Street,
ridgetewn .
9.7,6a—3n.





28.6.52- t.£.n, |









LOS LT
T ty The undersigned will offer for sale at
aetna PYE BATTERY SETS—Just a few left.| their Office No. 17 nh Street, on Friday
SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS—12 Jemaeey | Seer RADIO . the 25th July 1952 at . pam., by public
H.W.I. Sweepstake Tickets im un 15.6.52—4.f.n. | competition, the Dwellinghouse known
eee gateeee % 26 os Aen onto nego as “Edenville” standing, on 30s. ganar
Poe iene ik ore FURNITURE feet of land at George Street, Belleville
vee to 20. Finder please | N St. Michael. The Dwel¥inghouse contains
retura fo Eustace Holder c/o N. £. | - = a tn



gallery, drawing and dining reoms, two

ay
Wileae 4 Co. 21, Swan Street CHAIR=One Invalid's Wheel Chair bedrooms, one with running water),



















10.7. 2 | practical! new, rice $100.00. ply | J t light
ee 52—2n 1 Rte wills t. Savour's Willage Benge ee eikos: bath. Electric lig
Dark Hole St. Joseph. 22,6.$2—4n. a oled on application to. .Mer,
FOUND H. A. M. Lashley by phoning 4007.
KEYS—A bunch of keys in Leathe LIVESTOCK . 6 = particulars and conditions
Public Market. © insets nantly
ued’ aioe by applying to dest | fen cOWs— 1) gust caived (2) to co 2 CATFORD oO
List af cs an weeks, P B Waiker :
Trikes se 6 Sn io ftand” &. George. 10.7, 52--3n, 11.7,52—fn
PE NAL | MECHANICAL NOTICE
RSO ADDING MACHINES—New shipment
( Addo Addtus Machinas just received. | 4 We. ha Rap Bevery, (148.
en seiveripentneninretee id and. Electrically ted. T, Ged } ,
The public are her warned against : Gront fa porate bi o7as an 200 Barbados Foundry Limited Shares
giving credit to any person or persons | 520 Barbados Co-operative Cotton Fac-

whomseever in my name as 1 do net hold

if tory Ltd, Shares.
myse

ee
} “DUPLICATORS-Roneo Retary Dupli-





























K. R. Hunte & Co,, Lid.
Dial rr
a

Lower Broad Street. Sale at 2pm, Terms Cash i
VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer,

9, 7.52—3n,





responsible for anyone Con- | epto several 3] 0 500 Barnes & Co,, Litd., 5% Preference
wae any oo or 's pig sa 7 aan oes Se re eae sec Sa Shares re eres os the
unless by o written order signed by me.) Grant Ltd. ane,* 1 195 Barbadoe urance Co.
JOSEPH —. HAYDE, | nt Ltd., Bolton Lane nae | s
ares aes I “OFFICE EQUIPMENT—Roneo Filing Barbados sh Shipping & Trading Co.,
‘ ohn, ' Cabinets, Roneo Desks, Stationery Cup-
. 10.7, 52—21 |b ards, now available from stock at T,]| 20 West India Biscuit Co,, Ltd. Shares.
ee oeenemeereenenamenenneenennnnees eevee | Ceddes Grant Ltd. Phone 4442.” ‘Trinidad & Tobago 1963 4% Bonds.
The public are hereby warned against ; 9.7.52—0n; 3. St. Georges Parish 4% Bonds eee |
one credit to any person or perso Be st kd ae The a ean ae ber be
whomaoever in my nime ss [ do not ype al cet wp for sal at ub lic uction on!
hold mysel! responsible for anyone coy CP YREWRITERS Poe ee eee new | Prigay the 11th day of July, 1982. at |
tracting any debt or debts in my nar T. Geddes Grant Ltd, Phone 4442," 2 pam at Carrington & Sealy, Lucas |
unle®s ty u written order signed by me. > 9.7. f2-0n. | Street, Bridgetown. }
Sed, HOBART LEOPOLD BYNU Zo asset ee) Ee ae 6.9. $2+4n |
ogers Road, The Ivy, + eel
St. Michiel, MISCELLANEOUS \
1 -5a—2r a eee ae emnrerrate ncn mrt
i ADMIRALTY CHARTS of the fotiow- AUCTION \
The West Indies, Barbados, Grena-
NOTICE OF TRADE MARK ainas eee inion, ‘Wark Bndies te) By Instructions of the Insurance Co:
Pacsage to nica, es to instruction 8
Windward Talands. Bo & Co. No. 9} # will sell at the FORT ROYAL. GARAGE,
High St.. Dial 3301. 11.7.62~—sn,] on FRIDAY ith at 2 p.m. ONE,
pe owl Na hE a ea CAR. Damaged '
PAROMETERS—Household and Ships }) by Fire
| Anevoid Barometers, Roberts & Co, No. R. ARCHER McKENZIE.
§ Dleh St, Dial 3301, 11.7.62—3n. 9.7.52—3n.
MODELS—Five floating stale models.
Ships of Royal Nays Nourse, ashpy, st | UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER +
| George. 5.7.52—6n | By Instructions received from the
SS enrvance Co. A will sell at Messre.
MOBO TOYS—For that birthaay gift:} General Motor Co., Nelson Street!
horses, toteyeles, chair desis, snails,} on Friday, July inh (1) 1952-A-40 Austin
bieyelés etc. feountnyman) ad in aceident.



! ed
The Sidhe Oats Company, a corpor- “NYLON ‘STOCKINGS — La

‘or lowely
inuatly a. pair or three a for
{ 00 at Kirpalant 52, Swan St

11,7. 52—In.

a
VEFRIGERATOR—One Electrolux Oi)
suming Refrigerater. Just painted. Can

ation organized and existing under tre
laws of the State of New Jersey, and
having a place of business at 141 Wes!
Jackson Boulevard, City of Chicago,
County of Cook, State of Tiinols,
United States o2 America, eee 1

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER



ny order of Mrs.

turets, hereby gives notice that it p - 7 : . = TUESDAY, 15th ky order |
“ 9° seen working, Apply: Ward. _ River, will eell the Furniture
oan feode* and’ trevetienta of Philip. Dial’ 9S-qa7, 9.7.8a-Sn. ié “Gietament ke’ St. Joseph which

foods, particularly flour, cereal products

ee rn ineludes
pnd feeds That the Trade Mark is usu-| Subscribe now to the Baily Telegraph indie Table (seat 12), China Cabinet,

«|









By Lioyd Douglas



Segioud’s leading Daily Newspaper vow] Tub C and hacks 8, Upriaht Chairs,
ally impressed or oe te tgeeae areivind m Bariados by Alr only a teow inne * . Double
ba paskeace dos cancta themselves. | /° "5 sfier py in Londen. Con- Ena Settee all in aeahabehy Glass and
ue <7 pechne are hereby warned t: ben Gale, c/o Advoeate Co., Lid hina, Breakfast sR Berend atures, HMV

ea t of sald ‘Trady | )Oval Reprewentative, Tel, 3118. Gramaphone; acio im good

cent Tena telaan ut Bar 11-4.08—t.t.0. | order; Serving : Sideboard Hat.

Mane ne vom - eea in the _ . mone | sta * Desk; Wai eC, Dressing Tabie.

inet Pcieetis uring wD acember 1942. SEAL-A-VAC-—Flaak Stoppers, will not} W: nds in Mahogany: Pine Bedsteads

¥ ted this 18th day of June 1952. “pop out”, cannot leak, Is hygienic, | w VYonoe Springs; Larder, Cream

. IE THE QUAKER OATS COMPANY, ) thest thermal efficiency for hot or cold, | & , Senles, and many other items.

: Per: Cottle, Catford & Co, | | bl. standard size Flask only 42 cents} Sa’ .30 o'elook, Terms eash,
Agents. | (ch. Harrison. Dial 2364, B TROTMAN & CO.
= 9.7,.52—3n 11.7.52—2n. Auctioneers

a re

SOSOSSOSS ESOS FOS CPOE. WEDDING GIFT—A few ironing board 11.7.52—2n.
| end No-cord iron sets, subject to special
& wedding-gift eine’ A Barnes &

TO-DAY'S NEWS PT aces TED | $46696999S0090900500000%,

idee sich > >

OLLAND >: | : %

BOSWELL IN H A :
: 17691104 4.00 * DANCE NOTICE
THE CLOUD AB ‘A et
FOREN — By Bir Eni are Ma FARLEY HILL COUNTRY
TIME TO REMEMBER x ’ CLUB, St. Peter
i
i
i

PPCSOSGO PAI

A WOMAN CALLED % OPENING D ANCE
By Frank faeby vere oe st
learing out from our Hardwa * y ' ae
_ “Department cia giving vitamins and minerals SATURDAY 12th JULY, 1952
Sho ric * New a Sees +s %
Fat ee Gilde ber 100. )) page Of XYEAST-PHOS. Enjoy life Starts at 9.00 p.m.
All heavy Hardware items at a Dress Optional %
cost and below. 4 °
: These cut prices are due to ow ¥, a)
Coase out the greater part of 32) ADMISSION tt! $1.00

eur Hardware Department).

JOUNSON'S STATIONERY AND
HARDWARE

ad

(Meanwell’s Orchestra)
11,7.52.—2n,

COS









And a Holiday-on-Wheeis among the highways
and byways of the Lritish Isles; with a
ZEPHYR or CONSUL to answer your every
holiday whim—licensed, insured and with

tankful of gas, ready to vo the moment you



Plo iu i *
arrive in London! Please enquire further from

~~. >ooxzzrrrmarraanmmrnmrens





ST aS TS





or affecting the estate of William Albert |each new Subscriber recommended by







Worrell, gosneee, see aa some cue you. 1.7,52—6n. -
more Rock in the parish a! n ich- ——~--—--—

tel in this Island who me at sere? | SUPPLEMENT YOUR ous, te

Collymore Rock aforessid on commending REDIFFUS ss

ae at Cetober, 1951, are requested to full particulars from the REDIFFUSION er your

send in particulars of their claims duly | office. 1.7.52—fn

attested to the undersigned EVA
WALCOTT WORRELL Qualified Execu-
trix of the will of the said William Ai-



TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bonus
from Rediffusion for 25 recommende-

G6“ TRANSATLANTIQUE






ACHES...

hert Worrell, deceased, ¢/o Messrs. | tions in one calencay month. Backache is usually ca by lazy ki Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
: Gtifith, Solicitors, No. 12 1.7.52~6n. used idneys.
Girt Sie “aesdgetowa on ak beste The kidneys are the bloods filters. When Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica



they get out of order, excess acids and
poisonous wastes stay in the system,
Then backache, headache, rheumatism,
disturbed rest or that ‘tired out’ feeli
goon follow. To make your kidneys
properly — and to keep them in good order —
use Dodd’s Kidney Pills. Dodd's Kidney
Pills quickly rid your oyer-burdened blood
of excess acids and wastes so that pure,

the 15th day of August, 1952 after which . x
date I shall proceed to distribute the EMEN
ensets of the deceased among the par- ANNOUNC Ts
ties entitled thereto having refard only
to such claims of whicg 2 shall then | ‘
haye.had. notice and T wit not be liable
tor the assct® or any part fhereof so
distributed to any pérson of whose debt
ér claim % shall mot then have had |*
notice. ¢
And all persons indebted to the said

From Southampton Arrives Barbados
*“DE GRASSE” +» 12th July, 1952 .. 24th July, 1952
“COLOMBIE” «» S3ist July, 1952 .. 13th Avg., 1952
*“DE GRASSE” .. 22nd Aug. 1952 .. 3rd Sept., 1952
*Not calling at Guadeloupe Bs



ee
EARN BIG MONEY by selling Redif-

susion in your spare time. Get « supply

of forms today. 1.7.52—6n. |










PESOS OS PO OOPS POPS,











estate are Yequested to settic their in- | FLASH NEWS %s | fresh blood flows to every nerve and muscle. SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE
debtedness weamnout, Seley. peer & Slice” austeae = GAYS SS | Then you feel betier—look better—work From Barbados Arrives Southampton
Dae WEVA WALCOTT WORKELL, Pe ee Z| pele So res see © ae ote “COLOMBIE” .. 18th July, 1952 .. 28th July, 1952

i the , 5 AN: pp >| U mee >
Qualified Executrix af the The VARIETY SANDAL SHOPPE %| Pills in the blue ‘pockage with the ved =e GRASEE .. 6th Aug, 1952 .. 16th Aug., 1952
Worrell (dees: asc) eee aes mee | bands. Only 3/- at all drug stores. 424 ES - -. 24th Aug, 1962 .. 5th Sept. 1962
2.6.5 x on some > ty ee 7 * x | Kid Pills DE GRAgRE” -. 16th Sept., 1952 *". 26th Sept., 1952
399959906945606655900659) | Dodds ney Sailing direct to Southampton



R. M. a & co., LTD.





ORIENTAL
PALACE

VELVET EVENING BAGS

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

DECISIONS





a Speciality. Wages Board Act, 1943, and Wages Board Regulations, 1944.
i SOUVENIRS —
i} FROM INDIA, CHANA & DECISIONS made under Sections 10, 11 and 12 of the Wages Board
\ CEYLON Act, 1943 (1943—25) by the Waves Board established under the
\ 7 H AN N \' S_ Wages Board (Bridgetown Shop Assistants) Order, 1950

Wages Board (Bridgetown Shop Assistants) (Amendment)
Decisions, 1952, No. 2

Pr Wr ve & fhias

THE T.S.S.: GOLFITO will be arriving from South-
ampton at noon on Saturday, 12th July, and will be
sailing the same evening for Trinidad.





These Decisions may be cited as the Wages Board (Bridgetown
Shop Assistants) (Amendment) Decisions 1952, No. 2 and shall
be construed as one with the Wages Board (Bridgetown Shop
Assistants) Decisions, 1950, No. 2 (hereinafter referred to as the
Principal Decisions).

Sub-paragraph (1) of paragraph 3 of the Principal Decisions is
hereby repealed and the following new sub-paragraph substituted
therefor: —

“(1) The minimum holiday with pay for shop assistants
in Bridgetown shall be in accordance with the Holidays with
Pay Act, 1951 (1951-38), and any Act amending the same.”

Made this 6th day of June, 1952.

ASSISTANT TEACHERS
NOTICE

All Assistant Teachers are
hereby notified that the usu-
al monthly meeting takes
place to-morrow, Saturday,
12th at 11,00 aan, punctual-
ly.

c. C. D, ROACHFORD,

Secretary, A.T.U.
11,7.52—1n,.

There is ample first class accommodation available
for Trinidad.

Apply ...

Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd.

R. NICHOLAS JACK,
Labour Commissioner,
Chairman, Wages Board for Shop Assistants in Bridgetown.
Approved by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this 26th day
of June, 1952,





SPECIAL
DISCOUNT

of 10%

By Command,
J. C. KING,
Clerk, Executive Committee.
11.7.52—2n





Now Obtainable at

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

AT ATTRACTIVE PRICES

Barbados Amateur Boxing Assn.

Under the patronage of

CANADA DRY

=|



Invite
Entries for the 1952 CHAMPIONSHIPS
% to be held at



THE MODERN HIGH SCHOOL STADIUM

on at} during the month of August at a date to be announced later






% Championships will ve contested in the following divisions:
PEARL NECKLACES s Flyweight — — under 112 lbs.
x Bantamweight yo
at your Jewellers... $ tue —_ ” i” ” R. M. JONES & co., LTD., beg to notify the public
Y. De Lave A os eek: wi 143 x , § that, until further notice, due to building alterations
2 eR Sot ” b
‘ wT : ht Heavyweight— SAG og the en
& CO., LED. ‘ Hides yweight— jon. Aag 3 e entrance to their office will be on McGregor Street :
20 BROAD ST.. and at . pretending competitors are asked to call at Modern High Schoot x instead of Prince Wm. Henry Street. x
MARINE GARDENS for Entry Forms any afternoon 4—5 p.m. ¥ % ’ 3
2 x
3663 oh

Zz 5 56SS660655959S9SS9965 PPOSEOES

POPSPP OOPS OESSS



——_"

ay

Telephone Main Office 4493

Charles MeEnearney & Co., Ltd.

$23 +

Y





















FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1952
I a NS LE NL TTY A NT NY VT



HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON



4M GOING
TO MY CABIN.
COOCONIGAT.

I WONDER IF 5:
KNOWS WE SUSPECT
VILL OF THAT ROBSERY-
AND THAT S=VERN
PUT e* UP TOIT?



BLONDIE









=



$oGr Goes “










SST
Seat apcaiane oe

ee ~~ stn Youn Bost CLEAN come IMPORTANT

WHERE IS MY >S Coa IT HAVE AND YOU MUST

5 C7, COME DOW?

BATHROBE ? 1% te NT} | L NON THE, 5 See xc own :

I WANT TO A ( CLEANERS | iS en /

TAKE A 377 aa DEAR

BATH AV ee ) 3 ae

Na)
_&

iy

THAT 1S MO-LOK, GOD OF
FROST/ THE TEMPERATURE
INSIDE THE iOOL IS TWO
HUNORED DEGREES BELOW
ZERO! BELIEVE ME, FLASH
GORDON, IT |S A TERRIBLE
DEATH IN THAT FURNACE
OF FROST/






YES, YOUR _CREWMEN
ARE MY PRISONERS /
I_ WOULD HAVE LIKED
f YOU TO ACCEPT mY

. PROPOSAL WILLINGLY/...


















166
EVERYBODY
DOWN HERE? J)



I KNOW I'M
HERE ... WHAT'S



BE CAREFUL NOT
TO FALL, HERR

Ev Tue coun or
2 i> (Piac SMELLS



MAGGIE - I'M PROUD
WINNING WAS,
ENOUGH / THEY

SEEMED SO HAPPY

WHEN I CANCELLED

> THE $3450
aoe ME /

>

of j

OF YOU! IT WAS VERY
GENEROUS OF YOU

NOT TO ACCEPT YOUR
WINNINGS /



[7 THANKS, CARMODY...
_. || S=2( 1 CAN'T. SAY 1 ENJOYED
/ '
we'VE GOT SEIN! YOR GUEST!
LIL! LAVELLE, AND. SSS ug {

penne ee
‘YEAH, ¥ SHUT UF UP AN’ ORIVE

SHU
FINE!

(Gee, 8055, IT'S Y
IGREAT TO SEE

YOU'RE
FINE! /

) "KiRBY'S PLACE...
SOME UNFINISHED

eon L. “Ip

iT DOESN'T MAKE /AUCH DIFFERENCE) LET'S JUST SAY |
INOW, BUT I'M. CURIOUS, SEVEN... /I’M THE GALLANT
WHY OID YOU-CONFESS TO.THE / TYPE, AN' FORGET |

|MURDER OF YOUNG LAMBERT IT. EH CARMOOY#|
|AFTER WE HAD PICKED UP
| MONICA HILL?

YUt!

LOOKIN



YOU'RE A FREE “4
JOE SEVEN!

THE CPECIAL MEDAL # ORDERED By.

THE 9.C, HIMSELF! HASN'T

HAPPENED INA DECADE!
#1 WHAT DOVOUTHINKOF =~
==\ THAT ? —

Pr GE E- 5
\wai2!

BARBADOS ADVOCATE




PAGI

EVEN



°
me)
»
3
+
> ;

-

%
Â¥,
Â¥

PPPS ET

YES SIR!

S&SRUM

It’s the Flavour—
A Pistiz Flavour
Always Right--

ietis

4

your vays

STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.

Hei dquerters for Best Rum
‘ 699 POS y SSSIOSE Ape FN

neon 590% |
“SAL SO 3550990890 6SOO POO PSSSOSS OD

Holiday Entertainment



Att ee
FP a



.
~
+
* MIXED VEGETABLES in
es tins
+
i SLICED HAM
Bs LAME TONGUES in tins
ia
|} CORNED MUTTON in tins
|% ROAST BEEF in tins
1&
1% VEAL LOAF in tins
|
% LUNCHEON BEEF in tins
E R R I N (5 S N ee a
Â¥,
x FIVE STAR RUM
e

FRESH - or ix TOMATO SAUCE % '

INCE & CO.
LTD.

8 & 9, ROEBUCK ST.

oe PPP AOS



ee

en POOPSE LEE? ~

SSO SSSOOO FIG

er
6 CEP ESF SFO
eee tereear settee GIL

+

§
§

PECES

OPEC OIAS

+S9G6eo

OT OS SO



IT PAYS YOU

‘TO DEAL HERE



SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Cr Credit Customers for T for Thursday ‘to Saturday only













Soo

SPECIAL OFFERS are are now ay vaillable at our Branches White Park,
Tweedside, Speightstown and Swan Street



Usually Now PEARS SOAP 32
OVALTINE—Large 18) |: A410 CAMAY SOAP Rect
TOILET PAPER weed 35 80 CASHMERE ic eiieee sie rseness at
COLGATHS 5... 19
APRICOT JUICE in ‘2 WILLOW BEAUTY SOAP AS
MILK and ALMOND OIL
SELECT POWDE RED PVCPEE Ti etre ata cae s Chive P eee Raed 27
MIL 1.05 96 Ny eer ee ONS Nc pee eye ea 42
SAMMI IE Visas) so te 10
t GANBOIMCG Comall) s... sheesh 06
SCHWARTZ MUSTARD PLAYING CARDS (per pk.) eee
in Glasses 48 45 WRITING PADS Cae
BEER 28 99 BABIES NIPPLES ‘ (js ned Sg



THE COLONNADE GROCERIES
The Place Where Your Dollar Goes Further



CRICKET

The West Indies in Australia 1951—52

CRUSADERS

By HAROLD DALE

Mr, Harold Dale, already known to Millions
of readers for his forthright cricket reporting in
the Daily Express adds another outstanding book

to our series on Test Cricket. How would the
flashing strokes of Weekes, Worrell and Walcott
match up to the efficient run-getting of Morris and
Hassett?

Would the spin and guile of Ramadhin and





Valentine be more effective than the menacing
speed of .Lindwall and Miller? Would the
“stormy petrel of cricket,” Barnes, succeed in his
attempt at a comeback? These and the other

LT, . ‘
questions that spring to mind are fully dealt with

A ‘ ae ve ”, . ‘ ory ar Pe
Read all about Your favourite in Mr, Dale’s candid commentary Apart from
e : derailed chapters on the Test, he covers all the

Cricketing Stars— other jmportant games of the tour.
Few cricket enthusiasts could afford the time
6

GODDARD, ATKINSON, and money to be present throughout the “World

MARSHALL, WALCOTT, Championship” matches. Cricket Crusaders is



the idea) substitute for the absentee. Reinforced
WEEKES, WORRELL. by many splendid action illustrations, it brings a
momentous series right to

the

armchair

ADVOCATE
STATIONERY

reader’



$3.50

per copy















©



st

zt

wt

OO tet hm eater

sant hae Rom

a ve



PAGE EIGHT



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Surrey Establish 32-Point Lead By

*

Keating Worcester In Two Days

(From Out Own Correspondent) :
Japan Will

LONDON, July 16,
Worcester in two days at Kidderminster, Sur-

Reopen Swim
Controversy

the \fth county championship victory of

n and now 32 points ahead of their nearest

rs Middlesex who were without a game. Worces-

1 lown badly against spinners Lock and Laker both
\ rt ce for 30 and Erie Bedser and Fishlock

had no difficulty in hitting off the 17 needed for victory.
Chest . : By MILLIE HUDSON

‘iin Vusce oF ine Japanese

sw.mming delegate will be

heard immediately on his

being admi:ted to the Inter-

naticnal Gympie Committee

terfield the match be-
‘ he indian tourists and
Dert ll enter the last day in
ting position, The tour-
ni wickets in hand re-
victory. Derby to-

missed for 296. after an enforced silence
h following up his five since the war.

F innings. by At his first meeting, to be held

bee wder agen 2 ~4 during the XVth O.ympiad in

. gots ra ine Helsinki in July, he is to reopen

5. Kk. Gack i vn he had the controversial question of the

“Mantr? and butterfly and orthodox _ breast-

ood fi and took the <3). strokes. His vote will go for a

ithout further loss Yorkshire versus. Glamorgan: *e@parate race for each stroke in

24 not out, and Man- Yorks 321 for six declared and 167 ‘uture.

The mitter was thoroughly dis-

eussed at the 1948 meeting, but

several English-Speaking deéle-

gates were not satisfied with the

interpretation given in the trans-

lation of the minutes. So the mat-

ter was postponed until 1952.

31 s for six, (Hutton 72); Glamorgan
Scoreboard 222, (Wardle five for 40),
English Backing
If he wins—and he will have

versus the Surrey beat Worcester by ten
i162 and 296; the wickets; . Worcester 203 and 139;
18 for one Surrey 329 and 17 for no wicket.
English backing among others—
the orthodox breast stroke wil:
probably be over the 200 metres
event at present on the pro-
gramme for men and women. The
butterfly would best be over 100
metres,

Whereas men have now com-
fortab'y mastered the strenuous
butterfly stroke over tne longe:
distance, women have /;o fa
failed. Those who are faster on
it over 100 yards or metres,
haye hot apparently acquired a
sufficiently supple or relaxed
shoulder action to continue. Or
they have not achieved a per-
feet rhythmic timing for this
tricky stroke.

The crawl stroke was found a3
difficult to many when first intro-
duced. Now it is done over any
distance, even in races across the
Ch- nnel,

Another Idea
Another idea, I think, would be



L ah
uw Lot

Hants versus Notts: Hants 320;
Notts 152, (Gray seven for 56)
and 174 tor two, (Giles 99 not
out). F

Leicester versus Sussex. Sussex
403; Leicester 360 for six, (Jack-
son 101).

Lanes. versus Essex; “Lancs 349
for five declared and 72 for 2;
I x 221 (Statham three for 66).
somerset versus Kent; Kent
326; Somerset 162, (Wright five
jor 68) and 207 for four, (Tordoff









nine but

Indians:
er indians
8&6 and

yea Olympic Games
Team Short Of £700

(From Gur Own Correspondent)
LONDON, July 10,

Jamaica’s Olympic Games team which leaves to-mor-
ow by air for Helsinki is short of £700. The money. has
becn guaranteed by three officials Mr. Herbert McDonald
team manager, Mr. Frank Myers and Mr. Vivian Dayes. It
had not been for this guarantee, it would have been
to leave behind in London, coach J. J. Yancey

fifth member of the relay team.





nece ary
and Byron La Beach,



SNAPPERS
2—1 in the season’s
m the Aquatic Club yester-,

bal Mr. McDonald said today “I am
vusly to the team but the public’s
© ‘ J *) 1
onilas 2<—
er this week saying we were short
‘ Rather than do this, three of us
doy te establish a three point lead;

distressed that sufficient a 9
‘ fins e avai

eval nave not been made available to

snapper 5 Beat: Government subscribed gener-

subseriptions fell below mark.

‘JWhen I cabled to Jamaica earl-

sated Bonitas of money I was told to leave two

ime Water Polo members of the party behind.

decided to go guarantor. for £700.

“It would be ridiculous for us






in the Cup line up for the ‘ eae eke either f0F the. Olympic programme dis-
Challenge Cup. Kenneth - Me mebech if wa lot ae of oe and back-

wed both for Snappers and jy. Beach behind, it would mean § rok e to be exchanged. even if
Owen Johnson for Bonitas. shat if any members of the party only for women. Then erthodox

Bonitas with eight points and were ill or injured, we should not oF butterfly could still be optional,
two more matches can at most@\. apie to enter in the relay which but over 100 metres, and the back-
muster 12 points, but Snappere% 1. whole world is expecting us stroke held over a 200 metres
with 11 points and one more?’ win.” course,

match to be played against Whip-#
porays who were defeated in each
match they played this season, has'
chance of carrying off the

Below Scratch

Mr. MacDonald added that with
he exception of Rhoden, all the
nembers of the team were below
Cup. é wratch. '

it was altogether a_ fighting “We shall need the efforts of a
match in which one felt that any-[ooach now more than ever” he
thing might happen at any time! .qded, “But I still wish the Olym-
indeed, so keen was the contests! nics were a fortnight further
that there was never certainly* away. ’
which team would win. . Mr. MacDonald said that in Hel-

Each team went into the water’ sinki special attention would be
with its strongest side. From the‘ paid to baton changing. He was
beginning players were marking not satisfied with the way the team
ach other closely and one had to had performed at White City when
be shrewd in passing the ball they set up the new Empire Relay
owt of the reach of the marking “record, and he thought that with
cpponent if it were to be a good proper changing they could have
pass. So the game was fast from eee rar or even two seconds
the start with swift swimming, better time.
and good passing from both sides } Dah ere ae ar

i s £0; ‘pers savi some team’s cé if st,
wom ie sasieon ee He had been working at his stud-

In the first. half, Clarke the ies too hard and was tired, But
Snappers goalkeeper saved quite a pith tent expected
few of what seemed certain goals “ ‘ or
. ' Ridiaeas: py 1 ae MacDanald’s forecasts were that
from the re pie aes Rhoden would probably win the
Sear Ree APRN ag ot ; 400 metres with Wint as his most
Boni as M ere most aggressive ant dangerous opponent and that Mac
consistent in theiy efforts at Donald Ba‘ley who will be run-
SEOyINE: an 5 ning for Great Britain, would win

One Time Shots the hundred metres. He thought

Meanwhile Bannister was try- Jamaica had a fine chance in four

ing those one time shots he has the by the four hundred metres, but

having two events
stroke, as they do not wish the
Olympic programme to be length-
ened.

This is an important point, con-
sidering it has more or less been
decided to include a medley team
relay (3 x 100 metres. of back,
breast and free-styles),

The Americans are keen also to
include water ballets te be judg-
ed on points rather like diving.

Daly Four Points
Ahead Of Locke

(From Our Own. Correspondent)
LONDON, July 10,

After two rounds the Irishman
Fred Daly of Balmoral, led the
field in tne open golf champion-
ship at Royal Lytham and Stannes.
He added a 69 today to his record
breaking 67 of Wednesday for a
total of 136,

Four shots behind with 140 is
the South African champion,
Bobby Locke and one shot behind
him is the 22-year-old Australian
professional Peter Thompson, The
final two rounds will be played

every









habit of making immediately on warned that stiff opposition could HOMRarreW

receiving a pass, especially a high could be expected from the United

one, and Ince had taken a few States. Pe

shots which went slightly wide of In the women’s events, he ex- TO REPRESENT
the ne pected M'ss Hyacinth Walters to B.G. AT HELSINKI

10 do well but pointed out that she

world

gow about

et

came (Frem Ov Own Cor-sspon ont)













mina after start of play when be up avainst Marjorie © sORC sTOWN, B.G,. uty 10
Billy Manning swam down with Jackson, Austrolia’s world record Cecil Moore, %4-year-old light-
tae ball, passed it to Ince who had holder in the hundred metres and heavy weight-lifting champion, is
po-itioned himself for tt. Ince Mrs. Fanny Blankers Koen, the leaving British Guiana on Sunday
took a hard shot out of the goal- Dutch record breaker in the two a8 the colony’s only representa-
keeper’s reach. hundred, tive at Helsink’,
Even when Ince scored again for _ Twelve officials and athietes will ’
his team, the struggle was still an M@ke up the party leaving ‘to-
even one, and the goals were Morrow including Barbados cyel- ’
really the result of quick good '8t Ken Farnum, who is affiliated WHAT’S ON TODAY
passes when Ince had tricked the to the Jemaican team,
player who marked him. mialintecerepadsiomamcepsieavam vag’ i ‘ Oils and Fats Conference
Rain fell most of the second half 5—0, For Swordfish, FitzGerald 10.00 a.m,
of the game and it was during the and Herbert Portillo scored two ‘ a
rain.that Owen Johnson was able and Nestor Portillo 1, Court cf Grand Sessions:
to net one for Bonitas. The last The teams were:— 10.00 a.m.
minutes of the game were fast and | Snappers: Billy Manning, Frank
rough. Bonitas fought fairly hard Manning, Kenneth Ince, Delbert Court of Appeal: 10-00 a.m,
to equalise, but watching them Bannister, Malcolm Browne, T. asket B: :
one felt that they might have been Clarke 2nd George McClean. B 1 Balt os WEP,

7.30 p.m,
able to hold Snappers even to a 2

Boni‘as: M. Foster, B. Patterson,
last minute draw if they had put

J. Grace, BE, Johnson, W. Weather



miveinto it head, R, Eckstein and O, Johnson, | Films at British Council
The game took such a rough a H. Weatherhead, J 8.15 p.m.

turn about the last two minutes, Gorkan, D, Reece, H. Portillo, N. .

that three players were called out Portillo, M. FitzGerald and H. N Pais lpane Bees

within about half a minute of each Jones. 9; 25, Bee: Yer h Brown

other, Me Cleane, Grace and | Whipperays: G. Gréenidge, H. | No. 37. Reg. ys

Browne Weatherhead, A. Hunte, T. Year- YO: hy Se

} ames Haynes
In the other match played yes- Jem r

wood, L. Spence, P, Pottez and D
terday. Sword&sh best Whipporays

O'Neal.



(They













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| | ANO A SINKFUL OF
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CRUSTY CROCKERY

YW >=



eames Sd Kil MeATVES 8

This would suit these opposed to
for breast-

‘ll Do It Every Time seven 3. Pa Ome By Jimmy Hatlo

|
| KING-CUP
|
|
|
|

No Race In
Britain For
Russian Stars

r

ORGANISERS of the Highland
Games at Edinburgh’s great rugby
ground, Murrayfield, are enter-
prising. They invited Russia to
send two competnors to thelr
meeting on August 23, but they.
have received the inevitable
“Niet” (No).

lt would have been intcrest-
ing to see what their 5000 metres
man, POPOV, could do against
yur GORDON PIERIE over three

miles. Popov, I am told, recently
did 14 min. 16 sec. fer 5000 metres

at Kiev in an Olympic training
run.
Zatopek There
This time -is only a second
slower than Firie’s: recent British
record for the three miles of

13 min, 44.8 'secs., and what is more
ZATOPEK the Czech was in the
field. He could only finish third
in 14min, 22sec. and both he and
Popov were beaten by the crack
Russian steeplechaser, KASANT-
SEY (14 min. 13.2 sec.).

Tnis distance is rather short
fer Zatopek these days. His
events for the Clympics are like-
ty to be the 10,000 metres and the
marathon.

Atsent Members

TWO Hungarian Olympic chiam-
pions going to Helsinki are mem-
bers of Parliament. They are ham-
mer thrower IMRE NEMETH and
heavyweight wrestler GYULA
BOBIS, Both have been elected to

the Hungarian Nationa’ A: ly
since they. won their Olympic
titles in Londen in 1948.
U.S.A’s Best Ever
THE United States will be
sending its strongest ever ath-

letics teem to Helsinki if perform-
ances in the two days U.S. trials
are anything to go by.

In the two days 13 new meet-
ing records were set up in the 18
events, which means that the 1952
U.S, team exeelled previous teams
in all but five events.

The first three in each event
during the trials won a place in
the team. Because of this many
champions were left out through
injury and accidents.

DICK ATTLESEY, world re-
cord holder in the 110 metres high
hurdles, missed the team when in
a heat he finished last because of
a strained leg muscle.

Here is proof that Britain has
not been alone in athletic ad-
vancement. We have some real
hopes for Helsinki but the stupen-
dous task facing cur athletes must
not be underestimated.—L.E.S.



Sports Window

The Basketball Division
“A” matches at the ¥-M.P_C. .
tonight at 7.30 are:— Har-
rison College vs. Harrison
College Old Boys and Pick-
wick vs. ¥.M.P.C,

| THE WEATHER
REPORT

YESTERDAY
a from Codrington?
-12 in,
Total Rainfall for month to
date 1.17 ins.
Highest Temperature:
84.5° FB.
Lowest Temperature:
75.0° F.
Wind Velocity: 12 miles per
hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.945
(3 p.m.) 29.924
TO-DAY
Sunrise: 5-48 a.m.
Sunset: 6.18 p.m.
Moon: Full, July 7
Lighting: 7.90 p.m.
High Tide: 6.48 am.,
7.36 p.m.
. Low Tide: 12.39 a.m.,
108 p.m.







Know Your Cricket

Laws

23 & 24

|
|
|
|

\

BY O. S. COPPIN |

TWO LAWS dealing .with The Over will be discussed | ability to repeat in the Olympic



FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1952



Marathon Hope Peters

Answers

LONDON, June 20
Britain’s Marathon marvel dis-
pensing optician JIM PETERS,
vas in his training this week set
at rest any doubts about his

to-day. The history of the Laws of the game reveals the fact | Games the sort of form he showed
that as far back as 1889 the Laws concerning the over were
changed. They were changed again in 1900, 1922 and 1924.

LAW 23—THE OVER

The ball shall be bowled from
each wicket alternately in overs
of either 8 or 6 balls according to
the agreed conditions of play.
When the agreed number have
been bowled and it has become
clear to the umpire at the bowler’s
wicket that both sides have ceased
to regard the ball as in play, the
umpire shall call “Over” in a dis-
tinct manner before leaving the
wicket. Neither a “No Bali” nor
a “Wide Ball” shal) be reckoned
as one of the “Over”.

The history of the Laws of
Cricket places the number of balls
in an over in the United Kingdom
in 1889 as 4 and this number was
amended to 5 and finally 6, In
Australia and New Zealand the
over consists of 8 balls but in de-
fault of any agreement to the
contrary in the United Kingdom
the “Over” shall be 6 balls.

No Count

A ball shall not count as one
of an over if both bails have been
blown off the striker’s wicket be-
fore he plays his stroke or if the
bowler in running up to deliver
the ball, allows it to slip from his
hand betore delivery.

It is the umpire’s duty and not
the. scorer’s to call “Gver” so that
any additional balls allowed by
the umpire because of a miscount
are valid. ‘

I have knowr scorers who shout
from the pavilion “Over” much to
the discomfiture of the umpire

Sportsman’s Diary records



who is “on” at that time. They
are not required by the Law, to do
this.

LAW 24—FINISHING OVER

A bowler shall finish an “Over”
in progress unless he be incapaci-
tated or be suspended for unfair
play. He shali be allowed to
change ends as often as desired,!
provided only that he shall not |
bow! two “Overs” consecutively in
one innings. A bowler may re-
quire the batsman at -the wicket
from which he is bowling to
stand on whichever side of it he
may direet.

If a bowler is incapacitated
whilst running up to deliver the
first ball of an ever, the umpire
should call ‘Dead Bail” and cail
for another bowler to bowl an
over from the same end.

If a bowler is injured so that he
cannot finish the over he has be-
gun, the over shall be regarded
as completed.

Paintul

Intercolonial cricket history re-
cords painful incident in which
a Barbados bowler slipped and in-
jured his ankle in a game with
Trinidad and was compelled by
the umpire to complete the over
which he did by sitting and ¢oll-
ing the ball along the matting.

Under this provision the Umpire
should have called “Over” and re-
gard it as completed.

If an over is left incomplete
for some reason at the start of any
interval of play, it is finished on
resumption of play.

how—



Surrey Say ‘Thank You’
To Club Cricketers

SO MUCH is taken for granted by so many these days,
that I record with special pleasure a gesture of gratitude
which Surrey County Cricket Club are making towards
one Of the most renowned cricket clubs in Surrey, Thames

Ditton.

For the past three years Thames
Ditton have played a match
against ‘he Surrey XI in aid of a

professional taking his benefit.
In 1949 it was Eddie Watts, in
1950 Laurie Fishlock; last year

Jack Parker.

This year no Surrey player has
a benefit match. So Surrey are
going to play a match for the
benefit of Thames Ditton, It takes
place on Sunday on thé attractive
Thames Ditton ground at Giggs
Hill Green, known to every user
of the Portsmouth Road out of
London,

Centenary

The Surrey XI will be at full
strength, led by the county cap-
tain, Stuart Surridge. With
Surrey firmly established at the
head of the County Championship,
the game should be a great attrac-
tion to the public and a substan-
tial benefit for Thames Ditton,

The same motive has prompted
Surrey to arrange similar matches
with Thornton Health, Woking,
Reigate Priory—in celebration of
their centenary—and Southern
Railway (Raynes Park).

A spokesman of the Surrey
club commented: ‘the clubs have
been very good to our profession-
als, and this is our way of saying
‘Thank you.’ ”

Practical appreciation of — this
sort appeals to me. I’m sure it
will appeal to the clubs, too.

Leyton’s Thanks

Another nice gesture of the





Just

DEVON SPRAYS
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ASHFORD

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received WEDGWOOD IN
CHINA and EARTHEN WARE.

DINNER SERVICES are obtainable

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week comes from Leyton, F.C.,
defeated FA Amateur Cup final-
ists. Clubs, players and all who
have helped the club in their
uphill struggle have received the
club’s thanks on printed cards.

Said ihe message: “Leyton FC
Committee send this token of
grateful thanks. ..to all clubs who
have rendered us assistance in
completing our league programme
...to all players who have ‘guest-
ed’ for us...to all who have sent
messages of good wishes and con-
gratulations...and to the many
other friends and _ well-wishers
who have assisted the club in any
shape or form during the past
season.”

One-Girl Chorus

Rebecca, dark and _ diminutive
wife of West Africa’s Roy
Ankarah, was ushered politely
but firmly by Boxing Board
officials away from a seat near
her husband’s corner during the
Nottingham fight in which he was
beaten by Ray Famechon of
France.

For Rebecca, a bright figure in
blue, white and yellow, broke a
boxing rule when she began a
one-girl chorus of vocal support
for her husband in shrill English
and her own native tongue—Twi.

People in a boxer’s corner have
to keep quiet, and Mrs, Ankarah
after the first round, was moved
to a lonely chair some yards from
the ringside. She took it all in
good part.

—L.E.S,



WEDGWOOD

IN

BONE

ane China

are







in winning the Polytechnic Mara-
thon last Saturday.

It was feared that his world
record time in this race might
have burned him up, but it was
net generally known that he was
taking things easily at the end,
p-epared to sprint if necessary.

Peters has had nine runs, in-
cjiding the Marathon, in the
last week covering 88 miles, On
his 12 mile course last night he
did Ihr. 5min. 5lsec,, more than
a minute faster than his previous

best.
Early Spin
Ye! he was out again this morn-
ing at 5.45 to do his third best
time ever over his 10-mile course.
“That shows good recovery,
doesn’t it?’ he asked. “I could not

«pont Og gob at
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do that last year.”

And for good measure he was
doing another five miles at lunch-
time to-day because he was
missing to-night’s training run
to attend the AAA champion-

ships.
Saunders Sails

London leses one of its leading
amateur welterweight boxers to-
morrow. Twenty-one-year-ald
NORMAN SADNDERS, of the
Caius Boxing Club} sails for Mel-

bourne, Australia, to join his
family. es
Saunders, recently demobilised

from the Army, has boxed regu-
larly for the RAOC téam and has
rep_esented the Army.

He has represented the London
Amateur Boxing Association and
of his 200 bouts has lost only 17,
and in seven eases has gone back
to reverse these defeats.

He has boxed in Denmark and
Germany for his club,

—L.E.S.

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PAGE 1

! I'.HT BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, JULY 11. IKi Sorrej Establish 32-Point Lead By Afo Race In Know Your Crickel Beating Worcester In Two Days Japan \\ ill Reopen Swim Controversy (Kruni Our Own I orrespondrnt) LONDON. July 10. in two days at Kidderminster, Surunty championship victory of nta ahead of their nearest id > i were without a game Worcesinners Lock and Laker both i I Kric liedsci and Fiahlock IV needod for vit m NOI Hants 320. %  TVi a tor 38) 'in, tour.Hi 174 lor (wo. (Glint W not k< U in hjind reout). ,i Drrbv tn< Sussex Sussex %  '<•-. Mfl Leicestei 3GU (..i six. m laid. recently %  i.ii M nun. 16 MC. I.r 5000 r K. | in III Olympic run. Z.ito^ek There Th % time Is only u second to regard ihe ball • BrltteB umpire shall rail "Over" in a drOl tlncl manner before h-.ivinn lb wicket. Nrllhrr a "No Ball" no TWO LAWfc. dealing .with The Over will be discussed to-day, Th* history i t tlw Lawi veals the fact I irk m 1H U UM Laws I-OIK anting the over were changed They were changed again in 1900. 1922 and 1924. who it that tun a>re not rer L 'tircd by the I••..'. to do lh. lull shall be bowled tram tnls 'f"r"l.h"r V'.'r '"l"!u P ^co'rdlni P l.> *" U MNISHING OVER the agr.-rd lundlllviu of pla*. A Ko w)ri „, a || nnhli an "Over" Ahrn the airerd number ha v. ln pr0fT „, U11 r „ hr b,. mcap.rlu-ainmi b „ ^ P1 d M h „ ^ mr ^^ j ^ „ l Drnd ,^ ,„ r unUlT clear t,. the umpire al lhbowler %  „, ,„_,, .,|| tlwP,„ ulckrt Ihat both dde* have NJal ^^ rml ^ ofu n 4 dp irl(1 ilaj. Ui>' 4 rovld d un |y thai he -hall nol boul Iwa "0\rr" i mi-ii ulh rl> lit K C record for the throe milos "f u>tt manner beforr leavlna Ihr ol)r i nn | n B ,\ bwwirr BUT -s. and what U mor. WtekW>. Nrilher a "No Ball" nor ou(r „ ^ bataman at the wlrkel Marathon Hope Peters Answers Doubters LONDON. June SO do that last yeai Maiathon m-rvel disAnd for good measure he IV ivnsing optician JIM PETERS, doing another five miles at lunchInfl 'hi~ week set t.me to-day because he Wt* at real any doubt* about hi* nusatng to-nighfs training run repeat in the Olympic to attend the AAA thnmpiunthc sort of form he showed ships. in winning the Polytechnic MaraSamidcis SariW tlion last Saturday. It was feared that his world London loaea one of it* leading i.*cord lime in this race might amatour welterweight boxers toB4va burned him up. but it was mon^w. OOt generally knnu-n that he w NORMAN SAUNDERS. of the taking things easily at the end, Caius Boxing Club, sails lor Melp epared to sprint if necessary, bourne, Australia, to join his has had nine runs, infannl!•* :(*• Marathon, in tlw Saundars, rw nlly demobilise 1 lov.rmg 80 miles On from Hie Army, has boxed reguhis 12 mile course last night he larly for ihy_the •ting. a "Wide Ball" shall be reckoned ^ at one af the "<>v> %  The history of the Lriws ol BASAN1 Crtckeg places the Hah • %  ill an hi^hc^ mat airrct. bowler bow!lnc side of it he Infana* Iteted .. r in the United Kingd ayten^veral Engl.sh-Speakmg dtftt" 4 %*£* £%*m #-1 "•-d thta 0 amended to A and or bans wh |, sl rumilli8 up „, daorar aw oest. Early Spin Ye. he was out again this morning at 5 45 to do his third bast over Mi ta-anOa course %  "That shows good recovery, doesn't it?' he asked. "I could not Amateur U.xinii A*o.ialiun and Ol his 200 bouts has lOH only 17. .en rases has go*w back to i-e\Trsc these defeats. Ha hat boxed m Denmark and Gcimnnv f,, r hiclub. —L.K.S i MO and 139. gates were not satisfied with (1 Surras 32 and 11 'or u Australia and Ne llnnlly 6. Ze.il.ilHi lll< J"ca Olympic Games Team Short Of £700 (lioni Our Own ( orrrspondenll LONDON, July 10, mph Quntl Icain which leaves lu-inui,1 ol £700. Th< ni.i.iey has : i i Deltli Mr. Hwbert McDonald I Myers and Mr. Vivian Dayes. II gUtniltM, il would have been ul tn London, coach J. J. Yancey ch iih member ol the relay team. n hall or jin iver. thf umpHv ihOUM i ill U.M.1 Ball" and call lx>wl an over fre m If a bo1 BO lhal he nnot HnL.li Ihe over he ha, h..nunnuuoo ilv. ilia wu %  z '" p 'l! A'" Ution ol the minute. So the ,„„:'-y"' *<"<_ "•• £> •£ %  • %  ' %  %  'r caMMM „, 8 M \. bu. In drier powponed unlil 1U. ) ic lie Ihe lu.uou nieire and in. fii|| g inv J11 ,,^ m ,.„, to lhc l.nulish BackinK %  % %  M.„K._ .onlrary in Ihe llnlud Klnidom iun. thi over''^in|VW\eird'ed If he wlni and to will have ,,, %  .?[ ,.H„ lhe-Over-ihJllbedb.il.. English barkln, amon, othe. Two llunw ,.n Ol.mw. .hl.nihe orth.lox oraail .Irokc %  %  H f S. kl N ' !" l Painllil probably be over Ihe Ji JJJ' J, I-IIIII :.t jire-inl i>n the pro"" ninir tut men Mid VTOJ .i,..throwi i IHU: NBinil and A ball ahull not count a. one %  %  %  c; Y l; I. A r nonius. with eight points and, %  :..' %  %  i %  : .,i.n DM <•'•'" red Malnst Whipreatod in each %  %  %  i .tn ring off the fttna. %  light in a • that any%  any UmeJ i the contest, IQO BOnis. Both have ixvti elected u %  I Nations AsKooil/Iy ran their Olyrrpif 'ortab K mistered 1 '" /,: ''.' '" '** %  • butterfly sti.ike ov Ini V.>i\ s Best fcver Hi have a f J THE United States will he I si iKting its strongest ewer athit QVgf 100 yards <>r m'-tr letus te m In Helsinki if performhave not appan I B nncen in tho two days U.S. Irssal •;>• HjppJc oi relaxed %  %  anything m go by. shoulder aetion ti> continue o< in the two days 13 new oteatiiiev have not i feet rhythmic timing fo< lh|] events, which means that the 19V,! tricky ttrotW. U-8. team excelled previous Mmi The-crawl found si in all but five events. -. hen ihst tntritThe tlrst three in each event •y**trt*mun i during the trials won u place in the team. MOBUM Of this m.m champions ware loft out Ihroug ind accidents. DICK ATTLESEV, world re %  ord holder In tho 110 metrr> hjgh Intercolonial cricket history re ds ttut gainful incident in which blown off the striker's urlcket b,i ll.ii bi'-t* bowler slipped and fore he plays his stroke or if the jureit his nmtVa in a game with bowler in running up to rlelivei Triniilui ind was ci>mpel!cd b> the bail, allows it to slip fn>m Bal the umpire to complete the over hand beCoN delivery. which bw did by sitting and .illIt is the umpire's duty and not ing the boll along the mattint! tho scorer's to c:.ll "Over" so 'hat Under fhis provision the Umpire any additional bills allowed h. rhould have called "Over* and reuse umpire because of a miscount gal h ted. re valid |i in pver Li left incomplete I have known scorers who ihOVt (or some reason at the start of any %  h H I MHH II MMHH H no raeorda were ael un In thiIB f rom .V 13 B0 y ,Uon *Qwt" much to interval of piny, it ,s timshe.1 I* 1 " J n Ul ?J? the discomfiture of the UKnpU Oiurv n-cnrtl* how' i done over i oss Iho Another Idea Another Idea, I think, would he for the Olympic programme dis ^J'ST^T*?^ .-eeToibVau-irnKti'^rh:,.: hurdle-. mlo. the .earn when ITBLX SSJSTS J£)TJ£ -"•*", < Je.el^ued even „ h^ J**jd Oee.u-t ol edict, enter n Ihe relay wh.ch but over 1*1 metre-, and the back"*t l*'n alone ,„ athlet ho' whole world Is expecting us stroke held over n 200 m elre< vancement Wo hrncigQD LI win. course. li 2;?-year-o|,| Australian professional 1'oter Thompson. Tho final Iwn rounds .. ill lpliyed to-morrow. .i-.:! of Iho aoal.-. %  %  i. Mill .n l| of quick good hundred. Twelve < ffleials M | atll frU make up the pnrlv l ";.^ morrow Inetoding Bartwa 1st Ken Farnum. who is affiliated i team. TO REP.vtaCNT B.C. AT HELSINKI i • own %  !(( .'.TOWN. H.G, ,i> li' ce< ii Moora. 1.4-xaaT-old llght:i ivv % %  eight-llftlnn cham) Ion, %  leaving Itritish Guiana on Sunday Ihi "lonv's oily representative at Helslnk*. THE WEATHER REPORT YESTERDAY i: .Infall h-om CodringUnf .11 in. Total Ralnfa.ll for munlh U, dale 1.1, ins. Ilishesi Trmnoraturo: M.5 r. I am-.t rrmperalure: 75.0 P. Wind Velocllv: 13 miles p.r hour Itaromrler IB a.m.) "i 41 j 13 p.m. I .S?4 TO-lAY Sunrise: 548 a.m. Baaasl: s.ig p.m. Moon: Full. July 7 l i iiiin -HI i, i. Hllh Tide: 6.48 am. 7.36 pm. Low Tide: 13.39 a.m.. 1 08 p.m. SO MUCH Is taken for granted by so many these days, that I record with special pleasure a gesture of gratitude which Surrey County Cricket Club are making towards one Of the most renowned cricket clubs in Surrey, Thames Ditton Fo, the past three years Thames week comes from Leyton, F.C Ditton have played %  match defeated l*A Amateur Cup nualogalnat -'ie Surrey XI In aid of n Ists. Clubs, players and all who piofesslonol taking his benellt have helped Ihe club in their In 1949 it was Eddie Watts, in uphill struggle have received the 1950 Laurie Fishlock; last year club's thanks on printed cards. Jack Parker. .,message: "Leyton FC This year no SUM, s plajrar has Committee send this token of I benellt match. So Surrey are grateful thanks to all clubs who going tn play a match for the havo reWdoTa d us assistance in benefit of Thames Ditton. II takes completing or league programme place on Sunday on the attractive to all ptayan who have 'guestThames Dillon ground at Glggs ed" for us. to all who have sent Hill Gicen, known to every user messages of good wishes and conof the Portsmouth Road .Kit of gratulaUona. .and to tho many C'cnlrnary full The Surrey XI will be at strength, led by tha countv captain. Stuart Surridge. With SUmy lirmly established at the other friends and woll-wl-ihei-s who have aadi I-^I tha club 'ihape or form during the past '0.'l> HI." Qna-CUti (horn-. Rebecca, dark and diminutive Ife of West Africa's R Rice's Custom Tailored Tropical Sport Clothes of gay (or conservative) design, are of lasting value — and, too. prices are par! sm i C. B. Rice If I ul II..!.... lur head ol ihe County < hamplo.thlp. Ankarah. n. ushered polilelv he gametUiould.be a great attraebu „ rm | y bv [loxlrul Board ^M ISt' E?SJ """ •V'; bs 1 "" oBdUj ... <.nt near nal benefit for Thames Ditton he| hu b and'B corner during the The unto motive Uj promple.1 Nottlrujham tinhl in which lie WM "^ i'!.'" T" "?•"•;, -""'< %  ••<*>* hcaten by Ray Famcchon of ullh Thornton Health. Woklng. p. Ilelale Priory-in celebration of F „ r Rebceea. „ brlht fljure In Southern ,,|,„, wh j„ „„ d ye |low. broke • boxing rule when she began a %  .lie-all] chorus of vocal support bainl In shrill English -Twl. comer have :l,iii icntenary—and Railway (llayne. Park). A spokesiiLim of t'le Surrey flub iHkmmented: "the elubs hav been very good to enjr professionImd'her own"niili've "tong\i ,'.'.a .^ ""' W " V ' My n '' VPl 1" %  """er-. corne, irieki i the '" Ihc J d half %  % %  --1 :' v %  !• un nit: the ... : %  Sol %  The last | iff .. n ( >st and i hard Manning. Ken Malcol 9 n. rdr Swordfiih. i-. and Hertstrl Portill and Neitor Porllllo 1. TIM learns were:— Hilly Manning. Frank line, Del beet l.rowne T ive I..ii Clarke ud C.eornMcCk even to .i Bol'**: M. Foster. II. Patter un, II % %  h id put J.i lr tea I Johnson w Weathct i. n I. kah li .K d • %  %  ,ii Swordhsh: H. Woalherhead. .? two n .' %  Nrkan, D, Roeeo, II PortlUo, N. railed out Portillo, M. Fit/.(;.!aid an,; II if each Jones. Orate and Whlpporays: G. Greenidgc. H. Wt.ilherhend. A. Hunte. T Vi i %  i. I. Sus-nce. P. potto: and D Whipporny* O'Neal. WHAT'S ON TODAY Oils and Fats Conference 10 00 am. ( unit if Grand Sessions: 100 a.m. Court of Appeal: 10 00 a.m. Baskrt Ball al Y.M.P.C: 730 p.m. Film. ..; British Council 8.15 p.m. ASSIZE DIARY No. IS, Keg s. Joseph Brow > \o. 37. Ror.. \-> Jamo*. Itj*nrs 'Thank you.' Practical appreciation sort appeals to me I'm will appeal to the dubs, u Ley ton's Thanks Another nice gestura of thi nira i la keep aulec, and Mrs. Ank af.er tlie fli-st round, was moved to a Inm-h oh ilr %  Dtna yards from Ihe ringside. She took It all In good part ,l "' —L.E.S. MH i m I HMMMM MHMM SXJC^T—:' T-. %  %  %  : i :, -• %  ^ZZ^ZZ^Z^-itT* %  ? ~^~~ JUST IN TIME FOR THE HI it IS 11 \\ I SEASON ANEROID BAROMETERS Only a hunted number so select yours early and be piepared Also HURRICANE LANTERNS Es '" b ,h "' T. HERBERT LTD. mM 1860 10 & 11 Roebuck Street 1926 C',', ','-''.-.-* > %  .-.*.',',','*' ',-,%'.'.'.%',',*.',*.',*,*,',*,','.'.','*'*'-->'*'ss**,*s And she asked: IIH.OOII IN IIOSI CHINA They'll Do li Every Time By Jimmy Hatlo SABV SITTERS! /•rclSE.' >OU1?E MIRED TO *IIND ONE PRECOUS CMRLIhlS-... *g Jusi received WKIXIWool) IN BUNK CHINA and EARTHEN WARE DINNER SERVICES arc "burnable in each design DEVON SPRAYS KING-CUP ASHFORD China WHO MADE THE PERFECT TAPESTRY ON PATRICIAN GREEN LEAF HANANCULUS CORNFLOWER Etiltlien Ware Cave Shepherd & (.. Mil. 10, 11, \7 & 13 BROAD STREET SUIT YOU'RE WEARING? His Reply waa • • MAFFEI THE TOP CCOBERS IN TAII.OR1NG Prince Wm. Henry SI. >>,,,,,.,,, MM 1 THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. While Park Road, Bridgetown ENGINEERS. BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS Works contain modern appliances for the execution of lirat-ciass work of all kinds, and especially to SUGAR MACHINEP.Y and STEAMSHIPS Dealers in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY and GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES of all Description IRRIGATION PROJECTS. PUMPING EQUIPMENT and ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIALTY For Satisfaction. Quality and Servile Contact THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. Phone : 4546, 4650 Workshup Phone 4S28 Stoics Dept:





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Coalition Likely To Nominate Eisenhower Decisive Balloting. Probably Friday,\ V an F ,,H To TAFT GETS READY FOR SHOWDOWN Gives Taft Time To Regroup Forces CHICAGO. July 10, | A slop Taft coalition likely to nominate General Eisen-j hower for President of the United States was in control of| the Republican National Convention to-day. Eisenhower' Senator Robert A Taft and "favourite sons" whose stats' have faded, will be matched in nomination this afternoon or to-night But decisive balloting on the Presidential nomination probably will be postponed until to-rmrrow. That would (jive Taft followers lime to re-group their forces and devise strategy for recovery from the walloping they suffered in the "battle of ihe stolen delegates." The comparative standing of the candidates on the fourth Convention day was Taft 497 votes. Eisenhower 532. favourite sons and others 111. uiknown 66. Necessary votes to nominate are 604. This unofficial tabulation was based on pledges and known first Presidential ballot preferences. Yesterday's standings of leaders were Taft 550, Eisenhower 454. Those figures tell the story of n of those of Eisenhower. They swing toward Eisvnhowei. They wenon the losing dde. measure Ihe punishing effect of ( the rapid fire series of decisions? laughter which deprived Taft of *•> votes Printing of the list of Puerto from the southern states. Itican delegates and the difficulties Tuft's losses began yesterday of temporary Convention Ohalrwhen the Convention's Croden-jrnnn Waller llallan in prunouncHiiU Committee threw 13 contest-'Ing the Spanish Name* sent the ed Louisiana delegates to Elsen-. convention into gales of laughter hower. But the big break came*and enabled Murccdlno Romany last night when the Convention' not certified as a delegate by the Itself added 32 Texo* and Georgia Credential Committee to cast a delegates to Elsenhower's total, (lone Puerto Rican vote for ElsenThe Credentials Conduce had' hower It all started when Hector ruled for Taft in the Texas and Con/. Blanes. Chairman of the reiogni/ed delegation certified by On Page 1 E. German Reds Block Canals 10. BERLIN East German.*'* waterways adminialration has banned all West 1'erlin barges from East Berlin canaland the rlvei S Western (fflcials said to-day. Barges OWftaa b*. Government and use* for intar-citji transport have been *topp>v mi at Eat Berlin !ocks recently ihey said. The New East German measure was 'nit UlU> effect vesterda* One barge carrying Canadian wheat from n United States sector harbour to a French sector -tore was confiscated two days ago but wag released several hours later. We regard this at another pinpiick measure directed against West Beilin" a transport official said. The West Berlin police established 13 bsea on the border •' We=t Berlin and East Germ W, l The West Berlin city administration imnlem "uted the plan; halt the kidnapping of Anti-Communist, aj Ea>1 Germans barred West Berlin barges from Bag 4 Barltn waters The waterways between '.V.. i Berlin and Weal Germany running through the Soviet BOM PUD were open. Police sent three-man atmxf squads to noinls along the 70-mile Zonal border with orders to use arms to prevent a icpetlllon of Tuetnay'a daylight kidnapping bv Communist agents, of %  leading West Berlin anti-Communist. Police still had not carried out UM VJ: Government's order t-j erect barricades on streets connecting West Berlin and East Germany.—L'.P. On Fighting SEOCI. JuJj 10, I ieneral JaflBOg \ \ t .* ordered to-da %  l Is routine duties and %  Ki>'ing 'i., in J %  nujor streamlining of i-.. x il Mai w nark aonounts tl %  "M to take over multitude i>l I &f Sanertd Clark antv ined fi >m h* Tok>> %  swasuu/iUioii -will p. n efal Van Flee) to gtvp full rime %  %  IfMl again* Conununlal aggression in K' | I Command which will: .Include all Koraan tan Itpi la nreven; Communist raids Jnlo the Qf n oombal l Iind defend supfsV Ova* '" tranaportaUon lexviee and other aieiu-Us supporting hghtlim units Georgia contests. But Its finding was rejected by 607 to S31 m the Georgia roll call and by a voice vole on Uie Texas showdown.. Surrendered The General roll call revealed the dominant strength of the stop Taft coalition. The Senator's managers surrendered on Texas. The Convention must adopt permanent rules and a party platform. ,,, to*. d ove„ hoi? a^plo, -\2ZZZ, £,Z"u* A£W three more speeches before nating speeches begin. There was a rattle of dispute on one platform plank—Civil Rights. Some Southerners think it went too far, several negro delegates thought not far enough. But few have their minds on speeches or plalforam Ttaalr whoat attaotloB was focuaaed on the desperate eleventh hour infighting which will determine whether Taft can snap back: Into the delegate lead which he. held for so many months before the Convention. Taft is a ftsjhtcr and a dangerous man to count out too soon, but he has been giving ground for nearly a fortnight. The Puerto Rlcan three man VI to Hie Republican Na'ional Convention last Earthquake Jars Los Angeles Area LOS ANGELES. July 10. A slight earthquake jarred the Log Angeles area shortly before 2 ;.m. today but tlici,afSHSg no reports of damage. The quake downtown Los Angeles only ight shaking but In nearby l.'.nL. Beach, police said It was preceded by an explosion-like sound that frightened many reslThey said that in one nearby community, several persons who heard windows of their homes Mttll caU f d headquarters to port prowlers in the area.—UJP. P.N.P. MEMBER SUSPENDED KINGSTON. Julv 10 Bee: use Allan Coombs. P.N.P. member of the House of Representative* would not withdraw the remark that another member was the most stupid member in the House when he was called on bv the Speaker to do so. he has been night suspended from sitting for u voted two to one in the midst of month the greatest confusion to seat Taft This is a holiday for Coombi from Georgia instead) who will draw his salary.-C.F. uppot* I CCNFER ON PANMUNJOM TRUCE West Deliver Notes To Russia PARIS. July 10. The text of the Western Powers' reply to the last Soviet note on Germany will be delivered to Russia today. Thil announcement was made yesterday by French Foreign* Minister Robert Schuman after the meelinn of Cabinet Ministers when he said a enpy of the note had been sent to West Germany Chancellor Konrad Adenauer accompanied by an explanation why some recommendations have been om itted and others adopted. The note will be handed to Soviet Russia today by Ambassadors of the United States. Britain and France in Moscow. Schuman told Ihe meeting of Ministers that only "some admrial .diustmonta" had been made to The Western note since it wag drawn up In London on June 27. i The identic-it notes will tell Russia thai the West Is prepared to meet the Soviet to discuss the setting up of in nnj arti.il nmiiin sicn 'or investigating election prospects in East and West Germany. I Informed sources said the not." will be made public tomorrow morn in — V.P. Quads' Father Suffers Shock PORTLAND. Maine. July 10. SUaa Plnkham t:. ...r •J* csrpealer who*? wVe cave birth io quadruplet* Maataar la In hospital aufferlng rrom nervous rxhauslion. "He has not been able to %  leep since the quads were born" said Dr. Stanley Howe. "The shock of having faar babies all at mi -r and carrying on his dally work was too great for him. The doctor said he would keep Plnkham In bed for several days "so he ean rest." Plnkham collapsed last night while vlsitlne his wire at hospital.—I'.P SAIGON. ItKfc-ehliih.Julv I". franco Vietnam iroopa fighting an Important m-nsf*e in Annsm reported So Communist rebel* %  •tier The r'i : High Command ai %  %  t |Qu*dnile" launched on Mondaj Bght with torcai numb* •rai battalions to ittai iron;; points i Iluy lagoon, 21 miles of the Artil>niaaB oabltal "t Hui Tli.v ...i.l all the kllbsd ant 4 Victmlnl troops. Tliev • fVildiei liikc-i H bBOn I "" rminiM form during < i w 11 also fre* The An-i.ni! Imiu Iffl b i M gi \< ii Irc/iit with en I' paraUva handful ol fri pa hi i p P.risonere* Clash: 24 Injured PUSAN. Korea. July 10. It has been learned that 24 war prisoners were Injured, one seriously, in a fight between two Sisoner groups in a compound at unsau Camp. The compound held North Koreans who had declared themselves nnU-CommunItts. The clash started shortly after midnight yesterday, when some 40 prisoners, armed with clubs made I rum tent poles and stakes, began tearing tenls aoarl and attacking (other prisoners. U.S. guards armed with tear gas and bayonets broke up the fight shortly after, without using their weapons. In all. 130 prisoner* became involved In the melee. During the fighting 16 prisoners crawled under the barbed wire j surrounding the enclosure and | sought refuge with prison guards. • U.S. doctors treated the Injured J at the compound, fourteen were I j In hospital at Tailon. There were p no U.S. personnel hurt. -V.P. 6 Miners Die In Explosion GLACE BAY Nov.Scotia. Julv HI Dun choked rescue workers today crawled to the surface with the bodies of six miners killed in fin undersea coal mine explosion three miles on* the Atlantic Coast. Grim reie-ueteams sweating from the blistering heal. ,il*i hmui lit a critically iniured Seventh miner Irom the crumpled %  ha't. An ambulrnre whisked to hospital Ihe surviving nvner whoSi brother had been killed in the explosion. Doctors said he had %  uffered third degree burns. The extension which roefcad tha .My of :if000 oeople shortly liefore -nidnight. idled the mine w th ctebria and as and made rescue %  irations almi'st unbearable Authorities did not know the cause of Ihe blrst.—U.P. 50 Communist Rebels killed SMILING CONFIDINTIY. Sell. Robert A. Taft grasps Ihe hand of a wallwulirr shortly after his plane alighted in Chicago At right, in a wheelchair. i his wife. Although still suffering the aftartnath of a stroke, she Insists upon being at her husband's side. iInternational) \ mil lit r Fire At Warner KroUin ^ Flint gfudfo Julv in lit 'ii lues .n i|l .in Inng fni %  ,.. r %  n tl of the Warnei Brothi i Studio wnara mora than $i.r>iiIIOO worth of Mtg gn<] %  quipment a/an k litvad by tiame* thai Anally l>urnasl out in the hills. The Bit anoraa Lnaa tha blaga th ii raila i i '>f tttttsD | i' I %  M.I' it;, waa brougni uadM con trol late last night aftei ed about 75 acrethe hill!• hlod U I ittttUo. Total da range %  (jetwei'ii 14.500.000 Ofneers <-f the squad Investigated the po--ii In two dilfeiei.l Us the studio back lot— t'.r. Truce Talks Enter Second Year PANMUNJOM..?wK 1" Korean arttuslu-e iii-.'otialmns entered then ser-nrt v.n today with a 40-miiiutr M.iri session '(escribed bv ;> United Nations BpokMinan u"jual anotbar du?" TI.. i tramonyoi my kind of obacrvance at Pan i. ..il: tha OCCBJion. Truce talkers walked into ; -i, ., rtCa tant, talked for 40 minutes and walked tiators meat i ain .11 tl am Unsof iaa %  I %  New Wireleaa Equipnicnl For Police .%  %  |g o, (lll] %  hai arrivi-'i i pee-teel tha,j by the end II be put Into full Uon is batoa %  cctiic. Engineers• nd M. Uva or to tha arrival at about two week-. strategic %  %  •eta will t-e inked uti wuh is* i i i |of tiie lartp-4-t^ will lie inatalle.1 lying raaa. %  agh the countrv aaa System lauk.-t with this equipineni will i tarn. The laanaci pffovidaa % % %  | l'l!\ I sltuiited an up-totnri unit There will \i[y at with it.s 9 Switch sinity ( will ba hi' l will ho recorded all messoi;' I %  in tha eantra % %  ( tha — map of tna i .I and not many feel %  %  %  %  map of tha arttre Ii >f aructo oaacaton win plot Wie* exact atUU and %  0 on. The W exchange and the OH Potlca exchange which will l* uaa ara la alaaa proxin.ii\ .nut loariiv there Is a Dial uon! ha anlvad and > % %  bajng Inatallad, new and in. ne PAOblb will In la-Hight Inl I ba linked up %  Radioman Gets 5 Yeats For Spying 1.0NDON. July 10 i The young Brli radio operatoi William Hartbi j Marahall, has been eonvsQtad <>: j passing secret Informal Uplornml and aentenead llmtHv Approve Pay Raise tor Queen LONDON, ful| i" I ighi appi l. > IHM) a venr to run tha Royal Royal Initial of Hie outraged demands by l ton M I Parlianv n\ fen p i u' noun AfUn tha l onaarvath %  %  %  'inn iha bwlgat, srHhoul ndj M,0O0,0OQ 'Ota kB l\ve yv is imprisonment. A 12-maii jiir> found M II guilty on four charm of batray. ing Ins luunll^. but i %  r.1 the armistice ssrtks wch hnd natry ^ n flrtn pounl AT A U. N. FORWARD CAM* In Korea, Rear Admiral R. E. I-.bby (left) confers with Rear Admiral J. Daniel on the present status of tha Pan%  nunjom tmea talks. The latter, a destroyer flotilla commander, wU" raploce Libby as Navy delegate on the truce team. Citernaftonr*^ Battle Opens Over W. German Treaty BONN. Germany. July 10. era have maltreated Germany Chancellor -Konrad Adenauer These are the lines drawn in believes tbul West Germany can the battle to ratify the West remain free enly if it wholehcartGerman Peace Treaty and the Ina the Western military European Army Pact which Alliame The Socialist oppusiopened In the Lower House of tion contends that Russia has not '"* Bonn i vet shown its intentions towards Ir 'he two teams remain lined Germany. U P % %  ,hf,v were nt the start The Wet German Government Alenaucr sl.ouM have little l rou saya that the only chance of ever ble ,n wnning Lowar House apwinning a peaceful ..greement £"3L* hpn 'H 1 ^ r ^'" ' wi,h the RuSumTon Ga fffg^"* ,n "•* m anything but Kremlin term.. Bul hc has % n en u is for the West to rearm, but hurdles. The OppoMtmn control: Socialists insist that if Germany t^ Senate which has tht power i Western rearmament, fl f veto over both Russia will go to war. R 1* now reported that UH Adenauer claims Germany stltutional Court may decide that ha< received fair treatment fro'n rearmament Is unconstitutional. tiuWest particularly from tho If this happens Adenauer would United States, while Socialists have no alternative but to resten conuwids that the Western pov — t*J. Twenty Injured In Collision HAVANA, Cuba. July 10 More than 20 persons were injured, about half of them v;ncutly, when a loaded bus and u rmall train collided near Rum ho Boytros International airport .\ist night All the injured were l>u> I>assengers First report* '.aul Ihe Irtii driver attempled to b. at Ihe ir.in to crosslng._U.P. Concern For Eva Peron Dee/M*ns BUENOS AIRES July 10. An official medical bulletin bv ucd last .light disclosing that Ev.. Peron's health was "momentar.ly satisfactory" was suppresses< jtcday In all Buenos Aires papers with the sole exception of the English language "Buenos Aire Herald." They Instead printed editorial %  rtJclei itatlng th-t though i-VB was not physically present at yesterday's Independence faatmlUl in compliance with doctors' advice, that she should have abaoluUrest, & he was still there in spin: in the hearts of the people. Concern for Eva Heron's health was expressed toddy in quarterclose to Government House. The i nexpl.-tned fact that Peron did not go to his office this morning strengthened the view that her %  onditiun „i: LV nave worsenotf. IP The Navy Takes A Hand SEOUL, July 10, EMGHTH ARMY HEADQUARTERS said the First Marine Division *-* ii in action on the Western anchor of the Korean front including the truce site at Panmun)om It was formerly on the aait* •iround "the punchbowl" area. Marine* staged a heavy attack three days ago against deeply dugm Chinese two or three miles southeast of Panmun|om. Marines said Chinese had burrowed bunkers out of sheer rock off Korea's wet %  ..v-.r British naval units learned up for one of the moat active days m these waters in months Surface ships Including the Hritisi Belfast and the Australian Warnmuaga, pounded ant.-aircraft gui.s to the shore to keep them from firing. At the same time the BrTtl h aircraft earner Ocean, launched Sea Furies and Firefly rocket and .pud buildings, villages and military installations. Most of the attack was aimed at the peninsula wast of the North Korean capital or Pyongyang. Soans were knocked out of U and two highway bridges, three coastal gum were hit and a tra* . The Unit, day closed at a dwoun' of 2 13 If par cani In tat of I anadi funds up 13/16 close. Thai it look 97 3 16 een*a Canadian to buy fl Aniaftean. Ihe pounn 1,71, IJI%  •. from Tuesday. hi Now, KorK, Canadian dollar was down by ; i II i • premium of 1 15/ 14V p--i c %  %  term* of United Btataa funds m slaaing foreign ax* WediH-idav. The pour.. was down l of a cent at $2.70. vm\i i. m u. i;fini\\ OtBASAADOB To s/M/\ MUNICH, .Tnl, 10 Prince Adalbert of B mambeT of the rorrnei L ;i %  Hou-f of Wlttatanach, has accapt"in. post of Wi %  %  rman AmI asaador to Spain N( ws Ai;<-' Then has been no official ronl far thai the Prine,. the post— f.P. no will drafi %  .i I COVI Ing UM new i. %  I!. ;. Of COO .lily. In a live If dabat* : lacked %  %  tlm I r .1 I' .1.1 < %  Left W ... %  %  %  %  -,thai Butki luraad Into an H A Butti: Chi UM pi ii i %  Arguing for the budget increase : ; %  r Metal iCP) begun amid higli I n July 10, rn.iuoinvilllg III the Colifi'lelire lable was not "in Ihe Unlh i HI % %  %  ill he ,.!JI %  in military rnanu jii of Koraai talk) e|..(a-l,. %  rtani I %  i r II umworking IT mi" II. i i n Ind hi i ML tnig fi aaaenUal for mllltarj I the* iting with lain < KJ raan iruca talk II iddad l oniinunlsts had I g "countat pun iii thai than < i I He, di %  and unprincipled"'.—V.P. %  :. nfanei on II bal 1 I aan "led astray". Bai i 11 Mtounead Iha I antanei tba i out %  ( '" .'• %  taii of the fi I The i paratoi who larvad la iha hi acquired a : kiruj for ti* %  ..( lif• Bva-mmi Ing mi befora nnnounr—I'.P. Ilriininnim -imid** III. -Iran :<-%l %  •tir\ rvrr %  I lit IB bi a iii i Ihe "Sunda> Advitciir" hrims in reaaan the < I...,. tor>. (Ill WRONG HABV ItIK SIX VK.AKs |i„„ k rMU opy NOW A A • II I'HOT I CT iOlS Itarbtidiun Dies In Canada TORONTO, July 1 • %  %  %  %  netday Bon In ma to I Ida in ivtB I i %  i unt i f tha fan Playai Ha S**creiary Of ibool g ilo/en afflli-. ..'' l %  . .. %  Iha Cot -' %  .i (.In, C.l". Europe's Loss Is Korea 9 8 Gain WASHINGTON, July 10. Iln/ fundi Ifl fcW0pa, The an United States Airfur.. Bagn t n rdlly lurne.l Big •.II, ';irpatri. told newtinen totin day that the slow down in jel tinUghtai fighter r enabled tht UB of %  Me said larga ralnforei but will F 86 Sabrag and F H* Tnundai i. diati I Jets are t ting ... WITH BERGERTEX Wltil Baifartag, .. f„ r wa n, ( ,f Doajsvaaa. plaaagr, briok ot rtoaa w itat] m f tad aaalhai ra Bacaartag Maaot anek t %  %  ta^aanl part ol ii-, rasp i itl frt-li and -tnurt alnii*! intll I term %  F Fi Re "'several hurnii %  %  : r. %  K'iro| gramma Bui cord ng to roliabLa l low down Tr n Atlantic shipments owing iperata at foil st shortagei of air bases and opera—that is 2S plane 1 f I %  %  A fighter wing normally num%  %  %  fiezoexH riafgartaa U %  M i /* E /( 1 ivailahle in m BERGER PAINTS ON SALE AT ALL HARDWARE STORES GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTU-Agenti


}

E



; swing toward Eisenhower.





|
'

Pav bavos

ESTABLISHED 1895



Coalition Likely

Decisive Balloting

Gives Taft Time To Regroup

CHICAGO, July 10,

A stop Taft coalition likely to nominate General Eisen-
hower for President of the United States was in control of
the Republican National Convéntion to-day. Eisenhower, !
Senator Robert A. Taft and “favourite sons” whose stars!
have faded, will be matched in nomination this afternoon
or to-night.

But decisive balloting on the Presidential nomination
probably will be postponed until to-morrow. That would
give Tait followers time to re-group their forces anid devise
strategy for recovery from the walloping they suffered in
the “battle of the stolen delegates.”

The comparative standing of the candidates on the
fourth Convention day was Taft 497 votes, Eisenhower 532,
favourite sons and others 111, unknown 66. Necessary votes
to nominate are 604. This unofficial tabulation was based
on pledges and known first Presidential ballot preferences.

Yesterday's standings of leaders were Taft 550, Eisen-
hower 454.

Those figures tell the story of a of those of Eisenhower. They

They were on the losing side.

measure the punishing effect of |

the rapid fire series of decisions} are Laughter

which deprived Taft of 45 votes, Printing of the list of Puerto

from the southern states. | Rican delegates and the difficulties
Taft’s losses began yesterday'of temporary Convention Chair-

when the Convention’s Creden-!man Walter Hallan in pronounc-

tials Committee threw 13 contest-'ing the Spanish Names sent the

ed Louisiana delegates to Eisen-;convention into gales of laughter

hower. But the big break came'and enabled Marcedino Romany

last night when the Convention! not certified as a delegate by the

itself added 32 Texas and Georgia; Credential Committee to cast a

—





FRIDAY, JULY



» Probably Friday,
BR... ldots Kr orces

E. German Reds
Block Canals

BERLIN, July 10,

East Germany's waterways administration has banned all
Berlin barges from ‘East Berlin canals and the river Spree Western
cfficials said to-day. Barges owned by Government and used for
inter-city transport have been stopped and searched at. East Berlin
‘ocks recently they said.

The New East German measure was nut into effeet yesterday
One barge carrying Canadian wheat from a United States sector
harbour to a Freneh séetor store was confiscated two days ago but
was released several hours later. ‘We regard this as another pinprick
measure directed against West Berlin” a transport official said.

The West Berlin police establisheq 13 bases on the border of
on Berlin and East Germany to prevent Communist raids nto the

est. .
The West Berlin city administration implemented the plan to
halt the kidnapping of Anti-Communists as East Germans barred
West Berlin barges from Eas* Berlin waters. The waterways between
West Berlin and West Germany running through the Soviet zone sti!!
were open, .

Police sent three-man armed squads to noints along the 70-mile
Zonal border with orders to use arms to prevent a repetition of Tues-
aay’s daylight kidnapping by Communist agents, of a leading West
Berlin anti-Communist. Police still had not carried out the ity
Government's order to erect barricades on streets connecting West
Berlin and East Germany.—U.P.



a?

To Nominate

| On Fighting








delegates to Eisenhower's total.
The Credentials Comittee had|
ruled for Taft in the Texas and |
Georgia contests, But its finding |
was rejected by 607 to 531 in the;
Georgia roll call and by a roe
vote on the Texas showdown., |

Surrendered

The General roll call revealed |
the dominant strength of the stop
Taft coalition. The Senator’s |
managers surrendered on Texas.
The Convention must adopt per-
manent rules and a party platform
today, and even hear a couple or}
three more speeches before nomi-|
nating speeches begin.

There was a rattle of dispute on
one platform plank—Civil Rights.
Some Southerners think it went
too far, several negro delegates
thought not far enough. But few
have their minds on speeches or
platforms. Their whole attention
was focussed on the desperate
clevant hour sohep ting, wish

Ww ‘aft can
snap tack into the delegate lead
which -he, held for so many
months before the Convention.

Taft is a fighter and a danger-
ous man to count out too soon, but!
he has been giving ground for}
nearly a fortnight. i

The Puerto Rican three man





delegation to the Republican
National Convention last night!

voted two to one in the midst of
the greatest confusion to seat Taft
supporters from Georgia instead{

"CONFER ON PANMUNJOM TRUCE |

pres s Z



lone Puerto Rican vote for Eisen-
hower, It all started when Hector

Gonzales Blanes, Chairman of the

recognized delegation certified by
“ @ On Page 3



Earthquake Jars
Los Angeles Area

LCS ANGELES, July 10.

A slight earthquake jarred the
Los Angeles area shortly before
2 am. today but there were. no
reports of damage. The quake
gave,downtown Los Angeles only
a slight shaking but in nearby
Long Beach, police said it was
preceded hy an_ explosion-like
sound that frightened many resi-
dents,

They said that in one nearby
community, several persons who
heard windows of their homes
rattle, called headquarters to. re-
port prowlers in the area.—wU.P.

re nteeees
P.N.P. MEMBER
SUSPENDED
KINGSTON, July 10
Beccuse Allan Coombs, P.N.P.
member of the House of Repre-
sentatives would not withdraw the
remark that another member was
the most stupid member in the
House when he was called on by
the Speaker to do so, he has been
suspended from sitting for. a
month.
This is a holiday for Coombs
who. will draw his salary.—C.P.

AT AU. N. FORWARD CAMP in Korea, Rear Admiral R. E, Libby (left)
confers with Rear Admiral J. Daniel on the present status of the Pane .



West Deliver
Notes To Russia

PARIS, July 10.
The text of the Western Powers’ reply to the last Soviet
note on Germany will be delivered to Russia today. This
announcement was made yesterday by French Foreign
Minister Robert Schuman after the meeting of Cabinet
Ministers when he said a copy of the note had been sent
to West Germany Chancellor Konrad Adenauer accom-
panied by an explanation why some recommendations have
been omitted and others adopted.
ee eres The note will be handed to
Soviet Russia today by Ambassua-
’ dors of the United States, Britain
Quads’ Father
Schuman told the meeting of
Suffers Shock Ministers that only “some editorial
: adjustments” had been made to
PORTLAND, Maine, ,the Western note since it was
Silas Pinkham jm . }t. The identical notes will tell Rus-
ie carpder hier ate A vin that the West is prepardd to
gave birth w quadruplets meet the Soviet to discuss the set~
Monday is in hospital suff- ting up of an impartial commis-
tion, prospects in East and West Ger-
“He has not been able to | many.
sleep since the quads were |! Informed sources said the notes
born” said Dr. Stanley will be made public tomorrow
four babies all at once and
carrying on his daily work
was too great for him. 6 Mi Di
The doctor said he would Iners 1e |
| In Explosi
n xp osion
GLACE BAY Nova Scotia,
July 10,
j day crawled to the surface with
- the bodies of six miners killed in
an undersea coal mine explosion
three miles off the Atlantic Coast.

—————



several days “so he can rest,”
Pinkham collapsed last night
while visiting his wife at
hospital.—U.P.



and France in Moscow.

July 10, ‘drawn up in London on June 27.
ering from nervous exhaus- sion for investigating election
Rowe. “The shock of having | | morning —U.P.
keep Pinkham in bed for

| . Dust choked rescue workers to-

Prisoners Clash:
24. Injured

t Grim rescue teams sweating

PUSAN, Korea, July 10. from the blistering heat, also

It has been learned that 24 war brought a critically injured
prisoners were injured, one seri-



seventh miner from the crumpled

ously, in a fight between two hat

; ; att. An ambulance whisked to
prisoner groups in a compound at ; ; ; /
Munsan Camp. The compound hospital the surviving miner whose

brother had been killed in the
explosion. Doctors said he had
euffered third degree burns.

The explosion which rocked the
city of 30000 people shortly be-
fore midnight, filled the mine with
debris and as and made rescue
operations almost unbearable.

Authorities did not know the
cause Of the blest.—U.P.

held North Koreans who had de-
i themselves anti-Commun-
ists.

The clash started shortly after |
‘midnight yesterday, when some 40
prisoners, armed with clubs made
|from tent poles and stakes, began
tearing tents apart and attacking
; other prisoners,
lus. guards armed with tear gas
and bayonets broke up the fight
shortly after, without using their
;weapons, In all, 130 jelee. |





Concern For Eva

became involved in the melee. ;
During the fighting 16 prisoners , Peron Deepens
crawled under the. barbed wire
surrounding the enclosure and BUENOS AIRES, July 10.
sought refuge with prison guards.’ An official medical bulletin is-
U.S. doctors treated the injured } ‘sued last night disclosing that Eva
at the compound. Fourteen were | Peron’s health was “momentarily
in hospital at Taijon, There were!not satisfactory” was suppressed
no U.S. personnel hurt. teday in all Buenos Aires papers



—UP. with the sole exception of the
English language “Buenos Aires
° Herald.”
Twenty Injured They instead printed editorial

articles stating that though Eva
was not physically present at yes-
terday’s Independence festivities
in compliance with doctors’ ad-
vice, that she should have absolute

In Collision

HAVANA, Cuba, July 10






“veported 50

munjom truce talks, The latter, a destroyer flotilla commander, a
feplace Libby as Navy delegate on the truce team. (nterna



Battle Opens Over

More than 20 persons were in-
jured, about half of them seri-
ously, when a loaded bus and a
small train collided near Ran:ho
Boyeros International airport ‘ast
night. All the injured were bus
passengers,

First reports said the bus driver

rest, she was still there in spirit
in the hearts of the ple.
Concern for Eva Peron’s health
‘Was expressed today in quarters
close to Government House. The
unexplained fact that Peron did
not go to his office this morning
strengthened the view that her

W. German Treaty

BONN, Germany, July 10.

Chancellor -*Konrad Adenauer
believes that West Germany can
remain free only if it wholeheart-
edly joins the Western military
Alliance. The Socialist opposi-
tion contends that Russia has not
yet shown its intentions towards
Germany.

The West German Government
says that the only chance of ever
winning a peaceful agreement
with the Russians on Germany
on anything but Kremlin terms,
is for the West to rearm, but
Socialists insist that if Germany
joins in Western rearmament,
Russia will go to war.

Adenauer claims Germany
nas received fair treatment from
the West particularly from the
United States, while Socialists
contends that the Westerr

nov"

ers have maltreated Germany.

These are the lines drawn in
the battle to ratify the West
German Peace Treaty and the
European Army Pact which
opened in the Lower House of
the Bonn Parliament yesterday.

If the two teams remain lined
up as they were at the start
Adenauer shou!4 have little trou-
ble in winning Lower House ap-
proval when the third reading is
completed sometime in Septem-
ber or October.

But he has two even bigger
hurdles. The Opposition controls
the Senate which has the power
of veto over both treaties. Worse
it is now reported that the Con-
stitutional Court may decide that
rearmament is unconstitutional.
If this happens Adenauer would
have no alternative but to resign

—UP,

attempted to beat the train to “| condition may have worsened.

UP.



The Navy Takes A Hand

SEOUL, July 10,

Bae ARMY HEADQUARTERS said the First Marine Division

is in action on the Western anchor of the Korean front including
the truce site at Panmunjom. It was formerly on the eastern front |
around “the punchbowl” area.
, Marines staged a heavy attack three days ago against deeply dug-
in Chinese two or three miles southeast of Panmunjom. Marines said
pon gg had burrowed bunkers out of sheer rock off Korea’s west
coast.

British naval units teamed up for one of the most active days in
these waters in months. Surface ships including the British cruiser
Belfast and the Australian Warramunga, pounded anti-aircraft guns
on the shore to keep them from firing. At the same time the British
j aircraft carrier Ocean, launched Sea Furies and Fireflies to bornb
jeer and strafe occupied buildings, villages and military installa- |
| tions.

Most of the attack was aimed at the peninsula wast of the North
Korean capital of Pyongyang. Spans were knocked out of three rail
and two highway bridges, three coastal guns were hit and a trans-
‘former station damaged.—U.P.





1, 1952

}

Van Fleet To |
Concentrate

SEOUL, July 10.
General James A. Van Fleet
Was ordered to-day to ignore all |
qf nis routine duties and concen- |
vate on his mos} important job—
lighting the Korean War In a]



j@ajor streamlining of his United

Nations Command, General Mark |
W. Clark announeed the creation |
ft a “Combat Zone’ Command in|
Ss) tar tO take over a multitude of |

West * s» formesiy held by Van Ficet

meral Clark announced from
h&® Tokyo Headquarters that the
rear, ation “will permit Gen-
\@fal Van Fleet to give full time
ard attention to the vigorous
prosecution of the United Nations

j military effort against Communist
ite Ne in Korea.” ;

The New Command which will
include all Korean territory south |
of.the combat zone, will operate
and defend supply, evacuation, |
transportation service and other
agencies supporting fighting units

—U.P.



50 Communist

Rebels Killed |

SAIGON, Indo-China, July 10.

Franco Vietnam troops fighting
an important offensive in Annam
Communist rebels
killed and 57 taken prisoner, The
French High Command announced
the first report’ on Operation
“Quadrilie’ launched on Monday ,
ight. with forces numbering sev-|
@ral Dattalions to attack Commu-
Nist strong points near the Cau
Hiay lagoon, 21 miles south-east
af the Annamese capital of Hue.

They said all the killed anc}
prisoners were regular Vietminh
troops. They said 30 Vietn m|
foldiers taken prisoner by Com-
munist forces during earlier en-|
counters were also freed

The Annam front in central |
Indo-China has been the “for
gotten" front with only a com-
parative handful of French end
native troops holding some, 20,000

rebels.—U.P,

Another Fire At
Warner Brothers
Filnt Studio

BURBANK, Celifornia,
July 10

Detectives are searching for
evidence of arson in the back lo
of the Warner Brothers’ Film
Studio where more than $4,500,-|
000 worth of sets and equipment |
were destroyed by flames that!
finally burned out in the nearby;
hills,

The fira
worse than



described as much}
the blaze that razed |
25 acres of studio property la tl
May 16, was brought under con- |
trol late last night after it cover-
ed about 75 acres and swept into
the hills behind the studio, }

Total damage was estimated at
between $4,500,000 and, $6,000,000.
Officers of the Sheriff's arson
squad investigated the possibility
that the fire was started yesterday
by an arsonist and pointed out that
it apparently began simultaneous-
ly in two. different locations on
the studio back lot.—U.P.

Canadian, U.S. § |

MONTREAL, July 10

The United States dollar Wednes-
day closed at.a discount of 2 12/1
per cent, in terms of Canadian
funds up 15/16 from Tuesday's
close.

That is, it took 97 3/16 cents
Canadian to buy $1 American,
The pound sterling was $2.71, uy
from Tuesday.

In New York, Canadian dollar
was down by 11/32 cent at a
premium of 2 15/16 per cent. i
terms of United States funds in
closing foreign exchange dealings
Wednesday. The pound sterling
was down } of a cent at $2.79,

(CP)

PRINCE IS W. GERMAN |
AMBASSADOR TO SPAIV |







MUNICH, July 10
Prince Adalbert of Bavaria, a
member of the former Royal
House of- Wittelsbach, has accept-
ed the post of West German Am-

kassador to Spain a West German]

News Agency said today. There,

has been no official confirmation so}

far that the Prince
the post.—U.P.

offered

was



WASHINGTON, July 10.

United States Airforce Secre-
tary Gilpatrig, told newsmen to-
day that the slow down in jet
fighter shipments to Europe has
enabled the United States Al'r
force to boost jet strength in the
Korean war by 30 to 40 per cent
He said large reinforcements of
F 86 Sabres and F 84 Thunder
jets are being dispatched to the

Far East He used the tern
“several hundreds’
It was learned that a great rn
jority of these planes—the F 84’
originally were destined for
European airforces under the



inight approv







Eisenhower

TAFT GETS READY FOR SHOWDOWN i.

S



SMILING CONFIDENTLY, Sen. Robert A. Taft grasps the hand of a well-
wisher shortly after his plane alighted in Chicago, Atright,ina wheel-
chair, is his wife, Although still suffering the aftermath of a stroke, |
she insists upon being at her husband's side, (International) |

Truce Talks inter
Second Year

PANMUNJOM, July 10. |

Korean armistice negotiations entered their second
year today with a 40-minute secret session described by a,
United Nations spokesman as “just another day.”

|

There is no ceremony or any kind of observance at Pan-
munjom to mark the occasion. Truce talkers walked into |
the green conference tent, talked for 40 minutes and walked

|
: ie |
out again. Negotiators meet again at 11 a.m. tomorrow.

Brigadier General Nuckols who
has served as Liaison Officer be-!

House Approve |e the truce talks team and the

press gave his impressions toda)
. - oy
Pay Raise

E the armistice talks which Rad
For Queen

begun amid high hopes at Kaesong
on July 10, 1951.

He said manoeuvring at the
“in the
officers,
have

was not
States

should
manuals as

Conference table
book" for United
but he believed it
military

LONDON, July 10

The House of

Commons last

da pay raise for the] place in

Queen, giving her £475,000 a year} result of Korean truce talks ex-
to run the Royal household. The [| perience

decision increasing the Royal bud-

eet by £865,000 over that of the It hae become important for
late

demands by a seore of Labour] tevious and nefarious working

Members of
to £250,000

Parliament for a cut} Sommunist mind” he svid. “This
knowledge is essential for military
»perations against the Communists
is well as for

hem,”

After the Conservative Govern-
ment’s majority defeated
to trim the

approved it

negotiating with

Labour
budget,
without

amendments
the House .
vote 1¢ added Communists had shown

themselves to be “counter punch-

‘
King cume despite 2 li military men to understand the

During the Korean truce talk |



! Government now will draft a ers” rather than «constructive
ill covering the new budget. Its| negotiators, He described Com-!
iwceeptance by the killed. crafty

nons is only a formality,

In-a lively debate, Socialist
Members attacked the whole pomp
nd pageantry of the a chanae |

House of Com-j}munist delegates as
aa unprincipled”’.—U.P,

nd said it was time for a change A N D P R

Left Winger Emrys Hughes even |
uggested amid shocked cries from
ervative benches that Buck-
ingham Palace be turned into an
apartment house,

ons

R. A. Butler, Chancellor of the}
Exchequer retorted that the idea
would be opposed by the majority
of Britons

Arguing for the budget increase



Butler iid the simplification of

the Queen’ official functions
vould be welcomed,-—(CP)

|

nol 2 |

Barbadian |

Dies In Canada

TORONTO, July 10.

Noel Gaskin Barrow, 59, Secre-
tary of the famous Players Cana
dian Corporation, died here Wed-!
nesday Born in Jarbados,;:
Barrow came to Canada in 1918
when he became Secretary of the
Canadian Paramount Corporation
in Torontg, Canadian forerunner
f the famous Players. He
Secretary of about a dozen affili~
ates of the famous Players, and
was a charter member of the Cor-}
poration’s 25-year Club.—C.P.



was

With Bergertex, cthere’s new beat

tone

| | wea 2 aster, brick
Kurope’s Loss ines
Is Korea’s Gain

} part of the wall on which it is pai
fre



Be
ting funds in Europe. The air del
force readily turned the situa-
tion to good advantage loading out
the fighters aboard navy aircraft
carriers for the Orient

The shipment of F 86 and Vl
F 84's is believed to total about
200 plane They will not be
used to form new 1 bi il B
be distributed among two bre
ind three Thunder jet wings no
in the Far East to provide the
with ample spare rceraft some-

thing that been’ lach

unit ince





military aid programme. But ac juadron +

cord'‘ng to reliable reports, it was out that with the reinforceme AT ALL HARD
necessary to slow down Trans- r at hand, squa

Atlantic hipment owi kk te

shortage f air bases and C



has arrived
installed at
expected th
month the s
operation.

srr iA



PRICE : FIVE CENTS

New Wireless
Equipment
For Police

The
nent

new VHF wireless equip-
for the Police Department
and is now being
Headquarters. It is
yal by the end of this
will be put into full







The ins ion is beipg super-
vised by @ rts from the Gov-
ernment ectrice Engineers’

Department, and Mr, D, E. Stuart,
Pye’s Barbados Representative.
Prior to the arrival of the set

about two weeks ago, wireless
masts were erected at strategic
points throughout the island, and

smaller tranfmitting and receiving

sets will be linked up. with the

main set at Headquarters. One

of the large sets will be installed

at Castle Grant for relaying mes-

sages through the country areas.
999 Svstem

Linked with this equipment wil!
be the 999 telephone system. The
layout at headquarters provides
for the installation of a P.B.X.
near which is situated an up-to-
date map control unit. There will
be the VHF set with its 999 Switch
Board and in very close proximity
will be forms on which
will be recorded ‘all messages re-
ceived and transmitted,

In the centre of the room is a
map of the city area, .and not
many feet away another map of
the entire island, on both of which
operators will plot the exact
position of their mobile unjts and
so on. The 999 exchange and the
08 Police exchange which will be
for regular use are in close prox-
imity, and nearby there is a Dial
Director,

Now that the equipment ha:
arrived and is being installed, new
and more mobile units will be
brought into service arid these will
be linked up with -ireless at
Headquarters and the larger out-
stations

Radioman
Gels 5 Years
For Spying

JONDON, July 10.

The young British Foreign Office
radio operator, William Martin
Marshall, has been convicted of
passing secret information to a
Russian diplomat and sentenced
to five years imprisonment. A
12-man jury found Marshall, 24.
guilty on four charges of betray-
ing his country, but cleared him at
\the direction of Justice Sir Patrick
Barry on a fifth ‘count, a

The jury asked for the “utmost
leniency” on the ground that
Marshall had been “led astray”.
Barry pronounced the five-year
sentence after clearing the court-
voom at the start of the afternoon
ession to hear further secret evi-
dence

The operator who served in the
British Embassy in Moscow where
he acquired a liking for the Soviet
way of life, tapped his foot lightly
1s Barry read the tense five-min-
ute summing up before announc-
ing the sentence.—U.P.
ee eeeceSeScnensesnstnsheeeipnenssistusanis aetna



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PAGE TWO



Caub ¢

MACNIE

Secretary of

Mâ„¢ 0: -





€ Isla uy throu
i esterday morning by T-
Trinidad en reute to Van
couver f au holiday
M Maenie is now Managin
Director of the Sugar Producers’
A-sociation in British Guiana
Medico Returns
WYER. agd Mrs. Charlie M
DD Mrs, M. Tupper and her iwo
idien from the U.S.A. were
rrival from Canada yesterday
morning by T.CA
°
Dr. Manning who left here two
weeks ago for a holiday in Can-
ada, hoq to cut it short own: )
the illness of his father.
Mrs. Tupper whe is Dr, Char-
lie Manning's sister, has com
down to see her father.

Canadian Pilot

R. AND MRS. A. SMITH

Montreal, returnéd to Ca-
ada yesterday morning by TA
after spending two weeks’ holi-
day as guests at Rockley B cn
Club. They were accompanied by
their little son, Richard.

Mr. Smith is a pilot with T.C.4

in Montreal,

To Reside In U.S.A.

RS. ELIZABETH HONE
CHURCH of Gomier Estat
Dominica, left yesterday
T.C.A. for Bermuda on her
to the U.S.A. to reside with her

wuy





A. R. STARCK

U.K. Trade Commissioner
] NTRANSI'’ from Trinidad by

T.C.A,. yesterday morning wis
Mr. Aubrey R. Starck, O,.B.E
U.K. Trade Commissioner for the
British West Indies. He has gone

up to Bermuda on an official
visit and will be returning next
Whursday
On Business
R. A. D. PvAGE, Service
Representative for the Aus-

tin Motor Company of England,
children in Connecticut. She was operating from their Caribbean
here for the past two weeks as 1 Office in Kingston, Jamaica, left
guest of her son-in-law and yesterday morning by 3B.W.1.A.
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Frank for Antigua and Puerto Rico be-
Collymore of Chelsea Road. fore he returns to his headquar-
ters. He spent about three daiys
Spent Two Weeks in Barbados on business and was
n guest at the Ocean View Hotel.
FTER spending two weeks’ Mr. E. Rogers, Factory Repre-
holiday in Barbados as 1 sentative cf the same Company
guest at the Cosmopolitan Guest who came out with Mr. Page, is
House, Mr. Byron M, Devonish 91 remaining here until Tuesday
Brooklyn, New York, returned when he returns to Jamaic:
home yesterday morning by 4 at
B.W.LA. via Antigua and Puerto Marketing Officer
Rico. AYING his first visit to Bar-
A Barbadian, Mr. Devonis? had Johr og ‘aiatiehind ra B
been residing in the U.S... since N issaU bahamas. He is the eldest
1922. His last visit to the island other j Canon A. W. Johnson,
wae 10 1934. He ro wholesaic Ree .cr of St James, Rev A. I

clerk working with the

and is also Executive Secretary
of the Uniteq Action Democrati
Society.

Medical Student

ETURNING
yesterday morning

Bert Reece, a first year medical
Btudent at the University College
He is a on of Mr. C. Nigel Reece
of Society, St. John, and has come
over to spend his summer holidays
with his relatives.



The Last Girl BY ‘THE WAY . ... 8) Beachcomber |

To Leave
Aly’s Party

Lovely Lise Stays Till

The Dawn

From SYDNEY SMITH
PARIS,

exclusive and most
expensive party of the Paris
summer season, given by Aly
Khan, ended at 4.45

The first birds were stirring
and the sky was brighter than
the crystal chandeliers in, the res-
taurant among the trees of the
Bois de Boulogne. on the outskirts
of Paris, when the last two people
left. They were Aly Khan him-

Tae most

firm of
Jaxton Clothing Co. of New Yerk

from Jamaica

by
B.W.LA. via Trinidad was Mr.

Johnson, *
Canon A. C
Grenad

Mr. . on arrived yesterday
morning by B.W.I.A. via Trinidad
and will b> spending four weeks’
holiday with his brothers. He was
accompanied bh sister, Miss
Dorothy Johnson.

car of St. David’s and
Johnson of Gouyave,

American Consul

R. H. O. RAMSEY,
ean Consul

Ameri-
stationed here,
returned from Trinidad yester-
day morning by B.W.LA. after
a very short business visit.



MA® nurses at a hospital are
complaining that the braid
on their trousers gets them mis-

taken for hospital porters, That
is nothing.
The gorgeously dressed com-

missionaire outside a certain fim
theatre was mistaken for a Peru-
vian Admiral by a _ diplomat
On leaving the theatre, the diplo-
mat insisted on taking the Admiral
home with him for a drink. The
commissionaire played up, until
the diplomat’s wife said; “Have
your people built a new ship late-
ly”? “‘No fear!” said the Admiral.
“My people run a_ tobacconist’s
shop in Hounslow. Why should
they build ships’? A diplomatic
silence greeted this thunderbolt
Pibney St. Vitus
ROFESSOR O. K. McTOOT-

self and lovel Lise, ¢ "
France’s No, 1 Siveraai Tee ZIE met Mimsie Slopcorner
This was the biggest party Aly for the first time today, and

has yet given for his annual cele-
bration of the Grand Prix race at
Longchamp, just a mile away.

There were 180 guests, and it
lasted eight hours,

The Aga Khan, defying doctor's
orders in a wheel-chair, presided
at a table decorated with a model
in lace of Longchamp racecourse.

The Duke of Windsor, in a mid-
night blue dinner jacket, presided
at a second table, decorated with
models of Elizabethan warships.

And France’s first soldier and
only marshal, Alphonse Juin, was

at the head of the third table,
which had model cannons.
The Duchess of Windsor was

there in a white off-the-shoulder

dress; Across it-was-a-great scarlet

sash pinned with rubies.
The Begum Aga Khan

was

there and the jewelled Mahara-
nees of Baroda and Jaipur in
saris.

Paris society women, eagle-eyed
for signs of “romance,” watched
Aly Khan dancing.

I heard one woman guest say :
“But, my dear, he dances with
every woman as though she is the
only one he could possibly love—
how can you tell?”

Well—partner Lorraine Dubon-
net, 23-year-old wine heiress,
left well before the stars began to
pale. Singer Dany Dauberson flew
straight back to the South. But 27-
year-old Lise Bourdin, who stayed
tili sunrise, is still in Paris,

—L.E.S.

$1.00 $1.00 $1.00



showed her drawings of the kind
of helmet he thought Boadicea
shoula wear. He did not disguise
the fact that he found her in-
tensely stupid She said, “Isn't
it very heavy?” “Every thing wa*

heavy in those days’, snapped
MeTootzie., “And what's the
shield for?” asked Mimsie, “In

case they pelt you with things,”
replied the professe savagely.
“No need to be rude,” said Mim-
sie, “Every need,” said MeTootzie
And at that point Mrs. Golbrand
averted a scene by talking of her
spaniel, Esmond,
Twenty years of uproar
T READ of a conductor that “He
showed little sympathy with
the singers,” and even “ignored
their attempts to make themselves
heard.” That gives me an ex-
quisite picture of a tenor trying to
attract the conductor’s attention,
shouting “Hi!” between bars, and
making grimaces eloquent of
anger and frustration. If I were
a conductor, not only would T have
no sympathy with these queer
people, but I would be actively
hostile, as Ni‘wity was to Rusti-
guzzi, When he d-liberntely sub-
stituted Act II of Lohengrin for
Act Ul of La Bohe ne. There was
Mimi, lost and du

founded, and
looking very sil) ’ wrong
costume,
Education
OURGOUILLOU! Such igno-
rance f the el/ments 9 of
polite living! “The Riv Ariége,”

——- arene

CLEARING ODD LOTS DRESS GOODS

CREPES,

PLAIN,

SPUNS,
FLOWERED,

STRIPED,

Back From St. Vincent
ye 5 DOROTHY BARROW of
- B Hal] returned

Road



morning by B.G. Air-
from St. Vincent where she
t t he nnual holiday
Arrivil by the same oppor-
nity frem St, Vincent was Mi
Barrow of River Road who
is holiday! 1g there for the past
x weeks,

Kector Returns
1 EV. H.V
TM f St
Canada
returned
T.C.A,
by Mrs

B.G. Civil Servant

R. E. S. DOUGLAS, Super-

vieor of the Co-operative
Credit Banks ettached to the De-
partment of Agricul‘ure in British
Guiana, errived here yesterday
norning by B.W.LA. via Trini-
dad for two weeks’ holiday. He
was accompanied by Mrs. Doug-
1s and they are guests at “Leaton-
n-Sea”, The Stream.

To Study Nursing

RRIVING from St. Vincent

yesterday morning by BG.
Airways was Miss Margaret Ab-
bott, daughter of Mr. and Mrs,
W. J. Abbott of Kingstown, She
will be here until Sunday as a
guest of Rev. and Mrs. W. Harvey-
Read of Garden Gap, Worthing,
when she leaves by the Colombie
for England to study nursing at
the Royal Surrey County Hos-
pital.

‘ Philip
for
yesterday m¢
He wa accom-
Armstrong.

who went
ip to
ealth

by
panied

Enjoyed Holiday

FTER what he described as

very enjoyable holiday, Mr.
Max Erdwurm of New York left
yesterday morning by B.W.LA.
for Puerto Rico intransit for St.
Thomas where he will spend a
few days before returning to
New York. He was accompanied
by his wife. They had spent one
month haere as guests at Maresol
Flats, St. Lawrence Gap,

Mr. Erdwurm is working for
the Naticnal Advertising Depart-
ment of the Néw York Times. He

id that he was certainly not
ooking forward to the heat in
New York, but hopes to be baci
here soon again for a hceliday

Intransit
JAMES FORBES, Man-
ager of the Cocoa Planters
Association in Trinidad, was in-
transit yesterday morning by
T.C.A, on his way to Toronto for
medical treatment.

Talking Point

Don't forget to speak scornfully
of the Victorian age. There will
be time for meekness when you
try to better it.—J. M. Barrie.

R.

it says, “rises in the lake of
Naguilles.” It does) no such thing.
Naguilles is above the ancient
forge of Orlu, the oldest forge
in the world, Ariége, my own
Ariége, risés in the lake of Font-
Négre, 7,600 feet up, I know its
boyhood, as it goes leaping along
by Hospitalet and down to Ax
and les Cabannes, where it meets
the Aston. Together they go chat-
tering along to Tarascon (not
Tartarin’s), and so to Foix and
Pamiers. There used to be gold
in these parts, and as late as the
eighteenth century people were
ecarching for it in the mountains.
{ would sooner have the dark
wine they drink in Vicdessos,







CROSSWORD



Across
1. ty ied cord amended. of course
)

5. Found tn all c!b oarsmen,
Â¥. You're
(5)
0. [t's played to an audience, (4)
. And tf played well will this (9)

(4)
4 falr way out in this

t

11

13. Ruminants take tea, (5)

15, Semi-round but unsound. (4)

18, Produces a sticky wicket ? (5)

20. Open; able before accomplished
, 1 22. Ragged penetrator. (6)

24. He ts used to turnover, (3)

24. Chilly but I'd follow the gel. (5)

Down
Way to tend the race. (4)
Way to an outer. (5) Z
At the bar .t’s darmming. (4)
On many farme either explosive
or earthy. (9)

. It could be a eiuse tie. (4
Let's Drag about boats. (5
Hoider, (4)

Start of rags anc

. Pardon the merit.

eRe

tatters,

(

Rated as commerce, (5)
. The sap belongs to me,

Cold dice, (4)

Unytetding. (4)

Mare that will carp. (3)
Solution of Saturday's purzle.—Across
\ Neglect; 8. Orgatiged, 11, Trait; 12
tha 15. Boa; 15, Crown; 17 Wh

ann 24, Sheep dog;
Down. 1

(4)

(4)

KSIGe SIS





$1.00

SILKS.
CUECKS,

ALL AT ONE DOLLAR YARD.

PLAIN VOILES AND FANCY ORGANDIES



T. R EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE

STORES



DIAL 4606

ARMSTRONG, Rev-|

reasons of!

oO

BARBADOS



Knart, Hanid Heard a Noise

—And They Decided to Investigate It—

By MAX TRELL

KNAREF heard the noise first,
and went and told his sister Hanid
about it. “It sounds like digging,”
he sa “It comes from the o*'i-r

of the garden wall, Buc when
look ad over the wat J couldn't

nything being dug. So f don"t

} iknow what % can be.”
Hanic decided to take a look ry,
elf. Knarf went with her Yo

nunother look

A few minutes later they were
oth looking down at the ground
| (rom the top ef the wall. The sound |
ot ewing came up quite cleariy
| But nothing eould be seen. The
| trees, che bushes and the vines ail
remained still, Only the grass
moved a little just beside the fallen |
| trunk of the old apple tree. But |
that, as Knarf said, “might just be
| the wind.”
| Vhe Other Side

Then Hanid climbed down off the
wail and dropped on the other side,
with Knart following right after
her. They both walked over to the
trunk of the old apple tree and care-
fully watched the grass.

“There isn’t a bit of wind and |
it w moving!” exclaimed Hanid.

“Yes, it is!”

“Someone’s digging under
Knarf!”

“Who can it be?”

Hanid put her ear on the erofna,
at just the spot where the trass
was moving, “I hear the noise! It’s |
right under here!” At that Knarf |
and Hanid both started digging!
with their hands. A few moments
later the whole top of the ground
fell in, grass und all; fell into a
hole. The next instant Blinky Mote’s



it,

head came up, He looked around, |

rubbing his eyes in the bright li¢ht,
trying to see who had broken into
his house, and what for?

“Who's here?” said Blinky. “Who
just made a hole in my roof?”

“Oh! Blinky!” said Hani. “We
didn’t know it was you duwn there,
digging!”

“We heard the noise,” said Knart,
“but we couldn’t see anybody.”

By this time Blinky’s eyes finally
got used to the bright light a little,
and he was able to see Knarf and
Hanid. He smiled. “Oh, it’s all right.
Not too much damage. | can build
another room just as good. | should

sky.
| 55-year-old
Airways.
Until he exchanged his cockpit
seat for an administrative chair
in the corporation’s operations de-
partment at the end of the war,
Captain Armstrong was one of
Britain’s best-known civil air
pilots,

He pioneered the London-Paris
route just after the 1914-18 war.
He made historic flights for
Imperial Airways between the
wars, and flew on many diplo-
matic flights, including trips to
Russia, during the last war.

Poverty

Now Captain Armstrong
written a book* telling
became a flier.

In 1911 he
wanted to fly.

“But quickly I put away this
thought,” he says. “I would not
fly; it was out of “the question.
Why should I think of doing such
a thing? I, who was the son of
people living in poverty.

“My parents’ home, like so
many thousands of others in the
industrial north country, was
small and cramped; and I knew
that my mother found it difficult
|to make ends meet,
| Young Armstrong worked in
factories, and hated it. He seeth-
ed with rebellion against the
| conditions,

Finally, he was lucky enough to
be engaged by a firm of pharma-
ceutical chemists. In 1917 he
| joined the Royal Flying Corps and
became a bomber pilot.

Collapse
In 1919, Armstrong flew for Air

Opening To-day 2.30 & 8.30
and Continuing daily 4.45 & 8.30
at



has
how he

realised that the







it’s the midnight
affair that shook
Washington
| Square

| » «with
| laughter!






starriog
JOAN

| AOA

JOUN



J

| ai

| FAWN
7 NATOHELL LEISHN

pRooeCTION

2

Produced by HARSY TUGEND
' Brrecte MITCHELL LEISE®
OUNT PICTUR







ad Lesser Saments
TRY. THE FIRE, by



Extra:
Short:— TAR WITH A STAR
and Latest British News Reel

ADVOCATE




At Work. Then you would have
known.” b

Knart and ‘Hanid asked Blinky
why he was building more rooms
to his house. “You've got fifteen or | feet,
twenty rooms already,” said Hanid. | look narrower, wear shoes built;
“And you live in them all alone
Why do you need more?”

“Expecting guests,” said Blinky,
sitting down and lighting his pipe.
He struck his match on the bottom
of his shovel,

“Guests, Blinky?”

“They'll -be here in a few weeks.”
“My goodness,”
“You’re the busiest person 1 know
You work day and night all through
the Spring, and Summer and Fall.
And then, when the winter comes
and you have a chance to rest, you
invite a house-full of guests.”
Blinky nodded. “But they’re no
trouble, no trouble at all, They’ll |
come,* they'll say hello, I’ll show
them to their bedrooms, and they'll
go to sleep. They won’t wake up
until the Spring. Then they'll say
good-bye and
away again.
You see,” he said, “it’s Frog, and
Willy Toad, and Blackie the Beetle,
and Cricket, and maybe a grass-
hopper or two, and a few spiders.”
Willy chuckled. “Very sleepy win-
guests.
Well—I'd better get to work again.”
And he knocked the ashes out of
his pipe, smiled, and went down inte |
have put up a sign,” he said. “Mole | his hole

The Flying Pharmacist ea

Became Ace
Now He Is A B.O.A.C. Chief

JAMES STUART

FORTY-ONE years ago a 14-year-old poor Tyneside lad
watched one of the earliest airplanes plodding through the
Now he is Captain William (“Tim”) Armstrong, DFC,
airfields superintendent

ter



Transport and Travel, one of the
original airlines operating between
Hounslow and Paris.
of the first twelve civil pilots.
Then came collapse. The Gov-
ernment were not prepared to do
anything for aviation, and civil

{lying temporarily closed down. : vate
Armstrong, newly married, re- ete oe an a a deainee a ie Sen kaaetel Pare

turned to pharmacy. PARAMOUNT Presents _ on, Oe oEnee
He studied hard and qualified Joan FONTAINE—John LUND and

as a pharmacist, then accepted a
job at £3 10s. a week.

But in 1924, however, he joined
the new
flew again on the European routes,

And to cover
a second failure of civil aviation,
Armstrong set up a pharmacy and
put a manager into it.

new routes,

: : . : na ;

Armstrong went on flying until | storting vs “RAINBOW OVER TEXAS" (

2 ww ta ” a
1930 when for a short time he be-| ANN GENE ee ate Or MANZO" ss -_———--
came Imperial Airways’ manager 5 EV, ROYAL
in Cairo. The following year he| DVORAK ANS OLYMPIC ; To-day only 440 & 8.15
returned to England and started gm F : To-day to Monday 4.30 & 8.15 Scott BRADY—Richard BASEHART
A CCC CCEULONM Creal MARK W. CLARK ‘The Four MASS Brent cad te “HE WALKED BY NIGHT”
survey flights over the Far East eins agree tenie AFLAMING FEATHER” — Mo te and
in preparation for the opening of MEMORY LANE”
stn DOUGLAS KENNEDY - RICHARD LOO + LISA FERRADAY + PHILIP AWN

is i Produced . io Sunda 4.20 & BW
‘alee. heesdtaeas Sine el aoe, ‘Sect SEO sy Ne eet te ROAD’ and “Pail” ROBESON Leni ne
Ss " in
Slovakia from England to Ru: ee. “DON'T FENCE ME IN" i river”
in January, 1944," = PLAZA PARBAREES agro or: Sere! a
William Armetrono | iam rmstrona and for ® RICHARDSON
Hieem, 1883 fi TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.30 p.m. | Balph Seal

“Who's there?” Blinky asked.

es,
high bows or ‘apron’ fronts give

a A Few Weeks - Hengtn anc slimness to a short,
“Winter guests,” said Blinky, |proad foot. Four-holé lace-up



SENSATIONAL J



a8 Captain Quincy Wyatt, |

wm MARL ALDON _.
as the captive beauty “."

coun ne wl VEN BUSCH © MARTIN RACKIN

onesie oWARNER BROS,
PLAZA
{

; TO-DAY 2.30, 4.45 and 8-30 p.m.)
j and Continuing Daily 4.45 and)

« UNITED STATES PICTURES marron |



FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1952

“a

- BEAUTY
WITH SHOES}

THE DESIGN of a shoe ean change the look of a foot



OCSSSSOOS OSORIO ODOOES.
THE GAS COOKER

With Everything U Want

SIZE!
LCOKS !

THERMOSTATIC CONTROL |
and it’s easy to keep clean.
See them before it’s too late.

your Gas Showroom, Bay



At
3 Street
as completely as a hair-style can a face. A large foot can) % ONES A. Fee eee
| appear sizes smaller, a broad foot much narrower, in the] 4¢¢ 2DOPOBOHSE 7D OW
| OOo", FREES PSO



right shaped shoe. These are good basic rules to follow Gc Al & a ¥

The Garden—St, James
Te-day & Te-morrow 8.30 p.m.
‘iuetud?OW 18 ANOTHER DAY’

Steve COCHRAN &

INLY the VALIANT Gregory PECK
MIDNITE (Specia.) SAT.
GOLDEN STALLION’ Roy ROGERS
“WELLS FARGO GUNMASTER”
hocky LANE
Sun. & Mon. 890 p.m
Mat. Sun. 5 p.m
“DODGE crry”

Erro! FLYNN

| when choosing shoes from the point of view of their beauty,
| but don’t forget that this comes second to good fit.

} For Long, Narrow Fett. High the ankle. High built shoes, in-
heels, open toes, sling backs, step—and especially ankle straps
‘asymmetric, straps, trimmings or —fore-shorten the leg and make
strappings runnimg across rather the ankle appear thicker. Plaia
than down the foot, flat bows and dark shoes are the most slender-
other ornaments detract foot ising.

jlength. dn the low heeled shoes, — as a last word, bare legs look
| wedges, brogued tongues and low~ mich TOO bare unless they are
jcut Oxfords, or three hole Derby |tanned. Substitute cosmetic stock-
lacings help to fore-shorten the | ings for your real ones.

apparent length of 4 foot.
GLOBE

For Leng, Broad Feet.
OPENING TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 P.M. & CONTINUING

same rules apply
but to make

BUG MT CCR ChC CMC IU

CU LCC LES









The
as for narrow
a broad foot






























up at the sides. A low cut shoe
éxpeses too much instep to be
flattering. Choose straps or trim-
mings which run aslant, or down,
the broad part of the foot

For Short, Plump Feet. Designs
built up in front, pointed tongu

designs are lengthening. Medium
te low heels are better than very
high enes, which are inclined to
emphasise the width of a short
foot.

For A Broad Fronted Foot-
Large or small, the need here is
to slim the front part of the foot,
while keeping a snug fit round
the heel. This can be done by %
court cut with a ‘sweetheart’ front
line, also by an asymmetric ton-
gue, strap or trimming. Again
avoid designs which cut straight
across the braad front of the feet.

Sltimmer-Looking Ankles. Court
shoes are the most slimming ‘to

said Hanid

thank-you, and go
No trouble at all.

Not a bit of trouble. |




























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FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1952

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Firsi eye-witness story
of the raid the whole



SUIHO PLANT serve
40% OF NORTH KOREA
AND ANTUNG & DAIREN
AREAS OF MANCHURIA

‘To begin with,
the Ack-Ack was
thick, but then—'

i9st Was votsuivea oy the raid

che Yalu civer

Six days of diplomatic
crisis in the world’s

Ounk

clou

r

—

opposit:
Seane Diss and climbed into the

2
guing
<2 Pe * <

capitals” have passed At. 300: miles -an nou: ines

since the Americans first OC: Wb Onna er ASE TADS

* The first bomp fel) or tne

bombed the Yalu river mighty Suino plan atesone

power plants, close to cose past four in the »fter-
on.

the border of Manchuria. Ohe-tomsotiie Abpeecuaies

I
But amid all xi tae concrete | roofs. Delve
discusston, |: hardly Rene cate winders
Taipeey . 2 through the obdiusted window
anything -has been said came black smoke ano cherrs
of the operation itself. "ed ames
What happened on BRITISH THERE
that raid, and why did = go, 99° minutes tne race
the military minds went 408. the chombere un-
i i ” moles except or yn e
consider it necessary ‘ debris which they themsei* ss

Here is the first complete





reated.
answer is arees aay ae force }é
gnters—including ritis' uit
From RALPH Meteors “covered them . Th
wai in vain to be chalienge
WALLING by Red MiGs jihough these
were based 30 miles away
: TOKYO, Saturday Simultaneously raids were
HE clouds lay heavy made on four piaes power
» ale stations 1wo at Fuson on the
the Meee kee over — Songehon fiver aud (wo at
‘ Thugen on the n ive
Of the nofth-east coast Aliogether 500 alrerait ‘were
ot Korea steamed the, US La ron 9 ji ae oa
aircraft ~ carriers B zie} a me ;
Princeton * Philippine. “Sea “The ack-ack looked rough when
Bon Homme, and Richard the Orst plages went in to attack
Swiftly, thet? course set to the the plants, After their runs

west. 36 Skyraider dive-bombers "ee Was nothing to it.”




took olf. Piloting one was

Lieutenant Tom Dreis, of 49-MiLE STRETCH

Chicago. who tater described the Sutho, the. keystone of the

raid to ine. Yalu's mammoth hydro-electric
So began the most important

‘ , : system, has a chequered story
air mission of the Korea war— ae

the bombing of the Yalu river
power plants. hat afternoon
they put out the lights in North
Korea



It was built oy the Japanese in
1937 and completed in 1941. It
cost nearly
the fourth targest plant in the
world,







«

;

1O@oOo-OS



236,000,000 and is

DODGED RADAR The great Gam-burruge 1s
828ft. high 3,000ft tong
For 200 miles the Skyraiders creating u 40-mile long reservoir
flew west. almost clipping the Generating capacity of the
mountain tops to get below the plant was poosted by Soviet
Communist radat warning technicians from 400,000 kilo-
écreens. watts to 600,000. Now its switch-
At fixed poimts U.S. Fifth aj: Yards, transtormer yards, and
Force fighter-bombers from ‘urbine buildings are blasted
South Korean airfields joined and
them Before the raid a Jwpanese
Together they swung in alone engineer in chetge at Sutho in
.



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oi Tb Gagy But
bombs of 1952 crumpled it.

about

k



Korea fea by ine Yulu's nydro

blanners, electric system. They knew that
“Suiho is ouijlt to withstana hundreds of wrecked trucks and
nombing.” he said So it was railcars were being pulled back,

the mighty imto those caves repaired. and

gol back on to the. roads and

tailways they were constantly
‘WELL DONE’ hammering

fi Time und again they nud
aiiTe ate the verdicts on the gown over the power plants and

Gansta i Mack Clar left them unscathed
Amertcan Supreme Conk Admiral Briscoe, ot the U.S
manderin Korea: “The attack \® und Air Force Genera
contributed materially to the ‘Weyland studying their tosses
reduction oO! the enemy's war. bo recotamended that Sulh

making potential.

General Weyland, U.S. Air
Force : “Nothing, not a single
detail went astray.”
nin aemeoe : ; sae

went o without ‘2
hitch,”

and other plants should be hit
—not by any piecemen! method
but in one big blow

TACTICS CHANGED

Genera! Ridgway the torme
United Nations Commander-n

Vice- " ¥ ‘
ice-Admiral Clark signalled Oliief. egtecd

“Well done” to all hands and





aided: “It was like old Hig recommendations w. the
times.” Washington Chiefs of Staff und
State Department got nowhere

* * * Apprehensions of a Man

churian “incident”
proved too strong.
Then the tactics of the attack
were revised. General Mark
Clark, the new Onited Nutions
C.-in-C., verted them and sough)

developing

Now what the stor

ochind this raid ? On what

the american

hk command justify it as a
military necessity ?

To unde that 1 must tei) Washington apprevai to apply
you the Of the “cave them.’ Not unti! Sunday test
worl was this approval wi ven

Allied air rations designed Such Wus the ruig on Mondas
to strangle one Red armies which tn a4 few hours was to set
Supply lines were not succeeding ‘the world talking. Three times
because first-class repairs were ‘Since then the plants have beer
being done at workshops in ‘tacked.
caves in North Korea he Op Friday 150 planes again pit
sources of power for these work- the four subsidiary stations

were the Yalu river They are still burning

C,

ti





et

D.& W. Funds Running Out

Money Allocated
_ But Not Spent

LONDON.

niy about £5,000,000 vemains in reserve in the Colo-

and another

schemes.
/ Phis is reported in the
rreturn of schemes uhdey me
Colonial Development ané Wel-
ifare Aeis, which has just been

}
|

published in ‘London.

last year's total of £14,470,682
fpaid cut under the Acts was the ,

largest. sum





; paid eut in any one

year since the scheme came into

eperation in 1946, bringing th

total fo six years up to
£ 56,346,571.

1951 Grants

The 951 Srauts inchide

| £25,867 for cocoa development ia

British Guiana; £418,226 for

saad development in Britisa Hoa-
turas; 249,000 for survey and
soll conservation work in Domin-

iea; and: &31,530 gor mixed farm- :

ing in St. Vincent.

There is also a smal! item of
£50, ,concerning the visit. to St.
Lucia of Dr. Gunnar Bodvarsson,
of the Geothermal Department
of the State Electricity Authority
of Iceland. He was {nvestigatitg
the feasibility of harnessing ener-
gy derived from Volcanic fuma-
roles for the generating of elec-
tricity.

Commenting on the pep. i,
London Times draws «
the fact that not onl) wo ands
running low, but also (hat ic re-
cipients of these’ funds are wader-
pending. It adds; “In \the sixth

ear of the ten allotted by the
Act, less than half the allocations
have been spent, in spite of rises
in world war prices, This is due
partly to world shortage of men

the
PQ. 49

and materials and partly to the *

difficulty which countries’ like
Malaya have in cafrying out
ordered development among civil
unrest.”

The paper points out that the

funds have noi always been judi-

ciously applied. Initial errors were
made in 1946, soon after the Act
came into foree, There was too
mueh unproductive expenditure
and colonies were saddled witn
social services which they could
not afford to maintain, Later, a
new policy was adopted to give
precedence to schemes that would
benefit the colonies economically.

“The hew policy does, however,



raise the question of how far these
grants tread the same ground as
the Colonial Development Cor-
poration,” the paper adds. “In gen-

eral, the policy is to restrict them

to basic economic necessities,
buch as building roads or draining
swamps, whieh while they will
prove an asset to the colony’s
economic advancement in general,
will never pay an investor’s divi-
dend. Private enterprise, or the
Colonial Development Corpora-
tion for that matter, can then





nial Developmient.and Welfare Fund, to last until 1950. O1
the original £140,000,000 mace available to be spent ove:
;. ten years fram 1946, some £

U,000,000 has now been spe

£ 79,000,000 has been earmarked for various

id upon these basic services

No Limit

the Times suggests that no

mit sould be set to the. dii-

sement f funds under the

and that a further mail

ant towards the reserves should
be made before 1956,

\ comparison with the work of
tha Colonial Development Corpor-
xiion is also drawn by the London
liaily Telegraph in a leading ar-
ticle’ on the port. Both organi-
mations are pursuing the same ui-
iyuyate objective, it says. But one
ie managed directly by the various
eeionial gevernments, while the
other is run from London.

“The pattern to be aimed at i
triple partnership in which the



Sritish Government draws the
blueprint of development and
Colonial authorities provide the

Jocal management; while private
enterprise (American as well as
British) helps public funds to
build upon these foundations,” it
says. But it adds:

“Tt should be realised that, as
a #eneral rule, the development of
Celonial agriculture depends upon
the improved skill and enterprise
of the local peasantry rather than
upan the substitution of a sort of
industrialised agriculture.”

—B.U.P.

EISENHOWER

@ From Page 1

the Committee announced that his
rrowup was voting three to zero in
favour of sealing the Taft dele-
gates from Georgia, Gonzales
Blanes, Celestino Triante and
Ricardo Colon were approved
Tuesday by the Credentials Com-
mniitee,

lighting to firm up his lines,
YT. ft called about 40 of his state
tesders into a strategy conference
today. He told newsmen he is
still very much in the race and
repeated his claim of winning
nomination “on an early ballot.”

Jubilation spread through Eisen-
hower's headquarters in the peak
of the smashing victory in the
“Stolen Delegates” issue. Eisen-
hower himself did not know until
this morning that he had his big-
gest political victory to date,

General Douglas MacArthur's
name is being heard as a remotely
possible candidate. Satisfactory
jo some Taft supporters but
heard only faintly.

Eisenhower and Harold E, Stas-
sen were to meet at, or before
breakfast. Some of Stassen’s best
friends are urging him to abandon
the race and throw his support to
Eisenhower on the ballot,





U.P.





‘Ne Senate Majority
Yor Mossadegh

TEHERAN, July 9.
The Iranian Senate refused to
tive Mohammed Mossadegh the
majority vote he demanded as a
condition of forming a new gov-
ernment. Mossadegh resigned the;
premiership when the new parlia-
rent took over last week. He re-
ived an overwhelming “vote of
clination” from the Majlis las.
week to resume the post but the

oate baulked,

Called back into session to-day |

iiemribia hedidiosene

oaly 14 of 38 members of the
\ pper House voted for him. Three}
members voted for other candi-
dates and 19 abstained.—wU.P.

|
SEA AND AIR |



TRAFFIC

In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Timothy Van

‘ Sluytman, Sch
ivond Star, Sch. Marion Belle 'Woife,
Sch. Rainbow M. Sch. Lucille M.

Smith, M.V. Jenkins Roberts, Sch. Ev-
erdene, Sch. Turtle Dove, 6ch. United

Pilyrim, Seh. D’Ortac, Seh. Linsyd I,
Sen Triumphant Star, Sch. Hariett
Whittaker, M.V. Blue Star, M.V. Will-
emstad, MLV, Lady Jey, S.S. Feggen,

®S. Tribesman, Sch. Enterprise $. Sch.
Mary M, Lewis, Sch, Lady Noleen, Sch.
Parma D,
ARRIVALS -
Seh. Burma D, with drums of colas
trom Trinidad, Sch, Lady Noleen under
Capt, Caesar from Dominica with fresh









frult, Sch. Enterprise from St. Lucia,
Mary M. Lewis from British Guiana,
3s.

Tribesman, agents DaCosta & Go.,
from Trinidad,

DEPARTURES
Steamship Trader with general caigo
for the United Kingdom,

SEAWELL

Arrivals by B.W.LA. on Tuesday
From 8ST. LUCIA

Mr, — Watson, Mrs,
son, . Kelth Hicks, . Reginaid
Wateridge, Mrs, Kitty Wateridge, Miss
Huth Wateridge, Mr. Garnet Gordon,
Hon, Carl La Cordinene, Mr. Melvin
Bernard, Mr, Charles Manoram, Mr.
Lionel Gittens,

From AD
D. MeCauley, V. Manhin, E. Manhbin,
©, Manhin, BE. Holder, G, Yvonett, J,
Bell, R. Bayley, A. Page, E. Rogers,
N. Hoyland, ©, Rolland, B, Donaldson,
, Donaldson, 8S. Donaldson,
\arivals by BW.LA. on Wednesday
From TRINIDAD
*. Bermudez, BE. Bourne, E. Horton, F.
Lyneh, EB, Haynes, G. Legall, D, Blackett,
fr, Doppa, 8. Downes.
Departures om Wednosday
ianct Be Mamelain J Profit, O.
J, Hinds, R. rat . Profit .
litcher, J. Pitcher, Nee Searl, MH. Ham-
tay, P. Deminico.

Lid.,

Elaine Wat-

—> —————
r ve
RATES OF EXCHANGE
JULY 10, 1052
Selling NEW YORK Buying
73 1/10% Pr, Cheques or. 71 4/10% Pr.
Bankera
Sight or Demand 71 2/10)6 Pr.
Drafts :
781/10% Pr. Cable —*—s—is ss aw nits oe teen
716/10) Pr, Qurrency 69 9/10% Pr.
. Coupons 69 2/10 % Pr,
£00; Pr Silver 20% Pr,
OANADA
16 3/10% Pr.

78 2/10% Pr, ee on



cceccesces Sight Drafta
78 2/10% Pr, Cable bsevesere
"6 7/10% Pr, Currency 14 8/10%
Coupons
Silver 20%

GO% Pr.

d

a Broad St. and

plants.

The plants also supplied power
to the Red air bases in Man-
churia. whien are immune from

OTHER LIGHTS



And today the lights may o¢
bombing. out i other plac in Asia
For months young men iike [t 18 possible that they hi
Lieutenant Dreis und his com. been dimmed as tar uway us
rades had returned from flak. Mukden "ip Mun ra Or 4
tossed raids on the Red armies’ the Sino-Soviet Ouse of Pur
Tear areas asking :-~“ Arthur, or even at Siberta’s

“What's the use of these V edivostoe
supply line raids if we are for- Por that is how tar the Yalus
bidden to hit the plants which two-way flow af electricity
are pumping power back into extends

the enemy's arteries?"
They had seen a thousund ana

It is probuble the world otters
Mo other single target of such

one cave

workshops in Norti complex range

Londen Express Service

CONQUER

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i ee ee nl ee

PAGE THREE

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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS gif ADVOCATE

Viaad

fsaes Parasia?

Printed by the Advecate Co., Ltd., Broad 8t., Bridgetown

ee | Friday, “July 11, 1952

aN TERFERENCE

MR G..H. ADAMS, C.M.G., who
distinguished himself some years ago at a
meeting of the United Nations in Paris by
making it clear that the West Indies would
regard United Nations trusteeship as a step
backward last week was saying the same
thing at a general council meeting of the
International Confederation of Free Trade
Unions in Berlin,

An original draft had been submitted to
the council suggesting that non-selfgovern-
ing Territories should be put under United
Nations trusteeship as a means of forward-
ing their progress te self-government. Be-
cause of criticism from colonial represen-
tatives including Mr. Adams, this draft was
revised to say that trusteeship should be
called for cnly when metropolitan coun-
tries had failed to fulfil their obligations,
From this distance it would be unwise to
comment on this news from Berlin prema-
turely and until the draft is available in-
formed comment is impossible. But the
community of Barbados and the community
of the West Indies, the majority of whom
are not members of any trade unions. are
entitled to ask whether an international
confederation of trade unions is not exceed-
ing its rights in discussing a question which
could only be decided after careful explan-
ation to the more than ihree and a half
million inhabitants of the area had been
followed by a referendum,

Mr. Adams is to be congratulated on his
forthright expression of opinion that the
West Indies would regard United Nations

trusteeship as a step backward, but the
West Indian community may well be an-

noyed at a recommendation calling for
trusteeship “when metropolitan countries
had failed to fulfil their obligations” Trade
Unions have a function to fulfil in their
countries but they have no mandate from
the people in those countries to decide con-
stitutional relationships. In democratic
countries the people’s representatives in
Parliament debate constitutional issues and
Mr. Adams has not been attending the
General Council of I.C.F.T.U., as a repre-
sentative of the Barbados House of Assem-

bly but as a representative of the Barbados
Workers’ Union.







PRODUCTIVITY
OTHER reports from the Free Trade
Union conference in Berlin are less disturb-
ing. Mr. T. O’Brien of the British Trade
Union Congress has been advising colonial
peoples not to place their trust in national-
ist politics, because economic development
and the building up of strong trade unions
were of equal importance. When in the past
such advice has been offered by non-Trade
Unionists in the West Indies it has been
suspect and the givers of such advice have
been labelled as reactionaries or as‘enemies
of the Trade Union movement. When a
member of the T.U.C., offers such advice
West Indian Trade Unionists have no ex-
cuse for ignoring it.

West Indian Trade Unions might also pay
heed to the fact that at Berlin the General
Council of L.C.F.T.U., broke new ground by
discussing the importance of increased
productivity. Normally wages and im-
praved conditions of work are the dominant
note of trade union conferences but the
General Council of I.C.F.T.U., reflects the
realisation in Socialist circles generally
today that increased wages can only be paid
for by increased productivity. Even Mr.
Aneurin Bevan, British Socialism’s ultra
left-winger has been warning workers in

the United Kingdom recently that they
must double their production before they
can expect increased wages,

The position of Great Britain is especially
dangerous but it is a welcome sign that
trade unionist ‘ leaders. throughout the
countries with membership of LC.F.T.U.,

_ are stressing the importance ef produc-
tivity.

At the Berlin conference it was pointed
out that workers could benefit in two ways,
both dependent on productivity. Either
prices would fall as a result of increased
productivity or increased productivity
would allow higher wages to be paid.

Another British delegate the chairman of
the T.U.C, economic committee took the
argument yet further. He stressed that the

standard of living in any country depended
in the last analysis on productivity. And

he pointed out that productivity was not a
matter for the employers alone.

These outspoken and timely statements from
prominent Trade Unionists in Berlin will be wel-
comed in the British West Indies, where unions
have not yet freed themselves from the dominant
pre-occupation of higher wages. They now have
to give serious attention to the question of pro-
ductivity. Because unless greater productivity
results existing inflationary spirals will be exag-
gerated and real improvement in wages, for which
‘West Indian trade unions claim some of the credit,













will not be sustained. Shifts in political power
eannot add one cent to national revenue. And
efore any further improvement in social ser-
ind living standards can be made in Barba-

fos during the next six ye s the Government
has to find more than two million dollars to main-
tain « ling serv ¥ importance of pro-
y to trade Un ssed at Berlin will

n the hands rade unionists wha

ore the Berl erence were begin-

) understand how times have changed.















aliret
| lar idea, pretty



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

‘l Have Seen Fear

Growing Like This Elsewhere. ..
Near-bankruptcy Is The Spur’

But This Time

Esrael in Torment

TEL AVIV.
TODAY, as for the past fort-
night, a line of patient Israelis
has been filing past a stack of
food erates, empty gin bottles,
and sugar sacks which grace the
entrance to her Britannic Maj-

esty’s Legation in austerity-pack-
ed Tel Aviv.

Do they come to buy gr es
from Britain's NAAFI-fed diplo-
mats? No, These anxious men
and women come to register as
Britons,

They queue for hours to make
sure thoy are still entitled to
British passports granted when
they fled from Hitler,

Similar queues besiege Ameri-
can, French, and other consu-
lates.

Fear

Now, believe me, this rush for
reinsurance by passport is a
significant gesture from people
who have come here to find a
national home with their own
race,

It is an open expression of a
fear 1 thave found lurking in
almost every conversation I have
had with Israelis on this visit.

This is the fear that they are
caught up in a slow, strangulat-
ing proeess of economic bank-
ruptey. From it say pessimists,
not even the shameful millions
from the loathed and abominated
Germans are going to save them.

They foresee ‘that tens, per-
haps hundreds of thousands of
- searcely reunited with
their traditional homeland to
which they have directed their
prayers during 2,000 years, may
have to abandon it again in a
new exile. Those who remain in
the country will have to accept
® standard of living much lower
than that of today.

(And this is drastically de-
baged in comparison with that
of 1945 and even 1950.)

Paradox

The fact is that already, today,
disappointment in the economic
situation of the country is re-
sponsible for the entirely new
phenomenon in this country’s
post-war history: more Jews are
now leaving the country week
by weck than are coming in to
settle,

Many more would go if the
Israel authorities did not stop
them—by refusing exit visas and
-— licences for their prop~
erty.

The paradox is that outwardly
and superficially Tel Aviv and
Jerusalem and all the rest of the
country I have been over look
to be booming. Cafés and res-
taurants are crowded. Long,
elegant motor-cars glide down
Tel Aviv boulevards allowing a
peep at the young women dressed
in the latest Paris élegance.

Whole new suburbs of resi-




*o} dential flats have been added to
Tel Aviv since I was here. last .

year. When I drove out into the
Northern Negeb Steppe this time
I passed endless new villages anid
settlements, New immigrants
were busy by the roadside plant-
ing avenues of shady eucalyptus
trees,

Our Readers Say:

Why And How?

To The Editor,:The Advocate—

SIR,— The Government Bill
to increase to a big and even
startling degree the emoluments
of the ‘Experts’ and Civil Service
Heads, resulting in such heavy
and acditional charges upon the
Island Treasury, and the lively
and rebellious attack upon it in
the House of Assembly, 17th
June, aroused very trouble-some
questions in the minds of the
ordinary citizens, and although
it is too late to hope for any
‘road block’ to the plan the
on | press for expres-
on,

And perhaps some wise and
instructed person may be able
to put them to rest or at least
relieve the troubled minds, The
lucid and instructive addresses
of the Hon. Colonial Secretary
and Mr. Cuke in the council did
not, unfortunately deal with
the “Why and How” troubling
the Man-in-the-street, or the
painful problem; where is the
the great sum of additional
money to come from?

Here are some.of the chief
perplexities:

(1) Why do we need
many ‘Experts’ in Barbados?
It is a small place and its
affairs are not so complex and
mysterious and difficult, surely.
Take for example the Fiscal
Survey. The delay in producing
which has been so often men-
tioned as a main hindrance to
action, Is there anything to be
discovered and revealed of such
‘size and importance which was
not provided in the pamphlet
‘The National Income of Barba-
dos’, compiled by Dr,

ten years ago.

so

Or take another and very
homely glance at this aspect of
affairs. I know what I earn and
how I spend it. And I suppose
the sugar factory or. business
firm knows'what its income is
and what it pays for salaries
and wages and upkeep etc. And
the Income Tax Department
gathers the figures of income
from all citizens—3,404 in 1942
reported Dr, Benham, nearly pil
of them small people with fs-
comes under £400 a year, and
the rest of us just earning a bare
living below the income ‘tax
evel—or no living at all, Indeed,
or take the Teaching Profession.

It is so difficuit to catry the
boys and girls as far as they ‘need
to go in History, or Mathematics
or Lanhgueges—Modern or An-
cient and so on? And for those
who have to go further there are
plenty of people around with
School Certificates even a good
number with University diplo-

1as. a t a ehibdren need to

mainly, is 1 ‘roi useful











officials,
> popu-
provided



accordir





Sefton Deimer

BEGINS TODAY A FULL-SCALE SURVEY OF THE
ANXIETIES FACING THE YOUNG STATE OF
ISRAEL. IT IS A NEWS STORY THAT MAY BE
CONSIDERED CALMLY FROM AFAR TODAY...
BUT ITS IMPORTANCE IS IN THE DARK
POSSIBILITIES IT HOLDS FOR STABILITY AND
PEACE OF THE WHOLE MIDDLE EAST



Energy
Yes, the energy and imagina-
tion the Israelis are putting in to
making Negeb productive is as
impressive as anything I have

seen in Southern
Rhodesia,

But look undér the surface.
Everywhere, even in the busy
desert, portents of grim danger
at once manifest themselves.

A pipe factory was working
only one shift a day because of
lack of steel plates, Israel just
hasn’t the foreign currency to
buy them, When the faetory
runs out of its present supplies
it will have to close down. until
the Government can afforti to
buy more steel, And this project
is number one priority, *

In the town long queues were
waiting in front of ‘the banks.
They were queuing to change
their big-money notes into new
ones issued by the Government,
The only snag was that the Gov-
ernment was taking off ten per
cent. by way of a forced loan.

Street-corner black marketeers
in the Boulevard Rothschild
offered me ‘treble the official price
for my British pounds, I could
not replace my worn out itype-
writer: ribbon: “Sorry, .we have
none, They come from abroad,
There is no foreign exchange to
buy them,”

Tottering . . .

Schoolchildren are unable to
carry on their studies for latk of
English textbooks, Lawyers
cannot keep up with the law
because they do not get the latest
legal books from London,

In small things, and in big
‘ones the wihole of Israel seems

go-ahead

to be slowly tottering to a
standstill for lack of foreign
exchange.

The worst hit, as I have indi-
cated are the factories.

Some under construction are
having to be left uncompleted.
Others just finished are unable
to start producing for lack of
raw materials. Yet others which

have been producing are forced
to go on half-time or close down
altogether,

What is the reason for all this?
Just the age-old cause of most
bankruptcies: they have been
Spending more than they earn,
Statistics show that they are
importing eight times as much
as they export—£125 million
against’ £16,000,000 last year.

Embarrassing

In previous years the gap has
been bridged by generous Amer-
ican help plus ample use of
sterling balances which piled
up in favour of Palestine durings
the war. But even this was not
so. to take care of all
israel’s heavy expenditure, much
of it spent on projects which
cannot start earning money for
many years yet.

So they have taken up short-
term loans Many of these are
now falling due and causing
acute embarrassment. The exact
figure of short-term indebted-
ness ‘is a State secret. But I am
told an amount of at least 150
million dollans (£53,571,428) is
involved.. Sterling balances are
exhausted.

No Credit

The British Treasury and Brit-
ish cil firms, who supply two-
thirds of Israel’s oil needs have
refused to give credit.

Only by the forced sale of
their nationals remaining ster-
ling securities has the Israel Gov-
ernment managed to pay the oil
bill and assure supplies for what
fa top Israel Treasury official
vaguely described to me as “the
next couple of months”

Without oil life in Israel stops:
without oil the pumping sta-
tions stop pumping water. With-
out pumped water, the orange
groves Which provide 60 per cent,
of Israel’s export wither and die.

Yet it seems crazy that Pre-
mier Ben-Gurion and his semi-
Sccialist Government should have-
pushed all-out immigration and
fall-out industrialisation to the
point where the whole future of
the country is threatened. Is
(there any sense in this madness?

—L.E.S.



for, with tenure of position and
pensions in, the ‘offing—as Mr.
Cuke emphasised—should
their incomes substantially in-
creased, while such numbers. of
other people are left in a hard-
up position? ,

Ido not have. in wid the
Civil Service employees in the
lower grades—it is announced
that their pay will be dealt with
very soon—-with a further big
increase in public expenditure—
but the great company of ordin-
ary people with no relief in pros-
pect. And think of the old and
disabled people with parochial
allowances of less than 5/-+ per
week, which is the munificent
Old Age Pension!

(3) Why is it that a propor-
tion of the Barbados people
should be placed, above the need
for economy and hardship, when
such large numbers have to con-
tend with them and endure them
continually?

Should we not ali share
and share together? And is not
economy an excellent exercise
for everybody, in hard times?

And this is not a question for
people in Barbados only, by any
means, It applies very correctly
and forcibly to people in Britain.
and other lands as well. It’
seems to some of us that there is
a strong and unhealthy desire
and determination in many
places and circles to keep up the
old conditions of comfort and
even luxury, of pleasure and
sport, in spite of all. the talk
about ‘austerity’ , ‘tightening the
belt’ and the like.’ ‘To cut down.
one’s spending on the old
pleasant lines instead of striking
for higher pay would be an ex-
cellent plan, for reducing the
cost of goods of all kinds and the
high cost of living in general.

Increased production at lower
prices, and everybody at work
are the slogans of political lead-
ers, but the rank and toa
large extent do not really agree,
nor yet the higher grade and
more instructed sections.

(4) How is it supposed by
those in authority that small
people are to live at all and pay
their way, even without the
additions to taxation and costs,
such as must be required to pay
for the big increases in the upper
grades now approved and under-
taken}

This is a question which, we
think, requires no exposition
or illustration. But it does re-
quire serious attention by those
who have authority and the
control of the purse.

MAN-IN-THE-STREET.

Vegetables And Prices
To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Kindly allow me space
in your valuable paper to ex-
press my views oh ‘High P:
f tables,’ which



that if

wke
the joabia ‘from when

a

have «

they buy (meaning the growers)
would let them get the goods at
a reasonable price they would
be able to sell at lower prices
too, and with the Control Market,
ithe growers would not be able to
rob them.

Mr, Editor, these I would
quote, are the prices the majority
of growers usually seli to the
hawkers. For instance, you sell
Carrots at 16c. to 20c. a pound,
they sell at 36c. Beans the
same price. Cucumbers at 6c.
or 8c. per pound, they sell at
fourteen and sixteen cents each
and a good size cucumber
scarcely weighs more than three
quarters of a pound. This situa-
tion is preposterous. Those
people buy two to three dollars
‘in goods, catch the bus to town
and if they cannot make 100%
on the goods or more, they say it
‘cannot pay them. This, Mr.
Editor, is no joke, these are cold

facts. Growers have to pay tu
make up their beds, buy seeds,
eare their vegetables from

worms ete. Water them for may-
be three or four months before
they can see.any signs of their
labours. These exploiters as
goon as they sense the time of
fulfilment, come down on you
like Locusts, grab vegetables as
cheaply as they can and off to the

“market place of Massacre”
where — the power over
Econ

But witha Central Market run
by the Government. when all
prewere would be able to send
their praduets and get remuner-
ation priceg the rich and poor

alike coul? vurchase these
nutricious _ at reasonable
_ prices, inst@ad of having to eat
day in and day out foods of a

‘starchy nature,
nny j 3
Day of reckoning

To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,— It is regrettable that
such a labourite as the Hon,
Senior member for St. George,
one whom the labouring classes
are looking forward to lead
them in the not too distant
future, shonld have made such
a blundering mistake as to ask
to make the motion that rule 45
of the standing rules of the
House be brought into force.

This rule! seeks to eject visi-
tors from the Visitors’ Gallery
during any special debate. If
this rule were brought into
force on Tuesday last, it proves
beyond any reasonable doubt
that. the present representatives
of the people or I should state,
representatives of the Labour
Party are seeing after their own
interest. For, there must have

been something in that debate
not

that this gentleman
want the visi

did

tors to hear.



alana cal la il aaa i tii iil inl claimant iii ii i iii a



' Schools Rebel Against
| Lessons On UNO

From R, M. MacCOLL |

i WASHINGTON.

ALL over America a rising tide of oppo-
sition to UNO generally, and UNESCO—the
United Nations Educational, Scientific, and
Cultural Organisation—in particular, is
niaking itself felt in the schools and univers-
ities.

Some schools have discarded study courses
about UNO and others are preparing to a
the same. olay, 1 |

In places as far apart as Houston, Texas,
and Los Angeles school’ authorities have
abruptly refused to co-operate, as hitherto,
in an annual essay contest conducted by the
American Association for the United Na-
tions.

The contest has suddenly becotne a con-
troversial issue, and there are suggestions
that anything to do with UNO is now un-
American.”

Miss Dozothy Robbins, educational direc-
tor of the association, reports that 100 fewer
schools have taken part in the essay contest
this year and she flatly attributes this to
“fear of having anything to do with the
United Nations.”

The association rushes out a statement
saying “There is a strange attitude in some
communities, where objections have been
raised to teaching about UNO. Such oppo-
sition is founded on misinformation, fear,
and prejudice,”

The sharpest opposition is centred on
UNESCO.

The critics openly say that this agency is

going to “step in and tell the teachers how
to run their own schools.”

And when, some time back, it was an-
nounced that the University of Florida plan-
ned to hold a summer course on UNESCO,
fierce opposition developed, with charges
that the whole thing was “subversive,” and
now the university board is thinking of call-
ing it off.







































In eet ac ‘President Truman an-
nounces that he is appointing 57-year-old
Mrs. Margaret Daly, of Highland Park, New
Jersey, to be Controller of Customs in New
York,

William Benton, ex-advertising million-
aire, now a Senator representing Connecti-
cut, and a very close personal friend of Tru-
man, says he is sure the President . will
change his mind and run for re-election if
the Democrats find themselves in danger of
getting stuck with an unsuitable nominee at
the convention.

While America throws its hats into the air
over the debut of the liner United States, the
New York Times reminds that the overall
merchants marine picture is gloomy.

For while in 1939 America possessed 123
passenger ships, totalling 1,000,000 tons, to-
day she has only a scant 51, of 600,000 tons.

* * *

The blasé habitués of New York’s Second
Avenue are nonplussed to see a man wear-
ing only pyjama trousers pursuing another
man and firing revelover shots over his head.

The pursuer turns out to be a young po-
liceman, in hot pursuit of a burglar who
picked the cop’s own flat for a raid.

Later he tells the magistrate: “I was em-
barrassed—there was no place for me to pin
on my badge.”

A familiar word in America is “kibitzer,”
meaning the chap who watches other people
playing cards, and dishes out advice to the
gamblers on how to play their hands.

And Harlan Cleveland, assistant director
in Europe of the Mutual Security Agency,
tells a gathering of the New York State ee ee
Association that ‘the’ 75,000 Americans at
present administering the foreign aid pro-
gramine in many parts of the world are
“kibitzers at every crisis, large or small, that
presents itself, and involved in nearly every-
body’s business.”

The day of the trained diplomat has gone.

Says Cleveland : “Most of our foreign rep-
resentatives now are not trained for diplo-
macy—and many of them are not particu-
larly diplomatic.”

More and more Americans are building
their own homes.

It’s quite the “done thing” these days for
comfortably off families to form “working
parties,” father, mother and junior ali in
biue jeans, anc set to at the week-end to lay
the foundation or build another wall togeth-
er.

And “Build-It-Yourself” has brought big
changes for business. One maker of power
tools, who deliberately went after the ama-
teur market, has boosted sales from
£6,000,000 to £ 10,700,000.

Not only is it fun—but building it your-
self saves you a great deal of money.

“Lazy Susan” is no lady, but the American
term for a casserole set on a revolving wood-
en base, and surrounded by gaily-coloured

= 4





ee i FRIDAY, JULY J, 1958
PHOTOGRAPHS

Copies of Local Photographs

Which have appeared in the

ADY OCATE NEWSPAPER
ordered from the ..

} ADVOCATE. § STATIONERY ERY

“These I must remember — !”
Coffee Milis = 3 Sizes

TOT ern |
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Egg Slicers

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FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1952

Colonies Must

Surmount

Hardships

Renison Opens Home

Economics

Conference

PORT OF SPAIN, July 1.

IN OPENING A CONFERENCE on Home Economics
and Education in Nutrition at Kent House, Monday, His
Excellency the Acting Governor of Trinidad and Tobago,

Hon. P, M. Renison, warned
government to surmount diffic

cost of living.

ainst depending only on
ties caused by the rising

Delegates are present from nine Caribbean territories,

and several international

organisations, including ‘the

United Nations, World Health Organisation and the Holy

See, have sent delegates or

observers. The two delegates

from Barbados are Miss Betty Arne, Social Welfare Officer
and Miss I. 3. C. Alleyne, Organiser of the Government

Housecraft Centre.

The Conference is under the joint

sponsorship of the Food and Agriculture Organisation of

the United Nations and the

“With all the will in the world”,
His Excellency said, “this govern-
ment cannot spare very large
sums of money for extension
work. We are doing our best and
the work is growing, but I think
that we have got to find ways of
teaching people to help them-
selves.” He foresaw the need for
the better organisation of educa~
tion and extension services, and
for improving housing conditions,
and considered it in order that
the conference should meet in
‘Trinidad at a time when not only
were these problems being con-
sidered, but also when a food
production programme ‘was in full
swing. His Excellency also called
attention to the fact that the gov-
ernment had received advice on
aided-self-help housing from
Point IV technicians assigned to
the Caribbean Commission, and
expressed the view that the con-
ference was complementary to the
aided-self-help method.

“Conferences of itis ature ure
of enormous value,” he said: “I
think there is extraordinary value
in pooling knowledge and expe-
rience so that we can all improve
our own methods.”

In greeting detegales and others
on behalf of th.e Commission, Mr,
E. F. H. de Vriendt, Secretary
General, referred to the long
record of close co-operation be-
tween the Commission and tha
Food and Agricultufe Organisa-
tion. He mentioned joint action
in the field of co-operatives
which culminated in a Co-opera-
tives Conference last year, and
announced that negotiations to
obtain the services of an FAO
Agricultural Economist. for the
Commission are well advanced.
He described the meeting as “‘the
largest and most representative
technical conference ever held
under the quspices of the Com-
mission.”

Mr. de Vriendt further said:
“While the Caribbean Commis-
sion, realising the wide fields of
activities that lie open to it, has
jately found it necessary, for
practical and financial reasons, to
impose on iwelf a considerable
measure of retrenchment and
limitation of programme, it is
gratifying to note that this con-
ference, both in scope and popu-
larity. indicates that emphasis on
technical questions and on eco-
nomic development need not
necessarily exclude the human
factor or considerations of social
welfare.”

Particular mention was made of
Miss Maude Barrett, United Na-
tions representative, Dr. P. F..de
Caires, representative of the
World Health Organisation; Dr.
Lydia Roberts, delegate from the
United States, and a representa-
tive of the Organisation of Amer-
ican States, and Miss Dora Ibber-
son and Mr. J. L. Nicol, of the
Colonial Development and Wel-
fare Organisation, delegates of the
United Kingdom.

Miss Elsa Haglund, Home Econ-
omist, who with Mrs. Andro-
mache Sismanidis, Regional Nu-
trition Representative, was
assigned by FAO to help prepare
and conduct the conference, told
of the keen interest of the Organ-
jisation in the conference. Speak~
ing for Dr. W. R. Aykroyd, Direc-
tor of FAO’s Nutrition Division,
she expressed his sincere wish for
its success,

She stated that FAO realises
‘that “in order to make full use of
improvements in the field of food
and agriculture, it is essential that

Caribbean Commission.

and family life”. She went on to
say: “One of the aims of the Food
and Agriculture Organisation of
the United Nations is to raise the
standards of living and raising
standards of living goes hand in
hand with the work in the field of
Home Economics.”

Following the opening talks,
Dr. Roberts was unanimously
elected Chairman,

The agenda stresses the educa=
‘tional aspects of the problem.
Special attention will be given to
extension services, both govern-
ment and non-government, and
the question of better integration
of these activities will be consid-
ered. Other related subjects to be
studied include: Education
through Schools; Training of Ex-
tension Workers, Teachers and
Leaders of Non-Governmental
Organisations; Publications and
Other Teaching Aids; Educational
Value of School and Community
Feeding Programmes,

Possibilities in the direction of
technical co-operation both with-
in and from outside the Caribbean
Area will be explored. Particular
points to be covered include:
facilities for advanced training;
short training courses and ‘“work~
shops”; training schools for sev-
eral territories in the Caribbean
Area; fellowships and surveys.

The present conference is the
outgrowth of @ survey of home
economics education and exten-
sion in the Caribbean conducted
in 1949 jointly arranged by FAO
and the Caribbean Commission,
The report of the survey, which
embodies the observation of an
FAO Home Economics Officer in
ten selected Caribbean territories,
is included in the documentation
for the conference. In addition,
the FAO Secretariat has prepared
special papers dealing with vari-
ous items of the agenda, whilst
the Commission’s Secretariat has
prepared statements on the posi«
tion in the territories with respect
to the several items of the agenda.

Lady Noleen
Brings Firewood

Four schooners arrived in Car-
lisle Bay yesterday morning, All
of them were towed into the
Careenage by the Lord Comber-
mere. They were the Schooner
Lady Noleen from Dominica,
Schooner Mary M., Lewis.’ from
British Guiana, Schooner Burma
D, from Trinidad and Schooner
Enterprise S, from St. Lucia.

The Lady Noleen brought in
9,000 cocoanuts, 16 cords of wood,
one bag of bark, 64 bags of sugar
and 10 packages of fresh fruit.
Eighty tons of firewood, 600 bags
of charcoal, 327 bags of rice, 64
wallaba posts, 108 bunches of
fresh fruit and 90 pumpkins were
brought in by the Mary M, Lewis.

The Mary M. Lewis left British
Guiana on July 6 and encountered
bad weather in getting here. The
Emeline which left B.G. on July 4
has not yet reached Barbados.

The Burma D, came in with 525
drums of colas while Enterprise
S, which was the last schooner to
be towed in the Careenage by the
Lord Combermere, brought six
bags of cocoanuts, 113 packages of
fresh fruit, 427 bags of copra, 60
drums of cocoanut oil and seven
bunches of fresh fruit. All of
these Schooners are consigned to



improvements be made in home the Schooner Owners’ Association.

2POSS59OOGDHOHOH9HHOG9OOG9OO:



the]

RAKES .
WEEDING FORKS

HARRIS

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LOPPING SHEARS

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SECATEURS

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and the Increasingly Popular

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ONS



GARDEN
REQUISITES

WE CARRY A COMPLETE RANGE INCLUDING

TROWELS
HEDGE TRIMMERS

LAWN SPRINKLERS
TAP UNIONS, TAPS COMPLETE WITH UNION, WATERING CANS,

HOSE MENDERS, SPOUTS, CLIPS AND CONNECTIONS
AND THE POPULAR “SOLO” SPRAYER, THE ONE-MAN SPRAYER
WHICH OPERATES ON BOTH THE UP AND DOWN STROKES GIVING

HARDWARE DEPARTMENT
DIAL



BARBADOS

ADVOCATE



FISHERMAN SENTENCED TQ NINE
MONTHS’ IMPRISQGNMENT



Ch. Ch. Poor Law
Inspector Resigns

A letter of resignation from Mr.
Roland Eversley, Poor Law In-
spector of Christ Church,

was
accepted by members of the
Christ Church Vestry at their

meeting yesterday. é

Mr. Eversley was appointed
Pcor Law Inspector in 149
after having served as Assessor
for five years.

At the last Vestry meeting Mr.
Eversley’s letters were circulated.
In his letter Mr, Eversley asked
that he be allowed three months’
pre-retirement leave.

Mr. C- M. Drayton agreed that
the letter of resignation should be
accepted, but he did not agree
with Mr. Eversley asking for
three months’ leave.

He said that Mr. Eversley was
given one month’s leave every
year and as far as he knew, he
(Eversley) always took this leave.

Mrs. H. A: Talma corrected Mr.
Drayton. She said that she knew
of two years when Mr. Eversley
did not take his leave.

Mr. H. StG. Ward said that the
Board of Guardians had appcint-
ed Mr. Eversley and that same
Board had asked Mr. Eversley to
produce his birth certificate. This
Mr. Eversley failed to do.

He said that the Board of
Guardians would have to consider
the post vacant as from July 24.

He felt that Mr. Eversley should
be paid a pensicn in accordance
with the number of years’ ser-
vice he had put in in the parish.

Mr. C. B, Brandford said that!
the question of resignation was
one motion and that of the pen-
sion another. They should first ac-
cept the resignation and then dis-
cuss the question of pension. He
then moved that the resignation be
accepted as from August 24 and
that he be given one month's”
leave from July 24 to August 23.

He also suggested that one’ of
the other employees in the ser—
vice should be promoted, and
asked that Mr. Ashby, the store-
keeper, be appointed to act as
Poor Law Inspector.

Before discussing the question
of pension, Mr. Wood Goddard,
Vestry Clerk, read from records
Mr. Eversley’s term of service.

On the motion of Mr. C., B.
Brandford, the Vestry decided that
before fixing Mr. Eversley’s pen-
sion, legal opinion should ,be
sought.

T.B. PATIENT LEAVES
CH. CH. ALMSHOUSE

The T.B. patients at the Christ
Church Almshouse have present-
ed the Christ Church Vestry with
a problem. At a meeting yester-
day members discussed ways and

“means of keeping these patients

inside the Almshouse.

Mrs. H. A. Talma, Church-
warden, drew the matter to the
attention of the Vestry. She said
that these patients could be seen
walking up and down the streets.

Other Vestrymen spoke of see-
ing the patients offering food to
children along the streets and of
seeing them gambling in ~the
Isolation Ward.

Mrs- Talma said that there
were formerly three T.B. patients,
but one left the institution with-
out notifying anyone.

“Soon Christ Church will be
full of T.B.”, Mr. C. B- Brandford
said. He suggested that immedi-
ate action be taken,

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

CABLE AND WIRELESS (West #ndies)
Ltd. advise that they can now commu-
nicate with the following shirs through
their Barbados Coast Station:—

8.8. Alwaki, Abbeydale, Ariguani,
Golfito, Carrabuile, Acropolis, Tribes-
man, Themistokles, Esso Philadelphia,
Biographer, Vestfoss, Tartar, Tagalam,
Koligrim, Rio Jachal, Thorshov. S. A
Ipedro, Katrina Luckenbach, Cha'lenger,
Barfleur, English Prince, Hyeres, Lina,
Queen Mary, Queen of Bermuda, Brazil,
Latia, Rio de la Plata, Uruguay, Ora,
Jean Lykes, Presidente Dutra, Lady
Nelson, Scorton, Noordzee, Regent Leo-
pold, Belpareil, Alcoa Clipper, Jeusie
Stove, Alcoa Fartner, Dewdale, Tindra
Tekla, Hoegh Silverwave,, Gabbiano
Agamemnon, Canadian Cruiser, Regent
Springbok, as, Esso Salvador,
Teines, Ganymedes, Kaban, Atheiiic,
Thorshavet, Amakura, Corona, Algoa
Polaris, Couneil Grove, Mercator,
Sibilla, General San Martin, Casablanca,
Sunwalt, Agusta S8., Ambrosio S.,
Cirilo, Eeone, Hermes, Regent Caribgu,
Geologist Silverwake Trade, Stentor,
Mormacdale, Puerto Rico and E. W.
Sinclair,

2364 or 3142

|



SDE DD ADAP OOMOOE
6: .

$6$599999S

WHITFIELD JONES %

fisherman of Bay Street, was’

vesterday sentenced to aine months’ imprisonment with
hard labour by Mr. Justice’G. L. Taylor after an assize jury
found him guilty of having maliciously damaged clothing
and household articles on April 20. The articles were the
property of Jones’ reputed wife, Gwendolyn Rock, and

were valued $345,49.

Jones was also charged with inflicting bodily harm on
Rock’s mother, Geraldine Hinds, the same day, but the jury

did not find him guilty.

Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C.,

Solicitor General, prosecuted

for the Crown. Jones was not represented.

The offence was committed
after Jones amd Rock had a row
and when Rock had left hom:
and gone to the Police Station to
make a complaint. Among the
items damaged were sixteen
dresses and five pairs of shoes
The dresses were torn up and th:
shoes cut up.

Rock told the Court that Jones
and she had been living together
for about a year before the occurs
rence. They had a row on April
20 and she left home to go to the
Police Station. On her way there
she met her mother and the two
of them returned to her quarters.
Jones abused the two of them
when they arrived and she again
left for the Police Station. She
had made a report and was about
to leave ,;when her mother came
in the station bruised about her
bedy. Jones, too, came to the
Station soon after, showed a
bruise, and complained that her
mother and her had beaten him.

When she returned home, she
discovered that 16 of her dresses
were torn up, five or six pairs of
shoes cut up, glassware broken,
her machine and stove damaged
and her groceries were mixed
together, ’

Mother's Evidence

The eviderce of the mother,
Geraldine Hinds, corroborated
Rock’s as to the events after they
met, Hinds added that when Rock
left Jones and her together and
went to the station, Jones threw
the stove on the floor and stepped
upon it. She remonstrated,. and
he gave her two lashes with a
sticl) -eross her shoulders.

Ciyde Hinds and Lucy Odle of
Thomas Gap, Westbury Road,
also gave corroborated evidence
Ole said she was at a house near-
by and saw when Jones tore up
some of the dresses.

That was the case for the Prose-
eution,

Jones in evidence told the Court
of a row taking place between
Rock and him the night before the
offence, and Rock’s telling him to
leave the quarters, The row
which concerned another woman,
continued next day and Rock cut
hirt with a knife and threw hot
water upon him,

When Rock’s mother came, she
abused him and when he retorted,

she took a stick and struck him. ©

A scuffle followed.
Professional Witness

He gave no evidence concerning
the dresses, shoes or household
items, but under cross-examina-
tion said that Odle was a profes-
sional witness. He knew that
because she had given evidence
or his mother sometime before
He said that Clyde Hinds who haa
also given evidence against him,
had done so with the hope that
Rock would give evidence for him

He called a witness, Leotta
Yearwood, who gave a_ similar
story of the row as had been
given by Prosecution witnesses,
but said nothing of the damage
being done by Jones. She said she
had seen the stove fall.

She said that neither Hinds nor
Odle had been on the seene at
the time of the row, but she had
heard Hinds promise to give evi-
dence for Rock.

In his address to the jury, Jones
invitea them to believe that the
evidence of Hinds and Odle had
been false and that Hinds’ was
necessarily biased, she ° being
Rock’s mother. He questioned
Rock’s not getting witnesses who
lived at the same building where
they had quarters at the time, in-
stead of getting Hinds and Odle
who lived in Westbury Road.

It was ail a frame-up against
him, he said.

After hearing a review of the
evidence from His Lordship, the
jury setired 20 minutes and then
returned the verdict of guilty of
malicious damage but not of in-
flicting bodily harm.

PLLC GLELEL ALL LD LV PVELEED PLL LPLLPLCLLPLLE ISLS LPL LVLAELLPEPIOR

31 Piece DINNER

SET

6,46

4 -
LLG OCOCCRCC O08

PPL EPSPFIPS SPIES IPDS FD?

GOLA COF,



Husband Guilty Of
Injuring Wife

Ethel Trotman of Gibbons
8, Christ Church, sobbed yes-
y before Mr. Justice G. L,
Taylor and asked for a “break”
for her husband Ethelbert who
along with Pearline, Philip and
Hutson Jones pleaded guilty at
the Court of Grand Sessions to
the charge of inflicting grievous
bodily harm upon her on Decem-
ber 4 last year.

Included among her injuries
was a fracure of her left twelfth
rib.

Hutson Jones (16), the youngest
of the defendants, was put on 18
months’ probation, The other
three were bound over in the sum
of £50 and a similar surety to
keep the peace for 18 months.

After Ethel Trotman told His
Lordship that she and her hus-
band wete living together again
since the incident, and that she
did not wish him to be sent to
prison, Mr, W. W. Reece, Q.C.,
Solicitor General, who was prose-
cuting for the Crown, said that if
any extra leniency was shown. to
the husband, he would also have
to ask for leniency towards the
other defendants,

Besides giving evidence as to
her fractured rib, Dr. E, L. Ward
also spoke of many abrasions and
contusions.



Be





‘







T. Van Shaytman
On Dock

The Schooner Timothy Van
Sluytman which came in port a
few days ago from British Guiana
is now undergoing repairs on
dock, During her voyage here
a fire broke out in the engine
room where minor repairs were
being carried out on the auxiliary
engines.

The Van Shiwytman is expected
to come off dock on July 22
and sail the same day for British
Guiana without cargo.

S.S. Trader Takes
Sugar For U.K.

The Steamship Trader yester-
day took 5,970 gallons of water
from the Lord Combermere, The
Trader was also loaded with
sugar and left the same day for
the United Kingdom.

This steamship was
to DaCosta & Co., Ltd.



consigned



RACEHORSES
RETURN HOME

Sixteen racehorses from Barba-
dos which took part in the T.T.C.|
Meeting in Trinidad were brought
into the port yesterday when the!
Steamship Tribesman consigned to,
DaCosta & Co,, Lid., arrived here
at 10 a.m. from Trinidad,

The horses were Mary Ann,

First Admiral, Land Mark, Lun-!.

ways, Colleton, Frenah Flutter,,
Appollo, Rosette, Magic Coye,
Embers, Harroween, Castle-1:1-The
Air, Durham Jane, Columbus,
Canta Quisine and Bright Li tht.
The Tribesman is now being!
loaded with a cargo of sugar.

es

CANADIAN CRUISER C. .LLS

The Qanadian Cruiser, 3,935
tons whose agents are Ge «diner
Austin & Co,, Ltd. called ‘a this
port on Wednesday afternoon from
es and left later the same

ay.

‘The Cruiser brought 156 boxes
of cheese, 639 boxes of flour,
4,800 bags of pollard ar 130
cans of paint,



33. ,, DINNER SET
i er BROAREASLASET os. ccc cscs $30.00
Reid CI TOL 5 bis vine 0 6 000 ba oe nab iawn $15.37
AO gh RM SUID, ny aia cso 0 $10.95
Bo PRI Fk sis 0's ibis cae AND $ 4.76
AO iy SCORNED SUT e ciety os. ens $10.82
THERMOS FLASK
1 pt. at Reika e's Meera Hd apa ip doe ac agia Kis $1.64
BP AB iene) PEP Cot er fete kil $2.65
Ree Mas screed ss Rev Ove, a wnn cde ecaack $6.63
THERMOS 1 pt. JUGS a $3.28
Less 16% Cash Discount en all complete sets purchased

FPS

_capacity for 48 but at one time



ib 6A A OA AD OA 4AM A AOA Me
OO OSOOR GOCSCO5 OOOO

ee
St. Joseph Round-up

Not Depend Only On Governments To

——— eee

28 Patients
At St. Joseph
Almshouise

The Fever Ward at the St.
Joseph Almshouse has been un-
eccupied for many years. Many
people of the district are wonder-
ing whether it would not be better
to make some use of the building
instead of allowing it to remain
as it is at present,

The Almshouse at present has
28 patients—13 males, 11 females
and four children. It has a













there were 49 patients on the roll.

Nurse Winifred Williams has
been Matron for the past 19 years.
Prior to this appointment she
worked with the institution as 4
Staff Nurse.

Nurse Williams is ably assisted
by Nurse Springer, and she has
a staff of two other nurses and
two probationers. Because of her
length of service with the institu-
tion, Miss Williams is well ac-
quainted with the ways of patients.

The Quarters of the Matron and
Nurses, which are attached:‘to the
Almshouse itself, are very con-
gested.

At the back of the Almshouse,
a dangerous looking cliff stands
many feet in the air. Should any
part of this cliff break away, it
would completely demolish the
Almshouse.

The institution is kept in a very
sanitary condition, but many
people are looking forward to the
day when it will be removed to a
better site.

The Members of the Cleavers
Hill Boys’ Club have a_ lovely
kitchen garden, In it they have

planted beet, cabbage and butter];)

beans.
At this Club there are 55 mem-
bers. Twenty-four are active,

The activities are table tennis,
draughts, dominoes, football and
cricket, It is expected that three
trades, carpentry, shoemaking and
tailoring will soon be started.

P.C. 360 Victor Layne is in
charge of the Club which also
takes the form of a Police Post in
the area, He patrols the area and
keeps order in the district.

At the Girls’ Club opposite,
members are putting much effort
into a flower garden, but the best
results are not yet evident,

Miss Audrey Payne is in charge
of this Club, Members do mat«
making and needlework. This
Club has 31 members and all are
active,

A resident of Cleavers Hill told
the Advocate: “The Clubs. have
been of great benefit to the area.
Formerly groups of children were
seen sitting along the road, This
does not occur to-day.”

A perking area is now being
built around the Bathsheba Social
Centre at St. Joseph. The work
is being supervised hy Leon Payne
and he has a staff of three,

The Centre was officially opened
last month by His Excellency the
Governor,

Labourer Guilty Of
Indecent Assault

George Forde, a forty-two year
old labourer of Nelson Street wag
yesterday found guilty by an
Assize jury on a charge of indecent
assault on a twelve-year-old girl.
Sentence was postponed,

Forde who was arraigned on a
two-count indictment was acquit-
ted on the first count of carnal
knowledge. He was represented by
Mr. F. G, Smith. Mr. W. W, Reece,
Q.C., Solicitor General, prosecuted
on behalf of the Crown,

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keep her
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YOUTHFUL

—full of

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Why betired,
constipated
or liverish¥
or suffer indigestion? Bile Beans
will make you vitally fit, full of
energy, bright-cyed and happy

BE SURE TO GET THESE MEDICALL’
TESTED AND APPROVED BILE BEANS

ER Ae EL AE TT

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CYCLE TYRES (3)



RE i BT EE I TT



MONEY

Use MALF as much Fat
as Soap of Soay Fiakes

FAB Washes
FAST

4
i}

PAGE FIVE

MARMITE,

iS EVERYONE’S



The vitamins in Marmite keep everyone fitter. By
adding Marmite to our meals every day, we strengthen
our bodies to resist chills and diseases; we get more
goodness from everything we eat; and children are
assured of a vital ‘extra’ to help them grow
up sturdy and fit. Marmite is delicious in
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because a jar lasts such a long time.

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’
PAGE SIX

CLASSIFIED ADS.






































































/ PUHLIC SALES PUBLIC NOTICES



BARBADOS ADVOCATE
FOR BENT

FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1952

SHIPPING NOTICES









Vampires Spread




































































a |
we
eee o * ’
aa y ‘sla B.G
TELEPHONE 2508 NOTICE ‘Horse Rabies In B.G. peteionnees ts S
aati a | REAL ESTATE All male citieens of the Pnited States | HOUSES j s ROY NETHERLANDS FVOCG SSIS SS SIOSSSISIOS,
i ah ee . * | m the wmesOf 15 arid 6 seciding ene | (Pre Our Gwn Correspondent) } AL =
e : 686 | Barbados a reguesk ractiv . SETOWN
DIED i epee SALE | SONT™ coasts at Flim Man, i”, Vakhaden ake re sd to, gall at oftt active weaside F j GEORGETOWN, July 9. | STEAMSHIP CO. agg a ge ee
;$t. Michael, stand ng on 2 acres @ roods 952 for errs R ing dad oe Bath’ Open Verandah British Guiana cattlemen are The M/V. MON wil %
ea ae S eg 16 perches of ) ‘ inane ereiioe person tor Com le). slarmed over the discovery of SAILING FROM EUROPE teens Cates and Fee =}
Wednesday, 9th July 1 G UTOMOTIVE The Goss is ee oF stone ant coh- 1 Miltary’ Trewing Felgpincne ‘ , ak ‘< Mlses yy ad | At 8. sTemgon wth 1858 . Peninie, eee eka. <
Resrew. His funeral takes place to-day ts | gaits ns 2@fallerigs, Jarge drawing enc dir ' itizens of the United States Permanent ~ pnammes cymes Hom a disease calle OTTICA ith July, 1952. aay 14th saat —ee eS
ra Barrow, Edith BHITISI SHAGULL GUTBOARD- | 200@S baliway, ¢ Ledroos> he. attain the age of 1% years su —t FLAT No. 5. Abergeldie. Fury [equine alytic rabies caused by j}i'S. NESTOR oth July, 1952. if save s row, 2BiTL SHAG ‘ UTBOARD- ‘ hs S at 4 ae er. ivar . sats se i “CA a
ina Berrow, Srnemt | MOTOR, the New Model No, 102 Mark V,| Pedrams, dew Seeley Sha se Neon i 2Muemt MaPuly M4, 3662, are required |{urpitbed fer 3 months from ist. Octoher./vampire bats. The disease orig M.A. setting to. LU _ accept: Cargo and Passengeetifer
, i be seem at. The International | Pe iterteps (to xegister upon the day they. attain the Phgme 4537. ee jinally believed to be encephalo-} 4, < ORANJESTAD lea, Antigua, Montscrat, >
$ . =| ‘orporation Titd., _ Coleridge | " Garage and sorvants Teoms in Yard, , srebteenthy Ney bey no. | MAT Kive soemed fat, fur-jroyelitis was diagnosed as equine} saiminG To TDAD, doth 3 vis and St. Kitts Sailing %
On valde =. F waco at her : ole as a a = east | ww nerous fruft trees fe teth, or. within fwe deys ther sisfied. located in Balmoral Gap From | 552 aralytic rabies by the Bureau & BRITISH Sues day 18th inst. = x
esidience “Midget”, Palm Beach, Hast-;Simpie to operate, asy to move, . ’ q pare : ’
ings, Christ Chureh, Gertrude Rose] SEAGULL js the answer in OUTBOARL It pnanee roads of land adjoining the! , 702 further mtorihatiOn, consult the} Aug. ist for two or three months icf Anis, Husbandry in Wash-|™! 5, STENTO? an den’ ee B.W.L SCHOONER OWNERS’ ©
Meats Ree fre ae Clete eee aa = ©! shove (excelent buiidipg sites) SEE ee Oe aes eet toes jington to whom the brain of a/nis. NESTOR 6th August, 1952. ASSOCIATION (INC) x
lace at 5.00 p.m. to-day at 1e West- | informatio 7.52-—in. | Lik” he 4 texeent Su e Z 24, i acme ranean epsenatieainesirsim aan ‘4 c rho , .
bury Cemetery where friends are! {een eae except dimipsath on oe aot yee reneute Sante bod Entrance | ead horse was sent for investiga- ore ae TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO a oe en
asked to attend. * PSE ud } CAR Pore 10 Dips i gooe wari “| The khove will bé eet, up tht. sal NOTr lo eacons Road, Dial 2461, 11 7mein.{tion. Brazil reports that white |™ EReD BA Ss Tey, eee - :
De eee ee Meets 4g Se abe ae ames 947 | in Gocwpelven. on miday, tam ea * cmenn Mencia es }wi} are the vampire’s greatest] s. HESTIA Sst July, 2082, %
| ~ [Eeedighes Meret tere aleaihingiing > ~~ tegen et 4 ROOMS—Two furnished rocms, running | enemy and the disease was arrest-| 8. P. MUSGON, SON @ CO., LTD. ate mdee bbe
SPENCER-—On July 10, 195%—Geors GAR—Tord 10, Excellent condition, | HAGEPMMERPE Nang @ ivmech ts foes S crven that ert | Mater, WHR or without tenkfast. In) 4 sowing a ban on shooting Agents GOCE OR GOEIO EOE
Edward Lloyd Spencer (late of the' Apptr: «Mighténgale, Hingsbury Rend j aioe ple nd EASE HIVEN that 81!) Woodside Gardens, 10 minitus walk to|Cd fo i
Imperial College of Tropical Agricai Ge; 3.20 p.m. 10 ' rere hav ing any debts or claims acne | °° Club, or City. Dial 3356. jowls ‘but white owls are unknows 1} iecinaelgn niche -
ture, ‘Peinided?.. His funerad leaves! “Melwi”, Brown's Gap at 4.30 o'clock ONE (3) Austin two toa truck anc one | Boe sae ceekon ak eth oy tn ~ te
this afternoon for the Westoury Cem-F (1) Austin A:40 Car. ‘Telephone 402i, | Meee ree end prin s > parich ot Che ist Charen whe died | ANT ae. oe but has now spread a ‘a nadian ationa came Ips
etery. Friends are asked to attend. BD, V. Scott. d& Co., Ltd, Wools = io cat Chigaatins eamacenieds a ten. "7 f fh 4 ED o oTses.
Blanche Spencer (wife); Gardner! 26.6.52—t.f.n bees one a ass ae Shee feckiey a NESEPY, required wo ia in parmene | a a
aid Harry Spencer, Gertrude Tmitiss, | res i ie . sdjoining che. apoueee an pory. m= o eet bene on atte: TUDOR 10 DIE IN BUS !
Aubrey W. Smith, Jes, N. Smith, TRUC™—Chevrolet truck, no. Preason- Ns B ki h, 128, Roebuck St. oer Roebuck Street Aa cae ee ’ | SOUTHBOUND Balls Sutls Arrives Salls
1.7.52! nite offer tefused. A Barnes & To., |S Mine, te, P naaninn Teta ee: 7 Senn HELP UCK CRASH Halifax Boston B'dos Rides
nae ! {Ltd 3.1.428—t.hn. $0.7 .82 shin. | 0 # fore the 2 ote rain CANADIAN CRUISER -+ $9 June siuly 9July 9 July
phim renena=intego beste is dk ee ‘ceed : AN CONSTRUCTOR @ Suly 14 July 14 July
i A f +3 : 5 OFFERS for a briek wall to be de-' the assets of the estate among the parties Cook--First class cook (woman) for MEXICO, July 9. aa DNE ub
GOVERNMENT NOTICE | a % ree a ly ‘aoe GM, | beolished ond fr from our ontitied thereto having regerd to the debts | hotel hear City, appky by letter stating Police said ten persons ioe 2 = ‘oe * duly 14 ia 8 Juy am duly 3% July
| scent my Or ee ote xe | Cavans Stroet Store will be received and cléims only cf which I shall then | experience. A. B. Ltd. c/o Advocate.| Police Sag oak na tikes | % .
New L. N. Hutthinson, Clarendos | : “ 9.7.52—3 killed anq six critically injured!.
*Biack Rock or phone 4908 by Twelth July. DaCOSTA & Se ee are nee notice and. th " ; a a be + 7. n.} k . d 3 oo Sem tote ieee aul’ "RGaen ~ . See — ears eto
cs a ‘In «| r assets so distribute ae ee nan ren eee eee nana ryhen a bus cra ¥ BOU Arete:
Visit oe os ~— FO. Eto Stapp \paesort of Whose debt or claim 1 shal nXQUNG MAN—A capable, | ene | a parked cattle truck early to- Hace” St. Sonn “ir'des Gostom = Mallfar Montreal
“H.M.S. Burghea ay” will es - ; 2) | SHARES—1190 Shares, GawitaryLauadry | ot have had notice at the tlme of such | hardworking young man to hehe =
: i~Qne (1) Fotdsén Van (M1962) f 7 deubedze a} da The truck was parked on] ¢ TAN
be visiting Barbados trom the { ey working eee mae ‘West “Enata dann tin entre Ral "Co. winnie’ | ‘hes Mi pees indebted to the said aor for aks man. heeled ne. highway without lights. The CARONSTRUCTOR %4 July @ uty 6 Aug. 8 Aug. 10 Aug.
1th to 14th July, and will be open | ivic"'c/o He Torte Bouting CO,” Rogbucx | Wert Sadie, me Memmer eGo tics | ests ‘ure “renuestea, to" settle” thet {iether Bow XK. c/o Advocate | front of the bus was sheared and| LADY ROOMS. 9 Aug. 19 Aug 20 Aug. 23 Aug.
to organised parties of limited | “rect. ee: | Biscuit Co. Limited (at $16.25 per share). | xceounts without delay. ; 2s the truck’s platform telescoped by| por"gurther particulars, apply 40>
numbers from Youth Organisations " . All shares cum dividend. | “Dated this 29th day of May, 1952. r tremendous impact.
; : ELECTRICAL R. 8. NICHOLIZ & CO., | JOSEPH ONLSIMUS TUDOR, (Sar.)
such as Scouts, Guides etc., from} _ nae iat aeaaties Soltettors. Quatified Executor, MISCELLANEOUS GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD.—Agents.
2 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday the} ace’ WASHING MACHINES —Britain's Phone 2925, 7.52—$n, | Estate, George Arlington Payne, decd. deca. a enna U.S —JAP AIRLINE
~ 4 @astest Electric Washers $217.29 Less 5% } ME. hor t well ire r jit ill macdaaiat atlantis wvtteieliaitatan
12th July. Mouds of Youth ores sash discount, Cave Shepherd & Co.,y SPRINGVALE NTATION, Sate te eae cat Honale gxedlent| PLANNED i
isations who wish to arrange for}; iq 11.7.52--3n. }Amdrew, About arable acres and mouset, Phone 2222. 11.7.52—1n. TOKYO, July 9
parties to visit the ship, are asked | —-——___________ rer about 60 acres in pastures, roeds, etc. Tide. Ade bbidibinhadcabhobbnlineemlins anaes aa hippin 4 pa de
i r Just received new shipmen arrard | Manager's jouse, Overseer’s ouse, a c ily red apanese sh ie
to get in touch with the Harbour | sce speed Automatic Changers at fusnal oottai gs, two horves, cart, ete. NOTICE Satreneaapeetting ey subscribers tc| and a United States airline, are
and Shipping Master who will], Maffei & C td. Radio Em- be : Re Estate of ae q 2
e. ¢. 8. 2 ei & Co. Li The above Plantation will offered REDIFFUSION in one month 7 her rT link
arrange transport. porium 15.6,52—t.f.n. }for sale at auction on Friday, the Lith WILLIAM gp ps csi’ WORRELA in on n. gse—en,| Working together on plans to li
9 Rites | perenne te ann July next, unless Breviously sold bY! NOTICE is he aoe eas thet ai Gee depen nod Srael by air beginning
abe ee JusT R “Pye” e Uxe |} private treaty. inquiries ou e avi 4 3S e Hexcy . ; re nex ictober.— U.P.
Ultra-Modern Radio-Grams_ (with Gar- {directed to the undersigned im the first | °O"* having any debt or claim against REDIFFUSION offers $1.50 cash for t

rard 3.speed changers) Two Pickiip Heads | instance.
LOST & FOUND no needle worries, in attractive walnut j
esbinets. A mited: quantity only
$120.00. P. C. S. MAFFEI & CO., LTD.,
Pr: Wm. Henry Strect.

CARRENGTON & SEALY,
a Street,
ridgetewn .
9.7,6a—3n.





28.6.52- t.£.n, |









LOS LT
T ty The undersigned will offer for sale at
aetna PYE BATTERY SETS—Just a few left.| their Office No. 17 nh Street, on Friday
SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS—12 Jemaeey | Seer RADIO . the 25th July 1952 at . pam., by public
H.W.I. Sweepstake Tickets im un 15.6.52—4.f.n. | competition, the Dwellinghouse known
eee gateeee % 26 os Aen onto nego as “Edenville” standing, on 30s. ganar
Poe iene ik ore FURNITURE feet of land at George Street, Belleville
vee to 20. Finder please | N St. Michael. The Dwel¥inghouse contains
retura fo Eustace Holder c/o N. £. | - = a tn



gallery, drawing and dining reoms, two

ay
Wileae 4 Co. 21, Swan Street CHAIR=One Invalid's Wheel Chair bedrooms, one with running water),



















10.7. 2 | practical! new, rice $100.00. ply | J t light
ee 52—2n 1 Rte wills t. Savour's Willage Benge ee eikos: bath. Electric lig
Dark Hole St. Joseph. 22,6.$2—4n. a oled on application to. .Mer,
FOUND H. A. M. Lashley by phoning 4007.
KEYS—A bunch of keys in Leathe LIVESTOCK . 6 = particulars and conditions
Public Market. © insets nantly
ued’ aioe by applying to dest | fen cOWs— 1) gust caived (2) to co 2 CATFORD oO
List af cs an weeks, P B Waiker :
Trikes se 6 Sn io ftand” &. George. 10.7, 52--3n, 11.7,52—fn
PE NAL | MECHANICAL NOTICE
RSO ADDING MACHINES—New shipment
( Addo Addtus Machinas just received. | 4 We. ha Rap Bevery, (148.
en seiveripentneninretee id and. Electrically ted. T, Ged } ,
The public are her warned against : Gront fa porate bi o7as an 200 Barbados Foundry Limited Shares
giving credit to any person or persons | 520 Barbados Co-operative Cotton Fac-

whomseever in my name as 1 do net hold

if tory Ltd, Shares.
myse

ee
} “DUPLICATORS-Roneo Retary Dupli-





























K. R. Hunte & Co,, Lid.
Dial rr
a

Lower Broad Street. Sale at 2pm, Terms Cash i
VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer,

9, 7.52—3n,





responsible for anyone Con- | epto several 3] 0 500 Barnes & Co,, Litd., 5% Preference
wae any oo or 's pig sa 7 aan oes Se re eae sec Sa Shares re eres os the
unless by o written order signed by me.) Grant Ltd. ane,* 1 195 Barbadoe urance Co.
JOSEPH —. HAYDE, | nt Ltd., Bolton Lane nae | s
ares aes I “OFFICE EQUIPMENT—Roneo Filing Barbados sh Shipping & Trading Co.,
‘ ohn, ' Cabinets, Roneo Desks, Stationery Cup-
. 10.7, 52—21 |b ards, now available from stock at T,]| 20 West India Biscuit Co,, Ltd. Shares.
ee oeenemeereenenamenenneenennnnees eevee | Ceddes Grant Ltd. Phone 4442.” ‘Trinidad & Tobago 1963 4% Bonds.
The public are hereby warned against ; 9.7.52—0n; 3. St. Georges Parish 4% Bonds eee |
one credit to any person or perso Be st kd ae The a ean ae ber be
whomaoever in my nime ss [ do not ype al cet wp for sal at ub lic uction on!
hold mysel! responsible for anyone coy CP YREWRITERS Poe ee eee new | Prigay the 11th day of July, 1982. at |
tracting any debt or debts in my nar T. Geddes Grant Ltd, Phone 4442," 2 pam at Carrington & Sealy, Lucas |
unle®s ty u written order signed by me. > 9.7. f2-0n. | Street, Bridgetown. }
Sed, HOBART LEOPOLD BYNU Zo asset ee) Ee ae 6.9. $2+4n |
ogers Road, The Ivy, + eel
St. Michiel, MISCELLANEOUS \
1 -5a—2r a eee ae emnrerrate ncn mrt
i ADMIRALTY CHARTS of the fotiow- AUCTION \
The West Indies, Barbados, Grena-
NOTICE OF TRADE MARK ainas eee inion, ‘Wark Bndies te) By Instructions of the Insurance Co:
Pacsage to nica, es to instruction 8
Windward Talands. Bo & Co. No. 9} # will sell at the FORT ROYAL. GARAGE,
High St.. Dial 3301. 11.7.62~—sn,] on FRIDAY ith at 2 p.m. ONE,
pe owl Na hE a ea CAR. Damaged '
PAROMETERS—Household and Ships }) by Fire
| Anevoid Barometers, Roberts & Co, No. R. ARCHER McKENZIE.
§ Dleh St, Dial 3301, 11.7.62—3n. 9.7.52—3n.
MODELS—Five floating stale models.
Ships of Royal Nays Nourse, ashpy, st | UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER +
| George. 5.7.52—6n | By Instructions received from the
SS enrvance Co. A will sell at Messre.
MOBO TOYS—For that birthaay gift:} General Motor Co., Nelson Street!
horses, toteyeles, chair desis, snails,} on Friday, July inh (1) 1952-A-40 Austin
bieyelés etc. feountnyman) ad in aceident.



! ed
The Sidhe Oats Company, a corpor- “NYLON ‘STOCKINGS — La

‘or lowely
inuatly a. pair or three a for
{ 00 at Kirpalant 52, Swan St

11,7. 52—In.

a
VEFRIGERATOR—One Electrolux Oi)
suming Refrigerater. Just painted. Can

ation organized and existing under tre
laws of the State of New Jersey, and
having a place of business at 141 Wes!
Jackson Boulevard, City of Chicago,
County of Cook, State of Tiinols,
United States o2 America, eee 1

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER



ny order of Mrs.

turets, hereby gives notice that it p - 7 : . = TUESDAY, 15th ky order |
“ 9° seen working, Apply: Ward. _ River, will eell the Furniture
oan feode* and’ trevetienta of Philip. Dial’ 9S-qa7, 9.7.8a-Sn. ié “Gietament ke’ St. Joseph which

foods, particularly flour, cereal products

ee rn ineludes
pnd feeds That the Trade Mark is usu-| Subscribe now to the Baily Telegraph indie Table (seat 12), China Cabinet,

«|









By Lioyd Douglas



Segioud’s leading Daily Newspaper vow] Tub C and hacks 8, Upriaht Chairs,
ally impressed or oe te tgeeae areivind m Bariados by Alr only a teow inne * . Double
ba paskeace dos cancta themselves. | /° "5 sfier py in Londen. Con- Ena Settee all in aeahabehy Glass and
ue <7 pechne are hereby warned t: ben Gale, c/o Advoeate Co., Lid hina, Breakfast sR Berend atures, HMV

ea t of sald ‘Trady | )Oval Reprewentative, Tel, 3118. Gramaphone; acio im good

cent Tena telaan ut Bar 11-4.08—t.t.0. | order; Serving : Sideboard Hat.

Mane ne vom - eea in the _ . mone | sta * Desk; Wai eC, Dressing Tabie.

inet Pcieetis uring wD acember 1942. SEAL-A-VAC-—Flaak Stoppers, will not} W: nds in Mahogany: Pine Bedsteads

¥ ted this 18th day of June 1952. “pop out”, cannot leak, Is hygienic, | w VYonoe Springs; Larder, Cream

. IE THE QUAKER OATS COMPANY, ) thest thermal efficiency for hot or cold, | & , Senles, and many other items.

: Per: Cottle, Catford & Co, | | bl. standard size Flask only 42 cents} Sa’ .30 o'elook, Terms eash,
Agents. | (ch. Harrison. Dial 2364, B TROTMAN & CO.
= 9.7,.52—3n 11.7.52—2n. Auctioneers

a re

SOSOSSOSS ESOS FOS CPOE. WEDDING GIFT—A few ironing board 11.7.52—2n.
| end No-cord iron sets, subject to special
& wedding-gift eine’ A Barnes &

TO-DAY'S NEWS PT aces TED | $46696999S0090900500000%,

idee sich > >

OLLAND >: | : %

BOSWELL IN H A :
: 17691104 4.00 * DANCE NOTICE
THE CLOUD AB ‘A et
FOREN — By Bir Eni are Ma FARLEY HILL COUNTRY
TIME TO REMEMBER x ’ CLUB, St. Peter
i
i
i

PPCSOSGO PAI

A WOMAN CALLED % OPENING D ANCE
By Frank faeby vere oe st
learing out from our Hardwa * y ' ae
_ “Department cia giving vitamins and minerals SATURDAY 12th JULY, 1952
Sho ric * New a Sees +s %
Fat ee Gilde ber 100. )) page Of XYEAST-PHOS. Enjoy life Starts at 9.00 p.m.
All heavy Hardware items at a Dress Optional %
cost and below. 4 °
: These cut prices are due to ow ¥, a)
Coase out the greater part of 32) ADMISSION tt! $1.00

eur Hardware Department).

JOUNSON'S STATIONERY AND
HARDWARE

ad

(Meanwell’s Orchestra)
11,7.52.—2n,

COS









And a Holiday-on-Wheeis among the highways
and byways of the Lritish Isles; with a
ZEPHYR or CONSUL to answer your every
holiday whim—licensed, insured and with

tankful of gas, ready to vo the moment you



Plo iu i *
arrive in London! Please enquire further from

~~. >ooxzzrrrmarraanmmrnmrens





ST aS TS





or affecting the estate of William Albert |each new Subscriber recommended by







Worrell, gosneee, see aa some cue you. 1.7,52—6n. -
more Rock in the parish a! n ich- ——~--—--—

tel in this Island who me at sere? | SUPPLEMENT YOUR ous, te

Collymore Rock aforessid on commending REDIFFUS ss

ae at Cetober, 1951, are requested to full particulars from the REDIFFUSION er your

send in particulars of their claims duly | office. 1.7.52—fn

attested to the undersigned EVA
WALCOTT WORRELL Qualified Execu-
trix of the will of the said William Ai-



TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bonus
from Rediffusion for 25 recommende-

G6“ TRANSATLANTIQUE






ACHES...

hert Worrell, deceased, ¢/o Messrs. | tions in one calencay month. Backache is usually ca by lazy ki Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
: Gtifith, Solicitors, No. 12 1.7.52~6n. used idneys.
Girt Sie “aesdgetowa on ak beste The kidneys are the bloods filters. When Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica



they get out of order, excess acids and
poisonous wastes stay in the system,
Then backache, headache, rheumatism,
disturbed rest or that ‘tired out’ feeli
goon follow. To make your kidneys
properly — and to keep them in good order —
use Dodd’s Kidney Pills. Dodd's Kidney
Pills quickly rid your oyer-burdened blood
of excess acids and wastes so that pure,

the 15th day of August, 1952 after which . x
date I shall proceed to distribute the EMEN
ensets of the deceased among the par- ANNOUNC Ts
ties entitled thereto having refard only
to such claims of whicg 2 shall then | ‘
haye.had. notice and T wit not be liable
tor the assct® or any part fhereof so
distributed to any pérson of whose debt
ér claim % shall mot then have had |*
notice. ¢
And all persons indebted to the said

From Southampton Arrives Barbados
*“DE GRASSE” +» 12th July, 1952 .. 24th July, 1952
“COLOMBIE” «» S3ist July, 1952 .. 13th Avg., 1952
*“DE GRASSE” .. 22nd Aug. 1952 .. 3rd Sept., 1952
*Not calling at Guadeloupe Bs



ee
EARN BIG MONEY by selling Redif-

susion in your spare time. Get « supply

of forms today. 1.7.52—6n. |










PESOS OS PO OOPS POPS,











estate are Yequested to settic their in- | FLASH NEWS %s | fresh blood flows to every nerve and muscle. SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE
debtedness weamnout, Seley. peer & Slice” austeae = GAYS SS | Then you feel betier—look better—work From Barbados Arrives Southampton
Dae WEVA WALCOTT WORKELL, Pe ee Z| pele So res see © ae ote “COLOMBIE” .. 18th July, 1952 .. 28th July, 1952

i the , 5 AN: pp >| U mee >
Qualified Executrix af the The VARIETY SANDAL SHOPPE %| Pills in the blue ‘pockage with the ved =e GRASEE .. 6th Aug, 1952 .. 16th Aug., 1952
Worrell (dees: asc) eee aes mee | bands. Only 3/- at all drug stores. 424 ES - -. 24th Aug, 1962 .. 5th Sept. 1962
2.6.5 x on some > ty ee 7 * x | Kid Pills DE GRAgRE” -. 16th Sept., 1952 *". 26th Sept., 1952
399959906945606655900659) | Dodds ney Sailing direct to Southampton



R. M. a & co., LTD.





ORIENTAL
PALACE

VELVET EVENING BAGS

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

DECISIONS





a Speciality. Wages Board Act, 1943, and Wages Board Regulations, 1944.
i SOUVENIRS —
i} FROM INDIA, CHANA & DECISIONS made under Sections 10, 11 and 12 of the Wages Board
\ CEYLON Act, 1943 (1943—25) by the Waves Board established under the
\ 7 H AN N \' S_ Wages Board (Bridgetown Shop Assistants) Order, 1950

Wages Board (Bridgetown Shop Assistants) (Amendment)
Decisions, 1952, No. 2

Pr Wr ve & fhias

THE T.S.S.: GOLFITO will be arriving from South-
ampton at noon on Saturday, 12th July, and will be
sailing the same evening for Trinidad.





These Decisions may be cited as the Wages Board (Bridgetown
Shop Assistants) (Amendment) Decisions 1952, No. 2 and shall
be construed as one with the Wages Board (Bridgetown Shop
Assistants) Decisions, 1950, No. 2 (hereinafter referred to as the
Principal Decisions).

Sub-paragraph (1) of paragraph 3 of the Principal Decisions is
hereby repealed and the following new sub-paragraph substituted
therefor: —

“(1) The minimum holiday with pay for shop assistants
in Bridgetown shall be in accordance with the Holidays with
Pay Act, 1951 (1951-38), and any Act amending the same.”

Made this 6th day of June, 1952.

ASSISTANT TEACHERS
NOTICE

All Assistant Teachers are
hereby notified that the usu-
al monthly meeting takes
place to-morrow, Saturday,
12th at 11,00 aan, punctual-
ly.

c. C. D, ROACHFORD,

Secretary, A.T.U.
11,7.52—1n,.

There is ample first class accommodation available
for Trinidad.

Apply ...

Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd.

R. NICHOLAS JACK,
Labour Commissioner,
Chairman, Wages Board for Shop Assistants in Bridgetown.
Approved by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this 26th day
of June, 1952,





SPECIAL
DISCOUNT

of 10%

By Command,
J. C. KING,
Clerk, Executive Committee.
11.7.52—2n





Now Obtainable at

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

AT ATTRACTIVE PRICES

Barbados Amateur Boxing Assn.

Under the patronage of

CANADA DRY

=|



Invite
Entries for the 1952 CHAMPIONSHIPS
% to be held at



THE MODERN HIGH SCHOOL STADIUM

on at} during the month of August at a date to be announced later






% Championships will ve contested in the following divisions:
PEARL NECKLACES s Flyweight — — under 112 lbs.
x Bantamweight yo
at your Jewellers... $ tue —_ ” i” ” R. M. JONES & co., LTD., beg to notify the public
Y. De Lave A os eek: wi 143 x , § that, until further notice, due to building alterations
2 eR Sot ” b
‘ wT : ht Heavyweight— SAG og the en
& CO., LED. ‘ Hides yweight— jon. Aag 3 e entrance to their office will be on McGregor Street :
20 BROAD ST.. and at . pretending competitors are asked to call at Modern High Schoot x instead of Prince Wm. Henry Street. x
MARINE GARDENS for Entry Forms any afternoon 4—5 p.m. ¥ % ’ 3
2 x
3663 oh

Zz 5 56SS660655959S9SS9965 PPOSEOES

POPSPP OOPS OESSS



——_"

ay

Telephone Main Office 4493

Charles MeEnearney & Co., Ltd.

$23 +

Y


















FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1952
I a NS LE NL TTY A NT NY VT



HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON



4M GOING
TO MY CABIN.
COOCONIGAT.

I WONDER IF 5:
KNOWS WE SUSPECT
VILL OF THAT ROBSERY-
AND THAT S=VERN
PUT e* UP TOIT?



BLONDIE









=



$oGr Goes “










SST
Seat apcaiane oe

ee ~~ stn Youn Bost CLEAN come IMPORTANT

WHERE IS MY >S Coa IT HAVE AND YOU MUST

5 C7, COME DOW?

BATHROBE ? 1% te NT} | L NON THE, 5 See xc own :

I WANT TO A ( CLEANERS | iS en /

TAKE A 377 aa DEAR

BATH AV ee ) 3 ae

Na)
_&

iy

THAT 1S MO-LOK, GOD OF
FROST/ THE TEMPERATURE
INSIDE THE iOOL IS TWO
HUNORED DEGREES BELOW
ZERO! BELIEVE ME, FLASH
GORDON, IT |S A TERRIBLE
DEATH IN THAT FURNACE
OF FROST/






YES, YOUR _CREWMEN
ARE MY PRISONERS /
I_ WOULD HAVE LIKED
f YOU TO ACCEPT mY

. PROPOSAL WILLINGLY/...


















166
EVERYBODY
DOWN HERE? J)



I KNOW I'M
HERE ... WHAT'S



BE CAREFUL NOT
TO FALL, HERR

Ev Tue coun or
2 i> (Piac SMELLS



MAGGIE - I'M PROUD
WINNING WAS,
ENOUGH / THEY

SEEMED SO HAPPY

WHEN I CANCELLED

> THE $3450
aoe ME /

>

of j

OF YOU! IT WAS VERY
GENEROUS OF YOU

NOT TO ACCEPT YOUR
WINNINGS /



[7 THANKS, CARMODY...
_. || S=2( 1 CAN'T. SAY 1 ENJOYED
/ '
we'VE GOT SEIN! YOR GUEST!
LIL! LAVELLE, AND. SSS ug {

penne ee
‘YEAH, ¥ SHUT UF UP AN’ ORIVE

SHU
FINE!

(Gee, 8055, IT'S Y
IGREAT TO SEE

YOU'RE
FINE! /

) "KiRBY'S PLACE...
SOME UNFINISHED

eon L. “Ip

iT DOESN'T MAKE /AUCH DIFFERENCE) LET'S JUST SAY |
INOW, BUT I'M. CURIOUS, SEVEN... /I’M THE GALLANT
WHY OID YOU-CONFESS TO.THE / TYPE, AN' FORGET |

|MURDER OF YOUNG LAMBERT IT. EH CARMOOY#|
|AFTER WE HAD PICKED UP
| MONICA HILL?

YUt!

LOOKIN



YOU'RE A FREE “4
JOE SEVEN!

THE CPECIAL MEDAL # ORDERED By.

THE 9.C, HIMSELF! HASN'T

HAPPENED INA DECADE!
#1 WHAT DOVOUTHINKOF =~
==\ THAT ? —

Pr GE E- 5
\wai2!

BARBADOS ADVOCATE




PAGI

EVEN



°
me)
»
3
+
> ;

-

%
Â¥,
Â¥

PPPS ET

YES SIR!

S&SRUM

It’s the Flavour—
A Pistiz Flavour
Always Right--

ietis

4

your vays

STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.

Hei dquerters for Best Rum
‘ 699 POS y SSSIOSE Ape FN

neon 590% |
“SAL SO 3550990890 6SOO POO PSSSOSS OD

Holiday Entertainment



Att ee
FP a



.
~
+
* MIXED VEGETABLES in
es tins
+
i SLICED HAM
Bs LAME TONGUES in tins
ia
|} CORNED MUTTON in tins
|% ROAST BEEF in tins
1&
1% VEAL LOAF in tins
|
% LUNCHEON BEEF in tins
E R R I N (5 S N ee a
Â¥,
x FIVE STAR RUM
e

FRESH - or ix TOMATO SAUCE % '

INCE & CO.
LTD.

8 & 9, ROEBUCK ST.

oe PPP AOS



ee

en POOPSE LEE? ~

SSO SSSOOO FIG

er
6 CEP ESF SFO
eee tereear settee GIL

+

§
§

PECES

OPEC OIAS

+S9G6eo

OT OS SO



IT PAYS YOU

‘TO DEAL HERE



SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Cr Credit Customers for T for Thursday ‘to Saturday only













Soo

SPECIAL OFFERS are are now ay vaillable at our Branches White Park,
Tweedside, Speightstown and Swan Street



Usually Now PEARS SOAP 32
OVALTINE—Large 18) |: A410 CAMAY SOAP Rect
TOILET PAPER weed 35 80 CASHMERE ic eiieee sie rseness at
COLGATHS 5... 19
APRICOT JUICE in ‘2 WILLOW BEAUTY SOAP AS
MILK and ALMOND OIL
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THE COLONNADE GROCERIES
The Place Where Your Dollar Goes Further



CRICKET

The West Indies in Australia 1951—52

CRUSADERS

By HAROLD DALE

Mr, Harold Dale, already known to Millions
of readers for his forthright cricket reporting in
the Daily Express adds another outstanding book

to our series on Test Cricket. How would the
flashing strokes of Weekes, Worrell and Walcott
match up to the efficient run-getting of Morris and
Hassett?

Would the spin and guile of Ramadhin and





Valentine be more effective than the menacing
speed of .Lindwall and Miller? Would the
“stormy petrel of cricket,” Barnes, succeed in his
attempt at a comeback? These and the other

LT, . ‘
questions that spring to mind are fully dealt with

A ‘ ae ve ”, . ‘ ory ar Pe
Read all about Your favourite in Mr, Dale’s candid commentary Apart from
e : derailed chapters on the Test, he covers all the

Cricketing Stars— other jmportant games of the tour.
Few cricket enthusiasts could afford the time
6

GODDARD, ATKINSON, and money to be present throughout the “World

MARSHALL, WALCOTT, Championship” matches. Cricket Crusaders is



the idea) substitute for the absentee. Reinforced
WEEKES, WORRELL. by many splendid action illustrations, it brings a
momentous series right to

the

armchair

ADVOCATE
STATIONERY

reader’



$3.50

per copy















©
st

zt

wt

OO tet hm eater

sant hae Rom

a ve



PAGE EIGHT



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Surrey Establish 32-Point Lead By

*

Keating Worcester In Two Days

(From Out Own Correspondent) :
Japan Will

LONDON, July 16,
Worcester in two days at Kidderminster, Sur-

Reopen Swim
Controversy

the \fth county championship victory of

n and now 32 points ahead of their nearest

rs Middlesex who were without a game. Worces-

1 lown badly against spinners Lock and Laker both
\ rt ce for 30 and Erie Bedser and Fishlock

had no difficulty in hitting off the 17 needed for victory.
Chest . : By MILLIE HUDSON

‘iin Vusce oF ine Japanese

sw.mming delegate will be

heard immediately on his

being admi:ted to the Inter-

naticnal Gympie Committee

terfield the match be-
‘ he indian tourists and
Dert ll enter the last day in
ting position, The tour-
ni wickets in hand re-
victory. Derby to-

missed for 296. after an enforced silence
h following up his five since the war.

F innings. by At his first meeting, to be held

bee wder agen 2 ~4 during the XVth O.ympiad in

. gots ra ine Helsinki in July, he is to reopen

5. Kk. Gack i vn he had the controversial question of the

“Mantr? and butterfly and orthodox _ breast-

ood fi and took the <3). strokes. His vote will go for a

ithout further loss Yorkshire versus. Glamorgan: *e@parate race for each stroke in

24 not out, and Man- Yorks 321 for six declared and 167 ‘uture.

The mitter was thoroughly dis-

eussed at the 1948 meeting, but

several English-Speaking deéle-

gates were not satisfied with the

interpretation given in the trans-

lation of the minutes. So the mat-

ter was postponed until 1952.

31 s for six, (Hutton 72); Glamorgan
Scoreboard 222, (Wardle five for 40),
English Backing
If he wins—and he will have

versus the Surrey beat Worcester by ten
i162 and 296; the wickets; . Worcester 203 and 139;
18 for one Surrey 329 and 17 for no wicket.
English backing among others—
the orthodox breast stroke wil:
probably be over the 200 metres
event at present on the pro-
gramme for men and women. The
butterfly would best be over 100
metres,

Whereas men have now com-
fortab'y mastered the strenuous
butterfly stroke over tne longe:
distance, women have /;o fa
failed. Those who are faster on
it over 100 yards or metres,
haye hot apparently acquired a
sufficiently supple or relaxed
shoulder action to continue. Or
they have not achieved a per-
feet rhythmic timing for this
tricky stroke.

The crawl stroke was found a3
difficult to many when first intro-
duced. Now it is done over any
distance, even in races across the
Ch- nnel,

Another Idea
Another idea, I think, would be



L ah
uw Lot

Hants versus Notts: Hants 320;
Notts 152, (Gray seven for 56)
and 174 tor two, (Giles 99 not
out). F

Leicester versus Sussex. Sussex
403; Leicester 360 for six, (Jack-
son 101).

Lanes. versus Essex; “Lancs 349
for five declared and 72 for 2;
I x 221 (Statham three for 66).
somerset versus Kent; Kent
326; Somerset 162, (Wright five
jor 68) and 207 for four, (Tordoff









nine but

Indians:
er indians
8&6 and

yea Olympic Games
Team Short Of £700

(From Gur Own Correspondent)
LONDON, July 10,

Jamaica’s Olympic Games team which leaves to-mor-
ow by air for Helsinki is short of £700. The money. has
becn guaranteed by three officials Mr. Herbert McDonald
team manager, Mr. Frank Myers and Mr. Vivian Dayes. It
had not been for this guarantee, it would have been
to leave behind in London, coach J. J. Yancey

fifth member of the relay team.





nece ary
and Byron La Beach,



SNAPPERS
2—1 in the season’s
m the Aquatic Club yester-,

bal Mr. McDonald said today “I am
vusly to the team but the public’s
© ‘ J *) 1
onilas 2<—
er this week saying we were short
‘ Rather than do this, three of us
doy te establish a three point lead;

distressed that sufficient a 9
‘ fins e avai

eval nave not been made available to

snapper 5 Beat: Government subscribed gener-

subseriptions fell below mark.

‘JWhen I cabled to Jamaica earl-

sated Bonitas of money I was told to leave two

ime Water Polo members of the party behind.

decided to go guarantor. for £700.

“It would be ridiculous for us






in the Cup line up for the ‘ eae eke either f0F the. Olympic programme dis-
Challenge Cup. Kenneth - Me mebech if wa lot ae of oe and back-

wed both for Snappers and jy. Beach behind, it would mean § rok e to be exchanged. even if
Owen Johnson for Bonitas. shat if any members of the party only for women. Then erthodox

Bonitas with eight points and were ill or injured, we should not oF butterfly could still be optional,
two more matches can at most@\. apie to enter in the relay which but over 100 metres, and the back-
muster 12 points, but Snappere% 1. whole world is expecting us stroke held over a 200 metres
with 11 points and one more?’ win.” course,

match to be played against Whip-#
porays who were defeated in each
match they played this season, has'
chance of carrying off the

Below Scratch

Mr. MacDonald added that with
he exception of Rhoden, all the
nembers of the team were below
Cup. é wratch. '

it was altogether a_ fighting “We shall need the efforts of a
match in which one felt that any-[ooach now more than ever” he
thing might happen at any time! .qded, “But I still wish the Olym-
indeed, so keen was the contests! nics were a fortnight further
that there was never certainly* away. ’
which team would win. . Mr. MacDonald said that in Hel-

Each team went into the water’ sinki special attention would be
with its strongest side. From the‘ paid to baton changing. He was
beginning players were marking not satisfied with the way the team
ach other closely and one had to had performed at White City when
be shrewd in passing the ball they set up the new Empire Relay
owt of the reach of the marking “record, and he thought that with
cpponent if it were to be a good proper changing they could have
pass. So the game was fast from eee rar or even two seconds
the start with swift swimming, better time.
and good passing from both sides } Dah ere ae ar

i s £0; ‘pers savi some team’s cé if st,
wom ie sasieon ee He had been working at his stud-

In the first. half, Clarke the ies too hard and was tired, But
Snappers goalkeeper saved quite a pith tent expected
few of what seemed certain goals “ ‘ or
. ' Ridiaeas: py 1 ae MacDanald’s forecasts were that
from the re pie aes Rhoden would probably win the
Sear Ree APRN ag ot ; 400 metres with Wint as his most
Boni as M ere most aggressive ant dangerous opponent and that Mac
consistent in theiy efforts at Donald Ba‘ley who will be run-
SEOyINE: an 5 ning for Great Britain, would win

One Time Shots the hundred metres. He thought

Meanwhile Bannister was try- Jamaica had a fine chance in four

ing those one time shots he has the by the four hundred metres, but

having two events
stroke, as they do not wish the
Olympic programme to be length-
ened.

This is an important point, con-
sidering it has more or less been
decided to include a medley team
relay (3 x 100 metres. of back,
breast and free-styles),

The Americans are keen also to
include water ballets te be judg-
ed on points rather like diving.

Daly Four Points
Ahead Of Locke

(From Our Own. Correspondent)
LONDON, July 10,

After two rounds the Irishman
Fred Daly of Balmoral, led the
field in tne open golf champion-
ship at Royal Lytham and Stannes.
He added a 69 today to his record
breaking 67 of Wednesday for a
total of 136,

Four shots behind with 140 is
the South African champion,
Bobby Locke and one shot behind
him is the 22-year-old Australian
professional Peter Thompson, The
final two rounds will be played

every









habit of making immediately on warned that stiff opposition could HOMRarreW

receiving a pass, especially a high could be expected from the United

one, and Ince had taken a few States. Pe

shots which went slightly wide of In the women’s events, he ex- TO REPRESENT
the ne pected M'ss Hyacinth Walters to B.G. AT HELSINKI

10 do well but pointed out that she

world

gow about

et

came (Frem Ov Own Cor-sspon ont)













mina after start of play when be up avainst Marjorie © sORC sTOWN, B.G,. uty 10
Billy Manning swam down with Jackson, Austrolia’s world record Cecil Moore, %4-year-old light-
tae ball, passed it to Ince who had holder in the hundred metres and heavy weight-lifting champion, is
po-itioned himself for tt. Ince Mrs. Fanny Blankers Koen, the leaving British Guiana on Sunday
took a hard shot out of the goal- Dutch record breaker in the two a8 the colony’s only representa-
keeper’s reach. hundred, tive at Helsink’,
Even when Ince scored again for _ Twelve officials and athietes will ’
his team, the struggle was still an M@ke up the party leaving ‘to-
even one, and the goals were Morrow including Barbados cyel- ’
really the result of quick good '8t Ken Farnum, who is affiliated WHAT’S ON TODAY
passes when Ince had tricked the to the Jemaican team,
player who marked him. mialintecerepadsiomamcepsieavam vag’ i ‘ Oils and Fats Conference
Rain fell most of the second half 5—0, For Swordfish, FitzGerald 10.00 a.m,
of the game and it was during the and Herbert Portillo scored two ‘ a
rain.that Owen Johnson was able and Nestor Portillo 1, Court cf Grand Sessions:
to net one for Bonitas. The last The teams were:— 10.00 a.m.
minutes of the game were fast and | Snappers: Billy Manning, Frank
rough. Bonitas fought fairly hard Manning, Kenneth Ince, Delbert Court of Appeal: 10-00 a.m,
to equalise, but watching them Bannister, Malcolm Browne, T. asket B: :
one felt that they might have been Clarke 2nd George McClean. B 1 Balt os WEP,

7.30 p.m,
able to hold Snappers even to a 2

Boni‘as: M. Foster, B. Patterson,
last minute draw if they had put

J. Grace, BE, Johnson, W. Weather



miveinto it head, R, Eckstein and O, Johnson, | Films at British Council
The game took such a rough a H. Weatherhead, J 8.15 p.m.

turn about the last two minutes, Gorkan, D, Reece, H. Portillo, N. .

that three players were called out Portillo, M. FitzGerald and H. N Pais lpane Bees

within about half a minute of each Jones. 9; 25, Bee: Yer h Brown

other, Me Cleane, Grace and | Whipperays: G. Gréenidge, H. | No. 37. Reg. ys

Browne Weatherhead, A. Hunte, T. Year- YO: hy Se

} ames Haynes
In the other match played yes- Jem r

wood, L. Spence, P, Pottez and D
terday. Sword&sh best Whipporays

O'Neal.



(They













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CRUSTY CROCKERY

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eames Sd Kil MeATVES 8

This would suit these opposed to
for breast-

‘ll Do It Every Time seven 3. Pa Ome By Jimmy Hatlo

|
| KING-CUP
|
|
|
|

No Race In
Britain For
Russian Stars

r

ORGANISERS of the Highland
Games at Edinburgh’s great rugby
ground, Murrayfield, are enter-
prising. They invited Russia to
send two competnors to thelr
meeting on August 23, but they.
have received the inevitable
“Niet” (No).

lt would have been intcrest-
ing to see what their 5000 metres
man, POPOV, could do against
yur GORDON PIERIE over three

miles. Popov, I am told, recently
did 14 min. 16 sec. fer 5000 metres

at Kiev in an Olympic training
run.
Zatopek There
This time -is only a second
slower than Firie’s: recent British
record for the three miles of

13 min, 44.8 'secs., and what is more
ZATOPEK the Czech was in the
field. He could only finish third
in 14min, 22sec. and both he and
Popov were beaten by the crack
Russian steeplechaser, KASANT-
SEY (14 min. 13.2 sec.).

Tnis distance is rather short
fer Zatopek these days. His
events for the Clympics are like-
ty to be the 10,000 metres and the
marathon.

Atsent Members

TWO Hungarian Olympic chiam-
pions going to Helsinki are mem-
bers of Parliament. They are ham-
mer thrower IMRE NEMETH and
heavyweight wrestler GYULA
BOBIS, Both have been elected to

the Hungarian Nationa’ A: ly
since they. won their Olympic
titles in Londen in 1948.
U.S.A’s Best Ever
THE United States will be
sending its strongest ever ath-

letics teem to Helsinki if perform-
ances in the two days U.S. trials
are anything to go by.

In the two days 13 new meet-
ing records were set up in the 18
events, which means that the 1952
U.S, team exeelled previous teams
in all but five events.

The first three in each event
during the trials won a place in
the team. Because of this many
champions were left out through
injury and accidents.

DICK ATTLESEY, world re-
cord holder in the 110 metres high
hurdles, missed the team when in
a heat he finished last because of
a strained leg muscle.

Here is proof that Britain has
not been alone in athletic ad-
vancement. We have some real
hopes for Helsinki but the stupen-
dous task facing cur athletes must
not be underestimated.—L.E.S.



Sports Window

The Basketball Division
“A” matches at the ¥-M.P_C. .
tonight at 7.30 are:— Har-
rison College vs. Harrison
College Old Boys and Pick-
wick vs. ¥.M.P.C,

| THE WEATHER
REPORT

YESTERDAY
a from Codrington?
-12 in,
Total Rainfall for month to
date 1.17 ins.
Highest Temperature:
84.5° FB.
Lowest Temperature:
75.0° F.
Wind Velocity: 12 miles per
hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.945
(3 p.m.) 29.924
TO-DAY
Sunrise: 5-48 a.m.
Sunset: 6.18 p.m.
Moon: Full, July 7
Lighting: 7.90 p.m.
High Tide: 6.48 am.,
7.36 p.m.
. Low Tide: 12.39 a.m.,
108 p.m.







Know Your Cricket

Laws

23 & 24

|
|
|
|

\

BY O. S. COPPIN |

TWO LAWS dealing .with The Over will be discussed | ability to repeat in the Olympic



FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1952



Marathon Hope Peters

Answers

LONDON, June 20
Britain’s Marathon marvel dis-
pensing optician JIM PETERS,
vas in his training this week set
at rest any doubts about his

to-day. The history of the Laws of the game reveals the fact | Games the sort of form he showed
that as far back as 1889 the Laws concerning the over were
changed. They were changed again in 1900, 1922 and 1924.

LAW 23—THE OVER

The ball shall be bowled from
each wicket alternately in overs
of either 8 or 6 balls according to
the agreed conditions of play.
When the agreed number have
been bowled and it has become
clear to the umpire at the bowler’s
wicket that both sides have ceased
to regard the ball as in play, the
umpire shall call “Over” in a dis-
tinct manner before leaving the
wicket. Neither a “No Bali” nor
a “Wide Ball” shal) be reckoned
as one of the “Over”.

The history of the Laws of
Cricket places the number of balls
in an over in the United Kingdom
in 1889 as 4 and this number was
amended to 5 and finally 6, In
Australia and New Zealand the
over consists of 8 balls but in de-
fault of any agreement to the
contrary in the United Kingdom
the “Over” shall be 6 balls.

No Count

A ball shall not count as one
of an over if both bails have been
blown off the striker’s wicket be-
fore he plays his stroke or if the
bowler in running up to deliver
the ball, allows it to slip from his
hand betore delivery.

It is the umpire’s duty and not
the. scorer’s to call “Gver” so that
any additional balls allowed by
the umpire because of a miscount
are valid. ‘

I have knowr scorers who shout
from the pavilion “Over” much to
the discomfiture of the umpire

Sportsman’s Diary records



who is “on” at that time. They
are not required by the Law, to do
this.

LAW 24—FINISHING OVER

A bowler shall finish an “Over”
in progress unless he be incapaci-
tated or be suspended for unfair
play. He shali be allowed to
change ends as often as desired,!
provided only that he shall not |
bow! two “Overs” consecutively in
one innings. A bowler may re-
quire the batsman at -the wicket
from which he is bowling to
stand on whichever side of it he
may direet.

If a bowler is incapacitated
whilst running up to deliver the
first ball of an ever, the umpire
should call ‘Dead Bail” and cail
for another bowler to bowl an
over from the same end.

If a bowler is injured so that he
cannot finish the over he has be-
gun, the over shall be regarded
as completed.

Paintul

Intercolonial cricket history re-
cords painful incident in which
a Barbados bowler slipped and in-
jured his ankle in a game with
Trinidad and was compelled by
the umpire to complete the over
which he did by sitting and ¢oll-
ing the ball along the matting.

Under this provision the Umpire
should have called “Over” and re-
gard it as completed.

If an over is left incomplete
for some reason at the start of any
interval of play, it is finished on
resumption of play.

how—



Surrey Say ‘Thank You’
To Club Cricketers

SO MUCH is taken for granted by so many these days,
that I record with special pleasure a gesture of gratitude
which Surrey County Cricket Club are making towards
one Of the most renowned cricket clubs in Surrey, Thames

Ditton.

For the past three years Thames
Ditton have played a match
against ‘he Surrey XI in aid of a

professional taking his benefit.
In 1949 it was Eddie Watts, in
1950 Laurie Fishlock; last year

Jack Parker.

This year no Surrey player has
a benefit match. So Surrey are
going to play a match for the
benefit of Thames Ditton, It takes
place on Sunday on thé attractive
Thames Ditton ground at Giggs
Hill Green, known to every user
of the Portsmouth Road out of
London,

Centenary

The Surrey XI will be at full
strength, led by the county cap-
tain, Stuart Surridge. With
Surrey firmly established at the
head of the County Championship,
the game should be a great attrac-
tion to the public and a substan-
tial benefit for Thames Ditton,

The same motive has prompted
Surrey to arrange similar matches
with Thornton Health, Woking,
Reigate Priory—in celebration of
their centenary—and Southern
Railway (Raynes Park).

A spokesman of the Surrey
club commented: ‘the clubs have
been very good to our profession-
als, and this is our way of saying
‘Thank you.’ ”

Practical appreciation of — this
sort appeals to me. I’m sure it
will appeal to the clubs, too.

Leyton’s Thanks

Another nice gesture of the





Just

DEVON SPRAYS
af

ASHFORD

GREEN LEAF
RANANCULUS
CORNFLOWER

W



received WEDGWOOD IN
CHINA and EARTHEN WARE.

DINNER SERVICES are obtainable

: in each design.

TAPESTRY ON PATRICIAN

Earthen



week comes from Leyton, F.C.,
defeated FA Amateur Cup final-
ists. Clubs, players and all who
have helped the club in their
uphill struggle have received the
club’s thanks on printed cards.

Said ihe message: “Leyton FC
Committee send this token of
grateful thanks. ..to all clubs who
have rendered us assistance in
completing our league programme
...to all players who have ‘guest-
ed’ for us...to all who have sent
messages of good wishes and con-
gratulations...and to the many
other friends and _ well-wishers
who have assisted the club in any
shape or form during the past
season.”

One-Girl Chorus

Rebecca, dark and _ diminutive
wife of West Africa’s Roy
Ankarah, was ushered politely
but firmly by Boxing Board
officials away from a seat near
her husband’s corner during the
Nottingham fight in which he was
beaten by Ray Famechon of
France.

For Rebecca, a bright figure in
blue, white and yellow, broke a
boxing rule when she began a
one-girl chorus of vocal support
for her husband in shrill English
and her own native tongue—Twi.

People in a boxer’s corner have
to keep quiet, and Mrs, Ankarah
after the first round, was moved
to a lonely chair some yards from
the ringside. She took it all in
good part.

—L.E.S,



WEDGWOOD

IN

BONE

ane China

are







in winning the Polytechnic Mara-
thon last Saturday.

It was feared that his world
record time in this race might
have burned him up, but it was
net generally known that he was
taking things easily at the end,
p-epared to sprint if necessary.

Peters has had nine runs, in-
cjiding the Marathon, in the
last week covering 88 miles, On
his 12 mile course last night he
did Ihr. 5min. 5lsec,, more than
a minute faster than his previous

best.
Early Spin
Ye! he was out again this morn-
ing at 5.45 to do his third best
time ever over his 10-mile course.
“That shows good recovery,
doesn’t it?’ he asked. “I could not

«pont Og gob at
0 ge as

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do that last year.”

And for good measure he was
doing another five miles at lunch-
time to-day because he was
missing to-night’s training run
to attend the AAA champion-

ships.
Saunders Sails

London leses one of its leading
amateur welterweight boxers to-
morrow. Twenty-one-year-ald
NORMAN SADNDERS, of the
Caius Boxing Club} sails for Mel-

bourne, Australia, to join his
family. es
Saunders, recently demobilised

from the Army, has boxed regu-
larly for the RAOC téam and has
rep_esented the Army.

He has represented the London
Amateur Boxing Association and
of his 200 bouts has lost only 17,
and in seven eases has gone back
to reverse these defeats.

He has boxed in Denmark and
Germany for his club,

—L.E.S.

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>PDODD PPROBOPHO POP DIDLOPPGOPLO- DE OPPO VHPOMOD










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FKIOAY, JULY 11. 1S52 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACK FIVE Colonies Must Not Depend Only On Governments To Surmount Hardships Renison Opens Home Economics Conference FISHERMAN SENTENCED TO NINE MONTHS' IMPRISONMENT 28 Patients At St. Joseph Almshoiise s Ch. Ch. Poor LauInspector Resigns from Mr. IMPORT OF SPAIN, July 1. IN OPENING A CONFERENCE on Home Economics and Education in Nutrition at Kent House. Monday, His A letter of r*litnaUc Excellency the Acting Governor of Trinidad and Tobago. B |l nd "^"i'PV .*?!' L w '" Hon. P. M. Rcmson, warned against depending only on !^ V^luST* government to surmount difficulties caused by the rising ChriBi Church Ve*try al their COSl of living. meeting ycstei.Li> Delegates are present from nine Caribbean territories, Mr Crcnlty wag appolnUd and several international organisations, including tho JJ£ h V V m I r ^!L A~1£! United Nations, World Health Organisation and the Holy "„"v" ySSi Ae~or ^ on „ xf ra romn ,| ltM See, have sent delegates or observers. The two delegates At the ia>i Veairy meeiinn Mr. •'"'' Jon i!"* 1 R "' k had %  row irom Barbados are Miss Betty Arne, Social Welfare Officer Ever 5 !e.vS inters v>ere circulated "•[ ." !" f" p :? ; ^l"' SSSJSi and Uta I. L C. Alleyne, Organiser of the Government Ut/SUkKS^S Sfcf? &%& **t£gT& Housecraft Centre. The Conference is under the joint prc'reurenKi'i Tc'vr > m damaged .r* tisUm sponsorship of the Food and Agriculture Organisation of Mr. CM Di d that the United Nations and the Caribbean Commission. ihc letter of resignation ihouU be H^HER! esterd.Hv Mi' ths' imprisonment with o charged with inflictinK bodily harm on B paUamis—IJ inalea, it females line H;nds, the same day. but the jury m*J~*jfgL J\*S,* Mr. W. W. ncecft, Q.C, 9olieUoT General, prosecuted for the Crowa. Joins was not represented. .Hid five jiairs of shoe The dreaei Wfjra lorn up and th' accepted, but he did not agree "With all Ihe will in the world and family life She went on to „,,h Mr. Everaley asking for Bock told the Court that Jon, 111, Exeolletio Hid, thu govern.a,: -One of the aim. of the rood lnrTC „,„„„,. ,,.,„. a„S"he had iwliWiii loMlhT meal cannot .pate very large and Agriculture OrganlwUion of Ilc „,„ hll Mr Evmlc „„ ? !" ,houtTv.aTbel .sums of money lor extension the United Nation, is to raise the ,,„„ „„ c „,„,„„, lc ., Vi cv „ y reni Thev h td a row work. We are doing our best and .tantlards of living and raUlng VMr .„,, „, „ r as „, kl „. w „> !" £ !" feft h^nme to tilhV "" C Un "* "i ,';;';. K |,a S ve 8 g u l'ro'-r,nd --""* --"---'Si ***** ffSjSS !2 ^*>-." aW "* I" 1 : 1 f^ Polfe.St.do,. On hor w," U,,.,; then' wcro 49 i>atienU on the roll. Nurse Wlnlf.ed Williams ha* been Matron for the post IB year*. Prior to this appointment she ., .-, ., ... worked with (he institution as ;> eani when Mr. K\crley Jones abused the two of ihen. Dr. Roberts was unanimously rtl ^. no ta e h '* l vtv when they arrived and she aj;aii elected Chairman. Mr %  stlj Ward s ud that the left for the Police Station. Sh.Poard of Guardians had appointhad made a report and was about The agenda stresses the educaed Mr Eveisley and that same to leave ,when her mother cam1 ttonal aspects of the problem. Board had asked Mi Eversley to In thr station bruised about he. the charge of indicting grievous bodily harm upon her on December 4 last year. i i among her injuries was a frarure of her left twelfth rib. n*T • i %  "• -. ii. „ *, ,-..i.i xionai spccis 01 inc prooicm. uuniu noii "'M-J ;.ii *.v,p.irv ,o i.i i irf these problemi being considered, but also when a food production programme was in full swing. His Excellency also called the Caribbean Commission, ttnd expressed thr view that the conference was complementary to the aided-self-heli. methed. Jone: loo, I .' %  %  after, showed Almshouse a dangerous looking cliff stands in Hie air. Should any part of this clin" break away, it would completely demolish the Almshouse. Tfa institution is kept In a very sanitary condition, but many people are looking forward to tho day when It will be removed to a MARMITE IS EVERYONE'S feptett FOOD Hutson Jonas (16). the youngest of lha defendants, was put on 18 i tattoo. The other Ihraa were bojnd over In the sum better site extension ser\'ices, both "governMr. Eversley failed to do. station soon after, showed a f £5 and similar surety to rhf Mem ben of the Cleavers ment and non-govrrnment. and He said that the Board of bruise, and complained that her KPC P m o peace for IB months. Hill B OV ,' club have a lovely the question of better Integration Guardians would have to consider mother and her had beaten him After Ethel Trotman told His Kitchen garden. In It they have of these activities w.ll be considIhe post vacant as from July 24 When she returned home, sh> nip that she and her huaplanted beet cabbage and butter should discovered that 16 of her dresses hand wore living •ogvther again beans. crordance were torn up. live or six pairs of in the incident, end that she At this Club there are M memsershoes cut up. glassware broken, did not wish lum to be sent to i^ r Tweiitv-four are active put in In the parish, her machine and stove damaged prison. Mr. W. W. Reeee. Q.C, The IMMUM ar VT ;IS shown to irmlo* carnentrv shoemaknitf and unity sion another. They should flrst icmother's Kvidence the husband, ho would also havo Iallc7lngwlll icon^ieataSeJ to ask for leniency towards Iho p.c, 300 Victor Lavne is li. the mother other defendants. charge of the Club which also Hinds, corroborated Beside* giving evidence as to takes ihe form of a police Prut in %J*^^^^*g+ ^^^i^f^l^r sirs s 'SttsrjUR ^-^^ CT ^?Xrss ^^^3L D £HL.sa%  •• • --^ * • — m ( W |< 'mpmvc Area wffl be explored. Particular ,,. avc from Ju f^ 2 4 to August 23 left J i together and mecnoas. P 0 *"" to. bo fovered include: I(c abo 8 UMCStwl that one'of wont to the station. Jones threw In ivreetin* dioiM.es and others !a c 'H** '? r a v "nccd training; he olher employees in the ser-> 'he stove on the door and stepped _,*K!T,"? ,,' .FJZJtZLr !" short training courses and"workUvr should be promoted, and upon it. She remonstrated, and ; training etiooIs Tor sevi( ,j(ed that Mr. A*hby, ihe itgrthe gave her two lashes wilh a Caribbean ke eper, be appointed to act as slid aN he, shoulders. lNx>r Law Inspector. Civoe Hindi and Lucy Odlo Df Before discussing Ihe question Thor <'<>v. West bury Road, roborated evidence vas at n hnuse nearby nnd saw when Jones tore up some of the dresses, "Conferciu i | oj of enormous value, iis nature rte said: Value of School and Coi Feeding Programme. ept the resignation and then cii cuss the quesfon of pension. He n the direction of then Th. I'J -Tlh. i t V, ? x PossibiUtie* in the direction of then moved thai the resignation be Geraldin th nk there Is extraordlnarv value technical co-operation both withaccepted as from Auuust 24 and Rocks in.: our anv abrasions and H of tie Commission, Mr. K. P. H. do Vriendt. BecrtHary Genera' referred to tho long record o." close co-operatlo cral territories in thi lie— ^ ll a followships nnd surveys tween the Commis'ion and tho The present conference is tho .Food and Agricultufe Organisaoutgrowth of a survey of home , f PfMlon. Mr. Wood Coddard, g-vc tion. He mentioned joint action economics education and extenVestry Clerk, read from records *-"" u %  in the field of co-operatives s | on Jn ,h 0 Caribbcar. conducted Mr Everslcy's term of service which culminated In a Co-opera| n 1949 jointly arranged bv FAO n ,lc niolion of Mr. C. B fives Conference last year, and and the Caribbean Commission. Brandford. the Vestry decided that announced thet negotiations to The report of the survev which beio,e Axing Mr. Eversley's penobtain the services or an F.V> embodies tho observation of an on lp al opinion should _be Agricultural Economist for the FAO Homo Economics Officer in sought. Commission are well advanced, ten selected Caribbean territories. __ t,.-.-., !" -, .,,-Hs described the meeting as "the | s included in the documentation 1 -O. PATlfc-NT LEAVES largest and most representative for the eonference. In addition, technicnl conference ever held the FAO Secretariat has prepared T. Van SJuytniun On Dml That cut ion. as the case for the Proiekeepa order In the district At the Girls' Club opposite, max n bei are putting much eifint into a flower garden, but the best results an not vol evident. Mils Audrev P.vne is in charge of this Club. Members do matmaking and needlework. Thii Club has 31 members and all ure JiCtlVC. A resident of Cleavers HIM told tie Advocate: "The Clubs have CH. CH. ALMSHOUSE under "the auspices rr the ComapVialpapers "doling'^Tth'var^ -wT'"'. T U ,^ li, nls J' 1 th C\ i lion ous items of the agenda, whilst Crt "^ ^ A,m rl ouse t 1 !" P te ,en, the Com agenda. Mr. de Vriendt further said: 3US3K S^frifS^S &mLp*.-v>m •£%& sa-s zzx activities that He open to it. has inside the Almshouse. A .,.„„,„ fallows*. lately found it necessary, for practical nnd financial reasons, to fmposa on i'aelf a considerable. ions Scc^Urtalhai. ed ^ l} C f hrit \ < i huifh %&> £ prepared statements on the poal^_P. _!"" A 'n mc **. in yoster' 1 the territories with respect The Schooner Timothy Von Shtyrsssn which came in port u '1 -. (i i\ ,i r .i> irom British Qulani is now undergoing repairs on dock. During her voyage here N !" of sTe' beneilt to the area, a lire broke out In the englno F'merly groups of chUdren were K ."S3S ISPS, {fens s? TOSrSJfe.^ !" engines %  P-''"ig area is now being The Van Sliivlman Is expected b ui, J ^un6 the Bathsheba Social to come off dock on July 22 Centre at St. Joseph. The work and sail the same day for BrltUh '•* being supervised by Leon Payne Quianu without cargo. an 4L he ., h I,arr "' ^ 1 n *fc The Centre was officially opened last month by His Excellency the row taking place between Rock and him ihe night before the offence, and Hock's tellinij nun l<< leave Ihe lha because she had given evidence nomic development need n o t of them were towed Into the Isolation Ward. for his mother sometime before necessarily axcluo* the human Careenage by the Lord ComberMrs Talma said that there ,lp **' %  that Clyde Hinds who haa factor or considerations of social mere. They were the Schooner were formerly three T.B. patients, iM K'ven evidence against him. Lodw JVoleen from Dominica, but one left the institution withh ;"' —' the hope that S.S. Trader Takes a*—* Sugar For U.K. Labourer Guilty Of %  Mill I Till V -.-.Mill Tht *JSLamHS& !" *£T^!%-%Zlg!; In Touch With Barbado, had the of ilOwnintlonofAm^ nnd I0 Vltck „^ of ^w f ,, r...-l Qt..t. She said that neither Rock would give evidence for hiii He called a witness, Leottn Yearwood. who gave a similar story of the row as had been Kivcn liy Prosecution witnesses. RACEHORSES RETURN HOME lon n Sd tt Mr ft, J U^hSol £*&•" ^ ahiy ^nn of firewood. 600 bags SSoSS Develop !" !" C Sd f Wel! *J* !"!" 1 ? 27 ftP "' ***. • Organisation, delegates of th. Coastal Station I'nited Kingdom. Haba posts, 108 bunches of fresh fruit and t>0 pumpkins were brought in by the Mary Af. Lewis. Miss F.'sa Haglund, Home Econ_. „ ., omlst, who with Mrs. Andro^ T h Uar V • Leuns left British macho Sismnnidis, Keg-onal Nup utana on July R and encountered tritlon Representative, ftV a S ha d S rw,n ? r ln f'ng here. The n-ric CAni.r A.*m wrun r.ss LU advite that ihrv c an now commi ntrat* nith Ihe fDllowlns (hire throui Ihelr Darfoadoi Coeat SUUon — 8 1. Alwakl, Abbrydale. Arlgun GoUlto. CiirrabU> Philaiie'.phi Dlninphei. llXtecn racehorse* from Barlm-. which look part ln the T.T.C. tiLtlvi I '"^""S of "jo damage alerting in Trinidad were brought being done by Jone, She laid she inXo & ^ yrsUnda y wh n f,„. Stonmrhip Tribesman consigned '' ;,•"., n.Costa fr Co., Ltd., arrived hen. I f: %  Odle had been on the scene at ., the time of the row, but she had nl J" % %  "' %  trom Trlnldnd. heard Hinds proinlte tr. r-ivaM. dence for Rock. I i:iv ( "viy An In his nddross to the Jury, Jonr-s Api>oIlo, Rosette, Magic Ipedr* Hi" 11. mr, iMiironiMinc, was = !" .7 , * % %  ••" %  %  =. • nc |i.,ii!r..r. fchfiiilli l-rinwf. Mnin. Unn, nCCCNSBrilV % % %  assigned by FAO to help proparo E'neline which left B.G. on July 4 -n Mary oureit -f n-tmude. BraBi, Rock ff m o t her Ai and conduct the conference, told has not yet reached Barbados. £ %  g^ M&& 8£Z' .2a'y Rock', not getting witneMe," who of the keen interest of the Organ-. e„„,„ n %  -. .„ „J.I_ etc Neiaon. aceeton, Kordie, Reg-m i*r>. lived at the same building where %  -mm tr. the conference. Speak^J^?_ Ji !" Jz\ !" 7!? ln „ with 5 ,5 o-id. iviparei;. AI*.* _diipper. -•— ng for Dr. W. R. Aykroyd. Direc< e run " f co1 whJle Enterprise Km lor of FAO's Nulrltinn Di vision, ?• w hich was the last schooner to Tl* Dei tor ahe expressed h Cruiaer. Picmi llorch Hi re w'isn'for $* T^'f^ ,n ,he Careenage by the RpVi^hS. 011 'r£SH. lX)Td COmbermere. brought Six Tetne.. Gan.medr.. Haban. Alh.iiH. bags Of COCOanuts, 113 packages Of Thrahavi. Amakure. Corona Al,^> She slated thai FAO rnllM fmh fruit. 427 ba„ „t copra. BO BBSf oJSSIL SZZ. cJSSSi that in order to make full use of drums of cocoanut oil and seven sunwaii. AIUIU a Ambrum, improvements in the field of food bunches of fresh fruit, AH of c,rlto ,on 'i ""' and agriculture. It Is essential that these Schooners are conilgncd to S^ELtJ iwl home the Schooner Owners' Association. Sinclair. improvements be made l* M >g MM MM aaa MMMfMM M ia>eat GARDEN REQUISITES WE CARRY A COMPLETE RANGE INCLUDING RAKES WEEDING FORKS I.OPPINC. SHEARS HOES I.IK,I M KNIVES SECATEURS TROWELS HEDGE TRIMMERS LAWN SPRINKLERS TAP UNIONS, TAPS COMPLETE WITH UNION. WATERING CANS. HOSE MENDERS. SPOUTS, CLIPS AND CONNECTIONS AND THE POPULAR "SOLO" SPRAYER, THE ONE-MAN SPRAVER WHICH OPERATES ON BOTH THE UP AND DOWN STROKES GIVING A CONTINUOUS SPRAV. — ALSO — RANSOME LAWN MOWERS and the Increasingly Popular POPE LAWN MOWERS W1TH RUBBER TYRED WHEELS HARRISON'S HARDWARE DEPARTMENT DIAL 2364 or 3142 >faY.* MMMMMMM >* %&f • tO g > %  • % %  *•>• %  MM >•*><•! %  anolt on a twelve-year-old girl. r -in < %  ;is postponed. Fordo who was arraigned on n two-count Indictment was acquitted on Ihe fln* count of carnal knowledge. He w.is represented by l' <; Smith Mr. W. W. Itcecc. Q.C. Solicitor General, piwecuted on behalf of tlie Crown. BILE BEANS kvep her ATTRACTIVE YOUTHFUL -full of rigour Whyhctired, I Cj ,/\ constipated / / // or liverish)? I TI or iuh*.T indigestion ? Bile Beam will mric >.JU vitally fit, full of energy, bright-eyed and happy Be S'JRE TO GETTHESC MEOICALL 1 T.SiFn AHO*PPPQVei)BllEB t aJK First Admiral, I-nnd Mark, Lunwa>, Colleton, Frenoh Flutter. ..•olio, Rowlte, Mat'.fl ,.-, iUttia TarlaT 1 ftllC' bivlteo them to believe that the Embers, llarroween, CasUo-I i-Tha jachai, Thormhov s A' evidence of Hinds and Odle had Air. Durham Jane, Coh. nbua, laanar, been false and that Hinda' was Canta Qulslna and Hrljht L :ht. ii"iK' ncceiisarily biased, ihe belna The Tribetmun la now twin? questioned loaded with a cargo of suga.. they had quarters at the time, inCANADIAN (Klisi;n c lUaaM ,lcad of ge"lnii Minds and Odle Thc Oan-dlaaj O W Pa l who lived in We*lbury Bead. **"* whose agents are Oi It vas ail ii ri -,i Austin 4t Co.. Ltd.. called him. he 'aid. port on Wednesday aftemoo After hearing; a icvitw of the; Bermuda and left later Un from His Lordshlo, the day. %  Jury .-ctired 20 minutes and then Tho Cruiser brought 1S6 boxes TrS-. sict.iw' %  ''"><'< '• verdict o( guilty of of cheese, 830 boxes of flour, m and a w. malicious diimage but not of in4.800 bags of pollard ar 1 130 Meting bodily harm. cans of paint. LI-H 3,933 %  dlnei i th.s %  from HIM KNIGHTS PHOENIX & CITY PHARMACY SODA FOUNTAINS maeusrtaiwF k hfW TYKE DESERVES A HEN OUNIOr TUBE DUNIOP CYCLE umisf from S(o<*(iti t*'S 31 Picco DINNER WiTC $30.10 35 „ DINNER SET $26.08 60 „ BREAKFAST SET $30.00 16 „ TEA SET $15.37 16 ., TEA SET $10.95 9 COFFEE SET $4.76 15 ., COFFEE SET %\§.t.l THERMOS FLASK IN OUR HARDWARE DEPARTMENT 1 pi. at 2 pi. at 3 pt. at $1.64 $2 65 $6 63 THERMOS 1 pt. Jl'C.S it $3.28 Iiivnrnt on all complrlr M-IS purchased •.:: %  .::: %  .: %  %  .: %  %  .: %  %  %  %  % % %  %  %  .:; %  -.-.-.-. CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD. if n OAO si .'*'v,',',','.'.'.'.',',V# .^.'.-.-,'.'-'.



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PACE FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. JULY II, 19S2 BAr^DOSsA ADY6CATI: MiUI b| IkAStaraU C.. LM.. I Frl>. July 11, 1KZ ivn in i IIKV< E ?.!R 0. II ADAMS. C.MIi who %  i ..,'1 as in Paris by making i| clear that thi w I Adust Id regard United Nations trusteeship as a step backward last week wan -riving ti thing at a gtmnl council meeting of the >nal Confederation of Free Trade Unions in Berlin. An original draft had been submitted to the council suggesting that non-selfgoverning Territories should be put under United mams of i awarding their progress tjO self-government. Because of criticism lroin colonial reprcsenh eluding Mr. Adams, this draft was to suy that trusteeship should be i metropolitin countries' had failed to fulfil their obligations. l-'i ni this distance it would be unwise to OOtttBH rrt on this news from Berlin prematurely and until the draft is available informed comment is impossible. But the community of Barbados and the community of tli.V. i the majority of whom in not Rtembeif of any trade unions are entitled t<> ask whethti an mi-.-, national confederation of trade unions is not exceed %  [hts in discussing a question which could only be decide they cirnie to l>uy groceries from Brain* NAAKI-iVii dfplo;, ,.' \ %  and women come lo register as Britons. They queue for hours to mako are still entitled to British passports granted when they fled from rDtM SlmtlaY queue* besiege American, Trench, and other consuflaw Now. believe me. this rush for reinsurance By passport U s stgnilicont gesture from people who have eon I ben to And a national home with their own race. It is an open expression of a feir I ciave found lurking in Viry conversation I have had with Israelis on this visit This is the fear that I hey are eaughl up in i> slow, strangulating process of economic bankProm ft say pessimists, B The shameful millions loathed and abominated Oer^nni ore going to save them. %  iresee that tens, peril :• hundreds of thousands of oarcety reunited with t .1 homeland to ihcy have directed their during 2,000 years, may bavi to abandon it again in a new exile. Those who remain In :i nintry will have to nccept r .'andard of living much lower than ohat of today. 'And tfita I* drastically de• 11' pariaon with that of 1943 and even 1950.) Paradox I is that already, today, fll no'I'ment in the economic Mluauon of the country Is responsible for the entirely new phenomenon in this country's post-war history: more Jews are now leaving ihe country week by wink than are coming in to settle, Many more would Co ii the* Israel authorities did not stop ahem—by refuting exit visas and export licences f.atheir propcity. The paradox is that outwardly and superficially Tel Aviv and II and all the rest of the country 1 have, been over look to bo booming. Cafes and restaurants arc crowded, Long. elegant motor-cars glide down Tel Aviv boulevards allowing a peep nl the young women dressed In the latest Paris elegance. Whole new suburbs of residential flats have been added to Tel Aviv since I was here last year. When I drove nut into fhe Northern Hea rt Steppe tins time I passed endless new village* and %  i ftUffnontf, New immigrant-; were Imsy by the i-oadside planting avenues of stud* eucalyptus trees. IRAQ ARABIA "^ 33 NO Sefton Deltner BEGINS TODAY A FULL-SCALE SURVEY OF THE ANXIETIES FACING THE YOUNG STATE OF ISRAEL. IT IS A NEWS STORY THAT MAY BE CONSIDERED CALMLY FROM AFAR TODAY . BUT ITS IMPORTANCE IS IN THE DARK POSSIBILITIES IT HOLDS FOR STABILITY AND PEACE OF THE WHOLE MIDDLE EAST Energy v.. UM energy and imaglnaUon 'be Israelis are putliiik' D to making Negeb productive la as impressive aa anything I have seen in go-ahead Southern RhopfrUa > ok under the surface. Everywhere, even In the busy desert, portents of grim danger at once manifest them A pipe factory was working only one shift a day because of lack of steel plates. Israel just hasn't the foreign currency to buy them. When tiie factory of its present supplies it will have to close down until tha Ciovt mment can afford to buy more steel. And this p ro j ec t is number one priority. In ihe town long queues were waiting in front of the tianks. They were queuing to change their big-money notes into new ones issued by the Government. The only snag was thai tha Government was taking on* ten per cent, by way of a farced loon. Qtrttl llUUM black marketeer.: in the Boulevard Rothschild offered mo treble the official price for my British pounds. I could not replaoa my worn out typewriter ribbon: "Sorry, we have I'hey come from abroad. There is no foreign exchange to buy them." Tollrriny . Schoolchildren arc unable to carry on their studies for lack of E ngl i sh textbook:-.. Lawyers: cannot keep up with Qw law % %  > do not get the latest legal books from London. In :;nal! things, and in big ones the whole of Israel seems to be slowly tottering to a 1 P r lack -•( foreign exchange. Tho worst hit, as I have indicated are the factories. Pome under construction are having to lie left uncompleted. Others just finished are unable to start producing for lack of taw materials. Yet others which nave been producing are forced to go on half-time or close down altogether. What is ihe reason for all this? Jiuit tha age-old cause of most bankruptcies: they have been spending more than they earn. Statistics nay are importing eight times as much s they export—£125 million against £13,000,000 last year. KmbarrasMng In previous years the gap has been bridged by generous AmerIcafl help plus ample use of .sterling balances which piled up m favour of Palestine dunng. Ihe war. Bill even this was not enough [-.. take care of all uptndlture, much of it spent on projects which i.ing money for So ihcy have taken up shortterm loan Many of aw la •'!-' now falling due and CsnttbaJ .-.cute embarrassment. The exact figure m short-term indebtedness is a State secret. But I am told an amount of at least 150 million dOJteci (£53.571.428) is Sterling balances ore exhausted No Credit The Brltlah Treasury and Bri?i ms, who supply twothirds of Israel's oil needs havo refused to give credit. Only by the forced sale of their nationals remaining sterling securilKh has the Israel Government managed to pay the oil lull and .i ure supplies for what |a top Israel Treasury official vaguely detwribed to me as "the next couple of months" Without oil life in Israel .stop..: Mfthout oil the pumping stations rtop pumping water. Without pumped water, the orange groves which provide 60 per cent. of Israel's export wither and die. Yet It seems cra/y that Premier Ben-Gurion and his semiGovernment should havepushed all-out immigration and till-out industrialisation to the point whentlie whole future of the country is threatened. Is there any sense In this madness? —L.E.S. Our Readers Sav; Why And HmvY To The Editor, The Advocate— SIB.— Tho Government Bill to increase to a big and even hlartUng degree the emoluments "! MM Kxperts' and Civil Service Heads, resulting in such heav> ana %  dtttotnJ diargcs upon the Island Treasury, and the lively and rebellious attack upon it in the House of Assembly. 17Lh June, aroused very trouble-some questions in the minds of the ordinary citizens, and although it is too late to hope for any 'road block' to the plan the questions still press for expression. Aiul perhaps some wise and Instructed person may be able lo put them lo real or at least relieve the troubled minds. The lucid and instructive addresses Of. tli Hon. Colonial Sevictarv and Mr. Cuke In the council did not, unfortunately deal with the "Why and How" troubling the Man-in-the-street. or the painful problem; where Is the the great sum of additional money to come from? Here are some of the chief perplexities: (11 Why do we need so iiiii. %  Kxperts' in Barbados? ll i B small place and Its affairs are not so complex and BI >( dillU-ult, surety. Take IQr example the Fiscal Survey. The delay in producing which has been so often mentioned an a main hindrance lo action. Is than anything to be M "f such size and Importanca which was hoi pi'.vided in the pamphlel The National Income ol Benatdna', compiled by Dr. Benluun ten years ago. Or take another and very homely glance at this aspect of affairs. I know what I earn and how I spend it. And I suppose the sugar notary or buanMBg firm knows What its income is and what it pays for salaries and wages and upkeep etc. And the [neorna Rg Department tha Bfjum of income -3.404 in 19-12 reported D nearly J<11 of llieni .mall peop'e with £• 'tio a year, and the rest of US Just earning a bare living below the income tax level—or no living at all. Indeed, or bftka DMTe.rhlns Prufe-.!r: more Instructed sections, (4) How is It "supposed by those in authority that small people are to the at all and pay 1 :iy. even without tho additions to taxation and cost*. such as must be required lo pay for the big increases In the upper grades now approved and undertaken* This is a question which, we think, requires no exposition or dlustration. But it does reftaatioa by those who have authority and the control of the purse MAN-IN-THE-SrnEET. Vi-j-rtub/r* i/i*/ Priem %  dWor, Thtf Advocate— SIR.—1 me space in your v. luablg p-per to ex%  rOVlag reporter quotes is saving that if the people from M ivhen. to-y buy (meaning the growers) would let them gel the goods at ii>le prire they would be -ble to sell at lower prices too, and with the Control Market. UM growers would not be able to rob iheni. Mr. Editor, these I would quote, are .the prices the majority of grewerj usually sell to the hawkers. For instance, you sell I 10c. to 20c. a pound. at 36c. Baa Q l .viir.e price. Cucumbers at 6c. or tic. per pound, they sell at 'uurteen and sixteen cents each and a good size cucumber scarcely weighs more than three o na rterB of a pound. This situation is pr.'po'terous. Those peppl,buy two to three dollars in good-., catch the bus to town and II they cannot make 100% on the goods or more, they say it 'cannot pay them. This. Mr. Ki'itnr, i no ioke. these are cold facts. Growers have to pay tO make up their beds, buy seeds, care their vegetables from worms etc. Water them for maybe three or four month* before they can sM any signs of their labours. IJheso exploiters as soon as they sense the time of fiufiinicf. name down on you like T,ocusts. grab vegetables as cheaj !>as they can and off to the nj tea of Massacre" where what has the power over •mo*. era a Central Market run c-n-ornment. when all nj'ii he nhle In send their product! and get remunertha rich and poor ... i Dtoehaaa these Qua "bods nt reasonable t %  • %  iad of having to eat and] dav out foods of a ktatch> n fsn.v of ii'ikiming I liror. The Adeocetc— SIR.— u is regrettable that such n labourite as the Hon. Senior member for St. George. one whom the labouring classes are look it -j forward to lead them in the not too distant future, should have made such a Nundarii • mistake as to ask to make X)'-J motion that ride 45 of the standing rules of the House be b.ought Into force. I u'e seeks to eject visitors from HV Visitors' Gallery during any special debate. If this rule were brought Into force en Tuesday last, it proves beyond any reasonable doubt asen ta tivaa of the peooh) or I should state, of 'he Labour %  heir own For. there must have mathlng In that debate this gentleman did net 1 Ma oppori remind all Labourites or any aort of '1st' or 'ism" shat %  I reckoning is coming .: five or ten years from now. Dr. JEKYLL. Schools Rebel Against Lessons On UNO From R. M. MacCOLL WASHINGTON. ALL over America a rising tide of opposition to UNO generally, and UNESCO—the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation—in particular, is r. uking itself felt in the schools a..d universities. Some schools have discarded study courses about UNO and others are preparing to do the same. •'*<** fen In places as far apart as Houston, Texas, and Los Angeles school authorities have abruptly refused to co-operate, as hitherto, in an annual essay contest conducted by the American Association for the United Nations. • • • The contest has suddenly become a controversial issue, and there are suggestions that anything to do with UNO is now unAmerican." Miss Do-othy Robbins. educational director of the association, reports that 100 fewer schools have taken part in the essay contest this year and she flatly attributes this to "fear of having anything to do with the United Nations." The association rushes out a statement saying "There is a strange attitude in some communities, where objections have been raised to leaching about UNO. Such opposition is founded on misinformation, fear, and prejudice." • • • The sharpest opposition is centred on UNESCO. The critics openly say that this agency is gointj to "step in and tell the teachers how lo run their own schools." And when, some time back, it was announced that the University of Florida planned to hold a summer course on UNESCO, lierce opposition developed, with charges that the whole thing was "subversive," and now the university board is thinking of calling it off. • • • In Washington, President Truman announces that he is appointing 57-year-old Mrs. Margaret Daly, of Highland Park, New Jersey, to be Controller of Customs in New York. William Benton, ex-advertising millionaire, now a Senator representing Connecticut, and a very close personal friend of Truman, says he is sure the President will change his mind and run for re-election if the Democrats find themselves in danger of getting stuck with an unsuitable nominee at the convention. • • • While America throws its hats into the air over the debut of the liner United States, the New York Times reminds that the overall merchants marine picture is gloomy. For while in 1939 America possessed 123 passenger ships, totalling 1,000,000 tons, today she has onlv a scant 51, of 600,000 tons. • • • The blase habitues of New York's Second Avenue are nonplussed to see a man wearing only pyjama trousers pursuing another man and firing revclover shots over his head. The pursuer turns out to be a young policeman, in hot pursuit of a burglar who picked the cop's own flat for a raid. Later he tells the magistrate : "I was embarrassed—there was no place for me to pin on my badge." • • • t A familiar word in America is "kibitzer. meaning the chap who watches other people playing cards, and dishes out advice to the gamblers on how to play their hands. And Harlan Cleveland, assistant director Europe of the Mutual Security Agency, tells a gathering of the New York State Bar Association that the 75,000 Americans at present administering the foreign aid pro gramme in many parts of the world are "kibitzers at every crisis, large or small, that presents itself, and involved in nearly everybody's business." Tho day of the trained diplomat has gone. Savs Cleveland: "Most of our foreign representatives now are not trained for diplomacy—and many of Ihem are not particularly diplomatic." • • • More and more Americans arc building their own homes. It's quite the "done thing" these days for comfortably off families to form -'wot king partita," tatter, mother and junior alt in bill* jeans, and. set to at the week end to lay the foundation or build another wall togethAnd "Build-It-Yourself" has brought big changes for business. One maker of power tools, who deliberately went after the amateur market, has boosted sales from £6.000,000 to £10.700.000. Not only is it fun—but building tt yourself saves you a great deal of money. • • • "Lazy Susan" is no lady, but the American term for a casserole set on a revolving wooden base, and surrounded by gaily-coloured compartments in which hot or crld horsd'oeuvres arc served. And lazy susans arc selling in the as entertaining in America, what with the pitiless heat-wave and the vanishing .servants, becomes increasingly informal. PHOTOGRAPHS f upict of i.'u ;l Photographs Whkh hnvc appeared in the ADVOCATE NEWSPAPER Can b ordered hum the . ADVOCATE STATIONERY 1 rtn:'t> I mtutt n-mem/rtT — / Co/fat Mill* 3 Suet Mi-al '•//./-• /• trench fry Culten • Egg Slieeni • Fruit Slicen & Cratert C. S. PITCHER & CO. Ph. 4472 LIGHT COOL and HANDSOME MEN'S SUMMER SUITS *55 till Scores lo choose from—cool *£-^\ a;> im ven HI breeze, these Single Breasted MOYGAL? SHEL LINEiN SUITS come in Sand, Fawn and Rust. All-Wool, Double Breasted Tropicals represent outstanding value at... %  -., s Da Costa & Co., Ltd. GUINNESS STOUT FOR STRENGTH 12 os. Battles .32 Mi's -29 12 os. BASS ALE -3t 12 os. TUBOKG -30 12 M. WORTHINGTON .30 MAKE: YOIR FOOIB TASTY OBBLUT SALT KETCHUP 57 SAUCE MAM, 11 lllliNh CHUTNEY SAUCE CEREBOS SALT PREP.\RE1> MCSTARI* JUST AJhOI I ii MACARONI SPAGHETTI CRAVEN A 50'i CRAVEN A If. IM Mil. BARLEY 21b Did lift tins HA It HA DOS BEST Ml I.I K I GOUI 11R.UD RTM 3 yr. old SI.44 per Rot. ANCHOR RICH MILK . POWDER On S lib tin. '" %  WCHOH FRESH CARROTS GODDARDS FOR FINEST GROCERY SERVICE.



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PACK MX BARBADOS .ADVOCATE FRUMV. Jl'l V II. I* CLASSIFIED ADS PIM,ir SA,MS T ,n,L|r NOTICE* < FH MI TELEPHONE :sca REAL ESTATE NOTICE \ an.jjir. S,IIV;H1 IIor>.Kahi.>liiB.G. SHIPPING NOTICES DIUJ UIIOK Carol %  I'OII 5AU AUTOMOTIVE lUnov. I1L.U1 KMIWI : %  l. ll )H p.m. to-d> *l thr v Whrr* I.—id. eraI Btltad U -tlaad. %  Wly "ml Fatar KnowtH %  ng i i | a.. • i juu. H : %  *1 Mg %  i. .... r -* %  ; AT I *.< lor Afxrn-l.il II.IIM Irani 1,1 orioi. • / s ll .-'-* %  -II *l > %  %  ml i, I lmparlal Calirce %  Aunt* t %  : OlM altcirmo) f.-r II %  W01 %  %  fj A I • %  • 1? i : t.flci fcIiwM! MM %  'i MM .__!• %  M| Win."'"* fU I IH W MI 4 i-nd p.sail, mga CA*W\E n IVaay Ue* U'.n %  T. '.• %  • sr-ii (;OVER.N:I![M NOTHL ; 7 l>ert.. Area* HSM j"T' ll. . Knuh. IM. B> .. % %  I %  V: 1.110 ST"*" tor. A(.si It --t.Ll.ll Si Visit of "H.M.S. linnkrMi • H.H4.S. Burghead Bay" be visiting I' i nth in 14th July, and will be open to organised pailies of limited numbers from Youth Organisations such as Scouts. Guide* e'c. frOM 2 p.m. to 5 p.m on Satunl.iv Hi • i2thJul>'Heads of Youth t;n .... isations who wish to arrange for pnrtrea to visit the hip. are asked to get in touch with the Harbour and Shipptr.' Master who v.'ill arrange transport. 9.7 52— 2:i %  ft.id u it.P. is Cwt %  Clairndo .i or pilot* am W.1.M IB LOST A roi XII LOST ... %  pi h w.i HWUM Tvhau %  •aajaaal t., i ltai-k ne.1 Craaa Pa*' R. r r issu !. -HIHJ I ru% irdurBi ID r\i-t. %  Wii-m e> Co 31. Swan SI re* I ll-i li!r %  %  I r-rdee* van ,M-m: M %  AMI M %  va BMUimt <:• iw>tb* • T.st—du. rXECTHK AL ornrr.p ..KLI<.TON I-\*M In* any debt a m • aBacii** u.t eatauol t.fcuiti.K %  eh WM met %  rlanni tfulf all .'iiMl JOSCTM (I'IMBHK TUDOS %  :.U d.v ;t Julv iM, alMr hlcti dak I aha" prafpd la <1..lrll ul* f tl.r r-lar alK"^* .r paiUM %  %  .; • %  -.* r whlrh I .'.all tham -• h-t riMatr and MHM I -fiait not M %  had nMlcr at M" UBW Of BatnruWa /mi -u a*r*ona Uasabtad U th* aaldi Waal Indu r*at • an .^^-Wfl l^> acttb ni"iilt C* UmtWd lat 1 IS p r ai.arf-. w*i>ila with-it Uy. All itam cum d... I ftdalllW' n X NICTIOUB A eft I HOUSES .. . — — mrttpOadMU SMrtaln-a * I :-. T a raa i B-, GBOHtisTl OWN. July 9. | %-p^vo^sUVT the discovery of, i -u^. M M-_ %  r .. ; ho !" dy^ twm a (tlaeasc caUod I %  batt. The disease ortjl. ^li.v bchcvi>! to be cncephalo: lyelitis wsa diaKnosed as equine ; hies by the Bureau Husbandry in Wash%  whom the bt i.iwd horse was sent for investiga%  ion. Brar.ll reports that white ison|re*i create** %  owla .>" %  unknow.i The disease first afTecteil 11 .AT tlvt nialUd. locate Aut %  fa roerraa I I in %  al-noral Cap Trent two c lame BtaaUa> %  lI*XM-Two fur:i lajfttT, Wtlh m %  ..— % %  :<• lw.'0"iii. M i-ll-:. :achl Club, or CH*. Dial SsH. . !" a brlfk wall lo b. dri-lMltM aad rnDawaS Irani awr i -*. Stlidt Sjaara W.I 1 • b> TWalOi July D.1COST* CO, 1.TT1 1 1 alA£a—IUD Shim. MutCo. '.leaMad Ut MI r' I -im !ndlo hiti r*l\nr.v c rjak — uM BrtUU Wi.^SJlT.Sfl l^aa I •(•> dlacotml. C>v* Ibaalwitl Si Co llt:i %  • i.ta— % %  -.•a vrd IMW Ui.pav .. .i ,,irf %  M.ffai Co. L 1 !,.... %  < JUST AKMJVKD llra-MudaiK I id a.p*ed ihaninn T0 FlckUp Raada lu .lUarUva walaul A limited ^tiarrrfTT ofilT C. 8. StAFni At CO LTD Itmy atra-t. SJ-^INGVAUB n.A-fTATinN. Sat-t %  dli.w About aW irttb arrda and Mtat M acrea in p.i*i-irr naada dan %  oasri • MOuar. Otwaafti llawr. .. • ... 1 %  '"• I Tb* abntn 4'lanlaSapa -4 %  %  <>n< for ml* al their OfBca No It Kltli Str-*l. m. FMd.. tm> isth July IBM at 1 ajn 1 -ma*tit.'wi. Ww Dw'iluidhnuaa known as "WBUlc" >iandiru| on BBS aquarr f.et of land at G."rr nrast. FHU-titU furlhrr parUctiUrt and 'tcIrT{j 'cATTOr\n At CO, v** %  : Onrn AtiN.ftao Mna < WA.M"ttt irn.r C*>kneat tla-a rack (• %  mai; for atai HT at*, appk* by l**U* .tatlns "xswrntii'* A II 1 lil ( a A'lvncalf fc 1 -3 la ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. ill 1 .1. I BO* llaurt SrVOa rw> JillE laaj TM'A I.I J %  .! %  ll %  BOSKOil*' I I Au|ul 1SU RAIL1M. IO II BftrB M %  ANllhTAD 1Mb Jut}-, bt* til (NO TO TTIAO Hlmn A llltlllsH 1.1 IINA _l S STTNTlJii ISUi Jul*. > %  %  •. •* COTTSCA lath Jaly. ISM tl B. NSMTOft *u> AucuaL Itn ilUMi TO TBOtlVABI a cvmaCAi -;*Ii4A *ii July. Ita iCI'BV AO OXLTl M s HKTIA i JWIT. tasa I. r MOMN, SON a to l.ia I The MV MUNtKA ... 1 la ar.d Pinraaan far C -.uUSf*. bWm%  \ K*i. Sa.h d Won\ \ y ltn I fba M V % %  ::i'nrr . %  > .. P aa M i i abajl W> ~ J ll B.O. cattV %  .. bn %  but has now spread Canadian National Steamships 10 DIE IN BUS. TRUCK CRASH mil NC.iir vi, ANADIA.M CltUtSUl 1 .NADIAN COSTSTmUCTOH I.1DV RODNKY ;T^VK'S %  fsMl SBM '•" %  ri.aMnd (M r ;tn ^n. Applr Wlll NOTICE rtaSalat 4 MiiKi trOMBlaV N'a. .1 J£ la 1 j.naetirut 1 '/onall. Uhi d.wi . 1 1.-1 inati su of WUbiim Albari bnu :.... pariah n* SJlnl Mlchthia laland who dlad tt Lower CaUr>nora ok afawald on Dw 1Mb v of Oatobar. lSfti, ar* roouo-tad to • auto _.'-aiad to th utidentUpwd — atVA WAIXTTTT WORBaTLL QuaHSWd aWaOB%  will of tha aaid BTUU m Aln.r% Worratl. dacfa.ed. /'• asaaarsTlajpai A CHRlth. Bobcl'"111 dh flliwH. tBrhifatown an or ba*(we aalWiiUol nasMal, IHl alt(r wbMb data I aha.l sfocaad lo duUiiiuta Hi 1 (tan v 1 t*o nnviii1. 1 .nail Ucn .. I I .... not bo liable f a P r _j pataoii of whaaa daan aball not than haa di.tr id ..ud r claim And all peraona ii.dabbrd to tti* BaM rrtate ai fwawartad to Kit dabUBaarr without drlay. Danta tan IStb tmtt ojJuna. lVSJ MCCITT WOBttaO.1.. "wUI i *l.-aU (on**' MISCELLANEOUS _..S0 POCKBT MOWTA' aaallv aa-ned by ixcrnmendlna 39 ar aubacrlbara t< [ %  .'-.nlFTL'SION In or.m monll 1 7 BJ r, n |SJUIB>JU| c aelling Ral'f. rnur apar* timr (;-i • >un-' ad forms today l.TSX-dtt. ? FLASH NEWS : ; \ CfcOBD.O OOlt.N -AIJJ , lhUlltll %  AaaWAI %  jj W ft'l J %  r-.u strcrl All coodi arlhiur % %  \ tin NO* ANN BAV1 \ When your BACK ACHES... Badiarha U awniBy rauaad by lai> k^daeyt. Th* kklnryi aia tin blaaJ'i Intara. Whaai tbtj pi out aJ araVr, . *M Mass atai Miaaanaa aiUn (Ur Bi tin irataan. Tata bwoVacht. headVka, thaisaiaiss. taalurWd latt ar thai %  brad ant' Uaaag asaa loftaa. To luaha row Ittdnati wart staatrly ir-dloUrplr^-n-.injeadardai •at Dad.!*. Kidnr. P,\U. indd Ki+n, P*i qwicklr rid ratar ornburdVn.d* blaoa af aircat artda and aaani aa that pure, fr ch Maod flo. %  lo enn nrrra and niurl.. Than yaa larl batter leak better ark htttn and JOB era raadr lo darn* -;lh iay. Iiuiil on tin r**nrna IWifi KidWy Pal. M iha bkta parkata awh tin r*d handa. Oiilr 1 St all drut ahwta, j? Dodds Kidney Pills GOVERNMENT NOTICE DECISIONS iWjKf. linard Ail, 194!). and Wanes Board Krijiilatioiis. 1941. C I( 6 U TRANSATLANTIQUE SaUuiga from Southaasptoii to GUadeloape. MarHntuu.. Barbadas, Trinidad, La. i.ualra. Caracao JisaaJr^ froas KavtassaabBD Arrives Barbadoa *"DE CRASSE.. 12th July. 1S52 .. 24th July, 1952 £ "C'OLOMBIE" .. 31st J B>, I9S2 .. 13th Aug., 1962 ^ •"DE GRASSE" .. 22nd Aug., 1952 .. 3rd Sept.. 1952 ^ "Not calling at Guadeloupe SAILING FROM BAKBADOS TO fC1ROPE Fram Barbadoa Arrives gaBlautasplasi O COLOMBIE" .. 18th July, 19S2 23th July. 1952* DE GRASSF . 6th AiuL, 1992 . Iflth Aug., 1952 $ "COLOMB^E ,, .. 24th Aug., 1963 .. 5th Sept., 1962 £ -DE GRASSE" . 16th Sept.. 1992 . 28th Sept., 1952 8 •Sailing direct to Southan.pt'on B. M. JONES #2 COLTD.,—Ageats. I FYFFES LINE. DEt lSlO.NS uiade under Srclloiwi 19. 11 and 12 of the VYase* Board I A.l. 1943 (1943—25) by the Wares Board established undrr th.WSKM, Board iBitdxelown Shop Assistants) Order, 1956 Board iBridgetown Shap AaslaUnta) < Amendment) I>eela.int.s. IDS*. N*>. I prnptlclor of lb* In ia.pr.-1 ol (oodii li-oda. piirtU'tiUrly noil and Irda T^al tlw T iiupreaacd ot ol on Ut* ph-a" m d/or MI... ad that Baode — And all pareana are aoroby warnad ,<^aln.l the inlniiaarnarl or aaul T*ao> Mark In iha Uland ol lUrbados. A rtmlUr nolle* api*ar*a in tha Official Oaiatte durmd U;mhi ijll Dated thli ISth day nf Jiine lfa TtlF Mt'AKFH OAT (OMI'ANY. Pet: ColUe. CaUord Co TO-DAY'S NEWS HASH j __^______ DOBWKLL IN HOLLAND \| lies i ;M - '* ; %  nir. ci 01 0 AI: AK TH* GHKKN By Sli Phil | TIME TO lUrMKMDKR BIT Lio%d imucl." —tl %  <• A WOMAN CAIJ.KU *AM Bi Praaa Ot B v : li 0apartni.il ahoi Oao cartrtdcea — tnVw ISSl SluedHI.4S 1 All baovy Hiixi c-.-\ i ad at '> %  Clmlni oul the 0 our HardJIB Deuartinaui %  JOMS'aOV* BTAttOKrY Ah UAHlin \B1 These Decisions may be cited as the Wages Hoard (Bridgcto Shop Assistants') (Amendment) Decisions 1952, No. 2 and shall be construed as one with the Wages Board (Bridgetown Shop Assistants) Decisions. 1950, No. 2 (hereinafter referred to as the Principal Daclslons). i. Sub-paragraph (1) of paragraph 3 of the Principal Decisions hereby repealed and the following new les; with a ZEPHYK 01 I answer your every holiday whim—licenaeii. insured and with a tankful of gas, ready to o the moment yon arrive in London! Please enquire further from Charles McEnearnev&Co.. Ltd. or Telephone Main Office 443



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V I'Ac; mo IIAKHAIMIS AUVOCATK 1 RIDA1 Jin ii Caldb (falting M %  lands, juustd i' i't ntdad SO mute la Din t,., of the Sugar Pi" I A sot I ka> Guiana. N.cdico Returns D l %  , ... [ | A %  %  uda. n u i" CM 'I '' Iha UbM i Canadian Pilot M R. AND MRS. A. SMITH Montreal. ntUI Itrday morning by T.C guatti si i' 1 %  Club. They were nccompanieri their little ton. Richard. Knarf, Hanid Heard a Noise A. K xTABOK U.K. Trude Commission r 1 NTRAN8D (ram 11 I'.l" A. yesterday morning wu Mr. Aut,n> it Marek, O.B.I i'K Tradl <'cxr,nuioner lor the Mr Smith Is %  pool 01 T. : ,. ; vh W est indies He haa BBM Montreal. „p |o Btn .,v,i and -in ba iauum i To Reside In U.S.A. M lts KUXABTTH HOW CHURCH < %  < Qomsti I I Dominica, left yaittH T.C.A. for Bermuda on her WeY to the US.A. to reMde with hwi children in Connecticut. Bha • d here for the part two weeks at t guest of her son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mr> shrank CoUymOM of Chelsea Rond Spent Two Weeks A FTER upending two holiday in li.irbaaoa as •• guest at the Cosmopolite Otassl House. Mr Byron M. DOVOBUI] i Brooklyn. New Vork. return.n home yesterday RKM B.W.I.A via Aniigiu. unrl Puerto Rico A Barbadian. Mi %  N I been residing in %  '•:: Ufa Ian visit to wot In 1984. He it a wholesale clerk working with the Bini •( Jaxton Clothing Co. of New Y< iK and i.s also Executive Secrctnrv .r the United Action Drmu-Mi Society. Medical Student R ETURNING Hum Jamaica yesterday morning by B.W.I.A. vta Trinidad wu M'. Bert Reece. a first yenr medical student at the University OoUegO He Is a on of Mr. C. Nigel Rl i of Society, St. John, and ha? come over to spend his summer hollda) with hi* relative* On Business M R. A. I) I'AGC, Service Raprataalattw <<>i ibe Austin Motor Company of I operating Irom thenCaribbean Kingston. Jamaica, left yesterday morning by U W I A for Antigua and fore he returns ters Ho spent about three days in Barbados on business and was A guest at the Ocean V Mr E. Roger*. Factory Repctentative of the same Company who came out with Mr. Page, is remaining here until Tur-*ri:iy when he return* to J.Marketing Officer P AYING nil 'ii v i-ii |o BarMr. Willi.nn B %  Mi :anan A w Joknaon, Hav. A. i Jatui %  at Bl 11 Canon A C, .lohnaon of Gouyave. 1 %  %  i l and will b holiday with %  i-i ompanh Dorothy Jol %  B.W.I A. via'Trinidad %  Dandfaw f %  is. He wai tei Ml American Consul M W It i> It \'ISKV. Aiim can I Md here. %  %  day morning by It W.I. A. ana* a very short business vi r Back From St. Vincent M ;.:Y BARROW of B nk Hal) Road %  %  was Mi was hoIlda>Ps there foi I Kecior Returns n :., it v AJIMBTROM BM icaxoiis of %  bi 11 A a % %  MrArinMrnng. B.C. Civil Servant M it r s DOUOLAB, Bopervi-.r of the Co-operative %  ...it n.iit of AsrLul ure in British (lulana, arrived here yesterday nrrning by H.W.I.A via Trinild tor two week*' holiday. He •^panted by Mr". Doug* : iand they are guests at "Leatonn-Sea", The Streim. To Study Nursing A RRIVING from S! V, | I yesterday morning b> BG. Airways was Miss Margaret ASIxrtt, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Abbott of Kingstown. BtM will be nere until Sunday as %  nuest of Rev. and Mrs. W. HarveyRa*i of Garden Gap,. Worlluni,. when ahe leaves by the falomele for England to study i the Royal Surrey County Hospital. Enjoyed Holiday A FTER what he de-u %  B van enjoyable holiday, Mr. Max Erdwurm of New York left yesterday morning by B.W1.A tor Ihierto Rico in trans it for S" Thomas where he will spend | Bora returning to New York. He was %  OSOUBanal i by hia wife. They had spaOl one montli lure as gu.sts si M Flat*. St. Lawrence Gap. Mr aVdwurrrl working for •'. DepartIhf N'w Yark Time. He ,d thai ha • u can itnla i % %  ooktna forward lo As beat m Naw Vork, bui hoi>et( lo be ba,-' here won again m I ta llday Intransil M R. JAMES FORBES. Manager of the Cocoa PtaBl Association in Trinidad, was intnnsit yesterday morning by T.C A. on his way to TOronto for inadical treatment. — And They I )' VX* IRRIX neard Hit noi Iral 1 told hi mater Hani.l %  ; %  lik dsntnfl It roaMS from the c i.';• ..f ,ht garden wall R^. *hrr I I Ciiuliln'i I %  So I don't %  o Investigate It — BEAUTY thai %  %  look a% Knarl aoal with her JS the I i""k A few •nmuUa later they "•*' %  Ha tanking dotea si the gr..ur.' c.tii the )•# f 'he wall. Tbc SCURL | ng eaaM up *iuite clearly Bal n..ilnng t-ull he ieen. Th. ,rrr. (h bu.hea arm lr.e *tns n, remainl ttill. Only the mis ssaeari M mil* |uat bende (lie falltr trunk of the old apple tree. But thai, as Knarf said, "wight Jait tx the wind." Ike Other StsW Then Hand climbed down off |fca wall nd drnppeil on th* other side, with Knarf following right *ft*r her They both walked or r to the trunk of the old apple tree and carefully watched th* grass. "There lan't a bit of wind and It is moving!' exclaimed Hanid. -Yea. It is!" "Someone's digging under it. Knarf." "Who can it be?" Hanid put her ear or. the grofr.d. at just the spot where the srraai was moving. "I hear th noiae' It'* | right -;nder h*r*!" At that Knarf and Hanid both itarted digging with their hand*. A few momenta later the whola top of the ground fell in, graaa and all: fell inlo a hole The next instant Blinky Mole* head cam* up. He looked around, robbing his ey*s In the bright llrrlit. trying to see who had broken lots his house, and what for? "Who's her*?" aaid Blinky. "VY ho Just made a hole In niv r<> "Oh! Blinky!" aaid It. didn't know it win you dH Uici'f-. digging!" "W heard the noise." said Kaai' %  but we couldn't aet anybody." By this tine Blinkj 9 eyes flaai!) got used to the bright light a lltti-. and he was able to see Knarf a d Hanid. He smiled. "Oh. it sail i. • Not too much damage. 1 can bu imwth*r room juat as'giHid. I iao have put up a sign." he %  *, why he was i..,tiding mor* rooms to his iiouse. "Yi iv* g w t fifteen 01 twenty t>om already." said Hanid "And you live In li.em all aloa* Why de you need more?" "Expecting gue>>ta." said Blinky, m'tting down and lighting his pipe He struck his match on the bottom i i. | i fcsval "Guests. Blinky?" A Few Waeka "Winter gueats," aaid Blinky "They 114* here in a few weeka." "My goodness," said Hanid "You'r* the busiest person I know You work day and night all through the Spring, and Summer and Fall And then, when the xir.ter cornea and you hav* a chance to rest, you invite a house-full of guests." Blinky nodded. "But they're no tiouble. no trouble at all. They'll erne, they'll aay hello. Ill show them lo their bedrooms, and they'll go to sleep. They won'l wake up until the Spring, Then they'll say K'>od;l>y* and thank-you, and gu nway again. No troublt, at all. You see." he said, "it's Prog, and Uilly Toad, and Klackir the Hectic, and Cricket, and mayo* a grasaIwpper or two, and a few spiders," Willy chuckled. "Very sleepy winti r guct*. Not %  bit of trouble. I : itter gat to work again." And he knocked the aihn out of his pipe, -nuled. and went down Inte I hi* hole. 11 IK DESIGN *.l a shoe can change rujid fo->t much narrower, in the rtcht shapssd shoe. These are good basic rules to lullow when choosing ghoes from the point of view ot their beauty, but don t target that this comes second to uood lit. For Long. Harrow frees, mgkj ibe ankle High built laVSSa, m heels, open toe:. -ling back: especially anKlc straps asymmetric straps, trimming.* e* are the ni<~; slenddouaer ornamenta detract foot ising. length, tn the low heeled shoe ^ tatt wotd< ^ n Ier lootl wedges brogued tongues andi lowmuth TOO bare unless they are cut Oxfords, o, three hole Derby Unmd Slll> „ ltU te cosmetK SIOCKUcings help to fore-shorlen the; m ,,, or your „,„, onr pujparcnt length of a fool For Lena. Braid Feet. Thef same rules apply as for narrow i feet, but to make a broad foot 1 look narrower, wear shoes built up at the sidea. A low cut shoe leipoaes too much instep to be Hattattng. Choose straps or trim|mingst which run aslant, or down. %  -* %  *-1 %  1 wrt Qa IfM <" %  ! Fer Short, rhanap Feet. Design* : ljuilt up In front, pointed tongue*. high how* or 'apron' fronts give leeteffi and •Unu>.-&* io a short. broad fool. Four-hide icr-u^ designs are lengthening Medium to low hee's are better Utaa vm • high ones, which are inclined to ••mphnslse the width of a short foot. Far Broad Frented FoolLnrge or *mall. the need here is to slim the front part of the foot. while keeping i snug fit round Oie heel. This can be done by court cut with a 'sweetheart' fron line, also by an asymme" n tM gue. strap or trimming. Again avoid designs which cul straight across the brand front of (he faal srimr,-.--. i ....km Ankles. Coini ^hoes are the most 'limrn Tb* fiarden—St. Jam i. .i.. a !..%  •> % %  s M H.-..--..W la tNoiHis St*** COtttSAN A M U.\ >IMM XIPMII .••'!' %  -II IOI.DIM MHIIOV H, IKKilJ" "inr*a<.o r,iNiTi %  safe) IJU*B GLOBE OPFMNi; TO-DAY I & 830 P.M. & CQNTINUINO The Roaring Saga of Mexico's Raging #$*: ICH1 ;i!IN8IWS w~ Talking Point Deal i.irpef io speak scornfully tni licrorlan age. There nilf hd MSM for meekness leheii you iry ro bt'tfer ii.-J. M. Barrle. The Lasl Girl BY THE WAY To Leave Aly's Party Lowly UM Slavs Till Thv huu tt By Beachcomber From SVDNKV SMITH PARIS. 'i ,im IM exclusive and i m ,.i •srpanatvs puts "< ttaa Parli sununcr reason, given irv Alv Kh. ii. ended „t 4.45 The first birds were -tiinm; and the sky was brighter than the crystal obandaUan in the restaurant among Ihg tlSMi of th' Bols de Boulogne, on the outskirts uf Paria, when the last two people loft. They were Aly Kiijn talaB self and lovely Use. Bourdln. France's No. 1 cover gtrl This was the biggest party Alv has yet Riven for his annual celebration of the Grand Prix race at Lotigchamp, just a mile away. l'lu'M* were 180 gueaU, and It lasted eight hours. The Aga Khan, defying -I-KIIU outers in aaar, ha dance %  Vg f w"mji; M though she IS the only one he i*ould poaglbl] I hOW can rotl tell"" Well—partnei Lorraine Dubonnet, M "year-old wine haft v. % %  •any D Sou Dul 2'%  -.i till sunrise. 1| still in Paris. -IIS M AU: IllltISS at a tW | complaining that u.on their trousers gels them mi taken for bosnltal porters. That U nothing. Tho g*'i Dutstdi .> oartaln >• < ikon t"i i Pom\ lan Aoiiuiai b) s dip] on Mart mi; Ihg Ibaatra, \ . boms srUb bin f<>i •> drink Tba .-. lira |>ia>en up, until the diplomat's wife said. "Has* your people built a new ship lately"" "No fear!" said the Admiral. "My people run ,i tobacconist'' %  hOp in Houn-low Why should they build ships'"' A dsplonuUc silence greeted this tbunoWboll I'ihnry Si. I if HX P ltOFESSOR O K McTOOTZ1E met Mlmslc Slopcorner f < >J the li'-t lime t...t.i .i %  showed her drawlngi of the kind of helmet lie thought sh'iiln eerir He d'd not disi:m< the fact ihoT he found Her ietensely stupid Bha Mid, "Ian I II rat \ baat I Bvei thing wc i those days**, snapi"'J nafs thr BtaMd for' '.oisle. "In pi-It you with things." i-vplied i!i. savagely. %  NM -ire1 t. '.' %  %  .I. Kvel v :.. •it.' .. M. ('-'. ..' And at thai point Mrs CMbrand averted a scene by talking erf her >|MtHCl | Tin-niv y*an <•/ nyr—r f REAP lh.it He sd little sympat "ignored then ut'e l.eni>.elves henrd." That gives me an exl trying to ajflnM t the condu %  boating Hi"' bars aan b making grhnacas sloouant of anger and frustration If I were %  ild I have I'IIV with Ihc people but i would bo actieat it says, "rises In the lake of Naguilles." It doe* no such thing N;tguilles is ulxive the ancient fi>rge of Orlu. the oldest forge ii. Dai world. Ariege. my own i-e s In the lake of FontNegre, i.ooo feet up. 1 know IU |. lyhood, as it goes leaping along by Hrmpitalet and down to Ax a id les Cabunnes. where it meets Together ihey go chatlei ing along to Taroscon (not %  i. and so to Folx and There used to be gold *.i g parts, snd ai lata M MM %  igMaantn <-cntury paopsg sran %  ai\hing for It In the mountains. I would sooner have the dark wine they drink in Vlcdeasos. CA OSS WORD I p I M The Flying Pharmacist Became Ace Htm He is A ILO.A.C. Chief JAMBS STL'ART KOKTY-ONE years a^> a H-year-old poor Tyneside lad watched one of the earliest airplanes plodding through the sky. Now hi EUA KAZAN %  %, •. Ii I0 MN SiilW'-K V\XiA THEATRE* WM C FLYING LEATHERNECKS \l >M4^rd ptnr'.iaior. ifti . %  •> i. IM : i tun. .. tSi Ctniiv bu: I'd re::.,., the get IS' iiwu % %  Sun %  :i>i IM race. HI 1. Way to sii nii.w. ill I at laa i*r f daxoming. (t) un niAiii I..111. i-.-iiet • %  plgaiki nr ** Hi) i -> it roi:d 6* a euaw ti*. I L*V be S Start o: rats i J. Pardon *h nnn. ICI lUiaO an coinmcrAf. iji S. Tnr ap bsionaa tc ma. | i '. cs. (41 J I iHlr'dliig itl |l. Mara taaf ell' narp. 13) Soiuuoa ol Sal jrd r • %  yiwiU. —0 0 (.8 trd Ii Tr*l . w>rl ,t o Basra., i %  z&> ISttSt S i4> raits Jp Huoa. $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 (I.EAIIINC; ODD LOTS DRRSS 000M CREPES. SPUNS. SILKS. PLAIN, I I u\M III n STK1PEI). 11IECKS. ALL AT ONE DOLLAR YAKD. PLAIN VOILES AMI 1ANCV OUC.ANDIES 50*. r -_'*^ Its the '-, y*V*l roovle • -f thais r fora Hundred i HapiY .*-**. YOU! SSW I. T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL '220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606 0 ;. "" I MOsJ • ruisjj.' no(* PL474 BTOWN DIAL 2301 Extra: %  <> UM kM, i 45 Aid 8-30 p.m. short — I \K WITH A STAB j and Continuing Dally 4.45 and *ae Laleal British Sear, Berl 1.3* pm.



PAGE 1

1 I Kill w JULY 11, 1W2 BABBABOS MiVOCATt FAt.L TUIU.l First eye-witness story of the raid the whole world is arguing about To begin with, the Ack-Ack was thick, but then Six days ol diplomatic crisis in the world's capitals have passed since the Americans first bombed the Yalu river power plants, close to the border of Manchuria But amid all the discussion. hardly anything has been said of the operation itself. What hapinrned on that raid, and why did the military minds Cftnsider it necessary r Here is the first complete answer From RALPH WALLING TOKYO Saturday T HL clouds lay hf.iv'. in toe Miltry sky ove* %  -i -.11 -Sea On ihe nortlt-cj.tr coui .it Korea steamed the U.8 ner Princeton Philippine Sea Bon llntiimf. And K.chjnJ Swif;: ,. west K Skvra.du iliw-ixiniben took N P u m ( n MI Orel! of l'i: .. h< -_ . So DNii'i tie i war— the bombing ol me Vain rivet power plants. Ilia! j:%  -::OOB hev pm ow in* i :! % %  ii •forth DODGEO R*0R for iai> BUIM UM rfmti-. tiers Hew ; Hln;oM ri.pu.ne the -nounlA.il low '" gal -Commiin 1 "' adai m>rn:nf %  \ ud %  .ru AH Force South K h>.B*i MB Tiee'hei 't-.ev 4-Mine m *(>n Mai AOUSM Al 300 miiea-afl < huti: iftc* dived in wnMifl iral rhe nrv OOOID fell DC new mlnu'-e oust mar m h* fer D0H One-'on oonib* nppe,] uw concrete roof*. D •ICIlOD DORiAf exploded ati" 'hruma ine o %  ted ame biaclf inwBc an" ffl Hatne-% %  RiTISH THERE r\n W mmo'ei tnt -a i Mjp M 'tip o-MiiWra mi -nuiesiad except f"i urn m which unev Wm*fi -eatea MsrUM and a.i (dm UMtai*%  n Ou Meteors—fovcrrt mem Fh.-. tailed in vain u> be on* by Hod MiCH ihougt. were bMd 30 mile.< >\ nauUaneonalv rai*. nale .i ion* Mm ai ftHBf) on • %  > -tongehon fleet and n, at .4*11 ..i i LumieueaM OI*II low mi%  Tne ac*-.ick lookeo rough -In,! i ..ana* wen' in to alust* fie p:.inr* Artr Uvtr niTv* n to It." 40-MILE STRETCH hj'.li'j 'lie kcyalone ot ItM Zulu's mammoili hvdi < hid a chequers) It was built by the Japanese ID 1B37 and completed in 1*41 It aril 13§.O*I.OO; and '- •he foiirh :argrs* nlan* *n tin world. Tle Bicat dam-barrage is niitii :IOOII:' •*a uv in* rate Damaaan M -1 uni io w; mat* no 'Kintrtw %  n. *ua so n was ..%  L&i gUghtl I a! PR3 fru.iipled IL %  Gi WELL DONE' %  re in* f#rt i %  h i a 40-ti OOP unacny o! the plant was oooated or Soviti -ru from WVOOO fcllo *iLs to 000.000. So* II varda. tnuwiorm-t vardi ni iurbiue nuildlnva arr MaaLrd and xvnwuwd Boforv UM rain a Jw*mv -rj|ia*r n r*ia*ir a' %  iu'nn in ral Hark I'Lwfc % %  %  iw.ider nKoifw "'(Tw at t c t oon'ribniA] rttat^raily to tru •rdec on ol uw *pVfn> • war wa< it iioiat!ai r Oraral Wr.Und t'J* Ait Porr^ -S^thiru. not %  r.atW &<••*". *ent Miny." Admiral Brlarac : Lmi jJi:nu eni ofi wlUwwr a %  MBV VlerUmiul ( Urk a.n:iw Wrt! ^lon" M an hands anr* added: ~li aia* ute old tinifa." NOB wftur u ia .! %  o.-^*(id tat* "iid> ,, E il i if lit Mr av ixi'ii'ttuad raitiip it ,i t r TV ftanavlf • To ui^lrrauaw Iflir 1 it...,i %  rou LD* siorv oi thAoraanmia Aluad air opciatlooA : %  io strangle the Rod amitr* .suppiv tinat m-n not mrrtiirtina ftrstrtcanooa W.l • iniui nydmi'lecti.> -,-'.in llmv kiica Uiai nuDdreda of arecked u-ucka and ratlcar* were betnit pulled back %  nto thoac raves repaired ann AH Dark .HI io (he nuuli an.i railways thev we -.ina'anti tiammrrtriK Time and af i rioWD orer Hie po*^-Dl.nt* am' left Ufm unac^rbed adBinal Brjor ol ne U.H Hmvy. ana Air Porce VWilan-l MUdaUUI UlCli ODD %  %  %  : iTid o"! rje nil —not b/ any pi''. iul m nne tuir bio* TACTICS CHANCED Ueneral !{ %  % %  %  ." (if foniiei Untied Nations Ron "landowr. utr^rd Hat reoi Wajhinirion chiel Sia !• dmrtn* Appr 'hrii..nt!i* ol H Man ... ... % %  mved too iironc rhen the lacttea or tra wn mrlard Uaneral Uar %  n-r v*-ti • nttn and I Waahansiori u> 'ham Nfll intll Hi | R1 I %  wbkb rn i % % % %  rai la a*i Uie world uiUiiti Tnree lime* ll aaMd On Prii i.i '.IHlout Ml rbaa M* '.i %  %  OTHER LIGkTS ,,:I.:I .: i. DtUM Jl Por Arinur. or eten ..i %  ll la pruOabie utr aonj oileii no otlirr *ntrle tarei of co -cmDlei -,itae CONQUER PAIN WITH Murre i ... I No Limit l .man %  uaJBMtJ the di .that ond danPtit m mon/ parti of rM how melcomad ANACM' fr of pen. *n Greet Britain o*er IZfiOO tori aaa* oVntda recommeftd 1 rJiii onoffei.-. and ue* It fi their iwrgerMt "///^ X^ QEl SOME 'ANAGIH' TOdA Y AMD AKM YOURSELF AGAINST PAIN .UI CbflQH II, A be\>lopnu-tit ll.e original JL l4u,00U.OUu nvatli .ivaila pawl onpai %  'Hrs trom \ai ifa\QM,M I ii %  %  • %  lane AcM, wkich l.wi un tieext i I-al ) %  larfoat HI %  )•, Mlk .il upOTalKii in lUii. brmrnirf th t l a-.ar-i up -..i KIMB u %  %  ..% laaaaWWak n l*M Grants Thr* %  .-aiua m. i Bin uti* i .: load Oc.fltyMawH in UiOiau Ua-uDaaMbaal awvariiinoi.ts. 1U.O00 (in aurvey and %  her la run from London ,uil i-ouaafviiltou work in DomlnThr pattern >_31 r~io UM mi*, d f'u a nirh Iht B acwnt drawi fi lulr 9. Bi . Of formuiii .i i cmMrah I ^ lit hMM >l : %  %  %  i k to MM %  "Iked bach Into aeaaion lo-dnaH of M Mf atouaa VMM for MBS. Three I Tibervote.i • %  For a radiant thine -***> I • uitea and lit u -t.P. SEA AND AIR TRAFFIC In Carlisle Bay *•'• Mai-ton aWUe WH Tbaxw is alao a anurlj item nf 'uesrtnt Of M.v 'Jrnni., ii^i^.^ai* i Lucia of Dr> Ghaaoi tne '.eolhfrtn:il Bodi aravDn, 'ocat rru.neTnent; whUr private I ."'"' : rtCn 1 .ha n ? ^ ^^K U %  V,J. ,' .•nterpnse (Amerit.m aa well %  %  V aiuc *'tar. MV Vva'U* the fit.'.e Electnrily Authority 'rilL^hl hclpa public fund.s jf IceUir.tl. )W W upon these foundattofu.ll the fuaKtbility of harnessing CIUT. *. Hut it adda: U dMWod from Votcanlc fuma'It should be retdlard thai. a c rolea for the kc''iatim; of etcrm>n'ial rul*, tludtawtopiMDl of 'ricity. ileriiil.a upon Cuituncntinit on Hat i-niiuou Hi— draws i |ba> fact UuU not oiiij „. %  vunmiiif low. but -Is* itial I.MI* J*. ji. raagci'. ... %  *""" Bcn "*"erart^ s. Sen. r> al. Lnn. Ben. lj.it v Nsleen Brh l> OaaaTiM I ii autitia D, with drunta al ealae I i. *-h. i^d> Ka • [•V*. Caaaai n,-i, m-iuiu !" iu> dr.1. l>ieni.i "t thes' funds .g.. aaaaVpendlna. It ,-idds: In tne alxLi e ir (,t the ten ulletted by UM Act, 1CM than kalt the alloc,ition<. miw been apont, in aplte of riw • in world war pticea. Thia U due partly lo wur.d ahortage of men und matenaU and partly lo the uiffU-uIt* which countrlea like .viin cirrying out evaaQprnent uniong civil .uimi." Tlic fa^vc point' I .no noi nlw <-tou!y applied. Initial errors wen.made in 1948, soon nfter mo Act came Hitu foree. Tlierj was loo much unproductive e and cotoiiHM wore uddleil wi' %  •octal atrvice* which they coul I not uffonl to maiuUiln. Later, g new policy waa adopted to give pirrc-defire lo sebemaa that wulrl benefit the colvnu* economically "The new poll. -,., the th* improx-ed skin and •raaatprlM Laft !f-t^5L M* I i of Iht local pa* tan try raUMT thl i>wi ihe aurxtitullon of a sort reit -luatrinltaed aaTtculture.'' —B.t*.P. %  ii ii AM Trlhaenum. naenta IM.KU I (i in Iioin Tl IIM,I.I.I ^ nir A ar i am SleamWikj. lYaaar WRI, aeneral r.ran gas u.nirt gaaaaJ FlSF.MIOWI.lt SEAWtLL Arrl.ata . n I 4 .. T.-*4. *•• %  > NT. Ll <*IA Mr. JIMIM WBIMMI. Mr.. Elalno W.ln. Mr. Kalth Hl.ki, air lU*u.auI %  Nsafja, r. Klll> W.tr.lrta*. MIM -ilJai*. Mr. Gnwt Oordi at From Page I OoaaaaJitM annniince-l that hi •UP M.I, mi'in! thrae > %  MTO In /!-.-our of acaUng the Tufi daJi .•n. lium Oeorgin. Conralea %  iraaaa. Hr cbaViea "aWoiam." MV BI uies, CeleaUno Irlante ami "—-l Qaaajja ^^ rdo Colon were approved „ tttCmSm^SSS m M.ntu. E lluldrr. G. Vvancu. J I Bayler A Pair. K Boiun FWMra lo Um, „p hi, line.. ? SSSS^ c i ttSSi..?""• w "' 1 R cull,.I altoul 40 of iila atarlo \n*au a* BW.I A. %  NII>M*I U d>r into a %  brategy conference •'• TMNII>*II I..lTla\Vl-T U^.\lD^S:Ji, iil very much in the race anil 1 iopp^ a ih.nm repented hi* clnlm of winning aaaaaJatM^MJafaawaas ilngUon "n an early ballot.' oul U,., U,r 2*| "" "" CftUai Con,, „,,, ;y been )u.i. The qmaUty Metal Polith BAD SKIN ? Baniefa pamful akin blemi.,hi faat a.lh I'i I The • dgagaa at Di Q m i OaataaM i laliaepiic pro) aaavaaM bifaaatoa, UL*> paid aad %  %  .. boil., pinipka, pi RM MrM>aUM (in—*iz lilBea i, much) p.* Teeth Loose Gums Bleed Hlf-riiinic Oumi, 8ora M !.— T.-ih m-an that voa mar havs l'rdrrhaa. Tr-m.li Slouih %  r ptilitM %  ..<"• hud ata-aaa ihat will aooB*r or late <*ua your teth to fall oat aad may aUr> rauaa Hbeui iili.iii .H.l lliait Ti-mlil"' ImMiii atoua aum hlredin Iho Rrai day, a4a aoea moulh and qul.-bly tlahlma tha i*th. Iran rtad BTuaraata>. Amoian mini niak" yur m.iatli v*l\ an<" aa yi ur te^k or raon*y ba.k „igatuin or empty |>.i.'kas. tit AaTbaan In m ue rhamlal Mday. The Buarante pr>" i Jubilation gprMkd through Risen| hewtri he.i to fWtrlcl tMtri ublc candidate. Satbrfactory J to basic economic ne.-,itie'. ^mne Taft aupporteni but 1 such ag building roada o r draining i ud only falnlly. •wainptt, which while they will l.i i Uaiuld E. aMaa. prove an aaait to Ihe eitlony'i BNI were lo mi t at. or Ixrfoca economli' ii d vance in till In general, 'neakfu*!. Some ol Staaacn'a beat will never pay nil fnVWtoA dlvlf"i*nda nre urging film lo aba n don r>~nd. Priv.,1,. Mte^VrtaV, or thfl ''""' '" throw his support to Tolonlnl Developiiicnt CorporaElseohowur on the ballot. don for t)i t rnattar, cm the-i —u.p. %  Haia.lr.ih J PraOt, U Utter, NMarl. II Koi-v aaai NATES OF t:\aiA\vt. i raw JUI.V 10. IBSJ >aW tORK I -.-„ ,-. Ol ,1 t'l Mahl ur l)nitn 11 1 IB I -i i Cable ua/m re < HWY awt IO'J !!*(-• MI III %  • %  I %  Rllvar SO" l-r CAXABA n a/M% a*, ctaaaua* an Ml/lWi Uamaatf Dr-fu 7B.lS.iV Bifhl Orafla 7B :i j in -. n c.a.b> '' le i*r. CMreaney 1* a/lO*i Fr. Cauaoin Ttl 101 Pr M*. Pr. ailver M* !•/. BULOVA IWATCHES [Only a few in stock as [the quota is limited. .UT YOUR BEST BET IS TO GET ONE They are real magic when it comes to quality. 17 Jewel). Guaranteed V. De LIMA A CO.. I .Til. I Broad St. and Marine Gardens AT NO EXTRA COST! -i au %  %  •OnOM-Vitetipc. M ooe&ii&>''?imci ^flVitasy-foaasfii laaaaMJOt NOW PACKED if EVERY KOX OF Get yours vsday whila tha v.pply lasts! TOCitSf /V. ^nttnii 4-.'i-l maataurinzap'. now In IVary paeUge of <: jriou* Kellofg/a AIX-BKAii! fAOOIiNI BVI -,..''• I aponn and toaap • m on.%  qnartrr-wir.pr^iM % %  aVUraiaW. Iirmdicf •poona. vrMMMI ..... quickly. Acidproof! Offer gaada to amaaat yau v. iih tiae MM agtflcrWpa .-aA*fof tode •' Uaa.*^* -•. :i anaO DateaWiririg apon.-. %  u> uua anurlnLight! Te I %  • Afj^ngtAi* fcvt. Lazalive, too! Ii ivftiaac from cocuupatloa dus to ALL-BRAN lock of bulk ir. tV> dk-'t, enjoy a Y • "ul oi" K-liOKf' %  evr.y dn>. And drink pWnty of water. njtwoi Iu'..-tiva food! r AU %  %  in-' rra/juhng KOOOI. pr quick) Ofier i'. 'g ef Bauk. Creek, Mich. a



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FRIDAY. JULY 11, 1H2 H Will Vim\n\.i( Ml P W.I HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES .v\ BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG WHEPE IS MY : %  • .*. ^ t =FNT BATHSUBE •' S|i)~'lT ID I HE DAGWOOD YOUR BOSS ^I CAN T CC^E FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS £UCKQO %  i M THCCELLArOFA PlACE THAT &V.EUS OP lEATMEr' AT BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND *JCU D^ETSsa 1 LET'S JUST S*' CJIG*6. SBVSV... /lMTKft4U-ANT TO %  /TvTT.AN eC^eST 0--4 -Av3" / ,ECARHOP** (A THF PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES HERRINGS FRESH or in TOMATO SAUCE YES SIR! S&SRUM i %  FUvnur— THAI MM il Nil \!M I uMtm (1938) ITD. ;. li fli— t-r* lor !•, %  '! Rum Holiday [nliTlairnncnl * MUD VM.H\BI.EM In i: %  BUCn IIAM LAM TONGCER In lira I'OIINKn MI'TTON In tin* ROAST BF.EF In ting VIM LOAF In Una I I m BOM mil In tin And "nir roinil r FIVK STAR RUM L\CE & CO. LTD. MAI. ROIIUCK ST. IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only SI'I A I VI Ol I IIIS rr now n.uil.blr | ..r lhau.liro Whilr Park. I <•< iKi.l. S|i. ii(lilsl<>ll. IVORY .27 NEKO CARBOLIC (Large! PLAYING CARDS (pei Will i IE! NIPP1 PS 31) .12 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street THE I O I. O \ \ v i I 6IOCEBIE1 I'hf I'liMrf II #•.• Your Hollar *<• s In >(/ %  •<> CRICKET The West Indies in Australia 1951—52 CRUSADERS By HAROLD DALE Rend all about Your favourite Cricketing Stars— CODDARD. ATKINSON. MARSHALL. WALCOTT. VVFEKES, WOR.1ELL. Mi Harold D %  -fUHoni >i rei %  lor 1 'inn in the I) i troding book to oui i ; t< i Ti Cricket How would the Hashitn' lirokai 04 ircll and Walcott match UD t-> Uv eflU lent run ettli of Morris and Would the spin tnd suite ol Rajnadbin and Valrnimr be more effective than the menacing speed it UndweJl and Miller** Would the "storn patrol ol cricket uccaad in his attempt i' i comeback? Th< i ..nil the other qu* i • thai spring to mind ere fuliy deall with %  Dale's candid comment i '• %  I from on the Teat, he covers • 11 the %  ouU afford U end money to be preaeni throud %  > %  the "World Championship" mat Ci leaden U the id %  < ntee, Reinforced by man) splendid action It brings a .irmchair. $3.50 per copy ADVOCATE STATIONERY t