Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
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undap Advora

AGREEMENT AT. PEAS



ESTABLISHED 1895 1952 PRICE : SIX

nee













CE TALKS LIKELY ~
Meeting Held In |

Businesslike Way

~ TOKYO, July 6. |
Peiping Mivencd the secret Korean Truce Talks on,
Sunday with the word that final agreement was possible if
both sides negotiated ffgood faith and according to the
agreed principles. The negotiators met in a’ closed session
at Panmunjom for 70 minutes on Saturday—the longest
session in recent times and it is said that the meeting went
off in “a businesslike fashion”. f
Both sides were committed to secrecy on the proceed-
ings until it seemed as if they could find a way to break up|
the deadlock over whether prisoners should have the choice
of being sent back to their homes.
a as A Peiping radio voice of Red
China said in one of its more ami-

Rhee To Rum.
Open, Legal

whether the American delegates
Elections
ections

have the good faith to take this
Nast step towards an armistice in

PUSAN, Korea, July 5.
President Syngman Rhee, vic-

Xorea,
tor in a six-weeks’ batile with
the Korean National Assembly,
today progised a “legal and
open” presidential election. But
there were no prominent candi-
dates in the line to oppose the

Hopes for peace in April were
destroyed when the talks had
been jeopardized by the Ameri- |
can unilateral action of detaining}
100,000 Korean and Chinese war |
prisoners in violation of the}
principle that all prisoners should |
be sent back to lead peaceful |
lives. |



aging chief executive and it|, Now that the talks have gone)
appeared certain he would be re-|into executive session again there |
elected, is no reason why the final agree-

ment could not be reached if |

me od fay tr ante te

NEW SCHOOL |



THE NEW SECONDARY SCHOOL AT RICHMOND
(See Education Notes P. 11) |

Pils And Fats | —_--_.---
Talks Start RUSSIA RENEWS ABSURD

Next Tuesday | PROPAGANDA'GHARGES |

Osear Wins
Colony

Handicap |

Maureen Coxrnolly
Crowned After Winning
Women’s Singles Finals

By DENNIS HART
LONDON, July 5.

The seventeen-year-old American champion Maureen
(Little Mo) Connolly broke down and wept at Wimbledon
this afternoon following her Women’s Singles. Pinals against
Miss Louise Brough three times previously winner. They
were not tears of,regret that Miss Connolly shed. Her
breakdown was the natural reaction of a young girl who
had just achieved the highest honour in Woman’s Tennis.
Yes, Little Mo beat the mighty Miss Brough in straight
seis 7—5, 6-3 to become the first since Suzanne Longlen to
win the Wimbledon title at her first attempt. Yet not even
Maureen's tender 17 years makes her the youngest player to
have been crewned Queen of the lawn tennis world, Sixty-
five years ago Miss Lottie Dod became Woman's Champion
at 15.



p like Miss Connolly
een on the centre court
long time, Today she

rself in all respects a

From All Quarters:

Modern
Jacob

for a long,
proved he
y champion and likely to be-
come one of the greatest ever





cnown

In Louise Brough, winner in all
of 1! Wimbledon titles since the
war, she wis up against the most
rect centre court campaigner,



Rhee who won nis fight for a
popular election of the president
yesterday said he did not want to
be a candidate for re-election but
said he would serve again if
called by “the will of the people.’

The 177-year-o'd president left
the door open for what political
observers considered would be an
inevitable draft, There was no
immediate government announce-
ment of the date for balloting but
a new president must be inaugur-
ated on August 14.

Rhee succeeded in coming out
on top of the bitter political}
battle when the National Assem- |
bly finally passed four amend-
ments to Korea’s constitution giv- |
ing the President all the major |
concessions he had been fighting
for.



—UP.



British Guiana expects a bumper
rice crop this autumn, Mr, Jassu
Ramauth, rice miller and propri-
etor of Essequibo, told the Advo-
eate yesterday.

Mr. Ramauth arrived here last
week by B,W.LA., for about a
fortnight’s holiday and is staying
at the Hotel Royal. 1

He said that they are hoping
to get about 29 to 25 bags of rice
to the acre this crop as compared
with 18 to 20 bags for the same
period last year, This will be due
mainly to the rains immediately
following the six months’ drought
which they had during the rather
poor spring crop which yielde’
an average of about ten bags ts |
the acre, }

Speaking of conditions generally
in British Guiana, Mr. Ramauth
said that there was great improve-
ment for the last five years, parti-





cularly in the city of Georgetown | had intimated

where a number of modern build-

ings had been erected by various | would

merchants.

F permitted food and water to
|

both sides carry the principles
good faith, —U.P.

200 Striker#
Leave Mines

ANCONA, Italy, July 5.

Two hundred miners returned
above the ground after a 35-day
sitdown strike deep in two sul-
phur mines near here, Miners
refused to come out after their
shift on May 27 in protest against
the planned dismissal of 860 out
of 1,680 workers.

Operators of the two mines
claimed that the sulphur deposit
is running out.
strike after union officials and
operators agreed to seek a ‘settle-
ment. During the strike opera-



be lowered
meters level.
—U-P.





‘Mystery Target’? Was
Red Training School

AN IMPORTANT Communist officer training school
near the Yalu River was the “mystery target” in the giant

4th of July American air
Far East air forces revealed

.of Red M.LG. 15 jet fighters destroyed or damaged in the
second biggest air battle of the Korean War had been

Miners ended the}

to miners at 600

The sixth Oils and Fats Confer- |!
}ence will take place at Hastings;
House on Tuesday morning at i0,
o’clock under the Chairmanship |

RUSSIA in a roundak:
Professcr C. G. Beasley, Economic States, Britain and Alagpe,)
| Adviser to the Comptroller for De-
velopment and Welfare.

Following is the list of delegates
| Who are attending:

500 Korean war prisoners as

weapons in Australia
The fantastic Co un

Peiping radio proadeaiitts

came as
Red truce negotiators met in another secret se

j
\
|
|
|

mate or female, in the tournament,

Confidence






Mad 7 | From Our Own Correspondent) a

PANMUNJOM, Korea, July 5 PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 5 ‘ a Ry" pir Even though ted in each set,
‘ ; . : J BERLIN: Pupils in the We sty nt 4—2 and &—4 the fi cd
yt way accused the United | Bright Light, Cyril Barnard’s| sector borough of Schoeneberg| 5 9 in the second. sho et er ah
a today of conspiring to use 5% Vineent a and Barbados | have outgrown desks that have| Sioreme confidence of Fount sna
“cuines igs” for testing new trained bay filly, ran unplaged! fitted the same age groups for re he ont ence 0 outh anc
guinea pigs” for testing new |for the first time of its career in| years, Said an official: “In future didn eg the nervous strain she
: ; . een . jthe © six furong Woodbrook} we shall order only the biggest ‘ ot tg t least, not until

ist charge, made through a |fandicap for C and C2 Winners! size of bench. The smaller ones rena in a ten achieved
the United Nations and /this afternoon, the last day of the! seat fewer and fewer childrem"} °¢ Played her passing shots

siém here. |T.T.C, Summer. Meeting, with amazing speed and accuracy









Barbados—Mr. E. S, S. Bur- , ; aie. | RANGOON: A youag Burmese} Which left Miss Brough, a great net
| rowes, Delegate, Mr. F, A. Bshop, Peiping relayed the baseless unattributed accusation atter | Bebore the end of a colourful} trader in Pegu courted“ and de-| player, stretching helplessly.
1.S.0O., Mr, A, S. Bryden, Mr. H. F. it had made a complete round the world swing from Frank- | eting which saw English born! cided to marry a comely girl ard} Only once when in command did
| Alkins, Advisers; British Guiana— furt, Germany, through a series of Red propaganda |jockey Frank Quested ride five sought her father's consent, But/Maureen falter. In the eight game
Mr. H. H. Croucher, Delegate; agencies . jwinners in a row from the fourth the old man aged 70, refleeting}of the second set the score was
| Jamaica—Mr. S. G. Fletcher, Dele- There wae ais Sedna 2 Bases lrace to the eighth from Lady Bird; | °° his declining years, imsisted}5—2 in her favour and O—4
jgate, Mr, V. C. Smith, Adviser. -ciion Pas the ilied on pa — _ half bred bay mare on a heavy ‘#t the young man also’ marry} against Miss Brough’s service, This
| Mr. A. H. Phillips, Observer; An-' 10. n the allied armistice et sl aie ye his remaining daughter who was|meant she had three match points

; 1 CR 4 .| representatives here, The com- track. She equalleq Ostaras’s 1,14) ). s : match points.
tigua—Hon. V. C. Bird, Delegate;| . ‘ . . ‘ . | born blind. The lad @greed and] Miss Brough wl thr +}
lSt. Kitts—Mr. G. H. Warner munist report said it was “bed Fishing Boat 4/5 secs, for six furlongs estab-! with the father’s bles#ing married] been having trout wit hee sane
| St. |Delegate; Trinidad— Hon. Norman) intended to test. new types. of tfaphe i aka a ‘ vice, fought desperately and saved
| Tang, Delegate, Mr. O. C. Papin~ | atomic weapons in Australia Saved ‘Results c achentack, In th go ror cn| Lhe game. But in the next, efter
eau, Adviser and four representa- 7 5 \ , ir ~TaCRer ae: in the Ustralinn) being taken to deuce on her own
tives of commercial interests, also | The story was first print in, THE FISHING BOAT M-85 | 1. SAVANNAH HANDICAP | Alps was smoking his pipe in|service Maureen clinched the mat-
as Advisers; Grenada—Hon, W, E.!® Vienna newspaper in the form*| “Denoiselle’ was rescued by About 6 Furls. Class B and k2, {font of his fire wh®n a 70-m'lelter when a long rally ended with

Julien, Delegate: St. Lucia—Hon.! of a dispatch from the official
Mr. Garnet Gordon, C.B.B,, Advis-} Frankfurt. The Frankfurt ty
‘er; St. Vineent—Hon. E. A. caused that there were ‘
Hughes, Delegate, Mr. C. deB.| from Washington which” carried
Barnard, Adviser; Dominica—Hon., | unsupported allegations.

A. Winston, Delegate, Hon. R. B.}

Douglas, Mr, G. Winston, Advisers:



The secret Korean truce meet-























Cc. S. D. LaCorbiniére, Delegate,| Russian news agency Tass frm ”

an hour gust of wind carried his
| Six-roomed house away

: jhim — sitting
2, Crossroatts, l empty he
5. Buddha, | Sy, Pee:

Time 1,16 4/5 Secs. | WASHINGTON ;
2, GBODWOOD HANDICAP, | Geographic Society

the schooner “Rosaline M”
yesterday at about 7.50 p.m, 4
Skipper Noville Me Law-

ee
renee had left port earlier in ;

Miss Brough letting from a strong
1. Batthesong.

forehand.

Afterwards the former cham-
pion said; "Maureen really had it
today, I tried everything T knew,
but it wasn't any good.”

and left
unharmed on his

the afternoon bound for St.
Lucia, but sighted the fishing
boat in difficulty with boom
broken and

The National
announces

About 5 Furls. Class F and F2.| that the town of New Salem, IIli-



























1
. |
: % Y : sails torn about | : o :
j di h I aaa r age S Nabe ag 1 ThveesVears * nois, in which the gre brat Disappointments
Meossa eZ i | Windward Islands—Mr. G, = eM ee at hie ee to~ || 25 miles off North Point Light | ote ew Lincoln pane ued: ae Gee For Miss areuar it we a after-
: e Luck, Adviser, Development andi a in er re Sams, VEny Ate house. He immediately went F/h0 a it Ee | disappeared, Its 1 ‘ ‘abi : wert oon of disappointments, Wi
R. ‘ | Welfare Organisation—Mr. D, A,| Ute Session. Major General Wil- to its help and brought it |! First Admiral. pes «Its log cabins were) (0! ast k nents, th
esigns | Percivs 1 See arya ata Mr R “| liam K. Harrison, chief United back last night. | §. Baton. ; dismantled bit by bit and carried| v Cor no ly as her partner in
leis MB E. ME art irae iNations delegate had “nothing to The crew of the fishing || Time 1.03 1/5 Sees, ; #way to other townships Women’s Doubles she was once
TEHERAN, July 5. | EE EAE IEEE say” about what went on in the | boat, which is owned by |/3. QUEEN'S PARK HANDICAP. NICOSIA, Gyprus: A Turkis! la ee hee Vines
Premier Mohammed Mossa-| anata or ae ee bs guoe en of so About 6 Furls, Class A and 2) gipsy woman was called into al pori id 3, ae t . near
degh handed in his resignation! ° . ib kal oe Aba par Be meet: ORs -_ pan, Were ernon only Cypriot house to “chase away an! phon in eae eae
personally to the Shah of Iran on| Danish Cabinet | f eer eativing’’ gle pelocberal cabatles tenes Grant and 1. Babybird jevil ghost” by witchcraft. But, / cules & ye te acon
i Karit ‘lia- ; oe pclassilying” = é : ‘ , 8. lic while householde ‘i ntrated | an S - als, Miss Bro
Saturday, but the oman Parlia C " Devid, lof war the major stumbling block An 4001 -an Cans, ‘Mcbiw Hel leon, ey ee mers: meente BY suff yet: another detéel fics
nee met widel Pest thee | an ide to the armistice. rence had given the informa I wae YY tad ean of clothes and £10 "i aah wey; tnd) «6 Australian Ken McGregor
and it was widely believed AU | tion to the Harbour Police, he ‘4. MARAVAL HANDICAP was sentenced to nine tt vere beaten 3—6, 5—-7 by Argen-
Mossadegh would be_ re-elected COPENHAGEN, July 5 A United Nations spokesman left again for St. Lucia, » MARAVAL HAI Al > catia fc : yt Ree FIGS 431 oon in E. Morea and Austr: lig
Premier. ; The Danish cabinet at a special said the talks were conducted in | About One Mile and 130 Yards. prison for her performance, Mis, "Thelma ach Stralian
The 72-year-old politician who! meeting failed to reach a decision a “businesslike fashion and there - Class C and C2 Mitidens, WASHINGTON: In Durham.) Thus the wheel of fortune had
fought Britain to the deadlock! on whether to heed the United was no apparent evidence of thes oer: 99 ; 1. Golden Fleece, | North Carolina, Mrs. Terry Ewing |\turned full circle, For 1948 and
over the question of the great! States protest against the planned heated debate that had dominated! Times Comnients Red Coat. had come to the end of her slen-|1950 she ie ‘aobeee a : and
Iranian oilfields went to the) delivery of Danish built tankers previcus sessions ae execus 9 om | 3. Canpaquisine der resources, spending money ot | cuapenaet anal rned in three
Shah's palace to submit his resig-/ to Russia. tive session will be held again z , Viet Time 1.52 1/5 Secs | detectives’ fees trying to trace her| Reh aa
nation, Majlis was meeting in a{ The cabinet decided to refer tomorrow at 11.00. Ou Acheson s Visit 5. WOODBROOK HANDICAP. ‘|| missing husband. A friend urged| th) ate gh te ee eee
‘ | ‘ J a "Cl the disappointments, so did Frank
special session the same hour. A/| the problem to a meeting of hon- —U.P, ’ About 6 Furls, Class C and C2,) her to watch a boxing match !n|cedyman eniov the tri ;
vote expected on Saturday will | Communist party leaders on Mon- The I LOND IN, July Winner Madison Square Garden on rv,| He has # ‘ a iumphs, .
probably favour Mossadegh’s re- day. Only tour Ministers partici- ,., : e¢ London Times said today St. Moritz suggesting “it will take your mind] p, me id more success than
tention in office as Premier, He! bated in the cabinet mecting. Big Three Agree On in view of the bad relations be Epali, Baba (deadheat) off your troubles”. The T'V camera] ip). OY le player since the war.
oe e nationwide! Among absentees was Prime Min, 4 swear U.S. and Argentina, the . Porras S . . swung into the audience at one| ae afternoon he added Men’s
i ister Erik Eriksen who was orig- NX) . merican Secretary of State Dean a , ¢ Pe point—and there was the ; Abin Doubles and Mixed Doubles to the
: P usilgink tauainont inally scheduled to attend. } New Draft Note Acheson's visit to Brazil wa 6 ; Oe ea Hl rea P Mr. Ewing busily. sate vot | Singles victory of yesterday with
_UP —UP.! ne fica 6 “certainly no co-incidence \ Aout & Purle Olan ¥ oi yro,{ drinks to the boxing fan Mrs. |Ken MeGregor; he heid the title
A 5 | : : LOND IN, July 5. The newspaper said increasing is ey 3 e is, Chane ind Ewing has asked the police to they won last year by defeating
22 R e * 7 ind reign Oflice ple ‘Threr| hostility towards the United ‘aaah ; 3 MG ana over investigate. the American-South-African part-
ann ce at sig el Ss ” : ‘ica Was due i ray l merehit = on ‘
= eds Jailed K or Sasearn, eter’ axreed in Paris marty to ooo got 1 onalist Leap-On HOLLYWOOD: = Marilyn M¢ alee ese Og tay Beixes end Bric
\ pobauy sag Beta V . 7 ee ee eet > r roe is to star in “Niagara”, Quips|Sturgeds 6-3, 7--5, 6—4, In the
‘ ° on a new draft note to Moscow] feelings and partly to economic 3. Holiday : 7 eee Mixe ) ST as Bt
| Plotting Breach vhich was submitted for approval] pressures in countries which have 7. ELLERSLIE HANDICAP, ae we ade Hor ee eee cotemse nea
'to the Western governments. The] been led to expect too much from, About 6 Furls, Class D and inlatle. siisnortine iFole ~ | edtit wig: thaw hen sy st
BARCELONA, July 5 new draft takes into account the}their northern neighbour. a , a strictly supporting role felt eS oy le they beat B. Morea
Twenty-two persons were sen-' suggestions from the German t Profit —L.E.S. and Mr i—-3, 6—3, 6—~4,
tenced to prison for terms ranging, Federal Chance!lor Konrad Aden- The editorial reviewed Brazil Battlesong f 1 ~ ‘ ere
from six months to four years for|;uer advanced’ by him to theleconomic situation commenting 2 I °
SEOUL, Korea, July 5 : fo " SGer BGVaNe y page Happy Union, atAT ‘
’ ae trying to organize a branch of the: High Commissioners earlier this] that the United States rearmamen , 94 2/K Seca “
Communist Party during Barcel- week. Western governments will}programme had held up shipments | , Se AL, Pe KNDICAP e ohne K u er iner
a strikes arc { m sar seek ¢ ne sede » i » é that #
id, it disclosed to-day. ee yee, 1 omer be oh death text ohne Siac ceils wakber ony 2] About One Mile and 130 Yards ry. 4
raid, 10, Was GISCIOS si r Gregorio Lopez Ramundo, the! 2831", Pree. a + co .s rom |Cl A and Lower ¢ AG) 1 I °C . At
simultaneously that a number singed eae a ee ein he note be as the final year ee “4 J ‘oat ; + Pasiedit aces QO A lil ope ok
one of the three defendants sen- eee ate tre . ur - a Adder dala aoc yh or gah Leading Article
| — UF, yort facilities was meeting diffi
tenced by a military. tribunal yes-| ' ; 3, Landmark
3 ’ ) |

revised upward from 19 to-21.

Sabre pilots, got their biggest number of Red planes

on December 13, 1951, when

they destroyed thirteen MIG’s

probably destroyed two more and damaged another. A
study of a gun camera film showed the second highest
bag of Red planes in the war were twelve definitely shot

down, two probably downed and seven damaged.
a Nerth Kove che

school which was about to grad-'

uate 1,500 Red cadets was be-
lieved to have been seriously
damaged in a powerful United
States Air Force fighter bomber
assault.

But pilots returning from the
raids said that smoke was billow-
ing ‘from a large headquarters
building and tweéive barracks
after the bombing attack made it
impossible to determine whether
the school was completely
destroyed.

Air Force Headquarters in
Tokyo said intelligence reports
disclosed that 1,500 officer candi-
dates were scheduled to be grad-
vated from the School later this
month. The school was located
at Sakchu, just inside the border
north-west of Korea near the
Suiho power plant installations
bombed last week.

Ninety - five American Sabre
jets were thrown up against 115
Communist MIG’s in a massive
air battle which exploded into
eleven separate dogfights. Red
planes came swerming over the
Manchurian border to investigate
the fighter bomber assault on the
school.

The Fifth Air Force announced
meanwhile that for the first time
in nearly a year Allied aircraft
flew a week of stri against t
Reds without 1! 1 single

plane.—U.P,





Trinidad Will Ses
Rice To Janiaica

PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 4.
Trinidad Government
tative sources say it has been
agreed to send a couple of months’
rice supply to Jamaica follow-
ing Jamaica's S.O.S. appeal in vier
,of the acute rice shortage in th
| colony.

The rice to be submitted 1
Jamaica will he pa of an alle
|tion from British Guiana to T:
dad. A source close to Gover
declared that Trinidad mac













authori-





terday to 4 years’ imprisonment.)

ane Diet asked a 20-year sen-| Shops Protest
—U.P. °
Raised Sales Tax

BOMBAY, July 5
thousand shops and
business places, stock market
and money exchanges remained
closed yesterday in protest
against a proposed increase in the
government sales tax. The pres-



Parachutist Sets

New Jump Record

GRAND PRAIRIE, Texas,
July 5

Several



An Army paratrooper who set ont tax increase is about three
the new world’s record of 124 cents on a dollar for consumer
; parachute jumps in a single day, goods.
| said tycay he relanded to stay
grounaed for a while The proposed levy is to be
Neal Stewart set a new record about four and a half cents on



last night when he floated to hiy consumer goods handled by the
last landing at 11.49 p.m. (E.S.T.) middle man. It would remain at
“I don't expect” said im his three cents on goods a wholesaler
soft Southern d “to do any sells directly to a retailer,

more jumping for a while,”’-—U.P, —U.P.





















move — after being satisf : From Our Own Correspondent) who has reached his highest score

her rice stocks were substantial, © far against a county side, is 87

CP. | ane i a ar agi ta inty s i ;

Pies Abet ts ae J! ye hn a At the-Oval, Surrey are already

j fesCees. am anes ©. eee ave half way towards beating one of
r t orm gzethe t- Trent- Sit ie r . eae

BARBADOS NOT un ir ox toge her. At Trent- their chief championship rivals

REPRESENTED > to~cry, the scene of MOTe yorkshire, They shot out the

AT HE i scoring in English cricket upyyou for 137 and were only

ALTH TALKS since the war than any other iittee short of that score with

Barbades will not be repre- ground, the tourists rattled UP icaycn wickets in hand at the

sented at the Commonwealth 249 for the loss of only two ae awitig: a? stumps Test player

Health and Tubercul Confer. Wicket ac’ Bed asad: kshire

th ¢ cu re fos . | Alec Bedser caused Yorkshire

ence which opens in England this , /€ Opening partnership of 135 most trouble and started the col-

week. An Officer of the Depart- between Roy and D. Gaekwad, put lapse by bowling his E d cap-

ment of Medical Sorvic iq the the road to the big score tain, Len Hutton, when had

yesterday that no cfficer of the
Department will be going to the
Conference, but Dr. J. W. Hark
ness, Med c il Adv ser C.D
W., w look on for

for Barb









t on to complete his! made only



eight. That Yorkshire



of the tour He hed three figures was due al-
eceive spport from Adhi- entirely toa watel
kar nd Hazare and at the close tur t eft hander
146, Hazare nade in ten minutes u ree
‘

India Make 349 For 2 At Trentbridge

culties owing to the rapid increase
in population. oP,



5 ki ‘ d
a
Reeord Brea sing opee
| Independence Day 8.8. US. AT SEA, July 5,

P r ~ The superliner s.s. United States raced to Europe at a
ag : Tots a Ln
| De aths Votal 175 record breaking speed on Saturday, The giant liner, the
CHICAGO, July, 5 new qucen of the American merchant marine, made 801



‘Torch’ Passes

Through Sweden

































Americans lured by generally nautical miles in 22 hours, 30 minutes on the second day
a STOCKHOLM, July 5. “fair weather across the country, out of New York for an average speed of 35.6 knots.
rip oe be sot ot Were fled the nation’s cities yesterday The crew snd passengers were increasingly excited
So im. Gath wnday, ne acebrate the one Wh of Jus] over the cliance of slashing all Tvans-Atlantie speed records.
elay started in sunny but chilly » nh mounting, i ‘ It i mie gis gs
weather and later runners took A United P a rn os ef ial st { fog a fst a
ver the flame. / nite reSs survey showed } J “" « : a % 2
At the ancient University of that 175 persons met sudden U.S. Arniy raining Fa ep ee about
Uppsala, a relay of ix men death since 6 p.m. on Thursday ' a Offi a en h it under the Queen Mary's
anchored by Bertil Althion last night. There were 123 traffic v -| Japan s¢> cers
night and nominated the Swedish tims, 34 persons drowned, seven Tes : : . vat ins a, coer to the
olympic track team in both 5,000 died in airplane accidents, and | TOKYO, July, 5 ee - uae eae apa
and 10,000 metre carried the eleven in miscellaneous mishaps.| The American army is training Vy : is’ pees tne Queen
tore! —U.P. i ehh. | 500 officer of the Japane | Mary which said Welcome to
INational Police Reserve in the|the family of nations n the Atlan-
[ us of tanks and heavy artillery|tic.” On Saturday afternoon the
t was disclosed to-day. Keikichi]seas are light with moderate
| Ma uhara, commander of the new swelis, The ship rocking a
i Japanese security force aid atjtrifle, but there is no vibration,
| press conference that Japan¢ i Officially, the United States is
hours. Bedser finished with 5 for! dlesex 31 for 2 lofficers were under training at an due to leave France at 4 a.m. on
54 Gloucestershire v Worcester--— American camp Japan.—U v | Tues But it Tooks now as if
At Lords Worcester 306 for 7 it means slowing to row boat sveed
In the University match at Leicester Hants—Hantg 151, ome | ufter » pass Bishop’s Rock. We
Lord's, Oxford won the toss and Palme ) for 13, Leicester 219 , . mae junder stand the ship will not be
batted six hours for 233, losing six for 2 Foreign Priests jtaken into port until the sehed-
wickets in the process. South Afri- Notts vs. Indian Indians 349 pes dia’ 7 juled time,
can test fast bowler, McCarthy, for 2 Visiling France |
who was considered a likely Cam- Northants vy Somerset——Nortl r 5 "
bridge match winner, hasn't yet rick 196 not out; PARIS. Jul | Ana Pauker ““aecked
taken a wicket. Off spinner Mar- r ne cket 4 roun. of fe reign priest
lar has done the dz e and ha nbridge--Oxford | , r , k Monsigr 7 toacu =I BUCHAREST, July 5
so far claimed five victim Fuenzalida have arrived Paris; Ana Pauker, one of Romania’s
Scoreboard ork York-|atter a trip through Italy an if most powerful Communist lead-
Derbyshire v Lancashire r Su y 134 for 3 Switzerland. The party who is jen : to be relieved of her post
Derby 217, Lancashire one for no ex i Wear Gla~, , P Ver i Fon-{a Foreign Minister. A Govern-
5 ket t ex 54 fo ) i i > ss € 1 in! ment ecree announced that
Essex v Middlesex ‘ i Ken Warwick, Germany on Sunday and pla }Pauker has been “freed of her
for cl Griffiths 89, Mid Cent 112 for 3 England lat UP ty -U.P,
i
- x
‘




















PAGE TWO
ts 5 oo
| lop Getting Up ROFHSSOK C. G. BEASLEY,
Ecthomie Adviser to the
Comptroller for Development afid
iti ht Feel 20 Years Welfare, has just returned frém
ig S Younger Jamaica where he spent the last
two months as Chairman of the
No appetite? No pep? The ; ¢ Gren whit re Neen Cattle Industry Enquiry Board
rich, blood-building proper- a pine, gre Es
ties Of YEAST-PHOS will anh loka’ Of tatty eimoue _ . nis, Peers Was Sey. Wy the
restore lost energy and will r . ee aa 7 a ‘ og r ae
keep you fit! ERA GA © oe , ind mi-k particularly 4 re-





a nd health, ' ie 1eW gatd to prices

1 feel 16 t iSS G. de GALE

Quesnel of

and Miss A.
Trinidad





, hemist ©The vere
‘rantee protects vou rivals on Thursday by B.W.1A.
— I for two weeks’ holiday which

they are spending as guests a

‘ching, Burning and Smarting vi

Eczema
neret In

Cacrabank Hotel

Miss de Gale is a stenographer
employed with the West Indio
Tobacco Company while Miss
Quesnel is an accountant of the
Sun Life Assurance Company.

Also holidaying here staying at

Cacrabank Hotel is Mr. H. Gor-

ion, Freight Solicitor of Spros-

Mi 4 ton’s Ltd. Port-of-Spain. He

i n u e 4 arrived on Wednesday night by

sinee the @iscovery of Nixederm br at B.W.1L.A. and expects to remain

cian it is no longer
uffer from ugly, disgusti
skin blemishes such

Rash, Ringworm, Psori-
kheads, Scabies and Red

necessary






until next Saturday.

B.G. Merchant



ad skin make you

BEFORE AFTER





1 i you to lose your RRIVING during th ee)
jends, Cl this new scientific | © Gear your skin—the treatment to mate G - B 7 ae k
d don't Jet a bad skin make people ioe look Bera artractis ve + to heip you win by B.W.LA. from British
k you are diseased. riends. xoderm = hi brough clearer { ' a in? “ay
AN Di " healthier skins to thousands, such as M Guiana for two weeks’ holidey
; lew to durorons | Baste, 84, WEites: “E muftered {rom terri was Mr. C. De Abreau, merehan
Nixederm is an ointment, bu ifferen itehing, turning and smarting Eczema fo + by eae i
yn nay olitment you have ever seen or | 49 years, Tried everything. At iast 1 he of Georgetown. He+ was accom-
It, Th ik m1 rovery, and is not greasy | of Nixoderm., 11 stopped the itehing in panied by his daughter Thelma,
ferls 1 & powder en you | minutes, I could see my skin clearing
ply tt. Ib + apidly into the ndres | on the second day, Gil the rod disfigurin who has just finished school at
ne fights the ¢ f surface skin bicm-| blotches and sealy skin disappeared in 10 {8t, Rosés Ursuline C onvent, They
Mi inoderm cottains 9 Ingredients | days. My friends were amazed at the i

h Skin troubles in these 3 w
the microbes ar pa

ale for skin. ditorde

are staying at the Hotel Royal.

"| provement in my appearanc

Satisfaction Guaranteed |

s often respons















it stops Itching, butning and smartit: | Wieder corte absolutely nothing Guest Speaker Tonight
7 oe aa ne econ ereetan in | it Clears your skin to your complete
. : . faction, Get Nixoderm your ¢ ‘
“Works Fast. today, Look in the mirror. 4 the morni HE Reverend fa Costa Hare-
orks Fast a ou Will be amazed at the improvement .
5 wood, D.D., Rector of St.
te ; just keep on uelng Nixederm for « a F
gine a eo hehe ae Rouble it? fons 1s and at the end of that time It musy | Philip's Church, Philadelphia,
tac than anything you have scen in your | I 1 Td8Ge Lieeity att cles 110¢ will be the guest preacher at St.
before, It stops the Stehin ig, burning and | @P@ marnetica oer .





the kind of sh ba Michael's Cathedral th's



arting ina few to | mu evening
i Hintely. clearing and healing | mired wherey at 7 o’clock
vofte r, whiter turn. the emy f
in day or two 3 will Be refunded t Le



if will tell fou













i at last is | vour Chemist today, ‘The # Father Harewood is a Barba-
scientific **4-tment you have been needing | you i
dian and is spending a holiday
here with relatives.

NN Malt Triplets

ONGRATULATIONS to Mr.
and Mrs. Gerald Wood on
the bitth of triplets three
daughters yesterday at Mrs.

Cave’s Nursing Home
Mrs, Wood was the former Miss
Doreen Edwatds daughter of Mrs.

M. Edwards and the late Mr. Roy

“lo Johnson's Edwards.

Stationery

EMPIRE

TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30
and Continuing Daily

Sensational!
PAUL MUNI
The Bast Collection in Quality Watches
S|
JANETTA DRESS SHOP

(Next Door to Singer's)













large shipment of

FROCKS

Discount on all Nylon Underwear

Just received a

COTTON
| 10%

ihe
, FUGIEIVE

BROM A CHAIN GANG’
cons RE-ISSUED BY WARNER BLS.
GLENDA FARRELL ~ HELEN VINSON = PRESTON | OSTER
sory by ROBERT E, BURNS + Bieties ty MERVYN LC ROP
EXTRA:
HANDS TELL THE TIME
Latest Paramount British
News

SSssz
—

GLOBE

and Continuing Daily

“SKIRTS ANHOY”

The

Short :
And:

\
|

TONITE 8.30 5 & 8-30 p.m,

OO APPS FOOOSESISO DOD’

GAGE ER

Vivian De

BLAINE

Marco |
SISTERS

Joan

EVANS

Esther
WILLIAMS

—




















‘
Th is
and Featuring : TODAY Sato esw tee, M *
Mat, TODAY 4.30 PM
BELEY FCKSTINE R MassActn Stats
Rs SEA HOUND”
ee ®__Starring: “Buster” CRABBE }
America’s Singing Sensation % TURE. & WED Oia F -— %
% “JOHNNY ALLEGRO” 3
es SS 4 George RAPT & x
— oy ; * DESPERADOES ” %
indolph SCUIT »

aetetststoes a ¢
—_

i

Catt ataeiae.+





|PL PLAZA WHEAT RES




















STOW | BARBAREES OISTIN 1
} “BRIDGETON . ed (Dial H170) (Dial 8404) HBA RBEADOS
eats gs fay 2 ees Le ee ee Announces Theit
& Continuing Daily Errol FLYNN Errol FLYNN in i9 >2 % NNU
PLE SEE VOW !Rocky mouNTAIN|| DODGE CITY ee cB AL
im Patrice WYMORE _ Ann SHERIDAN
r a cae re aT Olivia ad teh BE A LL
s RE AMS oming Soo ; Alan_HALE—Others
— * Danny TO-MORROW 1S Y —a0ON, o ae »
DAY THOMAS ANOTHER DA 14h & BO PLD
Coming Seon! a Jimmie CAGNEY & Ont . i i. ARI N E
adikG vierune |] ONLY THE VALIANT « } on
CREE Ghidkny: Gregory PBCK NOTE BAT SATURDAY, AUGUST 16TH, 1952
Starring tt ——

QUFEN of the MAMBO Opening FIT site _CAG ee
SLANQUITA AMARO = ==
er | WAS AN - y aaune
Thurs (Special) 190 paka bab Bm sie Sa



“BARBARY PIRAT? SPY

< On a eee
Donald WOOPS & ee Ane LCE SPST TSDREDSSS
RETURN of th VORAK + MING
“k {ANS :
| DURANGO KID” VA ee
SSS ews SS SSS = — ——_ sll =
EMPIRE VY
TO-DAY 445 & 8 30 and te aaa TO-DAY to TUES. 4.30 & 8.1
nd
1 AM A FUGITIVE FROM A THINGS TO COME
R ond MASSEY
\
i News Q








Daily rm ROBESON Leal BANKS
Warner Bros Presents
Paul MUNI in

in

SANDERS OF THE RIVER

CHAIN GANG with @

EXTRA Pr

THE TIME
Brition Rn

iph RICHARDSON
'
{i Shors—MANDS TELL

WED. & THURS
Paramount

san &

and:—Latest RON Catt





{ in
{ PANHANDLE .
} OLYMPIC
W TODAY & TOMORROW 4.30 & 4.1! .
Dane CLARK Ben JOHNSON Lawrence. TIERNEY ON
FORT DEFIANCE ROYAL

and



TO-DAY last 2 shows 4.90 & 830
THE TORCH Mary ANDERSON
Dan DURYBA
; in
StarAng CHICAGO CALLING PRICES OF
Paulette GODDARD and
___-Pedro ARMENDARIZ THE SCARF” NIGHT: $1.50:
with , ar eet
SUES, & WED, 490 & BID John IRELAND
Richard BASHHART — Scott BRADY Mercedes McCAMBRIDG MATINEE:
in
’ §
uk WALKED BY NIGH wv i 1.30 & 8.90 . ven
Rete DRAKE nabere YOUNG (Io ALL SEATS
and in 8
ELLEN and Lt * MUSIC BY THE P
DESTINATION MOON rik MACK BOGS x MUSIC Y THE PO



ghettos
a a I RO, | I GOOOEBSSG



KEEP THIS DATE OPEN
Further Particulars Later

JULY 24 and 25 at 8.30 p.m.
MATINEE 25TH at 5.00 p.m.

$1.20;
$1.00 and 60¢c.

POPES SS SOOO O SOP SS SOO OOS OPO GS FECES PIOUS”

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Married At Cathedral

O* Thursday, July 3rd, at 4.30
p.m. at St, Michael’s Cathe-
dral, Mr. Alwyn Simmons Howell,
younger son of Dr, Timothy
Howeil of ‘Morne’, St. Liicia and
Mrs. Ercil Simmons Howell of
‘Martindale’, Hastings, took as his
bride Miss Kay Atistin, onl:
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. lL..
Austin, of “Brysmar”, Upper
Collymore Rock, and Women’s
Editor of the Advocate.

The double ring ceremony
which was fully choral with Mr.

Gerald Hudson, A.R.C.M, at the
organ, was performed by the Very
Reverend Dean Hazlewood asy

sisted by Rev. S. A. E. Coleman.

The bride who was given in
marriage by her father, wore an
oversi@rt of blonde lace and full
skirt of nylon tulle with long
close fitting lace sleeves and yoke

with mandarin neckline. Het
headdress was a tiara of seed
pearls and silver beads with a
finger tip veil of illusion tulle,

while her train was of long flow-
ing nylon tulle. She wore nylon
mesh slippers. The trousseau was
the gift of the bride’s cousin, Mrs.
R. Smith of U.S.A. She earried
a bouquet of Michaelmas daisie:,
gerber as

She

and roses.

was attended

Gladys Coppin, sister
groom, as Matron of Honou

with the Misses Wilma Clarke
and Lorna Chase (of B.G.) as
bridesmaids, The Matron of Hon-
our wore a skirt of teafose nylon
with a strapless matching bodica
of satin, bouffant skirt ankle
length, with a stole of nylon and
silver accessories. She carried «a
bell-shaped bouquet of pink radi-
ance roses and forget-me-nots,
while her headdress was of tea-
rose veiling and flowers, and sh«
wore matching mittens,

The bridesmaids
of identical cut in ice-blue, with
matching headdresses and ac-
cessories and carried bell-shaped
bouquets of Caracas daisies.

The duties of bestman
performed by Mr. Clifford
Zephirin, while those of ushers
fell to Mr. O. S, Coppin, Mr. Leo
Austin, Mr. John Evelyn and Mr.
Frank Clarke.

The reception was held al
‘BrysmNr’, Collymore Rovk, the
home of the bride’s parents and
the honeymoon is being spent of
‘Kaiteur’, Bathsheba, The bride's
going-away dress was lime green
garberdine with bottle green
accessories

Student In New York

R. ERNEST BARROW who |
employed at the New York
Hospital and is a student at the
College of the City of New York

by Mrs.
of the

wore dresse:

were

taking clinical psychology and
social organisation, arrived here
recently by B.W.1.A. via Puerto

Rico for a month’s holiday and is
staying with his relatives in Bel-
mont Road.

Ernest who is an old Harrison-
ian, left here two years ago to
join his father, Mr. Ernest PD.
Barrow of New York

POLO CLUB












HOTEL

Ss

SSO OO DS
PSSSSSSS SSOP S OPPOSES OOS

THE BARBADOS PLAYERS

PRESENT

“THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST”

By OSCAR WILDE

* AT s~EMPIRE

THEATRE

ADMISSION

$1.00 and 6c.

RESERVED.
LICE ORCHESTRA

f



MADAME E. IFILL and the Star Buds in the Grand Finale—‘The

Blue Horizon’,

Old Combermerian

ETURNING to Barbados on
Thursday night by B.W.LA.
from British Guiana after an ab-
renee of six years, was Mr. Vasco
Boyee, son of Mr. and Mrs Alfred
Boyce of Passage Road. He wi
accompanied by his wife and two

children.

An old Combermerian, Vasco is
stationed in Georgetown as Secre-
tary-Treasurer of the B.G. Mis-
sion of Seventh Day Adventists.
He is here for a couple of months
which he is spending with his re-
latives at Passage Road and Cave
Hill, St. Lucy.



Mr.

Touririg Europe

IR. AND MRS. P. A. POM-

MARES, formerly of France,
but have been residing in Bar-
bados for the past eight months
at Blue Waters Terrace, left on
Thursday morning by T.C.A. for
Bermuda and Montreal en route
to Europe. They were accompan-
ied by their two sons Jean Louis
and Guy.

Mr. Pomntares who is a Travei-
ling Agent said that he expects
to be away for about four months

on business coupled with plaa-
sure. On his return to Barbados
he will make stops at America and
Puerto Rico.

Mr. and Mrs, Pommares have
lived in Venezuela and Mexico
but they found that the climate
of Barbados suited them better
especially the children whose

health had improved considerably
since they were here,

Back From St. Vincent

ETURNING by the Lady Ne}-

Son on Friday morning from
St. Vincent, was Mrs. Alice
James-Laurency of Wellington
Street who had spent three
weeks’ holiday as the guest of
Mrs. Sampson of Kingstown. She
was accompanied by her grand-
son, Michael James.

ROXY.

TO-DAY to TUES, 4.30 & 8.15
Monogram Double

ean
AUTIFUL NAT
Ri PITTED TRIBAL CHIEFS
CPR Ct mest | wee

r

2 Bim (essies Ire Nelense

Preteen ae Sess cha LINE Brow USS

AND

LAA ao be
he LEL AS



the Empire



Collymore.

and Mrs. ALWYN HOWELL





+ Madame E. Ifill and the

fare League.

After the Overture by the Police
Band under Capt. Raison, the cur-
tain went up on a group of Cotton
Piekers, chief among whith was
Clarrie Layftie whose ‘girlish’
humour added pice to the sketch.
In this number a line of chorines
was introduced dancing a very
attractive routine to the tune of
‘Come on—a my House.’

Comedy was also provided in a
street scene with Anna Wade,
W.B.M. (Wash Board Manipula-
tor) and Sally Hicks, L.O.S, (Lead-
er wt Beeiety) The parts were
played by a mother and daughter
team, Mrs. Bart and Angela, This
item was extremely weil done.

One of the highlights of the
evening was ‘Blues in the Night’
by Cedric Phillips & Joyee Clarke,
A very séxy number, somewhat
akin to the popular ‘Slaughier on
Tenth Avenue’. Cedric put every-
thing into this number and I am
sure everyone who saw it will
agree that it was well wofth the
effort.

Dates To Be Remembered

as 24th. and 26th. On
these dates The Barbados
Players present that brilliant
Comedy by Oscar Wilde,— “The
Importance of being Earnest”, at
Theatre.

Several newcomers will be seen
in this production — Audrey Mac-
Intyre, Pam Chaytor, Margot

The number of the evening,
‘Kitten on the Keys’ was most
original, Clarrie Layne and Lorna

Dewhurst, 1 and Inniss, dressed as black and white
Aitred Prashant papi akan Naeaton kittens, even with masks, tap-
The Caste will. also include Ganced on two steps made to

resemble six keys of the piano.
This was so well received by the
audience that there were requests
for an encore.

Anthony Haynes who makes a
welcome return to the local stage,
Michael Timpson, William Ber-
talan, Greta Bancroft and Frank

Thelma Arthur, who definitely
stood out the whole show, has the
makings of a very fine dancer. Her
solo performance in the ‘Rose in
the Bud’ Ballet was outstanding.

After Six Months

RS. ESME BEST who had

been spending six months’
holiday staying with her hus-
band’s parents at Station Hill,
returned to Trinidad on Wednes-
day by the S.S. Colombie. She
was accompanied by her daughter
Bunny.

Off To Brazil

R. AND MRS. C. M. HOWE

of Navy Gardens left the
island yesterday for a sea voyage
to Brazil.

The Howes are taking the
voyage in the interest of Mr.
Howe’s health and will be back
in six weeks.

To Reside In U.S.A

A the passengers leav-
ing on Monday by B.W.LA.

ge :
From British Guiana for Puerto Rico en route to the

R. and Mrs. Ivan Coleman U-S.A. to reside with relatives, |
4VIl arrived in the island from Was Mr. Edrington Maynard ci
British Guiana by the SS. Lady Glenburnie, St. John.

Nelson on Friday morning to : “ ;
spend a month’s holiday. They ,, the 7 as 7 oe him bon
are siaying with Mr. and Mrs, VOÂ¥age and g uck were many
P, A, Vanterpool at “Glenroy”, of his relatives and friends.

Kensington New Road.

Mr. Coleman is a Civil Servant
attached to the Public Hospital in
Georg-town. This is his first visit

Peasant Proprietor
EAVING last week by the S.S.

+e Fort Townshend for the

ali iectigts tone U.S.A. was Mr. Albert E. Forde,

Mrs, Coleman, whose mother is 4 peasant proprietor of White

a Barbadian, visited the island in Hall, St. Michael. He has gone
1946 for the first time. over for six months’ holiday.

Ernst at their residence, “Vici”, St. Lawrence Gap, on Friday eveni
occasion of Independence Day which was celebrated by Americans i
world.

Left to right are: Mrs. Vicki Japp, Mrs. Henry O. Ramsey, Lad:
Mrs. H. L. N. Ascough.



HATS WIDE BRIM WHITE

$2.84 $3.28 and
LADIES’ WHITE STRAW
$1.64 $1.80 and



DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES



iia i

“Star Buds”
At The Drill Hall

THE THIRD Annual Benefit Show & Dance presented

JULY 1952

Bloom

SUNDAY, 6,



Star Bud School of Dancing,

which took place at the Drill Hall on Friday night turned
out to be a suecess as a result of sustained effort.
show was under the patronage of Sir George & Lady Seel
and in aid of the Christ Church and St. John’s Baby Wel-

The

Evén in the chorus line of other
niimbers which included ‘Come
cn—a My House’, ‘Blue Danube’
and ‘Count every Star’, she
excelled.

There were also two Saw Solos,
‘Mother McCrae’ and ‘The Bellis
of St. Mary’s’ by Mr. Ben Gibson.
As usual these were well rendered.
‘The Kiss Waltz’ in whieh Cedric
Phillips and Joyce Clarke were
Specialties, was most efféctive.
Austin Ward and Joyce Ramdin
helped very much in making this
so.

Now, *he tiny tots also did their
part, though they were not really
very tiny. In this section, little
Valerie Cole was very graceful
and showed a keen sense of timing.
Her performance in the ‘Parasol
Dance’ was faultless. Wendy Poly-
greén was a typical, stiff toy sol-
dier in ‘The Dance of the Toy
Soldiers’, complete without the
smile, The timing in this was also
even,

The children’s rea) attempt at
Ballet in ‘Roses of Picardy’,
though by no means perfect, so
good; with enough practice, they
should be quite near to perfection
next year. Here Valerie Cole
really did her best.

After almost two hours of reas+
onably good entertainment from
these blooming Star Buds, there
was dancing. Madame Ifill and all
those who helped to make the
show such a great success must be
congratulated and I am sure ber
effort was well appreciated by the
huge audience which attended (><
function,



B.Sc. In Agriculture

ONGRATULATIONS to Mr.

Hamilton deLisle King who
has just obtained his Batchelor
of Science degree in Agriculture
with First Class Honours at Mac-

ence

2 eT (FED

| Mr. H. DE LISLE KING.
Donald College, Canada.



DeLisle who is. an old Har-
risorfian, in the elder son of Mr.
and Mrs. Hamilton C. King of

|Wavell Avenue, Black Rock. He
is now’ taking his Master of
Science degree.



SOME of the guests who attended the reception given by the American Consul and Mrs. Philip

ng. The function was held on the
n the U.S.A. and throughout the

y Dangan, Mr. Philip Ernst and



LADIES’ FANCY STRAW and CRINOLINE

and COLOURS

$4.06
HANDBAGS

$4.06

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606











SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1952

.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



AT THE CINEMA

Salute To The Waves

- Bw

IN A BRIGHTLY-MOUNTED Technicolour musical,
producer Joe Pasternak’s SKIRTS AHOY ! now playing
at the Globe, is bright, breezy and refreshing light enter-
tainment and a fine show case for the aquatic talents and

allround charms of Esther Williams.
of fun poked at the rigours of life in a Wave traiming begins

While there is plenty

camp, the film concentrates on the romances of three
lamorous trainees —- Esther Williams, who leaves her
ance standing at the altar — Joan Evans, who is herself P. w. Gibson, Bishop of Kingston,

left standing and Vivian Blaine, who never seems to catch Jamaica,
up with her boy friend long enough to get her hands on Societ

him. The three of them meet at Camp and promptly set
about solving their man troubles.

Miss Williams aquatic feats are,
of course, amongst the highlights
of the film, and 1 must say that
her grace and skill leave nothing
to be desired, particularly in an
underwater ballet with the two
exceptional Tongay children.
These youngsters, aged 5 and 4
execute the most amazing feats,
from fancy high diving to intri-
cate underwater gymnastics that
include swimming through hoops,
climbing ladders and playing
games. It is an unusual sequence
and you will be astonished at the
ability of these small fry! Miss
Williams has two other aquatic
n one of which was a
dance with an inflated rubber toy
that I found highly diverting.

From the musical point of view,
there is no lack of bright tunes,
starting with radio and T.V’s
famous Billy Eckstine sing “Hold
Me Close To You;” Esther Will-
iams and the De Marco Sisters in
“What Makes A Wave?” probably
the wettest song ever filmed and
another number with our three
Waves asking the question vocally
“What Good is a Girl Without
a Guy?” There’s another good
one too with Debbie Reynolds and
Bobby Van singing and ng
a revival of the old song “Oh,
By Jingo” with all the zest in
the world. There are also good
precision performances of a drill
al chorus at the

corps and yor

Great Lakes Training Camp
where parts of the film were
shot.

All the members of the cast
give good performances and I
particularly enjoyed Viv ian
Blaine’s blonde pertness and her
undiminished efforts not only to
catch her own boy friend, but to
see that her two ‘“Shipmates”
caught theirs!

Altogether, SKIRTS AHOY! is
pleasant, light family entertaii-
ment, and there’s no denying tne
fact that a uniform does some-
thing for women just as it does
for men, and surely the wave uni-
form is the most attractive of any
of ‘the women’s forces!

7 * °

IT had not returned from my
holiday when the films showing
at the two Plazas were preview-

Change .In Basis

(From Our © Jurrespondent)
POR’ OPCSPAIN, uly 5.
The question of changing the

bagis of contributions to the funds

for the University College of the

West Indies will be the chief topic

at @ Conference to be held in

Jamaica towards the end of the

month.

The present contributions are
based on populations. The pro-
posal for the Conference is that
in future they be based on the
revenue ‘of each contributing
colony, The University is in need



What’s Cooking In

LIVER

How many people turn up their
noses when they hear the word
‘liver’? And they don’t realise
that liver is one of the most nour-
pas dishes you can ever find
and the nicest too if it is cooked

properly.

Liver Cooked in the Spanish
Way

2 ibs.
Flour

Olive oil or margarine
Salt

For 6 people
Calf’s liver

Pepper

Whole tomatoes
Parsley
Onion rin
Slices of

Cut the liver in slices about }
inch thick. Pass the slices in flour.
Dip them in oil or melted mar-
garine and grill them. As soon as
they are cooked on one side sea-
son them with salt and pepper.
Cook the whole

ime,

loeptees, | some
more salt and per, and
parsley on ihe grit and fry some
onion rings. ea dish, put the

onion rings in the middle pyramid
shape and put the slices of liver
around them adding one tomato
for each slice and putting it on
the top. If you haven’t got a grill
you ean cook this tasty dish in a
frying pan or saucepan.

Liver Cooked in the Italian





PAIN

COMES WITH

RAIN



SACROOL

KNOCKS OUT
PAIN

ON SALE AT ...:

KNIGHT'S LTD.
ALL BRANCHES
2000600006:2000071 0000008

ed so I can't tell you anything

about them. However, next week
you will have some information
on the pictures showing at these
theatres.



ESTHER WILLIAMS.

Of Costtributions

“To U.C.W.I. Suggested

of funds for the construction and
maintenance of a new Hospital
at Epips and it is believed that
a change of the method of con-
tribution would yield more money,

At the conference will be a
Council of the University’s dele-
gate with various representatives
of the colonies and representatives
of the Regional Economic Com-
mittee. Hon Roy Joseph, Minister

B.B.C. Radio
Notes
Bishop of Kingston
On The Air
Rt. Rev. P, W. Gibson

In the ‘Ten-Minute Talk’ which

the Wednesday evening
version of the B.B.C.’s “Calling
the West Indies” on the 9th. inst.
listeners can hear the Rt, Rev.

speaking about the
for the Propagation of the
Gospel. In 1951 this iety cele-

brated the 250th anniversary of
the beginning of its mission, and
as part of these celebrations,
members of the church overseas
were bidden to come to Britain
in order to give the people there
a picture of what had been attain-
ed so far, and what remained
still to be done. For over a year
this task has gone forward and
these missionaries, as they may
well be called, who bring to the
home field knowledge of the
church and of the peoples abroad
to whom they minister, number
in their ranks both humble and
distinames workers, One such
worker has been Bishop Gibson,
leader of a team which toured
Yorkshire, who is now giving his
services to furthering the cause in
London.

Following this talk Marjorie Few
of Jamaica and William Pilgrim of
British Guiana will conclude their
two-part discussion on folk music
and how composers—this week the
modern composers—have made use
of these folk tunes or melodies.
The half-hour begins at 7.15 p.m.
and will be broadcast in the 25
and 31 metre bands, 11.75 and
9.58 megacycles.

most influential of American wri-
ters and commentators on world
affairs, is to give a talk in the

BBC’s General Overseas Service riodic outbreaks, The present one™ pefore

on Friday next, 11th inst.
broadcast entitled ‘Public Opinion
and Foreign Policy in the

the Third Programme and
Livpman terms it ‘Facing a New
World Situation.’ The talk is a
shortened version of one of the two
lectures which Mr. Lippman gave
last May in Oxford and Cambridge
Universities under the auspices of
Sulgrave Manor Board, as the sec-
ond of the Sir George Watson lec-

tures, and at the Royal Institue of scale are not pursued in neigh- yevetable, and so simple to grow
s, Chatham bouring countries, in Britain these {hat there should be a continuous
House, London, Mr. Lippman, now are because of her export trade in supply in the garden at all times.

International Affairs,
in his early sixties, has had a dis-
tinguished career as commentator
for the New York Herald Tribune,
editor, and author of a number of
books including a two-volume
work ‘The United States in World
Affairs.’ Hig talk will be broadcast
on Friday, 11th July, beginning at
10.30 p.m.

On Sunday next, 6th July, the
Rev. L. Constantine broadcasts the
first talk in the BBC’s G.O5S, series
of four talks on ‘Communism in
China for nineteen years and the
experiences as a member of the
Methodist Missionary Society in
China for nineteen years and th
changes he saw up to the time he
returned to England in the au-
tumn of 1950, Mr. Constantine was
on the teaching staff of one of
China’s Christian Universities, the
Central Chinese University in the
city of Wuchang on the Yangtze
Kiang opposite Hangkow. During
the Japanese War the city was
captured and from 1938 to 1948 he
and other members of the staff and
student body lived as refugees
with @vacuated university in

FARM AND GARDEN

iky

HEALTH, especially if
man, plant or animal, can b
the bustle of daily life,
often regarded too casua

neglectful, his crops and liv

plants or animals are sick or

suffers and both his and the world’s food supplies may be

threatened.

Trade and the normal exchange
of commodities may be dislocated
in like proportion. A good exam-
ple of this is occurring today:
Western Canada, for the first time
in history, is afflicted with the
dread Foot-and-meuth disease of
cattle and the neighbouring United
States, her normal market, refuses
her beef. What happens? New
Zealand, where this disease
does not exist at present, and
which is under contract with the
British Government for meat sup-
plies enters into an agreement with
the United States to substitute her
product for Canadian, while the
United Kingdom where Foot-and-
mouth exists, exchanges New
Zealand for Canadian meat with
price adjustments accordingly.

Now, what has all this got to do
with the West Indies and this is-
land in particular? In the first
place, diswance is shortening be-
tween us and Foot-and-mouth in-
tected areas. The disease is endem-
tc in South America, probably also
tn Central America since Mexico
1as, very recently, suffered a long
and persistent outbreak costing the
United States vast sums of money
fo cohfine the disease within the,
sorders of Mexico. And now, it hag
eached Canada, reportedly car-
ried on the clothing of a European,

immigrant, The disease is preva- t
Walter Lippman, one of the lent in Europe—France, the LOWM weoks after

Countries and Germany are hardl,
ever free from it. Great Britait
itself suffers repeatedly from pe-

The is thought to have been carried by enough to pick.

migratory birds from the nearby

nited continental seaboard where the di- choosing the right time to pick)
States’ was originally broadcast.in sease is in, progress. They bring the heads.

T. the infection on their feet and be picked when the head is closed, |

feathers. Starting last November,
the cost to the nation for control
measures and to farmers in stock
losses, including the work of a life
time in many cases, runs into
staggering figures. While measures
of control on such an elaborate

pedigree animals. She is, indeed,
the world’s livestock nursery.

It was stated above that this di-
sease is advancing nearer to us
and, although enjoying a measure
of isolation by reason of being
surrounded by water in the same
way as Britain, this favourable po-
sition does not render us immune
from attack, Plane traffic is in-
creasing, people come and go in
greater numbers, migratory birds
visit our shores and the chances
of introducing disease throu
trade channels have increaged con.
siderably in modern times. While
Foot-and-mouth may not always
end fatally, animals attacked are
debilitated and rendered such poor
producers that they become of lit-
tle value, besides the added danger
of being carriers, The disease is
caused by a virus and can attack
all cloven-hoofed animals. There
are different strains but all terribly
infectious, Anything can carry it—
a wisp of straw, a piece of rope,
clothing, hands and feet of work-
ers, vehicles of all kinds including

of Education and Social Services, Southern China near the Burma bicycles, and birds. Cold storage
A. R. W. Robertson, Financial Sec- Road. This fifteen minute talk be- does not affect the vitality of the
retary will be Trinidad’s official gins at 8.30 p.m, on Sunday, 6th virus. Unfortunately, research has

delegates,

Way
Calf’s liver 3 or 4 oz. per head
Flour
Butter or margarine
Salt
r
Lime.

Slice ‘he liver 1n thin slices
about 4 inch thick. Pass the slices
in flour on both sides. Put some
butter or margarine in a frying
pan and when melted add the
slices of liver, the slices on
both sides, season them with salt
and pepper, add another piece of
butter or margarine when ready.
Squeeze on them some lime juice
and serve immediately. The
whole cooking and frying must
not take more than five minutes,
If you take longer to cook liver
it will become hard.

Liver and Artichokes
For 6 people
Artichokes

Oil
Calf’s liver 14 lb.
Salt

‘1 Ib.

Pepper

oa rsley——1 tablespoonful
Juice of half a lime
Onion.

Peel the artichokes and cook
them in a saucepan with some
olive oil. 'f vou like, cook a

chip) cnion in the oil before
pens the artichokes. Cook the

artichokes slow!y, so that they

will not become ard, Peel and

slice the | ver in ‘ine slices and as”
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soon as the artichokes are cooked
add the liver. Turn the fire on
a bit more, season with salt and

per. As soon as it is cooked
(it will not take more than five
minutes) take it off the fire, add
1 tehlaennanful of chipped parsley
ana the juice of half a lime. Stir
a bit, turn it into a dish and serve

immediately.

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PPP LLOSP HO SGSSSSOS

not yet discovered any safe and
practical means of control; there-
fore, the hard and costly procedure
of slaughter of contact animals,
disinfection, quarantine and rigid
precautions must be practised.

We in the West Indies, presently
engaged in the building up of im-
proved herds, cannot afford to see
these efforts vitiated or even com-=
promised in the smallest degree by
any infectious disease, whatever
the nature, and anything like Foot-
ind-mouth could cause a se

€

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AGRICOLA jain : JUST RECEIVED : NEW — PRETTY
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it ig bad health, whether in! TQ WAKE 8 American and Canadian

their close inter-dependence is
lly. If thes farmer is sick or

oe

are constantly under consid-
eration at the BCCF—where
you find new Stock and New
Ideas !

BARBADOS CO-OP.



PAC’ THREE
















e a depressing subject, yet, in

FEELING
TiRED

Now rises
full of
energy

DRESSES

Piquelet, Waffle Pique
Silk and Smart Cottons

Priced
$12.50 — $18.00

LADIES’
PRETTY HATS

Smart Straws, Velvets
and Felts
In all Colours

$4.32 — $7.20
HANDBAGS

estock suffer; conversely, if
neglected, the farmer’s pocket

5455
LGOSEOOE LPP PP PPP PEEL ALA PG

GARDENING HINTS:
FOR AMATEURS

|
THE VEGETABLE GARDEN— |
CAULIFLOWER, PARSLEY.
There must be few vegetable
growers who have not longed to
grow cauliflowers. This delicious
vegetable is a general favourite,
and is looked on as a luxury by
most housewives, }
Yet by observing a few simple}
precautions cauliflower can be}
grown most successfully in Barbe- |
dos, and, what is more, although |
it has got a peak time, or season,



What a bad start for @
day's work if you wake
up feeling tired and
listless, instead of being
brisk and full of energy.
| One Woman who can
| appreciate the difference from
ber own experience, writes to
us:

“Before taking Kruschen, I
always used to wake in the |
morning feeling very tired. Now
( have lost all that tiredness and
{ wake feeling full of energy.
Kruschen has made me feel years
younger. TI also suffered with
rheumatic pains in my shoulders
and swellings round my ankles
1 am now completely cured of

SOS



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Cauliflower can be grown all the these patna and swells S sees A fine assortment of *
year, k | cannot speak too highly of it.” CANADIAN BAGS %

TPs time of the year when this) —L.W. | For travel, afternoon or $
vegetable comes most easily is) Kruschen keeps you >

Cocktail

$4.13 — $8.95



young
because it tones up the liver,
kidneys and bowels and keeps

them all working smooth]

from October to June, but Cauli-
‘lower will grow at anytime, j

LPP LLL PIPE AAAS



Sow the seeds (obtained from) offciently. The reward of this
the Department of Science and) {nternal cleanliness tsa freshened
Agriculture in a nursery bed, or| and invigorated body. Poisonous | \ h
seed box, | waste materials are expelled and 1% e dern Dress Shoppe
When the seedlings are four to) the pains of rheumatism cease. | ys %
six inches tall transplant them into Soe tae occ bons seca og ca %
the well prepared garden bed. + ite’ purifyt ‘orce. . BROAD STREET. x
Space them two and a half feet! Kruschen is obtainable from ald | %
apart. Vhemists and Stores. VOL LPOSLOPSPPESE EEL LLC LPAI

Two weeks after the seedlings
have been planted out give them
an application of V.G.M. (vege-
able garden manu i six
this, the!
lants again,

Cauliflower are siow 4.oWeFrs,!
and it will be three to five months |
the cauliflowers are ripe






















































Judgment must be used in;

The cauliflower must)

firm, and white. When the head| |
has opened, and has a brown|
hairy look it is overripe: and has}
been left in the bed too long. |
Such a cauliflower is not really |

fit to eat, and should certainly |
never be offered for sale. : |
Cauliflower is such a delicious |

If even the family should get tired |
of it for a time, there is never any |
difficulty in selling the heads that
are not wanted,

It is a strange thing, but in a bed
where seedlings of one size have|
been planted out at the same time,

it is seldom that each plant de-
velops alike, So in the bed there
will probably be cauliflower in

different stages of ripeness. This
of course is an advantage, and
spins out the first picking longer.

To keep up the supply however |
throughout the year seeds should
be sown at intervals” of several
weeks.

EVERYTHING YOU NEED
FOR LASTING BEAUTY

Freshener in its adorable classic
style bottle, To flatter your face with
delicate glamour, you have a « hoice
of sixhades of Ponds face-powder,
each shade scientifically blended to
enhance the natural radiance of one
complexion type.

And to add the final touch of
loveliness, choose of Pond's
lipstic ks in seven gl lour
that just stay on, and on, and ¢

Parsley

Parsley is rich in iron, and so
is a valuable as well as a decora-
ive addition to the vegetable gar-
den, Used as a garnish, in sauces
and in salads it js more than use-
ful, besides making a splendid
border to a bed of other vegetables

Parsiey seeds are very slow to
germinate, and some people advise
soaking them in warm water for
some hours before planting them.
The seeds can be sown in the
open bed, but they are generally
started in a seed box. Scatter the
seeds, and cover them very lightly
with earth. Press down,

When the seedlings are 4 few
inches high transplant them to the
bed, if they are in a seed box. If
they are in a bed thin them out
to 9 or 12 inches apart,

women all over the world have

the value of Pond’s beauty
products, Pond’s offer you a com-
plete range of beauty aids at prices
to suit your purse.

Pirst, the two famous Creams:
Pond’s Cold Cream for cleansing
and Pond’s Vanishing Cream for
a day-long, protective, non-greasy
foundation. To tone up your tissues,
there’s Pond’s raildly astringent Skin

wy

one

wing ce

ied a nanstinaalennsinaamesnenieaete
from which we might never recov~
er, This note is in no sense meant
to create a scare, but since to be
forewarned is forearmed it may
help to keep us fully alert in mat-
ters. and dangers affecting the
health of our animals.



Mome Needs

Polishes &
Vittings



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Johnson’s Polishes
Brass Butts
Locks

Castors

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' PAGE FOUR



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SUNDAY ADVOCATE



|W... BOARD
ISSUES

i

SECRETARY
DENIAL

BY O. S. COPPIN

WAS most interested to read a report from Trinidad

recently

which stated that Mr, Cyril Merry, secretary of the West Indies’

} Cricket board of Control, had denied a statement in

c a section of the
frinidad Press which Claimed that Trinidad would be asked to pro.
vide approximately half of the estimated cost of the Indian cricket

| team’s tour of the West Indies next year.

Indies’ Cricket Board of Control,

The statement appeared in a reprinted report from a Jamaica
| newspaper quoting Mr. R, K. Nunes, former President of the West

as saying that Trinidad had ‘been

| aaled to provide approximately half of the $144,000 which the tour

will cost.

to contribute towards the tour.
| that.”

| Mr. Merry said that there was no question about Trinidad having
“The W.1, Cricket Board will handle

FALSE BUT USEFUL

|
‘HIS FALSE statement served

a useful purpose in that it elicited

some information from Mr. Merry on behalf of the Board which
itself still non-informative and as far as the Press in these parts is
| concerned, completely alien to any methods of building up any useful
| relationships with the Press, the only means whereby the West Indies’
cricket public can be kept informed as to future plans in connection

\ with West Indies cricket.

Mr. Merry went on to say, and we thank him for the informatjon,

| that the original schedule calls fc

| two-day game against the Trinidad Indians, three matches -

x two Tests, a colony match arm a
- a Test,

ja colony game and a two-day game against the Indians in British
Guiana and a Test and colony game against each of Barbados and

I can see the wisdorn of this

Jamaica.
| British Guiana have definite East

lation and have instituted an annual series of
Trinidad and British East Indians.

WHAT OF THE
E ARE REALLY

being made to enable us t
vague reference to the fact that “

concerned

schedule in that both Trinidad and
Indian representation in their popu-
games between the

PREPARATIONS ?

with the preparations which are
o field a proper team. ‘There is a
the professionals” have been invited

to take part, but that is not good enough.

We are entitled to know
and who are invited. There
experiment with the method of
not be true but some concrete

what is the nature of these
are

information on these subjects

invitations
there might be an
These rumours might
would

rumours, that
captaincy,

make the West Indian cricket public feel considerably relieved over

our prospects of the coming tour

measure of confidence and respec

Where are these grandiose pl
ing talents? Where now is this
It has become almost an axiom

and at the same time
t for the Board

promote

ans for unearthing some pace bowl-

search for pace bowlers to wwain?
in West Indian cricket circles that

without penetrating an effective pace bowling a team has no chance,

not even a rightful place for that

this; it will serve no useful
with only a few weeks available
test.

Let us face facts. Bowlers

commitment due,
the case of young
if they are to give of their best

I shall await developments

| do not live a life in which complete physical fitness is
ritual and even if they get themselves into some sort of physical
fitness then their efforts are relaxed until there is another similar
That being the case, ample notice, especially in
players making a first appearance 1s
tosthe West Indies,

matter, in International cricket.

GIVE THEM TIME

HAVE BEEN making an observation for years, whenever there
is a tour with an International flavour in the offing and it is
purpose calling upon a

young

player

who has shown talent as a pace bowler to represent the West Indies

for him to prepare for this crucial

to bowl fast
a relentless

today who endeavour

necessary

in this connection with the hope tha‘

tt

linto the doldrums is the fact that they have apparently run out of
jcontestants, Some have joined the professional ranks because of
| economic pressure (although they can really qualify again for ama-
teur status) while others have left the colony and a few have just
given up.

There would be no dearth of contestants if the schools entered

ee





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————

in the interests of West Indian cricket something will be done soon,

THE CASE FOR AMATEUR BOXING

AST WEEK I discussed in this column the need for replacing

‘ professional boxing on a respectable footing and cited some
of the difficulties that had arrested the progress of this form of sport
in Barbados,

Today some reference to amateur boxing is logically required.
With the formation of an Amateur Boxing Association, amateur box-
ing flourished spasmodically during the past eighteen months but
tne response of the public to the programmes whenever they were
staged constituted a definite indication that this form of sport would
be supported if it were made sufficiently attractive.

One of the chief reasons why amateur boxing too

has fallen

teams, the Boy Scouts’ Association, recognised clubs and associations
like the Y.M.C.A,, the Police Boys’ Clubs, Y.M.PC. and the like en-
tered teams as well







If this is properly advertised, the Amateur Boxing Association
has quite capable machinery for ensuring that the sport is done on
\the highest level Major A, R, Foster has been associated with boxing
jalmost all his life, Fred Bethel, Herbie Dowding, Claude Ramsay,
J, E. T. Brancker, Pierre Maffei, Louis Lynch, some of the officials
jare all quite capable of running this sport intelligently It is up to
{those interested to come together and make a concerted effort to
launch amateur boxing once and for all as one of the popular local

forms of sport.

BON VOYAGE

E SAY bon voyage tomorrow morning to a team of cyclists
selected by the Amateur Athletic Association of 3arbados to
compete in the 150 kilometre road race to be held in Martinique on
July 14, French National Day

Whether they are successful or not is hardly the primary consid-
}eration but the fact that the A.A.A. of B, has been able to take advan-
tage of this invitation is convincing proof that athletics and cycling
are again coming into their own in Barbados. In addition to this,
there can be fewer, if any, more powerful incentives to athletes and
cyclists to reach a stage as near perfection as possible than selection

to represent their colony outside.
I hope that the A.A.A. ot B. will find it possible to return this

invitation in the near future.
’ Bie ake \ at a 3 i
he coo Te \ sre”
€

ws atto®
i Toemels vith ATLAS *A

meted 4







———



SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1952



Spartan Defeat

-

What Of Local Amateur Boxing? Lodge by An Innings

Spartan scored an outright victory over Lodge School
yesterday in their First Division Cricket match at Lodge
when the schoolboys knocked up 87 after a previous 72 and
the Spartan team replied with 235 for 7 wickets.

At the College grounds “Boogles” Williams (94) and
“Brickie” Lucas (75) helped their team to total 273 for 6
wickets declared against Harrison College who made 159

and 46 for one wicket.

In reply to Empire’s score of
260, Wanderers made 308 to gain
first innings’ lead at Bank Hall,

Theodore Birkett was the out-
standing batsman for Pickwick
when he made 134 of his team’s
287 tor 8 wickets against Police
who had scored 234 in their first
innings at Kensington,

HARRISON COLLEGE vs
CARLTON

Harrison College

(and for 1 wkt.) ..........
Carlton (for 6 wkts decl’d) .. 273

A third-wicket partnership by
“Boogles” Williams (94) and
“Brickie”’ Lucas (75) which was
productive of 138 runs, enabled
Carlton to register 273 for the
loss of six wickets when the
innings was declared closed short-
jy after five o’clock at the College
grounds yesterday afternoon.
This ereditable score wag made
in reply to 159 by Harrison Col-
lege in their first innings.

In the remaining minutes of
play, the College had replied with
36 for the loss of one wicket,

Lucas 7 and Williams 1,
resumed for Carlton with the
total at 34 for the loss of twu
wickets in ideal conditions, This

pair by attractive and forceful
batting, defied all efforts by the
College bowlers to dislodge them
until shortly before the luncheon
interval was taken when Lucas
glided one neatly off slow bowler
Foster and wicket-keeper Black<
man held the catch. The total was
172 and Lucas’ innings, an un-
blemished one, which lasted for
110 minutes included ten bound-
aries,

Reynold Hutchinson assisted
Williams in taking the score past
the double century mark when
he too was taken behind the wick-
et by Blackman, this time off the
bowling of Simmons, He had
contributed a valuable 13.

Geoffrey Hutchinson partnered
Williams and this pair looked like
putting up a good stand when
Williams who had been batting
attractively was bowled by Sim-
mons, just six short of his cen-
tury after being at the wicket
for about 170 minutes. His inn-
ings was inclusive of seven
boundaries.

George
hurricane

Edghill who got a
18 including the only
of the day and Hutchinson
were together when the innings
was declared closed with the
total at 273 for the loss of six
wickets. Hutchinson who scored a
useful 30 got three boundaries
during the course of his innings,
Bowling for the College,
Cammie Smith got 2 for 61 while
Simmons got a similar number
for 64 and Mr, Headley and Fos-
ter each got one for 37 and 47

respectively,

With a deficit of 114 runs,
Harrison College started their
second innings with Hope and

Tudor to the bowling of George
Edghill and K. B. Warren from
the Weymouth and Pavilion ends
respectively.

The seore had only reached 9
when Tudor got his pad in front
of one from Edghill and he was
sent back without opening his
account,

Cc. W. Smith joined Hope who
seemed quite at home to the pace
men and this pair by neat shots
took thg seore to 27 when Carlton
made their first bowling change.

Cox a medium pace left arm
bowler replaced Warren at the
Sereen end and Hope singled the
first through the slips and later
Smith glanced him to the fine
leg boundary.

“Boogles” Williams bowled
from the other end and Hope cut
past Kennedy at gully to the
boundary to make his score 19.

George Edghill bowled the last
over for the day and sent down
a maiden to Smith. The total was
36 for 1, Smith is 15 and Hope
19.

LODGE vs. SPARTAN.

ROURO TH WE 5-es in ds 5 ee hee
Spartan (for 7 wkts)

Spartan secured an innings vic-
tory by 4 o’clock yesterday in their



for extra

VITALITY

PHOSFERIN

First Division crnket match
against Lodge Scnool. Lodge
scored 72 and 87 and Spartan 235
for the loss of 7 wickets.

Lodge were bowled out in their
first innings since the first day’s
play and Spartan had proceeded
to score 185 for the loss of six

. Wickets. Yesterday they went on

to bank up the odds against the
Lodge boys by scoring 50 quick
runs and then Phillips’s and
King’s fast attack were for the

most part responsible for forcing
the early victory.

In this match Phillips reached
a high degree of accuracy and
was able to secure 9 wickets for
61 runs in the two innings. The
first day he took 4 for 16 and yes-
terday 5 for 45.

Frank King developed a lot of
pace, especially in the second in-
nings when he unsettled the bats-
men a great deal. He took 4 for
$33, 1 for 19 in the first innings
and 3 for 14 yesterday.

The other Spartan bowler who
was fairly successful was K.
Bowen, the spinner. In the first
innings he took 4 for 27 and yes-
terday 2 for 16.

Cave In Good Form

Cave showed hintself in good
form on both days. At the close
of the first day’s play he finished
with his wicket still intact with
24. He carried that score to 62
and when Spartan declared with
7 wickets down, he was still not
out. He was never uncomfortable
against the Lodge attack, most of
the bowling of which he is fam-
iliar with having lately left Lodge,
and he delighted the spectators
with his shots all around the
wicket.

N. Harrison who had been not
out with 37 from the previous
Saturday, went on to score 48 be-
fore he was bowled by Outram.
His was the only Spartan wicket
to fall yesterday,

On the first Saturday, too, S.
Griffith and L. S, Harris had made
the valuable scores of 51 and 61
respectively.

Given 163 runs to make to draw
equal before setting Spartan runs
to go at in a second innings, Lodge
began to lose wickets quickly and
at first it even seemed as though
they would have been bowled out
for far less. Five wickets were
actually down for 19 runs.

Lodge ‘managed to survive until
lunch, but were all out shortly
after. Batting for ther, John
Hutson scored 22

EMPIRE vs. WANDERERS
Empire Ist Innings .......- 260
Wanderers Ist Innings ...... 308

Wanderers led Empire on first
innings yesterday when at close
of play they scorea 308 runs in
reply to Empire’s first innings
score of 260. Young David Mayers
who opened the Wanderers bat-
ting, scored a sound 72, and Denis
Atkinson an aggressive 83 to help
boost their team’s total.

The runs were scored off a
limited Empire bowling attack
which got no assistance whatever
from the deal board pitch, Poor
field placing, faulty catching, and
every conceivable fielding lapse on
the part of the Empire team con-
tributed in no small measure to
the Wanderers’ score,

Wanderers after losing the
wicket of Perry Evelyn at 35, saw
young David Mayers and W.
Knowles retrieve the position with
some free batting to take the
score to 107 before Knowles was
out l.b.w. to Horace King. Knowles
made 43.

Half Century

Then Denis Atkinson joined
Mayers, and during the partner-
ship Mayers reached his fifty
after being dropped by Robinson
at mid off with his score at 47.
Both these batsmen faced the
Empire attack with confidence,
and attacked thé bowling, execut-
ing shots all around the wicket.
Atkinson was the more severe of
the two, and at one time lofted,
H. King out of the grounds.

They saw the score move on to
134 at tea, and on resuming, car-
ried it to 150 when Mayers
jumped down the wicket to one of
King’s leg breaks, missed and
was stumped by wicket-keeper

RACING NOTES

GOING RACING by Radio, or even by means of the Trinidad
Guardian, is, as many of us have found in the last couple of weeks,
a disappointing business. Unless the horses we are interested in are
doing well, little is heard of them, and all we can do, is to speculate
vainly as to what’can have happened to them, and await the return
of eyewitnesses. In the meantime, a constant stream of rumours,
some good, others bad, is all that we have to go by.

The present meeting in Trinidad is no exception. We have heard
all about the successes, but nothing about the failures. To take an
example, the case of Darham Jane. As far as I know, her name
has not been mentioned on the Radio, nor in the press (except in so
far as it appears in the list of “Also Rans”), yet I gather that she
not shown bad form, and was unlucky in getting a very bad start
in the Bayshore Handicap on the first day. Her non-appearance last
Thursday, remains a mystery, which, however, we must hope, does
not indicate any mishap. .

Others who have not done as well as we might have expected,
are, Usher, Apollo, and Lunways, The first two should certainly have
been capable of picking up a race or two, in D., and the fact that
neither have placed, is a bit mystifying. Possibly, Appollo may not
have been quite fully wound up for his campaign, while Usher, like
his Granddam, Bridesmaid, may be a bad traveller. Perhaps,—but,
we still have to wait and see, Lunways’ form suggests that she may
be running off, but she, of course, is up against a lot stiffer opposition.

To turn from the failures, to the successes, the results of the
last wo days racing have emphasised, first of all, the excellence of
Bright Light. Mr. Barnard’s filly won her race against the C.s, in
the best time for the day, and there can be little doubt that, if all goes
well with her, she will have the remaining Classic races at her mercy.
She did not start on the third day, but may do so on the fourth, if
my information 1s correct. It ic always pleasant to record the success
of a good horse, and there are none who will grudge Bright Light’s
owner the reward, to which his farsightedness in purchasing Burning
Bow, and Felicitas, or his Orange Hill Stud, entitle him. In the same
stable, is the useful Rosette, whose win over a big field of F. class
horses, suggests that she is a long way above the average half breds
(and incidentally makes Twinkle a very attractive proposition for our
August meeting). 3

It is not often that one has to say “Hard Luck”, to Mr. Bethel
and, with two wins, and three seconds, to his credit, so far, I doubt
whether it would be an appropriate thing to say at this time. Neverthe-
less, First Admiral has been a little unfortunate in running up the
sequence we have come to associate with Landmark. His failure to
ot pad 19 Ibs. to April’s Dream can certainly not be held against

im,

I was as pleased to see April’s Dream return to form, as I was
by the comparatively good showing of her half brother, Cross Roads.
The unreliable Colleton (about whom I have heard more unkind re-
marks passed, than any other horse that I can remember), greatly
surprised me, but, apparently, not the Trinidad public, by winning a
mile race, seemingly quite easily. I would have expected at least
10—1 odds on this performance but the Trinidad Guardian’s corre-
spondent, “Nimbus”, apparently foresaw his victory, and tipped him,
= so he paid just over $3.00. I consider this to be tipping at its

est,

With only one day’s racing left, it remains to be seen whether
Landmark, and Harroween, can earn brackets. The latter has not
had the best of treatment from the handicappers, and there can be no
doubt that both are up against very good horses. Indeed, if Astrion
.3 going to continue to be a reformed character, it is hard to imagine
a more disheartening task than trying to beat a trio, consisting of him-
self, Hellican, and Ostara. Still, stranger things have happened, and
it is certainly time for Harroween’s luck to turn.

THE AUGUST MEETING

With less than’ a month left before the start of the B.T.C. four-
day August meeting, it is surprising how little activity there is to be
observed on gallops mornings. Nevertheless, signs are not lacking
of the approaching meeting, not the least of which, is the appearance
at headquarters, of Mr, Gill’s and Mr. Walecott’s strings. I expect that,
from next week, trainers will be getting down to it, and we shall be
able to assess to some extent, the way their charges are taking shape.
At the moment, a rather conservative policy is being pursued, particu-
larly in regard to the two year olds, very few of which, unless they
make great strides in the next three weeks, can hope to be anything
but extremely backward. At present, our main line of defence against
the usual strong St. Vincent challenge, would seem to be Apple Sam,
yet I should be surprised if he turned out to be the best that we have
in the long run. Still, the policy of giving two year olds time to
develop, is a good one, and perhaps we shall reap the reward of being
patient, when next year’s classics are contested.

TAILPIECE

It seems that there is a horse that no one wants.

Who is the

owner of Little Megdale.

Our latest importation can be seen being

walked and looking rather forlorn at the thought of having come all
the way across the Atlantic, only to find herself an orphan, so to
speak. Those of you who have ever contemplated becoming owners,

can do so now, and with an English importation at that!

but perhaps we have said enough

As to price—
about this little mystery.



DePeiza. He had made 72 in fine
style, and received a big ovation
from the large crowd.

Norman Marshall had a short
stay, for soon King had him
caught in the slips by E. .A V.
Williams for 4. However when
Skinner joined Atkinson, the situa-
tion brightened again for Wan-
derers, and these two saw the
score past the 200 mark and on
to 250 before Skinner was out
l.b.w. to Barker.

New Ball

Barker had just come on with
the new ball, and in his fourth
over, he bo\$ed inspired. He got
Skinner With one which swung
back sharply from the leg, and
three balls later, had Atkinson
out again by the Lb.w. route with
a similar ball. Atkinson batted at-
tractively for his 83.

Foffie Williams who had now
been switched to the southern end,
was moving the ball well through
the air, and two other wickets
fell quickly. Wanderers were 8
down for 269, but Lawless and
St. Hill took the score to 288 be-
fore Lawless was out to a catch
behind the wicket off Williams.
Williams earlier had Proverbs
caught by Barker at mid on. It
was a well judged catch by Barker
who threw himself forward and
sideways to hold a very low one.

With only a few minutes to go
before time call, King lured St,
Hill down the wicket for DePeiza
to whip off the bails, Wanderers



were all out for 308, a lead of 48
over the Empire total of 260.
PICKWICK vs POLICE

Police Ist Innings ..........
Pickwick (for 8 wkts) 287

A crisp 134 by tall Theodore
Birkett for Pickwick in their first
innings was the attraction in yes-
terday’s play in the Pickwick-
Police cricket match which is
being played at Kensington Oval.
Birkett who went in to bat at
number three in the Pickwick
batting order, hit 13 fours in his
century which was _ completed
after the luncheon interval and
his contribution enabled Pickwick
te score 287 runs for the loss of
eight wickets when play ended
yesterday in reply to the total of
243 runs scored by Police on the
first day.

Birkett took 175 minutes to
score his century and gave oniy
one chance when his score was 64.
After that chance he batted free-
ly and executed fine strokes and
feund the gaps in the field.

His Excellency the Governor
Sir Alfred Savage and Lady
Savage watched the after lunch
play. The Police fielding was not
so good after lunch and two
catches were dropped. The next
best score to Birkett’s was 45 by
K. Greenidge who went at nuj-
ber four in the batting order for
Pickwick,

Again veteran Byer who top-
scored in the first innings for

@ on page 5

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SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE

Cockell Comeback (| _ UGHT OLYMPIC TORCH IN ANCIENT CEREMONY GRICKET from Page 4) JULY 6 — NO, 231

















MODERN LIVING
IS A STRAIN

NUTROPHOS

helps you to relax and

,
re e

One-fight-a-Month Bee Ty a

-—~PETER WILSON SAYS

SCORE BOARD









Police came te the rescue and took - |
four of the Pickwick wickets for Th Wy j
63 runs® after sending down 14 e OpI1c
overs. He bowled steadily.
Mu.iins bowled with hard luck
and the two catches that we

dropped were unfortunately { of |
him. He varied his deliveries {6
a good extent and at times nad j



Rumour was busy to-day with
the future of DON COCKELL,
HARRISON COLLEGE vs. CARLTON gallant but unsuccessful defender



the batsmen tied down. c fortifies your whole
HARRISON COLLE 7 iti i ; i CARTON Ge NGS Of the British cruiser-weight titles Bradshaw's Bowling Last Week nervous system.
e r eadley 8 eK. 5 7 ex- ; 2 ‘kets . . s s :
GB Willams P symone ac» STEME Suggesting thab the 23 Se eapensea te hava Bit aes | SS Wa Pa
omer. eaEN 3 voor ex-Battersea blacksmith Gree BP ind ‘Snhers each toni oy SLEEP WELL, FEEL
L. Huteltinson © (W lackman) ~ Was about to retire. ery re ear y
a Simmons : Bao 4 = wicket for 47 and 49 runs respec- WELL, when you take
utchinson not out 30 Cockell has completely a tivel
c 0 _ has ely differ- 'y }
G. ‘agtitKentie « & b Smith .. 3 ent intentions. Accofding to JACK Seewnick were off to 9 gheky

NUTROPHOS

CCL

tras: b. 3, 1b. i, w. 8 12 SOLOMONS, the man who pro-

aan 4, moted Cockell’s championship en-

‘for 6 wkts, deel'd) #9 deavours, Don will seek “rehabili-

soe of, Wicketsnl for 28, 2 for a4 Stee’ by taking on all comers

jor 213, 5 for for 253. e rate of one a month—be-
BOWLING ANALYSIS ginning now.

start when they lost their open- |
ing batsman A. Trotter when the |
score was only seven, Trotter |
made four runs before he was |
given out leg before while on the |







































































































o mM R W ; defensive against Bradshaw. Then | :
Mr. S. A. Headley 15 4 2 1 A sensible move—and one that Birkett joined Edwards and the |
M. M. Simmons 19 2 & 2 will help to rid Cockell of the runs ¢é ore freely. Bir '
©. Reid 7 1 2 — ring-rust that must assuredly have ns cele more rreely. kett a rt ta
F. Tudor ... 5 1 1% — contributed to his battle with the reached his century just after |
& Ww Smits it t a ; scales. The only question is—who ren Sat Sy Caeae Pier ad |
ep et duce an he Bght? loat two wickets — Ketwards 201 5. ine ands ir Lady °
LLEGE ENNIN' and A. Trotter four—for runs. el or
Mh. Med TORUMO Sov... 0 5esssae5 es 19 . The new ball came out whan i aa aoe Recuerdos De India
F. Tudor l.b.w. Edghill | 0 Ambition Thwarted e new bs uu For opening on Friday uerdos ‘
C. W. Smith not out . _ Three-fifths of a s Sa a the Pickwick score was 228 and argeant's Community Hall. Chine, v Cylon
Extras: b. 1, n.b. 1 _? ‘hetw the Hoatin ores stands Bradshaw who was inswinging | we also thank the Governor Bolsa De Tachapelo
CEST page ae = sohooltied front i. FEARNE quite a lot in the first over with When he reminded all Especilitamente
« . the aw bal ined a succ Sargeant's co wi € C
Pall of wichete—t tor 9 ~ {pronouneed Farn) EWART and appeal against Birkett for leg be- | Sut for no, dance, Na meee 18% eoomnce
LY er ambition — to s n ti . a age t 2 , + ° : q ‘ a
wee mee rR. w. Olympic Games at Malinka * a this batsman was 134. Sone egos ive al denetns Perciento
. B raion : : it 2 ; rick naa ape Were Erewhy Plak- Sound lectures, they call bondage Durante De Baratillo
K. B. Warr Bo = But her nomination for the finalâ„¢ wick had scored 287 runs for the! Dancing is liberty
Cc. B. Wiliams ahh ae 4 — Ulympic trials at Blackpool on Pe ' . PES ‘ , : a loss of eight wickets in reply to : ’ : ° ° e
poo! ‘ : : ee
LODGE vs. SPARTAN pecoraay has not been accepted we te 7 er a ' the Police score of 243 in their) We, top thank Mrs. Talma
vs. caus firs | Saleaveiaae bad i # J *@
SPARTAN ‘ior’ 7 wikis ve ME 686 sec, Fe eat ee time Of bf DRESSED IN ANCIENT COSTUMES, Greck girls (left) light the Olympic fame in Olympia, Greece, where i ae ie tab: alien nee dead ee THANT:
Me ae tee ea ac age the standard. the games were born many centuries ago. The sun’s rays shining on the concave mirror ignited the toreh > . . ; °
A. Atkins ¢ Welch b Brdokes . 3 This is surprising, because if the % * im the hand of the girl at left. The flame was then transferred to the bow! held by the girl at right The Cyclists Leave We hone things wilt run, amoothly } Pr, Wm. Henry Street
S- Griftth b Farmer «so -canmer a free-style qualifying mark, which (| bow! was carried to the Olympic altar, where it will burn for the duration of the games, A runner (right) ‘i ae | Will treasure this new centre : Dial 3466
N. Harrison b Outram . : $s only five have reached, had been {§ : carries the torch, lit from the bowl, on its first lap toward Helsinki, Piniand, Relays of runners will trans~ For Martinique As they would treasure gold
N. Grant l.b.w. b Wilkie... 0 as lenient on National times as 4 port the torch to its final destination and the start of the 1952 games (International) eciloasene Pia tee
K. Walcott c Grant (wkpr.) b that for the women’s backstroke eee en Rornew iene to go on evenings
Wilkie are: 3 Miss Ewart 1 : Tomorrow After a titing day
x Harris b Wilkie “a easily we could have qualified BOOK REVIEW it's “wheal the Dastoes say :
Rise wat o e The Barbado: i : * ecm \
F. King not out ................ 1 a ; adosa e¢ontingent of
BMAOS ess ceeeeeeeeeeeeeeneees 4 Why Choose Barnett q' cyclists will leave Seawell to-| We“vent to the Drift Hall
see teed ee ota CRICKET S Chi a a THE BACK
LODGE SCHOOL and IONTNGS tr: ketle sa Martinique where they will take} py. sta. aera }
: 1 alian Test wicketkeeper, has a ; seer | The Star Buds and “Star Rose
: Ceiskh Conteretos MT against the Hy 0. S. Coppin Pace on the 14th July, the Freneh | ‘The paras! fie telight
* 2 7 , * ace a 3 With Minuet in G '
ze ; Royal Navy at Dartmouth on July CRICKET Crusaders. 4a account of the West Indies’ Ferguson had fielded out the last Nepenel Dey. a a : ; : ‘ | @ Here's a way to relief
L. 9 and 10. 51. #9 i istralia by Harold Dale, Daily E few fateful runs. It was no fault panying them be Mr. | Low steppers and high steppers } :
7 1951—52 tour in Australia by Haro ale, Daily Express (0° .0° so affected—but rather an J. W. B, Chenery, President of the | Like girls of the court yar Do you «now that a common
Z ooh} . 2 4 two nat by he this ouupiny Correspondent, has just come to hand and is on sale at Upsurge of loyalty that might Barbados Amateur Athletic Asso- | Diced pee Daub & ralampan cause “ an lies = =
. POE hen: rs ago and has been play- he Advocate Stationer : any youthful cricketing ciation, and Mr. C. E. Jemmott, | — ° . : : crabs evel conga
N. Wilkie b Phillips ............-. 4 7 the vocate Stationery. arise in any y ‘ . 2 cr kidne 1
Cid nw W Pein lili. 10 ing club cricket and making occa- Mr. Harold Dale, who covered the Tests in this series heart.” who will manage the team in| Fer though these girls both trembh help to filter impurities out
EE ince cate e aris apeeid 12 sional appearances in Minor P. S08 ; There is a refreshing frankness place of Mr, George Clarke who | Pie ,"he Policeman gone of the system. | When they grow
=—— a i ; for the Barbados Advecate, needs no introduction to loca Ore 28% Teter ee ee r. ge Clarke They start their relaxation sluggish, these impurities ac-
unty games as captain of Bucks : t ce P
tas TUES (Uae bar a . : , : . . ; + Nite = 2a) geal about Dale's description and 1 am has found it impossible to make | After they fire one cumnalat d ti it ‘
aia When I told him he had been cricket cireles since his style, individualistic, courageou: core that his observations with the tour. : : : ‘ ulate and the cenering oy.
Fall of wickets—1 for 11, 2 for 11, 3 Chosen, 44-yeay-old Barnett said: as well as vivid has served to bring home to the thousands respect to the selection of the Comprising the team are “Mike” | Qb,,Dend down boyaie, sailor tion is very often the cause of
for 16, 4 for 19, 5 for 19, 6 for 47, 7 for “It certainly is a nice gesture, but : tn trd : YT ee Nifth Test wi ke C ; # the team are “Mike” | ‘This thing sweeter than sitns + Be Wie: Pits gro
56, 8 for 56, 9 for 75. | really I think they ant cr of local cricket fans, intriguing word pictures of the now team for the Bifth Test will evoke Carmichael, (Captain) John | Something yonder parading 7 i prepared to invigorate
BOWLING ANALYSIS | w. picked a younger man They historic struggle for world cricket supremacy between Aus spnaidareine sien ane “ ne eens George Hill, | 4°¥ you cen’, stop yhat thing sia kidneys. They act
; + . . 5 ) a . in a8 4s 6 6cric as. “Mash” a i
5 sho a e P sn Shin s Ss. at . ash” Brathwaite, and D Mew! mew! we hear a tom cat directly on these vital organs, act
¥ Bie LS . a a ee fee” rere geile Bie eae on go measure his run, Rae took strike re given for his a. (Reserve). Young Grant of i's a ta. nots Bure: : : as a tonic, ne pes eee
K. Bowen ... oe 2.66 2 ; ' : £4) wall advande ith th ba ae * Holborn Boys is also going on the "was then that Lou discovered speedily restoring them to their
A NDERERS. ate enough to have followed the and Lindwall advanced with the apsence (Goddard's) was conflict- P | doe “he blood” start to stir : si .
EMPIRE Pe we ot 860 I agree Barnett has had the fortunes of the West Indian gathering impetus of his thirtec: ae aes aw Stabe that God- have but at the expense »f his| “"" “ be _ 6 : natal activity aeant Sion
WANDERERS ist Innings best cricket could offer and as cricketers on their halcyon tour strides. His arm whirled over 1) qirq was suffering from nervous ub Leas ahoy! boys, {ts action . ee ee se
D. Mayers stpd. (wkpr.) De Peiza i far oo 8 first-class sg is a of eavend a 1950 was peculiarly — hessaround Paper -~ exhaustion, Later it was correct- Basketball previa ase 2 pe De Witt’s Pills fave
. : ; cern e captains two sides suited for the job of recording, stantly on a good length came od to “Goddard is ninety per cent ; Vm ‘counting every star.” | been bringing relief to suf-
P. Evelyn b Williams 8 against th 3 : all of Bae Lind d to” . 4 ; | ringing ef to ou
W. Knowles lb.w. H. King 43 aga. e Indians this season— with clever injection of consider- ball of terrific pace new fit.’ Then it was declared that 4 ; inal sahil ferers from backache and
D. Atkinson l.b.w. Barker ...... 88 the Commonwealth XI at Black- ed opinion, the struggle between in the very onset at his top speed Goddard had offered to stand " | Sea ia tsp eet owe we have received cuuntless
N. Marshall c E. A. V. Williams ‘ pool next month, and the Minor the West Indies and Kustralia for with complete accuracy. Rae tote Carlton De eat | Gn see telnved. Ashi } letters of grachuas trom
A, Sennen tase tava 35 Counties XI at Norwich in Sep- the mythical “Ashes.” sound, knowledgeable batenaa Nesuous. fixhacsGon ? C Old B Received bow after bow. all over the. weed.
G. Proverbs ¢ Barker b Williams 4 itember, that he is, was shocked. ‘ 1 : hes HI te , : Get a supply from
F ke ae 9 : he ices ‘ ; 14d spoken to Goddard him- ate ‘oys Twas all to help the children % ,
t “Lawless e (wpe) ‘De ie 12 The selectors have brought him Praia tind anced di ‘ 5 ypbines oy the en self shortly ne gg mail by defeating Harri Colleg Shciver tae the ‘Star Buds Sa saayferee +
E. Williams ......- - 12 in to the exclusion of DO’ ON it saad : * ae eS B- Sec lian selectors — Manager Cyr i Orewen Paeicst Helped little’ ones indeed : :
. St. Hill st kpr) b H. King 13 ' e was ah impartial critic even ing velocity of the ball, CONC Sead Sa - Old Boys in a very excitir st | Helped little: one x . “
ak a isrkne Out 9 of Sevenoaks Vine. If Downton it only it was because of his slip collected the involuntary Merry, Jeffrey Stollmeyer and 7.4 ie very iting matcl | +
a had t then GRADY, of Dun. i ; himself—were to meet. He fore~ ik, Carlton have placed | After the show a bit dance
Extras: vewes 12 eeshie: re eo , Savee y nationality and he was an impor- snick, and Lindwall walked back <.\', ifficult job of selection and themselves in a good position for | They came from near and fax
a -- $08 Chance. a Ta eames mrenieds a tate ode rican noting aga’’ wanted to omit Rae and inchude winning the Division “A” Basket- | And three o'clock the, morning /
; ‘ota oeeee BAY ACUSAyHY j Prior Jones. The vast majority of 94} cup. ' y
i 7, 3-150. Departure ighes it their He ge a fe : at , ee j
hah of eg Saas. dog ich Expensive egncn, tie, Mighest pout in men, He, dave a faint Jor to Mis bit Cricketers. would Have taken the WheD the lust, quarter of, this sponsored by GUARANTEE AA
9—288. The Spartan League benefit by i ai straliz , en the ‘ldsme femme view. me Mea ee oe ; 7
ee Ws ale ay ‘the departure of Hemel Stare Bev taae of pouting with R Oe t his bat to the third ban) Played. Jones was omitted and Same number of points, but after J & R BAKERIES | nas minetared ender et strict! hygienic
Barker t 21 3 % 3 Hempstead and Upminster to the Australia for world cricket su- —de ts tely : but the impact ~2llmeyer captained the side—an six periods, Carlton were able tc | conditions and’ the ingredients con-
Rudder. 5 : io j Delphian League. Each club has premacy k ; err ns that Ria bteolke a nbition he had never concealed. forge & win, by © Rashes, utes of | fenin to rigid standards of purity
Williams 23 been fi fo tee dcr a alee : WAR, OO. SUPE me. ef = The nervous exhaustion” must trates beat Pickwick by a ak oer
Fields : 6 = = lente ation the penltted ode "ae Heurhynted 4 shiz to ae driven ‘Dace ware ond fs Gal’ ave coms upon Goddard sud- Single point the same night ree
King 154— 7% 4 date th ries that. ‘ I eras Oo COR UMERG: SACO se ier enly, because during our conver- Pirates were 18 points behind | ENRICHED BREAD t /
Grant CKWI “eal é Sind Ein 7a hin} ry ft haa. wat ata rab’ nes ition there was never any hint When the last quarter began, but | | E é
op 7 i se mnhen he Un yule »e yale o a team lar ‘ . . = . a > a > » tase |
couch ee The competition is being ex- land for Australia with the ex- Harold Dale's at the end of the (at he would not lead the team ‘hey played a very fast last quarter and the blenders of | Hy UINNERINRREEE IN
‘Inning ten Oo clubs next season. rience » Wes les 5 Hi - : ' ow v > same e page tM . : Ys ey an aay ;
A. E nee toe opredabaw 4 Bottom clubs Hoddesdon and Mar- Boar’ behind wear rae ee See ' py h ae a a hat he had shown all through Last aoe College beat Pirates J&R RUM } 4 ays: are
E. Edwards stpd (wkpr. Dodson) low have been fe-elected, and Surely E ry pe ae on ake ee the peace, in a very keenly contested match
b Greene a Ware, Polytechnic and Ford Sports oe % a tor a! ay aout Mi cet lege id Tests kni In the final chapters Harold Dale
o pi RS Bradshaw a hank Haak promoted from Divis- a eel een s eta ne ; it had taken aera ta ait gives his own answer to questions I B Y ~
J. D, ‘Godda pl e Greene b Pe é ion I. A place is found for the flashing "strokes of Weeke : Wor ‘a he a : sea ray x seen ey | ace “a te = 7%, t. , acht Club
W. Greenidge c Amey yer b: x ontt + c 7 s cs ae V - md idies lose iat happenec oO,
W. Greer? .° samen Stor 18 aa aes co — club: rel} rn Waleots would re sure men playiry, cricket not from any their famous batsmen?” “How Vennis Tournament
G. Wood b Sobers mo! u O The, ciieht Tungerting Of sense—or OF ligation, not giving @ was jt that after crushing Eng. ~
B, Inniss not out . . “i ag —LES. orris and Hassett; whether th ; > reput ; “
i nr. t out 27 ae pete ty el te ; le thought for reputations nor pay= jynd—and an England that ran .
T. Hoad (Jnr.) no spin and guile of Ramadt nd 1 lures, but RESULTS
Extras: oy 7 spin and g ; amadhin and ing any heed to past failure Ul Australia neck and neck in the MEN’
oo Valentine would be more effective filled instead with a burning de- sghes—West Indies ; b (N's SINGLES SEMI-FINALS |
Total (for 8 wkts.)” -. 287 Eleven Qu lif For than the menacing speed of sire for ‘victory if flesh and blood ve Ae abeaie’ ndies were beaten aise, % Wea, we Mr. J.D. Trim-
Fall of wkts: 1—7, 2—74, 3-204, 4-210 ¥ Lindwall and Miller. could achieve it, ; The hook contains some excel- LADIES’ DOUBLES
a 7—258, Harold Dale has written hi “We had seen West Indians at yont jlhistrati . : Mrs. P. Patterson and Mrs, RB, S$, Ban
5-810, OSGWLING ANALYSIS Skill Shot Badge account of the Tests anc the other fast playi ly he West (ont illustrations by Harry Mar- croft ‘beat Mrs. D. E, Worme and Miss
a ae | es | , a ests anc the ier fast playing fervently for the West tin, the Sydney Morning Herald ©. Worme 6—3, 6—4. |
9 important games of the tour from Indies t ly with their I 1s . j
Cc. Bradshaw 16 . 2 3 : day to.da “a therefore he has had ret Ne, See xeads photographer. Credit must be MONDAY’S FIXTURES |
¢. Mullins MM aati Lt. A. Lange, R.N., a visitor to Gay nye * e he has had but with their hearts. given to him for having photo LADIES SINGLES FINALS
Cc. Blackman 3 -_ a mM the island, was a guest of the no benefit of foreknowledge and graphed every moment of crisis Miss E, Worms vs. Mrs, D. BE. Worme |
x @ 5 re » th * . : 2 wis : ;
i ae u 1 49 1 |2B.R.A,, yesterday. He shot and the his account is therefore the mor¢ Deeper Feeling and excitement — a handsome Mrs, P psteraie. ponte }
G. Sobers 14 interesting in that by virtue of t Patterson and Mrs. R, 8. Ban
J, Byer oan 14 — 63 4 4|2B.R.A. was informed that it was 8 e 3 € tribute to his unrivalled skill croft ys, Mrs, J. Connell and Mrs, C,



thé first time he was using the this method he has given the read The account is not without it i seninsiieuaidinens Skinner. .
service rifle (b) under Bisley con- © the opportunity to share with touches of deeper feeling. For Rifle Shooting Mr. Wo Ee eee
ditions. His score of 86 was the players and the staunchest example, in the midst of Aus . nowles and Mr. D. |

TABLE TENNIS

“ Lawless vs Mr. V, Ri
QUARTER FINALS — [thought to be very creditable. West, Indian supporters, the un- tgalia's surprise win of the tour © CAPT. JORDAN Ginn ven neo gam
The second round of the certainties, hopes and frustrations ‘est he intrudes a scene as pres- TOP SCORES mingham ve. Mr, GL. gustend hee, |

The Quarter-finals of the Table

eliminating stage of the B.R.A. of each game as play developed. pant with feeling as this:—
Tennis B Class open championship

iters c ave cap- Captain J, R. Jordan top scored “. Crichlow.
House Competition was shot ycs- Few writers could have cap

“Ip was a tremendous momen- at last Wednesday’s practice of



were played at the Y.M.C.A. onlterday evening. The eight best ‘ured the atmosphere Of phe all- tum but I don’t think one of the the Small Bore Rifle Club with a Belgrade-Bound
Friday night. The scores were aS|scores out of a possible 105 were: jg - tte, forestall cana Heatly Duge crowd but spared a thought very good score of 99 out of a MA'TEUR champions)
follows: Major A. DeV. Chase 98, Mr. M. turned phrases than Harold Dale, {° ,tbe bewildered | disapplint- possible 100. JOHNNY MALONEY anc
King (Advocate) beat Chase|}G. Tucker 94, Mr. E. J. Parry 94, ang this was early in the ans ment of the West Indians. There The following are the eight best PERCY LEWIS are to box foi
(Bay Street Boys’ Club) 22—20,!Lt. Col. Connell 93, Mr. F. Davis For example here is a quotation “°°, ° decent restraint in their scores recorded. the Royal Air Force agains!
21—17, 22—20; Guiler (Modern|93, Mr. G. D. McKinstry 95, from his description of the dis- cheers—a sympathy that had beer: Capt. J. R. Jordan 99, Mr. M. A. Yugoslavia in Belgrade on Jun:
High Scho 01) beat Cadogan|Major J. E. Griffith 92 and P.C. missal of Rae and the severing of °Y°KC4 just before Worrell’s last Tucker 97, Major J. E. Griffith 97, 24—the first-ever direct boxing |
(Speightstown Sports Club) 21—{0,. Shepherd 92. the opening partnérship between over when litthe Ramadhin from Mr, H. B, G. Marshall 97, Mr. contact between the two coun-

19, 19—21, 21—-14; 22—-20, Archer
beat Symmonds 21—17, 21—16,
13—21; 18—21, 21—16, Hendy beat
Straughan 21—16, 21—17, 21—18.

4, heats ee ; ee Trinidad, appalled at the havoc L. W. Hassell 95, Mr, T. A, lL. tries

et a a. a See tea Warr thats) 7 tet that Ring had wrought against Roberts 95, Mr, R O. Browne 95 The RAF will be putting thei)

DeVerteuil 91 nd Cpl K. Knight such ‘te nd nope 2h mers tim in one over, and perhaps and Mr. M. Knaggs 88. top team of 10 in the ring, with
+48 ’ . . 4 oe blaming mse w the strait n ” ors ar 2 i services she i i 1B |

(Barbados Police Force) 90, have Vivid ming himself for the straits i Members are asked to note that Service champions BRUCE








‘ I c vhich his side then were the Spoon Shoot scheduled for WELLS, DAI ROE TONY
In the finals for the Adelphi} qualified for Skill Shot Badges in “Rae and Stollmeyer paced denly found himself unable to go Saturday, July 12th, will new WALLACE in ‘ouppiet™ of |
Club open championship Joe Hoad} the N.RsA. non-central competi- solemnly in unison to the wickets, on. He had left the field in a take place on Wednesday, July welter-weight Maloney and |
defeated Clarence Gooding. tion. and Lindwall walked back to great state of emotion, and Willy 9th feather-weight Lewis. |
2 eee

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i

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PAGE SIX

a
SS VQ u1q“°“0 i zn!

4\\
\\

“TRIUMPH OVER

PAIN

QUININE-—THE FOURTH INGREDIENT IN ‘ANACIN’

How does ‘ANACIN' relieve pain so fast, so effectively? A few years

|

Dear Mrs. Clarke, I am 15
years of age and was deeply in
love with a boy aged 16. I know
that he loveq me once but do

! not know if he still loves me as

I love him. 1 have other boy-
friends at the same school who
are deeply in love with me and
I do not know how to tell them
definitely no. They are always
speaking of me and it seems as
if my boy-friend js getting to
know. What can I do to help
the situation?
“EP.”

** I hope I have your initials

SUN



will see how true this is when
you reach my age and can look

DAY ADVOCATE



» Dear Mrs. Clarke, I am sixteen
years old and I am in love with a

back on a full life of happiness boy aged 20 who is in love with

with my husband, my children
and just recestly, some lovely
little grand-children. It is a
good life and you must not spoil
it.

L.u.E.” writes: 1 am a woman
aged 41 years and am jin love
with a man for the last 16 years,
He is married and has been tell-
ing me all along that he is going
to get a divorce and marry me.
However, I feel now that 1 have
been with him too long and have

me. -1 have not seen him for
about two months and I am very
worried as I feel that he flirts
with ether girls even though I
have not heard anything about
him, There are many other boys
who say that they love me but
my whole mind is on this one
boy and when he is not there 3
feel as though I were one of thea
living dead. Please help me.
“Votre Petit Amie”.

SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1932



The Debs Curtsy To An
Empty Chair...

15 minutes—and a guinea—in Mayfair gives them the
drill for Buckingham Palace

You might think that most girls
who had gone through dancing
class would be able to drop a
curtsy without further instruction.
But it seems that this is not so.
It has not been so for many a
year.

Quite a large proportion of the
thousand or so debutantes who
are coming out this year have
taken curtsy lessons before mak-

By EVELYN IRONS

The girl steps forward, makes
a full sweeping curtsy to the first
chair (the Queen), walks three
paces to the next chair (Prince
Philip), and curtsies again,

Then she recedes crabwise, so as
not to turn her back on royalty.
Miss Vacani tells her what is
wrong. She must bend her head,
not fix her eyes on the Queen.

curtsy from Miss Vacani for this
week’s presentations, and Was
one of he best of the current
bunch.

So Graceful
How do this year’s aebutantes
generally compare with those of
the fabulous Whigham days? Very
well indeed, in Miss Vacani’s view.
“We are back to the graceful girls

right, dear. They were ; s i o ** Well, dear, it certainly seems ing their a rance at Bucking- She must hold her body straight, again,” she says. “They really
ago leading scientists discovered that tlie secret lay in the exact balancing “athe “Sedietnek, aan know. eae a eae ‘oiak’ ye wae to me that you are really and oe hae not crouch. Said an ex-debutante care about poise and deportment.”
of three famous medicines (Phenacetin, Caffeine and Acetylsalicylic Acid) Well, about your problem; Please tell me what is best to truly in love with this chap and, So if no debutante stumbled (last year’s vintage). “It works. Just one regrettable point about

with a FOURTH ingredient—QUININE

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Quinine acts

‘Anacin * is also

available in handy 20-tablet boxes and in bottles of 50 tablets

in the benefits of this great mew scientific discovery !

ARM YOURSELF AGAINST PAIN
GET SOME ‘ANACIN’ Tovar:



Doctors and dentists recommend ‘ANACIN', In Great
* Britain alone over 12,000 use it in their surgeries.



YOUR
FREIGHT




which is not really a problem at
all. You are really too young to
take any one boy seriously. This
you must realise if you are go-
ing to grow to full and true
womanhood. By all means have
many boy-friends. That is but
healthy and normal, but I can-
not help feeling that it is such a
pity when a young girl like you
gets herself entangled so early
in life with a serious affair. It
will not help you later on, my
dear, when you have a home
and family of your own. Keep a
level head; don’t make any rash
decisions and above all do live
what you are—a fine girl of 15
years—with the whole world
and a full life before her. You



How To

WASHINGTON.

The tough American business
men of the last century, whose
gospel was rugged individualism
and constant slogan free enter-
prise, must be turning in their
graves,

For the U.S. Government now
stands forth as double guarantor
for Americans who wish to invest
their money in business enter-
vrises abroad.

The guarantee says first—Am-
ericans will not lose a cent of
their money if their property or

do. I should be very grateful
for your advice.

** I do really believe that your
idea about leaving this man is
the best of all as, if he has not
made any move for 16 years it
is rather unlikely that he will
upset his family life now for you.
It is a pity indeed that it has
taken you so long to see reason,
my dear, but women have al-
ways been forgiving and willing
to give another chance so I can
fully understand that you held
out hopes for him all the time.
Anyhow, try to get this whole
business off your mind—you will
feel so very much better when
you have made a final move.

if as you say, he is in love with
you there should be nothing tor
you to worry about. Remember,
dear, that love is trust and if
you do not trust the one you
love you lose a lot of the finest
meanings of true love. You say
you feel that he is a flirt. Are you
not being a little unfair? Are
you being a little flirty yourself
with these other boys flattering
you and saying nice things to
you? No, my dear child, trust
in true love and be faithful
always to the ‘only one in the
world’ and you will have a
happy and full life with trust
and companionship as a basis for
building a future with the man
you love,

Get Rich BY THE WAY
Without Any Risk

Ny RR. Mi. MacColl

Mike Hammer book you write
in future.”

As a magazine puts it: “The
astonishing thing about Mike
Hammer’s success is that no one
likes him except the public. No
major book reviewer anywhere
has ever said a kind thing for a
Spil.ane novel,”

MADAM Minister Perle Mesta
has written her autobiography, By
general agreement it will not be
published until after the presi-
dental election in November.

BY BEACHCOMBER

HRISTIE’S auction-room was

so crowded the other day
that some bids were made through
the open door. A dangerous
precedent,

Not long ago a_ ventriloquist
mingled with the gay throng just
outside an auction-room, and a
timid man, who had never opened
his mouth, was informed that he
was the lucky possessor of an
enormous chandelier, 12 soiled
volumes of Gaffney’s “History of
Polynesia,” three pipe-racks, a
stuffed gudgeon, 18 yards of
barbed wire, a dovecote, and a
violin.

EXPLOSION FOR FISH-TANK

over her obeisance to the Queen
at the two presentation parties
this week, part of the credit for
the performance goes to a little
woman with golden hair, petal-
pink complexion and bright blue
eyes. The name is Marguerite
Vacani,

This pocket dynamo put many
of the debutantes through their
paces beforehand.

Her Pupils

Although her manner is un-
reserved (“Darling!” she greets
the stranger. “Sweetheart!”), she
has many secrets, and one of
them is her age. She was, she
Says, presented at Court as a girl
When? “Ah, my darling. I couldn't
tell you that.”

But she has taught two genera-
tions of debutantes how to behave
at Court, anda third is just
coming along. Age does not
wither her. “She looks the same
now,” said the fifty-year-old
mother of one of her ex-pupils,
“ag she did when I was a debu-

myself.”
ae taught that celebrated
debutante of the ‘thirties, Miss
Margaret Whigham (now the
Duchess of Argyll), how to make
her Court curtsy. She taught that
other much-publicised girl Jeanne
Stourton (now Mrs. Sherman
Stonor, whose husband is heir to
Baron Camoys). And most other
notable debutantes before and
since,
One Lesson

How many of this year’s thous-
and or so debutantes has she
taught to curtsy for the current
presentations? Hundreds, my
sweetheart,” she said with a large
sweep of her hand, and skipped
away as busy as a bird to attend
to two slightly bewifiered clients

{ had no qualms when it came to
the day.”
First—A Bob

Miss Vacani then takes the part
of the Queen, stopping to speak
to the girls. They must make a
litle bob, and say, “Your Majesty”
in their first answer, and “Ma’am”
after that. Elementary? Maybe,
but it seems that same of them
have to be told.

The other day Miss Vacani was
bidden to a reception at New
Zealand House. There she gave
a mass curtsy and deportment
lesson to 20 overseas debutantes.
Her comment: “They were quick
—they learned the curtsy jin five
minutes. And they were grace-
ful.”

Miss Vacani is not so old-
fashioned as to make her pupils
walk around balancing books on
their heads, although she admits
that maybe that was the way she
acquired an erect carriage her-
self. But she is a great believer
in old-fashioned deportment, She
speaks of poise with missionary
fervoyr, hinting that even this
reporter might, if converted, avoid
a double chin.

“Good carriage,” she urges,
“gives health and energy. Grace-
ful poise—that’s the first thing a

utante should aim for.”

owadays of course, the debu-
tante goes to the Palace in a short
afternoon dress and a hat, not in
the full pre-war panoply of long
evening gown, train, and a bunch
of ostrich feathers on her head.

Does this make it easier to
curtsy gracefully? “Not at all,”
says Miss Vacani. Said one of
her pupils, “It must have been
easier in the old days, feathers,
train and all. There was a certain
amount of protection. Now our
legs can be seen.”

Two Hono-lulus

young girls of this vintage: slacks,
They are “unfeminine.” They
should have no place in the de-
butante’s plan for gracious living.
Miss Vacani abominates them.
“Except perhaps,” she conceded,
“for yachting, darling.”
—L.E.S.



ye

: FORECA awaiting her in the next room.
business is seized by any foreign Too much about good friend ECAST in 80 Son ae Ree instructed = ae eroved to be the
Government. ‘ “Harry” in it. HEN Mrs. Reculver, 61 (b) thousands. -— pret a ore at the Courts. '
| Second—Washington will see to IT TURNS OUT that the four Sebastopol Villas, © West The curtsy is taught in one oges to a the other debu- 40m



e

; a ; ; : : Tonight the Government an- tralisation in America’s traffic- : The drawing shows how to give character to
capital is not tied up in merchandise that is nounces that it is “a fraction” choked cities. Pe ere arene ens S ture to trip you up os waned No oully turnt
j ' ; below the January high-water IN GARWOOD, wew_ Jersey, man who was knoc own ’ eo
in tronsit for a long time. Inventory and ware- pap s San baffled cops have peer hopeless- by a train, picked himself up, all table is a tong, aartow shelt plugged to

housing costs are reduced, packaging can be
lighter and therefore less costly.

rates are reasonable.



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You make money at less
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Saves lime! Cut costs!



it that the business men draw
their profits in dollars only, even
though the foreign Governments
concerned thave regulations—as
in the ease of Britain—saying
that dollars cannot be taken out
of the country.
* oh *

THE rates for this protection
are reasonable. A business man
can get a policy good for ten
years for an annual premium of
one and a quarter per cent, cov-
ering the “convertibility” mat-
ter, and one per cent, for insur-
ance against expropriation or
seizure

The insurance 1s good in 56
nations, outside the Soviet orbit,
and covers any legitimate enter-
prise, from camphor plants and
oil refineries to fibre factories.

Who jis running the scheme?
Our old friend, presidential can-
didate Averell Harriman.

THE ceiling prices on whisky

and wine are removed by Wash- America, discloses that it has ita dreary one

ington, It will not make any dif- jought a 286-acre estate in West- TED: This meat tastes of Worst problem is the marrow hall Keep
ference—the prices are so high, chester County, and will eventu- kerosene, it as empty as pussible Rely on clever use
anyway, right now that no deal-

er would be sufficiently foolhardy
to try raising them any further.

TALKING of prices, the cost
of living in America is almost
the highest ever. Tops was reach-
ed last January—a whopping 189
per cent. of the average for
1935-39,

Sandwiches and cocktails for
two in an ordinary Washington
cafe yesterday set me back £2 11s

ONE of the most successful au-
thors in America today is a 34-
year-old writer called Mickey
Spillane.

Crew-cut-haired Mickey has
sold 13,000,000 copies of his six
books, all about a private detec-
tive named Michael Hammer,

and packed with every conceiyv-
able sort of violence.

; . Spillane has such a following
that Marines in Korea send him
wads of dollars and write: “Just
put me down on the list for every

youths who took over a New
York hotel for three hours early
the other morning, and amiably
provided room service while they
held up the guests and staff,
made a practice of this sort of
thing—and did it all on whisky.

When the police arrested them
they confessed to a string of 15
such exploits, but said that their
recollection of the details was
hazy, as they were always intoxi-
cated.

PETER USTINOV had ar orgy
of grimacing as Nero in “Quo
Vadis”. Now we're likely to be
in for more of the same treat-
ment—Charles Laughton is King
Herod in “Salome—The Dance of
the Seven Veils,’ which Columbia
starts to make in Hollywood to-
morrow,

IN NEW YORK an announce-
ment of considerable significance:
The Union Carbide and Carbon
Corporation, the 13th largest in-
dustrial concern in the whole of

ally move the whole of its New
York staff of 3,000 to work there
in “garden-type office buildings”
costing £6,000,000.

The Saw Mill River runs
through the estate, and working
conditions should be very nice.

This ig one more long step in
the growing tendency of decen-

ly outdistanced when they tried
to catch super sports cars driven
by wild youths. Now quiet con-
fidence reigns once more among
the constabulary. They have a
super car of their own—it can
do 110 miles an hour.

BIG TV news—four of Holly-
wood’s greatest companies, Col-
umbia. Universai—International,
Republic: and R.K.O., enter into
agreement with the Screen Ac-
tors Guild recognising the prin-
ciple of extra payment to per-
formers for repeat showings on
TV of films made for that me-
dium,



Harness, found that her head was
wedged between two barrels of
@arrots, she (turn to page 2,
col. 4).

HE appointment of a Tibetan

nobleman to captain the
Lhasa Wanderers is dismissed by
Pravada as an attempt of Fascist-
Capitalist elements to keep cricket
feudal, anti-progressive, and non-
proletarian. A special article by
Stakhanovite-cricketer Midov
says that the bats on their way
to Lhasa are sabotaged bats left
on the hands of United Nations by
American agents, and that the
handles come off at the lightest
touch, Balls dropped by parachute
in the Himalayas were found to
be half sawn through in the
middle,

(TOMORROW: What is Wrong
With Chinese Cricket? by Ah
Long Hop.)

DORIS: That’s the Snibbo, dear,

TED: I thought Snibbo was a
stove-polish,

DORIS: So it is.

(A week later.)

TED: If the stove likes Snibbo

as much as I do———!
(Both laugh heartily.)

“and walked along the line into
the tation, followed by the train,”
I came across an advertisement
for a book called The Beauty of
Old Trains. It was “by the author
of Four Main lines, Some Classic
Locomotives, and Trains I have
Loved.”

The train which followed that
man was just the sort of train
I could love, It probably answers
to his whistle by now, As for
beauty, give me the 7.54 from
Bunsley to Crockmarsh, when the
westering ‘sun glids its door
handles,

lesson. It takes 15 minutes and
costs a guinea, and in it even
the most awkward of girls get the
full instruction,

In the tiny Mayfair drawing-
room, two chairs are arranged to
represent the thrones in the great
ballroom of the Palace, Drawn
up to her full 5ft., Miss Vacani
takes the part of the Lord Cham-
berlain, the bearded Earl of Clar-
endon, and reads the debutante’s
name from a card.

ener

NHE nall gives your g

impression of your home

Of colour and wall treatment to give it galety

Do not use violent large sca

walls or fabrics in a cramped space.

Use small-scale pictures (fic

tume prints engravings miniatures eic) 4

t t whi
Invileé close tMspection Use large mirrors tor
added sense of space Remember vertical stripes
m walls give added hetght. horizontal stripes

Stripes across a narrow flo:
or ceiling make them appear wider ig

empnasise length

tne wall with angle-brackets. Large, secondh:
mirror trom @ junk shop reflects i ne

an illusion ot added space

Arrangement of flower prints
With decorative mounts and
frames adds life to the wall
treatment Broad shelf ubove
the front door displays coloured
glass which gleams und sparkles
against the fanlight.

Make them plain

ALL-fO WALL floor

matting has stripes

running across, mak-
ing the narrow hall seem wider.
Plain pustel walls increase the
sense of light and space. The
ceiling mus ua delicately pat-
tern Wallpaper



tantes? Astutely diplomatic Miss
Vacani pausés at that. “My
sweetheayt, it is jimggssible to
say.”

But back in the ’thirties there
was that lovely girl Cecilia Keppel
(Lady Cecilia McKenna now).
Hers was a curtsy to remember.
And Grania Guinness, now Lady
Normanby, who had her first baby
last month—she was a graceful
girl, too. Oh, and Lady Dufferin
was another. Her daughter, Lady
Perdita Blackwood, learned her

uests the first
Don’t make

le patterns on

ower prints cos-

ght and gives

Exposed rows of cou's and
nats are not attractive Ldeal,
but costly, solution ts a tall,
narrow cupboura fitment with
sliding doors. o: a cupboard
eee ee oe may be fitted
vith electric light an
coats and hats, Mare

Make it useful

SHELF plugged to
the wall 4ft Yins.
from the floor could

be low enough to display towers,
glass, and china, and high
enough to allow couts below

LEANING against surfboards at
Waikiki Beach in Honolulu are
two Hawaiian candidates for top
honors in different beauty con-
tests, At left is Beverly Rivera,
who will be “Miss Hawaii” in the
“Miss America” competition at
Atlantic City, N.J. At right is Elsa
Kananionapua Edsman, who goes
to the “Miss Universe” pageant in
Long Beach, Calif,, as “Miss Ha~
waiian Islands.” (International)



Make your hall say ‘Welcome’... ONAN

ILLUSION-BY
A MIRROR...

by ROGER SMITHELLS



Use a guy fabric to conceai
the-couts and mask the curtain
runners wilh a scalloped hard-
board pelmet painted to match

Fit a section of the hanging

space at one end with w: s
to take all the hats. spitenerd

London Express Service





We'll soon have.

| that better

—"" Goymolone

ASEPTIC GINTMENT

RECGD.

SHON] /!

—~
>























Supplies of Old Cottage Lavender —
perfume, soap and talcum — are
| available at your beauty-counter now !
Nowhere will you find truer, more
exciting Lavender than that
which comes to you direct from
England in the famous

Grossmith green bottle.

Germoiene Ointment soothes
and penetrates. It protects skin
injuries, rashes, scalds, and
insect bites from the
entry of harmful bacteria,
and stimulates healing. —
Keep a tin handy for |

OINTM
ILLS PAIN
















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SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1952





ee Pp a)

Mate eo eee eee

oe ete ee ee eee ee

MY _PIN-UP MPs

working
ended.







dow:








nt i

The Winterhalier skirt. (See fippets. too.)
i tte

... and here is the news of cous fashions

4 NATIONS PUT THEIR
DRESSES ON oH

Tneura’

tate a ee a s'est nn es”

:
7;



A Big Four fashion show at worsted s. bale

- the Savoy to-day was all ‘ena om ‘ }
in wool, wu.pure ace

French. Italian. American and One ai che mos
English dressmakers combined to <3 9arace :
show ultra-fine lightweight woo! pwn @
multi-coloured striped Woo. je! I re, eae E
seys, chiffon broadcioth and *3¢ Quecns dressmaker con
woo! muslin and lace Dakclen Wits

The parade is being staged again ono” a
to-night before the Duchess ef Pb ia ‘ ty



Gloucester for 300 intern nal
wool textile conference delegates
and their wives.
From ITALY came an
outfit with narrow trousers 1p t
red hand-woven woo!. worn with Jeweia eve

i bricd

after-sk1









a black jersey oud } Sleeveless wit al rine i
coat. pill Box red hat and cum- = = mate!
merbund ‘Im red embroidered Gili and oe flower elusie
woo! whict a
Finest white jersey was used for clothe eo up t
a-sarl evening gown edged with ing Ldditior ) on
gold beads and diamante pendants
Black ana white fine worsted made Sestood cips of opaa r
Spainet evens own worked the shape o t a
with white raffia flowers
tachi sent an even) Ing coat in TIPPETS, foo |
en Sono tee neces: ep T the Fas hion Fortnight made
a jown oh bry en. é house shows 1 noted
Ha was Bvening dresses in sheer materia
a gold woo! with’ Winterhalter skirts ‘ser
) rade ae uxt oF is ‘ ys
Se ae ey ar a re With
aes By ag a t saske velvel jackets

ang Victoriao
sie 0d iippets
aston dresses in nobbly jweeda

Wach pave a homespun em
Siraiau! skirts with smail * ”

pieats at the back

& AUTOGRAPHS

iilae fleece bolero tri
silver.

AMERICA produced a flaming red
eeet Slory coat cut in a complete
circle.

LONDON showed a red superfine

BEAUTIES EXCHANG



AS THEY GET READY to participate in the Miss Universe beauty pageant
finals at Long Beach, Calif., these contestants autograph each other's
programs. They are (1. to r.): Carolyn Carlew, Japan; Hinako Kojima,

*

@

By BOURJOIS

ROUGE « PERFUME
* BRILLIANTINE

FACE POWDER
SOLD CREAM * VANISHING CREAM



eccies




~ ECCLES,

A. MORE

p Se ré



angry kn

Dr



Japan; and Leah McCartney, Australia. (International Soundphoto)
eee en eee eee



LIPSTICK |
+ HAIR CREAM |

by Eileen Aseroft
seeking an answer to

AOA AS

the question: How elegant

SAAR AA Oe

is a Tory Government ?

SDA te



LYTTELTON

MORE cheerful tie display glad-
dened the Government front
bench on Parliament's first

day since court mourning

ecnt-Crpmaed Government since the
au
> fashion-plaie

Brummell Tories thse men
honours. Only two
the general standard of elegance.
gice of the talloring trade is

48-year-old Minister of

«Ss. His fashion advice, vos Lo

e Row ise le simply 3 "i to the

tailor,” He favours bold ie ingle:
feasted waistcoats with revers.

My bouquet goes to Oliver LYTTELTON,
Secretary of State for the Colonies. He
has a good sense of style I ee his
Edwardian-style waistcoats with

there is always Mr. ED! F that
ed politician for so many years’ Per-
we have become too used Ww his
rial perfect on

THE BACKSLIDERS

arabe led member of the Goyern-

R. H. TURTON, Parliamen-
y to the Ministry of National

whose ties are screwed into
ots and whose suits suggest a
vermanent all-night sitting.

Charies HILL 1s another MP
who sometimes appears in need
ot sponging and pressing



“ natiy Gresser is Peter PHORNEY-







CROFT. President of the Board
of Trade Shirt very white. tie
pery mmartiate buir very
ucked and = shini But
ings to nis old-fashioned gold
watch chain
{'y per cent of front bench
stomachs a draped with Vic-
orian gold gins One _mem-
ber Housing Minister Harold
MACMILLAN. stil) favours the
craditiona! near! tiepin

3OWLERS, HOMBURGS

‘ONVENTIONAL dresser is
Detence Minister, Viscount
ALEXANDER. Of them gil. he
ocrobably wears nis clothes” best
unconventional 1s Duncan
SANDYS, Minister of Supply.
ho 11s bappiuly biting his nails

A navy-blue Pin-Stripe suit and
jue tie in preference to the
iniform of lack and white
rived trousers and black coat.
n the smart tront-bencher
tor home he wears a bow-

or black hamburg. Bowler
tevotee is War Minister Antony
{EAD He can rarely be parted

rom his. even when making an

inspection underneath army
orries

IOTNOTE: Black marks to
Mr Peter Thorneycroft and Mr.
Harry Crookshbank tor empty
breast pockets in a row of

dazzling white handkerchiefs.

Patrick’ s

Mr. Robert Jasingh of Trinidad
and Miss Gloria Selby, who sang
in duet, “Wanting You”, high-
| lighted the Concert at St. Patrick’s
School, Jemmotts Lane, on Wed-
nesday night. The Concert was
held in aid of the Organ Repair
Fund,

It was very well attended and
everyone appeared to have enjoy-
ed the well arranged programme.

All the artistes did creditably
well <

On the programme Miss Gloria
Selby sang “At Dawning”; Mrs.

| Olga Cole, ‘‘Sunshine of the Smile’,
|Mrs. Monica Rudder, “Just A
pevcaring of You"; Robert Jasingh,
|\“My Heart and 1” and “I Love
|The”, Cedric Phillips, “Don’t Cry
Little Girl’; Mrs. Cynthia Selby
also sang.

Sketches were by Judy Graham
and Ivy Marshall, while Miss
Phillips recited. A Saw Solo was
given by Ben Gibson,

Many members of St. Patrick’s
Church and their friends are look-
ing forward to such concerts being
held regularly.










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Over 126 years behind therr

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

TOLLE GE GIRLS

; 740 of them in a -Women Only” preserve . - -



are asking if they should open the deor to—

COLLEGE MEN

LONDON UNIVERSITY'S Bed-
ford College is a college for
wemen only. It has been a college
for women ever since it was
founded in 1849 by a widow
named Mrs, Elizabeth Jessie Reid.

But now the girls of Bedford
are asking: would it not be bet-
ter fer us to admit men students
as well?

There are 740 undergraduates
altogether. I estimate that about
half of them @re in fayour of
admitting men.

What are they like, these 740
‘studious young women? I put the
question to their Principal—dark,
| shrewd-eyed Miss Norah Penston,
a doctor of philosophy of Oxford.
reply: “I think all our stu-
| dents these days are very serious
about their careers, though I sup-
pose most of them hope for mar-
riage in the end,”

Looking Ahead

The careers they are serious
about vary. I talked te six wo-
men students—the word “girl” is
frowned upon—round a table, One
Anne Dixon, from Seaford, Sussex,
was reading Sociology, hoped to do
social work in mixed boys’ and
girls’ clubs eventually. Another,
Brenda Hancock, from Haywards
Heath, reading French, wanted to
work among refugees in India,
Palestine or Africa,

A South African girl, Christine
Watson, from Johannesburg, hopes
to be a journalist; a third
student, Nancy Drew, rom
Wantage, Berks, wanted ‘wo be a
geologist with the Colonial De-
velopment Corporation; a girl from
the Isle of Man, Anne Quilliam,
hoped to teach at the Institute

By ROBERT KINGSLEY

of Education. The President of the
Students’ Union Norvella Forster,
of Salisbury reading honours
chemistry, would like best to do
pure academic research when she
is qualified,

“Fewer girls study for pleasure

new than did before the war,”
says the Principal. The great
majority of them receive some

kind of grant while studying.

Of the 740, twice as many are
reading for an Arts degree as are
studying seienee. There are 19 de-
partments of learning in the Col-
lege, and subjects ranging from
Middle Dutch to Foreign Strati-
graphy appear in the syllabus.
There are 95 on the teaching staff,
and roughly ‘half of those are

men,
Of the Ants students, 35 pen
teachers; the

cent hope to become ig
figure was my er prewi
Next most r secretarial
work, thoi is involves a fur-
a six months’ train.
ng after taking a degree,

The girls who are scientists
nearly all aim at industry; there
are a great many more openings
for them there than before the
war. The magic word is research.
Nost of these girls would like to
make their career in industrial
scientific res

Home and Away

Girls going into industry as, say,
scientists, are likely to earn more
than, for instance, teachers, “But
the salary they can expect does
not very often determine their
choice," said the Resident Tutor,
Mrs. Wileman, an M.A, of Oxford.

What many of them do ask is!
that their first job should be away |
from their homes—and, preverse-|
ly, that their next job should be
within reach of those homes

A few of the girls become en-
gaged during their time at the
University, There no rule
against it, and the students I
talked to spoke of what they
called a “rash” of engageme!
rings during the past few weeks
Occasionally girls marry while
still studying.

About 200 of the girls at Bed-
ford are “in residence.” Opinion
varies as to whether or not this
helped them in their studies. Th
students, I talked to reckoned that
about a fifth of their number really
busied themselves with collgac
activities, about the same pro-
portion as in mean’s colleges, they
thought; the rest had to be goad
ed into participation in collegiate
affairs,

Blue stockings? They thought

is

- the figure would be in the nature

of eight or ten per cent, “It is
difficult te know, because if they're
really like that you wouldn't ever
see them; they'd always be work-

ing.” ;
My verdict: Most of the girls
at Bedford regard their univer-

sity course as young men regard
short-service commissions in the
Forces—something to give them
background, status, substance
character to fit them later for an-
other career. The career at the
back of their mind? Marriage

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
—L.E.S.



Honours To The Women

LET us talk of famous women,
Last Thursday night I dined at
Walter Elliot's house in Lord
North-street, where a privately
installed division bell enables him
to get back to Westminster in
time to register his vote.

It was a small dinner of five,
but not without an historic sig-
nificance, That afternoon our host
had received the C nat
Honour insignia from
Majesty, thus making him the

newest of that small, distin-
guished order.
But at the table was Miss

Violet Markham, who was the
first to be so honoured. '-
five years separated these good
Companions in the awarding of
the medal which bears these
words; —

In rae", faithful

And in honour clear,

We are all we siillalaig of our
ancestors, and I suspect
Violet Markham's strength
purpose came from her grand-
father, Joseph Paxton,

He was the gardener at Chats-
worth, the home ot the
Devonshire family, and ended wu
by building the Crystal Palace
for the 1851 Exhibition and being
duly knighted.

Miss Markham hag always
her maiden name, although,
fact, she is Mrs, James Car-
ruthers.

Her record of social activities
would read like an official list of
public boards, She has sat on
countless committees, has been a
councillor and a mayoress, has
founded settlements, and even
contested a parliamentary elec~
tion, but without success, thus
proving that virtue and good
works do not necessarily
a golden key to Westminister.

It was King George V who
created the Order of the Com-
panion of Honour in 1917, and
of those who were then selected
our Lady of Good Works was the
first to receive it.

How splendidly those words,
“In action faithful and in honour
clear,” ring out above the elamour
of a discordant world,

Hier Seeret

Earlier in the day at the Liter-
ary Luncheon there was another
famous woman, Mrs, Neville
Chamberlain.

She was only one Soret 2) a: ae Wee Oy ane OF the seeetly

. scientific



cil in

ACRSET, EP

AGENTS: ALEC RUSSELL & CO., BARBADOS

7 attained

Beverley Baxter

were ea of other
notables to steal applause
but it was her name that received
the ovation.
The wheels of the gods .
The truthfulness of time,
They cheered Neville Chamber -
lain when he came back from
Munich, oe ae later
they curs ving gone
there. But his reputation wil!
mative the slander mongers.
am hoping that, same of these
aie Mrs. lain will
allow me to tell 2 roy
aa happened on night t
h returned from
Munich, It is a hidden chapter o!
history that clamours for the

light.
Ma! Ha! Ha!

Now let us break the mood anci
talk of a famous man who, in «
that Single Se Gene ent
an

equalled by the Guardsman who
dropped his rifle on

Last Saturday w Sir Walter
Monckton, that suave, smiling,
imperturbable lawyer and Min-

and there

by. ister of Labour, went to Oxford

to receive a D.C.L, de; s
Whether he deserved it or not
he had certainly earned it, for
he hsa been standing counsel (no
fees) to the University for many
years. 3 é 2
At the presentation ceremony
Dr. Higham, as Public Orataor,
announced that he would deliver
the Address in Latin, “You can
laugh at the jokes,” he said,
Sir Walter did his best with
sugh Latin as he could summon,
which was dashed little, but made
ne
Eventually, however, he saw an
oppotrunity, The Public Orator
had ended a sentence with a
terrific flourish, and Monekton
let out a loud: Ha! Hal Hal”
There was an embarrassed
silence. It was awful. Everyone
stared, Sir Walter had laughed
at the mest solemn moment in
ine whole address! If you see a
aggard Skulking along
the shady of a quiet Lonaak
street you will Te who it is
ome empo
- eb for Warrant

omess W. Luffman, R.A.E.C.
attached to the Royal Horse
Guards, Windsor.

;

4



“Your comments,” he writes,
“on the music played at the
Trooping the Colour are typical
of the uninformed chatter that
one hears on such occasions.”

That's the stuff for the troops
to give the columnist

“IT shudder to think,” he goes
on, ‘what a slow march to ‘Land
of Hope and Glory’ would have
done to Her Majesty’s Foot
Guards.” s

I like his spirit but deny his
argument. Too many military |
marches are musically banal,

Perhaps that is why Hitler
chose “The March of the!
Meistersinger” for the tremen-
dous climax of the last Nurem-
berg rally, when a vast army of
young Nazi idiots and idealists |
marched past his throne, |

The greatest funeral marph |
ever written is the
in Wagner's “Gotterdammerung,” |
although it would lose something |
if played in strict time.

Dialogue
It happened on Wednesday and]
of course, in Mayfair. Mr. Noel)
Coward and a_ politician who}
shall be nameless met and ahools|

hands. |
COWARD (anwiously): Some-!
thing has happened to you, What)

is it?

POLITICAN; I have lost my,
moustache, |
COWARD (sympathetically)

You must rise above it.

The Unsung
Perhaps it does not matter|
much that exactly 33 years ago)
yesterday two Englishmen took
off in a plane to make the mad,
inspired gamble of flying the|
North Atlantic,

What were their names? Per-|
haps on a basis of 20 questions a
panel of citizens might find the)
answer,

In two or three years there will}
be a statue to them at London
Airport, where no one will see it, |

I have raised this matter |
hefore, both in this column and |
in Parliament, but only by per- |
Sistence can the official mind be
jolted into action,

.

|
|
|
|
|

|
*
|
Once more, My Lords and
Members of the House of Com-
mons will you please remove the
Duke of Cambridge and his horse |
from Whitehall and give us
Alcock and Brown?

|

—L.E.S.



Cashmere Bovquel’s gentle
lather has been proved out
sandingly mild for ell types
of skin!

me Cashmere Pipshons ede tire a

th

f
Te]





PAGE SEVEN

Black is out-and they're
trying novel fabries for=

SWIMSUITS

Suis Dain News for Women



A



S unexpectedly as it arrived—and for no apparent
reason—black is out tor beachwear. For three
years a plain black s'rapless swimsuit has been

the uniform of all smart women on al! smart beaches.

in the Bahamas and Miami,
South and on the Italian

American women
French women wore
Riviera

English
usual
eatch
thev
beach ?
blue (or
yellow) is
Eventually
bought black

But one

ashion

wore it
it in the

women, as
were slow to
on. * Black,”
said. “on the
Surely vale
green or
nicer?’
they, too

of thase
somersaults
which without warning
bring in long. skirts
when we are all wear-
ing short and small
rats When we have only
big ones, has brought in

white frilly material
swimsuits, when we all
have Plain tailored
bluck

The Paris shops are
already showing swim-
suits in white cotten
piqué.

* * *

Among people 1 met
n London last week
Glyn Johns has
brough buck {rom
Venice a white broderie
anglaise swimsuit with
a deep camiknicker

frill She wears it out
of the water with a gold
bels and gold sandals











And in dof ble
prin 1 cetion for the r* : “a
beach. she has chosen a ¥ al
siting skirt made in ’ _
three layers like a why
Hawaiian straw and aera ¢ é: Sa
jenim dungarees with
three - quarter length Flower rwtit LARGE flower motife
ees. Yesterdays most effectively dressed
° wedding quest in London was Mrs. Inga
Beauty perils Adlarson in piamarous afigrat gown G
. a gtiest at the all-Swedish wedding
ALKING with 4 o/ Miss Vera Nilsson and Mr Bengi
estos! AAD, a Siosteen at London's Swedish churclt
Cauty speciulists
heard an alarining account of 1ubbery we ought to do away
the dangero: aids-to-neauty with.”
women think up jonsense !
N uncommon are women Where else should q woman
who who cannot afford nursing-home
Cut off their eyelashes {| wo to have a child?
hoping they will grow thicker in wu private house there
and larger in fact they 1 he special equipmer
ike months to grow at all. the experlenced staff to dea
Dye their eyelashes with hb an rer .
hair que. One doctor says: ge
® angerous and foolish
ane Shrinking
Use shoe polish imstead ot fy? my KNOW wt =the
mascara, Uf women knew the ‘ tar r wea
frightful cisks to their sight ne wool and cotton
they would never do it garmenis lose 193 inches of
/ut a razor on their hair- material by shrinking ?
line to get a “widow's peak.” Oo nal & man’s shirt will
Afler a few months of this irink up to 11} inehes and a
the hair grows lke wire cnild’s gingham dress up to 4
One woman [ heurd of tried ton incnes ?
to whiten her si n with wash- An attempt is being made to
Ing bleach The result? A put Bill through Parliament
badly burned and permanent ¢ mpelling all manufacturers to
facial sear. pre-shrink fabrics before they ao 9
to the shops.
Having a baby Extra cost of pre-shrinking to
R. HENRY ROGER, Medical 'e shopper would be about dd
Offjcer of Healtn for Bullolk, ® Yard. ‘
last week made a feolish “Would women be prepared
attack on mothers who insist on = vay this ext money?” I
having their babies in hospitels #8 asked. | And reply, of
“to impress the neignbours.” ALIse, Was Yes 1
He said: “These moters itxe PPM Tey Bac tae sill
to read in the papers that the 9% Hons } dmatencs
baby was bormin such a huspitel § ut ad; evard
and that ‘ thanks are di all ee oe
(doctors and purses.’ Wh #3 Service



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4







PAGE EIGHT



BARBADOS eiht ADVOCATE

me wasn ue ew ee
Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad 8t., Bridsetewa

a ae ee ee i

Sunday, July 6, 1952

Reporting Debates

ON April 5, 1951 the Advoeate published
information which was made available by
the Editor of Canada’s Hansard for the
express purpose of helping the House of
Assembly to improve upon the obviously
unsatisfactory way in which reports or de-
bates are made locally.

There are 262 members of the Canadian
House of Commons and two official lan-
guages French and English are spoken, but
most of the speeches are in English. To re-
port the procedure of the House of Com-
mons English and French staffs are
employed.

The English staff comprises an Editor of
Debates who is chief of the Reporting
Branch, 1 Assistant Editor, seven Parlia-
mentary Reporters, 1 Senior Reporter of
Committees and 4 assistant parliamentary
reporters. Parliamentary reporters report
debates of the House of Commons and
Assistant Parliamentary reporters report
proceedings of standing and special com-
mittees.

There can be no comparison between the
Canadian House of Commons which is in
permanent session daily and the Barbados
House of Assembly which meets once
weekly and which enjoys frequent vaca-
tions. But the small size of the English de-
bates staff (the French is much smaller)
suggests that large numbers of reporters
are unnecessary for verbatim reports of
any Assembly.

What is required is proper organisation
and understanding of the procedure to be
adopted, That organisation and understand-
ing is very lacking in Barbados and during
Tuesday’s debate according to a report in
the Press, Mr. R. G. Mapp came nearest to
suggesting how matters can be set right.

The methods to be adopted were, as men-
tioned above, published in the Advocate of
April 5, 1951,

First, local methods of recruiting House
reporters leave much to be desired, In Can-
ada reporters are appointed after competi-
tive examination held under the auspices
of the Civil Service Commission.

Secondly, each reporter ought to be pro-
vided with an expert typist. House report-
ers in Canada dictate their material direct
to the typist and committee reporters use
dictating machines.

Thirdly, House reporters ought to take
turns of so many minutes each. In Canada
six reporters take turns of ten minutes each
and every ten minutes a bell rings as a
signal to the next reporter to take his turn.
If six reporters are adequate for the Cana-
dian House of Commons, surely three are
more than adequate for the Barbados
House of Assembly and Legislative Coun-
cil together.

The entire system of reporting debates in
the two legislative houses needs revision.
A civil servant of no less standing than the
present clerk to the Legislative Council
ought to be appointed editor and Chief of
the Reporting Branch of the joint Legisla-
ture. He would employ three reporters and
three typists and these three reporters
would take for 20 minutes and dictate to
typists for forty minutes throughout the
meeting of each House of the Legislature.
This would only be practicable if the House
of Assembly and the Legislative Council
met on different days. This could easily be
arranged. The important point to be estab-
lished is that there is no necessity what-
ever tor any shorthand notes to be taken
away from the Public Buildings by report-
Even two reporters working thirty
minute shifts can dictate a large proportion
of their notes to expert typists during the
thirty minutes in which they are not taking
notes.

The present system of note taking is
thoroughly inefficient. A reporter is. ex-
pected to take notes for hours and then to
transcribe them without any aid from a
typist. It is not surprising that the notes
are taken home.

What is surprising and even shocking
is the state of affairs described by Mr.
alma who is reported to have said on
Tuesday that reporters had “to transcribe
into the King’s English what was not prop-
erly explained or spoken in the House by
some honourable members,”

If this is true, Barbados’ system of re-
porting politicians speeches must be unique
in the British Commonwealth and is cer-
tainly contrary to the English or Canadian
Hansard traditions.

In the Canadian House of Commons
members are permitted to see their speeches
in typescript in the Debates Office before
they are sent to the printers. It is a rule of
the House that only minor corrections or
alterations may be made. All such changes
are checked by the Editor before being in-
corporated into the copy which goes to
the printer. By ten o’clock the following
morning the printed Hansard is delivered
to the House of Commons.

The weakness of the present system of
reporting debates in the House of Assembly
the Legislative Council therefore lies

organis.
rganisation. Seatac ta!

ers,

and

in th

Each reporter must be provided with an
expert typist and reporters must take notes
for periods not exceeding twenty minutes
except in an emergency when a maximum
of one hour is possible. ’

Three reporters are adequate for both
Houses of the Legislature, but arrange-
ments must be made to avoid simultaneous
meeting of the two Houses.

One Editor who would be Chief of the
Reporting Branch must be appointed to
supervise the work of the three reporters
and the three typists and to ensure that
members do not make other than minor
corrections to their speeches.

It will be the Editor’s responsibility to
see that reporters and typists complete
their copy before leaving and there will
then be no question of copy going from the
Public Buildings until it is ready for the
printer,

Such a procedure will mean that copy
can be given to the printer on the same or
at latest the following day after debates
in the House or Council.

The mechanics of #yping are also import-
ant. The typewritten copy for the printer
in Canada is prepared on a “set” which con-
sists of an original sheet, a stencil and a
blue sheet. The set is perforated near the
top and when the copy comes from the
reporter it is separated, the original going
to the editor, the stencil to the duplicating
machine and the blue sheet to the outside
office for use of members. The stencil sup-
plies thirty copies to the press gallery for
information of the Press but it cannot be
quoted as Hansard.

Fortunately for Barbados the Speaker of
the House of Assembly is shortly going to
spend a month in Canada where he will
have the opportunity to check the accuracy
of the above information with the Editor
of Canada’s Hansard who as far back as
March 1951 expressed his willingnes to
assist the Barbados House of Assembly and
whose account of Canadian Parliamentary
Reporting methods was published in the
Advocate of April 5, 1951.

Stable Currency

IT IS interesting to compare an account
of “markets of the British Caribbean” pub-
lished in the New Commonwealth of June
9, with a talk on “Strains on the sterling
area” published in United Empire (the
Journal of the Royal Empire Society) for
May-June.

Whereas, Mr. Starck, the United King-
dom Trade Commissioner for the Eastern
Caribbean considers that the rise in the
area from £15 million of imports in 1938
to £70 million in 1950 merits serious atten-
tion, Sir Frederick Leith-Ross takes quite
another view of the United Kingdom’s rela-
tion to colonies.

Sir Frederick quotes Professor Arthur
Lewis’ recent statement that “for the first
time since free trade was adopted in the
middle of the nineteenth century the Brit-
ish Colonial system has become a major
means of economic exploitation.” And the
reason for Professor Lewis’ statement,
which. Sir Frederick acknowledges to be
based on facts is due to the relatively new
system of exchange controls by which “The

nited Kingdom continues to claim the
products of the sterling area by payment of
£ s. and in £ s, that are not convertible
and which cannot always be used here for
obtaining the goods they need: these £ s.
remain banked in London and during the
past few years their purchasing power has
been steadily draining away.”

The West Indies; it is known, are not big
dollar earners for the sterling area but
their receipts from oil, tuurism, sugar and
some other products probably exceed their
allocation of hard currency. To some
extent therefore they can be included in
the criticism which is levelled by Professor
Arthur Lewis against the British Colonial
system. But Sir Frede~ick cites Malaya
which during the first nine months of 1951
earned $350 million but only spent $44
million. And he remarked that the pres-
ent arrangement in Malaya is unlikely to
be maintained if Malaya gets a system of
self-gevernment, :

Whereas, Mr. Starck is quite ha
drawing the steep rise in the ae of East.
ern Caribbean imports to the attention of
the British exporters while trying to ex-
plain away our adverse balance of trade
by mentioning our earnings from invisible
exports and the flow of capital into the
area.

Mr. Starck is far more optimistic than
Professor Beasley who inclines rather to
the view that in Barbados anyhow imports
have been paid for partly by savings and
investments which are probably diminish-
ing.

Sir Frederick and Professor Beasley are

much better guides for Barbados than Mr.
Starck,

“Not until we have a sterling £ which

is freely convertible into gold will there
be any safeguard for the standard of life
either of people here or of the other peoples
in the sterling area. Social security is mean-
ingless unless it is based on a secure and
stable currency. Without that stable cur-
rency any welfare state is built on sand.”
‘ These two sentences of Sir Frederick
ought to be framed and used as arguments
by all those who are seriously concerned
with the effect that the most recent ex-
change controls are having in the British
Caribbean. Instead of being asked to pull
in our belts and to fight inflation as the
United Kingdom, Australia and other self-
governing members of the Commonwealth
are doing we are being invited to spend
more on British goods, or in other words to
increase local inflation. Great Britain could
no more have intended this than she in-
tended to accumulate £908 million from
colonial sterling balances in the 342 years
ended in June 1951, But there seems very
little concern about it in London and much
upathy here.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

The Man
Who Keeps

All B’dos
Laughing



NATHANIEL GUBBINS



Jennifer, the hen that laid
ten eggs in 45 minutes at
Bodymore Heath Farm,
Warwickshire, on May 26,
died 25 hours afterwards.

HEREVER hens are gath-
ered, whenever hens may

speak
The tale of little Jennifer shall ,

pass from beak to beak
And hens who never gave their
best shall look the other way
To hear of one who gave her
all soon after Empire Day,
In darkened nest she sat alone
while hens look in to mock;
Much gayer hens with beady
eyes for any passing cock.
“Poor Jennifer,” they laughed
aloud, “Poor Jennifer,” they

said, ‘

“All work, no play, no boys,
no dates she might as well
be dead.”

No answer came from Jennifer,
no word escape her beak
Although a single, glistening
tear ran down her feathered
cheek,

When spring has passed she
knew that eggs must be in
short supply

To bridge the gap she gave
her all soon after Empire
Dye.

No flags shall be unfurled for
her, no muted drums shall
rou

No parson speak a word for
her, no village bell shall toll

For one who gave her little life
(she had no more to give)

Except her humble offering
that we on eggs might live.
Scholar At Home

When carelessly you eat your
egg, if scrambled, boiled or
fried

Allow a moment for a thought
for one who gladly died

With beating heart, but unafraid,

with calm and steady eye
Because she loved her country
more . . soon after Empire
Dye.
“I often regret my univer-
sity education because I sus-

pect it prevents me from en-
tering with zest into family
small talk and my wife’s
limited material interests.”
—Letter to a newspaper.

SN’T that just like Vi?
Vi, dear?

You know Vi
inside taken out?

No, dear.

Isn't it like her to go to the
dentist now they’re charging £1

. As I don’t know Vi, dear, I

wouldn’t know if it is like her

or not.

For weeks she’s been going
about with a face like a balloon,
She could have had it for no-
thing. Now she'll have to pay
for it.

who had her

Am I to understand one is
now fined for having a face
like a balloon?

Don't tell me that with all
your Oxford education you've
never heard of the National
Health. And she’s going to have
twins on top of it.

On top of what, dear?

On top of all her teeth taken
out. It’s not pleasant to have
twins without teeth.

I didn’t know it made any
difference.

After all that I expect they'll
be born funny, too,

Funny in what way, dear?
I wonder if they’ll be like her

or their father?

If a maternal resemblance
means that they will be born

comedians with faces like
balloons and no insides, I think
it would be better for all con-
cerned if they were like their
father.

Unable Seaman

‘OUR Uncle Nat has forgotten
the name of the peer who
said, in the House of Lords, “We
don’t want another Nat Gubbins
Home Guard”; also the name of
the general who said “The Home
Guard must not be laughed at.”
But he has not forgotten the
remarks. Therefore, the Home

Guard will be deprived not only
of the flattest-footed private
ever to wear ammunition boots,
but a lot of much-needed pub-
licity.

* * *

People who live in little worlds
of their own have no idea of the
value of even the less solemn
forms of publicity.

What the Army (if you ean
call it the Army) has lost, the
Navy (if you can eall it the
Navy) will gain now that their
Uncle has joined the Royal Naval
Minewatching Service.

From now on Unable Seaman
Gubbins will tell you from time
to time of his adventures in a
service which is regarded, by
those. who ought to know, as
more important than the Home
Guard. So there.

Already he has been fayour-
ably impressed by the hearty
welcome given to the first mine-
watchers of The Nore at Chat-
ham.

Even if it is the first time he
ever joined a corps with women
in it, it is also the first corps he
has ever joined which offered
him free beer,

* * *

Moreover, as one who has
heard hundreds of pep talks by
Army officers, he can give Ad-
miral Sir Cecil Harcourt, C.-in-
C. The Nore, ten marks out of
ten for saying all that was neces-~
sary in the fewest possible words.

Although experience tells him
that the fre@*beer issue won't
last, even if the women do, this
anything-but-jolly tar, with only
one wife near one port, felt
jollier in the coach coming home,

The only snag is the uniform,
Unable Seaman Gubbins might
look respectable enough in blue
battledress but he feels that a
blue beret, worn at his age,
might remind people of one of
those elderly French guides sell-
ing those awful postcards.

—LE.S.



SIR JOHNS BIG «IF-

“Softy softy catch monkee” is
a good old West Indian proverb
of which I am reminded every
time I come back to study the
Bill which seeks to establish a
system of local government
based on recommendations by
Sir John Maude,

If you turn to page 60 of Sir
John’s report you will find a
“summary of recommendations,”
but if you turn to page 35 and
read part IV of the report which
is entitled “recommendations”,
you will understand why I am
reminded of the old West Indian

proverb.
Because Sir John begins his
“recommendations” with that

terrible two letter word “if’’.

“If the view is accepted,” he
writes, “that. change is neces-
sary the first and fundamental
question to be asked and
answered is whether local gov-
ernment in Barbados should
continue or whether the process,
which has been going on for
the past century, of entrusting
to the central Government
functions normally discharged
by local authorities should be
carried to its logical conclusion.”

Nobody it seems has answered
that question. Nor did Sir John,
But he committed himself to a
statement which seems to have
been generally overlookeu.

“IT make no doubt”, he writes
in Part IV, “that if the present
system remains unaltered the
centralising process will con-
tinue as new needs arise for
which parochial administration
is clearly inadequate, and that

the Vestries and _ Parochial
Boards in no very long space of
time will become patently

superfluous and will disappear.
To set up a new local govern-
ment system in their place will
be not only more difficult teeh-
nically but—what is far more
important—will require a much
greater effort on the part of all
responsible members of the
community than to allow the
system to lapse whether by
quick or slow stages into Gov-
ernment hands.”

I do not think these words of
Sir John Maude have been
iven the attention they deserve.

cause they sum up far more
than “the summary of recom-
mendations” his real feelings
about local government in Bar-
bados,

“Your. Vestry system’ he
might have said quite bluntly,
“is not local government at all
as local government is under-
stood in England. Already the
function of local government,
eg. in Bridgetown education,
police, housing, parts of public
health, highways, water supply,
bridges, markets and fire ser-
vices are under central govern-
ment control. Why all this fuss
then about local government?
Leave them alone and like BO-
PEEP’S sheep the Vestries will
all come home trailing their
tails of poor relief, roads and
church maintenance with them,

But if you people of Barbados
are not prepared to see the cen-
tral government run everything,
if the responsible members of the
community are prepared — to
make a much greater effort
then you can have a system of
local government.”

Somewhere here Sir John
Maude breaks his train of
thought and when he gets

around to the all important sub-
ject of qualification for voting
and for membership of new
councils there is no further
reference to responsible mem-
bers of the community. He is
recommending opening the vot-
ing to local government councils
and membership of local gov-
ernment councils to anyone of
British nationality aged 21.
Whether a_ single responsible
member of the community will
ba@ returned to councils under
these conditions clearly does not
interest Sir John.

He geineralises about its being
paradoxical “to regard the
people of Barbados as fit to take
responsibility for their island
affairs but not for parochial
affairs.” And this in spite of
his own statement earlier in
para. 67 of Part IV that “to set
up a new local government sys-
tem in their place will be. not
only more difficult but—what is
far more important—will re-
quire a much greater effort on
the part of all responsible
members of the community.”
How is that effort to be made
if the responsible members are
outnumbered by the irrespon-
sible? Truly Sir John seems to
have led us right yin the garden
and beyond into the stinging
nettle bushes with these soft
words.



By
George Hunte



. But getting back to the other
statement a his which sounds
like a prophecy rising from the
Scotch mists, “I make no doubt
that, if the present system re-
mains unaltered the centralis-
ing process will continue as new
needs arise for which parochial
administration is clearly inade-
quate and that the Vestries and
Parochial Boards in no very
long space of time will become
patently superfluous and _ will
disappear,”

If (to use the two letter word

r which. Sir John shows
ondness in Part IV) the Vestries
are going to go in no very long
space of time, why then give
them a parting kick?

“Because,” says Sir John, “to
entrust the whole administration
of local government to the cen-
tral government would be to
impose on it an intolerable
burden.”

Yet by the time he has reach-
ed para. 113 Sir John is reach-
ing up for a new note: “others
(will say)”, he writes, “that the
powers of the new Councils are
so hedged abput with govern-
ment controls that the system
is one of local government in
name rather than substance.”
And Sir John is forced to /imit
that the proposed control by the
central government undoubted-
ly goes beyond that to be found
in countries like Great Britain
with long experience of local
administration,

This little admission and the
sentence about the people being

fit to take responsibility for
parochial affairs do not seem to
be on all fours. He shows that
he does not really believe the
people will be responsible for
parochial affairs by using the
words, “if a spirit of collabora-
tion towards a common end
exists between the central and
local administrators,”

Sir John Maude’s report was
dated. 18th February 1949 and
he visited Barbados in 1948.
Since then elections under uni-
versal adult suffrage have fur-
ther reduced the effective power
of the British Governor and
thrown the entire responsibility
for government measures on to
the Leader of thr Barbados
House of Assemply. When
therefore Sir John writes about
“genuine differences of opinion
between the government and
the councils” he is thinking in
terms of the Governor-in-Exe-
cutive Committee,

To-day the Governor-in-Exe-
cutive Committee is virtually
dependent on the support of the
Serer of the House of Assem-
bly.

Government controls over the
Councils as proposed in the Bill
based on Sir John Maude’s re-
commendations mean that Gov-
ernment controls can only be
exercised through the Govern-
or-in-Executive Committee, that
is with the sanction of the po-
litical party which happens to
be in power. To abolish vestries
which according to Sir John
Maude are doomed to disappear
soon merely to create district
councils subservient to the po-
litical party in power seems
fatuous.

The vestries and parochial
Boards according to Sir John
Maude are only responsible for
repair and maintenance of
churches and salaries of officers:
poor relief: public health: par-
ish roads: provision and main-
tenance of burial grounds and
cemeteries: grants to charitable
institutions and powers peculiar
to Bridgetown, Speightstown
and Holetown.

How will the new councils be
able to carry out these duties
any better merely because
everybody is entitled to vote at
council elections or to become a
councillor? The bill nowhere
speaks of any new duties which
will be carried on by the new
councils,

Nor for that matter does Sir
John, His views on local gov-
ernment are so hedged around
with conditions that only on one
occasion does he let slip what
he really thinks. In para 73 of
Part IV he states “one obvious
course would be to treat the
whole island as a single local
government unit and to concen-
trate all local government ser-
vices in one Council, centred on
Bridgetown.” Better, in my
opinion, since Sir John never
seemed once to make up his
mind, leave the vestries alone,
when according to his prophecy
they wilt disappear and we'll
have the single local govern-
ment unit (the two legislative
Houses) which he undoubtedly
favoured, despite the “summary
of recommendations” on which
the local government has based

present controversial Bill.

SUNDAY, 1952

JULY 6,














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You'll fing them all over Great
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generations of family ties among
employers and employees.

Time was when the word ‘crea-
tion’ was applicable to the uni-
verse but it is more readily un-
derstood now in its modern,
euphemistic sense, as aplicable to
trend in a style conscious world,
the sartorial markets of which
call it Fashion,

~~

FROM the Handioom there has been
prises the Powerloom.

The Peoplic Of Barbad



AM FORKES ST

EWART









SUNDAY ADVOCATE



The combined utilitarian and In the bulk purehase of wool
fashionable nature of a woven the broker and manufacturer wil
wool fabric and its need to satisfy dicker over cents and fractions of
conditions and temperatures from cents, for these added ip play <
arctic to tropical, necessitates the important part in the price ¢ t th
making of a multitude of cloths, fimshed cloth. After its arrva
themseives broken down in myriad at.the Mill, the wool may still t
designs, colours, weights and in a jn its natural state, that is to say
variety of finishes. To satisfy the with a heavy impregna ol
enormous demand, an even more skin oil and greasy to handle I
enormous production of raw mate- will be thoroughly washed anc
rial is annually forthcoming from when dry, either dyed to the
the reat sheep pastures of the colours selected for the blend «
Commonwealth for conversion into converted | first into yarn. Thi

yarn and then cloth by the clat~
tering mechanism of the woollen
industry or woollen factories, or

simple little Mills far removed nowever, are woven from yarns |
from the bouncing and high pres- that are a mixture of colou! n
sure of industrial groups and the wool state and scrambled to-
combines. They all have this in gether before being spun int
common; they are converters of various Stages betw een wool ar

the golden fleece.

Bik: sora

developed the
The Beam roller with the

warp threads is shown

os—XII

for ‘solid’ cole

urs

rm.



soulless and highly efficient mechanism that com

in the back of the Loom.



Ky John Prideaux

“SLAVERY”

THE last few years
eighteenth century appears to
be the period in which public
opinion was about*to make up
its mind over the whole matter
of the Slave Trade. There were
many investigationsgebys Com-=
mittees of Parliament, and Com~
mittees for the Anti-Slavery
campaign. Bryan Edwards, a
planter and slave owner, wrote
‘History, Civi} ang Commercial,
of the British Colonies ins the
West Indies,’ which was_ first
published in 1791. Edwards took
an active part in improving the
slave trade and eventually lqd
a great dea] to do with its abo-
lition. But for all of this he
paints a glewing picture of the
conditions on board ship of the
slavers, which in the light of
other evidence is hard to be
lieve. Edwards records—

of the

“It is admitted on all hands
that the men slaves are
cured in irons when they first
come on board; but Sir George
Young, a Captain in the Royal
Navy who appears to be weil
acquainted with the trades in
all its branches, is of opinion
that this nof practiced
more than necessity requires.
The mode by fastening
every two men together, the
right ankle of one being lock-
ed by means of a small iron
fetter to the left of the other
and if marks of a turbu’ent
disposition appear, an addi-
tional fetter is put on their
wrists. On the passage, when
danger is no longer appre-
hended, the irons are coni-
monly taken off; and women
and young people are exemp*t-
ed from them from the be-
ginning. They are lodged be-

se-

is

is,

a

BALATA
SOUVENIRS



We invite you to j
inspect our local dis-
play of Balata Sou-
venirs — very artis-
tic “and colourful.

This ordinary rub-



ber is modelled into

the most attractive

designs of — local
characteristic. pat-
terns,

tween decks, on clean boards,
the men and wemen being
separated from each other by
bulkheads, and fresh air is
admitted by means of wind-
sails or ventilators: Covering

of any kind, ay. well from the

warmth of the climate as from
the constant practice of going
naked would be insupportable
to them, Every moming, if
the weather permits, they are
brought upon deck, and al-
lowed to continue there until
the evening. Their apart-
ments, in the meantime, are
washed, scrubbed, fumigated
and sprinkled with ‘vinegar.

The first attention paid
them in the merning is to
supply them with water to
wash their hands and faces,
after which they are provided
with their morning meal;
this, according to the country
from whence they come, con-
sists of either Indian corn, or
rice or yams, Before noon,
they are constantly and reg-
ulerly made to bathe in salt
water, and nothing can be
more agreeable and refresh-
ing. Their dinner is varier
consisting sometimes of food
to which they have been ac-

to






customed ‘in Africa, as yems
and Indian corn. etc., and .at
other times of provisions
brought from Europe es dried
beans and peas, wheat. shelled
barley and biscuit; all these
are boiled soft in steam and
mixed up with a sauce made
of meat, with fish, or pa'm

oil; this last is a constant and
desirable article in thei:
cookery. At each meal, they
are allowed as much as they



Donkey Carts
Sail Boats

Coconut Trees & Climbers...

Sugar Cane Boys on Donkeys

Washer Women ...
Mauby Women
Fisher Women
Steel Band Players

can eat, and have likewise a
sufficiency of fresh water, un-
less when, from an uncommon
long voyage, the preservat
of the ship compels the ¢
tain to put them to a short al-
lowance,. Drams also are given
them when the weather is
cold or wet and pipes and
tobacco whenever they desire
them, In the intervals between
their meals, they are encour-
aged to divert themse'ves with
music and dancing, for whicn
purpose such rude and un-
couth instruments »s are used
in Africa, are collected be-
fore their departure; and they

ion



ap-

are also permitted to amuse
themselves with games of
chance, for which they ai

likewise furnished with im-
plements of African inven-
tion.” Edwards continues—‘“In
sickness, the invalids are im-
mediately removed to the

Captain’s cabin, or to a hosni-
tal built in the forecastle, and
treated with all the c both
in regard te medicine nd
food, that circumstances w'!l
admit: and when, fortunately
for the Negroes, hip
touches at anv place her
vovage, as freauent’y har

every refreshment that tt
country affords roen4
limes

acatohles of N



re,

the
in

nutes. orances
fruits, with v
sorts, are distrihnt
them: and the refreshmer

are ¢ 1 ’



the same kind

lowed them at the niece °
their destination, betwe
days of arrival and sail.” Bry-
an Edwards appears to h
believed that the above di

cription was authentic,

n th

how-

'

@ $1.68
@ $1.92
@ $1.68
@ $1.44
96
-96
96
@ $3.00 a set



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LID.

(HOME PRODUCTS DEPT.)
10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET.



DOIDHOOS-

PDOODO-OD

latter process is applicable in most
instances
pearing in the cloth

ip
Many tweeds

THE sound of a Handloom is now seldom heard in

is an artist. He works with his hands and his head







I ndividual ad
i 1 poeticize bo
at 2 reach yar
} Ol it work vf only
few a power-l
And is sO, mt of
| th surroundi: the
j slow w hand-loomed article |
jis lost to u Most of tl maller
| Mill retain this ient—but
fundamentally, stil ay principle
of weaving cloth. Usually it ig
for pattern making although here
j}and there piece of upward of
fifty yards in length are produced
on a commercial } proudly

| Stamped ‘Handwoven

| (

o®

@ 59O9OS9SOSOSD

DOO

PL DOHO-LOSH*

DHHS: 8-9OOSGHO9S9G0.OH:H9-GG00 8

of it, much



he
h

ever,

must

wrong,
on the
m¢
and
t

yunte

in
ional f
cent
the
Islar
sold

In. the
Edwards’

dif

ids

was
book gives
lish ship ¢
320 tons.

st

publi



6 feet |
women 0
foo

foot irl

of



fic
ered by th
little

of tl

Two yei
of

bo



called the
land
James

Arn
evi ¢

“rt
on the
slave

to sé
his (t
that. he
Sometim

to compl



O64 OO



for

history
(1791) a book on the

he boy 5



sought after



> admits
ave

that
been

the loss

voyages

{ to fifteen

per
an
one-half

some Cases

Terent

before

West

they

could

ame year that
Vas
slave tr
London,
n of an E

‘Brookes,

hed in
the pl
illed

On

the
this
xe allowed
xy 1 foot

feet 10

ship
four inct
ine
feet |
3} inches by
ooks’ wa

»t only ¢

but t

ors were n

cir bodie
or

1em

no room

and t



elr boc

rs prior t the
both the

ks, ther h
nquiry

an

bo

into
English

lary ¢

on

Ruby of Bristol, I
e surgeon on board, o
old, g

ve the
the ¢
sneral

Fy or

1 your

ptair

» come
) cabin
lie with
would

desire

might
es ti

O® + ®SOOO4



1

and because
in north-

ern tourist markets

Althoug! at the start of
manufacture, the wool w thor
Oughly scoured, or vashe¢ t
must follow a similar clean
jafter being woven into cloth. Mn the
cloth and in being in direct contact
prior to entering the fini ,
with oily mechanism, the fabric
stages has a coarse d quite un-
pleasant handle. Neither does it
look particularly attractive with
knotted nd possibly broker
' threads on its surface. A combine

there
somethin
by deat!
freque
cent,
addi-

ly

er

while in the harbours of
Indian

ba

brvaa
publisnec

ade

This

ng

undred fet

» pl
were

betwe¢

men

spac
Ih

lie

d beer

pract

» actually touching one to the

publi-

emer

a
p

following

ce
in
n@

oO

her.
refuse
and





and his heart.





courit and ‘milling’
! ains and also brings
to e interlacings in a way
il felting Finally the
p and alkali is washed out, the
( eives an initial drying in
I extr which draw 1
the r, leaving the cloth dam}
Intense “heat circulating throurh
vs in the drying cham-
% he cloth stretched tight
or -hooks leaves it dry and
freque ly crackling with elec-
tricity
The cloth will regain a certain
amount of natural moisture be-
fore steam is again used in a
‘reverse’ direction—to blow into

ontent

1
vd

ound

e

material a congiderable damp
which it earries into the
iulic press for around twenty-
hours pressure of a thousand

(or considerably more)

- square inch of its surface

If all
ect
ould
nple
itively

ve

rs

has gone as planned, the
the inspection table
flawless—a superb ex-
a centuries old and, re-
unchanged art It may
been made at the whim of

on
be
of

would be severely beaten by
hun and sent below. There
was one young girl that he
retained for some time as his
favourite and kept her in his
cabin, until one day when she

was playing with his son, she
accidentally tore his shirt
When the Captain learned of

at, he whipped her unmerci-
fully with the eat, and beat her
up With his fists until she threw
herself from him against the
pumps and in dqing so injured
her head so severely that she
died three days after. She had

then been living with him as
mistress for five or six
nonths.” (1).

After the abolition of the Slave





Trade in 1807, conditions on
board the vile ships becarne
even worse, as slaves had to be
‘ ggied across the Atlantic

The Reverend Pasacoa Grenfell
Hill, a slain in the British
Navy wecorded an (Interesting

account of how the ship on which



he was serving captured a slave
smuggler called the Cleopatra
with a full cargo of Ne es, He
relates that after the capture of



this ship, a severe squall came

up
these

and that four hundred of
unfortunate people had to

be confined in a hole 86 feet long

and
feet of head room
ment
encountered and if they
been

would
being washed over the
chaplain
hatch had to be closed
them
hatch in the forepart of
sel
ened
endeavoured to reach thi
hatch so a
the result that the few
aged

blocked

7 feet wide, with only 3%
Their confine-
was due to the heavy sea
had not
below lives
been

kept
have

many
lost by their
de, The
the after
down on
and the

the ves

relates that

to keep them ‘n,



wooden
it,

had a

over

grating fa
All these slaves
small
to get some air, with
who man-
cling to \it completely
the passage of air into

to

the hole, The chaplain continues
may
the

ay

Moments

Shadow Stripe Mylon
in Pink, Blue & White —
“Detronelia™
This is a very serviceable
material, and flable
range of plain

Strt Sith Dique Sheer

Le
R



Pink, l





B



at $2.87 Yd.

mpas



ue,

Rose



at

~HARRISONS

BROAD STREET—DIAL 2664

29O99 9904 99OO9O4 POOCO4

Gime Sabries

jor those

i

I

“The cries, the
without ex

heat, |
iggeraton,

art silk

n lovely

€ Ecru

orquoise¢

id White
$2. 7f







process the



the land and this Weaver can never be replaced. He

desgnier, or at the express

order of a merchant, or be one of
a huge quantity taken by a whole-

sale clothier, or both fabric and
design may have been inspired
by the haute couture of London

Paris or New York—or it may be |

the

co

an
de

indirect outeome of a
ntact in a bus or. hotel foyer
d the photographic mind of
signer of woven wool fabrics

Whatever were the casual forces

casual |

|

to prompt its making, they are at|
least showing a part of their effect

in
the

come evident when, if it is for the
fashionable i
gre
the wearer—a stunning ensemble
perhaps,

from the conventional—but, in
any ease. fashionable headline
new

And far back into its compli-

cated history, the enquiring ming |

wi
ter

ning indeed
along tne line it was to perpetrate |
upon @ fashion
modern version of a golden fleece.

the smoothly beautiful material
» full impact of which will be-

women’s trade, i
aces the modelled perfection of

or a striking departure

li eventually find that this ma- |
ial had a very smiple begin-
although somewhere |

happy public, the |

smoke, of their torment which
ascended, can be compared to
nothing earthly. One of the
Sparnards gave warning that
the consequence would be
many deaths; this prediction
was fearfully verified, for the
next morning fifty-four crush

ea and mangled corpses wert

STO



brought to the gangway and
thrown overboard, Some were |
emaciated from disease, many |
bruised and

strangled, their hands. stil.
grasping each other's throats,”
(2) . |
Captain Richard Drake

one of the most famous or noto-

his

wat |
of slave smugglers, and in
autobiography there are}

our

some dismal accounts of the atro- |

et
tr
ac

zilian
staunch, handsome clipper craft
and deserved better maste
the first voyage out of Calabar,
we

fo

ade

rew
worst
the ship became half bediam and |

tics committed in this vile
Captain Drake gives an
count of a voyage on. the Bra-|
brig Gloria»—‘She was a

s. On



had not been out a week be-
I found that the Captain and
were desperadoes of the
kind. Onee off the coast

re



half brothel, Ruiz, our captain

ind his two mates set an example
of reckless wickedness. They
stripped themselves and danced |
with black wenches while our}
crazy mulatto cook played the;
fiddle. There was little attempt}
at discipline and rum and lewd- }
ness reigned supreme,” This was |
above the decks; below the slaves
were ‘packed like herrings on|
shelves around the vessel’s sides,’ |
being kept in by gratings over |
the hatches The groans and |
shnieks of the half-suffocated |
slaves below could be heard by

those enjoying themselves én
deck, Drake continues—On the

eighth day out I made my rounds |

|
of the half deck, holding a cam |
phor

bag in my teeth, for the

tench was hideous. The sick and

dying



were chained together,
On Page 10

l





bloody. Antoine |
tells me that some were founc |

|
(

SOLE AGENTS



Kou to mike a

Miferrnce lo

IF YOU HAD all the time in the
world, you could make elaborate
sauces to serve with fish. But it
is far simpler and more economi-
cal fish by
adding Lea & Perrins Sauce as you
cook.

to make delicious

You only need to use two
teaspoonfuls of Lea & Perrins in
fish-cakes, fish-pies and poached
fishforfour people. And, ofcourse,
put the bottle of Lea & Perrins
on the table whenever you serve

fried, baked or grilled fish.

ON

BRINGS
QUICK
RELIEF
FROM

PAGE NINE

i ss lasiieaatemeeeabelenmenenieeteiealingte



WHY DOES LEA & PERRINS
MAKE SUCH A DIFFERENCE ?

THE secret of the difference in
flavour is in the recipe, which
has been Lea & Perrins’ alone
for No
give the

over 100 years. other

Worcester Sauce can

Lea & Perrins flavour.

LEA & PERRINS
he eriginal and genuine
WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE



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This scientifically balanced formula gives you
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PAGE TEN



Dramas Behind The Law Is He This Year’s

Hy IAN GALE

CASES THAT CHANGED THE & Woman who accused him of
LAW By H. Montgomery Hyde robbing her of some jewellery by
(Heinemann 12/6). a confidence trick. The woman
Lawyer and layman alike will s#id that Beck had invited hey

enjoy reading this book which, as to go to the Riviera with him on

the title says, is about famous . ere trip ane bas ve her
cases which helped to change the 4St of the smart clothes she would
law of England. Tt is by no means need, On the list was included

a dull pedantic book, in fact the 4 ‘iding habit. When she asked

faint hearted are advised to read Why this was needed since she

it before sunset. had understood it was a yachting

The cages described range from ‘1p, Beck, she alleged, had replied

the years 1728 to 1931 and collec- 4irily that “when we landed He

ively they involve the setting in had always his own horses there.”
motion of the machinery of the He then gave her a cheque for
law with varying and usually £40 to pay for the clothes and
dramatic results. And like so muny *0OK one of her watehes to be
legal drams, each one abound; mended and a ring to be enlarged.
in human. interest, Needless to say, the cheque
The author, who is a barrister, 2©unced.
historian and Member of Parlia- Beck was tried, convicted and
ment, deal§>first with the extra- Sentenced to seven years penal
ordinary casg¢ of Burke and Hare. servitude, although he protested

For a yearfefore they were dis- ‘hat he had never geen the woman

covered these gentlemen lived by before in his life. But the evi-

selling for dissection the corpses “ence was all against him, Ten
of the unfortunates they had ther women were brought to see
killed. Indeed a new name fcr Beck and testified that he had
murder “burked” was coined as , SWindled them as well and the
result of their activities. handwriting expert gave it as his
At the trial Hare turned King . Opimion that Beck’s handwriting
evidence and Burke was sentence;! W8S the same as that of one “John
to hang. His-execution took place Smith’ who had been sentenced to
in 1829 before an estimated crowd VE years penal servitude some
of over’20,000 who shouted as thy Years before for “bilking” women.
rope was being adjusted around © Most unfortunate for Beck at
his neck, “Burke him! Burke this trial was the judge’s refusal
him!” to allow the defence to cross-

The case was important in thai ©xamine on the question whether

it caused the passing of the the prisoner was or was not the

Anatomy: Act in 1832, which au- same man as “John Smith,”

thorised rélitives who had the justifying his ruling on the ground

custody of a dead body to alloy that it might mislead the jury and
it to be sent to a medical schoo! it might afterwards be said that
so that it might be used for the the prisoner had been improper!,
study of anatomy and the pra:- convicted. Had the Court of
tice of surgieal operations, Criminal appeal been in existence

Perhaps the most pitiful case dv- at that time there is no doubt

seribed in the book is that of that this ruling would have been

Adolf Beck; This pooy man wos held to be bad in law and thej

accosted in the street one day !y trial squashed,





ge

America’s

WHO WILL SHE BE? By FREDERICK COOK

NEW YORK 0-acre farm high up on Indian
TO all Americans she is “Tic Mill overlooking the city of Cin-
First Lady.” Her official standing chee.
is nil. But the President’s wife arried 38 years and the
takes precedence over all other mother of four sons, Martha Taft
women in. all things American, 24mits only one dispute with her
and is always a person of conse. [Usband—about bulbs. “He likes
quence, them in rows,” she said, “And [|
If she ig a great person in he: ‘ike clumps. We have clumps.”
own right, like Eleanor Roosevelt, If her husband goes to the White
she may rival her husband in the House there will be changes in
public esteem—and get her shar Caf, Ear sens as well as in the
of the brickbats that go his wey, C@Pinet. The Trumans’ bulbs are
If she is the retiring, home. '" TOWS. |
loving type, like Bess Truma Divorce Question
her influenee is still strong. On the other side of the politi-



First Lad

Any wayfyou look at her, the cal fence everybody in America
First Ladyets first in importance, Knows N ancy Kefauver by now.
rs. But who knows Mrs, Ernest Ives’

\Who will@he he, by the ‘ime next Mrs, Ives is the only sister of

January cOfmes around? She coult 52-year-old = Illinois ~ Governor
be any one of half a dozen wo- Adlai Stevenson. If the Demo-
men—some. world-femous, like ¢ratic choice should fall on him—-
smiling Mamie Eisenhower; some ®Dd many in the Truman party
aearing fame’s pinnacle, like red» profess confidence that he would
haired Naney Ketauver with the ‘Win if it does—sudden fame will
twinklingeyes and the long come to Mrs. Ives. For Governor
pendant owtnes. Or she could be Stevenson is divoreed, and if he
someone almost unknown outside Were elected the duties of First
her family cirele Lady would fall on his sister.
There is, for Instanee, motherly Mrs, Ives is a friendly, brown-

Martha Taft, : oman of fame eved woman in the middle fifties

sid universally loved in her home ow living the quiet life of a to-

town, hol and noky Cinetnnati, bacco farmer’s wife in North

Ohio Fe / Carolina, Her husband is a re-
Mrs. Taft has been her hus- tired civil servant.

ban solace and support through- The Fox-Hunter

out | wult Hfe, But she h Stevenson would be the first

taken little part in his rough-and- divorced President.

turnble eanrpaigning against Gen- As a young fox-hunting Chica-

eral. Risénhower, fo

y f talit e was married in
1go she spffered a stroke gnc ior 19:





to attractive Ellen Borden, Some = Blt From Page 9
; ' H Pope-Hunt 42- ;
a while te near death. heiress to a milk and cheese for- van iier ails ee a oo saw pregnant women give birth
She Walks Again rhey Ww hree sons: yoker, has been for to babies whiled chained to!
Now, “with the ald of ‘ 1, Borden, 19 (beth at thypoe yours programe corpses which our drunken over-
braces on her legs, she ig able to Harvard), and John 15, stil! in director of Hongkong’s com- seers had not removed.” He re-
vali again—slowly, But she can prep school. The marriage ended mercial radio station lates that the young women
do no travelling and hes fieured after 21 years, She is in London tor six feared best at first, as they were
in none of her husband’s mect- Friends of Mrs, Stevenson said weeks to watch the BBC's

she disapproved of her husband
entering polities,

Brown-eyed, gentle. attractive Mrs, Stevenson herself says: “I
in a motherly way, martha Taft don’t see why there should Be any

ings. ”

was the most envied girl of her feeling against a divorced man in

time when she first met Bob Ta't. the White House. Divoree is a
In those days, he was a sort of soeially accepted factor in Ameri-

American Prince of Wales, the can life.” .

gallant college-boy son of the Agreeing that the White House
President, living in the aura of Atmosphere might not be best
White House publicity. a) for their three sons, she said: “I
Martha's father was Solicitoy- don't agree with the many who
general. Every newspaper in have apparently concluded this
America reported the develon- is the main Issue in my former
ment of the romance husband’s lack of enthusiasm for
On The Farm the nominaticn The boys would
She is 59 now. And her pun- be with me most of the time any-
gent wit and penetrating political way.”
commentary are famous at Cin- When Mrs. Stevenson was
einnati and on the national staye granted a decree, custody of the
in Washington. children was divided equally by
Like her husband, she has their patients. The boys live with
never dodged a fight. their mother. L.E.S.
She is living now on the Tafts’ (WoRLD COPYRIHGT RESERVED)

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

ee

Beck served five years of ie N ”?
sentence before being rek '
cross eo Sane seeet Num ber One Escort:
and had been trying to clear = :
name, the type of forgeries barter +t elease of Amevic
which he had been convieted be- By business a oe. Vageler fo
gan to occur again, Beck soon 2 HAR! ; st ican:
found himself in court again. A EPRRAIM CASTLE Ge awe _ es See
woman claimed that he had
swindled her out of some jewel- said y society hostess to me last Western Germany. He replied
jery and he was convicted a see- week. She was sreterr to 26- “That is not untrue.’ 7
ond time for offences of which he year-old Charles Arthu

: He revealed that the Coni-
was absolutely innocent. Hardy, Ww rated this seasen® junists would now - the estate
Y : Ne. | Escort for fantes. = = crown—but for a miscalculation
The judge, however was not en- A tall, faix, good- Aus-

tirely satisfied with the case and tralian, Hardy is no newcomer to
decided to postpone sentence until “deb” i He has “done «4
the next sessions. In the mean- season” in Paris, New ¥ "

time the real “John Smith” was ence, Rome, Stockholm, :
arrested and Beck received a free F ; tl

Pardon and £4,000 compensetion. Taciticn are the best- ie ‘ n
He did not live long enough : world. ¥
afterwards, however, to eee the cyesed ia the he sags

ia

\ ‘Italians are the most beautiful OF TREASURES.
great change in the law and Americans the most chic. He 3
was the direct outcome of his (req stralian debu is one the world’s riches
unfortunate trials. This was i ae

the With more personality than the men: ail multimillionaire Pau
creation in 1907 of the Court of Ss

Criminal Appeal, which is em- =W®#es- At Santa Monica (California)
powered to review any a
of law or fact in any ¢
matter brought before it as well Of poise, although we ave nat
as to increase or reduce sentences 50 attractive to a ' meviy owned by the
passed by any lower court. Hardy's of tante Oo! tugal, fetched 225,000
Some of the other cases dealt the year: “The corn is shared be- jbout £976,000) in 19)
with in this book are those of the tween Caroline Kirkwood and Britain, last year, he paic
“Flowery Land” pirates which led Caroline Child-Villiers,” be be- ¢86.000 for ‘a piece of ‘sculpture
to the abolition of public execu- lieves.
tions and that of W. T. Stead . * ~
whose exertions — including his

* * *

treasure-stacked

What does being a popular es- several books.

own trial and imprisonment on a cort entail? Hardy, personal as-~ et this mild-mannered mar
change of abduction—led to the sistant to a London restaurateur, |iy

passing of the Criminal Law muses: “I average about five hours with one or two

“age of consent” for girls from day to prepare for the evening he
thirteen to sixteen and alse in- round.
creased the penalties for those

*
who procure young women and TORY OF A KIN

dcirls for prostityHen. LORD KEYES, 33-year-old son
These are among the dramas oy ‘Lorg Keyes of

his own meals.
* *

ALE

the Law, dramas that came (4), on
straight from life itself and helped, ae § ee as ne
each in its own way, to ehange ex-King I ld of the -) 's Ledge’ was
nd improve the law of England. B , en tx bought by

100,000-word War, likely to fetch?
of Buide, of eourse, is that Rank’
Druid’

ne men on

king, the book will tell a story,
says Lord Keyes, “very different
from a? aaa to Warren House, Newmarket
a small cafe Trygve Lie, Secre-
tary General of U.N.O., Russia’: horses.

Jacob Malik, and America’s E.C.A. Another big
representative Milton Katz were question: What
having lunch,

mouthful o sendwich, “is we" to ride the Beckhampton horses.
cow’s eandidate for the <
lee DAUNTED

elections?

(Meaning of course which can- AT Lambeth Palace, the Arch-
didate would give Moscow's bishop of Canterbury, Dr. Fisher,
schemes most chance of flourish- had a guest—Bishop T. A. Scott
ish.ng.) Dr. Fisher asked him: “When

ae came the answer: Taft, would you like your bath?”
of course,” His guest hesitated, stammered,

HIDDEN CROWN and then declined the offer. Noi

OVER dinner with Archduke yntil much later did the Primate
Otto, son of the last Emperor of jearn the reason.

Austria and King of Hungary, ! On his last visit to Lambeth the
have just heard the latest news bishop's bath consisted of a tin
in the faseinating histery of the: bath and a can of water.

Holy Crown of St, Stephen.

Since it was handed to thc
Americans at the war’s end this
1,000-year.

‘The one z.
few who kmow its where: ta, }
calls it ‘a tremendously powertu! |
weapon in the cold war.” |

It has a great and mystical in-
fluence over the Hungarians, |’ ,
would immensely strengthen the
Communists’ prestige if they
eculd obtain it.

Two years ago they wanted t)

“Slavery”



MRS. POPE-HUNT

Woman is radio boss
4\NGLIBH-BORN Mrs Pris-



permitted on deck so that they
programme techniques. Later could be companions for the ¢a-
she nies to New York for six rous. crew, but after they had
week: By
The Hongkong station goes wo . foe re ee Ry |
on the air for seventeen hours the lusts of the negro. could }
a day, with programmes in be ned. He eine. “the
Favourites’ “with |" Chinese quarreling and bestiality that
steners @ > storvtelle followed was sickening, They
listeners are the storytellers. dope and gnawed each other i
Talking for an hour fights over the rum rations which
These are usually Chinese our captain ordered, and for

film actors, They have scripts, f |
but barely use them, can talk Wwenehes.” a the miserable

spontaneously for more than



ot Peta
HE is am asset to any party, I suggested the crown was in

A few before the Ameri- ™@de by the “Welby Bicycle Com-
vane te return it to Hun- Pany, Ltd.” — might just as weil
6a,

archduke, the firs y
1 pur, took made in Japan.
So Americans te the The same goes for a club spec-
a or
Britain this sum- the radiant, exported from Japa»

French gitls? “They have lots whee he lives on a ranch, he has ciation Guide which has now

He is an expert on eighteenth- . s
century furniture and has written _ The book is

es simply. He frequently travels MUSENBIAORS Which TAG SIE F gov:
; : > suitcases. and jt jays Japan's cycle war cards
Amendment Act, which raised the sleep a night.” And he swims each washes his own shirts. Sometimes y cycle war cards

lives in a caravan. cooking

FOR S ¥
} 00 worth of machines and com-
HOW much is the Beckhamp- ? .
rucee, is; ton Facing stable, which is being POM@MES, ip still working (0. the | ) wenn ———
deseribed in Cases that changed joaring the end of a “most ex- S°ld by whisky magnate ae shortage. But the manufacturers

recently ©5¢; and ape indignant about their
tractor distributor “#0°ts to cash im on British cycle
. makers’ prestige.
ments from his father and the J#¢k Olding for around £150,000.

Noe] Murless, who trains for Cycle ang Motor-cycle Manu
the Queen and Mr. Dewar at eee - syGe v
Beckhampton, moves next season

where Fred Armstrong used to came over to our cycle show we
It was October in Paris. In train the Maharajah of Baroda’s had a long talk with them

Beckhampton @Ven offering
will happen to “Raleigh-type” and “B.S.A.-type”
Gordon Richards? For he has —With the “type” printed very
“Who.” asked Lie, munching a long drawn g handsome retainer Small indeed.



3 SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1952
aos Os Oe nite

“Tricks In Trade” |
May Succeed...

For A Time I
cmos 1 4m Faris

The Japanese are using Eng-
lish-sounding names and the
reputation that goes with them
to menance the British cycle
market in South-East Asia.

The Indian clerk or Malayan
worker who chooses 4
_ cycle because it is a “Welby’-



1

London

New York...




{ buy a mistsuboshico, for both are women are

buying perfume
ial. It is just as Japanese as yama- - * '
guchi.

this new way
There is also the champ =

INEXPENSIVE HANDBAG PHIALS
OF A COSTLY PERFUME

t with machines named Fuju and
| Shiragiku.

All these names are in the 1952 pa ; a ,
, Japanese Bicycle Industry Asso Taste Hpi tne petene ener aes aes ey
cos! so e he ic y
private mu- reached London. The 84 Japanese the same as that in Goya's world-famous opsily lagttien--
seum. One of his tapestries, for- cycle industry trade marks print- there is simply less of it. -These phials were introduced by
. , for- / ee Sp ee r dca rf about with her,
Kin of Por- ed in full colour in its 294 glossy Goya so that a woman could carry perfume i wit >
dollars (now pages also include the Bennet in her handbag ; so that at any moment of the day, no
37. Cycle, the Mister Cycle, the Three matter where she was, she could renew and retsgsh her

i Ponies, the Aster, the Vanco, and
. the Ostrich de luxe.

fragrance

Get « handbag phial of Goya perfume to-day |
Handbag Phials by a.
cava'’s Hearuer. Like at

PAR >

adr
LONDON
NeW YORK



well bound and
written in faultless business Eng-
lish, completely tree from the

breeze froin ’




1 the moors, shart leat



2 vipaatic Gay ane al
amusing reading before the wai as sparkling « a

" Gardeia, Great

on the table-—but does not give t Mi .

prices. Ls

The British cycle





industry, ¥459
which last year exported £ 2,700,-

N PNGLAND

Sole Distrobuiors: L. Ma B. Meyers & Co. Iad., P.O. Box 171, Bridgnows

capacity permitted by the steel

have a wary eye on the Japan-

Said an official of the British

CANNOT BE REPEATED
3/16in. FLEXIBLE

GALVANISE WIRE
Me. per yd.
Sd

Union this week:
“When Japanese representatives

about their habit of using Eng-
lish-sounding names. They were
components as

“The postwar Japanese bicycle
is not the rubbish they produced
before the war, though it is not
comparable to ours. But their
prices are 10 and 20 per cent.
less.”

ideal for Fencing, Stays,
Ete., Ete., Ete.





Unaware of improvements at
the palace, the bishop was not
keen to repeat the experience.

Dr. Fisher has just told this
story to a gathering of clergy—
among them Bishop Scott.

—L.E.S.

GENERAL HARDWARE SUPPLIES

at i eh CT
RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office) "PHONE 4918



\\ NY

\ \
iy

an hour

Mrs. Pope-Hunt was in
America when the Japanese
invaded Shanghai. Her hus-
band was interned. and she
heard nothing of him for
four years ow he has re-
established his business in
Hongkong. They have no
ehildren.

London kenress Seruigs.

THE COLGATE WAY

the Abolition of the Slave Trad:
London. 1789.
2. 'Rim, Romance and Rebellic:
by Charles William Taussig, Nev
ork

York, 1938, page 179.

3. Revelations of a Slaye Smuggler.
being the Autobi ¥y of Cap
tain Richard Drake, an African

Report to the House of Lords o |
}
|



MILLIONS OF FAMILIES agree with scientific findings that :

COLGATE

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TUNER CoS LS Vi
Lea tas ee ae

Alweys beush your teeth
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Complete re-design of frame angles has



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EASIER PEDALLING Pine Apple Mangoe Chutney Sauce ,,
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Great Beauty hes been combined with Chicken Haddies Jellies ”
improved STRENGTH at all the important Sweet Corn Prunes —Lb.
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_ v yooseberries “6 s
TOUGHER FORK TIPS 12 Olives ait. a "
STREAMLINE ee ele ; C.T. Onions mk Golden Arrow Rum
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Why “make-out” with any other? ;
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Roebuck Street _







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“~













SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1952



Certificate For
Sayes Court Co-ops

THE SAYES COURT
Marketing Society Limited
be presented its Certificate
operative Societies Act.

Co-operative Producers’ and
became the fourth Society to
of Registration under the Co-

At a well attended function at

the Sayes Court Agricultural Station, Christ Church, on
Thursday night last, Mr. C. A. E. Beckles, Co-operative
Officer, made the presentation to Mr. G. A. Warner, Presi-

dent of the Society.

The three other Societies regis-
tered under the Co-operative So-
cieties Act are St. Barnabas Co-
operative Marketing, Welchman
Hall Co-operative Marketing and
Leeward Co-operative Saving So-
ciety.

The function was presided over
by Prof. J. S. Dash, former Direc-
tor of Agriculture of British
Guiana, who was introduced to
the gathering by the President,

Among the large audience who
witmessed the presentation were
Mr. H. G. Bayne, Assistant Mas-
ter, Boys’ Foundation School,
Messrs. W. H. Watson, Clement
Knight, V. Scantlebury, E. Harper,
Fitz A. Niles, Whitfield Watson,
P, E. Ellis, and other representa-
tives of the Welchman Hall Co-
operative Marketing Society,
Messrs. W. Headley, Jarvis and
Burrowes of the Shamrock Co-
operative Credit Society and Mr.
Louis Talma, Peasant Agricultural
Instructor, in charge of Sayes
Court Agricultural Station.

Many of the representatives of
other Co-operative Societies joined
in congratulating the Sayes Court
Society on its achievements, as
shown in the Secretary’s Report.
What was most striking to mem-
bers of the Welchman Hall Society
was the success achieved by Sayes
Court in bulk purchasing of arti-
ficial fertilizers which were re-

tailed to members on a_ strictly
cash basis.
The Co-operative Officer ex-

pressed regret for the absence of
the Registrar of Co-operative So-
cieties, Mr. C. C, Skeete, who, he
said, was indisposed, but had
asked him (Mr. Beckles) to as-
sure the Saves Court Society that
he was watching their progress
with interest and offered them his
sincere congratulations on becom-
ing registered.

Mr. Beckles reminded those
present that the Co-operators’ Day
celebration, being sponsored this
year by the Shamrock Co-operf
tive Credit Society, would take
place at 3 p.m. on Saturday, 19th
July in the Steel Shed at Queen’s
Park. One of the features of the
celebration would be an address
by Mr. D, A. Wiles, Assistant Co-
lonial Secretary, and all were cor-
dially invited to attend.

In presenting the Certificate of
Registration to the President, on
behalf of the Society, he enjoined
the Society to let their watch-
words be loyalty, perseverance,
self-help, mutual help and mu-
tual trust and confidence.

The Chairman, in his remarks,
referred to his experiences with
similar societies in British Guiana.
He made some interesting obser-
vations on the by-laws of the
Society and urged members to
build up their resources and ex-
panda their activities so that even-
tually they would be able to
market co-operatively mot only
their canes, but other produce as
well. Prof. Dash assured mem-
bers that he would be watching
their Society with great interest
and that they were free to call
on him any time for such assist-
ance as he was able to give them.

Mr. J.C. King, Treasurer of the
Society, moved a vote of thanks
to the Chairman for so ably pre-
siding over the function, the re-
presentatives of other Co-opera-
tive Societies and other visitors
for their attendance and words of
encouragement, the Co-operative
Officer for his enthusiastic and un-
stinting support of the Society
and Mr, Talma who had from the
inception of the Society proved
himself their most dependable
guide and friend.

Secretary’s Report

Mr. Lincoln Callendar, Secre-
tary, presented his report, as fol-
lows: —

It is now my pleasant duty to
present to you a brief report on

‘the activities of the Sayes Court

Co-operative Producers’ & Mar-
keting Society Limited, from the
time this organisation came into
being up to the present.
Cn the occasion of the
Peasant Farmers’ Day held
Sayes Couct in 1948, the then
Co-Operative Officer, Mr. Cave,
gave a talk on Co-operatives, Mr,
Talma, the Extension Officer of
this area, whom I can venture to

first
at

| ae tc aly

oe

OPO OCOFONSS

9

PPLE FFF GPSS GIDL OTT

636564, 66206

describe as the peasants’ guide,
philosopher and friend, ‘at once
took “time by the forelock” and
made contact with the key men
in agriculture in this area. He
invited these, and others who he
considered would be interested;
to a meeting at the farm, and put
to them the benefits of his ex-
perience in various co-operative
organisations. Mr. Cave was soon
after invited to one of these
meetings, and in a brief talk fol-
lowed by suitable answers to the
many questions asked, outlined
the working of such a co-opera-
tive society.

Like most new ventures in this
colony, the idea caught on, and
so enthusiastic were those who
attend these preliminary meetings
that they at once put their hands
into their pockets and from their
slender purses subscribed money
for the purchase of books and
other necessary equipment for the
working of the organisation. Be-
fore this, however, those who were
Present selected whom they con-
sidered the men to guide and to
foster this new venture. Here I
may mention the name of one
who has since been gathered to
his fathers, Mr, E. W. Alleyne.
He was our first Secretary. By
his déath our organisation lost
the services of an old and ex-
perienced agriculturist.

The numerical strength of the
Society in the early days was
about 55. Our numbers have
been somewhat reduced, mainly
owing to the fact that some of
these early members did not have
the right attitude towards co-
operation. To date we have 43
active members on roll.

I am confident that now we
are registered and are under the
guidance of the Director of Agri-
culture as Registrar of Co-oper-
atives, and the able, enthusiastic
and zealous Co-operative Officer
in the person of Mr. Beckles,
that we will most surely go from
strength to strength. I do not
think it will be amiss if I state
that Mr. Beckles has given valu-
able assistance in the interpreta-
tion of the Act and By-laws and
has not spared himself in visiting
us regularly on meeting nights
as well as during the time we
were closing our books prior to
registration.

Ts indicated in the name of the
Society, our chief function is to
stimulate increased production of
such crops as are grown by mem-
bers and to provide means for
co-operative marketing of such
produce as the Society can conve-
niently handle co-operatively.

One of the major activities of
the Society is supplying the chem-
ical fertiliser requirements of ita
members, These fertilisers are
purchased in bulk by the Society
and sold to the members for cash,
To facilitate strict cash payments,
the Society encourages members
to make savings deposits with the
Society, in addition to their share
deposits, These savings deposits,
unlike the share capital, can be
withdrawn at any time. In fixing
the price of the manures to mem-
bers allowances are made for
transportation and other charges,
any surplus remaining at the end
of the trading period being return-

ed to members as_ patronage
refunds.
During the period 1949—5l,

that is for the last three years, 49
tons, 7 ewt. of fertilisers at a cost
of $5,324.00 was purchased by the
Society and sold to members. It
was decided at the last annual
general meeting on the advice of
the Co-operative Officer that the
small surplus made on_ these
transactions should be carried
towards the Society's Reserve
Fund.

Another important activity of
the Society this year has been co-
operative marketing of its mem-
bers’ canes. Through these efforts
the Society has succeeded in
delivering to the factory well over
the 500-ton minimum required
for the payment of the extra price
allowed unger the terms of the
Domestic Sugar Agreement,

On page 16.

POPOSESSSPSPP OOF PEOPLE LOPS

Seout Notes
CUB RALLY

We'll do our best! On Saturday
afternoon 2lst June, the Cub
Packs of the St. Michael-Soutn
Sub-area held a Rally around the
margin of the Bay at Gravesend
and invited the other Packs in St.
Michael to join them. 80 Cubs
with their Akelas turned up and
thoroughly enjoyed the afternoon.

With the Assistant Commis-
sioner, Capt. R. A. Sealy, on the
Council Rock, the cubs ran in from
North, South, East and West
(their four corners) to form a
circle and give the Grand Howl.

This done they returned to their
corners and played games chang-
ing to a new corner every fifteen
minutes. After one hour, light
refreshments were provided
Needless to say these were in-
deed welcome. It was not all play
for the next item was an obser-
vation walk.

The Akelas were given cards 57
which were instructions as io
what was required, e.g. name the
trees in the area, bring in a white
erab alive and unhurt, a snail,
collect material in the ramble to
make an animal.

The boys as was to be expected
enjoyed the next item to the full
It was singing. Then followed
the Story, a Grand Howl and
Taps. The sun was new setting
across the bay and each Cub re-
luctant!y bade the other Dyb,
Dyb, Dyb, as they turned away
from the scene which had been
their Jungle for that afternoon.

FIRST TROOP CAMP

The Lodge School Troop had
their first Camp at Codrington
College over the week-end. (Fri-
day 27th — Sunday 29th June).
There were three Patrols in camp.
In spite of some heavy rain which
caused some of the tents to leak
the boys enjoyed themselves, The
Camp was in charge of Scout-
master Alec J. Tatnall and w
visited by Assistant Scoutmaster
Kenneth Pile of the Bethe] Troop
who assisted in testing boys for
the 2nd Class Badge. Two boys
completed |their tests in camp
and this brings the total number
of 2nd Class Scouts in the Troop
new to five.
LIAISON COMMISSIONER

ARRIVES

from Canada on

morning last on his
stop-over flight was Squadron
Leader W. R. (Bill) Ramsay,
Navigator of Trans Canada A
lines, and Liaison Scout Commis-
sioner between Canada, Imperial
Sccut H. Q. in London and Bar-
bados. Bill took part in the
monthly Scout Radio programme
over Re-diffusion Service on Fri-
day night last in a discussion with
Aubrey Douglas-Smith, Commis-
sioner for the Southern Scout Area
in Barbados and Charles Spring-
er, Assistant Commissioner for
Training. He will attend the
week - end Foundation Scouters
Training Course which is being
conducted by the Asst. Commis-
sioner for Training at Codring-
ten College over this week-end.
The Course is being conducted for
Scouters of the Southern Area
and it is planneq to run similer
courses for the Northern and Mid-
land Areas,

NEW ISSUE OF P.O.R.

A new issue of P.O.R. (Policy,
Organisation & Rules) has been
received. It is hoped to send a
copy to each Group during the
week,

COMMISSIONERS PAY
VISIT TO TROOP

Area Commissioner A, E, Doug-
las-Smith and Assistant Commis-
sioner Capt. R. A. Sealy visited
St. Patrick’s R.C. Troop at their
Headquarters, Jemmotts Lane, 04
‘Thursday evening last. There was
an inter-patrol competition in
progress and everybody seemed
to be busily engaged in some
activity. Five Scouts were pre-
sented with Badges recently pa
ed, they are: Master Swimmers:-
Errol Hyson, John Griffith and
Lance King. Swimmers: Rudolph
Winston and John Joseph. Four
recruits were invested the same
afternoon.

BETHEL TROOP

Congratulations to Patro] Lead-
er Carl Ince who hag recently
passed his Reader’s Badge. Carl
will receive his Badge in the near
future. Capt. Sealy will be visit-
ing this Troop on Wednesday
next.

ROVER MEETING

There will be a meeting of all
Rover Scout Leaders at Scout
Headquarters at 7.45 P.M. on

POPOL ED ALPE PPP





Arriving
Thursday







PROTECTED BY THE MAKERS OF

PPS

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Jamaica Wins
440 Yds Relay
Empire Record

From Our Own Co dent



pe

LONDON, July, 5.

Not only a huge crowd in the
hot sunshine at we White City
this afternoon got excited during
the Jamaican Olympic team’s
superb and successful crack at
the Empire record for the 440
yards relay. Herb McKenley got
excited too and showed it. After
making his own fine contribution
of 47.6 secs. in the third leg of
the event, he ran back the track-
side to spur his team - mate
Rhoden on for the last 50 yards
of the magnificent final leg of the
run of 46.8 secs.

Despite a fairly strong wind the
Jamaican four lopped 4 secs off

Great Britain who held the re-
cord for the event. The Jamai-
time was three mins. 13.2



. just 3.8 secs. off the world
record and it keeps the Jamaicans
top favourites for the Olympic
relay

This race in which the Jamai-
cans whacked the English and
Pakistan entrants climaxed for a
loudly cheering crowd the Jamai-
can trackmen’s dominance in
various events. MacDonald Bailey
was there too, but confined him-
self to helping England in the

triangular British tournament,
winning the hundred metres in
10.6 secs., leading a!l the way.

First the Jamaica Olympic
Men's triumphs came in two in-
vitation 300 yards races. Rhoden
beat Arthur Wint by yards in

a 30.4 secs victory in the first and

McKenley won the second, but
five seconds outside of his own
British record of 30.3 for the
event.

Leslie Laing added to the
Jamaicans’ honours with a 10.8
secs, win in an invitation 100
metres from the British runner

Shenton after a desperate finish.
The island’s sole woman entrant

K. Leslie, also ran in the 100
metres against such runners as
the Australian wonder girl M
Jackson who won in 11.7 sees
Russel is happier in the high jump
with » fourth place jump of 4
feet 10 inches against 5 feet 4
inches of the British gir) winner
Lerwill.



Annual Missionary
Meeting

The Annual Missionary Meet-
ing of the James Street Methodist
Church will be held on Monday
night at 7.30 p.m. This Meeting
is one of the outstanding events
of the Church’s year, This year,
His Excellency the Governor has
kindly consented to take the
Chair at the Meeting. The speaker
for the evening is Rev. John A.
varker of Grenada, This is the
first occasion on which Mr.
Parker has come to take services
jn the island of Barbados, Others
taking part in the programme will
be the Revd's. Lawrence, Grosse,
Furley and Towers, A special
anthem will be rendered during
the course of the Meeting by the
Church choir.

There are many people of the
community of this island who in
one way or another have bene-
fited from the ministrations of
the Methodist Church as a whole
and of James Street in particular.
It would be a source of pleasure
to the Church officers to have you
join in this Missionary Meeting.
On this occasion thanks are given
to Almighty God for the work and
witness of Methodism both !n
this colony and in the many parts
of the world where Methodism is
at work. The Methodist Church tn
Barbados rejoices that it is part
of a family numbering over forty

millions, fellow Methodists in
ninety-seven different countries of
the world. Two hundred and
fourteen years ago God warmed
the heart of John Wesley and
from the experience of that
warmed heart has grown this

world-wide family of Methodism.
At this Missionary Meeting on
Monday, Methodists and_ their
friends will gather to thank God
for what He has done in and
through Methodism,

To this meeting a cordial invi-
tation is given to all people of the
colony who share with Methodists
temhope of the salvation of man-
kind.



Saturday, 12th July, to discuss the
1.H.Q. Report on the suggested
fusion of the Rover and Senior
Scout Sections.

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EDUCATION NOTES:



PAGE ELEVEN





Inexcusable Delay To keep that special

WHEN I FIRST RAISED THE POINT as to the neces
sity for compulsory education as a background to any
changes introduced in the educational system in this island,

I was told that even if the expense could be afforded there

was insufficient accommoda

I am, and several others will be,
at a loss to understand why it is
that the new Secondary School at
Richmond began by Mr. Crowe
in 1949 and finished by the Colo-
nial Engineer in 1950 has not yet
been opened. The School is fin-
ished and equipped and I am yet
.o hear any sound reason why
of the pupils now over-
crowding other schools have not
been admitted.

Another matter which puzzles
me is the fact that the Education
Authorities allowed the Church
Village School to be closed with-
out telling the public why there
was no alternative except to hud-

some



tion in the schools.

SEA AND AIR
TRAFFIC

In Carlisle Bay

Blue Star,
Willemstad,
Franklyn







iV

D ale
M.V

MV

Daerwood
Caribbee Seh





D-R., Sch. Rosarene, Sch
dle the pupils into the Carring- y Orie, Sch. island ater, Sch. Timothy
, ST aoe oo) 5. fan Shoyuman Seh Inited Pilgrim
ton's Village School. Probably sch. Marion Bolle Wolfe, Sch. Rainbow
this school was not overcrowded. M. s,s. Dobin Marsono, ss Hersilia
But here is the point When 5.5. Lady Nelson, Sch. Triumphant Star
the school roll had 20,000 children
there were 126 Elementary Seawell
Schools. Now that there are
26,000 children there are 124 _.ON FRIDAY
schools with another new one Prem oie 7A EA
closed and excuses being offered C. Nurse, D. Blackett, C. Hutchinsor
that there is overcrowding and H. Arnell, M. Purcell, W. Laoyd Jone
lack of accommodation. This con- aba C. Francis, J. Hoffmann, 1
stitutes an indictment against de- From JAMAICA
partmental administration Carney Barrow, Daphne Pilgrin
A public ceremony at the open- James Williams
to eat ; = From PUERTO RICO
ing of this school would have af- “‘Mary Wiikie, Susan Wilkie, Gloria
forded an excellent opportunity Pompey, Florence Seales, Lione! Wil
for the Director of Edueation to liams, Mildred Seales, Rev. J. Da Costa
} > . sathing ,» Harewood, Gerahmie Baingham, Pear!
Mt the oo ; teas kod the Howard, Ernest Corbin, Jean Paviluk
uture of elementary education in por ANTIGUA
this island and what was being <£ifreda Wheatley, Arthur Greave
done to meet the demands of the Neliie Dougla
changing times, Then the public
would have known that there was =
a hope even if not an attempt to 3 ne > BWVOCUTANOR
regrade the schools. This delay RATES OF EXCHANGE
in instituting necessary and fun- fin creat tls
damental changes and the secrecy Selling NEW YORK Wivine
about them even when they are 73 4/10% Pr. Cheques on
being done can be regarded as a Bankers 71 T/10% Pr
misdirection of policy. It is little Sight K oe ee kale
use to be secretive about changes 73 4,10% pr cable ’
to the extent which makes the 7) 9/10% Pr. Currency 70 210% Pr
very people whom they are in- ote Coupons 69 5/10 % Pr
tended to benefit suspicious about 50% ? Silver 20% Pr
And it is stupid to fail t ae
them, And it is stup 0 fail to 9 3/10% Pr. Cheques on
gauge the reaction of the same Bankers 78 5/10% Pr
. se che 5 ° Demand Drafts 74.35 5 Pr
people to those changes, m 78.3 ty
What seems to have happened 46 '4){6¢¢ ‘br cae mrrarts 18 W108 FF
is that the Education Department 7 6/10% Pr. Currency Pr
responsible for the administration Coupons 6 3/W% Pr
50% Pr Silver 20% Pr

of the system has been toying with
pet ideas of intelligence tests and
age-grouping instead of getting on
with the essentials. Thousands of
dollars have been wasted in the
printing of cards which must be
filled out and filed and a teacher
from each school is taken away
from his job of teaching pupils to
carry out tests which prove little
except that the standard of edu-
cation has declined, And then the
blame is laid on the teacher, His



primary job is to teach and then] ancient science to

the statistician can toy around
with his figures.

I repeat that much of the two
million dollars spent on education

is wasted in this card index Sys—] predictions and
tem. And it is going to be rather] the sound practi-
for anybody to justify} ca! advice con-

difficult
87% of the total education vote
being spent on salaries ete.

The parents are the people to} lation, Finances,
prétest against the waste of their} Love -

children’s best years and the tax-
payers (parents or not) against
this misspending of funds,
is a serious thing to say but I hope

that some member of the House] George

will ask by way of an address for

an enquiry. It might then be
proved whether I am right or
wrongs

that parents will stage a public
meeting and pass a resolution ask-
ing the Governor to institute such
an enquiry into the administration
of the system,

There is precedent for such ac- fond other interesting literature

tion, When it was realised that
Queen's College had outgrown its
home and that this should be ex-
tended or the College removed
I remember that a number of pa-
remts led by Hon, H. A. Cuke met
at the Carnegie Hall and protested
against the treatment meted out
to, Queen's College. The result
was that Combermere was_ given

amjew home and Queen’s College

given the old Combermere School,

A protest meeting might be held
to speed up the opening of the
ew Secondary School and I hope
it will be done to get a commis-
ion of enquiry appointed,

With regard to the School it-
self I shall have something to say
later because I hope that some-
thing will be done to correct a
Wrong impression, Some parents
are of the opinion that this new
school is of the Secondary type

known in this island and where}

pupils are trained up to School
Certificate standard as is done at
Combermere and St. Michael's
Girls. It would be dangerous to
allow them to continue in_ this
belief. J.E.B.

This | educated

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PAGE TWELVE SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1952



a a













SUNDAY ADVOCATE

ae eo RR me me ren

oa
The painstaking inquiry today submits its most startling evidence

CA N FA ITH HEA LF yét to the Pane! of Bishops |

THREE WARY MEN SEE A HEALER

¥ ‘Patients’ even by post |

* meen - :
One touch and the OW we come to the phenomenon of “absent healing” : healings
pain disappeared” where healer never meets patient, yet a cure is said to take





~~ ST i aa





if you feel worn out, depressed, or
generally run down a giass or two a day of
Buckfast Tonic Wine will quickly restore lost
energy and tone up the whole nervous system.
Giving new vitality it fortifies you against fever
and exhaustion and remember, Buckfast Tonic
Wine is especially valuable after illness.



For the past two years Mr. Grisewood has
which gave

place. Said to? Is there much doubt, then? It is hard for the
«6 DO not know what the power is most determined sceptic to disdain the evidence presented in
Le: Harry Edwards transmits.” said thousands of testimonials seen by Daily Express investigators.
radio compére Freddie Grisewood Seores of such letters arrive each week at The Sanctuary, Burrows Lea '
yesterday, “but results are extraordinary. Shere, Surrey, addressed to Mr Harty Edwards

Mr, Edwards is one of the most widely known spiritual healers—" not “faith ne

please in the world His tuiging matibag confirms that his unseen “ patients”
tter. 1 looked at a selectior.

Buch week 9.000 letters urrive , aa

suffered from osteo-arthritis him
and hip.

sli torms of norma) medical



great pain in the leg
He sought reliet oy







“The whole horizon of my
Ee has been changed—wonder-
iy brightened—by this affair.
“Now this has happened to
po—and not to someone else—
cannot deny the obvious
ts any longer. I have been
lutely staggered bv |) all.”

“ How can 1 velieve otherwise?

They work by night because 't
T have had no medical waining

ig easier then to attain to that

THE INQUIRY CONTINUES

London Express Serv

| TONIC WINE
treatment. He was given r iy treatment at Droitwich at The Sanctuary Some con- | naye no or dae ol ot inner stillness which 1% | ON
but in the end his condition was unchanged. tain first requests tor Rawards's | istespathy. and vet ats touch | e83en iat to all healing |
4 serious Operation, to give him a new hip joint per a arcessian is t e word | 6+ my hands mbs and bones } There is no mumpo-jumbo a1 7 ies
was his only hope said the doctors he uses to describe his wark | «ad t ) Nritis | cit ubout They do n | ~ ae SS etal
pipes are trom distant pationia | iav ceen j pr as CRUTCRRDEES undet | ts eg i
: 2 sending in progress reports ; 4eanie SiAy dat nen 1 touch Stan’ tne wore .
With an open mind “Fhysiea! contact is quite } 1 h fee know there ane yuna }
Then he met an old iriend, an Anglican clergy- eek ne, ee ehermonta i mM side o o oh ae og 4 p' Lee ue = i bed
man, who sa¥ him hobbiiig painfully, and told him Yor’ tae i A . Be SD tien Gain Geaerioa se Seas in + possible
to ask the help of Harry Edwards i never see most of those wh 9) ations a3 a mass of vibrations | Mi Edwards never ps nse
“Tt rang Up and Pde 9) appoluliment witb healed through te” t cue a ey po s to i SPECIAL CASH OFFER FOR THIS WEEK
ai setthor eh: Gb rpg: 2 Th would be easy to unde AapOL Ck aeeP sola n : 1esimes 4 person wWriles
“1 went to Ghate with am oes mind. Emme- stand large pride in a man wi D, Se ae to uae Th in \ao late to 6S
diately after he toughed me the pain in my leg is constantly ut the receiving WOE eS OEY eye 1 death. But his lest .
disappeared E ; HARRY EDWAKLs end Of 30 muca graiijude ve hou v be miraculously freed
Very a Rr nie : But Ba wards. a man with E } ‘cht from oaln
y i, om A px golden-white hair. clear blue ? ign ‘
2 end of! of F 7 : aden n . Ys
hy # Py ee discomfort A PRIEST: CANON HUGH WARNER eyes, and an expression of & Stillness
re oe ee Edward: i Wbedleulating sincerity. remains : R. EDWaRDS VARL
_o, eee ele umble. att ; NOWARDS does us
foies oar Fane Ba8 ie ae J ~ ° ® “T have plenty of reasons toi NI ne Al 4; " . 1 Dat Re: ; wo- singing ang
ty ee ee : ust a friendly greeting ee ee al) Says 1 oe none Healiiuy:. Each night, when still- a ae intenban te dt
- > Sanctuary or pride. It is net I Who hea! . ross nas descended upon his chu rua. some al
wll: Micah a ee Y was all very simple, informal, and down to earth. A —lI am just the instrument for e, gubled house and 13 ucres PUdic meetings. Bur these are
ritten weekly progress reports quiet company of 30 men and women seated ih two rows, ‘he Spirit Power. srass and woodland when 40 able} to him. i ait
Edwards since. i man and two women assisting Mr. Harry Edwards. As ss the doves, canaries, and budgeri- a My wou dd away Dew i" vv
Lik j---—~ Pat Heat ome Meg remnsined aih: with epee love (or De gspeption fees. SO" Sathedral whan on 8 elous
e a sea . a full nute rr ) an armehatir ri * he said
“ getcee 1 wah an Miwsirds 3 After that no more than a friendly greeting to each SIXTEEN yeurs ago , With nim are Mr. and Mrs ae lt anatase. clausabte’ ‘anit
itted my teeth to turn over Pabient as he or she gat on the stool in front of him. Edwards was a ,Weorge Burton, who ace coughed as he inhaled. 24 Gauge x
fF bed. Now I can flop about The atmosphere was that of a doctor’s surgery rather printer, who sjaried POF_OWT SSE Qt RERUNE BpCU *] smoke too much." he
ike a seal in water,” he added than that of a chapel, though standing on a table in front 4 private investigation inio Kore 989 ‘: said He added with a smile do x Tit.
“My leg still gets tired ana Of us was a Cross with flowers on each side Spierauelisty with the intention | Methodically for taree ot “T have smoker's cough, and \°
jf, Oceasionally, But no pain As arms and legs were apparently freed from their of “ exposing it al) us u fake. tour hours each night. the three i won't respond to the healing é on
still limp, but friends tell me arthritis with a quiet touch of the hand. and sometimes a The sceptic ceased to Mock On ee et ae othe spice. te. heatment. oO x .
: Ikki h more ~ ‘| « : é . { h he stayed to believe in ‘he [#5k Of asking e spirits Thut remark was typical of
am walking muc con firm clasp, words of encouragement were given to each. heal es f the individuals wh
dently. I am losing my fear "here was » assuranc existence of higher or spirit ‘eal each of the individuals who” the man free of personal nome of
y & There was the assurance each gave of pain vanished intelligences have written to them or canting humbug. * t.
the old pain and movement restored It was not possible for me, a mere ,
x

onlooker, in so short a time to pass any kind of judgment on
- . Indeed, its

“faith healing” was clearly quite wrong if
one is thinking of faith as of necessity possessed by those
who were ill hat did not seem a necessary factor accordin:

to Mr Edwards though his own faith was quite unquestioned *

the degree of healing tnvolve . do. 10ft.
permanence.

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” THE KING’S SECRET DOORWAY

By Marguerite Peacocke

unfortunate lady of Queen Vic-







corner swings forward at the seals of office, and later hands Along the stately red-carpeted dishes at near to boiling point, |



This is the last in-
stalment, of the Bucking-
ham Palace story as told
by Marguerite Peacocke,
and yet, perhaps, it is
only the beginning.
Every day another chap-
ter of history is added
every year the Palace
grows dearer to the
hearts of a nation,

tL tN ne

The contents of Buckingham
Palace were valued at more than
£ 4,000,000 even before the war:
but even if its treasures had
been werth little more than a
pittance, few Britons could have
walked unmoved through the
corridors snd rooms, rich as they
are in tradition

But one Indian potentate was
visibly unimpressed by the State
suite, which clearly failed to
compare with his own fantastic
jewelled palace until he
weached the White Drawing

* Room.

This room contains four ebony
cabinets filled with valuable
china each standing at one corne:
of the room.

‘The cabinets and the tali gild-
ed mirrors that surmount them
are outwardly identical, but the
one standing in the north-west

touch of a spring and reveals a
doorways leading to the Royal

Closet.
Laugh-Raiser

At the sight of this secret door
the Indian ruler suddecly cast
side his boredom and could
hardly be enticed away from the
fascinating pastime of making
the. door swing to and fro—an
exhibition which drew a gaod
deal of laughter at the poten-
tate’s expense.

The White Drawing-Room is
one of the most familiar of the
State apartments, for it has
formed the background to many
Royal photographs, including the
first published pictures of Prince
Charles. The magnificent carpet,
43ft. long and nearly 25ft, wide,
is in “best quality Axminster,”
costing 34s. 6d., a yard more than
a century ago.

The State dining-room is used
for State dinners private ban-
quets and large family parties,
but it is not sufficiently spacious
for State banquets, even though
the Spanish mahogany dining-
tuble,” 25ft. long when unex-
panded, can be tengthened by
eight leayes; each one yard wide,
and so accommodate 60 diners.

‘Not Amused’

Conversation at the table is

limited to one’s next-door neigh-
bours for it is more than eight
feet across,

It was in this room that the



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toria's Household described the
notice she had seen at Dunkeld,
announcing that “The Duchess of
Atholl (a coach) left the Duke
of Atholl’s Arms (a tavern)
prom) at seven o'clock each
morning’—the famous story at
which Queen Victoria was “not
amused.’

The Throne Room, though
used less often than in earlier
days, is still used when the King
receives addresses or deputations
“on the Throne,” and it is on
the Throne dais that all Roya]
wedding groups have posed for
nearly 30 years.

There is a secret door in this
room, too, cut into the panelling
on the inner wall near the dais.

Among the series of semi-
State rooms is the Bow Room,
where Queen Elizabeth and her
sister held their first parties—
the weekly madrigal concerts
which continued from soon after
the war until just before Queen
Elizabeth’s marriage.

One of the most important
rooms in the modern history of
the Palace is the “44 Room” (re-
modelied in 1844 in honour of the

: : B.B.C. news bulletins are | will be abl s ing. Bicycle Raffle. We hope thai

Tsar of Russia’s visit.) heard with a closer attention %g Wile *0 Gu seabething the tickets for the Bicycle Raffic|

Lost Rings than they commonly receive} Mirs. Ward visits 24th Barba- are going rapidly. You are re-

It is sometimes in this room ¢lsewhere, books and magazines |dos. Ten girls passed their first minded that all books must be

that, when Ministries change lie ready to hand, and here | Aid test for the Second Class in to Mrs. D. H. L. Ward, Hinds-
hands, the King receives from Canasta invaded even a Royal’ when Mrs. D. H. L. Ward, Dis- bury Road, or Miss Frank at Cave| &

the outgoing Ministers their home. ‘trict Commissioner, visited them Shepherd by the 19th July, 1952. |

|

ne. aarstinor > AL SRSRPASGASESM SAS) See

A SERVICE TO THE MEN OF BARBADOS
Good quality KHAKI PANTS, all Sizes

RELIANCE SHIRT DEPOT.

PALMETTO SFP.



OF



them to their successors,

The seals are duly delivered,
each in its little box complete
with key, but nearly all the
signet rings which once accorm-
panied them have been lost. it
is suspected that they were kept
as souvenirs by iong-dead mem-
bers of former governments.

The pleasant first-floor roc
overlooking the north borders
and lawns, are the centre of
en's family and business

e.

Here the King had hig study,
where he spent what was often
little less than a 12-hour diy.
He worked ait a large, flat-topped
desk given him as a wedding
present by his parents-in-law.

ns,

In rooms off the same corridor
many family evenings were spent
in the Queen's drawing-room,
where Queen Elizabeth and her
equally musical younger daugh-
ter sometimes played the piano,
or in the King’s sitting-room
where the television set was in-
stalled and his family watched
ithe programmes by restful can-
dlelight.

Canasta Too



THE

“FOLBATE”
LAWN MOWER

A Masterpiece of
British Craftsmanship a»



STRONG — STURDY — RELIABLE

Keep your Lawns in fine trim with

“POLBATE"”

LAWN MOWER

S. P. MUSSON SON & CO., LTD.-DisTRIBUTORS





corridor and in and out of rooms
run the family pets.

At the end of the corridor is
the Chinese lunch-room, where
meals are no longer served un-
appetisingly tepid. Electric trol-
leys with hotplates to keep the

convey them on their long jour- |
ney from the kitchen. 1&
Beyond are the rooms which |
were once Queen Elizabeth's | ¥
suite and afterwards her first | %
merried home in which Prince |
Charles was horn. y












GUIDE NOTES ||

on the 26th June. This Company | ¥
also entertained the inmates ot)
St. Philip’s Almshouse on 3rd
July.

Mrs. H. A. Talma and Mrs. J.| ¢
A. Skinner, Brownie Commission-~ | %
| Bishop also examined the work er, visited 12th Barbados at! ¢
\for the Overseas Challenge. Westbury Girl’s School and en-
| rolled three Brownies. Game
| Hike to Silver Sands. The were played and the songs wer



Enrolment. An enrolment took
| place at St. Giles’ Girls’ School
on the 14th June, when six Guides
from 28th Barbados made _ the
promise before Mrs. F, A. Bishop
|}Distriet Commissioner. Mrs.



Guides and Brownies from 30th sung with the usual amount of | %
|Barbados with Miss Winifred enthusiasm which these littl:
|Smith, Lieutenant, and Miss

ones can always show,

Chief Guide’s Challenge. We
hope that the companies who
have entered for the Challeng?
are working hard at it and that
all entries will be in by the
allotted time.

| Bailey, Brown Owl, went on a
|pienic on the 21st June to Silver
'Sands. Most of these guides had
jnot hiked before, and they thor-
;aqughly enjoyed the experience.
|Next time they will take a Life
"Saver in the party so that they



$5.7 Each

PHONE 4764



Just Arrived...

SEMI-PORCELAIN

DINNER SETS
WITH SERVICE FOR 12

In pleasing. Patterns of Blue, Green &
Flowered. These SETS are ideal Gifts for the
young Bride.

Also opened

‘WATERMAN:
FOUNTAIN ‘PEN
AND PENCIL SETS

Single Pens in Cases as well.



Prices are reasonable, when considering the
quality that you will be sure of. Don’t miss
this cpportunity come and make your choice

|
LOUIS L. BAYLEY |

® Bolton Lane and Aquatic Club Gift Booth 3
? Phone 3909 Phone 4897 $
LVPPPOH IPOH HPPHO IS GG PHPHHHOOGOHHOSHOSHOSHHPOPE DE | |)

}

gor

4 AFTER YOUR
GARDEN NOW !!



Now from stock

PLANT PROTECTION PRODUCTS

AGROCIDE—Nos, 1 and 3
ABBOLINEUM
GAMMALIN

For destroying insect pests
WEEDICIDE
FERNOXONE

- VERDONE
For killing weeds
Full directions and instructions

ANNUAL HOLIDAY



Our Friends and Customers
are asked to note that the
Workshop Department .(with

the exception of a skeleton
staff to attend to Emergency

Calls) will be closed from
7th to 19th inst. (both days
inclusive) for the purpose of

giving the workmen vacation
leave.

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD,



SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1952

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON

FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD.... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES







MY DEAR MAS. DE LAZLON| [SO THAT'S /T? NOW THAT




























= 1 arora re
BUT FLINT'S SATISFIED) SECAUSE I HAV
— THE CIRCUMSTANCES YOU THINK YOU HAVE HE'S FOUND THE THIEF] “ROMISED PETA
HAVE COMPLETELY THE PALMER GIRLS SO WHY TELL HIM THAT ('D CLEAR
WHAT ABOUT CHANGED... MONEY - YOU DON'T 4 COULD ANY THING 2 JOE HAYS NAME,
NEED MINE! HARDLY PUT Ml.) j MY PLUMP
IT ANY MORE ae \ INTRIGUER. /
POE z i \ a ait
a >




BY CHIC YOUNG

T WAS JUST THINKING
HOW NICE IT WOULD
BE IF I TOOK OFFA

MONTH INSTEAD OF THE

USUAL TWO WEEKS

ULI

}

WE COULD TAKE OFF 2 BUT, DEAR, THAT WOULD )
7 1 WAS JUST

THE ROAD LIKE GYPSIES--} [COST A FORTUNE | KNOW
oe VISIT NIAGARA AN! WE COULDN'T iT
G, <2 THE GRAND CANYON POSSIBLY
ere: (TROUT-FISH IN THE LAKES | [DO IT f fei
Y ¢ AND Sweet AT THEA ne 4
â„¢ |

Va oe





~——1

ee



; = = : Y HE WAS EXHAUSTED!| [ OF COURSE! I AM
San VE HE 1S NAPPING — HERE TO MAKE YOU
GSEN ame = 1... THERE /HOW ABOUT | | COMFORTABLE! I
Suite Scone THE FOOD-? WILL ORDER IT!
TIME! WE r

WOULD LIKE

SOME FOOD!

eon sey

JOHNNY ARRANGES TO STORE ALL SET, HERR UMLAUT! ¥ WE ALWAYS HAVE GOOP

THE PLANE, WHILE THE OTHERS SAY...0O0 YOU GUYS UY | TRANSPORTATION FOR

WATCH SILENTLY... THESE LIMOUSINES BY | OUR ORGANIZATION,
Dn THE GROSS? A 15S RIGHT, HERR

AN OLD PRECAUTION,
HERR HAZARD.,.BUT
ALWAYS USEFUL /







COME BACK HERE / IT'S RAINING CATS
AND WHERE DO YOU AND DOGS-NOBODY
THINK YOU ARE GOING BUT AN IDIOT HH DON'T HOLLER |
ON A NIGHT LIKE WOULD GO OUT

|

eT 5 ‘\ 60 LOUD! 4} § BIMMY
ON A NIGHT iF I SOMEONE'S AT } “4 TO
LIKE THIO/ y7 ADMIT I'M \ THE DOOR! | |\
AN IDIOT - ste 9 | er
KIN _T GC / Sot <
MS 1 9 a \
soy of Cm Y

t

@fF
| es :

ne 5

K_\

\
\
a

OUT?
on
¢ Se f

be LILI, ITS -
: SE iTS HOPELESS! I CAN'T 2
KEEP OUDE AND LILI y ; 1 \ . TAKE ANY MORE

tty, PINNED DOWN, I'LL Y _ aA : : OF THIS! I’M

= (MAKE IT! ae . fd ‘is , GIVING MYSELF
* ie py Hi . 7 +7 i

YOUR BOYS ARE WAITING FOR
YOU. THEY LL BE GLAD TO HEAR
Pow YOU DESERTED THEM

Q

B | WAIT, SMYTH. |
PRISONERS, TO TOWN. LEAVE WANT TO TALK.

HE MASKED GUY SAID TO WAIT SMYTH HERE TO DRIVE THE _/,

HERE. WONDER IF HE CAUGHT





—<—<— $< nT $e
eee, 5

ia
Gs (THINKING HOW NICE )
S 2

| IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE _

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday onl

( IT WOULD GE 1/












SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN





By Appointment
Cin Distillers

to the Late
King George V1

2
\Gordon:

Stands Suyteme













4°O6966

s
%,
Ps)

s
$

+

SSSSSOO OOS

SSOP POS OSS -


















SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Hranches White Park,
Tweedside, Speightstown and Swan Street



Usually Now DRENE SHAMPOO (large) $ .78

STRAWBERRY JAM (bots.) ~$ 62 $$ 56 DRENE SHAMPOO (small) _ fil
HALO SHAMPOO (large) 58

SHREDDED WHEAT ‘ ‘ 52 A8 HALO SHAMPOO (small) 37
PALMOLIVE SHAMPOO Bt

NESCAFE (‘lb Tins) 87 80 LUSTRE CREAM SHAMPOO 62

LANALOL LIQUID
BEETROOT (Tins) , ee 35 LANALOL SOLID

YARDLEY’'S BRILLIANTINE
CASHMERE BRILLIANTINE



SAUSAGES, (Tins) 0.0.0.0. 65 81 5 ENGLISH LAVENDER BRILLIANTINE. .......
BOR VE, CREAM :iiccsscesssscsicsecsscsessgeocsvesssve sare
CUE HAIR DRESSING ..............

JACK STRAWS ........ jek Milly: Abid 1 52





THE COLONNADE GROCERIES

The Place Where Your Dollar Goes Further





. >
9950566555064 , 4
PSPC LLL LLLP PALL ALA AP APP POE PPP LLL LALLA LK: 65 oO OOOO.

Pe PLL ELE

a
‘ ae “9
“ = —_— — 5 at
a (ar)
ll ae

r

=
i
\\
Se
~ NY’ Te
CPDSOOOSSS SOS OSC FOOS?D

Wlemo.

Just to remind you of
| our new Atock of — :
! _ LEATHER PURSES :
| PEN & PENCIL SETS | :
| MANICURE SETS | :

in Leather Cases : >

Pen”

FOUNTAIN PENS |
PHOTO FRAMES }
PAPER SERVIETTES a !

at reduced prices !

NOVELS |
Advocate Stationery | |
|







PAGE FOURTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1952

Geneairibnly Age... oe | nay Og cee Yr cas coonms

‘ - ~, ", 7
EARN BIG MONEY by selling Redif- | Lieut.-Col. J. Connell, OBE, E.D.,

TELEPHONE 2508 em > os 8 time ont 2 Supply i REAL ESTATE AUCTION 7 oni The Serkonee’ Deckisnt.
form ssus No. 2% y
ee FOR SALE ear eee

DIED APPLEBY—on Sea, St. James HOUSE-One nd shingle 1, PARADES eee
1 —- .-—-——— PUBLIC NOTICES newly-built aaiaaes Each naae aan Situated at creek Vilna, a ear All ranks will parade at Regt. H.Q. at 1630 hours on Thursday 10 Jul 58 and mR Ee: OO" :













































































































—- has
IFILL.On th Sth Jul 952 Jane bedrooms, dining, drawing rooms and|®% x 20 x 9 with a gallery and kitchen at 1630 hours on Saturday 12 Jul 52, The Commander, Caribbean Area will and it’s easy to keep cl¢an.
Rath i tase ure | epee eee | — ara veunaast Stgetn Svenestes™ "ll ahcnea wit We papi fron by toe] SAT, cur Aim penton om Satiries, ace Mone AERA S | A Sw aenas nee aoe
f ‘al leave: ate re aati ANT NOTICE LONE—on sea, Fontabell 5 | Government Auctioneer on the l4th day a ater a - ua Ss wroom,
tan aes er cetsese Adasen, mne” "4, Sey, |My tot be goae ola amas Shovel nt two Ney ach’ has Gning. ang @® SB. Nat ierary ended tat unier he Betula Ber Myati,-ee SIS mw FW are,
this evening for Bank Halli Methodist|Cave, Shepherd & Co., Ltd /°}to us we will give you a brand new stove |*"d several bedrooms. Modern convon- a 4 eee: auianetuaiem en 1490 eee tines be able te uitgnd the pérade. olun- SEN Tee
Church and thence proceeds jo the , 1 1.52—6n ae are ae PoP ag oo offer a. a 074 Mr. Kenneth ‘.9.S+-as teers will be inepected before the parade and if their turn out ts not ‘up to
estbury Cemetery. Friends are invited ts "14 a limite me onby jandifor SS 3 ine
Leonora Baird and Inez Force | CAR—Morris Six, very reasonable, suit BRADSHAW & COMPANY, —$—$_—___—__________'|_i will offer toe sale by Publie Gom- Sena, ae ee nt Oe ean erin went Sums Se belts
(Children), Fred Hinkson and/to make a pick-up. Progressive Bus Co Service Dep’ “BRIGHTWOOD" St. Lawrence Gap, ptt at my Office, Victoria Street, on ess ursday ul - =~ a on : cae en aear
Euretha West (grandchildren) Culloden Road 6.7 52—in. 6.7.52—In, | With land about 33,100 sq. ft. Good URSDAY 10th at 2 p.m. 4,25] square and swords, and §.D. caps; On Saturday, ul — normal —
6.7. 52—In 5 no ipeken eeianaaill NoOTI aoe frontage Suitable for building. The eet lene at LIGHTSFOOT LANE, with ot ee caps, S.D. Sam Browne belts and swords
-_———— -—-- A ungalow has 2 (pen verandahs, 3 large e chattel house containing drawing, Ban emoes oe 4 eee oS
WOODRUFFE—On July 5. 1952, at No.| condition ne ee Raed ei whade ae CE 1iving rooms, 3 bedrooms, shower, toilet,|@ining, 2 bedrooms, usual out-offices Band practices will be held on Monday 7, Wed ® Jul with a view to rehears-
40, Tudor Street. William Woodruffe | Evelyn 2840 or 38%. 6.7.52—2n All male citizens of the United States| kitchen, pantry, Garage, servants’ quar-| freshly painted inside, with electric light ing for the ‘Annual Inspection by the Commander, Caribbean Area.
He funeral will leave the above * ao ed -“ oe es “ maining orca” eee, electricity. Premises|@nd fittings, shop attached. For in-|2. ORDERLY OFFICER AND Se Se FOR WEEK ENDING
address at 430 p.m. to-day for the CAR—Dod X- . > bado} 8! Oo (Cal at] re-pain an re-decorated throughout | $pection apply: $
Westbury Cemetery. Friends are asked | case "conditint, “Weensod ve year” Dial | Ses amarican Consulate érot July 4 911961, Jaspection by appointment only. R. ARCHER McKENZIE. Orderly Officer .. .. |.. Lieut, A. Hi. Clarke, ! e
to attend 3903. 6.7 ttn. | aid ‘or tive Service Registration | Appky “Landfall”, Sandy Lane, St. James, | Dial 2047. 6.7.52—4n. Orderly Serjeant 278 Sjt. Williams, $.D.
DrAray Scott, Govt PAS ee we Ender. the, Universnt Military Training 2.7.62 Next for duty Lieut. 8. @ ley j
(friend) . CAR-~-One Prefect Ford 1949 model. In : rennet ———— Orderly Officer ‘ ee o eut. S. G. Lash
. n cal
WS ine ailore Peactcely new. Wearest | itt! male Citizens of the United States} | BUNGALOW | — Modern Bungsiow! UNDER THE SILVER Orderly Serjeant wes LS Turney, BG.
THANKS offer to $900.00 Apply to Yearwood | sequent to July 31, 1962, are required | Paywater, Detcons Road, "eka HAMMER Gol a Adjutant, e ce
SHBPHERD—Through this medium we] G#rage, Hart St, Back St. Mary's Wall to register upon the day they attain the} open verandah, sitting room, dining The Barbados Regiment. .
ety, hae. Paine an those one 6.1.—1n oe eer £ the day of|room, 2 large bedroams with’ running| On Tuesday 8th by order of Mrs. J. F PART I) OFFICERS ae a
y ‘reaths, cards, letters bel ere- ‘ ’ SERIA . A.F.
of condolence, attended the funeral CAR—One 1950 Standard Vanguard in| after, a Pe: SY she ea oetnan cane tohiee? a fre" "gil seth the Furniture at | THE NO CREASE ‘ a ited
and assisted in sickness or in. any|A-—! condition. No reasonable offer re-|" For further information, consult fhe} yard enclosed with Vil, Age te beatioe. teers Oe, wee). eC een Granted a Commission in the B’dos Extensiv:
other way expressed sympathy with us} used. To be seen at Chelsea Garage | i , * pply . | incitides: Capt. L. C om e Listings of Good
¥ exp ympaths American Consulate, Bridgetown, Bar-| Rogers, Barber, over J. N. Goddard &| Ext Dini ‘ Regt. with rank of Captain wef. 30
in our sad bereavement occasioned by | 1950) Lid. Phone 4949. §,7.52—2n. | bados. e Ms.tbtéd.n. Sond itd. or’ telephone 000 after’ #1wWa — - ope: Votes Cait Mav, 1992. Class Property and Land
typ death of our mother and aunt] [> Gis woseley Sal i. ae p.m. 6.7.52—-Jn Waaron, Sewms & Srasnem 3 ebies; i ata ‘ ’ Always Available
, eu s olsele: joon, \ * ttee, . LEAVE - . y =
Sefer, Atle (ons) of Deacons Rd. | "to. Inspection at Marine’ Hotel. NOTICE Gr wate Gannune mee Hat stand: MT. Table, all in mahogany: 559 L/C Dolphin, J, “BY Coy. Granted 3 weeks’ P/Leave wef 3 Jul
iy : . ED _ e ass ina; nner Tea Services;
Ollie £. Arthur (nephews) i= E 5.7.52—2n, cinta: Se ov. eueem Desirable, 3 Bedroom with Basing &| Electric Lamps, Toaster & Kettle; Clock, M. L. re pa
eryl & Winifred (nieces) MOTORCYCLE—Triumph — Speed| Applications for two vacant Vestry (about 9 yrs, old). Dining & Breakfart oe Mepis ULE Toe a Grau: Soe Barbados Regiment.
6.7.52—1n, | twin 5 H.P. Motorcycle in perfect work- ps ret . ers an es paint Cream & Green FOR SALE

















































scholarships (one boy, one girl) tenable|ooms, 2 Toilets, Garage, Servant's illips 6 valve Radio in mahog: Case; NOTICE













ns PN order KX—315 License paid. Apply | at the Alleyne i, will be receivea | Room, Everite Roof,, A-1' Condition, | Di ; ; Offi & Serjeants’ Mess

WINS: ar - Lee ae at? School, ’ - " ning Table, Sideboard & Chairs in Blue; There will be a Mess Meeting of the Warrant cers

Fe ines Mahi beg to, say thanks vaone as near Pegwg., Thy En. by the undersigned up to Saturday,| Back Yard enclosed Pin Stone, about| Double & Single Simmons Bedsteads, at 1845 hours on Saturday 12 July, ay
to all those who sent wreaths, flowers, | Phone . TS July 19th, 1952. Applications must be] 12,000 *q ft. Going for Only Under rings, and Mattresses, Presses and —-——_--— . een ay : SWEETFI
letters, attended the funeral or in 6 ~~~ eran > accompanied by birth Certificate and | £3,100, Dressing Tables (painted Cream), Chgst Batata tone ae St. Beter — An
at&y other way expressed their sym- ONE (1) Austin two ton truck and one | ;ppiicants must present themselves to ate type house built of stone,
pathy with us in our recent bereaye-} (1) Austin A.40 Car. Telephone 4821,

he Head Master of the Alleyne School Contains large living room with

Be Wisé! “OLIVE BOUGH” (Seaside|of Drawers Gent-Dresser & Dressing
and weil Set in off Main Rd.) at|Table in Mahogany: G.B.C. Refrigerator
HASTINGS-—-NEAR PAVILION COURT; | (only 2 years), Larders,, Kitchen oper





















































































ment caused by the death of Ruth|D, V, Seott & Co., Ltd. French windows ding onto
ware. 26.6.52—t.t.n. |" Monday Signed med GA, SKINNER, JA Large (Partly. Stoney 3-8 4| Kitchen Utensils, Two "& Three covered verandahs with view. ot
eo mamins, Mine A and! "S00CK One Ford Vib $-Ton, Trudk, estry Clerk, St, Peter: | Bedrooms with “pasins, Several other | Florence oll Stoves & Ovens, Seales & pen ns) Dedrooms, kitchen, store-
rs. L. ch, s 3 Price an f —One: sor Ton SFuGk. 62—4n. | Rooms, Open Gallery (Front & 2 Sides), | Weights, oil Lamps, Magnet Electric DS SOSSS9S OCs : nd usual outbuildings,
Miss M, Roberts 6.7.52-—In. | Thone 4356. 4,7,52-—3 |. Enclosed Back Gallery with 24 Windows,| Stove, Lawn Mower, Garden Hose & M/V. “CARIBBEE” will oe and servants’ quarters.
OE a sil elie cee ceel Th Nie anatase ctete ha tepedhiianginsanitagiagisniallial : 7 a ' * n The , . Pprox. 2%4 acres well
ar temeanmnane TRUCE —Chewrols (nigh, no qeagow| BARBADOS CIVIL BERVICE | Tole, other Conveniences, vary | fool, & ee Som cu erm Cust STEAMSHIP CO. accest Cargo and Passengers for grqunds with ‘right ‘ot way over
Aiea, ievine | memory ot our} tbe cer retuned. A Barnes & Co... SOCIATION Good snd Bata Bathing, Trek. Gasset, Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, eh.
beloved eemedianther Soe z Matilda | 4 3.7,.52—t.f,n. Laer single Senne employee of | niso Gareqe Shed for 4 Cars wall heute BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO. a a stiee FROM EUROPE mela See St. Kitts. Sailing Mon- #
7 ray = -————___ + [the Government Service are asked to Ce ee are, * | M.S TENT 27th JUNE 1952, day inst. TLLCREST, Bathsheba — *
3 Nae sea who died on the 7th) “pRUCK—Used Fargo 5 ton truck with jattend a special general meeting of | UP = Ideal and enough Land to Auctioneers. S.S. COTTICA 11th July, 1952 The M/V.. “MONEKA” will stantially built modern me
‘At Baie I dae adie: meanengere 2 speed axle. Marris 10 h.p. 1947, Austin | Division Ik of the Civil Service Asso- build % ee a 60—70 Room Hotel, 4.7,52—2n.|M.S. NESTOR 25th July, 1952 accept Cargo and Passengers for bungalow on brow of cliff afford-
ame ana Sik car Weloved one fact, All ve the above in good con-| ciation to be held in the Town Hall on Seth 3 Bungalows, also Suitable for M.S. BOSKOOP ist August, 1952. Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, ing fine view of this wild and
away dition a Roval Garage ic nae Saturday 12th ma at 1,30 p.m. oe Say ae ee ea 6 pape EUROPE Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Fri- ving coast. 3 goad bedrooms,
: Ma Ne 4 ;phone 4504, nm ENDA. y. oD s , By M.S. ORANJESTAD 15th July, 1952, day llth inst, ing room, 2. side lleries,
Farley akepees eoupener’ oe pen abo To make preparation to meet the Civil] The Bus Sea aera Stone Business EDUCATIONAL SAILING TO T'DAD, PARAMARIBO The M/V, “CACIQUE DEL ae ane auiar ters ‘and |
Harcourt, Fred, Keith, Dennis, Magdiena ELECTRICAL Setvicw Commiasioner Te salary revision. | Coen Condivion lace! ie See Bite, PR en BT CARIBE" will accept Cargo and garage. Biectricity and maine
Lewis, Stella Cadogan (grands), & 7 great . Secretary, Div. U1, |Going Under £2,300. IN TUDOR ST NOTICE $8 COTTICA 28th July, 1982. tna eis” waa ; ;
grands. -1.5a—ln. | GENERATORS—One 3% KVA. AC 6.7.68—2n, | La 2-Storey Stone Business Premises = M.S. NESTOR 8th August, 1952. Date of sailing to be notified. VILLA VICQUE, ST. VINCENT
Generator 110 Volts & One 5 K.V.A, AC) & Residence with a Large G: ALLEYNE SCHOOL ENTRANCE | saizING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO : Beautifully Situated b built
LOW—In loving memory of Wii-| Generator 115 Volts. Phone 4358. 4 BARBADOS. Woskihon Gu. Cote. Wee. arage or EXAMINATION M.S HERSILIA 4th July, 1962 of as with ouse
liam Crichlow who departed July 6th, 4.7.$2—3n IN THE COLON: ait Ps sped , A-1 Con-| For the Sehool Year beginning 16th , iS NL B.W.i. SCHOONER OWNERS view, oni ig magnificent
E IAL COURT OF | dition, Ideal for any Business, Vacant,| Sept. 1962) Examination for Entrance atta ee tae en ASOT A Eee) town, 1 ee ce
Rest in peace dear Daddy FRIGIDAIRE, A.1. order, one year he ae ar tee a can — $120.00 p.m. Under £4,000| to the Alleyne School will be held on a oe theo nr a LT Consignee, Tele. . 4047 Beach wits a eugtic Club
Tis sweet to breathe thy name guarantee to go. Mrs. C. F. C. Kirton, = ae z Steamship Bed: uy It—UPPER NELSON ST.,—-3. Monday July 21, 1952 at 9 a.m. at the ih oaaie & CO., D. : he hitwonne ee
In life we loved jou dearly. Woodbourne, St. Peter or Dial 3003. aneee Cc vaeior Resides, Conveniences. Good | School. = (33 x 15) cas, ates
In death we do the same. 6.7. $2—In war 9a . s : ondition, about 3,500 sq. ft. Going] Applications together with Baptismal 4 » Verandah (2y
© Motor Vessel “T.B. Radar Below £800. C Meyfor Almost anything | Certificates and Testimonials will be ‘ usual outbuildings ete,

Fliga (wife) Vincent (daughter) Sydney
(son) Gladstone! Phillip (son-in-law) &] HAIR CLIPPERS — Horstman Electric} ,; 2 sore one oe aaa te
Grands. { Hair Clippers suitable for Barbers @/uay the ‘V7th day of July 1962, I will
6.3, 62—18- Peel 18 ea8 See them on display at our offer for sale by Public Competition at

mms | SHOW
'HOMAS—In lovi ¢ Baward-|* Rooms. The Standard Agmne? | ny in the Public Buildings for a
"ihe Whore. died bin July 196) (dos) Co., 14 Swan Street. Dia, we | sum “not less than tle appraised value
. . ate in. ;
“THE MOTOR VESSEL T. B. RADAR’



ESTATE HOUSE; St. James ~
A imposing spacious home with
Soe fey ms Sool location
\eigh € 4
Town 6 , © ing coast

fotos ka baie mete AB eats ©] Canadian Nati :
n » “Olive} Friday 18. t l t
Bough". Hastings. Applications for one or more yacant ana n a 1ona eams s
ne learn ——. | Foundation Scholarships tenable at the f

LAND-Half acre, situated at Waveil] Alleyne School, will be received by the
Avenue, St. Michael, almost entire area| Headmaster up to Friday July 18. Candi-

























































With thy Sheep a place provide her being under cultivation with healthy| dates will be examined on Monday SOUTHBOUND Arrives Sails Sails ives ees
From the goats afar divide her, J now at anchor in Carlisle Bay, Bridge-| well manured ratoon canes and aj July 21 at 9 a.m 29.6.52—-3n, Halifax Boston "doa IG HOUSE, ST.
From {ne Boat ater cin mule her | agit Tecelved new shipment of Gerrard |town, with its fittings. Particulars of | number of fruit trees. Amount required | ~—-———__________ | CANADIAN CRUISER . Sta Se Souly et tes Gn, Wile wopuler coats Shes
Lord all-pitying Jesus Blest, Pc. & Maffe!l & Co. Ltd fonic Em’ | the Inventory of the said Vessel can be] $1,300. The two houses on the land] BARBADOS BRITISH WEST CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 2 July > 14 July 14 a
Grant her thine eternal rest omni. 15.6 $2-4.4.n_|2e2 OF application. may also be bought. For terms and INDIES LADY RODNEY .... *.. i July 14July 16 July 2 July 26 July fone ae and secluded
Ever remembered by Lionel, Elton, oe The appraised value of the Vessel,| conditions of sale apphy: Gilbert Millar, : 5 on Bout ‘ e grounds of
Erla, Mildred, Eutarine. * “Bye” which was built in 1946, is the sum of, | Fitts Village, St. James 6.7.52—In.| ST. MICHAEL'S GIRLS’ SCHOOL A a 1% acres are well wooded
Ethelbert, Fela, i: eH s2—1n | 2USE, ARRIVED “Pye” De Luxe | THIRTY FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS . SECONDARY DAY SCHOOL . - and could readily be converted
‘ Ultra- Modern | Radio or ei toads | it, # fitted with an Internal combustion FOR GIRLS NORTHBOUND = Arrives Sails Arrives Asrives Agtives into one of the show places of
ent 3 one cl ine ‘wo a up mens Diesel Engine, has an estimated speed] LAND—86,750 square feet of lanu| Applications are invited from Gradu- B'dos St. John Boston ax mireal the Island. The house is of 2
FOR RENT no needle worries, in attractive Wain iy [of 10 knots, a gross tonnage of 162,34, |situate at Britons Hill, Saint Michael. | 6s for the post of Assistant Mistress | | .5y vErsoN . , 22 Jul: storeys and possesses noticeable
$430.00 F. C8 MATTED CO” TD. a register tonnage of 116.12, a length] Enclosed with stone wall on $ sides, | Qualified to teach Mathematics, General | ‘7, nian 4 July 8 July 17 July 19 July iy character.
Bri Wn, Money: & CO,, LTD..| o¢ 103 feet, a breadth of 20 & 3/10 feet} Fine view, over the harbour, Would} Blementary Science and Botany. Some CONSTRUCT! Jul 10 A
HOUSES r; Wm, Henry Street. Crd eh dat We aD deer, he incath Of be sold et Cha Ce ie CL EEEerIence in teaching in ‘Gévondary |) SONEREUCEOR fh ctiy © Oey, 5 Aug. 8 Aug. ug. 11, GRAEME HALL TERRACE—
VEDERE. Full ovis peer Oe ba he ain ESotn is 24 feet. ; quiries to the undersigned : Apbools will be a recommindation ; , INEY .. 7Aug. 9 Aug. 19 Aug. 20 Aug. 23 Aug. Steers Niet 2. storey house
BEL Maxwell Coast Milly] “Sasets.a et e accommodation consists of 2 ALAR ALE ist an class | * ic! of stone with everite
furnished, attractive grounds, splendid |, MUMLARD Rapier. fs, hae Table| passengers’ rooms with .4 beds each, CARRINGTON & SBALY, Honours Degrees $1,584 by $72 for further particulars, apply to— . Large living room,
sea-bathing. Phone 8188. 5.7,52—2n. $5.00 ore bea aarti M LIMITED. sailors’ rooms for 6, cooks’ accommoda- Lueas Street. $2,304 by $' 784. 3 bedrooms, kitchen, laundry, 2
in, HY. BE SBLRE'S ‘|tion for 2, Boatswain's locker and J 1.7.82—4n, Other Graduates GARDINER : servants’ rooms and garage,
“DUNDAS HOUSE” Crane Coast— + . Hy. St. -7.5%—8n | store room. Vipul cle Selgin alge ea $1,416 by. $60—$1,776 by $72—-$2,352. AUSTIN & CO,, LTD.—Agents. .
St. Philip — Dec. to April. Apply on MU RD SinEnoGlas of Braned Frosted For further particulars and arrange- OFFERS for a brick wall to be de-| Graduates who hold a Teacher’ iplo-
premises. Cee ee eee cathe Ob wartranc. | menue for inspeation apply to. .., molished and | removed from our! ma Will be paid an additional 58131 °f) \$§06G0008000000900000000000000000000000900000% ; cl Soe: TANS -Core-
s y Ne . . : . , Cavans Street St ill 116 per annus. tie “eg
FURNISHED BEDROOM at Maxwe. |/ASHLEY'S LIMITED, Pr. Wm. Hy, St Marshal in Admiralty. }by ‘Twelth July. DaCOSTA & CO. LTD. | A cost of Living Allowance is now on one of the most attractive sites
Good sea-bathing. Phone 8173 4. | Provost Marshal's Office 25.6,52—lin. 5.7. an | payable at pesveliing Haves. The posi- in popu.
1-52-20. | “SORGHHERRIGERATON One © Gus | LH on, tn sian Benle wo 'bee WATER COOLERS (Ice Cans) erected, Saw ak np Se
: ft. in. excellent condition, call and see ‘ SPRINGVALE PLANTATION,— Saint| © y ao mM, SPOOR” r loung a ena
AERTS Fwo Furnished Plats oy Dat [same at Redman & Taylor's Garage Lid FOR SALE sidrew., About 227 arable acres and about | Mt, “Soak is snob & Government, post 3 bedrooms, detached garage and
Available June 15th Onward. Fnane a g Lege" ager's House, Overseer's House, Seual ms o qed the Barbados Now Obtainable at servants’ quarters: All services.
- “Jana estieatel ‘Slaeteln ‘f wr outbuildings, two horses, cart, ete. eacher’s jon, ‘ BUN 5 \ ‘
ere to nee ow buaeus Oven ant Wormning Svthe. purect MISCELLANEOUS ‘The above Plantatic,’ -vill be offered Beige STR THE C€ CREW BUNGALOW, ROCKLEY—
eee Oe tn ed Dial gaol, |Coudition, Dial 2177, 2.7.6a—7n, | ——___—— — | for sale af auction on #riday, the 11th pie. ne spe ene ENTRAL EMPORIUM Fooms, large ‘living % Co wide
%1,83--9n BLACK & DECKER Tools 1”, 4”, & {July next, unless previously | s0 Dy The | 1 sonnel be re- , verandah oa Moen
tome : {private treaty, All inquiries should be he successful applic w eer t :
flat, fully fur- changing. ‘unit oii, me Fae | aanie pera, "shcasive.” ‘aibes. be directed to the undersigned in the first | quired to assume duties as front January AT ATTRACTIVE PRICES for kicese, Good situation near
¥LAT—Five roomed flat, fully | your requirements now the prices of the| instance. CARRENGTON & SEAL‘, | 1953 Golf Course. £4,300.

ished, located in Balmoral Gap. From] 57
A eee for two or three months. PYE BATTERY SETS—Just a few left.

. MAFFEI'S RADIO
ne 2135, 5.7.52—6n 15,6.52—t,f.n.











Lucas Street, Bridgetown. 18.6,52—4 Applica accompanied by _ three
wetown- 18.6.524n. | ecent testimonials, a Medical certificate
—_____________.. | of fitness, a Birth See Ss php-
The undersigned will offer for sale at | tograph should be sul mitte: , to: e
their office No. 17, High Street, Bridge-| Headmistress, 8t. Michael's Girls’ School,
town, on Friday, the 18th day of Juky Martindales Road, St. Michael, 15a,

next shipment will be higher. Da Costa
& Co. Ltd., Electrical Department.
4.7,52—6n.





NEWTON DGE,
stone

house containing enclosed gal-

Ist August, furnished or unfur- leries, spacious drawing and

|
n , “INGRID” Navy Gardens. Three RADIO—7 Tube K.B. Radio. 13 metres| CELANESE SILK-—Superfine flowered

in eight lovely colours 36 inches wide



Murry and Secure These...















F on by arrangement}‘o 31 m. Short and Medium Waves. ‘ I. to arrive not later dining rooms, breakfast room, 3

wil “the tenant, teleghone number. 8172 Beaapione Rius-in. Contecs:c, Pipers St ee ae. “THE DWELLING-MOUSE known aa BARB OID September 1962. bedrooms, 2 garages ete. Lately
YN, ROACH & yearns A ae Weary. — i : voli “Glenflora” standing on 1 acre 2 roods 15.6.52--Sn. CASH BOXES 8" 10" and 12" c oh Pa ROE

1.7, 52—t.f.n LIVESTOCK. GALVANISED—Special offer for 10] 2%'% perches of land on the main road | =~ RESIDENCE, FONTABELLE—2

Vee days. Best quality English galvanised |#t White Hall, Saint Michael, Electric Ww TED CARD INDEX CABINETS storey house with self contained

MANUELITA—Maxwell Coast fully] GOAT—One pure bred Saanan goat oo Sivihited nalia” ‘con eg “Tiebechtn’ anyees’ cn application to AN’ Sontalns ¢ livi van freak
furnished, Ring 3222. 6.7.52—2n J ig pints per day, also two ewe kids 7] Auto e Co. of Spry & ‘Tratalgar st. Ms, dob Alfred Bynoe on the premises. ie fast veheare ubete peiteceng,
—————— dE weeks old. pply to Mr, don Jones, eal fon. r further particulars and conditions |-——————————"" = -— usua’ . ,
SEA BEAUTY Attractive 3 Bedroom | rags Hill, St. Joseph. "O.7.82—1n, | oe tee8 21,6,52-t-£- | of sale apply toi— COTTLE, CATFORD HELP re ae aera



rooms. Annexe has wide verandah,

5 Mt
Bungalow on St. James Coast. A oie living room, 2 ap yee

& CO 4 .7.52—8n
modern conveniences. Apply to Mrs. A:] GoaTs—6 Sanaan & Alpine milch

a
INTERNATIONAL TORNADO K.39









Metal and Wire Waste Paper Baskets



YOUNG WOMAN as _ general help.


































































$450.00 nearest. Owner leaving island. and arage. Good investment
Bovell, Fitts Village, St. sak so—gn | £08t8. Fresh in milk. Apply. Cyril] Enquiries Yacht Club 6,7.52—1n amnesia Country girl prefered or foreigner. Must Proposition.
ad, eres Serene Land, County ROR, | erent -~ NOTICE sleep in. Good home. Write P.P.P. C/o
nn | P
—_M Ul. Unfurnished | > ichael. 7,$2—2n.| I1CE-BOX — White all Metal Chro- . Advocate, 6.7.52—2n THE GARDEN,
‘Amnitc batniae wel. ue Le “a mium fittings in first class condition ee ROHERTS STATIONERY Di | 3301 WORTHING—| ern coral stone
eee eats bedrooms, Venetian Blinds, | whUrs Pure. Bred Alsatian Puppies Can be seen at the Courtesy Garage. | 41 West Inga, Rum Refinery 14d. “National Cash Bock-Mesoing Machine — Dia bungalow on, comer site with wide
Telephone, all modern conven!- i " ” 5.7.52—3n. 3 es Operator Ww’ prev: e. es. leasant garden with
theese "Dial 3802, ? 2.7,.52—an, | Hales. ree Phone Water ince, 200 bados Foundry Limited Shares. | akgume duties on or before ist. August, flower beds, lawn, concrete ter-
————— | tor : ie 4370. 1.0848 —A new shipment of Canadian | 520 Barbados Co-operative Cotton Fac- | 1952, Apply in person with written fret, ean enanres Of bearing Spits
LOsT & FOUND Se ps in various designs. Why tory Ltd. Shares application to Secretary, Dowding Estates ; Monn
MECHANICAL gor Raquze one now, when we ave them, | 300 Barnes “& Co., Ltd., 8% Preference | # Trading Co., Limited.” q jorge living room. covered gallery,
| cena ’ : ic Shares (Ex Dividend) a ' ¢
MACHINE-—One Singer Leather Arm Dept. Phone 3878 3.7. +1195 Barbados Fire Insurance Co. Ltd. ———_—__ B rb d A i t B A robes, well fitted kitchen,
LOST sea: ee Machine, actually new, going cheap, Shares MISCELLANEOUS a a os ma eur oxin P ssn. with avers way to Bouse,
EEPSTAKE TICKET—Series “to | Wer leaving the colony, no reasonable ve floating scale models./ 250 Barbados Shipping & Trading Co, | Uniler the vat e of Sees 8 quarters and all usual
9161. Finder please return same to] fey refused, can be seen’ from 3—6 p.m, | Ships of Royal Navy. Nourse Ashby, St Ltd. Shares $62.50 POCKET MONEY easily earned patronag =o All public utility services,
Vernon Cox St. Lawrence, Ch sy tase jaily at Randall, Upper Reed Street George. 5.7.52—6n | 90 West India Biscuit Co., Ltd. Shares. by recommending 25 new subscribers to CANADA DRY Fesotanee Leathe our highest
“t ea ————— The abovementioned shares will be REDIFFUSION in one month :
alii ty Bhalla tial Sia RECORDS—A new shipment of 33 1/3] set up for sale at Publie Auction on 1.7.52~6n Invite ¢
555996 566 : 52 ve ; IN CHANCERY. AND INCH
5$9O9S695 ONE (1). Aeromotor Mill and 36¢t,|".P-m. records just received, selections} Friday the llth day of July, 1952 at ®
roekt isvexdet a, "Say [etme auth Pye chirps fy Baan"| nih Cation “& Soul. Lice | “REDRRRURTON ee, wim eam, |e Entries for the 1952 CHAMPIONSHIPS ee Cree ee
Leundry o. Ltd. "Phone 3592. a ete. | Street, Bridgetowr > . 4 by t
REAETORS LIMITED se abt Bee oe Be Vaan] ggt nee Bi dati aaa perks oem





DaCosta & Co., Ltd, Electric Dept
Phone 3878, 3.7.52—6n.,

: THE MODERN HIGH SCHOOL STADIUM

during the month of August at a date to be ennouneed later

cflers either a, a whole or

TYPEWRITER — One Royal Portable separately.

Nvpewriter, (Quiet De Luxe Model) with
atest features, Magic Margin, Speed

a —————
SUPPLEMENT YOUR %NCOME by

REALTORS LIMITED recommending REDIFFUSION. Obtain

| full particulars from the REDIFFUSION







OFFERS

RECORDS: Decca & Brunswick re-
cords. Standard numbers. To Clear at 1















































Es 3 7 re | . . ; ‘visions: LYNCHBURY BELLEVILLE —
ORYECEILE a ere ee ery NS ‘ean: |for Gc, 2 for $1.00 or 3 for Ste. AUCTION SALE office. 1,7,64—6n Chemmasensiare sent be contested in the fonearrne Pleasantly situated 2 storey house
Three bedrooms with built in laily, Ebony Dress Shop, Upper Reed |LASHLEY’S LIMITED, Pr. Wm. Hiv. St “}WENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bonus ywelg' : with good grounds of about 12,500
cupboards "and running.” water daily, muony Des pher, Reed We LAWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bonus | Renisaweietst — » ie ” oa. ft. 3 galleries, large drawin
Combination Drawing and Din- meen | re nmr ‘eatherweight - ° ' room, study, . we!
ing Room, Kitchen, Garage and TYIEWRITERS—Don't be misled, you] “STUK” GLUE—The 2-in-1 At 11.30 a.m. tions in one calendar month. |) | ¢ Lightwel “4 Ser fitted’ kitchen, 3 double bedrooms,
two servants rooms Also right vill get the best and the cheapest type- with the 1000 and 1 uses. -7,52--6n, | ¢ wa ” 147 ” garage and usual offices. Offers
of way to sea. A sound invest. vniters at Bradshaw's, always check with | dealer for Stuk Glue, On Thursday the 17th July, by order elterweight — » ” , required, under £3,000 would be
ment, so contact us now. 1s before buying. Our repalr workshe | —_————————————— of Miss Wylmer Cummins, we will sell Ue SEAM ES ae pratt os % Middleweight — ” 160 ,, considered. i
s equipped with modern tools and we nt now to a ed Telegraph tne as aan eS eet ak stamps Miveoh) State cies on or off % Light Heavyweight— ” 175 yy ’ BEMERSYDE, ST. LAWRENCE
WYNDAL ave skilled ‘mechanics for maintenapee ee + ee a pe yl a j Mayville’, Codrington Hill, whieh] paper, E. D, Peterson, 1265 No. Harvard, | §¢ Heavy — over 175 _,, —Strongly built coral stone bunga-
eee stone ahr ee ia er. cvees. kgihe. “to von a Onewettes days after Londen ‘Sone “Drawing suite three chairs and settee | Ivd., Los Angeles, Calit. 5. tain, x Intending competitors are asked to call at Modern High School low specious aaa. sargos and
plaster( on approximately 5 set . “¢ . "lot sovered) 2 a e ‘orms ernoon 4—. . galle: . ccommodati com-
square feet land. Situate at Rock- ae RAD an w pan mn Gels, ov eyere” an ire Y fadlo 4 “ble Sin mcohaents “ere | . for Entry F any aft te prises:— separate drawide and
ey, on the Bus route and within SHAW & COMPANY. Represen' . . rocketa EWS Bes tray tables, Bat’ sane 9 365656666666666 £66566659% dining rooms, 3 double bedrooms,
g- couple of 100 yards from the 6,7.52—In 15.46.0048 vor, folding chair wall brackets - — SOS large kitchen and pantry, 3
famous: Rockley © Beac Jery oto ee ee | ne Chih. ¢ ; : ; _ servants’ rooms, garage ‘and
“y TYPEWRITERS—Used and new type- TOOLS—Hand Drills, Hand Saws) °* china cabinet, one buffet, one Tip
teasonably priced, vriters: New Baby Portables only $110.00 fom a R Min. Back Saws 12in hop Taage, one Sane eles Top, on the best bathing beach at St
. Jsed larger portables at $110.00 and up, |and i4in., Compas Saws lain. & id4in,, | °\\"''*. : » : .
BUNGALOW These machines may all be had ‘on a |Oil Stoves Spirit, Levels Bin, to 24in.|


= oem r of Town by bus or car, and in
E Pe Caen fh peia- our opinion would be very suitable

On approximately 19,00Q square

week's trial without obligation. K. Braces & Bits, Plyers, Pincera Squares | Pek. one Rest Chair, 10 Tube Philco }
feet of land, Situate just off Rock~

Hunte & Co., Ltd., Lr, Broad St. Dial]with Mitre & Level, Claw Hammers, | "lio, one Mirror, Lamp shades, Floor













Â¥ : u . acid: oe 0 for conversion into a small guest
New Road overlooking the is6 4.7,.62—3n | Spoke T Pu =| Rugs and Bracket Lamps, Rush Settee : rt {

Gait course and commanding a a See RP ENeS, aurten a ag ee ee with cushions, one Clock, Antique et bruises.’ house.

magnificent view unobstructed to 35 m.m, Agfa Karomat Camera. Latest | town, 25.6.52—4n, | Glassware including Salad _ Dishes, Ice | A.1. ite Liniment | . BEA!

the sea, Comprising three bed- model, Fully. automatic F. 2.8 Xenar | ——_——— | Cream Cups, and Glass Cups ep | MENS wd oe” Bt. LAr
rooms, drawing and staihe, 308 Lens, HUGHES, Stansfeld Scott. WEDDING GIFT—A few ironing board | T° Savers, cones rane oe | Wed h 4 Recrbonen, Jarge Uoiteg coon and
kitchen, lovely tiled to’ an 4.7.52—@n | and No-cord iron sets, subject to special | Y4!¢ tneiueln pup ee ee et e do not have t tai’ 7 beac!
bath, wedding-gift allowance, A Barnes &| {1 Gold, Pi rex han New Customers We ot ancl preasiees © obtam find good bathing Pull details -

5 Feng Sale ’ ; ers v :
Downstairs: Garage, servants MISCELLANEOUS Co., Ltd. 3.7. 52—t th. Single and Double Beds and Springs, | . e give you 5% discount whether application.



rooms, with Bath and Toilet,




























Se



towel Racks, Triple Mirror Vanity, with | . you are a new customer, old custom i
and quite enough room for ANTIQUES — ot every di tion upnolstaane atagt Bedside Table ‘and | WHITE ing new cust er or a toot bring- WYNDOVER, ST. PETER—This
whatever you may require Giass, China, old Jewels, fine Blver Night Chair, One Dressing Taple, One | NIMENT 8 omers, s country home with over 4% acres
SWEET FIELD Watercolours. | Marly books, Maps, Aube. A D Buca $8 in rele tanger serine i Our prices on Galvanize Corrugated Sheets are:— SPS, Seats, veeaete,
Lovely Stone House, comprising adjoining Royal Yacht Club. Machine In mahogany Case, one Jones | orchard has been completely
upstairs three bedrooms, large % 3.2.82—t.t.n. Sewing Machine; One painted Breakfast | 4° 6 feet 90 modernised by the present owner
living room, dining room, 2 toilets — ‘our est Suite, Perfection Three Burner Stove x ; ee $3. There are 2 wide verandahs,
and baths, one with Tub bath AMERICAN Brassieres in pink and ee with Oven, One Hot Plate, One Water | LODGE STONE WORKS co. AQ $4.60 drawing and dining rooms, 3
and hot and cold water, gallery, white, A and B cups, all sizes, $1.50 per Cooler, One Spong Mincer, One Picnic} ” » double bedrooms with washbasins,
Downstairs: 3 spare rooms, kitchen ov. Strapless Bras. $2.35 per pr. The Many people never seem to get a good | ico. Flask, Kitchen Ware, One Gallon! A large quantity of 8 ,, $5.24 modern kitchen, laundry, servants
and shower room, Standing on Modern Dress Shoppe, Broad Street. night’s rest. They turn and toss—blame it Ice Cream Freezer, Books, Plants, Gad | K machine broken flint stone, all subject to 5% oa garage. A property of
approximately 2'* Acres of land 6.7.52—-2n ‘nerves’—when it may be their kidne One Garden Seat, and many other items. | \ all sizes, suitable for Road or subj ? s ction.
about 100 yards from Gibbs Beach. | . y ys. Inspection fram 9,30 a.m, on morning | \¢ ie
Inspection by appointment only, § BIG clearance Sale at Variety Sandal : kidneys filter poisons and excess | 4) sale i Yard Construction and/or at WILLOWS, PROSPECT,
Shoppe. Shoes Sandals, Ballerinas, Pumps | acids the blood. If they fail and 6.7.52—In.|% making concrete blocks, or On Iron Corrugated Sheets:— pv et 1 ae constructed
COVE SPRING COTTAGE “nd children's Sandals ete, Buy and] impurities stay in the system—disturbed 'a any other concrete struc- sarang tert a s beus Eas
Av lovely: cottage standing on 2 | save over 50% on these 6.7,52—1n wast ee follows. If you don’t rest well WOOos 399906999809 * x t The Co. al der- x 6 feet $3.00 1 1 Sbedros i exce ay
Roods 27 Perches of land, situate BROODER—One half inch wire, fi use Dodd's Kidney Pills. Dodd’s | * ; eng th: construction of 7 $3.50 Maced, wenden directly over-
st, having its own . ne e, five : ! > e oad > ” . looking the sea, downstai
at St James Coast, having tts tee gp] sombartment chicken brooder, Phone the kidneys so that you can rest |< REAL ESTATE %|% Roads and Yards by con- . 8 | $4.00 eichas, > Sana paStes. ane
bedrooms, with _brivate bath and aes -7.52— better—and feel better. 136 18 tract,. or —— % 9 $4.50 storerooms. Offers invited.
toilet to main bedroom, drawing BARGAINS—Children’ Art Sille mM D 2 ” .
gnd dining room, Buropean BAe BY Panties, 3 prs. for $1.00, Plastic Panties Kidney Pills |< ° KEITH RAYSIDE = 10 ,, $5.00 tall Derrece A apeme Geinged
running water, OT a #00 au Py Mee Reece Drees Rae y ‘, All less 5% nes bungalow on a corner site.
Bone and a gallery on Broad Street 6.7.52—2n % D'ARCY A. SCOTT %| SSOSS SBY re dining rosea verahaahe® kitchen,
; . = Sa " m athe
LAND : i $ Real Estate Agent and % | : rm e Son pastee: qe on s
Near Upton Plantation: guaran- + . \3 % -aid out with lawns and borders
teed Blectric Light. 10 DAY'S NEWS FLASH SHOOTING > x Auctioneer of Middle St, ¥ | of flowering shrube—£3,750,
the St. James Coast i . % |S offers the best in real estate. } A E T A Yy a O R Re 7 D
es ia Fests cu, - Clearing out our new stock SEASON | On his extensive list is a % ° . °
ae of shot gun cartridges:— 4 ms = % property called “Colleen” ¥ PALACE
bas ) : 3 } q
12 GUAGE ELEY—$11.65 iS HERE x % on the sea at Worthing at ¥ Dial 4100, ee
REALTORS Limited per 100 NET CASH Q|X& present vacant, also a three % VELVET EVENING BAGS » , aon pas os unt ed
E Shotgun cartridges $11.50 RIS bedroom stone bungalow at $
REAL ESTATE AGENTS Big closing out reductions per hundred. Our cartridge 31h Welehes, Ch. Ch., and sev- x where cy
AUCTIONEERS on all HARDWARE ITEMS. aoe : 1 as m Sis eral others. Why not make x re
VALUERS ae Saeed ida te he shin Ped $ | x aa appointment and — % | Qualities are HIGH wl eae
w= ®/% look a few. For Real Estate \ CTI
151/152 Roebuck Street, | ; / ee 1, cho ‘ and ¥
ye poe JOHNSON’S STATIONERY $/§ “St BRADSHAW & COM~ 9 /% sec x BUILDING SURVEYORS
Phone 4900 and HARDWARE PANY. 21% a sate % Prices are LOW Phone 4640
Sie: 5) PARSE ease: ey Plantations Building
PSGSSSOLOSSSOS | 69NGSOSSOSSOHHANGOOOOOS: | 5 . os 26900 |'
ri POSOSSSSE SO SSS SSSS SOS POSSESSES SO GOS OOS |















ST. MAR t : First Chevch 61 Christ, Scientist
i ie G yr § 5 ¥'S CHURCH SPEIGHTSTOWN setown, t ¢ Bay Stfeet
Attention is drawn to the Defence (Control of Drug and Patent} Trinity m1 n m Holtnese ecu 3 pr a ag SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1952 7.15 pam. — 10.90 25 Be "

and Proprietary Medicine Prices) Order, 1952, No. 7 which will be} , 79° a.m. Matins, 8.00 a.m. Low Mass, Company Meeting pm. Farewe Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p,m Led poms pam. — 19. 26m , 2 i ; See

published in the Official Gazette of Monday 7th July, 1952 9.00 am. Solemn Mass and Sermon Service, for Sr. Captain & Mr w Wednesdays 8 pm. A Serviee which ee ee Mry —e

y y; pm Stiiday Scidol. 400 pm. Eist Includes Testimonies of Christian Science 409 p.m The News, 410 pm_ Int t :

News, nte :

> a f 2 : - }3 30
2. Under this Order the maximum retail selling prices of “Chases| Children's Vespers. 415 p.m Solem FOUR ROADS Healing wade, 4 15 p m



soap as pure and

eS) ecvtie as Cuticits
r helps to clear awiy.
pimples «and blem-



For The Common Ge ishes and ,:ves aes
a

& 45







SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1952 sa! 3. SUNDAY ADVOCATE | Saas hear Ra PAGE FIFTEEN
: GOVERNMENT Notices = Church Services Shee LISTENING HOURS >= ‘Qpiemishes




































































































Nerve Food”, “Asthma Powder (Kéllogs)”, “Canadian Healing Oil"| Baptism, 7.00 p.m. Solemn Eversong and tl as aliness eeting, 3 mH Subject of L “89 GoD “
ind “Sulphur Bitters (Kings)” are as tel ows: — " gh | Sermon, r ter tHe vaca.” nbs Meeting fm.” Saivetk meet SUNDAY, JULY 6 Some The Bite q i om ‘mer From. ‘The Editoflals, 9 00 pm. National lusty din. Dugrane, Sette
ee Se Seas aa penncinanenrsnstatnemehlilnie e ST, LEONARD'S CHURCH Meeting ler ja Toe fae aw = _ arn. $13 gm. Smetand, 648 pm Ray's \ 2fvite—EKdward Ward | . | tev Of @ coplots ereacny lacher, the deep
| 3 MAXIMUM and Choral ‘Eucharist, 10.90 ain. jlo wee: he grill a@ell With them, ahathey ana! auee. ©16 pm Bnetisn Magazin. 0. NeW Casino Orchestra. 10-00 down cleansing of mildly medicated
ITEM | UNIT OF SALE RETAIL Baptism, 3 p.m. Sunday School. 7 $ oh 1) Am. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m 2é Rte Btople, and God himself shall be jude om. Progre mme Parade and Inter te News, 1010 pm News Talk. 10 15 | Gaticura Soap will safeguard your natural
ey | PRICE Evensong and Sermon Company Meeting. 7 p.m Salvation With them. and be their God : Homme Ni we cae rw pt op Tune : , loveliness, Buy a tablet today.
xs th tiranditinasnapen aelniigit | Hh fen fa x... | THE ST. JAMES NATIONAL HAPTisr ‘iceting am ea ma are ine.uded 715 qatae ba a iin ns
“ ~ ns d sermott, 7 ue deutenant K. Gibbor » shou Sermon: “ee at Som a fecktaccehe ervey
Chases Nerve Food .. wt Bottle $1.00 bikenee rst a i eer a The Bihie: The Lord is good to al ne in
é Asthma Powder (Kellogs) | ie i 48 }rbbes oa J.B. Grant. LT ll oawm orcas Meeting, 3 p.m 1 Pg tender mercies are re his . a =a, baitailian, 9 “ j i
1 er e e Sompany Meetin 7 pm Salvation a salir , ’ » bbean Volees, 1 45 p+ MEAT “aT
, Canadian Healing Oil ee * j .62 t 4 BO pam. Soadny, Wednesday, Frifia Meeting " tb a wie Health with Key te the see ere. a4 pm Radio New: } (OVERNMENT NOTH }
‘ > } . rainin, ‘ior youth s wil e te ~aptain Moore ‘eel, » Th communism in Cl a
Sulphur Bitters (King’s) .. | ‘s i $i.44 ducted by" the: ter. BruceCiat tet “ ss Att “oni See Be i 20 tnteriade, hal > Fre hte shih
n as’ ’ -§ a ’ RAVIAN subs ce, intelli, \. wi n dito: a, 0 a B.C Yon Sores «ee
5th July, 1952. 6.7.52—In, | Browne a) ane Mite, Glee ognurk SERRer tT aim, Morning being, PRETO, Sees, nag etect fet, Oveheta 1666 °> im Ths Nees, | COVERNMENT OF BARBADOS|
METHODIST Service. followed by Holy Communion: belong to God Page 275 = zm News Talk, 10.18 pm. Lon- | SALE OF PICKUP " 3 SRA VIEW GUEST
Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend+ gieeette ns hee — ~~ ieakion, eee ieliones ee Mistery and o Lite” See Rime: in The Barbados Regiment has for su :
ment) Order, 1952, No. 24 which will be published in the Official | Crosse. Sacrament of Tahis | Busbe: Communion); Preacher: Rev. BE Mnligay sey + gale one Hillman Pickup without | HOUSE
Gazette of Monday 7th July, 1952. RES, ene" E frathwaits, ,G@RACE Hiltdes11 a.m, Morning Service “Trader” Comes To 4.00 pit—2.15 pam, = 9 fem 2s sam | engine and gear-box. The Pick- ve
2, Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling |? pm Mx. U. Callender Spee eo: Seay a. ene 2 ee a eens caleen— | UP Ee 8 Come ied condition HASTINGS, BARBADOS
prices ef “Margarine (c) Mello-Kreem Brand” are as follows: — peaieees te — ae es roca ‘ FULNECK 11 am Morning Service Carlisle Bay Tomorrow Baily Seryjce, 415 > im a Tale ‘ot Two tor’ ine rinses ot he ted ar Daily and Longterm Rates
- RICES—@ a.m. Rev. S. W. C. Crosse, Breacher, Ms R. Lewis, 7 pom itles, pm Les Compagnens De | which can be seen on abplicati quoted on request.
. WHOLESALE | Sacrament of Lord's Slipper. 7 pm “yening. Service, Preacher, Mr W.Swire. The Steamship “Trader” is ex- La Chanson, $00 pm Smetana, 5 15 | WCD Can be seen on a ene Permanent Guests
ARTICLE | PRICE | RETAIL PRicE | MF, H. Mular ‘aul Sunday ‘schécls ARONMTOMRY Pom, nvening Seve pected to arrive in Carlisle Bay Webh Miscellany, 0.18 som ‘tmuner | Regimente Sees | welcome.
; } BETHEL METHODIST CERCUIT - ' ” Mi 5/4 = wn on onday, . m. Sports Round-up and 2s ittec mer an ba
| (not more than) (not more than) fe . Evening Service, Preacher: Mr. A —_ free Y 1 Mond Sreeaiass opm ee ts R * 9. Offers should be submitted Din d Cocktail
Rnetas ge j oes eee, On Fury DUNSCOMBE—7 p.m. Fvening Setvice, \ UY is steamship is Coh- News, 710 pm Hi Be he} ta the Colonial Secretary, Public Parties arranged.
ree | aly Gomininion Fie sar, TUNA: Preaghee: Mr. W. A. Deane 3 este een Sti ae ome News From) Buildings, not later than 4.00 J. H, BUCKLAND
‘ | eco ; oe meets SHOP HILL—7 p.m. Evening Service; Thursday y, 1952. | Proprietor.
(c) Mello-Kreem Brand | $2.70 per 5 Ib. tin | 59¢ per lb. or less Sra Se: a : Werle ME Wk Ree : p.m, on Thursday 10th July, 1952 bs)
} than 4 Ib. Ake. | 7 p.m. Rey 7 re ee oe ' HOMESTUDY COURSES FOR $7 N Pct A At tit Rs Matchen ata
| per oz, | munion : —
$13.44 case of | 6le, per lb. or less} BELMONT: 9 a.m. T. J. Furley, Ho'y .
Nf i ‘ a : “He fs s GENERA To-morrow — Night, To-morrow
24 x 1 Ib. tins peg, Ib. 44¢. | “aour inhi Mr. G. “Brewster. Lindsyd ll On Dock | eomenen colon at ith cote exes eVERY WEEK Nini AI! Monde Leads Yo King’s
iu aithe, bom r. C. Jones } . . ry ¢ 4 Ladi¢s and Ge atiemen Don't
‘ Note: There is no change in the retail prices of the above item.|7p mo Mr} Clarke “SMS ony i } w " - Forget th ir’ Tithe in
‘a tap 3 nite e Schooner Lindsyd II is now ‘olsey Hall, Oxford, can successfully prepare you by post for the above examina- | store {
k This publication clarifies the wholesale price of one| , VAUXHALL: Il am. Mr. lL Mayers, on dock undergoing repairs, Her tions; also lor London Uni rees; A.C.P,; R.S.A.; Bar, and other | € s ore for you at
pound tins, . COLLYMORE ROCK A, M. & cnurRCcH iceel 1s being worked and all the Seren inst "Mover weiner mei jpeg mon ae. arn Ne eee
m ne Vorship, 3.3 m iv . oti : »D, » MLA. LL.D., which w »¢ given by
th July, 1908. 8.7-52—1n. | exngny Veengel.T18 uin Receentas being removed, | WOLSEY HALI 0 the mayan ‘ eertinn ANAS HOLE
oO! ure cers and Holy Communion GLAND at wryhedys F-ten ar P-lié
| Revival Services from July 6th, through XFORD éxciano On MONDAY NIGHT 7th JULY.
Until further notice the following price has been arranged Bist; every evening at 7.15. A cordial The Schooner Harriett Whittaker | sie AEORS AE A SF See eam eres
___Untfrtner notice the following price hasbeen arranged | Mnf" gig,’ hh si, The Schooner Marit, Whitaker WEATHERHEAD'S ee
| ; Discount if paid | PREACHING PLAN — JAMES STREET, getting a general overhaul, Work . \ Music by Pere) Green's Orchestra
ITEM ’ | Som Price | by 31st July, 1952. SAE ONTSTOWN Marnonssy, . on this schooner began over the \ y y 1 Bar Solid Miss this ana blaine
ee kitty dant | da ~ a eee ney last week end. At present she is PRU VTORE Bynpire ‘Theatre at 6.58" Bim.
. z To s, BA., B Sh al uven- . Pp ne Theat 8 30
SULPHATE. OF AMMONIA « $153.70 $2.25 ie "Misetonary Meeting. 7 °o'm 2“Ne"" teaning on one side in the Careen« .oughing,- Stra ling Asthma an , ape a
6.7.52—In, | \PAYNES BAY: 9 30 am. Mr. W. St ane a ee Ta rer CON ee 2 ' BOOTS—Mi 1 Salts S|
aS * |Hi, 7 pm, Mr. V. B. St. John. Cleaned. n hifi Cu be in 3 Mi t ee ee ee ee
WHITEHALL: 9 30 n 3 Twelv e th k For Cattle, Horses, Sheep It's Rove Feths!
VACANCY FOR BUILDING CONSTRUCTION CLERKS marge TBM fee bawrence on her. * The Dutch Metor vessel Bor a ns. 7 rp Go Sones , muinutes seine wtiipesnt Wan A GRAND DANCE
; am 3 : ronchitis so by c every Pt
OF WORKS IN BRITISH HONDURAS Layne. 7; tm Mr »P ¥" teen fer ge ae —_ off bo and asp for ‘breath and can't sie 3 night, couldte neon, expecte to die i a 9 on wae | : mur .
+ . . : 0 am Vv D > yi ou co hear 0 S. .) 7° |
, ‘ Applications are invited for a Senior Clerk of Works (salary | Towers, B.A. B.D 7p a Mr D eaaine saikante as a you were being ruptured? Do. you | first night ant Pras d cee ee 3/6 per package | ar ie ae be
Sopol aco thesereeer mules te anaes coh ek antag ae or for the main ‘engne io bata | eer ented (Gee Gites)" Pan rare BOOTS Bicarbonateot —|})|| wall! sata’ as (ROM! ie
“ 2 ot ee a 30 am ; e is e cure 1 o C r ette now s (
geabracsnevahien is hilt Recicuner te it and assist in @ building Sinckler, 7% a Lae Sydney Payne repaired and clesned at the Cen- sag't cat certain foods? The et eet oer 7 Soda \4tb pk. 180. pk. fhe wee en ae
Honduras. Th ; ; y the Government of British} SPEIGHTSTOWN: 11 am Rev Ff tral Foundry, No matter how long you have suf- | 03° Mark Sat Cone of DACO BOOTS — Chlorophyl Tonic On ties ree The weane
Honduras.” The starting salary will depend on the qualifications and|tawrence, 7 pm. Mr. GM. Many , fered or what you have tried, there | Fugen your blood and helping nae | Tablet. 1/6 each (bottle) a ee
Paatbont of the applicants. Candidates must have a full knowledge ;|“SSLaH: 930 am. Mr. F Moore This heat te prescription. called MAUNDACO. No | {Ure rid you of the effoots of Asthma , | Mt QUEEN'S PARK MOUSE
of timber and reinforced concrete construction and should give full! BETHESDA: ‘9.20 , is heat exchanger is part of dopes, no smokes, no injections, no} in ne time at all MENDACO may MACHADO CIGARS ADMISSION 2
information about ther Qlalifications, ete, togcther with copie | teen : 930 am Rey PF the main engine and its main job atomiaer. All you do ts take two] C@#lly make you feel years younger Gems, J. T. C., Londres ! Music by Mr, Perey Green's
testimonials and references, Pete . meio THE SALVATION ARMY is to keep the engine cool, The tastelegs taniore, Bd, Ase Sra veut aad seronger, tty MENDACO under Fleurs, La Tropical 1 Orohesiis
, Passages will be paid to and from the Colony. Fourteen days) 11 am CESK EN BAL 3 salt water passes through the tubes } minutes MENDACO ute Asie. dn You be the judge. If you don’t feel : | Resear oe oe SAU
ical leave will be granted each year and three months leave on| Company Meeting. 7 pin Salvation 204 the fresh water around them (ng through your blood alding nature | Miiy pathaned atten tare ae THERMOS SILVER JUGS | Ree eee ee Gamer
full pay at the eng of the tract, Applications should be addressed | Meeting. or . saat” These tubes which were taken out phiceen Sopa fee enay treat Ang DA Ned shat returns the went tans for Teed Water at night |
to the Director of Public Works, Belize. | caasalor & Mrs. W. Mortis Divisignel nt — spree engine when the Wil- | snd bring sound s sep the first night age and the full purchase price wil (2 pints). A wonderful eee
6.7.52—In. | BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL lems ad went on dock is now being | er stronger. ¥ younger | your Chemiat today and see how } present.
VACANT POST 0 adam ane geniing, a: Bm c ae Py these tubes are | 4 Ne Asthma in 2 Years - Pail you sleep soplent and how mush BOXES OF MOIRS s es
\ y 4 p.m Salvation yked, > engi | yt OrTrow, ae ‘ . | , v
7 - R RA ea, GENERAL HOSPITAL, Meeting th a ieebeer Ternpietate. kak Seine | 1 RDACS Lge only belnge atmost Mendaco':’.:: CHOCOLATES JUST RECEIVED
Appli invi t a TING ay give | ing but builds up the system to , aschino Cherries,
gripnah Mame 2. nee to the post of Radio-| ,, , Paar sity gp lbtccn gaan ig part may give way. otf future attacks, or inetanee tbe Lads Asthme ye Bronchitie se Hay Fo | Cherry Cocktails 7
2, ‘Th . * z Company Meéting, 7 pw Salvation ay Pot of Gold, Happiness sees
$1,584. per annua. In addition “em ‘quaitese, Moira sonata [ist Mtoe 1, clive » ee ee eee a ae 1 pomee OF Wen?
and light or an inclusive allowance of $1,440 per annum in lieu, Uni- [a cs : — eT ee ae FERROZONE
ona af living alle vi ror the rate " f wise as ‘at present, A temporary JUST IN TIME FOR THE oe CATARRIUZONE
wance ‘ate 0 r annum is also payable, BOXES OF NEILSON'S eer : i
Pa ‘ i i 7 4 ; ave iece Differ
a expenses paid on appointment and on completion of Agree- | HURRIC ANE SEASON Ryety Diets Different DR. HAMILTON PILLS
3. The appointment will be on agreement for three years, Th | fore : :
; 3 " e ” . s | NERVERLINE
employers contribution to ah approved superannuation scheme is E | ANEROID BAROMETERS ||| KODAK FILMS ‘
a able. ; ° ‘ i e Te ‘ de Gamer
‘sai oe go of the post will be required to assist the Radi- AWAY NASTY ee ee eee — early and be prepared No. 1a? 140, 620, 116 ie ie
° the Diagnostic and Therapy services of the X-Ray Depart- 616, 122 \ Y
ment, General Hes ital. bé |
: nat and eae ea Candidates Must possess the M.S.R. (Diag- | HURRICANE LANTERNS | p Wantheslens C. CARLTON BROWNE
&. Applications should bé, addreseed to the Coloviel Secretar | | Establishea rice Weatherhea Wholesale & Retail
i Publie Bui Brid tbad ia. vs Ineerporated } }
(EA Sl Seal ee nase atu Beret hanes cane | T. HERBERT LTD. | Ltd | “pa
by 15th August, 1952, or ag soon as possible after this ir ‘soo COLDS ; 1860 10 & 11 Roebuck Stréei 1996 | ud, ' 136 Roebuck St, Dial 2813
* .7.52—sn 5 oz — = 4
a seliiiaiesien LL PRET cere. 499606009
' NOTICE TO OWNERS AND CREWS OF FISHING BOATS | ——
The attention of all owners and crews of fishing bo LIKE MAGIC |
ats is drawn ;
to nietivalionn Ch): e0d (a) Se eodn th ah ene | JOIN THE THOUSANDS OF HOUSEHOLD -
i arbour and Ship- |) WITH HIGHLY MEDICATED BUCKLEY'S W sl a hs .
ping Master Act, 1909—7, which provide as follows: — HE ROB |
“(2) It shall be the duty of the owner of a fishing boat t {|
‘ oO see Mothers, now you can relieve the th |
that his boat is not made fast to any part of the wharves, misery of kiddies’ colds so much No other RUB hes these | \ Y x R TABLE COVERS
or bridges, or anchored in the Careenage except when || faster with the Buckley White Ru» 4 Important Features | B ARG AIN ii J Plastic ones
actually engaged in landing fish, or when on account of || TWO-WAY treatment. Buckley's Whi'e Rub is ssomwtita, | | | b $1.29 u
weather on permission is given by the Harbour and anise as eS a D palledeaeniprsory OILCLOTH
Shipping ‘aster, } Ade : a lt penctrates deeper, brings ralial | $1 27
(3) For any bregch of this Section the owner of a fighing boat | toning were ead it tha the en hee he 2 tte \ :
shall be personally liable to a fine not exceeding five pounds secm. Every breath obitite soothing. taedien- 3 ff ls more highly medicated, hence | | BLANKETS
to be recovered in a summary way bef , ul | See hicetc pimmouks inoue. See teeure | Lovely Quality and
trate. e y ore a Police Magis } oe a Bs soothing medicated vapors carry | Colours
4.9.60. --ta || BLBee eee tet tet meson oct 4 one send wort fanser wie me | | Single... $1.08
a oT ADeLEsS, eer | ease Medium ...... $2.08
SNOW WHITE ond POSITIVELY STAINLESS. —_____———. JERSEY e tee
{le exierncl tractment helps breot ve | TRIPLE YOUR MONEY BACK | {| o, 8 : sO
|| semgeenan este sore chht mendes, cod | nef | Plain and Striped » , sh BEDROOM AND DRAW.
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION =| Scicce ‘tiu'“iae” RSet | Cite t htt te |] 48 in. wide. it is must on every shopping **txetoom xvas
k | vopors gives off keep up the good work for eny preparation you bave vver vied. | 99 ts .
BARBADOS EVENING INSTITUTE penne ballin oN ene i . r ‘ oer
a _ ‘WHITE SHARKSKIN list. W hy pay more ? BEDSPREADS
Commmsereal 1D 1 Glasses. POELELEEEE SELES CLOVE LOOP PLIABLE. 36 in. wide Single .... $4.12
: SHORTHAND-TYPIST COURSE | | Best in Town Double ....... $5.15 |
ia —— are ae hg = ~ . ghee ees @ > | $1.39 and $1.98 HANDKEROHIEFS 5 Alluring Shades
, composed of twent; students, and to be held at |% 2 1 1 i eben doce Sean
Combermere School, commeneing in September, 1952, The Course ® | WSEs ORSRRDY oe ete CENTS BED SHEETS
of two years is designed to lead to the examination for the Junior .# % Superior Quality Ladi m d Girls Single and Double
Shorthand-Typist Certificate of the Royal Society of Arts. (A copy | GS % 69 cents 180, 18¢, and 200 Very Heavy $4.01 and $6.21
‘ ‘ ee a ae
e syllabus may be seen on request at the Department.) . ye % CHILDREN'S PANTIES ea tn KHAKI DRILL LUNCH BAGS
Two lectures a week will be given in each of the 3 subjects— » 370, up Limited Quantity (Convenient Size)
Shorthand, Typewriting and English—on Mondays to Thursdays in- bi + - eaten BROCADE SILE 98c, and $1.20. $3.58 and $4.58
clusive. Students must take all three subjects. TT N 4 | SPUN SILK 36 in. wide. svi , ss
Applicants must have attained a minimum speed of 70 w.p.m. in 3 | 36 in. wide sn dhe Phd . GENTS’ SOCKS TAPESTRY CLOTH
Shorthand and 30 w.p.m. in Typewriting. They should " $ 69c. and 79¢, Benes! Rayon and Cotton 48 in. wide
g. y also be pre 4 v :
ate Sane ah gp Test for admission in each subject. % | vEsTts 7 SPUNS 3 pairs for $1.00 $1.29, $1.33 and $1.46
pplicants m 18 years R ; _ . est
B, BOOK-KEEPING of age or over on Ist September, 1952. HIGHLIGHT RECENT % All Sizes and Colours 720., 94¢., 94. —_ $1.0 GENTS’ WATCHES STRAW MATS
Applications will also be considered for entry to a beginners’ z 50¢. and 69c. -————__—- Reliable wa Watches In en . Drawing
Book-keeping Course to be held at Combermere School on Mo’ . F SIL ‘ Com aiaee
ndays, CONSIGNMENTS x UJIETTE K SHANTUNG
commencing in September, 1952. ||| All Shades, Qualities and Smart Colours 80c., O0c., and $1.06 —
cearTite,'* limited nimber of vacancies for the Senior Book-|® —_ | Widths 48 im. wide ...... s1.00 A OKERCH ORETONNES
eae ourse. Applicants should possess an Elementary L.C.C. OF NEW MERCHANDISE % | 57c. and 59c. nt aerating TEFS 87 in. wide — 48 in. wide
cate or its equivalent. Ri] COTTON PRINTS 4 for $1.00 ' :
Academic Classes $ A Huge Belection ee ae * ata tie
arts | 6. ischlcdnsticestlalns z ais
C. GENERAL CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION—UNIVERSITY OPENED AT % 39c., 62c., and 73e. — TROPICAL SUITING MOSQUITO NETS
LONDON ; % ——— Grey, Brown and Blue Ready made
Applications are invited for entry to the Junior Academic classes | ¥ x EMBROIDER nag $2.62 Medium $6.30
commencing in September, 1952 and preparing for examination at | % y | ANGLAISE A vast variety as attrac. : Large eile $7.24
Ordinary level in June, 1954. ° x White, Pink and Blue tive in Quality as in SPORT TWEED a
i Soe offered are English, Mathematics, Latin, Spanish, History | $ Wi son & Co % $2.80 a. 56 in. $5.20 TOWaIA
7 , ° e 3 nn “ is vine
There are also a limited number of vacancies in % ¥ ed a yw CHILDREN “ tees Fics ieee fe,
(a) Sehior classes preparing for examination at Ordinary | ¢ » e8 Bem fee 78¢.
level in June, 1953; ¥1% These beautifully designed COTTONS make delight- % et se cents See Sea ra z CREAM a ae naa gD gat
(b) Advanced classes preparing for examination at Advanced | ¥ fully cool, charming and inexpensive Frocks, Sun % NYLONS Ue BOYS’ FANCY SHIRTS shame 7 i Me rec $1.30
level in 1953 and 1964, Suits, Play Suits, Beach Wear, Housecoats, etc., for 51 Ga Assorted Colours pint ee 2 a
ie Protpective applicants may obtain further information and advice |% YOUNg and old, and are available ins: % | $1.12 and $1.39 2 for $3.00 SHIRTS :
om either: — ; 2 ns ehh a : All Wool Worsted
(a) The Principal. Department of Education, preferably be- | $ FLOWERED PIQUE, 2 eae BOYS’ PULLOVERS ent, Evess, Sport, Oot- TWEED PINSTRIPE
tween 10.00 ' : , % 36 in. wide. 59 cents ' 78c. up ton, Rayon and Silk 56 i B
a.m, and 12.30 p.m. on Saturday mornings. | % > ncitnnsieet tenascin ats inadidaadt dalla iiiealaad eas diss i Real Knock-d Pri 56 in. Navy and Brown
(Telephone 2680); PRINTED & PLAIN SEERSUCKER 3 BRASSIERES BOYS’ VESTS 1001 Qualities Ye
or () R 7. A. Johnson, fea,, BA, LCP, Assistant Principal, |% vaieacih Vadiewie wn % | Big pisortment from UK, 370. each pearent TROPICAL PINSTRIPE
e Waters, Chtist Church. (Telephone 8587); , sa FA ESE, » BA. BEU, > ance an B.A. ee eae » ; ;
or (¢) H. R. Daniel, Esq, BA, L.C.P., Dean of Academic |% % 600. and 84c CHILDREN’S RUBBER GENTS’ PARSON CREY 56 in. wide
Studies, Bush Hall, St. Michael. (Telephone 3487) B41 e 8 — . eis SANDALS $3.11 $2.80, $3.29, and $3.49
ies of application to be submitted to the Department of Bdu- |§ % || SATIN 360. a pair GENTS RIBBED >
cation by Saturday 26th July, 1982 and addressed as follows: |% MP See our SHOW WINDOW DISPLAY, and for the % |] 36 in. wide. Soft Quality —Grireraopaw x JOHN WHITE SHOES JOCKEY PANTS
Commercial Classes—The Dean of Commercial Studies ’ newest in LADIES’ UP-TO-DATE WEAR, visit: % -+ 62 cents BATE
; ‘ = -TO- 1 WEAR, visit: eee 10 per cent. off 72 cents
ai tae Classes—The Dean of Academic Studies. ; x a ___ 42 cents up eo
ee of $5, t . ‘ Midas, Citas
$5.00 per term payable during the first week of the term * % In 10 Varieties and CHILDREN’S SHOES
covers all the subjects. 80% of the fees paid will be refunded at the | $ s Shad 10 per cent. off
end of a session to all students who have, in the opinion of the Prin- | ¢ % 72c.,. 85¢ . na a ®
cipal, Dean and Lecturers, worked satisfactorily and attended regu- | & % acon then ta th ae TOYS |
latly and punetually. 3 WN. gi 3 MIAMI LINEN TOYS |! L
wiihin es the as wre to supply their own stationery and text % eh $1.08 * | or vee io f :
$s as réquired by the Lecturers. ¢ 31. SWAN STREE ote 2676 % a at Reduce ces , &§ st }
kh Sone: thes. i ° REET : DIAL 3676 % RAYON PONJEE TRAVEL BAGS Pr. Wm. Henry St. Swan St.
15.6.52—2n, |% % 59 cents $11.35
' ONL PLLCLLC LPP PPL LLL LLLELLLLLEONLLL LASS LL ee ae
j ‘







PAGE SIXTEEN



OLYMPIC POSSIBILITIES

Impressions

Championships At The White City %:=!sumicr’ igs of 2% fiw 9 SS oe

The 1952 Championships staged
by the Amateur Athletic Associa-
tion at the White City Stadium
on Friday and Saturday last weex
highlighted an athletic season in
Great Britain which has been full
cf interest since it begun earlier
than usual! last spring. The un-
usual interest is of course due to
the fact that this is Olympic year
and Helsinki was uppermost in
the minds of both athletes and
officials alike

The purpose of this article is
mainly to inform readers at home
what ihe prospects will be for the
West Inaians going to the Olym-
pics, but being a visitor to Eng-
land for the first time in my life
I cannot help if I a!so incorporate
my views on the meeiing in gen-
eral and the athletes fiem this
and other countries which caught
my eye.

In the first place Her Majesty
the Queen graced the events on
Saturday with her presence and
ene hes to be on the spot to really
appreciate just what this means
here in Britain today, I cannot
compare her public appearances
with that of former monarchs be-
cause this is my first visit, but
I am quite certain that as many
people came to see the Queen as
came to see the sports It was
the same at Ascot and every-
where else that she goes,

There was terrific cheering and
clapping of hands as the car drove.4
arcund the dirt track, more so, Ip
thought, than what I had hearc
at Ascot. In addition when sh
shook the hand of some populk
athlete among those who wer



vho “ yming to the : : ' é é |
presented to her, there was mor er Poe dune up a bit. As Se that in spite of the rustiness in the sprint heats but their strong | ot oe is ‘tastes pei 3 ati
applause from the crowd. Mac-f§ hey turned inte the back st he still _won it in 50 seconds flat. point was the high jump. Here,| omorts are now being made to |
Donald Bailey, I thought, got the# 4. the last ti Chataway je: 7. 1. Higgins of Herne Hill Har alas, I suspect that the cold/ “straighten” her up, The snag |
biggest hand, Gordon Pirie, theo, with a sp which Jef bis THTS ran the fastest heat in 49.6 weather and the new conditions of | that is encountered now is that |
six-mile Champion, next, while opponents standing. He com i owt Ine wes, I think, flat out. jumping from a dirt track in shoes, | pyery time when 1 hold has been |

Arthur Wint and one or two oth-
ers also received their share,
Princess Margaret was _ also
present but the Duke of Edin-
burgh was absent due to a chill
which later developed into the
jaundice which he has to-day
This was anounced a few minutes
before the Queen arrived and
caused @ rather amusing incident
which en Australian journalist
and myself thoroughly enjoyed.
Just as the announcer completed
his statement about the arrival
of the Royal party there was a
round of applause, As soon as
this died down h’s voice came
over again announcing the Duke
of Edinburgh's absence—further
applause, But ‘it was only half
hearted and as soon as the few
who did it realised what had
really been said it died down
But there is no doubt that the
young girl who is Britain’s Queen
today has enthused the nation
afresh, Those who have already
been talking and writing about
the New Elizabethan age may
have beet premature but might
not be so wrong after all.
British Athletics, which, like
every other sport oyer here, suf-
fered the effects of World War
lI, is yet another _ sphere in
which the New Elizabethans
seem to be emerging with a fre-

Hy

Not only the planters are feel-
ing that sense of elation which
comes with rain at this time, but
also Polo players, At this time of
the year tne Polo season_begins,
but the ground at the Garrison
where they play is badly cracked
end polo players are just hoping
for one of those big rains W nich
leave the Garrison covered with
water for some days.

They call it a rich man’s game,
this polo, but all alike are thrilled
when witnessing a really hectic
match between two good teams,
Yew lovers of sport can see the
aash and oftimes gruelling riding
of the horses, the chase after the
ball, the skilful interception, the
mighty whop or a player’s narrow
get away from being struck by
the ball, without getting excited.

The present Polo Club was
formed 15 years ago, though polo
used to be played here long be-
fore then. But with the war years,
1939—1945 interest flagged. Since
there has been a steady growth
and in 1950 the Club House on
the Garrison was built and the
ground harrowed and levelled,

So well supported was the game
in 1949 and so keen the interest
of the players, that that year a
Jamaican team was invited here
and in the three Tests played,
Jamaica won two and Barbados
the other.

Actually the game is liked more
in Jamaica, Venezuela and here
than in the other West Indian
islands.

The
sent a

following
team

vear the Club
to Venezuela, and



| They'll Do It Every ‘Time

WAIT A MINUTE. >,

NOT YET-UH“CANT j——
YOU GIVE ME SOME-
THING SO I WON'T
FEEL 17T?(GULP)-UH
HOW ABOUT THAT
NEW SAND ORILL
I READ ABOUT






























the last 300 yards must have been second in 48.6 and Higgins was persuaded to run in anything but |

POLO PLAYERS WANT RAIN: CLUB
WANTS NEW-GOMERS

Calvin Alleyne

UH» JUST
A MOMENT

SUNDAY ADVOCATE





The Jamaicans’ chances now look
very good indeed in the 1,600
metres relay and if Leslie Laing

én has not deteriorated since his

Of h grand* 1948 Olympic effort, they
4 e TI 1s are almost certain to win it.

A West Indian who showed

promise was C. M. Gibbs of Trini- The position

and he was third to Bailey and

a ee:
et ee aetna Ree

Certificate For
Sayes Court

@ From page ll.

f eae
of. the Society's Rainfall

-10 in,

ois date: .



from

30 in.



a.m.)

THE WEATHER
REPORT

YESTERDAY

Codrington:

Total Rainfall for month to

17 miles per

29.983

TODAY

Moon: First Quarter, June 30

High Tide: 2.02 a.m, 3.20 p.m.

By TREVOR GALE cannot be going»all out, there is Bey Ss Pore on’ — oe a = Temperature: 77.5 °F.
no mistaking him for a champion. 4, : aa" Mei +>e: Wind Velocity:
auency and skill which will make It was distppaindirar that John stand that he has a Seen oa hour .
it a great age. Thetoar Of Austrelia did no ‘ mended for a pick in the Trinidad $ 567 09 Barometer (9
Tr d not meet Olympic Tes ;
Jt inust be many years indeed him in the finals. Treloar made a coy pee eam and | think they ee (11 a.m.) 29.972
since Britain could’ number. in gallant effort in the semi-fianl of would do well to take him. Both $c
one team such world beaters &6 the 100 yards and almost ti 4 Wint and Bailey feel that he will Share Capital 428 3 :
Roser Ei “ : : e yards and almost tied with improve P 9 Sunrise: 5.46 a.m
Roger Bannister, Bill Nankevyille, Pinningten in 9.9 seconds. But as Or the visitors nail Profits 138 70 Se on
Chris Chataway ‘and Gordon Pirie he breasted the tape he went top- the visitors from overseas at ‘on Sunset: 6.16 p.m.
bver the longer distances. Any Of pling on to the side of the track the Championships the most suc- $ 567 09 :
these, one gets the impression with o pulled muscle, It will be a cerBful were the Australians. Al- ta Lighting 7.00 p.m.
after’ seeing. them run, might great ldss to Australia if he ‘does though. they won only one final yy Ghairman, ladi i }
break world record. from the ; S event with R. H. Weinberg,..who : oe eee ee eae |

half mile to the six nile
metres to 10,000 metres). On top
of that there was the recent A ‘
world record marathon run made out On the is Balev
rscently over here by J. H. -Pe- think, will be even ‘Atter at the! tne Gatance jn 8 style
ers y 3 .

ters, Incid y rs’ time wa Olympics than he. was over: here: suggested that he could have

so good that the experts are still ; taken seve seco
scratching their heads over it. In that cate he will be quite capa- ry nee ae eet

Young John Disley also won such ble of repeating the world record
a spectacular 2 mile Steeple- time which he equalled last yeat
Chase that he too is included by in Belgrade. Of course that does
the experts as a potential world not mean that he will automatical-
beater ly be the winner because no one

Of all Chataway knows what the Americans will

pics. My Australian friend tells me
Treloar’s luck

doula mile runner won his heat over

together
Society,
selfishness in

returned, but in the final He had a8

the most abominable luck when
he was spiked. His partner, young
J. M. Landy,

futuce a8 @ al trust and

miler and should

these Chris
3 mile was not run in record ran second to Nankeville in
ume the pace of the race struck
me as being a bit false. Pirie had
several littte duels with Heskith
in the early stages of the six Aihur Wint, who wiil captain Australia was also unfortunate
mile while Norris (who in run- the Jamaica Team, and whose not to win throwing the discus. |
nuvg second also broke the British popularity is second only to Three times did I, Reed throw!
‘ix mile record) hung on well Bailey's is obviously concentrating obviously greater distances than |
in the latter part. In the mile on the 400 metres, I understand ony other competitor, only to have
Nankeville won by a comfortable he has had a lay off and is only the red flag signal “no throw” on
margin but J. M. Landy of AUS- now warming up. Hence the each cccasion.

tralia gave him something (© 8° slight rustiness which was apparent The Nigerians were also pres-
it in the last lap. Chataway, how, in this first heat in the 440 yards, ent with almost their complete
wer, kept running in yo! Our nd TO Appreciate the high standard Olympic team while there were
ockets in the three mile and co by these athletes one only has ©lo scme visitors from the Gold |

rere were several pace makers to look at the time of the heat to Coast. They were mostly well up|

they will have to producesa world

is at his best. see what such

would mean,

THE

with tools.















to hold it until he had rm Later im the afternoon Wint which they do not wear at home
the lagt bend and as he entered came out for the semi-finals and prevented them
the home stretch I fully expect- beat Hiegins in 48.2. Higgins time their best. Nevertheless N. B.
eq to see him slow up, 1 was just in this race was 48.5 and P, Dolan, Osagie of Nigeria was third and
about to turn to my companion who ran third, did it in 48.8. That they all cleared 6 ft. 2 ins. With
to say “that’s that,” when to my was on Friday. On Saturday Wint regard to the weather I judge
amazement Chataway increased won the final by a comfortable them mainly on the effect it had |
his speed again. His time for margin in 48.1, L. C. Lewis was on me, and I could not have been





MR. F. C.
MRS,

-asily within 37 seconds, ,.,, third on this cecasion in 49.1. A.
In contrast to Gordon Pirie’s pick, who was fourth in 49.4 sec-
tall lanky figure, Chataway is @ onds has been picked along vrith
stocky red head. 1 should think yewis and Higgins to represent

that if there is anyone capable Of Britain in the 400 metres at the
matching Zatopek’s superhuman (VA pics,

rsts spe i e races, » é
bursts, of peed ays Bat it is Talking to Arthur Wint

said they will not meet. days later I gathered that he is Barge were given a new coat of |
sald Whey Ww ints McDonald Bailey Ot entirely datisfied with himself paint yesterday. It is expected
m ae eee the greatness of and he thinks that with the serious that they will be in service soon. |
not only wphehethan age, but sig- training schedule which he has | Each of the buoys which has the |
nifies the leading part the colonies made out between now and the | shape of a pear weighs ovier a}
can now play. He is a great runner Olympic Games he should be in| .
in every sense of the word. I soon much better form. In all proba- |
found out why every time he steps bility he will be well up to the
into the arena he invariably gets peak where he will once again be
spplause. His times for the first able to record 47.2 seconds which
hundred yard heat, the semi-final is his British record and the 46.2 |
and final were 9,9, 9.7 and 9.8 re- at which figure he holds the Olym- |
spectively, In the 220 yards he did pic 400 metres record jointly with
21.4 in the heat, semi-final and Carr of the U.S.A, He did not
final alike, His first heat he won by defend his British Championship
20 yards. title in the 880 yards and I under-
Mae is just a natural chap who stand he has not quite made up
seems incapable of running a bad his mind whether he will run the
race, Even though, at times, he 800 metres at the Olympics.

a winter fur coat.

BUOYS PAINTED

The two floating buoys wrech Fe ee
were brought down with the Lord Py
two Willoughby and the Number One |

kind

Programme



/ I

season they were unable to run
senior and junior teams because
of the lack of players and they
made four teams of those avail-
able.

Barbados won one and Venezuela The teams were: Mustangs—
two. The members of this team Vere Deane (Capt.), O. H. John-
were, H. A, Dowding, Col. R. T. Son, Lee Deane and J. H. Hans-









Michelin, Lee Deane, Mark Edg- chell; Rangers—R. T. Michelin
hill, Elliot Williams and John (Capt.), Keith Deane, W. W.!
Marsh. Bradshaw and J. W. Chandler, Morney







Unlike other games where there Bronces—Errie | Deane (Capt.),
are quite a few. clubs ana compe- G-. S. Emptage, M. D. Edghill and
tition can reach its highest, there K. D. Frost; and Busters—D. A.
is only this one polo ciub and the G. Weekes (Capt.), A. Arthur, -.
players get together in a domes- Melville and M, M. Parker, |
tic way and dec.de who will be though John Marsh played regu- |
playing for the various teams. larly as substitute for Parker.
‘They shuffle all the players. so
that the best are not normally all
in one team.

You may ask yourselves why
more clubs or at any rate many
more people are not interested in
taking part in the game. Well as
1 said, it is often referred to as a
rich man’s game, yet perhaps this
saying is stretched a bit too far,


























Busters won all their matches to
finish winners of the Advocate
Challenge Cup and tied with
Broncos in the number of goals
scorec. Two cups were given for
the highest number of goals, the |
H. Warner Bolton Challenge Cup |
and the Y. De Lima Cup. |

I remember well the last crucial
match between Busters and Bron-

Mais Oui



Charm




(800 not recover in time for the Olym-~ carried off the 120 yards Hurdles tiemen, I am sure you will agree |
is nearly ‘always most, of their athletes were im- we pa Seumuin has oe

re * P me wo =
pressive. Don Macmillan the huge while work during its short exist-

which ence, I am equally sure that you
will agree that much remains to

be done. It is up to us, members
inutee 164° | ascatik which Me and prospective members, to pull

perseverance

t feel sure ee -a- oo objects, with a sense of mutu-

: 7 spirit of self-help,
impressed me most. Although his produce, But it does mean that ‘MmPreve within a few years, As he Sayes Court Co-optuaiene Produc-

+ ; ;

: bo ers’ & Marketing Society one of
record breaker to beat him if he MNS. 11 secs. in the final one can which not only this parish but all
improvement Barbados may justly be proud. |

“STRAIGHTENING” |



Divers went down again this |
morning to see how the schooner |
Potick was sitting” on the bed)
of the Careenage.
lined the Wharf and watched the
two divers come up and go dowr

The Advocate was told yester- |

at made on a part of the vessel that |
from giving of | part gives away under the strain, |
mainly because it is rotten.

Se SSS
VARIETY CONCERT & DANCE

Under the patronage of
GODDARD MC.P. &

Beginning at 8 p.m,
permission
Commissioner of Police The Police {j/
Dance Orchestra under the direc- |
tion of Captain C. E. Raison M.B.©.,
will sepply the Music
ADMISSION -
Refreshments on Sale.

SSSSE—————=—=—==SS==—SSSS=

a




K.W.V, Cologne

Seventh Heaven

Kruschen Salts



by loyalty to the
and = un-
pursuing its aims
confidence and a
to make the

POTICK

A large crowd |





GODDARD

In _ aid of the
NEW HAVEN DAY NURSERY |
Sargeant’s Village, Christ Church

At the
VOLUNTEER DRILL HALL

Ist AUGUST, 1952 |
of the )))|

$1.00
will appear later

Reductions

ae

Low Tide: 9.10 a.m., 9.02 p.m,







What is Legal — is Right
You are reminded of the

DANCE

TO-MORROW NITE, July 7

BY
CHARLES LEGALL

TAXI DRIVER M. 1319
! at Queen’s Park House
ADMISSION 2/-

Cc. B. Browne’s Orchestra
Refreshments on Sale



This Week's
Special



FISH PIES

10¢. each

ARBADOS
AKERIES

DIAL 4758
JAMES STREET

ae













BEAUTY NEEDS




Formerly Now

Brilliantine at an
Imperial Leather Brilliantine
Potters Moors Lavender

Cologne

Piver Lotions e oi
Evening in Paris Perfumes

Goya Studio

Piver Perfumes
Squibbs Tooth Paste

for since the main trouble is to cos which Busters won 6—3. The | Colgate Shaving Cream
keep two horses—you may OWD outstanding players of this game ” ” Sticks
one and have. another at. your were Mark Edgnhill, John Marsh Aqua Velva Shaving Lotion
disposal~it should not be too ¢x- and Victor Weekes, Marsh par- Marquis Shaving Lotion
pensive for a land owner. ticularly was jin good form Macleans Shampoo

One thing though, you will throughout the season and_ his Sheen Shampoo







always find that these polo play- accuracy of strokes, his nice judg-
ers are lovers of horses, You ment, his dash and enthusiasm
can see it by the way they fondle were largely responsible for help-
them when they bring them ing Busters to win the Cup.
sweating off the field for a rest On the whole last season's
after a chukka. So when you standard of play was not as high
think of polo players, though the as the previous season, due to the
horse is usually in danger of get- inability to play senior and junior
ting a hard blow with the ball or teams but nevertheless, the games
the polo stick, you also think of were interesting.
horse lovers. At all events, since last year’s
The Club would like more players are expected to play again
young men to get interested in as soon as the ground is suitable,
the game. the secretary Mr. K. D. we can still look forward to the
Frost told me yesterday. Last thrill that polo brings.

immy Hadlo |

Yip












He 12,



y J

SS




{I THOUGHT
YipA IT WAS ALITTLE
» KIO IN THERE>+

THE TOUGHER THEY /} %
LOOK THE LOUDER /=Z

THEY WAIL» > =
OSCUT HOM
} WRESTLER, NO
LESF MAYBE
4= JUST WANTS
1O REHEARSE /:
HIS ACT WITH

AE ac oe







OF THE CHAIR
AND TELL. THE
boc TO 0O























HIM RASSLEP
CALLS HIMSELF





eS Te aa
Ask ANY DENTIST:
THE BIGGER THEY ARE-
THE MORE THEY Squirm!
fd, , THANX AND A POFF 7
. 2 { BOB BERKEY,

£D s -






CLEVELAND, O#/O

Writing Paper

”

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LID. |

13. BROAD STREET.

65
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1.44
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84

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1.20
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SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1952
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PEBOSPLOEFGSDOODOE SE

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Full Text

PAGE 1

PACE nr.iiT SUVDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, JULY i 12 BARR\D0SA ADVSCATE i .>--Jh*—**-f rrl.M* kr Ik* A4-.HM C*.. Ltd %  •••• BC M.MVM*** MIIMU.>. July t, 12 \embly which meets once v.e< kly and which enjoys frequent vacations. But the small size of the English debates staff (the French is much smaller) that tatfpi numbers of reporters are unnecessary for verbatim reports of Assembly. What Is required ia proper organisation and understanding of the procedure to be adopted. That organisation and understanding is veiv lacking in Barbados and during Tuesday's debate according to a report in the Press. Mr. R G. Mapp came nearest to bow matters can be set right. it hods to be adopted were, as mentioned above, published in the Advocate of April 5, 1951. First, local methods of recruiting House rapertan leave much to be desired. In Canada re'viteis are appointed after competitive examination held under the auspices of the Civil Service Commission. Secondly, each reporter ought to be provided with an expert typist. House reporter in Canada dictate their material direct tn tha typist and committee reporters use dictating inachmes Thiidlv, House reporters ought to take turns oJ 10 many minutes each. In Canada SIN reporters take turns of ten minutes each BBd every ten minutes a bell rings as a the next reporter to take his turn. If i\ reporters are adequate for the Canadian House of Commons, surely three are more than adequate for the Barbados House vi Assembly and Legislative Council together. i e M stem of reporlintf debates in the two legislative houses needs revision. A civil sei vant of no less standing than the present clerk to the Legislative Council Ought to be appointed editor and Chief of the Reporting Branch of the joint legislature. Ho would employ three reporters and three typists and these three reporters WOUld take for 20 minutes and dictate to tvixsts for forty minutes throughout the meeting of each House of the Legislature. This would only be practicable if the House of Assembly and the Legislative Council met on different days. This could easily be arranged. The important point to be estabBd is that there is no necessity whatever for any shorthand notes to be taken •way Inim the Public Buildings by rpportn liven two reporters working thirty minute gbjftl can dictate a large proportion of their notes to expert typists during the thirty minutes in which they are not taking notes. The present sy.stem of note taking is thoroughly inefficient. A reporter is expected to take notes for hours and then to transcribe thent without any aid from a typist. It is not surprising that the notes are taken home What is surprising and even shocking is the state of affairs described by Mr. lalma who is reported to have said on Tuesday that reporters had "to transcribe into the King 1 English what was not proptil> explained or spoken in the House by some honourable members." If this is true. Barbados* system of re* porting politicians speeches must be unique in the British Commonwealth and is certainly contrary to the English or Canadian Hansard traditions. In the Canadian House of Commons member! are permit ted to see their speeches in typescript in the Debates Office before are sent to the printers. It is a rule of the House that only minor corrections or alterations may hi' made. All such changes ed by the Editor before being ine irponted Into the copy which goes to the printer. By ten o'chx-k the following 'ling the printed Hansard is delivered to tbi House of Commons. The weakness of the present system of l in the House of Assembly and the Legislative Council therefore lies —• *-J Each reporter nuist. be provided with an • vpist and reporters must take notes for periods not exceeding twenty minutes except in nn emergency when a maximum of one hour is possible. Three reporters are adequate for both Houses of the Legislature, but arrangements must be made to avoid simultaneous %  f the two Houses. One Editor who would be Chief of the Reporting Branch must oe appointed to supervise the work of the three reporters and the three typists and to ensure that members do not make other than minor corrections to their speeches. It will be the Editor's responsibility to see that reporters and typists complete their copy before leaving and there will then be no question of copy going from the Public Buildings until it is ready for the printer. Such a procedure will mean that copy can be given to the printer on the same or at latest the following day after debates in the House or Council. The mechanics of ta/ping are also important. The typewritten copy for the printer in Canada is prepared on a "set" which consists of an original sheet, a stencil and a blue sheet. The set is perforateu near the top and when the copy comes from the reporter it is separated, the original going to the editor, the stencil to the duplicating machine and the blue sheet to the outside office for use of members. The stencil supplies thirty copies to the press gallery fui information of the Press but it cannot be quoted as Hansard. Fortunately for Barbados the Speaker of the House of Assembly is shortly going to spend a month in Canada where he will have the opportunity to check the accuracy Of the above Information with the Editor of Canada's Hansard who as far hack as Match 1951 expressed his willingnes to assist ihe Barbados House of Assembly and whose account of Canadian Parliamentary Reporting methods was published in the Advocate of April 5, 1951. Mulilr (iiriTiin IT IS interesting to compare an account of "markets of the British Caribbean" published in the New Commonwealth of June 9, witn a talk on "Strains on the sterling area" published in United Empire (the Journal of the Royal Empire Society) for May-June. Wheieas. Mr. Starck. the United Kingdom Trade Commissioner for the Eastern Caribbean considers that the rise in the area from .1115 million of imports in 1938 to £70 million in I95ti merits serious attention, Sir Frederick Leith-Ross takes quite another view of the United Kingdom's relation to colonies. Sir Frederick quotes Professor Arthur Lewis' recent statement that "for the tlrst time since free trade was adopted in the middle of the nineteenth century the British Colonial system has become I major means of economic exploitation." And the reason for Professor Lewis' statement, which Sir Frederick acknowledges to be based on facts is due to the relatively new system of exchange controls by which "The United Kingdom continues to claim the products of the sterling area by payment of £ s. and in £ s, that are not convertible and which cannot always be used here for obtaining the goods they need: these £ s. remain hanked in London and during the past few years their purchasing power has been steadily draining away." The West Indies; it is known, are not big dollar earners for the sterling area but their receipts from oil, tourism, sugar and some other products probably exceed their allocation of hard currency. To some extent therefore they can be included in the criticism which is levelled by Professor Arthur Lewis against the British Colonial system. But Sir Fredfick cites Malaya which during the tlrst nine months of 1951 earned $350 million but only spent $44 million. And he remarked that the present arrangement in Malaya is unlikely to be maintained if Malaya gets a system of self-gcvernment. Whereas, Mr. Starck is quite happy drawing the steep rise in the value of Eastern Caribbean imports to the attention of the British exporters while trving to explain away our adverse balance of trade by mentioning our earnings from invisible exports and the flow of capital into the area. Mr. Starck is far more optimistic than Professor Beasley who inclines rather to the view that in Barbados anyhow import* have been paid for partly by savings and investments which are probably diminishing. Sir Frederick and Professor Beasley are much better guides for Barbados than Mr. Starck. "Not until we have a sterling £ which is freely convertible into gold will there be any safeguard for the standard of life either of people here or of the ether peoples in the sterling area. Social security is meaningleM unless it is based on a secure and stable currency. Without that stable currency any welfare state is built on sand." These two sentences of Sir Frederick ought to be framed and used as arguments by all those who are seriously concerned with the effect that the most recent exchange controls are having in the British Caribbean. Instead of being ;.sked to pull in our belts and to fight inflation as the United Kingdom, Australia and other selfgoverning mcmlx'is of the Commonwealth are doing we are heini^ invited to spend more on British goods, or in other words to increase local inflation. Great Britain could no more have intended this than she intended to accumulate £908 million from colonial sterling balances in the 3^4 years ended in June 1861. But there seems very little concern about it in London and much apathy here. The* Man Who IW|iN All lidos Laughing NATHANIEL GUBBINS jg^ft^ fr-**. l"-*****! 1 w^ 4 %  u a "J3 aV aaar^ l W %  v ^^ I \\ Jennifer, the hen that laid ten eggs In 45 minutes at Ilod>more Heath Farm. Warwickshire, or. May 26. died 25 hours afterward*. W HEREVER hens are gathered, whenever hnu may %  peak The lair of little Jennifer shall pus from beak to beak And hrnir who rut'T gave their best shall look the other way To heat of one who gave her all aoon after Empire Day. In darkened neit the rat alone u-hllc lien* look In to mock: Much yd;,r h*Ki uith birarln eyes for any pairing cock. 'Poor Jennif.-r:' the-y lauphed aloud. "Poor Jennifer," ihey %  aid. '•All work, no plow, no boys, no date* the might ai u-ell be dead.' So aiUU'er ramp from Jet nifer. ••<> u-ord escape, I her dcak Although a single glistening lear ran down her leather vd cheek, When spring has wised she knew Uial eggi mutt be tti hor( supply To brfdav ihe gap the gave her all soon after Empire Dye So tags shall be unfurled for hen HO muted drumi shall roll No parson speak a word for her, no villaae bell shall toll For on. who nape for lilttc life 'she had no more to give) Except tier humble offering that we on eggs imuhl lire. Scholar At Home When carelessly you eat pour mi. it .1 'i. fili'd. boih-d it fried Allow a moment for a thought for one who gladly died Wiili bearing heart, but unafraid, u'ith calm and steady eye Mecausv eke loi'od her country more . soon after Empire Dye. "I often reitret my university education because I suspect It prevents me from entering with zest into family small talk and my wife's material interests.'* —Letter lo a newspaper. I SNT that Just like fit Vi, dear? You know Vi who had her inside Ui" No. dear. I nl it like her lo eo to th dentist now they're charging £1 Ai I don't know VI, dear, I wouldn't know if it is like her or not. For weeks she's been KOIIIK about with a face like n bnlloon. Sin could nave had it for nothing. Now she'll have to pay for it. Am t lo understand one is now fined for hawnfl a face like a ballwu'.' Don't UH me that with all your Oxford education you've never heard of the National Health. And she's going to have twins on top of It. On lop of what, dear? On top of all her teeth taken out It's not pleasant to have twins without teeth. / didn't know ll made any difference. After all that 1 expect they'll he born funny, too. Funny in what way. dear? 1 wonder if they'll be like her or their father? If a maternal resemblance means that they will be bom comedians with faces (ike balloons and no fnsides, I think • iMMtM br hrtfer for all coni if (hey were like their father. Unable Seamitn Y OUR Uncle Nat has forgotten the name of the peer who said, in the House of Lords. "We dont want another Nat Gubbins Home Guard"; also the name of the general who said "The Home Guard must not be laughed at." But he has not forgotten the remarks. Therefore, the Home Guard will be deprived not only of the flattest-footed private wear ammunition boots, but a lot of much-needed publicity. people who live in little worlds of their own have no Idea of the : iv.n the lew solemn forms of publicity. Whal tha Army (if you can call it the Army) has lost, the r**ivy (if you can call It the Navy) will sain now that their Uncle has joined the Royal Naval Mlnewatching Service. From now on Unable Seaman Gubbins will loll you from time oi his adventures In a %  anrtci which is regarded, by those who ought to know, as more Important than the Home Guard. So there Already he has been favourably impressed by the hearty welcome given to the flrat minewatchers of The Nore at Chatham. Even If it Is the first time he ever joined a corps with women in it, it Is also the first corps he has ever Joined which offered him free beer. Moreover, as one who has heard hundreds of pep talks by Army officers, he can give Admiral Sir Cecil Harcourt, C.-InC The Nore. ten marks out of ten for saying all that was necessary in the fewest possible words. Although experience tells him that the frce*becr issue wont i.isi. tven if the women do, this unvthiiiK-but-jolly tar, with only ana wife near one port, felt jollier in the coach coming home. The only anag Is the uniform. Unable Seaman Gubbins might look respectable enough In blue battledress but he feels that a blue beret, worn at his age. might remind people of one of icrly French guides selling those awful postcards. JOHN'S llll. -II 99 "Softy softy ratch inonkee" [fl a good old Wesl Indian proverb of which I am reminded every time I come back to study the Hill which seeks to estabh h %  system of local government based on recommendations by Sir John Maude. If you turn to page 60 of Sir John's report you will find a "summary of recommendations," but if you turn to page 35 :md read part IV of the report which is entitled "recommendations"'. you will understand why I am reminded of the old West Indian proverb. Because Sir John begins his "recommendations" with that terrible two letter word "If". "If the view is accepted." he writes, "that change i' necessary the first nd fundamental question to be asked and answered is whether local government in Barbados should continue or whether the process, which has bam going on for Ihe past century, of entrust in* to the central Government functions normally discharged by local authorities should be carried to Its logical conclusion." Nobody it seems has answered that question. Nor did Sir John. But he committed himself to a (.inn < tit which seems to have been generally overlooked. "I make no doubt", he writes in Part IV, "that if the present system remains unaltered the LUX process will continue as new needs arise for ajhkh parochial administration is clearly inadequate, and that the Vestries and Parochial Boards in no very long space of time will become patently superfluous and will disappear. To set up a new local government system in their place will be not only more difficult technically but—what is far more important -will require a much greater effort on the part of all responsible members of the community than to allow the system to lapse whether by quick or slow stages into Government hands." I do not think these words of Sir John Maude have been S iven the attention they deserve ecause they sum up far more than "the summary' of recommendations" his real toallngi about local government in BarDados. "Your Vestry system" he might have said quite bluntly, "is not local government at all as local government is understood In England. Already iho function of local government. •jr. in Bridgetown education, police, housing, part* of public health, highway-, water supply, bridges, market* and fire services are under centml government control. Why all this fuss then about local government ? Leave them alone and like BOPEEP'S sheep Ihe Ve-lnes will all come home trailing their tails of poor relief, roads and church maintenance with them. But if you people of Barbados are not prepared to see the central government run everything, if the iaspuinlbU BM tubers of the community are prepared to make a much greater effort then you can have a system of local government Somewhere here Sir John Maude breaks his train of thought and when he gets .•round to the all important subject of qualification for voting and for membership of new councils Ihere is no further reference lo responsible members of the community. He Is recommending opening the voting to local government councils and membership of local government councils to anyone of British nationality aged 21. Whether a single responsible member of the community will ba) returned to councils under these conditions clearly does not interest Sir John. Ha generalises about its being paradoxical "to regard the people of Barbados as fit to take responsibility for their island affairs but not for parochial nrYalr*." And this in spile of his own statement earlier in iara. 67 of Part IV that "to set up a now local government system In their place will be not only more difficult but—what is far more important—will require a much greater effort cm the part of all responsible members of the community." How is that effort to be made if the responsible members arc outnumbered by the irresponsible? Truly Sir John seems lo have led us right ftp the garden and beyond into the stinging tactile hushes with these soft words. By George Hunte ting of I ttatement of his which sounds like a prophecy rising from the Scotch mists. "I make no doubt that, if the present system remains unaltered the centralising process will continue as new needs arise for which parochial administration is clearly Inadequate and that the Vestries and Parochial Boards in no very long space of time will become patently superfluous and will disappear." If (to use the two letter word S r which Sir John ihon ndness in Part IV i the Vestries jie going lo go in no varj lon| space of lime, why then give •iiem a parting kick? "Because." says Sir John, "to entrust the whole administration cf local government to the central government would be to impose on it an intolerable burden." Yet by the time hr has reachet para. US Sir John is reaching up 'or a new note -others (Will say)", he write*, "tint the lowers of the new Councils arc M hedged about with governrnaM controls that the system ll one of local government in name rather than substance" And Sir John Is forced to /linil that the proposed control by uV central government undoubtedly goes beyond that to be found in countries like Great Britain uith long experience of local admin istr at i on. This little admission and the sentence about the people being fit to take responsibility for parochial affairs do not seem to be on all fours. Ho shows that ha does not really believe the people will be responsible for parochial affairs by using the words, "if a spirit of collaboration towards n common end exists between the central and local administrators." Nii John Maude's report was dated 18th February 1940 and he visited Barbados In 1948. Since then elections under universal adult suffrage have further reduced the effective power of the British Governor and thrown the entire responsibility for government measures on to the leader of th* Barbados House of Assemuly. When therefore Sir John writes about "genuine differences of opinion between the government and the councils" he is thinking in terms of the Governor-in-Executive Committee. To-day the Governorin-Executive Committee is virtually dependent on the support of the Leader of the House of Assembly. Government controls over the Councils as proposed in the Bill based on Sir John Maude's recommendations mean that Government controls can only be exercised through the Govern< r-in-Execullve Committee, that is with the sanction of the poUtJeal party which happens to bo in power. To abolish vestries which according to Sir John Maude are doomed lo disappear soon merely to create district councils subservient to the political party in power seems fatuous. The vestries and parochial Boards according to Sir John Maude are only responsible for repair and maintenance of churches and salaries of officers: poor relief: public henlth: parish roads: provision and maintenance of burial grounds and cemeteries: grants to charitable institutions and powers peculiar to Bridgetown, Speightstown and Holetown. How will the new councils be able to carry out these duties any better merely because everybody is entitled to vote at council elections or to become a councillor? The bill nowhere speaks of any new duties which will be carried on by the new councils. Nor for that matter does Sir John. His views on local government are so hedged around with conditions that only on one occasion does he let sUp what he really thinks In para 73 of PBI1 IV he .-.(.ties "one obvious course would be to treat the whole island as a single local government unit and to concentrate all local government services in one Council, centred on Bridgetown." Better. In my opinion, since Sir John never seemed once to make up his mind, leave the vestries alone, when according to his prophecy :lt disappear and we'll have the single local government unit (the two legislative Houses) which he undoubtedly favoured, despite the "summary of recommendations" on which the local government has based Ita present controversial Bill. PHOTOGRAPHS Copies, of Local Photographa Which have appeared in tha ADVOCATE NEWSPAPER Can be ordered from tha . BARBADOS STATIONERY *w N •• Thitp 1 mil./ %  >'^= Coffee Mil. remember — / Coffee aVb 3 Sizei Meal 'Inn ri • French Fry Cullert Urn Sliren • Fruit BUotn a Craters C. S. PITCHER & CO. P". 4472 (ESTABLISHED 1845) THE POLICIES THAT CARRY THE SEAL OF SECURITY AND SERVICE DA COSTA & CO., LTD. (AGENTS SINCE 1868) Jh&sra&xad!/ 6AW* r~i. Selfrldgc's. London Is one of the many famous buildings which have been painted with •• International Paints. If you require the best In paints always specify International Our agents will be glad to advise on the paint for your |ob. **x'l[er/>ftt'> '/*///*/ %  > Cjytnrt'J jh/ MBOt. DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. iN3wiavcna NOISSIWWOD LOOKING FORWARD TO HOLIDAY -TIME? HERE'S THE BEST WAY TO SPEND IT! &f RELAX AND ENJOY A GOLD BRAID" COCKTAIL



PAGE 1

•LNDAY, Jl'LY 8, 1*32 SUNDAY. UlVOCATi: I'W.I I II II I N GOVERN MENT NOTICES Attention u uriwo to the Defence (Control of Drug, and Patent | -infl Propneier> Medicine Prices! Order, 1952. No. 7 which will I*. published in the Official Gazette of Monday 7th July. 1952 2. Under this OrdfT the rhMlnimn retail celling price* of -Chases | Nerve Food". •Aiihm.i Powder (Kelloajs) *. 'Canadian Healing Oil"; md "Sulphur Bitten (Kingi)" We a* follow*: Church Services LISTENING IIOI RS %  T MAR1 iKIK. II I I KM Chase* Nerve Food Asttima Powder (KellofS) Canadian Healing Oil Sulphur Hitler* (King*-.) MAXIM' M PRICK ' am alaUn. as* a - (aa-a tta.v *m a m Solemn Ma-. .... J *• l> m t>"di> SettOaJ 4 00 ii > %  CMldirn Veeperv 4 1* m %  "••"i" !i" *Wi"!lvninl"l -r lIUKUli. i MI tt, M • %  m H" Cham Eocmriii nata. -Nnr, t-b-iuiHi —mtm ii .<•. m It... jinv I man T D OOD Mh July. 1952. 7.52—In Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend* ment) Order. i52, No. 24 which will be published in the Official •3ar.et.te of Monday 7th July. 1952. 2, Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling price* -I "Margarine (•) MeUo-Kreern Brand" are H follows — ARTICLE WHOLESAl.r PRICE (not more than) RETAIL PRICE (not more than) ih iii|i BETMII II air P.v T J Futla M
i : p m Pkv T J FUi lev M) OIIR MONT %  lew ton % r r ORAIT Kit J.-l I a Kk Motr-a* S-rv ,., Prewhaf Ml W Ha><.*_ tpiri rva. I — .-hfT Mt I % %  ; K tl s.ti n as *" %  Ml <• H UN : • MmiO*^lv i Eianv.* aWvici LUC %  rerniTK snuirr u •.,. e> Kfi 1 1 N *-nl, as*', rrftchti t'n.m>ip MM I* •.-& %  > Will flU.i. *ltr. (Hi IT W hi* *-•!ae-d U#* ti'M-aH .Mil h. %  .tin "m ,14 >.irL*i< CHI TW ii!m( umn. ... in, .< fa. Bl.l t-.ilout i(M41 la al • II-".. ana M.-ii-ii" •>•• I. I-. %  llllMI a, Mart 11..., IS*. AII -iiiu !" .. tnii:>a*'>t' ntaa Mrlaillj, cause, .ma anV. belif* to fod "a ST* Mr A pay %  • ... ag t-m.. T*>-....|[. ni-K-a-oMfir | faa*. rri—iwi Mt W Dranr %  T^.vrhr. M %  V %  Anhi.i Trader Comes To Carlisle Bay Tomorrow The Steamship "Tra4tr" i* i>pected lo arrive in Carlisle Hu> roni Speightstown on Monda>. 'uly 7 This steamship Is cotiM dn*d to DaCoaia A Co., Ltd. < M a m s-. >n .i., naif H* *-"* Thf HIM* • 1* m Mia. I II • a -,,,.,. i p „, a, v I Ma, t Proarcmtna Parad* and I Mi hat*, : oa ,. •., m P Hew : is h llotn* Nr<< r.a", kili.ir Til pia-ISW BM -\ : %  • T U a i %  4MkH fci*-W. I I. II ... !" i a v %  r ,„ Thr KdllnfUK 00 p „. n |l Q Wia m N*w< Tags, 10 IS p L L*. don forum. 10 49 p m Th* BibW Itniorv and in tita Nm. It in T* A Tata .^ fwr. Compacnwiin— -. —~ ... > — p ... Irnium • i pm au\*niN ol HuHC. 4 OS pi, W.M, M,^,ita Bt pit p „, l.iHtp ,< ("hair*. Id pm Spoil, Round-tap •>-! rrn-* l-.rada 1 SO p nTh. H4WI 1 IS i. m Kama N>. r.o^ llli'inislies %  vnttt at Oidwm h*via* 1.1 m a r liOVfli.VMFM Mllll! >t>flv B i i-s> M daw sa-r ^4?_1 r :: *M N* ^ ^ UnaoaaoUibMa^afs '^ I n d| Mm. Ttwn*. saarta.^ down .laandaa of nUdrf Uaucun i4,ip *j| (atatpunl raw —tuna kmlinni Pnw %  taMrl IPJJT fiiticura VSOAR ~ pound tins 5th July. 1952. aOUTH I'sIldiT rVaiinr 1pm Ml ( r H.n IDtNCK II a A ; a . j r>.ikl Ho Mt I) Ht.xlr \ M I I HI SM H Until further notice ihe following price has been arranged. JT** 1 ,. Maximum Price SULPHATE" or AMMONIA ,_, ~~$r53 70 Discount if paid by 31st July, 1952 0 25 II a II Hind*' hehool T l p.m o Chunrh rim, .. „ %  : 11 t Revival S. il '" A <-idi .' %  I I.I \. HI--. I I i i H. i I i I | • Ii HilllTllSN M HI I II. v K 1! I T..wT, n A n D ia %  %  I lie Mi-lonaiMacllni 7pm R>v K r Tawati n n n PAVNR.4 HAY JS a m Mr W • SI Joftn VACANCY FOR BUILDING CONflTRCCTION i l i l; hOF WORKS IN BRITISH HONDURAS .^^"^'f^iiS?* re inv "* for 8nlor Clerk of Works (salary 1 ^SS CiM0) Bnd lwo Aaalstant Clerks of Works (.alary £600^800) on a three-year contract tu supervise and assist in a building programme which is being undertaken by the Government of British Honduras. The starting salary will depend on the qualifications and • %  xuenence or ihe applicants. Candidate* must have a full knowledge ol timber and reinforced concrete construction tmd should give full information aboul their qualification*, etc. togi-'her with copies of ic*limonlals and references. Passage* will be paid to and from the Colom I be granted i (>ill nav at the en I BANK IIAll. ,,....-. iim I sprmHTSToWN idmrtsm iij.h PayM Hrv P M> r Mn.ua .... Fourteen days al lesve will be granted each year and three months leave on e contract. Applications should be addressed Major A ar M \ \ in-, mil HAI.I \tn Ufiin. I W MornDiv VACANT POST OR RADIOGRAPHER, OlNFRAL HOSPITAL. BARBADOR. Appliratroris artinvited for appointment (o the post of Radior.iapher. General Hospilal, Barbados. % .£ 7he ** lmry n tnff hed to the post is at the rait of SI. 44.0X4B-S, T^ 4 A* r annum ,n addition free quarters, rations, servant ..mi light or an Inclusive; allowance of 11.440 per annum m lieu Uniform* are orovided. Quarters are not available al oreMrnt A temporarv n dock ui"ii''U'nM^ lepatra. llet i;eel Is being corked stid all the I daataoUvsj iHi|i|-i -hi-' being Trmevfd The Schooner Harriett Whittakc dock but she Is ats< i netting a general overhaul. W<'k I on this schooner began over the) fcaal week and At present lte Is j leaning on one side i" the I'areen' age so that her keel could IK| Twelve men are doing the WMl iii iier. The Dutch Motor vesael Will.-mst.nl Vhich came off the "•• >. abimt lwo weeks ago. ia still under rgBsdrs a* tr heni exctaVgsgV fr for the main engine 15 baring repaired and cleoned at 'ho Ceniiwlry. This heii' exchanger Is part of the main engine arvt its main Job 1In keep the engine cool. The vill water passes through Ihe tllkNM and the fre*h water siotmd them Theae lubcv grbJCfl %  .. taken mtt if Ihe main Mggng whM the WllIcmstad ansol M dod DOW iHMng When Ihese tubes are rwfcad, in.engine Is not kejrt HI %  proper temperature and some part may ghi I | The work < 1 the heat exchutigei ar completion NOTICE TO OWNERS AND CREWS OF PISHING BOATS The attention of all owners and crews of ashing boats is drawn to Sub-Sectiooa (2) and (I) of Section It. of the Harbour and Shipping Mastei Act, 1909—7, which provide as follows: — "(2) It shall be the duty of the owner of a fishing boat to see that his boat is not made fast to any part of the wharves, or bridges, or anchored in the Careenage except when actually engaged in landing flsh, or when on account of weather conditions permission is given by the Harbour and Shipping Master. (4) For any breach of this Section the owner of a flsjilng boat shall be personally liable to a fine not exceeding five pounds to be recovered in a summary way before a Police Magistrate .t.52 —Jn DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION BARBADOS CVEMIMO INSTITUTE Coaamarelal 01sSMs. A. ADVANCED SHORTHAND-TYPIST COURSE Applications are invited for entry to an Advance.! Commercial Clats, to be composed of twenty (10) students, and to be held at Combermere School, commencing In September, 1852 The Course of tiro years is designed to lead to the examination for the Junior •Shorthand*Tvp(si Cerfl/lcoie of the Royal Society of Arts. (A copy of the syllabus may be seen on request at the Department.) Two lectures a week will be given in each of the 3 subjectsShorthand. Typewriting and English—on Monday* to Thursdays Inclusive Student* miut takt all fhree sublets Applicants must have attained a minimum speed of 70 w.p.m. In Shorthand and 30 w.p.m. in Typewriting. They should also be prepared to undergo a Qualifying Test for admission in each subject. Applicants must be 18 years of age or over on 1st September, 1952. B. BOOK-KEEPING Applications will also be considered for entr, to a beginners* Book-keeping Course to be held at Combermere School on Mondays. commencing In September, 1032 There Is a limited number of vacancies for the Senior Bookkeeping Course. Applicants should poasiss an Elementary L.C.C. Certificate or Its equivalent. Academic Oluae* C. GENERAL CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION-UNIVERSITY OF LONDON Applications are invited for entry to the Junior Academic classes commencing in September. IBM and preparing for examination at Ordinary level in June, lM. Subjects offered are English. Mathematics. Latin Spanish History or Geography. There are al*o a limited number of vacancies in (a) Senior classes preparing for examination at Ordinary level in June, 1MI; (b) Advanced classes preparing for examination at Advanced level In IMS and ISM Prospective applicants may obtain further Information and advice from either: — (a) The Principal. Department of Education, preferably between 10.00 a^i. and It.SO pm. on Saturdav morning* 'Telephone MM); or 7); or (O H. B. Daniel. Esq.. ft\A, LC.P. Dean of Academic Studle*. Bush Hall. St. Michael (Telephone 3487) Form* of application to be submitted to the Department of Edurntion by Saturday 26th July, IMl and addressed as follows: — Commercial Classes—The Dean of Commercial Studies. Academic Classes—The Dean of Academic Studies. A fee of S3.00 per term payable during the first week of the term covers all the subjects 80% of the fees paid will be refunded at the i-nd of a session to all students who have, in the opinion of the Prinripal. Dean and Lecturer. worked satisfactorily and attended reguInrly and punctually. Students will be required to supply their own stationery and text books as required by the Lecturer* 4th June. IB"? WIT AWAY NASTY COUGHS COLDS mi MACK WITH HIGHLY MEDICATED BUCKLEY'S WHilE HID Man,.... now ca. ...... *. No other KL'B hoi 'hase Miter* ol h>dd-..... --, %  -. fc. % %  :. -I W ...w, — (.-.. n i, „„.>,,., — . %  ..t M *..,a %  i-'i'.'i.a ~.!" -<...( -ii % % %  iBf .• 4 aa ika f**d % % %  %  — -Ma **4> • %  pYBIPlS YOUR MONSY SACK iy^AWV/.VlryAV,V,./,v,v/A'/| 1 ft CANADIAN COTTONS HIGHLIGHT RECENT CONSIGNMENTS OF NEW MERCHANDISE OPENED AT N. E. Wilson & Co These beautifully deaiiined COTTONS make delloht^ tull\ cool, churmlnti and inexpensive Fr'icks. Sun *i Suns. Play Suits. Beach Wear. Housecoats, etc. (or S ; youni: and old, and are available In*\ n.owi KKE) pique. I'RINTKII & PLAIN SKERSI'CKF.B PFIIC M.KS. PI.AIDS. ETC.. ETC. See our SHOW WINDOW TUSPI.AV. and lor llle ;I N. E. WILSON & CO. j :i SWAN man -.MALMH IM'W. .MtIO O is.5l_ln S^^yw^y^K i IWHM yw wewwwj HO-MTUDcouassi fO> CENMAL CERTIFICATE of EDUCATION CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL 4 HIGHER SCH. CERT. *-i H. Otford c wrwalif ftpwvtoahf iwlar iacakaM4>aiH **— M? '" UMM U.ieir B ,, DH WI A C P.. 11 S let. .. mmi itiwaair %  a* aaaa*aaBaar \ % %  ) %  .i.e. lint fhaih—nTin—i It 1 *-, |r>.r M w.. f„. I II. | ha^wiaSsS 'uatenaooflirVeatmaK l< Patkar M A I1D D",v.> lie&.Dn-UI WOLSEY HALL, OXFORD — %  .OVEHNMKST >* Regimeni Bale one Hlllman Pirku; %  up is in i cli^manllcd condili'in I Otren In a i Itliu in for the pufchaae of tli which ran bo seen on S| : to HeailT' R^fiment 3. OtTcr^ shoultl be • !<• the Colonial Secretary. Pur'.iBulldinns. not later than 4 00 p.tn r>n Thursrtav 10th Jul 4. %  sn mw GDBI MB B*iTI\OS. BARK UKM bail* mi-! Lortftei quoted on request Perananenl CursU welcome Dinner and Coeklall Parlies arransed. 1 H IHTKLAND Proprietor. .oughing, Strangling Asthma, Bronchitis Curbed In 3 Minuter Darou havi alUWEi ol AaOTnia ..r T. M. had biaifa ib< ufi.r-.l. I.HI. t*d thai y._ *nd pa-p fr hrealh id ean"t -let>n? l>o IOH >'ii|h ao Innl yn f-l Ilka ..in wete I %  It'K n.iilitrail* %  > Pod real wanh. i.. nl>!e I mft\. anJ h.\y nil ii.il I., take .old anil II rllnin lood-r Nn man. r BOW IMl ra h'B atiftf red or what *<*> hava Irlad. thara hapa rae u In a iKwlot'a i.rr^rH.n.n al -I HMNOACU No l"l-e. no amok—, no lujacilona, no nio'xlaar. All )U do la U>* tw lalalaai "Wen al maan -nd r ur ait..k--e. 111 in •iinlah IHa mailr In I mtnnla. VKXM*.-.. atari. ...k'" 'iir."'r. I'MW lilrvxi a.1 Jlna nain* '.> dliMitia and ramova auaimiini phKiiin. t.iMtni.' tr#anaf braathlnf und arSfpihaSi -nnl jrott an,* faal r.i J ysara > Na Aadt-va In 1 TH,. MFNPACO not only krlnf. ilmu n-f.'i ai.l tiaa braall 'ht-kinf and al ran*, hue ril!it. ii-uldn'l alarp, rieoriad Ml NUAt" -1..i-i-l • %  i ,. Mao. r Sa.k 0-.r„„... Tha vat) Aral ..ia* ,J UKKDACO Bi'-a MBI lo %  • rk rlri'iilnlliia ihrxuyii yi.ur M.— I d na li.lplni nn lira ridjou.-f thr(T..i.,,f A.ihma n no lima ,n all MRNDACO "• %  % %  •Mr make Ng (e. t-i.. j.J aljwqSW Ii i \u:\|. %  • You II UKNjlAOb an'ar ia mun-r K—h *imrani-. (udaa. If yoa aon'i laal .SM irtar ia£nf 1^ rafumlH 0 •our I'hanil*! •all i.-ii %  %  •! ti an. Mendaco "'•• iff MMI .tuck. % u, IO.UIIM. Mr. I IMl At' r.. e !" ,. i I. H.I Jt'ST IN TIMK FOII 1 IIK m intit i \i sh isox ANEROID BAROMETERS Onlv a llmiled number so select voura earlv and be prepaiert Aln HURRICANE LANTERNS F.stiiblKhed tncornnrste.l T. HERBERT LTD. ^ A11 Roebuck Strtvi 1926 aaaaaa #•:• i;i WEEK XfiI rrirti Is it WKAIIIKIUIEADS DKIKi STORE WMITH— Mineral Nail* PM Cattle, H For i/e IMtOTH^Mineral Kail* Fur I'imllu 3. I" i DSrf hags IICMH S Hlrarbanate al Hoda '.Th pk. IHe. pk tUHtrs — thla>r.>nh%l T.H... Tablet l/ cadi (BOttV I KtAOBADO OMMBI Oems. J T. c Laafarirest, Fl.-iii I I T\ I rilFRMOS sil.VF.R II 01 ,t muht .' Btntl I present IH>\I' 01 MOIRS ( IKM til All s Uaawhlno t'h. %  %  Pol nf Gold M HUM -. ill Mll.snv -; ( MI I.I i i III I'ho ,'..T, KODAK i n % % % %  T i lit .''crv i.in %  N. ItT, 1" Mil lit; III* 122 Brwr Vt>alhtThri\ii i I* la him > ... .1 feitl-a That Grand Dancr% % %  WI-l\\ MOt 'Hi: I rtKiia.lt I Saad lar Mit \HWI>ai-. a. mmi i* riM Maa -KB ll He. .1 1 iM, I4'2 i 01 II' • rsh IIOI -| IIS Na B> 1 '"""" IKlai kl •i fsai is>os>r-i-v'*'*---*e'--------. JI si nrmviD I l IBOflONI t\\l Mtltll/OM Illl afJUOLTOM PaUal N.RVIItl IM C. (AR1.T0N Itllffll Wholevtle A Retail Uniaflst 136 Rort Mi l JOIN THE THOUSANDS OF ll\IU.\l\ III \ II ISS GIGANTIC SALE JIIBT Plain end Striped IS in. trlde 99 centi WHITE SHAEKSKIH 36 in. wide Best in Town 11.39 and $1 98 WHITE 0S0ANDV Superior Quality 69 centi CHILDREN'S PANTIES 37c. np SPUN SILX 36 in. wide 69e. and 79e. il is must on every sli<>|i)>iim list. Why pay more? VESTS All Silei and Colours 60c. and 6Bc. rUJIETTE All Shadei. Qnalitiei and Width. S7c. and D9C COTTON PRINTS A HueSelection 30c 65c and 7Sc. EMBROIDER ANOLAISE White. Pink and Bine S3 80 SHOT TAPPBTAS Charmin; Shade. 99 centi! NYLONS 01 OH lire II 13 and I1.SS CALICO 36 in. wide. 60 cent. BRASSIISES Big msortment from UK Pranee and USA 60c and 64c SATW 36 in wide Soft Quality 63 cent. CREPES In 10 Virirtie. and %  atfil 73c. sv. ud Ii 12 stuanijiriir^ SIM RAYON P0NJEE M teilta HANDKEROHIEPS A very wide variety Cotton & Linen Ladie. and Olrl. 13c, 16e, and 30c. BROCADE SILK 36 In. wide 66 cent.. PRINTED SPURS 36 In wide 73c. 94c., 116. and tl 08 BILK SHANTUNO Smart Colour. .18 in wide 11.03 CLOTH UMBRELLAS 85c. Bass A vaat variety a. ultra. tlve In Quality u in Price.. CHILDREN SOYS' PAJC0Y SHIRTS Assorted Colour. 1 for S3 00 BOYS' PULLOVERS 78c up BOYS' VESTS 37o. each CHILDREN'S RUBBER SANDALS 36c. a pair (1IRI.8 STRAW HATS 43 cent, np CHILDREN'S SHOES 10 per cent, off TOYS TOYS I A loadful of them at Reduced Prices TRAVEL BAOS 111 85 GE Very Heavy KHAKI DRILL Limited Quantity 98c and SI 20 OENTS SOCKS Rayon and Cotton 3 pair, for 8100 OENTS' WATCHES Reliable Wrist Watches 18 33 Good Quality HANDKERCHIEFS 4 for 81 00 TROPICAL BUITINO Orey, Brown and Blue 13.62 SPORT TWEED 66 in 86 20 Latest Paahion CREAM PLANNEI. BEROE 84 38, 83 47 SHIRTS Khaki. Dress. Sport. Cot ton. Rayon und Silk Heal Knock down Prirc 1001 Qualities 0P.NT8 PARSON CRP.Y 83.11 JOHN WHITE 8H0E8 10 per cent, off TABLE COVERS Plastic ones $,120 up OILCLOTH 81 37 BLANKETS Lovely Qnahtv and Colours Sinvle 8198 Medium 83 08 BEDROOM AND DRAW INO ROOM RUOS 83 48 BEDSPREADS Bnuli8412 Double . 88.18 6 Alluring Shades BED SHEETS Single and Double 1401 and 8631 LUNCH BAOS (Convenient Size) S3 68 and 84 68 TAPESTRY CLOTH 48 in wide 8120. 81 ?3 and 8146 STRAW MATlT In Bedroom and Drawing Room Sixes 80c, 90c and 81.04 CRETONNES 37 in. wide 48 in. wide 79c. and 81 32 MOSQUITO NETS Ready made Medium 86.30 Lnree 87 24 TOWELS Wash Pace Balh . Bath .. Bath SB 37c 870. 78c. 91c. 8130 % %  rii. All Wool Worsted TWEED PINSTRIPE ,''6 in Navy and Brown 89 50 TROPICAL PINSTRIPE 56 in wide 83 80. S3 20 and 8349 OENT8 RIBBED JOCKEY PANTS 72 cents TIIA:\TS lp. 'm. Il.-..pj St. Nii;m St. -T



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Sl'MDAV JILY li. 1952 SCNDAT ADVOCATE PAC.F VIST WOVEN FROM THE GOLDEN FLEECE II. Will l.\>l I Oltlll > si>:u AMI You'll And Them nil over Great Britain and Ireland—some of mesuuni nit, others impre*t.'ily large, many so :i urvo of a valley or by the bend of a road. All of HkfBB are M.1U—Woc>;. engagi-d in the manuf cloth or specializing m onr uf Its many phase*; all of them Intent on a modern presentation of an ancient craft and nearlj all wMk generations of family ties among employers and employees. Time mi whan the word 'crealion' was ..pplnable to the universe but it li more readily understood now in its modern, euphemistic sense, as plit;tble to trend in a style conscious world, '•iial markets of which (.11 it r The com man aim .1 i.;UUre <•' %  uvii and Its need to satisfy *' nperatures fmm arctic to trouira! 4 a multitude %  broken down in imruti designs, colour^, weights and in a variety of finishes. To satisfy um CTiormous demand, an even moro enormous production of raw material is annually forthcoming from the .great sheep pastures of the areaM) for convi-: I then cloth by the clattering mechanism of the woollen Industry or woollen factories, or simple little Mills far removed from the bouncing and high pressure of industrial groups and combines. They all have Ihis in common; they are converters of the golden fleece. %  the broki i %  .nits, to* train* added uq mushed .11 in,. IfJ In Its natural state, that is to say. with .i heavy i. M skin •<>..) u THE -onnit of a Handloom is now -Mon heard in is an srtUt. Ho workwith Idlisi.d-. and hih-sd md lu 1 and thi. haan FROM th* prl-cs th* veloped the souU> and highly efflcletiv mch*nJm that L_ I roller with the warp threads u .liown in the back of the Loom. To . iwe thi IndivldUJ I %  ff w mil. %  %  i In Ui" %  malb i of *eavfa ror patten i %  %  % %  I produced on a con • % %  :. <>f |t. II. II. • Ill I.iff ..i '1 Of Itf oughly aooured, or washed, it %  h i i,, beini In Itn la enter! wi!**, mlv meeh, | %  %  does it live with knotted threads on Its surface. A Hi if i %  ulng K.naiu iba %  Initial drying In %  %  h had Ughi [ling wtUi elacrha earth will regain %  ceitam %  mounl ui natural mr^alwa before steam is again used In a [traction—-to blow into the matrrial a cwadderabla damp contain "hull It canies into the hydraulic press for train f iir hours pressure of u thousand %  inch of ito I If all has gom i the Inspection table iiparb cx%  pl Of .i ii'lituni:. Old %  changed art It may baan made at the whim of r be replaced He iha daaailar, ot ;it the cxpresr I HIT i • | intrihant. of be one of a huge quantltj baker, bj %  • wholesal) clothier, oi both fabric and' i] I iv. bam iiupltwd i.ii*> couture of Low doc \.*w York—or it Ota) be a caiual | a bus in hotel !'"> T an,t the photographs mind <>' i tr of %  *.-. %  \\ t'.v.r WOM the CIMI.II tOBCe to pruimpt it.makuiK. thev ira al '.vlng a part of their cflec" oothl] beautiful material I tinrail impact of which will beI coma evident when. If It is for th< j fashionable wonitn'i trade, i C l perfect wearer-a stunning t-neemble perhaps, or a striking departure conventional but. !? %  any case fashionable headline %  %  And far DacK mio its COnpUcated history, the anoulrliig mmu will eventually Hod that this Itll. ran smtple begin' ning indeed—although eomewher> in.K rai lO pvrpetratt upon a fashion—happ) public, trw in.liro version of a golden fleece. Hi. r.o|.lr Of llin hados—VII IP* JollH I'l 111. i.i -S I. A V E It 1 •• THE la I few years of the eighteenth century appears to be the period In which public opinion was about iu make up Its mind over the whole matter of the Slave Trade. T:. i many bv Coastmittees of Pui li .men*) and Corfimltiee* fur the Anti-Slavery campaign. Bryan Edwards, a i nd slave owner, wrote 'History, Civil and Commercial. of the British Colonies in' the West Indies;,* which wns first published In 1781. Edwards took an nctlve part in improving UK> slave trade and eventually '.%. 1 a great deal to do frith %  lltion. But for nil of this he paints a glowing picture of (be conditions on board ship of th" slavers, which in the liiThl of oth'-r evidence I hard to be* lieve. Edwards records— "It Is admitted on all hands that the men slaves arc *CUTOd in ironwhen thai come on board; but Sir (; Young, a Captain in the Royal Navy who appears to be well acquaint'"! with the b all Its branches, is of opinion that this Is nof practiced more than necessity require The mode hi, by I evary two men together, the right ankle of one being locked by mentis of a small iron fetter to the left of the other and if m.irks of ft turbu'ei-t disposition appear, an additional fetter is put on their wrists. On the passage, when danger Is no longer apprehandad, the iron* >re commonly taken off: and women and young people are exemp"ed from them from the bwginning. They are lodged between decks, on clean board i. the men and women beinn separated from each other b> bulkheads, and fresh air Is admitted by means of triad* il oi ventilators Covering oc any kpid, as #ell from tn. warmth of the climate as fro-'i the constant practice of going naked would be Insupportable to them. Every morning, if the weather permits, they a?" brought upon deck, and allowed to continue there until the evening. Their apartments. In the meantime, ar" washed, scrubbed, fumlaaied and sprinkled with vinegar. The first attention paid to them In the morning U t' supply them with water to wstafa their hands tad I after which they are provided with their rnornlng this, according to the country from whence they come, consists of either Indian corn, or rice or ynms. Before noon, they are con-dantlv and r"ul rly made to bathe in salt water, and nnthinB I more agreeable and refre*hlllg. Their dinner i^ varie. i rig sometimes of food to which they have been accustomed in A'r and Indian corn. etc.. and at other times of provision* brought from Furotvbeans and o eag wheel bnrlev and buKUtt: all Olg* eil gafl In steam Tnd mixed up with .-. aiu of meat, with tl!h. oil; this last is i oon* desirable article In cookery. At each meal, they are allowed as much as they %  suRlciency of fresh w I %  less when, from an uncommon long voyaKe, Use i of the Ship ton.; tain to put them to a lowtmce. Dian... them when the weather is cold or wet nnd pj| tobacco whenever UU9 them. In the batj n their meal.s, th. %  . %  aged to divert tl music and dancing, for win a purpose such rude and uncouth instruments •. M-, • "I.. | %  fore IBM U %  ; Ad t-i'"' are also pi rnafttted to atnui themselves with games nt chance, for which fl UawwUH furnisher) with Implements of African tlon."* Id wards contlnu %  i medlatelv rwOOVed Captain's cabin, or |o a hosnt| ,] 1,;.|. . .. '. i with all the t In remrd to medicine l food, thai die admit: nnrl when, tofti for tho Neeroes. the hin touches *' w Dlaea voragw, H fi'ien-'ii \ | every retw hnvn | %  %  rountrv afTord nut* ora"**-". Y'tnt* fnd'. with • sorts, are dlasrth • •* %  • them: and *• refVih" •'>m I""' 1 loVhM *ho-*i -* "' Ihelr dc'tlnntion. be) daya of arrfval and Ball" Bi an Edwards appears I believed thai Die ).. cription was uuthet-t. uri-t i are been aofnethlng irequeitj j and In add I i hll the harl-iurs of the d It' %  %  I imh in %  sold. In to* afi UasM i ... ( ITSl; u book on n London. This book givi i I | women 5 feet 10 inches by I %  root ; fa 1 %  %  %  red i i Iheli bodie i %  %  %  I. %  Rahy of Bl i su rg eo n on %  %  %  on Uu poung mio lo send l h's (the l • i.i arfth hi i Sometimes tnej would refutd his desires and WOUld be severely 1 %  I i. in -nd Bent below cauig Bill thai ha I %  Ite and rorpi hi .. mi: with Ins 'on, lie I I the C'aptiiin Uaii'M of *t. be whipped her u lully "t beat hei UP With In11-UUHtlll.be tin e, C herself from bun agBjlBsrl lh pump* and ID dung BO njured her heed BO afrverely thai she 1 %  %  She bad th him ••'. for bv.n -ix nonth*." di. \tv < the Bbolition "' I 11107. eiimliti.Pi, On | : e on worse, as I i I Iha Atlantu ; %  i %  Hill, .. chaplain in thi an ilnterestiiig . '.in.; Of bow the >ll11> 'Hi wbn H I.. % %  Cleopatra ,11 cargo of NegroH< rptura of tin. Bhtfh II -11 csmff iii.it four hundred of ii.. %  nof i i,. aontlned m a nob 86 feet lmn %  nd v (eat wide, wttb only m feet of hi %  ancounh i below I nj livee would b 10 %  ... i hatch had to be i them lo keep then n, nd the II-. %  rod pan i sel him a wooden gratiiiK baBt., ii AM the 1 %  ,. HI. v.itii Ull that *he few . ling lo il| %  esege of air Into the hole, The %  h Thicries, the heat, 1 may njj wilbout i-igner :' BALATA SOUVENIRS r e4s>eeeei ^eeeeeeeeBeeeB % eeeeeeeee> &f taee .moke. ,,( -l.eu loinielit wllli I. ;. i ai i-compared %  nothing earthly. One ot the i : gave BnUiUng tha' 1 .1 luejnoa would be n,,i deaths; this prediction i,-.,i nil ventied. foi tb. next nioriung fifty-four crush ad and mangled iorimes wm I %  10 DM pnge/ej an tbiown iivertHiaril Some wen %  11L..1 lated from dlaea a inanj 1.1 ,|..-.i and bloody Mitcgni tell* me that some wvre fouiu trangled iln n bands stll. grasping each Other*B thrOOtt (11 Captain MeJurd Drake wa* one of the nnst fiunous or noto M i--. and In h*a autobiography them >' 1I1-111.i| accounts of tinalio %  < cor •'* 't fel InJl MI. I iptalD lb. hiu ves an BO) ounl of a voyage on the HruBlllan brig lllsrb She was u .[K-r craft and d.-M'rve>i better masters. On tho first voyage out of Calabar, *.• ha.) not beam out a work before I found thai thcCaptum and I 1 %  j1 "li--of lh< ml Once oil the coasl 1 %  ....... half brotln-1 Hul/. OUT captain • WO mates BBt an i'xain|ilc of reekleeg wliigatliassi Thev %  'i Ippl .1 nd danced .k .MIICIII-S while our %  ulatte eooa played tn 1. litua attempl ; Una and rum and lewd TWe was above lha dckg: u-iow tinilavei V ked hkr herrings on round the vessel's stdee.' being kept m by gratings over %  ie% The groans and of the iiair-MifT.-..te.i slaves below could be heard by %  1 loylng themselves on deeft Drake Bontlnuaa 'On Ihg 1 ighth dav 0U| I made my rounds of the half ili-ek. holding a camphor ba| in n leath, for the telirb WU lialeoUS. The> sick ttfld dying were chained tngrihvr. I -t>eBB M BeB M seeei FISH! ir vof HAD all ihr nme in ihe wtuld, you toukl BUhf cUIIIK-.I aabJbiIbaspcwaaV \i>l. put the bessta <* Lag & Hrrtins on the uhle BfwBsstvei VeBJ BBTVe wi--,i. h.,1,,1 og pwM nwk WHY DOES LEA A PERRINS MME SUCH A DIFFERENCE? THi iirmi •<( ihc diffcernr'' in lljvur M m the reopr. which hs l-en Lea & Perrins' alone for o\er loo years. No other Unt.rMrt BwBsM 1 J" line Bsi Lag & Perno. awsSawT. LEA&PERRINS %  fAf rr/?t/nr/ ///t iai UNI H.iSI .1 MAI I I AN ItKANIt SI.Al.M M PCtWDBall ThU iiiialBslBni blin.d Irnmub gives ya really yuivk ivli.ll It i. also aMiUhkin TABLET fona. MACLEAN BRAND Stomach Powder j L M B MFYKIIM A ^ O.. LfC HiHlBlgf. Baihea 1 — /# it*hrii% Donkey Carl*. \ SICK Snil Boats | $IM We invite you to Coconut Trees & Climbers )LM inspect our local disSii:-;ir Cane Bo** on Donkeys 1 SI.14 play of Balata SouWasher Women -S* venirs — very artistic and colourful. I iOi.r Women - This ordinary rubSteel Band Players -B>//af" Thii range of plain shad ,-irt si III lisabla 111 lovely slffl till. VUgmm Mm B| $2.76 HARRISONS BROAD STREET-DIAL 2664 Count "Your blessings 0m000Pi0 HEALTH IS W1WB Good health Is the greatest auet a man or woman ran have . In fact, it Is the ..rly ItEAI, a.M-t It depends on good living habits II is dtmUy n-sured by a KrXlUI.AIl visit to a physicla.i. We itarid ready at all tinea to fill all pres-rlptlons written by your own doetor. Be sure to send us your next prescription and be asmired of pure drugs r impounded with acrine | KNIGHTS DRUG STORES %  %  II H I t III I SI v<^ <~ BACON jM'awa HAM iKaKieafj-, Wtm ///*;>/; OtaJOOTFVL BUYS!! DANISH CAMEMUKP P ClfJ I DANISH SUCBD HACON i'AMSII SMCKI) HAM P • KOSHB A Hl-A( KWW.I.S lil!K.\KIA M hAUSBURY CORNED MUTTON pr tin < 'AMI'MKI.I-S CONSOMNE SOUTH AFRICAN ROCK LOBSTBR I hlCOCONl KM'UATKH CHICKKN BROTH 5 lb. TINS NKW ZEALANU CHEDUE UPTONS PRENI M 1 OPPEB •' SHWAKT/. PSANUT BUTTER m Glass Mug l %  lOSSK At III.ACKWF.U.'S MINCEMEAT TATE l^ LYLC8 CUBE SUGAR per pki. N I itEAMKD WHEAT I 1 KOO PEACH JAM IHEINZ SWEET MIXED PICKLES POT lar DUTCH SLICED BEETROOT per Un DUTCH EXTItA KINK PEAS per tin NEILSONS NUT ROLL [wr pkt. Uk 1 COCKADE FINE RUM Stansfeld fii.ill M Cn., Lid.



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MMi\l JtLV . 1M1 SI'NDAV ADVOCATf IK.I l! MY PIN-UP MPs by l.ihi-ii Acru/I . seeking an answer to the question: How elegant is a Tory Government ? COLLEGE GIRLS . 7 IO f ili. in in -i \\ i i Onlj* |>r--r • . ;••••• n-kiiiK if lll< •.lllllllll ..|ll II ill. llll.ll III— COLLEGE MEN LONDON UNIVERSITY s Eedimd CoUaae U a oolleee foi wwai only U hu bMn a college of Education !., *,uiu(. only ever %  ( it WM Stu-'enta* HI lOKIT KINOftLll !. | . I hat their fit Tin rwtlilnil iif lln ruin tfeeli Norvrlla ForBtrr. iv that the] eXI j.i i Mould A it hi n reach ..f those homr* A MORE cheerful tie display gladdened, the Government froot bench on Parliaments first working day s.nce court mourning ended. ed Government slnoa tat* .. %  mm Only iwo l" dau. :.Jaid ol elegant.-* ol -lie tailor.11* trade b • l l IIVN I \1 mister ol "'-' %  la i. advi irin.iif UJ -. h. ...mu.v : -Uo to thr l>r,t tailor. M. Uvoaik bold lass. aln*le%  founded in 1848 by a widow Jf Salisbury reading honournamed Mrs Elizabeth Jessie Hold. Phi inistry, would like ben to oV Hut now the girls of Bedford Puie academic research when thA feu ,i aba |lrl> !tis aualirled. tfaged during their time st the lor for us to admit men itisaeni* "Power girla study for pleasure I'm vend ty There ino rule a) well' 'iw than did before the war. ||HM fc •""' As students 1 are 740 undergraduate-'* a>< th,. Principal Tinirv.ii f.ilked la %  (*.*. %  • • •! what tin > :hat about najont) of them receive som raUajI a "ffjr a| engagement half of then* ate in favour of i*ul ia* train while studying. rmfl dm mt; the past lew wreek drrultms mina science. There are 18 d>About 200 of the ghla at Bedto their Principal—dark, pan nenta ,rf learning in th* Collord are *ao resonance." OptnJoi tved Hfiss Nmah Pension, leg* and subjects ranguut from *.ine-i M u> whether or D a doctor of philosophy of Oxford. Middle Dutch to Fonrt-n Stratihelped them In their iHldsll H .11 our stuRniphy appear in the syllabus jbnut thencareers, though I supnui luughly half of those pra Ipusasd tbejaeglvai arltt pQH most of them hope fur marmei. actlvttlea. about Hal ria#ie In Ihe end." Of the Art* students, 36 peg portion a* In mean" college*. thc> I.... 'MII: Ahead cent M ** become leaches s, the thought; the rest had U. of g.t %  partlt'tpetion In coUofdati I K'tod aensa ol .sivle 1 % %  .... rever*. i MI \ \ >ih'.irian lor so OIAIU vea.-s Per i.jvc 'i.vuii* ivw UM! w ha I THE BACKSLIDERS ^ MORE iiumplrd uiciiiuor of Uie Oovfl :F ,iurup:.d ii Ul R H %  .•••."-%*.*-*-*a%a"a'.''. c -.--" -%*B B r ... tad hert ii the newt ol ftOWcfl S tashions 4 NATIONS PUT THE Hi DRESSES ON SHOW A Big Four fashion itsM at %  > >IBUM the Savoy lo-dg) *.. i wlK %  %  1 aluue suits nun i UMM -!'-:uglK HIIBaf Htl.I || auotner Mf :.i;:iic* appears in need >i spoHK.nff and onwMiut i %  %  % %  i er whiu 41 lie %  ag pgB .i-da> in wool. luUwn. \m(r 11 i. .i '.. ::.* %  . :i. Hhow ulira-nne ligiiiaeigm so i •nui:. iftgr. a OlacK larasv o|ou iloetalfsr n %  •oat. pill K>x red iiiT and %  ) iiierhuad \% rad enuMO'ere.i <. v>\i* >nsev was uani IOJ a sari even.ii/ % %  ] edged with mr S o Beadi Siw I immi ti a ana wh*:* flr.e worvert ma N nOM \L ji saggj j u-1.1... M : huu viacouni u I \ \MH K ut -neuiain* % %  "neJTben i;a t Duncan -%MV. M.n^ei ol tiuup.y ip I) ii um ins nail* i a nav\ mm* D:n-&-r,pe suit and ,.:., %  ., to the ol blacK and white • • and uia.-a COM %  run" ironi-oencnei ,. *i*a.-.-. a oowiin.uuiK Bowlai tevoter • War Mm.t AniOQV ii MI ii. an rareT)i w uaried roil no i>vt leii making an m underncarh arna 1 while *. iUi Will.-i. .'.oreel (lav • asr'nallns s lens cocfctai. dreas. wornwiui a K 1 .ttae fleere bolero : turned with - "P, p jL „ %  aauslly tsw.ored nav % %  Tiflde m a fasr'nallns (totd woo %  * k Bla.it Mr Pr-r; %  aast p i daaaiiiig white marks to .Ml Ml Mr emptv The careers they are asrtous fWu-e was murlj higher P"** about vary I talked to sU wo"•*•! %  " P 1 *^', 1 1 l*,**-' 1 ***^ 1 .wen student*-the word "alrl" Is work though_ thU tovatvgg fW frowned upon-round a table One *•' *i* n. stud-nt. Naiu-y Drew, from s*-leiiiu40, anlikely lo oaru mon Wantage, llerkn. wanted lo be a than, for uiaUuiee, toaihers. "But geologist with tho Colonial Dethe salary they can aapeut does buck of their mind* Marriage velopmenl Corporation; a girl from not very often determino then the Isle of Man, Anne QuUliam, choiee," said the Healdent Tutor. ..... to teach at the Institute Mrs Wilemait. an MA. ol Qsfoid tT.nrv Hlue kluekuup-' They thought Ihe ngurc would bs In 0 i^ eight or ten per eent It II .iidKult t.i know. beeauM 1 if they'lli.-ally like thai yOU wouldn't ev. *et' them, thev'd alwitys !-• work Enm" My vurdiet Mit at the |Ul ..t Be.ifo,d rasjard th. n unlww-ity course as young man regard '"Ml-.n ni' % %  .II.I i Ni-.ii in n Poreea--aomethini: lo give Ihel oaekgiound. nUtua. subatanr<' I'liilnSCtOi U. ht them later foi an •ther eaieer Th-' '""'r at UnWOH1U iMl'VKK.III I sisvan —L.E.H. Honours To The Women Bcarrley Hbaxlrr %  the godi truthfulness of lifM. . cheered Neville Chamber%  hin he came back from h, and a few days later %  ai'"i lun. for having gon< But his reputation will %  the alander tnotvjsrs. a hoping thai, sonu' of thaw*' Mrs. Chamberlain will me to tell the full story o' : ..opened on Uie tught that M.-i*U-i-
CARTON Ge NGS Of the British cruiser-weight titles Bradshaw's Bowling Last Week nervous system.
e r eadley 8 eK. 5 7 ex- ; 2 ‘kets . . s s :
GB Willams P symone ac» STEME Suggesting thab the 23 Se eapensea te hava Bit aes | SS Wa Pa
omer. eaEN 3 voor ex-Battersea blacksmith Gree BP ind ‘Snhers each toni oy SLEEP WELL, FEEL
L. Huteltinson © (W lackman) ~ Was about to retire. ery re ear y
a Simmons : Bao 4 = wicket for 47 and 49 runs respec- WELL, when you take
utchinson not out 30 Cockell has completely a tivel
c 0 _ has ely differ- 'y }
G. ‘agtitKentie « & b Smith .. 3 ent intentions. Accofding to JACK Seewnick were off to 9 gheky

NUTROPHOS

CCL

tras: b. 3, 1b. i, w. 8 12 SOLOMONS, the man who pro-

aan 4, moted Cockell’s championship en-

‘for 6 wkts, deel'd) #9 deavours, Don will seek “rehabili-

soe of, Wicketsnl for 28, 2 for a4 Stee’ by taking on all comers

jor 213, 5 for for 253. e rate of one a month—be-
BOWLING ANALYSIS ginning now.

start when they lost their open- |
ing batsman A. Trotter when the |
score was only seven, Trotter |
made four runs before he was |
given out leg before while on the |







































































































o mM R W ; defensive against Bradshaw. Then | :
Mr. S. A. Headley 15 4 2 1 A sensible move—and one that Birkett joined Edwards and the |
M. M. Simmons 19 2 & 2 will help to rid Cockell of the runs ¢é ore freely. Bir '
©. Reid 7 1 2 — ring-rust that must assuredly have ns cele more rreely. kett a rt ta
F. Tudor ... 5 1 1% — contributed to his battle with the reached his century just after |
& Ww Smits it t a ; scales. The only question is—who ren Sat Sy Caeae Pier ad |
ep et duce an he Bght? loat two wickets — Ketwards 201 5. ine ands ir Lady °
LLEGE ENNIN' and A. Trotter four—for runs. el or
Mh. Med TORUMO Sov... 0 5esssae5 es 19 . The new ball came out whan i aa aoe Recuerdos De India
F. Tudor l.b.w. Edghill | 0 Ambition Thwarted e new bs uu For opening on Friday uerdos ‘
C. W. Smith not out . _ Three-fifths of a s Sa a the Pickwick score was 228 and argeant's Community Hall. Chine, v Cylon
Extras: b. 1, n.b. 1 _? ‘hetw the Hoatin ores stands Bradshaw who was inswinging | we also thank the Governor Bolsa De Tachapelo
CEST page ae = sohooltied front i. FEARNE quite a lot in the first over with When he reminded all Especilitamente
« . the aw bal ined a succ Sargeant's co wi € C
Pall of wichete—t tor 9 ~ {pronouneed Farn) EWART and appeal against Birkett for leg be- | Sut for no, dance, Na meee 18% eoomnce
LY er ambition — to s n ti . a age t 2 , + ° : q ‘ a
wee mee rR. w. Olympic Games at Malinka * a this batsman was 134. Sone egos ive al denetns Perciento
. B raion : : it 2 ; rick naa ape Were Erewhy Plak- Sound lectures, they call bondage Durante De Baratillo
K. B. Warr Bo = But her nomination for the finalâ„¢ wick had scored 287 runs for the! Dancing is liberty
Cc. B. Wiliams ahh ae 4 — Ulympic trials at Blackpool on Pe ' . PES ‘ , : a loss of eight wickets in reply to : ’ : ° ° e
poo! ‘ : : ee
LODGE vs. SPARTAN pecoraay has not been accepted we te 7 er a ' the Police score of 243 in their) We, top thank Mrs. Talma
vs. caus firs | Saleaveiaae bad i # J *@
SPARTAN ‘ior’ 7 wikis ve ME 686 sec, Fe eat ee time Of bf DRESSED IN ANCIENT COSTUMES, Greck girls (left) light the Olympic fame in Olympia, Greece, where i ae ie tab: alien nee dead ee THANT:
Me ae tee ea ac age the standard. the games were born many centuries ago. The sun’s rays shining on the concave mirror ignited the toreh > . . ; °
A. Atkins ¢ Welch b Brdokes . 3 This is surprising, because if the % * im the hand of the girl at left. The flame was then transferred to the bow! held by the girl at right The Cyclists Leave We hone things wilt run, amoothly } Pr, Wm. Henry Street
S- Griftth b Farmer «so -canmer a free-style qualifying mark, which (| bow! was carried to the Olympic altar, where it will burn for the duration of the games, A runner (right) ‘i ae | Will treasure this new centre : Dial 3466
N. Harrison b Outram . : $s only five have reached, had been {§ : carries the torch, lit from the bowl, on its first lap toward Helsinki, Piniand, Relays of runners will trans~ For Martinique As they would treasure gold
N. Grant l.b.w. b Wilkie... 0 as lenient on National times as 4 port the torch to its final destination and the start of the 1952 games (International) eciloasene Pia tee
K. Walcott c Grant (wkpr.) b that for the women’s backstroke eee en Rornew iene to go on evenings
Wilkie are: 3 Miss Ewart 1 : Tomorrow After a titing day
x Harris b Wilkie “a easily we could have qualified BOOK REVIEW it's “wheal the Dastoes say :
Rise wat o e The Barbado: i : * ecm \
F. King not out ................ 1 a ; adosa e¢ontingent of
BMAOS ess ceeeeeeeeeeeeeeneees 4 Why Choose Barnett q' cyclists will leave Seawell to-| We“vent to the Drift Hall
see teed ee ota CRICKET S Chi a a THE BACK
LODGE SCHOOL and IONTNGS tr: ketle sa Martinique where they will take} py. sta. aera }
: 1 alian Test wicketkeeper, has a ; seer | The Star Buds and “Star Rose
: Ceiskh Conteretos MT against the Hy 0. S. Coppin Pace on the 14th July, the Freneh | ‘The paras! fie telight
* 2 7 , * ace a 3 With Minuet in G '
ze ; Royal Navy at Dartmouth on July CRICKET Crusaders. 4a account of the West Indies’ Ferguson had fielded out the last Nepenel Dey. a a : ; : ‘ | @ Here's a way to relief
L. 9 and 10. 51. #9 i istralia by Harold Dale, Daily E few fateful runs. It was no fault panying them be Mr. | Low steppers and high steppers } :
7 1951—52 tour in Australia by Haro ale, Daily Express (0° .0° so affected—but rather an J. W. B, Chenery, President of the | Like girls of the court yar Do you «now that a common
Z ooh} . 2 4 two nat by he this ouupiny Correspondent, has just come to hand and is on sale at Upsurge of loyalty that might Barbados Amateur Athletic Asso- | Diced pee Daub & ralampan cause “ an lies = =
. POE hen: rs ago and has been play- he Advocate Stationer : any youthful cricketing ciation, and Mr. C. E. Jemmott, | — ° . : : crabs evel conga
N. Wilkie b Phillips ............-. 4 7 the vocate Stationery. arise in any y ‘ . 2 cr kidne 1
Cid nw W Pein lili. 10 ing club cricket and making occa- Mr. Harold Dale, who covered the Tests in this series heart.” who will manage the team in| Fer though these girls both trembh help to filter impurities out
EE ince cate e aris apeeid 12 sional appearances in Minor P. S08 ; There is a refreshing frankness place of Mr, George Clarke who | Pie ,"he Policeman gone of the system. | When they grow
=—— a i ; for the Barbados Advecate, needs no introduction to loca Ore 28% Teter ee ee r. ge Clarke They start their relaxation sluggish, these impurities ac-
unty games as captain of Bucks : t ce P
tas TUES (Uae bar a . : , : . . ; + Nite = 2a) geal about Dale's description and 1 am has found it impossible to make | After they fire one cumnalat d ti it ‘
aia When I told him he had been cricket cireles since his style, individualistic, courageou: core that his observations with the tour. : : : ‘ ulate and the cenering oy.
Fall of wickets—1 for 11, 2 for 11, 3 Chosen, 44-yeay-old Barnett said: as well as vivid has served to bring home to the thousands respect to the selection of the Comprising the team are “Mike” | Qb,,Dend down boyaie, sailor tion is very often the cause of
for 16, 4 for 19, 5 for 19, 6 for 47, 7 for “It certainly is a nice gesture, but : tn trd : YT ee Nifth Test wi ke C ; # the team are “Mike” | ‘This thing sweeter than sitns + Be Wie: Pits gro
56, 8 for 56, 9 for 75. | really I think they ant cr of local cricket fans, intriguing word pictures of the now team for the Bifth Test will evoke Carmichael, (Captain) John | Something yonder parading 7 i prepared to invigorate
BOWLING ANALYSIS | w. picked a younger man They historic struggle for world cricket supremacy between Aus spnaidareine sien ane “ ne eens George Hill, | 4°¥ you cen’, stop yhat thing sia kidneys. They act
; + . . 5 ) a . in a8 4s 6 6cric as. “Mash” a i
5 sho a e P sn Shin s Ss. at . ash” Brathwaite, and D Mew! mew! we hear a tom cat directly on these vital organs, act
¥ Bie LS . a a ee fee” rere geile Bie eae on go measure his run, Rae took strike re given for his a. (Reserve). Young Grant of i's a ta. nots Bure: : : as a tonic, ne pes eee
K. Bowen ... oe 2.66 2 ; ' : £4) wall advande ith th ba ae * Holborn Boys is also going on the "was then that Lou discovered speedily restoring them to their
A NDERERS. ate enough to have followed the and Lindwall advanced with the apsence (Goddard's) was conflict- P | doe “he blood” start to stir : si .
EMPIRE Pe we ot 860 I agree Barnett has had the fortunes of the West Indian gathering impetus of his thirtec: ae aes aw Stabe that God- have but at the expense »f his| “"" “ be _ 6 : natal activity aeant Sion
WANDERERS ist Innings best cricket could offer and as cricketers on their halcyon tour strides. His arm whirled over 1) qirq was suffering from nervous ub Leas ahoy! boys, {ts action . ee ee se
D. Mayers stpd. (wkpr.) De Peiza i far oo 8 first-class sg is a of eavend a 1950 was peculiarly — hessaround Paper -~ exhaustion, Later it was correct- Basketball previa ase 2 pe De Witt’s Pills fave
. : ; cern e captains two sides suited for the job of recording, stantly on a good length came od to “Goddard is ninety per cent ; Vm ‘counting every star.” | been bringing relief to suf-
P. Evelyn b Williams 8 against th 3 : all of Bae Lind d to” . 4 ; | ringing ef to ou
W. Knowles lb.w. H. King 43 aga. e Indians this season— with clever injection of consider- ball of terrific pace new fit.’ Then it was declared that 4 ; inal sahil ferers from backache and
D. Atkinson l.b.w. Barker ...... 88 the Commonwealth XI at Black- ed opinion, the struggle between in the very onset at his top speed Goddard had offered to stand " | Sea ia tsp eet owe we have received cuuntless
N. Marshall c E. A. V. Williams ‘ pool next month, and the Minor the West Indies and Kustralia for with complete accuracy. Rae tote Carlton De eat | Gn see telnved. Ashi } letters of grachuas trom
A, Sennen tase tava 35 Counties XI at Norwich in Sep- the mythical “Ashes.” sound, knowledgeable batenaa Nesuous. fixhacsGon ? C Old B Received bow after bow. all over the. weed.
G. Proverbs ¢ Barker b Williams 4 itember, that he is, was shocked. ‘ 1 : hes HI te , : Get a supply from
F ke ae 9 : he ices ‘ ; 14d spoken to Goddard him- ate ‘oys Twas all to help the children % ,
t “Lawless e (wpe) ‘De ie 12 The selectors have brought him Praia tind anced di ‘ 5 ypbines oy the en self shortly ne gg mail by defeating Harri Colleg Shciver tae the ‘Star Buds Sa saayferee +
E. Williams ......- - 12 in to the exclusion of DO’ ON it saad : * ae eS B- Sec lian selectors — Manager Cyr i Orewen Paeicst Helped little’ ones indeed : :
. St. Hill st kpr) b H. King 13 ' e was ah impartial critic even ing velocity of the ball, CONC Sead Sa - Old Boys in a very excitir st | Helped little: one x . “
ak a isrkne Out 9 of Sevenoaks Vine. If Downton it only it was because of his slip collected the involuntary Merry, Jeffrey Stollmeyer and 7.4 ie very iting matcl | +
a had t then GRADY, of Dun. i ; himself—were to meet. He fore~ ik, Carlton have placed | After the show a bit dance
Extras: vewes 12 eeshie: re eo , Savee y nationality and he was an impor- snick, and Lindwall walked back <.\', ifficult job of selection and themselves in a good position for | They came from near and fax
a -- $08 Chance. a Ta eames mrenieds a tate ode rican noting aga’’ wanted to omit Rae and inchude winning the Division “A” Basket- | And three o'clock the, morning /
; ‘ota oeeee BAY ACUSAyHY j Prior Jones. The vast majority of 94} cup. ' y
i 7, 3-150. Departure ighes it their He ge a fe : at , ee j
hah of eg Saas. dog ich Expensive egncn, tie, Mighest pout in men, He, dave a faint Jor to Mis bit Cricketers. would Have taken the WheD the lust, quarter of, this sponsored by GUARANTEE AA
9—288. The Spartan League benefit by i ai straliz , en the ‘ldsme femme view. me Mea ee oe ; 7
ee Ws ale ay ‘the departure of Hemel Stare Bev taae of pouting with R Oe t his bat to the third ban) Played. Jones was omitted and Same number of points, but after J & R BAKERIES | nas minetared ender et strict! hygienic
Barker t 21 3 % 3 Hempstead and Upminster to the Australia for world cricket su- —de ts tely : but the impact ~2llmeyer captained the side—an six periods, Carlton were able tc | conditions and’ the ingredients con-
Rudder. 5 : io j Delphian League. Each club has premacy k ; err ns that Ria bteolke a nbition he had never concealed. forge & win, by © Rashes, utes of | fenin to rigid standards of purity
Williams 23 been fi fo tee dcr a alee : WAR, OO. SUPE me. ef = The nervous exhaustion” must trates beat Pickwick by a ak oer
Fields : 6 = = lente ation the penltted ode "ae Heurhynted 4 shiz to ae driven ‘Dace ware ond fs Gal’ ave coms upon Goddard sud- Single point the same night ree
King 154— 7% 4 date th ries that. ‘ I eras Oo COR UMERG: SACO se ier enly, because during our conver- Pirates were 18 points behind | ENRICHED BREAD t /
Grant CKWI “eal é Sind Ein 7a hin} ry ft haa. wat ata rab’ nes ition there was never any hint When the last quarter began, but | | E é
op 7 i se mnhen he Un yule »e yale o a team lar ‘ . . = . a > a > » tase |
couch ee The competition is being ex- land for Australia with the ex- Harold Dale's at the end of the (at he would not lead the team ‘hey played a very fast last quarter and the blenders of | Hy UINNERINRREEE IN
‘Inning ten Oo clubs next season. rience » Wes les 5 Hi - : ' ow v > same e page tM . : Ys ey an aay ;
A. E nee toe opredabaw 4 Bottom clubs Hoddesdon and Mar- Boar’ behind wear rae ee See ' py h ae a a hat he had shown all through Last aoe College beat Pirates J&R RUM } 4 ays: are
E. Edwards stpd (wkpr. Dodson) low have been fe-elected, and Surely E ry pe ae on ake ee the peace, in a very keenly contested match
b Greene a Ware, Polytechnic and Ford Sports oe % a tor a! ay aout Mi cet lege id Tests kni In the final chapters Harold Dale
o pi RS Bradshaw a hank Haak promoted from Divis- a eel een s eta ne ; it had taken aera ta ait gives his own answer to questions I B Y ~
J. D, ‘Godda pl e Greene b Pe é ion I. A place is found for the flashing "strokes of Weeke : Wor ‘a he a : sea ray x seen ey | ace “a te = 7%, t. , acht Club
W. Greenidge c Amey yer b: x ontt + c 7 s cs ae V - md idies lose iat happenec oO,
W. Greer? .° samen Stor 18 aa aes co — club: rel} rn Waleots would re sure men playiry, cricket not from any their famous batsmen?” “How Vennis Tournament
G. Wood b Sobers mo! u O The, ciieht Tungerting Of sense—or OF ligation, not giving @ was jt that after crushing Eng. ~
B, Inniss not out . . “i ag —LES. orris and Hassett; whether th ; > reput ; “
i nr. t out 27 ae pete ty el te ; le thought for reputations nor pay= jynd—and an England that ran .
T. Hoad (Jnr.) no spin and guile of Ramadt nd 1 lures, but RESULTS
Extras: oy 7 spin and g ; amadhin and ing any heed to past failure Ul Australia neck and neck in the MEN’
oo Valentine would be more effective filled instead with a burning de- sghes—West Indies ; b (N's SINGLES SEMI-FINALS |
Total (for 8 wkts.)” -. 287 Eleven Qu lif For than the menacing speed of sire for ‘victory if flesh and blood ve Ae abeaie’ ndies were beaten aise, % Wea, we Mr. J.D. Trim-
Fall of wkts: 1—7, 2—74, 3-204, 4-210 ¥ Lindwall and Miller. could achieve it, ; The hook contains some excel- LADIES’ DOUBLES
a 7—258, Harold Dale has written hi “We had seen West Indians at yont jlhistrati . : Mrs. P. Patterson and Mrs, RB, S$, Ban
5-810, OSGWLING ANALYSIS Skill Shot Badge account of the Tests anc the other fast playi ly he West (ont illustrations by Harry Mar- croft ‘beat Mrs. D. E, Worme and Miss
a ae | es | , a ests anc the ier fast playing fervently for the West tin, the Sydney Morning Herald ©. Worme 6—3, 6—4. |
9 important games of the tour from Indies t ly with their I 1s . j
Cc. Bradshaw 16 . 2 3 : day to.da “a therefore he has had ret Ne, See xeads photographer. Credit must be MONDAY’S FIXTURES |
¢. Mullins MM aati Lt. A. Lange, R.N., a visitor to Gay nye * e he has had but with their hearts. given to him for having photo LADIES SINGLES FINALS
Cc. Blackman 3 -_ a mM the island, was a guest of the no benefit of foreknowledge and graphed every moment of crisis Miss E, Worms vs. Mrs, D. BE. Worme |
x @ 5 re » th * . : 2 wis : ;
i ae u 1 49 1 |2B.R.A,, yesterday. He shot and the his account is therefore the mor¢ Deeper Feeling and excitement — a handsome Mrs, P psteraie. ponte }
G. Sobers 14 interesting in that by virtue of t Patterson and Mrs. R, 8. Ban
J, Byer oan 14 — 63 4 4|2B.R.A. was informed that it was 8 e 3 € tribute to his unrivalled skill croft ys, Mrs, J. Connell and Mrs, C,



thé first time he was using the this method he has given the read The account is not without it i seninsiieuaidinens Skinner. .
service rifle (b) under Bisley con- © the opportunity to share with touches of deeper feeling. For Rifle Shooting Mr. Wo Ee eee
ditions. His score of 86 was the players and the staunchest example, in the midst of Aus . nowles and Mr. D. |

TABLE TENNIS

“ Lawless vs Mr. V, Ri
QUARTER FINALS — [thought to be very creditable. West, Indian supporters, the un- tgalia's surprise win of the tour © CAPT. JORDAN Ginn ven neo gam
The second round of the certainties, hopes and frustrations ‘est he intrudes a scene as pres- TOP SCORES mingham ve. Mr, GL. gustend hee, |

The Quarter-finals of the Table

eliminating stage of the B.R.A. of each game as play developed. pant with feeling as this:—
Tennis B Class open championship

iters c ave cap- Captain J, R. Jordan top scored “. Crichlow.
House Competition was shot ycs- Few writers could have cap

“Ip was a tremendous momen- at last Wednesday’s practice of



were played at the Y.M.C.A. onlterday evening. The eight best ‘ured the atmosphere Of phe all- tum but I don’t think one of the the Small Bore Rifle Club with a Belgrade-Bound
Friday night. The scores were aS|scores out of a possible 105 were: jg - tte, forestall cana Heatly Duge crowd but spared a thought very good score of 99 out of a MA'TEUR champions)
follows: Major A. DeV. Chase 98, Mr. M. turned phrases than Harold Dale, {° ,tbe bewildered | disapplint- possible 100. JOHNNY MALONEY anc
King (Advocate) beat Chase|}G. Tucker 94, Mr. E. J. Parry 94, ang this was early in the ans ment of the West Indians. There The following are the eight best PERCY LEWIS are to box foi
(Bay Street Boys’ Club) 22—20,!Lt. Col. Connell 93, Mr. F. Davis For example here is a quotation “°°, ° decent restraint in their scores recorded. the Royal Air Force agains!
21—17, 22—20; Guiler (Modern|93, Mr. G. D. McKinstry 95, from his description of the dis- cheers—a sympathy that had beer: Capt. J. R. Jordan 99, Mr. M. A. Yugoslavia in Belgrade on Jun:
High Scho 01) beat Cadogan|Major J. E. Griffith 92 and P.C. missal of Rae and the severing of °Y°KC4 just before Worrell’s last Tucker 97, Major J. E. Griffith 97, 24—the first-ever direct boxing |
(Speightstown Sports Club) 21—{0,. Shepherd 92. the opening partnérship between over when litthe Ramadhin from Mr, H. B, G. Marshall 97, Mr. contact between the two coun-

19, 19—21, 21—-14; 22—-20, Archer
beat Symmonds 21—17, 21—16,
13—21; 18—21, 21—16, Hendy beat
Straughan 21—16, 21—17, 21—18.

4, heats ee ; ee Trinidad, appalled at the havoc L. W. Hassell 95, Mr, T. A, lL. tries

et a a. a See tea Warr thats) 7 tet that Ring had wrought against Roberts 95, Mr, R O. Browne 95 The RAF will be putting thei)

DeVerteuil 91 nd Cpl K. Knight such ‘te nd nope 2h mers tim in one over, and perhaps and Mr. M. Knaggs 88. top team of 10 in the ring, with
+48 ’ . . 4 oe blaming mse w the strait n ” ors ar 2 i services she i i 1B |

(Barbados Police Force) 90, have Vivid ming himself for the straits i Members are asked to note that Service champions BRUCE








‘ I c vhich his side then were the Spoon Shoot scheduled for WELLS, DAI ROE TONY
In the finals for the Adelphi} qualified for Skill Shot Badges in “Rae and Stollmeyer paced denly found himself unable to go Saturday, July 12th, will new WALLACE in ‘ouppiet™ of |
Club open championship Joe Hoad} the N.RsA. non-central competi- solemnly in unison to the wickets, on. He had left the field in a take place on Wednesday, July welter-weight Maloney and |
defeated Clarence Gooding. tion. and Lindwall walked back to great state of emotion, and Willy 9th feather-weight Lewis. |
2 eee

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Sparkling, “ fizzy »” Andrews
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finally, gefitly corrects constipa-
tion. An occasional glass of
Andrews as a “ refresher” keeps

you on top of your form—just a

| teaspoonful in a glass of water.

i

|

DO YOU KNOW that when food is swallowed it siarts on
a journey which takes 2 or 3 days, covering a distance of
30 or 40 feet? This traffic must keep moving constantly,
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lea)

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PAGE SIX

a
SS VQ u1q“°“0 i zn!

4\\
\\

“TRIUMPH OVER

PAIN

QUININE-—THE FOURTH INGREDIENT IN ‘ANACIN’

How does ‘ANACIN' relieve pain so fast, so effectively? A few years

|

Dear Mrs. Clarke, I am 15
years of age and was deeply in
love with a boy aged 16. I know
that he loveq me once but do

! not know if he still loves me as

I love him. 1 have other boy-
friends at the same school who
are deeply in love with me and
I do not know how to tell them
definitely no. They are always
speaking of me and it seems as
if my boy-friend js getting to
know. What can I do to help
the situation?
“EP.”

** I hope I have your initials

SUN



will see how true this is when
you reach my age and can look

DAY ADVOCATE



» Dear Mrs. Clarke, I am sixteen
years old and I am in love with a

back on a full life of happiness boy aged 20 who is in love with

with my husband, my children
and just recestly, some lovely
little grand-children. It is a
good life and you must not spoil
it.

L.u.E.” writes: 1 am a woman
aged 41 years and am jin love
with a man for the last 16 years,
He is married and has been tell-
ing me all along that he is going
to get a divorce and marry me.
However, I feel now that 1 have
been with him too long and have

me. -1 have not seen him for
about two months and I am very
worried as I feel that he flirts
with ether girls even though I
have not heard anything about
him, There are many other boys
who say that they love me but
my whole mind is on this one
boy and when he is not there 3
feel as though I were one of thea
living dead. Please help me.
“Votre Petit Amie”.

SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1932



The Debs Curtsy To An
Empty Chair...

15 minutes—and a guinea—in Mayfair gives them the
drill for Buckingham Palace

You might think that most girls
who had gone through dancing
class would be able to drop a
curtsy without further instruction.
But it seems that this is not so.
It has not been so for many a
year.

Quite a large proportion of the
thousand or so debutantes who
are coming out this year have
taken curtsy lessons before mak-

By EVELYN IRONS

The girl steps forward, makes
a full sweeping curtsy to the first
chair (the Queen), walks three
paces to the next chair (Prince
Philip), and curtsies again,

Then she recedes crabwise, so as
not to turn her back on royalty.
Miss Vacani tells her what is
wrong. She must bend her head,
not fix her eyes on the Queen.

curtsy from Miss Vacani for this
week’s presentations, and Was
one of he best of the current
bunch.

So Graceful
How do this year’s aebutantes
generally compare with those of
the fabulous Whigham days? Very
well indeed, in Miss Vacani’s view.
“We are back to the graceful girls

right, dear. They were ; s i o ** Well, dear, it certainly seems ing their a rance at Bucking- She must hold her body straight, again,” she says. “They really
ago leading scientists discovered that tlie secret lay in the exact balancing “athe “Sedietnek, aan know. eae a eae ‘oiak’ ye wae to me that you are really and oe hae not crouch. Said an ex-debutante care about poise and deportment.”
of three famous medicines (Phenacetin, Caffeine and Acetylsalicylic Acid) Well, about your problem; Please tell me what is best to truly in love with this chap and, So if no debutante stumbled (last year’s vintage). “It works. Just one regrettable point about

with a FOURTH ingredient—QUININE

Pains from fever ? Colds? Peadaches?

Do you suffer from Toothache? Kheumatisn: ? Meuralgia?

any of these pains ? Menstrual! Pains? Then *ANACIN * will
bring you inmediate relief, cast out
pain with amazing speed !

CAST OFF PAIN—AT ONCE!

Yes, for a very little you can buy a 2-tablet envelope of ‘ ANACIN '—
enough to bring you fast relief from a bout of pain !

And ‘ Anacin’s
ynergistically with the other medicines to soothe aches. bring down
feverish temperatures, restore a real sense of well-being !

Quinine acts

‘Anacin * is also

available in handy 20-tablet boxes and in bottles of 50 tablets

in the benefits of this great mew scientific discovery !

ARM YOURSELF AGAINST PAIN
GET SOME ‘ANACIN’ Tovar:



Doctors and dentists recommend ‘ANACIN', In Great
* Britain alone over 12,000 use it in their surgeries.



YOUR
FREIGHT




which is not really a problem at
all. You are really too young to
take any one boy seriously. This
you must realise if you are go-
ing to grow to full and true
womanhood. By all means have
many boy-friends. That is but
healthy and normal, but I can-
not help feeling that it is such a
pity when a young girl like you
gets herself entangled so early
in life with a serious affair. It
will not help you later on, my
dear, when you have a home
and family of your own. Keep a
level head; don’t make any rash
decisions and above all do live
what you are—a fine girl of 15
years—with the whole world
and a full life before her. You



How To

WASHINGTON.

The tough American business
men of the last century, whose
gospel was rugged individualism
and constant slogan free enter-
prise, must be turning in their
graves,

For the U.S. Government now
stands forth as double guarantor
for Americans who wish to invest
their money in business enter-
vrises abroad.

The guarantee says first—Am-
ericans will not lose a cent of
their money if their property or

do. I should be very grateful
for your advice.

** I do really believe that your
idea about leaving this man is
the best of all as, if he has not
made any move for 16 years it
is rather unlikely that he will
upset his family life now for you.
It is a pity indeed that it has
taken you so long to see reason,
my dear, but women have al-
ways been forgiving and willing
to give another chance so I can
fully understand that you held
out hopes for him all the time.
Anyhow, try to get this whole
business off your mind—you will
feel so very much better when
you have made a final move.

if as you say, he is in love with
you there should be nothing tor
you to worry about. Remember,
dear, that love is trust and if
you do not trust the one you
love you lose a lot of the finest
meanings of true love. You say
you feel that he is a flirt. Are you
not being a little unfair? Are
you being a little flirty yourself
with these other boys flattering
you and saying nice things to
you? No, my dear child, trust
in true love and be faithful
always to the ‘only one in the
world’ and you will have a
happy and full life with trust
and companionship as a basis for
building a future with the man
you love,

Get Rich BY THE WAY
Without Any Risk

Ny RR. Mi. MacColl

Mike Hammer book you write
in future.”

As a magazine puts it: “The
astonishing thing about Mike
Hammer’s success is that no one
likes him except the public. No
major book reviewer anywhere
has ever said a kind thing for a
Spil.ane novel,”

MADAM Minister Perle Mesta
has written her autobiography, By
general agreement it will not be
published until after the presi-
dental election in November.

BY BEACHCOMBER

HRISTIE’S auction-room was

so crowded the other day
that some bids were made through
the open door. A dangerous
precedent,

Not long ago a_ ventriloquist
mingled with the gay throng just
outside an auction-room, and a
timid man, who had never opened
his mouth, was informed that he
was the lucky possessor of an
enormous chandelier, 12 soiled
volumes of Gaffney’s “History of
Polynesia,” three pipe-racks, a
stuffed gudgeon, 18 yards of
barbed wire, a dovecote, and a
violin.

EXPLOSION FOR FISH-TANK

over her obeisance to the Queen
at the two presentation parties
this week, part of the credit for
the performance goes to a little
woman with golden hair, petal-
pink complexion and bright blue
eyes. The name is Marguerite
Vacani,

This pocket dynamo put many
of the debutantes through their
paces beforehand.

Her Pupils

Although her manner is un-
reserved (“Darling!” she greets
the stranger. “Sweetheart!”), she
has many secrets, and one of
them is her age. She was, she
Says, presented at Court as a girl
When? “Ah, my darling. I couldn't
tell you that.”

But she has taught two genera-
tions of debutantes how to behave
at Court, anda third is just
coming along. Age does not
wither her. “She looks the same
now,” said the fifty-year-old
mother of one of her ex-pupils,
“ag she did when I was a debu-

myself.”
ae taught that celebrated
debutante of the ‘thirties, Miss
Margaret Whigham (now the
Duchess of Argyll), how to make
her Court curtsy. She taught that
other much-publicised girl Jeanne
Stourton (now Mrs. Sherman
Stonor, whose husband is heir to
Baron Camoys). And most other
notable debutantes before and
since,
One Lesson

How many of this year’s thous-
and or so debutantes has she
taught to curtsy for the current
presentations? Hundreds, my
sweetheart,” she said with a large
sweep of her hand, and skipped
away as busy as a bird to attend
to two slightly bewifiered clients

{ had no qualms when it came to
the day.”
First—A Bob

Miss Vacani then takes the part
of the Queen, stopping to speak
to the girls. They must make a
litle bob, and say, “Your Majesty”
in their first answer, and “Ma’am”
after that. Elementary? Maybe,
but it seems that same of them
have to be told.

The other day Miss Vacani was
bidden to a reception at New
Zealand House. There she gave
a mass curtsy and deportment
lesson to 20 overseas debutantes.
Her comment: “They were quick
—they learned the curtsy jin five
minutes. And they were grace-
ful.”

Miss Vacani is not so old-
fashioned as to make her pupils
walk around balancing books on
their heads, although she admits
that maybe that was the way she
acquired an erect carriage her-
self. But she is a great believer
in old-fashioned deportment, She
speaks of poise with missionary
fervoyr, hinting that even this
reporter might, if converted, avoid
a double chin.

“Good carriage,” she urges,
“gives health and energy. Grace-
ful poise—that’s the first thing a

utante should aim for.”

owadays of course, the debu-
tante goes to the Palace in a short
afternoon dress and a hat, not in
the full pre-war panoply of long
evening gown, train, and a bunch
of ostrich feathers on her head.

Does this make it easier to
curtsy gracefully? “Not at all,”
says Miss Vacani. Said one of
her pupils, “It must have been
easier in the old days, feathers,
train and all. There was a certain
amount of protection. Now our
legs can be seen.”

Two Hono-lulus

young girls of this vintage: slacks,
They are “unfeminine.” They
should have no place in the de-
butante’s plan for gracious living.
Miss Vacani abominates them.
“Except perhaps,” she conceded,
“for yachting, darling.”
—L.E.S.



ye

: FORECA awaiting her in the next room.
business is seized by any foreign Too much about good friend ECAST in 80 Son ae Ree instructed = ae eroved to be the
Government. ‘ “Harry” in it. HEN Mrs. Reculver, 61 (b) thousands. -— pret a ore at the Courts. '
| Second—Washington will see to IT TURNS OUT that the four Sebastopol Villas, © West The curtsy is taught in one oges to a the other debu- 40m



e

; a ; ; : : Tonight the Government an- tralisation in America’s traffic- : The drawing shows how to give character to
capital is not tied up in merchandise that is nounces that it is “a fraction” choked cities. Pe ere arene ens S ture to trip you up os waned No oully turnt
j ' ; below the January high-water IN GARWOOD, wew_ Jersey, man who was knoc own ’ eo
in tronsit for a long time. Inventory and ware- pap s San baffled cops have peer hopeless- by a train, picked himself up, all table is a tong, aartow shelt plugged to

housing costs are reduced, packaging can be
lighter and therefore less costly.

rates are reasonable.



BRITISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS CORPORATION





Specdy delivery means quicker payment and

more [,cquent repeat orders) Your working

Insurance
You make money at less
cost when you fly your freight to Great Britain
by Speedbird. Check with British West Indian

\
| Airways.
Saves lime! Cut costs!



it that the business men draw
their profits in dollars only, even
though the foreign Governments
concerned thave regulations—as
in the ease of Britain—saying
that dollars cannot be taken out
of the country.
* oh *

THE rates for this protection
are reasonable. A business man
can get a policy good for ten
years for an annual premium of
one and a quarter per cent, cov-
ering the “convertibility” mat-
ter, and one per cent, for insur-
ance against expropriation or
seizure

The insurance 1s good in 56
nations, outside the Soviet orbit,
and covers any legitimate enter-
prise, from camphor plants and
oil refineries to fibre factories.

Who jis running the scheme?
Our old friend, presidential can-
didate Averell Harriman.

THE ceiling prices on whisky

and wine are removed by Wash- America, discloses that it has ita dreary one

ington, It will not make any dif- jought a 286-acre estate in West- TED: This meat tastes of Worst problem is the marrow hall Keep
ference—the prices are so high, chester County, and will eventu- kerosene, it as empty as pussible Rely on clever use
anyway, right now that no deal-

er would be sufficiently foolhardy
to try raising them any further.

TALKING of prices, the cost
of living in America is almost
the highest ever. Tops was reach-
ed last January—a whopping 189
per cent. of the average for
1935-39,

Sandwiches and cocktails for
two in an ordinary Washington
cafe yesterday set me back £2 11s

ONE of the most successful au-
thors in America today is a 34-
year-old writer called Mickey
Spillane.

Crew-cut-haired Mickey has
sold 13,000,000 copies of his six
books, all about a private detec-
tive named Michael Hammer,

and packed with every conceiyv-
able sort of violence.

; . Spillane has such a following
that Marines in Korea send him
wads of dollars and write: “Just
put me down on the list for every

youths who took over a New
York hotel for three hours early
the other morning, and amiably
provided room service while they
held up the guests and staff,
made a practice of this sort of
thing—and did it all on whisky.

When the police arrested them
they confessed to a string of 15
such exploits, but said that their
recollection of the details was
hazy, as they were always intoxi-
cated.

PETER USTINOV had ar orgy
of grimacing as Nero in “Quo
Vadis”. Now we're likely to be
in for more of the same treat-
ment—Charles Laughton is King
Herod in “Salome—The Dance of
the Seven Veils,’ which Columbia
starts to make in Hollywood to-
morrow,

IN NEW YORK an announce-
ment of considerable significance:
The Union Carbide and Carbon
Corporation, the 13th largest in-
dustrial concern in the whole of

ally move the whole of its New
York staff of 3,000 to work there
in “garden-type office buildings”
costing £6,000,000.

The Saw Mill River runs
through the estate, and working
conditions should be very nice.

This ig one more long step in
the growing tendency of decen-

ly outdistanced when they tried
to catch super sports cars driven
by wild youths. Now quiet con-
fidence reigns once more among
the constabulary. They have a
super car of their own—it can
do 110 miles an hour.

BIG TV news—four of Holly-
wood’s greatest companies, Col-
umbia. Universai—International,
Republic: and R.K.O., enter into
agreement with the Screen Ac-
tors Guild recognising the prin-
ciple of extra payment to per-
formers for repeat showings on
TV of films made for that me-
dium,



Harness, found that her head was
wedged between two barrels of
@arrots, she (turn to page 2,
col. 4).

HE appointment of a Tibetan

nobleman to captain the
Lhasa Wanderers is dismissed by
Pravada as an attempt of Fascist-
Capitalist elements to keep cricket
feudal, anti-progressive, and non-
proletarian. A special article by
Stakhanovite-cricketer Midov
says that the bats on their way
to Lhasa are sabotaged bats left
on the hands of United Nations by
American agents, and that the
handles come off at the lightest
touch, Balls dropped by parachute
in the Himalayas were found to
be half sawn through in the
middle,

(TOMORROW: What is Wrong
With Chinese Cricket? by Ah
Long Hop.)

DORIS: That’s the Snibbo, dear,

TED: I thought Snibbo was a
stove-polish,

DORIS: So it is.

(A week later.)

TED: If the stove likes Snibbo

as much as I do———!
(Both laugh heartily.)

“and walked along the line into
the tation, followed by the train,”
I came across an advertisement
for a book called The Beauty of
Old Trains. It was “by the author
of Four Main lines, Some Classic
Locomotives, and Trains I have
Loved.”

The train which followed that
man was just the sort of train
I could love, It probably answers
to his whistle by now, As for
beauty, give me the 7.54 from
Bunsley to Crockmarsh, when the
westering ‘sun glids its door
handles,

lesson. It takes 15 minutes and
costs a guinea, and in it even
the most awkward of girls get the
full instruction,

In the tiny Mayfair drawing-
room, two chairs are arranged to
represent the thrones in the great
ballroom of the Palace, Drawn
up to her full 5ft., Miss Vacani
takes the part of the Lord Cham-
berlain, the bearded Earl of Clar-
endon, and reads the debutante’s
name from a card.

ener

NHE nall gives your g

impression of your home

Of colour and wall treatment to give it galety

Do not use violent large sca

walls or fabrics in a cramped space.

Use small-scale pictures (fic

tume prints engravings miniatures eic) 4

t t whi
Invileé close tMspection Use large mirrors tor
added sense of space Remember vertical stripes
m walls give added hetght. horizontal stripes

Stripes across a narrow flo:
or ceiling make them appear wider ig

empnasise length

tne wall with angle-brackets. Large, secondh:
mirror trom @ junk shop reflects i ne

an illusion ot added space

Arrangement of flower prints
With decorative mounts and
frames adds life to the wall
treatment Broad shelf ubove
the front door displays coloured
glass which gleams und sparkles
against the fanlight.

Make them plain

ALL-fO WALL floor

matting has stripes

running across, mak-
ing the narrow hall seem wider.
Plain pustel walls increase the
sense of light and space. The
ceiling mus ua delicately pat-
tern Wallpaper



tantes? Astutely diplomatic Miss
Vacani pausés at that. “My
sweetheayt, it is jimggssible to
say.”

But back in the ’thirties there
was that lovely girl Cecilia Keppel
(Lady Cecilia McKenna now).
Hers was a curtsy to remember.
And Grania Guinness, now Lady
Normanby, who had her first baby
last month—she was a graceful
girl, too. Oh, and Lady Dufferin
was another. Her daughter, Lady
Perdita Blackwood, learned her

uests the first
Don’t make

le patterns on

ower prints cos-

ght and gives

Exposed rows of cou's and
nats are not attractive Ldeal,
but costly, solution ts a tall,
narrow cupboura fitment with
sliding doors. o: a cupboard
eee ee oe may be fitted
vith electric light an
coats and hats, Mare

Make it useful

SHELF plugged to
the wall 4ft Yins.
from the floor could

be low enough to display towers,
glass, and china, and high
enough to allow couts below

LEANING against surfboards at
Waikiki Beach in Honolulu are
two Hawaiian candidates for top
honors in different beauty con-
tests, At left is Beverly Rivera,
who will be “Miss Hawaii” in the
“Miss America” competition at
Atlantic City, N.J. At right is Elsa
Kananionapua Edsman, who goes
to the “Miss Universe” pageant in
Long Beach, Calif,, as “Miss Ha~
waiian Islands.” (International)



Make your hall say ‘Welcome’... ONAN

ILLUSION-BY
A MIRROR...

by ROGER SMITHELLS



Use a guy fabric to conceai
the-couts and mask the curtain
runners wilh a scalloped hard-
board pelmet painted to match

Fit a section of the hanging

space at one end with w: s
to take all the hats. spitenerd

London Express Service





We'll soon have.

| that better

—"" Goymolone

ASEPTIC GINTMENT

RECGD.

SHON] /!

—~
>























Supplies of Old Cottage Lavender —
perfume, soap and talcum — are
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Nowhere will you find truer, more
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which comes to you direct from
England in the famous

Grossmith green bottle.

Germoiene Ointment soothes
and penetrates. It protects skin
injuries, rashes, scalds, and
insect bites from the
entry of harmful bacteria,
and stimulates healing. —
Keep a tin handy for |

OINTM
ILLS PAIN
















family use. | “ols
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SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1952





ee Pp a)

Mate eo eee eee

oe ete ee ee eee ee

MY _PIN-UP MPs

working
ended.







dow:








nt i

The Winterhalier skirt. (See fippets. too.)
i tte

... and here is the news of cous fashions

4 NATIONS PUT THEIR
DRESSES ON oH

Tneura’

tate a ee a s'est nn es”

:
7;



A Big Four fashion show at worsted s. bale

- the Savoy to-day was all ‘ena om ‘ }
in wool, wu.pure ace

French. Italian. American and One ai che mos
English dressmakers combined to <3 9arace :
show ultra-fine lightweight woo! pwn @
multi-coloured striped Woo. je! I re, eae E
seys, chiffon broadcioth and *3¢ Quecns dressmaker con
woo! muslin and lace Dakclen Wits

The parade is being staged again ono” a
to-night before the Duchess ef Pb ia ‘ ty



Gloucester for 300 intern nal
wool textile conference delegates
and their wives.
From ITALY came an
outfit with narrow trousers 1p t
red hand-woven woo!. worn with Jeweia eve

i bricd

after-sk1









a black jersey oud } Sleeveless wit al rine i
coat. pill Box red hat and cum- = = mate!
merbund ‘Im red embroidered Gili and oe flower elusie
woo! whict a
Finest white jersey was used for clothe eo up t
a-sarl evening gown edged with ing Ldditior ) on
gold beads and diamante pendants
Black ana white fine worsted made Sestood cips of opaa r
Spainet evens own worked the shape o t a
with white raffia flowers
tachi sent an even) Ing coat in TIPPETS, foo |
en Sono tee neces: ep T the Fas hion Fortnight made
a jown oh bry en. é house shows 1 noted
Ha was Bvening dresses in sheer materia
a gold woo! with’ Winterhalter skirts ‘ser
) rade ae uxt oF is ‘ ys
Se ae ey ar a re With
aes By ag a t saske velvel jackets

ang Victoriao
sie 0d iippets
aston dresses in nobbly jweeda

Wach pave a homespun em
Siraiau! skirts with smail * ”

pieats at the back

& AUTOGRAPHS

iilae fleece bolero tri
silver.

AMERICA produced a flaming red
eeet Slory coat cut in a complete
circle.

LONDON showed a red superfine

BEAUTIES EXCHANG



AS THEY GET READY to participate in the Miss Universe beauty pageant
finals at Long Beach, Calif., these contestants autograph each other's
programs. They are (1. to r.): Carolyn Carlew, Japan; Hinako Kojima,

*

@

By BOURJOIS

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Japan; and Leah McCartney, Australia. (International Soundphoto)
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LIPSTICK |
+ HAIR CREAM |

by Eileen Aseroft
seeking an answer to

AOA AS

the question: How elegant

SAAR AA Oe

is a Tory Government ?

SDA te



LYTTELTON

MORE cheerful tie display glad-
dened the Government front
bench on Parliament's first

day since court mourning

ecnt-Crpmaed Government since the
au
> fashion-plaie

Brummell Tories thse men
honours. Only two
the general standard of elegance.
gice of the talloring trade is

48-year-old Minister of

«Ss. His fashion advice, vos Lo

e Row ise le simply 3 "i to the

tailor,” He favours bold ie ingle:
feasted waistcoats with revers.

My bouquet goes to Oliver LYTTELTON,
Secretary of State for the Colonies. He
has a good sense of style I ee his
Edwardian-style waistcoats with

there is always Mr. ED! F that
ed politician for so many years’ Per-
we have become too used Ww his
rial perfect on

THE BACKSLIDERS

arabe led member of the Goyern-

R. H. TURTON, Parliamen-
y to the Ministry of National

whose ties are screwed into
ots and whose suits suggest a
vermanent all-night sitting.

Charies HILL 1s another MP
who sometimes appears in need
ot sponging and pressing



“ natiy Gresser is Peter PHORNEY-







CROFT. President of the Board
of Trade Shirt very white. tie
pery mmartiate buir very
ucked and = shini But
ings to nis old-fashioned gold
watch chain
{'y per cent of front bench
stomachs a draped with Vic-
orian gold gins One _mem-
ber Housing Minister Harold
MACMILLAN. stil) favours the
craditiona! near! tiepin

3OWLERS, HOMBURGS

‘ONVENTIONAL dresser is
Detence Minister, Viscount
ALEXANDER. Of them gil. he
ocrobably wears nis clothes” best
unconventional 1s Duncan
SANDYS, Minister of Supply.
ho 11s bappiuly biting his nails

A navy-blue Pin-Stripe suit and
jue tie in preference to the
iniform of lack and white
rived trousers and black coat.
n the smart tront-bencher
tor home he wears a bow-

or black hamburg. Bowler
tevotee is War Minister Antony
{EAD He can rarely be parted

rom his. even when making an

inspection underneath army
orries

IOTNOTE: Black marks to
Mr Peter Thorneycroft and Mr.
Harry Crookshbank tor empty
breast pockets in a row of

dazzling white handkerchiefs.

Patrick’ s

Mr. Robert Jasingh of Trinidad
and Miss Gloria Selby, who sang
in duet, “Wanting You”, high-
| lighted the Concert at St. Patrick’s
School, Jemmotts Lane, on Wed-
nesday night. The Concert was
held in aid of the Organ Repair
Fund,

It was very well attended and
everyone appeared to have enjoy-
ed the well arranged programme.

All the artistes did creditably
well <

On the programme Miss Gloria
Selby sang “At Dawning”; Mrs.

| Olga Cole, ‘‘Sunshine of the Smile’,
|Mrs. Monica Rudder, “Just A
pevcaring of You"; Robert Jasingh,
|\“My Heart and 1” and “I Love
|The”, Cedric Phillips, “Don’t Cry
Little Girl’; Mrs. Cynthia Selby
also sang.

Sketches were by Judy Graham
and Ivy Marshall, while Miss
Phillips recited. A Saw Solo was
given by Ben Gibson,

Many members of St. Patrick’s
Church and their friends are look-
ing forward to such concerts being
held regularly.










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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

TOLLE GE GIRLS

; 740 of them in a -Women Only” preserve . - -



are asking if they should open the deor to—

COLLEGE MEN

LONDON UNIVERSITY'S Bed-
ford College is a college for
wemen only. It has been a college
for women ever since it was
founded in 1849 by a widow
named Mrs, Elizabeth Jessie Reid.

But now the girls of Bedford
are asking: would it not be bet-
ter fer us to admit men students
as well?

There are 740 undergraduates
altogether. I estimate that about
half of them @re in fayour of
admitting men.

What are they like, these 740
‘studious young women? I put the
question to their Principal—dark,
| shrewd-eyed Miss Norah Penston,
a doctor of philosophy of Oxford.
reply: “I think all our stu-
| dents these days are very serious
about their careers, though I sup-
pose most of them hope for mar-
riage in the end,”

Looking Ahead

The careers they are serious
about vary. I talked te six wo-
men students—the word “girl” is
frowned upon—round a table, One
Anne Dixon, from Seaford, Sussex,
was reading Sociology, hoped to do
social work in mixed boys’ and
girls’ clubs eventually. Another,
Brenda Hancock, from Haywards
Heath, reading French, wanted to
work among refugees in India,
Palestine or Africa,

A South African girl, Christine
Watson, from Johannesburg, hopes
to be a journalist; a third
student, Nancy Drew, rom
Wantage, Berks, wanted ‘wo be a
geologist with the Colonial De-
velopment Corporation; a girl from
the Isle of Man, Anne Quilliam,
hoped to teach at the Institute

By ROBERT KINGSLEY

of Education. The President of the
Students’ Union Norvella Forster,
of Salisbury reading honours
chemistry, would like best to do
pure academic research when she
is qualified,

“Fewer girls study for pleasure

new than did before the war,”
says the Principal. The great
majority of them receive some

kind of grant while studying.

Of the 740, twice as many are
reading for an Arts degree as are
studying seienee. There are 19 de-
partments of learning in the Col-
lege, and subjects ranging from
Middle Dutch to Foreign Strati-
graphy appear in the syllabus.
There are 95 on the teaching staff,
and roughly ‘half of those are

men,
Of the Ants students, 35 pen
teachers; the

cent hope to become ig
figure was my er prewi
Next most r secretarial
work, thoi is involves a fur-
a six months’ train.
ng after taking a degree,

The girls who are scientists
nearly all aim at industry; there
are a great many more openings
for them there than before the
war. The magic word is research.
Nost of these girls would like to
make their career in industrial
scientific res

Home and Away

Girls going into industry as, say,
scientists, are likely to earn more
than, for instance, teachers, “But
the salary they can expect does
not very often determine their
choice," said the Resident Tutor,
Mrs. Wileman, an M.A, of Oxford.

What many of them do ask is!
that their first job should be away |
from their homes—and, preverse-|
ly, that their next job should be
within reach of those homes

A few of the girls become en-
gaged during their time at the
University, There no rule
against it, and the students I
talked to spoke of what they
called a “rash” of engageme!
rings during the past few weeks
Occasionally girls marry while
still studying.

About 200 of the girls at Bed-
ford are “in residence.” Opinion
varies as to whether or not this
helped them in their studies. Th
students, I talked to reckoned that
about a fifth of their number really
busied themselves with collgac
activities, about the same pro-
portion as in mean’s colleges, they
thought; the rest had to be goad
ed into participation in collegiate
affairs,

Blue stockings? They thought

is

- the figure would be in the nature

of eight or ten per cent, “It is
difficult te know, because if they're
really like that you wouldn't ever
see them; they'd always be work-

ing.” ;
My verdict: Most of the girls
at Bedford regard their univer-

sity course as young men regard
short-service commissions in the
Forces—something to give them
background, status, substance
character to fit them later for an-
other career. The career at the
back of their mind? Marriage

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
—L.E.S.



Honours To The Women

LET us talk of famous women,
Last Thursday night I dined at
Walter Elliot's house in Lord
North-street, where a privately
installed division bell enables him
to get back to Westminster in
time to register his vote.

It was a small dinner of five,
but not without an historic sig-
nificance, That afternoon our host
had received the C nat
Honour insignia from
Majesty, thus making him the

newest of that small, distin-
guished order.
But at the table was Miss

Violet Markham, who was the
first to be so honoured. '-
five years separated these good
Companions in the awarding of
the medal which bears these
words; —

In rae", faithful

And in honour clear,

We are all we siillalaig of our
ancestors, and I suspect
Violet Markham's strength
purpose came from her grand-
father, Joseph Paxton,

He was the gardener at Chats-
worth, the home ot the
Devonshire family, and ended wu
by building the Crystal Palace
for the 1851 Exhibition and being
duly knighted.

Miss Markham hag always
her maiden name, although,
fact, she is Mrs, James Car-
ruthers.

Her record of social activities
would read like an official list of
public boards, She has sat on
countless committees, has been a
councillor and a mayoress, has
founded settlements, and even
contested a parliamentary elec~
tion, but without success, thus
proving that virtue and good
works do not necessarily
a golden key to Westminister.

It was King George V who
created the Order of the Com-
panion of Honour in 1917, and
of those who were then selected
our Lady of Good Works was the
first to receive it.

How splendidly those words,
“In action faithful and in honour
clear,” ring out above the elamour
of a discordant world,

Hier Seeret

Earlier in the day at the Liter-
ary Luncheon there was another
famous woman, Mrs, Neville
Chamberlain.

She was only one Soret 2) a: ae Wee Oy ane OF the seeetly

. scientific



cil in

ACRSET, EP

AGENTS: ALEC RUSSELL & CO., BARBADOS

7 attained

Beverley Baxter

were ea of other
notables to steal applause
but it was her name that received
the ovation.
The wheels of the gods .
The truthfulness of time,
They cheered Neville Chamber -
lain when he came back from
Munich, oe ae later
they curs ving gone
there. But his reputation wil!
mative the slander mongers.
am hoping that, same of these
aie Mrs. lain will
allow me to tell 2 roy
aa happened on night t
h returned from
Munich, It is a hidden chapter o!
history that clamours for the

light.
Ma! Ha! Ha!

Now let us break the mood anci
talk of a famous man who, in «
that Single Se Gene ent
an

equalled by the Guardsman who
dropped his rifle on

Last Saturday w Sir Walter
Monckton, that suave, smiling,
imperturbable lawyer and Min-

and there

by. ister of Labour, went to Oxford

to receive a D.C.L, de; s
Whether he deserved it or not
he had certainly earned it, for
he hsa been standing counsel (no
fees) to the University for many
years. 3 é 2
At the presentation ceremony
Dr. Higham, as Public Orataor,
announced that he would deliver
the Address in Latin, “You can
laugh at the jokes,” he said,
Sir Walter did his best with
sugh Latin as he could summon,
which was dashed little, but made
ne
Eventually, however, he saw an
oppotrunity, The Public Orator
had ended a sentence with a
terrific flourish, and Monekton
let out a loud: Ha! Hal Hal”
There was an embarrassed
silence. It was awful. Everyone
stared, Sir Walter had laughed
at the mest solemn moment in
ine whole address! If you see a
aggard Skulking along
the shady of a quiet Lonaak
street you will Te who it is
ome empo
- eb for Warrant

omess W. Luffman, R.A.E.C.
attached to the Royal Horse
Guards, Windsor.

;

4



“Your comments,” he writes,
“on the music played at the
Trooping the Colour are typical
of the uninformed chatter that
one hears on such occasions.”

That's the stuff for the troops
to give the columnist

“IT shudder to think,” he goes
on, ‘what a slow march to ‘Land
of Hope and Glory’ would have
done to Her Majesty’s Foot
Guards.” s

I like his spirit but deny his
argument. Too many military |
marches are musically banal,

Perhaps that is why Hitler
chose “The March of the!
Meistersinger” for the tremen-
dous climax of the last Nurem-
berg rally, when a vast army of
young Nazi idiots and idealists |
marched past his throne, |

The greatest funeral marph |
ever written is the
in Wagner's “Gotterdammerung,” |
although it would lose something |
if played in strict time.

Dialogue
It happened on Wednesday and]
of course, in Mayfair. Mr. Noel)
Coward and a_ politician who}
shall be nameless met and ahools|

hands. |
COWARD (anwiously): Some-!
thing has happened to you, What)

is it?

POLITICAN; I have lost my,
moustache, |
COWARD (sympathetically)

You must rise above it.

The Unsung
Perhaps it does not matter|
much that exactly 33 years ago)
yesterday two Englishmen took
off in a plane to make the mad,
inspired gamble of flying the|
North Atlantic,

What were their names? Per-|
haps on a basis of 20 questions a
panel of citizens might find the)
answer,

In two or three years there will}
be a statue to them at London
Airport, where no one will see it, |

I have raised this matter |
hefore, both in this column and |
in Parliament, but only by per- |
Sistence can the official mind be
jolted into action,

.

|
|
|
|
|

|
*
|
Once more, My Lords and
Members of the House of Com-
mons will you please remove the
Duke of Cambridge and his horse |
from Whitehall and give us
Alcock and Brown?

|

—L.E.S.



Cashmere Bovquel’s gentle
lather has been proved out
sandingly mild for ell types
of skin!

me Cashmere Pipshons ede tire a

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PAGE SEVEN

Black is out-and they're
trying novel fabries for=

SWIMSUITS

Suis Dain News for Women



A



S unexpectedly as it arrived—and for no apparent
reason—black is out tor beachwear. For three
years a plain black s'rapless swimsuit has been

the uniform of all smart women on al! smart beaches.

in the Bahamas and Miami,
South and on the Italian

American women
French women wore
Riviera

English
usual
eatch
thev
beach ?
blue (or
yellow) is
Eventually
bought black

But one

ashion

wore it
it in the

women, as
were slow to
on. * Black,”
said. “on the
Surely vale
green or
nicer?’
they, too

of thase
somersaults
which without warning
bring in long. skirts
when we are all wear-
ing short and small
rats When we have only
big ones, has brought in

white frilly material
swimsuits, when we all
have Plain tailored
bluck

The Paris shops are
already showing swim-
suits in white cotten
piqué.

* * *

Among people 1 met
n London last week
Glyn Johns has
brough buck {rom
Venice a white broderie
anglaise swimsuit with
a deep camiknicker

frill She wears it out
of the water with a gold
bels and gold sandals











And in dof ble
prin 1 cetion for the r* : “a
beach. she has chosen a ¥ al
siting skirt made in ’ _
three layers like a why
Hawaiian straw and aera ¢ é: Sa
jenim dungarees with
three - quarter length Flower rwtit LARGE flower motife
ees. Yesterdays most effectively dressed
° wedding quest in London was Mrs. Inga
Beauty perils Adlarson in piamarous afigrat gown G
. a gtiest at the all-Swedish wedding
ALKING with 4 o/ Miss Vera Nilsson and Mr Bengi
estos! AAD, a Siosteen at London's Swedish churclt
Cauty speciulists
heard an alarining account of 1ubbery we ought to do away
the dangero: aids-to-neauty with.”
women think up jonsense !
N uncommon are women Where else should q woman
who who cannot afford nursing-home
Cut off their eyelashes {| wo to have a child?
hoping they will grow thicker in wu private house there
and larger in fact they 1 he special equipmer
ike months to grow at all. the experlenced staff to dea
Dye their eyelashes with hb an rer .
hair que. One doctor says: ge
® angerous and foolish
ane Shrinking
Use shoe polish imstead ot fy? my KNOW wt =the
mascara, Uf women knew the ‘ tar r wea
frightful cisks to their sight ne wool and cotton
they would never do it garmenis lose 193 inches of
/ut a razor on their hair- material by shrinking ?
line to get a “widow's peak.” Oo nal & man’s shirt will
Afler a few months of this irink up to 11} inehes and a
the hair grows lke wire cnild’s gingham dress up to 4
One woman [ heurd of tried ton incnes ?
to whiten her si n with wash- An attempt is being made to
Ing bleach The result? A put Bill through Parliament
badly burned and permanent ¢ mpelling all manufacturers to
facial sear. pre-shrink fabrics before they ao 9
to the shops.
Having a baby Extra cost of pre-shrinking to
R. HENRY ROGER, Medical 'e shopper would be about dd
Offjcer of Healtn for Bullolk, ® Yard. ‘
last week made a feolish “Would women be prepared
attack on mothers who insist on = vay this ext money?” I
having their babies in hospitels #8 asked. | And reply, of
“to impress the neignbours.” ALIse, Was Yes 1
He said: “These moters itxe PPM Tey Bac tae sill
to read in the papers that the 9% Hons } dmatencs
baby was bormin such a huspitel § ut ad; evard
and that ‘ thanks are di all ee oe
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PAGE EIGHT



BARBADOS eiht ADVOCATE

me wasn ue ew ee
Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad 8t., Bridsetewa

a ae ee ee i

Sunday, July 6, 1952

Reporting Debates

ON April 5, 1951 the Advoeate published
information which was made available by
the Editor of Canada’s Hansard for the
express purpose of helping the House of
Assembly to improve upon the obviously
unsatisfactory way in which reports or de-
bates are made locally.

There are 262 members of the Canadian
House of Commons and two official lan-
guages French and English are spoken, but
most of the speeches are in English. To re-
port the procedure of the House of Com-
mons English and French staffs are
employed.

The English staff comprises an Editor of
Debates who is chief of the Reporting
Branch, 1 Assistant Editor, seven Parlia-
mentary Reporters, 1 Senior Reporter of
Committees and 4 assistant parliamentary
reporters. Parliamentary reporters report
debates of the House of Commons and
Assistant Parliamentary reporters report
proceedings of standing and special com-
mittees.

There can be no comparison between the
Canadian House of Commons which is in
permanent session daily and the Barbados
House of Assembly which meets once
weekly and which enjoys frequent vaca-
tions. But the small size of the English de-
bates staff (the French is much smaller)
suggests that large numbers of reporters
are unnecessary for verbatim reports of
any Assembly.

What is required is proper organisation
and understanding of the procedure to be
adopted, That organisation and understand-
ing is very lacking in Barbados and during
Tuesday’s debate according to a report in
the Press, Mr. R. G. Mapp came nearest to
suggesting how matters can be set right.

The methods to be adopted were, as men-
tioned above, published in the Advocate of
April 5, 1951,

First, local methods of recruiting House
reporters leave much to be desired, In Can-
ada reporters are appointed after competi-
tive examination held under the auspices
of the Civil Service Commission.

Secondly, each reporter ought to be pro-
vided with an expert typist. House report-
ers in Canada dictate their material direct
to the typist and committee reporters use
dictating machines.

Thirdly, House reporters ought to take
turns of so many minutes each. In Canada
six reporters take turns of ten minutes each
and every ten minutes a bell rings as a
signal to the next reporter to take his turn.
If six reporters are adequate for the Cana-
dian House of Commons, surely three are
more than adequate for the Barbados
House of Assembly and Legislative Coun-
cil together.

The entire system of reporting debates in
the two legislative houses needs revision.
A civil servant of no less standing than the
present clerk to the Legislative Council
ought to be appointed editor and Chief of
the Reporting Branch of the joint Legisla-
ture. He would employ three reporters and
three typists and these three reporters
would take for 20 minutes and dictate to
typists for forty minutes throughout the
meeting of each House of the Legislature.
This would only be practicable if the House
of Assembly and the Legislative Council
met on different days. This could easily be
arranged. The important point to be estab-
lished is that there is no necessity what-
ever tor any shorthand notes to be taken
away from the Public Buildings by report-
Even two reporters working thirty
minute shifts can dictate a large proportion
of their notes to expert typists during the
thirty minutes in which they are not taking
notes.

The present system of note taking is
thoroughly inefficient. A reporter is. ex-
pected to take notes for hours and then to
transcribe them without any aid from a
typist. It is not surprising that the notes
are taken home.

What is surprising and even shocking
is the state of affairs described by Mr.
alma who is reported to have said on
Tuesday that reporters had “to transcribe
into the King’s English what was not prop-
erly explained or spoken in the House by
some honourable members,”

If this is true, Barbados’ system of re-
porting politicians speeches must be unique
in the British Commonwealth and is cer-
tainly contrary to the English or Canadian
Hansard traditions.

In the Canadian House of Commons
members are permitted to see their speeches
in typescript in the Debates Office before
they are sent to the printers. It is a rule of
the House that only minor corrections or
alterations may be made. All such changes
are checked by the Editor before being in-
corporated into the copy which goes to
the printer. By ten o’clock the following
morning the printed Hansard is delivered
to the House of Commons.

The weakness of the present system of
reporting debates in the House of Assembly
the Legislative Council therefore lies

organis.
rganisation. Seatac ta!

ers,

and

in th

Each reporter must be provided with an
expert typist and reporters must take notes
for periods not exceeding twenty minutes
except in an emergency when a maximum
of one hour is possible. ’

Three reporters are adequate for both
Houses of the Legislature, but arrange-
ments must be made to avoid simultaneous
meeting of the two Houses.

One Editor who would be Chief of the
Reporting Branch must be appointed to
supervise the work of the three reporters
and the three typists and to ensure that
members do not make other than minor
corrections to their speeches.

It will be the Editor’s responsibility to
see that reporters and typists complete
their copy before leaving and there will
then be no question of copy going from the
Public Buildings until it is ready for the
printer,

Such a procedure will mean that copy
can be given to the printer on the same or
at latest the following day after debates
in the House or Council.

The mechanics of #yping are also import-
ant. The typewritten copy for the printer
in Canada is prepared on a “set” which con-
sists of an original sheet, a stencil and a
blue sheet. The set is perforated near the
top and when the copy comes from the
reporter it is separated, the original going
to the editor, the stencil to the duplicating
machine and the blue sheet to the outside
office for use of members. The stencil sup-
plies thirty copies to the press gallery for
information of the Press but it cannot be
quoted as Hansard.

Fortunately for Barbados the Speaker of
the House of Assembly is shortly going to
spend a month in Canada where he will
have the opportunity to check the accuracy
of the above information with the Editor
of Canada’s Hansard who as far back as
March 1951 expressed his willingnes to
assist the Barbados House of Assembly and
whose account of Canadian Parliamentary
Reporting methods was published in the
Advocate of April 5, 1951.

Stable Currency

IT IS interesting to compare an account
of “markets of the British Caribbean” pub-
lished in the New Commonwealth of June
9, with a talk on “Strains on the sterling
area” published in United Empire (the
Journal of the Royal Empire Society) for
May-June.

Whereas, Mr. Starck, the United King-
dom Trade Commissioner for the Eastern
Caribbean considers that the rise in the
area from £15 million of imports in 1938
to £70 million in 1950 merits serious atten-
tion, Sir Frederick Leith-Ross takes quite
another view of the United Kingdom’s rela-
tion to colonies.

Sir Frederick quotes Professor Arthur
Lewis’ recent statement that “for the first
time since free trade was adopted in the
middle of the nineteenth century the Brit-
ish Colonial system has become a major
means of economic exploitation.” And the
reason for Professor Lewis’ statement,
which. Sir Frederick acknowledges to be
based on facts is due to the relatively new
system of exchange controls by which “The

nited Kingdom continues to claim the
products of the sterling area by payment of
£ s. and in £ s, that are not convertible
and which cannot always be used here for
obtaining the goods they need: these £ s.
remain banked in London and during the
past few years their purchasing power has
been steadily draining away.”

The West Indies; it is known, are not big
dollar earners for the sterling area but
their receipts from oil, tuurism, sugar and
some other products probably exceed their
allocation of hard currency. To some
extent therefore they can be included in
the criticism which is levelled by Professor
Arthur Lewis against the British Colonial
system. But Sir Frede~ick cites Malaya
which during the first nine months of 1951
earned $350 million but only spent $44
million. And he remarked that the pres-
ent arrangement in Malaya is unlikely to
be maintained if Malaya gets a system of
self-gevernment, :

Whereas, Mr. Starck is quite ha
drawing the steep rise in the ae of East.
ern Caribbean imports to the attention of
the British exporters while trying to ex-
plain away our adverse balance of trade
by mentioning our earnings from invisible
exports and the flow of capital into the
area.

Mr. Starck is far more optimistic than
Professor Beasley who inclines rather to
the view that in Barbados anyhow imports
have been paid for partly by savings and
investments which are probably diminish-
ing.

Sir Frederick and Professor Beasley are

much better guides for Barbados than Mr.
Starck,

“Not until we have a sterling £ which

is freely convertible into gold will there
be any safeguard for the standard of life
either of people here or of the other peoples
in the sterling area. Social security is mean-
ingless unless it is based on a secure and
stable currency. Without that stable cur-
rency any welfare state is built on sand.”
‘ These two sentences of Sir Frederick
ought to be framed and used as arguments
by all those who are seriously concerned
with the effect that the most recent ex-
change controls are having in the British
Caribbean. Instead of being asked to pull
in our belts and to fight inflation as the
United Kingdom, Australia and other self-
governing members of the Commonwealth
are doing we are being invited to spend
more on British goods, or in other words to
increase local inflation. Great Britain could
no more have intended this than she in-
tended to accumulate £908 million from
colonial sterling balances in the 342 years
ended in June 1951, But there seems very
little concern about it in London and much
upathy here.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

The Man
Who Keeps

All B’dos
Laughing



NATHANIEL GUBBINS



Jennifer, the hen that laid
ten eggs in 45 minutes at
Bodymore Heath Farm,
Warwickshire, on May 26,
died 25 hours afterwards.

HEREVER hens are gath-
ered, whenever hens may

speak
The tale of little Jennifer shall ,

pass from beak to beak
And hens who never gave their
best shall look the other way
To hear of one who gave her
all soon after Empire Day,
In darkened nest she sat alone
while hens look in to mock;
Much gayer hens with beady
eyes for any passing cock.
“Poor Jennifer,” they laughed
aloud, “Poor Jennifer,” they

said, ‘

“All work, no play, no boys,
no dates she might as well
be dead.”

No answer came from Jennifer,
no word escape her beak
Although a single, glistening
tear ran down her feathered
cheek,

When spring has passed she
knew that eggs must be in
short supply

To bridge the gap she gave
her all soon after Empire
Dye.

No flags shall be unfurled for
her, no muted drums shall
rou

No parson speak a word for
her, no village bell shall toll

For one who gave her little life
(she had no more to give)

Except her humble offering
that we on eggs might live.
Scholar At Home

When carelessly you eat your
egg, if scrambled, boiled or
fried

Allow a moment for a thought
for one who gladly died

With beating heart, but unafraid,

with calm and steady eye
Because she loved her country
more . . soon after Empire
Dye.
“I often regret my univer-
sity education because I sus-

pect it prevents me from en-
tering with zest into family
small talk and my wife’s
limited material interests.”
—Letter to a newspaper.

SN’T that just like Vi?
Vi, dear?

You know Vi
inside taken out?

No, dear.

Isn't it like her to go to the
dentist now they’re charging £1

. As I don’t know Vi, dear, I

wouldn’t know if it is like her

or not.

For weeks she’s been going
about with a face like a balloon,
She could have had it for no-
thing. Now she'll have to pay
for it.

who had her

Am I to understand one is
now fined for having a face
like a balloon?

Don't tell me that with all
your Oxford education you've
never heard of the National
Health. And she’s going to have
twins on top of it.

On top of what, dear?

On top of all her teeth taken
out. It’s not pleasant to have
twins without teeth.

I didn’t know it made any
difference.

After all that I expect they'll
be born funny, too,

Funny in what way, dear?
I wonder if they’ll be like her

or their father?

If a maternal resemblance
means that they will be born

comedians with faces like
balloons and no insides, I think
it would be better for all con-
cerned if they were like their
father.

Unable Seaman

‘OUR Uncle Nat has forgotten
the name of the peer who
said, in the House of Lords, “We
don’t want another Nat Gubbins
Home Guard”; also the name of
the general who said “The Home
Guard must not be laughed at.”
But he has not forgotten the
remarks. Therefore, the Home

Guard will be deprived not only
of the flattest-footed private
ever to wear ammunition boots,
but a lot of much-needed pub-
licity.

* * *

People who live in little worlds
of their own have no idea of the
value of even the less solemn
forms of publicity.

What the Army (if you ean
call it the Army) has lost, the
Navy (if you can eall it the
Navy) will gain now that their
Uncle has joined the Royal Naval
Minewatching Service.

From now on Unable Seaman
Gubbins will tell you from time
to time of his adventures in a
service which is regarded, by
those. who ought to know, as
more important than the Home
Guard. So there.

Already he has been fayour-
ably impressed by the hearty
welcome given to the first mine-
watchers of The Nore at Chat-
ham.

Even if it is the first time he
ever joined a corps with women
in it, it is also the first corps he
has ever joined which offered
him free beer,

* * *

Moreover, as one who has
heard hundreds of pep talks by
Army officers, he can give Ad-
miral Sir Cecil Harcourt, C.-in-
C. The Nore, ten marks out of
ten for saying all that was neces-~
sary in the fewest possible words.

Although experience tells him
that the fre@*beer issue won't
last, even if the women do, this
anything-but-jolly tar, with only
one wife near one port, felt
jollier in the coach coming home,

The only snag is the uniform,
Unable Seaman Gubbins might
look respectable enough in blue
battledress but he feels that a
blue beret, worn at his age,
might remind people of one of
those elderly French guides sell-
ing those awful postcards.

—LE.S.



SIR JOHNS BIG «IF-

“Softy softy catch monkee” is
a good old West Indian proverb
of which I am reminded every
time I come back to study the
Bill which seeks to establish a
system of local government
based on recommendations by
Sir John Maude,

If you turn to page 60 of Sir
John’s report you will find a
“summary of recommendations,”
but if you turn to page 35 and
read part IV of the report which
is entitled “recommendations”,
you will understand why I am
reminded of the old West Indian

proverb.
Because Sir John begins his
“recommendations” with that

terrible two letter word “if’’.

“If the view is accepted,” he
writes, “that. change is neces-
sary the first and fundamental
question to be asked and
answered is whether local gov-
ernment in Barbados should
continue or whether the process,
which has been going on for
the past century, of entrusting
to the central Government
functions normally discharged
by local authorities should be
carried to its logical conclusion.”

Nobody it seems has answered
that question. Nor did Sir John,
But he committed himself to a
statement which seems to have
been generally overlookeu.

“IT make no doubt”, he writes
in Part IV, “that if the present
system remains unaltered the
centralising process will con-
tinue as new needs arise for
which parochial administration
is clearly inadequate, and that

the Vestries and _ Parochial
Boards in no very long space of
time will become patently

superfluous and will disappear.
To set up a new local govern-
ment system in their place will
be not only more difficult teeh-
nically but—what is far more
important—will require a much
greater effort on the part of all
responsible members of the
community than to allow the
system to lapse whether by
quick or slow stages into Gov-
ernment hands.”

I do not think these words of
Sir John Maude have been
iven the attention they deserve.

cause they sum up far more
than “the summary of recom-
mendations” his real feelings
about local government in Bar-
bados,

“Your. Vestry system’ he
might have said quite bluntly,
“is not local government at all
as local government is under-
stood in England. Already the
function of local government,
eg. in Bridgetown education,
police, housing, parts of public
health, highways, water supply,
bridges, markets and fire ser-
vices are under central govern-
ment control. Why all this fuss
then about local government?
Leave them alone and like BO-
PEEP’S sheep the Vestries will
all come home trailing their
tails of poor relief, roads and
church maintenance with them,

But if you people of Barbados
are not prepared to see the cen-
tral government run everything,
if the responsible members of the
community are prepared — to
make a much greater effort
then you can have a system of
local government.”

Somewhere here Sir John
Maude breaks his train of
thought and when he gets

around to the all important sub-
ject of qualification for voting
and for membership of new
councils there is no further
reference to responsible mem-
bers of the community. He is
recommending opening the vot-
ing to local government councils
and membership of local gov-
ernment councils to anyone of
British nationality aged 21.
Whether a_ single responsible
member of the community will
ba@ returned to councils under
these conditions clearly does not
interest Sir John.

He geineralises about its being
paradoxical “to regard the
people of Barbados as fit to take
responsibility for their island
affairs but not for parochial
affairs.” And this in spite of
his own statement earlier in
para. 67 of Part IV that “to set
up a new local government sys-
tem in their place will be. not
only more difficult but—what is
far more important—will re-
quire a much greater effort on
the part of all responsible
members of the community.”
How is that effort to be made
if the responsible members are
outnumbered by the irrespon-
sible? Truly Sir John seems to
have led us right yin the garden
and beyond into the stinging
nettle bushes with these soft
words.



By
George Hunte



. But getting back to the other
statement a his which sounds
like a prophecy rising from the
Scotch mists, “I make no doubt
that, if the present system re-
mains unaltered the centralis-
ing process will continue as new
needs arise for which parochial
administration is clearly inade-
quate and that the Vestries and
Parochial Boards in no very
long space of time will become
patently superfluous and _ will
disappear,”

If (to use the two letter word

r which. Sir John shows
ondness in Part IV) the Vestries
are going to go in no very long
space of time, why then give
them a parting kick?

“Because,” says Sir John, “to
entrust the whole administration
of local government to the cen-
tral government would be to
impose on it an intolerable
burden.”

Yet by the time he has reach-
ed para. 113 Sir John is reach-
ing up for a new note: “others
(will say)”, he writes, “that the
powers of the new Councils are
so hedged abput with govern-
ment controls that the system
is one of local government in
name rather than substance.”
And Sir John is forced to /imit
that the proposed control by the
central government undoubted-
ly goes beyond that to be found
in countries like Great Britain
with long experience of local
administration,

This little admission and the
sentence about the people being

fit to take responsibility for
parochial affairs do not seem to
be on all fours. He shows that
he does not really believe the
people will be responsible for
parochial affairs by using the
words, “if a spirit of collabora-
tion towards a common end
exists between the central and
local administrators,”

Sir John Maude’s report was
dated. 18th February 1949 and
he visited Barbados in 1948.
Since then elections under uni-
versal adult suffrage have fur-
ther reduced the effective power
of the British Governor and
thrown the entire responsibility
for government measures on to
the Leader of thr Barbados
House of Assemply. When
therefore Sir John writes about
“genuine differences of opinion
between the government and
the councils” he is thinking in
terms of the Governor-in-Exe-
cutive Committee,

To-day the Governor-in-Exe-
cutive Committee is virtually
dependent on the support of the
Serer of the House of Assem-
bly.

Government controls over the
Councils as proposed in the Bill
based on Sir John Maude’s re-
commendations mean that Gov-
ernment controls can only be
exercised through the Govern-
or-in-Executive Committee, that
is with the sanction of the po-
litical party which happens to
be in power. To abolish vestries
which according to Sir John
Maude are doomed to disappear
soon merely to create district
councils subservient to the po-
litical party in power seems
fatuous.

The vestries and parochial
Boards according to Sir John
Maude are only responsible for
repair and maintenance of
churches and salaries of officers:
poor relief: public health: par-
ish roads: provision and main-
tenance of burial grounds and
cemeteries: grants to charitable
institutions and powers peculiar
to Bridgetown, Speightstown
and Holetown.

How will the new councils be
able to carry out these duties
any better merely because
everybody is entitled to vote at
council elections or to become a
councillor? The bill nowhere
speaks of any new duties which
will be carried on by the new
councils,

Nor for that matter does Sir
John, His views on local gov-
ernment are so hedged around
with conditions that only on one
occasion does he let slip what
he really thinks. In para 73 of
Part IV he states “one obvious
course would be to treat the
whole island as a single local
government unit and to concen-
trate all local government ser-
vices in one Council, centred on
Bridgetown.” Better, in my
opinion, since Sir John never
seemed once to make up his
mind, leave the vestries alone,
when according to his prophecy
they wilt disappear and we'll
have the single local govern-
ment unit (the two legislative
Houses) which he undoubtedly
favoured, despite the “summary
of recommendations” on which
the local government has based

present controversial Bill.

SUNDAY, 1952

JULY 6,














PHOTOGRAPHS

Copies of Local Photographs
Which have appeared in the

ADVOCATE NEWSPAPER

Can be ordered from the...

BARBADOS STATIONERY

** These I must remember — !”



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° Meat Mincers
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SUNDAY, JULY 6,

1952







WOVEN FROM THE
GOLDEN FLEECE

Hy WILE

You'll fing them all over Great
Britain and ‘Ireland—some of
medium size, others impressively
large, many so tiny that they are

hidden in the curve of a valley
or by the bend of a road. All of
them are Mills—Woollen Mills

engaged in the manufacture of
cloth or specializing in one of its
many phases; all of them intent
on a modern presentation of an
ancient craft and nearly all with
generations of family ties among
employers and employees.

Time was when the word ‘crea-
tion’ was applicable to the uni-
verse but it is more readily un-
derstood now in its modern,
euphemistic sense, as aplicable to
trend in a style conscious world,
the sartorial markets of which
call it Fashion,

~~

FROM the Handioom there has been
prises the Powerloom.

The Peoplic Of Barbad



AM FORKES ST

EWART









SUNDAY ADVOCATE



The combined utilitarian and In the bulk purehase of wool
fashionable nature of a woven the broker and manufacturer wil
wool fabric and its need to satisfy dicker over cents and fractions of
conditions and temperatures from cents, for these added ip play <
arctic to tropical, necessitates the important part in the price ¢ t th
making of a multitude of cloths, fimshed cloth. After its arrva
themseives broken down in myriad at.the Mill, the wool may still t
designs, colours, weights and in a jn its natural state, that is to say
variety of finishes. To satisfy the with a heavy impregna ol
enormous demand, an even more skin oil and greasy to handle I
enormous production of raw mate- will be thoroughly washed anc
rial is annually forthcoming from when dry, either dyed to the
the reat sheep pastures of the colours selected for the blend «
Commonwealth for conversion into converted | first into yarn. Thi

yarn and then cloth by the clat~
tering mechanism of the woollen
industry or woollen factories, or

simple little Mills far removed nowever, are woven from yarns |
from the bouncing and high pres- that are a mixture of colou! n
sure of industrial groups and the wool state and scrambled to-
combines. They all have this in gether before being spun int
common; they are converters of various Stages betw een wool ar

the golden fleece.

Bik: sora

developed the
The Beam roller with the

warp threads is shown

os—XII

for ‘solid’ cole

urs

rm.



soulless and highly efficient mechanism that com

in the back of the Loom.



Ky John Prideaux

“SLAVERY”

THE last few years
eighteenth century appears to
be the period in which public
opinion was about*to make up
its mind over the whole matter
of the Slave Trade. There were
many investigationsgebys Com-=
mittees of Parliament, and Com~
mittees for the Anti-Slavery
campaign. Bryan Edwards, a
planter and slave owner, wrote
‘History, Civi} ang Commercial,
of the British Colonies ins the
West Indies,’ which was_ first
published in 1791. Edwards took
an active part in improving the
slave trade and eventually lqd
a great dea] to do with its abo-
lition. But for all of this he
paints a glewing picture of the
conditions on board ship of the
slavers, which in the light of
other evidence is hard to be
lieve. Edwards records—

of the

“It is admitted on all hands
that the men slaves are
cured in irons when they first
come on board; but Sir George
Young, a Captain in the Royal
Navy who appears to be weil
acquainted with the trades in
all its branches, is of opinion
that this nof practiced
more than necessity requires.
The mode by fastening
every two men together, the
right ankle of one being lock-
ed by means of a small iron
fetter to the left of the other
and if marks of a turbu’ent
disposition appear, an addi-
tional fetter is put on their
wrists. On the passage, when
danger is no longer appre-
hended, the irons are coni-
monly taken off; and women
and young people are exemp*t-
ed from them from the be-
ginning. They are lodged be-

se-

is

is,

a

BALATA
SOUVENIRS



We invite you to j
inspect our local dis-
play of Balata Sou-
venirs — very artis-
tic “and colourful.

This ordinary rub-



ber is modelled into

the most attractive

designs of — local
characteristic. pat-
terns,

tween decks, on clean boards,
the men and wemen being
separated from each other by
bulkheads, and fresh air is
admitted by means of wind-
sails or ventilators: Covering

of any kind, ay. well from the

warmth of the climate as from
the constant practice of going
naked would be insupportable
to them, Every moming, if
the weather permits, they are
brought upon deck, and al-
lowed to continue there until
the evening. Their apart-
ments, in the meantime, are
washed, scrubbed, fumigated
and sprinkled with ‘vinegar.

The first attention paid
them in the merning is to
supply them with water to
wash their hands and faces,
after which they are provided
with their morning meal;
this, according to the country
from whence they come, con-
sists of either Indian corn, or
rice or yams, Before noon,
they are constantly and reg-
ulerly made to bathe in salt
water, and nothing can be
more agreeable and refresh-
ing. Their dinner is varier
consisting sometimes of food
to which they have been ac-

to






customed ‘in Africa, as yems
and Indian corn. etc., and .at
other times of provisions
brought from Europe es dried
beans and peas, wheat. shelled
barley and biscuit; all these
are boiled soft in steam and
mixed up with a sauce made
of meat, with fish, or pa'm

oil; this last is a constant and
desirable article in thei:
cookery. At each meal, they
are allowed as much as they



Donkey Carts
Sail Boats

Coconut Trees & Climbers...

Sugar Cane Boys on Donkeys

Washer Women ...
Mauby Women
Fisher Women
Steel Band Players

can eat, and have likewise a
sufficiency of fresh water, un-
less when, from an uncommon
long voyage, the preservat
of the ship compels the ¢
tain to put them to a short al-
lowance,. Drams also are given
them when the weather is
cold or wet and pipes and
tobacco whenever they desire
them, In the intervals between
their meals, they are encour-
aged to divert themse'ves with
music and dancing, for whicn
purpose such rude and un-
couth instruments »s are used
in Africa, are collected be-
fore their departure; and they

ion



ap-

are also permitted to amuse
themselves with games of
chance, for which they ai

likewise furnished with im-
plements of African inven-
tion.” Edwards continues—‘“In
sickness, the invalids are im-
mediately removed to the

Captain’s cabin, or to a hosni-
tal built in the forecastle, and
treated with all the c both
in regard te medicine nd
food, that circumstances w'!l
admit: and when, fortunately
for the Negroes, hip
touches at anv place her
vovage, as freauent’y har

every refreshment that tt
country affords roen4
limes

acatohles of N



re,

the
in

nutes. orances
fruits, with v
sorts, are distrihnt
them: and the refreshmer

are ¢ 1 ’



the same kind

lowed them at the niece °
their destination, betwe
days of arrival and sail.” Bry-
an Edwards appears to h
believed that the above di

cription was authentic,

n th

how-

'

@ $1.68
@ $1.92
@ $1.68
@ $1.44
96
-96
96
@ $3.00 a set



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LID.

(HOME PRODUCTS DEPT.)
10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET.



DOIDHOOS-

PDOODO-OD

latter process is applicable in most
instances
pearing in the cloth

ip
Many tweeds

THE sound of a Handloom is now seldom heard in

is an artist. He works with his hands and his head







I ndividual ad
i 1 poeticize bo
at 2 reach yar
} Ol it work vf only
few a power-l
And is sO, mt of
| th surroundi: the
j slow w hand-loomed article |
jis lost to u Most of tl maller
| Mill retain this ient—but
fundamentally, stil ay principle
of weaving cloth. Usually it ig
for pattern making although here
j}and there piece of upward of
fifty yards in length are produced
on a commercial } proudly

| Stamped ‘Handwoven

| (

o®

@ 59O9OS9SOSOSD

DOO

PL DOHO-LOSH*

DHHS: 8-9OOSGHO9S9G0.OH:H9-GG00 8

of it, much



he
h

ever,

must

wrong,
on the
m¢
and
t

yunte

in
ional f
cent
the
Islar
sold

In. the
Edwards’

dif

ids

was
book gives
lish ship ¢
320 tons.

st

publi



6 feet |
women 0
foo

foot irl

of



fic
ered by th
little

of tl

Two yei
of

bo



called the
land
James

Arn
evi ¢

“rt
on the
slave

to sé
his (t
that. he
Sometim

to compl



O64 OO



for

history
(1791) a book on the

he boy 5



sought after



> admits
ave

that
been

the loss

voyages

{ to fifteen

per
an
one-half

some Cases

Terent

before

West

they

could

ame year that
Vas
slave tr
London,
n of an E

‘Brookes,

hed in
the pl
illed

On

the
this
xe allowed
xy 1 foot

feet 10

ship
four inct
ine
feet |
3} inches by
ooks’ wa

»t only ¢

but t

ors were n

cir bodie
or

1em

no room

and t



elr boc

rs prior t the
both the

ks, ther h
nquiry

an

bo

into
English

lary ¢

on

Ruby of Bristol, I
e surgeon on board, o
old, g

ve the
the ¢
sneral

Fy or

1 your

ptair

» come
) cabin
lie with
would

desire

might
es ti

O® + ®SOOO4



1

and because
in north-

ern tourist markets

Althoug! at the start of
manufacture, the wool w thor
Oughly scoured, or vashe¢ t
must follow a similar clean
jafter being woven into cloth. Mn the
cloth and in being in direct contact
prior to entering the fini ,
with oily mechanism, the fabric
stages has a coarse d quite un-
pleasant handle. Neither does it
look particularly attractive with
knotted nd possibly broker
' threads on its surface. A combine

there
somethin
by deat!
freque
cent,
addi-

ly

er

while in the harbours of
Indian

ba

brvaa
publisnec

ade

This

ng

undred fet

» pl
were

betwe¢

men

spac
Ih

lie

d beer

pract

» actually touching one to the

publi-

emer

a
p

following

ce
in
n@

oO

her.
refuse
and





and his heart.





courit and ‘milling’
! ains and also brings
to e interlacings in a way
il felting Finally the
p and alkali is washed out, the
( eives an initial drying in
I extr which draw 1
the r, leaving the cloth dam}
Intense “heat circulating throurh
vs in the drying cham-
% he cloth stretched tight
or -hooks leaves it dry and
freque ly crackling with elec-
tricity
The cloth will regain a certain
amount of natural moisture be-
fore steam is again used in a
‘reverse’ direction—to blow into

ontent

1
vd

ound

e

material a congiderable damp
which it earries into the
iulic press for around twenty-
hours pressure of a thousand

(or considerably more)

- square inch of its surface

If all
ect
ould
nple
itively

ve

rs

has gone as planned, the
the inspection table
flawless—a superb ex-
a centuries old and, re-
unchanged art It may
been made at the whim of

on
be
of

would be severely beaten by
hun and sent below. There
was one young girl that he
retained for some time as his
favourite and kept her in his
cabin, until one day when she

was playing with his son, she
accidentally tore his shirt
When the Captain learned of

at, he whipped her unmerci-
fully with the eat, and beat her
up With his fists until she threw
herself from him against the
pumps and in dqing so injured
her head so severely that she
died three days after. She had

then been living with him as
mistress for five or six
nonths.” (1).

After the abolition of the Slave





Trade in 1807, conditions on
board the vile ships becarne
even worse, as slaves had to be
‘ ggied across the Atlantic

The Reverend Pasacoa Grenfell
Hill, a slain in the British
Navy wecorded an (Interesting

account of how the ship on which



he was serving captured a slave
smuggler called the Cleopatra
with a full cargo of Ne es, He
relates that after the capture of



this ship, a severe squall came

up
these

and that four hundred of
unfortunate people had to

be confined in a hole 86 feet long

and
feet of head room
ment
encountered and if they
been

would
being washed over the
chaplain
hatch had to be closed
them
hatch in the forepart of
sel
ened
endeavoured to reach thi
hatch so a
the result that the few
aged

blocked

7 feet wide, with only 3%
Their confine-
was due to the heavy sea
had not
below lives
been

kept
have

many
lost by their
de, The
the after
down on
and the

the ves

relates that

to keep them ‘n,



wooden
it,

had a

over

grating fa
All these slaves
small
to get some air, with
who man-
cling to \it completely
the passage of air into

to

the hole, The chaplain continues
may
the

ay

Moments

Shadow Stripe Mylon
in Pink, Blue & White —
“Detronelia™
This is a very serviceable
material, and flable
range of plain

Strt Sith Dique Sheer

Le
R



Pink, l





B



at $2.87 Yd.

mpas



ue,

Rose



at

~HARRISONS

BROAD STREET—DIAL 2664

29O99 9904 99OO9O4 POOCO4

Gime Sabries

jor those

i

I

“The cries, the
without ex

heat, |
iggeraton,

art silk

n lovely

€ Ecru

orquoise¢

id White
$2. 7f







process the



the land and this Weaver can never be replaced. He

desgnier, or at the express

order of a merchant, or be one of
a huge quantity taken by a whole-

sale clothier, or both fabric and
design may have been inspired
by the haute couture of London

Paris or New York—or it may be |

the

co

an
de

indirect outeome of a
ntact in a bus or. hotel foyer
d the photographic mind of
signer of woven wool fabrics

Whatever were the casual forces

casual |

|

to prompt its making, they are at|
least showing a part of their effect

in
the

come evident when, if it is for the
fashionable i
gre
the wearer—a stunning ensemble
perhaps,

from the conventional—but, in
any ease. fashionable headline
new

And far back into its compli-

cated history, the enquiring ming |

wi
ter

ning indeed
along tne line it was to perpetrate |
upon @ fashion
modern version of a golden fleece.

the smoothly beautiful material
» full impact of which will be-

women’s trade, i
aces the modelled perfection of

or a striking departure

li eventually find that this ma- |
ial had a very smiple begin-
although somewhere |

happy public, the |

smoke, of their torment which
ascended, can be compared to
nothing earthly. One of the
Sparnards gave warning that
the consequence would be
many deaths; this prediction
was fearfully verified, for the
next morning fifty-four crush

ea and mangled corpses wert

STO



brought to the gangway and
thrown overboard, Some were |
emaciated from disease, many |
bruised and

strangled, their hands. stil.
grasping each other's throats,”
(2) . |
Captain Richard Drake

one of the most famous or noto-

his

wat |
of slave smugglers, and in
autobiography there are}

our

some dismal accounts of the atro- |

et
tr
ac

zilian
staunch, handsome clipper craft
and deserved better maste
the first voyage out of Calabar,
we

fo

ade

rew
worst
the ship became half bediam and |

tics committed in this vile
Captain Drake gives an
count of a voyage on. the Bra-|
brig Gloria»—‘She was a

s. On



had not been out a week be-
I found that the Captain and
were desperadoes of the
kind. Onee off the coast

re



half brothel, Ruiz, our captain

ind his two mates set an example
of reckless wickedness. They
stripped themselves and danced |
with black wenches while our}
crazy mulatto cook played the;
fiddle. There was little attempt}
at discipline and rum and lewd- }
ness reigned supreme,” This was |
above the decks; below the slaves
were ‘packed like herrings on|
shelves around the vessel’s sides,’ |
being kept in by gratings over |
the hatches The groans and |
shnieks of the half-suffocated |
slaves below could be heard by

those enjoying themselves én
deck, Drake continues—On the

eighth day out I made my rounds |

|
of the half deck, holding a cam |
phor

bag in my teeth, for the

tench was hideous. The sick and

dying



were chained together,
On Page 10

l





bloody. Antoine |
tells me that some were founc |

|
(

SOLE AGENTS



Kou to mike a

Miferrnce lo

IF YOU HAD all the time in the
world, you could make elaborate
sauces to serve with fish. But it
is far simpler and more economi-
cal fish by
adding Lea & Perrins Sauce as you
cook.

to make delicious

You only need to use two
teaspoonfuls of Lea & Perrins in
fish-cakes, fish-pies and poached
fishforfour people. And, ofcourse,
put the bottle of Lea & Perrins
on the table whenever you serve

fried, baked or grilled fish.

ON

BRINGS
QUICK
RELIEF
FROM

PAGE NINE

i ss lasiieaatemeeeabelenmenenieeteiealingte



WHY DOES LEA & PERRINS
MAKE SUCH A DIFFERENCE ?

THE secret of the difference in
flavour is in the recipe, which
has been Lea & Perrins’ alone
for No
give the

over 100 years. other

Worcester Sauce can

Lea & Perrins flavour.

LEA & PERRINS
he eriginal and genuine
WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE



é





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PAGE TEN



Dramas Behind The Law Is He This Year’s

Hy IAN GALE

CASES THAT CHANGED THE & Woman who accused him of
LAW By H. Montgomery Hyde robbing her of some jewellery by
(Heinemann 12/6). a confidence trick. The woman
Lawyer and layman alike will s#id that Beck had invited hey

enjoy reading this book which, as to go to the Riviera with him on

the title says, is about famous . ere trip ane bas ve her
cases which helped to change the 4St of the smart clothes she would
law of England. Tt is by no means need, On the list was included

a dull pedantic book, in fact the 4 ‘iding habit. When she asked

faint hearted are advised to read Why this was needed since she

it before sunset. had understood it was a yachting

The cages described range from ‘1p, Beck, she alleged, had replied

the years 1728 to 1931 and collec- 4irily that “when we landed He

ively they involve the setting in had always his own horses there.”
motion of the machinery of the He then gave her a cheque for
law with varying and usually £40 to pay for the clothes and
dramatic results. And like so muny *0OK one of her watehes to be
legal drams, each one abound; mended and a ring to be enlarged.
in human. interest, Needless to say, the cheque
The author, who is a barrister, 2©unced.
historian and Member of Parlia- Beck was tried, convicted and
ment, deal§>first with the extra- Sentenced to seven years penal
ordinary casg¢ of Burke and Hare. servitude, although he protested

For a yearfefore they were dis- ‘hat he had never geen the woman

covered these gentlemen lived by before in his life. But the evi-

selling for dissection the corpses “ence was all against him, Ten
of the unfortunates they had ther women were brought to see
killed. Indeed a new name fcr Beck and testified that he had
murder “burked” was coined as , SWindled them as well and the
result of their activities. handwriting expert gave it as his
At the trial Hare turned King . Opimion that Beck’s handwriting
evidence and Burke was sentence;! W8S the same as that of one “John
to hang. His-execution took place Smith’ who had been sentenced to
in 1829 before an estimated crowd VE years penal servitude some
of over’20,000 who shouted as thy Years before for “bilking” women.
rope was being adjusted around © Most unfortunate for Beck at
his neck, “Burke him! Burke this trial was the judge’s refusal
him!” to allow the defence to cross-

The case was important in thai ©xamine on the question whether

it caused the passing of the the prisoner was or was not the

Anatomy: Act in 1832, which au- same man as “John Smith,”

thorised rélitives who had the justifying his ruling on the ground

custody of a dead body to alloy that it might mislead the jury and
it to be sent to a medical schoo! it might afterwards be said that
so that it might be used for the the prisoner had been improper!,
study of anatomy and the pra:- convicted. Had the Court of
tice of surgieal operations, Criminal appeal been in existence

Perhaps the most pitiful case dv- at that time there is no doubt

seribed in the book is that of that this ruling would have been

Adolf Beck; This pooy man wos held to be bad in law and thej

accosted in the street one day !y trial squashed,





ge

America’s

WHO WILL SHE BE? By FREDERICK COOK

NEW YORK 0-acre farm high up on Indian
TO all Americans she is “Tic Mill overlooking the city of Cin-
First Lady.” Her official standing chee.
is nil. But the President’s wife arried 38 years and the
takes precedence over all other mother of four sons, Martha Taft
women in. all things American, 24mits only one dispute with her
and is always a person of conse. [Usband—about bulbs. “He likes
quence, them in rows,” she said, “And [|
If she ig a great person in he: ‘ike clumps. We have clumps.”
own right, like Eleanor Roosevelt, If her husband goes to the White
she may rival her husband in the House there will be changes in
public esteem—and get her shar Caf, Ear sens as well as in the
of the brickbats that go his wey, C@Pinet. The Trumans’ bulbs are
If she is the retiring, home. '" TOWS. |
loving type, like Bess Truma Divorce Question
her influenee is still strong. On the other side of the politi-



First Lad

Any wayfyou look at her, the cal fence everybody in America
First Ladyets first in importance, Knows N ancy Kefauver by now.
rs. But who knows Mrs, Ernest Ives’

\Who will@he he, by the ‘ime next Mrs, Ives is the only sister of

January cOfmes around? She coult 52-year-old = Illinois ~ Governor
be any one of half a dozen wo- Adlai Stevenson. If the Demo-
men—some. world-femous, like ¢ratic choice should fall on him—-
smiling Mamie Eisenhower; some ®Dd many in the Truman party
aearing fame’s pinnacle, like red» profess confidence that he would
haired Naney Ketauver with the ‘Win if it does—sudden fame will
twinklingeyes and the long come to Mrs. Ives. For Governor
pendant owtnes. Or she could be Stevenson is divoreed, and if he
someone almost unknown outside Were elected the duties of First
her family cirele Lady would fall on his sister.
There is, for Instanee, motherly Mrs, Ives is a friendly, brown-

Martha Taft, : oman of fame eved woman in the middle fifties

sid universally loved in her home ow living the quiet life of a to-

town, hol and noky Cinetnnati, bacco farmer’s wife in North

Ohio Fe / Carolina, Her husband is a re-
Mrs. Taft has been her hus- tired civil servant.

ban solace and support through- The Fox-Hunter

out | wult Hfe, But she h Stevenson would be the first

taken little part in his rough-and- divorced President.

turnble eanrpaigning against Gen- As a young fox-hunting Chica-

eral. Risénhower, fo

y f talit e was married in
1go she spffered a stroke gnc ior 19:





to attractive Ellen Borden, Some = Blt From Page 9
; ' H Pope-Hunt 42- ;
a while te near death. heiress to a milk and cheese for- van iier ails ee a oo saw pregnant women give birth
She Walks Again rhey Ww hree sons: yoker, has been for to babies whiled chained to!
Now, “with the ald of ‘ 1, Borden, 19 (beth at thypoe yours programe corpses which our drunken over-
braces on her legs, she ig able to Harvard), and John 15, stil! in director of Hongkong’s com- seers had not removed.” He re-
vali again—slowly, But she can prep school. The marriage ended mercial radio station lates that the young women
do no travelling and hes fieured after 21 years, She is in London tor six feared best at first, as they were
in none of her husband’s mect- Friends of Mrs, Stevenson said weeks to watch the BBC's

she disapproved of her husband
entering polities,

Brown-eyed, gentle. attractive Mrs, Stevenson herself says: “I
in a motherly way, martha Taft don’t see why there should Be any

ings. ”

was the most envied girl of her feeling against a divorced man in

time when she first met Bob Ta't. the White House. Divoree is a
In those days, he was a sort of soeially accepted factor in Ameri-

American Prince of Wales, the can life.” .

gallant college-boy son of the Agreeing that the White House
President, living in the aura of Atmosphere might not be best
White House publicity. a) for their three sons, she said: “I
Martha's father was Solicitoy- don't agree with the many who
general. Every newspaper in have apparently concluded this
America reported the develon- is the main Issue in my former
ment of the romance husband’s lack of enthusiasm for
On The Farm the nominaticn The boys would
She is 59 now. And her pun- be with me most of the time any-
gent wit and penetrating political way.”
commentary are famous at Cin- When Mrs. Stevenson was
einnati and on the national staye granted a decree, custody of the
in Washington. children was divided equally by
Like her husband, she has their patients. The boys live with
never dodged a fight. their mother. L.E.S.
She is living now on the Tafts’ (WoRLD COPYRIHGT RESERVED)

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

ee

Beck served five years of ie N ”?
sentence before being rek '
cross eo Sane seeet Num ber One Escort:
and had been trying to clear = :
name, the type of forgeries barter +t elease of Amevic
which he had been convieted be- By business a oe. Vageler fo
gan to occur again, Beck soon 2 HAR! ; st ican:
found himself in court again. A EPRRAIM CASTLE Ge awe _ es See
woman claimed that he had
swindled her out of some jewel- said y society hostess to me last Western Germany. He replied
jery and he was convicted a see- week. She was sreterr to 26- “That is not untrue.’ 7
ond time for offences of which he year-old Charles Arthu

: He revealed that the Coni-
was absolutely innocent. Hardy, Ww rated this seasen® junists would now - the estate
Y : Ne. | Escort for fantes. = = crown—but for a miscalculation
The judge, however was not en- A tall, faix, good- Aus-

tirely satisfied with the case and tralian, Hardy is no newcomer to
decided to postpone sentence until “deb” i He has “done «4
the next sessions. In the mean- season” in Paris, New ¥ "

time the real “John Smith” was ence, Rome, Stockholm, :
arrested and Beck received a free F ; tl

Pardon and £4,000 compensetion. Taciticn are the best- ie ‘ n
He did not live long enough : world. ¥
afterwards, however, to eee the cyesed ia the he sags

ia

\ ‘Italians are the most beautiful OF TREASURES.
great change in the law and Americans the most chic. He 3
was the direct outcome of his (req stralian debu is one the world’s riches
unfortunate trials. This was i ae

the With more personality than the men: ail multimillionaire Pau
creation in 1907 of the Court of Ss

Criminal Appeal, which is em- =W®#es- At Santa Monica (California)
powered to review any a
of law or fact in any ¢
matter brought before it as well Of poise, although we ave nat
as to increase or reduce sentences 50 attractive to a ' meviy owned by the
passed by any lower court. Hardy's of tante Oo! tugal, fetched 225,000
Some of the other cases dealt the year: “The corn is shared be- jbout £976,000) in 19)
with in this book are those of the tween Caroline Kirkwood and Britain, last year, he paic
“Flowery Land” pirates which led Caroline Child-Villiers,” be be- ¢86.000 for ‘a piece of ‘sculpture
to the abolition of public execu- lieves.
tions and that of W. T. Stead . * ~
whose exertions — including his

* * *

treasure-stacked

What does being a popular es- several books.

own trial and imprisonment on a cort entail? Hardy, personal as-~ et this mild-mannered mar
change of abduction—led to the sistant to a London restaurateur, |iy

passing of the Criminal Law muses: “I average about five hours with one or two

“age of consent” for girls from day to prepare for the evening he
thirteen to sixteen and alse in- round.
creased the penalties for those

*
who procure young women and TORY OF A KIN

dcirls for prostityHen. LORD KEYES, 33-year-old son
These are among the dramas oy ‘Lorg Keyes of

his own meals.
* *

ALE

the Law, dramas that came (4), on
straight from life itself and helped, ae § ee as ne
each in its own way, to ehange ex-King I ld of the -) 's Ledge’ was
nd improve the law of England. B , en tx bought by

100,000-word War, likely to fetch?
of Buide, of eourse, is that Rank’
Druid’

ne men on

king, the book will tell a story,
says Lord Keyes, “very different
from a? aaa to Warren House, Newmarket
a small cafe Trygve Lie, Secre-
tary General of U.N.O., Russia’: horses.

Jacob Malik, and America’s E.C.A. Another big
representative Milton Katz were question: What
having lunch,

mouthful o sendwich, “is we" to ride the Beckhampton horses.
cow’s eandidate for the <
lee DAUNTED

elections?

(Meaning of course which can- AT Lambeth Palace, the Arch-
didate would give Moscow's bishop of Canterbury, Dr. Fisher,
schemes most chance of flourish- had a guest—Bishop T. A. Scott
ish.ng.) Dr. Fisher asked him: “When

ae came the answer: Taft, would you like your bath?”
of course,” His guest hesitated, stammered,

HIDDEN CROWN and then declined the offer. Noi

OVER dinner with Archduke yntil much later did the Primate
Otto, son of the last Emperor of jearn the reason.

Austria and King of Hungary, ! On his last visit to Lambeth the
have just heard the latest news bishop's bath consisted of a tin
in the faseinating histery of the: bath and a can of water.

Holy Crown of St, Stephen.

Since it was handed to thc
Americans at the war’s end this
1,000-year.

‘The one z.
few who kmow its where: ta, }
calls it ‘a tremendously powertu! |
weapon in the cold war.” |

It has a great and mystical in-
fluence over the Hungarians, |’ ,
would immensely strengthen the
Communists’ prestige if they
eculd obtain it.

Two years ago they wanted t)

“Slavery”



MRS. POPE-HUNT

Woman is radio boss
4\NGLIBH-BORN Mrs Pris-



permitted on deck so that they
programme techniques. Later could be companions for the ¢a-
she nies to New York for six rous. crew, but after they had
week: By
The Hongkong station goes wo . foe re ee Ry |
on the air for seventeen hours the lusts of the negro. could }
a day, with programmes in be ned. He eine. “the
Favourites’ “with |" Chinese quarreling and bestiality that
steners @ > storvtelle followed was sickening, They
listeners are the storytellers. dope and gnawed each other i
Talking for an hour fights over the rum rations which
These are usually Chinese our captain ordered, and for

film actors, They have scripts, f |
but barely use them, can talk Wwenehes.” a the miserable

spontaneously for more than



ot Peta
HE is am asset to any party, I suggested the crown was in

A few before the Ameri- ™@de by the “Welby Bicycle Com-
vane te return it to Hun- Pany, Ltd.” — might just as weil
6a,

archduke, the firs y
1 pur, took made in Japan.
So Americans te the The same goes for a club spec-
a or
Britain this sum- the radiant, exported from Japa»

French gitls? “They have lots whee he lives on a ranch, he has ciation Guide which has now

He is an expert on eighteenth- . s
century furniture and has written _ The book is

es simply. He frequently travels MUSENBIAORS Which TAG SIE F gov:
; : > suitcases. and jt jays Japan's cycle war cards
Amendment Act, which raised the sleep a night.” And he swims each washes his own shirts. Sometimes y cycle war cards

lives in a caravan. cooking

FOR S ¥
} 00 worth of machines and com-
HOW much is the Beckhamp- ? .
rucee, is; ton Facing stable, which is being POM@MES, ip still working (0. the | ) wenn ———
deseribed in Cases that changed joaring the end of a “most ex- S°ld by whisky magnate ae shortage. But the manufacturers

recently ©5¢; and ape indignant about their
tractor distributor “#0°ts to cash im on British cycle
. makers’ prestige.
ments from his father and the J#¢k Olding for around £150,000.

Noe] Murless, who trains for Cycle ang Motor-cycle Manu
the Queen and Mr. Dewar at eee - syGe v
Beckhampton, moves next season

where Fred Armstrong used to came over to our cycle show we
It was October in Paris. In train the Maharajah of Baroda’s had a long talk with them

Beckhampton @Ven offering
will happen to “Raleigh-type” and “B.S.A.-type”
Gordon Richards? For he has —With the “type” printed very
“Who.” asked Lie, munching a long drawn g handsome retainer Small indeed.



3 SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1952
aos Os Oe nite

“Tricks In Trade” |
May Succeed...

For A Time I
cmos 1 4m Faris

The Japanese are using Eng-
lish-sounding names and the
reputation that goes with them
to menance the British cycle
market in South-East Asia.

The Indian clerk or Malayan
worker who chooses 4
_ cycle because it is a “Welby’-



1

London

New York...




{ buy a mistsuboshico, for both are women are

buying perfume
ial. It is just as Japanese as yama- - * '
guchi.

this new way
There is also the champ =

INEXPENSIVE HANDBAG PHIALS
OF A COSTLY PERFUME

t with machines named Fuju and
| Shiragiku.

All these names are in the 1952 pa ; a ,
, Japanese Bicycle Industry Asso Taste Hpi tne petene ener aes aes ey
cos! so e he ic y
private mu- reached London. The 84 Japanese the same as that in Goya's world-famous opsily lagttien--
seum. One of his tapestries, for- cycle industry trade marks print- there is simply less of it. -These phials were introduced by
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SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1952



Certificate For
Sayes Court Co-ops

THE SAYES COURT
Marketing Society Limited
be presented its Certificate
operative Societies Act.

Co-operative Producers’ and
became the fourth Society to
of Registration under the Co-

At a well attended function at

the Sayes Court Agricultural Station, Christ Church, on
Thursday night last, Mr. C. A. E. Beckles, Co-operative
Officer, made the presentation to Mr. G. A. Warner, Presi-

dent of the Society.

The three other Societies regis-
tered under the Co-operative So-
cieties Act are St. Barnabas Co-
operative Marketing, Welchman
Hall Co-operative Marketing and
Leeward Co-operative Saving So-
ciety.

The function was presided over
by Prof. J. S. Dash, former Direc-
tor of Agriculture of British
Guiana, who was introduced to
the gathering by the President,

Among the large audience who
witmessed the presentation were
Mr. H. G. Bayne, Assistant Mas-
ter, Boys’ Foundation School,
Messrs. W. H. Watson, Clement
Knight, V. Scantlebury, E. Harper,
Fitz A. Niles, Whitfield Watson,
P, E. Ellis, and other representa-
tives of the Welchman Hall Co-
operative Marketing Society,
Messrs. W. Headley, Jarvis and
Burrowes of the Shamrock Co-
operative Credit Society and Mr.
Louis Talma, Peasant Agricultural
Instructor, in charge of Sayes
Court Agricultural Station.

Many of the representatives of
other Co-operative Societies joined
in congratulating the Sayes Court
Society on its achievements, as
shown in the Secretary’s Report.
What was most striking to mem-
bers of the Welchman Hall Society
was the success achieved by Sayes
Court in bulk purchasing of arti-
ficial fertilizers which were re-

tailed to members on a_ strictly
cash basis.
The Co-operative Officer ex-

pressed regret for the absence of
the Registrar of Co-operative So-
cieties, Mr. C. C, Skeete, who, he
said, was indisposed, but had
asked him (Mr. Beckles) to as-
sure the Saves Court Society that
he was watching their progress
with interest and offered them his
sincere congratulations on becom-
ing registered.

Mr. Beckles reminded those
present that the Co-operators’ Day
celebration, being sponsored this
year by the Shamrock Co-operf
tive Credit Society, would take
place at 3 p.m. on Saturday, 19th
July in the Steel Shed at Queen’s
Park. One of the features of the
celebration would be an address
by Mr. D, A. Wiles, Assistant Co-
lonial Secretary, and all were cor-
dially invited to attend.

In presenting the Certificate of
Registration to the President, on
behalf of the Society, he enjoined
the Society to let their watch-
words be loyalty, perseverance,
self-help, mutual help and mu-
tual trust and confidence.

The Chairman, in his remarks,
referred to his experiences with
similar societies in British Guiana.
He made some interesting obser-
vations on the by-laws of the
Society and urged members to
build up their resources and ex-
panda their activities so that even-
tually they would be able to
market co-operatively mot only
their canes, but other produce as
well. Prof. Dash assured mem-
bers that he would be watching
their Society with great interest
and that they were free to call
on him any time for such assist-
ance as he was able to give them.

Mr. J.C. King, Treasurer of the
Society, moved a vote of thanks
to the Chairman for so ably pre-
siding over the function, the re-
presentatives of other Co-opera-
tive Societies and other visitors
for their attendance and words of
encouragement, the Co-operative
Officer for his enthusiastic and un-
stinting support of the Society
and Mr, Talma who had from the
inception of the Society proved
himself their most dependable
guide and friend.

Secretary’s Report

Mr. Lincoln Callendar, Secre-
tary, presented his report, as fol-
lows: —

It is now my pleasant duty to
present to you a brief report on

‘the activities of the Sayes Court

Co-operative Producers’ & Mar-
keting Society Limited, from the
time this organisation came into
being up to the present.
Cn the occasion of the
Peasant Farmers’ Day held
Sayes Couct in 1948, the then
Co-Operative Officer, Mr. Cave,
gave a talk on Co-operatives, Mr,
Talma, the Extension Officer of
this area, whom I can venture to

first
at

| ae tc aly

oe

OPO OCOFONSS

9

PPLE FFF GPSS GIDL OTT

636564, 66206

describe as the peasants’ guide,
philosopher and friend, ‘at once
took “time by the forelock” and
made contact with the key men
in agriculture in this area. He
invited these, and others who he
considered would be interested;
to a meeting at the farm, and put
to them the benefits of his ex-
perience in various co-operative
organisations. Mr. Cave was soon
after invited to one of these
meetings, and in a brief talk fol-
lowed by suitable answers to the
many questions asked, outlined
the working of such a co-opera-
tive society.

Like most new ventures in this
colony, the idea caught on, and
so enthusiastic were those who
attend these preliminary meetings
that they at once put their hands
into their pockets and from their
slender purses subscribed money
for the purchase of books and
other necessary equipment for the
working of the organisation. Be-
fore this, however, those who were
Present selected whom they con-
sidered the men to guide and to
foster this new venture. Here I
may mention the name of one
who has since been gathered to
his fathers, Mr, E. W. Alleyne.
He was our first Secretary. By
his déath our organisation lost
the services of an old and ex-
perienced agriculturist.

The numerical strength of the
Society in the early days was
about 55. Our numbers have
been somewhat reduced, mainly
owing to the fact that some of
these early members did not have
the right attitude towards co-
operation. To date we have 43
active members on roll.

I am confident that now we
are registered and are under the
guidance of the Director of Agri-
culture as Registrar of Co-oper-
atives, and the able, enthusiastic
and zealous Co-operative Officer
in the person of Mr. Beckles,
that we will most surely go from
strength to strength. I do not
think it will be amiss if I state
that Mr. Beckles has given valu-
able assistance in the interpreta-
tion of the Act and By-laws and
has not spared himself in visiting
us regularly on meeting nights
as well as during the time we
were closing our books prior to
registration.

Ts indicated in the name of the
Society, our chief function is to
stimulate increased production of
such crops as are grown by mem-
bers and to provide means for
co-operative marketing of such
produce as the Society can conve-
niently handle co-operatively.

One of the major activities of
the Society is supplying the chem-
ical fertiliser requirements of ita
members, These fertilisers are
purchased in bulk by the Society
and sold to the members for cash,
To facilitate strict cash payments,
the Society encourages members
to make savings deposits with the
Society, in addition to their share
deposits, These savings deposits,
unlike the share capital, can be
withdrawn at any time. In fixing
the price of the manures to mem-
bers allowances are made for
transportation and other charges,
any surplus remaining at the end
of the trading period being return-

ed to members as_ patronage
refunds.
During the period 1949—5l,

that is for the last three years, 49
tons, 7 ewt. of fertilisers at a cost
of $5,324.00 was purchased by the
Society and sold to members. It
was decided at the last annual
general meeting on the advice of
the Co-operative Officer that the
small surplus made on_ these
transactions should be carried
towards the Society's Reserve
Fund.

Another important activity of
the Society this year has been co-
operative marketing of its mem-
bers’ canes. Through these efforts
the Society has succeeded in
delivering to the factory well over
the 500-ton minimum required
for the payment of the extra price
allowed unger the terms of the
Domestic Sugar Agreement,

On page 16.

POPOSESSSPSPP OOF PEOPLE LOPS

Seout Notes
CUB RALLY

We'll do our best! On Saturday
afternoon 2lst June, the Cub
Packs of the St. Michael-Soutn
Sub-area held a Rally around the
margin of the Bay at Gravesend
and invited the other Packs in St.
Michael to join them. 80 Cubs
with their Akelas turned up and
thoroughly enjoyed the afternoon.

With the Assistant Commis-
sioner, Capt. R. A. Sealy, on the
Council Rock, the cubs ran in from
North, South, East and West
(their four corners) to form a
circle and give the Grand Howl.

This done they returned to their
corners and played games chang-
ing to a new corner every fifteen
minutes. After one hour, light
refreshments were provided
Needless to say these were in-
deed welcome. It was not all play
for the next item was an obser-
vation walk.

The Akelas were given cards 57
which were instructions as io
what was required, e.g. name the
trees in the area, bring in a white
erab alive and unhurt, a snail,
collect material in the ramble to
make an animal.

The boys as was to be expected
enjoyed the next item to the full
It was singing. Then followed
the Story, a Grand Howl and
Taps. The sun was new setting
across the bay and each Cub re-
luctant!y bade the other Dyb,
Dyb, Dyb, as they turned away
from the scene which had been
their Jungle for that afternoon.

FIRST TROOP CAMP

The Lodge School Troop had
their first Camp at Codrington
College over the week-end. (Fri-
day 27th — Sunday 29th June).
There were three Patrols in camp.
In spite of some heavy rain which
caused some of the tents to leak
the boys enjoyed themselves, The
Camp was in charge of Scout-
master Alec J. Tatnall and w
visited by Assistant Scoutmaster
Kenneth Pile of the Bethe] Troop
who assisted in testing boys for
the 2nd Class Badge. Two boys
completed |their tests in camp
and this brings the total number
of 2nd Class Scouts in the Troop
new to five.
LIAISON COMMISSIONER

ARRIVES

from Canada on

morning last on his
stop-over flight was Squadron
Leader W. R. (Bill) Ramsay,
Navigator of Trans Canada A
lines, and Liaison Scout Commis-
sioner between Canada, Imperial
Sccut H. Q. in London and Bar-
bados. Bill took part in the
monthly Scout Radio programme
over Re-diffusion Service on Fri-
day night last in a discussion with
Aubrey Douglas-Smith, Commis-
sioner for the Southern Scout Area
in Barbados and Charles Spring-
er, Assistant Commissioner for
Training. He will attend the
week - end Foundation Scouters
Training Course which is being
conducted by the Asst. Commis-
sioner for Training at Codring-
ten College over this week-end.
The Course is being conducted for
Scouters of the Southern Area
and it is planneq to run similer
courses for the Northern and Mid-
land Areas,

NEW ISSUE OF P.O.R.

A new issue of P.O.R. (Policy,
Organisation & Rules) has been
received. It is hoped to send a
copy to each Group during the
week,

COMMISSIONERS PAY
VISIT TO TROOP

Area Commissioner A, E, Doug-
las-Smith and Assistant Commis-
sioner Capt. R. A. Sealy visited
St. Patrick’s R.C. Troop at their
Headquarters, Jemmotts Lane, 04
‘Thursday evening last. There was
an inter-patrol competition in
progress and everybody seemed
to be busily engaged in some
activity. Five Scouts were pre-
sented with Badges recently pa
ed, they are: Master Swimmers:-
Errol Hyson, John Griffith and
Lance King. Swimmers: Rudolph
Winston and John Joseph. Four
recruits were invested the same
afternoon.

BETHEL TROOP

Congratulations to Patro] Lead-
er Carl Ince who hag recently
passed his Reader’s Badge. Carl
will receive his Badge in the near
future. Capt. Sealy will be visit-
ing this Troop on Wednesday
next.

ROVER MEETING

There will be a meeting of all
Rover Scout Leaders at Scout
Headquarters at 7.45 P.M. on

POPOL ED ALPE PPP





Arriving
Thursday







PROTECTED BY THE MAKERS OF

PPS

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Jamaica Wins
440 Yds Relay
Empire Record

From Our Own Co dent



pe

LONDON, July, 5.

Not only a huge crowd in the
hot sunshine at we White City
this afternoon got excited during
the Jamaican Olympic team’s
superb and successful crack at
the Empire record for the 440
yards relay. Herb McKenley got
excited too and showed it. After
making his own fine contribution
of 47.6 secs. in the third leg of
the event, he ran back the track-
side to spur his team - mate
Rhoden on for the last 50 yards
of the magnificent final leg of the
run of 46.8 secs.

Despite a fairly strong wind the
Jamaican four lopped 4 secs off

Great Britain who held the re-
cord for the event. The Jamai-
time was three mins. 13.2



. just 3.8 secs. off the world
record and it keeps the Jamaicans
top favourites for the Olympic
relay

This race in which the Jamai-
cans whacked the English and
Pakistan entrants climaxed for a
loudly cheering crowd the Jamai-
can trackmen’s dominance in
various events. MacDonald Bailey
was there too, but confined him-
self to helping England in the

triangular British tournament,
winning the hundred metres in
10.6 secs., leading a!l the way.

First the Jamaica Olympic
Men's triumphs came in two in-
vitation 300 yards races. Rhoden
beat Arthur Wint by yards in

a 30.4 secs victory in the first and

McKenley won the second, but
five seconds outside of his own
British record of 30.3 for the
event.

Leslie Laing added to the
Jamaicans’ honours with a 10.8
secs, win in an invitation 100
metres from the British runner

Shenton after a desperate finish.
The island’s sole woman entrant

K. Leslie, also ran in the 100
metres against such runners as
the Australian wonder girl M
Jackson who won in 11.7 sees
Russel is happier in the high jump
with » fourth place jump of 4
feet 10 inches against 5 feet 4
inches of the British gir) winner
Lerwill.



Annual Missionary
Meeting

The Annual Missionary Meet-
ing of the James Street Methodist
Church will be held on Monday
night at 7.30 p.m. This Meeting
is one of the outstanding events
of the Church’s year, This year,
His Excellency the Governor has
kindly consented to take the
Chair at the Meeting. The speaker
for the evening is Rev. John A.
varker of Grenada, This is the
first occasion on which Mr.
Parker has come to take services
jn the island of Barbados, Others
taking part in the programme will
be the Revd's. Lawrence, Grosse,
Furley and Towers, A special
anthem will be rendered during
the course of the Meeting by the
Church choir.

There are many people of the
community of this island who in
one way or another have bene-
fited from the ministrations of
the Methodist Church as a whole
and of James Street in particular.
It would be a source of pleasure
to the Church officers to have you
join in this Missionary Meeting.
On this occasion thanks are given
to Almighty God for the work and
witness of Methodism both !n
this colony and in the many parts
of the world where Methodism is
at work. The Methodist Church tn
Barbados rejoices that it is part
of a family numbering over forty

millions, fellow Methodists in
ninety-seven different countries of
the world. Two hundred and
fourteen years ago God warmed
the heart of John Wesley and
from the experience of that
warmed heart has grown this

world-wide family of Methodism.
At this Missionary Meeting on
Monday, Methodists and_ their
friends will gather to thank God
for what He has done in and
through Methodism,

To this meeting a cordial invi-
tation is given to all people of the
colony who share with Methodists
temhope of the salvation of man-
kind.



Saturday, 12th July, to discuss the
1.H.Q. Report on the suggested
fusion of the Rover and Senior
Scout Sections.

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EDUCATION NOTES:



PAGE ELEVEN





Inexcusable Delay To keep that special

WHEN I FIRST RAISED THE POINT as to the neces
sity for compulsory education as a background to any
changes introduced in the educational system in this island,

I was told that even if the expense could be afforded there

was insufficient accommoda

I am, and several others will be,
at a loss to understand why it is
that the new Secondary School at
Richmond began by Mr. Crowe
in 1949 and finished by the Colo-
nial Engineer in 1950 has not yet
been opened. The School is fin-
ished and equipped and I am yet
.o hear any sound reason why
of the pupils now over-
crowding other schools have not
been admitted.

Another matter which puzzles
me is the fact that the Education
Authorities allowed the Church
Village School to be closed with-
out telling the public why there
was no alternative except to hud-

some



tion in the schools.

SEA AND AIR
TRAFFIC

In Carlisle Bay

Blue Star,
Willemstad,
Franklyn







iV

D ale
M.V

MV

Daerwood
Caribbee Seh





D-R., Sch. Rosarene, Sch
dle the pupils into the Carring- y Orie, Sch. island ater, Sch. Timothy
, ST aoe oo) 5. fan Shoyuman Seh Inited Pilgrim
ton's Village School. Probably sch. Marion Bolle Wolfe, Sch. Rainbow
this school was not overcrowded. M. s,s. Dobin Marsono, ss Hersilia
But here is the point When 5.5. Lady Nelson, Sch. Triumphant Star
the school roll had 20,000 children
there were 126 Elementary Seawell
Schools. Now that there are
26,000 children there are 124 _.ON FRIDAY
schools with another new one Prem oie 7A EA
closed and excuses being offered C. Nurse, D. Blackett, C. Hutchinsor
that there is overcrowding and H. Arnell, M. Purcell, W. Laoyd Jone
lack of accommodation. This con- aba C. Francis, J. Hoffmann, 1
stitutes an indictment against de- From JAMAICA
partmental administration Carney Barrow, Daphne Pilgrin
A public ceremony at the open- James Williams
to eat ; = From PUERTO RICO
ing of this school would have af- “‘Mary Wiikie, Susan Wilkie, Gloria
forded an excellent opportunity Pompey, Florence Seales, Lione! Wil
for the Director of Edueation to liams, Mildred Seales, Rev. J. Da Costa
} > . sathing ,» Harewood, Gerahmie Baingham, Pear!
Mt the oo ; teas kod the Howard, Ernest Corbin, Jean Paviluk
uture of elementary education in por ANTIGUA
this island and what was being <£ifreda Wheatley, Arthur Greave
done to meet the demands of the Neliie Dougla
changing times, Then the public
would have known that there was =
a hope even if not an attempt to 3 ne > BWVOCUTANOR
regrade the schools. This delay RATES OF EXCHANGE
in instituting necessary and fun- fin creat tls
damental changes and the secrecy Selling NEW YORK Wivine
about them even when they are 73 4/10% Pr. Cheques on
being done can be regarded as a Bankers 71 T/10% Pr
misdirection of policy. It is little Sight K oe ee kale
use to be secretive about changes 73 4,10% pr cable ’
to the extent which makes the 7) 9/10% Pr. Currency 70 210% Pr
very people whom they are in- ote Coupons 69 5/10 % Pr
tended to benefit suspicious about 50% ? Silver 20% Pr
And it is stupid to fail t ae
them, And it is stup 0 fail to 9 3/10% Pr. Cheques on
gauge the reaction of the same Bankers 78 5/10% Pr
. se che 5 ° Demand Drafts 74.35 5 Pr
people to those changes, m 78.3 ty
What seems to have happened 46 '4){6¢¢ ‘br cae mrrarts 18 W108 FF
is that the Education Department 7 6/10% Pr. Currency Pr
responsible for the administration Coupons 6 3/W% Pr
50% Pr Silver 20% Pr

of the system has been toying with
pet ideas of intelligence tests and
age-grouping instead of getting on
with the essentials. Thousands of
dollars have been wasted in the
printing of cards which must be
filled out and filed and a teacher
from each school is taken away
from his job of teaching pupils to
carry out tests which prove little
except that the standard of edu-
cation has declined, And then the
blame is laid on the teacher, His



primary job is to teach and then] ancient science to

the statistician can toy around
with his figures.

I repeat that much of the two
million dollars spent on education

is wasted in this card index Sys—] predictions and
tem. And it is going to be rather] the sound practi-
for anybody to justify} ca! advice con-

difficult
87% of the total education vote
being spent on salaries ete.

The parents are the people to} lation, Finances,
prétest against the waste of their} Love -

children’s best years and the tax-
payers (parents or not) against
this misspending of funds,
is a serious thing to say but I hope

that some member of the House] George

will ask by way of an address for

an enquiry. It might then be
proved whether I am right or
wrongs

that parents will stage a public
meeting and pass a resolution ask-
ing the Governor to institute such
an enquiry into the administration
of the system,

There is precedent for such ac- fond other interesting literature

tion, When it was realised that
Queen's College had outgrown its
home and that this should be ex-
tended or the College removed
I remember that a number of pa-
remts led by Hon, H. A. Cuke met
at the Carnegie Hall and protested
against the treatment meted out
to, Queen's College. The result
was that Combermere was_ given

amjew home and Queen’s College

given the old Combermere School,

A protest meeting might be held
to speed up the opening of the
ew Secondary School and I hope
it will be done to get a commis-
ion of enquiry appointed,

With regard to the School it-
self I shall have something to say
later because I hope that some-
thing will be done to correct a
Wrong impression, Some parents
are of the opinion that this new
school is of the Secondary type

known in this island and where}

pupils are trained up to School
Certificate standard as is done at
Combermere and St. Michael's
Girls. It would be dangerous to
allow them to continue in_ this
belief. J.E.B.

This | educated

OSSEESOOS ESOS FOS SOFSSS
OF

COCO COOOL OOO

The Truth in
Your Horoscope

Would you like to know what the
Stars indicate for you? Would you like
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PAGE TWELVE SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1952



a a













SUNDAY ADVOCATE

ae eo RR me me ren

oa
The painstaking inquiry today submits its most startling evidence

CA N FA ITH HEA LF yét to the Pane! of Bishops |

THREE WARY MEN SEE A HEALER

¥ ‘Patients’ even by post |

* meen - :
One touch and the OW we come to the phenomenon of “absent healing” : healings
pain disappeared” where healer never meets patient, yet a cure is said to take





~~ ST i aa





if you feel worn out, depressed, or
generally run down a giass or two a day of
Buckfast Tonic Wine will quickly restore lost
energy and tone up the whole nervous system.
Giving new vitality it fortifies you against fever
and exhaustion and remember, Buckfast Tonic
Wine is especially valuable after illness.



For the past two years Mr. Grisewood has
which gave

place. Said to? Is there much doubt, then? It is hard for the
«6 DO not know what the power is most determined sceptic to disdain the evidence presented in
Le: Harry Edwards transmits.” said thousands of testimonials seen by Daily Express investigators.
radio compére Freddie Grisewood Seores of such letters arrive each week at The Sanctuary, Burrows Lea '
yesterday, “but results are extraordinary. Shere, Surrey, addressed to Mr Harty Edwards

Mr, Edwards is one of the most widely known spiritual healers—" not “faith ne

please in the world His tuiging matibag confirms that his unseen “ patients”
tter. 1 looked at a selectior.

Buch week 9.000 letters urrive , aa

suffered from osteo-arthritis him
and hip.

sli torms of norma) medical



great pain in the leg
He sought reliet oy







“The whole horizon of my
Ee has been changed—wonder-
iy brightened—by this affair.
“Now this has happened to
po—and not to someone else—
cannot deny the obvious
ts any longer. I have been
lutely staggered bv |) all.”

“ How can 1 velieve otherwise?

They work by night because 't
T have had no medical waining

ig easier then to attain to that

THE INQUIRY CONTINUES

London Express Serv

| TONIC WINE
treatment. He was given r iy treatment at Droitwich at The Sanctuary Some con- | naye no or dae ol ot inner stillness which 1% | ON
but in the end his condition was unchanged. tain first requests tor Rawards's | istespathy. and vet ats touch | e83en iat to all healing |
4 serious Operation, to give him a new hip joint per a arcessian is t e word | 6+ my hands mbs and bones } There is no mumpo-jumbo a1 7 ies
was his only hope said the doctors he uses to describe his wark | «ad t ) Nritis | cit ubout They do n | ~ ae SS etal
pipes are trom distant pationia | iav ceen j pr as CRUTCRRDEES undet | ts eg i
: 2 sending in progress reports ; 4eanie SiAy dat nen 1 touch Stan’ tne wore .
With an open mind “Fhysiea! contact is quite } 1 h fee know there ane yuna }
Then he met an old iriend, an Anglican clergy- eek ne, ee ehermonta i mM side o o oh ae og 4 p' Lee ue = i bed
man, who sa¥ him hobbiiig painfully, and told him Yor’ tae i A . Be SD tien Gain Geaerioa se Seas in + possible
to ask the help of Harry Edwards i never see most of those wh 9) ations a3 a mass of vibrations | Mi Edwards never ps nse
“Tt rang Up and Pde 9) appoluliment witb healed through te” t cue a ey po s to i SPECIAL CASH OFFER FOR THIS WEEK
ai setthor eh: Gb rpg: 2 Th would be easy to unde AapOL Ck aeeP sola n : 1esimes 4 person wWriles
“1 went to Ghate with am oes mind. Emme- stand large pride in a man wi D, Se ae to uae Th in \ao late to 6S
diately after he toughed me the pain in my leg is constantly ut the receiving WOE eS OEY eye 1 death. But his lest .
disappeared E ; HARRY EDWAKLs end Of 30 muca graiijude ve hou v be miraculously freed
Very a Rr nie : But Ba wards. a man with E } ‘cht from oaln
y i, om A px golden-white hair. clear blue ? ign ‘
2 end of! of F 7 : aden n . Ys
hy # Py ee discomfort A PRIEST: CANON HUGH WARNER eyes, and an expression of & Stillness
re oe ee Edward: i Wbedleulating sincerity. remains : R. EDWaRDS VARL
_o, eee ele umble. att ; NOWARDS does us
foies oar Fane Ba8 ie ae J ~ ° ® “T have plenty of reasons toi NI ne Al 4; " . 1 Dat Re: ; wo- singing ang
ty ee ee : ust a friendly greeting ee ee al) Says 1 oe none Healiiuy:. Each night, when still- a ae intenban te dt
- > Sanctuary or pride. It is net I Who hea! . ross nas descended upon his chu rua. some al
wll: Micah a ee Y was all very simple, informal, and down to earth. A —lI am just the instrument for e, gubled house and 13 ucres PUdic meetings. Bur these are
ritten weekly progress reports quiet company of 30 men and women seated ih two rows, ‘he Spirit Power. srass and woodland when 40 able} to him. i ait
Edwards since. i man and two women assisting Mr. Harry Edwards. As ss the doves, canaries, and budgeri- a My wou dd away Dew i" vv
Lik j---—~ Pat Heat ome Meg remnsined aih: with epee love (or De gspeption fees. SO" Sathedral whan on 8 elous
e a sea . a full nute rr ) an armehatir ri * he said
“ getcee 1 wah an Miwsirds 3 After that no more than a friendly greeting to each SIXTEEN yeurs ago , With nim are Mr. and Mrs ae lt anatase. clausabte’ ‘anit
itted my teeth to turn over Pabient as he or she gat on the stool in front of him. Edwards was a ,Weorge Burton, who ace coughed as he inhaled. 24 Gauge x
fF bed. Now I can flop about The atmosphere was that of a doctor’s surgery rather printer, who sjaried POF_OWT SSE Qt RERUNE BpCU *] smoke too much." he
ike a seal in water,” he added than that of a chapel, though standing on a table in front 4 private investigation inio Kore 989 ‘: said He added with a smile do x Tit.
“My leg still gets tired ana Of us was a Cross with flowers on each side Spierauelisty with the intention | Methodically for taree ot “T have smoker's cough, and \°
jf, Oceasionally, But no pain As arms and legs were apparently freed from their of “ exposing it al) us u fake. tour hours each night. the three i won't respond to the healing é on
still limp, but friends tell me arthritis with a quiet touch of the hand. and sometimes a The sceptic ceased to Mock On ee et ae othe spice. te. heatment. oO x .
: Ikki h more ~ ‘| « : é . { h he stayed to believe in ‘he [#5k Of asking e spirits Thut remark was typical of
am walking muc con firm clasp, words of encouragement were given to each. heal es f the individuals wh
dently. I am losing my fear "here was » assuranc existence of higher or spirit ‘eal each of the individuals who” the man free of personal nome of
y & There was the assurance each gave of pain vanished intelligences have written to them or canting humbug. * t.
the old pain and movement restored It was not possible for me, a mere ,
x

onlooker, in so short a time to pass any kind of judgment on
- . Indeed, its

“faith healing” was clearly quite wrong if
one is thinking of faith as of necessity possessed by those
who were ill hat did not seem a necessary factor accordin:

to Mr Edwards though his own faith was quite unquestioned *

the degree of healing tnvolve . do. 10ft.
permanence.

To call it

in each case,

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” THE KING’S SECRET DOORWAY

By Marguerite Peacocke

unfortunate lady of Queen Vic-







corner swings forward at the seals of office, and later hands Along the stately red-carpeted dishes at near to boiling point, |



This is the last in-
stalment, of the Bucking-
ham Palace story as told
by Marguerite Peacocke,
and yet, perhaps, it is
only the beginning.
Every day another chap-
ter of history is added
every year the Palace
grows dearer to the
hearts of a nation,

tL tN ne

The contents of Buckingham
Palace were valued at more than
£ 4,000,000 even before the war:
but even if its treasures had
been werth little more than a
pittance, few Britons could have
walked unmoved through the
corridors snd rooms, rich as they
are in tradition

But one Indian potentate was
visibly unimpressed by the State
suite, which clearly failed to
compare with his own fantastic
jewelled palace until he
weached the White Drawing

* Room.

This room contains four ebony
cabinets filled with valuable
china each standing at one corne:
of the room.

‘The cabinets and the tali gild-
ed mirrors that surmount them
are outwardly identical, but the
one standing in the north-west

touch of a spring and reveals a
doorways leading to the Royal

Closet.
Laugh-Raiser

At the sight of this secret door
the Indian ruler suddecly cast
side his boredom and could
hardly be enticed away from the
fascinating pastime of making
the. door swing to and fro—an
exhibition which drew a gaod
deal of laughter at the poten-
tate’s expense.

The White Drawing-Room is
one of the most familiar of the
State apartments, for it has
formed the background to many
Royal photographs, including the
first published pictures of Prince
Charles. The magnificent carpet,
43ft. long and nearly 25ft, wide,
is in “best quality Axminster,”
costing 34s. 6d., a yard more than
a century ago.

The State dining-room is used
for State dinners private ban-
quets and large family parties,
but it is not sufficiently spacious
for State banquets, even though
the Spanish mahogany dining-
tuble,” 25ft. long when unex-
panded, can be tengthened by
eight leayes; each one yard wide,
and so accommodate 60 diners.

‘Not Amused’

Conversation at the table is

limited to one’s next-door neigh-
bours for it is more than eight
feet across,

It was in this room that the



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toria's Household described the
notice she had seen at Dunkeld,
announcing that “The Duchess of
Atholl (a coach) left the Duke
of Atholl’s Arms (a tavern)
prom) at seven o'clock each
morning’—the famous story at
which Queen Victoria was “not
amused.’

The Throne Room, though
used less often than in earlier
days, is still used when the King
receives addresses or deputations
“on the Throne,” and it is on
the Throne dais that all Roya]
wedding groups have posed for
nearly 30 years.

There is a secret door in this
room, too, cut into the panelling
on the inner wall near the dais.

Among the series of semi-
State rooms is the Bow Room,
where Queen Elizabeth and her
sister held their first parties—
the weekly madrigal concerts
which continued from soon after
the war until just before Queen
Elizabeth’s marriage.

One of the most important
rooms in the modern history of
the Palace is the “44 Room” (re-
modelied in 1844 in honour of the

: : B.B.C. news bulletins are | will be abl s ing. Bicycle Raffle. We hope thai

Tsar of Russia’s visit.) heard with a closer attention %g Wile *0 Gu seabething the tickets for the Bicycle Raffic|

Lost Rings than they commonly receive} Mirs. Ward visits 24th Barba- are going rapidly. You are re-

It is sometimes in this room ¢lsewhere, books and magazines |dos. Ten girls passed their first minded that all books must be

that, when Ministries change lie ready to hand, and here | Aid test for the Second Class in to Mrs. D. H. L. Ward, Hinds-
hands, the King receives from Canasta invaded even a Royal’ when Mrs. D. H. L. Ward, Dis- bury Road, or Miss Frank at Cave| &

the outgoing Ministers their home. ‘trict Commissioner, visited them Shepherd by the 19th July, 1952. |

|

ne. aarstinor > AL SRSRPASGASESM SAS) See

A SERVICE TO THE MEN OF BARBADOS
Good quality KHAKI PANTS, all Sizes

RELIANCE SHIRT DEPOT.

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them to their successors,

The seals are duly delivered,
each in its little box complete
with key, but nearly all the
signet rings which once accorm-
panied them have been lost. it
is suspected that they were kept
as souvenirs by iong-dead mem-
bers of former governments.

The pleasant first-floor roc
overlooking the north borders
and lawns, are the centre of
en's family and business

e.

Here the King had hig study,
where he spent what was often
little less than a 12-hour diy.
He worked ait a large, flat-topped
desk given him as a wedding
present by his parents-in-law.

ns,

In rooms off the same corridor
many family evenings were spent
in the Queen's drawing-room,
where Queen Elizabeth and her
equally musical younger daugh-
ter sometimes played the piano,
or in the King’s sitting-room
where the television set was in-
stalled and his family watched
ithe programmes by restful can-
dlelight.

Canasta Too



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corridor and in and out of rooms
run the family pets.

At the end of the corridor is
the Chinese lunch-room, where
meals are no longer served un-
appetisingly tepid. Electric trol-
leys with hotplates to keep the

convey them on their long jour- |
ney from the kitchen. 1&
Beyond are the rooms which |
were once Queen Elizabeth's | ¥
suite and afterwards her first | %
merried home in which Prince |
Charles was horn. y












GUIDE NOTES ||

on the 26th June. This Company | ¥
also entertained the inmates ot)
St. Philip’s Almshouse on 3rd
July.

Mrs. H. A. Talma and Mrs. J.| ¢
A. Skinner, Brownie Commission-~ | %
| Bishop also examined the work er, visited 12th Barbados at! ¢
\for the Overseas Challenge. Westbury Girl’s School and en-
| rolled three Brownies. Game
| Hike to Silver Sands. The were played and the songs wer



Enrolment. An enrolment took
| place at St. Giles’ Girls’ School
on the 14th June, when six Guides
from 28th Barbados made _ the
promise before Mrs. F, A. Bishop
|}Distriet Commissioner. Mrs.



Guides and Brownies from 30th sung with the usual amount of | %
|Barbados with Miss Winifred enthusiasm which these littl:
|Smith, Lieutenant, and Miss

ones can always show,

Chief Guide’s Challenge. We
hope that the companies who
have entered for the Challeng?
are working hard at it and that
all entries will be in by the
allotted time.

| Bailey, Brown Owl, went on a
|pienic on the 21st June to Silver
'Sands. Most of these guides had
jnot hiked before, and they thor-
;aqughly enjoyed the experience.
|Next time they will take a Life
"Saver in the party so that they



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PHONE 4764



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Also opened

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ANNUAL HOLIDAY



Our Friends and Customers
are asked to note that the
Workshop Department .(with

the exception of a skeleton
staff to attend to Emergency

Calls) will be closed from
7th to 19th inst. (both days
inclusive) for the purpose of

giving the workmen vacation
leave.

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD,
SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1952

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON

FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD.... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES







MY DEAR MAS. DE LAZLON| [SO THAT'S /T? NOW THAT




























= 1 arora re
BUT FLINT'S SATISFIED) SECAUSE I HAV
— THE CIRCUMSTANCES YOU THINK YOU HAVE HE'S FOUND THE THIEF] “ROMISED PETA
HAVE COMPLETELY THE PALMER GIRLS SO WHY TELL HIM THAT ('D CLEAR
WHAT ABOUT CHANGED... MONEY - YOU DON'T 4 COULD ANY THING 2 JOE HAYS NAME,
NEED MINE! HARDLY PUT Ml.) j MY PLUMP
IT ANY MORE ae \ INTRIGUER. /
POE z i \ a ait
a >




BY CHIC YOUNG

T WAS JUST THINKING
HOW NICE IT WOULD
BE IF I TOOK OFFA

MONTH INSTEAD OF THE

USUAL TWO WEEKS

ULI

}

WE COULD TAKE OFF 2 BUT, DEAR, THAT WOULD )
7 1 WAS JUST

THE ROAD LIKE GYPSIES--} [COST A FORTUNE | KNOW
oe VISIT NIAGARA AN! WE COULDN'T iT
G, <2 THE GRAND CANYON POSSIBLY
ere: (TROUT-FISH IN THE LAKES | [DO IT f fei
Y ¢ AND Sweet AT THEA ne 4
â„¢ |

Va oe





~——1

ee



; = = : Y HE WAS EXHAUSTED!| [ OF COURSE! I AM
San VE HE 1S NAPPING — HERE TO MAKE YOU
GSEN ame = 1... THERE /HOW ABOUT | | COMFORTABLE! I
Suite Scone THE FOOD-? WILL ORDER IT!
TIME! WE r

WOULD LIKE

SOME FOOD!

eon sey

JOHNNY ARRANGES TO STORE ALL SET, HERR UMLAUT! ¥ WE ALWAYS HAVE GOOP

THE PLANE, WHILE THE OTHERS SAY...0O0 YOU GUYS UY | TRANSPORTATION FOR

WATCH SILENTLY... THESE LIMOUSINES BY | OUR ORGANIZATION,
Dn THE GROSS? A 15S RIGHT, HERR

AN OLD PRECAUTION,
HERR HAZARD.,.BUT
ALWAYS USEFUL /







COME BACK HERE / IT'S RAINING CATS
AND WHERE DO YOU AND DOGS-NOBODY
THINK YOU ARE GOING BUT AN IDIOT HH DON'T HOLLER |
ON A NIGHT LIKE WOULD GO OUT

|

eT 5 ‘\ 60 LOUD! 4} § BIMMY
ON A NIGHT iF I SOMEONE'S AT } “4 TO
LIKE THIO/ y7 ADMIT I'M \ THE DOOR! | |\
AN IDIOT - ste 9 | er
KIN _T GC / Sot <
MS 1 9 a \
soy of Cm Y

t

@fF
| es :

ne 5

K_\

\
\
a

OUT?
on
¢ Se f

be LILI, ITS -
: SE iTS HOPELESS! I CAN'T 2
KEEP OUDE AND LILI y ; 1 \ . TAKE ANY MORE

tty, PINNED DOWN, I'LL Y _ aA : : OF THIS! I’M

= (MAKE IT! ae . fd ‘is , GIVING MYSELF
* ie py Hi . 7 +7 i

YOUR BOYS ARE WAITING FOR
YOU. THEY LL BE GLAD TO HEAR
Pow YOU DESERTED THEM

Q

B | WAIT, SMYTH. |
PRISONERS, TO TOWN. LEAVE WANT TO TALK.

HE MASKED GUY SAID TO WAIT SMYTH HERE TO DRIVE THE _/,

HERE. WONDER IF HE CAUGHT





—<—<— $< nT $e
eee, 5

ia
Gs (THINKING HOW NICE )
S 2

| IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE _

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday onl

( IT WOULD GE 1/












SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN





By Appointment
Cin Distillers

to the Late
King George V1

2
\Gordon:

Stands Suyteme













4°O6966

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Ps)

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SSOP POS OSS -


















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PALMOLIVE SHAMPOO Bt

NESCAFE (‘lb Tins) 87 80 LUSTRE CREAM SHAMPOO 62

LANALOL LIQUID
BEETROOT (Tins) , ee 35 LANALOL SOLID

YARDLEY’'S BRILLIANTINE
CASHMERE BRILLIANTINE



SAUSAGES, (Tins) 0.0.0.0. 65 81 5 ENGLISH LAVENDER BRILLIANTINE. .......
BOR VE, CREAM :iiccsscesssscsicsecsscsessgeocsvesssve sare
CUE HAIR DRESSING ..............

JACK STRAWS ........ jek Milly: Abid 1 52





THE COLONNADE GROCERIES

The Place Where Your Dollar Goes Further





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Just to remind you of
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| PEN & PENCIL SETS | :
| MANICURE SETS | :

in Leather Cases : >

Pen”

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at reduced prices !

NOVELS |
Advocate Stationery | |
|




PAGE FOURTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1952

Geneairibnly Age... oe | nay Og cee Yr cas coonms

‘ - ~, ", 7
EARN BIG MONEY by selling Redif- | Lieut.-Col. J. Connell, OBE, E.D.,

TELEPHONE 2508 em > os 8 time ont 2 Supply i REAL ESTATE AUCTION 7 oni The Serkonee’ Deckisnt.
form ssus No. 2% y
ee FOR SALE ear eee

DIED APPLEBY—on Sea, St. James HOUSE-One nd shingle 1, PARADES eee
1 —- .-—-——— PUBLIC NOTICES newly-built aaiaaes Each naae aan Situated at creek Vilna, a ear All ranks will parade at Regt. H.Q. at 1630 hours on Thursday 10 Jul 58 and mR Ee: OO" :













































































































—- has
IFILL.On th Sth Jul 952 Jane bedrooms, dining, drawing rooms and|®% x 20 x 9 with a gallery and kitchen at 1630 hours on Saturday 12 Jul 52, The Commander, Caribbean Area will and it’s easy to keep cl¢an.
Rath i tase ure | epee eee | — ara veunaast Stgetn Svenestes™ "ll ahcnea wit We papi fron by toe] SAT, cur Aim penton om Satiries, ace Mone AERA S | A Sw aenas nee aoe
f ‘al leave: ate re aati ANT NOTICE LONE—on sea, Fontabell 5 | Government Auctioneer on the l4th day a ater a - ua Ss wroom,
tan aes er cetsese Adasen, mne” "4, Sey, |My tot be goae ola amas Shovel nt two Ney ach’ has Gning. ang @® SB. Nat ierary ended tat unier he Betula Ber Myati,-ee SIS mw FW are,
this evening for Bank Halli Methodist|Cave, Shepherd & Co., Ltd /°}to us we will give you a brand new stove |*"d several bedrooms. Modern convon- a 4 eee: auianetuaiem en 1490 eee tines be able te uitgnd the pérade. olun- SEN Tee
Church and thence proceeds jo the , 1 1.52—6n ae are ae PoP ag oo offer a. a 074 Mr. Kenneth ‘.9.S+-as teers will be inepected before the parade and if their turn out ts not ‘up to
estbury Cemetery. Friends are invited ts "14 a limite me onby jandifor SS 3 ine
Leonora Baird and Inez Force | CAR—Morris Six, very reasonable, suit BRADSHAW & COMPANY, —$—$_—___—__________'|_i will offer toe sale by Publie Gom- Sena, ae ee nt Oe ean erin went Sums Se belts
(Children), Fred Hinkson and/to make a pick-up. Progressive Bus Co Service Dep’ “BRIGHTWOOD" St. Lawrence Gap, ptt at my Office, Victoria Street, on ess ursday ul - =~ a on : cae en aear
Euretha West (grandchildren) Culloden Road 6.7 52—in. 6.7.52—In, | With land about 33,100 sq. ft. Good URSDAY 10th at 2 p.m. 4,25] square and swords, and §.D. caps; On Saturday, ul — normal —
6.7. 52—In 5 no ipeken eeianaaill NoOTI aoe frontage Suitable for building. The eet lene at LIGHTSFOOT LANE, with ot ee caps, S.D. Sam Browne belts and swords
-_———— -—-- A ungalow has 2 (pen verandahs, 3 large e chattel house containing drawing, Ban emoes oe 4 eee oS
WOODRUFFE—On July 5. 1952, at No.| condition ne ee Raed ei whade ae CE 1iving rooms, 3 bedrooms, shower, toilet,|@ining, 2 bedrooms, usual out-offices Band practices will be held on Monday 7, Wed ® Jul with a view to rehears-
40, Tudor Street. William Woodruffe | Evelyn 2840 or 38%. 6.7.52—2n All male citizens of the United States| kitchen, pantry, Garage, servants’ quar-| freshly painted inside, with electric light ing for the ‘Annual Inspection by the Commander, Caribbean Area.
He funeral will leave the above * ao ed -“ oe es “ maining orca” eee, electricity. Premises|@nd fittings, shop attached. For in-|2. ORDERLY OFFICER AND Se Se FOR WEEK ENDING
address at 430 p.m. to-day for the CAR—Dod X- . > bado} 8! Oo (Cal at] re-pain an re-decorated throughout | $pection apply: $
Westbury Cemetery. Friends are asked | case "conditint, “Weensod ve year” Dial | Ses amarican Consulate érot July 4 911961, Jaspection by appointment only. R. ARCHER McKENZIE. Orderly Officer .. .. |.. Lieut, A. Hi. Clarke, ! e
to attend 3903. 6.7 ttn. | aid ‘or tive Service Registration | Appky “Landfall”, Sandy Lane, St. James, | Dial 2047. 6.7.52—4n. Orderly Serjeant 278 Sjt. Williams, $.D.
DrAray Scott, Govt PAS ee we Ender. the, Universnt Military Training 2.7.62 Next for duty Lieut. 8. @ ley j
(friend) . CAR-~-One Prefect Ford 1949 model. In : rennet ———— Orderly Officer ‘ ee o eut. S. G. Lash
. n cal
WS ine ailore Peactcely new. Wearest | itt! male Citizens of the United States} | BUNGALOW | — Modern Bungsiow! UNDER THE SILVER Orderly Serjeant wes LS Turney, BG.
THANKS offer to $900.00 Apply to Yearwood | sequent to July 31, 1962, are required | Paywater, Detcons Road, "eka HAMMER Gol a Adjutant, e ce
SHBPHERD—Through this medium we] G#rage, Hart St, Back St. Mary's Wall to register upon the day they attain the} open verandah, sitting room, dining The Barbados Regiment. .
ety, hae. Paine an those one 6.1.—1n oe eer £ the day of|room, 2 large bedroams with’ running| On Tuesday 8th by order of Mrs. J. F PART I) OFFICERS ae a
y ‘reaths, cards, letters bel ere- ‘ ’ SERIA . A.F.
of condolence, attended the funeral CAR—One 1950 Standard Vanguard in| after, a Pe: SY she ea oetnan cane tohiee? a fre" "gil seth the Furniture at | THE NO CREASE ‘ a ited
and assisted in sickness or in. any|A-—! condition. No reasonable offer re-|" For further information, consult fhe} yard enclosed with Vil, Age te beatioe. teers Oe, wee). eC een Granted a Commission in the B’dos Extensiv:
other way expressed sympathy with us} used. To be seen at Chelsea Garage | i , * pply . | incitides: Capt. L. C om e Listings of Good
¥ exp ympaths American Consulate, Bridgetown, Bar-| Rogers, Barber, over J. N. Goddard &| Ext Dini ‘ Regt. with rank of Captain wef. 30
in our sad bereavement occasioned by | 1950) Lid. Phone 4949. §,7.52—2n. | bados. e Ms.tbtéd.n. Sond itd. or’ telephone 000 after’ #1wWa — - ope: Votes Cait Mav, 1992. Class Property and Land
typ death of our mother and aunt] [> Gis woseley Sal i. ae p.m. 6.7.52—-Jn Waaron, Sewms & Srasnem 3 ebies; i ata ‘ ’ Always Available
, eu s olsele: joon, \ * ttee, . LEAVE - . y =
Sefer, Atle (ons) of Deacons Rd. | "to. Inspection at Marine’ Hotel. NOTICE Gr wate Gannune mee Hat stand: MT. Table, all in mahogany: 559 L/C Dolphin, J, “BY Coy. Granted 3 weeks’ P/Leave wef 3 Jul
iy : . ED _ e ass ina; nner Tea Services;
Ollie £. Arthur (nephews) i= E 5.7.52—2n, cinta: Se ov. eueem Desirable, 3 Bedroom with Basing &| Electric Lamps, Toaster & Kettle; Clock, M. L. re pa
eryl & Winifred (nieces) MOTORCYCLE—Triumph — Speed| Applications for two vacant Vestry (about 9 yrs, old). Dining & Breakfart oe Mepis ULE Toe a Grau: Soe Barbados Regiment.
6.7.52—1n, | twin 5 H.P. Motorcycle in perfect work- ps ret . ers an es paint Cream & Green FOR SALE

















































scholarships (one boy, one girl) tenable|ooms, 2 Toilets, Garage, Servant's illips 6 valve Radio in mahog: Case; NOTICE













ns PN order KX—315 License paid. Apply | at the Alleyne i, will be receivea | Room, Everite Roof,, A-1' Condition, | Di ; ; Offi & Serjeants’ Mess

WINS: ar - Lee ae at? School, ’ - " ning Table, Sideboard & Chairs in Blue; There will be a Mess Meeting of the Warrant cers

Fe ines Mahi beg to, say thanks vaone as near Pegwg., Thy En. by the undersigned up to Saturday,| Back Yard enclosed Pin Stone, about| Double & Single Simmons Bedsteads, at 1845 hours on Saturday 12 July, ay
to all those who sent wreaths, flowers, | Phone . TS July 19th, 1952. Applications must be] 12,000 *q ft. Going for Only Under rings, and Mattresses, Presses and —-——_--— . een ay : SWEETFI
letters, attended the funeral or in 6 ~~~ eran > accompanied by birth Certificate and | £3,100, Dressing Tables (painted Cream), Chgst Batata tone ae St. Beter — An
at&y other way expressed their sym- ONE (1) Austin two ton truck and one | ;ppiicants must present themselves to ate type house built of stone,
pathy with us in our recent bereaye-} (1) Austin A.40 Car. Telephone 4821,

he Head Master of the Alleyne School Contains large living room with

Be Wisé! “OLIVE BOUGH” (Seaside|of Drawers Gent-Dresser & Dressing
and weil Set in off Main Rd.) at|Table in Mahogany: G.B.C. Refrigerator
HASTINGS-—-NEAR PAVILION COURT; | (only 2 years), Larders,, Kitchen oper





















































































ment caused by the death of Ruth|D, V, Seott & Co., Ltd. French windows ding onto
ware. 26.6.52—t.t.n. |" Monday Signed med GA, SKINNER, JA Large (Partly. Stoney 3-8 4| Kitchen Utensils, Two "& Three covered verandahs with view. ot
eo mamins, Mine A and! "S00CK One Ford Vib $-Ton, Trudk, estry Clerk, St, Peter: | Bedrooms with “pasins, Several other | Florence oll Stoves & Ovens, Seales & pen ns) Dedrooms, kitchen, store-
rs. L. ch, s 3 Price an f —One: sor Ton SFuGk. 62—4n. | Rooms, Open Gallery (Front & 2 Sides), | Weights, oil Lamps, Magnet Electric DS SOSSS9S OCs : nd usual outbuildings,
Miss M, Roberts 6.7.52-—In. | Thone 4356. 4,7,52-—3 |. Enclosed Back Gallery with 24 Windows,| Stove, Lawn Mower, Garden Hose & M/V. “CARIBBEE” will oe and servants’ quarters.
OE a sil elie cee ceel Th Nie anatase ctete ha tepedhiianginsanitagiagisniallial : 7 a ' * n The , . Pprox. 2%4 acres well
ar temeanmnane TRUCE —Chewrols (nigh, no qeagow| BARBADOS CIVIL BERVICE | Tole, other Conveniences, vary | fool, & ee Som cu erm Cust STEAMSHIP CO. accest Cargo and Passengers for grqunds with ‘right ‘ot way over
Aiea, ievine | memory ot our} tbe cer retuned. A Barnes & Co... SOCIATION Good snd Bata Bathing, Trek. Gasset, Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, eh.
beloved eemedianther Soe z Matilda | 4 3.7,.52—t.f,n. Laer single Senne employee of | niso Gareqe Shed for 4 Cars wall heute BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO. a a stiee FROM EUROPE mela See St. Kitts. Sailing Mon- #
7 ray = -————___ + [the Government Service are asked to Ce ee are, * | M.S TENT 27th JUNE 1952, day inst. TLLCREST, Bathsheba — *
3 Nae sea who died on the 7th) “pRUCK—Used Fargo 5 ton truck with jattend a special general meeting of | UP = Ideal and enough Land to Auctioneers. S.S. COTTICA 11th July, 1952 The M/V.. “MONEKA” will stantially built modern me
‘At Baie I dae adie: meanengere 2 speed axle. Marris 10 h.p. 1947, Austin | Division Ik of the Civil Service Asso- build % ee a 60—70 Room Hotel, 4.7,52—2n.|M.S. NESTOR 25th July, 1952 accept Cargo and Passengers for bungalow on brow of cliff afford-
ame ana Sik car Weloved one fact, All ve the above in good con-| ciation to be held in the Town Hall on Seth 3 Bungalows, also Suitable for M.S. BOSKOOP ist August, 1952. Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, ing fine view of this wild and
away dition a Roval Garage ic nae Saturday 12th ma at 1,30 p.m. oe Say ae ee ea 6 pape EUROPE Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Fri- ving coast. 3 goad bedrooms,
: Ma Ne 4 ;phone 4504, nm ENDA. y. oD s , By M.S. ORANJESTAD 15th July, 1952, day llth inst, ing room, 2. side lleries,
Farley akepees eoupener’ oe pen abo To make preparation to meet the Civil] The Bus Sea aera Stone Business EDUCATIONAL SAILING TO T'DAD, PARAMARIBO The M/V, “CACIQUE DEL ae ane auiar ters ‘and |
Harcourt, Fred, Keith, Dennis, Magdiena ELECTRICAL Setvicw Commiasioner Te salary revision. | Coen Condivion lace! ie See Bite, PR en BT CARIBE" will accept Cargo and garage. Biectricity and maine
Lewis, Stella Cadogan (grands), & 7 great . Secretary, Div. U1, |Going Under £2,300. IN TUDOR ST NOTICE $8 COTTICA 28th July, 1982. tna eis” waa ; ;
grands. -1.5a—ln. | GENERATORS—One 3% KVA. AC 6.7.68—2n, | La 2-Storey Stone Business Premises = M.S. NESTOR 8th August, 1952. Date of sailing to be notified. VILLA VICQUE, ST. VINCENT
Generator 110 Volts & One 5 K.V.A, AC) & Residence with a Large G: ALLEYNE SCHOOL ENTRANCE | saizING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO : Beautifully Situated b built
LOW—In loving memory of Wii-| Generator 115 Volts. Phone 4358. 4 BARBADOS. Woskihon Gu. Cote. Wee. arage or EXAMINATION M.S HERSILIA 4th July, 1962 of as with ouse
liam Crichlow who departed July 6th, 4.7.$2—3n IN THE COLON: ait Ps sped , A-1 Con-| For the Sehool Year beginning 16th , iS NL B.W.i. SCHOONER OWNERS view, oni ig magnificent
E IAL COURT OF | dition, Ideal for any Business, Vacant,| Sept. 1962) Examination for Entrance atta ee tae en ASOT A Eee) town, 1 ee ce
Rest in peace dear Daddy FRIGIDAIRE, A.1. order, one year he ae ar tee a can — $120.00 p.m. Under £4,000| to the Alleyne School will be held on a oe theo nr a LT Consignee, Tele. . 4047 Beach wits a eugtic Club
Tis sweet to breathe thy name guarantee to go. Mrs. C. F. C. Kirton, = ae z Steamship Bed: uy It—UPPER NELSON ST.,—-3. Monday July 21, 1952 at 9 a.m. at the ih oaaie & CO., D. : he hitwonne ee
In life we loved jou dearly. Woodbourne, St. Peter or Dial 3003. aneee Cc vaeior Resides, Conveniences. Good | School. = (33 x 15) cas, ates
In death we do the same. 6.7. $2—In war 9a . s : ondition, about 3,500 sq. ft. Going] Applications together with Baptismal 4 » Verandah (2y
© Motor Vessel “T.B. Radar Below £800. C Meyfor Almost anything | Certificates and Testimonials will be ‘ usual outbuildings ete,

Fliga (wife) Vincent (daughter) Sydney
(son) Gladstone! Phillip (son-in-law) &] HAIR CLIPPERS — Horstman Electric} ,; 2 sore one oe aaa te
Grands. { Hair Clippers suitable for Barbers @/uay the ‘V7th day of July 1962, I will
6.3, 62—18- Peel 18 ea8 See them on display at our offer for sale by Public Competition at

mms | SHOW
'HOMAS—In lovi ¢ Baward-|* Rooms. The Standard Agmne? | ny in the Public Buildings for a
"ihe Whore. died bin July 196) (dos) Co., 14 Swan Street. Dia, we | sum “not less than tle appraised value
. . ate in. ;
“THE MOTOR VESSEL T. B. RADAR’



ESTATE HOUSE; St. James ~
A imposing spacious home with
Soe fey ms Sool location
\eigh € 4
Town 6 , © ing coast

fotos ka baie mete AB eats ©] Canadian Nati :
n » “Olive} Friday 18. t l t
Bough". Hastings. Applications for one or more yacant ana n a 1ona eams s
ne learn ——. | Foundation Scholarships tenable at the f

LAND-Half acre, situated at Waveil] Alleyne School, will be received by the
Avenue, St. Michael, almost entire area| Headmaster up to Friday July 18. Candi-

























































With thy Sheep a place provide her being under cultivation with healthy| dates will be examined on Monday SOUTHBOUND Arrives Sails Sails ives ees
From the goats afar divide her, J now at anchor in Carlisle Bay, Bridge-| well manured ratoon canes and aj July 21 at 9 a.m 29.6.52—-3n, Halifax Boston "doa IG HOUSE, ST.
From {ne Boat ater cin mule her | agit Tecelved new shipment of Gerrard |town, with its fittings. Particulars of | number of fruit trees. Amount required | ~—-———__________ | CANADIAN CRUISER . Sta Se Souly et tes Gn, Wile wopuler coats Shes
Lord all-pitying Jesus Blest, Pc. & Maffe!l & Co. Ltd fonic Em’ | the Inventory of the said Vessel can be] $1,300. The two houses on the land] BARBADOS BRITISH WEST CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 2 July > 14 July 14 a
Grant her thine eternal rest omni. 15.6 $2-4.4.n_|2e2 OF application. may also be bought. For terms and INDIES LADY RODNEY .... *.. i July 14July 16 July 2 July 26 July fone ae and secluded
Ever remembered by Lionel, Elton, oe The appraised value of the Vessel,| conditions of sale apphy: Gilbert Millar, : 5 on Bout ‘ e grounds of
Erla, Mildred, Eutarine. * “Bye” which was built in 1946, is the sum of, | Fitts Village, St. James 6.7.52—In.| ST. MICHAEL'S GIRLS’ SCHOOL A a 1% acres are well wooded
Ethelbert, Fela, i: eH s2—1n | 2USE, ARRIVED “Pye” De Luxe | THIRTY FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS . SECONDARY DAY SCHOOL . - and could readily be converted
‘ Ultra- Modern | Radio or ei toads | it, # fitted with an Internal combustion FOR GIRLS NORTHBOUND = Arrives Sails Arrives Asrives Agtives into one of the show places of
ent 3 one cl ine ‘wo a up mens Diesel Engine, has an estimated speed] LAND—86,750 square feet of lanu| Applications are invited from Gradu- B'dos St. John Boston ax mireal the Island. The house is of 2
FOR RENT no needle worries, in attractive Wain iy [of 10 knots, a gross tonnage of 162,34, |situate at Britons Hill, Saint Michael. | 6s for the post of Assistant Mistress | | .5y vErsoN . , 22 Jul: storeys and possesses noticeable
$430.00 F. C8 MATTED CO” TD. a register tonnage of 116.12, a length] Enclosed with stone wall on $ sides, | Qualified to teach Mathematics, General | ‘7, nian 4 July 8 July 17 July 19 July iy character.
Bri Wn, Money: & CO,, LTD..| o¢ 103 feet, a breadth of 20 & 3/10 feet} Fine view, over the harbour, Would} Blementary Science and Botany. Some CONSTRUCT! Jul 10 A
HOUSES r; Wm, Henry Street. Crd eh dat We aD deer, he incath Of be sold et Cha Ce ie CL EEEerIence in teaching in ‘Gévondary |) SONEREUCEOR fh ctiy © Oey, 5 Aug. 8 Aug. ug. 11, GRAEME HALL TERRACE—
VEDERE. Full ovis peer Oe ba he ain ESotn is 24 feet. ; quiries to the undersigned : Apbools will be a recommindation ; , INEY .. 7Aug. 9 Aug. 19 Aug. 20 Aug. 23 Aug. Steers Niet 2. storey house
BEL Maxwell Coast Milly] “Sasets.a et e accommodation consists of 2 ALAR ALE ist an class | * ic! of stone with everite
furnished, attractive grounds, splendid |, MUMLARD Rapier. fs, hae Table| passengers’ rooms with .4 beds each, CARRINGTON & SBALY, Honours Degrees $1,584 by $72 for further particulars, apply to— . Large living room,
sea-bathing. Phone 8188. 5.7,52—2n. $5.00 ore bea aarti M LIMITED. sailors’ rooms for 6, cooks’ accommoda- Lueas Street. $2,304 by $' 784. 3 bedrooms, kitchen, laundry, 2
in, HY. BE SBLRE'S ‘|tion for 2, Boatswain's locker and J 1.7.82—4n, Other Graduates GARDINER : servants’ rooms and garage,
“DUNDAS HOUSE” Crane Coast— + . Hy. St. -7.5%—8n | store room. Vipul cle Selgin alge ea $1,416 by. $60—$1,776 by $72—-$2,352. AUSTIN & CO,, LTD.—Agents. .
St. Philip — Dec. to April. Apply on MU RD SinEnoGlas of Braned Frosted For further particulars and arrange- OFFERS for a brick wall to be de-| Graduates who hold a Teacher’ iplo-
premises. Cee ee eee cathe Ob wartranc. | menue for inspeation apply to. .., molished and | removed from our! ma Will be paid an additional 58131 °f) \$§06G0008000000900000000000000000000000900000% ; cl Soe: TANS -Core-
s y Ne . . : . , Cavans Street St ill 116 per annus. tie “eg
FURNISHED BEDROOM at Maxwe. |/ASHLEY'S LIMITED, Pr. Wm. Hy, St Marshal in Admiralty. }by ‘Twelth July. DaCOSTA & CO. LTD. | A cost of Living Allowance is now on one of the most attractive sites
Good sea-bathing. Phone 8173 4. | Provost Marshal's Office 25.6,52—lin. 5.7. an | payable at pesveliing Haves. The posi- in popu.
1-52-20. | “SORGHHERRIGERATON One © Gus | LH on, tn sian Benle wo 'bee WATER COOLERS (Ice Cans) erected, Saw ak np Se
: ft. in. excellent condition, call and see ‘ SPRINGVALE PLANTATION,— Saint| © y ao mM, SPOOR” r loung a ena
AERTS Fwo Furnished Plats oy Dat [same at Redman & Taylor's Garage Lid FOR SALE sidrew., About 227 arable acres and about | Mt, “Soak is snob & Government, post 3 bedrooms, detached garage and
Available June 15th Onward. Fnane a g Lege" ager's House, Overseer's House, Seual ms o qed the Barbados Now Obtainable at servants’ quarters: All services.
- “Jana estieatel ‘Slaeteln ‘f wr outbuildings, two horses, cart, ete. eacher’s jon, ‘ BUN 5 \ ‘
ere to nee ow buaeus Oven ant Wormning Svthe. purect MISCELLANEOUS ‘The above Plantatic,’ -vill be offered Beige STR THE C€ CREW BUNGALOW, ROCKLEY—
eee Oe tn ed Dial gaol, |Coudition, Dial 2177, 2.7.6a—7n, | ——___—— — | for sale af auction on #riday, the 11th pie. ne spe ene ENTRAL EMPORIUM Fooms, large ‘living % Co wide
%1,83--9n BLACK & DECKER Tools 1”, 4”, & {July next, unless previously | s0 Dy The | 1 sonnel be re- , verandah oa Moen
tome : {private treaty, All inquiries should be he successful applic w eer t :
flat, fully fur- changing. ‘unit oii, me Fae | aanie pera, "shcasive.” ‘aibes. be directed to the undersigned in the first | quired to assume duties as front January AT ATTRACTIVE PRICES for kicese, Good situation near
¥LAT—Five roomed flat, fully | your requirements now the prices of the| instance. CARRENGTON & SEAL‘, | 1953 Golf Course. £4,300.

ished, located in Balmoral Gap. From] 57
A eee for two or three months. PYE BATTERY SETS—Just a few left.

. MAFFEI'S RADIO
ne 2135, 5.7.52—6n 15,6.52—t,f.n.











Lucas Street, Bridgetown. 18.6,52—4 Applica accompanied by _ three
wetown- 18.6.524n. | ecent testimonials, a Medical certificate
—_____________.. | of fitness, a Birth See Ss php-
The undersigned will offer for sale at | tograph should be sul mitte: , to: e
their office No. 17, High Street, Bridge-| Headmistress, 8t. Michael's Girls’ School,
town, on Friday, the 18th day of Juky Martindales Road, St. Michael, 15a,

next shipment will be higher. Da Costa
& Co. Ltd., Electrical Department.
4.7,52—6n.





NEWTON DGE,
stone

house containing enclosed gal-

Ist August, furnished or unfur- leries, spacious drawing and

|
n , “INGRID” Navy Gardens. Three RADIO—7 Tube K.B. Radio. 13 metres| CELANESE SILK-—Superfine flowered

in eight lovely colours 36 inches wide



Murry and Secure These...















F on by arrangement}‘o 31 m. Short and Medium Waves. ‘ I. to arrive not later dining rooms, breakfast room, 3

wil “the tenant, teleghone number. 8172 Beaapione Rius-in. Contecs:c, Pipers St ee ae. “THE DWELLING-MOUSE known aa BARB OID September 1962. bedrooms, 2 garages ete. Lately
YN, ROACH & yearns A ae Weary. — i : voli “Glenflora” standing on 1 acre 2 roods 15.6.52--Sn. CASH BOXES 8" 10" and 12" c oh Pa ROE

1.7, 52—t.f.n LIVESTOCK. GALVANISED—Special offer for 10] 2%'% perches of land on the main road | =~ RESIDENCE, FONTABELLE—2

Vee days. Best quality English galvanised |#t White Hall, Saint Michael, Electric Ww TED CARD INDEX CABINETS storey house with self contained

MANUELITA—Maxwell Coast fully] GOAT—One pure bred Saanan goat oo Sivihited nalia” ‘con eg “Tiebechtn’ anyees’ cn application to AN’ Sontalns ¢ livi van freak
furnished, Ring 3222. 6.7.52—2n J ig pints per day, also two ewe kids 7] Auto e Co. of Spry & ‘Tratalgar st. Ms, dob Alfred Bynoe on the premises. ie fast veheare ubete peiteceng,
—————— dE weeks old. pply to Mr, don Jones, eal fon. r further particulars and conditions |-——————————"" = -— usua’ . ,
SEA BEAUTY Attractive 3 Bedroom | rags Hill, St. Joseph. "O.7.82—1n, | oe tee8 21,6,52-t-£- | of sale apply toi— COTTLE, CATFORD HELP re ae aera



rooms. Annexe has wide verandah,

5 Mt
Bungalow on St. James Coast. A oie living room, 2 ap yee

& CO 4 .7.52—8n
modern conveniences. Apply to Mrs. A:] GoaTs—6 Sanaan & Alpine milch

a
INTERNATIONAL TORNADO K.39









Metal and Wire Waste Paper Baskets



YOUNG WOMAN as _ general help.


































































$450.00 nearest. Owner leaving island. and arage. Good investment
Bovell, Fitts Village, St. sak so—gn | £08t8. Fresh in milk. Apply. Cyril] Enquiries Yacht Club 6,7.52—1n amnesia Country girl prefered or foreigner. Must Proposition.
ad, eres Serene Land, County ROR, | erent -~ NOTICE sleep in. Good home. Write P.P.P. C/o
nn | P
—_M Ul. Unfurnished | > ichael. 7,$2—2n.| I1CE-BOX — White all Metal Chro- . Advocate, 6.7.52—2n THE GARDEN,
‘Amnitc batniae wel. ue Le “a mium fittings in first class condition ee ROHERTS STATIONERY Di | 3301 WORTHING—| ern coral stone
eee eats bedrooms, Venetian Blinds, | whUrs Pure. Bred Alsatian Puppies Can be seen at the Courtesy Garage. | 41 West Inga, Rum Refinery 14d. “National Cash Bock-Mesoing Machine — Dia bungalow on, comer site with wide
Telephone, all modern conven!- i " ” 5.7.52—3n. 3 es Operator Ww’ prev: e. es. leasant garden with
theese "Dial 3802, ? 2.7,.52—an, | Hales. ree Phone Water ince, 200 bados Foundry Limited Shares. | akgume duties on or before ist. August, flower beds, lawn, concrete ter-
————— | tor : ie 4370. 1.0848 —A new shipment of Canadian | 520 Barbados Co-operative Cotton Fac- | 1952, Apply in person with written fret, ean enanres Of bearing Spits
LOsT & FOUND Se ps in various designs. Why tory Ltd. Shares application to Secretary, Dowding Estates ; Monn
MECHANICAL gor Raquze one now, when we ave them, | 300 Barnes “& Co., Ltd., 8% Preference | # Trading Co., Limited.” q jorge living room. covered gallery,
| cena ’ : ic Shares (Ex Dividend) a ' ¢
MACHINE-—One Singer Leather Arm Dept. Phone 3878 3.7. +1195 Barbados Fire Insurance Co. Ltd. ———_—__ B rb d A i t B A robes, well fitted kitchen,
LOST sea: ee Machine, actually new, going cheap, Shares MISCELLANEOUS a a os ma eur oxin P ssn. with avers way to Bouse,
EEPSTAKE TICKET—Series “to | Wer leaving the colony, no reasonable ve floating scale models./ 250 Barbados Shipping & Trading Co, | Uniler the vat e of Sees 8 quarters and all usual
9161. Finder please return same to] fey refused, can be seen’ from 3—6 p.m, | Ships of Royal Navy. Nourse Ashby, St Ltd. Shares $62.50 POCKET MONEY easily earned patronag =o All public utility services,
Vernon Cox St. Lawrence, Ch sy tase jaily at Randall, Upper Reed Street George. 5.7.52—6n | 90 West India Biscuit Co., Ltd. Shares. by recommending 25 new subscribers to CANADA DRY Fesotanee Leathe our highest
“t ea ————— The abovementioned shares will be REDIFFUSION in one month :
alii ty Bhalla tial Sia RECORDS—A new shipment of 33 1/3] set up for sale at Publie Auction on 1.7.52~6n Invite ¢
555996 566 : 52 ve ; IN CHANCERY. AND INCH
5$9O9S695 ONE (1). Aeromotor Mill and 36¢t,|".P-m. records just received, selections} Friday the llth day of July, 1952 at ®
roekt isvexdet a, "Say [etme auth Pye chirps fy Baan"| nih Cation “& Soul. Lice | “REDRRRURTON ee, wim eam, |e Entries for the 1952 CHAMPIONSHIPS ee Cree ee
Leundry o. Ltd. "Phone 3592. a ete. | Street, Bridgetowr > . 4 by t
REAETORS LIMITED se abt Bee oe Be Vaan] ggt nee Bi dati aaa perks oem





DaCosta & Co., Ltd, Electric Dept
Phone 3878, 3.7.52—6n.,

: THE MODERN HIGH SCHOOL STADIUM

during the month of August at a date to be ennouneed later

cflers either a, a whole or

TYPEWRITER — One Royal Portable separately.

Nvpewriter, (Quiet De Luxe Model) with
atest features, Magic Margin, Speed

a —————
SUPPLEMENT YOUR %NCOME by

REALTORS LIMITED recommending REDIFFUSION. Obtain

| full particulars from the REDIFFUSION







OFFERS

RECORDS: Decca & Brunswick re-
cords. Standard numbers. To Clear at 1















































Es 3 7 re | . . ; ‘visions: LYNCHBURY BELLEVILLE —
ORYECEILE a ere ee ery NS ‘ean: |for Gc, 2 for $1.00 or 3 for Ste. AUCTION SALE office. 1,7,64—6n Chemmasensiare sent be contested in the fonearrne Pleasantly situated 2 storey house
Three bedrooms with built in laily, Ebony Dress Shop, Upper Reed |LASHLEY’S LIMITED, Pr. Wm. Hiv. St “}WENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bonus ywelg' : with good grounds of about 12,500
cupboards "and running.” water daily, muony Des pher, Reed We LAWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bonus | Renisaweietst — » ie ” oa. ft. 3 galleries, large drawin
Combination Drawing and Din- meen | re nmr ‘eatherweight - ° ' room, study, . we!
ing Room, Kitchen, Garage and TYIEWRITERS—Don't be misled, you] “STUK” GLUE—The 2-in-1 At 11.30 a.m. tions in one calendar month. |) | ¢ Lightwel “4 Ser fitted’ kitchen, 3 double bedrooms,
two servants rooms Also right vill get the best and the cheapest type- with the 1000 and 1 uses. -7,52--6n, | ¢ wa ” 147 ” garage and usual offices. Offers
of way to sea. A sound invest. vniters at Bradshaw's, always check with | dealer for Stuk Glue, On Thursday the 17th July, by order elterweight — » ” , required, under £3,000 would be
ment, so contact us now. 1s before buying. Our repalr workshe | —_————————————— of Miss Wylmer Cummins, we will sell Ue SEAM ES ae pratt os % Middleweight — ” 160 ,, considered. i
s equipped with modern tools and we nt now to a ed Telegraph tne as aan eS eet ak stamps Miveoh) State cies on or off % Light Heavyweight— ” 175 yy ’ BEMERSYDE, ST. LAWRENCE
WYNDAL ave skilled ‘mechanics for maintenapee ee + ee a pe yl a j Mayville’, Codrington Hill, whieh] paper, E. D, Peterson, 1265 No. Harvard, | §¢ Heavy — over 175 _,, —Strongly built coral stone bunga-
eee stone ahr ee ia er. cvees. kgihe. “to von a Onewettes days after Londen ‘Sone “Drawing suite three chairs and settee | Ivd., Los Angeles, Calit. 5. tain, x Intending competitors are asked to call at Modern High School low specious aaa. sargos and
plaster( on approximately 5 set . “¢ . "lot sovered) 2 a e ‘orms ernoon 4—. . galle: . ccommodati com-
square feet land. Situate at Rock- ae RAD an w pan mn Gels, ov eyere” an ire Y fadlo 4 “ble Sin mcohaents “ere | . for Entry F any aft te prises:— separate drawide and
ey, on the Bus route and within SHAW & COMPANY. Represen' . . rocketa EWS Bes tray tables, Bat’ sane 9 365656666666666 £66566659% dining rooms, 3 double bedrooms,
g- couple of 100 yards from the 6,7.52—In 15.46.0048 vor, folding chair wall brackets - — SOS large kitchen and pantry, 3
famous: Rockley © Beac Jery oto ee ee | ne Chih. ¢ ; : ; _ servants’ rooms, garage ‘and
“y TYPEWRITERS—Used and new type- TOOLS—Hand Drills, Hand Saws) °* china cabinet, one buffet, one Tip
teasonably priced, vriters: New Baby Portables only $110.00 fom a R Min. Back Saws 12in hop Taage, one Sane eles Top, on the best bathing beach at St
. Jsed larger portables at $110.00 and up, |and i4in., Compas Saws lain. & id4in,, | °\\"''*. : » : .
BUNGALOW These machines may all be had ‘on a |Oil Stoves Spirit, Levels Bin, to 24in.|


= oem r of Town by bus or car, and in
E Pe Caen fh peia- our opinion would be very suitable

On approximately 19,00Q square

week's trial without obligation. K. Braces & Bits, Plyers, Pincera Squares | Pek. one Rest Chair, 10 Tube Philco }
feet of land, Situate just off Rock~

Hunte & Co., Ltd., Lr, Broad St. Dial]with Mitre & Level, Claw Hammers, | "lio, one Mirror, Lamp shades, Floor













Â¥ : u . acid: oe 0 for conversion into a small guest
New Road overlooking the is6 4.7,.62—3n | Spoke T Pu =| Rugs and Bracket Lamps, Rush Settee : rt {

Gait course and commanding a a See RP ENeS, aurten a ag ee ee with cushions, one Clock, Antique et bruises.’ house.

magnificent view unobstructed to 35 m.m, Agfa Karomat Camera. Latest | town, 25.6.52—4n, | Glassware including Salad _ Dishes, Ice | A.1. ite Liniment | . BEA!

the sea, Comprising three bed- model, Fully. automatic F. 2.8 Xenar | ——_——— | Cream Cups, and Glass Cups ep | MENS wd oe” Bt. LAr
rooms, drawing and staihe, 308 Lens, HUGHES, Stansfeld Scott. WEDDING GIFT—A few ironing board | T° Savers, cones rane oe | Wed h 4 Recrbonen, Jarge Uoiteg coon and
kitchen, lovely tiled to’ an 4.7.52—@n | and No-cord iron sets, subject to special | Y4!¢ tneiueln pup ee ee et e do not have t tai’ 7 beac!
bath, wedding-gift allowance, A Barnes &| {1 Gold, Pi rex han New Customers We ot ancl preasiees © obtam find good bathing Pull details -

5 Feng Sale ’ ; ers v :
Downstairs: Garage, servants MISCELLANEOUS Co., Ltd. 3.7. 52—t th. Single and Double Beds and Springs, | . e give you 5% discount whether application.



rooms, with Bath and Toilet,




























Se



towel Racks, Triple Mirror Vanity, with | . you are a new customer, old custom i
and quite enough room for ANTIQUES — ot every di tion upnolstaane atagt Bedside Table ‘and | WHITE ing new cust er or a toot bring- WYNDOVER, ST. PETER—This
whatever you may require Giass, China, old Jewels, fine Blver Night Chair, One Dressing Taple, One | NIMENT 8 omers, s country home with over 4% acres
SWEET FIELD Watercolours. | Marly books, Maps, Aube. A D Buca $8 in rele tanger serine i Our prices on Galvanize Corrugated Sheets are:— SPS, Seats, veeaete,
Lovely Stone House, comprising adjoining Royal Yacht Club. Machine In mahogany Case, one Jones | orchard has been completely
upstairs three bedrooms, large % 3.2.82—t.t.n. Sewing Machine; One painted Breakfast | 4° 6 feet 90 modernised by the present owner
living room, dining room, 2 toilets — ‘our est Suite, Perfection Three Burner Stove x ; ee $3. There are 2 wide verandahs,
and baths, one with Tub bath AMERICAN Brassieres in pink and ee with Oven, One Hot Plate, One Water | LODGE STONE WORKS co. AQ $4.60 drawing and dining rooms, 3
and hot and cold water, gallery, white, A and B cups, all sizes, $1.50 per Cooler, One Spong Mincer, One Picnic} ” » double bedrooms with washbasins,
Downstairs: 3 spare rooms, kitchen ov. Strapless Bras. $2.35 per pr. The Many people never seem to get a good | ico. Flask, Kitchen Ware, One Gallon! A large quantity of 8 ,, $5.24 modern kitchen, laundry, servants
and shower room, Standing on Modern Dress Shoppe, Broad Street. night’s rest. They turn and toss—blame it Ice Cream Freezer, Books, Plants, Gad | K machine broken flint stone, all subject to 5% oa garage. A property of
approximately 2'* Acres of land 6.7.52—-2n ‘nerves’—when it may be their kidne One Garden Seat, and many other items. | \ all sizes, suitable for Road or subj ? s ction.
about 100 yards from Gibbs Beach. | . y ys. Inspection fram 9,30 a.m, on morning | \¢ ie
Inspection by appointment only, § BIG clearance Sale at Variety Sandal : kidneys filter poisons and excess | 4) sale i Yard Construction and/or at WILLOWS, PROSPECT,
Shoppe. Shoes Sandals, Ballerinas, Pumps | acids the blood. If they fail and 6.7.52—In.|% making concrete blocks, or On Iron Corrugated Sheets:— pv et 1 ae constructed
COVE SPRING COTTAGE “nd children's Sandals ete, Buy and] impurities stay in the system—disturbed 'a any other concrete struc- sarang tert a s beus Eas
Av lovely: cottage standing on 2 | save over 50% on these 6.7,52—1n wast ee follows. If you don’t rest well WOOos 399906999809 * x t The Co. al der- x 6 feet $3.00 1 1 Sbedros i exce ay
Roods 27 Perches of land, situate BROODER—One half inch wire, fi use Dodd's Kidney Pills. Dodd’s | * ; eng th: construction of 7 $3.50 Maced, wenden directly over-
st, having its own . ne e, five : ! > e oad > ” . looking the sea, downstai
at St James Coast, having tts tee gp] sombartment chicken brooder, Phone the kidneys so that you can rest |< REAL ESTATE %|% Roads and Yards by con- . 8 | $4.00 eichas, > Sana paStes. ane
bedrooms, with _brivate bath and aes -7.52— better—and feel better. 136 18 tract,. or —— % 9 $4.50 storerooms. Offers invited.
toilet to main bedroom, drawing BARGAINS—Children’ Art Sille mM D 2 ” .
gnd dining room, Buropean BAe BY Panties, 3 prs. for $1.00, Plastic Panties Kidney Pills |< ° KEITH RAYSIDE = 10 ,, $5.00 tall Derrece A apeme Geinged
running water, OT a #00 au Py Mee Reece Drees Rae y ‘, All less 5% nes bungalow on a corner site.
Bone and a gallery on Broad Street 6.7.52—2n % D'ARCY A. SCOTT %| SSOSS SBY re dining rosea verahaahe® kitchen,
; . = Sa " m athe
LAND : i $ Real Estate Agent and % | : rm e Son pastee: qe on s
Near Upton Plantation: guaran- + . \3 % -aid out with lawns and borders
teed Blectric Light. 10 DAY'S NEWS FLASH SHOOTING > x Auctioneer of Middle St, ¥ | of flowering shrube—£3,750,
the St. James Coast i . % |S offers the best in real estate. } A E T A Yy a O R Re 7 D
es ia Fests cu, - Clearing out our new stock SEASON | On his extensive list is a % ° . °
ae of shot gun cartridges:— 4 ms = % property called “Colleen” ¥ PALACE
bas ) : 3 } q
12 GUAGE ELEY—$11.65 iS HERE x % on the sea at Worthing at ¥ Dial 4100, ee
REALTORS Limited per 100 NET CASH Q|X& present vacant, also a three % VELVET EVENING BAGS » , aon pas os unt ed
E Shotgun cartridges $11.50 RIS bedroom stone bungalow at $
REAL ESTATE AGENTS Big closing out reductions per hundred. Our cartridge 31h Welehes, Ch. Ch., and sev- x where cy
AUCTIONEERS on all HARDWARE ITEMS. aoe : 1 as m Sis eral others. Why not make x re
VALUERS ae Saeed ida te he shin Ped $ | x aa appointment and — % | Qualities are HIGH wl eae
w= ®/% look a few. For Real Estate \ CTI
151/152 Roebuck Street, | ; / ee 1, cho ‘ and ¥
ye poe JOHNSON’S STATIONERY $/§ “St BRADSHAW & COM~ 9 /% sec x BUILDING SURVEYORS
Phone 4900 and HARDWARE PANY. 21% a sate % Prices are LOW Phone 4640
Sie: 5) PARSE ease: ey Plantations Building
PSGSSSOLOSSSOS | 69NGSOSSOSSOHHANGOOOOOS: | 5 . os 26900 |'
ri POSOSSSSE SO SSS SSSS SOS POSSESSES SO GOS OOS |












ST. MAR t : First Chevch 61 Christ, Scientist
i ie G yr § 5 ¥'S CHURCH SPEIGHTSTOWN setown, t ¢ Bay Stfeet
Attention is drawn to the Defence (Control of Drug and Patent} Trinity m1 n m Holtnese ecu 3 pr a ag SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1952 7.15 pam. — 10.90 25 Be "

and Proprietary Medicine Prices) Order, 1952, No. 7 which will be} , 79° a.m. Matins, 8.00 a.m. Low Mass, Company Meeting pm. Farewe Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p,m Led poms pam. — 19. 26m , 2 i ; See

published in the Official Gazette of Monday 7th July, 1952 9.00 am. Solemn Mass and Sermon Service, for Sr. Captain & Mr w Wednesdays 8 pm. A Serviee which ee ee Mry —e

y y; pm Stiiday Scidol. 400 pm. Eist Includes Testimonies of Christian Science 409 p.m The News, 410 pm_ Int t :

News, nte :

> a f 2 : - }3 30
2. Under this Order the maximum retail selling prices of “Chases| Children's Vespers. 415 p.m Solem FOUR ROADS Healing wade, 4 15 p m



soap as pure and

eS) ecvtie as Cuticits
r helps to clear awiy.
pimples «and blem-



For The Common Ge ishes and ,:ves aes
a

& 45







SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1952 sa! 3. SUNDAY ADVOCATE | Saas hear Ra PAGE FIFTEEN
: GOVERNMENT Notices = Church Services Shee LISTENING HOURS >= ‘Qpiemishes




































































































Nerve Food”, “Asthma Powder (Kéllogs)”, “Canadian Healing Oil"| Baptism, 7.00 p.m. Solemn Eversong and tl as aliness eeting, 3 mH Subject of L “89 GoD “
ind “Sulphur Bitters (Kings)” are as tel ows: — " gh | Sermon, r ter tHe vaca.” nbs Meeting fm.” Saivetk meet SUNDAY, JULY 6 Some The Bite q i om ‘mer From. ‘The Editoflals, 9 00 pm. National lusty din. Dugrane, Sette
ee Se Seas aa penncinanenrsnstatnemehlilnie e ST, LEONARD'S CHURCH Meeting ler ja Toe fae aw = _ arn. $13 gm. Smetand, 648 pm Ray's \ 2fvite—EKdward Ward | . | tev Of @ coplots ereacny lacher, the deep
| 3 MAXIMUM and Choral ‘Eucharist, 10.90 ain. jlo wee: he grill a@ell With them, ahathey ana! auee. ©16 pm Bnetisn Magazin. 0. NeW Casino Orchestra. 10-00 down cleansing of mildly medicated
ITEM | UNIT OF SALE RETAIL Baptism, 3 p.m. Sunday School. 7 $ oh 1) Am. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m 2é Rte Btople, and God himself shall be jude om. Progre mme Parade and Inter te News, 1010 pm News Talk. 10 15 | Gaticura Soap will safeguard your natural
ey | PRICE Evensong and Sermon Company Meeting. 7 p.m Salvation With them. and be their God : Homme Ni we cae rw pt op Tune : , loveliness, Buy a tablet today.
xs th tiranditinasnapen aelniigit | Hh fen fa x... | THE ST. JAMES NATIONAL HAPTisr ‘iceting am ea ma are ine.uded 715 qatae ba a iin ns
“ ~ ns d sermott, 7 ue deutenant K. Gibbor » shou Sermon: “ee at Som a fecktaccehe ervey
Chases Nerve Food .. wt Bottle $1.00 bikenee rst a i eer a The Bihie: The Lord is good to al ne in
é Asthma Powder (Kellogs) | ie i 48 }rbbes oa J.B. Grant. LT ll oawm orcas Meeting, 3 p.m 1 Pg tender mercies are re his . a =a, baitailian, 9 “ j i
1 er e e Sompany Meetin 7 pm Salvation a salir , ’ » bbean Volees, 1 45 p+ MEAT “aT
, Canadian Healing Oil ee * j .62 t 4 BO pam. Soadny, Wednesday, Frifia Meeting " tb a wie Health with Key te the see ere. a4 pm Radio New: } (OVERNMENT NOTH }
‘ > } . rainin, ‘ior youth s wil e te ~aptain Moore ‘eel, » Th communism in Cl a
Sulphur Bitters (King’s) .. | ‘s i $i.44 ducted by" the: ter. BruceCiat tet “ ss Att “oni See Be i 20 tnteriade, hal > Fre hte shih
n as’ ’ -§ a ’ RAVIAN subs ce, intelli, \. wi n dito: a, 0 a B.C Yon Sores «ee
5th July, 1952. 6.7.52—In, | Browne a) ane Mite, Glee ognurk SERRer tT aim, Morning being, PRETO, Sees, nag etect fet, Oveheta 1666 °> im Ths Nees, | COVERNMENT OF BARBADOS|
METHODIST Service. followed by Holy Communion: belong to God Page 275 = zm News Talk, 10.18 pm. Lon- | SALE OF PICKUP " 3 SRA VIEW GUEST
Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend+ gieeette ns hee — ~~ ieakion, eee ieliones ee Mistery and o Lite” See Rime: in The Barbados Regiment has for su :
ment) Order, 1952, No. 24 which will be published in the Official | Crosse. Sacrament of Tahis | Busbe: Communion); Preacher: Rev. BE Mnligay sey + gale one Hillman Pickup without | HOUSE
Gazette of Monday 7th July, 1952. RES, ene" E frathwaits, ,G@RACE Hiltdes11 a.m, Morning Service “Trader” Comes To 4.00 pit—2.15 pam, = 9 fem 2s sam | engine and gear-box. The Pick- ve
2, Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling |? pm Mx. U. Callender Spee eo: Seay a. ene 2 ee a eens caleen— | UP Ee 8 Come ied condition HASTINGS, BARBADOS
prices ef “Margarine (c) Mello-Kreem Brand” are as follows: — peaieees te — ae es roca ‘ FULNECK 11 am Morning Service Carlisle Bay Tomorrow Baily Seryjce, 415 > im a Tale ‘ot Two tor’ ine rinses ot he ted ar Daily and Longterm Rates
- RICES—@ a.m. Rev. S. W. C. Crosse, Breacher, Ms R. Lewis, 7 pom itles, pm Les Compagnens De | which can be seen on abplicati quoted on request.
. WHOLESALE | Sacrament of Lord's Slipper. 7 pm “yening. Service, Preacher, Mr W.Swire. The Steamship “Trader” is ex- La Chanson, $00 pm Smetana, 5 15 | WCD Can be seen on a ene Permanent Guests
ARTICLE | PRICE | RETAIL PRicE | MF, H. Mular ‘aul Sunday ‘schécls ARONMTOMRY Pom, nvening Seve pected to arrive in Carlisle Bay Webh Miscellany, 0.18 som ‘tmuner | Regimente Sees | welcome.
; } BETHEL METHODIST CERCUIT - ' ” Mi 5/4 = wn on onday, . m. Sports Round-up and 2s ittec mer an ba
| (not more than) (not more than) fe . Evening Service, Preacher: Mr. A —_ free Y 1 Mond Sreeaiass opm ee ts R * 9. Offers should be submitted Din d Cocktail
Rnetas ge j oes eee, On Fury DUNSCOMBE—7 p.m. Fvening Setvice, \ UY is steamship is Coh- News, 710 pm Hi Be he} ta the Colonial Secretary, Public Parties arranged.
ree | aly Gomininion Fie sar, TUNA: Preaghee: Mr. W. A. Deane 3 este een Sti ae ome News From) Buildings, not later than 4.00 J. H, BUCKLAND
‘ | eco ; oe meets SHOP HILL—7 p.m. Evening Service; Thursday y, 1952. | Proprietor.
(c) Mello-Kreem Brand | $2.70 per 5 Ib. tin | 59¢ per lb. or less Sra Se: a : Werle ME Wk Ree : p.m, on Thursday 10th July, 1952 bs)
} than 4 Ib. Ake. | 7 p.m. Rey 7 re ee oe ' HOMESTUDY COURSES FOR $7 N Pct A At tit Rs Matchen ata
| per oz, | munion : —
$13.44 case of | 6le, per lb. or less} BELMONT: 9 a.m. T. J. Furley, Ho'y .
Nf i ‘ a : “He fs s GENERA To-morrow — Night, To-morrow
24 x 1 Ib. tins peg, Ib. 44¢. | “aour inhi Mr. G. “Brewster. Lindsyd ll On Dock | eomenen colon at ith cote exes eVERY WEEK Nini AI! Monde Leads Yo King’s
iu aithe, bom r. C. Jones } . . ry ¢ 4 Ladi¢s and Ge atiemen Don't
‘ Note: There is no change in the retail prices of the above item.|7p mo Mr} Clarke “SMS ony i } w " - Forget th ir’ Tithe in
‘a tap 3 nite e Schooner Lindsyd II is now ‘olsey Hall, Oxford, can successfully prepare you by post for the above examina- | store {
k This publication clarifies the wholesale price of one| , VAUXHALL: Il am. Mr. lL Mayers, on dock undergoing repairs, Her tions; also lor London Uni rees; A.C.P,; R.S.A.; Bar, and other | € s ore for you at
pound tins, . COLLYMORE ROCK A, M. & cnurRCcH iceel 1s being worked and all the Seren inst "Mover weiner mei jpeg mon ae. arn Ne eee
m ne Vorship, 3.3 m iv . oti : »D, » MLA. LL.D., which w »¢ given by
th July, 1908. 8.7-52—1n. | exngny Veengel.T18 uin Receentas being removed, | WOLSEY HALI 0 the mayan ‘ eertinn ANAS HOLE
oO! ure cers and Holy Communion GLAND at wryhedys F-ten ar P-lié
| Revival Services from July 6th, through XFORD éxciano On MONDAY NIGHT 7th JULY.
Until further notice the following price has been arranged Bist; every evening at 7.15. A cordial The Schooner Harriett Whittaker | sie AEORS AE A SF See eam eres
___Untfrtner notice the following price hasbeen arranged | Mnf" gig,’ hh si, The Schooner Marit, Whitaker WEATHERHEAD'S ee
| ; Discount if paid | PREACHING PLAN — JAMES STREET, getting a general overhaul, Work . \ Music by Pere) Green's Orchestra
ITEM ’ | Som Price | by 31st July, 1952. SAE ONTSTOWN Marnonssy, . on this schooner began over the \ y y 1 Bar Solid Miss this ana blaine
ee kitty dant | da ~ a eee ney last week end. At present she is PRU VTORE Bynpire ‘Theatre at 6.58" Bim.
. z To s, BA., B Sh al uven- . Pp ne Theat 8 30
SULPHATE. OF AMMONIA « $153.70 $2.25 ie "Misetonary Meeting. 7 °o'm 2“Ne"" teaning on one side in the Careen« .oughing,- Stra ling Asthma an , ape a
6.7.52—In, | \PAYNES BAY: 9 30 am. Mr. W. St ane a ee Ta rer CON ee 2 ' BOOTS—Mi 1 Salts S|
aS * |Hi, 7 pm, Mr. V. B. St. John. Cleaned. n hifi Cu be in 3 Mi t ee ee ee ee
WHITEHALL: 9 30 n 3 Twelv e th k For Cattle, Horses, Sheep It's Rove Feths!
VACANCY FOR BUILDING CONSTRUCTION CLERKS marge TBM fee bawrence on her. * The Dutch Metor vessel Bor a ns. 7 rp Go Sones , muinutes seine wtiipesnt Wan A GRAND DANCE
; am 3 : ronchitis so by c every Pt
OF WORKS IN BRITISH HONDURAS Layne. 7; tm Mr »P ¥" teen fer ge ae —_ off bo and asp for ‘breath and can't sie 3 night, couldte neon, expecte to die i a 9 on wae | : mur .
+ . . : 0 am Vv D > yi ou co hear 0 S. .) 7° |
, ‘ Applications are invited for a Senior Clerk of Works (salary | Towers, B.A. B.D 7p a Mr D eaaine saikante as a you were being ruptured? Do. you | first night ant Pras d cee ee 3/6 per package | ar ie ae be
Sopol aco thesereeer mules te anaes coh ek antag ae or for the main ‘engne io bata | eer ented (Gee Gites)" Pan rare BOOTS Bicarbonateot —|})|| wall! sata’ as (ROM! ie
“ 2 ot ee a 30 am ; e is e cure 1 o C r ette now s (
geabracsnevahien is hilt Recicuner te it and assist in @ building Sinckler, 7% a Lae Sydney Payne repaired and clesned at the Cen- sag't cat certain foods? The et eet oer 7 Soda \4tb pk. 180. pk. fhe wee en ae
Honduras. Th ; ; y the Government of British} SPEIGHTSTOWN: 11 am Rev Ff tral Foundry, No matter how long you have suf- | 03° Mark Sat Cone of DACO BOOTS — Chlorophyl Tonic On ties ree The weane
Honduras.” The starting salary will depend on the qualifications and|tawrence, 7 pm. Mr. GM. Many , fered or what you have tried, there | Fugen your blood and helping nae | Tablet. 1/6 each (bottle) a ee
Paatbont of the applicants. Candidates must have a full knowledge ;|“SSLaH: 930 am. Mr. F Moore This heat te prescription. called MAUNDACO. No | {Ure rid you of the effoots of Asthma , | Mt QUEEN'S PARK MOUSE
of timber and reinforced concrete construction and should give full! BETHESDA: ‘9.20 , is heat exchanger is part of dopes, no smokes, no injections, no} in ne time at all MENDACO may MACHADO CIGARS ADMISSION 2
information about ther Qlalifications, ete, togcther with copie | teen : 930 am Rey PF the main engine and its main job atomiaer. All you do ts take two] C@#lly make you feel years younger Gems, J. T. C., Londres ! Music by Mr, Perey Green's
testimonials and references, Pete . meio THE SALVATION ARMY is to keep the engine cool, The tastelegs taniore, Bd, Ase Sra veut aad seronger, tty MENDACO under Fleurs, La Tropical 1 Orohesiis
, Passages will be paid to and from the Colony. Fourteen days) 11 am CESK EN BAL 3 salt water passes through the tubes } minutes MENDACO ute Asie. dn You be the judge. If you don’t feel : | Resear oe oe SAU
ical leave will be granted each year and three months leave on| Company Meeting. 7 pin Salvation 204 the fresh water around them (ng through your blood alding nature | Miiy pathaned atten tare ae THERMOS SILVER JUGS | Ree eee ee Gamer
full pay at the eng of the tract, Applications should be addressed | Meeting. or . saat” These tubes which were taken out phiceen Sopa fee enay treat Ang DA Ned shat returns the went tans for Teed Water at night |
to the Director of Public Works, Belize. | caasalor & Mrs. W. Mortis Divisignel nt — spree engine when the Wil- | snd bring sound s sep the first night age and the full purchase price wil (2 pints). A wonderful eee
6.7.52—In. | BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL lems ad went on dock is now being | er stronger. ¥ younger | your Chemiat today and see how } present.
VACANT POST 0 adam ane geniing, a: Bm c ae Py these tubes are | 4 Ne Asthma in 2 Years - Pail you sleep soplent and how mush BOXES OF MOIRS s es
\ y 4 p.m Salvation yked, > engi | yt OrTrow, ae ‘ . | , v
7 - R RA ea, GENERAL HOSPITAL, Meeting th a ieebeer Ternpietate. k