Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
__







ESTABLISHED 1895



Speech By Alexander Kaises Storm

Churchill Says Bradley
Was Consulted Before’
House of Lords Report

LONDON, July 2.

RITISH DEFENCE MINISTER Earl Alexander declared
in a privaie speech that he would be happier to see
more reserves in Korea and his words raised another
political storm in Parliament on Wednesday. Angers
Labour leaders demanded in vain an immediate emergency
debate on the fact that Field Marshal Alexander gave
“secret” facts to a club meeting on Tuesday night that
he did not report to Parliament. '
Speaker W. S. Morrison suggested instead that if the
Labour Party wished to press the dispute they should put

down a Notion of Censure against the Government and
Prime Minister Winston Churchill agreed. Mr. Churchi
stepped into the breach to defend Zarl Alexander in 1
debate with former Defence Minister Emmanuel Shinwell
ana fori Prime Minister Clement Attlee. ‘Churchill

said during his defence that Alexander did not mention
weakness in reserves when he reported to Parliament on
his recent Korean tour on Tuesday because he was request- |
ed not to, by Generai Omar Bradley, Chairman of the
American Joint Chiefs of Staff.
Churchill first explained that-

Alexander’s speech was in answu't

ye
to private invitation and the de- W d shor
bate followed. The Prime Minis- m slor mM
ter said Alexander told the! e 5
Canada Club in an impromptu Razes Chile os

speech that there are weaknesses
in Korea, one of which he did 7

not like to merition. The speech | Food Crops
Tuesday night followed the big

Yalu bombing debate in Partia-
ment and Alexander’ report
When members of the audience
cried out “why not” Churchii

ARICA, Chile, July 2

A windstorm of hurricane pro
oe that lashed the .North-
€
|

rr ection of Chile for 24 hou
quoted Alexander as ying, “be- + huge nd and dust clouds
cause it is a thir I was asked }deatroyed crops anic disrupted
not to mention as it is a matter }communications.
of secrecy.”
Can Stop Them First reports said there were 1
“If the Chinese attempt a full]‘ 1a ltic but damages whicl

scale offensive they will penetr far are unestimated are belic
the front to a depth of some miles|Considerable. The storm destro
in some places but I believe th. }!@fge plantations of corn, potatoes
owing to the efficiency of the, tomatoes, sugar cane as well
Eighth Army and their fire power olive and orange groves in Azav:
they will be able to bring any!!! the interior province of Tara
offensive to a halt.” Other weak- | P#®c4

nesses which Alexander . men- Reports said Lluta Valley in the
tioned according to newspaper {came province was similarly lash- |
reports were, lack of air camou~ eq, The storm interrupted Arica
flage and the inexperience of [a Paz railroad schedules when |

many front line troops because some points along the line were
of rotation,







Lord Alexander used on the spur

of the moment wa no doubt . ran
unfortunately chosen, Churehill rT \
said. “What he intended to im- Assembly Vote For
ply was that his remarks were ,

liable to be misconstrued if said Police Round-up Of

in a public speech and not that
they affected military security ; _
a ‘ty Absent Members

opinion they
Det PUSEN, July 2
Churchill said Alexander took :

the precaution of referring points
of his reports to the House
Lords to Bradley before he spoke
and Bradley had replied he would
prefer that nothing be said about
Korean reserves, Bradley: thought]
that the statement in its original
form might be misconstrued as

s a 9 i *
fs so ones AE Spy Pleads Cooper’s Neck Broken pyperts Will
Not Guilty As Tree Crashes

LONDON, July

|
|

Eighty-six Assembly membe
requested the police round-up
a vote taken during a_ sect
session.

might be interpreted as implying]open to question since the A

that there are virtually no re-|sembly was six short of a working plead not guilty

serves In consequence of this| quorum. Nevertheless they, dou!

in the House of Lords
ence to reserves but





ing off the record, he made refer-| boycotting sessions and at lec=t|0f the Soviet embas
ence in the form which I have} 25 others are missing or in hiding. |information about I

read to the House of Commons.”

ing the vote on Rhee’s Govern- | ‘calculated
Harmless ment to change the South Korev | directly

Chur¢hill said he thought the constitution. | aay nem





statement to be harmless. “The |

circumstafices of the occasion and :

the use of the word “ssneey’| C.L.C. Protest |
have invested the incident with . *

an air of mystery and significance Adanis Detention
which can only be removed by 2

full tement such as I have (From Our Own Correspongent)

serves of the Eighth Army had} Barbadian political Labour
since been “substantially increas-| Leader in New York last Thurs-
ed” by troops used to restore|day, has been protested to the
order at Koje. Secretariat of the Caribbean

Churchill and Shinwell were| Labour Congress. The C,.L.C. today
immediately involved in a hot|sent letters to President Truman
exchange. When pressed by the;and the United States Consul
other’s questions the Prime Minis- |General in Jamaica protesting the
ter muttered insultingly and then action as an insult to Caribbean

@ On page 3. democracy.

MGLIDBAVIN





YOLANDE POMPEY, BABA-ADAMS AND MANAGER



TOP LEFT:
TOP RIGHT:

24-year-old |

radio operator who coded



The National Assemblymer | pleaded not
of | Supporting Syngman Rhee in the he handed informa-
fight for popuiar Presidential tion to Russian diplomat in London. |
elections voted to ask for a police Marshall’ next |
| round-up of absent members. Wednesday
rain-
the court, his pale,
eplied in a firm clear voice when
implying serious inadequacy of \he was

reserves, “In its original form it Whether the vote was legal wus |five charges brought under official|poth these men worked

gainst Marshall
interchange, Lord Alexander|that Home Minister Lee Sui | '0-day was that on five occasions
omitted from his public speech| would obey the “mandate” and|beginning with April 25 of
any refer-|send his police looking for the |Year for
speaking 4] assemblymen. | the safety”
he thought to a private gather- More than 40 Assemblymen are | Pavel Kuz

Absent assemblymen are prevent-|matic wireless service which was

@ On page 3.





THURSDA

a



Shows McIntosh’s body where it fell after being struck
Picture shows main trunk of tree which caught its

HELPER



on their own behalf

Mr, H, F. Alkins, Manager of the |
“a purpose prejudicial to| Barbados Co-operative Cotton | rp,
gave|Factory said that when in the}
ond Secretary

y in Britain

past few weeks work at the coop
3 er’s trade slowed down, the Man-
jritain’s diplo-|agement, in order to find some-
thing for the men to do, and at
be |the same time in an effort to clear
to|jthe yard in order to get more
| pace, they decided to give these

two men the tree provided the



Trinidad Boxers Pass
Schwinn “nil se] osinion eats Moore L rough On Way Home

ANSEL BABA-ADAMS, Heavy-weight champion 0
Yolande Pompey, undefeated cruis
weight champion of the West Indies, both of whom in
twelve-months’ tour of England scored note-worthy suc
’ and put the West Indies on the boxing ma
passed through here yesterday with their Manage
Jack Burns on the 8.8. Coleombie on their way home to
1 where they will spend a holiday.

During their 12 months in the

ers from the land of the Hum-
ming Bird, turned in grand per-

fers: tre Country, these two fight

formances, Pompey fighting un

jefeated in 12 contests, 11 of

j}which he won and the other he
|drew with Jim Slade why

ked out Don Cockell of
Britain in 4 rounds, To this big-

irted fighter also goes the dis-

the world to stop the Austra

re Middle-weight Crown. the assembly on the question

1 triple crowned holder Day
Sands who also holds the British
“his hievement was all the

more noteworthy for when the
fereé opped the
from further punishment

in .the 7th round, the Trinidadiar

vas far behind on points
jaba-Adams had 8 fight }

12 momths in England, ar he



sand

) ever The other he lost,
ut made up for this defeat by



outpointing the same man in a
return match Adams’ toughest) Qeean
encounter wa with the South|{
African Heavyweight champion!

Jonnie Arthur whom he defeated
on points.
Mr. Burns, the Manage of



these two boys, is one of Eng-
land’s leading boxing manager |
nd he is very yptimistic about
he future of these two West In-
tian He hopes that within the

@ On page 6



JULY. 3, 1952 e





TRAGEDY AT CHURCH VILLAGE

of the United States demand for Red Cross investigation

of Communist charges that United States troops have used

bacterial weapons in Korea, and warned that in the end
1

by the trunk of the tree.

victim as he tried to pull himself up out of the hole.

BOTTOM LEFT: A cross section of the large crowd outside the Cooporage yard trying to gain admittance to the scene of the tragedy
BOTTOM RIGHT: Three Policemen battle desperately to shut gatos

which were being constantly fotced open by the surging crowd geen in
the picture at the left.

Down Piscuss Civil

jie Aviation
UNHURT

GRANTLEY McINTOSH, a Cooper of Bragg;
Joseph, was killed instantly yesterday afternoon about | (:
1.45 when a huge tamarind tree which he and Clarence |
Cutting were felling gave way from the roots, struck him |
| on the head and broke his neck

modernising
al aerodromes to make them

I Cutting was catapulted | ports
to safety by the backlift of the tree trunk,
The fatal accident occurred ji
the yard of the Barbados Co-Op

erative Cotton Pactory’s Cooper-
asked how he pleaded tofage at Church

dug up the roots after they had|

Conference the late
schemes under Colonial

Last Friday Development

Village wher«
as coop } of

ers. They were felling this tree|Saturday morning he and Cut- illocated, specifically
which had been given to then Development
them close to
the trunk of ,the tree

Work continued on Monday and} cated in the year ending Marc

uesday and was still in progress

£1,719,224 was allo

wt for Colonial Civil Aviation
Aeronautica
jeu red. They had excavated about! Telecommunication
of securing} developments

at the top a rope which they hac ,
um allocates

This latter precaution they
completed,

] Government
tinulng the

importance
conference

excavation
’ forthcoming
the digging
25 experts
@ On page 6.



Case Against
Duclos Debated

PARIS, July 2
lhe French government debated
of the, Whether to try again to imprison
Communist
Duclos or to drop the case against me

Conference
imong other topics
lity of improving Civil Aviation

Second Since War

Conference
be held since )
had been calle:
experts up
the latest development
particularly

The government’s first attempt to end of the war.
ry Duclos on the charge of plotting
against the State’s security failed
when it was ruled

Representatives of the Ministr:
the Ministry
Ministry and the

parliamenta

ommonwealth

The decision
government

Communist
Some parliamentary observers
lieved government would drop the

that either

tinction of being the only man
the Colonie

istant Under





“| Race Begins

BERMUDA

After Delay

|" aching 27 knot





Bermuda this r
Bermuda-Ha



Viconderoga





PRICE : FIVE CENTS

——_



In Commons

U.N. Debate Will Go On
Despite Russia’s 50th
|v eto In Couneil’s Life

| UNITED NATIONS, New York, July 2.

i RUSSIA, SMARTING under a series of resounding
defeats in the United Nations in the germ warfare propa-
‘anda campaign against the United States, was on a “sit
jown strike” in the Security Council today

| Soviet delegate Jacob Malik angrily told the Council
yesterday that Russia “will not participate in the debate”

he would veto the proposal,
Despite Malik’s notice that the 50th veto in the United
Nations’ six year history would kill any possibility of an
impartial showdown investigation on the spot in-Kovéa,
the Council will proceed with the debate to-day at 3.00
p.m. (E.D.T
Malik sit dow Anneunces
4 . ment followed three defeats for
4g ‘ Soviet propaganda in the Security
Ke st German Council. After using the presi-
> e : dency for more than a week to
7“ \ oa I ignore the United States demand,
I olice f rre 5 Malik’s own call for all countric
e to ratify the 1925 Geneva protocol
A A yf ae outlawing po'son g
‘4 meric ans warfare was killed
‘il last Thursday



and germ
by tae Coun-

BERLIN, July





Malik manoeuvre. obviously

Armed East German police (> | was designed to embaras ihe

iy arrested four Americans in- | United States which signed but

iding a woman who tnied to}did not ratify the Geneva Treaty.

: ag ew a our

logic. fei ig oe oes , we The Kussian decision not to

rlin, the police reported, They | “Participate” in the debate did

vere taken by ear into E hot mean a Soviet walk-out such

rermany by German poli as the stroll taken by Sovitt

companied by a Seviet offic delegate Andrei A., Gromyke

+ luring the [ranian debate in 1946.

The neident occurred on »{ Nor did it mean @ repetition of

rder of a United State ec orfthe seven-month boycott of 1950

istrict. West Berlin police i when Russia refused to attend

he Americans drove wp in a W U.N, meetings because the Secu

jerman ear and crossed a line o ty Council declined to seat Com-

1 road marking the begins .} munist China in place of Chinese
tf Kast Cerman territory eboutt Nationalists—U,P.

yards in Tran, of an f {G



road block

“ .
when they started taking poo | Jamaica Hoitse

graphs, Kaat German pol
ushecd up waving rifles and forced 2 %
them to go with them Onw I lan Changes
American man was reported to ba Fiore .
| priest, United States authorities
cre said they were investigating. JAMAICA, July 2.
wP Ghatiges in Jarvaica’s constitu-
Se enen ti ion Came under debate in the
rr Jamaica House of Representatives
I ruce Talks today in connection with pro-
7 posals to set up eight Ministries
with individual responsibility

Postponed _ jres: santte,

If approved the changes will
uive the island full elected con-
‘rol over government departments
cxeepting finance and an elected

ajority in the Executive Coun-
cil by the appointment of three
dditional Ministers.

+ Own Correspondes

PANMUNJOM, July 2

Communists unexpectedly asked
a one day postponement in

be Korean truce talks revivin
rp that a break is immincn
the jong deadlocked negotiations
United Nations immediately agrees arr
the postponement and agreed The debate was initiated by

» meet again to-morrow at 11 W. A. Bustamante Majofity



m, (10.00 pm, E.D.T. to-day).[ Party Leader. Norman Manley
Reds presumably wanted more] Opposition Leader demanded
me to study the “exhaustive|that the House reject the pro-
eview” of the armistice discu posals as contrary to Jarnaican
ons. It was believed here that{¢esire and demands and form a
ommunist negotiators sent Har-| United non-Party Front to move
tison’s statements to a higher}immediately for the achieve-
level—possibly Peiping or Mos-}ment of full self government of
ow—for further study and decis-finternal affairs by next year, The
on.-—-U.P, debate continues tomorrow,

| Gravel Cunard |







ts MAURETANEN

Applications for Trans-Atlantic Passages
to England during 1953 have already reached
unpredicted levels. Those who contemplate
visiting the U.K. are strongly advised to make
their applications immediately

RASTBOUND Accommodation available
from August 1952 onwards



WESTBOUND Accommodation available
from October 1952 onward

Choice of Seven luxury liners from New
York {

Choice of Six lixury liners from Canad:

= RATES (ineluding plane Fares) we

From £100 (Tourist)
£120 (Cabin)
£135 (First Class)

HANSCHELL LARSEN & Co., Ltd.
Agents

THE CUNARD SS. CO., LTD.
DIAL 4114.









PAGE TWO





Carib Calling —

Me BRUCE MERIVALE
USTIN, elde i of Mr





and Mrs. Merivale Austin of
“Waterford,” Hastir 12s been
eppointed Manager Thoma
Skinner of Canada Ltd., Montreal.

He succeeds Mr. Arthur Innes
Pocock, Editor of the Canada
West Indies Year Book

Major Merivaie Austin has
served with the Black Watch

(R.H.R-) since 1938. He married
the Hon. Alison Hope, daughter
of Lord and Lady Rankeillour.

His two small caughters are
it prescnt staying with their
grandparents in Barbados.

Hawaiian Businessmen

MONG the passengers making

the cruise on the Moore
McCormack Liner Uru8uay which
called at Barbados yesterday
morning from Trinidad were a
party of fourteen Hawaiian busi-
nessmen “and their wives headed
by Mr. Themas Hore.

They paid a» visit to the city
and afterwards went sight seeing,
visiting such places as Hackle-
ton’s Cliff, St- John’s Church, Sam
Lord’s Castle and the Crane.

Golf Professional

R. AND MRS. H. E. BRISLEY

of Caracas, Venezuela who
were in Barbados two years ago
are now back again for two
weeks’ holiday. They arriv;cd
ever the week-end by B.WI1A
and are staying at Cacrabr,
Hotel Mr. Brisley is Golf Pro-
fessional of the Caracas Country
Club,

Their daughter
hag just completed a three-year
course studying Liberal Aris at
the University of Missouri, has
come over with them on her first
visit to the island.

Back to The U.S.A.
R. GERALD FORDE, a Bar-
badian resident in the U-S.A.
for the past forty years, returned
to his home in Brooklyn on Mon-
day by the Fort Townshend after
spending. two months’ holiday
here. He was staying at thei
Cosmopolitan Guest House.
Mr. Forde is in the real estate
business“tn the U.S.A,

Medico Returns

R. ECS, ST. JOHN of “West-

gate”, Corner of Strathclyde,
returned-from England yesterday
morning by the s.s Colombie after
an absence of three months, Dr.
St. Johnwent up in the interest
of his h@ilth.

Trevelliee Besrasentative
M"...< PARRAVICINO,
devenine Representative
of Messrs. L. M. B. Meyers and
Co. Ltdy returned to Barbados;
yesterday. morning after a two
wetk business visit to Dominica,
Montserrat, and Martinique.

Winding Up Leave
INDING up his six months’
leave in Barbados is Mr.

G. F. Adam, Senior Examiner of
Accounts of the Audit Depart-
ment, Tfinidad. He arrived here
yesterday morning by the
Colombie from England where he
spent the greater part of his leave

Virginia who

and is staying at Silver Beach
Guest House, Rockley.
Mr. Adam was accompanied by

his wife



Hospital=To Ascot

IT first saw the
in hospital wards, It’s been un-
der our noses for years, and
nobedy thought of making it into
anything but a uniform,

It is familiar in the old pinky
colour, but is now sweeping
America in fashionable prints
and vivid new colours. It is
DENIM, the Cinderella fabric,
now emerged as a No. 1 fashion
material.

One fashion

light of day

house in Britain
which: took a chance on Denim
cannot make enough dresses to
meet the demand.

It is cheap, selling retail
3% gns., and it washes,

Tt doesn’t fade or crease, and
it is.made this year in a dark
green, hyacinth blue and a honey
colour.

for

4-Nation Show
A cembined French/Italian/
American/British fashion show
was. held. in London, when top
designers’ from the four coun-
tries showed all - wool fashions
for the autumn.

I noted :-—

@ The similarity between the
Italian and French clothes —
except in cost. In an effort
to capture the fashion market
the Italians are keeping their
prices down,
The absence
the 44
ers.
The gossamer
fabrics, which
finest chiffon,
The English models, who
managed to look exotic in the
Italian c'othes, chic in the
French clothes, cute in the
American clothes, and com-
fortable, but well turned-out,
in the English clothes,
Thet the dress which got the
most applause and was talked
about most of all was—Eng-

of M. Dior from
world-famous design-

- like -wool
leok like the

he SENOS SSSR



" Jonnny—please pay more |
atiention—-for the purposes
of this lesson. the chief
exports of Imdiia are not
Umrigar, Hazare, @hadkar
and Ghulam Akined



London Expres+ Service.

After Four Months
RS. ELIZABETH MAC
FARLANE of Rochester, New
York, left for Antigua and Puerto
Rico on Monday by B.W.1.A. on
her way back home after spending
four months staying at the Sr.
Lawrence Hotiel,

Spent Ten Days
FTER spending ten days’ holi-
day staying at the St. Law-
rence Hotel, Mr. and Mrs. John
Parker of Georgetown, British
Guiana have now gone to Trini-
dad. Mr. Parker left over the
week-end by his company’s boat
the Athelbrook while his wife left

en Monday by B.W.LA.

Seventh Visit
PAYING her seventh visit to
Barbados is Miss Mabel

Taylor of the U.S.A. She arrived
on Monday by B,W.I.A. via
Puerto Rico and will be remain-
ing for two months staying at
Cacrabank Hotel.

Miss Taylor was last here dur-
ing the summer of 1948 when she
spent five months.

Off to U.K.

V. E. A. PITT, B.D: and Mrs.

Pitt, left Barbados on Sun-
day by the De Grasse for the
United Kingdom on _ furlough.
Rev. Pitt who is Superintendent
of the Georgetown Circuit of the
Methodist Church was at one tifne
Superintendent of the Ebenezer,
Circuit, St- Philip.

While here, Rey. and Mrsf Pitt
were guests of Miss Bullen of}
“Emerald Ville’, Cheapside.

Bank Director
R. C. C, GEORGE, Local
Director of Barclays Bank
(D.C. and .O.) and Mrs. George
of “Uplands”, Maxwell Hill were
passengers by the Colombie for
Trinidad yesterday afternoon.
Mr. George has gone over to
meet Mr. J. F. Cade, General
Manager of Barclays Bank and
Mr. Charles Gingell, Director
of the Bank in New York.
They will spend six days together
after which Mr, Cade and Mr.
Gingell will leave for Jamaica
and the Bahamas while he will
spend a week with his grand-,
children at Leaseholds, Point-a-
Pierre before returning ‘here,

By SUSAN DEACON

lish, It was newcomer John

Cavanagh’s elegant, narrow

fitting grey flannel evening

dress,
Why the Label ?

WHY must women's
always be labelled?

Worst culprits are the
whose favourite labels for
and dresses are:—

“For the
woman,”

“For the older woman,”

“For the under-30’s (or over

30's).

“For the fashion - conscious
woman,”

And hats :-—

“For the woman who wants
to look her best.”

“For a special occasion,” and

“For the not-so-young.”

HOW WRONG is the view
that women must always be
something, either sophisticated
or net-so-young or fashion con-
scious,

HOW WRONG is the view
that women only buy a hat or
dress for one occasion, either
mornings or for a specia] date.

AND HOW WRONG, too, is the
view that all the older women, nr
all the under 30's, or all sophisti-
cated women, can a!l wear the
same styles,

clothes

shops
coats

sophisticated

‘Exciting,’ This

THE B.B.C. men
are in great demand in a more
glamorous role of comparing
women's fashion shows,

At two shows last week the
clipped voices of Frank Phillips
and MeDonald Hobley did not
falter over the unaccustomed
fashion phrases, and the models
out-posed each other for a smile
from the compere,

I liked Frank Phillips's des-
cription of an “exciting coat lin-
ing” and a “fascinating colour.”

announcers

~ posing them,

rueeiianred

naa. A. CAMPBELL, form-
i erly Distribution Superin-
tendent

of the Power Co. in
Bermuda, is now on his way to,
British Guiana to take up a simi-}
lar post. He arrived here yes-
terday morning by the Colombie
from England where he had been
on six months’ leave and left
later in the afternoon by the same
opportunity for Trinidad. He was
accompanied by his wife.

Mr. Campbell told Carib that
Barbados had a good shopping
centre as compared with the other
islands he had visited, The streets
were clean, the people were well
clothed and he noticed no begging
on the streets.

He was particularly impressed
by the policemen directing traffic.
They were extremely smart and
efficient.

Photographer on The

“Colombie”

R. ROGER CHAUVET of

Paris who has been working
en the s.s, Colombie for the pas*
‘twenty months as photographer
told Carib yesterday that he liked
his job very much. It allows him
to see several places of interest
on the trip and he takes a number
of photegraphs of the various
colonies which he keeps as
souvenirs.

Prior to joining the ship. he
was employed with Harcourt
which is supposed to be the
largest photo studio in Paris. It
carries a staff of eighty photogra-
phers.

Visiting Her Sons
RS. W. S. ARCHER from
Deminica was intransit by
ihe Cclombie yesterday for Trini-
cad where she will spend about
four months holiday with her sons.












She was accompanied by her
grand-daughter Miss Hetty
Knowlton,

Mrs. Archer is the mother of
Mr. W. S. Archer, Acting Fin-
ancial Secretary of Trinidad, Mr.
Hunter Archer, the Tranquillity
tennis player who is head of the
Port-of-Spain Branch of Trinidad
Leaseholdas Ltd. and Mr. J. S.
Archer who id also with T.L.L.

A Trinidadian by birth, she has | 3

been living in Dominica for the
past 31 years. Her first visit back
to her native land since she left
it was last year when she visited
her children,

Intransit

ISS CHRISTINE CROSSE,

Headmistress of Gingerland
Girls’ School, Nevis, was an in-
transit passenger on the s.s. Fort
Townshend which left here on
Monday on its way back to the
US.A-

Miss Crosse who spent nine
months’ holiday in the United
States, stopped off here on her
first visit to the island to see her
relatives, She is a sister of Rev.
S. W. C. Crosse of Ebenezer
Manse, St- Philip.

Returns From U.K. Visit
ETURNING from England

yesterday morning by the
Colombie after an enjoyable three
months’ holiday were Mr. Ashley

Phillips of the Royal Bank of
Canada and Mrs. Phillips of
“Kineton”, Rockley Terrace.



Light on Age

BEAUTY experts in America,
having discovered that light
seems to melt away skin hollows
and wrinkles rather than ex-
are recommending
a new light, creamy make-up for
women with ageing skins, After
all these years, they say dark, or
peach tinted, foundation and
powder are more ageing than
lighter cosmetics.

There is also news of two-
colour eyebrows which start by
being either dark brown or black,
and taper off to a much lighter
brown,

Silk/nylon

SEVERAL attempts have been
made to find the perfect stocking,
which will please the nylon-
haters and the silk-haters, by
making silk/nylon stockings.

I find that they are more com-
fortable to wear than 100 per
cent. nylon, as there is more
elasticity. They are warmer than
all-nylon,

But after wearing a pair of
these new stockings for one
ordinary working day I had three
ladders in one stocking, two ir
the other, and holes in both
stockings’ feet.

Smart ‘Debs’

THE first Presentation
showed that the debs this
are more fashion-conscious.
@ Instead of the frilly, over-
trimmed, maze-patterned dresses
I saw many simple wide-skirtecd
dresses, which looled fashion-
able, in plain, sheer materials.
@ Instead of beflowered and rib-
boned hats they wore mostly th:
new demi-hats or untrimmed
picture hats.

@ Instead of those unattractive
white shoes, many more debs
wore pastel coloured strip san-
dals, much smarter.

Party
year

—LE.S.



THE NEW LOW PRICES

FINE QUALITY

BLACK & WHITE PRINTS 36”

WHITE CAMBRIC 36” .

1,23
1.00

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4606

+

eo









vr

(Your Personal Horascopeé
A change of

interests to
AQUARIUS

Jan. 21—Feb. 19 watchful. Ae those born January
22nd, mate

Money. 1 a * across the sea is

PISCES due soon, ing time for those trying

Feb. 20—March 20

A well-calculated business move could
profit you now, You must not hurt others
personal gain.
favoured from the romantic point of view.
Speak softly and.you will be better appre-

ARIES

March 21—April 20 [°°

ciated,

Mo
TAURUS wi?

April 21—May

ARBADOS ADVOCATE

tuniti€s to be

to settle in to do a new job. Persevere and
all will turn out well.

plications rear their heads but
ness and watchfulness you will
-eessful.

e suc
Sis a
words and how your friends.

Venus Ia Peconastey denotes a time

this
born under the ig the Twins,

|

‘Period July 3--6)

pation shall bring new
g00n. There are oppor-
ned if you are careful and

Youngest son well

A close relation has
all is well. Watch your

ers and newly-weds, Joy
period for all
Good

eee

You are a littlé too sensitive and aware of

tentialities if,you would exploit them.
Lucky for those born on 22nd June or July.

Some present coming to you soon. Great

GEMINI favourable
May 23—June 21 4nd ha
news Saturday.”
CANCER what other
June 22—July 23 reliant on yourself,
LEO
July 24—Aug. 22
yellow on
ing.
dvant S
+ ee 6 advantages
Aug. 23—Sept. 23 wij] hear of
born Augu
* LIBRA
Sept. 24—Oct. 23
trying.
can afford
SCORPIO and Uranu
Oct, 24—Nov. 22 person,
* A fortun
Moon’s
SAGITTARIUS strong just now.

Nov. 23—Dec. 20
just now.

+

CAPRICORN
Dec, 21—Jan. 20

for you.

+

4. Oe

shall not be a money gain for you.

A rather unfortunate period for you—if
you are the gldest born, Issue at stake may
not be large but you will require patience
and calmness to surmount them. Keen on

Rash aiatutatin’ is risky so watch what
you have and consider carefully what you

influence on domestic life is very

a source of joy.

A highly successful and productive period
You are due to receive a very
pleasant surprise too.

Lucky for you if born Dec, 29th or Jan.
3rd and 5th.

(Your next Horoscope will appear on Monday.)

folks say and think. Be more
You have great po-

*

A lucky break on Sunday if you know how
to handle if. Trust a true friend and do
not put your confidence in many. Avoid

-”

Friday—especially in the even-

* *

shall be offered though there
You
a wedding. Lucky for you if
st 21—22, Sept. 20 and 21,

to spend, Positions of Saturn
s favour the executive type of



ate period for the housewife as

News of a birth will be
Blue very lucky to wear

x eM KX KH KH KH KH HK

ei ae



— The Mcon Seemed
By MAX TRELL

“SOMETHING,” cried Teddy the
Stuffed Bear in alarm;
awful has happened to the moon!”

Knarf and Hanid, the shadows,
sprang up from their corner and
ran to the window. So did General
Tin, Mr. Punch, Judy, Mary-Jane
the rag-doll, and Gloria, the China
doll with the golden curls. The Ca
nary looked out through the bars
of his cage. Mrs, Cuckoo came rush-
ing out from inside the clock. And
a moment later Pooh-Pooh the
poodle, and Blackie the kitten, came
dashing down the hall.

“What’s the matter?” they both
asked,

“Something perfectly awful has
happened to the moon!” said Teddy.
Out of Window

By this time everyone was peer-
ing out of the window and up at the
sky where the moon was.

“Most of it has disappeared!”
Teddy said in a frightened voice.
“Only two sharp points are left!
Where's the rest of it!”

At this Hanid and Mr. Punch and

Judy and General Tin all said that !

there was nothing much wrong with
the moon at all,

“It’s a new
Punch.

If anything, this alarmed Teddy
more than ever.

“A new moon! But what hap-
pened to the old one?”

Hanid tried to explain. “The new
moon, Teddy, isn’t really a new one.
It’s still the same old one. It’s only
called a new moon because, instead
of being’ round, it has those two
sharp points.”

Knarf and Mary-Jane and Gloria

moon,” said Mr.

and Pooh-Pooh and Blackie all said |

they agreed’with Teddy. “If it’s the
same old moon, why isn’t it round
the way it always is? What hap-
pened to it?” asked Knarf,

Then Mr. Punch said: “It is round
the way it always is. But this is
why it’s so thin and small and has
those two sharp points, my dears.
There’s a shadow across the part
of the moon that you don’t see. It's
like a dark'Â¥66m with the door ope:
just on the crack and a little light
shining through. Only a little part
of the room can be seen, But the









“something |

Teddy Was Really Alarmed

to Be Dheppastok



Everyone was more satisfied with
this explanation than with any of
the others.

“IT only hope,” said Teddy, “that
it will get big and round again.”

“Oh, it will!” said Hanid.
sure of it.”

Mr. Punch was sure of it, too.

“Tm

A New Moon
“Every month,” Mr. Punch went
on, “there’s a new moon. Night
after night it gets bigger and big-
ger until there it is—a full round
moon again, Then,” he said, “the
moon starts getting smaller and
smaller again until finally — just
like a room with all the lights out
and not even a crack of light shin-
through the door—it seems to
disappear altogether, For several
| nights no one can see it at all. And
then—"

“And then?” cried Knarf and
Mary-Jane and Gloria and Pooh-
Pooh and Blackie.

“and then it starts coming back
again, just as we see it tonight, a
little sliver of a moon, just like a
bow without an arrow. And that’s ,
thé new moon.”

“But it’s still the old moon,” said
Hanid. “I mean, it’s just called the
new moon,”

Mr. Punch nodded. “New moon-or

'“Look at the moon,” Teddy said to
the ‘toys.

rest of the room is there just the

same.”

old moon—it’s still the same beau-
| tiful moon that we always have and
l always will.”

DORIS DANNY

DAY THOMAS
All the Pleasures of the SCREEN
Songs, Comedy, Dancing, Drama
—Whey're all here and Wondrous-
ly in WARNER BROS’ Ever-So-

y Gay Story

PLE SEE
You IN MY
DREAMS

And Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30
p.m.

PLAZA 2"
FRIDAY 2.30; 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
|





OPENING TOMORROW AT

2,30 & 8.30
AT

EMPIRE



ED BY WARNER BROS.
ELEWOA FARRELL = HELL") VINSON ~ PRESTON FOSTER
sno» ROBERT &. ‘BURNS © roe MERVYN LE ROY |

}

*



%| Opening To-morrow |

(FRIDAY) 4.45 & 8.30P.M.
AND CONTINUING DAILY

ARNER BROS:

RO

STARRING.

ERROL

LYNN

PATRIC

PLAZA

BARBAREES (DIAL 5170) IK





:

WIMORE





Listening Hours

THURSDAY, JULY 3,

4.00 — 7.15 19.76 M
4.00 p.m News, 410 p.m. The
Deily Service, 4.15 p.m: The Portrait

4435 p.m. Sporting Record,
Lawn Tennis, 5.15 p.m. Lis-
| teners’ Choice, 6.00 p.m. Welsh Diary
‘615 pw Just Fancy, 6.45 p.m. Sports
Round-u os and Programme Parade, 7.00
p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m. Home News

D An.

from Brit s1.99M

76 — 030...

see Britain, a0
Champtonship Bands, 815 p.m o
Newsreel, 6.30 p.m. Special Despatgh,
8.45 p.m. Interlude, 6.55 p.m From the
Editorials, 9.00 p.m. B.B.C. Scottish
Orchestra, 9.45 p.m. Lawn Tennis, 10.00
p.m, The News, 10.10 p.m. News Talk,
Personal Reminiscences of 120

Teds
6.53 M



a Lac

5.00 pam



“7.15 p.m. We



0.1

oe PD 30 p.m, Portrait of a Lady.

- . :
Talking Point

There is in every woman’s heart

a spark of heavenly fire which
beams and blazes
hours of adversity.
—Washington Irving.

in the dark

THURSDAY, JULY 3,

1952

The Oldest Car in Denmark
For British Rally

Mr. Ronald Lawson, of Bristol,
chairman of the south-western
section of the Veteran Car Club of
Great Britain. is off to Denmark

soon.

He hopes to arrange for the
oldest car in Denmark to be
brought to Bristol for a Corona~
tion year veteran car a

Y
James

*Po- DAY (Only) $30 P.M.
“MISSISSIPPI GAMBLER”
Kent TAYLOR &
“BLONDE ALIBI"
Martha 0 DRISCOLL

FRI. & SAT. 8.30 P.M.
“FRIGHTENED CITY" &
“GIRL OF THE YEAR”

Midnite Sat .
“BARBARY PIRATE’
Donald WOODS & J

“RETURN of the DURANGO KID
Charles STARRETT




JANETTA DRESS SHOP

(Next Door to Singer *s)

SPECIAL ‘
FOR ONE WEEK ONLY.
10% Discount on all Nylon Underwear.








GLOBE

TO-DAY, 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. LAST SHOWS

| FIGHTING

BIRD OF PARADISE

BILLY ECKSTINE —

MAN OF THE PLAINS
He i AND oe
(Louis JOURDAN, Debra Paget)



(Randolph Scott)



OPENING TO-MORROW, 5 & 8.30 P.M.

ESTER WILLIAMS in

SKIRTS AHOY



Whip WHELSON &
“WESTERN RENEGADES'





Jimmy WAKELEY &
“COLORADO AMBUSH” |
Johnny Mack BROWN





EMPIRE

TO-DAY (Last 2 Shows) 4.45 & 8.30
Paramount Presents
Bob HOPE — Hedy LAMARR
in
MY FAVORITE SPY

Extra:—FAIRWAY CHAMPIONS

Ever Golf Player should see this
ance and Latest British Paramount
ews



OLYMPIC
TO-DAY (Last 2 Shows) 4.30 & 8.15
Robert PRESTON
John BARRYMORE, jr.
in



THE SUNDOWNERS
and
SWORD OF THE AVENGER

:

Opening FRIDAY 4th 4.30 &
Dane CLARK -
in
PORT DEFIANCE
and
THE TORCH
Starring

Paulette GODDARD
Pedro ARMENDARIZ

8.15
Ben JOHNSON



lien
——S, iti

PALK'S KEROSENE COOKER :—

THREE-BURNER COOKER
and TWO-BURNER OVEN

“THE FAMILY FALKS — FOR HAPPY HOMES”



BRIDGETOWN BARBAREES or
(Dial 2310) (Dial 5170) (Dial 8404)
Last 2 Shows TO-DAY TO-DAY (Only) TODAY (Only)
4.30 & 8.30 p.m 4.30 & 8.30 P.M. 445 & 8.20 PM.

Warner’s New Picture Fred Ginger “RED DESERT”
“PRETTY BABY" ASTAIRE — ROGERS Don BARRY &
Dennis MORGAN & “TOP HAT” & “FRONTIER :

Betsy DRAKE]! “BLOOD on REVENGE
also the MOON” Lash La Rue &
Special Added Attraction Robert MITCHUM _ Fuzzy St. JOHN _
Errol FLYNN in TODAY'S Special 1.30 FRI. to SUN.
“DODGE CITY” 445 & 8.30 p.m,
TODAY Special 14 p-m || JOHNNY ALLEGRO DODGE CITY
“CHEROKEE UPRISING’ George RAFT

DESPERADOES

Johnny MACK BROWN Randolph SCOTT __ ]| Olivia LAN D
“Fri. 4.45 & 830 p.m. 4 ah
Opening FRIDAY “ROCKY MOUNTAIN’ neo nae 1.30 p.m
2.30 — 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.}l Giannis is “Cc
“PLL SRE YOU IN Se ue, en ceely, BAX: UPRISING” &
: MY DREAMS” || rHUNDER- “WESTERN ADES”
SAT. (Special) 90 & 1.30 MOUNTAIN |} ___ RENEG:
“RANGERS RIDE” Tim HOLT & “Midnite Sat.

“LEGION of
the LAWLESS"
George O'BRIEN
SS SaaS

Le Se a : Ky —S PES SSS =—— =





STOKES & BYNOE LTD. — AGENTS

Errol FLYNN
Ann SHERIDAN



“WELLS FARGO
GUNMASTER" &
“GOLDEN STALLION”





THEATRES
ROXY

TO-DAY (Last 2? Shows)
4.30 & 815





Margaret LANDSAY
Ralph BELLAMY

in
MEET THE WILD CAT
and
MELODY LANE
Starring
Leon ERROL — The Merry MAC
FRIDAY (Only) 4.30 & 8.15
Teresa WRIGHT — Lew AYRES
in
THE CAPTURE
and
STATION WEST



ROYAL

TO-DAY (Last 2 Shows) 4.30 & 8.30
HUNT THE MAN DOWN .

Starring
Gig YOUNG — Cleo MOORE

and
DANGEROUS PROFESSION

Starring
George RAFT — Ella RAINES











THURSDAY, JULY 3, 1952

German | Korea War Is Two Years Old = There's io Decision
Engineers eae iy Te Kane
Jump Ahead =i < ie

By SIDNEY RODIN

LONDON, June 23.
German ingenuity is behind the

BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE







‘ |

B.G. To Tax |

Commission
Agents

GEORGETOWN, June 28
The Georgetown CRamber

So Far

P- aae




To, keep
little busy bodies”
| fit and active...

Es

|
ot}

’ big attempt now being made in

Britain to motorize the pedal cy-
clist and give him power-assisted
travel for a farthing a mile.

Already nearly 250,000 cyclists
have joined in this latest craze in
popular transport ahd, by fitting
tiny motors to their bicycles, are
now calling themselves cycle-mo-
torists.

| Registration Fee of $60.00 on Com-

|} Leence of $60.00

Commerce has approved of a Draft
Bill which Government will shortly |
introduce in the Legislative Coun-!
cil and which seeks to impose a|

mission

Agents annual
The Chamber
has however informed Govern-

ment that if the amount proposed

and an

give them HALIBORANGE
every day

THERE’s YOTHING LIKE IT for building
up reserves of vital energy, promoting
healthy growth, strong bones and teeth
—and resistance to illness.









for registration was reduced, it ,

Eleven firms have produced ya- | weuld be acceptable to the Cham- Made from purest halibut oil, cleverly blended
rious forms of chug-chug motor. ber. with the juice of ripe oranges, it is rich in
a eee ie selling _— is ar % " i . . ; The Commission Agents’ Bil! Vitamins A ahd D and so delicious in taste that
Union Combaes Go which Hitler Driven hack ae Bits m + ignated a years Ago, 4 = the mist finicky youngster takes
lavished millions to make it the for UN f rn Gee eongeee Shed ae ge eg ~~ ee Gen. Douglas MacArthur went ashore that py oe iy ‘la oan eae it with delight

a oe 7 or forces Inchon landing, Sept. ‘ inspect prisoners. land Seoul at a tax s placed on vis- -,
greatest motor firm in Europe. | " , : > ee e UN drove in to . iting travelling agents only, but Incidentally, it’s fine for grown-

The British company which | , eS de a we cietieeiiatitiee . that suggestion was rejected ,by !

bought it have sold 60,000 in less! ; : ups too

Government w state i “y
than two years. They expect to overnment who stated that they





7 ‘ gern would net be prepared to impose a

ag hgh okay any restrictions on visiting trav- ni e

brains as well as British have | oe — ie ; ;

made other forms of miniature be ‘ane bi ‘ te VAebpere 9 of

motors. : a le gar Alanya ata gald THE NICEST WAY OF TAKING HALIBUT OIL
Prices range from £33 to £21— {tion reminded the Chamber of a}

no purchase tax. Pass a simple letter receivea from the U.S. Vice

driving test for 5s., and you can Consul, in which attention was

become a licensed cycle-motorist | drawn to the serious malpractice |

for 17s 6d a year, with insurance , Which was taking place on_ the |

as low as 12s. | Pauct of certain o-called Com- |
Hundreds of elderly people who | mission Agents Apart from that

gave up cycling because of fatigue
are awheel again—chugging along
with a cycle-motor.

The one serious competitor to
the cycle-motor is the motor scoot-
er, Here again foreigners are in
the lead. ,

Modern scootering started with
the civilian version of the British
paratrooper’s folding motor-cycle
—the Corgi. 1

Today, however, Enrico Piaggio,
a 47-year-old Genoese engineer
who made airplane engines for
Mussolini during the war, has sent
500,000 of his silver green scooters
to all parts of the world—3,000 of
them to Britain,

The Lambretta, the second
Italian challenger to the Corgi,
claims all the _ refinements and
glamour of the Vespa. P

But Britain is re-entering the
scooter market with a new Corg!
due out next year—if the Govern-
ment allows the steel. "

It will cost about £75, will be
as fast as its rivals—and, like bn
paratrooper’s machine, will still

fold up. _—LES.



European Trade

Shows Recovery

RICIA CLARKE
one TORONTO.

Canadian businessmen Some TY
studied eye-opening evidence of
European recovery at this years

i ioné @ ir hich
international trade fair Ww
showed they will have to meet
vigoroys competition. :
Onnicials said the fair, which

2 June 13, gave Canadian,
orith and American exhibitors:
“a look at the handwriting on the

Wea Bs
“Continental European exhibit-
ers increased therm showings as
much as 25 times over last year
and got a disproportionate share
of the interest and the business.

All exhibitors, however, said
they did well and sales from the
fair were expected to total even-
tually into tens of millions.

“It's a good age reg a ie
i stry to see what it is
odainstâ„¢ one Canadian exhibitor
said. “And some of the stuff has

an eye-opener.”
cone” aaa: other continen gk
exhibitors have an advantage In
being able to promise faster de-
liveries than can British or Cana-
dian plants which are short on
materials because of defense re-
quirements,

“It’s hard to blame buyers for
patronising foreign exhibitors
when they have the stuff, can
deliver it far ahead of our own
plants and are willing to stand
behind iit,” an exhibitor said

German exhibitors said they
were delighted with the way their
products were received. Their
machinery and instrument exhib-
its were particularly successful.
They reported finding prices and
quality competitive and their de-
livery dates were well ahead.

German vere very
popular ond COPA Yopewriters
did well in the office equipment
field. Germany was the only
nation with @ special display of
leather products.

Germany also appeared to be
recapturing» pre-war suprem-
acy in toys. It fascinated Cana-
dians with a seven-way bicycle,
trains that run under water (ideal
for playing in the bathtub), jet
planes, toy pianos, and tiny autos
that can be driven accurately and
electrically,

Dr. W. Muscheadt, president, of
the German export committee.
praised the fair as a “S€ridUs
market” in .~which Germans
achieved results whieh could not
have been hoped for in weéks of
travel.

“As one who appreciates organ-
ization, I must compliment the
conduct of the fair,” he said.

At least 10 new industries wil)
ldcate in Canada this year as 2
result of the fair and many firms
including some from Germany

oe = ts ar oe

JUNE 25 MARKS TWO YEARS since tank-led North Korean forces) warfare has cost billions of @ollars and huridreds of thousands of
4 Plunged across the 38th Parallel to invade South Korea. The see-saw | castialties on both sides, but the tssues seem as unsettled as ever,

A few of the tens of thousands of war-weary So
from their homes rest near demolished Seoul building. The South Pyongyang. Soon the Chinese entered the war, won back

ote ceo



C?wealth Students Take
Part In ‘Hampstead Week’

SIXTY-FOUR STUDENTS

LONDON, June.
from Commonwealth

countries, all resident in Hampstead, will learn about the
workings of the borough and meet local residénts in a

“Hampstead Week”

organised for them by the British

Council from June 28 to July 5.
The students come from East Africa, West Africa,

Hongkong, Malaya,

and India.

_ The week opens with a recep-
tion by the Mayor of Hampstead
at»the Town Hall, at which the
students will meet members of the
Hampstead societies, churches and
other organisations helping in the
arrangements. On Sunday, most
of the students will attend morn-
ing service and then be enter-
tained in the homes of church
members,

During the week, there will be
visits to the borough services, in-
cluding _ schools, housing and
health departments. Other Ar-
rangements include tea at the
Geod Companions Pensioners’
Club, a talk on the history of
Hampstead and a tour of Old
Hampstead, a debate arranged by
the Hampstead Parliament, There
will also be a tennis party ar-

ranged by the East and West
Friendship Council, a puppet
show, and a social evening ar-
ranged by the International

Friendship League and the East
and West Friendship Council. A
number of Hampstead residents
have invited the students to their
homes during the week,

The ten women students in the
group will attend a summer party
arranged by Hampstead Towns-
women's Guild. They will also
visit Seviers Pottery and the
Keats Museum.

On the evening of July 4, the
stydents will join with Hamp-
stead residents at Hampstead
Town Hall to discuss subjects re-
lating to Commonwealth students.
They will question Mr. Henry
Brooke, M.P. for Hampstead.
The evening will end with a de-
monstration by West African stu-
dents of their native music.

Spy



Pleads
Not Guilty

From Page 1.

“Marshall who made about £8
as wireless operator was arrested
in the park last month as he was
talking to Kuznetsov,

Arthur Mildon an attorney who
was instructed by the court to
eppear for Marshall, said he had
hopsd fer the possibility of de-
laying the trial until next court
sessions in September .but Gov-
ernment had pressed for it to
begin immediately, Mildon said
he was prepared to begin the
defence on Wednesday. as

branche’. Cabinet _ Peter
Ruppel of Frankfur to
start a small ass t in

‘Toronto.
“If businéss warrants it, I may
brimg out my family,” he said.



Goes planning Canadian —B.U.P,






Mauritius, the West Indies, Ceylon

South African
Held In BG,

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, dupe ous

Twenty - five - year o
Bebhi Araghi, native of South
Africa, is being detained by thd
Immigration Authorities here un-
til arrangements for his repatria-
tion can be arranged. Araghi was
‘dumped’ across the Venezuela
border some weeks ago by the
Venezuelans, His story is that hig
ship left him behind in Venezuela
three years ago, and he was held
in prison by the Venezuelang for
three years until he learnt enough
Spanish to explain his presence in
the Republic.

In British Guiana the Immi-
gration Authorities deemed him
an illegal immigrant, as he had
no passport and no money.
Brought before the Georgetown
Magistrate the Police were grant-
ed permission to detain him until
arrangements can be made for his
repatriation.

When the League of Coloured
Peoples heard of Araghi’s case,
Hon. John Carter went to his
assistance, The Immigration De-
partment has now written the
South African Government to find
out if they are prepared to re-
patriate him. If Malan’s ~
ment says ‘NO’ it seems at
British Guiana will have no choice
but to keep him in Police custody
or allow him his freedom on the
bond of some respectable citizen,
so that Araghi can find work and
so maintain himself in the Colony.

In the meantime Araghi is
allowed to go in and out of Police
Headquarters. He is provided
with regular meals and sleeping
accommodation, Araghi himself is
quite puzzled about his position.
He says he likes British Guiana,
but would like to go back to his
own country. “If I am repatri-
ated I will go. If I am to stay in
your country, I will be equally
glad.”

John Carter told the Magistrate
“we are doing everything we can
for him, a don’t want
back in South Africa, he can stay
here. and we will find work for

All now depends on the reply
from the South Afnican Govern-
ment, and it is expected that it
will some time before this will
reach itish Guiana, But mean-
while, Araghi is enjoying his ‘de-
tention’ here. He has made many
friends and he jis getting to like
B.G, more and more every day,
for here there is no race discrim-
ination and nobody likes Malan—
neither white nor coloured folks
...And,.. “everybody here is
so nice. I like here.”


























Slee Pel OE Bagh tee weg Parte

SA-48% P90

h Koreans uprooted In October, 1950,




me



oe

North Korean civilians welcomed UN



= Mea |
n ‘



troops imto

North Ko-
‘rean capital has changed hands four times, suffered with each. rean capital. Building carries pictures of Josef Stalin, Kim Il Sung.



Six Score
Hundreds

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, July 2.

Batsmen held the mastery téday
im most parts of the country. No
fewer than six individual centur-
les were recorded, Leading the
wun getters was Bernard Constable
of Surrey whose 205 hot out
against Somerset at the Oval war
ighest of his career. Surrey

with nearly 400 runs on.the board Ti

and only five wickets down look
set for their tenth championship

victory,
Also in a strong ition are
Middlesex for whom. ompson

and Edrich both made turi
in a second wicket ace ere of
345. Middlesex declated whe
Thompson was out, and

four quick Worcester wickets
fore the close.

Hutton for Yorkshire recorded e

his sixth century of the season
and the 109th of his career. He
batted just ovér four hours and
Yorkshire after declaring put
themselves well on the victory
road by capturing six Kent wicker
ets, In their, t game
Durham the Indians haye run apt
trouble. On an ea ic et
the. home nid dred
declaring, of whic opening bats;
man Kao made 135. Tri the half
hour teft m the fndtans lost
two quick wickets and at close
still needed 187 to save the follow

on.
Scoreboard

Durham versus the Indians:
Durham 302 for six @@clared. In-
dians 15 for two.

Essex versus Northants: Essex
364. for six, Insole 130.

Glamorgan yersys Lanes Glam-
organ 295, Lanes. eight for two.

Hants versus Gloucester: Harits
185, Scott seven for 46. Gloucester
119 for four.

Surrey versus Somerset: Surrey
384 for five. :

Warwick versus Leicester:
Leicester 210. Grove five for 44.
Warwick 78 for four,

Notts versus Sussex: Sussex 331
for six,

Worcester versus Midstepes:
Middlesex 350 for two, declared,
Thompson 158, Edrich 175 not out.
ates - four, 1: teil

0 versus Ken : -
shire 283 for five declared, Hutton
189; Kent 108 for six.

Y.M.P.C. Béat
Lynch’s School



THE Second Division Basket

Ball match which was played yes-
terday afternoon between
Y.M.P.C. and LSS. at. Y.M.P.C,;
ended in a victory for YMP.C.
game was fast and ¢xci
throughout and at the end of
allotted time the score was fifteen
all, play resurned for another ive
minutes and at the end of
the score was seventeen all.
After two minutes rest play
imutes and during latter part
m
of that time G. Greenidge scored
the deciding two points, The chief
scorers were D. Badenock and A.
Jones ten and seven points Pate. pe
‘ively for Lytich and G, G ge
and E. Mandeville netted eight
each for the













eat rn





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In Carlisle Bay

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h, Sch. ve Star, MV 1
S.S. Athelrook —





ARRIVALS
$5. Uruguay from Trinidad, & 5
Colombie 7,381 tons from Martinique
DEPARTURES
abevae le 2uy = dl,
Â¥ W.LA. ON TU
en ee 3 Pern he
, tell, C. tehinsot, T, De Abre
C,,. De Abrevy, RK, Jursoo, B, New, M
New, R. Holder, J. O'Callahan, ¢
O'Callahan, W. William, K, Forrest, A
TOW
om St. Lucia;

ernard Moore, Wendy Moore, Heath
er Moore, Lynne Moore, Donald Pail,
Kenneth Paul, Willoughby Sayers

Seawell

DBEARTURAG. BY BW.LA
SDAY
For Trinidad ;

V. Puarelall, c. Nascimento, M_. Holder
- Desouza, B. Griffith, F. Jordan, L
Jordan née Magallanes, M. Masalianes,
F. Hadid, F, Hutehinson, J, Steeher, Vv
Hpsmatali, :
For St, Lucia:
P. Skinner, C. Lawson, H Ascough, kh
lames, = C, iene Mts L. Lawrence, A
Bye

ra J. Kirton, r, E,. MeM
8 MeXtitian, N. Moffat, sm aa

bid eoeathinees

Speech By Alexander
Raises Storm In Commons
interrupted to say “I am speaking
with Shinwell on a perfectly fair
and square level and giving full
onswers. That he should suggest |
vary my remarks of what is
Straight and not straight is worthy
of his own mind.”

Shinwell said “is the Prime
Minister aware that he has ne-
cused Members on this side of
the House of lack of tact and
now when one of his own Minis-
ters is asked about dropping 1
brick he loses his temper?’

—UP.

for fivel}

SUPREME



Al HARD 6

en at TARATUN

| Agents
| €rmment became concerned at the

AINTS |

TIME



for Eniéerior

IN ALL SIZES &

GENERAL HA RD WARE



RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office)

the Qhamber had received repre-
Sentations from reputable trade
organisations, from Trade Commis-
sioners and from others, which in-
dicated a serious state of affairs
Which had arisen owing to the mal-
practice of go-called Commission





Based on those facts Gov-

deterioration of the good name of
the Colony. Mr. Stoby felt that any
small reputable Commission Agent
would welcome the protection

| which the Bill would give, as it

aimed at protecting large and
small agents, men of integrity,
The President of the Chamber,
Lieut.-Col, E, J. Haywood, M.B.B..
T.D., said they were all conscious
ef the fact that the Bill, like all
ills, was not fool-proof. It did,
however, serve a useful purpose
in that all Commission Agents, in-
cluding visiting agents, would
centribute some small sum

. +» But Daddy
Did Not Know

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, June 28

Because he is illiterate Chand-
warka Persaud of 5 Railway Line,
Kitty Village, did not know that
he could not be the lawful father
of the child of the woman he had
nvarried according to Muslim rites,
and that was how he happened
to appear before the City Magis+
trate, charged with wilfully giving
false information to the Registrar
of Births.

Persaud’s Counsel told the Court
he was really confused as to how
to advise his client to plea, and
on request the Magistrate agreed
to hear the facts of the case first.



It all happened this way, Maz-
moon Neshaw had given birth to

a baby girl on January 7, By
marrying according ‘to Muslim
rites, he is not legally her hus-
band. Persaud did not know this

and in giving information to the
Registrar of Births stated he was
the father of the child and hus-
band of the mother.

When he returned home he told
his ‘wife’ what he had done, and
she being literate pointed out the
mistake to him, and he immediate-
ly returned to the Registrar, ex-
plained the error, and the certifi-
cate had to be cancelled and «a
new one issued.

The Magistrate appreciated the
position of Persaud and his Coun-
sel_ who could not say that he
wilfully misled the Registrar.
However a plea of guilty was en-
tered and Persaud was reprimand-
ed and discharged.



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BARBADOS CO-oP. |





PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS wif ADVOCATE |

Sean ape SOR S875 10S Bee
Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad 8t., Bridgetown

Thursday, July 3, 1952

anche - CHALLENGE
4 48484, BE.

PROFESSOR Beasley’s Fiscal Survey of
Barbados which was laid in the House of
Assembly on Tuesday is a sober document,
full of challenge for those on witom has
fallen the heavy responsibility of keeping
Barbadian economy on an even keel.
“Allowing for maintenance on present lines
but for no improvement of existing central
or local government services and omitting
for the present any provision for the
Harbour Scheme or for the costs of estab-
lishing a British West Indies Federation,
Government requires to find every year
an increase of revenue over that of the
previous year, and these increases will by
1958/59 have amounted to about $2.4
million or 23 per cent. on top of the
original estimated net revenue of $10.3
million for 1951-52.”

This sentence forms the heart of the
survey.

And Professor Beasley proposes six main
methods of obtaining increased revenue to
meet this gap. After the introduction of
a new’'tariff and increased duties on liquor,
cotton piece goods and perfumery, a net
increase of $400,000 is suggested from cus-
toms receipts. Closer assessment of in-
come tax, introduction of new taxpayers
and natural growth would, thinks Pro-
fessor Beasley, produce $250,000. Increases
in excise duties and death duties would
preduce $300,000 divided equally. Revision
of stamp duties, licenses, postal rates,
water rates and departmental fees and in-
crease of interest on invested funds would
provide $280,000 while $70,000 might be
expected from a proposed entertainment
tax. “These proposals”, writes Professor
Beasley “represent what appears to be the
limit of extra annual revenue that can
properly be obtained by higher taxation
and improved administration over the
coming seven years.”



He draws three inferences.

First it will be out of the question to
maintain commodity subsidies for much
longer on anything approaching thei:
present scale “and that the sooner they
can be replaced by measures less costly to
Government the better.”

Secondly, he suggests that Government
cannot in present circumstances properly
undertake any new recurrent commit-
ments which are not calculated either to

create fresh revenue or to make for more
economical functioning of the Govern-
ment machine.

Thirdly, he suggests that another review
of the prospects ought to be carried out
after perhaps three years to ascertain
whether the island’s economy is by then
exhibiting better or worse prospects and to
make provisions for the following years.

With regard to the deep-water harbour
project Professor Beasley suggests that at
this stage of its development Barbados

cannot afford to continue without a deep
water harbour. And he makes it clear
that the construction of a deep-water
harbour must be undertaken ‘as part of a
full economic programme which includes
enlargement of the airport (already under-
taken), irrigation to maintain high average
sugar output, deep water harbour, asso-
ciated reclamation of adjacent land for
warehousing and _ industrial purposes,
hotel construction and extension, expan-
sion of tourist industry by means of both
increased accommodation in hotels and
guest houses and of extended seasonal
facilities.

With this full economic programme he
brackets potential developments of an oil
industry and minor industries,

A programme of this order, he suggests
can only be financed from a combination of
agents including private enterprise in
hotels and oil and Government assets,
grants and loans.

In obtaining loans for a full economic
programme with its axis as the deep

water harbour, Government would find
that the monies at present absorbed un-
profitably in meeting subsidisation would
be sufficient to service a very large ex-
ternal loan.

Professor Beasley is openly critical of the
Government's large vote for subsidisation, “The
provision of one million dollars annually,” he
writes, “for this purpose works out at ten cents
a week per head of the population and it is idle
to pretend that in normal ‘circumstances this
contribution is really important, Moreover it
must be appreciated that if Barbados is to em-
bark on a large programme of development,
employment will be on a high level for years and
a large part of the total capital outlay will be
spent on labour in the island. The Government
would be acting inconsistently if it made
crippling provision for subsidies at the same time
as embarking upon schemes designed to add to
the national income.”

Throughout his report Professor Beasley takes
as his text Barbados’ unique economic position
in not being “under-developed” or “developed”,
and stresses its economic dependence and the
fact that population growth has outstripped
potential and actual agricultural expansign,

His survey is a realistic and. sober document
and its appreciation by the public of Barbados
is indispensable for understanding of the eco-
nomic road ahead, Its conclusions, proposals
and recommendations will call for much revision
of popular political platforms but capacity for
revision of ideas and a new approach to prob-
lems in the face of facts is a sign of healthful
maturity.

An alternative to Professor Beasley's sober
and wise counsel as outlined in A Fiscal Survey
of Barbados will not easily be found and dis-
regard of the fundamental facts on which his
proposals are made canhot promote the pros-
perity of this island, .

There may well be minor objections and dis-
agreements with certain parts of detail in the
survey; just as there are a number of misplaced
lines, incorrect placing of figures in some tables
and a reasonably large number of spelling errors
in the printed version, but broadly speaking
Professor Beasley has stated blunt homegrown
truths about Barbados’ economy in a polite and





persuasive manner. How the report is received
by the two legislative bodies of Barbados partic-
ularly by the elected House of Assembly may
decide the future « this island for all time
That is a thought which ought to humble poli-

ticians and bring home to people the need for

thinking clearly and without prejudice.












SYNGMAN RHEE
BITES U.N
IN KOREA

Â¥ NICE QUIET SUMMER WE'RE HAVING, MiISSUS

ier

The Lie
To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—The Leader of the House
of Assembly, Mr, Adams, is
reported as having said, in the
debate on the revision of cer-
tain salaries of Civil Servants,
that he had destroyed the rule
of privileged parties in Barba-
dos. This statement would
be laughable were it not for the
fact that it was .uttered by
one who occupies a position of
such grave trust and respon-
sibility, As it is, either Mr.
Adams did not give sufficient
thought to what he was
saying — a forgivable human
lapse — or, what is far worse,
he has succeeded in deluding
himself as to the stage we have
reached in our political life and
‘the nature of the struggle in
which the progressive forces in
Barbados, of which he is the
leader, are engaged.

It is sufficient to say that the
proposals on which he was speak-
ing at the time and the nature of
their birth gave the lie direct
to the claim which Mr. Adams
made. It was indeed tragically
ironic. I find it difficult to be-
lieve that Mr. Adams _ really
thinks that the defeat of an un-
enlightened group of conservative
leaders ipso facto spells the
death knell of privilege in Bar-
bados, But let me ask him a
few questions concerning the said
proposals,

Does the action of the leader
of the Conservative opposition,
who usually leaves the House
at dusk but remained at his side
until dawn, mean anything to
him? Does he imagine that Mr,
Cuke’s -ringing approbation in
the Council, coming so soon after
his Cassandra ~- like pronounce-
ments on the high percentage of
Government revenue being
spent on the salaries and wages
of “pressure groups”, would
have been made under differ-
ent proposals—one which did
justice to the whole Service? Is
it not a striking contrast that
Mr. Cuke could have so quickly
changed his tune after his in-
glorious references to “pressure
groups”? Does all this not fit in
remarkably well with the at-
tempts of His Excellency in his
public speeches to prove that
there was no case for improv-
ting the salaries of the lower
brackets, but there was a 100
per cent. water-tight one for
paying the increases sent down?
Xs it not clear that what started
as an attempt to stop the exodus
of certain officials—and I have
jseen nothing ¢ither in the Re-
port or the debates in the Legis-
lature to show that this applied
to other than some technical
and professional posts—soon de-
veloped into efforts to increase
the salaries of all top officials:
and, the Anglican Clergy?

Can we excuse the Govern-
ment for overlooking the onesid-
ed nature of this whole business
ef salary increases and the po-
litical implications? 1 say, No,
and it is in this respect that the
Labour members of the Execu-
tive Committee should have
taken a strong stand and unite
firmly with the rest of the party.

Let me say here that I hope
they have paid no attention to
those who try to flatter them
that they were courageous in
bringing down these “unpopular
proposals”. This resembles
closely the praise given the ass,
which was told that in spite of
the added weight on its back and
the advice given it, it had done
a brave and wise thing in walking
‘through the stream with a load
of salt on its back. All praise to
the politician who refuses to
bow to popular wishes merely
because they are popular, or does
not flinch from doing his duty
because it may be unpopular with
some minor section of the com-
munity, For example, even those
Civil Servants who were serious-
ly affected at the time and disa-
greed with _ him admired the
courage of Mr, Adams in refus-
ing to bow to demands for 30 or
40 per cent, c.o.l, ‘bonus, and
were content to face the hard
economic faets which he. then
put before them and the public.
The people as a whole are con-
tent to bear the burdens of the
cost of living when they are told
that the Island cannot afford to
subsidise this or that foodstuff
and its price must rise. But is
unpopularity or hostility more
deserved than when, after all
this, the said Civil Service and
public are ‘told that we can
afford a sum of $100,000 per
annum on a small section of the
administration, and where there
is no justification, after making
provision for a similar amount
which may be incurred in leave
passages? Whatcan be worse
than, in the face of all this, trying
to cover up such discrimination
and political ineptitude by say-
ing: “Don’t worry! We will con-

BARBADOS

Our Readers Say:

’
sider you others later,” or “Blame
us for delaying the disestablish-
ment and disendowment of the
Anglican Church, but there is no
moral justification for leaving
them out’, even though they
deny they are Civil Servants and
are free to oppose the Labour
Party, for which they and the
Church cost this Island over
$40,000 per year? On no political
grounds whatsoever should these
proposals have reached the Legis-
jature.

I know 1 shall be told that
comparisons are ludicrous, but
a glance at the Civil List of
Great Britain and the salaries
paid there will show that the
colonies, and now Barbados,
compare more than favourably
with that country. Officials there
corresponding in status and
salary with ours have been given
a mere 40 per cent. increase in
salaries between 1938 and 1951.
‘The officer there who received
£500 in 1938 would be now paid,
by the last figures I saw, £700
per annum and £1,000 in 1938
would now be £1,400, In_ the
U.K., a single man earning £500
would pay in income tax £74.
5s: If married, £48. 15s., and if
married with two children, £18.
5s. In the £1,000 bracket, the
corresponding I.T, payments
would be £254. 5s., £222. 15s.,
and £168. 15s. In the £2,000
bracket, the corresponding pay-
ments would be £614, 5s,, £582.
15s., and £528. 15s, These were
the figures for 1950—51. During
that time, outside the Service,
the minimum wage of an agri-
cultural worker had risen to £5
per week, and the people, after
the war, were receiving all the
benefits of a Welfare State, viz.,
family allowances, free medical
land health services, social in-
surance benefits, vastly subsidis-
ed food and full employment.

In Barbados,. those officers in
the £500 bracket in 1938 or 1939
are now paid £1,200 or £1,300,
The following will receive more
than corresponding officers in
British Guiana; Harbour and
Shipping Master, Director of Ed-
ucation and Deputy Director,
Principal of Evening Institute
and Vice Principal, Chief Inspec-
tor of Schools, most top Agri-
cultural posts, Director of Med-
ical Services and most medical
posts, Director of Highways and
Transport, Police Magistrates
(they start higher than Magis-
trates in B.G. and Trinidad).
The Anglican Church is the only
State paid body of its kind in
the world—another unique fea-
ture of Barbadian life. All this
is happening in a place where the
effects of inflation and the bur-
den of cost of living are making
life well-nigh unbearable to the
average middle classes, clerks in
the Long Grade, and the labour-=
ing man and woman: where the
Labour Party has promised ta
reduce the burden from customs
duties on the mass of imported
articles classed as necessities:
where the minimum wage is
about $2.00 per day: where there
is much unemployment and a
lack of those social benefits
which mark the Welfare State.
Is it any wonder that this matter
was anathema to the majority of
the Labour Party?

We were told by the Hon.
Colonial Secretary that to give
increases to technical officers
only would “upset the symmetry
and general level of efficiency
of the Service. One wonders
how &n offiqial in such a respon-
sible position could ardently ad-
vocate that we puff out, unduly
in some cases, the heads and
breasts of this already unsym-
metrical body, pay no attention
to the other parts, and then
blandly talk about “symmetry
and general efficiency.” No mat-
ter how mwch the waist-line and
lower ends are tapered off and
slimmed down he still sees
symmetry, perfect rhythm and
harmony. Ye gods and little
fishes! What next? And, mind
you, if we examine the “sym-
metry” of Barbados with that of
British Guiana we will see more
clearly the peculiar way in which
the Colonial Secretary looks at
this matter. Let us examine how
certain officers stand in relation
to each other in the Istter
country: There, Office Super-
intendents. start at $3,000 per
annum, and go to $3,600. Our
Executive Grade is $1,920 to
$3,456, Take the Auditor Gen-
eral’s department in each colony.

In B.G., these are the salaries of

’ the following. A.G., $6,240, Asst.
Auditor $4,80v, Auditors, $3,600—
$4,320. In Barbados, these are
$6,240, $4,560 and $1,920—$3,456 .
respec, I could also take the post
office and other offices to show
the kind of symmetry we have.

I find no merit in the argu-
ment that we should watch the
office and not the individual in
making these proposals. It
seems to me that we are paying
many people neither according
to their needs nor their deserts.
It was because we wanted cer-
tain qualified persons for cer-
tain posts that this whole

matter began or rather that was 2

ADVOCATE





BOER
caoreves wt
. SOUTH AFRICA

Wuat We were told, It is how-
ever OvvilUsS Wat Wat alfficuity
merely provided an opportunity
Ww ger sncreases tor imported
Ollicnus and, In order not wr
appear quscriminatory, all top
(auclais, ine atthucde and pecu-
liar arguments of Mr. Cuke has
shown tinis, wiay it tei hum
however that his clever attempt
to. justify the proposals could
be so easily seen through that
ne snould petter have kept his
mouth closed! It happens that
wie Lapour Government has
peen caught by all this especi-
ally after it was agreed to bring
in the other ranks later. This
act of appeasement brought
around Mr. Cox quite conveni-
ently, and made him utterly
harmiess, What it will lead to
1 shudder to think, We will
have more inflation and less
money for social services and
for the reduction of the cost of
living. His Excellency knew this
and he really meant it when he
said that we could afford only
these increases, .He however
compromised ‘to get support of
the whole Executive, But does
Mr, Adams really think, when
he says it would be wrong to
leave out other heads besides
technical, that any man who
stepped up from Principal Clerk
or from the Executive Grade to
a departmental head at the old
rates could have any grouse
whatsoever? It is clear that all
this has been done merely
through the imported men,

I find that the back-benchers
of the Labour Party did great
credit to themselves, to the
Party and to Barbados, They
took a moral stand and won a
moral victory. They have de-
monstrated that they are not
content to be a mere sledge-
hammer machine enforcing and
legalising the decisions, how-
aver debatable, of a governing
bureaucracy. They have shown
that they stand firmly by gov-
ernment by a_ socialist party
and not government by officials.
Barbados is experiencing all the
evil effects of inflation at pres-
ent, Small savings and wages
‘are worth little and the gains
made by those who invest in
such things as real estate, land
and industrial stocks are tre-
mendously inflated, Further,
what a noted commentator said
recently of tthe position in
Britain that “in a period of
soaring prices and profits, the
imposition of a ceiling on food
subsidies, social services and the
health services automatically
reduces the real value of the
Welfare State to the poor and
its real burden on the rich,” is
also very applicable to this
Island. Our Governor thas con-
stantly advocated a cut in our
subsidies, and at this rate of
spending on salaries very little
will be found for much needed
social schemes, After all, His
Excellency from 1920, when he
served in the Crown Agents to
1949 when he was transferred
here from Nigeria, has been
taken _up with digits and con-
servative financing and book-
keeping. He is courageous and
forthright, according to his way
of looking at®things. But he
should be made at this time to
work out finance in the frame-
work of the licy on which
the Labour Party was elected.
Otherwise Mr Adams’
sounding talk about “Labour
Government” is sounding brass
and tinkling cymbal, If Sir
Alfred is even Financial Sec-
retary and Gé@vernor at the
same time so much the better,
for he loves figures and knows
them well. But unless the
Labour side of Government can
enforce a policy in keeping with
its outlook and with the needs
of the under-privileged classes
then there may well be further
splits in the ranks — a tragic
happening not only for Barba-
dos but for the West Indies as
a whole.

EX-CIVIL SERVANT.

Snake In The Hand...

To The Editor, The Advocate,—
SIR—1r was amused to read
the thrilling account of the kill-
ing of a snake: “among some
bushes in front of the Barbados
Museum” about 6 p.m. yester-
day, which appeared in to-day’s
Advocate. his snake, which
was quite harmless, had been
living for some time in the
courtyard of my quarters within
6 feet of my living room. About
3.30 p.m. yesterday it was
accidentally killed there in an
attempt to recapture it. The
snake's body was given by my
gardener, who was about to
bury it, to one of the employees
of the Barbados Turf Club. The
only accurate fact in your
account is that the snake was 3
feet long.
Yours etc.
NEVILLE CONNELL.

.7,52.

cece ie tate ALAN a LA AO LA

THURSDAY, JULY. 3, 1952
ee me etme eh cement CRRA ERAN, iam verter ns nrenna + nnn cect

The Man Who
Did Not
Want Money

He Used Deposits To Buy
More Cars For Sale

From R. M. MacCOLL

WASHINGTON.

ANOTHER chapter is written in the extra-
ordinary story of Robert Knetzer.

It starts in the car-famine days after the
last war, when he guaranteed delivery of new
cars under market price.

Crowds flocked to his office and pretty well
forced deposits on him.

He used the deposits to buy more cars, but
finally the bubble burst and there was Knet-
zer owing £ 1,000,000,

* * *

AT his trial the district attorney asked why
he thought he would ever make any money
that way. Replied Knetzer: “I just wanted to
make a reputation, not money.”

He was sentenced to 110 years in jail, but
last year was temporarily released because
he said he could raise money to pay off a
separate civil suit. And he amazed everyone
by handing in £60,000.

Congratulations were short lived when it
was found that he got the money by another
confidence trick. He told friends he had
bought a Christmas tree estate in Canada.

* * *

LAST NIGHT, in Springfield, Illinois, a
businesslike stranger appeared at the jail.
“George Hulem, United States marshal,” he
snapped, flashing a badge, “Knetzer is to come
with me. He will be returned later.”

Off went Robert with the “marshal,” who
turns out to be phoney as_ Robert’s
schemes.

Now the G-men are searching for the pair
of them.

HAWAII is being sugared under. A strike
has tied up all shipping services, and so the
sweet stuff is being dumped everywhere,
from tennis courts to roof tops.

NEIGHBOURS of handsome Hugo Linwal,
a 41-year-old carpenter, and his pretty wife
Ellin, who lived on New York’s Lexington-
avenue, were always hoping that there would
be a reconciliation after they quarelled some
time back and Hugo moved out.

He came back. Ellin answered his ring.
Smiling, Hugo opened a box, took out a
sawn-off double-barrelled shotgun and
killed his wife and himself.

I-SUPPOSE it had to come. A man in the
advertisements who wears a black eye patch
and helps to sell shirts is now followed by a
pretty girl who also wears a black patch. And
she sells girdles.

NEAT switcheroo on the “war is not inevi-
table” theme. Britain’s ambassador Sir Oliver
Franks visits Dartmouth College in New
England, and says roughly that in a speech.
The undergraduate newspaper, reporting the
event, headlines “War evitable, says Franks.”

AVERELL HARRIMAN lets it be known
that that’s the way he wants to be known
during the election campaign. Seems he is not
too keen on the William, which is his first
name.

BOB HOPE got a belly laugh on the air last
night when his straight man asked him what
he knew about the United States Govern-
ment. “All I know is that I put down the
Government as one of my dependants on my
income tax return,” cracked Bob.

Oh, and Bing Crosby. has just bought a big
new twin-engined plane.

IT is far too long since we have seen Her-
bert Marshall in a movie—but that’s being
taken care of now.

His phone rings in New York, and Herbert
is told by R.K.O. “Please be in Hollywood
tomorrow. You're starring in ‘The Murder.’ ”

In New York he has been doing a radio
show entitled “The Man Called X”.

ACTING just like a Rockefeller, John D.
jun. dashes off a note to New York’s Metro-
politan Museum saying he is giving it
| £3,500,000._ Lyrically, Roland Redmond,
president of the board of trustees, describes
the note as “a superb and perfect document.”

The note—or the cheque?

HEADLINE: “Coronation robes hunted by
anxious peers.”

CHARLES DICKENS, visiting New York,
described the institution as “badly ventilated,
badly lighted, none too clean, and very un-
comfortable.”

He was talking about the City Home for
Dependants (a _ poor-house) on Welfare
Tsland.

Now a big, spotless and»modern home is
being opened, with beds for 2,000. It is some
years now since the people there stopped
being .“inmates” and _ officially became
“guests.”

IS AMERICA “turning out more alibis
than airplanes?”

Jim Lucas, investigator for a big chain of
newspapers, is out to diseover the facts. And,
from Los Angeles he reports:—

“The planes we make cost millions, The

| Russians turn out cheaper and less compli-
cated planes by the thousand.”























IDOL ANKLET SOCKS
and Half-length HOSE
in many colours and

Da Costa & Co., Ltd.

CELEBRATE

TOMORROW



Goddard's Restaurant

Served from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.



yvou'mn
ENJOY OUR
GOLD BRAID
COCKTAILS

SESE eee ESSE

=



PHOTOGRAPHS
Copies of Local Photographs
Which have appeared in the
ADVOCATE NEWSPAPER
Can be ordered from the...
ADVOCATE STATIONERY

FIBRE MATS:
Plain, Stencilled and
Decorated. These are
available in four sizes.

3x 3yds.&3x 3% yds.

CONGOLEUM:
Six feet wide and cut
to any desired size.

Ph. 4472

Cc. S, PI TCHER

5
oe

KN

CP
Seo e

FF)
e
oe Sat

*.

‘s
hes.

ec

Crisp, smartly-styled MEN’S SHIRTS
by CONSULATE—Collars attached
and detached,

SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS
and UNDERWEAR

DRESS SHIRTS by MARCELLA and
DRESS COLLARS

Handsome TIES (including
BOW TIES, Maroon and
Black for Evening Wear)














FRENCH
ICE
CREAMS

1 Flavours




BDDGHOGHSHHHH9O99-99O9HGOG-HOOGO”



THURSDAY, JULY. 3,

1952



Turtle Fishing Is
A Monkey

Robs

The Housewife

OFF THE OISTIN’S COAST there has been a decline
in the catches of deep sea species of fish. Very few flying
fish and dolphin were brought to the market last month.

This decline signifies the end of the flying fish season

which is near at hand and
season.

the approach of the Hurricane

Although very few boats have been beached, their
owners are pondering on whether to fish or not. Every
man is watching the other in order to get an idea as to

whether there are still

sea fish.

Only about six fishing boats
left the Oistin'’s moorings yester-
day, Should they return with
reasonably large catches, perhaps
all the boats will be out during
the remainder of the week.

Turtle fishing has now become
an important feature in the
Oistin’s fishing industry. During
the past few weeks many turtle
nets were set along the coast.
Now that fishing boats are leav-
ing just before sunrise the turtle
catchers have ample time to haul
their nets and so save them from
being pulled away by the boats.

Rupert Harewood has been the
most successful turtle catcher.
Mr, “Jack” Ashby of Oistin’s, a
City druggist, is also taking a
keen interest in turtle fishing. So
far, every day this week he has
arrived at work with turtles in
the back of his car. They were
caught in his. nets.

Care of Nets

Mr. Ashby said that turtle
catching was a paying concern
but a certain amount of time
should be devoted to the care of
the nets if the best results were
to.be expected.

At Oistin’s yesterday various
catchers were drying their nets
in order to get them during the
evening,

Seine fishing is at present also
playing a big part in the lives of
the fishermen at Oistin’s, At
about 6.30 a.m. yesterday the
large seine boat, owned by Lewis
Fleming, returned to the beach
with 175 pounds of seine fish,
mostly jacks.

Fleming’s seine nets caught a
similar amount last month. Yes-
terday’s catch was quickly
bought by waiting housewives.

Other fishermen are hooking
goat fish and bringing them to the
market. On the housewife’s
menu, “goat” fish, jacks and
turtle are gradually replacing the
much loved flying fish.

The largest catch sold in the
market last month was on the
llth. That was 1,994 pounds of
flying fish. On the other days
catches were well below the 500
pound mark, The catches for
June this year are, however
much better than those for the
same period last year.

The new type of powered fish-
ing boat which is being built by
Corlett Yard at Oistin’s has
reached the stage where it will
now be planked. However, its
owner, Mr. Lewis Fleming; ‘is
awaiting lumber.

As soon as he gets his supply,
work on the boat will be resumed.
The boat jis expected to be com-
pleted in time for the next fishing
season,

Fishermen at Oistin’s are con-
templating holding a “singing” in
memory of two Oistin’s fisher-
men who were lost at sea during
the fishing season in the boat
Miss Pam. They hope, with the
approval of the fishing authori-

ties, to keep the “singing” in
Oistin’s Market.
Miss Pam, with its two-man

crew, left its mooring about two
months ago. Nothing has since
been heard of the boat or the
crew.

Referring to the unlucky crew,
a fisherman told the Advocate:
“Clayton and Bud.were good boys.
They were my good friends and
I think they are deserving of a
“singing.”

Miss Pam's last catch amounted
to 185 pounds which she brought
to the Oistin’s Market on April
25 last.

A group of model boats, 24
inches long, is now being built at
Oistin’s. The fleet will race
against boats of a similar size
along the St. James coast.

Corlett Yarde’s° Sea Fox re-
tained the championship when a
series of Model Boat Regattas,
sponsored by the Oistin’s Model
Boat Cluly, were held recently,

Several, Residents at Oistin’s
are not as concerned over world
affairs as they “are over a monkey
which is seen..cegularly in_ the
morning. This monkey, which
moves swiftly among the trees,
put in its appearance in the dis-
trict a few months ago,

Unlike the monkeys at Cherry
Tree Hill and Turners Hall, its
diet includes some of the delica-
cies p ised. by housewives. It
is not unusual for a housewife to
discover that a pint of milk and
a loaf of bread are missing from
her dining table.

Occasionally the monkey’s haul
includes such expensive com-
modities as pines.

The Weightlifting Club at Oi:-
tin’s a branch of Palm Springs
Barbell Club, now has a total of

possibilities of catching more deep

500 pounds in weights. Much of the
weights was supplied by Mr.
Harold Webster, Coach of the
Amateur Weightlifting Associa-
tion of Barbados.

There has been an increase in
the membership, ‘Mr. Webster and
Mr. Edwin Rogers, a Vice-Presi-
dent of the Association, visit the
club regularly to supervise the
training of these lifters.

One member, Felton Prescod,
had already reached championship
standard, He is of the 165 pounds
division and is training hard in
preparation for the coming compe-
tition in August.

139 Friendly
Societies
Registered

The Report of the Registrar of
Friendly Societies for the half year
ended June 30, 1950, was laid on
the table of the House of Assem-
bly at its meeting on Tuesday.

The report states:—

There were 139 Societies on the
Register at the 30th June, 1950.

No Society was registered dur-
ing the half.year.

The following Societies were
amalgamated during the half year,
viz:—

The Church Revival Band of
Charity F. S, was amalgamated
with the Holders Hill Scout F. S.

The Queen of Sheba F. S. was
amalgamated with the Oistins
Mutual Endeavour F. S.

The True Shepherd F. S. was
supaseenpted with the Lion Duke
No application for registration
was refused during the half year.

No society was struck off the
register during the half year.







GOVT. REJECTS
CEMENT PLAN

Government have made re-
plies to que@stions asked by
Mr. C. E. Talma, and Mr
E. D. Mottley.

Mr. Talma had enquired in
connection with the erection
of a cement pnt in the
Island. The reply is that the
Government does not consider
the present or the potential
internal demand for cement
sufficjent to justify the erec-

tion of an economic sized
cement plant here.
In reply to Mr. Mottley

who enquired about an inade-
quacy of bus services on cer-
tain routes, the Government
Stated that from time to time
representations have been
made to them regarding the
inadequacy of the bus services
on certain routes. These com-
plaints have been investigated
and then justified steps have
been taken to relieve them.



Lorry Destroyed
mi
By Fire

Motor lorry T.213 was com-
pletely destroyed when it caught
fire along Mangrove Pond Road,
St. Thomas, at about 11.00 p.m,
on Tuesday.

It was being driven by Theo-

dore Jordan of Reeves Hill, St.
Thomas,



$300 STOLEN

Gwendolyn Jeffers of Roebuck
Street, City, reported to the Po-
lice that $300 was stolen from
her bedroom between 7.30 a.m.
and 10.30 p.m. on Tuesday.

The Police are carrying out in-
vestigations.



Gordon For Dominica

Mr. G. M. Gordon, O.B.E.,
A.M.LC.E., Engineering Adviser to
the Comptroller for Development
and Welfare, will leave Barbados
by air on the 3rd July for a two
weeks’ visit to Dominica, §





WHAT'S ON TODAY

Police Courts—10.00 a.m.

Water Polo Aquatic Club—
5.00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema, Reef Grounds
—7.30 p.m.

Police Band Concert, Queen's
Park—7.45 p.m.



406 Deaths In ’°50
Due To Diseases Of
The Circulatory

DISEASES of the, Circulatory were responsible for
406 deaths in 1950, 15.10% of the total deaths, the Director

of Medical Services stated in
which was laid on the table

his Annual Report for 1950-51
of the House of Assembly at

their meeting on Tuesday last.

The figures for General and
Communicable Disease stated in
the report were as follows :—

Diseases of Early Infancy were
responsible for 472 deaths, repre-
senting 17-56% of total deaths.

Diseases of the Circulatory
System were responsible for 406
deaths, representing 15.10% of
total deaths.

Infective and Parasitic Diseases

‘were responsible for 329 deaths,
representing 12.24% of total
deaths. :

Intracranial lesions of vascular
origin accounted for 210 deaths,
representing 7.18% of total deaths.
These causes represented 85% of
the deaths due to diseases of the
Nervous System and Sense Or-
gans,

Diseases of the Respiratory Sys-
tem. 342 deaths were registered,
representing 12.72% of total
deaths. 197 of these were due to
pneumonia or broncho-pneumo-
nia and of these 95 occurred
within the first year. Deaths from
pulmonary tuberculosis and
whooping-cough are not included
in this category.

Diseases of the Digestive System
accounted for 213 deaths, repre-
senting 7.92% of total deaths.

Cancer and Other Tumours
were the cause of 173 deaths, re-
presenting 6.1% of total deaths.

More detailed information is
given in the Appendices to the
Report and special attention is
drawn to the eight major causes
of death as classified under the
Intermediate International List of
Causes of Death, These statistics
are shown for 1941/50...

Communicable Diseases

Enteric Fever:— 37 cases were
reported as ‘against 69 in 1949.
Of. thése nine or 24.3% died,
Though the morbidity represents
a notable decrease, it cannot be re-
garded as a true index of the dis~
ease in the community and al!
efforts to improve environmental

sanitation, and to give protection
by the appropriate vaccine should



continue,
Tuberculosis:— 78 cases wert
notified as against 93 in 1939.

Total deaths were 85, of which
45 occurred in residents of the
populated area of St. Michael. A
limited number of beds are avail-
able in Almshouses for isolation
of tuberculosis cases. Co-ordin-
ated attack on this ‘disease by
Public Health and Curative Ser-
vices is long overdue. Statistics
are available in Appendix XIV to
the Report which cover a period
of years.

Diphtheria:— 23 cases with one
death were notified ay against 14
in 1949. Free antitoxin and free
prophylactic toxoid continue to be
made available to medical prac-
titioners.

Venereal Diseases:— Although
net notifiable, the five types oc-
curred during the year, Of the 129
deaths caused by syphilis, or 4.8%
of total deaths, 70 occurred with-
in the first year of life and 11
occurred, from the first to thé
fourth year. There is need for
improved venereal disease ser-
vices from which good dividends
can be expected.

Leprosy:— No new cases were
reported. There were two deaths.

To think in terms of eradication!
is not “|

t Gine Gabrics

this number 25 were infants un-|

rather than control
trong a presumption.

Tetanus:— 44 deaths occurred
as a result of this disease. Of

der one year of age.
Cerebro-spinal Meningitis :—
Two cases were reported as
against 6 in 1949.
Malaria:—The colony remained
free from malaria and anopheline
mosquitees were not found, Dis-

insectisation of schooners and
aircraft continues routinely.
Whocping Couth:— Twelv

deaths occurred in a fairly cever
epidemic.





Our

LOCAL

Important



BARBADOS

178,150

ADVOCATE



Books

Feature At Oistin’s

Adults In A Year

THE PUBLIC LIBRARY issued 178,150.books in the

Adult

Department ant 61,841 books

in the Juvenile

Department, according t#' the Kepert. of the Public Librar-
ian for the year ended, March 31, 2981.

The report states in part:-
Headquarters — Adult

Department

This department issued a total
of 178.150 books during the year,
a decrease of 6,077 as compared
with the previous, year. 3,310 new
books were added to the stock and
638 withdrawn as unfit for further
use, making a total of 34,674 books
in this department at the close*of
the vear 15°7 new borrowers
were reg’stered, making a total
membership of 14,526.

The system of displaying nev
tooks for three days before put
ting them into circulation was
continued and it is pleasing to
record the satisfaction which the
public expressed with this facility.

The “Request System” whereb
priority claim is given to a bor
rower for the use of a book on its
return to the Library was made
full use of during the year.

Suggestions by the public for
the acquisition of books which
were not in stock were received
and purchases made where books
were considered suitable for
library purposes,

Gifts of books, although not as
plentiful as in previous years
were received and the donors in
each case gratefully thanked for
them.

Headquarters — Juvenile
Department

During the year 61,841 books
were issued, an increase of 4,369
over the previous year. 958 new
books were added to the stock
and 1,055 withdrawn as unfit for
further use, making a total stock
of 8,930 books in this department
at the close of the year. 1,206
new borrowers were registered
and 385 taken off the register on
account of reaching the age limit,
making a total membership of
6,622 at the close of the year,

From the stock of this depart-
ment supplies are drawn for the
juvenile sections of the Speights-
town Branch Library, the two
Government Industrial School
and the eight Deposit Stations.

As it is in the juvenile that the
seed of the love of reading is sown
special attention must be given tc
the selection of books jin order to
enable the seed gradually to grow
and develop. It is in this respect
that the main problem of this de-

partment lies. The markets of
Canada and the U.S.A., fron
which lerge quantities of books

have been previously drawn, art
now closed on account of currency
restrictions, and the United King-
dom remains the only open mar-
ket. In spite of this disadvantage,
every effort is being made to
maintain the efficiency ‘of thie
very important department at its
highest level possible.

In order to hold the children’s
interest in their library, “story
hour” was continued as a weekly
feature of this department with
marked success. At Christmas
time the usual entertainment was
staged indvors for the children,
many of whom were accompanied
by their parents or guardians.
The Police Band, which had been
kindly loaned by the Commis-
sioner of Police, was in attendance
and enlivened the preceedings
with music appropriate to the
season, The programme included
a Christmas story which was read
by one of the children, a musical
quiz for which prizes were award-
ed, Christmas Carols, a play by
pupils of the St. Matthias Boys’
School and a song by a member
of the adylt staff. The room
which had been attractively dec-
orated for the occasion was filled
to capacity. Efforts such as these
play no unimportant part in the
development of a juvenile library,

The Reference section of this
department received 9 new books
during the year, making a total
stock of 105 at the close of the
year.

Deposit Stations

There are seven Deposit Sta-
tions in the Island, one jn each
of the parishes of St. John, St.

Andrew, St. Joseph, St. Lucy and
St. Thomas, and two in St, Philip.
During the year 3,520 books were



|
|

|
}

|

j
|
|
}

LDODGHPDOGHOOS

| jor those

issucd from these stat’ons to adult
re. ders ds compared with 4,476
in tae preyious year; and 5,335
were issued to juvenile readers as
campared with 61231 in the pre-
vious year; making a total issue
from all stations of 8,855 as com-

pi with 10,607 in.the previous
yea. 217 rew borrowers wert
re icved and 22 removed from
the reg s-er, making a total mem-



bership of. 2.150 at the close of the

.
Pies iY

for new one

‘teryals the books
lat exchanged
in orde*â„¢ to held the

on

inter@st o° readers. There are
798 more wvenile them adult
member, but owing to the pres-

ent difficulty ‘n obtaining juvenile
bocks in suffle ent quantity and
variety it ‘s not always possible
to meet in full the demands of
the young readers. Every effort
is, however, beins made to meet
this difficult situat‘on, The duties
of issuing books, registering bor-
rowers and keeping the necessary
stat'stical records are undertiken

for the most part by elementary
school teachers whose services are
given voluntarily. As the time
given by these willing helpers is
somewh>;{ limited to meet fully
the cenvenience of readers, most
of whom live in the scattered

and remote villages, and, also, as
some of the stations are estab-
lished in districts that are not the
most convenient to enable mem-
bers to make full use of them,
consideration is being given ta
the possibility of enlisting addi-

tional helpers and o* removing
one at least of the stations to a
more convenient location. Rv

these efforts it is hoped to estab-
lish more fully the usefulness of
‘tthe Deposit Stations,

School Libraries Department

This department began to func-
tion in October, 1949, under a
trial scheme for the supply of
books to elementary chants. Ten
schools were brought under the
scheme during the year, making
a total at the close of the year of
28 schools to which books are
supplied, .During the year 1,011
new books were added to the
stock, making a_ total stock of
2,083 books at the close of the
year. Books were issued to 8,135
children duning the year as com-

pered with 2,942 in the six-
months period in the previous
year during which the scheme

operated for the first time.

As the scheme is on a trial
basis and as its success must in-
evitably rest with the teachers
who are responsible for seeing
after the issue and return of the
books and their proper care, its
progress will be watched with
care with a view to its ineorpor-
ation into the Public Library
service on a permanent basis. The
statistical records that are kept
of the working of the scheme are
net included in the general
statistics of the Public Library



Despotidency In
U.K. Due To
More Taxes

There is quite a lot of despond-
ency in England due to increased
taxation, said Mr. F. C. Bryan wh«¢
passed through here yesterday
from the U.K. on the Cclembie ou
his way back to Trinidad,

Mr. Bryan who is a welding
engineer with Apex Oilflelds went
over for three months’ holiday.
He was accompanied by his wife
and little daughter Carol Ann.

He said that things are stil!
very expensive in England and

the major contention is—the price |

of petrol which is now about 4/4
a gallon.

Meat which is very scarce ‘s
still rationed, but recently, there
has been a good supply cf fresn
vegetables.

During the first month he was
in England, Mr. Bryan said that
the weather was rather cold, but it
started to become
the last month.

LILLE CDLD®PDOO®@LVOV OOOO DOVO DDG DOO OOOEOHOOOPEVOYF

bright during }

Bob-A-job Week
' Was Suiecess

Reporting on Bob-a-Job Week
Major J. E. Griffith, Island Seout |
Commissioner states that “despit:
a number of important drawbacks
it can be stated that Bob-a-Jcb
Week was a success.”

Tne Island Commissioner writés
ftr. her, “two features stand out,
very prominently and fully justi-
iy our rushing the effort in spite |
ot time rather than postponing 1

een eam nggoe

Shoemaker
Awarded

Issued To $215 Damages

Noel Benjamin, a shoemaker of
Lodge Road, Christ Church, was
yesterday awarded $215 damages
by His Honour Mr. J. W. B
| Chenery, in the Assistant Court of
Appeal, Original Jurisdiction

Benjamin. who works for $30 a
week, lost these earnings for six
| weeks after he was involved in an
} actident off December 5, last year,
with a lorry driven by Michael
| Ramdin of Upper Roebuck Street

Benjamin had claimed $240,
holding that he had suffered great
vain from the injuries he received,
had incurred expenses for medi-
eines, medical attention and the
repair of his bicycle, besides being
tunable to pursue his calling as a
shoemaker for six weeks

He said that he had been rid-

Firstly, it was demonstrated quit?| ing on the left side of Durant’s
clearly that the public can be re- | Road, Christ Church, where the
lied upon for support if and whe secident occurred, when Ramdin
we approach them in the righ.) negligently drove and managed
way; secondly, the hearty oc-| the lorry M-2943 which he was

operation of the Scouts and the)
truly wonderful spirit with whic
they threw themselves into ib:
«ffort were clearly manifested.

The report states that “fro
returns to hand it can be state
that about 200 Scouts took part |
the Bob-a-Job Campaign and

earned the sum of $1,021, Twenty - |

five (25) Groups ;articipated and
to the newest Group, Harriso: »
College, goes the honour of ear,
ing the largest amount of $127
This sum was earned by 18 bFov |
The Scout earning the highest in-
dividual amount was Joes of th:
Cathedral Group: Tais boy eorn,
$17.00, The greatest number of |
jobs was performed by R. S. G

of Harrison College, 39, an avera |
of 6 a day. Creditable amoun s
were earned by Garrison S \|
Scouts, $96.37; Cathedral Grov>
$83.76 and the Fir.t Sea Scou
$80.09."

The Island Commissioner o
served that “in quite a number «
cases jobs were paid more thi
they worth while in a number they
were grossly underpaid. This wes
due, no doubt. to a misunc
standing that the job was to .
paid a bob or shilling, irreep
live of the nature of the job cr}
the time required to complete it

Concluding his Report, the |
land Commissioner writes “It
strongly recommended that th
method be used annually to crea
a Headquarters’ Fund,



Import Licences |
Will Be Issued |

A notice in the office of th
Controller of Supplies states tha,
consideration will be given t
issuing licences for importation
from all sources of items which
include pollard, linseed, oilmea!,
groundnut meal, alfalfa meal
malt sprouts, corn gluten fee ,
brewers grain and corn,

People who wish licenses f
impertation of any of thesg com-~-
modities have to make applicatic
to the office of the Controller of
than 10 am

Supplies not later

on July 14.



£5 For Profiteering |

Forty-year-old salesman Elias
Hadeed of Indramer Guest House,
Christ Church, was yesterday
ordered to pay a fine of £5 for
offering for sale three yards of
epun rayon to a customer at $6
per yard instead of at $3.46 per
yard,

The fine which was imposec
by Mr. C. W. Rudder, Polic
Magistrate of District “A”, is t
be paid in 14 days or in defau
one month's imprisonment witt
hard labour.





|
|






Rub away the pain-
ful torment of muscu-
lar sprains and bruises.
A.l. ite Liniment pene-
trates to the source of the
pain. Its soothing warmth
brings welcome relief, Buy
a bottle today!

A WHITE

eu









|

driving along the same road, and
sollided with him. He and his
bicycle were thrown to the
ground gnd he was injured and
his bicycle damaged.

He claimed that Ramdin had
driven too close to him while
overtaking him around a curve in
the road and he was also driving
at an excessive speed. ,

OFF in

Twinplex Sharpeners
Cigarette Holders
Photo Frames

Tea Strainers

Ash Trays














A | fa
Carainad

°

Shwartz Geletine—per 1-oz. pkt,

Lushus Jellies (7 Flavours)—per pkt.
Koo Tomato Sauce—Lge. bottle a“
Koo 8.0. Marmalade—per 8-Ib, tin 1,97

PAGE FIVE

“

Monoriel Service
At St. Leonards

Arriving here on Saturday last

by B.W.LA was Mr. Byron
Mansfield Devonish of Brooklyn,
New York This is’ his second
visit to Barbados since he, has
been residing in the United States.

On Sunday last at St. Leon-
ard’s Church after Matins, a
very impressive Service was held

to the memory of his mother Mrs,
Evalina Augusta Devonish, a
member of that Church. A large
and representative congregation
attended. The Revd. D. Woode
conducted the Service.

At the conclusion of the Ser-
vice in the Chureh by the singing
of the Hymn “Let Saints on
Earth in Concert Dwell,” the
Choir and congregation proceeded
to the grave where the unveiling
»f a Memorial Tablet
formed by Mr. Devonish,

The Revd. Woode svoke of the
deceased lady’s loyalty and chris-
tian principles, and paid tribute
to her as a devoted mother. This
was followed by the singing of
the Hymn “Abide with Me” and
the “Benediction.”

INTRANSIT ON
**COLOMBIE”

The S.S. Colombie arrived in
Carlisle Bay yesterday morning
from Martinique with intransit
passengers. Many of these p
sengers visited the town and
bought clothing from the various
stores.

The Colombie left
day for Trinidad.



later in the

P POLISH

“For Red
Composition i
floors, Red Tile floors, *
~ Brick & Cement Paths, etc.
WILL NOT WASH

the rain,

, Also in green

momo d. +





Fresh Supplies Beceived!

Gold Chloride
Huxley's Betul Oil .
Mother Greaves Worm

Exterminator
Charcoal Biscuits

Sinitary Blockettes

HOUSEHOLD GLOVES |
SKOL SUNTAN OIL

at Breakfast — Lunch

- Dinner

$0.34
19
48

Was per- -

rr

ee ee

















2 Liptons French Coffee—per tin .69
f Shadow Stripe Nylosw Clemens Pure Grape Juice—
in Pink, Blue & Lge. Bottle$1.02, Sml, Bottle 67
a ates ea eee ee, ee Indonesian eee oe Ib. ; 4
Pe Jax Pineapple Chunks-—per tin 5
ee eerenpene bl ilk *. Koo Tom tees: tins A a
his is a very serviceable art s - < Dried Fruit Salad—per pkt. Sa 3
eee the talk of the town material, and is available in lovely Heinz Sweet Mustard Pickle—per jar .97
: range of plain shades. Danish Thick Cream—per tin PaaS
GLAZED HANDMADE $6.00 v/ | Sik P She Ranch Minced Corned Beef—per tin =“
* POTTERY LAMPS .... " re . ‘a a ue Sheer Ranch Luncheon Beef Loaf—per tin 6
eae POTTERY PLATES ' j i 7 . : 7 Bronte Roast Beef—per 1-Ib. tin my
WATER MUGS ............ $4.00 2.00, $1.00 ' in Pink, Silver, Champagne, Ecru, Salisbury Corned Mutton—per tin 68
PUNCH & COCKTAIL $2.00, $1.00 each $ Lemon, Gold, Ice Blue, Torquoise, ontael a, Balasee Wuatis Colle
MUGS $3.00 POTTERY VASES © Rose, Lilac, Bois de Rose and White y 2.40
U pester casnabibenendh 08 . $6.00, $2.50, $2.00 $1.50 @ — at $2.76 per tin e
SETS “of POTTERS ie ae tara 3 Or Oete Huntley & Palmers Fruit Cake—
ENTREE DISHES .... $3.50 ASH TRAYS 48c. each 3 af far ts 2.00
-- *_ Neilsons Nut Roll—ver pkt, l5c.—
e Pe per box of 24 2.88
‘ Swifts Pate De Foie—per tin 21
HOME PRODUCTS DEPT. 3 Tate & Lyles Cube Sugar—per pkt. .34
’ g COCKADE FINE RUM
CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LTD.N $ BROAD STREET—DIAL 2664 sit ‘Lia
10, 11, 12 & 13. Broad. Street. : : |) Stansfeld Scott & Co, Ltd.
vi
zg @ Oe ae NE eo MR Ne eae









BOVE} YOY



DL oPLYOEEVPYOPDOO OOOO WY YOO 1D SOR OREO GOEF4 494 4FO444 444048 SS PADIS AAAS SS
















PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, JULY 3, 1952

CLASSIFIED AD§, PtBHt NOTICES) _PULIC SALES /Cooper’s Neck| SEEPPINIG NOTICES

TELEPHONE 2508 NOTICE REAL ESTATE Br ok en









We beg to inform our Customers ané | —————_
friends that our Provision Department APPLEBY—on Sea, St.


























































































































































































J | MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, We m tad 7 — .
DIED FOR SALE ate longer Re open to the Public! newly-built houses. Each “oe a } ZEALAND LINE LIMITED. P Y,
k jon Saturdays. Our Other De t8| bedrooms, dining, dtaw! rooms and From 1 (M.4.N Z. LINE) a
de gate will continue as usual. S. & $8. o0 Veratidah’ Modesh ‘son . * Page M.v. “CACIQUE DEL
SNTOsR a 52 7 eee sie ATHLONE—on sea, be! ° i . §.S. “GLOUCESTER” is scheduled to | ¥ ; 4
PO Tntie Melniceh. inte Gocper at | . into two fats Buch har Mining, Gene |, It Was While Melzitosh was dig-| sali trom Port Pine May slat Derompon | § ee Se ee
iat Wateaden. Coty. Cotton Factory | AUTOMOTIVE | NOTICE end several bedrooms. Modern conven- ging that they heard the main|June Sth, Melbourne June 14th, Sydney | ¥ Vincent, Grenada, Aud Akuba
Sie Prssasea. Co-op, Cotton Eavtory | araeyNe SCHOOL mwrrmance. [iencel. hone m0 Mr. Kenneth [foot give away. Mcintosh tried to| June 2th, Brisbane July 6th, arriving at] pire or sGiinn to’ be notified
residence gt 4.30 o'clock this after- | - CAR~\1) Austin 7H.P. in First Class| | | SXAMINASEION + edie of the hole, but before he "hae ae See oo ,
noon for St. Ann's Church. ondition, Recently Overhauled and se- For the School Year beginning 16th | >,,.... cL aL... a In addition to general cargo this vessel | ¢ “CARIBBEE”’ i
Enid McIntosh and children, Anita| paired. ‘Djal 2838 Sept. 1952.) Examination for Entrance |.) ROPERTIES—Shop and Residence at reach safety at the top, the| nay ample space for chilled and hard|® agcccnt Cargo usd Paseneers for
Branch and Lilian Thomas (sisters) | - : ~—~|to the Alleyne School will be held on}; Saag’ Water na on 000 sa: ft. tree crashed down on him, and| trozen cargo. R Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
3.7.52—In, 9 che Saree Light 6 JEP. Fitted | Monday July 21, 1952 at 9 am, at the} "Acres Building Land at Clapham, |*"0cked him back into the hole. Cargo accepted on through Bills of }@ Nevis and St. Kitts. Date of sail-
IN MEMORIAM Meee gee eet Snaainn, OwRer| _ Aprlictiions sewciner, with, Bagusitat |i Nowe at Howell's Cross Rood. Site eaapeled Out Of the hoke and' to] Bitek, Guiana, Leeward and Windward |® we gemoow
buy’! rger car. Cole & Co. Certificat and Testimonials will be . ole and to , " Bw ONER OWNERS’
- - 3.7.83—n.| received by the Headmaster up to|/"Mt 18 x 10, back 20 x 11. Shed 20 X lsatety by the backli 1 nee ASSOCIATION (INC.)
DANIEL—In loving memory of my dear ° | Friday July 18. «| 8 Land can'be rented. Aiso (1) Large y lift of the falling) yor ¢urther particulars apply—
Husband Frank Wilfred Daniel, who;| CAR—Morris Oxford. Im good condj-| Applications for one or more vacant eOnaEey. at BF isiode Hill. Apoly Jos. |tree. He said he immediately ran PURNESS WITHY & CO., L’ .
ditd July Grd, 1940. cm mem. | OM: Phone 288a 2.7.52—Sn. | Foundation Scholarships tenable at the) py Hi) Heal Estate Agent, Tyegtaise around to where McIntosh was| TRINIDAD * e ;
a y' - a aaciilatieairaeet sttartacseaiindll tienen - » - Ue . '
vay and as - : CAR—1951 Hillman Minx. 8,000 Miles Hoakaaiter ore wie received by the | ee [AG Was on time to see him fallir and ‘ J ,
y a : CAR—192 Q , er up to Friday July 18. Candi- | yy, back in 18 DA COSTA & CO. L’ Os
Time wears away the edge of grief, Ir good cohdition. A. R. Lewis c/o|dates will be examined on Monday pe taydareignes will offer for sale at to the hole, He called for » LTD., 5OOSOOOOGHHOOC84
Tubosh Geek th Chath $2) can CARH Sheers COs, 00 eee eS ee eee 29.6.52-—-3n. 117" High Strect, Bridgetown, om Friday, | 4m, but he did not answer Pe ue eee
ta a n at ve 1 in . . * 2 * a = :
live sais nah merinie sic tela Eee the 4th day of July, 1963 at 2 p.m. Cutting said they had , °
For in my heart he liveth still CAR-—Dodge Super-Deluxe, First Class RAFFLE The bungalow known as CAMILLE expected that the’ tetas wand
Ever to be remembered by a8) wih condition and Owner-driven. $2,000 The Table, tapestry worked, and pre- with the — Burs oe by aa. deeper, but as could be seen f * DO YOU KNOW What
Ivis. US.A 3.7,52—-1n. | pial 4476 12.6.52—t.f.n. | sented by Mrs. Worswick of St, James, | ™easuremen’ sq. ft. situate in the rom o ‘
—_—— OO rrr OC in aid of St. Peter's Daily Mea’ was|Nav¥ Gardens, Christ Church and uprooted trunk, there was h ust ‘
HINDS—In loving memory of our dear] GARS—One Gituar and one Car,| won by containing an open verandah facing |really nothing keeping it up except ee ee
wette! ea Agena Mreatt; | American »“Auatiny, both in” pena! | Mra Penna of Rovon..U-8.A. the Letty mS teen: Sits tas [200% ela. we wae at
. d . orking rder. Apply te > .| mount realized, . has been ser - iO ig * - ‘ ese
1928. ROUDFOOT. Dial 4949, after, 4 p.m.|to the Hon. Treas: of the Welfare }#"4 kitchen with garage and rooms for The huge trunk is about five to NEW YORK SERVICE. 6
She is gone where Millions have | pial gi93 3.7.52-—2n | League, ear marked for St, Peter's Daily }tWo servants and with electricity in- |six feet in diameter, and engineers
a Meal, ' Mrs, C. E. O'Neal, Whitehall, |stalled. Inspection | dial, 4480. ho visited the scene and who| “~ S*AMER sills 20 June—arrives barbados 1st July. |
a ae ONE (1) Austin two ton truck and one | St ‘eter 3.7,52—1n, | tu
We must go to meet herein glory. 1/11) Austin A.40 Car. Telephone 4821,| ——$—$—$________________. J sale_apply to:—" 7 have had to do with weights. NEW ORLEANS SERVI
Z : ; , j
For there's no night there D. V, Seott & Co.. Ltd LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE ,©OT™= CATFORD & CO, 20.6.52—8n |estimate that it would wei t os {
She is gone, yet not forgotten, * Ane ’ : us Q ae. ORR bo eratedetennentqupierenpeshbaeeaiee weigh about ad j
In’ our enone: 80 fat and clear re ee ct Lease tn Sank The application of Livingstone Lowe, AUCTION four or five tons, Re ee as sails Sth June—arrives Barbados 21st June. |
Some day we'll meet our dear TRUCK Chevrolet puck no reason. | shopkeeper of Bank Hall, holder of : McIntosh had been aceustomed une—arrives Batbados Sth Joly. 5
ae ie aad tats able offer refused. A Barnes & Go. | {stp sicense, No. S22 of 1952 granted | “By Kind permission I will sel atip.m, |t@ Going work of the kind, and
John & iris (Children) Lilia & Carlo: |i: 37 +4'n-|% board shop with wall frontage at}at McEmearney & Co., Garage Friday |had previously felled trees for his :
(Grandehtidren) F 3.7.52—1n is Marine Road, Bank Hall, St. Michael, [4th. One B.S.A. 5 Seater Sedan Car | @; ers. He fell CANADIAN SERVICE
st —ew | ere ae net rfett Speed for permission to use said Liquor License Jin wore oe Terns Cash. R | whie = e felled the tree e
~ ing order X—313 License paid, Apply |®', Said premises, Bank Hall, St. Mich- | Archer Mc » Auctioneer, ly MiG once stood in the old SOUTHBOUND }
ANNO? NCEMEN TS aro ae" near Peqwoll, Ye Oe eh duth. Bale dup ae $i Wee 2.7.52—3n. ie oS eane ‘Stl Se . tg ad Aras’ waveeaia é sil
———— SC a To:—E. A. MeLEOD, : By instructions of the Imsurance Com- ,,; - “TINDRA . “ on Dh May 19th June 5th i. A
FARN BIG MONEY by selling Redif Police Magistrate, Distt “AN pany I willrsell at. the GENERAL |ties, McIntosh leaves a wife and (Lt. Re a eee May 30th June 14th
susion in your spare time. Get a suppl: ELECTRICAL Signed LIVINGSTONE LOWE,|MOTOR OMNIBUS CO., Nelson Street |four children ranging in ages S1LOA, FOINTER” . ke: June 13th June 28th
of forms today. STD OE: bereits or ee Screeners Applicant. one 1962 Sommerset Austin Sedan Car. /from 10 years to 14 onths. Hi “A STEAMER” . : és June 27th July 12th
} Just received new shipment of Garrard N.B.—This application will be con- [damaged by accident. Done only 45% eldest chil m™m A is ‘A STEAMER” . ‘ ¥ July lith July 26th
. three speed Automatic Changers st! sidered at a Licensing Court to be held J miles. SALE FRIDAY 4th at 2.30 p.m child, a boy, was due to sit
FOR RENT 'P. C, S. Maffei & Co. Lid. Radio Em-|at Polfee Court, District “A” on Wed- |Terms CASH Fall of Hammer. an Entrance Examination to Har- NORTHBOUND
at 4 | portum 15.6,52—t.f.n. nedday the 8th day of July, 1952, at 11 R. ARCHER a - |rison College to-day
~~. ; o'clo¢e a.m . ineer. 7 . ene eee
JUST ARRIVED “Fye" De Luxe E. A. MeLEOD, 1,.7,52—4n | Of his family his tather-in-law : .
HOUSES | Uitra-Modern prugie-Czame (with Gar : Police Magistrate, Di A Ue leas aes was the first to arrive on the ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
ao — | rard 3-speed changers) Two Pickup Heads 52—1n i tC ns
AUtrictive sadbfie Fiat main road Has-|O needle Worries, in attractive walnut | ———————. ___.____™ | covt.-in-Exeeutive Committee 1 will selt |SCene. Other relatives on learning Apply:— DA COSTA & CO., LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE Whit d Coloured
ne e ier} cabinets. A limited quantity — only ~ [on the respective spots by public com-|of the accident rushed to the spot e an
tings, _ comfortably furnished, Englis'y | ¢® ‘ ae uantiy | only | LIQUOR LICENSE NOTIC# 0 ire Sn ‘Thursday next 3rd July a la po’
Bath, Open Verandah facing sea. Suitabi | $420.00. PC. S. MAPFEI & CO.,LTD.) m0 application of William E. Agagd, |following:-- One () 10 ly fog and later his wife and some of her . SATIN. Yard de.
ane, person (cp couple). Brora duly 2 [rs Wm: Menry Sweet, g ssa.tin, [shopkember, of Liahtetgot Lane, olde; ! wooden building at St. Boniface Junior |elatives arrived by car from the| s ee erere a rat
ephone 6, fn) OED lof Liquor License No 2 0 Branted | School at 12 o'clock, and at St. Luey’s}country, The shocking news had ‘
“From ist August, furnished or unfur-}, One Hotpoint Electric Stove, 4 Rings, eran oe cA fh | Teapans ot a pore ang Boys’ and Girls’ schools one (1) wood-/taken immediate and heavy toll NOTICE Very Soft Quality 62e.
nished, “INGRID” Nawy Gardens. Three ; Large Oven and Warming Ovens eone'|Aleyne'’s Tenantry, Bush Hall, ‘st. |"rerms stsictly et Drangy A. Scott,]0n the wife, and by the time she
bedrooms vspection by arrangemen p y is * | Michael, for permission to use said Liquo loneer. 6.52—4n. | 1 .
with ELYN Ae delephone number \ | pYE BATTERY SETS—Just a few left, | License at sald premises, Bush Hall, St Sa . : Seal esneaiaes calor tale a CLOSED FROM SURSVAY FUR SHOCK FARING GOFTON FURST"
IVELYN, 2ACH O,, L' * oka ey * | Michael pse.
Ricketts MARTIN'S RADIO SMPORIOM, eek Dated this Soh day of June, 1982. ]UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER |She was almost incoherent, and RE-OPENING FRIDAY THE 4TH all colours 59c.
- GA dncch meee | TOE. Ae Me a line when sympathisers endeavoured
GEFICE SPACE in building at Spry. REVHIGERATOR—One Norge 8 Cup | Police Magistrate, Dist. “Ar. By fristractiéns recelved trom ©. L. |t) keen” her f Pay ot p A N 36” $1.89
‘ar TPffaigar St. Apply Auto Pt, Refrigerator, In first class condition aulteet Straker & Co. I will sell on Thursday cm, Tom wing SHARKSKI
Tyre Co. 2090. eT} 27.6 btn Redman & Taylor's Garage Ltd. N.B.—This application. will pe sent uy oh aie faee oh Speer husband’s body, she wrung her NIRAL EMPORIUM ods
3 ‘ #..s2—2n. | cad a teeming Cou to Be, held ai Catbpaeel) tH, teeing nie . ; and snapped her fingers in Cochet Bbsdd aiid Deller Stree | GREY MIAMI 36” $1.08
Sr nae Police Court, District “A” on lay tions, (Outer Casings 28 x 1%) Dun- |Cespalr.
ER REFRIGERATORS — Frigidaites made | 1111, gay of July, 1952, at 11 o'clock a.m. mecrress ers, “
P SONAL by crepern Bictora, Beven jane ine Y EA. McLEOD, ~ lop Roadster) 2 Bicycles, Spanners, 4



ot: refrigerator a a rie, = Par

The public are hereby warned against! Hunte & Co., Ltd., Lr, Broad St. Dia

giving credit to my wife MIGNON , 5!36 1.7, 52—3n

VALERIA JONES (nee Forde) as 1 dol plea Abin

not hold myself responsible for her or: FURNITURE

enyone else contracting any debt or ee eee ee omen Condy

debts in my mame unless by a written FURNITURE—Larder 52 ins. high,

order signed by me . $16.00; car te -
: - .« | $16.00; carpet 90 x 108 ins; valuable
Sed. VERNE AMBROSE JONES antique mah. sideboard; cedar pigeon-

St. Patrick's, }
~ wles, base 36 x 8 ins; 3 tria
Christ Cmca Sn Judge saucepans; etc No telephone:

suspection daily after 3 p.m. WA Pavil-





Police Magistrate, Dist! “A”. kootbait boots, B i Me a ‘erat “ies .
ti , ke Cream wder, bs T’dad
WANTED termints, "extra Strong, a ae I 5 yxers

items, Terms Cash,

ep | SR Es On Way Home



PROCES











“National Cash Book-Keoping Machine *
Operator with previous experience. To] LAST & FOUND @ From Page 1
Assume duties on or ore Ss) . ,

1952. Apply in person with written next six months Pompey will be

application to Secretary, Dowding Estates | ———— "> boxing for the Cruiser weight















bs. ea & Trading Co., Limited.” championship of the World, and
The, public are hereby warned agains’ hess, Beyars. 3.7,5-30 2.%,52—Tn. LOST that Adams will be contesting

giving credit to my wife, Gwendolir = the British Empire heav weight

Armstrong* (nee Hall) as 1 do not hola LIVESTOCK WHITE 1) for Standard 8 h.p. Pp y

myself responsible for her or "anigrone tio Salata eae 4 MISCELLANEOUS car, Lost between Speightstown and | title. â„¢



else contracting ny debt or debts in] BULIg-One (1) Pure Bred Holstel) |pyGinpcwanied by Bidas Brewers |Bridgetown. Rinder please return tol Although having no intention









my name pinicss by a written order? Bull Calf two (2) months. old, out of |. , | Neville Rock, dsbury Road or. dial o: t whilb f
signed by ine P.B. Bull, Prince Albert. J. W.. Smith, | CO; Ltd. 10H. P, Diesel Engine, Phone | o65 Car M—2747. 2.7.5—2n a es eee a scelare, Mr.
Sgd* LISLE ARMSTRONG | Road Cot, St. Michael. Dil 3527. ee ey ve ys oes not mean
Liber vine we 17.521." | “SURVEYOR-ENGINEER would like to maE oe | Be ope - a“
3.7, 53--2n CALF—One (1) Mure Bred Holstein Cali et in touch with estate or building y'



——-——~- [two (2) months old, out of P. B, Bull

GOVRIRNMENT NOTICE "Seti" ag es

ievelopment. ¢ desi f ni A Se. I ‘ i hi i ee
ice aaa a amet with | US. Ait Force | retires nis? ene iat sn

everal years’ lene Wri L.c.J. ; :
Go havo, ae American promoter is interested































e in running a show in Trinidad
$62.50 POCKET MONEY easily earned Ch f M featuring both Pompey and
S—6 Sa ne > : y Subs 8

FISGAL SURVEY OF goata Bresh cit aa Appl + ‘Gyn REDIFFUSION Ix one month. 1e1s eet Adims » Sand ia Se, (is ile omen

§ § rathwaite, arden and, Country |" 4 1.7.82—6n o w ave to cut short my 2
BARBADOS shania a TOKYO, June 30, | stay which ends on 5th A

3.7,52—Q1 “DIFFUS 4 30 caal a * avs stay SOF ugust
Oe te eesiny CME eae: MECHANICAL sch ine. Subrerber recommended @ in United Nations “Hopped “Rides and Aelkrae plan to re MASSEY- HAR RIS ATLAS LOADER

*. Go Beasley, C.M.C., M.A., yee s2—6n. Jin 1 t a

oa the Fiscal Survey of Barbado ae ten ices ne CTS. cP Reeres ie te sake main in Trinidad until Septem- The Super-Six Atlas front end loader is one of the latest develo;
are available at the Colonial Sec~| 26,1. .M: yj Automatic, Record | commending REDIFFUSION. obtain {2S Visiting oon ee at per, one hg pie, will ieee to ments to make farming easier, more productive. Full hydraulic
retary’s Oulice at tne price of $1.50 ull particulars from the REDIFFUSION |air force officers co ngland in time for the season operation and perfect balance assure the operator of simple
each POULTRY wee inal ah go sign pind — wre dhat tonth. sewers... LOR * control and instant response . . . makes continuous spor a
. 3.7.52.—2n aie entation | “Preemesceeraer air eck carr ren ste | ALOE, Caan | See aoe end of that month. i -breaking chore. Attaching and de-
‘ | PIGEONS—Whie, Blue and Silver| jdm heaiituslon for 28° recommenda, |. The delegation headed by Act~) A big reception has been Beagrie te a few Siecned making the tractor
‘i Kings Phone Humphrey, 4428 tions in one calendar month, ing Air Force Chiéf of Staff Gen- planned n Trinidad for these two 6 ope fi k. Fi ‘ailabl
, bour “Ss I a ‘ui 2.7.52—2n, 1.7.52-6n. {eral Nathan Twining and Under} boys in recognition of what they readil available or other work. Five attachments are av: le
re mm y y TOULTRY chnperad Cannalan LATE = Secretary of Air Rosell Gilpatric| have done to place Trinidad and with 14 yard capacity; they easily lift 1000 lbs. to 9}4-feet in
A di d Pekin Ducks. 170 egg strain. Ap- FOR SALE arrived at Seoul Monday accom.} the West Indies generally on the 9 seconds. Maximum capacity is 2000 lbs. See the Super-Six
journe ery 5 ipa, ton wens Old. 5 is panied by Far East Air Forces} boxing map of the world, and the Atlas soon!
i ‘ee

MISCELLANEOUS Commander Lt.-Gen. Otto Wy-| Police Band will take part.
piste land, Six Major Generals from ———————
RECORD—Just Received. Long Playing, |Air Force Headquarters in Wash-| In Touch With Barbados

Calypsos, (Edmundo Ross) Charlie Kunz, |;
Mildred Atwell, Tea Heath, Billy Cotton |#2gton are also included in the Coastal Station



" rakes Seven dollars. Ducks Six dol-
His Worship Mr. C. W. Rudder, } ars, on View Friday 4th to. Sunda;
Coroner istrict “A”, yester- | ith. July, 4.30 p.m. to 6,30 p.m

day adjattrit™ until July 16 thc] 4F* Peebles, Bayleys, St. Philip.”



COURTESY GARAGE







indugy scingo, the . circumstance: Artists). Wm. Fogarty (B'dos) Ltd... | BTOUp. : Cablé ard Wireless (W.1) Ltd. advise
sg RO von ay |_| MIBCRLLAN OU Bie | eet tes Sa tates | alte ear seem Be
r a a :

Tields, a Yabourer of Foul B: ——_————— | con A ew shih P on 0 e nature o the owing ships throug! eir Bar- »
7: EC Sv pment of 38 1/3]. . pal
St. Philip, Agricultural ar and Sickles c.D p.m. records just received, selections Jit was speculated that the Air ae Gene ek Shemivuiniss. 96a. ROBERT THOM LEIMITED..

‘Allan Ei@las died at the General Jordan & Co,, Spe ightstown. 6.52-—4n, | from, South Pacific, Cakypsos by Edmun- | Force brass is conferring on the| ,. Dublin, 8.s. Fort ‘Townshend, 8.s.
Hospital J 23, after he was} ——— . Ao. Ross Dick Haymes album ete. }type of Communist targets to be/ Uruguay, s.4, Sun Rover, s.s._ Philose- q
aiiined ees leak Leen ie: SEREALS—Shredded Wheat, Corn | s.Geatn a Co. tan” Bisetia pit attacked following last week's | pher, Aicc ay Star. § Bi apooele. DIAL 4616

* I lakes, Oatmeal, Al 1 Makes, in | ¢.084 ~ ; 5.8 lcoa s.s ‘ansporter, «
juries which he sustained when | ras” Ween FORD aS, Hocbuek st. p2kene 2973. 3,7.52—n.| controversial assault on the Reds| 2) Attica, és. Argentina, s.s. Siranda,
he was involved in an accident | iat 4499 ; 2.7,52—2n | "Sry. pe Meek Satin. Heavy Yalu River Power Conan, ss sicon Planter, s.s, ‘Alabama, 8.8.
§ C —Cre —UP. mpéria ebec, 5.8. ores,

with a motor car on Haggatt Hall} “Aig In dine cu Pears, Peaches, | Quality, Satin Ribta dn o, Blue & ADR] ™ .

Dark a 8 in. au ; nO te
luced to yard a irpaiani, 52
swan Street, 3.7, 52—1n BARBADOS.

Road, St. Michael, on June 18. sliced Pineapple, Prunes, Guavas, Grapes,
A post mortem examination iso Sliced Carrots, W. M. Ford, Roe-

















nuek St. Dial 3489. 2.7,52—2n
was performed by Dr. A, S, Car ave ewe —_———
at the General Hospital Mortuar; { GALVANISED—Special offer for _10 | , Subscribe, now, te, she Badly oe ae CHANCERY SALE
on June 24. Te Oe eee te eae ee aes: | ctiving mâ„¢ Barbados by Air only -& The undermentioned property will be set up for sale at the Registration Office,
Sgt. Haynes attached to Dis-] :\so galvanised naile 39 cents per ib | !¥® after publication in London. Con-| Public Buildings, Bridgetown, between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the sum and on }
trict-“A” Police Station is con- ] \uto Tyre Co. of Spry & Trafalgar St Sean ee a ke eit free yi oat cided below. BPRS Whe ci eon ame Sole an aieutiee
es. the inquest on behalf-o'} Wal—eepe 21.6.8 hE aT he be on application ‘to me. : ‘ ;
e Police. LAMPS—A new shipment of Candia lO IIIQQQQeEv—VO eee — : Beers — = Plaintiffs
ce TINNED MEATS:—Luritheon DAISY HERBERT MURPHY and JAMES GRANT ATKINS PILE—Plain'
Corned Mutton, Cereal pele Brisket ft, executors of the will £. Eyare Murphy, deceased
d Steak & Puddings, W. M
tora, Hoebuck Btrect. ‘Dial 348, MILLICENT WAITHE and AURELIA CLARKE—Defendants

2.7.82—2n

SS acting herein by D’Arcy Augustus Scott their constituted Attorney x
TOOLS—Hand Drills, Hand Saws| PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at Eagle Hall
rom 18in. to @30in. Back Saws 1l2in Road in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island containing by
ind Idin., Compas Saws l2in. & I4in., » admeasurement nine and three fifths perches of thereabouts abutting
Oil Stoves Spirit Levels sin. to 2in and bounding on two sides on lands of Albertha Payne on aye ;
Braces & Bits, Plyers, Pincers Squares now or_Jate of one Mrs. Thomas and on Eagle Hall Road aforesa
f or however else the same is abutting and bounding Together with ‘







ST, JOWN'S BABY. WELFARE aes
enn ieee tee a ahaver ey ee & “einone the messuage or dwellinghouse thereon called eve ay ors
me ae oF land enedied and Built standing ahd being With the appurtenances.
WATER COOLERS — 3 Gal. ,| UPSET PRICE: £1500 0. 0. ,

Imported. Strongly built, only 4.
Just in time for the hot months, |DATE OF SALE: ifth July, 1952

; 3 H, WILLIAMS,
IARRISON. Dial 2364. 4,7.88—2n Registrar-in-Chancery,

me 4 + 1952.
WEDDING GIFT-——A few ironing board oA yy ea—an

and No-cord iron sets, subject to special
wedding-gift allowance. A _ Barnes &
Co., Ltd 3.7.52—t.f.n DPOODOOS

vew Tuc rur THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
ey on ng CORPORATION LTD.

carried out Engine Trials in Car-
lisle Bay on Thursday, 26th June,
1952. The trials proved satis-
factory and the tug has now been

put into service. r 1
Debate Tonight N Oo Ti Cc E

FOR SALE

We can strongly recommend
the properties listed below, the
owners want to sell and the
prices asked are all very reason-
able, far below present day
building costs.














tain Only reason for selling owne
e
1. OVERTURE Police Band

leaving island. Phone Vincent Burke
MUSICAL COMEDY with

Cotton Pickers & Chorines in
“Come On A My House”

3. DANCE. OF THE TOY SOL-
DIERS Fight Star Buds

| 4 SAW SOLO .,., Guest Artiste

y Mr, Ben Gibson

8. BALLET Blue Danube
Waltz Six Star Buds

6 TEA FOR TWO Dance —
Five Star Buda

7, PARASOL DANCE ....,.. see
Pour Star Buds

8. A_STRFET SCENE (Sketch)
Mrs
















MODERN BUNGALOW, Graeme
Hall terrace,—A nicely situated
stone bungalow on a corner site
Three bedrooms, living room,
dining room, verandah,

rs



cCetached garage and serv
quarters Pleasant garden
laid out with lawns ar
ot flowering shrabs.—£



borders





RESIDENCE, THE GARDEN,,
Worthing-—-Modern coral tone
bungglow on corner site with wide
frontages, Pleasant garden with
flower beds, lawn, cor
race, and number of be
tre



able lamps in various designs Why
1ot secure one now, when we have them,
rom Da Costa & Co., Ltd, Electric
dept Phone 3878 3.7. 52—6n

“Third Annual {ites Sasa
Benefit Show & Dance LAUNCH—Cabin Launch, Morris Vid

tte Engine, excellent condition, a bar
In Aid of The CH. CH, and
At DRILL HALL, Garrison
FRIDAY, July 4th 1952 at 8.45 p.m.
Under the distinguished Patronage
of Sir George and Lady Seel,
Madame Ifil yresents
“| School
The Star Buds Schoo
PROGRAMME
Bart & Daughter
IN THR NIGHT





fruit
Accommodation comprises



























CES PSSODH-POSSSOG HOH SSO O9-5O0 ee

9.- BL : large living room, covered gallery,
Dan Guest Artiste — 3 bedrooms with built-in ward- “That the powers of the Legis-
Me. Cedric Phillips & Star robes, We Alted itohss,, garage Bere Cunes Seer iy are ANNU AL AUDI I
1 covered ay oO LOUSE ed” w e deba a he Assem-~
. veTvant’s quarte d all 1 :
0. BALLET |. Rose in the Bud offices. All public,utiity serviees. ||{bly Hall, Speightstown, to-night :
11. KYTTENS ON THE KEYS Tat Drone Carries Cur Bigbsst at 8.00 o'clock. Opposing each ALL PERSONS having ACCOUNTS against
aeNe + s ecommendation z ;
Two Star Buds . other will be Mr. F. A. Smith and requested to be good
12. COUNT EVERY STAR .,,..... 11, GRARME HALL TERRACE— Mr. L. A. Williams, both Bar-} this Corporation fate ‘ he 30th
oe eee bb snares Recently, built 2 storey house risters-at-Law. enough to send them in, made up to the
13. "BA py OSES OF ray sonst> d of stone ‘ verite . 4 |
Eight Star Buds SBoet Marge iiving soon, anus, CY | of June, as soon as possible.
KISS WALTZ .... Star Buds 3 bedto hen, laundry, 3 a j
FINALE, : Madame 1A) and bile ‘ na errere, es * |
Star a 5 te 3. . J] : 7 y |
ademee fete! ee Anniversary Service
Mr. Sohn Beckles, M.B.E., Master ® |
packs Coreen OFFICERS & MEMBERS THE BARBADOS ELEC |
NCING AFIER SHOW 2 5 "
John bd. Biadon Scottish Diamond Lodge
Bi BA ale | te Ma CORPORATION LTD
a plin, ae, ne u Tr PB ’ t { iC “ir
direction aes Capt OCR AtbGn, he Cc @ - : 2 ey . | “ sShes :
A.R.C.M,, M.B.E.. the Police Ba igs . 7TH ANNIVERSARY ss SSeS SSS SSS = :
will supply jhe Music A.F.S.. F.VA ed at a Vv. SMITH
IDD FRI TS - |
ADMISSION $1 00 Real Estate Agents, 1f Meee LLOWS HALL . } Why 2 14
° Auctioneers, Building \{ Bay Street | J i I 0., Ltd.—Agents.
Wn atier ‘the Show as Surveyors, \¢ aie nager.
from Camunities or “tite “meee Phone 4640 1} oS A ee
Fud Bar ond Refreshments. Plantations Building. Hh Sunday, 6th July, 1952 \¢ 1.7.52. 2)
i] $5

apace enn a a ee
re eeeensanemcernsiariaenenrene—e—asaaant





















THURSDAY, JULY 3, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN







ea





HENRY } :
BY CARL ANDERSON $ IT'S ENGLISH “bat %
$ = looks = AMERICAN :
® IT's Smart st suitable ©
: or hot water emergency
“A ? aT mene Woke
i S Call and see it at
WHEN A COLD STRIKES, illt tame ord
He A | %4466000600076060000G088
| A } ed
STRIKE BACK FAST...

OFS

% LODGE STONE WORKS CO.
% A. large quantity of
% machine broken flint stone,
ss all sizes, suitable for Read or
S Yard Construction and/or
making concrete blocks, or
g any other concrete struc-
tures. The Co. also under-
| take the construction of
|$} Roads and Yards by con-











MORE THAN YOU'LL | § tract, or supervision,

EVER KNOW, MARK. x» _ Dial 2656

‘MM 21 TOMORROW. XS ss RAYSIDE
ys anager

.
‘
SPL PSOE LOO

T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH
| Clearing out our new stock
of shot gun cartridges:—

.







12 GUAGE ELEY—$11.65
per 100 NET CASH

Big closing out reductions



on all HARDWARE ITEMS.










3 GOOD TIME,
et ae USTERINE Antiseptic kills millions of ar
geems on throat surfaces... keeps them
from starting serious trouble. Remes>
ber, at the first sign of cold, gargle
LISTERINE Antiseptic, full strength,
early and often!

|
|
|
|
| JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
| and HARDWARE



SOMETIMES
I THINK BUMSTEAD
IS HALF-WITTED--
HELL LAUGH AT IN TESTS OVER A. 12-YEAR PERIOD, DAILY USERS

Sh OF LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC HAD FEWER COLDS! ®

=x
ee a a een en aeeeeremem enc

| ORIENTAL
PALACE

HEADQUARTERS FOR

WHAT A STUPID
MOTH- EATEN,



SOUVENIES {
FROM INDIA, CHINA @ }



THANI'S

Pr. Wm. Hy. 8} Dia: 5466















IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only




























OF course! I
WILL GRANT YOU
THAT/ AFTER ALL,
YOU HAVE LITTLE
CHOICE..

..FOR,
ENOUGH TO REFUSE, GARL
WILL SURELY USURP MY
THRONE — AND WE WILL
ALL BE LEFT TO HIS
TENDER MERCIES/

GIVE ME TIME
TO CONSIDER
YOUR PROPOSAL!
IT'S ALL TOO

SUDDEN / SZ

















CONSIDER MY OFFER, y
FLASH GORDON / WITH
YOU AS MY PRINCE
CONSORT, WE COULD
RULE THE ICE KINGDOM
TOGETHER IN PEACE.../

«. AND DALE

WOULD BE SAFELY
RETURNED TO

EARTH /

- ee





SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Hranches White Park,
Tweedside, Speightstown and Swan Street








Usually Now
Sch'wartz Mustard ; i .. AB
Cooking Butter—1-lb, Tins 7) ae 95 White Peppor--2-o8, Phes, . eb ave
Lea-Perrins Sauce —L, ve is ee
Veat Loaf * a be ‘. 64 60 Lea-Perrins Sauce—S. et 50
Holbrooks Sauce—L. ‘ . 61
, Peanut Butter .. sd Wig Pane) | 68 Holbrooks Sauce—S, .. me .» 45
Chutney Sauce
Sweet Corn... ni ai va: el 36 Pepper Sauce
J Tomato Ketchup .
COME ON .. ACH, I LIKE YOUR SPIRIT, Tomato Ketchup .
LET’S NOT TAKE ALL HERR HAZARD! ISS POSSIBLE * 7 ~ cd > 2 on Sn ‘ ,
NIGHT DOING THIS / OUR LEADER WILL ALSO! Dried Fruit Salad—}-lb. Pkgs. .. 39 36 Green Label Chutney :
Salad Cream 51
—< Mayonnaise j a “ i ae
> |—/.. fe aa Beer: Kings .. pl 2 ae 22
f of a4
sae Sg Me)



THE COLONNADE GROCERIES
The Place Where Your Dollar Goes Further

BRINGING UP FATHER





2 . 66566, GOO OOOO
9 °SCCDCG9GG COC GO SOOO POOP PPO OOOO LLL LLL LLLP LPLPLLPPAAPDAAAAAA AA

| : CMMIN > aie
| OH!OH! I GUESS WHAT'S THE YOU'RE NOT y 2 LISTEN- YOU! WHAT
ME BRAKES ARE BAD-Y (yyp/ IDEA OF RUNNIN! uIGGS- A PAL. DO YOU MEAN BY
pier INTO THAT PARKED OF DINTY’S ~ BACKIN' INTO THIS
pie CAR? WHAT'S LARRY LONIGAN GENTLEMAN'S: CAR ?

yoni’ pee ce] sree ||| USEFUL ITEMS...
ip tN f as Zi ay ho Ae } . L ers
i Baby Gift Paper CHALLENGE
Birthday Gift Paper TO THE
Wedding , ” BRITISH
Eee ) A ie esse Cellophane Paper CARIBBEAN



—POOSEFEOOS SP OGPCEEL EPPS.

ONE BY ONE!

by
THE EARL OF

Birthday Gift Tape LISTOWEL, P.C.

' RAWLE FARLEY

Wedding ” ” RITA HINDEN

Baby COLIN HUGHES
9 ”?

A FABIAN PAMPHLET

60c.

Gift Time Dressing S



Shower Z a

STOP! TURN AROUND. ) =
WE'RE GOING THE TEN THOUSAND IF / YOULL NEEDIT
YOU'LL LET US _¢<( FOR YOUR TRIAL.

PLAVPLLLA EPP AERP AAAS

ON SALE AT —

$
‘-ADVOCATE STATIONERY |

>

SSSSSSS SPOS POS PSS FOS SS SOS



; ROAD STREET
4
% é ; hI
$
¢
2 ys
“4 4 46,0 4,4,4,4 4 $4,6,666660600%
LSS LLLP CLE PBD LOO AAA PLL LLL LLLP LEP PSPLOFSDH

‘ ' ‘







PAGE EIGHT





Ry O CONTI LUC a
OM IN Te rich man’s
L blic
by JOHN gece bis pany
oY ie rm,
~ ; He Gawe aan
WATERMAN: be ReRACOREY
A arentnninryerd expenses need
WOOLMERS PARK, cast of the
Hertfordshire. Bony aay.
F 2150 = £300,
AERE Iam, watching the said} ‘amount
Hertfordshire polo for geet and
team—newcomers com- which ‘the
paratively among English cheapest item

polo clubs. That figure in
the bright scarlet shirt does
away with all those Kip-
lingesque illusions about
the dashing, youthful army
captain as the star of the
polo field. For the most
" striking personality here is
a chubby man of fifty,
Mr. Arthur Lucas.
Until five years ago Arthur
Tucas had never s0 much as
lifted a polo stick in anger. Now
Ff he is a dependable, accurat:

player with a handicap of one
He runs a stable of 29 ponies

the - Hertford- FOR THE
LUCASES,

shire Polio
Club, And he
is a member
of the com-
mittee of the

IN ACTION: Mr. S. E. Robinson
Mr. Arthur Lucas.



is the stick at

For the spec
tator the game
is not ar
Every Sunday
about 100 cars
visit} Wool-
mers. They
pay 10s. car
rrespective of
»ccu pants
Watchers who
come on foot
are admitted
free

One fact
about post-war
Rolo is this

he game does
not flourish in
London. To-
day there is
only one
ground n
London itself
where polo
can be watched

(left) and

Hurlingham ’ 0 every week. In 1939, four clubs
mb 2" (T'S JUST A FAMILY HOBBY * sitive
tion. ul- There was the historic Rane
; ing body of AT £1 200-A-YEAR OR $0 lagh Club, Now it is an allotmer
a polo. ds cae grounds
s Ss where the game could be watched
al). Arthur Lueas can put his Woolmers Park, which was once a4 Is, a head have been requt
entire family into the polo field. the home of the Ear! and iioned, although the club still
His 22-year-old son John playsfor Countess of Strathmore. He emains the centre of Mnglisii
Cambridge University and iscon- created a polo field out of & polo. The Roehampton Glub
sidered to be a coming top-clas: rough meadow which still yields where before the war tnere were
player. His wife, Mrs.Ethel Lucas a crop of silage. He built stables 150 ponies, now stages a ‘wo

behind the house
eereane 20 his geudy. sipping a
beer after practice, he told me

and 20-year-old daughter Patricia
also play. To complete the family
sporting album. Claire. aged



week tournament once a year.

trots round on a pony not much that polo was costly, but does ALL FREE
higher than her father's weil not say by how much, “It’s the
padded knee-guards, acting a: family hobby,’ he says, atee wore
ig e at ractices y ve 0 t c
unofficial umpire at practice ey coe. Wee ts ola etree Only Richmond Park, the head
him £300 per playing member Uarters of the Ham Club
7000 CROWD of his family—which makes Mains. Here, for no admission
en £1200 a year. His ponies must (age at all—because the ground
have cost about £5000 is on Crown Lands—many
Polo has now become modisi Londoners come at week-ends lo
again It is attracting more and CITY MEN catch a glimpse of the second
more spectators. It is having its fastest game in the world (the
best post-war si n. fastest is ice-hockey)
The man who has played the The members of his club Judging by the numbers who



greatest single part in this are mostly City men and local 69 there more polo in London
revival is the one-armed Lord farmers. Some of them have Would be po teiated But
Cowdray. He has five ground only one pony—although two is ‘meanwhile, if they want_ an
at. Cowdray Park. At week-end generally recognised as the alternative to Richmond Park
crowds of up to 7000 go to minimum, because the animals Londoners must travel to Cow-
the polo there. with the dash:r must be rested after dray Park, to the Duke of
Prince Philip as the a 7T}-minute playing period. or ‘Sutherland’s ground at_ Sutton
attraction chukka. Place, Guildford, to Bishop's
Lucas has also played his par There afe 75 non-playing ‘Stortford to Henlev or to
in the polo revival. He is s members who pay 2 guineas ¢ Woolmers Park
chartered surveyor. In 1947 he year, 12 playing members w WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED




bought the 18th-century house a)

pay nothing









For a farmer w



London Express Service

Nations Work As Partners
In Olympic Organization

(By CARL SHEPHERD)

ON JULY 19, sports enthusiasts the world over will
focus their attention on Helsinki, Finland. On that day
more than 6,000 athletes representing about 75 nations
will pass in review at Olympic Stadium during the opening
ceremonies of the XV Olympiad. For the next two weeks
these young men and women will compete in their athletic
Specialties.

That so many. athletes can get : seater tyne
together in friendly competition , a ‘
on a common field demonstrates Wale Swim Coach
the universality of spart. The
Olympie Games, however, do
more than that. They offer proof
that nations of divengent inter-
ests, languages, and potieel phi'-
osophies can share in setting up
accepted rules and practices and
abide by the deaisions of a single

governing y

The International Olympic
Committee directs the Olympic
movement and regulates the
Games.

A president, elected for a term
of aight years, and an executive
committee of six members, elected
for four years, carry out the rou
tine work of the Internationa!
Compe Committee. The presi-
dent has the right to make deais-
ions in extreme cases on his own
authority, but his actions are
subject to approval either by the
executive committee or the entire
body at its next meeting. The
Committee elects its own mem-
bers, which do not exceed three
per nation, from countries which
possess a _ recognized National
Olympic Committee. The Interna-
tional Olympic Committee repre-



ROBERT KIPHUTH
MR, KIPHUTH has coached

Yale’s famo swimmers for
37 years. For 13 years hig
team has remained undefeat-
ed in dual competition. He
has also been coach of the
U.8. Olympic swimming team
four times, He will go to

sents a majority of the nations Helsinki with the team this
involved in the Games. summer in an advisory ca-
In peacetime, ine Committes pacity.

meets at least once a year to dis-

cuss Olympic matters. The tech-
nical details of the conduct of
Olympic sports are left to the in-
ternational sporta fedelrations,
since the -nternational Olympic
Committee spends a good part of
the year assisting movements al!
over the world that might con-
tribute to the good of amateur



Olympic Committee is sought by
many aroups wishing to organize
end conduct sports meetings. A
large number do not receive its
Support because of their political

backgrounds.
The Committee also lays down
the principles upon which the

sport and to the ideals of the amateur status of athletes in all
Olympics. sports and from all nations is
Approval of the International determined,

s - -
T hey ll Do It Every Time
few COMES IT? IN THIS AGE
TECHNO-STUFF, MACHINES
LIXE THIS CAN BOTTLE, CAP, LABEL
AND PACK 8,500 CASES OF
BILGEWATER SODA POP PER HOUR,
AUTOMATICALLY ELIMINATING
746 LABORERS—



By fo REMEMBER
| SOUT IT Ta
eaDio Ces UMPTEEN AS YOU FEAST OUR s7ars, /|
| evmo are ag pi TO SNe FROLIC MAYONNAISE )
| ILGE- MaoGE WATE 2 AND UL
| WATER PROGRAM STARTED BevExaas 1S Jey op BR0UGHT Yo
ON THE AIR— WATER YOu BY.
4 SODA Hy, BILGEWATER
w IAS !
s MT,
Go Mas TS
iN Ay,
Sih Ati nae
â„¢% AND A
\ THOT OFF —
Bro mn HOWARY
24 YORK MILL
OK ae

Before a competitor enters the
Olympics he signs a_ statement
which reads:

“I declare, on my honour, that
I am an amateur according to the
rules of the International Feder-
ation governing my sport, that I
have participated in sport solely
for the pleasure ana for the
physical, mental or social benefits
L derive therelrom; tbat sport to
me is nothing more than a recre-
ation without material gain of
any kind, direct or indirect, and
that I am eligible in all respects
for participation in the Olympic
Games,”

A country desiring to enter the
Olympjcs must form a National
Olympie Committee. The com-
mittee must include nationals of
the country who are members of
the International Olympic Com-
mittee and the representatives of
all the bodies governing sports on
the Olympic programme. Techni
cal advice and individual control

of sports is supplied by the Inter-
Federations,
These federations are made up of
members of the recognized sports-
the various
has
full control of its sport on an in-
conducts

national Sports

governing bodies
countries. Each

in
federation

ternational basis and
that sport during the Olympics.





Sports Window

Two of the most interesting
Water Polo matches of the
season, matches which will
very likely decide the win-
ning team of the Division
“A” Oup, are scheduled to be
Played this evening at 5
o'clock at the Aquatic Club.

These matches are Harrisou
College—Snappers and Sword-
fish—Bonitas, These matches
are second round ones. In
their first encounter, College
held Snappers to a draw and
Bonitas won from Swordfish
by an odd goal.

A silver collection will be
taken this evening.

















BARBADOS ADVOCATE



DENIS COMPTON Drobny Meets Pesults Of RbYC "i's

by PETER DITTON



At Lords against North-
ants Denis Compton com-
pleted his 100th century in
First Class Cricket. He did
s® in his 554th innings—
fewer than any _ other

player apart from Sir Donald
Bradman.



Denis Compton woud have gone
to Lerds even if the 13 bus from
just outside his door did not pass
the Middlesex ground, The fact
that there was a direct connection
simply made it easier for the
young boy who learned much of
his early cricket from playing
with and watching his father’s
team,

mwa, Compton senior, an accom -
plished cricketer in his younger
days and now an enthusiasu :
spectavor, used Lo captain the Bet
Lane Old Boys Xi. And while
venis was still a pupil at the
school he was adopted as official
scorer and twelfth man, When-
ever one of the team was unabl¢
wo play, young Denis stepped into
the breach, een). undaunteeaney
having to face bowlers 2
naiee aide’ than pigent, usually:

erformed with credit. F
z One day in September 1932, be
embarked on the biggest under-
taking of his et me Hendon
he caught the us Lae
where ot wan to captain the Ble—
mentary Schools against Mr. Tuf-
nell’s XI, Rather shyly but with
complete confidence, Denis ent
tte ground which was later 10
become his headquarters.

Like all good captains, he won
the toss. Then he celebrated by
sharing in a_ century opening
partnership with a young
London schoolboy by the name of
McIntyre, before going on to com—
plete his individual hundred.

of 14, had arrived, His partner
n the opening stand, which pave
the way for a handsome victory,
is now Surrey’s wicket-keeper
and always one of Denis’s keen-—
est adversaries when their
teams meet in London’s Cri
Derby. ,

Among the many interested
spectators who watched the
Compton prelude was Sir Pelham
Warner, a former England cap-
tain, destined later to become
President of the M.C.C. To Sir
Pelham’s practised eye the ability
of this young schoolboy needed no

second recommendation, and
straightway the decision ‘Was
made that Compton sould be

teken on the Lord’s staff as soon
as he was cld enough.

So it was in 1937, straight from
Bell Lane School, that Denis
Compton went to Lords,

Three years of hard work fol-
lowed. The young Compton sold
scorecards, practised in the nets
twice a week under the instrue-
tion of George Fowler, and later
Archie Fowler, the senior profes-
sionals, and on Sundays continued
to turn out for his father’s team.

After a while, he graduated to
playing for the MCC in Out
matches.

Came 1936, and Compton was
chosen for a Middlesex Second Xt
niatch against Kent. He batted
extremely well in a crisis, nar-
rowly missing his half century.
Then he returned to Lords, where
Walter Robins, the Middlesex
skipper, was looking for a young-
ster to include in the senior team
for the traditional Whitsun holi-
day fixture with Sussex.

Compton's performance against
Kent was brought to his notice,
and young Denis was invited to
take his place in the nets while
Robins and G. O. Allen bowled to
him. It would be a slight exag-

























aya

Ng

{
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Denis Compton, at the tender ag@ ,



geration to” say he hit them alt
over the place. The construction
of the nets makes that impossible
But Denis so impressed them wifi
his beautiful stroke play and
quickness of eye and foot that the
empty place was filled without
further search

His debut was not brilliant, for
Middlesex did not require him to
bat until No. 11. But he made one
very good catch off the bowling of
Jim Smith to dismiss Jim Perks
@nd then had Harry Parks caught
by G. O. Allen. He followed tnis
performance by sharing in a last
‘wicket partnership with Allen,
which produced 36 and gave Mid-
dlesex first innings points.

Three more matches against
Notis, Northants anq Yorkshire

followed, all of them low scoring
games in which Denis gradually



DENNIS COMPTON.

worked his way up the batting
order, Then, three weeks after
his appearance in first class
cricket, and his sixth game, came
his first hundred, coincidentally
against Northants.

Sharing in a ninth wicket part-
nership of 76 with Jim Sims, the
only member of that Middlesex
side still playing regularly, and 74
with Ian Peebles for the last
wicket, he raced to three figures
in 95 minutes. This was the por-
tend of things to come.

Before joining Arsenal whom
he served with distinction, later
gaining a Championship and Cup
Final medal, Compton reached his
1,000 runs for the season. Ha
finished second in the Middlesex
averages to the immortal Patsy
Hendren, and was awarded his
senha cap. All this at the age of
1

Compton's feats over the years
have become legendary and re-
quire no enumeration. It is per-
haps pertinent though, to deal
briefly with ‘his most successful

Sedgman In

Tennis Finals

‘By DENNIS HART

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, July 2.

Jaroslav Drobny, the exiled
Czech and Frank Sedgeman the
Australian Champion will fight
out the Men’s Singles final at
Wimbledon on Friday.

That was decided by to-day’s
semi-finals in which Drobny beat
the American Herbie Flam 6—2,
6—4, 0—6, 8—10, 6—4 and Sedge-
man beat his fellow countryman
Mervyn Rose 6—4, 6—4, 7—5.

_Thus American domination in
this event, they have won it for
the past five years, has ended

This will be the fifth champion-
ship final between Sedgeman and
Drobny since May. The Austra-
lian won in Rome and Monte Carlo
and the Czech was victorious at
Bournemouth and Paris.

_To-day’s semi-finals presented
vivid contrasts. The Sedgeman—
‘Rose match was as tame and as
flat as stale beer, whereas the
other sparkled like vintage cham-
pagne.

Rose seemed to have an inferi-
ority complex. He played as if

eman was so assured of
reaching the final that there was
no point in trying to stop him.

It was thus made all to easy for
the Australian champion who
must have sensed Rose’s thoughts
and decided that with his oppo-
nent not going all out then he too
could take it easy. Most action
came in the final game of the
match. Then for the first time
both players appeared to enjoy
playing. Perhaps like the specta-
tors they were happy in the
thought that it was nearly all over.

How different was the semi-
final that followed. It was a
titanic two and a quarter hour
battle between two of the best tac-
ticians in the game to-day. Ex-
cept in the third set in which
Drobny was resting nothing was
given away. All points had to be
worked and schemed for.

As Drobny endeavoured to
manoeuvre into position to exe-
cute his famous forehand drive
so Flam strove to prevent this by
cleverly masking the direction of
his shots and varying his length
and pace.

As fortune fluctuated with each
move and counter move the thou-
sands of spectators who packed
the centre Court were kept. at
fever pitch of excitement.

Drobny won the first and sec-
ond sets but was driven so hard
that he decided to rest in the
third and go all out for a win in
the fourth,

But Flam had then tasted blood
and was aftermore. He hung on
like a leech and so keen was the

weason, 1947. This was a vintage
year for cricket followers. Eighteen
centuries flowed from the Comp-
ton bat, a new all-time recor
and a new record aggregate tota
of 3,816 was reached.

A knee injury in 1950 threat-
ened to close prematurely a
career which has outrivalled that
of any English batsman, includ-
ing even his great contemporary,
Len Hutton. Handicapped by a
stiffening joint, Compton lost his
ability to dance daringly down the
wicket.

Fortunately for England and for
cricket us a whole, he appears to
have recovered from the trouble
and this season is coming back
to his best form.

With all his success, Compton
remains much the same unaffected
person as the young schoolboy who
arrived at Lords for his debut in
19382, The passing years have add-
ed to his ability but, remarkably,
his enthusiasm for the game is
unabated. Long may te con-
tinue to delight us.



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PELL OLA EAE L EL ALAC CEC EP LLCS COD







THURSDAY, JULY 3, 1952
Dee cnn NY
Roach and T. A. Gittens.
M. R. deVerteuil and Dr. Klim-
Lawn Tennis ID Patio ae ee
The results of yesterday’s lawa |
bados Yacht Clubare- | THE WEATHER
Mrs. a eee nin Miss | REPORT
occ alae Watea YESTERDAY +

Miss D, Wood and Miss G.
Pilgrim beat Miss M. King and

Rainfall from Codrington: nil
Total for month to yesterday:








Mrs. A. A. Gibbons 2—6, 7—5, 17 in. 5
6—2. Highest Temperature: 85.5 °F ’
Men's Doubles Lowest Temperature: 72.0 °F

D. E, Worme and H. Johnson Wind Velocity: 7 miles per
beat I S. Robinson and S. P. hour
Edghill 6—3, 6—3; 7—65. Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.027

Mixed Doubles (3 p.m.) 29.943
Mrs. J. A. Mahon and C. B. TODAY
Sisnett beat Miss FE. Worme and Sunrise: 5.46 a.m.
H. A. Cuke, Jnr., 8—6, 8—6. Sunset: 6.16 p.m.
TO-DAY FIXTURES Moon: First Quarter, June 30
Men's Doubles Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

J. H. C. Edghill and C. B. Sis- High Tide: 1.43 p.m. é
nett vs. P. Patterson and G. H. Low Tide: 6.44 a.m., 6.21 p.m.

Manning.

H. L. Toppin and D. Blades vs. SSGSSSSOSGO FI OOO,

: —L.E.S. %

rd]

———-|% Colony Club §
struggle shat the first 17 games x
went with service. Flam broke 383s %
through Drobny’s in the 18th to %
take the set 10—8. Introduces %

Drobny came back _ straight | <
away in the final set and broke | B A R B E C U E >
through the American’s service in| i
the first gare. tJ \
bonetat thee the Czech’s turn to| nanos |

a on, f he coul y

services he would wn ra = Y SATURDAY JULY 5
did but right to the end the| %

American refused to acknowledge | % @ Full-Moon. Dancing § %&
deuce inthe ‘na ayceeonent (0B @ Bathing :

Drobny not only by his ies tants @ And Generally %
also by his perfect court de- % @ Quite Informal %
faeanour has made himself a firn:| % @ Reservations in *
favourite with Wimbledon crowds | ¥ Advance }*

But after to-day’s match he has a -
close rival for this honour in the 2.7.§2—2n. X
Person of Herbie Flam. SSO CCBBIOSSBOOS

ilt your game is
tennis ...

f offer

/SLAZENGER'S
” TENNIS BALLS

$4.12 per tin.

If it’s Cricket ...
‘We offer

CRICKET BATS

Autographed by LEN HUTTON, LESLIE AMES and DENIS
COMPTON—Priced from $10.00 to $16.61

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Full Text

PAGE 1

PACE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, JULY 3. lKt CLASSIFIED ADS. "' m r !" TO me PHONE 2 SO* OBD V IMt II M M| IW.J %  die Bam.do' Co-op C'Mum raatoty Ltd 11.luhrral Kill leave hla late me ld* Wet Jl 410 O'clock Ihlafterroan In* St Ann > thmrh EnH Mclni.i.h and children. Anita Blanch and Lilian TTiom*. outer* IN MKMOK1AM '•ill w.. n* !"!" of my de. !'uab*d rt-.,d B'llf^ T> -J July thd. IM (Win'ton i(nt n..i nni from IMP T.me HM anas 'he edge of grief. Tbeurn de.d h O-i-i .-I 'lull h 0" r-a n i : % %  beloved Uoiher r-"te-i %  Mg m i sir... for iiu-ie". no nicht She l> M*w. til not I l n our meit.orlea. ao tai and I Some d.i" well mtl our d..r u a i liVn • Wtta are n**d bar* John bW Mit sup-t-Lvuix*. run ciM* ndl Owner-driven HMO Dial MTS IJ • S-l I n i;iluai and ..I.I. : holll rt. Apply li DMI I*"' i NOTICE p b*g lo inform our Ojatotnert ant in'ndi thai our Provision DafMrtanaml •fill no l a—Bit I* eaari lo lb* Pub IK Saturday* Our nthtr Dapartn-nU M.I i e r c. .. A >-i SB—in IM Bl.lt S \l KS NOTICE AltllNl IIHOni INI1AHII I.VMtlNATIO* For Ih. .nl VHI bagl'inlng I ferpl. lflM> banatn-iiori for few. U the Allcene School -.ill be held Monday July m, itgg al t m at Scbaal. A|>p)M|lot>* loai.m. r -nil liDiMnul rrrllfleal** and Teotimonlat. Will bo \>\m Hnd-tilri up U rndav JulIS. Appiw-.iiona far ana o< more varan rt.umi.non Schniarehlp* tenabla al in. Mleync School, will bo rn.i.id by In. MaodanaMo* up lo Friday July l Candl. date* will bo aaaminad on Mondaj Mr II at 1 a m a M-J* aid of St on by RAFFLE %  apeatr: worai I %  V*. ,.„.. I-r Dill Ha ONK ill AiMt.n luo I Aualin A M Cnt U V. broil Co I %  Trlrphonr till. I UllJ-lIn Fennn of Boaton. U 5 A Thr I'i'd. IM 09. ha* bren arrl Tr... ..I Itxe Woirjiij-ilM* rai maiaad foi SI I pier %  Dell. Maad Mr. C K ON.--I WhIUhall 3.TM-1R HI:. AfflNH .>E-HEVTJ KLKCTKICAII (III KIM rocclvvd now ihipim v QikttwJd %  irnxl Aulomalir CM'-l-ti al % MifTri It ft, 1.10 lladiu Km15 11 IN. BOUSES Altnwtttp aUNdr llnjft. ceT.forta i-i.i balli. Oprn Vfi.n '..I ona peraon lor (mil Tlrpbena taas JUST AimiVKD %  !•,%  Do lin ii;nn-M*drtn IUdio-Onm> 'will. Oa. %  i.rd l-apoadCNand.i. Too I'i.kuf ll.-l> (-. rirvdlv Wprrlf.. in alUbi A "ml lad quaiillly onli 11P0I. P C H MAIKH a CO LTD a• ai r Iloipoin lined. •INOMtV' MaW Gard*n> Tin. fllh lha lanaai, irltpbono numbar "1"^ F.Vn.VM. POACH If Co.. LTD.. PIHK.ll St m I T U-l f ii of rut r.ij*i.. m inu.tiin* at piI iKTuV-n Si Apply A it • N Co M HIM I i.r I'Y* BATTERY STTRV-Jual a (a* lafl UArnn BAHIO cwroittuu ii f It li •. ..in %  .v n IM:HS.\.\I. %  K hncby warnad nj*in .... YAUEM1A 30MBI 'naa rordi al I dol nol hold mi M|| mpomitil* lot bar or i %  It aril ri ai.y a f-ilctdauo. K rUBMITilU drlda In m> a*in' uni. -.( VERNi: AMBROSC JONC < i 1 • i pwj varnad .itaim' 1 nrn-.Hri.na*-nac ll.illi <• %  I do no) boli : r hai or ai. ant >• aentrBii.i di bl ma. SdLIILE AjLMtlRONO v.. MB Kl Jjtii.-. ).: --n UIVLH.NMLM NOIRE UMAL slRVfcY OF Capita uf ituI > i rjor C. I. ii the CotoolfJ lacreury • OiUce at tne prloa of Jl.vin cacii. 37.W —Vn l>oui %  Ixiqifii') Adjourned His WUM.IV MI. L. W. It,;.. %  1 —X— District A", jt^ti'tday adjOUtWl unlil July 16 I i uiquUy _iiito Lh Lirtunuiattv b >i-nHiiii**TM/-hiilcitlli of Ail TiiTiburei of Frmi P. Si I'hihp AUU Kflna(in*-! .i the Genci i. on Jutlv 23, nilcr he wm rtct;uiit''i uuic lufftriiii brem Ui inch hiauntblnvd wh-hiwi. involviO in jn a-.ciilLi %  with A motor car on Hugftatt Hnl! Road, St. Michi.i'l. on June 16. A po>( mortem exarairmtii. was 'MTtormed by Dr. A. S. Cui' at the General Hospital Mortuat on June 24. Sirl. Haynes attached to Dis trlrt "A" r*olicc Station i.i con duct bit! Ihf inquest on behalf o the Police. Third Annual Rrnefit Show & Dinrr In AU of Tha CF. CH and 'T jnt'N-a BABY wnxABX I rAOIIF. ri.TNTCII Al MUM BAIJ-. liiiKol •The Star Buds School or HAM IM; • MIOCaAHHf i.vi'-irnr. r-iirr" Rand 1 MI H'AI I'OMJCDV with i I.I ... Ai cnoriiiM In Cm in A My %  •>•* %  a DANCR OF Tl TOY aotr.ltil Slar HudOwMl Armto i I TA1 I fT Danub" UK ta lludi i po Daara — i .. -it*lluda ; PABASOl. DAACC . %  BT SCENr. ilhalcbi Mr. : ii r\.\ El r; i:tr. Ntr.tiT Mi Com)hiinp. aO.U, Hud Buda l >T I VERY STAB .... r,„ Piraii' Lithl Slar Buda Slat Buda : > Madaina Inll and i ii,. %  Mr Jan.* Bxhlaa. MBS. Maalar -I I '.'rx.nl.. DIMIM. APtBB *HOW I prrrn'MkiOt Col. Sat I ho diratiion ol Capi lu.aoa v n r ih. folioa BaaW mm ii* u-ir ADMISSION $1.00 Show TlrVH_ or %  Tha Slar H '-.-.i-..,t %  .-.ii; in. i. ran pal M li anlMfua mail tldalxtard ola.. haaa M n U -i-.i. i -I. n < %  •VHtloi. d.lli alter .1 i ( .. .,i ......hi. II ,i.k.-i I"A Kavll' T 81— In LIVESTOCK i ix e* I Cat! I %  uia Brad Kolit'li ..Id. out oi ill. Prlnca Albail J W SmlOi Mlaha-1 Dill latl IMra Brad HolMam Call I.lllVOR LICENSE NOTICE ha atiplir-iiinn 1 Liquor Larenaa Mo 3 of 1S43 ii.nud la Jaa. Davla in raapacl of a board and • htnale "hop wlU ahadioof altathed al A leyne'a Tenantry. Buui Hail 81 Michael, lor peimiaalon lo uar aald Ligm. I icennr al aald prernlae. Bu.h Hall. *.l Mtcnaal Dated ihit i "lav of June. IBM 1 A Mr-LEUD Baq' V^'.,,-Mallatrale Dial "A" -.iBr.ad Wm I ACJABD. ApplK-nt, N B Thia applkallon will be con.idad al a Ucapalni Court lo ua halil al 4lca CouH, DM rid -A" tm mdar iha tn dai of JuV. Una. at u atw. ajn B A Mrt^OD REAL ESTATE AjnjTBY on Baa. Bl japM, T-w iW-lniill hwa iKh ha. ibaaa ATTII-*.|, al two n..i r "ieral bedroorm e. Phone Sft4 Punbiballa Dlv^ad hai dtnlna. n.-wlnj J-BUPBRT1BBShop a'.d Baatderua at T.a.lde Bd alandlna on 1100 aq It nd Water and UahU Inalollrd AIM-. Building. Land at Clapham rlr.-m.bl, iaw at Howall > Cnr Road Siaa la %  Id. back Bi x 11 Shad as a i, d can be ranted Alao il> Large "rfea Bd am £> %  l 2; Coopers Neck I SHIPPING NOTICES Broken The undarala-ned will offar for aale at 'ublie Coaaai l ilt lor, al tha4r orVr No 1 II Kh Sire.-!. Brtdawlown. an IT (Jar. i* aaa day >r July, laaa at I m m. fhe bungalow known aa CASVI1XE rHB the land tbaralo containing by adnaaauranwHit BMI aq ft illualo In >avy OardajM, Chml Church and ur.uinlng an open van* aouth and eaet combined i.g room. 3 badroonu. loilat, baaB • FTtMn Pa** 1 It Was while Mclntowh waa dig(ingt that they heard the main root give away. Mclmonh Hied to •W elta, the backUft of the fal'lng tree. He said he iinmediately ran around to where Mclntosh was and was on time to see hun (aluiut back inw the hole. He called for him, but he did not answer. Cutting aald they had both cxpacurd uuu the roots v deeper, but at could be seen I the uprooted trunk, there MOMTBgAl. ,1IHII ma 'HUM. lisp IINIill. m A M B i 'l %  GLOl'CBBTXB I -aL from Port Pirle May Hal, Dawaawort %  Hi. la>lboiirne June lth, flydney BUh. Brlabana July Kb. arriving al %  latbodoa about Auguat au> tn addition to ganaral cargo Qua vaaaal bat ample apace lar chlUod and bard rroaan cargo Cargo accaptad an Ih rough BUla ol rx (h,m and aw lipiuaill ETunk there ., pr-tt-yiS^ !3ft J jj tl,taf kwptng ii -p •-< The huge trunk l* about five to .nap^Uon dial 0 S^.J^ JSJ* !" *'' "<* * rther parurula/fl and condition. oTTT 00 V 31 !" the scene and who _Ja apply io_have had Ui do with weights cirrTLr CA TTOBD a co 3D %  n m [e.stinidle that it would weigh abou; aiTa"TirtBI foUr ' flve lon Mclntoah had been accustomed doing work of the kind, and lacr.ved from Ihe Govt .In-BxoeuUva Cornrr.lltao 1 wlU aell U.e leapactlve apota by public com,. UUen on Thiiraaar next 3rd July tha ilia wing — One II i double pooled oodan building at St Donlfacr Junior School at 13 o'clock, and al St Lucy. Ji ..a' and Otrla' achoola one m wood* building at 3 p m Terma alrtttty caah DArtj A Beott m-t Aucttanaar. WANTED "National Ca*h Monk Kecpini M'( *pcrator with prevluu. r>p< i < hefoie 1.1 Auguat. IB0J Apnl. In peraon with wrllten %  ppthalloii i '-,.ri-r>. Dov-d.ng p.tale. MISCELLANEOUS ce Hold* diploma a. llconce with rral vejra' rapannwiWllle LC J i Advocate IT.aw—da COATS li Hanaan n.u fiaah In ml Irathwailf, Gaidei load, SI Mlchaal MECHANICAL POULTRY i-i..i; .'.< ',vi.. 1 Dw 110 eg! old. On %  ke Th.idock. SB! 00 Indlvldui rakra Bavcn dollar. Ducka Sta do: li. On View rild.ii atli to Sunil. in pm tosaopm li Peawlea. Bayleya. St Pl>llii< MISCELLANEOUS lEHtAU. snirdrted Wh— liikaa. Ootmeol. All tln.ii A Ol rin. W V Pl)BD 3. Bo il MM* rnt'iT IN TiNS.—Paan. llWad I'liieiipplr. rrunei. C.uava k St Dial %  H kind parmlaalon I will aril .,.—.—.,. — ... — —_ MJ _, Mcbvaarnay ft Co tiaraga Frldar had previously felled trees for hi. Ona BIA 1 Seat-r Sedan Car enspaQyen Hf-llerf .K.. working Order Term. Caah B „._!??' „ ""_, If ll *d the tree win. McKanria. Auctlonaor ^ 7* h lha following .1.1 rubber.. Pedal*, rump tnp con ..,—. roxiar caatnga Bl a IHi DunBwncle). Spannni. BrwMVrre*. Man. UUrta. ataoaa. .,.'I„.il boon, Bladder, imull -lii kBraid, ke Cream Powder. Bul%  iU, Bxua Strang. and many othei i Tarnv Ca*. Sale at 13 10 V1NCT.NT OBirtTTll 'Auctioneer! Ki>*d.ter. tir*n 10 years to 14 months. His eldest ciuld. a boy, was due to sit an Bntiance Examination to Harrison College to-day. Of hw family hid father-lnwas the first to arrive on the scene Other relative!, on learn of the accident rushed to the spot and later his wife and some of hei latlves arrived by car from the luxury. The shocking new* had taken unmediate and heavy toll m the wife, and by the lime she cached the scene she was in an Imost complete state of collap**. She ws-* almost Incoherent, and when sympathisers endeavoured to keep her from viewing husbands body, she wrung hand* and snapped her nngen despair. LOST i or. MI LOST WHITE DISC 'I *<>• KUndald %  P %  i> I...S! between Spelghlitown and I'M.lgetown Pindar p>a* return to \.MII.Rock. HtpdaburRood or dial ^dl Car U-3T47 3 T 13—tn T'dad Boxers On Way Home A'Cighl 1 testing etRtit SVl PIJ3UENT VOII iM'.MI i irrUsiON Ohla.f %  II part.cul-1. froT„ the RKniPTt'Sli),, SU-e l I M fi '1VE LX.1.IJVII.S t.i ixii Kadlllu.lon for I na In oncalendar mr k OH KALE MISCELLANEOUS RKCORI) Juat Received 1 ong Plavm| %  lypaoa, r.i %  L-.I %  it.. rt liUo K %  i Mildred Al-ell. Tad Heath. Hilly rotnn Arllatal Wm Tog irtv Ud-.i Ltd 11 St—tu RBCbxm a % %  1 : %  1 S3 1 %  li cilon B %  paH | 1 pick aat> Tt-iP w .i %  •hona 3BT8 1JJ! Bi. BATaTt—Cropa Back In Oaaai. Dlua u-iiiiUi : • ..'... ui. now lo tha Dallp Talegraeh .i .1 leading Daily Newapaaor ad* Ktnt in Barbadoa by AH only -a raw re after publication In I ninl.ii Con riNNBD MEATS Lunehaon Ucf. TOOIA Hand DrllU Hand % %  II. II... to SMn Back Saw id lain Compaa Saw. 13m I I Slovea Spirit Levrla Sin | %  BlU. Plvan ilh Mitre ft I.-..-I %  HI. Claw Hanunai.. Ilia.hr. C D JOI HI.DDU.ti UtFT ad No-cord lion H-I .eddina-glll allo-ei NEW TUG PUT INTO SERVICE The nnv Mg Lord Uillothb. ,iit riiKi'ie TriaU in C.n lisle |i,iv oil Thursday, Mth Jun. 1952. The trialsproved soltfBctory and the tug ha* ne w beeUS. Aif Force Chiefs Meet kaasBB. For turtbar parUanlara apply— M "Mil W1IBT OO.. UTB., I Bis I it a ii v ajsj DA MIMA a in iii, CACIQUE DEL -ci-v' C-r.o -i.d LaarU. — „. and ." Date of SaiBng la be notHI The U V CAlUBBEt •crept Cargo and Paaaenajar Itaimmica. AnUgua. Mania i Bl Kitu Data of ln# to be nolldo it B.W.L it ao.i-.SB ASSOCIATION IINC. Coaaagaaa Tala. Na. I >0awjc r '.'.'.: ',',:*-'.:'.: •,*.*ss y^Mcoa SiwuMpCo. NEW YORK A STEAUBN taSB 30 Jfo a ii l.aa NEW ORLEANS CANADIAN SERVICE • HI IIIHIII V|i -TLNrHA•TIBTA% %  Al£OA r-oiNn.n %  A STEAMER%  A BTBAMKa-' SUBTBBIM Ml Ma.trral ArrlTea BarbeOaa May itth May )in June Itlh June :ith Jta lain June Ulh Jaa* nth July asm ROBERT TH0M LTD — NEW TORK B GFLF SERVICE Apply:— DA COSTA at CO.. LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE NOTICE CLOSED FROM TUESDAY FOB STUCK TAKING RE-OTENINCi FRIDAY THE 4TH Till. 11 \IH\I IMI'OltllM Corner Broad and Tudor Street* are buying at THANI BROS. Gigantic SALE While and SATIN. Yard Coloured wide. Very Soft Quality 4-*. COTTON FUJI JT* all colours 59c. SHARKSKIN W S1.M GREY MIAMI SS" fl.te TOKYO. June 30. new devgl^rnefit' Mepped up Airways appeared In the making %  siting delegation of top U.S. force ofUcers conferred In Seoul with Eighth Army Commnnder Oeneral Van Fleet. The delegation headed by Acting Air Force Chief of Staff General Nathan Twining and Under Secretary of Air Resell Gllpatrki'.l at Seoul Monday accomthe West Indies generally • From Pajre I rexl MX months Pompey boxing for ihe Cruiser championship nf the Wo that Adams will be c< the British Empire heavi title. AithouaTh having no inta-nuon of nahtink while in Trinidad. Mr. Burns say*, "that does not that if a good proposition Is given me on behalf of the boy Trinidad that they will not fight" He already has news that an American promoter is interested in running a show in Trinidad featuring both Pompey nnd Adams, and he says, "If this comes nff I will have to cut short my %  slay which ends on 5th August .Hid letIt through." Pompey and Adams plan to remain in Trinidad until September, and then they will return to England m time for the season which commences towards the end of that month. A big reception has been planned In Trinidad for these two boys in recognition of what the have done to place TT.'.nldad atii the ponied by Far East Air ForccM i'oxlng map of the world, and the Commander Lt.-Qen. Otto WyPolice Band will take partland. Six Ma]or Generals from —. %  Air Force Headquarters in Wash-] In I OUfJl With Barbados niglon are also Included in the. CoaurUl Stntion There was no Official indicn. h *lrt^e-n*no-" coVmunkte" d -i" lion Of the nature of the talks but ; ih. following "hipUm>..*h their Bar it was speculated that the Ait ,•** %  Coast luti !" —i_. Force brass II conferring on the ,'%'gTff'r.,lTTXfl f' type of Communist targets to br iinguay t Sun Rove. %  • Phiirwa.ittacked following last week' Phait a • Tacoina SUr. t LapontU ,,,„lrovo,s,.l ..utl on Ihe Bed, \ £ .TSkXL. 3"S5£. Y.ilu Rivtr Power complex. I, Alcoa Planter. %  i. Alabama —V.P. %  iidrtai Quebec. .. Dolor** 11 ABBA DOS CHANCERY SALE The undermanuoned property will br Die data epaclfled below If not than • %  Friday al tha tame place and during tha OB epplkauon lo me I ,g> for aala at the Raguir.ilion OrTc ..up aiu] > P-m. for the turn and o || will be • up On each auareodlr inig houra until aold FMU pariiculai MtlXlCENT WAtTinC anil AllTilA CLARKEDefend an W acUng hateln by D-Arcy Augu. I'HOPr.RTT ALL THAT certain plec. Road in tha pariah of s n>meaauage or dwellinal 11 and alngular rrtfUN Ihe t I land erected and buHl Michael In thlt laland conUining b) truer flMha pervhe. or thare.ibouU abuinni Jh on landa of Albaitha Pair-c oti land' Thomai and on Eagle Hall Boad atoraaaij .abutting ird bounding Tiai'tlu-' wn* ,Mho..ae Ibacoon calcd "Ejara ildiaas rdlng a I %  nd batng with t I aald pain-l Liiun' ptiice. £i5oo o o DATt OT SALE ISth Jul> ipsa wn LfAJfl ^rar-ii'-Cbancat). 30th Jun*. isu. IT dl-dn 1 M*>i Debate Tonight %  That the powers of the Legislative Council should be curtailed" will be debated at Ihf I bly Hall, Speightstown, to-night 11 8.00 o'clock. Opposing on<'• rther will be Mr. F. A. Smith and r L. A. Williams, both Bsr%  rs-;it-I^aw. Anni\mnry Ser\ire B .. BfBMBBM ^nittiih Diamond Lodge *. a M to iheir TTII ANNI\ritS\ltY • '.'. %  IIAU. Bay Street a I 3.3* F.M. Suaday. i.th July. 1952 THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY LTD. 0'*e*,*e<^*,-,-,%-,-,*,*,*^ ',-,-,-,0----'-'-*-'-0--^*,-,%'.*,'.'---'--,-,'--,-• SAVE LABOUR MONEY TIME MASSEY-HARRIS ATLAS L0ADIR The Super-Sii Atlas front end loader is one of the latest developments to make farming easier, more productive. Full hydraulic operation and perfect balance assure the operator of simple control and instant response . makes continuous loading a pleasure instesd of a back-breaking chore. Attaching and detaching operations lake but a few minutes making the tractor readily available lor other work. Five atuchments are available with I 4 yard capacity; they easily lift 1000 lbs. to <>?-ie*t in 0 seconds. Maximum capacity is 2000 lbs. See the Super-Sii Atlas soon 1 (OliniSV GARAGE nillll III THOM LIMITED. DIAL 4616 %  BB-SBBBBSBB-RwBa-aBB^ NOTICE A.WCAI. AMTMT ALL PERSONS bwtaf ACCOUNTS agnin.1 il.iCorponllnn .re mpmlil lo b.. ood onoutlh lo vnd them in. md> up lo Ihe Mtfc ol June. a% soon a. pos.lMe. THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY CORPORATION LTD. V. SMITH liener;.! MinBRer. %  I IMM .?f=^^tsM^as^EaB3BBl FIRST FOR LASTING WEAR houeantU44t *"UU. -awV GOOD/ffEAR g BBS SSSW CITY mm TRADIiMi (:.. Ltd.-A^n.





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PAGE TWO CaJuJb gatting fc\KH.\IMJS ADVOCATE THUBSOAT, Jl 1 -V x lt5 V \1 MEHIVALE AUSTIN. el and Mr M'iiv.1,tustin o: Waterford." HaMingi ppointed Managei c. Thomn-. i" Canada Lid ihuc Innes P>*;>ck. Editor of the Canada Indie* Year Booh. M*)'i tustin has a lib the Black Watch IRIIH > siii.J!38 He nun-led Alison Hope, daughter ind Lady Hankcillour. a small rauajhters ore ring with then b i and parents in Barbados. Hawaiian Businessm-n A vengers making %  use on th. Si Iniiuii which i from Trinidad were i f< on.n Haw -iian busi.1 id their wives headed by Mr. TV ma* Hore. ;-iid a visit lo the city -ind af'crwards went sight seeing. toM H rsaesflettni cliff, si John*! Church, Bun Lord's Castle and the Crane Golf Professional VII! AND MHS. H F,. I.HISLKY rTMumt please am more lor tin 00 DOfC" Of 1Kb ><• ckle frniKl Umrigar 'Ivnrr ftsdkar und til-: i Ah -wt Transferred V/TR. M A CAMPBEU-. form.-.. Venezuela wh( were It) IlarliadOi IBM ure now n.uk again fur tsvi bolHaW. They arri\ •: i i IJM • k-t nil by BWIA ml .ii. Staying >t Caerabr Hotel Mr Bristoj %  C.olt Pi — %  '<> day Maying d t the St C, S?,, ,_ rcnc "olil, Mr and Mrs John Their daughter Virginia who Parker of Georgetown British has Just compltted a three-year Guiana have now atme'to Trliu' Mr. PariTr "left over the Distribution SuperinUndent of IP.Power Co. in Bermuda, is n.w on his way to British Guiana to take up a similar peat. He err ved terday morning by the Cs d aibte from England where he had been on sut months' leave and left later in the afternoon by the opportunity for Trinidad. He was accompanied by his wife. Mr Campbell told Carib that Barbados had a good shopping centre as compared with the other iMunds he had visited The street* *ere clean, the people were well clothed and he noticed no begging on thr streets He was particularly impressed bv the policemen directing traffic. They were extremely efficient. Photographer on The "Colombie" M R RCX;EH CHAUVET of Paris who haa been working in the s-s. OlooiMe tor the pas'vcnly moiithi aa photographer lold Cirlb yesterday that he liked — .. mi i his job very much It allows him r'AHLANE of Kochraier, New ti. see several place* of interest York, left for Antigua and Puerto n the trip and he takes a number i cu on Monday by B.W.l.A. on of photographs of the various her w.,y back home after spending lolonles which he keeps four months staying at the S' souvenirs 1,-wrence HoSel PHor to joining the ship he Spent Ten Days *•• mpioyed with Harcourt Lo-d* Mr) After Four Months jVl"*. %  -'' %  !-? A -? ETH MAC hta job "very much P u A n ER "Pending ten days' iir.n> r\ ,|,y staying at the St. ... which Is supposed no "largest photo studio tarries s staff of eighty photographers. coursV studying Liberal Arts at m^uT/KnmXS ove'/'lhe Visiting Her Sona M University of Missouri, has week-end bThli eclian^ boat M* 8 W S ARCHEK .tli them on her nrsl the Athelbroak while ins wife 1 ft iT Dominica was InlmnaU by Monday by B.W.l.A •' <* lomble yestcrdny for TrlniSevenlh Visit ''**' hMC *"* wi n*" 1 about isit to thr island Back to The U.S.A. W^AVIC^'T"*" ""T!* 'our months holiday with her CKHAl.l) KOKI.r: ,i II r^* V—*—a— seventh vult to slip wat accompanied by her M f : badlan resid'nt in the US.A. the past forty years, returnad HM nths' stay 11 holiday staying at th." • Mouse Mr f'orili is in the ical Utal In Ihe t/i.A. Barbados > Hiss Mabel grind dftuanter Taykrof theUSA. She arrived Knowllon. Monday by B_.W I.A. via Mrs. Archer is the mother of !Mr W. S. Archer, Acting Finstaylng at i>n da\ Secretary of Trinidad, Mr. Hunter Archer, the Tranquillity VT_ J MT" lannis player who is head of (he ng th. summer of 1948 when she ,. ort of S pain Branch of Trinidad leasehold* Ltd. and Mr. J. S. D R | S s 1 gatr, cc R r l to his home in Brooklyn on Monfj?.—?Io, day bv d rssi raansstssai sfttr ^'\ R, co nn d *" be ing for two monthi • Carrabank Hotel. Miss Taylor was last h g the summer ol spent five months Off to U.K. Archer who i:i also with T.L.L. E. A. PITT, B.D and Mrs A Trinidadlnn by hlrth, she has Pitt, left Barbados on Sunbeen living in Dominica for the day by the De Orassc for the past 31 years Her first visit back United Kingdom on furlough, to her native land since she left Rev Pitt who Is Superintendent it was las* year when she risttsd _ of the Georgetown Circuit of the her children merest Methodist Church wss at one tlfne Superintendent of the Ebenen Intranait C 'wh!!; S h l err ,l'e P v. and Mr* Pit, Mf SSZFS f.J ""^ guests of Miss Bullen of, f. ."^^"M "' t ,, t,,L ,d Emerald Ville". Cheap„de Girls' School. Nevis was an inB *^ transit passenger on the ss Fort Bank Director Townahend which left here on M R. C C GEORGE, Local Monday on its way back to the Director of Barclays Bank u ?;*' „ (D.C. and O.) and Mrs George Miw Crosse who spent nm. cf "Uplands", Maxwell Hill were i !" n*h*' holiday in the United W'.firlin^ I l n l^.v-. passengers by the CWomWe for Slates, stopped off here on her Winding Up Lcavs Trinidad yesterday aRernoon fi,Bt v Blt to ,np Wand to see her W INDING op his six months' Mr George has gone over to relatives. She |sj a sister of Rev leave in Barbados is Mr meet Mr. J. r. Cad*, General s w c Cro " G K Adam, Banlar Baamlntr of Manager of Barclays Bank und Mnse. Si Philip. Accounts or the Audit IVp.rtMr. Charles Clingell. Director n ^ n nv in .. menl. THhldad He Btrlvtd hero of the Bank in New York Keturns from U.K. VlS.t >' srdaj mornlni by I h e They wHl spend six days together O ETi;RNIN(; frnm England (olombU. from England where he efter which Mr. Cade and Mr IV yesterday morning by spent th* greater part Of his leav.Gfngell will leave for Jamaica Cclonibie afler an enjoyable Ihrec ..ml i> staying at Sliver Beach and ihe Bahamas while he will months holniny wfn Mr. Ashlev Guest HOuat, KiM-klev spend i. week with his grand-, Phillips of Ihe Royal Bank of Vn Adam w .! %  ae. MTrp;.ii.e,i I,, .li.hli.-ii at I*aseiiol<|v. I'oml-aCjiiait.i .Ml.I MiPhillip. "is wife Pierre before returning here. "Kineton". Rockley Terrace. Medico Returns ST JOHN of "Wesi* of Strnthclyde, ulurneri (nmi England yesterday morningliy the *.t Colombie after an absence of three month*. Di St John -went up i of his hCjSlth Travelling Representativ: M M C N PARRAVIC1NO. Travelling RepresentsJlve %  ;' Mi rI M B III vi is and Barbados ) morning after a two an i> i ! %  : visit to Dominica, Montserrat. snd Martinique. B gsnan i IT first saw the light of day in hospital wurds. It's been under our noses for years, and nobedy thought of making it into anything but a uniform. It is familiar in Ihe old pinky colour! but is now sweeping America in fashionable printand vivid new colours. It I < DENIM, the CinosnUa fabric. rgad as a Nn. 1 fashion m u 11 i < ishlon house in Britain which took | ehanol OH Denim nnoi mall enough dresses lo Rhatt the demand. It la cheap, selling retail for 3'* gns., and It washes. 'i't fade or crease, and It Is made this year in a dark green, hyacinth Mug i nd -> bonagi 4-Nation Show A a pWned Fn-nch/Italian' American/British fashion By SUSAN DEACON Ufhl on Age CavanaLhT' sStSTj^ ^^^"^ R ^^ — posing them, are recotnineiiding tlannel dress. Why the Label ? WHY must women's always be labelled? Worst culprits are Hie whose favourite labels fo and dresses are. "F • r the light, creamy make-up rlothes women with ageing skins. After all these years, they say dark, shops peach tinted. foundation an I coats powder are Ughlcr n'.iniitr sephiaticaleil There i. .Iso news of tw.icolour eyebrows which start %  For the older woman." being either dark brewn or black. "For the unger-Sv's tor over and taper off to „ much light. 30's). brown. "For the fashion conacUus waman." Silk/n>ln /Ind hflis .— SEVERAL attempts have been For th*. -om.n who wants madc Il( nm , hl ,„.,,„, stlM klllK to i..ok her beat. wMch wl || p i Pa se Ihe ny|, for a special occaaton.' and haters and the -ilk-hate^. For the not-so-yousuj.' making si k nylon stockings, HOW WRONG .s the v.ew n „d that the. romen must always be fortable to wear lhan 100 pe i more lhat was held in I>ondon. when top somethlnt. either sophisticated cent, nylon, as there i designer* fn.m the four COUDor n^l-so-young or fa-hion conelaslicity. They are tries showed „ll wool fashions sclous. nil-nylon for the sutU ious. HOW WRONG is Ihe v.ew But after wearing a pair 0 that women only buy a hat or these new stockings for on dress for one occasion, either ordinary working day I had thre mornings or lor a special dab.-, ladders in one slocking, two I AND HOW WRONG, too. b the (he other, and holes in both view thai mil the older women, o.Morkings' ftct all the under 30*s. or all sophisticated women, i.m .1 wear Ihe Smart 'IlebV nm *style*. THE llrsl Presentation Parly !" — TWI^ -bowed that the debs this KxcltinK. This m mutv (gdUosi-caBairJous. THE B.B.C men announcers Q Instead of thr frillv, ove-are in great demand in a more trimmed, maze-patterned drews glamorous role of comparing i a aw man y simple wlde-skirte women s fashion shows. dresses, which looled fashionAt two -hows I.M wivk the JI hie in plain, she., n ,tei clipped voices of Frank Imilli] # Instead of Deflowered and ribMcDonald Hobley did not boned hats they wore B*QSU> th over the unaccustomed new demi-hats o r untrimmod and wa* talk..! cripbon of an %  llssigg coat llndais, much smarter. / Notes] I ImJlaritv between the Ilolian and French clothes — m cost. In an effort so capiure the fiishion market taa Italians are keeping then pri. : down, | The Bbaanta Ol M Dior from the 44 world-famous designers. | The gossamer like w o o 1 fabrics, which lcok like the hnest chiffon. The English models. h > manage.' Mrs. t'uekoo ing out from inside the clock. An-I a moment later Pooh-Pooh the poodle, an.l Bl.rk.e thkitten, eatif dashing down tho hnll. "What's the matterr' they both asked. "Something perfectly awful has happened to the moon!" said Teddj. out af \\ laafn By this tin ing out of th* ky absira th M at it hss di Teddy -iened to the old i Hanid tried lo explain. "The Teddy, Isnl reall] %  i sa on It's Mil) the .time eld one. It'a only called a new moon becsuK of bung round, it has those two aharp pnints." Knarf and Mary-Jane nnd Gloria and Pooh-Pooh and Rlackir all said they airreed vviih Teddy, "If it's the %  aeon, why i-n*i n the ay it slsmya Isl Waal bap pened to it?" nsbod Knarf. Then Mi Punrh *aid:"ll ia round the way it slirays i. Sin thit li why it's so thin and small and hat those two sharp points, my dears There's a -hadow across the pai* of the moon that yog don't SSS. It', like a darkTOnm with the dW opeJust on the vraek ami a little light shining through Only a HttJS part Of the room can be sen. But ilia %  lie oth. "I only hope." said Teddy, "thi .t will get hi* and mimd again." "Oh. it will!" said Hanid. "I'l • ure of it." Mr. Punch was sure of it. too. A New M "Every month," Mr. Punch SreTil on. "there'a a new moon. Nsgl .fter niirht it gels biggrr and Mg; i^r until there It is—a ft" Rut what hapmoon again. Then,*' he said, "the %  noon starts getting smaller -mailer again until finally —just hkt a room with all tho ligkta eul nd %  tven i eraek of light shining; through Ihe door—It seems lo isappear altogether. For several nights no one can see it at all. And thfii "And then?" eriad Knsrf and Man-Jane and Gloria and PoohIWi aad Blsckie. aad then II starts coming back ••gain, jimt as we see it tonight, a %  itle sliver of u moon, just like a bdjs without an arrow. And that's • it new moor." •Hut it*, still the old Hanid. "I mean, it'* Just railed th. Mr. Punch nodded. "Ne old moon-it's .till the • i (ul aaoon that we always have and n wavs will." \ll Ihe Pleasure* of the KIBM >wnas. Comedy, Danclnc. Drama — %  The>'re all here and Wondrou*ly In WAJLNEB BROS' tvi-r-SoGay Story I'LL SEE ion is ux inn iv,s PL4Z4 FRIDAY t.39; 1.45 A 1.30 p.m. And Onllnulng Daily 1.15 alt S.3*



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PACK EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE llli i;si,\t .H l.v 1, Its? BOOM IN POLO The rich man's finds a lublic T The rich i game fii new pu hy JOHN WATEXMAJfi WOOLMERS PARK Hertfordshire. LI I am. watching (he n Hertfordshire polo teamnewcomers com • paratlvely among English polo clubs That figure in t bf bright scarlet shirt doe. away with all those Kip lingrsque Illusion* about the dashing, youthful army captain as the star of the polo field. For the most striking personality here ll a chubby man of fifty Mr Arthur Lucas. !ivr v*j.s ago tftUn I.ucftf :iad nevei ao tnwn Wed a polo K'wk in angrr No* iir i i deoendabi*. arcura. nlavi mth %  hand>*an ot on. He runs a Mtble of roni*Heiiastounded %  h* Her t lord*hir* P o o Club And !•* -• .1 mrmly ol :lir iotn mil!** ot Uf M 11 I :.* >. .1 in F'nlO AftBOT.a: on. tn* ruling body of English polo Ti\a; l. not %  U, Arthur Lucas can H m:iw lain.ly mio the po.o lied HuSKI-year-old son John p a CMTiibr.dge university and i* con .vdrred *o be a coning -op a. p.a.rr Hnw f* MrsIShelLjca* and JOyear -old daughter Patric... a^o p:ay To romp*:* the fain.:. Mxir'.inf album Claire aged 8 trots round on a pony no higher than her lather' 7000 CROWD Polo ;.L : .i* r— ..%  i. .< again li w aura, tma more at d more .spectator* It having i M M : tM .-.t an Tii* man who has played greatest tingle pat: revival m U* one-arm* 1 \ Couaray H* tia. IIK gnu a*. Cudrav ParK At rrosds Ot up to 7000 go *o tli* DOIO there, with th< I'm" Philip aa the atuacuon in Mir IKIIO revival M. chartered surveyor In 1947 i tough: Uw itth-eentorv nous* m FOR THE LUCASES, IT'S JUST AT £1200 fiV At'TIO* A FAMILY HOBBY A-YEAR OR SO WoeAgftgfl N (be home < Ooun" Mr id n .d He : MlgD crop of i :age n* n mi *;anw* behind th* houa* Bitting in hta study upping <> bggff after practice, lie told me thai polo was cosily but '!*• not *av by ho* much "It's lit* family hobby.' he says. Hie Iudon where polo %  • very week. In 193*. four i tub were fhrtylng There was tl>* bWortfl It.: lag*. Club No* il ia at, %  i>io" llur! i.. ...tn'v ground/ mid bv watrheit .a la a hrad ha loned. although tli* club siin rmains [he centre oi %  oolo. The Koeham-on C' p ih nfmtt IWor* the uai L IW pOTiMBnan 'ifa 'noweek tournament one* a year. ALL FREE 1 Of his (ami I iTl.-tW a vear ttu. uoniea mual hare coal about CMoo CITYMEIj The member* ot hi.* dab ar*.niostlv Clly men in innrs Some ol them Imvf oolv one pooy—althouvi two u generally rerngnLvd m* Uie LiiiuUiium i-uu-Hie %  v reMerl alfi i '.-[iiinui* plaving period, or S 75 non-plnvinu ntembera who p.tv J auftienK n pay nothing ro* a tanner who Only Richmond Park quartern e anprer.ate.) Btr. ttla F they wangn .lernaltt* to Richmond Park %  dray Park %  -Jw Dim* M -nd> ground %  tiuildlord. -o a %  -i lien %  m lo Lv.a^ gj gnwi nM Nations Work As Partners In Olympic Organization (By CARL sill nil Kl i > ON JULY IK. sporls enthusiasts the world over will focus their attention on Helsinki, Finland. On that day more than 6.000 athletes representing about 7j rgaUoru will pasi in review at Olympic Stadium during the OMntnj] tereiiumies ol the XV Olympind. For the next two gnreil these youn>; men and women will cogflpeto ul their ;tthletu spvcialties. Taat so many gUUgteg can gerf together in friendly OMlpwUUar) t\ a common neld demonstrates thp universality or sport. ThiUlvmpic Games, however, do more Ihnn that. They offer proof that nat'ons ,.r divi-iwni mtci *•! %  languages, and political ph osophlea can share in setting up accepted rules .,nd practices and .ibide by the deojainns of a dingle I'.uverning body. The International Olympic (JommitU'i 1 dlrSVtg Uif Olymp" movement and legulates the IgdfJ %  A president, elector) for a term t flight yearn, and a n execoiliv.committee of six members, elcxu-d tor four years, carry out the rou tUM work of the Internstion:. I Olympic Committee. The pti-sident has the right to make awqtsions In extreme rases on bsl Owl authority, but his actions on* .iubjtvi to approval cither bv the executive committee or the entire body at its next ,. %  %  ThiCommittee elects its own members, which do not excMd thieper nation. (r.m> COtUarlgg which posse ss a recognize Nstionu! Olympic Committee. TinIntern., tional Olympic Committee reprc sents a malority nf v ,tnvnlvcri in th, I In peacetime, .i, CosniaMswa meets at least once . jragtf to discuss Olympic mntiet.i. The |gch> nicnl details of the cmduct oi Olympic sports are left to the international sporU since the .ntematinnal Olympi,Comnvltee spend: V.I.SnJmlu.i.l. ROBERT K1PHUTH MR. KIPKUTH h... coacbed Yala's faawua %  wimiiii-ifoi i~ yaaxa. For IS yaars hu teasa baremnntrt nndsfaat' ed in daal compeUliOu He inalso been coach of the us Olympic swimming team lour times. He will go to Helsinki with tht team laU summer in an advisory ca gggggg, Before J COnutOtttOI gntai 0M %  %  %  which reads: %  i dgcsatw, mi my bswtour, Ihatl oaatwui according to the iiiles of the International Feder. "ti, that I %  i ., part i Ipatod Ln port %  oltl] rot the .. (oi iim physical, naental M octal btgksfltg i dm., uu i..ion., dial port to -thing more than .i recreation without in any kind, direct or inu.: %  that I arn eligible in all respect; fnr partiripatloii in Ufa A country desinn^ tp gntsg Uv Olympics must form a National OlyrapK Cominittee. Tincominittee must In.lu.le nationals of th.country who aie ni< i,.t i .,1 Utg Intetnationdl Olvinpn C nlttcgj and the represa I all the Ixxties governing ^poru. ihe Olympic programme. Teehm cal advice and Individual control "f sport, is supplier |,y iii t Inlertiutional Sport, F.-lrr.ir l.,,^ Thesw federation'; are made up of members of the reeogrvzed sports%  foverning bodii* in the Various countriw. Each federation has Hill control of it S|K>H on gn la tcrnational basis and 'at .rl (fm-rn; tin ( Hympla DENIS COMPTON Drob y M ^ by PETER DITTON Sedgman In Tennis Finals \i Lords ...on i Nawthant.Deais ( In I ir.t I law Crtekrt. He did • in his. in, innings— fewer than any other HOfwf -part from Igfl D"ii.lil Hi ulni HI on a ouid have **• evsn u* Uie IS bus from just outside has door did IUA P*s he Middlesex ground. The fact *as a direct ctauiecUon de it euser for tho IIUC boy 'A'h" learned much of egurl) cricket from pUyin* h jnn watching his fathar** tim. mpUm senioi. an accwut iiisn.ci enckautr in his youngtIgyg _uu now an entnusiasu: captain the Bat Lanw Oid Hoys XL And whu i ... .i pupil at ta-9 a adopted as oflki. I scorer and twelfth man When,1 Uie teum was unaM 10 pUj N out in Denu. stepped into breach, and, undaunUHi b' Having ... face bvWlers swatrl yean oldc than himself, usuall* On day in beptcmber iwA oo %  mbarked an U.e laggeat undertaking of in> lif-. from Hondoii he caught the 13 bus to Lords, where he was to captain the Be mentary 8ehools against Mr. TufneU'a XI lUther shyly but wit complete conlidence. Denis entergd Ungiound which was later to become his headquarters. I good captains, he won the loss. Then he celebrated by sharing in a century "pctung partnership with a young Sout*> Lon 0*u Own Ca!rr*DOndri LONDON. Julv 2 Jaroslav Drobny. the exiled '.'zeeh and Frank Sedgeman thrAustraUan Champion will fight £& .'."* "**"'* Singles Anal at Wimbledon on Friday That was decided by to-day's semi-flnaLs in which Drobny beat the American Hrrbie Flam 6—2 8—4, 0—& 8—10, 8—4 and Sodge-" man beat his fellow countrvmat. Mervyn Rose 8—4. 6—4, 7—8 Thus American domination in this event, they have won it for the past five years, has endea This will be the fifth champion• hip final between Sedgeman and Drobny since Msy The Australian won In Rom* and Monte Carlo -and the Czech was victorious at Bournemouth and Paris To-day's semi-finals present* d vivid contrasts. The Sedgeman Rose match was ss tame and as Hat as stale beer, whereas Un other sparkled like vintage champagne. Ro>e seemed to have an inferiority complex. He played as if Sedgeman was so assured of reaching the final that there wag no point in trying to stop him It waa IBIM made all to easy for the Australian champion who must have sensed Rose's thoughts and derided that with his opponent not going all out then he *oo could take It easy Most action came in the final game of the match Then for the first time both players appeared to enjoy playing. Perhaps like the spectators thev were happy in the thought that it was nearly all over. How different was the semifinal that followed. It was a titanic two and a quarter hour battle between two of the best tacticians in the asm* to-d.i> K>cept in the third set in which Drobny was resting nothing was given away All points had to U worked and schemed for. As Drobny endeavoured to manoeuvre into position to execute Ids famous forehand di so Flam strove to present this cleverly masking the direction his shots and varying his length and pace. As fortune fluctuated with e move and counter move the thousands of spectators who packed • he centre Court were kept at fever pitch ot excitement. Drobny won the first and second sets but was driven so hard that he decided to rest in the third and go all out for a win In the fourth. But Flam had then tasted blood and was aftermore. He hung on like a leech and so keen wss the KVHUU* Of KHYC I.an it I'l'iinis The results of yekteiu • tennis played at the Hoy.,l li ,. %  oados Yacht Club are:— LaaUes' Kiaglea Mrs. D. E. Worme beat Miss at Wood 6—I, t—I. Ladles' Dwuble. Miss D. Wo.-. Pilgrim beat Miss M King and Mrs. A. A Gibbons 2—6, 7—fl. 6—1 Mens louk4*> D E Worme and H. Johnson beat I S Robinson Edghill 6—3. 6—3; 7—6. Mixed Daables Mrs. J. A. Mahon and C. BSisnett beat Miss E. Worme and H A. Cuke. Jm\. 8—6, S—. TO-DAY FIXTVRFS Mem'* DM blc* J H. C. Edghill and C. B. Ssictt vs. P Patterson n nrl O. H. Manning H L Toppm and D. Blades vi. —L.E.8. V. Roach and T A. Oltlen* M R. deVertcull and Dr DUsV %  -rymaki PL I Hill I .1 1) Trimliightii. "truggl* hag the first 17 games went with service Flam broke through Drobny's in the 18th to bska the set 10--8 Drobny came back straight awny in the final set and broke through the American's service in the first game *.JlJ"" lh t n ,hc c *rh's turn to LwewLSS. ht i0uid held his J !" "', h \ would win. Thl he AmJE.* r,, h ' the "" %  'he American refused to ackiwwledee defeat and took his opponent to deuce m the final game di!"!!? 5 V l only b> h,s P |av but dso fa) his perfect court derneanour has made himself a firm RiHh'T SSI ,n bIedon crowds But after to-dayS match he has o close rival for this honou, ,n t'., person of HiTbieFlam THE WEATHER REPORT YESTF.KDAY Highest Tempers tit re Sf, '. F Lowest Temperstur* T2.0 F Wind Velocity 7 miles per hoar Barometer (9 a.m.) 30 097 (3 p.m.) SB 843 TODAY Sunns* 5 46 a.n Sunset: 6 16 p.m Moon First Quarter Lighting 1 no pm High Tide 1 13 pm Low Tide: 6 44 June G21 p-s Colony Club :j BARBECUE To Barbados I SATURDAY 1ULY 5 DENNIS COMPTON. worked his way up the batting order, Then, time weeks utui his appearance in tint class i r J < ket. and his sixth game, came his first hundred, coincidental l.v igalnst Northants. Sharing in a ninth wicket partT.ership of 76 with Jim Sims, the uiiiy member of that MliMVaseg %  Ida still playing) regularly, and 74 with Ian PVcblea for the baft •wicket, he race.) to ihiee figures %  n 95 minutes This wss the portend oi things to come. i oining Arsenal whom ho served with distinction, later ggdnlngj a Championship and Cup Final medal. Compton reached his I .OOU runs for the season. Ho finished second in the Middlesex avoTHsea to the immortal Patsy liendren, and was awarded hu county cap. All this at the age of 18. cnmpton's teats over the years have become legendary and require no enumeration. It Is perhaps pertinent though, to deal briefly with his mo*t successful wason. 1947. This was n vintage vear for cricket followers. Eighteen centuries flowed from the Compton bid, a new all-llrae record, and a new record aggregate totnl of 3.816 was reached A knee injury in 1950 threatened to close prematurely laieer which has outrivailed that of any English batsman, lncludhu; even his great contemporary, Len Hutton, Handicapped by a •-tirTening joint, Compton lost his ability to dance daringly down tne wicket. Fortunately for England and foi < ii, ket as ., whole, he appears to .A'erod from the trouble and this season Is coming back to his best form. With all his success, Compton remains much the same unaffected person as the young schoolboy who arrived st lords for his debut in 1932. The passing years have added to his ability but. remarkably, his enthusta-sin for the game is unabated. Long may he continue to delight us. the year assisting moveuiriits sli over the world that might eontribute to the good nf amatein -porj and to the id-al. of the I tlymp'c. Approval of the International Olytnpk I otgght bj Bg] ^i. upg I %  isbiug to organize nd conduit -ports meetings. A H number do not rtssgave II good part ot -uppoii baosuse of tnetr ickground.s The Comnutloe also lays down the principles upon which the Linatcui sutus ,.f athletes in all •port* and from all nations i%  etermmed. Sports Window Two of the moat interestlnK WaUr Polo matches of the season, matche* which will very likely decide tho win uing team of the Division "A" Cup. are scheduled to be played this evening st A o'clock at the Aquatic Chili These matches are Harri-o Collage -Snappers and Bwoid Ash Bonltaa Theno match*-* are second round onea. In their first encounter. College held Snappers to a draw sod Boiiitas won from Swordash by iui odd goal. A silver collection will he taken thia evening. | They'll 1>> If Ev ery Time Kow COVES n? II THIS /WE %  W3e TECHNO-STUFF. M/*CM,JES LIKE THIS ON BOTTLE,CA'. UBEL AND PACK 8.SOO CASKS OP E4LGEW4TEB SOCM POP Pt-i HOU8, AUTOMATICALLY ELIM S- MG 746 LAPCKEBSFOR WI* HEINZ CREAM OF TOMATO SOUP B\ Jimmy Hado w "L*mm4*n*tHW %  OUT rr Tes unTeE\ I **ac ^vvoLi*:e<5 TO sven GET -me LoeIMTB CKCeSAM 5T.W7SD SOME LOVE THE REST WHO LOVE THE . BEST ENlllf IIE1> IIIUAII Full-Moon Da sclr t* Bathing inee N* \nd Generally Quit* Informal Rear rva Met m In Adv %  JJ8-n ,^ V*^#''-'-*****'-WO^*-'' 1 Jlf your game is ftennis ... W e [offer iSLAZENGERS TENNIS BALLS $4.12 per lin. If it's Cricket ... We offer CRICKET BATS Autographed by LEN HI'TTON. LESLIE AMF.H and DENIS < i IM I'ION—Priced from SH3.0 to S16.61 CAVE SHEPHERD &. CO.. LTD. 10, II. 12 & 13 Broad Si. SPECIAL OFFER CANNOT BE REPEATED 3/16in. FLEXIBLE tiALVANISE ViTHE fie. per yd. &f I'i.'.il for Fencing. Stay*. Etc., Etc., Elc. GENERAL HARDWARE SUPPLIES MCKE1T mill (Opposite Post Office) PHONE 41 i v//v/,v*v.%v.%AV-v,v/y.v,v-v//,%v,v^v,v/>'/>v-l TD0LS TAPS & DIES PIPS asr *". A". ", A". %", A". %  <•: A", $ SAE or NF v.". A". 1". A". Vi", A". *• %  *" 1 USS ur NC '.' *, *-, ,".-. -, ,".". V, V," Hi p:". r, 3" ENGINEER HI'. HAMMERS % l'lll). 1Mb.. 2V(,lb.. .lib FILES FLAT. ROUND. HALF ROt'ND. SQI A!:F HIGH SPEED GRINDING MACHINES HIGH SPEED TWIST DRILLS : F.XIBLK FILES OPEN i: BOX SPANNERS PRESSURE GAUGES 0-400 lb. ECKSTEIN BROTHERS I BAY STREET DIAL 4269 C--'.'.'.'.','..'.'.-,*,



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Jttoottt ESTABLISHED 1895 rilUKSD.W JULY PRICE F1VF. CENTS Speech By Alexander Raises Storm In Commons Churchill Savs Bradlevl Was Consulted Before House of Lords Report LONDON. July 2 OltlTIM! DEFENCE M1NISTI B Karl ftlimlw declared in A private \peech Ihnl he Mould IKliuppicr to see mon* rear TV cs in Koreu and his words raised a not he i political MM in nNMMM •• W Am day Agr Labour le. triers demanded in > uiii an immediate cmcruenc < debute on the fact thai Field Marshal Alexander yaw "secret" tacts lo a rluh meeting on Tue%da\ nighl lhal he did not report lo Parliament. lH B Morrl— H MggMtad insie.ni I., I i P ,\ wished to press the dispute they %  : I t'ensui' aiMin-.' tht Churchill agreed Mi fi ( %  %  tnci DeTence Minister Emmanuel Shin well %  Clement Attlee *Churchiil during his defence t!iat Alexandei did not mention weak'i vi when ne reported to PnrUejm his recent Korean tour on Tuesday because he was re ed not to. by General Omar Bradley. Chaiimm ol the American Joint Chiefl Ol Staff. Churchill first explau %  ii.. I HA4.MIV AT S ill lit II % III ..%I.K that if the should put lifneii! ai.i. Churchi to private .nvitatiun .. %  bet* follovrad The Pram ter said Alexander told IM Canada Out) lr an Impromptu speech ihnt mere ire emkngsj In Korea, one of MBjJd not Ilk* tn mention Th* spee--^ Tuesday night f..ll..*.Yalu botnbinif i. i men! anil Alexander** report. When members of the audicn %  • %  cried nut 'whv nut" Church i 'luoted Al" i-auae It I t at a matt r %  CH Slim Thrin "II the Chinees rtteanfrt i I scale offensive they will ptoetnl tlie front lo a depth o( | In some place* but 1 believe in I uwiug to the efficiency of tnc Eighth Army and Uatil they will be able to bring any offensive to a hall." Other weak%  tease* which' Alcxai.au men* Honed according to newspapci Windstorm Hazes Chile's Food Crops ARICA. Chile. JuU | A windatoroi "i lua %  V MI %  p Ike*. i..shed the Norih%  %  destroyed communications. %  ii'stimatnl are %  s The atom %  %  lefBa ptanl i H -.f corn, |.n'.it tomatoea. *ugar cane as wen i %  moves In Aiav.i %  paea. Reports said Lluta Valley hi the same province watt similarly lash-' repot is were lack of air camourd ^^ lorm .nu,, !" ,,^ Art( .. | nage and the inexperience of \ M p„ railroad schedules when i many front line troop* btcauio „, m e points along the Urn of rot*lion. covered with ewth. The wore %  seroe j inuen —I'p Lord A.exandcr used on the spur nt lh Ol in .'i public speech and not that %  they affected military security AhfU'nt VlfitlluTs, which in my opin.on they did /U,SU % %  %  % %  % %  %  not Churchill -aid Alexander took thi> precautjon of referring, points of hb M-p.ni % %  the Ho 1 1 ' -., and Bi.idli.-y had repln I prefer that nothing be Korean rsflStveB Bradley thought %  ii.i intateaaenl In %  % %  form mlehi be gftlflCOfl. implyiiiL! igrtoUB Inadf reserv In its original form I* might be Interpreted a" Impl.vltut that 'here ire virtually no rein consequent! 'h Interchange, Lord Alexander omitted from hi public speech In the House of I^ords nnv reference to reserves but • he thought to n prlvnte pathe 1 ing off the record, he made reference In the form which 1 hn*• read to the House of Common*." U.N. Debate Will Go On Despite Russia's 50th Veto In Council's Life UNITED NATIONS. New York, Jui. I RUSSIA SMARTING under %  (tefeutt in the United Natior > in the nerm warfare piipa* ..1 -' Ira Uniitd l "' the Security Council today 'c .l.iroh Mulik ancnly told the Council voaterdi 1 "will nol participate bi the debate" 1 d Siataa demand for Red Cross investiKation 1 gee that United Stetai %  used el weapon! In Korea, and warned that 111 the end he would v't> the proponl. Despite tfalrk'i notiei ttial the SOth vet., m the United I s.M Kletor) would kill any possibility f an imparUal ibowdown towatigatteei nn inc poi in Korea. until will proceed wirVi the de*j et ;iutt p.n Hi' r .r.nounceinent followed ihre* defej Soviet propagandii lr the 9eeur)l| TOP LEFT: Show Mclntosh' iody wliore it fell aftar buuf itrti TOP RIOIIT Picture -how. tn un trunk of Ue which -jtifkl !• BOTTOM LEFT A croit* uction of U)# larfa crowd oiibiie t> nOTTOM RIOIIT Three Poll-men battle d-uciaUly to shut gal eaf picture at Uio left. "V Mic trunk of tha tree. 11 Um a* he tried lo pull Inn. i'oop<>rK<' y*rd Iryiiut to lain admit' 1 .tm-ii watf iirtiin eonatautly mrcd out of the hole •inwoe of tha tragedy pen by the MiirglnK crowd TH bl Harndeas Churchill said h v thought the statetnajoj to be Imrmleas. "The ircumstancea of the occasion and the use of the word "lecrec nave invested the incident with %  in air of mystery and sigmncan< which can only be removed by full etatement such as I have matter a* %  '<> ,I *' ndded in .onciusion that the mobile reserves of the Eighth Army harliBarhadl "inee l>een "substanti.illy inrrei ed" by troops used to restore ,di>. has order at Koje. Churchill and Shtnwell were immediately involved tn a hot %  %  When pressed by the other's questions the Prime Minister muttered Insulting). PUSLN, July 2 The National Assemblym %  supporting Syngman Rhee in Ul Ugh, tor popu.^r President i 1 ledions voted to Jik for J pul>< i.und-un of absent mambei • Kiuhiy-Mx Asuembly mcintMreejUSSted the police round-up vote taken during a seerSpy Pleads Cooper's IVeck Broken Not Guilty ^ s Tree Crashes Down HELPER UNHURT LONDON. July 2 William Marshal] 24-year-okl radio operator who coded a mea%  pleaded not gutter to charges that he handed over secret inform J oon t' guial m dlpl mat In i*> afoi Maratiall's trial is set for next Wednesday July h Apt I SB ol Uili Bend hi* police looking for ttv v *w wr "a pu :i xe prejudicial to issemblymen, ^e sarety" of the state he gave More than 40 Assemblymen *','"<<' boycotting sessions and at le, •• ^ he Sm-iet emlwssy in Briusin 25 others arc missing or In hldn ab-iul Britain :.;.loAbeent assemblymen are prever • mac wireless kervic* which was uuj the vote on Rhee's Govern"calculated to be o, might be ment to change the South Kore directly ..1 in.iirectly useful constitution. I any enemy." (hi pace S. GRANTLEY McINTUKU .. Coopei >l Braggi Hill, Si Joseph, was killed insUmtlv yeaterdav iiniui 1.45 when a huge tamarind tree which In.in ihviCotton factory* CooperIs< Church Vtuagi both these men worke-i era. They wenfelling l which had been given lo then DO their own behalf. Mi II V. Alkins, Manager ol li Barbados • Itee CoUaii I actor} *aid that syhea Lo past few %  Bl U p er's trade slowed down, the laanagement, In ordithing foi the men to do. and al %  time in an eff-r the yard In order to get more .pace, fhe> decided to give these •Wo men the tree pro. d Experts Will Discuss Civil Aviation I. 1 .,.. LONDON, Ju 1'i.liiimes to in. 1 in. i.-f %  ill be ii> 11 il c'oka %  1 %  %  .'i t. 1 C.L.C. Protest Vduins' Detention LJetenlioi On pase 3 LI> Own CvrfiMitfml' JAMAICA. July 2 1 of Grantlev Adams political Laboui New York last Thursoern protested to the Secretariat of Uie t'anbbear Uibour Congraas. The C.L.C. todaj sent lauers to Preatdent Truman .ind the United States Consul General in Jamaica protest. n* the %  nd dasn action as an Insult to Caribbean d'-mocracy IfOI lie \1I.M. II \>IIMf the West Indies, both >f whom in 1 Iwelve-montns 1 tour of England scored note-worthy sin 1 put the West Indies on the boxing map of the World. 1 BSSed tin • -lerdav with their Manner J* k Burns on the &&. CoLeeaaia on their way home to fil 1 holiday Curing then 12 months in the .Mother Country, these : [rr* from the land of the HuniIminf Bird, turned m grand pefmpey fighting un defestsd III II < ontaats. II if which he WOO mid the other Ii. drew with Jim Siade St* n D f^eaati irn fre'"! •\< Id 1 %  • losl May ITrrOSX under government's erachthe Carnnsuni • Snmf parllamenUi'v ebst i*^ed government wouhi cose rather tha: ibly on the question of -IP ni "i ti ri turn "i Development BOd WVllare Acts. 1 iibsluntlnl nun ... 1 Bv lir ^ \ d Avi elopment In nlei %  itSd il ttie veai ending Maul %  r... 1 otonlal Civil Aviat 1.11 %  %  Mi •!•.• ". 1111 hiding Aiiiimiutlr.i ..I Airport %  1 %  This it the largi in any year BSt 1., to( .I imounl 'or this purpose Since %  %  The BrH 1 runeat at Cat Importance to the r I I • It il Avli Althougj laanda ha* lp It Is till a will di the !" %  1litv of ,, A via t foi %  Lars s of In. 11 !|.< be heldj since tb( BOd of the war had been ealleto tiring colonial experts up tdate oti the Ute*t development Civil Avintton. particular^ rTecttng jet .iircraft rtsprseantatives or the Mm sir Uas Mml-tr-. ol Ibe A 1 Mm.itrv and d • Reaafdan onu. 1 M I XI— I..1 N...I 1 olonial bV 1 re 1 Kopkln on MlfMStST of Htnte for the Colon Is %  • Ii I. 1 rnsn Raee Begins lifter Delay HCRMl.'DA %  HeadH-1 %  -. KQCiatioi, Yacht I Tha race started at 2.10 p. m. Daylight Time Instead -.f %  llurtr Jr to take on ire as his refrigerator was out of order Weather was squally with wtnda 1 %  •aching 27 knots and yachts got lagged sUrt %  %  in N 1 %  4 t IfimnierI I'-onderooo Uv renr. • -. were >ix enCw sea ma wb Foot Porfdfriwill leav' Bare uda rt the vnchti to cri I'.asi GennaD Police Arrosl t Americans BCItUN, Jub %  %  hotuBjrapl 1 .... .. rmanj to I I I %  • 1 ms on ,, ... (strict Wa %  B> • %  %  %  bloat W Wl . 'ii 1 in. n l>. had on oaving rtfles mm for< i.mil "T lo whli go wllli theni loerli .11 n priest iimtad Stni.-. .luthorltiears Bid tin, ven tneeetlgatl n Council Afler using the pre*denea fw mute than %  • week u> ... %  II for all countrig tn ratify U> "i"i warfare aa •d last Thui dai M.ihk'*nw""">"i' \< .( %  > BaaWpsd io emssi Unite,! Stele* aril IM not n I Treaty. The KU no) mem >>A sudi ss the droll taken I > • leiegaiiAndrei A Oeomyai i lo seat Com-niinut Chun, In place cf Chine*? u v.r Truce Talk8 POHI|>OIMMI PANMUNJOM, July J 1 X|>ettidly .ill >l • dl] i-.spOlienM'nt In 1 Immln n I .ll.llll IS '.!• UMini-IIMi 1 Tmlatstpimeiuent .tun %  %  Ri (10.00 pin R.D.T h>dJ -r-niniably wanted DVM I %  1 el the armlstli, ions. It was behaved, here lhal onununlst negotiators sent Hal ison'h stalementa to a high* 1 11. palplng ... bv ow—for furthei study snd ,,ri v 1 p Jamaica House /Han Changes JA..1AICA. July 2 IThaeain In .lamaleo's corutitu1 uadBI ty leader Norman Manic) LesdBI demanded mat th< House reject th.pfOpnenls us contrary to Jamal-an feSsirs and demands 'nd form a trnttad non-l*artv Front to move Immi.liately for the aChJerenient of full self gov-rrimorit of Internal affairs by next year The nebnte ci.ntlnueji tomorrow travel Gunard Appliciii'd, B-AlLan M '':i-*sagea tn EnKland rlunni; 1903 h.ivo already reached imprrdirto'l ptvali Those who contemplate tD make their %  ppUeai madl 1 RAfiTBOUND Accon a g %  %  Ai 001 % %  ..liable %  Choice t Seven luxurv hnrr: dcrri New v irk Chafe *'"i> linerftom C.mnd.i tr U\TKS (including plane Faret) lp From C100 (Tourist I eiZfl (CrsSin) R1SB (First Class ) l'..\nble in It.W.l Ciirreiuv lhrouh — HANSl'HELL LARSEN & Co.. Ltd. \|i'llls TMK

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__







ESTABLISHED 1895



Speech By Alexander Kaises Storm

Churchill Says Bradley
Was Consulted Before’
House of Lords Report

LONDON, July 2.

RITISH DEFENCE MINISTER Earl Alexander declared
in a privaie speech that he would be happier to see
more reserves in Korea and his words raised another
political storm in Parliament on Wednesday. Angers
Labour leaders demanded in vain an immediate emergency
debate on the fact that Field Marshal Alexander gave
“secret” facts to a club meeting on Tuesday night that
he did not report to Parliament. '
Speaker W. S. Morrison suggested instead that if the
Labour Party wished to press the dispute they should put

down a Notion of Censure against the Government and
Prime Minister Winston Churchill agreed. Mr. Churchi
stepped into the breach to defend Zarl Alexander in 1
debate with former Defence Minister Emmanuel Shinwell
ana fori Prime Minister Clement Attlee. ‘Churchill

said during his defence that Alexander did not mention
weakness in reserves when he reported to Parliament on
his recent Korean tour on Tuesday because he was request- |
ed not to, by Generai Omar Bradley, Chairman of the
American Joint Chiefs of Staff.
Churchill first explained that-

Alexander’s speech was in answu't

ye
to private invitation and the de- W d shor
bate followed. The Prime Minis- m slor mM
ter said Alexander told the! e 5
Canada Club in an impromptu Razes Chile os

speech that there are weaknesses
in Korea, one of which he did 7

not like to merition. The speech | Food Crops
Tuesday night followed the big

Yalu bombing debate in Partia-
ment and Alexander’ report
When members of the audience
cried out “why not” Churchii

ARICA, Chile, July 2

A windstorm of hurricane pro
oe that lashed the .North-
€
|

rr ection of Chile for 24 hou
quoted Alexander as ying, “be- + huge nd and dust clouds
cause it is a thir I was asked }deatroyed crops anic disrupted
not to mention as it is a matter }communications.
of secrecy.”
Can Stop Them First reports said there were 1
“If the Chinese attempt a full]‘ 1a ltic but damages whicl

scale offensive they will penetr far are unestimated are belic
the front to a depth of some miles|Considerable. The storm destro
in some places but I believe th. }!@fge plantations of corn, potatoes
owing to the efficiency of the, tomatoes, sugar cane as well
Eighth Army and their fire power olive and orange groves in Azav:
they will be able to bring any!!! the interior province of Tara
offensive to a halt.” Other weak- | P#®c4

nesses which Alexander . men- Reports said Lluta Valley in the
tioned according to newspaper {came province was similarly lash- |
reports were, lack of air camou~ eq, The storm interrupted Arica
flage and the inexperience of [a Paz railroad schedules when |

many front line troops because some points along the line were
of rotation,







Lord Alexander used on the spur

of the moment wa no doubt . ran
unfortunately chosen, Churehill rT \
said. “What he intended to im- Assembly Vote For
ply was that his remarks were ,

liable to be misconstrued if said Police Round-up Of

in a public speech and not that
they affected military security ; _
a ‘ty Absent Members

opinion they
Det PUSEN, July 2
Churchill said Alexander took :

the precaution of referring points
of his reports to the House
Lords to Bradley before he spoke
and Bradley had replied he would
prefer that nothing be said about
Korean reserves, Bradley: thought]
that the statement in its original
form might be misconstrued as

s a 9 i *
fs so ones AE Spy Pleads Cooper’s Neck Broken pyperts Will
Not Guilty As Tree Crashes

LONDON, July

|
|

Eighty-six Assembly membe
requested the police round-up
a vote taken during a_ sect
session.

might be interpreted as implying]open to question since the A

that there are virtually no re-|sembly was six short of a working plead not guilty

serves In consequence of this| quorum. Nevertheless they, dou!

in the House of Lords
ence to reserves but





ing off the record, he made refer-| boycotting sessions and at lec=t|0f the Soviet embas
ence in the form which I have} 25 others are missing or in hiding. |information about I

read to the House of Commons.”

ing the vote on Rhee’s Govern- | ‘calculated
Harmless ment to change the South Korev | directly

Chur¢hill said he thought the constitution. | aay nem





statement to be harmless. “The |

circumstafices of the occasion and :

the use of the word “ssneey’| C.L.C. Protest |
have invested the incident with . *

an air of mystery and significance Adanis Detention
which can only be removed by 2

full tement such as I have (From Our Own Correspongent)

serves of the Eighth Army had} Barbadian political Labour
since been “substantially increas-| Leader in New York last Thurs-
ed” by troops used to restore|day, has been protested to the
order at Koje. Secretariat of the Caribbean

Churchill and Shinwell were| Labour Congress. The C,.L.C. today
immediately involved in a hot|sent letters to President Truman
exchange. When pressed by the;and the United States Consul
other’s questions the Prime Minis- |General in Jamaica protesting the
ter muttered insultingly and then action as an insult to Caribbean

@ On page 3. democracy.

MGLIDBAVIN





YOLANDE POMPEY, BABA-ADAMS AND MANAGER



TOP LEFT:
TOP RIGHT:

24-year-old |

radio operator who coded



The National Assemblymer | pleaded not
of | Supporting Syngman Rhee in the he handed informa-
fight for popuiar Presidential tion to Russian diplomat in London. |
elections voted to ask for a police Marshall’ next |
| round-up of absent members. Wednesday
rain-
the court, his pale,
eplied in a firm clear voice when
implying serious inadequacy of \he was

reserves, “In its original form it Whether the vote was legal wus |five charges brought under official|poth these men worked

gainst Marshall
interchange, Lord Alexander|that Home Minister Lee Sui | '0-day was that on five occasions
omitted from his public speech| would obey the “mandate” and|beginning with April 25 of
any refer-|send his police looking for the |Year for
speaking 4] assemblymen. | the safety”
he thought to a private gather- More than 40 Assemblymen are | Pavel Kuz

Absent assemblymen are prevent-|matic wireless service which was

@ On page 3.





THURSDA

a



Shows McIntosh’s body where it fell after being struck
Picture shows main trunk of tree which caught its

HELPER



on their own behalf

Mr, H, F. Alkins, Manager of the |
“a purpose prejudicial to| Barbados Co-operative Cotton | rp,
gave|Factory said that when in the}
ond Secretary

y in Britain

past few weeks work at the coop
3 er’s trade slowed down, the Man-
jritain’s diplo-|agement, in order to find some-
thing for the men to do, and at
be |the same time in an effort to clear
to|jthe yard in order to get more
| pace, they decided to give these

two men the tree provided the



Trinidad Boxers Pass
Schwinn “nil se] osinion eats Moore L rough On Way Home

ANSEL BABA-ADAMS, Heavy-weight champion 0
Yolande Pompey, undefeated cruis
weight champion of the West Indies, both of whom in
twelve-months’ tour of England scored note-worthy suc
’ and put the West Indies on the boxing ma
passed through here yesterday with their Manage
Jack Burns on the 8.8. Coleombie on their way home to
1 where they will spend a holiday.

During their 12 months in the

ers from the land of the Hum-
ming Bird, turned in grand per-

fers: tre Country, these two fight

formances, Pompey fighting un

jefeated in 12 contests, 11 of

j}which he won and the other he
|drew with Jim Slade why

ked out Don Cockell of
Britain in 4 rounds, To this big-

irted fighter also goes the dis-

the world to stop the Austra

re Middle-weight Crown. the assembly on the question

1 triple crowned holder Day
Sands who also holds the British
“his hievement was all the

more noteworthy for when the
fereé opped the
from further punishment

in .the 7th round, the Trinidadiar

vas far behind on points
jaba-Adams had 8 fight }

12 momths in England, ar he



sand

) ever The other he lost,
ut made up for this defeat by



outpointing the same man in a
return match Adams’ toughest) Qeean
encounter wa with the South|{
African Heavyweight champion!

Jonnie Arthur whom he defeated
on points.
Mr. Burns, the Manage of



these two boys, is one of Eng-
land’s leading boxing manager |
nd he is very yptimistic about
he future of these two West In-
tian He hopes that within the

@ On page 6



JULY. 3, 1952 e





TRAGEDY AT CHURCH VILLAGE

of the United States demand for Red Cross investigation

of Communist charges that United States troops have used

bacterial weapons in Korea, and warned that in the end
1

by the trunk of the tree.

victim as he tried to pull himself up out of the hole.

BOTTOM LEFT: A cross section of the large crowd outside the Cooporage yard trying to gain admittance to the scene of the tragedy
BOTTOM RIGHT: Three Policemen battle desperately to shut gatos

which were being constantly fotced open by the surging crowd geen in
the picture at the left.

Down Piscuss Civil

jie Aviation
UNHURT

GRANTLEY McINTOSH, a Cooper of Bragg;
Joseph, was killed instantly yesterday afternoon about | (:
1.45 when a huge tamarind tree which he and Clarence |
Cutting were felling gave way from the roots, struck him |
| on the head and broke his neck

modernising
al aerodromes to make them

I Cutting was catapulted | ports
to safety by the backlift of the tree trunk,
The fatal accident occurred ji
the yard of the Barbados Co-Op

erative Cotton Pactory’s Cooper-
asked how he pleaded tofage at Church

dug up the roots after they had|

Conference the late
schemes under Colonial

Last Friday Development

Village wher«
as coop } of

ers. They were felling this tree|Saturday morning he and Cut- illocated, specifically
which had been given to then Development
them close to
the trunk of ,the tree

Work continued on Monday and} cated in the year ending Marc

uesday and was still in progress

£1,719,224 was allo

wt for Colonial Civil Aviation
Aeronautica
jeu red. They had excavated about! Telecommunication
of securing} developments

at the top a rope which they hac ,
um allocates

This latter precaution they
completed,

] Government
tinulng the

importance
conference

excavation
’ forthcoming
the digging
25 experts
@ On page 6.



Case Against
Duclos Debated

PARIS, July 2
lhe French government debated
of the, Whether to try again to imprison
Communist
Duclos or to drop the case against me

Conference
imong other topics
lity of improving Civil Aviation

Second Since War

Conference
be held since )
had been calle:
experts up
the latest development
particularly

The government’s first attempt to end of the war.
ry Duclos on the charge of plotting
against the State’s security failed
when it was ruled

Representatives of the Ministr:
the Ministry
Ministry and the

parliamenta

ommonwealth

The decision
government

Communist
Some parliamentary observers
lieved government would drop the

that either

tinction of being the only man
the Colonie

istant Under





“| Race Begins

BERMUDA

After Delay

|" aching 27 knot





Bermuda this r
Bermuda-Ha



Viconderoga





PRICE : FIVE CENTS

——_



In Commons

U.N. Debate Will Go On
Despite Russia’s 50th
|v eto In Couneil’s Life

| UNITED NATIONS, New York, July 2.

i RUSSIA, SMARTING under a series of resounding
defeats in the United Nations in the germ warfare propa-
‘anda campaign against the United States, was on a “sit
jown strike” in the Security Council today

| Soviet delegate Jacob Malik angrily told the Council
yesterday that Russia “will not participate in the debate”

he would veto the proposal,
Despite Malik’s notice that the 50th veto in the United
Nations’ six year history would kill any possibility of an
impartial showdown investigation on the spot in-Kovéa,
the Council will proceed with the debate to-day at 3.00
p.m. (E.D.T
Malik sit dow Anneunces
4 . ment followed three defeats for
4g ‘ Soviet propaganda in the Security
Ke st German Council. After using the presi-
> e : dency for more than a week to
7“ \ oa I ignore the United States demand,
I olice f rre 5 Malik’s own call for all countric
e to ratify the 1925 Geneva protocol
A A yf ae outlawing po'son g
‘4 meric ans warfare was killed
‘il last Thursday



and germ
by tae Coun-

BERLIN, July





Malik manoeuvre. obviously

Armed East German police (> | was designed to embaras ihe

iy arrested four Americans in- | United States which signed but

iding a woman who tnied to}did not ratify the Geneva Treaty.

: ag ew a our

logic. fei ig oe oes , we The Kussian decision not to

rlin, the police reported, They | “Participate” in the debate did

vere taken by ear into E hot mean a Soviet walk-out such

rermany by German poli as the stroll taken by Sovitt

companied by a Seviet offic delegate Andrei A., Gromyke

+ luring the [ranian debate in 1946.

The neident occurred on »{ Nor did it mean @ repetition of

rder of a United State ec orfthe seven-month boycott of 1950

istrict. West Berlin police i when Russia refused to attend

he Americans drove wp in a W U.N, meetings because the Secu

jerman ear and crossed a line o ty Council declined to seat Com-

1 road marking the begins .} munist China in place of Chinese
tf Kast Cerman territory eboutt Nationalists—U,P.

yards in Tran, of an f {G



road block

“ .
when they started taking poo | Jamaica Hoitse

graphs, Kaat German pol
ushecd up waving rifles and forced 2 %
them to go with them Onw I lan Changes
American man was reported to ba Fiore .
| priest, United States authorities
cre said they were investigating. JAMAICA, July 2.
wP Ghatiges in Jarvaica’s constitu-
Se enen ti ion Came under debate in the
rr Jamaica House of Representatives
I ruce Talks today in connection with pro-
7 posals to set up eight Ministries
with individual responsibility

Postponed _ jres: santte,

If approved the changes will
uive the island full elected con-
‘rol over government departments
cxeepting finance and an elected

ajority in the Executive Coun-
cil by the appointment of three
dditional Ministers.

+ Own Correspondes

PANMUNJOM, July 2

Communists unexpectedly asked
a one day postponement in

be Korean truce talks revivin
rp that a break is immincn
the jong deadlocked negotiations
United Nations immediately agrees arr
the postponement and agreed The debate was initiated by

» meet again to-morrow at 11 W. A. Bustamante Majofity



m, (10.00 pm, E.D.T. to-day).[ Party Leader. Norman Manley
Reds presumably wanted more] Opposition Leader demanded
me to study the “exhaustive|that the House reject the pro-
eview” of the armistice discu posals as contrary to Jarnaican
ons. It was believed here that{¢esire and demands and form a
ommunist negotiators sent Har-| United non-Party Front to move
tison’s statements to a higher}immediately for the achieve-
level—possibly Peiping or Mos-}ment of full self government of
ow—for further study and decis-finternal affairs by next year, The
on.-—-U.P, debate continues tomorrow,

| Gravel Cunard |







ts MAURETANEN

Applications for Trans-Atlantic Passages
to England during 1953 have already reached
unpredicted levels. Those who contemplate
visiting the U.K. are strongly advised to make
their applications immediately

RASTBOUND Accommodation available
from August 1952 onwards



WESTBOUND Accommodation available
from October 1952 onward

Choice of Seven luxury liners from New
York {

Choice of Six lixury liners from Canad:

= RATES (ineluding plane Fares) we

From £100 (Tourist)
£120 (Cabin)
£135 (First Class)

HANSCHELL LARSEN & Co., Ltd.
Agents

THE CUNARD SS. CO., LTD.
DIAL 4114.






PAGE TWO





Carib Calling —

Me BRUCE MERIVALE
USTIN, elde i of Mr





and Mrs. Merivale Austin of
“Waterford,” Hastir 12s been
eppointed Manager Thoma
Skinner of Canada Ltd., Montreal.

He succeeds Mr. Arthur Innes
Pocock, Editor of the Canada
West Indies Year Book

Major Merivaie Austin has
served with the Black Watch

(R.H.R-) since 1938. He married
the Hon. Alison Hope, daughter
of Lord and Lady Rankeillour.

His two small caughters are
it prescnt staying with their
grandparents in Barbados.

Hawaiian Businessmen

MONG the passengers making

the cruise on the Moore
McCormack Liner Uru8uay which
called at Barbados yesterday
morning from Trinidad were a
party of fourteen Hawaiian busi-
nessmen “and their wives headed
by Mr. Themas Hore.

They paid a» visit to the city
and afterwards went sight seeing,
visiting such places as Hackle-
ton’s Cliff, St- John’s Church, Sam
Lord’s Castle and the Crane.

Golf Professional

R. AND MRS. H. E. BRISLEY

of Caracas, Venezuela who
were in Barbados two years ago
are now back again for two
weeks’ holiday. They arriv;cd
ever the week-end by B.WI1A
and are staying at Cacrabr,
Hotel Mr. Brisley is Golf Pro-
fessional of the Caracas Country
Club,

Their daughter
hag just completed a three-year
course studying Liberal Aris at
the University of Missouri, has
come over with them on her first
visit to the island.

Back to The U.S.A.
R. GERALD FORDE, a Bar-
badian resident in the U-S.A.
for the past forty years, returned
to his home in Brooklyn on Mon-
day by the Fort Townshend after
spending. two months’ holiday
here. He was staying at thei
Cosmopolitan Guest House.
Mr. Forde is in the real estate
business“tn the U.S.A,

Medico Returns

R. ECS, ST. JOHN of “West-

gate”, Corner of Strathclyde,
returned-from England yesterday
morning by the s.s Colombie after
an absence of three months, Dr.
St. Johnwent up in the interest
of his h@ilth.

Trevelliee Besrasentative
M"...< PARRAVICINO,
devenine Representative
of Messrs. L. M. B. Meyers and
Co. Ltdy returned to Barbados;
yesterday. morning after a two
wetk business visit to Dominica,
Montserrat, and Martinique.

Winding Up Leave
INDING up his six months’
leave in Barbados is Mr.

G. F. Adam, Senior Examiner of
Accounts of the Audit Depart-
ment, Tfinidad. He arrived here
yesterday morning by the
Colombie from England where he
spent the greater part of his leave

Virginia who

and is staying at Silver Beach
Guest House, Rockley.
Mr. Adam was accompanied by

his wife



Hospital=To Ascot

IT first saw the
in hospital wards, It’s been un-
der our noses for years, and
nobedy thought of making it into
anything but a uniform,

It is familiar in the old pinky
colour, but is now sweeping
America in fashionable prints
and vivid new colours. It is
DENIM, the Cinderella fabric,
now emerged as a No. 1 fashion
material.

One fashion

light of day

house in Britain
which: took a chance on Denim
cannot make enough dresses to
meet the demand.

It is cheap, selling retail
3% gns., and it washes,

Tt doesn’t fade or crease, and
it is.made this year in a dark
green, hyacinth blue and a honey
colour.

for

4-Nation Show
A cembined French/Italian/
American/British fashion show
was. held. in London, when top
designers’ from the four coun-
tries showed all - wool fashions
for the autumn.

I noted :-—

@ The similarity between the
Italian and French clothes —
except in cost. In an effort
to capture the fashion market
the Italians are keeping their
prices down,
The absence
the 44
ers.
The gossamer
fabrics, which
finest chiffon,
The English models, who
managed to look exotic in the
Italian c'othes, chic in the
French clothes, cute in the
American clothes, and com-
fortable, but well turned-out,
in the English clothes,
Thet the dress which got the
most applause and was talked
about most of all was—Eng-

of M. Dior from
world-famous design-

- like -wool
leok like the

he SENOS SSSR



" Jonnny—please pay more |
atiention—-for the purposes
of this lesson. the chief
exports of Imdiia are not
Umrigar, Hazare, @hadkar
and Ghulam Akined



London Expres+ Service.

After Four Months
RS. ELIZABETH MAC
FARLANE of Rochester, New
York, left for Antigua and Puerto
Rico on Monday by B.W.1.A. on
her way back home after spending
four months staying at the Sr.
Lawrence Hotiel,

Spent Ten Days
FTER spending ten days’ holi-
day staying at the St. Law-
rence Hotel, Mr. and Mrs. John
Parker of Georgetown, British
Guiana have now gone to Trini-
dad. Mr. Parker left over the
week-end by his company’s boat
the Athelbrook while his wife left

en Monday by B.W.LA.

Seventh Visit
PAYING her seventh visit to
Barbados is Miss Mabel

Taylor of the U.S.A. She arrived
on Monday by B,W.I.A. via
Puerto Rico and will be remain-
ing for two months staying at
Cacrabank Hotel.

Miss Taylor was last here dur-
ing the summer of 1948 when she
spent five months.

Off to U.K.

V. E. A. PITT, B.D: and Mrs.

Pitt, left Barbados on Sun-
day by the De Grasse for the
United Kingdom on _ furlough.
Rev. Pitt who is Superintendent
of the Georgetown Circuit of the
Methodist Church was at one tifne
Superintendent of the Ebenezer,
Circuit, St- Philip.

While here, Rey. and Mrsf Pitt
were guests of Miss Bullen of}
“Emerald Ville’, Cheapside.

Bank Director
R. C. C, GEORGE, Local
Director of Barclays Bank
(D.C. and .O.) and Mrs. George
of “Uplands”, Maxwell Hill were
passengers by the Colombie for
Trinidad yesterday afternoon.
Mr. George has gone over to
meet Mr. J. F. Cade, General
Manager of Barclays Bank and
Mr. Charles Gingell, Director
of the Bank in New York.
They will spend six days together
after which Mr, Cade and Mr.
Gingell will leave for Jamaica
and the Bahamas while he will
spend a week with his grand-,
children at Leaseholds, Point-a-
Pierre before returning ‘here,

By SUSAN DEACON

lish, It was newcomer John

Cavanagh’s elegant, narrow

fitting grey flannel evening

dress,
Why the Label ?

WHY must women's
always be labelled?

Worst culprits are the
whose favourite labels for
and dresses are:—

“For the
woman,”

“For the older woman,”

“For the under-30’s (or over

30's).

“For the fashion - conscious
woman,”

And hats :-—

“For the woman who wants
to look her best.”

“For a special occasion,” and

“For the not-so-young.”

HOW WRONG is the view
that women must always be
something, either sophisticated
or net-so-young or fashion con-
scious,

HOW WRONG is the view
that women only buy a hat or
dress for one occasion, either
mornings or for a specia] date.

AND HOW WRONG, too, is the
view that all the older women, nr
all the under 30's, or all sophisti-
cated women, can a!l wear the
same styles,

clothes

shops
coats

sophisticated

‘Exciting,’ This

THE B.B.C. men
are in great demand in a more
glamorous role of comparing
women's fashion shows,

At two shows last week the
clipped voices of Frank Phillips
and MeDonald Hobley did not
falter over the unaccustomed
fashion phrases, and the models
out-posed each other for a smile
from the compere,

I liked Frank Phillips's des-
cription of an “exciting coat lin-
ing” and a “fascinating colour.”

announcers

~ posing them,

rueeiianred

naa. A. CAMPBELL, form-
i erly Distribution Superin-
tendent

of the Power Co. in
Bermuda, is now on his way to,
British Guiana to take up a simi-}
lar post. He arrived here yes-
terday morning by the Colombie
from England where he had been
on six months’ leave and left
later in the afternoon by the same
opportunity for Trinidad. He was
accompanied by his wife.

Mr. Campbell told Carib that
Barbados had a good shopping
centre as compared with the other
islands he had visited, The streets
were clean, the people were well
clothed and he noticed no begging
on the streets.

He was particularly impressed
by the policemen directing traffic.
They were extremely smart and
efficient.

Photographer on The

“Colombie”

R. ROGER CHAUVET of

Paris who has been working
en the s.s, Colombie for the pas*
‘twenty months as photographer
told Carib yesterday that he liked
his job very much. It allows him
to see several places of interest
on the trip and he takes a number
of photegraphs of the various
colonies which he keeps as
souvenirs.

Prior to joining the ship. he
was employed with Harcourt
which is supposed to be the
largest photo studio in Paris. It
carries a staff of eighty photogra-
phers.

Visiting Her Sons
RS. W. S. ARCHER from
Deminica was intransit by
ihe Cclombie yesterday for Trini-
cad where she will spend about
four months holiday with her sons.












She was accompanied by her
grand-daughter Miss Hetty
Knowlton,

Mrs. Archer is the mother of
Mr. W. S. Archer, Acting Fin-
ancial Secretary of Trinidad, Mr.
Hunter Archer, the Tranquillity
tennis player who is head of the
Port-of-Spain Branch of Trinidad
Leaseholdas Ltd. and Mr. J. S.
Archer who id also with T.L.L.

A Trinidadian by birth, she has | 3

been living in Dominica for the
past 31 years. Her first visit back
to her native land since she left
it was last year when she visited
her children,

Intransit

ISS CHRISTINE CROSSE,

Headmistress of Gingerland
Girls’ School, Nevis, was an in-
transit passenger on the s.s. Fort
Townshend which left here on
Monday on its way back to the
US.A-

Miss Crosse who spent nine
months’ holiday in the United
States, stopped off here on her
first visit to the island to see her
relatives, She is a sister of Rev.
S. W. C. Crosse of Ebenezer
Manse, St- Philip.

Returns From U.K. Visit
ETURNING from England

yesterday morning by the
Colombie after an enjoyable three
months’ holiday were Mr. Ashley

Phillips of the Royal Bank of
Canada and Mrs. Phillips of
“Kineton”, Rockley Terrace.



Light on Age

BEAUTY experts in America,
having discovered that light
seems to melt away skin hollows
and wrinkles rather than ex-
are recommending
a new light, creamy make-up for
women with ageing skins, After
all these years, they say dark, or
peach tinted, foundation and
powder are more ageing than
lighter cosmetics.

There is also news of two-
colour eyebrows which start by
being either dark brown or black,
and taper off to a much lighter
brown,

Silk/nylon

SEVERAL attempts have been
made to find the perfect stocking,
which will please the nylon-
haters and the silk-haters, by
making silk/nylon stockings.

I find that they are more com-
fortable to wear than 100 per
cent. nylon, as there is more
elasticity. They are warmer than
all-nylon,

But after wearing a pair of
these new stockings for one
ordinary working day I had three
ladders in one stocking, two ir
the other, and holes in both
stockings’ feet.

Smart ‘Debs’

THE first Presentation
showed that the debs this
are more fashion-conscious.
@ Instead of the frilly, over-
trimmed, maze-patterned dresses
I saw many simple wide-skirtecd
dresses, which looled fashion-
able, in plain, sheer materials.
@ Instead of beflowered and rib-
boned hats they wore mostly th:
new demi-hats or untrimmed
picture hats.

@ Instead of those unattractive
white shoes, many more debs
wore pastel coloured strip san-
dals, much smarter.

Party
year

—LE.S.



THE NEW LOW PRICES

FINE QUALITY

BLACK & WHITE PRINTS 36”

WHITE CAMBRIC 36” .

1,23
1.00

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4606

+

eo









vr

(Your Personal Horascopeé
A change of

interests to
AQUARIUS

Jan. 21—Feb. 19 watchful. Ae those born January
22nd, mate

Money. 1 a * across the sea is

PISCES due soon, ing time for those trying

Feb. 20—March 20

A well-calculated business move could
profit you now, You must not hurt others
personal gain.
favoured from the romantic point of view.
Speak softly and.you will be better appre-

ARIES

March 21—April 20 [°°

ciated,

Mo
TAURUS wi?

April 21—May

ARBADOS ADVOCATE

tuniti€s to be

to settle in to do a new job. Persevere and
all will turn out well.

plications rear their heads but
ness and watchfulness you will
-eessful.

e suc
Sis a
words and how your friends.

Venus Ia Peconastey denotes a time

this
born under the ig the Twins,

|

‘Period July 3--6)

pation shall bring new
g00n. There are oppor-
ned if you are careful and

Youngest son well

A close relation has
all is well. Watch your

ers and newly-weds, Joy
period for all
Good

eee

You are a littlé too sensitive and aware of

tentialities if,you would exploit them.
Lucky for those born on 22nd June or July.

Some present coming to you soon. Great

GEMINI favourable
May 23—June 21 4nd ha
news Saturday.”
CANCER what other
June 22—July 23 reliant on yourself,
LEO
July 24—Aug. 22
yellow on
ing.
dvant S
+ ee 6 advantages
Aug. 23—Sept. 23 wij] hear of
born Augu
* LIBRA
Sept. 24—Oct. 23
trying.
can afford
SCORPIO and Uranu
Oct, 24—Nov. 22 person,
* A fortun
Moon’s
SAGITTARIUS strong just now.

Nov. 23—Dec. 20
just now.

+

CAPRICORN
Dec, 21—Jan. 20

for you.

+

4. Oe

shall not be a money gain for you.

A rather unfortunate period for you—if
you are the gldest born, Issue at stake may
not be large but you will require patience
and calmness to surmount them. Keen on

Rash aiatutatin’ is risky so watch what
you have and consider carefully what you

influence on domestic life is very

a source of joy.

A highly successful and productive period
You are due to receive a very
pleasant surprise too.

Lucky for you if born Dec, 29th or Jan.
3rd and 5th.

(Your next Horoscope will appear on Monday.)

folks say and think. Be more
You have great po-

*

A lucky break on Sunday if you know how
to handle if. Trust a true friend and do
not put your confidence in many. Avoid

-”

Friday—especially in the even-

* *

shall be offered though there
You
a wedding. Lucky for you if
st 21—22, Sept. 20 and 21,

to spend, Positions of Saturn
s favour the executive type of



ate period for the housewife as

News of a birth will be
Blue very lucky to wear

x eM KX KH KH KH KH HK

ei ae



— The Mcon Seemed
By MAX TRELL

“SOMETHING,” cried Teddy the
Stuffed Bear in alarm;
awful has happened to the moon!”

Knarf and Hanid, the shadows,
sprang up from their corner and
ran to the window. So did General
Tin, Mr. Punch, Judy, Mary-Jane
the rag-doll, and Gloria, the China
doll with the golden curls. The Ca
nary looked out through the bars
of his cage. Mrs, Cuckoo came rush-
ing out from inside the clock. And
a moment later Pooh-Pooh the
poodle, and Blackie the kitten, came
dashing down the hall.

“What’s the matter?” they both
asked,

“Something perfectly awful has
happened to the moon!” said Teddy.
Out of Window

By this time everyone was peer-
ing out of the window and up at the
sky where the moon was.

“Most of it has disappeared!”
Teddy said in a frightened voice.
“Only two sharp points are left!
Where's the rest of it!”

At this Hanid and Mr. Punch and

Judy and General Tin all said that !

there was nothing much wrong with
the moon at all,

“It’s a new
Punch.

If anything, this alarmed Teddy
more than ever.

“A new moon! But what hap-
pened to the old one?”

Hanid tried to explain. “The new
moon, Teddy, isn’t really a new one.
It’s still the same old one. It’s only
called a new moon because, instead
of being’ round, it has those two
sharp points.”

Knarf and Mary-Jane and Gloria

moon,” said Mr.

and Pooh-Pooh and Blackie all said |

they agreed’with Teddy. “If it’s the
same old moon, why isn’t it round
the way it always is? What hap-
pened to it?” asked Knarf,

Then Mr. Punch said: “It is round
the way it always is. But this is
why it’s so thin and small and has
those two sharp points, my dears.
There’s a shadow across the part
of the moon that you don’t see. It's
like a dark'Â¥66m with the door ope:
just on the crack and a little light
shining through. Only a little part
of the room can be seen, But the









“something |

Teddy Was Really Alarmed

to Be Dheppastok



Everyone was more satisfied with
this explanation than with any of
the others.

“IT only hope,” said Teddy, “that
it will get big and round again.”

“Oh, it will!” said Hanid.
sure of it.”

Mr. Punch was sure of it, too.

“Tm

A New Moon
“Every month,” Mr. Punch went
on, “there’s a new moon. Night
after night it gets bigger and big-
ger until there it is—a full round
moon again, Then,” he said, “the
moon starts getting smaller and
smaller again until finally — just
like a room with all the lights out
and not even a crack of light shin-
through the door—it seems to
disappear altogether, For several
| nights no one can see it at all. And
then—"

“And then?” cried Knarf and
Mary-Jane and Gloria and Pooh-
Pooh and Blackie.

“and then it starts coming back
again, just as we see it tonight, a
little sliver of a moon, just like a
bow without an arrow. And that’s ,
thé new moon.”

“But it’s still the old moon,” said
Hanid. “I mean, it’s just called the
new moon,”

Mr. Punch nodded. “New moon-or

'“Look at the moon,” Teddy said to
the ‘toys.

rest of the room is there just the

same.”

old moon—it’s still the same beau-
| tiful moon that we always have and
l always will.”

DORIS DANNY

DAY THOMAS
All the Pleasures of the SCREEN
Songs, Comedy, Dancing, Drama
—Whey're all here and Wondrous-
ly in WARNER BROS’ Ever-So-

y Gay Story

PLE SEE
You IN MY
DREAMS

And Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30
p.m.

PLAZA 2"
FRIDAY 2.30; 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
|





OPENING TOMORROW AT

2,30 & 8.30
AT

EMPIRE



ED BY WARNER BROS.
ELEWOA FARRELL = HELL") VINSON ~ PRESTON FOSTER
sno» ROBERT &. ‘BURNS © roe MERVYN LE ROY |

}

*



%| Opening To-morrow |

(FRIDAY) 4.45 & 8.30P.M.
AND CONTINUING DAILY

ARNER BROS:

RO

STARRING.

ERROL

LYNN

PATRIC

PLAZA

BARBAREES (DIAL 5170) IK





:

WIMORE





Listening Hours

THURSDAY, JULY 3,

4.00 — 7.15 19.76 M
4.00 p.m News, 410 p.m. The
Deily Service, 4.15 p.m: The Portrait

4435 p.m. Sporting Record,
Lawn Tennis, 5.15 p.m. Lis-
| teners’ Choice, 6.00 p.m. Welsh Diary
‘615 pw Just Fancy, 6.45 p.m. Sports
Round-u os and Programme Parade, 7.00
p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m. Home News

D An.

from Brit s1.99M

76 — 030...

see Britain, a0
Champtonship Bands, 815 p.m o
Newsreel, 6.30 p.m. Special Despatgh,
8.45 p.m. Interlude, 6.55 p.m From the
Editorials, 9.00 p.m. B.B.C. Scottish
Orchestra, 9.45 p.m. Lawn Tennis, 10.00
p.m, The News, 10.10 p.m. News Talk,
Personal Reminiscences of 120

Teds
6.53 M



a Lac

5.00 pam



“7.15 p.m. We



0.1

oe PD 30 p.m, Portrait of a Lady.

- . :
Talking Point

There is in every woman’s heart

a spark of heavenly fire which
beams and blazes
hours of adversity.
—Washington Irving.

in the dark

THURSDAY, JULY 3,

1952

The Oldest Car in Denmark
For British Rally

Mr. Ronald Lawson, of Bristol,
chairman of the south-western
section of the Veteran Car Club of
Great Britain. is off to Denmark

soon.

He hopes to arrange for the
oldest car in Denmark to be
brought to Bristol for a Corona~
tion year veteran car a

Y
James

*Po- DAY (Only) $30 P.M.
“MISSISSIPPI GAMBLER”
Kent TAYLOR &
“BLONDE ALIBI"
Martha 0 DRISCOLL

FRI. & SAT. 8.30 P.M.
“FRIGHTENED CITY" &
“GIRL OF THE YEAR”

Midnite Sat .
“BARBARY PIRATE’
Donald WOODS & J

“RETURN of the DURANGO KID
Charles STARRETT




JANETTA DRESS SHOP

(Next Door to Singer *s)

SPECIAL ‘
FOR ONE WEEK ONLY.
10% Discount on all Nylon Underwear.








GLOBE

TO-DAY, 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. LAST SHOWS

| FIGHTING

BIRD OF PARADISE

BILLY ECKSTINE —

MAN OF THE PLAINS
He i AND oe
(Louis JOURDAN, Debra Paget)



(Randolph Scott)



OPENING TO-MORROW, 5 & 8.30 P.M.

ESTER WILLIAMS in

SKIRTS AHOY



Whip WHELSON &
“WESTERN RENEGADES'





Jimmy WAKELEY &
“COLORADO AMBUSH” |
Johnny Mack BROWN





EMPIRE

TO-DAY (Last 2 Shows) 4.45 & 8.30
Paramount Presents
Bob HOPE — Hedy LAMARR
in
MY FAVORITE SPY

Extra:—FAIRWAY CHAMPIONS

Ever Golf Player should see this
ance and Latest British Paramount
ews



OLYMPIC
TO-DAY (Last 2 Shows) 4.30 & 8.15
Robert PRESTON
John BARRYMORE, jr.
in



THE SUNDOWNERS
and
SWORD OF THE AVENGER

:

Opening FRIDAY 4th 4.30 &
Dane CLARK -
in
PORT DEFIANCE
and
THE TORCH
Starring

Paulette GODDARD
Pedro ARMENDARIZ

8.15
Ben JOHNSON



lien
——S, iti

PALK'S KEROSENE COOKER :—

THREE-BURNER COOKER
and TWO-BURNER OVEN

“THE FAMILY FALKS — FOR HAPPY HOMES”



BRIDGETOWN BARBAREES or
(Dial 2310) (Dial 5170) (Dial 8404)
Last 2 Shows TO-DAY TO-DAY (Only) TODAY (Only)
4.30 & 8.30 p.m 4.30 & 8.30 P.M. 445 & 8.20 PM.

Warner’s New Picture Fred Ginger “RED DESERT”
“PRETTY BABY" ASTAIRE — ROGERS Don BARRY &
Dennis MORGAN & “TOP HAT” & “FRONTIER :

Betsy DRAKE]! “BLOOD on REVENGE
also the MOON” Lash La Rue &
Special Added Attraction Robert MITCHUM _ Fuzzy St. JOHN _
Errol FLYNN in TODAY'S Special 1.30 FRI. to SUN.
“DODGE CITY” 445 & 8.30 p.m,
TODAY Special 14 p-m || JOHNNY ALLEGRO DODGE CITY
“CHEROKEE UPRISING’ George RAFT

DESPERADOES

Johnny MACK BROWN Randolph SCOTT __ ]| Olivia LAN D
“Fri. 4.45 & 830 p.m. 4 ah
Opening FRIDAY “ROCKY MOUNTAIN’ neo nae 1.30 p.m
2.30 — 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.}l Giannis is “Cc
“PLL SRE YOU IN Se ue, en ceely, BAX: UPRISING” &
: MY DREAMS” || rHUNDER- “WESTERN ADES”
SAT. (Special) 90 & 1.30 MOUNTAIN |} ___ RENEG:
“RANGERS RIDE” Tim HOLT & “Midnite Sat.

“LEGION of
the LAWLESS"
George O'BRIEN
SS SaaS

Le Se a : Ky —S PES SSS =—— =





STOKES & BYNOE LTD. — AGENTS

Errol FLYNN
Ann SHERIDAN



“WELLS FARGO
GUNMASTER" &
“GOLDEN STALLION”





THEATRES
ROXY

TO-DAY (Last 2? Shows)
4.30 & 815





Margaret LANDSAY
Ralph BELLAMY

in
MEET THE WILD CAT
and
MELODY LANE
Starring
Leon ERROL — The Merry MAC
FRIDAY (Only) 4.30 & 8.15
Teresa WRIGHT — Lew AYRES
in
THE CAPTURE
and
STATION WEST



ROYAL

TO-DAY (Last 2 Shows) 4.30 & 8.30
HUNT THE MAN DOWN .

Starring
Gig YOUNG — Cleo MOORE

and
DANGEROUS PROFESSION

Starring
George RAFT — Ella RAINES








THURSDAY, JULY 3, 1952

German | Korea War Is Two Years Old = There's io Decision
Engineers eae iy Te Kane
Jump Ahead =i < ie

By SIDNEY RODIN

LONDON, June 23.
German ingenuity is behind the

BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE







‘ |

B.G. To Tax |

Commission
Agents

GEORGETOWN, June 28
The Georgetown CRamber

So Far

P- aae




To, keep
little busy bodies”
| fit and active...

Es

|
ot}

’ big attempt now being made in

Britain to motorize the pedal cy-
clist and give him power-assisted
travel for a farthing a mile.

Already nearly 250,000 cyclists
have joined in this latest craze in
popular transport ahd, by fitting
tiny motors to their bicycles, are
now calling themselves cycle-mo-
torists.

| Registration Fee of $60.00 on Com-

|} Leence of $60.00

Commerce has approved of a Draft
Bill which Government will shortly |
introduce in the Legislative Coun-!
cil and which seeks to impose a|

mission

Agents annual
The Chamber
has however informed Govern-

ment that if the amount proposed

and an

give them HALIBORANGE
every day

THERE’s YOTHING LIKE IT for building
up reserves of vital energy, promoting
healthy growth, strong bones and teeth
—and resistance to illness.









for registration was reduced, it ,

Eleven firms have produced ya- | weuld be acceptable to the Cham- Made from purest halibut oil, cleverly blended
rious forms of chug-chug motor. ber. with the juice of ripe oranges, it is rich in
a eee ie selling _— is ar % " i . . ; The Commission Agents’ Bil! Vitamins A ahd D and so delicious in taste that
Union Combaes Go which Hitler Driven hack ae Bits m + ignated a years Ago, 4 = the mist finicky youngster takes
lavished millions to make it the for UN f rn Gee eongeee Shed ae ge eg ~~ ee Gen. Douglas MacArthur went ashore that py oe iy ‘la oan eae it with delight

a oe 7 or forces Inchon landing, Sept. ‘ inspect prisoners. land Seoul at a tax s placed on vis- -,
greatest motor firm in Europe. | " , : > ee e UN drove in to . iting travelling agents only, but Incidentally, it’s fine for grown-

The British company which | , eS de a we cietieeiiatitiee . that suggestion was rejected ,by !

bought it have sold 60,000 in less! ; : ups too

Government w state i “y
than two years. They expect to overnment who stated that they





7 ‘ gern would net be prepared to impose a

ag hgh okay any restrictions on visiting trav- ni e

brains as well as British have | oe — ie ; ;

made other forms of miniature be ‘ane bi ‘ te VAebpere 9 of

motors. : a le gar Alanya ata gald THE NICEST WAY OF TAKING HALIBUT OIL
Prices range from £33 to £21— {tion reminded the Chamber of a}

no purchase tax. Pass a simple letter receivea from the U.S. Vice

driving test for 5s., and you can Consul, in which attention was

become a licensed cycle-motorist | drawn to the serious malpractice |

for 17s 6d a year, with insurance , Which was taking place on_ the |

as low as 12s. | Pauct of certain o-called Com- |
Hundreds of elderly people who | mission Agents Apart from that

gave up cycling because of fatigue
are awheel again—chugging along
with a cycle-motor.

The one serious competitor to
the cycle-motor is the motor scoot-
er, Here again foreigners are in
the lead. ,

Modern scootering started with
the civilian version of the British
paratrooper’s folding motor-cycle
—the Corgi. 1

Today, however, Enrico Piaggio,
a 47-year-old Genoese engineer
who made airplane engines for
Mussolini during the war, has sent
500,000 of his silver green scooters
to all parts of the world—3,000 of
them to Britain,

The Lambretta, the second
Italian challenger to the Corgi,
claims all the _ refinements and
glamour of the Vespa. P

But Britain is re-entering the
scooter market with a new Corg!
due out next year—if the Govern-
ment allows the steel. "

It will cost about £75, will be
as fast as its rivals—and, like bn
paratrooper’s machine, will still

fold up. _—LES.



European Trade

Shows Recovery

RICIA CLARKE
one TORONTO.

Canadian businessmen Some TY
studied eye-opening evidence of
European recovery at this years

i ioné @ ir hich
international trade fair Ww
showed they will have to meet
vigoroys competition. :
Onnicials said the fair, which

2 June 13, gave Canadian,
orith and American exhibitors:
“a look at the handwriting on the

Wea Bs
“Continental European exhibit-
ers increased therm showings as
much as 25 times over last year
and got a disproportionate share
of the interest and the business.

All exhibitors, however, said
they did well and sales from the
fair were expected to total even-
tually into tens of millions.

“It's a good age reg a ie
i stry to see what it is
odainstâ„¢ one Canadian exhibitor
said. “And some of the stuff has

an eye-opener.”
cone” aaa: other continen gk
exhibitors have an advantage In
being able to promise faster de-
liveries than can British or Cana-
dian plants which are short on
materials because of defense re-
quirements,

“It’s hard to blame buyers for
patronising foreign exhibitors
when they have the stuff, can
deliver it far ahead of our own
plants and are willing to stand
behind iit,” an exhibitor said

German exhibitors said they
were delighted with the way their
products were received. Their
machinery and instrument exhib-
its were particularly successful.
They reported finding prices and
quality competitive and their de-
livery dates were well ahead.

German vere very
popular ond COPA Yopewriters
did well in the office equipment
field. Germany was the only
nation with @ special display of
leather products.

Germany also appeared to be
recapturing» pre-war suprem-
acy in toys. It fascinated Cana-
dians with a seven-way bicycle,
trains that run under water (ideal
for playing in the bathtub), jet
planes, toy pianos, and tiny autos
that can be driven accurately and
electrically,

Dr. W. Muscheadt, president, of
the German export committee.
praised the fair as a “S€ridUs
market” in .~which Germans
achieved results whieh could not
have been hoped for in weéks of
travel.

“As one who appreciates organ-
ization, I must compliment the
conduct of the fair,” he said.

At least 10 new industries wil)
ldcate in Canada this year as 2
result of the fair and many firms
including some from Germany

oe = ts ar oe

JUNE 25 MARKS TWO YEARS since tank-led North Korean forces) warfare has cost billions of @ollars and huridreds of thousands of
4 Plunged across the 38th Parallel to invade South Korea. The see-saw | castialties on both sides, but the tssues seem as unsettled as ever,

A few of the tens of thousands of war-weary So
from their homes rest near demolished Seoul building. The South Pyongyang. Soon the Chinese entered the war, won back

ote ceo



C?wealth Students Take
Part In ‘Hampstead Week’

SIXTY-FOUR STUDENTS

LONDON, June.
from Commonwealth

countries, all resident in Hampstead, will learn about the
workings of the borough and meet local residénts in a

“Hampstead Week”

organised for them by the British

Council from June 28 to July 5.
The students come from East Africa, West Africa,

Hongkong, Malaya,

and India.

_ The week opens with a recep-
tion by the Mayor of Hampstead
at»the Town Hall, at which the
students will meet members of the
Hampstead societies, churches and
other organisations helping in the
arrangements. On Sunday, most
of the students will attend morn-
ing service and then be enter-
tained in the homes of church
members,

During the week, there will be
visits to the borough services, in-
cluding _ schools, housing and
health departments. Other Ar-
rangements include tea at the
Geod Companions Pensioners’
Club, a talk on the history of
Hampstead and a tour of Old
Hampstead, a debate arranged by
the Hampstead Parliament, There
will also be a tennis party ar-

ranged by the East and West
Friendship Council, a puppet
show, and a social evening ar-
ranged by the International

Friendship League and the East
and West Friendship Council. A
number of Hampstead residents
have invited the students to their
homes during the week,

The ten women students in the
group will attend a summer party
arranged by Hampstead Towns-
women's Guild. They will also
visit Seviers Pottery and the
Keats Museum.

On the evening of July 4, the
stydents will join with Hamp-
stead residents at Hampstead
Town Hall to discuss subjects re-
lating to Commonwealth students.
They will question Mr. Henry
Brooke, M.P. for Hampstead.
The evening will end with a de-
monstration by West African stu-
dents of their native music.

Spy



Pleads
Not Guilty

From Page 1.

“Marshall who made about £8
as wireless operator was arrested
in the park last month as he was
talking to Kuznetsov,

Arthur Mildon an attorney who
was instructed by the court to
eppear for Marshall, said he had
hopsd fer the possibility of de-
laying the trial until next court
sessions in September .but Gov-
ernment had pressed for it to
begin immediately, Mildon said
he was prepared to begin the
defence on Wednesday. as

branche’. Cabinet _ Peter
Ruppel of Frankfur to
start a small ass t in

‘Toronto.
“If businéss warrants it, I may
brimg out my family,” he said.



Goes planning Canadian —B.U.P,






Mauritius, the West Indies, Ceylon

South African
Held In BG,

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, dupe ous

Twenty - five - year o
Bebhi Araghi, native of South
Africa, is being detained by thd
Immigration Authorities here un-
til arrangements for his repatria-
tion can be arranged. Araghi was
‘dumped’ across the Venezuela
border some weeks ago by the
Venezuelans, His story is that hig
ship left him behind in Venezuela
three years ago, and he was held
in prison by the Venezuelang for
three years until he learnt enough
Spanish to explain his presence in
the Republic.

In British Guiana the Immi-
gration Authorities deemed him
an illegal immigrant, as he had
no passport and no money.
Brought before the Georgetown
Magistrate the Police were grant-
ed permission to detain him until
arrangements can be made for his
repatriation.

When the League of Coloured
Peoples heard of Araghi’s case,
Hon. John Carter went to his
assistance, The Immigration De-
partment has now written the
South African Government to find
out if they are prepared to re-
patriate him. If Malan’s ~
ment says ‘NO’ it seems at
British Guiana will have no choice
but to keep him in Police custody
or allow him his freedom on the
bond of some respectable citizen,
so that Araghi can find work and
so maintain himself in the Colony.

In the meantime Araghi is
allowed to go in and out of Police
Headquarters. He is provided
with regular meals and sleeping
accommodation, Araghi himself is
quite puzzled about his position.
He says he likes British Guiana,
but would like to go back to his
own country. “If I am repatri-
ated I will go. If I am to stay in
your country, I will be equally
glad.”

John Carter told the Magistrate
“we are doing everything we can
for him, a don’t want
back in South Africa, he can stay
here. and we will find work for

All now depends on the reply
from the South Afnican Govern-
ment, and it is expected that it
will some time before this will
reach itish Guiana, But mean-
while, Araghi is enjoying his ‘de-
tention’ here. He has made many
friends and he jis getting to like
B.G, more and more every day,
for here there is no race discrim-
ination and nobody likes Malan—
neither white nor coloured folks
...And,.. “everybody here is
so nice. I like here.”


























Slee Pel OE Bagh tee weg Parte

SA-48% P90

h Koreans uprooted In October, 1950,




me



oe

North Korean civilians welcomed UN



= Mea |
n ‘



troops imto

North Ko-
‘rean capital has changed hands four times, suffered with each. rean capital. Building carries pictures of Josef Stalin, Kim Il Sung.



Six Score
Hundreds

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, July 2.

Batsmen held the mastery téday
im most parts of the country. No
fewer than six individual centur-
les were recorded, Leading the
wun getters was Bernard Constable
of Surrey whose 205 hot out
against Somerset at the Oval war
ighest of his career. Surrey

with nearly 400 runs on.the board Ti

and only five wickets down look
set for their tenth championship

victory,
Also in a strong ition are
Middlesex for whom. ompson

and Edrich both made turi
in a second wicket ace ere of
345. Middlesex declated whe
Thompson was out, and

four quick Worcester wickets
fore the close.

Hutton for Yorkshire recorded e

his sixth century of the season
and the 109th of his career. He
batted just ovér four hours and
Yorkshire after declaring put
themselves well on the victory
road by capturing six Kent wicker
ets, In their, t game
Durham the Indians haye run apt
trouble. On an ea ic et
the. home nid dred
declaring, of whic opening bats;
man Kao made 135. Tri the half
hour teft m the fndtans lost
two quick wickets and at close
still needed 187 to save the follow

on.
Scoreboard

Durham versus the Indians:
Durham 302 for six @@clared. In-
dians 15 for two.

Essex versus Northants: Essex
364. for six, Insole 130.

Glamorgan yersys Lanes Glam-
organ 295, Lanes. eight for two.

Hants versus Gloucester: Harits
185, Scott seven for 46. Gloucester
119 for four.

Surrey versus Somerset: Surrey
384 for five. :

Warwick versus Leicester:
Leicester 210. Grove five for 44.
Warwick 78 for four,

Notts versus Sussex: Sussex 331
for six,

Worcester versus Midstepes:
Middlesex 350 for two, declared,
Thompson 158, Edrich 175 not out.
ates - four, 1: teil

0 versus Ken : -
shire 283 for five declared, Hutton
189; Kent 108 for six.

Y.M.P.C. Béat
Lynch’s School



THE Second Division Basket

Ball match which was played yes-
terday afternoon between
Y.M.P.C. and LSS. at. Y.M.P.C,;
ended in a victory for YMP.C.
game was fast and ¢xci
throughout and at the end of
allotted time the score was fifteen
all, play resurned for another ive
minutes and at the end of
the score was seventeen all.
After two minutes rest play
imutes and during latter part
m
of that time G. Greenidge scored
the deciding two points, The chief
scorers were D. Badenock and A.
Jones ten and seven points Pate. pe
‘ively for Lytich and G, G ge
and E. Mandeville netted eight
each for the













eat rn





SEA AND AIR |
TRAFFIC

In Carlisle Bay

MV Willemstad, MV, Daerwoo
Sch, Franklyn D.R..’ Sch, Roselisse, eon
Urtle Dove, Sch. Island Star, Sch:
Tyee ae D’Ortac, Sch, United Pi).
h, Sch. ve Star, MV 1
S.S. Athelrook —





ARRIVALS
$5. Uruguay from Trinidad, & 5
Colombie 7,381 tons from Martinique
DEPARTURES
abevae le 2uy = dl,
Â¥ W.LA. ON TU
en ee 3 Pern he
, tell, C. tehinsot, T, De Abre
C,,. De Abrevy, RK, Jursoo, B, New, M
New, R. Holder, J. O'Callahan, ¢
O'Callahan, W. William, K, Forrest, A
TOW
om St. Lucia;

ernard Moore, Wendy Moore, Heath
er Moore, Lynne Moore, Donald Pail,
Kenneth Paul, Willoughby Sayers

Seawell

DBEARTURAG. BY BW.LA
SDAY
For Trinidad ;

V. Puarelall, c. Nascimento, M_. Holder
- Desouza, B. Griffith, F. Jordan, L
Jordan née Magallanes, M. Masalianes,
F. Hadid, F, Hutehinson, J, Steeher, Vv
Hpsmatali, :
For St, Lucia:
P. Skinner, C. Lawson, H Ascough, kh
lames, = C, iene Mts L. Lawrence, A
Bye

ra J. Kirton, r, E,. MeM
8 MeXtitian, N. Moffat, sm aa

bid eoeathinees

Speech By Alexander
Raises Storm In Commons
interrupted to say “I am speaking
with Shinwell on a perfectly fair
and square level and giving full
onswers. That he should suggest |
vary my remarks of what is
Straight and not straight is worthy
of his own mind.”

Shinwell said “is the Prime
Minister aware that he has ne-
cused Members on this side of
the House of lack of tact and
now when one of his own Minis-
ters is asked about dropping 1
brick he loses his temper?’

—UP.

for fivel}

SUPREME



Al HARD 6

en at TARATUN

| Agents
| €rmment became concerned at the

AINTS |

TIME



for Eniéerior

IN ALL SIZES &

GENERAL HA RD WARE



RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office)

the Qhamber had received repre-
Sentations from reputable trade
organisations, from Trade Commis-
sioners and from others, which in-
dicated a serious state of affairs
Which had arisen owing to the mal-
practice of go-called Commission





Based on those facts Gov-

deterioration of the good name of
the Colony. Mr. Stoby felt that any
small reputable Commission Agent
would welcome the protection

| which the Bill would give, as it

aimed at protecting large and
small agents, men of integrity,
The President of the Chamber,
Lieut.-Col, E, J. Haywood, M.B.B..
T.D., said they were all conscious
ef the fact that the Bill, like all
ills, was not fool-proof. It did,
however, serve a useful purpose
in that all Commission Agents, in-
cluding visiting agents, would
centribute some small sum

. +» But Daddy
Did Not Know

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, June 28

Because he is illiterate Chand-
warka Persaud of 5 Railway Line,
Kitty Village, did not know that
he could not be the lawful father
of the child of the woman he had
nvarried according to Muslim rites,
and that was how he happened
to appear before the City Magis+
trate, charged with wilfully giving
false information to the Registrar
of Births.

Persaud’s Counsel told the Court
he was really confused as to how
to advise his client to plea, and
on request the Magistrate agreed
to hear the facts of the case first.



It all happened this way, Maz-
moon Neshaw had given birth to

a baby girl on January 7, By
marrying according ‘to Muslim
rites, he is not legally her hus-
band. Persaud did not know this

and in giving information to the
Registrar of Births stated he was
the father of the child and hus-
band of the mother.

When he returned home he told
his ‘wife’ what he had done, and
she being literate pointed out the
mistake to him, and he immediate-
ly returned to the Registrar, ex-
plained the error, and the certifi-
cate had to be cancelled and «a
new one issued.

The Magistrate appreciated the
position of Persaud and his Coun-
sel_ who could not say that he
wilfully misled the Registrar.
However a plea of guilty was en-
tered and Persaud was reprimand-
ed and discharged.



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BARBADOS CO-oP. |


PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS wif ADVOCATE |

Sean ape SOR S875 10S Bee
Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad 8t., Bridgetown

Thursday, July 3, 1952

anche - CHALLENGE
4 48484, BE.

PROFESSOR Beasley’s Fiscal Survey of
Barbados which was laid in the House of
Assembly on Tuesday is a sober document,
full of challenge for those on witom has
fallen the heavy responsibility of keeping
Barbadian economy on an even keel.
“Allowing for maintenance on present lines
but for no improvement of existing central
or local government services and omitting
for the present any provision for the
Harbour Scheme or for the costs of estab-
lishing a British West Indies Federation,
Government requires to find every year
an increase of revenue over that of the
previous year, and these increases will by
1958/59 have amounted to about $2.4
million or 23 per cent. on top of the
original estimated net revenue of $10.3
million for 1951-52.”

This sentence forms the heart of the
survey.

And Professor Beasley proposes six main
methods of obtaining increased revenue to
meet this gap. After the introduction of
a new’'tariff and increased duties on liquor,
cotton piece goods and perfumery, a net
increase of $400,000 is suggested from cus-
toms receipts. Closer assessment of in-
come tax, introduction of new taxpayers
and natural growth would, thinks Pro-
fessor Beasley, produce $250,000. Increases
in excise duties and death duties would
preduce $300,000 divided equally. Revision
of stamp duties, licenses, postal rates,
water rates and departmental fees and in-
crease of interest on invested funds would
provide $280,000 while $70,000 might be
expected from a proposed entertainment
tax. “These proposals”, writes Professor
Beasley “represent what appears to be the
limit of extra annual revenue that can
properly be obtained by higher taxation
and improved administration over the
coming seven years.”



He draws three inferences.

First it will be out of the question to
maintain commodity subsidies for much
longer on anything approaching thei:
present scale “and that the sooner they
can be replaced by measures less costly to
Government the better.”

Secondly, he suggests that Government
cannot in present circumstances properly
undertake any new recurrent commit-
ments which are not calculated either to

create fresh revenue or to make for more
economical functioning of the Govern-
ment machine.

Thirdly, he suggests that another review
of the prospects ought to be carried out
after perhaps three years to ascertain
whether the island’s economy is by then
exhibiting better or worse prospects and to
make provisions for the following years.

With regard to the deep-water harbour
project Professor Beasley suggests that at
this stage of its development Barbados

cannot afford to continue without a deep
water harbour. And he makes it clear
that the construction of a deep-water
harbour must be undertaken ‘as part of a
full economic programme which includes
enlargement of the airport (already under-
taken), irrigation to maintain high average
sugar output, deep water harbour, asso-
ciated reclamation of adjacent land for
warehousing and _ industrial purposes,
hotel construction and extension, expan-
sion of tourist industry by means of both
increased accommodation in hotels and
guest houses and of extended seasonal
facilities.

With this full economic programme he
brackets potential developments of an oil
industry and minor industries,

A programme of this order, he suggests
can only be financed from a combination of
agents including private enterprise in
hotels and oil and Government assets,
grants and loans.

In obtaining loans for a full economic
programme with its axis as the deep

water harbour, Government would find
that the monies at present absorbed un-
profitably in meeting subsidisation would
be sufficient to service a very large ex-
ternal loan.

Professor Beasley is openly critical of the
Government's large vote for subsidisation, “The
provision of one million dollars annually,” he
writes, “for this purpose works out at ten cents
a week per head of the population and it is idle
to pretend that in normal ‘circumstances this
contribution is really important, Moreover it
must be appreciated that if Barbados is to em-
bark on a large programme of development,
employment will be on a high level for years and
a large part of the total capital outlay will be
spent on labour in the island. The Government
would be acting inconsistently if it made
crippling provision for subsidies at the same time
as embarking upon schemes designed to add to
the national income.”

Throughout his report Professor Beasley takes
as his text Barbados’ unique economic position
in not being “under-developed” or “developed”,
and stresses its economic dependence and the
fact that population growth has outstripped
potential and actual agricultural expansign,

His survey is a realistic and. sober document
and its appreciation by the public of Barbados
is indispensable for understanding of the eco-
nomic road ahead, Its conclusions, proposals
and recommendations will call for much revision
of popular political platforms but capacity for
revision of ideas and a new approach to prob-
lems in the face of facts is a sign of healthful
maturity.

An alternative to Professor Beasley's sober
and wise counsel as outlined in A Fiscal Survey
of Barbados will not easily be found and dis-
regard of the fundamental facts on which his
proposals are made canhot promote the pros-
perity of this island, .

There may well be minor objections and dis-
agreements with certain parts of detail in the
survey; just as there are a number of misplaced
lines, incorrect placing of figures in some tables
and a reasonably large number of spelling errors
in the printed version, but broadly speaking
Professor Beasley has stated blunt homegrown
truths about Barbados’ economy in a polite and





persuasive manner. How the report is received
by the two legislative bodies of Barbados partic-
ularly by the elected House of Assembly may
decide the future « this island for all time
That is a thought which ought to humble poli-

ticians and bring home to people the need for

thinking clearly and without prejudice.












SYNGMAN RHEE
BITES U.N
IN KOREA

Â¥ NICE QUIET SUMMER WE'RE HAVING, MiISSUS

ier

The Lie
To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—The Leader of the House
of Assembly, Mr, Adams, is
reported as having said, in the
debate on the revision of cer-
tain salaries of Civil Servants,
that he had destroyed the rule
of privileged parties in Barba-
dos. This statement would
be laughable were it not for the
fact that it was .uttered by
one who occupies a position of
such grave trust and respon-
sibility, As it is, either Mr.
Adams did not give sufficient
thought to what he was
saying — a forgivable human
lapse — or, what is far worse,
he has succeeded in deluding
himself as to the stage we have
reached in our political life and
‘the nature of the struggle in
which the progressive forces in
Barbados, of which he is the
leader, are engaged.

It is sufficient to say that the
proposals on which he was speak-
ing at the time and the nature of
their birth gave the lie direct
to the claim which Mr. Adams
made. It was indeed tragically
ironic. I find it difficult to be-
lieve that Mr. Adams _ really
thinks that the defeat of an un-
enlightened group of conservative
leaders ipso facto spells the
death knell of privilege in Bar-
bados, But let me ask him a
few questions concerning the said
proposals,

Does the action of the leader
of the Conservative opposition,
who usually leaves the House
at dusk but remained at his side
until dawn, mean anything to
him? Does he imagine that Mr,
Cuke’s -ringing approbation in
the Council, coming so soon after
his Cassandra ~- like pronounce-
ments on the high percentage of
Government revenue being
spent on the salaries and wages
of “pressure groups”, would
have been made under differ-
ent proposals—one which did
justice to the whole Service? Is
it not a striking contrast that
Mr. Cuke could have so quickly
changed his tune after his in-
glorious references to “pressure
groups”? Does all this not fit in
remarkably well with the at-
tempts of His Excellency in his
public speeches to prove that
there was no case for improv-
ting the salaries of the lower
brackets, but there was a 100
per cent. water-tight one for
paying the increases sent down?
Xs it not clear that what started
as an attempt to stop the exodus
of certain officials—and I have
jseen nothing ¢ither in the Re-
port or the debates in the Legis-
lature to show that this applied
to other than some technical
and professional posts—soon de-
veloped into efforts to increase
the salaries of all top officials:
and, the Anglican Clergy?

Can we excuse the Govern-
ment for overlooking the onesid-
ed nature of this whole business
ef salary increases and the po-
litical implications? 1 say, No,
and it is in this respect that the
Labour members of the Execu-
tive Committee should have
taken a strong stand and unite
firmly with the rest of the party.

Let me say here that I hope
they have paid no attention to
those who try to flatter them
that they were courageous in
bringing down these “unpopular
proposals”. This resembles
closely the praise given the ass,
which was told that in spite of
the added weight on its back and
the advice given it, it had done
a brave and wise thing in walking
‘through the stream with a load
of salt on its back. All praise to
the politician who refuses to
bow to popular wishes merely
because they are popular, or does
not flinch from doing his duty
because it may be unpopular with
some minor section of the com-
munity, For example, even those
Civil Servants who were serious-
ly affected at the time and disa-
greed with _ him admired the
courage of Mr, Adams in refus-
ing to bow to demands for 30 or
40 per cent, c.o.l, ‘bonus, and
were content to face the hard
economic faets which he. then
put before them and the public.
The people as a whole are con-
tent to bear the burdens of the
cost of living when they are told
that the Island cannot afford to
subsidise this or that foodstuff
and its price must rise. But is
unpopularity or hostility more
deserved than when, after all
this, the said Civil Service and
public are ‘told that we can
afford a sum of $100,000 per
annum on a small section of the
administration, and where there
is no justification, after making
provision for a similar amount
which may be incurred in leave
passages? Whatcan be worse
than, in the face of all this, trying
to cover up such discrimination
and political ineptitude by say-
ing: “Don’t worry! We will con-

BARBADOS

Our Readers Say:

’
sider you others later,” or “Blame
us for delaying the disestablish-
ment and disendowment of the
Anglican Church, but there is no
moral justification for leaving
them out’, even though they
deny they are Civil Servants and
are free to oppose the Labour
Party, for which they and the
Church cost this Island over
$40,000 per year? On no political
grounds whatsoever should these
proposals have reached the Legis-
jature.

I know 1 shall be told that
comparisons are ludicrous, but
a glance at the Civil List of
Great Britain and the salaries
paid there will show that the
colonies, and now Barbados,
compare more than favourably
with that country. Officials there
corresponding in status and
salary with ours have been given
a mere 40 per cent. increase in
salaries between 1938 and 1951.
‘The officer there who received
£500 in 1938 would be now paid,
by the last figures I saw, £700
per annum and £1,000 in 1938
would now be £1,400, In_ the
U.K., a single man earning £500
would pay in income tax £74.
5s: If married, £48. 15s., and if
married with two children, £18.
5s. In the £1,000 bracket, the
corresponding I.T, payments
would be £254. 5s., £222. 15s.,
and £168. 15s. In the £2,000
bracket, the corresponding pay-
ments would be £614, 5s,, £582.
15s., and £528. 15s, These were
the figures for 1950—51. During
that time, outside the Service,
the minimum wage of an agri-
cultural worker had risen to £5
per week, and the people, after
the war, were receiving all the
benefits of a Welfare State, viz.,
family allowances, free medical
land health services, social in-
surance benefits, vastly subsidis-
ed food and full employment.

In Barbados,. those officers in
the £500 bracket in 1938 or 1939
are now paid £1,200 or £1,300,
The following will receive more
than corresponding officers in
British Guiana; Harbour and
Shipping Master, Director of Ed-
ucation and Deputy Director,
Principal of Evening Institute
and Vice Principal, Chief Inspec-
tor of Schools, most top Agri-
cultural posts, Director of Med-
ical Services and most medical
posts, Director of Highways and
Transport, Police Magistrates
(they start higher than Magis-
trates in B.G. and Trinidad).
The Anglican Church is the only
State paid body of its kind in
the world—another unique fea-
ture of Barbadian life. All this
is happening in a place where the
effects of inflation and the bur-
den of cost of living are making
life well-nigh unbearable to the
average middle classes, clerks in
the Long Grade, and the labour-=
ing man and woman: where the
Labour Party has promised ta
reduce the burden from customs
duties on the mass of imported
articles classed as necessities:
where the minimum wage is
about $2.00 per day: where there
is much unemployment and a
lack of those social benefits
which mark the Welfare State.
Is it any wonder that this matter
was anathema to the majority of
the Labour Party?

We were told by the Hon.
Colonial Secretary that to give
increases to technical officers
only would “upset the symmetry
and general level of efficiency
of the Service. One wonders
how &n offiqial in such a respon-
sible position could ardently ad-
vocate that we puff out, unduly
in some cases, the heads and
breasts of this already unsym-
metrical body, pay no attention
to the other parts, and then
blandly talk about “symmetry
and general efficiency.” No mat-
ter how mwch the waist-line and
lower ends are tapered off and
slimmed down he still sees
symmetry, perfect rhythm and
harmony. Ye gods and little
fishes! What next? And, mind
you, if we examine the “sym-
metry” of Barbados with that of
British Guiana we will see more
clearly the peculiar way in which
the Colonial Secretary looks at
this matter. Let us examine how
certain officers stand in relation
to each other in the Istter
country: There, Office Super-
intendents. start at $3,000 per
annum, and go to $3,600. Our
Executive Grade is $1,920 to
$3,456, Take the Auditor Gen-
eral’s department in each colony.

In B.G., these are the salaries of

’ the following. A.G., $6,240, Asst.
Auditor $4,80v, Auditors, $3,600—
$4,320. In Barbados, these are
$6,240, $4,560 and $1,920—$3,456 .
respec, I could also take the post
office and other offices to show
the kind of symmetry we have.

I find no merit in the argu-
ment that we should watch the
office and not the individual in
making these proposals. It
seems to me that we are paying
many people neither according
to their needs nor their deserts.
It was because we wanted cer-
tain qualified persons for cer-
tain posts that this whole

matter began or rather that was 2

ADVOCATE





BOER
caoreves wt
. SOUTH AFRICA

Wuat We were told, It is how-
ever OvvilUsS Wat Wat alfficuity
merely provided an opportunity
Ww ger sncreases tor imported
Ollicnus and, In order not wr
appear quscriminatory, all top
(auclais, ine atthucde and pecu-
liar arguments of Mr. Cuke has
shown tinis, wiay it tei hum
however that his clever attempt
to. justify the proposals could
be so easily seen through that
ne snould petter have kept his
mouth closed! It happens that
wie Lapour Government has
peen caught by all this especi-
ally after it was agreed to bring
in the other ranks later. This
act of appeasement brought
around Mr. Cox quite conveni-
ently, and made him utterly
harmiess, What it will lead to
1 shudder to think, We will
have more inflation and less
money for social services and
for the reduction of the cost of
living. His Excellency knew this
and he really meant it when he
said that we could afford only
these increases, .He however
compromised ‘to get support of
the whole Executive, But does
Mr, Adams really think, when
he says it would be wrong to
leave out other heads besides
technical, that any man who
stepped up from Principal Clerk
or from the Executive Grade to
a departmental head at the old
rates could have any grouse
whatsoever? It is clear that all
this has been done merely
through the imported men,

I find that the back-benchers
of the Labour Party did great
credit to themselves, to the
Party and to Barbados, They
took a moral stand and won a
moral victory. They have de-
monstrated that they are not
content to be a mere sledge-
hammer machine enforcing and
legalising the decisions, how-
aver debatable, of a governing
bureaucracy. They have shown
that they stand firmly by gov-
ernment by a_ socialist party
and not government by officials.
Barbados is experiencing all the
evil effects of inflation at pres-
ent, Small savings and wages
‘are worth little and the gains
made by those who invest in
such things as real estate, land
and industrial stocks are tre-
mendously inflated, Further,
what a noted commentator said
recently of tthe position in
Britain that “in a period of
soaring prices and profits, the
imposition of a ceiling on food
subsidies, social services and the
health services automatically
reduces the real value of the
Welfare State to the poor and
its real burden on the rich,” is
also very applicable to this
Island. Our Governor thas con-
stantly advocated a cut in our
subsidies, and at this rate of
spending on salaries very little
will be found for much needed
social schemes, After all, His
Excellency from 1920, when he
served in the Crown Agents to
1949 when he was transferred
here from Nigeria, has been
taken _up with digits and con-
servative financing and book-
keeping. He is courageous and
forthright, according to his way
of looking at®things. But he
should be made at this time to
work out finance in the frame-
work of the licy on which
the Labour Party was elected.
Otherwise Mr Adams’
sounding talk about “Labour
Government” is sounding brass
and tinkling cymbal, If Sir
Alfred is even Financial Sec-
retary and Gé@vernor at the
same time so much the better,
for he loves figures and knows
them well. But unless the
Labour side of Government can
enforce a policy in keeping with
its outlook and with the needs
of the under-privileged classes
then there may well be further
splits in the ranks — a tragic
happening not only for Barba-
dos but for the West Indies as
a whole.

EX-CIVIL SERVANT.

Snake In The Hand...

To The Editor, The Advocate,—
SIR—1r was amused to read
the thrilling account of the kill-
ing of a snake: “among some
bushes in front of the Barbados
Museum” about 6 p.m. yester-
day, which appeared in to-day’s
Advocate. his snake, which
was quite harmless, had been
living for some time in the
courtyard of my quarters within
6 feet of my living room. About
3.30 p.m. yesterday it was
accidentally killed there in an
attempt to recapture it. The
snake's body was given by my
gardener, who was about to
bury it, to one of the employees
of the Barbados Turf Club. The
only accurate fact in your
account is that the snake was 3
feet long.
Yours etc.
NEVILLE CONNELL.

.7,52.

cece ie tate ALAN a LA AO LA

THURSDAY, JULY. 3, 1952
ee me etme eh cement CRRA ERAN, iam verter ns nrenna + nnn cect

The Man Who
Did Not
Want Money

He Used Deposits To Buy
More Cars For Sale

From R. M. MacCOLL

WASHINGTON.

ANOTHER chapter is written in the extra-
ordinary story of Robert Knetzer.

It starts in the car-famine days after the
last war, when he guaranteed delivery of new
cars under market price.

Crowds flocked to his office and pretty well
forced deposits on him.

He used the deposits to buy more cars, but
finally the bubble burst and there was Knet-
zer owing £ 1,000,000,

* * *

AT his trial the district attorney asked why
he thought he would ever make any money
that way. Replied Knetzer: “I just wanted to
make a reputation, not money.”

He was sentenced to 110 years in jail, but
last year was temporarily released because
he said he could raise money to pay off a
separate civil suit. And he amazed everyone
by handing in £60,000.

Congratulations were short lived when it
was found that he got the money by another
confidence trick. He told friends he had
bought a Christmas tree estate in Canada.

* * *

LAST NIGHT, in Springfield, Illinois, a
businesslike stranger appeared at the jail.
“George Hulem, United States marshal,” he
snapped, flashing a badge, “Knetzer is to come
with me. He will be returned later.”

Off went Robert with the “marshal,” who
turns out to be phoney as_ Robert’s
schemes.

Now the G-men are searching for the pair
of them.

HAWAII is being sugared under. A strike
has tied up all shipping services, and so the
sweet stuff is being dumped everywhere,
from tennis courts to roof tops.

NEIGHBOURS of handsome Hugo Linwal,
a 41-year-old carpenter, and his pretty wife
Ellin, who lived on New York’s Lexington-
avenue, were always hoping that there would
be a reconciliation after they quarelled some
time back and Hugo moved out.

He came back. Ellin answered his ring.
Smiling, Hugo opened a box, took out a
sawn-off double-barrelled shotgun and
killed his wife and himself.

I-SUPPOSE it had to come. A man in the
advertisements who wears a black eye patch
and helps to sell shirts is now followed by a
pretty girl who also wears a black patch. And
she sells girdles.

NEAT switcheroo on the “war is not inevi-
table” theme. Britain’s ambassador Sir Oliver
Franks visits Dartmouth College in New
England, and says roughly that in a speech.
The undergraduate newspaper, reporting the
event, headlines “War evitable, says Franks.”

AVERELL HARRIMAN lets it be known
that that’s the way he wants to be known
during the election campaign. Seems he is not
too keen on the William, which is his first
name.

BOB HOPE got a belly laugh on the air last
night when his straight man asked him what
he knew about the United States Govern-
ment. “All I know is that I put down the
Government as one of my dependants on my
income tax return,” cracked Bob.

Oh, and Bing Crosby. has just bought a big
new twin-engined plane.

IT is far too long since we have seen Her-
bert Marshall in a movie—but that’s being
taken care of now.

His phone rings in New York, and Herbert
is told by R.K.O. “Please be in Hollywood
tomorrow. You're starring in ‘The Murder.’ ”

In New York he has been doing a radio
show entitled “The Man Called X”.

ACTING just like a Rockefeller, John D.
jun. dashes off a note to New York’s Metro-
politan Museum saying he is giving it
| £3,500,000._ Lyrically, Roland Redmond,
president of the board of trustees, describes
the note as “a superb and perfect document.”

The note—or the cheque?

HEADLINE: “Coronation robes hunted by
anxious peers.”

CHARLES DICKENS, visiting New York,
described the institution as “badly ventilated,
badly lighted, none too clean, and very un-
comfortable.”

He was talking about the City Home for
Dependants (a _ poor-house) on Welfare
Tsland.

Now a big, spotless and»modern home is
being opened, with beds for 2,000. It is some
years now since the people there stopped
being .“inmates” and _ officially became
“guests.”

IS AMERICA “turning out more alibis
than airplanes?”

Jim Lucas, investigator for a big chain of
newspapers, is out to diseover the facts. And,
from Los Angeles he reports:—

“The planes we make cost millions, The

| Russians turn out cheaper and less compli-
cated planes by the thousand.”























IDOL ANKLET SOCKS
and Half-length HOSE
in many colours and

Da Costa & Co., Ltd.

CELEBRATE

TOMORROW



Goddard's Restaurant

Served from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.



yvou'mn
ENJOY OUR
GOLD BRAID
COCKTAILS

SESE eee ESSE

=



PHOTOGRAPHS
Copies of Local Photographs
Which have appeared in the
ADVOCATE NEWSPAPER
Can be ordered from the...
ADVOCATE STATIONERY

FIBRE MATS:
Plain, Stencilled and
Decorated. These are
available in four sizes.

3x 3yds.&3x 3% yds.

CONGOLEUM:
Six feet wide and cut
to any desired size.

Ph. 4472

Cc. S, PI TCHER

5
oe

KN

CP
Seo e

FF)
e
oe Sat

*.

‘s
hes.

ec

Crisp, smartly-styled MEN’S SHIRTS
by CONSULATE—Collars attached
and detached,

SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS
and UNDERWEAR

DRESS SHIRTS by MARCELLA and
DRESS COLLARS

Handsome TIES (including
BOW TIES, Maroon and
Black for Evening Wear)














FRENCH
ICE
CREAMS

1 Flavours




BDDGHOGHSHHHH9O99-99O9HGOG-HOOGO”
THURSDAY, JULY. 3,

1952



Turtle Fishing Is
A Monkey

Robs

The Housewife

OFF THE OISTIN’S COAST there has been a decline
in the catches of deep sea species of fish. Very few flying
fish and dolphin were brought to the market last month.

This decline signifies the end of the flying fish season

which is near at hand and
season.

the approach of the Hurricane

Although very few boats have been beached, their
owners are pondering on whether to fish or not. Every
man is watching the other in order to get an idea as to

whether there are still

sea fish.

Only about six fishing boats
left the Oistin'’s moorings yester-
day, Should they return with
reasonably large catches, perhaps
all the boats will be out during
the remainder of the week.

Turtle fishing has now become
an important feature in the
Oistin’s fishing industry. During
the past few weeks many turtle
nets were set along the coast.
Now that fishing boats are leav-
ing just before sunrise the turtle
catchers have ample time to haul
their nets and so save them from
being pulled away by the boats.

Rupert Harewood has been the
most successful turtle catcher.
Mr, “Jack” Ashby of Oistin’s, a
City druggist, is also taking a
keen interest in turtle fishing. So
far, every day this week he has
arrived at work with turtles in
the back of his car. They were
caught in his. nets.

Care of Nets

Mr. Ashby said that turtle
catching was a paying concern
but a certain amount of time
should be devoted to the care of
the nets if the best results were
to.be expected.

At Oistin’s yesterday various
catchers were drying their nets
in order to get them during the
evening,

Seine fishing is at present also
playing a big part in the lives of
the fishermen at Oistin’s, At
about 6.30 a.m. yesterday the
large seine boat, owned by Lewis
Fleming, returned to the beach
with 175 pounds of seine fish,
mostly jacks.

Fleming’s seine nets caught a
similar amount last month. Yes-
terday’s catch was quickly
bought by waiting housewives.

Other fishermen are hooking
goat fish and bringing them to the
market. On the housewife’s
menu, “goat” fish, jacks and
turtle are gradually replacing the
much loved flying fish.

The largest catch sold in the
market last month was on the
llth. That was 1,994 pounds of
flying fish. On the other days
catches were well below the 500
pound mark, The catches for
June this year are, however
much better than those for the
same period last year.

The new type of powered fish-
ing boat which is being built by
Corlett Yard at Oistin’s has
reached the stage where it will
now be planked. However, its
owner, Mr. Lewis Fleming; ‘is
awaiting lumber.

As soon as he gets his supply,
work on the boat will be resumed.
The boat jis expected to be com-
pleted in time for the next fishing
season,

Fishermen at Oistin’s are con-
templating holding a “singing” in
memory of two Oistin’s fisher-
men who were lost at sea during
the fishing season in the boat
Miss Pam. They hope, with the
approval of the fishing authori-

ties, to keep the “singing” in
Oistin’s Market.
Miss Pam, with its two-man

crew, left its mooring about two
months ago. Nothing has since
been heard of the boat or the
crew.

Referring to the unlucky crew,
a fisherman told the Advocate:
“Clayton and Bud.were good boys.
They were my good friends and
I think they are deserving of a
“singing.”

Miss Pam's last catch amounted
to 185 pounds which she brought
to the Oistin’s Market on April
25 last.

A group of model boats, 24
inches long, is now being built at
Oistin’s. The fleet will race
against boats of a similar size
along the St. James coast.

Corlett Yarde’s° Sea Fox re-
tained the championship when a
series of Model Boat Regattas,
sponsored by the Oistin’s Model
Boat Cluly, were held recently,

Several, Residents at Oistin’s
are not as concerned over world
affairs as they “are over a monkey
which is seen..cegularly in_ the
morning. This monkey, which
moves swiftly among the trees,
put in its appearance in the dis-
trict a few months ago,

Unlike the monkeys at Cherry
Tree Hill and Turners Hall, its
diet includes some of the delica-
cies p ised. by housewives. It
is not unusual for a housewife to
discover that a pint of milk and
a loaf of bread are missing from
her dining table.

Occasionally the monkey’s haul
includes such expensive com-
modities as pines.

The Weightlifting Club at Oi:-
tin’s a branch of Palm Springs
Barbell Club, now has a total of

possibilities of catching more deep

500 pounds in weights. Much of the
weights was supplied by Mr.
Harold Webster, Coach of the
Amateur Weightlifting Associa-
tion of Barbados.

There has been an increase in
the membership, ‘Mr. Webster and
Mr. Edwin Rogers, a Vice-Presi-
dent of the Association, visit the
club regularly to supervise the
training of these lifters.

One member, Felton Prescod,
had already reached championship
standard, He is of the 165 pounds
division and is training hard in
preparation for the coming compe-
tition in August.

139 Friendly
Societies
Registered

The Report of the Registrar of
Friendly Societies for the half year
ended June 30, 1950, was laid on
the table of the House of Assem-
bly at its meeting on Tuesday.

The report states:—

There were 139 Societies on the
Register at the 30th June, 1950.

No Society was registered dur-
ing the half.year.

The following Societies were
amalgamated during the half year,
viz:—

The Church Revival Band of
Charity F. S, was amalgamated
with the Holders Hill Scout F. S.

The Queen of Sheba F. S. was
amalgamated with the Oistins
Mutual Endeavour F. S.

The True Shepherd F. S. was
supaseenpted with the Lion Duke
No application for registration
was refused during the half year.

No society was struck off the
register during the half year.







GOVT. REJECTS
CEMENT PLAN

Government have made re-
plies to que@stions asked by
Mr. C. E. Talma, and Mr
E. D. Mottley.

Mr. Talma had enquired in
connection with the erection
of a cement pnt in the
Island. The reply is that the
Government does not consider
the present or the potential
internal demand for cement
sufficjent to justify the erec-

tion of an economic sized
cement plant here.
In reply to Mr. Mottley

who enquired about an inade-
quacy of bus services on cer-
tain routes, the Government
Stated that from time to time
representations have been
made to them regarding the
inadequacy of the bus services
on certain routes. These com-
plaints have been investigated
and then justified steps have
been taken to relieve them.



Lorry Destroyed
mi
By Fire

Motor lorry T.213 was com-
pletely destroyed when it caught
fire along Mangrove Pond Road,
St. Thomas, at about 11.00 p.m,
on Tuesday.

It was being driven by Theo-

dore Jordan of Reeves Hill, St.
Thomas,



$300 STOLEN

Gwendolyn Jeffers of Roebuck
Street, City, reported to the Po-
lice that $300 was stolen from
her bedroom between 7.30 a.m.
and 10.30 p.m. on Tuesday.

The Police are carrying out in-
vestigations.



Gordon For Dominica

Mr. G. M. Gordon, O.B.E.,
A.M.LC.E., Engineering Adviser to
the Comptroller for Development
and Welfare, will leave Barbados
by air on the 3rd July for a two
weeks’ visit to Dominica, §





WHAT'S ON TODAY

Police Courts—10.00 a.m.

Water Polo Aquatic Club—
5.00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema, Reef Grounds
—7.30 p.m.

Police Band Concert, Queen's
Park—7.45 p.m.



406 Deaths In ’°50
Due To Diseases Of
The Circulatory

DISEASES of the, Circulatory were responsible for
406 deaths in 1950, 15.10% of the total deaths, the Director

of Medical Services stated in
which was laid on the table

his Annual Report for 1950-51
of the House of Assembly at

their meeting on Tuesday last.

The figures for General and
Communicable Disease stated in
the report were as follows :—

Diseases of Early Infancy were
responsible for 472 deaths, repre-
senting 17-56% of total deaths.

Diseases of the Circulatory
System were responsible for 406
deaths, representing 15.10% of
total deaths.

Infective and Parasitic Diseases

‘were responsible for 329 deaths,
representing 12.24% of total
deaths. :

Intracranial lesions of vascular
origin accounted for 210 deaths,
representing 7.18% of total deaths.
These causes represented 85% of
the deaths due to diseases of the
Nervous System and Sense Or-
gans,

Diseases of the Respiratory Sys-
tem. 342 deaths were registered,
representing 12.72% of total
deaths. 197 of these were due to
pneumonia or broncho-pneumo-
nia and of these 95 occurred
within the first year. Deaths from
pulmonary tuberculosis and
whooping-cough are not included
in this category.

Diseases of the Digestive System
accounted for 213 deaths, repre-
senting 7.92% of total deaths.

Cancer and Other Tumours
were the cause of 173 deaths, re-
presenting 6.1% of total deaths.

More detailed information is
given in the Appendices to the
Report and special attention is
drawn to the eight major causes
of death as classified under the
Intermediate International List of
Causes of Death, These statistics
are shown for 1941/50...

Communicable Diseases

Enteric Fever:— 37 cases were
reported as ‘against 69 in 1949.
Of. thése nine or 24.3% died,
Though the morbidity represents
a notable decrease, it cannot be re-
garded as a true index of the dis~
ease in the community and al!
efforts to improve environmental

sanitation, and to give protection
by the appropriate vaccine should



continue,
Tuberculosis:— 78 cases wert
notified as against 93 in 1939.

Total deaths were 85, of which
45 occurred in residents of the
populated area of St. Michael. A
limited number of beds are avail-
able in Almshouses for isolation
of tuberculosis cases. Co-ordin-
ated attack on this ‘disease by
Public Health and Curative Ser-
vices is long overdue. Statistics
are available in Appendix XIV to
the Report which cover a period
of years.

Diphtheria:— 23 cases with one
death were notified ay against 14
in 1949. Free antitoxin and free
prophylactic toxoid continue to be
made available to medical prac-
titioners.

Venereal Diseases:— Although
net notifiable, the five types oc-
curred during the year, Of the 129
deaths caused by syphilis, or 4.8%
of total deaths, 70 occurred with-
in the first year of life and 11
occurred, from the first to thé
fourth year. There is need for
improved venereal disease ser-
vices from which good dividends
can be expected.

Leprosy:— No new cases were
reported. There were two deaths.

To think in terms of eradication!
is not “|

t Gine Gabrics

this number 25 were infants un-|

rather than control
trong a presumption.

Tetanus:— 44 deaths occurred
as a result of this disease. Of

der one year of age.
Cerebro-spinal Meningitis :—
Two cases were reported as
against 6 in 1949.
Malaria:—The colony remained
free from malaria and anopheline
mosquitees were not found, Dis-

insectisation of schooners and
aircraft continues routinely.
Whocping Couth:— Twelv

deaths occurred in a fairly cever
epidemic.





Our

LOCAL

Important



BARBADOS

178,150

ADVOCATE



Books

Feature At Oistin’s

Adults In A Year

THE PUBLIC LIBRARY issued 178,150.books in the

Adult

Department ant 61,841 books

in the Juvenile

Department, according t#' the Kepert. of the Public Librar-
ian for the year ended, March 31, 2981.

The report states in part:-
Headquarters — Adult

Department

This department issued a total
of 178.150 books during the year,
a decrease of 6,077 as compared
with the previous, year. 3,310 new
books were added to the stock and
638 withdrawn as unfit for further
use, making a total of 34,674 books
in this department at the close*of
the vear 15°7 new borrowers
were reg’stered, making a total
membership of 14,526.

The system of displaying nev
tooks for three days before put
ting them into circulation was
continued and it is pleasing to
record the satisfaction which the
public expressed with this facility.

The “Request System” whereb
priority claim is given to a bor
rower for the use of a book on its
return to the Library was made
full use of during the year.

Suggestions by the public for
the acquisition of books which
were not in stock were received
and purchases made where books
were considered suitable for
library purposes,

Gifts of books, although not as
plentiful as in previous years
were received and the donors in
each case gratefully thanked for
them.

Headquarters — Juvenile
Department

During the year 61,841 books
were issued, an increase of 4,369
over the previous year. 958 new
books were added to the stock
and 1,055 withdrawn as unfit for
further use, making a total stock
of 8,930 books in this department
at the close of the year. 1,206
new borrowers were registered
and 385 taken off the register on
account of reaching the age limit,
making a total membership of
6,622 at the close of the year,

From the stock of this depart-
ment supplies are drawn for the
juvenile sections of the Speights-
town Branch Library, the two
Government Industrial School
and the eight Deposit Stations.

As it is in the juvenile that the
seed of the love of reading is sown
special attention must be given tc
the selection of books jin order to
enable the seed gradually to grow
and develop. It is in this respect
that the main problem of this de-

partment lies. The markets of
Canada and the U.S.A., fron
which lerge quantities of books

have been previously drawn, art
now closed on account of currency
restrictions, and the United King-
dom remains the only open mar-
ket. In spite of this disadvantage,
every effort is being made to
maintain the efficiency ‘of thie
very important department at its
highest level possible.

In order to hold the children’s
interest in their library, “story
hour” was continued as a weekly
feature of this department with
marked success. At Christmas
time the usual entertainment was
staged indvors for the children,
many of whom were accompanied
by their parents or guardians.
The Police Band, which had been
kindly loaned by the Commis-
sioner of Police, was in attendance
and enlivened the preceedings
with music appropriate to the
season, The programme included
a Christmas story which was read
by one of the children, a musical
quiz for which prizes were award-
ed, Christmas Carols, a play by
pupils of the St. Matthias Boys’
School and a song by a member
of the adylt staff. The room
which had been attractively dec-
orated for the occasion was filled
to capacity. Efforts such as these
play no unimportant part in the
development of a juvenile library,

The Reference section of this
department received 9 new books
during the year, making a total
stock of 105 at the close of the
year.

Deposit Stations

There are seven Deposit Sta-
tions in the Island, one jn each
of the parishes of St. John, St.

Andrew, St. Joseph, St. Lucy and
St. Thomas, and two in St, Philip.
During the year 3,520 books were



|
|

|
}

|

j
|
|
}

LDODGHPDOGHOOS

| jor those

issucd from these stat’ons to adult
re. ders ds compared with 4,476
in tae preyious year; and 5,335
were issued to juvenile readers as
campared with 61231 in the pre-
vious year; making a total issue
from all stations of 8,855 as com-

pi with 10,607 in.the previous
yea. 217 rew borrowers wert
re icved and 22 removed from
the reg s-er, making a total mem-



bership of. 2.150 at the close of the

.
Pies iY

for new one

‘teryals the books
lat exchanged
in orde*â„¢ to held the

on

inter@st o° readers. There are
798 more wvenile them adult
member, but owing to the pres-

ent difficulty ‘n obtaining juvenile
bocks in suffle ent quantity and
variety it ‘s not always possible
to meet in full the demands of
the young readers. Every effort
is, however, beins made to meet
this difficult situat‘on, The duties
of issuing books, registering bor-
rowers and keeping the necessary
stat'stical records are undertiken

for the most part by elementary
school teachers whose services are
given voluntarily. As the time
given by these willing helpers is
somewh>;{ limited to meet fully
the cenvenience of readers, most
of whom live in the scattered

and remote villages, and, also, as
some of the stations are estab-
lished in districts that are not the
most convenient to enable mem-
bers to make full use of them,
consideration is being given ta
the possibility of enlisting addi-

tional helpers and o* removing
one at least of the stations to a
more convenient location. Rv

these efforts it is hoped to estab-
lish more fully the usefulness of
‘tthe Deposit Stations,

School Libraries Department

This department began to func-
tion in October, 1949, under a
trial scheme for the supply of
books to elementary chants. Ten
schools were brought under the
scheme during the year, making
a total at the close of the year of
28 schools to which books are
supplied, .During the year 1,011
new books were added to the
stock, making a_ total stock of
2,083 books at the close of the
year. Books were issued to 8,135
children duning the year as com-

pered with 2,942 in the six-
months period in the previous
year during which the scheme

operated for the first time.

As the scheme is on a trial
basis and as its success must in-
evitably rest with the teachers
who are responsible for seeing
after the issue and return of the
books and their proper care, its
progress will be watched with
care with a view to its ineorpor-
ation into the Public Library
service on a permanent basis. The
statistical records that are kept
of the working of the scheme are
net included in the general
statistics of the Public Library



Despotidency In
U.K. Due To
More Taxes

There is quite a lot of despond-
ency in England due to increased
taxation, said Mr. F. C. Bryan wh«¢
passed through here yesterday
from the U.K. on the Cclembie ou
his way back to Trinidad,

Mr. Bryan who is a welding
engineer with Apex Oilflelds went
over for three months’ holiday.
He was accompanied by his wife
and little daughter Carol Ann.

He said that things are stil!
very expensive in England and

the major contention is—the price |

of petrol which is now about 4/4
a gallon.

Meat which is very scarce ‘s
still rationed, but recently, there
has been a good supply cf fresn
vegetables.

During the first month he was
in England, Mr. Bryan said that
the weather was rather cold, but it
started to become
the last month.

LILLE CDLD®PDOO®@LVOV OOOO DOVO DDG DOO OOOEOHOOOPEVOYF

bright during }

Bob-A-job Week
' Was Suiecess

Reporting on Bob-a-Job Week
Major J. E. Griffith, Island Seout |
Commissioner states that “despit:
a number of important drawbacks
it can be stated that Bob-a-Jcb
Week was a success.”

Tne Island Commissioner writés
ftr. her, “two features stand out,
very prominently and fully justi-
iy our rushing the effort in spite |
ot time rather than postponing 1

een eam nggoe

Shoemaker
Awarded

Issued To $215 Damages

Noel Benjamin, a shoemaker of
Lodge Road, Christ Church, was
yesterday awarded $215 damages
by His Honour Mr. J. W. B
| Chenery, in the Assistant Court of
Appeal, Original Jurisdiction

Benjamin. who works for $30 a
week, lost these earnings for six
| weeks after he was involved in an
} actident off December 5, last year,
with a lorry driven by Michael
| Ramdin of Upper Roebuck Street

Benjamin had claimed $240,
holding that he had suffered great
vain from the injuries he received,
had incurred expenses for medi-
eines, medical attention and the
repair of his bicycle, besides being
tunable to pursue his calling as a
shoemaker for six weeks

He said that he had been rid-

Firstly, it was demonstrated quit?| ing on the left side of Durant’s
clearly that the public can be re- | Road, Christ Church, where the
lied upon for support if and whe secident occurred, when Ramdin
we approach them in the righ.) negligently drove and managed
way; secondly, the hearty oc-| the lorry M-2943 which he was

operation of the Scouts and the)
truly wonderful spirit with whic
they threw themselves into ib:
«ffort were clearly manifested.

The report states that “fro
returns to hand it can be state
that about 200 Scouts took part |
the Bob-a-Job Campaign and

earned the sum of $1,021, Twenty - |

five (25) Groups ;articipated and
to the newest Group, Harriso: »
College, goes the honour of ear,
ing the largest amount of $127
This sum was earned by 18 bFov |
The Scout earning the highest in-
dividual amount was Joes of th:
Cathedral Group: Tais boy eorn,
$17.00, The greatest number of |
jobs was performed by R. S. G

of Harrison College, 39, an avera |
of 6 a day. Creditable amoun s
were earned by Garrison S \|
Scouts, $96.37; Cathedral Grov>
$83.76 and the Fir.t Sea Scou
$80.09."

The Island Commissioner o
served that “in quite a number «
cases jobs were paid more thi
they worth while in a number they
were grossly underpaid. This wes
due, no doubt. to a misunc
standing that the job was to .
paid a bob or shilling, irreep
live of the nature of the job cr}
the time required to complete it

Concluding his Report, the |
land Commissioner writes “It
strongly recommended that th
method be used annually to crea
a Headquarters’ Fund,



Import Licences |
Will Be Issued |

A notice in the office of th
Controller of Supplies states tha,
consideration will be given t
issuing licences for importation
from all sources of items which
include pollard, linseed, oilmea!,
groundnut meal, alfalfa meal
malt sprouts, corn gluten fee ,
brewers grain and corn,

People who wish licenses f
impertation of any of thesg com-~-
modities have to make applicatic
to the office of the Controller of
than 10 am

Supplies not later

on July 14.



£5 For Profiteering |

Forty-year-old salesman Elias
Hadeed of Indramer Guest House,
Christ Church, was yesterday
ordered to pay a fine of £5 for
offering for sale three yards of
epun rayon to a customer at $6
per yard instead of at $3.46 per
yard,

The fine which was imposec
by Mr. C. W. Rudder, Polic
Magistrate of District “A”, is t
be paid in 14 days or in defau
one month's imprisonment witt
hard labour.





|
|






Rub away the pain-
ful torment of muscu-
lar sprains and bruises.
A.l. ite Liniment pene-
trates to the source of the
pain. Its soothing warmth
brings welcome relief, Buy
a bottle today!

A WHITE

eu









|

driving along the same road, and
sollided with him. He and his
bicycle were thrown to the
ground gnd he was injured and
his bicycle damaged.

He claimed that Ramdin had
driven too close to him while
overtaking him around a curve in
the road and he was also driving
at an excessive speed. ,

OFF in

Twinplex Sharpeners
Cigarette Holders
Photo Frames

Tea Strainers

Ash Trays














A | fa
Carainad

°

Shwartz Geletine—per 1-oz. pkt,

Lushus Jellies (7 Flavours)—per pkt.
Koo Tomato Sauce—Lge. bottle a“
Koo 8.0. Marmalade—per 8-Ib, tin 1,97

PAGE FIVE

“

Monoriel Service
At St. Leonards

Arriving here on Saturday last

by B.W.LA was Mr. Byron
Mansfield Devonish of Brooklyn,
New York This is’ his second
visit to Barbados since he, has
been residing in the United States.

On Sunday last at St. Leon-
ard’s Church after Matins, a
very impressive Service was held

to the memory of his mother Mrs,
Evalina Augusta Devonish, a
member of that Church. A large
and representative congregation
attended. The Revd. D. Woode
conducted the Service.

At the conclusion of the Ser-
vice in the Chureh by the singing
of the Hymn “Let Saints on
Earth in Concert Dwell,” the
Choir and congregation proceeded
to the grave where the unveiling
»f a Memorial Tablet
formed by Mr. Devonish,

The Revd. Woode svoke of the
deceased lady’s loyalty and chris-
tian principles, and paid tribute
to her as a devoted mother. This
was followed by the singing of
the Hymn “Abide with Me” and
the “Benediction.”

INTRANSIT ON
**COLOMBIE”

The S.S. Colombie arrived in
Carlisle Bay yesterday morning
from Martinique with intransit
passengers. Many of these p
sengers visited the town and
bought clothing from the various
stores.

The Colombie left
day for Trinidad.



later in the

P POLISH

“For Red
Composition i
floors, Red Tile floors, *
~ Brick & Cement Paths, etc.
WILL NOT WASH

the rain,

, Also in green

momo d. +





Fresh Supplies Beceived!

Gold Chloride
Huxley's Betul Oil .
Mother Greaves Worm

Exterminator
Charcoal Biscuits

Sinitary Blockettes

HOUSEHOLD GLOVES |
SKOL SUNTAN OIL

at Breakfast — Lunch

- Dinner

$0.34
19
48

Was per- -

rr

ee ee

















2 Liptons French Coffee—per tin .69
f Shadow Stripe Nylosw Clemens Pure Grape Juice—
in Pink, Blue & Lge. Bottle$1.02, Sml, Bottle 67
a ates ea eee ee, ee Indonesian eee oe Ib. ; 4
Pe Jax Pineapple Chunks-—per tin 5
ee eerenpene bl ilk *. Koo Tom tees: tins A a
his is a very serviceable art s - < Dried Fruit Salad—per pkt. Sa 3
eee the talk of the town material, and is available in lovely Heinz Sweet Mustard Pickle—per jar .97
: range of plain shades. Danish Thick Cream—per tin PaaS
GLAZED HANDMADE $6.00 v/ | Sik P She Ranch Minced Corned Beef—per tin =“
* POTTERY LAMPS .... " re . ‘a a ue Sheer Ranch Luncheon Beef Loaf—per tin 6
eae POTTERY PLATES ' j i 7 . : 7 Bronte Roast Beef—per 1-Ib. tin my
WATER MUGS ............ $4.00 2.00, $1.00 ' in Pink, Silver, Champagne, Ecru, Salisbury Corned Mutton—per tin 68
PUNCH & COCKTAIL $2.00, $1.00 each $ Lemon, Gold, Ice Blue, Torquoise, ontael a, Balasee Wuatis Colle
MUGS $3.00 POTTERY VASES © Rose, Lilac, Bois de Rose and White y 2.40
U pester casnabibenendh 08 . $6.00, $2.50, $2.00 $1.50 @ — at $2.76 per tin e
SETS “of POTTERS ie ae tara 3 Or Oete Huntley & Palmers Fruit Cake—
ENTREE DISHES .... $3.50 ASH TRAYS 48c. each 3 af far ts 2.00
-- *_ Neilsons Nut Roll—ver pkt, l5c.—
e Pe per box of 24 2.88
‘ Swifts Pate De Foie—per tin 21
HOME PRODUCTS DEPT. 3 Tate & Lyles Cube Sugar—per pkt. .34
’ g COCKADE FINE RUM
CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LTD.N $ BROAD STREET—DIAL 2664 sit ‘Lia
10, 11, 12 & 13. Broad. Street. : : |) Stansfeld Scott & Co, Ltd.
vi
zg @ Oe ae NE eo MR Ne eae









BOVE} YOY



DL oPLYOEEVPYOPDOO OOOO WY YOO 1D SOR OREO GOEF4 494 4FO444 444048 SS PADIS AAAS SS













PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, JULY 3, 1952

CLASSIFIED AD§, PtBHt NOTICES) _PULIC SALES /Cooper’s Neck| SEEPPINIG NOTICES

TELEPHONE 2508 NOTICE REAL ESTATE Br ok en









We beg to inform our Customers ané | —————_
friends that our Provision Department APPLEBY—on Sea, St.


























































































































































































J | MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, We m tad 7 — .
DIED FOR SALE ate longer Re open to the Public! newly-built houses. Each “oe a } ZEALAND LINE LIMITED. P Y,
k jon Saturdays. Our Other De t8| bedrooms, dining, dtaw! rooms and From 1 (M.4.N Z. LINE) a
de gate will continue as usual. S. & $8. o0 Veratidah’ Modesh ‘son . * Page M.v. “CACIQUE DEL
SNTOsR a 52 7 eee sie ATHLONE—on sea, be! ° i . §.S. “GLOUCESTER” is scheduled to | ¥ ; 4
PO Tntie Melniceh. inte Gocper at | . into two fats Buch har Mining, Gene |, It Was While Melzitosh was dig-| sali trom Port Pine May slat Derompon | § ee Se ee
iat Wateaden. Coty. Cotton Factory | AUTOMOTIVE | NOTICE end several bedrooms. Modern conven- ging that they heard the main|June Sth, Melbourne June 14th, Sydney | ¥ Vincent, Grenada, Aud Akuba
Sie Prssasea. Co-op, Cotton Eavtory | araeyNe SCHOOL mwrrmance. [iencel. hone m0 Mr. Kenneth [foot give away. Mcintosh tried to| June 2th, Brisbane July 6th, arriving at] pire or sGiinn to’ be notified
residence gt 4.30 o'clock this after- | - CAR~\1) Austin 7H.P. in First Class| | | SXAMINASEION + edie of the hole, but before he "hae ae See oo ,
noon for St. Ann's Church. ondition, Recently Overhauled and se- For the School Year beginning 16th | >,,.... cL aL... a In addition to general cargo this vessel | ¢ “CARIBBEE”’ i
Enid McIntosh and children, Anita| paired. ‘Djal 2838 Sept. 1952.) Examination for Entrance |.) ROPERTIES—Shop and Residence at reach safety at the top, the| nay ample space for chilled and hard|® agcccnt Cargo usd Paseneers for
Branch and Lilian Thomas (sisters) | - : ~—~|to the Alleyne School will be held on}; Saag’ Water na on 000 sa: ft. tree crashed down on him, and| trozen cargo. R Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
3.7.52—In, 9 che Saree Light 6 JEP. Fitted | Monday July 21, 1952 at 9 am, at the} "Acres Building Land at Clapham, |*"0cked him back into the hole. Cargo accepted on through Bills of }@ Nevis and St. Kitts. Date of sail-
IN MEMORIAM Meee gee eet Snaainn, OwRer| _ Aprlictiions sewciner, with, Bagusitat |i Nowe at Howell's Cross Rood. Site eaapeled Out Of the hoke and' to] Bitek, Guiana, Leeward and Windward |® we gemoow
buy’! rger car. Cole & Co. Certificat and Testimonials will be . ole and to , " Bw ONER OWNERS’
- - 3.7.83—n.| received by the Headmaster up to|/"Mt 18 x 10, back 20 x 11. Shed 20 X lsatety by the backli 1 nee ASSOCIATION (INC.)
DANIEL—In loving memory of my dear ° | Friday July 18. «| 8 Land can'be rented. Aiso (1) Large y lift of the falling) yor ¢urther particulars apply—
Husband Frank Wilfred Daniel, who;| CAR—Morris Oxford. Im good condj-| Applications for one or more vacant eOnaEey. at BF isiode Hill. Apoly Jos. |tree. He said he immediately ran PURNESS WITHY & CO., L’ .
ditd July Grd, 1940. cm mem. | OM: Phone 288a 2.7.52—Sn. | Foundation Scholarships tenable at the) py Hi) Heal Estate Agent, Tyegtaise around to where McIntosh was| TRINIDAD * e ;
a y' - a aaciilatieairaeet sttartacseaiindll tienen - » - Ue . '
vay and as - : CAR—1951 Hillman Minx. 8,000 Miles Hoakaaiter ore wie received by the | ee [AG Was on time to see him fallir and ‘ J ,
y a : CAR—192 Q , er up to Friday July 18. Candi- | yy, back in 18 DA COSTA & CO. L’ Os
Time wears away the edge of grief, Ir good cohdition. A. R. Lewis c/o|dates will be examined on Monday pe taydareignes will offer for sale at to the hole, He called for » LTD., 5OOSOOOOGHHOOC84
Tubosh Geek th Chath $2) can CARH Sheers COs, 00 eee eS ee eee 29.6.52-—-3n. 117" High Strect, Bridgetown, om Friday, | 4m, but he did not answer Pe ue eee
ta a n at ve 1 in . . * 2 * a = :
live sais nah merinie sic tela Eee the 4th day of July, 1963 at 2 p.m. Cutting said they had , °
For in my heart he liveth still CAR-—Dodge Super-Deluxe, First Class RAFFLE The bungalow known as CAMILLE expected that the’ tetas wand
Ever to be remembered by a8) wih condition and Owner-driven. $2,000 The Table, tapestry worked, and pre- with the — Burs oe by aa. deeper, but as could be seen f * DO YOU KNOW What
Ivis. US.A 3.7,52—-1n. | pial 4476 12.6.52—t.f.n. | sented by Mrs. Worswick of St, James, | ™easuremen’ sq. ft. situate in the rom o ‘
—_—— OO rrr OC in aid of St. Peter's Daily Mea’ was|Nav¥ Gardens, Christ Church and uprooted trunk, there was h ust ‘
HINDS—In loving memory of our dear] GARS—One Gituar and one Car,| won by containing an open verandah facing |really nothing keeping it up except ee ee
wette! ea Agena Mreatt; | American »“Auatiny, both in” pena! | Mra Penna of Rovon..U-8.A. the Letty mS teen: Sits tas [200% ela. we wae at
. d . orking rder. Apply te > .| mount realized, . has been ser - iO ig * - ‘ ese
1928. ROUDFOOT. Dial 4949, after, 4 p.m.|to the Hon. Treas: of the Welfare }#"4 kitchen with garage and rooms for The huge trunk is about five to NEW YORK SERVICE. 6
She is gone where Millions have | pial gi93 3.7.52-—2n | League, ear marked for St, Peter's Daily }tWo servants and with electricity in- |six feet in diameter, and engineers
a Meal, ' Mrs, C. E. O'Neal, Whitehall, |stalled. Inspection | dial, 4480. ho visited the scene and who| “~ S*AMER sills 20 June—arrives barbados 1st July. |
a ae ONE (1) Austin two ton truck and one | St ‘eter 3.7,52—1n, | tu
We must go to meet herein glory. 1/11) Austin A.40 Car. Telephone 4821,| ——$—$—$________________. J sale_apply to:—" 7 have had to do with weights. NEW ORLEANS SERVI
Z : ; , j
For there's no night there D. V, Seott & Co.. Ltd LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE ,©OT™= CATFORD & CO, 20.6.52—8n |estimate that it would wei t os {
She is gone, yet not forgotten, * Ane ’ : us Q ae. ORR bo eratedetennentqupierenpeshbaeeaiee weigh about ad j
In’ our enone: 80 fat and clear re ee ct Lease tn Sank The application of Livingstone Lowe, AUCTION four or five tons, Re ee as sails Sth June—arrives Barbados 21st June. |
Some day we'll meet our dear TRUCK Chevrolet puck no reason. | shopkeeper of Bank Hall, holder of : McIntosh had been aceustomed une—arrives Batbados Sth Joly. 5
ae ie aad tats able offer refused. A Barnes & Go. | {stp sicense, No. S22 of 1952 granted | “By Kind permission I will sel atip.m, |t@ Going work of the kind, and
John & iris (Children) Lilia & Carlo: |i: 37 +4'n-|% board shop with wall frontage at}at McEmearney & Co., Garage Friday |had previously felled trees for his :
(Grandehtidren) F 3.7.52—1n is Marine Road, Bank Hall, St. Michael, [4th. One B.S.A. 5 Seater Sedan Car | @; ers. He fell CANADIAN SERVICE
st —ew | ere ae net rfett Speed for permission to use said Liquor License Jin wore oe Terns Cash. R | whie = e felled the tree e
~ ing order X—313 License paid, Apply |®', Said premises, Bank Hall, St. Mich- | Archer Mc » Auctioneer, ly MiG once stood in the old SOUTHBOUND }
ANNO? NCEMEN TS aro ae" near Peqwoll, Ye Oe eh duth. Bale dup ae $i Wee 2.7.52—3n. ie oS eane ‘Stl Se . tg ad Aras’ waveeaia é sil
———— SC a To:—E. A. MeLEOD, : By instructions of the Imsurance Com- ,,; - “TINDRA . “ on Dh May 19th June 5th i. A
FARN BIG MONEY by selling Redif Police Magistrate, Distt “AN pany I willrsell at. the GENERAL |ties, McIntosh leaves a wife and (Lt. Re a eee May 30th June 14th
susion in your spare time. Get a suppl: ELECTRICAL Signed LIVINGSTONE LOWE,|MOTOR OMNIBUS CO., Nelson Street |four children ranging in ages S1LOA, FOINTER” . ke: June 13th June 28th
of forms today. STD OE: bereits or ee Screeners Applicant. one 1962 Sommerset Austin Sedan Car. /from 10 years to 14 onths. Hi “A STEAMER” . : és June 27th July 12th
} Just received new shipment of Garrard N.B.—This application will be con- [damaged by accident. Done only 45% eldest chil m™m A is ‘A STEAMER” . ‘ ¥ July lith July 26th
. three speed Automatic Changers st! sidered at a Licensing Court to be held J miles. SALE FRIDAY 4th at 2.30 p.m child, a boy, was due to sit
FOR RENT 'P. C, S. Maffei & Co. Lid. Radio Em-|at Polfee Court, District “A” on Wed- |Terms CASH Fall of Hammer. an Entrance Examination to Har- NORTHBOUND
at 4 | portum 15.6,52—t.f.n. nedday the 8th day of July, 1952, at 11 R. ARCHER a - |rison College to-day
~~. ; o'clo¢e a.m . ineer. 7 . ene eee
JUST ARRIVED “Fye" De Luxe E. A. MeLEOD, 1,.7,52—4n | Of his family his tather-in-law : .
HOUSES | Uitra-Modern prugie-Czame (with Gar : Police Magistrate, Di A Ue leas aes was the first to arrive on the ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
ao — | rard 3-speed changers) Two Pickup Heads 52—1n i tC ns
AUtrictive sadbfie Fiat main road Has-|O needle Worries, in attractive walnut | ———————. ___.____™ | covt.-in-Exeeutive Committee 1 will selt |SCene. Other relatives on learning Apply:— DA COSTA & CO., LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE Whit d Coloured
ne e ier} cabinets. A limited quantity — only ~ [on the respective spots by public com-|of the accident rushed to the spot e an
tings, _ comfortably furnished, Englis'y | ¢® ‘ ae uantiy | only | LIQUOR LICENSE NOTIC# 0 ire Sn ‘Thursday next 3rd July a la po’
Bath, Open Verandah facing sea. Suitabi | $420.00. PC. S. MAPFEI & CO.,LTD.) m0 application of William E. Agagd, |following:-- One () 10 ly fog and later his wife and some of her . SATIN. Yard de.
ane, person (cp couple). Brora duly 2 [rs Wm: Menry Sweet, g ssa.tin, [shopkember, of Liahtetgot Lane, olde; ! wooden building at St. Boniface Junior |elatives arrived by car from the| s ee erere a rat
ephone 6, fn) OED lof Liquor License No 2 0 Branted | School at 12 o'clock, and at St. Luey’s}country, The shocking news had ‘
“From ist August, furnished or unfur-}, One Hotpoint Electric Stove, 4 Rings, eran oe cA fh | Teapans ot a pore ang Boys’ and Girls’ schools one (1) wood-/taken immediate and heavy toll NOTICE Very Soft Quality 62e.
nished, “INGRID” Nawy Gardens. Three ; Large Oven and Warming Ovens eone'|Aleyne'’s Tenantry, Bush Hall, ‘st. |"rerms stsictly et Drangy A. Scott,]0n the wife, and by the time she
bedrooms vspection by arrangemen p y is * | Michael, for permission to use said Liquo loneer. 6.52—4n. | 1 .
with ELYN Ae delephone number \ | pYE BATTERY SETS—Just a few left, | License at sald premises, Bush Hall, St Sa . : Seal esneaiaes calor tale a CLOSED FROM SURSVAY FUR SHOCK FARING GOFTON FURST"
IVELYN, 2ACH O,, L' * oka ey * | Michael pse.
Ricketts MARTIN'S RADIO SMPORIOM, eek Dated this Soh day of June, 1982. ]UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER |She was almost incoherent, and RE-OPENING FRIDAY THE 4TH all colours 59c.
- GA dncch meee | TOE. Ae Me a line when sympathisers endeavoured
GEFICE SPACE in building at Spry. REVHIGERATOR—One Norge 8 Cup | Police Magistrate, Dist. “Ar. By fristractiéns recelved trom ©. L. |t) keen” her f Pay ot p A N 36” $1.89
‘ar TPffaigar St. Apply Auto Pt, Refrigerator, In first class condition aulteet Straker & Co. I will sell on Thursday cm, Tom wing SHARKSKI
Tyre Co. 2090. eT} 27.6 btn Redman & Taylor's Garage Ltd. N.B.—This application. will pe sent uy oh aie faee oh Speer husband’s body, she wrung her NIRAL EMPORIUM ods
3 ‘ #..s2—2n. | cad a teeming Cou to Be, held ai Catbpaeel) tH, teeing nie . ; and snapped her fingers in Cochet Bbsdd aiid Deller Stree | GREY MIAMI 36” $1.08
Sr nae Police Court, District “A” on lay tions, (Outer Casings 28 x 1%) Dun- |Cespalr.
ER REFRIGERATORS — Frigidaites made | 1111, gay of July, 1952, at 11 o'clock a.m. mecrress ers, “
P SONAL by crepern Bictora, Beven jane ine Y EA. McLEOD, ~ lop Roadster) 2 Bicycles, Spanners, 4



ot: refrigerator a a rie, = Par

The public are hereby warned against! Hunte & Co., Ltd., Lr, Broad St. Dia

giving credit to my wife MIGNON , 5!36 1.7, 52—3n

VALERIA JONES (nee Forde) as 1 dol plea Abin

not hold myself responsible for her or: FURNITURE

enyone else contracting any debt or ee eee ee omen Condy

debts in my mame unless by a written FURNITURE—Larder 52 ins. high,

order signed by me . $16.00; car te -
: - .« | $16.00; carpet 90 x 108 ins; valuable
Sed. VERNE AMBROSE JONES antique mah. sideboard; cedar pigeon-

St. Patrick's, }
~ wles, base 36 x 8 ins; 3 tria
Christ Cmca Sn Judge saucepans; etc No telephone:

suspection daily after 3 p.m. WA Pavil-





Police Magistrate, Dist! “A”. kootbait boots, B i Me a ‘erat “ies .
ti , ke Cream wder, bs T’dad
WANTED termints, "extra Strong, a ae I 5 yxers

items, Terms Cash,

ep | SR Es On Way Home



PROCES











“National Cash Book-Keoping Machine *
Operator with previous experience. To] LAST & FOUND @ From Page 1
Assume duties on or ore Ss) . ,

1952. Apply in person with written next six months Pompey will be

application to Secretary, Dowding Estates | ———— "> boxing for the Cruiser weight















bs. ea & Trading Co., Limited.” championship of the World, and
The, public are hereby warned agains’ hess, Beyars. 3.7,5-30 2.%,52—Tn. LOST that Adams will be contesting

giving credit to my wife, Gwendolir = the British Empire heav weight

Armstrong* (nee Hall) as 1 do not hola LIVESTOCK WHITE 1) for Standard 8 h.p. Pp y

myself responsible for her or "anigrone tio Salata eae 4 MISCELLANEOUS car, Lost between Speightstown and | title. â„¢



else contracting ny debt or debts in] BULIg-One (1) Pure Bred Holstel) |pyGinpcwanied by Bidas Brewers |Bridgetown. Rinder please return tol Although having no intention









my name pinicss by a written order? Bull Calf two (2) months. old, out of |. , | Neville Rock, dsbury Road or. dial o: t whilb f
signed by ine P.B. Bull, Prince Albert. J. W.. Smith, | CO; Ltd. 10H. P, Diesel Engine, Phone | o65 Car M—2747. 2.7.5—2n a es eee a scelare, Mr.
Sgd* LISLE ARMSTRONG | Road Cot, St. Michael. Dil 3527. ee ey ve ys oes not mean
Liber vine we 17.521." | “SURVEYOR-ENGINEER would like to maE oe | Be ope - a“
3.7, 53--2n CALF—One (1) Mure Bred Holstein Cali et in touch with estate or building y'



——-——~- [two (2) months old, out of P. B, Bull

GOVRIRNMENT NOTICE "Seti" ag es

ievelopment. ¢ desi f ni A Se. I ‘ i hi i ee
ice aaa a amet with | US. Ait Force | retires nis? ene iat sn

everal years’ lene Wri L.c.J. ; :
Go havo, ae American promoter is interested































e in running a show in Trinidad
$62.50 POCKET MONEY easily earned Ch f M featuring both Pompey and
S—6 Sa ne > : y Subs 8

FISGAL SURVEY OF goata Bresh cit aa Appl + ‘Gyn REDIFFUSION Ix one month. 1e1s eet Adims » Sand ia Se, (is ile omen

§ § rathwaite, arden and, Country |" 4 1.7.82—6n o w ave to cut short my 2
BARBADOS shania a TOKYO, June 30, | stay which ends on 5th A

3.7,52—Q1 “DIFFUS 4 30 caal a * avs stay SOF ugust
Oe te eesiny CME eae: MECHANICAL sch ine. Subrerber recommended @ in United Nations “Hopped “Rides and Aelkrae plan to re MASSEY- HAR RIS ATLAS LOADER

*. Go Beasley, C.M.C., M.A., yee s2—6n. Jin 1 t a

oa the Fiscal Survey of Barbado ae ten ices ne CTS. cP Reeres ie te sake main in Trinidad until Septem- The Super-Six Atlas front end loader is one of the latest develo;
are available at the Colonial Sec~| 26,1. .M: yj Automatic, Record | commending REDIFFUSION. obtain {2S Visiting oon ee at per, one hg pie, will ieee to ments to make farming easier, more productive. Full hydraulic
retary’s Oulice at tne price of $1.50 ull particulars from the REDIFFUSION |air force officers co ngland in time for the season operation and perfect balance assure the operator of simple
each POULTRY wee inal ah go sign pind — wre dhat tonth. sewers... LOR * control and instant response . . . makes continuous spor a
. 3.7.52.—2n aie entation | “Preemesceeraer air eck carr ren ste | ALOE, Caan | See aoe end of that month. i -breaking chore. Attaching and de-
‘ | PIGEONS—Whie, Blue and Silver| jdm heaiituslon for 28° recommenda, |. The delegation headed by Act~) A big reception has been Beagrie te a few Siecned making the tractor
‘i Kings Phone Humphrey, 4428 tions in one calendar month, ing Air Force Chiéf of Staff Gen- planned n Trinidad for these two 6 ope fi k. Fi ‘ailabl
, bour “Ss I a ‘ui 2.7.52—2n, 1.7.52-6n. {eral Nathan Twining and Under} boys in recognition of what they readil available or other work. Five attachments are av: le
re mm y y TOULTRY chnperad Cannalan LATE = Secretary of Air Rosell Gilpatric| have done to place Trinidad and with 14 yard capacity; they easily lift 1000 lbs. to 9}4-feet in
A di d Pekin Ducks. 170 egg strain. Ap- FOR SALE arrived at Seoul Monday accom.} the West Indies generally on the 9 seconds. Maximum capacity is 2000 lbs. See the Super-Six
journe ery 5 ipa, ton wens Old. 5 is panied by Far East Air Forces} boxing map of the world, and the Atlas soon!
i ‘ee

MISCELLANEOUS Commander Lt.-Gen. Otto Wy-| Police Band will take part.
piste land, Six Major Generals from ———————
RECORD—Just Received. Long Playing, |Air Force Headquarters in Wash-| In Touch With Barbados

Calypsos, (Edmundo Ross) Charlie Kunz, |;
Mildred Atwell, Tea Heath, Billy Cotton |#2gton are also included in the Coastal Station



" rakes Seven dollars. Ducks Six dol-
His Worship Mr. C. W. Rudder, } ars, on View Friday 4th to. Sunda;
Coroner istrict “A”, yester- | ith. July, 4.30 p.m. to 6,30 p.m

day adjattrit™ until July 16 thc] 4F* Peebles, Bayleys, St. Philip.”



COURTESY GARAGE







indugy scingo, the . circumstance: Artists). Wm. Fogarty (B'dos) Ltd... | BTOUp. : Cablé ard Wireless (W.1) Ltd. advise
sg RO von ay |_| MIBCRLLAN OU Bie | eet tes Sa tates | alte ear seem Be
r a a :

Tields, a Yabourer of Foul B: ——_————— | con A ew shih P on 0 e nature o the owing ships throug! eir Bar- »
7: EC Sv pment of 38 1/3]. . pal
St. Philip, Agricultural ar and Sickles c.D p.m. records just received, selections Jit was speculated that the Air ae Gene ek Shemivuiniss. 96a. ROBERT THOM LEIMITED..

‘Allan Ei@las died at the General Jordan & Co,, Spe ightstown. 6.52-—4n, | from, South Pacific, Cakypsos by Edmun- | Force brass is conferring on the| ,. Dublin, 8.s. Fort ‘Townshend, 8.s.
Hospital J 23, after he was} ——— . Ao. Ross Dick Haymes album ete. }type of Communist targets to be/ Uruguay, s.4, Sun Rover, s.s._ Philose- q
aiiined ees leak Leen ie: SEREALS—Shredded Wheat, Corn | s.Geatn a Co. tan” Bisetia pit attacked following last week's | pher, Aicc ay Star. § Bi apooele. DIAL 4616

* I lakes, Oatmeal, Al 1 Makes, in | ¢.084 ~ ; 5.8 lcoa s.s ‘ansporter, «
juries which he sustained when | ras” Ween FORD aS, Hocbuek st. p2kene 2973. 3,7.52—n.| controversial assault on the Reds| 2) Attica, és. Argentina, s.s. Siranda,
he was involved in an accident | iat 4499 ; 2.7,52—2n | "Sry. pe Meek Satin. Heavy Yalu River Power Conan, ss sicon Planter, s.s, ‘Alabama, 8.8.
§ C —Cre —UP. mpéria ebec, 5.8. ores,

with a motor car on Haggatt Hall} “Aig In dine cu Pears, Peaches, | Quality, Satin Ribta dn o, Blue & ADR] ™ .

Dark a 8 in. au ; nO te
luced to yard a irpaiani, 52
swan Street, 3.7, 52—1n BARBADOS.

Road, St. Michael, on June 18. sliced Pineapple, Prunes, Guavas, Grapes,
A post mortem examination iso Sliced Carrots, W. M. Ford, Roe-

















nuek St. Dial 3489. 2.7,52—2n
was performed by Dr. A, S, Car ave ewe —_———
at the General Hospital Mortuar; { GALVANISED—Special offer for _10 | , Subscribe, now, te, she Badly oe ae CHANCERY SALE
on June 24. Te Oe eee te eae ee aes: | ctiving mâ„¢ Barbados by Air only -& The undermentioned property will be set up for sale at the Registration Office,
Sgt. Haynes attached to Dis-] :\so galvanised naile 39 cents per ib | !¥® after publication in London. Con-| Public Buildings, Bridgetown, between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the sum and on }
trict-“A” Police Station is con- ] \uto Tyre Co. of Spry & Trafalgar St Sean ee a ke eit free yi oat cided below. BPRS Whe ci eon ame Sole an aieutiee
es. the inquest on behalf-o'} Wal—eepe 21.6.8 hE aT he be on application ‘to me. : ‘ ;
e Police. LAMPS—A new shipment of Candia lO IIIQQQQeEv—VO eee — : Beers — = Plaintiffs
ce TINNED MEATS:—Luritheon DAISY HERBERT MURPHY and JAMES GRANT ATKINS PILE—Plain'
Corned Mutton, Cereal pele Brisket ft, executors of the will £. Eyare Murphy, deceased
d Steak & Puddings, W. M
tora, Hoebuck Btrect. ‘Dial 348, MILLICENT WAITHE and AURELIA CLARKE—Defendants

2.7.82—2n

SS acting herein by D’Arcy Augustus Scott their constituted Attorney x
TOOLS—Hand Drills, Hand Saws| PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at Eagle Hall
rom 18in. to @30in. Back Saws 1l2in Road in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island containing by
ind Idin., Compas Saws l2in. & I4in., » admeasurement nine and three fifths perches of thereabouts abutting
Oil Stoves Spirit Levels sin. to 2in and bounding on two sides on lands of Albertha Payne on aye ;
Braces & Bits, Plyers, Pincers Squares now or_Jate of one Mrs. Thomas and on Eagle Hall Road aforesa
f or however else the same is abutting and bounding Together with ‘







ST, JOWN'S BABY. WELFARE aes
enn ieee tee a ahaver ey ee & “einone the messuage or dwellinghouse thereon called eve ay ors
me ae oF land enedied and Built standing ahd being With the appurtenances.
WATER COOLERS — 3 Gal. ,| UPSET PRICE: £1500 0. 0. ,

Imported. Strongly built, only 4.
Just in time for the hot months, |DATE OF SALE: ifth July, 1952

; 3 H, WILLIAMS,
IARRISON. Dial 2364. 4,7.88—2n Registrar-in-Chancery,

me 4 + 1952.
WEDDING GIFT-——A few ironing board oA yy ea—an

and No-cord iron sets, subject to special
wedding-gift allowance. A _ Barnes &
Co., Ltd 3.7.52—t.f.n DPOODOOS

vew Tuc rur THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
ey on ng CORPORATION LTD.

carried out Engine Trials in Car-
lisle Bay on Thursday, 26th June,
1952. The trials proved satis-
factory and the tug has now been

put into service. r 1
Debate Tonight N Oo Ti Cc E

FOR SALE

We can strongly recommend
the properties listed below, the
owners want to sell and the
prices asked are all very reason-
able, far below present day
building costs.














tain Only reason for selling owne
e
1. OVERTURE Police Band

leaving island. Phone Vincent Burke
MUSICAL COMEDY with

Cotton Pickers & Chorines in
“Come On A My House”

3. DANCE. OF THE TOY SOL-
DIERS Fight Star Buds

| 4 SAW SOLO .,., Guest Artiste

y Mr, Ben Gibson

8. BALLET Blue Danube
Waltz Six Star Buds

6 TEA FOR TWO Dance —
Five Star Buda

7, PARASOL DANCE ....,.. see
Pour Star Buds

8. A_STRFET SCENE (Sketch)
Mrs
















MODERN BUNGALOW, Graeme
Hall terrace,—A nicely situated
stone bungalow on a corner site
Three bedrooms, living room,
dining room, verandah,

rs



cCetached garage and serv
quarters Pleasant garden
laid out with lawns ar
ot flowering shrabs.—£



borders





RESIDENCE, THE GARDEN,,
Worthing-—-Modern coral tone
bungglow on corner site with wide
frontages, Pleasant garden with
flower beds, lawn, cor
race, and number of be
tre



able lamps in various designs Why
1ot secure one now, when we have them,
rom Da Costa & Co., Ltd, Electric
dept Phone 3878 3.7. 52—6n

“Third Annual {ites Sasa
Benefit Show & Dance LAUNCH—Cabin Launch, Morris Vid

tte Engine, excellent condition, a bar
In Aid of The CH. CH, and
At DRILL HALL, Garrison
FRIDAY, July 4th 1952 at 8.45 p.m.
Under the distinguished Patronage
of Sir George and Lady Seel,
Madame Ifil yresents
“| School
The Star Buds Schoo
PROGRAMME
Bart & Daughter
IN THR NIGHT





fruit
Accommodation comprises



























CES PSSODH-POSSSOG HOH SSO O9-5O0 ee

9.- BL : large living room, covered gallery,
Dan Guest Artiste — 3 bedrooms with built-in ward- “That the powers of the Legis-
Me. Cedric Phillips & Star robes, We Alted itohss,, garage Bere Cunes Seer iy are ANNU AL AUDI I
1 covered ay oO LOUSE ed” w e deba a he Assem-~
. veTvant’s quarte d all 1 :
0. BALLET |. Rose in the Bud offices. All public,utiity serviees. ||{bly Hall, Speightstown, to-night :
11. KYTTENS ON THE KEYS Tat Drone Carries Cur Bigbsst at 8.00 o'clock. Opposing each ALL PERSONS having ACCOUNTS against
aeNe + s ecommendation z ;
Two Star Buds . other will be Mr. F. A. Smith and requested to be good
12. COUNT EVERY STAR .,,..... 11, GRARME HALL TERRACE— Mr. L. A. Williams, both Bar-} this Corporation fate ‘ he 30th
oe eee bb snares Recently, built 2 storey house risters-at-Law. enough to send them in, made up to the
13. "BA py OSES OF ray sonst> d of stone ‘ verite . 4 |
Eight Star Buds SBoet Marge iiving soon, anus, CY | of June, as soon as possible.
KISS WALTZ .... Star Buds 3 bedto hen, laundry, 3 a j
FINALE, : Madame 1A) and bile ‘ na errere, es * |
Star a 5 te 3. . J] : 7 y |
ademee fete! ee Anniversary Service
Mr. Sohn Beckles, M.B.E., Master ® |
packs Coreen OFFICERS & MEMBERS THE BARBADOS ELEC |
NCING AFIER SHOW 2 5 "
John bd. Biadon Scottish Diamond Lodge
Bi BA ale | te Ma CORPORATION LTD
a plin, ae, ne u Tr PB ’ t { iC “ir
direction aes Capt OCR AtbGn, he Cc @ - : 2 ey . | “ sShes :
A.R.C.M,, M.B.E.. the Police Ba igs . 7TH ANNIVERSARY ss SSeS SSS SSS = :
will supply jhe Music A.F.S.. F.VA ed at a Vv. SMITH
IDD FRI TS - |
ADMISSION $1 00 Real Estate Agents, 1f Meee LLOWS HALL . } Why 2 14
° Auctioneers, Building \{ Bay Street | J i I 0., Ltd.—Agents.
Wn atier ‘the Show as Surveyors, \¢ aie nager.
from Camunities or “tite “meee Phone 4640 1} oS A ee
Fud Bar ond Refreshments. Plantations Building. Hh Sunday, 6th July, 1952 \¢ 1.7.52. 2)
i] $5

apace enn a a ee
re eeeensanemcernsiariaenenrene—e—asaaant


















THURSDAY, JULY 3, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN







ea





HENRY } :
BY CARL ANDERSON $ IT'S ENGLISH “bat %
$ = looks = AMERICAN :
® IT's Smart st suitable ©
: or hot water emergency
“A ? aT mene Woke
i S Call and see it at
WHEN A COLD STRIKES, illt tame ord
He A | %4466000600076060000G088
| A } ed
STRIKE BACK FAST...

OFS

% LODGE STONE WORKS CO.
% A. large quantity of
% machine broken flint stone,
ss all sizes, suitable for Read or
S Yard Construction and/or
making concrete blocks, or
g any other concrete struc-
tures. The Co. also under-
| take the construction of
|$} Roads and Yards by con-











MORE THAN YOU'LL | § tract, or supervision,

EVER KNOW, MARK. x» _ Dial 2656

‘MM 21 TOMORROW. XS ss RAYSIDE
ys anager

.
‘
SPL PSOE LOO

T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH
| Clearing out our new stock
of shot gun cartridges:—

.







12 GUAGE ELEY—$11.65
per 100 NET CASH

Big closing out reductions



on all HARDWARE ITEMS.










3 GOOD TIME,
et ae USTERINE Antiseptic kills millions of ar
geems on throat surfaces... keeps them
from starting serious trouble. Remes>
ber, at the first sign of cold, gargle
LISTERINE Antiseptic, full strength,
early and often!

|
|
|
|
| JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
| and HARDWARE



SOMETIMES
I THINK BUMSTEAD
IS HALF-WITTED--
HELL LAUGH AT IN TESTS OVER A. 12-YEAR PERIOD, DAILY USERS

Sh OF LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC HAD FEWER COLDS! ®

=x
ee a a een en aeeeeremem enc

| ORIENTAL
PALACE

HEADQUARTERS FOR

WHAT A STUPID
MOTH- EATEN,



SOUVENIES {
FROM INDIA, CHINA @ }



THANI'S

Pr. Wm. Hy. 8} Dia: 5466















IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only




























OF course! I
WILL GRANT YOU
THAT/ AFTER ALL,
YOU HAVE LITTLE
CHOICE..

..FOR,
ENOUGH TO REFUSE, GARL
WILL SURELY USURP MY
THRONE — AND WE WILL
ALL BE LEFT TO HIS
TENDER MERCIES/

GIVE ME TIME
TO CONSIDER
YOUR PROPOSAL!
IT'S ALL TOO

SUDDEN / SZ

















CONSIDER MY OFFER, y
FLASH GORDON / WITH
YOU AS MY PRINCE
CONSORT, WE COULD
RULE THE ICE KINGDOM
TOGETHER IN PEACE.../

«. AND DALE

WOULD BE SAFELY
RETURNED TO

EARTH /

- ee





SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Hranches White Park,
Tweedside, Speightstown and Swan Street








Usually Now
Sch'wartz Mustard ; i .. AB
Cooking Butter—1-lb, Tins 7) ae 95 White Peppor--2-o8, Phes, . eb ave
Lea-Perrins Sauce —L, ve is ee
Veat Loaf * a be ‘. 64 60 Lea-Perrins Sauce—S. et 50
Holbrooks Sauce—L. ‘ . 61
, Peanut Butter .. sd Wig Pane) | 68 Holbrooks Sauce—S, .. me .» 45
Chutney Sauce
Sweet Corn... ni ai va: el 36 Pepper Sauce
J Tomato Ketchup .
COME ON .. ACH, I LIKE YOUR SPIRIT, Tomato Ketchup .
LET’S NOT TAKE ALL HERR HAZARD! ISS POSSIBLE * 7 ~ cd > 2 on Sn ‘ ,
NIGHT DOING THIS / OUR LEADER WILL ALSO! Dried Fruit Salad—}-lb. Pkgs. .. 39 36 Green Label Chutney :
Salad Cream 51
—< Mayonnaise j a “ i ae
> |—/.. fe aa Beer: Kings .. pl 2 ae 22
f of a4
sae Sg Me)



THE COLONNADE GROCERIES
The Place Where Your Dollar Goes Further

BRINGING UP FATHER





2 . 66566, GOO OOOO
9 °SCCDCG9GG COC GO SOOO POOP PPO OOOO LLL LLL LLLP LPLPLLPPAAPDAAAAAA AA

| : CMMIN > aie
| OH!OH! I GUESS WHAT'S THE YOU'RE NOT y 2 LISTEN- YOU! WHAT
ME BRAKES ARE BAD-Y (yyp/ IDEA OF RUNNIN! uIGGS- A PAL. DO YOU MEAN BY
pier INTO THAT PARKED OF DINTY’S ~ BACKIN' INTO THIS
pie CAR? WHAT'S LARRY LONIGAN GENTLEMAN'S: CAR ?

yoni’ pee ce] sree ||| USEFUL ITEMS...
ip tN f as Zi ay ho Ae } . L ers
i Baby Gift Paper CHALLENGE
Birthday Gift Paper TO THE
Wedding , ” BRITISH
Eee ) A ie esse Cellophane Paper CARIBBEAN



—POOSEFEOOS SP OGPCEEL EPPS.

ONE BY ONE!

by
THE EARL OF

Birthday Gift Tape LISTOWEL, P.C.

' RAWLE FARLEY

Wedding ” ” RITA HINDEN

Baby COLIN HUGHES
9 ”?

A FABIAN PAMPHLET

60c.

Gift Time Dressing S



Shower Z a

STOP! TURN AROUND. ) =
WE'RE GOING THE TEN THOUSAND IF / YOULL NEEDIT
YOU'LL LET US _¢<( FOR YOUR TRIAL.

PLAVPLLLA EPP AERP AAAS

ON SALE AT —

$
‘-ADVOCATE STATIONERY |

>

SSSSSSS SPOS POS PSS FOS SS SOS



; ROAD STREET
4
% é ; hI
$
¢
2 ys
“4 4 46,0 4,4,4,4 4 $4,6,666660600%
LSS LLLP CLE PBD LOO AAA PLL LLL LLLP LEP PSPLOFSDH

‘ ' ‘




PAGE EIGHT





Ry O CONTI LUC a
OM IN Te rich man’s
L blic
by JOHN gece bis pany
oY ie rm,
~ ; He Gawe aan
WATERMAN: be ReRACOREY
A arentnninryerd expenses need
WOOLMERS PARK, cast of the
Hertfordshire. Bony aay.
F 2150 = £300,
AERE Iam, watching the said} ‘amount
Hertfordshire polo for geet and
team—newcomers com- which ‘the
paratively among English cheapest item

polo clubs. That figure in
the bright scarlet shirt does
away with all those Kip-
lingesque illusions about
the dashing, youthful army
captain as the star of the
polo field. For the most
" striking personality here is
a chubby man of fifty,
Mr. Arthur Lucas.
Until five years ago Arthur
Tucas had never s0 much as
lifted a polo stick in anger. Now
Ff he is a dependable, accurat:

player with a handicap of one
He runs a stable of 29 ponies

the - Hertford- FOR THE
LUCASES,

shire Polio
Club, And he
is a member
of the com-
mittee of the

IN ACTION: Mr. S. E. Robinson
Mr. Arthur Lucas.



is the stick at

For the spec
tator the game
is not ar
Every Sunday
about 100 cars
visit} Wool-
mers. They
pay 10s. car
rrespective of
»ccu pants
Watchers who
come on foot
are admitted
free

One fact
about post-war
Rolo is this

he game does
not flourish in
London. To-
day there is
only one
ground n
London itself
where polo
can be watched

(left) and

Hurlingham ’ 0 every week. In 1939, four clubs
mb 2" (T'S JUST A FAMILY HOBBY * sitive
tion. ul- There was the historic Rane
; ing body of AT £1 200-A-YEAR OR $0 lagh Club, Now it is an allotmer
a polo. ds cae grounds
s Ss where the game could be watched
al). Arthur Lueas can put his Woolmers Park, which was once a4 Is, a head have been requt
entire family into the polo field. the home of the Ear! and iioned, although the club still
His 22-year-old son John playsfor Countess of Strathmore. He emains the centre of Mnglisii
Cambridge University and iscon- created a polo field out of & polo. The Roehampton Glub
sidered to be a coming top-clas: rough meadow which still yields where before the war tnere were
player. His wife, Mrs.Ethel Lucas a crop of silage. He built stables 150 ponies, now stages a ‘wo

behind the house
eereane 20 his geudy. sipping a
beer after practice, he told me

and 20-year-old daughter Patricia
also play. To complete the family
sporting album. Claire. aged



week tournament once a year.

trots round on a pony not much that polo was costly, but does ALL FREE
higher than her father's weil not say by how much, “It’s the
padded knee-guards, acting a: family hobby,’ he says, atee wore
ig e at ractices y ve 0 t c
unofficial umpire at practice ey coe. Wee ts ola etree Only Richmond Park, the head
him £300 per playing member Uarters of the Ham Club
7000 CROWD of his family—which makes Mains. Here, for no admission
en £1200 a year. His ponies must (age at all—because the ground
have cost about £5000 is on Crown Lands—many
Polo has now become modisi Londoners come at week-ends lo
again It is attracting more and CITY MEN catch a glimpse of the second
more spectators. It is having its fastest game in the world (the
best post-war si n. fastest is ice-hockey)
The man who has played the The members of his club Judging by the numbers who



greatest single part in this are mostly City men and local 69 there more polo in London
revival is the one-armed Lord farmers. Some of them have Would be po teiated But
Cowdray. He has five ground only one pony—although two is ‘meanwhile, if they want_ an
at. Cowdray Park. At week-end generally recognised as the alternative to Richmond Park
crowds of up to 7000 go to minimum, because the animals Londoners must travel to Cow-
the polo there. with the dash:r must be rested after dray Park, to the Duke of
Prince Philip as the a 7T}-minute playing period. or ‘Sutherland’s ground at_ Sutton
attraction chukka. Place, Guildford, to Bishop's
Lucas has also played his par There afe 75 non-playing ‘Stortford to Henlev or to
in the polo revival. He is s members who pay 2 guineas ¢ Woolmers Park
chartered surveyor. In 1947 he year, 12 playing members w WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED




bought the 18th-century house a)

pay nothing









For a farmer w



London Express Service

Nations Work As Partners
In Olympic Organization

(By CARL SHEPHERD)

ON JULY 19, sports enthusiasts the world over will
focus their attention on Helsinki, Finland. On that day
more than 6,000 athletes representing about 75 nations
will pass in review at Olympic Stadium during the opening
ceremonies of the XV Olympiad. For the next two weeks
these young men and women will compete in their athletic
Specialties.

That so many. athletes can get : seater tyne
together in friendly competition , a ‘
on a common field demonstrates Wale Swim Coach
the universality of spart. The
Olympie Games, however, do
more than that. They offer proof
that nations of divengent inter-
ests, languages, and potieel phi'-
osophies can share in setting up
accepted rules and practices and
abide by the deaisions of a single

governing y

The International Olympic
Committee directs the Olympic
movement and regulates the
Games.

A president, elected for a term
of aight years, and an executive
committee of six members, elected
for four years, carry out the rou
tine work of the Internationa!
Compe Committee. The presi-
dent has the right to make deais-
ions in extreme cases on his own
authority, but his actions are
subject to approval either by the
executive committee or the entire
body at its next meeting. The
Committee elects its own mem-
bers, which do not exceed three
per nation, from countries which
possess a _ recognized National
Olympic Committee. The Interna-
tional Olympic Committee repre-



ROBERT KIPHUTH
MR, KIPHUTH has coached

Yale’s famo swimmers for
37 years. For 13 years hig
team has remained undefeat-
ed in dual competition. He
has also been coach of the
U.8. Olympic swimming team
four times, He will go to

sents a majority of the nations Helsinki with the team this
involved in the Games. summer in an advisory ca-
In peacetime, ine Committes pacity.

meets at least once a year to dis-

cuss Olympic matters. The tech-
nical details of the conduct of
Olympic sports are left to the in-
ternational sporta fedelrations,
since the -nternational Olympic
Committee spends a good part of
the year assisting movements al!
over the world that might con-
tribute to the good of amateur



Olympic Committee is sought by
many aroups wishing to organize
end conduct sports meetings. A
large number do not receive its
Support because of their political

backgrounds.
The Committee also lays down
the principles upon which the

sport and to the ideals of the amateur status of athletes in all
Olympics. sports and from all nations is
Approval of the International determined,

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Before a competitor enters the
Olympics he signs a_ statement
which reads:

“I declare, on my honour, that
I am an amateur according to the
rules of the International Feder-
ation governing my sport, that I
have participated in sport solely
for the pleasure ana for the
physical, mental or social benefits
L derive therelrom; tbat sport to
me is nothing more than a recre-
ation without material gain of
any kind, direct or indirect, and
that I am eligible in all respects
for participation in the Olympic
Games,”

A country desiring to enter the
Olympjcs must form a National
Olympie Committee. The com-
mittee must include nationals of
the country who are members of
the International Olympic Com-
mittee and the representatives of
all the bodies governing sports on
the Olympic programme. Techni
cal advice and individual control

of sports is supplied by the Inter-
Federations,
These federations are made up of
members of the recognized sports-
the various
has
full control of its sport on an in-
conducts

national Sports

governing bodies
countries. Each

in
federation

ternational basis and
that sport during the Olympics.





Sports Window

Two of the most interesting
Water Polo matches of the
season, matches which will
very likely decide the win-
ning team of the Division
“A” Oup, are scheduled to be
Played this evening at 5
o'clock at the Aquatic Club.

These matches are Harrisou
College—Snappers and Sword-
fish—Bonitas, These matches
are second round ones. In
their first encounter, College
held Snappers to a draw and
Bonitas won from Swordfish
by an odd goal.

A silver collection will be
taken this evening.

















BARBADOS ADVOCATE



DENIS COMPTON Drobny Meets Pesults Of RbYC "i's

by PETER DITTON



At Lords against North-
ants Denis Compton com-
pleted his 100th century in
First Class Cricket. He did
s® in his 554th innings—
fewer than any _ other

player apart from Sir Donald
Bradman.



Denis Compton woud have gone
to Lerds even if the 13 bus from
just outside his door did not pass
the Middlesex ground, The fact
that there was a direct connection
simply made it easier for the
young boy who learned much of
his early cricket from playing
with and watching his father’s
team,

mwa, Compton senior, an accom -
plished cricketer in his younger
days and now an enthusiasu :
spectavor, used Lo captain the Bet
Lane Old Boys Xi. And while
venis was still a pupil at the
school he was adopted as official
scorer and twelfth man, When-
ever one of the team was unabl¢
wo play, young Denis stepped into
the breach, een). undaunteeaney
having to face bowlers 2
naiee aide’ than pigent, usually:

erformed with credit. F
z One day in September 1932, be
embarked on the biggest under-
taking of his et me Hendon
he caught the us Lae
where ot wan to captain the Ble—
mentary Schools against Mr. Tuf-
nell’s XI, Rather shyly but with
complete confidence, Denis ent
tte ground which was later 10
become his headquarters.

Like all good captains, he won
the toss. Then he celebrated by
sharing in a_ century opening
partnership with a young
London schoolboy by the name of
McIntyre, before going on to com—
plete his individual hundred.

of 14, had arrived, His partner
n the opening stand, which pave
the way for a handsome victory,
is now Surrey’s wicket-keeper
and always one of Denis’s keen-—
est adversaries when their
teams meet in London’s Cri
Derby. ,

Among the many interested
spectators who watched the
Compton prelude was Sir Pelham
Warner, a former England cap-
tain, destined later to become
President of the M.C.C. To Sir
Pelham’s practised eye the ability
of this young schoolboy needed no

second recommendation, and
straightway the decision ‘Was
made that Compton sould be

teken on the Lord’s staff as soon
as he was cld enough.

So it was in 1937, straight from
Bell Lane School, that Denis
Compton went to Lords,

Three years of hard work fol-
lowed. The young Compton sold
scorecards, practised in the nets
twice a week under the instrue-
tion of George Fowler, and later
Archie Fowler, the senior profes-
sionals, and on Sundays continued
to turn out for his father’s team.

After a while, he graduated to
playing for the MCC in Out
matches.

Came 1936, and Compton was
chosen for a Middlesex Second Xt
niatch against Kent. He batted
extremely well in a crisis, nar-
rowly missing his half century.
Then he returned to Lords, where
Walter Robins, the Middlesex
skipper, was looking for a young-
ster to include in the senior team
for the traditional Whitsun holi-
day fixture with Sussex.

Compton's performance against
Kent was brought to his notice,
and young Denis was invited to
take his place in the nets while
Robins and G. O. Allen bowled to
him. It would be a slight exag-

























aya

Ng

{
X
}
{
\



Denis Compton, at the tender ag@ ,



geration to” say he hit them alt
over the place. The construction
of the nets makes that impossible
But Denis so impressed them wifi
his beautiful stroke play and
quickness of eye and foot that the
empty place was filled without
further search

His debut was not brilliant, for
Middlesex did not require him to
bat until No. 11. But he made one
very good catch off the bowling of
Jim Smith to dismiss Jim Perks
@nd then had Harry Parks caught
by G. O. Allen. He followed tnis
performance by sharing in a last
‘wicket partnership with Allen,
which produced 36 and gave Mid-
dlesex first innings points.

Three more matches against
Notis, Northants anq Yorkshire

followed, all of them low scoring
games in which Denis gradually



DENNIS COMPTON.

worked his way up the batting
order, Then, three weeks after
his appearance in first class
cricket, and his sixth game, came
his first hundred, coincidentally
against Northants.

Sharing in a ninth wicket part-
nership of 76 with Jim Sims, the
only member of that Middlesex
side still playing regularly, and 74
with Ian Peebles for the last
wicket, he raced to three figures
in 95 minutes. This was the por-
tend of things to come.

Before joining Arsenal whom
he served with distinction, later
gaining a Championship and Cup
Final medal, Compton reached his
1,000 runs for the season. Ha
finished second in the Middlesex
averages to the immortal Patsy
Hendren, and was awarded his
senha cap. All this at the age of
1

Compton's feats over the years
have become legendary and re-
quire no enumeration. It is per-
haps pertinent though, to deal
briefly with ‘his most successful

Sedgman In

Tennis Finals

‘By DENNIS HART

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, July 2.

Jaroslav Drobny, the exiled
Czech and Frank Sedgeman the
Australian Champion will fight
out the Men’s Singles final at
Wimbledon on Friday.

That was decided by to-day’s
semi-finals in which Drobny beat
the American Herbie Flam 6—2,
6—4, 0—6, 8—10, 6—4 and Sedge-
man beat his fellow countryman
Mervyn Rose 6—4, 6—4, 7—5.

_Thus American domination in
this event, they have won it for
the past five years, has ended

This will be the fifth champion-
ship final between Sedgeman and
Drobny since May. The Austra-
lian won in Rome and Monte Carlo
and the Czech was victorious at
Bournemouth and Paris.

_To-day’s semi-finals presented
vivid contrasts. The Sedgeman—
‘Rose match was as tame and as
flat as stale beer, whereas the
other sparkled like vintage cham-
pagne.

Rose seemed to have an inferi-
ority complex. He played as if

eman was so assured of
reaching the final that there was
no point in trying to stop him.

It was thus made all to easy for
the Australian champion who
must have sensed Rose’s thoughts
and decided that with his oppo-
nent not going all out then he too
could take it easy. Most action
came in the final game of the
match. Then for the first time
both players appeared to enjoy
playing. Perhaps like the specta-
tors they were happy in the
thought that it was nearly all over.

How different was the semi-
final that followed. It was a
titanic two and a quarter hour
battle between two of the best tac-
ticians in the game to-day. Ex-
cept in the third set in which
Drobny was resting nothing was
given away. All points had to be
worked and schemed for.

As Drobny endeavoured to
manoeuvre into position to exe-
cute his famous forehand drive
so Flam strove to prevent this by
cleverly masking the direction of
his shots and varying his length
and pace.

As fortune fluctuated with each
move and counter move the thou-
sands of spectators who packed
the centre Court were kept. at
fever pitch of excitement.

Drobny won the first and sec-
ond sets but was driven so hard
that he decided to rest in the
third and go all out for a win in
the fourth,

But Flam had then tasted blood
and was aftermore. He hung on
like a leech and so keen was the

weason, 1947. This was a vintage
year for cricket followers. Eighteen
centuries flowed from the Comp-
ton bat, a new all-time recor
and a new record aggregate tota
of 3,816 was reached.

A knee injury in 1950 threat-
ened to close prematurely a
career which has outrivalled that
of any English batsman, includ-
ing even his great contemporary,
Len Hutton. Handicapped by a
stiffening joint, Compton lost his
ability to dance daringly down the
wicket.

Fortunately for England and for
cricket us a whole, he appears to
have recovered from the trouble
and this season is coming back
to his best form.

With all his success, Compton
remains much the same unaffected
person as the young schoolboy who
arrived at Lords for his debut in
19382, The passing years have add-
ed to his ability but, remarkably,
his enthusiasm for the game is
unabated. Long may te con-
tinue to delight us.



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PELL OLA EAE L EL ALAC CEC EP LLCS COD







THURSDAY, JULY 3, 1952
Dee cnn NY
Roach and T. A. Gittens.
M. R. deVerteuil and Dr. Klim-
Lawn Tennis ID Patio ae ee
The results of yesterday’s lawa |
bados Yacht Clubare- | THE WEATHER
Mrs. a eee nin Miss | REPORT
occ alae Watea YESTERDAY +

Miss D, Wood and Miss G.
Pilgrim beat Miss M. King and

Rainfall from Codrington: nil
Total for month to yesterday:








Mrs. A. A. Gibbons 2—6, 7—5, 17 in. 5
6—2. Highest Temperature: 85.5 °F ’
Men's Doubles Lowest Temperature: 72.0 °F

D. E, Worme and H. Johnson Wind Velocity: 7 miles per
beat I S. Robinson and S. P. hour
Edghill 6—3, 6—3; 7—65. Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.027

Mixed Doubles (3 p.m.) 29.943
Mrs. J. A. Mahon and C. B. TODAY
Sisnett beat Miss FE. Worme and Sunrise: 5.46 a.m.
H. A. Cuke, Jnr., 8—6, 8—6. Sunset: 6.16 p.m.
TO-DAY FIXTURES Moon: First Quarter, June 30
Men's Doubles Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

J. H. C. Edghill and C. B. Sis- High Tide: 1.43 p.m. é
nett vs. P. Patterson and G. H. Low Tide: 6.44 a.m., 6.21 p.m.

Manning.

H. L. Toppin and D. Blades vs. SSGSSSSOSGO FI OOO,

: —L.E.S. %

rd]

———-|% Colony Club §
struggle shat the first 17 games x
went with service. Flam broke 383s %
through Drobny’s in the 18th to %
take the set 10—8. Introduces %

Drobny came back _ straight | <
away in the final set and broke | B A R B E C U E >
through the American’s service in| i
the first gare. tJ \
bonetat thee the Czech’s turn to| nanos |

a on, f he coul y

services he would wn ra = Y SATURDAY JULY 5
did but right to the end the| %

American refused to acknowledge | % @ Full-Moon. Dancing § %&
deuce inthe ‘na ayceeonent (0B @ Bathing :

Drobny not only by his ies tants @ And Generally %
also by his perfect court de- % @ Quite Informal %
faeanour has made himself a firn:| % @ Reservations in *
favourite with Wimbledon crowds | ¥ Advance }*

But after to-day’s match he has a -
close rival for this honour in the 2.7.§2—2n. X
Person of Herbie Flam. SSO CCBBIOSSBOOS

ilt your game is
tennis ...

f offer

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$4.12 per tin.

If it’s Cricket ...
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CRICKET BATS

Autographed by LEN HUTTON, LESLIE AMES and DENIS
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PAGE 1

THl'Ril'i a II I \ J, 1.S2 BARBADOS Al.VOCATE PACE FIVE OFF THF. OISTIN'S COAST then has been a decline In the catches of deep sea species (if fish. Very fenflying fish and dolphin were tirought to the market last month. Iins decline signifies the end of the living fish season which is near at hand and the approach of the Hurricane M %  Although very few boats have been beached, their owners are ponder.ng on whether to fiah or not. Every man is watching the other in order to get an idea as to whether there are still possibilities of catching more deep sea Ban i %  ? ]y ~ abwJl *'* nsnln boati so pound* in weights. Much of the left the Olstin-K mooring* yester. weighb. was supplied bv Mr day. Should they return with Harold Webster. Ooactl of the !" f?"" b ly '"' c catches, prrhaps Amateur WaghlllftliK Auocla'111 be out during tlon of Barbados, of the .... Th cr ha been n increase in Turtle fishing has now become the meml-,hlp. Mr. Webster and n me Mr. Edwin Rosteni, a Vlce-Pren,','!* t,cnl ^ the Asboclatioii. VIMI Ihc "e club regularly to supervise the all the boati the remainder of the week tie flshin tnportant featuie Otstin's llthing industry. the past few weeks Turtle Fishing Is Important Feature At Oistin's A Monkey Robs The Housewife GOVT. REJECTS CEMENT PLAN CiovcruuiM.1 tuvc made •bed by plloto questions Mr C E Tliu E D. Mnulcy Mi Talai* !id enquired m connection with the %  : % %  of a crmeiii plpnt in the lsUiid Tb reply is that Ut Oovsrmuent doa not consider too ViMM or tbo paUnUal Internal demand for cemem •uAcioDt to Justify tlie tree Uon of an economic slsed cement plant here. In reply to Mi MotUey who enquired about an made quacy of bu service* on cei tain routes tbe nsBUT %  ted that from time to time ropreeanuuon* have boon made to them regarding the inadequacy of the bua ervlcei on certain routes. These com plaints have been inveatigated and then )u-ufled tephave beeu taken to relieve them. A i guM mg jusTbefo^uSS? the* turV.e h J^ "J^T, *<* EK£ catchers have ample time to haul StalSSf^ fl? !?t?i2P IP "*S their nets and so save them from ST} 8 1 H ls of th< i IW P 0 ""** 8 being pulled away by the boats d v "' nd * training hard In Rupert Harewood has been the P 1 'i r -t"n for the coming compemost sutressful turtle catcher Mr. "Jack" Ashby of OttUnS, a City druggist, is also Inking a keen interest in turtle fishing. So far. every day this week he has arrived at work with turtles In the back of his car. They were caught in his nets. tare ol Nets Mr. Ashby said that turtle catching was a paying concern but a certain amount of time 178,150 Books Adults In A Shoemaker Awarded Issued To s ^ m > -^ Year K h.ori.'l Setfi lee Vi St. LeoMrda THE PrBUC l.im;ARY .mud 17H.15U books in the I and 61,841 buoks in the Juvfnlle 1 i ided Mai.!.11 J9.-1 Thi report si w% m part:i-u iff vm these mi on* to adult IU-.idqu.iri.-rs — Adult "• %  %  "Uh < %  *'• li p.irtiNcnt „,.,, r.^fie,, ^ %  it boitk* durm. the >• tram all i %  ti38 withdrawn Bl UnBl f"i furif1-odg.e Road. Chri.t Ch raatatflay awarded gus I Hll Ro ., Ml -I W B I'tuMl.l Appeal. Origln..i J Bob-A Job W. efe W as Success Lorry JJfulrnyiil By Firv 139 Friendly Societies Registered The Report of the Registrar of her Motor lorry T 213 was -_.. pletely destroyed when it caught *wefor I tire along Mangrove Pond Road, St. Thorn JK ;.i about 11.00 pm >II Tuesday. It was being driven by Theodore Jordan of Reeves Hill. St, Thomai $300 STOLEN t'endolyn Je'Ter* of Roebuck %  t. City, reported to the Fothat $300 was stolen from bedroom between 7 30 gjfl should be devoted to the care of Friendly Societies for the half year and 10.30 p.m. on Tuesday. were ended June 30. 1930, was laid jr. results the table of the House of Ajsemvarious bly^at its meeting on Tuesday. The Police are carrying out inestigatioiu. the net* if the best to be expaclcd. At Oistin's yesterday catchers were drying their nets The report states:— ^ c r\ in order to get them during the There were 139 Societies on the vjOrdon ror Uominicn evening. Register at the 3Cth June, 1950. M>. G. M. Gordon. OB F... Seine fishing is at present also No Society was registered (iurA.M.I C.E.. Engineering Adviser to S laying a big part in the IHnM of Ing the half year the Comptroller fot Dove! ie fishermen at Oistin's. At The following Societies were pnd Welfore. will Leave Barbados Mn| on Bob-a-Jub Wtek .'.: % %  ir .1 E i.Mftitii i th'fllll in th. pre' %  "de-pii iking a total IMUO nlimo-i ol important drawback t g.sV.5 a* comI' %  '* I ' 1 f, 1 Bob-a-Jit, U previoua w "* fc w " %1 .„ rni lalsmd CORunuBionai -nu tcaturei twid at i %  nd fujb iiwt%  Kimeniakw f ilng in. alfoii In iptl %  i i nine ruthrr than pnstp -IUIIK ih tMolu K lsllv '' ' %  %  '' dad QiUl [changed : '" ,K ,!l %  '" '*• imt'ln-can ba it h, I"' 1 upon i"i rapport if and artel I ,, i ... %  .'i pTOsH li tin in in Hi. rlgt m rfe Ul a idull %  '' %  -" %  '""> %  "i" li'-n.v i i tut (.wttu to UN |i '" "' Bootrti and tr< i i ill plrH ith whu i throw thajmaelvaa Into J i v. "n-ii I) ii"' alwarei MMlMa fi"' were clearly mantleatad. n t %  fall the d. mm.ts ol lhi a | pport latea thai n. i %  beii %  % %  • I moat l urM '" hand m The r lima fil !hp ""gelt amount ol $127. filing helper, i. "'" -"i" •< %  < '-"" I h' I i < Imitad l" meet TuUv T>c ^c "I tarmng the highest mtnoat dividual amount was Jo..ea of th. OJ arhom live i n the scattered Cathedral; liioap TQW boi I m and reniiP villages, and. glfo. as '".00. Ttie iireatest number ,t me of (he rtathms are e*tabJ ub " parfonned by H. S. G li.hed < n dislr ts that are not the t Harrison CoUoga, ItV an avort most oonvanlani In enable memof fl i day. Creditable am^uti make full iisc of them, were earned by Garrison S Uon is botna; pjhran to Scouts, *937. Cathedral Grw Dm tifl th.year 61.841 bookthe inade whera hooks n-ldcrcd su'.tablr lor %  i gh not aphfltlful \-earv warg racalvad '"d the donors In each cose gratefully thanked for '(.mi. Head.) nailer* — Juvenile DepHrtnuni 1.841 book ible to [mi Ml bil He said that ha ing on the left side .-' Hmid. Christ Church whan " 'icctdtnt OCCUrrad when Knmdin nenllKently drovfl and managed the lorry M-2S43 which he was driving %  long the same road, and ollided with him He and his i .y.-ie ware tnron a to lhi tiiuund and ha waa injured and nu Uereta d.^maferi. loyalty and chru. tun until i to DO. Bl a devoted miUhei This was followed bv the singing bl the Hymn "Afatda with Mc" and the Benediction" INTRANS1T ON "COLOMBIE" rha S.S. Colomble arrived It Bu nalarda) ti.im Martinique with Intl passengers. Many He claim..! thai rusmdJn bad ***** visited the km driven too dose to hi -' ll ClOUUBi from th.nvertaking him around a curve in atOfag the road and he was aksD driving ThColomble left 1 ter in tho .:, i-\ day for Trinidad en the 3rd July eeks' visit to Dominic WHAT'S ON TODAY Poll ce Con rta— 10.00 a.tn. Water Polo Aquatic Club— S 00 p.m. Mobile Cinema, Reef Ground—7 30 p.m. Police Band Concert. Queen's Park—7 4f> p.m. about 8.30 a.m. yesterday the amalgamated during the half year, large seine boat, owned by Lewis vn:— Fleming, returned to tho beach The Church Revival Band of with 175 pounds of seine fish. Charity F S. was amalgamat>d mostly Jacks. with the Holders Hill Scout F S. Fleming's seine nets caught a The Queen of Sheba F S. was similar amount last month. Yesamalg.imjted with the Olstin.s terday's catch was quickly Mutual Endeavour F S bought by waiting housewives. The True Shepherd F, S. was Other fishermen are hooking amalgamated with the Uon Duke goat ilsh and bringing them to the F. S. market. On the housewife's No application for registration menu, "goat" tish, jacks and was refused during the half year, turtle are gradually replacing tho No ;ociety was struck off th* much loved flying fish. i during the half roaT, The largest catch sold in the market la.it month was on the 11th. That was 1.994 pounds of Hying fish. On the other days catches were well below the 500 pound mark. The catches for June th.F vear ore, however much better than those for the same period last year. The new type of powered fishing boat which is being built by Corlclt Yard at Oistin's has reached the sta^e where it will now be planked. However, Us owner. Mr. Lewis Fleming, is awaiting lumber. As soon as he gets his supply, work on the boat will be resumed. The boat Li expoctod to be completed In tune for the next fishing season. Fishermen nt Oistin's are contheir meeting on Tuesday last, lemplating holding a "singing" in The figures for General and sanitation, and to glw memory of two Oistin's fisherCcmmunicuble Disease st.ted in by lhi men who were lost at sea during the report were as follows — lontinuc. the fishing season in the boat Diseases of Early sMkney wrr.' l^bereulaalo:— 78 and i DM Iw -I..-I i • %  i of 8.U31) book: i.t the cloaa hoi Itttd unfit tor iking a totnl stock in this dep.n lincni I tin>.-..i |JM a. iheae efforts it is hoped to eatab)-*h more fully t*>e usefulness of ihe IVpo*.i Stations. of in.' Speight*scheme during tho year, making Mrongly recommended that th ethod be used nnnunlly to BPH Headquarteis' Fund. 406 Deaths In 50 Due To Diseases Of The Circulatory and 385 taJton irt the %  • account of reaching the Blje inn making a total membership 0 6.622 -t the close of tir i UM stock of this depart merit supplies are drawn for th jun town itr.uu'h Library, the tw Government Indu-tml BchOO u.i ih. eight Deposit Stations. As it is n UM iiiveniie that Id %  %  %  apaclal attention must b* given t 1 tna MMCtlon .>t booka n ordar 1 1 enable the seed gradually to grot*. and dovolop. It bj m Ini %  tlut the main problem of this department li<^ Tinmarkets of Canada and. UH l' SA., frori Which 1; rge quant ties of book. 1 . lously drawn, .1" tloaod on account .>f cUrTCDC) Tlie iglai Coom kisBooai 0 served that in quit, g numptl 1 iscs Jobs were paid more th, they worth while in a number tin %  grossly underpaid This w, s School Libraries llennrtmrnt ' standing that the )ob ... %  to 1 Tins department begun to rumpaid a bob or 1111111111; nn i< Uon in October, 1040, under a UVg -( ""• nature of the Job (> li ^il s.lieme fin* the supply ol tho tune required to 1 pb U books to elementary schools. Ten Concluding his Raport, the I %  vhoob weubrought under the land Commissioner writes "I mini, total at the close of thi 2H schools to which books are supplied. During the year 1.011 new books were added to UM vtixk. making ,1 total stock of Kg at the C1O.IT of the) <.,r Books were issued to 8.135 children durng the year as com1 "i arnh 2.042 m the sl*rnontha i>eriod in the previous >er during wh.h the scheme 1 for the first tune h/if>nrt Licences \\ Ul B0 tssurti itiolUi nt Supplies state will As the scheme ittd as Its su itably test trial 1 'I'm is being, made t %  1 the oAV lancy of Ih verv importahl Hei..i tmeni ,1 I DISEASES of (fie Circulalorv were responsible lor hlgfaoal |ava| )%  lo 40G deaths in 1950, 15-ld*!. of the total death:., the Directoi of Medical Services stated in his Annual Rep-irl for igSO1 )! in i cr e*t' In thalr' bbraj which was laid on the table of the House of Assembly at hour" was continued us a weakly ut ilh 1 %  .', %  %  tsDN i'" UBUal entertainment was Kknn for the childn n. man] ol a hom wt ra gi 1 1 fit. 11 msideratioii will be gi ing lirtnces for importati<< Horn all KOUrcasj Ol item* win. %  !" n "" "^" u ",',"', ^"i"" OvlUbl) rest wth lb,. tVache'is u.elud. pollard, hnaeed. oilme 1 K?^S5!kl^^ff^ £?" *"< • r^poiisihlo for Kemg ^roundnul meal, alfalfa M.-i thr issue and return ..f th, hoofcg and their proper Cgdnl %  !> will I*. w.iu-hed will ea-re with a view to its incorporation Into the I'ubii. 11, civic., on 11 permanent basis. The statistical raootdsl that nrkepi tl iJ< ng cif the scheme are ludod in iho general statistics of the Public Ubrary 1 tho M tl i|>en market. In apilo Of (fall dlsiidvantag* ajfon sprouts, corn gluti grain and corn paoplt who wish he mp rtiiiion f *'iy of these mmlihes have to make |ppla %  •' to the ofllce >f the ControUai not l.dei Ulan 10 a. nn ,I„ly 14. protocUon %  Miss Pam. They hope, with the n sponsible for 472 death." ropronotified as against approval of the fishing authoriscnting 17 56^ ol total deaths. Total deaths were 85. of which ties, to keep the "singing" in Disease* r the < Inulalor* 5 occurred In residents of the Oistin's Market. Nyslem were responsible for 406. populitid area <>( St. Muh.H A Miss Pam. with its two-man deaths, representing 15.10% of limited number of beds are availtrew. left its mooring about two total deaths. able in Almshouses for isolation months ago. Nothing has since Infective and Paraaltle Diseases •>* tuberculosis cases. Co-oriiinbeen heard of the boat or the were responsible for 320 dcilhs ided attack on this disease by crew. reprtsentlng 12.24f of tolai Public H.alih and Curs Referring to the unlucky crew, deaths. vices Is long overdue I a fisherman told Ihe Ad vacate: Inlracranlal lesions of vaacal'r • irr available m Ajipendix XIV t" "Clayton and Bud.were good boys, orlaln accounted for 210 deaths, "ie Report which cover a period They were my acid friends and representing 7.18"; of total death 1 think they arc deserving of a These causes represented 85% of Diphtheria:— 23 eases with oM ""tssCfcann'. t n .t n,t^h .R, A ..f,i M l the deatt,% du to <"*• of the death were notified u against 14 „,..„,,, f(ir MtaVams last cawh amounted Nervous System and Sense Or'" to 185 pounds which she brought KB|1 to the Outin's Market on April Dlseaaea af the Reaplratory ;4,sI '<--|MUit|t IH'V III I .K. \hn To More 'V^xe* B5 For I'rofilrt ring Agent: A & S Bryden & Sons Ltd. Barbados nil Or guard) hM > kindly ln,itie ni1 ih.programme included I;)V ,„ Knglond due to in %  a Christmas story whieli 11 rU %  g y Q Blyall whl • >f the children, n mtisicid paaaod through here VCMorda) quiz for what, H %  ,K D -., t.hmM, .. <-d. Chr'stmas (-.. 1 ,, ,v 1... ,, 1 cR ,,. %  [,,„„, pupils of the St. Matttilas Hys' Schi-il and u song by a meiniwr Mr. Bryan who is „ waUln I "^ %  r Half. ThM n an riinmeei with Ape* (hid, i "'''' '••" ?t OttracUVOl) IOC ,. VI ,, r „ r three monthsholula. , '": '•":' ," 'I'M H was accompanie.i by hta Wtf< l-'oiii-yenr-old saltsmnn thus Hadoad ol Indramac Ouwl H I 1 ,t ('inn 1 h. .!%  yesterda. ordM 'I to pay a fine of i.5 ful %  %  pun rayon U> g eUfltOmOl ll N DM 'Oil instead of a| $3 46 peri yard. TinHue which was uni-'-' by Mr. C. W. Rudder. Poll" Magistrate or District "A", Is It be paid in 14 days or in detau one month's Imprisonment will hard labour. 25 last. A troop of model boats, 24 inches long, is now being built at Oistin's. The fleet will raco * against hoata of a similar size along the St. James coast. Corlclt Yardc's Sea Fox retained the championship when a series of Model Boat Regattas, sponsored by the Oistin's Model Boat CJufck were held recently. Severaf Kesld< 11U at Oistin's are not a* Mncelhod over world Ulf) arc 0VM a monkey which n. seen rcgulatly in the morning. This monkey, which moves swiftly among the trees. ive put in its appearance in the dis* trict a few months ago. Unlike the monkeys at Cherry Tree Hill and Turners Hall. Its tem 342 death;, were rfghtored. "wJJJJLi not notifliblc. the five types occurred during the year. Of the 1211 deaths caused by syphilis, or 4 8*; of total deaths, 70 occurred within the lirst year of life and II occurred from the ilrst to the fourth year Th'. re II 1 •niproved venereal disease services from whK'h ood dividend* can be OXpoctod l^proay:— No new cases wero reported. There were two do-t|is. To think in terms of eradication rather than control is not too 1 .•! na hides some of the daVcacles purchased by housewives. It la not unusual for a housewife to i.iseover that a pint of milk and a loaf of bread are missing from her dining table. representing 12.72% of total 197 cf these were due t.i pneumonia or broncho-pneumonia and of these 95 occurred within Ihe first year. Deaths from pilmonary tuberculosis and whooping-cough are not included in this category. Dlseaaea of the Directive System nccountcd fer 213 deaths, representing 7.92% of total deaths. <' %  '"'[ and Other Tumour* were the cause of 173 deaths, rapresentinii 6.1*". of total deathsMore detailed Information Is the Appendices to tho "rong a presumption. Report and special attmtiotn is TeHnna:— 41 deaths occurred irawn to the eight maji r causes „, a ^gy,, of tms dlsea se Of fled under the ht num |,er ^ were It 9. Free antitoxin and fn ophylactic toxoid continue to ne ,. .vaUabh 10 mMlcd pneSSS.,!^?^ §| Tne Iteference secti.,: ; very expensive England %  >w about 4 I during the" yenr, making i->tal of P*'"' 1 whlch stock of |f>5 at th,close Of Iho a •t a,l,m year. Meat which is very scarce still rationed, but recently, th-re Deposit StatHins has been u good supply cf fresh Th.i..re pawn DOpOah stavegetables. Uons in %  -h During the first month he w. Of the p.-iri'he.iof St. John. St. in England. Mr Bry n said th it Andrew, Kt Jboaph, Si Luej ind ,M '" weather was rather cold, but It -.as, and two In St Philip, started to become bright (hiring %  During the year 3,520 books wera the last month. I it-sit Sii/t/tlif v Hvvvirvdl Twinplen Sharpener* t liarette Holders Photo r-r-inir* Te* Strainers (.old (hhiride llUklet's lleliil Oil Chareaal Bis*'nits Sillllary Rlorkrltes A A WHITE -I LINIMENT f death cbu Intermediate International List Causes of Death. Thc:e statistic ..re shown for 1941 '50. Communicable Dkea*es Enteric Fever:— 37 cases ware ported as against 69 in 1949 der tne year of age. ( .......... Our LOCAL POTTERY . the talk of the town (.LAZED HANDMADE FOTTKRV WATER Ml'GM t4.4>0 t-i m it A iniKiui Ml (iS S 3-00 SET8 af POTTERV KNTREE DISHES S3.5 POTTERV LAMPS MOO POTTERV PLATES 2.00, 11.00 each POTTERY VASES S6.09. t*.M. J2.M 11.5* ASH TRAVH 4t> esrh HOME PRODUCTS DEPT. CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad Street. lit OlVf**M IsT i nk, 111 la 4 Wiiltc at IS 87 Yd. •'Irlrmmvllm" This I. s v. material and rangr nt plan Mrvimbie art I. .tvallable In to #r# till, /—/s*IsV. — r !'i*.k, Silver. Champagne, Ecru, Lemon. & Id, U Blue, Tot Itose. I.. Boi le Hose and White — at $3.76 HARRISONS BROAD STREET-DIAL 2664 no ............ ......... .....a............ HOUSEHOLD GLOVES SKOL SUNTAN OIL &f KNIGHT'S LTD. ENJOY THESE nt ttrwtkUint — t.unrh %  Itin 11 < %  iShwarli Cieletlne—per I-as. pkt l.usbus Jelllrs (1 I'lavoars)— pit pkl. Koo Tinn.lu Sauce— l^e botUe Koo S.O. Marmalade—per ft-lh. tin l.tplim* Irenrh t'ciPrr-per tin Cl—Sssl I'ure (.rape JukrI ;r K-.ltli-M Sml. Bottle Ind PI I 1 Illl Jar ". • 77*. • i? Koo Tamiloe*Lag tins Drlrd Inn* S.ljd prr pkl II. in. Srrt Mu.l.i.l CWl. ,;.-, I)4nlsh Thick (ream—prr tin Kanrh Mtnerd (urned Bref—per tin ir.. %  ,. i. I.uurhr.iii it 1 Lost—per tin Brontr Ku-' It .r per 1-lb. tin -.UU.ury Oomoi Mutton—p-r tie. lluntlrv \ I'jlmert Dundee OasH— pag nn Huntlr> X Palmers Eruit (skr— prr tin Nrll.on. Nut K..IIper pk< lie— box or M P..tDe f.dr pgff UN Tate A l.rles Cube Sursr—per pkl. COCKADE KINK RUM NU .1 .is .a 1.91 UN .SI .34 Miiiislnlil ,'iinil iS. I!n.. I.!il.



PAGE 1

THURSDAY, JULY 3. IMS BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE THREE German Engineers Jump Ahead B. im MUD1N LONDON. Jun* 23 PrmMi ingenuity u behind the l)ig attempt now being made in Britain to motorize the pedal cyclist and five him power-assisted travel for a farthing I nuic. Already nearlv 250>" have joined In thtt latest craze In popular transport and, by fitting tiny motors u> their bicycles, are now calling; themselves eye* .„,-,totists Eleven firms have produced various forms of Chun-chug motor. Hut too invention selling belt Is the product of the pre-war Auto Union Company, on which Hitler lavished millions to make it the greatest motor lirm in Europe. The British company which bought It have sold 00.000 in less! than two yean. Th*y expect to sell another 30.000 this >, %  ,: Italian and Dutch n brain* a* well as British have made other forms of miniature motors. Prices range from fSS to S2I— no purchase tax. Paw a simple driving test for 5s.. and you can become a licensed cycle-motorist for 17< 6d a year, with insuranre as low as 12s. Hundreds of elderly people who gave up cycling because of fatigue %  if awheel iiKam—chugging along with n cycle-motor. The one serious competitor to th| %  j to i motor is the motor scooter: Here again foreigners are In the lead Modern scootenng started with the civilian version t the British paratrooper's folding motor-cycle —the Corgi. Today, however. Enrico Piagglo. a 47-vear-old Genoese engineer who made airplane engines for Mussolini during the war. has sent %  00.000 of his silver green scooters lo all parts of the world—3.000 of them to Britain, The I-imbreMa. the second Italian challenger to the Corgi, claims all the refinements ani glamour of the Veepa. But Britain ia re-entering the scooter market with a new Corgi due out next year—if the Government allows the steel It will cost about f.75 will be as fast as lta rivals—and. Ilka the paratrooper's machine, will still fold up Korea War Is Two Years Old —There's No Decision So Far A few *l the teaa of thousands of war-weary South Korean* uprooted rreftl Ihelr homes real aear demnttshed Seoul Building. The Seeth rean capital has changed heads fear lasses, suffered with each. 1st October. 1M. North Korean .Kill..,H .-| '' IhH WTJ international trade fan which showed they will have to meet vigorous competition. Official.said lb* '•>"•• wh cn ciosi Ju'* 13 > *? vc Ca ".i.^2; lintish and American exhibitors a look at the handwriting on the wall i nentaj European exhibiton iniaTeued their showings aa much as 25 limes over last year and .got a disproportionate shareof the interest and the bu*m--AJl exhibitors, however. Mid they d:d well and miles fi-m unfair were expected to total eventually into tens of millions. "It's a good thing for our own industry to see what u is up aganst," one Canadian exhibitor said. "And some of the stuff has been an eye-opener." German and other contlncnAl eghibllors have an advantage in being able to promise faster dellverles than can British or Canadian plants which are short on materials because of defense requirements. "It's hard to blame buyers for patronising foreign exhibitors when they have the stuff, can deliver it tar ahead of our own pgantl and are willing to stand behind .t." an exhibitor said German exhibitors said they were delighted with the way their products were received. Their irutchinerv and instrument exhibit*were particularly successful. They rep* rted finding prices and B ilai u o-mpetltlve and their devcry dates were well ahead. German cameras were very poputir -nd German typewriters ccinl d/splay of leather products. Germany nUo appeared to be rec. j Tiirinx ltfl pre-w;r uDtemecy in toys. It fascinated Canadians with a seven-way bicycle. trains that run under water (ideal for playing in the Wthtubi. (et planes, toy pianos, and tiny auto* that can te driven accurately and electr cally. Dr. W. Muscheadt, president of the Gem.ni export committee. praised tiic fair as a "leiiage market" in .which German* achieved resojtg wto/eh ( %  I nol have been hoped for n weeks of travel. "As one who appreciates organ. %  zation. I must complin, -nt the conduct of the fair." he ud. At least '0 new nuustnes will locate in Canada this year as s result of -he rair i>nd incluuing *>n.t from Cm--.. star-wl pln'-ff C i i %  • i iFrom O-II oi, Conr>piii LONDON. July 2. Batsmen held the mastery today eogntriaa, all resident in Hampstead, will learn about the uJ!FLS"J.'i££JXS1!Z;,£ working, of the borooch and meet local resident, in a irT^Ti^ordrt i2iST SE "Hampstead Week" organised for them bv the British n"" setters was Bernard csmiNn Council from June 28 to July 5. "' Surr .'* wh "\ * 9 ' <•"= The students come from East Africa. West Africa. 'Srh*r !" L''^re? r a !,,S!", -i Honnkonp, Malaya. Mauritius, tlu* West Indies. Ceylon and India. — — SEA AND AIR TRAFFIC B.G. To Tax Commission Agents GEORGETOWN Ju The Geoiget..v.ii ('rhunber o I ummmv has approved of i D'afi Bill which Govwiimnit will ihortl introduce in Kir Legisla'.i cil and which seeks to Impose RatgdctraUon >.of fetf.uo on Coa misMion Agents and ha 1 NCtM of S4ti.nU The I ha howevci uifonne,! Qoeetli* •nit thjgj i( th* amount prvpoaed for registration was r diicevl. it would be i -lie Cham%  % %  :uiiii 1 .i,i Agajji %  iigin.ited several ye.irii mgo. In tinfirst i *utgestetl t'uit a tax ghouut be alia i 'ling travelling agent?, only, but that suggestion •*** rejected *by i^..ivernneiit who sUted that they would net be prepare.1 to impose ha reeerIstt ne on vbating travailing agents. %  %  'u l\nnr: \ %  \ he Chamber *>f a letter racepreo rroa Uw t B Wei Conmil. in wbn-h at t enUo ii wet rtrwn t.. i' i %  rueh was taking plnee on the p.irt of c*JthBit) fti-tMlbM Cinnmlaalon Agentv Apart from that nl IVIMI aentatlons fn.m rrp-rt:ibli' trad. lions, from Tnide Cnmml*%  lonenjand rrom oUtera, winch IndtCegM I ggiiOUs State of .ir;m> •iiicti had to themaii IN,i Cofiimtwinn ^( on thi^r III'S (it>\ %  iiiment beeuine cortcesrlsed ll the •ti il> felt that any small repuUble Ci'inmianion Agent would wekocne ah* protection which the Dill wuuld gdve, a* It aunod at protectim: large and ^inall agents, men *.f Integrltj The rresld.-nt 1 the Chamber UeuL-CM E. J Ha. wood. M.U.K. T.D., Miid Uaty were nil iigaajlinn • f the fact that Ihe Bill, like all -MilU, was not foul-proof It did. h..wewr, serve a useful purpo< in that all Commlasion Agi-nt.-. ineluding visiting agents, would • oniribute some small vum To keep 7/Me 6sy todies* fit ahd active... 1% give them HALIBORANOE • very day Tmu** *'iHrii imi rr tor buddm* op rcsen r* of riril energy, promoting healthy grt <>MX>V I : In Carlisle Bay M The week opens with a reception by the Mayor of Hampstead at the Town Hall, at which the students will meet members of the HnmpMcad societies, churches and other organisations helping in the arrangements. On Sunday, most of the students will attend morning service and then be entertained In the homes o* church %  iir-iii an South African Held In B.G. with nearly 400 runs on the board f"'" and only five wicket* down look '''?:" set for their tenth ctamplonship victory. Also in a strong position urr _*" Middlesex for whoin Thompson and Edrich both made centuries a.s in a second wiek*t partnership of ** %  345. Middlesex declared When F Thompson was oul, and upttired c four quick Worcester wIcKets beWi • uRI.,, DR *.h Ko.,1,,,.. Oov.. s,h i. UM ma.. i 5i.**5o ^O"^ ** Unn* 1''M Blu* Mil ABBIVALS i;iuu.. don. TdsMfed, 'S M TJBI I,-,. |,„ ra M.,tlnlq^ mrxi i 1.1 AU lr isi. ox Ti*SDt .. But Daddy Did Not Know Hebhl liurlng the week, there will be AJrici jr QL nty five year old Rasa fore the close o c*i:.r,n Araghi. native of South Huttnn for Yorkhhlre recorded f%£ Tr i %  ..i C ii %  . %  Aljr.u l( J U1 Holdr J native of South Hutton fa i being detikined by the his sixth oentury of the season n t ii. As*. -. D N*w. M UCilh>n I K rbrred. A rt*t *i visit.-, to the borough service* inInuingTstioo Authorities her* unand th100th of his career. He •* mrt> Lrm schools, housing and ltl arrangements for tus repatriabarbad Just over four hours and "•""> +•*. h i % %  Seawell • l-\KIl K> UY IS eluding schools, housing and health departments. Other hi,lon ,an ^ arranged Araghi wst Yorkshire after declaring put rangements include tea at the 'dumped' across the Veneaueis themselves well on th* victory Oeod Companion* Pensioners' border some weefcs ago by th*. road by capturing sis Kent wlckClub. a talk on the history of Veneauelans. His story Ithai hi* Is. In their two-day gam* with .. m.i*M < "' v "' Hampstead and a tour of Old ""'P lett hin behjnd in VenezuelB l->iirhiini the Indioni h^yc run Into v puarolaii, c Naatu Hampstead. a debate arranged bv three years ago, and he was held trouble, on an *aay pared wicket A it-.uu n arunih the_Hampstead Purliament. There Mi prison by the Veneiuelan* for the^ home side scored XOl before K'MCIUI r ^"rhi'-l^H will PIW be a tennis party arthree years until he learnt enough ranged bv the Fast and West Spanish to explain his presence Friendship Council, a puppet the Republic ihe. nd rial ng nged hty the Irrtcrnatlonnl Friendship League and the E..^' and West Friendship Council A number of Hampstead residents have invited the students to their homes during the week. The ten women students in the group will attend a summer'party arranged bv Hampstead Townswomen's Guild They will also vl.it gevten Pottery and the Hoa John ClirteT „,. to nW Keats Museum. assUUnce. The IrnnvgraUun D*On the evening of July 4. the partment has now written in* stildrnts will join with Hamp^ th African Oovernment to And stead residents at Hampstead oul f y, arff p^p^,, 1n „. -leclnring. of which opei.ing man Kteler made 135. In th. hour left to them the Indian* lost luirk wickets and at close hot*H...-U.U ie half *' st!% % % %  In British Oulana the Immigration Authorities deemed him ''till needed 1ST to an illegal Immigrant, as he had no passport and no money. Brought before the Georgetown Magistrate the Police were gran'nurharri S03 for" six declared ed permission to detain him until aims I ft for two Is and at close ft -, K "' !" \ ove the follow n MVtiuiM. N-'si V.i Jardnn I. Ma-al. r > Si#eh*r T IF V, ... (., | U.I.I-1. A •t. E MrMillm. Scoreboard Durham versuthe Indians: Inarrangements con be made for h'j repatriation. When the Leusue of Coloured Peoples heard of Araghi** case. iex versus Noithantv F.s*ev 384 for six. Tnsole 1.10 Glamorgan versus (jm^ Olami vgan 295. Linr. eight for two Hnnti versus Gloucester Hants 185. Scott seven for 48 Gloucester %  >' his own mind. 119 for four. Shinweil said is the Prli Surrey versus Somersei* Surrey Minister aware that he has Speech By Alexander rUUtfta Storm In Conunnrs Interrupted to say "I am spc.kin, with Shinweil on ;. perfectly fan and square level and giving full nruvsrers. That he should mag'-i I vary my remarka of wtuit k ..,*,, s„ d not .t,.„ h „ „„,h,. •ssrznrs <;KifotTOWN Jun. Because he is Illiterate I'harul\\.nka Ptraaud of ; ftallwnv Line. Kitty TOtai i know Uiat he could not be Ihe lawful f*rlh*l of ihe child of the woman hibad m irrM aceording to Muslhn rttei f'lid that wns hnw ho happened t.. a|>peai U-fore th* Cftf Miigislinte. charged with wilfully gl\ ini; fal.e infoniiation to UM ItegisliSl ff Birth* I'ersaud's Counsel told the Court ha. was really eonluseti aj to hto ndvisr his client to pl*a. and "ii requct the Uiignfliate agreed to heai the facts of the ease flrst. II nil rwi|t-*iied ihH way. Mnrnioon lfn\hnw hail ,>iven birth to n baby girl on lumary 7. By marrying acetfrding t-> Hoalifii i tten, he Is not legally hei hustinnd. Persaud did not know this nnd in giving Informntiou to the Itoglstrai ol Birth stated he Bra* the rattan. <-f the child and haah.nnj of DM mother. When he retUTMd home h* tol'i his 'wife* what he liad done, ami •he bem* lilerute pointed out Urn mistake t>> him, and he immediately returnnrl to th' Koglstrar. explained the error, and the ceillltlled and a new one iaiued. Town Hall to discuss subjects latlng to Commonwealth student* The> will question Mr. Henry Brooke, M.P for Hampstead The evening will end with a demonstration by West African student* of their native music —L.K.S. 384 for five Warwick The Magistrate versu* Leicester five for 41. ; 1V. : Sua patriate him. If Ualan'a Oovemmant says 'NO' it seems that Leicester 210. Or BriUsh Guiana will have no choice Warwick 78 for four, but to keep him in Police custody Notts versus Sussex or allow him his freedom on Iho for lx. bond of some re* pec table citlxpn. Worer-rter versu* Vlddle*ex .'ii that AraghJ can And work and Middlesex 350 for two declared so maintain himself in the Colony. Thompson 188, Edrich US not out In the meantirne Araghi Is Worcester 40 for four. C—--Ol**** Jo allowed to go la and out of Police Yorkshire versus KentYork%J%} Y MT ICttClo Headquarters. He is provided ..hire 283 for five declared. Hotton 'Jr./ _ with regular meals and sleeping 1M : Kent 108 for six accorrtnaodatlon. Araghi himself ;S quite puxzled about bis position. He says he like* British Ouisna. •aa Page 1. but would like to go back to his Marshall who made about £8 own country. "Ii* I am repatrla* wireless operator was arreeted ated I will go. If I am to stay in in the park last month as he was your country, I will be equally used Member* on this -icle of iwatiun of I'lTsuuil and ids CoUlittie House of lack of tact n\ i a*d who could not say that he now when one of his own Mini*, wilfully misled the Registrar trra U asked about dropping H However a plea of guilty was enbrick he loses his temper*" tered snd Persaud was reprimand—IT.p M and duchurged. Pleads Not Guilty Y.MLP.G. Bit Lynch's School glad.' John Carter told Ihe Magistrate THE Second Division Basket Ball match which waa played yeaday afternoon between 'we are doing everything we can y M.P.C. and USS. at Y M.P.C., for him. If they dont want him ^^^ n „ victory for Y.MJ.C i*ck in South Africa, he can stay -fl^ gu^ ., fMt ftnd eKcWn f,te *IK1 wo will find wort for tm^o^hout and at the ead of th* allotted time the wore was fifteen all, play resumed for another two talking to Kuaietaov. Arthur Mildon an attorney who tips instructed by the court .' ppcar for Marshall, said he h hoptd i^r the possibility of dethe trial ;ntil next corn'. stions in September but Go\ &•>• ernment had pressed for .1 to All now depend* on the reply begin Immediately. Mildon said 'rom the South African Govern£%££ tnd t the end of that he wa. prepared lo begin th!" f^Jli\'l"5^ d rt £ a | the score w ,wve*een 1L "" *-"-*•' %  _^ S£S%^ttJf^TZ2Z Alter -. - rm mm 1^_ while. Aragh, !s enjoying his 3ft*£* %!**,>£?}£. utSL n^r? tcntion' here. He has made many "I lm / T J !" 1 < !" ^h %  *iJ**" r *"! brancnef Cabinet maker Peter friends and he is getting to like ,lf th *t time O r.reenidge scored Purpel of Frankfurt planned to B.Q. more and more every da> '• deciding two poirrU. The chief stiirt small assembly plant n for here there I* no race discrlmworers we>c D Badenock and A. Toron-o matlon end nobody likes Malan-Jone* ten and seven points i*s*ec-| If t i• <"•.* i-nnt: it | may neither white nor coloured folkIvely for Lynch and G Creenidge i family. 1 H* said. . And . ''everybody here e BATTERIES FOR CARS TRUCKS & BUSES in ii'l ist! %  %  > %  %  J W I 'Hii .P 1 1 l" i CITY GARAGE TRADING CO.. LTD. DISTRIBUTORS VICTORIA ST. i:\i:ni: i AIMS si iiti >n roil Ti.aii-; ,\l IIAItn I.I 1ISS I.MlIM fr %  i.i.i..., U ... I, l.\ Ai.l si/i s & sunn s. !" AL HARDWARE IUCKTIT STREET fOppofit* Poet Office)



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I' \< I I III I. BARBADOS ADVOCATE I'lIBSDAV. JULV 3, 152 BARBADOS A ADVOCATE MH U AT.t.U Oft. LU kMl II. atlfttMwa Tlnit..l,i> Jul> ::. i:>:.J CHALLENGE PROFESSOR Beasley's Fiscal Survey of BSHMMIM whkfa STM laid in the House of %  %  y on Tuesday is a sober document, ful! of (haHen-e for those on wHom has fallui the heavy responsibility of keeping Barbadian economy on an even keel. maintenance on present lines •fit of existing central or local government services and omitting for the present any provision for the Harbour a* hetne w for the costs of estab I British Wot Indies Federation. Qovarnmnt requires to find every year IM oi revenue over that of the %  nd these increases will by ISDO/59 have amounted to about $2.4 million or -3 per cent, on top of the OsiAtnal estimated net revenue of $10.3 mill...,, for 196141." This suitence forms the heart of the And Professor Beasley proposes six main methods of obtaining increased revenue to meet this gap. After the introduction of a newtai'ifl and increased duties on liquor. COttOO piece goods and perfumery, a net of $400,000 is niggwlad Crom cus> %  OOiptl QOMT assessment of in>.. Introduction of new taxpayers ami natural growth would, thinks Prot — |.mduce $250,000. Increases in excise duties and death duties would produce $300,000 divided equally. Revision up duties, licenses, postal rates. .:tis and departmental fees and interest on invested funds would provide $280,000 while $70,000 might be expected from a proposed entertainment "'In%  proposals", writes Professor Beasloy "represent what appears to be the limit of extri annual revenue that can perl} bo obtained by higher taxation nnd improved administration over the coming seven years." He draws three inferences. it will be out of the question to maintain commodity subsidies for much longer on anything approaching theii present scale "and that the sooner they can be replaced by measures less costlv to Government the better," Secondly, he suggests that Government cannot in present circumstances properly undertake any new recurrent commitments which are not calculated either tc create fresh revenue or to make for more economical functioning of the Government machine. Thirdly, he suggests that another review of the prospects ought to be carried out after perhaps three years to ascertain whether the island's economy is by then exhibiting better or worse prospects and to make provisions for the following years With regard to the deep-water harbour project Professor Beasley suggests that at this stage of its development Barbados cannot afford to continue without a deep water harbour. And he makes it clear that the construction of a deep-water harbour must be undertaken as part of a full economic programme which includes nlaurinrnt of the airport (already undertaken). Irrigation to maintain high average sugar output, deep water harbour, assoii td n-lamatioii of adjacent land for warehousing and industrial purposes, hotel construction and extension, expan%  i of tourist industry by means of both increased accommodation in hotels and guest houses and of extended seasonal facilities. With tins full economic programme he brackets potential developments of an oil industry and minor industries. A programme of this order, he suggest! ean I oly be Rnanced from a combination of i tnts including private enterprise in lintels and oil and Government assets. %  fid loans. In obtaining loans for a full economic programme with its axis as the deep water harbour. Government would find that the monies at present absorbed unppilitablv in [nesting subsidisation would i VMS a very large ex al loan. i itle* is openly critical of the OOVO I I %  %  : 1 UbSjdl ..turn. "The %  million dollars mutually," ho •„ works out at ten cents I week per head of the population and u w Id* U nd that l" Our Readers Say; .I circumstances th contribution is really 'tnportant. Moreoeei U ( if llurbados is to embat k on inrm> progr amm e of davetopnant, %  i ill be on A hiRh level for years nnd iii "f the total capital outlay will be sprni on labour In die island. The UovemBBSOl onsutenu> it it made il kdiaa :it the same lime i-on schemes designed to add lo Uu national Income." Throughout his repoti PiotYssor Bensley takes ,1 Barbados' unique econonvc position In not beinj "under-developed." or "devrlopi'd", ti-oimmk' deiwudcnce >"• the population trtiwth HUJ outstripped ..Tin Ktual aRrnullutal expansion. His survey Is a realistic and sober kcumen, i,pi,.;..li..n Us the public ot Barbados ., QMbtc (ur undetsUmdinn of ihe ecoItl conclusions, proposals end recommendauoni will call t-t much revuion >f popular political platforms but capacity for iwision %  l>pioai-h to probItnei in the (ace ot toed It •' swi of healthful matui tv. Aii alternative to Professor Beasley'* sober counsel as uutlnr-,1 in A Fiscal Survey %  I Barbados will not To Tk$ Edllor, The Adiwolc— SIH.-Thu Leader of the House of Assembly, Mr. Adams, U reported as having said, in ttit dehats on the revision of certain %  Slariss <•( Civil Servants, had d•! me say here that I hope they have paid no attention in 'hose who try to flatter them that they were courageous In bringing down the* "unpopular proposals". This resembles closely* the praise given the ass. which wna told that In Spit* of tinadded weight on Its back and the advice given It, It had done a brave and wise thing in walking through the stream with n load of salt on its back. All praise to the politician who refuses to t>ow to popular wishes merely because they are popular, or does not flinch from doing his duty Uvause il may l>e unpopular with %  omr minor Section of the community, for example, even those Civil Servant* who were serious1> affected at the Unto and disagreed with him admired the courage of Mr. Adams in refusing In bow to demands for 30 or 40 i"', cent, c.o.l. bonus, and were content to face the hard economic facts which he then pur before them ami the public The people as a whole are content to bear the burdens of the emt of living when they are told that the Island cannot afford to subsidise this or that foodstuff and its price must rise But Is uni-ipul.irlty or hostility n N deserved than when, after all •his. ihe i*aid Civil Bervies sad puhhc are told that we cm afford a sum of $100,000 per nnnum on a small SSc M on of the administration, and where there is no Justification, after making provision for a similar amount which may be Incurred In leave passagas? What can be worse than, in the face of all this, trying to cover up such disci and political ineptitude ing: "Don't worry! We will eonlaii % % %  .• %  or "Blanle us for desaylna the illisslshllsti SSSBBI anil lllnillllllWlllSlat of the Anglican Church, but there Is no moral Justit)cotii>n (or isevftnf lliein out", even though they are CtvU Bervsnls and arc free to oppose the labour Party, for which they and tha Church cost this Island DV0f $40,000 per year? On no political grounds whatsoever should these proposals have it\ I the Leal wture. I know I hall I-' told that ludicrous, but ., panes al %  %  %  '"i" 1 I Great BrlU'n and the salaries paid there will show that tho colonies, and now Barbados, compare more than favourably with thai country. Officials there corresponding In status and ...I.ITV w.thjjurs have been given mere 40 per cent, increase In salaries between 1938 and 1951. The officer there who received £500 in 1938 would be now paid, by Ihe last figures I saw. £700 per annum and £1,000 In 1938 would now be £1.400 In the U.K. a angle man earning £500 would pay In income lax £T4. 3s: ir married. I 4H. 15s.. and If married with two children. £ 18. 3s. In the £1,00(1 bracket, the corresponding I T, payments would be £254. 5s., £222. 15* and £188. 15s. In Ihe £3,000 bracket, the d>ires ponding; payments would be £814. 5s., £582. 15s., and £528. 13s. These were the figures for 1950—51. During that time, outside the Service, the minimum wage of an agricultural worker had risen lo £5 per week, und the people, ufler the war, were rceq/.ving all the benefits of a Welfare Slate, viz.. family allowances, free gagajUCSJ and health services, social insurance benefits, vastly subsidised food and full employment. In Barbados, those officers In the £500 bracket In 1938 or 1939 are now paid £1.200 or £1.300. The following will receive mote than corresponding ofllccrs in Bflitish Guiana: Harbour and Shipping Master. Director of Education and Deputy Director. Principal of Evening Insf.luio and Vice Principal, Chief Inspector of Schools, most top Agrlrulturul posts. Director of Medical Services and most medlral posts. Director of Highways and Transport. Police asB^anratei (they start higher than Magistrates in B. ssn %  ncreaass tor imported uuivuus ana. in oruer DM W appeal uiKnrtunaiory, au top UiaeUUS. tae atti.uue ana paculini aigumeiits of Air. CUKC has %  Down UK*. stay i ieii hun However tnal his clevei attempt to justify the proposals could i. ao easily seen through that oe sOOUld oetlsr have Kept his inouib closed! It happens that ioe Laixmr Government has Dean cstsjnt by all this ospeciau> stter it was -K""'-I U onng In ihe other ranks later. This acl of appeasement brought aiound Mr. Cox qurto conveniently, and made him utterly harmless. Wiiat It will lead to I shudder to think. We will nave more inflation and leas money for social services and for the reduction of the cost of living. His Excellency knew this and lie really meant it when ho >aid thai we could afford only these increases. He however compromised to get support of the whole Executive, But does Mr. Adams really think, when ho says It would be wrong to :•.! % %  out other heads besides t'chnical. that any man who stepped up from Principal Clerk or from the Executive Grade to a departmental head at tho ultl rates could have any grouse whatsoever? It Is clear that all this has been done merely through the Imported men. 1 Hud that the buck-bent-bars of the Labour 1'arty did great credit lo themselves, to tho Party and lo tiurbados. They look a moral rtand and won a moral victory. They have dcmtmslrated th-it they are not content to be a mere sledgehammer rnachinc enforcing and legalising the decisions, howover debatable, of a governing lacy. They have shown lhat they aland llrmly by governmenl by a socialist party and not government by officials. Barbados is experiencing all tho "il Streets of inflation ut present. Small savings and wages are worth little and the gains made by thus* who Invest In such things as real estate, land and industrial stocks antremendously inflated. Further, what a noted commentator said recently of the position In Uritatn thai "in a period of soaring prices and profits, tho impoBiUon of a celling on food subsidies, social services and tho health %  srvsMI automatically reduces the real value Of the Welfare State to the poor and H real burden on the rich." Is also very applicable to this Island. Our Governor cuts constantly advocated a cut in our and at this rate of spending on salaries very llttie w-ill be found for much needed social schemes. After all, His Excellency from 1920. when ho served In the crown Agents to 1B49 when he was transferred here from Nigeria, has been taken up with digits and conservative financing and bookkcepinx. He is courageous and forthright, according to his way of looking .it. things. But ho should be made at this time to work out finance in the framework of the apllcy on which ihe Labour Party was elected. %  Mr Adams' highsouiKiing talk about "Labour Government" i : wninding brasn and tinkling cymbal. If Sir Alfred is even Financial Secretary and oewemor at the i-ame time an much Ihe better. lorhe loves litres and knows them well u u t unless the Labour side of Government can enforce a policy in keeping with its outlook and with the needs of the under-i rlvileged classes then there may well be further splits in the ranks a tragic happening not only for Barbadohut for the West Indies as %  whole. EX-^mi. SERVANT. >"*<• In Tho //anr/... r nrn* Frf " r Thr A<*rocafr.— ... H~T>} WM n>USed to read ihe thrilling account of the killing of a snake "among some bushes in front of Uie Barbados Museum" about 8 o.m. yesterday, which appeared In to-day's Advocate This snake, which was quite harmless, had been livinc for some time In tho I Of rhy quarters within fi feel of my li\ mg room. About 330 pm sevierdav it wag accidentally killed there In an attempt to recapture it. The body wai given by my who was about to bury It. to one of the cmplovee* B uThados Turf Club. Tho only accurate tact In your account i* that the snake was 3 feet long. Your* etc NEVILLE CONNELL The Man Who Did Not Want Money He Used Deposits To Buy More Cars For Sale From R. It MacCOLI. WASHINGTON. ANOTHER chapter is written in the extraordinary story of Robert Knetzer. It starts in the car-famine days after the last war. when he guaranteed delivery of new Qin under market price. Crowds flocked to his office and pretty well foiced deposits on him. He used the deposits to buy more cars, but finally the bubble burst and there was Knetzer owin g £1,000.000. * • AT his trial the district attorney asked why he thought he would ever make any money that way. Replied Knelzer: "I Just wanted to make a reputation, not money." He was sentenced to 110 years in jail, but last year was temporarily released because he said he could raise money to pay off a separate civil suit. And ha amazed everyone by handing in £60.000. Congratulations were short lived when it was found that he got the money by another confidence trick. He told friends he had bought a Christmas tree estate in Canada. • • j LAST NIGHT, in Springfield. Illinois, a j businesslike stranger appeared at the jail "George Hulcm. United States marshal," he snapped, flashing a badge. "Knetzer is to come with me. He will be returned later." Off went Robert with the "marshal." who turns out to be phoney as Robert's schemes. Now the G-men are searching for the pair of them. HAWAII is being sugared under. A strike has tied up all shipping services, and so the sweet stuff If being dumped everywhere, from tennis courts to roof tops. NEIGHBOURS of handsome Hugo Unwal. a 41-year-old carpenter, and his pretty wife Ellin, who lived on New York's Lexingtonavenue, were always hoping that there would be a reconciliation after they quarelled some time back and Hugo moved out. He came back. Ellin answered his ring. .Smiling, Hugo opened a box, took out a sawn-off double-barrelled shotgun and killed his wife and himself. I SUPPOSE it had to come. A man in the advertisements who wears a black eye patch and helps to sell shirts is now followed by a pretty girl who also wears a black patch. And she sells girdles. NEAT switcheroo on the "war is not inevitable" theme. Britain's ambassador Sir Olive Franks visits Dartmouth College in New England, and says roughly that in a speech. The undergraduate newspaper, reporting the event, headlines "War cvitable, says Franks." AVERELI, IIAKRIMAN lets it be known lhat that's the way he wants to be known during the election campaign. Seems he is not too keen on the William, which is his first name. BOB HOPE got a belly laugh on the air last night when his straight man asked him what he knew about the United States Government. "All I know is that I put down the Government as one of my dependants on my income tax return," cracked Bob. Oh, and Bing Crosby has just bought a big new twin-engined plane. IT is far too long since we have seen Her bert Marshall in a movie—but that's bein; taken care of now. His phone rings in New York, and Herbert is told by R.K.O. "Please be in Hollywood tomorrow. You're starring in "The Murder.' In New York he has been doing a radio show entitled "The Man Called X". ACTING just like a Rockefeller. John D jun. dashes off a note to New York's Metropolitan Museum saying he is giving il £3.500.000. Lyrically, Roland Redmond president of the board of trustees, describes •he note as "a superb and perfect document." The note—or the cheque? HEADLINE: "Coronation robes hunted by anxious peers." CHARLES IHCKENS. visiting New York, described the institution as "badly ventilated, badly lighted, none too clean, and very uncomfortable." He was talking about the City Home for Dependants (a poor-hnuae) on Welfare Island. Now a big. spotless and modern home is being opened, with beds for 2.000. It is some years now since the people there stopped bcrni; "inmates" and officially became "guests" IS AMERICA "turning out more alibis than airplanes?" Jim Lucas, investigator for a big chain of newspapers, is out to discover the facts. And. from Los Angeles he reports:— "The planes we make cost millions. The Russians turn out cheaper and less complicated planes by the thousand." PHOTOGRAPHS Copies of Local Photographs Which have appeared in the ADVOCATE NEWSPAPER Can be ordered from the • • > ADVOCATE STATIONERY I mm MATS: Plain. Stencilled and Decorated. Theae are available in (our aixes. CONGOLEUM SQUARES 3 x S yds. & 3 x 3>i ydl. CONGOLEUM: Six feet wide nnd cut to uy desired liie. Ph. 4472 a S. PITCHER & CO. CrUp. smnrtly-atyled MEN'S SHIRTS by CONSULATE—Collars attached and detached. SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS nnd UNDERWEAR DRESS SHIRTS by MARCEI.I.A and DRESS COLLARS Handsome TIES (Including BOW TIES, Maroon and Black for Evening Wear) IDOL ANKLET SOCKS and Hall-lensth HOSE in many colours and patterns Da Costa & Co., Ltd. %  > %  %  '' &f I MMMH I III III IH" CELEBRATE TOMORROW WITH A TURKEY SPECIAL AT Goddard s Restaurant Si'- %  •# tram IO a.m. lo '2 p.m. E.XJOY Ol II GOLD BRAID COCKTAILS FRENCH ICE CREAMS / l-lai-tiurs



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THUISDAT, Jll.V ::. 1932 HARUADOS ADVOCATE I' U.I SEVEN HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN STRANKS 8t GEORGE DAVIES BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS %  : %  -* BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS ME BRAKES APE BAD*M' THIS GOV4A Si,' A 0AL> BOCA" * /****AT S TUS 1 ..v 0)1 HU>* .' l jTO THAT BPkEL> V CAff** WHAT'S \ yxjo NAME r WHEN A COLD STRIKES,, STRIKE BACK FAST... l if USTERINE ANTISEPTIC m i:\r.LisH IMI Itwk. AMIKK \N \ +OO W fM 0 &f &f ** % *-'.'.'--.',-,'-',*,-.*,'.',-,'.*,'*'*W-*-i ^ LODGE STONE WORKS CO ** A large quantity of \ in Milbroken Hint alone. N all *l*e*. mltible lor Road or \ l .nl onitrurtton and/ar \ making conrrrlr blacks, ar •> anr other concrete atmr; lurra The Co. abo under> N take the i..ii.ifiiciLm of *; Ilnttti. and Varda by ron\ Iracl. or auperrtaton. I IlLsl 245. I KFITII RAYSIDE N Manager LHWM Aa*Uaptk kill, null— at Stem* on throat tatfmm.. keepa tbea* from nrtinf aerious trouble. I her, at the lint lign of cold, USTERINE AIII.M |MU. lull Krcsgih, early and oftenl M TESTS OVER A. 13-YEAR PERIOD, DAIIY USERS Of USTIBINE ANTISEPTIC HAD FEWER COIDSI • TO-DAYS NEWS FLASH Clearing oul out MW stock of shut gun cartridges.— 12 GUAGE EI.EY—tll.es per IH NET l\BH HIK do-tilt out rrdurllana .n .11 ll\Kim \ltl ITEMS. JOHNSONS STATIONER* and HARDWARE IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only SPECIAL Or FIJI* are now atailahlV at our Irramrhrw Whllr Park. TwaadaMo. BaiilgklalBiiai !" d S w sircri Usually Now I —t..., • Buller— III.. Tins H Gl .74 Sweet Corn .. .41 Dried Fruil -. ,l ,,l ]l |'k t :ia Brer: King! .. .26 M .21 Srh'MjrU Mustard While Pepper—-'-or.. Pkg*. I.rj-Pcrttn Saure —I.. .M %  .ea-l'ertTn* Saure— S. SO ll..llirukK Saner—I* II.ilhrook* Saure—S I hull"y Saure 55 I'rpprr Saure lofnalo Ketchup Inriniii Krtrhup ( %  tern I Mi. I Chutney Salad Hfjin .50 .5X M mine D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street THE ( II I \ \ A II I GROCERIES Thm t'U.r.. II #...• %  lour Hollar Oaat Further %  '.'.w.v.-.v,v,w.-.%w, w .-,w.-.v.v.w^^^ USEFUL ITEMS.. Baby Gift Paper Birthday Gift Paper Wedding „ „ Cellophane Paper Birthday Gift Tape Wedding „ „ Baby Shower „ „ Gift Time Dressing ox SALE AT ADVOCATE STATIONERY lino yii STHEET CHALLENGE TO THE BRITISH CARIBBEAN hy Till; KARI. OF I.ISTOWKI-. P.C. K UVI.K I ARI.IA RITA HINDIS COI.IN IIITail'S \ I Mil A S I'AMI'lll.rT n -v.v//,'.',v/-'.',','//.r.v//.v, ;;'.;',:',',;* • r \t,'SS r r ','.-,\UU* r '.*.'S.'SS*U**'**SSSSSS+*SSS& totl