Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


ESTABLISHED 1895

General Mark Clark
Senior British Officer

Churchill Warns Britons
Against Fault Finding

(By W. LANDREY)
" LONDON, July 1.
PRIME MINISTER Churchill’s Conservatives defeated

a Labour censure motion against his:Government over the

Yalu bombings Tuesday night shortly after it announced

that a British Deputy will be appointed for General Mark

Clark. The vote on the Censure Motion was 300 to 270

against it.

Government defeated the mo-
tion in the Commons after a
sometimes heated debate during
which it was under attack from
both Moderate and Leftist wings
of the Labour Party. The Labour
motion which followers of Left-
wing leader Aneurin Bevan claim-
ed was too mild, criticises govern-
ment for not having obtained con-
sultation before last week’s Yalu
raids. It demanded that Britain
be consulted in future before
military moves that might have
political consequences. But it did
not criticise the raids themselves.

Prime Minister Winston Church-
ill warned, Britons of the danger
of finding fault with the United
States during its Presidential elec-
tion campaign. In the Commons
in a full-dress debate on Korea
he hotly defended American pol-
icy. and warned against undue
fault finding. He said “there might
easily come a time especially dur-
ing the Presidential election when
a very sharp reaction of emotion,
even of anger, might sweep large
sections of the Amercian people
and any candidate for Presidency
who gave full vent to it would
gain considerable advantage.

_ Churchill seemed piainly voic-
ing the anxiety of Britons and
Europeans generally that an iso-
jlationist policy might come out of
the election. He announced at the
outset of the debate that a senior
Bnitish officer would soon become!
@ deputy to Geygeral Mark Clark,

Supreme United Nations Com- entry, the 64-foot schooner Wan-
mander in the Far East, derer 1X, owned by Commander
: John C. Reed, RCN, which was

grate neat dened 45th across the finish line in the
‘of a deputy representing Bnitish| Newport—Bermuda race last
Commonwealth countries which
have fighting men in Korea and
Commonwealth members “greed
that the deputy shall be a Briton,
In the debate Labourites moved

a censure of Government because
it was not consulted before the
Yalu River power plant bombings.
Churchill defended both his gov-
ernment and the United States on
Korean policy. He said the befib-
ings were a military necessity and
disclosed, they were made at this
time because summer rains soon |
‘would interfere with Air Force)
operations, |

Beath Penalty
For Stealing

LONDON, July 1.

Belgrade court sentenced
four persons to death by
shooting for stealing $83,000
worth of copper wire from:
a state enterprise according
to the official Yugoslavia
agency “Tan”,

It said twelve other per-
sons implicated were sen-
tenced to terms of imprison-
ment from eighteen years to
twelve months. The group
stole 35 tons of copper wire
and sold it privately.—U.P.



6 Yachts Leave For
Berniida—Halifax |
Océan Race

BERMUDA, June 30
Six yachts will start from St.
David’s Head, Bermuda at 1.00
p.m, Bermuda daylight time to-
morrow to compete in the Ber-
muda—Halifax ocean race spon-
sored by the Royal Canadian
Nayal Sailing Association and

the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club.

There is only one Canadian



|





Other contestants are Ticonder-
oga, owner John Hurtz, Jnr,
Teragram, owner United States
Coast Guard Academy, Gulf
|Stream, owner M. E, Hemmer-
| dinger, Blue Sea, owner Dr. J. A.
McLean, Web Foot, owner Junius
Beebe,



; H.M.C.S, Portage will escort the

| yachts to Halifax. Three trophies

are up for the competition —C.P.
¢



Labourer Falls
Into Careenage

Coleridge Alleyne, a labourer of
be to General Mark Clark. He Eagle Hall, St. Michael, fell into
cannot send information to us. A the Careenage on Monday about
good man in whom General Mark.’ 10 p.m., while he was leaning over
Clark has trust and confidence will the lighter “Dajsy” which wag
be exceedingly useful to him be. | being unloaded.

cause General Mark Clark will be The crew of the “Daisy” fished
able to consult him about any-|} Alleyne out of the Careenage.
thing he is not quite sure of.” ‘The matter was reported to the

—U.P.' Bridge Police Station.

Lord Alexander winding up the
debate in the House of Lords out- !
lined his conception of what the}
Britjeh deputy will do on Clark’s!
staff. He said “his loyalties must |



|





Security Council Meets
Under Jebb’s Presidency

UNITED NATIONS, New York, July 1.

THE UNITED NATIONS Security Council with Brit-
ain’s Sir Gladwyn Jebb presiding, will meet today at 10.30
a.m. to consider United States demand for the International
Red Cross investigation of Communist germ warfare
charges.

Jebb succeeded to the presidency at midnight replacing
Russia’s Jacob A. Malik under whose chairmanship the
eleven-nation council was prevented for more than a week
from taking action on the United States demand.

Begins 2nd Term

With Malik out under the
monthly alphabetical rotation plan
the debate was expected to proceed
with the minimum of procedural
red tape but the conclusion appear-
ed inevitable: Russia will veto the
United States proposal,

Although Malik undoubtedly
will use all parliamentary advan-
tage he can gain to snarl the
debate, his effectiveness in filibus-
tering was c.ninished at least by
half when he relinquished the
chair. The council’s president has
power to cirect the debate, to take
the floor when he chooses and to
make rulings on procedural that
jean tie up proceedings indefinitely.

But the Russian remained one
of five council members with a
veto, a power no other nation—
except France on one occasion—
has ever used. United Nations
|rules require that all five mem-
bers of the council—Britain,
China, France, Russia and the
United States—-must be among a
voting in favour of any council
action. If one votes “no” on a sub-
stantjal issue the proposal is lost.

Russia has
49 times

used a veto power
in the past five years.
ites ambassador Ernest
A. Gross served the notion that he
would press at the start of to-day’s





meeting for consideration of his: }
demand for on the spot red cross!
nvestigation of the communist)



EATED in his residence in Dublin,
Bean T. O'Kelly poses with his pet
poodle. He be installed Wed-
nesday as Pre: nt of the R
ic of Ireland for his secon

nal 7-year term. (!.,°

charges United States troops have
uged germ weapons against North
Koreans and Red Chinese








—UP

i
'



—— Harbados

Conservatives Defeat La

Will Get
As Deputy

‘rom Ail Quarters:

‘Dead Man’
Alive After

Two Years

TORONTO: Two years after}
he had been presumed dead, his
life insurance paid and will sets
tled, an. Ontario game warden has
been found alive 2,000 miles away |

He disappeared;
1950 while boating at

from his home.
on June 9,
Echo Bay, Ontario, and was pre-j
sumed drowned when his empty
boat was found. He has told the
Mounted Police that he cannot
remember a thing before Sep-'
tember 19, 1950, when he “awoke”
in British Columbia,
WASHINGTON: Groucho Marx
complains that the trouble with
shopping nowadays is that every-,
one offers you your money back}
instead of your money’s worth.
CAPE TOWN: For two years a}
man practised playing the piano]
on a Silent wooden keyboard in
his cell at Pretoria Central Prison.
Now he has gained the highest
marks in South Africa in the
Association of Performers exam-
ination of Trinity College, Lon-
don. He completed the course,
which usually takes 7 years, in 13
months and gained honours in the
examination. He played on a real
piano for the first time only 13
months before the examination.

MADRID: A 40-year-old

in-



To Begin Se

WEDNES?!.AY; JULY

bé

ntence
1

2,

1952



U.N. Tell Koreans
Saving Deadlock
‘Egypt Still con munists

Without |
« New Govt. |

4 ALEXANDRIA, Egypt, July 1.
Unconfirmed reports said vet-
eran. independent statesman Sirry
Pasha has turned down his man
date to form a new government
and settle Egypt’s latest political

crisis,



THE UNITED
there is a “face saving” way
deadlock and Red propaganc
to work out the solution.

Major General William
tiator, spent twenty minutes
in carefully prepared expo
sides are actually very close



Two morning newspapers, The|*> !"8
English Language Egyptian Gaz- last week to allow the Reds
ette, and The French Language
Le Progres Egyptian said flatly
FILM PRODUCER Walter that Sirry had turned down the

Three Children
Burnt To Death
PORT-OF-SPAIN,

June 30,
Three children ages rang-

job of creating a government
Sirry who has been Premier
three times before was given the
mandate on Sunday by King
Farouk after Hilaby Pasha sud-
denly resigned,

Rumours were

setae
leaves a plane at Los Angeles af-
tex a flying visit to his e

e, Joan. Bennett, in Chicago.
He is to enter jail Wednesday to
serve a four-months sentence for

the shooting of Jennings Lang,
his wife's agent, last ber,



circulated that

Sirry decided to decline the job






Questioned about a reconciliation, ing between one and tive
Wanger said: “No comment. But J “{ter serious differences of opinion were burnt to death when
you can say there is always hope §(eveloped between two leading the House in which they
where there is understandisig.* members of his projected Cabinet, were sleeping caught fire.
. Farouk meantime askeq Hilaly The tragec occurred at
to carry on temporarily in view Icacos Village on the south-
of the confused situation, The ernmost point of Trinidad

| e 1ame of pase yee Barakat Pasha ae oe ‘ :
. was mentioned as the possible t the time of the inci
U.S. Air Force future Premier in the event Sir dent the parents of the
c< ’ definitely rejects the post. children were reported to be
Officials On Barrakt, also an independent, attending a nearby dance, It
is a former President of th is believed that a lighted
Chamber of Deputies. Hilaly re- lamp left by parents flared

igned as opposition mounted over up causing the fire.—(CP)

Korean Tour





dustrialist, mute for 20 years, re- his ane See * pie ont ih eiiaean
covered his speech after being ‘ handling Egypts dispute with " .
stabbed by one of his clients in his SEOUL, July, 1. sritain over the Suez Canal zone ji

office. He has asked i police to Top - ranking U.S. airforeejand Sudan. He had served foi I amous Italian
let his attacker off because he orficials toured airforce installa-|four months.--U.P, Ww ihiad Di

wants to give him a job for|tions in Korea touching off specus rile i “es

life. , lations that new and more dam+












Man Burnt To Death





LISBON: A farmer has discov-|@8ing air assaults are being made 2 e ; _ROME, July 1
ered a 13th-century chapel inside|ready against the communists,| AS Boiler Catches Fire ple , Pietro Silvio Rivetta, one
his barn near the town of Mon-|The delegation is headed by act- of Italy's most popular journalist
forte. While carrying out some]ing airforce Chief-of-Staff Gen- EOE ee e-SPAIN. duly us Writers and humourist who wrote
repairs, a piece of wall fell out,jeral Nathan F. Twining and Air ORT-OF-8P ah het tye, Pander the penhame of Toddi’ ¥
revealing the ancient stone be-| Under-Secretary Roswell L. Gil-| Ome man was burnt’ to death | died; aged 86 ‘ :
neath, patrick, Accompanying them were apd) wares Injured | dn. Monday ie uent ae ae laxyguagos

WASHINGTON : A rocking|six Major Generals from Pen- ifternoon when a boiler in which eee Soon and Chinese.
chair with built-in music box has tagon. they were working at the eee former aide at the pees
been patented in Washington. 1B.O.T. . Refinery caught - fire.| Mmbassy in Tokyo in 1010. Re-
“Doubly soothing” claims the in-| They conferred with the Eighth|Theedead ‘man is Joseph Bean-| turning to Italy he was cortéss
ventor.—L.E.S, Army commander General J. A.|mont, 23-year-old labourer of} POncent for the Japanese news-



Duclos Refuses

To Leave Prison |

PARIS, July 1.

French authorities temporarily}
yielded to the jailed Communist |
party leader Jaques Duclos’ re-|
fusal to be transferred to a priy-
ate clinic for medical treatment,
No reason for the backdown was
given although a spokesman
called it a “temporary decision”.

Previously authorities were re-
ported ready to use force if
necessary to move 56-year-old
Duclos who is suffering from a
diabetes ailment and_ kidney
complaint. A police ambulance
brought into Sante Prison this
morning to make the transfer,
rolled out of the gates empty
shortly after 11.00 a.m. 10.00
a.m, G.M.T,

Authorities were reported
ready to use force if necessary to
earry Duclos to the clinic, A
police ambulance was standing
by the inside prison yard where
reporters were not allowed.

Two of Duclos’ lawyers told
newsmen clustered around Sante
Prison main gates, “we were

witnesses during the night to the

clandestine attempt to remove
Jacques *. Duclos.” One _ said, |
“strong forces have been de-
ployed throughout the prison!
with ambulance and escort
vehicles,”

They condemned the transfer
because Court ordered medical |
examination is in progress and |
because the Judge. must hand}

down ruling today whether Du-|
clos will be given provisional
freedom”.

Shortly afterwards the lawyers
were admitted inside the prison to

confer with Duclos. Prison offi-
cials said it was the first time
they had been permitted to see

him since last night, It was be-
lieved that the transfer of Duclos
would not take place before noon.
Lawyers said. they would have
something further to say after





Van Fleet and _ Lieut.-General]/Point Forfin and the injured | Papers hea lee his dispatehes in
~ ‘ thei native lang w
Otto P. Weyland, Far East air-Jare Gabriel Dillon, Solomon Gar-|''"'' " b Heuagt
forces commander and» Lt.-Gen-|vin and Washington Bruce. The] At Naples he was instructor at
eral Glenn O. Barcus, 4th air-|condition of Dillon is reported to} the Oriental Institute Among his
force commander, They visited]be very serious. An eye witne I y works were grammar books
both U.S. and Australian air]}said the men, attempting to ¢ Japanese and Chinese, French
bases. cape, jumped out of the boile ritings On mathematics and art
r ir the flames, id Italian history UF,
The party declined to see the but into : 7 : Sats ,





press in Tokyo or Seoul. Public
information officers said the only
purpose of the visit was to “in-

U.N. Gommission Guaranteed

spect Far East airforce installa~ ~ ‘ ,

tions in Japan, Korea and Oki- f { f | Kk

tions In Jap " Safety In South Korea
Meanwhile the airforce dis- PUSAN, July 1

pot al fiktes” to escttebte ana THE SOUTH KOREAN GOVERNMENT assured mem

communists gunfire in June, The bers of the United Nations commission on Korea that it

Navy lost 26 and the Fifth air- will guarantee their personal safety from threat of assass-
force 15, ination.
The Fifth airforce saig F86 The guarantee was promised to Baron Gerald von

Sabrejets shot down 18 Russian
built MIG 15 jet fighters and
three propeller-driven Red figh*~
ers while suffering only one loss.

Ittersum of Holland, chairman of the seven nation com-
mission charged with rehabilitating Korea. Von Ittersum’s
assistant, David Ketel, received a warning yesterday from



Marine night fighters accounted an “undercover agent” warning the commission of a plot
for one more conventional Red to kill or harm members unless they left Korea
fighter Von Ittersum said the commission members were in-
wnt PB, clined to minimise the threat as an “exaggeration”.
-% le commission consists of rep-
resentatives from Holland, United
States, Britain, France, Nationalist

China, Australia and Pakistan, It
the first U.N. body to protest
martial law imposed by President
Syngman Rhee in May and to urge
the ‘free emblymen arrested in
his feud w National Assem-
Rhee ‘ to let people
for ; 1 of the



bly

vot





court
entenced assembly-
in Ho to death for kill
Korean army captain in a
gun duel two months ago. Suh, son
of Won Ryron, 23 was fined 25,000
for assaulting the captain
the shooting took place,
During his 15 day court martial
trial never answered
questions from either eight judge
pro claiming the trial
uncon tional and illegal
has been one of Khee's out-

oo

“a

bo
Suh

an
ing

before

Suh er once
ecutors

tit



speaking with him.—U.P.



North Korears
Surrender Boldly

PANMUNJOM, July 1. |

It was learned that two North
Korean soldiers boldly walked past
communist guards at this truce |
village and surrendered to United
Nations soldiers last Saturday. The
soldiers both non-commissioned









tanding critics. The courts
i only to revic

ver-

ubjeet ow by

—UP



Vive Barbados
Horses On List

From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 1,



HERE 1S A CLOSEUP of the painting of the Madonna and Child at the





ur Censure Motion

Hold Secret Session

NATIONS

was the first since the Allies called a three-day rect

Harrison noted the irmisé AFTER 1orary de-
j} document has 63 paragrapt I King Gus-
lA ement has been reached on 62 V1, of Swec leaves the
except for minor details, The one platform at Helsinki University
paragraph awaiting solution is No in Finland. The king carries his
61 covering the prisoner excha! doctor’s letter, a sword and wears
He said “it seems clear that if the the insignia and hat that go with
prisoner of war issue is settled) the degree. (International)
an armistice will result v ithout |
delay.” | ) ‘ ‘
However Harrison aid ed : F I {
have in our custody prisoners of | assive ig 1
he ee Teisauanion. et raat Vill C *
or oO re t ’ u
basi principles”. He was referrin | W ontinue
to the United Nations stand ec! |
voluntary repatriation ullowing | DURBAN, South Africa, July 1
prisoners to return to the commu-! Organizers of the civil disobedi-
nist side only if they want to go ‘ » campaign in South Africa

Regina Pacis Votive Shrine, Brooklyn, N. Y., from which a thief stole
two jeweled tiaras (inset), valued at $100,000. The circled area shows





Five Barbados bred horses are
on the list of 27 nominated for the







x : 1952 running of the Preede
officers became prisoners’ of war| Where a rosette on the protective grillwork bad been sewee away to Cts tatis for tartca ants deetae at
by walking down the road within circumvent the burglar alarm. Lines leading tr Dm the circle point > he Trinidad Turf Club’s office on
20 yards of the truce conference the supports on which the gern~studded tiaras rested. (International) |Monday. The wre Hon. J. D
tent. | eaeermmi—me — a “" Chandler's Driftwood, Mr. J. D

The two were not members of) 4 e ee rd AY ple San on i
the Chinese and North Korean! Hh > M VY O B ll } Sul Jet, all
security guards at Panmunjom. lt ouse a . se t r Jetsam, and
was the first such surrender in the Mr Contralto and
tiny village where communist and PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 30 Jout consulting the Executive | Mr idler’s Stirling
allied negotiators have talked The report of the Commission |Council and it is believed even if| Flust j v Trinidtd horse
peace since October 25, of Enquiry into the transaction of |the Executive favour paying re nominated

Their selection of Panmunjom as|the Port-of-Spain City Council [about $60,000 to meet the Cor f bo II I Rose
the place to surrender could not} will be published as soon as Gov-~ |Missiouers’ bill, the ep ture Faerie Queen, four of

ive been more embarrassing tojernor Rance returns from the | will oppose it. ! I I
communist negotiato The pair|United Kingdom. The report has The Commissioner nN ‘
ambled through t village, then} 4 ised colony-wide interest. |} under the Comn ion of | 5 ur n j
broke into a sprint about 500 yards nwhile payment of Commis-|Ordinance are not entitled + B Br t on last
from the United Natior itary r r the attention | muneration beyond the £ f e which

ce check point. They € a Gov pense incurred ir hol I D he first
crude white surrender fi 0" inderstood, |enquiry ur A
—UP, -'the Legislative ¢ CP,

PRICE : FIVE CENTS







Custav Honored

Re, par

































Of Face
Easing
Agree ‘To




PANMUNJOM, July 1.
told the Communists that
out of the prisoner exechans
lists suggested a secret session



iy
K. Harrison, chief Allied nego- iy
of to-day’s 29 minute meeting ‘s
sition, pointing out that both
to agreement. To-day’s t

to think over their position





|





The “face saving” part of ey t racial discriminatory :ules
United Nations final offer of April) said last night their strategy will
28 provided that prisoners! who do} culminating
not wish to return to Communis!

onsist of three phase







nm mas action, They emphasized
be reclassified, ‘ hat their protest campaign.
U.P against the “unjust laws” would
he one of passive non violent
% + resistance,

it oO Di I tats ; i
oreign Iplomlats OMcials of the South African
* ‘ ‘ Indias Congress and African
Attend Session Of | National Congress said phase one
called for selected volunteers to

mtion
jase twio called

in big centres.
for more volun-

=. Korean Assembly |;

teers and centres of action, ase

PUSAN, July, 1. res oor be a climax Minat

One hundred armed police aM; uld ‘be nationwide mageed Mike
lounged unobtrusively in a com- pass

pound in the South Korean As-1" ‘roy said phase one has not yet

sembly when foreign | diplomat been completed, Only two big cen-

to-day , attended a five minute tres have been affected, the? Wit-

discussion #f a special session-|./otersiand and Port Elizabeth, All

President Syngman Rhee had volunteers are being trained in

nethods of non-violence,
declared he cannot wait ,any =

longer for the dissolution of the
assembly now torn
pro-Rhee and anti-Rhee forces

and must find a method of doing
thi

—UP.



between

Acheson Leaves

He is also demanding thet Y s
the President in future be elected hor Brazil
by 20pular vote and not ap
phate” by the assembly : é VIENNA, July, 1.
present United States Secretary of
State Acheson took off from Tulin
The five-minute opening cei Airbase at 9.30 a.m. for Brazil
mony was held without incident, Jafter a two-day conference with
Police turned back unauthorised |tep Austrian government officials.
people trying to enter the a Acheson was seen off by the
sembly compound, Supporters of [Austrian Foreign Minister K.
President Rhee yesterday had|Gruber and United States am-
threatened to invade the assem-|bassador Walter J, Donnelly and
bly and oust Parliament by force other top Austrian and United
unless the President proclaimed |States officials at the airport.
i general election No incident was reported by
The assembly is due to Austrian police officials in charge
@ On Page & f Acheson's security.—U.P.





Â¥

They're

y

aa

everything
I look for”

“Bat seldom find, except in
du Maurier, I suppose you
mean, But what exactly do
you look for in a cigarette?”















2

“Flavour—which cax
only come from tobacco
that is rather special.
Then, of course, perfect
smmoothness—which means
a comfortable throat,”

“Coolness too? Well, that’s
seen to by the da Maurier filter
tip. And no bits of loose tobacco
in the mouth—filter tip again.”




“ Yes—all that. D' you know, this
du Maurier filter tip is just about
the finest idea for improving a
smoke that I've ever come across."

Smoke to your throat's content

du MAURIER

THE EXCLUSIVE FILTER TIP CIGARETTE

SOLE






$1.04 f
MADE IN ENGLAND

DISTRIBUTOR: WIL! > » BRIDGETOWN

D







Perey





PAGE TWO



Caub Calling

AJOR ar
who ¢

Mr
ver

Vinter

1e United King
t .

}

R

to

Goldsn
Barbado

month

1d



Sunday
De Grasse.

On Long Leave
L dom

EAVING for the United Ku
Grasse on

Sunday
long leave
Lionel Birkett of
He was accompanied
and son Harold.

Mr. Birkett who is General
Manager of the Dawsons Estate
in B.G..was here with his family
for sometime staying in Belle-
ville. ae

For One Month
M* J. C. MORAY, an Ameii-

can who travelled out from
Morocco to Curacao on an Italian
ship, arrived here on Sunday pb;
the S.S. De Grasse for a month's
holiday and is staying at Cacra
bank Hotel.

For the past thirteen months
Mr. Moray has been supervising
construction work in Moroce
where the Americans are erect-
ing five of the largest air bases in
the world with runways two mi
in length. Prior to that, he was en-

€ French

on by the

was

by his wif

gaged in construction work. wv
Venezuela for three years from
1948-1951.

He said that his company hac
the distinction of erecting Kare:
Edificio, g seventeen-storey build
ing, the tallest in Caracas in ad
dition to El Conde, the largest
and most deluxe hotel in Caraca

During the last war up to 1944
Mr. Moray supervised construc
tion work at the U.S. air bases in
Trinidad, British Guiana and
Dutch Guiana. He was afterward
sent out to the Pacific area on
similar mission

He said that he was last in
Barbados in 1949 when he came
over fron Caracas in the interest
of his health and added that he
hed greatly benefited from hi:
visit

Fiftieth Wedding

Anniversary
CONGRATULATIONS to Mr.
and Mrs. A. E, Foster of

White Hill, St. Andrew, who will
be celebrating their fiftieth wed-
ding anniversary to-day.

Their children Arrindell, Kath-
leen, Ivy and Evelyn who are
residing in the U.SA, and Ruby
Perkins of Speightstown, join in
wishing them a happy golden
anniversary,

On Honeymoon
RRIVING on Sunday py
B.W.LA, from Trinidad to
spend their honeymoon were Mr.
and Mrs, Lawrence Johnson who
were married in Trinidad on Sat-
urday at Christ Church, Cascade.

Mr, Jchnson, a Barbadian, is
the son of Mrs. D. L. Johnson,
of “Three Arches”, Navy Gardens,
and the late Mr. Don. Johnson.
He is now working as an engineer
at one of the sugar estates in
British Guiana. His wife is the
former Miss Kathleen Middleton,
daughter of Mrs. D. M. S. Mid~
dleton, of Nottingham, England.

Mr, and Mrs, Johnson are stay-
ing at the Crane.

Married in Trinidad

R. AND MRS. Glenn Tucker

who were married on Sat-
urday at St. Patrick’s Church in
Trinidad, arrived here the fol-
lowing day by B.W.1LA, on their
honeymoon and are staying at
“West-We-Go", St. James.

Mr. Tucker is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Alvin Tucker and his
bride the former Miss Sheelagh
Knox, is the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Wilfred Knox of Aranguez
Estate, San Juan.

Spent Holiday



De
Mr.
British Guiar

MR. & MRS.

Registrar on Holiday



D* KEN STUART,
M.R.C.P., who has beer
rently appointed Registrar at
Hospital of the University College
of the West Indies, Jamaica,
rived in the Colony over the
week-end and is spending a short
holiday with his parents Mr. and
Mrs E. A. Stuart of “Brough
derg”, Black Rock

DR. KE NETH STUART
Dr... ®.ualt an id Har
risonian anu a iormer Barbado
scholar.
Medico at 1.L.L.
Dp" J, W. wwUnWUCH who ha
been residing im Trinidad
for the pa year as As ant



Medical Office:
holds Ltd., Point-a-Pigrre, is now
in Barbados for two weeks’ holi-
day. He arrived over the week-
end by B.W.LA. accompanied by
his wife and is staying at Cacra-
bank Hotel.

Originally from England, Dr.
Murdoch was House Physician at
Brighton General Hospital.

Passed Medicai Exam.

EWS has been received that

Miss Lorna Browne, daughter
of Dr. and Mrs. J. A. Browne, of
“Ashmount”, Pine Road, has
passed her second professional
examination at the University of
Edinburgh.

Miss Browne is. a
medical student and thi
tion takes place at
the’ third. year

On Inspection Tour
M®*. H. L. N. ASCOUGH, Divis-

ol irinidad Lease-

third year
examina-
the end of

! ional Manager of Messrs,
Cable & Wireless (West Indies)
Limited, left the island yesterday




evening by B.W.I.A, for St, Lucia

R. AND MRS. Harold Has~ where he will conduct a four-day

kell and their three chile inspection tour of the Branch

dren returned to Trinidad over Office in that cobony. He was ac-

the week-end by B.W.I.A. after companied by Mr, C. J. Lawson,
spending a holiday here. Area Engineer

er











JOUN PAVILUK

Married at St. Leonard’s
oS St. Leonard’s Chureh on
Saturday evening, Miss Jean

Edghill, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
H. E. Bruce Edghill of “Hamil-
ton", Strathclyde, was married
to Mr. John Paviluk, son of Mr.
and Mrs. F. Paviluk of New
York City.

The bride who was given in
marriage by her brother-in-law,
Mr. L. Briggs Collins, was at-
tended by Mrs. Jack Knight as

matron-of-honour.

The ceremony which was fully
choral with Mr, Samuel Burke at
the organ, was conducted by Rev.

D. Woode. The duties of bestman
vere performed by the bride-
groom’s brother, Mr Donald

Edghill, while those of ushers fell





to Mr. Ian Niblock and Mr. Alis-
tair Edghill.

\ reception was held at the
revidence of Mr. and Mrs. L. B.
Collins, “Rothesay”, Strathclyde,
after which the couple left for
Sam Lord’s Castle and a few
days later by B.W.LA. for the

Carib Hilton Hotel in Puerto Rico
on their honeymoon,

Mr. Paviluk is an engineer
working with Tidewater Asso-
ciated Oil Co, of New York. From
Puerto Rico, his wife will be re-
turning to Barbados after a week,
while he will be going on to
Mexico and Cuba on business in

the interest of his firm before

joining his wife here in about
six weeks’ time
Mr. and Mrs. Paviluk are go-
x to reside in New York

Spent Ten Weeks

M's: H. W. W. REECE, who

was holidaying here for the
pest ten weeks, left for England
on Sunday by the 8.8. De Grasse
where she will be joined later by
her husband who is with the
Kuwait Oil Co.

Mrs, Reece was accompanied by
her two daughters, Susan and
Wendy. Her husband is still here
staying with his father (Mr. W. W.
Reece) Q.C., Solicitor General, at
Barbarees Hill.

Sargeant’s Village
Playing Field
FPRHE Sargeant’s Village Play-
ing field and Community Hall

will be officially opened at 5
o’elock on Friday afternoon.
His Excellency the Governor

and Lady Savage have kindly
consented to attend,

The Playing field and Hal! are
receiving the finishing touches
ind with good weather it is ex-
pected that there will be a large
number of visitors

The Committee are anxious to
make this opening function a
success and will be glad to wel-
come members of the public.

Talking Point

Nothing in life is to be feared,

It is only to be understood.—
—Marie ste
1



THE NEW LOW PRICES

FINE QUALITY

BLACK & WHITE PRINTS 36”

KHAKI 28”

BLUE DENIM 28”

WHITE CAMBRIC 36”

T R EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220



and byways of the
ZEPHYR or CONSUL
holiday whim—licensec
tankful of gas, ready t
arrive in London!

And a Holiday-on-Whee

YOUR SHOE STORES

TED eee

eae

ls among the highways
British with
to answer your every
l, insured and with a

Isles; a

o go the moment

you

ar NNN



nan SERIO NY C 98
Me tiesto vais 1.00
DIAL 4606

shave a

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

EVEN the much maligned path
of true love can be made to run
smooth and -straight as a main
arterial road—provided (if you
will excuse the mixed metaphor)
you watch out for molehills on
the way. And the marriage mol
hill that fonceals the seeds
Mount Everest and every peak
the Andes is—MONEY.

The surest way to guard ma
riage against possible shibwively
on the financial rocks is to ge
his vexed question of money into

its proper place and keep it ther€ero0m. One well-placed picture or

And that place is out in the open,

It is easy in the rosy days while
you are planning your future and
budgeting for the furniture to
talk money matters over together
quite naturally and honestly. Cul-
tivate the habit and you will find
it pays tremendous dividends
later on—in mutual understand-
ing, trust and smooth running of
your lives.

In certain ultra-reminist circles
it has been suggested that eve:
wife should be entitled to a fixed
percentage of her husband's in¢
come, but marriages put on a kind
of salary and commission basis
would not work in practise. Hus-
bands do not fit neatly inte, in=
come groups. Some have elderly
parents to support. Others ha
professional training to comapleu
jobs jinvolving heavy entertain~
ing, big insurances or mortgages
on property, It is neither possible
nor at all desirable to generalise
on the fair division of the family
income between husband and
wife. This is something only the
two can work out between them-
selves. Having done it, they can
both feel satisfied that the money
at their disposal is fairly shared—
and that the subject remai
permanently open for discussion.

To avoid confusion, decide at
the outset which of the household
expenses are to come out of the
housekeeping allowance ana
which are to be paid by the hus-
band. A workable and practical
plan is for him to be responsible
for the larger accounts. Under
this heading come rent, rates, in-
surance premiums, gas and elec-
tricity, telephone, hire or hire-
purchase payments on domestic

equipment (cooker, gas fires, re- ably square—these fit close to-

frigerator, radio and so on)—plus
general savings and money put
aside for holidays and amuse-
ments, This leaves the wife re.
sponsibie for food, launary, ¢ ean-
ing materials, shoe repairs, and
dry ‘cleaning, window-cleaning,
news papers and magazines re-
placements of linen, china and
glass and domestic help, if any.

Make a point or agreeing on a

fixed sum, however small, as a
dress and personal allowance,
apart from the housekeeping

money. To have to rely on saving
what you can out of the house-
keeping, or asking your husband
for money when you need to buy
something, makes it impossible to
plan your wardrobe either eco-
nomically or intelligently. Be-
sides, it is soul-destroying to
have to ask him for money to buy
his birthday present, for instance!

Concerning the furnishing and

equipping of a new home, mosh

of us these days set up house on
the proverbial shoe string. So it
is wisest to decide not to attempt
too much at once. Nobody expects
a modern bride to embark on
married life with a dozen of
everything like the Victorians, or
even to start entertaining on an
ambitious scale,

The idea is to concentrate on
the essentials and add the trim-
mings later. It is more fun this
way and eventually you get what
you REALLY want, instead of a
lot of things you imagined you
liked. Whatever other rooms there
may be in your house or flat, for-
get about them for the time being,
until you have a living room,
bedroom and kitchen furnished
for the comfort and convenience
of the two of you.

It pays to buy, really good qual-
ity beds and upholstered furni-
ture, such as armchairs or sofas.
These items are long-term in-
vestments which should not wear
out for years. Comfort is of the
utmost importance so do not re-
gret spending most of your furn-
ishing budget on a bed and two
arm-chairs—even if you have to
paint white wood furniture for
the dining-room or go without
c ts!

ou can get along quite happily
with only six of everything for
the table, from cutlery to china
and glass—and still be able to en-
tertain twe people at a_ time.
What is far more important is to
vacuum-cleaner and
enough saucepans, tea cloths and
bed-linen—and also to make the
best of the space at your disposal.

One can create nearly as many

optical illusions with decorative kitchen — meanwhile _
schemes as with dress notions! A menu for dinner and listing shop-
small room can be made to look ping to be done. Wash wu :
bigger and more spacious with fast dishes, turn on bath. (Exit
walls of a very pale colour. Best husband).

of all is cream—for walls and

ceiling. A plain ciose-fitted carpet slowly make bed, dust and tidy



SAAR

please enquire further trom Charles MeEnearney & Co. Ltd.

a



- of the narrow walls is in a strong-



a

Smoothing The Path...

also in a pale colour will help to
increase the apparent size of the
floor space. Choose furniture
carefully: low prices; not large,
either in actual size or in appear-
ance. Light modern woods or
Small pieces of old furniture both
fit happily into the small room.

nything heavy is out of place.

he same applies to fabrics. Large
patterns are taboo. Plain mate-
rials, vertical stripes, or very tiny
flower posies are best. Avoid any-
thing that clutters up the small

bedroom, afterwards wash smalls,
do bathroom.

That, as you can see, is only a
lick and promise treatment. Each
room will have to be turned out
once a week, either in the eve-
ning or at the week-end—and
there is also all the ironing and
cooking to do sometime. Most of
your shopping can be done in the
unch hour or on the way to the
office. If possible, prepare the
vegetables in the morning and
leave them either in soak or in
the fridge—a great benefit when
coming in tired and having to
start cooking. It is a good plan to
go in for casserole cooking, hav-
ing one or two cooking sessions a
week. In this way, three or four
meals can be prepared at the same
time. Keep a pot of soup always
on the stove ready to be brought
to the boil, A pressure cooker will
save precious time. So will the
ready prepared quick-frozen
fruits and vegetables. Two habits
to avoid are cooking with a tin
opener constantly in the hand or
shopping only at the delicatessen!
Any world’s worker arriving home
dead tired should make herself a
pot éf tea and sit down with her
feet up and really rest for ten
minutes. Then she will we ready
to start cooking almost with en-
thusiasm.

It is best to see it the budget
will stretch to having a woman in

a little group of those enchanting
old miniatures is quite enough.
And have one really big vase of
tall flowers, rather than several
smaller ones.

A too high room can be made
tc look lower by giving it a ceil-
ing several shades darker than
the walls. The long, narrow room
looks better proportioned if one

ly contrasting colour. For a room
this shape, consider having three
white walls and one narrow one
in navy blue. Fascinating with
curtains and chair covers of pale
primrose with a very small white
attern! The long, thin room also
ds itself to dividing cleverly
into two spetions, - for ee
the other for eating.
oo oat find one of those double-
sided dressers, use one side as a
e-board and the other for
ooks and ornaments and have
your dining chairs upholstered
with the same fabric as the arm-
chairs at the other end of the
room, so that you don’t create the
feeling that the two sections are
entirely separat*

A low dresser or cupboard
with shelves at the back also
looks very attractive in the dining
or breakfast alcove of a kitchen.
However clever your ideas, don’t
be carried away and forget that
the kitchen is, first and foremost,
a workshop, requiring efficient
equipment if cooking is to be a
pleasure and not a penance!

These really are ‘musts’
should go, hopefully, on
wedding present list:

SAUCEPANS— minimum four,
from half-pint size to one big
enough for a stock pot. Prefer-

turn out all the rooms and only

done.

The weekly wash can be done
for you without undue extrava-
gence if you are fortunate
to have one of those self-service
automatic laundries near.

Those of you who are going to
make marriage your life’s work
won't need to budget your time
and energy quite so rigidly as
the ‘two job’ wives, But this is no
reason for letting the housework
drag on all day. By keeping to
the plan suggested for the office
wife—though starting it at a
more civiliseq hour, a young wife
ean be free by lunchtime that is,
before she has any children.

This newly found leisure should
be used to enrich the personality
and broaden the interests. It is
easy—fatally easy—to slip into
the habit of going to the pictures
or out to tea with another young
wife every free afternoon. If you
do not intend to become a ‘domes-
tic cabbage’ have the determina-
tion to strike out on your own,
to maintain old interests, develop
new ones, and keep abreast of
what is going on in the world. It
is infinitely rewarding to get
books on a pet subject from the
public library and really study it.
One thing leads to another and if
you take interest in some outside
subject, interesting people and

and
your

gether and you can cook two on
one burner.

ONE DOUBLE BOILER— the
friend and ally of all new cooks.
With one of these you need never
know the horrors of sauces, cys-
tards and milk puddings that
burn—and the potatoes will boil
in the lower half!

A FAMILY OF CASSEROLES
—six individual sizes, a couple of
round pudding shapes, a pie dish
one—and as many more as kind
friends will provide. They look
pretty on the table too.

HEAT RESISTING TRAYS—

one big enough for supper for events gather around you.

two by the fire: one for your Life runs more smoothly when
afternoon tea; small one for odd the two partners have some en-
drinks. lightening thing to say to one an-

A GOOD ELECTRIC IRON—
and ironing board.

A REALLY PRACTICAL
COOKING BOOK—the kind that
tells you how to make a white
sauce and assumes that you know
absolutely nothing.

While we are in the kitchen,
let us consider your store cup-
board. Tinned meats are, ‘ of
course, invaluable if you have to
entertain at short notice but they
are expensive and becoming in

other at the end of the day.

Listening Hours

WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1962
4.00 — 7.15 pom, .......... 19.76 M 25.53 M

4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 pgn. The
Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. New Road,
5,00 p.m. Lawn Tennis, 5.15 p.m, Listen-
ers’ Choice, 5.45 p.m. The Hymns We
Sing, 6.00 p.m. Scottish Magazine, 6.15
p.m. My Kind of Music, 6.45 p.m. Sports







s iy nned ork and found-up and Programme Farade, 7.00
ea ce - sand buys B. m ee News, 7.10 pm. Home News
: * From Britain
Bottled and tinned fruit can 7.15 — 10.30 p.m.

25.53 M 31.32 M







i into a pie.
speedily be turned int P 7.15 p.m, Calling the West
7.45 p.m, By Request, 615 p.m. Radic
Newsreel, 8.20 p.m. Statement of Ac-
count, 8.45 p.m. Interludé¢, 8.55 p.m
From The Editorials, 9.00 p.m. Ring Up
The Curtain, 9.45 p.m Lawn Tennis,
10.00 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. News
Talk, 10,15 p.m. Mid-Week Talk, 10 %
p.m. From The Third Programme

You may be wondering whether
you can combine your new domes-
tic responsibilities with an cut-
side job. The financial side of the
matter is, obviously one which
only you anq your husband can
decide. You will have to balance
your earnings (less income tax)
against the expenses involved.
Remember to count fares to and
from the office, lunches, possibly
some domestic help at home, and
quite a bit more for clothes, hair
and make-up.

If you decide to try it, you will
have to organise and budget your
time as carefully as your finances.
Worst of all, you will have to get
up earlier! That really is the only
hope if you are going to reach
the office on time knowing that
you have left the flat tidy enough
for your husband to bring home
the boss. One well planned hour
of domesticity should be enough
in a small flat.

Here is the programme: |

(1) Out of bed leaving it and
the room to air while your hus-
band is busy in the bathroom and
you dust the sitting-room and run
the vacuum over the carpet
meanwhile the coffee percolates.

(2) Prepare and serve break-
fast for two—if' possible in the
planning



Y

Garden—St. James
TO-DAY 8.30 P.M
Whole (New) Serial
“LOST CITY of the JUNGLE”
Russell HAYDEN & Key

THUBS. (Only) 8.20 P
“MISSISSIPPI GAMBLER”
Kent TAYLOR &
“BLONDE ALIBI”
Martha O'DRISCOLL
PRI. & SAT, 8.30 P.M.
“FRIGHTENED CITY" &
“GIRL OF THE YEAR”

Hello Everybody! The Spree Boys
on the Run Again

A GRAND DANCE

will be given "e
LOUIS & i u

Messrs. TH
WALROND
(Shopkeeper of Tudor Bride)
& DONALD PARRIS
At_ CHILDREN’S GOODWILL
LEAGUE, Constitution Road

TO-NIGHT

ADMISSION .
Muste by .Perey Green's Orchestra
Refreshments on Sale Please
invite your friends

break.



(3) While your, bath runs





three or four hours a week to i

leave the daily maintenance to be |}



or Telephone Main Office 4493

o
“,

WEDNESDAY, 1952

ATRES

JULY







OISTD

(Dial 8404)

Last ? Shows
TODAY 445 & 8.29 p.m




RBAREE
(Dial 5170)
LAST = SHOWS
Today




(Dial 2310)
& TOMORROW
1% & 8.30 pm





145 & 8 om
































































Warner's New Picture Whole Serial
The story of the Hite of

PRETTY BABY Christ SEA HOUND

EDehnis MORGAN & PRINCE OF PEACE){ Larry
ena DRAKE (Cotor) “Buster” CRABBE
also oe
———_—_—_—X——S~—~—) | OOO
Special Added Attraction) THURS. Special 1.20 Thurs, (only) 4.45 & 8.3




Errol, FLYNN in
“pDODG . “RED DESERT
: ae Don BARRY &

FRONTIER

JOHNNY ALLEGRO
. George RAFT
—and—
DESPERADOES

Randolph SCOTT

VENGE"
ue &
JOHN




Lash La
Fuzzy St.

























WESTERN RENEGADES || Manis Tspeclal) SAT PRI. to SUN
Johnny MACK BROWN Zane Gres" $e @ SP pm.
Loo movvtaw|| DODGE CITY
230 — 445 & 6.30 p.m. ‘aa a HOLT & Errol FLYNN
“VLE SEB ¥OU IN PGLON of Ann SHERIDAN
>. MY_ DREAMS



the LAWLESS" |] Olivia i ALE
Wy





ROXY

TO-DAY & TOMORROW 14.50 & 8.159

Margaret LANDSAY

Ralph BELLAMY
in

MEET THE WILD CAT
and



TO-DAY & TOMORROW 1.45 & 8.20
Paramount Presents
Bob HOPE — Hedy LAMARR
in
MY FAVORITE SPY

Extra:—FAIRWAY CHAMPIONS
















Every Golf Player should see this MELODY LANE
oot and Latest British Paramount Starring
ews. Leon EBRROL The Merry MAC










OLYMPIC

MTODAY & TOMORROW

Robert PRESTON

John BARRYMORE, jr
in

THE SUNDOWNERS
and
SWORD OF THE AVENGER

FRIDAY (Only) 4.36 & 8.15

Teresa WRIGHT — Lew AYRES
in

THE CAPTURE

and
STATION WEST

ROYAL

TODAY & TOMOKROW 1.30 & 8.30
HUNT THE MAN DOWN

4.30 & 815


















Opening FREDAY 4th 430 & 8.15
Dane CLARK Ben JOHNSON
in













PORT DEFIANCE Starring
ane Gig YOUNG — Cleo MOORE
THE TORCH an
Starring ‘ DANGEROUS PROFESSION
Paulette GODDARD Starring




George RAFT —

DAY THOMAS

All the Pleasures of the SCREEN

Songs, Comedy, Dancing, Drama

—They’re all here and Wondrous-

ly in WARNER BROS’ Ever-So-
Gay Story

Pili SEE
YOu IN MY
DREAMS

PLAZ

FRIDAY 2.305, 445 & 8.30 p.m.
And Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30
p.m.

B'TOWN
DIAL 2310

GLOBE
TO-DAY AND TO-MORROW 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
A Double Made To Order - - - -

ANTC

\ ?
1 one 5



1 UU h LON,

Olea ASed Dw ete anvil
is ae uns
| ee sg ORY - NiGH
, Dir. by EOWIN L. MARIN

Prod.by WAT HOLT

A Nat Holt Production §
S Released by 201% Centery fos TF

OPENING FRIDAY 5 & 8.30 P.M.
Billy ECKSTINE — Esther WILLIAMS

IN
SKIRTS AHOY

LOF

sin FE cot |

‘Worttes sad Deested by Bator sie Protaaee
DELMER DAVES - HARMON JONES










SAT. 1.30 P.M. MATINEE
“ORCHESTRA WIVES”
(Glen Miller Orch.)

and
“CALL NORTHSIDE 777”
James STEWART

SAT, MIDNIGHT
“ANCHORS AWEIGH”
Frank SINATRA

“HIGH BARBAREE”
Van JOHNSON











EE EE EE EEE ee

WEDNESDAY, JULY 2,



CARIBBEAN DEVELOPMENT CO.HOME OF

1952

“CARIB” BEER

W.L. INVESTMENT IN -
SUCCESSFUL PROJECT

‘Ta Caribbean Development Company, Ltd. of Trinidad
is an excellent example of how a local company, with
the enthusiastie support of local investors can successfully

establish modern industrial

concerns.

Late in 1949 the Company completed a glass plant at
Champs Fleurs. The next project, at the same site, was a
modern brewery capable of supplying a first-class lager
beer sufficient, not only for the entire consumption of
Trinidad, but also to export.

Capital cost of this new project together with steam
plant and auxiliary equipment, has been nearly $2,000,000
a very large proportion of which was subscribed by Trini-

dad investors.

So efficient is this plant, that it enables the company
to market beer at a price below that of the imported pro-

duet.

The malt used in the manufacturing process comes

from Denmark and is of the same quality as that used in
the famous Tuborg and Carlsburg lagers from Copenhagen.
No finer quality, and no more costly malt can be obtained

anywhere today.
Right Type Water

The hops used are imported
partly from Czechoslovakia and
partly from Bavaria. To produce
the cleanness and character of
Carib Lager a blend of Soaz and
Hallertau varieties is used by Mr.
Ole Humle, head Brewer, who
spent many years at Carlsburg
Breweries before joining the
Caribbean Development Co., Ltd.
A certain amount of local sugar is
incorporated in the brews. Only
other raw mgterial required is
water.

The importanee of water in
brewing has caused considerable
discussion among laymen. While
it is correct to say that different
types of beer demand different
types of water, modern technology
enables the quality of water to be
adjusted to give the properties re-
quired for any type of brew.

Fortunately however, the well-
water at Champs Fleurs is almost
ideally suited for producing a high
quality Pilsner type of beer with-
out the addition of chemicals of
any kind.

The malt is transferred from
large steel silos holding 50 tons
each where it is stored into the
brewery by pneumatic elevators
which keep the malt clean. The
malt is allowed to fall by gravity
into the cleaning drum where all
husks and foreign matters are re-
moved. It then falls on to an au-
tomatic machine which records

the exact quantity that falls imio
the mill situated below the weigh-
ing machine.

Skill Needed

In the mill the malt is crushed
to produce “grist” whieh looks
somewhat like whole-meal flour.
The brewer adjusts the various
rolls on the mill to give the maxi-
mum extractions of materials de-
sired. A great deal of skill is
needed at this stage of the pro-
cess as overcrushing the malt
leads to difficulties in the subse-
quent operations and deteriora-
tion in the taste of the finished
product.

From the mill the grist falls
into two steel, containers. When
the brewer is ready to brew, the
grist is mixed with water in a
large 80-barrel copper tun, and
the temperature is raised in steps
over a period of between two and
three hours. In the “mashtun”
the important constituents are ex-
tracted from the malt and remain
dissolved in the water. In order
to separate the water solution
from the spent grain, the entire
contents of the mashtun are
pumped into another vessel, the
“lautertun” which is like an enor-
mous colander. The flat bottom
of this vessel is perforated with
thousands of narrow holes and,

when the spent grain and liquor
are pumped into this tank, rotat-
ing paddles distribute the grains

ver the floor of
“Wort Kettle”

The liquor then drains through
the bed of grains and through a
series of pipes below the floor of
the Jautertun. The clear hot liquor
is run into another large copper
vessel, the “wort kettle” in
which it is boiled. Sugar and hops
are added, a certain amount of
protein matter is precipitated, and
the liquor is concentrated.

When the boiling is finished, the
kettle contains what is now called
wort, spent hops and a brown
precipitate. The hot sterile wort
is run through a smaller colander
a “hop-back” which retains the
spent hops and allows the wort
and sludge to pass on, ,

The wort is then cooled to a
low temperature through a special
plate type cooler. Because the
wort is liable to infection at low
temperatures the entire cooling
system is made from stainless
steel. The cold wort is ‘run into
a depositing vessel where its
volume and gravity are checked
for excise purposes. It is then
pumped into stainless steel fer-
menting tanks where yeast is
added.

The yeast starts life as a “test
tube baby” and is imported from
famous laboratories in Copenhagen
where an enormous amount of re-
search on yeast culture is carried
out. The yeast is inoculated into
small stainless steel tanks full of
sterile wort and is allowed to
grow until the propagating tank
is full of yeast cells. ’

It is this*mixture of yeast and
wort which is pumped into the
cooled wort as it enters the fer-
menting tank. As soon as the
yeast propagator is emptied a new
test tube baby is encouraged to
grow. In two or three weeks time
it. will be ready for adding to a
new brew. Instead of multiply-
ing as rapidly as it would do in
the presence of air, the yeast tends
to live off the sugars in the wort
extracted from the malt and con-
verts them into carbon dioxide gas
and alcohol,

Lager to Store

It takes the yeast about ten days
to convert all the fermentable ma-
teria) into alcohol in the ferment-
ing vesseis. The fermented beer
is then pumped into the storage
vessels. The yeast which sinks to
the bottong of the fermenting ves-
sels, is then run off and is used in
the next brew. ? ’

The yeast is used from brew to
brew until the next test tube baby
in the propagator has grown into
a sufficient quantity of yeast to
start the process all over again.
By this means the brewer can be
certain that he is always using
the same strain of yeast and there-

even!
vessel



THE LARGE 80-barrel copper tuns in which the grist is mixed with water and boiled.



REMEMBER THE NAME

ENGLISH ELECTRIC



AND

ECONOMY
COMBINED

REFRIGERATOR



MANNING & CO LTD.

Electrical Dept,

FOR ALL

ENGLISH ELECTRIC

PRODUCTS
CALL

Dial

PRODUCTS

WASHING
MACHINE

4289



————— —
OO SSS









BARBADOS ADVOCATE



control the
Fauality of the beer he produces.
|The fermenting vessels and stor-
age vessels are always kept in a

fore can accurately

refrigerating
with cork.
the

building insulated
The beer is stored in
storage vessels for three
months. The name “Lager Beer”
is derived from the German
“lager” meaning store. The beer
which is carefully stored and ma-
tured is called so to distinguish
it from beers in which yeast floats
and which are not matured

Chemical Changes

During the storage period, cer-
tain chemical changes take place
in the beer. The “green taste’’ is
gradually lost and fine flavour
and body are produced, At the
same time precipitates formed,
settle to the bottom of the lager
tanks and the beer, becomes much

Assistant Brewer.

brighter. Finally after three
months at a temperature slightly
below freezing the beer is filtered
through two different filters and
runs into glass-lined “bright beer’
tanks. Next to the bright beer
store which is also refrigerated,
is the a stores. Here three
modern machines, costing $170,000,

wash, pasteurise and label the
bottles. The bottle-washer sub-
mits all bottles to a series of baths

in a very powerful detergent and
follows this up with thorough
spindle-brushing and final rinses
From the washer the bottles, now
sparkling with cleanliness, pass
on to the filling and crowning
units, then on to the Meyer Cata-
raet Pasteuriser This piece of
equipment, which grosses about
30 tons, eliminates the possibility
of dangerous bacteria and ensures
the sterility of beer and bottle

The beer is pasteurised in the
bottle by means of hot “showers”
while passing slowly through the
unit. Considerable’ pressure is}
built up in the bottle during this |



Asiatics Get Bigger

Immigration Quotas

WASHINGTON, June 30.
President Truman Monday
proclaimed new immigration
quotas which permit natives of
eight Asiatic nations to immi-
grate to the United States for the
first time in history.

Quotas which mark the end of

outright racial barriers in the
nation’s immigration laws were
determined under the new

McCarren immigration law pass-
ed last week over the President’s

veto.

Truman said the law would
perpetuate the age old injustices
in immigration although he con-
ceded its elimination of racial
bans was an advance.

Quotas for eight countries
whose natives heretofore were
barred from coming here to live

—eeemeneee




permanently were set at 100!
each. They are Burma, Cambo-
dia, Ceylon, Indonesia, Korea, |
Laos, Pakistan and Vietnam, In)

addition a quota of 100 years was
allotted to what is called the
“Asia Pacific Triangle”
comprises most of Asia and which
permits entry of Asiatics of
mixed nationality or natives of

Asian colonies or dependencies
not eligible under national
quotas.

Most of the other quotas on the
new lists represent little change
from the past yearly quotas ac-
cording to Government experts,

Britain and Northern Ireland
keep the lion’s share with a com-
bined quota of 65,361, Next comes
Germany with 25,814 and Ire-
land with 17,766.—0.P.

COURTESY
CREATES
COURTESY

i

4)

which ,




THE EXTERIOR of Carib Brewery at Champs Fleurs, Trinidad. At
bottom is Head Brewer, Mr. Ole Humle. At top is Mr. Eden Fleming,

process and should there be a leak
in the crown cork or a crack in
the bottle the contents are forced
out and the faulty bottle is easily
detected and’ discarded. The last
machine, a campletely automatic
job, labels six bottles at a time.
That in brief is how Carib Lager
is manufactured. There is also
at the plant all the auxiliary
equipment for compressing car-
bon dioxide and maintenance de-
partments all of which are neces-
sary to keep the plant at the peak
of efficiency. Large numbers of
persons have already availed
themse'ves of the opportunity to
visit the plant, which has been
laid out so that visitors can be
taken around without interference
with the operation. They heve
seen for themselves the produce
tion of glass-ware and beer in a
project which has been made pose
sible through the confidence of

hundreds of West Indian investors.



WANTED

OLD GOLD
AND SILVER

JEWELRY

OR IN PIECES IN
SCRAP FORM

The very highest
market prices paid

at your Jewellers...

YÂ¥. De LIMA
& CO., LTD.

20 BROAD ST.
Phone: 4644













INSIST ON

SILVER STAR

SOLD AT ALL THE LEADING STORES










- REDIFFUSION

Offers a Commission of $1.50 in CASH for every New
Subscriber brought to and accepted by the Company.
REDIFFUSION will pay in addition a bonus of $25.00
to any person who brings in twenty-five New Subserib-
ers in one Calendar month who are accepted by the
Company.



Have always a supply of Recovmendation Forms ready
THEY CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE OFFICE
REDIFFUSION * Trafalgar Street.




ANNUAL HOLIDAY

Oe CUSTOM nd FRIENDS are asked to note
that our WOR HOP will be atte a rom Monday,
16th June, 1952, to Saturday, the 28th June, 1952, inclu-
sive, for the er e of granting our Workmen their
ANNUAL H AY.

Arrangements have been made for em ncy work
to be undertaken during this period and the receipt
of repairs and delivery of completed work will
continued as usyal.

Our Merchandise Department and Office will he open
to business as usual.

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.
mp



































PAGE FOUR



See eee

BARBADOS wif ADVOCATE |

ie. ror) ae ee

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad 6t., Bridgetown





Ww ednesday, July 2,

— — — ————___ sainstoeiy

WOMENS MONEY

THE work to be done for women in Bar-
bados is so great that only large sums of
money will enable any progress to be
noticed.

Where is thé money to come from?

A clear indication is given on the front
page of The Times of London for June 20th.
On that day in the personal column appear-
ed the following notice: “If you pay in-
come tax at nine shillings and sixpence in
the pound, you can double your subscrip-
tion to the Y.W.C.A, at no extra cost.
Every subscription from five shillings up-
wards which is convenanted for seven
years is worth nearly twice as much be-
cause the association can recover the in-
come tax paid.”

In Barbados there is no legislation which
allows money used in connection with
charities to be free of tax, although ap-
proved organisations are not taxed on the
proceeds of internal profit-making activities
while some small concessions are made to
business houses who donate sums to institu-
tions like the Y.M.C.A. where certain of
their employees may obtain meals.

Charities and institutions in Barbados
rely on bazaars, raffles, concerts, dances
and similar activities to obtain some por-
tion of their revenue.

The Police Boys and Girls Clubs are
largely dependent on the proceeds of an
annual Raffle.

In former years when rates of company
and personal income taxation were con-
siderably less than today the importance of
freeing money paid to charities and institu-
tions from tax was much less than it is
now. At present the high rates of in-
come tax which are weighed heavily
against the expansion of businesses compel
businessses to keep a very close watch on
their charities lists.

Demands on the individual, purse for
relief funds, school sports, schoolboy tours,
scouts and a variety of other appeals add to
the cost of living of people who are often
described as a “well-to-do,” but whose
scope for “well-doing” has been restricted
in recent years.

The only answer to the question “where
is the money to come from?” is that. pro-
vided by income tax legislation in the
United Kingdom.

Money used in connection with charities
must be free of tax.







ROAD DANGERS

DESPITE the drive which is being made
by the police and the Barbados Automobile
Association to improve the road manners
of drivers, certain glaring examples of
abuse of the roads can be noticed daily.

Parking around corners is prevalent.

Many corners in Barbados are provided
with studs and although it is illegal to park
within the studded area, certain vehicles
continue to break the law by this danger-
ous practice.

Some corners have no studs, and the
letter of the law cannot be broken if cars
park near unstudded corners. But the
spirit of the law is broken whenever park-
ing near corners is practised, because any
obstacle to be passed near a corner forces
a motorist off the proper side of the road
and encourages the taking of risks. Ob-
servance of the speed limit by all users of
the road is the most sure way of pro-
moting safety on the road but “road-hogs”
continue to flaunt their dedication to
SPEED by hurtling around corners at
speeds closer to 50 m.p.h. than to the legal
30 m.p h.

Failure to dim lights at night may be due
to ignorance on the part of drivers or it
may be due to inability on the part of the
driver with bright lights to appreciate the
blinding effect of powerful headlights: but
whatever the reason for failure to dim,
night-blinding is a gross abuse of the
roads and endangers human life.

Pedestrians in Bridgetown are gradually
discovering the existence of pavements and
by using them permit drivers some relaxa-
tion from the necessity of keeping many-
sided watch: but outside Bridgetown
pedestrians use the public highways as if
they were country lanes and the difficulties
of night-driving are increased fifty-fold by
the reckless way in which road-walkers
appropriate parts of the road obviously
intended for the use of wheeled traffic.

Danger exists too at certain junctions
where traffic is not one-way. At the foot
of Government Hill the risk of accidents
would be less if, vehicles approaching the
direction of Roebuck Street were com-
pelled to turn left and follow the “island” .
At the neighbouring junction close to the
new sub-post office the present sign-post-
ing does not prevent drivers from taking
risks.

The drive for safe roads must never be
allowed to flag.

To keep death off the roads requires

vigilance at all times. ’























































|
|

Ascot’s Okay. But Not F on | (an British Industry

BARBADOS

ADVOCATE

The Average Racegoer

Fifty years hence, assuming
that England is still England
and still being run by English-
men, a Gold Cup Day is going
to be held in June at Ascot, And
I'm willing to bet that it is going
to be essentially no different
from the Golf Cup Day of Thurs-
day. June 19, 1952.

So all you people who live
thousands of miles away, in
Trinidad, Tanganyika or Tas-
mania, need be in no hurry to see
famous Ascot if you are think-
ing tradition will give way to
progress. No sir. You can bet
your last penny that Ascot is
going to stay Ascot, and that’s
that.

And, to an extent, rightly so.
But only to an extent.

I went to Ascot this year to
see the Gold Cup show of 1952.
It was also my introduction to an
English race meeting, because
my home is in New Zealand and
the glories of Epsom, Newmar-
ket, Aintree and, of course,
Ascot, had till recently escaped
me by a consideration of about
14,000 miles,

“What better day,” I thought,
“to see how the English lose
their money.”

Inevitably, I was wondering
also how facilities for doing this
would compare with those back
in New Zealand,

Now, Ascot Week, as you
probably know, is the big event

of the “London Seagon” — the
time for debutantes, fashion
shows, parties; in short, the

highlight of the year for English
Society. Ascot, for four days, is
where Society gets together in
one glorious party, where the
creations of couturiers and mil-
liners are paraded elegantly
across the lawns, and gentlemen
resplendent in morning dress
and toppers, queue at the two-
shilling tote to place a bet and
go away for a drink of cham-
pagne at four pounds a bottle.

Above all, Ascot has tradi-
tion, There is no place for any~
thing new.

Which, from the racing side of
Ascot, is a great pity.

Frankly, I came away from the
meeting with mixed feelings, It
was a thoroughly pleasant day.
But I could not help thinking I
had been cheated over the actual
horse racing, which seemed al-
most incidental to the presence
of the Queen and her party to
the atmosphere of fashionable
restraint, and to the sense of oc-
casion.

Six races, involving the cream
of English and French thorough-

Hy Hrett Oliver

breds, and yet you would think
the crowd of round 40,000 was
watching a game of chess. Cheer-
ing? Hardly a trace. Excitement?
Not on your life,

Why? Simply because about
30,000 of the 40,000 there had
absolutely no idea where their
fancy was p-aced, And, really,
there is not much to cheer about
if you can’t tell who is leading
and who is challenging. The
reason for this is simple enough
too—there is no course com-
mentary, no attempt to help be-
wildered punters locate their
horse ang “ride” it home.

: is how it went at Ascot

Cup day: —

before the start of the
race, the course announcer
broadcast the number of each
horse starting, its jockey’s name
and its barrier position. In due
course, the horses left the pad-
dock and cantered off to the
starting post.

There was complete silence for
a time till the course announcer,
using a minimum of words, in-

on

toned: “They're under starter’s
orders.” Another silence, then
the announcement: “They’re

off,” followed by two clangs of
an asthmatic bell.

For the rest of the race, there
was not a peep out of the an-
nouncer—though, for the bene-
fit of those thousands who could
not even see what was happen-
ing, the bell was again clanged
twice as the horses swung into
the straight. From there to the
post, it was merely a matter of
craning one’s neck to catch a
glimpse of a saddlecloth number
as the field went by or listen-
ing hopefully for some binocu-
lared gentlemen in the stand to
ery the name of the leader.

Once past the post, the placed
horses were named by the course
announcer who, for good
measure, threw in the winning
margins, But, by then, it was too
late,

This business of keeping the
English racegoer in the dark ap-
plies not only to Adcot but to
every single race meeting held
in England, Course commen-
taries have never been broad-
east. And, from what I learned
to-day, it looks as if they never
will.

I rang up one of the men who
has a hand in this system. He
was quite crusty about my ques-
tions and sounded positively
shocked at the suggestion that
racegoers deserved a better deal.

“Course commentaries? We
don't like them; in fact, we hai*
the idea of them,” he pronounced.

I pointed out that commen-
taries are given at most race-
tracks overseas and that the
thrill of racing is as good as lost
without them. I suggested English
people would be grateful for
them too.

“I don’t think they would,” he
replied. “When I’m at a meet-
ing and following the race, I
would hate to have some silly
commentator blaring out the
names of the horses, and probab-
ly getting them all mixed up,
when I can see perfectly well how
they are placed.”

This astonished me and I beg-
ged him to remember that the
majority of people at race meet-
ings have no earthly hope of
locating their horses, not having
binoculars for one thing and not
being experts in knowing horses
by their colours, ~

“People who go to race meet-
ings regularly are expected to
know their colours,’ he retorted
to that, iy

I discovered further that there
is no clause in Rules of
Racing prohibit course com-
mentaries. It is just “an instruc-
tion” from ‘the Jockey Club
which is responsible.

So Ascot was a disappointment
in that respect. For the rest, it
was much like most race meet-
ings I have attended.

The crowd, apart from, the
Royal Enclosure section, was es-
sentially the same collection of
optimistic people out to make a
day of it and see if they could
bring in a few dividends besides.
There was the two shillings tote
— a fine institution for the
small punter—the buffet counter,
the bars, the trees, the lawn and,
of course, the usual hard luck
stories and swopping of tips.

Then there were the bookies,
bowler-hatted, beefy men who
shouted their odds with the speed
of auctioneers. Across the track,
from the grandstand enclosure
to the heath, flashed their tic-
tac signals. And in the crowd,
people waited, not for the start
of the race, but for the finish.
Because, for the crowd, the race
started perhaps 100 yards from
the post.

There is certainly something
thrilling about Ascot, But it is
not to be found in the racing.
And, till the “Great Men of
English Racing” decide to give
the ordinary racing public a
break, I remain wholly in favour
of racetracks as we know them
overseas.



Silence Is Golden
The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—During the recent de-
bate in the House of Assembly
in respect of the revision of
salaries of the technical staff and
Departmental Heads of the
Civil service. the Leader of the
House and the Government came
in for trenchant criticism. It was
an interesting debate and
though some of those who spoke
based their arguments on the
minor aspects of the bill and
apparently failed to grasp its
main issues, healthy criticism is
expected and is always most
welcome, But when members re-
sort to making abusive and un-
dignified references to civil
servants, they should be remind-
ed that not only are they in the
House to represent the people
but they should also uphold the
dignity and respect of that
chamber, Surely if they cannot
do the former efficiently, there
‘is absolutely no excuse for fail-
ing to accomplish the latter.

One honourable member was
quite willing to support the bill
where the technical staff was
concerned but failed to see why
the non-technical heads of De-
partments should be included and
so far he was well within his
rights where the privileges of the
house are concerned, but ‘when
he refered to these responsible
men as ‘pen-pushers! he over-
stepped his bounds. Along with
other reasons with which this
member should be conversant,
when one considers how help-
less Civil Servants are to re-
taliate honourable members
should refrain from such dis-
dainful references,

There is an acute demand for
technical men all over the world
and if we are to get and hold
our complement of these key
men, it is requisite that existing
salary scales be adjusted to com-
pare favourably with those of
the other islands in the area.
But the preponderance of re-
sponsibility which Heads of De-
partments have to shoulder
makes then also amply deserving
of consideration, The main con-
siderations to be taken are
whether what is necessary is
salary revision and whether gov-
ernment is financially equipped
to do it. Some will argue that
one necessity is more urgent than
the other, but IT can see no real
objection to the bill so long as
assurance is given that revision
of the salary scales of the entire
Civil Service retrospective from
lst. April will take place in the
near future,

Another honourable member
remarked that bills like this
would spell the end of the
Leader’s political career if the
people were “less docile’, But
this is no reflection of docility.
The presence of members like
Mr, Adams in the House of
Assembly is a tribute to the
ability of the electorate to recog-
nise able and upright leader-
ship. This is a most appropriate
occasion for relating the follow-

ing excerpt:

‘The new member having
taken his seat in the Assembly
and having remained _ silent

during the debates turned finally
to his colleague and asked “Do
you think my constituents would
consider me ignorant and use-
less if I continue to remain
silent?” In the interests of con-
serving the party seat and of
the solicitous member, his col-
leagues replied with profoundest
sincerity. “You must keep them
in doubt, if you speak they will
know.”

Similar advice would prove ex-

tremely valuable to those mem-
bers in the Barbados House of
Assembly who contribute nothing
worthwhile to debates but waste
valuable time indulging their
(habits of vote catching whenever
they address the Assembly.

Salary scales should always be
fixed or adjusted to suit the post
and not the man and the Leader
of the House by adhering to this
principle displayed a high de-
gree of magnamimity which js a
characteristic conspicuously lack-
ing in those newcomers who as
pire to leadership.

SUPER JET.
Family First
To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—In your leading article,
“Family First,” you point out
that “Barbados has been trying
to build the kind of civic-mind-
edness which is common in ad-
vanced countries” although it
lacks the basic family conditions
on which those countries have
built. While the loose and un-
certain state of much of the local
family life has long been known,
it does not seem to be so well
recognised that these conditions
are inconsistent, and even in
conflict, with many of the econo-
mic measures of public policy,
introduced in recent years.

In the name of progress Bar-
bados has adopted at substantial
cost several forms of economir,
organisation which have in th

course of a century and marl

developed in England and some
other Western countries, In its
lands of origin the organisation
we are trying to copy grew up
on the* basis of a monogamous
family unit with paternal re-
sponsibility for all the members.
Methods of taxation, wage and
salary scales, and Government
regulated ‘cost of living,’ as well
as many social services, are
based on the assumption that
such family units are the pre-
dominant and permanent part of
the social structure, and that
they are at all times clearly de-
fined, Yet in local conditions
which, as you say, are far unlike
those of Great Britain, we have
adopted the same schemes of
Income Tax, the same ideas of
labour organisation and wages,
and the same patterns of public
administration from Civil Ser-
vice salaries to Housing, which
in their countries of origin are
strictly derived from the type of
family foundation we so obvi-
ously lack. Of course this
monogamous family system is
by no means universal. Indeed,
most of the world’s population
lives in more numerous and ex-
pensive systems, But while
sometimes credited with great
human wisdom, these people are
not included among the advanced
countries. Inside their borders
such modern doctrines as the
redistribution of wealth by law,
and gost of living allowances, do
not operate, and the lives of
politicians and the salaries of
public servants are, alike in-
secure.

What are we entitled to ex-
pect in Barbados from adopting
a political structure so inconsist-
ent with the foundations on
which it must function? Is it as-
sumed by those responsible for
it that the growing expense of
Government and the increasing
cost of living which are in a large
measure due to the alien system
we are trying to copy, will in-
evitably create the family
foundations needed to justify it?
It is true that visiting experts,
singly and collectively, usually
deliver a moralistic homily on
the nebulous state of the family
life enjoyed by much of the local

Our Readers Say:

population, but it is not clear
that this procedure is changing
the normal conditions. If it is
not, then equity as well as effi-
ciency requires a_ different
method from _ undiscriminating
imitation in other matters—al-
though lacking paternal respon-
sibility as a pillar of state, we
do have political responsibility.

I an, sir,
Yours ete.
I. C. GREAVES
Box 186,
Bridgetown,

28th June, 1952.

Whistle And Weep
To the Editor, The Advocate;

SIR,—The public are grateful
to the Police and Highway De-
partments or their co-opera-
tion in providing ways and
means for improving the Traf-
fic regulations especially as to
stopping at Major Roads cross-
ing, and providing cat’s eyes in
awkward corners,

There is no doubt whatever
that these regulations have been
very much appreciated by Mo-
torists who have done all in their
power to co-operate,

Now that an Automobile As-
sociation has been formed, the
public trust that they will join
with the two departments in
making greater improvements,

There are one or two things
that require immediate consider-
ation. At present certain motor-
ists have attached whistles to
their cars and they seem to in-
dulge in making as much noise,
as they can with it, to the
great discomfort of residents in
the area. In Trinidad this type
of whistle is prohibited, and
any one found using it is sub-
ject to immediate arrests and
imprisonment, there is no fine
attached. A similar nuisance is
experienced through Motor Cy-
clists opening the throttle to their
engines, thereby creating a most
annoying and merve racking
noise, Motor Cyclists seem to be
immune from the Speed regula-
tions, so perhaps they are also
exempted from the law govern-—
ing annoying noises,

The Traffic in this Island has
become most c Lo
to the Increased number of cars
on the road, and road blocks
often occur. The public have no-
ticed that many of these blocks
are created or accentuated by
Motorists parking their cars on
both sides of the road within
ten yards of each other, thereby
creating a bottle neck, and are
wondering whether a regulation
cannot to prevent
the parking on both side of the
road in such close proximity.
The public feel that in most
eases it is thoughtlessness and
wonder if a talk over the radio
might not be all that is necessary
to get rid of this nulsance and
make tavelling easter.

The Police surelyywould bene-
fit from this, as frequently they
are catled on to ease such blocks
in Bay Street, at the fish market,
where cars are parked on both
sides of the road, Let us have co-
operation and the matter will
easily be settled.

It would be advisable to place
studs by the Barbados Mutual
Life Assurance at the point
where all traffic enters Lower
Broad Street as well as where
traffic enters Broad Street from
Tudor Street, as at these two
points accidents are continually
occurring.

MOTORIST.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1952
EE | ee
EES

PHOTOGRAPHS :













Copies of Local Photographs
Which have appeared in the

Be Denationalized?

By CHRISTOPHER HOLLIS, M.P.

| LONDON, June 20.
THE world watched Britain’s socialist ex-

periment and is now, with equal attention,

asking how far it is possible for Winston

Churchill’s Conservative Government to re-

verse the process of nationalization.
Parallel, between the present British situ-

| ADVOCATE NEWSPAPER
| Can be ordered from the .. .

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

Decorated. These are
available in four sizes.

ation and the resale of some formerly na- CONGOLEUM
tionalized industries in other countries are SQUARES
not quite exact. In these other countries 3x3 yds. &3x 3% yds.
non-Socialist governments took over indus- CONGOLEUM:

tries by agreement with their opponents for
practical and business reasons—such as the
virtual bankruptcy of a railway system. It is
quite different in Britain where there is one
political party which believes in nationali-
zation as a matter of principle and which is
likely to come to power again in the future.
If it looked as if the Socialists were out
for good in Britain, or if they had abandoned
nationalization from their party programme,
then the problem before the Conservatives
would be less acute. But even in the last
election the Socialists polled a higher aggre-
gate of votes than Conservatives and it was
only an electoral chance that left them with
a minority of seats in Parliament. And since
then the evidence of municipal electicns and
Gallup Polls shows that at the lowest it is
far from improbable that we shall have a
Socialist Government back in power.

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Conservatives may rightly protest against
statements from Socialist leaders, such as
Mr. Morrison and Mr. Strauss, that, if re-
turned to power, they will re-nationalize
steel, road transport and anything else that
may have been denationalized, and rena-
tionalize them on terms of compensation less
favourable to the investors. But no one can
shut his eyes to the fact that any intentions
which they express are likely to be inten-
tions that they will be in a position to fulfill.
Under those circumstances the real difficul-
ty about denationalizing either steel or road
transport is likely to be the difficulty of get-
ting industrialists to put up the money to
buy them. The Government has told us that
when it puts its “operable units” of road
transport up for sale, it will put a reserve
price on them. Tf it puts the reserve price
high, no one will bid; and, if it puts it low,
it will lose a large sum of public money,





There is nothing illogical in opposing na-
tionalization when it is first proposed then
arguing that, when it is passed, that it is the
lesser evil to let it stand. As Oliver Stanley,
the Conservative leader who died a few
years ago, once wittily said, “It may have
been a mistake to have thrown a man out of
a top-story window and broken his leg, but
it is not necessarily the right remedy merely
to throw him back again.” Obviously it is to
the nation’s interest that its industries
should be run efficiently and obviously those
in an industry can say that it is quite impos-
sible for them to do their work efficiently if
the constitution of their industry is a sub-
ject of constant electioneering and is chang-
ed from top to bottom every time that there
is a change of government. .

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and UNDERWEAR
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DRESS SHIRTS, by MARCELLA and
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Handsome TIES (including
BOW TIES, Maroon and
So the real problem of our industry is, as Black for Evening Wear)
most people are coming to see, to find for it
a structure that is accepted by all political
parties. Whatever the faults of the capitalist
system it can be argued that it satisfied that
condition, so long as there was no important
political challenge to it. In the old days of
Liberal and Conservative the ins-and-outs
of party politics made no difference to the
way in which our industry was run. To-day,
for better or worse, it is not so. On the other
hand, even Socialists admit that nationaliza-
tion is by itself no remedy. And even anti-
Socialists will admit that, after denationali-
zation a considerable measure of Govern-
ment control and interference will still be
necessary. Whatever details of modifications
or charges there may be, it is quite certain,
for instance, that we shall have a National
Health Service with us for good. Whether
we call the iron and steel industry ‘national-
ised’ or not, it will certainly be run in large
units, under a good deal of government con-
trol. And even if private individuals are
allowed to make profits out of it, a very sub-
stantial proportion of those profits will be
taken by the State in taxation. So the so-
called controversy between Socialism and
Free Enterprise is, under modern conditions
in Britain, a somewhat unreal controversy.




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The real question — the as yet quite
unanswered question—is how that control
should be exercised. It is pretty generally
admitted that the solution tried-by the late
Socialist Government of setting up for the

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nationalised industries Managerial Boards JAMS
that are in practice hardly responsible to sdidea Ib ih
anybody has not worked very well, These ae oa s. VISIT OUR SWEET

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Boards are, as Mr. Aneurin Bevan has writ-

ten, “a constitutional enormity”. On the er . is ee oe Pore
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Milk Fed Chickens
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Fresh Vegetables

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|answerable to the House of Commons and
amenable to every sort of party and elec-
toral pressure, often from people whose
knowledge of the problems of the industry
is superficial. Recently, we have seen the
Government refusing to accept a proposed
increase in transport fares and the Opposi-
tion refusing to vote for it, though neither
the one nor the other could give any clear
account how the transport system could be
made to pay without the fare increases.



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WEDNESDAY, JULY

°

1952

House Pass Address For
Additional Reporter

The House of Assembly last night passed an Address
to His Excelyency the Governor in connection with the

;
BARBADOS ADVOCATE
KILLED





PAGE FIVE





en

Infant’s Inquest
Adjourned

His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma,|
Coroner of District “A”, yesterday |
adjourned further hearing in the!
inquest into the cifcumstances

rounding the death of Pearson



Financial Position Of
Scouts Association
Greatly Improved





SNAKE

He

ing three-months’ infant}
remembered once that one Race’ vie 3 “ter tit| CCMMENTING on the fmancial position of the Local
; : : * so of the Revorters of » House haa vt Road View, St. Peter, until) . Be : a al pos u 40K
general re-organization of the subordinate staff of the House. pcb Borage # the x a me Be y 8 | Boy Scouts’ Association as reported on by the Executive
These propeeals which have been recommended by a Com- anak thes heute wathedt 6 rec Pearson Pickering died at the}
s a res

Committee of the Island Scout Council, His Excellency the

mittee appointed to review the organisation of the Staff, They could imagine what that Governor said he was “very glad to see that the financial

Ceoneral Hospftal on June 30 after}
. ¢ : - I
include the appointment of a fourth Official Reporter, an meant with the kind of speeches

was admitted there on June}

suffering from burns which he position has improved considerably, particularly because
sci : they usually had 2 se stainec » a fire “oke 0 aie ; 6 Al
Assistant Secretary and two typists. RR (tetas Sead ihe “House. ustained when a fire broke out) it is to some extent due to the efforts of the Scouts them-
The Add * ; r. peaker had informed the in a house at Road View, St. Peter, | F
e ress was passed after a motion by Mr. F. E. Committee of the practice in a ;



Miller seconded by Mr. E. W. Barrow to defer consideration similar Chambers elsewhere, and
of the matter for one week was defeated by an eight-six 't was obvious that some relief

m



which he was staying }

Dr, A. W. Scott who performed! in their Report on this subseriptions had been col.ected



: the post mortem examination on{..©™m, the Execulive Committ up to the time of his preparing

majority. : Oa given = agree June 30 at the General Hospital| «.tes that the “financisi position the statement. He anticipated that

ar as ne roposal concern- t , Z ore re t ! « pette Mal t ST » s i ad

The Address was strongly supported by the Opposition ing their Siudpet lenis rae concern- aoe? ee ~~ ieee a ye r ge vel ' ae 1 oa a mould be balk ae am

A ; ; me ds tensi yt is on the face 3 ‘en for s im i 5 I ay h-
members in the House, while some members of the Gov- - ae ts no ae was left hand and arm, of the deceas- ue mainiy to the efforts of the in the next two months,

ernment Party objected not to the Address itself, but to felt “Sask the Bates aouie wbsan cad. In his opnion, the deceased] jcouts themselves during Lob-a- Of the $500 which was set to

certain of the new posts which are suggested, and the in- that not only was such considera- yest yy ee eens as| ob Week and St. George's Week, a Reserve Fund, His Excellency

consistency in the yearly increments in relation to the re- tion long overdue, but also that iekering of R

burns i to the savings being made o.



said he would like to see it used
Enid Pickering of Road View . ;

; raise 2 > aries »viousl yaid to ¢ for the benefit of th outside
spective posts. ink come swith e tee the St. Peter—the mother of the dead | ae olen ond cobetabie , districts in relation to come self-
The proposals contained in the the Address which dealt with the raat ten es at aa kar =e child’ who identified the body to! ios have to be abolished.” The help scheme.

Address are for increasing the Secretary and Librarian, Mr. \hon the House wae 1 a es Dr. Scott—told the Court that on |” ecutive also acknowledgs with Equipment
staff of the Reporters of the Leg- Talma said that he was informed A eee ROT June 28 she carried the deceasec end F tae ‘atts P wid ee
idl : that officer should wear some to her sister’s place et Road View. | re thanks, the generous &§1 His Excellency said that th
ature to four; a salary scale of that other arrangements were quitabl mifor earthed o ae ee piace at oad Wew,) © one thousand dollars ($1,000) re aha? ; Ss id
$1680 x 120—$2400 be instituted; being made as far as that par- him Provided fo at Peter, since 4) was going te} '! Canhdien, tena e we ee ake se a
the i i sridgetown. 1a Vanaais wp ng ‘im that the best scheme he couic
Sen appointment of an Assistant ticular officer was concerned and It was also recommended that When she came out of her house Reserve Fund have for the purpose would be a
retary at a salary of $720 x 120 he was therefore asking that that officer should also assist with to catch the } 1 : wes 1emé by © : hie!
—$1,776 r annum: h roe Sea eee tee he © catch 1€ bus she saw het Mr. Neville Osborne, a men scheme to buy equipment which
Two ¢ pe ; paragraph B be deleted. the library. In agreeing with the ster’s house on fire end reaching of the Finance Committee, could be used by outside troops
stean ack tok es viel 48 8 Clause C which would now be~ salary proposed, the House would the house saw her sister holding| ead a prepared Statement of Avc- and se on. But ‘he was a litte
el 200 r ihe adda d ‘4 48 come B dealt with the Assistant be setting a good example. They her cbh/ld in her hands, while she unts in which it was shown reluctant to agree with the Island
per annum; and a Mes- Secretary and no doubt honour- should not forever scale salaries was trying to put out the fire t at the end of June, 1952, Commissioner in that respect, and
senger & Library Assistant at a .ble members would ask what from the top downwards, but. it The child was taken to the Gen- ¢ was in hand an amount of he would , like representatives
po sad of $720 x 96--$1200 per was the object of creating that was time they scaled some from erel Hospital and detained $22.60 of which $500 had been from outside the urban area to
um, : , » new post, but he would remind the bottom upwards. At this stage the inquest wa t to a Reserve Fund, leaving a consider the matter, and if, they
It is also suggested in the ad- them that the debates were far _AS he had said before, the adjourned until July 8 . a oid fas ; i
res * . ; . ; ae , ey lance of $922.60 from which ex- and the Executive Committee
dress that all appointments for behind hand and in addition, House could, if they pleased, dis- litu ould be made . ‘ to the conclusicn that .it
this Department should be made were not properly filed and it 48Tee with some of the proposals iditure; could be made. come. {0 e€ conciusicn at 4
on the recommendation of His and he did not agree with all of

Kuhewns ‘Rocrets ae Answering a query by His Ex- was the best way to use the $500,
Honour The Speaker, y by ng a competen !





6é7> se et eee y ave jecti
Assistant Secretary that they them. But the Speaker and the Paerwood And Neney whe. wee one at he _srculd nee ne a dag
‘ ~, Committee felt that those changes * meeting, Mr Ss > sal t S Bxcelency sa P Was VeF}
Introducing the address Mr. would be able to get all these were needed if the week was 3a **Pol¢ ween”’ Here visaged that the Association anxious that the Scouts outside
C, E. Talma (L) said that it was documents in order. be done efficiently. 7 ould be able to meet its com- receive some real appreciation of
some months since a Committee N Whil eeing w t Ces ’ nitment luring the present the Council's interest in them and
: : ot nile agreeing with the neces- The Motor vessel Da men during t
saw fit to reorganise ‘the salaries Properly Filed sity for increasing the staff of ene eae pore, 38 inancial year, since very few not only in Headquarters
of certain officers of the House, Clause D renumbered C refer- Reporters, honourable members yesterday morning from St. Luci, ———_——- Set eet rere aaa
oes fe a nothing had been done red to the appointment of two who criticised the Address felt with 454 packages of fresh fruit so
about the matter. typists who would be there to as- that there was no need for an 5 bags of -cocoanuts, 30 bags o
He observed that the debates sist the reporters. At the moment, Assistant Secretary, and even if

cassava starch, 6 cases of leathex
67 bags of peanuts, 206 bags
copra, one motor car engine,
pieces of machinery,

The Schooner Belqueen calle
yesterday from St, Vincent. Sh
brought in 620 bags of copra, four
cases of machinery, one ci
piston bearings, 14 bags of cocoa. |

of the House of Assembly were reporters took home their notes there was need for one steno-
many months behind hand and and if a fire took place and they grapher-typist, there was no need
attributed this to a lack of re- were burnt, they would have no for a second typist.
porters in the Assembly. He said debates. Under this new system,
that very often reporters had to the reporters would have to leave
take notes for very long spells their notes at the office in the
and he did not think such a state House and dictate them to the
of affairs should exist any longer, typists.

Mr. Talma explained that in the

oO, |

' anc



Inconsistency

DUDLEY WARD, a groom of Chelsea Road, holds a three-foot
long snake his fellow groom Cecil Springer, of the same district,
killed with a saw among some bushes in front of the Barbados

Mr. F. L. Walcott (L) drew
attention to the inccnsistency in
As far as clause D dealing with the suggested annual incremcnts

se of



; nuts and one machine |
Address before the House pro= Messenger and Library Assistant attached to Jn See scales for Museum yesterday evening about 6 o'clock. Ward is calm enough The Belqueen is consigned to |
vision was made for an additional was concerned he said that he te Ree ante ER aveiy one while holding the snake, but he grinned yesterday when asked the Schooner Owners’ Associa-,
reporter as well as two typists who was one of the underprivileged aia hes was ibe Seti Ls, sup- if he had helped killed it, before saying that he took to his heels tion |
would be at the disposal of the ; ‘aa. ,

reporters to type out members’
speeches so that they could get a
copy of what they actually said
earlier in the day on a particular

debate.
One Daily

There was only one daily news-
paper in the island and very often
the speeches made by some hon-
ourable members were not re-
ported and their constituencies
did not know what they actually
said.

He said that if the system
should continue much longer
whereby only two reporters were
kept in the House, it would create
a great hardship on them. A re-
porter, like those in the House of
Commons, should not be called
upon to take notes for longer than
fifteen minutes,

“We are really taking advantage

our reporters” Mr. Talma said
and he added “they are not
suitably paid for the work which
they were called upon to do.
“Imagine a Labour Government
arranging salaries for head of de-
partments!) and taking advantage
of their own reporters and other
officers:"’ For that reason he said
that he was trying to justify tha
position firstly by asking the
House to increase the num-
ber of reporters to the Legis-:
lature from three to four. At
the present, there were two
reporters in the House and one in
the Council. If one of them hap-
pened to be ill, there would be
no one to assist and in order that
the work should be done efficient-
ly and expeditiously ‘he was ask-
ing that the number should be in-
creased,

As to the question of salaries
for these men he reminded the
House that they were highly
trained and competent men who
had to transcribe into the King’s
English what was not properly ex-
plained or spoken in the House
by some honourable members. It
was therefore the duty of the
House to see that they were paid
proper salaries and not treat them
as if they were ordinary clerks
like those employed in Swan or
Roebuck Streets

Mr. Talma said that there was
not such a thing as a junior re-
perter and a senior reporter in
the House. They were all trained
officers who had to do the same
work and he saw no reaso¢ why
they should not be paid the same
salary.

He said that they were trying
to bring the work as up-to-date
as possible and if the reorganisa-
tion scheme was accepted and
implemented it would mean that
Xhe debates wou'd be in mem-
bers hands within a week with
the consent of the Speaker.

The step which they were
taking would not only be for the
benefit of the reporters, but for
the community as a whole wio
would be au fait with what was
going on in the Chamber.

With regard to p2ragraph B of

they had to see was properly
paid. He was one who worked
well and richly deserved his sal-
ary.
He hoped that honourable mem-
bers would at least exercise a
sense of responsibility now that
they had an opportunity of as-
sisting certain members of the
subordinate staff who were in this
case emplovees of the House.

Mr. R. G. Imepp (L) said that as
senior member on the Debates
Committee he was asked to move
the passing of the Address, but
he did not agree with some of
the suggestions in the Address
anq would second it mainly for
the sake of discussion,

As regards the first proposal
which concerned the Reporters,
he had suggested in the Commit-
tee that they should retain the
present number of
employ two typists, one of whom
should be a_ stenographer-typist.
He felt that a stenographer-typist
would be able to assist with tak-
ing notes and also the typing of
the notes. The majority of the
members of the Committee how-
ever agreed to an additional re-
porter and two typists—one : of
whom should be a stenographer-
typist.

Salaries Equitable

He felt that the House should
agree that the proposed salary
scale of the reporters was equit-
able and fair. The Committee
felt that, taking into considera-
tion salaries paid to the reporters
by the Press and those paid in
the British Guiana and Trinidad
legislatures, that salary was quiie
fair. The salary of the Chief re-
porter of the Trinidad Legisla-
tive Council was, he thought,
$3,600 per year, That body sat on

Yewer occasions than the House. on call’ could be

But he did not want to draw
comparisons too far, even with
British Guiana.

He hoped he would hear noth-
ing about the efficiency or other-
wise of this or that officer. The
Committee felt that the staff and
the duties should be re-organised.
He for example, had not agreed
What the Government could be
asked to make provision for an
Assistant Secretary or for the
falary scale for the Secretaiy
unless the duties of those officers
were properly defined. The du-
ties of the officer also should be
properly arranged as quickly as
pessible. The Deputy Clerk of the
House was a busy Solicitor and
the Government could not be
urged to agree to having addi-
tional posts unless it meant great-
er efficiency.

Mr, Mapp pointed out that the
Reporters in the House took notes
for too long periods. He said that
the member on the Committee
from the Other Place had also
stressed that the same thing ap-
plied to their Reporter, and it was
mainly for that reason that the
Committee had agreed to an ad-
ditional Reporter and two typists.

ers, but T

port the Address if the recom~
mendation respecting the Assistant
Secretary and the second typist.

He suggested that the Reporters
should be whole-time officers who
weuld attend at the Office at
specified hours, and observed that
Reporters for the House being
specially trained men, would be
able to type, and for that reason
there was no necessity to have a
typist to whom they would distate
their transcript.

Both Mr. F. E- Miller and Mr.
f—. W. Barrow suggested that the
matter should be deferred for a

week in order that members
would have time to study che
proposals. A motion made to this

effect by Mr. Miller seconded by
Mr. Barrow, was later defeated
by an eight—six majority. Sup-
porting the motion were Mr. L. A
Williams, Mr. F. L. Walcott, Mx.
O. Bryan and’ Dr. H. G. Cum-
mins, Voting against the post-
ponement were Mr. A. E, S. Lewis,
Mr. C. E- Talma, Mrs. E. Bourne,
Mr. J. E. T. Brancker, Mr. W.- A.
Crawford, Mr. V. B- Vaughan, Mr.
O. T. Allder and Mr. J. C. Mottley

The Address was then pass‘d,
and Mr. C. E- Talma directed by
His Honour the Speaker to pre-
cent it to His Excellency the
Governor.

What An M.P.
Wants To Know

Mr. T. O. Bryan (L) tabled the
following question in the House of
Assembly last night: —

1, Is Government aware that
on the night of the Ist June 1952,
a patient was taken to the Gen-
eral Hospital's Casualty, bleeding
profusely, and that neither the
Doctor on duty, nor the one ‘next



found to give
the necessary attention?
2. Was this matter ever re-

ported to the Medical Superin-
tendant?

3. If the answer to Question
(2) is in the affirmative, will
Government state what action has
been taken by him?

4. Will Government further in-
vestigate this matter and institute
disciplinary measures against the
offenders





Society Discuss
Draft By-Laws

Meeting on Monday night at the}
Modern High School, the members
of the People’s Co-operative Trad-
ing Society discussed 30 of the)
draft Model By-laws submitted to}
them for consideration.

Mr. C. E. Beckles, Co-operative
Officer, was present by invitation |
and as often as necessary ex-
plained points of difficulty as they |
arose.

The rules covered the objects of |
the Society, financial obligations
of members, expulsion of mem- |
bers, funds of the Society, liability







Our

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WATER MUGS ............

PUNCH & COCKTAIL
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SETS of POTTERY
ENTREE DISHES .... $3.

POTTERY

$4,



POTTERY LAMPS

00 POTTERY PLATES

$2.00, $1.00 each

POTTERY VASES

$6.00, $2.50, $2.00 $1.50

50 ASH TRAYS 48c. each

HOME PRODUCTS DEPT.
CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LTD.N

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OE $9SSSHHSSITS- OSM!

FPSHHDOS $99OOE HOH

on seeing it.





In The House
Yesterday








When the House of Assembly
met yesterdz Re. Cummins laid
the following

Fiscal Survey of Barbados by
c c Beasle C.M.G., M.A
Economic Adviser to the Comp
troller for Development and Wel
fare in the West Indies

Report of the Supervisor of
Elections on the General Elec
tions, 1951

Annual Report of the Director

tical Services for the year
of the Registrar of
Societic for the half
year ended 30th June, 1950

Report of the Public Librarian
for the year ended on the ‘ist
of March, 1951, to the Board of
Trustees

the = W Boards (Amend

it) Reg ns, 1952.

he = foll notices were
niven

Resolution to approve the
Wage. Board (Amendment;
Regulation 1952

Resolution to place the sum of
$2,000 at

disposal



Governor-i














to upple t !
1952 J ci i
in the r vy Estin
No, 10, which r the Schec
to the Resolutior

A Bill intituled an Act to
amend the Government Scholar
ships and Exhibitions Act, 1949

An Act to consolidate and
amend the Acts of the Island re
lating to Public Health

The House passed a Resolution
to increase the aries of their
« uw puty Cle and Marshal

The House passed an Address
to His Excellency the Governor
suggesting an increase in the
Staff of Reporter to the Lenis
lature and other matters relating
to the general reor isation of
the ubordinate ff of the
House

The House accepted the amend
ments sent down by the Legisia
tive Council to the Third F ty
Insurance Bill and the Fishing
Industries Bill

The House passed a Bill to
amend. the Peasants’ Loan Bank
Act, 1936,

The House adjourned to Tue
day next at 3.00 p.m

————

of members, balance sheet, income
and expenditure, audit and the
disposal of profits

It was agreed to meet again on
Monday night at the Modern High
School and complete the study of
these rules.





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Yard-Long
Snake Killed

A snake a yard long and two
in circumference, was
lled yesterday .about 6 p.m.
nong some bushes in front of the
rbados Museum by Cecil
Springtr a proom of Chelsea
Road. The snake was light brown
long the belly, darker brown on
back and was chequered all

ches

er

We were walking through the

shes, some other chaps and I,”
pringer told the Advocate last
night, “when I heard a rustling
We started a casual search, never
thinking for a moment that we
would come across a snake. Then
Tr saw the long thing wriggling
long quickly towards the thicker
bushes,

“T had a saw,” he
hacked at it until it

“and I

said,
was

W.1. JAMBOREE
PLANNED FOR ’55

local Seouts’ Association
informed from Scout
Headquarters that it is planned to
hold a Jamboree in 1957 in Eng
land to mark the first 50 years of
Seouting.

It is also planned to
Caribbean Jamboree in Trinidad
in 1955, and the Island Commis-
sioner has appealed to Scoutmas-
ters throughout the island to
start planning locally for the
occasion,

TALK AT PRESS
CLUB TONIGHT

Part in the Mora
Mankind” will form
the subject of discussion at the
Barbados Press Club to-night at
8.00 o'clock, The discussion will
be led by Rev. C, J. Ramcharran
of Trinidad. The discussion is
open to the public and ladies are
especially invited to attend, There
will be a collection in aid of the
Ciub’s Library funds.

The
ha been

“Woman's
Stability of

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Seaman Fined 20/-

His Worship Mr. C, W. Rudder
Police Magistrate of District “A’ |
yesterday ordered 3D-year-old!
seaman Lisbon Oliver to pay
fine of 20/- in 14 days or one!
month's imprisonment for throw-
ing stones on Fairchild Street, St
Michael

Police Constable Bradshaw at
tached to the Bridge Police Station
told the Court that the offence
was comm/tted on July 1 about
2.50 am, He arrested the defen-
dant after speaking to him |





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and packed fresh in vacuum tins, Four Square tobacco

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Drivers are asked to carry thei
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PAGE SIX



Warning On Canadian
Rapid Trade Decline

TERRIBLE WANT AND DISTRESS

An urgent warning against permitting any

LONDON
further

deterioration of Canadian-West Indian trade relations was
given by Mr. J. M. Campbell, chairman of the West India
Committee, at the Committee’s annual general meeting in

London.
The valuable reciprocal

trade between Canada and the

West Indies, he said, is threatened by the currency restric-

tions that limit West Indian

Imports from Canada. In ad-

dition, Canada has turned to non-Commonwealth sources
for some of her sugar supplies.

“I can imagine no greate:
economic disaster to the British
West Indies that the result of
failure to appreciate the value of
the Canadian market for sugar,”
Mr. Campbell declared, “There

can be no certainty that this
disaster will be averted until
there is a real rather than a

formal liberalisation of Canadian-
West Indian trade.”

He called upon all concerned in
Britain, Canada and the Britisn
West Indies to spare no effort to
ensure that the Canadian sugar
market is not lost thro “negli-
gence, shortsightedness or stupid-
ity,”

Mr, Campbell expressed the
hope that n@xt year’s West Indian
sugar ex would total 900,000
tons, but emphasised that
greater and diversified production
is needed to feed the expanding
populations of the territories,

“Terrible want and distress will
be the lot of the West Indian
colonies unless the development
of the sugar industry is accom-
panied by further agricultural
and industrial development,” he
declared.

“I am sure, however, that suc-
essiui Colonial
ly depends
cnverprise
enterprise

Jeveiopinent ui)
upon private

ud British private
at that,” he added,

Mr, Campbell outlined the aims
of the Cormittee, which are “to
represent dud help the local man,”
and called-dor greaied support for
the Commfitee’s work. He also
announced that the Commiltiee
bas asked dts secretary, Mr, A. E.

. Barton, to,undertake an exten-
sive tour ofthe West Indies in the
autumn. .

Mr. Campbell criticised the re-
cent transfer of Mr, Alan Lennox~
Boyd from the Colonial Office to
become Minister of Transport.
Mr. Lennox-Boyd, he pointed out,
had worked energetically on
colonial problems for a number of
years and had special knowledg:
of the West Indies. While con-
zg lating Mr. Lennox-Boyd on
his promotion in the Government,
Mr. Campbell spoke of “colonial
interests being sacrificed to poli-
tics in this country.”

Before making his statement as
chairman, Mr. Campbell paid a
moving tribute to the late Sir
Algernon Aspinall, who was sec-
retary of the West India Commit-
tee for 40 years from 1898 to 1938,
when he retired,

“He gave all the best years of
his life to his work in the inter-
ests of the British West Indies,
British Guiana and British Hon-
duras,” said Mr, Campbell.

During much of the time he
held the office of secretary, he
virtually was the West India
Committee, said Mr. Campbell.
During his period of office, mem-
bership of the Committee rose
from less than 300 in 1898 to more
than 2,000 in 1938,

Mr. Campbell reealled Sir
Algernon’s guide books to the
West Indies, which are _ still

standard works, his efforts on be-
half of the Empire Exhibition at
Wembley in 1924 and his work
as secretary of the Imperial
College of Tropical Agriculture.

Mr. H.L.Q. Henriques, a close
personal friend of Sir Algernon
during his lifetime, also paid a
brief but warm tribute and the
Committee passed. a_ resolution
expressing its profound regret at
Sir Algernon’s death and express-
ing sympathy to Lady Aspinall,

Here is the complete text of
Mr, Compbell’s address:

“In seekimy your approval of
the Reporb of the Executive
Committes Gh the activities of the
West Indit Committee for the
twelve months which ended on
the 2%th of April, 1952, and of the
eceournts for the calendar year
19F1, it is not neressary for me to
talle : 9 matters which you

oven had a nportunity of study-
in? tn theagiiborantents and which
nyes é only properly
covered invthem





be

“booking .back on the year
which has “pussed since our las!
Annual General Meeting, our
thoughts turn immediately to the
loss which the whole Common-
wealth and Empire still mourn—
the death of bis iate Majesty, King
George the Sixth. His Majesty
i a particular affection for th
British West Indian Colonies, as
he showed, for example at the
British Industries Fair, at which
he delighted to linger during his



unfsiling annual visits, Indee”
atten surprised officiaas in
ve of (@. eXmibits by his

knowledge of West Indian mat-
ters. In her Majesty Queen Eliza-
beth the Second, we rejoice that
we have a sovereign in whose
thoughts ‘wie affairs of the Com-

monwealth and Empire overseas
are 10 les$ prominent,
“The ydar 1952 will long be

rememberge in the British Wos
fixues as.Q@ year in which, for the
first time since sugar was estab-
lished as ;the foundation of the
West Indian economy some three
hundred years ago, a period dur-
ing which the Industry encounter-

ed the far extremes of fortune, :

from the days when Jamaica led
the world as the largest producer
to the more recent times of the
bounties on beet sugar, when one
West Indian estate after another
was abandoned—for the first time
in all its long history the sugar
ifidustry gained a real measure of
security which now enables the
efficient producer to plan ahead
in the sute knowedge that abnor
mal and prolonged natural calam-
ity alone can deprive him of a
fair retuth for his efforts.

“The epnclusion of the Com-
monwealth Sugar Agreement was
undoubtedly a great event. The
Agreement has rightly been called
a charter ~-for Commonwealth
Sugar. AH-the same, let no one
imagine that all is now necessary

is to sit back and watch it work.
Far from it. First, and of ex-
weme importance, there is the
fact that although Canada is not
a party to the Commonwealth
Sugar Agreement th export
quotas in the Agreement provide
lor the supply from Common-
wealth sources of virtually the
whole of Canada’s sugar require-
ments; indeed the Agreement is
designed to give Canadian re-
quirements over-riding priority.
“Canada, traditionally, buys the
bulk of her sugar supplies from
the British West Indies; and in
turn the British West Indies are,
tvaditionally, an important export
market for Canada—and indeed
an expanding market in which
he vaiue of Imperial Preference
hould stand Canada in good stead.
There is, moreover, a great fund
ot mutual goodwill betweer
Canada and the British West
Indies. In such donditions re-
ciprocal trade between the two
areas should flourish. But today,
alas, currency restrictions, even
with the new Trade Liberalisation
Plan in being, severely limits
British West Indian imports from
Canada. This valuable reciprocal
trade is thus threaten od

“As you know, Canada has
turned to non-Commonwealin
sourees for some of her sugar
supplies just because she has an
pportunity to develop counter-
part trade with the countries con-
cerned, I can imagine no greate:
economic disaster to the British
West Indies than the result of
failure to appreciate the value of
the Canadian market for sugar.
There can be no certainity that
this disaster will be averted until

there is a real rather than a
formal liberalisation of Canada-
West Indian trade. Even from

the point of view of dollar conser-
vation one feels bounds to ques-
tion the wisdom of a policy which
seeks to save a few million
dollars at the direct risk of
diverting Canada’s sources of
sugar dupply and thus lose
50,000,000 or more dollars.

“I thope that everyone here
and in the West Indies—and ir
Canada—who can in any way
influence policies and actions in
this field will spare no ecort to
ensure that we do not lose the
Canadian sugar market through
negligence, shortsightedness or
stupidity; moreover that they will
do all they can to create the most
favourable possible conditions fo
the strengthening of the vital
economic relationship between the
British West Indies and Canada,
whose economic might grows
stronger every day.

“Secondly, now that the fears
and anxieties which have in the
past inhabited the dynamic of
production have been swept aside,
producers must set about achiev-
ing their production quotas in the
shortest possible time. In fact, I
hope that 1953 will see the export
cf 900,000 tons of British West
Indian sugar.

“But let me pass on, For al-
though we have seen a great
measure of security given to
what is and must remain the most
important West Indian industry,
the populations of the Wesi Indies
are increasing at such an alarm-
ing rate that that industry alone
cannot maintain, let alone im-
prove, the standards of living of
the West Indian peoples.

“It is a simple truth that never
before did more uncertainty cloud
he West Indian horizon, and to
me, at all events, it is only too
plain that terrible want and dis-
tress will be the lot of the West
Indian cclonies unless the
development of the sugar indus-
try is accompanied by further
agricultural and industrial de-
velopment, The Colonial Develop-
ment Corporation and other Gov-
ermment or +quasi-Government
bodies such as the Agricultural
ind Industrial Development Cx

porations of Jamaica are a fin
concept and can make a gl
contribution to this essential
‘evelopment.

“IT am sure, however, that
successful Colonial development

ultimately depends upon private
enterprise—and British private
enterprise at that, For two hun-
dred years the West India Com-
mittee and its members have
played their part to the full in
Colonial development, but never
before has there been a greater
‘eed for a strong and constantly
vigilant West India Commiitee
Functions Of Committee
“So this morning | want more
han anything else to explain in
what way the West India Com-
mittee can help the West Indian
colonies in what far too few seem
really to appreciate is their time

of need. How can the Committee ;

May a full part in devising and
urthering those plans for the
iuture which all thinking people
know are not only essential but
very urgent?

Somewhat to

my dismay, I!

found during my recent visit to ;

the West Indies that there was
Ul in many places an imprestion
that the West India Committee was
a body largely, if not exclusively
looking after the interests of sugar
end big business; that it had no
interest whatever in the small
man. Perhaps you will allow me
to say something of the talks I
had with the President and lead-

officials of the Jamaica Agri-
cultural Society, many of whose
members I fear had quite a wrong
impression, To them I explained
that while originally, the West
India Committee had been com-
posed largely of London merchants
interested in the West Indies, the
position nowadays was entirely

ership of the



West India Committee was wide-

spread throughout the West Indies to
and that the Committee’s aim was »)

GENDARMES






BARBADOS ADV



OCATE



BREAK UP RED RIOT

oe -



HOLDING THEIR GUNS READY, steel-helmeted gendarmes move in on

Red demonstrators in Paris: The riots, touched off by the arrival of "; every Government

Gen. Matthew Ridgway, were a prelude to the seizure by police of
Communist Party headquarters throughout France. Flying squads ¢;
swooped into offices and ransacked files for evidence to support govern-
ment charges that the Reds planned overthrow of state, (International)
J at a —_— . — = fiwas “fiction.” He alleged that the

to place its services at the disposal
of all in the West Indies who
ought them; that, in fact, one
of the primary objects of the West
India Committee today was to re-
present and help the local man,
whether engaged in minor indus-
sphere, as faithfully and effective-
y as it attended to the needs of
its largest member companies,

“I referred to the coming
establishment of a Trade Commis-
sioner service in the United
Kingdom, saying that we welcom-
ed it and agreed it would perform
a most useful function, At the
same time it would relieve the
West India Committee of much
,outme work, so that the Com-
mittee woula be in a position not
only te give the fullest attention
to important matters of policy and
those la:ger issues in which it
could employ its unquestioned in-
fluence, but also to those important
details which daily call for the
assistance of an independent in-
vestigatdr, negotiator or advocate,
untied ta any political of Govern-
ment machine,

“upviously, the West India
Committee is in a strong and
indeed a unique position to under-
take such responsibilities, for,
in addition to being independent
of Government control, it has long
had the most happy relations with
all departments of Her Majesty's
Government in the United King-

dom, as well as with many in-
dependent bodies and interests,
both public and private, which

enable it to exert effective pres-
sure in the right quarters at the
right time and as often as may be
necessary.

“May I here say, in passing,
that one of the mutters to which
we have been paying attention
ecently is the question of main-
taining a vigorous executive com-
mittee, The intention is that in
future, subject to your concur-
ence—for after all it is the
general body of members who elect
the executive committee—mem-
bership of the executive should
always imply an obligation to
undertake active work on behali
of the Committee.

“You will forgive me if in my
inxiety to draw attention to the
pressing needs of these times I
am speaking for rather longer
than is customary on these
occasion but I do want to try to
ieave you with a clear impression
of the work and needs of the
Committee and indeed of the way
in which our often hard pressed
staff have gladly and willing
risen to them,

“A typical illustration this year
was, of course, the Commitiee’s
efforts on behalf of the Jamaica
Hu.ricane Reiief Fund, when we
placed all our resources at the
aisposal of Sir John Huggins and
his London committee with won-
derfully satisfactory results, I
would also mention the organisa-
tion of the West Indies exhibits at
the Briiish Inuustries Fair and in
the Colonial Otice-shop window,
under the inspi.ed d.rection of
Mr. Souness, while I think you
all know that the whole Common-
weal.h sugar industry was in-
debted to our staif for their ser-
vices throughout the necessarily
long proceedings of the Common-
wealth Sugar Conierence,

“In the future, as in the pasi,
our aim*will a-ways be to meet
very need; but clearly, in these
days of rising costs, if the West
India Committee is to conunue its
functions and usefulness, and
even more if it is to expand them,
as we earnestly desire, more
iunds will have to be placed at
its disposal and an even wider
membership will be essential. In
this connection you will have
noted from the accounts that
once again the income of the
Corumittee did not cover the
year’s expenditure, It is unnec-
ssary for me to’ say that this
state of affairs cannot continue
indefinitely, and our immediate
care must be to strengthen our
nancial position.

“I have aready spoken of the
happy relationship existing be
iween the West India Committee
nd Goverrment departments,
but I would like — especially
a a year when the implica-











tions of that relationship have
been so important to the West
Indies—to express particular
Y ‘iaticon of the help and co-
operation we lways receive
from Her Majesty’s Ministers and
permanent officials with who
ire concerned, of their u
l courte and of the
int of their hard-pressed time
hich thev are lway yrepal
to give to our problems. We «¢
} vs expect too reate
In fram Weet Indian Governor

officia our dealin with

them

Appointment OF Mr.
Lennox-Boyd



of Transport, we have equal,
not greater, reason to condole with?
ine West Inaies and with
ourselves on his departure from
a post at the Colonial Office whose
problems he had energetically
studied and had concerned him-
seif with for so many years and

ig) message,

MeCarran Bill |

Repassed

By House

Over Truman Veto

, By C. P. RUSSELL
Â¥, the New York Times
WadbHINGTON, June 26.

The House of Representatives
voved 219 to 113, tonight to pass
again \he MeCarran-Walter bill
iw overnaul and codify the immi-
sration, naturalization and nation-
ality laws, im the face of Presi-
aent iruman’s velo message yes-
verday.

Ihe two-thirds majority requir-
ea was met with seventeen votes
iv spare. The Senate agreed to
make its test at 2:30 P.M, tomor-

iuw atier two anda half hours
aebate.
The House acted after Repre-

sentative Frangis Ek. Waiter, Demo-
creat of Pennsylvania and ranking
Vemocrat of the Judiciary Com-
mittee, which handied the Bill,
had charged in debate that*the
President had used the veto despite
“strong recommendations” by
agency ad-
ministering alien laws that he
approve the rheasure.

Mr. Walter contended that the
velo message for the most part

concededly one of the
strongest sent to the Capitol by
the President, was the product of
“ghost-writers’ who “have neg-
lected to do one thing—iead the
bill.”

Assails Foes of Legimlation

/ highest i do not know,” Hepresentative
sopesal bia ee {Walter added, “who tne rresi-
it may be that in other Gov- Gems gnost-writers are, but |

ernment Departments an able
and intelligent man can im-
rediately fulfil ministerial vre-
sponsibilities without specialised
study and experience, This is
certainly not so with the Colonial
Office, whose complex and diverse

problems are not those en-
countered in normal life and
affairs in this country.

“Mr. (|Lennox-Boyd’s — trans-
lation seems a particularly un-

fortunate episode in the deplor-
able history of transitory Colonial

Ministers — the history, sad to
say, of Colonial interests being
sacrificed tg politics in this
country. Nonetheless, 1 need

hardly say that we offer our
duties and a sineere personnel
welcome to Mr. Hopkinson, Mr.

Lennox-Boyd’s successor as Min-
ister of State for the Colonies.

“Before finishing, I want to
vefer—indeed to .emphasise—the
immense contribution to the
work of the West India Com-
mittee made by Mr. Du Buisson,
our Vice-President, and Mr, Alan
Walker, Deputy Chairman. My
duties as Chairman would be im-
neasurably more burdensome
were I not able to count upon
ihelr great knowledge of the
West Indies, on their friendly
help and advice, on Mr, Du
Buisson's quiet wisdom and. en
Mr. Walker's ability and intense
vitelity.

“Finally — the Secretary. Mr.
Prrton’s powers of hard and
effective work are astonishing.
He is quite selfless in his en-
deavours for the Committee. 1
need not tell you how popular
he among West Indians and
all interested in the West Indies.
I can only say that I find | it
difieult if not impossible — to
imagine a better Secretary of the
West India Committee, Much
gratitude is due to Mr. Barton
and his admirable staff for their
work. I should tell you that the
executive committee have asked
Mr. Barton to undertake an ex-
tensive tour of the West Indies
this autumn on behalf of the
Committee.

“{ now have much pleasure in
moving ‘that the Annual Report.
of the Executive Committee fo
the year ended April 30th 1952
the audited statement and expen-
diture for the year ended $3lst
December 1951, and the Balance
Sheet be and are hereby adopted.”

The resolution was passed
unanimously. The meeting re-
elected all twelve retiring mem-
bers of the Executive Committee
and closed with tributes to Mr.
Campbell from Sir Harold Tem-
pany and Mr. Du Buisson.

—B.U.P.

P.M. Exam. Held

Dr. A. S. Cato performed a post
mortem examination on the body
of Louise Nurse of Bedford Lane,
St. Michael, at the Publie Mor-
tuary yesterday about 12.30 P.M,
Nurse was taken to the Public
Mortuary after she died at her
home at about 3.40 pm. on
June 30.



do find in the veto message most
of the statements made by ceriain
persons and certain Bioups
whose motives in fighting this
legislation are highly question-
apie, if mot suspicious, On the
ovher hand, I do know that * * *
lhe Deparument of Justice, the
Veparinent of State and the Cen-~-
tral Intelligence Agency, includ-
ing Such subordinate agencies ag
the Immigration and Navuraliza-
tion Service and the Federal
Bureau of Investigation, have
strongly recommended the enact-
ment of my bill.”

The MeCarran-Walter measure,
on which Congressional commit-
tees jointly and alone spent some
three years in devising, under-
takes in general:

To eliminate the remaining dis-
criminations against the immigra-
tion of Asians. Op; is contend
that it would make only a partial
and more discriminatory erasure,
through rigid restrictions in entry
quotas,

To maintain quotas based upon
United States population figures
compared with those of foreign
countries in 1920. Opponents hold
that the original quotas were dis-
criminatory against Eastern and
Southeastern Europe and Asia,
and are more so now. Proponents
rt that the original quotas
still represent ‘the
United - ee needs of the

To stiffen the law concerning
the admiviance, exciusion and ae-
bortauon of dangerous ailens, Up-
ponents charge wal iaw wouid ve
50 Graslic ana Suyject to arpiwary
administwauon as to deprive de-
serving aliens of admittance, or
cause the deportation or stripping
of garned naturalization of per-
sons committing minor ollenses.

10 limut the enuy of Asians to
the quotas (usually 100 each) of
the Pacific areas of their ancestry
or half-ancestry. Opponents com-
ylain that a person born, say in
wendon, could not enter the coun-
(ry except under the restricted
quota of a Pacific island he never
had seen. Proponents rebut that
vitnout this restriction there could
be a flood of Orientals through

‘he non-quota countries of Latin
America,

To codify all unmigration, nat-
Ulalizauion and nauionalily law
inty permanent Statutes, distinct
vom = S@parave emergency and
vemmporary legislation Gesigned to
sdmut large groups under perse-
‘nat this has resulted in “an anti-
alien, anti-immigration and anpi-
-\merican” programme,

To introduce a system of selec-
ive immigration by giving spe-
cial preference to skuled ahens
urgently needed by this country.
this preference, opponents hold,
could be administered on the un-
informed judgment of consuls at
sorelgn posts and prevent the re-
unions of deserving families,

T@ broaden the grounds for ex-
curston and deportation to con-
formity with recommendations
nade by the Senate Special Com-
nit#e to investigate Organized
Cc in Interstate Commercé,



TRENCH DUG BY REDS IN BERLIN



A COUPLE OF YOUNG CYCLISTS prepare to cross one of the trenches dug

by Soviet troops in Berlin to seal

areas. In addition, the Reds have iss,

needed by Germans who want to cro
40,000 guards have been instructed

to cross the dernarcation line without authorization,

off the Eastern Zone from Allied
ed orders that special passes are
ss the East-West border. More than
to shoot on sight anyone who tries
(International)



Opponents say it went much be-|
yond them.

To provide for judicial review
of Official decisions concerning |
aliens. Opponents contend that}
the provisions are far from being
ok for justice. |

On April 9, when the Ho }
passed the McCarran-Walter Di i
the vote exceeded by thirty-two
votes the required twothirds for!
overriding a veto. At that time
256 members participated in the!
test. Today 391 were on hand. |

The Senate passed the alien law |
bill earlier this month with a voice |
vote that was not recorded, The |
eee “aye” indicated over-'

elming a rr |
is different. TOA ee —

As to estimates of ‘0
Senate action tomorrow, tegen
records show that when it Pred
‘o a decision whether to sidetrack |
the MeCarran-Walter bill in fav. |
our of a substitute
its bitterest foes, the vote wes 4
to 27. On this premise it appeared |
that the sponsors lacked one vote!
for overriding a veto,

nm a second recorded t }
whether to send the bill back ‘tol
fhe committee for pigeonholing, |
the vote was 44—28, a tally jacks |
ma gd votes for repassage over |
a yeto,
_ It was on tifse premises thas]
the opponents of the bill gave up
their fight and waited for a Pres |
dential veto. :

Eighty-two of the ninety-six
Senators were present and voting
today, and more might file in be-
fore the veto test,

It was predicted widely that the|
President’s veto of the McCarran-
Waltkr bill would be sustained.
_ Another Presidential veto await-|
ing a test is the bill by which both |
Houses of Congress sought to de-
liver titles to rich offshore oil lands
to the bordering states. The Su-|
preme Court had ruled that the
Federal Government had “para-
mount right” to them,

Senator O’Mahoney. who sides
with the Supreme Court decision, |
and Senator Spessard L. Holland,
Democrat of Florida, sponsor of
the quit-claim bill, were assigned
to set a date for the veto test.







Whipporays Win
At Water Polo

Whipporays “B” gave Police al
sound beating yesterday afterngpn |
at the Aquatic Club when they
beat them to the tune of 9—3 in
their Water Polo match From the
beginning Whipporays were on
fop and ohce in the lead, held
it until the end.

Barnes and Gibson played well
ito score three goals each for
Whipporays while Potter put in|
two and O’Neil one goal. Best
scored the three goals for Police. |

In the other match, Harrison |
College (B) and Bonittas (B) }
|
|
!



Played to a 1—1 draw. This
game was slow but in the first
part of play, Collége were giving

the better exhibition. R. Taylor
seored for College and R.
Weatherhead for Bonittas. |

-_-_-e_ |



Cambridge
Beat Bradford _

Cambridge C.C. defeated Brad- |
ford C.C- in a one-day fixture at |
boarded Hall on Sunday when
they scored 133 for 7 wickets-in
reply to Bradford’s total of 12

Batting for Bradford, G. Harris
scored 67 at number 1, N. Phiilips
scored 16 and C. Harris 11, Bow:-
ing tor Cambridge, C. Duranu
bagged 5 for 18 in 8.5 overs, $.*|
Lewis took 2 for 16 and A. Gay
2 for 12.

For Cambridgé C. ‘'aylor scored
an undefeated 53, C. Clement 23
not out, G. Layne 25 and W
Jones 13. Bowling for Bradford
C, Harewood took 3 for 21, D.
Field, W. Brathwaite ang G.
Alleyne 1 each.







New Education
System For Spain

MADRID, June 27.

A draft bill laying down new
regulations for secondary educa-
tion in Spain was submitted for
study to the Standing Committee
of Cortes — Parliament—it was
learned here today. It provides |
for a modified form of matricula- |
tion consisting of two certificates |
——one elementary and one ad-
vanced — awarded respectively |
after the fourth and the sixth of |
a series of six courses,

Under this bill the state ex-
amination which formerly served
to confirm the certificate previous-
ly obtained would be abolished.

New measures are the outcome
of lengthy discussions between
the Ministry of National Educa-
tion and University authorities
and the Commission of Arch-
bishops. ,

The bill was drawn up by the |
Ministry after consulting with!
the Ecclesiastical hierarchy on
points arising from an agree-
ment reached in 1941 which still
regulates relations between the
Natican und Spain pending con-
clusion of a concordit.—U.P.

Two Killed In

Terrorist Attack

SINGAPOHE, June 30.

A Europe¢an security officer and
Malaya policeman were killed |
yesterday when 40 terrorists am-
bushed a food convoy in Segamat
area of Johore State. A European
police officer and Malaya consta-
ble were wounded in an exchange
of fire.

The convoy was escorted by a
jeep and armoured car, In another
raid by terrorists a freight train
travelling from Kuala Lumpur to
Ipoh was derailed between Bidor |
and Tapah road sub-stations yes- |
terday.

Terrorists wearing uniforms and





armed stole tools from the train
after holding up a three man
crew.

—U.P.
« =e



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PC 304






WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1952



Loan Scheme Ma

Revolving Fund To Be





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

prices paid for greens. It was a
known fact that in recent weeks



y Help Peasant Occupiers

ne

|
Mr. R. G. Mapp (L) said that}
in his opinion members should)











Increased By $150,000

The House of Assembly yesterday passed a Bill to



amend the Peasants’ Loan

Hitherto the Peasants’ Loan
Bank has been operated on “an
absolute, safety” basis and the
Bank could only advance a lean
to peasant owners. A large num-
ber of occupiers do not qualify
for assistance under the existing
provisions of the Act. The Board
of the Bank consider that the
Bank’s activities should be liber-
alized so that a greater number of
peasants may be accorded the fa-
cilities of the Bank and thereby
increase the productivity of peas-
ant holdings. =

This amending bill therefore
seeks to increase the size of a
peasant holding which would
qualify for a loan from 10 acres
to 25 acres (clause 2) and to in-
clude peasants who are renters
for assistance if the terms of their
tenancy offer reasonable security
(el, 2). The scope of the Bank’s
activities is also increased by al-
lowing a loan to be made for ac-
quiring a good title to the holding
and such other purpose as the
Bank may consider reasonable for
increasing productivity of the
holding (cl. 3). Attention is
drawn to the fact that sections 7
and 9 of the Peasants’ Loan Bank
Act, 1936, have been previously
speeded by Acts 1943-1 and 1949-

The Bank proposes to give these
extended powers a trial over a
period of 3 years at the end of
which, if not successful, they
would be discontinued.

After referring to the Objects
and Reasons of the Bill, Mr, F, L.
Walcott (L) who introduced it,
said that he believed members
would all agree that the proposed
amendment was a welcome one
and the Bill, indeed, was as im-
portant as the original Bill in 1936.

They would see, he said, that
occupiers and not only owners
would be able to utilize the funds
of the Peasants’ Loan Bank.

The amount of money involved
would be in the vicinity of $150,000
to be added to the revolving fund.

Refreshing Move

Mr. F. Miller (L) said it was
refreshing to realise that that
scheme would bring relief to
many peasants,

A section of the Objects and
Reasons states that the Bank pro-
poses to give certain extended
powers a trial over a period of
three years at the end of which, if
not successful, they would be dis-
continued. Speaking on this, Mr.
Miller observed that a period of
three years was of too short dura-
tion for a scheme of that sort.

Mr. W. A. Crawford (C) said
that he for one welcomed the
amendment and hoped thet it
would be able to go further.

The claim of Mr. F. L. Wal-
cott that the proposal would in-
volve $150,000 was purely prob-
lematical. No one knew how
many of those who came within
the scope of the Bill would take
advantage of it. ‘

The present total of loans in
any one year was slightly over
$60,000 and if they contemplated
expending $150,000, they would be
looking forward, naturally, to
somewhat corresponding increases
in the island’s production.

Mr, Crawford said that so far as
he knew there had never been a
single prostitution of any berrow-
er from the bank nor had a single
holder lost his holdings. There-
fore the Bank had a good reputa-
tion—a circumstance which would
be gratifying for members to
know and he thought that the re-
cord was greatly due to the char-
acter of the administrative ability
of the Manager of the Bank.

He sincerely hoped that since
they were widening the scope of
the Bank, since they were putting
the additional work on the staff of
the bank, that they would see fit
to remunerate the staff appropri-
ately, and if possible, provide ad-
ditional staff. They had to bear
that in mind.

He observed that it could
scarcely be said that he used
racial motives in any issue, but it
seemed to him that the claims of
the officer in question had been
overlooked because a colour ques-
tion was involved. ,

He also compared the Officer’s
salary then in charge of the Sav-
ing’s Bank with that of a previ-~
ous manager, Mr. Chase, who
received more money when the
work was not as much,

In addition, he was in charge of
the Labour Welfare Fund and they
would notice that when the last
increases came before for Heads
of Departments, etc., the Com-
mittee decided not to trouble his
salary, but to leave consideration
of it for the Directors of the Bank.
One could only hope that the Di-
rectors would see that he got ap-

ANOTHER SHINING EXAMPLE OF

There's always a clean hygienic

Bank Act, 1936, so that more

peasants, including some who merely occupy land and not
necessarily own it, can benefit from the fund.
Government member Mr. F. L. Waleott who introduced
the Bill informed the House that about $150,000 more would
be added to the revolving fund.
The Objects and Reasons of the Bill read:—

propriate consideration
pains. ‘

Mr. O. T. Allder (3) said that
some security must be given but
it still worried him in the Bill
where mention is made about
tenants and still they speak about
leasing when they knew that in
Barbados most of the land rents
were based on weekly tenancy.

“What I was/hoping to see was
the average agricultural labour-
er getting some benefit or being
included, those persons who till
the land and sell their crops to
the markets or factories,” he
Said.

Mr, Allder felt that some pro-
vision should be made in the Bill
to safeguard the agricultural la-
bourer, As the Bill stood this la-
Lourer could not go to the Bank
lor assistance.

He said that the scheme was
not wide enough. It was not going
to help the numerous barren plots
of the island to become ‘produc-
tive.

At this «stage the Deputy
Speaker explained to Mr: Allder
that he was straying from the
confines of the bill,

Barren Plots

Mr. Allder, continuing, said
that what he had hoped to see
was the Government, after re-
ceiving the report of the Fiscal
survey come forward with a
scheme which would involve a
large surh which would assist
owners of barren plots to culti-
vate them.

They could not say a bill of
this sort was sufficient as their
rolicy was not a broad one. In re-
cent weeks the local newspapers
mentioned some of the high

for his

a household could not purchase
a whole breadfruit but hag to
buy part of one.

He said that in his parish one
plantation starged to sell sweet
potatoes and the manager had to
get the assistance of the police in
order to stop people from steal-
ing the potatoes. “That only goes
to show what the food situation
is in this island,” said Mr. Allder.
“It is time that Government con-
sider the matter.”

He hoped that extending the
scope of the Peasants Loan Bank
would not put an end to Govern-
ment’s policy towards the agri-
cultural set up of the island,

“The truth of success in any
agricultural loan scheme is ,ro-
duction,” Mr. V. B. Vaughn, (1)
began. “And the policy of this
loan scheme does not result in
production which would benefit
this colony”,

He said that if they wanted {>
realise a substantial increase in
production and so reduce the cost
of living they have got to have a
more liberal policy.

In Jamaica they were 21 such
schemes, approximately 27 in
British Guiana and even more in
Trinidad, “This scheme should
not increase its beneficiaries but
it should increase its benefits to
the ten acre and under man.”

He felt that the bill was a scan-
dal and the administration had
the brunt to bear of that scandal.
They were doing nothing, There
was -nothing in the bill to encour-
age production. With limited
funds they were apt to do more
for the small man.

A man did not have to till the
soil to know about agriculture.
Experts had givem remarkable
reports on agricultural possibil-
ities in the West Indies and he
felt that no other body had ig-
nored these reports as the local
Government had done,

Mr. L. A. Williams (L) said
that it seemed to him that some
people forgot that Barbadians
were land hungry,

Mr. J. C. Mottley (C) said that
he was in hearty agreement with
the bill for widening the scope
for the provisions of the Peas-
ants Loan Bank,

The Bill was eventually passed.



Worst World Sugar
Glut This Year

By BUTE HEWES
LONDON.

The world is having the worst
glut of sugar this year that it has
had since before the war, Not
only is Cuba harvesting a record
cane crop, but beet-sugar produc-
tion in Europe has outstripped all
pre-war figures,

While Britain is taking all West
Indian sugar available at guar-
anteed prices, West Indian pro-
ducers are protected from the
slump in prices that must inevit-
ably result from this glut. But the
measures now being considered by
other big producers to prevent a
recurrence of this situation in
years to come will affect the Brit-
ish Colonial producers when they
enter ‘the world market eventual-
ly to sell their surplus sugars for
which no market is guaranteed
undey the Commonwealth Sugar
Agreement.

World sugar production in 1952
will reach the staggering total of
some 40,000,000 tons, according to
latest estimates. The greater part
of this, however, is protected in
some way. Just as British Colo-
nial producers are sure of a mar-
ket in the United Kingdom, so are
Cuba, Hawaii and the Philippines
sure of a market for a great part
of their crops in the United States.

But after these protected sugars
have been deducted from the total,
there still remains 7,335,000 tons
to be sold on the free market, ac-
cording to the International Sugar
Council, And the requirements of
this free market are only 4,950,000
tons.

There will thus be a surplus of
2,385,000 tons of free market
sugar. With producers competing
fiercely to sell their stocks at al-
most any price, little short of a
miracle can avoid a serious slump
in world prices.

Cuba is in a more serious posi-
tion than any other sugar nation.
Beiore the war, the Cuban crop
was kept down to about 3,000,000
tons a year because of various
Government and other restrictions,
but during and since the war there
has been a steady expansion in
Cuban production, until this year’s
crop will reach some 8,000,000
tond, or one-fifth of the world
total

Cuba can find markets for about |

6,000,000 of this, but will still be
left with an unsaleable surplus of
2,000,000 tons, Various measures
to support the price of this sur-
plus without letting the world
price sink so low that Cuba will
suffer a loss on its other produc-
tion are being considered in
Havana, ,

fragrance in every room where

this
cleanser is used. Pots, Pans,
and Tiles, Sinks, and Paintwork
respond quickly to its treat-
ment—there’s not a scratch
in a mountain of Chemico.

The County Chemical Co.



§-M-O-O0-T-H Paste

Ltd., Birmingham, England

One suggestion is that the Na-
tional Bank of Cuba should fin-
ance the surplus by supporting
other banks which have invested
funds in the crop, This, it is be-
lieved, would avoid having to
dump the surplus on the world
market. The surplus will be
stored in Cuba and released to
the market over a period of years.

One unexpected windfall for
Cuba has been the failure of the
Philippines to meet its full quota
for supply to the United States.
The Philippines should send 974,-
000 tons of sugar to the United
States this year, but will fall
short of that amount by 200,000
tons.

In accordance with U.S. law,
this deficit will be shared among
other major sugar-producing na-
tions which supply the U.S. mar-
ket. Cuba, by far the biggest sup-
plier, will get the biggest share of
this and will thus be able fo dis-
pose of another 190,000 tons of its
surplus.

But the sugar glut has now
reached such serious proportions
among all the major sugar produc~
ers of the world that some form
of international action is neces-
sary if the situation is to be saved.
Only the Commonwealth produc-
ers, protected by their agreement
with Britain, are not threatened—
yet.

@ Heap

Bp weakingt bowlfuls
of sweet lloge’s Corn Flakes.
They’re fresher! Cri: 1 So
hearty!—the “‘power”’ of corn
and its whole- values.
* oo, ne ae niacin!
jin in ness—

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~,

To Mothers
who cannot



Clerks, Marshal

Get Raises

The House of Assembly by a 13—6 majority yester-

day decided to increase the
Clerk and Marshal.

salaries of their Clerk, Deputy

The old salaries were, Clerk —$4,800, Deputy $2,400 and

Marshal $720 and the salarie
Clerk $5,760, Deputy $2,880

S the House have agreed to are,
and Marshal $1,080.

The Resolution was introduced by Mr. F. C. Goddard
(E) after only being given notice of about 10 minutes before,

and objection was taken whe
with it immediately. Leave
35-minute discussion and an

n he sought leave to go through
was, however, granted after a
11—7 division.

Those who voted for the passing of the Resolution

were: Messrs. A. E. S, Lewi
Brancker, W. A, Crawford,
Vaughn, J. A. Haynes, E. K
Goddard and Dr. H. G. Cu

F. Miller, R. G. Mapp, L. A.
Walcott a

S,

Dr. Cummins of the Government
bench was the first to raise yb-
jections to the Resolution being
proceeded with yesterday after it
had only been given notice of
shortly before.

Dr. Cummins said that he was
not dealing with the rightness or
wrongness of the proposed in-
crease, but he was objecting to it
being considered then as members
had had no opportunity to go into
it. Besides, he had felt all along
and had voiced his opinion when
the suggestion first came up, that
those salaries should wait for the
Commission.

Mr. F. L. Walcott (L) who sup-
ported the deferring of considera-
tion of the Resolution, said that
he was not objecting to the sal-
aries, but to the method of deal-
ing with them. For a matter of
such importance it was not good
enough to ask them at a moment’s
notice to consider it.

Other things connected with the
House wanted reorganizing, he
aid. They had to decide whether
the two clerks necessarily had to
be two qualified solicitors. Nor did
he think it necessary to have two.
In other such Assemblies, there
were not necessarily two qualified
solicitors.

What, indeed, one might ask,
were the legal difficulties the
House were sometimes placed in
that would justify the necessity
for two qualified solicitors? Why,
no member of the House was sup-
posed to accept the advice of the
Clerk.

He felt earnestly and sincerely
that a proposal like that should
be dicussed by a Committee of the
House before it came up for con- |
sideration.

The comment from Mr. :
Williams (L) that if there had
been a scheme for reorganizing
the House staff and things gener-
ally concerned with the House,
members

L.. A. |

it.

Mr. W.A. Crawford (C) said
that the question of which cate-
aecry the officers were, was involv-
ed in the matter, His view was
that the Clerk and the Deputy
Clerk were among those officials
for whom they had sanctioned in-
creases. It seemed strange to hear
the suggestion coming from the
Government Bench that the matter
should be postponed until such
time as they would deal with the
other employees of the Heuse,

The salaries for the officers in
auestion he also mentioned, had
been put somewhat on a basis with
Police Magistrates—not that he
Was suggesting for a moment that
the duties involved were such as
would necessitate a legally trained
man,

Mr. R. G. Mapp (L) felt that the |
matter was a domestic one and it
did not cut a nice show that they
should get there and wrangle over
it, He thought there should be a



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Don’t worry ! Cow’s milk can be prepared so that the youngest baby
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=, ROBINSON'S

‘parent’ BARLEY

C. Talma, T. O. Bryan, J. E. T.
J. C. Mottley, O. T. Allder, V.
. Walcott, E. D. Mottley, F. C.
mmins. Against were: Messrs.
Williams, E. W. Barrow, F. L.

nd Mrs. E. Bourne.

Select Committee represe,.tative
of all sections of the House to dis-
cuss it.

Mr. C. Talma (L) said that the
Resolution could be dealt with then
and he did not trust to the expe-
diency of a Select Committee. It
Was all very well to say it should
be done in a constitutional man-
ner, but it would be a long time
before it was done,

The voting for leave being
granted was: Ayes: Messrs. L, A.
Williams, E, W. Barrow, A. E. 8S.
Lewis, C, Talma, W. A. Crowford,
J. C. Mottley, O. T. Allder, J.
Haynes. BE. K. Walcgtt, E, D. Mott-
ley and F. C. Goddard. Noes:
Messrs: F. Miller, R. G. Mapp,
T. O. Bryan, F, L. Walcott, J. E. T.
Brancker, Dr. Cummins and Mrs.

Er. E. Bourne.

Discussion then began on the
Resolution.

Mr. F. ©. Gode=rd (E) said

that the Clerk of the House of
Assembly should not get less tnan
a Police Magistrate and the Dep-

have time to go into the matter.
“I do not propose to be involved
in any wrangling of this sort,” he
said.

He moved that the matter be
referred to a Select Committee
This was seconded by Mr. Miller.

Mr. E. D. Mottley (E) said that
the Clerk should be paid jn rela-
tion to the work and duties which
he performed and also in relation
to the cost of living with respect
to that community.

He supported the resolution be- |

cause he felt no precedent had
been created by Mr. Goddard. He
would be surprised at any mem-
ber of the Government raising
any serious objection to the reso-
lution.

Mr. Mottley also referred to the
reporter of the House who was
paid $120 per month. He said that
this was a scandalous salary for
a man who had to come to the
House, concentrate, report the
Speeches of members, take his
notes home and transcribe and
type them.

He said that within the last six
months the reporter had been
having it very hard and he hoped
Mr. Goddard's resolution
assist in expediting the matter of

paying the reporter a decent
salary.

Mr. F. L. Walcatt (L) asked
members to state an_ instance

where a person was paid £600 a
year as a part-time clerk He

would not uphold the resolution|

afvthat stage, |

Mr. C. E. Talma (L) felt that
no Fiscal Survey was needed to|
fix the salaries of officers of the

House of Assembly.
said |

|

Mr. W. A. Crawford (C)
that they would have to go a long
way towards satisfying employees
of the Government Service.

The resolution was put to the
vote and passed by a 13—6 major-
ity. Those against were: Messr
Miller, Mapp, Williams, Barrow,
F. L. Walcott and Mrs. Bourne.
Those for were: Messrs Lewis,
Talma, Bryan, Brancker, Craw-
ford, J. C. Mottley, Allder,
Vaughan, Haynes, E. K. Walcott,
Ee. Mottley, F. C. Goddard and
Dr. Cummins.



would |

|

would have been, one |
would have thought, informed of |

uty Clerk's salary should be fixed
at half of the ami cnt of the sum
paid to the Clerk,

He felt that members would be
in hearty agreemert with the}
resolution and asked that it be)
passed,

Mr. V. B. Vaughan (I) said that
it was a law in the U.K. that the



clerk could not be less than a

trained man, It was a legislative GONE!
body and the clerk should be

legally trained. He could not

imagine clerks of the general par-

liament being less than legally

| trained,

Obstinate Sutferers from
complaints the experience
relleved by [ian's letter
KRUSCHEN ago i bewan to

feel rheumatism
in my arms and shoulders. ‘Then
ains started in the small of my
Back, increasing until they were
really severe. bought a bottle
of Kruschen and was surprised to
find that I got a little relief. I
bought another and before it was
finished all my pains had gone
and from that day have not
appeared again. My pains were
obstinate and the relief really
surprised me."’—T.R .
Rhewnatic pains and backache
are usually the result of poisons
n the blood—poisons which lazy
wels and tired kidneys are
to ee. t For oheee
complaints there is no_ finer
treatment than Krusctien Salts
which cleanses all the internal
organs, stimulates them to nor-
mal healthy action and thus
restores freshness and vigour.

All Chemists and Stores sell
ohen.

For Weddings, Anniversaries
Birthdays, Christenings, etc.
DIAMOND RINGS
GOLD & SILVER
JEWELLERY

See your Jewellers . ; .

YÂ¥. De LIMA
& CO., LTD.

20 BROAD ST.
and at MARINE GARDENS





COOL AND FRESH...

-.» THANKS

TO MATROIL
te-decorate walls and ceilings with Matroil Oilbound Water Paint,
then see how cool and fresh the rooms look.” And how this new beauty
There

are more than twenty delightful shades to choose from, each giving a

lasts-for Matroil is oilbound to make it washable and durable

flat, smooth finish






Matroil is very
easy to apply,and you'll be pleasantly

surprised to find how far it goes,

MADE BY

BERGER PAINTS



| Agents

GARDINER AUSTIN « CO. LTD.,
BRIDGETOWN









|
|











} The beauty or HS
* Ferouson cottons... wih :
of Fergus n cottons yf ;
| exquisite designs blossom across } / { scersuickers, cambrics, voiles,
| and haircords . .. sparkling colours f } | stay wn hanged through
“Y wash after wash . . . thes / / he love ly crisp Ferguson

4 are th

{

} cottons that make up so { | beautif illy into clothes
{ a



for your children |

and yourse if





Obtainable from all lead stores

#THE GUARANTEE carried by all Ferguson Fabrics—
satisfaction assured or the matcrial will be replaced.
Always look for the name Ferguson on the selvedge.

|
|
|

RHEUMATISM,
and agonising)
BACKACHE



KLIM is ideal for infant feeding—it’s always
pure, safe and uniformly nourishing. KLIM sup-
plies the important food essentials needed for
babies to grow strong and healthy. And KLIM is
readily digested—another important feature.

» Above all, KLIM is dependable. It's not surprise
ing that so many Mothers prefer it]

1. KLIM is pure, safe milk

2. KLIM keeps without refrigeration

3. KLIM quality is always uniform

4. KLIM is excellent for growing children
5. KLIM adds nourishment to cooked dishes
| KLIM Is RECOMMENDED FOR INFANT FEEDING!

°
7. KLIM is safe in the specially-packed tin

8. KLIM is produced under strictest control

Take pure a water,
add S KLIM, stir

and you have pure, safe milk _
i.







aaa








’

Copr. 1950 pure
tntaeatt safe
jaternat’l Copr,

ut Beserved

FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVEE



THE

“FOLBATE”
LAWN MOWER

A Masterpiece of
British Craftsmanship

{





STRONG — STURDY — RELIABLE

*
| Keep your Lawns in fine trim with
“FOLBATE” LAWN MOWER

MUSSON SON & CO., LTD.-DISTRIBUTORS

”

——SS











PAGE EIGHT



CLASSIFIED ADS. |

DIED |



WEEKES—Mrs. ivy _weens, upger Col-
lymore Rock (Dress Maker) On
28th June — was buried same day

Fitz Herbert Weekes (Husband;
Gordon Weekes (Son), Ralph Weekes
(Grandson) Mrs. Myrie Babb and
others 2.7.52--In



IN MEMORIAM



BEST—In loving memory of our beloved
mother Ivy Best, who departed this
fe on G0th June, 1951

Gone but not forgotten

Tul memory fades and life departs

You'll live for ever in our heart
Ever..to. be remembered by_Mrs. Flor-
ence Taitt (mother), Mrs. Eleanor Mc-
Pherson, George Best ichildren), Joseph
McPherson (son-in-law), Deanna, Sheila





and- Anthony McPherson (grand chil-
dren} 2.7.82—1n
BLACKMAN—In loving memory of ry

dear mother, Florence Agusta Black-
man, Who was called to rest on July
Md, 195).
Memories are treasures,
No one can steal,
Death is a heartache,
Nothing can heal
Some may forget her,
Now she is gone
But I shall remember
No matter hew long
8. Pollard (Son) and other rela-
2.7.52—1n

H. M
tives

I
DRAKES—To the ever sacred memory
-of our dear Friend, the late N. C.
\Drakes, who was laid to rest two
years ago.
S Time, and circumstances continue to
add. lustre to this great man.
W. R. Orlando Dottin, Elberdeen F.
Griffith, Herman D. C. Yearwood, Lea-
burn Sampson, A. L. Welch, M. S
Haynes and W. N. Grannum, (Teachers).
2.7.52—1n. ¢

FIELD—In loving memory of our dear
son Roger, who died on July 2nd, 19651.
One year has passed since that
sad day,
Since the one we loved has passed
away,
We miss him much,
Our hearts are sore,
As time goes by we miss him more
Mummie, Daddy and aunties
2.7.52—1n

MORRISON—In Loving memory, of my

.Dear Beloved Son, Winston Morrison,
Soe departed this life on the ist July,
1 .

I waited patientky on the Lord

And He inclined His ear unto me.

And Tf will call upon Him as long as





I live.
iihelmina Morrison (mother) Bdmund
rrison (father), Darrell Morrison
(brother) and sisters. 2.7.62—1n

Pd

ANNOUNCEMENTS

ee
EARN BIG MONEY by selling Redii-

susion in your spare time. Get a suppls
.of forms today. 1.7,52—6n

FOR RENT
HOUSES _

| APPLEBY—on Sea,
wiy-built houses Each has
rooms, dining, drawing rooms
Â¥erandah. Modern conveniences,
; 2.7.52-—2n





Two
three
and

St. James

_—

ATHLONE—on sea, Fontabelle. Divided
finto two flats. Each has dining, drawing
and several bedrooms. Modern conven-

nees. Phone 374 Mr. Kenneth

mdiford. 2.7, 52—2n

Re
Attractive seaside Flat main road Has-
pee. comfortably furnished, English
th, Open Verandah facing sea. Suitable
one person (or couple). Frem July |.
Telephone 2949. 18.6.52—t.f.n.



“FARAWAY, St. Philip Coast, fully
furnished. For July, November,
December only. Dial 4476.

19.6.52—t.f.n.

——<$<$<$<$<$ $$
FLAT & HOUSE—Fully furnished, St.
Lawrence on-Sea. Phone 3503,
E 20.3.52—t.f.n.
$$
" From Ist August, furnished or unfur-
nished, “INGRID" Navy Gardens. Three
bedroonis, Inspection by arrangement
With the tenant, telephone number FITZ
. EVELYN, ROACH & CO., LTD.
Rickett St
* 1.7.52—1. fn,
————————————
-OHILLOREST," Bathsheba — Beautiful
view, well furnished, For months of
October, November and December. App!’
Cc. L, Gibbs & Co., Ltd. Tel. 2402.
; 1,.7,.52—am

—————— EEE ner
NEWHAVEN, Crane Coast, fully fur- °

nished.
ber only. Dial 4476.

For July, November, Decem-
19.6,52—t.f.n,



eae ree
OFFICE SPACE in building at Spry |

Apply Auto

Street near Trafalgar St
2506. 27.6.62—1.f.n

Tyre Co.
UNION VILLA—Maxwell
2.7.52

ences. Dial 3892 an

LODGE STONE WORKS CO. %

A large quantity of
% machine broken flint stone,
% nll sizes, suitable for Road or
© Yard Construction and/or
making concrete blocks, or



| ORIENTAL |
} PALACE |
|



HEADQUARTERS FOR |
SOUVENIRS

FROM INDIA, CHINA &

CEYLO! )

THANI'S



FURNITURE

for Home & Office

at Money-Saving Prices

NEW & Renewed Wardrobes,

Bureaus, Chest-of-Drawers, Bed-
2-feet to 5-feet wide,
Springs, Laths, Washstands $8 up,
Nightchairs, Towel, Shoe & Hat-
tacks—-TABLES for Dining, Kiteh-
er & Fancy Use, China, Bedroom
& Kitchen Cabinets, Larders.

DRAWING ROOM FURNITURE
Morris, Caned and other types,
KS with flat or tops,
Spring-seat and
Chairs, Bookracks

other Office

PIANOS, Banjos, Sewing Ma-
chine 15.00—Pram, Go-Cart Metal

and Wardrobes Trunks $8 up;
Typewriter, Kitchen Sink $4.50,
Enamelled Ware Drainers, $3

Magic Lantern $6.00

L.S. WILSON

Spry St — Dial 4069

PPOO DOS OSS GOH 9H HOOF 9H9D:



tion Phone 2562 2.7.52—3n
CAR—1951 Hillman Minx. 8,000 Miles.
Ir good condition A. R. Lewis c/o

Cave, Shepherd & Co., Ltd
1.7,52—6n

condition
Dial 4476

owner-driven, good as new. Dial 4476.

eo

ONE (1) Austin two ton truck and one
#1)
D. V. Seott & Co., Ltd.

——

“ELECTRIC
Ficctrie Iron and Board
lLoese
DA COSTA & CO., LTD., Electric Dept
Thone 3878.

three
2) ©
portum.

Ultra-Modern Radio-Grams
jard Speed changers) Two Pickup Heads
no needle worries, in attractive walnut | Service Act.
cabinets, A
£420.00, P. C. 8. MAFFEI & CO., LTD.,
Pr: Wm. Henry Street.

Large Oven and Warming Ovens
Condition

MAFFEI'’S RADIO EMPORIUM.







by
cubic
refrigerator is a
Hunte & Co., Lid., Lr
5136,

Kings

two (2) months old, out of P. B
Prince Aibert. J. W
St: Michael

Changing Unit 91.52

Unfurnished
Attractive Sea-Side Bungalow, with Hot
Water Plant. 3 bedrooms, Venetian Blinds,
Electric, Telephone, all modern conveni-

TELEPHONE 2508

FOR SALE

AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—Morris

Oxford im good condi-



CAR—Dodge Super-Deluxe, First Class
and Owner-driven $2,000
12.6,52—t.f.n.

little



CAR — Vauxhall Velox, need,

42.6.52—t.f.n,

Austin A.40 Car Telephone 4821,

26 .6,52-—t.f.n.

yRON—Walter No-Cord |
Get one e
all are sold,



fine units before

26.6.52—6n







Just received new shipment of Garrard
speed Automatic Changers at
S. Maffei & Co, Ltd. Radio Em-

15.6.52—-t.f.n.
“Bye”

JUST ARRIVED De Luxe



BARBADOS

day the lith day
offer for sale by Public
my Office in the Public Buildings for a
sum not less than the appraisecé value
“THE MOTOR V :
now at anchor in Carlisle Bay, Bridge-

whi

passengers’
sailors’ rooms for 6, cooks’ aecommoda-
tion for 2,
store room.

ments for inspection apply
+. %.

Proyost Marshal's Office

between the ages of 18 and 26 residing
in Barbados are requested to call
the American Consulate from July 1 to



(with Gar-

limited quantity only

28.6.62—t.f.n

————$
One Hotpoint Electric Stove, 4 Rings,



Dial 2177

PYE BATTERY SETS—Just a few lett

2.7.5%—in.







15.6.52—t.f.n.

— Frigidaires made

General Motors Seven and nine

feet Always make sure your
Frigidaire K

Broad St. Dial

1,7, 52—3n

REFRIGERATORS

POULTRY

PIGEONS—-White, Blue and
Phone Humphrey, 4428

2.7.52

LIVESTOCK





Silver

2n

, CALF—One (1; Lure Bred Holstein Calf
Bull,
Road Cot,



Smith,
Dial 2537
2.7,62—t.f.n.

MECHANICAL
One H. M. V. Automatic Record
2.7,.52—7n.

MISCELLANEOUS

ANTIQUES — ot every dercription
Giass, hina, old Jewels, fine Silver
Watercolours. Ear!

graphs etc., at Gorringes Antique Shop

adjoining Royal Yecht Club.
3.2,62—t.f.n.

BATH TOWELS:—Dutch Manufacture.
Extra Strong Quality with Beautiful
Stripes
to, Two for $3.50 at Kirpalani, 52 Swan
Street 2.7.52——In,
nn

‘ EREALS—Shredded Wheat, Corn
Fikes, Oatmeal, All Bran & Oatflakes in
Tins W. M. FORD, 36, Roebuck St
Dial 3489 2.7.52--2n

FRUIT iN TINS:--Pears, Peaches,
Sliced Pineapple, Prunes, Guavas, Gra 5
also Sliced Carrots. W. M. Ford, Roe-
buck St. Dial 480 2.7.52—2n

GALVANISED—Special offer for 10
days. Best quality English vaniged
sheets 6 ft. $3.94 7 ft. $4,60 B ft, $5.24
Also galvanised nails 39 cents per Ib.
Auto Tyre Co. of Spry & Trafalgar St
Dial—2696 21,6,52—t.f.n.











wecciperenesenhinenpmnasigeensene nine teacmeinenesctanionet
LAUNCH-—Cabin Launch, Morris Vid-

ette Engine, excellent condition, a bar-
ain, Only reason for selling owner
leaving island. Phone Vincent Burke.
28,.6,.52—Tn





RECORD—Just Received. Long Playing,
Calypsos, (Edmundo Ross) Charlie Kunz,

21, 1962 for Selective Service Registration
under the Universal Military Training

who
sequent to July 31, 1952,
to register upon the day th

el
their birth, or within five days there-
Perect | after.

American Consulate,
bados.





ainst
giving credit to my wife, ADA VIOLA
PITT
myself responsible for her or anyone
else contracting any
‘my name unless by
————-= | signed by me.









giving eredit to my wife
VALERIA JONES (nee Forde) as 1 do
not hold myself responsible for her or
anyone else contracting
debts in my name unless by a written
order signed by me

giving cred
whomsoever in my name as 1 do not hold
myself responsible for anyone contract-
ing any debt or deb’
less by a written order signed by me

—— Taran

The public are hereby warned against
Usual price $2.11 each. Reduced | Moore (nee Springer) as I do nat hold
elae contracting any debt or debts in

PUBLIC NOTICES |

|
IN THE COLONIAL COURT OF
ADMIRALTY

The Owners of the Steamship
“Amakura”™

ve
The Motor Vessel “T B. Radar’
Her cargo and freight
At 2 p.m, in the afternoon of Thurs-
1982, 1 will
Competition at

ot July

ESSEL T. B. RADAR’

town, with its fittings. Particulars of
the Inventory of the said Vessel can be
|seen on ligation

The appraised value of the Vessel,
%, bullt in 1846, is the sum of

IVE THOUSAND DOLLARS

It is fitted with on Internal combustion
Diesel

of 10 kn
ar
of 1
and a depth of 10 feet
the Engine room is #4

ine, has an estimated speed
, & gross tonnage of 162,34,
ister tonnage of 116.12, a length
feet, a breadth of 20 & 3/10 feet

a as

The accommodation consists of 2
rooms with 4 beds each,

Boatswain's locker

and
For further particulars and arrante-
to
HEADLEY,
Marshal in Admiralty
25.6.52—11.



NOTICE

All male citizens of the United States














at

All male citizens of the United States
attain the age 16 years sub-
are required
attain the

hteenth anniversary of the day of

For further information, consult ¢he
wn,
5.524. fn.



‘The public are hereby warned ag:
(nee SCOTT) as ¥ do not nol

debt or debts ir
a written order

Sed. MILTON PITT.
Melverton Village,

St. George.
1.7,52—2n



The public are hereby "warned against
MIGNON



any debt or

Sed. VERNE AMBROSE JONES.
St. Patrick's,
Christ Church

Ae

The publig are hereby warned against
fo any person or persons

in my name un-

Sed. CECHL WATTS,
Eagle Hall,
St. Michael
1.7, 52—2ng

giving credit to my wife, Mary Beatrice
myself responsible for her or anyone

my name w by a written order

signed by me,











Sed. ERROL PERCIVAL MOORE
Lower Carlton,
St. James
1,7,.52-—2n.
HOUSEKEEPER Experienced House
keeper; pleasant personality; to take
care of new, seaside flats. Livingy

quarters and agreeable surroundings. in
addition to reasonable Please
write C/o Box C.C
Co.

C/o Advocate
29.6.52-——3n





National Cash Book-Keeping Machine
Operator with previous experience. To
assume duties on or belove Ist) August,
1952. Apply in person with written

Mildred Atwell, Ted Heath, Billy Cotton | application to Secretary, Dowding Estates

(B'dos) Lid
2.7.52

(Artists). Wm. Fogarty
Qu

ubscribe now to the Dally Telegraph
Bngland's leading Daily Newspaper now
arriving tn Barhados by Air only a tew
dave after publcwtion in Londen Con.
tact’ ton Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltd.
Loca) Representative, Tel. 3118.

17 4.52-—t.t.n.







TINNED MEATS:-Lancheon
Corned Mutton, Cereal Beet, Brisket Bee*,
and Steak & Kidney Puddings, W. M.
Ford, Roebuck Street. Dial 3489,

2.7.52—2n.,

ains in Back
i eee

Beef,





STAMP COLLECTING







Genuine collector England
Wishes to contact genuine col- &
lector Barbados view exchange %
local issues. Box No 4645, %
Joshua B, Powers Ltd., 14 Cock- s

ur Street, London, 8.W.1.

land ‘.
x
NG

DANCE NOTICE

FARLEY HILL COUNTRY
CLUB, St. Peter

OPENING DANCE

SATURDAY 12th JULY, 1952
Starts at 9.00 p.m.

Dress Optional

ADMISSION tt $1.00
(Meanwell’s Orchestra)
29.6.52—3n.
569999999665 SGOECSLY
a)

NUTROPHOS

For frayed, tired nerves
that make you jumpy and
irritable. take

NUTROPHOS

for speedy relief

PSS SSS SSOSOSS



- MORNING

SLA SIOD





OCS

& Trading Co., Limited.”
2. jy 52-—-Tn.

MISCELLANEOUS

EL

SURVEYOR-ENGINEER would like to
get im touch with estate or building
development company desirous of ne
oe Holds poms & Yaane “
several. years’ experience i .
C/o Advocate. af .

——$— $$$ [ $$ TS,
$62.60 POCKET MONEY easily earned

by recommending 25 new subscribers to

REDIFFUSION in one month



1,7,52-—6n

—

REDIFFUSION offers $1.50 cash for
each new Subseriber recommended by
you 1.7.52-—6n
SUPPLEMENT YOUR i#NCOME by»
recommending REDIFFUSION Obtain
full particulars from the REDIFFUSION
office 1.7, 62—6n

aarp RE ERS
TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bonus





from Rediffusion for 25 recommenda-
tions in one calendar month
1.7, 52—6r
UNFURNISHED HOUSE--To rent or
lease anytime between. August and

November, for a long period in Hastinr's
or St. Lawrence area Dial 2405 be-
tween 8-—12 noon, 27.6.52—31

“Qolontbie” Due

The SS. Colombie is expected
to arrive in Carlisle Bay this
morning from Martinique. She
will be leaving to-day at 4 p.m.
for Trinidad. Her agents are
Messrs, R. M. Jones & Co., Ltd.





Don't let mourn night he
ing, attacks of Bronchitis oF Aathins
ene! Another: Ma
without . grea
sistem works thru the
tubes
inumedtatay remove wah
macus, R,
promoting freer breath! and ies
Seen eanee . et MERDACO
from emist today. °
faction or money back ‘alone

IT’S ENGLISH but

looks AMERICAN!
i's Smart, just suitable
to fix upstairs
for early morning tea

or hot water emergency.

3 Ts a sample 2 Burner
rl Gas Range Plate
> Call and see it at
Your Gas Showreom, Bay St

IMPORTERS

We offer Africa's best
quality PEANUT BUTTER.
Our peanut butter is ab-
solutely pure, nutricious,
and full of rich vitamins.
{Increase your turnover by
selling this popular line. We
ship direct from factory at
FACTORY PRICES,

Please write to
KOLIMPEX (PTY)

P.O. Box 9608,

LTD.,

s JOHANNESBURG,

South Africa.

Tweedside Rd
of land

Go

front 18 x 10, back 2 « 11 Shed 2
Land can be rented Also (1) Large
Property at Brittons Hill Apply Jos
St. Hill, Real Estate Agent, Tweedside
Rd., or Dial 4837 2.7, 52--2n

————
The undersigned will offer for sale at
Public Competition at their office No

17 High Street, Bridge’
the ‘ih day of July,
with the land thereto containing by ad-
measurement
Navy Gardens,
containing
south and east,
dining room, 3
and kitchen with garage and rooms for
two servants and with
stalled.
further particulars
sale apply to:—
COTTLE



By kind permission I will sell at 1 p.m
+ McEnearney & Co.,
h

in work Order. Terns Cash. R
Archer McKenzie’ Aue 7



pany 1
MOTOR OMNIBUS CO., Nelson Street
one 1952 Sommerset Austin Sedan Car
damaged

Terms CASH Fall of Hammer.
R. ARCHER

the yt spots by public com-
on e

petition on rsday next 3rd solr Lae
toll t ed
wooden building at St
School at 12 o’elock, and at St

Boys’ and Girls’ schools one (1)
en building

Govt. Auctioneer.



public auction on the spot at Layne’s
Gap, Brittons Hill on Friday next 4th
July at. 2 p.m. €
about 60 feet long with galyanize roof and
abovt 250 block stones. also 25 wooden
henches. This buitding +s ideally suited as

UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

Straker & Co
July 3 at his Office Spry St, (Oppesite

lop Roadster! 2
Ladies Brassieres,
Football boots,
Elastic Braid, ke Cream
termints, Extra Strong, and many other
items.

a









BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PUBLIC SALES (C’ada‘Greatest
Tradin
In The World’





REAL ESTATE
BRIGHTWOOD' yrence
With land about. @100 se": Goed
sea frontage. Suitable for building. The
bungalow has 2 open verandahs, 3 large
living rooms, 3 bedrooms, shower, toilet
kitchen, pantry, Garage, servants’ quar-
ters. Main water, electricity. Premises

ne and re-decorated throughout
1
Appk

Inspestion

by appointment only
“Landfall

Sandy Lane, St. James
2.7.62

PROPERTIES—Shop and Residence pt
, Standing on 2.500 sq. f
Water and Lights Installed
Acres Building Land st Clapham
ve Reasonable

1 House at Howells Cross Road



1





















































Size

wn, on Friday,

at 2 *
The bungalow known as CARVILLE

8241 sq.
Christ
an open

ft. situate ir
Church ane
verandah faging

combined drawing &
bedrooms, toilet, bath

electricity in-
dial 4460. For
and conditions of

Inspection

CATFORD & CO, 20.6.52—8n

AUCTION

Garage Friday
One-BsS.A. 5 Seater Sedan Car

tioneer
2.7,32—39

By instructions of the msuranee Com
Ww sell at the GENERAL

by accident. Done only 45%
SALE FRIDAY 4th at 2.30 p.m

Auctioneer.
1.7,52—4n
By instructions the

received from
Committee I will sell

— One (1) _ double
Boniface Jurilor
Lug's

wood-

wa A. Seutt,
6, 52—4an

at 2 p.m
Terms strictly cash

UNDER THE DIAMOND
By instructions received } will sell by

(1) one wooden building

pavilion or beach house, Terms Cash
yArey A. Scott, Auctioneer

instructions received from C. L

By
I will sell on Thursday

Men's
Bladders

Terms Cash. Sale at 12.30

VINCENT GRIFFITH (Agee.



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

SALES IN JULY

Tuesday #th Mrs, J. F. fnniss's Sale.
Harcliffe, St. Lawrence
Gap

Tuesday 15th Mrs. L. L. Gill's Sale
Clement Rock,
St. gone).
W. F. Harris’ Sale
Holborn, Fontabelle.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO,,
Auctioneers

Tuesday 22nd Mrs

2.7.52—1n.

LOST & FOUND







B-—6524,

52 Finder please
Trotman, Dayrell’s
2.7,52—I1n,

Mid-



B.T.¢
summer Meeting, If
return to Ethelbert
FPad., Christ Church

WHITE Disc (1) for Standard 6 h.p.
car, Lest between Speightstown and
Bridgetown Finder please return to
Neville Rock, Hindsbuny Road or dial
2065 Car M—2i47 2.7.52—2n

Foreign Diplomats
Attend Session

From Page 1.

open for business to-morrow.
President Rhee may then have
support to put through his de-
mand for the election of a Presi-
dent by popular vote. He be-
lieves he would win another
term as President that way. The
speaker in the assembly, an anti-
Rhee member, H. Seiniky did not
attend to-day’s opening.—U.P.

One







In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (West Indies)
Limited, advise that they can now com-
munieate with the following ships
through their Barbados Coast Station:

M.V. Bonaire, S.S_ Alcoa Pointer, 5.5
Hawk, M.S, Ravnanger, S.8. Uruguay,
= §. ‘Hurunui, SS _ Thorbjorg, S.5
Fridtiof Nansen, S.S. Colombie,
Silver Ocean, S.S, Enros, S 5 Seapearl
SS. Hertford, SS Interpreter,
Bresle, SS orden, SS. Mattawunds,
SS. Andrea Gtitti, © S. Sclara, $5
Fort Townshend, SS. Alcoa Pegasus,
SS. S. Paula, S.S. Campas,
Hersilia, SS. Argentina,
Quebec, SS. Fort Esperance, SS
coma Star, SS Sundial, SS. Aasem-
aersk, S&. Polyslory, SS. Samana,
ss ‘Cyrus, SS. Evros, SS. Sun
Valley, 8S. Nordahl Grieg, SS. Nati-
cina, SS. Christi Holm, ©.S. Alcoa
Corsair, S.S. De Grasse and SS At-
lantie Mariner





a





This Week's
Special



COCONUT CREAM

CAKES
6c. each

nel

Ss
B ARBADOS %
AKERIES MsTD.

General Post Office.

DIAL 4758
JAMES STREET



many
ment in Canada and of Canadian
investment abroad was contained
in an address at Toronto at the

Canadian
Fair. After noting that confidence

“ridiculous” charge had been made
of Canada
United States,

in Camada were considered as a

than 5 per cent of that wealth to-
day, However,

critical of capital from external

investment had made much of this
country self-sufficient, and “while }c

ertheless, the cost of servicing the
debt is offset by the saving effected

capital,

s2—4n. |that history shows that

© 5 | (1951-64) regarding Wages Books and other



gNation

A comprehensive analysis, from
angles, of outside invest-







In Carlisle Bay

week-end by Henry Borden, ae Willemstad, Seh Franklyn D.R
C.M.G., Q.C., President of Brazil-| Turtie Dove, Sch. ‘arrict Wiittake
fan Traction Light & Power Co.,}* wheter arriett Whittaker
to the Canadian Exporters’ Asso- ei ARRIVALS

ciation in connection with the lec Delaucen fram St. Vincent with

rgo and

ecoanuts

fresh fruit,
Consigned to
Association

machinery and

International the Schooner

Trade

Owners



in the continuing development of Motor vessel Daerwood arrived trom
Canada had renied in large - an ad a Soe
influx of new capital, more than DEPARTURES
$1.500,000,000 in the st two — eee, pm, Leveepest Motor
y 3 — or approximate » 15 . vente “races for inidad and Motor
cent of Canada’s aggregate capital —— apenie
expenditure during the period—

the speaker referred to the » Seawell

existence of “some suspicion and vn bn battubae
misunderstanding of the role of | Prom TRINIDAD rea

foreign capital”, both incoming L, Stanley, R. Cumberbatch, J. Mur
and outgoing, For instance, doch, E. Murdoch, J. Murdoch, \

the

Rezende, P. Rezende, M. Rezende, J
Mayers, A. Mayers, P. Mayers, D. Mayers
to the! R. Mayers, H, Nelson, C McLeod, J

Goddard, A. Goddard, C. Goddard, J

Even if external in ent as Maher, V. Knox, J. McKee

“selling out”

From 8T. LUCIA
mortgage On our national wealth, Miss Jill Devaux, Mr. Leslie Baylis,
this ‘mortgage” had decreased in Sn span Baylis, Mr. Isaac Sadoynik
the past generation from 19.2 per| tron SKIT
eent of Canada’s wealth to less Mr, Walter Tiesel, Mr. Lipton Wenhar

DEPARTURES — My Bb.
; ON SATURDAY
For TRINIDAD

WA
far from feeling

E. Horgan, A. Lee, H. Haskell
sources: Canada had benefited im- | Haskell, P. Haskell, E foskell M
measurably. In the case of oil, such | ##skell, M. Scott, D.- Ybberson, E

Robinson, ©. Gittens, M. Gittens, J
Perez, L. Jordan, B, Marshall, RB. Bywnoe,

cou r Harvey, H. Harvey,, R. Spooner

it ee that we must service this a GRENADA .
eA * 7 1 marris, N. Lucas, U. Milne, D

great new foreign investment, nev-]j..\) 3. "Sandifer, W. Allan, W. Vos, \N

Pearson, Jim Hercules
For VENEZUELA

in the reduction in petroleums im- Miss Carmen Vanderbranden, Miss
ports.” Another instance was in- rig ass ara, Mr. Alexander Stewart,
vestment of U.S. capital in devel- Retad. Shs. denn’ Moca... soar:
oping iron ore deposits: we are} Ronald Laidier, Mr Thomas Younger,
now exporters of iron ore and our Mt. Henry Eicher, Mrs. Mary Eicher,

> + , | Miss Jessie Eicher, r ‘uana Magal-
exports will grow more rapidly lanes, Miss Anita Magallanes Mise

than our imports. And the rapid
development of Canada’s pulp and
paper industry needed foreign

Norma Nunez.
ARRIVALS — BY B.W.LA
ON MONDAY
From TRINIDAD
E. Garside, S. Apack, G. Harris, H.

In order to have a healthy eco- | Weekes, C. Gittens, A. Kirby, V. Kirby.
RICO



nomy, “Canada must have a Tee al aes a ae
ylor, in jaza, Sustace
healthy and prosperous export Jones, Ernest Barrow, Eunice Tens
trade’. In 1951, Canada’s exports | Edna Applewaite, Rigaudeé. Prout. Moi
of and services were 24 per | timer Thompson, Gladstone Dayrell, John

C. Webster, Annie K,. Webster, James A
Wood, Edward Dottin, Millicent
Maggie Hassell, Michael Foster
DEPARTURES — BY BW.1LA
ON MONDAY
for TRINIDAD
D, Corbin, W. Sheppard, Olga Grannuin

ce of her gross national pro-
duct.

Canada’s Trade, $577 Per Capita
—While Canada is recognized as
a great exporting country, it is

Piaza













also a great “trading country”.|M. Sealy, H. Parker, R._Skeete. D
*. Scott, J. Scott, S. Scott, T. Springer.
Canada, the speaker pointed out,| (jacob. B, Mohammed, James Clerk,

is “the fourth ranking exporter
and importer but she is by far the
greatest “trading” nation in the
world”—on a per capita basis—
foreign trade in 1951 representing
$577 per capita, with the U.S.
somewhat less than one-third, at
$168 per capita.

Mr. Borden then emphasized
another point (with readily ex-
plainable exceptions”), namely
capital

Marjorie McLeod
For GRENADA

Fields, C, Crawford, D. Dunlop, V
rond, A. Kendrick
For GUADELOUPE

M. Kinch, L. Dimmick
For ANTIGUA

G. George, L, Hodge, E. Chavasse
For PUERTO RICO

Mr Raphael Spano, Mrs.
Spano, Mrs. Viola Ford, Mr
Paviluk, Mrs Margaret
Mildred Sandiford, Mrs
Mr
Miss Adeline Earle,

Wal-

Mrs,

does not enter an area, develop it} iin, Mr. Heulet Benjamin, Mr. Regin-
to a certain point and then de- aid MeConney, Mr Edrington Maynard,
Mrs. Jean Paviluk

part. When capital is wisely in-
vested, ably managed and fairly
treated, “it remains and grows
with the country of its adoption.”

Foreign trade for Canada could
be developed through the medium
of direct investment abroad. The
recent removal by the Canadian
Government of foreign exchange
control regulations should facili-
tate an increase in Canada’s trade
potential through export of our
capital and participation in the
development of other countries.

This led the speaker to refer
to “that colossal market and|{had been stimulated,

Sane

3 CHANCERY SALE

The undermentioned property will be set up for sale at the
Public Buildings, Bridgetown, between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for
the date specified below. If not then sold
Friday at the same place and during the s¢
on application to me

DAISY HERBERT MURPHY
executors of the





trading world, the

invested in a
Brazil, Since t
ment in “Brazilian

en, this

sult, in the past 5 years

materials had received




sours until sold

JAMES GRANT
Eyare Murphy,

ATKINS PLE—Plaintiffs
deceased

and
will of

and
MILLICENT WAITHE and AURELIA CLARKE Defendants
acting herein by D'Arey Augustus Seott their constituted Attorney
PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at Eagle Halt

Road in the parish of Saint Mic



ael in this Island containing by

admeasurement nine and three fifths perches or thereabouts abutting

and bounding on two sides on lands of Albertha Payne on lands
now or late of one Mrs. Thomas and on Eagle Hall Road
or however else the same
the messuage or dwellinghouse thereon called
all and@ singular other the buildings and erections on
of land erected and built standing and being with the appurtenances.

UPSET PRICE: £1500 0. 0.
DATE OF SALE

“Byare Ville”

18th July, 1962
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chancery,
30th June, 1952.

2.7,62—4n

gettin cal, Alans ALD Se oe

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

WAGES BOOKS AND OTHER RECORDS

Se 5h. i



HE ATTENTION of Employers is directed to the Wages Board
of 1950 (applicable
Bridgetown only), the Holidays
8.8 | with Pay Act, 1951, (1951-38), and the Protection of Wages Act, 1951

(Bridgetown Shop Assistants) Decisions, No. 2
to employers of shop assistants in

Records to be kept by

them.

2. Employers are required to enter in their Wages Book the

s& Imperial following particulars concerning each employee :—
a

Christian name and surname, sex, period of employment,
rate of remuneration,

ture of employee.
3. Employers are also required to keep a Register of all their
employees showing the following particulars :—
Christian name and surname, date of birth, date of engage-
ment, period in respect of which holiday with pay is given, date

and duration of holiday with pay, amount of holiday pay, date |

and duration of sick leave, remarks.
*4. The Labour Department is willing to give any further advice,
if required.
LABOUR DEPARTMENT,
Ist July, 1952.

POST OFFICE NOTICE

Change in Air Mail Schedule



Effective 1st July, 1952, Air Mails will be closed at the General}

Post Office as follows:—







Destination } Time Day
Dominica Sees cas 2.00 p.m. Wednesday
9.30 a.m. Saturday
t. Vincent .. es a 9.30 a.m, Monday

9.30 a.m.

Thursday

Schedules should be amended where necessary.

30/6/52
ROBERT A. CLARKE,
Colonial Postmaster

SEA AND AIR ||
TRAFFIC |



M.S. BOSKOOP Ist August, 1952

M.S, ORANJESTAD 15th
SAILING TO T'DAD, PARAMARIBO

mM s STENTOR ae July, 1952
83. ¢ A July, 1962
M.S. NESTOR 8th 7:
SAILING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO
\.S. HERSILIA 4th July, 1962

M.S

J, Steelman, E. Steelman, M. Glean, G.






Eleanor

John
Macfarlane,
Roberta Branch,
Kenneth Gibbs, Mrs. Edith Jones,
Elsie Benja-

Continent of
South America”. Fifty years ago
a small group of Canadians had
ublic ubility in
invest-
Traction”, had
grown to $750,000,000, As one re-
alone
Canadian suppliers of goods and
business
of $50,000,000 and interchange of
goods between the two countries

Registration Office,

the sum and on
ll be set up on each sueceeding
Full particulars

aforesaid
is abutting and bounding Together with
and
the said parce!

ee

SC OPLOPS PPPSSSS

YWPOSS

gross amount due, deductions (a record |‘
of each worker’s account is to be kept), net amount due, signa- |’

2.7.52.—2n. |







>
>

WEDNESDAY, JOLY 2. 1952

nd





Coupons eo 4/10%
RATES OF EXCHANGE 9. Sive me
IST JULY, 1952 CANADA
Seliing Buying 78 3/10% Cheques on Bankers 76.5/30%
NEW YORK Demand Drift 76.25%
3/10 Cheques on Bankers 71 6/10% Sight Draft 16 2/106
Sight or Demand 78 3/10% Cable
Drafts 71 4/10% 76 8/10% Currency 75%
13/10% Cable Coupons 74 2/106
1 8/10% Currency 70 1/10% 50% Silver 208,
ROYAL NDS | 2o°099°* ;
STEAMSHIP CO. ‘
The MV “CACIQUE DEL
| ¢ SEETOR Gan at tee CARIBE” will accept Cargo and
MS 7 A atin suse 1958 Passengers for St. Lucia, St
ss corre eon oe Vineent, Grenada, and Aruba
6 A Sith, SOly, 18 Date of Sailing to’ be notified
M.S. NESTOR 25th July, 1962

The M.V. “CARIBBEE” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
jee, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and St. Kitts Date of sail-
ing to be notified

B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATION (INC.) -
Consignes — Tele. No. 4947

SAILING TO SUROPE vaiie
iy.

& BRITISH GUIANA

EGO OOOO

1952

(CURACAO ONLY)

MESTIA 2ist July, 1952
Ss. P. MUSBON, SON & CO... LTD J
Agents SOSSSOBESSSOSGBG GOS SO SOS



Canadian National Steamships





SOUTHBOUND Arrives Satis Satis Arrives Sails

Halifax Boston B'dos B'dos

CANADIAN CRUISER .. 30 June 2 July — 10 July 10 July
CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 90 June 2 Juy = 12 July 13 Ju
LADY RODNBY .. .. =: 11 July 14 July 16 July 25 July 26 July

NORTHBOUND es Satls Arrives Arrives Arrives

B'dos St. John B’dos Boston Halifax Mo
LADY NELSON 4 July 8 July 17 July 19 July 22 July
CANADIAN

CONSTRUCTOR 24 July 29 July S Aug. 8 Aug. 10 Aug.
LADY RODNEY 7 Aug. 9 Aug. 19 Aug. 20 Aug. 23 Aug.

for further particulars, apply to—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD.—Agents.



_ HARRISON LINE



—

j OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM

Vessel. From Leaves Due
Barbados.
S.S. “TACOMA STAR” _.... Liverpool 19th June 4th July
S.S. “HERDSMAN” ..Lendon 5th July 30th July
S.S. “STATESMAN” .... Liverpool 12th July 27th July

HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM



Vessel. For Closes in Barbados.
S.S. “TRADER” .» Liverpool » 8th July
For further information apply to e

& CO., LTD.—Agents
5659S 9OSSODSSIOOSOOTE,,

M. V.
DAERWOOD

will be arriving at Barbados
on TUESDAY, July ist and
will be sailing on THURS-~-
DAY, July 3, for St, Lucia,
St. Vincent, Grenada, Aruba,
accepting Passengers and
Freight,

DA COSTA

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Clearing out our new stock
of shot. gun cartridges:—

12 GUAGE ELEY—$11.65
per 100 NET CASH

Big closing out reductions
on all HARDWARE ITEMS.

AT

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE













C6, 6,655 OSGI IAN

LLL TF OD oF

44%





SESOHLSGSS

C"G"TRANSATLANTIQUE |

Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique, ¥
Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica



From Southampton “Arrives Barbados

*““DE GRASSE 4th June, 1952 .. 16th June, 1952
“COLOMBIE” .. 19th June, 1952 .. 2nd July, 1952
*“DE GRASSE” 12th July, 1952 .. 24th July, 1952

*Not calling at Guadeloupe
SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO FUROPE

From Barbados Arrives Southampton
*““DE GRASSE” .. 29th June, 1952 .. 9th July, 1952
“COLOMBIE” .. 18th July, 1952 .. 25th July, 1952
*“DE GRASSE” 6th Aug., 1952 .. 16th Aug., 1952

*Sailing direct to Southampton





CLOSED FROM TUESDAY FOR STOCK TAKING
RE-OPENING FRIDAY THE 4TH

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
Corner Broad and Tudor Streets

Mbt bb bt POA 66 O56.

os

THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
CORPORATION LTD.

NOTICE

ONE of the LARGEST GENERATING SETS in
our Power Station will be OUT OF COMMISSION for
at least ONE WEEK from TUESDAY, JULY 2nd, for
overhaul by the Engine Maker's representative. There
is every probability therefore that LOAD SHEDDING

will be necessary at certain times during this period.

OD DODO

2948





THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
CORPORATION LTD.

Vv. SMITH,

General Manager.

ODD OO4-8-6-H@



HOPPED PHOPOAIP POOP DOO

3

‘ee8

SPO

SPL LLLP FIED



-WEDNESDAY, JULY. 2, 1952








SHE'S IN THE
CLEAR UNTIL
SHE MAKES A
CLAIM. ANY Way, |
“WHAT WE WANT Ss

| INSURANCE JOP
| IN THE STATES

LAST YEAR, TO KNOW IS —

| E SHE'S
GOT THE MEAL

VEWELLERY.





AH, BREADED )
VEAL CUTLETS, ~
MASHED POTATOES. i
CREAMED PEAS AND
APPLE PiE ~—



JUST A
MOMENT,

v PLEASE



FLASH GORDON

—I WILL REMIND yOu
THAT DR. CARSON
RETURNS SOON /
MARRY ME, AND I
WILL SEE THAT HE
AND HIS BOY ARE
RETURNED TO EARTH
SAFELY — ALONG WITH
YOUR EARTH WOMAN /

IT'S A TEMPTING
OFFER — BUT
HOW DO THEY
GET THERE

HOLD ON, QUEEN
MARLA— L KNOW
THIS IS LEAP
YEAR, AND I
COULD THINK OF
WORSE FATES,
BUT— WELL, THIS
IS KIND OF SUDDEN /

YOUR HESITANCY
IS NOT FLATTERING!
BUT NO MATTER!
IF YOU NEED
FURTHER
INDUCEMENT —



HOW 156 IT YOUR
COMPANY ALLOWS YOU
SUCH FREEDOM FOR
YOUR PROFITABLE
ENTERPRISES, HERR...

YOUR NAME 15... ?

SURE! HAVE YOUR
MONKEY DRIVE US TO
LE BOURGET AIRPORT.’ &

YOU VILL FLy
ALL OF US HOME



'M GONNA
MOVER! \ MARRY A
LOOK RICH GIRL
INTEND 7 AT MY _|)) AN! SIT
MUSCLE! ) AROUND
z\ an ENJOY
Ses\_( MY6ELF-



\

s =



STAND WHERE \ , 5
YOU ARE! WE ve ) \-
GOT You! _ I

=

|



“Giop THE.)
CORES

rw J







$$ sq



BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES

iN LONDOW
| | NO 0U87

sare cerosir \i{ a= f/f
} “oy {| YOULL DO MORE GOOD
| JY STAYING PUT.LET EM
F\\
\t

S
—

1 | \ 007 GET

| | OUT OF HERE | f
NOW 2 t we =

) | a
<) GR YX



JOHNNY HAZARD...
AND DON’T YOU ASK
TOO MANY QUESTIONS,

EITHER, BUD!










=== = / MIND IF | ae a ee
———— eens)
— Cc =— ‘
A». -



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

TL _

PAGE NINE

Vigour Restored,
Glands Made Young
in 24 Hours

It is no longer necessary to suffer
from loss of vigour and manhood,
veak merpory and body, nervousness,
npure od, sickly skin, depresaior
nd pe sleep, because an American

Doctor has discovered a quick, easy
yay to end these troubles,

This discovery ts In pleagant, eary
»-take tablet form, is absolutely
urmless, does away with gland oper~
tions and is Uereging, new youth and

rour to thousands. [t works direct!y

the glands and nerves, and pul?
ew, rich blood and energy im your
eins. In 24 hours you can see and feel
yourself getting younger. Your eyes
parkle, you feel alive and full of
vuthful vigour and power.

And this amazing, new Syne and
igour restorer, called VI-TABS, \s
laranteed. It has been proved by
housands and {s now distributed b»
hemists here under a guarantee of
,tisfaction or money back. VI-TA

vst make you feel full of vigour 21

| ergy and from 10 to 20 years your

| or you merely return the emr
“kage and get your mony be

i- TABS costs little, aui the gu.)

Vi-T



> or

}
BY CARL ANDERSON |



’ === =
= = ——
p [] | \ I] C POND’S COLD CREAN to cleanse and soften
your skin.
POND’S VANISHING CREAN

to protect your skin by day and to Fold your | |
powder matt,
|
|













“LL THINK 1M SATISFIED
2 ee YOURE THE CULPRIT,
i 2



otter these Beaty Products

PAIN

COMES WITH

RAIN





POND’S FACE POWDER: clinging,
) perfumed, sceintifically blended, for
ARE LP S* a glamorously matt complexion. POND’S LIPSTICK

so easily onto your lips; the
tich vibrant colour stays on
and on and on,



SACROOL

KNOCKS OUT
PAIN

ON SALE Al ....

KNIGHT'S LTD.
ALL BRANCHES

30 SOGGCOGS 5

It PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

smooth

Here is a range of beauty products used by lovely society women every-
where. Simple and inexpensive, they are all you need to keep you looking
flawlessly lovely, feeling your very best at all times. You will find them
wit! all the best beauty counters.

SPALL PISS

FALL ELSES




























SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for cnday to W

ednesday only

SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Branches White Park,
Tweedside, Speightstown and Swan Street









WHEN WE SEIZED i ae

THE CARSONS ON *\/)

EARTH'S MOON, we }/id id.

ALSO ACQUIRED... h
THis!





Usually Now

Green Olives in Brine 1.98

Bottles Hennesseys xxx Brandy 6.25 = 5.75 Selected Spanich Stuffed 1.80

Mazanilla Stuffed Olives large 1.46

Tins Condensed Milk ve Wi 33 a Mazanilla Stuffed Olives small 96

Spanish Queen Olives—large 1.02

Tins Meat Lunch 45 42 Spanish Queen Olives—small : 64
Mixed Pickles in Vinegar ‘Paar .63

BY FRANK ROBBINS

Tins Smedley’s Peas at ry 49 AS Mixed Pickles im Mustard es cides 58
Picallilli ; ;: sive i 58
ACH, EXCUSE, PLEASE ~ YEAH... f havi thai ‘“
16 JUST... OUR LEADER AND I'D LIKE Tins Fresh Herrings AS 12 See ”
LIKES TO KNOW WHO IT TO KNOW WHO Pickled Gerkins i \ 76
155 HE HiRES/ I'M WORKING saeica's Pr
:. Pkgs. Lux Flakes... 50 AS re ees





D. V. SCOTT & Co.Ltd, 'Broad Street

THE COLONNADE GROCERIES
The Place Where Your Dollar Goes Further



« “4

SELLE LCE A LPP LEP LPPPP PAPAL E>

Oe

PELL LPEL LLLP EOLA PLP PLP PPP $
% / §
@ :

y *
3 x

USEFUL ITEMS...

Baby Gift Paper CHALLENGE
Birthday Gift Paper TO THE
Wedding , " BRITISH

Cellophane Paper CARIBBEAN

by








‘I MET

|
:
WHAT'S TO BECOME
WANT TO }} | OF US? NOT ONE OF
—| LOOK FOR } | THEM WANTS TO BE
—\ WORK AND || @ 3)“ PRESIDENT /











THE EARL OF
LISTOWEL, P.C.

Birthday Gift Tape
Wedding ,
Baby :
Shower

RAWLE FARLEY

BPS DELL LDIODES HOHHSHHGHHHHHOOOHS

” RITA HINDEN

ott hoteS +44,
LLAMA LALLA LA LPP POETS AS SFO O

COLIN HUGHES

<

‘re

A FABIAN PAMPHLET

6O0e.

” ” i

Gift Time Dressing

ON SALE AT —

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

EROAD STREET

RE,
-





6365666666596
SEPSIS OSE FSS SSS SO FI SSE SG SAS

LLLP LPP LEP PEECPPPPE PPE OPEL COLL ALLL LPL PK POE PPP LPL PPPOE

APLC PPP PLS PPI FI PF FFL OFF EP PFS FF SF

ptt phat geste ECA ILLEALELLSS ASS







PAGE TEN





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Indians Register First Win Of Tour

Bowl Lancashire Out
For 68 In 2nd limings

(From Our Own

AT OLD TRAFFORD
their first win of the tour

beat Lancashire by ten wickets.

night score to 427 of whic

Divecha made a hard hitting 61.

ing pace bowlers, Ramchand
Lancashire side to dismiss tl
of the season. Ramchand w
with seven for 27. Roy who
the five runs necessary for a







ry
Three Teams
ye e

Win Outright

The Second series in the Second
Division cricket matches ended on
Saturday with Combermere scor-
ing an innings and 55-run victory






over Lodge Schocl at Comber-
mere. Outright victories were also
scored when Pickwick ‘fe.yed
Wanderers by five wickets and
Foundation defeated Wiudward
The condition were ideal for
cricket and some batsmen return-
ed good scores. C f
scored 96 before he was caught
by Batson for Erdiston in their
match against Harrison College.

At Combermere, Lodge resumed
their first innings on Saturday
with the score at 12 for no wicket
and then they were dismissed for
59, C. Smith taking four of the
Lodge wickets for 18 runs, Com-
bermere on the first day of play
had scored 215 runs.

Failing to save tho
Lodge were sent batk
disrnissed for 104 runs. A good
bowling performance is given
by N. Alleyne who ciptured three
of the Lodge wickets for 21

At Fosters, Central gained a
first innings lead over Leeward
whom they dismissed for 169 run

follow on
and were all





On the first day of play Central
seored 224 runs and at the end of
play on Saturday Central in their

second innings had scored 87 runs

for one wicket.



In the Empire-Y.M.P.C., fixture
Empire also secure points for a
i lead. Y.M.P.C., batted
first on the first day and scored

120 runs in their first innings and
on Saturday, fiinpire in their first
innings scored 15! runs. J. Bynoe
who hit 202 runs in 205 minutes
against Central again topscored
for his side when he scored 57
runs. Bernard Bourne hit 40 and
H. Brewster 31 not out. The best
bowler for Y.M.P.C., was O. Burke
who captured six of the Empire
wickets for 56 runs.

Pickwick scored a_ five-wicket
victory over Wanderers, When
play resumed on Saturday, Pick-
wick carried their overnight score
of 100 for four wickets to 137
runs in reply to Wanderers score
of 114,

In their second turn at the
wicket Wanderers were dismissed
fof 94 runs and when play ended
Piekwick had scored runs for
five wickets to give them victory.

At Erdiston, Erdiston gained a
first innings lead over College
Erdiston ia their first innings
scored 157 runs and College re-
plied with 110 runs. College in
their second intiings agsin scored
110 runs.

At\ Foundation, Foundation
scored their first outright victory
for the season when they defeated
Windward by an innings and 101
runs.

Foundation batting in their first
innings scored 294 runs for nine
wickets. E. Jones was not out with
94 runs.

Then Foundation
Windward for 61 runs in their
first innings and in their second
innings Windward could only col-
lect 132 runs. The only batsmon
that showed any resistance was H.
Johnson who scored 49 runs.

COMBERMERE vs. LODGE
At Combermere

Combermere 218 (My. R. Hughes
124, H. Riley 4 for 58), Lodge 59
(C. Smith four for 18) and 104
CN. Alleyne three for 21, L.
Weekes three for 20, F. Scott two
for 24).

CENTRAL vs, LEEWARD
At Fosters

Central 224, (V. King not out
43), and 37 for one wicket de-
clared. Leeward 160 (L, Foster 49,
L. Wood three for 23) and 74 for
no wicket, (G. Gilkes 67 not out
and L. Fuster six not out).





at

dismissed



YM.P.C, vs. EMPIRE
At Y.M.LP.C,

Y.M.P.C. 120 and 68 for
eight wickets (D. Edgehill 36, D.
Spooner five for 12). Empire 191
(J. Bynoe 57. B. Bourne 40, H.

Brewster 31 not out, O. Burke six
for 56, D, Ndgehill one for 22 and
L. Brarker one for 27).
WANDERERS vs. PICKWICK
At Wanderers
Wanderers 114 and 94 (J. Arm-
strong 62, L. Hoad five for 18, H.
Hoad three for 25). Pickwick 127

They'll Do It Every Time
WINDBERRY IS ALWAYS BLOWING 4B0UT

HIS BIG DEALS »- HES JUST THIS SIDE
OF A MILLIONAIRE, TO HEAR








HIM TELL. IT>>



a.
\) DEAL, ALL RIGHT: I SAID,
THERE'S TWO MILLION BUCKS’
WORTH OF BUSINESS--DO TI
GET A FULL PARTNERSHIP
OR DO I STARTA ;
BUSINESS OF MY



SweetuTTLe (Wo
y

Correspondent)

LONDON, July 1.
today the Indians recorded
against a county side. They
They carried their over-
the former “Oxford Blue”
Then on a wicket assist-
and Divecha ran through the
1em for 68—their lowest score
ho bowled splendidly. finished
opened with Gaekwad, made
victory.

In thrilling finish at Lord’s
Middlesex set 19) in 130 minutes
just got heme by three, They are

h

now only eight points behind
Surrey who were engaged in a
non championship match. In
third place with 92 points, 16
points behind Middlesex’ are
Yorkshire who beat Nottingham
today by ten wickets.
Scoreboard

The Indians beat Lancashire by

ten wickets; Lancashire 363 and
68, Indians 427 and five for no
wicket

Middlesex beat Hampshire by

three wickets: Hampshire 298 and

197, Middlesex 299 for nime de-
clared and 198 for seven.

Yorkshire beat Nottingham-
shire by ten wickets: Yorkshire
401 for 3 declared and 82 for no
wicket, Nottinghamshire 181 and
300, Stocks 96.

Surrey beat Oxford Unjiversity
by an innings :Wd 76 runs, Oxford
146 and 221, Surrey 443 for eight
declared.

Leicester beat Somerset by 25
runs: Leicester 306 and 127 for 9
declared, Somerest 235 and 173.

Warwickshire beat Essex by ten
wickets: Essex 224 ang 204. War-
wick 346 for six declared and 84
or no wicket.

Northants beat Worcester by
155 Northants 332 and 241
Worcester 269 and 149.

Glamorgan vs. Derby: match

drawn: Derby 270 and 215 for six
declared, Glamorgan 140 and 178
for seven, Watkins 91 not out,

Gloucester vs. Cambricige match
drawn; Gloucester 281 and 209 for
4 declared, Young 84, Cambridge
285 and 159 for nine.

Kent vs, Sussex match drawn
Kent 163 and 324, Sussex 241 and
221 for six, John Langridge 93

Full Bore
Rifle Shooting

The

Started



3arbados. Rifle Association
ri the second cr “eliminat-
ing” stage of their House Compe-
tition on Saturday the 28th June
with 7 rounds at 300, 500 and 60¢

yards at_ the Government Rifle
Range, The first: or “lining up”
Stage of six shoots, with an

HPS, of 3,025, was completed on
ith June, when the positions of

the Houses were:—
Blue House, (Lt-Col. Connell, ;
captain) 2,651
Red House, (Major A. D. Vv
Chase, captain 2,644
Yellow House, (Capt. Jordan,
eaptain) 2,585
Green House, (Capt. Warner,
captain) 2,549

In the eliminating stage, each
7 fat .
Rouse tries to knock out its low

scores with better ones and so
improve its position. On Satur-
day, Red House improved to

2,666, Blue and Yellow Houses re-
mained at 2



51 and 2,585 respec-
tively and Green improved to
2,573. It is unfortunate that one

ct Green’s men retired during the
hooting or Green's improvement
ould have been much more
Weather Conditions
While weather condi ions were
good, trouble was cxperienced
pS light, which was very vari-
able

at 500 and 600 and with’
wind, which although generally
“fresh”, often slumped suddtnly

to practically a dead calm at 600.
The best eight

scores were
T. A. L. Roberts, 97; M. R. de}
Verteuil, 96; G. E. Martin, 96:
Major Griffith, 95; F. D. Davis, 9:




P.C, O. Shepherd, 92; H. Boyc
fl and Lt, E- R, Goddard, 91, The
H.P.S, was 105.

M. A. Tucker and the above
eight reached the Skilled Shot
Badge standard in the National
Rifle Association Non-Central
Competitions. These men, have
however qualified for this badge
in shoots earlier this year Ff





The next shoot will be on
Saturday the 5th July, at 12.30
p.m,

slicer eesieansedethe omceiahmnionenisichictoeminaaies
(M. Lashley 55, H. Thomas 53) and
77 for five wickets.
COLLEGE vs, ERDISTON
At Erdiston
Coliege 110 and 110 (D. Wil-
liams 29, N. Sealy three. for 37).
Evaiston 157 (C. Norgrove 96, E.
Batson three for 30).
FOUNDATION vs. WINDWARD
At Foundation

Foundation 294 for 9 wickets
declared. Windward 61 and 132
runs. (H. Johnson 49, R. Arm-

strong six for 24).















THE TUNE IS WRITTEN S
I v
e IN RED INKew oT
wi! a - ne YOU GO ANY FURTHER oper) ——
Le = WA YOU TO KNOW>. : re
Sa VERY ‘TOUGH IN My t THINGS ARE

COOKK
SALESMAN
MAKING



ENDS



But WHEN HE s

PER AND PART-TIME
‘HAVE A TOUGH TIME

the stuay
discuss cOm-

of play and

Laws today conclude
declarations,

ind close

of
mencement
intervals

I should have discussed Law 16
in conjunction with Laws 14 and
15 for the simple reason that Law
16 is only a continuation of these
tYaws. For that reason I shall
briefly refresh the minds of my
readers with the provisions of
these Laws.

Law 14, it will be remembered,

anc

dealt with the following on of
innings—150 runs in a match of
three days or more—100 runs in

a two-day match or 75 runs in a
ene-day match (Australia 200
runs in a match last(ng three days
or more).

Law 15 provided for the declar-
ing of innings in a_ three-day
game at any time on the second
and succeeding days, in a two-
day match at any time but on the
first day not later than 1 hour and
40 minutes before the hour agreed
upon for the drawing of stumps;
in a one-day match, at any time.

LAW 16

When the start of play is de-
layed by weather, Laws 14 and 15
shall apply in accordance with
the number of days’ play remain-
ing from the actual start of the
match.

In other words,
no play on the
three-day match, the rules gov-
erning two-day matches. will
apply and naturally if the first
day of a two-day game is “wash-
ed out” the laws governing a one-
day game will apply.

LAW 17

Commencement and Close of

Play and Intervals
The umpires shal! allow such
intervals as have been agreed

where
first day

there i¢
of a



Lawn Tennis

(By 0. S. COPPEN)

upon for meals, 10 minutes be-
tween each innings and not more
than two minutes for each fresh
batsman to come in. At the starv
ef each innings and of each day’s
play and at the end of any in-
terval, the umpire at the bowler’s
end shall call “Play”, when the
side refusing to play shall lose
the match. After “Play” has been
called no trial ball shall be bow!-
ed to any player, and when one
of the batsmen is out, the use of
the bat shall not be allowed to
any player until the next bats~-
man shall come in.

Umpires are instructed not to
award a match under this Law
unless (1) “Play” has been called
in such a manner thet both sides
ean clearly understand that play
is to start: (ji) an appeal has been
made and, (iii) they are satisfied
that a side will not, or cannot,
continue to play.

Captains’ Duties

Captains are also reminded
that it is their essential duty to
ensure that the “in-going” bats4
man passes the “out-coming” one
before the latter leaves the field
of play. This, it is claimed, is all
the more important in view of
the responsibility resting on the
umpires for deciding whether or
not the delay of the individual
amounts to a refusal of the bat-
ting side to continue play.

Some teams to my. knowledga
have flag$:ntly broken this rule
especially when there is a steady
procession of batsmen to and from
the pavilion and often this stud-
ied waste of time has resulted in
1 worthy team failing to score an
outright win.

Umpires would do well to en-

Doris Hart Beaten By
Pat Todd At Wimbledon

(By DENNIS HART)

LONDON, July 1.

ANOTHER CROWN fell at Wimbledon today. Fol-
lowing Monday's defeat of the Men’s Singles title holder
Dick pavitt, the reigning women queen Doris Hart was for the U.S.A. have withdrawn
dethroned this afternoon by a compatriot Mrs. Pat Todd,
After a gruelling battle lasting nearly two hours she was

beaten 8-7, 5-7, 4-6.

Britain's two remaining
presentatives also fell, Mrs, Jean
Rinkel-Quertier was beaten 1—-+,

re-

7—9 by former Wimbledon
champion Louise jrough and
Mrs. Jean Walker-Smith was

beaten 3—6, 3—6 by Shirley Fry.

In another quarter final mate
\7-year-old Maureen Connolly
defeated the Australian champion

Mrs. Thema Long 5—7, 6—2,
6---0.
Like Mervyn Rose the’ con-

queror of Dick Savitt, Mrs. Todd
can partly attribute her victory
to superior stamina. Despite great
heat she played a tenacious game
and chased every ball, This plus
a powerful backhand, carried her
to victory.

After two in which both
players drepped their service on
five occasions, the score was one-
all. Further break throughs in
the final set enabled Mrs. Todd
to gain a 5—2 lead. Miss Hart
made a spirited rally and took
the next two games, but the end
was in sight for the champion.
She could net match
of her opponent
her fast
finish and
without

sels

who maintained
pace right up to the
won the final game
dropping a point.

Best Display

Maureen Connolly gave her
best display in the tournament so
far to beat Mrs. Long. She made

some delightful passing shots
which frequently left her op-
ponent standing,

In the first set the American

was unfortunate
of these go out

in seeing many
of the court by

THE WEATHER
REPORT

YESTERDAY
Rainfall from Codrington: nil
Highest Temperature: 87.5 °F.
Lowest Temperature: 75.5 °F.
Wind Velocity: 12 miles per

hour
Barometer (9 a.m.)
(3 p.m.) 29.962
TODAY
Sunrise: 548 a.m,
Sunset: 6.15 p.m.
Moon: First Quarter, June 30,
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.
High Tide; 11. 39 a.m.
Low Tide: 5.39 a.m,, 5.12 p.m.





30.020



By Jimmy Halo









OES TO THE M.D.



INEwsIM A ~—

\




MEET...

the speed ,





a matter of inches; but as the
game progressed she became more
accurate and dominated play to
such an extent that she took the
match by winning the final ten
games in succession.

Mrs. Rinkel-Quertier
most inconsistent display against
Louise Brough. She was com-
pletely off form in the first set
which the American won with
consummate ease. The British
girl recovered well in the second
only to throw away the vital
points by serving numerous
double faults,

Two such errors in the eighth
game cost her the chance of tak-
ing the 5—3 lead and another in
the 15th enabled Miss Brough tu
take an 8—7 lead.

Ground Shots

Miss Brough herself was guilty
of similar lapses, but superior
ground shots and volleying gain-
ed her victory.

Mrs. Jean Walker-Smith was
never in the hunt against top
form Shirley Fry; she was al-

gave a


































For le





a cael

THINK OF
THE FIT

AND

THINK OF
THE PRICE

P. C. S. MAFFE

“TOP SCORERS

SOO COOOS SOS E SE OSSSS ISS

A WORSTED
SUIT
ony $65.00

now Your Cricket “ws 16, 17 & 18),

sure that this rule is observed,
especially in games where the
competition js a close one.

Luncheon Interval

“Whe interval for luncheon should
not exceed 45 minutes, (in local
cricket association competition
rules it is 15 minutes). But this
is ,mportant—‘"In the event of the
last wicket falling within 2 min-
utes of the time arranged for
‘uncheon or tea, the game shal}
be resumed at the usual hour, no
allowance being made for the ten
minutes between the innings.
_*

LAW 18

The umpires shall call “Time”
ang at the same time remove the
baus from both wickets, on the
cessation of play before any ar-
ranged interval, at the end of
exch day’s play and at the con-
clusion of the match. An “Over”
shall always be started if “Time”
has not been reached, and shall
Be completed unless a batsman is
“Out” or “Retires” within two
minutes of the completion of any
period of play but the “Over” in
Progress at the close of play on
the final day of a match shall be
completed at the request of either
captain even if a wicket fall after
“Time” has been reached.

~

Perhaps this Law has given/
almost as much trouble as the
controvergial l.b.w. law. I can

hardly make it clearer than by
pointing out at this stage that
provided the FIRST ball of thé
LAST over is bowled before time,
ft is possible for as many as five
wickets to fall after Time in a
six ball over and seven in an
eight ball over. As a matter of
fact, under this provision, the
match itself might not end until
ten minutes after Time.

“ °

B.C.L. Fixtures

The following games are sched-
uled in the Southern Division of
the B.C.L. on Saturday next July
5 and July 12.

Seawell vs. Searles at Seawell,

Cambridge vs Maple at Maple..

Inch Marlowe Sydney
Sydney,

vs,

Shamrock vs Lancs, at Boarded |

Hall.
In the Leeward division Perse-
verance due to members leaving

from the competition, There will
therefore be no play in the Perse-
verance vs All Saints Match.



ways on the defensive against the
American’s powerful ground
strokes.

In the Men’s Doubles, Frank
Sedgman and Ken MacGregor,
holders of the title, entered the
semi-finals by defeating the Ital-
ian pair G. Cucelli and M, Del
Belo 6—2, 6—4, 3—6 6—3. Mac-
Gregor was not up to his usual
form and made many mistakes,
but Sedgman’s brilliant net play

WHAT'S ON TODAY

Court of Original Jurisdic-
tion—10.00 a.m.

Basket Ball—Second Division
—at Dist. A., Harrison Col-
lege and Y.M.P.C, at 5.00
p.m.

Police Band Concert, St.
George's Church Pasture—
7.45 p.m.

British Council Films
Aquatic Club—8,.30 p.m.

at



ather

of every colour—

It cleans, preserves—and how it
polishes! Ask your retailer for Propert's.
Nothing else is quite the same. Watch
the difference it makes to your shoes!

| & CO., LTD.
IN TAILORING’
St OSSSSSSSSSS

SSSSTSOSSS

at |

R.B. Yacht Club
Cennis Tournament

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Men's Singles
Mr. L. St. Hill beat Mr. N. D.
Tudor 6—3, 6—1.
Mr. J. D. Trimmingham beat
Mr. V. Roach 6—3, 6—4,
Mr. D. E. Worme beat Mr. C, B,

Sisnett 6—1I, 6—2.
Ladies’ Doubles
Mrs, J. ConneH and Mrs.
Skinner beat Miss L. Branch
Miss P. King 6—4, 6—2,
Mixed Doubles
Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Bancroft
beat Mr. M. deVerteuil and Mrs,
K, A. Knaggs 6—1, 6—3.

TODAY’S FIXTURES

Ladies’ Singles
Mrs. D. E. Worme vs. Miss M.
Wood.

C.
and

Ladies’ Doubles
Miss D. Wood and Miss G. Pil-
ry vs, Miss M, King and Mrs.

A. Gibbons.
Men’s Doubles
Mr. I. S. Robinson and Mra,
S. P. Edghill vs. Mr. D. E, Worme
and Mr. H. Johnson.
Mixed Doubles
Mr. C. B. Sisnett and Mrs, J. A.
Mahon vs. Mr. H. A. Cuke, Jr.
and Miss E, Worme.



Unguentin

26. 0E MOT. Om

Relieves painof











BACKACHE
IS YOUR cl

WARNIN

| Backache is usually the first sign of Kidney
Trouble. The kidneys are the blood’s filters,
When they get out of order, instead of pure,
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muscle, your blood stream is heavy with
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| Half a century’s experience and scientific

tests by doctors in famous clinics prove that
Dodd’s Kidney Pills quickly rid your blood
of excess acids and poisons. Then your
blood is clear—your backache disappears
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h and energy. You feel years



er.
Insist on Dodd’s Kidney Pills. ly 3/-
for large bottle at all chemists. Ji4



Dodd's Kidney Pills





BARBADOS AQUATIC
CLUB
(Local & Visiting Members)

Through the courtesy of
the British Council there
will be a FILM SHOW in
the Ball Room TO-NIGHT
Wednesday, 2nd July, at 8.30
o'clock,

The programme includes:
British News; a musical film
of the training of Military
Bands; the Making of Tennis
Racquets; and English Gar-
dens in Colour.

Members are cordially







invited.
No Admission Charge.
29.6.52—3n.
SOSSSSS SS SESS OOH OPIS,
Colony Club §
olony Club &
Introduces
BARBECUE §
To Barbados
@ Full-Moon. Dancing
@ Bathing
@ And General.
@ Quite Informal
@ Reservations in
Advance $
2.7.52—2n, $

POSSE ESOS SOSSS.

*
Y. M. P.C.

FIESTA ESPECIAL ! !
Decorationes Maravillosas
EN LA BAILE
(BARN DANCE)

Y. M. P. C.
Reckles Road

SABADO JULIO 5
Musica Por Los Jovenes De
Caribbean Troubadours

ENTRADA 3/-
(Compra su billete antes de
la fecha)

on

*







*







WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1952





If your game is
tennis ..
offer

SLAZENGER 'S
TENNIS BALLS

$4.12 per tin.
If it’s Cricket o.

Ys

We offer
CRICKET BATS

Autographed by LEN HUTTON, LESLIE AMES and DENIS
COMPTON—Priced from $10.00 to $16.61

CAVE SHEPHERD & €O., LTD.

10,

we







11, 12 & 13 Broad St.



SPECIAL CASH OFFER FOR THIS WEEK

GALVANISED
CORRUGATED
SHEETS

24 Gauge x Gft. occ ee eee ee $4.32
do. a ee 0 hey ba cee ee $5.04
We ivr heat cans $5.76
DO ae BR 88s tees ... $6.48
do. TUR SS iais abo ets $7.20

Do Not Miss This Attractive Offer

BARBADOS HARDWARE C0. LID.

(The House For Bargains)
No. 1€¢ Swan St. Phones: 4406, 2109, 3534









FYFFES LINE

Messrs Elders & Fyffes, Ltd., advise that an increase of

their current passage rates to and from the United Kingdom
has been found necessary.



The increased rates which are applicable on and from
Ist July 1952, are as follows:

Ss. S GOLFITO



Suites A & B per berth £127. 0. 0.
Double Rooms with Toilet and Shower
per Berth 109... 0.50...
Double Room per berth ; 104. O. O. )
Single Room with Toilet & Shower 115. 0. 0. }
Single Rom .. .. 109. 0. 0, 1
Four Berth Room per berth .. 98. Gs .0... 5 ¢ }
Rooms 51, 52, 53 and 54 per berth 2.40 0. . |
WILKINSON & HAYNES €0., ETD. |

AGENTS.






Rice’s Custom Tailored
Tropical Sport Clothes
of gay (or conserva-
tive) design, are of
lasting value — an d,

too, prices are par!

Cc. B. Rice & Co.

‘ ef Belitem Lane

294-099999GO54OO090-990000000004 oo

2
3

PODODOHG







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PAGE 1

r PACE Fir, ITT BARB tons \nvor\TF \vm\TsnAT mv • IM CLASSIFIED ADS. IM HI l \l PITS IMHIH VAI FA TCLCr-HOBI *S0* DIH> h I hi a*" lot• %  .Her.. O Sum •*• bun. Herbert Wrmr. ;,. %  %  -.-., .Jon. Balph Weeke, %  Urandtor,, Mn MrrbBabb sni thcr> T 511N MFJMOK1AM HIT In loving memory of our beltrtww rnotha* In Beat. a>bi> departed IhU Mfa> an SBth June. 1*81 Con b "t • <" 'r• in-Iaw. i>nnl, Sha-ila McPlier..* 'grand 1 p m in Hi' ilwrnaon o. Tnuf.day the ill* d-v .i ; ISM I will • •".'• I. ulr D> ful)lla Comr*|i'lon al (i, B> IN* i•on not ana ma.. !l. -.ppta..*.v.Tlir \eOTOB VKfMafcL T II BA1AA11 ;..,* at at-hor in CatUala Ba>. Brtdge .llown. with iU f.lll'S Pkit.r-.iat. M p C MArrri co i i> w n Hmr StrML .r M r>,.c>i U raa bull! In IBM i> (•TV ri* TH.1I/HAHII Allad aim an li.t.inji • i %  %  .' ha* an miawinl ipaad n knot.. | (Mat i.ri.uaa or i"i,M •B*r> %  "• It. • l*nrtn N laai. a b.aaotn of a VI* - a diiin M 10 (i -i Tba laatn • ~ hie toom i. M faal ia arrnm modal ion %  %  o Ml.M-l l.\ iAduilrall> M--llt REAL ESTATE liFiKiHTArxin a, LawrantH Win. i—* da am .*. n %  iroiUlr %  Viilablv far bulla.i.i najatow ha. 1 p*i !" .'- %  • J t-^m-jm, .ho*lat. Man ••lai^raauirrtj mi f-i' Ml InipaaJlo I N AaaairdtAB Haraiagpai C*ada*-.. i... C ..; "MS NOTICE <-nr llolpiiin l.>ga 0*l H ( .ndl'lon D" -.„.,. i m i ann ftot-r, On* VMT PV aWTTEJIT IKTS-JuM a "mi HAIMO EWPOHIUM i Irf.nia ard aora. "in ham n Ota MORKISOM—In lovln| D-.ir Balnvart Son 1 who daparlnd lhi< II" IMA I -alKtl |i..tl.nlV i And H' ifiallnad Hi And 1 will tnll "Bd i Morn—t. imaii'i 9*"* %  (.tin Danrii Monur ,., %  .iaw. I : E ANNO* NCEIHEIVTS narr*](,ri(ATOTlrrldldalff v (ionrr-1 Moton Savrn an ublc |aa< Alwar> lOMkr IMP aMaajnlsa it .igmMrc j*n. Of th L'nllad llataa %  aa %  r || M I %  IfafJN .ra r|.wl.d lo (all al ._. ConauUlr from Jul 1 lo 71 ItH *..r 1a>lfllaa larvlcr Rr-l-liation dar lb UnirBl MUlbau TraWlta* AiTMnT 'nH/ft * *d UniUd Stauaa who attain thr age of II >1 "lbaquam lo July M, IM. *ra rnqillrad to rajirtrr upon Ova day lb ay attain 1M l|C htaaa*Ui annivaaxj od lha da; •* than birth, or wllhln Bra da> Utatafor fiuUtn laJormatloti. neauuli fba AmatW-n CorunjLaK. BrMajato.n. BMdav of July. IN* at 1 p.m. Tha bimalow known aa CAbViU.r -lib lh> land Utatala ...nlai-inf IK admaaaunrmant kHI aq >1 -llnat' n Navy Oarrtani Cbrtat C*IU'C" KM aoi.lainli.B an opan varandAh lacmi Muth and raal. .oinbin.il ili-.i. n A dlolnS foom. 3 Iwdroonia. loiwt. ball and btKhan mill aaraA* and room* fi two aarvanla and with rUxUMll .n atallad Inapartloi, di..l 4tt Km ti particular, and condition, a. ajiply lo.— PTTI.r CATTORD at CO Ml U-Ar SEA AND AIR TRAFFIC %  Bayaaj vi II POULTRY LIVESTOCK Brad limit of r B Boll Anvil h. Road Col MECHANICAL FOI1 HE VI' HOUSES r,.vi. brJr..'i-i V-l.l. il ATrlI/Ni: on J... Ifito two fl't. Riirh and wai-l badioon |prw>a< l-hona XHfandlford [aballP Btvidad Attractive aaaaida Flal main i Unfia, roittloTtably furnlahad. Bath. Opan Varandah facing aaa onr paraon lor conplai Frrti Talrplonc IM -• MISCELLANEOUS PERSONAL Tha public are hereby warned HE • %  mat IvfeM (ledll In my wile. ADA VIOUA ITT 'na SCOTTi > %  I do not bold, lyaalf raaponalhlr for her or %  nTn. lw> rontracllng an> d-nl o. dah'n n ,y name unlaaa n a wrlllan o.gai ignid bv ma. ftfd MILTON PTTT. Melvatton Vulir*. Ml Oaorga I T W In AUCTION Hi aaManwn A, or-j B.A A of kind Order rsn: Co Garage rMa< ft "taatai Aadan CM Tern. Caah H in. SCR I MIII .all ,.t the liEN iiTtm OMNIIW-i C" N. • lU Hori inarm.1 A. .nit riadan Car imaged W afiCldenl. Dona nl ! Ilea. HA I,* 1-BlUAT Ilk al M %  n> rrma CA5HI Fall o llamrn^ H AJkCHBR MaKKXZDI. AucU.ntn (i-.vt-ln-BocuUva CotnmllUe I will Ml i tha raaw-nrlb.* ipol* by pobiit caaa, llllon on Thorada. nail k July the Uotktiur Cma in double roared building al m Boniface Junloi the inrfclte are herein warned againrl .,.*-; arad.l la m> !fa MIGNfaN VAlJtBJA JOt-fM in-a Fordai ai I da> no. bold aaywll f-*-eibte for Mr or .nyona rlaa contracting an) aa**, at ,#b> %  .miN agatna 1 AJ/TUICII oi n-' n-^--(|.M 1 rRRAI.I *lhredded . Oatmeal. All Br m • M roRo Wrtral. Com B A ruitrt.kea i . i | fUlTlT IN TiKA -Paa... Paaahao Sliced Pinenppie, Priioei. Ouavar. Graaaa. al debt or debit > led by • •rlil ordai Bulrlec not i.ol'l m anyoiva dabu sg.i i IIHOU inmcrvAX MOOBI i>. and OHIa arhoi In.lldlng al I P n rrmi itrkrll' caih A >rfiiprrl)(-nKivc ,m^l>. lioJii i njMB, of oul'ldr inrMtI'tcnt in Canada and of Canadian ir.watmam jbroad was contained In aVn jddreMi at BhtCS-ri I by Ilrnrv Hordpn. CMC. ye I'ro-ide-nt at H-i/ilUon Light & T'. tiiadian Kxpoi'dntion i' itii theC.iiiadlan lnlern.it ion;il Trade F.ur Alter noting that confide In the continuing development ol Canada had reaultcd in a large influx of nw rapiul. moril" '1.500.000.000 m the pal •wri — or apuruximalely 15 tin nf Canada'* aggregate capital xpendltiirr during thr periodthe speaker referred to ihr cxlitence of "lomc auipirlon and •ilU'idertanding of the role of foreign capital-, both incoming %  nid outgoing. For inatgncr. the ridlculoua" charge had bee,, maW of Canada "celling out" to thi 1'nitcd State.*. Even if nt external invgartment m Canada wtrv conaldered a-' %  mortgage on our national wealth :hin "mortgage" had decreaaed Ir %  %  pa • HnantlQa troiB IJ 2 M cent of Canada'* wealth to lef: lh.111 5 per rent of that wealth to-i.if. However, far from feelln:.' critical of capital from external lourcwCanada had benentori im inensurahly In the ease of oil. gOCT inveatment had made much of tht: country •elf-suffleient. KM w/hfll it is true that we must m 1 great new foreign investment, ne\ erthal m the coat of aervicing the debt U oflMrt by the wvlngeflectei In the reduction m petroleunw im portg." Another Inatance was In ve-tment of IT S eapitnl In devolving Iron 're depiwiltpg .itow exporters of iron ore and oui export* will grow more rapidly l^|^* aju. than our import*. And thp rapid |\.. KATES mEXCHANGE £SS" iT JU1V MkM lAhABA |aHM Rayaao M ) MCba>qu on Ba Ng i-OAK Damaaid Dr. t* ..n Baokrr. TI lie. eat Di ." Sight 0 r Dantaod ' 1 l"** Cd-k. Draft. !l I IM H Cable CMBM L^'rancy M I MB Btn "Ahwri a CarlitU Bar Baaa fat. s. iHeit Wnitiakefruit. n I aaael Daai aod .arhloiri %  ha vL I copra nW'ARTVRIM iB BandVrvr tot Uivrrpoo; iia* rarataa for TrinMad ai.. lor Powilnie* '" | I UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER By InnruCfionl rocaHed I win ll by iblle atieftnn an lha -pol at Latn-'* Oap. Brlttnna fun o.i Friday nawl h Juti ai 2 p m III one wooUon buudlna il HO lct long *lth galvanlre roof ..%  ( _... i JVi hloe* .lcw.ealao n wnaoat SenehaTola bokaanaT •* *-kUy -ullad a D %  ) •rfotl UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER Seawcll \am\ i* riv SHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. >n (M. i mix il m>ri U 1 STTrfTOB nth JUtfB IMI • afafJWA 4U> JillISM COTTtTA I HI. Jul.. IBU Il latHOfi "t *ui iau M BUBKOUJ' It Au.ual. IMS .MUX. IO ti aori M s OBAAJTATAD !Vh July. IM. %  HUM. IO I UAD. r ABA* til till* a aaiTiHM GUANA M • aTlTNToK 131h -li.lv IMd n (OTTHA M"h July. IBM M H NESTOR mn Auguat, IBM -MUM. IO laiMlDAO a CLBACAI %  UF.RinjA HI JarT, 1M "I RACAO OWLTi ' 1 HEBTIA Mat Jul.. IMS r HI ajiON ION a DO l in \geala V/.'.V.V/'-V/'/V/'V.V','• '•'' The M V CAJUBBBT *lU b accapl Cargo aod Pi eg I Bclta, HVAWW Canadian National Steamsliips T IIIIA Mlaa JIN Dasi. i. Mr !.e,:.r Ml Jean BaylH. Mr |.n.r A| Marguarila •arnard Frapa BT KITTB % %  rtaaaJ, Mr Upton M i.i i i i i i M, B.W I OB l*n RDAl lar rmsniAn K llorgi.i, A I*. If 'i..kall r Haakdll. M llaakrll M Meott. n B*er. Bell. J lindiiii An.n. W Vna. M Paarawt Jim Harrule. \ i *i/i il \ VandorbranoFn, Mn a, Mr 11,-w.rAM* MM %  t, ..IV td iJidier v Mam. BMhcr gJCtHw SOI TMBOUKD ANAUIAN 1-Kl'lSr.B i ANA III AN CONBTHircTOai IADY RODNBV Mai Baakaa J July il July It July M July .. ,sr Arrlaee Vrln :.ADV VgLBON ANAUIAN CONSTBffTOH ;ADY BODNBY .. lartlculara. apply GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agent.. Anil.. Magatli Hicvclt f.1,.ke. A 0* ' •" *" *!"•* July S al hie Office Bpr> si. eS-ani| tha following ibbaia. PrdaU. Pume i ,„_.. iCAiMt Caakiia M 1V, Dun lop Ri-dai3 Blew. >. Span ,, era Ladle* Hraggiair-. Men' ihirta •noa*. Football bow. Bladder, 'atnall **• F!a.ue Braid, are Ci pad*] mtnM. FARAWAY. %  Philip Coaal. full> fornlahed For July. Novwnbci. December only Dial MIS rtKhed. i.,". ..i l.hrd i IM.RIO MaV t. HMU l'ii"v %  in-iwctiiin bv arrangameii in., lcn.,.,1 telaphona .In-r Mil r\Tl YN llOACII A CO LTD llick.lt 1 7 BJt 1 n I1ll.li kl-l ii.,l..l.-l.. iVlaw. wall furnlahed For manlh* B Oclobn November and Decambar Art* 1 C L Olbba Co. 1*1 Tel MP3 NEWHAVEN. rr.nr Coail. lully lui GALVANISEDSpecial ofler lor !• daya Ba*t qualitv EngUali galvaniaao then • n. M HI i ft M a* a fi M Alan g.lyanlied naila M crnta per lb Auto T.re Co of Bpi • A Trafalgar *l Dl.l SBB1 1 CM t I n BKb It'll Cabin ginc, ekcallent onl* leaann I I aland Thon. ...umh. M,-i Vldeived long Playing. M li. Hubaerlb* now to thai Dallr Telagraib BnglgiKl'l leading Dally Nawapapcr now arriving in Ba--*do. b, Ai. nnla few d- altar pui tattag |i i cum (on U>-t Van '-. %  'C/O Atlvntale CO., l l.l 1 .... i.,, ......uuve T.l 1111 WAVI'MI HELP iiovsKKrjanih rpa.. |d>'*Bat'. '"tJrtngl .unoiirnliiuia III %  alary PWaaa <' .> Adv< i Bin Caah %  ga] > UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER OHi Gap Claenawt tuI SI Jo-aoa readay Mad MrW F Mbrti.n*i lloibam. Foniaba:ie RRANKEK. TBOTMAN CO.. Aurlli.nfrn 11 MIn Applt In per-'ii -H r^Uun lu Sat n ai>. Dowri A BOM, * wr-llea, ralalei MISCELIJVNEOUS l BNUD^FF-R "Hl1 i fee M H with e.tjle o> buiiiliug tompanv dgaiTntu oi <*• %  9 OfTaCC SPACF. nulldlng n SI Appl< 31 B U~ iii 11NM-U MfcAP. LAMwbowl I tuned Mutton. Cbe*l liaM, B'l •ffay | .1 sick A Kldn't I'uildlnaa LODGE STONE WORKS CO. 5 ._ Urge QBBBtlty "' iBAchlne broken flint stonr, A %  II btFH, %  Bltable for ROJ uin older ewoertte gtrne\ tureB. The Co. also mnder^ take the construction of •; RaadB and VBT4S bj COB\ traet, or kajrcrrkalon Dial 2s KHJII inisim S Manin-r V^yafa*a*aC<.''a*a'>*a V Pains in Back. Nervous, Rheumatic! •irj Ml M POCKET MONF.Y inmi-i'i ending M new %  i.HUITl'IION In '*"• n*ontl BCDBroVStON oflc. lAwr HIIXII drvelopment of Canada's pulp anil paper industry needed foreign isplUI In ortStr to have a healthy economy. "Canada most have %  heafthv and proBporous exportrade''. In 1951, Canada's export* of foods and services were 24 pei cent of hn gross national productCanada's Trade. $S77 Per Cnplt.. While Canada is lecogm/ed a u great exporting country. It is uLso a great "trading country'". Cannda. the speaker pointed out. is "the fourth ranking exportei ind Importer but she is by far th. trecteat "trading" nation In tin world"—on B per capita baals— foreign trade in 1951 representing 1577 per capiu. with the US wanewhat less than one-third, at 1168 per capita. Mr. Bordort then erophaM/ed %  jtflUBfef i>oint (vrtlJi readily ex>hunnble exceptions"), luimely that hlstor>' shown that capttal does not enter an area, develop it to a certain point and then depart. When capital is wisely invested, ably managed and fairly treated, "it remain* and grows with the country of its adoption." foreign trade for Canada could be developed through the medium of cii?"-t investment aliroad The recent lemovnl Governiuviil ot foieign exchange control regulaUons should facilin in. icase in Canada's trade potential through export of IAII capital and participation In Uio development of other cOonWg Tirled tha spe.iker to iffei that c->Io*MBl market .uul tBaiVAL* BT BWI OH MONDAT I .... I IM Mt> Mi fi Ham. cekea C OllUfia, A Kin v. V KaTby P*MB Pl'EBrO BICO Mabel TayMi Jahn itara. lndirf JoneErnaal Barrow Bunli Jonea. Kdna Appla—ne. Pagaude' rroul Md Inner TtifMnpaon. UUdatooe Daviall Jol.o ( Wehatn S • K W..od. Ed-.id Oottin. BUllhH U, l i.—l Foalai IIPPtRTI III B* B W I A ON tllMJ.l !•• iBiMiaaa It C'ortnn. W Muppard. Olga Oraiinum M Baaly H Parkal, B Bkretr. Il Scoll T Bkynngri. I Jacob ti...(o.ta McLaod tar UKANABA J Stawlm-ii E Sleelntan M tlleon. .) h |aMa, C Crawford D Dun lop. V W-l...~. A Keadrlck ,i Anri.oi PI HARRISON LINE OtrrWABIi FROM THI lirlTYItn ElltiDOBl M Km E Ch. LOtST i'htm i T.si la Wlinx IMSC* II ' HUudard h I l*at hel-een Speight.!.." lliidgctow" llndar pleaaa relmn Nrrllle %  -lllndaburv Road or dial %  ..A . M r.*: US In I....M %  TACOMA STAH' HERDSMAN"' F=TATFSMAN" l-iv.-i ( %  ...London .... Liverpool Dae IlBrba-lov 19th June 4th Jul> 5th July 50th Jul> 12th Julv :Tth July Mr Raphael Bpano. Mr. Blaanoi spano, Mr. Viola Pord. Ml John pnvlluk Mi. Maiga-el ti 'ildred gandlfoid, MrRv'—ita Hr.mcn r. Kennalh OIBba. Mr* Bottii Jonea .. Adeline Karlr Mi> Hale Banja. %  Mi lie.lei n.'N|armn Mr R-sl.' ,1 Met on, iev Mi .drlng-nn Mavnaro. %  wrtiuk tt tiding world, the Continent of Smith Amerua Fifty years ago ii small group of CanadJaru. h.id invested in a puliln utility in Hraitll. Slnco th'n Uiis inventincut in "BraxiUun Traction". had iroivn (i> S7r0,000.000. As one iesuit, in the past .1 yssUl .done Canadi.in suppliera of goods and BMtarlall n;id MOBivad bu-inets of 950.000,000 and interchange of giMxis between the two countries %  B stimulated IIOMIKAII) FOB THI'. UrtlTr.ll tUNC.DOH Vessel. Par Ctomm IB SS TRADER" Liverpool 8th Jul> FOr further information apply to DA COSTA & CO.. LTD.-Agents cieiring out our new stock ot shot gun eirtridges: — 12 GL'AGE ELEY—$11.85 per la* NET CAHB Big ilii'iii' OUt rnlurtiuiiOB all HARDWARK ITF.MS m aB u aa nriir i f i rieinnek M. V. DAERW00D Mill be arriving at Barbadiw ;. on IIFSllAV. JB1> 1st ami \ will be v.ih", on TIIURrtf DAV, JB1> 3. for ML Larla, g SL Vincent. Grenada. Arab*. | aorepltng 1"i—am:orv .ml '• f-rrlgtit. CHANCERY SALE Ji u\e The u Pt.blkB' Ow data rudav al tdiunentlooed propeil. lid.inllr.dgetr.an. b*t iporlBad below. If not Eg ^"i a phm ..nd d II fBMfg M Kicaa. Arlflll'. MfcykiiHurnUf Paamag. *" m.VS ORIENTAL PALACE HkAJV^UARTaUtS FOR .-.Ol'VliSIln %  ROM INDIA, CHINA i CEYLON THANI'S rr. War. %  >. %  !. Dial 348 a>aaa)aaa' 'FURNITURE for Home & Office al \.imr*-!.u\iii" Prices NEW A IMtwiwed Wardiobea. Buream CBaat-of-Drawar*. Bedaayadi j.faet to r,-f-t wide Bpiing.. Latha, B'a.hrtand, M up Ntgtitrhair*. Towel. Shoo A Hal I"|lt. TABl.rB ftir I'.i ntg KiU-h •T ft Fancy Uae ChinBedroom St Kitchen Cabinet* I-irderDRAW1NO ROOM FTOUnTl'BF laMor-t-. Canad and oUkar DESKS with Sat or •loyAnaT ajrlns-aaat an. o.-iBookxacl 'M .1L.S. WILSON %  ggy t II MMIIH Troakaen g| tba BftH aaa AMIU-. Oaltirg 1 faaJIng old bafPct your tirna kMnaj* purtfv your blood ... laa. The vet r flrel doaa aiarta hi ififc aaltl. )our kidn.M clean oal •: and tkla will yui. ki. make rou BO. UadMthem'.nev. (..,-( %  Mrantei tJyStM miMt BBthUy complaloly BV aeai T'fOMI TWKNTV-rrvr IXMJAW 1'NIUI.NlBMEtl HOUBE To lent ,. rate anytime batwt-n Augual -n. ior a long peaiod In lla.ti,i< ,r St Lawranca area Dial MOB b> wean I il nooa. H.S.M I 'l.t*iP t OIJ.I.I TINO ulna colle No *045. i u Pmn IM i coekBtrrai loon..). w t •Qolombi.'"' Due The S.S. Colomble is expect 1 to arrive in Carlisle Bay lit morning from Martinique Sin I will be leaving to-day at 4 p.n for Trinidad Her agents an Messrs. R M Jones $ Co., Ltd Foreign Diploiuutu \ tti'iHi Srssion 0 in-ill Page 1. open for busiiioss to-morrow,. President Rhee may then have supix'it to put through his dfihe election of a Presi, n*. popular vote. He believes he would win another 1-rm .s iTesident that way. The speaker In the assembly, an antiHhee member. H Seinlky did not nitend to-day's opening— D.P. In Touch With Barbado. Coastgl Station .Mr ila Wire lea. • that %  BM PVWftVAV,' v S DANCE NOTICE MORNINGCOUGHS L i n...( im n ami nth( cjugi %  Ing. ttiarka of Kroncbltla or Aaihi. N mm aleep and rnersy anotuar da X witlio U itiYtoMBtNl>ACO. Thligra il 5. nternal naadlclna worka thru th^ TARLEY HILL OOUNTRY ci.ru at. Fstar OPENING DANCE $ SATURDAY 12tk JULY. IBAa ^ Starts at 9 00 pi Dress Optional V ADMISSION 8100 \ (Meanwell's OKasstxa) * 29.fl.82—3n ^jt&AMrtXSSS.'.'S.'.'.'S-',*. %  .•* V-W.Wr'-V/MV/'.'.W,', MIIVIS Mill NUTROPHOS For frayed, tiri-d nerves thai make \oti jumpy and II rn .1,1. take NUTROPHOS lor spe-edy roliel i. thua alleviating coufhlng ai tiTomiillng froar hraotriing and mm %  t-fraahlng aleap Gat 51ENIU' %  frog, your chamlBt toda* Qulclt aan faction or moaay back guaraolaos. nkMte with the following .vigh their B-rbadoa CoBM BW MV Bonaire I S *", I' Hawk Ml riavnarigci. SS l ru "J*' -S Hurun.it. SB TholWo.. II idUaf Nana-jn. S.S. Cotambk. IJI tlr-aetMBMO s EBTOS. a I '%  PJ*' 1 Ilerlf.nd, BR Interpreter, w S_ llieaaf. %  So.den. 1 S M.ltawuog* %  S Andraa ami' S •" %  '" Fort Town ao and. B 8 s s 8 PauM. I B lleri.lla. I 0 Ara. Q.boc. B S Tort Eapenana.. %  m* Star H S Sundial Aaayrr. .rera*. I A -olyglory. 8 Saioan* Alcaa regaai ,.. -i C-i 8 B 1-roa. I B Nordahl Orwg. B B chti.tian Holm. -.S N.. Alcoa IMPORTERS We offer Afrien* best quality PEANI'T UUTTER Our peanut butter is absolutely |i u i e rMjtJ and full i*f ii-li tit.in.ins Incroase your Uitnuvt-r b ; selling thi-; popular lit" W ship diroct from faolorv at FACTORY PRICES. I'l. ;i B tin ,---,-.-,-,-.','-'^.*,',*a-a*a*>CV>'e*-a KM,IMPF.X (PTYl I'D llox 960$. JOHANN South Afric* I.T1' This W**k** Spvrinl COCONUT CREAM CAKES 6c. aach B Mi II \ I III', I HKER1ES LiTll. DIAL 4758 JAMES STREET DAIRY HrTiWEBT Ml'BJ'HY Mil I It'KNT WA1THE -nd Augtikkl %  • -."ii U < AL4. THAT tert.lti inert Road In Ire pariah "I Saint MMhacI %  amassoTB .ii.d bounding on two -in. on Unoi now or late Ot on* Br. I i or BowBver alar lha aamr IB abutting the rnaaauase or dwrllmkhousa Utoie %  ii .ind .insular other Ilia building* an %  f ,i,d ere-tetl ..nd b.nlt •timdlluj and T'sri IA Cl-ARKE Delendnnl" %  %  %  Ii at Eagle lr^Han PHBTE nATT OF BALE nlng by 'Albealha 1-av.n 1-igle Hal. Road afore.md .a bounding ToSelbat %  •' %  i CBlM "Byaia Villa 1 and erectionon lha a.id pai.-i ng with ihr .ippurtenanc-t IIUA*I. trai-ln-Chitnrast Jhh June. IBB I'B-' GOVERNMENT NOTICES C ,E G"TRANSAUANTIQUE Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe. MjutMdqQr Barbados. Trinidad. La Goalra. Caraeae ft JaBaaJr* Bt<> DE GRASSE COLOMBIE" •"DE ORASSE 4th June. 198S 19th June, 1981 12th July, 1981 iailing at Guadeloupi .\rtivos Barbodos 18th .tune, 1952 2nd July, 1982 24th July. 1952 SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO ri'KOFE From Barbados Arrives SsMthAmpton DE GRASSE' 29th June. 1982 %  COLOMBB" %  12th July, 1982 • DE GRASSE' 8th Aug., 1862 "Sailing direct to Southai 9th July. 1982 .. 25th July, 196J 16th Aug.. 1952 npton -----'.-,*,','-'.*-*-'.----'-*.-''•'•'-'-'-''*-'-'-' WAGES BOOKS AND OTHER RECORDS THE ATTENTION ol Employers"^""directed to the WaB8 Board] 2 of 1950 (applicable: mlyi. the Holidays N Hrkagutown Shop Assistants) PBCttaO n i —iploycrs Of shop assistants in Bridgolo, ,iti.i the Protection of Wages, Act, 1*51 ,ks nid other Records to be kept by NOTICE CUMSB affjQM TUESDAY FOR STOCK TAKINtl RK-IWFMNd FRIDAY THF ITH wllh PU AC ll. (151-S> (HS1-MI rearilin. W B. Iheni. 2. Employers HI,' required In elite, followtn. puticulsn. concerning MOD employee :— Chrnrtiui name and .uniame, e. period ot employmem, groB, anwunl due. deductions la record Iheir Wane. Book IruTHF. cmmmM. KMPOHIVM (tern.r Bred Mid r.idnr Street. rale of remuneration ol e.eh worker', account is In he kepi), net .mount due „m • lure ot employee 3 Employers .re Uu rec,uir„l to keep %  Keester of oil their employee, rtiowlne the followlmi part.culM. ChrkrlUn name .nd surn.„m\ Q.M of birth, dale of en.amment. period ,11 rcpect ol wh.ch holiday with pay .. Wven, dic and duration of holid.y with uay. amounl of holiday py. dal. and duration of sick leave, remarks. .. The Labour Dep.rtme„l a wiUBW l" Hive any further Bine,. ,f required. LABOUR DEPARTMENT. in July. IM a.i.2—i,. <. n >................... %  I MMH I • THE BARBADOS ELFCTRK SHIMMY LTD. Effett I'ost Ofrict POST OFFICE NOTICE Chanae in Air Mail Schedule ie1st July. 1952. Air saafll W0I *>r rlosed at the Gener, n< follows:— 2.00 p.m. 9 30 a-m 9.30 am 930 a.m. Schedules should be amended where necessary. General Post Office 30'6'52 ROBERT A CLAKKF. Colonial PostmsfSter NO I II I ONF. ol the I.ARCiKST OENERATIMl SETS In our Potter Station "ill be Ol'T OF COMMISSION lor nl l.-a.t ONE WEEK Irom TUESDAY. JULY 2nd. lor overhaul hv the Enuine Maker', reprewnlnlive. Then U evert prohnhilily thrrelore thnl LOAD SHEDDINt. will he IlliaWIJ al eenain Baaa. during IhU |>erioil. THE BARBADOS ELEITRK SUPPLY (0RP0RATI0N LTD. (ieneral Mana.er. 17.82 IMMII %  !"



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WEDN'l'SOAV. 311 V t, IMS House Pass Address For Additional Reporter The House of Assembly last night passed an Addres* to His Excellency the Governor in connection with the ll* remembered oa general re-organization of the subordinate staff of the House. * ,ne Boportari of th. I The prop. .Jj. which have been recommended by a ComSSSfffiU miltee appointed to review the organisation ol the Staff. Thej ivuld imatme wkal include the appointment of a fourth Official Reporter, an meam with trie kind I mt Secretarv and two tvpists "!'> %  """.* '••<' The Address was passed after a motion by Mr. F. E SL2SS" ". '"£S£i 'm Miller seconded by Mr E. W. Barrow to defer consideration annual Chaaabati afcatwram. and of the matter for one week was defeated by an eight-six '! *,*f ">" %  'hai om. .,.„,,.,,.,. should be given !h.. I iiuijum}. So tar aa lh proi*al %  .. %  :. The Address was strongly supported by the Opposition nig tiMli Memenger wn concernmembers in the House, while some members of the Gov"• %  he fc " 1Jt "" ooVai am ernment Parly objected not to the Address itself, but to J^, !" u l !" r „."i'"'l' ''' %  '•,. certain of the new posts which are suggested, and the inthai not only wag uch co.i consistency in the yearly increments in relation to the re"on long overdue, i i! \RR.\DOS ADVOCATl. PAGE FIVE thai office could be nttad in keeping Witt the dignity of ihe %  ataja T&M Comnttu i Mi UMI when the House wax meeting, that officer should wear some suitable uniform provided for spective posts. The proposals contained in the the Address which dealt with the Address are for increasing the Secretary and Librarian, Mr. staff of the Reporters of the LOBTalma said that he was LtU mature to four; a salary scale of that other arrangements 11680 x 120—$2400 be instituted; being made as far as that parthe appointment of an Assistant tlcular officer was concerned mid ft WaM aU,, te.-nmn.pnii,.,* th i 5Si l r a .t:' ,72 x i 2 h e w "\'ST forc ,-. k,ng ^ * SraW^ou'iysi^ss i^s ~TWM t SSu !" i torn v 4 _ P ara ra P h k V. dtf,e,C ^ th %  %  " %  '" •*•** W'th *• aiJu? I?!h ^2Lt ?Sjf ^2 claUM c whlch w0uW now bl ~ Ml rv prop****', the How would , A and tho other at 720 x 48 come B dealt with the Assistant be setting n good example —*l.ZOO per annum; and „ MesSecretary nnd no doubt honourshould not forever leak salaries 17 M I^ L" 1 b,e mem tf would ask whnt from the top downwards I 96—41200 per WAS the object of creating that Wtti new post, but he would remind the bottom upwards. adihcm that the debates ware far * h >>*"' Mid btfOfO, IftM %  "or behind hand and in addition. House n.uhi & dig. de were not properly filed and it a *'*' W1,h *"""• i>.posals His was only by having a competent • nd nc £ ,d n l y"" w Th " of Aulatint Secretary that thrv ,h m "' t h ' Speaker u would be able to get all thesV 22?*22 f .? " M chnn " documents in order. salary of $720 annum. It is slnt> suggested In undress that all appointmenbs this Department should DO %  on the recommendation of Honour The Speaker. Mr Introducing the address C. E. Talma said that it some months, since a Committee saw fit to reorganise the salaries of certain officers of the House A-ork were needed if the be done efficiently While agreeing with the neccsity for inert Clause D renumbered C ref*rReporters, honcurable mei Not Properly Filed Inconsistency Mr. f, L. Walroll (L) drew attention to the the suggested annu.il n attached to the salar) l he posts of AM J "--.— --— ——wiausc if rvnunioereu *. rel-i" %  •* %  "••. mai-timuif tin HL.?.l!T^Sf Un b C done '*d to the appointment of two * criticised the Add.. u tne matter. typists who would be there to aslh,t ,n r *' %  no need foi an He observed that the debates •.,„ ihc reporters. At the moment. Assistant Secretary, and *Vtn if of the House of Assembly were reporters took home their note* ,h *** w need for one itenomany months behind hand and end if a Are took place and they grapher-typist. then attributed this to a lack of rewere burnt, they would have no for second typist porters in the Assembly. He said debates. Under this new system, that very often rentiers had to the reporters would have to leave take notes for very long spells [heir notes at the office in the and hc did not think such a state House and dictate them to the of affairs should exist any longer, typists. Mr Tulma explained that in the As far as clause D dealing with Address before the House proMessenger and Library Aisistant vision was made for an additional was concerned hc said that he IT*. 'SZTJZhZZSiZZ*^ reporter u wall as two lyptstt who was one of the underprivileged JTfi f^Sth would bo at the disposal of the they had to see was propeny ££ u^e Address ?fh, reporters lo type out members' paid. He was one who woVked SendaLon SSSTutii the r\ tin earlier in the day on a particular He hoped that honourable memshould be wholc-'ime offi. i oeiNiu. bors would at least exercise %  wculd attend at the One Daily sense of respon'tbfllty now that ipeclfled hours, and observed 'hnt There was only one daily newsthey had an opportunity of asReporters for the HOUM paper in the island and very often sisting certain members of the specially trained men. would be the speeches made by some honsubordinate staff who were in this able to type, and for that reason ourablc members were not recase emolovees of the House. thenwas no DMggffty to have a ported and their constituencies i* P a n • — „,j ,,,„. typist to whom they would d.st#l.JJjl n* Xnow -, actuan, J^y^r^£S£ *?£&* MIU ZSSnb, oStWD rco^rtenTere he < d n< m m w h some jl u "' k "' r 1 "' "''' •" %  "" %  a ereat h-inHhm on thrm !" u i would "^"f ' mainly to.proposal,. A motion maOr la II. uort^i• like th ,Z th. I...1.T,; ""• '-"' ' " they were called upon "Imagine a Labour Government arranging salaries tor head of do."* !" f partments and taking advantage nd the notes. The majority o( the A. ., Crawford, Mr V II Vanfjul uie typing tit 0 T AMdcr .,„,, Mr j ( Hl ..,, members of the Committee howThe Adlrrs-s Ihi i! |i. of their own reporters and other '"""oer. 01 me lonuniiiee nowin(J Mr c E T ,| in directed by ofneers-." For thai reason hc said ev *7 agreed lo ail addlUonal re„„ Honour ihc Speaker to prethat he was trying lo justify tho H !" and two lyplsta—one rt cn „ to Hl K>r ellency the B aitlon nrslly by asking tho wh m should be a stenographer0ov ernor. raise u Increase the num'yp" 11 ber of reporters to the LegiiSalaries Kquitable lalure from three t„ f„ u r At He felt that the House aha %  ans>.rT*Vl it .„ "T : %  "" %  """ "" ""posed sail rainrtar. ,, th. House and one in Kato „, lho trponc „ wa ^ u „. ^S'T l L".u^'^J'r. •"• and fair. The Conum.l., What An If./'. Wants To Know *-.* 53^c a** sS i s SSSSn „,. T „. „„ „., ,.,„., lion salaries paid to the rcporte.. following uuesuon in the IbAise or by the I*ress and those paid in Assembly last night: — theBritish Guiana and Triiudu I I 1 government a legislatures, that salary was quiie on the night or Ihc 1st Ju .„. fair. The salary of the Chief r.a patient was taken lo I ^. %  ^''^"S'^nSLa""^ Portor of the V, imdad IX-K.M.£ iSaWJ I live Council wag, he thought, profusely, and that neither the $3,600 per year. That body sat on Doctor on duty, nor the or.. ~ i-iH^. >"ewer occasions than the House on call' could lie found to Ivf ISiKh^TLlT-^ JI^^^ Bul he dld not wanl IO drav •"" nocciuary attention? English uhat was not properly exarlsonj f w thr „^ vr>| plained or spoken in <•. Hou* BriUsh Guiana. ported U. the Hadlcal Buparth Hous. loVeTlhaV^theJ''w,^' ''S ' ^ut the efficiency or other3. If the answ, JE salJrteawl n!? 1^7 them W,Se ' lhU <* ,hat mtXr ^ t2 U ln U,e •^ !" 1 '^-. wl ^ W thev were ordinJrTV \eX Committee feit that the staff and Government rtatc what action hU 'hduties should be re-organised, been taken by h> !" • no irtie t<> assist and in order that the work should be done efficiently and expeditiously ho was aiding that the number should be int raaaad for these men he reminded the House that they were highly trained and competent men who He for example, had not agreed that the Government could | asked to make provision for Assistant Secretary or for ralary s< unless the duties of those oflsCM is'olt "wh'v were properly defined. The du* ties of the officer also should *— properly arranged possible. The EWput busy Sollcitoi 4. Will Government (Urttwr investigate this matter and > measures against the offenders" quickly u Clerk of the Society Discuss Draft Ify-Laws Heon Moi I oigfal y like those employed in Swi Roebuck Slreeta Mr. Talma said that there in %  ; UCn a thing as a junior porter and a senior reporter iu the BUM Th.y ware all trained ^'"^ •"'• or "" s *"'"' •officers who had to do the sani work and he saw no they should not be paid thi salary. He said thai they were trying ff" !" to bring the work as up-to-date a us possible and if the reorganisation scheme was accepted and implemented it would mean th.it Ihe debates wou'd be In members hand' within a week wi'n the consent of the Spe.iki-i The step which they were taking would not only he for tho V" h „ olh „_ P1 benefit of the reporter, but for ISSi* UnS: !h. 2 !" Ihe community as a whole WHO p ,,ed to the ir Reporter, and it was The rules covered the objects ol would be aa ran with what was mainly for that reason that the lhc Society, financial ongoing on in the Chamber. Committee had agreed to an ad<* r members, expulsion of memWith regard to p-mgraph B )f ddional Reporter and two typists. be. f" nds ol ,h Society, liability the Government could not be Modern High School, the memtie urged to agree to having addiof the People'* Co-operativ, I tional posts unless It meant greating Society discussed 30 of UM •T efHciency. draft MiKiel By-lBWI submitted lo Mr. Mapn pointed out thai the them for consideration. Reporters in the House took notes Mr. C. E. Beckles. Co-o] for too lont periods. He said that Officer, was present bj ln> the member on the Committee and as often as necessary exhad also plained points of difficulty as thty thing aparose. SWK KILLED In/ant's Itu/ucst AdjiHirnetl J1 'A \ %  %  %  adjourned furtl h u instances i f Pearson .ii.i I %  !(30 after he was <>ii Jura which \v %  nsj Dr. A W Scotl Who the past mortem tgamin %  %  .i In %  deceased %  %  %  %  %  %  %  Di Bcatl load V / la giitng tc Bridget %  t whlk %  •!" tna lira I %  %  "•' Hon; At td i until Julv 8. Financial Position Of Scouts Association Greatly Improved •he iTiancial pOtUlon ok i> Boy | n'tod on by the Eiu i CtssTUntttii Seoul Council, Hii KxotUai i •M that th.ii position hu iBiprovod ecnmeraUy, particularly because M b tnrttnl due to the efforts ol the Scouts them%  UOM had been col ectcd 'in. n. lime Of his piepdnna titipated thai moat of ihe <'utstanding UlsV i i sosn lua erlpttofsi would b* paid up with%  %  next two months, of the $500 which was set to rund. His Ex< i.l to the savings beinx made o.i said he would like to sea It used in .. full tor the benefit of the outside it'l.itioti to some selfhelp scheme. Kiiuipnient : %  .. %  %  %  iad told in a Cai hln Krsrrvr Kund |U be i "lUwrtrciHl" An/ "thlunccn" Here %  | 1; Ho Dt in.fV \\AR!>, A sroom of • h,l-, Road, hold* 4 ihree-foot long make his fellow groom Cecil Sprlnier. of ihr umr di-iri.i. kilhd "Hii .i .l^^ .>n>"im Mintibuhi's In Intnl nf thp Kirbido* Miii-iiiii raaastaatj rvrnlmc ihouI 6 oVIuek. Ward lo ralm enouih uhlle heldlns Ihe .intake, but nr Krlnned vesierdat uh>n asked if he had helped killed II. befwr,ul"i that he took lo til* heels on gsafjaj II. Do-rMMd. IN ., nsk B.iv i Si, Luc b with 4M ; i %  %  I. i 6T bags or pMDUtg, 2U6 bags o. copra, one ntoW caf ansjina, <•' %  > %  %  The Schooner BMMM m %  %  \ brought in (0M bag) ol i %  "" ol M ga rt llnara one case ol %  nuts and one machlna, lln Heluurrn i TiHigne.1 tr usocia tion. %  %  .,i ipn ...... in ... t at the and of Jum 140 ..i which $soo tu : to a Rasrv Fund, \ in,,of gniJO from which ex. ould i -• made, rVnswarlng •> ouary bj i i i Ks i .:iman .i. rnaatlng, Mr tlshorne said in' that ihe Association %  bit to II-''' i during lln innsl year, since v r\ f, io buy ao,ulpmant which %  I Hut he wag .. lilt 0 lelo. • nsc with 'inIslan i 1 11 would Uka rapraaaBtatlvoi ..ib. HI urea to consider the matter, and if they and thi inmltlee coma i" UM coochauV %  > that ii WM the best way to use the $500. 1 I have DO ObjV -11. IK-V -Li-ill lie m very %  I ... I Lntantf HI them and n only in Headquarters In The House Yistenlav ". of W 0) •Ins %  C r i .. C.M.OMS i %  %  i %  HTWi Wl-lbun DM Ha-iv.tl s.„-. %  %  A Hill %  hlpa ana E*hlbmim A.t >*e An Ad I.. i,.u-..lui4iaand .i %  • Mil' |..if* ajn, H irrcatad bag dtfi n %  dnnt after sp*> i • %  il •pring r. %  11 • i' of C n g lan %  ni Tiie snaka was itgiit brown i | II... dsVlWr brown on HJ8TI it .,il V t mm | through the ,i nt!,. i i haps oil i told ihc Mrcni. i,,, SHOWING OF LICENCES i.m ..in n i board %  niMimg LABELS CIVF.N ON UM : In-U'ancr Bill ..-.I Hi. I i %  lndu.lii*Bill ThHoWM i--l %  mil m •'"'ii'l th IV*.int. Lot Acl IBM Th Iloutr tj...nnl to T I n..l at I W |. m %  %  Kpendltura, audi' and tbu il ..f profltl ,1 p an h, im i lomeni that we ne across a sinke Ttun %  B thukii %  i "and i %  %  IQUI • a %  W.I. JAMBOREE PLANNED FOR 55 A hg boon infom planned In ,-, l-.iee HI IsW in Kll| %  iiitn'ii i. hold -. i n jai Trinidad i •iioni'i ha appaalad to s, %  itn i ignout lha ^'. 1 lT! plgaining %  occasion. TALK AT PRESS CLUB TONIGHT "Woman's Part i" UM Morsn kCi i.-iml" will foim act ol ilssTiisalnn ai the Barbados Press Club lo-nlght at g. The discussion will Raw i I Itameharran Of Trini'Wid. The diwusW-m is pen to MM publll aRd ladies %  -. k-up o %  i %  i. %  i -.. ffd>el* will ofii, i %  i, the produi lion of a l.lrli In. TH % %  ar'a lies ITf) lb I lii a*ica with Ihi m light at thi U altaod, Tr id) 'f ;• ill be B rollevtinn In Bill Ol tt WATCHES t.ni.n. srni. or < IlltdMU'M Mmklh .'or i ni i or irnls ni.iv <,i AH AN ri in %  A wonderful nrw ranie on slum at ouUtanilina priren N.i tin." lUbgCDM i-M'r gggfel troin S.otland than Four S.|n.iuBstBdad In>ni %  assCBad leatby m.i'.Kri.rjItMiu-n ami p.u Led iresh in vaiuum lini. l : our Square tobacco will delight Ihc innoitour's mutt exacting lastc. Hint SQUARE TOBACCOS t flNf BLINDS TO CHOOSE flOM HADF IV OOBIE Of AI Si'Y fab As<"i< MESSRS. A. S. MRVltl N a SONS HARBADOS) LTD. I'd I1UX 4"I. HRIIHimOWN, HAKBADOS FkTWth Sttpplil'S Bs a WC sfsPdMff Todaj at ir jeweller. Y. lie LIMA A O.. I. I'll. 2U HKOAD ST.. and at MAKIMQAaUM Ml siiori'iNf. n N im TH inplrx Sliarprners t 'Igarrllr Holder. Tea Stralnrrs OOU I hlnrlilr Huxl.> s IKIul Oil Mother OTasttal Wo V. \ terminator I lur.o.il IliotiliU s nil try Blsckrltes HOUSEHOLD GLOVES SKOL SUNTAN OIL KNIGHT'S LTD. Our LOCAL POTTERY . the talk of the town .i,A/i:n HANDMADE POTTERY WATER Ml Qf, S4.SU PI m II A. COCKTAIL MfJOfl $3.00 SETS of POTTERY I SI REE DISHES $1.50 POTTERY LAMPS 56 00 POTTERY PLATES 12.00. SI.00 .ol. POTTERY VASES SC.M. $tM, > %  ni. fl SO ASH TRAYS 4Bc. esch HOME PRODUCTS DEPT. CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad Street. OX I Um.lm i. f >>.><• Hi/Zon In Pink. Blac U Whlti — at $2 87 Yd. -I'rlramrllm This b u vi %  : art silk lovaij /in tm. <&*' /'t'sf •<> IsWs-aIn Pink. Ooid. !i C'lrnpagne, Ecru. %  Ifluc, Torquoisv, % %  — at %2 7fl HARRISONS BROAD STREET-DIAL 2664 A full rani;.' iriw ill Slock CHICK mnfcRs. WATU PANS. rixuuHD UNQfl etc I rarly from • II. JASON JONES & CO., LTD. KiEVTS. %  %  i B I %  %  sj u a Sa .u



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\WUMMIAY. JULY 2. 1952 llAUUAIMIs AllWM VII \l.l MSI HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... BY ALAN STRANKS 3. GEORGE DAVIES LL DO >*0*f OCCD %  sr.wAiavr.i.ff7 £*• BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS *MAT CO \ MOVER' 1 UAITtrV A •KM I LOOK PCM GUft. UTS** V AT -* v 1 Aw T A;I .., MV6ELF-".'; % %  RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND \o *.oJ<&, you. ia-tiit lit*POND'S *•*.•*$ €•! CHI 4V4 in cleansami soften your skin. p#s-% v v s IMI i st. cur AM to protect your skin by day and to hold your powder malt ARuTW 'Bt^Ay VoJ^t* Vigour Restored, Glands Hade Young In 24 Hours tn MM of Tlaoar "1 >•---• ...k rr.ra-.rr aid body. MrV'UHMI%  i.pur* b/<~V W "IT *ln. *P-"i. i ,i rgar •!••*>. bacauu an Aipararaa .. .Ibrovata* a aaWb. •*•. %  I tftaa* tfwMW tmry \* In t>uni. %  %  • laba i'>lt f'rm. la abtoluTal iraSiw. d'*iT wlIh*U*oB-i1 %  brtoflr.f n %  ih. n..ir.da !• w--.tb* it*r.ilMul vigour and i*)w.r. YHJ ihi* .mln*. now ajaag ""4 gtnir raptorar, e*it*-i VI-TTAH.I laraniaad II baa ba*n pro*"! jaand* and la now dla'rtb-if >1 < imilili bat urdar a ufaai. •t nuki Tou ffl full of vtcour rjy and from 10 to :0 vaaag %  r TCO PwaT raturn lha ••-' ~^a aid (•( your T.. rfAM ooata Ullla. a 1.1 tl Tabs I M.ahaaai.J IMNHV% .FACE r>\l: clinging, perfumed, scctntlAcally blended, for a glamorously ram complexion. I*S'\ IIPtllCK smooths so easily onto VOUI lips, the rich vibrani colour stays on and on and on Here is a range of beauty products used by lovely BO when* Simple and inexpensive, thev are all you need la korp you looking flawlessly lovely, fotUng your very best at all times You will find them at all the best beauty counters IMI.V corns wrnl HI IX KNOCKS OUT PAIN ON SAl£ U \ KNIGHTS LTD. 5 ALL BRANCHES ,' ,oct--'.'.IT PAYS Y OU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday \o Wednesday only SPECIAL OI-TMIS are nm aviiilnblr ul our % %  riirb-s \\ lux Park. TwaaaUMa, Sp<-ii{li <' " §••) *r-* 1 -• %  ! 11 v Now Bottler llenne*eyi xxx Brandy 6.25 S.7r Tim Condensed Milk %  Tins Meal Lunch Tin* Smedlry'i Pews Tim Firth tl. Pkgs Um Flake, .49 .4* 45 Ml .31 .12 .45 .12 .45 .rrrn OUm In Brlnr l SH 1 Srlrrlrd Ni>i.ii| |i SluHrd i.io q Mannlllj MBJIM QNfaj lf I.4B J Mjr.nlll^ MM OHvaa BBMB w. %  fe*' Spjn.-h C ( Uri-|i Itlivn—1iiriI %  J *•!'. 1" W">i n lllhr-—-null M Mini I'lrhlr. iii Ylm-nr M I'lrhlfil QaffUM 71 %  laklag \>..i>iu.. T4 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Straet T ii E i <> i o \ \ \ D i a ii C i: ii IE %  I h VJOIN VTUp Birthday Gift Tape Wedding „ Baby Shower Gift Time Dressing CHALLENGE 1 TO THE BRITISH s CARIBBEAN hy cm BAH <> %  i mown. ftc. j ItWVII KAKI.FN %  ItlTA HIND' N 1 COUN HUOHES 1 1 \ 1 UU IN r\MI'III.KT V <0. ox '.%i*: AT ADVOCATE STAT Hl.O\ll STHIM I -•v.y.v/.w/////^



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PAGE TIN BAKBAUUS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY. JULY 2. 152 Indians Register First Win Of Tour Bowl Lancashire Out For 68 In 2ii(li Innings Know Your Cricket LAWS ie, n&ia (From Our Own Correspondent! LONDON. July 1 I iRD today the Indians recorded Iheir .the lour against a county .side. They boat Lancashire bv ten wickets. They carried their overnight %  core to 4L'7 of which the former "Oxford Blue' Ie a hard hitting 81. Then on a wicket assist> %  "?> and dlM" <> o.s COPI'IM n tor aval*. It minute* %  intervals twrcn each Inntne* and not m..r> i have discussed Law 10 than two minute* lor %  *" '•"" •n Uwi U and baunun to rosne IeA* %  * %  •"£ IS for :he simple reaeaa that Law D | rarh Inmnn and of rwh %  • %  |.lv and al the end of any SUV that till: competition U rule is observed. game* where the %  dose one. Luncheon Interval The Interval for luncheon should "i exceed 45 minutes, (in local rfcet association competition thai reason 1 shall terval. the umpire at the bo *' 1 '" rule* it is 15 minutes). But this the minds of my rn j .hall eall iMay*. when with the provision* of ft | dr refunln* to play shall '•*• im: pace bowlers. Ramchand and Divecha ran thioujih the ,. . lh ,. mA trh. After Play' has hern hire si'le to dismiss them for 68—their low. st iCOri Lam 14 n %  ll ha ptnembered. called no trial ball shall be bowl"<' plandidly fini [ Jj £ XSJSS* •* Sm!m with sew-n ror '-!< Roy who openad with Gaekwad. made tM(>(i (tayI ^ morf w,,. ,,„. bJt „ ha „ nol be allowed t* the? li' i „ twn .nv player until the ne*t batal,, thrillli match (Australia JM nun shall cor" r. in ISO i % %  ireeday* | i %  lota behind La*, i provldi t fM tl % %  I' ansUad hi I inn Of inning* in . ihree-dey nun < Immpionship match. In m,me at any tin Ith 82 points, 16 and succeeding day*, In a w i."iimd M, d> hour agreed Scoreboard upon for ua %  .umns: Indiana heat Lanccshlrr bv m a one-day match, al my Una) ., re 303 and LAW 16 Bv) '"' "" Warn the sUrt of alav Is d' i( by wralhcr. Ust ll and it [ampahtra bj *hall apply In accorda Three Teams Win Outright %  i inn an lnninand Si-run Victory I %  f" t I %  Tha a nd • %  %  %  %  %  ii in their 401 foi I declared and U foi match imahlri 181 and At Combermen I 0, Blocks 96. iheir iirst innuiRs on Saturday Burrej t < r. T Oxford i'uvi f had aeored ni.-nicmei.l nml (lose of line beat Essex bj "n Play UU Intervals l-o'liie were ni i si i aaaax 224 and 204 warThe umpires shall allow aMfe difWnHspd for 104 run' A Rood wteh :i4fi fr.r -ix declared and HI ladanala aa ban been aureed bowline peifui 1 oance wt§ cket, bv N. An. ml sM and 241. %  "amorgan n Derby: mntch p Derbj ITO and II 1 OUmorgan 140 and 178 empires are nslmcieH not to iporUtnt"In the event of ll. I nit wicket falling within 2 minutes of the time arranged for %  uncheon or lea. the game dhall |e resumed at the usual hou xllowaiice being made for the ten mJtMlM between the innings. LAW 18 The umpires shall call "Time" %  ard" a match under this 1-aw tvk al the same time remove the unless < I) 'Play" has been called IM .is from both WaaMB, on the in such a manner thrt l-th sides tr-salion of play before any arcan clearlv understand that play ranged Interval, at the end •' Is to start:"AVS KKSULTS Men's Singles Mr. L St. Hill beat Mr. N D. Tudor 8—3, 8—1. Mr. J U. Trimminghnm beat Mr V. Koach 6—3. 6—4. M n K Worme beat Mr C. B. Slsnett 6—1. 6—2. Ladles' baubles Mrs. J 1 Mrs C Skinner b> mch and 1. 6^—2. Mixed Doubles Mr and Mrs H S Hamroft U-at Mr. M deVarteull and Mrs. K A Knaggs 6-1. 6—3. TODAYS FIXT1 KKS tM r,., 1, no de%  nd IW8 for sei/en. Nottlnaham1 play. Captains' Duties Captaana are also reminded „ thai It Is their essential duty to iih ensure that the "in-going" bats* passes the "out-mmm" l,.'„,.. the latter leaves the field of plav. This, it i claimed. Is all : f-nit In view of tha Aral day t .1 the lespons-bility resting on tha ,,.„ ,,„. ropires for deciding m lie number of days' pl.iy rrmih Inr from Ihe actual start of Ih match. the no plav %  %  %  Ladies' 'uidrMrs. D B. Wonoo a. Miss M Wood. Ladies' Itoables shall always be sUrted if Time' %  Ml D w ,... ( lll(l M is* G. Pilhw not been reached. SIHI shall g ,)rn vs. Miss M. King and Mr: he completed unlesa a b-l-man as A A. Gibbons. "Out" • %  • K-tiri' \iill 1111 IWO anbiutea of the romplrUon of any Men's Doubles period of nlay but the "Over' In Mr I. S Hobm.-on MXj Mrs. progress al Ihe close of pUy on S I' Kdghill Mi. 1>. B, Worme the final day of a match shall be and Mr. H. Johnson. completed at the request of either I Mixed Doubles captain even If a wicket fall after Mr C. H Sisnett and Mrs. J. A. Time" has been reached. Mahon vs. Mr. H. A. Cuke. Jr. and Mis* E Worme. Perhaps thai Law has given 1 _____^^ almost as mm-h trouble as the I g i-ontnue play. pointing out at this stage that Some learns to my knowledge, provided Ihe FIRST ball of lh %  •rfj ntly broken this rule IAST over is bowled l>e( aapeclally rhen there is a steady It is possible for as many as five procession of batsmen to and from wickets to fall after Time in a Uig pa* Uon and often "bis studix _ball over and seven In an led waste of time has resulted In eigtit ball over. As a matter of 1 worthy learn foiling to score an tact, under this prnvi'-pinn. the %  Miinl.t u.ii match Itaeir might not and until Umpires would do well to enlasj minutes after Time. Unguentine Relieves pain of of 'he 1 'or 21. A1 r %  whom ui' On the flrsl d i) % %  i>: l.iiun Tiiini* r.l 274 1 en, Watklns 91 not out plav or Bat 1 irel In their Otoueester vs ( .. %  ckel ^4. tainbridge .1 irm r: c.r n,. Ki 1 runs. Plekwuk victory 1 v.i W nd< n 1 Doris Hart Beaten By Pat Todti At Wimbledon B.C.L. Fixtures Full llorv Rifle Shooting %  %  I 01 -etui %  %  I Ull II H..UM%  il irday the ^BIH June 7 rounds at 300. 500 and 60* .il tin Km.B The lirnt or "lining up" Mrs. %  hoots, with The following games are sched..ied in the Southern Division ol Ihe B.C.I*, on Saturdav next Julv S and July 12. Seawell vs. searles at Seawall. Cambridge vi Maple at Maple Inch Marlowe vs. Sj (U> DENNIS HART! LONDON, July L Shamrock w LaBCa at Boarded ANOTHER CROWN Ull at Wimbledon today. K* ''^^ lmn{ ^^ ^^ lowing Mondays dafaat Of the Mens Singles title holder vcrance ,, U4 (<) 1 „ inU l ,,.. lVllllJ Dick aavilt, Ihe reinninK women queen Doris Hart was (or the USA. have withdrawn dethroned this afternoon by a compatriot Mrs. Pat Todd. from the competition. Theiv After a KruellinK buttle lasting nearly two hours she was th^oraja.-beaten 8-7, 5-7, 4-6. Inlng r.>a malter ot inches; but as the play in ihe Pargg All Saints Match. fell MrJean game progr.ssexl she became more ways on the defensive against the Hlnkel-t .uraic and dominated play to American's powerful ground 7—9 by former Wimbll..i. such an extent thai she took tin *trakes. ulaa Brough and match by n^nntng the Qnal ten In the MenDoubles, %  PickHI". ,, mpleted wtck carrierl June, when the posltloni of 100 r irare %  of IM. In their wicket Wanderei avere dismissed fin 1 'H runsand when pi rHakwkh I runs for five arlcki At ErdJalon, Ei first .M.I' I'1 Innings Hou aeorad 161 runand College replied with ll" runs. College HI improve ll Red House i 110 rum %  i nd Vtll ISS| -'.14 %  Cat OaansO, n ; .t the '' i as i Hafai A o v 1 I ijplatn I K'-pl Jordan, rsptalm . j MS Cant Waraaa, rapl*lm IMa In the eltnin.ditig sl;i>;i-. %  -.,, h h %  Ith better ones and ao %  iprovc i Frank succession. Sedgman and Ken MacGregor, beaten I 6, I t by Shlrlei l'i, Mra. Hmkrl-guertier gave .h'ddera of the title, entered the i rtothei tpiartei nnai mat. 'i most inconsistent display againat si'ml-flnals by defeating the Italf 17-year-old Maureen CwinoUj UoufaM Brough She was comian ^, G ^ uc T* u Jl ,, d %  „ I f el defeated tha Australian champion pletely off form in the tlrst set J? 1 ^ 6 — 2 6 4 ; 3 ~* —* %  a.5—1 ( -'. which the American won wit* Gregor was not up U his usual consummate ease. The British form und made many mistakes, Uke atervyn Ro a the eongl recovered well in the second but Sedgmans brilliant net play .in. M.I of Dick Bavitt, Mrs. Todd anly to throw a way ..in partly attribute her victory points by serving toaupartei ttamlna Daaplta graal o oubaa ft heal -i" KnsMM game Two such error. .iiid cbaaad even ball. This plus game ccst her ihe I arried hoi jo* ttn *~ 3 %  two aati in arhich botn take .i . %  Bve occasions, the score wasthe vital eai numerous in the eighth chance of tai.%  :*j and another m 1ho 15th enabled Miss Brough lu .7 lead ('.round Shi>t* Miss Brough herself was guilty At* rounds I ion. Foundation mained H purth |„,., lk throughl in of similar lapses, but superior proved lo the Anal set enabled Mrs. Todd ground shots and volleying galn11 infortunataj thai on-' to gain u 5—2 lead Mbaj Ha--t ed her victory. cI Greens men feUred during | anlrttad rally and look Mr^. Jean Walker-Smith was ooting or tirccn's improve) but the end never in the hunt against top " n '', \ more was m slKh ror hP ehamploo, form Shirley Fry: she was aln i ' cr iditions she could not match the speed — Wnue wt ithei corral Ion a/era ol ner opnonenl who mamiained peeienceci | i n up <; (be it. which was van ,1 game with' without dropping a nOlOl Best DlsBBBS for the se Wind'vard by an innings and 101 runs. Foundation batting in their flr.t f.>r nine not nut with ill runs. Then Foundation dismissed W ,i for 61 runs first Innings and i;i llu Inning i Wlndw ard cot I I lect 132 rum T lhnt showed an) i H Johnson wh i cored H i ur ric) the Australians to victory WHAT'S ON TODAY Court of Origins! JurtsdlcUon10 00 a.m. Basket Ball Becond Division —at Dist. A., Harrison Oollegs and Y M PC at 6.00 p.m. Police Band Concert, St. Qeorge's Church Pasture— 7 45 p.m. Brltl-h Council Filmat Aquatic Club -B 30 p.m. •--• nl tnra i dy U..I is BDUI RtUtTar* Psla-Q Comfort—Pre mows IsaaVl log. Tubes or jars. BACKACHE IS YOUR a WARNING! Backadw U .mi.ll, the first .lit. al Ki.lw. TrouMr. The kidney! are ihe hks-i's till-.. When lh .-I out of order, tn.i.i.t of aure. fre.h hboi fhwinf lo inn mm and aatarle. rna* bstod stream n ha*y wsh %  •Me peuoni and addi. Then end im IIPS. was 105 (N. AJleyne threa roi II. L Wcekcs iht. i foi 20, l" fur 24). C'FNTKAL \s. LF-CH \kl At Fosters Central 224 iv. Kir %  not ot l 13). mi.' :.; r one Ian %  Lei ward i^i (L. I I IV.. : three for 23i no ancfeat it: OUkes n not -"it and i. Fuoter >:x not out), l.M.P.t \s Ftll'IKI At Y.M.P.C. V H I C 120 and 68 for eight wickets in RdgehUl ;16. l>. 11). I i.i by me % %  B B 4tra to H. rsrewstsr ^i nol %  for 56. I' H INDUCES v. Pit K\\H K At n ^l A. Tiuket and :.' • .'J ichel the Skill. /*> •% Rice's Custom Tailored Tropical Sport Clothes "f fioy (or conservative) design, are of lasting value — an d. too. prices are par! C. B. Rice If Co. !,,,,,, • I U.K.%  AMMHII I MIIIII I IHI II



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WKD.NESDAY, JULY I, IHJ BAEBADOS ADVOCATE PAGI THREE CARIBBEAN DEVELOPMENT CO.HOME OF 6i CARIB" BEER W.I. INVESTMENT IN SUCCESSFUL PROJECT 'PHI. Caribbean Development Company, Lid. >l Trinidad is an excellent example of bow a local compan\. with the enthusiastic support ol local investor* can successfully establish modern industrial concerns. Late in 1949 thf Company completed a glass plant ii Champ* Fleuis. The next projeci. at the game site, was a modern brewery capable of supplying a Ant-clan lager beer .sufficient, not only lor the entire consumption of Trinidad, but also to export. Capital cost of this new project together with steam plant and auxiliary equipment, has been nearly $2,000,000 a very largo proportion of which was subscribed by Trinidad investors. So efficient b this plant, that it enables the company to market beer at a price belt w that of the imported product. The malt used in the manufacturing process comes from Denmark and is of the same quality as that mad 111 the famous Tuborg and Carlsburg lagers from Coper.: No finer quality, and no more costly malt can be obtained anywhere today. %  %  mi Right Type Water Tht nous us.d „tv Imported pertly From Czechoslovakia and partly from Bavaria. To produce the cleanness and character of Carlo Lager a blend of Soaz and The aajact quanUty lhat falls Jfilo 'he mill situated below the weigh Skill Needed In ihc mill ine malt is crushed Hallsrtau varieties Is used by Mr. ' u "xluce "grist" which look-. Ole Humle. head Brewer, who aflatrslsst like whole-meal flour. spent many years at Carlsburg 3H bri wrr adjusts the various Breweries before joining the rolls on the mill t'j give UM maxlCaribbean Development Co. Lid. mum •attractions of materials dcA certain amount of local sugar is "red. A great deal of skill is incorporated in the brews. Only needed at this stage of the proother raw material requiri is ess* %  overcrushing the malt water. leads to difficulties in the subseTht Importance ol water in quent operations and deterloraLrcwlng has caused considerable tlon in the taste of the finished discussion among layman. While iwoduct. rrect t.. say that different From the mill the grist falls types of beer demand different Into two steel. containers When types of water, modern technology the brewst u ready to brew, the enables tin quulilv of water to be *rl** %  mixed with water In a adjusted to give the properties reUrge ttO-barrel copper tun, and quired for any t \ ue of brew. the temperature Is raised In steps Fortunately however, the wellover a period of between two and water at Champs Fleurs Is almost three hours. In the "mashtun" Ideally suited for producing a high the Important constituents are exquality Pilsner type of beer withtraded from the malt and remsin out (he addition of chemicals of dissolved in I he water. In order ,inv kind to separate the water solution The mall is transferred from from the spent grain, the entire large steel silos holding SO tons contents of the mashtun art* each where it Is stored Into the pumped Into another vessel, the brewery by pneumatic elevators "laulertun" which is like an enorv-hich keep the malt clean. The mous colander. The flat bottom malt is allowed to fall by gravity of this vessel i*. perforated with into the cleaning drum where all thousands of narrow holes and. husks and foreign matters are rewhen the spent grain and liquor moved. It then falb on to an auare pumped Into this lank, rotat • tomatir machine which records ing paddles distribute the grains evaatlj vessel. %  "Wort Kettle" .or then drains through the bod of grains and through a Mite* of pipes below the floor of the laulertun. The clear hot liquor Is run into another large copper vessel, ih. wort kettle" in which It i! boiled Sugar and hops are added, a certain amount of precipitated, and the ttquoi Is n.iu-rntrated. Wh.ii the boiling i> (Unshod, the kettle contains what is now called wort spent hops and a brown %  v The hot sterile wort i' run through a smaller colander i. k" which retains the and allows the wort and sludge to pass on The wort is then cooled to a low temperature through a special [Lite b/pa eootsn Because the en it Ig Babst la temperature* the entire CBOttM made from stainless steel. The cold wucl is run into a depositing vessel where Hi .' checked for uvclte purposes. It is then pumped into stainless steel fernssftUnjJ tanks where yeast Is added. The reset nart* life as a "test lube baby" and is imported from famous laboratories in Copenhagen where an enormous amount of reseSfCh on yeast culture Is carried out, The vesal is inoculated Into small stalnluss steel tanks full of itetue vvnr anrt ' allowed to gross until the propagating tank iv full ol reasl caw It i> thU*mlxture of yeast and '•<>rt which is pumped Into the *4*"i swirl ai [j goferi Ujet ter* menting tank As soon as the veast propagator is emptied a new test tube baby Is encouraged to grow. In two or three weeks Ume it will be ready for adding to a new brew. Instead of multiplying as rapidly as it would do In air, the yeast tends 10 live off the sugars in the wort from the malt and ionverts them into carbon dioxide fsj and alcohol. Lager to Store U takes the yeast about ten days la aoovert all the fermentable materla. into alcohol in the fermenting vesseis. The fermented bear is then pumped into the storage vessels The yeast which sinks to the bottom) of the fermenting vessels, is then run off and Is used In ihe next brew , The yeast Is used from brew to hrcw until the next test tube babv Irewery at Champ* I'leuia. Trinidad At Ole Hlimit At top M Mi Eden Fleming. n the propagator has grown into sufficient quantity oj yeast to staff the process all over again. By this means the brewer can be •rtaln that he is always using" ie same strain of yeast snd thereTHE LABOE nn-bsrrel copper tuns In which the grist is mixed with water sod boiled. IIIMIMIII n rut: \ i in-. ENGLISH ELECTRIC PRODUCTS BEAUTY AND ECONOMY COMBINED REFRIGERATOR WASHING MACHINE FOR ALL ENGLISH ELECTRIC PRODUCTS CALL MANNING & CO LTD. Erectrical Dept. Dial 4289 tore can accurate!. iog*troJ I "quality of the beer he product The fermenting vessels and Un age vessels are always kept in %  lerrigetating building Insulated with cork. The beer Is stored in the storage vessels for three months. The name "Lager Beer" is derived from the German "lager" meaning store The beer which Is carefully stored and matured is called so to distinguish It from beers in which yeast floats and which are not matured Chemical Change* Dunns the storage period, ceituln chemical changes take place in the beer The "grin n taste 1 i> liradualLy lost and (UM flavour and l>ody are produced. At the aam time precipitates formed, settle to the bottom of the lager tanks and the beer becomes much brifblei Finally after three .. iiinperature slightly Ix-I.w fiee/ing the beer is Altered throuan two difTeieiit niters and ntns Into glass-lined "bright beer I Next to the ''right beer .in. h i ,1M. ufngerated. U the? bottling stores. Mere three achlnes, costing SHO.OOU. wash, pasteurise and label the bottles The bottle-washer submits all littles to a series of baths in a very powerful detergent and fsflsawi this up with thorough S indie-hrushlng and I'm I sxa the washer the hewes, BOW sparkltnii ••uli ,-leanliiiens, pass iv to the tilling and crowning units, then on to the Meyer CstaThla piece of ettdgeneuL which grosses about AU Ions, eliminates the poaskbtlit> mis bacteria and ensure. th< -teriht. ol DMT sM bottle The beer is pasteurised in tht bottle by means of hot "showers" wlnle passing slowly through the unit Considerable pressure is %  built up In the buttle during this process and should there be a leak the crown cork or a crack In the bottle the contents are forced out and the faulty bottle U easH> detected and discarded The Isst .utomatlc six buttles at a time ; u,l i| h.-w CaVtB l-ager i> umiiula.luievl There Is also at the plant all the auxiliary equipment for mmpresalng carbon dioxide •"' maintenance deill of which are neeesiv to keep the plant at the peak : cflUieinv lairgi' numbers of persons h.iv slreed) availed Ihemsw'vr-. of the opportunity tu plant, which has been ... %  i s esn be ad without mteiFsrenee */lth Hie operation Th> bSW seen for IhemselvM the inuduclinn of glass-waic and DMi in a hicb has been made pos! M Utreuah UM conlldence of hundreds of West Indian investors. FOR THE BEST 'STiyER STAR' C0N80UUM Asiatics Get Bigger Immigration Quotas WASHINGTON, June SO President Truman Monday proclaimed BOW immigration quotas which permit natives of eight Asiatic nations to Immigrate to the United States for (ha llrst time in hislory. Quotas which Btarfc the end of bright racial barriers in Ih" %  UcsVl immigration laws were u'tei milled under the new M,(.nt:i immigration law passed Isst week over the President s veto. Truman said the law would perpetuate the *r old In Just leek In Immigration allhuuih he conceded IU elimination ol rselal bans sfM an advance. Quotas foi tight eounUies .;hose natives heretofore were barred from coming here to live pei mently were set at 100 v. They are Burma. Cambodia Ceylon, Indonesia. Korea, |ai> .. Pakistan and Vietnam. In | i, .i nuciUi oj HW years was a.l'•>' INSIST ON SILVER STAR SOLD AT ALL THE LEADING STORES REDIFFUSI0N Offers a Commission ot $1.50 in CASH lor every New Subscriber brought to and accepted by flat Company. KCIHr Fl SHIN s/ill pay In addition a bonus of 1X5.00 to any person who brings In twenty-five New Subscribers in one Calendar month who arc accepted by Ihe Company. Have always a Mipply ol Keeoi imcndutlon Forms ready THEY CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE OFFICE KM Ml I I sli i\ Trafalgar Street *a THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. ANNUAL HOLIDAY Ou: CUSTOMERS and FRIENDS are asked to note that our WORKSHOP will be closed as from Mondsy. lth June, 111.2. (o Saturday. Hie XSth June, 1U2, inclusive, for the purpose of granting our Workmen their ANNUAL HOLIDAY. Arransemenfg have been made for eraergeacjr work to be undertaken during this period and the receipt of repairs and delivery of completed work will be continued aa uaual. Our Merchandise Deparleaenl and Office will be open te business as usual. • THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. Whli. Puk Bo.4 81. Mtehaal ^ COURTESY CREATES COURTESY BARBADOS AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION



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ESTABLISHED 1895 WEDNES' .'i, JIM FR'.CE I FIVE CENTS Conservatives Defeat Labour Censure Motion Gusiav Honored General Mark Clark Will Get Senior British Officer As Deput\ Churchill Warns Briton < Against Fault Finding To (By W, I.ANI>RKY) LONDON. July I. PRIME MINISTER Churchill's Conservatives rMtd a Labour censure moiion against his (-Government rswaj tinYalu bombings Tuesday night shortly after it announced that a British Deputy will be appointed for General Mark Clark. The vote on the Censure Motion was 300 to 270 against it. Government defeated the motion in the Common.' after a someUmes heated debate during which it was under attack from both Moderate and L.-'ti-i .sir-j•>f the labour Party. The Labour. PPtlOII which follower wing leader Aneurm Bcvan claimed was too mild, crUicis. ment for not having obtain. .1 consultation before last wt> ra'ds. It demanded that Britain be consulted, in future before military movM that might have polItU %  1 COn—quflCCl Hut it did not cr tici.se th.raids themselves. Prime Minister Winstar* Churchill warned Britons of the daneer of ilndlng fault with the ImMed States during Its Presidential election campsaen. In the Common? m a full-dress debate on Korea ho holly defended American pol. and warned ag;.msi undu' ;t Jiuding. Ho Mid "th. nggUhi #% Viifhlw I inive Prtr no :iUme especially dur-|" I < "IS HUM rOr l'.i irmiu — l!alil';i\ Ocean Kucc SruH easll. iug the IVesident al election a very sharp reaction of emotion. even of anger, might sweep large section* of the Amercian people and any candidate for Presidency who gave full vent to it would Rain considerable advantage. Churchill seemed piamly vetoing the anxi'ety of Britons and Europeans generally that an Isojatlonist policy might come out of the election. He announced at the outset of the debate that a senior Bmtish officer would soon become fi deputy |o General M.Mk dark. .Supreme United Nations Commander in the Far Easl, Heath Penalty For Stealing LONDON, July I Belgrade court .sentenced four persons lo death by shooting for stealing 183,000 worth of copper wire from a state enterprise eooordinf to the official Yugoslavia ,igcnc> "Tan". It said twelve other persons implicated were sentenced to terms of Imprisonment from eighteen years to twelve months. The group stole 3.1 tons of copper wire and told it privately. —I'.P. He announced that the United States r.greed to the appointment of a deputy representing Bn'-tbh Commonwealth countries which have fighting men in Korea and Commonwealth members agreed that the deputy shall be a Briton. In the debate Labourites moved a censure of Government because; stream it was not consulted before the' Yalu River power plant bombings. Churchill eminent BERMUDA. Juna M Six yachts will start from St. David's Head. Bermuda at 1.00 p.m. Bermuda daylight time tomorrow to compete In the Berniudu—Halifax ocean race sponsored by the Royal Canadian Naxal Sailing Association and theRoyal Bermuda Yacht Club. There Is only one Canadian entry, the 64-foot schooner Wanderer IX, owned by Commander John C. Reed. RCN. which was 45th across the finish line in the, Newport—Bermuda race 1 a • t week. Other contestants are TtcoudcrDr J.-hn Hurlx, Jnr.. Teragram, owner United State* COM Guard Academy. Gulf owner M. E. HenimerdinRer. Blue Sea. owner Dr. J. A. I defenderl both his ^-| ^ WPD Fo '' own r Junlu? and the United Suites on "" w "ted SUteaon Korean policy. He said the bcfib-' H.M.C S Portage will escort the ings were a mlUUry necessity and yachts to Halifax. Three trophies disclose.!, they were rniide at this r. up for the competition.—C\P. time because summer rains soon would interfere with Air Force operations. i Labourer Falls Into Careenage //vim li/ tjiiiirtvr' : 'Dead Man" I Alive After Two Years TORONTO: rwo ho had been presume.! life insiii..' tied, an Ontario game warden has been found alive ;MHM1 mile* ..waj from his home. Ho disappeared >n June %  IMQ i. ha boating at Echo Bay. Ontario, and was presumed drowned when b found Ha nee told Mounted Polio remember a thing bei. I IMQ, when he It Columbia. n tunNOiON eomolajns that the troul shopping nowad i one onan you your rnoneg bach iPdtead of your money's worth CAPE TOWN: F t* man practised playBU Tl on a silent wooden keyboard in hs coll at Proton I nas gained the highest nu>rks in South Africa In the Association of r inah'.on of Trinity College, don. He completed the course, Which usually l-iket 7 years. months and pained honou examination He played on .1 real piano for the tlr^t t,me only 13 months before the %  %  ah MADRID: \ +0 yaar-ntd industrialist, mute f<>r 20 years, recovered Insui.-vii afl< stabbed by one of l,s clients in his office lie has asked the poUoa I let his attacker off ( %  < wants to give him a Job for life. LISBON: A farmer has discovered 1 ISUM • ntury ohapi 1 In da In:, barn near the town of lafinvforte, WhuV carrying out some repairs, a piece of wall fall out, revealing the ancient ft neath. WASHINGTON : \ chair with built-in music U>x has %  Doubly southing" claims the In\entor -L.E.S. B^"*"* !" *' U.N. Tell Koreans Of Face Saving Deadlock Easing Egypt Still Communists Agree To Hold Secret Session nger ive> a plane at Lot Ancles efr a flying visit to bis est Joan Bennett, In Chi 1 eotef Jail Wednesday'to sorva • four-months sentence for %  ha shooting of Jennings Lang. tin wife's agent, list Dteambar. Questioned about a reconciliation. Waager (aid: "No comment. But you can say there Is alwayi hoi c where there U understanding." I U.S. Air Force Officials On Korean Tour SI CjfJL July, 1. Top rank raj i;.s eflcuua to !lon In Korea touching off speeumon dam ... ready against th.conunuotaal The lU'h 1 %  eral Nathan F r A %  Ai ...tupanviii'fx Major Genereli Iran UUJM Duclos Refuses To heave Prison Lord Alexander winding up the debate in the Hyuse of Lords outlined his conception of what the British deputy will do on Clark's staff. He said -'his loyaltie* musti Coleridge Alleyne. a labour., of be to General Mark Clark. He Eagle Hall, St. Michael, fell into ( ',' d "eadv cannot send .information to us. A the Careenage on Monday about ^ good man i n whom General Mark III p.m.. while he area U-amng ov.-r Clark has trust and confidence will the liRhter "Datey" which Wag 1 dingly_ useful to him be. being unloaded. red wfQ the Bghfh %  %  %  M ..1 .1 A Van Fleet and Lieu! General OMO P. Weyiand. Far Fast air. li r and l.t -Gei 1 > 1 •mander Th--. '' ITJJ and Australian li ; %  i.„..— r.._i^. .. informauon ofneen said the only purpoee of tinrant was to "m%  I . t K.. r I Without New Govt. July I .... (late to form I new £ %  in Iniii-h ljiiIU|r 1-M''.i.n Qei the irnifh Leaunaage rrucrea tajfaBUI BUd Hail. had lui ned 1 "i en i> who has 1 1 green the ndate on Bund %  Farouk niter Hilnby Pasha audIgned. Rumour %  the ju [ opinion %  r %  ri. The i 1 •al men* poaetbhi future I'M ihe Seflnltely • %  .. former Pre lent ol ihi %  n bei ol Wnuth gned as 01 indling me win %  tain i>\.. tii,s.i,-/ 1 1 .. ,1 [0U1 month*.-i\r. Aian Burnt To Death As Boiler Catches Fire l-Oltl Uf-M'AIN. July. 1. %  %  l-.ll 11:1 . f;> naaon whs 11 a botlei ihey wenw •> i K i n g at thd ^iUllo'I Three Children Burnt To Death POKr -tK-SI'AIN. June .1(1 Threi ran|%  % %  .( live to death when H mm In which Ihey caught fire. The i %  krenti ol the l to be a ni ii bj dance u ad bat .. Uahted ireni Oared I iui i'[ ihe pi isorttr eojrch.i! % %  deudlock .n 'i lu-l pri| UJ wci h Iitluii. Gea ral Wllllaji K rlvrienn, chitrf Alln-.i nego%  . v innuii. 29 I d gspi n poinllni • %  I y vwry eioaw ecmaii illtd %  thrce-d i I !;, %  i. think over their i Harrl dot lunenl ha %  S3 ; %  ,. %  %  %  %  i. %  %  III Ol. when ><•<' caiin.'t wHhoul rapub I %  i.. me United N itha .Unii.il'. rennttl %  i %  nonu %  "i %  i DO) %  .. | ii hi inturn to l i i p Famous Italian to riter IHes ROME, July 1 R|i The awed I n aeph 28-.. > Pofnl Forifn ai d the Injui d % %  in Mile %  %  %  i lou %  who I I i Chun %  I I %  I I ij Among ins i i French b cause General Mark Clark will be! The crew of the "Daisy" fished able to consult him about anyAlleyne out of the Careenage, thing he is not quite sure of." [ The matter was reported to the —U.P.' Bridge Police Station. Security Council Meets Under Jebh's Presidency UNITED NATIONS. New Ynrt. July I. THE UNITED NATIONS Security Council with Britain's Sir Glndwyn Jcbb presiding, will meet UxUw al |OJ0 a.m. to consider United States demand for the International Ke-d Cross investigation of Communist Rerm warfare charges. Jebb succeeded to the presidency at midnight replacing Russia's Jacob A. Malik under whose chairmanship the I N-ven-nation council was prevented for more than from taking action on the United States demand. With Malik out under th< monthly alphabetical lotattan gashl the debate was expected lo proceed with the minimum > %  procedural red tape but the conclusion appeared inevitable Russia will veto Hal Mates proposal. Although Malik undoubted!) will use all parliamentary advantage he CM\ gain to snarl the lie BUI effectiveness In filibustering was d-.ninbhed %  ) %  ...if when he relinquished the •air. The council's president has Hvaff U) direct the debate. t ( take le tkyir when lie etkOOat eJm rulirum on procedural that in tie up proceedings Indi Begins 2nd Term parts i' Duel fusal to be transferred I ate clink for medical I No re ison for the itiven although a sp called it a "temporary d" Previously authorlUei use | to oujve M-ycar-old Mho i* nillering from a diabetes ailment and kidney complaint. A police ambulance brought Into Minte Prison this morning lo make the transfer. oiled out of tingates empty liter 11.00 a.m. — 10.00 l. C.M.T, Authorities were reported dy to use force il neo iv Dneloa to the eunk A police ambulance WM the inside t>ri* %  -r> rard wheic reporters were not allowed. [ Duclos' la.. • newsmen clustere vehJela* The con os wn ned tin because Court ordered medical %  I because the Judge must hand down ruling tod clos will be given provisional freedom". Shortly afterwards Uh were admitted In I confer with Duclos. Prl eials said it was the they had been permitted to see him since 'it was be-i li the li,i?Hder of DuehM would not tnke place before noon. .Id have •omething further to fay after speaking with nim.—l* P. P fID in hi* rsatdenm '" Dublin, n T. O'Kelly poses w.th his pet noodle. He will be installed Wednesday I cRepublie of Ireland for his second and llnalT-yeac term Hut ihe Russian rams ol live council psanbera nitta veto, a power no %  > e i used. L'nited NausM ules require that all t.. l--r*. ol the council China. Fr:mr.\ Hus". i nl %  built MIO 15 jet lighters and throe propeueflr-driven Red iiglr%  laarfne nlahj tightprt accounted Do n re nt lonal Bed — tj.r. SCENE OF $100,000 ROBBERY North Korea ns Surrender Itoldly I'AXMUN.TOM. July I. It was learned that two North Korean soldiers boldly walked past <>< guards at this truce village and surrendered t<> United NaUons soldiers last Saturday. The soldiers both non-co %  i efheers became prisoners i>f war by walking down the road within 20 yards of the Imce i The 1*.. were not members ofIhe Clnn.se and Norii aecurity guards at P^nmur RUSSIA has imn.l a v~ ** % %  'he flrst such surrender in tha .. %  -I cnass) i-omm-, 1 • the communist j ombleil througli Ihe •' %  • charge* United States troops have broke into a sprint about Ma seas ;. .ns against Nortl I irude white -IP I -f-P 4 I Ne (^oimiiissioii GuLaraoteed Saleft) In South Korea li BAN, July 1. THE SOUTH KOLKAN UOVERNM ben of the United > m on Korea thai it will guarsjnh f -ly 11 %  -in thi cat "1 a %  .,!.%  I | llWisurn ol IIcll.iiul. on pan Passive lighl Will ConthMe .Inly I In Bouth Afiica %  degy wtll %  1. %  ampatoi would 1 %  & violent 1 r the Bouth \ f tn %  1 li |l i votu %  %  %  ore volunlOsi. Phane aaa thai %  %  massed acU..LI. I en 'II Wu.uncd 111 %  -UP Acheson Leaves fat Itrazil \ Ik.NNA. July, 1, Stalo Acln'-II l" K "li fmin TuL %  1 race with lop Austrian government official*. Acheson was % % %  | M %¡ ruber Btates am%  %  i"i* \V:iHi r They're everything I look for" "lint -M..111 liinl. rioeal in 'III ^1 lllll.f, I .rij.jni iVOU 11. Iliu amBl eiactly So leaft fr in a •igarrltc'.'" m Y f}\ '''" i* rathir I / I I hen, f tottr ,^mc nN >olhnrii —a*i ^^" I ,1 ^llHI>lU. I I 11 ,.i4i — which tiiily lomt from tobattu spciial. st, p*r/ rt — mhith meant •1 ftimfurtable throat." "Cssjgaass im,? f/eatj that's seen to by ihe da Msssrier tilt-r tip. And no tula of I..lobarr.. in the oioulli—tiller tip oguin Ytl — all thai, I) you tttnw, thu du Maurier fitter lip 1% jml .iboul th* finest idea fur imf>raiinK a smoke that I'M "" %  rasae ssi Smoke lo your throat's content du MAURIER THE EXCLUSIVE FILTER TIP CIGARETTE %  OLS DISIR I IIAVNEt Si.04 lor SO HAM IN IHGLSHD LTD., BSIOOBTOWN



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HAC.I. I 1.1' H.MCIIAIKIS AltVUCATK HI IINM1IAY. Jl'I.Y 2. liJ QaJtib (falLLnq Stnoothing The Path... | PLAZA THEATRES M AJOl who i to spend the wln1 ; ncdon •• \*r C.r*$mr On Long Leave L I dom on Bunds)) bj U (iriw OH long !WM' \-a* Ml. Lion ] r. He was aeceasaenied bj %  b %  na Estate In B.C. v for .sometime staving in l!cll< .ille. p a i For One Month M R. J. ( IOB ... Ann. can sri %  III MU fi' n Morocco I" uracao on ., hip. Utlvad here on Sunday b; % liruw for it month nohd.is ai bank Hotel For the pa-t thirteen month* ay has been s*sgervi .onstruetmi. work IB kforocr %  l"" 1 Hi,. American* ing five of the largest air buses In ihe world with runway* two mil-* in length lYun to that, I gaged in construction work Veneiuela for three vears Iron IMS—1961. id thiit hi* company h. %  ttnf Karat Kd.ficm. -a seven teen-storey builrfing. the tallest In Car..-1 F.I Conda, the larger ;uid mosl deluxe hotel in Carnca During the last war U Mr. Moray supervised COOttnB lion work i| the V 8 ;iir bases i Trinidad. Brlli-: 11 Dutch Guiana. Hi MM out to the Pacific area on. similar mission '' Id that he n In 1M9 when he cam* \ • • of hi health and added thai hi hi>d grrailv benefited from virit Fiftieth Wedding Anniversary /^"NCKATITLATIONS U Mi V III A I | While Hill. St Audi, v I 'ling UIIII lillirtli ... ding anniversary to-day. Their children ArrindHI. Kathleen, Ivy imd Evelyn who an residing in the U.SA. .mil Rub} IViki.i. of SpeightMown. join in wishing them %  happv golden .innlveraary. On Honeymoon A HiiiviNG oo Sunday b> \a. U.W.I.A from Trinidad to spend their h.iii. %  nil Ml Lnwrenco lohnm.n wh>. were marrMd la Trinidad on Saturday at Christ Church. Cascade Mr. Jthrwon. a Barbadian, Is the son ..I Mr, {, | Jolim-m. I if "Three Archoa", Navy Gardens, and the late Mr. Don. Johnson He la now working MI an sciflnwsji -.1 nne '.I V.Lt British Guiana. His wtfl former Miss Kathleen Middlctnn. daughter of Mrs. D. M. S. Mlddleton. of Nottingham. England. Mr. and Mi>. Johnson are tay%  !. tj he Cr.HII Married in Trinidad \f'< AND KBI ITM. who u.i. rnarrlad on Batin-day %  ) St Patrick?! Oiurch In Trinidad, arrived here Onfollowing day by it w i.A. in. that! honeymoon and .ire staying at "Waat-Wa-Go**, si James Mr. Tucker la the son of Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Tucker and hi> bride the former Mi*nhortajli Knox. u the daughter nf Mr. and Mr*. Wilfred Knor ol Arnniriir" K-iate San Juan. Spent Holiday M R. AND MRS Harold tUa> kell and their three chil. dran returned to Trim.i ,, OVfl ihe week-end by B.W.I.A. aft* %  pending a holiday here EVEN the much maligned path glao it gaj ran be made to rui the Andes Is—MONEY. The surest way to guard tnafl rlage against possible shlpwree| on the financial rock" i u g* ins vexed question i *• proper plu. pale colour will help to bedroom, afterwards wash unallg. the apparent si*e of the do bathroom. smooth and straight as a main floor space. Choose furniture That, as you can see. u> only a arterial road—provided (if >ou rarefull> tow prices; not large, lick and promi-c treatment E§ch will excuse the mixed metaphor) either in actual size or in appearroom will have to be turned out you watch out for molehills on ar.ee. Light modern wood* or once a week, either in the evethe way. And the marriage mole, mull pieces of old furniture both nlng or at the week-end—and hill that konceals the seeds flt.fil happily into the small room there is also all the ironing and Mount Everest and every peak •^Anything heavy Is out of place, cooking to do sometime. Most of ~ : he %ame applies to fabrics Large your shopping can be done in the kafterW Sre taboo Plain matelunch hour or on the way to the Wipe*, or very tiny office. If possible, prepaie the 1 flower posies are best Avoid nyvegetables in the morning and into thing that clutters up the small leave them either in soak or in keep it there., room. One well-placed picture or the fridge—a great benefit when ,MK. A MR* JOHN 1'Wit.IK Registrar on Holiday D .I:N ST l A 1 %  ..f th.> w. rived Hi over the holiday with hU parents Mr. and i D ivku. l.L.L. B 'i ii %  • %  \ i .. nolda Lui in Barbados lor two W* day. He HTtvad OVet .Tin n> i 1 '.VIA aeoonnattladl b) hk wUl b mk II Originally hum EnRlaiid, Dr. Murdoch was Houfi I Hoapftal. Paaaed Medical Exam. N \..\ , ba< %  n uvod th^i Ml Loraa I." .' '. daUBBku I A Browne, of At '. I % %  ' % %  RO I I i I %  Bdfnbui %  %  ii. tudani ..n l Un 'e end of On Inspection Tour M R n i. N Aacom I M. Wlrelca W> I Limited, lefl the Island %  vanlna by B W i A fo ndUd . four-day toui Ol II' %  %  companwd 0) M'' 1 i'larried at Si. Leonard s i U OSUBd i nurcn i ,, .i-ning, Miss Jean t Ighdl, daufhta i "I Mi and Mr*. .-in "Hamil•, was married M John P.iviluk, *on of Mi. and Mrs. K Pavjluk ol M ^ >rk City. The iiride who was given in by hoi Urother-ln-law, Ml I. linggs Collins, was ati.'ided by Mrs. Jack Knight ai %  .ii %  II Mr Samuel I iiv Rev. lutkM M bealman %  urmed by ths brldebrather, Mr. Donald Edflhlll, while those of u*hers fell Mi Ian Mblock and Mi Mkviiill. A nH-eplion was hold at the • >i Mr and Mrs. L. B. %  say". Strathclydc. hJeta the couple left for S;.m lord's Castle and a few i %  B W IN %  .in tfotal i" i' % %  on their honevmonn. Mr. i'a*-iiiih i u snglnasi wirkinic with Tidewater ASOI Co of New York. From wife will be reluming to Barbados afi. I IM ho will be filing on to i the Interest Hall ..ill EM officially opened Bl I 00 Kiidaj .ifternooii. II || Kxt.lleiuy the Govenu r d) Savage have kindly ted to attend. l .ylng field and Hall arc the I'lntshing touchot ind wiih good weather it Is expeeted that there will be a large number of visitors. The Committee are anxious to >, < inlng function %  it. ar rook,n wlth a tin h^H J^^tfHli f 2 whita walli and one narrow on, opener constantly m the hand pSceS-^ ST he n r 1,l h^oa 0 n;l-, flX ,ni >" TO -tm.. Fas.-in.ting. wiU, shopping.only at the delicatessen: blue. Fasc rurtami and chair covers of pale Any world's worker arriving home or !.Url ,^ ,*m^L?.„ i2J P'tmroat with a very small while dead t.red should make herself of salary snd commualon basis U n —.i Thi !" ,ihi. m .1. Id not work in piaetue. Husfit neatly into Some have elde p.irenu to support. Others hi professional training to cnmpleUft jobs involvkig heavy entertainInboard and the' ottser foi will stretch to having a woman In ing. big insurances or mortgages y^i,, im i ornaments and have three or four hours n week to -. property K is neither possible dining chairs upholstered 'urn out all the rooms and only ,r at all desirable to generalise £££ £ lime fabric as the armleave the daily maintenance to be LiS f ^LS!S 0O sS.fiL l,, a chairsTat the other end of the done. pattern' The long, thin room alo pot Af tea ami sit down ith he ids itself m dividing cleverly feet up and really rest for ten !" J£, 1 sJUTt, M '?" "to wo %  actions, one Tor loungminutes. Then .h. will *e ready me anrt the other for eating. If to start cooking almost with en-/ ing and — %  i find one of those doublethusiasm. uded dressers, use one side as .. It Is best to ; it the budget t create the are income between husband and m ... .-. • leeTina uiai""inie wo •*—-., Tnt *** h J v wa8n CW1 ^ dont two can work out between them'",,,"f v VT n rm .. for you without undue extravaselvefc. Having done it. they can —— %  •nwrm fsnce |f yQU mn fortun-le enoufh both feel satisfied that Ihe money A low dresser or cupboard to have one of those self-service at their disposal is fairly shared— u -|th shelves at the hack also automatic laundries near, and that the subject remains looks very attractive in the dining Those of you who are going to permanently open for discussion, or breakfast alcove of a kitchen, make marriage your life's work To avoid confusion. d< l ule at However clever your ideas, don't won't need to budget your time the outset which of the household be carried away and forget that .-nd energy quite so rigidly as expenses are to come out of the the kitchen is. first and foremost, the 'two job' wives. But this Is no housekeeping allowance and H workshop, requiring efficient reason for letting the housework which are to be paid by the husequipment if cooking is to he a drag on all day. By keeping to band. A workable and practical pleasure and not a penance' the plan suggested for the office S lan is for him to be responsible These really are 'musts' and wife^—though starting it at a ir the larger accounts. Undei -.hould go, hopefully, on your more civilised hour, a young wifa this heading come rent, rates, inredding present list: ean be free by lunchtime that Is. surance premiums, gas and elecSAUCEPANS— minimum four, hefore she has any children trlctty, telephone hire huefrom half-pint size to one big This newly found leisure should purchase payments on domestic enough for a stock pot. Preferbe used to enrich the personality equipment (cooker, gas fires, re0 bly square—these lit close toand broaden the interests. It is frigeratoi, radio and so on)—plu* gcther and you can cook two on easy—fatally easy—to slip Into general savings and money put one burner. ihe habit of going to the pictures i.'. fnt holidayand amuseONE DOUBLE BOILER— the or out to tea with another young men's. This leaves tlie wife t-. friend and ally of all new cooks, wife every free afternoon. If yo< sponvbie for food, launnry, c tan> With one of these you need never do not intend to become a 'dome*, ing materials, shoe repairs, ami ^ow the horrors of sauces, cqstic cabbage' have the determinedry cleaning, wlndow-ele.ining i. ir ds and milk puddings that lion to strike out on you: papers and magazines rebum—and the pel itoei will boil to maintain old interests, develop the lower half! new ones, and keep abreast of A FAMILY OF CASSEROLES what Is going on in the world. It .A. --— __ .„>„.„„_ sta individual sizes, a couple of is infinitely rewarding to get aJK ^ "EEL? .'S 1 '">nd pudding shapes, a pie dish books on a pet subject from the fixed sum however small, as a uue _„ nd „ man> more as kind public library and really study it Pe ^!' fl K.„?ilfc^i C „ u '•" %  w"l provide. They look One thing leads to another and if pretty on the table too. you take interest in some outsid HEAT RESISTING THAYS— subject, interesting people and e big enough for supper for events gather around you. 'o by Ihe lire: one for your Life runs more smoothly wher. lernoon tea: small one for odd the two partners have some endnnks. lightening thing to say to one anA GOOD ELECTRIC IRON— other nt the end of the day. ;nd ironing board. ^_——. A REALLY PRACTICAL placements of linen, china and glass and domestic help, if any. part from the housekeeping In have to rely on saving what you can out of the housekeeping, or asking your husband for money when you need to buy something, makes it impossible to plan your wardrobe cither ceo nomically or intelligently. Besides, It Is soul-destroying to J 1 av t,^^ k nlm ro, mon ?'I o1 ^ COOKING BOOK-the kind that his birthday present, for Instance|(i u how 0 make a wn „ e Concerning the furnishing and 0S! in WARNER BROS' Ever-SoGay Stery I'LL SEE 1 Oil IN M\ DREAMS BTOWN DIAL 1310 PLAZA FRIDAY ? 30: 445 & to p.rn And Continuing' Dalit 4.4S A 1.10 4. I O II I wisest to decide not to attempt too much at once. Nobody expect.>. n modern bride to embark >"> married life with %  dozen f everything like the Victorians, m \.i" int. rl.ailing on .in ambitious scale. The Idea is to concentrate on the essentials and add the trimlater. It is more fun thb THE NEW LOW PRICES FINE QUALITY W1I1TF. CAMBKIC :if.' BLACK & mm I'lllMs %  Also KHAKI ST" BI.IK DBNIM 2K12.-I l.Ot T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL *220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 460ft board. Tinned meats ore, of course, invaluable If you have to entertain at short notice but they are expensive and becoming In short supply Canned pork and sausages are both good buys. Bottled and tinned fruit can speedily he turned into a pie You may be wondering whether way and eventually you get wnat you can combine your new domesyuu REALLY want, instead of a tic responsibilities with an tutlot Of things you imagined ;ou side job The financial side of the liked. Whatever other roomn there matter Is. obviously one which may be In your house or Hat. fironly you and y husband can gel about them for the time being decide. You will have to balance until you have n living room, your earnings (lass income tax) bedroom and kitchen furms.'ie*l against the expenses involved, for the comfort and convenience Remember to count fare* to and of the two of you. from the office, lunches, possibly It pays to buy reallv good qualsome domestic help at home, and ity beds and unholsterod furniquite a bit more for clothes, him ttire, such as armchairs or sofas, and make-up. These items ve long-term inif you decide t try it. you will vestments which should not wear have to organise and budget your out for years. Comfort is of the time as carefully as your finances. utmost Importance so do not reWorst of all, you will have to get gret spending most of your furnup earlier! That really is the only ishing budget on a bed and two hope u* you are going to reach arm-chairs—even If you have to ihe office on time knowing thai paint white wood furniture for you have left the flat tidy enough the dining-room or go without for your husband to bring home carpets! the boss. One well planned hour You can get along quite happily of domesticity should be enough with only six of everything for in a small flat. the Inble. from cutlery to china Here Is the programme and glass—and still be able to ec(1) Out of bed leaving it nd tcrtuln two people at a time, the room to air while your huoWhal is far more important is to band is busy In the bathroom and have a vacuum-cleaner and you dust the sitting-room and run enough i^aucepans, tea cloths and the vacuum over the carper tH'd-llnen—and also to make the meanwhile the .offer percolates iwsl of the space at your disposal. (2) Prepare snd serve brenkOne can create nearly a* many fast for two^—if' possible in the optical Illusions with decorative kitchen — meanwhile planning schemes as with dress notions! A menu for dinner and listing shop%  n ill room can be made to look ping to be done. Wash up breakbigger and more spacious with fast dishes, turn on bath (Exit ills of a very pale colour. Best husband). all bv cream—for walls and (1) While your, bath runs ling. A plain ciosc-ntted carpet slowly make bed, dust and tidy TO-DAY AND TO-MORROW 4.45 A 8.3fi P.M. TO BRITAIN By Ford And a HoUday-on-Wheeui among ihe highways and byways of. the British Isl; with a ZEPHYR oi CONSUL to answer yom holiday whim—licensed, Lnsured and with a %  Ufisl nf gaa, rtedy to fo the moment J arrive in London! %  >' < "• %  '"• '."ii-" <" (hitrlt\s Me EncAnicy & Co.. Ltd. ,,r !" <*honr win om un .



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r PACE SIX BARBADOS AUVOCATt WEDNESDAY, JULT i. IK Warning On Canadian GENDARMES BREAK UP RED RIOT McCarran Bill %  BaKB.Mi.Kmii *•* —ataaaBa^a^aa^a^ Rapid Trade Decline ii i:i:ii'.i i WANT AND DlsTRKSs An urgent warning against permilling any further .ie'.t-riuraiinn uf Canadian-West Indian trade n-laiitms was by Mr. J. M. Campbell, chairman uf the West India Committee, at the Committee's annual general meeting in London. The valuable reciprocal trade between Canada and the Wi'-: IFHUM. lie s.ud. is threatened by the cumnoj rwtffc thai limit West Indian Imports from Canada. In addition. Cinada has turned to non-Commonwealth sources for some of net ugar supplies. I i mt imagine no great**! u to Ml bask OIK) vajah u work.. ooaoaair disaster to Uw British *ar f.uni it First, and of eaWes* kajk Uh -i' 0 e importance, there is the • appreciate the value of fad that although Canada is not iiraet for sugar," J party to the Commonwealth %  : Casapnoll declared. "There l*ugar Agra %  man t ui an be no reriauuy that thi* uuotas in Ihe Agreement provide averted until lor MM supply bom Commontuthvr than I wealth sources of virtually the wtNsa "f Canada's sugar requirements, indeed the Agreement i-n-signed lo give Canadian reiiuirements over-riding priority. "Canada, traditionally. bt bulk of her sugar supplies from ihe British West Indies; and u 'urn the Ilriti-h West Indies are, dry, an Important export i '.i -and indeed .in expanding market in whuh ie vatua of Imperial Pifference KHild staid Cana'la in good siesd. nd diversified production There is. moreover, a great fund is needed to feed the expanding i I mutual gooi populations of the territories. Canada and the Rritis'i Wast "Terrible want and distress will indies. In Mich dominions raoe ihe lot of the West Indian ciprocal tiade bet .olonie* unless the development Iran* hu dd ll u Istl Bu Igar Industry is accomall parded by further agricultural and industrial development." h declared. there is a reel formal liberalisation of Canadian W* Indian tiade." He called upon all concerned in ..ii-da and the Brill*. > Wast Indies to spare no effort u. ensure that the Canadian suga. martlet is not lost through "negligenoe dioruUghledneas or stupid Mr CVimpbcu expressed the lope thai next year's West Indian sugar expoyta. would total ftOO.OOti ton*, but *a emphasised tha'. Repassed By House Over Truman Veto l; ( l* HI mu ft bis Set Yowk I %  wvaJtiftU I Tae tlouMr of Keproeuuuvm i io i i J. tutugm lo pa*. ..i.i si in-Wattai mil HM iiiiintk'aiusn i.i arattpa ion and aatton* ..ui, (... ..<• o* Fresiih. BOttl .1 i n i >pponent .say it went much beyorid them. To provide for Judicial review %  t official decisions concernini aliens. Opponents contend itwt i •CM are far from being %  'or justice, "n Apni ii. wnen the House Aral. "*ed the McCarran-Walter bill ,. ^^ j^s.'sss swsrs MM* ".—„ !" ,u. s \ 'Si&srj'z Ph Tud "> Ml were on hand, I he Senate passed the alii*i law %  -thi, mo mhwnnTvuK H01DIN0 thill GUNS MAOY, steel-helir.eled gendarmes mova In on r Bed demonstrators In Parts.Tht riots, touched off by the arrival of w Gcn Matthew RU'gway. were a prelude to Ihe ssUurt by pollca of Communist Party headquarters throughout France. Tl> ng squad* .-, Swooped Into offices and ransacked flies for tvidenct to support govern' ment charges that the RVds planned overthrow of stats. unumded t !> ll^.io ii.i-Mdge for tlwi uu • as iictioti." tie iillsgad i :.— P'emise it M*ppeured f lor overriding i On today. %  arauaves with the Plan in being, gOV Ml) hrtilsh West Indian Impo l Canada. This IO place its services at the disposal ( f all In the We t Indl s who ou^ht them; that, in fact, one Of the primary objects of the West India Committee today was to represent and help the local man, 1 whether engaged in minor induais faithfully II • L-ilicUveittendel lo ihe needs of ,ve equal, if Loudole with' and with ,u#t •* %  *' M ** *cond recordeii IM -. ncUon." He alleged thai the whether to .end the bill £k iua>agc. toucededly one og the I ha cntninittee for plgeoiiholinr %  t the Colour strongest sent lo the Capitol by the President, was the product of 'ghost-writers" who "have neglected to ilu thing.wad Ihe blU." the vote ig four inn d sources (or some of her sugar -applies nist b-' interpart trsdii'.rics coofined. I can imagine %  economic disoster to thi lu^n h West Indies than the result of Iiiluie to appieeiate the value of t *e Canadian market for sugar. n,,..eu be M * St; SS! Jiffi Canada' I'.vii trotn | "I am sure, however, that suc• i>pon private lliiush private tat,*' be added. outlined tne ami: ee, which are "u> iU'J 'K-lp the local man," onu called-sj. gi-vaUfd swppor; for tin* Cocrunliiee's work. He ai^i I U erati r>. Mr. A. E. Hnrtnn, lo.undertake an gflltl' u.umT . " %  "• cent transfer of Mr. Alan Lennoxlaayd from tha Colonial Office to become Minister of Transport. Mr. Lentiox-iloyd, he pointed out, mid worked energetically on colonial problems for a number -f year* and had speci.il knowlcd,*of %  West Intllcs. While conit .iiiny Mr. Lennox lyd on his promotion In the Govemmen;. V.i Cm ,. .u *p..l;, ..f %  colonial in'erests being sacrificed lo poliI Before niakinti Ids statement M %  i. Xlr. Cn.npbeU paid a tribute to the late Sir Algernon Aspinall, who was secretary ef th" Wes* India CommKtea lot 40 ean from 1808 to 19SR When he retired. I .-viall Ihe best venn of to his work in the inter•sis of the British West Indies. i i iuians nod DiltUh llon%  %  %  ." %  -' %  v. r .TI.PI:i of the time he •tire of secretary, he he West India Committee, said Mr Campbell. pei.od of office, men herahlp of the Committee rose than 300 In 1898 to more than 2.000 in 1938. M Campbell rat ed Mr lo I West Indies, which are xtill a* fm you know. Canada has %  %  :ll .*r|Ui f ur I unii'li we %  i ban cslnblishment of a Trade CommlsrioMff service in the United Kingdom, saying that we welcomed it and agreed it would perform n moot useful function. At the Bjme tune it would re.ieve the We-t India C ann.itl %  o( much %  ouifne w. ik, th.t the Comm i be that in oihei (10V,ineni Departments an able i uiteiJigcni in. HI can lav diatall fulni mimsleiu*! sain :iiiiii without spscialised ,i, and eaperisnoa. Tin. „ '..uiily not so with the Colonial i.e. whoga complex and divers* T problems are not those entered in normal life an-1 !,' u,"pve' Ii.. fuU .IMnUon '•" *.*"TfiS „ UnpeiU... u^....r. u l policy MJ , M ''* nno "I^*"', ,."•"" !• re. issi.m In whlck I. %  "'"" so ns pi.Kul..il> oil %  ukl ,.n.pl..> It. u..Q...*.enl In••"•'..;.„ epljiod, ntfie Sjo ilu. n.r, but aUD to th.*e important .* "alary dl..raiM> I del ..la wnleh dl Ij call for the Minuter. — tile hlltory, d ..Ml^ai.oa ol an Indepandcn. In' Colonial ment machine. Office whose envrgellcjily hart ihtuahest i uo noi *no... feu had the "ei.es.. WattOT ^^^ .^^ ^ are, u... -wnwr do hud ui tne veto of the sUlcmani* persons g] wnase inouv leguiLtlLUii aii tiigtiij uui>lii aBsaj u not uapikiou>. cm Uua id, 1 do Ki *•••—28, a tally Uck-•otee for repaaaage over '.'•s on |ifas premises thai tha opponeiiis of Use bill g BV up their right and waited lor a Preslveto. Eighty-lwo of the mnety-slx ^en.itors were present and voting today and more might file in beaga most. "*• tne VPt test. TGXmZn „ * ProdicteH ;idely that the 1 !" 7-:; SSMt v "",v' ? M.caV r ;;;: in iiutina Uto Waltar bill would be .ualani.d I..-U, %  qoX-iu.., An erPn,ldcntl 0 |et„.w.ilMIU^U. un U '.'," 5 '"'. L t, ,ho bl b > wl 'h both %  '' iil "' •> uu •*"* i Uw Ceu,,reme Court had ruled that iKc i ..ugunce Agency, intludFederal Government had "paraing sued suooniinale agencies as mount right" to them. Ute immigration and NaairalizaSenator O'Mahoney. who side. 1 "ion Service and the r'vderal with the Supreme Court decision. **rTOSCA_ IJT^ *H*4S t COL6CNF tfA.'-e • j?^* The Oenviine "U" Kaa do Ceiegme comes from Cologne on Rhine; is now again obtainable In the original quality, mad* according the famous and necrcl formula mce 1792. interests lo polllics in country Nonetheless. | i -.jy thai we oflur llureau of iuvoug. iirengife recommandaa the eiuu.-tmeni of my bill." Cerran-Waller measure. on w Inch Congressional comnuttees jointly and alone spent some us in devising, underfo:ma! uaraUdatton West Indian t tic point of vie ration one feels bounds to aues% % %  '>'" a r^lcy which -^~~—. l^ajiimi and aainaerc i-waooiwl J^T „ ^J^OuJcS *, ...deed a unique noaitlon t., VW '.""f?"^ ," ."'"cilininauoia, u*u„ s u,e „„*,,a...? 5.J[r .rLt .TuT loi '••" an* raanonal %  ol SUto lor Ule Coloniea. „ on „, A,,,,^ 0pwlll ul# S& 5O.O0O.C100 or more dollar.. „ !" ."j H .!.. I !" ., reler—indeed to emphaaiMthe and Senator Sueuard L Holland. Democrat of Florida, spontor ol Ihe quit-claim bill, were assigned to atl a dale for the veto tet Whip/>oruyn Win At Water Polo "I hope that everyone henmeat control, it n... u>nn 7M"'""" Canada—who can in any wa. influence policies and %  COOng in ihis Held will spare no %  ort tu ensure that we do not lose thu ^'anaduiL gugai maket through negligence, shortslghtedneas or •.upui.tv, rnoraovar ihat they win -lo all they can to create the most favourable possible eondm as i' economic relitlonihip between the British Wast India, and Canada, whose e %  with Uiose irf foreign mid be imc ounirles in l2u. UpnoneuU hold drably more burdensome Uu,, lno ^^u^ qU oia7were dlsI not able to count upon ,-.„nmalory against tastai real knowledge of the Southa-astern Europe and Asia May L hare aay in passing . Ui which m ii ra bean payuuj atleatl i irtnll) |g the gu>sllon of maintaining a vigorous executive comFinally — the Secretary. Mr. intention is Uiat In P "*•• powers of hard and ne aonukaine, a*sCllgslon -iiu ibj.it to your concursffaetrse work are aslonlshing. *-"• •" %  "• %  oi oungiious aui 3 upi ill U Is the '(-• W quite selfless in his en'-" %  '•"is t iige i 1 la iied for College .^uc^'hrJeKnaST' '' ,..-,noc'r. who... W ihc Commmec. u auu,, at posslbl hope thai 1HO3 "ill sec th cxpd r 800.000 ton* of British West Indian sugar. %  fi'sSfi?!, ^ -.Ja"-S" !**% h.ilf of ihe l.-nplre Exhibition oi T~_ ^..ai., *„. , iprivc __ ihould lie bJ among West Indians' and rving aliens of .uauiuiiLt, at Dterestad In the West Indies. %  i"*** Uk; Oeporuiliun or snipping ou.u oe vVei.therhead for Bonittas lO d.-i.liii, %  re Exhibition ... WonUl | U IP3. and hi. work m ."'"" as gecretiiry of the Imperial ColleKc v.f Trorrtc.il Agricul'ure 1 g HenrlQiies, a close rKveoruil friend of Sir Algernon during hi Ufetinii', also paid a brief but wnrrr. tribute and the Committee pa*cd a resolution • Its profound regret at % %  ith and lapigag to I-adv Aspinall the complete text of y.r. CompbaVi u.hlrcse: In : .'"J: your approval of &f he R.-posa of the Executive i' AVi the Bi-Mvitl-* of the '" '• Commlttaa for the ended on April, lBN. "T the cnlendar year for me to 'vhich vou 1 '"£*>— -t"'*y of fltllilv— •I % %  unients ^nrt whle'i ,. properl i ^iem "LojKing back on the yea. i -d -unce our la. ral AleeUng, our Mm i:..mediately to tlM lo-s Mhicii the whole COB .. all no Empire sun moum— if the work and ""-a robu.auo„ undertake active work on behalf I can only any that I ftnd It "* • ttme naiui-ausaUon ol pe.of the Committee. if not impossible — lo • SOD commuting minor oilena^. "You will fo give mo if in my 'maglne n belter Secretary of the ,0 l u '* '•• %  aBUa of Asians to nxlety fc, draw attention to the I India Committee. Much thv Jiuuia* (usually luo oacn) of I renting needs of these Ume i Altitude Is due to Mr. Burto-i "* *acuic aiea* of llieir aiuestrj am spealtlng for rather longer gnd his admirable staff for their "' hau-ancestry. upponeuis oaav than is cust-may on these work. I should tell you that the '''"" %  *' u person oorn, say ui occisiun but I do want to ti! ommlltee hnve nske I t u "a" T >. could nut enter the counlear Impreasioo Vr Barton to undertake an ex'v wwsH unue iceds of the iensl*n tour of the West Indies ulumn nn beha'f of the i staff have gi..diy ami willing . 1,1 1 them now lu Ve *" U( n Pl^ure U •A DWCal illustration thi. year %  **£ %  ,"" %  • ,£• Annual lieoort was, of eoiine, tha ^ ommiUees "' "" %  %  "*• ""''•< %  %  '" %  effoits on behalf oi tlie Jamaica ilu neaoa Bad I rund, when we %  %  %  uditad latemi snd ; x l; placed all our resources at the lol of the Wcl ;.l-IK"-l ' Si. John liuggto. u d security given .1 Is nnd must rein mi the most impo.tant West Indian indusuy. '.he populations of the WeSi Indie:. u . such an alarmcannot maintain let alone Im* %  Jf M ftJ lr jSff "S2 "Ulili c !" """ rove, the siandaid> of lining of W : bn]'i truth that never lefore did mt>re uncertainty cloud .he West Indian boriion, .mj to ne, at all ev.-nrs, It is ily BOQ p.am that ter Hie want and d %  will be th Indian e Ionics unless the >ic>eopmoit of the sugar Industry is aci omp.*nied by further A **•*! %  leultui.il an I industrial dew vel pm.'nt The Colonial Deee lap iiem Cor-torallon and %  ther OovI I bodies such us the Agricultural ind liuiu trial Dei concept and gan i-entrilMi'ion to this essential %  "I am aure. however. tha'. successful Colonial development ultimately depends upon private i/nterprlse—and British private iterprtfi nber ould also mention t.ie l rganisaaudited < i raai ended 3Ul IMi and toe Balanee re by adopted was passed meeting Cambridge Heat Bradford Cambridge C C defeated Bradford CC in a one-day tlxturc at i-oaided Hall on bunday when hey scored IJ3 for 7 WsMatt'ln reply to Braulord'.. total m 135 Uattuig for Brauloro. i. rUUTH a y UKiml soorid 87 at number 1. N Phlihu % %  '" %  '•" %  l Wmd ha m oored ,,; and 1 Harm ,. 1.,, ^J^TL Pro *nenU, rebut that .ng lor Cambridge. C Durainvitnoui^reamciioi, there could oagged 5 for 18 in a.o overs, 5 • 1* a Hood of Orientals through Lewis ti^-K 2 lor Hi and A Ua. n. non-qu.Ha cOUnlrias of Latin i-rgcncy and Phrld, W. Braihwalte and' U. H'paiate lion of the Wes: Inoles exlubits b In.iustrU's Fail and In the Colonial Onus shop window. imI e ii.spl ed d.rect.on of Mr. Souneas, while I think you .dl know thai the whole Commonweal h sugar industry as indabtad to our sun lor their serIDrouahagt the necessarily long piocevuings of the Coiiunonwt-alin Suga. Conie;ence. In the future, as in the pas.. M io meat S t but clearly, ui tha elected all twelve retiring memMT| at the Executive Committee a..d closed with tributes to Mr. inpbell from Sir Harold Temnd Mr. Du Bulsson. —B.U.P. P.M Exam. Held emporary lag ns lauon uesiguea to Aileyii dnui i.nge gioups unaer perseut.on and UuriTSB. Opponent* gaj ILU tins has resulted 111 "en antiilicn, anU-imnugraUun aial aiut.n.'rn.m' progmmme. I.) intiouuce a system of seleciv. uiuiugruUon by giving spe'.'1 pretciuiico to tamed ahena •fc-miy needed by UUa counlry. nut prefeieme, opponeiibj hold, %  Hid be adinuustercd on tlie 1 each New Education System For Spain MADK1D. June 27. A draft bdl laying down new gulutioikft for secondary ediicam in Spain was j-ubmitted for Dr A. S. cato performed a !*<*!* ffff&A~ 'BSutakWE. mortem .\ .niination on the body ,ril !" P*^ and prevent the relearned here today. It piuvidc* f LAU-JC Nurse of Bedford Lane, '" u , 11 deecrving famillea. for a modiBed form of mitriculaMUhael. at the Public Moriabrouden Uw gruuuds (or exlion consisling of two certificates ..._> %  yesterday about 12.30 P.M. '"'•" and deportation to con—one elemenury and one adat that. For two nun. coata, u the Waal Nuna was taken to the Public 'rnHiy w, ih recoiiunendalions vanoed —_ awarded respectively fa ;f big late Majesiy, Kir.. drad years the West India ComIndU cmiumitea U lo coiumue Its Mortu tha S.x'h. ilia Maiestv mittee and Its members have functions and usefulness, an.. i lomc %\ >• lor •.." played their part to the full In cvoo more if it u to exp-nd them. j U ne SO liil'ish WT Indian Colonies. *; Clonial development, but never as we earnestly desire, more after she died about 3 40 p i it hoc nade 1 <3fr by the Sa-nate Special Com"f'er the fourth and the sixth of Commerce 1 Itefore has there been a greater I % %  %  Bfg '. inHm Cummltteo Functions Of Committee showed, for example at the Mulish Industrie* Fulr. at whkh ho deligUU'd t-> linger during hu ." '-ilmg annual visits. Indaa 4 gg) %  u'p.iscd officiau [11 a of %  v.. by hi %  of v.*<-t Indian rmithsrs. In bet I ijesty Queen ElizaSecond, we re.olce tha*. we have a sovereign In whose though'* o.e affalro of the Cemth and Empire overw'.,. .ire NO less pi'o---.incnt. •The yebr IB9S 111 long .* %  .' in Ihe liritbih W. I %  1 whloq, for the first dme *lnro sugar was ectablinhed ns .the fcuiida'ion of Ihe West Indian economy some three hundred years ;IEO. a period durf-und durim; my recent visit to inds will have to be plaoad ti disposal and an even llidai iicmberhip will be essential, in Ins connection you will have imied from the accounts mat 1 .IK. 'in the iiuume of the "So Uua inoning 1 want m<> • awaf "< 11 anytlUng else to exp.nn in rear*g expenditure li 1 unnr. "• %  hat way the Weal It.dla Comg, roc me to say that ttda m he'p the WM Indian : ta of aflairs cannot continue r.ilonie* in what f.ir too i.w seen. .cnnitely. nnd our immediate really to appreciate Is their lime moat 1 % % % %  %  > itrengjthan our f need. How can tlie Conuniliee •lay a full part In devMoa and tan of the n-.hertng those plans for the happy relationship rxtstll luture which ail thin tog p.-op:e iween the West India CanMnittar %  not only essential but an d Covert ment depart] ve y urgent? | lllt 1 would like — especialU hat to mv rtism.iy. 1 ,,'trr .1 year when the ImpliesTRENCH DUG BY REDS IN BERLIN .nq which the In.:jstry"encountered the far extremes of fortun--. from the days when Jamaica led the world a* the largest produc ; to tha more recant time, of *ho brain tieon beet sugar, when one West Indian estate after onothi tha 1 i)l that the West India Comi: U 'i l-xli la Rely. :f not exclusively ikniK after the interests of sugar .n-r big business; that u had no *t whatever in the small was abandoned—for the flrst time man. Perhaps you will allow me -n all its long history the sugar to say something of the talk* J Industry gained a real measure of 1 -'d with the President and lead.vr-wrltv which now enables the > officials of the Jamaica Agri.fTicient producw to plsn ahetid tultural Society, many of whoee in the ure knowc-Jgo thnt abnor membari I fear hud quite a wronR in:.I ;inH prolonged nMnrn! ralamimpression. To them I explained ity alone can deprive bim of 1 srhila o ri gi n al l y, fnlr return f -*h. Ovalllnr •hould be your Ismlh Hi Il ha* outaiandlng advantage* torhr'p ii... ttaaaa and eani> all day. a*i.l iiursl. rtsiotaiivi < .iliiiw gites yea thi highcu fxi.titil.* uudlio ui the lotacsi faoolMr (•o...oi,i.. 11 ,-o.u ..1 lana and |itf> i.i •MK.h --n il. errp.tr.d from Nature'* Unr.i laads, i>valliae' provldv. food rlrmeiK n..ludln|| '1i.1n.111.. of 1I1. gnMteal nutnn vahSB. Ihr lamou* 'Ovalline' latnia .... %  pacullv SMBblUhad IO -rl Ihr higheM .1.1, dard> for ilir malt, milk and rggn U Outline' Biwwo an .MiAm l. MSSSMSS tltn .-< rr.-J* BJMI "nei! lagn dMm.aadllJanSlpr.>piiHi r jf SslKMan 'UVMiuM aaJ um runs 'J The BM inn* row of Jn .>..tnr*' nmaenvr V ihaii dd, t(ar u.i j,,. kaatafi. pislaaa



PAGE 1

HEU.NUiDAV. JL'LV i. 1S52 UAKBAIMIs ADMHATI PAGE SI M \ Loan Scheme May Help Peasant Occupiers Revolving Fund To Be Increasetl By $150,000 prices paid lor greens It was a known fact that in recent weeks a household could not purchase a whole breadfruit but had to buy part of oat, He said that in his parish one plantation starred '" *- sweet Tlie House uf Assembly yesterday passed a Bill to i0, ,0 s ""d the manager had to amend th. Points' U.an Bank AC. 1936. Z ,hat more ^ tQ "SSr^ U £J^ peasants, includim; arnie who merely occupy land and not mg the potatoes. "That only goes 10 show what the food gltuauon is in this island," said Mi Alld. i %  •It is time Hud QovtemanafM coosider the matter He hoped that extending lhe scope of the Peasants faoan Bank would riot put an end to Government's policy towards the agriClerks, Marshal Gel Raises MCMgarUy own it. can l*>neflt from the fund. government mcmbi'r Mr. p, L. Walcott who intruduced tlie Bill informed the House that about $150,000 more would be added to the revolving fund. The Objects and Reasons of the Bill read:— Hitherto the Peasants' Loan propriate consideration for his Bank has been operated on "an pains. absolute safely" basis and the Mr. O. T. AIMer (I) said that !" .'. .X r *' f' up ?' "" !" to d Bank could only advance a lean some security must be liven but T "V. ,",' *" %  *• %  '" to peasant owners. A lar,c num. it still worried him in the Bill "• C U '".'.'*J 1 '*„ n f5" Jf > !" ber of occupiers do not qualify where mention ,. made about du '""-a^i 1 I '! .l\' tat assistance under the existing tenants and still they speak about • %  ". And the policy of this BTOVlalons of the Act The Board leasin, when thev knew that ill ""•" "?"""' fT' ""'.r"?" !" of the Bank consider that the Barbados most of the land rents P'oduc ion wh„h would benefll B ,f^* •"' v,u h !" ld " hberwere based on weekly tenancy "S "*£?*. . ... allied so that a greater number of What I was hopma to sea was ".? ""* lh .*' '' lh f> wanted '' peasants may be accorded the fa, hc average agricultural labour"i"* •ubstantial increase In cUlties of the Bank and thereby e setting some benefit or being Production and so reduce the cost to 7Wl. U,e ,^ d,K • ,lv "> < P"included, those persons who till "' '"" "V *£* •" '" n,v ant holdings. h lnri nri -„ Ih more liberul policy. This amending ,,! u.erefor^ ,£ markets o KSrSF he '" J !" "' ""> !" ' * *ks to increase the st/c of a ^.M :iem.. appraxtmattq .'; In easant holding which would qualify for a loan from 10 acres to 2S acre, .clause 2) and to into „ Iegu rd h e agricultural la!*?. >rp "I !" bourer. As the Bill stood this labourer could not go to the Bank %  i'M'llllil' Mr. R. G. Map* (L> said that in his opinion members should have time to go into the matter 1 do not propose to be invoke i In any wrangling of th|ls\ sort." he said. He moved that the matter be referred to a Select I This was seconded by Mi Mr. E. I>. Mettley (B) said that Tfw House of Assembly by a 13—• majority vaster'he Clork should be paid n reladsy divided to inert ries of their Clerk, Deputs. x !" £ ( ] Clerk ami Man ,„ llu eom llfnvln The old salaries mn, Ckss S4.HOO Dtputt $2,400 and ">at cotwrnouty. Marshal $720 and the salaries ll %  H,.use have agreed to are. "V^S^^JSSSS^& Clerk $5,760. IVpuU C.S8C ..... Marshal $1.0%. b^crXt^W Mr P ^d. r d. h He lhe KSSOtimOf) was in: rod need bv Mr F C (Joddard would be surprised at a] (Kl ;itier only being Riven notice of about 10 rninuUS heh.re. £ ^H !" " &£Ll?t?tw^lH and ..hjrvti..,, was taken when he sought leave to go tteough iuno? with it immediately. Leave was, however, granted nftet %  afc Hottka alao reivired to the :tfi-tnnmte dlSCUSSlOn and an 11 7 division reporter "f the House who was were T M S "'", PS", ** *2 4?£ n '" * Rra K were. Messrs. A. E. S. Lewis, C. T.IIIH.I. P cl llrvan JET" naa who ha.l la coma i Ika Bnnekar, VV A. rrawford. J. C Mottlev, O f Alldei V Vaughn. J A. Haynes. E. K. Walcott. E U Moltliv F C GodcUmi and Dt H. (j. Cummins A K ainst were: Messrs r. Miller. R. (... Mapp, 1. A. WilUum, K. W. Ban,.,, II Walcott and Mrs E. Boutin. l>r. Cun "M, Allder felt that ,me pro. ;;e.S.d <; C"'' ; '"F "T' ?, 1^^^ HS'S'ZSrSS'. S %  :' .' Z^ Tlie'l,'' vision should be made in the Bill J r ,n,d ^L T!"*_* chem ,* h ^ 1 '. 1 '""ons to the n„|„, 10 „ Mn ,.„,. „ lnn m ou •' ' du proceeded with ye.ler.1 ., afM u Mr. c. Talma ID said that thin it uv House, concentrate, report the auajLhaa of members, take his notes home and transcribe and lyn tliein II. ,i thai "illi.n the last six month! the reporter had tt Ihiylug lluraporuM The Iv.li.ly aag ,iii. ,./ Ferguson cottoni i ...,Wa, IM.I. r'" L 'i T 't %  elude peasant for assistance if the terms of their tenancy offer reasonable security (cl. 2). The scope of the Bank': acttvitlei lowing quiring and such other purpose Bank may consider reasonable for increasing productivity nf the holding (cl 3). Attention is drawn to the fact that sections 7 and 9 of the Peasants' Loan Bank Act. 1936. have been previously amended by Acts 1943-1 and 1W938 had only been" irlly before. Mr. r. HilctW ll.) a.skr.1 state nn inslaniv -,'Th'"'" < %  ""<' '*••"'•'< with then members „ .' C a £ 0l £L.,£ K"*.' 8 !" t aald t£t the scheme wa. J 1 1 „-"d the administration had not dealing w,,h the ",,",7,ln'U" " H to .TvTihTiuld > " r J a "W 1 ^? '"'"^ M ,Ln^ IST^rir 1 ^ lo wide enough. It was not going h v c brun J bcar of ^fj • c iD dal ww>sness or the -m^ose?...o7done^.^-MK-" "5SS *'" ul <> '"" •** the rwoluliotl a Sl ntl^tT.. hwT; lo hr| P ,he ""-""ous barren plots I h ,7„ n we d ""? h, "T 1 "-" crPa ^">U( he was nbjcrtSTto .1 JTr t w,m The Bank proposes to give thesi extended iwers a trial over ; period of 3 years at the end of which, if not successful, would be discontinued. After referring to the Objects tive. At this stage the Speaker explained to Mi that he was straying from the confines of the bill. Barren Plot* reports on agricultural possibilMi. Allder, continuing, said ities in the West Indies and he thai what he had hoped to see felt that no other body had was the Government, after renored these reports as the local COtvtafl the report of the Fiscal Government had done. %  Iirvoj ciime forward with a Mr. L. A. Williams |L) said not increase its iK'ncllciarles but ( should increase its benefitin he ten acre and under man." il< toll lhal UN UU as a scanDr. Cummins said that he dal and the administration had not doiiliim with thi> riatiiM. nf-thjit sUge. Mr V, E. Talma (Ll fell tti.ii i o B % %  < ,i Burv*) .is itaodod lo t\X the S.1I.1111. H % %  %  %  %  \ i nbt] Mr. W. A. i Hi that they would hava to |0 I Lon| i Mnit w ay tow r >* %  atisrytmc gaitpkWOi %  1. Mr. F L. Walcott (L) who suplev' md F C (Sdard NM"'-r'.^' <:, v, : r V l rl s he ported the deferring of eom.der!.MesMV F Miller V urrJarikcmeH,rt*lwilltrrrpl#r'l Aluvyi htkjm ffcr gUgwAqpMM M Vr ttivedgr. and !(>.. Walcotl of the Bill, Mr F. L. (L> who Introduced M).lei\ Mapp. Will they scheme which Voujd~invoYve n thiu'.t seemed"trhmT tnai sorne such"inii>oV't"m,v U^L"notToS n lh \'\'**'' m *•" be8an on ln Those for wen'"' v! l. large surh which would assist people forgot thai Barbadian, enough to a ,( % %  rt, -"" i,l,on Talma. Bi van. Hranrker, Crawof barren plots to cultiwere land hungry. notice lo consider it. Mr. F. ('. GaUOsrd. (K> said J'."""vate them. Mr. J. O. Mottley (C) said that Other things connected with HIP th it ihr Clerk nf the House They could not say a bill of he was in heartv agreement with House wanted reorgam/.lng, ha Asswnbly !" ta. a !" fi Tw mcmbe !" thU sort was sufficient as their the bill for widening the scope ud. They had to decide wMther -i 1 mliiim!.. v, i ptoposcd ["'ley was not a broad one. In refor the provisions of the Peasthe two clerks necessarily had to "i' Clerk's salary ne cent weeks the local newspapers ants Loan Bank. be two qualified solicitors. Nor did "l h-'U •' th e amo_nt of Uie sun. %  ntioned some of the high The Bill was eventually passed, he think it necessary to have two. paid U> the Clerk In other such Assemblies, (ban "'" ll UUM members would be I K. Walcott. "loddai-l .III.I ; Worst World Sugar Glut This Year and the Bill, indeed, was as Important as the original Bill In 1936. They would see, he LttsJ occupiers and not only owners would be able to utilize the funds of the Peasants' Loan Bank. The amount of monev Involved would be in the vicinity of H50.000 to be added to the revolving fund. Refreshing Move Mr. F. Miller said it was refreshing to realise that that scheme would bring relief to many peasants. A seetlon of the Objects and Reasons states that the Bank pro8 |U J of .— — poses to give certain extended bad since before the war. Not funds in the crop powers a trial over a period of only Cuba harvesting a record lleved, would avi three years at the end of which, if cane crop, but beet-sugarproducdump the surplus not successful, they would be disll n 'n Europe has outstripped all market. The surplus wHl be th c House staff and Hung* m m rtrontinued. Speaking on this. Mr l> r V,-*:' t "*"/ %  .,, „ ,„ ! orod n Cuba and released to ally concerned with the House. Miller observed that a period of While Britain Is takng all West the market over a period of years. „„.„,,„.,, would have tmn, QM three vears was of too short dura"ndian sugar available at guarOne unexpected windfall for WljuI %  huvi _. thought. litlOTTned of Uon for a scheme of that sort. anteed prices. West Indian proCuba has been the failure of the u Mr. W. A. Crawford (C) said duccrs are protected from the Philippines to meet its full quota Mr. W. A. Crawford (Cl said that he for one welcomed the slump In prices that must inev Ifor supply to :1KIJnlt*d Stales. 1hlt h( QU -tUoO Of WlUeh cateamendment and hoped th: t It ably result from this glut. But the The Philippines should send 974.. rv ,,„. ,ji kt rs vnv ,. ..„ ,„,,.,,. would be able to go furlhc. measures now bemg considered by 000 tons of sugar to the United c ,t ,n 5he tt." I, ,,'w ,. The claim of Mr. F. L Wal"'her big producers t. prevent a States this year, but will fall ,,,.,. lh( n Tk „'„,, h [h ,, cott that the proposal would inrecurrence of tin* situation in short of that amount by 200,000 clerk were among ih.ise oili, involve $150,000 was purely prohyears to come will affect the Biittons. for wh „ |n hpv f^ lematieal. No one kne how i^h Colonial produce,, when they In accordance with U.S. law, creases. It seemed strang.v IDMI many of those who came within enter the world market eventualthis deficit will lie shared among if.,, .suggestion eomiiu from tlie the scope of the Bill would take \y to sell their surplus suars for other major sugar-producing n.iOovernmenl Bench thut the mailer should I !" iitil aueh i> nl*--U Mottlev, y C C, : igtatratfl and the Hep-J Or. cumminN I I. i k | .il.ii %  iJlOU til-fixed RHEUMATISM were not necessarily two qualified i" hearty agreemcrt with the aolieitori i-eaolut-oiv ana asked that it be What, indeed, one might ask, paased. SS. Z„ !" r££i"X^ „ %  V. %  Vu. r ... ld Ujjt thai would justify lh.nccaulty ", "" %  'f" U S. U .K ".','" for two quahlkd solicitors? Why. fT" ""' d n ? 1 bc '.' no member of lhe House was sup-I !" "" '' "',"".. "'* ffiS U 2 posed lo aecepi the advice of the !"*;. '""' ""' ''V. k s '".' Ciarh lagally trained. He could not He felt earnestly and slnren.lv 'man !.< %  cliTks of the jzcnaral parBraWIS ami One aiaMloau that the Nolh „, ., ,„.„„„.,, ,;,,,. lu „ s ',,^|> l,a„„,. ; bMruj UN !t..„ legally LONDON. lional Bank of Cuba should Onba dicuased bv a OnmmlUM of the "aloeil. llie oild is having the worst once the surplus by supporting House before it came up for conigar this year that It has other banks which have Invested slderation This It Is beThe comment from Mr. L. A. Id having to Williams ILI that if than had Id been a scheme for reorganising and agonising} BACKACHE! CONE I advantage of it. The present total ' the'Commonwealth produc of their crops In thc United States, know and he thought that the record was greatly due to the character of the admlnistrotive nbility ers. protected by their agreement with Britain, arc not trlrcntened— yet. HIP. they would deal with tin other employees ol tin i;> u The %  UUMg for lhe oflleers ill Question he also mentioned, had been put somewhat on a basis with Police IfajMratai not that he oi ii moment that Lnvolvi d •'" if such as would necessitate a legal)> tratMd Mr. K. Q. Mapp (I.I felt Ui.it the mailer was a dorrMBStlC one.mil it did not cut a niea ihow ih %  should get there and wrangle over it He thought tin re gnoUM !' %  GIFTS For W drliiil v \lmlM -I s.n it Birthdays, thrislenlnis. etc. BIAMUNU RINtlK GOLD A -ll M K II \\ I I I I K\ See your Jewellers . 1. DeLIMA A MU %  ." %  20 BROAD ST. and at MARINK (iAKHKNH ago I began frl ll' ln my arms and shoulders. Th*n pains started in the small of inv back, Increasing; until they WITH really severe. I bought a bodle of KriuM-hnn ami was nurprlseught anotinr and bafore It was flniaoad all my pains had gone and from that day hava not appeared again. My paina WITS obstinate and the reliof r..llr surprised ma."—T.B. Rhaurnattr pains and bar kerbs ara oaaally the reeult of pot-nne ID the blood r-olnona which lasy bowels and lired kidneys am railing to expel. For these oomplalDta there la no Oner treatment than Krum Hen Kali.s. which cleanses all the internal ergans, atlmulates them lo nori anal hnslthy action and thus | restores freshness and vigour. All ChemUU and Btorsa sell KUM& /•eaornmended fa infant ted'">9 Kt.lM is IIICJI lor infjut feedinp-it'silwiiys POtS, Stft Ud unilotmlv itoutitbing. Kl IM up|.lic* thc impoftant (nod csscniJals needed for b.ihu-s in j-row •tiniii: uul hculihy. And KI IM ii iixlih (UgMtad— another im|xirt4iit Icature. 1 Ahovc all, Kl IM xsdcptmlablr. It's not surpiuV in^ ili.ii to iiuny Mothers prefer itl 1. KLIM is pure, safe mlNt 2. KLIM keeps without rsfrlqeratioa 3. KLIM quality is always uniform 4. KLIM is c icslk-nt for growing children 5. KLIM adds nourishmeat to cooked dishai KLIM IS SICOMMINDID FOU INFANT 'tlDINOI 7. KLIM It tof* in lhe sptclally-packad tin 8. KLIM is produced under strictest control %  • %  the additional work on the staff of the bank, that they would Ma 51 to remunerate the staff appropriately, and if possible, provide additional staff. They had lo bear that in mind He observed that it could 2.385.000 tons of free market sugar With producers competing fiercely to sell their stocks at alDMBI any price, little short of a miracle can avoid a serious slump In world prloaa. Cuba is in a more serious posiscarcely be said that he used t, 0 n than any other sugar nation. racial motives In any Issue, but it ^ tQt9 the war lhe c bjin crop ot was kept down to about 3,000.000 seemed to him that the clairr had been the officer in questi overlooked because i tlon was involved. He also compared the Officer's galaxy 'hen in charge of the Saving's Bank with that of a previous manager. Mr. C'i leceived more money when the work was not as much. In addition, he was in charge of the Labour Welfare Fund and they would notice that when r I..' increases came before for Heads of Departments, etc thc Corntons year liecause of varlou colour quesGovernment and other restrict! but during and since the war there has been a steady expansion In Cuban production, until this year's crop will reach some 8.000,000 tons, or one-fifth of the world total Cuba can find markets for about 0.000,000 of this, but will still be left with an unsaleable surplus of 2,000.000 tons. Various measures to support the price of thl; mittee decided not lo trouble his plus "without letting thc world salary, but to leave consideration pn ce sink so low that Cuba will of it for the Directors of the Bank. lu ffer a loss on Its other producOne could only hope that thc Dition are being considered in rectors would see that he got apHav ANOTHER SHINING EXAMPLE OF (JIEMICO There's always a clean hygienic fragram-e in every room where Ibis S-M-O-OT-H Paste cleanser is used. Pots. Pans andTilcs.SinkvandPaini"orl respond quickly to it* treatment there's not a scratch in a mountain of Chemtco.




ESTABLISHED 1895

General Mark Clark
Senior British Officer

Churchill Warns Britons
Against Fault Finding

(By W. LANDREY)
" LONDON, July 1.
PRIME MINISTER Churchill’s Conservatives defeated

a Labour censure motion against his:Government over the

Yalu bombings Tuesday night shortly after it announced

that a British Deputy will be appointed for General Mark

Clark. The vote on the Censure Motion was 300 to 270

against it.

Government defeated the mo-
tion in the Commons after a
sometimes heated debate during
which it was under attack from
both Moderate and Leftist wings
of the Labour Party. The Labour
motion which followers of Left-
wing leader Aneurin Bevan claim-
ed was too mild, criticises govern-
ment for not having obtained con-
sultation before last week’s Yalu
raids. It demanded that Britain
be consulted in future before
military moves that might have
political consequences. But it did
not criticise the raids themselves.

Prime Minister Winston Church-
ill warned, Britons of the danger
of finding fault with the United
States during its Presidential elec-
tion campaign. In the Commons
in a full-dress debate on Korea
he hotly defended American pol-
icy. and warned against undue
fault finding. He said “there might
easily come a time especially dur-
ing the Presidential election when
a very sharp reaction of emotion,
even of anger, might sweep large
sections of the Amercian people
and any candidate for Presidency
who gave full vent to it would
gain considerable advantage.

_ Churchill seemed piainly voic-
ing the anxiety of Britons and
Europeans generally that an iso-
jlationist policy might come out of
the election. He announced at the
outset of the debate that a senior
Bnitish officer would soon become!
@ deputy to Geygeral Mark Clark,

Supreme United Nations Com- entry, the 64-foot schooner Wan-
mander in the Far East, derer 1X, owned by Commander
: John C. Reed, RCN, which was

grate neat dened 45th across the finish line in the
‘of a deputy representing Bnitish| Newport—Bermuda race last
Commonwealth countries which
have fighting men in Korea and
Commonwealth members “greed
that the deputy shall be a Briton,
In the debate Labourites moved

a censure of Government because
it was not consulted before the
Yalu River power plant bombings.
Churchill defended both his gov-
ernment and the United States on
Korean policy. He said the befib-
ings were a military necessity and
disclosed, they were made at this
time because summer rains soon |
‘would interfere with Air Force)
operations, |

Beath Penalty
For Stealing

LONDON, July 1.

Belgrade court sentenced
four persons to death by
shooting for stealing $83,000
worth of copper wire from:
a state enterprise according
to the official Yugoslavia
agency “Tan”,

It said twelve other per-
sons implicated were sen-
tenced to terms of imprison-
ment from eighteen years to
twelve months. The group
stole 35 tons of copper wire
and sold it privately.—U.P.



6 Yachts Leave For
Berniida—Halifax |
Océan Race

BERMUDA, June 30
Six yachts will start from St.
David’s Head, Bermuda at 1.00
p.m, Bermuda daylight time to-
morrow to compete in the Ber-
muda—Halifax ocean race spon-
sored by the Royal Canadian
Nayal Sailing Association and

the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club.

There is only one Canadian



|





Other contestants are Ticonder-
oga, owner John Hurtz, Jnr,
Teragram, owner United States
Coast Guard Academy, Gulf
|Stream, owner M. E, Hemmer-
| dinger, Blue Sea, owner Dr. J. A.
McLean, Web Foot, owner Junius
Beebe,



; H.M.C.S, Portage will escort the

| yachts to Halifax. Three trophies

are up for the competition —C.P.
¢



Labourer Falls
Into Careenage

Coleridge Alleyne, a labourer of
be to General Mark Clark. He Eagle Hall, St. Michael, fell into
cannot send information to us. A the Careenage on Monday about
good man in whom General Mark.’ 10 p.m., while he was leaning over
Clark has trust and confidence will the lighter “Dajsy” which wag
be exceedingly useful to him be. | being unloaded.

cause General Mark Clark will be The crew of the “Daisy” fished
able to consult him about any-|} Alleyne out of the Careenage.
thing he is not quite sure of.” ‘The matter was reported to the

—U.P.' Bridge Police Station.

Lord Alexander winding up the
debate in the House of Lords out- !
lined his conception of what the}
Britjeh deputy will do on Clark’s!
staff. He said “his loyalties must |



|





Security Council Meets
Under Jebb’s Presidency

UNITED NATIONS, New York, July 1.

THE UNITED NATIONS Security Council with Brit-
ain’s Sir Gladwyn Jebb presiding, will meet today at 10.30
a.m. to consider United States demand for the International
Red Cross investigation of Communist germ warfare
charges.

Jebb succeeded to the presidency at midnight replacing
Russia’s Jacob A. Malik under whose chairmanship the
eleven-nation council was prevented for more than a week
from taking action on the United States demand.

Begins 2nd Term

With Malik out under the
monthly alphabetical rotation plan
the debate was expected to proceed
with the minimum of procedural
red tape but the conclusion appear-
ed inevitable: Russia will veto the
United States proposal,

Although Malik undoubtedly
will use all parliamentary advan-
tage he can gain to snarl the
debate, his effectiveness in filibus-
tering was c.ninished at least by
half when he relinquished the
chair. The council’s president has
power to cirect the debate, to take
the floor when he chooses and to
make rulings on procedural that
jean tie up proceedings indefinitely.

But the Russian remained one
of five council members with a
veto, a power no other nation—
except France on one occasion—
has ever used. United Nations
|rules require that all five mem-
bers of the council—Britain,
China, France, Russia and the
United States—-must be among a
voting in favour of any council
action. If one votes “no” on a sub-
stantjal issue the proposal is lost.

Russia has
49 times

used a veto power
in the past five years.
ites ambassador Ernest
A. Gross served the notion that he
would press at the start of to-day’s





meeting for consideration of his: }
demand for on the spot red cross!
nvestigation of the communist)



EATED in his residence in Dublin,
Bean T. O'Kelly poses with his pet
poodle. He be installed Wed-
nesday as Pre: nt of the R
ic of Ireland for his secon

nal 7-year term. (!.,°

charges United States troops have
uged germ weapons against North
Koreans and Red Chinese








—UP

i
'



—— Harbados

Conservatives Defeat La

Will Get
As Deputy

‘rom Ail Quarters:

‘Dead Man’
Alive After

Two Years

TORONTO: Two years after}
he had been presumed dead, his
life insurance paid and will sets
tled, an. Ontario game warden has
been found alive 2,000 miles away |

He disappeared;
1950 while boating at

from his home.
on June 9,
Echo Bay, Ontario, and was pre-j
sumed drowned when his empty
boat was found. He has told the
Mounted Police that he cannot
remember a thing before Sep-'
tember 19, 1950, when he “awoke”
in British Columbia,
WASHINGTON: Groucho Marx
complains that the trouble with
shopping nowadays is that every-,
one offers you your money back}
instead of your money’s worth.
CAPE TOWN: For two years a}
man practised playing the piano]
on a Silent wooden keyboard in
his cell at Pretoria Central Prison.
Now he has gained the highest
marks in South Africa in the
Association of Performers exam-
ination of Trinity College, Lon-
don. He completed the course,
which usually takes 7 years, in 13
months and gained honours in the
examination. He played on a real
piano for the first time only 13
months before the examination.

MADRID: A 40-year-old

in-



To Begin Se

WEDNES?!.AY; JULY

bé

ntence
1

2,

1952



U.N. Tell Koreans
Saving Deadlock
‘Egypt Still con munists

Without |
« New Govt. |

4 ALEXANDRIA, Egypt, July 1.
Unconfirmed reports said vet-
eran. independent statesman Sirry
Pasha has turned down his man
date to form a new government
and settle Egypt’s latest political

crisis,



THE UNITED
there is a “face saving” way
deadlock and Red propaganc
to work out the solution.

Major General William
tiator, spent twenty minutes
in carefully prepared expo
sides are actually very close



Two morning newspapers, The|*> !"8
English Language Egyptian Gaz- last week to allow the Reds
ette, and The French Language
Le Progres Egyptian said flatly
FILM PRODUCER Walter that Sirry had turned down the

Three Children
Burnt To Death
PORT-OF-SPAIN,

June 30,
Three children ages rang-

job of creating a government
Sirry who has been Premier
three times before was given the
mandate on Sunday by King
Farouk after Hilaby Pasha sud-
denly resigned,

Rumours were

setae
leaves a plane at Los Angeles af-
tex a flying visit to his e

e, Joan. Bennett, in Chicago.
He is to enter jail Wednesday to
serve a four-months sentence for

the shooting of Jennings Lang,
his wife's agent, last ber,



circulated that

Sirry decided to decline the job






Questioned about a reconciliation, ing between one and tive
Wanger said: “No comment. But J “{ter serious differences of opinion were burnt to death when
you can say there is always hope §(eveloped between two leading the House in which they
where there is understandisig.* members of his projected Cabinet, were sleeping caught fire.
. Farouk meantime askeq Hilaly The tragec occurred at
to carry on temporarily in view Icacos Village on the south-
of the confused situation, The ernmost point of Trinidad

| e 1ame of pase yee Barakat Pasha ae oe ‘ :
. was mentioned as the possible t the time of the inci
U.S. Air Force future Premier in the event Sir dent the parents of the
c< ’ definitely rejects the post. children were reported to be
Officials On Barrakt, also an independent, attending a nearby dance, It
is a former President of th is believed that a lighted
Chamber of Deputies. Hilaly re- lamp left by parents flared

igned as opposition mounted over up causing the fire.—(CP)

Korean Tour





dustrialist, mute for 20 years, re- his ane See * pie ont ih eiiaean
covered his speech after being ‘ handling Egypts dispute with " .
stabbed by one of his clients in his SEOUL, July, 1. sritain over the Suez Canal zone ji

office. He has asked i police to Top - ranking U.S. airforeejand Sudan. He had served foi I amous Italian
let his attacker off because he orficials toured airforce installa-|four months.--U.P, Ww ihiad Di

wants to give him a job for|tions in Korea touching off specus rile i “es

life. , lations that new and more dam+












Man Burnt To Death





LISBON: A farmer has discov-|@8ing air assaults are being made 2 e ; _ROME, July 1
ered a 13th-century chapel inside|ready against the communists,| AS Boiler Catches Fire ple , Pietro Silvio Rivetta, one
his barn near the town of Mon-|The delegation is headed by act- of Italy's most popular journalist
forte. While carrying out some]ing airforce Chief-of-Staff Gen- EOE ee e-SPAIN. duly us Writers and humourist who wrote
repairs, a piece of wall fell out,jeral Nathan F. Twining and Air ORT-OF-8P ah het tye, Pander the penhame of Toddi’ ¥
revealing the ancient stone be-| Under-Secretary Roswell L. Gil-| Ome man was burnt’ to death | died; aged 86 ‘ :
neath, patrick, Accompanying them were apd) wares Injured | dn. Monday ie uent ae ae laxyguagos

WASHINGTON : A rocking|six Major Generals from Pen- ifternoon when a boiler in which eee Soon and Chinese.
chair with built-in music box has tagon. they were working at the eee former aide at the pees
been patented in Washington. 1B.O.T. . Refinery caught - fire.| Mmbassy in Tokyo in 1010. Re-
“Doubly soothing” claims the in-| They conferred with the Eighth|Theedead ‘man is Joseph Bean-| turning to Italy he was cortéss
ventor.—L.E.S, Army commander General J. A.|mont, 23-year-old labourer of} POncent for the Japanese news-



Duclos Refuses

To Leave Prison |

PARIS, July 1.

French authorities temporarily}
yielded to the jailed Communist |
party leader Jaques Duclos’ re-|
fusal to be transferred to a priy-
ate clinic for medical treatment,
No reason for the backdown was
given although a spokesman
called it a “temporary decision”.

Previously authorities were re-
ported ready to use force if
necessary to move 56-year-old
Duclos who is suffering from a
diabetes ailment and_ kidney
complaint. A police ambulance
brought into Sante Prison this
morning to make the transfer,
rolled out of the gates empty
shortly after 11.00 a.m. 10.00
a.m, G.M.T,

Authorities were reported
ready to use force if necessary to
earry Duclos to the clinic, A
police ambulance was standing
by the inside prison yard where
reporters were not allowed.

Two of Duclos’ lawyers told
newsmen clustered around Sante
Prison main gates, “we were

witnesses during the night to the

clandestine attempt to remove
Jacques *. Duclos.” One _ said, |
“strong forces have been de-
ployed throughout the prison!
with ambulance and escort
vehicles,”

They condemned the transfer
because Court ordered medical |
examination is in progress and |
because the Judge. must hand}

down ruling today whether Du-|
clos will be given provisional
freedom”.

Shortly afterwards the lawyers
were admitted inside the prison to

confer with Duclos. Prison offi-
cials said it was the first time
they had been permitted to see

him since last night, It was be-
lieved that the transfer of Duclos
would not take place before noon.
Lawyers said. they would have
something further to say after





Van Fleet and _ Lieut.-General]/Point Forfin and the injured | Papers hea lee his dispatehes in
~ ‘ thei native lang w
Otto P. Weyland, Far East air-Jare Gabriel Dillon, Solomon Gar-|''"'' " b Heuagt
forces commander and» Lt.-Gen-|vin and Washington Bruce. The] At Naples he was instructor at
eral Glenn O. Barcus, 4th air-|condition of Dillon is reported to} the Oriental Institute Among his
force commander, They visited]be very serious. An eye witne I y works were grammar books
both U.S. and Australian air]}said the men, attempting to ¢ Japanese and Chinese, French
bases. cape, jumped out of the boile ritings On mathematics and art
r ir the flames, id Italian history UF,
The party declined to see the but into : 7 : Sats ,





press in Tokyo or Seoul. Public
information officers said the only
purpose of the visit was to “in-

U.N. Gommission Guaranteed

spect Far East airforce installa~ ~ ‘ ,

tions in Japan, Korea and Oki- f { f | Kk

tions In Jap " Safety In South Korea
Meanwhile the airforce dis- PUSAN, July 1

pot al fiktes” to escttebte ana THE SOUTH KOREAN GOVERNMENT assured mem

communists gunfire in June, The bers of the United Nations commission on Korea that it

Navy lost 26 and the Fifth air- will guarantee their personal safety from threat of assass-
force 15, ination.
The Fifth airforce saig F86 The guarantee was promised to Baron Gerald von

Sabrejets shot down 18 Russian
built MIG 15 jet fighters and
three propeller-driven Red figh*~
ers while suffering only one loss.

Ittersum of Holland, chairman of the seven nation com-
mission charged with rehabilitating Korea. Von Ittersum’s
assistant, David Ketel, received a warning yesterday from



Marine night fighters accounted an “undercover agent” warning the commission of a plot
for one more conventional Red to kill or harm members unless they left Korea
fighter Von Ittersum said the commission members were in-
wnt PB, clined to minimise the threat as an “exaggeration”.
-% le commission consists of rep-
resentatives from Holland, United
States, Britain, France, Nationalist

China, Australia and Pakistan, It
the first U.N. body to protest
martial law imposed by President
Syngman Rhee in May and to urge
the ‘free emblymen arrested in
his feud w National Assem-
Rhee ‘ to let people
for ; 1 of the



bly

vot





court
entenced assembly-
in Ho to death for kill
Korean army captain in a
gun duel two months ago. Suh, son
of Won Ryron, 23 was fined 25,000
for assaulting the captain
the shooting took place,
During his 15 day court martial
trial never answered
questions from either eight judge
pro claiming the trial
uncon tional and illegal
has been one of Khee's out-

oo

“a

bo
Suh

an
ing

before

Suh er once
ecutors

tit



speaking with him.—U.P.



North Korears
Surrender Boldly

PANMUNJOM, July 1. |

It was learned that two North
Korean soldiers boldly walked past
communist guards at this truce |
village and surrendered to United
Nations soldiers last Saturday. The
soldiers both non-commissioned









tanding critics. The courts
i only to revic

ver-

ubjeet ow by

—UP



Vive Barbados
Horses On List

From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 1,



HERE 1S A CLOSEUP of the painting of the Madonna and Child at the





ur Censure Motion

Hold Secret Session

NATIONS

was the first since the Allies called a three-day rect

Harrison noted the irmisé AFTER 1orary de-
j} document has 63 paragrapt I King Gus-
lA ement has been reached on 62 V1, of Swec leaves the
except for minor details, The one platform at Helsinki University
paragraph awaiting solution is No in Finland. The king carries his
61 covering the prisoner excha! doctor’s letter, a sword and wears
He said “it seems clear that if the the insignia and hat that go with
prisoner of war issue is settled) the degree. (International)
an armistice will result v ithout |
delay.” | ) ‘ ‘
However Harrison aid ed : F I {
have in our custody prisoners of | assive ig 1
he ee Teisauanion. et raat Vill C *
or oO re t ’ u
basi principles”. He was referrin | W ontinue
to the United Nations stand ec! |
voluntary repatriation ullowing | DURBAN, South Africa, July 1
prisoners to return to the commu-! Organizers of the civil disobedi-
nist side only if they want to go ‘ » campaign in South Africa

Regina Pacis Votive Shrine, Brooklyn, N. Y., from which a thief stole
two jeweled tiaras (inset), valued at $100,000. The circled area shows





Five Barbados bred horses are
on the list of 27 nominated for the







x : 1952 running of the Preede
officers became prisoners’ of war| Where a rosette on the protective grillwork bad been sewee away to Cts tatis for tartca ants deetae at
by walking down the road within circumvent the burglar alarm. Lines leading tr Dm the circle point > he Trinidad Turf Club’s office on
20 yards of the truce conference the supports on which the gern~studded tiaras rested. (International) |Monday. The wre Hon. J. D
tent. | eaeermmi—me — a “" Chandler's Driftwood, Mr. J. D

The two were not members of) 4 e ee rd AY ple San on i
the Chinese and North Korean! Hh > M VY O B ll } Sul Jet, all
security guards at Panmunjom. lt ouse a . se t r Jetsam, and
was the first such surrender in the Mr Contralto and
tiny village where communist and PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 30 Jout consulting the Executive | Mr idler’s Stirling
allied negotiators have talked The report of the Commission |Council and it is believed even if| Flust j v Trinidtd horse
peace since October 25, of Enquiry into the transaction of |the Executive favour paying re nominated

Their selection of Panmunjom as|the Port-of-Spain City Council [about $60,000 to meet the Cor f bo II I Rose
the place to surrender could not} will be published as soon as Gov-~ |Missiouers’ bill, the ep ture Faerie Queen, four of

ive been more embarrassing tojernor Rance returns from the | will oppose it. ! I I
communist negotiato The pair|United Kingdom. The report has The Commissioner nN ‘
ambled through t village, then} 4 ised colony-wide interest. |} under the Comn ion of | 5 ur n j
broke into a sprint about 500 yards nwhile payment of Commis-|Ordinance are not entitled + B Br t on last
from the United Natior itary r r the attention | muneration beyond the £ f e which

ce check point. They € a Gov pense incurred ir hol I D he first
crude white surrender fi 0" inderstood, |enquiry ur A
—UP, -'the Legislative ¢ CP,

PRICE : FIVE CENTS







Custav Honored

Re, par

































Of Face
Easing
Agree ‘To




PANMUNJOM, July 1.
told the Communists that
out of the prisoner exechans
lists suggested a secret session



iy
K. Harrison, chief Allied nego- iy
of to-day’s 29 minute meeting ‘s
sition, pointing out that both
to agreement. To-day’s t

to think over their position





|





The “face saving” part of ey t racial discriminatory :ules
United Nations final offer of April) said last night their strategy will
28 provided that prisoners! who do} culminating
not wish to return to Communis!

onsist of three phase







nm mas action, They emphasized
be reclassified, ‘ hat their protest campaign.
U.P against the “unjust laws” would
he one of passive non violent
% + resistance,

it oO Di I tats ; i
oreign Iplomlats OMcials of the South African
* ‘ ‘ Indias Congress and African
Attend Session Of | National Congress said phase one
called for selected volunteers to

mtion
jase twio called

in big centres.
for more volun-

=. Korean Assembly |;

teers and centres of action, ase

PUSAN, July, 1. res oor be a climax Minat

One hundred armed police aM; uld ‘be nationwide mageed Mike
lounged unobtrusively in a com- pass

pound in the South Korean As-1" ‘roy said phase one has not yet

sembly when foreign | diplomat been completed, Only two big cen-

to-day , attended a five minute tres have been affected, the? Wit-

discussion #f a special session-|./otersiand and Port Elizabeth, All

President Syngman Rhee had volunteers are being trained in

nethods of non-violence,
declared he cannot wait ,any =

longer for the dissolution of the
assembly now torn
pro-Rhee and anti-Rhee forces

and must find a method of doing
thi

—UP.



between

Acheson Leaves

He is also demanding thet Y s
the President in future be elected hor Brazil
by 20pular vote and not ap
phate” by the assembly : é VIENNA, July, 1.
present United States Secretary of
State Acheson took off from Tulin
The five-minute opening cei Airbase at 9.30 a.m. for Brazil
mony was held without incident, Jafter a two-day conference with
Police turned back unauthorised |tep Austrian government officials.
people trying to enter the a Acheson was seen off by the
sembly compound, Supporters of [Austrian Foreign Minister K.
President Rhee yesterday had|Gruber and United States am-
threatened to invade the assem-|bassador Walter J, Donnelly and
bly and oust Parliament by force other top Austrian and United
unless the President proclaimed |States officials at the airport.
i general election No incident was reported by
The assembly is due to Austrian police officials in charge
@ On Page & f Acheson's security.—U.P.





Â¥

They're

y

aa

everything
I look for”

“Bat seldom find, except in
du Maurier, I suppose you
mean, But what exactly do
you look for in a cigarette?”















2

“Flavour—which cax
only come from tobacco
that is rather special.
Then, of course, perfect
smmoothness—which means
a comfortable throat,”

“Coolness too? Well, that’s
seen to by the da Maurier filter
tip. And no bits of loose tobacco
in the mouth—filter tip again.”




“ Yes—all that. D' you know, this
du Maurier filter tip is just about
the finest idea for improving a
smoke that I've ever come across."

Smoke to your throat's content

du MAURIER

THE EXCLUSIVE FILTER TIP CIGARETTE

SOLE






$1.04 f
MADE IN ENGLAND

DISTRIBUTOR: WIL! > » BRIDGETOWN

D







Perey


PAGE TWO



Caub Calling

AJOR ar
who ¢

Mr
ver

Vinter

1e United King
t .

}

R

to

Goldsn
Barbado

month

1d



Sunday
De Grasse.

On Long Leave
L dom

EAVING for the United Ku
Grasse on

Sunday
long leave
Lionel Birkett of
He was accompanied
and son Harold.

Mr. Birkett who is General
Manager of the Dawsons Estate
in B.G..was here with his family
for sometime staying in Belle-
ville. ae

For One Month
M* J. C. MORAY, an Ameii-

can who travelled out from
Morocco to Curacao on an Italian
ship, arrived here on Sunday pb;
the S.S. De Grasse for a month's
holiday and is staying at Cacra
bank Hotel.

For the past thirteen months
Mr. Moray has been supervising
construction work in Moroce
where the Americans are erect-
ing five of the largest air bases in
the world with runways two mi
in length. Prior to that, he was en-

€ French

on by the

was

by his wif

gaged in construction work. wv
Venezuela for three years from
1948-1951.

He said that his company hac
the distinction of erecting Kare:
Edificio, g seventeen-storey build
ing, the tallest in Caracas in ad
dition to El Conde, the largest
and most deluxe hotel in Caraca

During the last war up to 1944
Mr. Moray supervised construc
tion work at the U.S. air bases in
Trinidad, British Guiana and
Dutch Guiana. He was afterward
sent out to the Pacific area on
similar mission

He said that he was last in
Barbados in 1949 when he came
over fron Caracas in the interest
of his health and added that he
hed greatly benefited from hi:
visit

Fiftieth Wedding

Anniversary
CONGRATULATIONS to Mr.
and Mrs. A. E, Foster of

White Hill, St. Andrew, who will
be celebrating their fiftieth wed-
ding anniversary to-day.

Their children Arrindell, Kath-
leen, Ivy and Evelyn who are
residing in the U.SA, and Ruby
Perkins of Speightstown, join in
wishing them a happy golden
anniversary,

On Honeymoon
RRIVING on Sunday py
B.W.LA, from Trinidad to
spend their honeymoon were Mr.
and Mrs, Lawrence Johnson who
were married in Trinidad on Sat-
urday at Christ Church, Cascade.

Mr, Jchnson, a Barbadian, is
the son of Mrs. D. L. Johnson,
of “Three Arches”, Navy Gardens,
and the late Mr. Don. Johnson.
He is now working as an engineer
at one of the sugar estates in
British Guiana. His wife is the
former Miss Kathleen Middleton,
daughter of Mrs. D. M. S. Mid~
dleton, of Nottingham, England.

Mr, and Mrs, Johnson are stay-
ing at the Crane.

Married in Trinidad

R. AND MRS. Glenn Tucker

who were married on Sat-
urday at St. Patrick’s Church in
Trinidad, arrived here the fol-
lowing day by B.W.1LA, on their
honeymoon and are staying at
“West-We-Go", St. James.

Mr. Tucker is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Alvin Tucker and his
bride the former Miss Sheelagh
Knox, is the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Wilfred Knox of Aranguez
Estate, San Juan.

Spent Holiday



De
Mr.
British Guiar

MR. & MRS.

Registrar on Holiday



D* KEN STUART,
M.R.C.P., who has beer
rently appointed Registrar at
Hospital of the University College
of the West Indies, Jamaica,
rived in the Colony over the
week-end and is spending a short
holiday with his parents Mr. and
Mrs E. A. Stuart of “Brough
derg”, Black Rock

DR. KE NETH STUART
Dr... ®.ualt an id Har
risonian anu a iormer Barbado
scholar.
Medico at 1.L.L.
Dp" J, W. wwUnWUCH who ha
been residing im Trinidad
for the pa year as As ant



Medical Office:
holds Ltd., Point-a-Pigrre, is now
in Barbados for two weeks’ holi-
day. He arrived over the week-
end by B.W.LA. accompanied by
his wife and is staying at Cacra-
bank Hotel.

Originally from England, Dr.
Murdoch was House Physician at
Brighton General Hospital.

Passed Medicai Exam.

EWS has been received that

Miss Lorna Browne, daughter
of Dr. and Mrs. J. A. Browne, of
“Ashmount”, Pine Road, has
passed her second professional
examination at the University of
Edinburgh.

Miss Browne is. a
medical student and thi
tion takes place at
the’ third. year

On Inspection Tour
M®*. H. L. N. ASCOUGH, Divis-

ol irinidad Lease-

third year
examina-
the end of

! ional Manager of Messrs,
Cable & Wireless (West Indies)
Limited, left the island yesterday




evening by B.W.I.A, for St, Lucia

R. AND MRS. Harold Has~ where he will conduct a four-day

kell and their three chile inspection tour of the Branch

dren returned to Trinidad over Office in that cobony. He was ac-

the week-end by B.W.I.A. after companied by Mr, C. J. Lawson,
spending a holiday here. Area Engineer

er











JOUN PAVILUK

Married at St. Leonard’s
oS St. Leonard’s Chureh on
Saturday evening, Miss Jean

Edghill, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
H. E. Bruce Edghill of “Hamil-
ton", Strathclyde, was married
to Mr. John Paviluk, son of Mr.
and Mrs. F. Paviluk of New
York City.

The bride who was given in
marriage by her brother-in-law,
Mr. L. Briggs Collins, was at-
tended by Mrs. Jack Knight as

matron-of-honour.

The ceremony which was fully
choral with Mr, Samuel Burke at
the organ, was conducted by Rev.

D. Woode. The duties of bestman
vere performed by the bride-
groom’s brother, Mr Donald

Edghill, while those of ushers fell





to Mr. Ian Niblock and Mr. Alis-
tair Edghill.

\ reception was held at the
revidence of Mr. and Mrs. L. B.
Collins, “Rothesay”, Strathclyde,
after which the couple left for
Sam Lord’s Castle and a few
days later by B.W.LA. for the

Carib Hilton Hotel in Puerto Rico
on their honeymoon,

Mr. Paviluk is an engineer
working with Tidewater Asso-
ciated Oil Co, of New York. From
Puerto Rico, his wife will be re-
turning to Barbados after a week,
while he will be going on to
Mexico and Cuba on business in

the interest of his firm before

joining his wife here in about
six weeks’ time
Mr. and Mrs. Paviluk are go-
x to reside in New York

Spent Ten Weeks

M's: H. W. W. REECE, who

was holidaying here for the
pest ten weeks, left for England
on Sunday by the 8.8. De Grasse
where she will be joined later by
her husband who is with the
Kuwait Oil Co.

Mrs, Reece was accompanied by
her two daughters, Susan and
Wendy. Her husband is still here
staying with his father (Mr. W. W.
Reece) Q.C., Solicitor General, at
Barbarees Hill.

Sargeant’s Village
Playing Field
FPRHE Sargeant’s Village Play-
ing field and Community Hall

will be officially opened at 5
o’elock on Friday afternoon.
His Excellency the Governor

and Lady Savage have kindly
consented to attend,

The Playing field and Hal! are
receiving the finishing touches
ind with good weather it is ex-
pected that there will be a large
number of visitors

The Committee are anxious to
make this opening function a
success and will be glad to wel-
come members of the public.

Talking Point

Nothing in life is to be feared,

It is only to be understood.—
—Marie ste
1



THE NEW LOW PRICES

FINE QUALITY

BLACK & WHITE PRINTS 36”

KHAKI 28”

BLUE DENIM 28”

WHITE CAMBRIC 36”

T R EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220



and byways of the
ZEPHYR or CONSUL
holiday whim—licensec
tankful of gas, ready t
arrive in London!

And a Holiday-on-Whee

YOUR SHOE STORES

TED eee

eae

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o go the moment

you

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DIAL 4606

shave a

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

EVEN the much maligned path
of true love can be made to run
smooth and -straight as a main
arterial road—provided (if you
will excuse the mixed metaphor)
you watch out for molehills on
the way. And the marriage mol
hill that fonceals the seeds
Mount Everest and every peak
the Andes is—MONEY.

The surest way to guard ma
riage against possible shibwively
on the financial rocks is to ge
his vexed question of money into

its proper place and keep it ther€ero0m. One well-placed picture or

And that place is out in the open,

It is easy in the rosy days while
you are planning your future and
budgeting for the furniture to
talk money matters over together
quite naturally and honestly. Cul-
tivate the habit and you will find
it pays tremendous dividends
later on—in mutual understand-
ing, trust and smooth running of
your lives.

In certain ultra-reminist circles
it has been suggested that eve:
wife should be entitled to a fixed
percentage of her husband's in¢
come, but marriages put on a kind
of salary and commission basis
would not work in practise. Hus-
bands do not fit neatly inte, in=
come groups. Some have elderly
parents to support. Others ha
professional training to comapleu
jobs jinvolving heavy entertain~
ing, big insurances or mortgages
on property, It is neither possible
nor at all desirable to generalise
on the fair division of the family
income between husband and
wife. This is something only the
two can work out between them-
selves. Having done it, they can
both feel satisfied that the money
at their disposal is fairly shared—
and that the subject remai
permanently open for discussion.

To avoid confusion, decide at
the outset which of the household
expenses are to come out of the
housekeeping allowance ana
which are to be paid by the hus-
band. A workable and practical
plan is for him to be responsible
for the larger accounts. Under
this heading come rent, rates, in-
surance premiums, gas and elec-
tricity, telephone, hire or hire-
purchase payments on domestic

equipment (cooker, gas fires, re- ably square—these fit close to-

frigerator, radio and so on)—plus
general savings and money put
aside for holidays and amuse-
ments, This leaves the wife re.
sponsibie for food, launary, ¢ ean-
ing materials, shoe repairs, and
dry ‘cleaning, window-cleaning,
news papers and magazines re-
placements of linen, china and
glass and domestic help, if any.

Make a point or agreeing on a

fixed sum, however small, as a
dress and personal allowance,
apart from the housekeeping

money. To have to rely on saving
what you can out of the house-
keeping, or asking your husband
for money when you need to buy
something, makes it impossible to
plan your wardrobe either eco-
nomically or intelligently. Be-
sides, it is soul-destroying to
have to ask him for money to buy
his birthday present, for instance!

Concerning the furnishing and

equipping of a new home, mosh

of us these days set up house on
the proverbial shoe string. So it
is wisest to decide not to attempt
too much at once. Nobody expects
a modern bride to embark on
married life with a dozen of
everything like the Victorians, or
even to start entertaining on an
ambitious scale,

The idea is to concentrate on
the essentials and add the trim-
mings later. It is more fun this
way and eventually you get what
you REALLY want, instead of a
lot of things you imagined you
liked. Whatever other rooms there
may be in your house or flat, for-
get about them for the time being,
until you have a living room,
bedroom and kitchen furnished
for the comfort and convenience
of the two of you.

It pays to buy, really good qual-
ity beds and upholstered furni-
ture, such as armchairs or sofas.
These items are long-term in-
vestments which should not wear
out for years. Comfort is of the
utmost importance so do not re-
gret spending most of your furn-
ishing budget on a bed and two
arm-chairs—even if you have to
paint white wood furniture for
the dining-room or go without
c ts!

ou can get along quite happily
with only six of everything for
the table, from cutlery to china
and glass—and still be able to en-
tertain twe people at a_ time.
What is far more important is to
vacuum-cleaner and
enough saucepans, tea cloths and
bed-linen—and also to make the
best of the space at your disposal.

One can create nearly as many

optical illusions with decorative kitchen — meanwhile _
schemes as with dress notions! A menu for dinner and listing shop-
small room can be made to look ping to be done. Wash wu :
bigger and more spacious with fast dishes, turn on bath. (Exit
walls of a very pale colour. Best husband).

of all is cream—for walls and

ceiling. A plain ciose-fitted carpet slowly make bed, dust and tidy



SAAR

please enquire further trom Charles MeEnearney & Co. Ltd.

a



- of the narrow walls is in a strong-



a

Smoothing The Path...

also in a pale colour will help to
increase the apparent size of the
floor space. Choose furniture
carefully: low prices; not large,
either in actual size or in appear-
ance. Light modern woods or
Small pieces of old furniture both
fit happily into the small room.

nything heavy is out of place.

he same applies to fabrics. Large
patterns are taboo. Plain mate-
rials, vertical stripes, or very tiny
flower posies are best. Avoid any-
thing that clutters up the small

bedroom, afterwards wash smalls,
do bathroom.

That, as you can see, is only a
lick and promise treatment. Each
room will have to be turned out
once a week, either in the eve-
ning or at the week-end—and
there is also all the ironing and
cooking to do sometime. Most of
your shopping can be done in the
unch hour or on the way to the
office. If possible, prepare the
vegetables in the morning and
leave them either in soak or in
the fridge—a great benefit when
coming in tired and having to
start cooking. It is a good plan to
go in for casserole cooking, hav-
ing one or two cooking sessions a
week. In this way, three or four
meals can be prepared at the same
time. Keep a pot of soup always
on the stove ready to be brought
to the boil, A pressure cooker will
save precious time. So will the
ready prepared quick-frozen
fruits and vegetables. Two habits
to avoid are cooking with a tin
opener constantly in the hand or
shopping only at the delicatessen!
Any world’s worker arriving home
dead tired should make herself a
pot éf tea and sit down with her
feet up and really rest for ten
minutes. Then she will we ready
to start cooking almost with en-
thusiasm.

It is best to see it the budget
will stretch to having a woman in

a little group of those enchanting
old miniatures is quite enough.
And have one really big vase of
tall flowers, rather than several
smaller ones.

A too high room can be made
tc look lower by giving it a ceil-
ing several shades darker than
the walls. The long, narrow room
looks better proportioned if one

ly contrasting colour. For a room
this shape, consider having three
white walls and one narrow one
in navy blue. Fascinating with
curtains and chair covers of pale
primrose with a very small white
attern! The long, thin room also
ds itself to dividing cleverly
into two spetions, - for ee
the other for eating.
oo oat find one of those double-
sided dressers, use one side as a
e-board and the other for
ooks and ornaments and have
your dining chairs upholstered
with the same fabric as the arm-
chairs at the other end of the
room, so that you don’t create the
feeling that the two sections are
entirely separat*

A low dresser or cupboard
with shelves at the back also
looks very attractive in the dining
or breakfast alcove of a kitchen.
However clever your ideas, don’t
be carried away and forget that
the kitchen is, first and foremost,
a workshop, requiring efficient
equipment if cooking is to be a
pleasure and not a penance!

These really are ‘musts’
should go, hopefully, on
wedding present list:

SAUCEPANS— minimum four,
from half-pint size to one big
enough for a stock pot. Prefer-

turn out all the rooms and only

done.

The weekly wash can be done
for you without undue extrava-
gence if you are fortunate
to have one of those self-service
automatic laundries near.

Those of you who are going to
make marriage your life’s work
won't need to budget your time
and energy quite so rigidly as
the ‘two job’ wives, But this is no
reason for letting the housework
drag on all day. By keeping to
the plan suggested for the office
wife—though starting it at a
more civiliseq hour, a young wife
ean be free by lunchtime that is,
before she has any children.

This newly found leisure should
be used to enrich the personality
and broaden the interests. It is
easy—fatally easy—to slip into
the habit of going to the pictures
or out to tea with another young
wife every free afternoon. If you
do not intend to become a ‘domes-
tic cabbage’ have the determina-
tion to strike out on your own,
to maintain old interests, develop
new ones, and keep abreast of
what is going on in the world. It
is infinitely rewarding to get
books on a pet subject from the
public library and really study it.
One thing leads to another and if
you take interest in some outside
subject, interesting people and

and
your

gether and you can cook two on
one burner.

ONE DOUBLE BOILER— the
friend and ally of all new cooks.
With one of these you need never
know the horrors of sauces, cys-
tards and milk puddings that
burn—and the potatoes will boil
in the lower half!

A FAMILY OF CASSEROLES
—six individual sizes, a couple of
round pudding shapes, a pie dish
one—and as many more as kind
friends will provide. They look
pretty on the table too.

HEAT RESISTING TRAYS—

one big enough for supper for events gather around you.

two by the fire: one for your Life runs more smoothly when
afternoon tea; small one for odd the two partners have some en-
drinks. lightening thing to say to one an-

A GOOD ELECTRIC IRON—
and ironing board.

A REALLY PRACTICAL
COOKING BOOK—the kind that
tells you how to make a white
sauce and assumes that you know
absolutely nothing.

While we are in the kitchen,
let us consider your store cup-
board. Tinned meats are, ‘ of
course, invaluable if you have to
entertain at short notice but they
are expensive and becoming in

other at the end of the day.

Listening Hours

WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1962
4.00 — 7.15 pom, .......... 19.76 M 25.53 M

4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 pgn. The
Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. New Road,
5,00 p.m. Lawn Tennis, 5.15 p.m, Listen-
ers’ Choice, 5.45 p.m. The Hymns We
Sing, 6.00 p.m. Scottish Magazine, 6.15
p.m. My Kind of Music, 6.45 p.m. Sports







s iy nned ork and found-up and Programme Farade, 7.00
ea ce - sand buys B. m ee News, 7.10 pm. Home News
: * From Britain
Bottled and tinned fruit can 7.15 — 10.30 p.m.

25.53 M 31.32 M







i into a pie.
speedily be turned int P 7.15 p.m, Calling the West
7.45 p.m, By Request, 615 p.m. Radic
Newsreel, 8.20 p.m. Statement of Ac-
count, 8.45 p.m. Interludé¢, 8.55 p.m
From The Editorials, 9.00 p.m. Ring Up
The Curtain, 9.45 p.m Lawn Tennis,
10.00 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. News
Talk, 10,15 p.m. Mid-Week Talk, 10 %
p.m. From The Third Programme

You may be wondering whether
you can combine your new domes-
tic responsibilities with an cut-
side job. The financial side of the
matter is, obviously one which
only you anq your husband can
decide. You will have to balance
your earnings (less income tax)
against the expenses involved.
Remember to count fares to and
from the office, lunches, possibly
some domestic help at home, and
quite a bit more for clothes, hair
and make-up.

If you decide to try it, you will
have to organise and budget your
time as carefully as your finances.
Worst of all, you will have to get
up earlier! That really is the only
hope if you are going to reach
the office on time knowing that
you have left the flat tidy enough
for your husband to bring home
the boss. One well planned hour
of domesticity should be enough
in a small flat.

Here is the programme: |

(1) Out of bed leaving it and
the room to air while your hus-
band is busy in the bathroom and
you dust the sitting-room and run
the vacuum over the carpet
meanwhile the coffee percolates.

(2) Prepare and serve break-
fast for two—if' possible in the
planning



Y

Garden—St. James
TO-DAY 8.30 P.M
Whole (New) Serial
“LOST CITY of the JUNGLE”
Russell HAYDEN & Key

THUBS. (Only) 8.20 P
“MISSISSIPPI GAMBLER”
Kent TAYLOR &
“BLONDE ALIBI”
Martha O'DRISCOLL
PRI. & SAT, 8.30 P.M.
“FRIGHTENED CITY" &
“GIRL OF THE YEAR”

Hello Everybody! The Spree Boys
on the Run Again

A GRAND DANCE

will be given "e
LOUIS & i u

Messrs. TH
WALROND
(Shopkeeper of Tudor Bride)
& DONALD PARRIS
At_ CHILDREN’S GOODWILL
LEAGUE, Constitution Road

TO-NIGHT

ADMISSION .
Muste by .Perey Green's Orchestra
Refreshments on Sale Please
invite your friends

break.



(3) While your, bath runs





three or four hours a week to i

leave the daily maintenance to be |}



or Telephone Main Office 4493

o
“,

WEDNESDAY, 1952

ATRES

JULY







OISTD

(Dial 8404)

Last ? Shows
TODAY 445 & 8.29 p.m




RBAREE
(Dial 5170)
LAST = SHOWS
Today




(Dial 2310)
& TOMORROW
1% & 8.30 pm





145 & 8 om
































































Warner's New Picture Whole Serial
The story of the Hite of

PRETTY BABY Christ SEA HOUND

EDehnis MORGAN & PRINCE OF PEACE){ Larry
ena DRAKE (Cotor) “Buster” CRABBE
also oe
———_—_—_—X——S~—~—) | OOO
Special Added Attraction) THURS. Special 1.20 Thurs, (only) 4.45 & 8.3




Errol, FLYNN in
“pDODG . “RED DESERT
: ae Don BARRY &

FRONTIER

JOHNNY ALLEGRO
. George RAFT
—and—
DESPERADOES

Randolph SCOTT

VENGE"
ue &
JOHN




Lash La
Fuzzy St.

























WESTERN RENEGADES || Manis Tspeclal) SAT PRI. to SUN
Johnny MACK BROWN Zane Gres" $e @ SP pm.
Loo movvtaw|| DODGE CITY
230 — 445 & 6.30 p.m. ‘aa a HOLT & Errol FLYNN
“VLE SEB ¥OU IN PGLON of Ann SHERIDAN
>. MY_ DREAMS



the LAWLESS" |] Olivia i ALE
Wy





ROXY

TO-DAY & TOMORROW 14.50 & 8.159

Margaret LANDSAY

Ralph BELLAMY
in

MEET THE WILD CAT
and



TO-DAY & TOMORROW 1.45 & 8.20
Paramount Presents
Bob HOPE — Hedy LAMARR
in
MY FAVORITE SPY

Extra:—FAIRWAY CHAMPIONS
















Every Golf Player should see this MELODY LANE
oot and Latest British Paramount Starring
ews. Leon EBRROL The Merry MAC










OLYMPIC

MTODAY & TOMORROW

Robert PRESTON

John BARRYMORE, jr
in

THE SUNDOWNERS
and
SWORD OF THE AVENGER

FRIDAY (Only) 4.36 & 8.15

Teresa WRIGHT — Lew AYRES
in

THE CAPTURE

and
STATION WEST

ROYAL

TODAY & TOMOKROW 1.30 & 8.30
HUNT THE MAN DOWN

4.30 & 815


















Opening FREDAY 4th 430 & 8.15
Dane CLARK Ben JOHNSON
in













PORT DEFIANCE Starring
ane Gig YOUNG — Cleo MOORE
THE TORCH an
Starring ‘ DANGEROUS PROFESSION
Paulette GODDARD Starring




George RAFT —

DAY THOMAS

All the Pleasures of the SCREEN

Songs, Comedy, Dancing, Drama

—They’re all here and Wondrous-

ly in WARNER BROS’ Ever-So-
Gay Story

Pili SEE
YOu IN MY
DREAMS

PLAZ

FRIDAY 2.305, 445 & 8.30 p.m.
And Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30
p.m.

B'TOWN
DIAL 2310

GLOBE
TO-DAY AND TO-MORROW 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
A Double Made To Order - - - -

ANTC

\ ?
1 one 5



1 UU h LON,

Olea ASed Dw ete anvil
is ae uns
| ee sg ORY - NiGH
, Dir. by EOWIN L. MARIN

Prod.by WAT HOLT

A Nat Holt Production §
S Released by 201% Centery fos TF

OPENING FRIDAY 5 & 8.30 P.M.
Billy ECKSTINE — Esther WILLIAMS

IN
SKIRTS AHOY

LOF

sin FE cot |

‘Worttes sad Deested by Bator sie Protaaee
DELMER DAVES - HARMON JONES










SAT. 1.30 P.M. MATINEE
“ORCHESTRA WIVES”
(Glen Miller Orch.)

and
“CALL NORTHSIDE 777”
James STEWART

SAT, MIDNIGHT
“ANCHORS AWEIGH”
Frank SINATRA

“HIGH BARBAREE”
Van JOHNSON








EE EE EE EEE ee

WEDNESDAY, JULY 2,



CARIBBEAN DEVELOPMENT CO.HOME OF

1952

“CARIB” BEER

W.L. INVESTMENT IN -
SUCCESSFUL PROJECT

‘Ta Caribbean Development Company, Ltd. of Trinidad
is an excellent example of how a local company, with
the enthusiastie support of local investors can successfully

establish modern industrial

concerns.

Late in 1949 the Company completed a glass plant at
Champs Fleurs. The next project, at the same site, was a
modern brewery capable of supplying a first-class lager
beer sufficient, not only for the entire consumption of
Trinidad, but also to export.

Capital cost of this new project together with steam
plant and auxiliary equipment, has been nearly $2,000,000
a very large proportion of which was subscribed by Trini-

dad investors.

So efficient is this plant, that it enables the company
to market beer at a price below that of the imported pro-

duet.

The malt used in the manufacturing process comes

from Denmark and is of the same quality as that used in
the famous Tuborg and Carlsburg lagers from Copenhagen.
No finer quality, and no more costly malt can be obtained

anywhere today.
Right Type Water

The hops used are imported
partly from Czechoslovakia and
partly from Bavaria. To produce
the cleanness and character of
Carib Lager a blend of Soaz and
Hallertau varieties is used by Mr.
Ole Humle, head Brewer, who
spent many years at Carlsburg
Breweries before joining the
Caribbean Development Co., Ltd.
A certain amount of local sugar is
incorporated in the brews. Only
other raw mgterial required is
water.

The importanee of water in
brewing has caused considerable
discussion among laymen. While
it is correct to say that different
types of beer demand different
types of water, modern technology
enables the quality of water to be
adjusted to give the properties re-
quired for any type of brew.

Fortunately however, the well-
water at Champs Fleurs is almost
ideally suited for producing a high
quality Pilsner type of beer with-
out the addition of chemicals of
any kind.

The malt is transferred from
large steel silos holding 50 tons
each where it is stored into the
brewery by pneumatic elevators
which keep the malt clean. The
malt is allowed to fall by gravity
into the cleaning drum where all
husks and foreign matters are re-
moved. It then falls on to an au-
tomatic machine which records

the exact quantity that falls imio
the mill situated below the weigh-
ing machine.

Skill Needed

In the mill the malt is crushed
to produce “grist” whieh looks
somewhat like whole-meal flour.
The brewer adjusts the various
rolls on the mill to give the maxi-
mum extractions of materials de-
sired. A great deal of skill is
needed at this stage of the pro-
cess as overcrushing the malt
leads to difficulties in the subse-
quent operations and deteriora-
tion in the taste of the finished
product.

From the mill the grist falls
into two steel, containers. When
the brewer is ready to brew, the
grist is mixed with water in a
large 80-barrel copper tun, and
the temperature is raised in steps
over a period of between two and
three hours. In the “mashtun”
the important constituents are ex-
tracted from the malt and remain
dissolved in the water. In order
to separate the water solution
from the spent grain, the entire
contents of the mashtun are
pumped into another vessel, the
“lautertun” which is like an enor-
mous colander. The flat bottom
of this vessel is perforated with
thousands of narrow holes and,

when the spent grain and liquor
are pumped into this tank, rotat-
ing paddles distribute the grains

ver the floor of
“Wort Kettle”

The liquor then drains through
the bed of grains and through a
series of pipes below the floor of
the Jautertun. The clear hot liquor
is run into another large copper
vessel, the “wort kettle” in
which it is boiled. Sugar and hops
are added, a certain amount of
protein matter is precipitated, and
the liquor is concentrated.

When the boiling is finished, the
kettle contains what is now called
wort, spent hops and a brown
precipitate. The hot sterile wort
is run through a smaller colander
a “hop-back” which retains the
spent hops and allows the wort
and sludge to pass on, ,

The wort is then cooled to a
low temperature through a special
plate type cooler. Because the
wort is liable to infection at low
temperatures the entire cooling
system is made from stainless
steel. The cold wort is ‘run into
a depositing vessel where its
volume and gravity are checked
for excise purposes. It is then
pumped into stainless steel fer-
menting tanks where yeast is
added.

The yeast starts life as a “test
tube baby” and is imported from
famous laboratories in Copenhagen
where an enormous amount of re-
search on yeast culture is carried
out. The yeast is inoculated into
small stainless steel tanks full of
sterile wort and is allowed to
grow until the propagating tank
is full of yeast cells. ’

It is this*mixture of yeast and
wort which is pumped into the
cooled wort as it enters the fer-
menting tank. As soon as the
yeast propagator is emptied a new
test tube baby is encouraged to
grow. In two or three weeks time
it. will be ready for adding to a
new brew. Instead of multiply-
ing as rapidly as it would do in
the presence of air, the yeast tends
to live off the sugars in the wort
extracted from the malt and con-
verts them into carbon dioxide gas
and alcohol,

Lager to Store

It takes the yeast about ten days
to convert all the fermentable ma-
teria) into alcohol in the ferment-
ing vesseis. The fermented beer
is then pumped into the storage
vessels. The yeast which sinks to
the bottong of the fermenting ves-
sels, is then run off and is used in
the next brew. ? ’

The yeast is used from brew to
brew until the next test tube baby
in the propagator has grown into
a sufficient quantity of yeast to
start the process all over again.
By this means the brewer can be
certain that he is always using
the same strain of yeast and there-

even!
vessel



THE LARGE 80-barrel copper tuns in which the grist is mixed with water and boiled.



REMEMBER THE NAME

ENGLISH ELECTRIC



AND

ECONOMY
COMBINED

REFRIGERATOR



MANNING & CO LTD.

Electrical Dept,

FOR ALL

ENGLISH ELECTRIC

PRODUCTS
CALL

Dial

PRODUCTS

WASHING
MACHINE

4289



————— —
OO SSS









BARBADOS ADVOCATE



control the
Fauality of the beer he produces.
|The fermenting vessels and stor-
age vessels are always kept in a

fore can accurately

refrigerating
with cork.
the

building insulated
The beer is stored in
storage vessels for three
months. The name “Lager Beer”
is derived from the German
“lager” meaning store. The beer
which is carefully stored and ma-
tured is called so to distinguish
it from beers in which yeast floats
and which are not matured

Chemical Changes

During the storage period, cer-
tain chemical changes take place
in the beer. The “green taste’’ is
gradually lost and fine flavour
and body are produced, At the
same time precipitates formed,
settle to the bottom of the lager
tanks and the beer, becomes much

Assistant Brewer.

brighter. Finally after three
months at a temperature slightly
below freezing the beer is filtered
through two different filters and
runs into glass-lined “bright beer’
tanks. Next to the bright beer
store which is also refrigerated,
is the a stores. Here three
modern machines, costing $170,000,

wash, pasteurise and label the
bottles. The bottle-washer sub-
mits all bottles to a series of baths

in a very powerful detergent and
follows this up with thorough
spindle-brushing and final rinses
From the washer the bottles, now
sparkling with cleanliness, pass
on to the filling and crowning
units, then on to the Meyer Cata-
raet Pasteuriser This piece of
equipment, which grosses about
30 tons, eliminates the possibility
of dangerous bacteria and ensures
the sterility of beer and bottle

The beer is pasteurised in the
bottle by means of hot “showers”
while passing slowly through the
unit. Considerable’ pressure is}
built up in the bottle during this |



Asiatics Get Bigger

Immigration Quotas

WASHINGTON, June 30.
President Truman Monday
proclaimed new immigration
quotas which permit natives of
eight Asiatic nations to immi-
grate to the United States for the
first time in history.

Quotas which mark the end of

outright racial barriers in the
nation’s immigration laws were
determined under the new

McCarren immigration law pass-
ed last week over the President’s

veto.

Truman said the law would
perpetuate the age old injustices
in immigration although he con-
ceded its elimination of racial
bans was an advance.

Quotas for eight countries
whose natives heretofore were
barred from coming here to live

—eeemeneee




permanently were set at 100!
each. They are Burma, Cambo-
dia, Ceylon, Indonesia, Korea, |
Laos, Pakistan and Vietnam, In)

addition a quota of 100 years was
allotted to what is called the
“Asia Pacific Triangle”
comprises most of Asia and which
permits entry of Asiatics of
mixed nationality or natives of

Asian colonies or dependencies
not eligible under national
quotas.

Most of the other quotas on the
new lists represent little change
from the past yearly quotas ac-
cording to Government experts,

Britain and Northern Ireland
keep the lion’s share with a com-
bined quota of 65,361, Next comes
Germany with 25,814 and Ire-
land with 17,766.—0.P.

COURTESY
CREATES
COURTESY

i

4)

which ,




THE EXTERIOR of Carib Brewery at Champs Fleurs, Trinidad. At
bottom is Head Brewer, Mr. Ole Humle. At top is Mr. Eden Fleming,

process and should there be a leak
in the crown cork or a crack in
the bottle the contents are forced
out and the faulty bottle is easily
detected and’ discarded. The last
machine, a campletely automatic
job, labels six bottles at a time.
That in brief is how Carib Lager
is manufactured. There is also
at the plant all the auxiliary
equipment for compressing car-
bon dioxide and maintenance de-
partments all of which are neces-
sary to keep the plant at the peak
of efficiency. Large numbers of
persons have already availed
themse'ves of the opportunity to
visit the plant, which has been
laid out so that visitors can be
taken around without interference
with the operation. They heve
seen for themselves the produce
tion of glass-ware and beer in a
project which has been made pose
sible through the confidence of

hundreds of West Indian investors.



WANTED

OLD GOLD
AND SILVER

JEWELRY

OR IN PIECES IN
SCRAP FORM

The very highest
market prices paid

at your Jewellers...

YÂ¥. De LIMA
& CO., LTD.

20 BROAD ST.
Phone: 4644













INSIST ON

SILVER STAR

SOLD AT ALL THE LEADING STORES










- REDIFFUSION

Offers a Commission of $1.50 in CASH for every New
Subscriber brought to and accepted by the Company.
REDIFFUSION will pay in addition a bonus of $25.00
to any person who brings in twenty-five New Subserib-
ers in one Calendar month who are accepted by the
Company.



Have always a supply of Recovmendation Forms ready
THEY CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE OFFICE
REDIFFUSION * Trafalgar Street.




ANNUAL HOLIDAY

Oe CUSTOM nd FRIENDS are asked to note
that our WOR HOP will be atte a rom Monday,
16th June, 1952, to Saturday, the 28th June, 1952, inclu-
sive, for the er e of granting our Workmen their
ANNUAL H AY.

Arrangements have been made for em ncy work
to be undertaken during this period and the receipt
of repairs and delivery of completed work will
continued as usyal.

Our Merchandise Department and Office will he open
to business as usual.

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.
mp
































PAGE FOUR



See eee

BARBADOS wif ADVOCATE |

ie. ror) ae ee

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad 6t., Bridgetown





Ww ednesday, July 2,

— — — ————___ sainstoeiy

WOMENS MONEY

THE work to be done for women in Bar-
bados is so great that only large sums of
money will enable any progress to be
noticed.

Where is thé money to come from?

A clear indication is given on the front
page of The Times of London for June 20th.
On that day in the personal column appear-
ed the following notice: “If you pay in-
come tax at nine shillings and sixpence in
the pound, you can double your subscrip-
tion to the Y.W.C.A, at no extra cost.
Every subscription from five shillings up-
wards which is convenanted for seven
years is worth nearly twice as much be-
cause the association can recover the in-
come tax paid.”

In Barbados there is no legislation which
allows money used in connection with
charities to be free of tax, although ap-
proved organisations are not taxed on the
proceeds of internal profit-making activities
while some small concessions are made to
business houses who donate sums to institu-
tions like the Y.M.C.A. where certain of
their employees may obtain meals.

Charities and institutions in Barbados
rely on bazaars, raffles, concerts, dances
and similar activities to obtain some por-
tion of their revenue.

The Police Boys and Girls Clubs are
largely dependent on the proceeds of an
annual Raffle.

In former years when rates of company
and personal income taxation were con-
siderably less than today the importance of
freeing money paid to charities and institu-
tions from tax was much less than it is
now. At present the high rates of in-
come tax which are weighed heavily
against the expansion of businesses compel
businessses to keep a very close watch on
their charities lists.

Demands on the individual, purse for
relief funds, school sports, schoolboy tours,
scouts and a variety of other appeals add to
the cost of living of people who are often
described as a “well-to-do,” but whose
scope for “well-doing” has been restricted
in recent years.

The only answer to the question “where
is the money to come from?” is that. pro-
vided by income tax legislation in the
United Kingdom.

Money used in connection with charities
must be free of tax.







ROAD DANGERS

DESPITE the drive which is being made
by the police and the Barbados Automobile
Association to improve the road manners
of drivers, certain glaring examples of
abuse of the roads can be noticed daily.

Parking around corners is prevalent.

Many corners in Barbados are provided
with studs and although it is illegal to park
within the studded area, certain vehicles
continue to break the law by this danger-
ous practice.

Some corners have no studs, and the
letter of the law cannot be broken if cars
park near unstudded corners. But the
spirit of the law is broken whenever park-
ing near corners is practised, because any
obstacle to be passed near a corner forces
a motorist off the proper side of the road
and encourages the taking of risks. Ob-
servance of the speed limit by all users of
the road is the most sure way of pro-
moting safety on the road but “road-hogs”
continue to flaunt their dedication to
SPEED by hurtling around corners at
speeds closer to 50 m.p.h. than to the legal
30 m.p h.

Failure to dim lights at night may be due
to ignorance on the part of drivers or it
may be due to inability on the part of the
driver with bright lights to appreciate the
blinding effect of powerful headlights: but
whatever the reason for failure to dim,
night-blinding is a gross abuse of the
roads and endangers human life.

Pedestrians in Bridgetown are gradually
discovering the existence of pavements and
by using them permit drivers some relaxa-
tion from the necessity of keeping many-
sided watch: but outside Bridgetown
pedestrians use the public highways as if
they were country lanes and the difficulties
of night-driving are increased fifty-fold by
the reckless way in which road-walkers
appropriate parts of the road obviously
intended for the use of wheeled traffic.

Danger exists too at certain junctions
where traffic is not one-way. At the foot
of Government Hill the risk of accidents
would be less if, vehicles approaching the
direction of Roebuck Street were com-
pelled to turn left and follow the “island” .
At the neighbouring junction close to the
new sub-post office the present sign-post-
ing does not prevent drivers from taking
risks.

The drive for safe roads must never be
allowed to flag.

To keep death off the roads requires

vigilance at all times. ’























































|
|

Ascot’s Okay. But Not F on | (an British Industry

BARBADOS

ADVOCATE

The Average Racegoer

Fifty years hence, assuming
that England is still England
and still being run by English-
men, a Gold Cup Day is going
to be held in June at Ascot, And
I'm willing to bet that it is going
to be essentially no different
from the Golf Cup Day of Thurs-
day. June 19, 1952.

So all you people who live
thousands of miles away, in
Trinidad, Tanganyika or Tas-
mania, need be in no hurry to see
famous Ascot if you are think-
ing tradition will give way to
progress. No sir. You can bet
your last penny that Ascot is
going to stay Ascot, and that’s
that.

And, to an extent, rightly so.
But only to an extent.

I went to Ascot this year to
see the Gold Cup show of 1952.
It was also my introduction to an
English race meeting, because
my home is in New Zealand and
the glories of Epsom, Newmar-
ket, Aintree and, of course,
Ascot, had till recently escaped
me by a consideration of about
14,000 miles,

“What better day,” I thought,
“to see how the English lose
their money.”

Inevitably, I was wondering
also how facilities for doing this
would compare with those back
in New Zealand,

Now, Ascot Week, as you
probably know, is the big event

of the “London Seagon” — the
time for debutantes, fashion
shows, parties; in short, the

highlight of the year for English
Society. Ascot, for four days, is
where Society gets together in
one glorious party, where the
creations of couturiers and mil-
liners are paraded elegantly
across the lawns, and gentlemen
resplendent in morning dress
and toppers, queue at the two-
shilling tote to place a bet and
go away for a drink of cham-
pagne at four pounds a bottle.

Above all, Ascot has tradi-
tion, There is no place for any~
thing new.

Which, from the racing side of
Ascot, is a great pity.

Frankly, I came away from the
meeting with mixed feelings, It
was a thoroughly pleasant day.
But I could not help thinking I
had been cheated over the actual
horse racing, which seemed al-
most incidental to the presence
of the Queen and her party to
the atmosphere of fashionable
restraint, and to the sense of oc-
casion.

Six races, involving the cream
of English and French thorough-

Hy Hrett Oliver

breds, and yet you would think
the crowd of round 40,000 was
watching a game of chess. Cheer-
ing? Hardly a trace. Excitement?
Not on your life,

Why? Simply because about
30,000 of the 40,000 there had
absolutely no idea where their
fancy was p-aced, And, really,
there is not much to cheer about
if you can’t tell who is leading
and who is challenging. The
reason for this is simple enough
too—there is no course com-
mentary, no attempt to help be-
wildered punters locate their
horse ang “ride” it home.

: is how it went at Ascot

Cup day: —

before the start of the
race, the course announcer
broadcast the number of each
horse starting, its jockey’s name
and its barrier position. In due
course, the horses left the pad-
dock and cantered off to the
starting post.

There was complete silence for
a time till the course announcer,
using a minimum of words, in-

on

toned: “They're under starter’s
orders.” Another silence, then
the announcement: “They’re

off,” followed by two clangs of
an asthmatic bell.

For the rest of the race, there
was not a peep out of the an-
nouncer—though, for the bene-
fit of those thousands who could
not even see what was happen-
ing, the bell was again clanged
twice as the horses swung into
the straight. From there to the
post, it was merely a matter of
craning one’s neck to catch a
glimpse of a saddlecloth number
as the field went by or listen-
ing hopefully for some binocu-
lared gentlemen in the stand to
ery the name of the leader.

Once past the post, the placed
horses were named by the course
announcer who, for good
measure, threw in the winning
margins, But, by then, it was too
late,

This business of keeping the
English racegoer in the dark ap-
plies not only to Adcot but to
every single race meeting held
in England, Course commen-
taries have never been broad-
east. And, from what I learned
to-day, it looks as if they never
will.

I rang up one of the men who
has a hand in this system. He
was quite crusty about my ques-
tions and sounded positively
shocked at the suggestion that
racegoers deserved a better deal.

“Course commentaries? We
don't like them; in fact, we hai*
the idea of them,” he pronounced.

I pointed out that commen-
taries are given at most race-
tracks overseas and that the
thrill of racing is as good as lost
without them. I suggested English
people would be grateful for
them too.

“I don’t think they would,” he
replied. “When I’m at a meet-
ing and following the race, I
would hate to have some silly
commentator blaring out the
names of the horses, and probab-
ly getting them all mixed up,
when I can see perfectly well how
they are placed.”

This astonished me and I beg-
ged him to remember that the
majority of people at race meet-
ings have no earthly hope of
locating their horses, not having
binoculars for one thing and not
being experts in knowing horses
by their colours, ~

“People who go to race meet-
ings regularly are expected to
know their colours,’ he retorted
to that, iy

I discovered further that there
is no clause in Rules of
Racing prohibit course com-
mentaries. It is just “an instruc-
tion” from ‘the Jockey Club
which is responsible.

So Ascot was a disappointment
in that respect. For the rest, it
was much like most race meet-
ings I have attended.

The crowd, apart from, the
Royal Enclosure section, was es-
sentially the same collection of
optimistic people out to make a
day of it and see if they could
bring in a few dividends besides.
There was the two shillings tote
— a fine institution for the
small punter—the buffet counter,
the bars, the trees, the lawn and,
of course, the usual hard luck
stories and swopping of tips.

Then there were the bookies,
bowler-hatted, beefy men who
shouted their odds with the speed
of auctioneers. Across the track,
from the grandstand enclosure
to the heath, flashed their tic-
tac signals. And in the crowd,
people waited, not for the start
of the race, but for the finish.
Because, for the crowd, the race
started perhaps 100 yards from
the post.

There is certainly something
thrilling about Ascot, But it is
not to be found in the racing.
And, till the “Great Men of
English Racing” decide to give
the ordinary racing public a
break, I remain wholly in favour
of racetracks as we know them
overseas.



Silence Is Golden
The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—During the recent de-
bate in the House of Assembly
in respect of the revision of
salaries of the technical staff and
Departmental Heads of the
Civil service. the Leader of the
House and the Government came
in for trenchant criticism. It was
an interesting debate and
though some of those who spoke
based their arguments on the
minor aspects of the bill and
apparently failed to grasp its
main issues, healthy criticism is
expected and is always most
welcome, But when members re-
sort to making abusive and un-
dignified references to civil
servants, they should be remind-
ed that not only are they in the
House to represent the people
but they should also uphold the
dignity and respect of that
chamber, Surely if they cannot
do the former efficiently, there
‘is absolutely no excuse for fail-
ing to accomplish the latter.

One honourable member was
quite willing to support the bill
where the technical staff was
concerned but failed to see why
the non-technical heads of De-
partments should be included and
so far he was well within his
rights where the privileges of the
house are concerned, but ‘when
he refered to these responsible
men as ‘pen-pushers! he over-
stepped his bounds. Along with
other reasons with which this
member should be conversant,
when one considers how help-
less Civil Servants are to re-
taliate honourable members
should refrain from such dis-
dainful references,

There is an acute demand for
technical men all over the world
and if we are to get and hold
our complement of these key
men, it is requisite that existing
salary scales be adjusted to com-
pare favourably with those of
the other islands in the area.
But the preponderance of re-
sponsibility which Heads of De-
partments have to shoulder
makes then also amply deserving
of consideration, The main con-
siderations to be taken are
whether what is necessary is
salary revision and whether gov-
ernment is financially equipped
to do it. Some will argue that
one necessity is more urgent than
the other, but IT can see no real
objection to the bill so long as
assurance is given that revision
of the salary scales of the entire
Civil Service retrospective from
lst. April will take place in the
near future,

Another honourable member
remarked that bills like this
would spell the end of the
Leader’s political career if the
people were “less docile’, But
this is no reflection of docility.
The presence of members like
Mr, Adams in the House of
Assembly is a tribute to the
ability of the electorate to recog-
nise able and upright leader-
ship. This is a most appropriate
occasion for relating the follow-

ing excerpt:

‘The new member having
taken his seat in the Assembly
and having remained _ silent

during the debates turned finally
to his colleague and asked “Do
you think my constituents would
consider me ignorant and use-
less if I continue to remain
silent?” In the interests of con-
serving the party seat and of
the solicitous member, his col-
leagues replied with profoundest
sincerity. “You must keep them
in doubt, if you speak they will
know.”

Similar advice would prove ex-

tremely valuable to those mem-
bers in the Barbados House of
Assembly who contribute nothing
worthwhile to debates but waste
valuable time indulging their
(habits of vote catching whenever
they address the Assembly.

Salary scales should always be
fixed or adjusted to suit the post
and not the man and the Leader
of the House by adhering to this
principle displayed a high de-
gree of magnamimity which js a
characteristic conspicuously lack-
ing in those newcomers who as
pire to leadership.

SUPER JET.
Family First
To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—In your leading article,
“Family First,” you point out
that “Barbados has been trying
to build the kind of civic-mind-
edness which is common in ad-
vanced countries” although it
lacks the basic family conditions
on which those countries have
built. While the loose and un-
certain state of much of the local
family life has long been known,
it does not seem to be so well
recognised that these conditions
are inconsistent, and even in
conflict, with many of the econo-
mic measures of public policy,
introduced in recent years.

In the name of progress Bar-
bados has adopted at substantial
cost several forms of economir,
organisation which have in th

course of a century and marl

developed in England and some
other Western countries, In its
lands of origin the organisation
we are trying to copy grew up
on the* basis of a monogamous
family unit with paternal re-
sponsibility for all the members.
Methods of taxation, wage and
salary scales, and Government
regulated ‘cost of living,’ as well
as many social services, are
based on the assumption that
such family units are the pre-
dominant and permanent part of
the social structure, and that
they are at all times clearly de-
fined, Yet in local conditions
which, as you say, are far unlike
those of Great Britain, we have
adopted the same schemes of
Income Tax, the same ideas of
labour organisation and wages,
and the same patterns of public
administration from Civil Ser-
vice salaries to Housing, which
in their countries of origin are
strictly derived from the type of
family foundation we so obvi-
ously lack. Of course this
monogamous family system is
by no means universal. Indeed,
most of the world’s population
lives in more numerous and ex-
pensive systems, But while
sometimes credited with great
human wisdom, these people are
not included among the advanced
countries. Inside their borders
such modern doctrines as the
redistribution of wealth by law,
and gost of living allowances, do
not operate, and the lives of
politicians and the salaries of
public servants are, alike in-
secure.

What are we entitled to ex-
pect in Barbados from adopting
a political structure so inconsist-
ent with the foundations on
which it must function? Is it as-
sumed by those responsible for
it that the growing expense of
Government and the increasing
cost of living which are in a large
measure due to the alien system
we are trying to copy, will in-
evitably create the family
foundations needed to justify it?
It is true that visiting experts,
singly and collectively, usually
deliver a moralistic homily on
the nebulous state of the family
life enjoyed by much of the local

Our Readers Say:

population, but it is not clear
that this procedure is changing
the normal conditions. If it is
not, then equity as well as effi-
ciency requires a_ different
method from _ undiscriminating
imitation in other matters—al-
though lacking paternal respon-
sibility as a pillar of state, we
do have political responsibility.

I an, sir,
Yours ete.
I. C. GREAVES
Box 186,
Bridgetown,

28th June, 1952.

Whistle And Weep
To the Editor, The Advocate;

SIR,—The public are grateful
to the Police and Highway De-
partments or their co-opera-
tion in providing ways and
means for improving the Traf-
fic regulations especially as to
stopping at Major Roads cross-
ing, and providing cat’s eyes in
awkward corners,

There is no doubt whatever
that these regulations have been
very much appreciated by Mo-
torists who have done all in their
power to co-operate,

Now that an Automobile As-
sociation has been formed, the
public trust that they will join
with the two departments in
making greater improvements,

There are one or two things
that require immediate consider-
ation. At present certain motor-
ists have attached whistles to
their cars and they seem to in-
dulge in making as much noise,
as they can with it, to the
great discomfort of residents in
the area. In Trinidad this type
of whistle is prohibited, and
any one found using it is sub-
ject to immediate arrests and
imprisonment, there is no fine
attached. A similar nuisance is
experienced through Motor Cy-
clists opening the throttle to their
engines, thereby creating a most
annoying and merve racking
noise, Motor Cyclists seem to be
immune from the Speed regula-
tions, so perhaps they are also
exempted from the law govern-—
ing annoying noises,

The Traffic in this Island has
become most c Lo
to the Increased number of cars
on the road, and road blocks
often occur. The public have no-
ticed that many of these blocks
are created or accentuated by
Motorists parking their cars on
both sides of the road within
ten yards of each other, thereby
creating a bottle neck, and are
wondering whether a regulation
cannot to prevent
the parking on both side of the
road in such close proximity.
The public feel that in most
eases it is thoughtlessness and
wonder if a talk over the radio
might not be all that is necessary
to get rid of this nulsance and
make tavelling easter.

The Police surelyywould bene-
fit from this, as frequently they
are catled on to ease such blocks
in Bay Street, at the fish market,
where cars are parked on both
sides of the road, Let us have co-
operation and the matter will
easily be settled.

It would be advisable to place
studs by the Barbados Mutual
Life Assurance at the point
where all traffic enters Lower
Broad Street as well as where
traffic enters Broad Street from
Tudor Street, as at these two
points accidents are continually
occurring.

MOTORIST.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1952
EE | ee
EES

PHOTOGRAPHS :













Copies of Local Photographs
Which have appeared in the

Be Denationalized?

By CHRISTOPHER HOLLIS, M.P.

| LONDON, June 20.
THE world watched Britain’s socialist ex-

periment and is now, with equal attention,

asking how far it is possible for Winston

Churchill’s Conservative Government to re-

verse the process of nationalization.
Parallel, between the present British situ-

| ADVOCATE NEWSPAPER
| Can be ordered from the .. .

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

Decorated. These are
available in four sizes.

ation and the resale of some formerly na- CONGOLEUM
tionalized industries in other countries are SQUARES
not quite exact. In these other countries 3x3 yds. &3x 3% yds.
non-Socialist governments took over indus- CONGOLEUM:

tries by agreement with their opponents for
practical and business reasons—such as the
virtual bankruptcy of a railway system. It is
quite different in Britain where there is one
political party which believes in nationali-
zation as a matter of principle and which is
likely to come to power again in the future.
If it looked as if the Socialists were out
for good in Britain, or if they had abandoned
nationalization from their party programme,
then the problem before the Conservatives
would be less acute. But even in the last
election the Socialists polled a higher aggre-
gate of votes than Conservatives and it was
only an electoral chance that left them with
a minority of seats in Parliament. And since
then the evidence of municipal electicns and
Gallup Polls shows that at the lowest it is
far from improbable that we shall have a
Socialist Government back in power.

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Conservatives may rightly protest against
statements from Socialist leaders, such as
Mr. Morrison and Mr. Strauss, that, if re-
turned to power, they will re-nationalize
steel, road transport and anything else that
may have been denationalized, and rena-
tionalize them on terms of compensation less
favourable to the investors. But no one can
shut his eyes to the fact that any intentions
which they express are likely to be inten-
tions that they will be in a position to fulfill.
Under those circumstances the real difficul-
ty about denationalizing either steel or road
transport is likely to be the difficulty of get-
ting industrialists to put up the money to
buy them. The Government has told us that
when it puts its “operable units” of road
transport up for sale, it will put a reserve
price on them. Tf it puts the reserve price
high, no one will bid; and, if it puts it low,
it will lose a large sum of public money,





There is nothing illogical in opposing na-
tionalization when it is first proposed then
arguing that, when it is passed, that it is the
lesser evil to let it stand. As Oliver Stanley,
the Conservative leader who died a few
years ago, once wittily said, “It may have
been a mistake to have thrown a man out of
a top-story window and broken his leg, but
it is not necessarily the right remedy merely
to throw him back again.” Obviously it is to
the nation’s interest that its industries
should be run efficiently and obviously those
in an industry can say that it is quite impos-
sible for them to do their work efficiently if
the constitution of their industry is a sub-
ject of constant electioneering and is chang-
ed from top to bottom every time that there
is a change of government. .

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and UNDERWEAR
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Handsome TIES (including
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So the real problem of our industry is, as Black for Evening Wear)
most people are coming to see, to find for it
a structure that is accepted by all political
parties. Whatever the faults of the capitalist
system it can be argued that it satisfied that
condition, so long as there was no important
political challenge to it. In the old days of
Liberal and Conservative the ins-and-outs
of party politics made no difference to the
way in which our industry was run. To-day,
for better or worse, it is not so. On the other
hand, even Socialists admit that nationaliza-
tion is by itself no remedy. And even anti-
Socialists will admit that, after denationali-
zation a considerable measure of Govern-
ment control and interference will still be
necessary. Whatever details of modifications
or charges there may be, it is quite certain,
for instance, that we shall have a National
Health Service with us for good. Whether
we call the iron and steel industry ‘national-
ised’ or not, it will certainly be run in large
units, under a good deal of government con-
trol. And even if private individuals are
allowed to make profits out of it, a very sub-
stantial proportion of those profits will be
taken by the State in taxation. So the so-
called controversy between Socialism and
Free Enterprise is, under modern conditions
in Britain, a somewhat unreal controversy.




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The real question — the as yet quite
unanswered question—is how that control
should be exercised. It is pretty generally
admitted that the solution tried-by the late
Socialist Government of setting up for the

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|answerable to the House of Commons and
amenable to every sort of party and elec-
toral pressure, often from people whose
knowledge of the problems of the industry
is superficial. Recently, we have seen the
Government refusing to accept a proposed
increase in transport fares and the Opposi-
tion refusing to vote for it, though neither
the one nor the other could give any clear
account how the transport system could be
made to pay without the fare increases.



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WEDNESDAY, JULY

°

1952

House Pass Address For
Additional Reporter

The House of Assembly last night passed an Address
to His Excelyency the Governor in connection with the

;
BARBADOS ADVOCATE
KILLED





PAGE FIVE





en

Infant’s Inquest
Adjourned

His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma,|
Coroner of District “A”, yesterday |
adjourned further hearing in the!
inquest into the cifcumstances

rounding the death of Pearson



Financial Position Of
Scouts Association
Greatly Improved





SNAKE

He

ing three-months’ infant}
remembered once that one Race’ vie 3 “ter tit| CCMMENTING on the fmancial position of the Local
; : : * so of the Revorters of » House haa vt Road View, St. Peter, until) . Be : a al pos u 40K
general re-organization of the subordinate staff of the House. pcb Borage # the x a me Be y 8 | Boy Scouts’ Association as reported on by the Executive
These propeeals which have been recommended by a Com- anak thes heute wathedt 6 rec Pearson Pickering died at the}
s a res

Committee of the Island Scout Council, His Excellency the

mittee appointed to review the organisation of the Staff, They could imagine what that Governor said he was “very glad to see that the financial

Ceoneral Hospftal on June 30 after}
. ¢ : - I
include the appointment of a fourth Official Reporter, an meant with the kind of speeches

was admitted there on June}

suffering from burns which he position has improved considerably, particularly because
sci : they usually had 2 se stainec » a fire “oke 0 aie ; 6 Al
Assistant Secretary and two typists. RR (tetas Sead ihe “House. ustained when a fire broke out) it is to some extent due to the efforts of the Scouts them-
The Add * ; r. peaker had informed the in a house at Road View, St. Peter, | F
e ress was passed after a motion by Mr. F. E. Committee of the practice in a ;



Miller seconded by Mr. E. W. Barrow to defer consideration similar Chambers elsewhere, and
of the matter for one week was defeated by an eight-six 't was obvious that some relief

m



which he was staying }

Dr, A. W. Scott who performed! in their Report on this subseriptions had been col.ected



: the post mortem examination on{..©™m, the Execulive Committ up to the time of his preparing

majority. : Oa given = agree June 30 at the General Hospital| «.tes that the “financisi position the statement. He anticipated that

ar as ne roposal concern- t , Z ore re t ! « pette Mal t ST » s i ad

The Address was strongly supported by the Opposition ing their Siudpet lenis rae concern- aoe? ee ~~ ieee a ye r ge vel ' ae 1 oa a mould be balk ae am

A ; ; me ds tensi yt is on the face 3 ‘en for s im i 5 I ay h-
members in the House, while some members of the Gov- - ae ts no ae was left hand and arm, of the deceas- ue mainiy to the efforts of the in the next two months,

ernment Party objected not to the Address itself, but to felt “Sask the Bates aouie wbsan cad. In his opnion, the deceased] jcouts themselves during Lob-a- Of the $500 which was set to

certain of the new posts which are suggested, and the in- that not only was such considera- yest yy ee eens as| ob Week and St. George's Week, a Reserve Fund, His Excellency

consistency in the yearly increments in relation to the re- tion long overdue, but also that iekering of R

burns i to the savings being made o.



said he would like to see it used
Enid Pickering of Road View . ;

; raise 2 > aries »viousl yaid to ¢ for the benefit of th outside
spective posts. ink come swith e tee the St. Peter—the mother of the dead | ae olen ond cobetabie , districts in relation to come self-
The proposals contained in the the Address which dealt with the raat ten es at aa kar =e child’ who identified the body to! ios have to be abolished.” The help scheme.

Address are for increasing the Secretary and Librarian, Mr. \hon the House wae 1 a es Dr. Scott—told the Court that on |” ecutive also acknowledgs with Equipment
staff of the Reporters of the Leg- Talma said that he was informed A eee ROT June 28 she carried the deceasec end F tae ‘atts P wid ee
idl : that officer should wear some to her sister’s place et Road View. | re thanks, the generous &§1 His Excellency said that th
ature to four; a salary scale of that other arrangements were quitabl mifor earthed o ae ee piace at oad Wew,) © one thousand dollars ($1,000) re aha? ; Ss id
$1680 x 120—$2400 be instituted; being made as far as that par- him Provided fo at Peter, since 4) was going te} '! Canhdien, tena e we ee ake se a
the i i sridgetown. 1a Vanaais wp ng ‘im that the best scheme he couic
Sen appointment of an Assistant ticular officer was concerned and It was also recommended that When she came out of her house Reserve Fund have for the purpose would be a
retary at a salary of $720 x 120 he was therefore asking that that officer should also assist with to catch the } 1 : wes 1emé by © : hie!
—$1,776 r annum: h roe Sea eee tee he © catch 1€ bus she saw het Mr. Neville Osborne, a men scheme to buy equipment which
Two ¢ pe ; paragraph B be deleted. the library. In agreeing with the ster’s house on fire end reaching of the Finance Committee, could be used by outside troops
stean ack tok es viel 48 8 Clause C which would now be~ salary proposed, the House would the house saw her sister holding| ead a prepared Statement of Avc- and se on. But ‘he was a litte
el 200 r ihe adda d ‘4 48 come B dealt with the Assistant be setting a good example. They her cbh/ld in her hands, while she unts in which it was shown reluctant to agree with the Island
per annum; and a Mes- Secretary and no doubt honour- should not forever scale salaries was trying to put out the fire t at the end of June, 1952, Commissioner in that respect, and
senger & Library Assistant at a .ble members would ask what from the top downwards, but. it The child was taken to the Gen- ¢ was in hand an amount of he would , like representatives
po sad of $720 x 96--$1200 per was the object of creating that was time they scaled some from erel Hospital and detained $22.60 of which $500 had been from outside the urban area to
um, : , » new post, but he would remind the bottom upwards. At this stage the inquest wa t to a Reserve Fund, leaving a consider the matter, and if, they
It is also suggested in the ad- them that the debates were far _AS he had said before, the adjourned until July 8 . a oid fas ; i
res * . ; . ; ae , ey lance of $922.60 from which ex- and the Executive Committee
dress that all appointments for behind hand and in addition, House could, if they pleased, dis- litu ould be made . ‘ to the conclusicn that .it
this Department should be made were not properly filed and it 48Tee with some of the proposals iditure; could be made. come. {0 e€ conciusicn at 4
on the recommendation of His and he did not agree with all of

Kuhewns ‘Rocrets ae Answering a query by His Ex- was the best way to use the $500,
Honour The Speaker, y by ng a competen !





6é7> se et eee y ave jecti
Assistant Secretary that they them. But the Speaker and the Paerwood And Neney whe. wee one at he _srculd nee ne a dag
‘ ~, Committee felt that those changes * meeting, Mr Ss > sal t S Bxcelency sa P Was VeF}
Introducing the address Mr. would be able to get all these were needed if the week was 3a **Pol¢ ween”’ Here visaged that the Association anxious that the Scouts outside
C, E. Talma (L) said that it was documents in order. be done efficiently. 7 ould be able to meet its com- receive some real appreciation of
some months since a Committee N Whil eeing w t Ces ’ nitment luring the present the Council's interest in them and
: : ot nile agreeing with the neces- The Motor vessel Da men during t
saw fit to reorganise ‘the salaries Properly Filed sity for increasing the staff of ene eae pore, 38 inancial year, since very few not only in Headquarters
of certain officers of the House, Clause D renumbered C refer- Reporters, honourable members yesterday morning from St. Luci, ———_——- Set eet rere aaa
oes fe a nothing had been done red to the appointment of two who criticised the Address felt with 454 packages of fresh fruit so
about the matter. typists who would be there to as- that there was no need for an 5 bags of -cocoanuts, 30 bags o
He observed that the debates sist the reporters. At the moment, Assistant Secretary, and even if

cassava starch, 6 cases of leathex
67 bags of peanuts, 206 bags
copra, one motor car engine,
pieces of machinery,

The Schooner Belqueen calle
yesterday from St, Vincent. Sh
brought in 620 bags of copra, four
cases of machinery, one ci
piston bearings, 14 bags of cocoa. |

of the House of Assembly were reporters took home their notes there was need for one steno-
many months behind hand and and if a fire took place and they grapher-typist, there was no need
attributed this to a lack of re- were burnt, they would have no for a second typist.
porters in the Assembly. He said debates. Under this new system,
that very often reporters had to the reporters would have to leave
take notes for very long spells their notes at the office in the
and he did not think such a state House and dictate them to the
of affairs should exist any longer, typists.

Mr. Talma explained that in the

oO, |

' anc



Inconsistency

DUDLEY WARD, a groom of Chelsea Road, holds a three-foot
long snake his fellow groom Cecil Springer, of the same district,
killed with a saw among some bushes in front of the Barbados

Mr. F. L. Walcott (L) drew
attention to the inccnsistency in
As far as clause D dealing with the suggested annual incremcnts

se of



; nuts and one machine |
Address before the House pro= Messenger and Library Assistant attached to Jn See scales for Museum yesterday evening about 6 o'clock. Ward is calm enough The Belqueen is consigned to |
vision was made for an additional was concerned he said that he te Ree ante ER aveiy one while holding the snake, but he grinned yesterday when asked the Schooner Owners’ Associa-,
reporter as well as two typists who was one of the underprivileged aia hes was ibe Seti Ls, sup- if he had helped killed it, before saying that he took to his heels tion |
would be at the disposal of the ; ‘aa. ,

reporters to type out members’
speeches so that they could get a
copy of what they actually said
earlier in the day on a particular

debate.
One Daily

There was only one daily news-
paper in the island and very often
the speeches made by some hon-
ourable members were not re-
ported and their constituencies
did not know what they actually
said.

He said that if the system
should continue much longer
whereby only two reporters were
kept in the House, it would create
a great hardship on them. A re-
porter, like those in the House of
Commons, should not be called
upon to take notes for longer than
fifteen minutes,

“We are really taking advantage

our reporters” Mr. Talma said
and he added “they are not
suitably paid for the work which
they were called upon to do.
“Imagine a Labour Government
arranging salaries for head of de-
partments!) and taking advantage
of their own reporters and other
officers:"’ For that reason he said
that he was trying to justify tha
position firstly by asking the
House to increase the num-
ber of reporters to the Legis-:
lature from three to four. At
the present, there were two
reporters in the House and one in
the Council. If one of them hap-
pened to be ill, there would be
no one to assist and in order that
the work should be done efficient-
ly and expeditiously ‘he was ask-
ing that the number should be in-
creased,

As to the question of salaries
for these men he reminded the
House that they were highly
trained and competent men who
had to transcribe into the King’s
English what was not properly ex-
plained or spoken in the House
by some honourable members. It
was therefore the duty of the
House to see that they were paid
proper salaries and not treat them
as if they were ordinary clerks
like those employed in Swan or
Roebuck Streets

Mr. Talma said that there was
not such a thing as a junior re-
perter and a senior reporter in
the House. They were all trained
officers who had to do the same
work and he saw no reaso¢ why
they should not be paid the same
salary.

He said that they were trying
to bring the work as up-to-date
as possible and if the reorganisa-
tion scheme was accepted and
implemented it would mean that
Xhe debates wou'd be in mem-
bers hands within a week with
the consent of the Speaker.

The step which they were
taking would not only be for the
benefit of the reporters, but for
the community as a whole wio
would be au fait with what was
going on in the Chamber.

With regard to p2ragraph B of

they had to see was properly
paid. He was one who worked
well and richly deserved his sal-
ary.
He hoped that honourable mem-
bers would at least exercise a
sense of responsibility now that
they had an opportunity of as-
sisting certain members of the
subordinate staff who were in this
case emplovees of the House.

Mr. R. G. Imepp (L) said that as
senior member on the Debates
Committee he was asked to move
the passing of the Address, but
he did not agree with some of
the suggestions in the Address
anq would second it mainly for
the sake of discussion,

As regards the first proposal
which concerned the Reporters,
he had suggested in the Commit-
tee that they should retain the
present number of
employ two typists, one of whom
should be a_ stenographer-typist.
He felt that a stenographer-typist
would be able to assist with tak-
ing notes and also the typing of
the notes. The majority of the
members of the Committee how-
ever agreed to an additional re-
porter and two typists—one : of
whom should be a stenographer-
typist.

Salaries Equitable

He felt that the House should
agree that the proposed salary
scale of the reporters was equit-
able and fair. The Committee
felt that, taking into considera-
tion salaries paid to the reporters
by the Press and those paid in
the British Guiana and Trinidad
legislatures, that salary was quiie
fair. The salary of the Chief re-
porter of the Trinidad Legisla-
tive Council was, he thought,
$3,600 per year, That body sat on

Yewer occasions than the House. on call’ could be

But he did not want to draw
comparisons too far, even with
British Guiana.

He hoped he would hear noth-
ing about the efficiency or other-
wise of this or that officer. The
Committee felt that the staff and
the duties should be re-organised.
He for example, had not agreed
What the Government could be
asked to make provision for an
Assistant Secretary or for the
falary scale for the Secretaiy
unless the duties of those officers
were properly defined. The du-
ties of the officer also should be
properly arranged as quickly as
pessible. The Deputy Clerk of the
House was a busy Solicitor and
the Government could not be
urged to agree to having addi-
tional posts unless it meant great-
er efficiency.

Mr, Mapp pointed out that the
Reporters in the House took notes
for too long periods. He said that
the member on the Committee
from the Other Place had also
stressed that the same thing ap-
plied to their Reporter, and it was
mainly for that reason that the
Committee had agreed to an ad-
ditional Reporter and two typists.

ers, but T

port the Address if the recom~
mendation respecting the Assistant
Secretary and the second typist.

He suggested that the Reporters
should be whole-time officers who
weuld attend at the Office at
specified hours, and observed that
Reporters for the House being
specially trained men, would be
able to type, and for that reason
there was no necessity to have a
typist to whom they would distate
their transcript.

Both Mr. F. E- Miller and Mr.
f—. W. Barrow suggested that the
matter should be deferred for a

week in order that members
would have time to study che
proposals. A motion made to this

effect by Mr. Miller seconded by
Mr. Barrow, was later defeated
by an eight—six majority. Sup-
porting the motion were Mr. L. A
Williams, Mr. F. L. Walcott, Mx.
O. Bryan and’ Dr. H. G. Cum-
mins, Voting against the post-
ponement were Mr. A. E, S. Lewis,
Mr. C. E- Talma, Mrs. E. Bourne,
Mr. J. E. T. Brancker, Mr. W.- A.
Crawford, Mr. V. B- Vaughan, Mr.
O. T. Allder and Mr. J. C. Mottley

The Address was then pass‘d,
and Mr. C. E- Talma directed by
His Honour the Speaker to pre-
cent it to His Excellency the
Governor.

What An M.P.
Wants To Know

Mr. T. O. Bryan (L) tabled the
following question in the House of
Assembly last night: —

1, Is Government aware that
on the night of the Ist June 1952,
a patient was taken to the Gen-
eral Hospital's Casualty, bleeding
profusely, and that neither the
Doctor on duty, nor the one ‘next



found to give
the necessary attention?
2. Was this matter ever re-

ported to the Medical Superin-
tendant?

3. If the answer to Question
(2) is in the affirmative, will
Government state what action has
been taken by him?

4. Will Government further in-
vestigate this matter and institute
disciplinary measures against the
offenders





Society Discuss
Draft By-Laws

Meeting on Monday night at the}
Modern High School, the members
of the People’s Co-operative Trad-
ing Society discussed 30 of the)
draft Model By-laws submitted to}
them for consideration.

Mr. C. E. Beckles, Co-operative
Officer, was present by invitation |
and as often as necessary ex-
plained points of difficulty as they |
arose.

The rules covered the objects of |
the Society, financial obligations
of members, expulsion of mem- |
bers, funds of the Society, liability







Our

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POTTERY

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POTTERY LAMPS

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$2.00, $1.00 each

POTTERY VASES

$6.00, $2.50, $2.00 $1.50

50 ASH TRAYS 48c. each

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FPSHHDOS $99OOE HOH

on seeing it.





In The House
Yesterday








When the House of Assembly
met yesterdz Re. Cummins laid
the following

Fiscal Survey of Barbados by
c c Beasle C.M.G., M.A
Economic Adviser to the Comp
troller for Development and Wel
fare in the West Indies

Report of the Supervisor of
Elections on the General Elec
tions, 1951

Annual Report of the Director

tical Services for the year
of the Registrar of
Societic for the half
year ended 30th June, 1950

Report of the Public Librarian
for the year ended on the ‘ist
of March, 1951, to the Board of
Trustees

the = W Boards (Amend

it) Reg ns, 1952.

he = foll notices were
niven

Resolution to approve the
Wage. Board (Amendment;
Regulation 1952

Resolution to place the sum of
$2,000 at

disposal



Governor-i














to upple t !
1952 J ci i
in the r vy Estin
No, 10, which r the Schec
to the Resolutior

A Bill intituled an Act to
amend the Government Scholar
ships and Exhibitions Act, 1949

An Act to consolidate and
amend the Acts of the Island re
lating to Public Health

The House passed a Resolution
to increase the aries of their
« uw puty Cle and Marshal

The House passed an Address
to His Excellency the Governor
suggesting an increase in the
Staff of Reporter to the Lenis
lature and other matters relating
to the general reor isation of
the ubordinate ff of the
House

The House accepted the amend
ments sent down by the Legisia
tive Council to the Third F ty
Insurance Bill and the Fishing
Industries Bill

The House passed a Bill to
amend. the Peasants’ Loan Bank
Act, 1936,

The House adjourned to Tue
day next at 3.00 p.m

————

of members, balance sheet, income
and expenditure, audit and the
disposal of profits

It was agreed to meet again on
Monday night at the Modern High
School and complete the study of
these rules.





z Shadow Stripe Mylon

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3 “Petrounella”™

° This is a very serviceable

< material, and is available in

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$ faivt Silk Dique Sheer

2 in Pink, Silver, Champagne,
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Rose, Lilac, Bois de Rose and White

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BROAD STREET—DIAL 2664



Yard-Long
Snake Killed

A snake a yard long and two
in circumference, was
lled yesterday .about 6 p.m.
nong some bushes in front of the
rbados Museum by Cecil
Springtr a proom of Chelsea
Road. The snake was light brown
long the belly, darker brown on
back and was chequered all

ches

er

We were walking through the

shes, some other chaps and I,”
pringer told the Advocate last
night, “when I heard a rustling
We started a casual search, never
thinking for a moment that we
would come across a snake. Then
Tr saw the long thing wriggling
long quickly towards the thicker
bushes,

“T had a saw,” he
hacked at it until it

“and I

said,
was

W.1. JAMBOREE
PLANNED FOR ’55

local Seouts’ Association
informed from Scout
Headquarters that it is planned to
hold a Jamboree in 1957 in Eng
land to mark the first 50 years of
Seouting.

It is also planned to
Caribbean Jamboree in Trinidad
in 1955, and the Island Commis-
sioner has appealed to Scoutmas-
ters throughout the island to
start planning locally for the
occasion,

TALK AT PRESS
CLUB TONIGHT

Part in the Mora
Mankind” will form
the subject of discussion at the
Barbados Press Club to-night at
8.00 o'clock, The discussion will
be led by Rev. C, J. Ramcharran
of Trinidad. The discussion is
open to the public and ladies are
especially invited to attend, There
will be a collection in aid of the
Ciub’s Library funds.

The
ha been

“Woman's
Stability of

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Seaman Fined 20/-

His Worship Mr. C, W. Rudder
Police Magistrate of District “A’ |
yesterday ordered 3D-year-old!
seaman Lisbon Oliver to pay
fine of 20/- in 14 days or one!
month's imprisonment for throw-
ing stones on Fairchild Street, St
Michael

Police Constable Bradshaw at
tached to the Bridge Police Station
told the Court that the offence
was comm/tted on July 1 about
2.50 am, He arrested the defen-
dant after speaking to him |





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LABELS GIVEN ON
SHOWING OF LICENCES

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and packed fresh in vacuum tins, Four Square tobacco

This year at the check-up o . J Sue > et .
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labels will only be pasted on |

vehicles on the production of a |
current vehicle licence and driv
er’s licence

Drivers are asked to carry thei
lriver's licence with them

WATCHES

GOLD, STEEL or :
CHROMIUM

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PAGE SIX



Warning On Canadian
Rapid Trade Decline

TERRIBLE WANT AND DISTRESS

An urgent warning against permitting any

LONDON
further

deterioration of Canadian-West Indian trade relations was
given by Mr. J. M. Campbell, chairman of the West India
Committee, at the Committee’s annual general meeting in

London.
The valuable reciprocal

trade between Canada and the

West Indies, he said, is threatened by the currency restric-

tions that limit West Indian

Imports from Canada. In ad-

dition, Canada has turned to non-Commonwealth sources
for some of her sugar supplies.

“I can imagine no greate:
economic disaster to the British
West Indies that the result of
failure to appreciate the value of
the Canadian market for sugar,”
Mr. Campbell declared, “There

can be no certainty that this
disaster will be averted until
there is a real rather than a

formal liberalisation of Canadian-
West Indian trade.”

He called upon all concerned in
Britain, Canada and the Britisn
West Indies to spare no effort to
ensure that the Canadian sugar
market is not lost thro “negli-
gence, shortsightedness or stupid-
ity,”

Mr, Campbell expressed the
hope that n@xt year’s West Indian
sugar ex would total 900,000
tons, but emphasised that
greater and diversified production
is needed to feed the expanding
populations of the territories,

“Terrible want and distress will
be the lot of the West Indian
colonies unless the development
of the sugar industry is accom-
panied by further agricultural
and industrial development,” he
declared.

“I am sure, however, that suc-
essiui Colonial
ly depends
cnverprise
enterprise

Jeveiopinent ui)
upon private

ud British private
at that,” he added,

Mr, Campbell outlined the aims
of the Cormittee, which are “to
represent dud help the local man,”
and called-dor greaied support for
the Commfitee’s work. He also
announced that the Commiltiee
bas asked dts secretary, Mr, A. E.

. Barton, to,undertake an exten-
sive tour ofthe West Indies in the
autumn. .

Mr. Campbell criticised the re-
cent transfer of Mr, Alan Lennox~
Boyd from the Colonial Office to
become Minister of Transport.
Mr. Lennox-Boyd, he pointed out,
had worked energetically on
colonial problems for a number of
years and had special knowledg:
of the West Indies. While con-
zg lating Mr. Lennox-Boyd on
his promotion in the Government,
Mr. Campbell spoke of “colonial
interests being sacrificed to poli-
tics in this country.”

Before making his statement as
chairman, Mr. Campbell paid a
moving tribute to the late Sir
Algernon Aspinall, who was sec-
retary of the West India Commit-
tee for 40 years from 1898 to 1938,
when he retired,

“He gave all the best years of
his life to his work in the inter-
ests of the British West Indies,
British Guiana and British Hon-
duras,” said Mr, Campbell.

During much of the time he
held the office of secretary, he
virtually was the West India
Committee, said Mr. Campbell.
During his period of office, mem-
bership of the Committee rose
from less than 300 in 1898 to more
than 2,000 in 1938,

Mr. Campbell reealled Sir
Algernon’s guide books to the
West Indies, which are _ still

standard works, his efforts on be-
half of the Empire Exhibition at
Wembley in 1924 and his work
as secretary of the Imperial
College of Tropical Agriculture.

Mr. H.L.Q. Henriques, a close
personal friend of Sir Algernon
during his lifetime, also paid a
brief but warm tribute and the
Committee passed. a_ resolution
expressing its profound regret at
Sir Algernon’s death and express-
ing sympathy to Lady Aspinall,

Here is the complete text of
Mr, Compbell’s address:

“In seekimy your approval of
the Reporb of the Executive
Committes Gh the activities of the
West Indit Committee for the
twelve months which ended on
the 2%th of April, 1952, and of the
eceournts for the calendar year
19F1, it is not neressary for me to
talle : 9 matters which you

oven had a nportunity of study-
in? tn theagiiborantents and which
nyes é only properly
covered invthem





be

“booking .back on the year
which has “pussed since our las!
Annual General Meeting, our
thoughts turn immediately to the
loss which the whole Common-
wealth and Empire still mourn—
the death of bis iate Majesty, King
George the Sixth. His Majesty
i a particular affection for th
British West Indian Colonies, as
he showed, for example at the
British Industries Fair, at which
he delighted to linger during his



unfsiling annual visits, Indee”
atten surprised officiaas in
ve of (@. eXmibits by his

knowledge of West Indian mat-
ters. In her Majesty Queen Eliza-
beth the Second, we rejoice that
we have a sovereign in whose
thoughts ‘wie affairs of the Com-

monwealth and Empire overseas
are 10 les$ prominent,
“The ydar 1952 will long be

rememberge in the British Wos
fixues as.Q@ year in which, for the
first time since sugar was estab-
lished as ;the foundation of the
West Indian economy some three
hundred years ago, a period dur-
ing which the Industry encounter-

ed the far extremes of fortune, :

from the days when Jamaica led
the world as the largest producer
to the more recent times of the
bounties on beet sugar, when one
West Indian estate after another
was abandoned—for the first time
in all its long history the sugar
ifidustry gained a real measure of
security which now enables the
efficient producer to plan ahead
in the sute knowedge that abnor
mal and prolonged natural calam-
ity alone can deprive him of a
fair retuth for his efforts.

“The epnclusion of the Com-
monwealth Sugar Agreement was
undoubtedly a great event. The
Agreement has rightly been called
a charter ~-for Commonwealth
Sugar. AH-the same, let no one
imagine that all is now necessary

is to sit back and watch it work.
Far from it. First, and of ex-
weme importance, there is the
fact that although Canada is not
a party to the Commonwealth
Sugar Agreement th export
quotas in the Agreement provide
lor the supply from Common-
wealth sources of virtually the
whole of Canada’s sugar require-
ments; indeed the Agreement is
designed to give Canadian re-
quirements over-riding priority.
“Canada, traditionally, buys the
bulk of her sugar supplies from
the British West Indies; and in
turn the British West Indies are,
tvaditionally, an important export
market for Canada—and indeed
an expanding market in which
he vaiue of Imperial Preference
hould stand Canada in good stead.
There is, moreover, a great fund
ot mutual goodwill betweer
Canada and the British West
Indies. In such donditions re-
ciprocal trade between the two
areas should flourish. But today,
alas, currency restrictions, even
with the new Trade Liberalisation
Plan in being, severely limits
British West Indian imports from
Canada. This valuable reciprocal
trade is thus threaten od

“As you know, Canada has
turned to non-Commonwealin
sourees for some of her sugar
supplies just because she has an
pportunity to develop counter-
part trade with the countries con-
cerned, I can imagine no greate:
economic disaster to the British
West Indies than the result of
failure to appreciate the value of
the Canadian market for sugar.
There can be no certainity that
this disaster will be averted until

there is a real rather than a
formal liberalisation of Canada-
West Indian trade. Even from

the point of view of dollar conser-
vation one feels bounds to ques-
tion the wisdom of a policy which
seeks to save a few million
dollars at the direct risk of
diverting Canada’s sources of
sugar dupply and thus lose
50,000,000 or more dollars.

“I thope that everyone here
and in the West Indies—and ir
Canada—who can in any way
influence policies and actions in
this field will spare no ecort to
ensure that we do not lose the
Canadian sugar market through
negligence, shortsightedness or
stupidity; moreover that they will
do all they can to create the most
favourable possible conditions fo
the strengthening of the vital
economic relationship between the
British West Indies and Canada,
whose economic might grows
stronger every day.

“Secondly, now that the fears
and anxieties which have in the
past inhabited the dynamic of
production have been swept aside,
producers must set about achiev-
ing their production quotas in the
shortest possible time. In fact, I
hope that 1953 will see the export
cf 900,000 tons of British West
Indian sugar.

“But let me pass on, For al-
though we have seen a great
measure of security given to
what is and must remain the most
important West Indian industry,
the populations of the Wesi Indies
are increasing at such an alarm-
ing rate that that industry alone
cannot maintain, let alone im-
prove, the standards of living of
the West Indian peoples.

“It is a simple truth that never
before did more uncertainty cloud
he West Indian horizon, and to
me, at all events, it is only too
plain that terrible want and dis-
tress will be the lot of the West
Indian cclonies unless the
development of the sugar indus-
try is accompanied by further
agricultural and industrial de-
velopment, The Colonial Develop-
ment Corporation and other Gov-
ermment or +quasi-Government
bodies such as the Agricultural
ind Industrial Development Cx

porations of Jamaica are a fin
concept and can make a gl
contribution to this essential
‘evelopment.

“IT am sure, however, that
successful Colonial development

ultimately depends upon private
enterprise—and British private
enterprise at that, For two hun-
dred years the West India Com-
mittee and its members have
played their part to the full in
Colonial development, but never
before has there been a greater
‘eed for a strong and constantly
vigilant West India Commiitee
Functions Of Committee
“So this morning | want more
han anything else to explain in
what way the West India Com-
mittee can help the West Indian
colonies in what far too few seem
really to appreciate is their time

of need. How can the Committee ;

May a full part in devising and
urthering those plans for the
iuture which all thinking people
know are not only essential but
very urgent?

Somewhat to

my dismay, I!

found during my recent visit to ;

the West Indies that there was
Ul in many places an imprestion
that the West India Committee was
a body largely, if not exclusively
looking after the interests of sugar
end big business; that it had no
interest whatever in the small
man. Perhaps you will allow me
to say something of the talks I
had with the President and lead-

officials of the Jamaica Agri-
cultural Society, many of whose
members I fear had quite a wrong
impression, To them I explained
that while originally, the West
India Committee had been com-
posed largely of London merchants
interested in the West Indies, the
position nowadays was entirely

ership of the



West India Committee was wide-

spread throughout the West Indies to
and that the Committee’s aim was »)

GENDARMES






BARBADOS ADV



OCATE



BREAK UP RED RIOT

oe -



HOLDING THEIR GUNS READY, steel-helmeted gendarmes move in on

Red demonstrators in Paris: The riots, touched off by the arrival of "; every Government

Gen. Matthew Ridgway, were a prelude to the seizure by police of
Communist Party headquarters throughout France. Flying squads ¢;
swooped into offices and ransacked files for evidence to support govern-
ment charges that the Reds planned overthrow of state, (International)
J at a —_— . — = fiwas “fiction.” He alleged that the

to place its services at the disposal
of all in the West Indies who
ought them; that, in fact, one
of the primary objects of the West
India Committee today was to re-
present and help the local man,
whether engaged in minor indus-
sphere, as faithfully and effective-
y as it attended to the needs of
its largest member companies,

“I referred to the coming
establishment of a Trade Commis-
sioner service in the United
Kingdom, saying that we welcom-
ed it and agreed it would perform
a most useful function, At the
same time it would relieve the
West India Committee of much
,outme work, so that the Com-
mittee woula be in a position not
only te give the fullest attention
to important matters of policy and
those la:ger issues in which it
could employ its unquestioned in-
fluence, but also to those important
details which daily call for the
assistance of an independent in-
vestigatdr, negotiator or advocate,
untied ta any political of Govern-
ment machine,

“upviously, the West India
Committee is in a strong and
indeed a unique position to under-
take such responsibilities, for,
in addition to being independent
of Government control, it has long
had the most happy relations with
all departments of Her Majesty's
Government in the United King-

dom, as well as with many in-
dependent bodies and interests,
both public and private, which

enable it to exert effective pres-
sure in the right quarters at the
right time and as often as may be
necessary.

“May I here say, in passing,
that one of the mutters to which
we have been paying attention
ecently is the question of main-
taining a vigorous executive com-
mittee, The intention is that in
future, subject to your concur-
ence—for after all it is the
general body of members who elect
the executive committee—mem-
bership of the executive should
always imply an obligation to
undertake active work on behali
of the Committee.

“You will forgive me if in my
inxiety to draw attention to the
pressing needs of these times I
am speaking for rather longer
than is customary on these
occasion but I do want to try to
ieave you with a clear impression
of the work and needs of the
Committee and indeed of the way
in which our often hard pressed
staff have gladly and willing
risen to them,

“A typical illustration this year
was, of course, the Commitiee’s
efforts on behalf of the Jamaica
Hu.ricane Reiief Fund, when we
placed all our resources at the
aisposal of Sir John Huggins and
his London committee with won-
derfully satisfactory results, I
would also mention the organisa-
tion of the West Indies exhibits at
the Briiish Inuustries Fair and in
the Colonial Otice-shop window,
under the inspi.ed d.rection of
Mr. Souness, while I think you
all know that the whole Common-
weal.h sugar industry was in-
debted to our staif for their ser-
vices throughout the necessarily
long proceedings of the Common-
wealth Sugar Conierence,

“In the future, as in the pasi,
our aim*will a-ways be to meet
very need; but clearly, in these
days of rising costs, if the West
India Committee is to conunue its
functions and usefulness, and
even more if it is to expand them,
as we earnestly desire, more
iunds will have to be placed at
its disposal and an even wider
membership will be essential. In
this connection you will have
noted from the accounts that
once again the income of the
Corumittee did not cover the
year’s expenditure, It is unnec-
ssary for me to’ say that this
state of affairs cannot continue
indefinitely, and our immediate
care must be to strengthen our
nancial position.

“I have aready spoken of the
happy relationship existing be
iween the West India Committee
nd Goverrment departments,
but I would like — especially
a a year when the implica-











tions of that relationship have
been so important to the West
Indies—to express particular
Y ‘iaticon of the help and co-
operation we lways receive
from Her Majesty’s Ministers and
permanent officials with who
ire concerned, of their u
l courte and of the
int of their hard-pressed time
hich thev are lway yrepal
to give to our problems. We «¢
} vs expect too reate
In fram Weet Indian Governor

officia our dealin with

them

Appointment OF Mr.
Lennox-Boyd



of Transport, we have equal,
not greater, reason to condole with?
ine West Inaies and with
ourselves on his departure from
a post at the Colonial Office whose
problems he had energetically
studied and had concerned him-
seif with for so many years and

ig) message,

MeCarran Bill |

Repassed

By House

Over Truman Veto

, By C. P. RUSSELL
Â¥, the New York Times
WadbHINGTON, June 26.

The House of Representatives
voved 219 to 113, tonight to pass
again \he MeCarran-Walter bill
iw overnaul and codify the immi-
sration, naturalization and nation-
ality laws, im the face of Presi-
aent iruman’s velo message yes-
verday.

Ihe two-thirds majority requir-
ea was met with seventeen votes
iv spare. The Senate agreed to
make its test at 2:30 P.M, tomor-

iuw atier two anda half hours
aebate.
The House acted after Repre-

sentative Frangis Ek. Waiter, Demo-
creat of Pennsylvania and ranking
Vemocrat of the Judiciary Com-
mittee, which handied the Bill,
had charged in debate that*the
President had used the veto despite
“strong recommendations” by
agency ad-
ministering alien laws that he
approve the rheasure.

Mr. Walter contended that the
velo message for the most part

concededly one of the
strongest sent to the Capitol by
the President, was the product of
“ghost-writers’ who “have neg-
lected to do one thing—iead the
bill.”

Assails Foes of Legimlation

/ highest i do not know,” Hepresentative
sopesal bia ee {Walter added, “who tne rresi-
it may be that in other Gov- Gems gnost-writers are, but |

ernment Departments an able
and intelligent man can im-
rediately fulfil ministerial vre-
sponsibilities without specialised
study and experience, This is
certainly not so with the Colonial
Office, whose complex and diverse

problems are not those en-
countered in normal life and
affairs in this country.

“Mr. (|Lennox-Boyd’s — trans-
lation seems a particularly un-

fortunate episode in the deplor-
able history of transitory Colonial

Ministers — the history, sad to
say, of Colonial interests being
sacrificed tg politics in this
country. Nonetheless, 1 need

hardly say that we offer our
duties and a sineere personnel
welcome to Mr. Hopkinson, Mr.

Lennox-Boyd’s successor as Min-
ister of State for the Colonies.

“Before finishing, I want to
vefer—indeed to .emphasise—the
immense contribution to the
work of the West India Com-
mittee made by Mr. Du Buisson,
our Vice-President, and Mr, Alan
Walker, Deputy Chairman. My
duties as Chairman would be im-
neasurably more burdensome
were I not able to count upon
ihelr great knowledge of the
West Indies, on their friendly
help and advice, on Mr, Du
Buisson's quiet wisdom and. en
Mr. Walker's ability and intense
vitelity.

“Finally — the Secretary. Mr.
Prrton’s powers of hard and
effective work are astonishing.
He is quite selfless in his en-
deavours for the Committee. 1
need not tell you how popular
he among West Indians and
all interested in the West Indies.
I can only say that I find | it
difieult if not impossible — to
imagine a better Secretary of the
West India Committee, Much
gratitude is due to Mr. Barton
and his admirable staff for their
work. I should tell you that the
executive committee have asked
Mr. Barton to undertake an ex-
tensive tour of the West Indies
this autumn on behalf of the
Committee.

“{ now have much pleasure in
moving ‘that the Annual Report.
of the Executive Committee fo
the year ended April 30th 1952
the audited statement and expen-
diture for the year ended $3lst
December 1951, and the Balance
Sheet be and are hereby adopted.”

The resolution was passed
unanimously. The meeting re-
elected all twelve retiring mem-
bers of the Executive Committee
and closed with tributes to Mr.
Campbell from Sir Harold Tem-
pany and Mr. Du Buisson.

—B.U.P.

P.M. Exam. Held

Dr. A. S. Cato performed a post
mortem examination on the body
of Louise Nurse of Bedford Lane,
St. Michael, at the Publie Mor-
tuary yesterday about 12.30 P.M,
Nurse was taken to the Public
Mortuary after she died at her
home at about 3.40 pm. on
June 30.



do find in the veto message most
of the statements made by ceriain
persons and certain Bioups
whose motives in fighting this
legislation are highly question-
apie, if mot suspicious, On the
ovher hand, I do know that * * *
lhe Deparument of Justice, the
Veparinent of State and the Cen-~-
tral Intelligence Agency, includ-
ing Such subordinate agencies ag
the Immigration and Navuraliza-
tion Service and the Federal
Bureau of Investigation, have
strongly recommended the enact-
ment of my bill.”

The MeCarran-Walter measure,
on which Congressional commit-
tees jointly and alone spent some
three years in devising, under-
takes in general:

To eliminate the remaining dis-
criminations against the immigra-
tion of Asians. Op; is contend
that it would make only a partial
and more discriminatory erasure,
through rigid restrictions in entry
quotas,

To maintain quotas based upon
United States population figures
compared with those of foreign
countries in 1920. Opponents hold
that the original quotas were dis-
criminatory against Eastern and
Southeastern Europe and Asia,
and are more so now. Proponents
rt that the original quotas
still represent ‘the
United - ee needs of the

To stiffen the law concerning
the admiviance, exciusion and ae-
bortauon of dangerous ailens, Up-
ponents charge wal iaw wouid ve
50 Graslic ana Suyject to arpiwary
administwauon as to deprive de-
serving aliens of admittance, or
cause the deportation or stripping
of garned naturalization of per-
sons committing minor ollenses.

10 limut the enuy of Asians to
the quotas (usually 100 each) of
the Pacific areas of their ancestry
or half-ancestry. Opponents com-
ylain that a person born, say in
wendon, could not enter the coun-
(ry except under the restricted
quota of a Pacific island he never
had seen. Proponents rebut that
vitnout this restriction there could
be a flood of Orientals through

‘he non-quota countries of Latin
America,

To codify all unmigration, nat-
Ulalizauion and nauionalily law
inty permanent Statutes, distinct
vom = S@parave emergency and
vemmporary legislation Gesigned to
sdmut large groups under perse-
‘nat this has resulted in “an anti-
alien, anti-immigration and anpi-
-\merican” programme,

To introduce a system of selec-
ive immigration by giving spe-
cial preference to skuled ahens
urgently needed by this country.
this preference, opponents hold,
could be administered on the un-
informed judgment of consuls at
sorelgn posts and prevent the re-
unions of deserving families,

T@ broaden the grounds for ex-
curston and deportation to con-
formity with recommendations
nade by the Senate Special Com-
nit#e to investigate Organized
Cc in Interstate Commercé,



TRENCH DUG BY REDS IN BERLIN



A COUPLE OF YOUNG CYCLISTS prepare to cross one of the trenches dug

by Soviet troops in Berlin to seal

areas. In addition, the Reds have iss,

needed by Germans who want to cro
40,000 guards have been instructed

to cross the dernarcation line without authorization,

off the Eastern Zone from Allied
ed orders that special passes are
ss the East-West border. More than
to shoot on sight anyone who tries
(International)



Opponents say it went much be-|
yond them.

To provide for judicial review
of Official decisions concerning |
aliens. Opponents contend that}
the provisions are far from being
ok for justice. |

On April 9, when the Ho }
passed the McCarran-Walter Di i
the vote exceeded by thirty-two
votes the required twothirds for!
overriding a veto. At that time
256 members participated in the!
test. Today 391 were on hand. |

The Senate passed the alien law |
bill earlier this month with a voice |
vote that was not recorded, The |
eee “aye” indicated over-'

elming a rr |
is different. TOA ee —

As to estimates of ‘0
Senate action tomorrow, tegen
records show that when it Pred
‘o a decision whether to sidetrack |
the MeCarran-Walter bill in fav. |
our of a substitute
its bitterest foes, the vote wes 4
to 27. On this premise it appeared |
that the sponsors lacked one vote!
for overriding a veto,

nm a second recorded t }
whether to send the bill back ‘tol
fhe committee for pigeonholing, |
the vote was 44—28, a tally jacks |
ma gd votes for repassage over |
a yeto,
_ It was on tifse premises thas]
the opponents of the bill gave up
their fight and waited for a Pres |
dential veto. :

Eighty-two of the ninety-six
Senators were present and voting
today, and more might file in be-
fore the veto test,

It was predicted widely that the|
President’s veto of the McCarran-
Waltkr bill would be sustained.
_ Another Presidential veto await-|
ing a test is the bill by which both |
Houses of Congress sought to de-
liver titles to rich offshore oil lands
to the bordering states. The Su-|
preme Court had ruled that the
Federal Government had “para-
mount right” to them,

Senator O’Mahoney. who sides
with the Supreme Court decision, |
and Senator Spessard L. Holland,
Democrat of Florida, sponsor of
the quit-claim bill, were assigned
to set a date for the veto test.







Whipporays Win
At Water Polo

Whipporays “B” gave Police al
sound beating yesterday afterngpn |
at the Aquatic Club when they
beat them to the tune of 9—3 in
their Water Polo match From the
beginning Whipporays were on
fop and ohce in the lead, held
it until the end.

Barnes and Gibson played well
ito score three goals each for
Whipporays while Potter put in|
two and O’Neil one goal. Best
scored the three goals for Police. |

In the other match, Harrison |
College (B) and Bonittas (B) }
|
|
!



Played to a 1—1 draw. This
game was slow but in the first
part of play, Collége were giving

the better exhibition. R. Taylor
seored for College and R.
Weatherhead for Bonittas. |

-_-_-e_ |



Cambridge
Beat Bradford _

Cambridge C.C. defeated Brad- |
ford C.C- in a one-day fixture at |
boarded Hall on Sunday when
they scored 133 for 7 wickets-in
reply to Bradford’s total of 12

Batting for Bradford, G. Harris
scored 67 at number 1, N. Phiilips
scored 16 and C. Harris 11, Bow:-
ing tor Cambridge, C. Duranu
bagged 5 for 18 in 8.5 overs, $.*|
Lewis took 2 for 16 and A. Gay
2 for 12.

For Cambridgé C. ‘'aylor scored
an undefeated 53, C. Clement 23
not out, G. Layne 25 and W
Jones 13. Bowling for Bradford
C, Harewood took 3 for 21, D.
Field, W. Brathwaite ang G.
Alleyne 1 each.







New Education
System For Spain

MADRID, June 27.

A draft bill laying down new
regulations for secondary educa-
tion in Spain was submitted for
study to the Standing Committee
of Cortes — Parliament—it was
learned here today. It provides |
for a modified form of matricula- |
tion consisting of two certificates |
——one elementary and one ad-
vanced — awarded respectively |
after the fourth and the sixth of |
a series of six courses,

Under this bill the state ex-
amination which formerly served
to confirm the certificate previous-
ly obtained would be abolished.

New measures are the outcome
of lengthy discussions between
the Ministry of National Educa-
tion and University authorities
and the Commission of Arch-
bishops. ,

The bill was drawn up by the |
Ministry after consulting with!
the Ecclesiastical hierarchy on
points arising from an agree-
ment reached in 1941 which still
regulates relations between the
Natican und Spain pending con-
clusion of a concordit.—U.P.

Two Killed In

Terrorist Attack

SINGAPOHE, June 30.

A Europe¢an security officer and
Malaya policeman were killed |
yesterday when 40 terrorists am-
bushed a food convoy in Segamat
area of Johore State. A European
police officer and Malaya consta-
ble were wounded in an exchange
of fire.

The convoy was escorted by a
jeep and armoured car, In another
raid by terrorists a freight train
travelling from Kuala Lumpur to
Ipoh was derailed between Bidor |
and Tapah road sub-stations yes- |
terday.

Terrorists wearing uniforms and





armed stole tools from the train
after holding up a three man
crew.

—U.P.
« =e



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PC 304



WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1952



Loan Scheme Ma

Revolving Fund To Be





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

prices paid for greens. It was a
known fact that in recent weeks



y Help Peasant Occupiers

ne

|
Mr. R. G. Mapp (L) said that}
in his opinion members should)











Increased By $150,000

The House of Assembly yesterday passed a Bill to



amend the Peasants’ Loan

Hitherto the Peasants’ Loan
Bank has been operated on “an
absolute, safety” basis and the
Bank could only advance a lean
to peasant owners. A large num-
ber of occupiers do not qualify
for assistance under the existing
provisions of the Act. The Board
of the Bank consider that the
Bank’s activities should be liber-
alized so that a greater number of
peasants may be accorded the fa-
cilities of the Bank and thereby
increase the productivity of peas-
ant holdings. =

This amending bill therefore
seeks to increase the size of a
peasant holding which would
qualify for a loan from 10 acres
to 25 acres (clause 2) and to in-
clude peasants who are renters
for assistance if the terms of their
tenancy offer reasonable security
(el, 2). The scope of the Bank’s
activities is also increased by al-
lowing a loan to be made for ac-
quiring a good title to the holding
and such other purpose as the
Bank may consider reasonable for
increasing productivity of the
holding (cl. 3). Attention is
drawn to the fact that sections 7
and 9 of the Peasants’ Loan Bank
Act, 1936, have been previously
speeded by Acts 1943-1 and 1949-

The Bank proposes to give these
extended powers a trial over a
period of 3 years at the end of
which, if not successful, they
would be discontinued.

After referring to the Objects
and Reasons of the Bill, Mr, F, L.
Walcott (L) who introduced it,
said that he believed members
would all agree that the proposed
amendment was a welcome one
and the Bill, indeed, was as im-
portant as the original Bill in 1936.

They would see, he said, that
occupiers and not only owners
would be able to utilize the funds
of the Peasants’ Loan Bank.

The amount of money involved
would be in the vicinity of $150,000
to be added to the revolving fund.

Refreshing Move

Mr. F. Miller (L) said it was
refreshing to realise that that
scheme would bring relief to
many peasants,

A section of the Objects and
Reasons states that the Bank pro-
poses to give certain extended
powers a trial over a period of
three years at the end of which, if
not successful, they would be dis-
continued. Speaking on this, Mr.
Miller observed that a period of
three years was of too short dura-
tion for a scheme of that sort.

Mr. W. A. Crawford (C) said
that he for one welcomed the
amendment and hoped thet it
would be able to go further.

The claim of Mr. F. L. Wal-
cott that the proposal would in-
volve $150,000 was purely prob-
lematical. No one knew how
many of those who came within
the scope of the Bill would take
advantage of it. ‘

The present total of loans in
any one year was slightly over
$60,000 and if they contemplated
expending $150,000, they would be
looking forward, naturally, to
somewhat corresponding increases
in the island’s production.

Mr, Crawford said that so far as
he knew there had never been a
single prostitution of any berrow-
er from the bank nor had a single
holder lost his holdings. There-
fore the Bank had a good reputa-
tion—a circumstance which would
be gratifying for members to
know and he thought that the re-
cord was greatly due to the char-
acter of the administrative ability
of the Manager of the Bank.

He sincerely hoped that since
they were widening the scope of
the Bank, since they were putting
the additional work on the staff of
the bank, that they would see fit
to remunerate the staff appropri-
ately, and if possible, provide ad-
ditional staff. They had to bear
that in mind.

He observed that it could
scarcely be said that he used
racial motives in any issue, but it
seemed to him that the claims of
the officer in question had been
overlooked because a colour ques-
tion was involved. ,

He also compared the Officer’s
salary then in charge of the Sav-
ing’s Bank with that of a previ-~
ous manager, Mr. Chase, who
received more money when the
work was not as much,

In addition, he was in charge of
the Labour Welfare Fund and they
would notice that when the last
increases came before for Heads
of Departments, etc., the Com-
mittee decided not to trouble his
salary, but to leave consideration
of it for the Directors of the Bank.
One could only hope that the Di-
rectors would see that he got ap-

ANOTHER SHINING EXAMPLE OF

There's always a clean hygienic

Bank Act, 1936, so that more

peasants, including some who merely occupy land and not
necessarily own it, can benefit from the fund.
Government member Mr. F. L. Waleott who introduced
the Bill informed the House that about $150,000 more would
be added to the revolving fund.
The Objects and Reasons of the Bill read:—

propriate consideration
pains. ‘

Mr. O. T. Allder (3) said that
some security must be given but
it still worried him in the Bill
where mention is made about
tenants and still they speak about
leasing when they knew that in
Barbados most of the land rents
were based on weekly tenancy.

“What I was/hoping to see was
the average agricultural labour-
er getting some benefit or being
included, those persons who till
the land and sell their crops to
the markets or factories,” he
Said.

Mr, Allder felt that some pro-
vision should be made in the Bill
to safeguard the agricultural la-
bourer, As the Bill stood this la-
Lourer could not go to the Bank
lor assistance.

He said that the scheme was
not wide enough. It was not going
to help the numerous barren plots
of the island to become ‘produc-
tive.

At this «stage the Deputy
Speaker explained to Mr: Allder
that he was straying from the
confines of the bill,

Barren Plots

Mr. Allder, continuing, said
that what he had hoped to see
was the Government, after re-
ceiving the report of the Fiscal
survey come forward with a
scheme which would involve a
large surh which would assist
owners of barren plots to culti-
vate them.

They could not say a bill of
this sort was sufficient as their
rolicy was not a broad one. In re-
cent weeks the local newspapers
mentioned some of the high

for his

a household could not purchase
a whole breadfruit but hag to
buy part of one.

He said that in his parish one
plantation starged to sell sweet
potatoes and the manager had to
get the assistance of the police in
order to stop people from steal-
ing the potatoes. “That only goes
to show what the food situation
is in this island,” said Mr. Allder.
“It is time that Government con-
sider the matter.”

He hoped that extending the
scope of the Peasants Loan Bank
would not put an end to Govern-
ment’s policy towards the agri-
cultural set up of the island,

“The truth of success in any
agricultural loan scheme is ,ro-
duction,” Mr. V. B. Vaughn, (1)
began. “And the policy of this
loan scheme does not result in
production which would benefit
this colony”,

He said that if they wanted {>
realise a substantial increase in
production and so reduce the cost
of living they have got to have a
more liberal policy.

In Jamaica they were 21 such
schemes, approximately 27 in
British Guiana and even more in
Trinidad, “This scheme should
not increase its beneficiaries but
it should increase its benefits to
the ten acre and under man.”

He felt that the bill was a scan-
dal and the administration had
the brunt to bear of that scandal.
They were doing nothing, There
was -nothing in the bill to encour-
age production. With limited
funds they were apt to do more
for the small man.

A man did not have to till the
soil to know about agriculture.
Experts had givem remarkable
reports on agricultural possibil-
ities in the West Indies and he
felt that no other body had ig-
nored these reports as the local
Government had done,

Mr. L. A. Williams (L) said
that it seemed to him that some
people forgot that Barbadians
were land hungry,

Mr. J. C. Mottley (C) said that
he was in hearty agreement with
the bill for widening the scope
for the provisions of the Peas-
ants Loan Bank,

The Bill was eventually passed.



Worst World Sugar
Glut This Year

By BUTE HEWES
LONDON.

The world is having the worst
glut of sugar this year that it has
had since before the war, Not
only is Cuba harvesting a record
cane crop, but beet-sugar produc-
tion in Europe has outstripped all
pre-war figures,

While Britain is taking all West
Indian sugar available at guar-
anteed prices, West Indian pro-
ducers are protected from the
slump in prices that must inevit-
ably result from this glut. But the
measures now being considered by
other big producers to prevent a
recurrence of this situation in
years to come will affect the Brit-
ish Colonial producers when they
enter ‘the world market eventual-
ly to sell their surplus sugars for
which no market is guaranteed
undey the Commonwealth Sugar
Agreement.

World sugar production in 1952
will reach the staggering total of
some 40,000,000 tons, according to
latest estimates. The greater part
of this, however, is protected in
some way. Just as British Colo-
nial producers are sure of a mar-
ket in the United Kingdom, so are
Cuba, Hawaii and the Philippines
sure of a market for a great part
of their crops in the United States.

But after these protected sugars
have been deducted from the total,
there still remains 7,335,000 tons
to be sold on the free market, ac-
cording to the International Sugar
Council, And the requirements of
this free market are only 4,950,000
tons.

There will thus be a surplus of
2,385,000 tons of free market
sugar. With producers competing
fiercely to sell their stocks at al-
most any price, little short of a
miracle can avoid a serious slump
in world prices.

Cuba is in a more serious posi-
tion than any other sugar nation.
Beiore the war, the Cuban crop
was kept down to about 3,000,000
tons a year because of various
Government and other restrictions,
but during and since the war there
has been a steady expansion in
Cuban production, until this year’s
crop will reach some 8,000,000
tond, or one-fifth of the world
total

Cuba can find markets for about |

6,000,000 of this, but will still be
left with an unsaleable surplus of
2,000,000 tons, Various measures
to support the price of this sur-
plus without letting the world
price sink so low that Cuba will
suffer a loss on its other produc-
tion are being considered in
Havana, ,

fragrance in every room where

this
cleanser is used. Pots, Pans,
and Tiles, Sinks, and Paintwork
respond quickly to its treat-
ment—there’s not a scratch
in a mountain of Chemico.

The County Chemical Co.



§-M-O-O0-T-H Paste

Ltd., Birmingham, England

One suggestion is that the Na-
tional Bank of Cuba should fin-
ance the surplus by supporting
other banks which have invested
funds in the crop, This, it is be-
lieved, would avoid having to
dump the surplus on the world
market. The surplus will be
stored in Cuba and released to
the market over a period of years.

One unexpected windfall for
Cuba has been the failure of the
Philippines to meet its full quota
for supply to the United States.
The Philippines should send 974,-
000 tons of sugar to the United
States this year, but will fall
short of that amount by 200,000
tons.

In accordance with U.S. law,
this deficit will be shared among
other major sugar-producing na-
tions which supply the U.S. mar-
ket. Cuba, by far the biggest sup-
plier, will get the biggest share of
this and will thus be able fo dis-
pose of another 190,000 tons of its
surplus.

But the sugar glut has now
reached such serious proportions
among all the major sugar produc~
ers of the world that some form
of international action is neces-
sary if the situation is to be saved.
Only the Commonwealth produc-
ers, protected by their agreement
with Britain, are not threatened—
yet.

@ Heap

Bp weakingt bowlfuls
of sweet lloge’s Corn Flakes.
They’re fresher! Cri: 1 So
hearty!—the “‘power”’ of corn
and its whole- values.
* oo, ne ae niacin!
jin in ness—

Kellogg’s Corn Flakes.

~,

To Mothers
who cannot



Clerks, Marshal

Get Raises

The House of Assembly by a 13—6 majority yester-

day decided to increase the
Clerk and Marshal.

salaries of their Clerk, Deputy

The old salaries were, Clerk —$4,800, Deputy $2,400 and

Marshal $720 and the salarie
Clerk $5,760, Deputy $2,880

S the House have agreed to are,
and Marshal $1,080.

The Resolution was introduced by Mr. F. C. Goddard
(E) after only being given notice of about 10 minutes before,

and objection was taken whe
with it immediately. Leave
35-minute discussion and an

n he sought leave to go through
was, however, granted after a
11—7 division.

Those who voted for the passing of the Resolution

were: Messrs. A. E. S, Lewi
Brancker, W. A, Crawford,
Vaughn, J. A. Haynes, E. K
Goddard and Dr. H. G. Cu

F. Miller, R. G. Mapp, L. A.
Walcott a

S,

Dr. Cummins of the Government
bench was the first to raise yb-
jections to the Resolution being
proceeded with yesterday after it
had only been given notice of
shortly before.

Dr. Cummins said that he was
not dealing with the rightness or
wrongness of the proposed in-
crease, but he was objecting to it
being considered then as members
had had no opportunity to go into
it. Besides, he had felt all along
and had voiced his opinion when
the suggestion first came up, that
those salaries should wait for the
Commission.

Mr. F. L. Walcott (L) who sup-
ported the deferring of considera-
tion of the Resolution, said that
he was not objecting to the sal-
aries, but to the method of deal-
ing with them. For a matter of
such importance it was not good
enough to ask them at a moment’s
notice to consider it.

Other things connected with the
House wanted reorganizing, he
aid. They had to decide whether
the two clerks necessarily had to
be two qualified solicitors. Nor did
he think it necessary to have two.
In other such Assemblies, there
were not necessarily two qualified
solicitors.

What, indeed, one might ask,
were the legal difficulties the
House were sometimes placed in
that would justify the necessity
for two qualified solicitors? Why,
no member of the House was sup-
posed to accept the advice of the
Clerk.

He felt earnestly and sincerely
that a proposal like that should
be dicussed by a Committee of the
House before it came up for con- |
sideration.

The comment from Mr. :
Williams (L) that if there had
been a scheme for reorganizing
the House staff and things gener-
ally concerned with the House,
members

L.. A. |

it.

Mr. W.A. Crawford (C) said
that the question of which cate-
aecry the officers were, was involv-
ed in the matter, His view was
that the Clerk and the Deputy
Clerk were among those officials
for whom they had sanctioned in-
creases. It seemed strange to hear
the suggestion coming from the
Government Bench that the matter
should be postponed until such
time as they would deal with the
other employees of the Heuse,

The salaries for the officers in
auestion he also mentioned, had
been put somewhat on a basis with
Police Magistrates—not that he
Was suggesting for a moment that
the duties involved were such as
would necessitate a legally trained
man,

Mr. R. G. Mapp (L) felt that the |
matter was a domestic one and it
did not cut a nice show that they
should get there and wrangle over
it, He thought there should be a



feed their babies

Don’t worry ! Cow’s milk can be prepared so that the youngest baby
can digest it without trouble. The addition of Robinson’s ‘Patent’
Barley prevents the milk forming large clots in baby stomachs,
making it easy for the delicate digestive organs to do their work

thoroughly whilst getting them ready to digest heavier foods later

in life. That’s why wise nurses and mothers always use Robinson’s

‘Patent’ Barley.

Peat hy

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=, ROBINSON'S

‘parent’ BARLEY

C. Talma, T. O. Bryan, J. E. T.
J. C. Mottley, O. T. Allder, V.
. Walcott, E. D. Mottley, F. C.
mmins. Against were: Messrs.
Williams, E. W. Barrow, F. L.

nd Mrs. E. Bourne.

Select Committee represe,.tative
of all sections of the House to dis-
cuss it.

Mr. C. Talma (L) said that the
Resolution could be dealt with then
and he did not trust to the expe-
diency of a Select Committee. It
Was all very well to say it should
be done in a constitutional man-
ner, but it would be a long time
before it was done,

The voting for leave being
granted was: Ayes: Messrs. L, A.
Williams, E, W. Barrow, A. E. 8S.
Lewis, C, Talma, W. A. Crowford,
J. C. Mottley, O. T. Allder, J.
Haynes. BE. K. Walcgtt, E, D. Mott-
ley and F. C. Goddard. Noes:
Messrs: F. Miller, R. G. Mapp,
T. O. Bryan, F, L. Walcott, J. E. T.
Brancker, Dr. Cummins and Mrs.

Er. E. Bourne.

Discussion then began on the
Resolution.

Mr. F. ©. Gode=rd (E) said

that the Clerk of the House of
Assembly should not get less tnan
a Police Magistrate and the Dep-

have time to go into the matter.
“I do not propose to be involved
in any wrangling of this sort,” he
said.

He moved that the matter be
referred to a Select Committee
This was seconded by Mr. Miller.

Mr. E. D. Mottley (E) said that
the Clerk should be paid jn rela-
tion to the work and duties which
he performed and also in relation
to the cost of living with respect
to that community.

He supported the resolution be- |

cause he felt no precedent had
been created by Mr. Goddard. He
would be surprised at any mem-
ber of the Government raising
any serious objection to the reso-
lution.

Mr. Mottley also referred to the
reporter of the House who was
paid $120 per month. He said that
this was a scandalous salary for
a man who had to come to the
House, concentrate, report the
Speeches of members, take his
notes home and transcribe and
type them.

He said that within the last six
months the reporter had been
having it very hard and he hoped
Mr. Goddard's resolution
assist in expediting the matter of

paying the reporter a decent
salary.

Mr. F. L. Walcatt (L) asked
members to state an_ instance

where a person was paid £600 a
year as a part-time clerk He

would not uphold the resolution|

afvthat stage, |

Mr. C. E. Talma (L) felt that
no Fiscal Survey was needed to|
fix the salaries of officers of the

House of Assembly.
said |

|

Mr. W. A. Crawford (C)
that they would have to go a long
way towards satisfying employees
of the Government Service.

The resolution was put to the
vote and passed by a 13—6 major-
ity. Those against were: Messr
Miller, Mapp, Williams, Barrow,
F. L. Walcott and Mrs. Bourne.
Those for were: Messrs Lewis,
Talma, Bryan, Brancker, Craw-
ford, J. C. Mottley, Allder,
Vaughan, Haynes, E. K. Walcott,
Ee. Mottley, F. C. Goddard and
Dr. Cummins.



would |

|

would have been, one |
would have thought, informed of |

uty Clerk's salary should be fixed
at half of the ami cnt of the sum
paid to the Clerk,

He felt that members would be
in hearty agreemert with the}
resolution and asked that it be)
passed,

Mr. V. B. Vaughan (I) said that
it was a law in the U.K. that the



clerk could not be less than a

trained man, It was a legislative GONE!
body and the clerk should be

legally trained. He could not

imagine clerks of the general par-

liament being less than legally

| trained,

Obstinate Sutferers from
complaints the experience
relleved by [ian's letter
KRUSCHEN ago i bewan to

feel rheumatism
in my arms and shoulders. ‘Then
ains started in the small of my
Back, increasing until they were
really severe. bought a bottle
of Kruschen and was surprised to
find that I got a little relief. I
bought another and before it was
finished all my pains had gone
and from that day have not
appeared again. My pains were
obstinate and the relief really
surprised me."’—T.R .
Rhewnatic pains and backache
are usually the result of poisons
n the blood—poisons which lazy
wels and tired kidneys are
to ee. t For oheee
complaints there is no_ finer
treatment than Krusctien Salts
which cleanses all the internal
organs, stimulates them to nor-
mal healthy action and thus
restores freshness and vigour.

All Chemists and Stores sell
ohen.

For Weddings, Anniversaries
Birthdays, Christenings, etc.
DIAMOND RINGS
GOLD & SILVER
JEWELLERY

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PAGE EIGHT



CLASSIFIED ADS. |

DIED |



WEEKES—Mrs. ivy _weens, upger Col-
lymore Rock (Dress Maker) On
28th June — was buried same day

Fitz Herbert Weekes (Husband;
Gordon Weekes (Son), Ralph Weekes
(Grandson) Mrs. Myrie Babb and
others 2.7.52--In



IN MEMORIAM



BEST—In loving memory of our beloved
mother Ivy Best, who departed this
fe on G0th June, 1951

Gone but not forgotten

Tul memory fades and life departs

You'll live for ever in our heart
Ever..to. be remembered by_Mrs. Flor-
ence Taitt (mother), Mrs. Eleanor Mc-
Pherson, George Best ichildren), Joseph
McPherson (son-in-law), Deanna, Sheila





and- Anthony McPherson (grand chil-
dren} 2.7.82—1n
BLACKMAN—In loving memory of ry

dear mother, Florence Agusta Black-
man, Who was called to rest on July
Md, 195).
Memories are treasures,
No one can steal,
Death is a heartache,
Nothing can heal
Some may forget her,
Now she is gone
But I shall remember
No matter hew long
8. Pollard (Son) and other rela-
2.7.52—1n

H. M
tives

I
DRAKES—To the ever sacred memory
-of our dear Friend, the late N. C.
\Drakes, who was laid to rest two
years ago.
S Time, and circumstances continue to
add. lustre to this great man.
W. R. Orlando Dottin, Elberdeen F.
Griffith, Herman D. C. Yearwood, Lea-
burn Sampson, A. L. Welch, M. S
Haynes and W. N. Grannum, (Teachers).
2.7.52—1n. ¢

FIELD—In loving memory of our dear
son Roger, who died on July 2nd, 19651.
One year has passed since that
sad day,
Since the one we loved has passed
away,
We miss him much,
Our hearts are sore,
As time goes by we miss him more
Mummie, Daddy and aunties
2.7.52—1n

MORRISON—In Loving memory, of my

.Dear Beloved Son, Winston Morrison,
Soe departed this life on the ist July,
1 .

I waited patientky on the Lord

And He inclined His ear unto me.

And Tf will call upon Him as long as





I live.
iihelmina Morrison (mother) Bdmund
rrison (father), Darrell Morrison
(brother) and sisters. 2.7.62—1n

Pd

ANNOUNCEMENTS

ee
EARN BIG MONEY by selling Redii-

susion in your spare time. Get a suppls
.of forms today. 1.7,52—6n

FOR RENT
HOUSES _

| APPLEBY—on Sea,
wiy-built houses Each has
rooms, dining, drawing rooms
Â¥erandah. Modern conveniences,
; 2.7.52-—2n





Two
three
and

St. James

_—

ATHLONE—on sea, Fontabelle. Divided
finto two flats. Each has dining, drawing
and several bedrooms. Modern conven-

nees. Phone 374 Mr. Kenneth

mdiford. 2.7, 52—2n

Re
Attractive seaside Flat main road Has-
pee. comfortably furnished, English
th, Open Verandah facing sea. Suitable
one person (or couple). Frem July |.
Telephone 2949. 18.6.52—t.f.n.



“FARAWAY, St. Philip Coast, fully
furnished. For July, November,
December only. Dial 4476.

19.6.52—t.f.n.

——<$<$<$<$<$ $$
FLAT & HOUSE—Fully furnished, St.
Lawrence on-Sea. Phone 3503,
E 20.3.52—t.f.n.
$$
" From Ist August, furnished or unfur-
nished, “INGRID" Navy Gardens. Three
bedroonis, Inspection by arrangement
With the tenant, telephone number FITZ
. EVELYN, ROACH & CO., LTD.
Rickett St
* 1.7.52—1. fn,
————————————
-OHILLOREST," Bathsheba — Beautiful
view, well furnished, For months of
October, November and December. App!’
Cc. L, Gibbs & Co., Ltd. Tel. 2402.
; 1,.7,.52—am

—————— EEE ner
NEWHAVEN, Crane Coast, fully fur- °

nished.
ber only. Dial 4476.

For July, November, Decem-
19.6,52—t.f.n,



eae ree
OFFICE SPACE in building at Spry |

Apply Auto

Street near Trafalgar St
2506. 27.6.62—1.f.n

Tyre Co.
UNION VILLA—Maxwell
2.7.52

ences. Dial 3892 an

LODGE STONE WORKS CO. %

A large quantity of
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% nll sizes, suitable for Road or
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| ORIENTAL |
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HEADQUARTERS FOR |
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NEW & Renewed Wardrobes,

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Morris, Caned and other types,
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PIANOS, Banjos, Sewing Ma-
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Magic Lantern $6.00

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Spry St — Dial 4069

PPOO DOS OSS GOH 9H HOOF 9H9D:



tion Phone 2562 2.7.52—3n
CAR—1951 Hillman Minx. 8,000 Miles.
Ir good condition A. R. Lewis c/o

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1.7,52—6n

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Dial 4476

owner-driven, good as new. Dial 4476.

eo

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——

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Changing Unit 91.52

Unfurnished
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TELEPHONE 2508

FOR SALE

AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—Morris

Oxford im good condi-



CAR—Dodge Super-Deluxe, First Class
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12.6,52—t.f.n.

little



CAR — Vauxhall Velox, need,

42.6.52—t.f.n,

Austin A.40 Car Telephone 4821,

26 .6,52-—t.f.n.

yRON—Walter No-Cord |
Get one e
all are sold,



fine units before

26.6.52—6n







Just received new shipment of Garrard
speed Automatic Changers at
S. Maffei & Co, Ltd. Radio Em-

15.6.52—-t.f.n.
“Bye”

JUST ARRIVED De Luxe



BARBADOS

day the lith day
offer for sale by Public
my Office in the Public Buildings for a
sum not less than the appraisecé value
“THE MOTOR V :
now at anchor in Carlisle Bay, Bridge-

whi

passengers’
sailors’ rooms for 6, cooks’ aecommoda-
tion for 2,
store room.

ments for inspection apply
+. %.

Proyost Marshal's Office

between the ages of 18 and 26 residing
in Barbados are requested to call
the American Consulate from July 1 to



(with Gar-

limited quantity only

28.6.62—t.f.n

————$
One Hotpoint Electric Stove, 4 Rings,



Dial 2177

PYE BATTERY SETS—Just a few lett

2.7.5%—in.







15.6.52—t.f.n.

— Frigidaires made

General Motors Seven and nine

feet Always make sure your
Frigidaire K

Broad St. Dial

1,7, 52—3n

REFRIGERATORS

POULTRY

PIGEONS—-White, Blue and
Phone Humphrey, 4428

2.7.52

LIVESTOCK





Silver

2n

, CALF—One (1; Lure Bred Holstein Calf
Bull,
Road Cot,



Smith,
Dial 2537
2.7,62—t.f.n.

MECHANICAL
One H. M. V. Automatic Record
2.7,.52—7n.

MISCELLANEOUS

ANTIQUES — ot every dercription
Giass, hina, old Jewels, fine Silver
Watercolours. Ear!

graphs etc., at Gorringes Antique Shop

adjoining Royal Yecht Club.
3.2,62—t.f.n.

BATH TOWELS:—Dutch Manufacture.
Extra Strong Quality with Beautiful
Stripes
to, Two for $3.50 at Kirpalani, 52 Swan
Street 2.7.52——In,
nn

‘ EREALS—Shredded Wheat, Corn
Fikes, Oatmeal, All Bran & Oatflakes in
Tins W. M. FORD, 36, Roebuck St
Dial 3489 2.7.52--2n

FRUIT iN TINS:--Pears, Peaches,
Sliced Pineapple, Prunes, Guavas, Gra 5
also Sliced Carrots. W. M. Ford, Roe-
buck St. Dial 480 2.7.52—2n

GALVANISED—Special offer for 10
days. Best quality English vaniged
sheets 6 ft. $3.94 7 ft. $4,60 B ft, $5.24
Also galvanised nails 39 cents per Ib.
Auto Tyre Co. of Spry & Trafalgar St
Dial—2696 21,6,52—t.f.n.











wecciperenesenhinenpmnasigeensene nine teacmeinenesctanionet
LAUNCH-—Cabin Launch, Morris Vid-

ette Engine, excellent condition, a bar-
ain, Only reason for selling owner
leaving island. Phone Vincent Burke.
28,.6,.52—Tn





RECORD—Just Received. Long Playing,
Calypsos, (Edmundo Ross) Charlie Kunz,

21, 1962 for Selective Service Registration
under the Universal Military Training

who
sequent to July 31, 1952,
to register upon the day th

el
their birth, or within five days there-
Perect | after.

American Consulate,
bados.





ainst
giving credit to my wife, ADA VIOLA
PITT
myself responsible for her or anyone
else contracting any
‘my name unless by
————-= | signed by me.









giving eredit to my wife
VALERIA JONES (nee Forde) as 1 do
not hold myself responsible for her or
anyone else contracting
debts in my name unless by a written
order signed by me

giving cred
whomsoever in my name as 1 do not hold
myself responsible for anyone contract-
ing any debt or deb’
less by a written order signed by me

—— Taran

The public are hereby warned against
Usual price $2.11 each. Reduced | Moore (nee Springer) as I do nat hold
elae contracting any debt or debts in

PUBLIC NOTICES |

|
IN THE COLONIAL COURT OF
ADMIRALTY

The Owners of the Steamship
“Amakura”™

ve
The Motor Vessel “T B. Radar’
Her cargo and freight
At 2 p.m, in the afternoon of Thurs-
1982, 1 will
Competition at

ot July

ESSEL T. B. RADAR’

town, with its fittings. Particulars of
the Inventory of the said Vessel can be
|seen on ligation

The appraised value of the Vessel,
%, bullt in 1846, is the sum of

IVE THOUSAND DOLLARS

It is fitted with on Internal combustion
Diesel

of 10 kn
ar
of 1
and a depth of 10 feet
the Engine room is #4

ine, has an estimated speed
, & gross tonnage of 162,34,
ister tonnage of 116.12, a length
feet, a breadth of 20 & 3/10 feet

a as

The accommodation consists of 2
rooms with 4 beds each,

Boatswain's locker

and
For further particulars and arrante-
to
HEADLEY,
Marshal in Admiralty
25.6.52—11.



NOTICE

All male citizens of the United States














at

All male citizens of the United States
attain the age 16 years sub-
are required
attain the

hteenth anniversary of the day of

For further information, consult ¢he
wn,
5.524. fn.



‘The public are hereby warned ag:
(nee SCOTT) as ¥ do not nol

debt or debts ir
a written order

Sed. MILTON PITT.
Melverton Village,

St. George.
1.7,52—2n



The public are hereby "warned against
MIGNON



any debt or

Sed. VERNE AMBROSE JONES.
St. Patrick's,
Christ Church

Ae

The publig are hereby warned against
fo any person or persons

in my name un-

Sed. CECHL WATTS,
Eagle Hall,
St. Michael
1.7, 52—2ng

giving credit to my wife, Mary Beatrice
myself responsible for her or anyone

my name w by a written order

signed by me,











Sed. ERROL PERCIVAL MOORE
Lower Carlton,
St. James
1,7,.52-—2n.
HOUSEKEEPER Experienced House
keeper; pleasant personality; to take
care of new, seaside flats. Livingy

quarters and agreeable surroundings. in
addition to reasonable Please
write C/o Box C.C
Co.

C/o Advocate
29.6.52-——3n





National Cash Book-Keeping Machine
Operator with previous experience. To
assume duties on or belove Ist) August,
1952. Apply in person with written

Mildred Atwell, Ted Heath, Billy Cotton | application to Secretary, Dowding Estates

(B'dos) Lid
2.7.52

(Artists). Wm. Fogarty
Qu

ubscribe now to the Dally Telegraph
Bngland's leading Daily Newspaper now
arriving tn Barhados by Air only a tew
dave after publcwtion in Londen Con.
tact’ ton Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltd.
Loca) Representative, Tel. 3118.

17 4.52-—t.t.n.







TINNED MEATS:-Lancheon
Corned Mutton, Cereal Beet, Brisket Bee*,
and Steak & Kidney Puddings, W. M.
Ford, Roebuck Street. Dial 3489,

2.7.52—2n.,

ains in Back
i eee

Beef,





STAMP COLLECTING







Genuine collector England
Wishes to contact genuine col- &
lector Barbados view exchange %
local issues. Box No 4645, %
Joshua B, Powers Ltd., 14 Cock- s

ur Street, London, 8.W.1.

land ‘.
x
NG

DANCE NOTICE

FARLEY HILL COUNTRY
CLUB, St. Peter

OPENING DANCE

SATURDAY 12th JULY, 1952
Starts at 9.00 p.m.

Dress Optional

ADMISSION tt $1.00
(Meanwell’s Orchestra)
29.6.52—3n.
569999999665 SGOECSLY
a)

NUTROPHOS

For frayed, tired nerves
that make you jumpy and
irritable. take

NUTROPHOS

for speedy relief

PSS SSS SSOSOSS



- MORNING

SLA SIOD





OCS

& Trading Co., Limited.”
2. jy 52-—-Tn.

MISCELLANEOUS

EL

SURVEYOR-ENGINEER would like to
get im touch with estate or building
development company desirous of ne
oe Holds poms & Yaane “
several. years’ experience i .
C/o Advocate. af .

——$— $$$ [ $$ TS,
$62.60 POCKET MONEY easily earned

by recommending 25 new subscribers to

REDIFFUSION in one month



1,7,52-—6n

—

REDIFFUSION offers $1.50 cash for
each new Subseriber recommended by
you 1.7.52-—6n
SUPPLEMENT YOUR i#NCOME by»
recommending REDIFFUSION Obtain
full particulars from the REDIFFUSION
office 1.7, 62—6n

aarp RE ERS
TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bonus





from Rediffusion for 25 recommenda-
tions in one calendar month
1.7, 52—6r
UNFURNISHED HOUSE--To rent or
lease anytime between. August and

November, for a long period in Hastinr's
or St. Lawrence area Dial 2405 be-
tween 8-—12 noon, 27.6.52—31

“Qolontbie” Due

The SS. Colombie is expected
to arrive in Carlisle Bay this
morning from Martinique. She
will be leaving to-day at 4 p.m.
for Trinidad. Her agents are
Messrs, R. M. Jones & Co., Ltd.





Don't let mourn night he
ing, attacks of Bronchitis oF Aathins
ene! Another: Ma
without . grea
sistem works thru the
tubes
inumedtatay remove wah
macus, R,
promoting freer breath! and ies
Seen eanee . et MERDACO
from emist today. °
faction or money back ‘alone

IT’S ENGLISH but

looks AMERICAN!
i's Smart, just suitable
to fix upstairs
for early morning tea

or hot water emergency.

3 Ts a sample 2 Burner
rl Gas Range Plate
> Call and see it at
Your Gas Showreom, Bay St

IMPORTERS

We offer Africa's best
quality PEANUT BUTTER.
Our peanut butter is ab-
solutely pure, nutricious,
and full of rich vitamins.
{Increase your turnover by
selling this popular line. We
ship direct from factory at
FACTORY PRICES,

Please write to
KOLIMPEX (PTY)

P.O. Box 9608,

LTD.,

s JOHANNESBURG,

South Africa.

Tweedside Rd
of land

Go

front 18 x 10, back 2 « 11 Shed 2
Land can be rented Also (1) Large
Property at Brittons Hill Apply Jos
St. Hill, Real Estate Agent, Tweedside
Rd., or Dial 4837 2.7, 52--2n

————
The undersigned will offer for sale at
Public Competition at their office No

17 High Street, Bridge’
the ‘ih day of July,
with the land thereto containing by ad-
measurement
Navy Gardens,
containing
south and east,
dining room, 3
and kitchen with garage and rooms for
two servants and with
stalled.
further particulars
sale apply to:—
COTTLE



By kind permission I will sell at 1 p.m
+ McEnearney & Co.,
h

in work Order. Terns Cash. R
Archer McKenzie’ Aue 7



pany 1
MOTOR OMNIBUS CO., Nelson Street
one 1952 Sommerset Austin Sedan Car
damaged

Terms CASH Fall of Hammer.
R. ARCHER

the yt spots by public com-
on e

petition on rsday next 3rd solr Lae
toll t ed
wooden building at St
School at 12 o’elock, and at St

Boys’ and Girls’ schools one (1)
en building

Govt. Auctioneer.



public auction on the spot at Layne’s
Gap, Brittons Hill on Friday next 4th
July at. 2 p.m. €
about 60 feet long with galyanize roof and
abovt 250 block stones. also 25 wooden
henches. This buitding +s ideally suited as

UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

Straker & Co
July 3 at his Office Spry St, (Oppesite

lop Roadster! 2
Ladies Brassieres,
Football boots,
Elastic Braid, ke Cream
termints, Extra Strong, and many other
items.

a









BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PUBLIC SALES (C’ada‘Greatest
Tradin
In The World’





REAL ESTATE
BRIGHTWOOD' yrence
With land about. @100 se": Goed
sea frontage. Suitable for building. The
bungalow has 2 open verandahs, 3 large
living rooms, 3 bedrooms, shower, toilet
kitchen, pantry, Garage, servants’ quar-
ters. Main water, electricity. Premises

ne and re-decorated throughout
1
Appk

Inspestion

by appointment only
“Landfall

Sandy Lane, St. James
2.7.62

PROPERTIES—Shop and Residence pt
, Standing on 2.500 sq. f
Water and Lights Installed
Acres Building Land st Clapham
ve Reasonable

1 House at Howells Cross Road



1





















































Size

wn, on Friday,

at 2 *
The bungalow known as CARVILLE

8241 sq.
Christ
an open

ft. situate ir
Church ane
verandah faging

combined drawing &
bedrooms, toilet, bath

electricity in-
dial 4460. For
and conditions of

Inspection

CATFORD & CO, 20.6.52—8n

AUCTION

Garage Friday
One-BsS.A. 5 Seater Sedan Car

tioneer
2.7,32—39

By instructions of the msuranee Com
Ww sell at the GENERAL

by accident. Done only 45%
SALE FRIDAY 4th at 2.30 p.m

Auctioneer.
1.7,52—4n
By instructions the

received from
Committee I will sell

— One (1) _ double
Boniface Jurilor
Lug's

wood-

wa A. Seutt,
6, 52—4an

at 2 p.m
Terms strictly cash

UNDER THE DIAMOND
By instructions received } will sell by

(1) one wooden building

pavilion or beach house, Terms Cash
yArey A. Scott, Auctioneer

instructions received from C. L

By
I will sell on Thursday

Men's
Bladders

Terms Cash. Sale at 12.30

VINCENT GRIFFITH (Agee.



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

SALES IN JULY

Tuesday #th Mrs, J. F. fnniss's Sale.
Harcliffe, St. Lawrence
Gap

Tuesday 15th Mrs. L. L. Gill's Sale
Clement Rock,
St. gone).
W. F. Harris’ Sale
Holborn, Fontabelle.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO,,
Auctioneers

Tuesday 22nd Mrs

2.7.52—1n.

LOST & FOUND







B-—6524,

52 Finder please
Trotman, Dayrell’s
2.7,52—I1n,

Mid-



B.T.¢
summer Meeting, If
return to Ethelbert
FPad., Christ Church

WHITE Disc (1) for Standard 6 h.p.
car, Lest between Speightstown and
Bridgetown Finder please return to
Neville Rock, Hindsbuny Road or dial
2065 Car M—2i47 2.7.52—2n

Foreign Diplomats
Attend Session

From Page 1.

open for business to-morrow.
President Rhee may then have
support to put through his de-
mand for the election of a Presi-
dent by popular vote. He be-
lieves he would win another
term as President that way. The
speaker in the assembly, an anti-
Rhee member, H. Seiniky did not
attend to-day’s opening.—U.P.

One







In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (West Indies)
Limited, advise that they can now com-
munieate with the following ships
through their Barbados Coast Station:

M.V. Bonaire, S.S_ Alcoa Pointer, 5.5
Hawk, M.S, Ravnanger, S.8. Uruguay,
= §. ‘Hurunui, SS _ Thorbjorg, S.5
Fridtiof Nansen, S.S. Colombie,
Silver Ocean, S.S, Enros, S 5 Seapearl
SS. Hertford, SS Interpreter,
Bresle, SS orden, SS. Mattawunds,
SS. Andrea Gtitti, © S. Sclara, $5
Fort Townshend, SS. Alcoa Pegasus,
SS. S. Paula, S.S. Campas,
Hersilia, SS. Argentina,
Quebec, SS. Fort Esperance, SS
coma Star, SS Sundial, SS. Aasem-
aersk, S&. Polyslory, SS. Samana,
ss ‘Cyrus, SS. Evros, SS. Sun
Valley, 8S. Nordahl Grieg, SS. Nati-
cina, SS. Christi Holm, ©.S. Alcoa
Corsair, S.S. De Grasse and SS At-
lantie Mariner





a





This Week's
Special



COCONUT CREAM

CAKES
6c. each

nel

Ss
B ARBADOS %
AKERIES MsTD.

General Post Office.

DIAL 4758
JAMES STREET



many
ment in Canada and of Canadian
investment abroad was contained
in an address at Toronto at the

Canadian
Fair. After noting that confidence

“ridiculous” charge had been made
of Canada
United States,

in Camada were considered as a

than 5 per cent of that wealth to-
day, However,

critical of capital from external

investment had made much of this
country self-sufficient, and “while }c

ertheless, the cost of servicing the
debt is offset by the saving effected

capital,

s2—4n. |that history shows that

© 5 | (1951-64) regarding Wages Books and other



gNation

A comprehensive analysis, from
angles, of outside invest-







In Carlisle Bay

week-end by Henry Borden, ae Willemstad, Seh Franklyn D.R
C.M.G., Q.C., President of Brazil-| Turtie Dove, Sch. ‘arrict Wiittake
fan Traction Light & Power Co.,}* wheter arriett Whittaker
to the Canadian Exporters’ Asso- ei ARRIVALS

ciation in connection with the lec Delaucen fram St. Vincent with

rgo and

ecoanuts

fresh fruit,
Consigned to
Association

machinery and

International the Schooner

Trade

Owners



in the continuing development of Motor vessel Daerwood arrived trom
Canada had renied in large - an ad a Soe
influx of new capital, more than DEPARTURES
$1.500,000,000 in the st two — eee, pm, Leveepest Motor
y 3 — or approximate » 15 . vente “races for inidad and Motor
cent of Canada’s aggregate capital —— apenie
expenditure during the period—

the speaker referred to the » Seawell

existence of “some suspicion and vn bn battubae
misunderstanding of the role of | Prom TRINIDAD rea

foreign capital”, both incoming L, Stanley, R. Cumberbatch, J. Mur
and outgoing, For instance, doch, E. Murdoch, J. Murdoch, \

the

Rezende, P. Rezende, M. Rezende, J
Mayers, A. Mayers, P. Mayers, D. Mayers
to the! R. Mayers, H, Nelson, C McLeod, J

Goddard, A. Goddard, C. Goddard, J

Even if external in ent as Maher, V. Knox, J. McKee

“selling out”

From 8T. LUCIA
mortgage On our national wealth, Miss Jill Devaux, Mr. Leslie Baylis,
this ‘mortgage” had decreased in Sn span Baylis, Mr. Isaac Sadoynik
the past generation from 19.2 per| tron SKIT
eent of Canada’s wealth to less Mr, Walter Tiesel, Mr. Lipton Wenhar

DEPARTURES — My Bb.
; ON SATURDAY
For TRINIDAD

WA
far from feeling

E. Horgan, A. Lee, H. Haskell
sources: Canada had benefited im- | Haskell, P. Haskell, E foskell M
measurably. In the case of oil, such | ##skell, M. Scott, D.- Ybberson, E

Robinson, ©. Gittens, M. Gittens, J
Perez, L. Jordan, B, Marshall, RB. Bywnoe,

cou r Harvey, H. Harvey,, R. Spooner

it ee that we must service this a GRENADA .
eA * 7 1 marris, N. Lucas, U. Milne, D

great new foreign investment, nev-]j..\) 3. "Sandifer, W. Allan, W. Vos, \N

Pearson, Jim Hercules
For VENEZUELA

in the reduction in petroleums im- Miss Carmen Vanderbranden, Miss
ports.” Another instance was in- rig ass ara, Mr. Alexander Stewart,
vestment of U.S. capital in devel- Retad. Shs. denn’ Moca... soar:
oping iron ore deposits: we are} Ronald Laidier, Mr Thomas Younger,
now exporters of iron ore and our Mt. Henry Eicher, Mrs. Mary Eicher,

> + , | Miss Jessie Eicher, r ‘uana Magal-
exports will grow more rapidly lanes, Miss Anita Magallanes Mise

than our imports. And the rapid
development of Canada’s pulp and
paper industry needed foreign

Norma Nunez.
ARRIVALS — BY B.W.LA
ON MONDAY
From TRINIDAD
E. Garside, S. Apack, G. Harris, H.

In order to have a healthy eco- | Weekes, C. Gittens, A. Kirby, V. Kirby.
RICO



nomy, “Canada must have a Tee al aes a ae
ylor, in jaza, Sustace
healthy and prosperous export Jones, Ernest Barrow, Eunice Tens
trade’. In 1951, Canada’s exports | Edna Applewaite, Rigaudeé. Prout. Moi
of and services were 24 per | timer Thompson, Gladstone Dayrell, John

C. Webster, Annie K,. Webster, James A
Wood, Edward Dottin, Millicent
Maggie Hassell, Michael Foster
DEPARTURES — BY BW.1LA
ON MONDAY
for TRINIDAD
D, Corbin, W. Sheppard, Olga Grannuin

ce of her gross national pro-
duct.

Canada’s Trade, $577 Per Capita
—While Canada is recognized as
a great exporting country, it is

Piaza













also a great “trading country”.|M. Sealy, H. Parker, R._Skeete. D
*. Scott, J. Scott, S. Scott, T. Springer.
Canada, the speaker pointed out,| (jacob. B, Mohammed, James Clerk,

is “the fourth ranking exporter
and importer but she is by far the
greatest “trading” nation in the
world”—on a per capita basis—
foreign trade in 1951 representing
$577 per capita, with the U.S.
somewhat less than one-third, at
$168 per capita.

Mr. Borden then emphasized
another point (with readily ex-
plainable exceptions”), namely
capital

Marjorie McLeod
For GRENADA

Fields, C, Crawford, D. Dunlop, V
rond, A. Kendrick
For GUADELOUPE

M. Kinch, L. Dimmick
For ANTIGUA

G. George, L, Hodge, E. Chavasse
For PUERTO RICO

Mr Raphael Spano, Mrs.
Spano, Mrs. Viola Ford, Mr
Paviluk, Mrs Margaret
Mildred Sandiford, Mrs
Mr
Miss Adeline Earle,

Wal-

Mrs,

does not enter an area, develop it} iin, Mr. Heulet Benjamin, Mr. Regin-
to a certain point and then de- aid MeConney, Mr Edrington Maynard,
Mrs. Jean Paviluk

part. When capital is wisely in-
vested, ably managed and fairly
treated, “it remains and grows
with the country of its adoption.”

Foreign trade for Canada could
be developed through the medium
of direct investment abroad. The
recent removal by the Canadian
Government of foreign exchange
control regulations should facili-
tate an increase in Canada’s trade
potential through export of our
capital and participation in the
development of other countries.

This led the speaker to refer
to “that colossal market and|{had been stimulated,

Sane

3 CHANCERY SALE

The undermentioned property will be set up for sale at the
Public Buildings, Bridgetown, between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for
the date specified below. If not then sold
Friday at the same place and during the s¢
on application to me

DAISY HERBERT MURPHY
executors of the





trading world, the

invested in a
Brazil, Since t
ment in “Brazilian

en, this

sult, in the past 5 years

materials had received




sours until sold

JAMES GRANT
Eyare Murphy,

ATKINS PLE—Plaintiffs
deceased

and
will of

and
MILLICENT WAITHE and AURELIA CLARKE Defendants
acting herein by D'Arey Augustus Seott their constituted Attorney
PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at Eagle Halt

Road in the parish of Saint Mic



ael in this Island containing by

admeasurement nine and three fifths perches or thereabouts abutting

and bounding on two sides on lands of Albertha Payne on lands
now or late of one Mrs. Thomas and on Eagle Hall Road
or however else the same
the messuage or dwellinghouse thereon called
all and@ singular other the buildings and erections on
of land erected and built standing and being with the appurtenances.

UPSET PRICE: £1500 0. 0.
DATE OF SALE

“Byare Ville”

18th July, 1962
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chancery,
30th June, 1952.

2.7,62—4n

gettin cal, Alans ALD Se oe

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

WAGES BOOKS AND OTHER RECORDS

Se 5h. i



HE ATTENTION of Employers is directed to the Wages Board
of 1950 (applicable
Bridgetown only), the Holidays
8.8 | with Pay Act, 1951, (1951-38), and the Protection of Wages Act, 1951

(Bridgetown Shop Assistants) Decisions, No. 2
to employers of shop assistants in

Records to be kept by

them.

2. Employers are required to enter in their Wages Book the

s& Imperial following particulars concerning each employee :—
a

Christian name and surname, sex, period of employment,
rate of remuneration,

ture of employee.
3. Employers are also required to keep a Register of all their
employees showing the following particulars :—
Christian name and surname, date of birth, date of engage-
ment, period in respect of which holiday with pay is given, date

and duration of holiday with pay, amount of holiday pay, date |

and duration of sick leave, remarks.
*4. The Labour Department is willing to give any further advice,
if required.
LABOUR DEPARTMENT,
Ist July, 1952.

POST OFFICE NOTICE

Change in Air Mail Schedule



Effective 1st July, 1952, Air Mails will be closed at the General}

Post Office as follows:—







Destination } Time Day
Dominica Sees cas 2.00 p.m. Wednesday
9.30 a.m. Saturday
t. Vincent .. es a 9.30 a.m, Monday

9.30 a.m.

Thursday

Schedules should be amended where necessary.

30/6/52
ROBERT A. CLARKE,
Colonial Postmaster

SEA AND AIR ||
TRAFFIC |



M.S. BOSKOOP Ist August, 1952

M.S, ORANJESTAD 15th
SAILING TO T'DAD, PARAMARIBO

mM s STENTOR ae July, 1952
83. ¢ A July, 1962
M.S. NESTOR 8th 7:
SAILING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO
\.S. HERSILIA 4th July, 1962

M.S

J, Steelman, E. Steelman, M. Glean, G.






Eleanor

John
Macfarlane,
Roberta Branch,
Kenneth Gibbs, Mrs. Edith Jones,
Elsie Benja-

Continent of
South America”. Fifty years ago
a small group of Canadians had
ublic ubility in
invest-
Traction”, had
grown to $750,000,000, As one re-
alone
Canadian suppliers of goods and
business
of $50,000,000 and interchange of
goods between the two countries

Registration Office,

the sum and on
ll be set up on each sueceeding
Full particulars

aforesaid
is abutting and bounding Together with
and
the said parce!

ee

SC OPLOPS PPPSSSS

YWPOSS

gross amount due, deductions (a record |‘
of each worker’s account is to be kept), net amount due, signa- |’

2.7.52.—2n. |







>
>

WEDNESDAY, JOLY 2. 1952

nd





Coupons eo 4/10%
RATES OF EXCHANGE 9. Sive me
IST JULY, 1952 CANADA
Seliing Buying 78 3/10% Cheques on Bankers 76.5/30%
NEW YORK Demand Drift 76.25%
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ROYAL NDS | 2o°099°* ;
STEAMSHIP CO. ‘
The MV “CACIQUE DEL
| ¢ SEETOR Gan at tee CARIBE” will accept Cargo and
MS 7 A atin suse 1958 Passengers for St. Lucia, St
ss corre eon oe Vineent, Grenada, and Aruba
6 A Sith, SOly, 18 Date of Sailing to’ be notified
M.S. NESTOR 25th July, 1962

The M.V. “CARIBBEE” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
jee, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and St. Kitts Date of sail-
ing to be notified

B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATION (INC.) -
Consignes — Tele. No. 4947

SAILING TO SUROPE vaiie
iy.

& BRITISH GUIANA

EGO OOOO

1952

(CURACAO ONLY)

MESTIA 2ist July, 1952
Ss. P. MUSBON, SON & CO... LTD J
Agents SOSSSOBESSSOSGBG GOS SO SOS



Canadian National Steamships





SOUTHBOUND Arrives Satis Satis Arrives Sails

Halifax Boston B'dos B'dos

CANADIAN CRUISER .. 30 June 2 July — 10 July 10 July
CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 90 June 2 Juy = 12 July 13 Ju
LADY RODNBY .. .. =: 11 July 14 July 16 July 25 July 26 July

NORTHBOUND es Satls Arrives Arrives Arrives

B'dos St. John B’dos Boston Halifax Mo
LADY NELSON 4 July 8 July 17 July 19 July 22 July
CANADIAN

CONSTRUCTOR 24 July 29 July S Aug. 8 Aug. 10 Aug.
LADY RODNEY 7 Aug. 9 Aug. 19 Aug. 20 Aug. 23 Aug.

for further particulars, apply to—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD.—Agents.



_ HARRISON LINE



—

j OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM

Vessel. From Leaves Due
Barbados.
S.S. “TACOMA STAR” _.... Liverpool 19th June 4th July
S.S. “HERDSMAN” ..Lendon 5th July 30th July
S.S. “STATESMAN” .... Liverpool 12th July 27th July

HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM



Vessel. For Closes in Barbados.
S.S. “TRADER” .» Liverpool » 8th July
For further information apply to e

& CO., LTD.—Agents
5659S 9OSSODSSIOOSOOTE,,

M. V.
DAERWOOD

will be arriving at Barbados
on TUESDAY, July ist and
will be sailing on THURS-~-
DAY, July 3, for St, Lucia,
St. Vincent, Grenada, Aruba,
accepting Passengers and
Freight,

DA COSTA

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Clearing out our new stock
of shot. gun cartridges:—

12 GUAGE ELEY—$11.65
per 100 NET CASH

Big closing out reductions
on all HARDWARE ITEMS.

AT

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE













C6, 6,655 OSGI IAN

LLL TF OD oF

44%





SESOHLSGSS

C"G"TRANSATLANTIQUE |

Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique, ¥
Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica



From Southampton “Arrives Barbados

*““DE GRASSE 4th June, 1952 .. 16th June, 1952
“COLOMBIE” .. 19th June, 1952 .. 2nd July, 1952
*“DE GRASSE” 12th July, 1952 .. 24th July, 1952

*Not calling at Guadeloupe
SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO FUROPE

From Barbados Arrives Southampton
*““DE GRASSE” .. 29th June, 1952 .. 9th July, 1952
“COLOMBIE” .. 18th July, 1952 .. 25th July, 1952
*“DE GRASSE” 6th Aug., 1952 .. 16th Aug., 1952

*Sailing direct to Southampton





CLOSED FROM TUESDAY FOR STOCK TAKING
RE-OPENING FRIDAY THE 4TH

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
Corner Broad and Tudor Streets

Mbt bb bt POA 66 O56.

os

THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
CORPORATION LTD.

NOTICE

ONE of the LARGEST GENERATING SETS in
our Power Station will be OUT OF COMMISSION for
at least ONE WEEK from TUESDAY, JULY 2nd, for
overhaul by the Engine Maker's representative. There
is every probability therefore that LOAD SHEDDING

will be necessary at certain times during this period.

OD DODO

2948





THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
CORPORATION LTD.

Vv. SMITH,

General Manager.

ODD OO4-8-6-H@



HOPPED PHOPOAIP POOP DOO

3

‘ee8

SPO

SPL LLLP FIED
-WEDNESDAY, JULY. 2, 1952








SHE'S IN THE
CLEAR UNTIL
SHE MAKES A
CLAIM. ANY Way, |
“WHAT WE WANT Ss

| INSURANCE JOP
| IN THE STATES

LAST YEAR, TO KNOW IS —

| E SHE'S
GOT THE MEAL

VEWELLERY.





AH, BREADED )
VEAL CUTLETS, ~
MASHED POTATOES. i
CREAMED PEAS AND
APPLE PiE ~—



JUST A
MOMENT,

v PLEASE



FLASH GORDON

—I WILL REMIND yOu
THAT DR. CARSON
RETURNS SOON /
MARRY ME, AND I
WILL SEE THAT HE
AND HIS BOY ARE
RETURNED TO EARTH
SAFELY — ALONG WITH
YOUR EARTH WOMAN /

IT'S A TEMPTING
OFFER — BUT
HOW DO THEY
GET THERE

HOLD ON, QUEEN
MARLA— L KNOW
THIS IS LEAP
YEAR, AND I
COULD THINK OF
WORSE FATES,
BUT— WELL, THIS
IS KIND OF SUDDEN /

YOUR HESITANCY
IS NOT FLATTERING!
BUT NO MATTER!
IF YOU NEED
FURTHER
INDUCEMENT —



HOW 156 IT YOUR
COMPANY ALLOWS YOU
SUCH FREEDOM FOR
YOUR PROFITABLE
ENTERPRISES, HERR...

YOUR NAME 15... ?

SURE! HAVE YOUR
MONKEY DRIVE US TO
LE BOURGET AIRPORT.’ &

YOU VILL FLy
ALL OF US HOME



'M GONNA
MOVER! \ MARRY A
LOOK RICH GIRL
INTEND 7 AT MY _|)) AN! SIT
MUSCLE! ) AROUND
z\ an ENJOY
Ses\_( MY6ELF-



\

s =



STAND WHERE \ , 5
YOU ARE! WE ve ) \-
GOT You! _ I

=

|



“Giop THE.)
CORES

rw J







$$ sq



BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES

iN LONDOW
| | NO 0U87

sare cerosir \i{ a= f/f
} “oy {| YOULL DO MORE GOOD
| JY STAYING PUT.LET EM
F\\
\t

S
—

1 | \ 007 GET

| | OUT OF HERE | f
NOW 2 t we =

) | a
<) GR YX



JOHNNY HAZARD...
AND DON’T YOU ASK
TOO MANY QUESTIONS,

EITHER, BUD!










=== = / MIND IF | ae a ee
———— eens)
— Cc =— ‘
A». -



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

TL _

PAGE NINE

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Glands Made Young
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It is no longer necessary to suffer
from loss of vigour and manhood,
veak merpory and body, nervousness,
npure od, sickly skin, depresaior
nd pe sleep, because an American

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This discovery ts In pleagant, eary
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the glands and nerves, and pul?
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vuthful vigour and power.

And this amazing, new Syne and
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i- TABS costs little, aui the gu.)

Vi-T



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BY CARL ANDERSON |



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SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for cnday to W

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SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Branches White Park,
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Mazanilla Stuffed Olives large 1.46

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Mixed Pickles in Vinegar ‘Paar .63

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Tins Smedley’s Peas at ry 49 AS Mixed Pickles im Mustard es cides 58
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PAGE TEN





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Indians Register First Win Of Tour

Bowl Lancashire Out
For 68 In 2nd limings

(From Our Own

AT OLD TRAFFORD
their first win of the tour

beat Lancashire by ten wickets.

night score to 427 of whic

Divecha made a hard hitting 61.

ing pace bowlers, Ramchand
Lancashire side to dismiss tl
of the season. Ramchand w
with seven for 27. Roy who
the five runs necessary for a







ry
Three Teams
ye e

Win Outright

The Second series in the Second
Division cricket matches ended on
Saturday with Combermere scor-
ing an innings and 55-run victory






over Lodge Schocl at Comber-
mere. Outright victories were also
scored when Pickwick ‘fe.yed
Wanderers by five wickets and
Foundation defeated Wiudward
The condition were ideal for
cricket and some batsmen return-
ed good scores. C f
scored 96 before he was caught
by Batson for Erdiston in their
match against Harrison College.

At Combermere, Lodge resumed
their first innings on Saturday
with the score at 12 for no wicket
and then they were dismissed for
59, C. Smith taking four of the
Lodge wickets for 18 runs, Com-
bermere on the first day of play
had scored 215 runs.

Failing to save tho
Lodge were sent batk
disrnissed for 104 runs. A good
bowling performance is given
by N. Alleyne who ciptured three
of the Lodge wickets for 21

At Fosters, Central gained a
first innings lead over Leeward
whom they dismissed for 169 run

follow on
and were all





On the first day of play Central
seored 224 runs and at the end of
play on Saturday Central in their

second innings had scored 87 runs

for one wicket.



In the Empire-Y.M.P.C., fixture
Empire also secure points for a
i lead. Y.M.P.C., batted
first on the first day and scored

120 runs in their first innings and
on Saturday, fiinpire in their first
innings scored 15! runs. J. Bynoe
who hit 202 runs in 205 minutes
against Central again topscored
for his side when he scored 57
runs. Bernard Bourne hit 40 and
H. Brewster 31 not out. The best
bowler for Y.M.P.C., was O. Burke
who captured six of the Empire
wickets for 56 runs.

Pickwick scored a_ five-wicket
victory over Wanderers, When
play resumed on Saturday, Pick-
wick carried their overnight score
of 100 for four wickets to 137
runs in reply to Wanderers score
of 114,

In their second turn at the
wicket Wanderers were dismissed
fof 94 runs and when play ended
Piekwick had scored runs for
five wickets to give them victory.

At Erdiston, Erdiston gained a
first innings lead over College
Erdiston ia their first innings
scored 157 runs and College re-
plied with 110 runs. College in
their second intiings agsin scored
110 runs.

At\ Foundation, Foundation
scored their first outright victory
for the season when they defeated
Windward by an innings and 101
runs.

Foundation batting in their first
innings scored 294 runs for nine
wickets. E. Jones was not out with
94 runs.

Then Foundation
Windward for 61 runs in their
first innings and in their second
innings Windward could only col-
lect 132 runs. The only batsmon
that showed any resistance was H.
Johnson who scored 49 runs.

COMBERMERE vs. LODGE
At Combermere

Combermere 218 (My. R. Hughes
124, H. Riley 4 for 58), Lodge 59
(C. Smith four for 18) and 104
CN. Alleyne three for 21, L.
Weekes three for 20, F. Scott two
for 24).

CENTRAL vs, LEEWARD
At Fosters

Central 224, (V. King not out
43), and 37 for one wicket de-
clared. Leeward 160 (L, Foster 49,
L. Wood three for 23) and 74 for
no wicket, (G. Gilkes 67 not out
and L. Fuster six not out).





at

dismissed



YM.P.C, vs. EMPIRE
At Y.M.LP.C,

Y.M.P.C. 120 and 68 for
eight wickets (D. Edgehill 36, D.
Spooner five for 12). Empire 191
(J. Bynoe 57. B. Bourne 40, H.

Brewster 31 not out, O. Burke six
for 56, D, Ndgehill one for 22 and
L. Brarker one for 27).
WANDERERS vs. PICKWICK
At Wanderers
Wanderers 114 and 94 (J. Arm-
strong 62, L. Hoad five for 18, H.
Hoad three for 25). Pickwick 127

They'll Do It Every Time
WINDBERRY IS ALWAYS BLOWING 4B0UT

HIS BIG DEALS »- HES JUST THIS SIDE
OF A MILLIONAIRE, TO HEAR








HIM TELL. IT>>



a.
\) DEAL, ALL RIGHT: I SAID,
THERE'S TWO MILLION BUCKS’
WORTH OF BUSINESS--DO TI
GET A FULL PARTNERSHIP
OR DO I STARTA ;
BUSINESS OF MY



SweetuTTLe (Wo
y

Correspondent)

LONDON, July 1.
today the Indians recorded
against a county side. They
They carried their over-
the former “Oxford Blue”
Then on a wicket assist-
and Divecha ran through the
1em for 68—their lowest score
ho bowled splendidly. finished
opened with Gaekwad, made
victory.

In thrilling finish at Lord’s
Middlesex set 19) in 130 minutes
just got heme by three, They are

h

now only eight points behind
Surrey who were engaged in a
non championship match. In
third place with 92 points, 16
points behind Middlesex’ are
Yorkshire who beat Nottingham
today by ten wickets.
Scoreboard

The Indians beat Lancashire by

ten wickets; Lancashire 363 and
68, Indians 427 and five for no
wicket

Middlesex beat Hampshire by

three wickets: Hampshire 298 and

197, Middlesex 299 for nime de-
clared and 198 for seven.

Yorkshire beat Nottingham-
shire by ten wickets: Yorkshire
401 for 3 declared and 82 for no
wicket, Nottinghamshire 181 and
300, Stocks 96.

Surrey beat Oxford Unjiversity
by an innings :Wd 76 runs, Oxford
146 and 221, Surrey 443 for eight
declared.

Leicester beat Somerset by 25
runs: Leicester 306 and 127 for 9
declared, Somerest 235 and 173.

Warwickshire beat Essex by ten
wickets: Essex 224 ang 204. War-
wick 346 for six declared and 84
or no wicket.

Northants beat Worcester by
155 Northants 332 and 241
Worcester 269 and 149.

Glamorgan vs. Derby: match

drawn: Derby 270 and 215 for six
declared, Glamorgan 140 and 178
for seven, Watkins 91 not out,

Gloucester vs. Cambricige match
drawn; Gloucester 281 and 209 for
4 declared, Young 84, Cambridge
285 and 159 for nine.

Kent vs, Sussex match drawn
Kent 163 and 324, Sussex 241 and
221 for six, John Langridge 93

Full Bore
Rifle Shooting

The

Started



3arbados. Rifle Association
ri the second cr “eliminat-
ing” stage of their House Compe-
tition on Saturday the 28th June
with 7 rounds at 300, 500 and 60¢

yards at_ the Government Rifle
Range, The first: or “lining up”
Stage of six shoots, with an

HPS, of 3,025, was completed on
ith June, when the positions of

the Houses were:—
Blue House, (Lt-Col. Connell, ;
captain) 2,651
Red House, (Major A. D. Vv
Chase, captain 2,644
Yellow House, (Capt. Jordan,
eaptain) 2,585
Green House, (Capt. Warner,
captain) 2,549

In the eliminating stage, each
7 fat .
Rouse tries to knock out its low

scores with better ones and so
improve its position. On Satur-
day, Red House improved to

2,666, Blue and Yellow Houses re-
mained at 2



51 and 2,585 respec-
tively and Green improved to
2,573. It is unfortunate that one

ct Green’s men retired during the
hooting or Green's improvement
ould have been much more
Weather Conditions
While weather condi ions were
good, trouble was cxperienced
pS light, which was very vari-
able

at 500 and 600 and with’
wind, which although generally
“fresh”, often slumped suddtnly

to practically a dead calm at 600.
The best eight

scores were
T. A. L. Roberts, 97; M. R. de}
Verteuil, 96; G. E. Martin, 96:
Major Griffith, 95; F. D. Davis, 9:




P.C, O. Shepherd, 92; H. Boyc
fl and Lt, E- R, Goddard, 91, The
H.P.S, was 105.

M. A. Tucker and the above
eight reached the Skilled Shot
Badge standard in the National
Rifle Association Non-Central
Competitions. These men, have
however qualified for this badge
in shoots earlier this year Ff





The next shoot will be on
Saturday the 5th July, at 12.30
p.m,

slicer eesieansedethe omceiahmnionenisichictoeminaaies
(M. Lashley 55, H. Thomas 53) and
77 for five wickets.
COLLEGE vs, ERDISTON
At Erdiston
Coliege 110 and 110 (D. Wil-
liams 29, N. Sealy three. for 37).
Evaiston 157 (C. Norgrove 96, E.
Batson three for 30).
FOUNDATION vs. WINDWARD
At Foundation

Foundation 294 for 9 wickets
declared. Windward 61 and 132
runs. (H. Johnson 49, R. Arm-

strong six for 24).















THE TUNE IS WRITTEN S
I v
e IN RED INKew oT
wi! a - ne YOU GO ANY FURTHER oper) ——
Le = WA YOU TO KNOW>. : re
Sa VERY ‘TOUGH IN My t THINGS ARE

COOKK
SALESMAN
MAKING



ENDS



But WHEN HE s

PER AND PART-TIME
‘HAVE A TOUGH TIME

the stuay
discuss cOm-

of play and

Laws today conclude
declarations,

ind close

of
mencement
intervals

I should have discussed Law 16
in conjunction with Laws 14 and
15 for the simple reason that Law
16 is only a continuation of these
tYaws. For that reason I shall
briefly refresh the minds of my
readers with the provisions of
these Laws.

Law 14, it will be remembered,

anc

dealt with the following on of
innings—150 runs in a match of
three days or more—100 runs in

a two-day match or 75 runs in a
ene-day match (Australia 200
runs in a match last(ng three days
or more).

Law 15 provided for the declar-
ing of innings in a_ three-day
game at any time on the second
and succeeding days, in a two-
day match at any time but on the
first day not later than 1 hour and
40 minutes before the hour agreed
upon for the drawing of stumps;
in a one-day match, at any time.

LAW 16

When the start of play is de-
layed by weather, Laws 14 and 15
shall apply in accordance with
the number of days’ play remain-
ing from the actual start of the
match.

In other words,
no play on the
three-day match, the rules gov-
erning two-day matches. will
apply and naturally if the first
day of a two-day game is “wash-
ed out” the laws governing a one-
day game will apply.

LAW 17

Commencement and Close of

Play and Intervals
The umpires shal! allow such
intervals as have been agreed

where
first day

there i¢
of a



Lawn Tennis

(By 0. S. COPPEN)

upon for meals, 10 minutes be-
tween each innings and not more
than two minutes for each fresh
batsman to come in. At the starv
ef each innings and of each day’s
play and at the end of any in-
terval, the umpire at the bowler’s
end shall call “Play”, when the
side refusing to play shall lose
the match. After “Play” has been
called no trial ball shall be bow!-
ed to any player, and when one
of the batsmen is out, the use of
the bat shall not be allowed to
any player until the next bats~-
man shall come in.

Umpires are instructed not to
award a match under this Law
unless (1) “Play” has been called
in such a manner thet both sides
ean clearly understand that play
is to start: (ji) an appeal has been
made and, (iii) they are satisfied
that a side will not, or cannot,
continue to play.

Captains’ Duties

Captains are also reminded
that it is their essential duty to
ensure that the “in-going” bats4
man passes the “out-coming” one
before the latter leaves the field
of play. This, it is claimed, is all
the more important in view of
the responsibility resting on the
umpires for deciding whether or
not the delay of the individual
amounts to a refusal of the bat-
ting side to continue play.

Some teams to my. knowledga
have flag$:ntly broken this rule
especially when there is a steady
procession of batsmen to and from
the pavilion and often this stud-
ied waste of time has resulted in
1 worthy team failing to score an
outright win.

Umpires would do well to en-

Doris Hart Beaten By
Pat Todd At Wimbledon

(By DENNIS HART)

LONDON, July 1.

ANOTHER CROWN fell at Wimbledon today. Fol-
lowing Monday's defeat of the Men’s Singles title holder
Dick pavitt, the reigning women queen Doris Hart was for the U.S.A. have withdrawn
dethroned this afternoon by a compatriot Mrs. Pat Todd,
After a gruelling battle lasting nearly two hours she was

beaten 8-7, 5-7, 4-6.

Britain's two remaining
presentatives also fell, Mrs, Jean
Rinkel-Quertier was beaten 1—-+,

re-

7—9 by former Wimbledon
champion Louise jrough and
Mrs. Jean Walker-Smith was

beaten 3—6, 3—6 by Shirley Fry.

In another quarter final mate
\7-year-old Maureen Connolly
defeated the Australian champion

Mrs. Thema Long 5—7, 6—2,
6---0.
Like Mervyn Rose the’ con-

queror of Dick Savitt, Mrs. Todd
can partly attribute her victory
to superior stamina. Despite great
heat she played a tenacious game
and chased every ball, This plus
a powerful backhand, carried her
to victory.

After two in which both
players drepped their service on
five occasions, the score was one-
all. Further break throughs in
the final set enabled Mrs. Todd
to gain a 5—2 lead. Miss Hart
made a spirited rally and took
the next two games, but the end
was in sight for the champion.
She could net match
of her opponent
her fast
finish and
without

sels

who maintained
pace right up to the
won the final game
dropping a point.

Best Display

Maureen Connolly gave her
best display in the tournament so
far to beat Mrs. Long. She made

some delightful passing shots
which frequently left her op-
ponent standing,

In the first set the American

was unfortunate
of these go out

in seeing many
of the court by

THE WEATHER
REPORT

YESTERDAY
Rainfall from Codrington: nil
Highest Temperature: 87.5 °F.
Lowest Temperature: 75.5 °F.
Wind Velocity: 12 miles per

hour
Barometer (9 a.m.)
(3 p.m.) 29.962
TODAY
Sunrise: 548 a.m,
Sunset: 6.15 p.m.
Moon: First Quarter, June 30,
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.
High Tide; 11. 39 a.m.
Low Tide: 5.39 a.m,, 5.12 p.m.





30.020



By Jimmy Halo









OES TO THE M.D.



INEwsIM A ~—

\




MEET...

the speed ,





a matter of inches; but as the
game progressed she became more
accurate and dominated play to
such an extent that she took the
match by winning the final ten
games in succession.

Mrs. Rinkel-Quertier
most inconsistent display against
Louise Brough. She was com-
pletely off form in the first set
which the American won with
consummate ease. The British
girl recovered well in the second
only to throw away the vital
points by serving numerous
double faults,

Two such errors in the eighth
game cost her the chance of tak-
ing the 5—3 lead and another in
the 15th enabled Miss Brough tu
take an 8—7 lead.

Ground Shots

Miss Brough herself was guilty
of similar lapses, but superior
ground shots and volleying gain-
ed her victory.

Mrs. Jean Walker-Smith was
never in the hunt against top
form Shirley Fry; she was al-

gave a


































For le





a cael

THINK OF
THE FIT

AND

THINK OF
THE PRICE

P. C. S. MAFFE

“TOP SCORERS

SOO COOOS SOS E SE OSSSS ISS

A WORSTED
SUIT
ony $65.00

now Your Cricket “ws 16, 17 & 18),

sure that this rule is observed,
especially in games where the
competition js a close one.

Luncheon Interval

“Whe interval for luncheon should
not exceed 45 minutes, (in local
cricket association competition
rules it is 15 minutes). But this
is ,mportant—‘"In the event of the
last wicket falling within 2 min-
utes of the time arranged for
‘uncheon or tea, the game shal}
be resumed at the usual hour, no
allowance being made for the ten
minutes between the innings.
_*

LAW 18

The umpires shall call “Time”
ang at the same time remove the
baus from both wickets, on the
cessation of play before any ar-
ranged interval, at the end of
exch day’s play and at the con-
clusion of the match. An “Over”
shall always be started if “Time”
has not been reached, and shall
Be completed unless a batsman is
“Out” or “Retires” within two
minutes of the completion of any
period of play but the “Over” in
Progress at the close of play on
the final day of a match shall be
completed at the request of either
captain even if a wicket fall after
“Time” has been reached.

~

Perhaps this Law has given/
almost as much trouble as the
controvergial l.b.w. law. I can

hardly make it clearer than by
pointing out at this stage that
provided the FIRST ball of thé
LAST over is bowled before time,
ft is possible for as many as five
wickets to fall after Time in a
six ball over and seven in an
eight ball over. As a matter of
fact, under this provision, the
match itself might not end until
ten minutes after Time.

“ °

B.C.L. Fixtures

The following games are sched-
uled in the Southern Division of
the B.C.L. on Saturday next July
5 and July 12.

Seawell vs. Searles at Seawell,

Cambridge vs Maple at Maple..

Inch Marlowe Sydney
Sydney,

vs,

Shamrock vs Lancs, at Boarded |

Hall.
In the Leeward division Perse-
verance due to members leaving

from the competition, There will
therefore be no play in the Perse-
verance vs All Saints Match.



ways on the defensive against the
American’s powerful ground
strokes.

In the Men’s Doubles, Frank
Sedgman and Ken MacGregor,
holders of the title, entered the
semi-finals by defeating the Ital-
ian pair G. Cucelli and M, Del
Belo 6—2, 6—4, 3—6 6—3. Mac-
Gregor was not up to his usual
form and made many mistakes,
but Sedgman’s brilliant net play

WHAT'S ON TODAY

Court of Original Jurisdic-
tion—10.00 a.m.

Basket Ball—Second Division
—at Dist. A., Harrison Col-
lege and Y.M.P.C, at 5.00
p.m.

Police Band Concert, St.
George's Church Pasture—
7.45 p.m.

British Council Films
Aquatic Club—8,.30 p.m.

at



ather

of every colour—

It cleans, preserves—and how it
polishes! Ask your retailer for Propert's.
Nothing else is quite the same. Watch
the difference it makes to your shoes!

| & CO., LTD.
IN TAILORING’
St OSSSSSSSSSS

SSSSTSOSSS

at |

R.B. Yacht Club
Cennis Tournament

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Men's Singles
Mr. L. St. Hill beat Mr. N. D.
Tudor 6—3, 6—1.
Mr. J. D. Trimmingham beat
Mr. V. Roach 6—3, 6—4,
Mr. D. E. Worme beat Mr. C, B,

Sisnett 6—1I, 6—2.
Ladies’ Doubles
Mrs, J. ConneH and Mrs.
Skinner beat Miss L. Branch
Miss P. King 6—4, 6—2,
Mixed Doubles
Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Bancroft
beat Mr. M. deVerteuil and Mrs,
K, A. Knaggs 6—1, 6—3.

TODAY’S FIXTURES

Ladies’ Singles
Mrs. D. E. Worme vs. Miss M.
Wood.

C.
and

Ladies’ Doubles
Miss D. Wood and Miss G. Pil-
ry vs, Miss M, King and Mrs.

A. Gibbons.
Men’s Doubles
Mr. I. S. Robinson and Mra,
S. P. Edghill vs. Mr. D. E, Worme
and Mr. H. Johnson.
Mixed Doubles
Mr. C. B. Sisnett and Mrs, J. A.
Mahon vs. Mr. H. A. Cuke, Jr.
and Miss E, Worme.



Unguentin

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Relieves painof











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WARNIN

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Dodd's Kidney Pills





BARBADOS AQUATIC
CLUB
(Local & Visiting Members)

Through the courtesy of
the British Council there
will be a FILM SHOW in
the Ball Room TO-NIGHT
Wednesday, 2nd July, at 8.30
o'clock,

The programme includes:
British News; a musical film
of the training of Military
Bands; the Making of Tennis
Racquets; and English Gar-
dens in Colour.

Members are cordially







invited.
No Admission Charge.
29.6.52—3n.
SOSSSSS SS SESS OOH OPIS,
Colony Club §
olony Club &
Introduces
BARBECUE §
To Barbados
@ Full-Moon. Dancing
@ Bathing
@ And General.
@ Quite Informal
@ Reservations in
Advance $
2.7.52—2n, $

POSSE ESOS SOSSS.

*
Y. M. P.C.

FIESTA ESPECIAL ! !
Decorationes Maravillosas
EN LA BAILE
(BARN DANCE)

Y. M. P. C.
Reckles Road

SABADO JULIO 5
Musica Por Los Jovenes De
Caribbean Troubadours

ENTRADA 3/-
(Compra su billete antes de
la fecha)

on

*







*







WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1952





If your game is
tennis ..
offer

SLAZENGER 'S
TENNIS BALLS

$4.12 per tin.
If it’s Cricket o.

Ys

We offer
CRICKET BATS

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do. a ee 0 hey ba cee ee $5.04
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do. TUR SS iais abo ets $7.20

Do Not Miss This Attractive Offer

BARBADOS HARDWARE C0. LID.

(The House For Bargains)
No. 1€¢ Swan St. Phones: 4406, 2109, 3534









FYFFES LINE

Messrs Elders & Fyffes, Ltd., advise that an increase of

their current passage rates to and from the United Kingdom
has been found necessary.



The increased rates which are applicable on and from
Ist July 1952, are as follows:

Ss. S GOLFITO



Suites A & B per berth £127. 0. 0.
Double Rooms with Toilet and Shower
per Berth 109... 0.50...
Double Room per berth ; 104. O. O. )
Single Room with Toilet & Shower 115. 0. 0. }
Single Rom .. .. 109. 0. 0, 1
Four Berth Room per berth .. 98. Gs .0... 5 ¢ }
Rooms 51, 52, 53 and 54 per berth 2.40 0. . |
WILKINSON & HAYNES €0., ETD. |

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PAGE 1

r IIWtllAlHi-. AllVtll Ml WEDNFSDAY. JULY 2. 1S2 BAjp^.AADVOCATE Ascot's Okay. But Not For I lit' Av k ras*4 k llac*t k goc*r LU B.M. %  <. liUii-n W,,!n.'..l.n. July 2. 1S52 \VOMK\ s M.M:I Work to be done for women in Barbados i. thai only large sums at will enable any progress lo be %  re li thf* money to come (rom? ir IndkaUon is given on the front The Tim*-, of LoadOB for June 20th. %  sunal column appeared the following notice: "If you pay income tax at nine shillings and sixpence in the pound, you can double your subscription to the Y.W.C.A. at no extra cost. Every MlbocripUon from five shillings upwards which is covenanted for seven years is worth nearly twice as much because the association can recover the income tax paid." In Barbados there is no legislation which allow* money used in connection with charities to be free of tax. although approVBd 0T| Utisatloni are not taxed on the if internal proAUinaJung acUvtUae %  ii me nnall aoocaaaiana are made to business houses who donate sums to institutions like the Y.M.CA. where certain of their employees may obtain meals. Charities and institutions in Barbados rely on bazaars, raffles, concerts, dances and similar activities to obtain some porti ,n of their revenue. The PolsM Boys ;.n an extent. I went to Ascot this year to Hw Gold Cup Show of 1952. It was also my introduction to an English race meeting, because my home I* in New Zealand and the glories of Epsom, Newmarket, Aintree and, of course. Ascot, had till recently escaped me by a consideration of about 14.000 miles. "What better day." I thought, "lo see how the English lose (heir money," Inevitably. I was wondering ahk) how facilities for doing this would coin pa ie with those back in New Zealand, Now, Ascot Week, as you probably know, is the big event i f the "Irfmdon Season" — the time for debutantes, fashion shows, parties; In short, the highlight of the year for English Society. Ascot, for four days, ii where Society gets together In one glorious party, where Hit* creations of couturiers and milliners are paraded elegantly H roa the I.iv. n ,,nd gi-iitliini'ti resplendent in morning dress -nil toppers, queue at the twoshilling tote to place a bet and go away fop :i drink of champagne at four i*Hindu a bottle. Above all. Aacot has tradition. There is no place for anything new. Which, from the racing* side o' Ascot. Is a great pity. Frankly, 1 came away from the meeting with mixed feelings. It was a thoroughly pleasant day. Iiui I could not help thinking I h.id been cheated over the actual horse racing, which kccmcd almost incidental to the presence of the Queen and her party to the atmosphere of fashionable restraint, and to the sense of occasion. Six races. Involving the cream of KngliMi and French thorouilh'I'M, .. %  am. i werr t ll> ll-rt-ii Oliver bred*, and yet you would think the crowd of round 40.000 was watching %  game of chess. Cheer. Ing? Hardly a trace Excitement'* Not on your life. Why'' Simply because about 30.000 of the 40,000 there had absolutely no idea where their fancy was p.need. And, really, there is not much to cheer about If you can't tell who is leading and who m challenging The reason for this i* ilmpls enough IDO there Is no course mmmentary, no attempt to help bewildered punter* locate their horse and "ride" n home is how It went at Ascot Cup day: — before the start of the race, the course announcer broadcast the number or each horse starting, its jockey's name and its barrier po-itIon. In due couise. the horses left the paddock and cantered off to the starting post. There was complete silence for & lime till the course announcer, using a minimum of words. Intoned: 'They're under starter'* orders." Another alienee, then the announcement I'hrs ir off." followed DJ (wo I an asthmatic bell For the rent of the race, then was not a peep out of the announcer—though, for tin fit of those thousands who could not even see what was happening, the bell was .ignn clanged swung into the straight. From there to th* post. It was merely a matter of craning one's nek to catch a gl.mpse of a saddlecloth number as the field went bv or listening hopefully for some blnoculared gentlemen In the stand to cry the name of the leader. Once |>ast the post, the placed horses were named by the course announcer who. for good measure, threw In the winning margins Hut. hv then, it wag toQ late. This business of keeping the English racegoer in the dark np: only to Acot hut to every rinata race meetliaj held In England, Course tmiiientaries have new cast. And, from what I learned to-day, it looks a* if t;,. will. I rang up one of the men who has a hand In this system He was quite crusty obout my questions and voun.ie,| |->sltivel> jihocked at the suggestion Ui.it racegoers deserved a better deal. "Course commentates" We dont like them; in fact, we hai • the idea of them," he pronounced. I pointed out that commei.tartssj are given *t moat racetracks ov er s eas and that the thnli of racing is as food as lost without them. I suggested Engil'-h people would be grateful for them too, "I don't think they would." he replied. "When I'm at a meeting and following the race, I would hale to have some silly commentator blaring out the Can British Industry Be Denationalized? By CHKISTOPHKR HOI.US. MP LONDON. June 20. THE world watched Britain's socialist experiment and is now, with equal attention, asking how far it is possible for Winston Churchill's Conservative Government to reverse the process of nationalization. Parallelbetween the present British situation and the resale of some formerly nationalized industries in other countries are not quite exact. In these other countries non-Socialist governments took over indusnames of the horses, and prooab| tries by agreement with their opponents for ^hi-i'^n^^^^hX P~ttl "<• *"•>• reasons-such as the {virtual bankruptcy of a railway system. It is they are placed." This astonished me and 1 begged him to remember that the majority of people at race meetings have no earthly hope of locating their horses, not having binoculars for one thing and not being experts in knowing horse* by their colours. %  People who go to race meetings regularly are expected to know their colours,' 1 he retorted to that. I discovered further that there Is no clause In |he Rules of Raring prohibiting course commentaries. It Is )ust **an Instruction" from the Jockey Club which Is responsible. So Ascot was a disapiin that respect. For the rest, it was much like most race meetings I have attended The crowd, apart from the Royal Enclosure section, was esssmtiaDy the same iTillectlon of optimistic people out to make a day of it and sea If they could bring in a few dividends besides. There was the two shillings tote — a fine institution for the small punter—-the buffet counter, the bare, the trees, the lawn and. of course, the usual hard luck stories and swopping of tips. Then there were the bookies, bowler-hatted, beefy men who shouted their odds with the speed of auctioneers. Across the track, from the grandstand enclosure to the heath, flashed their tictor signals. And In the crowd, people waited, not for the start of the race, but for the finish. Because, for the crowd, the race started perhaps IfXi yards from the post. There Is certain] v something thrilling about Ascot. But it is not to be found In the racing. And. till the "Great Men of English Racing*' decide to give %  M oidmary racing public a break, I remain wholly in favour Of racetracks as we know them ISO ilk II Wl.l us DESPITE the drive which is being mude by the police ami the Barbados Automobile Association to improve the road manners of drivers, certain glaring examples of abuse of the roads can be noticed daily. Parking around corners is prevalent. Many corners in Barbados are provided with studs and although it is illegal to park within the -studded area, certain vi-hirles continue to break the law by this dangerous practice. Some coiners have no studs, and the li-iu a ol ihe law cannot •** broken if cars park near unaUlddad corners. But the spirit of the law is broken whenever parking near corners is practised, because any obstacle to be passed near a corner forces a motorist oil the proper side of the road and encourages the Uiking "i risks. Observance of the speed limit by all users of ,.id is Hie most sure way of promoting safety on the toad but "road-hogs' continue to Haunt their dedication to SPEED by hurtling around corners at BMI dj closer to 50 m.p.h. than lo the legal 30 m.p h. Failure to din lights at night may be due to ignorance on the part uf drivers or it due to Inability on tha part of the driver With bright Ughti U) appreciate the blinding effect of powerful headlights: but whatever the reason for failure to dim, night-blinding is a gross abuse of the roads and endangers human life Pedestrians in Bridgetown are gradually %  i ing the existence of pavements and by using them permit drivers some relaxation from the necessity of keeping manysided watch: but outside Bridgetown pefieatriant uae tha public highways as if they were country lanes and the difficulties of night-driving are increased fifty-fold by the recfcleai way In which ioad-walkcrs appropriate parts of the road obviously intended for the use of wheeled traffic. Danger exists too at certain junctions whan traffic is not one-way. At the foot of Government Hill the risk of occidenta would be less if vehicles approaching tha direction of Roebuck Street were compelled to turn left and follow the "island" At the neighbouring junction close to the new sub-post office the present sign-postdoes not prevent drivers from taking risks. The drive for safe roads must never be allov Tu keep death off the roads requires vigilance at all times. Our Readers Say : n avflmee / %  > G*MM Ediior. The Advocaiv, SIR, — Dunns; the recent clcDala in the House of Assembly in respect of the revision of sul.ir.es of th,technical staff ,.n],•• minor aspects of the bill and apparently failed to grasp its main issues, healthy criticism is ailltcted and Is always most welcome But when members resort to making abusive and undignified references to civil servants, they should be reminded that not only are they in the House lo represent the people lint they hhould also uphold tha dignity ;ind respect of that chamber. Surely if they cannot do the former efficiently, thero is %  baolutety no excuse for failing to iircompllsh the latter. One honourable member was quite willing to support the bill where the technical stuff was concerned but failed to see why the noi.-techiiic.il heads of Department! should be Include-) and so far he was well within his rights where the privileges of Ihe house are concerned, but When ha reCered t>> these responsible men as 'pen-pushers' he overstepped his bounds. Along with other reasons with which this member should be conversant. when one considers how helpless Civil Servants are to retaliate honourable members nhould refrain from such disdainful references. There is an acute demand for technical men all over the world and if we are to get and hold our complement of these key men. It Is requisite that existing notary scales be adjusted to compare favourably with those of the olher Inlands In Ihe area But the preponderance of responsibility which HeadB of Departinantf have to shoulder makes then also amply deserving of consideration. The main considerations to be taken are whether what is necessary Is salary revision and whether gOVernment Is financially equipped lo do it. Some will argue thai one necessity Is more urgent than the other, but I can see no real objection to the bill so long as assurance Is given that revision of the salary scales of the entire Civil Service retrospective from 1st. April will take place in the near future. Another honourable member remarked that billlike this would .-pell the end of the Leader's political career if the people were "less docile". But this is no reflection of docility. The presence of members like Mr. Adams in the House of Assembly is %  tribute to the ability of the electorate to recognise able and upright leadership. This is a most appropriate occasion (or relaUng the followma excerpt: "The new member having taken his seat in the Assembly and having remained silent during the debates turned finally to his colleague and asked "Do you think my constituents would consider me ignorant anri useOODttaRM to remain silent?" In the interests of conserving the party seat and of the solicitous member, his colleagues replied with profoundest sincerity. "You must keep them in doubt. If you speak they will know." Similar advice would prove extremely valunbl bers in the Barbados House ol Assembly who contribute nothing worthwhile I" debutes but woste valuable tune indulging their h.tbll* of vote catching WOOD) tfOI they address the Assembly. Salary scales should alwnys be fixed or adjusted lo suit the post and not the man and the Leader of the House by adhering to this principle displayed a high degree of magnamimlty which )s a characteristic conspicuously lacking in those newcomers who inspire to leadership, SUPER JET. Family Ft ml To the Editor. The Advocate Silt In your leading article. "Family First," you point out that "Barbados has been trying to build the kind of civic-mlndedness which Is common In advanced countries" although it lacks the basic family conditions on which those countries; have built While the loose and uncertain state of much of the local family life has long been known. it does not stem to be HO well recognised that these condJttQM are Inconsistent, and even In conflict, with many of the economic measure* of public policy introduced in recent years. In the name of progress Barbados has adopted at substantial cost several forms of economl'*. organisation which have In thifl course of a century and monl developed in England and some*! other Western countries. In its lands of Origin the organisation we are trying to copy grow up on the'basis of a monogamous family unit with paternal reB oTisibility for all the members, rthods of taxation, wage and salarv scale*., and Covernmonl regulated 'cost of living,' as well as many social services, are based on the assumption thai such family units are the predominant and permanent part of the social structure, and that they are at all times clearly deliiM-d. YOt In local conditions which, as you say, are far unlike thorn "' (Ireat Britain, we have adopted, the same schemes of Income Tax. the same ideas of labour organisation and wages. and the same patterns of public administration from Civil Service salaries to Housing, which in their countries of origin are strictly derived fiom the type of family foundation we so obviously lack. Of course this monogamous family system Is by no means universal. Indeed, most of the world's population lives in more numerous and expeaatVO system*. But while M-nietim.s credited with great human wisdom, these people are not included among the advanced countries. Inside their borders such modem doctrines as the redistribution of wealth by law. and post of living allowances, do not operate, and the lives of politicians and the salaries of public servants are alike Insecure. What are we entitled to expect In Barbados from adopting a political structure so iMonstftent with the foundations on which it must function? Is It assumed by those responsible for it that the growing expense of ciovcmmcnt and the Increasing cost of living which are In a large measure due to the ah< l we are trying to copy, will inevitably create the f a m i I v foundations needed to Justify It* It is true that visiting experts, singly and collectively, usually deliver a niouhstic homily on the nebulous stale of the fatrily life enjoyed by much of the local population, but it in not clear that this procedure 11 changing the normal conditions. If it is not, then equity as well as efficiency requires a different method from undiscrtminatfng imitation in other matters—although lacking paternal responsibility as a pill ir of ftato, we do have political responsibility. I H-. sir. Yours elc. I. C. GREAVES Box ise. Bridgetown. 28th June, 1952. PsMaJfta Xtut Wmp To Ihe Editor, The Advocotc; SIR-—The, public are grateful 10 the Police and Highway Departments or their co-operation in providing ways and means for Improving the Traffic regulaUons especially as to stopping at Major Roads crossing, and providing cat's eyes in awkward corners. There is no doubt whatever %  M regulations have been very much appreciated by Mo lonsts who have done all In their power to co-operutc. Now that an Automobile Association has been formod, the public trust lhat they will Join with Ihe two departments in making greater improvements. There are one or two things that require immediate consideration. At present certain motorists have attached whlsUes lo their cars and Ihey seem to Indulge in making as much noise quite different in Britain where there is one political party which believes in nationalization as a matter of principle and which is likely to come to power again in the future. If it looked as if the Socialists were out for good in Britain, or if they had abandoned nationalization from their party programme, then the problem before the Conservatives would be less acute. But even in the last election the Socialists polled a higher aggregate of votes than Conservatives and it was only an electoral chance that left them with a minority of seats in Parliament. And since then the evidence of municipal elections and I Gallup Polls shows that at the lowes; it is far from improbable that wr shall have a Socialist Government back in power. Conservatives may rightly protest against statements from Socialist leaders, such as Mr. Morrison and Mr. Straust*. that, if returned to power, they will re-nationalize steel, road transport and anything else that may have been denationalized, and renationalize them on terms of compensation less favourable to the investors. But no one can shut his eyes to the fact that any intentions which they express are likely to be intentions thai they will be in a position to fulfill Under those circumstances the real difficulty about denationalizing either steel or road transport is likely to be the difficulty of getting industrialists to put up the money to buy them. The Government has told us that when it puts its "operable units" of road transport up for sale, it will put a reserve price on them. If it puts the reserve price high, no one will bid; and, if it puts it low, it will lose a large sum of public money. There is nothing illogical in opposing nationalization when it is first proposed then arguing that, when it is passed, that it is the lesser evil to let it stand. As Oliver Stanley, the Conservative leader who died a few years ago, once wittily said, "It may have been a mistake to have thrown a man out of a top-story window and broken his leg, but t is not necessarily the right remedy merely to throw him back again." Obviously it is to the nation's interest that its induslrics shuuld be run efficiently and obviously those in an industry can say that it is quite impossible for them to do their work efficiently if the constitution of their industry is a subject of constant electioneering and is changed from lop to bottom every time that there is a change of government. • So the real problem of our industry is, as most people are coming to see, to find for it a structure that is accepted by all political parties. Whatever the faults of the capitalist system it can be argued that > yds. CONGOLEUM: Six feet wide and rut to any desired site. /•/, 4472 a S. PITCHER & CO. = 1 .1' or not. it will certainly be run in large units, under a good deal of government control. And even if private individuals are allowed to make profits out of it, a very substantial proportion of those profits will be taken by the State in taxation. So the socalled controversy between Socialism and Free Enterprise is. under modern conditions in Britain, a somewhat unreal controversy. The real question — the as yet quite unanswered question—is how lhat control should be exercised. It is pretty generally admitted that the solution tried by the late Socialist Government of setting up for the nationalised industries Managerial Boards that are in practice hardly responsible to anybody has not worked very well. These Boards are, as Mr. Aneurin Bevan has written, "a constitutional enormity". On the other hand, no one can think that it would The Poce n |Lrrf J l'iouId bonei h l* ib 'c > run an industry by a Governill from tola, as frequently they ment department under a Minister directly answerable to the House of Commons and i amenable to every sort of party and electoral pressure, often from people whose knowledge of the problems of the industry ,i.s superficial. Recently, we have seen the Crisp, smartly-styled MEN'S SHIRTS by CONSULATE—Collars attached and detached. and UNDERWEAR SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS DRESS SHIRTS by MARCELLA and DRESS COLLARS Handsome TIES (including BOW TIES, Maroon and Black for Evening: Wear) IDOL ANKLET SOCKS and Half-length HOSE in many colours and patterns Da Costa & Co., Ltd. Jolly Good!! JAMS WITH J & R ENRICHED BREAD idled on to ca* such block* in B.iy Street. ;>t ftf*. fish market, wtMgkj can arc parked on both sides of the road. Iiet us have cooperation and the matter stQ] easily be settled. II would bo advisable to place Sf b ^u'=^1J d0 !n M r Sn. | Government refuting to accept a proposed where nil traffic MMMMMMMMMM-HMMMM I M>M> I JAMS 7 lb Mixed FmH Sirjwberry Jam Katpberry Jam .. Marmalade Apricot Jam 8 lb S. A. Marmalade 8. A. Pineapple Jam S. A. Apricot :.s H.lt (1.12 n.M IJ.IJ !. K.I: w.z "ALL THE TIME IS i.ill.11 BRAID TIME" Keep Bottle of GOLD BRAID RIM (3 m. Ola) On Hand Onlr 11.44 per BotUr VISIT OLR SWEET COUNTER 11 IK Blark M.iic Ctiorolsln Harlrv Sns.r Planter'. Nat. CUT'. Kw-eet 11M mi. Carr', Chww BUtfalt. Carr'. Crarkm ( I'll', hm in Cigarettes UnhiM, Cigarette, MEAT DEPT. Calves Liver DrnMd RabblU Milk Fed Cb.lra.ns Milk Fed Dark. Fresh Vrirlakle. G0DDARDS F R FINEST GROCERY SERVICE rll Hi ll III I HHIH t l lll lHIIII II