Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text







1952 PRICE ;: FIVE CENTS

I.E. Sir Alfred Savage Foresees | "8% ‘its MEET ALEXANDER Non-Europeans Wilt”
Improvement In Local Scouting* ) 2% } L ee
Council Decide Time Not Ripe | i. aws UI ide Scale

ESTABLISHED 1895 TUESDAY, JULY 1,












Tories.

‘LEADERS of non-Europeans in South Africa said

Classifivation
For Travelling Commissioner

DURBAN, South Africa, June 30.

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR, Sir Alfred
Savage, K.C.M.G., Local Chief Scout told the Local Scout

Council at a meeting which

he presided that he felt “that

the reorganisation by the Island Commissioner is doing

good, and if we are patient
in scouting throughout the

His Excellency was summing
up a lengthy discussion which
ensued when the Council con-
sidered a suggestion tnat the
Colonial *Governments in the
Caribbean should join together in
providing a substantial part of
the cost of a Travelling Com-
missioner for 12 months,

The Local Chief Scout during
the course of his summary
added “I believe that it is only
by personal contact, that it is only
if you have got faith in yourself
to get across to other people the
importance of scouting and of
boys, that yeu can get anywhere.
The responsibility is ours and we
have got to satisfy ourselves that
we are doing our utmost before
we can expect to encourage
other people to help us,

After mis kxcellency had sum-
med up, the meeting unanimously
agreed that it was the general
opinion that “the time is now
opportune to have a paid Travel-
ling Commissioner from outside,
and referred a number of sug-
gestions for training and the
general improvement of the
island to the Executive Com-
mittee for their consideration.

This suggestion was contained

, we will see, an improvement

island.”

Such a step would help the pe@o-
ple concerned 10 interpreting
scouting in the West Indies, but
he did not think that g Commis-
sioner coming out here from the
United Kingdom would justify the
amount of £800 a year which he
would be paid. He pointed out
that the finances of the local As-
sociation could not afford them
to contribute to the cost of such
a Commissioner, but yet it would
be welcomed if the Governments
provided the funds.

The Island Commissioner felt
that what training was needed
could be given locally, with oc-
easional visits to the Trinidad
Training Centre.

Enthusiasm

He emphasised the need for
leaders “who have enthusiasm,”
and said he did not think any
person coming here to run a
training course for three or four
months would benefit scouting.

Mr. R. C. Springer, Commis-
sioner for Training supported the
Island Commissioner on the
broad principles, and pointed out
that last year at the Commission-
ers’ Conference at Trinidad the
matter was discussed at great

| Motion.

LONDON, June 30

; Group of Members of Parlix
-ment from Winston Churchill
town party introduced a motio
Monday night in effect demand-
ing better consultation with Brit-

in Korea. The move came on ¥
eve of an important debate in fo
Commons on the Yalu River rai {
and statements on Korea by De
fence Minister Earl Alexande

and Minister of State Selwy

Lloyd.

It was led. by Viscount Hiti



i *hingbrooke who threatened la
1 i the Chu
wall Goverament in the Con

nons vote if it diq not get gui
intees of consultation from ti
United States. The life of t)
Government will be at stake bi
net in much danger in the de
bate Tuesday. Churchill himse!

jecided ake, pat ace
SIR ALFRED SAVAGE led to take, part in place «



liling Foreign Secretary Anthony

would be of great advantage to|Eden. Lord Hinchingbrooke and,
the whole area. jabout 20 , other Conservatives}
He felt that if a Travelling | "20 and file members introduc
Commissioner was brought out for lea an amendment to the Labou
three years, the need to send | Motion of Censure against the |
scouts abroad for training would |ChUtchill Government “for noi}
not arise, and then when the | Securing consultation before the |
chance arose for them to take part Yalu raids The Hinchingbrodok« |
in Jamborees, they would be more ®™mendment would blame thé pre |
au fait with what takes place in W'0US Labour Government instead /
Europe and Canada where the '° Mot setting up better meabs 0! |
movement had made tremendous CMSultation. But it would Ieave

ain on United Nations operatia |



BRITISH DEFENSE MINISTER Field Mavshai Bari Alexander (right) is
greeted on his arrival in Washington by Gen. Omar N. Bradley (left),
Chairman of the Joint Chicis of Staff, and Defense Secretary Robert
A. Lovett, Marshal Alexander, just back from an inspection tour of the
Korean batilefront, was given a 19-gun salute.

Vietnamese

Complete
Mopping Up Operations

SAIGON, June 30.

FRENCH VIETNAM ADMINISTRATORS, doctors and
police moved into the important sector of the Hanoi Rice
Bowl Monday following the successful
latest mop up operation

“Bolero” operation started last Friday when French
paratroopers dropped to crush a pocket of Vietnam Com-
munists against infantry
and enabled the Civil Administrat
area which has long bee

conclusion of the

‘aneing from the south
lon to be set u
n without any form of government.

This region some 40 miles east

today that their passive resistance campaign against racial
laws started last Thursday will become a struggle on a
huge scale embracing the whole country. About 150 non-
Europeans have been arrested so far during the campaign.
Indians and Africans under the campaign deliberately
break laws such as those under which Africans are com-
pelled to carry identity passes, observe residential segre-
gation and generai racial separation laws in public places.

The campaig: was organised

MacArthur Is by the Seuch Alviean and Indian
| Congress and the Africun Nation-

j}al Congress, U.e two main noa-

First Choice 3" wis" 8

Yi pean political group: in
Irst oice [eae Africs. They bitterly op-
If Ike, Taft Go Officials of the two Natienal

pose Prime Minister Danie!
Malan.
}
: a : | ongresses said the campaiga
By eatin ee, 30 } vill be planned in three stages.
Senktes Robert ow Taft “took | the first phase includes ealling
personal command of Republican} elected and trained people to
rules and disputes which hat nto action in the big centres to

brought an angry storm over th joreak racial laws. The second
party and its presidential nomin-| ‘tage would see an increase in
ating convention which ‘neets oy !he number ef these volunteers

July 7, and the centre’s operation. The
Republican tempers shot as the) thing stage would be one of mass

prairie winds, Fraud and vote/action during which the struggle
stealing charges were flying fast! should as far as possible broaden
among party men, jout to g country-wide scale and

Both Taft and his principal op- | assume a general mass character.
| The first stage has not yet been
, completed, leaders said, because
volunteers have been defied racial
; laws only in two big centres. Port
| Elizabeth and Witwatersrand:
—CP.

Senate OK.

4 | German Pact

strides, and where businessmen | U"touched that part of the motion | R . D h of Hanoi near the Dong Trieu is
were practically running the|@emanding better consultation | alns rene a fertile portion of the Red River

movement. It was true that it all//" future delta from which Vietminh was|
started with Government Officials | Tt was not yet known how

si. systematically shipping vice to
and the clergy and public officers, | ‘ hurehill would react to — the Korean Front feed ils hungry thek. the|

to
and they had to thank them for |#â„¢endment especially before tive |

in the Chief Scout’s article THE |!ength. _ ;
OUTLOOK in the May 1952 issue] He pointed out _ that while
of THE SCOUTER MAGAZINE |there was no question as to 10
in which he made reference ty joutside Commissioner Ss know-
his visit to Barbados ang wrote |ledge of ‘scouting, the tendency










north \ WASHINGTON, June 30,

i z rae . academic ; aan ot ebate . > wi 2, 1 : The Senate Foreign. dtélations
Mr. Grantley Adams, the Leader} was for them to be too academic] what they had done, but he did} debate in which he will need al SEOUL, Korea. June $ Meanwhile, 800 miles to the ats
of the House of Assembly, put }in their approach. He observed] think that it was time for them to| his votes. But he may be count |. Three days’ drenching rain ive South at the tip of the Indo-| | yatibedtion of the Comer noun
forward the suggestion that the|that they “try to implant ideas} spread their hands and get the|ing on Alexander's and Lloyd’: | tusned the Korean battlefront in-|China mainland French head- ratpescion of the German peace
Colonial Governments in the|rather than try to adopt them tof public interested in scouting. If | Speeches calming the fears of his) to q Soggy swamp where croaking ;“Uarters for seventh “Operation 1! uae, aes. pentocel a
Caribbean should join together |/ocal conditions.” they got the public interested in Wn supporters.-U.P frogs have taken over from the! Whirlwind”, reported 39 Com- 17} ante vey ih wil sobs
in providing a substantial nati of Mr. Springer said that they{the movement, then the question , booniing artillery munists killed and 29 prisoners ban W tG oo ae WHEE PURPA CCS
the cost of a Travelling Commis-| would be glad to have people] of eae in the Jong met 7 ‘ | Allied planes were grounded/taken in the latest drive to clear } danate MT eaitany leader Ernest
i & eye 7 1 > cali » Chief Scout}| come to them, Ti again today, Ev as yy {Cochin Ching Frene 2tne pe
0g Ba agen als Tod We Meaaebot Oey Caxadine Professor Dash felt that now “we Teachers alks ed ot Even all-weather it = sench yisinam

help to create Training Teams.
This very valuable suggestion has
the support of all the Governors

; ~ * r rs, in
| 26 light bombers remained at|forces lost only one man killed} ponent General Dwight Eisy)- ‘leParland announced late Mdn

‘ ial "See z er .'e : , ; Cay that the Senate debate on
: vs . | their bases. Lt.-Gen, Glenn O.]and some 40° wounded in the; hower are confident. Taft has “ay t ? y
Start In 7 dad | Barcus, Fifth Air Force Command-|tour-day operation which cap-|189 first ballot votes on Unitec ‘tification of the man Peace |

Training Commissioner, but he

felt that to have a Travelling lationship with Canada and the

United States, we should let them

|



are trying to develop a closer the |
|

’ Eyal arn ae : j f ’ a, i tract will cammence at 206
a issi k et oe iran es | er, reported that Allied planes|tured several Vietminh work.|!’ress tabulation and Bisenhowe: 69n -,
to ot we have spoken, as Seen ene eal come and improve our ee On August 9 which bombed the giant Suiho}shops and large supplies of am-|409. Needed to nominate is a pi, GMT. Tuesday
ments." es Govers- be valuable, Mr. Springer|,,“ lengthy discussion ensued on) ss = .,,.| power plant a week ago drew ]|munition and explosives. bare majarity of 604, Phere might f con stor ‘Tom Connally -Ghalke
Pies J. E Griffith who ledjSaid and he added if we had a big the subject in which it was gen- The Sixth Bi-Annual Con-|heayy fire from Communist anti- In Annam, Central Indo-China,} be a stalemate but few expect it
or J. E. Griffith who leds Sé 3

erally agreed that the local move~| ference of the Caribbean Unibu | aircraft
ment “needs inspiration by visits | o¢ Teachers "

—, a Buns across the Yalujit was Vietminh which was Eisenhower ov Taft by July 11 is am eee ee Pelstas Fone
” , opens in Portwi-| River in Manchuria; ultacking post, : ses} the word here. None foresees a] 0° | Sere

and ee rite tna act |Spain on Saturday August 9, and | Barcus said the air force and] pear Hue, T coastal port’ Oe ae bolt because both candidates hav pinion” 9 speeches favouring
Cbmiitesienan and Mr. Springer,|Comeludes on August 28, The! navy pilots made no attempt to}porth of Saigon, All French] promised to support the party Whe satificatian rasciueke ae
who objected to any suggestion|Comference will be formally | silence the Red guns although they | Vietnam posts were reported] ticket. . scheduled for submission’ to’ the
that the local assoqiation should, P€ned on Monday August 11 by; lasted Communist anti-aircraft |aviding out despite stepped .up} If the General and the Senator) co )U" Monday bit an’ extaoded
pay from its funds to the salary of |His Excellency Sir Hubert Rance, | batteries on the Korean side of the | communist pressure. knocked each other out Genera debate on the Military -Appropel«
srry inated: coming from outside|GOvernor of Trinidad, | Fiver. Cay. policy bans air strikes/" Ow the Annam coast in an} Douglas Mac Arthur would ‘be Shen” Wh took an” tne vertige
as a Travelling Commissioner,|_ The Programme is as follows. | i uh pelt Tent week's series of | 2%¢4 Nt exactly specified in an] @ likely prospect or Senator Ever- At ip eM od ae rinand Be
that it was not a “practical propo. |5#t_%—Civie Welcome by the Port-of arcus sald las eek § sertes OF foiticial communique French Viet-|ett Dirkensen of Ilinois.

i i : ate r that the Resolu-
‘i% , Spain City Council raids wiped out 13 power plants, oe . Stes UP. the Senate floor tha Mt
sition,” although they had nO/sun. 1—Chureh Sercices all there were in North Korea.}°2™ naval units in the course of u tion will be called up at a speciai

prejudice to any outside people| Mon, 11—Formal Onening-—His Exce!. | (cP) the past few days sank 100 Com- carly session Tuesday. He add@d
coming in. { ency, The Governor. Address by : munist Sampans loaded with rice

| r P Stn he

i {hat the related protocol to the

. oo sident of Rice | and headed for enemy areas Four Enter North Atlanglc Treaty which

Governments Willing Business Session. | I ] d G iorth of Hanoi. 5 arth SOE, ott tien

On the other hand Mr. F. J. Cole | "®%, '°—Address by the Minister of! ce an oes UP. e eS guarantees to Germany will be de.
emi- (ata & | ated immediately afterwards.

off the discussion on the subject] Organisation it would be necessary
said that the same questién was|for training to become a whole
discussed at a conference at the] ime job. bbe
Jamboree in Jamaica and Trini- Professor J. S. Dash said it was
dad was not enamoured with the|not the first time a suggestion ci
idea, nor was he personally. He|the sort was put forward, ana
said that if the cost could bejrecalled a _ similar proposition
borne by the Colonial Govern-| Which was put forward in Britisa
ments and the United Kingdom,| Guiana where he was President
he would have no objection, but}oOf the Scouts’ Association.
if the Local Association had to Warning
contribute to the cost, then he He warned the Council that
certainly did not agree with it.| they should not take too narrow
Short Time view of the suggestion, and ob-
The Island Commissioner ar-]@erved that “scouting in the
gued that in the first place »ajCaribbean needs to be strength-







‘ Education
thought that the question of ;





: tk ; { j INTERVAL ' ene a

Travelling Commissioner in these}ened at this time.” He addeti,} spending the funds of the Associa-| _ Business Continued | | | ] » P I] z Biombe. —UP.
parts would spend a very short} “for one reason or another, the}tion did not arise, seeing that the | Wed. 13. “Busines eer, | oO 1e oO Ss U.N. rs Blast \ (From Our Qwn Correspondent) ene

; : ee) aA Prieta ietien cantik a —Business Sess eee. some
time in any one particular co]-|movement has been going back-] Governments were willing to con- | Ph'"s. Business Session (a.m.) Delegates ICELAND, June 30. Be * By DENNIS HART.
ony, and he felt that such a| wards, and there is no question} tribute to the cost, and he advo-|\" jeaye tor Tabany at 800 pan | Polling Toaland’s residential Woreal Froutlines ' LONDON, June 30 La To Star
Commissioner would try to inter-] of doubt as far as I know that ajcated, like Professor Dash, that | Sat. 16—Public Sessions in Tobago ie viachaned ode although | The semi-finals of the Men's mas
pret scouting as it was in the} little new blood would not do uw: | 4 Travelling Commissioner should | “PBUH, Webetes’ Auer Return see onestedsien het oe SEOUL, June, 30, Singles at Wimbledon this year ° “ i
United Kingdom and not as it}any harm.” pe. Devnet down for at least 3 wont At Tobago at 9.00 p.m protic Ls over 90 per ane This} United Nations lignt bompers| will be between Frank Sedgman | With Liz Taylor
ean APR aS " ah eee daane oi as wae tev 7 Mr. R. S, Jordan pointed out Cues 19—Vintt te ye ae is the first time the country js}elasted communist front lines inj and Mervyn Rose and Jaroslay

ajor Griffith said he knew]|training whic oa e » ;



that a Travelling Commissioner | "4. 20—Visit to San Juan and East Si.jelecting a President by pc iQular}orea with high explosive bombs | Drobny and Battie Zim se ai
} Jeorge : 3 ‘ : : arter als this 4 “
would conduct Wood Badges |rnurs #1--visit to San Fernando Ballot. despite heavy over-hanging clouay| In the Quarter é

. n | + i “ha jon Dick
Courses yearly, one in each of the | ki. Visit to Siparia and Point Fortin Of an estimated 67,000 votes the}that hampered most of the noon, the reigning champ

that in Jamaica there were peopie having somebody well versed i)
—Assistant Camp Chiefs and so] scouting in most parts of th’

Ee ee



























on who were quite competent,| world would be most helpful ou''isjands, and in the meantime | neluding the famous Pitch Lake. {Independence Party workers } activities. | Savitt Of. Be gg al benee
and if necessary they could send|here. The more people we car people like Mr, Springer would be | **+,*% nts aoe ee at Hotel claimed between 33,000 and 37,000 To-day's attacks were carried} + ; “9 fot ed mn Rose and Vic \
a few of them up to England for} get from other places to help "\: |responsible for preliminary train-} Xorandie. § ; for their candidate Bishop Bjarnijout by B26’s which have made Austra A ctusacoxt radintart one Whe
a three months refresher course|in these quarters, the better i! ]ing in the area, covering the sort | Jonsson. Earlier straw votes fav-|move than 170 strikes in round the acta 4—6, 6—3, 3-6, 5--7 by
and on his return work in his own] would be for us. If we can g°']of course given by Mr. Dahl in| ‘oured former Premier Asgeir] coc activity during the past 4} ie fallow ’ countryman Herbie
colony. He did not think that they} a ‘Travelling Commissioner fir |Grenada and Mr. McGregor in H.E. Presents Asgeirson supported by social de-|) ours, The results of early strikes | jam. In the other games Frank
could find anyone in Barbados.|something like three years, | —— ne. ie eee z a ‘ig soerem and segments of other could not be observed. Defence Sedgmian, the favourite, had a
come down for a year “or two, Thanks Badges ihe third candidate Gieslie ry wa ania beans tend om oS enka ar gbilens: ohms
ay Ww he ¢£ ze . Fe ar Me is win. eoar PO) . tory ove e te
eee ould be able â„¢ | At a meeting of the Island Scout ees Seems Sey, See No communist jets appeared to] jion Eric Sturgess and exiled
RED RIOTER RUSHED TO .ROME JAIL Mr. Aubrey Douglas-Smith, who |©Ouncil yesterday His Excellency cratic eatin Turn out of figures |Challenge the bombers indicating} Czech Jaroslav Drobny came ‘Ken|
a ’ was recently made District Com-|the Governor Sir Alfred Savage indicated many Communist voters}'hat last wegk’s allied raids on] behind to beat the nan
\ missioner for the Southern Dis- | %.C.M.G presented “THANKS| gig not go to the polls, No inci-]ommunist hydro - electric plants} McGregor 6—0, 3-—-6, 2-6, 7--5,
trict urged members to revise \DGES to Mrs, F. J. Cole, al dents were reported. Vote count-|may have crippled Reds electronic] T=), iced the
their ideas, and suggested that the | ne t the Council, Mr, H. N. ing will not be completed untill varning system in Manchuria and Rose ~ Pee ee see '
funds could be better devoted to | und 1 Mr, A. Masterton~| pu sday.—U.P. {North Korea. peeonanee . ; full Niet of the
building up a permanent training | Smith. : | In blasting the railway line, oe, ra alsuien) One court
centre in the is land where courses The meeting after confirming |} Okinawa based B29’s took up! 4 e game lasted nearly two hours
4 oe ‘tat a, Tel * t ir \the Rep “ f the exon hive Cae I i h B J I L Bee. capensis based bombers! » 14 in the end it was the Austra-
fod Tate ee eee ery |" y Re port of | he ox mate he TIS u e eft off on Saturday night i0] jian’s ability to last the pace whiel
torhave some ful time man who yee for ie, period. Ost : Dabs rgag |hwatan” Dettleneck bridge neat) carried im through. It was
would be in charge, and if that|/," A." - eemras. Tas oie Raises I PICCS | Korean coast. ‘ = piegd Sn 8 on aN nf decid.
uggestion. proved .impossible in ' tas Prey Pr a Be 2 | Sorean coas | occasional break through |
ee ts his aa inance Committee, and the Cor- Rain to-day slowe, roun ow the first four sets. Savitt with
o Ser Sen saehee talana missioner’s for the same period DUBLIN, June 30. | ighting and kept fighter pouibe .| his style based on thunderous ELIZABETH TAYLOR
He prefesred, however, to see the | With special reference to (a) the Food subsidies costing £15,000,~| orounded at bases. An allied; ground shots was in complete HOLLYWOOD. “dime 20
| moOney spent in a local training|Chief Scout's Visit, and (b) the|000 will be cut by seven per cent, | pokesman said ‘fonly light patrol | contrast to the Australian's vol- The Arz aie ne Act es Fernando
centre. |Jamaiea Jamboree, on Friday when Prime Minister; ictivity” have taken place sincc| ‘eying and delicate net play he Argentine Actor



600 Scouts Ramon De Valera’s controversial) Rod attacks early yesterde, ; %ose several times drew the}Lamas who had been on suspen












| ‘ ‘ . f » ip sclk
r : 7 itte : Americeg > t 4 1eێ at MGM apparently is back
canes Y ° judget goes into effect, Bitter|, . " ad ‘hor-| “merican to the net with neat}sion a 5

| Mr, J. E, Brome observed tha Carraway Wins ities ee been voiced because rie AE position west. of ‘Cher | drop shots and this undoubtedly|in the studios good grace for he

| © this island there 6 a schoo! he cuts will lift prices for such| 7, ‘ | took a toll of Savitt’s reserves has been signed up for two pic-
opulation of 30,000 children, with ! Gur Own Corresponder me eee x “ fi va, fic ‘ Reds lost 200 killed and som In the final set Savitt was able]tures this year.

!q roll of 600 scouts, 200 of whom GEORGETOWN, June a6 pun meepies pe ie. 8 ‘tot aan 150 wounded in assaults th o stey with Rose to.two-all but Tn ‘osie of theme Lathes will bea
vere active, ar llenged any- Calvin Garraway, welter-weight} butter and the 2A! reached United Nations barbe rackéd and lost the next four] pico, qevlace ioe aine an ah
ody to uld be bene- | ¢hampion knocked out Venezue-jand liquor alse will cost more. vire defenses but that failed 1 ames and the match. The final the grt ‘oe had ae

were tetio ie ret i “ot £808 bid 4 we Bac -r ana 3ut De Valera defended his|’#rry Reds into allied positions | tame was on his own service arty where he will play the role of an

lissioner a of £8 0 F 3.G gro) ‘ : =| > ij ° » <4 oly

ae as rt 1 206 lto-day before ecord boxing |®udget by saying let no one pre- UP. Rose won it for the loss of only underworld character under the

hg aie Br an ’ il zy it rear niner ee “itend that this was the budget me point finishing with a scorch-

Mr. Brorne urged ouncH to | crowd, - '



direction of Richard Thorpe who

| build on what was now in exist- In the second round, Jota took {announced by the government PUBLISHERS GET ng forehand return. directed Elizabeth Taylor in the







She ° -MeGregor mate! f ]

jence, and said they should| count of nine and towards ihe| against the workers NEW MANAGER . ae enone ne set atrug.{movie version of Sir Walter
first get the se¢ to be trained.| -nd, Garraway caught him with lie Shatead. tha breton ena MONTREAL, June 30 gle. The deciding game was the {Scott’s “Ivanhoe”

Te pointed out that there were a/a strong left hook to the head o Soe pee sour | Thomas Skinner of Canada Ltd..| final one in the fourth _ set The surprise addition to “the

um} of Guildwe ans in the| which sent him to the canvas. The |4on_ Government headed by one publishers, announced the ap- Drobn had broken through the} cirl who had everything” cast

land, and appealed to them to! gong sounded befere the count|of Eire’s leading Barristers Joba | pointment of Merivale Austin a: McGrigot’ kervice to lead 6—* | William Powell who was long
come forward and put their| ended but Jota was still out when| Costelle with Paving dissipated manager in Canada succeeding the] 5), i in a terrific battle in thr Jabsent from the screen. The movie
shoulders to the wheel with a view | the gong for the third round |Marshall Aid. He added: “we are}y.1¢ 4° Innes Pocock. and E a



} t 4 } lj. |a bigger Party than the Labour game which went to elevenj!s being rushed into production
ing the stand-' and he siled nswer the bel}, /é 3




to assisting in
}



Merivale Austin’s name through deuces s ithi © weeks fol-
’ , ati ; ‘ uces, won his service to leveljwithin the next two weeks fal
local Jota, one-time world welter- | Party and we are strong enough v0 ihily connections is well known] the score at two sets all. lowing the announcement that
objected to engaging a! weight champion entered the ring |do things that we think are 7 the throughout the West Indies Drobny had previously won the [Elizabeth is expecting a baby.
@ On Page 5 155 pounds, Garraway at 1674, jinterests of the workers.—-U.P. (CP) | nr st set but suffered several lapses —U.P.
nents sieratinliiastinets } @ On page 8.







Report Puzzles Cuba, Britain ven tiows up

b ‘
LONDON, June 30. A Board of Trade spokesman | (reports in the London sugar mur- very large surplus in the present Worker 8 Hand
t 30a d “We know of no plans for ket that the Anglo-Cuban tride crop which up to this time Bri



B’dos Publicity
C’tee Advertising

The Barbados Publicity Commit-
















I f Trade | sa > tee is to meet next Monday te
ind the Cub Embassy are at a| negotiating a new Cuban de| pact is being made under which ain has only been able to buy A pants rae ne | discuss hia ntevahticives plans for
xpl t} publication} pact.” And the Cuban Embassy| Cuba will sell 500,000 tor of with dollars. The Cubans wan n pO | 0UntaL per ' the &
1 of reports that the United spokesman added not only was, sugar to the United Kingdom and to buy shi building materials blew up an office worker's finger. Thee titel eugdidbtiha “sapiens
I o are negotiat- the Embassy without knowledge! will accept payment in sterling and small cars, all of which Brit- The booby trap was a perfect imi~) ial y a . ae er _ sta _ d
* trade pact By the of the purported pact talks but) which can only be spent here. A ain could supply The British tation of a ball point pen Yoon | eed eee Sere in ho
A PLAINCLOTHES POLICEMAN takes a firm grasp on a Red rioter in Rame United Kingdon ise of “t 1ewspaper reports came as ajnumber of circumstances give Government would like to teke one of two fellow workers found a ; Sta’ es anc Canac a in an
as he hustles him off to jail. The youth was one of hundreds arrested 590,000 r of Cuban sugar, us.” credence to this report.” sugar off the ration and an addi-'in his desk and __was oe effort to attract the visitors hey
for staging a demonstration during the visit of Gen. Matthew Ridg~ ccepti ocker tead " t as published in New f tional supply of 500 000 tons it orem, Police are investigat- pnd the Summer Touris
Way, military commander of the western powers, to the Eternal Citz, of traditional dollar York states “There are strong ~ “ een a nat Cube am a woud mane this powsible.”—U.F -| ing : eason,
+ i

































o 70 “ :
PAGE TW BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, JULY 1, 1952
a
e e ' 4 Listeni Hi | 956559550999 9995 99S 98S" >
ive Walke ery sIOwly Lan eee te er NOTRCE ux i
| hear |
z 4 400 — 7.15 p.m. 19.76 M 25.53 M = >
—But He Saw Things No One Else Did— 4 % ;
L 4.0) p.m. The News, 4.10 The _ ‘
By MAX TRELL | Dats’ Seevice, 413 pom. ‘Bruinion Day. | & Me
ny ; . _ as “ Be 5.0 pm. Lawn Tennis, 5.15 pon Customers holding Rebate Notes
H' jm, Vi. ALE M.L.C., Intransit | GLIVE, the Snail, said: “Some | Cricket, 5.20 p.m BB : % up to the end of Dec. 1951, are
Managing ractc f the SONG ‘the onsdensers arriv folks like to go in a hurry. Some Light Orchestra, 6.00 p.m - weminded that final date of pay-
Advocate Go.. Lt etr from 7 the passengers AITiv~ | ¢.ins think I’m the unluckiest one zine, 6.15 p.m, Meet % ment will be 30tn June %
Trinidad 6n Sunda by ing here from Trinidad on | i) tie world not to be able t , wealth, 6.45 p.m. Sports and Same will be sang: ay a é
BW LA, . Sunday by the $:S. De Grasse in-) fase. But 1 think some folks are | Pageranane Earete Pea amet |B cur Gaver ao es SIE
Mr Jale had been nding transit for the United Kingdom 2 n ” | 7.15 — 10.30 p.m 453 M 31 |X p.m. with exception Saturday RM
the Summer Meeting of the were Mr. Max Kuhn, Consul for weBet it ‘gun dos ne bared” cael } 3 whole day and 11 a.m. to 12 .
= Y a1 tir he Switzerland in Trinidad and Mrs. ut i you go ina hurry, & | | 7.10 p.m. Rendezvous, 7.45 p.r er- o'clock daily .
rendg yf Cl vi 1 opene o —s ety f vena* sonal © i o savail.| % 4 tf,
a ‘the Queen's Pat tyes fo pes Kuhn who will be away for four| Knarf, “you get wherever you're | } ost ley ge A, pr = SOOO 3
Thursdé test Yr? 9g 7 | months and Mr. G. G. Gianetti of | going quick. ; i | Report-From Britain, 8.45 p.m. Intor-
ee a ae : | the Imperial College of Trepical| Glive said that.was right. “You} | tude, 8.58 p.m. From the Editoria’s, 9-00 | 4G a 5 &E Tt Y
For U.K; Holiday Agriculture. He was accompanied | get there quick all right. But what} } -io — ey rey Sea, | ry
M' GC. SGOTT of Barclays by his wife and two children| do you see? | mean, what do you} 10.00 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. News | The Garden—St. James ‘
Bank. St. Kitts, who was Tonina and Ian. see along the way?” | Talk, 10.15 p.m. Herbert Hodge Talk-| 2 TODAY & TOMORROW 4.30 P.M. y
here fo past week staving at a Mr. and Mrs. Gianetti expect| “You see everything. Glive You | ing, 10.30 p.m, India — Southern Jour-| Whole (New) Serial y
Sea View Guest House, left on » return to Trinidad about the| just see it all faster.” | ee } # 4 INGLE” 4
: 7 i ; , | —————- LOST CITY of the JUNGL y
Sunday by the S.S. De Grasse for janpena Fae te, will _ “You're quite sure that you see | | Russell HAYDEN & Keye LUKE ,
England where he will spend eavin, eir daughter onina at| everything: when you run?” ‘ 2 ,
fuss wenathe! boliday. a University in England to fur-|~ «Gp on ? 2 : Talking Point | THURS. (Only) 8.90 P.M ;
Also leaving for England on ther her studies. Glive though for a minute or two ae P29 | “MISSISSIPPI: GAMBLER’ 3
a > NE os | ‘ * ecord- | r .
Sunday by the De Grasse was Visiting Her Daughter Finally he said: “Maybe you do. | Knarf had an argument with Glive, |. Character is money © oe Kent TAYLOR & ,
Mr. G. Gilbert, Accountant of EAVING yesterd morning | Let’s both of us go from here to the | ing on She nan ears : ‘SLOnDs Alam ,
Bz r ‘lays Bank, St. Kitts, and Mrs S 7 et arp Pre & ws the money, money in turn becomes Martna O'DRISCOLL ‘
arclays Bank, St. Wits, and Mrs. by B.W.1LA. for Antigua and ,

Gilbert. They will also
about four months’ holiday.

spend





Puerto Rico on her way to the}
U.S.A. was Mrs. Robertha Branch |

stump of the old apple tree. You go | the flowers, and the bottom of the
as fast as you like. And I'll go as | grass, and a cricket or two, and a |
slow as | usually do. When we both | mowse, and an old rubber ball that





character.—Bulwer- Lytton.

Mr. ane Mrs. Gilbert arrived of King William Street. She has| get there we'll talk about the things | the children must have lost—”
Here about ten dave Sao ang ware gone on a visit to her daughter| we’ve seen on the way.” “Oh! Where is that ball? The
staying at the Hotel Royal. (Miss Vincent Branch ) of ?

Qn Business

Ne ; . : : “It’s at the end of that clump of - . ‘
er cs MICHAELS. Seconded to Washington Jamaica to be very interesting, The stub | daisies,” said Glive. “And then “ANNE OF THE INDIES’ : :
who us h Messrs. m ; - of the q vre | . %
Knight’s-Ltd., Phoenix Branch, {REGINALD McCONNEY, 4 7 PRESENT holidaying in| than twenty or thirty feet away — Gn mate " LOUIS JOURDAN — DEBRA PAGET ta
Ye years ago, is now back in as- arbados is Mr. . { ob tee . . ee Se ieee % 1%
the "est Indies y an Me racaliapen ury, left for the United States via Sarin hoe ig ota > > } a ee oe ~—; “Worm?” said Knarf, puzzled. Tomorrow and Thursday com Bolt ag y ,
. . , per storda > , “ 7o. ie an. ow “ E Ns
visit. Puerto Rico yesterday by B.W.LA. former Agricultural Assistant in So Knarf and Glive the Snatt| “Worml the earthworm. He was | FIGHTING MAN ome Bill WILLIAM S1¥
Mr. Michaels who revresents He has been seconded for three North-East Trinidad. started out. In one step Knart was |looking out of the top window of Victor JORY — Randolph 5 — 4 14
British Drug Houses in England, years’ service, following a proba- Mr. Sarjeant who is spending| ahead of Glive. In two steps Knart | his underground house. We chatted | IRD OF PARADISE xy
travelled to Jamaica by B.O.A.C. tion period of three months, with twelve days with his parents.) couldn't see Glive any teed: for | agent how he was getting along | ‘HANDLER 7 Debra PAGET — Louis JOURDAN xs
before coming on here over the Vosningeehe Supply Mission in yyy, and Mrs. L. Sarjeant of} Give was lost among the tall blades | d what we a were oer. Jeff C ad 3 BUYS e
veek- hy B.W.LA He is sninj * n ad, is his way t a ata ale |e , “|i was just about to say good-bye 0 OCP OOFOOOOLEES OVOP POSES
_—_ me the Ocean View Hotel. Reggie who is the only son of ae eect he has kins ct'o~ of grass. It only took Knart a min | when Worml suddenly diekppeated EOC OSEES SO In
s 1g +6 , ae3 Dr. and Mrs Cc. ceConne : a ute to reach the stump. Then he sat |, ‘ +. ,
Matron at St. Philip’s Sanaa Gy dines trast are Ship. moted to the post of Agricultural | 7). and waited for Glive. into his house again. z A RES
ISS- MADELINE B Y E R, ping Master’s and the Auditor a cakes to leave for King- It must have been an hour later | us hy? asked Knar ; Worm! P i i Barbados
Matron of St. Philip’s General’s_ before going to the gton via Antigua and Puerto Rico] “ hen Glive glided up to the stump. | Robin was just coming so Worm |
Almshouse, leaves today by Colonial Treasurer’s Department. },, B.W.1.A. later in the week. Well,” he said to Knarf, “what | Went. Then I met another old friend DO cn
B.W.LA, to spend. a fortnight’ At the airport yesterday to see "~ = "" ” iid you see, my boy?” jot. mine — Blackie the Beetle. | | BRIDGETOWN BARBAREES _ |{/ OISTIN &
holiday in St. Lucia. him off were many friends, well “] saw lots of things,” said Knart.| hadn't seen Blackie for quite a (Dial 2310) (Dial 5170) iu aed
During her stay Miss Byer will wishers and his colleagues in the ‘Because, even though | went fast, while. He told me he had moved into |

be the guest of Miss Isalene Wat-

son, Clerk in the Customs

MR. R. McCONNEY

service with whom he is deserv-

ingly popular. Among these was

Jamaica, Long Island.

Agricultural Officer,







Knarf didn’t think this was going |

kept looking around, | saw the
owers in the garden. | saw a robin

children have been looking all over

Very Interesting for it!”



TODAY LAST SHOWING 5 & 8.30 p.m.





a new house. It was right along the

wey, so | decided to look at it. | ian S

eo
:
:

HELD OVER

Shows TODAY
445 & 8.30 p.m.

POSES PEP ETE EEPEL ASS



Today 445 & 8.30 p.m.
| rhe story of the life of
Christ

TODAY & TOMORROW
445 & 8.30 p.m.











Gents.

Re i ‘ ; Very Heavy...
Department Mr, H. S, Jemmott, O.B.E., saw a lot of grass. | saw a rock | Blackie pointed it out to me. lhe |W re-release PRINCE OF PEACE || »°!* Serial , y vy DRILL
Keep The Date eee en | with moss on it. I saw a butterfly, | stairway led ween under nee - Mark TWAIN'S (Color) SEA HOUND ; Li ited @ atts
HE ANNUAL BAZAAR in aid oresters ance And then I saw the stump of the old | OSS on it, for that rock was the | fee E imited Quan
of the Old L Fed Gia wit HE Ancient Order of Foresters vpple tree and I sat down to wait | "oof. Then a butterfly came to visit | PRINCE & THE PAUPER ||~tiuns. Special 1.30 Larry 5 ahi eee 98c. and $1.20
tuke place. this year on Saturday, have for some time maintain- for you.” | Blackie and I left them both talking | Starring: Errol FLYNN || JOHNNY ALLEGRO Buster ( ——_——_— —__—_———

November 29th,

. . c en Sails : att? |until | saw you, Knarf, sitting on eet Coming Soon Rayon and Cotton
During the last two years, the the children of its members bene- aw a great many things. anti se . and ;

cinme ne Gia estun ae neon a “What did you see, Glive?” | the stump of the apple tree, waiting CHEROKEE UPRISING DESPERADOES ERROL FLYNN 3 pairs for $1.00
changed from Queen's Park to the In order to boost this Fund, “Well,” said Glive, “Ll walked for, 'or me. Pe

Volunteer Drill Hall, but public



eq a Scholarship Fund from which

they are making a bigger effort,







“Very pood,” said Glive. “You

a long ways without seeing much |

together. And that was all U saw |
|
|

“H’mm,” said Knarf thoughtfully.





|
|
| WWSar.



THURS. Special

WESTERN RENEGADES







1.30 p.m. George RAFT

Randolph SCOTT in


























GENTS’ SOCKS

~ GENTS’ WATCHES



support continued. and on Saturday night, July 5th, of anything exeept the bottom of! ‘*You really saw a lot, Glive.” Johnny MACK BROWN ious oe DODGE CITY Reliable Wrist Watches
The pases is staged in aia of ae A. foe te an, of the ‘ (Special) 930 & 130 |) THUNDER With $8.22
4# mest deserving cause and so Barbados Tu ub, will conduct —, C : no ip ahaa Raita
those who “have and those, the drawing. of Raffle Prizes at Rupert and the 1 oy Scout 36 yeas Ae as ) “ean HOLT & Ann SHERIDAN ¢ Good Quality
who will supportet in futuwe are the. Lodge’s Dance which takes “COLORADO AMBUSH” eres apenaue tot Dea -HANDKERCHIEFS
cence pen the date open. place et the Drill Hall. Ge b, 4 bi Johnny Mack BROWN George O°BRIEN_ Alan HALE 4f 1.00
i } P m TS gaily oy : er
To Reside in U.S.A. Transferred a yy ewe SS | ahapsene te itt
ISS ALETA EARLE, daugh- R. EMMANUEL WHISKEY Ae w; 7 7 A TROPICAL SUITING
\ tec of Mr, Seifert Earle of # who was over here super- ROODAL TMEATRES Grey, Brown and Blue
Grazettes Road, left here yester- vising old iron for Consumers a XY $2.62
re roe, by Bow.t A. for oo and Iron Co. of Canada, EMPIRE RO —____ ______.
ntigua and Puerto Rico en route left for British Guiana Frid PVERS Tice tteaer se
tthe USA. where Gee ee ee eee — “ oo rg TO-DAY 4.45 & 8:20 & Continuing Fee Semen ee at a eaee
side with her relatives. on transfer. . PARAMOUNT PRESENTS.— Ann SHERIDAN - : , est. Fas ia
, ; Pacts: ‘ansfei Jee Aiba: MR. V, A. L. SARJEAD Sab Hobe — Hedy GAatARtt UR non ena Trea Latest Fashion
ace ioheteacicanet tae a a —
“MY FAVOURITE SPY” “WOMAN ON THE RUN” CREAM





The first person whom the littke Daddys all had Christma, stock-

FAIRWAY CHAMPIONS
Every Golf player should see

EXTRA EXTRA
2 Reel Musical HOT & HECT

this

1c

a




FLANNEL SERGE

nals meet is Gaffer Jarge, who ir thar they didn't expect.”

$4.38, $3.47

















i ins SHORT WED 2nd & THUR 3rd 4.30 & 8.15) ee oe
hobbling along to join the other Gaffer chuckles silently, and after And LATEST BRITISH SHIRTS
rown-ups. ‘Hey, what's the fumbling in his coat-tail pocket he PAhAMOUNT NEWS MARGARET LINDSAY s
Ray. young Rupert?" wheezes pulls something out and holds it - (alas ex i Khaki, Dress, Sport, Cot-
the old ait ** Queer things up in front of Bi A have been happening.”” says the you, too!” cries Willie This i TO-DAY Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8.15 and eal Kxock-do Pri
j litle bear, “* Our Mummys and mere mysterious than ever. John KRELAND — James BARTON oo OMELODY NE” wn ces
; F ALL RIG/TS PRSERUES — in — na paren 1001 Qualities
“THE SCARF” Starring: Leon ERROL and TIF ——
TROPHIES ON, PARADE and Mitiiey WAGs“ ""\)% GENTS’ PARSON GREY
AEN, “CHICAGO CALLING” eo | odck asa id Dhar 11
Starring: DAN DURYEA ROYAL S

Gussie Moran’s lace - trimmed hibition of sporting trophies

anties, which sre t tal . which is being taken round |
Benet WD NR SES America. Other exhibits ave}
the tennis world when she wore tyophies won by Babe Zaharias,

‘JOHN WHITE SHOES
10 per cent. off

WED 2nd & THUR Sra 4.20 & 8.1) Last Two Shows TODAY 4.30 & 8.1
“THE SUNDOWNERS”

With Robert NRESTON —

“STATION WEST"



All Wool Worsted





i r ith Dick POWELL
i. them at Wimbledon two years the greatest woman athlete ores Zohn ARBOR BN ie aie “TWEED PINSTRIPE
q The three ptctures here ago, are still in the news. They Frank Parker, Donald Budge an “SWORD OF THE AVENGER" “TT HAPPEN TO ONE MAN” :
illustrate-- take pride of plece in an ex- Alice Marble. = SSS 56 in. Navy and Brown






$9.50

TROPICAL PINSTRIPE
56 in. wide
$2.80, $3.29. and $3.49

RE ETE EE, OE a SS EE SY i

ss

EXCLUSIVE |‘
MEN'S ‘
cHOP |:





GENTS RIBBED
JOCKEY PANTS
72 cents

~ HOUSEHOLD



TABLE COVERS
Plastic ones

FOR THE COCKTAIL PARTY—in pastel cals,





$1.29 up
OILCLOTH
@ ae Ss —three variants now on sale in - —— at pee eiionis
: Britain, BLANKETS
, “cinders,” is new tor outdoo: Lovely Quality and
at gQ and cocktall dresses, Sing! Colours 19
“Tree bark” pleating, which: ingle ........ $1.98
e@ ee crinkles like chocclate ;

we

ww
re
coe
Oa

Via Italy and America, they
are now here... to stay...







paper, is
also new for cocktail dresses.
Coronation year wedding
fashion will be the all white
bridal gown worn with a white
fur fabric jacket and pillbox.






Medium ...... $2.08

BEDROOM AND DRAW-
ING ROOM RUGS
$3.48





— ee is Spies Are Busy wee “0
Susan Deacon's News for Women FASHION spies are busy trying} MPP ON Oe eee eee BRIX po. $4.
|S ee oo ERG IS DPea to ferret out details of the Double veeees, $5.15
Pr Queen’s summer wardrobe. 5 Alluring Shades
(BY SUSAN DEACON) that men will like them. They I hear that one American TD «
I GREET with wonderment ana ¥"'t: ; : fashion house was prepared to BED SHEETS
joy the new fashion arrival from , “24 DON’T imagine that they spend up to £35,000 for photo- Bingle and Double
the Contizent—the Bare Backed wy, on ne ae afi graphs aoe Carte = oie .01 and $6.21
Sandal, you have a low instep you Queen’s clothes. It is the bigges TAPESTRY CLOTH
Sane â„¢ will have trouble keeping them a ever made for a fashion TAPESTRY CLOTH
We heard whispers from Italy on, and if you have a high instep secret. 48 in. wide
.+..the new shoes have no heels, they still feel as if they are The Queen’s dressmaker, $1.29, $1.33 and $1.46
and..rumours from France,,.. falling off. Norman Hartnell, told me: “. . . ———eTeTEO
they, are"Quite bare at the back But I predict that all fashion 1 can never relax our precautions STRAW MATS
...We s.w pictures ef them in conscious women will buy a pair. The Queen’s dresses are made In Bedroom and Drawing
the American magazines, but not New Colours up in several parts by different Room Sizes
so scon, I thought, would they FIRST of the autumn and workers, and very few people 80c., 90c., and $1.04
come to Britain, winter fashions seen in London see them complete, ee an esheets
British women seem to suffer jast week showed no change so. “On an important dress, such CRETONNES
with their feet. They like open far in the silhouette, but there as the Queen’s weer _—_ I 37 in. wide — 48 in. wide
oes and wedge heels. Comfort pre new colours and’ fabrics. had to have a ~hour-a-day T. ;
first. “yeu Sherry’ brown and benedictine guard on the building, and had SUI Ss LINEN SHORTS $10.50 790, and $1.32
re this elegant, fashionab!> with b'ack, creme de menthe, to black out all downstairs win- ‘ MOSQUITO NETS
and flattering new shoe style is pin gin, enadine, light ale dows.
well on the way even to beating Beenie souk are the coor in- “The sketches are seen by only KHAKI SHORTS $5.50 SUITS MADE TO ORDER Ready made
the ankle strap sales, expensive coat colours, two people—my dressmaker anc IN Medium ......... $6.30
DON’T imagine for a moment }

A lovely slate colour, called myself.”—L.E.S,

FROM A WIDE RANGE



















ae —————— | TROPICALS Sie wasn at
WOT spe vere - 57c.
NEW LOW PRICES LINEN este: teh SHIRTS Baek
GARBERDINE. and WR Sees) $1.30
FINE QUALITY WHITE CAMBRIC 36” .............00s00s0es ene 98 TROPICALS PYJAMAS HEAD KERCHIEFS
BUM) Me WHITE PRINTS,S6) occ cv vcccgn esas See bans beets 84 WOOLLENS From $35.00 up SOCKS TIES —"
Also TROPICAL PANTS : te acid %
MOR i ei bexc aaah edanhevel el icienciens ACs Be dpa we WORSTEDS ae ae SHOES.
MN NF e050 os A in wenn son dead ah wate bgagees 1.00 HAN :
. § THE LONDON SHOP LTD. BROS. |
T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS | pr. Wm, ery. street ana
DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606 | Se eee ats concn Sls ta ae
é § y





TUESDAY, JULY 1,

1952



Teachers Seek Parents’ Co-operation |

Begin Island Wide
Educational Plan

THE ELEMENTARY

School Teachers of Barbados

have started an island wide campaign to get the co-oper-
ation of ete oun in the training of the young. The first

meeting of

campaign was held last night at the Provi-
dence Boys’ School, Christ Church, and Mr.

J. Cameron

Tudoi addressed the teachers and parents.

Mr. Tudor said in: part :

We are all of us here this eve-
ning at the bidding of the Prim-
ary School Teachers of this island.
They are seeking our support and
enthusiasm for a cause so over-
whelming in its importance that
we scarcely grasp its significance.
We are here to inaugurate a cam-
paign, destined to be island wide
and designeg to rescue our young
people from all the consequences
of faulty character training. It is
altogether fitting that Teachers
should interest themselves in this
grave matter and it is even more
fitting that they should seize this
splendid opportunity to bring home
to the rest of us, the plight of our
young people. And the fact that
our Primary School Teachers have
embarked on this campaign is in
itself a warning to parents, guard-
iang and to the community that we
have largely fallen asleep at our
posts.

Not infrequently is it tolq to us
with all the fervour which attaches
to the announcement of a dis-
covery that we live in a changing
world. The people who tell us this
are usually professionai politicians
and newspaper editors. It is time
that their actions contradict their
thesis at every point, but the
‘thesis is in part true. The world is
in fact changing. But only in
material externals. The age old
problems of humanity—good and
evil, truth and falsehood, beauty
and ugliness — ever remain to be
solveq in each historical period.
The challenge of evil and sin are
ever present and each generation
is therefore equidistant from. Efer-
nity. It is in the light of this
truth that we approach this prob-
lem of character training in the
lives of the young.

The Child

One of the most depressing tasks
of the Educationist lies im. his
contemplation of the child — to
discover what sort of human being
he or she is. Books have been
written, diligent researches com-
pleted, lectures have been given,
all on this problem, the problem
of making a correct assessment of
the human young. True we know,
roughly speaking, its chief human
needs. On the purely physical side;
these are food, warmth and shelter,
and it is gratifying to discover
that governmental authorities are
at last discovering a connection be-
tween the suitable satisfaction of
these requirements and a success-
ful school career. Moreover, the
satisfaction of the physical needs
are of abiding interest to the
teacher who finds, more often than
not, that his expected results are
denied him, through the neglect of
these basic needs.

When, however, we pass to the
moral anq_ spiritual requirements
of a child, it is there that the trou-
ble begins. We seem unable to
make a correct assessment of the
child@’s needs in these spheres
because we so often forget that he
or she is a person in his or her
own right. And yet, on any defi-
nition of personality — and —
are several — we should ali, J
think, agree that a person to be
fully a person, must have secur-
ity, adventure and responsibility.

This is what we ought to mean
by security. Go into our Law

Courts any day, but especially on
criminal as-

the occasions when






REDIFF

Subseriber brought to and
to any
Com;

any.

¢ Have shways a supphy of Re



Offers a Commission of $1.50 in CASH for every New

“JDIFFUSION wil! pay in addition a bonus of $25.00
person who brings in twenty-five New Subscrib- 34
ers in ene Calendar month who are accepted by the @



sizes are being neld. An observant
person can gather, from the vast
majority of cases he listens to,
that the accused persons, more
often than not, show all the hail
merks of inferiority. He can read-
ily see that they have probably
never been really cherished by
anyone, that they have emerged
from loveless homes, stunted in
their emotional life, resorting *o
violent crime in qa futile gesture
to assert not their superiority —
poor wretches, they dare not hope
for that—but their equality! So
that the security we ought to have
in mind is not the mere freedom
from physical want—important as
that is — but acceptance by a
group whose love, whose approval
and whose esteem are necessary to
the moral growth of the child.
Moreover a child needs order-
ly living for his moral growth, He
must therefore observe in the re-
lationships of his parents affection,
mutual respect and a_ level of
physical decency which neither
increases noy restrains his natural
euriosity. In addition, it is neces-
sary that his childhood be passed
ina moral environ-
ment — preferably within the
bounds of Christian marriage, so
that his sensitive confidence is not
stiflea by am atmosphere of sexual
irregularity, by the spectacle of
tyranny or by the infrequent ar-
rivals and departures of the male
parent on the streetcar named
‘Desire’. That, ladies and gentle-
men, is what I mean by security.
It is woefully lacking in the lives
of our children and its importance:
cannot be over-emphasised.

Adventure

The second moral and spirilual
neeg Of the child is adventure, lic
must have fresh things to do, fresh
interests to delight in, and new
knowledge to acquire. All these
he needs simply because he is 4
Person. This curiosity is part ol
him and we have no right to ask
him to develop without it. From
crawling to standing, from stand-
ing to stepping and thence to
climbing aMq balancing—in ali
these he gains new confidence,
nourishes his soul on each success-
ful venture, until at maturity nis
natural curiosity leads him into
the adventure of ideas, thus mak-
ing him a philosopher, or into the
adventure of realities, thus mak-
ing him a christian,

And then there is responsibility,
the need for which is the third
moral and spiritual requirement
of the child. In order that you
may grasp it more readily, let me
describe it as the need of personal
independence through the medium
of something over which respon-
sibility can be assumed. Naturally,
at the tenderest age, this mahifes/s
itself in the desire for personal
possessions. This desire is an emi-
nently wholesome one and ought
to be encouraged. And for this
reason. Quite often the habitual
thief is the person who, as a child,
had never had anything of his own,
and everybody who has ever had
any dealings with delinquent chi'-
dren, must know how heart ren“ -
ing it is to hear gq little girl te'l
how she had always wanted a do'l
but her mother was too poor to
give her one,

The desire for possessions in the
young is a wholesome one. Its sat-

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isfaction, no matter on what scale, child, the being whom he must properly.

is a sensible thing, for it encour-
ag@s responsibility and responsi-
bility is an ingredient necessary
to personality.

It is wrong to give a child a toy
which he can enjoy or manipulate
unaided. Rather should he be
given something which he cannot
work unless he summons the
assistance of a brother, a friend or
an adult. In this way his orienta-
tion is guided away from himself
as an object of devotion and to-
wards co-operation with another
human being as a desirable and
pleasant attainment,

The Teacher

When I turn from. the child to
his teacher I am on firmer
greund, and for a very simple
reason. In dealing with the child
[ could rely only, for the most
part, on insight and direct observ-
ation. But the problem of the
teacher comes to me through vital
experience. Having enjoyed the
experience of teaching for at least
nine years at various levels, I feel
slightly more confident in attempt-
ing to relate the duties of respon-
sibilities of the teacher to the press-
ing requirements of the moment,
especially the requirements of the
tasks which we have to dis-
charge.

The three supreme vocations of
man are parenthood, teaching and
the sacred ministry. If these are
fulfilled adequately the aspirations
of ‘human beings will, it seems to
me, comprise the complete and en-
during City of God. And anyone
who desires to enter any part,
however small, of this trinity of
callings for the greater upliftmen:
of human life, must ds someone
has said in a diffegent connection,
live dangerously, For of all occu-
pations that of a person training the
young is the most dangerous,
partly because the school as such
is not as well based as the family
or the Church. It does not possess
such natural supports, Within this
context let us analyse the duty
and attitude not of the perfect
teacher (there is no such persen)
but of the teagher who thwarted
and hemmed in on every side, stiil
moves towards perfection in the
training of his charges. As usual,
he trains them by training him-
self and we refer to him in the
purely generic sense.

A very distinguished Educator
once defined in relation to the
tastes of a teacher, the difference
between a well educated well in-
formed man and a clever unedu-
cated man. It was that in the one
case the knowledge and training
have been absorbed into the
whole life and that in the other
it is eonfined to the head, With
one it flows naturally with the
other it is the consequence of con-
scious effort mingled with vanity.
I submit that the distinction in
true and that only the first kind
of teacher can really influence the
young in the building of their
character.

Face to Face

Such a teacher, in whom know-
ledge had been absorbed in his
whole life and not merely in his
head, will not worry about other
work he might prefer to do. He will
gladly accept his role of co-workey
with God, nourishing the soul
committed to his care. It will not
matter greatly whether he is a
mere assistant or whether he is
really teaching the subjects or the
pupils he would prefer to teach.
Nor will he ignore the defects of
his own character by feeding his
ambition on the outlines of the
school where he would like to be
headmaster. Brought face to face
with all sorts and conditions of
children, he will accept them as
they are and with the eye of the
soul he will see them, even in the
weaknesses as the summit of God’s
creation. Face to faee with the
unnerving simplicity of a



BARBADOS ADVOCATE ~



Naturally, there ar

t will not matter greatly

nourish, he will naturally realise good reasons for the nursery of make a firm resolve now to cdo

that in being himself he is more
nearly certain of being the perfect
teacher.

To influence those committed
his care, he will reveal all the en*
gaging qualities of a little child

the simple faith, the trust and con—

fidence which gives learning its
attraction and which rendeys to
the business of education that
proper degree of humility without
which no man can dare hope to
enter the Kingdom of Heaven, The
mainspring of his own existence,
the Faith by which he lives and
in whieh he hopes to die—this
should be the granary from which
a hungry soul may refresh itself
with renewed vigour for the
perilous business of growing up
in a sinful world,

Tt is true that environment
works against him, But yet, if in
deference to ignorant administra-
tors or to a pathetic community
he acquiesces in what is hideous
or artificial and betrays his trust
or betrays his noble aspirations,
the consequences are clear, The
child becomes depressed and frus-
trated, his gifts atrophy and he

emerges into a.man’s world a
frustrated being, without self

respect, conceited and ill-balare-
ed. And all because ks teacher
kad looked away from the light.

If his school is a bad one, if, that
is, he is subject to a narrow mind-
ed headmaster er to an ill dispoved
interfering bedy of managers, or to
an ignorant and befogged educa-
tional authority his answer must
ie in the contribution which his
own personality makes and the
degree to which it can subdue ad-
verse circumstances, For when he
remembers that there are little
people who rely on his personality
for nourishment he will, I think,
be much consoled and heartened
by the fact that his usefulness is
far greater in content and value
to his pupild than are his depres-
sion and sense of frustration,

He will remember that he is at
all times a teacher. Other claims
may be made upon his time, energy
and upon his inclinations, To these,
he must of course respond, but
never out of relation to the re-
quirements of hig vocation as a
teacher, For any teacher who en-
ters a legitimate sphere of action,
for instance political controversy,
in such a manner as to divert his
teaching energy and interest, is
acting in bad faith towards the
children who rely upon his words
and actions as mariners rely upon
the stars and compass, He can
properly exercise his talent for
citizenship mainly in his teaching.
That is the station to whieh it has
pleased God to call him, He can
best. serve his God by serving his
work. In his own school ard
through the school he stamps his
indelible mark upon the character
of his community since every
child he influences is a citizen.
Though he may work through a
long career, perhaps not getting the
promotion he has deserved, yet as
he reads or hears of the nobie
exploits of some child since grown
to adulthood, he will experience a
solemn pride in having laid hig
ambition on the altar of Personal-
ity. So you who teach can lift
up your hearts. There can be no
real failure, only degrees of suc~
cess. The way may be difficult,
but every step forward increased
“the multitude of the wise, the
welfare of the world.”

The Parental Problem

We have now arrived at the most
important aspect of this problem.
The responsibilities of parents in
assisting the teacher or at least
in not undoing his work, Here in
Barbados as elsewhere, it appears
to be an uphill struggle even to
impress upon parents the hard
necessity of being good examples
to their children apart from the





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life we see around us ana
ould like to stress here the im-
ance of a reasonable standar
; material well being to the
x upbringing of children. I
lad be more than foolish to
pre the fact that the mac
scramble for food, clothing anc
shelter exhausts the moral an
spiritual energies of most of ow
parents and it is only a few who
surmount the difficulties of ever
day living to attend to other mat-
ters. And it seems to me that a
sound duty rest upon our Govern-
ment to ease the burden of living
sufficiently to enable parents
fulfill theiy more important role
wus examples to and trainers «
such souls as are committed t
them by God.

But even when allowances av
made for the hardships unde
which most of us have
live, there is still the respotr
sibility which reste upon parent
as such: To explain is n
to excuse. For parents, lil
all of us are sinful creatures,
dive need of salvation—persons
who need to be put aright if i)
guidanee they in turn pass on to
their children is to be worthwhile.
And T can only supply th

guidance by drawing your atten
tion to Christian doctrine 0!
Parenthood, Which is the natural

consequence of the Christian Doe

trine of Marriage.

At a stage further we meet th
problems of the home. These o
many and varied. But they
arise from thé imperfect gra

which parents have of their dutic
More than half of the unhappin¢é
of children can be traced direct
to the selfishness of parents.
never occurs to them that the
have a responsibility before G
to their children, compared wi ii
which the necessity to feed an
clothe their young is relative)
unimportant.

What parents have to realise i
thet the home is the chief trainir

ound of the child. The schoo!
S awe supplementary, To nep-
lect an obvious duty on the temp
img calculation that the te ach
Wil discharge it is the hallmar}
of cynicism and cowardice. An
nothing but curses and contem)!
are the fitting reward of all
parents who neglect their plain
duty, a duty inherent in their vo-
eztion as a parent—on the spur “)
ous ground that they are not)
qualified to train their young. % ‘|
they are not qualified then, wit
God's Grace, they must

instruct their young by turning!
away from the wickedness they
have committed, and by doing th:
which is lawful and right. Thu
and thus only, can they save the
own @hildren’s souls and the

The truth is of course, that th
duty of imparting moral and re-
ligious training to children resi
on both parents in an equal dé
gfee. If a man claims that h
deily toil renders him unfit +f
assist in this work, so may
‘wife retort with more than Taste
that her daily toil also renders he

unfit. Actually this is what hay
pens. Naturally the _ childre
suffer. But the duty falls on both
since both are necessary to th
moral stability of the children

Thus we should bitterly contes(
to argument of the father whx
pleads inability to his duty o |

the doubtful ground that he is too
busy earning bread. He is
coward, shun him.

So we launch this campaign

among all parents for one good
and sufficient reason only. The!
teachers of our Primary schoo!l-|
are willing to share yowr burde:

in the teaching of your
They are anxious that your chil
dren, no matter what their statior

in life, no matter what their gifts|
pert}

may be, shall play their fell
as citizens of this community au
of course of the world. Even if

little positive duty of training. them you have hitherto heen negligent

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ewe "i Phy ae

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MORRIS

BiG

God's will in the upbringing and |
training of your children, Join
with them in Parent-Teacher

Association. Such bodies will help
your children. We have started
a campaign. It is for all parents
to turn it into a moral crusade
under the banner of Him who wa:
once a Child, has always been

|
}
}

if you;

}

parent and still remains a Teact- |

er from those truths by which
nen ought to live and die.

Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gen-
Uemen, you have borne with me.
long enough. I am grateful to the
Headmaster of the School for the
high privilege I have enjoyed. |
wish you well in your work and
pray that success will attend you,
In conclusion, I like to think how
vften T have been sustained by
the words of an Amerzican poet.

“To be out of the moiling street

With its weiter and its sin!

Who hath given me this sweet

And given my children dust to eat?

vd when will their wage come in’

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PAGE THREE



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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS eal ADVOCATE

uses | Gee wee’
Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad 8t., Bridgetown





Tuesday, July 1, 1952.

— — —







—

MILK MARKETING

THE Annual General Meeting of the
Milk Marketing Board held in London on
June 13th, produced information about
milk which will interest milk producers in
Barbados. The Chairman, Mr. Thomas
Peacock, noted that because of the rapid
increase in costs of milk production during
1951 together with a serious under- recoup-
ment in prices the dairy herd was reduced
by three per cent. “In 1952 the price of
milk was raised to a sixpence a pint and a
further price increase of 4d. a gallon is
contemplated. ,

In addition to increasing the price of
milk the Government of the United King-
dom is taking steps to provide a greater
incentive for dairy farmers to maintain
their yields of milk. These steps include
proposals for a fertiliser subsidy, plough-
ing-up grants and most important of all the
stabilization of the price of purchased feed-
ing stuffs.

“These and other benefits” comments Mr.
Peacock “will be of great assistance to the
preducer who strives for maximum pro-
duction, especially the small man who
plays such an important part in the milk
industry and who of necessity must pur-
chase the bulk of the feeding stuffs con-
sumed by his cattle.”

Mr. Peacock commended the Minister of
Agriculture for making it clear that the
development of milk and the rearing of
cattle for beef should go hand in: hand.
There are numbers of small milk pro-
ducers, he says, who rear some cattle but
for whom the regular monthly milk
cheque is essential. These men cannot run
their small farms on the basis of stock-
rearing alone and. there, is every reason
why they should couple milk selling with
stock rearing and expand the output of
both.

“This” says Mr, Peacock “is the proper
approach to a better economy for some
thousands of these small holdings on which
so much progress has been made in recent
years. I repeat that in our view the
growth of the milk and beef industries are
complementary and this should be the
basis of Government policy.”

Officials of the Agricultural Department
of Barbados and private dairy keepers will
be pleased to note that their own observa-
tions are supported by these statements of
the chairman of the Milk Marketing Board
of England.

At the same time everyone will note that
without a Milk Marketing Board the en-
couragement to produce milk or beef is
small. The high cost of establishing a
central milk depot: the unstable price of
animal feed: the absence of government
assistance to the dairy farmer or livestock
producer; all militate against any improve-
ment in the production of milk and beef
locally.

The Government of Barbados might
profitably study the statements of the
Chairman of the English Marketing Board.

Particular attention ought to be paid to
the sentence in which it is stated “the
Board cannot take the lead in an expan-
sionist policy without being set in controf of
the marketing side’. In Barbados at
present there is an unhealthy climate of
opinion backed by a large number of so-
called operators of “private enterprise” that
only the Government can run anything,

As a result all schemes requiring co-
operation on the part of primary producers
are regarded as “risks” which only the
Government can afford to take The
private dairy keepers and producers of
livestock ought to organise and form an
active union which will negotiate with the
Government, not wait for the Government

to spoonfeed them with the kind of con-
cessions that the National Farmers’ Union

of England are always active to obtain for
their members.

CANCER

HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor of
Barbados Sir Alfred Savage has supported
an appeal which has been circulated to a
limited number of people living in Barba-
dos. The appeal is addressed to people all
over the British Empire and funds are re-
quested in aid of the British Empire Can-
cer Campaign.

The battle against cancer is still to be
won. Words are unnecessary to stamp the
horror of this dread disease, There must
be nay hundreds of people living in Bar-
bados to whom the letters signed by Sir
Alfred have not. been addressed, but who
would be only too eager to send a contribu-
tion to the “British Empire Cancer Cam-
paign Appeal.”



Contributions ought to be mailed direct to |

The British Empire Cancer Campaign
Appeal
His Excellency the Governor of Barbados
Sir Alfred Savage K.C.M.G.,
C/o The British Empire Cancer Cam-
paign,
11 Grosvenor Crescent,
Myde Park Corner,
London, S.W.11.,
England.

As Sir Alfred notes at the end of his
letter “your contribution will not only be of
tremendous encouragement to all working
for this cause, but indeed for all you know,
may constitute the deciding factor towards

ievi utstanding success.”
ws duipaigh is wholly dependent upon

public support.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



LONDON LETTER

It has always been a debate
among students of history
whether personalities dominaic
events or whether events dom-
inate personalities, Had Napo-
leon been born fifteen years
earlier he might never have
been more than a professional
French soldjer who retired to
his native Corsica and bored his
relatives with stories of Paris or
fought battles with toy soldiers.

If it had not been for the
second World War Winston
Churchill would have been re-
garded as no more than a brilli-
ant frustrated politician and
historian whose genius was dis-
counted by his lack of judg-
ement. His opponent, Adolpn
Hitler, would have been just
another agitator if the Kaiser
had not led his country to de-
feat in 1914-18 and prepared for
the coming of Germany’s man
of evil destiny.

Rerhaps there is no answer to
the problem that I have posed.
Events throw up leaders, and
then the leaders dominate
events. Great men and great
villains are lucky if they are
born in the right period.

All this is a preamable to a
warming prospect that is unfold-
ing before our eyes. If the
American people are not frus-
trated by the party machine they
will elect Mr. Eisenhower next
November as President of the
United States. If the British
Conservative Party fights
another general election within
the next two or three years it is
practically certain that Anthony
Eden will lead it into battle.

I do not believe that Mr.
Churchill] has any intention of
retiring now. For one thing his
Government is under heavy:
bombardment and he was never
a man to leave the battlefield
while the guns were in full blast.
Nor is there any sign of physical
or mental deterioration which
would make him seek the sanc-
tuary of private life. Despite
mistakes of certain of. his min-
isters he dominates the House of

nF ne ee

Commons with a brilliancy of
mind that irradiates every sub-
ject it lights upon.

_. Yet he has his position in his-
‘tory to consider and no man in
‘his 78th year can claim that the
end of the story is still beyond
the ranges. Five times in his
stormy career Winston Church-
ill was defeated by the constitu-
ents whom he wanted to repre-
sent. He was not elected to
power as Prime Minister in 1940
but merely succeeded Mr. Cham-
berlain, The first time he went.
to the country as head of a gov-
ernment was in 1945 when the

British electorate threw him out

with a huge adverse majority.

a, oe in ee

and only won by a tiny ality

in 1951, Five eiptaas defeats
are almost unequalled in any
other political success story.

If he were to go to the coun-
try next year and if he once
more met defeat the ultimate

historian would have a strange
story to record. I do not

the fates again.

There are gossips who say that
the Tory Party will force
Churchill to resign, The ‘Tories
do some foolish things but are
not completely mad. If we told
Churchill to go—and we have
the right to do so—we would be
jeered at and condemned even
by the people who always voted
against him, and history would
tear us to tatters,

So we come back to Anthony
Eden, that handsome, greying,
perfectly tailored Crown Prince
of the Conservative Party.

Let it not be imagined that he
is without critics, Many of the
younger Conservatives believe
that his political experience has
been so grooved that he would
be at a loss to deal with the do-
rmestic problems that confront a
Government, In war and in peace
he has moved in the Chancel-
lories of the world,—the dip-
lomat, the Foreign Minister, the
dreamer gazing at the globe on
a swivel. What does he know of
Lancashire's cotton, or Sheffield’s
steel, or the Durham mines?
What does he know even of agri-
culture except what he sees

Waste Land And Labour
To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—I saw quite recently—
in the press—a statement that
there is quite a lot of idle land,
in small plots, within the ex-
tended boundaries of Bridge-
town City, followed by an ex-
pression of regret that it is not
cultivated and made to contri-
bute its quota of food for. the
ne hungry people around, and
for the large additional com
who cannot afford to pay the
high prices demanded at pres-
ent for the various kinds of
vegetables.

The statement. brought back to
my memory the circumstances
that in the early, busy, days of
the O.A, Pensions Committee in
St. Michael the ee Officer
sometimes reported, in answer to
our questions concerning the cir-
cumstances of applicants for the
pension, that there was a spot of
land attached to the applicant’s
house—either owned or rented—
which was not being used to ad- «
vantage, perhape because the old
person was not able to cultivate
it. And I remé@mber too that I
one day approached Mr. Guy
Perrin, then La Commission-
er, with the su ion that Gov-
ernment should provide a small
credit by means of which the idle
land and unemployed could be
utilised together for the general
benefit.

Alas! however, Mr. Perrin
wanted me to furnish details
concerning such spots of land,
their number and extent, the cost
of the necessary labour and
equipment, ete.—red tape once
more—which of course I was not
able to do. So my well-meant
plan—as I thought—fell through.
One would have thought it
would be a simple matter for
Government to place at the Com-
missioner’s disposal a suitable
small credit tp be spent at his
discretion for such a practical
purpose, subject of course to
proper reteipts and explanations
for the Audit Office,

a
spe ersten amg ecenetinentheeinenisainetnsilpentneecmmcccsn cameo | eanienaeaneneene

Our Readers Say:

Hy everley Haxter

from the windows of his country
house? j

The case against him does not
end there. We have a growing
body of opinion which believes
that our fate rests with fhe
British Commonwealth and
Empire. To the new Imperialist
the Sterling Bloc is the only
instrument that can save us from
the thraldom of the dollar. It is
all very well for Eden to speak
French, German and Persian but
can he talk to Canada, Australia,
and New Zealand?

Strangely enough there is also
a campaign of att ition going on
in America against Eisenhower,
No one doubts his integrity but
since when was West Point the
nursery of political genius? A
general orders and his soldiers
obey. A president must carry the
people with ‘him by logic, per-
suasion, exhortation and even
admonition. When the wind
blows hard against him the
politician must bend like a reed
and wait for the fury of the gale
to pass,

After my talk with General
MacArthur in New York last
January I was convinced that at
a given moment MacArthur
would campaign against the
adoption of Eisenhower on the
grounds that Americans did not
want to be changed into a mili-
tary State by having a general
in the White House, That
prophecy has proved true. Mac-
Arthur is the open enemy of the
man who once served on his
staff,

At the time that I wrote of
MacArthur [ believed that
Senator Taft would secure the
Repub'ican nomination and that
the would be defeated by Mr,
Trumen, Since then one cf my
two horses dropped out and I
must revise my estimates. Now
I believe that if Mr. Taft be-
comes the official Republican
choice he will be defeated by
the Democrat nomines whoever it

. On the other hand I have
little doubt tha, if Eisenhower
ig chosen by the Republican
Party he will d:feat any candi-
date that the Democrats can
produce,

So we come back to our first
proposition—that if Anthony
Eden and Dwight Eisenhower go
to the polls as the official choice
of the Conservative Party and
the Republican Party both will

ed to power, If this
does come about I am equally
certain that for the first time in
years world peace and world co-
operation will pass from the
realm of impossibility into the
clear light of the achievable,

One of the basic reasons for
the defeat of Hitler’s Germany
was the intimate and sympa-
thetic understanding between
Churchill and Roosevelt, It was
not to be expected that Truman
and Churchill could achieve a
similar unity of mind and tem-

think
that Churchill will gamble. with "perament, But if Anthony and

Ike become the political leaders
of their two nations we

well see a unison of purpose that
would achieve miracles.

Both were fighting soldiers,
and if the young Eden rose no
higher than a Brigade major at
21, with the M.C., he was made
Secretary of War by Churchill
when the old warrior took com-
mand of the stricken field in
1940, Only the archives could
show how often in the perilous
day that followed the collapse of
France Edsn’s advice was bold,
consiructive and shrewd, He
backed Wavell in the desert when
Churchill! wanted to recall him,
and Wavell gave the British
their first victory. What is more
Eden urged that we should rein-
force Wavell with armamenta
although we desperately needed
revi ing for the invasion that
seemed about to burst upon us,

Not ¢ven the most adept
syncophant could pretend that
Eden’s mind has the brilliance
of Churchill’s. A mordant wit
once said of Eden that he was
the greatest silent film Foreign
Secretary in history but was

Now in harmony with the
statement with which I com-
menced this‘ letter I have the
pleasure to add that on a very.
recent occasion I was accosted
in Bridgetown by a middle-aged
unemployed man—though not on
agricultural worker—for some-
thing to buy a meal, who actu-
ally voiced my old idea that
Government should put him and
other out-of-works to cultivate
idle: empty land and increase our
scanty s v of plain foodstuffs,
and so enable them to earn mod-
est support instead of begging—
or stealing. :

In this case it would mean the
Government acquiring a couple
of acres of idle land, in one or
more plots, and arranging to
send thither city idlers (under
the direction of some competent
Overseer or Driver) and thus
using to purpose the “Waste
Labour”. (If any idler refused
to al ‘ae a eee a way—
well, ternative is obvious).

many in order to give
’
weight and £

force to the idea, I

offer a rather sti quotation
from ape, "s famous
The Great Il which

book,

I feel Somewhat ashamed to say
I have just seen for the first
time—from our Public Library
—a quotation taken in its turn

“Tf all the employable labour
“were employed for a reasonable
“number of hours per week the
“world would have at its dis-
“posal a volume of commodities
“and services that would enable
“the entire population to live on
“a higher level of comfort. and
“well-being than has ever been
“contemplated in the rosiest vis-
“ions of the Social Reformer”.

By the way. Is that the H.R.H.
who was later for a few months
King Edward VIII? He might
have been speaking at one of the
modern Conferences for assist-
ance to the. under-developed
portions of the hungry world.

Yours truly,
F. GODSON.

June 26, '52,

ruined when the talkies came
Ceriainly his appeal is more to
the eye than to the ear yet he
remains a tremendous draw as
a speaker. He can fill any hall
in Britain or any sports ground
no matter how vast,

Like Eisenhower he gives the
impression of decency. That
may seem a tame tribute but
through the centuries Shake-
speare’s words: “Like a scurvy
politician,” remains the normal
attitude of people ards those
who are elected to govern them.
But who would say that Anthony
or Ike is a seurvy fellow?

The tragedy of America is
that she permitted two world
wars by clinging to the policy
of Isolation when the world had
become physically and political-
ly meaningless. The glory of
America is that when the Hitler
war was over she took the bur-
den of leadership upon her
shoulders and kept hope alive
when death and disaster stalked
across Europe. President Tru-
man has never received the
tribute he deservs for his cour-
age and his vision. No Ameri-
can President has ever taken
such momentous decisions of
such profound significance to
mankind.

; Who can doubt'that if Eisen-
hower is elected’ President his
personality will have a profound
effect on people in every land?
They say he is inexperienced as
a politician but is that true?
Any man who could k Alex-
ander, Montgémery, Bradley and
Patton fighting the enemy and
not each other is either a man
of great character or is as adrow@
as Machiavelli,

ERisenhower’s planning of the
invasion of Europe was magni-
ficently done. e has a cour-
ageous mind and a simplicity of
spirit. e may not command
language like Lincoln nor mes-
merise the people as Roosevelt
did but plain speech can attain
heights as well as oratory. The
Americans are basically humani-
tarian, generous and sentimental,
Eisenhower would give expres-
sion, to all this.

Simultaneously (looking
ahead) Anthony Rden would be
meeting the onslaughts of the
Opposition in Parliament with
good humour, with clarity and
an occasional flash of anger—
for he has a temper.

He would speak even of the
Russians with courtesy and he
would pledge Britain to the cause
of lifting up the people of the
world from the swamps and the
lowlands to high ground once
more. Downing Street and The
White House would be in con~
stant, intimate contact. Whereas
Shakespeare wrote of Anthony
and Cleopatra the moving finger
of history might well write a
greater story th@b came from the
politician reign of Anthony and
Ike.

Many times in these London
Letters I have declared that
every great decline or great ad-
vance in the history of humanity
is first born ina man’s mind,
Hitler dreamed the subjugation
af Europe anda tyranny built on
cruelty and fear when he was a
pecesier of bad sunsets in Vienna,

ause he was bold, bloody and

resolute he accomplished his
dream, But there was another
man, Winston Churchill in whose
mind was borf the vision of vic-
tory when defeat and deflection
faced him on every hand. He
too, was bold, bloody and reso-
lute and he made his dream of
victory come true. In the pro-
cess Hitler and his kingdom of
horror went down, in flames,

It may be that in the saga of
the English speaking peoples we
shall seetwo men so. alike in
mind and spirit that they shall
act as one, It does not mean that
other leaders than they could not
also move towards a. common
objective but the element of
simpatica would not be the same.

At any rate we are fortunate in
that public life with all its sacri-
fiee and ingratitude still attracts
men of such calibre as Eisen-
hower and Eden, It is therefore
true that character is destiny ana
that in the end it is men who
dominate events,

Thus we have resolved the
problem which we posed at the

beginning of this Letter.

The Child, Teacher, Parent

SIR,—Your leading article this
morning on the ‘subject of the
University College Extra-Mural
Course on “The Child, the Parent,
and the Teacher” is greatly ap-
preciated, There is no question
of any restriction preventing any
members of the public from at-
tending this course; all Extra-
Mural activities have always
been open to the entire commun-
ity. But web called this
course a Study teuip. and have
sent out special invitations to
responsible and intelligent mem-
bers of the public — teachers,
probation officers, Scoutmasters,
secretaries of clirlie committees,
ete., — for the following reasons,
We hope that this first series will
be followed by a second, com-
ménecing in September, dealing
especially with adolescent prob-
lems and the practical applica-
tions of both series to the Bar-
badian community. Our further
eim, in 1953, is then to enlist tae
‘assistance of the original Study
Group, which we hepe will really
read and study fo spread this
knowledge by means of further
public talks in suitably simple
terms and otherwise among the,
population both in town and
country, especially where it
seems needed. The aim miy
seem ambitious, but we believe
the effort worth making. Mean-
while the present series has re-

ceived good publicity both in
the “Advocate” .and through
Rediffusion, and. it has al-

ready been decided to adver-
tise in the press the two closing
sessions on “The Parent and the
Teacher”. conducted by Mr. J. R.
Nicol. Mesnwhile I shall still
be glad to hear at 4653 from all
members of the public who wish
to join.

Yours very truly,
AUBREY DOUGLAS-SMITH,

Resident Tutor, Univ.

Coll, of W.I
Boy Scout H.Q.,
Beckles Road,
St. Michael,
Tel: 4653,

TUESDAY, JULY 1, 1952



|THE GOOD TIMES GO ON
.. —EVERYONE IS HAPPY

By NEWELL ROGERS
NEW YORK.

There is a boom in courage in Wall-street
tonight. And in business offices and the
offices of Government economists.

After examining new statistics and getting
reports from market places, they are say-
ing:—

Recession? Slump? Nonsense! Employ-
ment climbs to a record 61,176,000 job-holders.
Building reaches a new high level for May.
The armed forces are on a shopping spree.
They are pushing out a flood of new orders
and will spend £15,000 million.





PHOTOGRAPHS

Copies of Local Photographs

Which have appeared in the

Advocate Newspaper

Can be ordered from the ...

ADVOCATE STATIONERY



* * *
But the Federal Reserve Bank predicts
that consumer goods prices will not change
much in the near future. The price con-
trollers allowed grocers to put up food prices
this week. Many did not do it. They knew

FIBRE MATS:
Plain, Stencilled and
Decorated. These are
available in four sizes.

, CONGOLEUM

they would be boycotted by housewives. SQUARES
Says a Wall-street man: “Some pessimists 3x3 yds. & 3x 3% yds.

think the country’s going to the poor house. CONGOLEUM:

If so, the people are riding there in new cars
with full stomachs and a jackpot of cash.”

FOOTNOTE: If Wall-street is right, and
this prosperity continues, it could work
against the election of a Republican Presi-
dent, whether Eisenhower or Taft. Ameri-
cans have a tradition of not turning a party
out of office if they are prosperous.

HEDY LAMARR is to make 36 half-hour |!<
TV colour-films, Each will portray a great
love story. Napoleon and Josephine for ex-
ample.

ELEVEN Left-wingers are Britain’s isola-
tionists, says columnist David Lawrence on
a trip to Britain. He says he has talked with
men who are intellectually arrogant, use the
same phrases as America’s Right-wing isola-
tionists, and patronise “ignorant Americans.”

Six feet wide and cut
to any desired size.

Ph. 4472

C. S. PITCHER
& CO.










f 7 kes them
flies. Just want to know what makes FINE RECEIVERS

glow. .
NO PANIC yet over steel supplies, or 5-TUBE TABLE MODEL RADIO

ATOMIC scientists at Oak Ridge are offer-
ing schoolboys a shilling a hundred for fire- A COMPLETE RANGE OF : THESE

higher prices, because 650,000 steelworkers uae ap paren Phi +? 1h eyed

strike. Detroit’s car makers and other steel 6-TUBE FLOOR MODEL RADIOGRAM ........- 330.00

users arecalm. They have built up reserves. | agro Rg bags ae Soca. —_ - cutee
Another surprise —Washington officials are LET US DEMONSTRATE ONE OF THE ABOVE sexs

still talking of taking controls off steel if the AND JOIN THE HUNDREDS OF SATISFIED OWNERS.

strike lasts less than a fortnight. Today ry

management and men met in their first at-

tditipt to settle it DA COSTA & CO., LID.
FREE enterprise provides striking steel

mill pickets with TV in Warren, Ohio. An x
enterprising dealer installed sets in the |}
pickets’ shanties at the gates of the mill. Said
the dealer: “They’re our customers. It will
be good for business later.

NEW initials T'VU stand for T.V. Uni-
versity. Some of America’s biggest and best
universities are teaching at home over TV.
Twenty more are planning to jump in with
tele-courses.

AMERICANS are marrying younger than
ever—firls at 20, men at 22. Why? Fear of
loneliness, says one experienced man. And |Â¥
he says they stay together for the same
reason even when they fight and make each
‘other miserable, 1%
Experienced man is band-leader Artie 3
| Shaw, six times in and out of marriages. x
Is he lonely? ae re een als iid ii dels oii
Cr oone. with Cindere a,” he a : ; Ve Bamidals to suas ellen
ly believe marriage can work—even for me”. 8 al ohmiihadahaens” “od
None of his ex-wives is Cinderella. To Artie,!% ¢olours,
who is as solemn about life as a more famous
Shaw, Cinderella means wanting the wrong
things from life, not living with a purpose.

REX HARRISON and Lilli Palmer have
become loyal subjects of Broadway, not the
West End. Before sailing for Italy they ad-
mitted their visit to England, after a month
of sunbathing in Portofino, will be just for
a fortnight to see friends. Then back to
Broadway for more play-acting. They are
reading eight play scripts in Italy—only one
British, by Norman Ginsbury, called “The
Limit”.

PROUDLY the Licensed Beverage Imdus-
tries Inc. announces that Americans drink
less liquor now than at any time in the last
100 years. Why knock their own business?
Temperance and respectability keep pro-
hibition away.

NO such thing as an average American?
Shucks, man, Henry Ford’s engineers have
made him. True he is a plastic dummy in 18
pieces, But exactly average—6 ft. 9 ins. tall,
14st. 10% Ib. in weight. They use him in de
signing and testing care seats, arm rests, leg
and head room.

BAGPIPES

Professor Ugo Gualazzini, director of the
Cremona library, claims he has discovered
that the bagpipes were imported into Scot-



Our new Rubber Bathing Shoes for Mummy
and Family have arrived in a variety of styles.
Colours are White, Blue and Red.

Da Costa & Co., Ltd. AW



SOPRPROODPO PSE FPP SSP OFFS



Jolly Good !!

JAMS

WITH

J&R

ENRICHED
BREAD















JAMS

land 500 years ago from Cremona, home- Mixed Fruit ....... . $2.50
town of the world-famous Stradivarius Strawberry Jam $3.12
violins. > eeors Jam oa Barley Sugar

“A few months ago,” said the Professor, * coves me” Si Planters Nate A.
“I received a letter from a Mr. Thomas Pew- S. A. Marmalade... $2.28 re ieee an
ston, of Glasgow, who wanted to find out S. A. Pineapple Jam ... $2.82 oe aun
about a Bruni family who, according to a S. A. Apricot ws $2.82 Churchman’s Cigarettes
eer este, had brought the bagpipes “ALL THE TIME IS Embassy Cigarettes
OTe latte GOLD BRAID TIME”

MEAT DEPT.









“The letter added that as the Brunis had! ¢
changed their name té McKrimona, he ones rn. ee
thought they might have come from (3 yrs. Old) Milk Fed Chickens
Cremona. > On Hand Milk Fed Ducks

“The whole thing was news to me, and| $ Only $1.44 per Bottle Fresh Vegetables
jsounded rather strange. But after long re-| ‘ gles al ie
searches in our archieves, we boot! able a} 2
ascertain, not only that bagpipe band existec GOD ARDS 2
in Cremona 500 years ago, but also that a D FOR FINEST GROCERY SERVICE
jcertain Baxianus del Bruno had moved from Le 3
Cremona to Glasgow ¥in 1515”,—E.N.S. GOODS TIO O ISS “—worrreveerye Ts " e







TUESDAY, JULY +1,



Local Cycling Team
Prepare For Martinique

1952

D. GRANT, cf Holborn Boys’ is expected to make the
trip to Martinique at the expense of his Club. His team
mate (George Hill) was among the team selected by the

AAA.B.

The local Committee will meet tonight and the team
will be briefed on the rules which will apply in the 150

kilometre road race which
on the 14th instant.





Record Entries
For Examinations

During the months of June and
July the Department of Education
supervises the arrangements for
many examinations of Overseas
Bodies, especially those of the
Universities of London and. the
Oxford and Cambridge Board ac-
cording to a communique from
the department:

This year there has been a re-
cord entry Of candidates for many
of the regular examinations. Here
is a summary:

London B.A. Honours:—2 can-
didates,

B.A. General:—6 candidates,

B.Se. (Econ.):—1 candidate.

Inter Arts:—15 candidates.

Inter B.Se.—1 candidate, ;

London Diploma: Theology: —
3 candidates.

Inter Divinity:—3 candidates.

Master of Theology—1 candi-
date.

London Ist Medical.—l candi-
date,

LL.B., Part 1.—1 candidate.

London General Certificate of
Education:— Ordinary Level:—
67 candidates; Advanced Level: —
1 candidate.

Oxford and Cambridge Gener-
al Certificate of Education: —

Advanced and Scholarship
84 candidates; Ordinary Level: —
411 candidates: (

London Chamber of Commerce
—Elementary Stage:—83 candi-
dates; Certificate Stage—102 can-
didates.

Chartered Institute of Secre-
taries:—1 candidate.

Society of Commercial Account-
ants:—1 randidate.

Officers Will Be Elected At
Police Sports Club Meet

The Annual General Meeting ot
the Barbados Police Sports Club
takes place on Saturday this week.
The meeting will among other
things, elect officers to serve for
the ensuing year, and consider
the Secretary’s Report and the
Audited Statement of Accounts,

The Secretary’s: Report shows
that at the end of the last finan-
cial year, membership of the Club
stood at 582, The finances of the
Club show an increase of over
$7,000 over the 1950—51 figure.

MOBILE CINEMA
SHOW CANCELLED

Owing to unforeseén circum-
stances the show which was to
haye been given tonight. by__the
Mobile Cinema af Chance Mall,
St. Lucy, has been cancelled.



will be ridden in Martinique

During the week-end, Mr, L. A.
lyynch completed his translation
of the copy of the rules which was
written in French, and copies have
been made in order that each
member of the team will
them to study in full detail.

It is now known that the race
will begin at Fort de France and
will continue through Morne
Rouge, St. Pierre, Fort St. Denis,
back through Fort de France
(around the town) Deux Choux,
Fort St. Denis and back to Fort
de France by the return route.

The race is open to amateurs
or dependents only holding li-
cences either from the French
Federation of Cycling, the Interna-
tional Union of Cycling or the In-
ternational Federation of Cycling.

Classification

Each country or club will be
represented by a team of five com-
petitors, a substitute and a man-
ager, seven men in all. A cup will
be awarded to the team whose
five competitors take the fore-
most places at the winning pole,
classification being by points.

Each competitor is required to
pass a medical test the day be-
fore the race, and everyone taking
part in the race must be decently
dressed, and competitors must
observe the greatest caution and
must assume responsibility for
any accident in which they are
either cause or victim, The fact
that a competitor hhas started the

race implies a strict adherence to h

the rules by him.

Competitors are advised to ob-
serve the strictest discipline and
to show the greatest respect for
officials. Brakes must be fitted to
both wheels so as to avoid an
accident which may prove fatal.

h team will be allowed a
team vehicle on which will ride
the team manager and a _ substi-
tute, and refreshment points have
veen fixed along the course.

SPEEDING FINE
REDUCED

Their Honours of the Assistant

Court of Appeal, Mr, J. W. B. J.

Chenery 2nd Mr. H. A, Vaughan,
yesterday reduced by half a £6
fine His Worship Mr. G. B. Grif-
fith imposed on Calvin Cox of
Ashton Hall, St. Peter, for ex-
ceeding the speed limit while
driving the motor van (M 2352)
on Cheapside on November 27
last year.

Cox had pleaded guilty to the
offence, but appealed against the
sum imposed, The speed limit
along that part of Cheapside
Cox was travelling when he was
reported by P.C » Seymour Lash-
ley ts 15 miles an hour, but he
was driving at 31% miles an hour.



H.E. Foresees Improvement In Local Scouting —

@ From page 1.
specialist scout to come and train
only 200 boys, and stressed the
need for building up the roll be-
fore considering the need for a
Travelling Commissioner,

The Island Commissioner ad-
mitted that there were many in
the island who had gone to Guild-
weld, but said that they were not
in Scouting today. He pointed out
further that many who had not
had the opportunity to go there
were still active, and charged that
scouting had not benefited from
those people going there.

Leaders Wanted

Major Griffith said, “we want
leaders and we cannot get them,
we want men of quality,” he add-
ed,
other people, It is no good spend-
ing a lot of money to train three
or four people. We want a com-
munity which realises the value of
scouting.” :

He observed that the quality of
scouting is poor compared with

“Men who can teach and lead °

scouting in Harrison College and
the Lodge School, there was a
nucleus for good scouting. He
said, “we want men who have
vision and an inspired sense of
community service,”

Hon, H. A, Cuke, President of
the Local Association warned that
the Scouts were not doing enough
themselves, and depended too
much on assistance from Govern-
ment and businessmen, the latter
of whom felt that the movement
was a “dead” movement.

He compared scouting of years
ago with that of today, and re-
ealled how the scouts of yester=
day took an active part in almost
everything.

He too, like the Commissioner,
observed that there was a lack of
enthusiasm within the movement
itself, and urged that they should
“do something to get people inter-
ested in the movement, He warn-
ed that the public would not get
interested unless the small nuc-





House Fire
Put Out

A one-roofed boarded and
shingled house, 16 ft. by 6 feet
by 10 feet at Deighton Road,
St. Michael, caught fire yes-
terday about 3.30 p.m. and
was quickly put out by the
Fire Brigade. The house is
the property of St. Gerald
Wallace of Rockley, Christ
Church, and was occupied by
Theresa Moses,



40/- For Untawful

Possession
His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma,

Police Magistrate of District “A”, A part of the roof and a
yesterday fined Denzil Forde of partition were burnt.
Bank Hall, St. Michael, 40/- to

be paid in 14 days or in default
one month's imprisonment for the
unlawful possession of lead and aris Kound-up
brass which he was carrying along —









Passage Road, St. Michael, on ie
June 28 Gar fituns Cif Road
Police Constable Lunn’ who

broucht the case said it was about . motor car G 114 owned and
5.15 p.m. when he saw the de- “#fven by E. Simpson of Superia-
fendant with the lead and brass UY Tan off the road waile
which he was carrying in his hand W4Â¥elling along Newbury Road,
on Passage Road. He asked the SÂ¥PGeorge, cn Saturday night
defendant how he had got the last, “proceeding in the direcuon
brass and lead and the defendant Of St. Judes. The ieft side of the
was unable to give him a proper Caf which siruck an embankment
explanation, He arrested the de- Was damaged. There were no
fendant and took him to the Cen- injuries to the occupants,
tral Investigation Department, " * 7

Sgt. Alleyne prosecuted for the _ Members of the Lodge School
Police from information received, Scout Troop went on a week-end
camp at Codrington College from
Friday, June 27 to Sunday and
spent an enjoyable camping
period, one of the boys reported
this merning.

25/- For Causirg
Dislocation.

A decision of His Worship Mr.
G. B. Griffith was yesterday re-



* >. .

Roman's C.C., champions of
Central Division 1950 and 1951,
got off to a good start in their
versed when Their Honours of first fixture vs. Danes C.C. and
the Assistant Court of Appeal won with a day to spare. Roman’s
ordered Randolph Glen of Passage had no opposition at all and won
Road to pay 25/- in seven days by an innings. Cambridge C.C. of
or in default, one month’s im- St. Joseph is at present leading
prisonment. Hadleigh’s C.C. on first innings

His Worship had dismissed this jn their Sunday Competition Fix-
case in which Glen threw Joseph ture which begun at Poole on
Marshall of Alkins’s Gap, Eagle June 29, but good bowling by
ie tae ee and dislocated # Ww. Cave and J. Higgison in

is right shoulder. ; A :

Marshall told. the Court that Combridge’s, second innings, has
© bad been at Passage Road and the total 22 runs, bringing

comet —s pa eon ae eet the lead for Cambridge to just
over thirty.

ee oe and told ho me
bring himself. in trouble; Glen * al ”
chucked him three times and Chimborazo's Koad, St. Joseph,
threw him to the ground. The which was rendered impassable
for many months, is again pass-
able and open to traffic. One

fall caused the dislocation.
pleasing feature is that _ the

20/- For Assauli *buses on Route 5 are again abe
: , Fs to take passengers to the end of
And Beating

the Route, at Blackman’s Cora-
e
Alexander Straker of Bank

r. Repairs on this road were
concentrated on damages caused
Hall, St. Michael, was yesterday by rains in 1950 and again last
ordered to pay 20/- by the Assist- year.
ant Court of Appeal Judges, Mr. * * $
W. B. Chenery and Mr. H. A. Maple C-C. the only club of
Vaughan for assaulting and beat- St, Joseph entering a team in the
ing Mabel O'Neal. In making this 1952 B.CLL. competition, kept
order, Their Honours varied the their reputation by starting the
om ot His Worship Mr. A. season as is their custom with a
es arper who had fined him Getent, ad hg beat thera. by
O'Na: ; a 4 runs. Eustace Small with four
the Onn tie Woke mae wickets for two runs. (second in-
The offence was committed on "ings) was the best Maple player
April 24 when O’Neale and Strak- He also played two not out in-
er were digging potatoes from a Mings. No player on either team
field at Guinea Plantation. Each reached double figures in the
of them had bought half of the game. Scores were: Nerwick 56
same row of potatoes and when and 34; Maple 29 and 27.
a dispute arose over some of the . * * :
potatoes, Straker cuffed her in Lobsters are at vresent in full
her left eye. *! supply and are scld at 25 cents





said that in his district, there was whether they had the people to

great enthusiasm. He felt the low train.

standard was mainly due to lack He said, “My impression for

of training, and stressed the idea the 21% years I have been here is
this: that for a number of reasons

of having preliminary training
the Seout Movement got com-

courses,
He told of the benefits he had pletely in the doldrum, and you
eannot expect in a few months

gained from attending training
to get on your feet after a num-

courses run by the Revd. A, E,
i n

Hesogrens, ‘st the. Septaeete,.. Soe ber of years of inactivity. I have

felt in the last few months that

urged that a similar practice be
d, 7
ee the public are taking greater in-

Other members who spoke sup-

rted the idea of running pre- terest’ in Scouting. I have
frninary training courses. a? felt that this Council,the indi-
After further discussion, His vidual members of this Council

Excellency in summing up the dis-
cussion said he had come to the
conclusion that the Council did not
consider the time opportune for sation by the Island Commissioner
the visit of a Travelling Com- is doing good, and if we are
missioner from outside, and he patient, we will see an improve-
directed that they should nota ment in scouting throughout the
that general opinion, and in the island.”

meantime, the Executive Com- His Excellency continued “I do
mittee go forward and consider recognise this, that there is not

are taking a greater interest in
scouting than their predecessors.
“T have felt that the reorgani-

the various suggestions

‘present since they are easier to:

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

SUMMER SCHOOL

THE University College of the West Indies Summer
School will be held this year at Codrington College by
permission of the Principal and Governing Board, from
July 25th to August Ist. The subject this year will be
“Drama and Dramatic Technique”.

Professor A. K, Croston, who
holds the Chair of English at the
University College in Jamaica,
will be in residence » during the
week, together with the Resident
Tutor. Professor Croston will lec-
ture on Modern English Verse
Drama, dealing especially w ith Saturday's racing at the T.T.C.|
T. S. Eliot's “Sweeney Agonistes Mecging, our @ninidad Corres-
and “The Cocktail Party". W. . pondent stated that “Ostara won

Haracé : Placed In
Different Classes

In our report on the results of |

Auden’s “Ascent of F.6” and the feature race today when she
Christopher Fry's “Venus Ob- beat “A” Class horses easily over
served”. Mr. Aubrey Doug as- the distance of six furlongs”, and

Smith will contribute a course on went on to add, “she was con-
Shakespeare’s middle period, vincing, beating Bright Light and

1 4 Castle-in-the-Air who ran un-
Dramstic Technique _ placed.”
On the prociical side of Dra- The face which was won by
‘ ‘nnigque ineluttiver cut, OStara, the Queen’s Park Stakes
matic Technique including such | for horses. classified “A” and
Sabjects as Make-up, Costume, “Dp”. Both Bright Light and Castle-
Stage Decor and the Arf. of Pro- inthe-Air are classified “C", anc
duction, the School will have the therefore did not take part in the
advantage of practical talks by “Queen's Park Stakes” with
Miss Hawkins and Miss Nurse ot Ostara.
Queen's College, and Mr. D. S.
Fowles. A feature of the Sum-
mer School will be evening ‘ses-
sions illustrating the progress of
a play from the first stages. My.
C. A. Grossmith, C.M.G., will The Schooner Sunlight, 34 tons,
first present the early stages of which arrived in Carlisle Bay
rehearsal, Mrs. Golde White and yesterday morning trom St. Lucie
Mr. A. F. C. Matthews wil] re- brought in 468 bags of copra
hearse groups at a later stawe, bags of charcoal, 31 drums of
and Mr. F. A. Collymore and the cocoanut oil, and five packages
Barbados Players will illustrate of fresh fruit, The 30-ton-schooner
the finished product by actua'ly Rosalie came in yesterday from
presenting a play at Codrington St. Lucia with 432 bags of copra,
College. 35 bags of charcoal and five

bunches of fresh fruit,
Car Strikes Pole




























“TURTLE DOVE”
BRINGS LUMBER



Three ‘hundred feet of lumber |,




and 600 drums of colas were

brought to the island by the

Shortly after 10.10 a.m. yester- Schooner Turtle Dove which also
day the motor car (M_ 2089) called here yesterday morning

owned by Mr. E. Fields of Roe- from Trinidad.
buck Street and driven by Fitz All these schooners are con-
Alleyne Welch of Licorish Vil- signed to the Schooner Owners’
lage, St. Michael, ran off Fountain a gsociation,
Road, St. Michael, and struck a
telephone pole.

No one was injured but the
front part of the motor car was
damaged.



Rudder At District “A”

His Worship Mr. C. W. Rudder,
Police Magistrate of District “B’
is now acting Police Magistratc

CANNED MEATS of District “A.” Yesterday he was
in the Centre Court o

Seventy-five tons of canned ee “AY
meats are to be imported into the “yy. 6 1, Walwyn who was act:
fsland between August and De- ing as Police Magistrate of Distric

cember, according to a notice «a is now sittin
g in the Distric
issued by the Office of the Con- «i Gourt at Boarded Hall Sta:

troller of Supplies.





Licences for this commodity tign.
will be issued against whole-
salers’ signed confirmation notes CORRECTION
up to their maximum distribu-
tion quotas, Applications for The address of Mr, J, O. Dickson

i Acting General Manager of British Wer
licences in respect of this item Shain Airways, is not Blairmont Estate,

close yeas Hy eet axe British Guiana. ec ampenred | oe fhe
been requested to submit the letter “uel” aX 0
sinned commashatiin notes showing Sawave, Manel eateer apaiy Tees
the quantities of each item of
canned meat, the C.F. price and
the net weight per case, and the
source of supply.





per pound. Totn men and boys}
can be seen nightly catching!
lobsters and crabs. Crabs are,

paying better than. lobsters at

catch arid the price asked for!
one is 18 cents or more.

sonal contact—it is only /if you
have got faith in yourself to get!
across to other people the,
importance of scouting and oa
boys, that you can get any~
where.”

“The regponsibility is ours and)
we have got to satisfy ourselves)
that we are doing our utmost
before we can expect to encour-
azu ocher people to help us.”

His Excellency made the
observation that “more is being
done now than was done 18
months ago, and added whether
the Training Centre is a good
idea, the Island Commissioner
had told us that Mr, Springer is
conducting three courses; I do
not know whether it is in rela-
tion to Scouters or Scouts, but
I would suggest that we refer
this matter to the Executive
Committee for them to
the suggestions made.

WATCHES

GOLD, STEEL or
CHROMIUM
Models for ladies or gents
FULLY GUARANTEED !
15 & 17 Jewels

A wonderful new range on
show at outstanding prices



Today at your jewellers ...

forward.

put the interest shown in parts of The Council

agreed

un-|| W. De LIMA




Sg



CREPES,



USE GLO

LPL ALLE

PAGE FIVE

mr

A MODERN BARGAIN

IN NEW

A Lovely assort-
ment of

SHEERS,

AND

Beautiful Light
Summer Colours

$18.00

EACH

Twinplex Sharpeners
Cigarette Holders
Photo Frames

Tea Strainers

Ash Trays



CANADIAN DRESSES

he Modern Dress Shows

BROAD STREET.

Gold Chloride bs
Huxley's Betul Oil
Mother Greaves Worm
Exterminator
Charcoal Biscuits
Sanitary Blocketles

HOUSEHOLD GLOVES
SKOL SUNTAN OIL



leus which was now there got up

this island by people who I
and did something.

would expect to have recognised
the value of scouting. In some
parishes there is not the jnterest
shown.”

His Excellency added “I
believe that it is only by per-

that in other islands, and charged
that “many scout leaders were not
taking enough interest in the
movement,” nor were they “trying
to improve their own standard of
scouting,”

He felt that with the advent of

His Excellency said that he
himself had been interested in
scouting for many years, but, he
was ‘forced to admit that he was
not clear on
points made,

Objection
Mr. L. T, Gay objected to the
general observation that Scout-

a number of the
masters were not interested, and

He was not sure



















Just Opened...

SANDY MAC DONALD WHITE SHIRTS — Colla:
attached, size 14 to 16} ins, @ $6.66 each.
CONSULATE SHIRTS, self colours, trubenised
collars attached coat style, aset’d. sleeve
lengths, 33 to 35 ins. in shades of Grey, Blue,
Tan, White $7.78; $8.45 & $8.77 each,

B.V.D. WHITE UNDER PANTS, size 32 to 44 ins.

PURE LISLE ENGLISH RIBBED
H.F. HOSE AND ANKLETS
with elastic tops made by
Messrs. Allen Solly, sizes 104
to 12 ins. in shades of Black,
White, Grey, Dark Brown,
Navy, Canary & Wine, Hf
woes $1.76 pair; anklets $1.63
pair.

MEN’S RAYON & COTTON HOSE
also COTTON ANKLETS in
fancy designs and _ stripes.
good value, sizes 11 & 11h
only.

BOYS BATH TRUNKS in shades
of Royal & Saxe-Blue, sizes
24 to 26 $2.33 & 28 to 32 $2.80










Pair.

GENTS. SATIN LASTEX BATH
TRUNKS, sizes smal), and,
med. @ $6.76 each. Shade
Royal.

MEN’S WORK GLOVES of a very

strong material, for use of

engineers and chaffeurs,

Gauntlets @ $4.52, ‘short

gloves $3.21.

Cave Shepherd

& Co., Ltd.

10-13 BROAD ST.

range of plain shades.

Art Sik Pique

in Pink, Silver,

Lemon, Gold,

HARRI

| Gime Tabrics
for those

Shadow Stripe Mylos

in Pink, Blue & White — at $2.87 Yd.

This is a very serviceable art silk
material, and is available in lovely

Champagne, Ecru, \
Ice Blue,
Rose, Lilac, Bois de Rose and White



BROAD STREET—DIAL 2664



| A b8@ BVP LEL®VE®VPOROVSSPVOVRCVROR POOR DOOD VRAD !DDOOV ORE? FVD POF HPOOOVPPOHES

mously with His Excellency’s
summing up that the general
opinion was that the time was
not opportune for a Travelling
Commissioner, and referred the
suggestions to the Executive
Committee.

& CO., LTD.

20 BROAD ST., and at
MARINE GARDENS
SHOPPING CENTRE



Sheer

Torquoise,

— at $2.76

SONS








;|

C4
KNIGHT'S LTD. |

6

99V9SG9SOS909G5SG998G 9909S 9OFFO DOH OPO OVOP IOP TT

STOOLS

TAPS & DIES








PIPE ” Ua -
%”, Va’, Ye”, 2’, 0”, 34”, Ye”. 1”, 1%", 1%”, 2”, 9”

BSF
%y" i”, yy" ts”, %”, ve”, wy", te”, 5”, %4”
SAE or NF
V4", 4 Lf, %”, te”, %", A 56”, 34"
USS or NC
V4", i %”, te”; yy", fr’, 5 ” 34”
ENGINEER B.P. HAMMERS
Yalb., %lb., 1Yalb., 1%4lb., 2%lb., 3lb.

FILES
FLAT, ROUND, HALF ROUND, SQUARE

HIGH SPEED GRINDING MACHINES
HIGH SPEED TWIST DRILLS

BODY REPAIR FLEXIBLE FILES
OPEN & BOX SPANNERS
PRESSURE GAUGES 0-400 Ib.

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

BAY STREET DIAL 4269

Â¥ LPLLSCLSCEOCE ESS CSF SO CSESSSSEO CESS SOS OSES

PO CCUM OOO





PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, JULY 1, 1952

CLASSIFIED ADS, tm sonias) eve sus | rercatiexat SHIPPING NOTICES fF



































































































____ TELEPHONE 2808 NOTICE ; REAL ESTATE MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, new |
——- xs —_—__—_____— | ‘THE LODGE SCHOOL | “Sti 2 Lintinb. $|:
- - v oderr lunge low { ANZ
IN MEMORIAM FOR SALE PARISH OF 8ST. PETER Ce onece se NE erdnance REAMIMATION som ANS. Late) cou van, 3/2
* Applications fer one or moire vacant | Sultivatert ahd very productive garden | S.S. “GLOUCESTER” is sctieduied te The L x A Pe %
‘ Vestry, Belurbitions tenable at the: Ales-betielosed dn ei. sage and smite on} The following nineteen boys have | «ii from Port Pirie Muy 3tet, Devonport Sees ee ae Ee ae
ELOGCK-In loving memory of our dear ie ~——« | gidra School will be received by the | seashore pply Mrs. . Harris, | Completely satisfied the Entrance Eyam. | June sth, Melbourne June Ith, Sydney tineent, G ne my a x ba *
meiner wlbertine Eleack ho died as undersigned up to July 13th 1952 Quinta Mia”, Pitts Village, St. James! ination Test of this School held on Sat-| Tane 24th, Brisbane July & arriving at Dake os Sa. a : eh ms fi ered
the Ist of July 1961 ee menace | Reel Slice. nee ah Retueon 4 pie. sed Opt ‘aad —~ oa | Barbados ‘about August 6th ee :
We miss you m ou arts e 5 i i foe a 1.7.989--8n —.
pines ch r hearts are Bon | ae a, a: s 29 a Applicants must be daughters ot | 1 Bell, J. &. M. | ei addition to general cargo ~~ "ot The M.V. “CARIBBEE” will
As tithe goes by we miss you migré? Cave, erd & Co., Ltd Parishioners in stratvened circumstances | CALCUCHIMA--On the Nockier Coma Conpiched!, W. A. f es ae re it eke "9, oe. Pee Se |
Your kindly wavs your loving face 1.7.$20n Fe must be between the ages of 7 and | Dial ace 28.6. bt £ Clarke, B. H = Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat
Ho ttle can fil your vacant piken a SE a ee te ; aad Edgehill, E. M Cargo accepted on through Bille of Nevis and St. Kitts. Date of sail
Ever to be remembered by Archibald CAR= Dodge eestates First Funes Candidates nmst present themee ves NEWLY ERECTED STONEWALL | Hall, E. M !Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to ing to be notified Qi
Eleock ‘husband),Ciescille, Goleridge,}condition and . Owner-driven $2,000 | [oF a by the headinistres ‘| BUNGALOW standing on 3,440 square | Humphrey, E. British Guiana, Leeward and Windward B.W.L SCHOONER *
Pearson, Blaine, Stafford (children) Dial 4476. Bt. ee Oe RO ee feet of land at Grazeties Road. Saint| Rives, @. 2. ee. a TION (INC.
1.7.52—In are — Pan it jee. {Michaei. Apply to COTTLE, CATFORD Lashley, E. McB | For further particulars apply- r
Gar = We Walcx, little used, | arochia cae . & CO. 26.6.52—6n | Matkie, B. N. lew . Consisnes — Tele. Ne. 4647
OSBOURNE--In loving memory of 1 @ood as new. Dial 4470. || of 6 59-3 My fy. ii tacenaeaaniaaenea cme msalieensaeintnieyone tiie eg om |e ee
dearly beloved husband, Nathon ©. 12.6.92-—t.1.0. | ee |, MOUSE—1 painted beard ard. citing: Medford, ‘P. ‘A. wail
bourne, who was laid to rest o1 ist |) Anpiieations for two vacanh Vente: land kiehey sitertny eroom: shedroot | Schick, A. DA COSTA @ CO., LAT
July, 18 c “ 7 Medel Standar a ae “y “i hen attached Apply Cuthbe ‘ s ick, . . . Len.
Wioday brings back. 10d). dietnocies onien a. nae bem a haat ant ae mipe (one ber, one gist) tenable | togers, Nr. Rices, St, Philip eau, 5. a oe itachi ean spelen fiat ane
Of a loved one gone to rest, doer van). Apply: Exro ndersigned | b.7 aiton, R.
And those who think of him this 4 = gt A Pea p after) gs “ oth 1962 Soatindions oe _L per seg Webster, L. A
Are those who loved him best.” |4.00 p.m. Upper Collymore Rock Bineetcn tes hirth Certificate and LAND. 96.750 eqduare feet of lant Webster. P. W. D 0.
Carlotta Osbourne (wife). 7 5 i 26.6. 52-~4: ii ter 4 e t theriselves to }2tvate at Brittons Hill, Sait Michee) Stuart, C. O’. B. m F
1.7-88—31 ~~ | the ‘Head Master Of the Alle?ne School |Enciosed with stone wall on 3 side» | | sag (Vestry of Si. Joseph) CAAT.
a , ’ Ine view over the harbour, Wout: n ion, there are twenty other meek
‘aoe es sedan 1949 Model. | om Monday 2st, 1952 to - Examined. | be solid as a whole or in 4 lots. By; Who. did reasonably well, and will be
digped ¢ ier, St, Pete: quiries to the undersi y notified for admittance, im order of

a CARRI Biche & SEALY | merit, as places become vacant durin, 4
a ae a r 7 62d the ensuing School year. *

Lueas Street

ANNOUNCEMENTS | cre" Done nly 17,900 ae Phone RS



NEW YORK SERVICE.

























































































































































“ies. '

Ft. Refrigerator, In first class conditlo:
Redman & Taylor's Garage 4
a

RETRIGERATOR® = Baas mace
by General f: » and nine

Tmmediately for our Book-ke

and Insurance Departnients a Young
Man with good education, previous +
pevience not essential but pteferab
Good Salary with guaranteed bon:













































1 These are:—
EARN : eerie tae ean ;
fusion in cite weoee ‘tim: ‘Ges none ae , ‘Apiephone iz. | PERSONAL The unde-signed will offer for sale st 2. uo ea . A STEAMER sails 20 June—arrives Barbados ist July.
of forms today. 4.6,52—20::. | | i Public Competition at their office Ne 3 Vieira, H. A. D. |
: tn. W. Seott & Co., Ltd. i wet ate ; a 4 "Lh. s NEW ORLEANS SERVICE.
FOR RENT | = ee | ihe “public are hereby warned against the at day vot Sly, 8 at Bm i Williams, R. S. dabei we Sestesecs et 2
a e w nown as : * . jos 5) une.
| | FRARIRRS-Sinae axle 4 fone on | ne reat to my wie) ADA VIOLA | DONE oie tne ee | Maal D, __AvSrthucen san To funewarene Basbados Sh J
Smith Enginesting Works, Roebuck | myself responsible for her or anyone |â„¢Measurement 624) sq. ft. situate in isc &. D. Sacer re
' Street. Phone 25.6.52—6n. | else contracting any debt or @ebts ir |Navy Gardens, Christ Church and 10. Theo, Saaz
HOUSES | ny name unless by a written ordey Vontaming Li open veranoae | Sis oe Fitcemeeia o 4 CANADIAN SERVICE
ee signed by me. eee ‘ 12. Forde, A.’
ractive seaside Flat main road Hw | ELECTRI q Sgd. MILTON PITT, dining room, 3 bedrooms, toilet, bath ; 4 SOUTHBOUND
tings, comfortably furnished, Eng’. | ICAL Melverton Village, Jand kitchen with garage and rooms for te Gi, So We sans FROM alain tas
pn ee Ce iia \ ly, RON CM a NO $8 GRDRA ww Ma ta “Sane ge
Telephone 2949 it-@0s-0t ELECTRIC STOVE— Jackson Threc| — _..—---- ----— |further particulars and conditions of 16. c. S$.S. “TISTA” Reson ae June 14th
eal “Atanas . mage ‘ Electric tear ay AC me Tee "The public are hereby warned agains’ |sale apply to:— iw Brooker, R. S. 8.8. “Rican Bowen ane ith aoe iar _
—Stri , Control, with con switch. Stove anc + r y wife MIGNON |COTTLE CATFORD & CO. 20.6.52—8 : ‘i f
taining ~ fli Som 4 po ha Ph ail fittings in perfect order. Stored a Behar s Somme aon Forde) as 1 de . 19. Henry, H “& STEAMER” sue ie July 26th
room, 3 bedrooms, Toilet, Bath & — Sa View Guest House. Can be seen b’ | ngt hold myself responsible for her or AUCTION ere
en. ‘Dial Mrs. Puckerin 366 elephone appointment with the Mar wnvone else contracting, any debt o NORTHROUND
rs. wckerin 3 ‘acer. Price $190, 00 . itter: piicnbiediie W. A. FARMER,
29 G.danch |e $1 or 6 59-97, | Aebte in my na wna Wy 2 wr By instructio f the insurd jeadmastes
o pichratntanscinticnnntan sien oil : a7 6.000. | ofdew oe by nie. han y Sail a ee Gat Sank 1.7. 82—10 Letra at
FLAT =~ Ex b. Lands ia. F a vp nn Sa JONES, | 04 “O.. Heleo ;
wanee of Dencons "Road. Dial so. | BLPCTRIC WRON—Walter No-Cord St. Batriee's. MOTOR OMNIBUS CO., Nelson Street ROBERT THOM 1.1D.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
° 5 te Tlect Iron and Board Get one ¢ Cc « 2 1 aioe .
: 1:7.08—-1r: | ee fine unite before all. te pole nn + 1.604 idamagea by ident, Done only 45° Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD. CANADYAN SERVICE COTTON PRINTS
From. ist August, furnished or unfu DA COSTA & CO. TTD Pidetric Der : shoe ee eee eee LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE, A Selection
nished, INGRID” Naw Gardens Thr | “Pore BGO) The public are Hereby warried agals ee N ARCHED Maik T®,
ms. inspection by arrangeme: | —> ; al Ghia credit to any person or pérsh x The application of William Thompson 38c., » and 73c,
with the tenant, te ape pi 513 vipir a: of Garrat! | whometever th my miatne ax I do not hots ucticneer of Church Village, St, Philip for perm! ——-
FVELYN, ROA cya Praees a ngcrs °<| myself; responsible for anyone con\ract 1.75240 bsion te sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at EMBROIDER
Le PE “s 8 cm i ta dio Er- | ing debt or dts in miy name uh By Aue : 4 beard and shingle shop with «shed at- .
oisae poriins fp | lane BP a Written, order signed bs mx ime uctions (recived from, thet tached at Church Village, St. Philip ANGLAISE
. ae Sed. CEC ; ~in-Bx' Com aittee I will Dia y ne
FARAWAY, St. Philip Coast, fu JUST. ARRIVED | De Lux: Eagle f on the ive spats by public com- aCe Sat Spee Cy OF FURR, TO CANAD White, Pink and Blue
furnished. ‘For July, | Novemb=* Mbidern Radio-Grame (with Gar- St. Michael. | petition on Thursday pext Sed July the To:—a. W. HABE, Bsa IAN SERVICE $2.80
December only. Dial 4476. a oreo. aye pices ee 1.9.62—-2ng Kcaidind at po Surlo Ag. Police Magistrate, F Mont 1 : asin
19,0.52—t.£.1 5 ae le worries, in attractive walnut wooden : Boniface ir Dist. “C° rom Mon rea ——SeAm WA and
tents | SPE ALEN, | Bey mk PAPO MEP ESE Soe at take Dhadak ‘oa D. 1. soRers, a SHOT TAFFETAS
: wet a,” ee Be.iy' fy a oP. a $ co, LTD., giving credit to my wife, x Wars Bestric: en. bulding ae eee one (1) wood- for Applicant Expected Arrival : Charming Shades
view, furnished. Te ¢ Street, loore (nee inger) as io n Y Mont:
October, Ni and Desmhiet, pp 29.6 5%t.(.n. | myself responsible for her or anyone | Eley Autios ly cash. D’Arey 2 oe N.B.—This application will be consid- ontre:t Halifax suninten leiden 99 cents
C. L, Gibbs & Co., Ltd. Tel, 2402. ’ : else contracting any debt or debts i H ree joneer. ered at a Licensing Court to be held at} S.s. “DODIN MARSANO” -. June 19 June ~~" gman 2
1.2.53—2n 7 a A a Connie my nate wnless by @ written orcs } " Police Court, District “CGy’, on Monday re ae ‘o” a 28 June 3 July 7 Ae NYLONS
radios rome. ne ay of July 1952, 2 relock, |S. ‘ ee ~ 18 Jus s
“NEWHAVEN, Crane Const, fully 4 soon. —~ PYE ¥TD. 20.6-.52—2n | Se TERR BERGE PERCIVAL MOOR! UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER Rae oe re Ce a a ra vendiag ef. Sh ee "4 “puma 2a “August 51
pistred. For July, November, Deer ee eee tera Tee Patera A. W. WARPER, tne shen ennsteenneneeinet $1 12. and
only, dial 4476. sash cate Messrs. P. C Maffei & Co., Ltd 1.7.52--29n By instructions reveiVed- from G€..L.. poe Aa, Police Magistrate, a ta UNITED KINGDOM SERVICE :
QFFIGE SPACE in building at Spey [he are our sole distributors in Barbados |. dian A al panes & Co. T will sell on. Thursday A CALICO
err ttens: See mnpeee ace ETE ME ie LOST FOUND Chthadsals die sclereitigl-< icv From South Wales, |.iverpeol and Glasgow . 36 in. wide. 59 cerits
G.02—thn 1 Bye 6 valve ROTOMBEMAE ADIOS, & pedal: rubbers, Padaln, Pump elles, con Scan * — : ahah heat
PRE! : _ | chromium plate, com soon + ' neetion: uter ng x bia) Duw Sout! Expecte a
th Gee oda ae Matthing Gap gine Urb a Py ee ee ne ee , ; Roadster! 2 state cident inden Wales Liverpool @lasgow Dates Briagetown, Soon UE
ms, water and basing in eac | ~ enemies eter shin tener en =e ac pai roi s. “FEGGEN” Big assortment from “
I PYE 3 speed automatic Radiograme- Football boots, Bladders (smalb sizes) a ¥ 2 +» 9 Sune June 24 June 10 J
canon, Dial’ wb a Sra. phones, Available now! PYE LTD 4 LOST Elastic Braid, kee Cream Powder, Bul a SUNWHIT “4 +. 80 June » July 14 July 1 Auguet France and U.S.A.
sesst .&, 2.6.52—2n | as — ferrite, WO striae, iene 230 aes I g 60c. and 84c
iaeitaistadn telnet hatter . m a items mms Cash, Sule .. End at Early August “ .
WANTED Eat Gi ee ca, HONE aaa eet | Mee ERwin, | IF Viewmin wi is a wortd. | £2. « er Ba dae" ae SATIN
é. BANDS! With bandspread on M1, 1%, Mi, Milton King, Rock Gar Fa n renowned . aan 7 arly Sept Mid Sept. Mid October
12, 16, 19, 26, & 21 meters PYE CT is rae, oe =o a ‘ appetite restorer. et seein cer i .
a Aecbtk Be ore he ier Bae Rin | ree en . ZAM Ne one with blood-build- UNITED KINGDOM ANP CONTINENTAL SERVICE oom, bg Quality
HELP PYE 6 volt battery radios. Available imute hs ay earns = have the From Antwerp, Rottczdam and London pendeanee eee
MoUannG aaah : vee now, 8 wavebands »- PYR ye , ENE minutes’ “work’—nine e 5 oan pre ee buoyant CREPES
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keeper; pleasant personality; to tai | —~———-2--L is +_ Wine ides—at Cross last Expected Arrival
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augmiers and: ayrecable’ surroundings i.) MAFFRI'S RADIO EMPORIUM = 4%; “TRDERAL vovacen” 13 ; Bridgetown, Barbados Shades
addition to reasonable “a 6.5044, fr zs oy Campton: | : $3.8. “SPURT ia ee ma | ou * 72c., 85¢., and $1.12
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frpy th, Dexfon << 1g 9. Ey d bis. feet Always make eure your MILLIONS OF FAMILIES AGREE THAT: {000000900061 09000000000/ Fe nn 59 cents
a . 5 56 retriger if ird. . & —
buck Street, Bridgetown 27. shina 62—t fn sinte te Go tee, te arr Wes Di al CAKE SALE > } U LADIES’ WRIST
Pernbamantins oct oor che | potions = i}} University: College of WATCHES
“8iyne Roach & Co Riekett e ;
Sievet. , Rit me a. LIVESTOCK $ | the West Indies $7.50
. PUPS- Bull terrier pups. Apply \ N | @ TTE
__ MISCELLANEOUS Cuthbert, Rouers, Nr. Rices, St Philly { ie he Si} EXTRA-MURAL All Shades. Qualities and
(82,80 POCK 1 WORRY nally urns f 1, 1.08 , a weet 2 DEPARTMENT Widths
2 sornmending 23 new sunscribers 1 COWS— 1a) young c mille +
R Tere *tON in one Tanith, pe sh py” Cathe Young cows fresh, in milk 7 ik Tat Friday, July 4th, 2 RESIDENTIAL S ER 570. and 590,
Bn i - Phill 1.7.62—1n UMM
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DN me lige REDPFUSION oO yrak ducks $24 00 hi Ne te * j 990000004
full partic: Ulen’s trom the REDIFF USION 4 Seven dollats. Ducks. Si ple t] Shishee ‘work Bove oepeta j y Hal ) ns t > 100 JERSEY
nw, soe 46 5200" as. On View. Friday “4th to Sundo” | Unteay § of sanek ean 05 egal eC DRAMA AND DRAMATIC Plain and Stri
y. “ . . i. . . in
“TWe: i Sorrane @xira Honus |rs. | Peebiea Bayleys, St. Philip. and stop fore tt 1s | ‘< T0- DAY'S NEWS FLASH TECHNIQUE 48 in. wide.
te 4 ot aan de ee y 1,7. a Pa leas’ ot tesa A ents Hhourse. | = owe
oe area : Y sm and heart trou | a
. $.6.52-—20 (Professor A. K, Croston
iii Se we | MECHANICAL New Discovery Saves Teeth Clearing out our new st stock acid dtlieny vo eee
a th t—To rent or |“ of shot gun cartridges:— wide
‘ ryiime . betw ; ANOS.-Carlton Pi lid mahog-
HOVEAUES, tor alone, erica eecinne | any Pa Aebt or dark fiteh, fully tropi: ren renghts sthese troubles, iar onee 12 GUAGE ELEY--$11.65 Fee: $20.00 Best in Town
yr St. Lawrence area, Dial 2405. bo. | calized Price $775.00 each, G. Ww oP ite from bleed- | per 100 NET CASH 1.39 d $1.98
| tween ®—12 noon, 27.6.69—1,. Hutchinson & Co, Ltd, Broad Street pa ire , the | Keele to R nt Tutor $1.39 an .
: ge {| Gente; tee! letter Big closing out reductions ,
yom May. W. W. B.shows that | on ail HARDWARE ITEMS. aaah Sees, WHITE ORGANDY
es te ire seca MISCELLANEOUS aun Y " aa | i Beckles Road, (Tel. 4658), Ruparioe e Quality
Eh % BEAUTY SOAP. , Bring out your Beou- | {Us we abe | sogbteocsnoeoocegesoees , ooseoees a who will give further
sary’ coreutter SOW" wenty Soa ct ue ieee An eae i tied | 2 Mi * JOHNSON’S STATIONERY pee | particulars CHILDREN’S PANTIES
faibe, uch and tos peat trgee Cites lenkes today from your Suppliors. | a pee fan, Tn 3 3 Mia LODGE STONE WORKS CO. x 8 MEMORIAL and HARDWARE 1.7.52—1n. 87. up
sai igen da nates | “oN seal | hae a |S antenine Sroten aint ‘stone, S| S a Rea OO SE OR: BRON SILE
vino Taken out che ewell- days Best quality English prvensee ‘Yacore gone mun the ow ae ‘itable for aes % % SERVICE ns
7 vleeding and combats nerve j sheets 6 ft $3.94 7 ft. $4.60 8 ft. $5.4 7 t \ sizes, su Road or + S or 1 interest to 36 in. wide
‘ tiereby curbing other trou. | Also “ealvanieed netie’ 38 ‘cente. per ib. Guaranteéd \% Yard Construction and/or x 8 JOINERS 69c. and 796o.
bles cauret by Viles such ks Headache, | Agto Tyre Co. of Spry & Trafalgar St »,fmosan 2 pa, fost + |% making cortcrete blocks, or % CABINET MAKERS + .
Nervourness, Backache, Constipation, | Dial—2698 21.6,52—1.4.n. | Mae it ts ‘o stop § s A Memorial Service will! 'e have an assortment of
topo Of enerey, debility, and Irritable ts am bleeding, One are eH ifite fiver i? any concrete struc- gt hd VESTS
Giepnaition Got Hytex trom your LAUNGH—Cabin Launch, Mortis Vid- jor MB weet to goue commmiete satlatnation % tures. ie Co. also utider- \ be held for the late Lilian ERROR GLASS All Sizes and Colours
RUMMEKhS Pylex trust Sine. xeus.pie ieee Engine, eer Seaton, a oot op sake 4 shane on i Sl "veoth 0: x take the construction of 5) Brandford Cossou on Tues- arD CHROMI'IM PLATED FITTINGS 0c. and 69e.
oalna ahd troubles or méney Back or | Caving? isl Phone Vincent Burke. | ang heart bi, et, Amoea our Ye Heads and Yards by con- day night, 1st July, 1952, at FOR SAME.
"arn of empiy package, ' . 38.6 ' P-amist He OS Aegon ad quaran- — % tract,. or supervision, % o'clock. at the New Testa- Oia heen CLOTH UMPRELLAS
a — +--+ --—- cic on zisk .
| SANIGANS—Kitehen Sanicans with & eeneee ae See S KE ae anes ment Church of God, River ¥ THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM 85c.
}sten-gn-, lever .which.. opens did... Re- tts you x vitae © Road, Corner Broad and Tudor Streets
[movable enamelled inner pail fr cy! Per Pyorrhea-Tronch Mewth > - * HANDKERCHIEFS
‘ ® | dutehinson @ Co. Ltd. Broad Street, . 666s SOOLEOCOSS OBESE BELOSBOAGCOSSOOM EO Ny aemeade A ve wid <
faint 42ga 27.6.52--4n. | SOROS oe S0OCECOCCO RES 1 VECCSCCS SOOO PO TTD ry wide variety
} bseribe now to the i Te apd) oueee ‘ ine
asc e ow a es an
leading Daily Ni w
can be Cured | esc: aa oot Wd 13¢., 15c,, and 20¢.
¢ . wer teatic jon ‘ > econ eneenneeeesnienmaapioetienciates
There afe thousands of men aad woite, | Soe ‘aw Cutt ea Advoeate Co, Lil | , BROCADE SILK
who suffer. note agony day and nigh; | iden! Represen @, ‘Tel. 311g, 7 a
because of pile trouble, whe do not know, | ec ae : 36 in. wide.
that every nist stocks a special semedy THA SETS—epiece Decorated Tea 65 cents.
Many attractive designs from



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AT THE

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TUESDAY, JULY 1, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN



BY CARL ANDERSON |








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PAGE EIGHT





Windward, Y.M.P.C. Win
Intermediate Matches

WINDWARD FORCED A WIN over Combermere in ———— :

the last ball of the day at Windward in their Intermediate
Division Cricket match op Saturday.
Y.M.P.C. were the only two of the six teams of this Division
Y.M.P.C.’s was over Cable &

to win their matches.
Wireléss.

The other matches petered out in draws, with Regi-
ment, Spartan, Pickwick and Empire gaining first inni

Umrigar Scores
Second Double

(From Our Own Cerrespendent)
LONDON, June 30.
Feature of today’s cricket was
a grand double century — his

Windward and

Jead points over the respective teams : Wanderers, Police, second of the tour by Umrigar

Carlton and Mental Hospital.
Combermere were ‘bowled out

for 117 and 88 and ward o. M. R- W. quarter hours and hit three sixes
who scored 150 in their first in- )uill!?® it, 4-38 3 and 26 fours, Two of his sixes
were given 56 to win in 55 Clarke Ley : $ 0 3. @ were off the England bowlers t
minutes. The last minutes of this eee ois 5 1 7 1 Tattersall and Berry. As the re-
eo were very exciting ay a 2 6 § 9 sults of Umrigar’s efforts the
indward went after the REGIMENT — 2ND INNINGS Indians finished the day only 12
= somewhat of ‘or fh, Saneedt i. secs 4 behind Laneashire with three
ae swiftly one on &: Phihips ‘Patterson 7 i wickets in ae
tagore the win was Extras pees 6 Lancashire vs. : Lancs.
ast bowler L. K. Brathwaite Sade ‘ches Swink) and ont Indians 351 7, Umrigay

% the first and six in the second,
In their second aes Comber.
ma Wi seored 25 and
Th the Cable & Wireléss—
Â¥.M.P.C. match, Cable & Wireless
made 129 and 77 and Y.M.P.C. 95
and for 8 wickets 113.
Spin bowler David Archer cap-
t six Y.M.P.C. wickets for
34 runs in the second
Wanderers
wickets 87 and
managed to gain the
iead when they scored oo The
oa ae of two wickets
second innings when
stumps were drawn.
Pickwick-Carlton

In the

each team batted one innings,
Pickwick scoring 210 and Carlton
179. For Pickwick C, Evelyn
made 51 and for Carlton H.
gaa scored 41 and G. Harding,

i rowne and C, Standf

seored 36, 33 and 56 : ay,

Fast bowler H. Jordan of Pick- ©. Wood

wick took four wickets for 33

runs.
In the Police—Spartan match,
C. Springer scored 65, F. Smith
51, and E. Denny 40 for Police.
For Spartan S. Chase had a brii—
jiant spell at number four for 97
Span nate Bal BO
. S

seored 60.

Ment Hospital scored 99 and
for, 9 155 in their match
against ire who scored 176
in their first innings.

Empire’s Harris took four wick-

ts 89 runs in the second

5 Saved Mental

ospital from defeat when he was

able to score an invaluable 56 in
their second innings,

Following are the scores: —~

oa & WIRELESS vs. Y.M.P.C.

: et PSs : 1290 &@ 7
Â¥.M.P.C, 95 iter. 8 wkts.) 118
. & W. INNINGS
Mawes b E. §. Branker 9
ht b E. S. Branker ... 3
r run out. eva 4
Alleyne b R. Austin 3
y Lbew., b Austin .. 24
ing c Burké b K. A. Branker 17
Seale c Burke b K. A. Branker 0
BE. Branker stpd, V. Lewis, b K. A.
ranker bee 0
Frost b Porter 1
Clarke 1Lb.w., b I. Burke 6
D, M. Archer not out 5
Extras : 6
Total i 7
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Cs BR Ww.
I. Burke 3 26 1
R, Austin 7 2 8 2
K. A. Branker 7 0 30 5
E. er . 6 1 q 2
B. Porter 1 1 0 1
Y.M.P.C. — IND INNINGS
B. Hoyos stpd. Clarke, b Archer 10
D, King 1.b.w., b Matthews Re
I, Burke c Alleyne, b E, Branker 9
K. A ae Healt gl ee ea 32
B. Porter c King, b Archer 10
V. Lewis ¢ Alleyne, b Archer 27
B. S. Branker stpd. wkpr., b Archer 56
Hay hew 1b.w., b Archer
Harol yhew c King, b Archer 0
as ..., 3
Total for 8 wkts.) . 113
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oR he Se
® King dpe 7 1 34 0
ls ws .. ’ 0 15 1
eM Pt wo
D. Archer ;: 65 1 34 6
WANDERERS vs. REGIMENT
Wanderers 93 and (for 8 whkts.) a
Resiment cane. (for 2 wkts.) .... 43
REG — 1ST INNINGS
Ishmael b Corbin se 7 *6
Lieorish c Proverbs, b Massiah 14
Phillips b Corbin io. ae
Weekes c & b Corbin 3
Price b Corbin
Beckles b Corbin . 24
Watts ¢ Ramsay b Corbin 8
Parris b Massiah 0
Brathwaite b Massiah 1
we ¢ Proverbs b Massiah .. 2
Clarke not out 7
Extras ll
Total 96
BOWLING ANALYSIS
, Oo, M. w.
J Corbin ; Ww 4 32 6
Proverbs 3 oO 18 0
Massiah . 44 3 31 4
WANDERERS -—_2ND INNINGS
A. G. Seale c & b Proverbs . 16
J, Massiah c Ishmael b Watts 1
M, G, Mayers c Ishmael b Phillips 1
J. Patterson c Price b Watts 2

R. Armstrong ¢ Weekes b Phillips 14
J, Mas _ not out 23
M. B, Proverbs b. Price 10
P. Patterson b Watts .. sae 12

D. _H, Alleyne c¢ & b Watts 3
J, B. Robbinson not out 0
Extras . 5
Total (for 8 wkts.) 87

for India against Lancashire.

BOWLING ANALYSIS Altogether he batted five and a

PIOKWICK vs. CARLTON
rae 4
‘ariton

210 ter 306 and 30 for no wicket,



eee eee ee IDG, Walsh 6 f. 97
CARLTON — is? INNINGS” , Somerset 235, Wa jer 87.
G. Matthews ec Lashley b C. White 8 Warwick vs. Essex: Essex 224
H. Burke ¢ (wkpr. Evelyn) b H. | and $8 for 1, Warwick 846 for 6
‘ declared, Bromley 121 not out.
G. G , 7
G. Harding sun eh Oe aaelte , Guan mt ni rte:
e oan oucester an Or no
A. Browne ¢ Marshall b C. Moore 33 wicket, Cambridge 285,
©. Seadtord ¢ H. Many, b H. | Glamorgan vs. Derby: Derby
C. Cox b Jordan | 9 270 and 215 for 6 declared, Gla-
- ae BUD UE rans 4 morgan 140 and 14 for no wicket.
eee nes loore 2 Northants vs. Worcester:
& ame Nie = ws Northants 332 and _ 168 for 5,
— Worcester 269.
ae 1% Middlesex vs, Hants: Hants 298,
BOWLING ANALYSIS Middlesex 289 for 8.
ie abshd e “ 5 w. Kent vs. Sussex: sve ee),
B Washley 5 6 834 John Langridge 115, Kent an
e wane: aot Oe : 324, Mayes 134, Murray-Wood
G. C. Moore . 8: Soa oe
- eee 2% 1° 2% @ — Yorks vs. Notts: Yorks 401 for
Ni Wo'Geeenidye 10 fas 8 declared, Notts 181 and 264 for
Cc, G. Greenidge s ..8 o 7%,
POLICE vs. SPARTAN Surrey vs. Oxford: Oxford 146
aie as : 14 and 140 for 3, Surrey 443 for 8
ARTAN — 1ST INNINGS declared, Eric Bedser 108.
B Roach b Grifith 33
rr >
b Barke’ 23 9
8. Chase Lb.w. b Denny 97 Lynch Ss Old Boys
BD, Morris ¢ & b Smith 29 E sity
W. Gemmett ¢ vkpr. Morris) “'b Beat Jamies Street
q nes ‘ 5
. b Griffith 4 1 5 isi Basket Ball
Ee Matthews oan Fes is The 2nd division

H

Â¥ =

fixture which was played at Col

Ez +. Gembeenb (Jnr.) not out * lege yesterday evening between

Bxtras: b. 19; Lb. 12... .... 31 Lyneh School Old Boys and James

Total “jap «Street Boys Scouts, resulted in a

4 maiden victory for the Old Boys
by a margin of 16 points to 6.

BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO. \

M R. W. W, Millington, J. Hyndman and
& ohatt, ' ae eae Me Ba Scored 6 each and 4
C, Sealy . 5 0 30 2 respectively for the Old_ Boys
oo 7 9 36 1 while H. Bynoe and L. Thorne
i Mayes it 2 36 1 scored 4 and 2 respectively for
G. Smith ’ 15 1 68 1 their team.





R.B. Yacht Club
Tennis Tournantent

YES’ AY’S RESULTS. From Page 1.
man's ** to lose the next two. Many of
Mr, L, St-Hill beat Mr. H. A. these lapses were the result of
Cuke, Jr. 6—1, 6—0. weakness on the backhand which
Mr. N. D. Tudor beat Dr. J. was fully exploited by McGregor.
Klimezynski 6—1, 6—0. In the final set he placed his
Mr. V. Roach beat Mr. H. L. Top- powerful forehand drives so accu-
pin 6—4, 6—4. rately that the Australian was
Mr, D. E, Worme beat Mr. I. S. often merely content to return
Robinson 6—1, 6—0. the ball over the net, Drobny
Men’s Doubles. broke through McGregor‘s service
Mr, P. Patterson & Mr. G. H. to lead 5—4 but dropped his own
Manning beat Mr. F. D. Barnes for the Australian to level the
and Mr. G. Watson 6—2, 6—2, 6—1. score. He came back and again
TO-DAY’'S FIXTURES. broke through the Australian's

Four Enter
Semi-Finals

Men’s Singles, and held his own to win the
Mr. L. St.Hill vs Mr. N. D. match.
Tudor, Eric Sturgess was no match for

Mr. J. D. Trimmingham vs Mr, Frank Sedgman who was in his
Vv. Roach, best volleying and smashing form.
Mr, D, E, Worme vs, Mr, C, B. The South African placed his
Sisnett, onary shots well but they lacked
L adi Doubles po .
oo L, Branch and Mis Herbie Flam is becoming the
Mr: s_.* veal dark horse of the tournament,
ge Be glad J. Connell and Mrs. tie is master of court geometry
or Doubl and as his brilliant positional play
M M sie mM. _ had beaten Gardnar Mulloy in
r, & Mrs, R. S. Bancroft vs. the previous round, so it was the
Mr. M. de Verteuil and Mrs, K, A. qownfall of Seixas.
Knages. The Flam-Drobny semi-final
should be a great battle of tactics

“ps. . for Drobn i {-
Billy" Greaves Wall Hg ue" as
ie io oO

Meet Kid Ralph

take the title. He has already
beaten Sedgman at Wimbledon.
Caleb “Billy” Greaves, No. 3
welterweight contender for cham-

ionship h i Trinidad

Vet yerterday by the MV. Moneka THE WEATHER
for Dominica whe he expects ‘

local ‘middleweight REPORT
champion Kid Ralph on Sunday









July 6 at Windsor Bark, Dom- YESTERDAY
nite, 7m me — from Codrington: .01
Ralph also left by the same n.
, Total rainfall for month to
oRpORTEnITY. yesterday: 4.68 ins,
Highest Temperature: 86.5 °F
ee eae ee 75.0 °F
- id Velocity 12 miles per
WHAT’S ON TODAY hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29,985
Meeting of House of Assem- (3 p.m.) 29 925
bly—3.00 p.m. TODAY

Police Band Concert, Mental
Hospital, 4.00 p.m.

Water Polo, Aquatic Club,
5,00

( Mm.
Basket Ball, Y¥.M.P.C.—7.30
p.m,

Sunrise: 5.46 a.m.

Sunset; 6.14 p,m.

Moon: First Quarter, June 30
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

High Tide: 10.29 a.m., 10.52

p.m.
Low Tide: 4.24 a.m. 4.04 p.m.





ETTING A LOAD OF
THE PRODIGAL SON WHO
E05 MORE PRODDING.
ae weX AND A HATLO AAT
a LIFT To C.W. RHODES,
ro 108 KINGS FIRST WALK
. BROOKLYN 32, N.â„¢%

. WORLD RIGHTS RESERVED.

S SYNDICATE. Inc



Somerset vs, Leicester: Leices-~

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

WEIGHTLIFTING AND

BODY BUILDING
Hy Edwin Hogers

NERVE — an essential of suc- as long as you live. I learnt a
cess. How ean we overcome that few things about the power of
habit of being nervous? Can we mind over the body before I
overcome that feeling of the ‘jit- read much about the reason for
ters’ before an important event it. It is common at the com-
takes place? mencement of any athletic event

Many youths have eliminated to become very nervous.
an inferiority complex by the Some time you will be stepping
growing knowledge of the power out in front of an audience. Per-
they possess and their physica] haps in a que Contest, a
ability or superiority over aver- dramatic play, a speech, but re-
age persons. gardless of what it is, the mere

I not mean by this that fact that you are stepping into the
strong men should go around ‘lime-light’ causes you to be
bullying others by demonstrating nervous. None of us are immune,
heir strength. As a matter of it happens to all of us at some
fact, the stronger and more capa- time or other. We may overcome
ble a man is, the less likely he is the feeling in one field to discover
to make a show of his strength that it still exists in another.
by hurting or fighting others. But Thus you may be able to give
strength of mind and body doe: speeches by the dozens without
beget confidence, eran. > any disturbing emotion, and yet
and many other admirable quali- the firs’ time you step on a Posing
ties. platform you may be putin a

. r~
When ve sumer from fear or state of possible collapse.

lack of nerve, it is best to analyse I remember ciearly the first
our fears and find out why we _ occasion I appeared on a lifting
experience them. Too lively anâ„¢stage. I was very nervous, in fact
imagination causes fear in many so very nervous that I became il!
persons, I find that the fatalistie i think it was the interval while
view is a good one to adopt waiting for the event to start more
through life. Work hard and do than anything else that caused
the best you can and if something me to become so nervous. Every
happens, then it cannot be helped. athlete who has ever participated
Do not give up. Never cry over in competition has at some time
spilt milk, what is done is done. or other experienced these pre-

too late. What we have to strive a combination of emotions such
to do is never let it happen again. ss worry, anxiety, apprehension,
_ The feeling of fear or inferior- Sirets antis hine
ity in the presence of those in effects upon different persons, but
high places or positions has come every athlete whether bi
g o1
down to us from those far off gmail, weak or strong, Amateur
days. But in this country where ‘Ofensl ,
or Professional knows what the
all men are created equal, most experience is like. Usually it
men had reached their positions, takes the form of a BURNING
even the highest ones, by their DESIRE in the pit of the stomach,
own efforts. Whenever we come which causes the inability to|
in contact with others who are im- sleep, loss of appetite, nervous- |
porvant we become somewhat tie- ness, sweating palms and irrita- |
tongued We cannot find words pjlity, |
ta say. You can avoid being F |
nervous in the presence of these The feeling is comparatively |
persone by building up mental strong in combative sports where
RVE in the form of feeling there is danger of personal injury
equal to them. You should feel. such as Boxing and Wrestling,
equal with those persons in high also in Football, Hockey or
positions. With a feeling of wherever you get knocked around,
equality or superiority, you should Strangely enough, you can always
be successful in what you desire find this effect in sports in which
to accomplish. there is no personal contact ae
: soever, such as track, wei -
The best system for a man who jing, swimming and civings The
is a strength athlete is to make mere fact that you are competing
phyeieal comparisons, MENTAIL- against someone is sufficient ‘to
LY, of course. Think of the things grouse the pre-competition ‘jit-
you can do better than the man ters’,
you are interviewing. Think of
yourself as the being in the most Think back on your first
favourable position. Perhaps you appearance before a microphone,
are a good swimmer and the your first speech and so forth. If
other fellow cannot swim at all, you are honest enough with your-
would even lose his nerve just self, you can recall how horrible
to go into the water. If you are you felt. I remember a few years
in good condition, very likely the ago when I was called upon to
other could not stand up to you make a speech at the ‘Young Com-
in a fight, or what a poor attempt municants’ Meeting’, my mouth
he would make in a foot race or went dry, my stomach burned,
if he tried to meet you in trials my feet were weak, my hands
of a strength or the lifting of trembled, but somehow I got
weights, or indulge in a score of through my speech and was com-
other athletic pastimes at which plimented on it too. That was my
rar Sa — if a beeetne frst speech.
a stren; athlete. ile think- . : : i
ing of the things which you as an , | think I am right in saying
advanced barbell man ‘could do that even seasoned actors and
better thar he, you dre onger actresses never really completely
afraid of him. While t ng of overcome that feeling of nervous-
the ways in which you supe- ess. However, they gradually
vior physically, you b up a control themselves, Le Welatit
feeling of equality or superiority. |. Just prior to the Junior Weight-
N° Bin tt == lifting championship, a friend of
It may seem a bit “swell-head-: mine who was competing, was
ed” to place yourself in these having a chat with me, when I
favourable situations in your noticed how very nervous and
thoughts, but it is not really. It jittery.he was, I think I did a
is only confidence. If you don’t good job in quieting his nerves
feel that you can do things, how for he was successful. Also at
do you ever expect to get them the Senior Championship last
done? year, another competitor asked
Physical strength builds cour- me how I felt. When I told him
age in addition to confidence. that I felt fine, he said that he
You can develop a spirit, through was feeling exactly the opposite,
which you will never be ‘licked’ nervous and ill, What made me

different

PRINTED HAIRCORD

SEE OUR
36 ins wide—7Be. & B5e. A
per yd.
BUCKRAM :
in White Only bbe.
37 ins wide— at The. Wd. Be

an event.

succeed at

fidence,



a







Sports Window

_First Division Basketball
matches to-night at the
Y.M.P.C. are :—H.0.0.B. vs.
Carlten and Pirates vs. Pick-
wick.

These teams are compara-
tively strong teams and the
basketball should be of a high
standard.

Water Polo Division “B”
matches at the Aquatic Club
at 5 pm. are:—Police vs.
Whipporays and Harrison Col-
lege vs. Caviar.

.



surprised was the fact that he had |
been in many weightlifting con- |
tests previously.
gether and laughed and sang, for
{ had previously found out that
that quieted my nerves.

Worrying about a race or
event is so unnecessary.
good to have a little thrill before
A man can always do
better when he is a bit nervous.
But if this condition comes too
far in advance of the race, saliva
flows rapidly and actual stomach
sickness occurs.

Physical strength and efficiency
beget nerve, nerve helps you
anything, If the
muscles you develop would do
nothing for you but give you con-
determination to over-
come all obstacles, even without
; the addition of the many other
It cannot be helped when it is competition JITTERS. There are things that strength will mean to
you, you will be repaid for the
moderate effort required to build
you into a superman

Third Annual

Benefit Show & Dance

In Aid of The CH CH. and

JOHN'S BABY WELFARE
LEAGUE CLINICS

At DRILL HALL, Garrison

FRIDAY, July 4th 1952 at 8.45 p.m.
Under the distinguished Patronage
of Sir George and Lady Seel

Madame Ifill presents

“The Star Buds School

of DANCING

PROGRAMME

1.,OVERTURE Police Band

2. MUSICAL COMEDY witn
Cotton Pickers & Chorines in
“Come Gn A My House”

3. DANCE OF THE TOY SOL-
DIERS Hight Star Buds

4, SAW SOLO Guest Artiste
Mr. Ben Gibson

>. BALLET Blue Danube
Waltz Six Star Buds

6. TEA FOR TWO Dance
Five Star Buds

7. PARASOL DANCE
Four Star Buds

8. A STR#ET SCENE (Sketch)
Mrs. Bart & Daughter

JES IN THE NIGHT
Dance Guest Artiste
Mr. Cedric Fhillips & Star



10. BALLET Rose in the Bud
A Star Bud

ll. KYTTENS ON THE KEYS






ET Roses of Picard;
Bight Star Buds

14, KISS WALTZ Star Buds
15* FINALE Madame [fill and
Star Buds in “The Blue

Horizon”
DANCING AFTER SHOW

By kind permission of Col.
Michelin and under the direction

of Capt Raison, A M.,
M.B.E. The Police Band will
supply the Music,

ADMISSION $1.00

Dancing after the Show. Tickets
from Committee or ‘The Star

Bud". Bar and Refreshments:





eye .0

COTTON PRINTS

36 ins. wide
Zse. = Tbe.
per yd.

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LTD.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.



BEST

BUY |
Ja
ENRICHED
BREAD





+

x

%

>

%

%



SLL) ————— HK

DANCE NOTICE $

OOS SS SSS OVO OOOO IID.

OPENING DANCE 3:

ADMISSION
(Meanwell's Orchestra)



PE



al

So we got to-



It is

For Weddings, Anniversaries

& CO., LTD.

20 BROAD ST.
and at MARINE GARDENS






























SALE!

VARIETY SANDAL
SHOPPE

BROAD STREET
Smashing Reductions on









T

ik
i

TUESDAY, JULY 1,

Requests

FARLEY HILL COUNTRY %)
CLUB, St. Peter | Annual
.

} tnd
SATURDAY 19th JULY, 1962 $f sosrnstoh
Dress Optional | Music by

$1.00 REFRE:!

29.6.52—3n.
EEL LL GOL E




GIFTS

JEWELLERY

See your Jewellers .. .

Y. De LIMA















At the














Bar Solid





MR. OLIVER GILKES
pleasure

yA S

Prize Dance

which will
SILVER BEACH CASINO,
Holetown, St
On WEDNESDAY
JULY, 1952
(Strictly)
Gents 2/6 Ladies 2/-

c.

Orchestra

S ON SALE
Beautiful Moonlight
Buses leave Lower Green & Mile

& Quarter St. Peter at 9



This Week's
Special

COCONUT CREAM

CAKES
6c. each

fae bs
AKERIES BaTD.
DIAL 4758
JAMES STREET

HAT
PAIN

THIS
QUICK
EASY
WAY

‘Mentholatum’ Balm
relieves Aches and Pains
so quickly that it seems
almost like magic. You
can feel its cooling,
soothing touch begin at
once to ease the painful
throb. And‘Mentholatun’
is so easy to use.
just RUB IT ON. Rub it
where the Pain is and the
Pain goes. That is all you have to do to bring
immediate relief from Aches and Pains,
sooner you get ‘ Mentholatum’ the sooner you
will get relief. Quick — get a jar or tin to-day.







RUB AWAY T















SALE!

SHOES, SANDALS, BALLERINOS

CHILDREN SHOES, PUMPS, SLIPPERS

PUSHERS, HATS, UNDERWEAR,

STOCKINGS.





FYFFES LINE

Messrs Elders & Fyffes, Ltd., advise that an inerease of

their current passage rates to and from the United Kingdom
has been found necessary.



The increased rates which are applicable on and from

duly 1952, are as follows:

S. S GOLFITO

£127.

Suites A & B per berth

Double Rooms with Toilet and Shower

per Berth
Double Rocm per berth
Single Room with Toilet & Shower
Single Roon
Four Berth Room per berth

Rooms 51, 52, 53 and 54 per berth



AGENTS.

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PAGE 1

n I SDAY, Jl'I.V l'.i.-,:: BARBADOS ADVOCATF. PACE SEVEN HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON ^ftf aooMEaAua F'El.D + f .> %  "*vi S Vv _ zjt%J (S & O FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAV1ES „ftf* BLONDIE CVMSWOOQ W.LL 1 PLEASE (SHAKE TME OUST OUT OF MY MOP FOR ME ? BY CHIC YOUNG I FLASH GORDON :-. C~: DY DAN BARRY YES ME APPEALS TO THEIR \ BUT WHY CONFIDE V CCuEtER INSTINCTS, AND 1 THIS IN WE ? I J}1 HOPES TO AROUSE TME / HAVE NO PART Y'mtt INTO OVERTHROWING^X IN ALL THIS.' / fA My RULE %  j^-y' ^-__ j-M 1/J \r^ x SRI • BY FRANK ROBBINS BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS "Cussed things, hens "I thought I had taken every precaution — yet they still get worms I" "Then there was one precaution yon didn't tak If yon'J dosed 'em with 'Phcnovis' once a month they would have been in fnil production noto" 99 WE OFFER %  laMaj Soaai Bali Lrmon Ewnr*> Vanilln lum •Mm I'TVpa-' mm & SAMPSON (1938) LTD. J Holiday tRtrrtainmrnt I • 9 'Phenovis controls worms in poultry mil MN \nu mini A. s. HRYiH N SONS (BAKBADOS] I in A proJuci ol Impciul OiaiiK.il l'liitiv.i^cuiK-U I i.t a subsidiary company <>f Impcriill hcim.jl IniluMt I MIAMI \I(.K\Uin Una S1JCM) HAM LAMB TONGUES In Ho* OOAMBB MUTTON In tan ROAST BEEF In Uu \ I \i i (i M In Una LUNCHEON BEEF In Una And iur I'upuUr FIVE STAR RUM &f ENCE & CO. LTD. t f. ROEBUCK ST. IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only SPECIAL (II I I IIS arc non atailahlr a r IRraiirhro While Park. Tn-<-iUial-. S|><-fi Tins Smedley's Peaa 1!l Till! 'nil I lii i in: .'IS rkes. I.ux flakes ..10 .42 (irrrii Olive* In Brlnr %  lM A MMM Sp-nl h Stuffed l.HO | Imtfi siuffrd OHm in.. 1.46 J M1/41.III. Stuffed OIIVM amall 9(1 rfcrf' Spanish Queen Olive*—Urie 102 i spmlsli () U fn Olive*—RM| .61 NttMi PMUM in V.ne*r .. S3 MIM-.I rirklrs lii MutMrd 5S .M :s I'kkh-d n-itiiut* 74 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street THE r o i o \ > A u i i. ii o r i; ii i i; s I If flue— II If %  #•• I'onr llnllar HOVH In rther '.'.v/,v//^v-v*v//,v////.v//,^v.v.v,v,v,v//.^^^'-',','.', %  ,-.vo',^^vvo^o^%^^*^'^^r.^%^^o%^^'***'/'^'-***--'-'-'*^****^'.USEFUL ITEI Baby Gift Paper Birthday Gift Paper Wedding ,, „ Cellophane Paper Birthday Gift Tape Wedding „ Baby ,, ,, Shower Gift Time Dressing ON MLR AT ADVOCATE STATIONERY j HIIOAIP Mill IT 'SSSSSSS/'SSSSSSSs'.'S'SSSSSs'SS*',*. V>V,VtWWV'..V^VVV..^^





PAGE 1

H.E. Sir Alfred Salvage Foresees* Improvement In Local Scouting* Council Decide Time Not Ripe Top" For Travelling Commissioner Amend Motion NSE CK -KS MEET ALEXANDER HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR. Sir Alfred Savae. K.C Mli.. Local Chief Seoul told the Loeu Council at a meeting which bg presided that he fell "iha' the reorganisation by the Island Commissioner u doing good, and if we are patient, we will see an Improi in scouting throughout the island." Hi Exuuilaucy was summing up a icngih> aw uMiun which ensued i*n the Council coneldervd a suggestion trmi Colonial liuvernmenis in the Caribbean should loin Whether u. providing a substantial part of the coat of a Travelling Com111—ciosier for M moDthi. The Local Chief Scout during the course of hi* —Jmmary added "I believe that it 1* only by personal contact, thai it is only if you luive got faith in yourself Ui net across to other people the importance uf scouting and of boys, thai you .-on gel any when. Tinrcapunsibilily is ours and have got to satisfy ourselves that we are doing our utmost before we can expect to encourage other people lo help us. Afttr nu excellency had summed up. the mauling unanimously agxeod that u was the general opinion thai the time la now opportune lo have a paid Travelling Commissioner from outside, and referred a number of suggestions lot training and Uw general improvement of the island i.. the Executive Com' mlttee for their consideration. This suggestion ww conlainl m liie Chief Scout's article THE OUTLOOK in the May 1952 Issue of THE SCOUTEH MAGAZINE Ui which he made referei his visit to Barbados ;tid wrote Mr. Grantlcy Adams, toe Lead* of the House of Assembly, put forward the suggestion that the Colon in i Qoverninenu in the Caribbean ihould join together in providing a subslantml j>^n <.\ the cost nf a Travelling Commissioner for 12 months, who would help kl create Training Teams. This very valuable suggestion the support of ah th P Goverr to whom we have spoken, well j members of Oov* Major J. E. Griffith who o*T the discus-don on th? subject %  aid Mat the same question w.is discussed at a conference al tbf Jamboree in Jamaica and Trinidad was not enamoured with ihi idea, nor wa he personally. He said that if the cost could be borne by the Colonial Governments and the United Kingdomhe would have no objection, but if the Local Association had to contribute to the cost, then he %  %  i: v did not agree with it Short Time I sla n d CoQuriitffc %  %  giieci thai in the firsl place • a Travelling Commissioner in these parts would spend a very short :.it„. i ony. and he felt that such a C0anlOl loner would try to interS et scouting as it was in the tilted Kingdom and not as H should apply to the West Indie?. Ml Griffith said he knew that in Jamaica there were peopie I nt Camp Chiefs and e given |ocaU>< with oeil visits lo the Trinidad Training Centre. Enthusiasm mphasised the need foi biadars "who have enthusiasm," 1 said he did not think an.. person coming here to run training course for three or fun j months would benefit scouting Mr. R. C. Springer, Commissioner tor Training supported Bland Commissioner on broad principles, and pointed oui last year at the CommissluiiConference al Trinidad matter was discussed .it great length. He pointed out that whi'.i there wa no question as to -u PUtStdjI COIIUIUSMOIICI i knowledge of scouting, the was for them to be i<*> at.turn. G in then approach He observe*! that Uiey 'try to impl. %  rather than try to adopt thetu to IrOOaJ condilions." Mi Hpnnger -aid thai they would be glad to have people of Hie calibre of the Chief Seoul and Mi McGregor, the Canadian Training Commissioner, but hi felt lhat to have a Travellinr. Commissioner would not work ID practice. At this stage, he woul %  %  not be valuable, Mr. Springer said and he added if we had a !> %  > %  La ii it would be necessan. for training to become %  whole time job. Professor JS. Dash said it was" not the hrst time l suggestion ol the sort was put forward, aim recalled a similar proposition which was put forward In BrttJ Guiana where be was Presiden* of the Scouts' Association. Wiirninu He warned the Council thai they shou-d not take too narrow view of the suggestion, and ob that "scouting in thl Caribbean needs to be strengthrued at this time." He addc > "for one reason or another, tr. movement has been going backwards, and there is no gu—tfc of doubt as far as I know thai little new blood would not do U any harm." Professor Dash added "ttu training which can be got in having somebody well versed scouting in most parts of tr. Id would be nun helpful > bera The more people we a %  get from other plnces lo help i these quarters, the better would be for us. If we can a Travelling Comminrioner f %  something like three years. PED RIOTER RUSHED TO ROME JAIL IONIM1N. June 31 Group of Membeis of PartM W QWH part) inti" night ill cflec nig better consuhatiun wilh B> I niled Nations ooerat-j l i ..me on |t eye of tO important debate m %  on it-,Vratu P enl on Kor. fence Minister Earl All and Mm Si itl Selv %  Lloyd. unt Hit ehlngbmokn 1 cht. Still killVI f It did niiaiiun from t. States The Ms of ti Qovornmonl ail uoi ui nuefa danger in the di bale Tuesday. Chucmll hlmse! SIR ALIRKIl v\\A.l B ln '" ^ I-' Se %  !., v Anthui, %  <\ be of great advantage !>> r-den laird Hinchingbro.>ke god the whole are.*. abou 20 ot '"'' Conservalive He felt that if a Travelling ', %  ""' *' u memben inliudu. Commissionci was brought out for t? n %  n,end 'hent to the Labou. three v. "iiainsl In scouts abroad i Mild h,,r, h,n Govern; fol I iae ..u,i then ..,., %  [' Yelu raid foe l(iii,h in J unit endment would blanv au fan wl as l-^l-mi cn Europe and Canada where the '* '";' %  attlruj up arty nml iu presidential nvminlUng ..invention whlrh •iily ?. Reaublican tiniuers shoi as tlta : line winds. Fraud ,m,i oil %  lulling chnise* w.-ic flMiiu f..: %  nuMitE party men Until T.ifl think thai u was Uma for them t spread Ibelr hands and public Inh aitlng If ihey got thr pubtk Inb tha movement II ..: funda •'. Mild in His loni run iomr !o thetn. %  Dash ifit that now "we to develop %  : with Canada ;nul Ihe United States, we ihould let than come and Imorova our %  eoutmg.'' A lengthy discussion ensued on the subject lo which II erally agreed that the local voles. Mul lie may IKcount "iii H .i d Uoed ipeeehea eatonni the teai of 'i p| Drtan r.r Teachers' Talk* Start In Toad On August 9 nu tereni Sixth in-Annual CGON 't the Caribbean Unw and •ontscta. members, partfeularlt • ..m.ni-.i.at.-i n "*";l"es on Aului l„. abjectad to t..,n' t on, *"" le *' w,| l be formal that the local assoqlatlon should *^ n *d_JJ. Monday Auaust J\ by f ^he by ,= !-' '^urd'ay^Au'iWir^, r M.n.'irci lv" c Jdo "" August 23. TI,* Ills Excellency Sir Hubert Ranci C.'ivernor of Trinidad. TIN Programme Is as follows pay from Iti funds tu the sal J timiing from outside a Travelllin. I that 4t was not a "practical proposition." although mag i^_.,i DO prejudice lo any outside people coming in. tiovernnients Willing Ontheolhtr hand Mi F thought that the qia ipending the fund %  ion diil not arise, seeing th.it the Governments w/tra willing to conribule to tfai atcd. like Professor Hush, thai i Travelling Commissioner should be brought down for at least S years. Mr. R S. Jordan pointed out that a Travelling Commissioner would conduct Wood Badges I t iB „* 0 5t„.. ... one in each ot Ihe ,,. % %  v.*. ,.. s.p., ? .„V!£i W %  tw I i. itMh al lint %  Hal rvanini n l\i H, "l-rormsl Oj>. utl j ll,. % %  •! %  I % %  %  i ... .\4dlr.t . Kven all-WMthet ll-^'l light liombers vent their baaaa. U-Cm Olenn n Hart us. riflh An Force Commandlied that Allied plums which bombed the gliuf Si power plant a week ago drew haavy An from cimununiat antiinrciaft guns across the Vaiu Rivui in Maiu4iuNa Bercus said Ihe air force and navy pilots made no attempt lo He*! guuh although they Masted Communist anti-aircraft 'I > Km cm ide of the i \ |..li." n ui-ui -ink.*-. inlo Hid China. Han-us aaid lasl week's series of i aids wi|ied oul 13 power plants. all there wen in North Korea ! i the i ountn is electing a Presidi nt b k Ballot %  nee i*srtj worken 11 umed between 33.000 and 37,000 foi their cundldHte Uishop Ujurn. Jonsson. Earlier straw votes favoured formei Piemlei Asgeir Aaflatnmi Hipportad hj social damocrats and segments of other p.il-l.e The; third candidate Glcslle vnison a I H suported by mi mban ol all dt mocratie parties. Turn out of figures many Communist vote.., did not go to the polls. No i_etdenls were reportei VoUcoum ing Will not IX eomplete,| nill I IOBOROITOWN, /ui ...... ...,. %  %  %  ked oul Ven./urJoij. Jota Fernandi %  t B <; t i -.-• %  %  u to i rowd OOnd found, Jota took ence. and MM | ., first get the s" dnad G ight inn. vith ik to the r,ea_ iweldlnns In the which sent him to the canvat The %  %  ,. %  come rot it *iitn ahoulde: to assistms In raising the stand 'ing %  # On Page I I'bi leg tun ...in. tu utilM i i Hanoi i.t-i UM Uoaa Trleu ferUki pui-tmii ui thaj Rd Hu delta hoiii Ahuh VikUmuh w yiMnnatwellj ..hippu. v .;<< nungrj arralts to i Meanwhile. Hun ottkl u> IM1 WUttl .1 Hie Up ol th, |ado-| i luna mainland I ranch beadironlh •qpersuun *' MHO, raportgd 3u ton. i.in.o u u U >u nrtaanaral U'ken in the Ulc.I drive lo tleai Lochio China. French Vi only one man killed and some 40 wounded in the luur-day opcuuoii which capavaral Vh unlnh workiii large supplies of munUloo and explosives. In Amiain, Cvulral Indo-Chma, ii was Vielminh which ittaefeing Pl> and blocklioun,. tear Hue. i consul pun 400 nulca oorUi o| Saigon. AH PnOCh i Hiatn p... I. ,MI, ii|H,ile.i noldlng out dcspiu.i.pp. ,t ,,[. oiiimuiiIM pressure. I'll the Annum coast in an sraa not axaatij variflgd i %  .in MI >iiiiiinuiiii|ue Fronch VietII naval uiuu ui the course oi past few days sank 100 Comnil Uanipans loaded with rice l headed loi enemy areas th of Hanoi. —V.V. Irinh Budget Kaisr.s Prices DUUUN, June 30. Food subsidies costing > i I MB MM will * %  cut hs i/han Prtnu Muuiiti Valera's conUoverMal!. Budget guw Uito effect. BitWi 1. rilicism has heeti voiced because .ho cuts will lift pilees for such Irish filial I ... Boui ..n: butter W nd the luxiuias" tobeeuc |M lipior also will cost more Um i>. .... r nfended hu nidgei by raying let no one pretcn4 that this was thbttflM iinwuiu oi by tne go . iucb—rgad utie previous coeU Lion Qovernmeol headed by one >f Eire*i leading Barristers Jot. CUH*I ll< with i-sving fllMtpaled Ided "we an I iiiggei Party than th.labour snough nai we think Bl t'.P UaNa KrUUlibcriisUrji IViH-cun 1 It/uUllirn UOUL, Juuu, N I tilted .Niioit iigui pomm oremunisi Iront Unas m uorea with mgii eaoiastv bomu* lesptta hoovy over-nanglng emu hat h a m p er ed moal al tha i % %  tivitiai To-day's altgglu won canrt. I oui by uati's whuh have i M .ore than HU eU-ikea m muud Itaa lock activity during Ui* past In ""no The roNlts ol early strike could not bu observed MgDO louu covci luro-d them to iu• radar ui diopping i..i.b loads. No coiiui.uiiiift jei s appanrad hallcnge Ihe lxtnibu> |n_tOgU—k . ommunlat hydro aw< ti % %  pla cripiilctiH.il %  %  % %  varning system in M-iiihun.i ui. i K.icea. In blasting the lailway line. Mf*l look Up vhara Japanaas baaed bombers %  eft off oi laturdaj nlglu In Kambing %  boiti'-nKwwks.-n along % %  1.11. Rain t ->i.i, lowe d gruun ightmg and kepi Bgntai bontbc I at bases. A I" howai .tie i HI. inn nt l\ill IWl tri first ballot votes on Uaitw iabulgtUand Eiseuhov ton Needed to nominate is -i uly nf 6U4. Then mlgh IH ii stalemate bul itw exptcl II > nnhi wi oi Tut by July II li i .. LIIHI hare. Non* fursseea ^ both candid I. .uppoit Ihe paily licket. If tiie tivneral mid Urn Stmator I.-,... kid e.o It tin i -.ill (i .n.i Ii uglas Mac Arthur would I,. ii likely prospect or Seimlur Bvei ell Dlrkeiiseu of Illinois — II.P Four Enter Semi-FinKla .jt, I 200 killed and <<" io woundod In assaults ttu 1 %  iti .'..., barn n^s but thai fattad i i d mt.. allied poaltloni —Ilr %  PDRLISHP.RS GET NEW MANAGER MONTREAL. Ju Skn i Ltd mn d the Ml Austin a. inagei %  .ding the A. Inn Poeoe—, through : ctloni i> w II knowi throughout Ihe Weil Indl" By HI N M •• llii'i IX>NDON. Juno U The svtni-flnals of the Man"! Singles at Wimbledon this yea A ill be between Frank Sexiipn-n • .i Marvyo Rose I Drobny and rlarfata riam in Iha U/ t.M Plnal tin ift i iMin, the reigning < l ampMui I) 11 Siivttl of Anieni.i was IMMU-I 6, B—3, 4—fl. 0 4. • V i ti.ili . Mervyn KOM* .md Vii \ uoi u 'in iiuiulxi one w.i. i eaten 4—6, 9—3. S~g, —7 b> fellm. countryman Herble 11.mi. In Ihe other game* Fr-nk ''.lgm.ui. Ihe f.ivoiinie. had i ..nfortHble 7—5. 6—1. —I victory over the south African bamlon Eric Sturgess and a nOtd %  i ii j.ui : %  nnd I" l-'-i' the Australian Ken -. 7 5. B Hose's v.. tors a i Indei ~U %  %  n the run bo iftarnogn on Numbn •< urt hfd M %  IW0 hour;. II wus the Australli. i*. i. I thi . arrtad him ihro n ilefa pl in i sn uceaslonal hroek thiougli in itl i CCH. Savitt with bti'.ed on thiindi'ioie t irOUnd hOli w.im t-oinpic. (initrast to Ihe Australian-. Wol• • Ing Mb ah %  tries. % %  mi i • al mn %  bol si 6 U undoubtedly ..ok a toll .f S • %  i In the final -ei Snvin .. itsy wilh Ham t...two-all hut racked and lost the next four :.-|me and the match The —0—1 'ante was on his own %  a r V l o ai Ritas won it for the loss of on! ne point ttmshiug with i icavCB* %  fi.'.'h.ind return. The Drol i %  i %  ui nli Bv< oi Irug do The daclding gbne wan th< Hnal one In ma %  > %  Drohny had bniken thrtmgh 'b< Nf<<;reKor lervlce to ka.i and In a terrifli h,ilM. Buna which went Io clever service '" I'vel [he score al Iwo seta all. I)r>-t>nv had Drevlouslv won ih' I 0 On i>t %  n %  % %  ,1 I atala MMPOltttCOl groups Ui lOUUl Ad me |0aJete AlaJan Mfcial .. Mblianal thi ...mpaig i Ihn %  H ireak racial laws. Th. tage would see an .n.rease : u he number of ihnse voumtean jnd the centre's operation. The iblM %  tage would b.* one icllon during which the struggle houkt a" fjir .. %  pon M, I.,,,. , %  out to counliv %  .tsmime n general mms eharactai Tho first stage has not mplele.1. leaders said, because volunteer* have been deft* liws only in Iwo big cenlres Port rilr-belli and WHwi.Ierwatf. -OP Senate O.K. German Par! A \ IHINOTt IM '..ne M i... ,. mmitlM h..ii %  'lOeaiion of th. <..-i..• iHract and protocol to Ihe Noiih HtntK ntai> *hich will ,' nd NATO dvfi Small lajarlti l-tiei Ern rt T IcFariand artMuugd lata Mo_" thai the Senate debatr on uilillcatlun of tha Oaruiuu Pe-.ee nil .it ill oununen. i ^1 .' (1, I in GMT -lunday i'um Connally Chairiian of ihe Ponign Relation Co-ncapecUd I •bate wiili H specchei tavouniif rallaoatbm The nllBcation roaohiUon • xheduled for lubniission to tht % % %  I. ,tt MMI... uebate on the Military Appropriation Bill took up th' UcFarland announced or. flooi thai ihe Res-.U hen *ili i Uad up si h>n Tuesday He idd • thai ihe nlatod protoi North Atlantic Treatj which. tu ud N A.TO I N f( n • guarantees lo Germany will be '"i ..i. \ in .ti.. .-i vly ..fleiward*. —I'.P. •I l.tiimm To Star With Liz Taylor Report Puzzles Cuba, Britain A PIAINCLOIMU POUC4MAN takes a firm grasp on a Red notar in 1 as be hustles bun off to Jail The youth was one of hundreds am for staging a demonstration during the visit of Gen. Matthew 1 a ay, military co mm and e r of the western powers, to tha U>NIKI\ tuna so. Trada I I'.m Kmb.issy are at a lion the United 'uba ire negotlat"h" 500.000 tons of Cuban lugar. n inilead of traditional d* %  published In New York states "There are strong report* in the Loo ket that ihe A-do-Cul pact is being mad Cuba will sugar lo the Ui'tad Kit which can only be spent here A number of circumstances givcredence lo thi* report "It Is known that Cuba has a very large surplus m the present crop which up Io this lime Brli aln has only been uhlc to bu) with dollars. The Cub..: to buy ships, buildup n An MOWS Up Worker's Itaml An ex plot lav up .in %  PARIS. June 30 H.I/.AHtTII HVKIK IKjl.l.YWOUU. June 30 aruando %  had '* i> on Mman i ui MGM apparently is back in the xtudloa good grace for >N has been signed up fo, tw., pi tune this year. In one of these Uunas will bu MUt ib< tl r rtor*! leading man " "the girl wtlo had everything" %  dun in will play the rule of gn umlei world character under the lireetlnii of Richard Thorpe who directed Elizabeth Tavlor in the movie version of Si, Si-oil" Ivt-nhoe" : %  %  oil who bad MI thing William Powell who was lonr. baent from the -crevn Tl • s b"mg rurhad within the nest Iwo weeks following Ihe announ.wnent mat Elizabeth iv expectine — v.e. oi KIT s finger. ind small cars, all of which Brit~no booby trap was a perfect iinialn could supply. The British tatlon of a hall point pen which Government would like to teki oe of two fellow workers found sugar off the ration and an addlIn his rtfik and wa-. tionsl supply of Mu.oon tow H -round. Police are invesligatwould make this possible."—I'.P.. ing IP irdtm Publicity ('Hep AfttH'rtlsipg The Barbados Publicity I %  tee is to meet nexl Monday U, dLicuas their advartjalng pbuu fo the year. They have how w t i iheir Buna : in th'; United States and Can.t. effort to attract the visitor* itey can for the Summer Tourir Season



PAGE 1

V\C.T -!•; TURBAnOO InVOfATF TUESDAY. JCLT 1. I CLASSIFIED ADS.' Hmif ***** %  % %  "' % %  >• *"* .:M %T.V%.. SHIPPING NOTICES 'tun-ONI Jl IN MEMOKIAM uto. *. "wr" fe,V1 • In uid u '-t .h •Tod* lin B> Hack u4 Mml. ..ved in. fu* i Anrl tnr who think f h Ar* ftnw na loved BAn heel C-rMtu (Mourn 1 \ \011AIIMIMS I1AI1N I.I', futlan IK ).-..nf firmfull con V\l> AI'TOMOTIVI MM atwwnaj.r %  V*. SS-e-vrrd Nonet ruin o* ar Pinr ... india Srhool -111 i. iW h W %  Xmin'd up It Julv 1Mb IBM AppHcMton ft-ni ran M o li taMaa "M parMftMl "*" % %  < m daulfctara a-d (tM RKAL ESTATE THE LODGE SCHOOL %  a tJaJiMi AMPH. BBWMB hi v .,[. VK ami %  M I) II-,, e-3S„ a a i. i 1 MR Try. IMNWL %  lie ffr.tr sat** i 'm*r Tea th ft -rtJune MM *•!.. If H /1ALAMI l.IN I.I MIT in • < v /. ll iibwavrff 1 M %  *••..*• i .. from r*"fi — *..^ lit, DM^ 'u ."H M %  lath. -.dr. I MUi, Br.aOane July BO., arriving %  i• A ir-l 'ih •7TT3 i un . _. a %  •* %  w % % %  *. CAH ' %  11 akw-i M h p %  %  .own** dnvn I eOaatral raumti i UiDfi CoaVn rrs. ; %  ', %  —;— T A*fc.ii. <<.. iwn .. %  f-.Ui-Mnii-in II %  %  Ai*pK ". r, lfc ..ridaralBw** up to H.1..1-. uao LM; JI in. IMI #'*!." %  <-u.t %  r CAixrci %  rtm %  H MEW1.V MncTKU STOKfAiJ IISGAIOW -tinal.ru mi :i.D ^.-.r. j (•at ui i.-ji i tirairlio* BaaP. Mul utrtwri. Apply to cornr CO M 8 aB~a p-u.ie.1 M II wilr. i. ..It-, hr*. | eppl inHH-I Maa . M...„; | n !X Mite. Phone P.. I I of th. Alter M SchoM IBM to b* EBarnlned A.sFKE 1 i ?K_*. I-ANI> I luat* ai i Fine vMa over the ruu-Boi r ild aa a wwela r In • lot qulrl*. t IV UBdwMfMd I— Mr IOH HKVT HOUSES OM i II AuMIn A 40 I > V rwoti Co two tP t:i> I 1.11. PIHSOXAI Sn'iih U>IF %  •rrn Fiat main r..i u ttPafJ. CMnlortably lurnkM, rnn %  Ml. OOHX Vtrrandak farinfl mm tWiU* on* parw> a lo. riuptax Vvnm July r "T' H PM I" I II KLECTKICAI. *trthaldi Dtl%*, %  TO%'K— JaaftMi i • %  r Stove. TfMra ,i Ih n mrpl pltrn flic i parted onj.%ti %  BIWliiliP—I with thi *1*0 ff> f4* "to'" J l*TT ( %  • -TOT i awtf rrapooptfeh I-P COI nty nama unlMa % %  hrr-l b ma •:.t MII.TOM •ITT. MHvarton VUlM ADA VICH> rto n.-t rwkl %  t or aayoru 'wmtea ora> Than(i.lni* will aAai tor .'• Iliblte CowwatlttM al lh-l r ocV., N, 11 lilafi tM*i. Brtdga'uon. on Kria-•W th *aj a* Jialr. IBM M I p.* Ttw huHCPlow known a. pAiVKU • %  Miita liaptction 1 %  PAKAw'A'. f.,nv.lM-i i Da-aanb*. „„! %  t PhlUp 1 r July, !>..i **;n 4llA4BCar. -la-*. wn fi^ml Novomt I iX~ 1 OMe--NevaanbaV anil Datamkrf. API C L dfcba A Co. M Tri M*3 NtWIIA'.'l \ en (f.. nl-hrd l ,l^r. ttn>. b.r ,-:i j^al <71 If •.i ( ."" l| 11"^ M K Slr-#t naai TraralKat -A. ApwW *> %  -. T*rCo MM n 1 Oil AW %  %  % %  *'i J t ••waton D . Ilaattaaa. unfumbh> rwm St. Matthtaa Cap th%  ratar and baalnP la i .. to • p m lu.madiair tl ^T0 . GSi -v.wrr.o MOI ".r IXBwrlcBr.'d pl.a-aiit pcnonalli -i ro c* -• •rn>i-Dtlal b.,r Onai Salary with (uaiant<-a.i %  MW .n r-rraou brOon n %  ir i. J p rr ",Mr,n. t .1. |#1/1'.; f: PWM 'irit. r.w,(i,w. PTXH t | MISCEIXANBOU8 II 1 ( In one morth. %  Han ti M r-.i-ti %  -z~~ % %  |g rr Bjl| n r%rra ,is.... %  • am lu-raOj *arrr'l ..in> if* -^H to m? wtfKinNo* 'A1JOUA JUNE* m*o PPrdai .• 1 da mraalf rappopatbla (a* har aI* contracUna aoy dabt o ",tin law tf a wrltfa" i VTBWB A i i n tj —• JONB> flt *•., %  fThiwi I %  .ntainlna I %  in with the Ur,,aroa nnul I .Nf anj daht .r d-oii In ' wrhun oreav wanad b> < ftfd CECU. WATT* "-if SA IAC DRV-BATTEHV r. black and (hmw I'VE VTD 1 i rrcelvete araold I II Waff-i A I .., Mirli f HBi The public arc hrt,v a.rnrt acali Moor* rne* Bprlnga.1 a. I do not hoi .nvarlf raapontftde fa har or awvoa • olaa contjartuif any rtrtt or drtt i | ran nanw unlaal by . wrttten of %  *"V5' fenm aoo.. fi> .TanHilfr rar [fed from tr< ia-k-t -m-aUaruiive Coir. ima. 1 will aat, "n it.a reapartlva tpat' by public oam i-rtltlon on Thurwia:' r ->t Jad July the .lollowpag: One H dduMe roole-i -.XHIMI b-nldU'd at St BaMlfar* Junl'. I'trhool at 1* u-iaUwk, and at Bt l*u Boyaand OirU* arhoali one til wood I in bulUlria at 1 p m I r.rm. itrleti %  ca.h D*Ar*y A flroti I Covl Auet,ot,iwr *• I %  ••• in i .i chr !" ITD M .Ma H ItlSI ItllMl valve radloa Mm h WiMi handnprcB I i -.xlt battciy radi.i A un. B t ,y u i,ai..ir-% i-Ti) PYE nATTEBV HITS—Juat a few lei MAPTItrS RADIO rWPOHlUM 1-lla-il' riKmiUKftATuR On* Notl* rl C It D'lrifiratur. In fliit cl> rondlt ZS3mVJttz ?h paake IMr. Bm.d I.OST -. o n TTiuradaJi i* -t 'Oflke Sp.y ftl, ">i>oalt IIWI> trta. fotli-tn.;i r-utoc-v Pedal r. tOuUr CaatiiB, d i > in. *.. Mrau>tt siitXMI. ..M matty otho .I...Term Caah. ->-ie .* VI .la VlNCrTKT CRlTriTII i ItHI .Miiha. l Gums Bleed, Teeth Loose! UVrsKN'K PUP*—t Bull temer pupi COWS *< yuunx roi Appi/ Cuthbert Badara n.. memh. I 4 r.: %  ••ftC-To .ant 'en AudiHt ai.J a Mia p.lnrl %  I n-nce area. Dal MM ba. """ ri • zx POULTRY %  \ %  i ,u July. 4 J* p m. t i Pfwti ei. Bailey. -< P MKCHAN'ICAI. tf.^i.ie.ly i atarta unly etorib* awei; -i.-ra" • %  *l--St '"-day %  CA'araitteHyt,. atna at d nouM*. and trr.Ubi. MIS* ii i ANQOUS HBAITY BOA" It-trul nut your Bel y aitl. die Mtllt and Alraiw. i Oil %  '..I a (i n pliera. IS •.(•—n PILES can be Cured Thcr* PP ihoftBhit'l. el RBkri %  hi w*rio amflcf awfol a-fur-y tU'' <.-. BWCAIIM of p*> trouble. kJ p the raiafTT ol thL'wi-1 MDJW aeoofidjnlo! jc %  %  •!) t. A*' hin: about Man Zai .". wtJi tall you thia a no oi-luiAiy ... bni a aoothiiip'. li'al'iui('< bdln Uatt at ot* aU^a ;;. %  aataaa tx.^ aboT aa4 clear* aaray inWina! Bwr or blaycduic pile*. The aoiajnc tube in which Mao Zaii %  aMd makca lh;a ptrpAra'iop to e-aay i .. cJean to UBt. The bi K v. %  •"?)* w aaecJU applii-tor. i. nftaaMy wag %  ku away the mutt d'flift It • .•. K-BKfabar the nuinr ol Uiii •acr.e.i tlDiecty tor C:'" ironble Mu/iZan P.LE REMEDY "ORIENTAT PALACE rMCTKKlM DflH \ i mv IAUNCII -Cabin launch. Uorrla VtdHlllBl owner 3* ft: .i SAVICANH—Kltehrai Sank am mill %  . ... l-vet which op-.iUnovaMa enamelrad inner PBfl frct rr -rnp'.liuf Prtc* M aach Q v iiitrhlnann • Co Ltd Biwad HIT— I %  mioa n.,w to ib* i>aar> t-^fr. ' r ..f-pa t l M II rrvriwp u Bataat m k. AW awl> • I mv Mr publkMti-n in Ldo-I-w. (. a-t * r\\ \PI\-, 4FRV1C. AIX'OA PolHTWf %  A 3TBAMEB" •A ftTEAMEB-' Mlilllli.il si. May IMh May MV) fan* 1MB raaa IM Jidv nth June lath Juna Mth July IBM July Mth KOBEVT i/HOM. M aa. M V VOBK OtH.r SBBTICK Apt>:— D* t^OST* CO.. LTD. CANADtAN 1 THMI BHDS. 71 ..ard -nd "hlnal. %  • Dili N n —Th ..ppltcMlon win be %  red M a Lramlrut Court to ba hald at Mka c ...t D>-i.i ?•. w|U red" 4p v: in A Minulf 1NE %  aftHtaa' rkle* .ii Naw Craaa lam •II:',( "irned World and iiov M*li'b lUe* Sayecil^ay Chnipioi. IACK YOCNO. *M It-. Aa. allee Mi N l rVltB.iB BI il a world renowrMd appttiie reuurer. I .m'-mcl with lilK-lhiiikl ins mitxi.i, you ha** the "ey o ioyaai baoyant •TIIIB. Stop Oyrrrieo and Trench Mourn (n 24 Hours Blaedlni -nva. apra raeuUi. M ioea* rhaa rraneT ••^fh or %  .%  "-'iaoMlia* !" .r te?t^IM^p>V^a aaM !, fB Viit fe UkdP? aVpM l BMaa H r a*',',' MfwB llrMrbaS the vaatd M that BOW arlenil-U .^T ikat lour aar. ol ...rr •*• paoplr K %  erara eooner or talar Be nr.i-.i lv and atop i heap dtataaaf bafore it .* %  ^'•a-jnacisrjafts MIUIOHS Of fA/fUIti 46*11 THAT: COLGATE 'Cleans your teeth Cleans your breath i brwh n Cf.REy COLGATE CENTAL CREAM .... %  ^TSBS'yj'iSSi"';; !"!" \ LODGE STONE WORKS co s ., iT^". %  x^£3VRa-• a, "• | __ GcarantMd .; Yard ('..n.uorUon wid/or '.' %  , 't—dft.(. apdaoMtBOBUaudlu'.i'i. .. ...... -.i ; .r. 'yea oil return ol nW pt'ttr £ •:;"* .tbane* on OUIUJ oai i**ih *(...r tTe danaara Iroai iheaaiat. lo-. ;,?;.* -Ti-ontJi NaafJi tftVV -*HVW'//.7 muhlnp broken flint aUrar. .' aU alant, raltiale fir Road or '; Yard (onttracllon and/or 0 aaaklna; cwncrpto blaaki. er ^ nrtT other eowerr>te> ttritr H lines. The C. alaa amdrrS Mae the eon-lriieUeiB af | Raada and Yards by rang tr.u-t or aupervUhMi. Dial ?H \ t,i i in i: \, sun Manajter MEMORIAL SERVICE A Memunal Service will ba held Tor ihe late LUIBB Bmndfard Coaaoa on Tuesday night, 1st July, 1952, at 1 o'clock, at the New Testament Church of Ood, River Itoad. CANADIA:. SERVICE Fron Munlrt j| and Halifax FAMILY SALE IS THE TALK OF THE TOWN COTTON PRINTS A Huge BeloctioR 3-c., 69c and 73c. KMBROIDCR AN0LAI8E White, Pink and Blue $2 80 UODI.N MAjtaAHO'' BRUNO flLNDAU %  "A VhVsEl. • I I July 31 Jul> 4 Auaui Juiv IT Ju>y Mb Ai K il Aulut LN1TKD KI.NC-LOM SERVICE From South Wales, i i erpool and Glaacow | ,1.1 s SUNWHIT MAB1A U.. LARR1NAGA BTUaAKD V1ABRRT7.I %  arly Au*u .1 Rnd Annul Mid Sept %  I .1 A... Mid ftepi Mid i>< -„,t UNfTCD KINGDOM AM) I .INT1NKNTAL SRKVICk From Antwerp, IC< ,-ilum and London Agents MM J. t Mid A AI..I Sty %  End Jul l'"0 A-ICUM End ftarpf ld Arrival Brld..tawa. BWtadai 7 July Mid August Mid Sept Mid Oetah-r PLANTATIONS LIMITED — Phone 4703 aaa.e, M MM , | CAKE SALE -NEWSAM'S STORE Lower Rro.d Slrart on ] i nl... July 4lll, I0.N a.m. in aid of BETHEL MISSIONARY FUND IM I UMMMIH *. IP-DATS .NEWS FLASH Clearing out our new stock ul shot gun cjrtridgea;— 12 UUAGE ELEY—>11, Per IN NET TARH Bif eloclBK oat rednoUana MII nil HARDWARE ITEMS. JOHNKOM'R STATIONERY •ltd HARDWARE University lollpgf of Ik Wes( indifN EXTRA-MURAL DEPARTMENT RESIDENTIAL HUMMER SCHOOL at CODRINOTON COLLEGE JULY t5lh — AUGUST lat, 1952 DRAMA AND DRAMATIC TECHNIQUE (Prof.or A. K. Crsaton and Ptherai Fae: $t0M Apply to the I!i • iuYnl Tator. Scout Hra dqBa r tera. Becklea Road. (Tel. 448S). who wtTi five further BdJtesalare 1.7.82—In. TBA am Bab. n It M IV M-p my a)faVt,v* daofaw %  *. Oady tie Set G. \ i At CO Ltd Dial na. M I H 11 .iift> IN til. \ CAR FOR HIRF .'laa-i !t\l!BAD0S Mil \IH I It'll %  J Thmukh i will 1 Uio Ba.l1 Rooca <>n Wodrvn• .i;. 1 ;it 8.S0 pvm. TI..progranimf Include*. RrRrart Newa: A mintcau fRm MlllUry %  letinln Rirquelv; ntid l.nclish Garileiw In Colour. Mcmtiera aro cortluilly No Admi*lim I 29.8.52—31!. SAVE LABOUR MONEY TIME MASSEY-HARRIS ATLAS LOADER the latest develop11 hydraulic operation and perfect balance atiure the rinerator of aimple The Supcr-Sn Atlaa front end loade menu to DIHKC farming aaaii it one of t produ< i'f control and instant response . makea conrinuoua loading pleaaure Inntead of a back-breaking chore. Attaining and deUi-htng opeiutions take but a few minutaa making the tractor raadily available lor other work. Five attachment* are available with 'i yard capacity; they easily lift 1000 lira, to 0^-h>et in 0 secondi.. MaJdanua capacity is 2000 Ike. See tho Shper-bit Atl.iaoool (l KTi:SV IBTARAC-E ItOHl HI TUOM inilllll DIAL 4616 Of special interest to JOWERS £ CARiN'ET MAKERS We have an Assortment of Mraaaw CLA AMD CHROMH'M 1'LATKD FTTTINGS rOR ) \ME TIfF CE1VTRAL I.MPUHIl M Corner Broad and Tudor Streeta DRA WING FOR THE FORESTERS' SCHOLARSHIP RAFFLE By Mr. Lewi*. Sain ciry B'd... Turf Club lakes plarr on SATl /.'DAY. JULY "l II DANCE SHOT TAFFETA* Charming Shadaa M Mill! NYLONS SI Gaajra $112 and 11.39 CALICO 36 in. wide 59 cents BRAI8IERB8 Bin aaaortmant from OX., France and USA. •Oc and S4c. 70JIETTE AU Shadst QnaUtiea and Wldtha 67o. and B9c. BAGS A vast variety aa attractive in Quality as in Frtcea. JER3EY Plain and Striped 48 in. wide. 99 oenU WHITE SHARKSKIN So In. aids Beit in Town 11.39 and $1 98 AT IHE DRILL HALL 1 II .! pormiHsiun uf ( Band Danrf Orehpvlm la*t Mkhelin Ihc Police will supply the Music aV*JslUa ky Tickel: SUBSCRIPTION $1.00 Kaffle Tickets are still n\nilable al Singer Machine Co.. Co-operatlve Banl. and A. E. Taylor Ltd. | .WW/'/.W/'A'. Doeao. -/^>-> II tATTN 36 in. wide Soft Quality 82 cents CREPES In 10 Varieties and Shades 72e.. 88s. and 1113 BnAMILINrW 11.08 SAYON PONJEE 89 centi LADIES' WHIST WATCHEB 87 80 WHITE 0ROANDY Bnperlor Quality 89 osnls UHILDBEN'S PANTIES 37c ap SPUN SILK 36 in. wide 69c. and T9o. VESTS AU Sixes and Colour! 60c aid Its. ~ CLOTH UMBRBLLaT HANDKERCHIEFS A very wide variety Cotton A Linen Ladlae and Olrls 13c, 18c, and JOc BROCADE BILK"~ Sfi in. ... !o 66 cents. PRINTED SPTJNS 36 in wide 72c. 94c. 96.. and 81 08 8ILK BHArTTUNO ~~ Smsrl Coloetn 38 in. wide 1102 CHILDREN P.OYBFANCV SHTBTB Asiorted Colours 8 f or 83.00 BOYS 7 rOLLOVERS 7Bc np BOYS' VESTS 37e. each CHILDRFVSl RUBBER SANDALS Sac ep atr OriUJB^^TEAWHATB 42 cent, up CHILDREN'S SHOES 10 per cent, off TOYS TOYS I I A loadfnl of them ml Reduced Prices TRAVEL BAOB 811.38 .



PAGE 1

rxi.i II ti:ilAI>-< AKVttCATK TUESDAY. JULY 1, 152 Mip^ J A..ApfcrE by Uw A4IMIU C* I 14 ICM4 ft*.. MMMm July 1. 1952 LETTER Ml IK Vi AHKITIX. THE Annual General Meeting of the Milk M; i ui London on June 13th, produced information about r:iilk which will interest milk producers in Barbados. The Chairman, Mr. Thomas Peacock, noted that because of the rapid :.nlk production during li51 together with a serious underrecoupment in prices the dairy herd was reduced by three pet cent. In 1952 the price of milk was raised to a sixpence a pint and a further price increase of 4d. a gallon is contemplated. In addition to increasing the price of milk the Government of the United Kingdom Is taking steps to provide a greater Incentive for dairy farmers to maintain their yield-, of milk. These steps include proposal;, lor a fertiliser subsidy, ploughing-up grants and most important of all the %  tebUlMlion of the price of purchased feeding stuffs. "These and other benefits" comments Mr. Peacock "will be of great assistance to the producer who strives for maximum production, especially the small man who plays such an important part in the milk industry and who of necessity must purj chase the bulk of the feeding stuffs con\ Mimed by hit. cattle." Mr. Peacock commended the Minister of Agriculture for making it clear that the development of milk and the rearing of cattle for beef should go hand in hand. There are .numbers of small milk producers, he says, who rear some cattle but for whom the regular monthly milk cheque is essential. These men cannot run their small farm:; on the basis of stockrearm, 1 alono -iwl there in every reason why they should couple milk selling with stock rearing and expand the output of both. "This" iyi Mi. Peacock "is the proper approach to a better economy for some thousands of these small holdings on which so much progress has been made in recent years. I repeat that in our view the growth of the milk and beef industries are complementary and this should be the basis of Government policy." Officials of the Agricultural Department of Barbados and private dairy keepcis will bo pleased to note that their own observations are supported by these statements of the chairman of the Milk Marketing Board of England. Al the same time everyone will note that without %  Milk Marketing Board the encouragement to produce milk or beef is small. The high cost of establishing a central milk depot: the unstable price of animal feed: the absence of government I lo the dairy farmer or livestock pr dlicer: all militate against any improveI Ul the production of milk and btef 1< cully. The Government of Barbados might profitably study the statements of Die Chairman of the English Marketing Board. Particular attention ought to be paid to the sentence in which it is stated "the Board cannot take the lead in an expansionist policy without being set incontrof of the marketing side". In Barbados at present there is an unhealthy climate of opinion backed by a large number of socalled operators of "private enterprise" that only the Government can run anything. As a result all schemes requiring cooperation on the part of primary producers are regarded as "risks" which only the Government can afford to take. The Bj ivate dairy keepers and producers of livestock ought to organise and form an active union which will negotiate with the Government, not wait for the Government to spoonfeed them with the kind of conat -ions that the National Farmers' Union of England are always active to obtain for their memhi'i ; r.i.MEii HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor of Barbados Sir Alfred Savage has supported an appeal which has been circulated to a limited number of people living in Barbados. The appeal is addressed to people all over the British Kmpire and funds are requested in aid of the British Empire Cancer Campaign. The hat tie against cancer is still to be won. Words are unnecessary to stamp the horror f this dread disease. There must be many hundreds of people living in Barbados to whom the letters signed by Sir Alfred have not been addressed, but who would* be only too eager to send a contnbutiuti to the "British Empire Cancer Campaign Appeal." Contributions ought to be mailed direct to The British Kmpire Cancer Campalirn Appeal %  he Governor of Barbados Sir Alfred Savage K.C.M.G C/o The British Empire Cancer Campaign. 11 Grosvenor Crescent, Hyde I'aik Cormi London, S.W.I.. England. |r Alfred notes at the end of his letter "voiir contribution will not only be of tremendous encourai irking for this c*use. but in-iced for all you know, may constitute the deciding ractor towards achieving outstanding success. TheCampaign is wholly dependent upon public support. It has always been a debate among students ol whether personalities oV events or whether evenu dominate personalities. Had Napoleon been born fifteen year earlier he miKht never have been more than a professional French soldier who retired l 1 his naUve Cor: KM and bored hit relatives with sturle* of Paris or fought battles with toy soldier... lf it had not been for the second World War Wm.t.,., Churchill would have been regarded a< no more than a brilliant frustrated politician and historian whose genius was discounted by his lack tf judgement. Hid opponent, Adolpa Hitler, would have been just another agitator if the Kaiser hud not led his country to defeat in 1914-18 and prepared for the coming of Germany's man of evil destiny. Perhaps there is no answer to the problem that I have po^ed. Events throw up leaders, and then the leaders dominate events. Great men and great villains are lucky if they are born in the right period. ruined All this is a preamable to a warming prospect that is unfolding before our eyes. If the American people are not frustrated by the party machine they will elect Mr. Eisenhower next November as President of the United Stales If the British Conservative Parly fight J another general election within the next two or three years it to practically certain that Anthony Eden will lead it into buttle. I do not believe that Mr. Churchill has any intention of retiring now. Tor one thing his ( %  overnnieiit ..•< under heavy bombardment and he was never a man lo leave the bnttleilel i while the guns were In full blast Nor is there any sign of physical or mental deterioration which would make him seek the sanctuary of private life. Despite mistakes of certain of his ministers he dominates the House of Commons with a brilliancy of mind that irradiates every sub* leel It lights upon. Yet he has bis position In history lo consider and no man in Mil 7Bth year ran claim that the end of the story is still beyond the ranges Five times in his stormy career Winston Churchill was defeated by the constituents whom he wanted to represent. He wns not elected to power as Prime Minister In 1940 but mertty succeeded Mr. Chamberlain. The first time he went to the country as head of a government was In 1945 when the Briiish electorate threw him out with a huge adverse majority. Again he was defeated In 1950 nnd only won by a tiny plurality in 1951. Five electoral defeats arc almost unequalled In any other political success story. If he were to go lo the country next year and If he once more met defeat the ultimate historian would have a strange story lo record. I do not think that Churchill will gamble with the fate* again. There are gossip* who say that the Tory Party will force Churchill to resign. The Tories tlo some foolish things but are not completely mad. If we tnld Churchill lo go—and we have the mtht to do so—we would be ieered at and condemned even by the people who always voted ugatnit him. and history would %  ...! m la tatteii So we come back to Anthony Fdcn, that handsome, greying, t erfcetly tailored Crown Prince o| the Con.scrvallvt Party. 1-ei ii not he imagined that he ii without critics. Many of the younger Conservatives )>clieve that his political experience has. been so grooved that he would be at a loss to deal with the domestic problems that confront ;i (lov.-rnment. In w.ir and in peace he has moved In the Chancellories of the world,—the diplomat, the Foreign Minister, the dreamer gazing at the globe on a swivel. What dues he know of Lancashire's cotton, or Sheffield's iteai Of the Durham mines* What does he know even of agriculture except what he sees lit iPrirrlr* Kuxli>r < windows of his country house? i The caae against him does not tml Baste W li % %  • %  -i growing: body of that our fate rests with AM iintish Caataa Einphe. To Ihc new Imperialist the Sterling li. instrument that can save us from the thraldom of I I OssllsU 11 h all very well lor Man to speak French. German and 1'ersliui bul can he talk to Cai.ada. Au-st:aliu. and New Zealand? Strangely enough ihere is also %  canipclfn • f ait Ulon going on In America again n Kisenhower. No one doubts hi* Integrity but since when was West I*oint the nursery of political genius? A general orders ar.d his soldiers obey. A president miur carry the people with I im by logic, permasion. exhortation and even admonition. When the wind blows hard again't him the politician must bend like a reed and wait for the fury of the gale to iWtf. A tier my talk with General UaoArUtur In New York last January I wns convinced thai at a given moment Mac Arthur would campaign against the adoption of EL*:iho*cr on Iho grounds that Americans did not want to be changed into a milltary Stale by having a general In the White House. That prophecy has proved tiue MacArthur is the opan i Bag al the man who once ""ved on his staff, Al the t.ine that I MacArthui I Leie.ed thai Senator Tofi would secure the RaposVicaa nomination and that l;e would be d fe.iied by Mr. Tmrii n Sn <.% %  t e o e f my two ho. so drop.x'd out and I n.ust rovl c my estimates. Now 1 bela*** tha-. li Mr Tart becomes the official R publican choice he w.ll l-e deferred by the Democrut nominewhoever it la. On the y candidate that the Democrats eun produce. So we come h.iek to OUT first proposition—that if Anthony Eden and Dwigh; Eisenhower go to the polls as the official choice of tho Conservative Party and the Republican Party both will be returned lo power. If this does come abOU 1 too equally certain that for the first time In yean world peace and world cooperation will piiss from the realm of in clear light of the achievable. One of the bask reaaons for the defeat of Kith-, Germany wag the mtini.ite and sympathetic understanding between Churchill and Roosevelt. It was not to be expected r-ot Truman and Chuicbill could achieve a ;;imilnr unity of mind and temperament But if Anthony and Political leaders of their two nation. 1 ; we might well sec a unison of purpose that would achieve miracles. li >tb were fighting soldiers, and if the young Eden rose no higher than a brigade major at 21, with the M.C., he was made Secretary of War by Churchill When the old wan lor tk command of the stricken field In 1910. unly the archives OOUM show how often in the perilous day that Trowel tlie collapse of France Ed -H'S advice was bold, cona'.ructive and -hrewd. He Lacked Wavcll in the desert when C retail! wanted to rec ill him, and Wavell gave the British the.r first viiloiy. Wn;il is more Eden urged that we should reinforce Wavell with ar.namcnu although we desperately needed everything for the invasion that .teemed about to burst upon us, Nol even tho most adept syncophant could pretend thai Eden's mind has the brilliance of Churchill's. A mordant wit once said of Eden thut he was the greatest silent film Foreign Secretary In history but was hsa the talkies can.* I >pcBl is more lo than to the ear yet ha remains tremendous oi-w a* a speaker. He can fill any hall in Britain or any sports ground no matter how vast. like Eisenhower he gives the impression of dtcency. Thai may seem a tame tribute but through the centuftes Shakeapeare'B words: "like a aeurvy politician.'* remains the normal attitude of peopU tov.-i.rds those Who are elected to govet:. them. But who would say that Anthony or Ike i'. a scurvy fellow? The tragedy of America 1* that ahe permitted two world want by clinging lo the policy of Isolation when the world had become physically and politically meaningless. The glory of H that when the H tl f I war was over she took ahe bur. den of leadership upon het shoulders and kept hop-? alive I when death and disaster sulked across Europe, president Truman has never received the | tribute he deservs for his cour| age and his vision. No Amercan President has ever taken I such momentous decisions of | *uch profound signifi •mankind. %  Who can doubt that if Eisenhower is elected President his personality will have a profound effect on people every land? They aay ho i Inexperienced as a politician but la that true? Any man who could keep Alexander. Montgdmery. Bradley and p.iium lighting the enemy und not each olher Is either a man of great character or is as adroat an Machlavelll. i.l %  %  : |.l. '. .. of Europe was magnificently done. He has a courageous mind and a simplicity of Himay not command lungiinge like Lincoln nor mesmerise the people as Roosevelt did but plain speech can attain hckghts at well as oratory. The Americans are basically humanitarian, generous and seal Eisenhower would give expression to all this. Simultaneously (looking ahead) Anthony Eden would be meeting the onslaughts of the Opposition in Parliament with good humour, wilh clarity and an occasional flash of anger— !< too. was bold, bloody and resoluh* and he made his dream of \ II tci v eome> true. In the process Hitler and his kingdom of horror went down in flames. It may he thnt in the saga of tho English shall see tw mind enrl spirit lhat they shall act at one. It does not mean that Mrg t ton they could not also move towards a common objective but the clcmeci o| himpatlM would not bet] At any rate we are fortunate in fruit puMir life with nil Its sacrifice and ingratitude still attracts men of such calibre as Ei&cnhowex mil Bdan. It Is therefore true that character Is destiny ana ih.it In the end it is incu who dominate events. Thus we have resolved Ihe problem which we posed at the beginning of this Letter. THE GOOD TIMES GO ON —EVERYONE IS HAPPY Bv NFVVF.U. ROT.ERS NEW YORK. There is a boom in courage in Wall-street tonight. And in business offices and the offices uf Government economists. After examining new statistics and getting reports from market places, they are saying:— Recession? Slump? Nonsense' Employment climbs to a record 61,176,000 job-holders. Building reaches a new high level for May. The armed forces are on a shopping spree. They are pushing out a flood of new orders •nd will spend £15,000 million. • • • But the Federal Reserve Bank predicts that consumer goods prices will not change much in the near future. The price con! trollers allowed grocers to put up food prices this week. Many did not do it. They knew I they would l>e boycotted by housewives. I Says a W.-ill-slreet man: "Some pessimists think the cuntrys going to the poor house. | If so, the people are riding there in new cars 1 with full stomachs and a jackpot of cash." FOOTNOTE: If Wall-street is right, and this prosperity continues, it could work against the election of a Republican Presi|denl, whether Eisenhower or Taft Americans have a tradition of not turning a parly f office if they are prosperous. PHOTOGRAPHS Copies of Local Photographs Which have appeared in the j\dt-wci ft**? Xt'uvspupi'r Can be ordered from the . ADVOCATE STATIONERY FIBRE MATS: Plain. Stencilled and Decorated. These are available in four sizes. CONG0LEUM SQUARES 3x3 yds. & 3 x Vk >osCONGOLEUM: Six feet wide and cut to any desired size. PA. 4472 O. S. PITCHER & CO. Our ItVatlcrs Say: sfsMtsJ /.im,/ AM Labour To llir Fdiror. The Advocate— SIR.—I saw quite recently— in the press -a statement that there is quite a lot of Idle land. In small plols. within the extended boundaries of Bridgttown City, followed by an expression of regret that it is not cultivated and made to contribute Us quota of food for the many hungry people around, and lor the large .i.lditienal company who cannot afford to pay the high prices demanded at present for the various kinds of vegetables. Tha statement brought back to my memory the circumstances that In the early, busy, days of the O.A. Pensions Committee in St. Michael the Enquiry Ofncer MimeUmes reported. In answer to our questions concerning the circumstances of applicants for the pension, that there was a spot of land attached to the applicant's house—either owned or rented— which was not being used to advantage, perhaps bscause the old oerson was not able to cultivate i: And I wmeinber too that I one day approached Mr. Guy IVrrin. then L~il>our Commissioner with the suRgesUon that Government should provide a small credit by means of which the idle land and unemployed could be utilised together for the general benefit. Alas! however. Mr. Pcrrin wanted me to furnish details luiKHTiiina such spots of land. their number and extent. Ihc cost of the necessary labour and equipment, etc—red tape ODca more which of course I was not able to do. So my well-meant plan—as I thought—fell through. One would hove thought it would be a simple i' •nint to place at the Commissioner's disposal a suitable small credit to be spent at his tl for such a practical purpose, subject of course to Droper receipts and explanation* for the Audit Office. Now In harmony wilh the statement with which I commenced this'letter I have Ihe pleasure to add that on a very recent occasion I was accosted in Bridgetown by a middle-aged unemployed man—though not on agricultural worker—for something to buy a meal, who actual! p fined mp old idea thai Gnfcrninent should put him and other ot>(-o/-u'orfcs to culfii'Olc idU empty land atid increase our scantp supply o] plain foodstuf/s. and so enable them to earn modest supin.rt Instead uf begging or stealing In this caie it would mean the Government acquiring a couple or acres of idle land, in one or more plots, and arranging to % %  end thither city idlers (under the direction of some competent Overseer or Driver) ind thus tiding to good purpose the "Waste labour". (If any idler refused to go and work in this waywell, the alternative Is obvious). Finally, In order to give weight and force to the idea, I offer a rather striking quotation from Norman Angefls famous book. The Grcai illusion, which I feel somewhat ashamed to say I have Just seen for the first time—from our Public Library —a quotation taken in its turn from an address by the Prince uf Wales in 1133: — "If all the employable labour "were employed for a reasonable "number of hours per week the "world would have at Its dls"Dosal a volume of commodities "and services that would enable %  th< cnlire population to live on "a higher level of comfort and "well-being than has ever been "contemplated in the rosiest visions of the Social Heformer". By the way. Is that the ll.lt It who wai later for a few months King Edward VIM" He might have been speaking at one of the modern Conferences for asslstancO to H'c under -developed portions of Ihe hungry world. Youra t'-uiv. r. GODSON. June 26. '52. HEDY LAMARR is to make 36 half-hour TV colour-films. Each will portray a great love story. Napoleon and Josephine for example. ELEVEN Left-wingers are Britain's isolationists, says columnist David i*awrence on a trip to Britain. He says he has talked with men who are intellectually arrogant, use the s^me phrases as America's Right-wing isolationists, and patronise "ignorant Americans." ATOMIC scientists at Oak Ridge are offering schoolboys a shilling a hundred for flreIlies. Just want to know what makes them glow. NO PANIC yet over steel supplies, or higher prices, because 650,000 steelworkers strike. Detroit's car makers and other steel %  n calm. They have built up reserves. Another surprise-Washington officials artjitill talking of taking controls off steel if the Strike lasts less than a fortnight. Today rticna^cment and men met in their first attempt to settle it. FREE enterprise provides striking steel mill pickets with TV in Warren, Ohio. An enterprising dealer installed sets in the pickets' shanties at the gates of tho mill. Said be dealer : "They're our customers. It will be good for business later. NEW initials TVU stand for T.V. University. Some of America's biggest and best universities are teaching at home over TV. Twenty more are planning to jump in with tele-courses. AMERICANS are marrying younger than ever—girls at ?0. men at 22. Why? Fear oi loneliness, says one experienced man. And he says they stay together for the same reeaon even when they fight and make each ipsaking peoples we ; 0 fa„ miserable. Experienced man is band-leader Artie |S Shaw, six times in and out of marriages. jj Is he lonely? Well, in his new book, "The J Trouble with Cinderella," he says: "I firmly believe marriage can work—even for me". None of his cx-wives is Cinderella. To Artie. who is as solemn about life as a more famous Shaw, Cinderella means wanting the wrong things from life, not living with a purpose. REX HARRISON and Lilli Palmer have £ become loyal subjects of Broadway, not the ;< West End. Before sailing for Italy they ad^ mitted their visit to England, after a month ^ of sunbathing in Portoflno, will be just for | a fortnight to see friends. Then back to|S Broadway for more play-acting. They are|S reading eight play scripts in Italy—only one> British, by Norman Ginsbury. called "The J I Jmit". PROUDLY the Licensed Beverage .industries Inc. announces that Americans drink less liquor now than at any time in the last 100 years. Why knock their own business? Temperance and respectability keep prohibition away. NO such thing as on average American? Shucks, man, Henry Ford's engineers have made him. True he is a plastic dummy in 18 pieces. But exactly average—5 ft. 9 ins. tall, list. 10*4 lb. in weight. They use him in de signing and testing care seats, arm rests, leg and head room. A COMPLETE RANGE OF THESE FINE RECEIVERS 5-TUBE TABLE MODEL RADIO >• 6-TI BE TABLE MODEL RADIO %  ••• 5-Tt'BE TABLE MODEL RADIOGRAM 3.5.00 %  .TOTI FLOOR MODEL RADIOGRAM SW.H 6-TUBE FLOOR MODEL RADIOGRAM (wRh Automatic Three Speed OiansenO .. 5 D W m era UKMONSTRATE ONE OF THE ABOVE SETS AND JOIN THE HUNDREDS OF SATISFIED OWNERS. &f III C OS I \ & CO., LTD. Thv ChiUI. Tvuvhvr, Pannt SIR.—Your leading article Ihis morninji on the subject of the University College Extra-Mural Course on "The Child, tho Parent, and the Teacher" la greatly appreciated. There is no question of any r* Mint, any members of the iKiblie from attending this course; nil ExtraMural activities hive always boon open to the entire communlly. Hut we liivc called thLi i-ourse a Study Onrup. and have sent out special Invitations lo responsible and I'-telligent members of ihe pu'Jic — teachers. officers SmutmV Meanwhile i *brn itiii I to hear at **'•* *-om all %  f %  i ubKc who wish fours \ rv nub-. SMITH. Resident Tulor, Univ. Coll. of w.I Boy Scout H.Q_ Bnvkles Road. %  Tel: 4855. Canvas ic Raffia Beach Sandals in many colours and combinations of colours. Our new Rubber Bathing; Shoes for Mummy and Family have arrived in a variety of styles. Colours are White, Blue and Red. Da Cosla & Co., ltd. ^i$ BAGPIPES JAMS Mixed Fralt Sir J wherry Jam Raspberry Jam Msrmalade A prtoet Jam S. A. Mtnulw S. A. Pineapple Jam S. A. Aprleet ajsj S3.H 42 M IS. IS I2.SI IZ.SS IS.K ROME. June 17. Professor Ugo Gualazzini, director of tho Cremona library, claims he has discovered that the bagpipes were imported into Scotland 500 years ago from Cremona, hometown of the world-famous Stradivarius violins. "A few months ago." said the Professor. "1 received a letter from a Mr. Thomas Pewstoti, of Glasgow, who wanted to linti out about a Bruni family who, according to a Glasgow tradition, had brought the bagpipes to Scotland. -Th letter added that as the Brunis hadj j changed iheir name to McKrimona, hr % thought they might have come from j Cremona. | e "The whole thing was news to me, andi J sounded rather strange. But after long re| searches in our archieves. we were able to I $ ____ •%. %  -# ascertain, not only that bagpipe band existed! | 1^000 A I? llN cno In Cremona 500 years ago, but also that a UV/UUAI\UJ certain Baxianus del Bruno had moved from| Cremona to Glasgow an 1515".—E.N.S. VAV^'AleMi^VAVeV-V^^^ >eeeeee ee eeaaaeaaaaaaeeeeeeeeeaa4' Jolly Good!! JAMS WITH J & R ENRICHED BREAD "ALL TIIK TIME IS GOLD BRAID TIME" Keep B BotUe of COLD m: \in RIM (S yrs. Old) On Hsnd Only 11.44 per Bottle VISIT OUR SWEET COUNTER FOR Black Msale Chocolates I: i ir> Kucar Punter's Nate t'srr's Sweet BUculU Can's Cheese Biscuits Carr's Crsehers Churchman's Clraretles i;mbaw.y Ciiareftes MEAT DEPT. Car* Liver Dressed RjbulL. Milk Prd Chickens Milk Fed Duck* Fresh VeeetaWes FINEST GROCERY SERVICE



PAGE 1

' 'N JULY I. If..' rJXKBADOS ADVOCATE PAOI. FIVE Local Cycling Team Prepare For Martinique D GRANT, cf Holborn Boys' is expected to make the trip to Martinique at the expense of his Club. His team mate (George Hill) was among The team selected bv the A.A.A.B The local Committee will meet tonight and the team will be briefed on the rules which will apply in the 150 kilometre road race which will be ridden in Martinique on the I4th Instant. During the work-end. Mr. I* A. I,„.~_ J E? a • Lynch completed hu translation lUHVICU Kilt TICS f the copy of the rule* which was -_written m French, and copies have ror hxtumiiutioiiH !" ".' m,d *, ;L 0 rdfr 3? r* h member of ihe learn will have During the month* of June and ,he fV to SUid Z ta fuJ drta "July the DepartDMnl of Education !* ,ow k "*" ,h the tace supervises the arrangements for w be ln nl rondt F T ttnc *', and many examinations of Overseas wl continue through Morne Bodies, cspcciallv those of the R*>U8 e St. Pierre. Port St Dents, Universities of London and tie h ck through Fort de France Oxford and Cambridge Board ac(abound the town) Deux Choux, cording to a communique from Port St. Denis and back lo Fort the department: de France by the return route. This year there ha* been a reThe race Is open to amateuri cord entry of candidstes for many or dependent-, only holding liof the regular examinations Hero cences either from the French If a summary: Federaiion of Cycling, the ItiTomaLondon B.A. Honours: 2 cantional Union of Cycling or the Indtdaics. tcrnational Federation of Cvcling B.A. General:— candidates. %  %  %  * -• Inter B.Sc.-I candidate. ^>re"tS by. t^m of ftve cornLondon Dinloma: Theology:— P*'^^ substitute and a man3 candidates. -*-'*> g eri wv n men in all. A cup will Inter Divinity:—3 candidates. * w arded to the team whose Master of Theology—1 candinve competitors take the foredate, most places at the winning pole, London 1st Medical.—1 candiclassification being; by points. date. Each competitor is required lo LL.B., Part 1.—l candidate. pass a medical teat the day beLondon General Certificate of fore the race, and everyone taking Education:— Ordinary Level:— part in the race must be decently 67 candidates; Advanced Level — dressed, and competitors must JwriS"L 0j *.. --i observe the greatest caution and .irSS ir?^." Ceiw must aaaume resaximibilUy for London Chamber of Commorre !" '"£ %  ** adherence to —EJemcntirv Stage—83 candith l rule y hWn dates: Certificate Stage—102 canCompetitors are advised to obdidates wve he strictest discipline and Chartered Institute of Secrelo %  how ,he irreateSl reapect for laries: — 1 candidate. officials. Brakes must be fitted lo Society of Commercial Accountboth wheels so a* lo avoid any ants* —I candidate, accident which may prove fatal. Each team will be allowed a team volmle on which will ride the team manager and a suostind refreshment points have xed along the course. SPEEDING FINE REDUCED Their Honours of the Assistant the Secretary's Report and the Court of Appeal. Mr. J. W. Ii. Audited BUtamatlt of Account*. Chenery ?nd Mr. H. A. Vaughan. The Sccrciary'ii Report shows, yes'.orday reduced by half a £6 that at the end of the la*t linennnp His Worship Mr. G. B Gnfcial year, memberfhlp of the Club fltn Imposed on Calvin Cox o( stood at 582. The finances of the A*htn Hall, St. Peter, for ex40/For Unlawful Possession %  *hiu Mr. H. A FabM igtatrate of Dial \ yesterday nned Dentil Fordo of 1. to be paid in U d one %  .nil, | nun. iN.tmnoiH Bag BBS unlawful possession of brass which he was can -1 Passage Road. St. Michael on June 2fl P i I lafata Umn who brou ht the cat* said it was about 5.15 p.m. when he saw the defendant with tha le-d %  was carrying in his hand i Hi I tad On dMnndant h w he had % % %  : the bra and lead and the defendant was unable to give him a proper fendant and took him to the Cc-iKigatlotl Department. Sgt, Allcyiie prosecuted for the Police from information received, 23/lor Causing Dislocation A decision of His Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith was yesterday reversed when Their Honours of Ihe Assistant Court or Appeal ordered Randolph Glen of Road to pay 25/in seven da\* or in doiuult, one month's imprisonment. His Worship had dismissed this case in which Glen threw Joseph Marshall of AlkinV* Gap. E.igU" Hall, to the ground and dislocated his right shoulder. Marshall told the Court that he had been at Passage Ri>ad when he saw Glcti push a woman between some stones. He went toward* Olen and told him not lo bring himself. In trouble; GUn chucked him three timei tml threw him lo the ground The fall caused the dislocation. House FU^e Put Out A one roofed boarded and Cingled bom*. 16 ft. by 6 feat by 10 feet at Dalgbton Read. It Michael, caught are ysstarday sboat 3 30 p.m. and was quickly put out by tha Wtn Brigade. The faousa la thr property of St. Qarsld Wallace of RockUy. Carlrt Chnrcb. and was occupied by Thmsa MO-M. A part of tha roof and a partition were burnt. SUMMER SCHOOL THE University College of the West Indies Summer School will be held this year at Codrington College by permission uf the Principal and Governing Board, fr m July 25th to August 1st The subject this year will be "Drama and Dramatic Technique". i A. K. Croston. who -— — %  %  H UMM Pltmi lit i)ifiVrt.-ut Classes In out report on the results i holds the Chair uf Ens'. I i College in Jatnaicu. will ba in residence during th • •atk, Uasattaar srMi the Reside.i. fessor Croston will le, ture on Modem finalish Verse iu^WTS'JT~IWTT£ T. S. r %  Agunistes" — ,i "ihr CoektaU \\w.w >i "Ai lumsti Hun mi up Idr Huns OH iioitd A imwtor ear G III owned and i r. Simpson ol fiuperla... oil UM road arsilla along New bury Hoad. 4MiP*0rae. en Suturoa.v mgnt laaOprooeeduig in the of StJudes. Tne .. fl skM of the car which nruck an embankmeut Doauaad. There wcic no to the occupants. Members uf the Lodge School Scout Troop artnl QB %  weck-eni camp at Codrington CoUi Friday. June 27 to Sunday and spent an enjoyable camping period, one of the boys repotted this mcrnuig. MtV-ing. our f;neudad CotTtupondent stated Uiat "OfcUra % %  A rnl if t.t' and uie feature race today when shi rr Fry", "Venus Obbeat "A" Oasa horses easily ovat ser\-eit". Mr. Aubrey Doug asthe distance Ol six furlongs", anc Smith will eonlnhu'f Shakespeare's middle riod Dnasilk Techniqio.i UM pr. eues] atda mati'Techokiua inclu tJbJects as Make-up. Costume, SUge Dcv.r and the Aj | went on to add. "she was conviiH'ing. KMI.II^ Bright Light and tha All who ran uuic which was won L" OsUra, the Queen's park Stakes %  i.tsiild "A" anc D'. Both BrigJit Light and Castle -the-Air are clssslBed "C". an. yue*n'< Colle^r. and Mr. D. S. •TIUTLE DOVE" BRINGS LUMBER ;r Sunltsttt. 14 totu. Officers Wilt Be Elected At Police Sports Club Meet The Annual General Meeting oi •**• xed >ng >he course, the Barbados Police Sports Club takes place on Saturday this week. The meetiru; will among other things, elect oncers to the ensuing year, and conaidei Club show an increa $7,000 over the 1950—51 0. of ovei MOBILE CINEMA SHOW CANCELLED Owing to unforeseen circumalong stances the sh,>w which was le Cox haye been given tonight by the reporiad by CC, jieymour Lash.. the speed limit while driving the motor van (M 23521 on Cheapeide on November 27 %  st in ii Cux had pleaded guilty to the offence, but appealed against tin sum Imposed. The speed limit that port of Cheapslde ellinp when he Mo lie Cinema al chance Hall, tay la St. Lucy, has been cancelled 15 miles ah" hour, bul he iriving al SI M miles an hour. 20/For Assault And Heating Alexander Stiaker of Bank Mill. St. Michael, was yesterday ordered to pay 20/by the Assistant Court of Appeal Judges. Mr. J. W. B. Chenery and Mr. H. A. Vauehnn for assaulting and beating] Mabel O'Neal. In making this order. Their Honours varied Ihe decision of His Worship Mr. A. W. Harper who had lined him 10/-. O'Neale had appealed against ihe tine His Worship Imposed. The oflence was committed on April 24 wh/>n O'Neale and Slraker were digging potatoes from a field at CJuinn Plantation. Each of them had bought hilf of the s.ime row of potatoes and when a dispute arose over some of thr potatoes. Sirnker cuffed her In her left eye. C.C.. champions of Central Division 1950 and 1951. gut off to a good start In their first tixture vs. Danes C.C. and won with n day to spare. Human'* had no opposition at all ftl by an Innings. Cambridge C.C. of St. Joseph is at present lead In* H.ullngh's C.C. on llrst Innings in their Sunday Competition Fixture which begun at PooJe on June 29. but good bowling by E. W. Cave and J. Higgtson In Cambridge's second innings has so far accounted for live wtckett and the total 22 runs, bringing the lead for Cambridge to Just over thirty. ChimbeeaM's Road. ST. Joseph, which was rendered impassable for many months, is again passable and open to traffic. One pleasing feature is that the 'buses on Route 5 are again ab •* to lake passengers to the end of the Route, at Blackman's Corner. Repairs on this road were concentrated on damages caused by rains in 1950 and again last yenr. Miplri VC the only club of St. Joseph entering a team In |hj 1952 B.C.L. romm-mlon, kept their reputation by starting the season as is their custom with I defeat. Norwick beat them by 34 runs. Eustace Smill wllh four wicket for Vvo runs (second inningsl was the best Maple pUyi r He also played two not r nings. No | i pet on stUMi thter sre al nrewnt in finl 'Upplv nrti nre srld at 25 rent* Towlftj. A feature of Ihe Summw School will b rreatni '***• IMoa il'Urtratlng the progress uf a play from the first stages. M-. C. A. Grnssmilh, t'.M.O v. II The, Schi first present th. ,arl< h ]i at rived in Carlisle Ba> rehearsal. Mrs Oolda Wbttt | an mug from St. Lucth Mr. A. F. C. Matthewwil; re. brought in 468 bags of copra. 4: hearse grnup> at a later slae*. bags of charcoal. 31 drums of and Mr. F. A. Collymore an,' th<^ coeoaxUai oil, and flve package* Ttirb>do< plav.;,i]| ..: .,.of fisli fruil The 30-ton-achooner the finished product by aatoVlv Ros.'lie oaoM In \iterday from presenting a play at CodrinKton Si. Lucia with 433 bags of copra. College Car Strikes Pole bags of charcoal and five bunches of freah fruit. Ii,-. I I ret "f lumtx-: %  ,,..,. won brought to tho Island by the yealerSchooner Turtle* Dove which al* (M2089) called here yearlerday momlni Shortly after I0.U day the motor aji owned by Mr. E. Fields of Roefrom Trinidad Mick Streeand driven bv Fits All these schooners are conAUayna Vteich of Lleorlsh Vd, Rr .ed to the Schooner Owners l-Ue. St. Michael, ran off Fountain A.-laUon Michael, and struck a A x "" n telephone pole. No one was injured but the fron: part uf tho motor eir was dnmaged. C^/V/VfD MEATS silting Swanty-flve tons of mmte are to be Imported into the Inland between August and December, according to a notice Issued by the Office of tho Controller of Supplies. Licences for this commodity will be issued against wholesalers' signed eonntmation -.otes up to their maximum distribution quotas. Applications for Bf in respect of tida Item cose to-day, and Importers have Ien requested to submit the ntlrmntlon notes showing? lite quantities of each item of tinned meat, the C.I.F. price and • e net wi'hthl per ease, and the %  urea of supply j>or pound. l*otr men and boy* >iit be ssan itigtitly catchiiiM iobsteis and crabs. Crabs ait laying better than lobsters .it present since they are easier to c.itph and the price asked for one Is 18 cents or more. Rudder At District "A" His Worship Mr C W. Rudder Police Magistrate of District "B* is now acting Police Magistral) uf District "A." Yesterday he SAW sitting in the Centre Court .. "A". Mr. C. 1. Wolwyn who WM ait iilg as Police Magistrate ot Di.-tn. "A" is now sitting In the Diatrlc It' C30Uli .it Boarded Hall Sta lion. A MODERN BARGAIN IN NEW CANADIAN DRESSES A Lovely assortCORRECTION | CREPES, SHEERS, '.[,.,' c.,,..., I "lllLUll Wl . mm* SMa n*|>|.n,a un I Saim*-' Ut. I Dodds b KIDNEY PUtS P" Beaut %  ful Light A $ Summer Colours H.E. Foresees Improvement In Local Scouting # Frem page L specialist aeOul to come and train only 200 Dm ;,nd stressed tha need for building up the roll beIderlnit the need for a TrayelllnR Ciiinn^ifiiioner. The Island Commissioner ndmitted that there were many in the island who had gone to Guildweld, bul said that they were not In Scoutir.ft today. He pointed out further that many Who bad not had the opportunity to go there %  .1, liU active, mid charged that scouting had not benefited from those people going there. Lender* Wanted Major Griffith said, "we want leaders and we cannot get them. we want men of quality," he ridded. "Men who can teach and lead other people. It Is no good spending a lot of money to train three or four people. We want a community which realises the value of scouting." He observed that the quality of scouting Is poor compared with that In o'.her islands, and charged that "manv scout leaders were not taking enough Interest in the movement," nor were they "trying to Improve their own standard of scouting." He felt that with the advent of scouting in Harrison College and the Lodfte School, there was a nucleus for good scouting. He TIKI. *'w>///4MV/ WAVAV/VV//,'//, ', Teday at yer Jewellers . Y.DcLIMA A CO.. LTD. 20 HKOAiJ ST.. and at MAUNB OABDENH % %  OFFING CENTREJtMst Opened . SANDY MAC DONALD WHITE SHIRTS — Collai attached. s:re 14 to 16* ins. '-i 6 66 each. CONSULATE SHIRTS, self colours, trubonised collars attached coat style, asst'd. sleeve lengths, 33 to 35 Ins. In shadei of Grev. Blue Tan. White $7.78; S8.45 & $8.77 each. B.V.D WHITE I'NDER PANTS si/e 32 to 44 ,ns. PI RE LISLE ENGLISH KIRBElf H.F. HOME AND ANKLETS with elastic tops made bv Messrs. Allen Solly, sizes 10 to 12 ins. in shades of Illack, While. Grey, Dark Brown, Navy. Canary St Wine, Hf Hose 81.78 pair; anklets 1.63 pair. MEN'S R4YON COTTON HOSE also COTTON ANKLETS in fancy designs anu good value, ibl | .-. t n, only. BOYS B\TII THINKS n shades < %  Ho> .'. S.v, 24 to 26 *2 33 A 28 lo 32 .B0 p, .CENTS SATIN |.\STI\ B\T1I TRI taut, med. *S 86.76 etch Royal MEVS WORK GLOVEl of a very strong material, for uae of n I chdffeurs. Gauntlets ft $4.52. short gloves 83.21. i t tlMIM H* /Oaf #/fOl4L Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. I0-I3 BSOAD ST In Pink. Blue & White — at $2.67 Yd. -|'#lM.' This is a very serviceable art silk material, and Is available in lovely range of plain shades. /In Silk #..,.• lk-r In Pink. Silver. Charr.pagne. Ecru, LSAMSL Gold, Ice Blu#, Torquoiw, Rote. Lilac, Bols de Ross and White — at 82 II HARRISONS BROAD STREET-DIAL 2664 i iiti i i i i i iii vmtk Supplies llvrvirt dl Twlnples: Sharpeners Cigarette Haiders | Masai Frames Tea Strainers Ash Trays Gold Chloride Huxley's B-tuI Oil Molhrr QtssWal ttarm iMumi! ii Charcoal Biscuits S>nilary it k HOUSEHOLD GLOVES SKOL SUNTAN OIL &f KNIGHTS LTD. VV>**V>00**V'#V>V^*'*V*-VWV>V X>VVV' TDDLS TAPS & DIES %  i" w V vt PIPE ', V. V, V. 1", 1V4', 1% >; %  A" w A" BSF *. A", fcf. A", v. w wA" *" A" SAE or NF M>", A", i*. W Vt" A" %" A" USS or NC V4". A". V. V 2", 3" ENGINEER II I' HAMMERS V4II1., *.IK, 1 Vilb.. I'.lb 2Vlb 31b. FILES FLAT, ROUND. HALF ROUND, SQUARE MICH SPEED GRINDING MACIIINKS illGII SPEED TWIST DRILLS BODY REPAIR FLEXIBLE FILES OPEN & BOX SPANNERS PRESSURE GAUGES 0-400 lb. ECKSTEIN BROTHERS f BAY STREET DIAL 4269 *j









1952 PRICE ;: FIVE CENTS

I.E. Sir Alfred Savage Foresees | "8% ‘its MEET ALEXANDER Non-Europeans Wilt”
Improvement In Local Scouting* ) 2% } L ee
Council Decide Time Not Ripe | i. aws UI ide Scale

ESTABLISHED 1895 TUESDAY, JULY 1,












Tories.

‘LEADERS of non-Europeans in South Africa said

Classifivation
For Travelling Commissioner

DURBAN, South Africa, June 30.

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR, Sir Alfred
Savage, K.C.M.G., Local Chief Scout told the Local Scout

Council at a meeting which

he presided that he felt “that

the reorganisation by the Island Commissioner is doing

good, and if we are patient
in scouting throughout the

His Excellency was summing
up a lengthy discussion which
ensued when the Council con-
sidered a suggestion tnat the
Colonial *Governments in the
Caribbean should join together in
providing a substantial part of
the cost of a Travelling Com-
missioner for 12 months,

The Local Chief Scout during
the course of his summary
added “I believe that it is only
by personal contact, that it is only
if you have got faith in yourself
to get across to other people the
importance of scouting and of
boys, that yeu can get anywhere.
The responsibility is ours and we
have got to satisfy ourselves that
we are doing our utmost before
we can expect to encourage
other people to help us,

After mis kxcellency had sum-
med up, the meeting unanimously
agreed that it was the general
opinion that “the time is now
opportune to have a paid Travel-
ling Commissioner from outside,
and referred a number of sug-
gestions for training and the
general improvement of the
island to the Executive Com-
mittee for their consideration.

This suggestion was contained

, we will see, an improvement

island.”

Such a step would help the pe@o-
ple concerned 10 interpreting
scouting in the West Indies, but
he did not think that g Commis-
sioner coming out here from the
United Kingdom would justify the
amount of £800 a year which he
would be paid. He pointed out
that the finances of the local As-
sociation could not afford them
to contribute to the cost of such
a Commissioner, but yet it would
be welcomed if the Governments
provided the funds.

The Island Commissioner felt
that what training was needed
could be given locally, with oc-
easional visits to the Trinidad
Training Centre.

Enthusiasm

He emphasised the need for
leaders “who have enthusiasm,”
and said he did not think any
person coming here to run a
training course for three or four
months would benefit scouting.

Mr. R. C. Springer, Commis-
sioner for Training supported the
Island Commissioner on the
broad principles, and pointed out
that last year at the Commission-
ers’ Conference at Trinidad the
matter was discussed at great

| Motion.

LONDON, June 30

; Group of Members of Parlix
-ment from Winston Churchill
town party introduced a motio
Monday night in effect demand-
ing better consultation with Brit-

in Korea. The move came on ¥
eve of an important debate in fo
Commons on the Yalu River rai {
and statements on Korea by De
fence Minister Earl Alexande

and Minister of State Selwy

Lloyd.

It was led. by Viscount Hiti



i *hingbrooke who threatened la
1 i the Chu
wall Goverament in the Con

nons vote if it diq not get gui
intees of consultation from ti
United States. The life of t)
Government will be at stake bi
net in much danger in the de
bate Tuesday. Churchill himse!

jecided ake, pat ace
SIR ALFRED SAVAGE led to take, part in place «



liling Foreign Secretary Anthony

would be of great advantage to|Eden. Lord Hinchingbrooke and,
the whole area. jabout 20 , other Conservatives}
He felt that if a Travelling | "20 and file members introduc
Commissioner was brought out for lea an amendment to the Labou
three years, the need to send | Motion of Censure against the |
scouts abroad for training would |ChUtchill Government “for noi}
not arise, and then when the | Securing consultation before the |
chance arose for them to take part Yalu raids The Hinchingbrodok« |
in Jamborees, they would be more ®™mendment would blame thé pre |
au fait with what takes place in W'0US Labour Government instead /
Europe and Canada where the '° Mot setting up better meabs 0! |
movement had made tremendous CMSultation. But it would Ieave

ain on United Nations operatia |



BRITISH DEFENSE MINISTER Field Mavshai Bari Alexander (right) is
greeted on his arrival in Washington by Gen. Omar N. Bradley (left),
Chairman of the Joint Chicis of Staff, and Defense Secretary Robert
A. Lovett, Marshal Alexander, just back from an inspection tour of the
Korean batilefront, was given a 19-gun salute.

Vietnamese

Complete
Mopping Up Operations

SAIGON, June 30.

FRENCH VIETNAM ADMINISTRATORS, doctors and
police moved into the important sector of the Hanoi Rice
Bowl Monday following the successful
latest mop up operation

“Bolero” operation started last Friday when French
paratroopers dropped to crush a pocket of Vietnam Com-
munists against infantry
and enabled the Civil Administrat
area which has long bee

conclusion of the

‘aneing from the south
lon to be set u
n without any form of government.

This region some 40 miles east

today that their passive resistance campaign against racial
laws started last Thursday will become a struggle on a
huge scale embracing the whole country. About 150 non-
Europeans have been arrested so far during the campaign.
Indians and Africans under the campaign deliberately
break laws such as those under which Africans are com-
pelled to carry identity passes, observe residential segre-
gation and generai racial separation laws in public places.

The campaig: was organised

MacArthur Is by the Seuch Alviean and Indian
| Congress and the Africun Nation-

j}al Congress, U.e two main noa-

First Choice 3" wis" 8

Yi pean political group: in
Irst oice [eae Africs. They bitterly op-
If Ike, Taft Go Officials of the two Natienal

pose Prime Minister Danie!
Malan.
}
: a : | ongresses said the campaiga
By eatin ee, 30 } vill be planned in three stages.
Senktes Robert ow Taft “took | the first phase includes ealling
personal command of Republican} elected and trained people to
rules and disputes which hat nto action in the big centres to

brought an angry storm over th joreak racial laws. The second
party and its presidential nomin-| ‘tage would see an increase in
ating convention which ‘neets oy !he number ef these volunteers

July 7, and the centre’s operation. The
Republican tempers shot as the) thing stage would be one of mass

prairie winds, Fraud and vote/action during which the struggle
stealing charges were flying fast! should as far as possible broaden
among party men, jout to g country-wide scale and

Both Taft and his principal op- | assume a general mass character.
| The first stage has not yet been
, completed, leaders said, because
volunteers have been defied racial
; laws only in two big centres. Port
| Elizabeth and Witwatersrand:
—CP.

Senate OK.

4 | German Pact

strides, and where businessmen | U"touched that part of the motion | R . D h of Hanoi near the Dong Trieu is
were practically running the|@emanding better consultation | alns rene a fertile portion of the Red River

movement. It was true that it all//" future delta from which Vietminh was|
started with Government Officials | Tt was not yet known how

si. systematically shipping vice to
and the clergy and public officers, | ‘ hurehill would react to — the Korean Front feed ils hungry thek. the|

to
and they had to thank them for |#â„¢endment especially before tive |

in the Chief Scout’s article THE |!ength. _ ;
OUTLOOK in the May 1952 issue] He pointed out _ that while
of THE SCOUTER MAGAZINE |there was no question as to 10
in which he made reference ty joutside Commissioner Ss know-
his visit to Barbados ang wrote |ledge of ‘scouting, the tendency










north \ WASHINGTON, June 30,

i z rae . academic ; aan ot ebate . > wi 2, 1 : The Senate Foreign. dtélations
Mr. Grantley Adams, the Leader} was for them to be too academic] what they had done, but he did} debate in which he will need al SEOUL, Korea. June $ Meanwhile, 800 miles to the ats
of the House of Assembly, put }in their approach. He observed] think that it was time for them to| his votes. But he may be count |. Three days’ drenching rain ive South at the tip of the Indo-| | yatibedtion of the Comer noun
forward the suggestion that the|that they “try to implant ideas} spread their hands and get the|ing on Alexander's and Lloyd’: | tusned the Korean battlefront in-|China mainland French head- ratpescion of the German peace
Colonial Governments in the|rather than try to adopt them tof public interested in scouting. If | Speeches calming the fears of his) to q Soggy swamp where croaking ;“Uarters for seventh “Operation 1! uae, aes. pentocel a
Caribbean should join together |/ocal conditions.” they got the public interested in Wn supporters.-U.P frogs have taken over from the! Whirlwind”, reported 39 Com- 17} ante vey ih wil sobs
in providing a substantial nati of Mr. Springer said that they{the movement, then the question , booniing artillery munists killed and 29 prisoners ban W tG oo ae WHEE PURPA CCS
the cost of a Travelling Commis-| would be glad to have people] of eae in the Jong met 7 ‘ | Allied planes were grounded/taken in the latest drive to clear } danate MT eaitany leader Ernest
i & eye 7 1 > cali » Chief Scout}| come to them, Ti again today, Ev as yy {Cochin Ching Frene 2tne pe
0g Ba agen als Tod We Meaaebot Oey Caxadine Professor Dash felt that now “we Teachers alks ed ot Even all-weather it = sench yisinam

help to create Training Teams.
This very valuable suggestion has
the support of all the Governors

; ~ * r rs, in
| 26 light bombers remained at|forces lost only one man killed} ponent General Dwight Eisy)- ‘leParland announced late Mdn

‘ ial "See z er .'e : , ; Cay that the Senate debate on
: vs . | their bases. Lt.-Gen, Glenn O.]and some 40° wounded in the; hower are confident. Taft has “ay t ? y
Start In 7 dad | Barcus, Fifth Air Force Command-|tour-day operation which cap-|189 first ballot votes on Unitec ‘tification of the man Peace |

Training Commissioner, but he

felt that to have a Travelling lationship with Canada and the

United States, we should let them

|



are trying to develop a closer the |
|

’ Eyal arn ae : j f ’ a, i tract will cammence at 206
a issi k et oe iran es | er, reported that Allied planes|tured several Vietminh work.|!’ress tabulation and Bisenhowe: 69n -,
to ot we have spoken, as Seen ene eal come and improve our ee On August 9 which bombed the giant Suiho}shops and large supplies of am-|409. Needed to nominate is a pi, GMT. Tuesday
ments." es Govers- be valuable, Mr. Springer|,,“ lengthy discussion ensued on) ss = .,,.| power plant a week ago drew ]|munition and explosives. bare majarity of 604, Phere might f con stor ‘Tom Connally -Ghalke
Pies J. E Griffith who ledjSaid and he added if we had a big the subject in which it was gen- The Sixth Bi-Annual Con-|heayy fire from Communist anti- In Annam, Central Indo-China,} be a stalemate but few expect it
or J. E. Griffith who leds Sé 3

erally agreed that the local move~| ference of the Caribbean Unibu | aircraft
ment “needs inspiration by visits | o¢ Teachers "

—, a Buns across the Yalujit was Vietminh which was Eisenhower ov Taft by July 11 is am eee ee Pelstas Fone
” , opens in Portwi-| River in Manchuria; ultacking post, : ses} the word here. None foresees a] 0° | Sere

and ee rite tna act |Spain on Saturday August 9, and | Barcus said the air force and] pear Hue, T coastal port’ Oe ae bolt because both candidates hav pinion” 9 speeches favouring
Cbmiitesienan and Mr. Springer,|Comeludes on August 28, The! navy pilots made no attempt to}porth of Saigon, All French] promised to support the party Whe satificatian rasciueke ae
who objected to any suggestion|Comference will be formally | silence the Red guns although they | Vietnam posts were reported] ticket. . scheduled for submission’ to’ the
that the local assoqiation should, P€ned on Monday August 11 by; lasted Communist anti-aircraft |aviding out despite stepped .up} If the General and the Senator) co )U" Monday bit an’ extaoded
pay from its funds to the salary of |His Excellency Sir Hubert Rance, | batteries on the Korean side of the | communist pressure. knocked each other out Genera debate on the Military -Appropel«
srry inated: coming from outside|GOvernor of Trinidad, | Fiver. Cay. policy bans air strikes/" Ow the Annam coast in an} Douglas Mac Arthur would ‘be Shen” Wh took an” tne vertige
as a Travelling Commissioner,|_ The Programme is as follows. | i uh pelt Tent week's series of | 2%¢4 Nt exactly specified in an] @ likely prospect or Senator Ever- At ip eM od ae rinand Be
that it was not a “practical propo. |5#t_%—Civie Welcome by the Port-of arcus sald las eek § sertes OF foiticial communique French Viet-|ett Dirkensen of Ilinois.

i i : ate r that the Resolu-
‘i% , Spain City Council raids wiped out 13 power plants, oe . Stes UP. the Senate floor tha Mt
sition,” although they had nO/sun. 1—Chureh Sercices all there were in North Korea.}°2™ naval units in the course of u tion will be called up at a speciai

prejudice to any outside people| Mon, 11—Formal Onening-—His Exce!. | (cP) the past few days sank 100 Com- carly session Tuesday. He add@d
coming in. { ency, The Governor. Address by : munist Sampans loaded with rice

| r P Stn he

i {hat the related protocol to the

. oo sident of Rice | and headed for enemy areas Four Enter North Atlanglc Treaty which

Governments Willing Business Session. | I ] d G iorth of Hanoi. 5 arth SOE, ott tien

On the other hand Mr. F. J. Cole | "®%, '°—Address by the Minister of! ce an oes UP. e eS guarantees to Germany will be de.
emi- (ata & | ated immediately afterwards.

off the discussion on the subject] Organisation it would be necessary
said that the same questién was|for training to become a whole
discussed at a conference at the] ime job. bbe
Jamboree in Jamaica and Trini- Professor J. S. Dash said it was
dad was not enamoured with the|not the first time a suggestion ci
idea, nor was he personally. He|the sort was put forward, ana
said that if the cost could bejrecalled a _ similar proposition
borne by the Colonial Govern-| Which was put forward in Britisa
ments and the United Kingdom,| Guiana where he was President
he would have no objection, but}oOf the Scouts’ Association.
if the Local Association had to Warning
contribute to the cost, then he He warned the Council that
certainly did not agree with it.| they should not take too narrow
Short Time view of the suggestion, and ob-
The Island Commissioner ar-]@erved that “scouting in the
gued that in the first place »ajCaribbean needs to be strength-







‘ Education
thought that the question of ;





: tk ; { j INTERVAL ' ene a

Travelling Commissioner in these}ened at this time.” He addeti,} spending the funds of the Associa-| _ Business Continued | | | ] » P I] z Biombe. —UP.
parts would spend a very short} “for one reason or another, the}tion did not arise, seeing that the | Wed. 13. “Busines eer, | oO 1e oO Ss U.N. rs Blast \ (From Our Qwn Correspondent) ene

; : ee) aA Prieta ietien cantik a —Business Sess eee. some
time in any one particular co]-|movement has been going back-] Governments were willing to con- | Ph'"s. Business Session (a.m.) Delegates ICELAND, June 30. Be * By DENNIS HART.
ony, and he felt that such a| wards, and there is no question} tribute to the cost, and he advo-|\" jeaye tor Tabany at 800 pan | Polling Toaland’s residential Woreal Froutlines ' LONDON, June 30 La To Star
Commissioner would try to inter-] of doubt as far as I know that ajcated, like Professor Dash, that | Sat. 16—Public Sessions in Tobago ie viachaned ode although | The semi-finals of the Men's mas
pret scouting as it was in the} little new blood would not do uw: | 4 Travelling Commissioner should | “PBUH, Webetes’ Auer Return see onestedsien het oe SEOUL, June, 30, Singles at Wimbledon this year ° “ i
United Kingdom and not as it}any harm.” pe. Devnet down for at least 3 wont At Tobago at 9.00 p.m protic Ls over 90 per ane This} United Nations lignt bompers| will be between Frank Sedgman | With Liz Taylor
ean APR aS " ah eee daane oi as wae tev 7 Mr. R. S, Jordan pointed out Cues 19—Vintt te ye ae is the first time the country js}elasted communist front lines inj and Mervyn Rose and Jaroslay

ajor Griffith said he knew]|training whic oa e » ;



that a Travelling Commissioner | "4. 20—Visit to San Juan and East Si.jelecting a President by pc iQular}orea with high explosive bombs | Drobny and Battie Zim se ai
} Jeorge : 3 ‘ : : arter als this 4 “
would conduct Wood Badges |rnurs #1--visit to San Fernando Ballot. despite heavy over-hanging clouay| In the Quarter é

. n | + i “ha jon Dick
Courses yearly, one in each of the | ki. Visit to Siparia and Point Fortin Of an estimated 67,000 votes the}that hampered most of the noon, the reigning champ

that in Jamaica there were peopie having somebody well versed i)
—Assistant Camp Chiefs and so] scouting in most parts of th’

Ee ee



























on who were quite competent,| world would be most helpful ou''isjands, and in the meantime | neluding the famous Pitch Lake. {Independence Party workers } activities. | Savitt Of. Be gg al benee
and if necessary they could send|here. The more people we car people like Mr, Springer would be | **+,*% nts aoe ee at Hotel claimed between 33,000 and 37,000 To-day's attacks were carried} + ; “9 fot ed mn Rose and Vic \
a few of them up to England for} get from other places to help "\: |responsible for preliminary train-} Xorandie. § ; for their candidate Bishop Bjarnijout by B26’s which have made Austra A ctusacoxt radintart one Whe
a three months refresher course|in these quarters, the better i! ]ing in the area, covering the sort | Jonsson. Earlier straw votes fav-|move than 170 strikes in round the acta 4—6, 6—3, 3-6, 5--7 by
and on his return work in his own] would be for us. If we can g°']of course given by Mr. Dahl in| ‘oured former Premier Asgeir] coc activity during the past 4} ie fallow ’ countryman Herbie
colony. He did not think that they} a ‘Travelling Commissioner fir |Grenada and Mr. McGregor in H.E. Presents Asgeirson supported by social de-|) ours, The results of early strikes | jam. In the other games Frank
could find anyone in Barbados.|something like three years, | —— ne. ie eee z a ‘ig soerem and segments of other could not be observed. Defence Sedgmian, the favourite, had a
come down for a year “or two, Thanks Badges ihe third candidate Gieslie ry wa ania beans tend om oS enka ar gbilens: ohms
ay Ww he ¢£ ze . Fe ar Me is win. eoar PO) . tory ove e te
eee ould be able â„¢ | At a meeting of the Island Scout ees Seems Sey, See No communist jets appeared to] jion Eric Sturgess and exiled
RED RIOTER RUSHED TO .ROME JAIL Mr. Aubrey Douglas-Smith, who |©Ouncil yesterday His Excellency cratic eatin Turn out of figures |Challenge the bombers indicating} Czech Jaroslav Drobny came ‘Ken|
a ’ was recently made District Com-|the Governor Sir Alfred Savage indicated many Communist voters}'hat last wegk’s allied raids on] behind to beat the nan
\ missioner for the Southern Dis- | %.C.M.G presented “THANKS| gig not go to the polls, No inci-]ommunist hydro - electric plants} McGregor 6—0, 3-—-6, 2-6, 7--5,
trict urged members to revise \DGES to Mrs, F. J. Cole, al dents were reported. Vote count-|may have crippled Reds electronic] T=), iced the
their ideas, and suggested that the | ne t the Council, Mr, H. N. ing will not be completed untill varning system in Manchuria and Rose ~ Pee ee see '
funds could be better devoted to | und 1 Mr, A. Masterton~| pu sday.—U.P. {North Korea. peeonanee . ; full Niet of the
building up a permanent training | Smith. : | In blasting the railway line, oe, ra alsuien) One court
centre in the is land where courses The meeting after confirming |} Okinawa based B29’s took up! 4 e game lasted nearly two hours
4 oe ‘tat a, Tel * t ir \the Rep “ f the exon hive Cae I i h B J I L Bee. capensis based bombers! » 14 in the end it was the Austra-
fod Tate ee eee ery |" y Re port of | he ox mate he TIS u e eft off on Saturday night i0] jian’s ability to last the pace whiel
torhave some ful time man who yee for ie, period. Ost : Dabs rgag |hwatan” Dettleneck bridge neat) carried im through. It was
would be in charge, and if that|/," A." - eemras. Tas oie Raises I PICCS | Korean coast. ‘ = piegd Sn 8 on aN nf decid.
uggestion. proved .impossible in ' tas Prey Pr a Be 2 | Sorean coas | occasional break through |
ee ts his aa inance Committee, and the Cor- Rain to-day slowe, roun ow the first four sets. Savitt with
o Ser Sen saehee talana missioner’s for the same period DUBLIN, June 30. | ighting and kept fighter pouibe .| his style based on thunderous ELIZABETH TAYLOR
He prefesred, however, to see the | With special reference to (a) the Food subsidies costing £15,000,~| orounded at bases. An allied; ground shots was in complete HOLLYWOOD. “dime 20
| moOney spent in a local training|Chief Scout's Visit, and (b) the|000 will be cut by seven per cent, | pokesman said ‘fonly light patrol | contrast to the Australian's vol- The Arz aie ne Act es Fernando
centre. |Jamaiea Jamboree, on Friday when Prime Minister; ictivity” have taken place sincc| ‘eying and delicate net play he Argentine Actor



600 Scouts Ramon De Valera’s controversial) Rod attacks early yesterde, ; %ose several times drew the}Lamas who had been on suspen












| ‘ ‘ . f » ip sclk
r : 7 itte : Americeg > t 4 1eێ at MGM apparently is back
canes Y ° judget goes into effect, Bitter|, . " ad ‘hor-| “merican to the net with neat}sion a 5

| Mr, J. E, Brome observed tha Carraway Wins ities ee been voiced because rie AE position west. of ‘Cher | drop shots and this undoubtedly|in the studios good grace for he

| © this island there 6 a schoo! he cuts will lift prices for such| 7, ‘ | took a toll of Savitt’s reserves has been signed up for two pic-
opulation of 30,000 children, with ! Gur Own Corresponder me eee x “ fi va, fic ‘ Reds lost 200 killed and som In the final set Savitt was able]tures this year.

!q roll of 600 scouts, 200 of whom GEORGETOWN, June a6 pun meepies pe ie. 8 ‘tot aan 150 wounded in assaults th o stey with Rose to.two-all but Tn ‘osie of theme Lathes will bea
vere active, ar llenged any- Calvin Garraway, welter-weight} butter and the 2A! reached United Nations barbe rackéd and lost the next four] pico, qevlace ioe aine an ah
ody to uld be bene- | ¢hampion knocked out Venezue-jand liquor alse will cost more. vire defenses but that failed 1 ames and the match. The final the grt ‘oe had ae

were tetio ie ret i “ot £808 bid 4 we Bac -r ana 3ut De Valera defended his|’#rry Reds into allied positions | tame was on his own service arty where he will play the role of an

lissioner a of £8 0 F 3.G gro) ‘ : =| > ij ° » <4 oly

ae as rt 1 206 lto-day before ecord boxing |®udget by saying let no one pre- UP. Rose won it for the loss of only underworld character under the

hg aie Br an ’ il zy it rear niner ee “itend that this was the budget me point finishing with a scorch-

Mr. Brorne urged ouncH to | crowd, - '



direction of Richard Thorpe who

| build on what was now in exist- In the second round, Jota took {announced by the government PUBLISHERS GET ng forehand return. directed Elizabeth Taylor in the







She ° -MeGregor mate! f ]

jence, and said they should| count of nine and towards ihe| against the workers NEW MANAGER . ae enone ne set atrug.{movie version of Sir Walter
first get the se¢ to be trained.| -nd, Garraway caught him with lie Shatead. tha breton ena MONTREAL, June 30 gle. The deciding game was the {Scott’s “Ivanhoe”

Te pointed out that there were a/a strong left hook to the head o Soe pee sour | Thomas Skinner of Canada Ltd..| final one in the fourth _ set The surprise addition to “the

um} of Guildwe ans in the| which sent him to the canvas. The |4on_ Government headed by one publishers, announced the ap- Drobn had broken through the} cirl who had everything” cast

land, and appealed to them to! gong sounded befere the count|of Eire’s leading Barristers Joba | pointment of Merivale Austin a: McGrigot’ kervice to lead 6—* | William Powell who was long
come forward and put their| ended but Jota was still out when| Costelle with Paving dissipated manager in Canada succeeding the] 5), i in a terrific battle in thr Jabsent from the screen. The movie
shoulders to the wheel with a view | the gong for the third round |Marshall Aid. He added: “we are}y.1¢ 4° Innes Pocock. and E a



} t 4 } lj. |a bigger Party than the Labour game which went to elevenj!s being rushed into production
ing the stand-' and he siled nswer the bel}, /é 3




to assisting in
}



Merivale Austin’s name through deuces s ithi © weeks fol-
’ , ati ; ‘ uces, won his service to leveljwithin the next two weeks fal
local Jota, one-time world welter- | Party and we are strong enough v0 ihily connections is well known] the score at two sets all. lowing the announcement that
objected to engaging a! weight champion entered the ring |do things that we think are 7 the throughout the West Indies Drobny had previously won the [Elizabeth is expecting a baby.
@ On Page 5 155 pounds, Garraway at 1674, jinterests of the workers.—-U.P. (CP) | nr st set but suffered several lapses —U.P.
nents sieratinliiastinets } @ On page 8.







Report Puzzles Cuba, Britain ven tiows up

b ‘
LONDON, June 30. A Board of Trade spokesman | (reports in the London sugar mur- very large surplus in the present Worker 8 Hand
t 30a d “We know of no plans for ket that the Anglo-Cuban tride crop which up to this time Bri



B’dos Publicity
C’tee Advertising

The Barbados Publicity Commit-
















I f Trade | sa > tee is to meet next Monday te
ind the Cub Embassy are at a| negotiating a new Cuban de| pact is being made under which ain has only been able to buy A pants rae ne | discuss hia ntevahticives plans for
xpl t} publication} pact.” And the Cuban Embassy| Cuba will sell 500,000 tor of with dollars. The Cubans wan n pO | 0UntaL per ' the &
1 of reports that the United spokesman added not only was, sugar to the United Kingdom and to buy shi building materials blew up an office worker's finger. Thee titel eugdidbtiha “sapiens
I o are negotiat- the Embassy without knowledge! will accept payment in sterling and small cars, all of which Brit- The booby trap was a perfect imi~) ial y a . ae er _ sta _ d
* trade pact By the of the purported pact talks but) which can only be spent here. A ain could supply The British tation of a ball point pen Yoon | eed eee Sere in ho
A PLAINCLOTHES POLICEMAN takes a firm grasp on a Red rioter in Rame United Kingdon ise of “t 1ewspaper reports came as ajnumber of circumstances give Government would like to teke one of two fellow workers found a ; Sta’ es anc Canac a in an
as he hustles him off to jail. The youth was one of hundreds arrested 590,000 r of Cuban sugar, us.” credence to this report.” sugar off the ration and an addi-'in his desk and __was oe effort to attract the visitors hey
for staging a demonstration during the visit of Gen. Matthew Ridg~ ccepti ocker tead " t as published in New f tional supply of 500 000 tons it orem, Police are investigat- pnd the Summer Touris
Way, military commander of the western powers, to the Eternal Citz, of traditional dollar York states “There are strong ~ “ een a nat Cube am a woud mane this powsible.”—U.F -| ing : eason,
+ i






























o 70 “ :
PAGE TW BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, JULY 1, 1952
a
e e ' 4 Listeni Hi | 956559550999 9995 99S 98S" >
ive Walke ery sIOwly Lan eee te er NOTRCE ux i
| hear |
z 4 400 — 7.15 p.m. 19.76 M 25.53 M = >
—But He Saw Things No One Else Did— 4 % ;
L 4.0) p.m. The News, 4.10 The _ ‘
By MAX TRELL | Dats’ Seevice, 413 pom. ‘Bruinion Day. | & Me
ny ; . _ as “ Be 5.0 pm. Lawn Tennis, 5.15 pon Customers holding Rebate Notes
H' jm, Vi. ALE M.L.C., Intransit | GLIVE, the Snail, said: “Some | Cricket, 5.20 p.m BB : % up to the end of Dec. 1951, are
Managing ractc f the SONG ‘the onsdensers arriv folks like to go in a hurry. Some Light Orchestra, 6.00 p.m - weminded that final date of pay-
Advocate Go.. Lt etr from 7 the passengers AITiv~ | ¢.ins think I’m the unluckiest one zine, 6.15 p.m, Meet % ment will be 30tn June %
Trinidad 6n Sunda by ing here from Trinidad on | i) tie world not to be able t , wealth, 6.45 p.m. Sports and Same will be sang: ay a é
BW LA, . Sunday by the $:S. De Grasse in-) fase. But 1 think some folks are | Pageranane Earete Pea amet |B cur Gaver ao es SIE
Mr Jale had been nding transit for the United Kingdom 2 n ” | 7.15 — 10.30 p.m 453 M 31 |X p.m. with exception Saturday RM
the Summer Meeting of the were Mr. Max Kuhn, Consul for weBet it ‘gun dos ne bared” cael } 3 whole day and 11 a.m. to 12 .
= Y a1 tir he Switzerland in Trinidad and Mrs. ut i you go ina hurry, & | | 7.10 p.m. Rendezvous, 7.45 p.r er- o'clock daily .
rendg yf Cl vi 1 opene o —s ety f vena* sonal © i o savail.| % 4 tf,
a ‘the Queen's Pat tyes fo pes Kuhn who will be away for four| Knarf, “you get wherever you're | } ost ley ge A, pr = SOOO 3
Thursdé test Yr? 9g 7 | months and Mr. G. G. Gianetti of | going quick. ; i | Report-From Britain, 8.45 p.m. Intor-
ee a ae : | the Imperial College of Trepical| Glive said that.was right. “You} | tude, 8.58 p.m. From the Editoria’s, 9-00 | 4G a 5 &E Tt Y
For U.K; Holiday Agriculture. He was accompanied | get there quick all right. But what} } -io — ey rey Sea, | ry
M' GC. SGOTT of Barclays by his wife and two children| do you see? | mean, what do you} 10.00 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. News | The Garden—St. James ‘
Bank. St. Kitts, who was Tonina and Ian. see along the way?” | Talk, 10.15 p.m. Herbert Hodge Talk-| 2 TODAY & TOMORROW 4.30 P.M. y
here fo past week staving at a Mr. and Mrs. Gianetti expect| “You see everything. Glive You | ing, 10.30 p.m, India — Southern Jour-| Whole (New) Serial y
Sea View Guest House, left on » return to Trinidad about the| just see it all faster.” | ee } # 4 INGLE” 4
: 7 i ; , | —————- LOST CITY of the JUNGL y
Sunday by the S.S. De Grasse for janpena Fae te, will _ “You're quite sure that you see | | Russell HAYDEN & Keye LUKE ,
England where he will spend eavin, eir daughter onina at| everything: when you run?” ‘ 2 ,
fuss wenathe! boliday. a University in England to fur-|~ «Gp on ? 2 : Talking Point | THURS. (Only) 8.90 P.M ;
Also leaving for England on ther her studies. Glive though for a minute or two ae P29 | “MISSISSIPPI: GAMBLER’ 3
a > NE os | ‘ * ecord- | r .
Sunday by the De Grasse was Visiting Her Daughter Finally he said: “Maybe you do. | Knarf had an argument with Glive, |. Character is money © oe Kent TAYLOR & ,
Mr. G. Gilbert, Accountant of EAVING yesterd morning | Let’s both of us go from here to the | ing on She nan ears : ‘SLOnDs Alam ,
Bz r ‘lays Bank, St. Kitts, and Mrs S 7 et arp Pre & ws the money, money in turn becomes Martna O'DRISCOLL ‘
arclays Bank, St. Wits, and Mrs. by B.W.1LA. for Antigua and ,

Gilbert. They will also
about four months’ holiday.

spend





Puerto Rico on her way to the}
U.S.A. was Mrs. Robertha Branch |

stump of the old apple tree. You go | the flowers, and the bottom of the
as fast as you like. And I'll go as | grass, and a cricket or two, and a |
slow as | usually do. When we both | mowse, and an old rubber ball that





character.—Bulwer- Lytton.

Mr. ane Mrs. Gilbert arrived of King William Street. She has| get there we'll talk about the things | the children must have lost—”
Here about ten dave Sao ang ware gone on a visit to her daughter| we’ve seen on the way.” “Oh! Where is that ball? The
staying at the Hotel Royal. (Miss Vincent Branch ) of ?

Qn Business

Ne ; . : : “It’s at the end of that clump of - . ‘
er cs MICHAELS. Seconded to Washington Jamaica to be very interesting, The stub | daisies,” said Glive. “And then “ANNE OF THE INDIES’ : :
who us h Messrs. m ; - of the q vre | . %
Knight’s-Ltd., Phoenix Branch, {REGINALD McCONNEY, 4 7 PRESENT holidaying in| than twenty or thirty feet away — Gn mate " LOUIS JOURDAN — DEBRA PAGET ta
Ye years ago, is now back in as- arbados is Mr. . { ob tee . . ee Se ieee % 1%
the "est Indies y an Me racaliapen ury, left for the United States via Sarin hoe ig ota > > } a ee oe ~—; “Worm?” said Knarf, puzzled. Tomorrow and Thursday com Bolt ag y ,
. . , per storda > , “ 7o. ie an. ow “ E Ns
visit. Puerto Rico yesterday by B.W.LA. former Agricultural Assistant in So Knarf and Glive the Snatt| “Worml the earthworm. He was | FIGHTING MAN ome Bill WILLIAM S1¥
Mr. Michaels who revresents He has been seconded for three North-East Trinidad. started out. In one step Knart was |looking out of the top window of Victor JORY — Randolph 5 — 4 14
British Drug Houses in England, years’ service, following a proba- Mr. Sarjeant who is spending| ahead of Glive. In two steps Knart | his underground house. We chatted | IRD OF PARADISE xy
travelled to Jamaica by B.O.A.C. tion period of three months, with twelve days with his parents.) couldn't see Glive any teed: for | agent how he was getting along | ‘HANDLER 7 Debra PAGET — Louis JOURDAN xs
before coming on here over the Vosningeehe Supply Mission in yyy, and Mrs. L. Sarjeant of} Give was lost among the tall blades | d what we a were oer. Jeff C ad 3 BUYS e
veek- hy B.W.LA He is sninj * n ad, is his way t a ata ale |e , “|i was just about to say good-bye 0 OCP OOFOOOOLEES OVOP POSES
_—_ me the Ocean View Hotel. Reggie who is the only son of ae eect he has kins ct'o~ of grass. It only took Knart a min | when Worml suddenly diekppeated EOC OSEES SO In
s 1g +6 , ae3 Dr. and Mrs Cc. ceConne : a ute to reach the stump. Then he sat |, ‘ +. ,
Matron at St. Philip’s Sanaa Gy dines trast are Ship. moted to the post of Agricultural | 7). and waited for Glive. into his house again. z A RES
ISS- MADELINE B Y E R, ping Master’s and the Auditor a cakes to leave for King- It must have been an hour later | us hy? asked Knar ; Worm! P i i Barbados
Matron of St. Philip’s General’s_ before going to the gton via Antigua and Puerto Rico] “ hen Glive glided up to the stump. | Robin was just coming so Worm |
Almshouse, leaves today by Colonial Treasurer’s Department. },, B.W.1.A. later in the week. Well,” he said to Knarf, “what | Went. Then I met another old friend DO cn
B.W.LA, to spend. a fortnight’ At the airport yesterday to see "~ = "" ” iid you see, my boy?” jot. mine — Blackie the Beetle. | | BRIDGETOWN BARBAREES _ |{/ OISTIN &
holiday in St. Lucia. him off were many friends, well “] saw lots of things,” said Knart.| hadn't seen Blackie for quite a (Dial 2310) (Dial 5170) iu aed
During her stay Miss Byer will wishers and his colleagues in the ‘Because, even though | went fast, while. He told me he had moved into |

be the guest of Miss Isalene Wat-

son, Clerk in the Customs

MR. R. McCONNEY

service with whom he is deserv-

ingly popular. Among these was

Jamaica, Long Island.

Agricultural Officer,







Knarf didn’t think this was going |

kept looking around, | saw the
owers in the garden. | saw a robin

children have been looking all over

Very Interesting for it!”



TODAY LAST SHOWING 5 & 8.30 p.m.





a new house. It was right along the

wey, so | decided to look at it. | ian S

eo
:
:

HELD OVER

Shows TODAY
445 & 8.30 p.m.

POSES PEP ETE EEPEL ASS



Today 445 & 8.30 p.m.
| rhe story of the life of
Christ

TODAY & TOMORROW
445 & 8.30 p.m.











Gents.

Re i ‘ ; Very Heavy...
Department Mr, H. S, Jemmott, O.B.E., saw a lot of grass. | saw a rock | Blackie pointed it out to me. lhe |W re-release PRINCE OF PEACE || »°!* Serial , y vy DRILL
Keep The Date eee en | with moss on it. I saw a butterfly, | stairway led ween under nee - Mark TWAIN'S (Color) SEA HOUND ; Li ited @ atts
HE ANNUAL BAZAAR in aid oresters ance And then I saw the stump of the old | OSS on it, for that rock was the | fee E imited Quan
of the Old L Fed Gia wit HE Ancient Order of Foresters vpple tree and I sat down to wait | "oof. Then a butterfly came to visit | PRINCE & THE PAUPER ||~tiuns. Special 1.30 Larry 5 ahi eee 98c. and $1.20
tuke place. this year on Saturday, have for some time maintain- for you.” | Blackie and I left them both talking | Starring: Errol FLYNN || JOHNNY ALLEGRO Buster ( ——_——_— —__—_———

November 29th,

. . c en Sails : att? |until | saw you, Knarf, sitting on eet Coming Soon Rayon and Cotton
During the last two years, the the children of its members bene- aw a great many things. anti se . and ;

cinme ne Gia estun ae neon a “What did you see, Glive?” | the stump of the apple tree, waiting CHEROKEE UPRISING DESPERADOES ERROL FLYNN 3 pairs for $1.00
changed from Queen's Park to the In order to boost this Fund, “Well,” said Glive, “Ll walked for, 'or me. Pe

Volunteer Drill Hall, but public



eq a Scholarship Fund from which

they are making a bigger effort,







“Very pood,” said Glive. “You

a long ways without seeing much |

together. And that was all U saw |
|
|

“H’mm,” said Knarf thoughtfully.





|
|
| WWSar.



THURS. Special

WESTERN RENEGADES







1.30 p.m. George RAFT

Randolph SCOTT in


























GENTS’ SOCKS

~ GENTS’ WATCHES



support continued. and on Saturday night, July 5th, of anything exeept the bottom of! ‘*You really saw a lot, Glive.” Johnny MACK BROWN ious oe DODGE CITY Reliable Wrist Watches
The pases is staged in aia of ae A. foe te an, of the ‘ (Special) 930 & 130 |) THUNDER With $8.22
4# mest deserving cause and so Barbados Tu ub, will conduct —, C : no ip ahaa Raita
those who “have and those, the drawing. of Raffle Prizes at Rupert and the 1 oy Scout 36 yeas Ae as ) “ean HOLT & Ann SHERIDAN ¢ Good Quality
who will supportet in futuwe are the. Lodge’s Dance which takes “COLORADO AMBUSH” eres apenaue tot Dea -HANDKERCHIEFS
cence pen the date open. place et the Drill Hall. Ge b, 4 bi Johnny Mack BROWN George O°BRIEN_ Alan HALE 4f 1.00
i } P m TS gaily oy : er
To Reside in U.S.A. Transferred a yy ewe SS | ahapsene te itt
ISS ALETA EARLE, daugh- R. EMMANUEL WHISKEY Ae w; 7 7 A TROPICAL SUITING
\ tec of Mr, Seifert Earle of # who was over here super- ROODAL TMEATRES Grey, Brown and Blue
Grazettes Road, left here yester- vising old iron for Consumers a XY $2.62
re roe, by Bow.t A. for oo and Iron Co. of Canada, EMPIRE RO —____ ______.
ntigua and Puerto Rico en route left for British Guiana Frid PVERS Tice tteaer se
tthe USA. where Gee ee ee eee — “ oo rg TO-DAY 4.45 & 8:20 & Continuing Fee Semen ee at a eaee
side with her relatives. on transfer. . PARAMOUNT PRESENTS.— Ann SHERIDAN - : , est. Fas ia
, ; Pacts: ‘ansfei Jee Aiba: MR. V, A. L. SARJEAD Sab Hobe — Hedy GAatARtt UR non ena Trea Latest Fashion
ace ioheteacicanet tae a a —
“MY FAVOURITE SPY” “WOMAN ON THE RUN” CREAM





The first person whom the littke Daddys all had Christma, stock-

FAIRWAY CHAMPIONS
Every Golf player should see

EXTRA EXTRA
2 Reel Musical HOT & HECT

this

1c

a




FLANNEL SERGE

nals meet is Gaffer Jarge, who ir thar they didn't expect.”

$4.38, $3.47

















i ins SHORT WED 2nd & THUR 3rd 4.30 & 8.15) ee oe
hobbling along to join the other Gaffer chuckles silently, and after And LATEST BRITISH SHIRTS
rown-ups. ‘Hey, what's the fumbling in his coat-tail pocket he PAhAMOUNT NEWS MARGARET LINDSAY s
Ray. young Rupert?" wheezes pulls something out and holds it - (alas ex i Khaki, Dress, Sport, Cot-
the old ait ** Queer things up in front of Bi A have been happening.”” says the you, too!” cries Willie This i TO-DAY Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8.15 and eal Kxock-do Pri
j litle bear, “* Our Mummys and mere mysterious than ever. John KRELAND — James BARTON oo OMELODY NE” wn ces
; F ALL RIG/TS PRSERUES — in — na paren 1001 Qualities
“THE SCARF” Starring: Leon ERROL and TIF ——
TROPHIES ON, PARADE and Mitiiey WAGs“ ""\)% GENTS’ PARSON GREY
AEN, “CHICAGO CALLING” eo | odck asa id Dhar 11
Starring: DAN DURYEA ROYAL S

Gussie Moran’s lace - trimmed hibition of sporting trophies

anties, which sre t tal . which is being taken round |
Benet WD NR SES America. Other exhibits ave}
the tennis world when she wore tyophies won by Babe Zaharias,

‘JOHN WHITE SHOES
10 per cent. off

WED 2nd & THUR Sra 4.20 & 8.1) Last Two Shows TODAY 4.30 & 8.1
“THE SUNDOWNERS”

With Robert NRESTON —

“STATION WEST"



All Wool Worsted





i r ith Dick POWELL
i. them at Wimbledon two years the greatest woman athlete ores Zohn ARBOR BN ie aie “TWEED PINSTRIPE
q The three ptctures here ago, are still in the news. They Frank Parker, Donald Budge an “SWORD OF THE AVENGER" “TT HAPPEN TO ONE MAN” :
illustrate-- take pride of plece in an ex- Alice Marble. = SSS 56 in. Navy and Brown






$9.50

TROPICAL PINSTRIPE
56 in. wide
$2.80, $3.29. and $3.49

RE ETE EE, OE a SS EE SY i

ss

EXCLUSIVE |‘
MEN'S ‘
cHOP |:





GENTS RIBBED
JOCKEY PANTS
72 cents

~ HOUSEHOLD



TABLE COVERS
Plastic ones

FOR THE COCKTAIL PARTY—in pastel cals,





$1.29 up
OILCLOTH
@ ae Ss —three variants now on sale in - —— at pee eiionis
: Britain, BLANKETS
, “cinders,” is new tor outdoo: Lovely Quality and
at gQ and cocktall dresses, Sing! Colours 19
“Tree bark” pleating, which: ingle ........ $1.98
e@ ee crinkles like chocclate ;

we

ww
re
coe
Oa

Via Italy and America, they
are now here... to stay...







paper, is
also new for cocktail dresses.
Coronation year wedding
fashion will be the all white
bridal gown worn with a white
fur fabric jacket and pillbox.






Medium ...... $2.08

BEDROOM AND DRAW-
ING ROOM RUGS
$3.48





— ee is Spies Are Busy wee “0
Susan Deacon's News for Women FASHION spies are busy trying} MPP ON Oe eee eee BRIX po. $4.
|S ee oo ERG IS DPea to ferret out details of the Double veeees, $5.15
Pr Queen’s summer wardrobe. 5 Alluring Shades
(BY SUSAN DEACON) that men will like them. They I hear that one American TD «
I GREET with wonderment ana ¥"'t: ; : fashion house was prepared to BED SHEETS
joy the new fashion arrival from , “24 DON’T imagine that they spend up to £35,000 for photo- Bingle and Double
the Contizent—the Bare Backed wy, on ne ae afi graphs aoe Carte = oie .01 and $6.21
Sandal, you have a low instep you Queen’s clothes. It is the bigges TAPESTRY CLOTH
Sane â„¢ will have trouble keeping them a ever made for a fashion TAPESTRY CLOTH
We heard whispers from Italy on, and if you have a high instep secret. 48 in. wide
.+..the new shoes have no heels, they still feel as if they are The Queen’s dressmaker, $1.29, $1.33 and $1.46
and..rumours from France,,.. falling off. Norman Hartnell, told me: “. . . ———eTeTEO
they, are"Quite bare at the back But I predict that all fashion 1 can never relax our precautions STRAW MATS
...We s.w pictures ef them in conscious women will buy a pair. The Queen’s dresses are made In Bedroom and Drawing
the American magazines, but not New Colours up in several parts by different Room Sizes
so scon, I thought, would they FIRST of the autumn and workers, and very few people 80c., 90c., and $1.04
come to Britain, winter fashions seen in London see them complete, ee an esheets
British women seem to suffer jast week showed no change so. “On an important dress, such CRETONNES
with their feet. They like open far in the silhouette, but there as the Queen’s weer _—_ I 37 in. wide — 48 in. wide
oes and wedge heels. Comfort pre new colours and’ fabrics. had to have a ~hour-a-day T. ;
first. “yeu Sherry’ brown and benedictine guard on the building, and had SUI Ss LINEN SHORTS $10.50 790, and $1.32
re this elegant, fashionab!> with b'ack, creme de menthe, to black out all downstairs win- ‘ MOSQUITO NETS
and flattering new shoe style is pin gin, enadine, light ale dows.
well on the way even to beating Beenie souk are the coor in- “The sketches are seen by only KHAKI SHORTS $5.50 SUITS MADE TO ORDER Ready made
the ankle strap sales, expensive coat colours, two people—my dressmaker anc IN Medium ......... $6.30
DON’T imagine for a moment }

A lovely slate colour, called myself.”—L.E.S,

FROM A WIDE RANGE



















ae —————— | TROPICALS Sie wasn at
WOT spe vere - 57c.
NEW LOW PRICES LINEN este: teh SHIRTS Baek
GARBERDINE. and WR Sees) $1.30
FINE QUALITY WHITE CAMBRIC 36” .............00s00s0es ene 98 TROPICALS PYJAMAS HEAD KERCHIEFS
BUM) Me WHITE PRINTS,S6) occ cv vcccgn esas See bans beets 84 WOOLLENS From $35.00 up SOCKS TIES —"
Also TROPICAL PANTS : te acid %
MOR i ei bexc aaah edanhevel el icienciens ACs Be dpa we WORSTEDS ae ae SHOES.
MN NF e050 os A in wenn son dead ah wate bgagees 1.00 HAN :
. § THE LONDON SHOP LTD. BROS. |
T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS | pr. Wm, ery. street ana
DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606 | Se eee ats concn Sls ta ae
é § y


TUESDAY, JULY 1,

1952



Teachers Seek Parents’ Co-operation |

Begin Island Wide
Educational Plan

THE ELEMENTARY

School Teachers of Barbados

have started an island wide campaign to get the co-oper-
ation of ete oun in the training of the young. The first

meeting of

campaign was held last night at the Provi-
dence Boys’ School, Christ Church, and Mr.

J. Cameron

Tudoi addressed the teachers and parents.

Mr. Tudor said in: part :

We are all of us here this eve-
ning at the bidding of the Prim-
ary School Teachers of this island.
They are seeking our support and
enthusiasm for a cause so over-
whelming in its importance that
we scarcely grasp its significance.
We are here to inaugurate a cam-
paign, destined to be island wide
and designeg to rescue our young
people from all the consequences
of faulty character training. It is
altogether fitting that Teachers
should interest themselves in this
grave matter and it is even more
fitting that they should seize this
splendid opportunity to bring home
to the rest of us, the plight of our
young people. And the fact that
our Primary School Teachers have
embarked on this campaign is in
itself a warning to parents, guard-
iang and to the community that we
have largely fallen asleep at our
posts.

Not infrequently is it tolq to us
with all the fervour which attaches
to the announcement of a dis-
covery that we live in a changing
world. The people who tell us this
are usually professionai politicians
and newspaper editors. It is time
that their actions contradict their
thesis at every point, but the
‘thesis is in part true. The world is
in fact changing. But only in
material externals. The age old
problems of humanity—good and
evil, truth and falsehood, beauty
and ugliness — ever remain to be
solveq in each historical period.
The challenge of evil and sin are
ever present and each generation
is therefore equidistant from. Efer-
nity. It is in the light of this
truth that we approach this prob-
lem of character training in the
lives of the young.

The Child

One of the most depressing tasks
of the Educationist lies im. his
contemplation of the child — to
discover what sort of human being
he or she is. Books have been
written, diligent researches com-
pleted, lectures have been given,
all on this problem, the problem
of making a correct assessment of
the human young. True we know,
roughly speaking, its chief human
needs. On the purely physical side;
these are food, warmth and shelter,
and it is gratifying to discover
that governmental authorities are
at last discovering a connection be-
tween the suitable satisfaction of
these requirements and a success-
ful school career. Moreover, the
satisfaction of the physical needs
are of abiding interest to the
teacher who finds, more often than
not, that his expected results are
denied him, through the neglect of
these basic needs.

When, however, we pass to the
moral anq_ spiritual requirements
of a child, it is there that the trou-
ble begins. We seem unable to
make a correct assessment of the
child@’s needs in these spheres
because we so often forget that he
or she is a person in his or her
own right. And yet, on any defi-
nition of personality — and —
are several — we should ali, J
think, agree that a person to be
fully a person, must have secur-
ity, adventure and responsibility.

This is what we ought to mean
by security. Go into our Law

Courts any day, but especially on
criminal as-

the occasions when






REDIFF

Subseriber brought to and
to any
Com;

any.

¢ Have shways a supphy of Re



Offers a Commission of $1.50 in CASH for every New

“JDIFFUSION wil! pay in addition a bonus of $25.00
person who brings in twenty-five New Subscrib- 34
ers in ene Calendar month who are accepted by the @



sizes are being neld. An observant
person can gather, from the vast
majority of cases he listens to,
that the accused persons, more
often than not, show all the hail
merks of inferiority. He can read-
ily see that they have probably
never been really cherished by
anyone, that they have emerged
from loveless homes, stunted in
their emotional life, resorting *o
violent crime in qa futile gesture
to assert not their superiority —
poor wretches, they dare not hope
for that—but their equality! So
that the security we ought to have
in mind is not the mere freedom
from physical want—important as
that is — but acceptance by a
group whose love, whose approval
and whose esteem are necessary to
the moral growth of the child.
Moreover a child needs order-
ly living for his moral growth, He
must therefore observe in the re-
lationships of his parents affection,
mutual respect and a_ level of
physical decency which neither
increases noy restrains his natural
euriosity. In addition, it is neces-
sary that his childhood be passed
ina moral environ-
ment — preferably within the
bounds of Christian marriage, so
that his sensitive confidence is not
stiflea by am atmosphere of sexual
irregularity, by the spectacle of
tyranny or by the infrequent ar-
rivals and departures of the male
parent on the streetcar named
‘Desire’. That, ladies and gentle-
men, is what I mean by security.
It is woefully lacking in the lives
of our children and its importance:
cannot be over-emphasised.

Adventure

The second moral and spirilual
neeg Of the child is adventure, lic
must have fresh things to do, fresh
interests to delight in, and new
knowledge to acquire. All these
he needs simply because he is 4
Person. This curiosity is part ol
him and we have no right to ask
him to develop without it. From
crawling to standing, from stand-
ing to stepping and thence to
climbing aMq balancing—in ali
these he gains new confidence,
nourishes his soul on each success-
ful venture, until at maturity nis
natural curiosity leads him into
the adventure of ideas, thus mak-
ing him a philosopher, or into the
adventure of realities, thus mak-
ing him a christian,

And then there is responsibility,
the need for which is the third
moral and spiritual requirement
of the child. In order that you
may grasp it more readily, let me
describe it as the need of personal
independence through the medium
of something over which respon-
sibility can be assumed. Naturally,
at the tenderest age, this mahifes/s
itself in the desire for personal
possessions. This desire is an emi-
nently wholesome one and ought
to be encouraged. And for this
reason. Quite often the habitual
thief is the person who, as a child,
had never had anything of his own,
and everybody who has ever had
any dealings with delinquent chi'-
dren, must know how heart ren“ -
ing it is to hear gq little girl te'l
how she had always wanted a do'l
but her mother was too poor to
give her one,

The desire for possessions in the
young is a wholesome one. Its sat-

USION

aecepted by the Company.

POD DOVVOOOPOGVOG GYR

SE LOSOOS

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isfaction, no matter on what scale, child, the being whom he must properly.

is a sensible thing, for it encour-
ag@s responsibility and responsi-
bility is an ingredient necessary
to personality.

It is wrong to give a child a toy
which he can enjoy or manipulate
unaided. Rather should he be
given something which he cannot
work unless he summons the
assistance of a brother, a friend or
an adult. In this way his orienta-
tion is guided away from himself
as an object of devotion and to-
wards co-operation with another
human being as a desirable and
pleasant attainment,

The Teacher

When I turn from. the child to
his teacher I am on firmer
greund, and for a very simple
reason. In dealing with the child
[ could rely only, for the most
part, on insight and direct observ-
ation. But the problem of the
teacher comes to me through vital
experience. Having enjoyed the
experience of teaching for at least
nine years at various levels, I feel
slightly more confident in attempt-
ing to relate the duties of respon-
sibilities of the teacher to the press-
ing requirements of the moment,
especially the requirements of the
tasks which we have to dis-
charge.

The three supreme vocations of
man are parenthood, teaching and
the sacred ministry. If these are
fulfilled adequately the aspirations
of ‘human beings will, it seems to
me, comprise the complete and en-
during City of God. And anyone
who desires to enter any part,
however small, of this trinity of
callings for the greater upliftmen:
of human life, must ds someone
has said in a diffegent connection,
live dangerously, For of all occu-
pations that of a person training the
young is the most dangerous,
partly because the school as such
is not as well based as the family
or the Church. It does not possess
such natural supports, Within this
context let us analyse the duty
and attitude not of the perfect
teacher (there is no such persen)
but of the teagher who thwarted
and hemmed in on every side, stiil
moves towards perfection in the
training of his charges. As usual,
he trains them by training him-
self and we refer to him in the
purely generic sense.

A very distinguished Educator
once defined in relation to the
tastes of a teacher, the difference
between a well educated well in-
formed man and a clever unedu-
cated man. It was that in the one
case the knowledge and training
have been absorbed into the
whole life and that in the other
it is eonfined to the head, With
one it flows naturally with the
other it is the consequence of con-
scious effort mingled with vanity.
I submit that the distinction in
true and that only the first kind
of teacher can really influence the
young in the building of their
character.

Face to Face

Such a teacher, in whom know-
ledge had been absorbed in his
whole life and not merely in his
head, will not worry about other
work he might prefer to do. He will
gladly accept his role of co-workey
with God, nourishing the soul
committed to his care. It will not
matter greatly whether he is a
mere assistant or whether he is
really teaching the subjects or the
pupils he would prefer to teach.
Nor will he ignore the defects of
his own character by feeding his
ambition on the outlines of the
school where he would like to be
headmaster. Brought face to face
with all sorts and conditions of
children, he will accept them as
they are and with the eye of the
soul he will see them, even in the
weaknesses as the summit of God’s
creation. Face to faee with the
unnerving simplicity of a



BARBADOS ADVOCATE ~



Naturally, there ar

t will not matter greatly

nourish, he will naturally realise good reasons for the nursery of make a firm resolve now to cdo

that in being himself he is more
nearly certain of being the perfect
teacher.

To influence those committed
his care, he will reveal all the en*
gaging qualities of a little child

the simple faith, the trust and con—

fidence which gives learning its
attraction and which rendeys to
the business of education that
proper degree of humility without
which no man can dare hope to
enter the Kingdom of Heaven, The
mainspring of his own existence,
the Faith by which he lives and
in whieh he hopes to die—this
should be the granary from which
a hungry soul may refresh itself
with renewed vigour for the
perilous business of growing up
in a sinful world,

Tt is true that environment
works against him, But yet, if in
deference to ignorant administra-
tors or to a pathetic community
he acquiesces in what is hideous
or artificial and betrays his trust
or betrays his noble aspirations,
the consequences are clear, The
child becomes depressed and frus-
trated, his gifts atrophy and he

emerges into a.man’s world a
frustrated being, without self

respect, conceited and ill-balare-
ed. And all because ks teacher
kad looked away from the light.

If his school is a bad one, if, that
is, he is subject to a narrow mind-
ed headmaster er to an ill dispoved
interfering bedy of managers, or to
an ignorant and befogged educa-
tional authority his answer must
ie in the contribution which his
own personality makes and the
degree to which it can subdue ad-
verse circumstances, For when he
remembers that there are little
people who rely on his personality
for nourishment he will, I think,
be much consoled and heartened
by the fact that his usefulness is
far greater in content and value
to his pupild than are his depres-
sion and sense of frustration,

He will remember that he is at
all times a teacher. Other claims
may be made upon his time, energy
and upon his inclinations, To these,
he must of course respond, but
never out of relation to the re-
quirements of hig vocation as a
teacher, For any teacher who en-
ters a legitimate sphere of action,
for instance political controversy,
in such a manner as to divert his
teaching energy and interest, is
acting in bad faith towards the
children who rely upon his words
and actions as mariners rely upon
the stars and compass, He can
properly exercise his talent for
citizenship mainly in his teaching.
That is the station to whieh it has
pleased God to call him, He can
best. serve his God by serving his
work. In his own school ard
through the school he stamps his
indelible mark upon the character
of his community since every
child he influences is a citizen.
Though he may work through a
long career, perhaps not getting the
promotion he has deserved, yet as
he reads or hears of the nobie
exploits of some child since grown
to adulthood, he will experience a
solemn pride in having laid hig
ambition on the altar of Personal-
ity. So you who teach can lift
up your hearts. There can be no
real failure, only degrees of suc~
cess. The way may be difficult,
but every step forward increased
“the multitude of the wise, the
welfare of the world.”

The Parental Problem

We have now arrived at the most
important aspect of this problem.
The responsibilities of parents in
assisting the teacher or at least
in not undoing his work, Here in
Barbados as elsewhere, it appears
to be an uphill struggle even to
impress upon parents the hard
necessity of being good examples
to their children apart from the





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life we see around us ana
ould like to stress here the im-
ance of a reasonable standar
; material well being to the
x upbringing of children. I
lad be more than foolish to
pre the fact that the mac
scramble for food, clothing anc
shelter exhausts the moral an
spiritual energies of most of ow
parents and it is only a few who
surmount the difficulties of ever
day living to attend to other mat-
ters. And it seems to me that a
sound duty rest upon our Govern-
ment to ease the burden of living
sufficiently to enable parents
fulfill theiy more important role
wus examples to and trainers «
such souls as are committed t
them by God.

But even when allowances av
made for the hardships unde
which most of us have
live, there is still the respotr
sibility which reste upon parent
as such: To explain is n
to excuse. For parents, lil
all of us are sinful creatures,
dive need of salvation—persons
who need to be put aright if i)
guidanee they in turn pass on to
their children is to be worthwhile.
And T can only supply th

guidance by drawing your atten
tion to Christian doctrine 0!
Parenthood, Which is the natural

consequence of the Christian Doe

trine of Marriage.

At a stage further we meet th
problems of the home. These o
many and varied. But they
arise from thé imperfect gra

which parents have of their dutic
More than half of the unhappin¢é
of children can be traced direct
to the selfishness of parents.
never occurs to them that the
have a responsibility before G
to their children, compared wi ii
which the necessity to feed an
clothe their young is relative)
unimportant.

What parents have to realise i
thet the home is the chief trainir

ound of the child. The schoo!
S awe supplementary, To nep-
lect an obvious duty on the temp
img calculation that the te ach
Wil discharge it is the hallmar}
of cynicism and cowardice. An
nothing but curses and contem)!
are the fitting reward of all
parents who neglect their plain
duty, a duty inherent in their vo-
eztion as a parent—on the spur “)
ous ground that they are not)
qualified to train their young. % ‘|
they are not qualified then, wit
God's Grace, they must

instruct their young by turning!
away from the wickedness they
have committed, and by doing th:
which is lawful and right. Thu
and thus only, can they save the
own @hildren’s souls and the

The truth is of course, that th
duty of imparting moral and re-
ligious training to children resi
on both parents in an equal dé
gfee. If a man claims that h
deily toil renders him unfit +f
assist in this work, so may
‘wife retort with more than Taste
that her daily toil also renders he

unfit. Actually this is what hay
pens. Naturally the _ childre
suffer. But the duty falls on both
since both are necessary to th
moral stability of the children

Thus we should bitterly contes(
to argument of the father whx
pleads inability to his duty o |

the doubtful ground that he is too
busy earning bread. He is
coward, shun him.

So we launch this campaign

among all parents for one good
and sufficient reason only. The!
teachers of our Primary schoo!l-|
are willing to share yowr burde:

in the teaching of your
They are anxious that your chil
dren, no matter what their statior

in life, no matter what their gifts|
pert}

may be, shall play their fell
as citizens of this community au
of course of the world. Even if

little positive duty of training. them you have hitherto heen negligent

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ewe "i Phy ae

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MORRIS

BiG

God's will in the upbringing and |
training of your children, Join
with them in Parent-Teacher

Association. Such bodies will help
your children. We have started
a campaign. It is for all parents
to turn it into a moral crusade
under the banner of Him who wa:
once a Child, has always been

|
}
}

if you;

}

parent and still remains a Teact- |

er from those truths by which
nen ought to live and die.

Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gen-
Uemen, you have borne with me.
long enough. I am grateful to the
Headmaster of the School for the
high privilege I have enjoyed. |
wish you well in your work and
pray that success will attend you,
In conclusion, I like to think how
vften T have been sustained by
the words of an Amerzican poet.

“To be out of the moiling street

With its weiter and its sin!

Who hath given me this sweet

And given my children dust to eat?

vd when will their wage come in’

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PAGE THREE



SUB0 SRaEeC AF the name are “sao

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_



PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS eal ADVOCATE

uses | Gee wee’
Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad 8t., Bridgetown





Tuesday, July 1, 1952.

— — —







—

MILK MARKETING

THE Annual General Meeting of the
Milk Marketing Board held in London on
June 13th, produced information about
milk which will interest milk producers in
Barbados. The Chairman, Mr. Thomas
Peacock, noted that because of the rapid
increase in costs of milk production during
1951 together with a serious under- recoup-
ment in prices the dairy herd was reduced
by three per cent. “In 1952 the price of
milk was raised to a sixpence a pint and a
further price increase of 4d. a gallon is
contemplated. ,

In addition to increasing the price of
milk the Government of the United King-
dom is taking steps to provide a greater
incentive for dairy farmers to maintain
their yields of milk. These steps include
proposals for a fertiliser subsidy, plough-
ing-up grants and most important of all the
stabilization of the price of purchased feed-
ing stuffs.

“These and other benefits” comments Mr.
Peacock “will be of great assistance to the
preducer who strives for maximum pro-
duction, especially the small man who
plays such an important part in the milk
industry and who of necessity must pur-
chase the bulk of the feeding stuffs con-
sumed by his cattle.”

Mr. Peacock commended the Minister of
Agriculture for making it clear that the
development of milk and the rearing of
cattle for beef should go hand in: hand.
There are numbers of small milk pro-
ducers, he says, who rear some cattle but
for whom the regular monthly milk
cheque is essential. These men cannot run
their small farms on the basis of stock-
rearing alone and. there, is every reason
why they should couple milk selling with
stock rearing and expand the output of
both.

“This” says Mr, Peacock “is the proper
approach to a better economy for some
thousands of these small holdings on which
so much progress has been made in recent
years. I repeat that in our view the
growth of the milk and beef industries are
complementary and this should be the
basis of Government policy.”

Officials of the Agricultural Department
of Barbados and private dairy keepers will
be pleased to note that their own observa-
tions are supported by these statements of
the chairman of the Milk Marketing Board
of England.

At the same time everyone will note that
without a Milk Marketing Board the en-
couragement to produce milk or beef is
small. The high cost of establishing a
central milk depot: the unstable price of
animal feed: the absence of government
assistance to the dairy farmer or livestock
producer; all militate against any improve-
ment in the production of milk and beef
locally.

The Government of Barbados might
profitably study the statements of the
Chairman of the English Marketing Board.

Particular attention ought to be paid to
the sentence in which it is stated “the
Board cannot take the lead in an expan-
sionist policy without being set in controf of
the marketing side’. In Barbados at
present there is an unhealthy climate of
opinion backed by a large number of so-
called operators of “private enterprise” that
only the Government can run anything,

As a result all schemes requiring co-
operation on the part of primary producers
are regarded as “risks” which only the
Government can afford to take The
private dairy keepers and producers of
livestock ought to organise and form an
active union which will negotiate with the
Government, not wait for the Government

to spoonfeed them with the kind of con-
cessions that the National Farmers’ Union

of England are always active to obtain for
their members.

CANCER

HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor of
Barbados Sir Alfred Savage has supported
an appeal which has been circulated to a
limited number of people living in Barba-
dos. The appeal is addressed to people all
over the British Empire and funds are re-
quested in aid of the British Empire Can-
cer Campaign.

The battle against cancer is still to be
won. Words are unnecessary to stamp the
horror of this dread disease, There must
be nay hundreds of people living in Bar-
bados to whom the letters signed by Sir
Alfred have not. been addressed, but who
would be only too eager to send a contribu-
tion to the “British Empire Cancer Cam-
paign Appeal.”



Contributions ought to be mailed direct to |

The British Empire Cancer Campaign
Appeal
His Excellency the Governor of Barbados
Sir Alfred Savage K.C.M.G.,
C/o The British Empire Cancer Cam-
paign,
11 Grosvenor Crescent,
Myde Park Corner,
London, S.W.11.,
England.

As Sir Alfred notes at the end of his
letter “your contribution will not only be of
tremendous encouragement to all working
for this cause, but indeed for all you know,
may constitute the deciding factor towards

ievi utstanding success.”
ws duipaigh is wholly dependent upon

public support.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



LONDON LETTER

It has always been a debate
among students of history
whether personalities dominaic
events or whether events dom-
inate personalities, Had Napo-
leon been born fifteen years
earlier he might never have
been more than a professional
French soldjer who retired to
his native Corsica and bored his
relatives with stories of Paris or
fought battles with toy soldiers.

If it had not been for the
second World War Winston
Churchill would have been re-
garded as no more than a brilli-
ant frustrated politician and
historian whose genius was dis-
counted by his lack of judg-
ement. His opponent, Adolpn
Hitler, would have been just
another agitator if the Kaiser
had not led his country to de-
feat in 1914-18 and prepared for
the coming of Germany’s man
of evil destiny.

Rerhaps there is no answer to
the problem that I have posed.
Events throw up leaders, and
then the leaders dominate
events. Great men and great
villains are lucky if they are
born in the right period.

All this is a preamable to a
warming prospect that is unfold-
ing before our eyes. If the
American people are not frus-
trated by the party machine they
will elect Mr. Eisenhower next
November as President of the
United States. If the British
Conservative Party fights
another general election within
the next two or three years it is
practically certain that Anthony
Eden will lead it into battle.

I do not believe that Mr.
Churchill] has any intention of
retiring now. For one thing his
Government is under heavy:
bombardment and he was never
a man to leave the battlefield
while the guns were in full blast.
Nor is there any sign of physical
or mental deterioration which
would make him seek the sanc-
tuary of private life. Despite
mistakes of certain of. his min-
isters he dominates the House of

nF ne ee

Commons with a brilliancy of
mind that irradiates every sub-
ject it lights upon.

_. Yet he has his position in his-
‘tory to consider and no man in
‘his 78th year can claim that the
end of the story is still beyond
the ranges. Five times in his
stormy career Winston Church-
ill was defeated by the constitu-
ents whom he wanted to repre-
sent. He was not elected to
power as Prime Minister in 1940
but merely succeeded Mr. Cham-
berlain, The first time he went.
to the country as head of a gov-
ernment was in 1945 when the

British electorate threw him out

with a huge adverse majority.

a, oe in ee

and only won by a tiny ality

in 1951, Five eiptaas defeats
are almost unequalled in any
other political success story.

If he were to go to the coun-
try next year and if he once
more met defeat the ultimate

historian would have a strange
story to record. I do not

the fates again.

There are gossips who say that
the Tory Party will force
Churchill to resign, The ‘Tories
do some foolish things but are
not completely mad. If we told
Churchill to go—and we have
the right to do so—we would be
jeered at and condemned even
by the people who always voted
against him, and history would
tear us to tatters,

So we come back to Anthony
Eden, that handsome, greying,
perfectly tailored Crown Prince
of the Conservative Party.

Let it not be imagined that he
is without critics, Many of the
younger Conservatives believe
that his political experience has
been so grooved that he would
be at a loss to deal with the do-
rmestic problems that confront a
Government, In war and in peace
he has moved in the Chancel-
lories of the world,—the dip-
lomat, the Foreign Minister, the
dreamer gazing at the globe on
a swivel. What does he know of
Lancashire's cotton, or Sheffield’s
steel, or the Durham mines?
What does he know even of agri-
culture except what he sees

Waste Land And Labour
To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—I saw quite recently—
in the press—a statement that
there is quite a lot of idle land,
in small plots, within the ex-
tended boundaries of Bridge-
town City, followed by an ex-
pression of regret that it is not
cultivated and made to contri-
bute its quota of food for. the
ne hungry people around, and
for the large additional com
who cannot afford to pay the
high prices demanded at pres-
ent for the various kinds of
vegetables.

The statement. brought back to
my memory the circumstances
that in the early, busy, days of
the O.A, Pensions Committee in
St. Michael the ee Officer
sometimes reported, in answer to
our questions concerning the cir-
cumstances of applicants for the
pension, that there was a spot of
land attached to the applicant’s
house—either owned or rented—
which was not being used to ad- «
vantage, perhape because the old
person was not able to cultivate
it. And I remé@mber too that I
one day approached Mr. Guy
Perrin, then La Commission-
er, with the su ion that Gov-
ernment should provide a small
credit by means of which the idle
land and unemployed could be
utilised together for the general
benefit.

Alas! however, Mr. Perrin
wanted me to furnish details
concerning such spots of land,
their number and extent, the cost
of the necessary labour and
equipment, ete.—red tape once
more—which of course I was not
able to do. So my well-meant
plan—as I thought—fell through.
One would have thought it
would be a simple matter for
Government to place at the Com-
missioner’s disposal a suitable
small credit tp be spent at his
discretion for such a practical
purpose, subject of course to
proper reteipts and explanations
for the Audit Office,

a
spe ersten amg ecenetinentheeinenisainetnsilpentneecmmcccsn cameo | eanienaeaneneene

Our Readers Say:

Hy everley Haxter

from the windows of his country
house? j

The case against him does not
end there. We have a growing
body of opinion which believes
that our fate rests with fhe
British Commonwealth and
Empire. To the new Imperialist
the Sterling Bloc is the only
instrument that can save us from
the thraldom of the dollar. It is
all very well for Eden to speak
French, German and Persian but
can he talk to Canada, Australia,
and New Zealand?

Strangely enough there is also
a campaign of att ition going on
in America against Eisenhower,
No one doubts his integrity but
since when was West Point the
nursery of political genius? A
general orders and his soldiers
obey. A president must carry the
people with ‘him by logic, per-
suasion, exhortation and even
admonition. When the wind
blows hard against him the
politician must bend like a reed
and wait for the fury of the gale
to pass,

After my talk with General
MacArthur in New York last
January I was convinced that at
a given moment MacArthur
would campaign against the
adoption of Eisenhower on the
grounds that Americans did not
want to be changed into a mili-
tary State by having a general
in the White House, That
prophecy has proved true. Mac-
Arthur is the open enemy of the
man who once served on his
staff,

At the time that I wrote of
MacArthur [ believed that
Senator Taft would secure the
Repub'ican nomination and that
the would be defeated by Mr,
Trumen, Since then one cf my
two horses dropped out and I
must revise my estimates. Now
I believe that if Mr. Taft be-
comes the official Republican
choice he will be defeated by
the Democrat nomines whoever it

. On the other hand I have
little doubt tha, if Eisenhower
ig chosen by the Republican
Party he will d:feat any candi-
date that the Democrats can
produce,

So we come back to our first
proposition—that if Anthony
Eden and Dwight Eisenhower go
to the polls as the official choice
of the Conservative Party and
the Republican Party both will

ed to power, If this
does come about I am equally
certain that for the first time in
years world peace and world co-
operation will pass from the
realm of impossibility into the
clear light of the achievable,

One of the basic reasons for
the defeat of Hitler’s Germany
was the intimate and sympa-
thetic understanding between
Churchill and Roosevelt, It was
not to be expected that Truman
and Churchill could achieve a
similar unity of mind and tem-

think
that Churchill will gamble. with "perament, But if Anthony and

Ike become the political leaders
of their two nations we

well see a unison of purpose that
would achieve miracles.

Both were fighting soldiers,
and if the young Eden rose no
higher than a Brigade major at
21, with the M.C., he was made
Secretary of War by Churchill
when the old warrior took com-
mand of the stricken field in
1940, Only the archives could
show how often in the perilous
day that followed the collapse of
France Edsn’s advice was bold,
consiructive and shrewd, He
backed Wavell in the desert when
Churchill! wanted to recall him,
and Wavell gave the British
their first victory. What is more
Eden urged that we should rein-
force Wavell with armamenta
although we desperately needed
revi ing for the invasion that
seemed about to burst upon us,

Not ¢ven the most adept
syncophant could pretend that
Eden’s mind has the brilliance
of Churchill’s. A mordant wit
once said of Eden that he was
the greatest silent film Foreign
Secretary in history but was

Now in harmony with the
statement with which I com-
menced this‘ letter I have the
pleasure to add that on a very.
recent occasion I was accosted
in Bridgetown by a middle-aged
unemployed man—though not on
agricultural worker—for some-
thing to buy a meal, who actu-
ally voiced my old idea that
Government should put him and
other out-of-works to cultivate
idle: empty land and increase our
scanty s v of plain foodstuffs,
and so enable them to earn mod-
est support instead of begging—
or stealing. :

In this case it would mean the
Government acquiring a couple
of acres of idle land, in one or
more plots, and arranging to
send thither city idlers (under
the direction of some competent
Overseer or Driver) and thus
using to purpose the “Waste
Labour”. (If any idler refused
to al ‘ae a eee a way—
well, ternative is obvious).

many in order to give
’
weight and £

force to the idea, I

offer a rather sti quotation
from ape, "s famous
The Great Il which

book,

I feel Somewhat ashamed to say
I have just seen for the first
time—from our Public Library
—a quotation taken in its turn

“Tf all the employable labour
“were employed for a reasonable
“number of hours per week the
“world would have at its dis-
“posal a volume of commodities
“and services that would enable
“the entire population to live on
“a higher level of comfort. and
“well-being than has ever been
“contemplated in the rosiest vis-
“ions of the Social Reformer”.

By the way. Is that the H.R.H.
who was later for a few months
King Edward VIII? He might
have been speaking at one of the
modern Conferences for assist-
ance to the. under-developed
portions of the hungry world.

Yours truly,
F. GODSON.

June 26, '52,

ruined when the talkies came
Ceriainly his appeal is more to
the eye than to the ear yet he
remains a tremendous draw as
a speaker. He can fill any hall
in Britain or any sports ground
no matter how vast,

Like Eisenhower he gives the
impression of decency. That
may seem a tame tribute but
through the centuries Shake-
speare’s words: “Like a scurvy
politician,” remains the normal
attitude of people ards those
who are elected to govern them.
But who would say that Anthony
or Ike is a seurvy fellow?

The tragedy of America is
that she permitted two world
wars by clinging to the policy
of Isolation when the world had
become physically and political-
ly meaningless. The glory of
America is that when the Hitler
war was over she took the bur-
den of leadership upon her
shoulders and kept hope alive
when death and disaster stalked
across Europe. President Tru-
man has never received the
tribute he deservs for his cour-
age and his vision. No Ameri-
can President has ever taken
such momentous decisions of
such profound significance to
mankind.

; Who can doubt'that if Eisen-
hower is elected’ President his
personality will have a profound
effect on people in every land?
They say he is inexperienced as
a politician but is that true?
Any man who could k Alex-
ander, Montgémery, Bradley and
Patton fighting the enemy and
not each other is either a man
of great character or is as adrow@
as Machiavelli,

ERisenhower’s planning of the
invasion of Europe was magni-
ficently done. e has a cour-
ageous mind and a simplicity of
spirit. e may not command
language like Lincoln nor mes-
merise the people as Roosevelt
did but plain speech can attain
heights as well as oratory. The
Americans are basically humani-
tarian, generous and sentimental,
Eisenhower would give expres-
sion, to all this.

Simultaneously (looking
ahead) Anthony Rden would be
meeting the onslaughts of the
Opposition in Parliament with
good humour, with clarity and
an occasional flash of anger—
for he has a temper.

He would speak even of the
Russians with courtesy and he
would pledge Britain to the cause
of lifting up the people of the
world from the swamps and the
lowlands to high ground once
more. Downing Street and The
White House would be in con~
stant, intimate contact. Whereas
Shakespeare wrote of Anthony
and Cleopatra the moving finger
of history might well write a
greater story th@b came from the
politician reign of Anthony and
Ike.

Many times in these London
Letters I have declared that
every great decline or great ad-
vance in the history of humanity
is first born ina man’s mind,
Hitler dreamed the subjugation
af Europe anda tyranny built on
cruelty and fear when he was a
pecesier of bad sunsets in Vienna,

ause he was bold, bloody and

resolute he accomplished his
dream, But there was another
man, Winston Churchill in whose
mind was borf the vision of vic-
tory when defeat and deflection
faced him on every hand. He
too, was bold, bloody and reso-
lute and he made his dream of
victory come true. In the pro-
cess Hitler and his kingdom of
horror went down, in flames,

It may be that in the saga of
the English speaking peoples we
shall seetwo men so. alike in
mind and spirit that they shall
act as one, It does not mean that
other leaders than they could not
also move towards a. common
objective but the element of
simpatica would not be the same.

At any rate we are fortunate in
that public life with all its sacri-
fiee and ingratitude still attracts
men of such calibre as Eisen-
hower and Eden, It is therefore
true that character is destiny ana
that in the end it is men who
dominate events,

Thus we have resolved the
problem which we posed at the

beginning of this Letter.

The Child, Teacher, Parent

SIR,—Your leading article this
morning on the ‘subject of the
University College Extra-Mural
Course on “The Child, the Parent,
and the Teacher” is greatly ap-
preciated, There is no question
of any restriction preventing any
members of the public from at-
tending this course; all Extra-
Mural activities have always
been open to the entire commun-
ity. But web called this
course a Study teuip. and have
sent out special invitations to
responsible and intelligent mem-
bers of the public — teachers,
probation officers, Scoutmasters,
secretaries of clirlie committees,
ete., — for the following reasons,
We hope that this first series will
be followed by a second, com-
ménecing in September, dealing
especially with adolescent prob-
lems and the practical applica-
tions of both series to the Bar-
badian community. Our further
eim, in 1953, is then to enlist tae
‘assistance of the original Study
Group, which we hepe will really
read and study fo spread this
knowledge by means of further
public talks in suitably simple
terms and otherwise among the,
population both in town and
country, especially where it
seems needed. The aim miy
seem ambitious, but we believe
the effort worth making. Mean-
while the present series has re-

ceived good publicity both in
the “Advocate” .and through
Rediffusion, and. it has al-

ready been decided to adver-
tise in the press the two closing
sessions on “The Parent and the
Teacher”. conducted by Mr. J. R.
Nicol. Mesnwhile I shall still
be glad to hear at 4653 from all
members of the public who wish
to join.

Yours very truly,
AUBREY DOUGLAS-SMITH,

Resident Tutor, Univ.

Coll, of W.I
Boy Scout H.Q.,
Beckles Road,
St. Michael,
Tel: 4653,

TUESDAY, JULY 1, 1952



|THE GOOD TIMES GO ON
.. —EVERYONE IS HAPPY

By NEWELL ROGERS
NEW YORK.

There is a boom in courage in Wall-street
tonight. And in business offices and the
offices of Government economists.

After examining new statistics and getting
reports from market places, they are say-
ing:—

Recession? Slump? Nonsense! Employ-
ment climbs to a record 61,176,000 job-holders.
Building reaches a new high level for May.
The armed forces are on a shopping spree.
They are pushing out a flood of new orders
and will spend £15,000 million.





PHOTOGRAPHS

Copies of Local Photographs

Which have appeared in the

Advocate Newspaper

Can be ordered from the ...

ADVOCATE STATIONERY



* * *
But the Federal Reserve Bank predicts
that consumer goods prices will not change
much in the near future. The price con-
trollers allowed grocers to put up food prices
this week. Many did not do it. They knew

FIBRE MATS:
Plain, Stencilled and
Decorated. These are
available in four sizes.

, CONGOLEUM

they would be boycotted by housewives. SQUARES
Says a Wall-street man: “Some pessimists 3x3 yds. & 3x 3% yds.

think the country’s going to the poor house. CONGOLEUM:

If so, the people are riding there in new cars
with full stomachs and a jackpot of cash.”

FOOTNOTE: If Wall-street is right, and
this prosperity continues, it could work
against the election of a Republican Presi-
dent, whether Eisenhower or Taft. Ameri-
cans have a tradition of not turning a party
out of office if they are prosperous.

HEDY LAMARR is to make 36 half-hour |!<
TV colour-films, Each will portray a great
love story. Napoleon and Josephine for ex-
ample.

ELEVEN Left-wingers are Britain’s isola-
tionists, says columnist David Lawrence on
a trip to Britain. He says he has talked with
men who are intellectually arrogant, use the
same phrases as America’s Right-wing isola-
tionists, and patronise “ignorant Americans.”

Six feet wide and cut
to any desired size.

Ph. 4472

C. S. PITCHER
& CO.










f 7 kes them
flies. Just want to know what makes FINE RECEIVERS

glow. .
NO PANIC yet over steel supplies, or 5-TUBE TABLE MODEL RADIO

ATOMIC scientists at Oak Ridge are offer-
ing schoolboys a shilling a hundred for fire- A COMPLETE RANGE OF : THESE

higher prices, because 650,000 steelworkers uae ap paren Phi +? 1h eyed

strike. Detroit’s car makers and other steel 6-TUBE FLOOR MODEL RADIOGRAM ........- 330.00

users arecalm. They have built up reserves. | agro Rg bags ae Soca. —_ - cutee
Another surprise —Washington officials are LET US DEMONSTRATE ONE OF THE ABOVE sexs

still talking of taking controls off steel if the AND JOIN THE HUNDREDS OF SATISFIED OWNERS.

strike lasts less than a fortnight. Today ry

management and men met in their first at-

tditipt to settle it DA COSTA & CO., LID.
FREE enterprise provides striking steel

mill pickets with TV in Warren, Ohio. An x
enterprising dealer installed sets in the |}
pickets’ shanties at the gates of the mill. Said
the dealer: “They’re our customers. It will
be good for business later.

NEW initials T'VU stand for T.V. Uni-
versity. Some of America’s biggest and best
universities are teaching at home over TV.
Twenty more are planning to jump in with
tele-courses.

AMERICANS are marrying younger than
ever—firls at 20, men at 22. Why? Fear of
loneliness, says one experienced man. And |Â¥
he says they stay together for the same
reason even when they fight and make each
‘other miserable, 1%
Experienced man is band-leader Artie 3
| Shaw, six times in and out of marriages. x
Is he lonely? ae re een als iid ii dels oii
Cr oone. with Cindere a,” he a : ; Ve Bamidals to suas ellen
ly believe marriage can work—even for me”. 8 al ohmiihadahaens” “od
None of his ex-wives is Cinderella. To Artie,!% ¢olours,
who is as solemn about life as a more famous
Shaw, Cinderella means wanting the wrong
things from life, not living with a purpose.

REX HARRISON and Lilli Palmer have
become loyal subjects of Broadway, not the
West End. Before sailing for Italy they ad-
mitted their visit to England, after a month
of sunbathing in Portofino, will be just for
a fortnight to see friends. Then back to
Broadway for more play-acting. They are
reading eight play scripts in Italy—only one
British, by Norman Ginsbury, called “The
Limit”.

PROUDLY the Licensed Beverage Imdus-
tries Inc. announces that Americans drink
less liquor now than at any time in the last
100 years. Why knock their own business?
Temperance and respectability keep pro-
hibition away.

NO such thing as an average American?
Shucks, man, Henry Ford’s engineers have
made him. True he is a plastic dummy in 18
pieces, But exactly average—6 ft. 9 ins. tall,
14st. 10% Ib. in weight. They use him in de
signing and testing care seats, arm rests, leg
and head room.

BAGPIPES

Professor Ugo Gualazzini, director of the
Cremona library, claims he has discovered
that the bagpipes were imported into Scot-



Our new Rubber Bathing Shoes for Mummy
and Family have arrived in a variety of styles.
Colours are White, Blue and Red.

Da Costa & Co., Ltd. AW



SOPRPROODPO PSE FPP SSP OFFS



Jolly Good !!

JAMS

WITH

J&R

ENRICHED
BREAD















JAMS

land 500 years ago from Cremona, home- Mixed Fruit ....... . $2.50
town of the world-famous Stradivarius Strawberry Jam $3.12
violins. > eeors Jam oa Barley Sugar

“A few months ago,” said the Professor, * coves me” Si Planters Nate A.
“I received a letter from a Mr. Thomas Pew- S. A. Marmalade... $2.28 re ieee an
ston, of Glasgow, who wanted to find out S. A. Pineapple Jam ... $2.82 oe aun
about a Bruni family who, according to a S. A. Apricot ws $2.82 Churchman’s Cigarettes
eer este, had brought the bagpipes “ALL THE TIME IS Embassy Cigarettes
OTe latte GOLD BRAID TIME”

MEAT DEPT.









“The letter added that as the Brunis had! ¢
changed their name té McKrimona, he ones rn. ee
thought they might have come from (3 yrs. Old) Milk Fed Chickens
Cremona. > On Hand Milk Fed Ducks

“The whole thing was news to me, and| $ Only $1.44 per Bottle Fresh Vegetables
jsounded rather strange. But after long re-| ‘ gles al ie
searches in our archieves, we boot! able a} 2
ascertain, not only that bagpipe band existec GOD ARDS 2
in Cremona 500 years ago, but also that a D FOR FINEST GROCERY SERVICE
jcertain Baxianus del Bruno had moved from Le 3
Cremona to Glasgow ¥in 1515”,—E.N.S. GOODS TIO O ISS “—worrreveerye Ts " e




TUESDAY, JULY +1,



Local Cycling Team
Prepare For Martinique

1952

D. GRANT, cf Holborn Boys’ is expected to make the
trip to Martinique at the expense of his Club. His team
mate (George Hill) was among the team selected by the

AAA.B.

The local Committee will meet tonight and the team
will be briefed on the rules which will apply in the 150

kilometre road race which
on the 14th instant.





Record Entries
For Examinations

During the months of June and
July the Department of Education
supervises the arrangements for
many examinations of Overseas
Bodies, especially those of the
Universities of London and. the
Oxford and Cambridge Board ac-
cording to a communique from
the department:

This year there has been a re-
cord entry Of candidates for many
of the regular examinations. Here
is a summary:

London B.A. Honours:—2 can-
didates,

B.A. General:—6 candidates,

B.Se. (Econ.):—1 candidate.

Inter Arts:—15 candidates.

Inter B.Se.—1 candidate, ;

London Diploma: Theology: —
3 candidates.

Inter Divinity:—3 candidates.

Master of Theology—1 candi-
date.

London Ist Medical.—l candi-
date,

LL.B., Part 1.—1 candidate.

London General Certificate of
Education:— Ordinary Level:—
67 candidates; Advanced Level: —
1 candidate.

Oxford and Cambridge Gener-
al Certificate of Education: —

Advanced and Scholarship
84 candidates; Ordinary Level: —
411 candidates: (

London Chamber of Commerce
—Elementary Stage:—83 candi-
dates; Certificate Stage—102 can-
didates.

Chartered Institute of Secre-
taries:—1 candidate.

Society of Commercial Account-
ants:—1 randidate.

Officers Will Be Elected At
Police Sports Club Meet

The Annual General Meeting ot
the Barbados Police Sports Club
takes place on Saturday this week.
The meeting will among other
things, elect officers to serve for
the ensuing year, and consider
the Secretary’s Report and the
Audited Statement of Accounts,

The Secretary’s: Report shows
that at the end of the last finan-
cial year, membership of the Club
stood at 582, The finances of the
Club show an increase of over
$7,000 over the 1950—51 figure.

MOBILE CINEMA
SHOW CANCELLED

Owing to unforeseén circum-
stances the show which was to
haye been given tonight. by__the
Mobile Cinema af Chance Mall,
St. Lucy, has been cancelled.



will be ridden in Martinique

During the week-end, Mr, L. A.
lyynch completed his translation
of the copy of the rules which was
written in French, and copies have
been made in order that each
member of the team will
them to study in full detail.

It is now known that the race
will begin at Fort de France and
will continue through Morne
Rouge, St. Pierre, Fort St. Denis,
back through Fort de France
(around the town) Deux Choux,
Fort St. Denis and back to Fort
de France by the return route.

The race is open to amateurs
or dependents only holding li-
cences either from the French
Federation of Cycling, the Interna-
tional Union of Cycling or the In-
ternational Federation of Cycling.

Classification

Each country or club will be
represented by a team of five com-
petitors, a substitute and a man-
ager, seven men in all. A cup will
be awarded to the team whose
five competitors take the fore-
most places at the winning pole,
classification being by points.

Each competitor is required to
pass a medical test the day be-
fore the race, and everyone taking
part in the race must be decently
dressed, and competitors must
observe the greatest caution and
must assume responsibility for
any accident in which they are
either cause or victim, The fact
that a competitor hhas started the

race implies a strict adherence to h

the rules by him.

Competitors are advised to ob-
serve the strictest discipline and
to show the greatest respect for
officials. Brakes must be fitted to
both wheels so as to avoid an
accident which may prove fatal.

h team will be allowed a
team vehicle on which will ride
the team manager and a _ substi-
tute, and refreshment points have
veen fixed along the course.

SPEEDING FINE
REDUCED

Their Honours of the Assistant

Court of Appeal, Mr, J. W. B. J.

Chenery 2nd Mr. H. A, Vaughan,
yesterday reduced by half a £6
fine His Worship Mr. G. B. Grif-
fith imposed on Calvin Cox of
Ashton Hall, St. Peter, for ex-
ceeding the speed limit while
driving the motor van (M 2352)
on Cheapside on November 27
last year.

Cox had pleaded guilty to the
offence, but appealed against the
sum imposed, The speed limit
along that part of Cheapside
Cox was travelling when he was
reported by P.C » Seymour Lash-
ley ts 15 miles an hour, but he
was driving at 31% miles an hour.



H.E. Foresees Improvement In Local Scouting —

@ From page 1.
specialist scout to come and train
only 200 boys, and stressed the
need for building up the roll be-
fore considering the need for a
Travelling Commissioner,

The Island Commissioner ad-
mitted that there were many in
the island who had gone to Guild-
weld, but said that they were not
in Scouting today. He pointed out
further that many who had not
had the opportunity to go there
were still active, and charged that
scouting had not benefited from
those people going there.

Leaders Wanted

Major Griffith said, “we want
leaders and we cannot get them,
we want men of quality,” he add-
ed,
other people, It is no good spend-
ing a lot of money to train three
or four people. We want a com-
munity which realises the value of
scouting.” :

He observed that the quality of
scouting is poor compared with

“Men who can teach and lead °

scouting in Harrison College and
the Lodge School, there was a
nucleus for good scouting. He
said, “we want men who have
vision and an inspired sense of
community service,”

Hon, H. A, Cuke, President of
the Local Association warned that
the Scouts were not doing enough
themselves, and depended too
much on assistance from Govern-
ment and businessmen, the latter
of whom felt that the movement
was a “dead” movement.

He compared scouting of years
ago with that of today, and re-
ealled how the scouts of yester=
day took an active part in almost
everything.

He too, like the Commissioner,
observed that there was a lack of
enthusiasm within the movement
itself, and urged that they should
“do something to get people inter-
ested in the movement, He warn-
ed that the public would not get
interested unless the small nuc-





House Fire
Put Out

A one-roofed boarded and
shingled house, 16 ft. by 6 feet
by 10 feet at Deighton Road,
St. Michael, caught fire yes-
terday about 3.30 p.m. and
was quickly put out by the
Fire Brigade. The house is
the property of St. Gerald
Wallace of Rockley, Christ
Church, and was occupied by
Theresa Moses,



40/- For Untawful

Possession
His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma,

Police Magistrate of District “A”, A part of the roof and a
yesterday fined Denzil Forde of partition were burnt.
Bank Hall, St. Michael, 40/- to

be paid in 14 days or in default
one month's imprisonment for the
unlawful possession of lead and aris Kound-up
brass which he was carrying along —









Passage Road, St. Michael, on ie
June 28 Gar fituns Cif Road
Police Constable Lunn’ who

broucht the case said it was about . motor car G 114 owned and
5.15 p.m. when he saw the de- “#fven by E. Simpson of Superia-
fendant with the lead and brass UY Tan off the road waile
which he was carrying in his hand W4Â¥elling along Newbury Road,
on Passage Road. He asked the SÂ¥PGeorge, cn Saturday night
defendant how he had got the last, “proceeding in the direcuon
brass and lead and the defendant Of St. Judes. The ieft side of the
was unable to give him a proper Caf which siruck an embankment
explanation, He arrested the de- Was damaged. There were no
fendant and took him to the Cen- injuries to the occupants,
tral Investigation Department, " * 7

Sgt. Alleyne prosecuted for the _ Members of the Lodge School
Police from information received, Scout Troop went on a week-end
camp at Codrington College from
Friday, June 27 to Sunday and
spent an enjoyable camping
period, one of the boys reported
this merning.

25/- For Causirg
Dislocation.

A decision of His Worship Mr.
G. B. Griffith was yesterday re-



* >. .

Roman's C.C., champions of
Central Division 1950 and 1951,
got off to a good start in their
versed when Their Honours of first fixture vs. Danes C.C. and
the Assistant Court of Appeal won with a day to spare. Roman’s
ordered Randolph Glen of Passage had no opposition at all and won
Road to pay 25/- in seven days by an innings. Cambridge C.C. of
or in default, one month’s im- St. Joseph is at present leading
prisonment. Hadleigh’s C.C. on first innings

His Worship had dismissed this jn their Sunday Competition Fix-
case in which Glen threw Joseph ture which begun at Poole on
Marshall of Alkins’s Gap, Eagle June 29, but good bowling by
ie tae ee and dislocated # Ww. Cave and J. Higgison in

is right shoulder. ; A :

Marshall told. the Court that Combridge’s, second innings, has
© bad been at Passage Road and the total 22 runs, bringing

comet —s pa eon ae eet the lead for Cambridge to just
over thirty.

ee oe and told ho me
bring himself. in trouble; Glen * al ”
chucked him three times and Chimborazo's Koad, St. Joseph,
threw him to the ground. The which was rendered impassable
for many months, is again pass-
able and open to traffic. One

fall caused the dislocation.
pleasing feature is that _ the

20/- For Assauli *buses on Route 5 are again abe
: , Fs to take passengers to the end of
And Beating

the Route, at Blackman’s Cora-
e
Alexander Straker of Bank

r. Repairs on this road were
concentrated on damages caused
Hall, St. Michael, was yesterday by rains in 1950 and again last
ordered to pay 20/- by the Assist- year.
ant Court of Appeal Judges, Mr. * * $
W. B. Chenery and Mr. H. A. Maple C-C. the only club of
Vaughan for assaulting and beat- St, Joseph entering a team in the
ing Mabel O'Neal. In making this 1952 B.CLL. competition, kept
order, Their Honours varied the their reputation by starting the
om ot His Worship Mr. A. season as is their custom with a
es arper who had fined him Getent, ad hg beat thera. by
O'Na: ; a 4 runs. Eustace Small with four
the Onn tie Woke mae wickets for two runs. (second in-
The offence was committed on "ings) was the best Maple player
April 24 when O’Neale and Strak- He also played two not out in-
er were digging potatoes from a Mings. No player on either team
field at Guinea Plantation. Each reached double figures in the
of them had bought half of the game. Scores were: Nerwick 56
same row of potatoes and when and 34; Maple 29 and 27.
a dispute arose over some of the . * * :
potatoes, Straker cuffed her in Lobsters are at vresent in full
her left eye. *! supply and are scld at 25 cents





said that in his district, there was whether they had the people to

great enthusiasm. He felt the low train.

standard was mainly due to lack He said, “My impression for

of training, and stressed the idea the 21% years I have been here is
this: that for a number of reasons

of having preliminary training
the Seout Movement got com-

courses,
He told of the benefits he had pletely in the doldrum, and you
eannot expect in a few months

gained from attending training
to get on your feet after a num-

courses run by the Revd. A, E,
i n

Hesogrens, ‘st the. Septaeete,.. Soe ber of years of inactivity. I have

felt in the last few months that

urged that a similar practice be
d, 7
ee the public are taking greater in-

Other members who spoke sup-

rted the idea of running pre- terest’ in Scouting. I have
frninary training courses. a? felt that this Council,the indi-
After further discussion, His vidual members of this Council

Excellency in summing up the dis-
cussion said he had come to the
conclusion that the Council did not
consider the time opportune for sation by the Island Commissioner
the visit of a Travelling Com- is doing good, and if we are
missioner from outside, and he patient, we will see an improve-
directed that they should nota ment in scouting throughout the
that general opinion, and in the island.”

meantime, the Executive Com- His Excellency continued “I do
mittee go forward and consider recognise this, that there is not

are taking a greater interest in
scouting than their predecessors.
“T have felt that the reorgani-

the various suggestions

‘present since they are easier to:

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

SUMMER SCHOOL

THE University College of the West Indies Summer
School will be held this year at Codrington College by
permission of the Principal and Governing Board, from
July 25th to August Ist. The subject this year will be
“Drama and Dramatic Technique”.

Professor A. K, Croston, who
holds the Chair of English at the
University College in Jamaica,
will be in residence » during the
week, together with the Resident
Tutor. Professor Croston will lec-
ture on Modern English Verse
Drama, dealing especially w ith Saturday's racing at the T.T.C.|
T. S. Eliot's “Sweeney Agonistes Mecging, our @ninidad Corres-
and “The Cocktail Party". W. . pondent stated that “Ostara won

Haracé : Placed In
Different Classes

In our report on the results of |

Auden’s “Ascent of F.6” and the feature race today when she
Christopher Fry's “Venus Ob- beat “A” Class horses easily over
served”. Mr. Aubrey Doug as- the distance of six furlongs”, and

Smith will contribute a course on went on to add, “she was con-
Shakespeare’s middle period, vincing, beating Bright Light and

1 4 Castle-in-the-Air who ran un-
Dramstic Technique _ placed.”
On the prociical side of Dra- The face which was won by
‘ ‘nnigque ineluttiver cut, OStara, the Queen’s Park Stakes
matic Technique including such | for horses. classified “A” and
Sabjects as Make-up, Costume, “Dp”. Both Bright Light and Castle-
Stage Decor and the Arf. of Pro- inthe-Air are classified “C", anc
duction, the School will have the therefore did not take part in the
advantage of practical talks by “Queen's Park Stakes” with
Miss Hawkins and Miss Nurse ot Ostara.
Queen's College, and Mr. D. S.
Fowles. A feature of the Sum-
mer School will be evening ‘ses-
sions illustrating the progress of
a play from the first stages. My.
C. A. Grossmith, C.M.G., will The Schooner Sunlight, 34 tons,
first present the early stages of which arrived in Carlisle Bay
rehearsal, Mrs. Golde White and yesterday morning trom St. Lucie
Mr. A. F. C. Matthews wil] re- brought in 468 bags of copra
hearse groups at a later stawe, bags of charcoal, 31 drums of
and Mr. F. A. Collymore and the cocoanut oil, and five packages
Barbados Players will illustrate of fresh fruit, The 30-ton-schooner
the finished product by actua'ly Rosalie came in yesterday from
presenting a play at Codrington St. Lucia with 432 bags of copra,
College. 35 bags of charcoal and five

bunches of fresh fruit,
Car Strikes Pole




























“TURTLE DOVE”
BRINGS LUMBER



Three ‘hundred feet of lumber |,




and 600 drums of colas were

brought to the island by the

Shortly after 10.10 a.m. yester- Schooner Turtle Dove which also
day the motor car (M_ 2089) called here yesterday morning

owned by Mr. E. Fields of Roe- from Trinidad.
buck Street and driven by Fitz All these schooners are con-
Alleyne Welch of Licorish Vil- signed to the Schooner Owners’
lage, St. Michael, ran off Fountain a gsociation,
Road, St. Michael, and struck a
telephone pole.

No one was injured but the
front part of the motor car was
damaged.



Rudder At District “A”

His Worship Mr. C. W. Rudder,
Police Magistrate of District “B’
is now acting Police Magistratc

CANNED MEATS of District “A.” Yesterday he was
in the Centre Court o

Seventy-five tons of canned ee “AY
meats are to be imported into the “yy. 6 1, Walwyn who was act:
fsland between August and De- ing as Police Magistrate of Distric

cember, according to a notice «a is now sittin
g in the Distric
issued by the Office of the Con- «i Gourt at Boarded Hall Sta:

troller of Supplies.





Licences for this commodity tign.
will be issued against whole-
salers’ signed confirmation notes CORRECTION
up to their maximum distribu-
tion quotas, Applications for The address of Mr, J, O. Dickson

i Acting General Manager of British Wer
licences in respect of this item Shain Airways, is not Blairmont Estate,

close yeas Hy eet axe British Guiana. ec ampenred | oe fhe
been requested to submit the letter “uel” aX 0
sinned commashatiin notes showing Sawave, Manel eateer apaiy Tees
the quantities of each item of
canned meat, the C.F. price and
the net weight per case, and the
source of supply.





per pound. Totn men and boys}
can be seen nightly catching!
lobsters and crabs. Crabs are,

paying better than. lobsters at

catch arid the price asked for!
one is 18 cents or more.

sonal contact—it is only /if you
have got faith in yourself to get!
across to other people the,
importance of scouting and oa
boys, that you can get any~
where.”

“The regponsibility is ours and)
we have got to satisfy ourselves)
that we are doing our utmost
before we can expect to encour-
azu ocher people to help us.”

His Excellency made the
observation that “more is being
done now than was done 18
months ago, and added whether
the Training Centre is a good
idea, the Island Commissioner
had told us that Mr, Springer is
conducting three courses; I do
not know whether it is in rela-
tion to Scouters or Scouts, but
I would suggest that we refer
this matter to the Executive
Committee for them to
the suggestions made.

WATCHES

GOLD, STEEL or
CHROMIUM
Models for ladies or gents
FULLY GUARANTEED !
15 & 17 Jewels

A wonderful new range on
show at outstanding prices



Today at your jewellers ...

forward.

put the interest shown in parts of The Council

agreed

un-|| W. De LIMA




Sg



CREPES,



USE GLO

LPL ALLE

PAGE FIVE

mr

A MODERN BARGAIN

IN NEW

A Lovely assort-
ment of

SHEERS,

AND

Beautiful Light
Summer Colours

$18.00

EACH

Twinplex Sharpeners
Cigarette Holders
Photo Frames

Tea Strainers

Ash Trays



CANADIAN DRESSES

he Modern Dress Shows

BROAD STREET.

Gold Chloride bs
Huxley's Betul Oil
Mother Greaves Worm
Exterminator
Charcoal Biscuits
Sanitary Blocketles

HOUSEHOLD GLOVES
SKOL SUNTAN OIL



leus which was now there got up

this island by people who I
and did something.

would expect to have recognised
the value of scouting. In some
parishes there is not the jnterest
shown.”

His Excellency added “I
believe that it is only by per-

that in other islands, and charged
that “many scout leaders were not
taking enough interest in the
movement,” nor were they “trying
to improve their own standard of
scouting,”

He felt that with the advent of

His Excellency said that he
himself had been interested in
scouting for many years, but, he
was ‘forced to admit that he was
not clear on
points made,

Objection
Mr. L. T, Gay objected to the
general observation that Scout-

a number of the
masters were not interested, and

He was not sure



















Just Opened...

SANDY MAC DONALD WHITE SHIRTS — Colla:
attached, size 14 to 16} ins, @ $6.66 each.
CONSULATE SHIRTS, self colours, trubenised
collars attached coat style, aset’d. sleeve
lengths, 33 to 35 ins. in shades of Grey, Blue,
Tan, White $7.78; $8.45 & $8.77 each,

B.V.D. WHITE UNDER PANTS, size 32 to 44 ins.

PURE LISLE ENGLISH RIBBED
H.F. HOSE AND ANKLETS
with elastic tops made by
Messrs. Allen Solly, sizes 104
to 12 ins. in shades of Black,
White, Grey, Dark Brown,
Navy, Canary & Wine, Hf
woes $1.76 pair; anklets $1.63
pair.

MEN’S RAYON & COTTON HOSE
also COTTON ANKLETS in
fancy designs and _ stripes.
good value, sizes 11 & 11h
only.

BOYS BATH TRUNKS in shades
of Royal & Saxe-Blue, sizes
24 to 26 $2.33 & 28 to 32 $2.80










Pair.

GENTS. SATIN LASTEX BATH
TRUNKS, sizes smal), and,
med. @ $6.76 each. Shade
Royal.

MEN’S WORK GLOVES of a very

strong material, for use of

engineers and chaffeurs,

Gauntlets @ $4.52, ‘short

gloves $3.21.

Cave Shepherd

& Co., Ltd.

10-13 BROAD ST.

range of plain shades.

Art Sik Pique

in Pink, Silver,

Lemon, Gold,

HARRI

| Gime Tabrics
for those

Shadow Stripe Mylos

in Pink, Blue & White — at $2.87 Yd.

This is a very serviceable art silk
material, and is available in lovely

Champagne, Ecru, \
Ice Blue,
Rose, Lilac, Bois de Rose and White



BROAD STREET—DIAL 2664



| A b8@ BVP LEL®VE®VPOROVSSPVOVRCVROR POOR DOOD VRAD !DDOOV ORE? FVD POF HPOOOVPPOHES

mously with His Excellency’s
summing up that the general
opinion was that the time was
not opportune for a Travelling
Commissioner, and referred the
suggestions to the Executive
Committee.

& CO., LTD.

20 BROAD ST., and at
MARINE GARDENS
SHOPPING CENTRE



Sheer

Torquoise,

— at $2.76

SONS








;|

C4
KNIGHT'S LTD. |

6

99V9SG9SOS909G5SG998G 9909S 9OFFO DOH OPO OVOP IOP TT

STOOLS

TAPS & DIES








PIPE ” Ua -
%”, Va’, Ye”, 2’, 0”, 34”, Ye”. 1”, 1%", 1%”, 2”, 9”

BSF
%y" i”, yy" ts”, %”, ve”, wy", te”, 5”, %4”
SAE or NF
V4", 4 Lf, %”, te”, %", A 56”, 34"
USS or NC
V4", i %”, te”; yy", fr’, 5 ” 34”
ENGINEER B.P. HAMMERS
Yalb., %lb., 1Yalb., 1%4lb., 2%lb., 3lb.

FILES
FLAT, ROUND, HALF ROUND, SQUARE

HIGH SPEED GRINDING MACHINES
HIGH SPEED TWIST DRILLS

BODY REPAIR FLEXIBLE FILES
OPEN & BOX SPANNERS
PRESSURE GAUGES 0-400 Ib.

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

BAY STREET DIAL 4269

Â¥ LPLLSCLSCEOCE ESS CSF SO CSESSSSEO CESS SOS OSES

PO CCUM OOO


PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, JULY 1, 1952

CLASSIFIED ADS, tm sonias) eve sus | rercatiexat SHIPPING NOTICES fF



































































































____ TELEPHONE 2808 NOTICE ; REAL ESTATE MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, new |
——- xs —_—__—_____— | ‘THE LODGE SCHOOL | “Sti 2 Lintinb. $|:
- - v oderr lunge low { ANZ
IN MEMORIAM FOR SALE PARISH OF 8ST. PETER Ce onece se NE erdnance REAMIMATION som ANS. Late) cou van, 3/2
* Applications fer one or moire vacant | Sultivatert ahd very productive garden | S.S. “GLOUCESTER” is sctieduied te The L x A Pe %
‘ Vestry, Belurbitions tenable at the: Ales-betielosed dn ei. sage and smite on} The following nineteen boys have | «ii from Port Pirie Muy 3tet, Devonport Sees ee ae Ee ae
ELOGCK-In loving memory of our dear ie ~——« | gidra School will be received by the | seashore pply Mrs. . Harris, | Completely satisfied the Entrance Eyam. | June sth, Melbourne June Ith, Sydney tineent, G ne my a x ba *
meiner wlbertine Eleack ho died as undersigned up to July 13th 1952 Quinta Mia”, Pitts Village, St. James! ination Test of this School held on Sat-| Tane 24th, Brisbane July & arriving at Dake os Sa. a : eh ms fi ered
the Ist of July 1961 ee menace | Reel Slice. nee ah Retueon 4 pie. sed Opt ‘aad —~ oa | Barbados ‘about August 6th ee :
We miss you m ou arts e 5 i i foe a 1.7.989--8n —.
pines ch r hearts are Bon | ae a, a: s 29 a Applicants must be daughters ot | 1 Bell, J. &. M. | ei addition to general cargo ~~ "ot The M.V. “CARIBBEE” will
As tithe goes by we miss you migré? Cave, erd & Co., Ltd Parishioners in stratvened circumstances | CALCUCHIMA--On the Nockier Coma Conpiched!, W. A. f es ae re it eke "9, oe. Pee Se |
Your kindly wavs your loving face 1.7.$20n Fe must be between the ages of 7 and | Dial ace 28.6. bt £ Clarke, B. H = Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat
Ho ttle can fil your vacant piken a SE a ee te ; aad Edgehill, E. M Cargo accepted on through Bille of Nevis and St. Kitts. Date of sail
Ever to be remembered by Archibald CAR= Dodge eestates First Funes Candidates nmst present themee ves NEWLY ERECTED STONEWALL | Hall, E. M !Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to ing to be notified Qi
Eleock ‘husband),Ciescille, Goleridge,}condition and . Owner-driven $2,000 | [oF a by the headinistres ‘| BUNGALOW standing on 3,440 square | Humphrey, E. British Guiana, Leeward and Windward B.W.L SCHOONER *
Pearson, Blaine, Stafford (children) Dial 4476. Bt. ee Oe RO ee feet of land at Grazeties Road. Saint| Rives, @. 2. ee. a TION (INC.
1.7.52—In are — Pan it jee. {Michaei. Apply to COTTLE, CATFORD Lashley, E. McB | For further particulars apply- r
Gar = We Walcx, little used, | arochia cae . & CO. 26.6.52—6n | Matkie, B. N. lew . Consisnes — Tele. Ne. 4647
OSBOURNE--In loving memory of 1 @ood as new. Dial 4470. || of 6 59-3 My fy. ii tacenaeaaniaaenea cme msalieensaeintnieyone tiie eg om |e ee
dearly beloved husband, Nathon ©. 12.6.92-—t.1.0. | ee |, MOUSE—1 painted beard ard. citing: Medford, ‘P. ‘A. wail
bourne, who was laid to rest o1 ist |) Anpiieations for two vacanh Vente: land kiehey sitertny eroom: shedroot | Schick, A. DA COSTA @ CO., LAT
July, 18 c “ 7 Medel Standar a ae “y “i hen attached Apply Cuthbe ‘ s ick, . . . Len.
Wioday brings back. 10d). dietnocies onien a. nae bem a haat ant ae mipe (one ber, one gist) tenable | togers, Nr. Rices, St, Philip eau, 5. a oe itachi ean spelen fiat ane
Of a loved one gone to rest, doer van). Apply: Exro ndersigned | b.7 aiton, R.
And those who think of him this 4 = gt A Pea p after) gs “ oth 1962 Soatindions oe _L per seg Webster, L. A
Are those who loved him best.” |4.00 p.m. Upper Collymore Rock Bineetcn tes hirth Certificate and LAND. 96.750 eqduare feet of lant Webster. P. W. D 0.
Carlotta Osbourne (wife). 7 5 i 26.6. 52-~4: ii ter 4 e t theriselves to }2tvate at Brittons Hill, Sait Michee) Stuart, C. O’. B. m F
1.7-88—31 ~~ | the ‘Head Master Of the Alle?ne School |Enciosed with stone wall on 3 side» | | sag (Vestry of Si. Joseph) CAAT.
a , ’ Ine view over the harbour, Wout: n ion, there are twenty other meek
‘aoe es sedan 1949 Model. | om Monday 2st, 1952 to - Examined. | be solid as a whole or in 4 lots. By; Who. did reasonably well, and will be
digped ¢ ier, St, Pete: quiries to the undersi y notified for admittance, im order of

a CARRI Biche & SEALY | merit, as places become vacant durin, 4
a ae a r 7 62d the ensuing School year. *

Lueas Street

ANNOUNCEMENTS | cre" Done nly 17,900 ae Phone RS



NEW YORK SERVICE.

























































































































































“ies. '

Ft. Refrigerator, In first class conditlo:
Redman & Taylor's Garage 4
a

RETRIGERATOR® = Baas mace
by General f: » and nine

Tmmediately for our Book-ke

and Insurance Departnients a Young
Man with good education, previous +
pevience not essential but pteferab
Good Salary with guaranteed bon:













































1 These are:—
EARN : eerie tae ean ;
fusion in cite weoee ‘tim: ‘Ges none ae , ‘Apiephone iz. | PERSONAL The unde-signed will offer for sale st 2. uo ea . A STEAMER sails 20 June—arrives Barbados ist July.
of forms today. 4.6,52—20::. | | i Public Competition at their office Ne 3 Vieira, H. A. D. |
: tn. W. Seott & Co., Ltd. i wet ate ; a 4 "Lh. s NEW ORLEANS SERVICE.
FOR RENT | = ee | ihe “public are hereby warned against the at day vot Sly, 8 at Bm i Williams, R. S. dabei we Sestesecs et 2
a e w nown as : * . jos 5) une.
| | FRARIRRS-Sinae axle 4 fone on | ne reat to my wie) ADA VIOLA | DONE oie tne ee | Maal D, __AvSrthucen san To funewarene Basbados Sh J
Smith Enginesting Works, Roebuck | myself responsible for her or anyone |â„¢Measurement 624) sq. ft. situate in isc &. D. Sacer re
' Street. Phone 25.6.52—6n. | else contracting any debt or @ebts ir |Navy Gardens, Christ Church and 10. Theo, Saaz
HOUSES | ny name unless by a written ordey Vontaming Li open veranoae | Sis oe Fitcemeeia o 4 CANADIAN SERVICE
ee signed by me. eee ‘ 12. Forde, A.’
ractive seaside Flat main road Hw | ELECTRI q Sgd. MILTON PITT, dining room, 3 bedrooms, toilet, bath ; 4 SOUTHBOUND
tings, comfortably furnished, Eng’. | ICAL Melverton Village, Jand kitchen with garage and rooms for te Gi, So We sans FROM alain tas
pn ee Ce iia \ ly, RON CM a NO $8 GRDRA ww Ma ta “Sane ge
Telephone 2949 it-@0s-0t ELECTRIC STOVE— Jackson Threc| — _..—---- ----— |further particulars and conditions of 16. c. S$.S. “TISTA” Reson ae June 14th
eal “Atanas . mage ‘ Electric tear ay AC me Tee "The public are hereby warned agains’ |sale apply to:— iw Brooker, R. S. 8.8. “Rican Bowen ane ith aoe iar _
—Stri , Control, with con switch. Stove anc + r y wife MIGNON |COTTLE CATFORD & CO. 20.6.52—8 : ‘i f
taining ~ fli Som 4 po ha Ph ail fittings in perfect order. Stored a Behar s Somme aon Forde) as 1 de . 19. Henry, H “& STEAMER” sue ie July 26th
room, 3 bedrooms, Toilet, Bath & — Sa View Guest House. Can be seen b’ | ngt hold myself responsible for her or AUCTION ere
en. ‘Dial Mrs. Puckerin 366 elephone appointment with the Mar wnvone else contracting, any debt o NORTHROUND
rs. wckerin 3 ‘acer. Price $190, 00 . itter: piicnbiediie W. A. FARMER,
29 G.danch |e $1 or 6 59-97, | Aebte in my na wna Wy 2 wr By instructio f the insurd jeadmastes
o pichratntanscinticnnntan sien oil : a7 6.000. | ofdew oe by nie. han y Sail a ee Gat Sank 1.7. 82—10 Letra at
FLAT =~ Ex b. Lands ia. F a vp nn Sa JONES, | 04 “O.. Heleo ;
wanee of Dencons "Road. Dial so. | BLPCTRIC WRON—Walter No-Cord St. Batriee's. MOTOR OMNIBUS CO., Nelson Street ROBERT THOM 1.1D.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
° 5 te Tlect Iron and Board Get one ¢ Cc « 2 1 aioe .
: 1:7.08—-1r: | ee fine unite before all. te pole nn + 1.604 idamagea by ident, Done only 45° Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD. CANADYAN SERVICE COTTON PRINTS
From. ist August, furnished or unfu DA COSTA & CO. TTD Pidetric Der : shoe ee eee eee LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE, A Selection
nished, INGRID” Naw Gardens Thr | “Pore BGO) The public are Hereby warried agals ee N ARCHED Maik T®,
ms. inspection by arrangeme: | —> ; al Ghia credit to any person or pérsh x The application of William Thompson 38c., » and 73c,
with the tenant, te ape pi 513 vipir a: of Garrat! | whometever th my miatne ax I do not hots ucticneer of Church Village, St, Philip for perm! ——-
FVELYN, ROA cya Praees a ngcrs °<| myself; responsible for anyone con\ract 1.75240 bsion te sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at EMBROIDER
Le PE “s 8 cm i ta dio Er- | ing debt or dts in miy name uh By Aue : 4 beard and shingle shop with «shed at- .
oisae poriins fp | lane BP a Written, order signed bs mx ime uctions (recived from, thet tached at Church Village, St. Philip ANGLAISE
. ae Sed. CEC ; ~in-Bx' Com aittee I will Dia y ne
FARAWAY, St. Philip Coast, fu JUST. ARRIVED | De Lux: Eagle f on the ive spats by public com- aCe Sat Spee Cy OF FURR, TO CANAD White, Pink and Blue
furnished. ‘For July, | Novemb=* Mbidern Radio-Grame (with Gar- St. Michael. | petition on Thursday pext Sed July the To:—a. W. HABE, Bsa IAN SERVICE $2.80
December only. Dial 4476. a oreo. aye pices ee 1.9.62—-2ng Kcaidind at po Surlo Ag. Police Magistrate, F Mont 1 : asin
19,0.52—t.£.1 5 ae le worries, in attractive walnut wooden : Boniface ir Dist. “C° rom Mon rea ——SeAm WA and
tents | SPE ALEN, | Bey mk PAPO MEP ESE Soe at take Dhadak ‘oa D. 1. soRers, a SHOT TAFFETAS
: wet a,” ee Be.iy' fy a oP. a $ co, LTD., giving credit to my wife, x Wars Bestric: en. bulding ae eee one (1) wood- for Applicant Expected Arrival : Charming Shades
view, furnished. Te ¢ Street, loore (nee inger) as io n Y Mont:
October, Ni and Desmhiet, pp 29.6 5%t.(.n. | myself responsible for her or anyone | Eley Autios ly cash. D’Arey 2 oe N.B.—This application will be consid- ontre:t Halifax suninten leiden 99 cents
C. L, Gibbs & Co., Ltd. Tel, 2402. ’ : else contracting any debt or debts i H ree joneer. ered at a Licensing Court to be held at} S.s. “DODIN MARSANO” -. June 19 June ~~" gman 2
1.2.53—2n 7 a A a Connie my nate wnless by @ written orcs } " Police Court, District “CGy’, on Monday re ae ‘o” a 28 June 3 July 7 Ae NYLONS
radios rome. ne ay of July 1952, 2 relock, |S. ‘ ee ~ 18 Jus s
“NEWHAVEN, Crane Const, fully 4 soon. —~ PYE ¥TD. 20.6-.52—2n | Se TERR BERGE PERCIVAL MOOR! UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER Rae oe re Ce a a ra vendiag ef. Sh ee "4 “puma 2a “August 51
pistred. For July, November, Deer ee eee tera Tee Patera A. W. WARPER, tne shen ennsteenneneeinet $1 12. and
only, dial 4476. sash cate Messrs. P. C Maffei & Co., Ltd 1.7.52--29n By instructions reveiVed- from G€..L.. poe Aa, Police Magistrate, a ta UNITED KINGDOM SERVICE :
QFFIGE SPACE in building at Spey [he are our sole distributors in Barbados |. dian A al panes & Co. T will sell on. Thursday A CALICO
err ttens: See mnpeee ace ETE ME ie LOST FOUND Chthadsals die sclereitigl-< icv From South Wales, |.iverpeol and Glasgow . 36 in. wide. 59 cerits
G.02—thn 1 Bye 6 valve ROTOMBEMAE ADIOS, & pedal: rubbers, Padaln, Pump elles, con Scan * — : ahah heat
PRE! : _ | chromium plate, com soon + ' neetion: uter ng x bia) Duw Sout! Expecte a
th Gee oda ae Matthing Gap gine Urb a Py ee ee ne ee , ; Roadster! 2 state cident inden Wales Liverpool @lasgow Dates Briagetown, Soon UE
ms, water and basing in eac | ~ enemies eter shin tener en =e ac pai roi s. “FEGGEN” Big assortment from “
I PYE 3 speed automatic Radiograme- Football boots, Bladders (smalb sizes) a ¥ 2 +» 9 Sune June 24 June 10 J
canon, Dial’ wb a Sra. phones, Available now! PYE LTD 4 LOST Elastic Braid, kee Cream Powder, Bul a SUNWHIT “4 +. 80 June » July 14 July 1 Auguet France and U.S.A.
sesst .&, 2.6.52—2n | as — ferrite, WO striae, iene 230 aes I g 60c. and 84c
iaeitaistadn telnet hatter . m a items mms Cash, Sule .. End at Early August “ .
WANTED Eat Gi ee ca, HONE aaa eet | Mee ERwin, | IF Viewmin wi is a wortd. | £2. « er Ba dae" ae SATIN
é. BANDS! With bandspread on M1, 1%, Mi, Milton King, Rock Gar Fa n renowned . aan 7 arly Sept Mid Sept. Mid October
12, 16, 19, 26, & 21 meters PYE CT is rae, oe =o a ‘ appetite restorer. et seein cer i .
a Aecbtk Be ore he ier Bae Rin | ree en . ZAM Ne one with blood-build- UNITED KINGDOM ANP CONTINENTAL SERVICE oom, bg Quality
HELP PYE 6 volt battery radios. Available imute hs ay earns = have the From Antwerp, Rottczdam and London pendeanee eee
MoUannG aaah : vee now, 8 wavebands »- PYR ye , ENE minutes’ “work’—nine e 5 oan pre ee buoyant CREPES
SEKEEPER— Exper: ence ow 78.6 62 ealt
keeper; pleasant personality; to tai | —~———-2--L is +_ Wine ides—at Cross last Expected Arrival
care new. seaside flats. Lavin PYE BATTERY SETS—-Just a few let a comune, a and now | by SOOT: Sg Rendon Dates In 10 ao and
augmiers and: ayrecable’ surroundings i.) MAFFRI'S RADIO EMPORIUM = 4%; “TRDERAL vovacen” 13 ; Bridgetown, Barbados Shades
addition to reasonable “a 6.5044, fr zs oy Campton: | : $3.8. “SPURT ia ee ma | ou * 72c., 85¢., and $1.12
ya ae? C.C, C/e Advoe: ———— _____—____.- A 98 1 | ae S.S. “Essr’ 2 , uly id August ” "y a
Co, 20,6 52—21 | REFRIGERATOR—One Norge @ Cul) eeth | aosel| a Cees oe eh ax 4 ate oe ee 5G Ament iid August Mid er sip fkiesnaasamninasate patina
rae WS. +: s+, Mild dept End Sept. Mid October MIAMI LINEN
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TUESDAY, JULY 1, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN



BY CARL ANDERSON |








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PAGE EIGHT





Windward, Y.M.P.C. Win
Intermediate Matches

WINDWARD FORCED A WIN over Combermere in ———— :

the last ball of the day at Windward in their Intermediate
Division Cricket match op Saturday.
Y.M.P.C. were the only two of the six teams of this Division
Y.M.P.C.’s was over Cable &

to win their matches.
Wireléss.

The other matches petered out in draws, with Regi-
ment, Spartan, Pickwick and Empire gaining first inni

Umrigar Scores
Second Double

(From Our Own Cerrespendent)
LONDON, June 30.
Feature of today’s cricket was
a grand double century — his

Windward and

Jead points over the respective teams : Wanderers, Police, second of the tour by Umrigar

Carlton and Mental Hospital.
Combermere were ‘bowled out

for 117 and 88 and ward o. M. R- W. quarter hours and hit three sixes
who scored 150 in their first in- )uill!?® it, 4-38 3 and 26 fours, Two of his sixes
were given 56 to win in 55 Clarke Ley : $ 0 3. @ were off the England bowlers t
minutes. The last minutes of this eee ois 5 1 7 1 Tattersall and Berry. As the re-
eo were very exciting ay a 2 6 § 9 sults of Umrigar’s efforts the
indward went after the REGIMENT — 2ND INNINGS Indians finished the day only 12
= somewhat of ‘or fh, Saneedt i. secs 4 behind Laneashire with three
ae swiftly one on &: Phihips ‘Patterson 7 i wickets in ae
tagore the win was Extras pees 6 Lancashire vs. : Lancs.
ast bowler L. K. Brathwaite Sade ‘ches Swink) and ont Indians 351 7, Umrigay

% the first and six in the second,
In their second aes Comber.
ma Wi seored 25 and
Th the Cable & Wireléss—
Â¥.M.P.C. match, Cable & Wireless
made 129 and 77 and Y.M.P.C. 95
and for 8 wickets 113.
Spin bowler David Archer cap-
t six Y.M.P.C. wickets for
34 runs in the second
Wanderers
wickets 87 and
managed to gain the
iead when they scored oo The
oa ae of two wickets
second innings when
stumps were drawn.
Pickwick-Carlton

In the

each team batted one innings,
Pickwick scoring 210 and Carlton
179. For Pickwick C, Evelyn
made 51 and for Carlton H.
gaa scored 41 and G. Harding,

i rowne and C, Standf

seored 36, 33 and 56 : ay,

Fast bowler H. Jordan of Pick- ©. Wood

wick took four wickets for 33

runs.
In the Police—Spartan match,
C. Springer scored 65, F. Smith
51, and E. Denny 40 for Police.
For Spartan S. Chase had a brii—
jiant spell at number four for 97
Span nate Bal BO
. S

seored 60.

Ment Hospital scored 99 and
for, 9 155 in their match
against ire who scored 176
in their first innings.

Empire’s Harris took four wick-

ts 89 runs in the second

5 Saved Mental

ospital from defeat when he was

able to score an invaluable 56 in
their second innings,

Following are the scores: —~

oa & WIRELESS vs. Y.M.P.C.

: et PSs : 1290 &@ 7
Â¥.M.P.C, 95 iter. 8 wkts.) 118
. & W. INNINGS
Mawes b E. §. Branker 9
ht b E. S. Branker ... 3
r run out. eva 4
Alleyne b R. Austin 3
y Lbew., b Austin .. 24
ing c Burké b K. A. Branker 17
Seale c Burke b K. A. Branker 0
BE. Branker stpd, V. Lewis, b K. A.
ranker bee 0
Frost b Porter 1
Clarke 1Lb.w., b I. Burke 6
D, M. Archer not out 5
Extras : 6
Total i 7
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Cs BR Ww.
I. Burke 3 26 1
R, Austin 7 2 8 2
K. A. Branker 7 0 30 5
E. er . 6 1 q 2
B. Porter 1 1 0 1
Y.M.P.C. — IND INNINGS
B. Hoyos stpd. Clarke, b Archer 10
D, King 1.b.w., b Matthews Re
I, Burke c Alleyne, b E, Branker 9
K. A ae Healt gl ee ea 32
B. Porter c King, b Archer 10
V. Lewis ¢ Alleyne, b Archer 27
B. S. Branker stpd. wkpr., b Archer 56
Hay hew 1b.w., b Archer
Harol yhew c King, b Archer 0
as ..., 3
Total for 8 wkts.) . 113
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oR he Se
® King dpe 7 1 34 0
ls ws .. ’ 0 15 1
eM Pt wo
D. Archer ;: 65 1 34 6
WANDERERS vs. REGIMENT
Wanderers 93 and (for 8 whkts.) a
Resiment cane. (for 2 wkts.) .... 43
REG — 1ST INNINGS
Ishmael b Corbin se 7 *6
Lieorish c Proverbs, b Massiah 14
Phillips b Corbin io. ae
Weekes c & b Corbin 3
Price b Corbin
Beckles b Corbin . 24
Watts ¢ Ramsay b Corbin 8
Parris b Massiah 0
Brathwaite b Massiah 1
we ¢ Proverbs b Massiah .. 2
Clarke not out 7
Extras ll
Total 96
BOWLING ANALYSIS
, Oo, M. w.
J Corbin ; Ww 4 32 6
Proverbs 3 oO 18 0
Massiah . 44 3 31 4
WANDERERS -—_2ND INNINGS
A. G. Seale c & b Proverbs . 16
J, Massiah c Ishmael b Watts 1
M, G, Mayers c Ishmael b Phillips 1
J. Patterson c Price b Watts 2

R. Armstrong ¢ Weekes b Phillips 14
J, Mas _ not out 23
M. B, Proverbs b. Price 10
P. Patterson b Watts .. sae 12

D. _H, Alleyne c¢ & b Watts 3
J, B. Robbinson not out 0
Extras . 5
Total (for 8 wkts.) 87

for India against Lancashire.

BOWLING ANALYSIS Altogether he batted five and a

PIOKWICK vs. CARLTON
rae 4
‘ariton

210 ter 306 and 30 for no wicket,



eee eee ee IDG, Walsh 6 f. 97
CARLTON — is? INNINGS” , Somerset 235, Wa jer 87.
G. Matthews ec Lashley b C. White 8 Warwick vs. Essex: Essex 224
H. Burke ¢ (wkpr. Evelyn) b H. | and $8 for 1, Warwick 846 for 6
‘ declared, Bromley 121 not out.
G. G , 7
G. Harding sun eh Oe aaelte , Guan mt ni rte:
e oan oucester an Or no
A. Browne ¢ Marshall b C. Moore 33 wicket, Cambridge 285,
©. Seadtord ¢ H. Many, b H. | Glamorgan vs. Derby: Derby
C. Cox b Jordan | 9 270 and 215 for 6 declared, Gla-
- ae BUD UE rans 4 morgan 140 and 14 for no wicket.
eee nes loore 2 Northants vs. Worcester:
& ame Nie = ws Northants 332 and _ 168 for 5,
— Worcester 269.
ae 1% Middlesex vs, Hants: Hants 298,
BOWLING ANALYSIS Middlesex 289 for 8.
ie abshd e “ 5 w. Kent vs. Sussex: sve ee),
B Washley 5 6 834 John Langridge 115, Kent an
e wane: aot Oe : 324, Mayes 134, Murray-Wood
G. C. Moore . 8: Soa oe
- eee 2% 1° 2% @ — Yorks vs. Notts: Yorks 401 for
Ni Wo'Geeenidye 10 fas 8 declared, Notts 181 and 264 for
Cc, G. Greenidge s ..8 o 7%,
POLICE vs. SPARTAN Surrey vs. Oxford: Oxford 146
aie as : 14 and 140 for 3, Surrey 443 for 8
ARTAN — 1ST INNINGS declared, Eric Bedser 108.
B Roach b Grifith 33
rr >
b Barke’ 23 9
8. Chase Lb.w. b Denny 97 Lynch Ss Old Boys
BD, Morris ¢ & b Smith 29 E sity
W. Gemmett ¢ vkpr. Morris) “'b Beat Jamies Street
q nes ‘ 5
. b Griffith 4 1 5 isi Basket Ball
Ee Matthews oan Fes is The 2nd division

H

Â¥ =

fixture which was played at Col

Ez +. Gembeenb (Jnr.) not out * lege yesterday evening between

Bxtras: b. 19; Lb. 12... .... 31 Lyneh School Old Boys and James

Total “jap «Street Boys Scouts, resulted in a

4 maiden victory for the Old Boys
by a margin of 16 points to 6.

BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO. \

M R. W. W, Millington, J. Hyndman and
& ohatt, ' ae eae Me Ba Scored 6 each and 4
C, Sealy . 5 0 30 2 respectively for the Old_ Boys
oo 7 9 36 1 while H. Bynoe and L. Thorne
i Mayes it 2 36 1 scored 4 and 2 respectively for
G. Smith ’ 15 1 68 1 their team.





R.B. Yacht Club
Tennis Tournantent

YES’ AY’S RESULTS. From Page 1.
man's ** to lose the next two. Many of
Mr, L, St-Hill beat Mr. H. A. these lapses were the result of
Cuke, Jr. 6—1, 6—0. weakness on the backhand which
Mr. N. D. Tudor beat Dr. J. was fully exploited by McGregor.
Klimezynski 6—1, 6—0. In the final set he placed his
Mr. V. Roach beat Mr. H. L. Top- powerful forehand drives so accu-
pin 6—4, 6—4. rately that the Australian was
Mr, D. E, Worme beat Mr. I. S. often merely content to return
Robinson 6—1, 6—0. the ball over the net, Drobny
Men’s Doubles. broke through McGregor‘s service
Mr, P. Patterson & Mr. G. H. to lead 5—4 but dropped his own
Manning beat Mr. F. D. Barnes for the Australian to level the
and Mr. G. Watson 6—2, 6—2, 6—1. score. He came back and again
TO-DAY’'S FIXTURES. broke through the Australian's

Four Enter
Semi-Finals

Men’s Singles, and held his own to win the
Mr. L. St.Hill vs Mr. N. D. match.
Tudor, Eric Sturgess was no match for

Mr. J. D. Trimmingham vs Mr, Frank Sedgman who was in his
Vv. Roach, best volleying and smashing form.
Mr, D, E, Worme vs, Mr, C, B. The South African placed his
Sisnett, onary shots well but they lacked
L adi Doubles po .
oo L, Branch and Mis Herbie Flam is becoming the
Mr: s_.* veal dark horse of the tournament,
ge Be glad J. Connell and Mrs. tie is master of court geometry
or Doubl and as his brilliant positional play
M M sie mM. _ had beaten Gardnar Mulloy in
r, & Mrs, R. S. Bancroft vs. the previous round, so it was the
Mr. M. de Verteuil and Mrs, K, A. qownfall of Seixas.
Knages. The Flam-Drobny semi-final
should be a great battle of tactics

“ps. . for Drobn i {-
Billy" Greaves Wall Hg ue" as
ie io oO

Meet Kid Ralph

take the title. He has already
beaten Sedgman at Wimbledon.
Caleb “Billy” Greaves, No. 3
welterweight contender for cham-

ionship h i Trinidad

Vet yerterday by the MV. Moneka THE WEATHER
for Dominica whe he expects ‘

local ‘middleweight REPORT
champion Kid Ralph on Sunday









July 6 at Windsor Bark, Dom- YESTERDAY
nite, 7m me — from Codrington: .01
Ralph also left by the same n.
, Total rainfall for month to
oRpORTEnITY. yesterday: 4.68 ins,
Highest Temperature: 86.5 °F
ee eae ee 75.0 °F
- id Velocity 12 miles per
WHAT’S ON TODAY hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29,985
Meeting of House of Assem- (3 p.m.) 29 925
bly—3.00 p.m. TODAY

Police Band Concert, Mental
Hospital, 4.00 p.m.

Water Polo, Aquatic Club,
5,00

( Mm.
Basket Ball, Y¥.M.P.C.—7.30
p.m,

Sunrise: 5.46 a.m.

Sunset; 6.14 p,m.

Moon: First Quarter, June 30
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

High Tide: 10.29 a.m., 10.52

p.m.
Low Tide: 4.24 a.m. 4.04 p.m.





ETTING A LOAD OF
THE PRODIGAL SON WHO
E05 MORE PRODDING.
ae weX AND A HATLO AAT
a LIFT To C.W. RHODES,
ro 108 KINGS FIRST WALK
. BROOKLYN 32, N.â„¢%

. WORLD RIGHTS RESERVED.

S SYNDICATE. Inc



Somerset vs, Leicester: Leices-~

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

WEIGHTLIFTING AND

BODY BUILDING
Hy Edwin Hogers

NERVE — an essential of suc- as long as you live. I learnt a
cess. How ean we overcome that few things about the power of
habit of being nervous? Can we mind over the body before I
overcome that feeling of the ‘jit- read much about the reason for
ters’ before an important event it. It is common at the com-
takes place? mencement of any athletic event

Many youths have eliminated to become very nervous.
an inferiority complex by the Some time you will be stepping
growing knowledge of the power out in front of an audience. Per-
they possess and their physica] haps in a que Contest, a
ability or superiority over aver- dramatic play, a speech, but re-
age persons. gardless of what it is, the mere

I not mean by this that fact that you are stepping into the
strong men should go around ‘lime-light’ causes you to be
bullying others by demonstrating nervous. None of us are immune,
heir strength. As a matter of it happens to all of us at some
fact, the stronger and more capa- time or other. We may overcome
ble a man is, the less likely he is the feeling in one field to discover
to make a show of his strength that it still exists in another.
by hurting or fighting others. But Thus you may be able to give
strength of mind and body doe: speeches by the dozens without
beget confidence, eran. > any disturbing emotion, and yet
and many other admirable quali- the firs’ time you step on a Posing
ties. platform you may be putin a

. r~
When ve sumer from fear or state of possible collapse.

lack of nerve, it is best to analyse I remember ciearly the first
our fears and find out why we _ occasion I appeared on a lifting
experience them. Too lively anâ„¢stage. I was very nervous, in fact
imagination causes fear in many so very nervous that I became il!
persons, I find that the fatalistie i think it was the interval while
view is a good one to adopt waiting for the event to start more
through life. Work hard and do than anything else that caused
the best you can and if something me to become so nervous. Every
happens, then it cannot be helped. athlete who has ever participated
Do not give up. Never cry over in competition has at some time
spilt milk, what is done is done. or other experienced these pre-

too late. What we have to strive a combination of emotions such
to do is never let it happen again. ss worry, anxiety, apprehension,
_ The feeling of fear or inferior- Sirets antis hine
ity in the presence of those in effects upon different persons, but
high places or positions has come every athlete whether bi
g o1
down to us from those far off gmail, weak or strong, Amateur
days. But in this country where ‘Ofensl ,
or Professional knows what the
all men are created equal, most experience is like. Usually it
men had reached their positions, takes the form of a BURNING
even the highest ones, by their DESIRE in the pit of the stomach,
own efforts. Whenever we come which causes the inability to|
in contact with others who are im- sleep, loss of appetite, nervous- |
porvant we become somewhat tie- ness, sweating palms and irrita- |
tongued We cannot find words pjlity, |
ta say. You can avoid being F |
nervous in the presence of these The feeling is comparatively |
persone by building up mental strong in combative sports where
RVE in the form of feeling there is danger of personal injury
equal to them. You should feel. such as Boxing and Wrestling,
equal with those persons in high also in Football, Hockey or
positions. With a feeling of wherever you get knocked around,
equality or superiority, you should Strangely enough, you can always
be successful in what you desire find this effect in sports in which
to accomplish. there is no personal contact ae
: soever, such as track, wei -
The best system for a man who jing, swimming and civings The
is a strength athlete is to make mere fact that you are competing
phyeieal comparisons, MENTAIL- against someone is sufficient ‘to
LY, of course. Think of the things grouse the pre-competition ‘jit-
you can do better than the man ters’,
you are interviewing. Think of
yourself as the being in the most Think back on your first
favourable position. Perhaps you appearance before a microphone,
are a good swimmer and the your first speech and so forth. If
other fellow cannot swim at all, you are honest enough with your-
would even lose his nerve just self, you can recall how horrible
to go into the water. If you are you felt. I remember a few years
in good condition, very likely the ago when I was called upon to
other could not stand up to you make a speech at the ‘Young Com-
in a fight, or what a poor attempt municants’ Meeting’, my mouth
he would make in a foot race or went dry, my stomach burned,
if he tried to meet you in trials my feet were weak, my hands
of a strength or the lifting of trembled, but somehow I got
weights, or indulge in a score of through my speech and was com-
other athletic pastimes at which plimented on it too. That was my
rar Sa — if a beeetne frst speech.
a stren; athlete. ile think- . : : i
ing of the things which you as an , | think I am right in saying
advanced barbell man ‘could do that even seasoned actors and
better thar he, you dre onger actresses never really completely
afraid of him. While t ng of overcome that feeling of nervous-
the ways in which you supe- ess. However, they gradually
vior physically, you b up a control themselves, Le Welatit
feeling of equality or superiority. |. Just prior to the Junior Weight-
N° Bin tt == lifting championship, a friend of
It may seem a bit “swell-head-: mine who was competing, was
ed” to place yourself in these having a chat with me, when I
favourable situations in your noticed how very nervous and
thoughts, but it is not really. It jittery.he was, I think I did a
is only confidence. If you don’t good job in quieting his nerves
feel that you can do things, how for he was successful. Also at
do you ever expect to get them the Senior Championship last
done? year, another competitor asked
Physical strength builds cour- me how I felt. When I told him
age in addition to confidence. that I felt fine, he said that he
You can develop a spirit, through was feeling exactly the opposite,
which you will never be ‘licked’ nervous and ill, What made me

different

PRINTED HAIRCORD

SEE OUR
36 ins wide—7Be. & B5e. A
per yd.
BUCKRAM :
in White Only bbe.
37 ins wide— at The. Wd. Be

an event.

succeed at

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a







Sports Window

_First Division Basketball
matches to-night at the
Y.M.P.C. are :—H.0.0.B. vs.
Carlten and Pirates vs. Pick-
wick.

These teams are compara-
tively strong teams and the
basketball should be of a high
standard.

Water Polo Division “B”
matches at the Aquatic Club
at 5 pm. are:—Police vs.
Whipporays and Harrison Col-
lege vs. Caviar.

.



surprised was the fact that he had |
been in many weightlifting con- |
tests previously.
gether and laughed and sang, for
{ had previously found out that
that quieted my nerves.

Worrying about a race or
event is so unnecessary.
good to have a little thrill before
A man can always do
better when he is a bit nervous.
But if this condition comes too
far in advance of the race, saliva
flows rapidly and actual stomach
sickness occurs.

Physical strength and efficiency
beget nerve, nerve helps you
anything, If the
muscles you develop would do
nothing for you but give you con-
determination to over-
come all obstacles, even without
; the addition of the many other
It cannot be helped when it is competition JITTERS. There are things that strength will mean to
you, you will be repaid for the
moderate effort required to build
you into a superman

Third Annual

Benefit Show & Dance

In Aid of The CH CH. and

JOHN'S BABY WELFARE
LEAGUE CLINICS

At DRILL HALL, Garrison

FRIDAY, July 4th 1952 at 8.45 p.m.
Under the distinguished Patronage
of Sir George and Lady Seel

Madame Ifill presents

“The Star Buds School

of DANCING

PROGRAMME

1.,OVERTURE Police Band

2. MUSICAL COMEDY witn
Cotton Pickers & Chorines in
“Come Gn A My House”

3. DANCE OF THE TOY SOL-
DIERS Hight Star Buds

4, SAW SOLO Guest Artiste
Mr. Ben Gibson

>. BALLET Blue Danube
Waltz Six Star Buds

6. TEA FOR TWO Dance
Five Star Buds

7. PARASOL DANCE
Four Star Buds

8. A STR#ET SCENE (Sketch)
Mrs. Bart & Daughter

JES IN THE NIGHT
Dance Guest Artiste
Mr. Cedric Fhillips & Star



10. BALLET Rose in the Bud
A Star Bud

ll. KYTTENS ON THE KEYS






ET Roses of Picard;
Bight Star Buds

14, KISS WALTZ Star Buds
15* FINALE Madame [fill and
Star Buds in “The Blue

Horizon”
DANCING AFTER SHOW

By kind permission of Col.
Michelin and under the direction

of Capt Raison, A M.,
M.B.E. The Police Band will
supply the Music,

ADMISSION $1.00

Dancing after the Show. Tickets
from Committee or ‘The Star

Bud". Bar and Refreshments:





eye .0

COTTON PRINTS

36 ins. wide
Zse. = Tbe.
per yd.

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LTD.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.



BEST

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BREAD





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DANCE NOTICE $

OOS SS SSS OVO OOOO IID.

OPENING DANCE 3:

ADMISSION
(Meanwell's Orchestra)



PE



al

So we got to-



It is

For Weddings, Anniversaries

& CO., LTD.

20 BROAD ST.
and at MARINE GARDENS






























SALE!

VARIETY SANDAL
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BROAD STREET
Smashing Reductions on









T

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TUESDAY, JULY 1,

Requests

FARLEY HILL COUNTRY %)
CLUB, St. Peter | Annual
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} tnd
SATURDAY 19th JULY, 1962 $f sosrnstoh
Dress Optional | Music by

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29.6.52—3n.
EEL LL GOL E




GIFTS

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See your Jewellers .. .

Y. De LIMA















At the














Bar Solid





MR. OLIVER GILKES
pleasure

yA S

Prize Dance

which will
SILVER BEACH CASINO,
Holetown, St
On WEDNESDAY
JULY, 1952
(Strictly)
Gents 2/6 Ladies 2/-

c.

Orchestra

S ON SALE
Beautiful Moonlight
Buses leave Lower Green & Mile

& Quarter St. Peter at 9



This Week's
Special

COCONUT CREAM

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6c. each

fae bs
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relieves Aches and Pains
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sooner you get ‘ Mentholatum’ the sooner you
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CHILDREN SHOES, PUMPS, SLIPPERS

PUSHERS, HATS, UNDERWEAR,

STOCKINGS.





FYFFES LINE

Messrs Elders & Fyffes, Ltd., advise that an inerease of

their current passage rates to and from the United Kingdom
has been found necessary.



The increased rates which are applicable on and from

duly 1952, are as follows:

S. S GOLFITO

£127.

Suites A & B per berth

Double Rooms with Toilet and Shower

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Single Room with Toilet & Shower
Single Roon
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PAGE 1

PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY. JIXY IM Windward, Y.M.P.C. Win Intermediate Matches WINDWARD FORCED A WIN over Combermere in the lust ball of the day at Windward In their Intermediate Division Cricket match on Saturday. Windward and Y.M.P.C. were the only two oj the ilx teams of this Division to win their matches VMP.C'l was over Cable Wireleaa. The other matches petered out in draws, with RegiHft a JC rt *"' p kw k <">n>l Barry. A.hr rr \\ K.(.HTUFTING AND BODY BUILDING Uy Edwin llo* is NERVF an essential of sueas long as you livo. 1 learnt a resa How can we overcame that lew thing* about the powrr of habit of being nervoua? Can we mind over the body before I overcome that feeling of the ')itread much about the reason for rers' before an Important evtut It. It is common at the com* '.ake place'.' mencemeni of any athletic even'. Many youths have eliminated to become very nervoua. an inferiority complex by the Some time you will be steppin*: growing Knowledge of the cower out In front of an audience. Perthcy p ost oas and their phyeV-al haps In a Physique Contest. ability or luperiority over averdramatic play a speech, but nSportt* Window Fii-i Division Basketball mstcheto rug hi at tin Y.M.P.C an H COB n. Carlton and Ptrataa vs. Pickwick. Tbew teams us cosapara Uvsly strong taaau and tke baaketaail ataould b of a high WaUr Polo DtvUiou %  mitc&M at tna Aquatic Club at 5 p.m. arc:—Polios vs. Whipporayand Harrison Oollega TB. Caviar HI'IIMIM IUun*l not __. i-oiiOi • Hubbnibiii I. Phillip* b Pattrrtt/ri WaakM not out tatrai SND IMNINOS FrW#rb" Total ilor I wkU.i MtKHMK ,. (4BLTUK %  ,,.. ] afflhta CARLTON 1ST INNINGS ; Matiiwwi % %  L*-ni*> b c Whit* I flurka t itvkaf. Ev.lvni b II Brewna Bladf u n Jordan CO* I. J Edahill i WireM**-q c^ na match. Cable j, Wirclcet Hardine made 129 and 77 and Y.M.P.C. 0ft nod for 8 wlcketa 113. Spin bowler David Archer caplured six Y.M.P.C. wtckew for .I?"'" '" lhe %  *** !" i innings. Wandrrora arored 83 and fur H wickets 87 and Regiment ]ust managed to gain the firs* inntoa> tosd when they soured 98. Thev were 47 for the loss of two wirkeU HI their aacond '""Hgy when xtumps were drawn. S '.^.M.Pick wick-Carl ton ^ 1 1 '' In the Pickwlck-C-rlton mitdi, ? e,^K" * Burke scored 41 and G. Harding % %  •"• %  A. Browne and C. Slandford D AHTAN scored 38. 13 and 58 respectively, r Fast bowlrr H Jordan of Pickwick took four wickets for 33 runs. In the Police—Spartan mates), w C. Springer scored 65, F. Smith pi, and E Denny 40 for Police rw Spartan S. Chaw* had a bril N iianl spell at number four for 9T e runs, three short of the ecatturv. Spartan ocxtitog bet. S. Pem seared 60. Mental Hospital scored 9f and for B wlcketa 15ft in their match against Empire who arored 176 in their flrsi innings. i Empire's Hams took four wick" ets for 38 runs in the second i innings Williams saved Mental Hospital from defeat when he wea able to eoore an invaluable 58 in their second innings Following are the scores: — >.ulU of Umrigar'. efforts the Indians finished the fia\ only 13 behind Lancashire with three wlckots in hand. •COKE BOARD I-ancashlre v.. litaUaru: Lanes 383. Indians 351 for T. Umngaj 204 Somerset V, Leicastet {Mm ter 308 and 30 for no wicket Somerset 235, Walsh 6 lor 67 Warwick vs. Essex: Baton 224 and 38 for I. Warwick 346 for ft declared, Bromley 121 not out. Gloucester vs Cambn.er.r and many other admirable qua ties. When v: muster from fear <•> lack of nerve. It Is beat to analy our fears and find out why wo I thm. Too lively B Imagination causes fear In man. persons. 1 find that the fatalist. good one to adopt gardless of what it Is, the men fact that you arc stepping into the 'lime-light' causes you to be nervous None of us are Immune it happens to all of us at some time or other. We may overcome the feeling in one field to discovei that It still exists In another Thus you may be able to giv< •perches by the dozens without %  ny disturbing emotion, and ye" the firr* time you step on a Posing platform you may be put In %  state o* pobtdble collapse. irly Mantua b c MM %  M KK1I..V. b II I remember clearly the flrsi I appeared on a lifting stage. I was very nervous. In fact so very nervous that I became i): i think it was the interval while it mi; for the event to start more Gloucester 281 and 18 for no through life. Work hard ;uu\ d. than anything else that cause1 I'ket. Cambridge 365. >hc best you can and if somethinii mc to become so nervous. Every Glamorgan vs. Derby: Derby happens, then it cannot be helped athlete who has ever participate'1 BOWIJNO ANAI.ySI' GlaDo not give up. Never cry cket. nth* milk, what is done Is d ater: It cannot be helped when it in goropetltton JITTEKS. There >r 6, "**> 'ate. What we have to strive combination of emotions such to do u never let it happen again !" worrj anxiety, apprehension. ."z 'g-zsjr T asfK '^sSrtSisnm, ..,„..„ %  i .'if. """H." ^?"?_J"_ Ils u|-,„ difltront person., bill every athlete whether big I 2B. hiKh oil mv to ft 1ST INNINr.S 270 and 215 lor 6 derla morgan 140 and 14 for ti v w NorthanU vs. Wore Northants 332 and 168 I Worcester 269. Middlesex vs. Hants: Hani Middlesex 289 for 8. Kent vs. Sussex: Sussex^24 hlRn ,,,„„* or po^Hona has come John 1-ingndge 115. Kent 163 and ,, owri lo ^ from h05p far off 324. MBJW 134, Murray-Wood d,,,. But in this country where 107. all men are created equal, moat Yorks v, Notl* Yorka 401 for .„<.„ haii reached their positions, 3 declared, Notts 181 and 254 lor even the highest ones, by their 7, own effdrts. Whenever we come Surrey vs. Oxf nervous surprised was the fact that he had been in many weightlifting teats previously. So we got together and laughed and sang, for I had previously found out that li at quieted my nerves. Worrying about a race or /vent is so unnecessary. It ta good to have a little thrill bason an event A man can always do better when he la a bit nervous. But if this condition comes too far In advance of the race, saliva flows rapidly and actual stomach si c k n aea occurs. l'ii>Mcal lllallglh ami eftlciency beget nerve, nerve helps you to succeed at anything. If the muscles you develop would do nothing for you but give you confidence, determination tn overpettttoa has at some time come all obstacles, even without other experienced these preihe addition of lhe many other things that strength will mean to, you. you will bo repaid for the moderate effort required to build j i in i atnna scr. Lynch'u Old Boys Beat James Street OclttlUi Maithr-i run o>.i <> .-.i b iaab CumbrrtMMb Jr,i fctua* %  If. I b BOWUMfi A>**l.YatV H, weak or strong. Amateui or Professional knows what thi. experience Is like. I' takes the form nf | BUHNING DESIRE in the pH of the itoiitaetl which causes the Inability to ileep, loss of appetite, ncrvousbscome somewhat tieIIMB awealing palms and lrrltaWe cannot find word.bfll&. You can avoid belns n the presence of these The feeling is comparatively pcrsons by building up mental strong in combative sports where NEKVE m the form of feeling there is danger of personal injury equal to them. You should feel NCh as Boxing and Wrestling equal with those persons In high also In Football, Hockey Or A TI, B i !" i ••—-— n -h ke.i liall po''-ioii5 With a leeling of wherever you gel knocked around. The 2nd division %  ** %  ~ ,,,uiility or superioritv. von aho'lld Strangely enough, you can alway; £ lUUate wsuch was playou -i u*il># >ucc# | u i in whmX vou a,*,, 1|1( , hl affect En sports In which .Hit i lege yesterday evening bet*" ,„ accomplish. no personal contact whatai Lynch Schuul Old tk*b and JaiDfJB aMver -och as track, weightUft-^ Street Boya ftcuuU, rvsuiuxl In a The beat system (or a man who | n g. swimming and diving. The maiden victory for the Old Boya U a strength athlete is to mi.kr ,„,.,,. Ilu x hal vou are competing i.v .. margin of 16 puUita tu 8. physical comparisons, MENTAl against someone is sufficient to M w W MUilngUMi. J Hyndman and LY. of course. Think of the things iiroU se the pre-compeUUon 'Jltfi I S Gnffith scored 6 each and 4 you can do belter than the nan ,,>„•. s rcspocUvely for the Old Boy. > ou a !" Interviewing. Think e scored 4 and 2 I heir team. leapecUvaay for i vm r WU.SLS ... rsr Ci WIIS \ 1c M ..4 <|r S -ki. CAW IMl) IHNINns Maiih-wt b E S Hmnhr' Ifniiht b %  K BVankfi Clr nn ou i Altrvnc b R Auajtin Cttmry lb* I, An.tin Klna iShirks b K A Br*nk*r aif c Rurk* b K. A Brankat C. Brankrr >tpd V 1,*U I, K A ferankei Fnt b Pnrlrr CUrhr Ih. D I llurkr D M Arclio. n..t out FKIr.i Total BOWLING ANALVS1S O M. It i n.i... t 9 as It. Aurttn IIS K. A. Brankri 7 D SO E. llran.r, • 1 a I i a Y.MPC JND INNtKOO H. Ilovo. .tpd c-l-.kp b Arrhrr n Km* I b.w. b M.iih.-. I Unrkc c Allayi.a. b %  Branka< K A Branhar not out rericr K.B. Yacht Club .'ennia Tournaiitful YEJITERDAY'S HI '-I Mae's Mskflaa. Mr. I. si iLii beat M Cuke, Jr 6—1, 6—0 M Klimcsynaki lEh'J n'^JZZ „^T r !" Thlwni yourself 'he being in the mosl Think back on your Orst ,hilo H. Bynoe and L Thorasi favouiabIe pcaion. Perhaps you appearance baton %  microphone. are a good swimmer and the your rirot speech and so forth II Other fellow eannM swim at all. >ou are honest enough with yourwould even lose in:nerve just self, you can recall how horrible to go Into the water. If you arc you ielt. 1 remember a few years ni good condition, very likely the ago when 1 waa railed upon to other could not stand up to you make a speech at the 'Young Comma light, or what a poor attempt Ki.niicants' Meeting, my mouth he would make in a foot race or went dry. my stomach burned, it he tried to meet you in trials my feet were weak, my hands of a strength or the lifting of trembled, but somehow I got ivelghts, or Indulge In a score of through my speech and was comFour Enter Semi-Finals From Pace 1. to lose Lho next two. Many of these lapses were the Mall [ ! atbkuc paJUmes"at"which pli.nenied on it %  -. That was my l -~" first speech. tfiM" %  J rHi^rvFBH:" £-^&!s i>in ... 0,. toi.1 sot he placed hU -f*£ -" %  "-"'" %  -_ lhlnk a „, „.,„ ,„ wll ,g Mr. V Boach beat Mr. H. I. Toppowerful forehand drlye..o .ecuJ.1S Sll !" ,, Zl? 31 lhal even >ned* aclor. aiul S Brai Allei %  tpd wkpl. b A.. 'lav Mavhaw Ibw b ArcHai lUroki NUyhrw c King, b An Bxtiaa T..1..1 lor S wkU %  IIOWLINCJ ANALYSIS V Roach. Mr. D. E. Worme vs. Mr. C B Sisnett. Ladle. Ietlblea. Miss L. Branch and King vs. Mrs. J Conncll C. Skinner. Mixed IhMblea. Mr. & Mrs. K. S. Buuciufl Mr M de Verteull Kn..K. ; %  dvanced barbell man could do ,nnt **•" -actresses never really completely overcome that feeling <<( nervousi. M^.vei. :lu> giadually control themselves. ipped his own f ce'ling"Cr'eT 1 "u J a'utv"'"r "sUMrtority. J"" P" 01 '" lh '; Junior Weightlevel the ^ ^^_ J* %  •- y itfum championship, a friend of score. He came back and again H m ay seem a hit "swell-head%  mine who was competing, was broke ty-roush the Australian a C d" to place yourself in these having ehat with me, when I and held his own to win the) favourable situations in your noticed how very nervous and match. iioughts. but it is not really. It jittery he was. I think I did a Erie Sturgesa was no match tor ,., only confidence. If you dont good job in quieting his nerves frank Scdspnan who was in hi. f^i that you can do things, how for he waa successful AUo at '—P lately tnai me rtusiraiian waa (V-H— tharr h* vou •>*• !" i lnnc F Mea-s Deabtoa. broke Uirough McGregbr's svke JJ ffiJ^Uy yuu 'uifd ur Mr. P. Patterson 4 Mr. Q. H. to lead 5—4 but dropped his own >. ~' ut J ,„ ^Sirl^,.. Manning beat Mr F I> Barnes for the Australian """i *h and Mr. G. Wataon 8—2, 6—2, TODAY'S nXTUKU. Mens Singles. Mr. L St Hill v Mr. N Tudor. Mr J. I>. Trimminghiim *1 MUs P ind Mrs best volleying and smashing form. -i 0 you ever expect to get them the Senior Championship last The South Airue.ii nlaeed has done? year, another competitor asked passing shots well but they lacked Physical strength builds courme how I felt. When 1 told him power. fan in addition to confldence. that I felt line, he said that he Herble Flam Is hecoming the^Vou can develop a spirit, through was feeling exactly the opposite it K . mm real dark horso of the tournament. | He Is master of court geometr> and as his brilliant positional play I had ixMten Gardnar Mulloy ln| the previous round, so It was thi md Mrs. K. A. downfall of Selxaa. The Plam-Drobny *emi-nnal should be u great battle of tactics for Drobny too is a master of post-' hlch you will never be 'licked' nervous and ill. What made I Third Annual Benefil Show \ ItannIn Aid I Th. Ill CM .„ I T JOHN IIAIO WUJAI.P LEAGUE CLINICS AI OBII.L IIAIJ.. ajattasM FHIDAV. July *th ISM at S 9-m. Under lhe dltUnallhalMd assaaa a 1 •Thr Slar Buds School nf DANTIMi • rifoi.a uan %  • %  . s-a OVILI-l Hi 'i %  .. D Uf| I I IOV • Dir-H* niht BUI Bud* H ii Uutit Arlt>"I %  %  %  v. atom Bud h^ \i.ii.i %  %  !... Bud KiTTCNS ON Tin: Kgfffg Ttotur tliid> %  n-\l UBT !' % %  at '•< PrA ngat atai auaa aajea U I mi* inn Tha I Hi* iron Man ISI. \i uu -NOW i kind parntUMon cd Cat. Capl IU.-..H. ARCH. B.E Th rVaWs I*".,! %  ria %  upiflv '' MuUc. ADMISSION n iaa afan uat ••* $1.00 For Vteddincs. Amiu.rurtf. HiiLlm.t hrUtenlass. etc. HI XMOMI RIKOH GOLD dt SILVER II wi I i I i:> See jour Jewellers . Y. De LIMA A CO.. S.T. 20 BROAD ST. •ad >l MARINE CiARIIKNS This II ''A*v S/n-citil COCONUT CREAM CAKES 6c. each B ARBADDS AKER1ES DIAL 4758 JAMES STREET iTII. RUB AWAY THAT PAIN THIS QUICK EASY WAY • Mcniholatum' Bain iclicvc Aches and Painso quickly that it seen ^ almosi like magic. Yon can feel ils cooling. Noolhing louclt begin -it once lo ease the pajoful ihrob. And'Mcniholatum is so easy io use. Yo.i just RUB IT ON. Rub it where ihe Pain is and the Pain goes. That is all you have lo do to brirt? immediate relief from Ache* and Pains. The sooner you gel' Mcntholiitum' the sooner you will get relief. Ouick get a jar or tin to-day MENTHOLATUM 1ST INNlNtH 1) Ari-hvr S9 I V. >S Ml 1,1 11„ I M.IMI • Waadarari SI aad >U. S ki. i BWaamaal M tad liar t whu.i aeciiMFNr lnm*i b Cotbin IJcoil-Ic rrovrrbi. h Ml Phllllr 1> Cixbln Waakp> c b Corbln Pric* I) Coil, in Bechlrb Corbin WiltI Rsinaa> h Cofbln ParH* b M. u i.i. Wnthwl Rose Clarke BOWI.INn ANALVKIS O M J Corbtn H l'irvart>1 • Ma-lali 1*1 1 WANPEHEIOt IMi INNl; A O e.-Ja r*b Pravatb. • •11*11. f „ \\ -11 I'robnv too is :i nisler i>f post. IllIU i*n'4lV*'S >\ ill i.o„al play. IT Flam can beat _, a,--— --. . Drobny ho could well ~ M %  • I Kid Ralph tnke the title. I • aten Sedgiii^ii He has already t Wimbladon. Caleb "Billy' Greaves, No. 3 welterweight contender for championship honours in Trinidad left yesterday by the M.V. Mooeka fi>r Dominica wher he espects lo meet the local middlewelylit champlan Rid Ralph on Smut July 8 at Windsor t**rk 1W: Inica. nalph also left by the same opportunity. M G Mayax • lahl : Prlea It. Annatrona I Mai ,.i .HI M. B Piovertb Prira I' PalterMin b Watt* tl II Allfne r . b Wi J B Rabbliuoii not ov.l I iar-1 b Phillip* b Watli %  !: % % %  b Phllllpi WHAT'S ON TODAY Meeting of HOILSS of Assam hly— S.00 p.n. Police Band Concert. Mental Ho-piui. 4.00 p.m Water Polo. Aauatic Club. 6.00 pjn. Baaket Ball. T.M.P.O 7 30 THE WEATHER REPORT YKSTRKDAY Rainfall from Codrlngton' t>l in. Total rainfall for awnth to yesterday: M-inn. Highest Tcprrturs: 8.& F I.owat Tamperaturs: 76.0 -F Wind Velocity L'J miles per hour Barometer (e m i 28.M6 (3 p.m.) 38 26 TODAY Bunrlse. 6.48 a.m. .'-:..• 6.11 p.m. Moon: rirtt Qtiartei. Juna W Lulitiug: 7.00 Dm High Tide: 10.20 a.m., 10 62 p.m. Low Tide4.21 a.m. 4.04 p.m They 11 Do It Everv Time By Jimmy Hallo <$ETTiNC5 A LOAD OF TH C PRDOkJAL SON WHO -| ls-£0S MORE PROODlNo. s^ s^m %6 ^*rrn ur r TO c.tf. ATTVOOCS s^Sf*r It^m -"*& h S3S c ? :i it %  ;. -\ m$> *$h ^0~7ii& PRINTED HAIRCORD A ."... 36 int widi 7r. per yd. BUCKRAM 37 in While vide— Ml Only 7.tr Yd. sat nm . COTTON 1'iilMS 3b ina. wide •. 7J %  r. 711.. |T •at CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10. II. 12 h 13 Broad Slreei. ASIC FOR REAL MEN-THO-LAY-TUr TINS AND JARS Ma* Inly ly /*• Maalaa/aliiH Co. IU. (tit. 1l*\ I/au,*, eneh.d §ALE! SALE! Al Ihe VARIETY MMIAI •sllOIM'l BROAD STREET Smashing Reductions on SJIOKS. SANDALS, BALLERINOS ( Mil IIKKN SIIOKS PIMPS, SI.1PPKRS II sllllIS HATS. I'NDKKWF.AK. STOCKINGS SOME LOVE THE REST WHO LOVE THE . BEST BUY JAW i:\icit in ii III.I All FYFFES LINE Messrs EMors & FyfTcs. Ltd., advise that aji increase of ir current passage rales to and from the l'nite


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PACK TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY. Jl'I.V 1. 1*52 Ctuuh gallitig Ml r H V. I \! v \ l I Mr XZaie hod been of the %  _^ %  h v I, . ,,.: %  ... % %  l-cr U.K. HoCday M %  hi s, \ Gu %  Hnuaa, hi* on I %  Pc r.ruar IW EniEland 'II anem' : Abo lesrvitm for Fiijtlatid on fr (irm-*e was Mr. ';. >:. \ i.lant of Borcliy> I QUbMl IhtJ "'II alao --pcnd otvmt four i Mr aM here obc>" Man *rr. %  Living nt Ihr Hotel H On Busin-M M R. GEORGE MICHAFJsS. hi bo with Messrs. Braich. V..nk n'. %  tadiM on %  VI Kit. Mr Michaels, who reoreaents % %  iuooa in Englnnd. 11 o \ c %  TiinK 0*1 her. HWIA. He i Via ". Hotel Mntron ;il St. Philip'i M ISS MAKH.INT if V E It. Matron of St Pbillp'l Almshou %  i.day by II W.I A : -i" %  %  I"rtniht' %  During her Otay Mil Byoi Drill % %  ton. Cleik in I he Customs Department Keep The Date *T*HK ANNUAL HA/.A Alt in did 1 of tl Homo will %  N. vcmber 2Dth. During* th,laM two veors. the 1 1 • %  i'nk |0 in., "i olunleei Drill H.ill. but public .•up-iort continued. /nar is staged In aid of moN deserving cause and so thos. >,.,,, a fw&orw . %  To R::de in U.S.A. M iss Al BTA 1 v.i.K. daughu %  of Mr, s. [foil %  :. %  II W I A for ,..' % %  bo will r* side with her relatives. Glive Walked Very Slowly — Bui He Sow Things No %  Ortt El$e Did— MR R MrCONNET IntranoU \ MONG the passen> inf her" from Trinidad on I Do Qroopo iiiranoit for the United R were Mr Max K'inn. Consul frr Switzerland in Trinidad and Mrs Kuhn who will l>c own for four TH.nth* a: lonotll of ".< %  Irnji He v by his wifiaim two rhddren I'. ,*,.[.. r.,| \;>t\ Mr. and Mi*. OtOOOtU expect •bout the middle of October. The.v will Inleuving Iheir daughter Tunlna at a University In England to further her studies. Visiting; H?r Daughter %  esterdoy morninc Antigua and h'-r US^. was Mrs. Robertha Branch .f King William Street She ha* gone on a visit to hei daughter rent Branch! of Jamaica. Long Inland. Agricultural Officer. Jamaica PRESENT holidaying in i is Mr. V. A. L EAVING yesterdi by B.W.I.A. for By MAX IWH4 OUVoT, the Snail. .a id "Som.folks like lo go In a hurry. Some folk* think I'm the unluckien one in tht world not la bo ablv to move fast. But I think some folks or* wrong.'* "But if you go in %  nurry." sold Knarf, "you got wherovor you're going quirk." Clive said that *> %  > %  nht. "Vou gel there quirk all right. Hut what do you seo? I mm. what do you see along the wa>"" "You see everything. CUta You iu-t set it all fn "You re aulto sure that you see everything when you run?" "Oh 000." Olive though for a minute or two Finally ho sold; "Maybe you do Let's both of us go from net* to lb* Mump of the old apple tree You go os fast os you like Ann* I'll go a 1 .',-.---.".-,*, W/.V, %  15 o m Radio M*wiwl. S JS p m Report rrotn Britain. I • p m loCwlu4e. IHpm rrotn IM Bdlloilaa. • SB p m M-plf LI rom" • l" *..n> Tone, •> K '" l10 OH p m Th !< %  ••. II P %  •"*> lalD. 10 1" t> %  Hi-rtH-M HtxISr Talk. MSL 10 30 p m India aoulh* !" Jourlinarf had an argument with Glle. Stcondtd to vV .shington M l:. REGINALD McCONNEY. Clerk in th P"Mie TressJ\ Uiy, left fur the United Slates via ^rieml' R S. D"V C T A *^i PiMrtoRKoyaoteMKiv rv a *I.A tomr Xmcuituroi Aaoloiant'In He has been seconded for throe North-East 'Trinidod. yean scrv.ee following a probaMr Soriennt who Is spending lion period of three months, with twvlve days with hn porenw. h. Colonial Supply Mission U. Mr nnd Mrs. L, Sarjeant of Washington Bclmont Road. Is on hiiwav to Reggie who is the only son of j mmcn w h en he has been prolii ..i.d Mrs t M<^onney njoied to the post of Agricultural ived in the Ratfboui and Shipofficer. ping Master's tad Ibi Aodilui JJ,. pyj^eig to leave for King'iini'Lil'' lo thr ,,,.,. V| t Antlgun nnd Puerto Rui Coloniol Treasurers Deparlment. 1>v |t w I A HttOjl la Uat week. At the airport yesteidi> v. a him off were many friends, well -1 nnd his colleagues In the service with whom he is dooerv%  ngly popular. Among these was Mr. H. S. Jemmott, O.B.E retired Auditor General. Forester* Dance T HE Ancient Older 0i I hovo for some time nuiintoin•d .i Scholarship Fund from which the children of It. members benei;t Iii order to boost this Fund, they are making a bigger eflort. mid on Saturday night. July 5th. Mr. G. A. Lewis, Secretory of the llarbados Turf Club, will conduct %  % %  • drawing of Raffle Pligo it vne lAHlga'h Dance whkcb t..ke place tt the Drill Rait Transferred M R. EMMANUEL WHISKEY who was over here supervising old iron for Conoumera Mfltal .Hid Iron Co. of Canada. ]• ft tor British Guiana on Friday l t H W I A. whero he has gone on transfer. ihe flowers, ond the bottom of tht arass. and a cricket or two. and a as I usually do When we bath IIIOOT. ond sn old rubber ball thst get thrv we'll talk atut the thing* the children must hove loot—" we've seen on the way 1 "Oh! Whero is that ball? The Ver, ln.e.cMiag %  *% %  b n look,n '" T *' Kno-t didn't think this -si going aw.*, mt ^ ^.d 0 f that clump of -?ry interesting The stuiru .uisie-t." said Glive. "And then 1 el thv old apple tiee 0*M ao more top ped for a moment or two to Ulk than IWOffl) or thutv reel awoy to my friend Wot ml." JUM 01 the fa. end ol the ga.de. { Wnrm? .. Mfd Knarfi po „ led "Worml the earthworm. He • % %  looking out of the top window of — tiio underground house. We chatted 00. In l stops hnart ,, ..•SlJlLSSKL!" *h.t hi. child.en wer. dnin, Talking Point Character a money and according as the man earns or spends the money, money in turn becomes character.—Balwer-Lytuwi. laOaw FhoUt Oar and 11 04 Tbo Gardra—St. Jotaea tODAV a lOMOBBOtt S SB r M AY DEN a Kv lAiKE K.i.1 TAVIliloMil \ So knait ond t'bve the Snail •tarted out. In one step Knarf OHM nhead of Glue. In two steps Knort -ouldn't GLOBE TODAY LAST SHOWING 5 %  P m. *ssi • %  me i**ait* LOUIS JOIRI1AN DtllllA FAGI.T LET US GO.. Tom*rro and Thursday 4.5 A S-SP P-*HGIITIN.l MAN OF THE MJ !" lwwwo Vletor JORY — Randolph f grots. It only took Knml a gaJo> He to reach ihe •tiimt' Then he al town and wailed far Ulive. It must nave been on horn late, vhen (Jliw glided up to Ihe stump. Well." ho oald to Knorf. "what d vou %  • %  e. my !•.> f "I saw lot ot thing-," said K %  :i • t 'Because, oven though I went fast. %  ..king around. I saw the romn i" Ihe mi.den. I saw nsMll .. a lot of glass. I saw a rock on it. I "is a hultrrtl) i\nd then I UK the itumpof I ho old tno and I sat down lo wait BIRD Ol PARADISE Jeff (HANDLER — Debra PAGET — I> U H JOl RDAN I wa< just about to say good-bye when Worml auddenly disappeared into hh house again." *'\Vliv?" asked Knarf. "Robin was just coming so Worml ent. Then I met another old friend of mine Blockie the Beetle I on Blocklo for quite o aaill Hi told me he had moved into a new house. It ws right along the way, so I decided to look at it. !..l il out to me. Tag Stairway led down under a rock *ith •no*' nn il, for that rock was (ho roof then a butterfly come to vtift god I lefl them both talking "Very kood,said t.live. You *•*£"" %  Kr K ,hn J "" £ Mw av Bgi.ot t-tiinv II '"" ,l "" ou K, '" ,f ,, """ : n "What did you oat. ("live?! ,h %  "-• ' *PP |t; u **W"I -Well." said UHeo, 1 talked for for RM. lonsi ways orltaoal fto>ng much "ll'mm," said Kr.orf thoughtfully. %  v>ept the itnt'nm of 'You nally oan a Int. dive." Rupert and the Toy Scout — 36 PLAZA THEATRE* MR. V. A. L. SARJEANT Tlie Ihrft pier ores Kei illUMtnttr.. Ml] on tho way i the ankle s'rap sale--. DONT Imagine for a monvent that men will like them. They -on I And DONT imagine that they in comfortable. They aren't. If you have a low instep you will hove trouble keeping them on, and if you save .i high Inotoo they still feel as If they uiv fMlllii* off. But I predict that all fa-hion conscious women will buy a pair, New Colour* F1HST of thp autumn a.id .vinter fashions seen in London (got week showed no change %  *o far In the silhouette, but there re new colours and fabrics. Sherry brown and ban with back, rremc de menth-. pink sin, grenadine, light JIO and milk stcut are the n-w 10coat colours. A lovelv slate colour, oatttd t —Ci'ii' nirmnl.t now on sole in Britain. "cinders." it new ior outdooi and cocktail dresses. "Tree bark" pleating, w!u< i .Tinkles like chocrlate paper, U JISO new for cocktail dresses. Coronation year wedding fashion will be the all while bridal gown worn with a WhlW fur fabric jacket and pillbox. Spies Are Busy FASHION spin ore busy tryin;: to ferret out details of the ljuccn's summer wardrobe. I hear that one Am-'i-;fashion house was prepared to spend up to £35.000 for photographs and descriptions of the Queen's cloUic. It is the biggest %  iTci mr mide for o fashion secret. The Queen's dressmaker, Norman Harlnell. told me: ". . I c;:n never relox our precaution* The Queen'." dreasos are made up In several parts by different workers, and very f. !" >ole—mv dressmaker myself."—L-E-S. and Buy the BEST BUYS in Barbados • fit'lltM. Very Heavy . KHAKI DRILL Limited Quantity 98c. and Jl 20 OENTS' BOOKS Rayon and Cotton 3 pairi lor $1.00 DENTS' WATCHES Reliable Wnst Watchee $8 22 Good Quality HANDKERCHIEFS 4 for $1.00 "TROPICAL SUITING Qrey, Brown and Blue $2.62 SPORT TWEED 06 in $ 5.20 Latest Fashion THE NEW LOW PRICES KINK Ql'ALITV WIIITK CAMBRIC 36" 98 Hi.AC K & WHITE PRINTS 36" 84 AIM KHAKI 28' 4, 123 lli.ll D1AIM 28" 1.00 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL *220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606 EXCLUSIVE MEX'S SHOP VALUES IN GENTS READY MADE SUITS IN TROPICALS LINEN WOOLLENS WORSTEDS LIKEN SHORTS $10.50 KHAKI SHOHTS $5.50 SUITS MADE TO ORDER FROM A WIDE RANGE OF SUITINGS Ready made GARBERDINE and TROPICALS From S35.00 up TROPICAL PANTS From $8.75 and up SHIRTS PYJAMAS SOCKS, TIES SHOES. THE LONDON SHOP LTD. LOWER BROAD STREET PHONE 4785 CREAM FLANNEL SEROE $4.38. $3.47 SHIRTS £ Khaki. Dren. Sport Cot.; ton, Rayon and Silk I. Real Kaock-down Puces ;: 1001 Qualities '; CENTS' PARSON QREY $311 •; JOHN WHITE SHOES 10 per cent, off *• All Wool Worated S TWEED PINSTRIPE ; 38 in. Navr and Brown $91 50 $ TROPICAL PIN8TRIPE >; 56 in. wide ;; $2 80. $329. and $3 49 OENTS RIBBED 1 JOCKEY PANTS 72 cent! I HOUSEHOLD :• TABLE C0VER8 N Plaatic ones S 51 211 U|i OILCLOTH $1.27 BLANKETS Lovely Quality and Colours Single $ 1.98 Medium $2.08 BEDROOM AND DRAW. INO ROOM RUOS $3.48 BED8PREAD8 Single $ 4.12 Double $ 8.15 5 Alluring Shade* BED SHEETS Single and Double $4.01 and $6.21 TAPESTRY CLOTH 48 in. wide $1.29. $1.33 and $1.46 STRAW MATS In Bodroom and Drawing Room Sixes 800., 90c.. and $1.04 CRETONNES 37 in. wide 48 in. wide 79c. and $1 32 MOSQUITO NET8 Ready made Medium $ 8 30 Large $7 24 TOWELS Wash S 7c. Pace B7c. Bath T ie. Bath t ic. Bath $1 JO HEAD KERCHIEFS Colonrful 92c THANI BROS. Pr. Wm. Henry Street and Swan Street. DIAL 34M.



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7 TUESDAY. JW.Y 1 IMS BARBAIHV! ADVOCATT PACE THRU Teachers Seek Parents' Co-operation £&***'** I j Hmiim to aJaWiaS tl:. i-w Begin Island Wide Educational Plan THE ELEMENTARY School '!• i i I iiarbados have slatted an islind wide campaign to Ret the co-operation of the parents in the training o( the young. Tha Hi il meeting of the campaign waheld laat night at the Prm.der.ee Boys' School. Christ Church, and Mi. .T Cameron Tudo. addruitfed the teacher.and paieiu.s Mr. Tudor said in part — We are all of in hare this evesizes are being neld. An obaarveo* nine at the bidding of the Primncrson can gather, fron. nry School Teachers of this island, majority of case-, he Ustacu They an seeking our support and tha' ihc accused penoaa, nsorienthusiasm for a causa so overoften thnn not. show all the feat! whelming in its importance that mi of inferiority. He can readwe scarcely grasp it* significant „ y ee that they have probably We arc here to inaugurate a camnever bean really chert-hod \ ortmg '<_ of faulty character training. It is violent crime in a fuio. altogether fitting that Teachers to ass ar t not their superiorlt> should int. rest themselves in this pour wretches they dare not nope grave matter and it is even more for that—but their equ. i fitting that thay should setae tf:<* mat the security we ought to luv. M>leadiri opportunity to bring homo in mind is not tha mere freedom to the rest of us, the plight of oar lium physical want—unportani ga young people. And the fact thut that is — but acceptance uy a OUT Primary School Teachers hav. group whose love, whose approval embarked on this campaign la in and whose esteem are necessary to Itself a warning to parents, guardthe moral growth of the child iang and to the community that arc Moreover a child needs ordei have largely fall.-n asleep a) our y living for bta moral growth, IT posts. niu.t therefore obscr*,in Ihc n Not infrequently is u ml %  thesis is in part true. Thr world li that his sensitive confidence is no in ffic-t changing. But only in srifl-d by an atmosphere of sexual material externals. The age old Irregularity, by the spectacle of problems of humanity—good and tyranny or by tha infrequent arevll. truth and falsehood, beauty ilvalt and departure of the male and ugliness — tVW remain to be parent on the streetcar named folven In etch historical period, •Desire'. That, ladies and gantla Tho chnllenife of evil and sin ore men, is whnt I mean by security isfactaoci. no matter on what x*lr. child, the being whom he must Naturally, there a sensible thing, for i; encou. nourt-l'. hr will naturally realise flBod laaanna fo the nursery Ufa we see around us an< like to hires* here the imof a reasonable sundae being to the se more than fooli h •a* fact thai the mac 1 i bed. clot !n nt %  afcausts the nv i >' moat nf on inly a few wl %  • difficulties %  ahei in' gas responsibility and resssonsl'hat b) N-iivK hlsnaelf ha is saor* %  aeeaesi y nearly certain of being the perfect to personality Men**.. i ,>y To ta aue n at those conv manipulate hi* care, he will n unaided. Rather should he be aaginfi qualities of a little cased %  given something which he cannot the simple faith, the trust anc "Mp unless he summons the Iklence which Uva* leanuaa 1m ssssssaMa sac %  Dd or attraction and which render* %  ekel %  aaaa %  tl In this way his orlanta'he buslnoas of education tnat sea lion is guided away from himself proper degree of humltu as an object of devotion and towhich no man <*ai dare hope la auraaount 'he wiards co-operation with another enter the Kingdom of Heaven. The dy living to human being as .. desirable and in a l aaa rl na of bis ow„ existence, lei? And it seems u> me that pleasant attainment the Faitn bj which he lives and sound duty rest upon oti tn which he hope-: te> die—this e*ent The Teacher reu-ulrf ha the granary from which sufficiently When 1 turn f. vs* ma chad u, a huiitfiy soul m;iy Tefresh Ma %  iv-lth renewed vigour foi me as i l ground. ,'nd for a ve-y simple perlloua l>usn>sa> of an. souls reaaon. In dealing with the child m a tlnful world. them by God. I could raly only, for the moat tme tha: •iiviroT M aan But even part, on insight and direct obscrvworks against him. Put yet. if In made for Iflo Iatkm. Ilui the prablem of tha deference to ignorant ainununrawhich mogt "f us h • \ • %  teacher comes to me through vital tors or to a pathetic nanmu expertenre Having enjoyed the he srquiesees m wluit is hldaoua slbility which real .•-xperlonce of teaching for at taast or artiilcial and betrays has trust a such. To axp'aln U n nine years at various levels. I feel Or betrays hit noble asutratUMS. *a Staa as For |>r>ren\ slight!* more confident m attemptthe consequences gre tie atnftil .-reatum nig u. i elate the duties of reasonchild becomes deprs—xt and Innvcufe nr ,rt f .sibllltiasof the te-acher t<> the pisastratad. his glfU atrophy ami ing requirements of the moment, emerges Into %  nian'h world especially the requiienients of the the burd %  |j enable parents rtant ro'e as are committed I II Wtll noi matter gioally d >JO make a firm resolve now to go God's will in the upbringing aiui of your children. eOUl A, in thera in Parent-Teacher Association. Such bodieraar ahlldren We run a campaign, it io turn II aaa .. gaogaj erusad> ^f Him who wa baa always been parant and >-iill remains a Teacner front thoaa trutiis by whn-' nan ought to live and die. irman. Ladies and On liiiit-n. vou have borne with in* long enough. I am grateful to th< Headmaster of the School for tnMgh privilege 1 have enjoyad. i i ssall m your work an>i success will attend you ualon, I like to tl iften I have levn sustaiasd ds nf an A: * Be ai > wi h.,it, BStan -n aaa -w Bad m.~n MS t-nilrirvai tha !(• Ml //*//• to rlfttti front hlifotl nuftiiflmpwi",.*r xloast saav < 'rtleamaslc aches a*4 ssslns, tiut and ...nli.i 1.1.. aoU>, amssasa aad common In dl' Caaaae's KUaad Mlarara l'i> to SMT.IT ISM htaoS. Sstiu i use ays* .-.< aad •*•<•<• American poet mnlllits Urm 11 '.evaf pre: nt -inrt each gene !" t•' It is woefully Incking in the liv r I her 1 foil' equidistant from I*o* of our children and Its import run nlty. It is in the llRht of th; tiuth that we rmptoach lem of ehSTSeter tr.iininp in th^ liveof *he younw. ^snnot be over-emph; ( sued Adventure sks which The three supreme vocations of in ., • im ra n t haaa, kaaaWnaj aasl tba gacrad miD %  . 1 fulfilled adequately the aspir-tloa-. tt hogaasj I-'MIKS vs. ill. it >.*etm to me. comprise the complete and eodarau CMy "f God. And anyone who desires to enter m nort. %  nvi'v.i smili. .,f tlw irinity •' %  aliings for the graatei tipllftmei of human life, must as -omeowe haa said in a diffeieni aojBMC k* rag 1: 1 pattooa young la Hie most dangerou partly because the school as such is not as well bused as the famil/ or the Church. It doe* not posset* suoh natuial supporta. Within this context lei u analyse the duw and attitude not of the perfe I teacher (there h> no such persoi.1 (nit "f the teai*ier \v*i, thw.nl. I md hrmmnl in on every side, still -iiTince IIL.V m in 11 u frustrated bi'lag, without sdf thetr ehildrea is to u-woriin* > %  respect, conceited and 11 %  l *"<' r r n on, y ed. And all because k.s teacher widanee 1 drawn had toahad away fium the llalit. Un to Christian doctnne 1 ,, • rerrthood srhitfi is. he is sub %  "> I>H SEA AND AIR TRAFFIC 'ijou'Hl'Vf to make IttketjttloK te eat it > 1 ggget or to .in ill disp-f "d inti-i ; %  •. .I,.; bad) %  •( mi laaors, 01 to an Ignorant and befOK'-'' tional aurhorilj 1 lie In tliti conn iluili-'ii winch klg osm personality maksa degree to which r". ata subdue udarhaB %  • %  rememberg that there are liula !im M.iTriasT. A* .1 s1iu?e flirthei wa I I I rted Bui Ihej %  .1 m half of roe ui I of chlldran can be traced 1 In Carlisle Bay Says Danny Dolphin. our bei-looo Chef Try dais sacipe ss a trasi fit ins tanulv k"s ddtrrent %  1 Sr.w.ll „irsm sso siuesciit I ... Uin.-j-n. WB W tHl i.. '"^y"^ "„''K" "„„T,T *" ~tur io lk> movoa towaidn perfection in Iho training of his ihniues. As to thair children, compared inch Ihsj IIW Miv to i ad %  clothe tlielr young is relative 1 unimportant. What parents have CO %  ths the mme t* the chief trainn r ,,,.,,i >f ma chOd IT* im 0 .'ii-incnt.-iry. To ne lect .0 obvious duty on thi K < at.-illation that the di aaaegaj It li the I of cynicism and cowardice. Ami nothing out curses and conlcm %  The CBBM • in > >nd m< 1 i iivou 01 Uu.cuiiu is auveiiturv. il<* must U-vc Irean things to do, fresh One of the most Basra aaag UaUtS m(er ,>w lo delight in, and new of the tducaUonait new m hu km>wleogo lo acquire. All Uie>cl "in.-iiiplation ui the child — to lltf ncSJdl .amply btrratlHI lie is a discover what sort of human being ivraon. lius curiosity 1 he or she is. Books have been lmn J|1(J we nMVC Ilo llg ni to ask written, adigent researcbes comnim ^ develop wiuioul it. sTrooi pieled, *ctures have been given, tr „ w liiui to standing, Irom stauuall on this problem, the problem m(( to stepping and thence 10 of making a correct assessment 01' climbing and balancing—in au the human young. True we know. n e*e he gams new ccmAdence, roughly speaking, its chief human nourishes his soul on each successneeds. On the purely physical side, r u | venture, unto at maturity 111these are food, warmth and shelter, natural curiosity leads him into and it is gratifying |o 4iKQsgf Ilie a u V eniure of ideas, thus maathal governmental authorities arc in g him u philosopher, ot into Itag at last discovering a connection beD dvenlure of realities, thus maktwean llic suitable satisfaction of mg nun a Christian, I h ** e requirements and u agaeatl,\jid then there is lesponslbilil .. ful school career, Mono* satisfaction of the physical needs are of abiding interest to 'he teacher who finds, more often than not, that his expected results aaa denied him. through the neglect of these basic needs. When, however, we pass to the moral and spiritual requirement' the need for which is the thiro moral and spiritual requirement of the child. In order that you may grasp it more readily, let mo describe it as the need of person.u independence through ihc medium of something over wii; slbility can be assumed. Natural!*. t the tendercst age. this niaiui of A child, it is there that the trouhself In the desire for personal ble begins. We seem unable to l xssscssions. This da-ire is an emimake a correct assessment of the naOuy wholesome on and oul child's needs in these spheres to be" encouraged. And for th because we so often forget that ho reason. Quite often the habtturl or she is a person In his or her thief kj the person who. as a child, own right. And vet. on anv detlh:td never hid .-aivthmg of his own. nitlon of personality — and the*.and evarybody who has ever hml are several — we should al 1 any dcaunga with deli'iqucm chl think, agree that a person to bo dren must know how In 'ully a person, must have securing It i* to hear a little clrl t-'l ty. ndventure and rcsponsihilitv how she had always wanted a do I This is what we ought to mi *9M1 a poor • v securi-y Go Into our L-w give he '"ourts any day, but especially on The desire for pi 'he occasions when criminal asyoung Is a wholesome one. It: consoled and hciitened by the fact thst his usefulness Is far greater in content and value to his pupil* thsn are his depression and sense of frustration. He will remember that he is at all times a tcnoher. Other claim? HI ay l*o in and upon his inclination-. To these, be must of course respond. IJU* Of .,'•.. m !" .,..!,, ;i'iremems of hi. vocally, as a nvm lH traAa ihem'bv training himwuehe-r. For any teacher wlio cu-rp th 0 fitting reward of %  gfll and we refer to him in the crs .• (eaJUmate phera of a*-tion, „ 4rrTlU who nee>eiween a well educated well uand actions as %  %  !lima ieiy njxm Ood'a Oraee, the* must maV formed man and a clever iincdothe stars and compass. He can llie-naaeves so. But thev ran 1 C*tad man. li was that In the one property exercise hi>. talent lor in>u-ct their young hv turnn case the knowledge and training citUeradup mainly in his teaching. •* %  from the wickedneas tin have been absorbed Into the That Is the station to which it has haea committed, and by doingth whole life and that in Uie other pleased one it flows naturally with the work In his own school and other it In the consequence of ionthrough the school he stamps fas scions effort mingled with vamt, indelible mark upon the charade I submit that the distinction in of his community true and that only the first kind child he influences 1,. a rtthum of teacher can really Influence the Though he may work through young in the building of Ihen lung caiwr. parhapsiiol gellin* th( charaetec. promotion he has deserved, yet as iirsUl m hls wurk Face to Pace he reads or hear. „i (he nooie will mor^u, m(ir ,. „ Rw leaeher. in whom knowex^tsof inc child siace grow.. „.,, ledge hasbeen absorbed In hu lo adulmood, he will ex|ieilence a unfit Aatual III wnole life and not merely In bis ^frnn piide in havmg laid In. pens. Naturally I h e 1 Head will not amrry 100m other ambition on the altar ol 1 • imi kha d i woi-k'hemsghiprererlodo.HewUl ^ So you who teach can lift since both are rf i r iasar; •liinh ....opt his role of co-worker P/•; h -rt "" 9g£* *uibilU> ol ha ohttdrei ivrth God. nourishing the soul nti-l faUure. only degreaa of sueThus we shouU hitterly oonte* committed to his caie. It wi ifreatly whether he mere assistant or whether he is really teaching the subject* or tho pupils he would prefer to leech. HOT will he ignore the defecu of his own character by feeding his Wa have now arrived at the mot iY''suffcieiV reason "only imbltion on the outlines ol tho Impor tant peet t Qf ,, M p i n * n \ lead. ne willkir to share j usanaxa — BY "s -i ire 1 ... S ,11* I %  'kins. J Davwtiaa L Oortai,' %  • > 1 1 >i* a w %  A o\ a I KATKS tir KXCUANQK ia-rt 1 *\n* ..-SMUNI hawloi Nvata 2 o* 1 0* the Pilchaa*(Dolphm Brsnd, "t course) 1 111 2 i.hlc.p. hutter 2 tableap. i"^ Dnnn the nsh. ***** S p„nklr "llh the *•*! *t once. ,MOSTANT. These.' ;,„ pSt£ n !" vi Ptdu, ,.,„.„.,! ,..,...u.i.. .!' v„u on fly "" "hf" „' , %  !. |IK""J"'" %  11 tiinj *••"'**"' %  ai .tr-l %  felt and pcpP" Ulurfo' ^* "' 0, Uwun lira R,.u,.a•" ""• * "* Luttered ^*•' kja ^ul Maw a chair n-ilk s saucepan. AJ'i urns, than the fab Md 0 ,.inl tlic mnrrun! 1" • hf %  ,, ,, each p*ece 0*1 ,0 ^^' n lemon rmd sn-l '*"* e .cine* are specul.T rr* ItJ ^lUdafmBaa* r.n. ami wtt the oatai raadaM troh %  >"•" Bada i !" n. Ciim-nn. souls and the 0, alive. Th* truth is of course, that u inrp nvr^t ,,v * imparting moral and r ., !" J lyimut training to children res m U.th parenU Bi an gree. if a man clalma that 11 tl"U> toil rentiers lilm unfit be no moral ol ma. Tnus we shouln %  argument of loo faUier TOBsed pleads inability to I. the doubtful ground that ha %  t< ousy earning gfid, He Is -oweid. shun him The ParenlaJ Problem S we launch tin The way may but every step forward •the multitude of the welfareof the world." tfta %  II piirenbi for %  oho 1 arhera he irould lik,> to be The responstblHties of parents headmaster, nrouutit face to faM asistUu| the teacher Mat M with all sorts and conditions r.f in not undoing his work. Here in children, he will accept them as Barbados as elsewhere, it appeaii •.hey are and with the eye of tha to be an uphill .-druggie even to M>U1 he will see them, even in the impress upon parenU the bard .. weaknesses as the summit of God's necessity of being good asarngdas %  citiaens of tilt. e creation. Face to fee with the to their children i.part from lie of t „ u rso of the unnerving simplicity of m the teaching of your children • Pliey are atixiou. that your chll van, as %  ith i ai I thalr statiot • in hfe, no m.Htei what their glft-j y be, -hdi BIJ ITOfld Rven i' WANTED OLD GOLD AND SILVER JEWELRY OR IN PIE* I'M IN NCRAP FORM The very highest market price paid al )our 1. .v.lI11 V. 1< IJMA A to.. 1111 20 BROAD ST I* he ne : 4tW Whatever kiiid of fish you buy stake sare tkc brand is DOLPHIN Look for tho Red and tlach label when you buy: Cape Ph; Cape Pish in asgasafo; I Natural (hi; pilchards in Tornatu, i 1 ,., jdly, (li..icc Mackerel. (him. Mackerel in Tosuato ; Mullet ; t.la>k>Snock Choice Sooak in T>*usio. DOLPHIN ^0 CANNfio at*" S RoD uCTS PI\M PKIIfHi.CS REDIFFUSION O1T1 n ;i CommUsion of $1.50 in CASH lor ever>New Subscriber btougsat to arii ncrepted by the Company. D ; : ON pay in addition a bonus of $25.00 to < i I raon wlio brings in Iwcnlj -five New Subscrlh^ era In one t .ilcml.ir month who are accepted by the I Com' %  • IV. • s> .j Hare Jw!iv< a ssrppvy of llt'eoninieiidittion F'orniH ready TIB J (AM BE DBTAINED AT VHP OFKICi: rl>i;:isi IN Trafalgar Street. 1 **t*tt*" &f &f&f&f&f&f *; ^aea-a+a-f citljlVal ': ;. 'I IN! I MAUN WEXDICIUE PSRNOXONe VEBDOKE ItUng weeds Ul'CCtlOUl and instrjettort PLANTATIONS LTD. I, I X