Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

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Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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avbudoes



ESTABLISHED 1895

Labourites Protest Yalu Bombin

Say Britain Was
Not Consulted

POSITION” —cuHuRCHILL

LONDON, June 24.
LABOUR members of Partiament including their
leader Clement .Attlee protested in Commons to-day that
Britain should have been consulted before 500 United
States planes bombed Yalu River power plants on the
Korean-Manchurian border two nights ago.

Prime Minister Churchill
said the attacks did not ap-
pear to involve any exten-
sive Korean_ operations
hitherto pursued. “So far as
the British Government is
concerned there has been no
change of policy” he added.

Attlee supporting the op-
position” attack said that
while no obligation was laid
down for consultations, in
his experience there had
been consultations at every
point at which political con-
sideration impinged on
military. “Surely this is one
of those occasions where
there should have been full
consultations?” he asked.

Churchill replied: “No
such consultation wiith the
British _ Government has
taken place but we natural-
ly will inform ourselves
upon the whole matter. “We
are in an extremely difficult
and delicate position.

“We are in great difficulty
but it has been entrusted
by the United Nations to
the Supreme Commander of
the United States and I am
not going to be drawn into
saying anything which in
any way will be taken as a
reflection upon that com-
mander or embarrass him
in any action he may think
it necessary to take.” Chur-
chill pror ised the House an



WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1952



Leg. Co. Appro

For Sending Down
‘Unpopular’ Measure

The Legislative Council yesterday
ber of Orders giving effect to the proposals for increases
in salaries attached to certain technical and professional
key pests in the Government Service as well as the salaries
attached to various administrative posts. ”

In contrast to the stormy and prolonged debate on these
proposals in the House of Assembly on Tuesday last week,
there was a quiet atmosphere in the discussions which took
place yesterday in the Council and which lasted for just
over two hours ss against the 11 hours during which the
matter was discussed in the House of Assembly,

Bid To Oust |i 9 oes natt

e this was followed by a further
Rh F exposition by Hon. Mr, H. A, Cuke
ee Ss vas seconded the motion for the

concurrence in the Resolytion
PUSAN, Korea, June 24, |dealing with the Civil Establish-

Opposition National assembly- Iment General Amendment Order,

men continued the boycott of the |Number IV of 1952.
Assembly amid reports that they | Hon
were mapping a_ parliamentary | .
Strategy to repeal two measures
keeping President Syngman Rhee
in office,

Only 86 assemblymen showed |SUch as had ome
up for to-day’s session, six short of | before and ‘while
the necessary quorum. Pro-Rhee jconceding that it was impossibie
assemblymen passed measures |for any Committee to send down
keeping Rhee in office yesterday.
One measure extended Rhee’s everybody, drew
term of office until August 15 and |attention to certain anomalies
the other keeps him on as Presi- reece in relation to “the

The Honourable Colonial Sec-
retary, Mr. R. N. Turner, deliv-
ered a_ lucid address

Massiah and other
Honourable members congratu-
lated the Government for send-
ing down an “unpopular” measure

Dr,



which
the Council,

that

measures’ of the kind Which

could please

dent until a presidential election resyfective salarfes paid to the
is held. headmasters of various First

The measures were pushed ! Grade and Secondary Schools,
through by a handful of pro-Rhee During his reply to the various
assemblymen. Rhee has been try- a
ing to take the presidential elec-
tion out of the hands of the As-
sembly and give it to the people
from whom he would stand a bet-
ter chance of re-election.

The Assembly was to have elect-
ed a new President yesterday to

Secretary informed the Coun?!
that a training scheme “wag very
much in the fore” and expressed
the hope that the proposals set
out in the various Orders, would
be an incentive to officers:

approved of a na

fering from jaundice and will be
confined to his room at Bucking-
ham Palace for several days, ac-
cording to a
bulletin,

wh
covered the various proposals



points raised, the Hon, Colonial,







therefore advised His Royal High-
ness to cancel all immediate

gagements including his projected
visit to Edinburgh’, «

ve Sa



m7

i zhY Moment

' e



RARELY has Princess Margaret
been pictured smoking in public,
but here she puffs a cigaret as she
attends the races at Ascot, Eng-
land. In foreground {s the Duke of

Edinburgh, busband of Queen
Elizabeth 11. (International)

Philip Has

Jaundice

LONDON, June 24,
The Duke of Edinburgh is suf-

palace medical
The bulletin added “we have

ate en—

—UP,

Mossadegh Given

Hero’s Welcome

TEHERAN, June 24,
Premier Mossadegh was given a



tp ene

way’s visit, Last night French police patrolled streets of



lary Increases

Ridgway | Inspects
Troops In Germany
Under His Command

BADEN GERMANY, June 24.

GENERAL MATTHEW B. RIDGWAY, allied supreme
‘ommander in Europe, visited crack French division under
his command. a

In the second day of his three-day tour of 500,000
frontline troops in his Western European Defence force,
Ridgway landed at Lahr Airbase in French zone of Ger-
many. He had flown to Lahr Airport in his private four
engined Constellation from Bueckendag, a base in the
British zone,

He inspected British forees yesterday and said he
found them “fully up to my expectation in every respect.

He said he did not intend to meet any German lead-
ers on this visit to Germany. He said “my first purpose is
to see first hand the commanders who carry great respon-
sibility.” ,

West Germany is the second of N.A.T.O. nations that
Ridgway has visited, He visited Italy last week, Ridgway
was met at Lahr by General Roger Noiret, Commander-in-
Chief of French troops in Germany, and French Ground
and Air Commanders. J

Ridgway said “I am really proud to serve with you,’
He inspected six platoons of the crack French infantry in
blue uniforms with white gloves and leggings. Then he
was driven to Rastatt, 40 miles north of Lahr, to inspect
more French troops. 5

French occupation authorities took special precautions
against possible Communist demonstrations during Ridg-

Baden French occupation headquarters in groups of. four.
The city was heavily guarded.

However, despite efforts to Kast German Communists
to stir up anti-Ridgway demonstrations no disturbances
are reported,

In Paris Ridgway’s headquarters announced that the
Supreme Commander will visit Norway and Denmark
starting June 30. He will sta
July 2. He will visit Denmar
to Paris in late July.—U.P

in Norway from June 30 to
on July 3 and 4 and return



Clark Sends Typhoon Claims
65 Lives In Japan

. TOKYO, June, 24.
The edge of a typhoon hit Japari

Message To

early ~dissue. replace Rhee whose term expires , were sent gbroad for training to
, Labour M.P’s © eo July 15. Meanwhile 200 local /remain in Barbados when they
; " mee’ on councillors who support Rhee} would have returned.
pressing. for an ediate went on “hunger strike” demon-| Imtroducing the measures, the
debate until the uproar stration in Pusan demanding that | son, Colonial Secretary said:— {
bellowed. Reference by Mr. CLEMENT ATTLEE. cae ee nl de iietudintes I
j ; - “ seein a psembly, e€ Inadequacy of con ns
oa leader Aneurin Bevan to § thousands of square miles Police today arrested _ three !service in the upper ranges of the
of territory inside of Manchuria” was drowned in a barrage | members of the anti-Rhee Demo- Barbados Civil Service, by com-
of barracking from government benches. Bevan shouted | cratic Nationalist Party on charges | parison with conditions of ser-
above the din, “if you want to go to war why not say so?” of an “illegal assembly.” The men } elsewhere in the

This brought disapproving shouts from Conservatives
and for several minutes neither Bevan nor Churchill could
be heard as they tried to speak. Leftwinger Sydney Silver-
man contended that “the question of peace or war may
depend on the continuance of these attacks”. i

After the Speaker had asked the House to keep caim,
Churchill said the government had no objection to a debate
tomorrow, though he would prefer to wait a week until
Lord Alexander, Minister of Defence, had returned to
report on his Korean visit. It was up to the opposition to
ask for the debate tomorrow.

Unknown to M.P’s, while the row was going on news
was being flashed from Tokyo that Korean power houses
had received another plastering to-day. And Earl Alexan-
der, Britain’s Defence Minister, was telling reporters in
Washington that even while he was in Korea he had not}
been informed in advance of the Yalu River raid.

Politicians were convinced tonight that the situation
presents a serious threat to continued bi-partisan foreign |
policy of the British Government.—U.P. he

THE YANKS WILL
DO IT AGAIN

By STEWART HENSELEY

WASHINGTON, June 24,
U.S. officials promise another massed air blast of vital
Yalu River power plants on the Korean-Manchurian
frontier if Reds ever succeeded in getting them working
again. They said there was no intention in future to per-
a Communists to restore this source of energy for North
orea.

At the same time Allied officiais here expressed hope
that a huge air attack on plants had convinced the Chinese
and Korean Communists that the United Nations mean
business and it would be well to come to an agreement in
Truce talks at Panmunjom. However, any political or
psychological effects of the bombing were distinctly second-
ary.

r Officials said the bombing, the first against these in-
Stallations in the two years of conflict, was undertaken
purely on military grounds. One high official said “the
Navy has been wanting to do this for a long time.”

Speculation ranged widely. The most frequently ad-
vanced premises were that the attack meant either—(1)
That the United Nations had decided to give up on the Truce
talks, or (2) Was trying to soften up Communist negotiators.

....And They Did It

TOKYO, June 24.

FOUR of five North Korean power houses which were
bombed by more than 500 allied planes on Monday received
another plastering to-day.

The largest of the five—a huge Suiho dam project on
Yalu River near Shantung was one not bombed in the new
air raids. The other four were attacked by nearly 200 heavy
planes from aircraft carriers steaming-off Korea’s east
coast and Air Force fighter bombers from dozens of bases
in South Korea.

The Air Force said F84 Thunderjets “completed the
destruction” of two power stations near Chanjin reservoir
and two on Songchon River near Hamnung. Experts to-day
were still studying films of damage done in Monday’s mass
raids,





—UP.

are important members in power- |

vice provided

hero's welcome when he returned
from the International Court at!
the Hague. Thousands of Iran-



UNITED NATIONS HEAD-
QUARTERS, Korea, June 24,

U.N. Troops |

Caribbean area and in the Colo-
nial Service at large, is not diffi-
cult to prove. Three years ago
Sir Maurice Holmes stated as a
fact in his report on the Unifica-
tion of the Public Services in the
LAKEHEATH, Suffolk, British Caribbean Area that “in

: June, 24, |tne highest and upper middle

Eleven United States airmen|ranges! in the Civil Services of
were killed when a B.50 Super- | the Caribbean Area the salary
fortress on routine training flight | levels are low, in many instances
crashed and burst into flames here !deplorably low, as compared with
to-day. The aircraft, one of a flight those obtaining in other parts of

ful opposition, but are not mem~
bers of the Assembly.
—UP.

11 DIE IN PLANE CRASH



of ten, fell to the ground twelve 'the Colonial Empire” and went on!
minutes after the take off. Names |to say that “it is not a question |

of victims were being withheld of salaries being insufficient to at-

' route,

jans lined the route from the air-
port to the Shah's summer palace
and shouted anti-British slogans
between cheering the Premier,

Cows were sacrificed along the
After stepping from the
aircraft pale but smiling, Mossa-
degh reiterated the view that the
court was incompetent to judge
the issue between Iran~and the
British Oil Company,

Only a few thousand people |
were allowed in the airport to |
greet him, The route to the
Shah's palace was lined with
police and the military. Mossa-
degh said his duty was to report

pending notification of next of tract to the Public Services men] to the Shah.

kin. —U.P. @ On Page 3

LORD ALEXANDER
DID NOT KNOW



WASHINGTON, June 24,
EARL ALEXANDER, Britain’s Defence Minister, said
here to-day that he did not know in advance that the
United Nations Command planned to bomb North Korea’s
hydro-electric power plants on the Yalu River near Man-

churia.



LORD ALEXANDER.
had never appeared to him t
robust.—-U.P.



He made this statement
when questioned by report-
ers after a thirty minute
visit to Truman at the White
House. He said he had not
been informed that the raid|
was planned while he was inj
Tokyo or Korea on his in-
spection tour and “I know
nothing more than you do
from reading the mnewspa-

He: declined to say whether
he thought the raid on Yalu
power plants was the result
of the deadlock at the
fruce Talks but he did say
the targets appeared to be a
“proper target”.

Alexander said he had
discussed Korea _ general]
with Truman who, he added,
o be in better form or more

—UP.



Prisoners Screened
With Impartiality

KOJE ISLAND, June 24.

Loudspeakers blared outside
tents telling prisoners that Chin-
ese and North Korean Red Armies
had pledged amnesty for any sol-
dier returning including those
who might have tattooed them-
selves with anti-Communist slo-
gans,

Leaflets were distributed to all
prisoners before they were screen-
ed explaining in detail the United
Nations does not want to retain a
single prisoner. But the United
Nations promised it will stand be-.



hind any prisoner who would |
forcibly resist returning. ‘
Individual screenings lasted

only two minutes, A Republic of

General Mark Clark, United
Nations commander in chief said
in a message on the second anni-
versary of the Korean War today
that if the armistice talks faik
U.N. is ready for “bloody fight-
ing”.

In the message te hig troops
Clark said “we prefer to achieve
an armistice at the conference
table. But if the enemy prefer
otherwise and forces the return
lo the bitter, bloody fighting of
1950 and 1951 we are ready,

“The United Nations command
an Bighth Army which have been
trained in battle and strengthened
by the revitalised Republic of
Korea.”

—UP.



Science Degree For
Parke-Davis Head

PHILADELPHIA,

The Philadelphia College of
Pharmacy and Science to-day con-
ferred the honorary Doctor of

Science Degree on Harry J, Loynd,
president of Parke, Davis and
Company.

Dr. Ivor Griffith, president of the
131~year-old institution, said at the
commencement exercises in Col-
lege Hall here that the degree was
conferred on Loynd “in recogni-
tion of the leadership which you

Korea Major stood behind each jhave evidenced in the field of pub-

see that
asked

interpreter’s table to
screening questions were
clearly and accurately.

Each question was so phrased
as to offer prisoners encourage-
ment in returning to the North.
If the prisoner said he would fore-
ibly resist returning to North a
large “S” was printed indicating
South. If he said he wanted to
back an “N” was marked on the
card,

Those who said they wanted to
return were marched back to their
compounds, Others were marched
to new compounds, The reaction
of the 400 to screening surprised
United Nations officers who had
assumed Koje compounds were

pulated almost entirely by die-
nard communists.—U,P.



fic health and human.welfare.”
.

Dr. Loynd, 54, has been presi-
dent of Parke-Davis, world’s
largest makers of pharmaceutical
products, since April, 1951, A
native of Springville, Utah, he was
graduated from the University of
Utah in 1922 with a bachelor of

© Iscience degree. After several years

with the Owl Drug Company in
San Francisco, Oakland, Calif.,
Portland, Oregon, and Salt Lake
City, he joined Parke-Davis at
Kansas City in July, 1931, In less
than 20 years, he rose to the presi-
dency of the world-wide firm
which makes more than 1,000
different drug products.
—U.P.



U.S. Has Family Of Atomic Weapons

WASHINGTON, June 24.

It was learned that United
States scientists have developed
a “complete family” of atomic
weapons which are being incor-
porated into army, navy and air
force combat plans.

In addition to

atomic power

for artillery shells and guided
missiles the United States
Atomi Arsenal presumably
des or soon will include



d hydrogen super bomb

ry and civilian experts who



the recent rapid
strides in atomic development
to the House Appropriations
Sub Committee did not sperci-
fically say that the hydrogen
bomb has been perfected.

But there were constant refer-
ences to the H. bomb in the
carefully edited testimony made
available to reporters today.

The testimony was in connec-
tion with Truman’s request for
an additional $3,191,000,000 to
expand United States

described

atomie

energy facilities the largest
single sum ever asked for thi
purpose.
Chairman Gordon Dean of
the Atomic Commission said
“certain elements” of the H.
bomb will be produced in plants
to be built under an expansion

programme. He added that
“primary” the H. bomb effort
“is now in its developmental
phase rather than production
phase.”

Informed sources previously

indicated that the United States
will test the first H bomb this fall

in the Pacific, Chairman Bren!
McMahon of Esnate House
Atomic Energy Committee
strongly implied in a speech

last week that perfection of the |
H. bomb is now’ assured and
jsaid if he was Presidpnt he}
would order the Atomic Energy |
Commission to go ahead and!
produce thousands of city-
wrecking weapons,

—U.P.

on Tuesday killing at least 65 per-
sons and the toll was rising as re-
ports came in over battered com-
munication systems that another
58 are missing.

The Japanese coast guard said
55 fishing boats with 234 persons
aboard also were unaccounted for.
Some may have been blow: to
sea,

The storm began blowing out
to sea by midday. Torrential rains
raised the Nagaro River to flood
slage.

A thousand men are fighting
breaks in its banks in an effort
to prevent flooding around Nagoya
and Gifu 250 miles west of Tokyo.

~—(CP)



|
|
|

a

So

Top Ace Welcomed

=

, AMERICA’S greatest living air ace,
Col. Franeis S. Gabreski waves

cisco, Thousands turned out to.
give a hero’s welcome to the man

planes in World War Il and six
and a half In the Korean cam~ -
paign. (International Soundphoto) *

enim

| U.N. Violating

|
|

Geneva
Convention

who brought down 83 enemy «











a

A

7



-—SAY REDS
i
PANMUNJOM, June 24... ;
Communist truce negotiators $
accused the United Nationg of
Beene ae extension of the Korean /° /
Wat -by ..seree ba

‘ e ming pr On
Kole Figs “in violation of the
Geneva Convention”.

North Korean General Nam IL
said the screening resumed yes=
terday after a two months’ recess
was a “dangerous step’ by the
United Nations. At the same time
Nam took an issue with a state-
ment by Major General William
K. Harrison, Chief United Nations
negotiator, that the major obstacle
to settlement of the prisoner ques-
tion was the number of prisoners
that the United Nations would re-
turn under the policy of volun-
tary repatriation,

He said that the practice of re-
‘aining war prisoners in whatever
form is in violation of the Geneva
Convention and minimum stand-
ards of humanitarianism,

Nam again made no reference
to the United Nations reminder
that the Soviet army in 1943 off-
ered German troops “voluntary
repatriation “if they would sur-
render,—U.P.



66

They're everything

I look for’





“But seldom find, except in

du Maurier, I suppose you
mean. But what exactly do

you look for in a cigarette?”

“Flavour—which can
only come from tobacco
that is rather special.
Then, of course, perfect
smoothness—-which means
_ a comfortable throat.”*







“Coolness too? Well, that’s
seen to by the du Maurier filter
tip. And no bits of loose tobacco
{a the mouth—filter tip again.”

“ Yes—all that. D'you know, this
du Maurier filter tip is just about
the finest idea for improving a
smoke that I've ever come across.”

Smoke to your throat's content

du MAURIER we

THE EXCLUSIVE FILTER TIP CIGARETTE = ut) or ot

SOLE DISTRIBUTOR: WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD., BRIDGETOWN





~





PAGE TWO

Sa a at

Carb

R. T. GRANT MAJOR, Can-

Trade
Eastern
with headquarters in
on
Monday night by the R.M.S. Lady
paying a routine

Â¥ adian
Commissioner
Caribbean
TY jad,

yovernment
for the



returned home

Nelson after
visit to the colony. He was stay-
ing at the Ocean View Hotel,

To Further His Studies

R. KEITH MELVILLE who

has be@n doing optics with

his gran@father, the late Dr. Har-
court Carter for the past three
years, left the colony on Monday
fer England to further his studies
in that respect. He left by
B.W.IA. via Antigua and Puerto
Rico for New York where he will
travel by B.O.A.C, to London.

Keith is a son of Rev, H. A.
Melville, Vicar of St. Ambrose
and Mrs. Melville of “Aberfoyle”,
Fifth Ave., Belleville.

For New Appointment

. AND MRS. L. R. HUTSON

were passengers by the Lady
Nelson on Monday night for
Trinidad, Dr. Hutson has gone to
take up his new appointment as
Deputy Director of Agriculture
(Animal Husbandry) . He was
formerly Chief Veterinary Officer
of the Leeward Islands with
headquarters in Antigua.

Longest Ticket

R. H. J. KENDRICK, Sales
Executive of the Hercules
Cycle Co, of England, arrived from

Antigua on Monday by
B.W.LA. on a week's
visit and is staying at the Ocean

View Hotel.

. Kendrick who left home on

usual business tour

to England in

ber after covering some
miles on the trip,

has the longest ticket P.A.A.

issued in England. It is

Kendrick has come to
treduce an entirely new range
f cycle models specially designed
or the West Indies. From Barba-








be)

‘OR GLENN CALKINS,
Presidént of the

Conference of Seventh Day Ad-
ventists. Inter-American:
with headquarters at
Florida, arrived here on Monday
morning by B.W.1.A. from Trini-
dad where he had been on a visit
in the interest of the §.D.A. work.

He. said that he had been
travelling around the West Indies
for eleyen years, but had never
been to Barbados before. Since
he had a few days at his disposal,

â„¢-\he thought it would be nive to

pe
a





spend them here and sée what
‘the island was like, \

Pastor Calkins expects to leave
temorrow for Puerto Rico where
he- will remain for about a week
before going on to

Miami and
. Mexico. In Puerto Rico he said

‘teat the S.D.A. ate building
@ three-quarter million dollar
(U.S.) hospital at Myguaze which
should be completed in anothner
two months.

First Since 1938

. SARAH HINE, aunt of

Mr, Frank Morgan of Club

Morgan, arrived from Bermuda

on Monday by the Lady Nelson

for two weeks’ holiday which

she will be spending as the guest
of Mr. and Mrs. Morgan.

A resident of New York, Mrs.
Hine has staying in Ber-
muda for the past few months.
tae is her first visit here since
























DIAL 4220





Division
Miami,\,





5

r

t
5







ff : co

MR. AND MRS. FRANCIS E. M. JORDAN

ivarried At St. Patrick’s
OQ” Saturday morning at St.
Patrick’s Roman Catholic

Church, Jemmott’s Lane, the
wedding took place of Senorita

Ligia Magallanes, daughter of
senora. Magallanes’ 6f aracsc,
Venezuela, and the late ‘Senor |y
Magallanes, and Mr. Francis E. M.

Jordan, son
Jordan of
selleville.
The ceremony which took place
at a Nuptial Mass at nine o'clock,

of Mr. and Mrs, G, C.
“Angleséa,’ 9th Ave.,



as conducted by Fr. A. Parkin-
son, Sil.
fhe bride who was given in

marriage by Mr. Arthur A Hunte,
wore a dress of broderie anglaise.
Her headdiess was kept in place
by a Uiara of gardenias and lilies

and she carried a bouquet of
orchids, a gitt from the U.S.A,
Mrs, Arthur Hunte attended

the bride as matron of honour,
The duties of bestman were per-
formed by the bridegroom’s
brother, Mr. Govard Jordan.

A reception was held at “Angle~
sea”, 9th Ave. Belleville ‘ after
which the couple left for the
Crane to spend their honéymoon,

Senora Juana Magallanes,
grandmother of the bride, who
came over for the* wedding, is
staying with Mr. and Mrs, Norman
Hart of “Seafield,” Worthing.

Mr, and Mrs,
leaving on Saturday for Caracas,
Mr. Jordan, an employee in the
‘Traffic Department of B.W.1LA.,,
thas been transferred to a similar
post in Caraeas.

Conducting Services

PENDING three months in

Barbados conducting meetings
for the Baptist Churches are Rev.
Jack Parker and Rev, George
Starling ffom Tennessee, Fl
They arrived here ‘recently by
B.W.LA. via Puerto Rico and
Antigua and are with
Rev. and Mrs, Wayne Divine of
“Vesta Bella”, Navy Gardens.

Also in Barbados is Rev, E, F,
MacMillan, . Superintendent . of
the Baptist Churches in St, Lucia.
He arrived yesterday morning by
the Lady Nelson accompanied by
his son Daniel and will be spend-
ing two weeks Staying with Rev.
Mrs, K, Hanson of Two Mile

a.

New Shipment....
LADIES’



YOUR SHOE STORES

And a Holiday-on-Wheels among the highways

and byways of the

British Isles; with a

ZEPHYR or CONSUL to answer your every
holiday whim—licensed, insured and with a

tankful of gas, ready
arrive in London!

to go the moment you

Jordan will be.

orida, Robert Clarke of

Enjoyed Holiday

AP. the passengers return-
ing from Antigua on Monday
evening by B.W.LA, were Miss
Agnes Boyce of Messrs. A. S&..
Bryden and Sons Ltd. and Miss
Grace Hill of the Singer

achine Co, They said that they
spent two weeks’ holiday in the
colony and had a most enjoyable

Slay.

After 20 Years

RS. MARJORIE WILSON, a
clerk and stenographer of
New York, returned to the U.S.A.
on Monday by B.W.LA, via An-
tigua and Puerto Rico after spend-
ing three and a half months’
holiday im the colony, This is Mrs.
Wilson’s second visit to the
island after 20 years and she is
much impressed by the progress
of the island—Boys’ Clubs, Danc-
ing Schools, Baby Leagues and
along the cultural lines. To her
many friends, all of whom she
cannot see before leaving, she
says “Au Revoir”,

During her stay here she was
the guest of Mr, and Mrs. James
Marshall of Whitehall, St. Philip.

For T.T.C. Races

R. F. E. C. BETHEL, popular
local turfite, left for Trini-
dad by B.W.I, Airways on Mon-
day. He will attend the T.T.C.
Summer Meet.
On Vacation
RS. Cora (Boo-buh) Thomp-
son, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Lione] Gittens, Snr., is back
in the island on vacation after
huving been away for nine years,
the last five of which were spent in
U.S.A. During her stay here, she
will be the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
“Mornington,”
Collymore Rock. Mrs, Thompson
and Mrs, Clarke are sisters.

Travelling Representative

R. C. N. YOUNGHUSBAND,

Overseas Travelling Repre-
seivtative of James Buchanan and
Co., Ltd, of London and Glasgow,
proprietors of Black and White
Whiskey, left for on
Monday evening by B.W.LA.
after spending a week here on
business, He was staying at the
Marine Hotel,



UNDERWEAR

BRIEFS, PANTIES, VESTS, SLIPS, & NIGHT DRESSES
ARCOLA SHOES

LADIES HIGH GRADE, IN RED, BLACK, GREEN &
WHITE. ALL IN SMART STYLES.

T R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606



BARBADOS

Barbadian Returns Home

M* GARNET L. JOHNSON, a
Barbadian, who wes in the
Real Estate business in Boston,
Mas achusetts for the the past 38
years, is now back in Barbados
for a holiday. He arrived here
some weeks ago and will be
remaining until the end of
August.

Mr Johnson was here two years
ago when he spent two months’

holiday. He is staying, with his
relatives in Westbury Road.
A Daughter
ONGRATULATIONS to Mr

and Mrs. John Kirton on the

ADVOCATE



THE FOODS

This is the time to start a little

mild dieting--or shall we call it
sensible eating. Most of us over
25 could probably dé with a few
fees pounds. In the teens no one
should worry about overweight—
it soon disappears. Excessive slim-
ming at any age is most unwise

since appetite, digestion 2nd
elimination mey suddenly cease
to work—and then you get ill.

Â¥ is Cmphasised because a fig-
> which charms is not a thin
Mid seragegy body, but a well kept
Boy.

Certaih alkaline: foods counter-

birth of a daughter on MOnday @et acidity, and it is acidity which

night at Dr. Bayley’s Hospital.
Mother and babe are doing well.

‘.cecountant, Barclays Bank
A= the passengers arriv-

ing on Saturday by B.W.LA.
from St. Kitts were Mr, and Mrs.
R. L, Gilbert who are intransit
for the United Kingdom, They
are staying on until Sunday when

they leave by the De Grasse.
They are staying at the Hotel
Royal,

Mr. Gilbert who is an Account~ |
ant of Barclays Bank, is on four
months’ leave which he will be
spending in England.

Back From Dominica
~~ by the Lady Nel-
son on Monday morning
from Dominica were Dr. and Mrs.
Robert Salmond of Bay Mansion
who went over for two weeks’
holiday.

Woman’s Place Discussed
Tonight
HE Woman’s Place in the
Modern World will be the
subject of a discussion which
will be led off to-night at the Bar-
bados Press Club, No. 53, Swan
Street, by the Rev. A. Ramsaran
of Trinidad.
Members of the Club and
general public are invited
part in the discussion. «

LISTENING
HOURS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1952

410 — 7.15 p.m . WM. 25.53 M
4.00 The News; 4.10 The Daily Ser-

vice; 4.15 B.B.C. Midland Light —

the
‘uke







chestra; 5.00 Lawn Tennis; 5.15 Caval-
cade of Melody: 5.55 Interlude; 6,00 |
Scottish Magazine, 6,10 Rendezvous
Players; 6.30 Think on These Things;

6.45 Sports Round-Up and Programme
Parade; 7.0 The News; 7.10 Home News
From Britain

7.15 — 10.8 p.m . 58M 41.92 M

7.15 Calling the West Indies; 7.45 By
Request 8.15 Radio Newsreel; 8,30
Statement of ecount; 8.45 Interlude;
8.55 From the Editorials; 9.00 The Loss
of the Birkenhead; 9.45 Report From
Britain; 10.00 The News; 10.10 News
Talk; 10.15 Mid-week Talk; 10.30 Ray's
a Laugh,

By MAX TRELL

“| WONDER,” said Kuarf to his |
sister Hanid and to Mr. Puneh,
“how it would feel like to be—to
be-——an elephant?” |

Bveryone laughed when they |
} heard Knarf say this, for General
Tin and Teddy the Stuffed Bear, |
who were sitting on the other side |
of the room, hear it too.

“You'd féel enormous,” said Ted- |
dy. |

But General Tin said: “No, you |
wouldn't féel enormous at all, my!
boy. In fact, you'd feel quite small.” |

‘T would!” said Knarf in surprise.

“How do you know, General, how |
an elephant feels?” Hanid asked, |

General Tin lowered his voice. |
“Once,” he said, “I was an ele-
phant.”

“You were!”



Only a Dream
“Maybe,” said General Tin, “it
Was only a dream. Or maybe a
Megician changed me into one, But,
however ft happened, there 1 was—
a real live elephant, out in the
jungle.”

Everyone listened while General
Tin told his story.

“At first 1 felt enormous, just as |
Teddy said. I looked down at my |
legs and they were like the trunks |
of trees. | turned my head around |
and saw that I had a body as big |
as a whole room. I looked down and |
sew the ground far below, and I!
knew that I was very tall. I could |
feel that I had ears as big as ta-
les, And in front of me were two |
tusks and a long trunk. Yes,
sure then that 1 was the most
enormous Animal in the world.

“And then,” General Tin said, “I /
went for a little walk through the
ingle. And it wasn't long before I
w how really smell I was. For if
thought that my legs were like |
trunks of trees, | now saw trees |
* were thicker than all my legs |
together, And if [ thought L had |
hedy as big as a whole room, I}
saw tooms and caves among |
rocks in which a whole ‘herd of |
yants might have marched. And |
fooked down and thought the |
fer helaw









SRSA RE



awh

The Story General Tin Told

— He Said He Was Once an Elephant —

is the thief of beauty .. . inside
us first by giving indigestion, out-
Side us pretty soon by giving us
drab hair and a dull skin. The
beaQty foods arei+

Milk, leaf vegetables, all fruits.

Funnily enough, sugary sweet
things turn acid in digesting,
whereas seur tasting foods such as
lemons, grapefruit and oranges
‘turn alkaline. Vinegar stays acid
(amd how ). Cut it out with all
at



CAOSSWOoORPD



ACOs
1. Spoll spirit? in the
too. (6)

b Thus a wee may cry, (3)
&. Vlag-gifi. (4)
Â¥. Halt a crocus. (8)
10. By nu means similar, (9)
12. Take a tilt for it, (5)
13. Reel back, (4)
14. He met the Subject for discus
sion. (5)

15. ‘He's ‘oi a

y. He scores in twelfth

19. A lace. (4)
20, Entitled to add up, |
22. Diet Reet by the French, (6)/
23. Hil ¢

24. Many e a fest. (5)

Down
1. Centre om twopence in the]
mile, (6)
4. Raise, could be. (6)
4

1. Weapon. (

. Direction of the thorn. (6)

o. 10'S just part of the act. (5) |}

‘Sitios sane man rettirns wo

broken » (dL '

| You hear of a spor of tt from
b

7
fhe north, ¢
Â¥. Synonym of 24. (4)
| 1}. Dramatically it’s furiny. (5)
16. This driver is overhead, (4)
| 17. Still has its Wworsnippers. (4)
18 Part in a 5 down. (4)

1 lwisted. (5)
91. Heart of a steéd. (4)

ale. Across:

Solution of vestérday’s wuz.
1 Camera; 6. Sv. 9,
Penal: 11, Trestivs
14, Dress: 17 An
: @1, Bade
k

(Of) (ee:
12, Rieht: 1S
yeep: 19. Son: 2




1) Set.

pases)

When General Tin was an elephant.

when I looked down off a cliff, the
ground was so far below that I

‘inew that the cliff on which I was

standing was taller than all the
elephants in the world standing on
each other’s backs, :

“And when I thought,” Geners]
Tin went on, “that 1 had ears as
big as tables, now I saw tables of
hills so big that great cities could
have been built on top of them. And
when I thought that my tusks and
my trunk were long, | saw the
young moon sailing through the
sky, as white as ivory, and I knew
that it had tusks bigger than mine
could ever be, and its trunk moved
in and out among the clouds.

Even Larger
“Yes, I felt so small that when
I gaw a mouse standing in front
of me, I fancied it was even larger
than I was—and I was seized with
fright and tan bellowing into the
middle of the jungle to hide,”
When General Tin was finished.
Knarf said: “I guess General Tin
is right about an elephant feeling
smali. Because elephants really are
ftightened of mice. And now I won-
der:—How would it feel like to be
a mouse?”
But no one answered Knarf. For
n@ ohe in the room had ever been







ether condiments. Above ali, avoid
hetween-meal chotolatés and

cakes.

A good way to take the edge
off a generous appetite is to eat
an appie before every meal—good n

for the inside also. Educate your
palete to appreciate the foods you
need,

if you are underweight, swal-
low milk galore, eat all the fat and
bitter You can, relax before a meal
and éat little and often.

A onstipated inside is fet
working as nature intended it to
und Meither does it give us the
vanity of a nice flat stermach. Bn-
courage nature to do its job with

ua regular morning visit. If the
bowels are obstinate, exercise
them by rotating the tummy

clock-wise like a Hula girl, push-
ing it out in front and drawing it
im as you push out behind. Medi-
cine should be avoided if possible
... Tather try eating lots of the
beauty foods containing alkalis, A
giass of hot water with the juice
of @ lemon first thing in the morn-
ing is a great inner cleanser: so.
too, is the juice of an orange Qt
jhat time.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25,

TO FE. ANCY BY THE WAY e e « By Beachcomber



T LIKE my sctentists to

precise and to give plenty of ti

be you of this.

{952

Moreover, it is prac-
sing a deception on your public.

details. I see that an American “They all know it’s false,” said
ecientist has s#id that the craters Wugwell in a surly voice. “I
the moon were made by «a doubt that,” replied the Colonel,
teorite, : ‘I have read of women with real
beards.” “Anyhow,” said Wugwell,
‘the meteorite, he says, banged “what aré We arguing about? We
no a mountain at 30 miles never said Zaphroma’s beard wes
second (noe more ana Wo "ess! real” “You imply it by adver-
and the force of the impact bored jising her es a beartted lady.”
aveavity or tunnel in the moun- “7 khew it .was ¥alse,” inter-
tah 20 miles deep. That is near -ywpted Mrs. Wretch. “I saw
enoush to the actual facts for Komote pull’ it off Ome day.”
me. I Will only add that, Using “But the spéttators @ldn't see
iy of powerful telésccpe, 1 that,” soid the Célonél stolidly.
seem to detect bats in that tunnel, “it works loose when the glue
which prove: that there is lif? melts in hot weather,” said Mrs.
in the old moon yet. Wretch. “Very likely,” shapped
“ ‘ ’
Mrs. Wretch @nd the Cirens thé Cotone’, “So there you are,
said Wugwell.

offer of a false beard grace-
fully. Very quietly and court-
ecusly Colonel Wretch said: “Mr.
Wugwell, it is quite out of the
question for a lady in my wife’s
position to appear at a circus
wearing a false beard. One mce-
meént’s thought should comvince

OT everyone can refuse =|



GLOBE

To-day and To-morrow
4.45 & 8,30p.m.

A DOUBLE FEATURE

June WS este coes
William 24

au LIRA

= HAVEN DAY JAtids :




.
eee bos 4
°

WS rae 2d
Meee

eens



Ee
L
He wi
[7 FOURTEEN HOURS vertnig PAUL DOUGLAS -RICHARO x
SO SEHART + BARE OF, TEL 5S2 + ceees hp



j

i
5
las
Z
Zz
*
=
=
=
=
>.
ot














OPENING FRIDAY 27th, 4.45 and
8.80 pam. and continuing daily.

PLAZA

BARBAREES (Dial 5170).

GAUETY

The Garden--St. James
TO-NITE 8.% P.M.
“SMART GIRDS DON'T TALK"

Virginia MAYO &
“HER KIND















RS. (Only) 8.30 P.M.
Action-Packed Double
“RED DESERT" (Don Barry) ;
op ' REVENGE’ :
Lash BA | & . JOHN ¢



















Just arrived: NYLON
Peach and Black.






(Dial



Last 2 Shows TO-DAY
4.30 &@ 8.30 P.M

|











“HOUBE of

EI YOU &]/ Basi RATHBONE 4s]]/ Whole (New) Serial
Dane SHERLOCK HOLMES || “Lost soar, Pi ‘The
& “MUG TOWN” iy
{BECAME ACRIMINAL]| 8. ona xias with





Selly GRAY
____‘Trevor HOWARD {| "Thurs. Sp
THURS. Special 1.30 P.M.









RIDING DOWN
THE CANYON

Jon HALL














JANETTA DRESS SHOP

(Next Door to Singer’s)

_ BRIEFS from $1.82, HALF SLIPS $6.82
A few English HANDBAGS $4.98

THEATRES:

TODAY 4.30 & $390 p.mj] Last 2 Shows TO-DAY









PLAZA

B'TOWN (DIAL 2310)

. Presents . _
WARNER BROS. CLASSIC \\
— OF —

MARK TWAIN'S
(Greatest Story).

PRINCE

AND THE

PAUPER

+ *: Starring °.%

ERROL FLYNN

— with —

THE MAUCH--TWINS

(Billy and Bobby).
Cla Rains,
Barton MacLANE.

Opening Thursday 4.45 and
8.30 p.m.; also Friday 2.30,
4.45 and 8.30 p.m. and ton-
tinuing, to Sunday, 4.45 ahd





UNDERWEAR in White,



REES DISTIN
6170) (Dial 8404)
FEAR” 4:45 & 8.30 p.m.






Russel HAYDEN

jeclal 1 30 Keye LUKE






p.m.
Roy ROGERS Double! “GRAND CANYON" THURS

Richard ARLEN & 4.45 : _M.
SONG OF TEXAS & “DEPUTY MARSHAL” “BLONDE ALTBI"











Donald WOODS &
“MISSISSIPPI
GAMBLER”



"opening TO-MORKOW THURS. (Only) Kent TAYLOR
4.45 & 8.20 p.m. Set hee MIDNITE SAT
& Continuing Dally “BULLDOG DRUM- “BARBARY i
Re-Release MOND STRIKES PIRATES”
Mark ‘TWAIN'S BACK” i




PRINCE & THE PAUPER
ering 2eroL ELYNN

EMPIRE

TODAY & TOMORROW 4.45 & 830
Robert a — Jane RUSSELL

“HIs KIND OF WOMAN”

Extra:— Latest newsreel and
Crocodile Hunters

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8.16
A George Raft Double —

“RED LIGHT’
and
“OUTPOST IN MOROCCO”











To-morrow & Friday 4.30 wn 8.15
Paul HENRIED
maf goies

“SO YOUNG 80 BAD”
and

“CIRCLE OF DANGER”
‘with

Ron RANDELL &

ROODAL























Donald WOODS &
“RETURN Of The

“DURANGO KID”
haries STARRETT



SES

——————}





ROXY
TO-DAY & TOMORROW 4.45 & 8.15)
Maureen 0'F

John PAYNE —
fie

“TRIPOLI”
and











“STREETS OF LAREDO"

Starring
William Holden — MaéDonald Carey}

TOMORROW AT 1 30 PM.
John WAYNE — Oliver HARDY







“FIGHTING KENTUCKIAN”

and’
“SPORTING CHANCE” |
)



ROYAL

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW 4130 & 8.30)
Dana Andrews — Susan Hayward
+in—

“CANYON PASSAGE”
and

“CORVETTE K. 25"
Starring
Sco — And






Please enquire further from Charles Me Enearney & (o.. | td. or Telephone Main Office 4493

LEE TIT arto mo ones Miho ipip nose

Se es



ee

{SUPER MARKET









_—





WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1982



B



ARBADOS ADVOCATE

Leg. Co. Approve Salary Increases

@ From Page i

of the highest qualifications. It is
a qued@tion of the salaries being
insufficient to attract persons with
the minimum qualifications re-
quired.”

In this passage of hi8 Report,
which is set out in full in para-
graph 6 of the Report of the Com-
mittee of which I was appointed
Chairman (which I will from now
on refer to simply as “the Com-
mittee”) and which was laid in
this Honourable Council a month
or two back, Sir Maurice Holmes
was referring to conditions of ser-
vice in the Caribbean Area gen-
erally, with the exception of
Trinidad, but since then other
territories in the area have intro-
duced greatly improved conditions
of service for the upper ranges
in their Public Services, and his
criticism is accordingly more par-
tieularly applicable to Barbados
now than it was at the time it
was made.

Technical Posts

There are many Barbadians who
are su well qualified to fill
senior administrative, professional
and technical posts in this Island,
but they tend, because of the poor
egnditions of service provided in
the Barbados Civil Service, either
te serve in Public Services else-
where (and names spring readily
te mind) or, if they return to

Os, to seek their livelihood
outside Government Service, Let
me quote three recent examples:
Dr. Colin Tudor recently made
enquiries regarding the vacant
pest of Anaesthetist at the Gen-
eral Hospital, but was not inter-
ested in it on its present terms
and has accepted a post on bet-
ter terms in Trinidad; Dr. Forde,
a Barbadian employed in British
Honduras on ble terms,
would have been prepared to
come here some time back if the
post of Physician Specialist had
been pensionable, and has acecept-
ed a post in Jamaica; J. A. H.
Sealy, who has been training as
a Pupil Engineer in Trinidad and
was due back in March has elected
te stay in Trinidad on a much bet-

salary than he could be
Oj here. A young doctor, who
returned to Barbados after com-
pleting hig long period of training
in the U.K, at Government ex-
pense, left the service of Gov-
ernment after about a.year’s ser-
viee in order to improve his pros-
pects in private practice, and I
understand that another one is
following suit.

Barbadians First

It is the accepted policy of the
Barbados Government to fill
vacancies with hy ~ a
falling them, with other West In-
dians, if suitable candidates are
available, and a search is only
made farther afield if there are
no local candidates of the right
calibre. There is nothing secret
about salaries and conditions of
service in the Colonial Service,
for the salaries of the Senior posts
are set out in the Colonial Office
List, and general conditions are
swmmarised in a pamphlet entitled
“appointments in Her Majesty's
Colonial Service”, both of which
are published annually.

Officers who are already serving
in one territory, when offered a
transfer to Barbados, will natural-
ly compare their present condi-
tions with those that are offered
to them, and are prone to decline
tg come to Barbados because of
the inferior conditions offered.

As Sir Maurice Holmes put it
in another passage of his Re-
port: “It stands to reason thai
officers in Colonies which grant
leave passages would be re-
luctant to accept transfer to
Colonies which do not do so.
Perusal of conditions of service
throughout the Colonial Service
proves beyond any doubt that,

hereas Barbados

wi is one of the
most attractive on some grounds,
such as climate i~

These factors in combination
= it very diffeult to recruit
{ cers from outside the Island,
whether from elsewhere in the
Caribbean or from farther afield,
and to retain their services for
any considerable length of time.

Return Passages

For, as again Sir Maurice

Holmes put it, the overseas officer be avoided, but would confine im- Excellency

t keep fre







luse LIFEB

It’s easy to keep fresh all day—just use
Lifebuoy Toilet Soap whenever you wash! Its
deep-cleansing lather really frees you of weari-
ness, keeps you fresher so much longer. So get
a tablet of Lifebuoy today and make sure of

day-long freshness!



attaches considerable
to visiting his country of origin at
intervals to see higy family and
friends, and whereas before World
War II return sea passages to the
United Kingdom for an officer
and his wife cost about $660, they
now cost, with baggage charges
and incidentals thrown in, well
over $2,000, which represents
nearly half a year's pay for the
Head of a major Department in
Barbados on his present salary of
$5,040 a year, or over a half. if
he has children as well.

The consequences of the inade-
quate conditions of service in the
upper ranges of the Barbados Civil
Service are that a post remains
vacant for a very long period or
that, in desperation, it is even-
tually filled by an officer whose
qualifications are not up to the
standard which the appointment
lemands.

d hs

The first alternative means that
essential work is left undone and
that the officer, when at last ap-
pointed, has a depressing amount
of leeway to make up, It also
means that the Departments con-
cerned come in for undeserved
publie criticism.

Recently, for example, I have
read complaints about the lack of
supervision of the work of the
District Agricultural Stations and
of work on the roadd@, It is only
fair to the Departments concerned
to mention that the Agricultural
Department has been without a
Deputy for 24 years and the High-
ways Department has been with-
out an Executive Engineer for
eight months. The second alterna-
tive means that there is a falling
off in standard.

So long as conditions of service
remain as they are at present the
tendency must be, whenever a
post becomes vacant, for it to be
filled by an officer of inferior
calibre and, as stated in paragraph
24 of the Committee’s report,” in
either case there will inevitably
be a marked falling off in
efficiency which sooner or later,
must lead to serious disruption in
the administration of the Island.”

The Remedy

What is the remedy? I have
heard it said that the problem
is quite simple and that the Com-
mittee has made it deem unneces-
sarily complicated, This school of
thought argues that all that is
required when a post is vacant for
a long time and it is not desired to
lower standards is to offer condi-
tions which will cause that par-
ticular post to be filled; there is
however, no need to tamper with
conditions attaching to posts which
are already filled. But what is the
inevitable consequences of action
along these lines?

It was, in fact, taken at the
time of the Hallinan Report, and
caused the anomalies mentioned
in paragraph 8 of the Committee's
report; it was taken towards the
end of last year when the Gov-
ernment Analyst was appointed
on inflated agreement terms, al-
though the duties which that
officer performs are on a par with
those performed by the Agricul-
tural Chemist and the Entomolo-
gist, whose conditions of service
remained unchanged,

Piecemeal treatment in this
fashion must inevitably cause dis-
satisfaction among serving officers,
Suppose, in fact, some of the
existing vacancies were filled in
this way, what would be the re-
sult? You will see from Appendix
“E” of the Committee’s report
that the Secretary of State con-
siders that it is necessary to offer
a seale of £1,150 rising to £1,350
to attract a Medical Officer of
Health with a D.P.H., a qualifica-
tion which is considered to be
essential for the post. But to ap-
point a new Medical Officer of
Health on £1,150 to £1,350 would
be manifestly unfair on the Senior
Medical Officer of Health (who
holds the D.P.H.) and the Director
of Medical Services, who after
long years of service, draw £1,050
and £1,300, re: tively, Similarly,
to appoint an ecutive Engineer,
Highways and Transport, on £1,200
a year, the salary which the Sec-
retary of State considers that it
is mecessary to offer, would
create an obvious anomaly in the
case of the Director of Highwiys
and Transport, who draws £1,050,
and to appoint a Deputy Director
of Agriculture on, say, £1,350,
simply because a man of the right
calibre cannot be got for less,
would be hardly fair on the Direc-
tor, who draws £1,450,

Anomalies

Another school of thought agrees

that such anomalies as this must

- 3

FOR PERSONAL FRESHNESS ALWAYS

MUBT 667-1110-55



importance proved

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conditions of service to
such departments as the Medical
and Agricultural Departments, and
perhaps to the Education Depart-
ment, but would call a halt there,
and would not extend concessions
to administrative or non-technical
officers, In the first place such
treatment would upset the sym-
metry and general level of
efficiency in the service.

In the second, it is in the best
interests of the Lsland that the
officers in charge of the spending
and revenue collecting Depart-
ments of the Island should be
men of first rate quality.

By providing conditions of
service which will attract good
officers, and to quote Sir Maurice
Holmes again, by and large “the
higher the salary scales attaching
to a service the higher will be
the quality of the officers in that
rervice.” Government will do
much to ensure that its expendi-
ture is spent wisely and is not
wasted, and that its revenue is
collected without loss or leakage.

To my mind, it is just as im-

portant to have a_ first-rate
Commissioner of Income Tax,
Accountant General, or Comp-

troller of Customs, say, as it is
to have first-rate technical offi-
cers.

-In the third place, constitu-
tional advance is in the nature
of things, and Barbados cannot be
expected to stand still while
other parts of the Empire move
forward, But, if I may quote the
concluding sentences of para-
graph 17 of the Report, “there is
little advantage if highly quali-
fied and highly paid technical
experts are obtained only for
their services to be misdirected
and inefficiently correlateq by
incapable administrative and
professional officers. If Ministe-
rial Status is to be introduced
and is to prove successful it is
all the more important that the
Public Service should be capa-
ble of functioning efficiently.”
T should have thought that the
truth of this would be indisputs-
ble.

Future Economy

As long ago as November 194)
the Governor-in-Exec¢utive Coi-
mittee reached fhe conelusion
tnat the future ¢€conomy of the
island would be jeopardised un-
less immediate steps were taken
to improve the terms and con-
ditions of service attached to the
senior administrative, profes-
sional and technica] posts in the
Barbados Civil Service and set
up a Committee, of which the
Honourable Dr. Massiah was a
member, to examine the problem
and make recommendations.

The Committee was given a
time-limit within which to report,
and was not able to submit its
final conclusions, In an interim
report, however, this Committee
expressed the opinion that the
first and most important measure
to overcome the difficulty of
recruitment and retention of ad-
ministrative, professional and
technical officers was the provi-
sion of return leave passage priv-
ileges to the holders of certain
scheduled posts, but added that
the inadequacy of salaries was
another matter that required
more detailed examination than
they had been able to give it.

In consequence of that Com-
mittee’s

recommendation, a
Leave was pre=
pared, but it lapsed with the

prorogation of the Legislature in
April 1950. In the year and a
half that passed between then
and the end of the legislative
session in November 1951, some
of the vacancies have been filled,
but some have not, others have

occurred and have not yet
attracted officers of the right
calibre.

Objections

At the opening of the present
Legislative Session in December
1951, His Excellency the Gov-
ernor reviewed the position
and after setting out certain op-
jections to improvement of con-
ditions of service of senior
officers that have been raised
from time to time and answering
them shortly informed the Leg-
islature that, bearing in mind
that the Other Place had ex-
pressed its genera] agreement
with the Holmes Report, he had
set up another Committee to
examine the matter.

I was appointed Chairman of
that Committee, the reason for
my selection being that His
wanted the Com-








LEVER rropver
amen

A



mittee’s report to be
time for consideration
Annual Estimates,
would be delays and
in the appointment of
Chairman.

I am assuming that Honoura-
ble Members have studied the
Committee's report and
various Appendices attached
thereto, and I will not therefore
go over it again in detail. Ther
are, however, certain matters
connected with it and arising out
of it on which I will comment
briefly.

First, whatever opinions may
be held about the Committee’s
conclusions, it cannot be denied
that it was thorough and that its
recommendations are reasoned
and balanced. Second, it resclved
at the very /beginning that it
must eliminate personalities in
its deliberations. In connection
with each post that it considered
it put the question, “If it, is
vacant or were to become vacant
now, can it be filled by an officer
of the requisite calibre and qual-
ifications on the present terms,
and if not what minimum terms
is it necessary to offer in order
to fill it with such an officer?”

ready
with the
and there
diffieult

an outside

in

Equal Leave Passages

Third, it senciuded, for the rea-
sons set out in paragraph 11 of its
Report, that equal leave passage
concessions should be made avail-
able without regard to the officer’s
place of recruitment and domicile,
and that, bearing in mind the
normal practice elsewhere and the
deterrent effect on recruitment
which failure to follow that prac-
tice must entail, leave passages for
wives should be included. In this
connection I would say that figures
from British Guiana which have
been received since the Report
was completed bear out the Trini-
dad experience that actual ex-
penditure on leave passages falls
far short of the potential.

Fourth, a majority of the Com-
mittee considered tha the Estab-
lished Church should fall within
its terms of reference since, what-
ever views may be held regarding
the disestablishment of the
Church, the fact remains that the
Anglican Clergy receive their
emoluments from the Public
Treasury. The Lord Bishop was

accordingly invited to give
evidence before the Committee
and, in consequence of his repre-
sentations, recommendations were
made which have been endorsed
by the Executive Committee and
approved by the Other Place,

Fifth and last, the recommenda-
tions of the Committee have been
passed “in toto” by Executive
Committee and approved by the
Other Pla.e, with the following
four exceptions. It will be seen
from the relevant Orders that the
salary of the Director of Agricul-
ture has been increased to $8,160
(and his Sugar Cane-Breeding
Allowance kept at $480), the
Headmaster of the Coleridge and
Parry School has been put up to
$4,800 and the Superintendent,
Waterworks, and Public Librarian
increased to $4,080 each. ‘

Two Criticisms

Next, I would touch very briefiy
on two eriticisms which have been
made. First, it has been said that
this matter derives its origin from
the complaints of a few “im, ed
officials”. That is not so. Two of
the three Heads of Departments
referred to in His Excellency’s
speech at Appendix I of the Re-
port are West Indians two other
officers in Key positions who have
made representations regarding
the inadequacy of their present
conditions of service are Barba-
dians. : :

The general public is certainly
not aware of the amount of time
that has been spent in persuading
certain officers to stay on until this
Committee was appointed and its
recommendations considered, Sec-

oe





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the #?

ond, it has been suggested that the
present methods of advertisement
for vacancies are faulty

Now vacancies for the posts
with which the Committee dealt
fill under two main heads, those
for which there is no objection to
selecting an officer on first ap-
intment from outside the Ser-
vice, and those which are normal-
ly filled by transfer within the
Service, '

The former type is advertised,
first locally and then in the U.K.,
but, as the Secretary of State has
pointed out in connection with
such posts as the Chemical Pathol-
Ogist and Radiographers, there is
little point in continuing to adver-
tise since the present conditions
are so unlikely to attract suitable
candidates.

Previous Experience

The latter type, which includes,
for example, the post of Deputy
Direetor of Agriculture, is not ad-
vertised, for it is considered that
it is in the Island’s interest that
the holder should have previous
experience either in the Caribbean
area or elsewhere. In cases like
this the dossiers of suitable officers
are. considered in the Colonial
Office, and an offer of transfer
nade to the one who seems to be
best fitted for the post.

In consequence of the inade-
quacy of the conditions of ser-
vice vis-a-vis, those obtaining
elsewhere the difficulty of finding
a really suitable officer for a par-
ticular post may be very great in-
deed, and in this connection I in-
vite the attention of Honourable
Members to the comments of the
Secretary of State on the filling of
the post of Deputy Director of
Agriculture in Appendix E of the
Report,

Or again, since the Committee's
report was completed the Secre-
tary of State has said that the
present conditions of service for
the post of Executive Engineer
will not attract anyone of higher
calibre than a Clerk of Works.

Three further points and I have

done. Once it is accepted that
present conditions of service of
the senior administrative, pro-

fessional and technical posts are
inadequate, the crux of the mat-
ter is whether the Island can af-
ford to improve them to the ex-
tent recommended in the Report
In this regard I invite attention to
the passage in His Excellency the
Governor's speech to the Legisl«-
ture in December when he, said
that he had “no doubt that this
Island could afford substantially
to improve their salaries and con-
ditions of service and emphasised
that the approach should rather
be whether Barbados could afford
to let its standards in administra-
tion, in the scientific field and in
many professional fields, deterior-
ate to the lowest in the Caribbean.

Honourable Members who hav?
visited some of the smaller islanc
in the area will appreciate what

this means.
Annual Estimates

In the debate in this Honourabie
Council on the 10th July last year
the Honourasle Mr, Pile put the
matter in the same way when he

meluded that he did not think
that “it is a question of our ask-
ing ourselves whether we can
afford to pay, but whether we can
afford not to pay them,” The
Committee was given a_ figure
within which it was estimated that
it could safely work, and these
amounts were inserted in this
year’s Annual Estimates and are
available in the event of these re-
commendations being approved,
The annually recurrent sum is
substantial, but if the Island is to
carry out a steady programme of
agricultural development, to main-
tain its standards in the pro-
fessional, technical and education-
al fields and to cater for the mani-
fold social needs of a rapidly in-
creasing population, the price will
be worth paying.

@ On Page 5

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TRAFFIC

In Carlisle Bay



V_ Student Prir M. V. Caribbee,
M V. Willemstad, Set ' Davidson
Sch. Franklyn, D.R
ARRIVALS
S.S. Wanderer from Dominica. Agents
DaCosta & Co. Ltd. Lady Silver 30 tons
from Martinique. Consigned to Schooner
Owner Association
DEPARTURES
Sch. Gloria B_ for Fishi c
Sch. Sunshine R Igo for the Fist
Bank

ARRIVALS BY BW EA. ON MONDAY
From Puerto Rico
Comd, David QO. Reed, John Natwir
Joan Hoffmann, William H. Bexill, Jer
vis Murray, Alan Wakefield, Doris Welch
Monica Scott

ARRIVALS ON MONDAY

From Martinique

Yasont Rene, Gibrin Rene, Amelia

Nelson
Prom Antigua

Grace Hill Agnes Boyce Edwina
Horgan Ata Lee, Arthur Kendrick,
Lilian Hodge, Gerald George Gui
herme Da Silva, Jessie Sellars, Lilias
Sellares

ARRIVALS ON TUESDAY
From Trinidad

M. Nurse, P Nurse
1 Bowen F Jardine

a
Mc
Spooner

Nurse,
Cowan

K

DEPARTURES BY BHWt A. ON
MONDAY
Per Trinidad
F. Cannon, N. Cannon, S._ Silveste
H Hearn B Farner Fred Bethe
S. Haddock, K. Farmer, Fred Bethe
ey Younghusband, R Bocsanczy, C
Stoute, M. Stoute M. Martinez M
Martinez
DEPARTURES BY BWHEA. ON
MONDAY
Per Grenada
©, Gunstone, G. Louison
DEPARTURES BY BW. EA ON
TUPRSDAY
For Trinidad
H,. Gareta, J Svoboda, C Svobed
I Fisher R Jackson, S Jacksa
Mark Henzell I cFadden, 1 Mr
FPadden, G. Marshall, E. Marx, A. Br
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PAGE THREE

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PAGE FOUR

MS cr

oft ADVOCA Ge

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Bro:



St., Bridgetown

Wetnenion ~ June- 25, 952



es _—

TRADE CRISIS

THE recent visit to Barbados. of Mr.
-@.

Grant Major; Canadian Frade Commission-

er in the West Indies, will. have reawak-

ened interest in the subject of Canadian-
West Indian trade relations.

West Indian trade relations with
Canada in recent years eannot be said to
have arduséd much’ enthusiasm among
Canadian businessmen who were hoping
to expand’ Canadian-West Indian Trade.

The Trade’ Liberalisation Plan which
was introduced because of Canadian com-
plaints of being squeezed out of the West
Indies in favour of, British exporters has
been a palliative measure, a token gesture
on the part of-the United Kingdom to the
rightness »of «the Canadian businessman’s
plea.

It was certainly not to be expected that
Canadians would continue to buy much
more from, the British West Indies than
the British West Indies° were allowed to
buy from Canada.

The crisis of Canada-West Indies trade
is too little understood in the British Car-
ibbean. This is due to the eddy of propa-
ganda which is being circulated by a min-
ority of individuals who claim to have in-
side knowledge of what is going on. These
propagandists may be divided into three
main categories. The first cannot see why
Canada is entitled to trade with British
possessions at the expense of British manu-
facturers. This category may be dismissed
as the old-school tie ‘imperialistic group
who can see no further than the Union
Jack and whe still regard Canadians as
rather brash colonials, hardly more ad-
vanced tharWest-Indians.

The second group are the representa-
tives of British manufacturers who are
only too willing to exploit the opportunity
offered to them by the British policy of
controlling West Indian trade movements.
This group is in no way connected with
the British government but are naturally
concerned to convert as many people as
possible to view West Indian trade through
British officialdom’s eyes.

The third group are frankly anti-Can-
adian. They do not see what is to be gained
by building up trade relations with
Canada, and they accuse Canadians of
wanting all they can get from the West
Indies without accepting any responsibil-
ity for the West Indies.

The merits of these three types of pro-
paganda need not be scrutinised in public:
but it is important that the existence of
these propagandists be recognised. They
do exist and their propaganda is respons-
ible for the confused thinking and expres-
sions of opinion which are prevalent in
Barbadés Whenever Canada-West Indies
trade isibeirig discussed,

What is the Canadian attitude?

Officially the Dominion of Canada keeps
on excellent Aerms with the United King-
dom ‘and the Government of Canada will
go a long way to find a satisfactory trade
compromise with the United Kingdom
vis-a-vis Wést Indian trade,

But the Government of Canada, like all
other governments in the world, is sub-
ject to pressure from its own citizens.

And there are signs that Canadian
businessmen are becoming so disillusioned
as to the long-term prospects of trade with
the West Indies that they are beginning
to use pressure on their’ government
departments responsible for West Indian
trade matters to discourage favourable
treatment of the West Indies.

Should this pressure be intensified to the
point’ where. Canadian preferences on
West ‘Indian sugar imports are threatened
then the whole platform on which Canada-
West Indies trade has béen built will have
been kicked away.

Canadians cannot understand why
Great Britain continues to impose restric-
tive trade controls. in the British West
Indies, becatise they have been informed
that British. policy is directed towards the
raising of sta EN of living of the British
West Indian peoples.

They have been accustomed in recent
years to regard the British West Indies
as the natural British suppliers of sugar
and tropical a eee roduce to the
rapidly expanding population of Canada.

heir business training taught them
that increased consumption of West Indian
agricultural produce would give the West
Indies inereased Canadian dollars .with
which to purchase Canadian products and
manufactures.

Instead they have seen the British Min-
istry of Food sell West Indian sugar to
Canada at higher prices than was paid to
the West Indian sugar producers: and
they have seen a flourishing Canadian ex-
port trade arbitrarily truncated and the
direction of West Indian purchases
switched by Whitehall directive from
Canada to the United Kingdom.

Small wonder that they should consider
Cuba, Haiti, San Domingo, Venezuela and
Mexico as more profitable markets.

Canadian® today are very lukewarm
about promoting West Indian trade. Un-
less West Indian btsinessmen initiate action
through their governments, the Canadian
market for British West Indian sugar may
be lost altogether or may be handicapped
by the removal of the Canadian prefer-
ences on British West Indian sugar.

LONDON, June, *:,

The worid is entitled to
confused about which A oa
Britain is going. We are con-
fused, ourseives. This week we
are not certain whether we
should walk around the streets
with long faces, tightening our
belts, putting our noses to the
grindstone, pulling up our sockr,

ete. Or sheuld we smile with
happy contentment at our
recent doughty achievements.
Is this a crisis or isn’t it? The
prophets of gloom are gloomy;
the men of good cheer are
cheerful. We have still some
gold — but we ought to have
more. The pound stands firm—

and yet there are dark rumours
of devaluation. We are paying
our way, and going deep into
the red at the same time.

As far as the ordinary citizen
is concerned it is all Korea to
a row of beans that he won't
be worrying about the nation’s
balance of payments — but how
to afford his own family’s
holiday this year.

The pattern of postwar Britisn
life is changing very gradually.
Most of the things the foreign
viritor noticed — good and bad
—abcut Socialist Britain, are
still there under the Tories.
There is still very full employ-
ment and so there is no labour
to spare for those spare ser-
vices that are usual and possible
in other countries. It is diffi-
cult to find stores that will
deliver purchases. There are
leng lines in some shops —
for lack of shop assistants. Re-
pairs of all kinds are expensive
and take a long time. There is
still rationing — carefully ob-
served and jealously guarded,
almost as a privilege, by Social-
ists who call it “fair shares.”

These are the irritations left
behind by the postwar Socialist
experiment. There are also
great gains. Wages and food
are, on the average, and for the
mass of wage-earners, better
than ever before in Britain.
The health of children—mainly

BARBADOS siti a ical TOC

ooarr | WHITHER BRITAIN? |

By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS.

because of better feeding, is
higher on the average. .inese
were the gains the Labour

Government set cut to achieve
and it certainly succeeded with
the aid of food subsidies, heavy
taxation, family allowances,
school meals and freg medical
services.

Now there is a Conservative
Government in Britain and the
leaders of that government —
particularly R. A. Butler, the
Chancellor do not want, to
dismantle the social. service
system the socialists established.
What they are trying to do is
to prune it and maké it less
wasteful. The best example is

the case of food i.
Every person in Britain has
about four shillings of \ his
weekly food bill paid by the
Government — it is done to
relieve the hardship of the
poorest. But since the average
wage in Britain is now running
around £7 a week it is only a
very few of the unlucky, the
the pensioners, the disabled or
the few unemplcyed who really
need the subsidies,

What the Conservative Gov-
ernment is trying is to ease tne
country back to a more normal
way of paying — over the
counter of the shop rather than
to the tax collector.

M.P.’s Salaries

This week, for the first time,
every one of sixteen million peo-
ple got a little more in his pay
packet because Mr. Butler’s
budget does not tax him so
heavily. The same week the
Members of Parliament who are
paid £1,000 each year to legis-
late were discussing the possi-
bility of putting up their own
salaries,

The British M.P. is the least
well-pdid in all the British
Commonwealth — with the ax-
ception of New Zealand. He has
also far more work to do. The
old tradition was that M.P.’s
were part-time legislators who
came down: to the House of



Commons: in the evening to dis-
cuss the affairs of the nation.
But now the Hous: of Commons
meets at 2.30 in the afternoon
and the party organisations keep
their followers, very regularly,
almost tied to staying in the
Palace of Westminister itself —
in case they should be a givision
and a yote taken. For hundreds
of M-P.’s of all parties, the busi-
ness of Par is the whole






‘time and ave to try and

live on their £1,000.
It is mot for them; un-
rather un-

and educate te
they .cught ‘to
as an American

The lawyers are hoping for a
bit of business in the courts
settling arguments about who has
the right to certain ceremonia!
functions at the coronation.
Many ancient families have pre-
scriptive rights to perform cer-
tain services to the sovereign.
Before King Edward VII was
crowned in 1902 there was a
\long and stormy argument be-
tween the Earl of Lauderdule
and another Scottish family who
should carry the banner of Scot-
land. And who shall carry the
Queen's spurs? And who shall
carry the swords of state? Or
the cusions on which the orb is
placed?

But the great question, about
which there can be no argu-
ments in the courts, but on
which much depends is “which
way will the procession pass’.
Already ticket selling agencies
are selling places for prices be-
tween £5. 5. 0. and £42, They
do not tell the “purchaser”
where the seat will be — be-
cause they do not know where
they will build their stands. The
general agreement seems to be
Uhat for £5. 5. Od, it is now
possible to buy a promise of a
place from which it is unlikely
that you will have more ‘than
a glimpse of the coronation
procession,

Help For Colonial _

) Legislature

A chorus of praise for his
very considerable constitutional
work for Colonial Legislatures,
some of which he visited recent-
ly, was given the Clerk-Assist-
ant of the House of Commons,
Mr. Fellowes, during discussion
in the House of Wednesday,

In an _ adjourned’ debate
during the last half-hour before
midnight, Mr. Ian Winterbot-
tom, Conservative Nottingham
Central, raised the question of
appointing an extra Clerk at the
Table — a specialist, he suggést-
ed, who would be able to help
new Colonial Legislatures ‘to
find their way into and through
the mazes of our procedures.”

In no fewer than 12 Colonial
Legislatures recently, Mr. Win-
terbottom said, there had been
advances, and all these Legisla-
tures benefited from the assist-
ance of a real expert in Parlia-
mentary procedure. deal of troublesome trial and
error would be avoided if an
expert in Britain was available
to help new Legislatures during
their early dave

Mr. Fellowes, ¢n the past few
months, had prepared the Stand-
ing Orders of the Legislatures
of Jamaica, Celyon, Trinidad,
and Nigeria, He had also visited
the Legislatures of Ceylon, the
Sudan, the Gold Coast and Nige-
ria. Everywhere his services had
proved of the very greatest value.
In Nigeria, Mr. Fellowes presid-
ed over the Legislature for, a
period — at the request of the
Governor.

Sir Edward Keeling and Mr.
James Johnson, both of whom
were in West Africa earlier this
year, echoed Mr, Winterbottom’s
tribute to the successful work
Mr. Fellowes had accomplished in
that area.

Commenting on practices he

had observed in Colonial legis-
latures, Sir Edward pointed out
that in the House of Commons
the practice was not to try to
exercise administrative or ex-
ecutive duties.

“We leave that to re.
ment,” he continued. €

Special Member of Commons’
Staff Suggested.

control the Government by
criticism, and, if necessary, by
turning them out-

“I have noticed in some of the
Colonial Legislatures whieh I
have visited that they do not
always understand this method
of controlling the Government.
They try to exercise executive
powers.

Colonial Legislatives ngced ‘Tot
slavishly follow the British ex-
ample, Sir Edward added; it was
for them to decide what their
practice should be, “but they
should do so with their eyes’
open.” He was sure they would
like to have the’ services of a
Clerk of the House of Cormmons
to explain the procedure of that
House as it had been evolved
over a period of hundreds of
years and particularly in the last
160 years,

Mr. Douglas Dodds-Parker,
Conservative, Danbury who orig-
inally proposed the extra staffing
at the Table, during a meeting of
the Commonwealth Parliamen-
tary Association paid tribute to
Mr. Fellowes’ work, particular-
ly in the Sudan.

A point of interest made .by
Mr. Dodds-Parker was that’ it
had been found possible “to
adapt the Prayers of this House
to all monotheistic religions,
and to ensure that whatever may
happen later in the proceedings
they start off with three quiet
minutes.”

Mr. Johnson, Labour, Rugby,
said he was convinced frqm ap-
preciations of Mr. Fellowes’
work expressed by West African
Ministers that if the proposal
before the House was accepted
“it would pay enormous divid-
ends in goodwill and in im-
proved Colonial Legislatures.”,

The Minister of State ve
Colonial affairs, Mr. Hei
Hopkinson, told the House th at
during the past six years 15
persons from 11 territories, of
which five were Coloniai terri-
tories, had come ever to London
to receive expert guidance in

legislative procedure. A num-
ber of officers from Hong Krp¢
and elsewhere were expected to
arrive shortly.

The Minister went on to note
that “the Glerk-Assistant has
already been engaged upon th
work of revising the Model
Standing Orders for Colonfal
Legislative Councils which were
issued first in 1929. It is a la-
borious business and he has put
a great deal of time on it, Even
so, the work is not yet ready.
The gradations vary so much
from one territory to another
that it is really impossible to de-
vise a code which would cover
them all.

“The issue of this code is not
intended to impose British P&r-
liamentary procedure, on any
territory, but rather to afford a
basis, formed upon the success-
ful experience of the House .of
Commons, by which a Colonial
Legislature may measure its own
procedure and practice and,
where necessary, introduce modi
fications.”

The staffing of the Clerk's
Office was, of course, a matter for
consideration in the first instance
by the Commissfon for Regulat-
ing the Offices: of the House of
Commons the Minister went on.
The appointment of a_ special
member of the staff of the
House to look after Colonial
Legislatures would certainly
seem to offer many advantages-
He would, of course, require to
travel extensively, but it was
equally important that he should
not spend his whole time
abroad. He would be, above all,
an important link with the
‘Table, and his value would de-
pend very much on his keeping
abreast of current practice in
this country.

The Minister promised to bring
the matter to the attention ‘of
the Colonial Secretary when he
returned from West Africa. Mr.
Lyttelton would, no doubt, con-
sider in consultation with Mr.
Speaker, what recommendations
should be made to the Commis-
sioners.





Where The Young Prince

Gets His Money

PARLIAMENT is soon to

discuss the Civil List — the
salaries paid to the Royal
Family,

One thing is already — sure.
The allowance for Prince

Charles will be paid out of the
huge revenues of the Duchy of
Cornwall.

Last year
this estate, which owns 1
farms, many manors, _ entire
parishes, pubs, hotels, post
offices, , banks, shops, and tin
mines amounted to £84,000.

The year before they were
£102,000, and the year before
that £99,000. All this money
went towards meeting the Civil
List payments to the Monarch.

It is expected that as much
as a quarter will now be paid
for the maintenance of Prince
Charles and to start a savings
account for the day when he
will marry.

the profits from
170

... But Powerful
Not only is the Duchy wealthy
—perhaps the richest of all this
country’s great estates—but it is
powerful.
It is superior to Acts of Par-
liament. It is not ruled by the

laws of rent restriction, local
government housing and town
planning. It is not even liab'e
to pay rates.

Still upholding these rights,
the Council of the Duchy

observes the law veluntarily
It makes ex-gratia payments t
cover the rates it should pay

Most of the 130.000 acres it
controls are in the Wes
Country, but there are 78 dcres
in London.

The Duchy owns the Oval,
home-ground of Surrey’s cricket

By ROBERT GLINTON.

warehouses and wharves, blocks

of flats and houses, Until 1922

it owned Lambeth-walk.
Town Sold

All the Scilly Isles belonged to
the Duchy until two years ago,
when it sold a whole town —
Hugh Town, the capital, in St.
Mary’s, the main island,

The Duchy is always reluctant
to sell land. It does not
speculate.

Why, then, did it sell Hugh
Town? An awkward situation
was developing. The town
council, according to the law,
was the local planning authority,
But in fact it had no power on
Duchy land. To avoid this
contretemps the Duchy soid out.

Since the war, however, the
Duchy has added considerably
to its farm acreage on the main-
land.

In the old days,
little good to say about the
Duehy. It was described as a
dead weight on the land—*“suck-
ing out the revenue and giving
nothing in return.”

history had

But when. Queen Victoria
came to the threne great re-
forms were made. These con-
tinue today.

No Crities

Most of the tenants of the
Duchy extol their landlerd:.
Criticism is rare. These are

exceptions, In 1939 a Judge Liss

said :—

“I venture to hope that they
(his remarks) will lead the
legal advisers of the Duchy to
consider carefully the Duchy’s
clsim to the whole of the fore-
shore of Cornwall as againct
the King and his other subjects,

and will cause the Duchy office
to abandon its present predatory
practice of treating -other
people’s property as its 6wn and
enab'e the coastal owners tw

' resist “Unauthorised invasion of

their rights.

The Duchy ce was angry.
It pointed out that its claim to
the whole of the Cornish fore-
shore was well-founded.

Since that time it has leased
nearly all the beaches. Why ?
The Duchy regards the task cf
collecting dues from private ice-
cream sellers and other trades
as too big a task. Two days ago
the black flag of the Duchy—
which bears 15 gold coins, sup-
posed to be the ransom Blondia
paid for the freedom of Richara
Lion Heart, flew over the
splendid white building just
outside Buckingham Palace
gates.

This is ‘the ‘headquarters of
the Duchy, and/the new Queen
was presiding over the Duchy
Council, which meets about
twice a year.

i
Three Feathers

In the magnificent council
room the three-feather badge of
the eldest son of the Monarch
is interwoven in the carpet. It
is in the scrollwork of the hign
ceiling.

Without ceremony and with-
out fuss, Prince Charles became
the owner of this huge enter-
prise. As the eldest son he
automatically became the Duke
of Cornwall, following in the
steps of the man who was late:
to be Duke of Windsor.

It is a fine inheritance. Never
has the Duchy owned more land
or been more flourishing.





| Red Threat Worries
: The Pentagon

From R. M. MacCOLL

THERE is serious alarm today in the
Pentagon and among members of America’s
all-important National Security Council—
the top-level -body that advises the Presi-
dent on the nation’s military-political
courses and problems — over the threat of
an imminent and massive Red. Chinese
offensive in Korea.

Latest intelligence reports give the follow-

ing estimates of present enemy strength:
(a) 1,000,000 combat troops. (Two and a half
to three times as great as the combined
strength of the United Nations and South
Korean forces); (b) 1,800 to 2,000 planes;
(c) 400 modern tanks; (d) “excellent” artil-
lery, giving the Reds firepower roughly
equal to that of the Allies (who a year ago
were vastly superior in this respect).

Although there has been considerable un-
easiness in Washington for some time past
over the look of things in Korea, this back-
ground apprehension has suddenly changed
in the past day or so to a condition of real
“alert”, as new reports have come suggest-
ing that the “balloon may go up” any day
now.









No responsible officer has said so far that
the actual security of Allied forces in Korea
is now in jeopardy. But what is being ad-
mitted tonight is that if the Reds hit they
will cause “serious” initial reverses to the
United Nations, and inflict heavy losses
before they can be stopped. Whether the
Communists could actually push the Allies
into the sea or confine them once again to
a small pocket round the base port of Pusan,
in south-eastern Korea, depends entirely, in
the opinion of Pentagon experts, on whether
they decide to strike under the protection of
an “air umbrella”, which they now possess.

Truman's military advisers have told him
that the main deterrents to a Red offensive
are simply the enemy’s own doubts as to
whether he is able to inflict a complete
defeat, and the fact that time is on his side.

And they have said that unless the Allied
build-up is increased to a much sharper rate,
the enemy initiative — and the dangers of
the whole situation — will go on increasing.
The only factors in the picture which are
encouraging to the West are: (1) United
Nations’ armoured strength is still superior;
(2) The Red’s strategy still seems geared to
the foot soldier.

And, far to the Allied rear, on Koje Island,
the Reds have succeeded in producing a
“second front”, which is at present pinning
down 6,000 first-class troops, including the
only airborne regimental combat team that
America has in the Korean theatre.

The tension built up in Washington over
the possibility of an “all or nothing” Red
smash is understood to lie behind General

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1952



Mark Clark’s recent statement in Tokyo that

he would favour a general bombing of
Chinese cities if the Communists do launch
a new Korean attack.

The new Far Eastern Supreme said that! 4

retaliatory bombing would be agreed to by
him if the Red offensive included big air
attacks on the UNO armies.

It is understood that this view was cleared
with the Pentagon in advance, before Clark
left for Japan, and coincides with United
States’ top policy.



—_

What Goes On Where
Fuchs Used To Work

CHAPMAN PINCHER

fills in some gaps in the £120 million story

AFTER a search of more than two years
the Government has failed to find an atom
scientist good enough to replace Dr. Klaus
Fuchs, the Russian spy now serving a 14-year
jail sentence.

This is officially disclosed in the first re-
port* to the nation on Britain’s £120 million
atomic enterprise, published recently.

There is no mention of Fuchs in the report’s
128 pages, though they are entirely devoted
to the Harwell atom station where he work-
ed.

His name and that of his fellow-Communist
Bruno Pontecorvo, who fled to Russia 21

at Harwell is a blank space in the list of de-
partmental chiefs. It occurs opposite the
name “Theoretical Physics”—the department
which he headed. It is still without a leader.

This omission is typical of the report which
is being sold as “the story of the work and
problems of Harwell,” but it little more than
ash-dry catalogue of complicated machinery
and chemical processes,

The real story of Harwell is the story of
courageous struggle against materials short-
ages, political indecision, Civil Service “pro-
cedure” and the ham-stringing restrictions of
security.

Above all, it is the human story of the
fight to rebuild mutual trust after repeated
political purges culminating in the discovery
among the station’s top ten men ofthe most |
damaging spy in history. LES,

months ago, have been carefully kept out
even from the long list of scientific papers
published by Harwell men.

The only admission that Fuchs was ever

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25 1952

Leg. Co. Approve

Salary Increases

i. Beek pank’s fair average-standard; if the sal
In this connection Honourable
Members will no doubt be aware
of the assurance that was given in
the Other Plate by the Leader of
the House that early steps would
be taken to obtain the services of
a Commissioner to review the con-
ditions of service of the rest of the
Service. It will be remembered
that Commissioner Adams recom-
mended that his proposals should
hold good for five years and
should then be reviewed, but he
was not of course able to foresee
such factors as devaluation or the ermment to-day requires :—
= = pre: ¢ living or the 1. A fair and
ing 0: estern world, minis i i
and in the circumstances it seems 2. The po ee
reasonable that the review should and order
be brought forward, 3. :

Aim—Too High

It has been put to me that the
Committee aimed too high. Study
of the salaries in the upper
branches of the other Public Ser-
vices in the Caribbean does not
bear this out. To take two ex-
amples. The salary proposed for
the Chief Justice would put him
above the Puisne Judges of Trini-
dad and British Guiana, instead of
below as at present, and is just
about right to ensure that this post
is filled by an officer of the right
calibre when it falls vacant.

Or again, the post of Director of
Highways and Transport, whose
present holder has been offered
and accepted a transfer to Trini-
dad, and is being retained here
until a successor is appointed, can-
not be filled suitably at present,
for where will a qualified Civil
Engineer with the requisite ex-
perience be found to take up the
post on $5,040 a year without leave
passages? Certainly not from
Trinidad, which has six officers in
the Department of Works and
Hydraulics whose salaries exceed
$5,040 a year and whose scale for
Executive Engineers exceeds that
point. But the proposed new
terms, $6,480 with leave passages,
without being in any way extrava-
gant, ought to ensure that the post
is filled in the not too distant fu-
ture with a suitably qualified offi-
cer with the necessary experience.

ernment workers will

government expenditure

- reduced.

vice is composed of

civil service.

second the ver:
provisions. The first condition
does not apply to the community
generally. Contrary to ill-formed
opinion in Government circles
there is no security of tenure in
commerce for the very simple
reason that business enterprise is
risky and any business enterprise
can fail, from one cause or an-
other, In the case of Government
the service is continuous whether
efficiently or inefficiently carried
on, Therefore, when a young man
decides to enter the wider field
of commercial enterprise he can
have no security of tenure how-
ever ~ efficient he individually
may be. The Civil Servant, on
the other hand, knows that in the
case of Government he is assured
of life _ long employment unless
his conduct is such that Govern-
ment is forced to dispense with
his. services. A precise value
cannot placed on this factor
of security of tenure, but it is
taken into consideration when
the cash emoluments are fixed.

Pensions
With regard to pensions, this

is another factor which must
be taken into consideration.
The present pension provisions
of Government are very gen-
erous through the early retir-
ing age. Such conditions do not
exist in the community gen-
erally, It is true that all the
principal commercial houses in
this Island, as well as the Sugar
Estates, grant pensions to their
employees, but even in such
cases there is no guarantee that
the business may not get into
financial difficulties at some
time in the future. For this
reason many businessmen are
now taking steps to purchase
pensions for their employees
through the insurance Com-
panies so that the employee is
protected in case the firm fail-
ed, but even in this case the
pension can only be propor-
tionate.

After giving, weight, to__ these
factors, the cash emoluments of
the Government employee must
be settled. The rates generally
should be somewhat below the
best wages earned in commerce,
but certainly above the lowest. In
other words, the salary must be
such as to attract a reasonably
good type of employee, and of
such an amount that the Govern-
ment servant can live in reason-
able comfort. The Civil Servant
cannot expect to enjoy the bene-
fits of security of tenure and
good pension provision and still
have a cash salary equal to the
best in commerce; on the other
hand, Government must not
over-value the two factors of
security of + tenure and_ pension
provisions, Since no precise
value can be placed on these two
factors, and, imasmuch as the
conditions in non government
areas vary considerably there is
no complete yardstick by which
government salary scales can be
settled. There must inevitably
be a certain amount of human
judgement involved in the mat-

ter.
General Principles

If the general principles out-
lined in this address are accepted,
it will be seen how very silly it is
to compare the salary of the Chief
Justice with the wage of a can-
tonier of the Road Board. One
must compare like with like. Those
appointments in the service which
can be exclusively filled by Bar-
badians are compared with con-
ditions in Barbados. Thus in fixing
ithe salary scales of clerical work-
ers, typists, office messengers,
‘tradesmen, mechanics, and man-
ual workers you compare Govern-
ment scales with their counter-
parts in this Island, and applying
tthe principles previously outlined
you fix these somewhat below the
top rates in commerce since the
two factors of séeurity of tenure
and pension provisions must be
gives some weight,

‘When it comes to those positions
whicn cannot be filled exclusively
by Barbadians you take into con-
sideration the salary scales for
those neighbouring Islands whose
economic position is comparable
with Barbados. This is the princi-

COSTUME
JEWELLERY

including —

Summing Up

To sum up, I would certainly
deny that the Committee aimed
too high. In the few cases, such
as Director of Agriculture, where
the salary proposed exceeds the
British Guiana figure, there are
good reasons for the recommenda-
tion.

Finally, I would stress that the
Committee was not working in a
void, but although as the Com-
mittee warned in paragraph 25 of
its report, the implementation of
its recommendations will not re-
sult in the immediate filling of all
senior administrative, profession-
al and technical posts with men of
the requisite calibre, it should ar-
rest the present decline, and by
and large, ensure that the present
vacancies and future vacancies, as
and when they occur, are filled by
officers of the requisite quality
and experience.

Classification

Hon. Mr. H, A. Cuke said; The
approach to this subject appears
to me to’ be somewhat along the
following lines, The wage earn-
ing population of this Island is
made up of a number of different
occupations or callings, and a
general classification would be
somewhat as follows :—

Business Executives;
Technicians; Medical
ers including Specialists; Legal
Practitioners; Accountants; En-
gineers; Architects; Building
Contractors; Agriculturists: Cle-
rical Workers including Typists;
Tradesmen; Skilled Workers;
Semi-skilled Workers; Manual
Workers.

This
classified
heads.

Under modern conditions Gov-
ernment activities embrace a
very wide field and it can be
stated with some assurance that
in the Government service there
will be found the counterpart of
every occupation or calling which
will be found in the community
generally. It would be extremely
difficult to find any class of wage
earner in. the community whose
counterpart cannot be found in
the Government ice. j

As time goes on an increasing
proportion of the national in-
come is expended by Govern-
ment and unless the Government
has no sense of responsibility it
is essential that this expenditure
must be administered with the
greatest care, or it will be wast-
ed, By the very nature of things
this is a difficult task and the
problem is intensified unless the
service can attract the best possi-
ble workers of every grade. This
attraction can only become real
if the conditions of service and
salary scales are in line with
those of the Community general-

ly. ’
Average Standard

If the salary scales and condi-
tions of service are in conformity
with those in force in the gener-
al community, the general run of
Government employees, will in
the long run, be composed of a

Business
Practition-

list
into

further
sub-

could be
numerous





AND
' OTHER BEAUTIFUL





ro; 3592 & 13





ary scales are below that of the
community the standard of Gov-
" be lower
with a consequent waste of Gov-
ernment expenditure; and as all
comes
out of the national income the
amount left to the community is
It is to -the-interest of
every member of the community
to see that the Government ser-
‘ efficient
workers who are prepared to give
a-good day’s work and are free
from corruption. Successful gov-

impartial ad-
law
An_ efficient and incorrupt

In arriving at the cash emolu-
ments of civil servants there are
two main factors which have to
be taken into consideration. The
first is security of tenure, and the
generous pension







A LARGE CROWD gathers around the spot where the generator of a welding plant exploded on the

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





EXPLOSION



Wharf yesterday about 10.15 o'clock. The plant was being worked b:

mechanics who ran off just before the explosion occurred.





ple followed by

the only reasénable way in which
the matter can be dealt with.

The opponents of the résolution

failed to give due weight to the
principles of comparing one class
of employment in the Government
service with the similar class in
the community generally, includ-
ing the wider area of neighbour-
ing Islands where this was neces-
sary. Even when an attempt was
made to make comparisons, mis-
quotations occurred. For instance,
the Revenue of British Guiana
was quoted as $60,000,000 whereas
‘the correct figure should be
$25,000,000. British Guiana has a
population of 400,000 as compared
with a Barbadian population of
200,000 and an annual Revenue of
$12,000,000,
Particular Cases

As stated previously, there is no
precise yardstick by which salary
scales can be fixed, and therefore
any salary scale which is advanc-
ed can be attacked in particular
instances. For my part I do not
subscribe to every detail of the
seale which is before the Council,
but I do feel that taken as a whole
the scale is a reasonable one and
can be accepted without any seri-
ous reservations.

Even if comparison is made be-
tween one scale and another scale
in the service, it must not be lost
sight of that the incidence of in-
come tax reduces the difference
considerably. For instance,. the
ference between the salary of the
Chief Justice which is put down
at £2,000 and a clerk in the ser-
vice of £500 appears superficially
as £1,500; in actual fact, assuming
both to be married men with two
children and each paying 4% to
the widows and orphans fund, the
difference is only £1,183. The
former pays 18%% Income Tax,
the latter less than 1%.

There is one other matter on
which I should like to comment.
The opponents of the resolution
have stated that their principal
objection to the resolution was the
increase to Administrative offic-
ers. My own observation on this
point-is that the successful carry-
ing or of the Government depends
on the efficiency of its administra-
tive officers, If the head of the
Department is efficient, his effi-
ciency permeates throughout the
department. if he is inefficient the
standard of efficiency throughout
the department is lowered, This is
the experience of commercial
concerns*and applies equally to
Government. For this reason it is
essential to offer such salaries as
wijl attract the best men to the
post, whether he is an imported
officer or a Barbadian. For reasons
given above. I beg to support the
resolution,

Specialist Teachers

Hon, Dr. H. G. Massiah said he
‘was very glad to see that after
the passage of three years, Gov-
ernment had at last succeeded in
sending down the respective Reso-
lutions, and recalled that it was
sometime in 1949 that he first
raised the question of improving
the conditions and salaries of the
Service, when he asked the hon-
ourable Colanial Secretary ‘““wheth-
er Government was aware of the
fact that the Secondary Schools
were being depleted rapidly of all
specialist teachers, and that that
state of affairs was due to the
fact that they were not given
leave passages and also that their
salaries were not competitive
enough to keep them in Barbados.”

As the Colonial Secretary had
pointed out, he (Dr. Massiah) was
appointed to the Committee which
investigated the matter, and he
had. great hopes that what that
Committee had set out to do would
have been implemented earlier.
However, like many other things
in Berbados, politics consider-
ations had killed all their efforts
and it had taken three years for
the Resolutions to come before the
legislature.

Hon. Dr, Massiah admitted that
it would be impossible for any-





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the Committee body to be able to make compre+
appointed by Government, and is

hensive Resolutions of the sort and
please everybody, and he thought
that the Committee which had
dealt with the matter, and whose

recommendations were the suo-
ject of the Resolutions, had
served Barbados well by pre-

senting the fects as lucidly as they
had done.

He said it would be invidious
for him to mention one or two
cases Which he did not. think

were right for the simple reason,

as he had said before, that it would
be impossible for any collection
of people to bring down a schedule
of the kind to please everybody.

Heads’ Salaries

Hon. Dr, Massiah, however, drew
attentign to an anomaly which
might be noticed between the sal+
aries of the Headmaster of the
Lodge School and the Headmaster
of the Combermere School, and
asked by what process of mental
reasoning the salaries of the two
Heads were arrived at,

He pointed out that the salary
of the Headmaster of Combermere
school was set at $6,000, while
hat of the Headmaster of the
Lodge was set at $5,520. He said
he could not fathom what reason
lay behind the anomaly, because
as he regarded the status of the
ttwo schools, there was no com-
parison educationally at all,

Hon. Dr. Massiah argued that
the Lodge School “does the same
work as Harrison College, has a
staff of specialists and University
Scholars who are masters in that
school, provides education up to
the highest of the accepted Uni-
versities in the world—which was
the same as Harrison College does.
Combermere, Hon, Dr, Massiah
continued, “does not attempt to da
this sort of work and therefore, to
place it above a school like the
Lodge School which is on par with
Harrison College, to my mind, ‘s
unjust and unfair.”

Elementary Schools

He said: “I have been trying to
find out what the reason for doing
it is. If it is a question of numbers.
surely the Headmaster of the St.
Giles’ Elementary Boys’ School
whose numbers are 1,000 should
get twice the salary of the other
Headmasters, Similarly, the Head-
master of the Wesley Hall Boys’

School. I cannot understand nor
rationalise this procedure.”

Hon, Dr. Massiah asked the
Colonial Secretary to say what

were the grounds for the differ-
ence in the salaries of the Head-
masters of the Lodge School and
Combermere, or whether it was
an oversight.

A Perfect Schedule

Hon. G. D. L. Pile said he was
quite certain that all members of
the Council would know how he
stood on the question before them
and as the honourable member
who had just sat down had said,
it was impossible to make a sched-
ule of salaries and satisfy every-
body that every post had been
treated equally well,

“T think Government is to be
heartily congratulated for what
they have done,” he said.

It was unpopular and a matter
which obviously had been misrep-
resented both with regards to what
was being attempted and with
regards the motive behind the at+
tempt. Something was being done
that ought to have been done long
ago and which he believed would



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HARRISONS

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VOSS SSS TOEOOOOSS HOO OFOOOO

Generator
Explodes

Three mechanics, Neville Forde,
Gomez Boyce and Norman Al-
leyne, who were working with a
welding plant on the U
Wharf yesterday morning about
Ww.45 am. escaped injury by
scampering away ju before the
generator which contained cal-
cium carbide, exploded

The carbide scattered over a
farge area of the road, some soiled
the workmen and a few others too

pper

and some poured into the sea. A
side’of the generator was blown
high into the air and fell on the

opposite side of the wharf about
50 yards off.

“When I saw the main valve
stuck,” Forde told the Advocate,
“we decided that there was no-
thing else to do but to run and
save ourselves.”

Immediately after the explosion,
crowds gathered about the spot.

Heaviest Rainfall
At Crab Hill





heaviest rainfall on
cording to the Police
yesterday this area had received
41 parts of rain, but no district re-
ceived an inch of rain, No damages
were reported to the Police.
Other figures were District “A”
13 parts, District “B” 14 parts,
District “C" three parts,
“D"” seven parts, District “E” 20
parts, Four Roads, St. John seven
parts. |
Many people in the Crab Hill}
area complained of the high winds)
on Sunday, but again there was
ro serious injury or damage re-
ported. |

Monday,

ac

—



have been done long ago, had
fit’ been possible to get it accepted
by the Legislature

It was ‘refreshing, he said, in
these days to find that there had
been ccu.age enough to bring
down a measuse so unpopular and
he would like to cengretulate those
responsible.

son, Dr. A. S. Cato observed
that the Resolutions were of great
importance and seemed to have
created a great deal of public re-

ad or ea aes fs A san $24 DONATED BY

selves as to where they stood on A. WONDER LTD.

the matter, .
|



There did not see much | The amount of $24 listed under |
dig Sg nt seem Sonieal and the head New Bike for Ken Fat
professional officers, But it seemed num appearing in yesterday's is-|
to be generally recognised that Sue was donated by
since the war there had been great

A. Wonder |
Ltd, Ovaltine Manufacturers, Lon-|
don, and not by the Local Agents |



‘shortages and consequently a great : S Seieeat a
demand for officers of that kind, of Ovaltine Co., as was staten
add unless they improved the con-

ditions of services and salaries at-

tached to the pasts, they would “WILLEMSTAD”

remain unfilled or they. would have STILL ON DOCK |
to . be j conten — 1 of The Lord Combermere which is|

uncertain quality, doing the job of towing the Num-|

“Adjustment ber One Water B ; being |
The attempt to adjust the sal- painted. Pe ee

aries resulted in anomalies in re- The Dutch Motor Vessel Wil-|
spect of administrative posts and lemstadt is still on dock undergo- |
adjustment of these anomalies re- ing a general overhaul. She is ex-
sulted in a hue and cry through- pected to come off dock sometime

out the services for better con- next week, |
ditions, Government seemed to --—

think that the clamour. was just J

and he noticed that Government “WANDERER'’

had promised to set up a Com-
mission to enquire into the rest
of the Service and make recom-
menaations.

So what really started as a
limited objective had finished by
being a complete overhaul of the
whole Service?

It seemed to him that Govern-
ment, the administration, were
the best judges of whether the
island could afford the measures
or not and they had been told in

GOING TO U.K.

The Steamsnip Wanderer arriv-
ed in Carlisle Bay yesterday
morning from Dominica Her
agents are DaCosta & Co., Lid
When she leaves she will be going
to the United Kingdom,

OBITUARY





Mr. George Blackburne

very plain language that the
island could, "he des , nay taitem
Government had reviewed the 4, he death occurred at his resi-

dence Maiden’s Lane on Friday of

situation and felt that they could y),. George

afford the changes. When he said ‘paiiy Clerk Blackburne, eed
review, he took it as accepted “Hiring the last two year:
that it was not only in the light «purns,”’ as he was known. to!
of the propositions before them everyone, showed a serious de- |

then, but also in the light of any

Crap Hill, St. Lucy, received the |

|

Up to 6 a.m. |

District



cline in health after a serious fall |
on the deck of a steamer. He yet
maintained the keenest interest in ||

proportionate recommendations
which might be made in the light

of the propositions before them ee affairs and matters affect
Commission to be set up and also jing business at the waterfront. |
in the light of social and capital Here he was highly respected ||

works that Government had plan-
ned doing.

Several people had asked him,
he said, why it was that a local
Commission was set up to investi-
gate what was then before them
and when it came to the investi-

no less because of his virility of ||
character than his knowledge of |
ships and men visiting the Port}
of Bridgetown during the last 50)
years, |

Fond of sport in all its forms he |
was a true friend and a fine com- |

dation of the rest of the service, panion. There was a side to his
it wad necessary to bring one from character which many of his)
elsewhere. He did not know the friends never suspected, He was}

a tender man, The troubles of his |
friends distressed him and he has
been known to forego his own
pleasures and even financial gain |
to render help in times of distress

The fool he brushed uncere-
moniously from his path and the
tout and vagabond he threatened
with a dose of his own punish-
ment, For all this he was loved
and respected especially the
waterfront.

Mr, Blackburne was twice mar-
ried, both wives and a son by the

reason, but it seemed to him that
they should avoid getting one
yardstick in that that was before
them then and another in the
other. It waa very important to
avoid anything of that nature.
Generous Increases

“I have no doubt that these in-
creases recommended are very
generous,” the said, “and I also
have no doubt that we cannot go
on forever, to use the words that
have been used before. Finality
has to be reached sometime. I first marriage having predeceased |
hope that the result which is en- him. His passing will be the |
visaged, namely, a better and more source of deep regret and sincere
efficient Service, will be achieved.” condolence will be extended to his

e On page 6 relatives.

at

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PAGE SIX

Leg. Council

@ From Page 5

As the Honourable Colonial
Secretary mentioned, he said,
political and constitutional
changes were taking place and if

Ministerial Status was coming to
Barbados, then people who did
the administrative work would
have to be men of the highest
calibre. a

Everyone would realise that in
the changes, the improved con-
ditions would not at onde give

them a perfect and efficient
Civil Service, “I am not sure,”
he said, “I do not wish to be

offensive, but I am sure that the
Honourable Colonial Secretary
must be well aware that there
are certain squarish in
roundish holes and in are
not deserving in these increases.”

But, he added, had to
consider the position and net the
personality and he believed they
should make the changes with a
view to not excluding the possi-
bility of putting more efficient
people in the job whenever and
wherever’ the Opportunity arose.

It seemed to him, he said, t...1
they should not give everyone
the benefit of the increases at one

fell swoop and he wondered
whether they should not be
graded so that the con-
cerned could work up te them
When it came Heads of
Departments, could it not be
possible, he asked, that they

could be scaled in such a way as
to make it possible to take people



scale the headmaster of Founda-
tion Buys’ School was on a par
with the Headmistress of St.
Michael’s Girls’ School and in the
new scale they had the Head-
mistréss of St. Michael’s Girls’
School getting $3,420 and the
Headmaster of Foundation getting
$4,080 and he wondered what
was the reason for the new
departure. He also noticed that
in one of the Resolutions, an
Assistant master might actually
reach a salary higher than the
headmaster and he wanted to
know what was the explanation
of that.
A Comparison

A point on which he would
speak very strongly, he said, was
the comparison between men and
women graduates and First or
Second Class Honours Graduates,
There was a_ great disparity
between the scales for women
Graduates and those for men
graduates, They would see, too,
that for women’s Honours Grad-
uates, the scale started much
lower than the scale for men
Graduates,

“A woman who has an Hon-
ours degree has to work for it
just as hard as a man,” he said.
“If she is doing comparable wor,
why should she be id less than
u man. If it were for some eco-
nomic reason, there need not be
such a disparity as we sée on this
schedule before us.”

Great Demand

into posts with a salary com-%, Hon. Mr. G. B, Evelyn thought

mensurate with their experience
and qualifications?

Training Schemes

One point that emerged from
it all was that they had to inten-
sify their training schemes, he
said, not only with a view to get+
ting their people better trained for
the work, but also with a view to

— having to be d . t on
the .yagaries of s and
densi Bom outside. wr

The were certain points of
details whieh occurred to him
and which he did. not intend

A. at that stage, but as
others Natl taken the initiative in
mentionir such points, he
would - one or two points,

He noticed that in Po. of
certain grades in the ce, the
lower-~emolument grades had
been “raiSed and he was anxious
te know just what happened to a
more senior officer in a grade
when a junior officer jumped to
the new low level. Was it that
he suffered a certain amount of
loss or was he allowed a certain
number of increments to main-
tain his position of seniority?

On the question of the teach-
ers, he said that in the case of the
headmaster of Combermere and
Lodge, it seemed to him always
to have been that way and in the
new scale, the same relationship
that existed in the old scale was
maintained,

They would notice in the old





that the whole trouble wag due to
the great demand in every de-
partment of the Public Services | or
people to fill jobs which had been
created as a result of an increase
in Government work, social ser-
vices and everything else, and the
corresponding lack of people who
were capable or willing to accept
those jobs.

Referring to the professional
men, Hon. Mr. Evelyn said that
men in private practice in these
days found more inducement than
what was being offered in the
Public Services. There were many
medical men who would take part-
time jobs, but, he asked, “what
medical man is going to give up
his practice to take a job as Direc-
tor of Medical Services?”

He said that even in England
there was difficulty in getting
legal practitioners to give up their
practice -to take a judgeship.
There was great demand, he said,
and supply was limited. Added to
that, the promise of pension did
not appeal to them.

Hon, Mr. Evelyn asked: “How
long can we carry on this com-
‘petition with other places larger
than ourselves? We can compete
up to a point, but every place has
its limitations.” ;

Like other honourable members,
Hon. Mr. Evelyn said he could see
no reason for going into the de-
tails of the Order, because who-
ever prepared an Order of the
kind was bound to make some re-
commendations with which others
would disagree,

Replying the Hon. the Colonial

Approve Salary Increase

Secretary in referring to the point
raised by Hon. Or. Massiah rela-
tive to the salaries of the Head-
masters of the Lodge School and
Combermere said that it would be
seen from Appendix D of the Re-
port that the Director of Educa-
tion submitted written representa-
tions, and appeared in person be-
fore the Committee, so that the
Committee had the advantage of
his advice. He pointed out that in
the written representations of the
Director of Education, recom-
mendations were submitted, and
it was suggested that such and
such a percentage of increase
should be for the Head of Com-
bermere and such and such a per-
centage should be for the Head of
the Lodge.
Retain Difference

It was agreed by the Committee
that the difference between the
Director of Education and the
Headmaster of Combermere, and
the Headmaster of Combermere
and that of the Lodge should be
retained at present. e effect of
that was that the Headmaster of
Combermere School should re-
ceive a salary $960 less than the
Director of Education and the
Headmaster of the Lodge a salary
$480 less than the Headmaster of
Combermere. The Committee
accepted the Director’s assessment
of the importance of the two posts
in ratio one with the other, and his
suggestion that the two posts
should retain their status quo.

The Colonial Secretary pointed
out that in effect, when one
looked at Appendix C of the Re-
port, the percentage given the
Headmaster of the Lodge was
greater than that given the Heaci-
master of Combermere.

Following a sotto voce remark
by Hon, Dr, Massiah to whose
query he was replying, Hon, Mr.
Turner said it was clear that the
Honourable Dr, Massiah was not
content with his explanation, and
said that, if one looked at the
report it would be seen that the
Committee held 21 meetings in
approximately sixty days. This
meant that the Committee worked
under considerable pressure, The
Director of Education had
appeared before the Committee,
and had put up his recommenda-
tions in writing. He considered
that the ratio between the Head-
master of Combermere who at
present drew more than the
Headmaster at the Lodge should
remain the same, and the Com-
mittee accepted the recommen-
dation with the result that the
proposed increase for the Head-
master at the Lodge was in fact
slightly higher than that for the
Headmaster at Combermere, The
salaries were in relation to the
scale recommended by the Head
of that Department, and the post
of $5,520 for the Headmaster of
the Lodge was midway between
the extreme points in the scale.

With regard to Hon, Dr. A, S.
Cato’s point about the setting up
of a Commission from outside to
consider the remainder of the







BARBADOS ADVOCATE



In The Leg. Co.
Yesterday

WHEN the Legislative
Council met yesterday, a
number of Resolutions and
Bills which gives sanction
to the Civil Establishment
Order which makes provi-
sion for increases in the
salaries of technical person-
nel and Heads of Depart-
ments of Government De-
partments, were passed.

were as follows:—

(General) (Amendment) No.
4 Order, 1952.

2. Resolution to approve
the Civil Establishment
(Teachers) (Amendment)
No, 2 Order, 1952.

3. Resolution to vary the
salary scales and allowances
payable to Headteachers and
Teachers in First and Sec-
ond Grade Aided Schools as
set out in Appendix ‘D’ to
Resolution No. 33/1949.

4. Resolution to make the
salaries, allowances and con-
ditions of service set out in
Column TI of the Schedule
to the Resolution applicable
to the officers set out in Col-
umn I of the Schedule to
the Resolution with effect
from the Ist of April, 1952.

5. Resolution to approve
the Pensions (Pensionable
Offices) (Amendment) Or-
der, 1952,

6. Resolution to approve
the Civil Fstablishment
(Leave Passase) Order,
1952.

7. Resolution to approve
the Civil Establishment
(Payment of Passages)
Ament ree. 1952.

8. Bill intituled an Act
to amend the Chief Judge
and Crown Law Officers Act,

1907 (1907—13).

9. Bill intituled an Act
to amend the Assistant
Court of Appeal Act, 1900
(1900—2).

10. Bill intituled an Act
to amend the Anglican
Church Act, 1911) (1911—
10).

The Council then adjourn-
ed until 2.00 p.m. on Tues-
day, July 8.



Service, Hon. Mr, Turner said it
was up to His Excellency the

Governor who was selected to siti|cil that Heads

on the other Commission (that
which will consider the salaries
of the rank and file of the Ser-
vice), and referring again to
paragraph 4 of the Committee’s
Report, said that it took 21 meet-
ings covering roughly three
months, and that meant consid-
erable strain.

SRS ASE

PARK CLOSE TO THE CURB





BARBADOS AUTOMOBI

LE

ASSOCIATION |



Bigger Job

If His Excellency the Governor
should appoint a Committee with-
in the island for the other job,
which of course was much bigger
than the first, then no doubt the
members would serve, but he (the
Colonial Secretary) felt that it
would be beyond their capacity
to do their existing jobs and do
their work on the Committee as
well.

The Cormmittee of which he was
Chairman had 21 meetings
which many were held during the
night, because if they had worked
in the day time, the report would
have been held up considerably.
He said that if an inside com-
mittee was appointed for this
much bigger task, he felt it would
be a great strain on the Commis-
sion, but he added “it is a
matter for the Governor to de-
cide.”

He had mentioned that the Com-
mittee was not dealing with a yoid.
It would have made their task
much simpler if it had been so.
On balance, it seemed better to
do what the committee did.

As regard the point about the
“Squarish pegs in roundish holes”
Hon. Mr. Turner said that for all
he knew he might be one, but the
point was that the particular
people were in the jobs, and would
continue to be so, but as and
when they did go, it would be
possible to fill those posts with
qualified people. :

He said that the Administration
was making full use of the Public
Service Commission, and was in-
voking the general clause in
which matters of the sort might
be referred to the Publi¢ Service
Commission for their advice.

Anomalies

Regarding the matter of the
anomalies created by the differ-
ence in the salaries of the heads
of some secondary schools as
raised by Hon, Dr, Cato, the Hon.
the Colonial Secretary again re-
ferred to the recommendations of
the Director of Education, and
mentioning the point concerning
the grades raised by Hon. Dr.
Cato, said that for administrative
convenience, it was considered
that there should not too
many scales.

On the point about intensifying
the training schemes, Hon. Mr.
Turner recalled that His Excel-
lency had said that he would en-
deavour to deal with each depart-
ment individually rather than deal
with the complete training plan,
and added “training proposals are
very much in the fore at the
moment.”

Hon. Mr. Turner told the Coun-

of

be





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were going up to see His Excel-
lerncy daily in the afternoon, and
he therefore hoped that an over-
all training scheme would not be
long in delay. He expressed the
further ope that “when officers
should have received their train-
ing, they would not_return to Bar=
bados and stay for a short while
and then vanish elsewhere.”
Those conditions of service
recommended in the committee's
report would help te insure that
those people who were trainedwiit ;
return to Barbados. When the
Resolutions were passed, the Ad-
ministration would in fact have
to go carefully through and see
what the repercussions would be,
and he felt that Hon. Dr, Cato
would have to rely on the good)
sense of the Administration with |
the assurance that in cases of that |
sort it would be referred to th)
Public Service Commission. |
Regarding the differential be-|
tween male and female honours |
graduates, the Hon. the Colonial
Secretary said the Committee felt |
that that differential should re-'
main, and said that it was not,
pointed out at any time during!
the committee’s deliberations that |
ithey were going contrary to the
recognised practice elsewhere.



Not Convinced

Hon. Dr. H. G. Massiah in refer-
ring to the Colonial Secretary's
reply, said that as the Colonial
Secretary had said, he had not
been convinced. It seemed to
him, as he had said, before, to be
an anomaly as there could be no
comparison between the two
schools,

“It is surely want of vision on
somebody’s part to allow a thing
of this sort to go ,on,” he said.
“I do not think any explanation
can be given because what he has
said makes the position more
indefensibe than ever.” |

Hon. G. D. Pile who supported |
Hon. H. G. Massiah on this ques-
tion, said that why on earth the
Headmaster of Combermere wa:
paid more originally seemed to
him a matter that it was well to
investigate. One was a secondary
and the other a primary school.

He pointed out that the Director
of Education and both head-
masters were increased by the
same $720.

* On this question, Hon, F. C.
Hutson said that he might be
wrong, and it might not be the
reason, but for many years, Lodge
School had been a boarding school
and it had been quite possible
that the outside emoluments of
the headmaster through this
quarter was far above those of
the headmaster of Combermere in












a

é

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25. 1952 '







*
those days. Now the Board;
emolurnent had been separated | When BACK
and therefore the Headmaster of |
Lodge got nothing out of the/|
Boarding. A ese
He was not defending the Com- : kidneys.
mittee, he said, but it would be eee ap ert my When
good if an investigation WET®| they get out of order, excess acids and
made, for obviously Lodge School ;: wastes in the system.
| was considered senior,to Comber- Lm backache, rheumatism,
mere and its headmaster should | disturbed rest or that ‘tired out’ a
be considered senior too. | soon follgw. To make your kidneys
The respective Resolutions were tnd ince Bettis baie
then passed. use 's Kidney s
Pills quickly rid your over-burdened blood
| of excess acids and wastes so that pure,
Ob fresh blood flows to nerve and muscle.
better and you are to dance
WHEN the Legislative Council ig. ‘ata on Dodd's
met yesterday, Hon. G. B, Evelyn in the blue with the
presented a petition from the| bands. Only 3/-at stores. 124
Anglican Synod praying that the Kidney Pills
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THE CAINE MUTINY: Herma
THE SOUL OF MARSHAL GILLES DE RAIZ:

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LOOKING FOR GEORGIAN ENGLAND: %

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PHOENIX RISING: Marguerite Steen

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30TH JUNE, 1952.

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"a marathon
/ show originating in El Capitan

a coast to coast telecast to raise
_ funds to-send the United States

gh cularly on the western half

her elégance in Paris salons and
on magazine coves: to-day
from injuries € in a car

ee
mt

crash yesterday,

oad, She was unconscious when

pital suffering from a fractured

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1952

T.V. Show
Cost Cinemas
$2,000,000

HOLLYWOOD, June 24.
A survey showed United States
wide motion picture box office re-
ceipts’ dropped off more than
$2,000,000 on Saturday night when
14-hour _ television

Uniforn: Reporting
Urged By
Hurricarie Ctee

PORT-OF-SPAIN.

Greater uniformity in weather
reporting practices features the
recommendations of the Eastern
Caribbean Hurricane Committee
which met at Kent House this
week at the invitation of the
Caribbean Commission.

The Committee’s report urges
conformance with international
standards with respect to (1)
bours of reporting; (2) standard-
ising barometers; (3) the location
of stations; (4) codes used in re-
porting.

Theatre here — which marked
Bing Crosby’s Video Debut film in

Olympic team to Helsinki,

Crosby, comedian Bob Hope and
Dorothy Lamour, their. co-star in
many pictures, obtained pledges
of more than $1,000,000: from per-
sons in all walks of life thereby
reaching a goal of $850,000,

Between announcements of
pledges as low as 25 cents to as
high as $10,000 top names in en-
tertainment and the athletic world
contributed specialties,

In the matter of reporting hours,
ihe Committee recommended that
“the islands in and adjoining the
Caribbean Sea should adopt the
international hours of observation
from January 1, 1953, and that
the other parts of the Regional
Association IV (North and Cen-
tral America) should consider the
possibility of adopting these inter-
national hours also as soon as pos-
sible.”

As to the use of codes, it is re-
commended that “ all members of
the region be urged to adhere to
the regional codes as promulgated
by the World Meteorological Or-
ganisation and that where such
eodes were not fully in use by
January 1, 1953, differences should
be notified to the President of Re-
gional Association IV.”

The Committee considered the
problem of expediting the send-
ing of reports and recommended
that “the Governments concerned
take all possible measures, either
through the provision of the neces~
sary facilities themselves or
through financial support of the
respective communication agenc-
ies, to ensure the expeditious flow
of meteorological reports and ad-
visories in the Caribbean Area.”

To ensure the prompt receipt of
hurricane advisories, the Com-
mittee recommended that, where
a continuous watch was not main-
tained, consideration should be
given to the use of automatic
radio alarm systems to alert per-
sonnel assigned to man receiving
stations.

The drop in box office receipts
which in some cases was from 25
to 40 per cent, was more acutely
felt since the show began at 8.00
p.m, Pacific coast time, Which on
Saturday night usually brings
movie houses the peak of business,

the United States. Farther east
here the show. started later
ple just stayed home that night
await the show.

—UP.



‘amous Maniiequimn
Dies After Crash

PARIS, June 24.
Praline, France’s most famous
mannequin known to the fashion-
able woman in-the world over for

Praline had been returning from
holiday by car when she was in-
olved in the crash with another
mar near Lissieunt, Northern
ance, and was hurled into the

e was brought to Lissieunt Hos-

While the Committee considered
that the organisation of hurricane
relief measures is not strictly in
its province, it proposed that mem-
bers keep “the Caribbean Com-
mission informed of all relief
measures undertaken in their ter-
ritories and any modifications
thereto,” The Commission, it was
noted, will undertake to send these
reports to the Governments con-
cerned.

In revising the action taken on
recommendations made by the
meeting held last year, four sub-
stantial achievements were re-
corded, The first was the installa-
tion of rawinsonde (radio sound-

7m. Tons Sugar jpg balloon) equipment at Guade-
: : oupe. Another was the inaugura-
On Free Market

tion of a radio-teletype broadcast
at Miami by the U.S. Weather
(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, June 24,

skull and with her face badly cut.
A. plastic surgeon was called,

The famous mannequin, a tall
slender blonde whose real name
was Jane Mayneer was 29 years
old, She was born in a village of
Loire Valley, won a beauty con-
test after. the war and went on a
tour of the United States. As head
model of Pierre Balmain’s fashion
house she became the most photo-
graphed mannequin in France,

—UP.







Bureau.
In line with the recommend-
Free market supplies of sugar
for the crop year ending August
31 next have been estimated at
7,335,000 metric tons and require
ments at 4,950,000 metric $a ac-
cording to a statistical report re-
ceived by the International Sugar
Council im@eting in London to-
day,

The West. Indies were repre-
sented at the two-day meeting of
the Council by J. M.- Campbell
Chairman and A, E. V. Barton
Secretary of the West India Com-
mittee, The meetings were at-
tended by representatives of 18
governments and by. observers
from ten other governments and
from food and agricultural organ-
izations,

A special committee reported

| the pragress made in drafting a

new International Sugar Agree-
ment. The Council decided to re-
commend to the governments
which signed the protocol the
prolonging of the present agree-
ment to August 31 next to sign
‘another. protocol @xtending that
@greement on the understanding
that as soon as the new agreement

“comes into force the protocol will
terminate.

ation that additional circuits be
set up, Martinique is now in
radio contact with Puerto Rico,
and the circuit can be put on-a
24-hour basis when necessary. The
Caribbean Commission has carried
out the recommendation that at
the start of the hurricane season,
a statement should be circulated

giving information concerning
radio stations issuing hurricane
warnings.



Committee Will
Work Out Rules

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jamaica, June 24,

B.W.I. Parliamentarians meet-
ing in Jamaica have agreed to the
formation of a British Caribbean
Parliamentary Association and
appointed a Provisional Commit-
tee of Hon, W. H. Courtenay,
O.B.E., Chairman, Hon. Donald
Sangster, Norman Manley, Wil-
liams of Antigua and Noel of
Grenada to work out its consti-
tution and rules.

The conference which began
Monday will be completed to-
moryow,





3

>

Joy Back Home

om
ay

VICE ADMIRAL Charles Turner
Joy, former chief negotiator at
Panmunjom, Korea, is shown with
his wife, and their dog “Fury”,
after their arrival in San Fran-
cisco on the transport Gen. H. W.
Butner, Joy refused to predict the
outcome of the Korean truce talks.
He said he believes the Commu-
nists are using the talks as a “‘tac-
tical maneuver to build up their
army.” (International Soundphoto)

R.B. Yacht Club

Tennis Tournament

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Ladies Singles
Mrs. D. E. Worme beat Mrs, A.
A. Gibbons 69-1, 4—6, 6—0.
Miss E. Worme beat Miss L.
Branch 6—3, 4—6, 6—1.
Men’s Singles
Mr. E, P. Taylor beat Mr. G.
Watson 6—1, 6—0,
Mr, W. H. Knowles beat Mr. G.
L. Hunte 6—4, 5—7, 6—2.
Mr, J. D. Trimmingham beat
Mr. F, D. Barnes 7—5, 6—2.
Mr. D. E. Worme beat Mr. S. P.
Edghill 6—0, 6—2.
TO-DAY’S FIXTURES
Ladies’ Singles
Miss M. King vs, Miss R. Hudson
Mrs, P. Patterson vs, Miss M.
Wood.



Men’s Singles

Mr. J. D. Trimmingham, vs. Mr.
M. deVerteuil.

Mr. H. L. Toppin Mr. V.
Roach.

Mr. D. E. Worme vs. Mr. I. §S,
Robinson,

Mr. C. B. Sisnett vs. Mr. D. Mac
Phail.

vs.



Dames Defeat
Unique High School

Notre Dame defeated Unique
High School in a Netball game on
Monday by twelve goals to four.

The Misses M. Dottin and D,
Belgrave scored six goals each for
Notre Dame while the Misses
Holder and Green scored three
goals and one goal respectively
for the Unique High School.



Surplus Money
For New Factory

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jamaica, June 24,

Jamaica’s share of the surplus
sugar money arising out of dollar

sales to Canada is likely to be ,

used towards erection of a new
sugar factory planned for the
western end of the island. The
sum officially announced to-da
is $1,500,000 insterfi of $1,000,000
reported yesterday.

Detailed plans of the factory of
10,000-ton capacity are not yet
completed but the capital cost is
to be met by government, C.D.C.
and cane farmers while industry
has been asked to apply any sur-



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Ladies Play

Tame Tennis

From Our Own Correspondent
By DENNIS HART
LONDON, June 24.
Today the Wimbledon spotlight

centred on the ladies.

The first and some of the second
round matches of the Women’s
Singles were played. They pro-
vided neither the thrills nor
shocks served up by the men
yesterday. All eight seeded
players won their matches.

Only one, Mrs. Jean Walker-
Smith, one of Britain’s two seeds
was extended. But she won in
two straight sets defeating Mrs

S. Schmidt of France 6—3, 6—4.

Doris Hart, the holder needed
just 22 mimutes to beat Miss S.
I, Oddling of Great Britain 6—1,
6—0, in the first stage of the de-
fence of her title. Miss Oddling
who was playing in place of the
injured Mrs, Mottram caused a
surprise by winning the first game
against the champion’s service.
But with no undue exertion Miss
Hart won the next 12 games to
take the match.

She displayed some powerful
ground shots which gained her
the title last year but appeared to
move a little slower about the
court. However this was no
doubt due to the fact that she
wasn't extended,

The eagerly-awaited Wimbledon
debut of 17-year-old Maureen
Connolly was greeted with tre-
mendous applause from the pack-
ed Number One Court.

For two days she had been out
of action nursing an injured
shoulder and her swing seemed
jerky. This did not prevent her
defeating Mrs. C. G. Moeller 6—2,
6—0. The American champion’s
display wasn’t spectacular but like
Miss Hart she wasn’t extended.

Louise Brough began her bid to
regain the title she lost last year
with a comfortable 6—1, 6—0,
victory over Miss P. A. Lewis.
She was right back to the form |
which won her the crown three |
years in succession and showed no
signs of the tennis elbow from
which she suffered last year,

Two other American seeds,
Shirley Fry and Pat Todd, main-
tained the run of quick victories.
Miss Fry had the easiest of all
against Mrs. W. C. J. Halford
whom she beat 6—0, 6—0, Mrs.
Todd defeated compatriot Miss A.
McGuire 6—0, 6—2.

Britain’s other seed Mrs, J.
Rinkel-Quertier beat Mrs, R.
Cooper 6—1, 6—3, and the

Australian champion Mrs. Thelma
Long had a convincing 6—1, 6—0
victory over Mrs. H. M, Proudfoot,

Men’s Doubles favourites K.
McGregor and Frank Sedgman
had an easy 6—0, 6—0O, 6—1 first
round victory over the Belgian
pair J, Brichant and P. Washer. |

Britain’s hopes Tony Mottram |
and Geoff Paish gained a note-
worthy victory over the young
Australian pair Don Candy and
Mervyn Rose, They won in four
sets 6—0, 3—6, 6—3, 6—4.



Youth Movement
Gets Gramaphone

he Barbados Youth Movement
has just received a gramophone
as a gift from the Cambell Youth
Centre, England, to assist the
youths in their musical apprecia-
tion,

A letter from the youth centre
in England, wished the President
of the local Youth Movement,
success in the Movement under-
takings and added that records
would be sent on within a fort-
night,

Man Drowned

Robert Miller of Bath Village,
Christ Church, was drowned off
Battery Beach, Christ Church
yesterday morning. Miller a 34-
year-old fisherman wag in a fish-
ing hoat about half mile off
Battery Beach when a large wave





Two other men who were in the





The Council will continue in-
vestigation of a new agreement
and a further meeting will be held
in September.

P. J. Westermann was re-elect-
ed Chairman,

~

Although Barbados has not sent
a delegate Hon. Lloyd Smith,
M.C.P, on his way to the U.K, on
a Parliamentary visit is acting as
an observer at the Conference for
that colony.





oF } «

REDIFFUSION

Offers a Commission of $1.50 in CASH for every New
Subscriber brought to and accepted by the Company.
REDIFFUSION will pay in addition a bonus of $25.00
to any person who brings in twenty-five New Subscrib-
ers in one Calendar month who are accepted by the
Company.

Have always a supply of Recommendation Forms ready

THEY CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE OFFICE
REDIFFUSION i+ Trafalgar Street.

=

))
»))

i THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.
ANNUAL HOLIDAY

\

| Out CUSTOMERS and FRIENDS are asked to note
that our WORKSHOP will be closed as from Monday,

16th June, 1952, to Saturday, the 28th June, 1952, inclu-

sive, for the purpose of granting our Workmen their

ANNUAL. HOLIDAY,

Arrangements have been made for emergency work

to be undertaken, during this period and the receipt

of repairs and delivery of completed work will be

continued as usual.

Our Merchandise Department and Office will be open

to business as usual.

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

White Park Road.
St. Michael

———















struck the boat thus capsizing eal

plus to the project. boat were brought safely ashore,



White shoes, to pass muster
in company, must be spot-
less, immaculate. Use
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or Propert’s Shuwhite. No
surer way of making sure



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ADDRESS \
\







y 7 ¥ J
P.ALY.E. For J’ca
@rom Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jamaica, June 24,

A decision has been taken in)
Jemaica to introduce the pay-as-
you-earn Income Tax collection Page
sysiem here from January next -
year. The decision was taken as
a result of recommendations by

commercial and private groups in
the island.

MAIL NOTICES |

Mails for United Kingdon and France |
by the S.S. De Grasse will be closed at
the General Post Office as und r:— !

Patce! Mail at 3 p.m. on, the 27th |








Sweet dre

No fuss

weaning t






June 1952, Registered Mail at 9.15 a.m | other
on the °Sth June 52. Ordinar Mail at}
10.15, 2m. on the 28th June 1952 happy be
Malis for Bominiea, Antigua, Montser growing u
rst, Nevis, and St. Kitts by the M.V + :
Momeka, will be closed at the General | rm Mother ins ’
Past Office as under | se
Parcel Mail at 12 Noon on the 27th!
June 1952 Registered Mail at 2 p.m. on | ROBINSON’S ‘patent’ GROATS
the 2th June 1952. Ordinary Mail at
2.30 pm. on the 27th June 1952
Mails for St. Vincent by the Sch. |
Mandalay will be closed at the General |
Post Office as under:- |
Parcel Mail at 12 Noon on the 26th!
June Registered Mail at 2 p.m, |
on the 25th ‘une 1952. Ordinary Mail |
at 2.30 + on the 25th June, 1962



|
In Touch With Barbados |
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1) Lid. advise |
that they can now communicate with the
folowing ships throuh their Barbados
Coast Station

S.S. Rangitata, §.S



Fort Townshend, 8S Adolfo, 8.8
Rosario, §&.S. Juncal, 8.8 Riojachal,
$.S. Eva Peron, 5S.S. Sirena, S.S
Mercator, S.S. Buceaneer, S.5. Path-
finder, S.S. Bonito, S.S. Polarusgem,
s.s DeGrasse, S.S Bianca, S.S
Hyeres, 5.8 Latia, S.8, Jotunfjell,
M/T Driade, S.S. Astridnaess, Ss



Livada, S.S. Bixoe, S.S. Utilitas, Ss
North Point, S.S Finn Mark, 8.S. Tweed
8.S. Teresa, 8.S. S. Rosa, §.S. S Mon-
ica, S.S. Quercy, 8.8. Argentina, R.M.S
Lady Nelson, S.S. Rita Garcia, 5.8. Lm
perial Charlottetown, S.S, Crofter, S.S |
Alcoa Pointer, 8S. Stiklestad, S.S. L. |
P, St. Clair, 8/T Troy, S.S. Oranjestad,

|
j
\
North Britain, $.S |
|
|
|
|
|

8.8. Skauvann, 5.8. Araby, 8.8. Corri-
entes, S.S. El Aleto, 5.S. S. Adolfo, §.S
Alcoa Planter, M/T Thorbjorg, S.S. Frid
Tjof Nansen, S.S. Strix, S.S. Dolores,
S.S. Viator, S.S. Tridale, S.S. San
Veronico, S.S. Tiberius, 8.8. Benito,
8.8. Crown Point, 8S.S. Romana, 8.8. |
Brazil, S.S. Rosa, S.S. Seamagic, 8.S |
Augusta, S.S. Wanderer, 8.8. Seapear!





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Sub-Agents for St

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|





PAGE

SEVEN

OP COURSE ..+ Wisdom
is the best buy becausé it’s

| the only toothbrush with thig
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into every crevice, even the
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Yes, FAB — even in the hardest water — witl ge.
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wash—use FAB...put it on your gwocer’s list ‘AOcDaAcX.

Washing with FAB asecenellly
SAVES money — ~ :
Use HALF as

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VIM

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| See cee
=

x+y 496-202



: LEVER paopuc?







PAGE EIGHT

CLASSIFIED ADS. | "mmc Saxe [ruse Nerices

TELEPHONE 2508



DIED



HOLDER—At Stuart's Land, Fairfield,
David Holder. His funeral leaves
hig late residence at 4 p.m. for the
Gili Memerial Chureh, thence to the
w Cemetery



(wife), Vernol, George,
(sons), James Jordan,
Harper (sons-in-law>,
Euretha, Esina, Naomi, Iris, Jestina
ida a
A papers
eee SS san
I
ROLLINS——We the undersign heg to re-
turn thanks to those relatives and

friends who attended the funeral of
Mr. Joseph Nathaniel Rellins whieh
took place on 22.6.52 and who sent
wreaths and Cards or im any way
gave their sympathy te the family

Mrs. E. Rollins and family
25.6. 52-—-la



IN MEMORIAM



BISHOP—-In lov memory ef eur deer
father, Aubrey Fitz Allan Bishop who
was called to rest on June 25th, 1951

Memories are treasures nO one ca.

steal
Death is a heartache, only time ca>
heal

Some may forget now that you are

But we — Yemember while jife\ TRACTOR-

|

wiites uenderan

(children), ima
(friend) . B

@52-—ia



Neen nn nnn EP anEIEn RARER
Attractive seaside Flat main road Has-



tings, wtably furnished, Engliso
Bath, Open Verandah facing sea. Suitabic
one person (or couple) rom July i.
Telephone 2949. 18.6.52-4.f n
FARAWAY, St. Philip Coast, fully
furnished For ee November,

December only. Dial 4@
a 6.52—t+.f.n

LARGE pearl and shingled. . shop |-

and shedroof for Rent On Alleyne’s









Land, Bush Hall Cross Rd Gooa
business stand. Apply EF Alleyne,
Bush Hall. 24.6.52-—3n
NEWHAVEN, Grane Coast, fully fur-
nished. For July, November, Decem-
ber only. Dial 4476 19.6.52—t. fn
— ————_—_—
ROOM—From July Ist at the Mayfair
Gift Shop. Suitable for Dressmakipg

Plower Shop, Hairdressing etc. Apply
at Mayfair 4 to 6 p.m,
29.5.52--4n

| ae
ST. WYENIFRED — Unfurnished Max-





FOR SALE

AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—Dodge Super-Deluxe, First Class
condition and Owner. . $2,000
Dial «76 .2--t. fn

CAR--Dodge. Two
overhauled New
working condition.







recently
Excellent
-.
22.6.52—80

seater
tyres.
Phone





CAR—-One ‘Austin Wh p. car with two
new 6-volt Batteries one standard & h.p.
in very goed condition Cc. R. Appie-
wh ite, Lakes Folly, Dial 5062

22.6.52—-3n



CAR--1951 Morris Minor, very good
condition. $1,800.00 Phone 2898

25.6.52-—2n



CAR—1 Morris 8 h.p. Tquring car in





wfeet working order. Price $350.00.

al 4719. 25.6.52—2n.
; CAR — 1951 Hillman Minx 8,000
miles as good as new R. Lewia
e/o Cave Shepherd & Co, Ltd

25.6.52—3n

a

only 16,400
Apply Redman

LAND ROVER, done
miles in excellent order
& Taylor's Garage Ltd

One Massey Harris Tractor
res and half tracks very
Manager ak Hall,
1.6.52—7n,

with pneumatic
little used. App!
St. Joseph.

TRALLERS—Single axle 4 tons and
double axle 6 tons from stock.













Smith Engineering Works, Roebuck
Street. Phone 4047 25.6. 52—Hn
VAN—Fordson Van in perfect running
order. 20,000 miles: Royal Store No 12,
High St. Dial 4359 24.6. 52-—2n
One (1) Columbia Record Player in
perfect condition. Phone Joan Burton
2881 or 5045, C/o T. Geddes Grant Ltd
25,6. 52-——3n





Just received new “shipment of Garrard
three speed Automatic Changers at
P. C. S. Maffei & Co. Ltd. Radio Em-

porium 15,6.52-—t.f.n.

PYE BATTERY SETS—Just a few left.
MAFFEI’S RADIO EMPORIUM.
15.6.52—t.f.n,

f



MECHANICAL

B.S.A. BICYCLES,
and sizes, call and see them.
Redman & Taylor's Garage Ltd,
25.6. 52—3n



various “models,









well Coast. Available Ist July. Apply
a ae vs ae 22" | “MACHINE—Usea Domestic, z Singer
“WISMAR", Gibbes , Beach, St. Peter, - } Sewing Machine In good c ion.
fully furnished 3 bedroom bungalow, | Ply Reliance Shirt Factory. 21.6.
for tue month gf July ABU un | ROYAL TYPEWRITER — As good as
new. Apply H. Jason Jones & Co.
24.6.52-3n
WANTED LIVESTOCK



_—_—— —
WANTED—A master for the Coleridge
and Parry School, St. Peter, Barbados,
to teach up to G. C. E. Ordinary level
Candidates with qualifications to teach
Agricultural Science will be preferred
Salary for a Graduate $1,728 x 72--2,160
” for a Graduate with Ist or 2nd
class hanours $1,820x96-—2, 800:
Allowance will be made for previous
experience. Applications with tegtime-
should be sent to the Headmaster
by 17th July, 1952. 18.6,52—3n

E

ES
JUNIOR OVERSEER. Rowans Planta-
tion. Apply in Person. 26.6.52—fn.

POSITION—Required as Cook ar
butler; pastries a specialty. Response,

neerful and willing, Diat s
ae 2, @ 80-40

SALES GIRL—with previous expe fe
enee of Dry Goods for a Dry





Store in Swan Street. Only in ent
and hard working need apply b
Box 270. Brid wh 25.6.52-—In,

S

diately, furnished 2-3
bedrooms. Garden spice. On Bug route,
Apply: X X X C/o Advocate ra

4.6,52—2n



“TWENTY-FIVE — DOLLARS extra Bonus
rom Rediffusion for 25 recommenda

tions tm ene calendar month.
4 6.92--2m

$62.50 POCKET MONEY easily earned
recommending 25 new subscribers to

REDIFFUSION in one month, —
20n

REDIFFUSION offers $1.50 cash for
each new Subscriber recommended by
you. a

SUPPLEMENT YOUR INCOME by
ean REDIFFUSION. Obtain
particulars from the REDIFFUSION

4.6 52—20n.

NOTICE

uv



52—20n,







POST OFFICE

REMOVAL OF POSTING BOX.

The PUBLIC POSTING BOX
has been removed from the wall of
the Dispensary, Horse Hill, St.
Joseph.

Posting facilities arg available
at the St. Joseph Post Office about
100 yards distant,

R. A. CLARKE,
Colonial Postmaster,
General Post Office,
24th June, 1952.



25.6.52—In,





o POPPI SOSSO
— NOTICE =



Customers holding
up to the end of

ment will be 30th June

Same may be collected any day

9 a.m. to 3 p.m, with

exception Saturday whole day and
1l a.m. to 12 o'clock daily

Notes
» are
pey-



10- DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Special Pencils for Shorthand 10c.
Artists’ Drawing Pencils 18c
Artists’ Pink Diamond

Erasers .

Large Supply of Paints, Brushes

Ete., for Artists Just Received

Coloured Sheet Plastics for mak-
ing Bags, Etc
AT

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE



ORIENTAL
PALACE

BEADQUARTERS FOR
SOU TENIRS

FROM INDIA, CHINA &
CEYLON

_ THANI'S

» Wm. Hy. 83. Dial 3466 fh) %
OS NN AI







COW—One Guernsey ~- Holstein ie
To calf in a few days. Phone 2084 P.
Pilgrim, Chapel Gap

22.6.52—4n



One riding HORSE and three GUERN
SEY HEIFERS Apply Manager, Foste.
Hall, St. Joseph. 21.6.52—7n.











sale also cockerels bred from keypre aor? Glass and China a Jug oer ee
of 300 eggs and upward. Apply to} Tea Service 68
Harold Ward of Gragettes Road, St.| Pieces of old of ol Chinas wish Be an pages
Michael. 25.6.523—1n Card Table, an
_——_—_—_$—_$_— | ar
MISCELLANEOUS on Beskng ae GEORGE DUNCAN ALBERT BURKE,
White, Painted le; intera Des!
sia, Consfoleum:” Wary nie, NOTICE 1S HEREBY that al
ACCESSORIES, Pump Connections,! Bedsteads, Vono Springs Mahos: oe persons having any debt or im upon
Chamois Leathers, Dusters, Wind Screen | sieep Mattresses; Mahog: Press, Wash-| OF affecting the Estate of George Dun-
Wiper Blades, Head, Stop and Tail] stand; Vanity Table; Cordea Cabinet; { ean Albert Burke late of Paynes Bay,
and Indieator’ Bulbs. Redman & Tay-/ Oj) stoves, Elec-Hot Plate; Toasters, /1n the parish of Saint Ja who died
lor's Garage Ltd. 26.6.52—3n. | Ware Press. Pt. Freezer; tlroning| im this Island on the 25th y of April
rrr | Board, Copying Press, Firewood; and i382, are requested to send in particu-
ACCESSORINS, French Chalk, Split | m, items of value, lars of theit claims, an attested, to
Ping Cycle Black, Valve Grinding TRO & OO. | the undersigned, the uanaed execu-
compound, Redman & ‘Taylor's tors of the Estate of S George
Garage Ltd 25.6, 52—3n. Auctioneers Duncan Albert Burke, deceased, in
—— care of E, D, Rogers, James Street,
Agricultural Farke and Sickles. C. D. Bridgetown, on or before the 15th day
Jordan & Co., Speightetqwn, a of of Avast | 1600. oe which date we
, Proc oO tribute the assets
lnieeniigdaa on & FOUND of the said Estate among the parties
“ACCESSORIES, Battery Terminals, & entitled thereto having regard to the
Clipa, K.L.G Spark Plugs, Tyre — ry | Sha and elaims only of which we
Valves, & Repair Kits Redman & A have had notice. And that
Taylor's Garage Ltd. 2% .6.52—3n. LOST be liable for assets so

ne

ACCESSORIES, for Cars and Trucks,
Hot Patches, & Clamps, Insulation
Tape, Tyre Gauges, Radiator Stop
Leak Redman & Taylor's, Garage Lid

25.6,52-—3n,



COTTON FUJIETE—In Pink, Lemon,
Blue, Peach, & White. Min. wide 62
cents yard at Kirpalani, 53 Swan Street.

25.6,.52-—-1n.

Delicious Maraschino
Boxes. Every one a delight,
Ltd 2.6.

GALVANISED—Special offer
days Best quality English
sheets 6 ft. $3.94 7 ft. $4.60 8

Koignt's
$2-—3n



JUST opened lovely dress materials
in beautiful designs colours at
very attractive prices. e Shopping
Centre. No. 37, Swan Street

24,.6.52—2n

Tilley —Kerosene
Domestic irons
S. Husbands,
Lucy, A, G
St. James
25.6.52—3n.



Just
sure Lamps
Spare parts N
Hall Plantation, St
bands, Mount Stanctast,

arrived
&

Pres-
and
Bright
Hus-

OLD FLOORS made like
floors look
Floor Way
you have electrie Power or not.
Evelyn Roach and Co,, Ltd. Te o=
3584 or 3586. 22.6, 52-—3n.

RAILINGS—Pine Office
able for an Offige. L,
& Co.,



Railings suit-
M. B. Meyers
20.6.52—t.f.n.





RAT. BAYTS——Supplies of

at le. each between the hours of 8
am, and 4 p.m., exeept from il
am. to 12,30 p.m

19.6.52—3n



in Barbados Air only » few

days after publication London. Con-

tact: kan Gale, ofo A te Co., Lid
Local Representative, Tel. was

7.4.82—t.f.n.

TOOLS—-Hand Drills, Hand Saws

from 18in to 30in. Back Saws 12in

and ld4in,, Compas Saws 12in. & l4in.,

Oil Stoves Spirit Levels 8in. to 24in

Braces & Hits, Plyers, Pineers Squares

with Mitre & Level, Claw Hammers,
Spoke Shaves, Iron Planes & Masons
Brushes. C. D. Jordan & Co, Speights-



town 25.6.52—4n
TOOTH PICKS in boxes of 750. Finest |

quality 1/3 box. Get yours at Knights

Ltd 6.52—3n



PERSONAL

This is to notify the
public that I have not heard }
from my husband, Leslie *
Rayside, of
Street, Brooklyn, New York,
U.S.A., for the past 13 years
and I am about to be mar-
ried again in the © near
future.

(Signed)
ELISE RAYSIDE
(Nee CARRINGTON)
Green Hill, St. Michael,
Barbados.
12.6.52—3n,

POSSSSSOSO

SSS SSD

A

x











—

ADVOCATE



REAL ESTATE





The Club will be ae to members





~HOUSE—One board and shinglea| °° Saturday 7ge _
house, with three roofs, Rock Hall, y ore
St. Thomas, opposite the vicarage. Ap- ASTOR BANCROFT,
bly to Joseph N. Hunte of Weich Secretary
Hall, St. Thomes %.6.52-- A.6.5B—2n

STONE WALL DWELLING HOUSE} ~——

with 4, square feet land attaehed

at Dayrell’s Road, Christ Church. The NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. LUCY

dwelling house contains ving room,
two Sebaaoma, kitchenette, usual con-
Government water installed.

for. electricity. Inspection
tion to the tenant Mr. Ince,
hours of IL am. and 1 p.m







Vestry Exhibitions tenable at the
andra School will be received by me
not later than July
dates must be daughters of Parishioners

















Applications for one or more vacgnt

Alex-

15th, 1962. Candi-





* Bagasse Paper Has,
“Grown Up” Now

BIG FUTURE IN

ugar ala pene ces WBb-be set] Sind not sess than eight. and not more
Office, J. as yah | one than twelve years of age Forms of NEW YORK.
fustant at 98; Pemitcations must Re obtained Grom qe) BAGASSE r has “grown up” now. No ee

& BOYCE, aps, "c ertifieate. must accompany | it a novelty, a substitute for paper made of more tradi

al jon

boon ete Oe ica lust present themeeives to| materials. For some purposes, aioe genet is actually
The undersigned will set up for sale} ime Hoadmistiess for examination | on better than the more usual
by Bublic competition a Rim ee | a eae see on This was stated by Mr. Pecans t
ames Street - Priday zth P
instant at 2 0. 1 wane. of W. R. Grace and Co,, the Selsewetionsl 3 and

¢ v . : e
pal THAT. Meertain Memaan °% ree Lu’. trading concern of New York, which was one of the first
thereto containing feet sit- 25.6 52 -4n} companies to realise the value of bagasse paper in paper
uate at the corner of ttle manuf. ture.
Sone a oe on ee NOTICE i pater tne But all the time, experiments
he an ex- ul ni

ae All male citizens of the United States| hibition in New Yor. of the many are going on at Paramonga to im-

Freeh samen of between the ages of 18 and % restrli ee. paper and cardboard prove Be the methods used in mak-
: ders! ffer for sale requested call at| product it now makes ba- xy aioe prakie al bagasse

at "Public, Competition at their. office | ne ,Amertean Consulate from July 1 ta assent only oowegein, but produets, At one Why
No, 1? High Street, Bridgetown, on| 9): J S68 fer Selective Registration a cardboard six to f
Friday the #th day of Juby 1952 at} godct iversal Military Training | #ls@ | corruga ee a 2
Ne. Service Act. tainers, heavy paper sacks, small pulp were , but in more

The bungalow known as CASVILLE
with the land thereto containing by ad-
measurement 8241 sq. ft. situate in
Navy Gardens, Christ Church and
containing an open verandah facing
and east, combined drawing &
dining room, 3 bedrooms, toilet, bath
and kitehen ‘with ga and rooms for
two servants and with electricity in-

Inspection dial 4460. For
particulars and conditions of
sale apply to:
COTTLE CATFORD &



AUCTION



Bn ee:

at
al Garage, St. Michael's Row:

10 h.p. orris Car. (Damaged in ac-
cident). Terms Cash. Sale at 2 p.m.
Vineent Griffith, Auctioneer

22,6.52-4n.



UNDER THE DIAMOND
HAMMER

By instruction
Lowe I will sell
house~ “Katteur’*;
Road, Ch. Ch.,

received from Mias
by auction at her
Rockley, Hastings

of
cludes:
mah
mahogany

household furniture which = in-

tables, chairs,

dressing , . Westinghouse -
erator,
gas stove, glasg ware, ures &
other items of in TERMS CASH.
DARCY A. SCOTT,
Auetioneer.
20,6,52—4n



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Thuredaw Mth by order of Miss

M. Cave we will sell the Furniture eens without Seley.

at. Avalon Colkymore

which includes.

Pedestal Sideboard, Floor Lamps, Book
and Ornament Tables; Rockers, China
Cabinet Very good Fiat ss
Mh eal Be gg BR he Berbice

Tip-Top Ta’ ; : a |——





Sweepst Ticket Series QQ 6219
Finder return same to Harold
Young Cheapside Rum



ANNOUNCEMENTS

—

EARN BIG MONEY by selling Redit-
fusion in your spare time. Get a supn/
of forms today. 4.6.52--20n.

The Land Acquisition Act
1949

(Notice required by Seotion 3)
is hereby given that it



p-

pears to the Governor in Execut.ve

Committee that the lands described in At 2 p.m. in the afternoon of Thurs
the Schedule hereto and situate at} day the i?th day of July 1952, I will
Queen Street and, nd Street inf offer for sale by Public Competition at
Speightstown, Saint er, in the Island} my>Office in the Public Buildings for a

of Parbados are likely to be needed for

purposes which in thé opinion of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee sre
ublic purposes, namely for a Fish
Market

THE SCHEDULE
ALL THAT, certain pargel of lend con-
taining 4,806 square feet more or
situate at the junction of Queen Strret
with Sand Street in Speightstown in he
parish of Saint Peter Abutting on the
north on lands of F. Miller, on
west on the seashore, on the south on
lands of the Vestry of Saint Peter
(being the site of the t Fish
Market) and on the east on Sand Street

aforesaid

and Queen Street or however
else the same is abu! Together with
the buildings thereon.
an this day of 1962 at
Bridgetown 4% the a2.
. R. N. TURNER,
Colonial Secretary,
24.6, 5230



CHANCERY SALE

ah undermentioned property witli! be set up for sale at the Registration

‘Offee, Public Buildings, between !2 noon and 2 p.m, for the sum and on
the date If not then sold it will be set up on each succeeding
Friday at same place and during the same hours until sold Full partieu-

me.
NORMAN

lars on application to

Property:—ALL

with the appurtenances,
Upset price £3,944. 18. 4,
Date of Sale: Friday, 11th July, 1962.

Registration Office,
23rd June, 1962.



0990069000005009900039"
NOTICE
PASSENGERS sailing off

N.S. De GRASSE

June 29th are asked to be |

on board by 2 p.m.
24.6.52——2n.

co, 2.6 an]

UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER | tura: year is6ate 1000"

On Wednesday next,[ sons having a debt aim
28th June at 12.30 pom. her entire lot} affecting the etate of Edward

Jarge dining table, #ideboard,| who died in
recom

of| send in partieulars of their claims d
drawera, Simmons, bedstead & mattress, | attested . pine, Grae

yy} before the 5th day of August, 1952 after

‘ess | which was built in 1946, is the sum of,
THERTY

the} of 10 knots, a gross tonnage of 162,34,

City of} atore room
ir

NILES
JOSEPH ONESIMUS TUDOR (Defendant)
THAT Certain piece or parcel of land situate at Government
Hill in the parish of Saint Michnel and island abovesaid containing b.
urement sixty-six thousand eight hundred ane, ninety square feet or there-
atiouts abutting and bounding on lands of J
Waithe on other lands of the Defendant on a’ road
and on the public road er however else the same may 4











All mate citizens of the Uni States
who attain the age of 18 ee sub-
sequent to July 31, 1952, are required
to register upon the day they attain the
eighteenth anniversary of day of
their birth, or within five days there-





monga, Rb which has oe ‘ —_ Soe is made Ur UP

For f . making bagasse paper since 1939. © ely bres
‘aceetioan ‘Cuneta Baa jews, he it eae out | tens of ba- not withstand much beating or re-
a wrruees [Oita weal Mopottos a ehieh Gee and “excessive hysretion
a ut a ion of which ting and excessive on.
) Se yURAL esa ae, aomac UL was consumed locally. Paramonga é! whose job

Te oa ereditors holding specialty liens
Hepe Plantation, st. James

TAKE NOTICE that I, the Owner, ‘of
the above Plantation am about ta ab-
tain a loan of £300 under the provis-
ions of the abeve Act the said
the Agricul-

Plantation, in
No money has been borrowed under
the Agricultural Aids Ach, 1905, or
the above Act (as the case may be’ in
respect of such year.
Dates this 25th day of June 1952
SYBIL J. ROCK,
Owner.
25... 52 —3n





NOTICE

Re: Estate of
EDWARD SINCLAIR FIELDS,
deceased
NOTICE is hereby gtven that atl per-
i nm or
Fields late of the pariah of Saint PhO
Island on the 10th 4

af October, 1 are harete required to

to the
Messrs. Hutchinson
tors, James Street,

igned in care of
& Banfield, Solici-
Brigdetown, on or

which date we shall proceed to distribute
the assets of the estate among the parties
entitled thereto having regard to the
debts and claims only of which we shall
then have had notice and that we shall
not be liable for asseta go distributed
te amy person of whose debt or claim
we shall not have had netice at the time
of such

And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their

af May, 1952
TON BROWNE,

lifled Executors . of the
of EDWARD SINCLAIR
Deceased

30.5.52—4n

ed the 29th da:





Matcibutea to any person of whose
debt or claim we shall not have fad
notice at the time of such distribution,

And all persons indebted to the said
Estate are requested to settle their
accounts without delay.

Dated this 9th d of June 1952, |

VETIAN VERONA BURKE,
WHEYMAN ARNETT GRIFFITH,
Qualified Executors of the Estgte of
George Duncan Albert Burke,

Deceased.
10.6. 62—4n,

BARBADOS

IN THE COLONIAL COURT OF
ADMIRALTY

Phe Owners of the Steamship
“Amakura”

va
The Motor Vessel “T.B. Radar’
Her eargo and freight



















sum not less than the appraised value
MOTOR VESSEL, T. B. RADAR”

now at anchor in Carlisle Bay, Bridge-

town, with its fittings. Particulars of

the Inventory of the said Vessel can be

seen on application

The appraised value of the Vessel,

FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS
It is fAtted with an Internal combustion
Diesel Engine, has an estimated speed

a register tonnage of 116.12, a iength
of 108 feet, a breadth of 20 & 3/10 feet
and a depth of 10 feet. The length of
the Engine room is 24 feet
The accommodation consists of 2
passengers’ roems with 4 beds each,
sailors’ rooms for 6, cooks’ accommoda-
tion for 2, Boatswain's locker and
further particulars and
ments for ih fa apply to
T. HEADLEY
Marshal in Admiralty
Provost Marshal's Office 25.6 satin

arrange-























(PlaintifY)

admeas-

Roberts on kinds of Lilian
to the publie read
and bound together

. c.

H. WILLZAMS

WANTED FOR CASH

USED
POSTAGE STAMPS

Of the British West Indies,

Good Prices Paid. At The

CARIBBEAN STAMP

SOCIETY, 3rd Floor, No. 10,
Swan Street.

23.6.52—6n

_—

(CAAA APPAR AATTATIPTDPTPPPTTAA o

paper ba
rtons.

Grace sugar plantation at Para~

Peru to the .
monga r bags w

ae seein 8 as entirely
trend towards

use of paper for oar epee, Mr
Rentzel disclosed. ?
















cane plantation, the Paramo:
paper mill has succeeded in 7
creasing producti













gs, wrapping paper and
All these were made at the

A trial shipment of sugar from

United States in Para-
eee a future
increased

“Most industrial sugar users
prefer paper to cotton because of

the absence of lint contamination
in paper and the Ramee protection
against ca

whic f-
fords.” he explained. me

Employing the huge bagasse re-
sources of a 14,000-acre sugar

ion more than

00 per cent in its first twelve

or. = operation. Fa output
roduc

about 3,000 to tons. 2 woe

try’s shops.

The process consists first of
washing and screening the bagasse
to remove the pithy material,
cooking the remaining fibrous
pulp for the time required to pro-
duce distinct paper types, and
lastly refining to the degree most
suited for the production of the
various grades,

When it was first introduc
Paper made from was =
garded somewhat sceptically. But
gee stood up well to the test of

An independent expert, report

|
|

recent years the company has con-
centrated on four separate types.
The mills can now esters Se ba-
gasse paper as fine ad

ngineers,

it has been to select refining
equipment and set u
turing procedures,
guided accordingly.
methods of refining have had to
be weighed against paper charac-
teristics to assure economical pro-
duction of satisfactory qualities at
maximum ‘speeds.

Now the company has found
that there is more world-wide in-
terest than ever before in its ba-
gasse paper products, because of
the uncertain supplies of the more
traditional types of paper. That
is why the company has been per-
suaded to increase its plans for
bagasse paper production.

manufac-
been

—B.U.P



RATES OF EXCHANGE

a

and eet. worry
and lel hey

sgt en

eats a

Soot

wees Sere: ee stants By
and nie ill is ules ly mate you fe ‘ou fi ¢

new. Under the money-back guarantee
Cystex mush qe ttaty completely or cost

ystex fro! yr



GLASS

- AND CHROMTUM ries FITTINGS

| OB SAME.

THE CENTRAL EMPonIUM

Corner Broad and Tudor Streets






JOHN
Roebuck Street




o

°

arrangement.

POSSESSES

THIS Is 1 TO NOTIFY. OUR CUSTOMERS
AND THE GENERAL PUBLIC THAT WE
CLOSE FOR STOCK-TAKING ON JUNE
30TH, 1952

ga Customers Are Asked to Co-operate

D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.

FOR SALE

“TRINITY COTTAGE”

Derricks (on sea-side) St. James

Three Bedroom Stone House, with usual conveni-
ences, fully furnished or without furniture. Standing
on 3 roods and 10 perches. Immediate possession.
Mortgage can be arranged.

For further particulars ‘Phone 2959. The Barbados
Import & Export Co., Ltd. Plantations Building.





Dial 4335




6:6

Inspection invited by

25.6.52—5n.

LL LLLEESSSS SEES LESSEE LSD



From Barbados Arrives Southampton
*“DE GRASSE” +. 29th June, 1952 .. 9th July,
% “COLOMBIE” 13th July, 1952 .. 25th July, 1962
y *“DE GRASSE” :. 6th Aug., 1952 16th Aug, 1952
> *Sailing direct to Southampton

SCLC LLCCLLL LPP LCE PPT

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1952
LT

GOVERNMENT NOTICES



AMENDMENT

‘LEASE OF AGRICULTURAL HOLDINGS AT SEAWELL

Persons desiring to lease one of the seven agricultural holdings
at Seawell, Christ Church, in accordance with the prescribed condi-
tions of lease should apply in writing to the Director of Agriculture,
Department of Agriculture, Bridgetown, not later than the 5th of
July, 1952. Persons whoc may have applied previous to the publication
of this notice will need to apply afresh as set out above.

2. Copies of the statement of conditions of lease may be seen
at the District Agricultural Stations and at the Head Office of the De-~
partment of Agriculture, Bridgetown. No applicant will be considered
who is unable to comply fully with the conditions of the lease.

22.6.52—3n,

THE BARBADOS REGIMENT
NOTICE

BY
LIEUT-COL, J. CONNELL, O.B.E., E.D.,
Commanding, The Barbados Regiment.
Officers’ Mess Meeting ene te
The Commanding Officer has directed that there will be na
Officers’ Mess Meeting on Saturday 26 June 52.
Parades

The next Regimental Parade will be held on Thursday 3 July, 52,
at 1700 hours, Further details will bh e published later.

M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major.
S.O.LF. & Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment.





St. Ann’s Fort,
24 June, 51.
25.6.52.—2n.

SHIPPING NOTICES

ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO.

SAILING FROM EUROPE







“4

The will

accept an. ‘and Passengers for
Dominica, ee Antigua, Mon\

\tserrat,

M.S. â„¢Mth 1962. Nevis and St. Kitts.
M.S. aaa at a Sailing to be notified.
8.8. COPEICA “aech Hity 1052, The M/V. “MONEKA"
M.S. NESTOR ase July 1952. accept Cargo and veesgnaee
SAHANG TO EUROPE Dominica, Antigua, tserrat,
M.S. QRANJESTAD 15th J 1962. Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Fri-
SAILING TO T'DAD, PARAMARIBO day, 27th inst.
AND BRITISH G A ss “
M.S. BONAIRE 30th June, 1952. The M/V. “CACIQUE | DEL
M.S lth July, 1952 CARIBE” will accept sar a si
S.8. COTTICA 28th July, 1982. eas %
M.S 1962,

bat aay Sth August.
TO TRINIDAD & CURAC.
SPIGERBORG 28th June,
(Trinidad only)
S. HERSILIA

y
























ante ee w th we af ha- Selling ’ ee Buying M S*° marta Pe a 6 : .
3 .
oo fae ae increas precee aes NEW YORK 8. P. MUSSON, 4 SON © 00. San
‘i Cheques on
eT iw = 1940, bai sce ac- Bankers 1 WO
per cen Soe otal ~
i nace eee oye See” “| ATARRISON LINE
Today,” the figure is nearer me per h Sion Currency Hd 2/10%
oupens A i"
Certain ty: of 50% Silver 2%
naprencint “tea Aebakee: ah as | Oeawana -
. aes from 100 per cent ba- L onnpety is a sie
man rafts
foe O's ee ne ee vanes Sidite Brett 78 4/10% OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
tsgrid percent Dogme pap. "|" Sauna ws 20% Vessel. From Leaves «Due
" e s 1
a $ SH Blew | Soe na Barbedos.
newsprint wo, lesan Peruvlan SS. “PHILOSOPHER” London and
pers. si ins
duty bags to the counts eavy- f i M/brough 14th June @8th June
cement, mineral LB , S.S. “TACOMA STAR ... Liverpool 2ist June 6th July
tries, They sup ot Lad aha S.S. “HERDSMAN” «... London 5th July 30th July
ping paper for use in the oe SS, “STATESMAN” .. Liverpool 12th July 27th July

—>

HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM



Vessel. For Closes in Barbados.
S.S. “CROFTER” .- London 23rd June
S.S. “TRADER” .«.. Liverpool 28th June
S.S. “WANDERER” «Liverpool 28th June
For further information apply to

DACOSTA & CO., LTD,—Agents

¢ (Canadian National Steamships







on the recent shi fe wie. sm, Biadter tects
VTound that new 80UTBBOUND Geils Sails Sails Arrives
bat climaated'comtver-| SEA VIEW GUEST epee, Se SEE Re
cial 1 LADY NELSON ‘ @June 12 June 4 June 23 June 23
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a of =
stances, a. a Gua cian HOUSE LADY RODNEY .... ., 11. July 14 16 July a3 July 38 Jute
ec bags were used, was mini- ‘TINGS, BARBADOS
overall” strength, a : thick Daly and Longer Rates NORTHBOUND Arrives Salle Artives Arrives Asrives
pyar sacks was greater than that = “a ~_ - Bides B'dos 8. John Bosten Halifax asntren!
Corruga’ ‘containers made of welcome. ent ee ay & July 19 July 22 July

asse i inne! Cocktail . 7 ly 19 Jub 26 July 2% July 1 Aug.
ve flak onan by opie oes : NaNSTRUCTOR 24 i 29 a 5 Aug. 8 Aug. 10 Aug.
mere that , & were “the most J. H. BUC LADY RODNEY TAug. 9 Aug. 19 Aug. 20 Aug. 28 Aug.

highly satisfactory r our com- Proprietor, cenaunsanprsitanmenmnninanesinguinicnivieiarintn ate
pany has ever handled.” CPOC6SG6SSS990S0060660" | por further particulars, apply to—
399900900800009000000000000000000005290565965"--", $ E
Of interest to GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD.—Agents.
JOINERS & CABINET MAKERS
‘We have an assortment of

ee)
CG TRANSATLANTIQUE

Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica









From Southampton Arrives Barbados

*““DE GRASSE .. 4th June, 1952 16th June, 1952
“COLOMBIE” .. 19th June, 1952 2nd July, 1952
*““DE GRASSE” -. 12th July, 1952 24th July, 1952

*Not calling at Guadeloupe
SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE



















FOR SALE
LYNCHBURG

oth Avenue. Belleville.

An Attractive and Well Proportioned 2 Storey House situated
on a corner site of 12,050 square feet. Contains 3 galleries (1
enclosed), large drawing room, dining room, study, modern
kitchen, 3 bedrooms, garage, etc. Offers considered.

JOHN M. BLADON & CO.

AF.S., F.V.A.
REAL ESTATE AGENTS



















NES LS. OP

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, i952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE

3 PAGE NINE



HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON

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in 24 Hours

Tt is no longey necessary to suffer
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alias ee empaths
SOMETHING ABOUT
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ANO INSURANCE

MONEY... GUT

MARK~1 SAVY THAT WOMAN
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| AND THEN | HEARD

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~ oat. ee aN A v
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eee iane fa | - CS ke) % 4 Be kind to your face











POSSB9FOIS 6S SS BH
PAIN
COMES WITH






Usgiass To Buy the loveliest Cold Cream to cleanse and cherisn |



N

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your complexion unless you also use the gentlest of tiisues to ‘
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Don't scomr your abiicate skin. There's no need. Pond’s soft S
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and save you hours of washing und ironing. Destroy
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SACROOL







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Y EARTHLING IN HIS BRAIN SHOULD ht /

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=: ——. we sae —
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SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Hranches Tweedside,
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R
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THE COLONNADE GROCERIES
The Place Where Your Dollar Goes Further

la

BRINGING UP FATHER











Alice in Andersen's
Wonderland Fairy

For successive generation of children, the magic Tales

vi Lewis Carroll’s pen has brought to life a host of
fascinating characters from the world of fantasy. The
Mad Hatter, the Mock Turtle, and the White Rabbit
are only a few of the names from the cavalcade of
endearing, wholly believable madcap characters
moving so joyously through the pages of Alice in



Wonderland. Here is a new edition of the Fairy Tales which have
enthralled children for many years, It aia:
m1. ; ee . ; at have bec » ¢ rel} m-— ittle
This new edition has been especialiy created to the stories that ‘have become so well known -— bittle
Git ie need of the young eer” G. 'W. Backhouse Ida’s Flowers, The Swincherd, The Emperor's New
1as given an artistic interpretation which lacks noth- Clothes, The Constant Tin Soldier, The Flying Trunk,
oon TT] ing of sympathy, humour or ingenuity. The large “te
; a — =e : p\ ri leaf size makes for a satisfying book, gives a clear
| \ So — ef ; > ws fl 2 PW @ voadable page, and allows for the inelusion of a a This book which is enhanced with many charming
Sw —— (i> — FY , \ number of attractive line drawtnfoe-curely a worthy illustrations in black and white and eolour, eannot
a wf. Lelk = ae MOT secu} | ee sabaaieille te tin addition to any child’s bookshelf, fail to delight every child who possessea 11

BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

ahve UR BREATA TILL ON SALE AT. o%

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

STAND UP, SARGE ye NONE GOT | b- ge DUE! ; a4 ie RE NOT SAFE YET?
BROAD STREET





} 5

LLP LE LELLP LIDS VORESILIS LELIELPPE A AAPA 2

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KNIGHTS LTD. }



PR PPOOOPOV PPS LDEDPPDPOOSPPPODP PO LOGIODP DPLBE VND HOY





@
}
>
&
©

[AOE SCOR D824





PAGE TEN



England Win Second Test By Eight Wickets| WHEN ~

- Batsmen

—$—$$__—__——.

Take 45

Minutes To Score 37

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, June 24.

Only a handful of spectators
admitted free of charge at Lord’s
saw England complete the form-
ality of victory over India _ by
eight wickets in the Second Test
today. It took 45 minutes to
score the 37 needed and the pro-
cess cost Peter May his wicket.
He was caught at deep square leg
trying to finish the match with a
six.

Play this morning was inter-
minably dreary and reminded one
of the first day of the Test with
everything at stake rather than
the last with victory just round
the corner.

Although defeat for England
was out of the question Mankad
and Ghulam Ahmed attained an
undoubted moral victory over the
batsmen, They dropped the ball
right on a length and runs came
very sedately in ones and twos
with just an occasional four.

Mankad as fresh as when play
first began on Thursday made one
or two lift disconcertingly and
Hutton twice had difficulty in
withdrawing his bat from balls
which whipped right across his
body. The pitch was taking spin
for the first time and one couldn't
help feeling that had not India’s
batting again broken down in the
middle order as it did yesterday
that this game could have had a
much different ending. Even this
undoubtedly strong England bat-
ting side would have had difficulty
in making 200 to-day.

But that was what might have
been. Returning to what was,
the proceedings were brought to
a merciful close by Compton
sweeping Ghulam Ahmed for
four. And now England are
dormie two.

The man of the match of course
was Mankad. He eclipsed even
Len Hutton and Godfrey Evans
and Evans did well goeug by
scoring a century end claiming his
hundredth victim behind the
stumps.

But it was Mankad, Mankad all
the way. There never seemed to
be a moment when he wasn’t
actively concerned in the game.
He, Hazare and Ghulam Ahmed
are well up to Test standard. But
there are a lot of shortcomings
in this India team mainly in the
pace attack and the middle bat-
ting. It is hardly likely that
Ramchand and Phadkar will find
an extra yard at*this stage in the
season but it is possible for bats-
men such as Adhikari, Umrigar
and Phadkar to show improved
form and they'll need to if India
are to win their first Test in this
country.

Once again Len Hutton has had
a successful match as England’s
captain, If there was one criti-
cism to offer it was that he didn’t
bowl Compton sufficiently. With
five other recognized bowlers in
the side it wouldn't however be
fair to pursue that point too far.

His century in the first innings
too was a good enough answer to
those who suggest that cap-
taincy worries might affect his
play.

If England are to make any
changes for the next Test at Man-
chester beginning July 17 it is
likely to be in the spin depart-
ment. Roley Jenkins couldn't hit
a length at Lord’s and leg spin-
ners who cannot find a mark are
expensive luxuries. Roy Tatter-
sall of Lancashire may join Laker
as another off spinner of if he is
fit Ikin who bats left handed and
also bowls leg breaks may be the
choice. This was probably the
selectors’ original intention for the
Lord’s game but Ikin had to with-
draw because of back trouble and
hasn't played cricket since.

SCOREBOARD
INDIA—First Innings
Mankad be Caakye tay vs oa ee
Hazare (not out) Sad We + ee
Trueman four for 72.
"235

INDIA—Second tnnings
Mankad a : § 184
Trueman four for 110

478
ENGLAND—Pirst Innings a
Hutton » vee hie oe
Evans biele ved y . 104
May : 4
Graveney +e a3
Mankad five for 196.
537
ENGLAND—Second Innings
Mutton {not out) ae 39
Simpson run out sat 2
May ec Roy b Ghulam Ahmed 26
Compton tnot cut) 5 sisthge 4
tras, . . 8
Tota! (for two wickets) . 79
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oa. M R. We
Ghulem Ahmed 3.2 9 31 1
Hazare 1 1 0 0
Ramchand ; 1 0 5 0
Mankad ee derek? O6 12 5 0

Surrey Head
Table With
104 Points

{From Qur Own Correspondent)
LONDON, June 24,
Winning their eighth county

championship match of the season
against Kent at Blackheath to-
day Surrey have opened up a 20
point lead at the top of the table.
They now have 104 points and
are followed by Middlesex who
were beaten by their bogie team
Somerset. In third place are
Yorkshire, four points behind
Middlesex as a result of their vic-
tery over Leicester.

Essex game. with Lancashire
, resulted in a tie—the second of
the season,
Scoreboard

Surrey beat Kent by nine wieck-
ets. Surrey 346 ang 72 for one,
Kent 217 and 200.

Somerset beat Middlesex by 54
runs, Somerset 213 and 94, Mid-
dlesex 201 and 52; (Hazell six for
16).

Yorkshire beat Leicester by 73
runs. Yorkshire 307 and 193 for
nine declared, Leicester 245 and

Gloucester beat Glamorgan by
27 runs. Gloucester 284 for nine
declared ang 218 for three de-
clared, Glamorgan 166 and 309.

Derby beat Northants by eight
wickets. Derby 399 and 84 for two,
Northants 115 and 367.

Sussex beat Oxford University
by five wickets. Sussex 305 and
304 for five, Oxford 384 for nine
declared and 223 for nine de-
clared.

Essex versus Lancashire tied.
Lancashire 266 and 226 for seven
declared, Essex 261 and 231.

Warwick versus Cambridge
University: match drawn, War-
wick 138 and 382 for five declar-
ed, Cambridge 290 for nine de-
clared and 183 for eight.

Worcester versus Notts: match
drawn, Worcester 450 for eight
declared and 12 for no wicket,
Notts 474,



HUGHES SCORES
CENTURY

Mr. Ronnie. Hughes, batting for
Combermere against Lodge at
Combermere on Saturday scored
124 runs to enable Combermere to
score 218 runs in their first in-
nings against Lodge. :

Mr. Hughes hit 16 four in his
124 runs and was always at ease
against the Lodge bowling. He
went in at number three in the
Combermere batting order.

RT

WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Original Jurisdiction
10.00 a.m.

Police Courts and Petty Debt
Court—10.00 a,m,

Meeting of Chamber of Com-
merce—2.00 ‘p.m.

Mobile Cinema, Lowthers
Plantation Yard, Ohrist
Chureh—7.30 p.m.

Lecture by Mr. L. T. Gay,
District Inspector of
Schools, at Belmont
Church—7.30 p.m.

Police Band Concert at Bos-
cobel, St. Andrew--7.45

p.m.
Discussion at Barbados Press
Club—8.00 p.m.





coveweeneeteienacnecentisnncslisie

THE WEATHER
REPORT

YESTERDAY

Rainfall from Codrington:
.83 in.

Total rainfall for month to
date: 3.80 ins.

Highest Temperature: 84.5 °F

Lowest Temperature: 74.5 °F

Wind Velocity: 10 miles per
hour

Barometer: (9 am.) 20.987,
(3 p.m.) 29,932

TO-DAY

5.45 a.m.

Sunset: 6.18 p.m.

Moon; New, June 22

Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

High Tide: 4.25 a.m., 6.14 p.m.

Low Tide: 11.26 a.m., 11.23
p.m,



Sunrise:










= POPPING
BOWLING CREASE
CREASE

BARBADOS



--->

(Five F

© i ‘in > ESA Sn pe fem — ae ee eae cat mot Ma ms

THIS WILL ILLUSTRATE LAWS ‘7.8-9

(THE PITCH

ADVOCATE





WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1952









>



he




POPPING
CREASE




Know Your Cricket—sws z, « « 9

Three laws are discussed today
and these cover, The Pitch, The
Wickets and The Bowling and
Popping Creases.

These laws are really non con-
troversial and wiil cali for small
comment from me.

LAW 7-——THE PITCH

The pitch is deemed to be the
area of the ground between the
bowling creases, five feet in width
on either side of the line joining
the centre of the wickets, Before
the toss for innings the executive
of the grounds shall be responsi-
ble for the selection and prepa-
Fation jof the pitch; thereafter
the umpires shall control its use
and mintenance. The pitch
shall not be changed during a
match unless it becomes unfit for
play end then only with the con-
sent ef both captains.

WIDTH

The width of the pitch which
is ten feet, since it extends five
feet on either side
joining the centre of the wickets,
is intended for turf wickets.
The width of an artificial pitch,
matting is the only one we know,



By O. S. COPPIN

is that of the playing surface of
course.
LAW 8—THE WICKETS

The wickets shall be pitehed
opposite and parallel to each
other at a distance of 22 yards
from stump to stump. Each
wicket shall be nine inches in
width and consist of three stumps
with two bails on top. The stumps
shall be of equal and sufficient
size to prevent the bill from pass-
ing through, with their tops 28
inches above the ground. The
bails shall be 4%, inches in length,
and when in position on the top
of the stumps, shall not project
more than 4% inch above them.

Notes t. this law included in
several editions, discourage the
use of stumps with metal fittings,
It is claimed that they are a
source of danger.

RECOMMENDATIONS

They recommend that the tops

of the stumps be dome-shaped

of the line except for the bail grooves.

T shall mention later in_ this
series a specific rule dealing with
the conditions for the “wicket
being down” as they relate«to



Banned Golfer Gets

Cash

By FRANK ROSTRON

LONDON.

A subscription has been started
by Sandy Lodge Golf Club for
its new professional, 27-year-old
Scot Eric Brown, who won the
recent £500 Penfold Tournament
first prize,

The money, according to sec-
retary Tan M. Lucas, is for
Brown’s expenses in the British
Open Championship,

But it will enable members to
sympathise wth Brown on losing
five years on tournament golf
because of a Professional Golf-
ers’ Association rule,

The P.G.A. bars a golfer from
becoming a full professional for
five years, He cannot take part in
tha big tournaments under P.G.A.
control during that time.

Secretary Lucas says with
official correctitude: “The sub-
scription will mark our appreci-
ation of Brown’s successful start
here.”

But his younger brother, P. B.
“Laddie” Lucas, Sandy
Lodge record-holder, says:

“It would be fair to describe
this subscription as a note of
sympathy for Brown for the five
lost tournament years of his life,
and as an unspoken protest
against the ludicrous P.G.A,
closed-shop rule,”

Boost

professional immediately after.

The P.G.A. could not prevent
him going to Switzerland last
year, winning the Swiss cham-
pionship and finishing in the first
three of the French, Italian,
Belgian and Dutch championships.

But their rule could and did
prevent his playing for Britain
in the Ryder Cup team, so heavi-
ly beaten by the Americans,

Commander R. C, T, Roe, hon
secretary of the Professional
Golfer’s Association, defends the
embargo like this:

1. This is not only a British
rule, It is the rule of every
P.G.A, in every country,

2. In every profession there
are embargoes, apprentice-
ships and examinations to
make people learn their
jobs,

3. It is essential for a good golf
professional to learn rou-
tine club-making and do
all the petty jobs connected
with it.

4. We have 200 fully quali-
fied but unemployed golf
pros in Britain. Why let
youngsters like Brown
overcrowd?

Erie Brown, in his dry Scottish
manner, closes the debate with
the pay-off comment:

“Ah, well, the P.G.A. members

Brown at 21, won the Scottish don’t like newcomers taking the

Amateur Championship, turned

Rifle Shooting

At last Saturday’s practice of
the Small Bore Rifle Club in spite
of unusual strong and gusty wind
members were able to obtain some
very good scores.

The following are the scores re-
corded :—~



HLP.S
100
Major J. E. Griffith........ ie, OR



Mr, 'T. A; L. Roberts.,..u. 98





M. G. Tueker 97
R. Edghill ........ 4: 88
K. S. Yearwood....... 96
Py TORNBON, s,s. 95
M. A, Brown. 95
R. O. Brown... 93

money. Mebbe I'll feel like that ~

myself when I’m older.”



DO’S AND DON’TS

FOR CAREFUL
DRIVERS

DO keep your windscreen —
and your conscience — clear.
DON'T leave your car or
motor cycle where it will cause
dunger or obstruction.



The next practice will be on |

Wednesday night June 25th, 1952.
Members are reminded that they
have to put in four cards to qualify
for the next Spoon Shoot.

They'll Do It Every Time tet 5 te By Jimmy Hatlo









EDDAR’S FRAU FLOTILLA WA'
Gus OSE TO GET HIM SPRU
FROM THE HOSPITAL >>>

WEL-L.s+
OPERATIONS OFA! \~(_ =O PREFER

ONLY REST Ee
erie y fai
CAN'T

DOCTOR





S EVER Ves INDEED“ THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE
NG HOME / AS THE FELLA SEZ( HOWEVER
THE FELLA WHO SAID IT AINT CHEDDAR ++)





,



















MEN DON'T LOAF ON THE
JoB! THE KIDDIES WiLL
KEEP COMPS!




fe, ee
{ 4 BLOW
} THANXANO" Jato
i OF THES

} ~

|

the bails but at this stage I think
I ean safely mention without
leading to any confusion that in
a high wind the captains may
agree, with the approval of the
umpires, to dispense with the
use of bails.

LAW 9—THE BOWLING AND

POPPING CREASES

The bowling crease shall be in
line with the stumps; 8 feet 8
inches in length; with a return
crease at each end at right angles
behind the wicket. The popping
crease shall be marked 4 feet in
front of and parallel with the
bowling crease. Both the return
and popping creases shall be
deemed unlimited in length.

IN HIS GROUND

Here again I shall come later
in the series to a Law which sets
out the circumstances in which
a batsman can be deemed “In or
out of his ground” but here I
can draw to the attention of
my readers that a batsman must
have some part of his bat or per-
son grounded inside the popping
crease to be deemed to be within
his ground.





Umpires’
Association
Holds Meeting

The Barbados Umpires’ Associ-
ation held a meeting on Monday
last at the Challenor Stand and
received the report of the Commit-
tee appointed to draft Rules for
the Association, Present were
Messrs. J. M. Kidney (Chairman),
B. de L. Inniss and W. F, Hoyos,
of the Umpires’ Committee of the
B.C.A. Umpires attending were:
Messrs. J. H. Walcott, H. B, de C.
Jordan, L. H. Roach, T. Sisnett,
W. Harewood, R. Parris A. Parris,
K, Quintyne, C. Batson, F. ‘Trot-
man, S. Gilkes, Cc. W. E. Archer
end K. Sealy.

After the Chatyman had spoken
on the aims and objects of the
Barbados Umpires’ Association,
the meeting considered the draft
Rules. The Secretary of the Bar-
bados Cricket Association was
asked to summon a General Meet-
ing of the Umpires’ Association
for Monday 30th June when the
Rules of the Association will be
formatly adopted. The election of
a President, Vice-President, Hony.
Secty.-Treasurer and a Committee
of Management wil lalso take
place,

Copies of the draft rules will be
circulated among the umpires and
the Chairman appealed to mem-
bers to make an effort to turn out
in full strength at the General
Meeting.



S. Leonards Centenary
SOCIAL & DANCE

GOODWILL LEAGUE
SHED

FRIDAY JUNE 27th
9 p.m, to 3 a.m.
Admission 2/-
Good Orchestra,
Refreshments on Sale
24.6.52—3n.





The West Indies Cricket Board
of Control, at their General Meet-
ing, accepted an invitation from
the Canadian Cricket Associa-
tion to send a West Indies team
to Canada during the summer cf
1953 to play a series of matches
lasting seven weeks. The W.I.
Board, at the request of the

Canadian Cricket Association,
has submitted the cost of this





















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busily occupied making arrange-
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the Indian team in January next.
It is likely that India may play
a tournament against Pakistan
from October to December, 1952,
causing a delay of some two
weeks of the preposed tour to
the West Indies. This has neces-
situated submitting two probable
itineraries to the Board of Con-
trol for Cricket in India which
will affect the duration of the
tour to these parts.

It will be appreciated that the
W.I. Board has to act very care-
fully in view of the heavy ex-
penditure involved in bringing
out the Indian team. The estima-
ted cost is likely to exceed
£30,000 and the question of travel
by ship or air still has to be de-
cided. Present cost is based on
travel by ship.

Leading West Indies profes-
sionals and amateurs have been
approached by the W.I. Board
and it is hoped that the services
of all the best players will be
available.

Mr. Maurice Green and possibly
Mr. C. R. Browne will represent
the West Indies at the Imperial
Cricket Conference to be held in
London on July 28. The follow-
ing Resolution, passed by the
General Meeting of the W.I.C.B.
of C., will be considered:—

“As a result of the existing
“arrangement whereby Austra-
“lia and South Africa each
“sends a touring side to England
“once in four years, and of the
“fact that the English Counties
“do not desire to receive any
“touring side in the year
“following an Australia visit,
“it transpires that New Zealand
“The West Indies and India
“normally can only send a
“touring side to England once
“in twelve yearsi— Be it
“resolved therefore that this
“Board request the Imperial
“Cricket Conference to use its
“influence to have the period
“for Australian and Soutn
“African visits changed from
“once in four years to once in
“five years, so that opportuni-
“ties for other Member Coun-
“tries to visit England be
“increased to at least twice in
“ffteen years.”

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THINK OF
THE FIT

AND







ERNIES
DEMOCRATIC
CLUB

Ernies wishes to remind
his friends to keep to-mor-
row night open as_ there
will be a meeting to discuss
the problems of the first
day’s races of the Trinidad
Summer meeting,










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onty $65.00



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Chicken Pelew, Peaches

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and Pear Melba.

Cc. B. Rice's

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Full Text

PAGE 1

HI ONfcSDAY. JUN6 tt. i*U BARBADOS AtiVtH A I I HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLtNT OF THE FLYING SQUAD ... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE OAVIES AWK/ ££r, r>-^7 ivo**-w I 1 sow?'s ***LV TMlf IWI^V.'^; .. ^] ^S.VC #V&!/*' v *_ %  ** **•*-• C44 %  vCt /. WWDO VOt BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS &JJ ZJ *WBU-WSI_L.' uc %  . %  %  %  'MAGG.E • WS M*V* A %  r C*N PO PC*T HI %  I ALffEADy PA A\ V*T-AND5HiSAlO I THVOS .VAT> NCJTHf*/ TJOLC o-uinruir. \ RIP KIRBY ^VN BY ALEX RAYMOND Be kind to your face UIILIU TO at v the loveliest Cold Cream lo caainae ami therMi your oaranent-it unkwa you ilw un On |k of ii.auae to Don't Kr youi oeiioate akin. Thm'i no need. Pwr* oft TWaae Hutic* are *o abaorbern that Ihev will quickly toal, up tht crwm du. ule male-up and all. And ihe> never colUpse into %  VM pieces They'ra inviaj u well at -of! and aUnM&en.. Than arc to man> uaw for Ihea* TMiuaaaU the tuuc'. r..-iv>iti. Ud • %  haakiee. the* are (offer (has the ftoel cambric. and ana you hoen of *aaflin and iron*..IXvu.y i oawe yog hare utod them. Oci a packM today, and keep n haody, 1 You will woadw how you evar manj^tl wtth_oui fond'a I-aeue Hankiea. At all the bM •tome. MOT # THNO AIIOKIIINT Vigour Restored, Glands Hade Young In 24 Hours It la no i"i*ar %  • %  •"•ar' *~ • B M at ija i w a4aMMi'. < -ir* fa**5; a*rt3T*ht. *a*a-*i -' .4g -^ -KU trvtiMaa. •hi. (l.^.vary la la fWaamaL aal laV* laMt farav la •hanlut* %  rnilm d--a "way with eland par 'tnVflanda ana narveV kaw, itch blow and anarr I -!i In M fceura yon tnn a** ard furaa-f frtlrf raungar. Taur a; ;*rk>. you faaf %  ;". ar* fj • itMul Mf-urand power. AM 111* inaiHf M* (land four raatorar. railed VI : %  -i Ir baa baan provad • >na*noa and 1* now dlatr %  lafaeti !" or roonay back VITA: ,-l m.1.. rj fa.1 full of .lam., ; %  rcy and troio 10 te ff* yaara ye** you aaarrly ralurn (I • f ABB road MOe, BM4 3e amaa r' Tabs Maaaaad •-• %  fJi. | 5M#.V coins M//;/ KNOCKS OUT PAIN ON SAIC u .... KNIGHTS LTD. ALL BRANCHES IT PATS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers lo all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday lo Wednesday only SPECIAL OFFKHH an% %  Mnilitblr nl our kCm:i!•<•• %  '.-r M .tt H 7 .n .3(1 ConIrclion*r\ Dyen . 9 .13 Srl Oraniip M'ludc—t-lh .SI Slraubrrry Jam— 2-lh 1.01 HWHI Corn—20-ot ^8 Nw.rl Corn—l-iu. M rmrlien—l(l-o .. $ .40 Ciuavus—.lO-oi JI5 (.nova*—IB-oj. -32 r. .n. ii..... -4 Apriiols—.10-0/. .^ 6 Apricots—li-o. M Orap.-i:iO-M. %  P. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Sti T n r. i • L o %  n \ D E an CHIII Thf'la..-.. H *.•• JVowf Hollar flwaM Fwrrftiwr <• • &f • III Hi ll III'W THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK ft RAY MOORES Alice in Wonderland For successive ({eneration of children, the maRic ji L*wis Carroll's pon has brought to life r, ho of fascinating characters from the world of fanUxy. Th-Mad Halter, the Mock Turtle, and the While Uabbli %  n only a few of the name* from ihe cavalcade of %  ndearinK, wholly believable madcap character!, moving so loyously throuh Ihe pa^es of Alte* in netifmii Thia new edition h.u, been especiaiiv created lo .at ihr need of the younc reader. C. W. Backhouse v'n an artistic interpretation winch lacknoth %  vmpathy. humour or ingenuity. The large te makes for a satisfying book. VrVM a clear readable pap^, and allows for the Inelusion of a large .umber of attractive line drawfhj*')-ltheir 0.\ KALE AT... Andersen's Fairy Tales run W •. nc* edition of lh K.iiry Talfs which have .mlhrellnl childnn lor many v


PAGE 1

PAUL l-Wu BARBADOS ADVOCATK \\l IISI *1>AV. JIM. -... I'.'i-' Qahib tfallmy Barbadian Return. Home M IABOT L. JOHMSON, Barbadian, who THE FOODS TO FANCY BY THE WAY ...By twee-.^ M R. T. GRANT MAJOR. Canf.i.vcrnment Trade .ssioncr for the Eastern Msn with headquarters in %  %  13 night by 'he rVMS.-Ledi/ n nfnr paying a routine visit 10 the colony. He was staying at the Ocean View Hotel. To Further Hi. StuJic, M R. KEITH MELVILLE who (.>en IIJ: optic Mi kcnelfather. the late Dr. Hartourt Carter for the past three left the colony on Monday far England to further his studies' in that respect. He reft by B.W.IA. via Antigua and Puerto Rico for New York where he will travel by BO AC. to London. Keith i> a son or Rev. H. A. Melville Vicar of St Ambrose ami Mrs Melville of '-Aberfoyte", Fifth Ave., Bctlevillc. For New Appointment ] D R AND MRS. L, R HUTSON* were passengers by the Lady IVrlstm on Monday night lor Trinidad. Dr. Hutaon has gone to take up bis new appointment as Deputy Director of Agriculture 1 Animal Husbandry) Hi formerly Chief Veterinary Officer of the Leeward Islands with headquarters In Antigua. Longest Ticket H. J. KBNDRJCK, Sales Executive of the Hercules of England, a-nved from AtiUfcua mi Monday evening b> B.W.I.A. on a week's business visit and is staving at the Ocean View Hotel Kendrtck who left home on In the Reel Estate business In Boa*n. Mas achusetss for the the pact SB year Is now back In Barbados for a holiday. He arrived hare son* weeks ago and will be vm.-lning until the end of Ttus u the time to sun littl %  etmg. Moil of M gaajr 1 .nubably do with .. few %  JM no one uM arom ahowl overweight— i %  %  -. -I. ng at any age is most unwise fcas .'Ppetite, digestion n't "11 may suddenly cease >rte—g I get ill. s 1 mphaaifcd because a figA -. gr *nich charms .3 Daughter Iff g m be*. bu> 1 -HI Its*. C ONOfMTULATIONl Id Mr j^., and Mrs, John Klrton OR the Certain alkali:.e foods courrtetMrth of a daughter on Monday mri .. %  it if*. II i-idity which beauty . inid 1st by giving indigestion, outAhove all. -ivoid 1 hotoUres artd Mr Johnson was here two years iM when he spent two months' He Is staying with hi* • latrves In Weatbury Road. take the edge appetite is *o eat gale. Educate your %  the foort' voti at Dr. Bayley's Hospital. %  and babe are doing well. cccuntnnt, Barclay* Bank A MONG the passengers arriving on Saturday by B.W.I.A. rroii St Kills were Mr. and Mrs it L. ( Albert who are lntranslt MR AND VMS IKWlls I. \|. JOHDW M H k .tarried At St. Patrick's Enjoyed Holiday A MONG tho pasM-ngei.s n-luniSaturUay morning at St. Patrick's Roman Catholic i~Y mg from AnUgua on Monday ( huriii. Jemmott's Lane, the evening by ll.W.I.A wiav Miss wadding took place of SenorUa Agmw Boyce of Meaara. A. 5.. 1-igi* MagaUanes. daughter of Q dee, and son Ltd. and Miss Ifkce Hill of the Singer Sewing LlOU. to 6 on Ids usual business tour 'llano*, and Mr. 1 • Kit to return to England in -' an, son of Mr. an. N jibe*, after cover inn Co, They said that they general public us pretty soon by giving us niao hair and a dull >kin. T'n* besotv foods am Milk. laf vegetables, all fruits Funnily enough, sugary sweet thhu" turn acid in digesttag. ..-! uit Umted Kingdom. They gfbcMM aaur tasting foods such as are staying on until Sunday when lemona, Rrapefruit jnd oranges they leave by the De Groase. turn Online, Vinegar stays aci-l They gge staying at the Hotel (and how 1 Cut ft nul with all Royal. Mr. Gilbert who is an Accountant of Barclays Bank, is on four months' leave which he will be ending in England Back From Dominica R ETURNING by the Lady Nelson on Monday morning I rom Dominica were Dr. and Mrs. Robert Salmond of Bay Mansion who went over for two weeks* holiday. Woman'g Place Discussed Tonight T HE Woman's Place B1 the Modern World will be the sublet', of a dis c u s sion which %  .ill bled oft to-night a] the Barbados Press Club, No. S3. Swan' Street, by the Rev. A. Ram^aran of Trinidad. Members of the Club an,[ the OSSWOR'" %  1 1 • I 1 • %  I 1 r~ 1' other "** % • r,-menl A good way • 1 gi gat bcf.*' •1 tneide paftoto to appreeii need. are underweight, swallow milk galore, em 1 U the t^ and -e a men I and eat bttlc and often. A onsl paled melee is not worktal aa ni 1 ire 'nten-t*-' t to ,r,d neither doeM five H the MBfeeb. Ehcourage nature to do Rg job with I regular morning Vaflt If the noweu are obttfi u aaBareiag ,hem by rotating The tummv Hula girl pushing it out in front and drawing 11 In as you push out behind. Medilld b" avoided if possible . rather try eating lots of the i-.mtv foods containing alkalis. A 'yass of hot water arttn ttst hsjag >f a lemon first thng in the morning Is a great inner cleanser: so. too, is the juice of an orange .t hat time t LIKE my screndst* to lie preiise and to gi^'e pleniy of dctalk. I see thai on A Mssaid that the craters gflOOO were made by 0 %  %  and the faro n.eavfCy or tunnel In rJh i-.-h 2fl mil*. d:cp. Th^t is nenr igaju D lo 'he aenaai m1 Will r.nly .ndn Ml Ofg], „,W*-^J1 teev<^c. 1 %  aggg to detect bat* in '" ... .. ., .... in I he old modh yet, lira, frVwHb mm/ Ihr Cirvm you of this. Moreover, it is pra. ti-mg J deception on youi publu •They all know it's false." 60>d Wugwel) in a smK si doubt ih. >•" " * %  mucn impresaed by the progreej x* "' "O" 01 """ %  Sc" 0 *. Baby Leatuea and ', r,.„f„^T *S -2JS" rP^ff '" ' ""<"' •• Peralong the eultural Unea. To her ^mSSMSm 'iauSu"--""' % % %  %  %  >— %  ;;."',;; ( v ^r "-*• norlda. arrived here on Monday A reception I. .„ .,, 'Angle* morning by B.W.IA. from TrinlBee", atili Av. l,.!k.Ule after During her May here she wa* uad where he had bean 00 u vudt wldch the couple left for the Ihe (tuest of Mr. and Mrs. Jamea in the interest of the 6IA wort Crane 10 spend lhr lioneymeon. Marrhell of Whitehall, St. Philip. 1 He aakl that he bad been Srnorn Junnu Magallanea, p„, TTC R.e.a ame nver for lh.-' -...adinii, u. m an, f. E. C. BETHEI., populiir teyiiig with Mi .MM.. Normal. JV1 |oMl ,„„,,,., Ieft for TH^. I s.„li.l.l. Worthing. ^ „ y B w MT v.y, .,„ MenMr. and Mr.. Jordan will bo g£ "e will attend the T 1 — las, am ma lh. UM H II llndlo 1 Satan. krnheaa 9 l> Bt-pori rroiii I 00 TtiP K-> 1" l-i HSWI Mi.wrt*k Tnlt. 10 3D Hays travelling around the West Indies for elevist years, but had never been to Ba r bados before. Since he had a few days at his disposal, he thought it would be nit* to fcpend them here and ace what the island WN like. having on Saturday fur Caracas. Buflrtner Meet On Vacation Mr. Jordan, an employee in the Pnrtor Calkins expect* to leave Truffle Department of B.W.IA., tpmoTTOw for Puerto Rico where ftM |. n transferred to a .--insllar _^_ „ _ . __. t „ he will remain for about a ssaek port m Caracas. M" S 0a B (Boo-buh) Thompbefore gouig on to Miami and + v ". daughter of Mr. and Mexico In Puerto Hleo he a-ud Conduetiag Services -. Uonel Oittttis. Snr ...s back *hat the S.D.A. are bulldtng '" *g Island OB vacation after a three-quarter million dollar Ol'tNDING three months in h ng been away for nine years, (\J,S.) hospital at Mygujii-'which *3 Barbados conductuig meetluasj thi last live of which were spent in r.hould be rornplrted In nnottqer tor the Baptist Churches are Rev. U S A During her sUy hf^ijm two months. Jack Parker and Rev. George wH be the guest of Mr .and %  Starling from Tenn>see, norlda. Rorei First Since 1938 M RS SARAH HINE. aunt of Antigua Mr. Frank Morgan of Club Morgan, arrived from Bermuda "VeeH on Monday by the Lady Nelson for two weeks' holiday which she will be spending as the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Morgan. T^r^ved hr !" W'en-tlyo7 ^more Rock. Mrs Th-^ I1.WI.A, via Puerto Rico and "" ri M !" cu,rk ar te eP ' Antigua and are staying with ,., D ._a,*t. Rev and Mrs. Wayne Divine of Traveiling RcpreeenUtlve U-nia-, Navy aardens. R c N YOU NGHUSBAND. Also in Barbados Is Rev. EF. IVL Overseas Travelling RepnaM.icMlllan, Suporlntctidont Of ntni t've of James Ruchanan and Baptist Churches in Si. Luda. O A resident of New York. Mrs. I lline hat been staying In Ber' mudu for the past few months. I TWa la her fltst visit here since 1MB Ltd. of London and Glasgow. arrived yesterday morning by proprisgora of Black and White gfn e /-adp Nelson accompanied by Whiskey, left for Trinidad on s son Daniel and will be spendMonday evening by B.W.IA. ...g two weeks Maying with Rev. after spending a week here on K Hanson of Two MUs hit nines*. He wss staying at the Ilill. Murlne Hotel. jVeir Shipment . LADIES' UNDERWEAR BRIEFS. HANTltS. VI >TS. SLIPS, & NltiHT DRESSES AIMOI.A SHOES LADIES HIGH OBADE, IN' RED. Bl ACK. URGEN & WHITE. AM. IN SMART STYLES. T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL *2W YOUR SHOF STORF.S DIAL 4*I0N i i The Story General Tin Told Hf Said He Wan Once an Elephant — By MAX lid l l "1 WONDER," Mid Ki.arf to his sister Hui.ul and to Mr. Punch. "how it would feel liltto bs—to b—an elephant?" Everyone laughed mhun they h nl !< %  srl -:,y tads, for General Tin and Teddy ihe Stuffed Bear. who were sitting on the orher side .' Hi.liHini. Iir.ini it (CKI "Y-m'd fdcl -Hnrmmi"." said TedBut {;enets! Tin nidi "He, you wouldn't feel ennrninm at all, my boy. In fact. \ DV'd f*l 1 <|ihte nmsll." "I wmilil'" said Knarf in aurpilse. "How dn yi.u know. (JcTH-rnl. how SD elephant feel*?" Hanid asked. llpnvral Tin lowered his voles. %  Once," ho MM, "1 • %  an eleIiliant." (lul) s llrrsm MUM..." MM QtnfNl Tin. **lt V I dt-eani. Or mrtrl-e a ntsgicisn chsnged IM Kite DM, ml, however ft tl I 'I 1 I a leal live elephant. Ml in Ihe I untie." I sons listened Whlls GentHi Ti'i htld his story. "At first 1 felt enormous, just ss TMj aiy trunk were long. I *aw the aid saw that I had a body a* big y*-ung moon sailing thiuitgh the si %  whol'(oiin snlmsl In th''• Bcanso elephants real n • dy if big ss a whole room. I f*fcfhened of talee. And nnw I arcs among he. and Ittrunk mtved nd out among the Hourl Kven l.arner I felt so small that ainr li inc. I fsm'ied it wss even Inrgrt in I wa.—and I was seirc! with %  t'iffht and ran hcllowlnir into the 1 the jungle !•> hide." Ceneral Tin wnn-^Knarf naidt "I guc** General Tin I i,-, T right sltoat an glehlMhi fc M toOW UM MVOl sssong '.rr:—How would it feel like to bt nru in whhh a whole herd of s moust?" A) Mi 1*1 hte marchpd. And Bat no one answered Knarf For locked it on and rhouglit ihe no one in the room had evi BRITAIN By Ford And a Holiday-uu-Whewls among the highways and byways of the British Isles; with a ZEPHYR or CONSUL to answer your evtfj holiday whimlicensed, insured and with a tankful of gas. ready to go ihe moment you arrive In I-ondon! Please enquire further from Charles MrEnearnev&C.. Ltd. ••*•*••** OB***






avbudoes



ESTABLISHED 1895

Labourites Protest Yalu Bombin

Say Britain Was
Not Consulted

POSITION” —cuHuRCHILL

LONDON, June 24.
LABOUR members of Partiament including their
leader Clement .Attlee protested in Commons to-day that
Britain should have been consulted before 500 United
States planes bombed Yalu River power plants on the
Korean-Manchurian border two nights ago.

Prime Minister Churchill
said the attacks did not ap-
pear to involve any exten-
sive Korean_ operations
hitherto pursued. “So far as
the British Government is
concerned there has been no
change of policy” he added.

Attlee supporting the op-
position” attack said that
while no obligation was laid
down for consultations, in
his experience there had
been consultations at every
point at which political con-
sideration impinged on
military. “Surely this is one
of those occasions where
there should have been full
consultations?” he asked.

Churchill replied: “No
such consultation wiith the
British _ Government has
taken place but we natural-
ly will inform ourselves
upon the whole matter. “We
are in an extremely difficult
and delicate position.

“We are in great difficulty
but it has been entrusted
by the United Nations to
the Supreme Commander of
the United States and I am
not going to be drawn into
saying anything which in
any way will be taken as a
reflection upon that com-
mander or embarrass him
in any action he may think
it necessary to take.” Chur-
chill pror ised the House an



WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1952



Leg. Co. Appro

For Sending Down
‘Unpopular’ Measure

The Legislative Council yesterday
ber of Orders giving effect to the proposals for increases
in salaries attached to certain technical and professional
key pests in the Government Service as well as the salaries
attached to various administrative posts. ”

In contrast to the stormy and prolonged debate on these
proposals in the House of Assembly on Tuesday last week,
there was a quiet atmosphere in the discussions which took
place yesterday in the Council and which lasted for just
over two hours ss against the 11 hours during which the
matter was discussed in the House of Assembly,

Bid To Oust |i 9 oes natt

e this was followed by a further
Rh F exposition by Hon. Mr, H. A, Cuke
ee Ss vas seconded the motion for the

concurrence in the Resolytion
PUSAN, Korea, June 24, |dealing with the Civil Establish-

Opposition National assembly- Iment General Amendment Order,

men continued the boycott of the |Number IV of 1952.
Assembly amid reports that they | Hon
were mapping a_ parliamentary | .
Strategy to repeal two measures
keeping President Syngman Rhee
in office,

Only 86 assemblymen showed |SUch as had ome
up for to-day’s session, six short of | before and ‘while
the necessary quorum. Pro-Rhee jconceding that it was impossibie
assemblymen passed measures |for any Committee to send down
keeping Rhee in office yesterday.
One measure extended Rhee’s everybody, drew
term of office until August 15 and |attention to certain anomalies
the other keeps him on as Presi- reece in relation to “the

The Honourable Colonial Sec-
retary, Mr. R. N. Turner, deliv-
ered a_ lucid address

Massiah and other
Honourable members congratu-
lated the Government for send-
ing down an “unpopular” measure

Dr,



which
the Council,

that

measures’ of the kind Which

could please

dent until a presidential election resyfective salarfes paid to the
is held. headmasters of various First

The measures were pushed ! Grade and Secondary Schools,
through by a handful of pro-Rhee During his reply to the various
assemblymen. Rhee has been try- a
ing to take the presidential elec-
tion out of the hands of the As-
sembly and give it to the people
from whom he would stand a bet-
ter chance of re-election.

The Assembly was to have elect-
ed a new President yesterday to

Secretary informed the Coun?!
that a training scheme “wag very
much in the fore” and expressed
the hope that the proposals set
out in the various Orders, would
be an incentive to officers:

approved of a na

fering from jaundice and will be
confined to his room at Bucking-
ham Palace for several days, ac-
cording to a
bulletin,

wh
covered the various proposals



points raised, the Hon, Colonial,







therefore advised His Royal High-
ness to cancel all immediate

gagements including his projected
visit to Edinburgh’, «

ve Sa



m7

i zhY Moment

' e



RARELY has Princess Margaret
been pictured smoking in public,
but here she puffs a cigaret as she
attends the races at Ascot, Eng-
land. In foreground {s the Duke of

Edinburgh, busband of Queen
Elizabeth 11. (International)

Philip Has

Jaundice

LONDON, June 24,
The Duke of Edinburgh is suf-

palace medical
The bulletin added “we have

ate en—

—UP,

Mossadegh Given

Hero’s Welcome

TEHERAN, June 24,
Premier Mossadegh was given a



tp ene

way’s visit, Last night French police patrolled streets of



lary Increases

Ridgway | Inspects
Troops In Germany
Under His Command

BADEN GERMANY, June 24.

GENERAL MATTHEW B. RIDGWAY, allied supreme
‘ommander in Europe, visited crack French division under
his command. a

In the second day of his three-day tour of 500,000
frontline troops in his Western European Defence force,
Ridgway landed at Lahr Airbase in French zone of Ger-
many. He had flown to Lahr Airport in his private four
engined Constellation from Bueckendag, a base in the
British zone,

He inspected British forees yesterday and said he
found them “fully up to my expectation in every respect.

He said he did not intend to meet any German lead-
ers on this visit to Germany. He said “my first purpose is
to see first hand the commanders who carry great respon-
sibility.” ,

West Germany is the second of N.A.T.O. nations that
Ridgway has visited, He visited Italy last week, Ridgway
was met at Lahr by General Roger Noiret, Commander-in-
Chief of French troops in Germany, and French Ground
and Air Commanders. J

Ridgway said “I am really proud to serve with you,’
He inspected six platoons of the crack French infantry in
blue uniforms with white gloves and leggings. Then he
was driven to Rastatt, 40 miles north of Lahr, to inspect
more French troops. 5

French occupation authorities took special precautions
against possible Communist demonstrations during Ridg-

Baden French occupation headquarters in groups of. four.
The city was heavily guarded.

However, despite efforts to Kast German Communists
to stir up anti-Ridgway demonstrations no disturbances
are reported,

In Paris Ridgway’s headquarters announced that the
Supreme Commander will visit Norway and Denmark
starting June 30. He will sta
July 2. He will visit Denmar
to Paris in late July.—U.P

in Norway from June 30 to
on July 3 and 4 and return



Clark Sends Typhoon Claims
65 Lives In Japan

. TOKYO, June, 24.
The edge of a typhoon hit Japari

Message To

early ~dissue. replace Rhee whose term expires , were sent gbroad for training to
, Labour M.P’s © eo July 15. Meanwhile 200 local /remain in Barbados when they
; " mee’ on councillors who support Rhee} would have returned.
pressing. for an ediate went on “hunger strike” demon-| Imtroducing the measures, the
debate until the uproar stration in Pusan demanding that | son, Colonial Secretary said:— {
bellowed. Reference by Mr. CLEMENT ATTLEE. cae ee nl de iietudintes I
j ; - “ seein a psembly, e€ Inadequacy of con ns
oa leader Aneurin Bevan to § thousands of square miles Police today arrested _ three !service in the upper ranges of the
of territory inside of Manchuria” was drowned in a barrage | members of the anti-Rhee Demo- Barbados Civil Service, by com-
of barracking from government benches. Bevan shouted | cratic Nationalist Party on charges | parison with conditions of ser-
above the din, “if you want to go to war why not say so?” of an “illegal assembly.” The men } elsewhere in the

This brought disapproving shouts from Conservatives
and for several minutes neither Bevan nor Churchill could
be heard as they tried to speak. Leftwinger Sydney Silver-
man contended that “the question of peace or war may
depend on the continuance of these attacks”. i

After the Speaker had asked the House to keep caim,
Churchill said the government had no objection to a debate
tomorrow, though he would prefer to wait a week until
Lord Alexander, Minister of Defence, had returned to
report on his Korean visit. It was up to the opposition to
ask for the debate tomorrow.

Unknown to M.P’s, while the row was going on news
was being flashed from Tokyo that Korean power houses
had received another plastering to-day. And Earl Alexan-
der, Britain’s Defence Minister, was telling reporters in
Washington that even while he was in Korea he had not}
been informed in advance of the Yalu River raid.

Politicians were convinced tonight that the situation
presents a serious threat to continued bi-partisan foreign |
policy of the British Government.—U.P. he

THE YANKS WILL
DO IT AGAIN

By STEWART HENSELEY

WASHINGTON, June 24,
U.S. officials promise another massed air blast of vital
Yalu River power plants on the Korean-Manchurian
frontier if Reds ever succeeded in getting them working
again. They said there was no intention in future to per-
a Communists to restore this source of energy for North
orea.

At the same time Allied officiais here expressed hope
that a huge air attack on plants had convinced the Chinese
and Korean Communists that the United Nations mean
business and it would be well to come to an agreement in
Truce talks at Panmunjom. However, any political or
psychological effects of the bombing were distinctly second-
ary.

r Officials said the bombing, the first against these in-
Stallations in the two years of conflict, was undertaken
purely on military grounds. One high official said “the
Navy has been wanting to do this for a long time.”

Speculation ranged widely. The most frequently ad-
vanced premises were that the attack meant either—(1)
That the United Nations had decided to give up on the Truce
talks, or (2) Was trying to soften up Communist negotiators.

....And They Did It

TOKYO, June 24.

FOUR of five North Korean power houses which were
bombed by more than 500 allied planes on Monday received
another plastering to-day.

The largest of the five—a huge Suiho dam project on
Yalu River near Shantung was one not bombed in the new
air raids. The other four were attacked by nearly 200 heavy
planes from aircraft carriers steaming-off Korea’s east
coast and Air Force fighter bombers from dozens of bases
in South Korea.

The Air Force said F84 Thunderjets “completed the
destruction” of two power stations near Chanjin reservoir
and two on Songchon River near Hamnung. Experts to-day
were still studying films of damage done in Monday’s mass
raids,





—UP.

are important members in power- |

vice provided

hero's welcome when he returned
from the International Court at!
the Hague. Thousands of Iran-



UNITED NATIONS HEAD-
QUARTERS, Korea, June 24,

U.N. Troops |

Caribbean area and in the Colo-
nial Service at large, is not diffi-
cult to prove. Three years ago
Sir Maurice Holmes stated as a
fact in his report on the Unifica-
tion of the Public Services in the
LAKEHEATH, Suffolk, British Caribbean Area that “in

: June, 24, |tne highest and upper middle

Eleven United States airmen|ranges! in the Civil Services of
were killed when a B.50 Super- | the Caribbean Area the salary
fortress on routine training flight | levels are low, in many instances
crashed and burst into flames here !deplorably low, as compared with
to-day. The aircraft, one of a flight those obtaining in other parts of

ful opposition, but are not mem~
bers of the Assembly.
—UP.

11 DIE IN PLANE CRASH



of ten, fell to the ground twelve 'the Colonial Empire” and went on!
minutes after the take off. Names |to say that “it is not a question |

of victims were being withheld of salaries being insufficient to at-

' route,

jans lined the route from the air-
port to the Shah's summer palace
and shouted anti-British slogans
between cheering the Premier,

Cows were sacrificed along the
After stepping from the
aircraft pale but smiling, Mossa-
degh reiterated the view that the
court was incompetent to judge
the issue between Iran~and the
British Oil Company,

Only a few thousand people |
were allowed in the airport to |
greet him, The route to the
Shah's palace was lined with
police and the military. Mossa-
degh said his duty was to report

pending notification of next of tract to the Public Services men] to the Shah.

kin. —U.P. @ On Page 3

LORD ALEXANDER
DID NOT KNOW



WASHINGTON, June 24,
EARL ALEXANDER, Britain’s Defence Minister, said
here to-day that he did not know in advance that the
United Nations Command planned to bomb North Korea’s
hydro-electric power plants on the Yalu River near Man-

churia.



LORD ALEXANDER.
had never appeared to him t
robust.—-U.P.



He made this statement
when questioned by report-
ers after a thirty minute
visit to Truman at the White
House. He said he had not
been informed that the raid|
was planned while he was inj
Tokyo or Korea on his in-
spection tour and “I know
nothing more than you do
from reading the mnewspa-

He: declined to say whether
he thought the raid on Yalu
power plants was the result
of the deadlock at the
fruce Talks but he did say
the targets appeared to be a
“proper target”.

Alexander said he had
discussed Korea _ general]
with Truman who, he added,
o be in better form or more

—UP.



Prisoners Screened
With Impartiality

KOJE ISLAND, June 24.

Loudspeakers blared outside
tents telling prisoners that Chin-
ese and North Korean Red Armies
had pledged amnesty for any sol-
dier returning including those
who might have tattooed them-
selves with anti-Communist slo-
gans,

Leaflets were distributed to all
prisoners before they were screen-
ed explaining in detail the United
Nations does not want to retain a
single prisoner. But the United
Nations promised it will stand be-.



hind any prisoner who would |
forcibly resist returning. ‘
Individual screenings lasted

only two minutes, A Republic of

General Mark Clark, United
Nations commander in chief said
in a message on the second anni-
versary of the Korean War today
that if the armistice talks faik
U.N. is ready for “bloody fight-
ing”.

In the message te hig troops
Clark said “we prefer to achieve
an armistice at the conference
table. But if the enemy prefer
otherwise and forces the return
lo the bitter, bloody fighting of
1950 and 1951 we are ready,

“The United Nations command
an Bighth Army which have been
trained in battle and strengthened
by the revitalised Republic of
Korea.”

—UP.



Science Degree For
Parke-Davis Head

PHILADELPHIA,

The Philadelphia College of
Pharmacy and Science to-day con-
ferred the honorary Doctor of

Science Degree on Harry J, Loynd,
president of Parke, Davis and
Company.

Dr. Ivor Griffith, president of the
131~year-old institution, said at the
commencement exercises in Col-
lege Hall here that the degree was
conferred on Loynd “in recogni-
tion of the leadership which you

Korea Major stood behind each jhave evidenced in the field of pub-

see that
asked

interpreter’s table to
screening questions were
clearly and accurately.

Each question was so phrased
as to offer prisoners encourage-
ment in returning to the North.
If the prisoner said he would fore-
ibly resist returning to North a
large “S” was printed indicating
South. If he said he wanted to
back an “N” was marked on the
card,

Those who said they wanted to
return were marched back to their
compounds, Others were marched
to new compounds, The reaction
of the 400 to screening surprised
United Nations officers who had
assumed Koje compounds were

pulated almost entirely by die-
nard communists.—U,P.



fic health and human.welfare.”
.

Dr. Loynd, 54, has been presi-
dent of Parke-Davis, world’s
largest makers of pharmaceutical
products, since April, 1951, A
native of Springville, Utah, he was
graduated from the University of
Utah in 1922 with a bachelor of

© Iscience degree. After several years

with the Owl Drug Company in
San Francisco, Oakland, Calif.,
Portland, Oregon, and Salt Lake
City, he joined Parke-Davis at
Kansas City in July, 1931, In less
than 20 years, he rose to the presi-
dency of the world-wide firm
which makes more than 1,000
different drug products.
—U.P.



U.S. Has Family Of Atomic Weapons

WASHINGTON, June 24.

It was learned that United
States scientists have developed
a “complete family” of atomic
weapons which are being incor-
porated into army, navy and air
force combat plans.

In addition to

atomic power

for artillery shells and guided
missiles the United States
Atomi Arsenal presumably
des or soon will include



d hydrogen super bomb

ry and civilian experts who



the recent rapid
strides in atomic development
to the House Appropriations
Sub Committee did not sperci-
fically say that the hydrogen
bomb has been perfected.

But there were constant refer-
ences to the H. bomb in the
carefully edited testimony made
available to reporters today.

The testimony was in connec-
tion with Truman’s request for
an additional $3,191,000,000 to
expand United States

described

atomie

energy facilities the largest
single sum ever asked for thi
purpose.
Chairman Gordon Dean of
the Atomic Commission said
“certain elements” of the H.
bomb will be produced in plants
to be built under an expansion

programme. He added that
“primary” the H. bomb effort
“is now in its developmental
phase rather than production
phase.”

Informed sources previously

indicated that the United States
will test the first H bomb this fall

in the Pacific, Chairman Bren!
McMahon of Esnate House
Atomic Energy Committee
strongly implied in a speech

last week that perfection of the |
H. bomb is now’ assured and
jsaid if he was Presidpnt he}
would order the Atomic Energy |
Commission to go ahead and!
produce thousands of city-
wrecking weapons,

—U.P.

on Tuesday killing at least 65 per-
sons and the toll was rising as re-
ports came in over battered com-
munication systems that another
58 are missing.

The Japanese coast guard said
55 fishing boats with 234 persons
aboard also were unaccounted for.
Some may have been blow: to
sea,

The storm began blowing out
to sea by midday. Torrential rains
raised the Nagaro River to flood
slage.

A thousand men are fighting
breaks in its banks in an effort
to prevent flooding around Nagoya
and Gifu 250 miles west of Tokyo.

~—(CP)



|
|
|

a

So

Top Ace Welcomed

=

, AMERICA’S greatest living air ace,
Col. Franeis S. Gabreski waves

cisco, Thousands turned out to.
give a hero’s welcome to the man

planes in World War Il and six
and a half In the Korean cam~ -
paign. (International Soundphoto) *

enim

| U.N. Violating

|
|

Geneva
Convention

who brought down 83 enemy «











a

A

7



-—SAY REDS
i
PANMUNJOM, June 24... ;
Communist truce negotiators $
accused the United Nationg of
Beene ae extension of the Korean /° /
Wat -by ..seree ba

‘ e ming pr On
Kole Figs “in violation of the
Geneva Convention”.

North Korean General Nam IL
said the screening resumed yes=
terday after a two months’ recess
was a “dangerous step’ by the
United Nations. At the same time
Nam took an issue with a state-
ment by Major General William
K. Harrison, Chief United Nations
negotiator, that the major obstacle
to settlement of the prisoner ques-
tion was the number of prisoners
that the United Nations would re-
turn under the policy of volun-
tary repatriation,

He said that the practice of re-
‘aining war prisoners in whatever
form is in violation of the Geneva
Convention and minimum stand-
ards of humanitarianism,

Nam again made no reference
to the United Nations reminder
that the Soviet army in 1943 off-
ered German troops “voluntary
repatriation “if they would sur-
render,—U.P.



66

They're everything

I look for’





“But seldom find, except in

du Maurier, I suppose you
mean. But what exactly do

you look for in a cigarette?”

“Flavour—which can
only come from tobacco
that is rather special.
Then, of course, perfect
smoothness—-which means
_ a comfortable throat.”*







“Coolness too? Well, that’s
seen to by the du Maurier filter
tip. And no bits of loose tobacco
{a the mouth—filter tip again.”

“ Yes—all that. D'you know, this
du Maurier filter tip is just about
the finest idea for improving a
smoke that I've ever come across.”

Smoke to your throat's content

du MAURIER we

THE EXCLUSIVE FILTER TIP CIGARETTE = ut) or ot

SOLE DISTRIBUTOR: WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD., BRIDGETOWN





~


PAGE TWO

Sa a at

Carb

R. T. GRANT MAJOR, Can-

Trade
Eastern
with headquarters in
on
Monday night by the R.M.S. Lady
paying a routine

Â¥ adian
Commissioner
Caribbean
TY jad,

yovernment
for the



returned home

Nelson after
visit to the colony. He was stay-
ing at the Ocean View Hotel,

To Further His Studies

R. KEITH MELVILLE who

has be@n doing optics with

his gran@father, the late Dr. Har-
court Carter for the past three
years, left the colony on Monday
fer England to further his studies
in that respect. He left by
B.W.IA. via Antigua and Puerto
Rico for New York where he will
travel by B.O.A.C, to London.

Keith is a son of Rev, H. A.
Melville, Vicar of St. Ambrose
and Mrs. Melville of “Aberfoyle”,
Fifth Ave., Belleville.

For New Appointment

. AND MRS. L. R. HUTSON

were passengers by the Lady
Nelson on Monday night for
Trinidad, Dr. Hutson has gone to
take up his new appointment as
Deputy Director of Agriculture
(Animal Husbandry) . He was
formerly Chief Veterinary Officer
of the Leeward Islands with
headquarters in Antigua.

Longest Ticket

R. H. J. KENDRICK, Sales
Executive of the Hercules
Cycle Co, of England, arrived from

Antigua on Monday by
B.W.LA. on a week's
visit and is staying at the Ocean

View Hotel.

. Kendrick who left home on

usual business tour

to England in

ber after covering some
miles on the trip,

has the longest ticket P.A.A.

issued in England. It is

Kendrick has come to
treduce an entirely new range
f cycle models specially designed
or the West Indies. From Barba-








be)

‘OR GLENN CALKINS,
Presidént of the

Conference of Seventh Day Ad-
ventists. Inter-American:
with headquarters at
Florida, arrived here on Monday
morning by B.W.1.A. from Trini-
dad where he had been on a visit
in the interest of the §.D.A. work.

He. said that he had been
travelling around the West Indies
for eleyen years, but had never
been to Barbados before. Since
he had a few days at his disposal,

â„¢-\he thought it would be nive to

pe
a





spend them here and sée what
‘the island was like, \

Pastor Calkins expects to leave
temorrow for Puerto Rico where
he- will remain for about a week
before going on to

Miami and
. Mexico. In Puerto Rico he said

‘teat the S.D.A. ate building
@ three-quarter million dollar
(U.S.) hospital at Myguaze which
should be completed in anothner
two months.

First Since 1938

. SARAH HINE, aunt of

Mr, Frank Morgan of Club

Morgan, arrived from Bermuda

on Monday by the Lady Nelson

for two weeks’ holiday which

she will be spending as the guest
of Mr. and Mrs. Morgan.

A resident of New York, Mrs.
Hine has staying in Ber-
muda for the past few months.
tae is her first visit here since
























DIAL 4220





Division
Miami,\,





5

r

t
5







ff : co

MR. AND MRS. FRANCIS E. M. JORDAN

ivarried At St. Patrick’s
OQ” Saturday morning at St.
Patrick’s Roman Catholic

Church, Jemmott’s Lane, the
wedding took place of Senorita

Ligia Magallanes, daughter of
senora. Magallanes’ 6f aracsc,
Venezuela, and the late ‘Senor |y
Magallanes, and Mr. Francis E. M.

Jordan, son
Jordan of
selleville.
The ceremony which took place
at a Nuptial Mass at nine o'clock,

of Mr. and Mrs, G, C.
“Angleséa,’ 9th Ave.,



as conducted by Fr. A. Parkin-
son, Sil.
fhe bride who was given in

marriage by Mr. Arthur A Hunte,
wore a dress of broderie anglaise.
Her headdiess was kept in place
by a Uiara of gardenias and lilies

and she carried a bouquet of
orchids, a gitt from the U.S.A,
Mrs, Arthur Hunte attended

the bride as matron of honour,
The duties of bestman were per-
formed by the bridegroom’s
brother, Mr. Govard Jordan.

A reception was held at “Angle~
sea”, 9th Ave. Belleville ‘ after
which the couple left for the
Crane to spend their honéymoon,

Senora Juana Magallanes,
grandmother of the bride, who
came over for the* wedding, is
staying with Mr. and Mrs, Norman
Hart of “Seafield,” Worthing.

Mr, and Mrs,
leaving on Saturday for Caracas,
Mr. Jordan, an employee in the
‘Traffic Department of B.W.1LA.,,
thas been transferred to a similar
post in Caraeas.

Conducting Services

PENDING three months in

Barbados conducting meetings
for the Baptist Churches are Rev.
Jack Parker and Rev, George
Starling ffom Tennessee, Fl
They arrived here ‘recently by
B.W.LA. via Puerto Rico and
Antigua and are with
Rev. and Mrs, Wayne Divine of
“Vesta Bella”, Navy Gardens.

Also in Barbados is Rev, E, F,
MacMillan, . Superintendent . of
the Baptist Churches in St, Lucia.
He arrived yesterday morning by
the Lady Nelson accompanied by
his son Daniel and will be spend-
ing two weeks Staying with Rev.
Mrs, K, Hanson of Two Mile

a.

New Shipment....
LADIES’



YOUR SHOE STORES

And a Holiday-on-Wheels among the highways

and byways of the

British Isles; with a

ZEPHYR or CONSUL to answer your every
holiday whim—licensed, insured and with a

tankful of gas, ready
arrive in London!

to go the moment you

Jordan will be.

orida, Robert Clarke of

Enjoyed Holiday

AP. the passengers return-
ing from Antigua on Monday
evening by B.W.LA, were Miss
Agnes Boyce of Messrs. A. S&..
Bryden and Sons Ltd. and Miss
Grace Hill of the Singer

achine Co, They said that they
spent two weeks’ holiday in the
colony and had a most enjoyable

Slay.

After 20 Years

RS. MARJORIE WILSON, a
clerk and stenographer of
New York, returned to the U.S.A.
on Monday by B.W.LA, via An-
tigua and Puerto Rico after spend-
ing three and a half months’
holiday im the colony, This is Mrs.
Wilson’s second visit to the
island after 20 years and she is
much impressed by the progress
of the island—Boys’ Clubs, Danc-
ing Schools, Baby Leagues and
along the cultural lines. To her
many friends, all of whom she
cannot see before leaving, she
says “Au Revoir”,

During her stay here she was
the guest of Mr, and Mrs. James
Marshall of Whitehall, St. Philip.

For T.T.C. Races

R. F. E. C. BETHEL, popular
local turfite, left for Trini-
dad by B.W.I, Airways on Mon-
day. He will attend the T.T.C.
Summer Meet.
On Vacation
RS. Cora (Boo-buh) Thomp-
son, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Lione] Gittens, Snr., is back
in the island on vacation after
huving been away for nine years,
the last five of which were spent in
U.S.A. During her stay here, she
will be the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
“Mornington,”
Collymore Rock. Mrs, Thompson
and Mrs, Clarke are sisters.

Travelling Representative

R. C. N. YOUNGHUSBAND,

Overseas Travelling Repre-
seivtative of James Buchanan and
Co., Ltd, of London and Glasgow,
proprietors of Black and White
Whiskey, left for on
Monday evening by B.W.LA.
after spending a week here on
business, He was staying at the
Marine Hotel,



UNDERWEAR

BRIEFS, PANTIES, VESTS, SLIPS, & NIGHT DRESSES
ARCOLA SHOES

LADIES HIGH GRADE, IN RED, BLACK, GREEN &
WHITE. ALL IN SMART STYLES.

T R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606



BARBADOS

Barbadian Returns Home

M* GARNET L. JOHNSON, a
Barbadian, who wes in the
Real Estate business in Boston,
Mas achusetts for the the past 38
years, is now back in Barbados
for a holiday. He arrived here
some weeks ago and will be
remaining until the end of
August.

Mr Johnson was here two years
ago when he spent two months’

holiday. He is staying, with his
relatives in Westbury Road.
A Daughter
ONGRATULATIONS to Mr

and Mrs. John Kirton on the

ADVOCATE



THE FOODS

This is the time to start a little

mild dieting--or shall we call it
sensible eating. Most of us over
25 could probably dé with a few
fees pounds. In the teens no one
should worry about overweight—
it soon disappears. Excessive slim-
ming at any age is most unwise

since appetite, digestion 2nd
elimination mey suddenly cease
to work—and then you get ill.

Â¥ is Cmphasised because a fig-
> which charms is not a thin
Mid seragegy body, but a well kept
Boy.

Certaih alkaline: foods counter-

birth of a daughter on MOnday @et acidity, and it is acidity which

night at Dr. Bayley’s Hospital.
Mother and babe are doing well.

‘.cecountant, Barclays Bank
A= the passengers arriv-

ing on Saturday by B.W.LA.
from St. Kitts were Mr, and Mrs.
R. L, Gilbert who are intransit
for the United Kingdom, They
are staying on until Sunday when

they leave by the De Grasse.
They are staying at the Hotel
Royal,

Mr. Gilbert who is an Account~ |
ant of Barclays Bank, is on four
months’ leave which he will be
spending in England.

Back From Dominica
~~ by the Lady Nel-
son on Monday morning
from Dominica were Dr. and Mrs.
Robert Salmond of Bay Mansion
who went over for two weeks’
holiday.

Woman’s Place Discussed
Tonight
HE Woman’s Place in the
Modern World will be the
subject of a discussion which
will be led off to-night at the Bar-
bados Press Club, No. 53, Swan
Street, by the Rev. A. Ramsaran
of Trinidad.
Members of the Club and
general public are invited
part in the discussion. «

LISTENING
HOURS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1952

410 — 7.15 p.m . WM. 25.53 M
4.00 The News; 4.10 The Daily Ser-

vice; 4.15 B.B.C. Midland Light —

the
‘uke







chestra; 5.00 Lawn Tennis; 5.15 Caval-
cade of Melody: 5.55 Interlude; 6,00 |
Scottish Magazine, 6,10 Rendezvous
Players; 6.30 Think on These Things;

6.45 Sports Round-Up and Programme
Parade; 7.0 The News; 7.10 Home News
From Britain

7.15 — 10.8 p.m . 58M 41.92 M

7.15 Calling the West Indies; 7.45 By
Request 8.15 Radio Newsreel; 8,30
Statement of ecount; 8.45 Interlude;
8.55 From the Editorials; 9.00 The Loss
of the Birkenhead; 9.45 Report From
Britain; 10.00 The News; 10.10 News
Talk; 10.15 Mid-week Talk; 10.30 Ray's
a Laugh,

By MAX TRELL

“| WONDER,” said Kuarf to his |
sister Hanid and to Mr. Puneh,
“how it would feel like to be—to
be-——an elephant?” |

Bveryone laughed when they |
} heard Knarf say this, for General
Tin and Teddy the Stuffed Bear, |
who were sitting on the other side |
of the room, hear it too.

“You'd féel enormous,” said Ted- |
dy. |

But General Tin said: “No, you |
wouldn't féel enormous at all, my!
boy. In fact, you'd feel quite small.” |

‘T would!” said Knarf in surprise.

“How do you know, General, how |
an elephant feels?” Hanid asked, |

General Tin lowered his voice. |
“Once,” he said, “I was an ele-
phant.”

“You were!”



Only a Dream
“Maybe,” said General Tin, “it
Was only a dream. Or maybe a
Megician changed me into one, But,
however ft happened, there 1 was—
a real live elephant, out in the
jungle.”

Everyone listened while General
Tin told his story.

“At first 1 felt enormous, just as |
Teddy said. I looked down at my |
legs and they were like the trunks |
of trees. | turned my head around |
and saw that I had a body as big |
as a whole room. I looked down and |
sew the ground far below, and I!
knew that I was very tall. I could |
feel that I had ears as big as ta-
les, And in front of me were two |
tusks and a long trunk. Yes,
sure then that 1 was the most
enormous Animal in the world.

“And then,” General Tin said, “I /
went for a little walk through the
ingle. And it wasn't long before I
w how really smell I was. For if
thought that my legs were like |
trunks of trees, | now saw trees |
* were thicker than all my legs |
together, And if [ thought L had |
hedy as big as a whole room, I}
saw tooms and caves among |
rocks in which a whole ‘herd of |
yants might have marched. And |
fooked down and thought the |
fer helaw









SRSA RE



awh

The Story General Tin Told

— He Said He Was Once an Elephant —

is the thief of beauty .. . inside
us first by giving indigestion, out-
Side us pretty soon by giving us
drab hair and a dull skin. The
beaQty foods arei+

Milk, leaf vegetables, all fruits.

Funnily enough, sugary sweet
things turn acid in digesting,
whereas seur tasting foods such as
lemons, grapefruit and oranges
‘turn alkaline. Vinegar stays acid
(amd how ). Cut it out with all
at



CAOSSWOoORPD



ACOs
1. Spoll spirit? in the
too. (6)

b Thus a wee may cry, (3)
&. Vlag-gifi. (4)
Â¥. Halt a crocus. (8)
10. By nu means similar, (9)
12. Take a tilt for it, (5)
13. Reel back, (4)
14. He met the Subject for discus
sion. (5)

15. ‘He's ‘oi a

y. He scores in twelfth

19. A lace. (4)
20, Entitled to add up, |
22. Diet Reet by the French, (6)/
23. Hil ¢

24. Many e a fest. (5)

Down
1. Centre om twopence in the]
mile, (6)
4. Raise, could be. (6)
4

1. Weapon. (

. Direction of the thorn. (6)

o. 10'S just part of the act. (5) |}

‘Sitios sane man rettirns wo

broken » (dL '

| You hear of a spor of tt from
b

7
fhe north, ¢
Â¥. Synonym of 24. (4)
| 1}. Dramatically it’s furiny. (5)
16. This driver is overhead, (4)
| 17. Still has its Wworsnippers. (4)
18 Part in a 5 down. (4)

1 lwisted. (5)
91. Heart of a steéd. (4)

ale. Across:

Solution of vestérday’s wuz.
1 Camera; 6. Sv. 9,
Penal: 11, Trestivs
14, Dress: 17 An
: @1, Bade
k

(Of) (ee:
12, Rieht: 1S
yeep: 19. Son: 2




1) Set.

pases)

When General Tin was an elephant.

when I looked down off a cliff, the
ground was so far below that I

‘inew that the cliff on which I was

standing was taller than all the
elephants in the world standing on
each other’s backs, :

“And when I thought,” Geners]
Tin went on, “that 1 had ears as
big as tables, now I saw tables of
hills so big that great cities could
have been built on top of them. And
when I thought that my tusks and
my trunk were long, | saw the
young moon sailing through the
sky, as white as ivory, and I knew
that it had tusks bigger than mine
could ever be, and its trunk moved
in and out among the clouds.

Even Larger
“Yes, I felt so small that when
I gaw a mouse standing in front
of me, I fancied it was even larger
than I was—and I was seized with
fright and tan bellowing into the
middle of the jungle to hide,”
When General Tin was finished.
Knarf said: “I guess General Tin
is right about an elephant feeling
smali. Because elephants really are
ftightened of mice. And now I won-
der:—How would it feel like to be
a mouse?”
But no one answered Knarf. For
n@ ohe in the room had ever been







ether condiments. Above ali, avoid
hetween-meal chotolatés and

cakes.

A good way to take the edge
off a generous appetite is to eat
an appie before every meal—good n

for the inside also. Educate your
palete to appreciate the foods you
need,

if you are underweight, swal-
low milk galore, eat all the fat and
bitter You can, relax before a meal
and éat little and often.

A onstipated inside is fet
working as nature intended it to
und Meither does it give us the
vanity of a nice flat stermach. Bn-
courage nature to do its job with

ua regular morning visit. If the
bowels are obstinate, exercise
them by rotating the tummy

clock-wise like a Hula girl, push-
ing it out in front and drawing it
im as you push out behind. Medi-
cine should be avoided if possible
... Tather try eating lots of the
beauty foods containing alkalis, A
giass of hot water with the juice
of @ lemon first thing in the morn-
ing is a great inner cleanser: so.
too, is the juice of an orange Qt
jhat time.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25,

TO FE. ANCY BY THE WAY e e « By Beachcomber



T LIKE my sctentists to

precise and to give plenty of ti

be you of this.

{952

Moreover, it is prac-
sing a deception on your public.

details. I see that an American “They all know it’s false,” said
ecientist has s#id that the craters Wugwell in a surly voice. “I
the moon were made by «a doubt that,” replied the Colonel,
teorite, : ‘I have read of women with real
beards.” “Anyhow,” said Wugwell,
‘the meteorite, he says, banged “what aré We arguing about? We
no a mountain at 30 miles never said Zaphroma’s beard wes
second (noe more ana Wo "ess! real” “You imply it by adver-
and the force of the impact bored jising her es a beartted lady.”
aveavity or tunnel in the moun- “7 khew it .was ¥alse,” inter-
tah 20 miles deep. That is near -ywpted Mrs. Wretch. “I saw
enoush to the actual facts for Komote pull’ it off Ome day.”
me. I Will only add that, Using “But the spéttators @ldn't see
iy of powerful telésccpe, 1 that,” soid the Célonél stolidly.
seem to detect bats in that tunnel, “it works loose when the glue
which prove: that there is lif? melts in hot weather,” said Mrs.
in the old moon yet. Wretch. “Very likely,” shapped
“ ‘ ’
Mrs. Wretch @nd the Cirens thé Cotone’, “So there you are,
said Wugwell.

offer of a false beard grace-
fully. Very quietly and court-
ecusly Colonel Wretch said: “Mr.
Wugwell, it is quite out of the
question for a lady in my wife’s
position to appear at a circus
wearing a false beard. One mce-
meént’s thought should comvince

OT everyone can refuse =|



GLOBE

To-day and To-morrow
4.45 & 8,30p.m.

A DOUBLE FEATURE

June WS este coes
William 24

au LIRA

= HAVEN DAY JAtids :




.
eee bos 4
°

WS rae 2d
Meee

eens



Ee
L
He wi
[7 FOURTEEN HOURS vertnig PAUL DOUGLAS -RICHARO x
SO SEHART + BARE OF, TEL 5S2 + ceees hp



j

i
5
las
Z
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*
=
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=
>.
ot














OPENING FRIDAY 27th, 4.45 and
8.80 pam. and continuing daily.

PLAZA

BARBAREES (Dial 5170).

GAUETY

The Garden--St. James
TO-NITE 8.% P.M.
“SMART GIRDS DON'T TALK"

Virginia MAYO &
“HER KIND















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Action-Packed Double
“RED DESERT" (Don Barry) ;
op ' REVENGE’ :
Lash BA | & . JOHN ¢



















Just arrived: NYLON
Peach and Black.






(Dial



Last 2 Shows TO-DAY
4.30 &@ 8.30 P.M

|











“HOUBE of

EI YOU &]/ Basi RATHBONE 4s]]/ Whole (New) Serial
Dane SHERLOCK HOLMES || “Lost soar, Pi ‘The
& “MUG TOWN” iy
{BECAME ACRIMINAL]| 8. ona xias with





Selly GRAY
____‘Trevor HOWARD {| "Thurs. Sp
THURS. Special 1.30 P.M.









RIDING DOWN
THE CANYON

Jon HALL














JANETTA DRESS SHOP

(Next Door to Singer’s)

_ BRIEFS from $1.82, HALF SLIPS $6.82
A few English HANDBAGS $4.98

THEATRES:

TODAY 4.30 & $390 p.mj] Last 2 Shows TO-DAY









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B'TOWN (DIAL 2310)

. Presents . _
WARNER BROS. CLASSIC \\
— OF —

MARK TWAIN'S
(Greatest Story).

PRINCE

AND THE

PAUPER

+ *: Starring °.%

ERROL FLYNN

— with —

THE MAUCH--TWINS

(Billy and Bobby).
Cla Rains,
Barton MacLANE.

Opening Thursday 4.45 and
8.30 p.m.; also Friday 2.30,
4.45 and 8.30 p.m. and ton-
tinuing, to Sunday, 4.45 ahd





UNDERWEAR in White,



REES DISTIN
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FEAR” 4:45 & 8.30 p.m.






Russel HAYDEN

jeclal 1 30 Keye LUKE






p.m.
Roy ROGERS Double! “GRAND CANYON" THURS

Richard ARLEN & 4.45 : _M.
SONG OF TEXAS & “DEPUTY MARSHAL” “BLONDE ALTBI"











Donald WOODS &
“MISSISSIPPI
GAMBLER”



"opening TO-MORKOW THURS. (Only) Kent TAYLOR
4.45 & 8.20 p.m. Set hee MIDNITE SAT
& Continuing Dally “BULLDOG DRUM- “BARBARY i
Re-Release MOND STRIKES PIRATES”
Mark ‘TWAIN'S BACK” i




PRINCE & THE PAUPER
ering 2eroL ELYNN

EMPIRE

TODAY & TOMORROW 4.45 & 830
Robert a — Jane RUSSELL

“HIs KIND OF WOMAN”

Extra:— Latest newsreel and
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OLYMPIC

TO-DAY Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8.16
A George Raft Double —

“RED LIGHT’
and
“OUTPOST IN MOROCCO”











To-morrow & Friday 4.30 wn 8.15
Paul HENRIED
maf goies

“SO YOUNG 80 BAD”
and

“CIRCLE OF DANGER”
‘with

Ron RANDELL &

ROODAL























Donald WOODS &
“RETURN Of The

“DURANGO KID”
haries STARRETT



SES

——————}





ROXY
TO-DAY & TOMORROW 4.45 & 8.15)
Maureen 0'F

John PAYNE —
fie

“TRIPOLI”
and











“STREETS OF LAREDO"

Starring
William Holden — MaéDonald Carey}

TOMORROW AT 1 30 PM.
John WAYNE — Oliver HARDY







“FIGHTING KENTUCKIAN”

and’
“SPORTING CHANCE” |
)



ROYAL

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW 4130 & 8.30)
Dana Andrews — Susan Hayward
+in—

“CANYON PASSAGE”
and

“CORVETTE K. 25"
Starring
Sco — And






Please enquire further from Charles Me Enearney & (o.. | td. or Telephone Main Office 4493

LEE TIT arto mo ones Miho ipip nose

Se es



ee

{SUPER MARKET









_—


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1982



B



ARBADOS ADVOCATE

Leg. Co. Approve Salary Increases

@ From Page i

of the highest qualifications. It is
a qued@tion of the salaries being
insufficient to attract persons with
the minimum qualifications re-
quired.”

In this passage of hi8 Report,
which is set out in full in para-
graph 6 of the Report of the Com-
mittee of which I was appointed
Chairman (which I will from now
on refer to simply as “the Com-
mittee”) and which was laid in
this Honourable Council a month
or two back, Sir Maurice Holmes
was referring to conditions of ser-
vice in the Caribbean Area gen-
erally, with the exception of
Trinidad, but since then other
territories in the area have intro-
duced greatly improved conditions
of service for the upper ranges
in their Public Services, and his
criticism is accordingly more par-
tieularly applicable to Barbados
now than it was at the time it
was made.

Technical Posts

There are many Barbadians who
are su well qualified to fill
senior administrative, professional
and technical posts in this Island,
but they tend, because of the poor
egnditions of service provided in
the Barbados Civil Service, either
te serve in Public Services else-
where (and names spring readily
te mind) or, if they return to

Os, to seek their livelihood
outside Government Service, Let
me quote three recent examples:
Dr. Colin Tudor recently made
enquiries regarding the vacant
pest of Anaesthetist at the Gen-
eral Hospital, but was not inter-
ested in it on its present terms
and has accepted a post on bet-
ter terms in Trinidad; Dr. Forde,
a Barbadian employed in British
Honduras on ble terms,
would have been prepared to
come here some time back if the
post of Physician Specialist had
been pensionable, and has acecept-
ed a post in Jamaica; J. A. H.
Sealy, who has been training as
a Pupil Engineer in Trinidad and
was due back in March has elected
te stay in Trinidad on a much bet-

salary than he could be
Oj here. A young doctor, who
returned to Barbados after com-
pleting hig long period of training
in the U.K, at Government ex-
pense, left the service of Gov-
ernment after about a.year’s ser-
viee in order to improve his pros-
pects in private practice, and I
understand that another one is
following suit.

Barbadians First

It is the accepted policy of the
Barbados Government to fill
vacancies with hy ~ a
falling them, with other West In-
dians, if suitable candidates are
available, and a search is only
made farther afield if there are
no local candidates of the right
calibre. There is nothing secret
about salaries and conditions of
service in the Colonial Service,
for the salaries of the Senior posts
are set out in the Colonial Office
List, and general conditions are
swmmarised in a pamphlet entitled
“appointments in Her Majesty's
Colonial Service”, both of which
are published annually.

Officers who are already serving
in one territory, when offered a
transfer to Barbados, will natural-
ly compare their present condi-
tions with those that are offered
to them, and are prone to decline
tg come to Barbados because of
the inferior conditions offered.

As Sir Maurice Holmes put it
in another passage of his Re-
port: “It stands to reason thai
officers in Colonies which grant
leave passages would be re-
luctant to accept transfer to
Colonies which do not do so.
Perusal of conditions of service
throughout the Colonial Service
proves beyond any doubt that,

hereas Barbados

wi is one of the
most attractive on some grounds,
such as climate i~

These factors in combination
= it very diffeult to recruit
{ cers from outside the Island,
whether from elsewhere in the
Caribbean or from farther afield,
and to retain their services for
any considerable length of time.

Return Passages

For, as again Sir Maurice

Holmes put it, the overseas officer be avoided, but would confine im- Excellency

t keep fre







luse LIFEB

It’s easy to keep fresh all day—just use
Lifebuoy Toilet Soap whenever you wash! Its
deep-cleansing lather really frees you of weari-
ness, keeps you fresher so much longer. So get
a tablet of Lifebuoy today and make sure of

day-long freshness!



attaches considerable
to visiting his country of origin at
intervals to see higy family and
friends, and whereas before World
War II return sea passages to the
United Kingdom for an officer
and his wife cost about $660, they
now cost, with baggage charges
and incidentals thrown in, well
over $2,000, which represents
nearly half a year's pay for the
Head of a major Department in
Barbados on his present salary of
$5,040 a year, or over a half. if
he has children as well.

The consequences of the inade-
quate conditions of service in the
upper ranges of the Barbados Civil
Service are that a post remains
vacant for a very long period or
that, in desperation, it is even-
tually filled by an officer whose
qualifications are not up to the
standard which the appointment
lemands.

d hs

The first alternative means that
essential work is left undone and
that the officer, when at last ap-
pointed, has a depressing amount
of leeway to make up, It also
means that the Departments con-
cerned come in for undeserved
publie criticism.

Recently, for example, I have
read complaints about the lack of
supervision of the work of the
District Agricultural Stations and
of work on the roadd@, It is only
fair to the Departments concerned
to mention that the Agricultural
Department has been without a
Deputy for 24 years and the High-
ways Department has been with-
out an Executive Engineer for
eight months. The second alterna-
tive means that there is a falling
off in standard.

So long as conditions of service
remain as they are at present the
tendency must be, whenever a
post becomes vacant, for it to be
filled by an officer of inferior
calibre and, as stated in paragraph
24 of the Committee’s report,” in
either case there will inevitably
be a marked falling off in
efficiency which sooner or later,
must lead to serious disruption in
the administration of the Island.”

The Remedy

What is the remedy? I have
heard it said that the problem
is quite simple and that the Com-
mittee has made it deem unneces-
sarily complicated, This school of
thought argues that all that is
required when a post is vacant for
a long time and it is not desired to
lower standards is to offer condi-
tions which will cause that par-
ticular post to be filled; there is
however, no need to tamper with
conditions attaching to posts which
are already filled. But what is the
inevitable consequences of action
along these lines?

It was, in fact, taken at the
time of the Hallinan Report, and
caused the anomalies mentioned
in paragraph 8 of the Committee's
report; it was taken towards the
end of last year when the Gov-
ernment Analyst was appointed
on inflated agreement terms, al-
though the duties which that
officer performs are on a par with
those performed by the Agricul-
tural Chemist and the Entomolo-
gist, whose conditions of service
remained unchanged,

Piecemeal treatment in this
fashion must inevitably cause dis-
satisfaction among serving officers,
Suppose, in fact, some of the
existing vacancies were filled in
this way, what would be the re-
sult? You will see from Appendix
“E” of the Committee’s report
that the Secretary of State con-
siders that it is necessary to offer
a seale of £1,150 rising to £1,350
to attract a Medical Officer of
Health with a D.P.H., a qualifica-
tion which is considered to be
essential for the post. But to ap-
point a new Medical Officer of
Health on £1,150 to £1,350 would
be manifestly unfair on the Senior
Medical Officer of Health (who
holds the D.P.H.) and the Director
of Medical Services, who after
long years of service, draw £1,050
and £1,300, re: tively, Similarly,
to appoint an ecutive Engineer,
Highways and Transport, on £1,200
a year, the salary which the Sec-
retary of State considers that it
is mecessary to offer, would
create an obvious anomaly in the
case of the Director of Highwiys
and Transport, who draws £1,050,
and to appoint a Deputy Director
of Agriculture on, say, £1,350,
simply because a man of the right
calibre cannot be got for less,
would be hardly fair on the Direc-
tor, who draws £1,450,

Anomalies

Another school of thought agrees

that such anomalies as this must

- 3

FOR PERSONAL FRESHNESS ALWAYS

MUBT 667-1110-55



importance proved

oh all day...!

UOY TOILET SOAP



conditions of service to
such departments as the Medical
and Agricultural Departments, and
perhaps to the Education Depart-
ment, but would call a halt there,
and would not extend concessions
to administrative or non-technical
officers, In the first place such
treatment would upset the sym-
metry and general level of
efficiency in the service.

In the second, it is in the best
interests of the Lsland that the
officers in charge of the spending
and revenue collecting Depart-
ments of the Island should be
men of first rate quality.

By providing conditions of
service which will attract good
officers, and to quote Sir Maurice
Holmes again, by and large “the
higher the salary scales attaching
to a service the higher will be
the quality of the officers in that
rervice.” Government will do
much to ensure that its expendi-
ture is spent wisely and is not
wasted, and that its revenue is
collected without loss or leakage.

To my mind, it is just as im-

portant to have a_ first-rate
Commissioner of Income Tax,
Accountant General, or Comp-

troller of Customs, say, as it is
to have first-rate technical offi-
cers.

-In the third place, constitu-
tional advance is in the nature
of things, and Barbados cannot be
expected to stand still while
other parts of the Empire move
forward, But, if I may quote the
concluding sentences of para-
graph 17 of the Report, “there is
little advantage if highly quali-
fied and highly paid technical
experts are obtained only for
their services to be misdirected
and inefficiently correlateq by
incapable administrative and
professional officers. If Ministe-
rial Status is to be introduced
and is to prove successful it is
all the more important that the
Public Service should be capa-
ble of functioning efficiently.”
T should have thought that the
truth of this would be indisputs-
ble.

Future Economy

As long ago as November 194)
the Governor-in-Exec¢utive Coi-
mittee reached fhe conelusion
tnat the future ¢€conomy of the
island would be jeopardised un-
less immediate steps were taken
to improve the terms and con-
ditions of service attached to the
senior administrative, profes-
sional and technica] posts in the
Barbados Civil Service and set
up a Committee, of which the
Honourable Dr. Massiah was a
member, to examine the problem
and make recommendations.

The Committee was given a
time-limit within which to report,
and was not able to submit its
final conclusions, In an interim
report, however, this Committee
expressed the opinion that the
first and most important measure
to overcome the difficulty of
recruitment and retention of ad-
ministrative, professional and
technical officers was the provi-
sion of return leave passage priv-
ileges to the holders of certain
scheduled posts, but added that
the inadequacy of salaries was
another matter that required
more detailed examination than
they had been able to give it.

In consequence of that Com-
mittee’s

recommendation, a
Leave was pre=
pared, but it lapsed with the

prorogation of the Legislature in
April 1950. In the year and a
half that passed between then
and the end of the legislative
session in November 1951, some
of the vacancies have been filled,
but some have not, others have

occurred and have not yet
attracted officers of the right
calibre.

Objections

At the opening of the present
Legislative Session in December
1951, His Excellency the Gov-
ernor reviewed the position
and after setting out certain op-
jections to improvement of con-
ditions of service of senior
officers that have been raised
from time to time and answering
them shortly informed the Leg-
islature that, bearing in mind
that the Other Place had ex-
pressed its genera] agreement
with the Holmes Report, he had
set up another Committee to
examine the matter.

I was appointed Chairman of
that Committee, the reason for
my selection being that His
wanted the Com-








LEVER rropver
amen

A



mittee’s report to be
time for consideration
Annual Estimates,
would be delays and
in the appointment of
Chairman.

I am assuming that Honoura-
ble Members have studied the
Committee's report and
various Appendices attached
thereto, and I will not therefore
go over it again in detail. Ther
are, however, certain matters
connected with it and arising out
of it on which I will comment
briefly.

First, whatever opinions may
be held about the Committee’s
conclusions, it cannot be denied
that it was thorough and that its
recommendations are reasoned
and balanced. Second, it resclved
at the very /beginning that it
must eliminate personalities in
its deliberations. In connection
with each post that it considered
it put the question, “If it, is
vacant or were to become vacant
now, can it be filled by an officer
of the requisite calibre and qual-
ifications on the present terms,
and if not what minimum terms
is it necessary to offer in order
to fill it with such an officer?”

ready
with the
and there
diffieult

an outside

in

Equal Leave Passages

Third, it senciuded, for the rea-
sons set out in paragraph 11 of its
Report, that equal leave passage
concessions should be made avail-
able without regard to the officer’s
place of recruitment and domicile,
and that, bearing in mind the
normal practice elsewhere and the
deterrent effect on recruitment
which failure to follow that prac-
tice must entail, leave passages for
wives should be included. In this
connection I would say that figures
from British Guiana which have
been received since the Report
was completed bear out the Trini-
dad experience that actual ex-
penditure on leave passages falls
far short of the potential.

Fourth, a majority of the Com-
mittee considered tha the Estab-
lished Church should fall within
its terms of reference since, what-
ever views may be held regarding
the disestablishment of the
Church, the fact remains that the
Anglican Clergy receive their
emoluments from the Public
Treasury. The Lord Bishop was

accordingly invited to give
evidence before the Committee
and, in consequence of his repre-
sentations, recommendations were
made which have been endorsed
by the Executive Committee and
approved by the Other Place,

Fifth and last, the recommenda-
tions of the Committee have been
passed “in toto” by Executive
Committee and approved by the
Other Pla.e, with the following
four exceptions. It will be seen
from the relevant Orders that the
salary of the Director of Agricul-
ture has been increased to $8,160
(and his Sugar Cane-Breeding
Allowance kept at $480), the
Headmaster of the Coleridge and
Parry School has been put up to
$4,800 and the Superintendent,
Waterworks, and Public Librarian
increased to $4,080 each. ‘

Two Criticisms

Next, I would touch very briefiy
on two eriticisms which have been
made. First, it has been said that
this matter derives its origin from
the complaints of a few “im, ed
officials”. That is not so. Two of
the three Heads of Departments
referred to in His Excellency’s
speech at Appendix I of the Re-
port are West Indians two other
officers in Key positions who have
made representations regarding
the inadequacy of their present
conditions of service are Barba-
dians. : :

The general public is certainly
not aware of the amount of time
that has been spent in persuading
certain officers to stay on until this
Committee was appointed and its
recommendations considered, Sec-

oe





eause you like ‘em so/

@ Toasted fresh and sweet
Flakes fest awe neck
fast as we
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ness. Get K.

ot
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and we have many letters from sufferers
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the #?

ond, it has been suggested that the
present methods of advertisement
for vacancies are faulty

Now vacancies for the posts
with which the Committee dealt
fill under two main heads, those
for which there is no objection to
selecting an officer on first ap-
intment from outside the Ser-
vice, and those which are normal-
ly filled by transfer within the
Service, '

The former type is advertised,
first locally and then in the U.K.,
but, as the Secretary of State has
pointed out in connection with
such posts as the Chemical Pathol-
Ogist and Radiographers, there is
little point in continuing to adver-
tise since the present conditions
are so unlikely to attract suitable
candidates.

Previous Experience

The latter type, which includes,
for example, the post of Deputy
Direetor of Agriculture, is not ad-
vertised, for it is considered that
it is in the Island’s interest that
the holder should have previous
experience either in the Caribbean
area or elsewhere. In cases like
this the dossiers of suitable officers
are. considered in the Colonial
Office, and an offer of transfer
nade to the one who seems to be
best fitted for the post.

In consequence of the inade-
quacy of the conditions of ser-
vice vis-a-vis, those obtaining
elsewhere the difficulty of finding
a really suitable officer for a par-
ticular post may be very great in-
deed, and in this connection I in-
vite the attention of Honourable
Members to the comments of the
Secretary of State on the filling of
the post of Deputy Director of
Agriculture in Appendix E of the
Report,

Or again, since the Committee's
report was completed the Secre-
tary of State has said that the
present conditions of service for
the post of Executive Engineer
will not attract anyone of higher
calibre than a Clerk of Works.

Three further points and I have

done. Once it is accepted that
present conditions of service of
the senior administrative, pro-

fessional and technical posts are
inadequate, the crux of the mat-
ter is whether the Island can af-
ford to improve them to the ex-
tent recommended in the Report
In this regard I invite attention to
the passage in His Excellency the
Governor's speech to the Legisl«-
ture in December when he, said
that he had “no doubt that this
Island could afford substantially
to improve their salaries and con-
ditions of service and emphasised
that the approach should rather
be whether Barbados could afford
to let its standards in administra-
tion, in the scientific field and in
many professional fields, deterior-
ate to the lowest in the Caribbean.

Honourable Members who hav?
visited some of the smaller islanc
in the area will appreciate what

this means.
Annual Estimates

In the debate in this Honourabie
Council on the 10th July last year
the Honourasle Mr, Pile put the
matter in the same way when he

meluded that he did not think
that “it is a question of our ask-
ing ourselves whether we can
afford to pay, but whether we can
afford not to pay them,” The
Committee was given a_ figure
within which it was estimated that
it could safely work, and these
amounts were inserted in this
year’s Annual Estimates and are
available in the event of these re-
commendations being approved,
The annually recurrent sum is
substantial, but if the Island is to
carry out a steady programme of
agricultural development, to main-
tain its standards in the pro-
fessional, technical and education-
al fields and to cater for the mani-
fold social needs of a rapidly in-
creasing population, the price will
be worth paying.

@ On Page 5

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TRAFFIC

In Carlisle Bay



V_ Student Prir M. V. Caribbee,
M V. Willemstad, Set ' Davidson
Sch. Franklyn, D.R
ARRIVALS
S.S. Wanderer from Dominica. Agents
DaCosta & Co. Ltd. Lady Silver 30 tons
from Martinique. Consigned to Schooner
Owner Association
DEPARTURES
Sch. Gloria B_ for Fishi c
Sch. Sunshine R Igo for the Fist
Bank

ARRIVALS BY BW EA. ON MONDAY
From Puerto Rico
Comd, David QO. Reed, John Natwir
Joan Hoffmann, William H. Bexill, Jer
vis Murray, Alan Wakefield, Doris Welch
Monica Scott

ARRIVALS ON MONDAY

From Martinique

Yasont Rene, Gibrin Rene, Amelia

Nelson
Prom Antigua

Grace Hill Agnes Boyce Edwina
Horgan Ata Lee, Arthur Kendrick,
Lilian Hodge, Gerald George Gui
herme Da Silva, Jessie Sellars, Lilias
Sellares

ARRIVALS ON TUESDAY
From Trinidad

M. Nurse, P Nurse
1 Bowen F Jardine

a
Mc
Spooner

Nurse,
Cowan

K

DEPARTURES BY BHWt A. ON
MONDAY
Per Trinidad
F. Cannon, N. Cannon, S._ Silveste
H Hearn B Farner Fred Bethe
S. Haddock, K. Farmer, Fred Bethe
ey Younghusband, R Bocsanczy, C
Stoute, M. Stoute M. Martinez M
Martinez
DEPARTURES BY BWHEA. ON
MONDAY
Per Grenada
©, Gunstone, G. Louison
DEPARTURES BY BW. EA ON
TUPRSDAY
For Trinidad
H,. Gareta, J Svoboda, C Svobed
I Fisher R Jackson, S Jacksa
Mark Henzell I cFadden, 1 Mr
FPadden, G. Marshall, E. Marx, A. Br
genti, A Briganti






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PAGE THREE

PAYNE'S

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PAGE FOUR

MS cr

oft ADVOCA Ge

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Bro:



St., Bridgetown

Wetnenion ~ June- 25, 952



es _—

TRADE CRISIS

THE recent visit to Barbados. of Mr.
-@.

Grant Major; Canadian Frade Commission-

er in the West Indies, will. have reawak-

ened interest in the subject of Canadian-
West Indian trade relations.

West Indian trade relations with
Canada in recent years eannot be said to
have arduséd much’ enthusiasm among
Canadian businessmen who were hoping
to expand’ Canadian-West Indian Trade.

The Trade’ Liberalisation Plan which
was introduced because of Canadian com-
plaints of being squeezed out of the West
Indies in favour of, British exporters has
been a palliative measure, a token gesture
on the part of-the United Kingdom to the
rightness »of «the Canadian businessman’s
plea.

It was certainly not to be expected that
Canadians would continue to buy much
more from, the British West Indies than
the British West Indies° were allowed to
buy from Canada.

The crisis of Canada-West Indies trade
is too little understood in the British Car-
ibbean. This is due to the eddy of propa-
ganda which is being circulated by a min-
ority of individuals who claim to have in-
side knowledge of what is going on. These
propagandists may be divided into three
main categories. The first cannot see why
Canada is entitled to trade with British
possessions at the expense of British manu-
facturers. This category may be dismissed
as the old-school tie ‘imperialistic group
who can see no further than the Union
Jack and whe still regard Canadians as
rather brash colonials, hardly more ad-
vanced tharWest-Indians.

The second group are the representa-
tives of British manufacturers who are
only too willing to exploit the opportunity
offered to them by the British policy of
controlling West Indian trade movements.
This group is in no way connected with
the British government but are naturally
concerned to convert as many people as
possible to view West Indian trade through
British officialdom’s eyes.

The third group are frankly anti-Can-
adian. They do not see what is to be gained
by building up trade relations with
Canada, and they accuse Canadians of
wanting all they can get from the West
Indies without accepting any responsibil-
ity for the West Indies.

The merits of these three types of pro-
paganda need not be scrutinised in public:
but it is important that the existence of
these propagandists be recognised. They
do exist and their propaganda is respons-
ible for the confused thinking and expres-
sions of opinion which are prevalent in
Barbadés Whenever Canada-West Indies
trade isibeirig discussed,

What is the Canadian attitude?

Officially the Dominion of Canada keeps
on excellent Aerms with the United King-
dom ‘and the Government of Canada will
go a long way to find a satisfactory trade
compromise with the United Kingdom
vis-a-vis Wést Indian trade,

But the Government of Canada, like all
other governments in the world, is sub-
ject to pressure from its own citizens.

And there are signs that Canadian
businessmen are becoming so disillusioned
as to the long-term prospects of trade with
the West Indies that they are beginning
to use pressure on their’ government
departments responsible for West Indian
trade matters to discourage favourable
treatment of the West Indies.

Should this pressure be intensified to the
point’ where. Canadian preferences on
West ‘Indian sugar imports are threatened
then the whole platform on which Canada-
West Indies trade has béen built will have
been kicked away.

Canadians cannot understand why
Great Britain continues to impose restric-
tive trade controls. in the British West
Indies, becatise they have been informed
that British. policy is directed towards the
raising of sta EN of living of the British
West Indian peoples.

They have been accustomed in recent
years to regard the British West Indies
as the natural British suppliers of sugar
and tropical a eee roduce to the
rapidly expanding population of Canada.

heir business training taught them
that increased consumption of West Indian
agricultural produce would give the West
Indies inereased Canadian dollars .with
which to purchase Canadian products and
manufactures.

Instead they have seen the British Min-
istry of Food sell West Indian sugar to
Canada at higher prices than was paid to
the West Indian sugar producers: and
they have seen a flourishing Canadian ex-
port trade arbitrarily truncated and the
direction of West Indian purchases
switched by Whitehall directive from
Canada to the United Kingdom.

Small wonder that they should consider
Cuba, Haiti, San Domingo, Venezuela and
Mexico as more profitable markets.

Canadian® today are very lukewarm
about promoting West Indian trade. Un-
less West Indian btsinessmen initiate action
through their governments, the Canadian
market for British West Indian sugar may
be lost altogether or may be handicapped
by the removal of the Canadian prefer-
ences on British West Indian sugar.

LONDON, June, *:,

The worid is entitled to
confused about which A oa
Britain is going. We are con-
fused, ourseives. This week we
are not certain whether we
should walk around the streets
with long faces, tightening our
belts, putting our noses to the
grindstone, pulling up our sockr,

ete. Or sheuld we smile with
happy contentment at our
recent doughty achievements.
Is this a crisis or isn’t it? The
prophets of gloom are gloomy;
the men of good cheer are
cheerful. We have still some
gold — but we ought to have
more. The pound stands firm—

and yet there are dark rumours
of devaluation. We are paying
our way, and going deep into
the red at the same time.

As far as the ordinary citizen
is concerned it is all Korea to
a row of beans that he won't
be worrying about the nation’s
balance of payments — but how
to afford his own family’s
holiday this year.

The pattern of postwar Britisn
life is changing very gradually.
Most of the things the foreign
viritor noticed — good and bad
—abcut Socialist Britain, are
still there under the Tories.
There is still very full employ-
ment and so there is no labour
to spare for those spare ser-
vices that are usual and possible
in other countries. It is diffi-
cult to find stores that will
deliver purchases. There are
leng lines in some shops —
for lack of shop assistants. Re-
pairs of all kinds are expensive
and take a long time. There is
still rationing — carefully ob-
served and jealously guarded,
almost as a privilege, by Social-
ists who call it “fair shares.”

These are the irritations left
behind by the postwar Socialist
experiment. There are also
great gains. Wages and food
are, on the average, and for the
mass of wage-earners, better
than ever before in Britain.
The health of children—mainly

BARBADOS siti a ical TOC

ooarr | WHITHER BRITAIN? |

By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS.

because of better feeding, is
higher on the average. .inese
were the gains the Labour

Government set cut to achieve
and it certainly succeeded with
the aid of food subsidies, heavy
taxation, family allowances,
school meals and freg medical
services.

Now there is a Conservative
Government in Britain and the
leaders of that government —
particularly R. A. Butler, the
Chancellor do not want, to
dismantle the social. service
system the socialists established.
What they are trying to do is
to prune it and maké it less
wasteful. The best example is

the case of food i.
Every person in Britain has
about four shillings of \ his
weekly food bill paid by the
Government — it is done to
relieve the hardship of the
poorest. But since the average
wage in Britain is now running
around £7 a week it is only a
very few of the unlucky, the
the pensioners, the disabled or
the few unemplcyed who really
need the subsidies,

What the Conservative Gov-
ernment is trying is to ease tne
country back to a more normal
way of paying — over the
counter of the shop rather than
to the tax collector.

M.P.’s Salaries

This week, for the first time,
every one of sixteen million peo-
ple got a little more in his pay
packet because Mr. Butler’s
budget does not tax him so
heavily. The same week the
Members of Parliament who are
paid £1,000 each year to legis-
late were discussing the possi-
bility of putting up their own
salaries,

The British M.P. is the least
well-pdid in all the British
Commonwealth — with the ax-
ception of New Zealand. He has
also far more work to do. The
old tradition was that M.P.’s
were part-time legislators who
came down: to the House of



Commons: in the evening to dis-
cuss the affairs of the nation.
But now the Hous: of Commons
meets at 2.30 in the afternoon
and the party organisations keep
their followers, very regularly,
almost tied to staying in the
Palace of Westminister itself —
in case they should be a givision
and a yote taken. For hundreds
of M-P.’s of all parties, the busi-
ness of Par is the whole






‘time and ave to try and

live on their £1,000.
It is mot for them; un-
rather un-

and educate te
they .cught ‘to
as an American

The lawyers are hoping for a
bit of business in the courts
settling arguments about who has
the right to certain ceremonia!
functions at the coronation.
Many ancient families have pre-
scriptive rights to perform cer-
tain services to the sovereign.
Before King Edward VII was
crowned in 1902 there was a
\long and stormy argument be-
tween the Earl of Lauderdule
and another Scottish family who
should carry the banner of Scot-
land. And who shall carry the
Queen's spurs? And who shall
carry the swords of state? Or
the cusions on which the orb is
placed?

But the great question, about
which there can be no argu-
ments in the courts, but on
which much depends is “which
way will the procession pass’.
Already ticket selling agencies
are selling places for prices be-
tween £5. 5. 0. and £42, They
do not tell the “purchaser”
where the seat will be — be-
cause they do not know where
they will build their stands. The
general agreement seems to be
Uhat for £5. 5. Od, it is now
possible to buy a promise of a
place from which it is unlikely
that you will have more ‘than
a glimpse of the coronation
procession,

Help For Colonial _

) Legislature

A chorus of praise for his
very considerable constitutional
work for Colonial Legislatures,
some of which he visited recent-
ly, was given the Clerk-Assist-
ant of the House of Commons,
Mr. Fellowes, during discussion
in the House of Wednesday,

In an _ adjourned’ debate
during the last half-hour before
midnight, Mr. Ian Winterbot-
tom, Conservative Nottingham
Central, raised the question of
appointing an extra Clerk at the
Table — a specialist, he suggést-
ed, who would be able to help
new Colonial Legislatures ‘to
find their way into and through
the mazes of our procedures.”

In no fewer than 12 Colonial
Legislatures recently, Mr. Win-
terbottom said, there had been
advances, and all these Legisla-
tures benefited from the assist-
ance of a real expert in Parlia-
mentary procedure. deal of troublesome trial and
error would be avoided if an
expert in Britain was available
to help new Legislatures during
their early dave

Mr. Fellowes, ¢n the past few
months, had prepared the Stand-
ing Orders of the Legislatures
of Jamaica, Celyon, Trinidad,
and Nigeria, He had also visited
the Legislatures of Ceylon, the
Sudan, the Gold Coast and Nige-
ria. Everywhere his services had
proved of the very greatest value.
In Nigeria, Mr. Fellowes presid-
ed over the Legislature for, a
period — at the request of the
Governor.

Sir Edward Keeling and Mr.
James Johnson, both of whom
were in West Africa earlier this
year, echoed Mr, Winterbottom’s
tribute to the successful work
Mr. Fellowes had accomplished in
that area.

Commenting on practices he

had observed in Colonial legis-
latures, Sir Edward pointed out
that in the House of Commons
the practice was not to try to
exercise administrative or ex-
ecutive duties.

“We leave that to re.
ment,” he continued. €

Special Member of Commons’
Staff Suggested.

control the Government by
criticism, and, if necessary, by
turning them out-

“I have noticed in some of the
Colonial Legislatures whieh I
have visited that they do not
always understand this method
of controlling the Government.
They try to exercise executive
powers.

Colonial Legislatives ngced ‘Tot
slavishly follow the British ex-
ample, Sir Edward added; it was
for them to decide what their
practice should be, “but they
should do so with their eyes’
open.” He was sure they would
like to have the’ services of a
Clerk of the House of Cormmons
to explain the procedure of that
House as it had been evolved
over a period of hundreds of
years and particularly in the last
160 years,

Mr. Douglas Dodds-Parker,
Conservative, Danbury who orig-
inally proposed the extra staffing
at the Table, during a meeting of
the Commonwealth Parliamen-
tary Association paid tribute to
Mr. Fellowes’ work, particular-
ly in the Sudan.

A point of interest made .by
Mr. Dodds-Parker was that’ it
had been found possible “to
adapt the Prayers of this House
to all monotheistic religions,
and to ensure that whatever may
happen later in the proceedings
they start off with three quiet
minutes.”

Mr. Johnson, Labour, Rugby,
said he was convinced frqm ap-
preciations of Mr. Fellowes’
work expressed by West African
Ministers that if the proposal
before the House was accepted
“it would pay enormous divid-
ends in goodwill and in im-
proved Colonial Legislatures.”,

The Minister of State ve
Colonial affairs, Mr. Hei
Hopkinson, told the House th at
during the past six years 15
persons from 11 territories, of
which five were Coloniai terri-
tories, had come ever to London
to receive expert guidance in

legislative procedure. A num-
ber of officers from Hong Krp¢
and elsewhere were expected to
arrive shortly.

The Minister went on to note
that “the Glerk-Assistant has
already been engaged upon th
work of revising the Model
Standing Orders for Colonfal
Legislative Councils which were
issued first in 1929. It is a la-
borious business and he has put
a great deal of time on it, Even
so, the work is not yet ready.
The gradations vary so much
from one territory to another
that it is really impossible to de-
vise a code which would cover
them all.

“The issue of this code is not
intended to impose British P&r-
liamentary procedure, on any
territory, but rather to afford a
basis, formed upon the success-
ful experience of the House .of
Commons, by which a Colonial
Legislature may measure its own
procedure and practice and,
where necessary, introduce modi
fications.”

The staffing of the Clerk's
Office was, of course, a matter for
consideration in the first instance
by the Commissfon for Regulat-
ing the Offices: of the House of
Commons the Minister went on.
The appointment of a_ special
member of the staff of the
House to look after Colonial
Legislatures would certainly
seem to offer many advantages-
He would, of course, require to
travel extensively, but it was
equally important that he should
not spend his whole time
abroad. He would be, above all,
an important link with the
‘Table, and his value would de-
pend very much on his keeping
abreast of current practice in
this country.

The Minister promised to bring
the matter to the attention ‘of
the Colonial Secretary when he
returned from West Africa. Mr.
Lyttelton would, no doubt, con-
sider in consultation with Mr.
Speaker, what recommendations
should be made to the Commis-
sioners.





Where The Young Prince

Gets His Money

PARLIAMENT is soon to

discuss the Civil List — the
salaries paid to the Royal
Family,

One thing is already — sure.
The allowance for Prince

Charles will be paid out of the
huge revenues of the Duchy of
Cornwall.

Last year
this estate, which owns 1
farms, many manors, _ entire
parishes, pubs, hotels, post
offices, , banks, shops, and tin
mines amounted to £84,000.

The year before they were
£102,000, and the year before
that £99,000. All this money
went towards meeting the Civil
List payments to the Monarch.

It is expected that as much
as a quarter will now be paid
for the maintenance of Prince
Charles and to start a savings
account for the day when he
will marry.

the profits from
170

... But Powerful
Not only is the Duchy wealthy
—perhaps the richest of all this
country’s great estates—but it is
powerful.
It is superior to Acts of Par-
liament. It is not ruled by the

laws of rent restriction, local
government housing and town
planning. It is not even liab'e
to pay rates.

Still upholding these rights,
the Council of the Duchy

observes the law veluntarily
It makes ex-gratia payments t
cover the rates it should pay

Most of the 130.000 acres it
controls are in the Wes
Country, but there are 78 dcres
in London.

The Duchy owns the Oval,
home-ground of Surrey’s cricket

By ROBERT GLINTON.

warehouses and wharves, blocks

of flats and houses, Until 1922

it owned Lambeth-walk.
Town Sold

All the Scilly Isles belonged to
the Duchy until two years ago,
when it sold a whole town —
Hugh Town, the capital, in St.
Mary’s, the main island,

The Duchy is always reluctant
to sell land. It does not
speculate.

Why, then, did it sell Hugh
Town? An awkward situation
was developing. The town
council, according to the law,
was the local planning authority,
But in fact it had no power on
Duchy land. To avoid this
contretemps the Duchy soid out.

Since the war, however, the
Duchy has added considerably
to its farm acreage on the main-
land.

In the old days,
little good to say about the
Duehy. It was described as a
dead weight on the land—*“suck-
ing out the revenue and giving
nothing in return.”

history had

But when. Queen Victoria
came to the threne great re-
forms were made. These con-
tinue today.

No Crities

Most of the tenants of the
Duchy extol their landlerd:.
Criticism is rare. These are

exceptions, In 1939 a Judge Liss

said :—

“I venture to hope that they
(his remarks) will lead the
legal advisers of the Duchy to
consider carefully the Duchy’s
clsim to the whole of the fore-
shore of Cornwall as againct
the King and his other subjects,

and will cause the Duchy office
to abandon its present predatory
practice of treating -other
people’s property as its 6wn and
enab'e the coastal owners tw

' resist “Unauthorised invasion of

their rights.

The Duchy ce was angry.
It pointed out that its claim to
the whole of the Cornish fore-
shore was well-founded.

Since that time it has leased
nearly all the beaches. Why ?
The Duchy regards the task cf
collecting dues from private ice-
cream sellers and other trades
as too big a task. Two days ago
the black flag of the Duchy—
which bears 15 gold coins, sup-
posed to be the ransom Blondia
paid for the freedom of Richara
Lion Heart, flew over the
splendid white building just
outside Buckingham Palace
gates.

This is ‘the ‘headquarters of
the Duchy, and/the new Queen
was presiding over the Duchy
Council, which meets about
twice a year.

i
Three Feathers

In the magnificent council
room the three-feather badge of
the eldest son of the Monarch
is interwoven in the carpet. It
is in the scrollwork of the hign
ceiling.

Without ceremony and with-
out fuss, Prince Charles became
the owner of this huge enter-
prise. As the eldest son he
automatically became the Duke
of Cornwall, following in the
steps of the man who was late:
to be Duke of Windsor.

It is a fine inheritance. Never
has the Duchy owned more land
or been more flourishing.





| Red Threat Worries
: The Pentagon

From R. M. MacCOLL

THERE is serious alarm today in the
Pentagon and among members of America’s
all-important National Security Council—
the top-level -body that advises the Presi-
dent on the nation’s military-political
courses and problems — over the threat of
an imminent and massive Red. Chinese
offensive in Korea.

Latest intelligence reports give the follow-

ing estimates of present enemy strength:
(a) 1,000,000 combat troops. (Two and a half
to three times as great as the combined
strength of the United Nations and South
Korean forces); (b) 1,800 to 2,000 planes;
(c) 400 modern tanks; (d) “excellent” artil-
lery, giving the Reds firepower roughly
equal to that of the Allies (who a year ago
were vastly superior in this respect).

Although there has been considerable un-
easiness in Washington for some time past
over the look of things in Korea, this back-
ground apprehension has suddenly changed
in the past day or so to a condition of real
“alert”, as new reports have come suggest-
ing that the “balloon may go up” any day
now.









No responsible officer has said so far that
the actual security of Allied forces in Korea
is now in jeopardy. But what is being ad-
mitted tonight is that if the Reds hit they
will cause “serious” initial reverses to the
United Nations, and inflict heavy losses
before they can be stopped. Whether the
Communists could actually push the Allies
into the sea or confine them once again to
a small pocket round the base port of Pusan,
in south-eastern Korea, depends entirely, in
the opinion of Pentagon experts, on whether
they decide to strike under the protection of
an “air umbrella”, which they now possess.

Truman's military advisers have told him
that the main deterrents to a Red offensive
are simply the enemy’s own doubts as to
whether he is able to inflict a complete
defeat, and the fact that time is on his side.

And they have said that unless the Allied
build-up is increased to a much sharper rate,
the enemy initiative — and the dangers of
the whole situation — will go on increasing.
The only factors in the picture which are
encouraging to the West are: (1) United
Nations’ armoured strength is still superior;
(2) The Red’s strategy still seems geared to
the foot soldier.

And, far to the Allied rear, on Koje Island,
the Reds have succeeded in producing a
“second front”, which is at present pinning
down 6,000 first-class troops, including the
only airborne regimental combat team that
America has in the Korean theatre.

The tension built up in Washington over
the possibility of an “all or nothing” Red
smash is understood to lie behind General

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1952



Mark Clark’s recent statement in Tokyo that

he would favour a general bombing of
Chinese cities if the Communists do launch
a new Korean attack.

The new Far Eastern Supreme said that! 4

retaliatory bombing would be agreed to by
him if the Red offensive included big air
attacks on the UNO armies.

It is understood that this view was cleared
with the Pentagon in advance, before Clark
left for Japan, and coincides with United
States’ top policy.



—_

What Goes On Where
Fuchs Used To Work

CHAPMAN PINCHER

fills in some gaps in the £120 million story

AFTER a search of more than two years
the Government has failed to find an atom
scientist good enough to replace Dr. Klaus
Fuchs, the Russian spy now serving a 14-year
jail sentence.

This is officially disclosed in the first re-
port* to the nation on Britain’s £120 million
atomic enterprise, published recently.

There is no mention of Fuchs in the report’s
128 pages, though they are entirely devoted
to the Harwell atom station where he work-
ed.

His name and that of his fellow-Communist
Bruno Pontecorvo, who fled to Russia 21

at Harwell is a blank space in the list of de-
partmental chiefs. It occurs opposite the
name “Theoretical Physics”—the department
which he headed. It is still without a leader.

This omission is typical of the report which
is being sold as “the story of the work and
problems of Harwell,” but it little more than
ash-dry catalogue of complicated machinery
and chemical processes,

The real story of Harwell is the story of
courageous struggle against materials short-
ages, political indecision, Civil Service “pro-
cedure” and the ham-stringing restrictions of
security.

Above all, it is the human story of the
fight to rebuild mutual trust after repeated
political purges culminating in the discovery
among the station’s top ten men ofthe most |
damaging spy in history. LES,

months ago, have been carefully kept out
even from the long list of scientific papers
published by Harwell men.

The only admission that Fuchs was ever

PHOTOGRAPHS

Copies of Local Photographs
Which have appeared in the

Advocate Newspaper

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ere:
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25 1952

Leg. Co. Approve

Salary Increases

i. Beek pank’s fair average-standard; if the sal
In this connection Honourable
Members will no doubt be aware
of the assurance that was given in
the Other Plate by the Leader of
the House that early steps would
be taken to obtain the services of
a Commissioner to review the con-
ditions of service of the rest of the
Service. It will be remembered
that Commissioner Adams recom-
mended that his proposals should
hold good for five years and
should then be reviewed, but he
was not of course able to foresee
such factors as devaluation or the ermment to-day requires :—
= = pre: ¢ living or the 1. A fair and
ing 0: estern world, minis i i
and in the circumstances it seems 2. The po ee
reasonable that the review should and order
be brought forward, 3. :

Aim—Too High

It has been put to me that the
Committee aimed too high. Study
of the salaries in the upper
branches of the other Public Ser-
vices in the Caribbean does not
bear this out. To take two ex-
amples. The salary proposed for
the Chief Justice would put him
above the Puisne Judges of Trini-
dad and British Guiana, instead of
below as at present, and is just
about right to ensure that this post
is filled by an officer of the right
calibre when it falls vacant.

Or again, the post of Director of
Highways and Transport, whose
present holder has been offered
and accepted a transfer to Trini-
dad, and is being retained here
until a successor is appointed, can-
not be filled suitably at present,
for where will a qualified Civil
Engineer with the requisite ex-
perience be found to take up the
post on $5,040 a year without leave
passages? Certainly not from
Trinidad, which has six officers in
the Department of Works and
Hydraulics whose salaries exceed
$5,040 a year and whose scale for
Executive Engineers exceeds that
point. But the proposed new
terms, $6,480 with leave passages,
without being in any way extrava-
gant, ought to ensure that the post
is filled in the not too distant fu-
ture with a suitably qualified offi-
cer with the necessary experience.

ernment workers will

government expenditure

- reduced.

vice is composed of

civil service.

second the ver:
provisions. The first condition
does not apply to the community
generally. Contrary to ill-formed
opinion in Government circles
there is no security of tenure in
commerce for the very simple
reason that business enterprise is
risky and any business enterprise
can fail, from one cause or an-
other, In the case of Government
the service is continuous whether
efficiently or inefficiently carried
on, Therefore, when a young man
decides to enter the wider field
of commercial enterprise he can
have no security of tenure how-
ever ~ efficient he individually
may be. The Civil Servant, on
the other hand, knows that in the
case of Government he is assured
of life _ long employment unless
his conduct is such that Govern-
ment is forced to dispense with
his. services. A precise value
cannot placed on this factor
of security of tenure, but it is
taken into consideration when
the cash emoluments are fixed.

Pensions
With regard to pensions, this

is another factor which must
be taken into consideration.
The present pension provisions
of Government are very gen-
erous through the early retir-
ing age. Such conditions do not
exist in the community gen-
erally, It is true that all the
principal commercial houses in
this Island, as well as the Sugar
Estates, grant pensions to their
employees, but even in such
cases there is no guarantee that
the business may not get into
financial difficulties at some
time in the future. For this
reason many businessmen are
now taking steps to purchase
pensions for their employees
through the insurance Com-
panies so that the employee is
protected in case the firm fail-
ed, but even in this case the
pension can only be propor-
tionate.

After giving, weight, to__ these
factors, the cash emoluments of
the Government employee must
be settled. The rates generally
should be somewhat below the
best wages earned in commerce,
but certainly above the lowest. In
other words, the salary must be
such as to attract a reasonably
good type of employee, and of
such an amount that the Govern-
ment servant can live in reason-
able comfort. The Civil Servant
cannot expect to enjoy the bene-
fits of security of tenure and
good pension provision and still
have a cash salary equal to the
best in commerce; on the other
hand, Government must not
over-value the two factors of
security of + tenure and_ pension
provisions, Since no precise
value can be placed on these two
factors, and, imasmuch as the
conditions in non government
areas vary considerably there is
no complete yardstick by which
government salary scales can be
settled. There must inevitably
be a certain amount of human
judgement involved in the mat-

ter.
General Principles

If the general principles out-
lined in this address are accepted,
it will be seen how very silly it is
to compare the salary of the Chief
Justice with the wage of a can-
tonier of the Road Board. One
must compare like with like. Those
appointments in the service which
can be exclusively filled by Bar-
badians are compared with con-
ditions in Barbados. Thus in fixing
ithe salary scales of clerical work-
ers, typists, office messengers,
‘tradesmen, mechanics, and man-
ual workers you compare Govern-
ment scales with their counter-
parts in this Island, and applying
tthe principles previously outlined
you fix these somewhat below the
top rates in commerce since the
two factors of séeurity of tenure
and pension provisions must be
gives some weight,

‘When it comes to those positions
whicn cannot be filled exclusively
by Barbadians you take into con-
sideration the salary scales for
those neighbouring Islands whose
economic position is comparable
with Barbados. This is the princi-

COSTUME
JEWELLERY

including —

Summing Up

To sum up, I would certainly
deny that the Committee aimed
too high. In the few cases, such
as Director of Agriculture, where
the salary proposed exceeds the
British Guiana figure, there are
good reasons for the recommenda-
tion.

Finally, I would stress that the
Committee was not working in a
void, but although as the Com-
mittee warned in paragraph 25 of
its report, the implementation of
its recommendations will not re-
sult in the immediate filling of all
senior administrative, profession-
al and technical posts with men of
the requisite calibre, it should ar-
rest the present decline, and by
and large, ensure that the present
vacancies and future vacancies, as
and when they occur, are filled by
officers of the requisite quality
and experience.

Classification

Hon. Mr. H, A. Cuke said; The
approach to this subject appears
to me to’ be somewhat along the
following lines, The wage earn-
ing population of this Island is
made up of a number of different
occupations or callings, and a
general classification would be
somewhat as follows :—

Business Executives;
Technicians; Medical
ers including Specialists; Legal
Practitioners; Accountants; En-
gineers; Architects; Building
Contractors; Agriculturists: Cle-
rical Workers including Typists;
Tradesmen; Skilled Workers;
Semi-skilled Workers; Manual
Workers.

This
classified
heads.

Under modern conditions Gov-
ernment activities embrace a
very wide field and it can be
stated with some assurance that
in the Government service there
will be found the counterpart of
every occupation or calling which
will be found in the community
generally. It would be extremely
difficult to find any class of wage
earner in. the community whose
counterpart cannot be found in
the Government ice. j

As time goes on an increasing
proportion of the national in-
come is expended by Govern-
ment and unless the Government
has no sense of responsibility it
is essential that this expenditure
must be administered with the
greatest care, or it will be wast-
ed, By the very nature of things
this is a difficult task and the
problem is intensified unless the
service can attract the best possi-
ble workers of every grade. This
attraction can only become real
if the conditions of service and
salary scales are in line with
those of the Community general-

ly. ’
Average Standard

If the salary scales and condi-
tions of service are in conformity
with those in force in the gener-
al community, the general run of
Government employees, will in
the long run, be composed of a

Business
Practition-

list
into

further
sub-

could be
numerous





AND
' OTHER BEAUTIFUL





ro; 3592 & 13





ary scales are below that of the
community the standard of Gov-
" be lower
with a consequent waste of Gov-
ernment expenditure; and as all
comes
out of the national income the
amount left to the community is
It is to -the-interest of
every member of the community
to see that the Government ser-
‘ efficient
workers who are prepared to give
a-good day’s work and are free
from corruption. Successful gov-

impartial ad-
law
An_ efficient and incorrupt

In arriving at the cash emolu-
ments of civil servants there are
two main factors which have to
be taken into consideration. The
first is security of tenure, and the
generous pension







A LARGE CROWD gathers around the spot where the generator of a welding plant exploded on the

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





EXPLOSION



Wharf yesterday about 10.15 o'clock. The plant was being worked b:

mechanics who ran off just before the explosion occurred.





ple followed by

the only reasénable way in which
the matter can be dealt with.

The opponents of the résolution

failed to give due weight to the
principles of comparing one class
of employment in the Government
service with the similar class in
the community generally, includ-
ing the wider area of neighbour-
ing Islands where this was neces-
sary. Even when an attempt was
made to make comparisons, mis-
quotations occurred. For instance,
the Revenue of British Guiana
was quoted as $60,000,000 whereas
‘the correct figure should be
$25,000,000. British Guiana has a
population of 400,000 as compared
with a Barbadian population of
200,000 and an annual Revenue of
$12,000,000,
Particular Cases

As stated previously, there is no
precise yardstick by which salary
scales can be fixed, and therefore
any salary scale which is advanc-
ed can be attacked in particular
instances. For my part I do not
subscribe to every detail of the
seale which is before the Council,
but I do feel that taken as a whole
the scale is a reasonable one and
can be accepted without any seri-
ous reservations.

Even if comparison is made be-
tween one scale and another scale
in the service, it must not be lost
sight of that the incidence of in-
come tax reduces the difference
considerably. For instance,. the
ference between the salary of the
Chief Justice which is put down
at £2,000 and a clerk in the ser-
vice of £500 appears superficially
as £1,500; in actual fact, assuming
both to be married men with two
children and each paying 4% to
the widows and orphans fund, the
difference is only £1,183. The
former pays 18%% Income Tax,
the latter less than 1%.

There is one other matter on
which I should like to comment.
The opponents of the resolution
have stated that their principal
objection to the resolution was the
increase to Administrative offic-
ers. My own observation on this
point-is that the successful carry-
ing or of the Government depends
on the efficiency of its administra-
tive officers, If the head of the
Department is efficient, his effi-
ciency permeates throughout the
department. if he is inefficient the
standard of efficiency throughout
the department is lowered, This is
the experience of commercial
concerns*and applies equally to
Government. For this reason it is
essential to offer such salaries as
wijl attract the best men to the
post, whether he is an imported
officer or a Barbadian. For reasons
given above. I beg to support the
resolution,

Specialist Teachers

Hon, Dr. H. G. Massiah said he
‘was very glad to see that after
the passage of three years, Gov-
ernment had at last succeeded in
sending down the respective Reso-
lutions, and recalled that it was
sometime in 1949 that he first
raised the question of improving
the conditions and salaries of the
Service, when he asked the hon-
ourable Colanial Secretary ‘““wheth-
er Government was aware of the
fact that the Secondary Schools
were being depleted rapidly of all
specialist teachers, and that that
state of affairs was due to the
fact that they were not given
leave passages and also that their
salaries were not competitive
enough to keep them in Barbados.”

As the Colonial Secretary had
pointed out, he (Dr. Massiah) was
appointed to the Committee which
investigated the matter, and he
had. great hopes that what that
Committee had set out to do would
have been implemented earlier.
However, like many other things
in Berbados, politics consider-
ations had killed all their efforts
and it had taken three years for
the Resolutions to come before the
legislature.

Hon. Dr, Massiah admitted that
it would be impossible for any-





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DESIGNS



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Broad Street.







the Committee body to be able to make compre+
appointed by Government, and is

hensive Resolutions of the sort and
please everybody, and he thought
that the Committee which had
dealt with the matter, and whose

recommendations were the suo-
ject of the Resolutions, had
served Barbados well by pre-

senting the fects as lucidly as they
had done.

He said it would be invidious
for him to mention one or two
cases Which he did not. think

were right for the simple reason,

as he had said before, that it would
be impossible for any collection
of people to bring down a schedule
of the kind to please everybody.

Heads’ Salaries

Hon. Dr, Massiah, however, drew
attentign to an anomaly which
might be noticed between the sal+
aries of the Headmaster of the
Lodge School and the Headmaster
of the Combermere School, and
asked by what process of mental
reasoning the salaries of the two
Heads were arrived at,

He pointed out that the salary
of the Headmaster of Combermere
school was set at $6,000, while
hat of the Headmaster of the
Lodge was set at $5,520. He said
he could not fathom what reason
lay behind the anomaly, because
as he regarded the status of the
ttwo schools, there was no com-
parison educationally at all,

Hon. Dr. Massiah argued that
the Lodge School “does the same
work as Harrison College, has a
staff of specialists and University
Scholars who are masters in that
school, provides education up to
the highest of the accepted Uni-
versities in the world—which was
the same as Harrison College does.
Combermere, Hon, Dr, Massiah
continued, “does not attempt to da
this sort of work and therefore, to
place it above a school like the
Lodge School which is on par with
Harrison College, to my mind, ‘s
unjust and unfair.”

Elementary Schools

He said: “I have been trying to
find out what the reason for doing
it is. If it is a question of numbers.
surely the Headmaster of the St.
Giles’ Elementary Boys’ School
whose numbers are 1,000 should
get twice the salary of the other
Headmasters, Similarly, the Head-
master of the Wesley Hall Boys’

School. I cannot understand nor
rationalise this procedure.”

Hon, Dr. Massiah asked the
Colonial Secretary to say what

were the grounds for the differ-
ence in the salaries of the Head-
masters of the Lodge School and
Combermere, or whether it was
an oversight.

A Perfect Schedule

Hon. G. D. L. Pile said he was
quite certain that all members of
the Council would know how he
stood on the question before them
and as the honourable member
who had just sat down had said,
it was impossible to make a sched-
ule of salaries and satisfy every-
body that every post had been
treated equally well,

“T think Government is to be
heartily congratulated for what
they have done,” he said.

It was unpopular and a matter
which obviously had been misrep-
resented both with regards to what
was being attempted and with
regards the motive behind the at+
tempt. Something was being done
that ought to have been done long
ago and which he believed would



YOU'LL FANCY

if
yp Y
Pap
am) %

styles.
These have
carefully se

something s
any occasion,






y Neville Forde and two othet





in Cotton, Art Silk, and
Nylon in “Fashion-right”

amongst them you'll find



HARRISONS

BROAD STREET—DIAL 2352



VOSS SSS TOEOOOOSS HOO OFOOOO

Generator
Explodes

Three mechanics, Neville Forde,
Gomez Boyce and Norman Al-
leyne, who were working with a
welding plant on the U
Wharf yesterday morning about
Ww.45 am. escaped injury by
scampering away ju before the
generator which contained cal-
cium carbide, exploded

The carbide scattered over a
farge area of the road, some soiled
the workmen and a few others too

pper

and some poured into the sea. A
side’of the generator was blown
high into the air and fell on the

opposite side of the wharf about
50 yards off.

“When I saw the main valve
stuck,” Forde told the Advocate,
“we decided that there was no-
thing else to do but to run and
save ourselves.”

Immediately after the explosion,
crowds gathered about the spot.

Heaviest Rainfall
At Crab Hill





heaviest rainfall on
cording to the Police
yesterday this area had received
41 parts of rain, but no district re-
ceived an inch of rain, No damages
were reported to the Police.
Other figures were District “A”
13 parts, District “B” 14 parts,
District “C" three parts,
“D"” seven parts, District “E” 20
parts, Four Roads, St. John seven
parts. |
Many people in the Crab Hill}
area complained of the high winds)
on Sunday, but again there was
ro serious injury or damage re-
ported. |

Monday,

ac

—



have been done long ago, had
fit’ been possible to get it accepted
by the Legislature

It was ‘refreshing, he said, in
these days to find that there had
been ccu.age enough to bring
down a measuse so unpopular and
he would like to cengretulate those
responsible.

son, Dr. A. S. Cato observed
that the Resolutions were of great
importance and seemed to have
created a great deal of public re-

ad or ea aes fs A san $24 DONATED BY

selves as to where they stood on A. WONDER LTD.

the matter, .
|



There did not see much | The amount of $24 listed under |
dig Sg nt seem Sonieal and the head New Bike for Ken Fat
professional officers, But it seemed num appearing in yesterday's is-|
to be generally recognised that Sue was donated by
since the war there had been great

A. Wonder |
Ltd, Ovaltine Manufacturers, Lon-|
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‘shortages and consequently a great : S Seieeat a
demand for officers of that kind, of Ovaltine Co., as was staten
add unless they improved the con-

ditions of services and salaries at-

tached to the pasts, they would “WILLEMSTAD”

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to . be j conten — 1 of The Lord Combermere which is|

uncertain quality, doing the job of towing the Num-|

“Adjustment ber One Water B ; being |
The attempt to adjust the sal- painted. Pe ee

aries resulted in anomalies in re- The Dutch Motor Vessel Wil-|
spect of administrative posts and lemstadt is still on dock undergo- |
adjustment of these anomalies re- ing a general overhaul. She is ex-
sulted in a hue and cry through- pected to come off dock sometime

out the services for better con- next week, |
ditions, Government seemed to --—

think that the clamour. was just J

and he noticed that Government “WANDERER'’

had promised to set up a Com-
mission to enquire into the rest
of the Service and make recom-
menaations.

So what really started as a
limited objective had finished by
being a complete overhaul of the
whole Service?

It seemed to him that Govern-
ment, the administration, were
the best judges of whether the
island could afford the measures
or not and they had been told in

GOING TO U.K.

The Steamsnip Wanderer arriv-
ed in Carlisle Bay yesterday
morning from Dominica Her
agents are DaCosta & Co., Lid
When she leaves she will be going
to the United Kingdom,

OBITUARY





Mr. George Blackburne

very plain language that the
island could, "he des , nay taitem
Government had reviewed the 4, he death occurred at his resi-

dence Maiden’s Lane on Friday of

situation and felt that they could y),. George

afford the changes. When he said ‘paiiy Clerk Blackburne, eed
review, he took it as accepted “Hiring the last two year:
that it was not only in the light «purns,”’ as he was known. to!
of the propositions before them everyone, showed a serious de- |

then, but also in the light of any

Crap Hill, St. Lucy, received the |

|

Up to 6 a.m. |

District



cline in health after a serious fall |
on the deck of a steamer. He yet
maintained the keenest interest in ||

proportionate recommendations
which might be made in the light

of the propositions before them ee affairs and matters affect
Commission to be set up and also jing business at the waterfront. |
in the light of social and capital Here he was highly respected ||

works that Government had plan-
ned doing.

Several people had asked him,
he said, why it was that a local
Commission was set up to investi-
gate what was then before them
and when it came to the investi-

no less because of his virility of ||
character than his knowledge of |
ships and men visiting the Port}
of Bridgetown during the last 50)
years, |

Fond of sport in all its forms he |
was a true friend and a fine com- |

dation of the rest of the service, panion. There was a side to his
it wad necessary to bring one from character which many of his)
elsewhere. He did not know the friends never suspected, He was}

a tender man, The troubles of his |
friends distressed him and he has
been known to forego his own
pleasures and even financial gain |
to render help in times of distress

The fool he brushed uncere-
moniously from his path and the
tout and vagabond he threatened
with a dose of his own punish-
ment, For all this he was loved
and respected especially the
waterfront.

Mr, Blackburne was twice mar-
ried, both wives and a son by the

reason, but it seemed to him that
they should avoid getting one
yardstick in that that was before
them then and another in the
other. It waa very important to
avoid anything of that nature.
Generous Increases

“I have no doubt that these in-
creases recommended are very
generous,” the said, “and I also
have no doubt that we cannot go
on forever, to use the words that
have been used before. Finality
has to be reached sometime. I first marriage having predeceased |
hope that the result which is en- him. His passing will be the |
visaged, namely, a better and more source of deep regret and sincere
efficient Service, will be achieved.” condolence will be extended to his

e On page 6 relatives.

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PAGE SIX

Leg. Council

@ From Page 5

As the Honourable Colonial
Secretary mentioned, he said,
political and constitutional
changes were taking place and if

Ministerial Status was coming to
Barbados, then people who did
the administrative work would
have to be men of the highest
calibre. a

Everyone would realise that in
the changes, the improved con-
ditions would not at onde give

them a perfect and efficient
Civil Service, “I am not sure,”
he said, “I do not wish to be

offensive, but I am sure that the
Honourable Colonial Secretary
must be well aware that there
are certain squarish in
roundish holes and in are
not deserving in these increases.”

But, he added, had to
consider the position and net the
personality and he believed they
should make the changes with a
view to not excluding the possi-
bility of putting more efficient
people in the job whenever and
wherever’ the Opportunity arose.

It seemed to him, he said, t...1
they should not give everyone
the benefit of the increases at one

fell swoop and he wondered
whether they should not be
graded so that the con-
cerned could work up te them
When it came Heads of
Departments, could it not be
possible, he asked, that they

could be scaled in such a way as
to make it possible to take people



scale the headmaster of Founda-
tion Buys’ School was on a par
with the Headmistress of St.
Michael’s Girls’ School and in the
new scale they had the Head-
mistréss of St. Michael’s Girls’
School getting $3,420 and the
Headmaster of Foundation getting
$4,080 and he wondered what
was the reason for the new
departure. He also noticed that
in one of the Resolutions, an
Assistant master might actually
reach a salary higher than the
headmaster and he wanted to
know what was the explanation
of that.
A Comparison

A point on which he would
speak very strongly, he said, was
the comparison between men and
women graduates and First or
Second Class Honours Graduates,
There was a_ great disparity
between the scales for women
Graduates and those for men
graduates, They would see, too,
that for women’s Honours Grad-
uates, the scale started much
lower than the scale for men
Graduates,

“A woman who has an Hon-
ours degree has to work for it
just as hard as a man,” he said.
“If she is doing comparable wor,
why should she be id less than
u man. If it were for some eco-
nomic reason, there need not be
such a disparity as we sée on this
schedule before us.”

Great Demand

into posts with a salary com-%, Hon. Mr. G. B, Evelyn thought

mensurate with their experience
and qualifications?

Training Schemes

One point that emerged from
it all was that they had to inten-
sify their training schemes, he
said, not only with a view to get+
ting their people better trained for
the work, but also with a view to

— having to be d . t on
the .yagaries of s and
densi Bom outside. wr

The were certain points of
details whieh occurred to him
and which he did. not intend

A. at that stage, but as
others Natl taken the initiative in
mentionir such points, he
would - one or two points,

He noticed that in Po. of
certain grades in the ce, the
lower-~emolument grades had
been “raiSed and he was anxious
te know just what happened to a
more senior officer in a grade
when a junior officer jumped to
the new low level. Was it that
he suffered a certain amount of
loss or was he allowed a certain
number of increments to main-
tain his position of seniority?

On the question of the teach-
ers, he said that in the case of the
headmaster of Combermere and
Lodge, it seemed to him always
to have been that way and in the
new scale, the same relationship
that existed in the old scale was
maintained,

They would notice in the old





that the whole trouble wag due to
the great demand in every de-
partment of the Public Services | or
people to fill jobs which had been
created as a result of an increase
in Government work, social ser-
vices and everything else, and the
corresponding lack of people who
were capable or willing to accept
those jobs.

Referring to the professional
men, Hon. Mr. Evelyn said that
men in private practice in these
days found more inducement than
what was being offered in the
Public Services. There were many
medical men who would take part-
time jobs, but, he asked, “what
medical man is going to give up
his practice to take a job as Direc-
tor of Medical Services?”

He said that even in England
there was difficulty in getting
legal practitioners to give up their
practice -to take a judgeship.
There was great demand, he said,
and supply was limited. Added to
that, the promise of pension did
not appeal to them.

Hon, Mr. Evelyn asked: “How
long can we carry on this com-
‘petition with other places larger
than ourselves? We can compete
up to a point, but every place has
its limitations.” ;

Like other honourable members,
Hon. Mr. Evelyn said he could see
no reason for going into the de-
tails of the Order, because who-
ever prepared an Order of the
kind was bound to make some re-
commendations with which others
would disagree,

Replying the Hon. the Colonial

Approve Salary Increase

Secretary in referring to the point
raised by Hon. Or. Massiah rela-
tive to the salaries of the Head-
masters of the Lodge School and
Combermere said that it would be
seen from Appendix D of the Re-
port that the Director of Educa-
tion submitted written representa-
tions, and appeared in person be-
fore the Committee, so that the
Committee had the advantage of
his advice. He pointed out that in
the written representations of the
Director of Education, recom-
mendations were submitted, and
it was suggested that such and
such a percentage of increase
should be for the Head of Com-
bermere and such and such a per-
centage should be for the Head of
the Lodge.
Retain Difference

It was agreed by the Committee
that the difference between the
Director of Education and the
Headmaster of Combermere, and
the Headmaster of Combermere
and that of the Lodge should be
retained at present. e effect of
that was that the Headmaster of
Combermere School should re-
ceive a salary $960 less than the
Director of Education and the
Headmaster of the Lodge a salary
$480 less than the Headmaster of
Combermere. The Committee
accepted the Director’s assessment
of the importance of the two posts
in ratio one with the other, and his
suggestion that the two posts
should retain their status quo.

The Colonial Secretary pointed
out that in effect, when one
looked at Appendix C of the Re-
port, the percentage given the
Headmaster of the Lodge was
greater than that given the Heaci-
master of Combermere.

Following a sotto voce remark
by Hon, Dr, Massiah to whose
query he was replying, Hon, Mr.
Turner said it was clear that the
Honourable Dr, Massiah was not
content with his explanation, and
said that, if one looked at the
report it would be seen that the
Committee held 21 meetings in
approximately sixty days. This
meant that the Committee worked
under considerable pressure, The
Director of Education had
appeared before the Committee,
and had put up his recommenda-
tions in writing. He considered
that the ratio between the Head-
master of Combermere who at
present drew more than the
Headmaster at the Lodge should
remain the same, and the Com-
mittee accepted the recommen-
dation with the result that the
proposed increase for the Head-
master at the Lodge was in fact
slightly higher than that for the
Headmaster at Combermere, The
salaries were in relation to the
scale recommended by the Head
of that Department, and the post
of $5,520 for the Headmaster of
the Lodge was midway between
the extreme points in the scale.

With regard to Hon, Dr. A, S.
Cato’s point about the setting up
of a Commission from outside to
consider the remainder of the







BARBADOS ADVOCATE



In The Leg. Co.
Yesterday

WHEN the Legislative
Council met yesterday, a
number of Resolutions and
Bills which gives sanction
to the Civil Establishment
Order which makes provi-
sion for increases in the
salaries of technical person-
nel and Heads of Depart-
ments of Government De-
partments, were passed.

were as follows:—

(General) (Amendment) No.
4 Order, 1952.

2. Resolution to approve
the Civil Establishment
(Teachers) (Amendment)
No, 2 Order, 1952.

3. Resolution to vary the
salary scales and allowances
payable to Headteachers and
Teachers in First and Sec-
ond Grade Aided Schools as
set out in Appendix ‘D’ to
Resolution No. 33/1949.

4. Resolution to make the
salaries, allowances and con-
ditions of service set out in
Column TI of the Schedule
to the Resolution applicable
to the officers set out in Col-
umn I of the Schedule to
the Resolution with effect
from the Ist of April, 1952.

5. Resolution to approve
the Pensions (Pensionable
Offices) (Amendment) Or-
der, 1952,

6. Resolution to approve
the Civil Fstablishment
(Leave Passase) Order,
1952.

7. Resolution to approve
the Civil Establishment
(Payment of Passages)
Ament ree. 1952.

8. Bill intituled an Act
to amend the Chief Judge
and Crown Law Officers Act,

1907 (1907—13).

9. Bill intituled an Act
to amend the Assistant
Court of Appeal Act, 1900
(1900—2).

10. Bill intituled an Act
to amend the Anglican
Church Act, 1911) (1911—
10).

The Council then adjourn-
ed until 2.00 p.m. on Tues-
day, July 8.



Service, Hon. Mr, Turner said it
was up to His Excellency the

Governor who was selected to siti|cil that Heads

on the other Commission (that
which will consider the salaries
of the rank and file of the Ser-
vice), and referring again to
paragraph 4 of the Committee’s
Report, said that it took 21 meet-
ings covering roughly three
months, and that meant consid-
erable strain.

SRS ASE

PARK CLOSE TO THE CURB





BARBADOS AUTOMOBI

LE

ASSOCIATION |



Bigger Job

If His Excellency the Governor
should appoint a Committee with-
in the island for the other job,
which of course was much bigger
than the first, then no doubt the
members would serve, but he (the
Colonial Secretary) felt that it
would be beyond their capacity
to do their existing jobs and do
their work on the Committee as
well.

The Cormmittee of which he was
Chairman had 21 meetings
which many were held during the
night, because if they had worked
in the day time, the report would
have been held up considerably.
He said that if an inside com-
mittee was appointed for this
much bigger task, he felt it would
be a great strain on the Commis-
sion, but he added “it is a
matter for the Governor to de-
cide.”

He had mentioned that the Com-
mittee was not dealing with a yoid.
It would have made their task
much simpler if it had been so.
On balance, it seemed better to
do what the committee did.

As regard the point about the
“Squarish pegs in roundish holes”
Hon. Mr. Turner said that for all
he knew he might be one, but the
point was that the particular
people were in the jobs, and would
continue to be so, but as and
when they did go, it would be
possible to fill those posts with
qualified people. :

He said that the Administration
was making full use of the Public
Service Commission, and was in-
voking the general clause in
which matters of the sort might
be referred to the Publi¢ Service
Commission for their advice.

Anomalies

Regarding the matter of the
anomalies created by the differ-
ence in the salaries of the heads
of some secondary schools as
raised by Hon, Dr, Cato, the Hon.
the Colonial Secretary again re-
ferred to the recommendations of
the Director of Education, and
mentioning the point concerning
the grades raised by Hon. Dr.
Cato, said that for administrative
convenience, it was considered
that there should not too
many scales.

On the point about intensifying
the training schemes, Hon. Mr.
Turner recalled that His Excel-
lency had said that he would en-
deavour to deal with each depart-
ment individually rather than deal
with the complete training plan,
and added “training proposals are
very much in the fore at the
moment.”

Hon. Mr. Turner told the Coun-

of

be





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were going up to see His Excel-
lerncy daily in the afternoon, and
he therefore hoped that an over-
all training scheme would not be
long in delay. He expressed the
further ope that “when officers
should have received their train-
ing, they would not_return to Bar=
bados and stay for a short while
and then vanish elsewhere.”
Those conditions of service
recommended in the committee's
report would help te insure that
those people who were trainedwiit ;
return to Barbados. When the
Resolutions were passed, the Ad-
ministration would in fact have
to go carefully through and see
what the repercussions would be,
and he felt that Hon. Dr, Cato
would have to rely on the good)
sense of the Administration with |
the assurance that in cases of that |
sort it would be referred to th)
Public Service Commission. |
Regarding the differential be-|
tween male and female honours |
graduates, the Hon. the Colonial
Secretary said the Committee felt |
that that differential should re-'
main, and said that it was not,
pointed out at any time during!
the committee’s deliberations that |
ithey were going contrary to the
recognised practice elsewhere.



Not Convinced

Hon. Dr. H. G. Massiah in refer-
ring to the Colonial Secretary's
reply, said that as the Colonial
Secretary had said, he had not
been convinced. It seemed to
him, as he had said, before, to be
an anomaly as there could be no
comparison between the two
schools,

“It is surely want of vision on
somebody’s part to allow a thing
of this sort to go ,on,” he said.
“I do not think any explanation
can be given because what he has
said makes the position more
indefensibe than ever.” |

Hon. G. D. Pile who supported |
Hon. H. G. Massiah on this ques-
tion, said that why on earth the
Headmaster of Combermere wa:
paid more originally seemed to
him a matter that it was well to
investigate. One was a secondary
and the other a primary school.

He pointed out that the Director
of Education and both head-
masters were increased by the
same $720.

* On this question, Hon, F. C.
Hutson said that he might be
wrong, and it might not be the
reason, but for many years, Lodge
School had been a boarding school
and it had been quite possible
that the outside emoluments of
the headmaster through this
quarter was far above those of
the headmaster of Combermere in












a

é

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25. 1952 '







*
those days. Now the Board;
emolurnent had been separated | When BACK
and therefore the Headmaster of |
Lodge got nothing out of the/|
Boarding. A ese
He was not defending the Com- : kidneys.
mittee, he said, but it would be eee ap ert my When
good if an investigation WET®| they get out of order, excess acids and
made, for obviously Lodge School ;: wastes in the system.
| was considered senior,to Comber- Lm backache, rheumatism,
mere and its headmaster should | disturbed rest or that ‘tired out’ a
be considered senior too. | soon follgw. To make your kidneys
The respective Resolutions were tnd ince Bettis baie
then passed. use 's Kidney s
Pills quickly rid your over-burdened blood
| of excess acids and wastes so that pure,
Ob fresh blood flows to nerve and muscle.
better and you are to dance
WHEN the Legislative Council ig. ‘ata on Dodd's
met yesterday, Hon. G. B, Evelyn in the blue with the
presented a petition from the| bands. Only 3/-at stores. 124
Anglican Synod praying that the Kidney Pills
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a coast to coast telecast to raise
_ funds to-send the United States

gh cularly on the western half

her elégance in Paris salons and
on magazine coves: to-day
from injuries € in a car

ee
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crash yesterday,

oad, She was unconscious when

pital suffering from a fractured

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1952

T.V. Show
Cost Cinemas
$2,000,000

HOLLYWOOD, June 24.
A survey showed United States
wide motion picture box office re-
ceipts’ dropped off more than
$2,000,000 on Saturday night when
14-hour _ television

Uniforn: Reporting
Urged By
Hurricarie Ctee

PORT-OF-SPAIN.

Greater uniformity in weather
reporting practices features the
recommendations of the Eastern
Caribbean Hurricane Committee
which met at Kent House this
week at the invitation of the
Caribbean Commission.

The Committee’s report urges
conformance with international
standards with respect to (1)
bours of reporting; (2) standard-
ising barometers; (3) the location
of stations; (4) codes used in re-
porting.

Theatre here — which marked
Bing Crosby’s Video Debut film in

Olympic team to Helsinki,

Crosby, comedian Bob Hope and
Dorothy Lamour, their. co-star in
many pictures, obtained pledges
of more than $1,000,000: from per-
sons in all walks of life thereby
reaching a goal of $850,000,

Between announcements of
pledges as low as 25 cents to as
high as $10,000 top names in en-
tertainment and the athletic world
contributed specialties,

In the matter of reporting hours,
ihe Committee recommended that
“the islands in and adjoining the
Caribbean Sea should adopt the
international hours of observation
from January 1, 1953, and that
the other parts of the Regional
Association IV (North and Cen-
tral America) should consider the
possibility of adopting these inter-
national hours also as soon as pos-
sible.”

As to the use of codes, it is re-
commended that “ all members of
the region be urged to adhere to
the regional codes as promulgated
by the World Meteorological Or-
ganisation and that where such
eodes were not fully in use by
January 1, 1953, differences should
be notified to the President of Re-
gional Association IV.”

The Committee considered the
problem of expediting the send-
ing of reports and recommended
that “the Governments concerned
take all possible measures, either
through the provision of the neces~
sary facilities themselves or
through financial support of the
respective communication agenc-
ies, to ensure the expeditious flow
of meteorological reports and ad-
visories in the Caribbean Area.”

To ensure the prompt receipt of
hurricane advisories, the Com-
mittee recommended that, where
a continuous watch was not main-
tained, consideration should be
given to the use of automatic
radio alarm systems to alert per-
sonnel assigned to man receiving
stations.

The drop in box office receipts
which in some cases was from 25
to 40 per cent, was more acutely
felt since the show began at 8.00
p.m, Pacific coast time, Which on
Saturday night usually brings
movie houses the peak of business,

the United States. Farther east
here the show. started later
ple just stayed home that night
await the show.

—UP.



‘amous Maniiequimn
Dies After Crash

PARIS, June 24.
Praline, France’s most famous
mannequin known to the fashion-
able woman in-the world over for

Praline had been returning from
holiday by car when she was in-
olved in the crash with another
mar near Lissieunt, Northern
ance, and was hurled into the

e was brought to Lissieunt Hos-

While the Committee considered
that the organisation of hurricane
relief measures is not strictly in
its province, it proposed that mem-
bers keep “the Caribbean Com-
mission informed of all relief
measures undertaken in their ter-
ritories and any modifications
thereto,” The Commission, it was
noted, will undertake to send these
reports to the Governments con-
cerned.

In revising the action taken on
recommendations made by the
meeting held last year, four sub-
stantial achievements were re-
corded, The first was the installa-
tion of rawinsonde (radio sound-

7m. Tons Sugar jpg balloon) equipment at Guade-
: : oupe. Another was the inaugura-
On Free Market

tion of a radio-teletype broadcast
at Miami by the U.S. Weather
(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, June 24,

skull and with her face badly cut.
A. plastic surgeon was called,

The famous mannequin, a tall
slender blonde whose real name
was Jane Mayneer was 29 years
old, She was born in a village of
Loire Valley, won a beauty con-
test after. the war and went on a
tour of the United States. As head
model of Pierre Balmain’s fashion
house she became the most photo-
graphed mannequin in France,

—UP.







Bureau.
In line with the recommend-
Free market supplies of sugar
for the crop year ending August
31 next have been estimated at
7,335,000 metric tons and require
ments at 4,950,000 metric $a ac-
cording to a statistical report re-
ceived by the International Sugar
Council im@eting in London to-
day,

The West. Indies were repre-
sented at the two-day meeting of
the Council by J. M.- Campbell
Chairman and A, E. V. Barton
Secretary of the West India Com-
mittee, The meetings were at-
tended by representatives of 18
governments and by. observers
from ten other governments and
from food and agricultural organ-
izations,

A special committee reported

| the pragress made in drafting a

new International Sugar Agree-
ment. The Council decided to re-
commend to the governments
which signed the protocol the
prolonging of the present agree-
ment to August 31 next to sign
‘another. protocol @xtending that
@greement on the understanding
that as soon as the new agreement

“comes into force the protocol will
terminate.

ation that additional circuits be
set up, Martinique is now in
radio contact with Puerto Rico,
and the circuit can be put on-a
24-hour basis when necessary. The
Caribbean Commission has carried
out the recommendation that at
the start of the hurricane season,
a statement should be circulated

giving information concerning
radio stations issuing hurricane
warnings.



Committee Will
Work Out Rules

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jamaica, June 24,

B.W.I. Parliamentarians meet-
ing in Jamaica have agreed to the
formation of a British Caribbean
Parliamentary Association and
appointed a Provisional Commit-
tee of Hon, W. H. Courtenay,
O.B.E., Chairman, Hon. Donald
Sangster, Norman Manley, Wil-
liams of Antigua and Noel of
Grenada to work out its consti-
tution and rules.

The conference which began
Monday will be completed to-
moryow,





3

>

Joy Back Home

om
ay

VICE ADMIRAL Charles Turner
Joy, former chief negotiator at
Panmunjom, Korea, is shown with
his wife, and their dog “Fury”,
after their arrival in San Fran-
cisco on the transport Gen. H. W.
Butner, Joy refused to predict the
outcome of the Korean truce talks.
He said he believes the Commu-
nists are using the talks as a “‘tac-
tical maneuver to build up their
army.” (International Soundphoto)

R.B. Yacht Club

Tennis Tournament

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Ladies Singles
Mrs. D. E. Worme beat Mrs, A.
A. Gibbons 69-1, 4—6, 6—0.
Miss E. Worme beat Miss L.
Branch 6—3, 4—6, 6—1.
Men’s Singles
Mr. E, P. Taylor beat Mr. G.
Watson 6—1, 6—0,
Mr, W. H. Knowles beat Mr. G.
L. Hunte 6—4, 5—7, 6—2.
Mr, J. D. Trimmingham beat
Mr. F, D. Barnes 7—5, 6—2.
Mr. D. E. Worme beat Mr. S. P.
Edghill 6—0, 6—2.
TO-DAY’S FIXTURES
Ladies’ Singles
Miss M. King vs, Miss R. Hudson
Mrs, P. Patterson vs, Miss M.
Wood.



Men’s Singles

Mr. J. D. Trimmingham, vs. Mr.
M. deVerteuil.

Mr. H. L. Toppin Mr. V.
Roach.

Mr. D. E. Worme vs. Mr. I. §S,
Robinson,

Mr. C. B. Sisnett vs. Mr. D. Mac
Phail.

vs.



Dames Defeat
Unique High School

Notre Dame defeated Unique
High School in a Netball game on
Monday by twelve goals to four.

The Misses M. Dottin and D,
Belgrave scored six goals each for
Notre Dame while the Misses
Holder and Green scored three
goals and one goal respectively
for the Unique High School.



Surplus Money
For New Factory

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jamaica, June 24,

Jamaica’s share of the surplus
sugar money arising out of dollar

sales to Canada is likely to be ,

used towards erection of a new
sugar factory planned for the
western end of the island. The
sum officially announced to-da
is $1,500,000 insterfi of $1,000,000
reported yesterday.

Detailed plans of the factory of
10,000-ton capacity are not yet
completed but the capital cost is
to be met by government, C.D.C.
and cane farmers while industry
has been asked to apply any sur-



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Ladies Play

Tame Tennis

From Our Own Correspondent
By DENNIS HART
LONDON, June 24.
Today the Wimbledon spotlight

centred on the ladies.

The first and some of the second
round matches of the Women’s
Singles were played. They pro-
vided neither the thrills nor
shocks served up by the men
yesterday. All eight seeded
players won their matches.

Only one, Mrs. Jean Walker-
Smith, one of Britain’s two seeds
was extended. But she won in
two straight sets defeating Mrs

S. Schmidt of France 6—3, 6—4.

Doris Hart, the holder needed
just 22 mimutes to beat Miss S.
I, Oddling of Great Britain 6—1,
6—0, in the first stage of the de-
fence of her title. Miss Oddling
who was playing in place of the
injured Mrs, Mottram caused a
surprise by winning the first game
against the champion’s service.
But with no undue exertion Miss
Hart won the next 12 games to
take the match.

She displayed some powerful
ground shots which gained her
the title last year but appeared to
move a little slower about the
court. However this was no
doubt due to the fact that she
wasn't extended,

The eagerly-awaited Wimbledon
debut of 17-year-old Maureen
Connolly was greeted with tre-
mendous applause from the pack-
ed Number One Court.

For two days she had been out
of action nursing an injured
shoulder and her swing seemed
jerky. This did not prevent her
defeating Mrs. C. G. Moeller 6—2,
6—0. The American champion’s
display wasn’t spectacular but like
Miss Hart she wasn’t extended.

Louise Brough began her bid to
regain the title she lost last year
with a comfortable 6—1, 6—0,
victory over Miss P. A. Lewis.
She was right back to the form |
which won her the crown three |
years in succession and showed no
signs of the tennis elbow from
which she suffered last year,

Two other American seeds,
Shirley Fry and Pat Todd, main-
tained the run of quick victories.
Miss Fry had the easiest of all
against Mrs. W. C. J. Halford
whom she beat 6—0, 6—0, Mrs.
Todd defeated compatriot Miss A.
McGuire 6—0, 6—2.

Britain’s other seed Mrs, J.
Rinkel-Quertier beat Mrs, R.
Cooper 6—1, 6—3, and the

Australian champion Mrs. Thelma
Long had a convincing 6—1, 6—0
victory over Mrs. H. M, Proudfoot,

Men’s Doubles favourites K.
McGregor and Frank Sedgman
had an easy 6—0, 6—0O, 6—1 first
round victory over the Belgian
pair J, Brichant and P. Washer. |

Britain’s hopes Tony Mottram |
and Geoff Paish gained a note-
worthy victory over the young
Australian pair Don Candy and
Mervyn Rose, They won in four
sets 6—0, 3—6, 6—3, 6—4.



Youth Movement
Gets Gramaphone

he Barbados Youth Movement
has just received a gramophone
as a gift from the Cambell Youth
Centre, England, to assist the
youths in their musical apprecia-
tion,

A letter from the youth centre
in England, wished the President
of the local Youth Movement,
success in the Movement under-
takings and added that records
would be sent on within a fort-
night,

Man Drowned

Robert Miller of Bath Village,
Christ Church, was drowned off
Battery Beach, Christ Church
yesterday morning. Miller a 34-
year-old fisherman wag in a fish-
ing hoat about half mile off
Battery Beach when a large wave





Two other men who were in the





The Council will continue in-
vestigation of a new agreement
and a further meeting will be held
in September.

P. J. Westermann was re-elect-
ed Chairman,

~

Although Barbados has not sent
a delegate Hon. Lloyd Smith,
M.C.P, on his way to the U.K, on
a Parliamentary visit is acting as
an observer at the Conference for
that colony.





oF } «

REDIFFUSION

Offers a Commission of $1.50 in CASH for every New
Subscriber brought to and accepted by the Company.
REDIFFUSION will pay in addition a bonus of $25.00
to any person who brings in twenty-five New Subscrib-
ers in one Calendar month who are accepted by the
Company.

Have always a supply of Recommendation Forms ready

THEY CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE OFFICE
REDIFFUSION i+ Trafalgar Street.

=

))
»))

i THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.
ANNUAL HOLIDAY

\

| Out CUSTOMERS and FRIENDS are asked to note
that our WORKSHOP will be closed as from Monday,

16th June, 1952, to Saturday, the 28th June, 1952, inclu-

sive, for the purpose of granting our Workmen their

ANNUAL. HOLIDAY,

Arrangements have been made for emergency work

to be undertaken, during this period and the receipt

of repairs and delivery of completed work will be

continued as usual.

Our Merchandise Department and Office will be open

to business as usual.

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

White Park Road.
St. Michael

———















struck the boat thus capsizing eal

plus to the project. boat were brought safely ashore,



White shoes, to pass muster
in company, must be spot-
less, immaculate. Use
Propert’s White Renovato
or Propert’s Shuwhite. No
surer way of making sure



PROPERT’S
SHUWHITE & WHITE RENOVATOR
In Cartons with Sponge ~

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i smoes







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FITNESS © when you buy Aertex Mesh you
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ye .
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1% ‘with the wonder weave specially

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You feel warm in the cold and coo}

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SS

ADDRESS \
\







y 7 ¥ J
P.ALY.E. For J’ca
@rom Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jamaica, June 24,

A decision has been taken in)
Jemaica to introduce the pay-as-
you-earn Income Tax collection Page
sysiem here from January next -
year. The decision was taken as
a result of recommendations by

commercial and private groups in
the island.

MAIL NOTICES |

Mails for United Kingdon and France |
by the S.S. De Grasse will be closed at
the General Post Office as und r:— !

Patce! Mail at 3 p.m. on, the 27th |








Sweet dre

No fuss

weaning t






June 1952, Registered Mail at 9.15 a.m | other
on the °Sth June 52. Ordinar Mail at}
10.15, 2m. on the 28th June 1952 happy be
Malis for Bominiea, Antigua, Montser growing u
rst, Nevis, and St. Kitts by the M.V + :
Momeka, will be closed at the General | rm Mother ins ’
Past Office as under | se
Parcel Mail at 12 Noon on the 27th!
June 1952 Registered Mail at 2 p.m. on | ROBINSON’S ‘patent’ GROATS
the 2th June 1952. Ordinary Mail at
2.30 pm. on the 27th June 1952
Mails for St. Vincent by the Sch. |
Mandalay will be closed at the General |
Post Office as under:- |
Parcel Mail at 12 Noon on the 26th!
June Registered Mail at 2 p.m, |
on the 25th ‘une 1952. Ordinary Mail |
at 2.30 + on the 25th June, 1962



|
In Touch With Barbados |
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1) Lid. advise |
that they can now communicate with the
folowing ships throuh their Barbados
Coast Station

S.S. Rangitata, §.S



Fort Townshend, 8S Adolfo, 8.8
Rosario, §&.S. Juncal, 8.8 Riojachal,
$.S. Eva Peron, 5S.S. Sirena, S.S
Mercator, S.S. Buceaneer, S.5. Path-
finder, S.S. Bonito, S.S. Polarusgem,
s.s DeGrasse, S.S Bianca, S.S
Hyeres, 5.8 Latia, S.8, Jotunfjell,
M/T Driade, S.S. Astridnaess, Ss



Livada, S.S. Bixoe, S.S. Utilitas, Ss
North Point, S.S Finn Mark, 8.S. Tweed
8.S. Teresa, 8.S. S. Rosa, §.S. S Mon-
ica, S.S. Quercy, 8.8. Argentina, R.M.S
Lady Nelson, S.S. Rita Garcia, 5.8. Lm
perial Charlottetown, S.S, Crofter, S.S |
Alcoa Pointer, 8S. Stiklestad, S.S. L. |
P, St. Clair, 8/T Troy, S.S. Oranjestad,

|
j
\
North Britain, $.S |
|
|
|
|
|

8.8. Skauvann, 5.8. Araby, 8.8. Corri-
entes, S.S. El Aleto, 5.S. S. Adolfo, §.S
Alcoa Planter, M/T Thorbjorg, S.S. Frid
Tjof Nansen, S.S. Strix, S.S. Dolores,
S.S. Viator, S.S. Tridale, S.S. San
Veronico, S.S. Tiberius, 8.8. Benito,
8.8. Crown Point, 8S.S. Romana, 8.8. |
Brazil, S.S. Rosa, S.S. Seamagic, 8.S |
Augusta, S.S. Wanderer, 8.8. Seapear!





First in Preference the World Over

Copr, 1950 Borden Co. Internat’l Copr, Reserved







MILK STOUT
C. L. Gibbs & Co. Ltd.,

P. O. Box 56
BRIDGETOWN - Dial 2402






———— Fas 1,
5 —* COMFORT Anis

TCA specialize in the trans-
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Students. Take advantage of
our special student fares
Nermal lay-over expenses and
arrangements handled by TCA.

For full information, sec-
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ene Broad Street

i Phone 4518
TRANSCANADA Air Lines
International Trans-Atlantic
Transcontinental

SHINING EXAMPLE OF
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There’s always a clean hygienic
fragrance in every room where
this S-M-O-O-T-H Paste
cleanser is used, Pots, Pans,
and Tiles, Sinks, and Paintwork
respond quickly to its treat-
ment-—there’s not a scratch
in a mountain of Chemico.




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The County Chemical



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Ltd,, Birmingham, England



EVELYN ROACH & CO., LTD.

Sub-Agents for St

Lucia:

P.O. Box 191, FRANK H. JOHNSON & SON, LTD.
Bridgetown, Castries, Everybody's Stores,
Barbados, Bt. Georges, Grenada.



|





PAGE

SEVEN

OP COURSE ..+ Wisdom
is the best buy becausé it’s

| the only toothbrush with thig
* *correct-shape” handle it’s
\4e——— mado to help you get
into every crevice, even the
hardest to reach, No wondeg
more dentists fayvoug the
Wisdom shape than thag of
any othet toothbrush, i
| Nylon (Round-ended) .@}y

, .: Sd J, EGO
Wisdoin § Se

THE CORRECT-SHAPE TOOTHBRUSH
BY







—buy

MADE ADDIS BLTD.,, OB BBRBEPORD.,

Gets the.

Dirt owt?
of WORK CLOTHES
faster and easier than ANY Soapl

Yes, FAB — even in the hardest water — witl ge.
the dirtiest garments cleaner, whiter, brighter — and
QUICKLY too. For your dainty things or heaviest
wash—use FAB...put it on your gwocer’s list ‘AOcDaAcX.

Washing with FAB asecenellly
SAVES money — ~ :
Use HALF as

oo























A sprinkle of Vim on a damp cloth—a quick
rub —and those dirty, greasy things will sparkle
like new again! Vim leaves surfaces shining and
gleaming, so quickly and easily !

VIM

cleans everything
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| See cee
=

x+y 496-202



: LEVER paopuc?




PAGE EIGHT

CLASSIFIED ADS. | "mmc Saxe [ruse Nerices

TELEPHONE 2508



DIED



HOLDER—At Stuart's Land, Fairfield,
David Holder. His funeral leaves
hig late residence at 4 p.m. for the
Gili Memerial Chureh, thence to the
w Cemetery



(wife), Vernol, George,
(sons), James Jordan,
Harper (sons-in-law>,
Euretha, Esina, Naomi, Iris, Jestina
ida a
A papers
eee SS san
I
ROLLINS——We the undersign heg to re-
turn thanks to those relatives and

friends who attended the funeral of
Mr. Joseph Nathaniel Rellins whieh
took place on 22.6.52 and who sent
wreaths and Cards or im any way
gave their sympathy te the family

Mrs. E. Rollins and family
25.6. 52-—-la



IN MEMORIAM



BISHOP—-In lov memory ef eur deer
father, Aubrey Fitz Allan Bishop who
was called to rest on June 25th, 1951

Memories are treasures nO one ca.

steal
Death is a heartache, only time ca>
heal

Some may forget now that you are

But we — Yemember while jife\ TRACTOR-

|

wiites uenderan

(children), ima
(friend) . B

@52-—ia



Neen nn nnn EP anEIEn RARER
Attractive seaside Flat main road Has-



tings, wtably furnished, Engliso
Bath, Open Verandah facing sea. Suitabic
one person (or couple) rom July i.
Telephone 2949. 18.6.52-4.f n
FARAWAY, St. Philip Coast, fully
furnished For ee November,

December only. Dial 4@
a 6.52—t+.f.n

LARGE pearl and shingled. . shop |-

and shedroof for Rent On Alleyne’s









Land, Bush Hall Cross Rd Gooa
business stand. Apply EF Alleyne,
Bush Hall. 24.6.52-—3n
NEWHAVEN, Grane Coast, fully fur-
nished. For July, November, Decem-
ber only. Dial 4476 19.6.52—t. fn
— ————_—_—
ROOM—From July Ist at the Mayfair
Gift Shop. Suitable for Dressmakipg

Plower Shop, Hairdressing etc. Apply
at Mayfair 4 to 6 p.m,
29.5.52--4n

| ae
ST. WYENIFRED — Unfurnished Max-





FOR SALE

AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—Dodge Super-Deluxe, First Class
condition and Owner. . $2,000
Dial «76 .2--t. fn

CAR--Dodge. Two
overhauled New
working condition.







recently
Excellent
-.
22.6.52—80

seater
tyres.
Phone





CAR—-One ‘Austin Wh p. car with two
new 6-volt Batteries one standard & h.p.
in very goed condition Cc. R. Appie-
wh ite, Lakes Folly, Dial 5062

22.6.52—-3n



CAR--1951 Morris Minor, very good
condition. $1,800.00 Phone 2898

25.6.52-—2n



CAR—1 Morris 8 h.p. Tquring car in





wfeet working order. Price $350.00.

al 4719. 25.6.52—2n.
; CAR — 1951 Hillman Minx 8,000
miles as good as new R. Lewia
e/o Cave Shepherd & Co, Ltd

25.6.52—3n

a

only 16,400
Apply Redman

LAND ROVER, done
miles in excellent order
& Taylor's Garage Ltd

One Massey Harris Tractor
res and half tracks very
Manager ak Hall,
1.6.52—7n,

with pneumatic
little used. App!
St. Joseph.

TRALLERS—Single axle 4 tons and
double axle 6 tons from stock.













Smith Engineering Works, Roebuck
Street. Phone 4047 25.6. 52—Hn
VAN—Fordson Van in perfect running
order. 20,000 miles: Royal Store No 12,
High St. Dial 4359 24.6. 52-—2n
One (1) Columbia Record Player in
perfect condition. Phone Joan Burton
2881 or 5045, C/o T. Geddes Grant Ltd
25,6. 52-——3n





Just received new “shipment of Garrard
three speed Automatic Changers at
P. C. S. Maffei & Co. Ltd. Radio Em-

porium 15,6.52-—t.f.n.

PYE BATTERY SETS—Just a few left.
MAFFEI’S RADIO EMPORIUM.
15.6.52—t.f.n,

f



MECHANICAL

B.S.A. BICYCLES,
and sizes, call and see them.
Redman & Taylor's Garage Ltd,
25.6. 52—3n



various “models,









well Coast. Available Ist July. Apply
a ae vs ae 22" | “MACHINE—Usea Domestic, z Singer
“WISMAR", Gibbes , Beach, St. Peter, - } Sewing Machine In good c ion.
fully furnished 3 bedroom bungalow, | Ply Reliance Shirt Factory. 21.6.
for tue month gf July ABU un | ROYAL TYPEWRITER — As good as
new. Apply H. Jason Jones & Co.
24.6.52-3n
WANTED LIVESTOCK



_—_—— —
WANTED—A master for the Coleridge
and Parry School, St. Peter, Barbados,
to teach up to G. C. E. Ordinary level
Candidates with qualifications to teach
Agricultural Science will be preferred
Salary for a Graduate $1,728 x 72--2,160
” for a Graduate with Ist or 2nd
class hanours $1,820x96-—2, 800:
Allowance will be made for previous
experience. Applications with tegtime-
should be sent to the Headmaster
by 17th July, 1952. 18.6,52—3n

E

ES
JUNIOR OVERSEER. Rowans Planta-
tion. Apply in Person. 26.6.52—fn.

POSITION—Required as Cook ar
butler; pastries a specialty. Response,

neerful and willing, Diat s
ae 2, @ 80-40

SALES GIRL—with previous expe fe
enee of Dry Goods for a Dry





Store in Swan Street. Only in ent
and hard working need apply b
Box 270. Brid wh 25.6.52-—In,

S

diately, furnished 2-3
bedrooms. Garden spice. On Bug route,
Apply: X X X C/o Advocate ra

4.6,52—2n



“TWENTY-FIVE — DOLLARS extra Bonus
rom Rediffusion for 25 recommenda

tions tm ene calendar month.
4 6.92--2m

$62.50 POCKET MONEY easily earned
recommending 25 new subscribers to

REDIFFUSION in one month, —
20n

REDIFFUSION offers $1.50 cash for
each new Subscriber recommended by
you. a

SUPPLEMENT YOUR INCOME by
ean REDIFFUSION. Obtain
particulars from the REDIFFUSION

4.6 52—20n.

NOTICE

uv



52—20n,







POST OFFICE

REMOVAL OF POSTING BOX.

The PUBLIC POSTING BOX
has been removed from the wall of
the Dispensary, Horse Hill, St.
Joseph.

Posting facilities arg available
at the St. Joseph Post Office about
100 yards distant,

R. A. CLARKE,
Colonial Postmaster,
General Post Office,
24th June, 1952.



25.6.52—In,





o POPPI SOSSO
— NOTICE =



Customers holding
up to the end of

ment will be 30th June

Same may be collected any day

9 a.m. to 3 p.m, with

exception Saturday whole day and
1l a.m. to 12 o'clock daily

Notes
» are
pey-



10- DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Special Pencils for Shorthand 10c.
Artists’ Drawing Pencils 18c
Artists’ Pink Diamond

Erasers .

Large Supply of Paints, Brushes

Ete., for Artists Just Received

Coloured Sheet Plastics for mak-
ing Bags, Etc
AT

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE



ORIENTAL
PALACE

BEADQUARTERS FOR
SOU TENIRS

FROM INDIA, CHINA &
CEYLON

_ THANI'S

» Wm. Hy. 83. Dial 3466 fh) %
OS NN AI







COW—One Guernsey ~- Holstein ie
To calf in a few days. Phone 2084 P.
Pilgrim, Chapel Gap

22.6.52—4n



One riding HORSE and three GUERN
SEY HEIFERS Apply Manager, Foste.
Hall, St. Joseph. 21.6.52—7n.











sale also cockerels bred from keypre aor? Glass and China a Jug oer ee
of 300 eggs and upward. Apply to} Tea Service 68
Harold Ward of Gragettes Road, St.| Pieces of old of ol Chinas wish Be an pages
Michael. 25.6.523—1n Card Table, an
_——_—_—_$—_$_— | ar
MISCELLANEOUS on Beskng ae GEORGE DUNCAN ALBERT BURKE,
White, Painted le; intera Des!
sia, Consfoleum:” Wary nie, NOTICE 1S HEREBY that al
ACCESSORIES, Pump Connections,! Bedsteads, Vono Springs Mahos: oe persons having any debt or im upon
Chamois Leathers, Dusters, Wind Screen | sieep Mattresses; Mahog: Press, Wash-| OF affecting the Estate of George Dun-
Wiper Blades, Head, Stop and Tail] stand; Vanity Table; Cordea Cabinet; { ean Albert Burke late of Paynes Bay,
and Indieator’ Bulbs. Redman & Tay-/ Oj) stoves, Elec-Hot Plate; Toasters, /1n the parish of Saint Ja who died
lor's Garage Ltd. 26.6.52—3n. | Ware Press. Pt. Freezer; tlroning| im this Island on the 25th y of April
rrr | Board, Copying Press, Firewood; and i382, are requested to send in particu-
ACCESSORINS, French Chalk, Split | m, items of value, lars of theit claims, an attested, to
Ping Cycle Black, Valve Grinding TRO & OO. | the undersigned, the uanaed execu-
compound, Redman & ‘Taylor's tors of the Estate of S George
Garage Ltd 25.6, 52—3n. Auctioneers Duncan Albert Burke, deceased, in
—— care of E, D, Rogers, James Street,
Agricultural Farke and Sickles. C. D. Bridgetown, on or before the 15th day
Jordan & Co., Speightetqwn, a of of Avast | 1600. oe which date we
, Proc oO tribute the assets
lnieeniigdaa on & FOUND of the said Estate among the parties
“ACCESSORIES, Battery Terminals, & entitled thereto having regard to the
Clipa, K.L.G Spark Plugs, Tyre — ry | Sha and elaims only of which we
Valves, & Repair Kits Redman & A have had notice. And that
Taylor's Garage Ltd. 2% .6.52—3n. LOST be liable for assets so

ne

ACCESSORIES, for Cars and Trucks,
Hot Patches, & Clamps, Insulation
Tape, Tyre Gauges, Radiator Stop
Leak Redman & Taylor's, Garage Lid

25.6,52-—3n,



COTTON FUJIETE—In Pink, Lemon,
Blue, Peach, & White. Min. wide 62
cents yard at Kirpalani, 53 Swan Street.

25.6,.52-—-1n.

Delicious Maraschino
Boxes. Every one a delight,
Ltd 2.6.

GALVANISED—Special offer
days Best quality English
sheets 6 ft. $3.94 7 ft. $4.60 8

Koignt's
$2-—3n



JUST opened lovely dress materials
in beautiful designs colours at
very attractive prices. e Shopping
Centre. No. 37, Swan Street

24,.6.52—2n

Tilley —Kerosene
Domestic irons
S. Husbands,
Lucy, A, G
St. James
25.6.52—3n.



Just
sure Lamps
Spare parts N
Hall Plantation, St
bands, Mount Stanctast,

arrived
&

Pres-
and
Bright
Hus-

OLD FLOORS made like
floors look
Floor Way
you have electrie Power or not.
Evelyn Roach and Co,, Ltd. Te o=
3584 or 3586. 22.6, 52-—3n.

RAILINGS—Pine Office
able for an Offige. L,
& Co.,



Railings suit-
M. B. Meyers
20.6.52—t.f.n.





RAT. BAYTS——Supplies of

at le. each between the hours of 8
am, and 4 p.m., exeept from il
am. to 12,30 p.m

19.6.52—3n



in Barbados Air only » few

days after publication London. Con-

tact: kan Gale, ofo A te Co., Lid
Local Representative, Tel. was

7.4.82—t.f.n.

TOOLS—-Hand Drills, Hand Saws

from 18in to 30in. Back Saws 12in

and ld4in,, Compas Saws 12in. & l4in.,

Oil Stoves Spirit Levels 8in. to 24in

Braces & Hits, Plyers, Pineers Squares

with Mitre & Level, Claw Hammers,
Spoke Shaves, Iron Planes & Masons
Brushes. C. D. Jordan & Co, Speights-



town 25.6.52—4n
TOOTH PICKS in boxes of 750. Finest |

quality 1/3 box. Get yours at Knights

Ltd 6.52—3n



PERSONAL

This is to notify the
public that I have not heard }
from my husband, Leslie *
Rayside, of
Street, Brooklyn, New York,
U.S.A., for the past 13 years
and I am about to be mar-
ried again in the © near
future.

(Signed)
ELISE RAYSIDE
(Nee CARRINGTON)
Green Hill, St. Michael,
Barbados.
12.6.52—3n,

POSSSSSOSO

SSS SSD

A

x











—

ADVOCATE



REAL ESTATE





The Club will be ae to members





~HOUSE—One board and shinglea| °° Saturday 7ge _
house, with three roofs, Rock Hall, y ore
St. Thomas, opposite the vicarage. Ap- ASTOR BANCROFT,
bly to Joseph N. Hunte of Weich Secretary
Hall, St. Thomes %.6.52-- A.6.5B—2n

STONE WALL DWELLING HOUSE} ~——

with 4, square feet land attaehed

at Dayrell’s Road, Christ Church. The NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. LUCY

dwelling house contains ving room,
two Sebaaoma, kitchenette, usual con-
Government water installed.

for. electricity. Inspection
tion to the tenant Mr. Ince,
hours of IL am. and 1 p.m







Vestry Exhibitions tenable at the
andra School will be received by me
not later than July
dates must be daughters of Parishioners

















Applications for one or more vacgnt

Alex-

15th, 1962. Candi-





* Bagasse Paper Has,
“Grown Up” Now

BIG FUTURE IN

ugar ala pene ces WBb-be set] Sind not sess than eight. and not more
Office, J. as yah | one than twelve years of age Forms of NEW YORK.
fustant at 98; Pemitcations must Re obtained Grom qe) BAGASSE r has “grown up” now. No ee

& BOYCE, aps, "c ertifieate. must accompany | it a novelty, a substitute for paper made of more tradi

al jon

boon ete Oe ica lust present themeeives to| materials. For some purposes, aioe genet is actually
The undersigned will set up for sale} ime Hoadmistiess for examination | on better than the more usual
by Bublic competition a Rim ee | a eae see on This was stated by Mr. Pecans t
ames Street - Priday zth P
instant at 2 0. 1 wane. of W. R. Grace and Co,, the Selsewetionsl 3 and

¢ v . : e
pal THAT. Meertain Memaan °% ree Lu’. trading concern of New York, which was one of the first
thereto containing feet sit- 25.6 52 -4n} companies to realise the value of bagasse paper in paper
uate at the corner of ttle manuf. ture.
Sone a oe on ee NOTICE i pater tne But all the time, experiments
he an ex- ul ni

ae All male citizens of the United States| hibition in New Yor. of the many are going on at Paramonga to im-

Freeh samen of between the ages of 18 and % restrli ee. paper and cardboard prove Be the methods used in mak-
: ders! ffer for sale requested call at| product it now makes ba- xy aioe prakie al bagasse

at "Public, Competition at their. office | ne ,Amertean Consulate from July 1 ta assent only oowegein, but produets, At one Why
No, 1? High Street, Bridgetown, on| 9): J S68 fer Selective Registration a cardboard six to f
Friday the #th day of Juby 1952 at} godct iversal Military Training | #ls@ | corruga ee a 2
Ne. Service Act. tainers, heavy paper sacks, small pulp were , but in more

The bungalow known as CASVILLE
with the land thereto containing by ad-
measurement 8241 sq. ft. situate in
Navy Gardens, Christ Church and
containing an open verandah facing
and east, combined drawing &
dining room, 3 bedrooms, toilet, bath
and kitehen ‘with ga and rooms for
two servants and with electricity in-

Inspection dial 4460. For
particulars and conditions of
sale apply to:
COTTLE CATFORD &



AUCTION



Bn ee:

at
al Garage, St. Michael's Row:

10 h.p. orris Car. (Damaged in ac-
cident). Terms Cash. Sale at 2 p.m.
Vineent Griffith, Auctioneer

22,6.52-4n.



UNDER THE DIAMOND
HAMMER

By instruction
Lowe I will sell
house~ “Katteur’*;
Road, Ch. Ch.,

received from Mias
by auction at her
Rockley, Hastings

of
cludes:
mah
mahogany

household furniture which = in-

tables, chairs,

dressing , . Westinghouse -
erator,
gas stove, glasg ware, ures &
other items of in TERMS CASH.
DARCY A. SCOTT,
Auetioneer.
20,6,52—4n



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Thuredaw Mth by order of Miss

M. Cave we will sell the Furniture eens without Seley.

at. Avalon Colkymore

which includes.

Pedestal Sideboard, Floor Lamps, Book
and Ornament Tables; Rockers, China
Cabinet Very good Fiat ss
Mh eal Be gg BR he Berbice

Tip-Top Ta’ ; : a |——





Sweepst Ticket Series QQ 6219
Finder return same to Harold
Young Cheapside Rum



ANNOUNCEMENTS

—

EARN BIG MONEY by selling Redit-
fusion in your spare time. Get a supn/
of forms today. 4.6.52--20n.

The Land Acquisition Act
1949

(Notice required by Seotion 3)
is hereby given that it



p-

pears to the Governor in Execut.ve

Committee that the lands described in At 2 p.m. in the afternoon of Thurs
the Schedule hereto and situate at} day the i?th day of July 1952, I will
Queen Street and, nd Street inf offer for sale by Public Competition at
Speightstown, Saint er, in the Island} my>Office in the Public Buildings for a

of Parbados are likely to be needed for

purposes which in thé opinion of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee sre
ublic purposes, namely for a Fish
Market

THE SCHEDULE
ALL THAT, certain pargel of lend con-
taining 4,806 square feet more or
situate at the junction of Queen Strret
with Sand Street in Speightstown in he
parish of Saint Peter Abutting on the
north on lands of F. Miller, on
west on the seashore, on the south on
lands of the Vestry of Saint Peter
(being the site of the t Fish
Market) and on the east on Sand Street

aforesaid

and Queen Street or however
else the same is abu! Together with
the buildings thereon.
an this day of 1962 at
Bridgetown 4% the a2.
. R. N. TURNER,
Colonial Secretary,
24.6, 5230



CHANCERY SALE

ah undermentioned property witli! be set up for sale at the Registration

‘Offee, Public Buildings, between !2 noon and 2 p.m, for the sum and on
the date If not then sold it will be set up on each succeeding
Friday at same place and during the same hours until sold Full partieu-

me.
NORMAN

lars on application to

Property:—ALL

with the appurtenances,
Upset price £3,944. 18. 4,
Date of Sale: Friday, 11th July, 1962.

Registration Office,
23rd June, 1962.



0990069000005009900039"
NOTICE
PASSENGERS sailing off

N.S. De GRASSE

June 29th are asked to be |

on board by 2 p.m.
24.6.52——2n.

co, 2.6 an]

UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER | tura: year is6ate 1000"

On Wednesday next,[ sons having a debt aim
28th June at 12.30 pom. her entire lot} affecting the etate of Edward

Jarge dining table, #ideboard,| who died in
recom

of| send in partieulars of their claims d
drawera, Simmons, bedstead & mattress, | attested . pine, Grae

yy} before the 5th day of August, 1952 after

‘ess | which was built in 1946, is the sum of,
THERTY

the} of 10 knots, a gross tonnage of 162,34,

City of} atore room
ir

NILES
JOSEPH ONESIMUS TUDOR (Defendant)
THAT Certain piece or parcel of land situate at Government
Hill in the parish of Saint Michnel and island abovesaid containing b.
urement sixty-six thousand eight hundred ane, ninety square feet or there-
atiouts abutting and bounding on lands of J
Waithe on other lands of the Defendant on a’ road
and on the public road er however else the same may 4











All mate citizens of the Uni States
who attain the age of 18 ee sub-
sequent to July 31, 1952, are required
to register upon the day they attain the
eighteenth anniversary of day of
their birth, or within five days there-





monga, Rb which has oe ‘ —_ Soe is made Ur UP

For f . making bagasse paper since 1939. © ely bres
‘aceetioan ‘Cuneta Baa jews, he it eae out | tens of ba- not withstand much beating or re-
a wrruees [Oita weal Mopottos a ehieh Gee and “excessive hysretion
a ut a ion of which ting and excessive on.
) Se yURAL esa ae, aomac UL was consumed locally. Paramonga é! whose job

Te oa ereditors holding specialty liens
Hepe Plantation, st. James

TAKE NOTICE that I, the Owner, ‘of
the above Plantation am about ta ab-
tain a loan of £300 under the provis-
ions of the abeve Act the said
the Agricul-

Plantation, in
No money has been borrowed under
the Agricultural Aids Ach, 1905, or
the above Act (as the case may be’ in
respect of such year.
Dates this 25th day of June 1952
SYBIL J. ROCK,
Owner.
25... 52 —3n





NOTICE

Re: Estate of
EDWARD SINCLAIR FIELDS,
deceased
NOTICE is hereby gtven that atl per-
i nm or
Fields late of the pariah of Saint PhO
Island on the 10th 4

af October, 1 are harete required to

to the
Messrs. Hutchinson
tors, James Street,

igned in care of
& Banfield, Solici-
Brigdetown, on or

which date we shall proceed to distribute
the assets of the estate among the parties
entitled thereto having regard to the
debts and claims only of which we shall
then have had notice and that we shall
not be liable for asseta go distributed
te amy person of whose debt or claim
we shall not have had netice at the time
of such

And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their

af May, 1952
TON BROWNE,

lifled Executors . of the
of EDWARD SINCLAIR
Deceased

30.5.52—4n

ed the 29th da:





Matcibutea to any person of whose
debt or claim we shall not have fad
notice at the time of such distribution,

And all persons indebted to the said
Estate are requested to settle their
accounts without delay.

Dated this 9th d of June 1952, |

VETIAN VERONA BURKE,
WHEYMAN ARNETT GRIFFITH,
Qualified Executors of the Estgte of
George Duncan Albert Burke,

Deceased.
10.6. 62—4n,

BARBADOS

IN THE COLONIAL COURT OF
ADMIRALTY

Phe Owners of the Steamship
“Amakura”

va
The Motor Vessel “T.B. Radar’
Her eargo and freight



















sum not less than the appraised value
MOTOR VESSEL, T. B. RADAR”

now at anchor in Carlisle Bay, Bridge-

town, with its fittings. Particulars of

the Inventory of the said Vessel can be

seen on application

The appraised value of the Vessel,

FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS
It is fAtted with an Internal combustion
Diesel Engine, has an estimated speed

a register tonnage of 116.12, a iength
of 108 feet, a breadth of 20 & 3/10 feet
and a depth of 10 feet. The length of
the Engine room is 24 feet
The accommodation consists of 2
passengers’ roems with 4 beds each,
sailors’ rooms for 6, cooks’ accommoda-
tion for 2, Boatswain's locker and
further particulars and
ments for ih fa apply to
T. HEADLEY
Marshal in Admiralty
Provost Marshal's Office 25.6 satin

arrange-























(PlaintifY)

admeas-

Roberts on kinds of Lilian
to the publie read
and bound together

. c.

H. WILLZAMS

WANTED FOR CASH

USED
POSTAGE STAMPS

Of the British West Indies,

Good Prices Paid. At The

CARIBBEAN STAMP

SOCIETY, 3rd Floor, No. 10,
Swan Street.

23.6.52—6n

_—

(CAAA APPAR AATTATIPTDPTPPPTTAA o

paper ba
rtons.

Grace sugar plantation at Para~

Peru to the .
monga r bags w

ae seein 8 as entirely
trend towards

use of paper for oar epee, Mr
Rentzel disclosed. ?
















cane plantation, the Paramo:
paper mill has succeeded in 7
creasing producti













gs, wrapping paper and
All these were made at the

A trial shipment of sugar from

United States in Para-
eee a future
increased

“Most industrial sugar users
prefer paper to cotton because of

the absence of lint contamination
in paper and the Ramee protection
against ca

whic f-
fords.” he explained. me

Employing the huge bagasse re-
sources of a 14,000-acre sugar

ion more than

00 per cent in its first twelve

or. = operation. Fa output
roduc

about 3,000 to tons. 2 woe

try’s shops.

The process consists first of
washing and screening the bagasse
to remove the pithy material,
cooking the remaining fibrous
pulp for the time required to pro-
duce distinct paper types, and
lastly refining to the degree most
suited for the production of the
various grades,

When it was first introduc
Paper made from was =
garded somewhat sceptically. But
gee stood up well to the test of

An independent expert, report

|
|

recent years the company has con-
centrated on four separate types.
The mills can now esters Se ba-
gasse paper as fine ad

ngineers,

it has been to select refining
equipment and set u
turing procedures,
guided accordingly.
methods of refining have had to
be weighed against paper charac-
teristics to assure economical pro-
duction of satisfactory qualities at
maximum ‘speeds.

Now the company has found
that there is more world-wide in-
terest than ever before in its ba-
gasse paper products, because of
the uncertain supplies of the more
traditional types of paper. That
is why the company has been per-
suaded to increase its plans for
bagasse paper production.

manufac-
been

—B.U.P



RATES OF EXCHANGE

a

and eet. worry
and lel hey

sgt en

eats a

Soot

wees Sere: ee stants By
and nie ill is ules ly mate you fe ‘ou fi ¢

new. Under the money-back guarantee
Cystex mush qe ttaty completely or cost

ystex fro! yr



GLASS

- AND CHROMTUM ries FITTINGS

| OB SAME.

THE CENTRAL EMPonIUM

Corner Broad and Tudor Streets






JOHN
Roebuck Street




o

°

arrangement.

POSSESSES

THIS Is 1 TO NOTIFY. OUR CUSTOMERS
AND THE GENERAL PUBLIC THAT WE
CLOSE FOR STOCK-TAKING ON JUNE
30TH, 1952

ga Customers Are Asked to Co-operate

D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.

FOR SALE

“TRINITY COTTAGE”

Derricks (on sea-side) St. James

Three Bedroom Stone House, with usual conveni-
ences, fully furnished or without furniture. Standing
on 3 roods and 10 perches. Immediate possession.
Mortgage can be arranged.

For further particulars ‘Phone 2959. The Barbados
Import & Export Co., Ltd. Plantations Building.





Dial 4335




6:6

Inspection invited by

25.6.52—5n.

LL LLLEESSSS SEES LESSEE LSD



From Barbados Arrives Southampton
*“DE GRASSE” +. 29th June, 1952 .. 9th July,
% “COLOMBIE” 13th July, 1952 .. 25th July, 1962
y *“DE GRASSE” :. 6th Aug., 1952 16th Aug, 1952
> *Sailing direct to Southampton

SCLC LLCCLLL LPP LCE PPT

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1952
LT

GOVERNMENT NOTICES



AMENDMENT

‘LEASE OF AGRICULTURAL HOLDINGS AT SEAWELL

Persons desiring to lease one of the seven agricultural holdings
at Seawell, Christ Church, in accordance with the prescribed condi-
tions of lease should apply in writing to the Director of Agriculture,
Department of Agriculture, Bridgetown, not later than the 5th of
July, 1952. Persons whoc may have applied previous to the publication
of this notice will need to apply afresh as set out above.

2. Copies of the statement of conditions of lease may be seen
at the District Agricultural Stations and at the Head Office of the De-~
partment of Agriculture, Bridgetown. No applicant will be considered
who is unable to comply fully with the conditions of the lease.

22.6.52—3n,

THE BARBADOS REGIMENT
NOTICE

BY
LIEUT-COL, J. CONNELL, O.B.E., E.D.,
Commanding, The Barbados Regiment.
Officers’ Mess Meeting ene te
The Commanding Officer has directed that there will be na
Officers’ Mess Meeting on Saturday 26 June 52.
Parades

The next Regimental Parade will be held on Thursday 3 July, 52,
at 1700 hours, Further details will bh e published later.

M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major.
S.O.LF. & Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment.





St. Ann’s Fort,
24 June, 51.
25.6.52.—2n.

SHIPPING NOTICES

ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO.

SAILING FROM EUROPE







“4

The will

accept an. ‘and Passengers for
Dominica, ee Antigua, Mon\

\tserrat,

M.S. â„¢Mth 1962. Nevis and St. Kitts.
M.S. aaa at a Sailing to be notified.
8.8. COPEICA “aech Hity 1052, The M/V. “MONEKA"
M.S. NESTOR ase July 1952. accept Cargo and veesgnaee
SAHANG TO EUROPE Dominica, Antigua, tserrat,
M.S. QRANJESTAD 15th J 1962. Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Fri-
SAILING TO T'DAD, PARAMARIBO day, 27th inst.
AND BRITISH G A ss “
M.S. BONAIRE 30th June, 1952. The M/V. “CACIQUE | DEL
M.S lth July, 1952 CARIBE” will accept sar a si
S.8. COTTICA 28th July, 1982. eas %
M.S 1962,

bat aay Sth August.
TO TRINIDAD & CURAC.
SPIGERBORG 28th June,
(Trinidad only)
S. HERSILIA

y
























ante ee w th we af ha- Selling ’ ee Buying M S*° marta Pe a 6 : .
3 .
oo fae ae increas precee aes NEW YORK 8. P. MUSSON, 4 SON © 00. San
‘i Cheques on
eT iw = 1940, bai sce ac- Bankers 1 WO
per cen Soe otal ~
i nace eee oye See” “| ATARRISON LINE
Today,” the figure is nearer me per h Sion Currency Hd 2/10%
oupens A i"
Certain ty: of 50% Silver 2%
naprencint “tea Aebakee: ah as | Oeawana -
. aes from 100 per cent ba- L onnpety is a sie
man rafts
foe O's ee ne ee vanes Sidite Brett 78 4/10% OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
tsgrid percent Dogme pap. "|" Sauna ws 20% Vessel. From Leaves «Due
" e s 1
a $ SH Blew | Soe na Barbedos.
newsprint wo, lesan Peruvlan SS. “PHILOSOPHER” London and
pers. si ins
duty bags to the counts eavy- f i M/brough 14th June @8th June
cement, mineral LB , S.S. “TACOMA STAR ... Liverpool 2ist June 6th July
tries, They sup ot Lad aha S.S. “HERDSMAN” «... London 5th July 30th July
ping paper for use in the oe SS, “STATESMAN” .. Liverpool 12th July 27th July

—>

HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM



Vessel. For Closes in Barbados.
S.S. “CROFTER” .- London 23rd June
S.S. “TRADER” .«.. Liverpool 28th June
S.S. “WANDERER” «Liverpool 28th June
For further information apply to

DACOSTA & CO., LTD,—Agents

¢ (Canadian National Steamships







on the recent shi fe wie. sm, Biadter tects
VTound that new 80UTBBOUND Geils Sails Sails Arrives
bat climaated'comtver-| SEA VIEW GUEST epee, Se SEE Re
cial 1 LADY NELSON ‘ @June 12 June 4 June 23 June 23
zit Love eau ing trom ai Nay a CANADIAN Ss saps 2 ah -- 10 Ee 10 July
a of =
stances, a. a Gua cian HOUSE LADY RODNEY .... ., 11. July 14 16 July a3 July 38 Jute
ec bags were used, was mini- ‘TINGS, BARBADOS
overall” strength, a : thick Daly and Longer Rates NORTHBOUND Arrives Salle Artives Arrives Asrives
pyar sacks was greater than that = “a ~_ - Bides B'dos 8. John Bosten Halifax asntren!
Corruga’ ‘containers made of welcome. ent ee ay & July 19 July 22 July

asse i inne! Cocktail . 7 ly 19 Jub 26 July 2% July 1 Aug.
ve flak onan by opie oes : NaNSTRUCTOR 24 i 29 a 5 Aug. 8 Aug. 10 Aug.
mere that , & were “the most J. H. BUC LADY RODNEY TAug. 9 Aug. 19 Aug. 20 Aug. 28 Aug.

highly satisfactory r our com- Proprietor, cenaunsanprsitanmenmnninanesinguinicnivieiarintn ate
pany has ever handled.” CPOC6SG6SSS990S0060660" | por further particulars, apply to—
399900900800009000000000000000000005290565965"--", $ E
Of interest to GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD.—Agents.
JOINERS & CABINET MAKERS
‘We have an assortment of

ee)
CG TRANSATLANTIQUE

Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica









From Southampton Arrives Barbados

*““DE GRASSE .. 4th June, 1952 16th June, 1952
“COLOMBIE” .. 19th June, 1952 2nd July, 1952
*““DE GRASSE” -. 12th July, 1952 24th July, 1952

*Not calling at Guadeloupe
SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE



















FOR SALE
LYNCHBURG

oth Avenue. Belleville.

An Attractive and Well Proportioned 2 Storey House situated
on a corner site of 12,050 square feet. Contains 3 galleries (1
enclosed), large drawing room, dining room, study, modern
kitchen, 3 bedrooms, garage, etc. Offers considered.

JOHN M. BLADON & CO.

AF.S., F.V.A.
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
















NES LS. OP

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, i952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE

3 PAGE NINE



HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON

| Vigour Resiored,
| Glands Made Young
in 24 Hours

Tt is no longey necessary to suffer
rom loss of vigour and smanhood
reak merpory and body, nervousnes
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[AOE SCOR D824


PAGE TEN



England Win Second Test By Eight Wickets| WHEN ~

- Batsmen

—$—$$__—__——.

Take 45

Minutes To Score 37

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, June 24.

Only a handful of spectators
admitted free of charge at Lord’s
saw England complete the form-
ality of victory over India _ by
eight wickets in the Second Test
today. It took 45 minutes to
score the 37 needed and the pro-
cess cost Peter May his wicket.
He was caught at deep square leg
trying to finish the match with a
six.

Play this morning was inter-
minably dreary and reminded one
of the first day of the Test with
everything at stake rather than
the last with victory just round
the corner.

Although defeat for England
was out of the question Mankad
and Ghulam Ahmed attained an
undoubted moral victory over the
batsmen, They dropped the ball
right on a length and runs came
very sedately in ones and twos
with just an occasional four.

Mankad as fresh as when play
first began on Thursday made one
or two lift disconcertingly and
Hutton twice had difficulty in
withdrawing his bat from balls
which whipped right across his
body. The pitch was taking spin
for the first time and one couldn't
help feeling that had not India’s
batting again broken down in the
middle order as it did yesterday
that this game could have had a
much different ending. Even this
undoubtedly strong England bat-
ting side would have had difficulty
in making 200 to-day.

But that was what might have
been. Returning to what was,
the proceedings were brought to
a merciful close by Compton
sweeping Ghulam Ahmed for
four. And now England are
dormie two.

The man of the match of course
was Mankad. He eclipsed even
Len Hutton and Godfrey Evans
and Evans did well goeug by
scoring a century end claiming his
hundredth victim behind the
stumps.

But it was Mankad, Mankad all
the way. There never seemed to
be a moment when he wasn’t
actively concerned in the game.
He, Hazare and Ghulam Ahmed
are well up to Test standard. But
there are a lot of shortcomings
in this India team mainly in the
pace attack and the middle bat-
ting. It is hardly likely that
Ramchand and Phadkar will find
an extra yard at*this stage in the
season but it is possible for bats-
men such as Adhikari, Umrigar
and Phadkar to show improved
form and they'll need to if India
are to win their first Test in this
country.

Once again Len Hutton has had
a successful match as England’s
captain, If there was one criti-
cism to offer it was that he didn’t
bowl Compton sufficiently. With
five other recognized bowlers in
the side it wouldn't however be
fair to pursue that point too far.

His century in the first innings
too was a good enough answer to
those who suggest that cap-
taincy worries might affect his
play.

If England are to make any
changes for the next Test at Man-
chester beginning July 17 it is
likely to be in the spin depart-
ment. Roley Jenkins couldn't hit
a length at Lord’s and leg spin-
ners who cannot find a mark are
expensive luxuries. Roy Tatter-
sall of Lancashire may join Laker
as another off spinner of if he is
fit Ikin who bats left handed and
also bowls leg breaks may be the
choice. This was probably the
selectors’ original intention for the
Lord’s game but Ikin had to with-
draw because of back trouble and
hasn't played cricket since.

SCOREBOARD
INDIA—First Innings
Mankad be Caakye tay vs oa ee
Hazare (not out) Sad We + ee
Trueman four for 72.
"235

INDIA—Second tnnings
Mankad a : § 184
Trueman four for 110

478
ENGLAND—Pirst Innings a
Hutton » vee hie oe
Evans biele ved y . 104
May : 4
Graveney +e a3
Mankad five for 196.
537
ENGLAND—Second Innings
Mutton {not out) ae 39
Simpson run out sat 2
May ec Roy b Ghulam Ahmed 26
Compton tnot cut) 5 sisthge 4
tras, . . 8
Tota! (for two wickets) . 79
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oa. M R. We
Ghulem Ahmed 3.2 9 31 1
Hazare 1 1 0 0
Ramchand ; 1 0 5 0
Mankad ee derek? O6 12 5 0

Surrey Head
Table With
104 Points

{From Qur Own Correspondent)
LONDON, June 24,
Winning their eighth county

championship match of the season
against Kent at Blackheath to-
day Surrey have opened up a 20
point lead at the top of the table.
They now have 104 points and
are followed by Middlesex who
were beaten by their bogie team
Somerset. In third place are
Yorkshire, four points behind
Middlesex as a result of their vic-
tery over Leicester.

Essex game. with Lancashire
, resulted in a tie—the second of
the season,
Scoreboard

Surrey beat Kent by nine wieck-
ets. Surrey 346 ang 72 for one,
Kent 217 and 200.

Somerset beat Middlesex by 54
runs, Somerset 213 and 94, Mid-
dlesex 201 and 52; (Hazell six for
16).

Yorkshire beat Leicester by 73
runs. Yorkshire 307 and 193 for
nine declared, Leicester 245 and

Gloucester beat Glamorgan by
27 runs. Gloucester 284 for nine
declared ang 218 for three de-
clared, Glamorgan 166 and 309.

Derby beat Northants by eight
wickets. Derby 399 and 84 for two,
Northants 115 and 367.

Sussex beat Oxford University
by five wickets. Sussex 305 and
304 for five, Oxford 384 for nine
declared and 223 for nine de-
clared.

Essex versus Lancashire tied.
Lancashire 266 and 226 for seven
declared, Essex 261 and 231.

Warwick versus Cambridge
University: match drawn, War-
wick 138 and 382 for five declar-
ed, Cambridge 290 for nine de-
clared and 183 for eight.

Worcester versus Notts: match
drawn, Worcester 450 for eight
declared and 12 for no wicket,
Notts 474,



HUGHES SCORES
CENTURY

Mr. Ronnie. Hughes, batting for
Combermere against Lodge at
Combermere on Saturday scored
124 runs to enable Combermere to
score 218 runs in their first in-
nings against Lodge. :

Mr. Hughes hit 16 four in his
124 runs and was always at ease
against the Lodge bowling. He
went in at number three in the
Combermere batting order.

RT

WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Original Jurisdiction
10.00 a.m.

Police Courts and Petty Debt
Court—10.00 a,m,

Meeting of Chamber of Com-
merce—2.00 ‘p.m.

Mobile Cinema, Lowthers
Plantation Yard, Ohrist
Chureh—7.30 p.m.

Lecture by Mr. L. T. Gay,
District Inspector of
Schools, at Belmont
Church—7.30 p.m.

Police Band Concert at Bos-
cobel, St. Andrew--7.45

p.m.
Discussion at Barbados Press
Club—8.00 p.m.





coveweeneeteienacnecentisnncslisie

THE WEATHER
REPORT

YESTERDAY

Rainfall from Codrington:
.83 in.

Total rainfall for month to
date: 3.80 ins.

Highest Temperature: 84.5 °F

Lowest Temperature: 74.5 °F

Wind Velocity: 10 miles per
hour

Barometer: (9 am.) 20.987,
(3 p.m.) 29,932

TO-DAY

5.45 a.m.

Sunset: 6.18 p.m.

Moon; New, June 22

Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

High Tide: 4.25 a.m., 6.14 p.m.

Low Tide: 11.26 a.m., 11.23
p.m,



Sunrise:










= POPPING
BOWLING CREASE
CREASE

BARBADOS



--->

(Five F

© i ‘in > ESA Sn pe fem — ae ee eae cat mot Ma ms

THIS WILL ILLUSTRATE LAWS ‘7.8-9

(THE PITCH

ADVOCATE





WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1952









>



he




POPPING
CREASE




Know Your Cricket—sws z, « « 9

Three laws are discussed today
and these cover, The Pitch, The
Wickets and The Bowling and
Popping Creases.

These laws are really non con-
troversial and wiil cali for small
comment from me.

LAW 7-——THE PITCH

The pitch is deemed to be the
area of the ground between the
bowling creases, five feet in width
on either side of the line joining
the centre of the wickets, Before
the toss for innings the executive
of the grounds shall be responsi-
ble for the selection and prepa-
Fation jof the pitch; thereafter
the umpires shall control its use
and mintenance. The pitch
shall not be changed during a
match unless it becomes unfit for
play end then only with the con-
sent ef both captains.

WIDTH

The width of the pitch which
is ten feet, since it extends five
feet on either side
joining the centre of the wickets,
is intended for turf wickets.
The width of an artificial pitch,
matting is the only one we know,



By O. S. COPPIN

is that of the playing surface of
course.
LAW 8—THE WICKETS

The wickets shall be pitehed
opposite and parallel to each
other at a distance of 22 yards
from stump to stump. Each
wicket shall be nine inches in
width and consist of three stumps
with two bails on top. The stumps
shall be of equal and sufficient
size to prevent the bill from pass-
ing through, with their tops 28
inches above the ground. The
bails shall be 4%, inches in length,
and when in position on the top
of the stumps, shall not project
more than 4% inch above them.

Notes t. this law included in
several editions, discourage the
use of stumps with metal fittings,
It is claimed that they are a
source of danger.

RECOMMENDATIONS

They recommend that the tops

of the stumps be dome-shaped

of the line except for the bail grooves.

T shall mention later in_ this
series a specific rule dealing with
the conditions for the “wicket
being down” as they relate«to



Banned Golfer Gets

Cash

By FRANK ROSTRON

LONDON.

A subscription has been started
by Sandy Lodge Golf Club for
its new professional, 27-year-old
Scot Eric Brown, who won the
recent £500 Penfold Tournament
first prize,

The money, according to sec-
retary Tan M. Lucas, is for
Brown’s expenses in the British
Open Championship,

But it will enable members to
sympathise wth Brown on losing
five years on tournament golf
because of a Professional Golf-
ers’ Association rule,

The P.G.A. bars a golfer from
becoming a full professional for
five years, He cannot take part in
tha big tournaments under P.G.A.
control during that time.

Secretary Lucas says with
official correctitude: “The sub-
scription will mark our appreci-
ation of Brown’s successful start
here.”

But his younger brother, P. B.
“Laddie” Lucas, Sandy
Lodge record-holder, says:

“It would be fair to describe
this subscription as a note of
sympathy for Brown for the five
lost tournament years of his life,
and as an unspoken protest
against the ludicrous P.G.A,
closed-shop rule,”

Boost

professional immediately after.

The P.G.A. could not prevent
him going to Switzerland last
year, winning the Swiss cham-
pionship and finishing in the first
three of the French, Italian,
Belgian and Dutch championships.

But their rule could and did
prevent his playing for Britain
in the Ryder Cup team, so heavi-
ly beaten by the Americans,

Commander R. C, T, Roe, hon
secretary of the Professional
Golfer’s Association, defends the
embargo like this:

1. This is not only a British
rule, It is the rule of every
P.G.A, in every country,

2. In every profession there
are embargoes, apprentice-
ships and examinations to
make people learn their
jobs,

3. It is essential for a good golf
professional to learn rou-
tine club-making and do
all the petty jobs connected
with it.

4. We have 200 fully quali-
fied but unemployed golf
pros in Britain. Why let
youngsters like Brown
overcrowd?

Erie Brown, in his dry Scottish
manner, closes the debate with
the pay-off comment:

“Ah, well, the P.G.A. members

Brown at 21, won the Scottish don’t like newcomers taking the

Amateur Championship, turned

Rifle Shooting

At last Saturday’s practice of
the Small Bore Rifle Club in spite
of unusual strong and gusty wind
members were able to obtain some
very good scores.

The following are the scores re-
corded :—~



HLP.S
100
Major J. E. Griffith........ ie, OR



Mr, 'T. A; L. Roberts.,..u. 98





M. G. Tueker 97
R. Edghill ........ 4: 88
K. S. Yearwood....... 96
Py TORNBON, s,s. 95
M. A, Brown. 95
R. O. Brown... 93

money. Mebbe I'll feel like that ~

myself when I’m older.”



DO’S AND DON’TS

FOR CAREFUL
DRIVERS

DO keep your windscreen —
and your conscience — clear.
DON'T leave your car or
motor cycle where it will cause
dunger or obstruction.



The next practice will be on |

Wednesday night June 25th, 1952.
Members are reminded that they
have to put in four cards to qualify
for the next Spoon Shoot.

They'll Do It Every Time tet 5 te By Jimmy Hatlo









EDDAR’S FRAU FLOTILLA WA'
Gus OSE TO GET HIM SPRU
FROM THE HOSPITAL >>>

WEL-L.s+
OPERATIONS OFA! \~(_ =O PREFER

ONLY REST Ee
erie y fai
CAN'T

DOCTOR





S EVER Ves INDEED“ THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE
NG HOME / AS THE FELLA SEZ( HOWEVER
THE FELLA WHO SAID IT AINT CHEDDAR ++)





,



















MEN DON'T LOAF ON THE
JoB! THE KIDDIES WiLL
KEEP COMPS!




fe, ee
{ 4 BLOW
} THANXANO" Jato
i OF THES

} ~

|

the bails but at this stage I think
I ean safely mention without
leading to any confusion that in
a high wind the captains may
agree, with the approval of the
umpires, to dispense with the
use of bails.

LAW 9—THE BOWLING AND

POPPING CREASES

The bowling crease shall be in
line with the stumps; 8 feet 8
inches in length; with a return
crease at each end at right angles
behind the wicket. The popping
crease shall be marked 4 feet in
front of and parallel with the
bowling crease. Both the return
and popping creases shall be
deemed unlimited in length.

IN HIS GROUND

Here again I shall come later
in the series to a Law which sets
out the circumstances in which
a batsman can be deemed “In or
out of his ground” but here I
can draw to the attention of
my readers that a batsman must
have some part of his bat or per-
son grounded inside the popping
crease to be deemed to be within
his ground.





Umpires’
Association
Holds Meeting

The Barbados Umpires’ Associ-
ation held a meeting on Monday
last at the Challenor Stand and
received the report of the Commit-
tee appointed to draft Rules for
the Association, Present were
Messrs. J. M. Kidney (Chairman),
B. de L. Inniss and W. F, Hoyos,
of the Umpires’ Committee of the
B.C.A. Umpires attending were:
Messrs. J. H. Walcott, H. B, de C.
Jordan, L. H. Roach, T. Sisnett,
W. Harewood, R. Parris A. Parris,
K, Quintyne, C. Batson, F. ‘Trot-
man, S. Gilkes, Cc. W. E. Archer
end K. Sealy.

After the Chatyman had spoken
on the aims and objects of the
Barbados Umpires’ Association,
the meeting considered the draft
Rules. The Secretary of the Bar-
bados Cricket Association was
asked to summon a General Meet-
ing of the Umpires’ Association
for Monday 30th June when the
Rules of the Association will be
formatly adopted. The election of
a President, Vice-President, Hony.
Secty.-Treasurer and a Committee
of Management wil lalso take
place,

Copies of the draft rules will be
circulated among the umpires and
the Chairman appealed to mem-
bers to make an effort to turn out
in full strength at the General
Meeting.



S. Leonards Centenary
SOCIAL & DANCE

GOODWILL LEAGUE
SHED

FRIDAY JUNE 27th
9 p.m, to 3 a.m.
Admission 2/-
Good Orchestra,
Refreshments on Sale
24.6.52—3n.





The West Indies Cricket Board
of Control, at their General Meet-
ing, accepted an invitation from
the Canadian Cricket Associa-
tion to send a West Indies team
to Canada during the summer cf
1953 to play a series of matches
lasting seven weeks. The W.I.
Board, at the request of the

Canadian Cricket Association,
has submitted the cost of this





















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Mr. Maurice Green and possibly
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London on July 28. The follow-
ing Resolution, passed by the
General Meeting of the W.I.C.B.
of C., will be considered:—

“As a result of the existing
“arrangement whereby Austra-
“lia and South Africa each
“sends a touring side to England
“once in four years, and of the
“fact that the English Counties
“do not desire to receive any
“touring side in the year
“following an Australia visit,
“it transpires that New Zealand
“The West Indies and India
“normally can only send a
“touring side to England once
“in twelve yearsi— Be it
“resolved therefore that this
“Board request the Imperial
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“influence to have the period
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“once in four years to once in
“five years, so that opportuni-
“ties for other Member Coun-
“tries to visit England be
“increased to at least twice in
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THINK OF
THE FIT

AND







ERNIES
DEMOCRATIC
CLUB

Ernies wishes to remind
his friends to keep to-mor-
row night open as_ there
will be a meeting to discuss
the problems of the first
day’s races of the Trinidad
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PAGE 1

Labourites Protest Yalu Bombing Say Britain Was i Not Consulted "WE ARE IN A DIFFICULT POSITION"— CHURCHILL LONDON. Juno 24. LABOUR members of Parliament includn leader Clement Atllee protested in Commons to-dav that Britain should have been consulted before 500 United States planes bombed Yalu River power plants nn the Korean-Manchurian border two nights ago. Prime Minister Churchill said the attacks did not appear to involve any extensive Korean operations hitherto pursued. "So far as the British Government is concerned there has been no change of policy" he added. Attleo supporting the opposition attack said ihat while no obligation was laid down for consultations, in his experience there had been consultations at every point at which political consideration impinged on military. "Surely this is one of those occasions where there should have been full consultations?" he asked. Churchill replied: "No such consultation with the British Government has taken place but wr naturally will inform ourselves upon the whole matter. "We are in an extremely difficult and delicate position. "We are in great difficulty but it has been entrusted by the United Nations to the Supreme Commander of the United States and I am not going to be drawn Into saying anything which in any way will be taken as a reflection upon that commander or embarrass him in any action ho may think it necessary to take." Churchill promised the House on early debate en >*u issue. Labour M.f*s kept on pressing for an Dninediale debate until the uproar bellowed. Reference by Mr. CLEMENT Am.EE, leftist leader Aneurin Bevan to "thousand* of square miles of territory inside of Manchuria 11 wai dn u ru d In a barrage of barracking from government benches. Bevan shouted above the din. "if you want to go to war why not sav so?" This brought disapproving shouts from Conee and for several minutes neither Bevan nor Churchill could be heard as they tried to speak. Left winger Sydne\ 8 man contended that "the question of neace or war may depend on the continuance of theseattacks". After the Speaker had asked the H eep cairn, Churchill said the government had no objection to a debate tomorrow, though he would prefer to wait a week until Lord Alexander. Minister of Defence, had returned to report on his Korean visit. It was up to the opposition to ask for the debate tomorrow. Unknown to M.P's, while the row was goim was being flashed from Tokyo that Korean power houses had received another plastering to-day. And Karl A r. Britain's, Defence Minister, was telling report.., n Washington that even while he was in Korea he had not been informed in advance of the Yalu River raid Politicians were convinced tonight that the situation presents a serious threat to continued bi-partisan foreign pol.cy of the B ritish Governm ent —V.P. THE YANKS WILL DO IT AGAIN By STEWART HKXSIIKV WASHINGTON. June 24. U.S officials promise another massed air blast of vital Yalu River power plants on the Korean-Manchurian frontier ,f Reds ever succeeded in getting them working again. They said there was no intention in future to permit Communists to restore this source of energy for North Korea. At the same time Allied officials here expressed hope that a huge air attack on plants had convinced the Chinese and Korean Communists that the United Nation mean business and it would be well to come to an agreement in Truce talks at Panmunjom. However, any political or psychological effects of the bombing were distinctly secondary. Officials said the bombing, the first against these installations ir. the two years of conflict, was un-lei taken purely on military grounds. One high official said "the Navy has been wanting to do this for Speculation ranged widely. The entry advanced premises were that the attack meant elthef (l) That the United Nations had decided to give up on Ui talks, or (2) Was trying to soften up Communl Leg. Co. Approve Salary Increases Govt. Congratulated For Sending Down 'Unpop ular' Measure Top Ac* Welcomed %  'aht* Msment And They Did It The Legislative Council yesterday approved of a iium-' bei ofj y pests in the Government Service as well as the salaries attached to various administrative posts. to the slormv and prolonged debate on tliev proposals m the House of Assembly on Tuesday last week. • here was a quiet atmosphere in the discussions which took place yesteraa) In the Council and which lasted for jusi over two hours u against the 11 hours during which the matter saa in the House of Assembly. Bid To Oust Rhee Fails PCS AN, Korea. June 24. Opposition National assemblven continued the boycott of the Assembly amid reports that they were mapping a parllamentary siralesy to repeal two measures kteptni President Svnutnan Rhee Oftlff. Only 86 assemblymen showed up for to-day's session. I Is slim* ••' '! %  MCanary quorum. Pro-Rhee assemblymen passed measure* keeping Kheo In office yesterday. Hire extended Rhce's term of office until August IS and the other keeps him on as President until a presidential election The measures were pushed through by , handful of pro-Rhec issemblymon Rhee has been tryng to tike the presidential election out of the hands of the Assembly and give it to the people frum whom he would stand a better chance of re-eleelion. The Assembly was to have elected a new President vcnlrrd.'v to replace Hint whose term expires July 15. Meanwhile 200 local councillors who support I thee nt on "hunger strike" demonstration in Pii'an demanding Ihat the President dissolve the Assembly. Police today arrested three ii the rmti-Khee Democratic Nationalist 1'nrly on charge' Tni' Honourable Coloni.il Ski Iretary, Mr U. N. turner, Stt ered a lucid address which [covered the various proposals get [out In the respective Orders an > this was followed by a furthei exposition by Hon. Mr. H A. Cuke (who seconded the motion lor the i v.io.uireiioe in the ftesolytio i itealing with the Civil >Vi*U hin-:;I (e in Number IV of 18S2. Hun Dr. Masslah Slid "U"-r Honourable members toiigrstulated tin* Government for sending down ;in "unpopul.ir" ineasui. such as timt which had eo*i<' before the Council, and wrrtV conceding thai It wss impotslbii for any Committee to send dow measures ol (Inkind whu i could pleme everybody, drc. %  tleflUon lo certain %  noreelW In relation to Its i a sni.ii>"paid to Uiheadmasters of various FTr-t Grade und Secondary Schools. During his reply 10 the varloi;points raised, the Hon. ColOOU informed th? CoUBJBi that tralntni scheme "wu very much In the fore" and expreawi the hop* thai the proposals set out In the varloua Ordet*, wnul,, he e irtra on routine training fllaht.level.. _. ashed and burst Into flames here'deplorably low. to-day. The aircraft, one of a flight those obtaining In other port* mi! Sri vice at large. Is not difficult to prove. Three years ago Sir Kaurloa Holmes stated as a fact In his report 'i the Unlflcalior, of the Puhlie Serving in the British Caribbean Area that "In the highest and upper middle ranges in the Civil Services of ribbean Area the salary re low. In many InsLm.es pared v lib I RAfllLY bat Princess Margaret tured smoking In public, but here *lc puffs s cigaret si ihe attends Ihe races st Ac | land In foiegniMid Ii the I*'i r BdUlburah, tui band Of tjnrrn PbiiipHas Jaundice LONDON. IW The Duke of Edinburgh is ufl-nng from jaundice and will be < tinned to his room at Buckingham Palace f. even] days, accordiiuc to ,i palare medical uUetin The bullrlln added -w have theroSore ad< cd Ills Royal Highntss to cancel all immediate enaBeni!its Including his projected %  'it to Bdlnbui (I — v.r. Hi-ro*8 Wjektum TKHCRAN, June 24. tfo ill uh V/ai given ;i in h'Mne when he returned faun UH International Court at Ihe Hague. Thousands of Iranians lined the route from the airport to tbo Shah's summer palace and shouted anll-llrilish sloitaiis between cheerhu: the Pranfa g Cows were sarrtllcivl alon the route. After stepping fiooi ih< aircraft pale but smiling, Mossadegh reiterated the view that the court was incompetent to judge the Issue between Iran and the i i. Oil Company. Only a few thousand people Wtro allowed In the airport to greet him. The route to th Ridgway Inspects Troops In Germany Under His Command BADEN GERMANY. Juno 24 GENERAL MATTHEW 11 HIUGWAY. allied supreme -•ommander in Europe, visited crack FienHi division under his command. In tlu* second .lay of his three-day Urnof 500,000 frontline troops m his Waatarn European Defanea HKII;\V.. V landed at Lahr Airbase in Krenrh Dana I Qo Ha had Mown to Lahr Airport in his private fDUI anginad ConalellaUon from Bueckendar. a bane m UM British zone. Hiutrpactad Brltlah Esraasi paatatday and said he •oiind llit'in %  hilly up t. m\ i in CVITV i llMid he did not intend to men inj Gannaii laadm OH this visit to Germany He said "my first pui| to see lirst hand the commanders who carry K reaI sibility." West Germany is the aaoond of NA.T.O. natioiis thai RklgWay has visited. Ha visited Ilaly l.tsl wck. Uid^way was met ;il i.ahrby deneral Roger No!ret, Commander-inI'hiii oi Kraneh troona In Oarmanjr, and PVaoch Oround .uol An tAimmandeTB. Uuli.way saul "I BID vo.ilU prottd U) serve with you." Mo InspactM MX platOOni Ol UM crack French inf;inlry m bhM uniforms with whlta |1OVM and ltfft*ni Tiu-n ha vmi in Etaatntti -I 1 milaa north <>f Lnhr, to Inapaol mora Franch broopa. French occupation authorities took special pracauUoni ;U':HII.S1 pcsMble Communist demonstrations during Kid(-way's MMI L.isi nigh) branch polloa patrolled streati >f Prnacfa OCCUpnUon headquarters in groups of four. The city was heavily guarded However, deaplta afforta to East German Communlata •ii stir up nnti'Hidgwav il"mongirations no djaturbancai are reportedi In Paris Rldgwey*l headqaaHera announced that the Supreme Commander will visit Norway and Denmark Starting June 90, Ha Will Itay in Norway from Jum Q July 2 Ha Will visit Denmnik on July 3 and 4 and return to Paris Is Late .Inlv II' of ten. fell to the 'ground twelve ihe cv.lnnlal Empire %  and went onl Shahs palace wns lined with nlnutei nflei the take off. Names t" say that "It Is not^ a queetinnl police and Ihe military. Moss:iOSgfa suld hlb duty of victims were Iwina withheld "f *nlnrle* l pending n'dlneation of next of trart to the Public Service* men • On Page 3 LORD ALEXANDER DID NOT KNOW WASHINGTON, June 24 EARI, ALEXANDER, Britain's Defence Minister, said hero to-day that he did not know in advance that the United Nations Command planned to bomb North Korea's hydro-electric power plants on the Yalu River near Manchuria. He made this statement when questioned by naBorters after a thlrtv minute visit to Truman at the While Huuse. He said he had not been informed that the raid wa planned while he was in Tokyo or Korea on Ul inspection tour and "I know nothing more than you do from reading the newspapers". He declined to say whether he thought the raid on Tall power plants was the result if the deadlock at the r.ilks but he did say the targets appeared to b' a "proper target". Alexander said he had discussed Korea generally A-ith Truman who. he added, !> be in better form or more to the Shnh. wa* to report —IT.P. PrisoiH'rs Srrt'Oiml With Impartiality KOJE ISLAND, June 24. Loudspeakers blared outllde tents telllntc prisoners that Chinese and North Korean Red Armies bad plcdiccd amnesty for any soldier returning including those who might have tattooed themselves with antl-Communist sloLeaflets were distributed lo .ill prisoners before they were screened explaining In detail the United NationdOSS not want to retain u single prlsonei. Hut the United Clark Sends %  Message To U.N. Troops UlflTID NATIONS HF.ADytMHTKHS. Korea. June 24. Osflkttal Mnrk Clark. Untied Nut Ions commander In chief said HI a message on the second annl%  i .ii %  • t ihe Kun ..M W II loday that if the armistice talks fall U.N Is ready for "bloody lighting". In the message to his troops Clark said "we prefer to achieve ..ui annlMlee at Ihe conference liable. Hut if Uw enemy prefer i otherwise and forces Uw return fa) tin. hitter, l.Lxidy lighting of 1950 and 1951 we are ready. The United Nations command Ul Eighth Army which have been trained In battle and strengthened by the revitalised Republic of Korea." —H.P. LORD ALEXANDER. had never appeared to him t Seknoe Thgtee For Purkf-Davirt HVAUI I'HII^DELPHIA, Th.> I'lul...lelphi.i Cullegf i I Pharmacy and Science to-day conhonorary Doctor Of S. ienee lH'n-e on Honry J. Loynd Parka, Davis and Company Or. Ivor (JrllBth. president of the Nations promised it will stand be'31-year-old institution, sal hind any prisoner who would I ieoccnvni ... i forcibly resist returning. 'ii'gu 1" Individual screenings lotted only two minutes. A Republic of Korea Major stood behind each intcrpreterII by midday Tonenlial rains .-.i th Nasjsi R|1 t. fl.-d IhOUsaad men nie lightiiu; breaks In its bunks in an sfl to prevent flooding around Nsgoya 'i I Clilu I'M ITIIII ..i I .i AMIKICA'S gifatest Itrlag air %  Col. FranrU S. GsbresU waves from his car during s parade staled In his honor to San FranCisco. Thousands turned out to give a hero's welcome to the man who brought down 13 enemy places in World War II and sU and a half In the Korean campaign, i international JouadfibotW U.N. Violating Geneva Convention —SAY REDS i \MUNJOM, June 24. %  lOl t truce r.egotiatortv accuesd the United Nations of >Wkih an CMtenslon o| the Korean >g prlwuers on Kole ^toiui 'in vloUUon of the Ge ntli north Korean QeneraJ Nam II ald tin ..lied yestordtty after a two months' rcees* step"' by the United Nrtlioo.. At the some Umo or* an issue with stateWilliiini b i Nations malor obstacle 1 ner question was tfe iriioncrs "• iiu" would n'rn under Ihe pulley of voluni ....%  He sait that the practice of re%  T iirisoners In whatever DOB of the Geneva < minimum stand%  t nf lmm;inltarlanlsm. in made DO refcrenco to the United Nations reminder %  iiiv in 1943 oftrod German troops "voluntary u -.they would surI'.P. They're everything I look for" Icgu ll.ilihcicthat the degree was %  onlerred on Ixiynd "In recognition of tho leadership which you nave evidenced In the Held of pubb ind human.welfare." I)I/>yinl. M dent of rtirke-Devis. worldi largost makers of phure |;i'"lij." in,,. April, 1..-,). A native of BprtecvlUe, Utah, he was graduated from the University of Utah in 1922 with a bachelor of with the Owl Drug Company in San Francisco. Oakland, Calif., I'ortland. Oregon, and Salt iJike City, he joined I'arke-Davls Kansas City In July, |3I. In le*>, than 20 years, he rose to theprutlIha world-wide f %  hbh makes more than 1.000 different drug products. —U.P. TOKYO. June 24. FOUR of five North Korean power houses which wart bombed by more than 500 nllie-l pinnae OfJ Monday another plastering to-day. The largest of the five—a huge Sulho dam i Yalu River near Shantung was one noi bombed in <) air raids. The other four were attacked by nearly 200 I planes from aircraft cai: coast and Air Force fighter bombers from d / in South Korej The Air Force said F84 Thumieriets "completed the destruction" of two power stations near Char, j in reservoir and two on Songchon River near Hamnung. Experts to-day were still studying films of damage done in Mondayraids. -V.P. U.S. Has Family Of Atomic Weapons iviL'iitvr-nViti *.. %  • -. %  WASHINGTON. June 24. It Wd s learned that United States scientists have developed n "complete family" of atomic weapons which are being incor%  ito army, navy and air force combat plans. In addition to atomic power for artil'ery shells b' 1 missiles, the Unite.! Arsenal presumably includes or soon win I hydrogen super bomb. Military and civilian experts who described the stride.-; in atomic de\ i to the House Appropriations Sub Committee did I fleally say that thhydrogen bomb hss been perfected. But there were constant reference* to the H. bomb in the carefully edited testimony made. %  veUeb .• to rej,orters today. %  tlmony was r lion with Truman's rlional 43.191,000.000 to expand atomic r.icilittes llo single urn ever asked for tn.s pssjpo I Chairman Gordon I>;iri 6f the Atomic Commission said "certain elements" of the H. bomb will IKproduced in plants to |„. built UTV programme He edct "primary" the H. bomli sfforl developmental phase rather than production phase." Informed sources previously indieatcl ii..tt the UnJtr.i %  %  H aa .•I the Padde. Chairman Bren McMahon of r.,nate llou-i Atomir Knergy Comitilttei* strongly implied in i last week that perfection Of Hv H. bomb i>* now eemiretl ai I m Pre would ordi r ihe Atoa Ion lo ID ihi produce thousaniU v.reclclnf weapon. -I'f. "Bui seleam fioe, ssseat In .In Mmitiii, I suapese you nvan. But what •sectlj 4e %  a look for in a cigarette?" Flavour — which tmn 'inly touts from tobacto Ihat is rathtr ip*ctmL I htm, of to*ru, p*rftci iltirtirs — which i mfor table thrtai." I "Coolness loo? Veil, ihal's •era te by Use Su Maurier filler tie. Ami no biU of loose leee, la the in.nib—Gltrr tip aeaii Y„ all ihat. D'you know, this dm Maurier filter tip is just about th* finest idea for improving a smoke that I'vt ever come across." Smoke lo your throat'i content du MAURIER THI EXCLUSIVE FILTER TIP CIGARETTE I0LI Dlliaiauios: VILKIMIOM %  ii"Nj| QO., St.04 for 50 M40I M IMOtAMO ro.. inoaiTOWM


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WEDNESDAY, JI'M B, 1852 numvnos \h\i.i in I'M.I sIMS T. V. Shmv Cjost Cinemas $2,000,000 HOLLYWOOD, June 24 A survey showed United States wide motion picture box office teJ ceipu dropped off m I ,000,000 on Saturday night when marathon 14-hour television low originalm* in El Capital. .Tieatre here which mvkod fcng Crosby's Video Debut film In J coast tu coast telecast to raise fund* to. send ihe Uniu~j Si.,,.-. OlvinpuMam t*> Helsinki I'rofhy. MUMdlaB lion Hope and Dorothy LapMUT, their co-star In many pictures, obtained pledges of more than Sl.MMOnO from persons in ,tll walks of life thereby reaching a goal of $850,000. Between announcements of pledges as low as 20 cents to as high as $10,000 top names in entertainment and the athletic world contributed specialties. The drop in box office receipts which in some cases was from 25 to 40 per cent, was more acutely felt since the show began at 8.00 i.m. Pacific roast time, which on >al unlay night usually brings • movie houses the peak of business, articularly on the western half [ the United State*. Farther east here the .show started later Wple just stayed home that night 1 await the show —VT. Pur mm* WiniTt ipi.iiv Dies After Ofash PARIS, June 24. Praline. France's mon hunoui larmoquin known, to the fashionable woman in the world over for elegance in Pain, salons and magazine coVfaKdled to-day mi Injuries teofRTC in a car ash yesterday. Praline had been returning from loliday by ear wnen she was inolved in the crash with another near Llssieuni, Northern v, and war hurled Into the load. She was uncofwioiiwhen Jihe was brought to Lissieunt Hospital lumrlng from •> fractured skull mid with llnt to August 31 next to sign lother protocol "extending that ent on the understanding soon as the new agrt.-ment conies into force the protocol will lerminate. The Council will continue in| vestigalion of a new agreement [ and a further meeting will be held in September. P. J. Westermann was re-clected Chairman. Uniform Reporting Urged By Hut m-aiif iVivv PORT-OF-SPAIN. Greater uniformity in we ither reporting practices features tht recommendations of the Eastern Caribbean Hurricane Committee which met at Kent House this week at the invitation of the Caribbean Commission. The Committee's report urges • %  onformance with International standards wKh respect to (1) hours of reporting: (2) standardising barcanttar*; (3> Uutoe linn of •Nation*: < %  ) codes used In reporiinc. In the matter of reporting hours the Committee recommended that "the islands in and adjoining the Caribbean Sea should adopt the international hours of observjtion from January 1. 1953. and that the other parts of the Regional Avociation IV (North and CenII .! Amartca) should eomlossr Lb* possibility of adopting these miirnatlonal hours also as soon as DtaV ribat.As to the use of codes, it Is re commended that all members of D bo urged to MttWN to the regional codes as promulgated by the World Meteorological Organisation and that where such codes were not fully in uJanuary I. 1933. differences should be notified to the President of Rcv . ,., %  IV The Committee considered OV problem of expediting tni inn of reports and reconinunitiJ th.*t "the Governments loncerneil take all possible measures, either through the provision of the necesBBSVINI themselves or through "nancial support of the respective communication agencies, to ensure the expeditious flow of meteorological reports BBH sdvirories In the Caribbean Arei." To ensure the prompt receipt of hurricane advisories, the Committee recommended that, where %  continuous watch was not maintained, consideration should be given to the use of automatic radiialarm systems to alert personnel assigned to man receiving s"; lion: While the Committee considered that the organisation of hurricane relief measures Is not strictly In Its provinoe. It proposed that members keep "the Caribbean Commission Informed of all relief measures undertaken In their aM r i lories and any modifications thereto." The Commission. II vru noted, will undertake to send these reports to the Governments concerned. In revising the action taken on recommendations made by th meeting held last year, four substantial achievements were recorded. The first was the installation of rawlnsonde (radio sounding balloon) equipment at Guadeloupe. Another was the inauguration of a radio-teletype broadcast at Miami by the US. Weather Bureiu. In line with the recommendation that additional circuits bo set up. Martinique Is now In radio contact with Puerto Rico. and the circuit can be put on a 24-hour basis when necessary. The Caribbean Commission has carried out the recommendation that at the start of the hurricane season. a statement should be circulated giving Information concernine radio stations issuing hurricane warnings. Committee Will Work Out Rules (Fran Osr Own rarrdBandanli KINGSTON. Jamaica. June 24. B.W.I. Parliamentarians meeting in Jamaica have agreed '" the formation of a British Caribbean Parliamentary Association and appointed a Provisional Committee of Hon. W. H. Courtenay. O.B.E., Chairman. Hon. Donald Sangster. Norman Manley. Williams of Antigua and Noel of Grenada to work out Its constitution and rule*. The conference which began Monday will be completed tomorrow. Although Barbados has not sent a delegate Hon. Lloyd Smith, M C.P. on his way to the UJC. on a Parliamentary visit Is acting as an observer at the Conference for that colony. Joy Back Home Ladk k S Play 1 Tame Tennis VICI AOMIKU Charles Turner Joy, former chief negotiator at Panmunjom, Korea, is shown w ;th his wife, and their dog "Fury". after their arrival in San Francisco on the transport Gen. H. W. Butnrr. Joy refuned to predict the outcome of the Korean truce talks. He said he believes the Communists are using the talks as a "tactical maneuver to b.iild up their sriny."iinfernalum at Soundvhotol IMI. Yuehl Club Tennis Touriiuinonl YESTERDAY'S RKSl'LTS Ladle* Single* Mrs. D. E. Worme beat Mrs, A A. Gibbons 6-l. 4—0, 8—0. M I Worme bent Miss L Branch 6—3. 4—6. — 1. Men 1 Single* Mr E. I*. Taylor beat Mr. G. Watson II—1. 6—0. Mr. W. H. Knovitsj beat Mr. G. L. Hunt.6-4. 5—7, 6—S. Mi ,1 D. Tnmmingham beat Mr. F. D. Bames 7—5. 6—2. Mr. D. E. Worm.bv;.t Mr. S 1'. Edghiil 6—0. 6—2. TO-DAYS FIX TV RES Ladies' Sbnglea Miss M King vs. Miss H. Hudson Mi-. I 1 I % %  %  n M Wood. Men's Single. Mr. J. D. Trimmingham vs. Mr. M. deVerteuil. Mr II L Toppin vs. Mr. V. Roach. Mr. D. E. Worme vs. Mr. I. S. Robinson. Mr C. B. Sisnett vs. Mr. D. Mac Phail. Main.'Mriral UiiiijiHHigh School Notre Dame defeated Unique High School In a Netball game on Monday by twelve goals to four. The Misses M. Dottin and D. Belgravc scored six goals each for Notre Dame while the Misses Holder and Green scored three goals and one goal respectively for the Unique High School. Surplus Honey For New Factory %  I %  %  •I Oar Own I < % %  maandaal. KINGSTON. Jamaica. June 24, Jamaica's share of the surplus sugar money arising out of dollar sales to Canada is likely to be Used towards erection of a new sugar factory planned for Ihe western end of the island. The sum officially announced to-day |s $1,500,000 inste.Ji of $1,000,000 reported yesterday. i plans of the factory of 1" -I' ti ..|... ,' ... %  : ,..! %  et complel.il but the pd-'l % % %  ito be met by government, IDC. and cane I.IIMHI, uhile industry hen bM0 osked to apply ony surplus to the project. IU DENNIS HART LONDON. June 24. Today the Wimbledon spotlight centred on the ladies. The first and some at the second round matches of the Women'-. Singles were played They provided neither the thrills nor shocks served up by the men yaaterday All eight seeded players won their matches. Only one, Mm. Jean WalkerSmith, one ,.t Mut.nns two seeds Md Mm HI two straight sets defeating Mrst S. Schmidt of France 6—3, — %  Dans Hart, the holder needed just 22 minutes to bestt Miss S. 1. Oddling of Greet Britain 6—1. 6—0. in the first stage of the defence of her title. Miss Oddling who w.is playing in place of the injured Mrs. Mottmm caused a • ipnse by winning the first game %  he champion's service. I .t with m. Liiulne .-xertian Miss Hart won the next 12 games to tSkfJ the match. She displayed some powerful ground shots which gained her the title last year but appeared u> move a little slower about the court. However this was no doubt due to the fact that she wasn't extended Thu eagerly -awaited Wimbledon debut of l?-yeai--old Maureen Connolly was greeted with tremendous applause from the packed Number One Court. For two days she had been out of action nursing on Injured shoulder and her swing seemed jerky. This did "ot prevent her G. Mueller 6—2. 6—0. The American champion's display wasn't spectacular but hkw Miss Hart she wasn't extended. Louise Brough began her bid to regain the UUshe loot last year with a comfortable 6—1, 6—0, victory over Miss P. A. Lewis. She was right back to the form which won her the crown three years in succession and showed no %  igTBi of the tennis elbow from which she suffered last year. Two other Amnu Shirley Fry and Pat Todd. maintained the run of quick vmofaal Miss Fry had the easiest of all against Mrs. W. C. J. BaJford whom she beat 6—0. 6—0. Mrs. Todd defeated compatriot Miss A McGuire 6—0, 6—2. Britain's other seed Mrs. J. Hinkel-Quertler beat Mrs. R. Cooper 6—I, 6—3. and the Australian champion Mrs. Thelma Long had a convincing H—I, 0—0 victory over Mrs. H. M. Proudfoot Men's Doubles favourites K. McGregor and Frank Scdgman had an easy 6—0, 6—O, 6—I first round victory over the Belgian pair J. Brichant and P. Washer Britain's hopes Tony Mottram and Geoff Palsh gained a noteworthy victory over tinyoung Australian pair Doit Candy and Mervyn Hose. They won in four, sets 6—0. 3—6, 6—3. 6—4. P.A. WE. For Tea OTnan Our Own dwtMpcndrni %  >N, Jamaica, J f) o Itrtnaasies thi loileition sys'em here from Jan., year. The decision was taken as a result of recommendations by MasssM I >1 U i pi hrsssl pVUgd in MAIL NOTICES M„L i> l.ui.,1 Knifldo.; id r*ancr '** a* UrM "III be rloMtf al i .o.l , "*"" M-tl at II NAM. an Ihr SHh 1 IWM I1M WlgSHtfd Mail al I p m on tli. SMh %  ma 1KU Oil .1 1 %  •, <-, ih, SHh J n,r ISM Street dims*, w ROBINSON'S ••— CROATS In Touch With Barbados Coastal Station I..IIO— Bariwdoa Ceaa B S I aaglMaa, %  S N.Mlh SiLtaln. 8 S >ajd Im.n.hn.1 S M| v v HaaarM. S KsSMll, S Rli<|arltal. S H fva Prran. a S Hlrvna. S S MrrMtor. S S Ducoanarr, S.a PaUilin*i S St IkKlllo, S S rilllSlnaaajiii s s iwii... s s Manes § HI-M i a i*i. a B M/T t>Fiada>. S S Aatr>dnaau. S S %  MStUlPl JlnMksrl S s' yweaa] i. a a i m*. 9 n n HV I W II Ar-."nlm.. H M H I ,1 \ MB, S S ttlla Oarrla H H b nartai i liarkillot.-n ~ -. t A Iron I'.ilnlrr S S HllklnlDd g • I. %  M %  -rTi !" • Oranjaatad. < II .... s s Arab}, a S CornaaiM ~ . AH., s a s Aooiio. S S Akoa PUnlM, M T Ttiwrbloi, TJO* Naiiarn. H S M*tS SB Viator, ss Tiidair % %  s.i. II Tlbrnua, S BVnilo. g.l '-.—n INtnt. s Rumana, SS I Drain s | ii,.u. | s Vamafir. S R AUU.l". ? S Wan.lr.al. H S %-*|-.i I KLIM is produced undn /tMcfot KLIM Lsasat MILK M la PratacaKt Ida Watal 0 wise OP (IHHM: ... wudom U \he best buy bntuu It's '. ihoonly (ooihbnisbiwiih tbi| onset-*rtape* handle ^ it's |*^t*SaaaaM nuJo ti> help you Ret into eiery caevke. eieo the huuVit ro rea. h. No woodcl more dcnilits favour tha VsMionshspo ihanibaiol snf twlw toothbrush, | Nylofl (UiHinu%cfldd) e^, NaiualUiUUo Till: C ORREClSilAPIi TOOTHBRUSH MAD II BV ADDIS LTD., OH DDIIfOID -buy Wisclm Youth $fovenuwt Gets Gramophone he Barbados Youth Movement has just received a gramophone si .. girt from UH> C..mbell Youth Centre, ICngland, to assist the youths In their musical apprtttati D A letter from the youth rentiv in England, wished the President of the local Youth Movement, BtkSDsH In the Movement undertakings and added that records would be sent on within a fortnight. Man browned Robert Miller of llaUi Village. Christ Church, was drowned off Battary Batch, Christ Church yesterday morning. Miller a 34year-old ILsherman was in a fishing ljo.it about half m|U* off Mattery Heaeh when a large wave struck the boat thus eupsuing It, Two other men who were in thu boat were brought sufcly ashore. REDIFFUSION Offers a Commission of $1.50 in CASH (or every New Subscriber brought tu and accepted by the Company. KKDIFFUSION will pay in addition a bonus of $25.00 to any person who brings in twenty-five New Subscrib era in one Calendar mui.th who are accepted by the Company. Hare always a supply of Recommendation Forms ready THEY CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE OFFICE KKIHrl LSION Trafalgar Street. For all Mthile ahoemWhile shoes, to pass muster in company, must be spot* less. Immaculate. Hie mi, or Propcrt s Shuwhite. No '' surer way of making sure that white shoes arc hhltef PROPERTY SUUWUITE* mil 11. Ill Mil i i IIK THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. \\M \l. HOLIDAY Ct CUSTOMERS and HIIINDS ore asked to note that our WORKSHOP will bt closed at from Monday, Kth Junr. 1932. to Saturday, the 28th June. I9S2. inclusive, (or the pur]) .e of granting our Workmen their ANNUAL HOLIDAY. Arrangements have been made for emergency work to be undertaken, during this period and the receipt of repairs and delivery of completed work will be continued a* usual Our Merchandise Department and Office will be open to business as usual. THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. White Park Road. St. Michael FASCINATING FITNESS Whs* you buy"Aerie* Mesh you buy for >out*clf the sparMinf good 'o**k* ihji %o hand in hand with iiinet nj comfort. These \sell-cut. so WaataMl blouses jrc fashioned m Aeries fabfK vsnh |he ssynder SSCJVC spevijIK designed for mtatureti \cnUlativn. You feel warm in the cold and cool %  in ihe heal when >ou s*ear Acrtex. <: ACPTEX %  %  Gets the Dirt ootl of WORK CLOTHES faster and easier titan ANY Soacs! I' All — even in tile hardeal water — wiH gmt ::. ilntii t vrtu-im-nU cli'an.'r, whiter, brighter — and tJUICKLY too. For your dainty Uiinn.s or heavteat wash—use FAII...put it on wnur gsocefs's Nat 'WilM*. Washing wtfrt FAB SAVES motifs — Use HALF M much I -.ti' as MILK STOUT C. L. Gibbs INKR At'NTIN a O. LTD. l-rf Broad Sir--, JlMn4-.1I U Air IJ ANOTHIK IHINIH0 IX AM HI Of Qifthico There's always a clean hygienic fragraiKc in every room where this S-M-O-O-T-H rasM ckarucr Is used. Pol-, Pans, and Tiles, Sinks, sod Paintwork respond quickly to its treatment — there's not a scratch in a mountain of Chcmico. A sprinkle of Vim on a damp cloth —a quick rub —and those dirty, greasy things will sparkle like new again! Vim leaves surfaces shining and gleaming, so quicklv and easily VIM cleans everything smoothly and speedily KVELYK ROACH k CO LTD. P O. Box 191, Bride •town. BarbUss, Sub-AoetUt 1<# st J.urtoFRANK H. JOHNBON B SOW. LTD Csstrls*. Evsrybodr'n Htorss. Bt. OsorgM, Qrsnsda



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PACK srx n\im.\no \nvoc.\TS WEDVESDAT. Jl'Sf M > />eg. Council Approve Salary Increases aiuun-AOOW not them a perfect and adieu nl vi.c. -I w w aura.'' he nid I
  • IKH wish to lie AM lw bui i MI m tiut it* IlimounWf Colonial 8eeretiir must be well awin thai lhre m i tttmn tquuuh pas* From Fae S As the Honourable CoaoPlai **•' **J^ 1 **** * e%nindasecretary In referring to the point mi—! %  — % %  % be Mid, "" *** *"<* .• "J P" "aerl y Hon Lr Maatiah relaand cotMUtuUonal ,,n ''**' *flmilr*M of St. lie* in ihe saltm.-. of Ihc Hearltaklng u.co ann .f *"rhael"s Girls' School and In the master* nf ih hmd "** HeadComherntrre sni (ban people who did m ***** ** Si. Michael's Girls' seen fnm .\pprnciix l of ihc Ri i .„! % %  11 .Mrativr work woukl Scho I getting J3.430 and the ion that in* Director of Educanavc to Or men ,.... i.ii H thai in W M "** •**> %  • 'or the new 'rr lh* Committee. M> that th ^SZZmTl!? EStJtLZ t^partimHe utao noticed that Cotnmittaa had the advantage uf iam> th. '"'P !" '* ". Q orwi |(f )h(> lI( M(luli<(n m hi h i S pointed out thai In '** Assistant m-rter might actually lh written representation* atf llv reach a salary higher than the '"*;*£ >,t Education rerorr.ttendmaatcr and he wanted to !'" ,nda "" 1 w !" *""'<*. ami ... what was the explanation " % %  suggesird that •ucfaand *^ on graduates and rtrsi or M wa* agreed by the Committee ronodor ihe puaiuun and not Vw %  £r u "i tlaas HnnouiT Graduatea. thai the difference between On prtko/tdlity and he bdlevad Ihey **are waa u great disparity Director of Education and one >houid make the changaa with a no*"'**" 'he acalea for women HiMdmasun of (Vimbermere, and view t,i not excluding the MM* r aduates and those for mm the HcadmasUr of Combermcre bilitj *n Honours Gradregained at prevent. The effect 'if wherever Ute opportunity ar< v %  ***• 'he scale started much that was that the Headmaster of It Mitneo to him he C!i.rl. t %  • ** %  •" than tho scale for men Combermwe School should ratbag wiouid not give evaryixia Graduateit, clva a salary M60 less than the the benefit of the increases at i %  %  -..lull..11ir it itvea aaa^tioa l.nUhlNhniriil make* pmvi Ihr ha I tho work, but also with a avofd having to be dependent a the vagaries of .-upply and ,-.ei!ta( dctaila which occurrad to him .ind which he dui not intend %  ilng at thut stage, but * othere rtnfl taken the initiative in inenUonmg such points. lie would preeant one or tuu points. H, Tintuxi that in reepect of Referring lo thr professional content with his explanation, men, Hon. Mr Evelyn said thai said that, it one looked at the. nun in private practice in these report It would be seen that tho days found more inducement than committee held 21 meetings .n what was being offered in the a pp rtMUI u u ,|y aixty daya. This Jn^li • frl^i., T ,?f^ W ,t r l e D m "' , y "' ean t that Ihe Conunlltee wofk-d medical man is going to give up Erector ot !"!" *to"*** hla practice to take a job asDIreePPre4 before the Commitl..-, tor of Medlci.I Services?" and had put up ^ u r n d /: He said that even in England thrna in writing. He eonalder.-d there was dlfficuRy In getting that the ratio between the He*t.ertnln grades In the Service, tho legal practitioners to give up their master of Cumberim-uWho at -moluiiR-nt grade!) hod practice to take %  ludgrslup prearm drew more than Hie bean r..*-ied and he was arudoue There was great demand, ho suni. Headmaster at the Lodge should to know ju*t what happcniid to %  and supplv was lltnlU d, Added 10 ivmam llw same, and Ihe Commonsenior orncor In it grirom|se ot pension did mlttee accepted the recommenwhen a tumor officer Jumped lo m>t appeal lo them dallon with the reault that Ine Ihe new low level. Was 11 Hint H'" 1 M'Evelyn asked: "How ,„<>pueed increase for the Heedhc idjTarad u certain amount of l """ ll £ %  *' 1,r, v " ,h,s t" 0 "'RUUhn ;it the Lodge waa lo BWt hs or was he allowed a cerl.iin l -, '"'>" '•"> "that places larger .,|, g htlv higher than that for the i-umbei of increments to mam,nan *raelvea7 We can compete n,. ;rt j, nJlrtor at Combermere. The tain his position of seniority? "P. 1 <*?' nt ,V u1 "•" pl-r has salaries ware in relation to the On the question of ihe teach".gaK^ M %  ,,—r. • i-commendad by the Head *. hojaid that in u.e naa or m„'; k, M 1 "Jt'..'*""J 'z', r ','. 'j ,. ••' '"-' Department, and the p.l i-admiiter of Combannere and "".-Eon for BOS. iiitu the d?of W S20 ** "* Haadmaater of Lodge, it seemed W him always !" |,^ '\Tihe ^ Order U-caui,,^ who" Lud ^ w ""^V between lo have been that way and m the pVe prepared an Order of the ** •"' l "'ii' poinu In the scale |.arugiaph 4 of the Committees rrf^** seal*, the same relationship k, m | was bound to make some rew,tl1 regard to Hon. Dr. A. S. Report, said that it took SI meetthat existed In the old scale wit coraruendaUoni with uhich others Coto*!. point about the setting up ings covering roughly three maintained. would disagree of a Cminl9sion from outside to mouths, and that meant conslilThey would notice In the old Replying the Hon. the Colonial consider the remainder of the erable strain. C numlh HIM. to tb Order SUMI for % %  < %  alarlea af leehnlrai personMl jnil II.il..i Departments ..I i .m TH mi nl III.partmrnu. werr eaased. The were as follows:— 1 Resolution to approve the Civil Establishment (General) (Amendment) No. 4 Order, 1S52. X. rtrsolutln to approve the Civil Mtablishment < Teachers) t Amendment > No. t Order, l. S. Resolatten to vary ihr salary scales and allowances payable bi Headteachrrs and Teachers In First and Second Grade Aided Hchools as set out In Appendix l> la Resolution No. 33/1MS. t Resolution lo make the salaries, allowances and conditions of servke set eat hi Column II of ihe Mchedale to the Reaolullon applicable to the emeers set oat In Celiimn I or thr .tchednle to tar Resolution with effect from the 1st ol April. 195t. S. Resolution to approve the Pensions (Penslonsble Offices) i.Amri-iliiienli (Itder. l5t. f. Resolution to approve Ihe Civil I itablWhment (Leave Pasaa :r) Order, 1952. 7. Resolution to approve the Civil Establishment (Payment of Pasaates) (Amendmenti Order, 15157. ijui t Bill Intituled u Act to amend the Chief Jadge and Crown Law Officer* \r\ 1M7 (1MT—IS) t. BUI ini.lt. i,-,i .,. Act to amend the Aa>iUn4 Conrt of Appeal \et. IMS iltOU— 3) It. BUI intituled an Ac) lo amend the A ng I Irs it Church Act. I'll i%  11 It), The Council llien jdjoum rd until ?vS pm on in. da>. lull those days. Now the Board -molument had batn separated ^nd therefore the Headmaster of Lodge got nothing out of the Boarding He was not defending the Com> mittee. he said, but it would be good If an Investigation were | obviously Lodge School wa considered senior to Comber: mcr-ml its headmaster should ministration would in fact runto go carefully through and see • IB* rr-p'TniKsions would b/ and be felt that Hon. Dr. Cat* would have to rely on the goot' i of the Administration witi the assurance that in cases of tha* sort it would be referred to tit > Public Service Ccarunlasion. Regarding the differential beThe respective Resolution* wete IBM paamM Bigger Job were going up to see Hu Exce'.lf Klf Excellency the Govenn-r k3 Baaj in the afternoon, and ,uur w much Ua" •""> rt ">' „ H VET'S.iii "T'^'VS^S.ITSLT, Hum l IW. Ihn no doubt th. (urth*r VW '"• """, •***?" inrmbcn would lerve. but ne (tho Khould hv.. rocrivod ll>. ... Id ! %  beyond thoucporfly h;. , .nd lb, tot^k Umt whllo Sol, work on .he Commlttt. .. Tho JOhd'"" !" ; ' •Jj" recommended in the commute* in the lav tune. Ihe report would have been held up considerably. M ...I mat if an Inside committee mi appointed for this much bigger t""k. he felt it would he i great 'train on Ihc Commi*tton, but he added 'it Is in.tier fothe Governor U. decide." He had mentioned that me Cornnut tee was not dealing with a void, twaen male and female honour It would have made their task Rradu.tes. *he Hon. the Colonu.1 much simpler if it had been so. Secretary the Committee fel On balance, it seemed better ll do what the committee did. As regard the point about th. Squarish pegs in roundish hole* When your BACK ACHES... %  Waatas M •BOB*. taMei M IS* aaaarfa. TW kJmy, . rh. uei Is-i Whoa Bwbrhs, hseasdo. fto^aatsai. f* •( lhat W Mt' lMin( Synotl Object WHEN the LegUUitive Council met yesterday. Hon. G B. Evelyn p rese nte d u petition froan the Anglican Synod praying that the Legidsturr reject the Maude Bill — Dse/i Eldssff PaV Dear. KiaW. Has edrsh M r*w •* M -*tea MM d Issai %  I SUM KIOI tad VMSM M shot pars, l i.sfcMissfcu s lssiw i sMissndsaaaBs. TWn ysu M Wttof hex tottor vsrk hrtUt MSTMM rosei t asers tin %  ,. btslst so OpwesM Dso/s Uaalt Mb h *• bis* sonSsai dlk fts tt4 toads. Osri J si si ansj aases. ,.* DoddsKkliWYPflrS Not Convinced Hon. Ur. H. G. Masslah in referring to the Colonial Secretary reply, said that as the Colonial Secretary had said, he had n-1 been convincedIt seemed to him. as he had said, before, to bs (' %  mimission for Ihelr advice. Anomalie-4 re. Hon. Mr. Tumor said it up to His Excellency the who waj. selected to sit nn the other Commission (that BM at!) n,i,aider the salaries f the rank and ill of the referring again i that that differential should msin. anH said that it was net' pointed out at any time durlm the committee's deliberations th.. Hon MT* Turner"saTd'thTt fo^'Vll Jjjf were goinx eontnry to th) ha knew he might be one. but the recogni-scd practice elsewhere. point was that the particular ;.'opte were in the jobs, and would continue to be so. but as and when they did go. it would be possiole to (111 those posta qualiped people. He *aid that the Administration was making full use of the Publli which matters of the sort might rh ftli_ rrfrrrrt H U,, Public STV,C *%* u „, 5 „„, u V]elsrtC3 hail said that he would enHulion said Uiat he might loavOuT to dent with each departwrong, and It might not be the nent individually rather than deal reason, bur for many years. Lodrc ivlth me complete training plan. .Sihnol h,u" been a boarding sch.-.I md .dded •'training proposaL arc and it had been quite possible -ry much in the fore at the that the outside emoluments of moment*' the headmaster through this lion. Mr. Turner told the Counquarter was fsr above those of il thai Hesdi of Departments 'he headmaster of Combermere in Tht Heighi ol Delight From Morning till r4l|ht lew doei ol "-* 11" fJatBM EtOf CJi|" mhaltd MW1 vow hmH e**>rt *ret <*•> w.tl hi iV wt.o'f dsy k> LUCli %  < The Genuine "4TII" Eau d> Coiopnc comes from Cologne an Rhine; It Is now again obtainable in the original quality, made according n the famous and secrol foimula since PM. PARK CLOSE TO THE CURB t^fiHSi' mm vmms SPECIAL CAfJBJ OFFER FOR THIS WEEK Galvd. Mesh Wire W Mesh X 48@ $1.50 per yard S. P. C. K. BOOK DEPARTMENT C. F. HARRISON CO.. LTD. TH. 4427 An fvclLnl Selection of BOOKS for all Agn. Reciti addilioul:— 1 1 I 1 IM I'. I 1 I BARBADOS AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION x :>4 %  „l 6,k X .Ml" Hi BIXX 36" 90c. X 48" @ $1.20 X 18" @ 4Sc. X Ml" @ 61c \ 41'" BARBADOS HARDWARE CO. LTD. |T1 House For B;ir. No. 1C Swan Si. Phones: II".;. 21M. 3S34 ll\l C A ,NI MUT| NV llrm„ Wouk THE SOUL OF MARSHAL OILLES DE RAI2: T, !5„ C .?. UN IS Y OF W, "T* CWVwrSTBttn?*' LKIN0 FOR GEORGIAN ENGLAND; ^^ NEXT MAN IN G. U BrodOM, ''* 7mfflnd ,rmit WHITF MAN RETURNS Agnos Keilh PHOENIX RISING Mnrcuerlte Sletri HOW TO TRAVEL INCOGNITO Ludlrta Bemalinuit MURDER ON DirTY M.les Burton ( Kei CrlSClutI DIE LAUGHINC. Pal MrGerr t UB MURDER BY THE BOOK Rex Slout ROYAL FAMILY BOOKS includinj QUKp f WISDEN IM2-Coplj w .i„ avtilM^' !" ^" 1 '' Order vour Uwki by telephone or bv po. Any liUet not In oek will be obtain ed w.lh the m inimum 5 Slay AS OUR FINANCIAL YEAR ENDS AT THIS TIME W ARV Jo !" T jutr ^S OUNTS W,TH us BF T SETrug SrSF N THE a.J\c K BOOK DBPAETMDNT WILL BI OLOarn •' i iiiiiiniiii in i in .I i



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    PAGE Kir.irr BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, JUNE U. i*SX CLASSIFIED ADS. MR HAIM THANKS SOLIJNS -We %  >• i*n" beg *o ret ,m thank* ht Iheaarelative, and fr.rr.rti who UWiM Ike Ituioral of Mr Jowpk WBthanlel IWIM -Itirt iMk plan o St.a M "niliM ~ Mi ot la W>1 J to Ike fa Bollint MI<1 Mmily •m IN MKMOK1AM IMM I AUTOMOTIVE %  DP i — r-Del^a.. rU< Clans I'l III 10 SALES BKA1. KSTATF. I'IHIII \nrn.s I MM HOVAI iimw-o,,, •-... I MB, wllh Ihie. I TSi.-e. .. BfBMMM I. lo Jwrp. N H :ii at p. !" ...,.l .hl..ied 1. Bock Mall %  vifirMl Af>' We LI I M • itIn BT)M WAIL Ty-TBXLXNO WAU llh IBM Mj u .f. feel of U*M attaohed %  I DoreU'a Road. ChrMt Church T' dwei.ji house eoatan* Svkng kitohenetke, ' %  Ht- in BHeaUBBI order Appl. Hedrt. i Taylor's Oarede Ud Phone *" Hot w* Will itmman whlk lingers en W.i.frwd, llckf.-. Ur.Udle.il. • Iru-nd. *ie-.FOH WENT U road I la* B-lh. Open Verandah lattu. Suit*!.. DIM pri-.ii, laj couplei from Jul> I Telephone • PA HA WAV. *t Philip CnnA I-ABOM be..eU al and Bhedroof rot Bent land. Buah Hall Croi buIM eland Appl. f: sb Hall NEK HAVEN. Orano Coeat. lull* StirnMh*4 For July. Novsenbei. O-eenbar ont I MBl *JH l S SS-1 f n %  CrOW—From July l.l at the May lair Oft Shop Sn.t^Mr DM Drr-.)n..lll| Shop. llalrdic.ine etc Apply ss i %  -4B I M*>la„ I nUhrd MA.. U* J.il ApP" M S U) *i TatACTUa One al-aa-y Battt" Tr. 1U aaxiuMaUa Uiir> and hall h-< % %  HUM uted Appb Manager '•"" alidfirii. P "v^i IWCXJO — %  r., ^t -p lo. TB* undaiuariad I publM pomprinn >m-a SlrH an rrW., tM HI* Jv>tt* iiunl it l>m A!J. THAT mum HiwuH I ir-alui.n nauaa l<>uaUM>r wiui IhI-' r.araB null >mi \W aBjaMfa '~l 1 ..la at IK. oa;n*i ol fkuBaal MM :' """ t S-WEM. -.In MM NOTICE %  or rr M<- \>>i'. R>niDitMuu BlM MM I Mr iKan Jul> !*" %  muat oa •..!.!••. al %  ttrfiad < Maa lhan awkl -n ,•!• >aa o* afp I .i •-.. .. ••"• Pan) .... M OfcUil -I lr. %  Puoehul Traaiuiai €m aMhaa alava %  aajtjiBBBBl c>-li*f ,' % %  a*ch ^pplk-atka. Candida!** n...i pt UM M—draMMat Ii Tuaad'li day al July. tM -r. Cl'f It.. •Par for th. Amor Iran Co. Prioaty 17 Hl.n SU..I. yrkl#*W.^. i tka k day af JUB* !• % %  UaaaMB MM| %  VAN PKrdaan V.r. In paffm %  "oiiii. ,,„,.. 0M mil*. Hoval Hlorr No I! Hl|h SI Dial U* M t 1 t I I KM -M rrcclvad n *hlpmnt of Uani .p**d AutomalK Ctaand*iS MarTu A C" I.U1 Hadlo 1. lilB-ll MKdIANKAL h TiTloy-' Oirac LU, MACMINR—UaM Domealk %  %  •r % %  WIMAM". flibb Baach. nuih*4 a btdroom but i avmtk ol Juh A f ? pLY U£ 11 WANTEIt WAKTMD A matter fa. Ih. CVMrulaj. •M Parry Bahool, tl Patai Uaru.-.i.i to laath up lnC.CE Ordlnarv •* %  .! CanilLrtal*. llh qu-lin.alioiiw It-a^h ABTlrultural Sclenta will a* pralari. I Salarv (o. > Ur-dMal* It.fMI a T 7 1M „ lop a Oraduala *lth Ul ol :'nd rlaaa honur< >l W*BB .BW> AIIOV..I".-tll a* made foi prrvim.t %  •frr.iiiPApplkallont with MUmu. %  UaM ^h.^^lld be Mil %  y ITlb Jill/. IrM %  %  S. -r Hooai i^> GtBJwith pra*Mu> eP**t Dry Ooodh.r a Div &>* Swan llr-M nnl, loWlacm hard B-HkltM %  PPb (I r* 0 MISCELLANEOUS IIDOBB-Jtnir-Mllatelv. r-rtntalwd nedraoma Qrdpn .pn.r On rk I Aunty' X X X C <• Advocat* Co TWENTV-Five DOI.I.AIUI extra mm nedlfluilon lor IS recodu (Ion* Mi ana calendar •••onlli tn M fOCKBT MONIY ettlty aamad by recommendiiiB' new .unactlbai KCDIFU'SION in one month oflrr. |1 M CaMt ILTI'IPAIPNT YOUH INCOME reaABhliirndl"* PXDtPrt'HloN O* lull paillruUrt (rom the HBDIPFUBIUN POST OFFICE MliUI KEMOVAX OF POSTING BOX. The PUBLIC l"OST1NC, BOX has Iwi rcmovpd from ihe wull >if l!i,. U II.,-, Hill S eaMl. FoBlina fntilllic :nv ,iv..ll. I.U* JI ihe si. jtMrph Poi OMBOT about UHl vu rdt tll*t*nt. R A I I.AUK) Coeonial ptwlmastf G.tu-rul Poal OfTW'v 24th June. ISS2 25.6.51--I '///,W-V,'/.'.V.W-V/<'.-TO-DAYS NEWS FLASH r.tnu. Mru'hc. JOHNSON'S STATIONKRV ud iiiiiimin ORIENTAL PALACE mjuxjL' VRTKBS roR OC % %  I IN IRK FROM INDIA. CHINA CITLON THANI'S Pr. t H. Bl. Dbl MM LIVESTOCK COW <" %  Ouarnary • Holeteln Co* asH In a law dayPbone MM P. V 'iiii.m. Chapel flap n < u-4i On* Itdliig HC HEY HUf-VH-S Apply Mabagti. POULTRY J'llJJTTS 100 New ruunpahlre Brown Inchon, hall drown pullett fot,,lp alao rorkciela bred IronLayol m e|i and upward Apply HUM. l.l Ward o( OraaMUa Road, Mlthaal Ml tl aS I MISCKLLANSOUH %  Ml ChrUt gpan v^anda* larlrtt aauU aad •• %  *. tombuaed drawia. A d.ntntl room. %  badiaoaM. totla*, balk kllchar. v. iifi .-r* Baal roprn* aervenU Bi.d with rlectxtrtty nlled InepecUor. dial JM rt/ier parllrulara and ronBjft>o" ._lp ..|BJ> t" CoTTlJr CATKOHD A, CO M M-el Itlora. NOTICE Bagasse Paper Has "Grown Up" Now BIG FUTURE IN INDUSTRIAL USES NEW YORK BAGASSE paper has "grown up" now No lonjjw la it a novelty, a substitute for paper made of more traditional materials. For some purpose*, bagaaae paper is actually better than the more usual types of paper. This was stated bv Mr Deloa Rentzel. a vice-preaiderit ol W. H Grace and Co. Ihe International industrial ai i trading concern of New York, which was one of the 'lr companies to realise the value of bagasse paper in paper manufacture. GOVERNMENT NOTICES AMENDMENT LEASE Oe AGRICULTURAL HOLDINGS AT SEAWELL Persosu dMUruvi to lease otw of tae seveD aaritultural hoidirut' at SesueU. Christ Church, in arcurtianc* with ihe prf^crlDad eondiUona of laase should apply in writiMf to the Director of Agriculture. Department of Agriculture. Bridgetown, not later than the 5th of July. 1932. Person* who may have applied prrvbou* to ihe publication of thi> iiutMt will need to apply .-fresh ss set out above. 2. Copiei of ihe itatement of conditiixti of lease may be seen at the District Agricultural Station* and at the Head Office of the Department of Agriculture, Bridgetown. No applicant will be considered who Is unable to comply fully with the conditions of the lease. THE Bi\RBADOS MGIMENT iiit.ni of the Unlled I BMF*SN All r* who all Military Ti... -ruj UlUei %  o( llir UnlMal the a| of IB >ean %  jaufiti in July II. 1SU. are r* tu realtler upon lha da< the* aliai ifhtppnth am Ibalr htrth oi MBB For further inform at ton., cto ill lha Amanr-n Camulate. Brldaaki-i Bareadoe r S J i f ., The company has staged an ex • hlbitten in New York of the mar., varieties of paper and cardbr.an! product it now makes oat of bagasse—not only iMrwaprlm, but also corrugated cardboard containers, heavy paper sacks. %  paper bags, wrapping paper rum*. < tbe at* of the INI UAB AUCTION UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER ay loatrueMBM rar*<>rod 1 wUl aaO uv. liday June Stta. al I III I I. fatt XoI ......e • MirhMfB HoHi l-fl.0 h p MerrM Car iDatnaawd Ui aeHI...I' Trim. CaBk Sale al I p M r mien I Oi.mii. Aurtlanaer 3S laVtn r i M- Hap. Fla. TAKE WrnCE u,al I, o>. Ow> OOF ..,* •M tbove ItanlaUoii am about to lam a loan of JlJSv under UM pr.. i-'j a' tha above Act -g-*"^ BW SSMl PtanlBUoii In raapact oT Uta An UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER from MMB H>1kMr> Lowe I will tall uaa -KalkFiif" Ror.lrv. li-ail. Ch Ch On Wrdnoa. id.* .1 II SO p m. t..i entire W BMeawara M*. CMIM cheat ludaa:~) Ura. dlalna table T...lion*ai Ubl*.. fliUtr n i.iioany Bailee. ItadW urawi-rB, lmmi. badtlead ItwaMBS t*ba>. Wr.iina'..' UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER Un Th.,iaay Cave i Avalnn ..raw of MUM lb* furniture NOTICE a*KaMAe *t i in. MI. -iv. i M, i ii in BWaaaaaa ft-Tlf-F. i. hareb: ervan lhal it havini any dabi or rtaiai retinaII"' —tale of EdU Ida lot* of tha pariah ot Mini e dMd in Uu lataaM on ihr m Oetnher. lSSl ,.,P Hrrobv reqi.i Band in partMuMB* of Ibelr rlnln.i atlpttad W the unaVartlgrird m < Meaara HMlchinann n; (l-lrl lor.. Jam*. SUrrt. Bn,..!.-,, bofora the VIdav of A..l lfA: Whtth d„lp -r .mil II I I lha atari* of Ihe eitale ainona Ihe | entitled Uanelo haying rodnrd I only nf ( Mih , But all the time, expert:u< *rdir going on at Pararnonga to improve the methods used In making different grades of bsgas*-' products. At one time, as many . as six to eight different type* of all pulp were produced, but In more .ml reeent years the company has conentrated on four separate types. All these were made at the The mills can now produce baigar plantation at Paragsase paper as fine ar)tissue papvr mongs. Peru, which has l>een Sugar rane bagasse Is made up making bugaaee paper a^raf | i3:l of relatively short fibre* that will It turnnt out 19,000 tarns frf banot withstand much beating or regasse paper products in ltel. all nning without undue fibre cutBut a small proportion of which ting and excessive hydration was consumed locally Pararnonga engineers, whose lot. A trial ahipment of sugar fiom it has been to select rehnin. Peru to the United State* In P.traequipment and set up maoufac tnonga paper bags was entirely luring procedures, have bee successful, indicating a future trend towards greatly increased use of paper for that purpose. Mr Rentrrl disclosed. "Most industrial sugar users prefer paper to cotton because of the absence of lint contaminati" in papei antl the better protection against caking which paper affords" he explained Employing the Huge bagasse ivsources of a 14,00O-ac %  upon or rd TTos nuiKTE in rvih. i. *. IVarli. A Whlto M*n wic la vird al Klipalani, U Satii Hi M • il UAI.VAN1SSUAprcUl .Jrer foi 10 ->. Ii..I qualify I. .1,-1. eatv-u—l in. n an UN i II MStsn son 11-. Kalvanited naila M rejnU pei lb lulo Tyre Co Dial sssn II S S3 Ifn JURT opaned lov< Jual arrived T.iie* Karoat aura lampA DonwtUc Ii Soar* pern N H llntbaaM Hall PlnntaUan. Si 1*\. A lias til at OIJ) n*<->H.S made Uhe Saw New %  sore look betler if Sanded Ihe Nurluui Way We tan do Ihe rob whrther vou havo aUcMM Power o. nol Call del. n Hoach and Co Ud Phonr LSB* or MAS BIU V. Kipplie of Bad Aartrulliiial Smlety •. anapi* i.. Ihe nn-i.il public lUMd p*M.ti at the Si—1 Shad. Park, and may be purchased brlwren the hours ol S p in rrxapt Iraaa II IS 8 M Sn S^.barrlbe now |o tha wall, Ttbiod r.i.l.ai.1 i Iradtaf. llally Newtpapa* MM arrreSag bs B BTSBSOB ly> AH only • %  ctayt alter pubBratMei In London COBItot Mn Oale. e,n AdvwcaM Ce. Ud Local Kepreecntaove. Tvl HIS. nas spun i.st with Mllr* A S.-.K. SI,.nr. Uruahaa C D TOOTH I'ICKN I booee of ISS. Plnr-l ,1 Kniahl. si ss li MIVAI This Is to notify Ihe 1 | putbc that I huve not heard J i from mv husband, Leslie i Rayside, of 21? Monroe 1 [ Street. Brooklyn. New York, [ U.S.A., for the past 13 years j [ and I am about to be again in tha near i| (Signed) E1.ISE RAYS1DB \ (Nee CAHKINGTON) J Oreto Hill, si Michael. S Barbados. \ 12.6.52— 3D. Co)bw-*rlock which includes Sideboard rioor 1 •mant Tab:** Roc Ban CTUna Cabinet Very good Flat Tap u*-W; Waon: Coiarhet Barbie* Cbab, Bknind Tip-Top Table. BxBeit. ail In blahua*. anv OUat and Clina S P Jus China Tea Service. Cut glau TasAB)MrB. Few Pteeea of old Chiaa; Fuk Univ., .nd F'-rkR nactrola, a*vidt, Phllco Radio. Whiu1'alntad Tblai FU"t-r. I..-.K. Congolemn; V*i' nMr SfaJtca SHndM .!..i, d. V-anhj Table Oil BUnElec Hot Ware Frraa PI IWurd. Cop'iiiif I"'" BSfgaB othe. BRArfRE ; TROTMAN Auctioneers LaMTT A I Ol Ml LOST * OVoTciieaoMd lo liar.. .1 Mum Bond %  •> ia—n AN NMi l NfEMEVni The Land Arquisitioa Arl 1941 t Queen SI (eel a.u^Jid SU-ei u> talnl Peter. % %  the Mi id %  Uriel, lo BlM %  in Ihe oplm >ublk .rpoer.. THM MiiMT.l Ml THAT oertam paroal of Mnd .on t.uwiia I.WB aauare Ice* more or * %  iiiiate al ike |iaxl— ii of Qiieen S|, llh San.l Street in Si-.-hlHnwrt in h. parlak of Sakal PStM Ai.nlt.iis on in north a.i lands of r Miller, mi Uv weet on Ihe Baoabor*. on the touU< Of land, of the Vealr. of Saint Pete. .Iiefna the tile of 'rie preaent S '** id Quern SSreal aforeoaSS or howevei BB I' e tame M BbutUtUf m buildindB and erxliona Haled IhM SOU. day of June ISSt me PubUc BulMlnna in Uva CSV lha uOand al Marba.. i CeaMnaad. R N TVRNBJt l T agetki r with in rdaelo.1. t led IK. Brth day of Wa> ISM CrLAHLSS CAHLTON itnousE. • MO. i rixij>s QonlllWd i .%  ..I. nf |na Will ef EUWAHD smil-MR rail pi DecoaBSd. SO S M tn NOTICE S> I .Ml..1 osos..i IIIWAN Ai.atat ni ant 4e,....d NOTICr IS HUHHV fllVRI "• %  pertona na.lns an> debt r rMlm upo can Albert Burke late of Payttra R> In Ihe parltfi of Saint Jamaa *i. die, in ihit Itland on tiic tSUi tfa> ol APn I SSI. are requaaled Iv tend la pajlli'n Mr* of men .latint duly aUo>e-.l. l< lha undnitaned. the auaMSad tire* lort of Ihe RaUle ,1 *%• Bald (teonl, Dunran Albert Burke. dec** ed, n %  ue ,. E, O Boa-rs. Jsme. SUerl liNdSohntn. on or beli.ro Ihe 1Mb da at Auarutt ISS3 alM. wblcri I ,1* , ehall pro>eod to dialribuAa the aasrl of Ul* .i i.l gataM .rnoNg Ihi' parUe .-rillUPil thereto having .e.-...t to Ih OebM and 'BM-ns ml. of winch w. ahaU than havr h..il nolke. And thai we dbaa net be liable for a.tets so dlttrtbuted to anj perton ol wtlOpB debt or claim we -h,il nol have ftad notice al the llmr ol men diatribulton And all petaoru indebted lo U>e BBM gatate me requaaled lu H".I their %  ecounlwilbaut delav Iil*il IHM Sill da] ol JunISM vrrtAN vmoNA HUHM WHFYMAN ABrncrr cBirrrnt. Ifualinen e-RPculora ol tiir Eaui* of Oeotse n.ine-n Albert Burke. 1>%  1 *i sugar cane plantation, the Paramongit paper mill has siieraeded In increasing production more than *00 per cent in iU flrst twelve years of operation. Total output of paper products In 1940 WHS about 3.000 tons. The overall percentage of ba_ tase used in the various grade of paper has also Increased considerably. In 1940, bagasse aecountcd for 21 per cent o? the total pulp processed at Paramon,-. Today, the figure Is nearer TO per cent. t Certain types of paper, such us newsprint and printing papers, are made from 100 per cent bnI nssc pulp Paper hoards use rou i tin to Ho par cent Hgaasi PUlp. Thick brown-paper bags use 45 per cent bagasse pulp Tha Pkramonga mills supply newsprint to leading Peruvl.m dally papers They supplv hev% duty bags to the country's augai cement mineral and flour industries. They supply brown wrapping paper for use In the tuunon ibgsBa The procea. coiuiista flrst of washing and screening the bagasse 'o nirnovc the pithy mater in] cooking Ihe remaining fibrous pulp for Ihe tune required to produce distinct paper types, and lastly refining to the degree auiled for the production of the various grades. When it was first introduced, papc made from bagasse was regarded somewhat sceptically But It na* stood up well to the lest of time An indeiwndent expert, reportthe recent ahipment of Keruvi.ui sugar in hagas^e-paper bags, found that the new type of packing had eliminated eommercint loss resulting from dlrtv cargo Contamination from foreign substances, always a danger when cotton bags were used, was minimised bv the use of paper. The overall strength of the thick paper sacks was greater than that of cotton bags Corrugated containers made of 'jagas.se have been used by a big U.S. cornflakes company, which reported that they were *tn most guided accordingly Degrees methods of refining have had be weighed against paper characteristics to assure economical production of satisfactory qualities P' maximum speeds. Now the company has foumt that there Is more world-wide interest than ever before in its baunsne paper products, becsuM' of the uncertain suifiles of the more traditional tvpes of paper Tl %  Is why the company has been persuaded to increase Its plans pot bagasse noper production. —BX.P. NOTICE BY I IH r l Ol. J. < ONNkl.1. O.BV.. E.D.. teas a sMBaling. The Barbadoa Regtsaeat. duected that there will be no t June 31. Officers' Mesa Meettag The Commanding Officer Officers' Mesa Meeting on Saturday ParaaVs The next Regunantal !*arade wilt be held on ThursdMy 3 July, St, at 1700 hour-.. Further details will b a published later. M. I. D SKEWCS-COX. Major. S.OX.P. A Adjutant. The Barbados Regiment. St. Ann's Fort. 34 June. 91 AU—2n. SHIPPING NOTICES Tba Own nil Mtrmit VU irIbe nicb - built ia ISM. M Use .urn of. niaWPV FIVE TJk)l.!i.VNll IHUJ-MIV fitted wlUt an InWnal to* baatlsa I engine, haa an aaUmalea .peed knoU, a STOaa tonnaaw of 1BS.M. I V i li fast •-. depih of 10 I Enj Son lor I Boattwatn t More ream For further partu'uMra %  aorta '," ii.poctMii ap|M' T T HrAI>LKV. rSjovoal Uarahals Uffki CHANCERY SALE HARilAJXlh Tho undetii'-oi.Uunad prop*r\. .11 be aev taskr*. Ilibii,rk.ii.ui,*' ,I-..T. I iu>oa k dale .Derated M 'ud Iben aukt It will at Bh. BBBMBI Prtdsy %  place and dunn* ihe t (... | SMBMAN Prapertf.—ALL THAT Certain pMro> M1H In II e parish of Batnt Mlchnel itrroaani •KIV * Skausend ei.t i .i>ui> -Uuil.ii,! .ind kouiul,. .' Wagn* on olher land* of tho Drfc. ,ind on the public road * boweAei wilk III* .ppi.teritncee lpw-1 price gSIS* IB 4. Itale of Bole Flida. tlth Julv IBM lit* iPUmUfl' .slhWS Tt'lkJK .Oelena. r parcel irf l.i.d Btbl lb ,.,. ..i.n.ii BtaesaaM i .*. imJred and nln*v> ea^a inda of J C rkif-il. o .„l on a rood kSMlSS to .-Uva Bute BBSS "bin an. A .. %  thereM o< 14 ban pubito road „l bei .1 cc'-icr ISrd June. 1M NOTICE r \---i:sGFfts samng oS S.S. DeGRASSE Jun. Itli rr Mhrd 1 l>. ..ii ,......( by t p.n t..u—a.. WANTED FOR CASH POSTAGE STAMPS Of the British West Indies, Good Pr.ce*. Paul At The CAHlBBsAN STAMP SOCIETY. 3rd Floor, No .0. Swan Street M.6a^-fas RATES OF EXCHANGE aril JUSTS, IMI asfaag si . VOBK "e.ha. tl l/|e 1 Ssatil or Darnead Drafte 11 S/IO" %  3 , 10-. Cable ?l S-iea tS S/lOw M Coupon t ss s-in. SB> CANADA n ns Banker* TS/10- Demand Oiann Sat Sldht Deeft. Tss/ia-. Cabto vu JM. TO I %  : -, -.ivVNj[s,r.\ii i\ -.MINI. TO T-DAD I. l-.HIt l-ll I M s BOKAIFUE .th J. STKNTOK ;iUl Juli coTTicA ann July. NIKTOII all. August, ._*_ •>U1N(, TU TBSNIUAB A CI'SACAU U S aa.| ( ;fJUORO ISth a r MiaaoN. BOM a co.. un Pains in Back. toirous, Rheumatic! Wrorvo toode sad drlaka. wem Mights. Burning tu|>> Lea PalSa Shsst.te'BfcwSiia feoilookl aelcee your i:-.. Melpvaar IMntyi purify your blood wlih Cys tea. The very Orat doae tiarts helsas a CTSariS sussSK r.e*> Under the nion.y.tui V autrnn'e. Cyllet niuti as'itly c aeiplctetr or east ablna\_npl C..U. froaj .o;.r okjeiiROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. FBjOM n lull M s sTsarruN inn June, issi lieSTIA tin July. ISM irT-rSTA SMh July 1SU • ISSS i svora b JuAf ISSS PaStAMASUBI VIAMA "c. ISM ISSS The M,v cARmagx ami -crept Cargo and PBAsecigera for Dominica AnlafiH. Monlaerral BSSVM and St KJtlt DaM ol The MV MtiNJBCA" will -crept Cargo and Paningai* foi Demlnlro Antkjua. MorUaarr-t. N..Iand St Kttt. Sblllna FT1da. rth .iitl The MVV i vigil IF-I AHnit will arcopt Carlo and p-^enaera for St t-ueta. St Visa Bart, armada, and Aniba "..Urns dale to be noUSod. %  SMI aOMOONBB OWMSBS* ASSIM-IATION iINC OiaMrasi — TeM. Ke. Mel HARRISON LINE OC7TWABD PBOnf TIP. UNITED KINGDOM S.S. 'PHILOSOPHEB'' S.S. "TACOHA STAR" SS. "HERDSMAN" S.S. -STATaaSMApr London and M/brough Liverpool London Liverpool 14th June 381 h June 21st June sth July -in July 30th July 12th July 37th July HOMEWARD FOR THE CNITTJ) KINGDOM S.S. "CROFTER" S.S. -TRADER" SS "WANDERER" For further Arrive. 16th June, 1M2 2nd July, 19s2 24th July, 1982 29th June, 1952 Sth July. 1952 13th July, 19U 25th July. 1992 9th Aug., 19U .. ISth Attg., 19C2 g direct to Southampton '//////,V.-.-.'.V,VA'.'.'.V-V.VAWAWeV.v'-W.', SALE Three Bedroom Stone House, with usual conveniences, fully furnished or without furniture. Standing >.n 3 roods and 10 perches. Immediate po s s e ssion Mortgage can be arranged Inspection invited hv arrangement. For further particulars Phone 259. The Barbados ^ Import & Export Co., Ltd. Plantations BuUdinjj. A 25.6.52—An. ^ *'.'.***p*,*.'-Vre-,-.***,*e*e--'e'--eI i M IIIM IU. ..Ih Arenaie. Ifrlle.ille. An Attractive and Well Proportioned 2 Storey House situated on a comer site of 12.050 square feet. Contains 3 galleries (I enclosed), large drawing room, dining room, study, modern kitchen. 3 bedrooms, garage, etc. Offers considered. JOHN tl. Ill AIIOX A CO. AJf.S.. F.V.A. REAL ESTATE AGENTS 'Phone 4940 PlaanaUene IsiMnig



    PAGE 1

    WEDNESDAY. TON! 25 MS* BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE FfVE Leg. Co. Approve Salary Increases i \i'i usm\ frnm page 3 fair average-standard; If the salary cl are below thai of the In this connection Honourable commun ". v %  standard of GovMembers will no doubt be aware ernmem workers will be lower of the assurance that was given In w,ln a eonaequent waste of Gov. tbe Other Plate bj the Leader of emm *n' expenditure; and a* all the House that early steps would •* ovrri "ent expenditure comas be taken to obtain the service* of oul ot ">* national income the a Commissioner to review the con* nloun, hjrt * the communltv is dittons of service of the rest of the f**d. It Is to th*. Interest of Service. It will be remembered ever >' number of the community that Commissioner Adam lo see tha the Government ermended thai his propoaals should vlce ** composed of efficient hold good for five years and workers who are prepared to give should then be reviewed, but he a" 00 1 d *y'* wotk *"d are free was not of course able to foresee lrom corruption. Successful govsuch factors as devaluation or the ernmeni to-day requires :— effect on the cost of living or the rearming of theWestern world, find In the circumstances It seems reasonable that the review should be brought forward. Aim—To.) Hitch 1. A fair and impartial administration of Justice. 2 The maintenance of law and order. 3. An efficient and incorrupt civil service. In arriving at the cash emolur !"!" .t^!?n,K EV h c V£ r mcnls of CIV|1 *rvants there are nf ,hi ^-jSr 1 t0 ^5 h StuUy Iwo m ,ln actor *W* have to tZJSL ^tf!" ,K2 vli "I*** * takm " consideration. The ^toSL^S&PXZ'Si X£ ^ve? ' ***** nd "" this oulTo lake two rGenerator Explodes Gome/ Bovee and S imm AlMrM mbe m th .< welding plnnt Wharf yeterda% I • ,-n ffcate. KamparUlg awaj lilted cal• mill eatb . > Thf r*l 'arge area of the road, ggi th. workmi'ii M I sod some poured into the sea. A tide of the sjt.ar atoi was blown high iii% thr air, and fell on the opposite side of the wharf about *<0 vards off "When I saw the mam valve Muck." Fordr toM 'he A* %  we decided that there wi thing ||B| tn do but t"> run anc save ourselves." Immediately after thr explosion crowd* gathered .tix-nn What fm&T'value could there be? . wonderful nydmtby Aristcc lit uvicsl I lam i .ill At Crab Hill In Government circles put him above the Puisne Judges of Trlnldad and British Guiana. Instead of [fere A LARGE CROWD gather* around the spot where the generator of a welding plant oxplodrd ou the Wfaarf yeaterday about Mitt o'clock. The plant was being worked by Ncrille fordr and two other mechanics who ran off Jiut before the explonlon occurred. no security of tenure in Ph' followed by the Cur LbouT rig*to^n^cthln\aDOrt !" m,Mrw for *"* Wy simple appom'ed by Cov-,, it billed bv an oXei f the iniS reason tha! bu '"" enterprise La lhe onl> reisonableiWU U art cUor?wheii 1fa^u^Lm rlskv an<1 nv buwneaa enterprise ho matte, .-an uv dealt with. Or MSS IhiiSrto?Direc'tnr nf can fa from >• * ' -" The opponents of the P HfiwXTand Transportwho^ SP"* 1 '" lhe "^ of Governmtnl f..iL-d I i Hv* dug tmlsjW to the .,M.*n!' hniHnr *,.. >£.' ^w D — A ** service is continuous whether principles of comparing MM Many peopUin thr Crab 11.1! en complained of the n.gh *rUMb Sunday, but again there Crabjmi St i hraviest raHtfaJ] on Monday, cording M tha Potto*. Up to aun vgaterdny this area had %  % %  41 parts of mm. but '*' reived an inch of ram. No ilnmagrh ittee body to be able to make comprehave been done long ago. had were reported fa the nd is hensive RavoloUOOl * tha sort nod ft been possible tn get it accepted Otliei llgurv. went DtalJ i whrli please everybody, and he though" b) thg L-'gilaiuu13 parts. Dtotrict H" 14 pnrls, I matter CaD b* dealt With. that the C<>mn.iU<- ado>. well by prehe ouM like to cngr-tulate those dad. and is being retained here on^ Therefore, ^when a young man iervice_wilh the similar class hi scntlng the frets as lucidly as they rwsponsible until a successor is appointed, ca not be filled suitably at prese for where will n minlMed Civil "* vv no securny or tenure now. ing isiancis wncrc mis was necesmr mm IO mention one or iwo lmp Engineer with the requisite exfVCr efflo i enl hr individually sar>-. Even when an attempt ni Ca*g which he did not think crraUfd n j.,,^, ( | c al „f public perience be found to take up the "}* y be Tnc C|V|1 Servant, on made to make comparisons, miswere right for the simple reason, j—,^ Members of the Other post on $5,040 a vear without leave lne ,n hand, knows that In the quotations occurred. For Instance, as he had said before, that it would pi.,-Xoo had expressed thetnS iasages? Certainlv not from cas of Government he is assured the Revenue bf British Guiani be Impossible for any col lection ,-,..' ,. ;„ .i.,„. h v ,. rtll ,,., rlnidad. which has six officers In of H' Ion* employment unless was quoted as $60,000,000 whereas of people to bring down a achedul* ;,.,. „.,,,,„ the Department of Works and hls conduct is such that Governthe correct figure should be of the kind to please everybody. T he. did ,„i *e*m t,. be much The amount of s:'i IUI1-.1 under Hydraulics whose salaries exceed >" ent %  forced to dispense with J25.nnu.ono. British Guiana hai 1 „ ,,''" :T" ,' Ul ,„.hW,i nri "•* %  head New Hike '..1 K.-n Kai $5,040 a year and whose scale for ha services. A precise value population of 400,000 ns compared HricU Saliiri* SS2SJIi^*iuii BT.V .1 ^Um*wr """> .ipp>--'ring n y.-Mcnlav's > %  Executive Engineers exceeds that cannot be placed on this factor with 0 Barbadian population of H..n. Dr. Musslah, however, drew ? CT -,^LTi., 7.,^-^ VhVt %  • was donated tij A v. point. But the proposed new ' security of tenure, but it 1* 200.000 and an annual Revenue of attention to an anomaly which • l •*' ,"' uHfh^ J.-. Ltd. Ovaltinc Mrnuf.nturv, l terms, $6.4S0 with leave passages. *ken into consideration when $12,000,000. might be noticed between the gal* ; "' % %  '**". "" %  „.n !" d""' ""d no by tiUOBl) AK''"twithout being in any wav extravathe cash emolume are fixed. Particular Cassaa "" of *"• Headmaster of tl.w ah.-mage* and consoquetiiiy a greai o| Qv a i tinf Q 0 to WM ,i, at# H gant, ought to ensure that the post r "" lcu, r ^^ I^>dge School and the Headmaster dfnand for officers of that kind, Pensions As stated previously, there is no of lc Combermpr ,. schaJl. and ,,ri <* nle *the > "opn>^-*d lb* onWlth regard to pensions this Precise yardstick bv which salary Blkrt by wh-l procc5S of mwi tal JrUons of sarvices and salaries atU another factor which must scales can be fixed, and therefore reasoning the salaries of the two lathed to the posts, they would be taken Into consideration. • r lv salary scale which is jidvancn Pa ,i s were arrived at. icmain unfilled or they would have He pointed out thnt the s.ilnry to be content with materUL of """ decides to enter the wider field the community generally, includhad done. t4-1 l(r a, s cab* observed **•"'/. "• " %  "'' %  ">* %  MnX of commercial enterprise he can mg the wider area of neighbourHe said il would be Invidious ihjt the HesolulHn. were of great !'.'!i,T lOU i m,ul> ot damage reCivli have no security of tenure how. Ing Islands where this was necesfor him to mention one or two imu.irtance and seemed to have $24 DONATED BY A. WONDER LTD. is filled in the not too distant'future with a suitably qualified officer with the necesaary experience. Summing Up To sum up. I would certainly deny that the Committee aimed too high. In the few cases, such as Director of Agriculture, where the salary proposed exceeds the British Guiana figure, there are good reasons for the recommendation. Finally, I would stress that the Committee was not working in a void, but although as the Committee warned in paragraph 25 of Its report. UM irnplenivntallon of its recommendations will not result in the immediate filling of all senior administrative, professional and technical posts with men of the requisite calibre. It should arrest the present decline, and by and large, ensure that the present vacancies and future vacancies, as and when they occur, are filled by officers of the requisite quality and experience. Classification Boa Mr. II. A. Cuke said: The approach to this subject appears vhich is artv The present pension provlslea* ed can be attacked tn particular "WILLEMSTAD" STILL ON DOCK of Government are very geninstances For my part I do not llt lhe Headmaster of Com] %  QMM i.Tu-eitain quality. eroua through the early retlrsubscribe; to -yei> del ill of tho g.hnol was set at $6,000, while Adjustment The Lord rmbermer* WrUOh idoing the job of towing the Ninn r One Wid IT Barge is now being i Just big age. Such conditions do not scale which is before the Council, fi^ of lhp Headmaster of the The attempt to adius* the salw„n7ed exist in the community genbut I do tel mat taken as a whole r^odg, u s m at $: M 0. He said ri lesulted in anomalies in rP The Dutch Motor Vessel VVII erall. It Is true that all the the scale is a reasonable one and he „,„,,, nm fathnm whll| lt .„ on dmims.r.it,ve poaU and lem-ud -still',, .h-\ prlnrlp.1 commerruU house, .n can be^ecepted without any M-, MRI „ ^SlSJd^S^'ZSSL^ IrTH-.J, .d %  1. '.. s£ ssfta u bu n'o Saui sras SSW^LSSRSS — •— **> a t •* g ^J^S ^z the bu.incw m not get Into glftM of that the .ncldence of InHon l>laaaVHUi BTflUad that ""' k ha V". %  '!*" ^ " r financial dlfllculUes at some come tax reduces the difference the Lodge School "does the same "' be noticed H %  time In the future For this considerably. For instance., tha work as Harrtson College, has a hiUl promised to MUP a Comreaaon many businessmen are ference between the salary of the Malf of specialists and ITniverslly mi-sion to enquire into tne resi now Uklng atepa to purchase Chief Justice which Is put down Befaolirg rnO an gMgitri In thai "' ' %  **•• ,ui makp •" om penslons for Ihclr employees nt £2.J00 and a clerk In the scrschool, provides education up to m '' tation*. through the Insurance Comvice of £600 appears superficially the high.-M of UM accepted UniS> what really started as a pantes so that the employee Is ns (1,500; in actual bet, .issuming verslties in the world—which was limited objective had finished by aK">t are DaCosta ft CO Mil protected In ease the firm fallboth to be married men with two the same as Harrison College does, being a complete overhaul of the When she '*vc-< she Will be going ed. but even In this eaae the children and each paying 4% to Combermere. Hon. Dr. Massiah •* i, Service; '" w U nited K ingdom. pension ran only be properthe widows and orphans fund, the cont.mir.l. does not attempt to do II seemed U> him that Govern%  tlonate. difference Is onlv £1,133. The lh i.s sort of work ami therefore, lo m.-nl, the administration, were OBITUARY After giving weight to these former pays 18fc^ Income Ta*, Place it above a school itke the *a be%t Judgea ot whether the factors, the cash emoluments of the latter less than 1%. I*dge School which is on par wit. i Hi.nd could afford the measures the Government employee must There Is one other matter on Harrison College, to my mind, -s .., not and they had been told in be settled. The rates generally which I should like to >omment. UnJUal and unfair." yn plnin language that the should be somewhat below the Th" opponents of the raaolutlon KlementLirv Schools. Island cotdd. rvlPW,Nl "'" t's Laneonrridjtf ofl Black burne, populai %  off dock aomattrM "WANDERER 1 GOING TO U.K. Thf aqcauni ru| rVaasj <. t •d in Carltale Bat omlng from Donibi Mr. George Blacltburne The best wages earned in commerce, have stated that their principal He salt* "I Inn bssM trying U> Government had reviewed tha ( r „ ( v ... but certainly above the lowest. In objection to the resolution was the find out what the reason for doing iltualion and felt that they could Ml Qeoraw other words, the salary must be increase to Administrative OflV It la. If it II %  qutoUon of number) atfofd tha eJffnfCa. When he ttahi f(1| ,.,,., v such as lo attract a reasonably Brj( y owtl observation on this surelv ..I lhe St. i il as accepteil During good type of employee, and Of pnnt-is that the successful carrytlilr, 1 | ,: ..' s. In-d Hut it WW not only in Ur lighi "BotfmV '"s he wa? such an amount that the Governj n g or of tht. Government depends whose numbers are 1.000 should of the propositions before them ever; l 7 on the efficiency of its ridministrnget twice (lie snlarv of the othen UWft, i it also In UMI light of any i (nc | n health of lei ; immendatlons on o,,. daeh i • / gagvinl i live I i to me to be somewhat along tin following lines. The wage earning population of this Island is made up of a number of different occupations or callings, and a somewhat as follows:— able comfort. The Civil Servant llv( ,,(!!„;„_ if ,he head of the Bagghngatgaa. Similarly, the Heudproj,oiii..ni.te Businos Executives; Business cannot expect to enjoy the beneDepartment is efficient, his tfSmaster <>( the Wesley Hall Boys' which might Umade in the light maintained the kaenesl Intoreat I Technicians: Medical Practilion"' *>' security of tenure and cjclu v permeates throughout the School. I cannot understand nor ol the propositions before them pub || c nffnlrs „,„, m-tt€Ti arf ,,,., ers including Si>-ilists; Legal B 11 *"' pension provision and siiii department, if he i. !n--flkient \}w raUotUtlsW thll i>.o.edure." Commission to be set up and aiao mf business al lhe waterfront Practitioners; Accountants: Enhave a caghjatjary equal^to^Jhe standard of eltincncy throughout Hon. Irr. Massiah asked lh '' ^. %  |Hj D j?.J!!5ir!_f^_f*JJiH T rr '"' rt ''" what CBKK raUMMi WATKR I'ANS. 1 Kl.l.l 1.(111) RINGS elc. Sclecl parly from . ft JASON JONES & CO., LTD. mm. %  % % % % %  %  % m w m % % % % % % % %  u Hi r,.ii „th salary rqiul lo lhe t .., n ,,,.„.,| „( ellicicncy lhn>uh..ul Hon. Dr. M..i..h a,k.-.l lha "• '"" %  "' "" %  'a 1 """ tapllal Hr „ ,„. Kln^fr!^ Archilecls; Building bent in commerce; on me omcr ^ deiwinnvnt II lowered. This is Coktttftl S* ( ielarv u aav what work* thai Covernmcnl had plan„„ | eu becauae of hi. vtarlUl) 04 Conliaclorsi AariculluriiU^ Clehand, Oovernmenl """'"• n cxperirnco of commercial were lhe ,.,,.n f..i • %  "•' characlcr than hl knowli rlcal Worker! including Typiau; over-value lhe iwo factori of orall ond npp | te aq ua ll y | 0 ence in Hit salaries of lhe KM **f!" i^l' 1 '' hail aak.M him. h |p. and men vl.illej t Trade.men: Skilled Worker.: aecurlly of tenure and pennon Government. For this reaaon It il maitcra of the Lodje School an.l he -aid. why II wa. that a local „( n r l.l,elown durlna DM last 50 Seml-ikilled Workers. Manual provlaiona Since M iP*{Jj* Workervalue can be placed on these two Tins list could be further factors and inasmuch as lhe rlaasilled inlo numerous subconditions In non government h areas vary considerably there i* Under modern conditions Covno complete yardstick by which ernmcnl aclivllies idllions Govno complete yarasiica oy .,. ...-.la. ...i.i, „ m „,., anC e that be a certain amount of human 'olved in the matGeneral Principles, If the general principles stated with some — in the Government service there judgement will be found the counterpart of ter evary occupation or calling which will be found in the community generally. It would be extremely difficult to find any class of wage aaana, in the enmmunilv whose counterpart cannot be found in the Government *rvice. As lime goes on an increasing tonier cf the proportion of lha_ national Fund of sport in all its forms he waa a true MgtWl and %  line companion There wu,• side '" his character which many of his elsewhere He did not "know the friends never Waapantin 1 He was reason, but it seemed to him that a tender man The troubleii of hix th v -hould "void getting one friends dlslress'l him and he ..< that thit tial to offer such salaries as Combcrnure, or whether it waa Commission was set up to invaatlwgl attract the best men to the an oversight. tatr what was then before them pot. whether he Is an Imported A Perfect Schedule und whl n ,ame lo " nve "ofti'-er or a Barbadian. Tor reasons Hon G D. 1+ pile said he wM 4aUon of the rest of the service, given above I beg to support the quMe certain that ull members of tt a, necessary to Wing one from resolution. the Council would know how he Specialist Teachers stood on the question before then, i. Dr. HO. Massiah aaid he and as the honour.d.lo umber %  %  T UI ,; I ,"';" 11 ^: '; h \t'*wi-;''!*'ore been known to forego his very glad to see that after wh„ had Just sat down had said. \!" *-* "> *ha* ,h, \. w " 1 Dcr ** ,,,, M1 ,re and even AruUkual ITHITI the P1 gc of three years. Gov,. was impossible to make a achedijcm then a d -J"'^' ' ''J RZ3& Sip uTTh^ofXSaerninent had al last aumadad U) uto of claries and satisfy eve.vT. 't .was very 'mportarrt to Thf roQ ^ ^^ arndlng down the respective Resoboly that every peat had been avoid anything or mat nature. moni „ u ,i y from hli path and lha Ilutions. and recalled thnt it was treated equally well. f.eneroiis Increase.. tolil in< i vagabond he threatened hU address are accepted, sometime in HMD that he firs' • %  [ think Government is U be "I have no doubt that these inw „ h „ rimo of hla (lWI) ^mishit will be seen how very nlDy It is raised tlie question of improving heirtily congratulated for what croaaea recommended are very mcr ,(. F„ r u )\ thU he was loved to compare the salary of the Chief lhe conditions and salaries of the they have done.he aald. generous." he said, "and I also and ,etpected especially at the Justice with the wage of a cmService, when he asked the honi, was unpopular and a matter have no doubt that we cannot go wa terfront. IM tonier I f thi Pogd Board. One ourahle Colonial Secretary "whethwhich obviously had been misrep. nn forever, to u* the words that Mr. Blaekburne waa twle ,must comoare like with like. Those cr Gov.-rrment w aware of the rew-nted both with regards V what have been used before rinaUty rici hv GoverninnomtincnU In lhe sen'ice which 'act that the Secondary Schools. w .„ (> .., N and with ) )M to be reached sometime 1 exclusively filled by Barwere txu.u depleted rapidly of all ,,.,,<,..„.„ „ 1( ,^3^ m Mnd xhe al hope that the result which is enhim. I i by the I tlrst'marriage havl ig predeceased d S?f SiSSSl !" "!! bldiai.7'^omp.r7d'wUh conf^Mlat teachers, and that that JempTsoineThiRg „. Barbados. Thus in fixing, atnte of alTiira was due to the t hat lU ght to have be-n .!..n ( l.,ng tfinent Service, will be acideved. ment has i is essential that th xpenditure ditto boing done 'laaged. namely, a brtt*r and more source of deep regrsj ... ,i.._. i„_..II t.Prvi.n will he achieved. • if.ndolenre will !• ekti nJST !" -' 'SSSSS. Ihtf a a dimcult task and the u -.l workers you compare Oovernnou* to keep th.,., in Uarbados. problem is inlcnsiHed unless the moot .cales with Ihelr counlerAs the Cc*nlal Seer, service can attract the best possiparts in this Island, and applying PO'"!" Ofl I,. I ble workers of every Erade. This me prinelnle. previously outlined appointed u. the CummlUce wluil. attraclion can only become real >ou fix these somewhat below the nv i ""' f. ""• ";•'' '" '" d ,J" if the conditions of service and top rates In commerce since the had Croat hopes thit what that salary scales are in line with two factors of security of tenure Committee hail act out In >dn woul I those of the Community generaland pension provisions must be ^ v ^ been Implemented earlier. ly. „„e. some weiahl. However, like .,..,-,, other thlnfa Average Standard When It comes to thosepositions in If lhe salary scales and condi. which cannot be filled exclusively lions of service are in conformity bv Barbadi. i^la^^^^^^ M ^^^^^ M ^'^'<^''^'^^ YOU'LL FANCY you lake int" eon— i had kilird nd it h..'l taki II their effort three years for nons or service are in coniormiiy r>v ndii"-"/— •-—^ *"* %  ---. r--i.,(in-. ., ^ ni —. kakfr.iv itti> wilh those in force in the genersideration the salary scales for the Resolutions to .ome before thai communitv, the general run of those neighbouring Islands whose ""V" 0 !" !;' , Government employees, will In economic position is comparabj. Hon. DrMisslah admitted that lhe long run. be cbmposed of a with Barbadoa. ThU Is the prWel" %  "" •* impossible for anyCOSTUME JEWELLERY including — BEAD NECKLACES BUNCHES OF FRUIT AND OTHER BEAUTIFUL DESIGNS CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad Street. WE'RE SHOWING! in Cotton, An Silk, and Nylon in "Kashion-rifflil" styles. Thee have lieen most carefully seleclrd and amongst them you'll find something suitable for any occasion. HARRISONS BROAD STREET-DIAL 2352 • &f &f&f &f&f&f%  MORE COMFORT means MORE WORK TAN-SAD 0//ice Chain art built for Comfort Tan-Sad chairs are now the esIrtlHtUd seating for modern and progressive office* Typists rind F' alike, require posture sealing to attain maximum efficiency. Everyone worts better in a T a n Sad S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.-Agenls



    PAGE 1

    VTOAMDAT JVHT. M. 1MJ nvRBADOS IDVOCAH Leg. Co. Approve Salary Increases PACE THREE • rnn p *. attaches conatdentble ImportaiKvpruvrd condition* of service to miit.c a repot i lo tie iMdv tn p ,* %  ih %  .,-._ .:. ., . !• vu "l | ' hl country of .>ri1n .1 aucft dcpailinoil. ... Ik Medical tune [ COHM.I.-I iiiim '..,. %  ,'in,. fuu^S?^ ?^*""?"2''Ji 5S*7 • BMdb and and Ar.cultur.l Driianunta, and Annul.! &>„,, ," ,nd ,n !" ZjaStS^JSLF 1 ""* """J """"• Kl '" %  "• Mt"c W.n-M perhiip. lo uEducation Depulwou.d I, d.1,,, in. u* nunlmum Q ual,nr.i„on. „Iniii.l Burton I !" "<" ana would no, .xKaid cun.—idn. Chairman ""d hat wile co*t about $660. tnej to admlnUUalivi non-u.'luucaa 1 .,„, vaurriul, that Honoura,"„!a us* .i**"" •"•"^ "i?!r* '" "? *"" •"• %  u %  ncilmula thrown In. weU trMUnmt would upaet the j !" Commmert report and the represent* metry and (•ncral lavel ol various Appandic*. attackad %  MCJ la the service. thereto, and 1 will not II SfS? £££ TSrisz. *&• waB*paarsB — irS Li* £ 5 :",.;!r' ,JI.:;' 3.So I'wKh" wa'. "iaS"?n ,' '. ii", ',5, "*" 27". '" "-""","' ft IKS' """"•'"" ^ '•"' ""^ thU HorK.ur.bl, CWnci, a monih ig "alffT lift*. .~~!" d tcv, : nu f ~**. %  *!•'•• %  > ",ch I will %  1.1J111.. :.! j In this paiaatc of hi! lleport. and which is set out In fuU In paraover 62,000, which crapti C of the Report of the Comnearly half a years p.. lo, tho Utlee of which 1 was appointed Head of a major Department inl. llonourau* Council a monlh The ronMouence. of the in.dem. ^r .1 he 1 ,i d ,houlu U • „. was r^J"'"' S' M i" nC " lmm UU: "" """ %  "• ' ""* S E ., 'TIS wl 3 !" '^"'n* WconditKin. of Barupper raww of the Barbados Clva B, provum, condition, ol ta. Sid abou ery long period or ,,*•„, Trinidad, but stag\~h~en"olhcr %  a""-""-m ^f-T" orncers. ...ul to quote Sir Maurice that it WM ihorougr. and that its ^Swsfi ^Sr^^i^ SWSSS5 atpsssj^g now tiian I was made -—— *..^MV.J ii|iii"i|i njriiiitiiiijj (jujuiivduufti art" HOC Up U| UN i i ^y 1 ^ '*' tn "PP** niruj rtandard which the appointnwot it,.. 1 ihiv IQ thrtr PubUc Servlcw. Md his demanda. crtucuin is accord intfy more parThe flrf alternaUve nu'.iu that „ tleularty applicable to Barbados essential work is left undone and — at the time it that the officer, when pointed, ha of leeway to make t ,.. It iiscans that the Dep-rtmenU en, H1IIjn L cerd com,, in fo. onttai mi There are man> Baibadiaii* who public criticism %  re sufUcmiUy well qualified to 1\U HecenUy. tor example 1 have MMor admmistrative. profeasi^al read complainu about the Lick <* nd lechnical posts hi this Island, kupen-ialon of the work of the twx they tand. becauae of the p.*.r Diitiict AjMcultUrai Stations and rondiuom of service provided in of work on tot road* H is only the Bui-bado* Civil Service, either ..,„ t„ lhl Deparlmmu concerned eliminate personal I lies of the officers in that Government w)U do Ita dellberation>. mm that its expenitiwith each post th.i spent wiM-l> and is no! it put the question. "If 1. it has been suggested thai the i ttiods of advertlaemeit • ..r< f.mlt> %  ih wMok the Committee deal. %  for which there is no ob)erUon prlr-tiini an officer on ftrst ap rntxnent from outside the SeiIce, and those which .ire i tilled h> transfer within th.XKV. Th>' f.ici.ci :>pe is advcrtinil. 1 si locally and then in the I' K but. as the Seeretan of Stale I d OUl m connection w uch posts as the Chemical Pathi hatever opimom may o^r un.i Kadiographers. then i patM in rontlnuing to *iv. I since the present conditm %  so unlikrh .ttfa Previous Hxpericticc rtie latter type, which lOCllMh iple, the post of Depiit Teclinical Post imof the requisite calibre and qullhave a llrst-raTe Iflc.itlons on CaauuMioner of Income Ts. and if not what minimum term* Atvoununt (Jvtieral. correlated :, v and has accepted ;i post on bat••ndency must IH-. whenever a incapable adnunistrativ. tar terms in Trinidad; Dr. Fordo, l**t becomee vacant, for It to lie profeseional nfflrer* If Minist •. Barbadian employed in British ***J 1 b y ** officer of in/en..r rial BtatW iice must entail, leave passages for wives should be mclude.1. In this connection I would ..iv that i,,:urc* from British Guiana which bava t* been received since the Report was rampleted bear nut the Trlnlllondur.s";,n""pJnslV.u.ble termi %  "*•• "^ rn'oaragrliph and ;rVo^rov7succevful ,, t^u^Txl^lJ^^ foU. would have been prepared lo "of the Committee-, report.m all Hw more lmpnrt.nl that Ihc flTr X c' the i.tcS cone here some time back If the •* caae ihere will Inevitably Public Btrvtet should be cap,Fourth %  mnlorUvof he Compoft of Physician Specialist had be a imarked falUng off m 1.1, of functioning effincnth ln ,ttee coniidered thaj the btab', been pensionable, and has accept2"^*?, whi c h _, >ner or later, 1 should have thought that the Uihed Church should fall within t ^ ri I I Bill %  ( % % %  ill.' flimt Ul i-| rtio.. 1't'octor of Agriculture, is not %  isiJered '•••rtlsed. for it i.. considered th. t It is In Ihe Islands interest that Iho boldat should have pterloi... experience either in the Qm!0., area or elsewhere In cases like siieth or ndtabaa oflki ire. consider..i in tli. I OSea. and an offai iadv to the one who eat jesl Ollud loi Uupost. In consequence of the inadcuacy of the conditions of service vU-a-vis, those ublninii g ft she difficulty of finding rer.lly suitable officer for a IUO. ular post may be very great indeed, and In this rnnneetlon I ln,i .,„.. ,i m. ( .^L v "*' ,hp -itirntlon of Honourable in. in mind the' "waban lo the comments of the f BUte on UMflWngo. the |Mst of Deputy Directoi •me in Appendix E of Report I uii.il Leave Passages p., uderi. ta U graph 11 ol Us this post In Jamaica; J. A. ~H. m "* laad to serlou, disruption in truth of Saaly. who has been training ox ,no odminWtratU,n of the Island." hie a Pupil Engineer in Trinidad and The Remedy was due back m March has elected What u. the remedy.' 1 have Future Kconomv to stay In Trinidad on a much betheard it said thai the problem tar salary than he could be U quite simple and that the Com• 'i again, since '.in loiiiiiutti. icport was nmpleted Ol St.it. hai Nld thai the < rvlce for he poat of Executive Bnglneei rfl] not .ittract anyona of higlu-i ,.librr than u Clerk of Works. Three further iM>inta and I have lone Once it is accepted that resent conditions of service ol 'iinir.it would he indiiput >Ita terms of reference dnce. whatfesaonal and leehnicul post ever views may be held reg.u lint inadequate. Ih t crui of the I >< lei li whethci the Island ci Improve (hem to thi A. long ago m i runt I li imandad in th. • Isuvvinox-in-txvvulivc ,ntChurch, the fart n-mains that the Anglican Clergy receive their "tnoluments from the Public in no. mumii i inuii .it...it oflWd here. A young doctor, who mltiee has in.de it'.-em uanec'esSttTTSZET'lErZILStt Tr ~ I r'The Lord Bishop was .,.,' „... ;.^. m |fi, rL'.AU-L. returned to Barbados after comsanly complicated. This school of o... f .i... ,1, !" < -cord ,ni f i v lv, l,d l ,:,v, GovernorV speech lo the I-egisl pleting hi* long period of training thought argues that all that 5 KLft , i co om J "" **<}**** before the Committee luIl ,„ DfeSmVi whan ha H in the U.K. at Government exrequr„d when a post is vacant f r H? 1 ? uu ld ^ )P* u ^ wd u "" nd / ">"*""' / h" !" W„„ hl ia „ %  „„ lk)llhI lhll w pense. left the service of Oova long time and it is not detured to ~ *.!" *" *? l pg were lakoii ^"' a J 1 ^ i r ct ^ mo d J ,,,ons wer ^ Mand could afford substantial ernment after about a. year's serlower standards Is to offer condiV', ""P^^ "" %  terms and mmade which have beet, endorsed ttlariea and ear vke in order to improve hLs prosKotaS which will enuso that paru,,,on uI €,v '"' •" l -''^' '" * ''f '^J^" 1" A^wtL iitUa r "' -" v,c0 ul < m ,h "" i pacts in private practice, and I licul.r post to be filled: theie la CIUW f "muustrative, pcofH• ,p £ r I' h w '" H ,, h ^}^l Aa '' :l "' %  P*f* 1 ,1 ll,d T * hi aadersund that another' one Is however, no need to tamper with s '* 1 and technical post* m Uw .^^Vr^M^ZZ^X '' '" ,! l, l '~ ~£H f*" following suit. condition, attaching to p.^ which '-"*• Civd Service and set "?"/_?' ?,• S^ 1 !! 1 ''^ h JL v _.. b ^ 1 ? to let 11. rtandards In admlni oro already filled. But what i* the u u a V| B J nm Wc '„ Barbadians First inevitable consequences of action o 0U 'b l e Or. Massiah It is the accepted policy of the along these Una*? member, lo examine the problem Barbados Government to fill It was, in fact, taken at thu •"** %  ***• recommendation*, vacancies with Barbadiaru,, or time of the Hallinau Report, and Tht Committee wa given j falUrui them, with other West Incaused the anomalies mentionad tune-limit within which to raport, dian*. If aultable candidate, in in paragraph 8 of the Committa*'* nd wu n l •>*-* to mbmit its available, and a search is only report; it was taken towards the """' conclusions. In an interim made farther afield if iherv axe end of lost year when the Govr, 'l^"'. iiowe.er, thu. Committee no local candidates of the right ernment Analyst was appointed expressed the opinion that |h* calibre. There Is nothing secret on inflated agreement terms, alBn,t n< niost important measu Fifth and last, the recommendathe Committee have been "whiejT inV P a l fn toto" by Executive m Committee and approved hy th* Other Pla.e, with the following four exceptions. It will he seen from the relevant Orders that Ihe salary of the Director of Agriculture has been Increased to $8,100 (and his Sugar Cnne-Brceding Allowance kept at MB0). the Headmaster of the Coleridge and Parry School naa heen put ihe aetantlfk A*M nd my professional fields, daterto %  to the lowest in the Caribhe.>. onOUrgbl* Meniherwho Im .. ,.f the imaUarlalanthe area will appreciate wh $4,800 and the Superintendent. ;,„. Hoawnffaalc M Xriiill.il I Inn.II. %  he debate to tins Hunoui the unii July last ye put tieabout salaries and conditions of though Ihe "duties which that to overcome the difficulty ol Waterworks, and Public librarian mailer i„ ihe •am,way when I service In the Colonial service, officer perform* are on a par with recruiUnent and retention of au" %  creased lo $4,080 each Concluded that he did not think for the salaries of the Senior post,-, those performed by the Agrirul"linistralive, professional and are set out In the Colonial Office tm-.il Chemist and the Enlomolotechnical officers was the provilist, and general conditions are gist, whose conditions of service "'n of return leave postage pnvsummarised in a pamphlet entitled remained unchanged. ileges to the holders of certain "tpporntments in Her Majesty's Piecemeal treatment in this scheduled post', but added that Colonial Service", both of which fashion must inevitably cause disthe inadequacy of salaries was are published annually. satisfaction among serving officers, another nuttier that required _._ Suppose, in fact, some of the more detailed examination than Officers who ore aircadyserving ..xisting vacancio* were filled in they had been able to give it in one tetrltory, when offered a thU Wflv wnat wou u ^ ^ „,. Jn consequence f tn.t corntransfer to Barbados, will naturalmu ? You ^n. sw from A ppendbc mlttee's recoiiunendaUuo \y compare their present conch. ..£•• of the Commitiees report -Leave Passage* Order was preUtms with those that are offered tha ,h e Secretary of State conpared, but r| lapsed wiU. thto them, and are prone to decUno g i der5 tnat lt u necessary to offer prorogation of ihe Legislature m to come io Barbados because of xaie ot £U50 llsing lo £li 3 50 Aprll 195o ,„ lhe d tha inferior conditions offered. to attract l Medical Officer of half thai passed beiw-veit then ^, .. _. ,^~ .. Heolu w 'th a D PH.. a qualifiesand the end of the legislative A. air Maurice Holmes ptti H lion which is considered to be session in November 11*51 mx ,.. f 9nf ^Z SZ", tswllal f <"* h Pt But to opof the vacancies have been' till poil "It stands to reason thai ppin, a nfw Medical Ofnoer of but some h„. . . -.—-. „.-,, -. u Ul ,,,,., „(, V( not, others hive ,Conm.litcc was ..ppomted and Iti offlcem in Colonies whkli granl Health on $1,150 to C1J80 would occurred and hav,. X,i v-r recommendations considered lacCelonle, which do not do *-o. holds the D PH.) and the Director Perusal ol^ e.ngltlon. of serv cr of Mci)lt aI Services, who after Objeclionh throughout the Colonial Service ong yca „ nt wvvic( t draw £ 0M A „ K upenin& oi ,,,,. BgeggJit proves beyond any doubt that. (m(1 c i >3 oo, rospevtively. Similarly, LegWaUva Session in Decembe -'Tr^.Lrt'' !o PP mt n Executive Engineer. IKal. Hu Excellency the Go.^"2^"' Highways and Transport, on £l.?00 ernor reviewed the poalbon year, the salary which the Seeand after setting out certain ooetary of State considers that it jeetions to improvement of oon necessary to offer, would dition* of service of Mmior ... ,,.,., ... lv ., create an obvious anomaly in ihe ofllcerii that have been raiwd w VSBW CBae o, ,„, rjjrerto,. ^ Highw .ys from time to time and answering These factors in combination ""d Transport, who draws Cl.tSd. idem shortly informed the Legmake it very difficult to recruit ond 1O "PPoint a Deputy Director .sUture that, bearing in mind officers from outside the Island. "' Agriculture on. say. £1.3. r .0. that Ihe Other Place had exwhether from elsewhere in lhe simply because a man of the righl pressed its general .greement Caribbean or from farther afield, calibre cannot be got for lew. w1111 the Holmes Report, he had and to retain their services for would be hardly fair on the Direcset up another Committee to any considerable length of time tor. who draws £1,450. examine the matter. Anomalies I was appointed Chairman of Return Passages Another school of thought agrees that Committee, the reason for For. as again 31? Maurice that such anomalies as this must my selection being that His Holmes pul it. the overseas oflictr be avoided, but would oonflne ImExcellency wanted the CornTwo Criticisms Mist 'it is a question of our askNext, I would touch very briefly ug ourselves whether we can on two criticisms which have bean srlord to pay, but whether w* can madjf. First, it has been said that alTord not to pay them." The thu matter derive* its origin from Commute.was given a ..gunthe complaints of a few "imported within which It was estimated th.it officials*. That li not so. Two of " could safely work, and Ihe...the three Heads of Departments amounts were inserted in Uu. referred to In His Excellency's year's Annual Estimates and ai. speech at Appendix I of the Beavailable in the event of these n port are West Indians two other commendaUons being approved officers in Key positions who have The annually recurrent sum Is made re presentations regarding substantial, but if the Island Is to the inadequacy of their present carry out a steady programme oi conditions of service are Burbaagricultural development, lo maln,ii;,i. tain its standards in the proThe general public Is certain 1> h llonal, lechnteal and educauonnol aware of the amount of time al fields and to cater for the manithat has been spent in persuading fM social itasMb oi u lapidl) in certain officers to stay on until th %  creasing population, the price will Committee was appointed and ithe worth paying • On I'age it whereas Barbados la < most sttrsctiv. •a-eh sa cUssate tad opportus.1 ties far educating children, il Is wecfaUr behind In ethers, notably salaries and the abaenrr SEA AND AIR TRAFFIC In t .,11,1. H.,, a a .-.I.'.• %  DnCU CI IN l-u> *u.., M ... %  %  io rum m, SEAWELL l.i I--..1. Sic. iml Da*M O Rawl I. Jr*,,, Hnltmapi, Willlan. II Vluit-v Al-n W.Hrfl-IJ 1 Han Millio iVIIar,. UK. %  v-u DM nr.iiM iirrtsti %  %  m a a • a* Bjoafstal l .. TitaMa.1 Ha socepU this as %  agn ..I ... But why let yoursrli i— %  >m|| plenty ol rest, (mil aw. m htifmnv food and by taking lr. Ou s t s Nerve Pood lo buil>i ibem up. fur the VH Jiiuii Id. iroa .ed atacr Msdad aaiaersU m thss tssKtestrrf tguic help build up your vitality and aid m uatiug up th* aaurc •ysi-ui -i you ran lace the leturt with conhdeiur l.ivr l>( Ctiaar'a Nrrve food %  cbaace to help l>aaih narvnufears aad il-nlilIt helps you re^ better, nnd Irel betler. The "Dr. Cls N ATURAL, restful .l.. P % %  the high road lo radiant hcallh and hti %  ndioonilc'.ll.ouaandiiif men, women and children who drink 'Ovsltss*' at bedtime are rn)o>ing lhe best klad ot deep r.rtv nl|ht. r reason to hrhrva that your .leap U not at rcttful and beneficial a. ii %  luiukt he, irv tha rdni of a cup of deb.to... 'Otaltinr' tonight. 'Ovaltlsui' Inducva alecp In a ("th.il\ natural wav. for It U nt-pared from Nature 1 I loodt. Sea how It l.clpa \ou to rsiaa, id bo.li, aad In v I lea akw|<. See how refrealied and cheerful >nu feel In V.nir "n rxp.-iin WVJUUMMMM %  lltf I ITS Daurit .al 0el.atitli.il, naDII'lli.-., .I.n, and iiiniiH' laaordtr will convhK* you "• foo.i beverage lor ever, mrml-er >•' IUUI tamlly. to promote |>cacstol tleep, lo renew energy irtrj 1.. keep IOU all feelini and looktn, rOaal beat V-M in *aaajg| mi l- mH I >—iw. ana tweaa. Quality has made OVALTINE The World't moil popular Food Beverage and The World's Bert Night-cap I keep fresh atUay...! fuse LIFEBUOY TOILET SOAP It's easy to keep freib all day —just use Lifebuoy Toilet Soap whenever you wash! Its dcep-cleanMng lather really frees you of weanocis, keeps you fresher so much longer. So get g tablet of Lifebuoy today and make sure of day-long frcshncu! FOR PESS01S II. FRESII\ESS ILVAYS A 1 gaaajgaj o| tot, kidney* la r< hannful impurities (rorn the system. If audoeys grow sluggiab, thes* iiupiiiiltag ia swrticuiar eaceaa acid settle, and %  *• gffdjariag ia kMnu and uauacJea. Th* stay to tackle th* root tt the troubia I* to bate Ora kidneys. They ahoold few • %  aad up wiib Da Witt a Pills the medictn* made spacially (or tht* purpose De Witt'* POl* bava a toothing, deanaing aad antiseptic action on tha kjdneys that j~ knoga thern bads to perform tlkasr *• nataraJ faacttoa properly. pa Wm %  Pill, ara a .%  -,w-.1-tried remedy They ara sold ail over the world aad wi hare many lettera (roni tutarera telling of relief gaioad, suffering alter taking De Wilt a Pius. They act oa the kidneys qmrkly Why not try them for your trouble? Ge to your cberruat and obtain a auppir la-day. tygtmic conditioaa anal the ingredieriU all ronforn. to rigid atandaud. of purity. / DE WITTS PILLS for Kidney and Bladder Troubles SEE OCtt l/ISPLAV M mmTHE CORNER STORE





    PAGE 1

    PACK TEN BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY. JINK 25, IM2 England Win Second Test By Eight Wickets WHEN Batsmen Take 45 Minutes To Score 37 ( THE PITCH ) i Our Own C*i LONDON. Junt 24. Only a handful o( sf sst ta t uii %  *aw Enc'ai.il oo m psste ihe formeight wicket* in the Second Te*t today. It look 45 minute* to score the 37 needed and the pro%  INIU tita He was caught M deep uiuare lee trying to rlnUh the match with a li Play '.his morning was Interminably dreary and reminded MM of the first day of the Ti-st with Surrey Head Table With 104 Points ~ sturtrs %  *ft. CRtASf % %  %  ,'nc CA5E Si LONDON. June 24. Winning their eighth countv championship match of the season against Kent at Blackhealh toMWythlftfl at slake rather than rtlv Surrey have opened up a 20 the last with VW0I7 His! round po ln , Pad at u,, ,-,5 0 f the table, the corner -p.. (l | potnU and Although defeat tor England ar . toXW WM out pi the quotum Mankad wwe hctcn by their bogie team and Ghulrim Ahmed attained an s-.m*rsel. In third place are undoubted moral victory > over the Yorkshire, four points behind batsmen. They dropped the ball Middlesex U a result of thru virright on a length and rum came . )lpr very sedately in ones and twos with Just an occasional four Mankad as fresh as when play first began on Thursday made one or two lift disconcertingly n id Hutton twice had difficulty 111 wlthdrawinK hi-, bat from balls whleli whipped right across his body. The pitch was taking spin for the first time and one couldn't lielji feeling that had not India'', tatting a-jain broken down In the middle t-rdcr as It did yesterday that thi* game could have hod a much different ending. Even this runs. V-------"{BE YA5O$" THIS WILL ILLUSTRATF LAWS W.I. Team To Tour Canada T. 8-9 Know Your Cricket— LAWS ?,8&9 The West Indies Crick, of Control, at their General Meetj ing, accepted an Invitation from, the' Canadian Cricket Assocm-, lion to send a West Indies team to Canada during the summer (( ItM to play a series of matches lasting -even weeks. The W-I Board, at the request of the Canadian Cricket Association, has submitted the cost of this tour, approximately $10,000 Canadian dollars, and now await furthur developments. Meanwhile the WI.C.B. of C. is •usily occupied making arrangements for the proposed visit of th* Indian team in January next. It is likely that India may play I the bails but at this stage 1 think a tournament against Pakistan I can safely mention without from October to December. 1952. tMI name, with Lancashire Wickets and Tne Uowlmg a-id LAW S—Tilt: WICKETS leading to any confusion that in causing a delay resulted In a tie—the second Of Pupping CreasesThe wicket* shall be pitched u high wind the captains may ***** the season. These laws are really non coioppeaile and parallel to each .igree, with the approval of the th trover*lal and wid call for small aiher si a distance of 22 yards umpires, to dispense with QM Scoreboard comment fng (torn slump to stump. jfeft, h use of bails. LAW 7—THE PITCH wlekel shall be nine Indira in L.\W Mil BOWLING AND Hv f>. & cams Three laws arc discussed today 11 that of the playing surface and these COM I rue course. Surrey beat Kent by n,ne wickTll< pllch u deemed to be Hiwidth and consist of three stump* some of the proposed tour to West Indies. This has necessituated submitting two probable itineraries to the Board of Control for Cricket in India which of the POPPING CREASES will affect the duration Surrey 340 and -2 for one. MM of 0u ro *nd between tl..with tun bail* on lop. The stumps The bowling crease shall be in tour lo these parts. Kent 117 and 200. „ W-Ul flv e feet In width .hall be of e*iual and sufficient line with the stumps: 8 feet 8 will be appreciated lhat the STSSL^VK^rw &M " *" >'> of ll.e line Johamg .He to prevent the bill from pas*Inches in length: with a return W I. Board hato act very ortdieses: 201 ..nd SX, (Hazell six for ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ „ ppu „,,. lnrhrs -bovp m gmtna nr bch nd m wlrk( L The f ^^ pendlture involved in bringing YOsktblra beat Leicester by 73 r u,p s-r• nrt, •ha'l bp respowibdbt shall he Mi Indies In length, ereaae shall be marked feet In out the Indian Yorkshire 307 and 193 fot le for the StSsMttM and pr*Jtthfc ** declared. Leicester 245 and Iraiton of Uspitch l>er.aflrr of the stumps, shall not proj. t'ngsMe would hJ?e had difWStV '82. m ^ um "' r " h " """J* 1 %  \J" "VL^ Vhi '. St? OmiUlli SM to-du Gloucester beat Glamorcan by and milnlenanre. The plU-h Notes t this law inc uded Gloucester 284 for nine shall not be chained during a several editions, discourage 118 for three dematch unlr* it becomes until for use of slumps with metal fitting rgan 166 and 309. r Hy nrd thrn only wllh the eonIt is claim.d thai they pre •ent of bo'-h captains. source of danger. WIDTH IfKCOMMENDATIONS 1 t.( the pitch which They recommend that the lo: ted cost is likely to exceed t bowling crease. Both the return £30.0W and the question of travel and popping creases shall be by ship or air still has to be dcfl deemed unlimited in length. elded. Present cost is based on IN HIS r.ROl'M) lravel b ** %  But that was what might have declared and been. Returning to what was. elated, Glamc; the proceedings were brought to %  inc:,iful close by Compton Derby beat Northnnts by ttfjll : .Tig Ghulam Ahmed for wickets. Derby 390 and 84 for two, !&u7wnS n W Eng]Hnd "" N S.e n x\!eaVox.or;. Univers.tv b te £j Of the slump, be dorna-Shsptd ( ,„ draw to the attemion of The man of the match of course bv live wick** Si 1 a JOfl and ] "' %  %  M IntaWdad for lutf wkketa. %  x-riea a specillc rule dealing M son grounded inside the poppin and Evans did will enough bv dared. % % %  I'h of ,, rthVlal plW>. the conditions for the "wicket crease lo be deemed to be scoring a century 1 nd claiming his Essex versus Lancashire tied, matting is the only oie we know being down" as they relate lo his ground. hundredth victim behind the Lancashire 260 and 226 fot seven o„rrh i u M ^nd d ^h^ o ;Lsi.'?''"•""• • ttentton WhileI c.iin.-I.-l u3 in. wide |3 81c. Pink & Blue 36 in. wide (a> 8 3c. Satin 36 in. wide @> Jc., 74c.. & 96c. ( MIIMII Plaids tl in. wide Q 3c. TiME WE SUGGEST YOU INSPECT OUR COTTON PLAIDS 27" wide SKIc. |i*r MM Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10. II. 12 H 13 Broad Street ivithln But It the way. declared, Essex 281 and 231. Warwick verjus Cambridgo match drawn. War-' % %  il... victim stumps. versus nc waj. tuciv never HTIKU I v __, 'Uo'o' ,' ,x Vi riwlarhe a moment -when he wasn't ^ ,c ^. l3 \ a ^ d „**?J f l£?2L actively concerned in the gatm < ,' %  V mb r l 1SS 2? £lL He. Harare and Ghulam Ahmed >'' ** n ? ^P^/JfilV.msteh are well up to Test standard. But Worcester versus Nolti match there are a lot of shortcomings ***** W T T' C, .^ 0 T to LS& In this India team mainly in the ^ rlarPd and ,2 for no wlck "' pace attack and Ihe middle batNotts 474. ting. It is hardly likely that Ramchantl and Phadkar will find an aartri y.ird at'this stage In the M>ason but It Is possible for bat'Banned Golfer Gets Cash Boost Umpires' Association Holds Meeting ny FRANK KOSTtON The Barbados Umpires' AsiociMonday stand and HUGHES SCORES CENTURY men such as Adhiksrl, Umriga and Phadkar lo show Improve.! form and they'll need lo If India are to win their first Test in thl* country. Once again lien Hutton has had g successful match as England's captain If there was one crltl„._-_ .„, B i 0 rt Lodge. clssn to offer it wag that he didn't bowl Compton sufllciently. With five other recognized bowlers in tho side It fair to pursue !hot point too fa His CfntUTJ in the first innings too was a good enough answer to those who suggested that captaincy worries might affect his Play. If England are lo make any changes for Uw next Test at Manrhester beginning July 17 It Is likely to be In the spin department. Holey Jenkins couldn't hit n length -it Lord'* and leg spinners who cannot find a mark arc expensive luxuries. Hoy Tatterhall of Lancashire may Join Laker us another off spinner of if he is fit Ikln who bats left handed and also bowls leg breaks m:iy l>c the choice. This Wag probably the %  electors' original intention for tint Lord's itumr but Ikin had to withdraw because of hack trouble and hasn't played cricket since. SCOREBOARD INDIA—I'li-M iBslaf* %  Manknd Haasrr m*i •>•!%< Truemin lair Imr IS. iKnrA- rr n Manhxi i M I *Mi %  i :• RNOI AMI-•<*•• %  In llmion mot euli %  ..i oul stay e Bov b Ok i.i.i p.it i ofessional immediately after. The P.G.A. could not prevent otion held a meetini IX*NfX>N. hjm going to Switzerland last last at the Challeni A subscription has been started VCil w i nn | nB lne Swisa chamreceived the report of the Com by Sandy Lodge Golf Club for )oilsni)) Blld finishing in Uie first %  '• appointed lo draft Rules for Its now professional, 2 %  -year-old (nn^. of the French Italian the Association. Present were Scot Eric Brown, who won the Belgian and Dulch champronships. Messrs. J. M. Kidney (Chairman). recent £300 Penfold Tournament But lhrjr ^^ cw | d pnd ,, ld B. de L. Inniss and W. F. Hoyos. „ .... L ... # !" nrst priie. i.roi-m.t hin nlavmit for Hrltaui ot the Umpires' Committee of the S^SKS C"^3=^ S BtiU,h J—b \ !" i etaWigAisa This is not only a British rule, It is the rule of every After the Chai r man had spoken l'll.A. in every country. Oil the aims and object* of the Mi. Hughes hit 16 four In his sympathise wth Brown on losing \2i runs and was always at cas* JW '-'.is on tournament golf the Lodge bowling. He because of a Professional Gotfdn't however be -„. i n n t numlter three in the ers" Association rule. .-a A a a ? a i.i 1 f*laa. T> f~* \ t^r. aat ja v batting order. WHAT'S ON TODAY Court of Origins] Jurisdiction 10 00 a.m. Pollcs Courts and Petty Debt Court—10.00 ii.iu. Meeting of Cbsmbur of Com merce—200 p.m. MoMle Cinema. Lowtlmrs FlsnUtlon Yard. Christ Church—7 30 p.m. Leetare by Mr. L. T. Qsy. Dlntiict Inspector of %  c h o o 1 s. at Bolrnont Church—7.30 p. Polles Band Concert at B-v-oobet. Bt. Andrew-7 i > p.m. Dt-cns'loii fit Bnl>.:d<" Pies.i Club-8.00 p.m. The P.G.A. bars a golfer from lecoming a full professional for iwe years. He lannut take part In tho big tournaments under P.OA. control during that time. PeeretiQ LUMI say* with Oflsefaml lorrectitudc: "The subscription will mark our apprecigtlon rif nrown'i successful alort here." But Inn younger brother. P. B. "I-adetic" Lucas. M. P. Sandy Lodge) record Jiolder. says: "It would be fair to describe thi< subscription as a note of sympathy for Hrown for Ihe five lost tournament years of his life. ..ML .in unspoken protest against the ludi< closed-shop nil In every profession there Barbados Umpires Association, are embargoes, apprenticethe meeting considered the draft ships and examinations to Rl "es. The Secretary of the Barmake people learn their L;| ds Cncket Association w.s joba asked to summon a General MeetIt u'eseentli.1 for a good golf !" g of the Umpires' Association professional to leam roufor Monday 30th June when the line club-making and do '">* ,f '^e Association will be all the petty i"t* connected formally adopted. The election of with it a Presidenl. Vice-president, Hony. We have 200 fully quailSecty.-Treasurer and a Committee lied but unemployed golf ' Management wil lain take pros in Britain. Why let P" 1 SSSSSt "^ Br Wn Capita of the draft rulewill be circulated among the umpires and Hrown. In his dry Scottish ''•* Chairman appealed to memloses the debate wllh "•" n,Hke an e,Tnrl to turn out ROJV. the psy-off comment: '" ^H strength at the General Ah. well, the P.G.A. members Meeting. va liable. Mr. Maurice Green and possibly Mr. C. R. Browne will represe.it the West Indies at the Imperial Cricket Conference to be held in London on July 28. The following Resolution, passed by the General Meeting of the WI.C.B. of C-. will be considered'— "As a result of the existing "arrangement whereby Austrn"Xia and South Africa each "sends a touring side to England "once in four years, and of the '•fact that the English Counties "do not desire to receive any "touring side In the year "following an Australia visit, "il transpires that New Zealand -The Wrst Indies and Indi "normally can only send "touring side to England one) "in twelve years:— Be i "resolved therefore that th.' "Board request the Imperb "Cricket Conference lo use It "influence to have the period "for Australian and Souln "African visits changed fr "once In four years to once In "five years, so lhat opportum"lies for other Member Countries to visll England I* "increased to at leasl twice in "fifteen years." Phone 4267 for AI.UMINICM Conllnous Guttrrine 18", 24". 30", 36" wide ALUMINIUM Corrunaled Shrels 6', T, 8', •, 10' lengths ALUMINIUM Painl ALUMINIUM Nails POH.ITE Flat Sheets Hard Flexible Asbestos-Cement Sheets fir exterior or interior use W thick, 4' x 8' EVERITK Corrugated Sheets *', T. 8', V, 10' lengths Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd. Eric Brown at 21. won the Scottish donT like newcomers taking the Amateur Championship, turned money. Mebbe I'll feel like that myself when I'm older Qha rr. V.' '. '1 -THE WEATHER REPORT % % %  YESTERDAY Rainfall from Codrington: Vi in. n* Total rsliifsll for month to data3*0 in*. 104 HighcM Temp^ratr.re: "4 f> r Lowsat Tsmpsrature: 74.R F J> Wind Velocity in roUss par hour Iff, Barometer (0 a m > St W7. (3 pm } VM.032 a TO-DAY as Sunset: fl 18 p m Moou: New, Jane 22 7* Lighting: 7.00 p.m. High Tide: 4 -.'• s.n„ 6 14 pra. 1 Low Tide: 1126 -in 11.23 0 p m Rifl<* Shooting At but Saturday's practice of the Small II ire Itillc Club In spite of unusual strong and gusty wind members we*g ebie to obtain sum.' %  tbl) mint 1 •">"" the scores reii rded HI'S. I Oft Major J K. Giirhtii Mr T. A. I* Roberts,. .. M O. Tir-kcr ., ,. R. LMfhlil K s V. ood ]'. TeJuH M. A. Brown R o Brewi Th^ next practice will I 11 night June 23th, 1952. Members ate reminded that they have Li rut In lour rnrd I toff the Mi-xt BpOOII s %  in 07 II 95 93 They'll Do It Every Time FRO -TH£ HOSPITAL-— By Jimmy Hallo i^S.lNDeED-'TrlERE'S HO PLACE UKE HOWE?AS THE FELU SEZ-fHOVEVER, THE FELL4 BO S4IP n /I^T CMEDWR %  ••) : ST-1RTED TD HAVE TUE FUCE REN0V41E0 Kite XXI KE/WATCH -THAT THE ORKeH OOJT UMCOM THE josi me wooes WILL KEEP >OU Otl^> — I HAVE TJ cO COHNTDIVM TDRCKC3UT H.ILLFSPER /$xj ... DOS AND DON'TS FOR CAREFUL DRIVERS DO keep your windscreen — and your conscience — clear. DON'T leave your car or saolor cycle where it will cauoa d ng'T or obstruction. S. Usnirds Ontrnary SOCIAL & DANCE GOODWILL LEAGUE SHED FRIDAY JUNE 27th 9 iMI. to I e.m. Admisslen 8/Oood Orchestra. Itefreshmcnti on Sale 24..S2—3n. ERNIES CLUB Ernies wishes to remind his friends to keep to-morrow night open as there will be a meeting to discuss the problems of the first day's races of the Trinidad Summer meeting. There will be the usual cold buffet. Squadron Leader A C. Snow of the Ednewater Hotel fame has promised to supply his well known lobster cocktails. Chicken Pelew, Peaches and Pear Melba. SAY! THINK OF THE FIT AND THINK OF THE PRICE A WORSTED SUIT $65.00 G\* Ve£ ^ ONLY AT P. C. S. MAFFEI & CO., LTD. "TOP SCORERS IN TAILORING' C>' n\* 1 The Finest Beer Brewed Anywhere toll ^ e I •^a^Tl.*-^ C. B. Iai '* Mt'i-rliunl Tailor*



    PAGE 1

    PACE roru BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY. JUNE . 1KB BARBADOS **& ADVOCATE t...5T_1 n r TrM>US I*. A4-*te .. LM BNM S*-. %  %  —— % %  U IN I 111 I! IIIIIIAIW Wrdnrsdiiy. June 25. 1M2 TRADE I KIMS THE recent vWl to Barbados men 'if good cheer ore cheerful. We hjve still some gold — but we ought to have more. The pound stands firm— and yet ihere are dark rUBMttl of devaluation. We lire payi:i,i our way. and going deep into the red at the same time. A* far an the ordinal is concerned it lo all Korea i<~> ;i row of beans that he won't be worrying about the nations bahUBt Of payments — but how to afford hji own famOy'i holiday in is year. The pattern of postwar Bntiri life la changing very gradually. Moat of the things the foreign vi-ltor noticed — good and bad about Socialist Britain, arc Mill there under the Tories. There is Mill very full sjgftpleB*nii-nt ..nil n than to spare for those spare services thai are usual •>> In other countries. 11 i< dimcult to find stores that will purchase*. There -"> %  long line* in some shop* — for lack of shop assistant*. Repair! of all kinds are expensive Ud lake „ long time. There is -Mi rationing — carefully observed and jealously guarded. almost as .. privilrxi-. i brtS who caU it "fair %  : These are the Irritations left behind by the postwar Socialist experiment. There are abO great gains. Wages and fid are. on the overage, and for UM mass of wage-earners, bettei than ever before in Britain. The health of children—mainly Bj nwili llMl'M ROBERTS, c %  r i u edtng, U .iverage. 1 *.• wen ir %  gaioj \n %  t to ...hii-v. rtatitly Mireeeded wiin food >ouidWs, heavy allowances, school men! and frej med;cr.l services. Now theri a Conaervi.tive %  in UrltaSB and the %  .. i • Butler, the Chancellor do not wan) it octal System the social What they arc trying bo fto U> prune it and mast* it les* wasteful. The best example is Ihe case of load subside .. Every person In Britain has about four shilling* of his weekly food bill paid by the Government — It SI done to relieve the hardship of the I r average wage in Britain is now running around £7 a week it Is only a very few of the unlucky, the the pensioners, the disabled or the fcw unvmpli yed who reatlv need the subsidies. What the Conservative Government is trying Is to ease tnc < '.untry back to a more norm;.I way of paying — over the counter of the shop rather than 10 the tax celleclor. %  LF.'i Salaries Thlj. wri-k. for the first time. every one of sixteen million people got a little more in his pay packet because Mr Butler's budget does not tax him so %  ivU) The same week the Mrmbcrs of Parliament who ar*r paid £ 1.000 each year to legislate were discussing the possibility of putting up their own salaries The British M.P. Is the least well-pgid In all Ihe Hrltish Commonwealth — with flat exception of New Zealand. He has also far more work to do The old tradition was that M.P.'s were part-time legislators who came down to the House of in the evening to discus* UM> affairs "f the nation. But now the Hou.i f Commons meets at 2.S0 in the afternoon Barf) organisation* keep iln ii followers, verj regularly. %  ilmost tied to (.laying la tne Palace of Wastminisier itself — m case they should be a division and a vote takes. For hundreds of MP's of all parties, the business of PiirllunffH w ihr whole time and they nave fo try and live on thoir il.ttOa. not egsy tnt them; unfortuiiaffesy 'hesre rather u.nwlUing to try and educate Lit E blic to believe they _ughl io a* highly paid as an American Longressman who g-1 m< re than mnet wid % %  *s*erttarj pato for him. Coronation Claims The lawyers are hoping for a bit of business in the courts settling arguments about who has the right to certain ceremonial functions at the coronation. Many ancient families have prescriptive rights |D perform certain services to the sovtrcign Before King %  0 v..rd VII was erowned in 1* there was a •long and stormy argument between the Earl if Laudrrd..'lc ind another Scottish family who should carry the banner of Scotland. And who shall carry the Queen's spurs'* And who shall carry the swords of state? Or the custom on which the orb is placed? But the great question, abou". which there can be no arguments In the courts, but on which much depends is "which way will the procession pass". Already ticket selling agencies are selling places for prices between 4*5. 3 0. and £42. They do not tell ihe "purchaser" where the seat will be — because they do not know where they will build their stands. The general agreement seems to be ghat for £5. 5. 0d. it Is now possible to buy a promise of a place from which it Is unlJcely that you will have more %  Jhan a glimpse of the coronation procession. Help For Colonial Legislatures A chorus of praise for very considerable constitutional work for Colonial Legislature*, some of which he visited recently, was given the Clerk-Assistant of the House of Commons. Mr. Fcllowes, during discussion in the House of Wednesday. In an adjourned debate during the last half-hour before midnight, Mr. Ian Winierbottcm, Conservative Nottingham Central, raised the question ,' appointing M extra Clerk at the Table — a specialist, he suggested, who would be able to help new Colonial Legislatures "to find their way Into and thrmnrn the mazes of our procedures.' In no fewer than 12 Colonial lAgtsUture* recently. Mr. Winlerbottom said, there I s. and all these legislatures benefited from the assistance of n real expert in Parliamentary procedure. A BP >t deal of troublesome trial and error would be svoided if ae expert in Britain was %  vallabfel to help new I .eg el at. in" chinin: ,.-k rial Mr Fclh-wrs, m the past lew '.ad prepared the Stan | mg Orders of the Leglslntuns of Jamaica, Celyon. Trinidad, end Nigeria. He hud also visited the Legislatures of Ceylon, the S.iuaii, the Coin i i ii Kvriywlii'i-iIn' SSIfflBM Sad proved of the very greatest value and to ensure In Nigeria. Mr. Fcllowes presidhappen later the l/cgislature for. period — at the request of the Governor, Sir Edward Keeling and Mr Jamag Johnson, both of whom were In West Africa earlier this year, echoed Mr. Winterbottom s tribute to the successful work Mr. Fcllowes had accomplished in that area. Commenting on practices he MVed in Colonial legislatures. Sir Edward pointed out that in the House of Commons the practice was not to try to egaflVtre administrative or executive duties. -We leave that to Oovernnient.' he continued. 'W Special Member of Commons' SUfT Suggested. (ontrol t h c Government by criticism, and, If iKcessary, by turning them out "I have noticed in some of the Colonial Legislature* which I have visited that they do not always understand this method of controlling the Government. to exercise executive powers.'' Colonial Legislatives n # 'd cot slavishly follow the British SCainpln. Sir Edward added; it was for them to decide what their practice should be, "but they should do so with their eyes open.' He was sure they would lik.to have the services of a Clerk of the House of Commons U) explain the procedure of that House as it hud been evolved over a period of hundreds of years and particularly in the last ll<0 years. Mr. Douglas DoddsParker. Conservative. Panlniry who originally proposed the extra staffing .it the Table, during a meeting or Ihe Commonwealth Parliamentary Association paid tribute to Mr. Fcllowes' work, particularly In the **• dan. A point of interest mnde .by Mr. Dodds-Parkcr was that it had been found possible "to adapt the Prayers of this House to all monotheistic religions, and to ensure that whatever may the proceedings they start off with three qulel minutes." Mr. Johnson. Labour. Rugby, said he was convinced trom appreciations of Mr. Kc.ilov.es Work exprvswd by West African Ministers that if the proposal boll re the House was accepted "it would pay enormous dividends in goodwill and an Improved Colonial Legislatures."The Minister of State for Colonial affairs. Mr. Henry Hopkinson. told the House that miring the past six years IS persons (rom 11 territories, of which five were Colonial territories, had come ever to London to icceive expert guidance in legislative procedure. A number of officers from Hong K<*' and elsewhere were expected to arrive shortlyThe Minister wcit on to note that "the Qlerk-Assistant has already been engaged upon 'h work of revising the Moi>"l Standing; Orders for Colonial Legislative Councils which were Issued first In 1929 It Is a laborious business and he has put a great deal of time on It. Even so, the work is not yet ready. The gradations vary so much from one territory to anoUjcr that it Is really Impossible to devise a code which would cover them all. "The i**ue of this code Is no*, intended to impose British Parliamentary procedure, on any territory, but rather to afford a basis, formed upon the successful experience of the House .of Commons, by which a Colonial legislature may measure its own procedure and practice and, where necessary, introduce mjdlfl cations." The staffing of the Clerk's Office was, of course, a matter for consideration in the first Instanee by the Commiss/in for Regulating the Office* of the House ot Commons the Minister went on. The appointment of a special member of the staff of the House to look after Colonial Legislatures would certainly seem to offer many advantages He would, of course, require to travel extensively, but it was equally important that he should not spend bis whole tune abroad. He would be. above all. an important link with the Table, and his value would depend very much on his keeping abreast of current practice in this countrv. The Minister promiscu to bring the matter lo the attention of the Colonial Secretary when ho returned from West Africa. Mr. Lyttrlton would, no doubt, consider in consultation with Mr. Speaker, what lecomniesulalions should be mad* to the Commissioners. Red Threat Worries The Pentagon From R. M. MacCOl.L THERE is serious alarm today in the Pentagon and among members of America's all-important National Security Council— 1 the top-level body that advises the Presi-. dent on the nution'.s military-political courses and problems — over the threat ol, an imminent and massive Red Chinese offensive in Korea. Latent intelligence reports give the following estimates of present enemy strength: (a) 1.000.QOO combat troops. (Two and a hall to three times as great as the combined strength of the United Nations and South Korean forces); (b) 1.800 to 2.000 planes; (c) 400 modern tanks; (d) "excellent" artillery, giving the Reds firepower roughly equal to that of the Allies (who a year ago were vastly superior in this respect). Although there has been considerable uneasiness in Washington for some time past over the look of things in Korea, this background apprehension has suddenly changed n the past day or so to a condition of real "alert", as new reports have come suggesting that Ihe "balloon may go up" any day now. No responsible officer has said so far thai the actual security of Allied forces in Korea is now in jeopardy. But what is being admitted tonight is that if the Reds hit they will cause ".serious" initial reverses to the United Nations, and inflict heavy losses before they can be stopped. Whether the Communists could actually push the Allies into the sea or confine them once again to a small pocket round the base port of Pusan, in south-eastern Korea, depends entirely, in the opinion of Pentagon experts, on whether they decide to strike under the protection of an "air umbrella", which they now possess. Truman's military advisers have told him that the main deterrents to a Red offensive are simply the enemy's own doubts as to whether he is able to inflict a complete defeat, and the fact that time is on his side. And they have said that unless the Allied [build-up is increased to a much sharper rate,! the enemy initiative — and the dangers of| the whole situation — will go on increasing.} The only factors in the picture which are[ encouraging to the West are: (1) United; Nations' armoured strength is still superior; (2) The Red's strategy still seems geared to the foot soldier. And. far to the Allied rear, on Koje Island. the Reds have succeeded in producing a "second front", which is at present pinning down 6,000 first-class troops, including the only airborne regimental combat team that America has in the Korean theatre. The tension built up in Washington over Ihe possibility of an "all or nothing" Red %  niush is understood to lie behind General Mark Clark's recent statement in Tokyo that he would favour a general bombing of Chinese cities if the Communists do launch a now Korean attack. The new Far Eastern Supreme said that retaliatory bombing would be agreed to by him if the Red offensive included big air attacks on the UNO armies. It is understood that this view was cleared with the Pentagon in advance, before Clark left for Japan, and coincide:, with United States' top policy. PHOTOGRAPHS Copies of Locl Photognphj Which IBM ppred in tt> Advocate Newspaper Can be ordered from the . ADVOCATE STATIONERY Where The Young Prince Gets His Money PARLIAMENT is disvms "hiClVtl Ut — the salaries paid |0 the Royal Family. One thing it already *uiv. The allowance tor Prince Charles will be paid out ot the huge revenues or the Duchy ot Cornwall. Last year the prollts Irom this estate, which owns 170 (arms, many manors, entire parishes, pubt. hotels, i>"jl oinc-vs, banks, shops, and Un mines amounted to £84.000. The year before ihoy were J-102,000. and the year before ihi.t £89,000. All Ihis money went towards meeting the Civil List payments to the Monarch. It Is expected that ."> much ns a quarter will now be palrt for the nialnteniiiicv of iTince Charles and to start a lavtOfs account tor DBS daj "hen a* will marry, . But Powerful Nut only i* Ihe Duchy wealthy —perhaps the richest of all th.s country'.* great estates—but It is powerful. It Is superior to Acts of Pard by the laws of loi.l fovarnment housing and town planning. It i& not even liali • to pay rates. Still upholding these right.*. the Council of ihe Duchj observes the law voluntaril menu :. %  rates It should pay Most of the 130 000 SCMi %  eotttroll are in the *" CoUUtrji but there are 78 Sere* In London. The IHiehy own* the Ovil hame-ground of Surrey', cricket By ROBKRT OLINTON. warehouses and wharvea. bloeks *r flala and bousaa. i mil 1S] II owned Lambeth-walk. Town Sold All the Siilly L ie beonged to Ihsj Mcby mini two years ago. when it sold a whole town — Hugh Town, the capital, In S*. Mary's, the main island. The Duchy is always reluctant to sell land. It does not .-.peculate. Why. then, did It sell Hugh Town ? An awkward situation was developing. The town council, according to the law, was the local planning authority. Hut in fact it had no power on Duchy lsnd. To avoid thi* contretemps the Duchy sold out. Since the war, however, the Duchy has added considerably lo Its farm acreage OD the mainland. In the old days, history lud little good to say about the Duehy. It was described as a dead weight on the land—"sucklug out the revenue and giving nothing in return." But whin (jueen Victoria came to the throne great reforms asSra made. These continue today. No Critic* Most of the tenants of the Duchy evtnl their laiid'ord is rare. These are m In 1S3C %  Judge Li's gald "1 vi'iiUiro to hope that they (bis njsurka) will lead the Ol thi Duchv lo I ircfully the Duchy'.i cl lm to the wholn of the forev u anbvt the King and his other subjects. rill cause the Duchy office to abandon its present predatory practice of treating other people's property as Its Own and enabe the coa*tal owners to resist unauthorised Invasion of their rights. The Duchy og*cc was angry. It pointed out mat Its claim to the whole of the Cornish fonhore was well-founded. Since that time it has leased nearly all the beaches. Why The Duchy regards the lask cf collecting dues from private Icecream sellerand other trades as too big a task. Two days ago the black flag of the Duchy— which bears 15 gold coins, supposed to lie the ransom Hlondin paid for the freedom of Richaru Lion Heart, (lew over the splendid whit.building Just outside BiH-kmgham Palace gates. This Is the headquarters of the Duchy, and'the new Queen was presiding over the Duchv Council, which meets about twice a year. Three Feathers In the maimlurcm council • %  Htm the three-feather badge of the eldest son of the Monarcn is interwoven m the carpetIt Is in the scrollwork of the hign celling. Without ceremony and without fuss. Primv Charles became the owner of this huge enterprise. As the eldest son he automatically became the Duke of Cor/iwall, following in ihe steps of the man who was latci to be Duke of Windsor. II is a fine Inheritance. Nevei has the Duchy owned more land or been more flourishing. What Goes On Where Fuchs Used To Work CHAPMAN I'IMlllK fills in s ome Raps *n the .CI20 million story AFTER a search of more than two years the Government has failed to find an atom scientist good enough to replace Dr. Klaus Fuchs, the Russian spy now serving a 14-year jail sentence. This is officially disclosed In the first report* to the nation on Britain's £120 million atomic enterprise, published recently. There is no mention of Fuchs in the report's 128 pages, though they are entirely devoted to the Harwell atom station where he workad. His name and that of his fellow-Communist Bruno Pontecorvo, who fled to Russia 21 months ago. have been carefully kept out even from the long list of scientific papers published by Harwell men. The only admission that Fuchs was ever at Harwell is a blank space in the list of departmental chiefs. It occurs opposite the name "Theoretical Physics"—the department which lie headed. It is still without a leader. This omission is typical of the report which is being sold as "the story of the work and problems of Harwell," but it little more than ash-dry catalogue of complicated machinery and chemical processes. The real story of Harwell is the story of courageous struggle against materials shortages, political indecision. Civil Service "procedure" and the ham-stringing restrictions of security. Above all, il is the human story of the fight to rebuild mutual trust after repeated political purges culminating in the discovery among the station's top ten men of the most damaging spy In history. ,—L.E.S. TO-DAY TO-MORROW MI LATE. RE TOO FOR YOl'H REAEKVE STOCK. Pate da fata Gras Petted Meat Featlne Paste Carned Beef Cereal Lunch Tongae* OK Tongaes Brlakel ot Beef Haaaare* Spaghetti A Cheese Cheese In Una Sardines Salmon Goldrn Cora Herring* Can's Bbrulta Canada Dry Drinks Instant Coffee Insist on a 12 oz. Bottle of BEER Ask for GOLDENTREE Holland's Best BREAKFAST FOODS. Are Bran Shredded Wheat Grape Nuts Fares r iiilum Oal Flakes .Seoteh OstaUKftl Corn Flakes MEAT DEPT. Calves Liver Kidneys .Sausages Dressed RabbiU Sweet Breads Fresh Vegetables PHONE G0DDARDS FOR !" E ^ST IMIMMMMM i