Jam — 2-lt 1.01 SwiH'i Cum —; %  %  >. %  .48 Swpoi Cm—ifi-*. .39 IX^J^ Pi-iirhes— 16'UK. .... J.4 .15 ..12 ( %  imvns—.111.ox Pears —lfi-n*. .43 Aprii-iils —.:u ,,Aprlrols—|fi-/ M . .4* D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street THE O I O \ > A II i; HOI EHIES '#*• #/#..• Whmrm Ymmr Bm ttmr *w Further BRINGING UP FATHER -.-.-,-,-.-.•.-.-.-.-.•.-.',•.-,-.-,•.-.•.•,•.-.-,-.-,-.-.-.•.-,-,•,-..-.•-•.'.•.•.-. %  .-.-.•-•.-.--•.-.•.•.•-•.-.-.•.•.•.-.-.•,•.-,•.-.(. •,-.•--.•--.-.•. %  S.W.VSrS



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FAC.l. TWO M KDAY \IVM'ATK JAM I I A IMII SS SHOP Weil soon have lhat better with tiukirca'ai rout* ef GMMHM Osstasaaa III l>-v( unisoan. aubduca lanamanari— and p.pNioMi ages** the sary harmful bacteria You wiB 1*4. wo, ifaai Cermolcne draws oat din from cuts, %  bra'-'iii, btiiwrs and nm and attsaglatat (ha growth of new akka KM* • of Gmnnlcnr handy for rasas)* MM. FOR S"0TS. RUSHES, BURNS I'iR'UTIONS, UMIIWS -WllltlKOlrf MM. .- to -our own wishes. Nothing /or London, England OlI the tbeali* to r*Mcit> >i %  an. *"Ihen that not onlr was the eon.Milftar> her.. If you want a They art) the two dciegale* i "L r .,n <" i f "*' nU,n ,n ^ • %  b * her ipeciahv in dancing Master of Ceremonies pleat* reprcsentine; the Barbados Branch The but she Is versatile in other nances choose one who will make things of the Commonwealth Parliament'iirbadia culture •till urtaln went up hort)> :i fter as she moveoMo thir*ai 30 p. II. hythtn. performed in quick sui Stole The ShiiM' ast. which consisted < Cafe Society which depict* t the youth of yesterday .. ,"2H perel with those of the present rnm* %  group of ftne dancers, Rosa"'itself < > Layne will act in his place He Knight stealing the show. Then the Master of Ceremonies At the airport to see them off One cannot fall to see the verralis on a gentleman to propose were Mrs. Smith and famllv, Mr. satlllly In this young dancer, She ,0 t to the bridesmaids. The J E T. Brancker. M.C.P., Mr. T. ha* the making of a fine actrea< bestmsn replies on behalf of the O. Brvan, M.C.P.. Mr. R G. and should go far as a piii.ii Mapp, M.CP, Mr. Perclval om. Highlighting th<> Ncj ' ,h u ** 'o the bride's ~ performance were the rorents to which the bride's father gorgeous costumes so colourful "'P'ies on behalf of his w|fa and nri rich The teenerv and itaa' 1 ""*•" Thf> • m *PPUes to the 'tidegn Tli.seventy girls, wap.iiativih V"urtg one. them only Iota These ust be (ongratulated nn their i|ay was perhaps the faeourfuVnf the bi>de The bridegroom line ixTformance and although at (s,, „. fn ,ng> entertainment One !>*• on behalf of his wife ntervals not all of them %  regular time, ict In e-. be seen the aim i<> giv< paWfjcet finish and grace to each movement. This, to my mind was a very fine quality. Th ( programme could be summ<*>! up as one uf Classical Damcvrnlns ing. Triaeh-rraseh in which Rosalie and June Knight were ind UM Daiietaf Class pgnd the balfcai of a %  D with that of to-day opened the :'i>t part In The CnM.lcri. lr.-n. The Ballet Shoe—there were many posslMlltlet In the aM csl banat Orana of nurtfemanl .ne of Kin %  %  Orttstanrlinj; Part II, In my opli whole need-t neual mention. Espetnilly the Ballade pa n.lng girls with Mlu Ransom tukuii. the solo part. I think these gtiU were indeed the best that could have %  i n [Of this number and hright ary Association. While in the; th Master of Ceremonies U.K. Mr. Cox and Mr Smith will BIBKM Ml opening remarks thanknltenrt lecture* on parliamentary Ina the guestfor bong present procedure and will also vieit the r who helped with prepfi'tuse of Commons and the arations, etc. Me then calls on Northern Ireland Parliament propose the health of Mr Smith is also Managing reDirvtloi of Self Help Enterprise* ii i Ltd. During his absence. Mi and Mr the trammer setting togethti high standanl oi bv Capt. C. E Ra his MiiH' Makers, rang down the lur'ain on another successful eerformanee In Barbadian* Culture The Barbados School Ing has found a place in trW iielo of the i parents. In the c absence of either parent. MBE. and M ld friend may reply sucaessn XI n iiw n Please snappy. If they are too long i drawn out. guests will lose brterist and wander off BpeecheB must b expressions of sincere (shefor happiness, and pei Stuan. Mr O. Squirts Spent Two Week* M R, AND MRS. CLAHKNCL RKNWICK returned tfl c.rcnada yesterday morning by H.W.I A. after spending &as%m ^*m£Z ^~ ~ ultur* nrt thou*, who u,ie ( l vinc< ICMnauuuinp. %  „„ —, oll>bor'* %  *"" <•""'; TENDER LEAF TEA =^^~M %  ) Youthful Vigoi usstored In 24 Hours v • lauds Fortified ^*< y New Discovery k Gl b %  %  %  i-.-ii a iarii1 |ln i | | t %  1 unWt" i fl saala Wi r*> VllsdlM Vaur OlaMtds %  ii'i lion* In presenting the show. Mn M Benfieid who played the .•M-rompanlment In Ballade, and manv others are to be rongratuIsleri. K A. Talkint Point ng grace and case oi movement predominated. One Tn persrt'ere In one can readily see that this is Mlg be silent la the bear nnswe-r Ransom's special department in calHmnn.--Oaorge Washington. She possesses sterling a • • quallUta that make for a first class ballerina In Bepuiw by Cola Portca the haunilng rhythm 1( hp to |. and beautiful tawhatqua) of ora a I a note of charm ^n-morritu. to the entire movement. . „ ,Jj2i After the interval Part 111 '""•'• •"* a ywd oprn-^i with Capelr. £.pa V nol. J !" ^' "'fL"' ."J*"' MOthet An Item, followed by filpe"ed. -Dean Inge liaUti f) %  •• Mood*, u by Miss Ransom bore Men tcere born fo •tirceed. no"n pal) on the fondest heart To speaJi but little becomes a ii'ornan and the Is best adorn d plain mi ire. grandfather, and their history must be omitted Thi* is the couple's night BMkC everything for them i happy link to tea* back on Then there may be tha euttlna of the cake. The bride and groom cut the first piece of the bride s cake. You may want to call on tha Chief bridesmaid and in."illy and bestman or perhaps an engaged IQ couple who may be the next to be married. After this ceremony there may be dancing and the time draws near when the couple will take their leave Remember nothing effecta a greater anti-climax to the marriage ceremony and celebration than the lingering prcsmanu ence of the bridal pair. Oorxl nance wishes and congratulations lose In significance when uttered more than once; and repeated farewell-; M K Superinlemlei.t f iniblu* works In Grenada. Venezuelan Leaves R ALFREDO OCKOA. J n accountant at La Mote dCoco, a bank In Caracas, Venezuela, left for Malquetia yesterday morning by B.W.I.Aon his war home? after spending a. week's nollday He was staying at Abbeville Guest House. MR AND MRS GEOFFREY SKEETL spei i q.uallti< left I roto fail,—Thoraau. PLAZA THEATRE* Not more than two hours at lh< most should elapse between n wedding pair's arrival from ir church and their departure U their honeym The bestman will complete hla duties by getting together tha luggage in advance. If he his done hla Job well the couple will not have to suffer the embarrassment of curious stares. Once the bridal pair have left, however, a wedding party Is liable to flop like a pricked balloon Considerate guesta will therefore take their departure, leaving the hostess, who is probably exhaustparatlve peace. WATCH YOUR PARTY MANNERS here Is a list of guest; will never again be Invited The one who arrives too early (The hostess Isn't dressed, but the thoughtless guest had nothing else to do.) The one who arrives late, plus two of his her friends (Knew you wouldn't mind.) The one who Is bored. (It's n party. Isnt it? Well, bring on the entertainment.) The one who can only drink imported liquor. (Its back on the market, dear ) Tho one (female) who has only come to .-innex a man. (Any man.) The one (male) who has only come to annex a woman, (Any the nicest ^ogaiblc way.) The one who elects himself herself the life of the party. The one who didn't bother to dress up. (After all. I'm an Individual, my dear.i The one who takes a mucous farewell, and can't see to close the car door. (You hope the landlord will be under>tnndlng.) So. . Happy parties, and mind your manners don't show. Except m the nicest possible way.) At St. Philipg A T. Si. Philip's Parish Chuuu yesterday afternoon. Miss Joaiile Karmer. daughter of Mr. and Mr*. A. G. Farmer of Oughtrron. St. Philip, was married to Mr. Geoffrey Skevte, son of Dr. and Mrs. H. E. Skeste fl "The Grotto". Dalkeith Road. Tne bride who was given In marriage by her father, wore a dress of laco over satin, with a tight ntting bodice, long sleeves. a very full flared skirt and a ong full train. Her finger tip veil of illusion tulle was kept in place by a headdress of white •oses. Her bouquet was alto of She was attended by Miss Sidi Preeoc us maid of honour and Miss Jeanette Goddard and Miss Cynthia Branch as bridesmaids. They wore white stamped nylon over ice-bttie satin with b.illerlna-length skirts, tight fitting bodices and full flared skirts and long white gloves Their headdresses ware of net and white roses and thty carried hymn books. Three little flower girls, the A a li M.ttkla. I7f n l MUies Anne Farmer, Jennifer At M. Matthias tngaged p Brker illd Vaier |, Pack9Ii com. A T f\e o'clock yesteriay \flSS ERMINE WINSTON of plrled lnp bridal entourage. They .... afternoon at St. Matthia. 1*Kingstown, St. Vincent who sjora while stamped nylon with If you are no longer invited to Church. Miss June Eileen Crone-, la at present on holiday in Barbanff-the-shouldar bodices. puft irtics then read this carefully daughter ol Mr. and Mr. J. W. ^ ( w f J****** XSPEU* *£ ,ccves and whl, bonnets. la the time for all good men Creney of %  'Croasasia", WorUiins. o <-" !" of El Boss, 7m ThQ ceremony w „ conducted bv and women to brush up theii was married to Mr, Richard Ulatr Ave. tsoilevlUe. (hp niHh Rev ntjiop D. W. Bentparty mannati For your^ guldTaylor, von of Mr. B^ Taylor of j, u „ Winston who U oriMuuUly '• The riutles of bMimin wsri MK AND KF8 RICHARD TAYLOR 10 Graeme Hall Terraci' and tfom R OBeakii DomTiu.a. expects "erformed by Mr. Richard Packer. late Mr. Malcolm C. Tay-or. lo ) CUV ^ the Island shortly for St. while those of ushers fell m The ceremony was conriurv - i-esume her duties on KesarJohn Farmer, Robert taosnttad Pagged Bar Finalg by Rev. M. E. Jrlfllth? with M G. C. Williams at the organ. The bride who was given ll by har father wore dress of chantilly lace and mlu net with close fitting bodie, long sleeves, a yolk of nylon n and a full skirt with alternate )ut passed his panes Cat lace and net forming Middle Temple, a train. Her flnger-tip veil of nylon net wts kept In place by a juliet cap trimmed with orange blossorna. She carried a bouquet of orchids and Queen Anne's the nursing staff of the Colonial Farmer. Francis Cheesman, John Armstrong, George Skeete. Michael Skeetc and Andrew Skeete. C ONGRATULATIONS to Elliston Carmichacl wh. Bar flnaii Ho Is the s Mr-. Martirt Carmichael FltU Village. St. James. bag A recotlnn was held at Oufihtersni. St. Philip and the honeymoon ia being spent al the Crane. Barbadoa Playcra' Firat Production C AKIB learns that the Barbados Players, a newly Elliston who received his eurly formed company from the amalcducatlon al Combermere Scho-i. gamatlon of the Bridgetown was an employee of the AdvuPlayers and the Barbados Dra,aCe cate Co.. Ltd. %  and also worked matlc Club, are working on their She wits attended by Mi>s as an Assistant Master on the first production, Oscar Wilde's Yvonne Ccalello as chief bridesstaff of the Parry School as well "The Importance of being maid who wore blue lace ov-r as the Grenada Grammar School Earnest." taffeta. The two bridesmaids, the before going up to the U.K. u< They hope to present this next Misses Jasmin Croney and Pat study hi** profession. July. Further details later. Oooding wore pink nylon over laffcW. Their dresses were mane OSJ similar lines — ballerina length with strapless bodices with stole*, full skirts and they wore tiaras of blue and pink flowers respectively, backed with veiling to match. They all carried posies of pink roses and blue forgetme-nots. Taylor was the bestman while the ushera were Messrs. Will Nurse. Dav.d Creney. Francis Deher and DnvW Leach A reception was held at No 20 Graemf Hall Terrace and the honeymoon is being spent i Edsewater Hotel. Rathsheba. Agricultural Officer J. 11 GREGORY. AgriculI Officer of lif-ittsri Mmas who has already spent ulhs of his long leave in l-irnados. returned from Trinidad On Friday by B.W.I.A. after -pending a week in that colony Mr is staying art Bathaher*. WiU hia family. '*• • First Clagg Honours M R. WALTER R. L. CODBINflTON son of Mr. & Mrs. S. 6. Codnnsrton of Bnltons Cross Roal hag cnined first cla*s honours in I-ilin. Mathematics and Phyalcs at McCill University Mr, Codring*> an o'd Harrisonian. intends • *4tng a medical course. MR AND MRS VERKON WALROND On Tluiisda quiet ceremony performed by Mugistiiite Rudder when D.tvtive 1 Waldron of Grenada's Constabulary, look Miss Juliette Douglas, daughter of Mr. Charles Douglaa, -* his bride at their residence. Silver Sands The bride who was given in marriage by her brother. Mr. Carlton Douglas, wore a dress of .ii appliqued with bells and carried a bouquet of anthulium lilies and Queen Anne's lace. Her headdress was kept in pl,ce wnh Olive Blossoms. Detective Waldron is expected to leave the Colony for Grenada where he will resume duties while hla wife will follow one month lhler. They will reside in Grenada. riiONr 4511 AND BOOK YOl'R ORDERS III DVT VAN JOHNSON JJOimiH,YMi(JIJJRB KUIHROMADf COMINO! ANHS OF THI' INDUS IDrbr. Pfll SKIRTS MIIIV .MID aanttki ROBERT MITCHUM JANE RUSSEIl HIS KIND OF WOMAN! VINCI NI PRICE-TIM H01T M


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HACK TWE1 M SINDAV AOVOCATE SCNDAY. 1VSF. K. 1SS5 AGRICULTURAL REPORT I foil.I. i( .irrangemni> May Rainfall Below Average THE following aS uoH ^it-''" P" %  tance of the Co-operativ* Ofltctr. merit t be reaponaibae lor ..rranil"* 1 ,4^S".",nm-,f programmeJUJ co-operat v* it TSTSSSSS W^.; : ,; li fW to "** ••* dart ,n arhic] Island-* • %  ytnenced ..I.I,I..,I ...... .-, receive* r>, rorof the j]*t ** m ihe nltroaan experiment According I "' th** l * Codringu.n 011 liie new cam31 <*neral Fragr—a %  Tn lii.boc f %  aVtVM. A comparison U registration during the monui f i Uv 13. Sugar cane dead hear: *ulphte of Anmwnu versus urea Q^tvico-operative societies ha* the average total ramI numbering 2,300) were cut li will be mad*-, pjjjn u, Hie inoveanent. (all (or the month was %  !.* inotoM i mou* fields and di*ecled in UM sample* laken lo follow tear xh cr ,. ns b^n a marked incrtaM The average total for May, 18.-.;. laboratory for larvae or puparii nitrogen trends. ln activity and > •nthuaiaam among was 1.4 rtCBge -r me I>. saarfcaralU larval para26. rIiar IMagoeals. (JinBUBlh „ group-*|rvidy formed. Bcfor the past 100 > %  I.i\us4uu* aUaSraea. NolW rlred and ninety-live phoaphalc. qUwl hnV( in-en received for waa 3.13 niche*. The approxiMR found, and it would appeal 13 nitrogen and 25 potash deter; ,jLtaiice In establishing societies MUl fail for the live tnejt despite a long period oi f*rvSilnsllnial were completed. All January to Hay, IMI %  samples taken tron %  Cndftj the total for the rij* again failed M eslabli-h .'.earn manunal trials last year corresponding period for 1051 %  *u\ nave beo leanpleled. was 2085 inches. 27. The sample* taken during 2. The highest total rainfall '* %  **•* *•** "•"• It" 0 this year in connection with (ai *• During the month of May for May. 1052 at any <>f the shot %  "" sfutta and young brown routine sampling of commercial ins*" u sum of S15WU was re2S stations, was 4.41 Inches re'""* back grubs were found ;: %  line f rom | WO (u-lds at the Pins .', b boat-owner* again 1 l at a station iu...ui w •" Held* uuninsd. The dam. lt 3 weekly intervals nnd (b) up[„„ jit. ma kes a total I I of the parish of •• oauaed was patchy, mid only ;lke of nUroRW1 by t .„ u UIu)l r MS 0 ^ 2 9 repaid to dataThe outI. Peter. and the lowest *as W . %  c* waa it really %  ** %  ,rr,gtion whan *ulph*te of amsUin uaas>. 11 U trnpoaubie to r rtBtioo. are now b-tnK carried " i n ierest .ollected (or I Muar OHSB. The BSatartU %  I nlna all tlalds at the stage oul lx u ^V* to sample the monUl ,„ m „, yi Vi UliI | %  ugnr factories completed gnn>l""•" damage is visible above manorial trial* during June if tho mjfc — tha total interest pan I)' Ing opt ' (usuaUy early m th aSM by the kn> |<1 intmg of these tng 1951 and the consciuent pool yield* which Srere obtained. The late planting was due to ths extended harvaatlng of the sugar cane crop. The plsnfi] new yam crop wa* begun durin.* the month, and a num>>. wen* also planted to aarsel potatoes. Eleven rsgular M. riahtng during the mcitftl RenarnT mintingof ro-operntlve has bean steady and returns from! %  CIslam ware attended by thf most centres hav. huwn a mark-1 '""• Co-oparative Ofncei during the ad improvement over t:. monUi. Hiu. OaWllUon was ospec-, lally iiuticeable on Uu%  QUth. 2tf. Ragiairatiaa. Ihre* Sonand north-western nshwfl oafr-l of Uutotal loniiaiie of ,. U p were registered during US iXPSi while flying ilsh ha sugar cane_ which is reMped month. These were tho St. B-.relatively sparse on the western 15. Intradneed Predator* and nabas Co-operative Markeunn l ,ltfmn Tin prsdator PyreSociety, iajoavard Co CfSaTatlVS uhare* Namfcaaaa a or larye lireSavings Society and Welchman 35. F, om „n indlcatlorfs, It H lly tw^tla has been active earlier Hall Co-operative Markaunji expected that the flying nan nnd in more extensive areas in. -i Society. The date of registration OB! .on may well run Into Augutt, 1 i' 11 1 rasi Otnoi ; r. i.itois „, theae (hre socletleo. the first (weather permitting), an very i psxastla* havr also been M bc registered under the Cof PW flying fish in spawn h*ve| found establlsfu-d. spssatras Societies Aci, hi the u vf been Uken. lfi Food and narden Iraax. mma em May. The formal preH'Kitlne examination* for insect ^.nuilon of the certificate cf 36. ProjTess with the lst re-1 %  J--.I €> % %  and rseomreglatration to the St. Barnabas placement programme %  the niarti'. Soclsty by the Itegiatrar touk Keef continues and ten boat nnve _ n. place on 22nd of the month. ueen skinned up to the benri It I. UU.NI Anl t'outrol Iiiinn; 30. Co-aperators' Day. The is not possible to complete any May, three government buildings, deration of Co-operatorn Day. of these boats, gs lumber f all private buildings und various ,. u .xoected, will take place on larger sixes for baauna, bem: .s, 1. la.. i_ A.A_f.K&.^v a A _t^ _• .— A II. PEASANT AOKUTI. TURK Peasant Aricullure in Ihe Colony 6. 1 vi.i.-i,.., Work, (i) The Peasant Agricultural l. visited 1,480 peasant holding and 23 athool B>rdsni duiing the mouth, (ii> Members of iho extensi-M staff assisted the Co-operatnc Otllcsr at 10 maetiiifct of 00operaUve group* held during the worms and bud? almost as month. %  cc.ii iiaataasir>.-All s-a tionsh)i ( i the rl|kc May. Preparation* fur 1 kg Of fixxl cn.ps wenwell ifi hand. At The HoOlS, Baj 11,1 QrOVSS fields m and laid oil other Stations hand was carried out Cr<>|>< of yams avert pOUttoss, Indian rorv rounceval and eassavi 1 planted. 1 were examined. A deme jj^ Saturday in July, the bends etc. is yet to arrive fnrn. turn In the treatment .f official anniversary of the Coaurce of supply. This lumber i-i trrmite nests was also given operative Movement. It is pro. expected shortly. In the meaniuivKimrii posed that the celebration should time, progress is being naaintan IV. HOM.MtAI. y, observed In the colony this ad with such section* us cat 18. First Year Needling*. The yMr H1 u u a1. The Shamrock be built up from stock no* ,,>. 1'urther tletci ir.i wilting point (13) and ny.un ploufhed .iock soil calibration (18) arc tour At bslnj carried out. 21, six nylon Uooki ars rs burled at the Pine UVntial liSSstock Station) in connection witli irrigation snitsr application contor every member of the 1 nil ample taken for munlty cannot be mensured in calibration puipiaars in tBSJ laerm ," *•*& The small numllory. In this connection the j" SJSSSS ^0O C f^ UB ' Reasons For Changes LAST week 1 darVotad this column to the publication of \hu pres.iit lyatCOll nt uru'tim: Kboolf in the United Kingdom. Whilst I do advocate a method of regrfldin^ I should like to sue the nCSaVar) variations made which would afford the maximum benefit to the local child population I must emphasize however that can help I should like to point "-it any ermnaai artilch 1 support ta mat the ratntroduatlon of Uv pupU iiiriunM a background of com-.-.irhor syatem would be a distinct pulsnry education. I am not con..dvsnlage. And T do not want 1C vinced that tho coat will be so to lv understood lhat the honprorugdtiva or that it will be 1morary system is ever to be consld]K>sslble t< And accommodation srod It is absurd and d^honaa* for the number of children not f->r nny Government to ask young now on the roll. I have hoard all people to work sometime* up to the arguments used against the to live years without any pey— introduclion of compulsion and I nicnt. I advocate a system wheream atill of the belief that the l y pupils of the Elementary lue of n proper banc educaUon 8 hools could be drafted Into the hing service. a now %  no*t iiole' tvue auger re. !" v. !" ;^ %  -* t* .-<. ,,,'recetv.d gTthj K Z^jfi^JftZ^ T5S*. :" t ;^ B r,a" >n ^I^*, !" that U also increased the 8. LJve*kck Ihe six Station* at the end of now "poet "hole 1 type May. including cattle, pigs, | aheap and aqulnea, numb.136. Three hundred and .-.evenlyW a* teated in the field. The soil one gallons of milk llBl |,e moisl for sati-.factoi duced and 12 young pigs sold „„. ,,f this auger, but if too we for breeding. puddUng Of the sides and boUoi (11) Stud service* paid fm r,t ,.1 ,h* h oV occurs. This latter UouJl-IMih t \ iH-utlon I have found that ln the majorthe falluchiua belief that the lack My of instances the teachers ln horn ii sense of vocation tuj bs recognlxed are those who icreased the ama ln under the Pupil Teacher ber of unreasonable people System. This does not aay thai rltn whom lt 1* Impossible tn time are not others but there la rgue. something In the four years' trainis to tr credit of Hon. Mr. N ^J 1 -"^Jf m0ul(l thWn '-to what la needed. JulW W buck., B5. tjm „ 55 „;;. '^po.t'or' quick"rsJrWenmSu S -m U ^XST^S S *^C£8SU*~ bows 121 making %  total of .,.,„,.,. iui i,bnutn h be ,,buto oiuwrulJlh 'behJeeS '"' ,n P'Prt'n to The drafting of those who hold should then th %  region of the block. 22. The soil tlierinotuetcr a \l for use in soil temper-lure effect on nylon block readings is eminently suitable foi gBH As UM groen hou< in the DeparUuent ha* now beei. ipleted, a series of coinprcher for the month. III. KN'TOMtH.OGICAl. 10. Moth Borer Control. I)i..lng AUiy 79.772,000 Trirhoanmssa parasite* were bred and 89.801.000 were liberated. This brings the total bred so far Una year to 230.327,000 ami the number liberated to 201..136.O0O. 11. The aveiaite .omit of cane Internodes damaged bv moth borer Hi, r „t ,.. well below the nenoral asnu 1 nverage 12. Oomts of moth borer eggs laid in entomological plot Codrington were continued t>> uons. gether with counts of the par24. Manures. Two samples distinguish ~ between jhs obviously false and the poanf Ihosc from the Elementary, wbly and It was courageous of him I'", 001 undcr thm ^P" Tewn er aay it In a public discussion In U-gislativa Council, Swtem. Counting the Cost A correspondent with in-ranted eetimiit* In Trinidnd 1 not surprised to find 1 Vi tppl pot testa have been planned l'*ers recenUy raised Uwpoliit liaaalaals both soil tempera' recurrent expenditure. Whllat cnVct and ^-nUtaUv. W-t. l*af ^pfc.^^^ ^. Tr^-soa M 1* iSSf* UowX U 'rJ examX % %  Tom the Onliva. ^ ^anV Xli of^en^S .nicer In connection with greo.t ix-pnnments and damn a achenii tuuse molsture/growfh expi'riby assuming the rol# of flnanclal inenta for laboratory dctermlnuexpert. Let the Financial Secretary advise the Government on "us Important detail But If 1 I am not surprised to Snd tn*) loacher*' Unten of Trlnld.id advo• ..ling to the Government that th) unPupil Teacher System be Introhat own duced because the present system has not produced the resultexpected it was this same Unloa, which condomned nge-grouplng nd had it abandoned In Trinidad, Rw Siaallng of teachers at which ige-grouping was discussed and accepted In Barbados was attendnl by 58 teachers. A Farce Let me now tell the public that there are 124 Elementary Schools Sj On Page 16 ' MH I IH w>a*ss4 sassasss*ss*sas*a. TOOLS i'i ^7 S 1 x TAPS K DIES 1'11'K W, W. W. H v W i'>". "4". 2". 3" BSF W, A", V.", A". V, A". Vi'. A", a*, a* SAE or NF W.A",*". ft", vCSS ur NC Vi", A". %-, A". Vi". A". *'. H" ENGINEKK II P, HAMMERS 1 ilb MK IVilb., 1Mb li'-ilb., 31b. I'll FS HAT. ROUND. HALF ROUND. SQUARE llli-.M SPEED GRINDING MACHINES IllCII SPEED TWIST DRILLS BODY REHA1H FLEXIBLE FILES BOX SPANNERS PRESSURE GAUGES 0-400 lb. • ECKSTEIN BROTHERS BAY STREET DIAL 4269 THE REh LECTION (X Rn depends on the quality. This li what jrOU w.i %  i>kmi; foi . "STUART IKYSTAL" I*. Hav Just Receiwd . CrysUl Bowla, Sauce Jiura Sets of Water Jugs and Tumbles I iPL.il. mk Hitlders. Vu-.es. in the most plca*inu palterns. Thesf Items make IdM] CHfts and thai PliCM Fit Bvvy Pocket M is AT ONCE! LOUIS L. BAYLEY Itollon l.aiio PlilM 3909 .Mill Aquatic Club Gill BIII Phone 4KJ7 mm t — PAIN CAN BE CONQUERED! why 'Anacis r*viiACfg*7 *•**•"• hy Dioi I—3 *-5/ la Great Bnuin alae* [WaC/*? >n '* in "QUtNINf u na FOURTH mgraSkm* TheOvlnta* I-Jtm aaan K.sniif.tsli, bMtdS *.th tar** watl-aco>i maSktMM (ShaaacMtn. CaSsoui and Atst r lui>triir *t,i. so ihac tm fegr madtONM togsitvsr act iriwr|.tf>(aub(M bo*. Or i* a S0-tatHt< botil* (lar he*n us*). ARM YOURSELF AGAINST PAIH BET 'AMACI '#' TOOAfl wu>s Get wm. k Relief from Cold*. Cough* and Influenza with WHIZZ The Tablet lht in so EfTwtive tor COLDS as well as lor lh.. ratal of ALL TYPES OF PAIN. I!i-,i....iil.n : ONE WHIZZ DOES THE WORK OF TWO ORDINARY TABLETS anasaaaMB STOKES a BYNOE LTDAGESTS I I Canadian Decorated Glassware A beautiful assortment ,ust opened including — M PINT. PUNY t. COCKTAIL fiLASSKS U \ I. I. SETB JIGS— AHHTKAVN ETC. if 5 mfiME Mofce yours wifh CANADA DRY Quinine Water I'hone 4S4I For sour Kequipment* St l-11.tniti--. GENERAL HARDWARE SL'PPLIKS RICKETT STREET (Opposlta Post Offics) PHONE 4918 > &f&f &f • %  +• &f %  >d>s>sssssssassssssass* THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. \\.\l AI HOLIDAY 1.M m CASH (or every new Subscriber hrousht to and accepted by the Company. Commission will be paid after the installation has been mode REIHt''( sio\ will in addition pay a Bonus of S2S.SS to any persv i who brings in twenty-five new subscribers within n!iicalendar month who are accepted by Ihe Company. Get a supplv of Recommendation Forms from the iti IMI i i *i<>\ lin v, II -i i % %  esi Mrsel and ss, %  HI*MONEY m your spare time. ft**/#f.V WITH REDIFFUSI0N I Oil IH I II It I IMI.MM. Ilfur it at Trafalgar Street. ARC YOU IUM YOU'VE cor THE RIGHT PRESCRIPTION t Wiih machinei human or otherwi ( c it's a **s*B precauuoQ io make ure you put ihe r<*lH atuiT in ins rifbt place. EMO Industrial Lubricants are made to suit sassy indtiuna! MgrJ and, lo ensure Ihe best results, Esio Lubncauoa cspcrts will visit factories anywhere in the Colony to advise, fret-or-chanrc. on lubrication problems. Why not write to us today ? INDUSTRIAL LUBRICANTS



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tttttofli J^tweaie ESTABLISHED 1895 BARBADOS. JUNE i MANY REPUBLICANS Eisenhower Makes Rousing Speeches TEXAS, June 21 GENERAL DWIGHT EISENHOWER charged on Saturday night that Senator Robert Taft's Texaa supporters wei*£ rustlers who "stole Texas' birthright In the botryi / ii... ontire Republican Party." General Eisenhower is stated to have made the strongest attack so far on both Taft and Taft's backers. Speaking from a prepared te\t. Eisenhower declared the Republicancannot hope to ftf(ht corruption in Government unless they follow the policy >>I "honesty and fair play." As he had promised Eisenhower dwell at length on the dispute between rival Texas delegations tc the Republican National Convention One delegation was pledged to Taft and one to Eisenhower. He said: "The contented dtlvgates at (he l^rthcomm. lican National Convention must ( not be allowed to vote to •oat i themselves or other contested del-) cgatlon* until their credential*' have been passed m the open air i and in an impartial manner and approved by the Convention Otherwise, persons on trial will be member* of the juryHonesty and fair play cannot be lomprim. They wlU b respected at thc|Nm>l O.B.E.. awieatioa Adviser. Republican Convention. Then, but,both ..( the Development and Welonly then, wilt our nominee for f ; lv Organization, will be among tbe present, whatever his nam.. is.'ihe British represent;,be In a position to fight effectively ,<>nfercnce on education in against corruption in our BfMMrialj economics and nutrition In 'he Government." (Caribbean which Is to be held In Advisers For Economics Conference Mis* D. Ibberson, C.B.E.. Sn Welfare Adviser, und Mr. J. VIMIS Uld Home E;-enhowcr vttttSd the little Wni't. House in which lie was born 1 in Denison, Texas, before coming to Dallr.5. He marie short speeches In Denison and Denlon. but his major Texas speech was delivered here. He said; "Instead Trinidad from the 30th the 5th July. Most of the BritlCfl West Indian fOVenUBCBI I "ding represental The eonfarence hai bw id under the joint sponsorship of :h" Food and Agriculture Organof the United Nations and of.the great upsurge of moral and the Caribbean Commission. It physical strength we need, how general purpose is to promote an sadly must we look on what has exchange of Information happened here. Thousands upon penence on problem r.nd dcvelthousands of Republican voters— opments in home economics and an overwhelming majority of thi-in nutrition education with a view —deliberately and ruthlessly disto providing guidance In the franchised. Majority rule, this formulation of programmes In the very basis of our free Governmcn' t.. was here flouted and overridden. I The cnnfi i • Bee wtll also explore Jn this case rustlers stole the ways in which member countries Texas birthright instead of the may be of mutual assistance In Texas steers." I promoting this objective and obl"h.T,-> dispute arose during taking odvlc On how the Food the iiiii' t-onesaitleaa u< Mlnnrul *""' Amiiulturo Organisation and V7ells where T-ft's supporters re-! !" c-anr-benn Commission may be fused to seat Eisenhower hicker*.*'''* l ''Y H '''•* P"" of their normtl The Eisenhower group walked ESSS? r ", r "! r r hr '&***** out and staged a Turn? conven-| Prw ,mm ' ,,f Tfrnn,c tlon of their owr I v U.K. Has Fastest A—Bomber PARIS. June 21 Britain has hinted built and tested the ft) tins bomber in the world, reliable aviation DUfcai said on Saturday. Sources close to the North Atlantic Treaty OVaasuxal the four-jet plane, believed to be the Hi-; heav> bomber in the form of "rtyilij triangle", is the most efficient dm to and faitcr than ssund Tin* disclosure followed an ai I planning to underwrite nvtatlori industries In N.A.V.O. ns4MM 0 placing orders for complete warplanes in Europe with hundreds of millions of dollars allotted (Or the purchase of miliiury equipment abroad. — (I'.P.l Cotton Quota Discussed ANTIGUA, June 21. The West Indian Sea Island Cotton Association held an extraordinary general meeting at the Antigua Beach Hotel on Thursday last under the chairmanship of F. H. S. Warneford ilonald Cadmun represented the secretaries and J. V. Lorhrie. technical advisor. The delegates, are H. F. Alkins. Harlsados; W. Walwyn. St. Ktttg; II. Hadden. Nevis; A. W. Grifflth, Montscrral. L. Punnett, St. Vincent, and Novelle Richard, Antigua. Main discussions are centre! %  round the cotton situation in Antigua and Nevis as these islands face a reduced price of 32 cents V>er pounct lur 1BSS and th Quantity required is 800.000 pounds. AtitiKim Individually exported approximately 57O.000 pounds this year. Guards Killed In Prison Riot RIO DE JANEIRO, June 21. The mutinv of 350 prisoners on AiKita Island has assumed disastrous proportions and according to latest reports mutineers who had killed some guards, broke Into the Armoury and took 50 rifles and 9 machineguns, four mortars and 28 rounds of ammunition and sailed for the mainland in a boat. An aircraft kept watch for them. Twelve mutineers were quickly recaptured and the town of Ubatuba occupied by troops. Mutineers have struck In the direction of the town of Guaratingeta in the State of Sao Paulo with official forces in pursuit while reinforcement;; have been sent. —l.P. T.C.A.: Five Million MONTREAL. June IB. Canadian aviaUon marked another milestone Today when Trans-Canada Air Unas nnnounccd the company had carried its fifth million p> seoger since regular passenger •• Inaugurated In 1939. The rate of growth in Canada* air transportation Indurtry Is illustrated by tho fact It took TCA nine years to carry Its flrnt million passangan. and yet the airline carried close to that numbei last year alone. During nearly 16 years of operaUon. TCA has expanded routes from 122 to 17,000 miles, and ha* flown 1T5.000, 00 miles. DISFRANCHISED Rescue Problems Discussed At Civil Aviation Meeting -> PUUMNI MAWtV HUMAN Dim kk MtuU on U M*l !*"• ' "" (fatiliu, world'. at.l itemlc-powerril mbnunM Hurtn, drtlrnion cirfmonlrs it Oroton, Conn. W.tclill* l H*> SecrtUr ol Iht Niv, D.n L. KlnMII i"d >" ' ***"• %  mrpnri'ion l>"i TH mlln.ll w. Ulct burned l.*> • •" %  (IntwnnllonnU \ationalisls Stall Bill PUSAN. Jum21. gSMrarfUl South Koreai ratlc nationaliM purt, watt ad out of the National H u % %  -ni^l>romlse bill whl.*i eeutd end 'he political ctista and left Insuffl••irnt nv mban for a vote l< tfikei, UfiniKT..iK naUonalisls left when the Mlnisier of Justice Suh Ang Swan began explaining the bill staving only P7 members present—enough to allow discusions out not enough to assure the .. %  > two thirds majority. i" %  • has 1M members and %  i be required tu pass the eltl uhn.h comprises two const Iuil alterations wanted by lem Sviigman Rhre and thr inpn-mises he has accepted pressure from the oppostSpy Faces More Charges LONDON, June 21. Wlllmin Martin Marshall. 2A >.:ir old llritish Foreign Omec wireless operator, to-day faced further charges of giving secret information to I'nvel Kuxnctsnv, the Ehiattatl Embassy Second Secretary, when he appeared in court bate. Marshall nrreste^l eight davs ago walking in a park with I Soviet Embassy official, was also accused of obtaining Information which might he useful to an enemy at llanslope Park. Buckirmhamshire wherS he worked. Marshall tlrst appeared In court' last Saturday on a charge of giving information to Kuznetsov. —U-P. undei Ithee wants the President to be fleeted by a popular vote Instead •a by the Assembly nnd Institution if two Chamber legislature inilead of the present one Chamber NiiUsial Assembly He had conceded thnt the cabinet should be subject to %  vote of non confidence md i.eitlier th. Csblnet mar the President can dissolve tbe Aaaemilv. from Honduras. THE MKFTIN*; %  Civil Aviation Officers of the British Caribbean Area ended at Kent House. Trinidad, last yrgjeh ittti I throi % % % % %  •' %  I %  Attanding tb* meeting wore rep res. Antigua. Barbados. British Guiana British J;,injucu, St Lucia, Si Vincent and Trinidad. Chairman of the nui-ting was wmg Commandsi L A field, Director General ^ Civil lAvi.itmii in 'he CaribbeMii. who that it had been 10 eiv'V t^'l f ih* Brttlah i-.t--.-sgv te meet and JOKCUSS various pi.tbless-1 dlat %  time when Mi. jK MacAleavey. I>eputy Repre•wntaiive, l.CJasO.. North Aaaeiii.in Ke>nrna| Ofh.cr could be prt-L.SWanlGerm War Charges Investigated The I i hnttli sin C.VITED NATIONS New York. June 21. tilted States vowed today the procedural tape and i*rtatn Soviet veto mpeir in cither o! I polls Natic (he iprint finals. Wint Win* ' Mile Arthur Wint did not defend hu> title in the half mile which WBf won by Roger Bannister in one minute 51.5 seconds. Wint instead competed In the quarter mite which he won in 481 seconds by five yards from L. C Lewis. Sugar Workers To Get Extra Bonu'is 11 taw mi OWB i ..IT. .->,*.in ANTIGUA, June 21. The Antigua sugar factory havng manufactured over 23,260 tOttl %  f sugar, all workers of the industry will receive an additional bonus Vi% on every thousand tons produced during the remaining crop. U.S. Keplaeeixents Repulse Attack SEOUL. Korea. June 21. Fresh American Infantry reThis equals placements l>eat bark the biggest rommiinist atUick ol the year on the western front today and i tilled N-.IIOIK l>;illl. imnmander said they were prepared to 'attack or repel any Chinese ofltnilve. After a bloody fight that waged west of Cborwon RaT MS hoars 3.500 America** sueci'ssfully fought off a full ChUWM regiment. An Eighth Army spokesman wtld the rtedt suffered more than 400 dead or wounded. Over 500.000 Parisians go to the | It was the twenty-first attempt by arrow to elect the i Communists to retake positions datd by the 45th Divi'ion ten Judge Ward Stresses Freedom Of Judges To Express Opinions (From our Own Correspondent) PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 21 A STRONG statement made by The Hon. Mr. Justice F. R. L Ward, Barbarlo,-born Jvui ir from the bench of !• %  • Court of Appeal on Friday Is the ii Ik of the town today. The public are freely expressing ihp view that Mr. Ward and Mr Mortimer I>uke have gtfatly contributed to making tl.e Tiimdad bench stronger than it has been for many years, Mr. Ward streswd Hie freedom of judges and mairistnites to express their opinions on matters cominn before them and their right to resist any attempt by the Police or any executive officer of the Government to interfere with judiciary independence or to issue instiurtious to them as to the administrati'-n of.justice. Mr. Ward, who on the previous evidence when It Is clear thai day declared also froai the beneh wsmesasM h,iv<* no regard for the that some "fresh policeman" had truth or fee Ihf impartial adminOT justi'-' M won by three yards Paris Goes To The Polls PARIS. •nbly deputy in i-placement of the top rankln.i ?*^ •^ *^ geJaoOal who reigned his man .."'.. %  .... gan when the (lerce United Nations ^*mxissnsr mmm gling. Louis 1' Itadot. v member, returned to his nudies after wrtttni to (•cr>eral Chat. whose reported his rem nor, began by saying that some week* ago he expressed the opinion during the hearing of case that a handwriting expert geaald !-• of no assistance to the Cuuri in the ease as the matti-i was clear. Two police Ottsort MW fit to m.'ke a gnrbled report of wh it he said and someme in m the Police Force reported to the Governor that his emarks were likely to hamper the police rr. the execution oi their du'o. Police Evldeuce Mr. Ward said he constrained to make those r emar k s because thcr. ppeared to be an opinion prevalent In some quarters that the Courts were bound to adept the evidence of pohrrmen nod expert< without question Such a theory was entirely contrar. t>< law and he for %  not be deflected fiom my pimn duty to criticise adversely soon truth or fi %  *rnt> inat #f any Attempt Here made <'.' unyune to influence ui Merci ., lO'MChif ill I er, :ln pi.ip. r com meni w.i the retort made bv %  i i Isteatea occegton : V., ike t<"' much upon you, yt I Levi" L.K.WUlRai8e Coal Exports BIRMINGHAM. Eng. June 21. Britain is to Increase Its coal ex-' ;torU by aiioihei million torn thi%  %  %  Minister of Fuel nnd ["owe'announced here trxlay But most if it nan already been sold This would bring British %  ipoi •T all grades of coal in I0S2 up to 12.S00.dUU tons "At present prices, these coal exports should tarn s. mw < £ 00.000,000 of foreign exchinge as compared with coal earnings ,..r" he said. "Moai untries /* rtucp ur Payments in gold |Q the Union i,y an amount at present aqua] to the full value of $20M. L\S. AM for Pakistan KARACHI, June 21 .JL'I 11 ^ 18 W,M f 01 mor lnn J20.m(iuo undci the United Stat*s expanded Point Four Prov next year Amba**,idor Warren said he.e to-day. m who arrived back from ** consultations in WashWglon said the signing of npeiaUonal agreements would begin as soon as money w;.>. voted l,> Congress which had already passed authorising legislation. 2nd Italian Freighter Held Up In Port-of-Spain PORT-< >K-SIAm*Tuiie"2l. Incidents which led to ihe arrest In Trinidad waterlast Tuesday of the Italian trader "Giulla" took a dramatic turn yesterday when I %  rk i not he, frelghtei which had llguritt Mrtth Cinli., in ihe 1 '•" l '• M' Ki %  ./! %  in M.|.m erars River. British fhilana, March ie. was arrested by the Marshal of Ihe Bupri l yesterday. The Ifonduian i-egistered "R. noJ.842 long, I, t|e,| up „, the ( h.-iguaramah terminals here, lade,, wllh bauxite from f'aramaid H Dutch (;LIUUU.. It ia understood this Is a counter action by the i of the "Giulia." Bond In the tSO.000 (U.S.) ha. hcen poste.1 for the release of each vessel, l' S ambassador. Ernest A. IPO a, lyhtatltid the resolutio.i eaterday calling on the United NationS. | .II |t] CoUItCtl to %  %  quefi the international committee i of the Red CrOSi "and aueh oghej experts it may select" to investigate germ war cl-argee on the •pot in Korea ana report the results to the Council as soon as •vible. Gross requested the mi.nn.: kpeciflrally to "consider the following new Agenda item'the ssjai DM a of MUNI fa nation of the alleged use Of HSM a \ tertologlcal warfare" TI | Hy Council roniphrd with the reque->t and scheduled Ing for next Monday %  fternoi -t'.P. No Forced Repatriation TOKYO, June 2t The United Nations informed omrniudstl today that Soviet Muslin has laid down the principle of "no forced repatriation" of prisoners u. World War II. 95 0M War re Chief United Nauom asllMatt lo 'hi. Korean truce talks Ma)oi C.neral William K Hunlson %  •inilivi Hrii-i at Panrnvinlon* i> auoUng the Russiun surrender ipeal to Oerman soldier-* In Id War II The Soviet offered to return German trou any country where pri should desire to go" if they surrendered according tu the Russian publication which Harrison quoted. The promise was made on two occasions during the last war, Harrison said, on January H, l"43 and again during the lasgl of Budapest. Thcv have Insisted that the United Nations refusal to II prisoners to Communlsl territory nguint his will was a lolatlun of the Geneva C* lloi -rr n i-ii-ontlofficaj orind r. .|uirejnrnW, Mr W. A Cr actor of the R-itish Caribbean MeteOI Service, gave a brief historical review of the establishment m the area nnd outlined the pi i .n hand and Hie plan* %  l ii were gnder consideration for futur r dev.lopmcn. llclu lem irs Mr. MacAleavey explained that „ nuinln'i of meteorological requirements had been listed ss vital denestneles In tbe Caribbean area and added that several of the reUllll Sinenlg howeiw, had Since i .< n leniedled. He asid that with the develop iiirit of Jet aircraft, I.C.A.O.. .ittarhetl ihe gi eaten importance t> radio wind observations -tilth SVgCSj \ it.il \<> the <>p.-r.i tiona of ihes„ aircraft. This equsprnent eoabled wind strength ..', i dtreetlori to ie recorded UP uheighb. over S0.0OO feet. The meeting also discussed the question of aviation fuel and ill the reini'sl u| *ln(liairman. Mr. K Napiei of Shell I..-.,.-i.ol.tDidrihuiion CO., Ltd.. ex%  ml posfuon el aviation fuel supplies and gave an outusM "i aeenai leadtag up to the recent shortages which resulted III temporar> rastr* ttonj on quantities of gaoUng supplieil to airlines. The meeting dealt with Seared and Rescue Problems and Lt Rraehtaj "f the I'S. Naval Station •t (baguaiiinias, explained the >EiiantiBtiun at his base, as related o the operation of Search and i i craft. Search Procedures Lt (ominander A. Wlk i >t the U.S. Naval Slation initlinecl the procedures necessarv before lirrraft were despatched on ., i He peinted out that on heir receiving an eject, InftTTtnitlon was immediately passed on to heir command in Puerto Rico, and Ml TICIvlng approval from that ource HI ..mi.ifi ww despatchHe drew attention to the dta> iie.it.ning efleet on Br** "t thtli being sent on search missions, v English champion J. Disley b political circles at Fisherman Drowns nine minutes 44 second., artdcti the he*t time ever rscordad .n the champtonahtps Bill Nankeville ran the fastest Mat year in BriUln—four mmutei Oscar Worrell, fa fisherman t .Shermans St. lJ.-!}. was diowned 1 .bout thr-e miles off ^fo^th Point Ughth-iU'. iislerday morning unanimous al^-ut 7 .'clock when the lH*rt their belief thai L^vaaMn" in which he and his election will not end in a clean' fellow fisherman Clifton Griffith 0U and a run-i • | ..ullng. sink. mi will be necessao' at a later date I The "l^jvlaon" E— 74, was owned 88r asronds—to rveiun t,k ,llt U I ne of th,v 'n*teen by I>rayton Babb of Shermsns. 252 Workers Leave lor U.S. Engineers Should Not Be Driven Away From T'dad (From Our Own Correspondent) PORT-OF-SPAIN. June 21 HON. P. M. RENISON, acting Governor of Trinidad, spealcinj! at truAnnual General Meeting of the Civil Service Association this morning, warned against driving away engineers fr•Oar o- i -...r.••*.. %  ANTIGUA. June II. 252 agricuitur.l workers left Antigua during the week tor harvesting employment in the United States. 113 from Anligu... I'17 from St Kitu and 32 fn-m Montserrat. The Leewards' full quota of SO Labdu was unfulfilled due to applicants Jatoan Four Japs Start Hunger Strike TOKYO, Jura21 Four Japanese employees of the British Commonwealth Forces look up positions outside the door the British Cogaanohufetaith Office at Kure, to-diiy. and i ne Acting Oovernor added 'that H was difneult to get the number requirud. Then Mr. Renison asserted 'we hould be verv unfortunate position if by insult* we dries engineers away before we can replace them and the result will be that we shall And ourselves without any qualified engineers lo carry out cnu ... Works PYogr;.tnine which they 'end In chaos." There were lu the %  .gain until they [civil service, he said, tremendou had received a satisfactory an'opportunities for all ranks and *wer to the wage demand.—U.P. 'branches. You are on a WINNER when you ride a Raleigh! A Rakigh was the choice <>f Reg Harris—World's Professional Sprint (Jiamnx-n for the wood year in eac c caBOB. Hue is rr*">1 'f the wisd.n of buying your bicycle from a Company with such great technical rsperiencc snd knowledge dial designed and built the record-breaking RALfclGH. RALEIGH THE ALL-STEEL BICVCLE A rveaMi tf KMnf • IMkMrwi Umud, .VMII v^. h-|WW I i". CAVE. SHEPHERD & CO., LSD. 11, 12 & 13 Brod Street. H l M MM



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SUNDAY, JUNE S2. 1S32 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PARE nVE England Gains Lead In Test Against India EVANS SCORES 2ND TEST CENTURY 1 I iN" I] June II. K'KKT during which 'iH2 run* wiif scored, was bfQUfbl to premature close ten minutes before time by bad tight. At this stage, India, fighting desperately to avoid defeat, were still 165 behind England with eight second innings' wickets to fall. Facing a disadvantage ul 302 India mad* a bad atari by losing Roy before he had stored and with only seven on the board Adlukan who was unable to be on the fttW because of a bruised knee, was beaten by Tniemans speed at 59. But then in the closing half hour Mankad and Hazarc In the rapidly worsening light, tailed ;i halt to England's run at w m a n which hud been in progress gince the first ball of the day. 11 was perky Godfn England'* srlcMkaepaj tvtt all second Teat century, who led the way. In a partnership with Torn Greveney, he assured that Hutton's legacy of the previous day should not be squandered. In a masterful display of batting they added 150 runs In two hour* ten minutes to pave in.M| b I England's big lead. .M.ii.niln .-in Strokes And Evans, by only two runs. failed to achieve the rare distinction of a Test century before lunch. He was at his most audacious and brilliant best and those who remember his first Test century against the West Indies at Manchester two years ago will know what a magnificent range of strokes he possesses Hazare, handicapped by the injury to Phadkar, was unable to make full use of the new ball and Evans took full loll of the spinners. He raced to 50 in Just over an hour, mrludinc seven fours Issd than greeted Shlnde whose introduction in the attack at such a moment might be subject to criticism with three successive boundaries. (Jravency. piaylng with complete assurance was content to alAfter Evans n Graveney launched out and wi.< caught fur 7J made m 200 minutes. iiy comparison with Evans it was. slow, but it was what was needed. Jenkins. Bedser, Laker and Tiuaman all contributed some lusty blows and England after iiir.e iind three-quarter hours' batting, were all out lot 517their second h'ghct score against India in this country. Mankad, whose final figures wars 5 for lM in 75 overs, bowled magnificently and throughout hi* laM spells, sent down exceptionally fewloos* belts. He and Ohulam Ahmed who improved considerably after lunch carried the brunt of India's stuck. Following up his marathon howling effort. Mankad, who habecn on the field for all excei.i three hours of the match, opened India's batting.. Refusing to be naunted by Roy's dismissal he mumui REN FARN1M i (or Finland h rricket. 11.1*1 it not been for tarts closure, he might easily ha Us century and on tfr rvirtrtir, only Ken') MilVi Australia Is a better all rounder rNoiA iii INNINOS as INDIA Itif INMMfl* Basket Mankad I A.lh'kai. Tim-man > mil Trom MBBJ Sheppard Hits 1,000 I {mis '-— ".i % %  i*rraafaa4aai' LONDON, June 21, David Sheppard who made 7 for Cambridge University ..ga"* Warwick at Birmingham today became the first amateur lo comp <•!.1,000 runs thi* season. Carlton Defeat EC The determined Carlton playi beat Hamsun College M—23 their return basketball match Y M PC on Friday night to themselves in the lead of the p line up All teams rathe* than eoU i Carlton hi been defeated least three time* nnd these two th only two defeats, met i ..it turned out te he | very (ting match. M-n of all spurts. Buckle igaa a*aa the most dashing of Carlton players and scored if nf the goals for his te ii'> is swift and ready, and see qualities more than a cornHe ability at scoring, helped I *t u> . %  * a* laflem aa he did acli member of the Carlton B pulls his weight. but i 4her outstanding player was J'an Davis, who la a more pree arorer. (OIIIKKY EVANS low his partner the lion's share of the bowling and fours sped to all parts of the ground. In the hiro houis befun lunch Evans scored 98 while England's total advance was by 147. And only a slow field change prevented an additional over being bowled inch which would probably have given Evans his century. lei Scoring Stroke He completed three figures after bailing two hour* and five minutes, but his celebration at the sixteenth four was his last scoring stroke, for he was well caught and bowled by Ahmed. nntarr I for SI afSSjgaftJfJI US INMINOS npaon b Mankad iv ,ManUI b Mankad mplnn low HiUlf arassn sunm b ohuiam ..I-T < "amrtiairf l> Wank ad rman b Oh.ilam AtimaS paMss ROW LINO ANALYSIS %  unsB Scoreboard. Kent Kent 217. Surrev 92 fo. I Eait-x v. LencaVur -i. Essex 8 for 0 Gloucestetahlre is Glamorgan. Gloucestershire SM for DSomersel vs Middlesex, Sorners-t 218, Middlesex 47 for S Sussex vs Oxford Universitv. C xfoid 384 for W Warwick vs Cambridge Univ.TSltjr. Cambridge 280 for 9 .i-clared, Warwick 4* for Q Derby v Northantv Derby 3i The one thhig noticeable about B way the Carlton team played -s their determination. As the .-.me got going it .i evident .t the> were getting litUe : upport from the crowd, moet of ht rc vhom by their hailing *nd M >urag)ing, favoured College 'in. But the pun>seful. trmrougii i.iy in which Cartton iet about he game tola straightaway that hey wenleaving nothing The ground was lumvjr as than 11 ad been a few spells of rain .•artier, but this wai disadvantage ti both teams Fust < ..irm i: 0 .-har .i snind* Byes: I. la* byeai Yorkshire Yorkshire 307. for I. Worcestershire vs -estershire t2 few Leicestershire. Lelcetershlre JUNE 22 — NO. 229 The Topic of Last Week The Only Pa.n Seiiever containing Vitamin B, SXS Tkaaa aXaTSM min aUa^M b* I 0-.II I mass lh eland lalkiaa I,. II..* :., ^nrt^iiLT^ IT ISN'T that there U no local talent in this boxing business nor that the public wouldn't support It that has brought boxing to the low ebb at which it now Is. It only needs a central boxm, stadium and a Boxing Board of Control and boxing would be as eagerly supported as any oiherpopular game today. What adds Ui the grouse that a boating Ian must red when he think' - recover the oulla> 11 wui.l-l t*a*l 1.. l.uilrt aUadlum. Suotl is the present posit ton. but I have got some Inside information that a certain man of fair mean' who/il interested la the game is eirnestly trying to get one or two others to Join him in putting up money for a central stadium. Last Legislative session, there was n measure on the Order papa* at the House of Assembly which sought to establish a Boxing Board of Control, but the session died, and the Bill likewise. Of course, there must be a Boxing Board of Control if boxing is to I'run with satisfaction to all. The fan would be ensured to a Scoreboard a> From Page 4 rOUCS—1-1 lanlatI MUKI — l>i Inalala rOUCI-lal lr.,:ln,. C marl"in b Barker t. Tu-IO' I4.w. b Batkar C AitM-v h Baikrr W. A. rarmer b Barker i Bjat r A Holder b Bark-r Blvninan r Hunt* b TwUJa Dodion not out 0 Suberi radrad hurl g Orean c Barker b WUluunC Mulllm b B.Tk.r C Bradahaw b Barkar HsM Total BOW UNO ANALYSIS LOCAL BOXING TODAY mon fix ci/.in \i.LEWt; reasonable extent that he would not pay to see two men merely dancing about and lightly t.ippm;; each other, and the boxer would be happier knowing that he might not ba doing all the p:ide work i i Sei.miin ir, (he lightweight division. Sam King in the lightweight and Victor Lovell, Gilbert Ooodiii. oi of umalcur fame In the featherweight. These are the names that have become popular to the boxing fan. But when the amateur contests come u!" next month ,t ttsp Modern High School, we will be getting quite a few other names lo add to our list. In this n-w crop for next month, there Is an enthusiasm, fostered chiefly bv the amateur tournaments which have come into vogue over th* past few years in the ncighlxmring islands. Two of these tournaments have ii.-i-M heLd in Gremada, ono in Trlnld-id and the next, which In ..u probability will come ofT lutci in.*, year, will be held In Uritash • in;.in. i In these lournaments our amateurs have not met with any outstanding successes, the most accomplished being an entry mto the finals bv Som King, then middleweight amateur champion of the island, in one of the Grenada outBut one thing can be said (or the boxers who went, and It is that they by no means had much convenience. It was all B hurried affair and one might hope thai In the proposed tour to British Guiana, there will be advintages from whirh our Mtitatlves could gain alance und control and eseen•lallty in boxing. Before telling m o i e about innateur boxing competitions being planned. I can sav that some of the most active promoters today are Doyle Hinds, runner of the Fox Club, Al Blackraun and Claude llamsay who are more closely connected with the amatour line thai the others and Ben Jones. The Amateur Boxing Association la expected to stage then ..tinual Utxlng twunvimant l tinModern High School next monti. oid the umateurs, some of th.-n .Id boys from Combermere, Lodge School and Harrison College be -ides present boy* and boys from Alley no School, are In serious training Then. too. 'lie Press Club proi %  HI Annu.il Boxlni; Tournament, the nrst of its kind. to take place the following month f'erh.p* because of the little encouragement they get, there is i dearth of heavier boxers In thi From start to finish the g *-sa fast. Carlton were the first to score and it was evident that 'he College boys were not going Werthat all out way as though liiten' in winning, a manner of playing which was invited from ovarcondence However, they made most l--w ._ 4 their chances and the first uarter ended H .ill Carlton UiuK avar the lead (nun .v second quarto. a lead they over relinquished Carlton were -ways combining well, bcttci an Collage, and with Brickie t %  '• %  piercing through and beg fed with the ball, and Davis dglng through the players and ••sitiuiiiug himself for scoring, iey were able to be leading— d—II—by half time. Next uuMrtor. alter a short •howii of 'in. the game was .lower and ended IS—14, Carlton till ItNidlng In the nrst half of the last Canton played for all the} iie worth to establish a better lead and College who seemed to have given up the seat for winning, allowed goal after goal to I..' stored against them. Then in nothing to slow game 1,! .tagii '" %  lost by playing a Iton did .xartly ring here these days snd the real um and by their win |>ut themhectic bouts will come trim the s.>|ve* In the lead of the <\ip line light-r boxers „ E A V Wil H Kins Hunlr rl out Smiih not out Ixtraa BOWLING ANALYSIS GANGSTERD0M GOES ON POINTS CHAPMAN PINCHERS Column tails ••* to pick toaorraw't IIIUR. Irnnt lodav'i innocent children r ITH thig •,-.., point chart p s y c lioiiigt.-'. claim Uiey can predict an innocent child's chanceit ma] *u*d u TISM .am*i .Kaiia* A Kuia can So i il. i . ., A King cast Sk> m *a eo.SI Michaal'* Thai UM> i\inip in And !%  >I Moml Ttia> Ian Ur -Ton Mil -Usawal lUia <>IS lUon N.i aarrad |>. Iiona' 10.11 Said ha will Saop on hnodnnaTill Ma walk throuali thr aV~>r> Sli* all llii. ftli.ii talk Mia anoe S* li.oa is Poor man mwal Irani lo walk off' (in ina. ... 10 Olad o.liiM. tha> will b) r.m ua I* oUaar aaanfa*a> Axailina Inam aul ihrra And UMCI >L. an Fr bari tmi will a Th. ouwiona al I'l .-1 V I I'h '< 1 -ill IKt-aer 1 IW oallanl. Twill ha >oui I' 11 In. 1 haia and long ioai> 1 la yaur rtiana* aiaalail niae.atil ....al dimi kill wall 0.1 rihsar nlshl ita Xnipira Tltaana 1 Danrina Tima *a* wlalu 'W>uand ui. faaMi .1 UM wliul' -lant-na laai" lu anal Lno and HoUart • Diaan. laafcM G11U.* lumn Udla> .latiilm nii-l %  %  1 iilv.il B|lurrr..r-l J It lt.ra.1 II—I All h. Mia %  -.IBM uai'i.c ii. ma auataataa It.in.. naaft XnnrtiM* PraaO sponsored by J ft R BAKERIES makers of ENRICHED BREAD and the blenders of JAR RUM S 1 Kit* YEAS! I 'QJg PAIN %  M*K£ :. A-tl'. isBMMasix' %  : r/ias SCOLOS, CHIL lid ,, (, .Mm :' I \ ti.\ I • VI i'l 1 <0kB r Air "'"' r Kept out of the luvenile oourU. DEFIANCI + laUl 18 no* -Jie test m works AI • irks foi assertive neas. das'rue vnriaam. su.;. mot tonal in.abilit>II his total aeon? ZOO 300 has been carefully worked out from hundreds of oases of young enninau It ( ne h.ivs total score is under 200 his chance of becoming u criminal] is last than one In tea 1 psicliolog 'is clBim. But .1 hr scores more 'han 300 his chanc of tak^nii up a criminal career .s more than n nc oui of in Note lhat a poorly developed taelina 01 isimly unity ia rated as a far more important cause of artase liian lack of duciplin*or affee'ion. The psychJiOK.sU :.;.a Uva over-iincl dlsc.pline .a more dangerous that none at all. This system of preventing crime hn been worked out bv PTOfeSMM an.l Mr. Sheldon l.larrk H '1 II ( 'ill. Jllil .l paychoiotiisi taaai utter ten years of rei^ircli I>.I~MIII-O bv th'tin'anJ law trhool r %  ii p>vcaoieguu *rr DiSiirLiNi or aov 1 n.-i-iiii 1 <]. iii.uiftiiii ulu-ihi i:< •ikruvgb (aaw a* %  ri.lt. -r> IIIK iH-fween -In. In. .ml l.vll* I 11 l-itn>| ihr bo da -hit he likes Firm hut kind!, baaing dlselplinr an aoanS 1--..11which the be srerpta a-. <.lr Huriavisioh OP aov av Momta I n'uiiAi.llaailng il.r bo. lo hiown iir.i.r, or in Ihr rare of an kmponslbk perswn 1 JII gl.lng mil. partial auperilaioii te Usr -m BSsMaw kaaplai slaae alrh sag Matldinr for but Ir-Uare hoars "otiiiiN 01 MINIeoa nov^" Indinrrant or hoallle •,.. Warsalt alfrrllonste. nrn BeMa orr preUrtlvr •urn ION OP HurHPa post uov lndi(1r..iii ..r hoallle Hiiml> AnraUaiaM, nen IWIHI ...it prolrrtl.r KlllgSION OP I AMU V 1 mull 11 .! %  L! tn.iii. t> 111-1 plaai to i%  ..*r hat •core 34 '"!; %  ;::, %  -ii" a aridr in in ii. all/"it: ankiaUA to ir> uu: me -.yhiern on an esper.menta) ssair The urgent need lui method ol detect tr.n In' 1 %  :. t UK eartwu os>is shown b> tne fact thai y> England alone mure than tt

|







ESTABLISHED 1895



MANY REPUBLICA

Eisenhower Makes
Rousing Speeches

TEXAS, June 21 |
GENERAL DWIGHT EISENHOWER charged U.K. Has

on Saturday night that Senator Robert Taft’s | F
astest

Texas-supporters werg rustlers who “stole Texas’ |
birthright in the betrayal of tho entire Republican |
Party.’”’ General Eisenhower is stated to have’ A—Bomber
made the strongest attack so far on both Taft and |
Taft’s backers.

PARIS, June 21.

, ; | Britain has hinted that. she
Speaking from a prepared text, Eisenhower declared | puilt and tested the fastest jet-
the Republicans cannot hope to fight corruption in Gov-|powered atom bomber in the
‘ernment unless they follow the policy of “honesty andj world, reliable aviation sources

said on Saturday.

fair play.” As he had promised, Kisenhower dwelt at
length on the dispute between rival Texas delegations to
the Republican National Convention One delegation was
pledged to Taft and one to Eisenhower.

He said: “The contested dele-
gates at the torthcoming Repub-|
lican National Convention must,
not be allowed to vote to seat}
themselves or other contested del-|
egations until their credentials!
have been passed in the open air
and in an impartial manner and
approved by the Convention.
Ctherwise, persons on trial will be

Sources ciose to the North At-
lanti@ Treaty Organization said
the first heavy bomber in the
form_of a “flying triangle’’, is the
most efficient design at speeds up

Advisers For |‘ and faster than sound. This

‘ disclosure ‘followed an announce;
ment that the United States are

Economics

Conference

planning to underwrite aviation
industries in N.A.T.O. nations by
placing orders for complete war-
planes in Europe with hundreds
of millions of dollars allotted for

members of the jury. Honesty and} Miss D, Tbberson, C.B.E., Social Se eae of military equip-
fair play cannot be compromised.! welfare Adviser, and Mr. J. L. {ent aproad. GP.)
They will be respected at the|Nicol, O.B.E., Education Adviser, P.



Republican Convention. Then, but jboth of the Development and Wel-
only then, will our nominee for!fpre Organization, will be among
the present, whatever his name is,!the British representatives at a
be in a position to fight effectively |conference on education in home
against corruption in’our national/economics and nutrition in the

Government.” Caribbean which is to be held in

2s {Trinidad from the 30th June to
Visits Old Home ene 7

; : : ‘the 5th July. -
Eisenhower visited the little Most of the British West Indian

wee House 4 ware be was born’ governments are also sending re- West Indian Sea Island
in Denison, Texas, before com- presentatives. *6 ; *
ing to Dallas, He made short The conference has been arrang- Sy tekareh emi a,
speeches in Denison and Denton, eq under the joint sponsorship of Antigua Beach Hotel on Thurs-:
but his major Texas speech was the Food and Agriculture Organ- day last under the chairman-!
delivered here. He said: “Instead ization of the United Nations and ship of F. H. S Warneford. |
of_the great upsurge of moral and the Caribbean Commission. Its] Ronald Cadman represented the
physied strength we need, how general purpose is to promote an|secretaries and J. V. Lochrie, !
sadly must we look on what has exchange of information and €x-:technical advisor. —
happened here. Thousands upon perience on problems and devel-] The delegates. are H. F Alkins, |
thousands of Republican voters— opments in home economics and) Barbados; W. Walwyn, St. Kitts;
an overwhelming majority of them nutrition education, with a view], Hadden, Nevis: A. W. Griffith,
—deliberately and ruthlessly dis-,to providing guidance in the] Montserrat. L. Punnett, St. Vin-
franchised. Majority rule, the formulation of programmes in the|cent. and Novelle Richard, Anti-
very basis of our free Government, | territories represented. ¥ c
‘was here flouted and erertiadbn | The conference will also explore
In this case rustlers stole the:'Wways in which member countries
Texas birthright instead of
‘Texas steers.”

Cotton Quota
Discussed

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ANTIGUA, June 21.
The

Main discussions are centred
the-may be of mutual assistance injaround the cotton situation in
{promoting this objective and ob-| Antigua and Nevis as these islands

The Texas Genie arose during taining advice on how the Food|face a reduced price of. 32 cents |

at Mineral @nd Agriculture Organisation and|per pound for 1953 and the quane

state
Pek whore. Taft's supporters re-|the Caribbean Commission may be{tity required is 600,000 pounds. |

fused to seat Eisenhower backers.|/0f Service, as part of their normal, Antigua , indivi
The Eisenhower group walked
out and staged a rump conven-
tion of their own.—U.P.

Programme

of Technical Assist-| year,
ance.



Guards Killed |
In Prison Riot

RIO DE JANEIRO, June 21.





Spy Faces
More Charges

LONDON, June 21.
William Martin Marshall, 24

T.C.A.: |

Five Million

MONTREAL, June 18,
| Canadian aviation marked

The mutiny ef $50 prisoners on | qnother “"mnilastme’ “today || Sinn! opmuier, Mecgee Oites
Ancita Island has assumed disas- when Trans-Canada Air Lines t hirther. chatges of givin secret
trous proportions and according announced the company had |! information O paver Re eetent
to latest reports mutineers who carried its fifth million pas- |) th Russe EB ee Ss nd Bees
had killed some guards, broke e ssian Embassy Secon

Senger since regular passenger
was inaugurated in 1939,

The rate of growth in Can-
ada’s air transportation in-

retary, when he appeared in court
here. Marshall arrested eight
days ago walking in a park with
a Soviet Embassy official, was also
dustry is illustrated by tho accused of obtaining information
fact it took TCA nine years which might be useful to an
to carry its first million pas- | enemy at Hanslope Park, Buck-
sengers, and yet the airline inghamshire, where he worked. |

into the Armoury and took 50
rifles and 9 machineguns, four
mortars and 28 rounds of ammu-
nition and sailed for the mainland
in a boat, An aircraft kept watch
for them. '

Twelve mutineers were quick-
ly recaptured and the town of
Ubatuba occupied by troops. !
Mutineers have struck in the di- |
rection of the town of Guaratin-'
geta in the State of Sao Paulo}
with official forces in pursuit
while reinforcements have been |

sent,
—U-P.

Bailey Wins Both Sprint
Titles For Fourth Year

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, June 21.

WATCHED by Her Majesty the Queen and Princess
Margaret, E. McDonald Bailey won both sprint titles for
the fourth year in succession in the A.A.A. Championships
at the White City today.

Despite unfavourable weather conditions he returned/
the fast time of 9.6 seconds in the 100 yards. This equals
his own British national record. He won by three yards

from A. R. Pinnington.
Bailey's victory in the 220 yards



carried close to that number Marshall first appeared in court
last year alone. last Saturday on a charge of giv-
During nearly 15 years of ing information to Kuznetsov.
operation, TCA has expanded —UP.
routes from 122 to 17,000 |}
miles, and has flown 195,000,- |



000 miles.





Get Extra Bonus

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, June 21.
The Antigua sugar factory hav-
ing manufactured over 23,260 tons
of sugar, all workers of the in-

dustry will receive an additional
“%%

Sugar Workers To

bonus

ing crop.



U.S. Replacements
Repulse Attack

SEOUL, Korea, June 21.
Fresh American infantry re-
placements beat back the biggest
Communist attack of the year on
{the western front
a United Nations

and
com-

today
battle

Sunday



MST. INGTIALS FERS”



the four-jet plane, believed to be|

_~

v ¥y
activities or under the Expanded| approximately 570,000 pounds this

on every thousand
tons produced during the |



BARBADOS, JU]

his



ee

ine

‘
i




































SIDENT HARRY TRUMAN places his initials on the Keel plate of the
tilus, world’s first a r y
ceremonies at Groton, Conn, Watching at
Navy Dan L. Kimball and (left) n Joy
‘The initials were later burned weer.



(International)

P-

GRINNING HAPPILY, President Truman holds a model of the world’s
first atomic-powered submarine—the Nautilus, It was presented to the
Chief Executive following dedication ceremonies at Groton, Conn. The
President put his initials on the sub’s kee) plate. (International)

ee ee eee ee

Judge Ward Stresses
Freedom Of Judges

To Express Opinions

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 21.
A STRONG statement made by The Hon. Mr. Justice

EK. R. L. Ward, Barbados-born Judge from the bench of
the Court of Appeal on Friday isthe talk of the town to-
day. The publie are freely expressing the view that Mr.
Ward and Mr. Mortimer Duke have greatly contributed
to making the Trinidad bench stronger than it has been
for many years. Mr. Ward stressed the freedom of judges
and magistrates to express their opinions on matters com-
ing before them and their right to resist any attempt by
the Police or any executive officer of the Government to
interfere with judiciary independence or to issue instruc-
tions to them as to the administration, of justice.

Mr, Ward, who on the previous eyidence \when it is clear that
day declared also from the bench) witnesses have.no regard for the
that some “fresh policeman” had| truth or for the impartial admin-
reported his remarks in a case to) istration of) justice.” He declared
the Governor, began by saying) that @f any attempt were made
that some weeks ago he expressed by anyone to influence or coerce
the opinion during the hearing of a|4 judicial vificer, the proper com~-
case that a handwriting expert}/ment was the retort made by
would be of no assistance to the Moses on a celebrated occasion
Court in the case as the matter) “Ye \ake too much upon you, ye
was clear, Two police officers | 998 of Levi
saw fit to make a garbled report
of what he said and someone in

































during dedication
} is Secretary of the
kins, corporation head.

fto 12,500,000



3 DISFRANCHISE

\romie 8’ Rescue Proble

At Civil

Nationalists
Stall Bill
PUSAN, June 21.
The powerful South Korean
demecratic nationalist party walk-
€a out of the National Assembly
‘today during discussions on the

sompromise bill which could end
the political crisis and left insuffi-

cient members for a vote to be
taken,
Democratic nationalists left

When the Minister of Justice Suh
Ang Swan began explaining the
bill leaving only 97 members
present—enough to allow discus-
sions but not enough to assure the
necessary two thirds majority.
The House has 183 "members and
123 woul’ be required to pass the
bill which comprises two consti-
tutional alterations wanted by
President Syngman Rhee and the
two compromises he has accepted
yg pressure from the opposi-
on,
Rhee wants the President to be
elected by a poplar vote instead
of by the Assembly and institution
of two Chamber legislature in-
stead of the present one Chamber
National Assembly. He had con-
ceded that the cabinet should be
subject to a vote of non confidence
and neither the Cabinet nor the)

gat can dissolve the Assem-
aly,



—UP.

U.K. Will Raise
Coal Exports

BIRMINGHAM, Eng. June 21,



ports by another million tons this
year, Minister of Fuel and Power
announced here today.
wf it has already been sold,
This would bring British exports
of all grades of coal in 1952 up
tons. “At present
prices, these coal exports should
earn some £60,000,000 of foreign
exchange as compared with coal

yearnings of just under £30,000,-
1000.1 aaa

st or he said.
our 1
on the Ba
position in the a
. ments Union, we estimate our
coal exports to European countries
will reduce our payments in gold
to. the Union by an amount at

present equal to >
ton eae the full value of

$20M. U.S, Aid
For Pakistan






Pakistan will get more tt
$20,000,000 unde the United
States expanded Point Four Pro-
gramme next year Ambassador
Arren Warren said here to-day.

Warren who arrived back from
two weeks consultations in Wash
\ngton said the signing of opera-
tional agreements would begin as
soon as money was voted by Con-
@ress which had already passed
authorising legislation.

—UP.



2nd Italian Freighter
Held Up In Port-of-Spain

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 21.
_ Incidents which led to the arrest
in Trinidad waters last Tuesday
of the Italian trader “Giulia” took
a dramatic turn yesterday when
“Rosario”, another freighter which
had figured with “Giulia” in the
collision at McKenzie, in the Dem-
erara River, British Guiana, on
March 16, was arrested by the

Marshal of the Supreme Court
yesterday,

The Honduran registered “Rosa-
rio” 3,842 tons, ig tied up at the
Chaguaramas terminals here, laden
with bauxite from Paramaribo
Dutch Gulana, It is understood this
is a counter action by the owners

[of the “Giulia,” Bond in the sum of

$30,000 (U.S.) has been posted for
the release of each vessel,



\iteriological warfare.” The Secur-

i
Britain is to increase its coal ex-!



But most,

KARACHI, June 21, |



was eyen more convincing. He
breasted ‘the tape six yards ahead
of Brian Shention, a European
200 metres champion in 21.4

Paris Goes |
secon preloar of Australia who To TI ve P. olls

took the 100 yards title from, |
Bailey in 1948, pulled a =o PARIS. June 21. |
in the 100 yards semi-final and Over 500,000 Parisians go to the |
was unable to compete in either of | polls to-morrow to elect the!
the sprint finals. National Assembly deputy in -re-|
Wint Wins “4 Mile placement of the top ranking
Arthur Wint did not defend his | Scientist who resigned his man
title in the half mile which was|date in disgust of political hag- |
won by Roger min ging St one | gling, |
i 5 seconds. int in- |
ew. Sooted in the ee Louis Pasteur Valety Radot,|
mile which he won in 48.1 sec-/an academy member, returned to}
onds by five yards from L. C.'his studies after writing to Gen-|
Lewis, }eral Charles De Gualle, whose |
The biggest surprise of the day rally of French people he repre-|
was a defeat of P. Segedin, the sented, that h dred. nf
holder in the two mile steeple-| politics, |
chase. The event was won by
English champion J. Disley in|
nine minutes 44 seconds which ij,
the best time ever recorded in

was

Political
their

unanimous
to-morrow’

circles are
belief that

yaicd election will not end in a clean

ve aateariis ten the fastest )°U! decision and a run-off bal-ot
i é ; an the fastest |i) be necessary at a later date

i 1 year ritain—four 5 ee a Sater’ Oat
nodes gg Rs tere regain to pick up one of the nineteen
ska title he held from 1948 to candidates, About five candidate

1950. Roger Bannister, last year’s #Te Slven real chances of carry-/|
winner did not compete. ‘ng off the by

The three miles race was won political
by Chris Chataway in 13 minutes
59.6 seconds.



electicn, which

rees inter;
remier Antoine Pinay’

policy. —U.P,



pret a al

jtest for P



| Lighthouse

j that a big wave

to “attack or repel any Chinese
offensive.” Afterya bloody fight
that waged west of Chorwon for
six hours 3,500 Americans suc-
cessfully fought off a full Chinese
regiment. An Eighth Army
spokesman said the Reds suffered
more than 400 dead or wounded.
It was the twenty-first attempt by
Communists to -retake positions
seized by the 45th Division ten
days ago and when the fierce
battle was over, United Nations
flags flew triumphantly at the top
of four strategic hills. be



Fisherman Drowns

Oscar Worrell, *a fisherman of
Shermans St, La.'>, was drowned
ibout three miles off North Point
yesterday morning
about 7 o'clock when the boat
“Levison” in which he and his
fellow fisherman Clifton Griffith
were sailing, sank.

The “Levison” E—74, was owned
by Drayton Babb of Shermans,

Griffith was rescued by fishermen
of the boat “Surana” which passed
by soon after the “Levison” sank.
the Police
struck the boat and
caused it to sink,





Griffith reported to

mander said they were ae in the Police Force re-

ported to the Governor that his
emarks were likely to hamper
the police im
their duty.

the execution or

Police Evidence

Mr. Ward Said he constrained to
make those remarks because there
ppeared to be an opinion preva-
in some quarters that the
Courts were bound to accept the
evidence of policemen and experts

lent

without question

Such a theory was entirely con-
trary to law and he for one ‘‘shall
not be deflected from my plain

duty to criticise adversely such

252 Workers
Leave for U.S.

{ (From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, June 21.
252 agricultural workers
Antigua during the week
harvesting ernployment in
United States. 113 from Antigua,
107 from St. Kitts and 32 from
| Montserrat



The Leewards’ full quota of 309

wes unfulfilled due to applicants

rejected on final medical examina-
tion chiefly through decayed or
insufficient teeth.



| Hunger Strike

left
for
the |

, es E
Engineers Should Not Be
e ; : ° |
Driven Away From T’dad

’

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 21.

/» HON: P. M.. RENISON, acting Governor of Trinidad,
spans at the Annual General Meeting of the Civil Ser-
(Vice Association this morning, warned against driving
-away engineérs from the colony by insults before they
could be replaced,.Mr. Renison ‘declared : “We have in
this colony a tremendous works programme on which the
colony's future depends. We have very few Trinidad
enginéers at the present and we have been struggling to
find students with scholastic backgrounds which could

make it possible to train them to become qualified
engineers.”

Four Japs Start





The Acting Governor added
that it was difficult to get the
number required. Then Mr. Ren-
ison asserted ‘we should be in a
very unfortunate position if by
insults we drive engineers away
before we can replace them and
the ‘result will be that we shall
find ourselves without any quali-

TOKYO, June 21.
Four , Japanese employees of

the British Commonwealth Forces

took up positions outside the dgor

of the British Commonwealth |fied engineers to carry out our
Labour Office at Kure, Souvnern | Works Programme which will
Japan to-day, and said they end in chaos.” There were in the
would not eat again until they | civil service, he said, tremendous
had received a satisfactory an-/opportunities for all ranks and
swer to the wage demand,—W.P. | branches.






-roblems: Discussed 7
Aviation Meeting

THE MEETING of Civil Aviation Officers of the Brit-
ish Caribbean Area ended at Kent House, Trinidad, last
week after a three-day session. ‘

Attending the meeting were representatives from
Antigua, Barbados, British Guiana British Honduras,
Jamaica, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and Trinidad.
: Chairman of the

Wing Commander L. A. |
field, Director General of Civil

U.S Want Germ 8.2 in the Caribbean, who

| explained briefly that it had been

War Charges \sepreent to enmhleggivil aviation
Investigated

representatives offe4the British
Caribbean territories meet and
‘discuss various. problem of mut-
UNITED NATIONS,
New York, June 21.
The United States vowed today

val interest at a time when Mr.
}K. MacAleavey, Deputy Repre-
to battle the procedural tape and
almost certain Soviet veto of Red)

‘sentative, 1.C.AyO., North Ameri-
lean Regicnal Officer could be pre-

Cross investigation of Communist}

germ warfare propaganda. Service, gave a brief historical re-

of the Red Cress “and such other

* Gross requested the meeting

sent.
US ambassador, Ernest A.| View of the establishment in the
experts it may select” to investi-
Spécifically to “consider the fol-

meeting was
Eggles-

Deficiencies
Mr. MacAleavey explained that
number of meteorological re-
quirements had been listed as vital
deficiencies in the Caribbean area
and added that several of the re-
quirements however, had _ since
been remedied,
He said that with the develop

Discussing meteorological or-
ganisation and requirements, Mr
W. A. Grinsted, Director of the
3ritish Caribbean Meteorological
Grows, submitted the. resolution |@re@ and —— the pe
resterde 7 he Initea | at present in hand and the plans
pester. calling. onthe United that wore under: consideration for
quest the international committee tuture developmen
gate germ war charges on thea
Spot in Korea ana report the re-
sults to the Council as soon as
possible.



lowing new agenda item: ‘the ment of Jet aircraft, I.C.A.0.,
question of request for investi- attached the greatest importance
gation of the alleged use of bac- to radio wind observations

which were vital to the opera-

ity’ Council complied with the} tions of these aircraft. This

request and scheduled a meet- equipment enabled wind strength

ing for next Monday afternoon and direction to be recorded
, UP, up to heights over 50,000 feet.

The meeting also discussed
the question of aviation fuel and
at the request of the Chairman,
Mr. R. Napier of Shell Lease-
holds Distribution Co., Ltd., ex-
plained the present position of
aviation fuel supplies and
gave an outline of events lead-
ing up to the recent shortages



No Forced
Repatriation

TOKYO, June 21. which resulted in. temporary
The United Nations informed restrictions on quantities of gas-
Communists today that Soviet oline supplied to airlines,

stussia has laid down the princi-
ple of “no forced repatriation” of
war prisoners in World War II,

Chief United Nations delegate
to the Korean truce talks Major
General William K. Harrison
startled Reds at Panmunjom by
quoting the Russian surrender
appeal to German soldiers in

orld War II. The Soviet offer-
ed to return German troops “to
ony ‘ sguniny where ow soners
should desire to go” if they sur-[ 07° ta :
rendered according to the Russian search. He pointed out that on

1 . heir receiving an alert, informa-
ama which Harrison: quot- tion was immediately passed on tu

their command in Puerto Rico, and
The promise was made on two fon receiving approval from that
occasions during the last war, /source, an aircraft was despatch-
Harrison said, on January 8, 1943 fed.
and again during the siege of He drew attention to the dis-
Budapest, They have insisted |heartening effect on crews of their
that the United Nations refusal to |being sent on search missions, e3-
return prisoners to . Communist |pecially for marine craft, and to
territory against his will was a]discover that no alert existed. It
violation of the Geneva Conven-|was therefore necessary to con-
tion. sider carefully each case before

The meeting dealt with Searecn
and Rescue Problems and Lt.
Wachtel of the U.S, Naval Station
at Chaguaramas, explained the
omganisation at his base, as related
‘o the operation of Search and
Rescue aircraft,

Search Procedures
Lt. Commander A, Walker also

the procedures necessary before
aircraft were despatched on

—UP.

@ Ona Page 15






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stadia seiidPeabaiedaldiamcsoi i a le a SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 1952
i RS SSS SS SS SSS ; ane eae OT ee ee ee -
TE ISS S | DANCING TIM. i ; :
| JANETTA DRESS SHOP | edding
? a ,

i) (Next Door to Singer’s) ry A S CCESS :

i} ee, U Etiquette
Just opened a smal shipment of - - - DANCING TIME, produced by Miss Joan Ransom. SPEECHES R, M. E. COX, M.C.P. and a
\) s pen as LRA D., was staged at the Empire Theatre on Friday itil x a member * the Executive
( 7 _ VEY night in the presence of an a ne 5 ? 3 everything has Committee and ir. L. E. Smith,

{i DOR VILLE DRESSES Show was staged under th ¥ Appreciative audience. The passed smoothly the hour now M.C.P., J.P. and Chairman of
i Excelle ae h . a % er the distinguished patronage of His arrives for speeches and then on Committees of the House of
w ; ate rb er «xcellency the Governor and Lady Savage and Was tre- with the dance! ~ Assembly, left yesterday morning
Ni Sale of ITALIAN STRAW GOODS still centinuing mendous success, Of course the number of people by B.W.1.A. for Jamaica where
iH : 7 : : L you want to speak will conform they will connect with B.O.A.C.
ES — oo 7 An Speen e whith almost \- gret—it was far too short. We to your own wishes. Nothing for London, England.
—— Pnoe eitort aan ee NV an- — ae that not only was the compulsory here. If you want a They are the two a
; ee a eae in the stan- ballet her specialty in dancing Master of Ceremonies please representing the Barbados Brane

"il soon have that better lard of Barbadian culture. The but she is versatile in other ances choose one who will make things of the Commonwealth Parliament-
curtain went up shortiv after as she moved to the beat of latin bright. ary Association, While in the
ef & 8 = D ee and the numbers were rhythm, s, First the Master of Ceremonies U.K. Mr. Cox and Mr, Smith will
Py vith eee is quick succession. Stole The Show makes his opening remarks thank- attend iectures on parliamentary
oe a ich consisted of well ' ing the guests for being present procedure and will also visit the
Ve eee girls, was a com- Café Society which depicted 32nd those who helped with prep- House of Commons and the

paratively young one, most of the youth of yesterday as com- @tations, etc. He then calls on Northern Ireland Parliament,
ASEPTIC OINTMENT ad gph BBL i ae fon pared with those of the present someone to propose the health of | Mr. Smith is also Managing

» gratula 5

{ 7 .
a sa ae nde pertermance ene alineush af day was perhaps the favourite of the bride. The bridegroom re- Director of Self Help Enterprises

f , the evening’s entertainment. One Plies on behalf of his wife and Ltd. During his absence, Mr, E.
touch of Germolene Ointment. It re- intervals not all of them kept saw a group of fine dancers, Rosa. himself. ©. Layne will act in his place,
licves irritation, subdues inflammation and regular time, yet in each could jie Knight stealing the show. Then the Master of Ceremonies At the airport to see them off
gives protection against the entry of be seen the aim to give perfect One cannot fail to see the ver- Calls on a gentleman to propose were Mrs. Smith and family, Mr.
harmful becteria. You will Sad, to, finish and grace to each move- gatility in this young dancer, She 4 toast to the bridesmaids. The J. £, T. Brancker, M.C.P., Mr. T.
that Germolene draws out dirt from cuts, aha ‘aoa eS Bua eres 6 Bite Srirees po een me pe See O. ree. BOS. Ba S
abrasions, blisters and sores and stim- The programme could be sum- Se eee” eee is th Fann ge ne I

Miss Ransom.

ulates the growth. of new skin. Keep @
tin of Germolene handy for family use.

FOR
SPOTS, RASHES, BURNS
IRRITATIONS, ABRASIONS






century

opened

Cobbler'’s

Shoe—there were many possibili-

med up as one of Classical Danc-
ing. Trisch-Trasch , in which
Rosalie ang June Knight were
the Sailors and the Dancing Class
which compared the ballet of a
ago with that of to-day

the first part. In The

Dream The Ballet

ties in the field of ballet. Grace
of movement and ease of style
together with the wonderful
lighting made its effects stand out
as one of finesse

Ontstanding
Part Il, in my opinion, as a
whole needs special mention

Especially the Ballade performed

by adozen dancing girls with
Miss Ransom taking the solo
part. I think these girls were
indeed the best that could have
been chosen for this number and
strict timing grace and ease of
movement predominated. One

can readily see that this is Miss
Ransom’s special department in
dancing. She possesses sterling
qualities that make for a first
class ballerina. In Beguine by
Cole Porter, the haunting rhythm

Highlighting the
evening's performance were the
gorgeous costumes so colourful
and rich. The scenery and stage
setting together with the usual
high standard of coors iment
by Capt. C, E. Raison, M.B.B., and
his Music Makers, rang down the
curtain on another suctessfu!

pecereneace in Barbadiarff(Cul-
ure.

The Barbados School ne-
ing has found a place int field

of culture and those who assisted

Next is the toast to the bride’s
parents to which the bride’s father
replies on behalf of his wife and
himself. The same applies to the
bridegroom's parents, In the case
of the absence of either parent,
an old friend may reply.

Please remember that s: hes
muet be short, to the ena

snappy. If they are too long and
drawn out, guests will lose inter-
est’ and wander~ off, Speeches
must be expressions of sincere
wishes for happiness, and peace.

and collaborated in the prepara. All other sentiments about father,
tions in presenting the show, Mys, grandfather, and their history
M. Benfield who played the must be omitted. ; ;
accompaniment in Ballade, ana’ This is the couple’s night make
many others’ are to be congratu-. ©verything for them a happy link
lated. to look back. on.

K.A. Then there may be the cutting



Talking Point

To persevere in one s
be silent is the best

calumny —George Washington.
* * +

To speak but little becomes a
woman and she is best adorned jn ej,

of the cake. The bride and groom
cut the first piece of the bride's
cake. You may want to call on
the Chief bridesmaid and the

outy and bestman or perhaps an engaged
answer to couple who may be the next to

be married.

After this ceremony there may
be dancing and the time draws
near when the couple will take
leave. Remember nothing

Stuart, Mr. O. Squires and Mr.

Spent Two Weeks

R AND MRS. CLARENCE

RENWICK returned to
Grenada yesterday morning by
B.W.LA. after spending two
weeks’ beledans were ates
ing at the Hotel Royal.

Mr, Renwick is Superintendent

of Public works in Grenada.

Venezuelan Leaves

R. ALFREDO OCHOA, an

accountant at La Mote de
Coco, a bank in Caracas, Vene-
zuela, left for = tia yester-
day morning by 8B.W.I.A. on his
way home after wae.
noliday. He was y
Abbeville Guest House.

week’s
g at



MR. AND MBS. GEOFFREY SKEETE

At St, Philip’s
A’. St. Philip’s Parish Churen
4 yesterday afternoon, Miss
Joanie Farmer, daughter of Mr.
_ 4nd Mrs. A. G, Farmer of Ough-
terson, St. Philip, was married
to Mr. Geoffrey Skeete, son of
Dr. and Mrs. H. E. Skeete of
























































































sho is ¢ lain attir “The Grotto”, Dalkeith Road,
and besutitul technique of or- “0 - Pim Bere. effects a greater anti-climax to ~ The bride who was given in
chestration lent a note of charm _ the marriage ceremony and cele- marriage by her father, wore a
to the entire movement. —Democritus. bration than the lingering pres- dress of lace over satin, with a
After the interval Part Im ! have had @ good, many ence of the bridal pair. Good tight fitting bodice, long sleeves,
af . ice Espagnol, troubles most of which never wishes and congratulations lose in a v full fi kit d
opened with Caprice pag ” De I ignifi a very fu ared skirt and a
another fine item, followed by happened, —Dean Inge, | significance when uttered more wong full train. Her finger tip
Air de Ballet. - Dance Moods, a than once; and repeated farewells veil of illusion tulle was kept
specialty by Miss Ransom bore Men were born to succeed, not can pall on the fondest hearts. aa 4 hit
Sp ; a : Not m than t hi t th in place by a headdress of white
out her qualities but left one re- to fail—Thoreau, Fe Sah TWO BOUTS BF the roses. Her bouquet was also of
. most, should elapse between the ree
Se SS DSS SEDI DDIOSSSSAASIICSS | wedding pair's arrival from the white roses. oc
ehureh and their departure for She was attended by Miss Sidi
1 i HEA i RES | their) honeymoon. Preece as maid of honour and
8 hye) The bestman will complete his Miss Jeanette Goddard and
ou u IgG 4.8$ ore duties by ing together, the jug- Miss Cynthia Branch as brides-
a ain ill oa ; Sie es || gage in advance. e has done maids, They wore white stamped
BRIDGETOWN! BAR OTSTIN his job well the couple will not nylon over ice-blue satin with
pagar Ante) (Dial 5170) iss sgt | have to suffer the embarrassment ballerina-length skirts, tight fit-
4 oda i" 4 y & To . rc
ni ours mh pm & "continuing Dally kt PM. rar 8.29 pm of curlaus Mares. left ting bodices and full flared
FIVE ACADEMY sectinés - waoieas : Once the bridal pair have left, skirts and long white gloves
Gl d FE ee hes \3 AWARD WINNER! ousla . Bing cece however, a wedding party is lia- Their headdresses were of net
Q4NaS ort2 f ze d A STREETCAR ‘n umenn Come | ble to flop like a pricked balloon. mr ;
: FIGHTING O'FLYNN ping = | Considerate guests will therefore Aid white siete ahd thay carried
by New Discover y NAMED DESIRE}] aiso tne short —|\|| take their departure, leaving the RICHARD TAYLOR vpan books.
Do you feel old bet ; a Uivien Lika INCH BY INCH eee Sora “ee Dore PP rg fm eo iter
o,you feel old before your time? Are fou tired _ Vivien LEIGH 445 &@ 8% PLM. ed, in comparative peace. isses nne armer, nifer
sseofiats ettuaes sree ieee unre fHURS ‘speci 146 FM] shoving GH Jumell Woe new Sena a As Ot. Matthias hapaoed Packer ond Valerle Packer, com-
from loss of memory. nervousness, weak body, im- Roy ROGERS Double! ing, Flat Racing Etc, LOST CITY OF WATCH YOUR PARTY A T five o'clock yesterday ISS ERMINE WINSTON of pleted the bridal entourage. They
fear or have an inferiority complex? bo you enjoy SONG OF TEXAS & Taos We MANNERS afternoon at St. Matthias 4 Kingstown, St. Vincent who wore white stamped nylon with
suu by without ® second glance? If you sufler from RIDING DOWN 4.30 & 840 P.M THE JUNGLE If you are no longer invited to Church, Miss June Eileen Croney, is at present on holiday in Barba- off-the-shoulder bodices, puff
these conditions, then you are the victim of weak “HOUSE of FEAR” wit ti hi t arefully, daughter of Mr. and Mr. J. W. dos, was recently to Mr. siceves and white bonnets.
glands, and unless your glands are forufed and £0 . arties then read this ¢ my - ” Keith Clarke of “El Rosa”, 7th =
stimulated, you ean fot hope to fepain youthtul THE CANYON Bel Aaa ae Russel HAYDEN ow is the time for all good men Croney of “Cronesia”, Worthing, ym Datleviile , The ceremony was conducted by
ae Nieise. Your lends Os || xi ke le a eee eee ee ener at as winter, who ta extgtnay 19, He Rata RDN, Bane
Fotunately for those who suffer trom turt-down PRINCE AND Thurs. Special 1 30 cuanbiaaehel. ? ance here is a list of guests who No. 10 Graeme Hall Terrace and from Hosea, "Euacinien caeene nerformed by Mr, Richard Packer,
has perfected o simple, safe, and positive prescrip: THE PAUPER]| “aranw “cANvon” & Gamprer’* afff| Will never again be invited. the late Mr. Malcolm C, ‘fsy-0r. to leave the island shortly for St. while those of ushers fell to
ton to simulate gland activity and thus bring 8 : ! AUF snytied caabmieil J “BLONDE ALIBI” The one who arrives too early. “The ceremony was condtcs*d Vincent to resume her duties om Messrs John Farmer, Robert
Acsling of ineteased energy, vitality, jana nealn } Starring: Errol) FLYNN DE (The hostess isn’t dressed, but the by Rev. M. E. Griffiths with Mr. the nursing staff of the Colonia] Farmer, Francis Cheesman, John
tasteless, tablet form. All vou need to do\ ae r , ean guest had nothing else < ©, Williams at the organ. Hospital. Armstrong, George Skeete, Michael
each day. This prese work | SSeS SS : ‘ The bride who was given in Skeete and Andrew Skeete.
Sacaceting the tinea. ROODAL THEATRES The one who arrives late, plus au P d Bar Final and ete:
Vigoursting the é 4 | te ine ist marriage by her father wore a asse ar Finals A reception was held at Ough-
stranger, you will feel ane nthe gland system, the nerves, a "ou Soulkan Oma) en dress of chantilly lace and nylon : terson, St. Philip and the honéey-
coming ’éunder, m ew blood and vigour, there ts ns y + : 4 ; li fittin bodice ONGRATULATIONS to Mr. , . :
b ting for results, Moat sere ree Th rho is bored It’s net with aq close & Ace, : moon is being spent at the Crane.
only able to keep up w yu fost lsers re EMPIRE ROXY e one who is bored, (It’s a : ; eh
realising thw joys ei of ine asouining improvement within party, isn’t it? Well, bring on long sleeves, a yolk of nylon nev ~~’ Elliston Carmichael who has 4 ’ Be
more frequently thau 7 F siibih end Sask. Cheek oeate TODAS 6-05 @ 8% and TO-DAY to TUES 4.45 & 8.15 the entertainment.) and a full skirt with alternate just passed his Bar Finals at arbados Players’ First
Doctor Pruises Vi-Tabs i hed time after time Mekind Badia dicients William HOLDEN — William BEND The one who can only drink pane’s of Jace and net forming Middle Temple. He is the son Production
Dr. J. Rastelli, widely-known kutopeon | a iven Ub hope of ever being strong, tiotiven Sat Cera an os hee in ‘imported liquor. (It's back on the a train. Her finger-tip veil of of Mrs. Martin Carmichael of ARIB learns that the Bar-
are of the opinion that the true urret | 8 “NO Vieorous again =p an eae Thre Gide market, dear.) : nylon net was kept in place by a Fitts Village, St. James. bados Players, a newly
in the ' ; . © “SUBD NE © E The one (female) who has only juliet cap trimmed with orange . ; vee ’ ‘ok
.° glands func- Results G ‘ > f juliet Pp , er ~ Ss
wwe would (eet uid 10K |e catmunay warennees Beene WOE tide Extra Shorts | come to annex a man, (Any man.) jlossoms. She carried a bouquet _ Elliston who received his early formed company from the amal
Oe na ites vents lone j uhling ba been the success o} : nee aes “fl : ‘ . +, @ducation at Combermere School, gamation of the Bridgetown
ret ae oct Vi-Tabs in thousands and thousands and: "CROCODILE HUNTERS NAUGHTY NANNETTE The one (male) who has only of orchids and Queen Anne’s : F
Fo tas CarMate Cnet tin nen’ | cases thtoythout the world that it is now HALF WAY TO HEAVEN come to annex a woman, (ANY jac¢ was an employee of the Advo- Players and the Barbados Dra-
nun inch rw positive guarantee to com OLYMPIC erat Beane the nicest possible way.) nem _ cate Co., Ltd.-and also worked matic Club, are working on their
aD Sn pda TO-DAY to MON, $.90 & 8.15 John PAYNE — Maureen O'HARA The one who elects himself/ She was attended by Miss as an Assistant Master on the first production, Oscar Wilde’s
Sone w blood tingles through Lon McCALLISTER in herself the life of the party. Yvonne Costello as chief brides- staff of the Parry School as weil “The Importance of being *
M Lourating ihe glands, acd tp 6 Arar ene ane Preston FOSTER “TRIPOLI” & | The one who didn’t bother to jnaid who wore blue lace over as the Grenada Grammar School Earnest.” ¥
{tinue thne ote vou Be onfay tite aa iranientie in “STRERTE OF LARRDGY | dress up. (After all, I’m an in- taffeta. The two bridesmaids, the before going up to the U.K. to They hope to present this next i
ve Nw be Brine Whe iy yok pid te sour “THE BIG CAT” | Axes, my fom.) Misses Jasmin Croney and Pat (study his profession, July. Further details later.
tour Results we COU d, merely return wat | e one who takes a raucous ; ; phan. | strindonsiadihleclpnem ingen net fe Pate ae 1S Ce ekeciijilitinidi adits:
Vi-Tawe ore \ (Get Vivtabs trom ‘THE RIDDEN ROOM” ROYAL | farewell, and can't see fo clone ae wore Pink ‘nylon over |
de tok foes © guarantee pro- Starring | y Last 2 Shows TODAY 4.40 & #8 30! | the car door. (You hope the land- A die .
. : al aa Rabert NEWTON & Sally GRAY Joel McCREA WANDA HENDRIX }!| | lord will be understanding.) Lc — cen. enath
BRaramnieea ood, Vitality PUES. & WED, 480 & 8.15 in So... 2...

with strapless bodices with stoles,
full skirts and they wore tiaras
of blue and pink flowers respec-

Happy parties, and mind your
manners don’t show. Except in
the nicest possible way.)

“SADDLE TRAMP”
Color By Technicolor

and
Jeff! CHANDLE — Marta TOREEN

George RAFT Double

“RED LIGuT’










ee 7 | tively, necked with veiling to
} hay n | match. ey all carried posies
} SS G ALETY aft nee roses and blue forget- |

The Garden—St. James Mr. David Taylor was the best-

G L 0 B E re entice. *â„¢-@iman while the ushers were

| . “ | Messrs. Wilh Nur David

| ‘TONITE, 8.30 P.M, MONDAY—TUESDAY, 5.60 & 8,30 P.M. Warner's, Action Thriller: Peasy. Frofeis elas aia avid

hits! 4 | Steve COCHRAN a.

Two hits! Canada Dry Ginger Ale | + reception was held at No.
-.-Canada Dry Water—two sparkling | yey \ ee a eee 20 Graeme Hall Terrace and the
bev fi fi} d : Lb : i Dr 7S honeymoon is being spent ai

erages for mixing or drinking re ' \ YyIrwyY Po ane 3 rf j . jf a
Geshinent “Pia-Point Carbonation | ew HE STORY OF A WLT. / Y ee poe cows TALK > | Edgewater Hotel, Bathsheba.
gives them the long-lasting livelines | ‘ ne AGS, |

Agricultural Officer

R. J. B. GREGORY, Agricul- |

tural Officer of Bbitish Hon-
duras who has already spent
, three months of his long leave in |
Barbados, returned from Trinidad |
on Friday by B.W.LA. after)
spending a week in that colony. |
He is staying at Bathsheba wit) |
his family, ‘e*

First Class Honours

TODAY 4.45 & 8.30
AND CONTINUING DAILY

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MR, AND MRS. VERNON WALROND

On Thursday a quiet ceremony

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was performed by Magistrate

and earried a bouquet of anthu-



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the screen!
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COMING!
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Billy Eckstein)

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, R. WALTER R. L. CODRING-
TON son of Mr. & Mrs. S. S.
Codrington of Brittons Cross Road
has gained first class honours in
Latin, Mathematics and Physics at
McGill University. Mr. Codring-
‘“" an old Harrisonian, intends
‘king a medical course.

DIAL 4220



WHITE.

| Rudder when Detective 169 Wal-
dron of Grenada’ Constabulary,
took Miss Juliette Douglas, daugh-
ter of Mr. Charles Douglas, 78 his
\bride at their residence, Silver
|Sands. The bride who was given
in marriage by her brother, Mr.
‘Carlton Douglas, wore a dress of

|| New Shipment....
LADIES’

A SHOES



YOUR SHOE STORES

rium lilies and Queen Anne’s lace.
Her headdress was kept in
place with Olive Blossoms.
Detective Waldron is expected
to leave the Colony for Grenada
where he will resume duties while
his wife will follow one month
later, They will reside in Grenada.



UNDERWEAR

BRIEFS, PANTIES, VESTS, SLIPS, & NIGHT DRESSES
ARCOL

LADIES HIGH GRADE, IN RED, BLACK, GREEN &
ALL IN SMART STYLES,

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606
ere

SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 1952
At The Cinema;

Human Emotion Admirably Protrayed

TWO PICTURES currently advertised for showing
aver the week-end supply a feast of entertainment for
those who love drama and good music. It is seldom that.
local theatre goers get an opportunity to decide between
really first class pictures shown at the same time at differ-




Pride of. goes to “A
STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE”
the five Award Winner
at the Plaza. Two

-@fitertainment.

Vivien iaies as Blanche Du-
Bois and Marlon Brando as Stan-
ley revel in stardom in the Warner
Bros. production which came from
Broadway as a Pulitzer Prize
Winner. to win the Academy
Award. :

Brando as the he-man with a
thick hide and a bitter tongue be-
came suspicious of the bona fides
of his wife’s sister, Vivien, after
the loss of the family plantations.
He does not fail to make ‘this
clear when she visits them in New
Orleans and unloads trunks of
gorgeous furs, beautiful clothes
and jewellery. But he gets ‘a
line on her past’ and devotes him-
self not merely to removing her
from his home, but to breaking
a romance which had sprung up
between his pal Karl Malden.

Blanche as an _ “ex-school
marm” living in her dream world
of leng lost gentility offends him
when she describes him as a com~
mon animal and worse of all, ‘a
Polack.’ The lid is off and Stan-
ley ‘goes to town’ in his methods
of ruin. Feminine charm and
coquettishness are lost on him.
Ruthlessness in his make up
would be a virtue but the balance
is maintained when his_ wife,
Stella, shows a deep and loving
affection for her elder sister, the
story of whose past she utterly
rejects.

But if Blanche, (Vivien Leigh)
is caught in Stanley’s trap she
does not surrender without one
last struggle in which the audience
sees every emotion known to the
human soul admirably portrayed.
A defeating combination of her
lage and her past finds her plead-
ing with Karl: ‘I have those
things to offer which a man needs
in a woman,. richness of mind,
tenderness of heatt................ .

And here is the moving beauty
of fine drama with an appropriate
background of music sufficiently
colourful to embellish ever so
slightly the story.

AT THE GLOBE

M.G.M’S moving drama of bor-
rowed love, ‘INVITATION’, star-
ving Van Johnson, Dorothy Me-
Guire, Ruth Roman and Louis
Calhern opened at the Globe on
Friday.

The unfaltering love of a
father for his only daughter, the
pitying parental love for a child
in ill health and the self assurance
of a beautiful woman that she
can wait for the man she wants,
are the three main threads of a
lovely story.

Dorothy, who suffered at an
early age from an attack of
rheumatic fever reconciled her-
self against her’ own desires to a
life of spinsterhood, but Louis
Calhern, an adoring father, is
prepared to exhaust his grea
wealth in an attempt to bring the
happiness of home and husband
to his child. With the mark of
death upon her and only a year
to live, she believes that Van is
in love with her and marries him.
Her father’s machinations run
foul of the designs of the beauti-
ful Ruth Roman madly in love
with Van. ‘T can wait for a year’.

The story breaks and Dorothy
learns for the first time that she
has only a few more months to
live. But she rises to the occasion
with a strength of character and
a greatness of soul whieh sur-
prisés Van who had grown to love
her desperately. ‘There are things
greater than wanting to live’.

Love conquered this submission
to death and an adoring father
and devoted husband are richly
rewarded in the end.

This is another fine drama and
I have hardly seen the play upon
human emotions more effectively
brought to the screen.—J.E.B.
eS



a
VIVIEN LEIGH



VAN JOHNSON

Guide Notes’

Mrs. A, W, Scott takes her guides
to visit the Nightingal Home.

On the 7th June the Ist Bar-
bados Company had an enter-
tainment at “Woodside”. The
amount realized was $48.40. Part
of the Proceeds goes to
Funds, while some was wi
for refreshments for the children
of the Nightingale Home,

The guides visited the Home
on Wednesday 18th June, They
were met by Nurse Garner the
assistant matron who showed
them around. The girls were very
much im; with the Home
and remarked on its cleanliness
and neatness and on the di
line and team spirit of the child-

t ren, who joined wholeheartedly

in the games and songs,

After refreshments were serv-
ed, prayers were read by one of
the boys of the Home, and before
on a Dismissal Mrs. Scott

€ Op unity to speak to

the aun x nig
Hike to Codrington College
7th Barbados with Miss Pember-
ton in charge hiked to Codrington
College on the 14th June. They
ss work for the Second Class

ge.
Mrs. Bishop Enrols Guides

On Tuesday 17th Mrs. F. A.
Bishop enrolled nine Guides and
Five Brownies at 8th Barbados,
Mrs, Bishop was pleased to wel-
come parents of the Brownies
who attended the enrolment.
Their presence showed that they
are interested in the activities of
the ¢hildren and in the Guide
Movement Mrs, Bishop took the
opportunity to speak on the

Guide Laws.
On the 14th June Guides from

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Women ? They're
The Tougher
Sex After All

BY THE DOCTOR
WHAT are the differences be-
tween the mental equipment of
men and of women? This is one
of the questions discussed in the

new edition of Amram Schein-
feld’s standard work, You and
Hertdity.* Scheinfeld examines

in great detail the differences in
the genetic endowments of the
two sexes.

For every 100 girls born there
are about 105 boys. It was
thought for a long time that male
embryos were stronger and so bet-
ter able to survive to birth. The
reverse, in fact, is the truth.
Because males are biologically the
weaker sex, more male than
female embryos are started off on
the road to life in order to make
up for the greater loss among
males, not only in the embryo
stage but in infancy, childhood,
manhood and «'d age.

Boys, incide:tally, are more re-
luctant to be born than girls, who
usually enter the world several
days before boys can bring them-
selves to face it.

Death Risk

In almost every important dis-
ease (diabetes, certain forms of

er, itre exe th,

male aeathneate ts “fue fhiener
than the female. As Scheinfeld
puts it: “Females are genetically
better constructed, have a more
efficient internal chernical system,
and in various other ways are bio-
logically better adapted to resist
most of the modern human afftic-
tions.”

The only single important dis-
ease of childhood which takes a
higher toll of girls than boys is
whooping cough. Why this
should be so is a mystery. It is
equally a mystery why stammer-
ing should be so much commoner
among boys than girls

. Men Only

Males suffer jally from
certain inherited disorders which
the women of the family may
transmit without, as a general
rule, being affected by them.
Colour blindness and haemophilia
(a dangerous proneness to severe
bl ) are two of these

disorders. It is common knowl-
edge that, through transmis-
sion by Victoria to
some of her descendants,
the gene (heredity factor)

responsible for haemophilia has
peeved several of the Royal

uses of Europe in the last 50
years or so. Fortunately, as
Seheinfeld shows in 4 WYiagram-
matic “pedigree,” the children of
our present Queen cannot surfer
from haemophilia or carrv the
gene,

Baldness is another inherited
physical tendency which affects
women much less severely than
men, The reason for this is a
little obscure, but it is probably
due to different glandular make-
up im the two sexes, Obesity
(and for that matter slenderness)
also tends to run in families, but
here men and women share the
same risk,

In case some men may be de-
pressed by women’s advantage in
genetic endowment it may com-
fort them to know that there is
no evidence that women’s biologi-
cal superiority qualifies them to
do anything better than men ex-
cept bear and rear children,

The Slow Child

An important difference be-
tween the sexes is also seen in
the progress of gifted children.
Boys usually turn their talents to
good account in later life, but
girls, even in these days, are often
eontent with the humdrum occu-
pation which happens to be near-
est at hand. :

One of the commonest of paren-
tal worries is about a _ child’s
apparent failure to grow and put
on weight as fast as, say, the
neighbour’s child. Fortunately it
is very unlikely that a child who
is small and thin but otherwise
healthy is suffering either from
malnutrition or from some physi-
cal disorder which is retarding its
progress,

* Chatto and Windus (25).
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
—LE.S.

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SUNDAY

FARM AND GARDEN —2v

Gardening Hints
For Amateurs

There have been several en-
quiries lately as to the treatment
of different kinds of Blight, and
as to the use of Sunflower seeds.

With the kind help of Mr
Tucker of the Department of
Science and Agriculture, this in-
formation has been obtained, and
this article will be devoted to
answering these queries

“Cottony Cushion Seale”

Worried

Describe a blight on the Rose
trees as a white woolly formation
about the size of a pea fastened
to the plant by a black head, and

full of minute redish insects with
many feet.” This blight is
‘Cottony Cushion Scale” and the
minute insects inside the white

eushion are the living young of
the Scale insect, and these young
will in time disperse and spread
the pest.
Remedy

The best way of getting rid of
this “Cottony Cushion Scale”is to
wipe it off the plant with a rag
dipped in a bowl of soapy water,
at the same time crushing the
cushion scale, This simple
remedy, if carried out systemati-
cally, will get rid of this trouble-
some blight. But that is only
part of the treatment. After this
has been done, the plant must be
sprayed with D-.D. Tane, which
can be obtained from the seed
Department of the Department of
Science and Agriculture. |

The spray must be applied in
a mist to wet the whole plant,
and must be repeated at twelve
day intervals. Both these treat-
ments will destroy the young
scale insects, and so prevent the
spread of the blight.

“Seale Blight”

Query number two describes
“Gat brown scales which form
along the stems and sometimes
on the back of the leaf”.

Remedy

This scale blight must be treat-
ed in exactly the same way as the
Cottony Cushion Scale i.e, wipe it
off with a soapy "ag, and then
spray the plant with D.D, Tane.

“Mildew”

describes

Query number three |
“a fine silky cobweb which forms
under some of the leaves and
' .
seems to become mildew.
Remedy

This mildew
by dusting the plants with fine
sulphur. his should be done in
the early morning when the
plants are wet with dew. Put the
sulphur in a muslin or similar
bag, and dust it on by hand.

“Thrips”
number four describes
“the bushes are attacked by
very fine dark coloured = in-
sects which s6éem to get into the
unopened bud, so that when it
opens the petals are discoloured
and withered.”

Remedy

These insects are called Thrips.
Adult Thrips can fly, but when
young they are wingless and
light in colour. The opening
blooms must be sprayed with
“Gammalin”, which can be pur-
ehased from the Seed Department
of the Department of Science
and Agriculture.

This completes the answers to
the questions asked by “Worried”.
“The Use of Dried Sunflower

Seeds”

The next question comes from
“G.B,” who asks “Could you ad-
vise me as to the use of dried
Sunflower seeds, as a friend told
me they are used in some way as
a vitamin product.” Well “G.B.”
no certain information has been
obtained on this subject, but it is
believed that Sunflower seeds are
used in some countries as Chic~
ken feed. They are also crushed
to yield an oil which has a com-

|

Query

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ADVOCATE

AGRICOLA | OLD

The Breadfruit (sae
WHAT a handsome tree is the |
breadfruit! And what a valuable |
ect nic plant too! If we took the
trouble to weigh the produce of |
a fully mature tree growing undes
favourable conditions, the yield
figure in terms of food would be |
astonishing. In season, it is the |
main starchy component of the |
diet in some of the neighbourin:s
islands where it often saves the
need for importing rice.



Then





Breac- | found the remedy
fruit can be served so many) be
different omen “sae wail know’ | YOUTHFUL VIGOUR

‘FE THREE





AT 31, HE FELT LIKE ' :




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to be recounted here | This young man was being
Fortunate, indeed, it was far | premaverss7 Het. tie eaeseoare Coes
the West Indies that all went how Kruschen gave him back “a vee ;
well with the second ship, the health after weeks of pain :— ~ z
Providence, which, chartered by| «q guffered for weeks from ee
the british Government, brought) kidney trouble felt like an | eeee
the breadfruit and other eegnonig | old aithough Tam only 31. | ee
plants from the South Sea Islands | stooped to do anything 1% ceeed
in 1793, History records, as you| Was to stra nee
know, that the first expedition of | py eral poopie. aoe covers ;
Eee in Bligh failed as a res§lt| found them wonderful. °y ee -oeee
o iiny by the crew of the} tread d found the ve pase
Bounty, St. Vincent and Jamaica | mie. rellet trom pa, fale . Fae a ok
claim to be the original distrib- every way. [sha 86} & “ .
uting centres in these parts. on with the daily dose because oeee .
can ow do my day's work and } « eeceee
By a peculiar growth caprice. | 200 °>sl any the worse for it, o. | sa0cee
the breadfruit at some stage e eee | eeear
appears to have lost the seeding Umess the kidneys function eeoneces
habit, like the cultivated banana Past rye ee eaea at pe ytd ee
As if to compensate, the edible | ajjo: pollute the besa | evesseeeee
part of the fruit has developed mce troublesome | «seeeeeeee ee ASS
advantageously and so the plant . fheuma- |
muedepnd on vegative — ‘i > ag ar tha Baek Th f th th
to Feproduce itself. Not infre-| Krasoh e perfume with the longe? ne {ragrance
quently, we have heard L the jack- ureties, Of kidpey eperiente. | P :
fruit, a native ndia, Malay anc | idan and 7 :
Ceylon, referred to as the male working et Peed nevastiios WY BO U R J O I S
breadfruit. This is not the case | go tha ws blo stream «
since the jackfruit is a distinet| purified and vigorous h PERFUME (g sizes) and EAU DE COLOGN}
species in the same genus; it pro- restored @ @ |
duces fruits of irregular shape, Ask your nearest Chemist er | 2
weighing as much as 50 to 60 Ib Orug Store for Kruschen. . =

each, containing numerous seed

embedded in edible pln of a
similar consistency 1 the closely
related breadfruit 4) ‘qually

prized as food in the F

The breadfruit is pxopagated
by means of root suckers which
arise from the base of the tree,
or by root cuttings. The suckers
are removed always with a por-
tion of the Toot attached, when
they are about 12 to 18 inches
high It is best to start the suck-
ers in separate receptacles keep-
ing them well watered until they
have recovered the shock and
plenty of young roots have form-
ed, They may then be removed
to permanent positions. Like most
fruit trees, the breadfruit is not
happy in exposed sites, preferring
shelter from strong winds and
aecess to moisture but not stag-
nant water. Under favourable
conditions, growth is rapid and!
fruiting may begin in two or,
three years, If there is a tendency |
for fruit to drop or not form at)
all, the best policy is to consult
n'agricultural officer before driv-

into the trees as is tometimes done. |

Reverting to propagation; if a
root sucker is not available when |
required, scrape the soil away
from one or two of the surface
roots, cut them about half way
through and leave the wound ex-
posed. Shoots should develop in
a few weeks near the wound; lift
as previously recommended when
of the desired size. Alternatively,
a few ig? of root about one
one and a half inches in diameter
‘and one foot long are severed
from the main surface roots, laid
in a bed or box of light, sandy
soil and lightly covered with soil,
keeping them moist and shaded.
In about six weeks, one or more
shoots should form; when suffi- |
ciently strong, treat as root suck-
ers. By this method, three or four
plants are quite possible from
each cutting and a careful nurse~
ryman with one or two good
breadfruit trees may make a good
thing by selling plants in addition
o fruits.

. Finally, pick the fruits care-
fully; do not knock them down.
The fruits do not keep long at
best and bruising never helps
This is a good time to plant a
breadfruit tree.

mercial value, and the resultant
‘geed-cake’ is valuable as cattle
feed, No information can be

found as to their use as a vita-
min product.














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PAGE FOUR

ete



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

SUNDAY,



JUNE 22,

1952











-_-

The man
who didn’t
know...



‘Condition—that’s the answer!
A dog needs regular condition-
ing to keep really fit. Try giving
Buster Bob Martin’s Condition
Tablets daily and you'll soon

‘Hello, where’s Buster today?’
‘Oh, he preferred snoozing
indoors. I don’t know what's
come over that puppy! No life
er i have him straight again. The stuff
"What are you doing about them—vitamins and minerals
) y & and so on—does a dog good
it? naturally by purifying his blood
and toning him up generally’.

‘Bob Martin’s, eh? I’ve heard
of them’.

‘All dogs need Bob Martin’s
and they're particularly impor-
tant for pups, to start them off
well, and to build healthy bones
and teeth. Judy has them regu-
larly, and she’s seven now’.

‘Doing ‘about it? A dog can
look after himself, surely! I
must just have picked a dud,
that’s all. But he looked fine
when we got him’.

*That’s where you’re wrong.
‘tle is a fine pup, but he can’t
look after himself, the way wild
animals can. It’s up to you to
do something if you've let



DR. C. B. CLARKE
QUALIFIED FOR M.C.C.

Ken Farnum Leaves Tomorrow
For XV Olympiad

By O. S. COPPIN

T= news that Dr. C. Bertie Clarke, West Indies and Spar-

tan slow right arm bowler and quite useful right hand
batsman has been invited by the M.C.C. to play the necessary
qualifying matches for membership, will be received in loca)
cricket circles, nay even in West Indies cricket circle, with
a considerable measure of pride and gratification.

This means that this sig-
nal honour, for that is only
conferred upon those who
have made some outstand-
7 ing contribution to the pro-

gress of the game in any of
its departments, has again
fallen on a West Indian and
a Barbadian at that,

“Bertie”, as the West In-
dian fans have always affec .
tionately known him, wa3
proposed for membership in
1942 by Sir Pelham Warner
and Lieutenant Colonel G.
T. S. Stevens, former cap-
tain of Essex, but must play

YESTERDAY’S CRICKET ;——

SPARTAN vs. HARRISON
cOLLEGE

Spartan ores eho Be
Harrison College .....166 & 71

GOOD bowling by B. K. Bowen,
Spartan right hand spinner, com-
bined with unenterprising batting
by College batsmen enabled Spar-
tan to defeat Harrison College by
an innings and 110 runs before
lunch yesterday. Bowen in 11
overs took 4 wickets for 30 runs,

As on the second day of the
match, the College batsmen fail-
€d to use their feet to the slow
bowlers, and when a batsman did
decide along this line, he did so
at the wrong moment.

College resumed their second
innings yesterday with the score
at 1 run for two wickets, includ-
ing that of their best man Camie
Smith, and when only four runs
had been added lost their third
wicket.

Then Blackman who batted
well in the first innings for his
team, again featured in a fourth
wicket stand with Fernando
Tudor, these two together putting
on 31 runs.

After that wickets fell cheaply,
and there was a regular proces-
sion to and from the pavilion.
Except for Simmons and Reid
who attempted to attack the bowl-

For Pickwick in their first
innings, A. E. Trotter had scored
33, T. S. Birkett 49 and J.
Greenidge 57. In their first innings,
Cariton’s N. S. Lucas scored 90, G.
Hutchinson 68 and C. B. Williams
38.

After dismissing Pickwick for
the smal] total of 148 yesterday,
Carlton went to the wicket, bent
on going at the runs and opened
with N. S, Lucas and C. MeKenzie
who set about the task in a manner
which showed that to them then
dash was more impcrtant than
caution, and Lueas soon played
over one from K. Greenidge and
was bowled with the score at 10.

C. B. Williams joined McKenzie
and the two of these sought for
all opportunities to score and in
attempting to run two runs
McKenzie was run out.

With Hutchinson being bowled
by T. S. Birkett five runs later,
the Carlton batsmen ceased their
efforts to go at the runs, especially
as they had by now dropped
behind the clock.

When four wickets were down,
a shower of rain caused play to
be abandoned when there was yet
about 15 more minutes of possible
play.



THE BTC PROVISIONAL
PROGRAMME

By “BEN BATTLE”

THE big news of the week is, I imagine, the issuing by the
B.T.C. of their provisional Programme for the August. Meet-
ing. Unfortunately, I have not had the time to give this import-
ant matier the consideration it deserves, but there are_one or
two comments which I should like to make, I shall try, wher-
ever possible, to accompany these with suggestions—construc-
tive criticism being surely the aim behind putting out a pro-
gramme that is provisional.

One thing I shall not do, and that is join in the howl of
protest that I feel sure is already going out, because, with one
exception, the programme does not hold promise of any in-
crease in stakes over those of last August, I am of course aware
of the steadily rising costs, against which, those who keep
racehorses, must constantly battle, and I can see very clearly
that, without an increase in stakes, some of the weaker
brethren, must inevitably be forced out of the game. On the
other hend, I am persuaded that the gentlemen who drew up
the programme, are as well aware of this as I am, and, more~
over, they enjoy the privilege, which I do not, of knowing inti-
mately the financial position of the Turf Club. They are all
men with the best interests of racing at heart, and I, at least,
am prepared to accept their verdict; that the total stakes money
offered, is all that can be afforded. That being so, I shall refrain
from demanding a greater purse distribution, but shall try and
limit my criticisms to suggesting how the money might have
been better allocated,

for the M.C.C, in ten | ing and fail b. the oor — m nt aie F bya for ane THE CHAMPION STAKES
i i ‘J ad state. .: tches i i never at any time tried to get on Empire ..‘. or no : 4
Seu t Bony Judy it Soe Macuare Sc veut Seabee, woke, ottenianen top the bowling, and by 3.30 the Police ......... ses 52 & 219 The chief innovation in the programme is one which, I am
} y :

here—' tainly done her proud!

Thanks for the tip, and I'll
~“ get some today’.

*I must say she always ;
looks in lovely condition’. <4





to membership.
C. B, Clarke went to Eng-
land with the West Indies

entire College team was out for
71 runs.
Spartan thus became the first



Empire defeated Police at Em-
pire by ten wickets yesterday the

sure, all racing men will welcome unreservedly. It is the insti-
tution of a mile and a half race—the Champion Stakes. This is

team in 1939 and during the team to win outright in. this final day S as at a $1,200, ai Tass: 407A" Ween Ons tae toe ore ay ens
saa sid ani ; ‘ . tour which was cut short by | Series. cricket match. noo esate eae an admirable idea, and one which, if I am not mistaken, is
BOB oes aa. Pr swandy rot Oe See me ; the imminence of war, fin- had eer “ ae a eiee bound to be reflected in universal enthusiasm and increased
omer e Cutten” > ee? ished third = - a PICKWICK vs. cameras = Wike bad batted ethene} attendance, However, there are one or two suggestions that I
L. M. B. MEYERS & C 47 . B. CLARKE averages with 87 wickets CKWiek 226 & ooeeececcceeees 1 0 a ies tame feel ought to be made. ‘
BRIDGETOWN RARBADOS BRITISH WEST INDIBS (ay. 21.81). In the three Tests he took six wickets (av. 43,) | Carlton .. 261 & (for 4 wits.) 45 °2 Tuns in their first innings on



DUSSEAL priming is essential to the painting of all new walls: its
application ensures that the paint dries right and stays right. Dusseal
seals off the destructive alkalis and moisture always present in new











his best performance being 3 for 59 first innings at Manches-
ter. Apart from this, his best figures were 13 for 107 vs.
Hampshire.

A stubborn 58 at number five
by skipper John Goddard yester-

the first day of play, carried their
second innings score from 155 for
four at the end of the second day’s

In the first place, I consider that the purse offer is not
large enough. It must be realised that, to prepare a horse for

; ; as lay to 219 runs yesterday. Their a mile and a half, is an entirely different proposition from get-

RETURNED TO ENGLAND i Coll tar tee tee Ptage innings ended just before the ting one generally fit, so that it can run a series of races wore

E eres Sen cana the ee oe ee at the hands of Carlton in the luncheon interval. Empire first distances ranging from 5% furlongs to 9. It is quite on the
e captaine e British Empire and accomplishe hs

some excellent performances with bat and ball and when first
class cricket was resumed in 1946 he played for Northants
under a sperial qualification taking 44 wickets (av. 32,11)

last day of their First Division
cricket match at Kensington.
Goddard’s invaluable 58 helped

imnings score was 255, Hunte 114,
Their opening batsman Black-
man topscored with 70 which he

cards that a horse that has received a thorough preparation for
a race like the Champion Stakes, is going to be “overboard”,
for the rest of the meeting. To this must be added the risks of

. ; ““ made on the second day and yes- breakdown, which so thorough a training programme must,
Latest news from England is to the effect that Bertie has Pickwick to score 148 runs in terday Skipper Byer carried his of necessity, involve. Hence, I consider, that, to increase the
already .commenced these qualifying games because in a their second innings and this overnight score of five to 42 before

recent M.C.C. match he finished second highest scorer with
55 out of an M.C.C, total of 296.

WHAT OF CANADA-W.I. TOUR

7s has been no news forthcoming in connection with
» the proposed West Indies tour of Canada. Although I
did not anticipate miracles I thought that with the shifting of
the seat of West Indies cricket from Jamaica to Trinidad that
we in these parts would be able to glean some information
pie oo pata the plans for and future prospects of West Indies
cricket.

I am all for the tour for the simple reason that we would
now be afforded the opportunity of giving some of our best
players who have been unable through a concatenation of
circumstances to gain selection for overseas tours,

EXPLORING AVENUES
A’ the same time we would be exploring avenues for fur-
ther talent for our commitments with India next year
by seeing how these near-miss candidates stand up to an
overseas tour.

This must not be construed to mean that I am advocating
sending 1 second rate team to Canada because after all it
will be a WEST INDIES team. But certainly players like
Andy ‘anteaume, Rupert Tangchoon, Clarence Skeete, Ralph
Legall of Trinidad, Norman Marshall, Wilfred Farmer, Cammie
Smith, Conrad Hunte, Adzil Holder, Horace King, Carl Mul-
lins of Barbados, Alfie Binns, Denis Thorbourn, Neville Bon-
itto of Jamaica, Mason of the Leeward Islands, should pro-
vide between them a combination worthy of representing the
West Indies in Canada without “losing face”.

GOOD LUCK

meant that Carlton had 114 to
make to win in 68 minutes.

The scores are : Pickwick 226
and 148 and Carlton 261 and for
four wickets 45.

Yesterday’s play was exciting.
First it was thought that it would
end in a fairly tame draw, but
then Carlton’s attack, spearheaded
by c. B. Williams had Pickwick
in trouble and it was only John
Goddard who saved the day for
them.

Williams captured 6 wickets for
47 in a grand spell of 17.1 overs

and fast bowler Edghill took
2 for $1.

Good Bowling

Williams bowling was good. but
he was well assisted by Brickie
Lucas who took three really

brilliant catches, two off Williams’
bowling.

he was caught by Holder off the
bowling of Barker.

Best bowling performance for
Empire in the Police second in-
nings was given by Barker who
ended up with an analysis of
025. M9 R56 W7. He bowled with
great pace and kept a good length
all the time. He bowled six of the
Police batsmen, with yorkers when
motif were looking for the rising
all.

Veteran ‘Foffie”’ Williams and
O. Fields took one wicket each for
57 and 11 runs respectively,

Empire opened their second in-
nings after the luncheon interval
with Conrad Hunte and Smith to
the bowling of Bradshaw and Mul-
lins, Both batsmen played with
ease and after some seven overs
were bowled, the 17 runs for vic-
tory were scored. When stumps
were drawn Empire had scored 24
runs for no wicket with Smith not
out 7 and Hunte not out 13.

SCOREBOARD

HARRISON COLLEGE
« wap —2nd Innings





Cc. Greenidge b Williams ...

purse of such a race to only $100.00 above that of the ordinary
“A” class event, does not offer’sufficient inducement for owners,
and trainers, to risk the best horses in their stables in an
attempt to win it.

When I first heard the subject of an “A” class mile and a
half race mooted, the figure I had in mind for it, was $1,500.00,
and this still seems to me to be no more than adequate. Yet if
I accept, as I have said I do, the fact that the Turf Club cannot
aflord to allot any more money for this meeting, it may well be
asked how I propose to accomplish raising the prize money for
the Champion Stakes? Well, what about the various Maiden
races? There are four of these proposed—two for F. and F, 2
horses, and two for C, and C, 2, and they carry the same purse
as the corresponding races framed for winners in these classes,
Now, surely, 2 maiden horse has already been given a consid-
erable concession, by ‘having a race framed, so that it does not
have to compete against winners, and none could object, if
they competed for a slightly smaller prize, as a result. I suggest,
therefore, that the first prize, in each of these Maiden races, be
reduced by $75.000, and th resulting $300.000 saved, be tacked
on to the Champion Stakes.

My second suggestion, in regard to what, I hope, will
turn out to be the “star turn” of this, and all subsequent
meetings, is that some precautions should be taken in regard
to weight concessions. Our classification allowances are rather
arbitrary, and, over a distance as long as 12 furlongs, they
may prove burdensome to the extent where it becomes impos-
sible for the good A. class horse to concede them, I think,
therefore, that the ‘urf Club should safeguard against the
race being at the mercy of some light-weighted B.2., or C.
class contender, by stipulating that the maximum weight





et





Fong cee, BWultams ne 8 corieeaion, sroen Whatever seule, should not be greater than
ic Ps jams : a > sw B
. P EN FARNUM, Barbados’ leading Cyclist leaves by B.W.I. e Blackmon ; ee Pee” innise Willams. . 4 18 Ibs. aanaguaion Guan. a nile ahd Surely a aeaethas hae ‘
surfaces, and at the same tae provides a uniform, non porous base finesrs on he rn he of a eae sn, _ ee ey ee carencler, Fun ouit " Pag ete eee me rte in no chance when receiving 18 lbs. has little right in top
c ee $ * to Trinidad, Jamaica, -K. and_ finally elsinki. nland, nec FE. King b Atkins .. 3 5 re Sci class company.
for the paint coats to follow. It thus prevents peeling and discoloura where he will compete in the XV Olympiad. te aree Soe ae ee is UN IL, Bre castes teen Aine
tion, permits speedy painting and This is the fulfilment of commendable industry on the | Ss. Hewitt b Bowen sstses¢ 2. Wall of wickets: 2-16, $-87, 9-42, __1 was very pleased to see that the Turf Club has
part of the Barbados Olympic Committee, the generosity of . © Waleott b Bowen .. 9 : es es = P th ber of D. class rz from th to four.
X tons th t M E 10 Yoo for dni 4—63, 5—63, 7—112, 8—118, 9—148, increased the number of D, class races, from three to four.
assures that the paint coat gives the those private citizens who thought it their duty to offer some BR ee ae tet bes ; BOWLING ANALYSIS As I said, in a previous article, the D. Class should correspond
. ia contribution and last but not least the sterling gesture of io Oo. M. R. wW. to the creole A., and, it is in this class, that the best creole
maximum service, the Barbados Government who offered a oe on a dollar DOWR Seiad, Side, nf rs - iy te : racing should occur. I hope that the B.T.C. will continue :o
basi. t maximum of $1,440, — ¢'s i hol A She laatdt ea Peak’ CE: Tew | 4ocnihes i ‘thi
na "Tide cer by Governinent served Tete than anything else 8/38) 6741 Wass eyaoy 8 Ree ee ace m € Cox : wet uf Ef tin vainbers Of toese ‘to lamina ea here ie
MADE BY to inject a last minute spiritedness into the fund that while BOWLING ANALYSIS delet Ghee fae reenter a a nothing to prevent the F,’s from their chance in D,
it hovered at the $1,000 mark when Government's offer was Dien Me We Pecan eer ghar ren Sabre ae
made with only some days to go before the closing date, that BOs, ly tee 8 5 8 © €'R Williams not cut eee 7 F. CLASS MAIDENS
Government was called upon to donate an amount far below oe sasee @ 2 5 2 G Hutchinson b Birkett oe . ASS J Ee.
B E R G E R th $1,440 maximum, since the fund reached and passed the uw sigh} AR -b@. Bagh ib Hosa 3 inn a
he $1, yi arris, N, ..... 5 4 tO R Batehinson not out... ‘ 2 The proposed division of the F.’s into winners an
' Bowen, B. ......../ 11 2 30 4 r eon ; ie ¢ y ¢ 5 j
FN cum ad wad bobnted uve the dion. tha Oeleuial Fesrah 7 . eae Extras recess maidens, is a new departure, It has worked well in C. class,
a. y § 1 as | PD il last eas ‘Athlet CARLTON vs, PICKWICK ies hak Sa wie a but whether its application to the F.’s is a good thing, will
(ine Secretary in the Legislative Counei as' wee ine hich Pickwick «2.2.0... os. ce ss 226 & 148 Be eae et ae : Prin have to wait the test of time, My only objection to it is, that
manage to represent his country at two ymplads whic Carlton 261 & (for 4 wkts) .........45 pail of wickets: 1—10, 2~22, 3-27. it provides winning opportunity for some very bad horses—
S are four years apart. He or she is seldom at peak form for] . | PICKWICK — and INNINGS 4—33, an F, class maiden, at this time of the year, cannot justifiably
ON ALE ee er ee cases of people like Arthur z Wwanlams : : ute inson a4 BOWLING ANALYSIS “ is locked upoa up tach eles, Hut. then, aah. Besaonea Md
n y. . Edwards je b Edghill 1 ' 5. ri : i i remi
i It is for this reason that I am glad that Ken Farnum, who ]-7, 8. Birkett¢ Lucas b Warren. 7: & Birkett a ae Peta Seen. VRS SOS Pie, | Ob, -Vee yr, BONE Ale)
AT ALL HARDWARE ) ‘ORES is without doubt at the peak of his career, has been afforded »|s A. cGteenidge b Williams... 13 oH Speen ees og ees < Met ere " te ara eae rue on, the
this opportunity now. We wish him God speed and good luck. Ks {Goa Se Buses b etna. 6 On Page 5 ‘ . ; .
GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents . Greenidge b Cox ......,....... 20 @ e

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SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 1952



England Gains Lead In Test Against India

EVANS SCORES 2ND
TEST CENTURY

I

LONDON, Lora’s. June 21.

A MAGNIFICENT DAY’S CRICKET during which
382 runs were scored, was brought to a premature close

ten minutes before time by bad light.

At this stage, India,

fighting desperately to avoid defeat, were still 165 behind
England with eight second innings’ wickets to fall.

Facing a disadvantage of 302
India made a bad start by losing
Roy before he had scored and with
only seven on the board. Adhikari
who was unable to be on the field
because of a bruised knee, was
beaten by Trueman’s speed at 59.
But then in the closing half hour
Mankad and Hazare in the rapid-
ly worsening light, called a halt
to England’s run of sueeess which
had been in progress dince the first
ball of the day.

It was perky Godfrey Evans,
England's wicketkeeper with his
second Test century, who led the
way. In a partnership with Tom
Graveney, he assured that Hut-
ton’s legacy of the previous day
should not be squandered.

In a masterful display of batting
they added 159 runs in two hours,
ten minutes to pave the way for
England’s big lead.

Magnificent Strokes

And Evans, by only two runs,
failed to achieve the rare distinc-
tion of a Test century before
lunch. He was at his most auda-
cious and brilliant best and those
who remember his first Test cen-
tury against the West Indies at
Manchester two years ago will
know what a magnificent range of
strokes he possesses. Hazare,
handicapped by the injury to
Phadkar, was unable to make full
use of the new ball and Evans
took full toll of the spinners. He
raced to 50 in just over an hour,
including seven fours and then
greeted Shinde whose introduction
in the attack at such a moment
might be subject to criticism with
three successive boundaries.

Graveney, piaying with com-
plete assurance was content to al-

IT ISN’T that there is no local
talent in this boxing business nor
that the public wouldn’t support
it that has brought boxing to the
low ebb at which it now is, It
only needs a_ central boxing
stadium and a Boxing Board of
Control and boxing would be as
eagerly supported as any
popular game today.

What adds to the grouse that a
boxing fan must feel when he
thinks of this deplorable state of
things is that it would not take
many years to recover the outlay
it would eost to build a stadium.

Such is the present position, but
I have got some inside information
that a certain man of fair means
who,sis interested in the game is
earnestly trying to get one or two
others to join him in putting up
money for a central stadium.

Last Legislative session, there
was a measure on the Order
Paper of the House of Assembly
which sought to establish a Box-
ing Board of Control, but the
session died, and the Bill likewise.

Of course, there must be a Box-
ing Board of Control if boxing is
to be run with satisfaction to all,
The fan would be ensured to a





: Scareboard |

@ From Page 4

POLICE—Ist Innings oé

EMPIRE—Iist Innings
POLICE—2nd Innings

. Blackman b Barker

. Taylor 1.b.w, b Barker

Amey b Barker

._ A. Farmer b Barker

Byer c A. Holder b Barker

. Bilenman c Hunte b Fields

Dodson not out

. Sobers retired hurt

Green c Barker b Williams

Mullins b Barker

Bradshaw b Barker

Extras

Ba
3
ae

ontompesa
cooose es BSars

Total

Fall
4/155;

1/i; 2/15;
7/219; 8/219;

of wickets:—
5/188;; 6/211;

BOWLING ANALYSIS
°

Barker 25.2
. Grant 4

Rudder 9

A. V. Williams 22

King il

Holder
Fields

R

woo

Sonn onmoe
oe
3

EMPIRE—2nd Innings
Hunte not out . 13
Smith not out . q
Extras 4

0 Ophinugm

Total (for no wicket) 24
BOWLING ANALYSIS
°o M

Cc. Bradshaw
Cc. Mullins

F. Taylor

c Amey

mee
oooe
eaeat



other \



GODFREY EVANS

low his partner the lion’s share of
the bowling and fours sped to all
parts of the ground.

In the two hours before lunch
Evans scored 98 while England’s
total advance was by 147. And
only a slow field change prevented
an additional over being bowled
before lunch which would prob-
ably have given Evans his cen-
tury.

Last Scoring Stroke

He completed three figures after
batting two hours and five min-
utes, but his celebration at the
sixteenth four was his last scor-
ing stroke, for he was well caught
and bowled by Ahmed.



After Evans was dismissed
Graveney launched owt and was
caught for 73 made in 200 minutes.
By comparison with Evans it was
slow, but it was what was needed.

Jenkins, Bedser, Laker and
Trueman all contributed some
lusty blows and England after
nine and three-quarter hours’
batting, were all out for 537—
their second highest score against
India in this country.

Mankad, whose final figures were
5 for 196 in 73 overs, bowled
magnificently and throughout his
long spells, sent down exceptional-
ly few loose balls. He and Ghulam
Ahmed who improved considerab-
ly after lunch carried the brunt of
India’s attack,

Following up his marathen
bowling effort, Mankad, who has
been on the field for all excevt
three hours of the match, opened
India’s batting. Refusing to be
daunted by Roy’s dismissal he
ufein played magnifocent attacking
cricket. Had it not been for an
early closure, he might easily have
reached his century and on this

evidence only Keith Miller of

Australia is a better all rounder.
INDIA lst INNINGS — 235

INDIA 2nd INNINGS

Roy b Bedser o

Mankad not out 86

Adhikari b Trueman 16

Hazare not out 4
Extras ll
Total (for 2 wkts.) 137

Bedser 1 for 22; Trueman 1 for 48.

ENGLAND — Ist INNINGS
Hutton c Mantri b Hazare 150
Simpson b Mankad 53
May e Mantri b Mankad 7”

Compton 1|.b.w. Hazare 6
Graveney c Mantri b Ghulam Ahmed 13
Watkins b Mankad 0

Evans ¢ & b Ghulam Ahmed 104
Jenkins stpd. Mantri b Mankad 2
Laker not out 23
Bedser c Ramchand b Mankad 3
Trueman b Ghulam Ahmed Ww

Extras 13

Total 637

BOWLING ANALYSIS

oO M. R w
Mankad 73 24 196 5
Ghulam Ahmed 43.4 12 106 3
Hazare 24 4 53 2
Umrigar 4 0 15 0
Phadkar 27 8 “4 0
Ramehand 29 8 67 0
Shinde 6 0 a3 0
Byes: 8; leg byes: 5
Sea casein minom

“LOCAL BOXING TODAY

By CALVIN ALLEYNE

reasonable extent that he would
jnot pay to see two men merely
dancing about and lightly tapping
each other, and the boxer would
be happier knowing that he might
not be doing all the spade work
and the promoter sitting back and
pocketing the bulk of the pro-
ceeds.

The boxers in the professional
beat today are Kid Ralph—
naturally — middleweight and
lightheavyweight champion with-
out any troublesome contender,
Radio Kid, Al Mauler and Kenny
Seaman in the lightweight divi-
sion, Sam King in the lightweight
and Victor Lovell, Gilbert Good-
man of amateur fame in the
featherweight.

These are the names that have
become popular to the boxing fan.
But when the amateur contests
come off next month at the
Modern High School, we will be
getting quite a few other names

to pick tomorrow’s thugs

ITH this five
point chart
psychologists

claim they can predict an
innocent child’s chances
of becoming a gangster or
a good citizen. They
believe their forecasts wil!
be right in at least eight
cases out of every ten.
They are so confident of
the test’s reliability in spot-
ting .the future crimina)
before it is too late that they
are urging its adoption as a
routine “screening test” for
all children when they start

~GANGSTERDOM

CHAPMAN PINCHER’S Column tells how |~

ftto add to our list. In this new
crop for next month, there is an
enthusiasm, fostered chiefly by
the amateur tournaments which
have come into yogue over the
past few years in the neighbour-

ing islands,
Two of these tournaments have
been held in Grenada, one in

Trinidyd and the next, which in
all probability will come off later
this year, will be held in British
Guiana, In these tournaments,
our amateurs have not met with
any outstanding successes, the
most accomplished being an entry
into the finals by Sam King, then
middleweight amateur champion of
the island, in one of the Grenada
bouts. But one thing can be said
for the boxers who went, and it
is that they by no means had
much convenience. It was all a
hurried affair and one might hope
that in the proposed tour to
British Guiana, there will be ad-

from today’s innocent children

social workers are sent out to |
probe into his home life. |
The boy is then marked on |
their findings according to the |
table on the right,
|

|

200... 300...

oa THE SCORE awarded for
each feature of family life
has been carefully worked out
from hundreds
criminals.
If the boy's total score is under
200 his chance of becoming u

of cases of young

crimina} is less than one in ten. |
psychologists Gale. But if he |
scores more than 300 his chance

of taking up a criminal career is |
more than nine out of ten.

Note that a poorly developed

school feeli, ol damnily unity is rated |
a earned 2 ieves. @S a far more important cause
att sentiee stale” kee Ss of ooeek than laek of discipline |
, of the juvenile courts or affection,
Rept put of tae Jas 7 vente The Pay snolonists find tha
over-stric iscipline is more
DEFIANCE dangerous that none at all.
+ THIS IS how the test This system of preventing
works : After carefully crime has beer) worked out by
studying the child, psychologist Professor and Mrs. Sheldon
give him black marks fot Glueck, a U.S, husband-and-wite

ieflance assertiveness, dest ruc-
veness, suspiciousness. and
motional instability

If his total score is meh





psychologist team. after ten
years of resgarch sponsored by
the Harvard Law ool.

Bri are

ish psychologists

fine cars

SUNDA

€



KEN FARNUM

—leaves for Finland to-morrow.



_

heppard Hits

1000 Runs >

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, June 21,
David Sheppard who made 74
for Cambridge University against
Warwick at Birmingham teday
became the first amateur to com-~
p ete 1,000 runs this season,

Scoreboard: Kent vs Surrey;
Kent 217, Surrey 92 for 1,
Essex vs Lancashire. | vshire

266, Essex 8 for 0.

Gloucestershire vs Glamorgan,
Gloucestershire 284 for 9.

Somerset vs Middlesex, Somer-
set 218, Middlesex 47 for 3.

Sussex vs Oxford University,
Oxford 384 for 9.

Warwick vs Cambridge Uni-
versity, Cambridge 290 for 9
declared, Warwick 43 for 0.

Derby vs. Northants, Derby 339

for 4,
Yorkshire vs Leicestershire,
Yorkshire 307, Leicestershire |
for 1.

Worcestershire vs Notts, Wor-

cestershire 362 for 6.



vantages from whieh our repre-

sentatives could gain more
balance and control and essen-
tiality in boxing.

Before telling more about

amateur boxing competitions being
planned, I can say that some of the
most active promoters today are
Doyle Hinds, runner of the Fox
Club, Al Blackman and Claude
Ramsay who are more closely con-
neeted with the amateur line than
the others and Ben Jones.

The Amatous Sening ae
tion is ex to 1
annual ionine eae ap e
Modern High School next’ montn’
and the amateurs, some of them
old boys from Combermere, Lodge
School and Harrison College be-
sides present boys and boys from
Alleyne School, are in serious
training.

Then, too, the Press Club pro-
poses to stage an Annual Boxing
Tournament, the first of its kind,
to take place the following month

Perhaps because of the little
encouragement they get, there is
a dearth of heavier boxers in the
ring here these days and the real
heetie bouts will come from the
lighter boxers.

GOES ON POINTS



or erratic, varyin
Lax, letting the

reasons which the boy accepts as fair ,,,..,

SUPERVISION OF
or in the care of an irresponsible

Fair, giving only partial supervision to bo:
Suitable, ME Sole Pareie watch and Aerie

for his leisure hours

AFFECTION OF |
Indifferent or hostile



Warmly affectionate, even being over-protective

AFFECTION OF
Indiflerent or host

Warmly affectionate, even being over-protective

COHESION OF FAMILY

Unintegrated—home is just a place to “ hang

your hat” ,.

Some degree of cohesion—family hehayes as

cooperative group to some extent
Fopenve-—wi h a pride in the
“oll for one and one for all”

eel

anxious to try oul Lhe system on

an experimental seale che
The urgent need for some T)

method of detecting future § /t

criminals at the earliest possibi« A

age is shown by the fact that In
England alone more than 26,000
children under 14 are found 4d:4%
guilty of indictable offences ©.’
every year

found wherever

travel

1 Keeps your motor cleaner ..

2 Protects against bearing corrosion

3 Improves performance—greater economy
4



ROBERT THOM LIMITED

AGENTS

BASKETBALL

in their return basketball match
at Y.ML.P.C. on Friday night to
put themselves in the lead of the
Cup line up.

and
at least three times and these two

Lueas, was the most dashing of

rrother outstanding

me shower of

LSC! = OF BOY ¥ FATHER
Overstrict demandin; obedient itr hh fear,

between strictness on laxity
oy do what he likes .....,..
Firm but kindly, basing discipline on sound

BO BY MOTHER
Unsuitable, leaving the Toy to his own devices
person

FATHER FOR s8O0Y

MOTHER FOR BOY

ou,c, & sbrong

@Heres how to try out th:
rigut

1. up marks left,

EEO

Y ADVOCATE

eae



Carlton



The determined Carlton play-
‘rs beat Harrison College 36—23

All teams other

Carlton had

than College
been defeated

th only two defeats, met in
hat turned out to be a very
‘iting match.

Man of all sports, Brickie

» Carlton players and scored
if of the goals for his team.
lueas is swift and ready, and
ese qualities more than a com-
‘ate ability at scoring, helped
himm to seore as often as he did.

“ach member of the Carlton
pulls his weight, but
player was
\lan Davis, who is a more pre-
se scorer,

ic. m

The one thing noticeable about
he way the Carlton team played
was their determination, As the
game got going, it was evident
hat they were getting little
support from the crowd, most of
whom by their hailing and en-
couraging, fayoured College to
win, But the purposeful, thorough
vay in which Carlton set about
the game told straightaway that
they were leaving nothing to
‘hance.

The ground was heavy as there
had been a few spells of rain
earlier, but this wag a disadvan-
vage to both teams

Fast Game

From start to finish the game
was fast, Carlton were the first
to score and it was evident that
the College boys were not going
that all out way as though intent
on winning, a manner of playing
whieh was invited from overcon-
fidence, However, they made most
of their chances and the first
quarter ended 8 all.

Carlton took over the lead from
the gecond quarter, a lead they
ever relinquished. Carlton were
ilways combining well, better
‘han College, and with Brickie
Lueas piercing through and be-
ing fed with the ball, and Davis
lodging through the players and
positioning himself for scoring,
‘ney were able to be leading—
\6—ll—-by half time,

Next quarter, after a short
rain, the game was
slower and ended 18—~14, Carlton
still leading.

In the first half of the last
quarter, Carlton played for all
they were worth to establish a
better lead and College who
seemed to have given up the zest
for winning, allowed goal after
goal to be scored against them,

Then in the last stages, with
nothing to be lost by playing a
slow game, Carlton did exactly
this and by their win put them-
selves in the lead of the Cup line
up.

“



Score
72

83
57

10



pao Lovell g 76
34

ape

86
43

97
61
21

ne

f on any child you knou

marks awarded for eaeh
ure of family Itfe are
VAYS those shown in the
hand column There are
variations for diflerent
rees. To get a total strike

lines that do not apply. and



———

. smoother -running

DIAL 2229



JUNE 22

The Topic
of










NO. 229 |




The Only Pain



Reliever

| containing Vitamin B,
| a Teel
|
|
|
|
|

iffering from a Cold,

TT ‘ l, Head or Nerve Pain
KY start taking YEAST-ViPB
Vatiets AV ONCE, You will be

over t the difference tt

ae) a) ) Your Pain, Cold,

or ¢ uptoms will quickly



md you'll feel ever

Joe, Rebert, mind your business
These words were stressed by Lou














Don't mind the island talkies RELIEVES. YOUR Pyare
Follow the “hush mouth” crew Oe and
‘ * . MAKES YOU FEEL WELt
You knew a crowd of smarties - for. :
wat practice uw p, fee fence f WEA HE 3 There's nohiag else like
To ear, what's your defence EADAC . ane T-Vt Th, i's the
F . . NERVE Pairs NLY pain re liever
io @ll We say dear comrades wheeh AiSO contains
It may sound quite age-long SGOLDS, CHILIS§ me were Viemin B
Time cannot change its essence Get i ly af
“A King can do no wrong.’ *s = ¢ and $ VbAST.¥ ra PO 2
; . : i { bA ITE ‘Table
Form your ives in battalions pI 5 RNEUMAT! Q TO-DAY! That's the
Advance if thousands strong “ YEAST-VITE"’ - best way to get quick re-
Malt! cries & voige; remember | a istered | s SY PAI! re ect 4
‘A King can do no wrong Mone ‘ged » ) lic and Teel berver, Gage
’ : ° een

“4 ———

wel

i

4 , [jen

f
§
wy
yy

1H PAINS

-- DUE TO

INDIGESTION

We see St. Michael's people | %
They too “jump in the line’ |
And boys by Monday evening j
They left the “Toreh” behind |
‘ ° : taal
Joe asked what was the reason |

For doing such a thing

Lou said the people preferred

Another “Tudor” King
.

But





“Daniel” like old “Daniel”
Not sacred by lions’ roars
Said he will keep on knocking

TIM he walk through the doors
. . .

Forget the past, Lou erhoed
‘Stop all this foolish talk
Big men fly long in airplanes
Poor men must learn to walk
Off! Off they go from Seawell
Glad tidings they will bear
From us to other comrades
Awaiting them out there |
. . .
And who don’t like a ‘freness’’?
The

practice of this age

lf you ‘aint get your “freeness
Don't get in a big rage

Your freeness" coming next year

And then you will be keen
For boys you will see wonders;
The crowning of the Queen

Brush your top hats and long coats

Be patient; its your chance

‘Twill be your sreatest moment
Enjoying the royal dance, If you suffer from
' ° ° Sey > >
Now we referred to dancing STOMACH PAINS
Well! well on Friday night due to Indigestion try
At the Empire Theatre MACLEAN BRAND

The Dancing Time was bright STOMACH POWDER

at once! Pain and diseom-
fort are quickly relieved
by this scientifically
balanced formula: One
dose will prove its value
for Stomach Pains,
l leartburn, Flarulenee,
Nausea and Acidity
due to Indigestion,

The “rabbits” and the ‘‘fairies
And the whole dancing team
To Joe and Lou and Robert
Was like the “Cobbler’s Dream.’
. . .

The “Sailor Girls;” “young ladies
All in their dancing mood

By their resplendent figures
Proved J & R Bread is food

What dancing! high class dancing

ent” Miss Renae led '
“Dancers need: Enriched Bread, oe
sponsored by Tasuar
J&R BAKERIES |



makers of
ENRICHED BREAD
and the blenders of
J&R RUM

iFYERS & CO., LTD,
town,—-Barbados,









DUNLOP RUBBER 2M PANY LT Bi RMIN HAM EN AR

Depots ind Distributors






PAGE SIX





iy dulls hair

Halo <.orifies it!
3 “> » ian one

nw
Pea
3

HALO leaves your
hair wonderfully soft

and easy to manage.
it
Sw HALO makes your

y LE K permanents take
ey |

better — last longer!

HALO REVEALS
THE HIDDEN BEAUTY
OF YOUR HAIR



is 1. KLIMis pure, safe milk

2. KLIM keeps without refrigeration

l






ye

nCREEVE quality is always

In each and every tin of nourishing KLIM
you get benefits found only in the finest
fresh cow's milk, Exactly the same amounts
of important food essentials are yours in
every tin. KLIM's uniformity is your assur-
ance of consistently fine milk!






4. KLIMis exceltent for growing childrea
5. KLIM adds nourishment to cooked dishes
6. KLIMis recommended for infant feeding
7. KLIMis safe in the specially-packed tin
8. KLIMis produced under strictest control
Take pure water, @ BS

add KLM, “=p stir and you
G have pure, sofe milk

=f

FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER

aT ROUB
UB

~










Copt. 1950 Borden Co,
Tnternat') Come.

Rapereas
7 of

~







This non-stop existence puts a big strain
on the nerves. We live *‘on edge’’ and
sleeplessness is a common result. Here is
a simple and safe way to get to sleep
without lying awake and waiting for it to
come—take a couple of *ASPRO’
tablets at bedtime. The soothing action
of ‘ASPRO’ settles the nerves and com-
poses you. It helps you to go straight
to sleep—natural, refreshing sleep. Many
avail
Next day they feel the full
By relieving.pain and



STOMAC

lose sleep during hot nights—they need not, if they
themselves of this simple method.
benefit of a good night’s sound sleep.
dispelling feverishness and sudden chills, *ASPRO’ will help

you again and again. Keep it handy.



All Trade Enquiries to:

~ W. B. HUTCHINSON & CO.
MARHILL STREET, BRIDGETOWN

AsprO

Pale) hm VT
BLUE a US

may mean kidney trouble

A function of the kidneys is to eliminate
harmful impurities from the system, If the
kidneys grow sluggish, these impurities—
in particular excess acid —accumulate and
settle, and become a cause of pain and
suffering in joints and muscles,

The way to tackle the root of the trouble
is to help the kidneys. They should be
toned up with De Witt’s Pills— the medicine
made specially for this purpose. De Witt’s
Pills have a soothing, cleansing and
antiseptic action on the kidneys that 1
brings them back to perform their **
natural function properly.

e De Witt’s Pills are a very well-tried
remedy. They are sold all over the world
and we have many letters from sufferers
telling of relief gained, after years of
suffering after taking De Witt's Pills,
They act on the kidneys quickly, Why
not try them for your trouble? Go to
your chemist and obtain a supply to-day.

\
PRICES
- 3 tablets for 3°

30 tablets for 2/6

Made in England by ASPRO LTD,, Slough, Bucks OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE
Teel

De Witt's Pills

are made specially for
BACKACHE
JOINT PAINS
RHEUMATIC PAINS
LUMBAGO
SCIATICA

OUR GUARANTEE
De Witt’'s Pills are
made under strictly
bs poy conditions
and the ingredients
all conform to rigid
standards of purity.

Ay ERY

ladder et sd




you must not be

Dear Reader,
| too disappointed .
| little delay in replying

if there is @
to your

| letter—but I find myself simply
snowed under with problems of
all serts.. So, please be patient

and bear with me. fi
Your friend,
MRS. CLARKE.
* *

*

DEAR MRS. CLARKE, I am 17
years old and am still at school.
My boy friend goes to school too
but lives far away in the country

and I do not get very much
chance to see him except at
| school, He goes around with



other girls but one special one of
these girls hates me and tries all
she can to break us up. I love
| him very much and hope to marry
| him some day, so please help me.
| “UNE FILLE”.
**As you are both still at school
my dear, I wouldn’t worry too
much about this boy just yet.
Ignore this other girl who is
making things unpleasant for you,
Remember that a great weapon
indeed is to completely ignore an
incident etc. Be calm and
patient and, if it is to be, you will
find your true happiness in_ time
with this boy you love. Never
jump at love, dear, but rather let
it grow slowly and gradually like
a lovely flower, s

|

*

1 AM IN LOVE with a girl aged
16 who ts in love with me. We
plan to get married as soon as we
can but she wants me to have
intercourse with her now, She

has never had relations with a
man before, Should I do_ this
|before we get married or should
we wait,

“ADAM”.

**Well, Adam, the answer is a
little obvious don’t you think?
Wait by all means and start your
lives together with pride and hap-
piness—all the greater because
you both exercised self control

SEWING

The style illustrated to-day is

| very quickly made and very com-
|fetable to wear in hot weather.
The back is two long panels with
a seam down the centre back, The
button on yoke and revers are
cut on to the back panels, To
gather in the waist line you may
use elastic thread or simply belt
it in which is easier and I believe
more comfortable.

The first step is to design the
lapels and revers on your basic
bodice front. Extend the yoke
about an inch beyond the
shoulder seam, Draw a V neck to
|the depth most becoming to you.
| Draw in the revers then fold paper
under on the V neck line and trace
revers.



FRONT

If you find you have trouble
getting the tabs on the ends of the
yoke right try working with a
complete front pattern.

Pin the yoke and revers to the
back shoulder seam and extend
back shoulder to meet yoke.
Straighten out top part of back
armhole, Make an extra copy of
,| the yoke and revers pattern for

Doctors Prove



——a



For a Brighter, Fresher <\
Complexion, use Palmolive



y
J

leading skin specialists proved

plexions in many ways. Oily skin |

finer.

i :
| PALMOLIVE F

Vou looMay Win

A Lovelier Complexion in 14 Days

va: S
Soap as Doctors Advised Yess

Palmolive Soap can improve com-

less oily—dull, drab skin wonderfully
brighter. Coarse-looking skin appears

SUNDAY

during this difficult period,
fully realise how hard it is for
you both to have restraint but if
you resist now, you will both be
all the more happy when you get
married.
* * *

DEAR MRS. CLARKE, It its
over a year since I first met my
boy-friend but there is one thing
bothering me. He has another
girl whom he still sees and I hear
that he has other girl-friends too.
Yet, if I go out with anyone else
he gets very jealous and will not
speak to me, I not know
whether to go on with him or not,
Please help me. — “A.M.L.”

**You must come to an under-
standing with your boy-friend
If you are both really and truly
in love there must be mutual
trust and you must both be faith-
ful to each other, Without this.
love could never live. Have a chat
with him, my dear, and explain
your own point of view. I should
be inclined to tell him that you
cannot go on this way and that
you will be forced to stop seeing
him if he cannot make up his mind
to be faithful to one only. I do

I to have to make a very

feel sure that he will understand

how you feel and that things will
work out well for you both,
*

1 AM very much in love with a

boy I’ve been going with for over
a year but we had a quarrel a few
weeks ago and he has taken up
with another woman who is mar-

ried. He says that she «can do

much more for him than I can,
Yet he still comes to see me, not-
withstanding the fact that he takes

this other woman to his own home

very often,

I love him so much and just do
not know what to do. Should I
give him up and try to forget or
should I just carry on as though
nothing were wrong?

—"M.A.F.” (St. Michael)

**This is where you are going

CIRCLE

By PENNY NOLAN

cutting the facing for them.

Put your basic back skirt pattern
on to your back bodice at the waist
line and draw a straight line from
the back armhole to the bottom
of the skirt.

If you wish a wider skirt you
may add two or three inches to
the width at the bottom of your
basic skirt before making this side



BACK

seam line. Width may also
added at the bottom centre back
and graded off to the centre back
neckline.
The front
front bodice

skirt is added to the
in the same manner.
The bodice in the front carries
the natural armhole. There is a
seam down the centre froat

Make a facing for the V neckline
or finish it with a piece of bias.
The front armhole may be fin-
ished with either a shaped facing
or bias. The facing for the back
armhole may be cut with the fae-
ing for the yoke and revers, Make
a shaped facing for the back neck-
line,

When you are ready to sew join
the centre baek seam first then
seam the back neck facing to the
yoke facing and fac® the back
armhole, yoke revers and back
neck line all at once. Chip the
seams, turn and press,

Join the centre front seams and
side seams. Then face the front
armholes, :‘10ulder seam on front
and neckline,













that so, co 8 36 skin specialists advised:
1 Wash with Palmolive Soop,

2 For 60 seconds, massoge with
Palmolive's soft, lovely lother, Rinse!

3 De this 3 times @ day for 14 doys

ooks

ae LOVELY cadet ETSY

ADVOCATE





cision, my dear. It must be obvi-
ous to you that this man does not
really love you in the true sense

of the word, but is just using you |

as a plaything. This other woman
has apparently got
great attraction for

I would advise
to her, I know too well that
it is a very hard thing to do but,
for your own sake and the sake
of your pride in yourself you can-
not let this situation go on as it is.
If you decide to make a break,

him, so

out of your mind altogether. On
the other hand, if you think of
keeping on there can be no true
happiness for you and you will be
faced all the time with doubts and
anxieties about this man—and you
know, my dear, I do not think
that this or any man would be
worth such sacrifice on your part.
We women are used to sacrifice
and so forth for our men and are
proud to be able to do it but there
is a limit.

“Bad luck” writes, My boy-
friend and I disagree a month and

a few days ago, but if I see him
and call him he comes to
me and makes love to me.
He has gone to live’ with!

another woman and I want to
know if there is any hope of his
coming back to me. I love him
very much,

**Do yeu really love this man?
That is the question you must ask
yourself and be very honest, my

dear. He could not really be in)

love with you, except that he likes
to make love to you when another
is not available. I should be in-
clined to let him go and have no
more to do with him. After all,
if you are going to be faithful to
him, the least he can do is to be
faithful to you.

If you too have a problem write

to Mrs, Clarke, c/o The Editor
The Advocate,

What's Cooking In
The Kitchen

The three best known ways to
cook rice are Rice Pilaw or better
the way the Turks cook
Indian rice and Curried Rice and
Rice Creole which is the way the
Cubans use to cook their rice.

Rice Pilaw

Olive Oil or butter; Rice;
Boiling water; Salt; Seasoning.

Put in the saucepan a bit of lard
(olive oil, butter or margarine
with or without seasoning accord-
ing to your particular taste), Pour

the rice which you have previous- |

ly washed into the fat and let it
cook for about three minutes
stirring all the time. Add then
the boiling water which has to
be double the weight of the rice
Stir again, season with salt and
let it start boiling again, cover
the saucepan with its lid and put
immediately in the oven where
you leave it for exactly 18
minutes. When ready, take the
saucepan out of the oven, add a
few pieces of butter, pour into a
dish and serve. You can make a
separate sauce if you like with
onions, or tomatoes, or garlic and
oil or anchovies,

Indian Rice and Currie
Indians cook their rice in quite
a different way. Put some Water
into a saucepan with salt. When
the water boils add the rice which

be you ‘have already washed and let

it cook. When ready wash it with
some more boiling water (some
people use cold water instead).
Then put it in a cloth and put it
into the oven for about 10 or 15
minutes, From time to time you
have to stir it with a wooden
spoon so that it will dry complete-
ly. Then pour it into a dish and
serve it either like this or with
some curry or with fried butter.

Currie

Onion 1, Butter or margarine
1 oz., Ham 2 oz. Thyme, Parsley,
Pepper Currie powder 1 teaspoon-
ful, Flour 1 teaspoonful, Water
I Egg yolk, -Cream or milk 2
teaspoonsful,

Put the butter or margarine in
a saucepan, Chip the onion and
let it fry. Be careful that it does
not burn. Add the finely chipped
paraley, the ham, the thyme and
the pepper. Then add the teaspoon-
ful of Currie Powder and the tea-
spoonful of flour. Let it cook for a
few minutes then add the water







Clarks Children's Sandals.



a choice of width fittings

long...

—no wonder you all
want them...

‘JOYANCE?

MADE BY C. @ J. CLARK LTD, (Wholesale only), STREET, SOMERSET, ENGLAND

big de-|

some |

leaving him)

it, |



(about 1 pint) and let it cook
slowly for twenty minutes,
the currie and add | beaten egg)
yolk
cream or evaporated milk.

boiling water, some salt, 3 ozs, of
lard( animal lard). and 1 pound
of rice. Cover the saucepan and
let it
minutes, The rice will have ab-
sorbed all the water by then. Add
3 more ounces of lard and stir
with a fork. You can use butter |
if you don’t like the lard.

wives feel the same but towards
the end of the flying fish season |
one gets so tired even of hearing |
the hawkers shout Flying fish. 1}
made up my mind to try and find |
new recipes and here they are:
three new recipes as easy as they
can be,

60 Countries say
“ More Clarks Children’s Sandals, Se

please”

All over the world mothers feel satisfied

What's behind this long-tested reputation?
Finest, richest leathers and rubbers .°. .
... scientific

design based on thousands of test
measurements... Clarks skill in
fashioning which makes their
footwear last so ‘' new," so

Over 126 years behind them 1

Se a a aM ls! =

Se

by EILEEN ASCROFT

[MBLEDON style-sette
W bloomer suit It is trim and becoming. with Its

fitted elasticised waist

tennis stars have already seen the first model

nas tried it on, Lorna Cornell played in
it during ine recent Prench cnampinships. y
make a clean one and wash him| White cotion pique makes a big come-back this year afvs the nylons
and semi-transparent materials of last season

larton. non-playing Wightman Cup captain ha:
for her veam for a fuli-skirtea dress. witb
Oniy Mrs Walker-Smith wil! not

American ».aureen Connol)

Mrs, Shepherd
chosen it
attractive side-butroning
wear the dress because she prete:

singles ; put she wil! have the same material

Maureen Connolly na- a Wimbiecon
nylon material. orlon

seersucker with a

court play the yoke wil
pale olue
English

ocket_tabs

organdie Foxe RRA tisets on” the “Shorts trimmed with appliqued

flowers

. . . and at the DERBY



THE RACE-GOERS SAID:

It has a oermanentiy pape skirt
Beryl Penrose. an Ausiraiian olayer wili wear a dri

nove: cotton mesh button-in yoke
be white. for off-the-court interva =|

player Lorna Cornel! has tailored shorts and matchin, SS
shirt. in white frost-bar acetate with white satin collar and



SUNDAY,

Behold! The bloomer suit
IT SETS THE STYLE

Peete ee ae eee ab

FOR WIMBLEDON



r this June will be the

and bioomer skirt. Several

an
s shorts and shirts for
dress u. the oewer-than

ess af white
Fo

sores and” Shirts. with

to-day—

us
=
Zz

JUNE 22, 1952








RIX sketches the
‘ » bloomer suit as
GLAMO . worn by Maureen
: Connolly. it is in
TO BE COMFORTABLE’ ha
7 acetate with an
7 L \ slasticisea = wai st-
of the official! Toppers- Jewellery trade is tollowing the
ten d D th royal flower spray fash:on For bana.
for-the-Derby Rye: “two guineas it can be Ddougn: }
public chose comfort rather) Qilie's ae) SAE hin nein
than glamour Ta Ee Pet ae
Black and grey silk nats were he a 7 rh
exception Most men wore Charm and charmers ss ht.
lounge suits and soft felt nats o
Women carried raincoats or OME women ure narwming,
umbrellas. only one woman ine others fiagve arm asked
eight nad nigh neels au'hor Diana Morgan wnat »
Many women who arrived in cars pro. piec “she on'reune 14s
brought alternative hats and course on charm in her piav oe
shoes in case the weather after Mv Pasion
changea : Mss Morgan -oniessec was
DePby . sande Pa Sar ge oecause of tne ftundamenral 5 !
meetin ; aR s 4 ditterence oetween so many ummer cur
day when people like tO enjovV women sne meets’ n rea. ute 5 .
themselves in comfortablé€ She descrines as Marien gre: ame ‘ne aot perm , then
clothes women Lady weeasnu:t tne cag Now we nave the
Spias’ of colour among the rather ory MP for Aberceen Sou'h tep;a wave Ustus ana cool for
somore feminine clothes was writer Lesiie Siorm elev'sior short -ummet nairstyles
i by the saris of ViSILOTS announcer Marv Maicolm anc Cnet advantage tt curls
rom the East Ladv Balcon the film producers Che na closer to the scalp ani
£1000 ftashicn wife can de used tor those untidy
ase W ‘ 2 shori strands at the nape o
AVOURITE roya: oieces of Tapeh trek ore detisvitiubyy wat. er p
Jewellery. st oresent are their best at the head ol a dinner ‘
diamond flower sprays fable 4 RA fashion
When she Queen lett for Balmoral .. ." Conan who nas charm doesn t HIR tasiion tor men. from the
or the Monday nignt train she iM . tort ail’: asnic :
wore ner diamond !ily vrooch eed ;o make any etfort at at Royal Academy olue shirts
given to ner in South africa in , Says Miss Morgan in ner olay SW" ang white collars. Portrait
the lapel of her black coat Real-life examples of women wh painter Davia Jagger has used

Che Queen Mother wore a
diamond flower spray about 6in
long pinned to her black dress

hand jewel shops are the
genuine Victorian flower pieces
Tf you can find them they cost
about £250 t
21t even ""e cheaner end of the



Sift
and 2 tablespoonsful of

Rice Creole
Put in a saucepan 2 pints of

cook for about twenty

FLYING FISH
I don’t know whether all house- |

nave
Morgan are actresses Kav Ham
mond. Margaret Rawlings. Vivien

ones
and

have
idy' anc a
nave

Fashion talipiec



Flying fish 6
English mustard half a
spoonful

White pepper

Marjoram

Fillets of anchovies

Oil

Lime

Flour

1 egg

Parsley.

Clean the fish and bone it. Put
4 teaspoonful of English mustard
in a cup, a tiny bit of white
pepper, quite a bit of parsley, the
dry marjoram and the fillets of
anchovies which yeu have pre-
viously mashed. Mix everything
with 4 glass of olive oil or melted
butter if you don't like the taste
of Olive oil, and add the juice of
half a lime.

tea-





CER oo.

“Pie
a %

48. ma,
By





if they get }










LOCAL AGENTS: ALEC RUSSELL & CO., BARBADOS

charm named by Miss

Nomen who want to follow royas Leigh and Dame Wenn en: G
fashion wil) find it expensive Oury former brewery Mr
Average price of a flower spray mandant, now a
in real diamonds 1s £1000 , director

| uch sought atter in the second- © T

this co.our scheme for both mis
portrais this
rox

season. of W

Esa. and Lieut.-colonel

. L. Hoare
Jagger
colourful than the sore eey
cream or white combination.

thinks It 18 re
in

he charming people are the tidY syirt manufacturers disagree with

always neat in appearance ~ Mr
mind The women who
charm are frequently un-
little disorganised
more ses anneal 100

unfashionable an
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED

it is

Jagger. They s@
an untidy.

London &reress Sernice

FROM PARIS COMES
A CHOIRBOY COLLAR



CHUIRBOY COLLAR in starched white organdie is
summer idea from Paris for changing the appearance 0

plain dark dress.

It looks most attractive worn over the ii.

décolleté boat-shaped neckline.

London Frpress Service.



Take now the flying fish one at
a time, cover each one of them
with the mixture like a veil and
leave them until you are almost
ready to go to dinner, Take then
the flying fish and roll each of
them starting from the tail, pass
them through the flour then in
the beaten egg and fry them in
hot lard or oil. When ready put
them on a dish and serve with
parsley and pieces of lime.

Oil 5 tablespoonsful

Pepper

Parsley 1 tablespoonful (chipp-
ed).



Breadcrumbs

Lime juice or vinegar,

Garlic.

Bone and clean the fish. Put
them in a pyrex dish so that they
cover the bottom with the white
part of the fish up. Add 2 table-
spoonsful of oil, salt and_ pepper.
Cut a few pieces of garlic then
finish by adding the chipped
parsley and the breadcrumbs.
Add the rest of the oil. Bake in
moderate oven for about 4 an hour.
When cooked add the juice of one
lime or more according to taste
er vinegar according to taste.



the fashionable woman wears

KAYSE

“coerce orto eminent i

FP nylon stockings





'

aye


a

SUNDAY, JUNE 22,



aorva’s
perfumsy . . . heavy, mysterious.
OovA'S @INK MIMOSA.
perfume thats diflerent— different.



“ prineess
takes up
the sword

by PATRICK FORREST

‘THERE is a hum of children’s voices from
the main room of St. Philip and St

James Hall, in

and parry.
Takin,

of this hall.

One of them is

e is takin
against Cambridge.

A chance—next year
The girls are not going about their ambition
Cromarty-
the Oxford maitre d’armes and Olympic coach
“Will they be good ah to fence agains
ASKS

easually. Training them is Mr.

Cambridge this
Dickson, “ No.
will havea

I watched president Gillian
Anne's Society. and secretary

year?’
Definitely not

their looks
Later Miss Rackham, who

Sandy e Lane. Northwood
Miss Dowling ced 2), trom
Ealing—di eir chantes
uridge the best

. e ae gelling 1

d we should

ackham

Leckford Road. Oxford
where infants are being given religious
instruction, but below there is
martial sound—the steely noise of thrust

fencing instruction in the basement
several times a week, are 16
women undergraduates of Oxtord University
~year-cld Princess Sebe
Derta of Ethiopia. She is in her second year
at Oxford, and is reading law. Like the other

embefs of the Oxford Ladies’ Fencing Club
lessons as often as she can
hoping to be chosen to fence for the University

but they probab!
chance of beating them next veal
Rackham,
Catherine Dowling
engage each other with a flerceness that belied

1s 22 and lives a!

coaching possible
stand a fair chance,” said Miss
“We will win,” said secretary Dowling

1952



a more

ckson
Mr. Cromarty
of St
Middlesex, and

Mount Avenue
against Cam-

They told me that each member of the club

has forsa) other forms of serious sport to learn
the art rs A aoa bn Miss Dowling has a

leaning towards
small- boat
Sailing.

They were
enthusiastic
about their

oach. Mr

romarty
ickson had as
pupil the
rown Prince
lav of Norway

fhe won hile
half ~ blue in
1926), whose

daughter, Prin
eess Astrid. is
now at Oxford

Like Princess
Sebel of Ethio-

ia, she is at

ady Margaret
all, but unlike
her. she does
nob fence.

I left Presi-
dent Rackham
and Secretary
Dowling dis-
¢cussii their
plans for team-
building. Their
though are
on Hilary term
next ear —
when four of
the 16 members
of the Oxford
club will cross foils with four
from Cambridge.

And now listen to Mr. C. L, de
Beaumont, Olympic swordsmf&in
and secretary of the Amateur
Fencing Association, on the up-
surge of the sport in this country.
At the London Fencing Club he
told me; “There between
700 and 8000 members of the
AFA and 350 clubs scattered all



over the ~=" Clubs find
that their in ee
every ¢: is g rapidly
because the interest. in
the svort

C'nb mempership costs as






IN THE BASEMENT of a chi

irch hall women

little a5 2s. 9 week, and that
includes lessons from qualified
leaders in about 200 areas.

Women score
“Fenoing is an ideal sport for
women. It is the one sport
where a woman can be matched
on equal terms with a man. In
some ways a woman may have
the advantage over a man oppo
nent because of her natural
poise AA adroltness,
it is a sport where physique
does not really come into it.”
Mr. de Beaumont said that the
cost of the spam ws ne bigh

——



SUNDAY



PRINCESS SEBEL DERTA
learns fencing at Oxford.

at Oxford

of Ethiopia



undergraduates cross swords.

According
extra
cost
woman between 7 to 12

a

foil,

to the number of
lessons taken it should
an amateur swordsman or

en
juipment
love and
de mront

year after buying
The jacket, mask.
Says Mr,

should cost £12 at the most.

“Then, of course, they last for

ever,” he said.

extra
reasons, cost up

Mr. de Beaumont toléi me that
lessons,

for special
to about 10s

each, even from top-ranking
coaches e

kcmdes Keusae Rerun a







...and a plague of BLACK EYES



e JOHN BAKER WHITE, MP
examines a blot on the
Eglish summer : the girls
in dark glasses...

[THE summer is on its way
and with it a bad out-
break of dark glasses
disfiguring the faces of
countless thousands of
comely young women.

What affectation, what
sense it all is.

During the war, in the strong
sun of the Middle East glaring
on the white bulidings. large
numbers of young women in the
Services and on che civilian
staffs of various Cairo-born
departments an to wear dark
glasses .The habit began to
spread to troops off duty. who
wore chea and horrific
spectacles with pink. green and
yellow rims bought :n the Muski
er off the hawkers outside the
Kasr-el-Nil_ barracks

Wise in his time the Director
of Medica! Services brought in
an order that no one in the Ser
vices was to wear dark glasses
without a medical certificate
Within a fortmghr nine out ot
ten of the ATS and WAAF had
discarded their glasses; the

non-








There is no

cost ean Nhe
same as that in Goya's w
is simply legs of it. bts 2

so that a woman could carry perfume about with her, in

no

ote ee ence eo poo
—— ae



Ano aow they ve

Rot glassiess

lasses—— but are they any better ?

enctian blind sun goggles are
German contribution to the 1952 scene

number of wearers among
troops was even lower.

It is reasonably certain that a
vest of London’s young women
now disterting their beauty and
charm would show exactly the
same result. The great majority
of people, least of all the young
do not need dark g-asses, except
perhaps for car-driving or
Soe when the sun is low in
the sky. or at the sea or for
reading and writing in the sun
More than that, the wearing of
dark glasses when they are not
necessary can permanentiy
weaken the resistance of the
eyes to sunlight. That is why
the Director of Medical Services
Middle East acted as he did

The other day T watched them
pouring out of South Kensington
Tube Station ... hundred f

the







In Paris
London

New York

women

are buying

perfume this new waj

INEXPENSIVE HANDBAG PHIALS
OF A COSTLY PERFUMIi

perfume made than Goya—yet it nec:
perfume in Goya handbag phials is the

famous costly bottles-



normally attractive, personable
young women, five out of ten
made hideous with the dark

glasses of a
aineugh the sun was still down

strange variety,

»ehind the high buildings of the

Harrington Road.

country women

The next morning I was out in*

: field with a squad of young
hoging. ‘They

were in the full glare of the sun,
he earth hot and dry, but there

were no dark glasses there. I

perhaps they will



iw some women of the Royal
observer Corps at work under a
udieds Bey, They did not need
lem eitner

So ugly
I suppose it is no good telling
ill those pretty ps in London
nd elsewhere how ugly they
ake themselves look. Th time
et over this
vanity as





yarticularly stupi

\hey have got over others.

end 50.
rnd _ attraction, good looks and

There is one consolation. This
the age of women between 40
They have the charm

od style. And they do not wear

‘ark glasses. When I see
liarlene Dietrich Irene Dunne
d Lynn Fontanne meet

there

were introduced by Goya

her handbag ; so that at any moment of the day,

matter where she
fragrance. Get a ha

Handbag Phials by 5S

xo. 5." Most hexurious of

The flower

In seven fragrances :
Decision, Vibration, Goya Heather.

Gardenia, Great
, Pink Mimosa, ‘No, 5,’

MADE IN ENGLAND

Sole Distributors

L. M. B. Meyers & Co, Lad.,

P.O. Box 171, Bridgetown

she could renew and refresh her
pallies phial of Goya perfume to-day

PARI
LONDON

NEW YORK

yublic in dark glasses I wi
ke back allt that I have said
s0ut those who are 30 years
OPYRIGHT RESERVED
London Express Service.







.

TWICE A



~
y
PS

ass



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LIFE TO CLOTHES

FAB Soaks
clothes clean without
hard serubbing FAB-
washed clothes give
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S



Mummy ... They Say |
You're Not My Mother

Every day a list grows longer:
the list of couples anxious, eager,
sometimes desperate to adopt a
child, to offer it their love, their
home, their name. At least ten |
would-be adopters ask for each of |
the 17,000 children who are adopt- |
ed every yeer in Britin,

And every day, too, people face |
the question “How—and when—
shall I tell my child he is not mine |

-but adopted?”

It is the worst question of all. A |
wrong answer can mar a life and
ruin a relationship, To the worried, |
kindly people who ask it, social |
worker Margaret Kornitzer has |
some comfort in a book published |
this week.* |

The adoptive parent must tell the |
ehild,- otherwjse, eventually
almost inevitably—he will hear
from others, with regults no one!
can predict. |

Case-histories prove this time |
and again. i

Mary, five-year-old adopted
daughter of a country accountant
and his wife, was playing
friends. There was an
A playmate jeered _ spitefully:
“Youre not your mummy's little
girl at all, You're only adopted, . .”

A silence followed this word she |
had not heard before, After she |
discovered its meaning she cried
for four days and would not be |
comforted, |

Peter, 17, had to produce a birth |
certificate when he applied for a!
clerking job. Only when he saw {
the certificate did he realise he
was adopted, and a world of love |
and kindness crumpled all about !
him,

AN ENDEARMENT |

It was a wrong act by the adop- |
tive parents of these two, They
feared to tell their children lest in
so doing they lost their love and

with
argument, |

be preserved by
mutual confidence than by trying
to preserve a fiction,

Says Miss Kornitzer; “If you
leve a child, and he knows it, you
can tell him anything he needs to
know without harming him, . .”

Well—how to tell him? And
when?
He must be told as soon as

he starts to ask questions; certainly | Lady’ by
well before he goes to school, Some {probably not as well known now-
experts! believe he can absorb the /adays as such a careful writer de-

knowledge even before he can
talk,

Dr. H. N. Pratt, of the New
York Hospital, himself an adop-

tive father, believes the best way
to start the telling is by whisper-

ing to the child: “You are my
adopted son (or adopted daugh-
ter).”

Then the word “adopted” be-

comes a term of endearment, It
should never be used, of course,
in anything but a happy associa-

tion.
‘I CHOOSE YOU’

One expert carries the doctor's
theory one stage further, She
tays: “The child should know he
was specially chosen by his parents
—and had another mother when

he was born—as soon as he begins | Can

to wonder ‘where babies come
| from’”

| The importance of telling the
|child he is adopted cannot be
| over-stressed. pe

| The British Medical Association,
{in a report on The Adolescent
| Delinquent Boy, last year said:
|“Some delinquents »

| children, and



their adoption, . . .”
World (Putnam), 16s.

| *Child Adoption in the Modern
!



|. SP

These are the
sort of smart
| sanda! = many
women would
like to wear
but you need
trim feet and
ankles like Miss
jane Smith to
carry them off.
They are of
and white striped












a chance of
a
t
| pis a. A, '
| bring these out
| when | come to
town to shop,
she said “They

nana feet

London Express

ta
E
inch

*

is wasted as

date, fo: half-an-hour beginning PHENSIC tablets cle... che head and dispel tightness
$i ae! * aes in_the 25 and and pain behind the eyes. The ng down high temperature,
megs ands, 11.75, and 9.58 relieve stuffy, congested feeling the same time soothing the
1 | nerves and counteracting depress: The aches and pains of ’Flu
7 | dis: i ime. PHENSIC | »blets act quickly and safely.

Wimbledon | isappear im no time ets act quic nd sate



st. But lasting affection and },,,,
deep trust are far more likely to dais ven
establishing at 9.15

are adopted
their delinquency |heard on
may date from the sudden dis- | BBC’s G.O.S, in ‘Sticky Wicket’, |
closure to them of the fact of



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IN BOND



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SIND TO HANDS DOMINION TEXTILE CO. LIMITED...
PAB is safe for daint- MONTREAL~ CANADA ,
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aves everything

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lean

ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN

B.B.C. Radio |
Notes

Wesi Indian Economy

As many of our readers know,
professer Arthur Lewis, the dis+
tinguished West Indian economist
has been discussing with Douglas
Hall im the Wednesday evening
‘Calling the West Indies’ the basic
factors of West Indian economy
in a four-part series of programmes

ee ct rae









2 SME ALR AT SET ee

eyicke*-

with .



called ‘Marginal Comments.’ In the
first three programmes which
have been heard on the three}

Wednesdays in June the discus-
Sion centred on population, land
and industry, In the last pro
gramme which will be heard next
Wednesday, 25th June, there will
be a general programme diseuas-
ing investment, planning and de- |
velopmen| This broadcast will
occupy the whole of the BBC’s
“Calling the West Indies” on that





| They neither harm the heart n
supply of Pi

pset the stomach. Keep a
THe Wimbledon fortnight epens NSIC tablets by you always

on Monday next, 28rd June, when |

the lawns of the All-England |
Club, ‘and’ especially the famed '
centre and number one courts, will 5
become once again a meeting | &
place for the world’s 7 ie lawn
tennis players. Each d#y—in addi-

‘ TWO TABLETS BRI

tien ta. four ‘live’ broadcasts which

I dreamed | went

& , toa formal in
tSte DUOULCDS OMS

CUICK RELIEF

C7 @








may not be audible here—there FROM RHEUMATIC PAINS, | MBAGO, NERVE PAINS,

will be a daily ‘Report from Wim- cs : Maidenette Strapless bra
bledon’ broadcasts in the BBC's HEADACHES, NEURALGIA, INS SENZA, COLDS & CHILLS

General Overseas Service with

impressions by Fred Perry and
recorded extracts of commentary
on some of the highlights of the ,
day's play, the programme being
introduced by Max Robertson, This :
‘Report from Wimbledon’ will be
yadcast twice for listeners in
at 5.00 p.m and again

lia big occasion is on your cal



this dream of a bra is
Maidenette
most fashion.

endar,
designed for you!
trap! s the
party-goer ever! Wonders

ider bare- shouldered

p.m. both being on the we clothes or cocktail
regular beams to this area in a NEnkek te” Strapless
the 25 and 3% metre bands, 11.75

¢ excellent figure control,



and 9.58 megacycles, giv !
Dainty meets make it extra fem-
Sevial By Henry James inige vdeniinb Nalin bonlen enn:

The new serial to be broadcast pors your cu rom below.
in the General Overseas Service In white or black vor.
of the BBC i The Portrait of a He fabru

Henry James, who is :
Genuine Maidentovm brassiere
ave made only in the United Staie
jperves to be. In the preface to this of Ainerien

novel which was written in
and 1881, Henry

1880
James describes
the theme as ‘the conception of a

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bravery and magnanimity; she had |
a fixed determination to regard
}the world as a place of brightness’ |

A)

7+
certain young lady affronting her a oy AS ! ae ee
destiny. The young lady is an bring beauty eye ONS Sar «
American, who ‘spent half her , i * Y Fe
time in thinking of beauty and into your life... a BACKACHE
|

dlourful

vith the loveliest, most

designs you ve ever seen in







jof free expression, of irresistible | Is YOUR
action: she held it must be detes- | printed seer ickers, cambrics , 7

table to be afraid or ashamed, She | th Js th er F ING
had an infinite hope that she VOLES ana naircoras inal Wear s

would never do anything wrong.’

with an air of freshness and wash











. . is ides Backache is usually the first sign of Kidney
In pursuance of this ideal concep- i 4
tion of herself she rejects two} without changing / colour... wonderful on = ere the boo ers
admirable suitors, the English ‘ it : e bi y get apy gy ® ed
Mirae “Mt eal atid the, anata for clothes for yourself or the children : fresh flowing to every nerve ar
| businessman Gasper Good- 4 a nea ¥ \ eet, SS 23 ne
wood, and marries the American oY phat : ' ¥ Half a century’s experience and scientific
|James’s most evil characters, dem FEIRC eK Ni FABR ie he) tests by doctors in famous clinics prove that
Broadcast in ten episodes the play Neos ee

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| Cricket Comedy | satisfaction assured or the material will be replaced. ey oo Ow = Dew Pe y 3/-
| A most amusing story is to be Always look for the name Ferguson on the selvedge. Pa ee oo a4

Monday next in the

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SEWING YOUR OWN CLOTHES

IS EXCITING WITH
BROADCLOTHS

in plain colours by

a midsummer play for cricket lov-
ers by C. Gordon Glover, which
will be broadcast at 7.15 p.m, on}
\Monday, 23rd June







|
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PAGE EIGHT SUNDAY stiarennieatiittineinan eels. TeV OCR



Ce earner = serene cette meant tet nce

SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 1952

ro

BARBADOS «ii ADVOCATE

fico a se Baa

Ltd., Broad St,

Bridgetown

Printed by the Advocate Co.,





chial

subjected to the importunities of electors
than there might well be if members are
elected or seek office with the ideals of
service to the community not as clearly

Sitting On The Fence

A

to write a daily column

SHORT time ago I offerea By NATHANIEL GUBBINS

granted the last wish.
In fact, he has not only pro-



PHOTOGRAPHS

Copies of Local Photographs



: for Pravda if Stalin would forecast said—th: J
nigel a: June 22, 152 sale imprinted as they are, say, in the United ot tes 000,000 roubles a week free first and. fine tol eet te tiny ‘saci aen Male Sas . Which have appeared in the
Kingdom. . Although I promised to dev. a aie th “Faitsen, the 18 in — mie ae ~ Advoe a Newspaper
: -education o ie faithless.” n. long, a an ©& me
VESTRY SYSTE MM Tn addition to the loss of efficiency which Pe lee ae oe of deve Psychiatrist and. range of about a yard. It fires are

THE Local Government Bill based on
the report of Sir John Maude has met with
opposition from the majority of members
of the eleven Vestries of the island.

Majority opinion on the Vestries consid-
ers that the Vestry system ought to be

|

will inevitably result from an inflated
electoral roll and the submerging of par-
ishes into large distriets the proposed local
government will cost the taxpayers more
money.

The raising of Bridgetown to the status

I now propose to take two
items of news from Moscow
radio and show him how an ex-
perienced and imaginative coj-
ig would have handled

em

Here are the items:—

Bridegroom

On two occasions when a bride
bridgegroom was going to the
church to be married, his “legs
buckled under him and he was
unable to walk.”

In_ the Medical Press Dr.
Charles Berg, Harley-street

psychiatrist gives this explana-

millions of rounds of atomised
insecticide a minute.

With Lottie the Devil Cat as
Second in Command, I went into
battle with my little gun against
four bluebottles and two wasps.

The enemy’s centre was
formed by the four bluebottles
buzzing on the window pane like
Highland regiments defiantly






Can be ordered from the...

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

of a municipality is something different. steps he raised his hand, and tion of his condition: — blowing their bagpipes, his left
retained and that with amendments to the This is a pr ought to token tie the aan seemed to shine | “Emotions that a person ae right ‘Gems’ to the two ae
Vestries Act and the operation of the new “Snow fell in Mt will not admit are buried deep wasps circling the battlefield on One I Caught Yesetrday!
Public Health Act defects in Vest d it can be taken within the Vestry system. a oscow yes- — = his mind, but ay come air reconnaissance. His line of
u Hic ea th Act defects in Vestry ad- The political party with a majority in the eT ack ie tied e ae surface . in phy- retreat was cut off by a cl
ministration can be removed. The case sun | reaction which cannot door.

for abolishing the Vestries seems to be
based on emotional theories that the Ves-

House of Assembly is pledged to support
the Local Government Bill. But a political
party grows in stature when it takes into

taxes of not inne Dhan $680 ae, i ee eee than $4.80 there
seems less likelihood of members being

shone and the snow fell on‘
different days, but who would
bother about facts when writing
for a Communist are

be controlled. So the bride-
ream Probably did not want

marry.”
Dr. Gubbins, the Fleet-street

I don’t know what Field
Marshal Lord Montgomery
would have done, but I attacked
his






“And You Should Have Seen the

GUTTYHUNK — Pure

Irish Linen Rod Limes
with a 90 lbs. breaking

t sas is anti ted d rupt rath ‘ centre, ordering Lottie to chilis
ry system is antiqua ec and corrupt ra consideration the objections which are * e ae i xtites: sale guard our flanks. "
er than on any detailed knowledge of ee ; é gratulations to my Har~- I gave the nearest bluebottle
ine made by the majority of responsible This is how Nathaniel Gubsky,f! l¢y-Street colleague on his bril- @
what Vestries do or do not perform. a ‘ ; of Pravda, would h written@ lant diagnosis of a case which 3 one-second burst from the gun.
Oi ln Re ook iliac tee ie critics to proposed legislation. There can | jj." ‘ave written# has its counterparts in other =F 4 moment it buzzed louder : .
=vP . be no room for doubt that the majority “As Stalin, human activities. than ever. Jen 2) abe fo PITCHER'S also stock:

position of Vestries and who have no idea
of what local government means are quite
willing to throw stones at the Vestry sys-
tem merely because they do not understand
it.

“Many persons”, writes W. Eric Jackson
in Local Government in England and
Wales, “are quite convinced that members
of local authorities get elected for personal
and private reasons, that they get some-
thing out of their membership—meaning
of course that directly or indirectly there
are monetary advantages, opportunities
for improving one’s business connections,
or some other financial gain to be got by
becoming a member of a local council.”

The comment is interesting because
while it reflects undoubtedly what a great
many people in Barbados say about Ves-
try members it is written about local gov-
ernment councils to which members are
elected by universal suffrage.

The Vestry system in Barbados is just
as open to abuse or criticism as the local
government system in England or Wales.
But the Vestry system in Barbados has
been so closely associated with the Angli-
can Church in the island (the rector of
each parish is ex-officio chairman) that it
is impossible to attack the Vestry system
without bringing the church into disre-
pute. A glance too at the names of Vestry
members of the eleven Vestries as pub-
lished in the Advocate Year Book 1951 is
adequate to show how fortunate the par-
ishes have been in the types of Vestrymen
they have been able to elect under the
present electoral system.

The conception of work in the island's
Vestries has been the conception of service
to the community.

The functions of the Vestries can well
be described as services to the parish.

” . ; oJ perhaps in our wer to give, Mi the interi f the yA0rs

Vestries are responsible for the r Spas and operate district markets. from Peuthentic sauces of Pre. Eariok, Althought ebook call- or tk ae edit teen

maintenance of churches and salaries of The erection of a district market at Eagle cord, the Introduction of Negro ed ‘True Description of the Newors they doue alow as
> island h h cathic ak r Slaves into this, the most ancient Congo and _ Its pease many wifes as they will haue,

church officers. In an island where the Hall will, it is hoped, be the first of several of the British Colonies in the Countries from the Writings and sume will haue 3 or 4, accord-

Governor is instructed by Her Majesty
the Queen “to the utmost of his power to
promote religion and education in the
island” the support of the established
religion of the island seems a necessary
function of local government to all who
duly recognise the priority which religion
must have over all other activities.
Vestries are also responsible for poor
relief, public health, parish roads, provi-

of those with the greatest knowledge and
experience of the Vestry system do not
agree with the proposed local government
bill. They consider that the Vestries Act

Mayor, Aldermen and Citizens of the City
of Bridgetown.”

In view of the possibility that certain
members of the Labour Party in the House
of Assembly will in any case insist on the
maintenance of more local government
units than the three councils proposed in
the Bill it seems prudent to retain the
Vestry system with amendments to the
Vestry Act and to raise the status of the
City of Bridgetown. To bulldoze the local
government bill through the legislature
against the advice and protests of citizens
with great records of public service on
Vestries would be unstatesmanlike.



EAGLE HALL

THE clearing of land at Eagle Hall
Corner will have attracted the attention
of many who are hopeful of seeing district
markets established in Bridgetown in the
near future.

The land which has been cleared has no
the proposed district
But opposite the clearing the

eonnection with
market.
tenants on Government owned land were
given a month’s notice in April to remove
their properties and to leave in prepara-
tion for the clearing of a site on which a
district market is to be constructed under
the supervision of the St. Michael’s Ves-
try.

District markets in Barbados have a
long list of champions and in 1948 legisla-
tion was passed empowering Vestries to

the assistance of the Colonial Engineer to
the Véstry and the Committee of the Ves-

god-like in his
white and gold Salers, es
ed the steps, snow clouds, dar!

and evil as the dogs and

‘bals of the coneuilon| Wi
mocracies, gathered in th
Northern pM and cast their

smiling features of our beloved"
leader and his ingrowing mous-
tache, Tovarich,

“In a silence so intense that
the sobbing of an overwrought
woman sounded like a herd of
cows with the hiccoughs, Stalin
raised his hand,

“As if obeying a signal from
a superior officer, the snow
clouds halted and rolled back,
and the sun, as bright as the
spirit that watches over our des-
tinies and as warm as the heart
that loves us as his own children,
shone over all,

“That was just another of
Stalin’s daily miracles, com-
rades, this time to show us how
easily he will deal with our’
enemies,

“The charwoman who shouted
‘It’s just

what the weather |

The People Of Barbados.XI

. had three wishes—to

“We have all heard of the
phrase ‘He spends money like a
man with no arms.’

“This describes perfectly the
condition of a man who avoids
settling a restaurant bill if
somebody else is likely to pay.

“He does not care to admit
jpet he is a lick-a-penny skin-

flint, but so deeply is this in
stinet’ buried in his mind that,
at the sight of a bill, an uncon-
trollable physical reaction tem-
porarily paralyses his arms,
keeping them out of his pockets.

“In other words, he does not
want to spend money, a conclu-
sion that could be reached only
by a trained psychiatrist.

“My advice to girls who are
waiting at the church for a
bridegroom with buckled legs is
to send her relatives to hog tie
him with ropes and bring him
to the altar on a stretcher.”

Into Battle

WHEN I was very young, I
e a church
bell ringer, to drive a tram, and
to shoot flies with a tiny gun.

A good fairy, disguised as a
manufacturer of insecticides, has



the Moor, spss were wack,
threw up its six or r eight hands
and died.
* * *

Another one-second burst fin-
ished a second bluebottle, and
there is no doubt that I would
have routed their main army
with 100 per cent. casualties if
Lottie had not attacked ‘without
orders.

She not only trapped a third
bluebottle on the window pane
with her paw, transferring it to
her mouth to consume under the
table, but got in the line of fire
and held up the attack.

Although I brought down the
wasps with accurate ack-ack
fire, the fourth Dluebottle
escaped through an open
window.

At a court martial to be held
shortly Lottie will be charged
with disobeying a lawful order
while on active service, eating
the enemy in defiance of Queen’s
Regulations, and with conduct
prejudicial to good order and
military discipline.

The findings of the court will
be promulgated.

LES.

By John Prideaux

“SLAVERY”

THE introduction of the Afri-
, can as a slave to Barbados,
appears to have just taken place
without any definite record of
the exact date of its commence-
ment. In June 1823, a Commit-
tee of the Council consisting of
Messrs; Ren Hamden, Nathan
Lucas and John Rycroft Best
was appointed to inquire into
the then state of Slavery in Bar-
bados; and Dr. Lucas records
that he endeavoured to co
ute the history of the intr
tion of Slavery and the encour-
sent held out to our ancestors,
as well as to they themselves,
by the Mother Country. He
states that the report became
voluminous, and was sent to
England for publication. Dr.
Lucas quotes — “it is not now

can be amended and that Bridgetown shidowes Nop “crowds. in Rede
should bear the corporate name of “the Square, but also on the noble.

West Indies.”

Dr. Lucas continues—‘The
first Settlers here never
dreamt of Sugar at their first
coming: They brought Eng-
lish labourers with them, de-
nominated “Christians” in all
Deeds and Apprisements, in-
dented to Serve for a period
certain. These serving their
indented time frequently rent-
ed a few acres of land from
the great land holders, after
the manner of England, for a

It is relevant here to describe
some of the history of the West
coast of Africa, as it is from this
quarter that most of the colour-
ed people of the West Indies
came. The fifteenth century was
the era of the great voyages of
discovery. During this century
the outlines of the coast of
Africa began to come into focus.
In 1482 the Portuguese mariner
Diego Cao found the mouth of
the Capes River in West Africa,
and in 1485 he sailed up this
river to the first falls, a distance
of 135 miles.

The Portuguese founded colo-
nies near the mouth of the Congo
and endeavoured to convert the
coastal tribes to Christianity;
but made only a few attempts to

Tales of Edward Lopez, a Portu-
gues,’ was published in 1591,
little was done to develop this
country. All Europe’s eyes were
turned to the New World, where
Spain was becoming fabulously
rich from the gold and silver
shipped from there.

The resistance to work shown
by the natives of this section,
(the New World), and the teach-
ings of the Bishop of Chiapa,
(see Article I of this series),
opened a the slave trade from

This also set in motion another
prospect of the slave trade, the
tribes of the interior went fur-
ther inland and fought other
tribes to bring back slaves to sell
to the coastal natives, who in
iarn sold them to the traders.
It is felt that these wars were
unnecessary and were only a
means of obtaining gain from
those unfortunate wretches who
were captured during battle and
brought back to be _ sold as
slaves,

In 1654, one visitor to Barba-
dos recorded —
“This Island is inhabited with
all sortes: with English,
French, Dutch, Scdétes, Irish,
Spaniards they bring Tues:
with Ingones and miserabell

ing as they find thayer bodie
abel: our English heare doth
think a negor child the first
day it is born to be worth
O5li, they cost them noething
the bringing up, they goe all
ways naked: some_ planters
will haue 30 more or less about
4 or 5 years ould: they sele
them from one to the other
as we doue shepe.’ (2)

Another visitor recorded on
the 12th of Noverpber 1710—
B Barbados Isle inhabited













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is 3 ? yearly money rent. Some of Africa. he English saw that
ste: Peas mr ahi is a purie aber try responsible for supervising the erec- these Leases are in~ my other nations were making Pree Sanat sai
and cemeteries and grents to charitable Papers: The _ profits were money out of the slave trade, ten thousand knaves Paints include : SUPERTROPICAL ANTIFOULING COMPOSITIONS

institutions.

Before prejudging the Vestry system
citizens must ask what is the record of
the Vestries in these respects?

The work of the Vestry with regard to
the relief of the poor and social services
can be evidenced from Vestry records
where it may be noticed that far from
standing still the expenditure of Vestries
has mare than doubled in the last ten

years, and that no less than 50 per cent.

of expenditure has been applied to poor
relief and social welfare,

With regard ‘to roads the excellent road
network of this island has for generations
aroused the envy of neighbouring West
Indian islands and the admiration of visi-
tors from every quarter of the globe. The
Vestries’ road record stands very high.

Only someone wholly ignorant of the
conditions of burial grounds and ceme-
teries in other countries could seriously
complain about burial grounds and cem-

tion of the Eagle Hall market will no
doubt have consulted with contractors as
to the type of building best suited for
erection at Eagle Hall. But the standards
of building in Barbados though deservedly
high are based on traditional styles
designed for ages where pressure of space
was not the important consideration it is
today. What is needed at Eagle Hall is a
market which will not only free the shop-
walks and street corners of hucksters, but
which will allow the free entrance and exit
of motor vehicles. Nothing,will be gained
if at Eagle Hall the cluster of hawkers
along the sides of the streets is replaced by
parked rows of cars, lorries or other
wheeled transport.

The planners of the Eagle Hall District
Market must plan for customers who
arrive on wheels as well as by foot. A
parking place will have to be provided or
a free right of way. The actual design of
the market is also important.

An attractive market at Eagle Hall will

trifling, the cultivated plants
for sale Tobacco Cotton.

“But the Civil War in Eng-
land soon produced a new
order of things, introduced the
Culture of Sugar, with it
Negro Slavery.”

“The Mother Country forgot
she had Colonies; and the
Dutch monopolized. the whole
trade of the Island, import and
export.—From the voyages of
the Dutch West India Com-
pany to the Brazils, they came
to the knowledge and value of
Sugar making; they supplied
the Island. with Sugar Canes,
Mr, Drax with the model of a
Mill and Works, and imparted
the art of making Sugar. It
was very soon found that
White men could not stand the
field culture and manufacture
of Sugar, even if they could be
procured in ent num-
bers; and Negro Slaves, as in
the Brazils, were substituted
for them; and besides, the
pride of Freedom creates such
a difference of Rank, that
White Labourers, no doubt,
would not condescend to work
in the field with them.”

“It is reasonable to suppose,

and they followed the Portu-
guese traders in this respect. The
Portuguese had long recognised
the importance of Gambia, and
had established several trading
posts along the river of the same
name. The English followed
their example and annexed
James Island, a waterless spot
ten miles up the estuary of the
Gambia, and turned this island
into a fortress. They later set-
tled at Bathurst where they
could more easily control the
river. The trade, all in slaves,
ivory, beeswax, and gold dust;
opened up the overland routes to
the North and East and gave rise
to. settlements on the river which
became the ports and terminals
of the caravan routes.

The enslavement of the Afri-
can in the English colonies was
nothing exceptional in the his-
tory of the world, as slavery in
some shape or the other had
been the common law of most
nations in most ages; so the ex-
istence of the slave is no special
shame or blame to our forebear~
ers. In many states of society
the doom of slavery may have
been a reprieve from death
either as a prisoner in warfare
or as a Wrongdoer sentenced for

Religion to thee’s a
Romantick storey
Barbarity and ill gott
wealth thy glo
ll Sodom’s Sins are
centered in thy heart
Death in thy look and
Death in every part
Oh! Glorious Isle in
Vilany excell
Sin to the Fe any
fate is Hell,’’¢

The Quaker movement was
one of the first of such move-
ments to abhor slavery. George
Fox, the founder, visited this
Island in 1671, and records in
his journal how he councelled
the Quakers on this Island to
train their slaves up in the fear
of God, and to require their
overseers to deal mildly with
them, and not to uSe_ cruelty
towards them, as was then too
often the custome, and after a
certain number of years of ser-
vice to set them free.

John Smith, a Quaker visit-
ed Barbados in 1742 and re-
corded—“They have Abund-
ance of Negroes on this Island
some of their Estates in the
Country having upwards of

nou PrP ww PY

‘ Nf 200 of them. Nay I was told
d that the Dutch being the Capi- pti. “oni bist seal y

teries in this island. improve the appearance of a part of St. talist, possessing Ships and ih SPE OCTET Bstates ‘had woe we
Michael which stands close to the most Manufacturies, and Settle-e —_It_is believed that the huge t

Can it be that the outery against the
Vestries wherever there has been an out-
cry is based on a misunderstanding of
what the Vestry system is?

W. Eric Jackson in the book mentioned
above notes: “there is, of course, a certain
type of elector who thinks that because he
once voted for a candidate, this gives him
a right to ask the candidate (when he be-
comes a member) to use influence on the

widely used highways of the island, Tour-
ists ought to want to visit the Eagle Hall
market. If it is attractively designed and
surrounded by shade trees they will make
a point of going there,

The Vestry of St. Michael’s is no doubt
aware of all these points and will be giv-
ing them careful consideration before the
plans for the district market are com-

ments on the Coast of Africa, |
which England had not; as is”
expressed said by Anderson.”
in his Commerce, ‘in loco;’ didt
not bring Slaves to us, ‘after
the manner of the Portuguescy
in their Colonies, and receiv
payment in Sugar. This is
the most reasonable conjectu

of heir first
here; for both General and
Local history, to my know-
ledge at least, is silent; an
all that we can now gather
from Ligon, and Anderson,

introduction 9

portion of the slaves brought to
the West Indies belonged to the
first named category. For more
than two hundred years this
horrible trade continued, the
West coast of Africa was de-
populated not only by the expor-
tation of its men and women,
but also by the wars and re-
sultant famines and plagues
which were a by-product of the
slave trade. The white settlers
and traders armed the coastal
natives so that they could go into
the interior for slave raids. The



Negroes and they use them
coarsely giving them hardly
any thing to Eat but a pint of
Corn a day for each Negro and
a little Salt.” (4)
(To be Continued)
1. Lueas Manuscript Vol. 1.
iscellaneous, pages 42—
45. B.M.H.S. Journal Vol.
X, pages 15—17,

2. Henry Whistler’s Journal of
the West India Expedition,
1654. Sloane M.S, 3926 Brit-
ish Museum. B.M.H.S.
Journal Vol. V p 185. ‘

3. BM.HS. Journal Vol. xv,|



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BEFORE







elector’s behalf. pleted. It is possible, however, that the ag zoe a, found oe ee ogee x page, 50. aetna
There is a general feeling that a mem- existence on the staff of the Governor of in existence, are — silent.”1) * and battles were often furious. page 83, ’
ber exists to serve the interest of the elec- the Windward Islands of an Executive ay east AFTER
tors, and it is not always easy to determine Architect who was partly responsible for
whether a member, in doing a good turn the town plan of Castries may have been OUR READERS SAY 3
for an elector is serving public or private overlooked. That executive officer periodi-
interests.” cally visits Barbados on official business. “Less Docile” “that if we had a less loath- “less docile” . The whole sentence | $ Every Bottle of

Under the present safeguards by
which membership of Vestries is restrict-

|
\

There seems no reason to believe that if
his advice were asked as to the type of

markets to be established in Bridgetown |
and its suburbs,

It is unfortunate for Barbados that
there is no office of ‘town and country
planning in which all the requirements of
a district market could be outlined by a
competent architect.

The government of Barbados has offered

To The Editor, The Advocate—

some people”, 4
Mr. Editor, do you think any

should read ‘ ‘if we had a LESS |
DOCILE people and a more poli- |

tically conscious people, it would | ¢




GODDARD'S GOLD BRAID RUM

SIR,—In part of the report of politician so personally irre- :
ed and qualifications for voting are based market jmost suitable for Eagle Hall it aa speech in the House on Tues~ sponsible as to refer to his peo- ba retihaent ed oe lead-| IS 3 YEARS OLD
aa sae a ade ; ; alt Si gt Ua day, it is stated in one sentence ple as “loathsome”? The words |
on payment in the previous year of paro- would not be readily given. that I referred to the people so erroneously misquoted were V.B, VAUGHAN, | %

a






SUNDAY,

JUNE -22,



1952



Ten Days Under Canvas;

If you look very closely as you_day the flagof the Barbados Regi-

Nearer to
the casuarinas stands the armory

drop down from
Hill towards the
country: you will

Cherry Tree
flat Belleplaine
see something

bright and shining among the
fat pork shrubs. It is the silver-
painted ater tank which the

HighwayS afd Transport Depart-
ment have erected for the Bar-
bados Regiment whose ten-day

camp at Walkers’ Savannah ends
this morning.

To enter Walkers’ Savannah
you must’pass the country house
of Barbados’ only lady member
of the House of Assembly. The
approach to the savannah is along
a dusty/cart track just tolerable
for motor vehicles in dry weather.
On “both sides of the track tall
prickle-studded cacti grow at in-
tervals: until close to the camp
there is a profusicn of «mall sea
grape trees. Walkers’ Savannah is



ment flaps in its place.

tent and still closer is the tent of fer it. Prowler guard mounts at
the quarter-master, the important 1815 and the retreat’ is ceremoni-
tent in which is stored quantiti¢s ally sounded in the presence of
of meat, tins, vegetables, garden all the camp at 1830. Supper is
produce, and bacon from the near- served at 19.30 and the canteen
by bacon factory at Gregg Farm. closes at 2100. A bugler blows
Meat and ice are kept in a large first post at 2130 and last post at
ice box. Across the way from the 2200. At 2215 the lights which are
quarter-master’s ration store is supplied by the camp’s own gen-
the cook house, built under the erating set are out. That was the
easuarinas from wooden frameé= camp routine on Tuesday last
work boards and galvanise sheets week when I spent two hours
which belong to the Barbados away from the heat and bustle of
Regiment. Within this half-open Bridgetown.

kitchen ‘huge wood-fired stoves

are used to cook for two hundred
men. The soldiers’ dinner, tea and

supper is served on tables placed
nearby and
heat of the sun by the cool canopy
of casuarina foliage overhead.

A stone throw away is the bare

protected from the

SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



























Swimming in the pond, football
in the open pasture near the tents
or deck tennis for those who pre-

But a
“camp routine

slip of p per labelled
gives little idea
of the soldiers’ strenuous activi-
ties which cannot be conveyed by
block letters typed on a piece of
*. During the two hours I

ent in the camp soldiers were
going through continuous motions









PAGE NINE

)





nh 4. \

a



a

To lighten
J our step pune
and your budget

wonderful
{ristoc » /

Yond.



















a natural bowl which lies at the rolled up tent.of the medical or- laden with rifles, tin hats and Y free as a breeze in these

foot of sloping hillocks on the derly where daily sick parades are field packs. beautiful nylona by Aristoo, who are specialists

land farthest away from the sea held. Behind the.mess tables is ; : open '

while _ tree fringed sand dunes the eae nteen which is They were learning how to in fi okings exclusively. Their prices gre almoat

shut off its view of the sea. As opened three thines a day -and. camouflage 1 ves behind the shamefully low; but their value is high . .. so high that

you look straight ahead towards where soldiers’can consume liquid neighbourin pe Eushes: some Tho London Fashion Designers specify thet their models wear Aristoc at th
Chalky Mount you will notice a and solid refreshment in excess of of them were called upon to ex- ddenkinn} achiathicinn, Thana ere shadaa sé sohaevers mood. Gilad with avers
glade of casuarinas which lead to Official rations. tinguish a fire: while others were stip dreaa ... Pay yourself the subtlest of compliments

an enclosed pasture where cattle busily preparing rifles, Brenguns |

for slaughtering are being reared At night. a prowler guard of and mortars for Wednesday's all get several pairs as quickly as you can
by an enterprising American who twelve men keepS watch on the day excursien to Snipers Valley

hails from Texas. Beyond the
fenced-in pasture land there is a
natural Jake or pond in which
officers and men of the Barbados
Regiment have been swimming
daily for the last nine days. The
water of the pond is not as entic-
ing as the nearby sea but is free
from. dangerous currents. Oppo-
site the casuarina trees as you
face the direction of Pico Te
iffe is the treeless savannah cle

sleeping camp. Cut off from the at the foot of Chalky Mount.

the aristocrat of stockings





George Huaite






ar-









loaned by the Department of
ing on which the sand coloured Agriculture and — the electricity
bell tents of the Barbados Regi- lignts and other camp in tallations
ment have been pitehed. Oppo- erected by the pioneer jfatoon

site the tents a large Union Jack

Will be wanted nO more and will
sways in the breeze.

have to be. collected. After spend-
jug Wo hours at Walkers I could

On visitors’














hoi help. regretting that more of
he island's young. male popula-
tion Were unable to experience
tne stimulus and good comrade-
ship that has been felt by the
200 members of the Jarbados
Regiment in this year’s annual
c mp

But the success of this year’s
camp will give a much needed

fillip to the activities of the Regi-
ment and maybe in a year or two
4hke annual camp will be spent in
neighbouring St. Lucia or St.
Vincent,

A MEMBER of the Regiment
LOOKING DOWN on the camp from a hill behind. To the righ: is the casuarina grove.

stands guard in a tour of sentry
duty.

rest of Barbados in this natural The soldiers have not been
tree bordered savannah the sol- having an idle time at Walkers.
diers of the Barbados Regiment But there has been some fun to
have been spending ten days of prove the adage that all work and

recat |
os A |



crowded life.. Roused from their no play makes Tommy dull, A
bell tents in which they have camp concert and sports ended
been slumbering peacefully in last week's activities and the 2 y Z
groups of seven and eight by a Band dressed in their colourful d
bugler’s shattering reveille call at. Zowave uniform provided music nee give you no anxiettes
5.30 a.m, soldiers are ready YY for visitors to the sports and
inspection at 0630 and breakfast prought brightness and music to j
is served from.0700—0745, és the community centre at Belle- | There need be no restless nights, no tears, no baby disordera,
‘The day’s routine begins with plaine. | ,
Crea at0800 and the first break aon ) if you have Ashton & Parsons Infants’ Powders handy,
- pf fhe day, is at 11 a.m, Dinner It really is an ideal site for a \ Mothers all over the world have found them soothing and
is served at 1246 and the day’s military camp this Walkers’ Sea- |
ONE BYE the “hour; one eye"*faratle @nds At Y615, Tea is ready vannalh and it seems 3 ow coat } cooling when baby is fretful through teething, and, best of all,
tells the mee rae tee there is” from’ to-day. me woter pipes | they are ABSOLUTELY SAFE.
INFANTS’ POWDERS
}
'



TP/akla









| Your
| Greatest

Alessing
Is Good

A SECTION relaxes by doing various chores
town by reading the “Advocate,

One soldier keeps ‘au fait’ with what is going on in



BY THE WAY..

- By Beachcomber













HE word “Périgueux” falling ogainst the rich in P&is, which | Vohu-Bohu
on my ear, I recalled how, in, kept, and have in my desk to th |
the Place Francheville there, I day. For he distributed copies of MAN who sneered at.a hor H lth
once watched a man who was it, and we all howled the ch A was Wicked’ by the hor 1} ea
trying to sell bootblacking, hard To ptove the excellence of his Quner and promptly kicked t! |
by the statue of cld Bugeaud, who polish, "he poured water over horse The horse then kicked Good health is the greatest asset a man or woman
fought as a sergeant at Auster- young = man 5 shoes, and then owner, The sneere jeered at ti can have in fact, it is the only REAL asset. It j
Ms blacked them. The result was nil, ie: but was kicked by the | depends on good living habits. It is doubly assured |
but the young man bewitched, | a: ON; Owe ) both: tate, thet| by a REGULAR visit to a physician. We stand ready
Froduoser One thing, #f a time, bought a tha, Wi ee ; a aes a upc iy { |! at all times to fill all prescriptions written by your |
ee ly : t ah ; gy lir hea one t} ’ own doctor ot
Myself: Then here is a blow Prodnose: What a_ pointle vo men li n eos. Be sure to send us your next prescription and be
IP oe ates Sateae aes a snd ioe es de eae ye assure of pure drugs compounded with accuracy.
This salesman’s patter was Myself: Not at all. It will in- pay to let people sneer at yt
ending, and he even sang a song spire commercial travellers. horse, e







KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

nnn

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p
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asada ~saeillipiiieaiaginatitniiansiehl:

he Height of



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i $ ig jv WH } MAXAM STEAK & KIDNEY PUDDING. ...per Tin .69
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in Cotton, Art Silk, and }}|}) ESTACOURT STUFFED OLIVES per Jar .89
g Nylon in “Fashion-right” These are Recent Arrivals... . 1 i Pati PLAIN OLIVES per Jar 62
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styles. 4 4711 E. de Calor } i cee oe @ vours) per pkt. 19¢.
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i? LION WHITE PEPPER per " 39¢
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PAGE TEN



THE ROMANCE BUCKINGHAM PALACE—-PART 6

The King’s

When

A FEW days before the bombs
fell on Léndgu and Buckingham
Palace became one of the first
buildings te_receive a direct hit,
the King and-Queen were enter-
taining 300 “disabled men tc a
party infthe garocns

The sirens sounded and the
King, though afraid that some of
the men might resent being
asked to take cover, ordered
them to shelter in the Grand
Hall.

He was surprised to hear late:
that one of the men had said:
“Oid Goering deserves a vote oi
thanks for this"-—‘‘this” being
the chance of seeing the inside
ot the Palace,

On September 8, 1940, a time
pomb fel on the Palace, It ex
ploded on September 10, The
King and Queen were at Wind-
sor and nobody on the staff was*
*hurt, but tons of masonry were
sent hurtling right over the roof
into the Quadrangle and almost
every window in the North Win
was blown out,

Glass, soot and rubble coverec
the private apartments, includ
ing tne Royal bedrooms anc
advessing-rooms, the _ King’:
baiconied workroom and the
Queen’s bow-windowed drawing-
room.

The steel diving tower in the

swimming pooh (it used to bt
the Nortly Conservatory) was
twisted out of shape and the

glass roof of the Picture Gallery
lay shattered? on the floor—as
nearly 100 years before, it hao
been smashed during a frea.
hailstorm.

No Quarter

Next day the King and Queen”
returned to the Palace, .
s dil

were uninhabitable,
bomber Gropped five bombs on
the Palace.

Two exploded in front of the
building between the railings and
the Queen Victoria Memorial,
two in th» Quadrangle and ons
on the floor of the Chapel

This last bomb made a hole
in the roof orly two feet in
diameter, but it did so much
damage when it exploded that
even today the Chapel cannot be
used roe

Queen -Vietoria’s Bible, in
which all Royal births had been
recorded. 6 and since her
reign,

All the Ne oibiows in. nie Chape"
ante-room were blown a
ithough life-size portraits of the
ex-Kaiser, the last Tsar and the
late Emperor Franz Josef of
Austrian were w

As elsewhere, the blast had
freak etects. Im a corridor a
ae painting of the

Cambridge was pitted with
broken glass and fragments of
masonry, While a ©
mirror hanging on one side of
st was untouched

The dive-bomber itself was
shot to pieces by Spitfires. One
member of the crew baled out
but his parachute failed to open
and he was killed on a roof not
far away.

Meanwhile
Que

the King and

cn had scarcely time to in-

spect this second lot of damage

to ther chome before they had
‘ et off on a tour of blitzed
London to visit other homes that
had been. bombed.

sits
| SEA: VIEW GUEST
§



OCBS SOY oOoe, ‘

~ HOUSE

HASTINGS, BARBADOS
Daily and Longterm Rates
quoted on request.
Permanent Guests
welcome,

Dinner and Cocktail
Parties arranged.

. H, BUCKLAND

Proprietor. x
%
Prdstie so wines iter tates. atpteteed

[SSS SSE SS

ORIENTAL |
PALACE

HE A DUVEMERE FOR
|
}

POCEEO SEES









From Tina. CHINA &
CEYLON

THANIS

er. Wm, Hy. 5).

Diai 3466



FLASHLIGHT ||
BATTERIES |

by |
G.E.C.
18c. each

CITY GARAGE |

VICTORIA STREET

MARGUERITE
PEACOCKE

The following Sunday
Palace was bit tov the wura tun
while the Hing and wuce
again at Winasor,

In March, ivei, three bombs
dropped on tne rorecuurt aha
two on the North Loage, killing
phe of we policemen On auty
ihe porter wo normally occu-

By

the

nm Wes

plied tne Lodge was Sale iN a
sneiter and nis Canaries and biue
persian cat Were rescuea from
se febris some days jater

No Lifts

Finally, a V-i explodca in the
grounds in August 1944, wreck-
ing We summernouse.

there were, of cours », shelter
helow the Palace — converted
basement rooms which had Ww be
approached by stipulated routes
to avoid congestion on the stairs.

The King and Queen, like
everyone else, had to walk dowu
to the shelter as no lifts were
used during an alert. At first
inyone in the Palace when a
raid began had to stay until the
All Clear as the outer gates were
closed, but the rule was relaxed
later when raids were more often

on” than “off.”

No Frills
The shelter prepared for the
King and Queen had been a

sapherpaicts sown and was fai
{ rately equipped than
might be imagined, It did not
in the least resemble a sub-
terranean, State apartment.

The flowered wallpaper was

. faded and a large service sink
was exposed to view. Rugs
partly covered the linoleum
Nooring and a plain deal table,
normally used for sorting house-
hold linen, made a dressing table
for the Queen,

Two long crimson-brocaded
sofas and a pair of armchairs,
brought down from upper rooms,
sat oddly in these homely sur-
roundings.

There was a small, round gilt
table with a tea- tray laid with
two white cups and saucer:
each bearing the Royal crest

@ was an electric kettle
for making tea, Patience cards
for the Queen, a radio, some
magazines laid out in orderly

array by a footman, bottles of
mineral water, glasses, torches,
notebooks and pencils—in fact,
much the same little collection
ot handy items which the aver-
age householder gathered into
the room where his family might
most safely await, the All Clear.

No Favours

There was also a telephone so
that when the took shelter
he could in touch with the
outside world.

After the outbreak of war the
Royal household and staff were
quickly sane The staff were
called up their age groups,
there wine “no reservation” for
Royal servants,

The King’s valet, who became
a Guardsman, and his chauffeur,
who joined the Royal Horse
Guards, were seconded for duty
!o the King. This was the most
convenient arrangement, as the
King’s duties often took him to
ureas banned to civilians, so that
his personal attendants had to
be members of the Services.

Throughout the war the King
wore the uniform of one or other
of the Services,

Simple war-time menus were
served—the Royal family was
subject to rationing e the
general public—and so of the
money saved was used to pay
allowances to staff in the Forces,

-
|

FACTORY INSPECTION

Don't let
Inspector
napping.
Commence
fence
} Machinery.
We can

prices that

competition.

CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner Broad

| -



the Factory
catch you

around your

supply
EXPANDED METAL at



Was Bombed !.

Other money saved Was in-
vested in National Savings and
subsequently handed to the
Treasury to off6et payments due
to the Royal family urder the
Civil List.

To the Palace during the war
years came a constant
of the nation’s heroes:
survivors, Battle of Britain crews
and men of the Bomber Squad-
rons; Eighth and Fourteenth
Army men; commandos, para-
troopers, an@ men from the
Normandy beaches, Arnhem and
the crossing of the Rhine; sail-
ors from submarines and con-
voys; men and women who
fought on gunsites, in bomb dis-
posal squads, Civil Defence and
Home Guard.

No Courage

And with them came wives
and mothers, fathers and sweet-
hearts, for each was allowed to
bring two guests.

For some of the men decor-
ated, the ceremony was an ordeal
as well as an honour. In the
presence of their Sovereign some
found themselves wanting in the
courage they haq not lacked in
the face of the enemy.

..1t is not recorded, however
that any tollowed tne example
of the Australian who, arriving
at the Palace to be decorated
durmg the first Werld War, was

To Buckingham Palace came
Queen Wilhelmina with nothing
but the clothes she stood up in.
Another exiled Sovere; King
Haakon of Norway, his
letters directed to the Palace
Post Office so that his own
address might be kept secret.

The Princesses paid only occa-
sional visits until the King
learned that the end of the war
was imminent. Then he brought
his daughters back to Buckiug-
ham Palace and on VE Day, as
the crowds surged up to the
Palace gates, the Royal family
came out on the balcony, where
they were joined by Mr. Church-
All.

No One Knew

Princess Elizabeth wore the
uniform of a junior officer in the
A.T.S. In the last few weeks of
the war she had been undergoing

a driver's tr course during
whieh she drove for the

pk a time, ean Hill
with “L” plates on her vehicle, |:

On VJ King and
Tatcenr “hite Wie “danaheses

inconspicuously dressed with
searves round their heads ana

unrecognised even by the people
they Tubbed shoulders with,

slipped out of the Palace by a
side entrance and mingled with
the cheering crowds.
Meanwhile, two heavy lorries
escorted
had bro
art treasures worth hundreds of
‘thousands of pounds.

But reinstatement of the
Palace its pre-war position
was a slow process that even to-
day is not complete.

Next Sunday

The wedding of Princess Eliza-
beth and the Birth of Prince
Charles. How Queen Mary
searched for lost treasures in the
Royal homes. The Royal post

office and the policemen who pa-
trol the grounds of the Palace with
their dogs.

now and

the

defy

& Tudor Sts.

armed police i
t ‘back te the Eolace



SUNDAY ADVOCATE
‘hiicaicpciiadeatiaa eee.

Life On All Levels Laid

On For The Sultan

By EVE PERRICK

SULTAN OMAR ALI SAI-
FUDDIN of Brunei Cioense)
C.M.G., has come to England t
‘view some aspects of British
tife.” And he really couldn't
have chosen a better vantage
~~. to view them from.

me, just Sasa

guineas a week) he can look out
scaped sites lt
course, swimming souk "vee
urten-

ances of luxury hotel

The opposite window looks
trim, tree-lined avenue of semi-
detached villas.

of one window and 1 sne Se Se land-

baths and other cost

down a social step or two on a
For the ruler of the Empire’s

biggest oil State (£6,000,000
worth produced last year), is
staying in the suburbs, in an

hotel on the wrong side of that
chic county Surrey, and missing
by the merest mile or two the
stigma of a London, S.E., postal
district number.

‘Contrasts

The hotel’s history is not
unusual—a monastery before the
Reformation, private residence
of a brewer-king before the first
world war.

Today it is a place of startling
contrasts. His Highness on the
way from his suite to the dining-
room (if he doesn’t get lost
again in the corridors as he has
already done once) will pass the
15th century mantelshelf in the
lounge which bears the trophies
that proprietor Alan Sanderson
(who owns a_ lubrication oil
business) won car racing.

The cloakroom leading off
from the carved-panelled foyer
(once the chapel) is carried out
in that modernist motif which
looks so much like a Neapolitan
ice-cream.

Would his Highness
learn about speedway stars ?
Host Sanderson (who owns
three speedway tracks, will talk
for hours on the subject.

Dog-racing ? Sanderson owns
two greyhound tracks.

like to

Would he Yke to meet a per-
sonality to liven up the solemn
scene of bridge-players intent on
the game ? Well, Orson Welles

stayed here-on his last visit to

... YOu

CEMENT

England. So did “Oilbeat
Konew, the woman ship
magnate. Pat Kirkwood is 4

regular week-ender.
And on Sundays the sultan
- get a glimpse of the Brighter
Younger Set) who crowd the
driveway with their sports cars,
swim im the pool (at 5s. a head),
apd buy ices and soft drinks
from the hut on the edge.
Incidentally, how did the sul-
tan come to the hotel ?
He was recommended by
sultan—of Rocke wie stayed
there last year.

er possibly many,
before—and you will be able to
buy a head of the Duke of Edin-
burgh for which he has posed.
It happened this way. He
commissioned artist Vasco Laz-
Be ie Se, 5 bronse. pans of hint,
destined f apart—
ments in > Palanan lace. This is
now nearly complete—final sit-
takes place on Monday —
Lazzolo has also made an

Lazzolo found the Duke rather
a difficult subje¢t: ‘‘He’s too
#o0od-looking. Uglier people, with
irregulaxy features, come out
best in seulpture.” But he was
a good sitter, although inclined
to spoil his pose by laughing or
jumping about,

Anyway, the work
have turned out well. Prince
Charles came intg the room,
saw the head and said imme-
diately: “That’s Poppa.”

Just Fabulous

RECENTLY I watched the
most expensive cabaret act in
the country (£1,250 a week is
the likely figure). And while I
concede that Miss Hildegarde
Loretta Sell has talent, charm,
and personality in equal propor-
tions, it seems to me that Hilde-
garde’s is a success story with-
out much visible means of sup-
port,

So I went along to see Anna
Sosenko, who is Hildegarde’s
manager, clothes-buyer, director,
lighting expert, organiser, and
writer of her signature tune,
“Darling, Je Vous Aime Beau-
coup.”

_ She sums status
simply with “We’re partners.”

It you can spend ten minutes
with Anna and not be hypno-
tised intéd believing that her
partner is the most beautiful
and talented performer in the
world, your powers of resistance
are stronger than mine.

Miss Sosénko, daughter of a

New Jersey boarding - house

keeper, is a dark-haired woman,
Page 11

seems to

up her

can't



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i
a
|

an.-high réplica of it as a com-
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SUNDAY, JUNE 22,

1952

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SUNDAY, JU



22, 1952

A new name to couple with Tyrone Power, Gregory Peck, and Gary Merrill,

ARLENE

“+ bmidievin| MISS NEFF ARRIVES THE M

ILDEGARDE NEFF,
Hollywood's first Ger-
man star since Marlene
Dietrich, flew into Lomdon
yesterday for a five-day
visit. a
In 18 months Miss Neff—
tall, ash-blonde, slim, and 25
—has been given the full
Holiywood treatment and
the top Hollywood stars to
Dlay opposite her.
Her léading men include
Tyrone Power, Gregory Peck,
and Gary Merrill.

Said Miss Neff last night:
“Tm really relaxed when
I'm wor » So for the past 18

months life has been relatively
simple. I only find things
hectic when I have to do simple
things, like pack a case or buy
clothes.”

Miss Neff turned up yester-
day in a white linen skirt und
black silk jersey top. Said she
“I bought them in seven
minutes. I don't waste time on
clothes.”

How did it all start for her?
“I went to Holiy-
wood first nearly
four years ago
under contract to a
Producer who was
unproductive, «Isat
around getting a
suntan but nothing
else.
“So I went back
to Germany Ww
make a film there—
and then,.of course,
I was wanted
immediately by
another Hollywood
company.”

She made
“Decision _ Before
Dawn” in Germany
for an American
company. and was
mptly discovered
Yr a second time.

In America now
her closest friend
is Marlene Di¢trich—although



second Dietrich,

Says Miss Nelf:
the plan is not to build her as a only one Marlene.



=]

Dietrich in her early Hollywood days.

“There is
I wouldn't

even try to follow her.”

London Express Service

TROOPING THE COLOUR

By BEVERLEY BAXTER

Arrayed in morning coat,
striped trousers and a grey top-
er, I made my way to the
orse Guards Parade and took
my seat in one of the specially

erected stands. The occasion
was the annual Trooping the
Colour (not Colours) by the
Brigade of Guards, and on such
occasions London pretty well
knows off work.

It was a summer’s day of

sheer perfection, with only a few
wisps of clouds to remind the

sun that it was not the only
occupant of the skies. On the
great historic parade — ground
stood the Regiments of the

Guards in their red tunics and
huge bearskins, It was their day
and they were ready, for it.

But there was the Household
Cavalry as well in their gleam-
ing breastplates standing against
the background of the tush
green trees and the shining lake
of St. James’s Park. As a con-
trast the massive bomb proof
stone walls made ;the adjoining
Admiralty Building look like a
beleagured aneédieval fortress.

From the Mall came the
cheers of the crowd and the
playing of the National Anthem
as the procession made its way.
In the'first carriage were Queen
Mother with the tiny Princess
Margaret, and it was good to
see the Queen Mother smiling
again. In the second carria
was the Duchess of Kent with
an escort,

And then riding side-saddle
came the Queen, wearing the
hunting skirt and tunic of the
Scots Guards as she is their
Colonel in Chief. Her horse
which belongs to the mounted
police is named Winston and
we were all hoping that the
animal would conduct himself
with a gentleness and a decorum
not always associated with his
political namesake. I am _ glad
to report that the four legged
Winston behaved perfectly,

So, as the Queen sat on her
horse, the regiments of the
Guards wheeled and marched to
the music of the massed bands
and to the hoarse commands of
officers. who sounded like tor-
tured souls in Hades. The whole
thing was done with a perfec-
tion of precision that no thea-
trical spectacle could emulate.
Once again the English were
demonstrating that when it
comes to pageantry there has
been nothing to equal them
since the days of Ancient Rome.





——

EXECUTIVE...





The logical mind might ask
what all this parading and man-
oeuvering have to do with mod-
ern warfare. What meaning
today have these redcoats and
ridiculous bearskins? And for
that matter of what service
could these massed bands be
with their brassy pomp?

Perhaps the answer might be
found in the Guards’ memorial
silhouetted against the trees of
St. James’s Park. On the base
of that memorial stand the
figures of four Guardsmen in
service uniform and on _ the
monument are the names of the
battles where in two world
wars they fought and died.

Again the logical mind could
protest that other men with no

military background and in
units of no_ special lineage
whatever also fought bravely

and.died..Of course that is true,
but it does not alter the special

mystique of the Household
Brigade.

Surrender?
Let me tell of an _ incident

that happened in 1941 when the
British and Commonwealth
forces were driven back into
Tobruk and completely cut off
by Rommel’s troops and the
Italians. The Commander of the
beleaguered troops was a South
African and he took the view
that since“organised resistance
or escape were both impossible
he would surrender so as to
avoid unnecessary slaughter.
Accordingly he issued orders to
the commands of the different
units to destroy their arms and
transport and prepare to surren-
der. 3

One of the officers to receive
this instruction was a Colonel
commanding a Battalion of the
Coldstream Guards. With the
utmost courtesy and promptness
he sent to the Commander a

sssage couched in these
terms: “I have carefully studied
the Book of Army Regulations
and cannot find any way in
which a Guards Battalion sur-
renders”. Bravado? Yes — but
it was magnificent,

Taking their own decision he
and his men fought their way
out of Tobruk with terrible losses
but the remnant reached the
main British Forces and reported
for duty. Were there enough of
them to make any difference?
No, Is it not a fact that men
were killed and maimed in this
mad gamble against hopeless
odds? It is certainly true,
















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But

the remnant that got
through

brought with them a
legend that will live for ever
or as long as there gre regi-
ments, They brought a legend.

So in the presence of their
Colonel-in-Chief, they trooped
the colour, which means that
they dedicated themselves to
the honour of the Brigade. But
beneath those scarlet tunics
who are tihese youngsters?
Welsh lads who have come from
the valleys to try soldiering as

a job; Scots who want to see
London and foreign service;
Cockneys who think that it’s

probably a bit of alright and
want to show off to their girls
in the Park, Heroes? You'd bet-
ter not say that aloud,
Grouse Natural

They grouse as all soldiers
do. They have nicknames for
their officers and blasphemy for
their N.C.O’s. Over and over
again they ask each other what
all this perishing spit and polish
has to do with chasing Malayan
territorists or pushing the
Chinese behind the 38th Par-
allel. A British soldier who does
not grouse would be a phenom-
enon of a deeply disturbing
type.





But even if they are not sure
just what the Battle of Water-
loo was about they remember
that as the Grenadiers formed
squares to meet the desperate
attack of Napoleon’s elite, “The
Old Guard”, that Wellington
issued the order that every man
was to hold his fire until he
could see the whites of the
Frenchmen’s eyes.

On came the French sending
death and mutilation into the
British ranks, without a single
musket barking a reply, The
British had their orders — and
were they not the crack regiment
of the line? At lastthe order
came. Against the withering hail
of bullets the brave French
troops were stopped in their
tracks. Then there was the com-
mand “Up Guards and at ’em!”
And with a roar of fury and exal-

tation the British swept forward
Napoleon saw it and said: “C’est
finis’ and the cry went out:
“Sauve qui peut!” Napoleon’s
Grand Army hag become a
rabble.

But surely all this talk of
glory and discipline and esprit

de corps is merely to exalt the
vile thing called war, and to
bemuse young men into think~
ing that there is something
splendid in giving and taking
life in battle, Is not war the
supreme blasphemy of the
human race? Is it not a denial
of all that civilisation means,

and a denunciation of the
brotherhood of man?
It is hard to answer those

questions, just as it is hard not
to feel that they speak the high-
est truth, But there is one thing
worse than war—the weakness
of a nation or group of nations
which permits an aggressor to
attain such superiority in men
and arms that war becomes in-
evitable. Hitler and Mussolini
were the sponsors and architects
of the 1939-45 war—and history
will hold them guilty for all
time—but their accomplices were
the bemused idealists who cried










Mobiloil

socomy vacuuee

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



“Peace! Peace!” when there was
no peace; who put their trust im
the League of Nations but re-
fused to give justice its sword:
who denounced Chamberlain
when he gained time at Munich
and accused him of selling
Czechoslovakia down the river
Self-righteousness, pacifism and
hypocrisy were the three hags
that set the cauldron boiling.
Coming Of Age

My son was 21 a few weeks
ago, and in England the coming
of age is a great event in a fam-
ily no matter what its social
or financial position may be.
Clive asked if he could throw a
party and, in due course, gath-
ered about forty girls and boys
of his own generation.

With the exception of two or
three who are first completing
their University education, the
lads had all done their national
service. In other words they had
completed their two years train-
ing in the Army, the Navy or
the Air Force, Most of them had
acquired commissions in the
process. Now they are civilians
but at stated intervals they must
undertake refresher courses ana
will be called to the colours at
once if war breaks out.

They had not been brutalised
in this process of training,
rather have they been human-
ised, All had to begin in the
ranks which meant that they
mingled with young fellows
from every walk in life. The
miner’s son slept in the same
hut with the rich man’s son and
they learned to like and respect
each other. The unfortunate
divisions of school background
that have done so much to keep
class distinction alive in Britain
have been narrowed by the
democracy of service.

We have seen the repercussion
in political life. The most power-
ful support that Churchill has
today is the Young Conservative
movement. Their military ser-
vice has taught them organisa- |
tion, responsibility, team work
and a realisation that the gov-
ernment of the country concern
them closely. Without this in-
fusion of young blood the Con-
servative Party might well have
sunk to utter impotence in the
six years of Socialst rule.



These boys have nothing in
common with the jackbooted, |
strutting idiots who followed |
Hitler as if he were the Pied
Piper of Hamelin. In under-
standing they are older than

their years, in outlook they are |
serious, but in spirit they are
gay and confident.

Some of them who were at
Clive’s party will go into the
Brigade of Guards if war comes,
and will come under the influ- |
ence of the Tradition that I have
described. Some will join the
Navy, others the Commandos,
and even more of them the Air
Force, They have no hatred of
the Russians or the Chinese.
They have no wish or longing
for war. But if it comes they
will be ready instead of having
to let others do the work while
they train.

Despite the alarums and ex-
cursions of Central Europe we
do not believe that there will be
an all out war. It will demand

=





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PAGE ELEVEN







American Column

By R. M. CacCOLL

Says the New York Herald-Tribune of
General Eisenhower's return to
last month, and of his upsurge of
toral strength: “It has been an astonishing
phenomenon, matched only once or twice in
our history—this sure, spontaneous turning
of a great portion of our people towards a
man whom they desire to place in the high-
est office in the land.”

Headline—“Britons are said to regard Taft)
as a foe. Eisenhower as a friend.”

While most makers of “consumer durable
goods” have long faces because of slow busi-
ness, one group is gleeful. Power-driven gar-
dening tools, which save elbow grease, are
booming. In ten years sales have jumped
from £2,850,000 annually to £ 42,860,000.

The tough old “Flying Tiger” turns up
again. Maj-General Claire Chennault, now
in business in the Far East, appears before
the Senate’s Internal Security Committee to
give the law-makers hints on Communist
techniques in his part of the world.

New York’s chief magistrate, John Mur-
tagh, who is tough with people who break
the motoring laws, produces his toughest
ever sentence. To jail for 30 days goes Wil
liam O'Neil, a New Haven (Connecticut)
lorry-firm official. He must also pay a fine|
of £785 for ignoring 84 different parking!
summonses in two years. And if O'Neil fails)
to pay up—he must stay in jail a further)

swe LIFE ON
ALL LEVELS

@ From Page 10

anu spectacled,




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THE CREAM _

America

WAY

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| CURES AS SWIFTLY |



the greatest restraint and judg-
ment to prevent it—but those
qualities have been developed in
the harsh years that followed the
fury of Hitler’s war. In the Far
East the situation wersens almost
daily but we in London doubt

that Stalin will encourage China Plump

who

to make a full scale attack against looks rather like Bessie Bunter)
the United Nations. if you can imayine — that
We cannot see the distant schoolgirl grown-up and wearing

jade silk and “Carnet de Bal”
perfume. To discus® her tale of
triumph with her chosen star
she will use the royal “we”
“Of course, you may not
Us but you have to admit
Hildegarde is just fabulous
after all, you can’t go on fooling
the people for ten years

why Noel Coward said to us in
New York, ‘Hildegarde, you've
brought dignity to cabaret’ .

scene, but because the peaceful
nations of the West have dared
to look the truth in the face and
have refused to weaken resolu-
tion with pious exhortations and
smug self-righteousness the
hounds of war may not be un-
leashed,

But if it comes the Guards
will doff their bearskins and ex-
change their redcoats for khaki
once more. determined that the

Like
that



laurels of the Brigade shall not > Were you there No. ?
wither in their hands. With She was absolutely fabulous
memories of Arnhem the Com JURE PAnUOMs,
‘ "he? rds © oil Come to think of it fabu CA
mandos will le NA LA ‘GEST
and with the oaaer ee ie Geek lous is the word for Ann: DA'S R
of Britain on their wings the , So Misguided SELLING COUGH
young cavalry of the air will ride WHY IS IT that, year after
into battle, while the Navy be- Ye8, the Englishman will sit AND COLD REMEDY
gins once more its historic out a hot-spell in his winter
isentry-go of the sea. woollies? Tell him that tweed
™ “he ale shane ia jackets and flannel pants are |
‘ ele rope, their jonging 18 really no cooler than serge
for peace, but they believe that suitings, and why doesn’t he|
peace can only be maintained wear linen or rayon, or even |
through strength, That is why seersucker cotton, he'll answer
we were deeply moved _ this that such things aren't done
morning when to the music of over here.
the massed bands the Brigade So the temperature goes up,
slow-marched past the Queen the skies are blue, the trees | MIXTURE
carrying the colour to which they jare green, the flowers are |

were dedicating their courage, blooming, the girls are gay |
their loyalty and their youth. and only man is vile. —L.E.S,
EEA ue



tan



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increases GORIROSIOIN

Business calls may be part of your livelihood, but cial properties of Shell X-100 Motor Oil
they’re a menace to engine life. As the engine | enable it to neutralise combustion acids and make
cools, acids and moisture produced by combustion
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aa eisai aS
RA TTI LL DLA NAL ALLAN

PAGE TWELVE
AGRICULTURAL REPORT

| May Rainfall

THE following are notes on the work of the Depart-
ment of Science and Agriculture for the month of May, 1952.
The rainfall for the month of May, 1952 was slightly



t

t



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Below Average

filler press mud were taken from
he Codrington observation triais
for nitrogen and phosphate analy-
is (4 determinations were made).

tance of the Co-operative Officer,
will be responsible for arranging
the programme. All co-operative

below average and the distribution eee the —, 25. Two hundred weights ut en Ese to tone vee

day on which island-wide rains were experienced was the technical urea were received for Course of the ee ae

21st. use in the nitrogen experiment

According to rainfall returns centage of these eggs parasitised at Codrington on the new cane 31. General Progress. The
received from 29 stations, typi~ by Trichogramma, variety B.4744. A comparison of registration during the month of
eal of all rainfall categories of th 13. Sugar cane dead hearts sulphate of Ammonia versus urea three co-operative societies has
Island, the average tota| rain- (numbering 2,300) were cut from (sprayed) will be made, and leaf given a fillip to the movement.
fall for the month was 2.84 inches various fields and dissected in the samples taken to follow leaf

The average tota] for May, 1951, laboratory for larvae or puparia

was 2.07 inches and the average of the D, saecharalis larval para- 26. Foliar Diagnosis. One hun- the groups already formed, Re-
for May for the past 100 years site Lixophaga diatraea. None dred and ninety-five phosphate, was 3.13 inches. The approxi- were found, and it would appear 13 nitrogen and 25 potash deter- assistance in establishing societies
mate total fall for the five that despite a long period of fav- minations were completed. All in st. George, St. Thomas and
months, January to May, 1952, is curable weather, this parasite leaf samples taken from sugar st Andrew.
9.75 inches, the total for the has again failed to establish it- cane manurial trials last year
corresponding period for 1951 self. have been completed. ll. FISHERIES
was 29.65 inches, “oO ie: teats 27. The samples taken during Vv a

2. The highest total rainfall , Cane Root . ©O% this year in connection with (a4) 39 During the month of May,
for May, 1952, at any of the above borer grubs and young brown routine sampling of commercial F % |

hard back grubs were found in
many fields examined, The dam-

29 stations, was 4.41

inches, re-
corded at a

station situated in

of

the highlands of the parish of 9%¢ caused was patchy, and only take of nitrogen by cane under $45 058.29 repaid to date. Pre wi |

St. Peter, and the lowest was |!) @ few cases was it really seri- irrigation when sulphate of am- standing balance to. the end of

1.49 inches, registered at a star %48 in young plant canefields or monia is applied before and after ay is $45,853.86, A

tion in the parish of St. Luey, vatoons, It is impossible to irrigation, are now being carried ~ 33 Interest collected for the

3. Sugar Cane, The majority of ©*amine all fields 2 = out, It is hoped to sample the j,onth amounted to $2.12; this
e

when damage is
ground (usually early in
year in dry weather), but the
damage can always be found if
looked for. Similarly with the
mealy bug Neorhizoecus and i's

sugar factories completed grind-
ing operations by the end of
the month, the remainder expect
to finish early in June. Informa-
tion has been received that the
quality of the juice improved dur-

Vv

28. Meetings.
genera! meetings of co-operative

nitrogen trends.

cane from two fields at the Pine

at 3 weekly intervals and (b) up-

manurial trials during June if the
the rains come in.

There has been a marked increase
in activity and enthusiasm among

1952, a sum of $1,590.88 was re-
paid by boat-owners against
This makes

makes the total
date, $1,112.43.

interest paid to

I. CO-OPERATION

Eleven

34. Fishing during the month
has been steady and returns from

regular

i ‘ “ = societies were attended by the most centres have shown a mark-
ing the month, but field yields @ttendant: Fa tei ant Acropyss. Co-operative Officer during the ed imprevement over the last
remained below the original These pests which damage the ponth. year. This condition was espec-
estimate. According to the latest T° of canes in the fields can

have only one effect, namely, the
lowering of the total tonnage of
sugar cane which is reaped.

15. Introduced Predators
Parasites. The predator Pyro-
phorus luminosus or large fire-
fly beetle has been active earlier
and in more extensive areas than
in former years. Other predators
and parasites have also been
found established.

16. Food and Garden Crops.
outine examinations for insect
pests were carried out and recom-
mendations made.

returns received. from sugar fae-
tories, the 1952 crop is now
estimated to be the equivalent
of 167,000 tons of sugar.

4. The young cane crop, al-
though showing signs of the lack
of moisture and being much
more backward than it was at
this time last year, remained in
fairly good condition.

5. Food Crops. As was to be
expected,” the supply of ground
provisions continued to be very
limited during the month. This
shortage has been caused by the
late planting of these crops dur-
ing 1951 and the consequent poor
yields which were obtained, The
late planting was due to the ex-
tended harvesting of the sugar
cane crop. The planting of the
hew yam crop was begun during
the month, and a number of fields

17, Wood Ant Control. During
May, three government buildings,
six private buildings and various
eanefields were examined. A de-
monstration in the treatment of
termite nests was also given.

en ‘ . IV. BOTANICAL
potatoes, Pianted to sweet 1g. ‘First Year Seedlings, The
potted seedlings in the cisterns
Il. PEAS ‘UL- were planted out during the
aaa month. Two thousand of these
2 were planted in a_ first year
3 . . seedling short season trial, while
am Agriculture in the jineteen thousand, six hundred
. i ial is and forty-nine were planted in

. Extens ~ Gi € the nursery.

Peasant Agricultural Instructors 19, Maize. Trials, Three strains
Visited 1,490 peasant holdings of hybrid maize were planted

and 23 school gardens during the
month.

(ii) Members of the extension
Staff assisted the Co-operative
oe, at 10 meetings of co-
operative gro eld r
on ups hi ay ing the

8. Crop HusbamdryseA)l . Ste-

tions had completed the reaping of
the ripe cane crop by the end of

out at Codrington during the
month in a 4 x 4 latin square
trial together with local seed as
a standard. The ipoosted strains
were heavily attacked by cut-
worms and buds almost as soon
as they emerged, and are unlikely
fo ‘be of Use locally. ;

Vv. CHEMICAL

May. Preparations for the plant- 20, Irrigation Investigation.
ing of food crops were wel] in Further determinations of soi
hand, At The Home, Sayes Court wilting point (13) and nylon
and Groves fields were ploughed }lock/soil calibration (18) are
and laid off on the contour. At being carried out.

other Stations hand cultivation 21. Six nylon blocks were

was carried out. Crops of yams,
sweet potatoes,

buried at the Pine (Central Live-

Indian corn, stock Station) in connection with
rounceval and cassava have been irrigation water application con-
planted. trol, and soil samples taken for

: calibration purposes in the la-
9. Livestock (i) Livestock at In this connection the

boratory.
new ‘post hole’ type auger re-
cently received for the purpose
of ‘quick burying nylon_ blocks’
was tested in the field. The soil

the six Stations at the. end of
May, including cattle, pigs, goats,
Sheep and equines, numbered
136. Three hundred and seventy-

29. Registration,
eties were registered during the
month, These were the St. Bar-
nabas Co-operative L
Society, Leeward Co - operative
Savings Society and
Co-operative
Society. The date of registration
of these three societies, the first
registered under
Societies Act,
same, 9th May. The formal pre-
certificate of

Hall

wo be
operative

sentation of
registration to the
Society by

the

Three

St. Ba

the Registrar touk
place on 22nd of the month,

30. Co-operators’ Day.

year as
Credit Society,

usual,

celebration of Co-operators’ Day,
it is expected, will take place on
the first Saturday in
official anniversary of
operative Movement.

posed that the celebration should
be observed in the colony this
The Shamrock

with the

EDUCATION NOTES:

Reasons For Changes

LAST week I devoted this column to the publication of|¢

Marketing
Welchman
Marketing

the Co-

July, the
the Co-
It is pro-

ially noticeable on the south, east
and north-western~ fishing cen-
tres, while flying fish has been
relatively sparse on the western
section,

Soci-

35. From all indicatiorfs, {t is
expected that the flying fish
season may well run into August
(weather permitting), as very
few flying fish in spawn have
as yet been taken.

36. Progress with the boat re-
placement programme at the
Reef continues and ten boats nave
been skinned up to the bends. It
is not possible to complete any
of these boats, as lumber of
larger sizes for beams, benches,
bends etc. is yet to arrive from
seurces of supply. This lumber is
expected shortly. In the mean-
time,. progress is being maintain-
ed with
be built
available.

is the

rnabas

The

up from stock now

assis-

the present system of grading schools in the United King-

dom. Whilst I do advocate a method of regrading I should|%
like to see the necessary variations made which would}?
afford the maximum benefit to the local child
I must em
any change
against a”
pulsory education, I am net con~
vinced that the cost will be so
prohibitive or that it will be im-
find accommodation
for the number of children not
now oh the roll, I have heard all
the arguments used against the
introduction of compulsion and I
am still of. the belief that the
basic education

possible to

value of a pro
for every mem
munity

phasize however
which I Pete that
ckground - teacher

system ¢
advantage. And T do not want it! ¢%

of the

opulation.

to point out
on of the pupil
would be a distinct

that can ees T should
the reintrod

to be understood that the hon-
orary system is ever to be consid-
ered,
for any Government to ask young
people to work sometimes up to
to five years without any pay-
ment, I advocate a system where-
by pupils of the Elementary
Schools could be drafted into the

com- teaching service.

cannot be measured in

terms of £.s.d, The small num-
ber of people who once clung to
the fallacious belief that the lack
of proper education increased the
ranks of menials must have learnt
by now ae it also increased the

Vocation
I have found that in the major=-
ity of instances the teachers in
whom a sense of vocation can
easily be recognized are those who
came in under the Pupil Teacher

. 4 ne unreasonabl s : does

one gallons of milk were pro- must be moist for satisfactory Sr eat it is lepcostiie "te fore at ay ieee ‘hee i

duced and 12 Young pigs sold use of this auger, but if too wet, argue, something in the four years’ train-

for breeding. ‘ puddling of the sides and bottom {t is to the eredit of Hon, Mr, "8 which seems to mould them
Gi) Stud services paid for at of the hole occurs. This latter Douglas Pile thet he ius dinsven: into what is needed.

the Stations were as follows: factor is most undesirable from ed that one of the basic needs of The drafting of those who hold

| son oe — 83, Nat's, et the aspect of quick seen education is to enable people to Sonam Certificates at =

» making a al of 431 tive soi s in be »e in proporti t nD
a ive soil moisture equilibrium in be able to distinguish — between p oa te the num

the region of the block.

22. The soil thermometer re-
ceived for use in soil tempera+
ture effect on nylon block read-
ings is eminently suitable for
the purpose. As the green house
in the Department has now been
completed, a series of comprehen-
sive pot tests have been planned
to investigate both soil tempera-

il, ENTOMOLOGICAL

10. Moth Borer Control. Dur-
ing May 79,772,000 Trichogram-
ma parasites were bred and
69,801,000 were liberated. This
brings the total bred so» far this
year to 230,327,000 and the num-
ber liberated to 201,536,000,

Il. The average count of cane

internodes damaged py moth ‘ure effect and quantitative water
borer was 8.6 per cent, which is ‘plications. :
Well below the general aunusl 28: Three soil samples were re-
average. ceived from the Cultivation
Officer in connection with greea
12. Counts of moth borer eggs house moisture/growth experi-
laid in entomological plots «at ments for laboratory determina-
Codrington were continued to- tions.
gether with counts of the per- 24. Manures, Two samples cf



—————— I

SSO VODSPPSISVIS SSP SSSO SS SSS,

5654, S :
ih", 1”, 114", 134”, 9?





TAPS & DIES

PIPE
Ky" Vall, He", Ya, Hal, 94",
BSF ‘
, iv 5 Bw THe ow ” ” ”
1q"”, to’, Vy +18» ¥%s +10 > % ’ fs , % : %
SAE or NF
4", Pe”, %”, Te”, ¥2”, 8s”, 0", 14”
USS or NC
LW & aw oF fy 9 BLY BAP
%4”, He’, %", Te”, ¥0", Tr”, 56", 4”



ENGINEER B.P. HAMMERS
Y4lb., 341b., 14lb., 154]b., 244]b., 3lb.

FILES
FLAT, ROUND, HALF ROUND, SQUARE
HIGH SPEED GRINDING MACHINES

® HIGH SPEED TWIST DRILLS
% BODY REPAIR FLEXIBLE FILES
® OPEN & BOX SPANNERS

PRESSURE GAUGES 0-400 lb.
: e
* ECKSTEIN BROTHERS
= Bolton
¢ BAY STREET DIAL 4269 oo
3 ;
soseesces OCC CV OOOO OOO O9BSSSO9 9898S 99SSS9SDS POSOOD OS

ad eset...

*
Â¥,

the obviously false and the pos- °!
sibly and it was

to say

it ina

the Legislative Council,

Counting the Cost

A correspondent wii *
warranted ‘estimate o 2

powers recently raised Oe point
it

of

of recurrent expenditure,

I have to

financial lica any and had it abandoned in Trini
changes I vocate, I am not The meeting of teachers at which
going to follow the bad example ge-grouping was discussed and

of many
Departments and damn

a scheme ed by 56 teachers.
by easuming the role of financial A Farce
‘ao oe og oe plat me now tell the public the
. . e& Elem
this important detail. But if I Pe ae t.
——____..,

LOUIS

Heads of

give due weight to the
tions of

THE REFLECTION of
depends on the quality. This is what
you were asking for...

We Have Just Received . . .

Lane

Phone 3909



his

OODODO ODS» #

5 ae School under the Pupil Teacher

Suttle Wiscudehcas in

System.
In Trinidad

T am not

own duced because the present

pected.
which condemned age-group:

fine crystal

“STUART CRYSTAL”

Crystal Bowls, Sauce Jugs

Sets of Water Jugs and Tumblers
Candlestick Holders, Vases,

in the most pleasing patterns.



These Items make Ideal Gifts
and the Prices Fit Every Pocket



SEE US AT ONCE!

L. BAYLEY

OF

and Aquatic Club Gift Booth

Phone 4897

(<=

ESPs

such sections as can)

t is absurd and dishonest 2

surprised to find the
Teachers’ Unien of Trinidad advo
cating to the Government that the
Pupil Teacher System be intro=

system
has not juced the results exe
t was this same Union

accepted in Barbados was attend-

SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 1952



|
















































PAIN GAN BE
CONQUERED!

[RUAE Ti] comeice QUININE we FOURTH ingrosions! The Quinine
has been scientifically blended with three well-proven |
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medicines

|

j

if you feel worn out, depressed, or
generally run down a giass or two a day of
Buckfast Tonic Wine will quickly restore lost
energy and tone up the whole nervous system.
Giving new vitality it fortifies you against fever
and exhaustion and remember, Buckfast Tonic
Wine is especially valuable after illness.

four together act synergistically. That is why ‘Anacin’
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[ANACiW/ is welcomed by Doctors! Over 12,000 doctors and dentists
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new specific brings you amazingly quick relief from all of them !
[RACV] costs ieee. You can buy it in a two-tablet
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ARM YOURSELF
AGAINST PAIN
GET ‘ANACIN’ TODAY!



if

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e
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Make yours with
CANADA DRY

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Phone 4541 For your Requirements
& Enquiries
















|







|

|



STOKES & BYNOE LTD—AGENTS. sees

Canadian Decorated

Glassware
A beautiful assortment

just opened including —








‘a PENT, PONY & COCK-

TAIL GLASSES
WATER SETS
JUGS—-ASHTRAYS ETC,
















GeneRAL FTAARD WARE svPriirs

RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office)



PHONE 4918


















EASY MONEY!

REDIFFUSION offers a commission of $1.50 in CASH
tor every new Subscriber brought to and accepted by the
Company. Commission will be paid after the installation has
been made . REDIFFUSION will in addition pay a Bonus of





ANNUAL HOLIDAY

Ovt CUSTOMERS and FRIENDS are asked to note
that our WORKSHOP will be closed as from Monday,
16th June, 1952, to Saturday, the 28th June, 1952, inclu-
sive, for the purpose of granting our Workmen their
ANNUAL HOLI AY. ;
Arrangements have been made for emergency work
to be undertaken during this period and the receipt
of repairs and delivery of completed work will be
continued as usual,

Our Merchandise Department and Office will be open
to business as usual.

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LID.

White Park Road.
St. Michael

MONEY in your spare time.

$25.00 to any perso: who brings in twenty-five new subscribers
relax wr

within one calendar month who are accepted by the Com-

pany, Get a supply of Recommendation Forms from the
FOR BETTER’ LISTENING

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Hear it at Trafalgar Street.

















ARE YOU SURE
——
YOU'VE GOT
THE RIGHT PRESCRIPTION?
With machines human or otherwise it’s @ wise
precaution io make sure you put the right stuff in the right place.
Esso Industrial Lubricants are made to suit every.
industrial need and, to ensure the best results, Esso Lubrication experts
will visit factories anywhere in the Colony to. advise, free-of-charge,

on lubrication problems. Why not write to us today ?

lt pays to gay

INDUSTRIAL LUBRICANTS

|
$|






SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN
a na EE unitate enema Cll LL LLL A LLL LALLA LLL LLL LLL ALLL





HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON










g IS ‘
a +4, \ ¢
wey fe

By Appointment
Cin Distillers
to the Late
King George VI



BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES

my
—"" a BUT MARK SEVERN
= Swe SWORN THAT
aa S Jit 1S STILL |
SHA ’

ALIVE...

+--+. BUT BEFORE WE COULD
MAKE AN ARREST ~THE
SUSPECT DIED ~
iN AMERICA...3

| SO THE FILE
WAS CLOSED



—
| =













DAGWOOD, COOKIE SAYS HER TOOTH
HURTS-- BEFORE YOU START YOUR









SHELVES, I WISH Pcesitl
YOU'D LOOK va. |
AT IT S Gea}

ISIE



IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

A. |
“| Berita) |
ASA |
It. oF



SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only











SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Branches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street



Usually Now

Conf FR cee. css a
POTATOES, —3 Ibs, 15 40 onfectionery Dyes ...........00 § 13

cma Sweet Orange M’lade—2-1Ib 51

: tk alt 3
iH Oye ear 7
3 | . ’ y. bo a . PSs
a HY DAN BARRY
a DUTCH CLEANSER 34 30 Strawberry Jam—2-1b 1.01 >
= , Sweet Corn—20-o0z. aouss 48 |
THis "BRUTE MAD j 77 a CHERRIES—per bot. .... 82 T2 Sweet Corn—16-0z. ....... . 20 Is
x ‘RE,TORO: f Ne wawe eS iy Qian
5 } ie: aby ' . WA e Peaches—16-02.....0.....ccccccceseeseemeeee B40
; ‘| f , KARDOMAH COFFEE 95 80
5 re | H 4 7 r : ;
i 7 4; a f. : , e - Se |

—



I CAN M
USE OF THIS
LIPPERY ICE!

CREAR VR ARMIOIIG GG ieb ven iosedasdinciven: svaspassbectosedboos verve 65
Guavas—16-02, 0.0.0... Saliva) 32
Pears—16-02, ..,..........660606 cece 1 Fee iadieiaeell A3
Apricots—30-0z.
Apricots—16-oz.
Grapes—30-0z,

PRUNES —Tins sik ‘as 70 60



il i

Z FLASH DISTRACTS |} 7
g THE CHARGING ;
T BEAST BY SKIDDING i,
ACROSS ITS PATH. || [i
1 wh 1%e KING PRATURES SYNDICATE, Ine, WORLD RIGHTS RESERVED. | J



PICKLED ONIONS. .........00065 15 70





THE COLONNADE GROCERIES

IT DOWN!

D Ca ; , > |
E IN WHENEVER 16S NO TIME c r r ~
YOU'RE READY, GENTS/ Oi Mm. TO WASTE! BREAK Fe ae Ce The Place Where Your Dollar Goes Further





Pag santinnsisiaaseenetep-ticeiiainaiad” sacathaisiaatinses ~
66, 6,6, 6,6, 64,6, 6,659
—PEOSOELEPSEP SVL PPP PARP PPP PPP PERL PDP PPLP?P?PPPPP LLLP






>

5 WHAT ARE ALL
HESE PACKAGES?

SS SOSSS

*





PETROLEUM MARKETING CO (WEST INDIES) LTD

BRETTON HALL, 16 VICTORIA AVENUE, PORT OF SPAIN

ee EE VE

THE PHANTOM MOVES LIKE LIGHTNING;| | FORTHE LUVA+)WHATS THE DIFFERENCE?

DESTROYING THE SMUGGLERS’CAMP. ‘| |WHOS THAT A HESON OUR SIDE! LETS | | y
WS DRNADO, (remo HELP HIM! | Ke

( te ‘— yy 1 | ; NM |
\ “EL | 2



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see as
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DISTRIBUTORS

DA COSTA & CO.. LTD.
JAMES A. LYNCH & CO., LTD.





SIOSS

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PAGE FOURTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE suMbay, stilt 24, 1052

GEASSIFIED ADS. wee? |, GOVERENT ene novice

SMa Bid MONEY by line ea’.|UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER| UNDER THE SILVER |
|

























































TELEPHONE 2508 | fusion in your # yet a ae '
ELEPHONE 250 s 3 pare time. Get a supp: HAMMER It's the
lof forms today. 6 52—20n. | BY instruction received I will sell on! MODERN FURNITURE £0-OP
caitess FOR SALE | ___‘ SS = | Friday Sune gts,"at Messrs. Fore Moy. on thursday ath by order of Miss VACANCY FOR CROWN COUNSEL — BRITISH DEPOT (Tudor Sirecs)
| al Ga fe, s Michael’ ow » a sda. p st |
Silt te i eeepc a x | PUNLIC SALES }10 hep. Morris Car. (Damaged in at | Cave we will sell the Furniture} HONDURAS for value, Reliability, and Capa
MARSHALL—To Sam and Joan 17th} ———. —_——_—__—_ | BS oa | Vincent Gn, ee = 8 em cope oe Applications are invited for the post of Crown Counsel, British Oar i hist of eieuaee wae.
ae ao —— aie AUTOMOTIVE ey . , os 22.6. 58-—4, | lesen Sideboard, Floor Lamps, Book | Honduras. Se come and visit our Showroom
Port-of-Spain 22.6 52—in. —_——— | and Ornament Tables; Rockers, sees | The post is : s and werkshop and be convenienc-
Saab Riodaer apanGhehiaee, Foren iioas REAL ESTATE UNDER THE DI |Gabinet Very good Flat Top Desk: Ss pensionable and carries a salary in the scale of ed at what you will receive here
DIED Stition sea Owner-driven, Ga | “ESAT TST oe, BE AGaR® ina Waggon: Couches, Berbice Chair, Round | $3,120 x 120 — 3,600 x 150 — 3,900 E.B. $4,050 x 150 — 4,200. The = is where your money =
a” i Dial 4476 12,6.52—t.f.n, | . ter S fe rites | Se pee Mahog-| point of entry to the scale will
BANCROFT On June 2ist - - ee ee ee ; R aes | rey cpatrustions received from Mra Tea Soon st oe 2 us. = perience of th oe 2 Up queiiieuiips end on Osa, art eoen the pond
her residence “Glencoe CAR—Dodge. Two | seater recently |ABROAD) AUCTION YOUR HOUSE. | [7m aids iil fell by auction at her] Pleces of old China; Fish Knives and | Wis e successful candidate. 2261 and we will be glad fo come
venue, elleville Ma overhauled New tyres xcelle . oar - s ype e next : ; i ’
Sancroft. Her funeral will leave the| working condition. Fihone 8419 ' jaa J ie CARS. TiBsION | “led, Sane Paddock” ie rece ee ane oe Radio: | en travelling on duty a subsistence allowance of $3.00 for +e yeh are $2—2n
above residence at 430 p.m. todas 22.6,52—d0, | WE MCSE sto OM eer | {0t" June at 12-30 p.m. her household | gytension Dining Table. and. Chatres | the first six days and $2.00 a day after the first six days, is paid. HA ,
irae Gp recinl toques. N° | - Gan Vaden Welox, le wend [BE CHARITABLE AND 1 AM WITH |S "Yush, chaine, anes eae chairs. | White Painted “Table; Planters Desk, | The appointment will be on probation for two years in the first
lis E ; xtae n sosadinettl p ‘}YOU, I WILL GIVE A_ REASON-} ona di is ing desk | Congoleum; Very nice. Mahog: Sir ' inste ; ;
lis E Astor Ban « _ on, . Dial 4476. tend dinimg chair, p: : ’ ez ngle .
Phyl Browne t ni >wner-driven, good as new. Dial 4476, [ABLE PART OP MY ConMISSION TO | nd dintas folatnigesant, stands. collection steads,, Vono ‘Springs and = | Manet, 29 the office is confirmed in the appointment, he will be
Sek ee a rete eae AO, Oe PERSONS GIVING aa stand, larder, frigidaire, ’ ironing boaréi, amen. “waste ' Se een, eligible for admission to the permanent anid pensionable establish-
une 2ist 2 3 mode a electric double a Ps 9 ’ ~ . .
INS — June Set, A iliman Minx SUCH SALES. WHAT ABOUE, Tae |°!° plate, dressing lable, 2| Stoves Elee-Hot Plate; Toasters: | ment. In other respects the appointment will be subject to Colonial



good condition. Courtesy. Garage 4616. |\.GAncER CAMPAIGN"? SATISFAC-

single bedstcads and mattresses, ovep,'
19.6. 52—-3n =

Joseph Nathanie! Rollins

fare Press. Pt. Freezer; Ironing | Regulations and local General Orders. Free passages will-be provided





























































































































"i os forks, glassware, 5 pi:
TION, TERMS, CONDITIONS, AND! ‘”ives and , 5 plecemcon-| Hoard, ¢ Pr
years. His funeral leaves the teyibeniage eens ; voleum, rubber hose, bed linen, td, Copying ess, Firewood; and i ; ; Special Pencils for Shorthand ec.
ee eg ean votes GAR Ford Cons Wieck), in. perfect [PAYMENTS WITHIN “48° HOURS, | Ene Onc, 6 doz. boxes nen. 48 boxes, cy? dinar Wemths of Walae on first appointment and on termination of appointment for the officer| @ Artists’ ere et . 18e
GMS." Church and thence t condition 2nd done only et calles. BOUGH", HASTINGS." 22.6.52—In. | POx@s kas. 1 Apex érain bowl, 1 Swivel ANKER TROTMAN & CO. | and family not exceeding four persons in all. Leave with full salary # oe ae
; y 2aSO! 0} PS a ass clase i Seg Kaen 4+ eemnee ‘
E. Rollins (widow), Ruby. Sylvia}in Zngland. Can be seen at McKnearney| “Ry Navy GARDENS — A Very|"@" ite! ad tommeateme Saati aia Auctioneers is granted at the rate of 5 days for each month of resident service, Large Supply of Paints,’ Brushes
tdaughters), Everton (son, John | & Co. oF contact Mr €. E. Clarke |nesirable 3 Bedroom (with Basins & est. Terms Cash. D'Arcy A. Scott. Aue- 2 —————— | with maximum of 180 days. The length of tour is 2~3 years. Free .
Trinidad and U.S.A. papers, please copy. “= ae | agers) 8 fe ene, eee : cere UNDER THE SILVER passages on leave are provided for the officer and his wife, subject|% coicured ‘sheet Plastics for mak.
22.6.52 . ue yrs, . a -
s | EMaa’t dud" tandltion. Dial wis, | Rooms, 2 Rolle, Cdarawe, Servants| INDER THE IVORY HAMMER | HAMMER to the provision of funds annually by the Legislative Council. ing Bags, Ete. .
: ERD -— Gn eune zi, 1952, Mary 6.52—3) oom, verite . - ‘ondition, Candid
ies Shepherd. Her’ funeral witt| = ea ee ee |Back Yard enclosed with Stone, about} On Tuesday 24th by order of Mrs. ¢ On Tuesday 24th by order of Mr vabitenl ates should be a Barrister at Law with at least four years AT
leave her late residence, Deacons CARS—Morris Oxford Saloon Morris £3 100 ae alterna Only Under | Marshalt IT will sell het furniture at Trecthonete es we ee exioreg Se ee JOHNSON’S ATIONERY
: t 4.15 today for the]) Si sale “y 5 - Seaside |G , i” ” at “Parks’, § os gc i
Wea eee OL ae. are ete Renae” belclas, renaattobes | Residences, IN BAY ST. — One Seaside chides Table, Upright cha ete] hich x both mofern ‘and antique _The successful candidate will be required to pass a medical ex- and ARE
asked to attend Morris Cowley 10 Cwt. Pick-UP. For |j,,pedroom a Residence, Going | Morris chairs © with’ cushions’ alr ig] apd. incites: Round ‘Tip-top Dining | amination, He will be subject to taxation in accondance with local ;
Arley and Jeffrey Shepherd (sons).| good used cars see FORT ROYAL a ; ty Business Premises & | mahogany; Bentwood chairs, Liquor| 29b!¢-, Sideboard, Sofas, Card Tables Jegislation.
Beryl and Ollie Shepherd (nieces).| GARAGE LTD. Telephone 4504 eer yeg ak Are ag MAIN RD + }eage, Pictures, Books, Marble top a with brass claw feet, Standard Lamp b
2.6.52 13.9,89-—-6n | F*o ne. Sen, ae pind * ae ating, Mahogany (aressinis table. Linen (Carved Stand), pcsneraton ponkease Applications should be addressed te the Colonial Secretary, British
not aasbnnatacet Bike atrallbato ‘ype. 9s, 1-burner Va ; . or van vada en A
THANKS CAR—One Austin 10 h.p. car with two | Conveniences, Very Good | Condition, | Falks | stove "S Ove lee Bon, "Benes Tuble; Upright and Easy chairs, | #Mduras, to reach him as soon as possible and in any event not later
new 6-volt Batteries one standard 8 h.p. |O¥°%,8000 sa. ft. at antisite and other items, Sale at 11.30 a.m, Sete cae 1770. All in old| than the 30th July, 1952. sJ@ &
MARYNECTHe family of the late! in, Very good condition, C-R. APDIC- liyoe. Dial Sl, D. F. de Abreu. |iioneer on neent Grime, Ader aeq Service oe. “How Pots! set or “eat 22.6.52.—In.
iiiiam Waterman Alleyne of * ; ve 22 6,52—2n Auctioneer & Real Estate Agent, “Olive paca Rs Rati 3.) 4° Jorricks Hunting Print 2 has eee —_—L SS
Brittons X ‘Road, Saint Michae)|— “. | Bough", Hastings. 22.6. 52—In, UN Orts; Cordea Revolving Book case,
Beknowiedge with kratetul supret-|~GARne i ow —Auaiin 10 ha. | “Tempemrwrear DER 'THE DIAMOND |} iashor. Refectory Dining Table: “Old Ni .
tion the kind expressions ¥!%- | saioon fully licenced to 1953, new battery EENW and Avenue, Belle- HAMMER mahog. Tall Post Bedsteads with springs,

pathy and the useful assistance
rendered them in their sudden

ville, 2 Storey House with nice Jawn.
2 bedrooms. Gas & Modern Conveni--
ences. Phone G. Webster—5134 8 a.m,
to 4 p.m 20.6.52-8n.

" s Vone
By instructions received from mise’ ght Table no sereeae? ion
Lowe I will sell by auction at her house | vhite Chest of Drawers, Single and
at Rockley, ‘Ch. Ch. on Wednesday next, uble M.T. Washstands, Cupboards and
25th June at 12.30 p.m. her entire lot Reece Chamber ware, Cedar Press,
SPRINGVALE PLANTATION,— Saint}! household furniture which includes:— | Prigida’
Andrew. About 227 arable acres and about|1 large dining table, sideboard, mahog ;

60 acres in pastures, roads, ete. Mar-|tables, dining room chairs, Mahog. Doors),

and tyres. Condition like new, Reason
. a - {for sale — owner purchased Jaguar
bereavement on Sunday 15th June} co aisea Garage (1950) Ltd., Phone 4949.

1952. 22.6.52—-In 21.6.52--dn



: BLABDON

STEA HIP ‘ scoust | Caras and Passengers for e ce.
minic, 7
-AMSHIP CO. Nevis ad St. Kitts, Date of AFS, F.V.A.











ROYAL NETHERLANDS



The M/V.











BARROW—We the undersigned desire New Morris Model J Cab over Engine

, Eleetric Hot te,
through this medium to thank |: cwt. Vans $2,400.00 Larder t jot Plate
'

» Kitchen Cabinets (glass
les and Kitchen utensils.





those kind friends who attended New Morirs Cowley 10 cwt. Vans













































































































































































































£
!
funeral, sent wreaths, letters of con-! so 599 09 All excellent for fast light|##er’s House, Overgeer’s House, usuul| settee, Radio, chest of drawers, Sim-| Pye 6-valve Radio, Large Telescope SAILING FROM EUROPE Salling to be ares cA”
dglence and who in various wie be. | delivery. FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD, outbuildings, two horses, cart, etc. mons’ bedstead & mattress, dressing and stand Binoculars, Barometers, Ther-|M.S. STENTOR 27th June, 1952. anene Cargo “an. ‘Fosspemers tor
prea sympathy yy the death of Miss | Telephone 450+. 13.6.52—Gn. | » The foe Plantae « will be offered | table, General Electric Refrigerator, mometer, Chiming Clocks and other 44 HESTIA 4th July, 1952. Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat
Inez Barrow on Sunday 15th WAGON—One Oldsmobile Wagon in July next, Minloss Sreneuny ba y ate dele wae, Ea and Bo Terms \ A # Or SATLAN G ‘to ‘s0norE Bevis an Sty Mine. SEE FOR SALE
Thernnill re ee. tawde. working order. Twq new tyres. Apply | Private treaty. All inquiries should be | other items of interest. TERMS CASH. | f M.S. ORANJESTAD 15th July, 1952. ES eS, *
Pag __ SS 20 | gg bares, habe Bh “Eig Me (cance * “Satan SEA Dancy A. scorr, | BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO., |" SS 1) Taran PARA ARibo lS canine” wilt accept Cargo end eis
GILKES—The family of ithe, inte. Bose ies 7 Lucas Street, Bridgetown. 18.6.52—4n Ree. ' Auctioneers. M.S. BONAIRE 30th June, 1968, passengers for St. Lucia, St. SWEETFIELD, st. Peter — An
line Gilkes beg through this, media | TRACTOR—-One Massey Harris Tractor 52—4n 20.6.52—2n. |M.S. STENTOR lith July, ‘1952, Vincent, Grenada, and Aruba. } rg a t_of stone.
ears) ee ee is eeein Be bn pneumatic torte and half eae very with ant vee WE Seve ove ; S.S. CORMICS 38th wus see Sailing date to be notified. Freneh windatrs leading =
? ittle used. A anager Foste: feet a ee INID.
condolence, or in any way expressed | 5; kK. a dan tat fat Dayrell’s , Christ Church, The M.S. SPIGERBORG 28th June, 1952. BWI. SCHOONER sr tee. 3 Netveeen Nidan. Ones
sympathy ‘in their recent eave; dwelling house contains living | room, OVERNMENT NOTICES SAILING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO ASSOCIATION pee. 3 bedrooms, ‘kitchen. store-
ment. 22.6.52—1n. Sap, bedveame, Shendoaie, panel. fone 7 yas: @ist July, 1952. J Consignee — Tele. No. 4047 garage “and ‘ervenia wqueriere’ ;
at i venien: be Vi wi . LTD 1 . 1
INNISS.—The undersigned through this ELECTRICAL House ited eat lectin . iaveotied - eon SS die ’ "eeeegassssss —re many 2% acres well laid out
snedium inform their driengs that on application to the tenant Mr. Ince, LEASE OF AGRICULTURAL HOLDINGS AT S SS WEA ‘right, Of way over
r kind expressi Sympathy etween the hours 0: a. and 1 i » ;
oe som ayerecates we se be soccixed nay ares ¢ Garrard ontty, rane Pet near RAWELL Canadia N ti ] S BS Bathsheba Sub-
fully acknowledge a as ree spe utomatic angers at ¢ above dwelling h will*be set 5 5 asiri “ ‘ + t " Tr
Sa ieee the. passing of) B.C. 8. Mailel a: Go. tad, Reale Em: (up toh gic by vening ices weal ve at Persons desiring to lease one of the seven agricultural holdings n a 10na eamships 0 od built modern stone
ig woes Inniss of] porium 15.6,52—t.f.n, Onis, comes Street, on Friday 27th June | At Seawell, Christ Church, in accordance with the prescribed condi- ing fine Saw at thts “wild “and
Sreniebury ‘ instant at 2 p.m. tions of lease should ly i iti Sails
Kyle. Keith, Alban, Claude; Etta] PYE BATTERY SETS—Just a few lett. YEARWOOD & BOYCE, should apply in writing to the Director of Agriculture, soUTHB rocky coast. 3 good bedrooms,
' " 6. i EMPORIUM. , é i i OUND ving b .
Jasmine (¢ en) 22.6.52—In. | MAFFEI’S RADIO aie orn Solicitors. Se a ee ee of Agriculture, Bridgetown, not later than the 5th of ane Montreal Halitax Boden “Saco aes itoen, servants’ yy
aE rseagge eg coer wr aT ee 6.58—4.2.n. = 5 NELSON .. .. ., 9 June 12June 14 J 23 J 23 J garage.’ Electricity and main:
PERRY—We through this medium edhe ilolilmmineinatatnirdtiene [eee Lae Atnareae cian pe e une une 23 June ty 3
o return vhs te, Serre nt featt FURNITURE hg Triage re as a 4 2. Copies of the statement of conditions of lease may be seen { CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR © aime 6h = Stee tee att Sek ee
wreaths or im amy way expressed) No. 17 High Street, Bridgetown, on| at the District Agricultupal Stations and at the Head Office of the De- LADY RODNEY .. .... AL July W4July 16 July 2 July 26 July Sian VICQUE, QU. SF. VINCENT
in our recent bereave-| “CHATR—One Invali@’s Wheel Ghair|Ftiday the 4th day of Julv 1952 at} partment of Agriculture, Bridgetown. No applicant will be considered of local stone with sens 4
the death of Beatrice practically new, price $100.00 ply 2 p.m. *ho i view, only 3% miles un meee
22.6.52—10- | Trene Williams,’ St. Savour's | Village pie wy accel vty agra who is unable to comply fully with the conditions of lease. NORTHBOUND Arpives Sails Agriven Agtives Advives _Ancives town, 1 mile Golf Club, 100 yards
oe Hole St.’ Joseph. 22.6.52-—4n. Ineasurement Wath a situate As 22.6.52—3n. B'dos os «6 Bt. John «Boston «(alifax Montreal esate, Cun with >
MEMORIAM FURNITURE—Small — quantit a | ave Darden, ey ee LADY NELSO! July 2_ bathrooms, lo ¢
IN furniture, also carpets and vatitan “ato containing an open verandah facing CDN. cRUiSEn os usun 19 July Se 3 july * ug 15), verandah "Go 2th, tod
Reasonabie, No. Dealers. Tel, 3875, SU aghat a" Uanteme Sole, Path THE BARBADOS REGIMENT CANADIAN : usual o} .
, 9 ae i 7 5 pt, ba
nogen te loving memory ot may deat eee J £2.6.68—cin. | Tine hen ‘with garage and rooms for : ae eee % Jo ae ak fit 10 Aug. ESTATE HOUSE; st 7
- lied t ie Lal ah ‘Sond 1949 FURNITURE — Bedroom and Drawing | ‘Wo servants and with electricity n- NOTICE " sae : - e, 3 Ang, An imposing spacious home with
“Gene but nee forgotten Room suites of mahogany modern Merris | St#lled. Inspection = dial 4460. Por “ us quiet cool location
Let all on earth their voices raise,|Cesign. Kitchenette suite painted cream a a and conditions of By x overlooking .
and . All od sale apply — a
Pan ieee oe Stee leaving the isiand. Fe pertiewiare paone COTTLE CATFORD & CO. 20.6.52—8n Major O. F. C, WALCOTT, E.D., ~ nen 3 ay. Se tere ‘ ‘
alle * alleuia. 2 0.20048. eee Commanding Winey Mit, Raathre vous
and) Mes. I. E + -—-— 7 ; GAR TLL—Modern stone bungalow
“ t a Pe ners t, sik | “MAHOGANY INVALID CHAIR, Hart, PUBLIC NOTICES The Barbados Regiment. DINER AUSTIN & co, LTD.—Agents. with la living cenit, 3 bed- i
Mr. and Mrs. C. N. Weekes (Friends). | Pavilion, Hastings." 22.6.52-—1n. f ‘ooms, kitchen, toilet and shower,
22.6.52—1n Hae 1. PARADES nt verandah, detached i
MECHANICAL NOTICE There will be no parade on Thursday, 26 June, 52, The next par-}, REA : Auarec. $000 eg. 8 ot ground
FOR RENT a midi ‘ailet ie Bat ade will be at 1700 hours on Thursday, 3 July, 52. Further details ORS LI D position, with Gookdtenad vine.
week. These beautiful ee et Ds for aplelpet umpires | ‘an tent moeting i s ve poees later. public services,
y world famous Original Odhbner-Facit |/Une 4 p.m, at the Challenor Stand ; 2. MESS MEETING OFFER COVE
USES fron ial al ned steels All Umpires and Pers: ; : SPRING BOUSE, ST.
HO a + abla omy. in aches gu last you ohne ested are invited ' to mae me 8a an, pes will be a Mess Meeting of the Officers’ Mess at 2015 hours ais va eee ia ae pep unr og eo 4
_| time. Features include six extra char- on Saturday, 28 J 52. H r ® T FIELD } : \
du ry) une, 9 onorary Member comp uded
ti AESTeg Te qnanice a as AR acter keys and the famous feather touch NOTICE 2045 hours 7 a. may vatiend at Lovely Stone House, comprising upstairs: three bedrooms, large living eater eae, atte hea of
Bath’ Open Verandah facing sea. Suitable typing. To introduce these machines we| Ai male citizens of the United States . room, dining room, 2 toilets and baths, one with tub bath ‘and hot and about i¥q acres are Woll wi
one person (or couple). From July i x quote xo ihe lowest prices. BRAD-| between the ages of 18 and 26 residing M. L, D. SKEWES-COX, Major. cold water, gallery Downstairs: 3 spare rooms, kitchen and shower and could readily be conv
Telephone 2949. 18.6.68—t.f,n. | SHAW & COMPANY. _ 1.6.99-8--t4n, in Barbados are requested to, call at S.O.L.F. & Adjutant, yoom. Standing on approximately 2% Acres of ‘land about 100 yards {St Ans. Bt: Spectanie tudes, Of
I " a e American Consulate from July 1 to NPedted’ ’ rom Gibbs Beach nmspection by appointment. e ind. ie house o
BUNGALOW-The Modem Bungalow, Sewine Machine Is good condition, p= a1, 1058 for Selective Service Registration The Barbados Regiment. eiiataw STE gee oqnrenes ..natiggentg
“Beresford” laxwe oa ie > e iver itary ‘a > .
nished all modern conveniences from Ist ply Reliance Shirt Factory, 21.6.5: + | Service Act. ™€}St. Ann’s Fort, At Rockley New Road: on approximately 19,000 square 12 CE nd
of July. Ring Nurse Pilgrim from All male citizens of the United States| 21 Jun, 52, Magnificent view of Golf Course. Three bedrooms drawing and g iD. Caney
Monday during the day, Phone 6101. LIVESTOCK who attain the age of 18 sears sub; 22.6.52-—1n,{|| "20m, kitchen. Downstairs: Garage, servant room with bath and Mier ah wane Gun eamte
6, 52—2n uen ‘uly 31, are required 6,.52—1n. and tor Sonsirenige
CALVES—heifer Calves at Kingsland|to register upon the day they GER CREED CER | emo cerns neointima Sc a BOG SROMETY FORE, 26m RARene ee iushop. . ._, Large — Salery,
FURNISHED FLAT,—at Dundee, St.]Dairy, Dial 8325. 21.6.52—2n, | eighteenth anniversary of the day of ‘ BUNGALOW 3 bedrooms, .
Lawrence. Suitable for 2 only. Avail- their birth, or within five days there- rooms and a
able June 15th Onward. Phone 8240. DONKEY—Jenny for sale. Apply Mrs. | after. en e ou At Rockley New Road, Thtee bedrooms drawing and dining room, Offers in of £4,000 con-
1,.6.52—t.f.n.{| Gibbons. Phone 0117 22.652. For further information, consult the modern kitchen, toilet and bath. All built in cupboards. Veny close * cost £5,
a ee nie poentanianas American Consulate, Bridgetown, Bar- to Golf Course. The last available spot at this very popular residential at present .
LELAT & HOUSE Fully furnished, St.| | KITTENS— 2 pure bred, male Persian bados. 27.5.52--t.f.n, By Treating Gland area, Immediate possession, ck main een
wrence on-Sea. one 38503. iMtens — one cream, one grey. Phone— ; . , JAMES—Care-
29.3.82—t.f.n.] Mrs. Gordon Proverbs, No. 3394. NOTICE | erfumes Se So cos Of Ge eet Airactive sites
WAY, St. Philip Coast, fulty i Saeco re Estate of ‘Ss 1p Getting. be stehes, Durning genes. At Maxwell Coast Road. Three bedrooms with running water com- nd a ot
furnished,’ For July, — November,| One riding HORSE and three GUERN on0kes ae ees over i i: ae Ail ache at base of spine, groin and Good residential ares. Hxeellent sea bathing A" sound Investment at perma =
December only. Dial 4476. SEY HEIFERS. Apply Manager, Foste. sosaans. 2, world blend to leg nervousness, Cobcee the very low reserve price m â„¢ calm, sate. Setniad.
19.6.52—t.f.n.} Hall, St. Joseph, 21,6.52—Tn, Pane tavihe tee ae ey eta a its glorious and as of manly v1 are caused hei a , ¥ verandahs on both pie
wpe: » This silk- by a disease land WYNDAL
NEWHAV. G Coast, fully fur- or affecting the estate of GEORGE) #tr@, (@ most important sex gland in 4 servants’ quarters. services.
nixha Se or November, Delay POULTRY ARLINGTON PAYNE late of Clapham soft powder gives men). To overcome eeubied At Rockley, Partly stone and lath and plaster comprising three
ber onty. Dial 4476. 19.6 toot n - in the parish of Christ Chureh who died comfort and dainti- | Jn 24 hours and qui restore vig- bedrooms, dining and living room, toilet and bath, and a large i NEW f a
: ee ; POULTIRY—Twenty five (25) Imported e thie ai oo oe Deckaahier. 1961, ness to the most our and health, py ip ag The out buildings comprise servants room and garage. on Commodious with 3 bed-
ROOM—From July Ist at the Mayfair Hampabire Bullets 1 weer old. Ah, tre Sere Sa wee 4 sensitive skin. eee. called Rogena. No spproximately 10,000 square feet of land. This house is very close %0 eet a ee Lite
ssa ki . 4 'e' the $ . »
SNe Sop, Heirdresting ete. ‘Appls fen Dae hee ee Pe, Beer Of (ia) eoebuck Street, Bridgctewn, on r Weogena is jaranteed to set you Re oe et ey pantry, servants’ and
* jock . 6. . * " rT ING
at Mayfair 4 to 6 p.m. sg 52—In. | cr befake the Bist day of July 198%, after uticu Ud cee eee ow feel hae BUNGALOW ., 9908, sitaation: Rese
-b2—4 MISCELLANEOUS which I shall proceed to distribute years younger or money back. Get At Graeme Hall Terrace. Very attractively designed. Comprising
VER WATERS — Silver Sands the a of the estate among the parties TALCUM Rogena from your chemist, The three bedrooms with toilets and baths attached, dining and living rooms, NEWTON LODGE, MAXWELL
jam Ri pi. September 4 teds Saas eatitl < jo having resard to the wets guarantee protects you. : kitchen. verendah to the west and a nice patio to the east. Standing on COAST—Solidly constructed stone
e ANTIQ an and ¢ only © hich approximately ‘2 acre . f losed ~
with running water in each. Spring’ Glass, China, old Jewels, fine have notice and that £ not be : eee ‘Tastee, Cee, drawing =
boda. Fully furnished with all conven Satan. Sete Maps, Auto- | liable * assets = © Grutctes to oft seca! interest to BUNGALOW dining rooms, breakfast room, 3
niences. a -6.52—3n. a. rringes tique person whose or claim bedrooms, 2 etc. Lately
ce pres adjoining Royal Yacht Club. not have had notice at the time of such oe CABINET MAKERS spare room dining and Grnwing reoma, ane cloned goliey.” Goveruendut | core ©. cones eva
WANTED oa -2.82—t.2.n. distetbution Bien ia i, Wo MANE OR GLA: $s water, electric light installed. r ex able for or rent (furnished).
EAUTY SOAP. Bring out your Beau-| estat: are requ to settle thelt HA
ty with the Milk and Almond Oil in| accounts usec dee, AND CHROMIUM PLATED FITTINGS ni
HELP WILLOW" Beauty Soap. Get a few| Dated this of May, 1952, FOR SAME At Navy Gardens. Three bedrooms, 2 toilets and baths, communal annexe adjoining. M:
cakes today from your Supe, a TUDO! , Snr.) * ge ie Aine ot peste, ioe, and store room, 2 servants rooms pore large living and break-
a tart a nn reheat .6,53—9n. , in yai with toflet an 5 uundry room and garage. This is a last rooms, 4 bedrooms,
JUNIOR OVERSEER. Rowans LANIER: \ aaltepet entire | | etal ack agen decd. WE 7 7 MPO, lovely house offered at a competitive price. usual offices, garage ,
tion, Apply in Person. 26.6.52—-6n. aa sare —Atractive ery piece 4 $2—4n. Tr CEN 7 RAL E RIUM ‘ as at rooms. ‘Arnexe hse ‘wide’ verandah,
nner Sets in sever jesigns, ce E Vi living . 2 roomy bedrooms
SERVANT—A general servant for cook- |] $28.96 set. G. W. Hutchinson & Co. Corner Broad and Tudor Streets and gurene. Good” investment
ing and house work. Apply Bryan. No. | Limited Dial 4222 19.6,53—4n At Rockley New Road. Modern 3 bedroom bungalow with combina- ti
y! . 6. : tion living and dining room. Lovely open gallery offering magnificent proposition.
7, the Garrison. 98.0, B= 10. | ne reer ennnaeieceenenien FOR SALE view of Golf Course and coast line. All built in cupboards. Garage and
SCELLANEOUS tin perfect working erase," Yoraes SEIVEIDS COURS COWREAED, SEE em WORTHING. Modern. coral. stone
Mi Electrical, Cheapside. Dial 4614. ¢€ Y 4 R To bungalow on corner site with wide
22.6,52—1n, MISCELLANEOUS 4 L N ‘y delameaip dela frontages. Pleasant garden with
POSITION—Cook or butler, Pastries a | nt y r At Mile and a Quarter, St. Peter. A
e - 7 : ’ 2 , St. ‘ nother lovely house. 3 bedrooms, flower beds, lawn, crete ter-
specialty. Responsible, cheerful, and | FRESH BUTTER $1.20 per Ib at Wood | “RAE BAgTS-Suppiies “of rat ball CHICKEN NOQDLE SOUP dining room. living room, modern toilets and baths, hot and cold water. face, and ntimber of bearing fruit
willing. Dial 4598. 5.52—2n. | land Plantation, Phone 95—214. eredad” tore a itural Society So e t ‘< Large verandahs. Outstanding view to the sea. Extensive trees. Accommodation comrgises
- arene | 21.6.62—am | Pucpared oy age donna public . asy to prepare, Just empty one package includirfg big garage, 2 servants rooms, laundry, workshop. Extensive large living room, covered gallery,
TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bonus We 'Stecl Shed into a pint and a half of beil ter k f orchard with specially selected fruit trees. The property has been well 3 bedrooms with built-in ward-
from Rediffusion for 25 recommende | Grey Miami 36in. wide at rock | {oF limited period at the Steal Rhacs : ae © ing water, cook for cared and. is in. excellent condition. Immediate possession. Very low robes, well fitted kitchen,
tions in one calendar month. | bottom price $1.17 very superior quality | Queen's Park, and be pure 6 minutes and get a “Home-made Chick rice with covered way to
52—201 eee an t ic. each "between hours of 8 le icken Pi
46 mn. | THANI BROS, 22.6.52,—1n, | a* Be. except from Sow servant's quarters and all
$62.50 KET MONEY easil a =ED—Sp. oe a UR * a offices. All public utility services.
POC iON easily earne GALVANIS! a.m. to ls x ; ————— sath .
by ecommending 25 new suoscribers 10 | days. “Best quali eerglish galvanised 19.0.58—p oe perckage for 25c. (not 49. ) gives 4—6 recommendation .
KEDIFFUSI im one month. sheets 6 ft. $3.94 7 ft. 60 8 ft, $5.24) ~ plates of soup.
4.6, 52—20n SILK POPLIN—Lovely Quality in
Auk Tone Co. Dial 26006-- 216 52. ttn, | Blue, Grey, Mauve and White 36/7 wide Obtainable from. .. . REALTORS LIMITED
REDIFFUSION offers $1.50 cash for} 72 cents per yard nearly ‘finished at STANSFELD, SCOTT & ©O,, LTD. |



KIRPALANI 52 Swan Street.

22,6,52—1n. YOUR REAL ESTATE AGENTS

SPOTLIGHT
THE HOUSE OF THE WEEK

ATHERLEY BROS., Speightstown.

:
JOHN F. HUTSON LTD.

acres of coast land are open tad
either a, a

each new Subscriber recommended by Imported long-sleeved khaki _ shirts
you. $3.28 a Pe. or $33.00 a doz NI
4.6. 02—20n | BROS. Pr. Wm, Henry Street

22. 6.52—1n.
SUPPLEMENT YOUR INCOME by| __ i cil
sonmeasena ing REDWFUSION. Obtain IRONS—Sad Irons No. 6 $2.27 per
1 W





SOUPS — Carlton packaged Chicken
Noodle and Tomato Vegetable. More

economical than canned soups. Easy. \6 | 466699990 9S 909 9999S G OOF
ives

























fi particulars from the REDIFFUSION | pair No. 7 $2.64 per pair. G@ prepare. A 25c. package mn
: 4.6 52—20n. | c ; r ‘| servings. Obtainable from Stansfeld, ‘ “ ” ec
office Hutchinson & Co, Ltd. oat ae Scott & Co, Ltd., Bridgetown and Athec- EF Oo R § A L E WYNDOVER
LOST FOUND , ‘|ley Bros,, Speightstown, and John F
, & JACOBS extra light Cream Cracker — | Hutson Ltd, 21,6,92—2n.
Ad he ein — |these delightful biscuits stand unrivalled i .
. excellence y : Subscribe now to the Datly Telegraph r 1
LOST for excellence of quality, Special Price “5 Ne now | ¥
thie week. 5/- per tin, Bruce Weather- Bagiand's leading Daily Newspaper . I
rinse pe teen nnn pm aerin head Ltd. ' 22,6.52—1n, | arriving in Barbados a for only a few! \ " UP MGHT D PIANO
SPECTACLES -— while shopping in| days after publication Londen. Con-| \ By Albert Fi
Briamelo we on Friday sone pai Si peies CNE (1) Chila’s iron cradle and bed | tact: lan Gale, ¢/o RErSene Oh Ltd. % y vert Finger
tacles in grey case eward ound fin, gf rder = $20.0 — Local Representative, i. is . ‘ ee
and taken to Civil Aviation Directorate] “°°° °FS*" OO I bei "794. a—ttn. | This instrument possesses an Excellent Tone and a
over Goddards, B86. a peestethinreeeryreerensemniaioctianigecnaonennbasaentiertdan beautiful Mohogany case finish.
OLD FLOORS made like new. New SANICANS--Kitchen Sanicans with) y> You are invited to call for a demonstration

ean er ee opens Bas nee
r or @
emptying. Price $4.86 each. G. W.| ¥ CECIL JEMMOTT

‘
Hutchinson & Co, Ltd. Broad St./ w 48 Tudor Street —- Phone 4563

EDUCATIONAL floors look better if Sanded the Nu-

Floor Way. We can do the job whether
you have eleetric Power or not. Call
MODERN HIGH SCHOOL, Evelyn Roach and Co., Ltd. Phone —
Pupils who would like io be placed | $584 or 3585 22.6. 52—3n
on the waiting list of this sehool for aD
school year 1953 which commences in Printed French crepe with Barbados



Dial 4222. 19,6, 52—4n %
999999996999 999S9988 6% ‘








Weatherheads offer Fresh Pascall’s





ee * SLEEPS
























September 1952 are asked to apply for | beauty spots four alluring shades for | Sunshine Marshmallows in tins and | 99066966996996999699669696%% -
a waiting list form. Call or talanncin 4 hirt skirts and dresses at $1.20 also|Packages— Pascall’s Barley Sugar in %
2846 and it will be posted to you. The | Sifts $3.98. THANI BROS Bottles and tins Large and smal \
date-of the Entrance Examination, on 22.6,52—1n, |BRUCE WEATHERHEAD LTD. FOR - - - , sb lbeamainealee 5° BRR ee ay
the fesults of which six free scholat ———_____—__-_- —_—_—_—~-—_-- 22.6.92-—1n, 5 _ «pees
ships will be awarded, will be announc- ‘Parson Grey very ideal shade Séin T T 7 : Me
ed r, {w de only $3.45 Limited quantity $9 R & A ‘E Xx hag’ ae. ae ' : *
L. A, LYNCH, rhani Bros 22.6.52—In. | % SAFER ROADS K % Se ‘ os Pe furnished and unfurnished
Principal. | —————— ‘. a eT ——a rent. :
25.5.52 eas | PRIMUS STOVES,— This name has | % 1 of the ne eeG in | x IN y meng #00
been proven by years of experience as SAPE DRIVING S ms

WANTED—A ster for the {being an insurance certificate against fire is proper % ALL ITS BRANCHES % Situate at Mile and a Quarter, St. Peter. ab
and Parry School, St. Petey hazard. Do not buy cheap inferior makes ‘. A
to teach up tio G. C. E. Ordir . ith at do not last and which are danger- CONTROL x SEE oot lye $ With an Excellent View to the Sea.. REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Cand@idates with qualificatior teach ] ° Primus stoves use less fuel and are Just as it is necessary x X %,
Agwiguitural Science will be pre jthe most economical and efficient cook- with successful cooking Rie Y ny MOTT ~

Salary for a Graduate 7 z apparatus made, Accept no_ other The Thermostatic Control g EC IL JEM x) 151/152 Roebuck Street,

Shee for a Gradua |inake eum is avallate SS ue To the Medern Gas Cooker 8 x BRIDGETOWN P

ec honours $1,¢ g i n & Co., Ltd. 4 —- .f.n, Gives correet temperature for s, + a %, :

Allowance @vill be made for previcu — $$ ___—___— Every cooking need x Ps 48 TUDOR STREET 7” PHONE 4563 2 Phone No. 4900.
expetience. Applications with testimo RAILINGS e Office Railings suit- % Call and see them at your 4 y x
nialg should be sent to the dmast le for an Office L. M. B. Meyers|% GAS SHOWROOMS, BAY ST Rig Sty
by Ith July, 1852 2% | c Ltd 20.6.52—t.f.n YSOSSSSSISSOSVSSSSSSSSSSOS. LCCSOSSOCOP POOP PS SS SSS OSS SESS SSSI FSS FSGS SSS SS SSS




CHURCH 227 2etacles miss india’ ins. Rescue —_"08%Rz canTeSn
0 Antigua’s TE | LANCASTE

SERVICES Prosperity Problems | Sia



SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 1952_. SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE FIFTEEN —





One Man In eee a ie RATES oF Exchaie

AHundred | SEAAND AIR “see cnD













Peat
= i ;
D Fi e One of B.O.A.C’s Stratocruiser ‘ 119 6/106
LONDON ISCUSS d ' irliners, which normally carrie TRAFFI |

ANGLICAN Labour troubles in Antig Ke G0 adult passengers, recentl; | a aaa
ST. MARS 'S CHURCH ineludi h : neue @ From Page | arrived at London Airport from | : ae
TRINITY it. including the unwillingness of x. New York with the largest num- ;.

7.30 a.m. Matins &.60 a.m. Low Maes, Many men to work in agriculture, )

requesting the despatch of search

9.00 a.m. Solemn Mas: & Sermon, 3.°9 are one of the main obstacles to airerat ee .. RI

ber of passengers ¢ver accom-














Sunday Se >hil- 2 hi, a law modated on the trans-Atlantic ai isle ;
Saoci View oe 7 "Raphieni, 7 to the island's — prosperity, The lack of survival equip- crossing, In Carlisle Bay
p.m. Solemn Evensong & Sermon according to The Times British ment absard motor and sailing Including the flying crew and) Seh. Sunshine Ke ‘
> * sunday. June 2088 om ae 1 vessels which ply between = steward staff, totalling 10, the . Vv Ss -, so LV. Willer
; ‘ mn, Survey of unemployment in islands, was commented upon by Stratocruiser had aboard no fewer, 7"
8 a.m. Hol . ratoc nad . ‘ "
| \) Pd 8 ly oowninton, iad are the island in 1950 showed that Mr. O. Kelsick, Acting Assistant than 118 people—65 mothers, one AS RIVALS GOVERNMENT NOTH BS
i} 3 p.m. Sunday Sehool, 7 p.m. Evensong 18.5 per cent. of the population Admiristiator of St. Vincent, ; Seh. Mandal 0 inder C. 1 OPAL t DK
afl and’ Serseel, were. unemployed and oni; grandmother, 41 children... and). Wiiscpell Pan’ Vincents
‘ about half of these who wor« Mr. ©. Agostini, Director of just one male passenger, Mr.! ccora, fresh frujt and s Attention is drawn to the De-
poner GayRCE working at the time of the sur- Civili Aviation, Trinidad, re Frank Braun, of Philadelphia, who) gned to Schooner Owners’ Associat ic fence (C rol of Drug and Patent
sail — oe Ba, Vey had been continuously em- viewed the Search amd Rescue Well, darling, if you're travelled with his 19-month old} oop ageustus Am Compton 2 and Pr etary Medicine Prices)
oe 3 8b ra Rey Fr Lawrence . Bloyed throughout the year. ~ Organisation as planned for ‘the really certain that our daughter, Jill, to visit. his wife’s) Lucia with cargo of cocoanut Order 2. No. 6 which will be
an BING PLAN — “Tn Spite of this,” says the Eastern Caribbean, explaining wedding present hasn’t parents at Braintree, Essex 1 Soca vie, CRSeeet Bae, = published in the Official Gazette
June article, “the unemployed have that a draft SAR Manual had turned up yer, I’m terribly [Greene Acccteeen f Monday 23rd June, 1952
JAMES ST.: Towers, Layrence. strong reservations about the already been prepared and for- afraid there’s only one The remainder of the passengers | , rr 22.6.52—1n.
PANIES. Avs Sear, Tewets. type of work they are willing’ to warded to the various colonies. {| possible explanation!”

were the British wives of Ameri-| DEPARTURES
can Servicemen who, with their| Seh es W. Smit?

GILL MEMORIAL: Crawford, Harper S¢cept; at the time of the survey. os io eke. Ben
returned to Britain to! ‘Ph.

It was intended that a separate
HOLETOWN : Towers, Mrs. Morris, OMly one-fifth of them were



Belqueen, Sch Mary }


















Day yaaa sad : ar : ° children line, S hip Plant GENERAL HOSPITAL
‘ SHALL | Lawrence, Cabral willing to take any sort of job hapter should be erevered i DutchColonies bin thalé families end friends.| "> in teamship Planter f
‘ ‘ : jannister, Mar- that igh eaitt each colony, setting out in detail ; ; iF
wine, et might be offered and al- their search and rescue proce They will go back to the U.S.A. SEAWELL Appointment Of Acting Assistant
gs LAM: Greaves, though most of the opportunities Sites She hope was expressed S in August. The B,O.A.C, Strato- Dispenser
es PAYNES BAY ee likely to be in agriculture, hat efforts woula be made to urpass e ee cruiser was specially chartered on oe eee B.W.1.A. on Friday A Qualified Druggist is required
930 am Mr, PB Deane 700 p.m Only One in 20 said he was look- ‘omplete these procedures at an | their behalf, by an American or- Phillip Hewit-Myring Eleanor Hewitt. t0 act as Assistant Dispenser at
Rev K E Towers, BA, BD. Fina) ing for agricultural work and 63 easly’ tes ND ganisation which arranges for ayyring wa. sorta ie Th ci the General Hospital, for approxi-
re OOWHITEHALL ae sae tng er In their political enon en Sraeee. Sh 2. Betton ae thet: Edgar. Funelen, ov Augie, 1808 at” on + of $100
in e canefields. eet, Bt ee : a ess, *} familie ep | rith th cdgar Finglen, V. Venellia Ringlen, August, 1852, at a salary of 00
9.30 am Mr. Grant. “The future of Antigua must Airline Requirements Netherland West Indies, which fe] oe RFA ene fee Avleen Carter, John A. Donac i atk plus A Cae of Living
930 a.m Mr R_ Crawford lie partly in the expansion and 1e necting among other things '°rly lagged behind, have now | eee Allowance of $12 a month,
paeaa ue Er re ic improvement of agriculture and ae A rites Tou tsecnealll urpassed the slower but more! The YOuugest Or Whe passengers DEPARTURES—-by BW 5A Applications for this acting ap-
oh mae SR A., Bp, these occupational reservations nd Problems; Communications thorough development of the Brit-| in this “flying nursery” was onl) vor SailitbAn pointment should be forwarded to
BANK HALL could be .a_ serious obstacle end Air Traffic Control; Opera- is West Indies, of which the ul-|three months old and the oldest} ["pigmas © Sealy, M. Mutehinson, A the Secretary, General Hospital, by
| 9 30am. Key F Lawrence. Some of the estates claim that tional Requirements and Equip- ‘imate goa) is a federation with|was the 74-year-old grandmother,| Armstrong, R. Haynes, J. Leelook, Rk. | 30th June 1952
Bankhall are waked te Gauniosiowe, the difficulty of getting a suffi- ment at Small Airports and Co- dominion status, says “The Timvs| B.O.A.C. Stewardess Joan Gib-| Greea, Yo Grecia, t Dave, TN —2n.
Bay in the evening. ; cient and regular supply of lonial Civil Aviation Service. British Colonies Review,” in anjWon was kept busy during the) cme eee ee
is @ aPaeAaTOWN ae ga labour reduces their efficiency, Tt doen AOD Commissn article on the development to-j flight preparing bottles of milk \ ver wt sc
in. Mr. G. Mini. as they are not able to get some the Chairman, Wing.) ‘ng Ward self-government in the Dutch | and mixing baby food. so
* SELAH tasks done at the best possible .: Creat. ie 4 Bet West Indies. \ VALOR COOKER
930 am. Mr. Greaves time” address sal “No wor s “For c
BETHESDA The prosperity of Antigua decisions have been reached be- no erebietn’ ao beteonne ee | Short Burners
evens will always be determined largely cause it was not the purpose of tha 19.20 it says, “urinam Sad hi thane Haj “teas
Sunday, Reng 6 by the price of sugar, the article meeting. But many matters which ’ es : perver ie = ¢ oe a
PREACHING, APPOINTMENTS continues, .but it is .beyond the Pe Se we Pe
BETHEL: 11 a.m, Rey. T. J. Furley 4] camhd
: DALKEITH: ton G. H ie Con dear peice eee teen fortunate in having with us OWn constitutions, governments i Also
; a.m. r. > fe ar- . , - . ‘ sae ’ ‘ ” ep y 7” 3
vile 7 pm Mr C.F. Broome, B A, “But there are also factors experts in the various aeronautical ~ at Amey Cause Ki led in 3 Days \ wae bathe toh aie
7 BELMONT: gt sere & Mayers controlling production costs and subjeats, who have been gonetous | ehh ekioeing ie Caan the The very first apptication of Nixo. |} aieiiase with rants anh "oteed
" gouTH DisTRICT: 9am, Mr. L, Yield,” it adds, “and it is here SARIDRAPED Indrani Rahman, 21, in imparting information and Dutch colonies in the Caribbean gigi, bene We AR tae piniiee P i aste and overflow
_ : \« . i. . s tal ares y 5 or ° ningic o
Waithe 7 p.m, Mr. St, Hill. _ that there is a chance for tuture “Miss India,” arrives at Idlewild advice. Sa re ow ee re satin and yourwill soon see Sone skin be: 1M) Established T. HERBERT, Ltd. Incorporated
7 Aoi P. a.m, Mr. H, Harris improvement, within the power Airport, N. Y. She will represent “This has been the first meeting Sadan ft f rth article eC " comity soft athootn and orn! Mixes {
r ‘ nes ; : as 2c P . c $s for further progress were erm a new discover: at s | . (
a VAUXHALL: ii am: Mr. C. Forde Of the Antiguans themselves. The her country uu: the “Miss Uni- + ii, kind in this area, and it is shelved when the ere a cuanal kerms and parnaiter on the skin that ) 1860 10 & 11 Roebuck Street 1926 ‘
7pm Vaend ee at om sony #38 een vty of verse” bees ae . anon most gratifying to see that eight and these territories supplied Fletaa, Hing worn and erupcions ESS SSS
e labour force show e in- Beach, Calif, week une és. Governments found it possible to ,
EBENEZER: 11 a.m. Mr, A. Lucas, creased, and the unnecessary ODO” POD dO oe

important quantities of oil ‘and You can't get rid of your skin troubles

7 pan. Mr E. Toppin. send representatives. Jt is also bauxite for the Allied war until you remove the gernis that hide














d iy PDPSOOD PPS OOGOOO GSO 2
i i i he tiny pore , So
BEULAH: 9 a.m, Revd. 8. W. C. on lever ve by industrial dis- particularly pleasing to onsetye machine: in hy thy pores of wet Skin. ane 2
; Crosse, 7 p.m. Mr, O. H. Millar, putes avoided, " C =f onawrena the friendly atmosphere in which In 1942 Queen Wilhelmina day under the positive guarantee that
. ° aaesuer i ee Hunte, “Continued experiment with Area ouife rence the discussions have been conduct- promised to call a conference clear yaue wil pe RS se
j RICES: 11 a.m. Revd. 8. W. C. Crosse, Hew varieties of cane and im- At H Monda ed. Criticism, there has been in immediately after the war to paen Us
5 en sees. proved methods of | cultivation We i y plenty, but always constructive, gefine a new status for all Dutch Nixoderm return ot
Sunday Schools meet at 3 p. m. should be as fruitful in the sceking an intelligent solution, overseas territeries This cone empty
MORAVIAN SERVICES future as they have been in the The Southern Area Conference ysther than condemnation; and wi eae , Ser Skin Troubles packuge.

c : ne ; ference was never held. It was
ROEBUCK STREET: 11 a.m. Morning Past; and if a constant flow of will be held on Monday, June 23rd have | think, achieved a very real ;. a, ,
Service, preacher: Rev. A.C. Hi. Pilgrim cane to the factory could be at 4.45 p.m. at the Scout Head- .cnsc 0 fellowship in the realisa- {oreStalled by the turn of events

MAL? pm, Even ing Service; preacher: maintained the production cost of quarters, Beckles Road. The prim- {jon that our problems are our)” Indonesia.

a ; s In 1948, universal suffrage was
: f _ sugar would be reduced. cipal items on the agenda will be neighbour's, and that his problems... . =
vin ee ie a ee Pet ea “The production of foodstuffs the consideration of 1.H.Q. Report are ours, to be solved mutually by pe neat om fae wut ie

Evening Service, preacher; Mr, F. G. should be expanded so that the on Rovers and Senior S-outs helping each other.” ,



> # |
. js. Netherlands Antilles © ar inde- |
vere perplexing us have been dis- e
ane ana solved, and we have Pendent of each other, with their
|







Downes. ; ; * » nrablerin existing Dutch constitution made
ress bik G ian tee on eve = ana lanpoeke any enter eae ea itn a bene. An informal meeting to discuss a eet o responsi~ Dissolved First Day } > ]
3 - G. Ve Pm. . us b r . stg C rescue proc res ji - oh A * SAUS L—4-lb. Tins AS tAGUS TIPS Tins
Rios ervice, preacher: Mr. W. ey Hii i ay u aS “S bag r= eae if yay ae The report suggests search and re scue procedures. 4 ried sah pee ag nauthed i Asthma fiat Wonca polron 1AM SAUSAGE—4-lb. Tin ASPARAGUS TIPS Tin
: p.m, Evening Ser- ist trade — developed. that the existence 0: ese two sec- ihe Haste aripbean, nas f . r system, sap your energy, ruin . . Fa
vice; preacher: Mr. I. Oxley, : = these things can ie cotelit. tions making with Scouts and Wolf convened by the Director General the autumn of 1948, however, to our health and "weaken your heart, UFILLIT BISCUITS SWEET CORN
Meee on ects Tice | plished it may well be possible Cubs four wings of the Scout of Civil Aviation. This will take|make possible the transfer of] [n.3 minutes MENDAGO- the pre- PEARS
SHOP HILL: 7 p.m, Eyening Service, to. increase the national income Movement, imposes too great a place on Tuesday, June 24, at Seen 9, ~ Republle io fates through the plead, aulekly ourb- 4 SANDWICH SPREAD—Bot
prone) a: Smich, and improve the standard of burden on the organisation and Hastings House by the kind per-| Indonesia, All colonial regula-} {hg the attacks, The very Arst day the PEACHES ‘
ST. NICHOLAS E. 0. CHURCH, ” kes it harder th ver to fing mission of Sir George Seel, Comp-| tions were thereby suspended Ving free, eaay breathing and reast- OLIVES
ana “sunday etter Stat “ ye eee tint oy The Conterenige will troller for Development and Wel-|and this applied ually to the fii oer No open ne fmokes,‘n0 PINE APPLE " z
11 am. Divine Service, Celebrant: also discuss the Week-end Train- fare. ; | territories of the est Indies, lass MENDACO table fa at meals ‘and BREAKFAST ROLI CHUTNEY
Bae So See, eneanee ar ie er Col ial A 1 ing Course to be conducted by Mr. Among those attending will be ae ee cleared the xe for be ‘entirely trae from Asthma and ‘ al. '
fos ae don od ‘ont: Mev. ial ea C. R. C. Springer, Island Commis- epresentatives from the U.S.A.,;| the final settlement e new Ieuan vou May Wave cultersd. toe CARE 3 "HU" r ..
c "fanmael;. Adaresd: Celebrant: Rey on PP sioner for raining, on July 5th & the French West Indies and the] constitution, which will give the pears, NENDAGO ie “so successful Anna x CHUTNEY SAUCE 4

Â¥ . : British Caribbean, two Caribbean territories, com-| that It Is guaranteed to give you free,
ent ees For The Blind“ i é

i asy breath in 24 hours and to
THE ST, JAMES et a BAPTIST Scouters are being invited to plete local autonomy. Discus- Sompletsiy ton your Ast ma in 8 days

11 a.m, Matias and Sermon, 7. p.m, : join a Study Group organised by sions on this are still going on} or money back on rely of empty
Evensong and Sermon, preacher at bath Brought In $21 000 the University College Extra- with the “Maihinande’ Weverns aby be ri ure rom 98
nicks ree th , Mural Department on “The child, Banned Professor [ments —p.up. Bhamiet. The guarantes protects you

v .m, . Ww . Friday The links between the people of the Parent and the Teacher” r Pegi!
een mo MRRRY, this wi "he ‘eon Britain and the Colonial territories which will open on Friday, June Wants To Leave }
{
'

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O94

ducted by Rev. ruce-Clatke, are not eonfined to official action 27th. The first meeting will be
‘Assistant Pastor) and Mrs, biva Browne (snd reports, as has been well held at the British Council at 5



ie Britist cil at 5 WASHINGTON, J
demonstrated by the result of an P-m. on subsequent Fridays the professor Owen Rashiaene vies
appeal by the British Empire meeting place will usually be porarily banned from leaving the. .
Listening Hours Society for the Blind. mont 1 SPC AA USL ere, OED United’ States was deported toda!
f , probably some films will be shown ae ae ae thnk Bane
eM “ odes ye oe Byndey at Wakefield. This Study Group to have made a “coneitional re- |
su! . JUNE , r

ne Baltimore’s John
; Child and the Family, Parental ¢ . i ‘
~ ————-~-—-<—-— a blind man, spoke on a B.B.C. : vides « nat _ Strathmore University where he
er Pah, tee 8 bm Setar programme for a few minutes. to Responsibility, and the Behaviour teaches. RECD.

and mental Development of the
4.30 p.m. Sunday Half-Hour, 5.00 p.m. make an appeal for funds, to help growing child. A seec ‘|
Composer of the Week, 5.15 if , ind- ©. & t second series A University spokesman said
Variety” Bandbos, Begiish the Soclety’s crusade against blind- \;)) y spokesman said



% <4
: . i or ge ee quest for a yen’s leave of
4.00 — 7.15 p.m. |... 19.76M. 25.88M Society, Mr, John Wilson, himself Wi!! deal with the problems of the apsence — from =

6.15 p.m. 8 : deal with the problems of he made the request several
Magazine, 6.45 p.m. Programme Fiarade ness throughout the Colonial Terri- adolescence ; . ues ire > ‘gq’ 1 ‘ "
and Interlude, 7.00 p.m. ‘The News, 7-10 tories. This was the first broad- Enrolment should be — sent pene 080, 508 pad ae ee | SSMU Hj 8 KK FAL d ASH OFFER
Fis — 104s pm oF se M stam ast appeal ever made for the immediately to the Southern 4} Ree ar se .

: the , ow
ee = = Colonies as a whole. Mr. Wilson, Area Commissioner, Headquarters, wii ie eee sine ay emi.
ak p.m, Cartabann Voices, 3.08 sm. speaking from notes in Braille, Beckles Road, or telephone 4653. demic year See |
unday Service, 8. om, oO News- ; " Wh t . 3 . y ; ‘ }
feel, 8 30 Dm. Charlie Kun 845 pm, told of the plight of a million | JUMBLE SALE, The Jumble

Interlude, 8.55 p.m. From the Editorials, blind people and many thousands Sale organized coe ey Taylor ‘ be — tg og 6 = v4 |
‘a ecouts terday at an order to eep m

9.00 p.m. British Concert Hail, 10.00 of others who suffer from blind- for the lst Bar

a5 nee Ree a CO. wews aw ing diseases throughout the British Group last Saturday was very suc- from leaving the country was

The Bible In History and In Life. | | Colonial Empire. poagel The amount collected was issued to the Customs Service.
MONDAY, The response, expressed in a $125, and Mrs. Taylor begs to —U-P.

FOR THIS WEEK

Galvd. Mesh Wire

%” Mesh X 48” @ $1.50 per yard
; X 24” @ 60c.







JUNE 23 feos
4.00 — 7.18 p.m. /... 19.16M, 25.589M good of jetters’ to the Society’s thank all those individuals and |
Daily Servite, 4.18 p.m. illustration of the feeling of Em- %%)Well as those who assisted at the

4.00 |
iy
Programme, 5.00 p.m. Lawn Tennis, 5.15

The News, 4,10 = The officers in London, was a striking Bridgetown firms who gave items,
; , 4.10 p.m. |
era ericket, 5°20 pin. Souvenirs of pire unity which such appeals sale. German Marshal |











l X 30° @ B0c.
usie, ¢,00 p.m. Welsh Miscelleny, 6.15 ming oe che = well anne ‘ Se In Russi | X 36° @ 90c
.m. Tip Top Tunes, 6.45 p.m. Sports tyra y the public response to e seen in ussia | v i Pk Aton.

ou x Programm » 7.00 . . l ; . 8 ‘ ?

pune 4." Vib pn Parade, 7% the appeal made for Jamaica India Offers To e i xX 48” @ $1.20
‘om Britain. after last year's disastrous hur- ; HOF, Germany, June 21. 4 is xX 18° @ 45c. ,

7.15 — 10.30 p.m. ..,.. , 203 M 31.32 ricane. Try For Solution A German deportee who re- | 1M%4 X 30° @ 6lc.

: . turned from a Soviet labour camp ' V, Fa a ae

p.m" Musté of the Regiments, 8 18pm Of course, this appeal for the rned from a Soviet labour camy 1M% xX 48” @ BAe

‘ two days ago claimed here to-d
Radio Newsreel, 6.30 p.m. African Sur- blind was not on as large and NEW DELHI, India, June 21. he saw fortes ersan “Field |
RE Rg oe p.m. tai urgent a scale as that for the Premier Jawaharlal Nehru Marshal Friedrich Von Paulus in|
e j itor Ms Re DN Ps virebd Jamaica hurricane victims. Less offered India’s services to help Russia wearing Russian uniform. |
9,45 p.m. Report from Wimbledon, 10,00 than five minutes on the radio by solve the Korean exchange of |

BARBADOS HARDWARE (C0. LID.

p.m. The News, 10.10 pm, News Talk, Mr, Wilson, and B.B,C. officials prisoners deadlock in 4 statement Vincenze Kraupe, 42, who re-| r ‘
Beatie With Baden 30.30 Pm. said that, in these difficult times, to the press to-day. India was turned from Russia on Thursday | a (The House For Bargains)
anything’ over £1,000 in response favourably suited for such a @94 is now in Moschendorf | No. 16 Swan St. Phones: 4406, 2109, 3534
——$- to such an appeal was considered function Nehru claimed, because Refugee Camp near here said |

OR DVOCVEDD DDD OVODED ED

. . a German prisoners were told Von |
good. she was frienaly with all coun- p: . 4 sos , tactic "

Swedish Plane So officials of the Society were tries involved. foe the oa Wor he |
. rised and delighted at the “When I say India would go all Kraupe said he Gy tae Ten |

Was Shot Down mail which reached their offices out to find some solution, that ranking former Wehrmacht off. |
f in the next ee. Well ares is as son as anybody can say,” cers and industrialists w hile stav- |
letters bringi a total of he said. ;

STOCKHOLM, June 21, 5,000 } +s







ryy 7
c : ing there ; I RY
A report showing that Sweden's "Ore than £4,500 ($21,600) — in _ Commenting = on Americar —ur. | Frank B, Armstrong & Co., Ltd.—Agents.
P Dakota was shot bums ranging from 6d, in stamps to enator exander Wiley's sug- ___
downs bee: it Govern- £116 in one-pound notes sent gestion that leading statesmen ———EeEeEeeeeaee——eooeeee
ae ne pe to mously. like Nehru shoulg investigate w %
Evoelry‘ according ig author! inna” “ne penaover and communis alezation, "of germ |] We NEW INDIA INSURANCE CO.,LTD. «Third
am sorry I cann more,” | warfare, Nehru said “any proper | ‘ 7 .
fais ve Peg today, t to Was the theme of many letters en-| investigation should be ‘py al Cover 12 HIGH STREET Party '
the eyetchiie Staff which oid e@ Closed with a helenae Tor of area accepted and approved by | Y ‘
or a postal order for ajall parties concerned. Anything! ou
| i gpelaggcmeine. Jan on souple'of shillings, unilatera] is no good.—U.P. | PHONE 4713 Hishs
June 13 and is oa} lave Qne contributor was an old lady





been in Lancashire with nothing in the
ser. the Boreal Baltic foland of world but her small old age pen-
Gothland. sion, who sent ten shillings which

It was while searching for the ste had received as a gift for her
Dakota that the Swedish Catalin 95th birthday. Several other peo-
flying boat was fired on by ple in their nineties and about a
Russian fighters and came down dozen in their eighties sent dona-



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PAGE SIXTEEN



A.A.A.B. To S








end Cycle

SUNDAY



Trinity College Reasons For













ADVOCATE









You can obtain the following:













SUNDAY, JUNE 22,



~~



1952









FS
Y . . v ))
4 ~ a. ’
Examination Changes T Ss’ T
Ales ( SL E }
T T M ini Results os i ARTIST JPPLIES |
Wa ¢ a ‘ { From Page 12 |) READY PREPARED CANVAS
eam O i jarlinique ay e : \\} CANVAS BOARDS & CANVAS BLOCKS
The following are the results Of |: this island with a teaching roll|{}}) STUDENT PREPARED ACADEMY BOARDS in three sizes
By J. C. PROUTE the practical examinations of the | or go1, And so 56 can make a de- LAMP SHADE PAPER ;
’ F Trinity College of Music which | cision binding on 800, Farcical!| ARTIST OIL COLOUR BOXES.
cas : ane were held in , bados on the Now that “the teachers” are being} PAINTS IN TUBES, BRUSHES
THE DECISION by the Barbados Amateur Athletic 14th and 16th June, 1952, by Dr.|bjamed I hope they fully realise | CHARCOAL, TURPENTINE & LINSEED OIL
Association to accept an invitation from the VELO CLUB FPesinald_Cooper:— ‘ |\what they have done. If [ Also OIL SKETCHING BLOCKS
= 0 CL PIANOFORTE PLAYING | iad their tntexest, Be St ee
MARTINIQUAIS to send a five-man cycling team to take rurits OF MRS. M. P. COBHAM Fi gy, ge naisect Sirens BORLETS STATIONERY — bia! 3301 i
= in a big two day meeting in that colony is a commend- Bit A a Hintoste them that they delude |
able one, Headley, M. E.--Pass themselves if they do not: believe cate }
; : a py are aw 6 Se =
Undoubtedly the tour which takes place on the 13th of — copnam eeeeetey . Sivisies that ex, Se er Ee wae i ; a |
next month and concludes on the 14th, the French National gyjo, Fi" Sisps Divteion. 4, jnime Seed. OWE ia thelr duty, | :
Holiday, will afford local eyclists who are selected to make Pose, Skinner, E, A—Pass, Skinner, M./ whatever difficulties may arise,| Phone 4267 for
the trip the opportunity to compete with other top class °~""* """tnitial Divilen [to ensure that the children a |
miltite nf ie u j — . » ewneri . shi Gilkes, M.—Pass with it, Gilkes,|trusted to their care rece a e . |
cyclists of the area, and thus widen the experience which ., CK. 0 Suinspury, Po AL V Pass fullest benefit from the education- ALUMINIUM Continous Gutterin |
they have already gained at other intercolonial meets with merit . ‘ The education of the! 8 |
ae E , na. oe . i ao eee , . al system. a e ve ” ye re as i
Interest in the Whitsun Intercolonial oa at oe eaeensen peeeiry pivene® young is a sacred care and those | 18”, 24”, 30’, 36” wide !
t has t vet subsided, and coming so close on that, the King, P,_L.—Pass. to whom it is entruste >| ,
ee ne yet su maces = J ' s mas, ee - ll be ; Preparatory Division prepared not only to accept but ALU MINIUM Corrugated Shects A AN’'S FINEST BUY |
performance of our local boys inthe French Island will be ward, w. R.—-Pass with merit Pret out agaitat wil-cheliennes:| 6.8.9. 10 1 hs M |
; : Fi s Divi ag : *| » ov,
watched with more than passing interest Davis, kee bae ties.3., A. fend the bismingad « Director or | »&, engt in Black and White
The big event of the meetin 5 ———-—=_ Pass, Lorde, M.—Pass with merit, Sealy,|the criticism of a system will be, ALUMINIUM Paint : .
which will be held under the © prion R I BO NII i as conducive to success as the} ain Brown and White,
patronage of the Prefect of “peighisiown Round-up Arthur, W. M-—-Pass, Taylor, Pp. a,j beating of a drum to the regular- | ' - 4 Brogues and Oxfords
Martinique, is the 150 kilometre Honours, Waithe, J. £.—Honours jising of a storm. i} ALUMINIUM Nails
> whic’ , re Wate , H. W.—Pass with merit. ] EB. j
reed at th 1 oe ce A... ePUPILS OF MISS. A. LYNCH | JEB at $10.94 and $12.02
seeetee RAND Furuse. “aaude Keport ».... Jt ae | POILITE Flat Sheets per pait
‘SIDE E JB- >rescod, M. M,—Pass . |
his i e | - 7 Ad eed Preparatory Division j zy | $ 5 7
ee ee ee enn To B > D b: t d Harrison, N.—Pass be Schooners Bring Hard Flexible Asbestos-Cement White Nu-Buck
in skill, stamina and judgment. € e€ da e Inniss C Ke Paes With coast, Skeete, | Varied Cargoes a vce or interior use $11.73 per pair
It will be their greatest test, and M, _V.—Honours. Ai - . ck, x |
it will be interesting to learn how ‘Taq Maud)» Report” will be PUPM™ OF MR. £. P. M. ROCHEFORD j = . « All Sizes in Stock
they equip themselves against Subject of a debate which will ‘oppin, rte pees ae oh atte eed “ere oe EVERITE Corrugated Sheets
their more experienced rivals be held at the Assembly Room, PUPIL OF MISS J. SHEPHERD as a >roi "tr +. | 6’, 7’. 8’. 9’. 10’ 3
over this distance. Speightstown, on Thursday night, Rice street ee Saeeen uber ‘Capt. a marche. Cee ee CAVE SHEPHERD
a a gi a June 26, at 8 p.m. PUPILS OF THE URSULINE CONVENT | She brought in 423 bags of copra, |
having correspondence with. th = Raat ae = nae the de- Ingram a> Pee, ee Pass with|12 bags of arrowroot, six bags 01 | & CO LTD
. A > wi : “S cepy” it ' . ; ‘ starc . . . . .
Martinique Association, and §0 gm ith, and, iin ke A, Willers “eet Preparatory Division ji tit ea 7 7h f Wilki & H C Ltd
pr — ” r eet = n M.C.P., both Barristers-at-Law. | _, Farrara, eas Knazgs, M oe ae Te inson aynes 0., . 10, ll, 12 & 13, BROAD ST.
made Meanwhile, i@ loca The he Pi Pr "14, Pass fe aes 2 :
pea ao tg cuite: a108..of Th A ding of the debate will First Steps Division Sixty drums of cocoanut oil
road work in preparation for the ) revival of the Literary eve- Beroh. pees He Freltaes We Pass were brought in by the Schooner ="
Ty n an effort to gain D8 which kept the Assembly Wi i J Honours, Sarkis, J Augustus B. Compton which PLOPLPS OP S9OS POPE ECO PLOOSSOS OE OP PN SA APE fo
tour, and i 1 ef ; I Pi . merit, Millan 0 fs
selection to the team. lal] lively for some time since Pass,’ Taylor,’ A. C—Pass alled in yesterday from St. Lucia,
¢ he committee, the final ! was opened. Initia} Division a This schooner also brought in 490
For t ym Alvarez, N.—Pass, Baron, M.—Pass

task,

selection will be a difficult r wn ‘ Lazo, M.—Pass with merit, Mazo, D.—|bags of copra, eight bags of cocoa-|
and no doubt, they will endeavour The Old Parry School ground pass’ with merit, Paschen, A, — Pass,|)nuts, 66 bags of charcoal, 140|
$ in St. Lucy was crowded on Faschen, “ ass Pennacchiotti, & |

to select the best team.

This team, in my view, should

comprise of three of the best A held band PUPIL oF, MIs M. GRIFFITH | Both schooners are consigned
Class cyclists, an Intermediate "°'G an open air concert _Pirs eps Division to. Schooner Owners’ Association. :
man, and one from the B Class The programme, which was ‘re, 5. Le R—Pass with merit

On h + the Test vanes varied trom. the ‘

iv performance at the last mambo to classical pieces. / oe fe Th T th

two meetings here—the Interclub Fifty-four parts of rain have Police Band e ru in THINK OF .
meeting in April, and the << been recorded at District “E” At Ei 1 * d
colonial Meet-——John Skinner, who Police Station for that area of sptartade Y H
disposed of all opposition over the St, Peter during — the week up P our oroscope THE FIT

distance races should be a cer-

tainty, It carmot be denied that, The 54 parts fe oa R. T. Michelin, O,B.E., Commis- astenntcitne
with Farnum out of those events, night, ea Hee Pipeeday sioner of Police, the Police Band,}| Would you like to know what the AND
he upheld the reputation of Bar- conducted by S/Sgt. C. Archer, | Stars indicate for you ? Would you like

bados in winning the five, nine
and fifteen mile events from such

old carpenter of Mt. Brevitor, St. ancient science to
veterans as Carmichael, Yard, Peter, was twice during the
Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
|







ESTABLISHED 1895



MANY REPUBLICA

Eisenhower Makes
Rousing Speeches

TEXAS, June 21 |
GENERAL DWIGHT EISENHOWER charged U.K. Has

on Saturday night that Senator Robert Taft’s | F
astest

Texas-supporters werg rustlers who “stole Texas’ |
birthright in the betrayal of tho entire Republican |
Party.’”’ General Eisenhower is stated to have’ A—Bomber
made the strongest attack so far on both Taft and |
Taft’s backers.

PARIS, June 21.

, ; | Britain has hinted that. she
Speaking from a prepared text, Eisenhower declared | puilt and tested the fastest jet-
the Republicans cannot hope to fight corruption in Gov-|powered atom bomber in the
‘ernment unless they follow the policy of “honesty andj world, reliable aviation sources

said on Saturday.

fair play.” As he had promised, Kisenhower dwelt at
length on the dispute between rival Texas delegations to
the Republican National Convention One delegation was
pledged to Taft and one to Eisenhower.

He said: “The contested dele-
gates at the torthcoming Repub-|
lican National Convention must,
not be allowed to vote to seat}
themselves or other contested del-|
egations until their credentials!
have been passed in the open air
and in an impartial manner and
approved by the Convention.
Ctherwise, persons on trial will be

Sources ciose to the North At-
lanti@ Treaty Organization said
the first heavy bomber in the
form_of a “flying triangle’’, is the
most efficient design at speeds up

Advisers For |‘ and faster than sound. This

‘ disclosure ‘followed an announce;
ment that the United States are

Economics

Conference

planning to underwrite aviation
industries in N.A.T.O. nations by
placing orders for complete war-
planes in Europe with hundreds
of millions of dollars allotted for

members of the jury. Honesty and} Miss D, Tbberson, C.B.E., Social Se eae of military equip-
fair play cannot be compromised.! welfare Adviser, and Mr. J. L. {ent aproad. GP.)
They will be respected at the|Nicol, O.B.E., Education Adviser, P.



Republican Convention. Then, but jboth of the Development and Wel-
only then, will our nominee for!fpre Organization, will be among
the present, whatever his name is,!the British representatives at a
be in a position to fight effectively |conference on education in home
against corruption in’our national/economics and nutrition in the

Government.” Caribbean which is to be held in

2s {Trinidad from the 30th June to
Visits Old Home ene 7

; : : ‘the 5th July. -
Eisenhower visited the little Most of the British West Indian

wee House 4 ware be was born’ governments are also sending re- West Indian Sea Island
in Denison, Texas, before com- presentatives. *6 ; *
ing to Dallas, He made short The conference has been arrang- Sy tekareh emi a,
speeches in Denison and Denton, eq under the joint sponsorship of Antigua Beach Hotel on Thurs-:
but his major Texas speech was the Food and Agriculture Organ- day last under the chairman-!
delivered here. He said: “Instead ization of the United Nations and ship of F. H. S Warneford. |
of_the great upsurge of moral and the Caribbean Commission. Its] Ronald Cadman represented the
physied strength we need, how general purpose is to promote an|secretaries and J. V. Lochrie, !
sadly must we look on what has exchange of information and €x-:technical advisor. —
happened here. Thousands upon perience on problems and devel-] The delegates. are H. F Alkins, |
thousands of Republican voters— opments in home economics and) Barbados; W. Walwyn, St. Kitts;
an overwhelming majority of them nutrition education, with a view], Hadden, Nevis: A. W. Griffith,
—deliberately and ruthlessly dis-,to providing guidance in the] Montserrat. L. Punnett, St. Vin-
franchised. Majority rule, the formulation of programmes in the|cent. and Novelle Richard, Anti-
very basis of our free Government, | territories represented. ¥ c
‘was here flouted and erertiadbn | The conference will also explore
In this case rustlers stole the:'Wways in which member countries
Texas birthright instead of
‘Texas steers.”

Cotton Quota
Discussed

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ANTIGUA, June 21.
The

Main discussions are centred
the-may be of mutual assistance injaround the cotton situation in
{promoting this objective and ob-| Antigua and Nevis as these islands

The Texas Genie arose during taining advice on how the Food|face a reduced price of. 32 cents |

at Mineral @nd Agriculture Organisation and|per pound for 1953 and the quane

state
Pek whore. Taft's supporters re-|the Caribbean Commission may be{tity required is 600,000 pounds. |

fused to seat Eisenhower backers.|/0f Service, as part of their normal, Antigua , indivi
The Eisenhower group walked
out and staged a rump conven-
tion of their own.—U.P.

Programme

of Technical Assist-| year,
ance.



Guards Killed |
In Prison Riot

RIO DE JANEIRO, June 21.





Spy Faces
More Charges

LONDON, June 21.
William Martin Marshall, 24

T.C.A.: |

Five Million

MONTREAL, June 18,
| Canadian aviation marked

The mutiny ef $50 prisoners on | qnother “"mnilastme’ “today || Sinn! opmuier, Mecgee Oites
Ancita Island has assumed disas- when Trans-Canada Air Lines t hirther. chatges of givin secret
trous proportions and according announced the company had |! information O paver Re eetent
to latest reports mutineers who carried its fifth million pas- |) th Russe EB ee Ss nd Bees
had killed some guards, broke e ssian Embassy Secon

Senger since regular passenger
was inaugurated in 1939,

The rate of growth in Can-
ada’s air transportation in-

retary, when he appeared in court
here. Marshall arrested eight
days ago walking in a park with
a Soviet Embassy official, was also
dustry is illustrated by tho accused of obtaining information
fact it took TCA nine years which might be useful to an
to carry its first million pas- | enemy at Hanslope Park, Buck-
sengers, and yet the airline inghamshire, where he worked. |

into the Armoury and took 50
rifles and 9 machineguns, four
mortars and 28 rounds of ammu-
nition and sailed for the mainland
in a boat, An aircraft kept watch
for them. '

Twelve mutineers were quick-
ly recaptured and the town of
Ubatuba occupied by troops. !
Mutineers have struck in the di- |
rection of the town of Guaratin-'
geta in the State of Sao Paulo}
with official forces in pursuit
while reinforcements have been |

sent,
—U-P.

Bailey Wins Both Sprint
Titles For Fourth Year

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, June 21.

WATCHED by Her Majesty the Queen and Princess
Margaret, E. McDonald Bailey won both sprint titles for
the fourth year in succession in the A.A.A. Championships
at the White City today.

Despite unfavourable weather conditions he returned/
the fast time of 9.6 seconds in the 100 yards. This equals
his own British national record. He won by three yards

from A. R. Pinnington.
Bailey's victory in the 220 yards



carried close to that number Marshall first appeared in court
last year alone. last Saturday on a charge of giv-
During nearly 15 years of ing information to Kuznetsov.
operation, TCA has expanded —UP.
routes from 122 to 17,000 |}
miles, and has flown 195,000,- |



000 miles.





Get Extra Bonus

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, June 21.
The Antigua sugar factory hav-
ing manufactured over 23,260 tons
of sugar, all workers of the in-

dustry will receive an additional
“%%

Sugar Workers To

bonus

ing crop.



U.S. Replacements
Repulse Attack

SEOUL, Korea, June 21.
Fresh American infantry re-
placements beat back the biggest
Communist attack of the year on
{the western front
a United Nations

and
com-

today
battle

Sunday



MST. INGTIALS FERS”



the four-jet plane, believed to be|

_~

v ¥y
activities or under the Expanded| approximately 570,000 pounds this

on every thousand
tons produced during the |



BARBADOS, JU]

his



ee

ine

‘
i




































SIDENT HARRY TRUMAN places his initials on the Keel plate of the
tilus, world’s first a r y
ceremonies at Groton, Conn, Watching at
Navy Dan L. Kimball and (left) n Joy
‘The initials were later burned weer.



(International)

P-

GRINNING HAPPILY, President Truman holds a model of the world’s
first atomic-powered submarine—the Nautilus, It was presented to the
Chief Executive following dedication ceremonies at Groton, Conn. The
President put his initials on the sub’s kee) plate. (International)

ee ee eee ee

Judge Ward Stresses
Freedom Of Judges

To Express Opinions

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 21.
A STRONG statement made by The Hon. Mr. Justice

EK. R. L. Ward, Barbados-born Judge from the bench of
the Court of Appeal on Friday isthe talk of the town to-
day. The publie are freely expressing the view that Mr.
Ward and Mr. Mortimer Duke have greatly contributed
to making the Trinidad bench stronger than it has been
for many years. Mr. Ward stressed the freedom of judges
and magistrates to express their opinions on matters com-
ing before them and their right to resist any attempt by
the Police or any executive officer of the Government to
interfere with judiciary independence or to issue instruc-
tions to them as to the administration, of justice.

Mr, Ward, who on the previous eyidence \when it is clear that
day declared also from the bench) witnesses have.no regard for the
that some “fresh policeman” had| truth or for the impartial admin-
reported his remarks in a case to) istration of) justice.” He declared
the Governor, began by saying) that @f any attempt were made
that some weeks ago he expressed by anyone to influence or coerce
the opinion during the hearing of a|4 judicial vificer, the proper com~-
case that a handwriting expert}/ment was the retort made by
would be of no assistance to the Moses on a celebrated occasion
Court in the case as the matter) “Ye \ake too much upon you, ye
was clear, Two police officers | 998 of Levi
saw fit to make a garbled report
of what he said and someone in

































during dedication
} is Secretary of the
kins, corporation head.

fto 12,500,000



3 DISFRANCHISE

\romie 8’ Rescue Proble

At Civil

Nationalists
Stall Bill
PUSAN, June 21.
The powerful South Korean
demecratic nationalist party walk-
€a out of the National Assembly
‘today during discussions on the

sompromise bill which could end
the political crisis and left insuffi-

cient members for a vote to be
taken,
Democratic nationalists left

When the Minister of Justice Suh
Ang Swan began explaining the
bill leaving only 97 members
present—enough to allow discus-
sions but not enough to assure the
necessary two thirds majority.
The House has 183 "members and
123 woul’ be required to pass the
bill which comprises two consti-
tutional alterations wanted by
President Syngman Rhee and the
two compromises he has accepted
yg pressure from the opposi-
on,
Rhee wants the President to be
elected by a poplar vote instead
of by the Assembly and institution
of two Chamber legislature in-
stead of the present one Chamber
National Assembly. He had con-
ceded that the cabinet should be
subject to a vote of non confidence
and neither the Cabinet nor the)

gat can dissolve the Assem-
aly,



—UP.

U.K. Will Raise
Coal Exports

BIRMINGHAM, Eng. June 21,



ports by another million tons this
year, Minister of Fuel and Power
announced here today.
wf it has already been sold,
This would bring British exports
of all grades of coal in 1952 up
tons. “At present
prices, these coal exports should
earn some £60,000,000 of foreign
exchange as compared with coal

yearnings of just under £30,000,-
1000.1 aaa

st or he said.
our 1
on the Ba
position in the a
. ments Union, we estimate our
coal exports to European countries
will reduce our payments in gold
to. the Union by an amount at

present equal to >
ton eae the full value of

$20M. U.S, Aid
For Pakistan






Pakistan will get more tt
$20,000,000 unde the United
States expanded Point Four Pro-
gramme next year Ambassador
Arren Warren said here to-day.

Warren who arrived back from
two weeks consultations in Wash
\ngton said the signing of opera-
tional agreements would begin as
soon as money was voted by Con-
@ress which had already passed
authorising legislation.

—UP.



2nd Italian Freighter
Held Up In Port-of-Spain

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 21.
_ Incidents which led to the arrest
in Trinidad waters last Tuesday
of the Italian trader “Giulia” took
a dramatic turn yesterday when
“Rosario”, another freighter which
had figured with “Giulia” in the
collision at McKenzie, in the Dem-
erara River, British Guiana, on
March 16, was arrested by the

Marshal of the Supreme Court
yesterday,

The Honduran registered “Rosa-
rio” 3,842 tons, ig tied up at the
Chaguaramas terminals here, laden
with bauxite from Paramaribo
Dutch Gulana, It is understood this
is a counter action by the owners

[of the “Giulia,” Bond in the sum of

$30,000 (U.S.) has been posted for
the release of each vessel,



\iteriological warfare.” The Secur-

i
Britain is to increase its coal ex-!



But most,

KARACHI, June 21, |



was eyen more convincing. He
breasted ‘the tape six yards ahead
of Brian Shention, a European
200 metres champion in 21.4

Paris Goes |
secon preloar of Australia who To TI ve P. olls

took the 100 yards title from, |
Bailey in 1948, pulled a =o PARIS. June 21. |
in the 100 yards semi-final and Over 500,000 Parisians go to the |
was unable to compete in either of | polls to-morrow to elect the!
the sprint finals. National Assembly deputy in -re-|
Wint Wins “4 Mile placement of the top ranking
Arthur Wint did not defend his | Scientist who resigned his man
title in the half mile which was|date in disgust of political hag- |
won by Roger min ging St one | gling, |
i 5 seconds. int in- |
ew. Sooted in the ee Louis Pasteur Valety Radot,|
mile which he won in 48.1 sec-/an academy member, returned to}
onds by five yards from L. C.'his studies after writing to Gen-|
Lewis, }eral Charles De Gualle, whose |
The biggest surprise of the day rally of French people he repre-|
was a defeat of P. Segedin, the sented, that h dred. nf
holder in the two mile steeple-| politics, |
chase. The event was won by
English champion J. Disley in|
nine minutes 44 seconds which ij,
the best time ever recorded in

was

Political
their

unanimous
to-morrow’

circles are
belief that

yaicd election will not end in a clean

ve aateariis ten the fastest )°U! decision and a run-off bal-ot
i é ; an the fastest |i) be necessary at a later date

i 1 year ritain—four 5 ee a Sater’ Oat
nodes gg Rs tere regain to pick up one of the nineteen
ska title he held from 1948 to candidates, About five candidate

1950. Roger Bannister, last year’s #Te Slven real chances of carry-/|
winner did not compete. ‘ng off the by

The three miles race was won political
by Chris Chataway in 13 minutes
59.6 seconds.



electicn, which

rees inter;
remier Antoine Pinay’

policy. —U.P,



pret a al

jtest for P



| Lighthouse

j that a big wave

to “attack or repel any Chinese
offensive.” Afterya bloody fight
that waged west of Chorwon for
six hours 3,500 Americans suc-
cessfully fought off a full Chinese
regiment. An Eighth Army
spokesman said the Reds suffered
more than 400 dead or wounded.
It was the twenty-first attempt by
Communists to -retake positions
seized by the 45th Division ten
days ago and when the fierce
battle was over, United Nations
flags flew triumphantly at the top
of four strategic hills. be



Fisherman Drowns

Oscar Worrell, *a fisherman of
Shermans St, La.'>, was drowned
ibout three miles off North Point
yesterday morning
about 7 o'clock when the boat
“Levison” in which he and his
fellow fisherman Clifton Griffith
were sailing, sank.

The “Levison” E—74, was owned
by Drayton Babb of Shermans,

Griffith was rescued by fishermen
of the boat “Surana” which passed
by soon after the “Levison” sank.
the Police
struck the boat and
caused it to sink,





Griffith reported to

mander said they were ae in the Police Force re-

ported to the Governor that his
emarks were likely to hamper
the police im
their duty.

the execution or

Police Evidence

Mr. Ward Said he constrained to
make those remarks because there
ppeared to be an opinion preva-
in some quarters that the
Courts were bound to accept the
evidence of policemen and experts

lent

without question

Such a theory was entirely con-
trary to law and he for one ‘‘shall
not be deflected from my plain

duty to criticise adversely such

252 Workers
Leave for U.S.

{ (From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, June 21.
252 agricultural workers
Antigua during the week
harvesting ernployment in
United States. 113 from Antigua,
107 from St. Kitts and 32 from
| Montserrat



The Leewards’ full quota of 309

wes unfulfilled due to applicants

rejected on final medical examina-
tion chiefly through decayed or
insufficient teeth.



| Hunger Strike

left
for
the |

, es E
Engineers Should Not Be
e ; : ° |
Driven Away From T’dad

’

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 21.

/» HON: P. M.. RENISON, acting Governor of Trinidad,
spans at the Annual General Meeting of the Civil Ser-
(Vice Association this morning, warned against driving
-away engineérs from the colony by insults before they
could be replaced,.Mr. Renison ‘declared : “We have in
this colony a tremendous works programme on which the
colony's future depends. We have very few Trinidad
enginéers at the present and we have been struggling to
find students with scholastic backgrounds which could

make it possible to train them to become qualified
engineers.”

Four Japs Start





The Acting Governor added
that it was difficult to get the
number required. Then Mr. Ren-
ison asserted ‘we should be in a
very unfortunate position if by
insults we drive engineers away
before we can replace them and
the ‘result will be that we shall
find ourselves without any quali-

TOKYO, June 21.
Four , Japanese employees of

the British Commonwealth Forces

took up positions outside the dgor

of the British Commonwealth |fied engineers to carry out our
Labour Office at Kure, Souvnern | Works Programme which will
Japan to-day, and said they end in chaos.” There were in the
would not eat again until they | civil service, he said, tremendous
had received a satisfactory an-/opportunities for all ranks and
swer to the wage demand,—W.P. | branches.






-roblems: Discussed 7
Aviation Meeting

THE MEETING of Civil Aviation Officers of the Brit-
ish Caribbean Area ended at Kent House, Trinidad, last
week after a three-day session. ‘

Attending the meeting were representatives from
Antigua, Barbados, British Guiana British Honduras,
Jamaica, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and Trinidad.
: Chairman of the

Wing Commander L. A. |
field, Director General of Civil

U.S Want Germ 8.2 in the Caribbean, who

| explained briefly that it had been

War Charges \sepreent to enmhleggivil aviation
Investigated

representatives offe4the British
Caribbean territories meet and
‘discuss various. problem of mut-
UNITED NATIONS,
New York, June 21.
The United States vowed today

val interest at a time when Mr.
}K. MacAleavey, Deputy Repre-
to battle the procedural tape and
almost certain Soviet veto of Red)

‘sentative, 1.C.AyO., North Ameri-
lean Regicnal Officer could be pre-

Cross investigation of Communist}

germ warfare propaganda. Service, gave a brief historical re-

of the Red Cress “and such other

* Gross requested the meeting

sent.
US ambassador, Ernest A.| View of the establishment in the
experts it may select” to investi-
Spécifically to “consider the fol-

meeting was
Eggles-

Deficiencies
Mr. MacAleavey explained that
number of meteorological re-
quirements had been listed as vital
deficiencies in the Caribbean area
and added that several of the re-
quirements however, had _ since
been remedied,
He said that with the develop

Discussing meteorological or-
ganisation and requirements, Mr
W. A. Grinsted, Director of the
3ritish Caribbean Meteorological
Grows, submitted the. resolution |@re@ and —— the pe
resterde 7 he Initea | at present in hand and the plans
pester. calling. onthe United that wore under: consideration for
quest the international committee tuture developmen
gate germ war charges on thea
Spot in Korea ana report the re-
sults to the Council as soon as
possible.



lowing new agenda item: ‘the ment of Jet aircraft, I.C.A.0.,
question of request for investi- attached the greatest importance
gation of the alleged use of bac- to radio wind observations

which were vital to the opera-

ity’ Council complied with the} tions of these aircraft. This

request and scheduled a meet- equipment enabled wind strength

ing for next Monday afternoon and direction to be recorded
, UP, up to heights over 50,000 feet.

The meeting also discussed
the question of aviation fuel and
at the request of the Chairman,
Mr. R. Napier of Shell Lease-
holds Distribution Co., Ltd., ex-
plained the present position of
aviation fuel supplies and
gave an outline of events lead-
ing up to the recent shortages



No Forced
Repatriation

TOKYO, June 21. which resulted in. temporary
The United Nations informed restrictions on quantities of gas-
Communists today that Soviet oline supplied to airlines,

stussia has laid down the princi-
ple of “no forced repatriation” of
war prisoners in World War II,

Chief United Nations delegate
to the Korean truce talks Major
General William K. Harrison
startled Reds at Panmunjom by
quoting the Russian surrender
appeal to German soldiers in

orld War II. The Soviet offer-
ed to return German troops “to
ony ‘ sguniny where ow soners
should desire to go” if they sur-[ 07° ta :
rendered according to the Russian search. He pointed out that on

1 . heir receiving an alert, informa-
ama which Harrison: quot- tion was immediately passed on tu

their command in Puerto Rico, and
The promise was made on two fon receiving approval from that
occasions during the last war, /source, an aircraft was despatch-
Harrison said, on January 8, 1943 fed.
and again during the siege of He drew attention to the dis-
Budapest, They have insisted |heartening effect on crews of their
that the United Nations refusal to |being sent on search missions, e3-
return prisoners to . Communist |pecially for marine craft, and to
territory against his will was a]discover that no alert existed. It
violation of the Geneva Conven-|was therefore necessary to con-
tion. sider carefully each case before

The meeting dealt with Searecn
and Rescue Problems and Lt.
Wachtel of the U.S, Naval Station
at Chaguaramas, explained the
omganisation at his base, as related
‘o the operation of Search and
Rescue aircraft,

Search Procedures
Lt. Commander A, Walker also

the procedures necessary before
aircraft were despatched on

—UP.

@ Ona Page 15






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stadia seiidPeabaiedaldiamcsoi i a le a SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 1952
i RS SSS SS SS SSS ; ane eae OT ee ee ee -
TE ISS S | DANCING TIM. i ; :
| JANETTA DRESS SHOP | edding
? a ,

i) (Next Door to Singer’s) ry A S CCESS :

i} ee, U Etiquette
Just opened a smal shipment of - - - DANCING TIME, produced by Miss Joan Ransom. SPEECHES R, M. E. COX, M.C.P. and a
\) s pen as LRA D., was staged at the Empire Theatre on Friday itil x a member * the Executive
( 7 _ VEY night in the presence of an a ne 5 ? 3 everything has Committee and ir. L. E. Smith,

{i DOR VILLE DRESSES Show was staged under th ¥ Appreciative audience. The passed smoothly the hour now M.C.P., J.P. and Chairman of
i Excelle ae h . a % er the distinguished patronage of His arrives for speeches and then on Committees of the House of
w ; ate rb er «xcellency the Governor and Lady Savage and Was tre- with the dance! ~ Assembly, left yesterday morning
Ni Sale of ITALIAN STRAW GOODS still centinuing mendous success, Of course the number of people by B.W.1.A. for Jamaica where
iH : 7 : : L you want to speak will conform they will connect with B.O.A.C.
ES — oo 7 An Speen e whith almost \- gret—it was far too short. We to your own wishes. Nothing for London, England.
—— Pnoe eitort aan ee NV an- — ae that not only was the compulsory here. If you want a They are the two a
; ee a eae in the stan- ballet her specialty in dancing Master of Ceremonies please representing the Barbados Brane

"il soon have that better lard of Barbadian culture. The but she is versatile in other ances choose one who will make things of the Commonwealth Parliament-
curtain went up shortiv after as she moved to the beat of latin bright. ary Association, While in the
ef & 8 = D ee and the numbers were rhythm, s, First the Master of Ceremonies U.K. Mr. Cox and Mr, Smith will
Py vith eee is quick succession. Stole The Show makes his opening remarks thank- attend iectures on parliamentary
oe a ich consisted of well ' ing the guests for being present procedure and will also visit the
Ve eee girls, was a com- Café Society which depicted 32nd those who helped with prep- House of Commons and the

paratively young one, most of the youth of yesterday as com- @tations, etc. He then calls on Northern Ireland Parliament,
ASEPTIC OINTMENT ad gph BBL i ae fon pared with those of the present someone to propose the health of | Mr. Smith is also Managing

» gratula 5

{ 7 .
a sa ae nde pertermance ene alineush af day was perhaps the favourite of the bride. The bridegroom re- Director of Self Help Enterprises

f , the evening’s entertainment. One Plies on behalf of his wife and Ltd. During his absence, Mr, E.
touch of Germolene Ointment. It re- intervals not all of them kept saw a group of fine dancers, Rosa. himself. ©. Layne will act in his place,
licves irritation, subdues inflammation and regular time, yet in each could jie Knight stealing the show. Then the Master of Ceremonies At the airport to see them off
gives protection against the entry of be seen the aim to give perfect One cannot fail to see the ver- Calls on a gentleman to propose were Mrs. Smith and family, Mr.
harmful becteria. You will Sad, to, finish and grace to each move- gatility in this young dancer, She 4 toast to the bridesmaids. The J. £, T. Brancker, M.C.P., Mr. T.
that Germolene draws out dirt from cuts, aha ‘aoa eS Bua eres 6 Bite Srirees po een me pe See O. ree. BOS. Ba S
abrasions, blisters and sores and stim- The programme could be sum- Se eee” eee is th Fann ge ne I

Miss Ransom.

ulates the growth. of new skin. Keep @
tin of Germolene handy for family use.

FOR
SPOTS, RASHES, BURNS
IRRITATIONS, ABRASIONS






century

opened

Cobbler'’s

Shoe—there were many possibili-

med up as one of Classical Danc-
ing. Trisch-Trasch , in which
Rosalie ang June Knight were
the Sailors and the Dancing Class
which compared the ballet of a
ago with that of to-day

the first part. In The

Dream The Ballet

ties in the field of ballet. Grace
of movement and ease of style
together with the wonderful
lighting made its effects stand out
as one of finesse

Ontstanding
Part Il, in my opinion, as a
whole needs special mention

Especially the Ballade performed

by adozen dancing girls with
Miss Ransom taking the solo
part. I think these girls were
indeed the best that could have
been chosen for this number and
strict timing grace and ease of
movement predominated. One

can readily see that this is Miss
Ransom’s special department in
dancing. She possesses sterling
qualities that make for a first
class ballerina. In Beguine by
Cole Porter, the haunting rhythm

Highlighting the
evening's performance were the
gorgeous costumes so colourful
and rich. The scenery and stage
setting together with the usual
high standard of coors iment
by Capt. C, E. Raison, M.B.B., and
his Music Makers, rang down the
curtain on another suctessfu!

pecereneace in Barbadiarff(Cul-
ure.

The Barbados School ne-
ing has found a place int field

of culture and those who assisted

Next is the toast to the bride’s
parents to which the bride’s father
replies on behalf of his wife and
himself. The same applies to the
bridegroom's parents, In the case
of the absence of either parent,
an old friend may reply.

Please remember that s: hes
muet be short, to the ena

snappy. If they are too long and
drawn out, guests will lose inter-
est’ and wander~ off, Speeches
must be expressions of sincere
wishes for happiness, and peace.

and collaborated in the prepara. All other sentiments about father,
tions in presenting the show, Mys, grandfather, and their history
M. Benfield who played the must be omitted. ; ;
accompaniment in Ballade, ana’ This is the couple’s night make
many others’ are to be congratu-. ©verything for them a happy link
lated. to look back. on.

K.A. Then there may be the cutting



Talking Point

To persevere in one s
be silent is the best

calumny —George Washington.
* * +

To speak but little becomes a
woman and she is best adorned jn ej,

of the cake. The bride and groom
cut the first piece of the bride's
cake. You may want to call on
the Chief bridesmaid and the

outy and bestman or perhaps an engaged
answer to couple who may be the next to

be married.

After this ceremony there may
be dancing and the time draws
near when the couple will take
leave. Remember nothing

Stuart, Mr. O. Squires and Mr.

Spent Two Weeks

R AND MRS. CLARENCE

RENWICK returned to
Grenada yesterday morning by
B.W.LA. after spending two
weeks’ beledans were ates
ing at the Hotel Royal.

Mr, Renwick is Superintendent

of Public works in Grenada.

Venezuelan Leaves

R. ALFREDO OCHOA, an

accountant at La Mote de
Coco, a bank in Caracas, Vene-
zuela, left for = tia yester-
day morning by 8B.W.I.A. on his
way home after wae.
noliday. He was y
Abbeville Guest House.

week’s
g at



MR. AND MBS. GEOFFREY SKEETE

At St, Philip’s
A’. St. Philip’s Parish Churen
4 yesterday afternoon, Miss
Joanie Farmer, daughter of Mr.
_ 4nd Mrs. A. G, Farmer of Ough-
terson, St. Philip, was married
to Mr. Geoffrey Skeete, son of
Dr. and Mrs. H. E. Skeete of
























































































sho is ¢ lain attir “The Grotto”, Dalkeith Road,
and besutitul technique of or- “0 - Pim Bere. effects a greater anti-climax to ~ The bride who was given in
chestration lent a note of charm _ the marriage ceremony and cele- marriage by her father, wore a
to the entire movement. —Democritus. bration than the lingering pres- dress of lace over satin, with a
After the interval Part Im ! have had @ good, many ence of the bridal pair. Good tight fitting bodice, long sleeves,
af . ice Espagnol, troubles most of which never wishes and congratulations lose in a v full fi kit d
opened with Caprice pag ” De I ignifi a very fu ared skirt and a
another fine item, followed by happened, —Dean Inge, | significance when uttered more wong full train. Her finger tip
Air de Ballet. - Dance Moods, a than once; and repeated farewells veil of illusion tulle was kept
specialty by Miss Ransom bore Men were born to succeed, not can pall on the fondest hearts. aa 4 hit
Sp ; a : Not m than t hi t th in place by a headdress of white
out her qualities but left one re- to fail—Thoreau, Fe Sah TWO BOUTS BF the roses. Her bouquet was also of
. most, should elapse between the ree
Se SS DSS SEDI DDIOSSSSAASIICSS | wedding pair's arrival from the white roses. oc
ehureh and their departure for She was attended by Miss Sidi
1 i HEA i RES | their) honeymoon. Preece as maid of honour and
8 hye) The bestman will complete his Miss Jeanette Goddard and
ou u IgG 4.8$ ore duties by ing together, the jug- Miss Cynthia Branch as brides-
a ain ill oa ; Sie es || gage in advance. e has done maids, They wore white stamped
BRIDGETOWN! BAR OTSTIN his job well the couple will not nylon over ice-blue satin with
pagar Ante) (Dial 5170) iss sgt | have to suffer the embarrassment ballerina-length skirts, tight fit-
4 oda i" 4 y & To . rc
ni ours mh pm & "continuing Dally kt PM. rar 8.29 pm of curlaus Mares. left ting bodices and full flared
FIVE ACADEMY sectinés - waoieas : Once the bridal pair have left, skirts and long white gloves
Gl d FE ee hes \3 AWARD WINNER! ousla . Bing cece however, a wedding party is lia- Their headdresses were of net
Q4NaS ort2 f ze d A STREETCAR ‘n umenn Come | ble to flop like a pricked balloon. mr ;
: FIGHTING O'FLYNN ping = | Considerate guests will therefore Aid white siete ahd thay carried
by New Discover y NAMED DESIRE}] aiso tne short —|\|| take their departure, leaving the RICHARD TAYLOR vpan books.
Do you feel old bet ; a Uivien Lika INCH BY INCH eee Sora “ee Dore PP rg fm eo iter
o,you feel old before your time? Are fou tired _ Vivien LEIGH 445 &@ 8% PLM. ed, in comparative peace. isses nne armer, nifer
sseofiats ettuaes sree ieee unre fHURS ‘speci 146 FM] shoving GH Jumell Woe new Sena a As Ot. Matthias hapaoed Packer ond Valerle Packer, com-
from loss of memory. nervousness, weak body, im- Roy ROGERS Double! ing, Flat Racing Etc, LOST CITY OF WATCH YOUR PARTY A T five o'clock yesterday ISS ERMINE WINSTON of pleted the bridal entourage. They
fear or have an inferiority complex? bo you enjoy SONG OF TEXAS & Taos We MANNERS afternoon at St. Matthias 4 Kingstown, St. Vincent who wore white stamped nylon with
suu by without ® second glance? If you sufler from RIDING DOWN 4.30 & 840 P.M THE JUNGLE If you are no longer invited to Church, Miss June Eileen Croney, is at present on holiday in Barba- off-the-shoulder bodices, puff
these conditions, then you are the victim of weak “HOUSE of FEAR” wit ti hi t arefully, daughter of Mr. and Mr. J. W. dos, was recently to Mr. siceves and white bonnets.
glands, and unless your glands are forufed and £0 . arties then read this ¢ my - ” Keith Clarke of “El Rosa”, 7th =
stimulated, you ean fot hope to fepain youthtul THE CANYON Bel Aaa ae Russel HAYDEN ow is the time for all good men Croney of “Cronesia”, Worthing, ym Datleviile , The ceremony was conducted by
ae Nieise. Your lends Os || xi ke le a eee eee ee ener at as winter, who ta extgtnay 19, He Rata RDN, Bane
Fotunately for those who suffer trom turt-down PRINCE AND Thurs. Special 1 30 cuanbiaaehel. ? ance here is a list of guests who No. 10 Graeme Hall Terrace and from Hosea, "Euacinien caeene nerformed by Mr, Richard Packer,
has perfected o simple, safe, and positive prescrip: THE PAUPER]| “aranw “cANvon” & Gamprer’* afff| Will never again be invited. the late Mr. Malcolm C, ‘fsy-0r. to leave the island shortly for St. while those of ushers fell to
ton to simulate gland activity and thus bring 8 : ! AUF snytied caabmieil J “BLONDE ALIBI” The one who arrives too early. “The ceremony was condtcs*d Vincent to resume her duties om Messrs John Farmer, Robert
Acsling of ineteased energy, vitality, jana nealn } Starring: Errol) FLYNN DE (The hostess isn’t dressed, but the by Rev. M. E. Griffiths with Mr. the nursing staff of the Colonia] Farmer, Francis Cheesman, John
tasteless, tablet form. All vou need to do\ ae r , ean guest had nothing else < ©, Williams at the organ. Hospital. Armstrong, George Skeete, Michael
each day. This prese work | SSeS SS : ‘ The bride who was given in Skeete and Andrew Skeete.
Sacaceting the tinea. ROODAL THEATRES The one who arrives late, plus au P d Bar Final and ete:
Vigoursting the é 4 | te ine ist marriage by her father wore a asse ar Finals A reception was held at Ough-
stranger, you will feel ane nthe gland system, the nerves, a "ou Soulkan Oma) en dress of chantilly lace and nylon : terson, St. Philip and the honéey-
coming ’éunder, m ew blood and vigour, there ts ns y + : 4 ; li fittin bodice ONGRATULATIONS to Mr. , . :
b ting for results, Moat sere ree Th rho is bored It’s net with aq close & Ace, : moon is being spent at the Crane.
only able to keep up w yu fost lsers re EMPIRE ROXY e one who is bored, (It’s a : ; eh
realising thw joys ei of ine asouining improvement within party, isn’t it? Well, bring on long sleeves, a yolk of nylon nev ~~’ Elliston Carmichael who has 4 ’ Be
more frequently thau 7 F siibih end Sask. Cheek oeate TODAS 6-05 @ 8% and TO-DAY to TUES 4.45 & 8.15 the entertainment.) and a full skirt with alternate just passed his Bar Finals at arbados Players’ First
Doctor Pruises Vi-Tabs i hed time after time Mekind Badia dicients William HOLDEN — William BEND The one who can only drink pane’s of Jace and net forming Middle Temple. He is the son Production
Dr. J. Rastelli, widely-known kutopeon | a iven Ub hope of ever being strong, tiotiven Sat Cera an os hee in ‘imported liquor. (It's back on the a train. Her finger-tip veil of of Mrs. Martin Carmichael of ARIB learns that the Bar-
are of the opinion that the true urret | 8 “NO Vieorous again =p an eae Thre Gide market, dear.) : nylon net was kept in place by a Fitts Village, St. James. bados Players, a newly
in the ' ; . © “SUBD NE © E The one (female) who has only juliet cap trimmed with orange . ; vee ’ ‘ok
.° glands func- Results G ‘ > f juliet Pp , er ~ Ss
wwe would (eet uid 10K |e catmunay warennees Beene WOE tide Extra Shorts | come to annex a man, (Any man.) jlossoms. She carried a bouquet _ Elliston who received his early formed company from the amal
Oe na ites vents lone j uhling ba been the success o} : nee aes “fl : ‘ . +, @ducation at Combermere School, gamation of the Bridgetown
ret ae oct Vi-Tabs in thousands and thousands and: "CROCODILE HUNTERS NAUGHTY NANNETTE The one (male) who has only of orchids and Queen Anne’s : F
Fo tas CarMate Cnet tin nen’ | cases thtoythout the world that it is now HALF WAY TO HEAVEN come to annex a woman, (ANY jac¢ was an employee of the Advo- Players and the Barbados Dra-
nun inch rw positive guarantee to com OLYMPIC erat Beane the nicest possible way.) nem _ cate Co., Ltd.-and also worked matic Club, are working on their
aD Sn pda TO-DAY to MON, $.90 & 8.15 John PAYNE — Maureen O'HARA The one who elects himself/ She was attended by Miss as an Assistant Master on the first production, Oscar Wilde’s
Sone w blood tingles through Lon McCALLISTER in herself the life of the party. Yvonne Costello as chief brides- staff of the Parry School as weil “The Importance of being *
M Lourating ihe glands, acd tp 6 Arar ene ane Preston FOSTER “TRIPOLI” & | The one who didn’t bother to jnaid who wore blue lace over as the Grenada Grammar School Earnest.” ¥
{tinue thne ote vou Be onfay tite aa iranientie in “STRERTE OF LARRDGY | dress up. (After all, I’m an in- taffeta. The two bridesmaids, the before going up to the U.K. to They hope to present this next i
ve Nw be Brine Whe iy yok pid te sour “THE BIG CAT” | Axes, my fom.) Misses Jasmin Croney and Pat (study his profession, July. Further details later.
tour Results we COU d, merely return wat | e one who takes a raucous ; ; phan. | strindonsiadihleclpnem ingen net fe Pate ae 1S Ce ekeciijilitinidi adits:
Vi-Tawe ore \ (Get Vivtabs trom ‘THE RIDDEN ROOM” ROYAL | farewell, and can't see fo clone ae wore Pink ‘nylon over |
de tok foes © guarantee pro- Starring | y Last 2 Shows TODAY 4.40 & #8 30! | the car door. (You hope the land- A die .
. : al aa Rabert NEWTON & Sally GRAY Joel McCREA WANDA HENDRIX }!| | lord will be understanding.) Lc — cen. enath
BRaramnieea ood, Vitality PUES. & WED, 480 & 8.15 in So... 2...

with strapless bodices with stoles,
full skirts and they wore tiaras
of blue and pink flowers respec-

Happy parties, and mind your
manners don’t show. Except in
the nicest possible way.)

“SADDLE TRAMP”
Color By Technicolor

and
Jeff! CHANDLE — Marta TOREEN

George RAFT Double

“RED LIGuT’










ee 7 | tively, necked with veiling to
} hay n | match. ey all carried posies
} SS G ALETY aft nee roses and blue forget- |

The Garden—St. James Mr. David Taylor was the best-

G L 0 B E re entice. *â„¢-@iman while the ushers were

| . “ | Messrs. Wilh Nur David

| ‘TONITE, 8.30 P.M, MONDAY—TUESDAY, 5.60 & 8,30 P.M. Warner's, Action Thriller: Peasy. Frofeis elas aia avid

hits! 4 | Steve COCHRAN a.

Two hits! Canada Dry Ginger Ale | + reception was held at No.
-.-Canada Dry Water—two sparkling | yey \ ee a eee 20 Graeme Hall Terrace and the
bev fi fi} d : Lb : i Dr 7S honeymoon is being spent ai

erages for mixing or drinking re ' \ YyIrwyY Po ane 3 rf j . jf a
Geshinent “Pia-Point Carbonation | ew HE STORY OF A WLT. / Y ee poe cows TALK > | Edgewater Hotel, Bathsheba.
gives them the long-lasting livelines | ‘ ne AGS, |

Agricultural Officer

R. J. B. GREGORY, Agricul- |

tural Officer of Bbitish Hon-
duras who has already spent
, three months of his long leave in |
Barbados, returned from Trinidad |
on Friday by B.W.LA. after)
spending a week in that colony. |
He is staying at Bathsheba wit) |
his family, ‘e*

First Class Honours

TODAY 4.45 & 8.30
AND CONTINUING DAILY

EMPIRE

that gives you long-lasting enjoyment.

GINGER ALE
and WATER



{

rs

The hottest

combination
that-ever hit

MR, AND MRS. VERNON WALROND

On Thursday a quiet ceremony

slipper satin appliqued with bells
was performed by Magistrate

and earried a bouquet of anthu-



Amencas Fist Family of Beverages *

PHONE 4541 AND BOOK YOUR ORDERS TO-DAY



the screen!
LOVELLA O PARSONS”

\ or

HOWARD HUGHES

ay
LAW LL

a Pe
VINCENT PRICE+TiM H

DE eee)



COMING!
ANNE OF THE INDIES (Debra Paget)

SKIRTS AHOY (

PM) mast

Billy Eckstein)

Bane

OF WOMAN!



, R. WALTER R. L. CODRING-
TON son of Mr. & Mrs. S. S.
Codrington of Brittons Cross Road
has gained first class honours in
Latin, Mathematics and Physics at
McGill University. Mr. Codring-
‘“" an old Harrisonian, intends
‘king a medical course.

DIAL 4220



WHITE.

| Rudder when Detective 169 Wal-
dron of Grenada’ Constabulary,
took Miss Juliette Douglas, daugh-
ter of Mr. Charles Douglas, 78 his
\bride at their residence, Silver
|Sands. The bride who was given
in marriage by her brother, Mr.
‘Carlton Douglas, wore a dress of

|| New Shipment....
LADIES’

A SHOES



YOUR SHOE STORES

rium lilies and Queen Anne’s lace.
Her headdress was kept in
place with Olive Blossoms.
Detective Waldron is expected
to leave the Colony for Grenada
where he will resume duties while
his wife will follow one month
later, They will reside in Grenada.



UNDERWEAR

BRIEFS, PANTIES, VESTS, SLIPS, & NIGHT DRESSES
ARCOL

LADIES HIGH GRADE, IN RED, BLACK, GREEN &
ALL IN SMART STYLES,

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606



ere

SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 1952
At The Cinema;

Human Emotion Admirably Protrayed

TWO PICTURES currently advertised for showing
aver the week-end supply a feast of entertainment for
those who love drama and good music. It is seldom that.
local theatre goers get an opportunity to decide between
really first class pictures shown at the same time at differ-




Pride of. goes to “A
STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE”
the five Award Winner
at the Plaza. Two

-@fitertainment.

Vivien iaies as Blanche Du-
Bois and Marlon Brando as Stan-
ley revel in stardom in the Warner
Bros. production which came from
Broadway as a Pulitzer Prize
Winner. to win the Academy
Award. :

Brando as the he-man with a
thick hide and a bitter tongue be-
came suspicious of the bona fides
of his wife’s sister, Vivien, after
the loss of the family plantations.
He does not fail to make ‘this
clear when she visits them in New
Orleans and unloads trunks of
gorgeous furs, beautiful clothes
and jewellery. But he gets ‘a
line on her past’ and devotes him-
self not merely to removing her
from his home, but to breaking
a romance which had sprung up
between his pal Karl Malden.

Blanche as an _ “ex-school
marm” living in her dream world
of leng lost gentility offends him
when she describes him as a com~
mon animal and worse of all, ‘a
Polack.’ The lid is off and Stan-
ley ‘goes to town’ in his methods
of ruin. Feminine charm and
coquettishness are lost on him.
Ruthlessness in his make up
would be a virtue but the balance
is maintained when his_ wife,
Stella, shows a deep and loving
affection for her elder sister, the
story of whose past she utterly
rejects.

But if Blanche, (Vivien Leigh)
is caught in Stanley’s trap she
does not surrender without one
last struggle in which the audience
sees every emotion known to the
human soul admirably portrayed.
A defeating combination of her
lage and her past finds her plead-
ing with Karl: ‘I have those
things to offer which a man needs
in a woman,. richness of mind,
tenderness of heatt................ .

And here is the moving beauty
of fine drama with an appropriate
background of music sufficiently
colourful to embellish ever so
slightly the story.

AT THE GLOBE

M.G.M’S moving drama of bor-
rowed love, ‘INVITATION’, star-
ving Van Johnson, Dorothy Me-
Guire, Ruth Roman and Louis
Calhern opened at the Globe on
Friday.

The unfaltering love of a
father for his only daughter, the
pitying parental love for a child
in ill health and the self assurance
of a beautiful woman that she
can wait for the man she wants,
are the three main threads of a
lovely story.

Dorothy, who suffered at an
early age from an attack of
rheumatic fever reconciled her-
self against her’ own desires to a
life of spinsterhood, but Louis
Calhern, an adoring father, is
prepared to exhaust his grea
wealth in an attempt to bring the
happiness of home and husband
to his child. With the mark of
death upon her and only a year
to live, she believes that Van is
in love with her and marries him.
Her father’s machinations run
foul of the designs of the beauti-
ful Ruth Roman madly in love
with Van. ‘T can wait for a year’.

The story breaks and Dorothy
learns for the first time that she
has only a few more months to
live. But she rises to the occasion
with a strength of character and
a greatness of soul whieh sur-
prisés Van who had grown to love
her desperately. ‘There are things
greater than wanting to live’.

Love conquered this submission
to death and an adoring father
and devoted husband are richly
rewarded in the end.

This is another fine drama and
I have hardly seen the play upon
human emotions more effectively
brought to the screen.—J.E.B.
eS



a
VIVIEN LEIGH



VAN JOHNSON

Guide Notes’

Mrs. A, W, Scott takes her guides
to visit the Nightingal Home.

On the 7th June the Ist Bar-
bados Company had an enter-
tainment at “Woodside”. The
amount realized was $48.40. Part
of the Proceeds goes to
Funds, while some was wi
for refreshments for the children
of the Nightingale Home,

The guides visited the Home
on Wednesday 18th June, They
were met by Nurse Garner the
assistant matron who showed
them around. The girls were very
much im; with the Home
and remarked on its cleanliness
and neatness and on the di
line and team spirit of the child-

t ren, who joined wholeheartedly

in the games and songs,

After refreshments were serv-
ed, prayers were read by one of
the boys of the Home, and before
on a Dismissal Mrs. Scott

€ Op unity to speak to

the aun x nig
Hike to Codrington College
7th Barbados with Miss Pember-
ton in charge hiked to Codrington
College on the 14th June. They
ss work for the Second Class

ge.
Mrs. Bishop Enrols Guides

On Tuesday 17th Mrs. F. A.
Bishop enrolled nine Guides and
Five Brownies at 8th Barbados,
Mrs, Bishop was pleased to wel-
come parents of the Brownies
who attended the enrolment.
Their presence showed that they
are interested in the activities of
the ¢hildren and in the Guide
Movement Mrs, Bishop took the
opportunity to speak on the

Guide Laws.
On the 14th June Guides from

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Women ? They're
The Tougher
Sex After All

BY THE DOCTOR
WHAT are the differences be-
tween the mental equipment of
men and of women? This is one
of the questions discussed in the

new edition of Amram Schein-
feld’s standard work, You and
Hertdity.* Scheinfeld examines

in great detail the differences in
the genetic endowments of the
two sexes.

For every 100 girls born there
are about 105 boys. It was
thought for a long time that male
embryos were stronger and so bet-
ter able to survive to birth. The
reverse, in fact, is the truth.
Because males are biologically the
weaker sex, more male than
female embryos are started off on
the road to life in order to make
up for the greater loss among
males, not only in the embryo
stage but in infancy, childhood,
manhood and «'d age.

Boys, incide:tally, are more re-
luctant to be born than girls, who
usually enter the world several
days before boys can bring them-
selves to face it.

Death Risk

In almost every important dis-
ease (diabetes, certain forms of

er, itre exe th,

male aeathneate ts “fue fhiener
than the female. As Scheinfeld
puts it: “Females are genetically
better constructed, have a more
efficient internal chernical system,
and in various other ways are bio-
logically better adapted to resist
most of the modern human afftic-
tions.”

The only single important dis-
ease of childhood which takes a
higher toll of girls than boys is
whooping cough. Why this
should be so is a mystery. It is
equally a mystery why stammer-
ing should be so much commoner
among boys than girls

. Men Only

Males suffer jally from
certain inherited disorders which
the women of the family may
transmit without, as a general
rule, being affected by them.
Colour blindness and haemophilia
(a dangerous proneness to severe
bl ) are two of these

disorders. It is common knowl-
edge that, through transmis-
sion by Victoria to
some of her descendants,
the gene (heredity factor)

responsible for haemophilia has
peeved several of the Royal

uses of Europe in the last 50
years or so. Fortunately, as
Seheinfeld shows in 4 WYiagram-
matic “pedigree,” the children of
our present Queen cannot surfer
from haemophilia or carrv the
gene,

Baldness is another inherited
physical tendency which affects
women much less severely than
men, The reason for this is a
little obscure, but it is probably
due to different glandular make-
up im the two sexes, Obesity
(and for that matter slenderness)
also tends to run in families, but
here men and women share the
same risk,

In case some men may be de-
pressed by women’s advantage in
genetic endowment it may com-
fort them to know that there is
no evidence that women’s biologi-
cal superiority qualifies them to
do anything better than men ex-
cept bear and rear children,

The Slow Child

An important difference be-
tween the sexes is also seen in
the progress of gifted children.
Boys usually turn their talents to
good account in later life, but
girls, even in these days, are often
eontent with the humdrum occu-
pation which happens to be near-
est at hand. :

One of the commonest of paren-
tal worries is about a _ child’s
apparent failure to grow and put
on weight as fast as, say, the
neighbour’s child. Fortunately it
is very unlikely that a child who
is small and thin but otherwise
healthy is suffering either from
malnutrition or from some physi-
cal disorder which is retarding its
progress,

* Chatto and Windus (25).
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
—LE.S.

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FARM AND GARDEN —2v

Gardening Hints
For Amateurs

There have been several en-
quiries lately as to the treatment
of different kinds of Blight, and
as to the use of Sunflower seeds.

With the kind help of Mr
Tucker of the Department of
Science and Agriculture, this in-
formation has been obtained, and
this article will be devoted to
answering these queries

“Cottony Cushion Seale”

Worried

Describe a blight on the Rose
trees as a white woolly formation
about the size of a pea fastened
to the plant by a black head, and

full of minute redish insects with
many feet.” This blight is
‘Cottony Cushion Scale” and the
minute insects inside the white

eushion are the living young of
the Scale insect, and these young
will in time disperse and spread
the pest.
Remedy

The best way of getting rid of
this “Cottony Cushion Scale”is to
wipe it off the plant with a rag
dipped in a bowl of soapy water,
at the same time crushing the
cushion scale, This simple
remedy, if carried out systemati-
cally, will get rid of this trouble-
some blight. But that is only
part of the treatment. After this
has been done, the plant must be
sprayed with D-.D. Tane, which
can be obtained from the seed
Department of the Department of
Science and Agriculture. |

The spray must be applied in
a mist to wet the whole plant,
and must be repeated at twelve
day intervals. Both these treat-
ments will destroy the young
scale insects, and so prevent the
spread of the blight.

“Seale Blight”

Query number two describes
“Gat brown scales which form
along the stems and sometimes
on the back of the leaf”.

Remedy

This scale blight must be treat-
ed in exactly the same way as the
Cottony Cushion Scale i.e, wipe it
off with a soapy "ag, and then
spray the plant with D.D, Tane.

“Mildew”

describes

Query number three |
“a fine silky cobweb which forms
under some of the leaves and
' .
seems to become mildew.
Remedy

This mildew
by dusting the plants with fine
sulphur. his should be done in
the early morning when the
plants are wet with dew. Put the
sulphur in a muslin or similar
bag, and dust it on by hand.

“Thrips”
number four describes
“the bushes are attacked by
very fine dark coloured = in-
sects which s6éem to get into the
unopened bud, so that when it
opens the petals are discoloured
and withered.”

Remedy

These insects are called Thrips.
Adult Thrips can fly, but when
young they are wingless and
light in colour. The opening
blooms must be sprayed with
“Gammalin”, which can be pur-
ehased from the Seed Department
of the Department of Science
and Agriculture.

This completes the answers to
the questions asked by “Worried”.
“The Use of Dried Sunflower

Seeds”

The next question comes from
“G.B,” who asks “Could you ad-
vise me as to the use of dried
Sunflower seeds, as a friend told
me they are used in some way as
a vitamin product.” Well “G.B.”
no certain information has been
obtained on this subject, but it is
believed that Sunflower seeds are
used in some countries as Chic~
ken feed. They are also crushed
to yield an oil which has a com-

|

Query

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AGRICOLA | OLD

The Breadfruit (sae
WHAT a handsome tree is the |
breadfruit! And what a valuable |
ect nic plant too! If we took the
trouble to weigh the produce of |
a fully mature tree growing undes
favourable conditions, the yield
figure in terms of food would be |
astonishing. In season, it is the |
main starchy component of the |
diet in some of the neighbourin:s
islands where it often saves the
need for importing rice.



Then





Breac- | found the remedy
fruit can be served so many) be
different omen “sae wail know’ | YOUTHFUL VIGOUR

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to be recounted here | This young man was being
Fortunate, indeed, it was far | premaverss7 Het. tie eaeseoare Coes
the West Indies that all went how Kruschen gave him back “a vee ;
well with the second ship, the health after weeks of pain :— ~ z
Providence, which, chartered by| «q guffered for weeks from ee
the british Government, brought) kidney trouble felt like an | eeee
the breadfruit and other eegnonig | old aithough Tam only 31. | ee
plants from the South Sea Islands | stooped to do anything 1% ceeed
in 1793, History records, as you| Was to stra nee know, that the first expedition of | py eral poopie. aoe covers ;
Eee in Bligh failed as a res§lt| found them wonderful. °y ee -oeee
o iiny by the crew of the} tread d found the ve pase
Bounty, St. Vincent and Jamaica | mie. rellet trom pa, fale . Fae a ok
claim to be the original distrib- every way. [sha 86} & “ .
uting centres in these parts. on with the daily dose because oeee .
can ow do my day's work and } « eeceee
By a peculiar growth caprice. | 200 °>sl any the worse for it, o. | sa0cee
the breadfruit at some stage e eee | eeear
appears to have lost the seeding Umess the kidneys function eeoneces
habit, like the cultivated banana Past rye ee eaea at pe ytd ee
As if to compensate, the edible | ajjo: pollute the besa | evesseeeee
part of the fruit has developed mce troublesome | «seeeeeeee ee ASS
advantageously and so the plant . fheuma- |
muedepnd on vegative — ‘i > ag ar tha Baek Th f th th
to Feproduce itself. Not infre-| Krasoh e perfume with the longe? ne {ragrance
quently, we have heard L the jack- ureties, Of kidpey eperiente. | P :
fruit, a native ndia, Malay anc | idan and 7 :
Ceylon, referred to as the male working et Peed nevastiios WY BO U R J O I S
breadfruit. This is not the case | go tha ws blo stream «
since the jackfruit is a distinet| purified and vigorous h PERFUME (g sizes) and EAU DE COLOGN}
species in the same genus; it pro- restored @ @ |
duces fruits of irregular shape, Ask your nearest Chemist er | 2
weighing as much as 50 to 60 Ib Orug Store for Kruschen. . =

each, containing numerous seed

embedded in edible pln of a
similar consistency 1 the closely
related breadfruit 4) ‘qually

prized as food in the F

The breadfruit is pxopagated
by means of root suckers which
arise from the base of the tree,
or by root cuttings. The suckers
are removed always with a por-
tion of the Toot attached, when
they are about 12 to 18 inches
high It is best to start the suck-
ers in separate receptacles keep-
ing them well watered until they
have recovered the shock and
plenty of young roots have form-
ed, They may then be removed
to permanent positions. Like most
fruit trees, the breadfruit is not
happy in exposed sites, preferring
shelter from strong winds and
aecess to moisture but not stag-
nant water. Under favourable
conditions, growth is rapid and!
fruiting may begin in two or,
three years, If there is a tendency |
for fruit to drop or not form at)
all, the best policy is to consult
n'agricultural officer before driv-

into the trees as is tometimes done. |

Reverting to propagation; if a
root sucker is not available when |
required, scrape the soil away
from one or two of the surface
roots, cut them about half way
through and leave the wound ex-
posed. Shoots should develop in
a few weeks near the wound; lift
as previously recommended when
of the desired size. Alternatively,
a few ig? of root about one
one and a half inches in diameter
‘and one foot long are severed
from the main surface roots, laid
in a bed or box of light, sandy
soil and lightly covered with soil,
keeping them moist and shaded.
In about six weeks, one or more
shoots should form; when suffi- |
ciently strong, treat as root suck-
ers. By this method, three or four
plants are quite possible from
each cutting and a careful nurse~
ryman with one or two good
breadfruit trees may make a good
thing by selling plants in addition
o fruits.

. Finally, pick the fruits care-
fully; do not knock them down.
The fruits do not keep long at
best and bruising never helps
This is a good time to plant a
breadfruit tree.

mercial value, and the resultant
‘geed-cake’ is valuable as cattle
feed, No information can be

found as to their use as a vita-
min product.














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PAGE FOUR

ete



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

SUNDAY,



JUNE 22,

1952











-_-

The man
who didn’t
know...



‘Condition—that’s the answer!
A dog needs regular condition-
ing to keep really fit. Try giving
Buster Bob Martin’s Condition
Tablets daily and you'll soon

‘Hello, where’s Buster today?’
‘Oh, he preferred snoozing
indoors. I don’t know what's
come over that puppy! No life
er i have him straight again. The stuff
"What are you doing about them—vitamins and minerals
) y & and so on—does a dog good
it? naturally by purifying his blood
and toning him up generally’.

‘Bob Martin’s, eh? I’ve heard
of them’.

‘All dogs need Bob Martin’s
and they're particularly impor-
tant for pups, to start them off
well, and to build healthy bones
and teeth. Judy has them regu-
larly, and she’s seven now’.

‘Doing ‘about it? A dog can
look after himself, surely! I
must just have picked a dud,
that’s all. But he looked fine
when we got him’.

*That’s where you’re wrong.
‘tle is a fine pup, but he can’t
look after himself, the way wild
animals can. It’s up to you to
do something if you've let



DR. C. B. CLARKE
QUALIFIED FOR M.C.C.

Ken Farnum Leaves Tomorrow
For XV Olympiad

By O. S. COPPIN

T= news that Dr. C. Bertie Clarke, West Indies and Spar-

tan slow right arm bowler and quite useful right hand
batsman has been invited by the M.C.C. to play the necessary
qualifying matches for membership, will be received in loca)
cricket circles, nay even in West Indies cricket circle, with
a considerable measure of pride and gratification.

This means that this sig-
nal honour, for that is only
conferred upon those who
have made some outstand-
7 ing contribution to the pro-

gress of the game in any of
its departments, has again
fallen on a West Indian and
a Barbadian at that,

“Bertie”, as the West In-
dian fans have always affec .
tionately known him, wa3
proposed for membership in
1942 by Sir Pelham Warner
and Lieutenant Colonel G.
T. S. Stevens, former cap-
tain of Essex, but must play

YESTERDAY’S CRICKET ;——

SPARTAN vs. HARRISON
cOLLEGE

Spartan ores eho Be
Harrison College .....166 & 71

GOOD bowling by B. K. Bowen,
Spartan right hand spinner, com-
bined with unenterprising batting
by College batsmen enabled Spar-
tan to defeat Harrison College by
an innings and 110 runs before
lunch yesterday. Bowen in 11
overs took 4 wickets for 30 runs,

As on the second day of the
match, the College batsmen fail-
€d to use their feet to the slow
bowlers, and when a batsman did
decide along this line, he did so
at the wrong moment.

College resumed their second
innings yesterday with the score
at 1 run for two wickets, includ-
ing that of their best man Camie
Smith, and when only four runs
had been added lost their third
wicket.

Then Blackman who batted
well in the first innings for his
team, again featured in a fourth
wicket stand with Fernando
Tudor, these two together putting
on 31 runs.

After that wickets fell cheaply,
and there was a regular proces-
sion to and from the pavilion.
Except for Simmons and Reid
who attempted to attack the bowl-

For Pickwick in their first
innings, A. E. Trotter had scored
33, T. S. Birkett 49 and J.
Greenidge 57. In their first innings,
Cariton’s N. S. Lucas scored 90, G.
Hutchinson 68 and C. B. Williams
38.

After dismissing Pickwick for
the smal] total of 148 yesterday,
Carlton went to the wicket, bent
on going at the runs and opened
with N. S, Lucas and C. MeKenzie
who set about the task in a manner
which showed that to them then
dash was more impcrtant than
caution, and Lueas soon played
over one from K. Greenidge and
was bowled with the score at 10.

C. B. Williams joined McKenzie
and the two of these sought for
all opportunities to score and in
attempting to run two runs
McKenzie was run out.

With Hutchinson being bowled
by T. S. Birkett five runs later,
the Carlton batsmen ceased their
efforts to go at the runs, especially
as they had by now dropped
behind the clock.

When four wickets were down,
a shower of rain caused play to
be abandoned when there was yet
about 15 more minutes of possible
play.



THE BTC PROVISIONAL
PROGRAMME

By “BEN BATTLE”

THE big news of the week is, I imagine, the issuing by the
B.T.C. of their provisional Programme for the August. Meet-
ing. Unfortunately, I have not had the time to give this import-
ant matier the consideration it deserves, but there are_one or
two comments which I should like to make, I shall try, wher-
ever possible, to accompany these with suggestions—construc-
tive criticism being surely the aim behind putting out a pro-
gramme that is provisional.

One thing I shall not do, and that is join in the howl of
protest that I feel sure is already going out, because, with one
exception, the programme does not hold promise of any in-
crease in stakes over those of last August, I am of course aware
of the steadily rising costs, against which, those who keep
racehorses, must constantly battle, and I can see very clearly
that, without an increase in stakes, some of the weaker
brethren, must inevitably be forced out of the game. On the
other hend, I am persuaded that the gentlemen who drew up
the programme, are as well aware of this as I am, and, more~
over, they enjoy the privilege, which I do not, of knowing inti-
mately the financial position of the Turf Club. They are all
men with the best interests of racing at heart, and I, at least,
am prepared to accept their verdict; that the total stakes money
offered, is all that can be afforded. That being so, I shall refrain
from demanding a greater purse distribution, but shall try and
limit my criticisms to suggesting how the money might have
been better allocated,

for the M.C.C, in ten | ing and fail b. the oor — m nt aie F bya for ane THE CHAMPION STAKES
i i ‘J ad state. .: tches i i never at any time tried to get on Empire ..‘. or no : 4
Seu t Bony Judy it Soe Macuare Sc veut Seabee, woke, ottenianen top the bowling, and by 3.30 the Police ......... ses 52 & 219 The chief innovation in the programme is one which, I am
} y :

here—' tainly done her proud!

Thanks for the tip, and I'll
~“ get some today’.

*I must say she always ;
looks in lovely condition’. <4





to membership.
C. B, Clarke went to Eng-
land with the West Indies

entire College team was out for
71 runs.
Spartan thus became the first



Empire defeated Police at Em-
pire by ten wickets yesterday the

sure, all racing men will welcome unreservedly. It is the insti-
tution of a mile and a half race—the Champion Stakes. This is

team in 1939 and during the team to win outright in. this final day S as at a $1,200, ai Tass: 407A" Ween Ons tae toe ore ay ens
saa sid ani ; ‘ . tour which was cut short by | Series. cricket match. noo esate eae an admirable idea, and one which, if I am not mistaken, is
BOB oes aa. Pr swandy rot Oe See me ; the imminence of war, fin- had eer “ ae a eiee bound to be reflected in universal enthusiasm and increased
omer e Cutten” > ee? ished third = - a PICKWICK vs. cameras = Wike bad batted ethene} attendance, However, there are one or two suggestions that I
L. M. B. MEYERS & C 47 . B. CLARKE averages with 87 wickets CKWiek 226 & ooeeececcceeees 1 0 a ies tame feel ought to be made. ‘
BRIDGETOWN RARBADOS BRITISH WEST INDIBS (ay. 21.81). In the three Tests he took six wickets (av. 43,) | Carlton .. 261 & (for 4 wits.) 45 °2 Tuns in their first innings on



DUSSEAL priming is essential to the painting of all new walls: its
application ensures that the paint dries right and stays right. Dusseal
seals off the destructive alkalis and moisture always present in new











his best performance being 3 for 59 first innings at Manches-
ter. Apart from this, his best figures were 13 for 107 vs.
Hampshire.

A stubborn 58 at number five
by skipper John Goddard yester-

the first day of play, carried their
second innings score from 155 for
four at the end of the second day’s

In the first place, I consider that the purse offer is not
large enough. It must be realised that, to prepare a horse for

; ; as lay to 219 runs yesterday. Their a mile and a half, is an entirely different proposition from get-

RETURNED TO ENGLAND i Coll tar tee tee Ptage innings ended just before the ting one generally fit, so that it can run a series of races wore

E eres Sen cana the ee oe ee at the hands of Carlton in the luncheon interval. Empire first distances ranging from 5% furlongs to 9. It is quite on the
e captaine e British Empire and accomplishe hs

some excellent performances with bat and ball and when first
class cricket was resumed in 1946 he played for Northants
under a sperial qualification taking 44 wickets (av. 32,11)

last day of their First Division
cricket match at Kensington.
Goddard’s invaluable 58 helped

imnings score was 255, Hunte 114,
Their opening batsman Black-
man topscored with 70 which he

cards that a horse that has received a thorough preparation for
a race like the Champion Stakes, is going to be “overboard”,
for the rest of the meeting. To this must be added the risks of

. ; ““ made on the second day and yes- breakdown, which so thorough a training programme must,
Latest news from England is to the effect that Bertie has Pickwick to score 148 runs in terday Skipper Byer carried his of necessity, involve. Hence, I consider, that, to increase the
already .commenced these qualifying games because in a their second innings and this overnight score of five to 42 before

recent M.C.C. match he finished second highest scorer with
55 out of an M.C.C, total of 296.

WHAT OF CANADA-W.I. TOUR

7s has been no news forthcoming in connection with
» the proposed West Indies tour of Canada. Although I
did not anticipate miracles I thought that with the shifting of
the seat of West Indies cricket from Jamaica to Trinidad that
we in these parts would be able to glean some information
pie oo pata the plans for and future prospects of West Indies
cricket.

I am all for the tour for the simple reason that we would
now be afforded the opportunity of giving some of our best
players who have been unable through a concatenation of
circumstances to gain selection for overseas tours,

EXPLORING AVENUES
A’ the same time we would be exploring avenues for fur-
ther talent for our commitments with India next year
by seeing how these near-miss candidates stand up to an
overseas tour.

This must not be construed to mean that I am advocating
sending 1 second rate team to Canada because after all it
will be a WEST INDIES team. But certainly players like
Andy ‘anteaume, Rupert Tangchoon, Clarence Skeete, Ralph
Legall of Trinidad, Norman Marshall, Wilfred Farmer, Cammie
Smith, Conrad Hunte, Adzil Holder, Horace King, Carl Mul-
lins of Barbados, Alfie Binns, Denis Thorbourn, Neville Bon-
itto of Jamaica, Mason of the Leeward Islands, should pro-
vide between them a combination worthy of representing the
West Indies in Canada without “losing face”.

GOOD LUCK

meant that Carlton had 114 to
make to win in 68 minutes.

The scores are : Pickwick 226
and 148 and Carlton 261 and for
four wickets 45.

Yesterday’s play was exciting.
First it was thought that it would
end in a fairly tame draw, but
then Carlton’s attack, spearheaded
by c. B. Williams had Pickwick
in trouble and it was only John
Goddard who saved the day for
them.

Williams captured 6 wickets for
47 in a grand spell of 17.1 overs

and fast bowler Edghill took
2 for $1.

Good Bowling

Williams bowling was good. but
he was well assisted by Brickie
Lucas who took three really

brilliant catches, two off Williams’
bowling.

he was caught by Holder off the
bowling of Barker.

Best bowling performance for
Empire in the Police second in-
nings was given by Barker who
ended up with an analysis of
025. M9 R56 W7. He bowled with
great pace and kept a good length
all the time. He bowled six of the
Police batsmen, with yorkers when
motif were looking for the rising
all.

Veteran ‘Foffie”’ Williams and
O. Fields took one wicket each for
57 and 11 runs respectively,

Empire opened their second in-
nings after the luncheon interval
with Conrad Hunte and Smith to
the bowling of Bradshaw and Mul-
lins, Both batsmen played with
ease and after some seven overs
were bowled, the 17 runs for vic-
tory were scored. When stumps
were drawn Empire had scored 24
runs for no wicket with Smith not
out 7 and Hunte not out 13.

SCOREBOARD

HARRISON COLLEGE
« wap —2nd Innings





Cc. Greenidge b Williams ...

purse of such a race to only $100.00 above that of the ordinary
“A” class event, does not offer’sufficient inducement for owners,
and trainers, to risk the best horses in their stables in an
attempt to win it.

When I first heard the subject of an “A” class mile and a
half race mooted, the figure I had in mind for it, was $1,500.00,
and this still seems to me to be no more than adequate. Yet if
I accept, as I have said I do, the fact that the Turf Club cannot
aflord to allot any more money for this meeting, it may well be
asked how I propose to accomplish raising the prize money for
the Champion Stakes? Well, what about the various Maiden
races? There are four of these proposed—two for F. and F, 2
horses, and two for C, and C, 2, and they carry the same purse
as the corresponding races framed for winners in these classes,
Now, surely, 2 maiden horse has already been given a consid-
erable concession, by ‘having a race framed, so that it does not
have to compete against winners, and none could object, if
they competed for a slightly smaller prize, as a result. I suggest,
therefore, that the first prize, in each of these Maiden races, be
reduced by $75.000, and th resulting $300.000 saved, be tacked
on to the Champion Stakes.

My second suggestion, in regard to what, I hope, will
turn out to be the “star turn” of this, and all subsequent
meetings, is that some precautions should be taken in regard
to weight concessions. Our classification allowances are rather
arbitrary, and, over a distance as long as 12 furlongs, they
may prove burdensome to the extent where it becomes impos-
sible for the good A. class horse to concede them, I think,
therefore, that the ‘urf Club should safeguard against the
race being at the mercy of some light-weighted B.2., or C.
class contender, by stipulating that the maximum weight





et





Fong cee, BWultams ne 8 corieeaion, sroen Whatever seule, should not be greater than
ic Ps jams : a > sw B
. P EN FARNUM, Barbados’ leading Cyclist leaves by B.W.I. e Blackmon ; ee Pee” innise Willams. . 4 18 Ibs. aanaguaion Guan. a nile ahd Surely a aeaethas hae ‘
surfaces, and at the same tae provides a uniform, non porous base finesrs on he rn he of a eae sn, _ ee ey ee carencler, Fun ouit " Pag ete eee me rte in no chance when receiving 18 lbs. has little right in top
c ee $ * to Trinidad, Jamaica, -K. and_ finally elsinki. nland, nec FE. King b Atkins .. 3 5 re Sci class company.
for the paint coats to follow. It thus prevents peeling and discoloura where he will compete in the XV Olympiad. te aree Soe ae ee is UN IL, Bre castes teen Aine
tion, permits speedy painting and This is the fulfilment of commendable industry on the | Ss. Hewitt b Bowen sstses¢ 2. Wall of wickets: 2-16, $-87, 9-42, __1 was very pleased to see that the Turf Club has
part of the Barbados Olympic Committee, the generosity of . © Waleott b Bowen .. 9 : es es = P th ber of D. class rz from th to four.
X tons th t M E 10 Yoo for dni 4—63, 5—63, 7—112, 8—118, 9—148, increased the number of D, class races, from three to four.
assures that the paint coat gives the those private citizens who thought it their duty to offer some BR ee ae tet bes ; BOWLING ANALYSIS As I said, in a previous article, the D. Class should correspond
. ia contribution and last but not least the sterling gesture of io Oo. M. R. wW. to the creole A., and, it is in this class, that the best creole
maximum service, the Barbados Government who offered a oe on a dollar DOWR Seiad, Side, nf rs - iy te : racing should occur. I hope that the B.T.C. will continue :o
basi. t maximum of $1,440, — ¢'s i hol A She laatdt ea Peak’ CE: Tew | 4ocnihes i ‘thi
na "Tide cer by Governinent served Tete than anything else 8/38) 6741 Wass eyaoy 8 Ree ee ace m € Cox : wet uf Ef tin vainbers Of toese ‘to lamina ea here ie
MADE BY to inject a last minute spiritedness into the fund that while BOWLING ANALYSIS delet Ghee fae reenter a a nothing to prevent the F,’s from their chance in D,
it hovered at the $1,000 mark when Government's offer was Dien Me We Pecan eer ghar ren Sabre ae
made with only some days to go before the closing date, that BOs, ly tee 8 5 8 © €'R Williams not cut eee 7 F. CLASS MAIDENS
Government was called upon to donate an amount far below oe sasee @ 2 5 2 G Hutchinson b Birkett oe . ASS J Ee.
B E R G E R th $1,440 maximum, since the fund reached and passed the uw sigh} AR -b@. Bagh ib Hosa 3 inn a
he $1, yi arris, N, ..... 5 4 tO R Batehinson not out... ‘ 2 The proposed division of the F.’s into winners an
' Bowen, B. ......../ 11 2 30 4 r eon ; ie ¢ y ¢ 5 j
FN cum ad wad bobnted uve the dion. tha Oeleuial Fesrah 7 . eae Extras recess maidens, is a new departure, It has worked well in C. class,
a. y § 1 as | PD il last eas ‘Athlet CARLTON vs, PICKWICK ies hak Sa wie a but whether its application to the F.’s is a good thing, will
(ine Secretary in the Legislative Counei as' wee ine hich Pickwick «2.2.0... os. ce ss 226 & 148 Be eae et ae : Prin have to wait the test of time, My only objection to it is, that
manage to represent his country at two ymplads whic Carlton 261 & (for 4 wkts) .........45 pail of wickets: 1—10, 2~22, 3-27. it provides winning opportunity for some very bad horses—
S are four years apart. He or she is seldom at peak form for] . | PICKWICK — and INNINGS 4—33, an F, class maiden, at this time of the year, cannot justifiably
ON ALE ee er ee cases of people like Arthur z Wwanlams : : ute inson a4 BOWLING ANALYSIS “ is locked upoa up tach eles, Hut. then, aah. Besaonea Md
n y. . Edwards je b Edghill 1 ' 5. ri : i i remi
i It is for this reason that I am glad that Ken Farnum, who ]-7, 8. Birkett¢ Lucas b Warren. 7: & Birkett a ae Peta Seen. VRS SOS Pie, | Ob, -Vee yr, BONE Ale)
AT ALL HARDWARE ) ‘ORES is without doubt at the peak of his career, has been afforded »|s A. cGteenidge b Williams... 13 oH Speen ees og ees < Met ere " te ara eae rue on, the
this opportunity now. We wish him God speed and good luck. Ks {Goa Se Buses b etna. 6 On Page 5 ‘ . ; .
GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents . Greenidge b Cox ......,....... 20 @ e

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SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 1952



England Gains Lead In Test Against India

EVANS SCORES 2ND
TEST CENTURY

I

LONDON, Lora’s. June 21.

A MAGNIFICENT DAY’S CRICKET during which
382 runs were scored, was brought to a premature close

ten minutes before time by bad light.

At this stage, India,

fighting desperately to avoid defeat, were still 165 behind
England with eight second innings’ wickets to fall.

Facing a disadvantage of 302
India made a bad start by losing
Roy before he had scored and with
only seven on the board. Adhikari
who was unable to be on the field
because of a bruised knee, was
beaten by Trueman’s speed at 59.
But then in the closing half hour
Mankad and Hazare in the rapid-
ly worsening light, called a halt
to England’s run of sueeess which
had been in progress dince the first
ball of the day.

It was perky Godfrey Evans,
England's wicketkeeper with his
second Test century, who led the
way. In a partnership with Tom
Graveney, he assured that Hut-
ton’s legacy of the previous day
should not be squandered.

In a masterful display of batting
they added 159 runs in two hours,
ten minutes to pave the way for
England’s big lead.

Magnificent Strokes

And Evans, by only two runs,
failed to achieve the rare distinc-
tion of a Test century before
lunch. He was at his most auda-
cious and brilliant best and those
who remember his first Test cen-
tury against the West Indies at
Manchester two years ago will
know what a magnificent range of
strokes he possesses. Hazare,
handicapped by the injury to
Phadkar, was unable to make full
use of the new ball and Evans
took full toll of the spinners. He
raced to 50 in just over an hour,
including seven fours and then
greeted Shinde whose introduction
in the attack at such a moment
might be subject to criticism with
three successive boundaries.

Graveney, piaying with com-
plete assurance was content to al-

IT ISN’T that there is no local
talent in this boxing business nor
that the public wouldn’t support
it that has brought boxing to the
low ebb at which it now is, It
only needs a_ central boxing
stadium and a Boxing Board of
Control and boxing would be as
eagerly supported as any
popular game today.

What adds to the grouse that a
boxing fan must feel when he
thinks of this deplorable state of
things is that it would not take
many years to recover the outlay
it would eost to build a stadium.

Such is the present position, but
I have got some inside information
that a certain man of fair means
who,sis interested in the game is
earnestly trying to get one or two
others to join him in putting up
money for a central stadium.

Last Legislative session, there
was a measure on the Order
Paper of the House of Assembly
which sought to establish a Box-
ing Board of Control, but the
session died, and the Bill likewise.

Of course, there must be a Box-
ing Board of Control if boxing is
to be run with satisfaction to all,
The fan would be ensured to a





: Scareboard |

@ From Page 4

POLICE—Ist Innings oé

EMPIRE—Iist Innings
POLICE—2nd Innings

. Blackman b Barker

. Taylor 1.b.w, b Barker

Amey b Barker

._ A. Farmer b Barker

Byer c A. Holder b Barker

. Bilenman c Hunte b Fields

Dodson not out

. Sobers retired hurt

Green c Barker b Williams

Mullins b Barker

Bradshaw b Barker

Extras

Ba
3
ae

ontompesa
cooose es BSars

Total

Fall
4/155;

1/i; 2/15;
7/219; 8/219;

of wickets:—
5/188;; 6/211;

BOWLING ANALYSIS
°

Barker 25.2
. Grant 4

Rudder 9

A. V. Williams 22

King il

Holder
Fields

R

woo

Sonn onmoe
oe
3

EMPIRE—2nd Innings
Hunte not out . 13
Smith not out . q
Extras 4

0 Ophinugm

Total (for no wicket) 24
BOWLING ANALYSIS
°o M

Cc. Bradshaw
Cc. Mullins

F. Taylor

c Amey

mee
oooe
eaeat



other \



GODFREY EVANS

low his partner the lion’s share of
the bowling and fours sped to all
parts of the ground.

In the two hours before lunch
Evans scored 98 while England’s
total advance was by 147. And
only a slow field change prevented
an additional over being bowled
before lunch which would prob-
ably have given Evans his cen-
tury.

Last Scoring Stroke

He completed three figures after
batting two hours and five min-
utes, but his celebration at the
sixteenth four was his last scor-
ing stroke, for he was well caught
and bowled by Ahmed.



After Evans was dismissed
Graveney launched owt and was
caught for 73 made in 200 minutes.
By comparison with Evans it was
slow, but it was what was needed.

Jenkins, Bedser, Laker and
Trueman all contributed some
lusty blows and England after
nine and three-quarter hours’
batting, were all out for 537—
their second highest score against
India in this country.

Mankad, whose final figures were
5 for 196 in 73 overs, bowled
magnificently and throughout his
long spells, sent down exceptional-
ly few loose balls. He and Ghulam
Ahmed who improved considerab-
ly after lunch carried the brunt of
India’s attack,

Following up his marathen
bowling effort, Mankad, who has
been on the field for all excevt
three hours of the match, opened
India’s batting. Refusing to be
daunted by Roy’s dismissal he
ufein played magnifocent attacking
cricket. Had it not been for an
early closure, he might easily have
reached his century and on this

evidence only Keith Miller of

Australia is a better all rounder.
INDIA lst INNINGS — 235

INDIA 2nd INNINGS

Roy b Bedser o

Mankad not out 86

Adhikari b Trueman 16

Hazare not out 4
Extras ll
Total (for 2 wkts.) 137

Bedser 1 for 22; Trueman 1 for 48.

ENGLAND — Ist INNINGS
Hutton c Mantri b Hazare 150
Simpson b Mankad 53
May e Mantri b Mankad 7”

Compton 1|.b.w. Hazare 6
Graveney c Mantri b Ghulam Ahmed 13
Watkins b Mankad 0

Evans ¢ & b Ghulam Ahmed 104
Jenkins stpd. Mantri b Mankad 2
Laker not out 23
Bedser c Ramchand b Mankad 3
Trueman b Ghulam Ahmed Ww

Extras 13

Total 637

BOWLING ANALYSIS

oO M. R w
Mankad 73 24 196 5
Ghulam Ahmed 43.4 12 106 3
Hazare 24 4 53 2
Umrigar 4 0 15 0
Phadkar 27 8 “4 0
Ramehand 29 8 67 0
Shinde 6 0 a3 0
Byes: 8; leg byes: 5
Sea casein minom

“LOCAL BOXING TODAY

By CALVIN ALLEYNE

reasonable extent that he would
jnot pay to see two men merely
dancing about and lightly tapping
each other, and the boxer would
be happier knowing that he might
not be doing all the spade work
and the promoter sitting back and
pocketing the bulk of the pro-
ceeds.

The boxers in the professional
beat today are Kid Ralph—
naturally — middleweight and
lightheavyweight champion with-
out any troublesome contender,
Radio Kid, Al Mauler and Kenny
Seaman in the lightweight divi-
sion, Sam King in the lightweight
and Victor Lovell, Gilbert Good-
man of amateur fame in the
featherweight.

These are the names that have
become popular to the boxing fan.
But when the amateur contests
come off next month at the
Modern High School, we will be
getting quite a few other names

to pick tomorrow’s thugs

ITH this five
point chart
psychologists

claim they can predict an
innocent child’s chances
of becoming a gangster or
a good citizen. They
believe their forecasts wil!
be right in at least eight
cases out of every ten.
They are so confident of
the test’s reliability in spot-
ting .the future crimina)
before it is too late that they
are urging its adoption as a
routine “screening test” for
all children when they start

~GANGSTERDOM

CHAPMAN PINCHER’S Column tells how |~

ftto add to our list. In this new
crop for next month, there is an
enthusiasm, fostered chiefly by
the amateur tournaments which
have come into yogue over the
past few years in the neighbour-

ing islands,
Two of these tournaments have
been held in Grenada, one in

Trinidyd and the next, which in
all probability will come off later
this year, will be held in British
Guiana, In these tournaments,
our amateurs have not met with
any outstanding successes, the
most accomplished being an entry
into the finals by Sam King, then
middleweight amateur champion of
the island, in one of the Grenada
bouts. But one thing can be said
for the boxers who went, and it
is that they by no means had
much convenience. It was all a
hurried affair and one might hope
that in the proposed tour to
British Guiana, there will be ad-

from today’s innocent children

social workers are sent out to |
probe into his home life. |
The boy is then marked on |
their findings according to the |
table on the right,
|

|

200... 300...

oa THE SCORE awarded for
each feature of family life
has been carefully worked out
from hundreds
criminals.
If the boy's total score is under
200 his chance of becoming u

of cases of young

crimina} is less than one in ten. |
psychologists Gale. But if he |
scores more than 300 his chance

of taking up a criminal career is |
more than nine out of ten.

Note that a poorly developed

school feeli, ol damnily unity is rated |
a earned 2 ieves. @S a far more important cause
att sentiee stale” kee Ss of ooeek than laek of discipline |
, of the juvenile courts or affection,
Rept put of tae Jas 7 vente The Pay snolonists find tha
over-stric iscipline is more
DEFIANCE dangerous that none at all.
+ THIS IS how the test This system of preventing
works : After carefully crime has beer) worked out by
studying the child, psychologist Professor and Mrs. Sheldon
give him black marks fot Glueck, a U.S, husband-and-wite

ieflance assertiveness, dest ruc-
veness, suspiciousness. and
motional instability

If his total score is meh





psychologist team. after ten
years of resgarch sponsored by
the Harvard Law ool.

Bri are

ish psychologists

fine cars

SUNDA

€



KEN FARNUM

—leaves for Finland to-morrow.



_

heppard Hits

1000 Runs >

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, June 21,
David Sheppard who made 74
for Cambridge University against
Warwick at Birmingham teday
became the first amateur to com-~
p ete 1,000 runs this season,

Scoreboard: Kent vs Surrey;
Kent 217, Surrey 92 for 1,
Essex vs Lancashire. | vshire

266, Essex 8 for 0.

Gloucestershire vs Glamorgan,
Gloucestershire 284 for 9.

Somerset vs Middlesex, Somer-
set 218, Middlesex 47 for 3.

Sussex vs Oxford University,
Oxford 384 for 9.

Warwick vs Cambridge Uni-
versity, Cambridge 290 for 9
declared, Warwick 43 for 0.

Derby vs. Northants, Derby 339

for 4,
Yorkshire vs Leicestershire,
Yorkshire 307, Leicestershire |
for 1.

Worcestershire vs Notts, Wor-

cestershire 362 for 6.



vantages from whieh our repre-

sentatives could gain more
balance and control and essen-
tiality in boxing.

Before telling more about

amateur boxing competitions being
planned, I can say that some of the
most active promoters today are
Doyle Hinds, runner of the Fox
Club, Al Blackman and Claude
Ramsay who are more closely con-
neeted with the amateur line than
the others and Ben Jones.

The Amatous Sening ae
tion is ex to 1
annual ionine eae ap e
Modern High School next’ montn’
and the amateurs, some of them
old boys from Combermere, Lodge
School and Harrison College be-
sides present boys and boys from
Alleyne School, are in serious
training.

Then, too, the Press Club pro-
poses to stage an Annual Boxing
Tournament, the first of its kind,
to take place the following month

Perhaps because of the little
encouragement they get, there is
a dearth of heavier boxers in the
ring here these days and the real
heetie bouts will come from the
lighter boxers.

GOES ON POINTS



or erratic, varyin
Lax, letting the

reasons which the boy accepts as fair ,,,..,

SUPERVISION OF
or in the care of an irresponsible

Fair, giving only partial supervision to bo:
Suitable, ME Sole Pareie watch and Aerie

for his leisure hours

AFFECTION OF |
Indifferent or hostile



Warmly affectionate, even being over-protective

AFFECTION OF
Indiflerent or host

Warmly affectionate, even being over-protective

COHESION OF FAMILY

Unintegrated—home is just a place to “ hang

your hat” ,.

Some degree of cohesion—family hehayes as

cooperative group to some extent
Fopenve-—wi h a pride in the
“oll for one and one for all”

eel

anxious to try oul Lhe system on

an experimental seale che
The urgent need for some T)

method of detecting future § /t

criminals at the earliest possibi« A

age is shown by the fact that In
England alone more than 26,000
children under 14 are found 4d:4%
guilty of indictable offences ©.’
every year

found wherever

travel

1 Keeps your motor cleaner ..

2 Protects against bearing corrosion

3 Improves performance—greater economy
4



ROBERT THOM LIMITED

AGENTS

BASKETBALL

in their return basketball match
at Y.ML.P.C. on Friday night to
put themselves in the lead of the
Cup line up.

and
at least three times and these two

Lueas, was the most dashing of

rrother outstanding

me shower of

LSC! = OF BOY ¥ FATHER
Overstrict demandin; obedient itr hh fear,

between strictness on laxity
oy do what he likes .....,..
Firm but kindly, basing discipline on sound

BO BY MOTHER
Unsuitable, leaving the Toy to his own devices
person

FATHER FOR s8O0Y

MOTHER FOR BOY

ou,c, & sbrong

@Heres how to try out th:
rigut

1. up marks left,

EEO

Y ADVOCATE

eae



Carlton



The determined Carlton play-
‘rs beat Harrison College 36—23

All teams other

Carlton had

than College
been defeated

th only two defeats, met in
hat turned out to be a very
‘iting match.

Man of all sports, Brickie

» Carlton players and scored
if of the goals for his team.
lueas is swift and ready, and
ese qualities more than a com-
‘ate ability at scoring, helped
himm to seore as often as he did.

“ach member of the Carlton
pulls his weight, but
player was
\lan Davis, who is a more pre-
se scorer,

ic. m

The one thing noticeable about
he way the Carlton team played
was their determination, As the
game got going, it was evident
hat they were getting little
support from the crowd, most of
whom by their hailing and en-
couraging, fayoured College to
win, But the purposeful, thorough
vay in which Carlton set about
the game told straightaway that
they were leaving nothing to
‘hance.

The ground was heavy as there
had been a few spells of rain
earlier, but this wag a disadvan-
vage to both teams

Fast Game

From start to finish the game
was fast, Carlton were the first
to score and it was evident that
the College boys were not going
that all out way as though intent
on winning, a manner of playing
whieh was invited from overcon-
fidence, However, they made most
of their chances and the first
quarter ended 8 all.

Carlton took over the lead from
the gecond quarter, a lead they
ever relinquished. Carlton were
ilways combining well, better
‘han College, and with Brickie
Lueas piercing through and be-
ing fed with the ball, and Davis
lodging through the players and
positioning himself for scoring,
‘ney were able to be leading—
\6—ll—-by half time,

Next quarter, after a short
rain, the game was
slower and ended 18—~14, Carlton
still leading.

In the first half of the last
quarter, Carlton played for all
they were worth to establish a
better lead and College who
seemed to have given up the zest
for winning, allowed goal after
goal to be scored against them,

Then in the last stages, with
nothing to be lost by playing a
slow game, Carlton did exactly
this and by their win put them-
selves in the lead of the Cup line
up.

“



Score
72

83
57

10



pao Lovell g 76
34

ape

86
43

97
61
21

ne

f on any child you knou

marks awarded for eaeh
ure of family Itfe are
VAYS those shown in the
hand column There are
variations for diflerent
rees. To get a total strike

lines that do not apply. and



———

. smoother -running

DIAL 2229



JUNE 22

The Topic
of










NO. 229 |




The Only Pain



Reliever

| containing Vitamin B,
| a Teel
|
|
|
|
|

iffering from a Cold,

TT ‘ l, Head or Nerve Pain
KY start taking YEAST-ViPB
Vatiets AV ONCE, You will be

over t the difference tt

ae) a) ) Your Pain, Cold,

or ¢ uptoms will quickly



md you'll feel ever

Joe, Rebert, mind your business
These words were stressed by Lou














Don't mind the island talkies RELIEVES. YOUR Pyare
Follow the “hush mouth” crew Oe and
‘ * . MAKES YOU FEEL WELt
You knew a crowd of smarties - for. :
wat practice uw p, fee fence f WEA HE 3 There's nohiag else like
To ear, what's your defence EADAC . ane T-Vt Th, i's the
F . . NERVE Pairs NLY pain re liever
io @ll We say dear comrades wheeh AiSO contains
It may sound quite age-long SGOLDS, CHILIS§ me were Viemin B
Time cannot change its essence Get i ly af
“A King can do no wrong.’ *s = ¢ and $ VbAST.¥ ra PO 2
; . : i { bA ITE ‘Table
Form your ives in battalions pI 5 RNEUMAT! Q TO-DAY! That's the
Advance if thousands strong “ YEAST-VITE"’ - best way to get quick re-
Malt! cries & voige; remember | a istered | s SY PAI! re ect 4
‘A King can do no wrong Mone ‘ged » ) lic and Teel berver, Gage
’ : ° een

“4 ———

wel

i

4 , [jen

f
§
wy
yy

1H PAINS

-- DUE TO

INDIGESTION

We see St. Michael's people | %
They too “jump in the line’ |
And boys by Monday evening j
They left the “Toreh” behind |
‘ ° : taal
Joe asked what was the reason |

For doing such a thing

Lou said the people preferred

Another “Tudor” King
.

But





“Daniel” like old “Daniel”
Not sacred by lions’ roars
Said he will keep on knocking

TIM he walk through the doors
. . .

Forget the past, Lou erhoed
‘Stop all this foolish talk
Big men fly long in airplanes
Poor men must learn to walk
Off! Off they go from Seawell
Glad tidings they will bear
From us to other comrades
Awaiting them out there |
. . .
And who don’t like a ‘freness’’?
The

practice of this age

lf you ‘aint get your “freeness
Don't get in a big rage

Your freeness" coming next year

And then you will be keen
For boys you will see wonders;
The crowning of the Queen

Brush your top hats and long coats

Be patient; its your chance

‘Twill be your sreatest moment
Enjoying the royal dance, If you suffer from
' ° ° Sey > >
Now we referred to dancing STOMACH PAINS
Well! well on Friday night due to Indigestion try
At the Empire Theatre MACLEAN BRAND

The Dancing Time was bright STOMACH POWDER

at once! Pain and diseom-
fort are quickly relieved
by this scientifically
balanced formula: One
dose will prove its value
for Stomach Pains,
l leartburn, Flarulenee,
Nausea and Acidity
due to Indigestion,

The “rabbits” and the ‘‘fairies
And the whole dancing team
To Joe and Lou and Robert
Was like the “Cobbler’s Dream.’
. . .

The “Sailor Girls;” “young ladies
All in their dancing mood

By their resplendent figures
Proved J & R Bread is food

What dancing! high class dancing

ent” Miss Renae led '
“Dancers need: Enriched Bread, oe
sponsored by Tasuar
J&R BAKERIES |



makers of
ENRICHED BREAD
and the blenders of
J&R RUM

iFYERS & CO., LTD,
town,—-Barbados,









DUNLOP RUBBER 2M PANY LT Bi RMIN HAM EN AR

Depots ind Distributors









PAGE SIX





iy dulls hair

Halo <.orifies it!
3 “> » ian one

nw
Pea
3

HALO leaves your
hair wonderfully soft

and easy to manage.
it
Sw HALO makes your

y LE K permanents take
ey |

better — last longer!

HALO REVEALS
THE HIDDEN BEAUTY
OF YOUR HAIR



is 1. KLIMis pure, safe milk

2. KLIM keeps without refrigeration

l






ye

nCREEVE quality is always

In each and every tin of nourishing KLIM
you get benefits found only in the finest
fresh cow's milk, Exactly the same amounts
of important food essentials are yours in
every tin. KLIM's uniformity is your assur-
ance of consistently fine milk!






4. KLIMis exceltent for growing childrea
5. KLIM adds nourishment to cooked dishes
6. KLIMis recommended for infant feeding
7. KLIMis safe in the specially-packed tin
8. KLIMis produced under strictest control
Take pure water, @ BS

add KLM, “=p stir and you
G have pure, sofe milk

=f

FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER

aT ROUB
UB

~










Copt. 1950 Borden Co,
Tnternat') Come.

Rapereas
7 of

~







This non-stop existence puts a big strain
on the nerves. We live *‘on edge’’ and
sleeplessness is a common result. Here is
a simple and safe way to get to sleep
without lying awake and waiting for it to
come—take a couple of *ASPRO’
tablets at bedtime. The soothing action
of ‘ASPRO’ settles the nerves and com-
poses you. It helps you to go straight
to sleep—natural, refreshing sleep. Many
avail
Next day they feel the full
By relieving.pain and



STOMAC

lose sleep during hot nights—they need not, if they
themselves of this simple method.
benefit of a good night’s sound sleep.
dispelling feverishness and sudden chills, *ASPRO’ will help

you again and again. Keep it handy.



All Trade Enquiries to:

~ W. B. HUTCHINSON & CO.
MARHILL STREET, BRIDGETOWN

AsprO

Pale) hm VT
BLUE a US

may mean kidney trouble

A function of the kidneys is to eliminate
harmful impurities from the system, If the
kidneys grow sluggish, these impurities—
in particular excess acid —accumulate and
settle, and become a cause of pain and
suffering in joints and muscles,

The way to tackle the root of the trouble
is to help the kidneys. They should be
toned up with De Witt’s Pills— the medicine
made specially for this purpose. De Witt’s
Pills have a soothing, cleansing and
antiseptic action on the kidneys that 1
brings them back to perform their **
natural function properly.

e De Witt’s Pills are a very well-tried
remedy. They are sold all over the world
and we have many letters from sufferers
telling of relief gained, after years of
suffering after taking De Witt's Pills,
They act on the kidneys quickly, Why
not try them for your trouble? Go to
your chemist and obtain a supply to-day.

\
PRICES
- 3 tablets for 3°

30 tablets for 2/6

Made in England by ASPRO LTD,, Slough, Bucks OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE
Teel

De Witt's Pills

are made specially for
BACKACHE
JOINT PAINS
RHEUMATIC PAINS
LUMBAGO
SCIATICA

OUR GUARANTEE
De Witt’'s Pills are
made under strictly
bs poy conditions
and the ingredients
all conform to rigid
standards of purity.

Ay ERY

ladder et sd




you must not be

Dear Reader,
| too disappointed .
| little delay in replying

if there is @
to your

| letter—but I find myself simply
snowed under with problems of
all serts.. So, please be patient

and bear with me. fi
Your friend,
MRS. CLARKE.
* *

*

DEAR MRS. CLARKE, I am 17
years old and am still at school.
My boy friend goes to school too
but lives far away in the country

and I do not get very much
chance to see him except at
| school, He goes around with



other girls but one special one of
these girls hates me and tries all
she can to break us up. I love
| him very much and hope to marry
| him some day, so please help me.
| “UNE FILLE”.
**As you are both still at school
my dear, I wouldn’t worry too
much about this boy just yet.
Ignore this other girl who is
making things unpleasant for you,
Remember that a great weapon
indeed is to completely ignore an
incident etc. Be calm and
patient and, if it is to be, you will
find your true happiness in_ time
with this boy you love. Never
jump at love, dear, but rather let
it grow slowly and gradually like
a lovely flower, s

|

*

1 AM IN LOVE with a girl aged
16 who ts in love with me. We
plan to get married as soon as we
can but she wants me to have
intercourse with her now, She

has never had relations with a
man before, Should I do_ this
|before we get married or should
we wait,

“ADAM”.

**Well, Adam, the answer is a
little obvious don’t you think?
Wait by all means and start your
lives together with pride and hap-
piness—all the greater because
you both exercised self control

SEWING

The style illustrated to-day is

| very quickly made and very com-
|fetable to wear in hot weather.
The back is two long panels with
a seam down the centre back, The
button on yoke and revers are
cut on to the back panels, To
gather in the waist line you may
use elastic thread or simply belt
it in which is easier and I believe
more comfortable.

The first step is to design the
lapels and revers on your basic
bodice front. Extend the yoke
about an inch beyond the
shoulder seam, Draw a V neck to
|the depth most becoming to you.
| Draw in the revers then fold paper
under on the V neck line and trace
revers.



FRONT

If you find you have trouble
getting the tabs on the ends of the
yoke right try working with a
complete front pattern.

Pin the yoke and revers to the
back shoulder seam and extend
back shoulder to meet yoke.
Straighten out top part of back
armhole, Make an extra copy of
,| the yoke and revers pattern for

Doctors Prove



——a



For a Brighter, Fresher <\
Complexion, use Palmolive



y
J

leading skin specialists proved

plexions in many ways. Oily skin |

finer.

i :
| PALMOLIVE F

Vou looMay Win

A Lovelier Complexion in 14 Days

va: S
Soap as Doctors Advised Yess

Palmolive Soap can improve com-

less oily—dull, drab skin wonderfully
brighter. Coarse-looking skin appears

SUNDAY

during this difficult period,
fully realise how hard it is for
you both to have restraint but if
you resist now, you will both be
all the more happy when you get
married.
* * *

DEAR MRS. CLARKE, It its
over a year since I first met my
boy-friend but there is one thing
bothering me. He has another
girl whom he still sees and I hear
that he has other girl-friends too.
Yet, if I go out with anyone else
he gets very jealous and will not
speak to me, I not know
whether to go on with him or not,
Please help me. — “A.M.L.”

**You must come to an under-
standing with your boy-friend
If you are both really and truly
in love there must be mutual
trust and you must both be faith-
ful to each other, Without this.
love could never live. Have a chat
with him, my dear, and explain
your own point of view. I should
be inclined to tell him that you
cannot go on this way and that
you will be forced to stop seeing
him if he cannot make up his mind
to be faithful to one only. I do

I to have to make a very

feel sure that he will understand

how you feel and that things will
work out well for you both,
*

1 AM very much in love with a

boy I’ve been going with for over
a year but we had a quarrel a few
weeks ago and he has taken up
with another woman who is mar-

ried. He says that she «can do

much more for him than I can,
Yet he still comes to see me, not-
withstanding the fact that he takes

this other woman to his own home

very often,

I love him so much and just do
not know what to do. Should I
give him up and try to forget or
should I just carry on as though
nothing were wrong?

—"M.A.F.” (St. Michael)

**This is where you are going

CIRCLE

By PENNY NOLAN

cutting the facing for them.

Put your basic back skirt pattern
on to your back bodice at the waist
line and draw a straight line from
the back armhole to the bottom
of the skirt.

If you wish a wider skirt you
may add two or three inches to
the width at the bottom of your
basic skirt before making this side



BACK

seam line. Width may also
added at the bottom centre back
and graded off to the centre back
neckline.
The front
front bodice

skirt is added to the
in the same manner.
The bodice in the front carries
the natural armhole. There is a
seam down the centre froat

Make a facing for the V neckline
or finish it with a piece of bias.
The front armhole may be fin-
ished with either a shaped facing
or bias. The facing for the back
armhole may be cut with the fae-
ing for the yoke and revers, Make
a shaped facing for the back neck-
line,

When you are ready to sew join
the centre baek seam first then
seam the back neck facing to the
yoke facing and fac® the back
armhole, yoke revers and back
neck line all at once. Chip the
seams, turn and press,

Join the centre front seams and
side seams. Then face the front
armholes, :‘10ulder seam on front
and neckline,













that so, co 8 36 skin specialists advised:
1 Wash with Palmolive Soop,

2 For 60 seconds, massoge with
Palmolive's soft, lovely lother, Rinse!

3 De this 3 times @ day for 14 doys

ooks

ae LOVELY cadet ETSY

ADVOCATE





cision, my dear. It must be obvi-
ous to you that this man does not
really love you in the true sense

of the word, but is just using you |

as a plaything. This other woman
has apparently got
great attraction for

I would advise
to her, I know too well that
it is a very hard thing to do but,
for your own sake and the sake
of your pride in yourself you can-
not let this situation go on as it is.
If you decide to make a break,

him, so

out of your mind altogether. On
the other hand, if you think of
keeping on there can be no true
happiness for you and you will be
faced all the time with doubts and
anxieties about this man—and you
know, my dear, I do not think
that this or any man would be
worth such sacrifice on your part.
We women are used to sacrifice
and so forth for our men and are
proud to be able to do it but there
is a limit.

“Bad luck” writes, My boy-
friend and I disagree a month and

a few days ago, but if I see him
and call him he comes to
me and makes love to me.
He has gone to live’ with!

another woman and I want to
know if there is any hope of his
coming back to me. I love him
very much,

**Do yeu really love this man?
That is the question you must ask
yourself and be very honest, my

dear. He could not really be in)

love with you, except that he likes
to make love to you when another
is not available. I should be in-
clined to let him go and have no
more to do with him. After all,
if you are going to be faithful to
him, the least he can do is to be
faithful to you.

If you too have a problem write

to Mrs, Clarke, c/o The Editor
The Advocate,

What's Cooking In
The Kitchen

The three best known ways to
cook rice are Rice Pilaw or better
the way the Turks cook
Indian rice and Curried Rice and
Rice Creole which is the way the
Cubans use to cook their rice.

Rice Pilaw

Olive Oil or butter; Rice;
Boiling water; Salt; Seasoning.

Put in the saucepan a bit of lard
(olive oil, butter or margarine
with or without seasoning accord-
ing to your particular taste), Pour

the rice which you have previous- |

ly washed into the fat and let it
cook for about three minutes
stirring all the time. Add then
the boiling water which has to
be double the weight of the rice
Stir again, season with salt and
let it start boiling again, cover
the saucepan with its lid and put
immediately in the oven where
you leave it for exactly 18
minutes. When ready, take the
saucepan out of the oven, add a
few pieces of butter, pour into a
dish and serve. You can make a
separate sauce if you like with
onions, or tomatoes, or garlic and
oil or anchovies,

Indian Rice and Currie
Indians cook their rice in quite
a different way. Put some Water
into a saucepan with salt. When
the water boils add the rice which

be you ‘have already washed and let

it cook. When ready wash it with
some more boiling water (some
people use cold water instead).
Then put it in a cloth and put it
into the oven for about 10 or 15
minutes, From time to time you
have to stir it with a wooden
spoon so that it will dry complete-
ly. Then pour it into a dish and
serve it either like this or with
some curry or with fried butter.

Currie

Onion 1, Butter or margarine
1 oz., Ham 2 oz. Thyme, Parsley,
Pepper Currie powder 1 teaspoon-
ful, Flour 1 teaspoonful, Water
I Egg yolk, -Cream or milk 2
teaspoonsful,

Put the butter or margarine in
a saucepan, Chip the onion and
let it fry. Be careful that it does
not burn. Add the finely chipped
paraley, the ham, the thyme and
the pepper. Then add the teaspoon-
ful of Currie Powder and the tea-
spoonful of flour. Let it cook for a
few minutes then add the water







Clarks Children's Sandals.



a choice of width fittings

long...

—no wonder you all
want them...

‘JOYANCE?

MADE BY C. @ J. CLARK LTD, (Wholesale only), STREET, SOMERSET, ENGLAND

big de-|

some |

leaving him)

it, |



(about 1 pint) and let it cook
slowly for twenty minutes,
the currie and add | beaten egg)
yolk
cream or evaporated milk.

boiling water, some salt, 3 ozs, of
lard( animal lard). and 1 pound
of rice. Cover the saucepan and
let it
minutes, The rice will have ab-
sorbed all the water by then. Add
3 more ounces of lard and stir
with a fork. You can use butter |
if you don’t like the lard.

wives feel the same but towards
the end of the flying fish season |
one gets so tired even of hearing |
the hawkers shout Flying fish. 1}
made up my mind to try and find |
new recipes and here they are:
three new recipes as easy as they
can be,

60 Countries say
“ More Clarks Children’s Sandals, Se

please”

All over the world mothers feel satisfied

What's behind this long-tested reputation?
Finest, richest leathers and rubbers .°. .
... scientific

design based on thousands of test
measurements... Clarks skill in
fashioning which makes their
footwear last so ‘' new," so

Over 126 years behind them 1

Se a a aM ls! =

Se

by EILEEN ASCROFT

[MBLEDON style-sette
W bloomer suit It is trim and becoming. with Its

fitted elasticised waist

tennis stars have already seen the first model

nas tried it on, Lorna Cornell played in
it during ine recent Prench cnampinships. y
make a clean one and wash him| White cotion pique makes a big come-back this year afvs the nylons
and semi-transparent materials of last season

larton. non-playing Wightman Cup captain ha:
for her veam for a fuli-skirtea dress. witb
Oniy Mrs Walker-Smith wil! not

American ».aureen Connol)

Mrs, Shepherd
chosen it
attractive side-butroning
wear the dress because she prete:

singles ; put she wil! have the same material

Maureen Connolly na- a Wimbiecon
nylon material. orlon

seersucker with a

court play the yoke wil
pale olue
English

ocket_tabs

organdie Foxe RRA tisets on” the “Shorts trimmed with appliqued

flowers

. . . and at the DERBY



THE RACE-GOERS SAID:

It has a oermanentiy pape skirt
Beryl Penrose. an Ausiraiian olayer wili wear a dri

nove: cotton mesh button-in yoke
be white. for off-the-court interva =|

player Lorna Cornel! has tailored shorts and matchin, SS
shirt. in white frost-bar acetate with white satin collar and



SUNDAY,

Behold! The bloomer suit
IT SETS THE STYLE

Peete ee ae eee ab

FOR WIMBLEDON



r this June will be the

and bioomer skirt. Several

an
s shorts and shirts for
dress u. the oewer-than

ess af white
Fo

sores and” Shirts. with

to-day—

us
=
Zz

JUNE 22, 1952








RIX sketches the
‘ » bloomer suit as
GLAMO . worn by Maureen
: Connolly. it is in
TO BE COMFORTABLE’ ha
7 acetate with an
7 L \ slasticisea = wai st-
of the official! Toppers- Jewellery trade is tollowing the
ten d D th royal flower spray fash:on For bana.
for-the-Derby Rye: “two guineas it can be Ddougn: }
public chose comfort rather) Qilie's ae) SAE hin nein
than glamour Ta Ee Pet ae
Black and grey silk nats were he a 7 rh
exception Most men wore Charm and charmers ss ht.
lounge suits and soft felt nats o
Women carried raincoats or OME women ure narwming,
umbrellas. only one woman ine others fiagve arm asked
eight nad nigh neels au'hor Diana Morgan wnat »
Many women who arrived in cars pro. piec “she on'reune 14s
brought alternative hats and course on charm in her piav oe
shoes in case the weather after Mv Pasion
changea : Mss Morgan -oniessec was
DePby . sande Pa Sar ge oecause of tne ftundamenral 5 !
meetin ; aR s 4 ditterence oetween so many ummer cur
day when people like tO enjovV women sne meets’ n rea. ute 5 .
themselves in comfortablé€ She descrines as Marien gre: ame ‘ne aot perm , then
clothes women Lady weeasnu:t tne cag Now we nave the
Spias’ of colour among the rather ory MP for Aberceen Sou'h tep;a wave Ustus ana cool for
somore feminine clothes was writer Lesiie Siorm elev'sior short -ummet nairstyles
i by the saris of ViSILOTS announcer Marv Maicolm anc Cnet advantage tt curls
rom the East Ladv Balcon the film producers Che na closer to the scalp ani
£1000 ftashicn wife can de used tor those untidy
ase W ‘ 2 shori strands at the nape o
AVOURITE roya: oieces of Tapeh trek ore detisvitiubyy wat. er p
Jewellery. st oresent are their best at the head ol a dinner ‘
diamond flower sprays fable 4 RA fashion
When she Queen lett for Balmoral .. ." Conan who nas charm doesn t HIR tasiion tor men. from the
or the Monday nignt train she iM . tort ail’: asnic :
wore ner diamond !ily vrooch eed ;o make any etfort at at Royal Academy olue shirts
given to ner in South africa in , Says Miss Morgan in ner olay SW" ang white collars. Portrait
the lapel of her black coat Real-life examples of women wh painter Davia Jagger has used

Che Queen Mother wore a
diamond flower spray about 6in
long pinned to her black dress

hand jewel shops are the
genuine Victorian flower pieces
Tf you can find them they cost
about £250 t
21t even ""e cheaner end of the



Sift
and 2 tablespoonsful of

Rice Creole
Put in a saucepan 2 pints of

cook for about twenty

FLYING FISH
I don’t know whether all house- |

nave
Morgan are actresses Kav Ham
mond. Margaret Rawlings. Vivien

ones
and

have
idy' anc a
nave

Fashion talipiec



Flying fish 6
English mustard half a
spoonful

White pepper

Marjoram

Fillets of anchovies

Oil

Lime

Flour

1 egg

Parsley.

Clean the fish and bone it. Put
4 teaspoonful of English mustard
in a cup, a tiny bit of white
pepper, quite a bit of parsley, the
dry marjoram and the fillets of
anchovies which yeu have pre-
viously mashed. Mix everything
with 4 glass of olive oil or melted
butter if you don't like the taste
of Olive oil, and add the juice of
half a lime.

tea-





CER oo.

“Pie
a %

48. ma,
By





if they get }










LOCAL AGENTS: ALEC RUSSELL & CO., BARBADOS

charm named by Miss

Nomen who want to follow royas Leigh and Dame Wenn en: G
fashion wil) find it expensive Oury former brewery Mr
Average price of a flower spray mandant, now a
in real diamonds 1s £1000 , director

| uch sought atter in the second- © T

this co.our scheme for both mis
portrais this
rox

season. of W

Esa. and Lieut.-colonel

. L. Hoare
Jagger
colourful than the sore eey
cream or white combination.

thinks It 18 re
in

he charming people are the tidY syirt manufacturers disagree with

always neat in appearance ~ Mr
mind The women who
charm are frequently un-
little disorganised
more ses anneal 100

unfashionable an
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED

it is

Jagger. They s@
an untidy.

London &reress Sernice

FROM PARIS COMES
A CHOIRBOY COLLAR



CHUIRBOY COLLAR in starched white organdie is
summer idea from Paris for changing the appearance 0

plain dark dress.

It looks most attractive worn over the ii.

décolleté boat-shaped neckline.

London Frpress Service.



Take now the flying fish one at
a time, cover each one of them
with the mixture like a veil and
leave them until you are almost
ready to go to dinner, Take then
the flying fish and roll each of
them starting from the tail, pass
them through the flour then in
the beaten egg and fry them in
hot lard or oil. When ready put
them on a dish and serve with
parsley and pieces of lime.

Oil 5 tablespoonsful

Pepper

Parsley 1 tablespoonful (chipp-
ed).



Breadcrumbs

Lime juice or vinegar,

Garlic.

Bone and clean the fish. Put
them in a pyrex dish so that they
cover the bottom with the white
part of the fish up. Add 2 table-
spoonsful of oil, salt and_ pepper.
Cut a few pieces of garlic then
finish by adding the chipped
parsley and the breadcrumbs.
Add the rest of the oil. Bake in
moderate oven for about 4 an hour.
When cooked add the juice of one
lime or more according to taste
er vinegar according to taste.



the fashionable woman wears

KAYSE

“coerce orto eminent i

FP nylon stockings





'

aye





a

SUNDAY, JUNE 22,



aorva’s
perfumsy . . . heavy, mysterious.
OovA'S @INK MIMOSA.
perfume thats diflerent— different.



“ prineess
takes up
the sword

by PATRICK FORREST

‘THERE is a hum of children’s voices from
the main room of St. Philip and St

James Hall, in

and parry.
Takin,

of this hall.

One of them is

e is takin
against Cambridge.

A chance—next year
The girls are not going about their ambition
Cromarty-
the Oxford maitre d’armes and Olympic coach
“Will they be good ah to fence agains
ASKS

easually. Training them is Mr.

Cambridge this
Dickson, “ No.
will havea

I watched president Gillian
Anne's Society. and secretary

year?’
Definitely not

their looks
Later Miss Rackham, who

Sandy e Lane. Northwood
Miss Dowling ced 2), trom
Ealing—di eir chantes
uridge the best

. e ae gelling 1

d we should

ackham

Leckford Road. Oxford
where infants are being given religious
instruction, but below there is
martial sound—the steely noise of thrust

fencing instruction in the basement
several times a week, are 16
women undergraduates of Oxtord University
~year-cld Princess Sebe
Derta of Ethiopia. She is in her second year
at Oxford, and is reading law. Like the other

embefs of the Oxford Ladies’ Fencing Club
lessons as often as she can
hoping to be chosen to fence for the University

but they probab!
chance of beating them next veal
Rackham,
Catherine Dowling
engage each other with a flerceness that belied

1s 22 and lives a!

coaching possible
stand a fair chance,” said Miss
“We will win,” said secretary Dowling

1952



a more

ckson
Mr. Cromarty
of St
Middlesex, and

Mount Avenue
against Cam-

They told me that each member of the club

has forsa) other forms of serious sport to learn
the art rs A aoa bn Miss Dowling has a

leaning towards
small- boat
Sailing.

They were
enthusiastic
about their

oach. Mr

romarty
ickson had as
pupil the
rown Prince
lav of Norway

fhe won hile
half ~ blue in
1926), whose

daughter, Prin
eess Astrid. is
now at Oxford

Like Princess
Sebel of Ethio-

ia, she is at

ady Margaret
all, but unlike
her. she does
nob fence.

I left Presi-
dent Rackham
and Secretary
Dowling dis-
¢cussii their
plans for team-
building. Their
though are
on Hilary term
next ear —
when four of
the 16 members
of the Oxford
club will cross foils with four
from Cambridge.

And now listen to Mr. C. L, de
Beaumont, Olympic swordsmf&in
and secretary of the Amateur
Fencing Association, on the up-
surge of the sport in this country.
At the London Fencing Club he
told me; “There between
700 and 8000 members of the
AFA and 350 clubs scattered all



over the ~=" Clubs find
that their in ee
every ¢: is g rapidly
because the interest. in
the svort

C'nb mempership costs as






IN THE BASEMENT of a chi

irch hall women

little a5 2s. 9 week, and that
includes lessons from qualified
leaders in about 200 areas.

Women score
“Fenoing is an ideal sport for
women. It is the one sport
where a woman can be matched
on equal terms with a man. In
some ways a woman may have
the advantage over a man oppo
nent because of her natural
poise AA adroltness,
it is a sport where physique
does not really come into it.”
Mr. de Beaumont said that the
cost of the spam ws ne bigh

——



SUNDAY



PRINCESS SEBEL DERTA
learns fencing at Oxford.

at Oxford

of Ethiopia



undergraduates cross swords.

According
extra
cost
woman between 7 to 12

a

foil,

to the number of
lessons taken it should
an amateur swordsman or

en
juipment
love and
de mront

year after buying
The jacket, mask.
Says Mr,

should cost £12 at the most.

“Then, of course, they last for

ever,” he said.

extra
reasons, cost up

Mr. de Beaumont toléi me that
lessons,

for special
to about 10s

each, even from top-ranking
coaches e

kcmdes Keusae Rerun a







...and a plague of BLACK EYES



e JOHN BAKER WHITE, MP
examines a blot on the
Eglish summer : the girls
in dark glasses...

[THE summer is on its way
and with it a bad out-
break of dark glasses
disfiguring the faces of
countless thousands of
comely young women.

What affectation, what
sense it all is.

During the war, in the strong
sun of the Middle East glaring
on the white bulidings. large
numbers of young women in the
Services and on che civilian
staffs of various Cairo-born
departments an to wear dark
glasses .The habit began to
spread to troops off duty. who
wore chea and horrific
spectacles with pink. green and
yellow rims bought :n the Muski
er off the hawkers outside the
Kasr-el-Nil_ barracks

Wise in his time the Director
of Medica! Services brought in
an order that no one in the Ser
vices was to wear dark glasses
without a medical certificate
Within a fortmghr nine out ot
ten of the ATS and WAAF had
discarded their glasses; the

non-








There is no

cost ean Nhe
same as that in Goya's w
is simply legs of it. bts 2

so that a woman could carry perfume about with her, in

no

ote ee ence eo poo
—— ae



Ano aow they ve

Rot glassiess

lasses—— but are they any better ?

enctian blind sun goggles are
German contribution to the 1952 scene

number of wearers among
troops was even lower.

It is reasonably certain that a
vest of London’s young women
now disterting their beauty and
charm would show exactly the
same result. The great majority
of people, least of all the young
do not need dark g-asses, except
perhaps for car-driving or
Soe when the sun is low in
the sky. or at the sea or for
reading and writing in the sun
More than that, the wearing of
dark glasses when they are not
necessary can permanentiy
weaken the resistance of the
eyes to sunlight. That is why
the Director of Medical Services
Middle East acted as he did

The other day T watched them
pouring out of South Kensington
Tube Station ... hundred f

the







In Paris
London

New York

women

are buying

perfume this new waj

INEXPENSIVE HANDBAG PHIALS
OF A COSTLY PERFUMIi

perfume made than Goya—yet it nec:
perfume in Goya handbag phials is the

famous costly bottles-



normally attractive, personable
young women, five out of ten
made hideous with the dark

glasses of a
aineugh the sun was still down

strange variety,

»ehind the high buildings of the

Harrington Road.

country women

The next morning I was out in*

: field with a squad of young
hoging. ‘They

were in the full glare of the sun,
he earth hot and dry, but there

were no dark glasses there. I

perhaps they will



iw some women of the Royal
observer Corps at work under a
udieds Bey, They did not need
lem eitner

So ugly
I suppose it is no good telling
ill those pretty ps in London
nd elsewhere how ugly they
ake themselves look. Th time
et over this
vanity as





yarticularly stupi

\hey have got over others.

end 50.
rnd _ attraction, good looks and

There is one consolation. This
the age of women between 40
They have the charm

od style. And they do not wear

‘ark glasses. When I see
liarlene Dietrich Irene Dunne
d Lynn Fontanne meet

there

were introduced by Goya

her handbag ; so that at any moment of the day,

matter where she
fragrance. Get a ha

Handbag Phials by 5S

xo. 5." Most hexurious of

The flower

In seven fragrances :
Decision, Vibration, Goya Heather.

Gardenia, Great
, Pink Mimosa, ‘No, 5,’

MADE IN ENGLAND

Sole Distributors

L. M. B. Meyers & Co, Lad.,

P.O. Box 171, Bridgetown

she could renew and refresh her
pallies phial of Goya perfume to-day

PARI
LONDON

NEW YORK

yublic in dark glasses I wi
ke back allt that I have said
s0ut those who are 30 years
OPYRIGHT RESERVED
London Express Service.







.

TWICE A



~
y
PS

ass



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LIFE TO CLOTHES

FAB Soaks
clothes clean without
hard serubbing FAB-
washed clothes give
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S



Mummy ... They Say |
You're Not My Mother

Every day a list grows longer:
the list of couples anxious, eager,
sometimes desperate to adopt a
child, to offer it their love, their
home, their name. At least ten |
would-be adopters ask for each of |
the 17,000 children who are adopt- |
ed every yeer in Britin,

And every day, too, people face |
the question “How—and when—
shall I tell my child he is not mine |

-but adopted?”

It is the worst question of all. A |
wrong answer can mar a life and
ruin a relationship, To the worried, |
kindly people who ask it, social |
worker Margaret Kornitzer has |
some comfort in a book published |
this week.* |

The adoptive parent must tell the |
ehild,- otherwjse, eventually
almost inevitably—he will hear
from others, with regults no one!
can predict. |

Case-histories prove this time |
and again. i

Mary, five-year-old adopted
daughter of a country accountant
and his wife, was playing
friends. There was an
A playmate jeered _ spitefully:
“Youre not your mummy's little
girl at all, You're only adopted, . .”

A silence followed this word she |
had not heard before, After she |
discovered its meaning she cried
for four days and would not be |
comforted, |

Peter, 17, had to produce a birth |
certificate when he applied for a!
clerking job. Only when he saw {
the certificate did he realise he
was adopted, and a world of love |
and kindness crumpled all about !
him,

AN ENDEARMENT |

It was a wrong act by the adop- |
tive parents of these two, They
feared to tell their children lest in
so doing they lost their love and

with
argument, |

be preserved by
mutual confidence than by trying
to preserve a fiction,

Says Miss Kornitzer; “If you
leve a child, and he knows it, you
can tell him anything he needs to
know without harming him, . .”

Well—how to tell him? And
when?
He must be told as soon as

he starts to ask questions; certainly | Lady’ by
well before he goes to school, Some {probably not as well known now-
experts! believe he can absorb the /adays as such a careful writer de-

knowledge even before he can
talk,

Dr. H. N. Pratt, of the New
York Hospital, himself an adop-

tive father, believes the best way
to start the telling is by whisper-

ing to the child: “You are my
adopted son (or adopted daugh-
ter).”

Then the word “adopted” be-

comes a term of endearment, It
should never be used, of course,
in anything but a happy associa-

tion.
‘I CHOOSE YOU’

One expert carries the doctor's
theory one stage further, She
tays: “The child should know he
was specially chosen by his parents
—and had another mother when

he was born—as soon as he begins | Can

to wonder ‘where babies come
| from’”

| The importance of telling the
|child he is adopted cannot be
| over-stressed. pe

| The British Medical Association,
{in a report on The Adolescent
| Delinquent Boy, last year said:
|“Some delinquents »

| children, and



their adoption, . . .”
World (Putnam), 16s.

| *Child Adoption in the Modern
!



|. SP

These are the
sort of smart
| sanda! = many
women would
like to wear
but you need
trim feet and
ankles like Miss
jane Smith to
carry them off.
They are of
and white striped












a chance of
a
t
| pis a. A, '
| bring these out
| when | come to
town to shop,
she said “They

nana feet

London Express

ta
E
inch

*

is wasted as

date, fo: half-an-hour beginning PHENSIC tablets cle... che head and dispel tightness
$i ae! * aes in_the 25 and and pain behind the eyes. The ng down high temperature,
megs ands, 11.75, and 9.58 relieve stuffy, congested feeling the same time soothing the
1 | nerves and counteracting depress: The aches and pains of ’Flu
7 | dis: i ime. PHENSIC | »blets act quickly and safely.

Wimbledon | isappear im no time ets act quic nd sate



st. But lasting affection and },,,,
deep trust are far more likely to dais ven
establishing at 9.15

are adopted
their delinquency |heard on
may date from the sudden dis- | BBC’s G.O.S, in ‘Sticky Wicket’, |
closure to them of the fact of



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lean

ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN

B.B.C. Radio |
Notes

Wesi Indian Economy

As many of our readers know,
professer Arthur Lewis, the dis+
tinguished West Indian economist
has been discussing with Douglas
Hall im the Wednesday evening
‘Calling the West Indies’ the basic
factors of West Indian economy
in a four-part series of programmes

ee ct rae









2 SME ALR AT SET ee

eyicke*-

with .



called ‘Marginal Comments.’ In the
first three programmes which
have been heard on the three}

Wednesdays in June the discus-
Sion centred on population, land
and industry, In the last pro
gramme which will be heard next
Wednesday, 25th June, there will
be a general programme diseuas-
ing investment, planning and de- |
velopmen| This broadcast will
occupy the whole of the BBC’s
“Calling the West Indies” on that





| They neither harm the heart n
supply of Pi

pset the stomach. Keep a
THe Wimbledon fortnight epens NSIC tablets by you always

on Monday next, 28rd June, when |

the lawns of the All-England |
Club, ‘and’ especially the famed '
centre and number one courts, will 5
become once again a meeting | &
place for the world’s 7 ie lawn
tennis players. Each d#y—in addi-

‘ TWO TABLETS BRI

tien ta. four ‘live’ broadcasts which

I dreamed | went

& , toa formal in
tSte DUOULCDS OMS

CUICK RELIEF

C7 @








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will be a daily ‘Report from Wim- cs : Maidenette Strapless bra
bledon’ broadcasts in the BBC's HEADACHES, NEURALGIA, INS SENZA, COLDS & CHILLS

General Overseas Service with

impressions by Fred Perry and
recorded extracts of commentary
on some of the highlights of the ,
day's play, the programme being
introduced by Max Robertson, This :
‘Report from Wimbledon’ will be
yadcast twice for listeners in
at 5.00 p.m and again

lia big occasion is on your cal



this dream of a bra is
Maidenette
most fashion.

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Sevial By Henry James inige vdeniinb Nalin bonlen enn:

The new serial to be broadcast pors your cu rom below.
in the General Overseas Service In white or black vor.
of the BBC i The Portrait of a He fabru

Henry James, who is :
Genuine Maidentovm brassiere
ave made only in the United Staie
jperves to be. In the preface to this of Ainerien

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bravery and magnanimity; she had |
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A)

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certain young lady affronting her a oy AS ! ae ee
destiny. The young lady is an bring beauty eye ONS Sar «
American, who ‘spent half her , i * Y Fe
time in thinking of beauty and into your life... a BACKACHE
|

dlourful

vith the loveliest, most

designs you ve ever seen in







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had an infinite hope that she VOLES ana naircoras inal Wear s

would never do anything wrong.’

with an air of freshness and wash











. . is ides Backache is usually the first sign of Kidney
In pursuance of this ideal concep- i 4
tion of herself she rejects two} without changing / colour... wonderful on = ere the boo ers
admirable suitors, the English ‘ it : e bi y get apy gy ® ed
Mirae “Mt eal atid the, anata for clothes for yourself or the children : fresh flowing to every nerve ar
| businessman Gasper Good- 4 a nea ¥ \ eet, SS 23 ne
wood, and marries the American oY phat : ' ¥ Half a century’s experience and scientific
|James’s most evil characters, dem FEIRC eK Ni FABR ie he) tests by doctors in famous clinics prove that
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| Cricket Comedy | satisfaction assured or the material will be replaced. ey oo Ow = Dew Pe y 3/-
| A most amusing story is to be Always look for the name Ferguson on the selvedge. Pa ee oo a4

Monday next in the

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will be broadcast at 7.15 p.m, on}
\Monday, 23rd June







|
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PAGE EIGHT SUNDAY stiarennieatiittineinan eels. TeV OCR



Ce earner = serene cette meant tet nce

SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 1952

ro

BARBADOS «ii ADVOCATE

fico a se Baa

Ltd., Broad St,

Bridgetown

Printed by the Advocate Co.,





chial

subjected to the importunities of electors
than there might well be if members are
elected or seek office with the ideals of
service to the community not as clearly

Sitting On The Fence

A

to write a daily column

SHORT time ago I offerea By NATHANIEL GUBBINS

granted the last wish.
In fact, he has not only pro-



PHOTOGRAPHS

Copies of Local Photographs



: for Pravda if Stalin would forecast said—th: J
nigel a: June 22, 152 sale imprinted as they are, say, in the United ot tes 000,000 roubles a week free first and. fine tol eet te tiny ‘saci aen Male Sas . Which have appeared in the
Kingdom. . Although I promised to dev. a aie th “Faitsen, the 18 in — mie ae ~ Advoe a Newspaper
: -education o ie faithless.” n. long, a an ©& me
VESTRY SYSTE MM Tn addition to the loss of efficiency which Pe lee ae oe of deve Psychiatrist and. range of about a yard. It fires are

THE Local Government Bill based on
the report of Sir John Maude has met with
opposition from the majority of members
of the eleven Vestries of the island.

Majority opinion on the Vestries consid-
ers that the Vestry system ought to be

|

will inevitably result from an inflated
electoral roll and the submerging of par-
ishes into large distriets the proposed local
government will cost the taxpayers more
money.

The raising of Bridgetown to the status

I now propose to take two
items of news from Moscow
radio and show him how an ex-
perienced and imaginative coj-
ig would have handled

em

Here are the items:—

Bridegroom

On two occasions when a bride
bridgegroom was going to the
church to be married, his “legs
buckled under him and he was
unable to walk.”

In_ the Medical Press Dr.
Charles Berg, Harley-street

psychiatrist gives this explana-

millions of rounds of atomised
insecticide a minute.

With Lottie the Devil Cat as
Second in Command, I went into
battle with my little gun against
four bluebottles and two wasps.

The enemy’s centre was
formed by the four bluebottles
buzzing on the window pane like
Highland regiments defiantly






Can be ordered from the...

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

of a municipality is something different. steps he raised his hand, and tion of his condition: — blowing their bagpipes, his left
retained and that with amendments to the This is a pr ought to token tie the aan seemed to shine | “Emotions that a person ae right ‘Gems’ to the two ae
Vestries Act and the operation of the new “Snow fell in Mt will not admit are buried deep wasps circling the battlefield on One I Caught Yesetrday!
Public Health Act defects in Vest d it can be taken within the Vestry system. a oscow yes- — = his mind, but ay come air reconnaissance. His line of
u Hic ea th Act defects in Vestry ad- The political party with a majority in the eT ack ie tied e ae surface . in phy- retreat was cut off by a cl
ministration can be removed. The case sun | reaction which cannot door.

for abolishing the Vestries seems to be
based on emotional theories that the Ves-

House of Assembly is pledged to support
the Local Government Bill. But a political
party grows in stature when it takes into

taxes of not inne Dhan $680 ae, i ee eee than $4.80 there
seems less likelihood of members being

shone and the snow fell on‘
different days, but who would
bother about facts when writing
for a Communist are

be controlled. So the bride-
ream Probably did not want

marry.”
Dr. Gubbins, the Fleet-street

I don’t know what Field
Marshal Lord Montgomery
would have done, but I attacked
his






“And You Should Have Seen the

GUTTYHUNK — Pure

Irish Linen Rod Limes
with a 90 lbs. breaking

t sas is anti ted d rupt rath ‘ centre, ordering Lottie to chilis
ry system is antiqua ec and corrupt ra consideration the objections which are * e ae i xtites: sale guard our flanks. "
er than on any detailed knowledge of ee ; é gratulations to my Har~- I gave the nearest bluebottle
ine made by the majority of responsible This is how Nathaniel Gubsky,f! l¢y-Street colleague on his bril- @
what Vestries do or do not perform. a ‘ ; of Pravda, would h written@ lant diagnosis of a case which 3 one-second burst from the gun.
Oi ln Re ook iliac tee ie critics to proposed legislation. There can | jj." ‘ave written# has its counterparts in other =F 4 moment it buzzed louder : .
=vP . be no room for doubt that the majority “As Stalin, human activities. than ever. Jen 2) abe fo PITCHER'S also stock:

position of Vestries and who have no idea
of what local government means are quite
willing to throw stones at the Vestry sys-
tem merely because they do not understand
it.

“Many persons”, writes W. Eric Jackson
in Local Government in England and
Wales, “are quite convinced that members
of local authorities get elected for personal
and private reasons, that they get some-
thing out of their membership—meaning
of course that directly or indirectly there
are monetary advantages, opportunities
for improving one’s business connections,
or some other financial gain to be got by
becoming a member of a local council.”

The comment is interesting because
while it reflects undoubtedly what a great
many people in Barbados say about Ves-
try members it is written about local gov-
ernment councils to which members are
elected by universal suffrage.

The Vestry system in Barbados is just
as open to abuse or criticism as the local
government system in England or Wales.
But the Vestry system in Barbados has
been so closely associated with the Angli-
can Church in the island (the rector of
each parish is ex-officio chairman) that it
is impossible to attack the Vestry system
without bringing the church into disre-
pute. A glance too at the names of Vestry
members of the eleven Vestries as pub-
lished in the Advocate Year Book 1951 is
adequate to show how fortunate the par-
ishes have been in the types of Vestrymen
they have been able to elect under the
present electoral system.

The conception of work in the island's
Vestries has been the conception of service
to the community.

The functions of the Vestries can well
be described as services to the parish.

” . ; oJ perhaps in our wer to give, Mi the interi f the yA0rs

Vestries are responsible for the r Spas and operate district markets. from Peuthentic sauces of Pre. Eariok, Althought ebook call- or tk ae edit teen

maintenance of churches and salaries of The erection of a district market at Eagle cord, the Introduction of Negro ed ‘True Description of the Newors they doue alow as
> island h h cathic ak r Slaves into this, the most ancient Congo and _ Its pease many wifes as they will haue,

church officers. In an island where the Hall will, it is hoped, be the first of several of the British Colonies in the Countries from the Writings and sume will haue 3 or 4, accord-

Governor is instructed by Her Majesty
the Queen “to the utmost of his power to
promote religion and education in the
island” the support of the established
religion of the island seems a necessary
function of local government to all who
duly recognise the priority which religion
must have over all other activities.
Vestries are also responsible for poor
relief, public health, parish roads, provi-

of those with the greatest knowledge and
experience of the Vestry system do not
agree with the proposed local government
bill. They consider that the Vestries Act

Mayor, Aldermen and Citizens of the City
of Bridgetown.”

In view of the possibility that certain
members of the Labour Party in the House
of Assembly will in any case insist on the
maintenance of more local government
units than the three councils proposed in
the Bill it seems prudent to retain the
Vestry system with amendments to the
Vestry Act and to raise the status of the
City of Bridgetown. To bulldoze the local
government bill through the legislature
against the advice and protests of citizens
with great records of public service on
Vestries would be unstatesmanlike.



EAGLE HALL

THE clearing of land at Eagle Hall
Corner will have attracted the attention
of many who are hopeful of seeing district
markets established in Bridgetown in the
near future.

The land which has been cleared has no
the proposed district
But opposite the clearing the

eonnection with
market.
tenants on Government owned land were
given a month’s notice in April to remove
their properties and to leave in prepara-
tion for the clearing of a site on which a
district market is to be constructed under
the supervision of the St. Michael’s Ves-
try.

District markets in Barbados have a
long list of champions and in 1948 legisla-
tion was passed empowering Vestries to

the assistance of the Colonial Engineer to
the Véstry and the Committee of the Ves-

god-like in his
white and gold Salers, es
ed the steps, snow clouds, dar!

and evil as the dogs and

‘bals of the coneuilon| Wi
mocracies, gathered in th
Northern pM and cast their

smiling features of our beloved"
leader and his ingrowing mous-
tache, Tovarich,

“In a silence so intense that
the sobbing of an overwrought
woman sounded like a herd of
cows with the hiccoughs, Stalin
raised his hand,

“As if obeying a signal from
a superior officer, the snow
clouds halted and rolled back,
and the sun, as bright as the
spirit that watches over our des-
tinies and as warm as the heart
that loves us as his own children,
shone over all,

“That was just another of
Stalin’s daily miracles, com-
rades, this time to show us how
easily he will deal with our’
enemies,

“The charwoman who shouted
‘It’s just

what the weather |

The People Of Barbados.XI

. had three wishes—to

“We have all heard of the
phrase ‘He spends money like a
man with no arms.’

“This describes perfectly the
condition of a man who avoids
settling a restaurant bill if
somebody else is likely to pay.

“He does not care to admit
jpet he is a lick-a-penny skin-

flint, but so deeply is this in
stinet’ buried in his mind that,
at the sight of a bill, an uncon-
trollable physical reaction tem-
porarily paralyses his arms,
keeping them out of his pockets.

“In other words, he does not
want to spend money, a conclu-
sion that could be reached only
by a trained psychiatrist.

“My advice to girls who are
waiting at the church for a
bridegroom with buckled legs is
to send her relatives to hog tie
him with ropes and bring him
to the altar on a stretcher.”

Into Battle

WHEN I was very young, I
e a church
bell ringer, to drive a tram, and
to shoot flies with a tiny gun.

A good fairy, disguised as a
manufacturer of insecticides, has



the Moor, spss were wack,
threw up its six or r eight hands
and died.
* * *

Another one-second burst fin-
ished a second bluebottle, and
there is no doubt that I would
have routed their main army
with 100 per cent. casualties if
Lottie had not attacked ‘without
orders.

She not only trapped a third
bluebottle on the window pane
with her paw, transferring it to
her mouth to consume under the
table, but got in the line of fire
and held up the attack.

Although I brought down the
wasps with accurate ack-ack
fire, the fourth Dluebottle
escaped through an open
window.

At a court martial to be held
shortly Lottie will be charged
with disobeying a lawful order
while on active service, eating
the enemy in defiance of Queen’s
Regulations, and with conduct
prejudicial to good order and
military discipline.

The findings of the court will
be promulgated.

LES.

By John Prideaux

“SLAVERY”

THE introduction of the Afri-
, can as a slave to Barbados,
appears to have just taken place
without any definite record of
the exact date of its commence-
ment. In June 1823, a Commit-
tee of the Council consisting of
Messrs; Ren Hamden, Nathan
Lucas and John Rycroft Best
was appointed to inquire into
the then state of Slavery in Bar-
bados; and Dr. Lucas records
that he endeavoured to co
ute the history of the intr
tion of Slavery and the encour-
sent held out to our ancestors,
as well as to they themselves,
by the Mother Country. He
states that the report became
voluminous, and was sent to
England for publication. Dr.
Lucas quotes — “it is not now

can be amended and that Bridgetown shidowes Nop “crowds. in Rede
should bear the corporate name of “the Square, but also on the noble.

West Indies.”

Dr. Lucas continues—‘The
first Settlers here never
dreamt of Sugar at their first
coming: They brought Eng-
lish labourers with them, de-
nominated “Christians” in all
Deeds and Apprisements, in-
dented to Serve for a period
certain. These serving their
indented time frequently rent-
ed a few acres of land from
the great land holders, after
the manner of England, for a

It is relevant here to describe
some of the history of the West
coast of Africa, as it is from this
quarter that most of the colour-
ed people of the West Indies
came. The fifteenth century was
the era of the great voyages of
discovery. During this century
the outlines of the coast of
Africa began to come into focus.
In 1482 the Portuguese mariner
Diego Cao found the mouth of
the Capes River in West Africa,
and in 1485 he sailed up this
river to the first falls, a distance
of 135 miles.

The Portuguese founded colo-
nies near the mouth of the Congo
and endeavoured to convert the
coastal tribes to Christianity;
but made only a few attempts to

Tales of Edward Lopez, a Portu-
gues,’ was published in 1591,
little was done to develop this
country. All Europe’s eyes were
turned to the New World, where
Spain was becoming fabulously
rich from the gold and silver
shipped from there.

The resistance to work shown
by the natives of this section,
(the New World), and the teach-
ings of the Bishop of Chiapa,
(see Article I of this series),
opened a the slave trade from

This also set in motion another
prospect of the slave trade, the
tribes of the interior went fur-
ther inland and fought other
tribes to bring back slaves to sell
to the coastal natives, who in
iarn sold them to the traders.
It is felt that these wars were
unnecessary and were only a
means of obtaining gain from
those unfortunate wretches who
were captured during battle and
brought back to be _ sold as
slaves,

In 1654, one visitor to Barba-
dos recorded —
“This Island is inhabited with
all sortes: with English,
French, Dutch, Scdétes, Irish,
Spaniards they bring Tues:
with Ingones and miserabell

ing as they find thayer bodie
abel: our English heare doth
think a negor child the first
day it is born to be worth
O5li, they cost them noething
the bringing up, they goe all
ways naked: some_ planters
will haue 30 more or less about
4 or 5 years ould: they sele
them from one to the other
as we doue shepe.’ (2)

Another visitor recorded on
the 12th of Noverpber 1710—
B Barbados Isle inhabited













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is 3 ? yearly money rent. Some of Africa. he English saw that
ste: Peas mr ahi is a purie aber try responsible for supervising the erec- these Leases are in~ my other nations were making Pree Sanat sai
and cemeteries and grents to charitable Papers: The _ profits were money out of the slave trade, ten thousand knaves Paints include : SUPERTROPICAL ANTIFOULING COMPOSITIONS

institutions.

Before prejudging the Vestry system
citizens must ask what is the record of
the Vestries in these respects?

The work of the Vestry with regard to
the relief of the poor and social services
can be evidenced from Vestry records
where it may be noticed that far from
standing still the expenditure of Vestries
has mare than doubled in the last ten

years, and that no less than 50 per cent.

of expenditure has been applied to poor
relief and social welfare,

With regard ‘to roads the excellent road
network of this island has for generations
aroused the envy of neighbouring West
Indian islands and the admiration of visi-
tors from every quarter of the globe. The
Vestries’ road record stands very high.

Only someone wholly ignorant of the
conditions of burial grounds and ceme-
teries in other countries could seriously
complain about burial grounds and cem-

tion of the Eagle Hall market will no
doubt have consulted with contractors as
to the type of building best suited for
erection at Eagle Hall. But the standards
of building in Barbados though deservedly
high are based on traditional styles
designed for ages where pressure of space
was not the important consideration it is
today. What is needed at Eagle Hall is a
market which will not only free the shop-
walks and street corners of hucksters, but
which will allow the free entrance and exit
of motor vehicles. Nothing,will be gained
if at Eagle Hall the cluster of hawkers
along the sides of the streets is replaced by
parked rows of cars, lorries or other
wheeled transport.

The planners of the Eagle Hall District
Market must plan for customers who
arrive on wheels as well as by foot. A
parking place will have to be provided or
a free right of way. The actual design of
the market is also important.

An attractive market at Eagle Hall will

trifling, the cultivated plants
for sale Tobacco Cotton.

“But the Civil War in Eng-
land soon produced a new
order of things, introduced the
Culture of Sugar, with it
Negro Slavery.”

“The Mother Country forgot
she had Colonies; and the
Dutch monopolized. the whole
trade of the Island, import and
export.—From the voyages of
the Dutch West India Com-
pany to the Brazils, they came
to the knowledge and value of
Sugar making; they supplied
the Island. with Sugar Canes,
Mr, Drax with the model of a
Mill and Works, and imparted
the art of making Sugar. It
was very soon found that
White men could not stand the
field culture and manufacture
of Sugar, even if they could be
procured in ent num-
bers; and Negro Slaves, as in
the Brazils, were substituted
for them; and besides, the
pride of Freedom creates such
a difference of Rank, that
White Labourers, no doubt,
would not condescend to work
in the field with them.”

“It is reasonable to suppose,

and they followed the Portu-
guese traders in this respect. The
Portuguese had long recognised
the importance of Gambia, and
had established several trading
posts along the river of the same
name. The English followed
their example and annexed
James Island, a waterless spot
ten miles up the estuary of the
Gambia, and turned this island
into a fortress. They later set-
tled at Bathurst where they
could more easily control the
river. The trade, all in slaves,
ivory, beeswax, and gold dust;
opened up the overland routes to
the North and East and gave rise
to. settlements on the river which
became the ports and terminals
of the caravan routes.

The enslavement of the Afri-
can in the English colonies was
nothing exceptional in the his-
tory of the world, as slavery in
some shape or the other had
been the common law of most
nations in most ages; so the ex-
istence of the slave is no special
shame or blame to our forebear~
ers. In many states of society
the doom of slavery may have
been a reprieve from death
either as a prisoner in warfare
or as a Wrongdoer sentenced for

Religion to thee’s a
Romantick storey
Barbarity and ill gott
wealth thy glo
ll Sodom’s Sins are
centered in thy heart
Death in thy look and
Death in every part
Oh! Glorious Isle in
Vilany excell
Sin to the Fe any
fate is Hell,’’¢

The Quaker movement was
one of the first of such move-
ments to abhor slavery. George
Fox, the founder, visited this
Island in 1671, and records in
his journal how he councelled
the Quakers on this Island to
train their slaves up in the fear
of God, and to require their
overseers to deal mildly with
them, and not to uSe_ cruelty
towards them, as was then too
often the custome, and after a
certain number of years of ser-
vice to set them free.

John Smith, a Quaker visit-
ed Barbados in 1742 and re-
corded—“They have Abund-
ance of Negroes on this Island
some of their Estates in the
Country having upwards of

nou PrP ww PY

‘ Nf 200 of them. Nay I was told
d that the Dutch being the Capi- pti. “oni bist seal y

teries in this island. improve the appearance of a part of St. talist, possessing Ships and ih SPE OCTET Bstates ‘had woe we
Michael which stands close to the most Manufacturies, and Settle-e —_It_is believed that the huge t

Can it be that the outery against the
Vestries wherever there has been an out-
cry is based on a misunderstanding of
what the Vestry system is?

W. Eric Jackson in the book mentioned
above notes: “there is, of course, a certain
type of elector who thinks that because he
once voted for a candidate, this gives him
a right to ask the candidate (when he be-
comes a member) to use influence on the

widely used highways of the island, Tour-
ists ought to want to visit the Eagle Hall
market. If it is attractively designed and
surrounded by shade trees they will make
a point of going there,

The Vestry of St. Michael’s is no doubt
aware of all these points and will be giv-
ing them careful consideration before the
plans for the district market are com-

ments on the Coast of Africa, |
which England had not; as is”
expressed said by Anderson.”
in his Commerce, ‘in loco;’ didt
not bring Slaves to us, ‘after
the manner of the Portuguescy
in their Colonies, and receiv
payment in Sugar. This is
the most reasonable conjectu

of heir first
here; for both General and
Local history, to my know-
ledge at least, is silent; an
all that we can now gather
from Ligon, and Anderson,

introduction 9

portion of the slaves brought to
the West Indies belonged to the
first named category. For more
than two hundred years this
horrible trade continued, the
West coast of Africa was de-
populated not only by the expor-
tation of its men and women,
but also by the wars and re-
sultant famines and plagues
which were a by-product of the
slave trade. The white settlers
and traders armed the coastal
natives so that they could go into
the interior for slave raids. The



Negroes and they use them
coarsely giving them hardly
any thing to Eat but a pint of
Corn a day for each Negro and
a little Salt.” (4)
(To be Continued)
1. Lueas Manuscript Vol. 1.
iscellaneous, pages 42—
45. B.M.H.S. Journal Vol.
X, pages 15—17,

2. Henry Whistler’s Journal of
the West India Expedition,
1654. Sloane M.S, 3926 Brit-
ish Museum. B.M.H.S.
Journal Vol. V p 185. ‘

3. BM.HS. Journal Vol. xv,|



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BEFORE







elector’s behalf. pleted. It is possible, however, that the ag zoe a, found oe ee ogee x page, 50. aetna
There is a general feeling that a mem- existence on the staff of the Governor of in existence, are — silent.”1) * and battles were often furious. page 83, ’
ber exists to serve the interest of the elec- the Windward Islands of an Executive ay east AFTER
tors, and it is not always easy to determine Architect who was partly responsible for
whether a member, in doing a good turn the town plan of Castries may have been OUR READERS SAY 3
for an elector is serving public or private overlooked. That executive officer periodi-
interests.” cally visits Barbados on official business. “Less Docile” “that if we had a less loath- “less docile” . The whole sentence | $ Every Bottle of

Under the present safeguards by
which membership of Vestries is restrict-

|
\

There seems no reason to believe that if
his advice were asked as to the type of

markets to be established in Bridgetown |
and its suburbs,

It is unfortunate for Barbados that
there is no office of ‘town and country
planning in which all the requirements of
a district market could be outlined by a
competent architect.

The government of Barbados has offered

To The Editor, The Advocate—

some people”, 4
Mr. Editor, do you think any

should read ‘ ‘if we had a LESS |
DOCILE people and a more poli- |

tically conscious people, it would | ¢




GODDARD'S GOLD BRAID RUM

SIR,—In part of the report of politician so personally irre- :
ed and qualifications for voting are based market jmost suitable for Eagle Hall it aa speech in the House on Tues~ sponsible as to refer to his peo- ba retihaent ed oe lead-| IS 3 YEARS OLD
aa sae a ade ; ; alt Si gt Ua day, it is stated in one sentence ple as “loathsome”? The words |
on payment in the previous year of paro- would not be readily given. that I referred to the people so erroneously misquoted were V.B, VAUGHAN, | %

a









SUNDAY,

JUNE -22,



1952



Ten Days Under Canvas;

If you look very closely as you_day the flagof the Barbados Regi-

Nearer to
the casuarinas stands the armory

drop down from
Hill towards the
country: you will

Cherry Tree
flat Belleplaine
see something

bright and shining among the
fat pork shrubs. It is the silver-
painted ater tank which the

HighwayS afd Transport Depart-
ment have erected for the Bar-
bados Regiment whose ten-day

camp at Walkers’ Savannah ends
this morning.

To enter Walkers’ Savannah
you must’pass the country house
of Barbados’ only lady member
of the House of Assembly. The
approach to the savannah is along
a dusty/cart track just tolerable
for motor vehicles in dry weather.
On “both sides of the track tall
prickle-studded cacti grow at in-
tervals: until close to the camp
there is a profusicn of «mall sea
grape trees. Walkers’ Savannah is



ment flaps in its place.

tent and still closer is the tent of fer it. Prowler guard mounts at
the quarter-master, the important 1815 and the retreat’ is ceremoni-
tent in which is stored quantiti¢s ally sounded in the presence of
of meat, tins, vegetables, garden all the camp at 1830. Supper is
produce, and bacon from the near- served at 19.30 and the canteen
by bacon factory at Gregg Farm. closes at 2100. A bugler blows
Meat and ice are kept in a large first post at 2130 and last post at
ice box. Across the way from the 2200. At 2215 the lights which are
quarter-master’s ration store is supplied by the camp’s own gen-
the cook house, built under the erating set are out. That was the
easuarinas from wooden frameé= camp routine on Tuesday last
work boards and galvanise sheets week when I spent two hours
which belong to the Barbados away from the heat and bustle of
Regiment. Within this half-open Bridgetown.

kitchen ‘huge wood-fired stoves

are used to cook for two hundred
men. The soldiers’ dinner, tea and

supper is served on tables placed
nearby and
heat of the sun by the cool canopy
of casuarina foliage overhead.

A stone throw away is the bare

protected from the

SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



























Swimming in the pond, football
in the open pasture near the tents
or deck tennis for those who pre-

But a
“camp routine

slip of p per labelled
gives little idea
of the soldiers’ strenuous activi-
ties which cannot be conveyed by
block letters typed on a piece of
*. During the two hours I

ent in the camp soldiers were
going through continuous motions









PAGE NINE

)





nh 4. \

a



a

To lighten
J our step pune
and your budget

wonderful
{ristoc » /

Yond.



















a natural bowl which lies at the rolled up tent.of the medical or- laden with rifles, tin hats and Y free as a breeze in these

foot of sloping hillocks on the derly where daily sick parades are field packs. beautiful nylona by Aristoo, who are specialists

land farthest away from the sea held. Behind the.mess tables is ; : open '

while _ tree fringed sand dunes the eae nteen which is They were learning how to in fi okings exclusively. Their prices gre almoat

shut off its view of the sea. As opened three thines a day -and. camouflage 1 ves behind the shamefully low; but their value is high . .. so high that

you look straight ahead towards where soldiers’can consume liquid neighbourin pe Eushes: some Tho London Fashion Designers specify thet their models wear Aristoc at th
Chalky Mount you will notice a and solid refreshment in excess of of them were called upon to ex- ddenkinn} achiathicinn, Thana ere shadaa sé sohaevers mood. Gilad with avers
glade of casuarinas which lead to Official rations. tinguish a fire: while others were stip dreaa ... Pay yourself the subtlest of compliments

an enclosed pasture where cattle busily preparing rifles, Brenguns |

for slaughtering are being reared At night. a prowler guard of and mortars for Wednesday's all get several pairs as quickly as you can
by an enterprising American who twelve men keepS watch on the day excursien to Snipers Valley

hails from Texas. Beyond the
fenced-in pasture land there is a
natural Jake or pond in which
officers and men of the Barbados
Regiment have been swimming
daily for the last nine days. The
water of the pond is not as entic-
ing as the nearby sea but is free
from. dangerous currents. Oppo-
site the casuarina trees as you
face the direction of Pico Te
iffe is the treeless savannah cle

sleeping camp. Cut off from the at the foot of Chalky Mount.

the aristocrat of stockings





George Huaite






ar-









loaned by the Department of
ing on which the sand coloured Agriculture and — the electricity
bell tents of the Barbados Regi- lignts and other camp in tallations
ment have been pitehed. Oppo- erected by the pioneer jfatoon

site the tents a large Union Jack

Will be wanted nO more and will
sways in the breeze.

have to be. collected. After spend-
jug Wo hours at Walkers I could

On visitors’














hoi help. regretting that more of
he island's young. male popula-
tion Were unable to experience
tne stimulus and good comrade-
ship that has been felt by the
200 members of the Jarbados
Regiment in this year’s annual
c mp

But the success of this year’s
camp will give a much needed

fillip to the activities of the Regi-
ment and maybe in a year or two
4hke annual camp will be spent in
neighbouring St. Lucia or St.
Vincent,

A MEMBER of the Regiment
LOOKING DOWN on the camp from a hill behind. To the righ: is the casuarina grove.

stands guard in a tour of sentry
duty.

rest of Barbados in this natural The soldiers have not been
tree bordered savannah the sol- having an idle time at Walkers.
diers of the Barbados Regiment But there has been some fun to
have been spending ten days of prove the adage that all work and

recat |
os A |



crowded life.. Roused from their no play makes Tommy dull, A
bell tents in which they have camp concert and sports ended
been slumbering peacefully in last week's activities and the 2 y Z
groups of seven and eight by a Band dressed in their colourful d
bugler’s shattering reveille call at. Zowave uniform provided music nee give you no anxiettes
5.30 a.m, soldiers are ready YY for visitors to the sports and
inspection at 0630 and breakfast prought brightness and music to j
is served from.0700—0745, és the community centre at Belle- | There need be no restless nights, no tears, no baby disordera,
‘The day’s routine begins with plaine. | ,
Crea at0800 and the first break aon ) if you have Ashton & Parsons Infants’ Powders handy,
- pf fhe day, is at 11 a.m, Dinner It really is an ideal site for a \ Mothers all over the world have found them soothing and
is served at 1246 and the day’s military camp this Walkers’ Sea- |
ONE BYE the “hour; one eye"*faratle @nds At Y615, Tea is ready vannalh and it seems 3 ow coat } cooling when baby is fretful through teething, and, best of all,
tells the mee rae tee there is” from’ to-day. me woter pipes | they are ABSOLUTELY SAFE.
INFANTS’ POWDERS
}
'



TP/akla









| Your
| Greatest

Alessing
Is Good

A SECTION relaxes by doing various chores
town by reading the “Advocate,

One soldier keeps ‘au fait’ with what is going on in



BY THE WAY..

- By Beachcomber













HE word “Périgueux” falling ogainst the rich in P&is, which | Vohu-Bohu
on my ear, I recalled how, in, kept, and have in my desk to th |
the Place Francheville there, I day. For he distributed copies of MAN who sneered at.a hor H lth
once watched a man who was it, and we all howled the ch A was Wicked’ by the hor 1} ea
trying to sell bootblacking, hard To ptove the excellence of his Quner and promptly kicked t! |
by the statue of cld Bugeaud, who polish, "he poured water over horse The horse then kicked Good health is the greatest asset a man or woman
fought as a sergeant at Auster- young = man 5 shoes, and then owner, The sneere jeered at ti can have in fact, it is the only REAL asset. It j
Ms blacked them. The result was nil, ie: but was kicked by the | depends on good living habits. It is doubly assured |
but the young man bewitched, | a: ON; Owe ) both: tate, thet| by a REGULAR visit to a physician. We stand ready
Froduoser One thing, #f a time, bought a tha, Wi ee ; a aes a upc iy { |! at all times to fill all prescriptions written by your |
ee ly : t ah ; gy lir hea one t} ’ own doctor ot
Myself: Then here is a blow Prodnose: What a_ pointle vo men li n eos. Be sure to send us your next prescription and be
IP oe ates Sateae aes a snd ioe es de eae ye assure of pure drugs compounded with accuracy.
This salesman’s patter was Myself: Not at all. It will in- pay to let people sneer at yt
ending, and he even sang a song spire commercial travellers. horse, e







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PAGE TEN



THE ROMANCE BUCKINGHAM PALACE—-PART 6

The King’s

When

A FEW days before the bombs
fell on Léndgu and Buckingham
Palace became one of the first
buildings te_receive a direct hit,
the King and-Queen were enter-
taining 300 “disabled men tc a
party infthe garocns

The sirens sounded and the
King, though afraid that some of
the men might resent being
asked to take cover, ordered
them to shelter in the Grand
Hall.

He was surprised to hear late:
that one of the men had said:
“Oid Goering deserves a vote oi
thanks for this"-—‘‘this” being
the chance of seeing the inside
ot the Palace,

On September 8, 1940, a time
pomb fel on the Palace, It ex
ploded on September 10, The
King and Queen were at Wind-
sor and nobody on the staff was*
*hurt, but tons of masonry were
sent hurtling right over the roof
into the Quadrangle and almost
every window in the North Win
was blown out,

Glass, soot and rubble coverec
the private apartments, includ
ing tne Royal bedrooms anc
advessing-rooms, the _ King’:
baiconied workroom and the
Queen’s bow-windowed drawing-
room.

The steel diving tower in the

swimming pooh (it used to bt
the Nortly Conservatory) was
twisted out of shape and the

glass roof of the Picture Gallery
lay shattered? on the floor—as
nearly 100 years before, it hao
been smashed during a frea.
hailstorm.

No Quarter

Next day the King and Queen”
returned to the Palace, .
s dil

were uninhabitable,
bomber Gropped five bombs on
the Palace.

Two exploded in front of the
building between the railings and
the Queen Victoria Memorial,
two in th» Quadrangle and ons
on the floor of the Chapel

This last bomb made a hole
in the roof orly two feet in
diameter, but it did so much
damage when it exploded that
even today the Chapel cannot be
used roe

Queen -Vietoria’s Bible, in
which all Royal births had been
recorded. 6 and since her
reign,

All the Ne oibiows in. nie Chape"
ante-room were blown a
ithough life-size portraits of the
ex-Kaiser, the last Tsar and the
late Emperor Franz Josef of
Austrian were w

As elsewhere, the blast had
freak etects. Im a corridor a
ae painting of the

Cambridge was pitted with
broken glass and fragments of
masonry, While a ©
mirror hanging on one side of
st was untouched

The dive-bomber itself was
shot to pieces by Spitfires. One
member of the crew baled out
but his parachute failed to open
and he was killed on a roof not
far away.

Meanwhile
Que

the King and

cn had scarcely time to in-

spect this second lot of damage

to ther chome before they had
‘ et off on a tour of blitzed
London to visit other homes that
had been. bombed.

sits
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The following Sunday
Palace was bit tov the wura tun
while the Hing and wuce
again at Winasor,

In March, ivei, three bombs
dropped on tne rorecuurt aha
two on the North Loage, killing
phe of we policemen On auty
ihe porter wo normally occu-

By

the

nm Wes

plied tne Lodge was Sale iN a
sneiter and nis Canaries and biue
persian cat Were rescuea from
se febris some days jater

No Lifts

Finally, a V-i explodca in the
grounds in August 1944, wreck-
ing We summernouse.

there were, of cours », shelter
helow the Palace — converted
basement rooms which had Ww be
approached by stipulated routes
to avoid congestion on the stairs.

The King and Queen, like
everyone else, had to walk dowu
to the shelter as no lifts were
used during an alert. At first
inyone in the Palace when a
raid began had to stay until the
All Clear as the outer gates were
closed, but the rule was relaxed
later when raids were more often

on” than “off.”

No Frills
The shelter prepared for the
King and Queen had been a

sapherpaicts sown and was fai
{ rately equipped than
might be imagined, It did not
in the least resemble a sub-
terranean, State apartment.

The flowered wallpaper was

. faded and a large service sink
was exposed to view. Rugs
partly covered the linoleum
Nooring and a plain deal table,
normally used for sorting house-
hold linen, made a dressing table
for the Queen,

Two long crimson-brocaded
sofas and a pair of armchairs,
brought down from upper rooms,
sat oddly in these homely sur-
roundings.

There was a small, round gilt
table with a tea- tray laid with
two white cups and saucer:
each bearing the Royal crest

@ was an electric kettle
for making tea, Patience cards
for the Queen, a radio, some
magazines laid out in orderly

array by a footman, bottles of
mineral water, glasses, torches,
notebooks and pencils—in fact,
much the same little collection
ot handy items which the aver-
age householder gathered into
the room where his family might
most safely await, the All Clear.

No Favours

There was also a telephone so
that when the took shelter
he could in touch with the
outside world.

After the outbreak of war the
Royal household and staff were
quickly sane The staff were
called up their age groups,
there wine “no reservation” for
Royal servants,

The King’s valet, who became
a Guardsman, and his chauffeur,
who joined the Royal Horse
Guards, were seconded for duty
!o the King. This was the most
convenient arrangement, as the
King’s duties often took him to
ureas banned to civilians, so that
his personal attendants had to
be members of the Services.

Throughout the war the King
wore the uniform of one or other
of the Services,

Simple war-time menus were
served—the Royal family was
subject to rationing e the
general public—and so of the
money saved was used to pay
allowances to staff in the Forces,

-
|

FACTORY INSPECTION

Don't let
Inspector
napping.
Commence
fence
} Machinery.
We can

prices that

competition.

CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner Broad

| -



the Factory
catch you

around your

supply
EXPANDED METAL at



Was Bombed !.

Other money saved Was in-
vested in National Savings and
subsequently handed to the
Treasury to off6et payments due
to the Royal family urder the
Civil List.

To the Palace during the war
years came a constant
of the nation’s heroes:
survivors, Battle of Britain crews
and men of the Bomber Squad-
rons; Eighth and Fourteenth
Army men; commandos, para-
troopers, an@ men from the
Normandy beaches, Arnhem and
the crossing of the Rhine; sail-
ors from submarines and con-
voys; men and women who
fought on gunsites, in bomb dis-
posal squads, Civil Defence and
Home Guard.

No Courage

And with them came wives
and mothers, fathers and sweet-
hearts, for each was allowed to
bring two guests.

For some of the men decor-
ated, the ceremony was an ordeal
as well as an honour. In the
presence of their Sovereign some
found themselves wanting in the
courage they haq not lacked in
the face of the enemy.

..1t is not recorded, however
that any tollowed tne example
of the Australian who, arriving
at the Palace to be decorated
durmg the first Werld War, was

To Buckingham Palace came
Queen Wilhelmina with nothing
but the clothes she stood up in.
Another exiled Sovere; King
Haakon of Norway, his
letters directed to the Palace
Post Office so that his own
address might be kept secret.

The Princesses paid only occa-
sional visits until the King
learned that the end of the war
was imminent. Then he brought
his daughters back to Buckiug-
ham Palace and on VE Day, as
the crowds surged up to the
Palace gates, the Royal family
came out on the balcony, where
they were joined by Mr. Church-
All.

No One Knew

Princess Elizabeth wore the
uniform of a junior officer in the
A.T.S. In the last few weeks of
the war she had been undergoing

a driver's tr course during
whieh she drove for the

pk a time, ean Hill
with “L” plates on her vehicle, |:

On VJ King and
Tatcenr “hite Wie “danaheses

inconspicuously dressed with
searves round their heads ana

unrecognised even by the people
they Tubbed shoulders with,

slipped out of the Palace by a
side entrance and mingled with
the cheering crowds.
Meanwhile, two heavy lorries
escorted
had bro
art treasures worth hundreds of
‘thousands of pounds.

But reinstatement of the
Palace its pre-war position
was a slow process that even to-
day is not complete.

Next Sunday

The wedding of Princess Eliza-
beth and the Birth of Prince
Charles. How Queen Mary
searched for lost treasures in the
Royal homes. The Royal post

office and the policemen who pa-
trol the grounds of the Palace with
their dogs.

now and

the

defy

& Tudor Sts.

armed police i
t ‘back te the Eolace



SUNDAY ADVOCATE
‘hiicaicpciiadeatiaa eee.

Life On All Levels Laid

On For The Sultan

By EVE PERRICK

SULTAN OMAR ALI SAI-
FUDDIN of Brunei Cioense)
C.M.G., has come to England t
‘view some aspects of British
tife.” And he really couldn't
have chosen a better vantage
~~. to view them from.

me, just Sasa

guineas a week) he can look out
scaped sites lt
course, swimming souk "vee
urten-

ances of luxury hotel

The opposite window looks
trim, tree-lined avenue of semi-
detached villas.

of one window and 1 sne Se Se land-

baths and other cost

down a social step or two on a
For the ruler of the Empire’s

biggest oil State (£6,000,000
worth produced last year), is
staying in the suburbs, in an

hotel on the wrong side of that
chic county Surrey, and missing
by the merest mile or two the
stigma of a London, S.E., postal
district number.

‘Contrasts

The hotel’s history is not
unusual—a monastery before the
Reformation, private residence
of a brewer-king before the first
world war.

Today it is a place of startling
contrasts. His Highness on the
way from his suite to the dining-
room (if he doesn’t get lost
again in the corridors as he has
already done once) will pass the
15th century mantelshelf in the
lounge which bears the trophies
that proprietor Alan Sanderson
(who owns a_ lubrication oil
business) won car racing.

The cloakroom leading off
from the carved-panelled foyer
(once the chapel) is carried out
in that modernist motif which
looks so much like a Neapolitan
ice-cream.

Would his Highness
learn about speedway stars ?
Host Sanderson (who owns
three speedway tracks, will talk
for hours on the subject.

Dog-racing ? Sanderson owns
two greyhound tracks.

like to

Would he Yke to meet a per-
sonality to liven up the solemn
scene of bridge-players intent on
the game ? Well, Orson Welles

stayed here-on his last visit to

... YOu

CEMENT

England. So did “Oilbeat
Konew, the woman ship
magnate. Pat Kirkwood is 4

regular week-ender.
And on Sundays the sultan
- get a glimpse of the Brighter
Younger Set) who crowd the
driveway with their sports cars,
swim im the pool (at 5s. a head),
apd buy ices and soft drinks
from the hut on the edge.
Incidentally, how did the sul-
tan come to the hotel ?
He was recommended by
sultan—of Rocke wie stayed
there last year.

er possibly many,
before—and you will be able to
buy a head of the Duke of Edin-
burgh for which he has posed.
It happened this way. He
commissioned artist Vasco Laz-
Be ie Se, 5 bronse. pans of hint,
destined f apart—
ments in > Palanan lace. This is
now nearly complete—final sit-
takes place on Monday —
Lazzolo has also made an

Lazzolo found the Duke rather
a difficult subje¢t: ‘‘He’s too
#o0od-looking. Uglier people, with
irregulaxy features, come out
best in seulpture.” But he was
a good sitter, although inclined
to spoil his pose by laughing or
jumping about,

Anyway, the work
have turned out well. Prince
Charles came intg the room,
saw the head and said imme-
diately: “That’s Poppa.”

Just Fabulous

RECENTLY I watched the
most expensive cabaret act in
the country (£1,250 a week is
the likely figure). And while I
concede that Miss Hildegarde
Loretta Sell has talent, charm,
and personality in equal propor-
tions, it seems to me that Hilde-
garde’s is a success story with-
out much visible means of sup-
port,

So I went along to see Anna
Sosenko, who is Hildegarde’s
manager, clothes-buyer, director,
lighting expert, organiser, and
writer of her signature tune,
“Darling, Je Vous Aime Beau-
coup.”

_ She sums status
simply with “We’re partners.”

It you can spend ten minutes
with Anna and not be hypno-
tised intéd believing that her
partner is the most beautiful
and talented performer in the
world, your powers of resistance
are stronger than mine.

Miss Sosénko, daughter of a

New Jersey boarding - house

keeper, is a dark-haired woman,
Page 11

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22, 1952

A new name to couple with Tyrone Power, Gregory Peck, and Gary Merrill,

ARLENE

“+ bmidievin| MISS NEFF ARRIVES THE M

ILDEGARDE NEFF,
Hollywood's first Ger-
man star since Marlene
Dietrich, flew into Lomdon
yesterday for a five-day
visit. a
In 18 months Miss Neff—
tall, ash-blonde, slim, and 25
—has been given the full
Holiywood treatment and
the top Hollywood stars to
Dlay opposite her.
Her léading men include
Tyrone Power, Gregory Peck,
and Gary Merrill.

Said Miss Neff last night:
“Tm really relaxed when
I'm wor » So for the past 18

months life has been relatively
simple. I only find things
hectic when I have to do simple
things, like pack a case or buy
clothes.”

Miss Neff turned up yester-
day in a white linen skirt und
black silk jersey top. Said she
“I bought them in seven
minutes. I don't waste time on
clothes.”

How did it all start for her?
“I went to Holiy-
wood first nearly
four years ago
under contract to a
Producer who was
unproductive, «Isat
around getting a
suntan but nothing
else.
“So I went back
to Germany Ww
make a film there—
and then,.of course,
I was wanted
immediately by
another Hollywood
company.”

She made
“Decision _ Before
Dawn” in Germany
for an American
company. and was
mptly discovered
Yr a second time.

In America now
her closest friend
is Marlene Di¢trich—although



second Dietrich,

Says Miss Nelf:
the plan is not to build her as a only one Marlene.



=]

Dietrich in her early Hollywood days.

“There is
I wouldn't

even try to follow her.”

London Express Service

TROOPING THE COLOUR

By BEVERLEY BAXTER

Arrayed in morning coat,
striped trousers and a grey top-
er, I made my way to the
orse Guards Parade and took
my seat in one of the specially

erected stands. The occasion
was the annual Trooping the
Colour (not Colours) by the
Brigade of Guards, and on such
occasions London pretty well
knows off work.

It was a summer’s day of

sheer perfection, with only a few
wisps of clouds to remind the

sun that it was not the only
occupant of the skies. On the
great historic parade — ground
stood the Regiments of the

Guards in their red tunics and
huge bearskins, It was their day
and they were ready, for it.

But there was the Household
Cavalry as well in their gleam-
ing breastplates standing against
the background of the tush
green trees and the shining lake
of St. James’s Park. As a con-
trast the massive bomb proof
stone walls made ;the adjoining
Admiralty Building look like a
beleagured aneédieval fortress.

From the Mall came the
cheers of the crowd and the
playing of the National Anthem
as the procession made its way.
In the'first carriage were Queen
Mother with the tiny Princess
Margaret, and it was good to
see the Queen Mother smiling
again. In the second carria
was the Duchess of Kent with
an escort,

And then riding side-saddle
came the Queen, wearing the
hunting skirt and tunic of the
Scots Guards as she is their
Colonel in Chief. Her horse
which belongs to the mounted
police is named Winston and
we were all hoping that the
animal would conduct himself
with a gentleness and a decorum
not always associated with his
political namesake. I am _ glad
to report that the four legged
Winston behaved perfectly,

So, as the Queen sat on her
horse, the regiments of the
Guards wheeled and marched to
the music of the massed bands
and to the hoarse commands of
officers. who sounded like tor-
tured souls in Hades. The whole
thing was done with a perfec-
tion of precision that no thea-
trical spectacle could emulate.
Once again the English were
demonstrating that when it
comes to pageantry there has
been nothing to equal them
since the days of Ancient Rome.





——

EXECUTIVE...





The logical mind might ask
what all this parading and man-
oeuvering have to do with mod-
ern warfare. What meaning
today have these redcoats and
ridiculous bearskins? And for
that matter of what service
could these massed bands be
with their brassy pomp?

Perhaps the answer might be
found in the Guards’ memorial
silhouetted against the trees of
St. James’s Park. On the base
of that memorial stand the
figures of four Guardsmen in
service uniform and on _ the
monument are the names of the
battles where in two world
wars they fought and died.

Again the logical mind could
protest that other men with no

military background and in
units of no_ special lineage
whatever also fought bravely

and.died..Of course that is true,
but it does not alter the special

mystique of the Household
Brigade.

Surrender?
Let me tell of an _ incident

that happened in 1941 when the
British and Commonwealth
forces were driven back into
Tobruk and completely cut off
by Rommel’s troops and the
Italians. The Commander of the
beleaguered troops was a South
African and he took the view
that since“organised resistance
or escape were both impossible
he would surrender so as to
avoid unnecessary slaughter.
Accordingly he issued orders to
the commands of the different
units to destroy their arms and
transport and prepare to surren-
der. 3

One of the officers to receive
this instruction was a Colonel
commanding a Battalion of the
Coldstream Guards. With the
utmost courtesy and promptness
he sent to the Commander a

sssage couched in these
terms: “I have carefully studied
the Book of Army Regulations
and cannot find any way in
which a Guards Battalion sur-
renders”. Bravado? Yes — but
it was magnificent,

Taking their own decision he
and his men fought their way
out of Tobruk with terrible losses
but the remnant reached the
main British Forces and reported
for duty. Were there enough of
them to make any difference?
No, Is it not a fact that men
were killed and maimed in this
mad gamble against hopeless
odds? It is certainly true,
















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HILDEGARDE NEFF ... From Germany for the full Hollywood treatment,

But

the remnant that got
through

brought with them a
legend that will live for ever
or as long as there gre regi-
ments, They brought a legend.

So in the presence of their
Colonel-in-Chief, they trooped
the colour, which means that
they dedicated themselves to
the honour of the Brigade. But
beneath those scarlet tunics
who are tihese youngsters?
Welsh lads who have come from
the valleys to try soldiering as

a job; Scots who want to see
London and foreign service;
Cockneys who think that it’s

probably a bit of alright and
want to show off to their girls
in the Park, Heroes? You'd bet-
ter not say that aloud,
Grouse Natural

They grouse as all soldiers
do. They have nicknames for
their officers and blasphemy for
their N.C.O’s. Over and over
again they ask each other what
all this perishing spit and polish
has to do with chasing Malayan
territorists or pushing the
Chinese behind the 38th Par-
allel. A British soldier who does
not grouse would be a phenom-
enon of a deeply disturbing
type.





But even if they are not sure
just what the Battle of Water-
loo was about they remember
that as the Grenadiers formed
squares to meet the desperate
attack of Napoleon’s elite, “The
Old Guard”, that Wellington
issued the order that every man
was to hold his fire until he
could see the whites of the
Frenchmen’s eyes.

On came the French sending
death and mutilation into the
British ranks, without a single
musket barking a reply, The
British had their orders — and
were they not the crack regiment
of the line? At lastthe order
came. Against the withering hail
of bullets the brave French
troops were stopped in their
tracks. Then there was the com-
mand “Up Guards and at ’em!”
And with a roar of fury and exal-

tation the British swept forward
Napoleon saw it and said: “C’est
finis’ and the cry went out:
“Sauve qui peut!” Napoleon’s
Grand Army hag become a
rabble.

But surely all this talk of
glory and discipline and esprit

de corps is merely to exalt the
vile thing called war, and to
bemuse young men into think~
ing that there is something
splendid in giving and taking
life in battle, Is not war the
supreme blasphemy of the
human race? Is it not a denial
of all that civilisation means,

and a denunciation of the
brotherhood of man?
It is hard to answer those

questions, just as it is hard not
to feel that they speak the high-
est truth, But there is one thing
worse than war—the weakness
of a nation or group of nations
which permits an aggressor to
attain such superiority in men
and arms that war becomes in-
evitable. Hitler and Mussolini
were the sponsors and architects
of the 1939-45 war—and history
will hold them guilty for all
time—but their accomplices were
the bemused idealists who cried










Mobiloil

socomy vacuuee

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



“Peace! Peace!” when there was
no peace; who put their trust im
the League of Nations but re-
fused to give justice its sword:
who denounced Chamberlain
when he gained time at Munich
and accused him of selling
Czechoslovakia down the river
Self-righteousness, pacifism and
hypocrisy were the three hags
that set the cauldron boiling.
Coming Of Age

My son was 21 a few weeks
ago, and in England the coming
of age is a great event in a fam-
ily no matter what its social
or financial position may be.
Clive asked if he could throw a
party and, in due course, gath-
ered about forty girls and boys
of his own generation.

With the exception of two or
three who are first completing
their University education, the
lads had all done their national
service. In other words they had
completed their two years train-
ing in the Army, the Navy or
the Air Force, Most of them had
acquired commissions in the
process. Now they are civilians
but at stated intervals they must
undertake refresher courses ana
will be called to the colours at
once if war breaks out.

They had not been brutalised
in this process of training,
rather have they been human-
ised, All had to begin in the
ranks which meant that they
mingled with young fellows
from every walk in life. The
miner’s son slept in the same
hut with the rich man’s son and
they learned to like and respect
each other. The unfortunate
divisions of school background
that have done so much to keep
class distinction alive in Britain
have been narrowed by the
democracy of service.

We have seen the repercussion
in political life. The most power-
ful support that Churchill has
today is the Young Conservative
movement. Their military ser-
vice has taught them organisa- |
tion, responsibility, team work
and a realisation that the gov-
ernment of the country concern
them closely. Without this in-
fusion of young blood the Con-
servative Party might well have
sunk to utter impotence in the
six years of Socialst rule.



These boys have nothing in
common with the jackbooted, |
strutting idiots who followed |
Hitler as if he were the Pied
Piper of Hamelin. In under-
standing they are older than

their years, in outlook they are |
serious, but in spirit they are
gay and confident.

Some of them who were at
Clive’s party will go into the
Brigade of Guards if war comes,
and will come under the influ- |
ence of the Tradition that I have
described. Some will join the
Navy, others the Commandos,
and even more of them the Air
Force, They have no hatred of
the Russians or the Chinese.
They have no wish or longing
for war. But if it comes they
will be ready instead of having
to let others do the work while
they train.

Despite the alarums and ex-
cursions of Central Europe we
do not believe that there will be
an all out war. It will demand

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PAGE ELEVEN







American Column

By R. M. CacCOLL

Says the New York Herald-Tribune of
General Eisenhower's return to
last month, and of his upsurge of
toral strength: “It has been an astonishing
phenomenon, matched only once or twice in
our history—this sure, spontaneous turning
of a great portion of our people towards a
man whom they desire to place in the high-
est office in the land.”

Headline—“Britons are said to regard Taft)
as a foe. Eisenhower as a friend.”

While most makers of “consumer durable
goods” have long faces because of slow busi-
ness, one group is gleeful. Power-driven gar-
dening tools, which save elbow grease, are
booming. In ten years sales have jumped
from £2,850,000 annually to £ 42,860,000.

The tough old “Flying Tiger” turns up
again. Maj-General Claire Chennault, now
in business in the Far East, appears before
the Senate’s Internal Security Committee to
give the law-makers hints on Communist
techniques in his part of the world.

New York’s chief magistrate, John Mur-
tagh, who is tough with people who break
the motoring laws, produces his toughest
ever sentence. To jail for 30 days goes Wil
liam O'Neil, a New Haven (Connecticut)
lorry-firm official. He must also pay a fine|
of £785 for ignoring 84 different parking!
summonses in two years. And if O'Neil fails)
to pay up—he must stay in jail a further)

swe LIFE ON
ALL LEVELS

@ From Page 10

anu spectacled,




YOU CAN TASTE
THE CREAM _

America

WAY

¢

elec-



CADBURY’S

DAIRY MILK CHOCOLATE

for STUBBORN hang-on Bronchial

COUGHS
coLDs

| CURES AS SWIFTLY |



the greatest restraint and judg-
ment to prevent it—but those
qualities have been developed in
the harsh years that followed the
fury of Hitler’s war. In the Far
East the situation wersens almost
daily but we in London doubt

that Stalin will encourage China Plump

who

to make a full scale attack against looks rather like Bessie Bunter)
the United Nations. if you can imayine — that
We cannot see the distant schoolgirl grown-up and wearing

jade silk and “Carnet de Bal”
perfume. To discus® her tale of
triumph with her chosen star
she will use the royal “we”
“Of course, you may not
Us but you have to admit
Hildegarde is just fabulous
after all, you can’t go on fooling
the people for ten years

why Noel Coward said to us in
New York, ‘Hildegarde, you've
brought dignity to cabaret’ .

scene, but because the peaceful
nations of the West have dared
to look the truth in the face and
have refused to weaken resolu-
tion with pious exhortations and
smug self-righteousness the
hounds of war may not be un-
leashed,

But if it comes the Guards
will doff their bearskins and ex-
change their redcoats for khaki
once more. determined that the

Like
that



laurels of the Brigade shall not > Were you there No. ?
wither in their hands. With She was absolutely fabulous
memories of Arnhem the Com JURE PAnUOMs,
‘ "he? rds © oil Come to think of it fabu CA
mandos will le NA LA ‘GEST
and with the oaaer ee ie Geek lous is the word for Ann: DA'S R
of Britain on their wings the , So Misguided SELLING COUGH
young cavalry of the air will ride WHY IS IT that, year after
into battle, while the Navy be- Ye8, the Englishman will sit AND COLD REMEDY
gins once more its historic out a hot-spell in his winter
isentry-go of the sea. woollies? Tell him that tweed
™ “he ale shane ia jackets and flannel pants are |
‘ ele rope, their jonging 18 really no cooler than serge
for peace, but they believe that suitings, and why doesn’t he|
peace can only be maintained wear linen or rayon, or even |
through strength, That is why seersucker cotton, he'll answer
we were deeply moved _ this that such things aren't done
morning when to the music of over here.
the massed bands the Brigade So the temperature goes up,
slow-marched past the Queen the skies are blue, the trees | MIXTURE
carrying the colour to which they jare green, the flowers are |

were dedicating their courage, blooming, the girls are gay |
their loyalty and their youth. and only man is vile. —L.E.S,
EEA ue



tan



Yes, Sir, but
‘stop and starV motoring

increases GORIROSIOIN

Business calls may be part of your livelihood, but cial properties of Shell X-100 Motor Oil
they’re a menace to engine life. As the engine | enable it to neutralise combustion acids and make
cools, acids and moisture produced by combustion
are allowed to condense on the cylinder walls and |
corrode them. Research has proved that CORRO-
SION is the major cause of engine wear.

Sne

| it cling, forming a protective film over working
Acids settle on this film but cannot pene-
cannot damage the metal underneath,
| You must PROTECT the engine.

parts,
trate it,

change *°

SHELL





LN OLE A TEI NL ETE ESATA ERAN NEEL NN ASE NENINN CERNE AEDES SIMBA ES AAR THIEN, RAN ES SRS Sh Ah ES A EON TORRE ARRESTS SOR



A Oe ee le

aa eisai aS
RA TTI LL DLA NAL ALLAN

PAGE TWELVE
AGRICULTURAL REPORT

| May Rainfall

THE following are notes on the work of the Depart-
ment of Science and Agriculture for the month of May, 1952.
The rainfall for the month of May, 1952 was slightly



t

t



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Below Average

filler press mud were taken from
he Codrington observation triais
for nitrogen and phosphate analy-
is (4 determinations were made).

tance of the Co-operative Officer,
will be responsible for arranging
the programme. All co-operative

below average and the distribution eee the —, 25. Two hundred weights ut en Ese to tone vee

day on which island-wide rains were experienced was the technical urea were received for Course of the ee ae

21st. use in the nitrogen experiment

According to rainfall returns centage of these eggs parasitised at Codrington on the new cane 31. General Progress. The
received from 29 stations, typi~ by Trichogramma, variety B.4744. A comparison of registration during the month of
eal of all rainfall categories of th 13. Sugar cane dead hearts sulphate of Ammonia versus urea three co-operative societies has
Island, the average tota| rain- (numbering 2,300) were cut from (sprayed) will be made, and leaf given a fillip to the movement.
fall for the month was 2.84 inches various fields and dissected in the samples taken to follow leaf

The average tota] for May, 1951, laboratory for larvae or puparia

was 2.07 inches and the average of the D, saecharalis larval para- 26. Foliar Diagnosis. One hun- the groups already formed, Re-
for May for the past 100 years site Lixophaga diatraea. None dred and ninety-five phosphate, was 3.13 inches. The approxi- were found, and it would appear 13 nitrogen and 25 potash deter- assistance in establishing societies
mate total fall for the five that despite a long period of fav- minations were completed. All in st. George, St. Thomas and
months, January to May, 1952, is curable weather, this parasite leaf samples taken from sugar st Andrew.
9.75 inches, the total for the has again failed to establish it- cane manurial trials last year
corresponding period for 1951 self. have been completed. ll. FISHERIES
was 29.65 inches, “oO ie: teats 27. The samples taken during Vv a

2. The highest total rainfall , Cane Root . ©O% this year in connection with (a4) 39 During the month of May,
for May, 1952, at any of the above borer grubs and young brown routine sampling of commercial F % |

hard back grubs were found in
many fields examined, The dam-

29 stations, was 4.41

inches, re-
corded at a

station situated in

of

the highlands of the parish of 9%¢ caused was patchy, and only take of nitrogen by cane under $45 058.29 repaid to date. Pre wi |

St. Peter, and the lowest was |!) @ few cases was it really seri- irrigation when sulphate of am- standing balance to. the end of

1.49 inches, registered at a star %48 in young plant canefields or monia is applied before and after ay is $45,853.86, A

tion in the parish of St. Luey, vatoons, It is impossible to irrigation, are now being carried ~ 33 Interest collected for the

3. Sugar Cane, The majority of ©*amine all fields 2 = out, It is hoped to sample the j,onth amounted to $2.12; this
e

when damage is
ground (usually early in
year in dry weather), but the
damage can always be found if
looked for. Similarly with the
mealy bug Neorhizoecus and i's

sugar factories completed grind-
ing operations by the end of
the month, the remainder expect
to finish early in June. Informa-
tion has been received that the
quality of the juice improved dur-

Vv

28. Meetings.
genera! meetings of co-operative

nitrogen trends.

cane from two fields at the Pine

at 3 weekly intervals and (b) up-

manurial trials during June if the
the rains come in.

There has been a marked increase
in activity and enthusiasm among

1952, a sum of $1,590.88 was re-
paid by boat-owners against
This makes

makes the total
date, $1,112.43.

interest paid to

I. CO-OPERATION

Eleven

34. Fishing during the month
has been steady and returns from

regular

i ‘ “ = societies were attended by the most centres have shown a mark-
ing the month, but field yields @ttendant: Fa tei ant Acropyss. Co-operative Officer during the ed imprevement over the last
remained below the original These pests which damage the ponth. year. This condition was espec-
estimate. According to the latest T° of canes in the fields can

have only one effect, namely, the
lowering of the total tonnage of
sugar cane which is reaped.

15. Introduced Predators
Parasites. The predator Pyro-
phorus luminosus or large fire-
fly beetle has been active earlier
and in more extensive areas than
in former years. Other predators
and parasites have also been
found established.

16. Food and Garden Crops.
outine examinations for insect
pests were carried out and recom-
mendations made.

returns received. from sugar fae-
tories, the 1952 crop is now
estimated to be the equivalent
of 167,000 tons of sugar.

4. The young cane crop, al-
though showing signs of the lack
of moisture and being much
more backward than it was at
this time last year, remained in
fairly good condition.

5. Food Crops. As was to be
expected,” the supply of ground
provisions continued to be very
limited during the month. This
shortage has been caused by the
late planting of these crops dur-
ing 1951 and the consequent poor
yields which were obtained, The
late planting was due to the ex-
tended harvesting of the sugar
cane crop. The planting of the
hew yam crop was begun during
the month, and a number of fields

17, Wood Ant Control. During
May, three government buildings,
six private buildings and various
eanefields were examined. A de-
monstration in the treatment of
termite nests was also given.

en ‘ . IV. BOTANICAL
potatoes, Pianted to sweet 1g. ‘First Year Seedlings, The
potted seedlings in the cisterns
Il. PEAS ‘UL- were planted out during the
aaa month. Two thousand of these
2 were planted in a_ first year
3 . . seedling short season trial, while
am Agriculture in the jineteen thousand, six hundred
. i ial is and forty-nine were planted in

. Extens ~ Gi € the nursery.

Peasant Agricultural Instructors 19, Maize. Trials, Three strains
Visited 1,490 peasant holdings of hybrid maize were planted

and 23 school gardens during the
month.

(ii) Members of the extension
Staff assisted the Co-operative
oe, at 10 meetings of co-
operative gro eld r
on ups hi ay ing the

8. Crop HusbamdryseA)l . Ste-

tions had completed the reaping of
the ripe cane crop by the end of

out at Codrington during the
month in a 4 x 4 latin square
trial together with local seed as
a standard. The ipoosted strains
were heavily attacked by cut-
worms and buds almost as soon
as they emerged, and are unlikely
fo ‘be of Use locally. ;

Vv. CHEMICAL

May. Preparations for the plant- 20, Irrigation Investigation.
ing of food crops were wel] in Further determinations of soi
hand, At The Home, Sayes Court wilting point (13) and nylon
and Groves fields were ploughed }lock/soil calibration (18) are
and laid off on the contour. At being carried out.

other Stations hand cultivation 21. Six nylon blocks were

was carried out. Crops of yams,
sweet potatoes,

buried at the Pine (Central Live-

Indian corn, stock Station) in connection with
rounceval and cassava have been irrigation water application con-
planted. trol, and soil samples taken for

: calibration purposes in the la-
9. Livestock (i) Livestock at In this connection the

boratory.
new ‘post hole’ type auger re-
cently received for the purpose
of ‘quick burying nylon_ blocks’
was tested in the field. The soil

the six Stations at the. end of
May, including cattle, pigs, goats,
Sheep and equines, numbered
136. Three hundred and seventy-

29. Registration,
eties were registered during the
month, These were the St. Bar-
nabas Co-operative L
Society, Leeward Co - operative
Savings Society and
Co-operative
Society. The date of registration
of these three societies, the first
registered under
Societies Act,
same, 9th May. The formal pre-
certificate of

Hall

wo be
operative

sentation of
registration to the
Society by

the

Three

St. Ba

the Registrar touk
place on 22nd of the month,

30. Co-operators’ Day.

year as
Credit Society,

usual,

celebration of Co-operators’ Day,
it is expected, will take place on
the first Saturday in
official anniversary of
operative Movement.

posed that the celebration should
be observed in the colony this
The Shamrock

with the

EDUCATION NOTES:

Reasons For Changes

LAST week I devoted this column to the publication of|¢

Marketing
Welchman
Marketing

the Co-

July, the
the Co-
It is pro-

ially noticeable on the south, east
and north-western~ fishing cen-
tres, while flying fish has been
relatively sparse on the western
section,

Soci-

35. From all indicatiorfs, {t is
expected that the flying fish
season may well run into August
(weather permitting), as very
few flying fish in spawn have
as yet been taken.

36. Progress with the boat re-
placement programme at the
Reef continues and ten boats nave
been skinned up to the bends. It
is not possible to complete any
of these boats, as lumber of
larger sizes for beams, benches,
bends etc. is yet to arrive from
seurces of supply. This lumber is
expected shortly. In the mean-
time,. progress is being maintain-
ed with
be built
available.

is the

rnabas

The

up from stock now

assis-

the present system of grading schools in the United King-

dom. Whilst I do advocate a method of regrading I should|%
like to see the necessary variations made which would}?
afford the maximum benefit to the local child
I must em
any change
against a”
pulsory education, I am net con~
vinced that the cost will be so
prohibitive or that it will be im-
find accommodation
for the number of children not
now oh the roll, I have heard all
the arguments used against the
introduction of compulsion and I
am still of. the belief that the
basic education

possible to

value of a pro
for every mem
munity

phasize however
which I Pete that
ckground - teacher

system ¢
advantage. And T do not want it! ¢%

of the

opulation.

to point out
on of the pupil
would be a distinct

that can ees T should
the reintrod

to be understood that the hon-
orary system is ever to be consid-
ered,
for any Government to ask young
people to work sometimes up to
to five years without any pay-
ment, I advocate a system where-
by pupils of the Elementary
Schools could be drafted into the

com- teaching service.

cannot be measured in

terms of £.s.d, The small num-
ber of people who once clung to
the fallacious belief that the lack
of proper education increased the
ranks of menials must have learnt
by now ae it also increased the

Vocation
I have found that in the major=-
ity of instances the teachers in
whom a sense of vocation can
easily be recognized are those who
came in under the Pupil Teacher

. 4 ne unreasonabl s : does

one gallons of milk were pro- must be moist for satisfactory Sr eat it is lepcostiie "te fore at ay ieee ‘hee i

duced and 12 Young pigs sold use of this auger, but if too wet, argue, something in the four years’ train-

for breeding. ‘ puddling of the sides and bottom {t is to the eredit of Hon, Mr, "8 which seems to mould them
Gi) Stud services paid for at of the hole occurs. This latter Douglas Pile thet he ius dinsven: into what is needed.

the Stations were as follows: factor is most undesirable from ed that one of the basic needs of The drafting of those who hold

| son oe — 83, Nat's, et the aspect of quick seen education is to enable people to Sonam Certificates at =

» making a al of 431 tive soi s in be »e in proporti t nD
a ive soil moisture equilibrium in be able to distinguish — between p oa te the num

the region of the block.

22. The soil thermometer re-
ceived for use in soil tempera+
ture effect on nylon block read-
ings is eminently suitable for
the purpose. As the green house
in the Department has now been
completed, a series of comprehen-
sive pot tests have been planned
to investigate both soil tempera-

il, ENTOMOLOGICAL

10. Moth Borer Control. Dur-
ing May 79,772,000 Trichogram-
ma parasites were bred and
69,801,000 were liberated. This
brings the total bred so» far this
year to 230,327,000 and the num-
ber liberated to 201,536,000,

Il. The average count of cane

internodes damaged py moth ‘ure effect and quantitative water
borer was 8.6 per cent, which is ‘plications. :
Well below the general aunusl 28: Three soil samples were re-
average. ceived from the Cultivation
Officer in connection with greea
12. Counts of moth borer eggs house moisture/growth experi-
laid in entomological plots «at ments for laboratory determina-
Codrington were continued to- tions.
gether with counts of the per- 24. Manures, Two samples cf



—————— I

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5654, S :
ih", 1”, 114", 134”, 9?





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USS or NC
LW & aw oF fy 9 BLY BAP
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ad eset...

*
Â¥,

the obviously false and the pos- °!
sibly and it was

to say

it ina

the Legislative Council,

Counting the Cost

A correspondent wii *
warranted ‘estimate o 2

powers recently raised Oe point
it

of

of recurrent expenditure,

I have to

financial lica any and had it abandoned in Trini
changes I vocate, I am not The meeting of teachers at which
going to follow the bad example ge-grouping was discussed and

of many
Departments and damn

a scheme ed by 56 teachers.
by easuming the role of financial A Farce
‘ao oe og oe plat me now tell the public the
. . e& Elem
this important detail. But if I Pe ae t.
——____..,

LOUIS

Heads of

give due weight to the
tions of

THE REFLECTION of
depends on the quality. This is what
you were asking for...

We Have Just Received . . .

Lane

Phone 3909



his

OODODO ODS» #

5 ae School under the Pupil Teacher

Suttle Wiscudehcas in

System.
In Trinidad

T am not

own duced because the present

pected.
which condemned age-group:

fine crystal

“STUART CRYSTAL”

Crystal Bowls, Sauce Jugs

Sets of Water Jugs and Tumblers
Candlestick Holders, Vases,

in the most pleasing patterns.



These Items make Ideal Gifts
and the Prices Fit Every Pocket



SEE US AT ONCE!

L. BAYLEY

OF

and Aquatic Club Gift Booth

Phone 4897

(<=

ESPs

such sections as can)

t is absurd and dishonest 2

surprised to find the
Teachers’ Unien of Trinidad advo
cating to the Government that the
Pupil Teacher System be intro=

system
has not juced the results exe
t was this same Union

accepted in Barbados was attend-

SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 1952



|
















































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Make yours with
CANADA DRY

Quinine Water

Phone 4541 For your Requirements
& Enquiries
















|







|

|



STOKES & BYNOE LTD—AGENTS. sees

Canadian Decorated

Glassware
A beautiful assortment

just opened including —








‘a PENT, PONY & COCK-

TAIL GLASSES
WATER SETS
JUGS—-ASHTRAYS ETC,
















GeneRAL FTAARD WARE svPriirs

RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office)



PHONE 4918


















EASY MONEY!

REDIFFUSION offers a commission of $1.50 in CASH
tor every new Subscriber brought to and accepted by the
Company. Commission will be paid after the installation has
been made . REDIFFUSION will in addition pay a Bonus of





ANNUAL HOLIDAY

Ovt CUSTOMERS and FRIENDS are asked to note
that our WORKSHOP will be closed as from Monday,
16th June, 1952, to Saturday, the 28th June, 1952, inclu-
sive, for the purpose of granting our Workmen their
ANNUAL HOLI AY. ;
Arrangements have been made for emergency work
to be undertaken during this period and the receipt
of repairs and delivery of completed work will be
continued as usual,

Our Merchandise Department and Office will be open
to business as usual.

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LID.

White Park Road.
St. Michael

MONEY in your spare time.

$25.00 to any perso: who brings in twenty-five new subscribers
relax wr

within one calendar month who are accepted by the Com-

pany, Get a supply of Recommendation Forms from the
FOR BETTER’ LISTENING

REDIFFUSION office in Trafalgar Street and earn BIG
Hear it at Trafalgar Street.

















ARE YOU SURE
——
YOU'VE GOT
THE RIGHT PRESCRIPTION?
With machines human or otherwise it’s @ wise
precaution io make sure you put the right stuff in the right place.
Esso Industrial Lubricants are made to suit every.
industrial need and, to ensure the best results, Esso Lubrication experts
will visit factories anywhere in the Colony to. advise, free-of-charge,

on lubrication problems. Why not write to us today ?

lt pays to gay

INDUSTRIAL LUBRICANTS

|
$|









SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN
a na EE unitate enema Cll LL LLL A LLL LALLA LLL LLL LLL ALLL





HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON










g IS ‘
a +4, \ ¢
wey fe

By Appointment
Cin Distillers
to the Late
King George VI



BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES

my
—"" a BUT MARK SEVERN
= Swe SWORN THAT
aa S Jit 1S STILL |
SHA ’

ALIVE...

+--+. BUT BEFORE WE COULD
MAKE AN ARREST ~THE
SUSPECT DIED ~
iN AMERICA...3

| SO THE FILE
WAS CLOSED



—
| =













DAGWOOD, COOKIE SAYS HER TOOTH
HURTS-- BEFORE YOU START YOUR









SHELVES, I WISH Pcesitl
YOU'D LOOK va. |
AT IT S Gea}

ISIE



IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

A. |
“| Berita) |
ASA |
It. oF



SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only











SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Branches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street



Usually Now

Conf FR cee. css a
POTATOES, —3 Ibs, 15 40 onfectionery Dyes ...........00 § 13

cma Sweet Orange M’lade—2-1Ib 51

: tk alt 3
iH Oye ear 7
3 | . ’ y. bo a . PSs
a HY DAN BARRY
a DUTCH CLEANSER 34 30 Strawberry Jam—2-1b 1.01 >
= , Sweet Corn—20-o0z. aouss 48 |
THis "BRUTE MAD j 77 a CHERRIES—per bot. .... 82 T2 Sweet Corn—16-0z. ....... . 20 Is
x ‘RE,TORO: f Ne wawe eS iy Qian
5 } ie: aby ' . WA e Peaches—16-02.....0.....ccccccceseeseemeeee B40
; ‘| f , KARDOMAH COFFEE 95 80
5 re | H 4 7 r : ;
i 7 4; a f. : , e - Se |

—



I CAN M
USE OF THIS
LIPPERY ICE!

CREAR VR ARMIOIIG GG ieb ven iosedasdinciven: svaspassbectosedboos verve 65
Guavas—16-02, 0.0.0... Saliva) 32
Pears—16-02, ..,..........660606 cece 1 Fee iadieiaeell A3
Apricots—30-0z.
Apricots—16-oz.
Grapes—30-0z,

PRUNES —Tins sik ‘as 70 60



il i

Z FLASH DISTRACTS |} 7
g THE CHARGING ;
T BEAST BY SKIDDING i,
ACROSS ITS PATH. || [i
1 wh 1%e KING PRATURES SYNDICATE, Ine, WORLD RIGHTS RESERVED. | J



PICKLED ONIONS. .........00065 15 70





THE COLONNADE GROCERIES

IT DOWN!

D Ca ; , > |
E IN WHENEVER 16S NO TIME c r r ~
YOU'RE READY, GENTS/ Oi Mm. TO WASTE! BREAK Fe ae Ce The Place Where Your Dollar Goes Further





Pag santinnsisiaaseenetep-ticeiiainaiad” sacathaisiaatinses ~
66, 6,6, 6,6, 64,6, 6,659
—PEOSOELEPSEP SVL PPP PARP PPP PPP PERL PDP PPLP?P?PPPPP LLLP






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5 WHAT ARE ALL
HESE PACKAGES?

SS SOSSS

*





PETROLEUM MARKETING CO (WEST INDIES) LTD

BRETTON HALL, 16 VICTORIA AVENUE, PORT OF SPAIN

ee EE VE

THE PHANTOM MOVES LIKE LIGHTNING;| | FORTHE LUVA+)WHATS THE DIFFERENCE?

DESTROYING THE SMUGGLERS’CAMP. ‘| |WHOS THAT A HESON OUR SIDE! LETS | | y
WS DRNADO, (remo HELP HIM! | Ke

( te ‘— yy 1 | ; NM |
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DISTRIBUTORS

DA COSTA & CO.. LTD.
JAMES A. LYNCH & CO., LTD.





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55504

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PAGE FOURTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE suMbay, stilt 24, 1052

GEASSIFIED ADS. wee? |, GOVERENT ene novice

SMa Bid MONEY by line ea’.|UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER| UNDER THE SILVER |
|

























































TELEPHONE 2508 | fusion in your # yet a ae '
ELEPHONE 250 s 3 pare time. Get a supp: HAMMER It's the
lof forms today. 6 52—20n. | BY instruction received I will sell on! MODERN FURNITURE £0-OP
caitess FOR SALE | ___‘ SS = | Friday Sune gts,"at Messrs. Fore Moy. on thursday ath by order of Miss VACANCY FOR CROWN COUNSEL — BRITISH DEPOT (Tudor Sirecs)
| al Ga fe, s Michael’ ow » a sda. p st |
Silt te i eeepc a x | PUNLIC SALES }10 hep. Morris Car. (Damaged in at | Cave we will sell the Furniture} HONDURAS for value, Reliability, and Capa
MARSHALL—To Sam and Joan 17th} ———. —_——_—__—_ | BS oa | Vincent Gn, ee = 8 em cope oe Applications are invited for the post of Crown Counsel, British Oar i hist of eieuaee wae.
ae ao —— aie AUTOMOTIVE ey . , os 22.6. 58-—4, | lesen Sideboard, Floor Lamps, Book | Honduras. Se come and visit our Showroom
Port-of-Spain 22.6 52—in. —_——— | and Ornament Tables; Rockers, sees | The post is : s and werkshop and be convenienc-
Saab Riodaer apanGhehiaee, Foren iioas REAL ESTATE UNDER THE DI |Gabinet Very good Flat Top Desk: Ss pensionable and carries a salary in the scale of ed at what you will receive here
DIED Stition sea Owner-driven, Ga | “ESAT TST oe, BE AGaR® ina Waggon: Couches, Berbice Chair, Round | $3,120 x 120 — 3,600 x 150 — 3,900 E.B. $4,050 x 150 — 4,200. The = is where your money =
a” i Dial 4476 12,6.52—t.f.n, | . ter S fe rites | Se pee Mahog-| point of entry to the scale will
BANCROFT On June 2ist - - ee ee ee ; R aes | rey cpatrustions received from Mra Tea Soon st oe 2 us. = perience of th oe 2 Up queiiieuiips end on Osa, art eoen the pond
her residence “Glencoe CAR—Dodge. Two | seater recently |ABROAD) AUCTION YOUR HOUSE. | [7m aids iil fell by auction at her] Pleces of old China; Fish Knives and | Wis e successful candidate. 2261 and we will be glad fo come
venue, elleville Ma overhauled New tyres xcelle . oar - s ype e next : ; i ’
Sancroft. Her funeral will leave the| working condition. Fihone 8419 ' jaa J ie CARS. TiBsION | “led, Sane Paddock” ie rece ee ane oe Radio: | en travelling on duty a subsistence allowance of $3.00 for +e yeh are $2—2n
above residence at 430 p.m. todas 22.6,52—d0, | WE MCSE sto OM eer | {0t" June at 12-30 p.m. her household | gytension Dining Table. and. Chatres | the first six days and $2.00 a day after the first six days, is paid. HA ,
irae Gp recinl toques. N° | - Gan Vaden Welox, le wend [BE CHARITABLE AND 1 AM WITH |S "Yush, chaine, anes eae chairs. | White Painted “Table; Planters Desk, | The appointment will be on probation for two years in the first
lis E ; xtae n sosadinettl p ‘}YOU, I WILL GIVE A_ REASON-} ona di is ing desk | Congoleum; Very nice. Mahog: Sir ' inste ; ;
lis E Astor Ban « _ on, . Dial 4476. tend dinimg chair, p: : ’ ez ngle .
Phyl Browne t ni >wner-driven, good as new. Dial 4476, [ABLE PART OP MY ConMISSION TO | nd dintas folatnigesant, stands. collection steads,, Vono ‘Springs and = | Manet, 29 the office is confirmed in the appointment, he will be
Sek ee a rete eae AO, Oe PERSONS GIVING aa stand, larder, frigidaire, ’ ironing boaréi, amen. “waste ' Se een, eligible for admission to the permanent anid pensionable establish-
une 2ist 2 3 mode a electric double a Ps 9 ’ ~ . .
INS — June Set, A iliman Minx SUCH SALES. WHAT ABOUE, Tae |°!° plate, dressing lable, 2| Stoves Elee-Hot Plate; Toasters: | ment. In other respects the appointment will be subject to Colonial



good condition. Courtesy. Garage 4616. |\.GAncER CAMPAIGN"? SATISFAC-

single bedstcads and mattresses, ovep,'
19.6. 52—-3n =

Joseph Nathanie! Rollins

fare Press. Pt. Freezer; Ironing | Regulations and local General Orders. Free passages will-be provided





























































































































"i os forks, glassware, 5 pi:
TION, TERMS, CONDITIONS, AND! ‘”ives and , 5 plecemcon-| Hoard, ¢ Pr
years. His funeral leaves the teyibeniage eens ; voleum, rubber hose, bed linen, td, Copying ess, Firewood; and i ; ; Special Pencils for Shorthand ec.
ee eg ean votes GAR Ford Cons Wieck), in. perfect [PAYMENTS WITHIN “48° HOURS, | Ene Onc, 6 doz. boxes nen. 48 boxes, cy? dinar Wemths of Walae on first appointment and on termination of appointment for the officer| @ Artists’ ere et . 18e
GMS." Church and thence t condition 2nd done only et calles. BOUGH", HASTINGS." 22.6.52—In. | POx@s kas. 1 Apex érain bowl, 1 Swivel ANKER TROTMAN & CO. | and family not exceeding four persons in all. Leave with full salary # oe ae
; y 2aSO! 0} PS a ass clase i Seg Kaen 4+ eemnee ‘
E. Rollins (widow), Ruby. Sylvia}in Zngland. Can be seen at McKnearney| “Ry Navy GARDENS — A Very|"@" ite! ad tommeateme Saati aia Auctioneers is granted at the rate of 5 days for each month of resident service, Large Supply of Paints,’ Brushes
tdaughters), Everton (son, John | & Co. oF contact Mr €. E. Clarke |nesirable 3 Bedroom (with Basins & est. Terms Cash. D'Arcy A. Scott. Aue- 2 —————— | with maximum of 180 days. The length of tour is 2~3 years. Free .
Trinidad and U.S.A. papers, please copy. “= ae | agers) 8 fe ene, eee : cere UNDER THE SILVER passages on leave are provided for the officer and his wife, subject|% coicured ‘sheet Plastics for mak.
22.6.52 . ue yrs, . a -
s | EMaa’t dud" tandltion. Dial wis, | Rooms, 2 Rolle, Cdarawe, Servants| INDER THE IVORY HAMMER | HAMMER to the provision of funds annually by the Legislative Council. ing Bags, Ete. .
: ERD -— Gn eune zi, 1952, Mary 6.52—3) oom, verite . - ‘ondition, Candid
ies Shepherd. Her’ funeral witt| = ea ee ee |Back Yard enclosed with Stone, about} On Tuesday 24th by order of Mrs. ¢ On Tuesday 24th by order of Mr vabitenl ates should be a Barrister at Law with at least four years AT
leave her late residence, Deacons CARS—Morris Oxford Saloon Morris £3 100 ae alterna Only Under | Marshalt IT will sell het furniture at Trecthonete es we ee exioreg Se ee JOHNSON’S ATIONERY
: t 4.15 today for the]) Si sale “y 5 - Seaside |G , i” ” at “Parks’, § os gc i
Wea eee OL ae. are ete Renae” belclas, renaattobes | Residences, IN BAY ST. — One Seaside chides Table, Upright cha ete] hich x both mofern ‘and antique _The successful candidate will be required to pass a medical ex- and ARE
asked to attend Morris Cowley 10 Cwt. Pick-UP. For |j,,pedroom a Residence, Going | Morris chairs © with’ cushions’ alr ig] apd. incites: Round ‘Tip-top Dining | amination, He will be subject to taxation in accondance with local ;
Arley and Jeffrey Shepherd (sons).| good used cars see FORT ROYAL a ; ty Business Premises & | mahogany; Bentwood chairs, Liquor| 29b!¢-, Sideboard, Sofas, Card Tables Jegislation.
Beryl and Ollie Shepherd (nieces).| GARAGE LTD. Telephone 4504 eer yeg ak Are ag MAIN RD + }eage, Pictures, Books, Marble top a with brass claw feet, Standard Lamp b
2.6.52 13.9,89-—-6n | F*o ne. Sen, ae pind * ae ating, Mahogany (aressinis table. Linen (Carved Stand), pcsneraton ponkease Applications should be addressed te the Colonial Secretary, British
not aasbnnatacet Bike atrallbato ‘ype. 9s, 1-burner Va ; . or van vada en A
THANKS CAR—One Austin 10 h.p. car with two | Conveniences, Very Good | Condition, | Falks | stove "S Ove lee Bon, "Benes Tuble; Upright and Easy chairs, | #Mduras, to reach him as soon as possible and in any event not later
new 6-volt Batteries one standard 8 h.p. |O¥°%,8000 sa. ft. at antisite and other items, Sale at 11.30 a.m, Sete cae 1770. All in old| than the 30th July, 1952. sJ@ &
MARYNECTHe family of the late! in, Very good condition, C-R. APDIC- liyoe. Dial Sl, D. F. de Abreu. |iioneer on neent Grime, Ader aeq Service oe. “How Pots! set or “eat 22.6.52.—In.
iiiiam Waterman Alleyne of * ; ve 22 6,52—2n Auctioneer & Real Estate Agent, “Olive paca Rs Rati 3.) 4° Jorricks Hunting Print 2 has eee —_—L SS
Brittons X ‘Road, Saint Michae)|— “. | Bough", Hastings. 22.6. 52—In, UN Orts; Cordea Revolving Book case,
Beknowiedge with kratetul supret-|~GARne i ow —Auaiin 10 ha. | “Tempemrwrear DER 'THE DIAMOND |} iashor. Refectory Dining Table: “Old Ni .
tion the kind expressions ¥!%- | saioon fully licenced to 1953, new battery EENW and Avenue, Belle- HAMMER mahog. Tall Post Bedsteads with springs,

pathy and the useful assistance
rendered them in their sudden

ville, 2 Storey House with nice Jawn.
2 bedrooms. Gas & Modern Conveni--
ences. Phone G. Webster—5134 8 a.m,
to 4 p.m 20.6.52-8n.

" s Vone
By instructions received from mise’ ght Table no sereeae? ion
Lowe I will sell by auction at her house | vhite Chest of Drawers, Single and
at Rockley, ‘Ch. Ch. on Wednesday next, uble M.T. Washstands, Cupboards and
25th June at 12.30 p.m. her entire lot Reece Chamber ware, Cedar Press,
SPRINGVALE PLANTATION,— Saint}! household furniture which includes:— | Prigida’
Andrew. About 227 arable acres and about|1 large dining table, sideboard, mahog ;

60 acres in pastures, roads, ete. Mar-|tables, dining room chairs, Mahog. Doors),

and tyres. Condition like new, Reason
. a - {for sale — owner purchased Jaguar
bereavement on Sunday 15th June} co aisea Garage (1950) Ltd., Phone 4949.

1952. 22.6.52—-In 21.6.52--dn



: BLABDON

STEA HIP ‘ scoust | Caras and Passengers for e ce.
minic, 7
-AMSHIP CO. Nevis ad St. Kitts, Date of AFS, F.V.A.











ROYAL NETHERLANDS



The M/V.











BARROW—We the undersigned desire New Morris Model J Cab over Engine

, Eleetric Hot te,
through this medium to thank |: cwt. Vans $2,400.00 Larder t jot Plate
'

» Kitchen Cabinets (glass
les and Kitchen utensils.





those kind friends who attended New Morirs Cowley 10 cwt. Vans













































































































































































































£
!
funeral, sent wreaths, letters of con-! so 599 09 All excellent for fast light|##er’s House, Overgeer’s House, usuul| settee, Radio, chest of drawers, Sim-| Pye 6-valve Radio, Large Telescope SAILING FROM EUROPE Salling to be ares cA”
dglence and who in various wie be. | delivery. FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD, outbuildings, two horses, cart, etc. mons’ bedstead & mattress, dressing and stand Binoculars, Barometers, Ther-|M.S. STENTOR 27th June, 1952. anene Cargo “an. ‘Fosspemers tor
prea sympathy yy the death of Miss | Telephone 450+. 13.6.52—Gn. | » The foe Plantae « will be offered | table, General Electric Refrigerator, mometer, Chiming Clocks and other 44 HESTIA 4th July, 1952. Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat
Inez Barrow on Sunday 15th WAGON—One Oldsmobile Wagon in July next, Minloss Sreneuny ba y ate dele wae, Ea and Bo Terms \ A # Or SATLAN G ‘to ‘s0norE Bevis an Sty Mine. SEE FOR SALE
Thernnill re ee. tawde. working order. Twq new tyres. Apply | Private treaty. All inquiries should be | other items of interest. TERMS CASH. | f M.S. ORANJESTAD 15th July, 1952. ES eS, *
Pag __ SS 20 | gg bares, habe Bh “Eig Me (cance * “Satan SEA Dancy A. scorr, | BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO., |" SS 1) Taran PARA ARibo lS canine” wilt accept Cargo end eis
GILKES—The family of ithe, inte. Bose ies 7 Lucas Street, Bridgetown. 18.6.52—4n Ree. ' Auctioneers. M.S. BONAIRE 30th June, 1968, passengers for St. Lucia, St. SWEETFIELD, st. Peter — An
line Gilkes beg through this, media | TRACTOR—-One Massey Harris Tractor 52—4n 20.6.52—2n. |M.S. STENTOR lith July, ‘1952, Vincent, Grenada, and Aruba. } rg a t_of stone.
ears) ee ee is eeein Be bn pneumatic torte and half eae very with ant vee WE Seve ove ; S.S. CORMICS 38th wus see Sailing date to be notified. Freneh windatrs leading =
? ittle used. A anager Foste: feet a ee INID.
condolence, or in any way expressed | 5; kK. a dan tat fat Dayrell’s , Christ Church, The M.S. SPIGERBORG 28th June, 1952. BWI. SCHOONER sr tee. 3 Netveeen Nidan. Ones
sympathy ‘in their recent eave; dwelling house contains living | room, OVERNMENT NOTICES SAILING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO ASSOCIATION pee. 3 bedrooms, ‘kitchen. store-
ment. 22.6.52—1n. Sap, bedveame, Shendoaie, panel. fone 7 yas: @ist July, 1952. J Consignee — Tele. No. 4047 garage “and ‘ervenia wqueriere’ ;
at i venien: be Vi wi . LTD 1 . 1
INNISS.—The undersigned through this ELECTRICAL House ited eat lectin . iaveotied - eon SS die ’ "eeeegassssss —re many 2% acres well laid out
snedium inform their driengs that on application to the tenant Mr. Ince, LEASE OF AGRICULTURAL HOLDINGS AT S SS WEA ‘right, Of way over
r kind expressi Sympathy etween the hours 0: a. and 1 i » ;
oe som ayerecates we se be soccixed nay ares ¢ Garrard ontty, rane Pet near RAWELL Canadia N ti ] S BS Bathsheba Sub-
fully acknowledge a as ree spe utomatic angers at ¢ above dwelling h will*be set 5 5 asiri “ ‘ + t " Tr
Sa ieee the. passing of) B.C. 8. Mailel a: Go. tad, Reale Em: (up toh gic by vening ices weal ve at Persons desiring to lease one of the seven agricultural holdings n a 10na eamships 0 od built modern stone
ig woes Inniss of] porium 15.6,52—t.f.n, Onis, comes Street, on Friday 27th June | At Seawell, Christ Church, in accordance with the prescribed condi- ing fine Saw at thts “wild “and
Sreniebury ‘ instant at 2 p.m. tions of lease should ly i iti Sails
Kyle. Keith, Alban, Claude; Etta] PYE BATTERY SETS—Just a few lett. YEARWOOD & BOYCE, should apply in writing to the Director of Agriculture, soUTHB rocky coast. 3 good bedrooms,
' " 6. i EMPORIUM. , é i i OUND ving b .
Jasmine (¢ en) 22.6.52—In. | MAFFEI’S RADIO aie orn Solicitors. Se a ee ee of Agriculture, Bridgetown, not later than the 5th of ane Montreal Halitax Boden “Saco aes itoen, servants’ yy
aE rseagge eg coer wr aT ee 6.58—4.2.n. = 5 NELSON .. .. ., 9 June 12June 14 J 23 J 23 J garage.’ Electricity and main:
PERRY—We through this medium edhe ilolilmmineinatatnirdtiene [eee Lae Atnareae cian pe e une une 23 June ty 3
o return vhs te, Serre nt featt FURNITURE hg Triage re as a 4 2. Copies of the statement of conditions of lease may be seen { CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR © aime 6h = Stee tee att Sek ee
wreaths or im amy way expressed) No. 17 High Street, Bridgetown, on| at the District Agricultupal Stations and at the Head Office of the De- LADY RODNEY .. .... AL July W4July 16 July 2 July 26 July Sian VICQUE, QU. SF. VINCENT
in our recent bereave-| “CHATR—One Invali@’s Wheel Ghair|Ftiday the 4th day of Julv 1952 at} partment of Agriculture, Bridgetown. No applicant will be considered of local stone with sens 4
the death of Beatrice practically new, price $100.00 ply 2 p.m. *ho i view, only 3% miles un meee
22.6.52—10- | Trene Williams,’ St. Savour's | Village pie wy accel vty agra who is unable to comply fully with the conditions of lease. NORTHBOUND Arpives Sails Agriven Agtives Advives _Ancives town, 1 mile Golf Club, 100 yards
oe Hole St.’ Joseph. 22.6.52-—4n. Ineasurement Wath a situate As 22.6.52—3n. B'dos os «6 Bt. John «Boston «(alifax Montreal esate, Cun with >
MEMORIAM FURNITURE—Small — quantit a | ave Darden, ey ee LADY NELSO! July 2_ bathrooms, lo ¢
IN furniture, also carpets and vatitan “ato containing an open verandah facing CDN. cRUiSEn os usun 19 July Se 3 july * ug 15), verandah "Go 2th, tod
Reasonabie, No. Dealers. Tel, 3875, SU aghat a" Uanteme Sole, Path THE BARBADOS REGIMENT CANADIAN : usual o} .
, 9 ae i 7 5 pt, ba
nogen te loving memory ot may deat eee J £2.6.68—cin. | Tine hen ‘with garage and rooms for : ae eee % Jo ae ak fit 10 Aug. ESTATE HOUSE; st 7
- lied t ie Lal ah ‘Sond 1949 FURNITURE — Bedroom and Drawing | ‘Wo servants and with electricity n- NOTICE " sae : - e, 3 Ang, An imposing spacious home with
“Gene but nee forgotten Room suites of mahogany modern Merris | St#lled. Inspection = dial 4460. Por “ us quiet cool location
Let all on earth their voices raise,|Cesign. Kitchenette suite painted cream a a and conditions of By x overlooking .
and . All od sale apply — a
Pan ieee oe Stee leaving the isiand. Fe pertiewiare paone COTTLE CATFORD & CO. 20.6.52—8n Major O. F. C, WALCOTT, E.D., ~ nen 3 ay. Se tere ‘ ‘
alle * alleuia. 2 0.20048. eee Commanding Winey Mit, Raathre vous
and) Mes. I. E + -—-— 7 ; GAR TLL—Modern stone bungalow
“ t a Pe ners t, sik | “MAHOGANY INVALID CHAIR, Hart, PUBLIC NOTICES The Barbados Regiment. DINER AUSTIN & co, LTD.—Agents. with la living cenit, 3 bed- i
Mr. and Mrs. C. N. Weekes (Friends). | Pavilion, Hastings." 22.6.52-—1n. f ‘ooms, kitchen, toilet and shower,
22.6.52—1n Hae 1. PARADES nt verandah, detached i
MECHANICAL NOTICE There will be no parade on Thursday, 26 June, 52, The next par-}, REA : Auarec. $000 eg. 8 ot ground
FOR RENT a midi ‘ailet ie Bat ade will be at 1700 hours on Thursday, 3 July, 52. Further details ORS LI D position, with Gookdtenad vine.
week. These beautiful ee et Ds for aplelpet umpires | ‘an tent moeting i s ve poees later. public services,
y world famous Original Odhbner-Facit |/Une 4 p.m, at the Challenor Stand ; 2. MESS MEETING OFFER COVE
USES fron ial al ned steels All Umpires and Pers: ; : SPRING BOUSE, ST.
HO a + abla omy. in aches gu last you ohne ested are invited ' to mae me 8a an, pes will be a Mess Meeting of the Officers’ Mess at 2015 hours ais va eee ia ae pep unr og eo 4
_| time. Features include six extra char- on Saturday, 28 J 52. H r ® T FIELD } : \
du ry) une, 9 onorary Member comp uded
ti AESTeg Te qnanice a as AR acter keys and the famous feather touch NOTICE 2045 hours 7 a. may vatiend at Lovely Stone House, comprising upstairs: three bedrooms, large living eater eae, atte hea of
Bath’ Open Verandah facing sea. Suitable typing. To introduce these machines we| Ai male citizens of the United States . room, dining room, 2 toilets and baths, one with tub bath ‘and hot and about i¥q acres are Woll wi
one person (or couple). From July i x quote xo ihe lowest prices. BRAD-| between the ages of 18 and 26 residing M. L, D. SKEWES-COX, Major. cold water, gallery Downstairs: 3 spare rooms, kitchen and shower and could readily be conv
Telephone 2949. 18.6.68—t.f,n. | SHAW & COMPANY. _ 1.6.99-8--t4n, in Barbados are requested to, call at S.O.L.F. & Adjutant, yoom. Standing on approximately 2% Acres of ‘land about 100 yards {St Ans. Bt: Spectanie tudes, Of
I " a e American Consulate from July 1 to NPedted’ ’ rom Gibbs Beach nmspection by appointment. e ind. ie house o
BUNGALOW-The Modem Bungalow, Sewine Machine Is good condition, p= a1, 1058 for Selective Service Registration The Barbados Regiment. eiiataw STE gee oqnrenes ..natiggentg
“Beresford” laxwe oa ie > e iver itary ‘a > .
nished all modern conveniences from Ist ply Reliance Shirt Factory, 21.6.5: + | Service Act. ™€}St. Ann’s Fort, At Rockley New Road: on approximately 19,000 square 12 CE nd
of July. Ring Nurse Pilgrim from All male citizens of the United States| 21 Jun, 52, Magnificent view of Golf Course. Three bedrooms drawing and g iD. Caney
Monday during the day, Phone 6101. LIVESTOCK who attain the age of 18 sears sub; 22.6.52-—1n,{|| "20m, kitchen. Downstairs: Garage, servant room with bath and Mier ah wane Gun eamte
6, 52—2n uen ‘uly 31, are required 6,.52—1n. and tor Sonsirenige
CALVES—heifer Calves at Kingsland|to register upon the day they GER CREED CER | emo cerns neointima Sc a BOG SROMETY FORE, 26m RARene ee iushop. . ._, Large — Salery,
FURNISHED FLAT,—at Dundee, St.]Dairy, Dial 8325. 21.6.52—2n, | eighteenth anniversary of the day of ‘ BUNGALOW 3 bedrooms, .
Lawrence. Suitable for 2 only. Avail- their birth, or within five days there- rooms and a
able June 15th Onward. Phone 8240. DONKEY—Jenny for sale. Apply Mrs. | after. en e ou At Rockley New Road, Thtee bedrooms drawing and dining room, Offers in of £4,000 con-
1,.6.52—t.f.n.{| Gibbons. Phone 0117 22.652. For further information, consult the modern kitchen, toilet and bath. All built in cupboards. Veny close * cost £5,
a ee nie poentanianas American Consulate, Bridgetown, Bar- to Golf Course. The last available spot at this very popular residential at present .
LELAT & HOUSE Fully furnished, St.| | KITTENS— 2 pure bred, male Persian bados. 27.5.52--t.f.n, By Treating Gland area, Immediate possession, ck main een
wrence on-Sea. one 38503. iMtens — one cream, one grey. Phone— ; . , JAMES—Care-
29.3.82—t.f.n.] Mrs. Gordon Proverbs, No. 3394. NOTICE | erfumes Se So cos Of Ge eet Airactive sites
WAY, St. Philip Coast, fulty i Saeco re Estate of ‘Ss 1p Getting. be stehes, Durning genes. At Maxwell Coast Road. Three bedrooms with running water com- nd a ot
furnished,’ For July, — November,| One riding HORSE and three GUERN on0kes ae ees over i i: ae Ail ache at base of spine, groin and Good residential ares. Hxeellent sea bathing A" sound Investment at perma =
December only. Dial 4476. SEY HEIFERS. Apply Manager, Foste. sosaans. 2, world blend to leg nervousness, Cobcee the very low reserve price m â„¢ calm, sate. Setniad.
19.6.52—t.f.n.} Hall, St. Joseph, 21,6.52—Tn, Pane tavihe tee ae ey eta a its glorious and as of manly v1 are caused hei a , ¥ verandahs on both pie
wpe: » This silk- by a disease land WYNDAL
NEWHAV. G Coast, fully fur- or affecting the estate of GEORGE) #tr@, (@ most important sex gland in 4 servants’ quarters. services.
nixha Se or November, Delay POULTRY ARLINGTON PAYNE late of Clapham soft powder gives men). To overcome eeubied At Rockley, Partly stone and lath and plaster comprising three
ber onty. Dial 4476. 19.6 toot n - in the parish of Christ Chureh who died comfort and dainti- | Jn 24 hours and qui restore vig- bedrooms, dining and living room, toilet and bath, and a large i NEW f a
: ee ; POULTIRY—Twenty five (25) Imported e thie ai oo oe Deckaahier. 1961, ness to the most our and health, py ip ag The out buildings comprise servants room and garage. on Commodious with 3 bed-
ROOM—From July Ist at the Mayfair Hampabire Bullets 1 weer old. Ah, tre Sere Sa wee 4 sensitive skin. eee. called Rogena. No spproximately 10,000 square feet of land. This house is very close %0 eet a ee Lite
ssa ki . 4 'e' the $ . »
SNe Sop, Heirdresting ete. ‘Appls fen Dae hee ee Pe, Beer Of (ia) eoebuck Street, Bridgctewn, on r Weogena is jaranteed to set you Re oe et ey pantry, servants’ and
* jock . 6. . * " rT ING
at Mayfair 4 to 6 p.m. sg 52—In. | cr befake the Bist day of July 198%, after uticu Ud cee eee ow feel hae BUNGALOW ., 9908, sitaation: Rese
-b2—4 MISCELLANEOUS which I shall proceed to distribute years younger or money back. Get At Graeme Hall Terrace. Very attractively designed. Comprising
VER WATERS — Silver Sands the a of the estate among the parties TALCUM Rogena from your chemist, The three bedrooms with toilets and baths attached, dining and living rooms, NEWTON LODGE, MAXWELL
jam Ri pi. September 4 teds Saas eatitl < jo having resard to the wets guarantee protects you. : kitchen. verendah to the west and a nice patio to the east. Standing on COAST—Solidly constructed stone
e ANTIQ an and ¢ only © hich approximately ‘2 acre . f losed ~
with running water in each. Spring’ Glass, China, old Jewels, fine have notice and that £ not be : eee ‘Tastee, Cee, drawing =
boda. Fully furnished with all conven Satan. Sete Maps, Auto- | liable * assets = © Grutctes to oft seca! interest to BUNGALOW dining rooms, breakfast room, 3
niences. a -6.52—3n. a. rringes tique person whose or claim bedrooms, 2 etc. Lately
ce pres adjoining Royal Yacht Club. not have had notice at the time of such oe CABINET MAKERS spare room dining and Grnwing reoma, ane cloned goliey.” Goveruendut | core ©. cones eva
WANTED oa -2.82—t.2.n. distetbution Bien ia i, Wo MANE OR GLA: $s water, electric light installed. r ex able for or rent (furnished).
EAUTY SOAP. Bring out your Beau-| estat: are requ to settle thelt HA
ty with the Milk and Almond Oil in| accounts usec dee, AND CHROMIUM PLATED FITTINGS ni
HELP WILLOW" Beauty Soap. Get a few| Dated this of May, 1952, FOR SAME At Navy Gardens. Three bedrooms, 2 toilets and baths, communal annexe adjoining. M:
cakes today from your Supe, a TUDO! , Snr.) * ge ie Aine ot peste, ioe, and store room, 2 servants rooms pore large living and break-
a tart a nn reheat .6,53—9n. , in yai with toflet an 5 uundry room and garage. This is a last rooms, 4 bedrooms,
JUNIOR OVERSEER. Rowans LANIER: \ aaltepet entire | | etal ack agen decd. WE 7 7 MPO, lovely house offered at a competitive price. usual offices, garage ,
tion, Apply in Person. 26.6.52—-6n. aa sare —Atractive ery piece 4 $2—4n. Tr CEN 7 RAL E RIUM ‘ as at rooms. ‘Arnexe hse ‘wide’ verandah,
nner Sets in sever jesigns, ce E Vi living . 2 roomy bedrooms
SERVANT—A general servant for cook- |] $28.96 set. G. W. Hutchinson & Co. Corner Broad and Tudor Streets and gurene. Good” investment
ing and house work. Apply Bryan. No. | Limited Dial 4222 19.6,53—4n At Rockley New Road. Modern 3 bedroom bungalow with combina- ti
y! . 6. : tion living and dining room. Lovely open gallery offering magnificent proposition.
7, the Garrison. 98.0, B= 10. | ne reer ennnaeieceenenien FOR SALE view of Golf Course and coast line. All built in cupboards. Garage and
SCELLANEOUS tin perfect working erase," Yoraes SEIVEIDS COURS COWREAED, SEE em WORTHING. Modern. coral. stone
Mi Electrical, Cheapside. Dial 4614. ¢€ Y 4 R To bungalow on corner site with wide
22.6,52—1n, MISCELLANEOUS 4 L N ‘y delameaip dela frontages. Pleasant garden with
POSITION—Cook or butler, Pastries a | nt y r At Mile and a Quarter, St. Peter. A
e - 7 : ’ 2 , St. ‘ nother lovely house. 3 bedrooms, flower beds, lawn, crete ter-
specialty. Responsible, cheerful, and | FRESH BUTTER $1.20 per Ib at Wood | “RAE BAgTS-Suppiies “of rat ball CHICKEN NOQDLE SOUP dining room. living room, modern toilets and baths, hot and cold water. face, and ntimber of bearing fruit
willing. Dial 4598. 5.52—2n. | land Plantation, Phone 95—214. eredad” tore a itural Society So e t ‘< Large verandahs. Outstanding view to the sea. Extensive trees. Accommodation comrgises
- arene | 21.6.62—am | Pucpared oy age donna public . asy to prepare, Just empty one package includirfg big garage, 2 servants rooms, laundry, workshop. Extensive large living room, covered gallery,
TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bonus We 'Stecl Shed into a pint and a half of beil ter k f orchard with specially selected fruit trees. The property has been well 3 bedrooms with built-in ward-
from Rediffusion for 25 recommende | Grey Miami 36in. wide at rock | {oF limited period at the Steal Rhacs : ae © ing water, cook for cared and. is in. excellent condition. Immediate possession. Very low robes, well fitted kitchen,
tions in one calendar month. | bottom price $1.17 very superior quality | Queen's Park, and be pure 6 minutes and get a “Home-made Chick rice with covered way to
52—201 eee an t ic. each "between hours of 8 le icken Pi
46 mn. | THANI BROS, 22.6.52,—1n, | a* Be. except from Sow servant's quarters and all
$62.50 KET MONEY easil a =ED—Sp. oe a UR * a offices. All public utility services.
POC iON easily earne GALVANIS! a.m. to ls x ; ————— sath .
by ecommending 25 new suoscribers 10 | days. “Best quali eerglish galvanised 19.0.58—p oe perckage for 25c. (not 49. ) gives 4—6 recommendation .
KEDIFFUSI im one month. sheets 6 ft. $3.94 7 ft. 60 8 ft, $5.24) ~ plates of soup.
4.6, 52—20n SILK POPLIN—Lovely Quality in
Auk Tone Co. Dial 26006-- 216 52. ttn, | Blue, Grey, Mauve and White 36/7 wide Obtainable from. .. . REALTORS LIMITED
REDIFFUSION offers $1.50 cash for} 72 cents per yard nearly ‘finished at STANSFELD, SCOTT & ©O,, LTD. |



KIRPALANI 52 Swan Street.

22,6,52—1n. YOUR REAL ESTATE AGENTS

SPOTLIGHT
THE HOUSE OF THE WEEK

ATHERLEY BROS., Speightstown.

:
JOHN F. HUTSON LTD.

acres of coast land are open tad
either a, a

each new Subscriber recommended by Imported long-sleeved khaki _ shirts
you. $3.28 a Pe. or $33.00 a doz NI
4.6. 02—20n | BROS. Pr. Wm, Henry Street

22. 6.52—1n.
SUPPLEMENT YOUR INCOME by| __ i cil
sonmeasena ing REDWFUSION. Obtain IRONS—Sad Irons No. 6 $2.27 per
1 W





SOUPS — Carlton packaged Chicken
Noodle and Tomato Vegetable. More

economical than canned soups. Easy. \6 | 466699990 9S 909 9999S G OOF
ives

























fi particulars from the REDIFFUSION | pair No. 7 $2.64 per pair. G@ prepare. A 25c. package mn
: 4.6 52—20n. | c ; r ‘| servings. Obtainable from Stansfeld, ‘ “ ” ec
office Hutchinson & Co, Ltd. oat ae Scott & Co, Ltd., Bridgetown and Athec- EF Oo R § A L E WYNDOVER
LOST FOUND , ‘|ley Bros,, Speightstown, and John F
, & JACOBS extra light Cream Cracker — | Hutson Ltd, 21,6,92—2n.
Ad he ein — |these delightful biscuits stand unrivalled i .
. excellence y : Subscribe now to the Datly Telegraph r 1
LOST for excellence of quality, Special Price “5 Ne now | ¥
thie week. 5/- per tin, Bruce Weather- Bagiand's leading Daily Newspaper . I
rinse pe teen nnn pm aerin head Ltd. ' 22,6.52—1n, | arriving in Barbados a for only a few! \ " UP MGHT D PIANO
SPECTACLES -— while shopping in| days after publication Londen. Con-| \ By Albert Fi
Briamelo we on Friday sone pai Si peies CNE (1) Chila’s iron cradle and bed | tact: lan Gale, ¢/o RErSene Oh Ltd. % y vert Finger
tacles in grey case eward ound fin, gf rder = $20.0 — Local Representative, i. is . ‘ ee
and taken to Civil Aviation Directorate] “°°° °FS*" OO I bei "794. a—ttn. | This instrument possesses an Excellent Tone and a
over Goddards, B86. a peestethinreeeryreerensemniaioctianigecnaonennbasaentiertdan beautiful Mohogany case finish.
OLD FLOORS made like new. New SANICANS--Kitchen Sanicans with) y> You are invited to call for a demonstration

ean er ee opens Bas nee
r or @
emptying. Price $4.86 each. G. W.| ¥ CECIL JEMMOTT

‘
Hutchinson & Co, Ltd. Broad St./ w 48 Tudor Street —- Phone 4563

EDUCATIONAL floors look better if Sanded the Nu-

Floor Way. We can do the job whether
you have eleetric Power or not. Call
MODERN HIGH SCHOOL, Evelyn Roach and Co., Ltd. Phone —
Pupils who would like io be placed | $584 or 3585 22.6. 52—3n
on the waiting list of this sehool for aD
school year 1953 which commences in Printed French crepe with Barbados



Dial 4222. 19,6, 52—4n %
999999996999 999S9988 6% ‘








Weatherheads offer Fresh Pascall’s





ee * SLEEPS
























September 1952 are asked to apply for | beauty spots four alluring shades for | Sunshine Marshmallows in tins and | 99066966996996999699669696%% -
a waiting list form. Call or talanncin 4 hirt skirts and dresses at $1.20 also|Packages— Pascall’s Barley Sugar in %
2846 and it will be posted to you. The | Sifts $3.98. THANI BROS Bottles and tins Large and smal \
date-of the Entrance Examination, on 22.6,52—1n, |BRUCE WEATHERHEAD LTD. FOR - - - , sb lbeamainealee 5° BRR ee ay
the fesults of which six free scholat ———_____—__-_- —_—_—_—~-—_-- 22.6.92-—1n, 5 _ «pees
ships will be awarded, will be announc- ‘Parson Grey very ideal shade Séin T T 7 : Me
ed r, {w de only $3.45 Limited quantity $9 R & A ‘E Xx hag’ ae. ae ' : *
L. A, LYNCH, rhani Bros 22.6.52—In. | % SAFER ROADS K % Se ‘ os Pe furnished and unfurnished
Principal. | —————— ‘. a eT ——a rent. :
25.5.52 eas | PRIMUS STOVES,— This name has | % 1 of the ne eeG in | x IN y meng #00
been proven by years of experience as SAPE DRIVING S ms

WANTED—A ster for the {being an insurance certificate against fire is proper % ALL ITS BRANCHES % Situate at Mile and a Quarter, St. Peter. ab
and Parry School, St. Petey hazard. Do not buy cheap inferior makes ‘. A
to teach up tio G. C. E. Ordir . ith at do not last and which are danger- CONTROL x SEE oot lye $ With an Excellent View to the Sea.. REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Cand@idates with qualificatior teach ] ° Primus stoves use less fuel and are Just as it is necessary x X %,
Agwiguitural Science will be pre jthe most economical and efficient cook- with successful cooking Rie Y ny MOTT ~

Salary for a Graduate 7 z apparatus made, Accept no_ other The Thermostatic Control g EC IL JEM x) 151/152 Roebuck Street,

Shee for a Gradua |inake eum is avallate SS ue To the Medern Gas Cooker 8 x BRIDGETOWN P

ec honours $1,¢ g i n & Co., Ltd. 4 —- .f.n, Gives correet temperature for s, + a %, :

Allowance @vill be made for previcu — $$ ___—___— Every cooking need x Ps 48 TUDOR STREET 7” PHONE 4563 2 Phone No. 4900.
expetience. Applications with testimo RAILINGS e Office Railings suit- % Call and see them at your 4 y x
nialg should be sent to the dmast le for an Office L. M. B. Meyers|% GAS SHOWROOMS, BAY ST Rig Sty
by Ith July, 1852 2% | c Ltd 20.6.52—t.f.n YSOSSSSSISSOSVSSSSSSSSSSOS. LCCSOSSOCOP POOP PS SS SSS OSS SESS SSSI FSS FSGS SSS SS SSS







CHURCH 227 2etacles miss india’ ins. Rescue —_"08%Rz canTeSn
0 Antigua’s TE | LANCASTE

SERVICES Prosperity Problems | Sia



SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 1952_. SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE FIFTEEN —





One Man In eee a ie RATES oF Exchaie

AHundred | SEAAND AIR “see cnD













Peat
= i ;
D Fi e One of B.O.A.C’s Stratocruiser ‘ 119 6/106
LONDON ISCUSS d ' irliners, which normally carrie TRAFFI |

ANGLICAN Labour troubles in Antig Ke G0 adult passengers, recentl; | a aaa
ST. MARS 'S CHURCH ineludi h : neue @ From Page | arrived at London Airport from | : ae
TRINITY it. including the unwillingness of x. New York with the largest num- ;.

7.30 a.m. Matins &.60 a.m. Low Maes, Many men to work in agriculture, )

requesting the despatch of search

9.00 a.m. Solemn Mas: & Sermon, 3.°9 are one of the main obstacles to airerat ee .. RI

ber of passengers ¢ver accom-














Sunday Se >hil- 2 hi, a law modated on the trans-Atlantic ai isle ;
Saoci View oe 7 "Raphieni, 7 to the island's — prosperity, The lack of survival equip- crossing, In Carlisle Bay
p.m. Solemn Evensong & Sermon according to The Times British ment absard motor and sailing Including the flying crew and) Seh. Sunshine Ke ‘
> * sunday. June 2088 om ae 1 vessels which ply between = steward staff, totalling 10, the . Vv Ss -, so LV. Willer
; ‘ mn, Survey of unemployment in islands, was commented upon by Stratocruiser had aboard no fewer, 7"
8 a.m. Hol . ratoc nad . ‘ "
| \) Pd 8 ly oowninton, iad are the island in 1950 showed that Mr. O. Kelsick, Acting Assistant than 118 people—65 mothers, one AS RIVALS GOVERNMENT NOTH BS
i} 3 p.m. Sunday Sehool, 7 p.m. Evensong 18.5 per cent. of the population Admiristiator of St. Vincent, ; Seh. Mandal 0 inder C. 1 OPAL t DK
afl and’ Serseel, were. unemployed and oni; grandmother, 41 children... and). Wiiscpell Pan’ Vincents
‘ about half of these who wor« Mr. ©. Agostini, Director of just one male passenger, Mr.! ccora, fresh frujt and s Attention is drawn to the De-
poner GayRCE working at the time of the sur- Civili Aviation, Trinidad, re Frank Braun, of Philadelphia, who) gned to Schooner Owners’ Associat ic fence (C rol of Drug and Patent
sail — oe Ba, Vey had been continuously em- viewed the Search amd Rescue Well, darling, if you're travelled with his 19-month old} oop ageustus Am Compton 2 and Pr etary Medicine Prices)
oe 3 8b ra Rey Fr Lawrence . Bloyed throughout the year. ~ Organisation as planned for ‘the really certain that our daughter, Jill, to visit. his wife’s) Lucia with cargo of cocoanut Order 2. No. 6 which will be
an BING PLAN — “Tn Spite of this,” says the Eastern Caribbean, explaining wedding present hasn’t parents at Braintree, Essex 1 Soca vie, CRSeeet Bae, = published in the Official Gazette
June article, “the unemployed have that a draft SAR Manual had turned up yer, I’m terribly [Greene Acccteeen f Monday 23rd June, 1952
JAMES ST.: Towers, Layrence. strong reservations about the already been prepared and for- afraid there’s only one The remainder of the passengers | , rr 22.6.52—1n.
PANIES. Avs Sear, Tewets. type of work they are willing’ to warded to the various colonies. {| possible explanation!”

were the British wives of Ameri-| DEPARTURES
can Servicemen who, with their| Seh es W. Smit?

GILL MEMORIAL: Crawford, Harper S¢cept; at the time of the survey. os io eke. Ben
returned to Britain to! ‘Ph.

It was intended that a separate
HOLETOWN : Towers, Mrs. Morris, OMly one-fifth of them were



Belqueen, Sch Mary }


















Day yaaa sad : ar : ° children line, S hip Plant GENERAL HOSPITAL
‘ SHALL | Lawrence, Cabral willing to take any sort of job hapter should be erevered i DutchColonies bin thalé families end friends.| "> in teamship Planter f
‘ ‘ : jannister, Mar- that igh eaitt each colony, setting out in detail ; ; iF
wine, et might be offered and al- their search and rescue proce They will go back to the U.S.A. SEAWELL Appointment Of Acting Assistant
gs LAM: Greaves, though most of the opportunities Sites She hope was expressed S in August. The B,O.A.C, Strato- Dispenser
es PAYNES BAY ee likely to be in agriculture, hat efforts woula be made to urpass e ee cruiser was specially chartered on oe eee B.W.1.A. on Friday A Qualified Druggist is required
930 am Mr, PB Deane 700 p.m Only One in 20 said he was look- ‘omplete these procedures at an | their behalf, by an American or- Phillip Hewit-Myring Eleanor Hewitt. t0 act as Assistant Dispenser at
Rev K E Towers, BA, BD. Fina) ing for agricultural work and 63 easly’ tes ND ganisation which arranges for ayyring wa. sorta ie Th ci the General Hospital, for approxi-
re OOWHITEHALL ae sae tng er In their political enon en Sraeee. Sh 2. Betton ae thet: Edgar. Funelen, ov Augie, 1808 at” on + of $100
in e canefields. eet, Bt ee : a ess, *} familie ep | rith th cdgar Finglen, V. Venellia Ringlen, August, 1852, at a salary of 00
9.30 am Mr. Grant. “The future of Antigua must Airline Requirements Netherland West Indies, which fe] oe RFA ene fee Avleen Carter, John A. Donac i atk plus A Cae of Living
930 a.m Mr R_ Crawford lie partly in the expansion and 1e necting among other things '°rly lagged behind, have now | eee Allowance of $12 a month,
paeaa ue Er re ic improvement of agriculture and ae A rites Tou tsecnealll urpassed the slower but more! The YOuugest Or Whe passengers DEPARTURES—-by BW 5A Applications for this acting ap-
oh mae SR A., Bp, these occupational reservations nd Problems; Communications thorough development of the Brit-| in this “flying nursery” was onl) vor SailitbAn pointment should be forwarded to
BANK HALL could be .a_ serious obstacle end Air Traffic Control; Opera- is West Indies, of which the ul-|three months old and the oldest} ["pigmas © Sealy, M. Mutehinson, A the Secretary, General Hospital, by
| 9 30am. Key F Lawrence. Some of the estates claim that tional Requirements and Equip- ‘imate goa) is a federation with|was the 74-year-old grandmother,| Armstrong, R. Haynes, J. Leelook, Rk. | 30th June 1952
Bankhall are waked te Gauniosiowe, the difficulty of getting a suffi- ment at Small Airports and Co- dominion status, says “The Timvs| B.O.A.C. Stewardess Joan Gib-| Greea, Yo Grecia, t Dave, TN —2n.
Bay in the evening. ; cient and regular supply of lonial Civil Aviation Service. British Colonies Review,” in anjWon was kept busy during the) cme eee ee
is @ aPaeAaTOWN ae ga labour reduces their efficiency, Tt doen AOD Commissn article on the development to-j flight preparing bottles of milk \ ver wt sc
in. Mr. G. Mini. as they are not able to get some the Chairman, Wing.) ‘ng Ward self-government in the Dutch | and mixing baby food. so
* SELAH tasks done at the best possible .: Creat. ie 4 Bet West Indies. \ VALOR COOKER
930 am. Mr. Greaves time” address sal “No wor s “For c
BETHESDA The prosperity of Antigua decisions have been reached be- no erebietn’ ao beteonne ee | Short Burners
evens will always be determined largely cause it was not the purpose of tha 19.20 it says, “urinam Sad hi thane Haj “teas
Sunday, Reng 6 by the price of sugar, the article meeting. But many matters which ’ es : perver ie = ¢ oe a
PREACHING, APPOINTMENTS continues, .but it is .beyond the Pe Se we Pe
BETHEL: 11 a.m, Rey. T. J. Furley 4] camhd
: DALKEITH: ton G. H ie Con dear peice eee teen fortunate in having with us OWn constitutions, governments i Also
; a.m. r. > fe ar- . , - . ‘ sae ’ ‘ ” ep y 7” 3
vile 7 pm Mr C.F. Broome, B A, “But there are also factors experts in the various aeronautical ~ at Amey Cause Ki led in 3 Days \ wae bathe toh aie
7 BELMONT: gt sere & Mayers controlling production costs and subjeats, who have been gonetous | ehh ekioeing ie Caan the The very first apptication of Nixo. |} aieiiase with rants anh "oteed
" gouTH DisTRICT: 9am, Mr. L, Yield,” it adds, “and it is here SARIDRAPED Indrani Rahman, 21, in imparting information and Dutch colonies in the Caribbean gigi, bene We AR tae piniiee P i aste and overflow
_ : \« . i. . s tal ares y 5 or ° ningic o
Waithe 7 p.m, Mr. St, Hill. _ that there is a chance for tuture “Miss India,” arrives at Idlewild advice. Sa re ow ee re satin and yourwill soon see Sone skin be: 1M) Established T. HERBERT, Ltd. Incorporated
7 Aoi P. a.m, Mr. H, Harris improvement, within the power Airport, N. Y. She will represent “This has been the first meeting Sadan ft f rth article eC " comity soft athootn and orn! Mixes {
r ‘ nes ; : as 2c P . c $s for further progress were erm a new discover: at s | . (
a VAUXHALL: ii am: Mr. C. Forde Of the Antiguans themselves. The her country uu: the “Miss Uni- + ii, kind in this area, and it is shelved when the ere a cuanal kerms and parnaiter on the skin that ) 1860 10 & 11 Roebuck Street 1926 ‘
7pm Vaend ee at om sony #38 een vty of verse” bees ae . anon most gratifying to see that eight and these territories supplied Fletaa, Hing worn and erupcions ESS SSS
e labour force show e in- Beach, Calif, week une és. Governments found it possible to ,
EBENEZER: 11 a.m. Mr, A. Lucas, creased, and the unnecessary ODO” POD dO oe

important quantities of oil ‘and You can't get rid of your skin troubles

7 pan. Mr E. Toppin. send representatives. Jt is also bauxite for the Allied war until you remove the gernis that hide














d iy PDPSOOD PPS OOGOOO GSO 2
i i i he tiny pore , So
BEULAH: 9 a.m, Revd. 8. W. C. on lever ve by industrial dis- particularly pleasing to onsetye machine: in hy thy pores of wet Skin. ane 2
; Crosse, 7 p.m. Mr, O. H. Millar, putes avoided, " C =f onawrena the friendly atmosphere in which In 1942 Queen Wilhelmina day under the positive guarantee that
. ° aaesuer i ee Hunte, “Continued experiment with Area ouife rence the discussions have been conduct- promised to call a conference clear yaue wil pe RS se
j RICES: 11 a.m. Revd. 8. W. C. Crosse, Hew varieties of cane and im- At H Monda ed. Criticism, there has been in immediately after the war to paen Us
5 en sees. proved methods of | cultivation We i y plenty, but always constructive, gefine a new status for all Dutch Nixoderm return ot
Sunday Schools meet at 3 p. m. should be as fruitful in the sceking an intelligent solution, overseas territeries This cone empty
MORAVIAN SERVICES future as they have been in the The Southern Area Conference ysther than condemnation; and wi eae , Ser Skin Troubles packuge.

c : ne ; ference was never held. It was
ROEBUCK STREET: 11 a.m. Morning Past; and if a constant flow of will be held on Monday, June 23rd have | think, achieved a very real ;. a, ,
Service, preacher: Rev. A.C. Hi. Pilgrim cane to the factory could be at 4.45 p.m. at the Scout Head- .cnsc 0 fellowship in the realisa- {oreStalled by the turn of events

MAL? pm, Even ing Service; preacher: maintained the production cost of quarters, Beckles Road. The prim- {jon that our problems are our)” Indonesia.

a ; s In 1948, universal suffrage was
: f _ sugar would be reduced. cipal items on the agenda will be neighbour's, and that his problems... . =
vin ee ie a ee Pet ea “The production of foodstuffs the consideration of 1.H.Q. Report are ours, to be solved mutually by pe neat om fae wut ie

Evening Service, preacher; Mr, F. G. should be expanded so that the on Rovers and Senior S-outs helping each other.” ,



> # |
. js. Netherlands Antilles © ar inde- |
vere perplexing us have been dis- e
ane ana solved, and we have Pendent of each other, with their
|







Downes. ; ; * » nrablerin existing Dutch constitution made
ress bik G ian tee on eve = ana lanpoeke any enter eae ea itn a bene. An informal meeting to discuss a eet o responsi~ Dissolved First Day } > ]
3 - G. Ve Pm. . us b r . stg C rescue proc res ji - oh A * SAUS L—4-lb. Tins AS tAGUS TIPS Tins
Rios ervice, preacher: Mr. W. ey Hii i ay u aS “S bag r= eae if yay ae The report suggests search and re scue procedures. 4 ried sah pee ag nauthed i Asthma fiat Wonca polron 1AM SAUSAGE—4-lb. Tin ASPARAGUS TIPS Tin
: p.m, Evening Ser- ist trade — developed. that the existence 0: ese two sec- ihe Haste aripbean, nas f . r system, sap your energy, ruin . . Fa
vice; preacher: Mr. I. Oxley, : = these things can ie cotelit. tions making with Scouts and Wolf convened by the Director General the autumn of 1948, however, to our health and "weaken your heart, UFILLIT BISCUITS SWEET CORN
Meee on ects Tice | plished it may well be possible Cubs four wings of the Scout of Civil Aviation. This will take|make possible the transfer of] [n.3 minutes MENDAGO- the pre- PEARS
SHOP HILL: 7 p.m, Eyening Service, to. increase the national income Movement, imposes too great a place on Tuesday, June 24, at Seen 9, ~ Republle io fates through the plead, aulekly ourb- 4 SANDWICH SPREAD—Bot
prone) a: Smich, and improve the standard of burden on the organisation and Hastings House by the kind per-| Indonesia, All colonial regula-} {hg the attacks, The very Arst day the PEACHES ‘
ST. NICHOLAS E. 0. CHURCH, ” kes it harder th ver to fing mission of Sir George Seel, Comp-| tions were thereby suspended Ving free, eaay breathing and reast- OLIVES
ana “sunday etter Stat “ ye eee tint oy The Conterenige will troller for Development and Wel-|and this applied ually to the fii oer No open ne fmokes,‘n0 PINE APPLE " z
11 am. Divine Service, Celebrant: also discuss the Week-end Train- fare. ; | territories of the est Indies, lass MENDACO table fa at meals ‘and BREAKFAST ROLI CHUTNEY
Bae So See, eneanee ar ie er Col ial A 1 ing Course to be conducted by Mr. Among those attending will be ae ee cleared the xe for be ‘entirely trae from Asthma and ‘ al. '
fos ae don od ‘ont: Mev. ial ea C. R. C. Springer, Island Commis- epresentatives from the U.S.A.,;| the final settlement e new Ieuan vou May Wave cultersd. toe CARE 3 "HU" r ..
c "fanmael;. Adaresd: Celebrant: Rey on PP sioner for raining, on July 5th & the French West Indies and the] constitution, which will give the pears, NENDAGO ie “so successful Anna x CHUTNEY SAUCE 4

Â¥ . : British Caribbean, two Caribbean territories, com-| that It Is guaranteed to give you free,
ent ees For The Blind“ i é

i asy breath in 24 hours and to
THE ST, JAMES et a BAPTIST Scouters are being invited to plete local autonomy. Discus- Sompletsiy ton your Ast ma in 8 days

11 a.m, Matias and Sermon, 7. p.m, : join a Study Group organised by sions on this are still going on} or money back on rely of empty
Evensong and Sermon, preacher at bath Brought In $21 000 the University College Extra- with the “Maihinande’ Weverns aby be ri ure rom 98
nicks ree th , Mural Department on “The child, Banned Professor [ments —p.up. Bhamiet. The guarantes protects you

v .m, . Ww . Friday The links between the people of the Parent and the Teacher” r Pegi!
een mo MRRRY, this wi "he ‘eon Britain and the Colonial territories which will open on Friday, June Wants To Leave }
{
'

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ducted by Rev. ruce-Clatke, are not eonfined to official action 27th. The first meeting will be
‘Assistant Pastor) and Mrs, biva Browne (snd reports, as has been well held at the British Council at 5



ie Britist cil at 5 WASHINGTON, J
demonstrated by the result of an P-m. on subsequent Fridays the professor Owen Rashiaene vies
appeal by the British Empire meeting place will usually be porarily banned from leaving the. .
Listening Hours Society for the Blind. mont 1 SPC AA USL ere, OED United’ States was deported toda!
f , probably some films will be shown ae ae ae thnk Bane
eM “ odes ye oe Byndey at Wakefield. This Study Group to have made a “coneitional re- |
su! . JUNE , r

ne Baltimore’s John
; Child and the Family, Parental ¢ . i ‘
~ ————-~-—-<—-— a blind man, spoke on a B.B.C. : vides « nat _ Strathmore University where he
er Pah, tee 8 bm Setar programme for a few minutes. to Responsibility, and the Behaviour teaches. RECD.

and mental Development of the
4.30 p.m. Sunday Half-Hour, 5.00 p.m. make an appeal for funds, to help growing child. A seec ‘|
Composer of the Week, 5.15 if , ind- ©. & t second series A University spokesman said
Variety” Bandbos, Begiish the Soclety’s crusade against blind- \;)) y spokesman said



% <4
: . i or ge ee quest for a yen’s leave of
4.00 — 7.15 p.m. |... 19.76M. 25.88M Society, Mr, John Wilson, himself Wi!! deal with the problems of the apsence — from =

6.15 p.m. 8 : deal with the problems of he made the request several
Magazine, 6.45 p.m. Programme Fiarade ness throughout the Colonial Terri- adolescence ; . ues ire > ‘gq’ 1 ‘ "
and Interlude, 7.00 p.m. ‘The News, 7-10 tories. This was the first broad- Enrolment should be — sent pene 080, 508 pad ae ee | SSMU Hj 8 KK FAL d ASH OFFER
Fis — 104s pm oF se M stam ast appeal ever made for the immediately to the Southern 4} Ree ar se .

: the , ow
ee = = Colonies as a whole. Mr. Wilson, Area Commissioner, Headquarters, wii ie eee sine ay emi.
ak p.m, Cartabann Voices, 3.08 sm. speaking from notes in Braille, Beckles Road, or telephone 4653. demic year See |
unday Service, 8. om, oO News- ; " Wh t . 3 . y ; ‘ }
feel, 8 30 Dm. Charlie Kun 845 pm, told of the plight of a million | JUMBLE SALE, The Jumble

Interlude, 8.55 p.m. From the Editorials, blind people and many thousands Sale organized coe ey Taylor ‘ be — tg og 6 = v4 |
‘a ecouts terday at an order to eep m

9.00 p.m. British Concert Hail, 10.00 of others who suffer from blind- for the lst Bar

a5 nee Ree a CO. wews aw ing diseases throughout the British Group last Saturday was very suc- from leaving the country was

The Bible In History and In Life. | | Colonial Empire. poagel The amount collected was issued to the Customs Service.
MONDAY, The response, expressed in a $125, and Mrs. Taylor begs to —U-P.

FOR THIS WEEK

Galvd. Mesh Wire

%” Mesh X 48” @ $1.50 per yard
; X 24” @ 60c.







JUNE 23 feos
4.00 — 7.18 p.m. /... 19.16M, 25.589M good of jetters’ to the Society’s thank all those individuals and |
Daily Servite, 4.18 p.m. illustration of the feeling of Em- %%)Well as those who assisted at the

4.00 |
iy
Programme, 5.00 p.m. Lawn Tennis, 5.15

The News, 4,10 = The officers in London, was a striking Bridgetown firms who gave items,
; , 4.10 p.m. |
era ericket, 5°20 pin. Souvenirs of pire unity which such appeals sale. German Marshal |











l X 30° @ B0c.
usie, ¢,00 p.m. Welsh Miscelleny, 6.15 ming oe che = well anne ‘ Se In Russi | X 36° @ 90c
.m. Tip Top Tunes, 6.45 p.m. Sports tyra y the public response to e seen in ussia | v i Pk Aton.

ou x Programm » 7.00 . . l ; . 8 ‘ ?

pune 4." Vib pn Parade, 7% the appeal made for Jamaica India Offers To e i xX 48” @ $1.20
‘om Britain. after last year's disastrous hur- ; HOF, Germany, June 21. 4 is xX 18° @ 45c. ,

7.15 — 10.30 p.m. ..,.. , 203 M 31.32 ricane. Try For Solution A German deportee who re- | 1M%4 X 30° @ 6lc.

: . turned from a Soviet labour camp ' V, Fa a ae

p.m" Musté of the Regiments, 8 18pm Of course, this appeal for the rned from a Soviet labour camy 1M% xX 48” @ BAe

‘ two days ago claimed here to-d
Radio Newsreel, 6.30 p.m. African Sur- blind was not on as large and NEW DELHI, India, June 21. he saw fortes ersan “Field |
RE Rg oe p.m. tai urgent a scale as that for the Premier Jawaharlal Nehru Marshal Friedrich Von Paulus in|
e j itor Ms Re DN Ps virebd Jamaica hurricane victims. Less offered India’s services to help Russia wearing Russian uniform. |
9,45 p.m. Report from Wimbledon, 10,00 than five minutes on the radio by solve the Korean exchange of |

BARBADOS HARDWARE (C0. LID.

p.m. The News, 10.10 pm, News Talk, Mr, Wilson, and B.B,C. officials prisoners deadlock in 4 statement Vincenze Kraupe, 42, who re-| r ‘
Beatie With Baden 30.30 Pm. said that, in these difficult times, to the press to-day. India was turned from Russia on Thursday | a (The House For Bargains)
anything’ over £1,000 in response favourably suited for such a @94 is now in Moschendorf | No. 16 Swan St. Phones: 4406, 2109, 3534
——$- to such an appeal was considered function Nehru claimed, because Refugee Camp near here said |

OR DVOCVEDD DDD OVODED ED

. . a German prisoners were told Von |
good. she was frienaly with all coun- p: . 4 sos , tactic "

Swedish Plane So officials of the Society were tries involved. foe the oa Wor he |
. rised and delighted at the “When I say India would go all Kraupe said he Gy tae Ten |

Was Shot Down mail which reached their offices out to find some solution, that ranking former Wehrmacht off. |
f in the next ee. Well ares is as son as anybody can say,” cers and industrialists w hile stav- |
letters bringi a total of he said. ;

STOCKHOLM, June 21, 5,000 } +s







ryy 7
c : ing there ; I RY
A report showing that Sweden's "Ore than £4,500 ($21,600) — in _ Commenting = on Americar —ur. | Frank B, Armstrong & Co., Ltd.—Agents.
P Dakota was shot bums ranging from 6d, in stamps to enator exander Wiley's sug- ___
downs bee: it Govern- £116 in one-pound notes sent gestion that leading statesmen ———EeEeEeeeeaee——eooeeee
ae ne pe to mously. like Nehru shoulg investigate w %
Evoelry‘ according ig author! inna” “ne penaover and communis alezation, "of germ |] We NEW INDIA INSURANCE CO.,LTD. «Third
am sorry I cann more,” | warfare, Nehru said “any proper | ‘ 7 .
fais ve Peg today, t to Was the theme of many letters en-| investigation should be ‘py al Cover 12 HIGH STREET Party '
the eyetchiie Staff which oid e@ Closed with a helenae Tor of area accepted and approved by | Y ‘
or a postal order for ajall parties concerned. Anything! ou
| i gpelaggcmeine. Jan on souple'of shillings, unilatera] is no good.—U.P. | PHONE 4713 Hishs
June 13 and is oa} lave Qne contributor was an old lady





been in Lancashire with nothing in the
ser. the Boreal Baltic foland of world but her small old age pen-
Gothland. sion, who sent ten shillings which

It was while searching for the ste had received as a gift for her
Dakota that the Swedish Catalin 95th birthday. Several other peo-
flying boat was fired on by ple in their nineties and about a
Russian fighters and came down dozen in their eighties sent dona-



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PAGE SIXTEEN



A.A.A.B. To S








end Cycle

SUNDAY



Trinity College Reasons For













ADVOCATE









You can obtain the following:













SUNDAY, JUNE 22,



~~



1952









FS
Y . . v ))
4 ~ a. ’
Examination Changes T Ss’ T
Ales ( SL E }
T T M ini Results os i ARTIST JPPLIES |
Wa ¢ a ‘ { From Page 12 |) READY PREPARED CANVAS
eam O i jarlinique ay e : \\} CANVAS BOARDS & CANVAS BLOCKS
The following are the results Of |: this island with a teaching roll|{}}) STUDENT PREPARED ACADEMY BOARDS in three sizes
By J. C. PROUTE the practical examinations of the | or go1, And so 56 can make a de- LAMP SHADE PAPER ;
’ F Trinity College of Music which | cision binding on 800, Farcical!| ARTIST OIL COLOUR BOXES.
cas : ane were held in , bados on the Now that “the teachers” are being} PAINTS IN TUBES, BRUSHES
THE DECISION by the Barbados Amateur Athletic 14th and 16th June, 1952, by Dr.|bjamed I hope they fully realise | CHARCOAL, TURPENTINE & LINSEED OIL
Association to accept an invitation from the VELO CLUB FPesinald_Cooper:— ‘ |\what they have done. If [ Also OIL SKETCHING BLOCKS
= 0 CL PIANOFORTE PLAYING | iad their tntexest, Be St ee
MARTINIQUAIS to send a five-man cycling team to take rurits OF MRS. M. P. COBHAM Fi gy, ge naisect Sirens BORLETS STATIONERY — bia! 3301 i
= in a big two day meeting in that colony is a commend- Bit A a Hintoste them that they delude |
able one, Headley, M. E.--Pass themselves if they do not: believe cate }
; : a py are aw 6 Se =
Undoubtedly the tour which takes place on the 13th of — copnam eeeeetey . Sivisies that ex, Se er Ee wae i ; a |
next month and concludes on the 14th, the French National gyjo, Fi" Sisps Divteion. 4, jnime Seed. OWE ia thelr duty, | :
Holiday, will afford local eyclists who are selected to make Pose, Skinner, E, A—Pass, Skinner, M./ whatever difficulties may arise,| Phone 4267 for
the trip the opportunity to compete with other top class °~""* """tnitial Divilen [to ensure that the children a |
miltite nf ie u j — . » ewneri . shi Gilkes, M.—Pass with it, Gilkes,|trusted to their care rece a e . |
cyclists of the area, and thus widen the experience which ., CK. 0 Suinspury, Po AL V Pass fullest benefit from the education- ALUMINIUM Continous Gutterin |
they have already gained at other intercolonial meets with merit . ‘ The education of the! 8 |
ae E , na. oe . i ao eee , . al system. a e ve ” ye re as i
Interest in the Whitsun Intercolonial oa at oe eaeensen peeeiry pivene® young is a sacred care and those | 18”, 24”, 30’, 36” wide !
t has t vet subsided, and coming so close on that, the King, P,_L.—Pass. to whom it is entruste >| ,
ee ne yet su maces = J ' s mas, ee - ll be ; Preparatory Division prepared not only to accept but ALU MINIUM Corrugated Shects A AN’'S FINEST BUY |
performance of our local boys inthe French Island will be ward, w. R.—-Pass with merit Pret out agaitat wil-cheliennes:| 6.8.9. 10 1 hs M |
; : Fi s Divi ag : *| » ov,
watched with more than passing interest Davis, kee bae ties.3., A. fend the bismingad « Director or | »&, engt in Black and White
The big event of the meetin 5 ———-—=_ Pass, Lorde, M.—Pass with merit, Sealy,|the criticism of a system will be, ALUMINIUM Paint : .
which will be held under the © prion R I BO NII i as conducive to success as the} ain Brown and White,
patronage of the Prefect of “peighisiown Round-up Arthur, W. M-—-Pass, Taylor, Pp. a,j beating of a drum to the regular- | ' - 4 Brogues and Oxfords
Martinique, is the 150 kilometre Honours, Waithe, J. £.—Honours jising of a storm. i} ALUMINIUM Nails
> whic’ , re Wate , H. W.—Pass with merit. ] EB. j
reed at th 1 oe ce A... ePUPILS OF MISS. A. LYNCH | JEB at $10.94 and $12.02
seeetee RAND Furuse. “aaude Keport ».... Jt ae | POILITE Flat Sheets per pait
‘SIDE E JB- >rescod, M. M,—Pass . |
his i e | - 7 Ad eed Preparatory Division j zy | $ 5 7
ee ee ee enn To B > D b: t d Harrison, N.—Pass be Schooners Bring Hard Flexible Asbestos-Cement White Nu-Buck
in skill, stamina and judgment. € e€ da e Inniss C Ke Paes With coast, Skeete, | Varied Cargoes a vce or interior use $11.73 per pair
It will be their greatest test, and M, _V.—Honours. Ai - . ck, x |
it will be interesting to learn how ‘Taq Maud)» Report” will be PUPM™ OF MR. £. P. M. ROCHEFORD j = . « All Sizes in Stock
they equip themselves against Subject of a debate which will ‘oppin, rte pees ae oh atte eed “ere oe EVERITE Corrugated Sheets
their more experienced rivals be held at the Assembly Room, PUPIL OF MISS J. SHEPHERD as a >roi "tr +. | 6’, 7’. 8’. 9’. 10’ 3
over this distance. Speightstown, on Thursday night, Rice street ee Saeeen uber ‘Capt. a marche. Cee ee CAVE SHEPHERD
a a gi a June 26, at 8 p.m. PUPILS OF THE URSULINE CONVENT | She brought in 423 bags of copra, |
having correspondence with. th = Raat ae = nae the de- Ingram a> Pee, ee Pass with|12 bags of arrowroot, six bags 01 | & CO LTD
. A > wi : “S cepy” it ' . ; ‘ starc . . . . .
Martinique Association, and §0 gm ith, and, iin ke A, Willers “eet Preparatory Division ji tit ea 7 7h f Wilki & H C Ltd
pr — ” r eet = n M.C.P., both Barristers-at-Law. | _, Farrara, eas Knazgs, M oe ae Te inson aynes 0., . 10, ll, 12 & 13, BROAD ST.
made Meanwhile, i@ loca The he Pi Pr "14, Pass fe aes 2 :
pea ao tg cuite: a108..of Th A ding of the debate will First Steps Division Sixty drums of cocoanut oil
road work in preparation for the ) revival of the Literary eve- Beroh. pees He Freltaes We Pass were brought in by the Schooner ="
Ty n an effort to gain D8 which kept the Assembly Wi i J Honours, Sarkis, J Augustus B. Compton which PLOPLPS OP S9OS POPE ECO PLOOSSOS OE OP PN SA APE fo
tour, and i 1 ef ; I Pi . merit, Millan 0 fs
selection to the team. lal] lively for some time since Pass,’ Taylor,’ A. C—Pass alled in yesterday from St. Lucia,
¢ he committee, the final ! was opened. Initia} Division a This schooner also brought in 490
For t ym Alvarez, N.—Pass, Baron, M.—Pass

task,

selection will be a difficult r wn ‘ Lazo, M.—Pass with merit, Mazo, D.—|bags of copra, eight bags of cocoa-|
and no doubt, they will endeavour The Old Parry School ground pass’ with merit, Paschen, A, — Pass,|)nuts, 66 bags of charcoal, 140|
$ in St. Lucy was crowded on Faschen, “ ass Pennacchiotti, & |

to select the best team.

This team, in my view, should

comprise of three of the best A held band PUPIL oF, MIs M. GRIFFITH | Both schooners are consigned
Class cyclists, an Intermediate "°'G an open air concert _Pirs eps Division to. Schooner Owners’ Association. :
man, and one from the B Class The programme, which was ‘re, 5. Le R—Pass with merit

On h + the Test vanes varied trom. the ‘

iv performance at the last mambo to classical pieces. / oe fe Th T th

two meetings here—the Interclub Fifty-four parts of rain have Police Band e ru in THINK OF .
meeting in April, and the << been recorded at District “E” At Ei 1 * d
colonial Meet-——John Skinner, who Police Station for that area of sptartade Y H
disposed of all opposition over the St, Peter during — the week up P our oroscope THE FIT

distance races should be a cer-

tainty, It carmot be denied that, The 54 parts fe oa R. T. Michelin, O,B.E., Commis- astenntcitne
with Farnum out of those events, night, ea Hee Pipeeday sioner of Police, the Police Band,}| Would you like to know what the AND
he upheld the reputation of Bar- conducted by S/Sgt. C. Archer, | Stars indicate for you ? Would you like

bados in winning the five, nine
and fifteen mile events from such

old carpenter of Mt. Brevitor, St. ancient science to
veterans as Carmichael, Yard, Peter, was twice during the week Esplanade on Sunday 22nd inst.,| useful purposes | THINK OF
Keizer, and even Matthieu, the committed to stand trial at the Commencing at 4.45 p.m, pee picasa 1%
Trini ympie choice ax j ‘ ; : Mareh—WAR MARCH OF THE enviable reputa- y
ee next sitting of the Court of Grand “PRIESTS ... Mendelssohn | tion? = The ac- 1% THE PRICE
j y . ‘o, Dessions by the Police Magistrate 2. Overture—LIGHT CAVALRY —Suppe | curacy of his x
Skinner showed on those three of District “ER”, Mr. S. H. Nurse, * Sélection—LA BOUTIQUE predictions and ¥
occasions that he could stand up cn charges of '} enki Na do ines Oe FANTASQUE Rossini-Respight | the sound practi-
y-grind, and that he had ¢ ; Bes of breaking and en- 4. Medley—THE GOLDEN VALSE cal advice con- %
to any grind, and that he had a tering ee cb leet te ste
finish second only to the Champ- 6. ero Malan Horedtes’ Gh
ion, On Monday, the court sent on -(1) NOCTURN Chopin Business, Speeu-
the case i s . Viste tu (2) HUMORESKI s Dvare lation, Finances,
Of the other A Class Cyclists, 1 charg aire ween Cummins is ¢. suite — NELL GWYN .. B. German} ove | - affairs,
; 3 »* charged with the breaking and 7. Selection — FAMOUS MUSICAL Friends, Enemies,
think Carmichael, because of his entering of Carlisle Reid’s dwell- PLAYS . S. Rémberg | Lotteries, ete.
experience, and because of the ing house at “Farrows” on. the eee Perpetuum waite have astounded
fact that he is still one of our best } het : ; ece Strauss | wducated people
ro s ** boundary of St. Peter and St. Hymns 290 A. &. M, Through all the ;
wheelsmen, should be given a {joy, a ghangine scenes of me wee ae

chance to make the team. Keizer
is my other choice, since in ad-
dition to being a good distance
man, he “can finish, and uses his
judgment better than any of the
remaining cyclists in this class.

#. Cacben “et. Banton, : Ds. MEP Stee eeliclaat ap veuneel a
RE Aicide tor the Intarmedinte anes He was again committed Programrie money wanted for Astrological Work, p Cc S FFEI & co LTD
Y » Cour Me rent > la sh
man lies between George Hill and % the Court of Grand Session. : Postage etc., but send cane ° ° . MA a 4

Grant, two of the Holborn boys.

Hill is undoubtedly the stronger "0W being stocked, will soon, be 23rd June, 1952. be ¢ dat the remarkable accuracy “ RS ; Mi ilo
of the two, but Grant's determina. opened at Church Street, Monday, 23rd:—8.00 p.m, ‘Eve-| of his statements about you and your TOP SCORE IN TAILORING erchant Tailors
tion and tenacity of purpose are Speightstown. It is owned by Mr. nings with the Composers’ by Mr. | affairs. Write now as this offar may noe

) s noe ; S on 2 ‘me al). . 4 C5:
two of the greatest attributes of Linco'n Rollock who has been ucedas, Seth: 848 | TARORE, (Dept, 213-0), Upper Forjett | #ePOOSSSGCSS7668: SOSSSSS

any sportsman, and for this reason,



Wednesday night, as parishioners
danced and swayed to the music
of the Police Band, The

te Thursday,

Burton Cummins, a

20-year-

Cummins was before the court
again on Wednesday charged
with the breaking and entering
of the dwelling house of Henry

A new general store, which is

carrying on a similar business in



Honours, Urbaneja, B.—Pass, Vallenilla;
®.—Pass_ with merit

VIOLIN PLAYING



BY kind pernussion of Colonel

will render the following pro-
gramme of music at the Bay Street

lite
266 A. & M. Lead kindly light
GOD SAVE THE QUEEN



British Council

Programme tor week beginning







packages of freshfruit, five bags}
of nutmegs, 300 wallaba posts and
five cords of firewood.



to test free the skill of Pundit Taboré,



India’s most famous Astrologer, who b?

of New York he-
(leves that Tabore
must possess some sort of second-sight.

To popularise his system Tabore will





send you FREE your Astral Interpreta-
tion if you forward him your full name

Postal Order for stationery, testimonials

and other interesting literature. You will

Street, Bombay 26, India, Postage to India,













ony $65.00




























i i re om ") i Sach NSB o~ SO = -
1 would give him a chance to gain © hureh Street for years, for one once ot te 4 cents. ceils B2LZLFAFAFF
some more experience. The store has been built along School Pet re a a 8 oo, y
: : : modern lines and presents a * Tal cat x

The other eee - oo contrast to the “old world lcok” Oiyinale Cant Pies Reading eg ANNUAL DANCE
as was seen at the last meeting af the street. vines ei Mlb «eg D
were not up to the standard of men pin. Flay Reading, “The Linden Given by
‘Trinidad’s Pat Gomez who in his "Friday 27th: 6.00 p.m. Lec- MR. ERROL BISHOP &

own island rides in the B Class,

; F i pene re, “The Child, The Parent &

and so are automatically ruled 4 cure, 1 ” . on
oe i Petition Granted Yo vercher (Extra-Mural). SATURDAY, JULY 5, 1952

. IN the ¢ + ot Ones 8.15 p.m, Films. public, at

re Court o rdinary on 9.00 p.m. Rediffusion, “Friday ,

Ri . the t ais ae Friday Mr. Justice G, L. Taylor Miscellany”. QUEEN'S — earn
é e team 18 young pr; > » >t reli 2 « . ‘ ‘ 9 ¢ r
Carter who finished as the champ- ts er Pear roe ee Saturdey, «28th: Pi 9Or' aati. ADMISSION 2/-

ion cyclist in the B. Class. He
showed promise as a very good
sprinter, and in some of the races
at the last intercolonial meet, re-
turned better times than were re-
turned in the intermediate class.
What's more, Carter is a stayer,
and I-cannot see any of the other
B, Class who would rival him for
the position on the team.

Washington Harper of Lakes Fol-
ly, St. Michael, Civil Servant, the
Attorney of Ismay Stewart of
San Juan, Trinidad for Letters of
Administration to the estate of
Eleanor Laicy, late of New York,
U.S.A,

Miss M. A. Reece, instructed hy
Yearwood & Boyce, appeared for
the petitioner,

Films, children,

Photographic Exhibitions, “Our
Men in Korea.” “Latest British
Aireraft.”

“LADY RODNEY”
COMING MONDAY

The R. N, S. Lady Nelson will be
arriving on Monday June 23 from
Montreal, Halifax, Boston, and



MISS ERLA BISHOP



Music by Mr. Percy Green's
Orchestra
Refreshments on Sale











*
Y. M. P. Cc.








Bonniest Babies are of course Cow & Gate Babies





Bermuda via the British North-
ern Islands and will be leaving
the same night for St. Vincent,

Whatever the final decision ef
the Committee is as regards the

ANNUAL Rv e










REPORT Pe Gow Gale

























selection of the team, it is to be Grenada, Trinidad and British
hoped that they will select the THE WEATHER Guiana, Her agents are Gardiner CRICKET =
best men available for the job. VESTERDAY Austin & Co, Ltd, '
Pe has a reputation which Rainfall from Codrington: BARN DANCE
nas been set by men like J. D. 14 in Y 1. y ~ ay 6
Douglas, G. Hoppin, Gene Barlow, Total Rainfall for month to DO’S AND DONT’S on EN TRIES CLOSE ON SEPTEMBER 3O0- 19352.
veterans of yesterday and so ably date: 2.71 ins.
carried on by Ken Farnum, of | ‘Temperature: 79.5 °F FOR CAREFUL SATURDAY, JULY 5th
which we can justly be proud, and Wind Velocity: 9 miles per @
rae : ‘ ; 8 Silver Cup, and $25.00 i h, ted by Cow & Gate, Ltd.
every effort should be made to hour DRIVERS Dance to the Music of SECOND PRIZE—S10.00 and a Piatea Sliver tee, vieeaied: fr Cow & Gate, Ltd.
maintain, and if possible enhance Barometer: (9 a.m.) 30.037 THIRD PRIZE—S5.00 and a Plated Silver Cup, presented by Cow & Gate and (9)

DO help faster traffic to over
take by kecping to the left,
except when about to turn
yourself

Caribbean Troubadours

that reputation. Souvenir Gifts.

(11 a.m.) 30,029
TO-DAY
5.44 a.m.

RULES:

2 e
It cannot be too strongly em- Sunriso: All bables must be under 2 years of age on October Sist; 1952,

o—

A posteard size photograph of baby must be sent in together with 24 lids from





LELBEGDDODGGGGDGGGG GGG OGG GGDDDGGGGDGLGLOCGGG YS
e s
: 7 Who is Barbados
Fey Bonniest Baby
re of 19.32 ?
: { The search for Barbados’ Bonniest Baby of 1952 is on,
a and mothers are invited to enter their babies for
eine ; : ' Barbados’ Bonniest Baby Contest of 1952 Barbados’
and this compefifion is open to all babies fed on
Cow & Gate Milk Food, the Food of Royal Babies
and the Best Milk for Babies when Natural Feeding fails.
Ss

phasised upon the men who are | gunset: 6.18 pan. oe eee you From 9.00 p.m. to 3 a.m, itms of Cow & Gate Milk Food,
finally selected that tea s rit is ; o« : ‘ %. Parents agree to abide by the selections of the Special Committee and the
aia x one ‘Aret BP TSM Sirs } Moon: New, June 22 DON’T overtake unless you * * final judges

prerequisites in Lighting:















PRIZES :
FIRST PRIZE—The Cow and Gate Silver Challenge Bowl to keep for one (1) year,
|


























postcard sie picture.

THINK IT WAS HIS



LETTERS FOR MEP MY

ot

V620 — Vi27 — V1Il6E —

7.00 p.m.
\ any team, and that on this will High Tide: 2.28 a.m., 4,01 p.m. ieehioass Pt syenon Shed The twelve (12) leading babies will be selected by a Board of Judges for| final jude-
mainly depend their success or Low Tide: 9.53 a.m,, 9.23 p.m. ' DPOSSSSSO SPOS POF IS > ing. The names of the selected twelve will appear in the “Sunday Advocate” of
failure, g x — 9th and the final judging will take place on Saturday, 22nd November, XN
H ves X , K<
Th ll Do lt E : cy Tim ——— % Vew Shipments to x »
Tr . ouistered U.S Patent . ee
arial stigaeertcopeeneersorr eects $ Weatherheads see ee S
See Ta. Nee a ee hoe ae ae oe “ . e % “ "
ba f EVERY TIME HE GIVES IAT CLUB OF HIS MUST a ¥ J. B. LESLIE & CO., LTD., Representative COW & GATE LTD., §
ee Creme Wate haeen Y SoMETHING OUT HE Be * te HIS ea x Again This Week - - y P.O. Box 216, Collins’ Building, Bridgetown.
’ 4 C * .
ou THE WAY WILL YOU ASKS YOU TO DO SOME- % { hereby enter my baby for Barbados’ B jest Baby C st, 1952.
ae oot oR OF THING FOR HIM™YOU'D y % KODAK FILMS — vV120 — ¥ x jo! jonnie: aby ‘ontest, 1952, and enclose
K












































*
ci OWN STUFF HE ITS CHEAPER TO I certify that is a Cow & ;
AND Se UIRMAN WAS GIVIN’ y_/ BUY ANY SUPPLIES ie Serer vols — vizz — vis — 3\% ee oa an ee eee
AWAY. Af OUTSIDE“LAST TE ae ue Ae aunt. lids taken from .atins of E COW TE SILVER CHALLENGE BOWL
GEE“IM - \ I GOTA BALL OF LOOKS LIKE A * Vi80 — PX135 — K1355 We & \ ‘ i THE COW & GATE S
AWFUL. \ “IN WINE FROM HIM x 3 COW & GATE Milk Food, I agree to abide by the decision of the Special Commit-
BUSY, MR. ) free ° HE SOLD ME TWO iN XX135 — XX828 — K828— x tee and Judges If you are not yet using Cow & Gate for your Baby, don't
ANGLEWORM", iz eee omnia y KODAK MOVIE FILMS $ I SEMMUAD. ao ewer ete nace aU Sbllg sw MacR UN Bed ok Fd RG TOTP UR Cae bik oe eee delay. Get a tin from your nearest dealer and put baby on
; = x 8MM Kodachrome Rolls & N an ont COW & GATE Milk Food, the Best Milk for babies when
% Magazine. 16MM ss Koda- ¥| Weight at Birth Present Weight Natural Feeding Fails. Cow & Gate Milk Food is free from
g chrome 100-feet Rolls, 3) wee all disease germs, including tubercle, diptheria and typhoid.
: ALSO x ‘ ee Cow & Gate Food is safe because Cow & Gate roller process
x KODAK MOVIE “CAMERA 1y Siguature of Patent or Guardian ensures that all disease germs are utterly destroyed whilst
1X hae secs a a x Date the essential vitamins and valuable mineral salts which baby
\% the best results from your % X needs to crow straight bones and develop strong tecth remain
* Films have them develped, , oc cineca . a â„¢ .
1S Printed and Enlarged at... % SV THIS IS YOUR ENTRY FORM—CUT IT OUT intact. \,
{ss WEATHERHEAD'S XI %
=~ |S = ALAG — |S g
|ss If you require a Passport } » »
War | Photo you can get it at... | K } I L aah %
ROOM DOLER-OUTER LIVE! |* pprop w 81K .
UP To WIS REPUTATION + | | BRUCE WEATHERHEAD & » cs te %
%,
THANX AND A TIP OF x X ® I @ OD ‘«
THE HATLO HAT TO ‘ LTD ¥ WS »
O97, SIE SON TERS, % Head of Broad Street YMG oan M~3>~4~6~6~o ~~ O tn aa
‘ oe WN . x BPSD PB OF ‘ S ; BSE S ZB BAS : :
VIRGINIA | eosesesosososnesoosess® IK BS3LLPFA7AAAFAFAA FF FSF J. B. Leslie & Co., Lid. — Sole Agents 7 BEAAAFAAFAA-F FE AAR





Full Text

PAGE 1

I'll,I StXTI I s --[ Ml \y 1II1IH I II si \n\v. .1, \i 2; i" : A.A.A.B. To Send Cycle Team To Martinique Tripiiy (.'allege Examination Results RttMOBfl For ( ihttigfM n> J. ( I'ROl TI 'VII ihe prv % % %  tl 1 Trimly Collm which M n ith June i8Z *> DI VSLO CLUB ^fiAM>/<-"' * '-/. road rscr (or which will lie — , •warded !hc OBANI1 PIH.X DU i\|;| |I| |<> Kl'lHtH PRESIDENT DC l.A RSPUB ""'"" It*. IMM I 1 o lie Debated 1 %  • %  •• %  •i) bunion I' ,., M,,. i.t.,.„ ru>, RoMrM. C A—P.. Pa* with >•* -.,... r A \ 1: riiltlllir) H..111..F1 wilh merit 1. -i *<• %  • in........ A I. !*•-. Kin. J. A. I mm Initial KW.II M IW Ml P A Wailhr. J F. Ilotv.u" 11 w PMI WIUI n rim n HI-* \ i i M M jMlar I1..1...H \a.aarfsl erasa-alarr IHvi.l.i. From l'jr 1? in thu Island wilh %  teachln of 801. And so 56 can mke teuton binding on 800 Farcical'.. Now lhat "the teachers" are being ( I blamed 1 hope they fully realise I what they have done ir f %  lore, ki me by direct addi H they deludr themsehra ii thej that thfv are drawn fiom Ua-j %  seme elate the children whom they tcaoh. It is their dun*. ....> %  anao, •hat the hildren rnI rutted to their care receive UMJ Wit from the education, a) system The education or lm yoting Is a sacred cure and those t.. whom it is entrusted must be prepared not only to accept but •o win nut itgalnst all challenges, ..uning of a Director or the criticism of a system will b>n.i conducive to success as the beating of a drum to the regularising of a storm. J F.B }->II run obtain Ik* fiAlmtcin/[: ARTISTS' SUPPLIES 1 %  S PARED CANVAS LS BOARDS 4 CANVAS DIXX'KS I A RED ACADEMY BOARDS tn three > LAMP SHADK PAPER ARTIST OIL COLOl'R BOXES PAINTS IN TL'BES. BRUSHES .1 nid'ENTINE & LINSEED OIL OIL SKETCHnta BLOCKS ikiriu II i s s i % %  io VIII i D AM MINU'M Continou* Guttering 18", 24". 30". 3T* wide All MINRM (Arru: -led Sheets ', 7', 8. 9\ 10' length* ALUMINUM Paint ALUMINIUM NaiU stamina m" judemeni [1 will he tbell B 'd Ung to lenrn how tma MuucReport" will U* they eiuip Utefnaelvea egal Men will their more experienced rivals be held at the Assembly Room, over fa SneighUtown, on Thursday inghi. 2. al 8 p.m. 1 '' other u the dehnvinp d Mr. L. A. V. ik.t. i PitOS MB >. r. M innnoin IT.p.i.t-.. DltMa riTiL i MI-> i -Mriniau r*atalar* Dlvlataa it.ii Paai PI tn ftll II-IIIN -l VI HUMi I iiat ANSoriallon. and %  v, %  I %  %  i for the torn, and m :m effoi • selection to tht t fm tl"committee, the llnal D will be a di" Ooubt, ihey will endeavour to select the best team. both njrrmters-al-Ivit "f the debate b a r< %  -%  : i-r. kfi't ilie Assen Hal) lively for ome time patted. c r--. i 'I ,biv ; nee i Th. (Hd rarr* Nchool arcund ^ in St Lucy Ml erowdtd fl I I Wednesday night, us pan-limners S"^ This team, in my View, should rtan '*<" *| swayed to tbl comprise of three of thv beei A ( ""' Pww Band. Th Class ocltsts, an Intermenp. %  — — r>n. w P. Tf Ptvltaa, M PaDun* ii Mm-" J lloncim. Satkl* J TMi.t A *' — PM* I H..L II.. l... %  „.. -. i-a B..-..I M -Paa il*> m--rtl. Una. I) wilh mrrii. Paacacn. A ura. Urtuutaja. B —Faaa. Val^nUla. • u -. with merit VIOLIN PLATING CI III ill MISS M. (.Mlt'UTH I ,.l !.[,. I I H r*" Police /fund At Esplanade BY kind p.*.mission of ( oloi.el Tuesday R T Mlchtlm O.B.E.. Commissioner of Police, the Police lt.u.ii inducted by S/Sgt. C. Archer, 20-ycarSchooners Bring Vtirlwl Cargoes The S-ho-ncr Maadals) II 30 tons, II I uTllale Ba> vcaterday morning from 3\ Vmccnl under Capt. R. Mltehetl ght in 423 bag) 13 bags of nrrowrtHit. ix i*e ! cassava starch, four bags of coanuta and two bunches of rroflo/rult drVDM of cocoaiiiit cal LgM in by the Schooner i B, Compton which raataffctej iTora St. IAICIB.] Ihi< sch">ner nl -i brought in 490, b IRS of copra, eight bags of cocoa-; nuts. 68 bags of charcoal. 1401 paikages of freshfruil. flvr baf>' of nutmegs, 300 wallaba |" I ir..i i of firewood. Both Thooners are consigned io Schooner o-nersAssociation.) The Truth in Your Horoscope I'OII.ITI: rial Sana llurd I lexiblr Asbnlus-Omrnt Sheets I r exlerutr or interior n ', thlrk. I'ir K.VKKITi: c i i M: II. .1 SheeM S'. 7', 8'. 9'. IU' l.-n 1: il,. FORUM SHOES FOR COMFORT A MAN S FINEST BUY Wilkinson & Haynes Co.. Ltd. in Black and While, Brown und White. BruKUe* and Oxfords at SIOW and SI2.02 per pair White St. Buck SI 1.7.1 per pair 411 Slir* In Stork CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD 10, 11, 12 a. 13. BROAD SI veterans as Cermichiit-l. V i ,. Ketsar, snd even Matthleu, the e-immitted t Trinidad Olympic choice. will render Brevito'r. St. iffiinnn'of thg %  duiltii; the Skinner showed on those three occaalon* th.it he couln Io iny grind, and Ihut he hnd a finish second only to the ChimpIon of -he other A Class Cyclists. I think Carmichaet. bet tuse <>( hi experience, and because of th" r**i that he Is -till one of our beg! boundary wheelsrtu' B u| | ingtvcv .• | chance In make the team. Kei/ei Is my other ehi let, sun-' In addition to being n gocxl disrnnr.man, he can linish, and uses his lUdgment better thai any of ib. remaining cyclists in this class. stand trial .it UM next Mtllnn of the Court Sessions by the Pallet Mutflitra'.o of District "E". Mr. S. H. Nurse, r.n charges of breaking and entering On Monday, the oouri sent on the case in which Cummins l*. iking and Of r.irlisle Rod's tollhouse at '•Farrows" on the of st Piter and 8t. following proit Utc Baj Btret I ^,'ji Eaplanflde on Sunday 22ml insi., loinmenclti Mar.h WAK MAIKIi Of TtlK T-Hirrrs -i ,^. I-..M. 0\*1ur*-I.IOIfTrAVAIIIV Mass* %  %  %  %  i A tun r.li Rnpifhl Mrdlri -THE fiOl.DEN VA1SR A MM T*"! PlHt-a %  111 NOCTURN lasi il' HUMOtlKSKI Uara Sulla — NCtJ. OWVM SrMUnn r-AMOl'S MuHCAL VI.AYS !• F 'mhi rtiaraclflialic I'rr.i.t. Picep -lr. .mna 1*0 A A M ISiotuah all thr •hu iiKU m wenea The choii-i(or the Intennedlate man lies between George Hill ind Grant, two of the Holboni boys. Hill is undouhh-dly the -trongc CummllH was befoif the court gain "ii vTedneedaj charged wilh the briaking and I ol the dwelling hcuse of Henry A. Cadogan at Bonthams. Si Lucy. He was again commltti 1 Io Ihe Com! ol Cli.in: A new seneral store, which i. being hsM Hrillsii Council Program no • %  K btgbi of the two. but Orahrg detennlnaJW* i ', hurch Street. I laniclt) of Otirpoee are ^'^'"-trnvn. I is owned by M*. two of the grcateaf ittributt ol wncon Itoiiock who has been any sporuman. und for this reason. fUrylni on a gbnluff DU I would give him n rhancc |o gal" w>me more experience The other intermeHi .•. sen at the |g| were not up Io th) Trinidad's Pat Gome/ who in blown island rides in the B Clott, and so are uutoinnticallv ruHO out. reh Street for years. odern UDM and pgi rid Icok" %  %  treat Petition Granted Programme i n locked, will soon be 23rd June, 1952, Monday, 23rd 8 00 p.m. 'Evenings with the Composers" by Mr. E. E. Beckett tExtra-Murall Tuesday. 24th 2 4.1 p.m. Films for Mothers' Union, tjueen's Park. store has been built along Scho !" p m %  """ %  Mo(,crn H, h Wednesday, 25th 4.30 p.m. Olwiipm Club, Play Reading. 8.15 p.m. Play Reading. "Tht Limlcn Tree Krid.iv -'Tib: 5.00 p.m. Lecture. "The Child. The I'.nenl & Tin Teacher" (Extra-MuralI. 8 15 p.m. Films public -r*.. ...., — ,„i. i n,,..iIN %  Courl of Ordinary on ll 00 p.m. Rcdlffusion. "Friday Ibr „thrr mnn who 1 think >v,d..v Mr. Justice(I I. Taylor Mi Mi'll,in\" should mike ihe team is younfi granted UM petition of Aurehm Sdlutdav. 28lh; p.00 a.m. Carter who finished ns the champWashington Harper of Lakes Fo|Films, ,-hiidrcn ton cyelist in ihe B. t H S : Michael, Civil Servant, the Photographic Exhibitions. "Our %  ed promise as a very goon .v. ... ..> (grnai Stewart of Man U Korea." "Latest British %  ' %  '' %  %  %  s. n jm.i rnn i.„i tot Lone %  of Aircriri nt the.last int. -, %  del mew Wretlon to th.eriate pi turned better UTAH dun were reDnnor uicj late of Hen Yotfc ( in Ihe iiiUrmedlflte class. ( %  s A What's more I rt ii i stayer, M„. y ,\ Reeee, Instn mid I cannot see any of Ihe oihei v..iiv.( Nw York tt€ilcvcBlriatTBbuie pnaan* aom To popcitnrtar I .nd >..u rlltr. arsrard Mr*. M Mlaai. addnaa and data ol lililH all •lra>l< wrtMan *• ioiiraair M* rnonay ant*d lor Aal.olnakal Wnrk. I'aalaaa air but a.nd I in bntih I'l.it-il Ordar (or Mnlionrrj. Iraliitwnwl* nd *jtri*r inUrcaUrg lilaralui* You "111 bo amarad al Ine iniar*abla arc *' %  • i*w>* %  ice** >I.T-li;ml lailurs P. C S. MAFFEI & CO., LTD. "TOP SCORERS IN TAILORING" 4 i 12 $ 2 Z Z t $ Z ZZ $%  $ Z $ i $ $ 1$ $-i Z Z 2$ i i Z1 Z Z ? Z Z Z i 11 9 Z ZZ II #io is Barbatios* Boitnivst Bab if 0# §932'? Tbe tearchfor Barbados' Bonniest Bsby of 1952 it on, and mothers ITS invited to enter their babies for Barbados' Bonniest Baby ConUst of 1952 Barbados' Bonniest Babies are of course Cow & Gate Babii-s and this competition is open to all babies fed on Cow & Gate Milk Food, th: Food of Royal Babies and the Best Milk for Babies when Natural Feeding fails. CLOSE .%• v#;/# #.#/ .•/ma. % lOW A. GATE •>J{** Z^ff^f-pf^^f^Z 1 B. MX. f... ltd. S..r *,-U MILK FOOD I



PAGE 1

PACI MX SCNDAY ADVOCATE Sl'N'UAV. JINK a. 1*32 'lulls hair_ Iiak >.orii'ies it! HALO HALO leave.* your hair wonderfully soft and easy to ma nog* okei your menfi rake Bit longer' HALOSHAMfOO %  • KLIMit pure, taf* mill; 2. KLIM keeps without rafrlaeratlee ^Mrs. Clarke's Column Deer KeeeVr, yon must *ot be during thii ilimcuU period. I to have to make a very big detoo diMjrjwinfed if there * fully realise how hard It Is for en on. my dear. It must be oovililtlc delay i r,i*vkng to your you both to have restraint but if ou to jrou th-t this man does not id iu*elf simply you resist now, you will both be really love you In the true sense irith problem* of all the more happy when you get of the word, but is just using you all tart: So, ol.use b-patient married, a* a plaything. Thi other woman arid bear uifi M %  • I ** apparently got some your h DEAR MRS. CLARKE. It is neW attraction for him. ao MRS. CLARK) or since / dm met my 1 would advise leaving hini • • • bou-/nrnd but (here U one thinW hex. 1 know l. well that DEAR MRS. CLARKE. I am 17 be*s*erf>a me. He ha* another H % %  vmrj hard thing to do but. years old and am still at achool. pirl tehem ha still iei and I hear tor your own akc and the sake Mu boa friend ooei to school too that he ha* other oirl-friendj loo. of your pride In yourself you canbtU HtM*l far au'flu in Ihe country Yet. 1/ / uu out icith anyone else not let lhi.* ttuatlon go on a* it It, uiid I do nut yet eery much he gel* t#ry jealous and will not If yid *iope to merry If jrou are both really and truly lfcccd ill the time with doubts and me day, to please help me. In low there must be mutual anxieties, about this man—and you %  'UNE niXE". trus*. and vou must both be faithknow, my dear, 1 do not think both still at school ,uI <' Bcn "'her. Without this. thM thu or any man would be Behold! The bloomer suit IT SETS THE STYLE FOR WIMBLEDON *£ •As you i KLIM quality is always uniform )IKI gCI ! Ilrlll fm.lhl I ol Knponan. (.-.I •*•* %  vtn tlB. KI IM ..ml..!! as/* hot n 4. KLIM it riceileat far aro-iaq cWldrM 5. KLIM odd* %  eariihaisat | D cooked dishes 6. KLIM it ritenintfidtd far lafaat feodieg 7. KLIMii sofa la the > %  *u rrf brt n yrina uHth for over comfny back fo me. / love him I /iU IX t OVE with a uirl aoed a '"' ar but "* had a auo "" el a f*w '""T/ wuch. lit" IrtnuSridum^ "•"" fl H h '* r tW ^ Wh U ma 25 l '' hP ?r Jon ^ mUrt •* 1 h. i f rlTl, mr tn hate r "d. He says that he -can do yourself and be very honest, my imuJSLml Jith hrr nmu She """'' l """" %  /'" %  h "i 'ban / con. dear. He could not really be In r?r hid n-telEn.' tcilh u Y "* • comes to see me. not&• with you. except that he like* maa before Should I do ihU u-Uhitandlay the /act that he taJcei to make love to yai when anothrkM yet married or should 1UI * "•otnon to his oum home J> uery often. cn..- ~ ... ...... mv I love him io much and jutf do m ore to do with him. After all. sap what to do. Should I vou are going to be faithful to yive him up and try to forget or him. the least he can do ls to be tkovld I Just carry on as though faithful to you. nothing tcere ummg? ry „ou ioo havr a problem tvrtte — "M.A.F." (St, Michael) to Mr*. Clarke, c/o The Editor This is where you are going The Adrocafc. W Amerki ii dm White bv EILEEN ASCROFT IMHLEDON style-ietter this June will be the bloomer ault It is trim and Becoming with IL* fitted elastlclsed waist and bloomer *kiri Several nu stars have already seen the first model men Connol.y nas irieo .1 <>n. l^irna Cornell o:aved in %  raeaM fTenehrnampn..-'. iiiquc miHf a Dig ^onie-rawli; :hi rear aiis uie nvion pieaieo Beryl rVnroKC ao Aifira'Uin olay.r mh weat a dre*> ol l; wer-u.-Ker witn a nove: cotton mwh outlon-in roar l cojri y.a^ 'he voar wil De while lor ofl-lhe-cour: HHaTl ftujlKh plaver Lorna Cornell ns uilored *nort.' and maicn *lrt, in arhlt* triat-bar acetate with white ailn rollar po^Kei tat) maa nirtn with o7anrlfr'voe*a1^TnMft"on*'n>e"ir-oru trimmal wiUi app'.iqu.'d flower!* . and at the DERB Y to-day — THE RACE-GOERS SAID: 'GLAMOUR? WE PREFER TO BE COMFORTABLE' N spite ol the OfBclaJ TOpperafor-the-Derby drive the public cnose comfort rather than glamour I should be Inmac* and erev aUkMU " nd have no wcept. "ADAM". •Well. Adam, the answer is a little obvious don't you think? Wail by all means and start your lives together with pride and fiapii the greater becaune you boih exercised self control ;oi %  Mil MUSI oaaj nat or SEWING CIRCLE that's Cooking In The Kitchen SSPRO DOCS NOT Thil non "P exigence put* a big it %  "*** www a on lhnervM We l|ve „ on tdfe -. and M JflV-dMI ileepleisnett it a common result. Here ii a simple and safe way co fet to sleep THE HEART wl(houl lvin S 'wake and waiting for it to • %  ibMi.rwr*i come—take a couple of 'ASPRO' QD t jblet* at bedtime. The toothing action of 'ASPRO' settles the nerves and comCT^M Aa^H P olos vou '* ne 'p* you to go straight •11%/nHwri to s | ee p—natural, refrcthlng iTeep. Many lose sleep during hot nights—they need not, if they avail thomsel-es of this simple method. Next day they feel the full benefit of a good night's sound sleep. By relieving pain and dispelling fcverlihneis and sudden chills. 'ASPRO' will help you again and again. Keep it handy. . The style illu*tr..ud to-day h. By TENNY NOLAN Th p ,nre "t known ways Io very quickly made and very com. , .*_ cook rice are Rice Pilaw or better ££biruV\raar to ru^rWthar. ittto the.tec toa ter.tlwm. fa way the Turb w* IL The hark U two lorn* itanels with Put yenir baalc bock skirt pattern lno...n nee and turned Mice and rseamdoinTh" eSSlTbSS. The • to your tack bodice at the waist Rjce Creole which is the way the hutlon on voke and revcrs arc lme and draw a sl r iKht line from Cub .:is use Io cook their rue. nil OB to the back panels. To the back armhole to the bottom Ricc p Uaw gather in the waist line you may or the skin ollve 0 j| or bullor R(cp uselastic thread or simply belt * %  wish a wider skirt you Bo ,, |n|[ water j^,,. ^ lf>on| It in which la easier and 1 believe mj v ad d two or three Inches to p (i m he sauccpa a b|t „, (ard more comfortable. " %  width at the ln.ttom of your ( „| hl ^ bu „ er ur miiri dl ini Th.Or*t step Is to design the basic skirt before making this side w nj, „ r without seasoning accordWonMD .arrec uinorellas on!i eisiii nad Msnv omen MO arnvea Qrouniit ar.ernatire "' sboe in case the wwatran IXTOV Day la not %  lasni MIUO.I meeting dice Aacot *eos ll It a da> when oeopie use u> enjoy thenvelea m comloruoif Charm and rharmers coua n. : i>ukni n* m jf colour amooii vn ratner . feminine cloihea was .Ma nv rne *an* 9f visiiors ra oy m 'rom lie t*H £1000 fjshicn pAVOL'KlTI ro/a. %  i Ml'i v.|. raan:ao i Moraan on BUST "' inerenea *T?ier >;• i." Mh* \tp A" -. I • I If "J* Injiels and revern on your basic INMIII-P fn>nl Extend ihe yoke about an inch beyond the fchouldiT seam. Draw a V neck to ihidrplh iin.51 l>'ic>ming to you. Draw In the revers then fold paper under Oil Ihe V neck line and truce rcvi'i %  t-roorh me. \^t SPEEDILY] DISPELS. */neen lei; I >r p Mondav n:a: *or* ner d:aaiond iven io ner in *n.in inea in •he laoc: of her Olart -oa: fhe Queen Mother wore a dktmor.d llower *mrv noon' (liii tons n i:ied to 'ir n'.act leasa Vomen *no want :o loiton royai fajbion will flna ;•. tsi Areraie nr.ee ol a flower *prav in real diamo-d* If Kiooo vlucn HOUBII: si er in trie wcona nand lewe'. hoo? are trw frnu.ne Victor an flower Dieces if vou can find '-hem thev coti aboui CI-5C %  ' evrn '"'• fhe^o^r "id M 'i womer are ae::gniiui to loos ,""."" > *' aiacious to ua.a to and oo y n :he:r oeet ai IM t*ad 4 SKTES hwamw *ne nas ciiarm doesn i neoo M make anv eflon ai al in M.a> Monran if-l.le eai i from the jiue an.rtj wni'e collar* Port i Oavio laaaer na> u-^ed )oui sciiemr lor ootn DM portraiu lAll u*on ol W Vox R-o ano Uieui %  colon'-l o L Hoare lr faaMt 'hinks ll.-IC. ing to your particular taste). Pour the rice which you have previously washed into the fat and lei it cook for about three minute* stirring all the time. Add then the boiling water which has to be double the weight of the rice (about 1 pint) and let it took Slir again, season with salt and slowly for twenty minutes. Sift let it start boiling again, -over the currle and add 1 beaten egg the saucepan with Its lid and put yolk and 2 tublespoonsful of immediately In the oven where cream or evaporated milk. y..u leave it for exactly 18 Hicr Creole minutes. When ready, take the Put ln „ M ucepan 2 pints of saucepan out of the oven, add a boiling water some salt 3 ozs. of few peaces of butter, pour into a | ard( un lmal lard) and 1 pound mole* ot womer. m.!.r Ka* Hin. monrt Mania-•; Kaw:.nus Vivien Leiar ano Dam* *elicity Hai rnirv former WAAP* com mandani. now a brewer? director cream or wmte combination Ihe charming oeople ore Ihe t:di Slvrt ma nufaciurer.* du-agree with ones always neai in appearance M Janner Trie? aj tt a and mind The women wno unfaslnor.aOle and untidy '! WOIU.l COHYRIUMI RBSirtVED t:d* Ills d sorKSmsed llsh and You can make : of rice. Cover the saucepan and BACK Width n o be back rntiNT .oparate sauce if you like with let 1( cook t „ r aDO ut twenty rnions. or tomatoes, or garlic and mlnutes The nee will have abut or anchoviessorbed all the water by then. Add l-ai.DI„. -J f i 3 more ounces of lard and stir Indian Klce and Lurrie wl h a forki You Mn ^ butter; I^Hf C ^ tU t? rlc ln qui "" H >ou don't like the lard. :. different way. Put some water H.VINO FISH into a saucepan with sail. When i don t knef>per Currle powder 1 teaspoonIM '* ful. Flour 1 teaapoonful, Water When you are ready to sew join | Egg yolk. Cream or milk 2 Fashion tailpiece 'ROM PADS COhES i CHOIRIOY cttun Flying fish 6 English mustard half spoonful White pepper Marioram Fillets of anchovies Oil Limp Flour 1 egg Parsley. Clean the llsh i teaCHOIRBOY COLLAR tn Marched white orpondie i summer idea from Paris lor changing the appearance o plain dark dress. It looks most attractive worn over lie H* decollete boat-shaped neckline. \ Take now the flying lUh one at a time, cover each one of them with the mixture like a veil and leave them until you are almos'. Breadcrumbs Lime Juice or vinegar. Garlic. Bone and clean the llsh. Put W. B. HUTCHINSON & CO. ft***? to MAP.HILL STREET. BRIDGeTOWN %  "'* MT J -fTi 30 tibletsfor 2 6 ;,l] I i..4 BTAIMOIFD.UO*,^. s*.<>. oaraiaiau %  VIS'TWIMM %  ; .irmhole. Make an extr %  eady to go to dinner. Take then them in a pyrex dish so that they .,.„ ,.,„ -nd bone U. Pu" the flying llsh and roll each of cover the bottom *£ w J' to 1 tcaspoonful of English mustard them starting from the tail, pass part of the Ash up. Add 2 tablecup, a tinv bit of white them through the flour then in apoonsful of oil. salt and pepper. bit of parsley, the ihe beaten egg and fry them in Cut a few pieces of garlic then u., asniMam and t h e fillet* of hot lard or oiL When ready put finish by adding the chipped id revers to the mtk line all at once, chip the not born. Add the finely chipped anchovies which ycu have prethem on a dish and serve with parsley and the breadcrumb*. Sd extend teems, mm and press. paiafley. the ham. the thyme and viously mashed Mix everything parsley and pieces of lime. Add the rest of the oil. Bake In Oil 5 tablvspoonsful noderate oven for about I an hour. Pepper When cooked add the Juice ol one Parsley 1 tablespoonful (chipplune or more according to taste If you llncl you have troubli getting the tabs on the end* of the the cent if back seam first then tcaspoonsful. >..ke right tiy working with a %  •-•>'<" the back neck facing to the put the butter or margarine in complete front pattern. yoke facing and fac* the back a saucepan. Chip the onion and pepper quite irmhole. yoke rawer* and back || ft fry. Be er.reful that it does dry mar) Pin the yoke back shoulder back shoulder to meet yoke Join the centre front seams and u|wpMr. Then' add the teaa^Kmw with jf glass of olive oil or melted Straighten out top part of back .uie seam.-. Then face the front f u l of Currie Powder and the leabutter if you dont like the taste ful of flour. Let it cook for a of Olive oil. and add the juice of yoke and revcrs patlci n tot and neckline fn fi'w minutes then add the water half u lime. •d] vinegar according to taste. A tm t>on of the kidneys ia to eluninata harmfu, UBSMHsM i'om Ihe syslem. If tha kidnrya gt the (rouble is to htip the kidneys. They should be toned up with De Witt's Pilla the medicine made specially lor this purpose. De Witt's Pills liave a soothing, cleansing and antiseptic artioa on the kidneys that j brings them back to perform their *' natural function properly. Be Witt* Pills are a eery well-tried remedy. They are sold all over the world and wc have many letters from sufferers telling of tfln i gainrd, after years of sufferm* after taking De Will's Pills. They act on the kidneys quickly. Why nit try them foe TOUT trouble? Co to your chemist and obtain a supply to-day. Doctors Prove ... A lovelier Complexion in 14 Days /?/ DeWllt'iPllli n •*< ad*H| (ar BACKACHE JOINT PAINS RHEUMATIC PAINS LUMBAGO SCIATICA OUR GUARANTEE D* Wilt's Pills ar* made under strictly lygiemc ronditiona and the ingredients all conform to ngid ataixhuda of punly. DE.WITTS PILLS for Kidney and Bladder Troubles %to a Brighter. Fresher ^ \ ^ ^->#^ ,. g 5nplexion. use Patmolive ^ ^S ID as Doctors Advised *fA leoding ikin specialists proved thol It Polmollv* Soap con Improve com' plosions in many ways. Oily shin looks N xlu 'i *-... ( %  • —• %  less oily-dull, drab shin wonderfully 3 *• *• i—•••*(• M S>^ b'ighler Coarse-looking shin appears \^rr -^ 60 Counlrirn More Clark* pleamf >ii nl ii.say <-• Children'* Sandal** %. All owr the world mothers feel satisfied if they get 1 Clarks Children's Sandals. What's behind this long-tested reputation? Finest, richest leather* and rubbers .•. a choice of width fittings . scientific design based on thousands tf • %  • M measurements .. Clark* sktl tashioning which makes their footwear list so new." so long . Over 126 years behind them — no wonder you all want them . C-UXA/r<5j SANDALS rVJX lr t I 1 CLANK LTD. fWfcaleaaia **.). STUelT. SOf-tCT. FNCLAMO LOCAL AGENTS : ALIC RUSSELL A CO BARBADOS l'ie* ftis/iimxthfr u mium n vtirt



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SINI1W .11 Nl M, 1952 SUNDAY ADVUt'ATK PARE VINE Ten Days Under Canvas II you look very closely as you drop down from Cherry Tree Hill toward* the flat Belleulaiiw country you will see something bright and shining among ihe fat pork shrubs It is the silverpaialee, gvajer tank Highways ati i Tran purl Department have erected f"i tht lawbados Regin>c;,t whose ten-day (.imp at Walkers' Savannah ends this morning. To enn savannah you mu*t pas< the coul of Barbados* only lady member of the House of Assembly. The approach to the savannah is along it dusty/cart track just tolerable for motor vehicles in drv wejiher. On both sides of the pnckle-atudde.1 eacti grow at intervals unn ela > to ihe camp there is a pmfu*irn of grape '""'-•W Ho nV Sa nnah la :t natural bowl hleh ' font of sloping hillocks on the land farh the He whllg tree (ringed sand dunes shut off its View of the soa. As you look strncM nhnrt inward* Cl Ik. Mount % % %  I aril) notice a triads of eaguannas which lead to an encIos-:-fi p where cattle for slaughtering are t>eing reared by n enterprising American who li.nl* from Texas. Beyond the fenced-In pasture land there [s a natural lake or pond in which officer* and men of the Barbados Regiment ha\.' U*en nwlmm'nc daily for the 11 nine d 11M water of the pond is not %  ant ing as the nearby s*a but i (tag from dangerous currents. Oppolite the casuarlna trees as you face the direction of Ren TerterifTe is the treataas savannah clearing on which the sanrt coloured tell tents of the Barbados 'teg.meikt have b i n pits! i Flic the tenta a large Union J.irk sways in the breeze. On visitors* da* the flag of the Barbados Regiment flaps i n its place. Nearer to nines stands the armory tent and still closer is the tent of 't'l-master. the Important tent in which is stored quantities of meet, tins, vegetable produce, and bacon from I by bacon factory at Gregg Farm. Meat and ice are kept in a large i-iL>o X Across the way from the quarter-master's ration house, built under the casuarinas from wooden framework boards and galvanise sheets which belong to the Harhadna Regiment Within this half.open kitchen huge wood-fired stove* are used to cook, for two hundred men. The soldiers' dinner, tea and •.upper is served on tables placed nearby and protected from the heat of the sun by the cool canopy of casuarln.i foliage overhead. A stone throw away is the bare r il.ro up '.cni >>i %  %  re daily sick parade* are 'und the mese 1 %  •oekgalcanU-vii whlCB II opened three times > .<-, —,., %  I-iiers'can consume liquid and solid refreahmciu in ei oflh lal ratloH At niuhi a pro* lei twelve men keeps watch on the keeping cmp. Cut oft from the swimming in the pone; In the open pasture near the tents or deck tennis for those who prei'w-ltr guard mounu at :he retreat is ceremonl% %  !ence of rnp g| 1830. Supper is %  close* at I'lOO A bugler blow* Bret DOBI il I1M %  ..-.ii but i"'.-' at 2J0O At 2213 the lights which ST* %  by the camp". crating set are out. That was the Gavn routine on Tuesday last hen | spent two hours away from the heat and bnatlt of -wn. But a l:p of p*pet l.ixln -camp routine %  lies which eann 1 oed on a piece pa| Wring the two hours %  f in motlo 1th rifles, tin bat! al lie Id pack*. i pot ttrguudi a lire while other* were : i.1 \ \ i %  .: 'V %  I M DINNER tlsCE and Urgs ii.-lj.itiKfor tired ( {*< urge Hutite ONE ETE -tgal^uie boar, one aye rtir.id. em ; ttilfl tails the mlf*m at IMQ • / LOOKING DOWN on the camp from a hill behind. To Us rlga; is the • Mai pi i: i %  log in this natural The gold I I been t %  !having an Idla time at Walkers. dsars uf •• %  Bai have been spending ten days of pi %  *i t"ork and III R %  laad from I t.s in which they have camp COT* Uimbtring peace! to 1 eUM td In tMi colourful buglei's ah .lie call nt Zotsave unl ltd music 5.30 a.m. soldiers are i and music to n i rronvOnO -0746. cotaoiunlty centre at BeUex The day's routine begins with plume ,t 0300 and the pf the day is nl 11 a.m. Dinner u really is nn ideal *itc for a i -f rise end the day's military camp thu Walk**. 10, Tea is read %  i'"> "'•'' pag th.ie is from to-dny the water pipes loaned i .rtnean1 i Agriculture and Hu • I %  pi have to L. tut; iwu liours at Walkert 1 could l.„. I!LI %  "IK" f Hie iIan.( > young male popula.. to experience tnf stimulus Bud goni .r ha* l*cn felt hv ihe f tin Barbados Fti ornrnl in this year's annuul BkM ihe success of u camp will give a mm b stttae % %  ( the itegiincnt and maybe In a ye oi two n will be gpent bi neighoouring St. i.utia or St. %  •-I %  Thai. '. .|>~f< !' %  > \.xi>~llO>->Mt,ltoMolrotD|>LnMnta r >'l-'v*rkli>iriMi|'>-i>'tlr > %  juu .m. tin aristocrat of stockings A MEMBER of the Rogunent %  UndH mard In a tour of -eittiv BABY'S TEETHING need give you no anxieties There nrr-il he oo rent letuiglil*. no tears, no bahy disorders. U vgaj batVa \-hton & l'srsons lafant*' Powders handy. Moihn. nil over the. *Bjg|| have luuud tlirut IUK and .....In.:: gag LBSOL1 TKLT SAFE. ASHTON ft PARSONS INFANTS POWDERS BY THE WAY ... % Baocfteomftsi THE TROOPS in fllf Of three, prepare to march olf the parade ground, "by the right", T HE erord Periguewr* I i c D my ear, 1 %  ; nee w.liiml man who was irying to tell itt>1 ktef, hard] l v the statue .f i Id liugeaud, who Fought as a ser^anl at AusteiP.-xilnixe: On* thing at a time, leaiae! Myself: Then here t* K"i'ig on willi. This sale man'! patter was unending, aid he even sang a song .-gainst the rich In I'Y*. whi h I ni h .-.. hi n %  aVsM to > i da> Por hi it. a". We ull howled In. Tn pr. the i • %  ad water ov< i a .mi the i ) La< kd ihen> Thu rei It *, but the yodng man b bought a tin. rradneae: Wh d ., Mreatf: Not at all. It will %  BPiTI <- in Cotton, Art Silk, and Nylgag in "Fashinn-riijht" Mylcs. Thesr have been most carefully selected and amongst lhem you'll find Norni'lhini; suitable for any occasion. HARRISONS BROAD STRFET-DIAL 2352 y ggeeaaaaaae >aaaa4a iE-.i i ^ii War Qrealest blessing 9s Qood Wealth 4* ^^EWJDE COLOGNE -atrt COUKiNE C*' SltiME w fArtuus aim k u'Hj> LMIL 'She Weight of Sklight 'Jrom ffifomtng till Wight The\e are Ret em ArrlvmU 4711 Kaa dc Colosnc 4711 Khavhif Bowl, 4711 Altar %  i*t i an 4711 So.ps 4711 04MJH Slirks 4711 I'lrliuur^ 4711 Kill II. . nil i >,i ii.Categ". ...il.Wr in .11.1,. % %  %  I" Lre Family CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD. 10. II. 12 6t 13 Broad Street. MM %  ..Itli is ihe greatest osiet a man or woman ran have In f.e t. It is the only 11KAL asset. It i good hvmg habits. It is doubly assured by a HKUtiLAK visit to a physician. We stand ready at all times to fill all prescriptions written by your own d De sure to nend us your next pres.riptinn and he i | drugs compounded with eecuraC*. KNIGHTS DRUG STORES Unit PfsMSaai .l#r mill 4 tt.si #.** • IN JAM . 2-11. Till .41 Kim PI M IIK.S III CIJ Tin .41 K'K, 0U KVA 1H.I V pr Tin .21 HSDO i %  .1 D I'll Kl.K ...per J.ir .: SIKAKi KID.V1V I'lUHIKi; par Tin .a ROAST BUT per Tin .71 pw in 3fc am fi'urrcu ouvn per j.r .BI H AIM OUVH per J.r .! i Ikiml pn pkt I HEfSI IPHBAD LION Will IK PKPPKH LION BLACK PKPPBR pef Tin It) lb Tin C. B. i pti Tin REAL SPECIAL SAVDN per 10-lbs. |.T 4-lbs. KEI1S t* Tin NKII-Si.-. ; ; MT II, .1.1 ,,. r |„, x 24 19c. •a 39c Hi t.7 41c. 11.04 1 20 2 8 %  4k I n n ONLY COCKADE KINK HUM .'iliiiisl'iilil finill ri. L'u., I.lil.



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P.\(.F. FOI'RTTC M SDAy VDVOCATF. SUNDAY. JUNE 12. 1M1 CLASSIFIED Ans:* 3mm:m mm \ AUTIOX SALES TFLEPHOIf JSOB .. aw* at Nurw Johnaor. > I on-of-Spaln 1)1 W) Dial 447* l'.. %  i, ii n -"'. ""i t I"-On •"" Joerph Kaaaeuuel F r el 4 P "> W'i |Brj • " %  I' E h. .dauahler* Trinidad and US A pap*i >MirHI*l> :l. I'MI Shephen Hn %  tea.i*i Lit. a,.*d. • %  a.M %  %  .•*r-1 %  Ark" and Jefl.. %  DM)I and Oil* Kl.rpl.erd IV THANKS -I VI.I. AllrVM T>. William Waterm-i. A Brilton. X Ruad. Saint MWha BCkr.ool and the uarf.il B"Ui laddered l> their %  Ml MaU-Wf II* uiidcraagwad % % %  • thner Mind rrier.o. i" MUi-i-rt f.wei.l. ent delence and h.. in i mat* TTawnhili t,lLh\r—The family "I th* W Hi* OUfcea b thiwih ih It, return thank, to ell ' %  Irwndu who *ent BSJialBB, 1 HI an* way i their recent • empathy IMMUH — TW .i-der* .. gJB FOB. K.M.K r-AR-N mo MONKT IU.I.M, in rtjffl .[.a,%  of fnraa* today. in* Re-i.' 4 H-n %  %  Hi.i s %i I s AITOMOTIVE REAL ESTATE UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER It? lawtructton nravM I will Mil %  .T.dav June irtb. .1 M-wr. ran HOT. .1 oV *** m ft MMtMII K.... i TiVl",'*." 5~"* C %  %  —Sao I" -e* *•!* -I > O lei I %  1 Ni>FR THE SILVER II WIMFR Ton inWr reeenUy vrrhauled I.celWmt ". :s (-All lord Cnniul Ibtaehi in pe-'ecl Id dona only **fO iMlea. ,„..,. for .ellina ewner now rrUdlM i England CM he MM M MeXnearne* ; Co. of contact Mr C. Clark. .... stie-i. Phone MO I M ( AH IUW Hlllman Mini NOW It* II I good condition Dial Mil BY Al'CTION' l-FT %  **%  *"""• %  • A THAINCU Al i TtONEEH WITH WARS OF l> KI'IF.NCg (ALSO AUCTION YOUB HOUSE ..Mil ii i AM rn i EFT A II RANGING FROM J TO BE i HANITAIIIF AND I AM WTTII liol I will QIVB A HAIM>NAHIJ: PART or MY COMMISSION To \VY MAI. DESEHVINU CAl'.'E NAMFO BY PCR*.ONS aivistci Mr. :£l'CH SALES. WHAT AIVOL'T TUB 'CAHCKH CAMPAION— SITIMA. TION. TERMS. I'DNUITIONS AND l-AYMEVTS WITHIN W HOIIHI OI'AHANTBEI* DIAL 3111. "OUV| BOUOH HAST1M.H DIH III UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER Mr. aid wm M ii ,) %  hfj T' ., Rt.mdllloncd .i-i l HIT ROYAL I *MM u f a *n \ .1 n It i p <-.ir wh two | MM .lan iwilh Cupboard.* II Inch atona nunawl ibout T yn. Oldi. Illmnl A Brafjn -mi-. 1 Ttiii.ii. Uaraa*. m*ii1 -i I. Rao/. A-l Condition, H-i-k Yard rncloaad with Hbuic, aUnil 10D M| II Oolnd lor Onl.v Under tl.H. AT WAKtlNOH SraMdr ''-"I"— IN Mt T Ot>* K.an IWdrooni Saoo* PkkNWT | | Under CI.1W Cuy Buainoa. Prrmkwa A cwnaw. AT WOKTMINO SAIS ail ratlnl SV... Rldhl-of-Wa* In fen, 3 Modroom Bunialow Tp* all Modani Can.wlw.... Vn Good Condllmn. over •MO *Q ft Oolnd Under 1J 3tU C Ma far AUnoat unrthln| l n na*l Ert-lr DUI 1111 D f o> Abrvu. Aurttonc*. ft Raal Kal..te Ai.ni "Oliv* Roiiarti' Hn*tln|i 13 -j in. wm VfflJi*dy nert ._, „ .. „ p „, „., %  .-!..-*> tub chain ii%  nth. a— i alanda, colUrtwr. —n, ... Move .> And lardor. r*tjdalra. Ironl'.H jpajJ • droaalA* ^01,. t IngM b*d)tt*4icM and ILIIIIW!. ovea nl*M **a lork. ilimirt. S pk>caicoaV .. i ii.... i-~i n, wfl( i, y,, tm %  . hv order ol Mw*! I M Ca*a "• will aell U-i Ai.rCollnnorBUKk h include* radii I SMrboard Fleor I^eap*. Book and Oroamanl Tables Hoc ken. China rahUirt Very aWOd nal Top De.h. I ^aaw—I r#uchea — irb l ff r Chair Round TBa-ToQ T.ble Raek-n. all In Malioffj. o. Ulaae and OUna %  P lug China | Tva Sar.ire Cut fUa* Taanblen. PVw PaMe* of oUt China; rfih Knlvra and IrOM Hfcord.. Phlleo Radio. 1 • Card T ,, le Vwaartah Chair* Oak K i.alori Dinuu; Taaaht and ChaaT*. la PainM T-IMe Plantar* Laae*. I CBnrolWin; Var nk-a Manor Stii|r Vono Sprlnc* and Deep MahoaPre.. ~ GOVERNMENT NOTICE Ape —i .." I* An. A "NDER THE IVORY HAMMER la Model J Cab over r.nirtne < rn Van* *J.ao 00 Nr. MonrCdWHB 1* *Wt. VaM K.M4 "i Al. e.criient for fa.l luhl ll,-i > FORT ROYAL GARAOB LTD. Telephone HM. 11 I** Oldinuibilr Wal CFF-rNWICTV-and Avenue. HI. I llorav Hoi.* wllb BtaW bawroom* Oaa MoeJeen r., i.eea r*iona C. Wrbtter 11.14 V.' On TueatU. ih i I ofdM [ %  Granvllle. I .ir.t Mail. i %  I |i*i>li %  ....:. %  iWtUl %  '( %  •hloni. nil ) %  BanlWOOd ( value ANKIK TaOTMAN AurUanrrn L'NUF.R THE Ml.VI H HAMMER a i i. ). aid MI Tbi. I --..it i-..i ii_ order of Mi %  all the hou %  M .i %  •j haa n -oikina iiKter Two new lid Apply Alton Ba,nee. Crane a* PL .p. No p yr 21 u-in IVALB PLANTATION Saint Andrew About TWl arable nerea ai.d .ton' %  •?• Honte. Ovaiaaar'i liouaa, oatul ouibuildlnai. two horaa*. ran. ate The above JManta.it ill br nM v .;i for aah> M awcttan on rrlda*, the llth July naat. unlaw. prav1o.nl % %  M • private treaty All inqulrMi ahnuld ut I he ur-deruene-l In thf lltal CARRINOTON A SftAL'.' I. Brldfetowr, 10 0 13 4 Tahlca Wiui man. riaia leat. -M.ndard Lamp. %  Caned Mindi. Sheraton Ih-ih<-• %  >.-, with RarrltolnRnl.mda M T Water Table. Uprlalit I IBanllrtU. era Cloeh ITTO All In old laahoa-anv Olaaa and -. fi-.i. .1 TM >r.it •> r Bow P. •i % %  • jurrH-ha HullUng Prlnta 1 Thain..arta. Cordaa RaAoivma Book oar UNDER THE DIAMOND ra-hoa HanatorT Dawn* Table oid li\,i\ll if naahoii Tall Poat Bid iU lda with .prli—a iinn.nr.n 1 hfiaht Table* Smale Brditaad. YOBO By in.trurt-ona received Irom HlM j-,,,,,-, rieep Sleep Maltrraaaa. HepLoaa I will aell bv aurtlon nt her houae Lh.iCb**t of Drawwra Stnga* and al Kocklay. Ch t_h on Wadneadav neat. rm,i.> M T Tfiawafanlli Cupboarda and Ulh June at II So p m bar entlra lot Pioaea* Chamber ware. Cedar PTraa. ..f honaahold rMrnltura -him Includaa Filai4i*a. L*rd*r. Rleelrie ll.n Paale I larffa dlnlnf table aidaC'iard. inahoB Blac Row. Kitchen Cab.nel. Iglja< 'rblaa dining room chain, Mahog Down.. Table, and Kitchen .iten.ll. wttae Radio, cheat of drawara. BMa•>• g-vatve Radio. I^rga Tolaacop. n.oni bodataad A* maltmi. draeatng and .land Binocular.. Baron.etc:'. TnerOoneral ClacttuRHrigeralor. momaiar. Chlotlnaj Clockt and othar Klactilc boa. toolbox. 4 bumar aaa tcma H vnlua Bah, n M a e'-eb VACANCY FOR CROWN COl'NSEI B RITISH HONDURAS Application, ire Invited loi tinpost of Crown Counsel. British Hondurat. Tinpo.i l^ pvnuonaule -nd rarrMg a salary In tht* scale of W.iaO x 120 3.6ffJ0 ISO — LMO t.B. 14,0-0 x 150 — 4,200. Thdj point of entry to the scale will depend on the qualification* and experience of the successful candidate. When travelling ou duly a subatatence allowamcr of $3 00 for the ririt ix day* and SZ.Ou a day after the first gist days. Is paid. The appointment will be on probation [or two years in the flnt inatance. If the r.fnce In conftrmi-d m the appointment, he w-lU be eligible for admission to the permanent and pensionable establishment. In other respects the appointment will be subject to Colonial Regulations and local Genera! Orders. ee passage* will be provided on first appointment and on termination of appointment foe the officer and family not t x. reding four persons In all. Leave with full salary H lii.nted at thv tale of 3 days for each month of resident service, with maximum of IM days. The length of tour is S—I yean. 1 paaaaice* on leave are provided for the officer and his wife, subject to the provision of funds annually by the Legislative Council. Cancttdotca should be a Barrister a r Law with at leant four years ft] experience. The gucccsful candidate will be required to pass a rnadlcal examination. He will be gunjact to taxation In aocondanc* with local legislation. Applications should be addressed to the* Colonial Secretary, British Honduraa. to reach him at soon as pn.aao*e and In any event not luiar than the SOth Julv. 19S2 M.f.M—In. wotifQf* Mooaaj* rrarNrmai: i"o or nr POT U> Inc Mr* Carlotl. %  HintUbur?' Hoaal K>at. Katlh. Albai ELECTRICAL ,< i. ikw 13 S M PIBXT—W. bag %  ih thla madliiin thank, lo .11 tr-.kii-1 (..end. Who, at*rn*r.t %  •* Imeral a-nl wreath, a* PA B> way % %  p-ea— lhair vrnathj fc mir raawat !"!" V* nwnl r.i.aad7bf lb< J.art levelled aaw anipcneait ol tiarrard iron apeeal AulomaUr Changara at 1 C S. Mallei a. Co Lad. HaaUa En.. I'VE RATTTRY 5S7TSJual a fow left. UAlTB'tt RADIO BaaPOMUM IM1 II. I I CtlAllt-Oiw ECRNITURE IN P4EMOR1AM Lalinder Koacli wh. 1M< I foraolf aauththatr voiceraiaa. Ra-ocaetiia hear, on Triumphal AlL'uiat'AllauU. Aila>ri k p.-cn. iHu.i'.n.l' M 1 a Millm.i.n. Mr and Mia I. iMa-. I M' FOR REVr UOUSES Attractive aaaalde Flat main i. I.nga. romfortably lurnlahrd. Hath. Open Verandah fncing ... I %  UtfaAI/>W-Th. Modem Buiii %  Parriford ataxwoll Hoad lolly ..i-hed all moden. ...i.venlencaa In ,X July Ring Nugaa Pilgrim Monday dutlng tha day PhonFUKMI1HKU FLAT.—at Dundee, t LaWTOfrf* Suitable for > only Ava able Juno 1Mb Onward Phono sa*B Philip ConOL July, No%cl >I*I 4*!g ii g as-1 NaTWHAVKN. c...... i IN. lied F..r Julv PI" bar onlDial *4la ROOat-Tiorn Jul* 1. Qlfl Shop Suitable I riowor Shop. Holrdre. at May fair 4 to 0 p m Ink. SI I...ph Wheel G S100.0D Ai.pl V avcajr'a Vlgaga SI S BS-4n Hocsr 4.B04 aquare foot 01 land att.-hed L>roll*4 Road. Chrlat Churck. Tha .waning houae contain*, living room. aag badioooia, kitchenette, uaual conjenlenee.. Government Water tnatalled louae wired for clocU-wily. InapevtUin >n applk-alMn to tha tenant Mr Ii... *l ween tha hour, of II am and I P m rlovo. glaaa %  re. picture Int.rc.l IBRMS CASH t'ABCY A SCOTT. BRANKEK. TROTMAN Auctioneer%  aB*. Ung houao will'be i ompatllKii. at g PHea] STtb hj up lor aale by public IMTIra. Janie. Slre-t. a ln-Ur.t al J p m YEARWOOD A BOYcr SolMltora II 0 11gn i niMT'iii • Tha undaralgned will oRar for aali at Public Competition at their oflU'. No IT High Street. Bridgetown, oi I'rlday ihe 4U> dav ol Jut* U>SI n Tha bianaalov. known .. CABVIUJ y ith Ihe land thereto mnUinlng by ad lureinent SMI aq fl alt.iate %  r Oartlani. Chrlat Church an bedroom and Drawing ho*jaii> modern Mar rite .ulte painlcd IIM" I good aa iww t>m'v^ lor partlculara phone ii a.si-m rrm.iiMiniis MECHANICAL TVl-rWRITtRB,— Thla weak. Theae beautiful typewntera made by world famoua OrlBlnal Odhner-Faeit Irr.ni apai-ial alloy l.ardenad .teaU avail. abla onl, in Nwedar. will teat you a Ilia lime fealurea include ala eatra character keyand Iho tamoua feather touch typin* Tii introduce three machine* we will quota you the loweel price* IIRAUS1IAW at COMPANY. LSU-S—i.tn. au 11, I a3 LIVESTOCK r aala Apply Hn K1TTKNS 3 pure brad, I V.u. M one cream, one an Mi. U*ron Proveibe. No Una nding HOMHk n,,a mrae OUKRN HKV liriKYRt A|H'1 Maruiger. Foat. Hall. 8t Joaaah II H 31 Tn ragssar. Beaieyi l'i • IS l*n POULTRY M.yifl. niLakipu Appl) . '-t Royal Yacht Club lll'AUTY f iy -un th, WIIHIW.ik. |aeaa Milk and Aim...,. Beauty Soap lie Irom your Buppliei li..v..ina Plant. I gS|" NIRVANT A ina; aiul h.iM> i I. tha a-rn^in MISCELLANEOUS I'OSITION-Cook tbutler pantile. p-clally Reaponalhle Iwatfin <• billing Di..l 4Me SIM I TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS ealra Bon-n fiuret Radifluaion for IS recotrunandw norm in one calandai month. PS W POCKF.T MOMY i by teoorrimanding SS new %  IJDITFIJBIUN in one mo I.INM.i srrs. A cuva 14 ploee %  dealgna Prkr< :.:; %  .1 i\ 1 4SB> i* a i 4i. I RII./II it. Una -, .. .'.. % %  i %  .„,.*( Elertriral. hrapatdi DUI Mil a w in I B SJSM || rrui ft per tb at Woodl.nd PUnla lea jni as 314 31 g ss-aa fjrn si %  ml Ml 11 11 V vupertOT qualllv THAMl UR 'n SI -In 1UOJ11H 'U'N recpnitneiiJiiiii lull partinii-r. ..ll.ee i.AlVANlSgp Bpa a ial lara Beat quality Eng he, i. an sain ft> Alao aalvamaad nail. SO ted FJ IS a P> BROS Fi oflei for i.h aalvanwad IIO gTt is 14 MM, combined dlatvln*a rn. 3 bod room*, toilet, bath urther partlculara ule apply to:— .n-rir CATTOHD A CK> laclrliltI al 44a* | ..T.llll-.l an a u NOTICE Tliaio wUI i.r cricket I una al S p b* an important tag it lag implraa on Mwndar Sard n at tha Challenar mand invited t NOTICE I mala cltlren* of Ihe United StntM '! %  '". %  I. tho agca of lg and SS lealdlna Harbadoa ..re i e-, le-te-T to ca"" American Conaulate from July 1*43 lor Selective Service RogKti •r tha Univmal Military TtaUilag Servioa AM. All mala citiien* of the United "taleho attain tha ago of lg rin aub-.qu.nt to July 11, ISM, are required i. iral.ter upon Ihe dav they attafn the HhtMnth annlvariary of the day Of ti.elr birth, or within five day* thrrrFor further imerican Cont badoa. GOVERNMENT NOTICES LEASE OF AGRK CLTURAL HOLDINGS AT SEAWELL Persons desiring to lease one of the seven afrlcultural holdings at Scawell, Christ Church, In accordance with the rjreacribed conditions of lease should apply In writing to the Director of Agriculture, Department of Agriculture. Bridgetown, not later than the 9th of July, 1052. 2. Copies of the statement of conditions of lease may be seen at the District Agricultufal Statioi.. and at the Head Office of the I>eparlmitnt of Agriculture. Bridgetow No applicant wit! he considered who Is unable to comply fully with 'he conditions of lease. 22 6.52—3n. SHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. Ml INI. FROM FI'ROPr M 8 STKNTOR ITUi June, IBM M S HXSTTA 4th July. |ggl B B COTTICA llth July, Iggl aAFUND TO riiun M s OKANJESTAD ISth July 1SU aAlLIM. TO 1KINIUAD. PAatAlfAHBO wn naiTi-H OIIANA M S DofNAlHi: soth June, ISM U S STENTOR llth July. ISB3 B S COTTICA lath July, IfS! HUM. Ill IIUMIIMI M S 3PIOKHBORG llth June. l5j -AILLNO IO IRINfDAD A CIRACAO M s irtxTLA 1UT July. IMS 8. P MI'BION. BON a CO. LTt> Aaaaaa .'/,w.^v/y J i %  a a a a •oi Tha M v i AiuuiiBBf wUI rcapt Cargo and P.•earner, for Antigua. MoniaerraL >nd St KItta Dal. acepl Donm Nevi. not I Red M V -MONBCA" will Cargo and Paaaengeat for lea, Aflllgua. Monlaacrat. and St. KittSailing Prtiwx goaooKia OWKSBS' ASSOCIATION UNC-l CaawalBM — T.I. Nw. 1041 THE BARBADOS REGIMENT V(HH is B> Major O. F. C. WAUOTT. E.D., Comm.ii ni inn. The Barbadus Heumtent. I I'AKAIlr.s There will be no parude on Thuisday, 26 June. 52. The next parade will be nl 1700 hours on Thursday. 3 July, 82. Further details will be published later. 2. OFFICERS' MESH MEETING Thenwill be a Mesa Meeting ot the Officers* Mess nt 2015 ho\ira on Saturday, 28 Jane. 92. Honorary Member* may attend at 2045 hours. M. L D. SKEWES-COX, Major. SOI. F. it Adjutant. The Barbados Regiment. St. Ann's Fact. 21 Jim. 52. PATNI NOTICE to I -Liaf ..I OIK. I 1-1 IM. MIS g*Maa*4 NOTirK IS HRRTJIY QIVrTN l!i prruma having any drbta Of claim* ... nlTeetlng Ina Mtate of UBOROF .MU.1NIITON PAYNB late ot CUaphaain iha paikah of Chrlat C^^ l rah who 4WI IN thla I.land on tho Mth IVtaawb-r. 1*11. are haraby rwauirad to ^4 ha imir Uia of Uwlr •Ulrna dul atte.ted VIhi underatanad JOBEPH ((NF-HIMl's Tt'ln.n .1 .111 Rmb.ick Blraat nrldgetawn. on ... ".ION Iha Slat dav of Julv IMS. olt.i which daHa I ah.11 proceed to dkrtrlbula the ...wrta of the e.tale among the partie. .DUI -I thereto having rca-.rd to th. debt. .Dd .aim. only Ol whkh I aMll then hate had nottc* and that 1 ahall not be IMbla for aaawla M dPUib.iied to any pei-m ol wh.-e dabl or claim I .ha* not '.ava had aotica at tinl af auoh dlllllaSgaaSB And aU awvaona kadablad ratal > are raquMtod to ......inta without daiay lh>i*d ti.lt hrth day of May. 1SR> %  osEi-ii ohiaauiua TUHOII. isar %  qualuaad Baacutor. I .uta, Oaaaga Aillngton Prja, •**"* %  15 irfamfsTi thMt FOR SALE MISCELLANEOUS KIT BA Tat—aXippIkM ol lal bait* .pared b/ tho Agrtrulluriii SoclatT III be available to the ganaral paibllc r a limited oailod al the Sic I Shell. wwwo Park, and may be purchac.i lc each, betwwaci tho ho*ira of a anat 4 p.aa.. aacaa* traaa n ... II p-a-_ga. -.. i'. .PUN LaarSSJ *"" '' in,. Orev. Mauve and White SS" '* long aleevad. kh. or US as m doa Wm Honry Strc THAW I SB— In I OM A MM Ml LOST iiTiawti.... laclM in gn ..lid L.ke.. 1" CM) Ax. o**r Ooddard->,. %  :.pin* I. d al •: % %  ,r.l If (..I.1 I Mil AIIOVAI MODfiRN HIGH SCHOOL. PHpUa who would Ilka to be placed ..n Ska waltlna II.t of thla arhool fof -rhMl yeai I0i3 wl... h .-.mmenra. in Vptombti ISM are a.had to apply for a waiting lt form Call or Irlrphone ISM and .1 will he poated to you. The .lat* af O^ Entran.. E— % % %  ".a taaulta af which m fnea •.hnl.. •luge will be awaideri. will bo announced later I A I.VM g I 11SM in V VF. •in iB a M—4n Bpecial PTH knar* WMIhai u a SSii ol II FUKHIN i.-i.le like new Nr. "o..i lo..k Iwtter if Sanded tha Null, ran do the Job whether • ea. have electric Power or not Call tv.ljn Hatch and Co Lad ISaoaa> — :i.W4 or 3MB 33 g Sfl3n n i in" areae with Baibado. •poll lotii %  11, %  r i %  >. || .hiidr. lor ..irl. and die.ee. al 11 10 alao •3 1 THANI nROS n a ir-aon Cray vary ideal .hade sam M * l.iniltrd quantllv llnw Bill In A'AS n.f A i %  ml Pan' I i.. Marl, up I.. I. I I ..raBld.it'-. with qudiifi.-.iii >*htultur.il Sci.i.r *,!. Saaai. lor a Oraduale II TSS %  Tl 1 inn %  %  ctaaa hotioura SI.MO.9S XaW AJpnrance aWlll ha made for pre... • .paalaaea Applicationwith team. %  i.ila ahould i.e ^ %  by rTth Jul,. ISat PRIMUS UTOVI' I—en proven by vMra of •!_, I'm. an m.urancr ceitifltat. aaaln.l Sir 'imp inferior aaa le* furl and are 1 moat economical and efficient cookai.paralua made Acaapt labla O Priaiua' la available 11AI LINOSPine %  %  %  Office Railing* • %  L M B Meyer M %  <: %  i %  hnU'AI-ANl Tin ud.nl ii a ss—ii Gfeja Men Made Younger By Treating Gland Hatting up ulg&ta, boralag MUMlion of organa. whlUah dtoakauw*. %  lull aoha at baao ca* aatna. groin and lag paina. narvouanaaa waaknaaa BBd laaa ol manly vtgnur are aauaaH i" a dlaaaaa of tha Froatate Oland IB linn l-i.porlaiit aaa gland In • in ninm MI NELSON >IAN CRUISER. i ANAUIAN LoNaTHUCTOJI I-ADY RODNTY (June IS Juno Junai 1 July B June g Jut il July 14 July 14 Juno El June — ID July LADY TCLSON CON CRULSXH CAlfADlAM CON9TRUCTOR IADY RODNEY „ Fur further partlculara, apply to— GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.A f enU. Of fcpt_r and haalth. take tha new aalai. nnc dlaoovary called Rogana. Nnuttier how long you have %  uRared Rooana la au man lead to Ml you nrht.' rolnvlgorata your Proatal. •.land and make you foal 111 to 10 yaora younger nr money back. Oat Rogana from your chomlsL.Tha %  aarant.e pcotacta you. 91 to littere... ._ JOINERS & CAl'INET MAKEKS Wi li.iv,. .u. dseortment of .IIIIIIOII i,i us AND CHROMIl'M PLATED FITTINGS FOR SAME THE IK.VTH.lt. IMI'lHtll If Corser Broad and Tudor Streeis Carlton packaeed Chac Noodle and. Tomato Vegalable W e—ioaraVal Uian canned MUM Kaa> .prapara A Sr packaae alve* 4 •etvlngt Obuinabla from Stanafoid. Scott fc Co Ud Brldaat..wii and Alhcr lay Bros Speight*!*,*.n. and John F Hulaon Ltd -'' ; %  ~Bubacnbo noU, iha n.iif T-H— 9* Ei.ji.nd-. leading Dally Newapapct no arriving la Barhadoa by Air **niy a faw dava after publication In t-knaVn con (ac(: laa OaM, c.o Advocate Co. IM Local HapieeentaUve. T*l. BUS. SANICANS—Kll.h. ..|.-, lever whKh opena Ud %  MB enamotlad Inner pall ...pi.lng Prlc* SS SB each HulchlnMii A CO Plat 4KB rANLTOJV <:iti<:hf:\ \OODLE SOLP So rs> lo prepare. Jtisl empty one |i.n k;i-i into a pint und n half of boiling water, rook for Ii minutes and i*et a H. Sael-hUtown. JOHN F. Ill i-..\ LTD. Ill Ml >i aa* M i* *•. 15I/15J RMbiiok StrMI, BRIDGETOWN Phone No. 4900. Canadian National Steamships ... Furniture (or U-aa munev Bl and we will rat glad H come 11401 NEWS HASH aclal Pencil, for Shorthand IHU Drawing Pencil* bat* Pink Diamond .iW ... JOHNMiN's HTATIONKKV aJB| RAKDWAKIFOR S.-VLE SWEETrm-n. St Pater An E.iata tvpa houM buill ol -tone Contain* large living roean wllb Franco wMdowa lead in* onto covered veeandaha with view ot aaa S hadrOM aa klUhen. alorarocana and uaual outbuilding-. garage and aervanU' quarter* Approa IS acre* wall laid out grounda with right of way over HIljy-RJOT Ralhehefaa — Subaunually built modern atone bunaaiow on brow of cliff affording An* vaew of this wild aod rocky coaat 1 good badiooma living room. 1 aide gallerlea. kitchen, artvant.' quartora and %  araa> Electricity and main* waler Over g acTM VtLLA Vltgur, BT VTMClaST -BMuthhiUy alluatad nouM bulU of local atone with magnificent view, onlv !> %  rnuea Irom Kingatown. 1 mile Coif Club. 100 vard* Aquatic Club Beach with exccllenl iwnnmlng 3--4 bedroom*. I bathroomi. larg* lounge .a a utual outbtiUdlnga ate ESTATE HOUSE: St Jan*. — quiet aurroundlng* cool loraUon on haajrhu overlooking coaat. Town S milr* WTNTrtT MUX. IHU. %  Uotl.ro al with large living roomi. kitchen, to, VOUS kaaagggqag I. S bed. Aaawea. g.OOO aq. fl. of ground cov* spRiNq Movmt. BT JAlint Our of the few propercomplctely private and aecluded baihlna beach The grounda of about lh> acraa aee wOU wooded and could readily be converted Into one of Uta ahow plac*e of Iha Uland The houit la of S •Mreyo and poaaaaaei nottreabM character. 11, aiaSJaaaX HALL TKiiKAt'K %  Retenlly built 1 •tor** houae conalructad of ttone wltA evertte roof Largo living room, gallery, 3 bedroome, kitchen, laondry. S aervanta* room* and garage. Offer, in region of £4.000 con' %  Mered Would coat fiS.S0ll plua el prraant building aoBta. BaftA rOeaT, ST. JAWS Cuedl"' ra anodauad 1 (lorry houae on one of tha nv>et altracUve altaa in thla increaaingiy popular area. Reautiful coral eand beach and calm, aafe Mining Dining room. lo*nuja. vrrandahi on both Aoore. 3 bedrooma. detached garag* and aeivanta' quarter* All errvttea. NEW BVNOAIX7W, ROCKLSTY — COfnanedloua home with I bedroom., lari-e living room, wide verandah with good view.Ttltchen. pantry aervanta' quartan and %  knMrg tiaij Oood aituauoo near Ooaf Ceune. t* JOO NEWTON lA>Dv'-E. MAXWEU. COAST -Solidly con.tructad .lone houar containing ancloaad galIdle.. apaeioua drawing and dining ro*ana. breakfaat room. 3 bedrooma. S a.iragM etc lately able for i %  rant (furnished* RgRIDENCt FONTAllEI.LT %  etorey houae with aalf contained adjoining htaln houae i larg* living %  ou, 4 upatal uaual onVaa. garage -__ rooma. Ann", tin wide verandah. living room. 1 roomy bedrooma and garage. Oood inveetment propoaitlon lUOhllH-NCF. THE OAKDRM. WORTHtNO—aScatara rornl atone bungalow on cor nee *lte wtth wide rrontagra PlMaaiit garden with Bower bad*, lawn, ton' rate terrace, and number of bearing fruit tree. AceoaamodaUon comioiM. Life 1lvtn room, covered gallery. robe*, well flited kitchen, garage wiih covered way to houea, •rninl'i quartora and all uaual onVee All public utility *TVICM Thla property carrUa our hlgheat raco rnmaodaUon Of CStAKCIRY AHD INCH MARLOW, CHIUST CHURCH -Theae two well coneuueted pro pa i r U M tag* Ina* with apnroa. 4 acraa ol coaat land are open tat i (Tar. either aa whole or Bgfggaagaj Uv •Itwated 1 etoeey houae with good ground* of about UaS aq fl. 1 galUrtM. large drawing room, dming room. *iul>. well filed kitchen. 1 double bedrmaT.*. garage and uaual ocneaa. Orfera required, under £3.0*0 would bo conaldarad RENTALS ,UW. ... % %  ( %  reub.l EEAL IBTATI AGENTS Accnomaou Phone 4*M BaUdlBg



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PAGE EICIIT SUNDAY AIiVOCATE SUNDAY, JLNF 12. 195! BA^AD^.^ ADVOCATE fM h *• A4.W.U C. H4 Brat* it. B*a*Q>, June 22. 1H2 VESTRY SYSTEM THE Local GovenUMni Bill based on the report .if Sir John Maude has met with opposition from the majority of members of the eleven VaatriM of the island. Majority opinion on the Vestries considi) the Vaatry system ought to be ; und ih,tt with amendments to the Act and the operation of the new I'lihlkHealth Act defects in Vestry addition can be removed. The case for aboUahing the Vestries seems to be based on emotional theories that the Ves1'in is antiquated and corrupt rather than on any detailed knowledge of what Vestries do or do not perform. People who do not even know the compositii.n of Vestries jmd who have no Idea of what local government means are quite willing to throw stones at the Vestry system merely becauae they du not understand it. "Many persons", writes W Brie Jackson in Local Government in Unt-lund and Wales, "are quite convinced that members of local authorities gel elected for personal and private reasons, that they get something out of their membership—meaning .] %  that directly or indirectly there are monetuiy advantages, opportunities for Improving OtnVl business connections, or some other financial gain to be got by becoming a member ol a local council." The comment is interesting because while it reflects undoubtedly what a great many people in Barbados say about Vestry 'lumbers it is written about local government councils to which members arc elected by universal suffrage. The Vestry system in Barbados is just as open to abuse or criticism as the local government system in England or Wales. But the Vaatry lyitem In Barbados has been so closely associated with the Anglican Chuich in the island (the rector of .•eh ptlilh %  eat eaErio chairman) thai it is impossible to attack the Vestry system without bringing the church into disrepute. A glance too at the names of Vestry members ol the eleven Vestries as published in the Advocate Year Book 1951 is adequate to show how fortunate the parishes have been In tho types of Vestrymen the*/ have been able to elect under the present electoral system. The conception of work in the island's Vestries has been the conception of service to the community The funcUona <>f the Vestries can well he described as services to the parish. Vestries are responsible for the repair and maintenance of churches and salaries of church officers. In an island where the Governor is instructed by Her Majesty the Queen "to the utmost of his power to promote religion and education in the island" the support of the established religion of the island seems a necessary function of local government to all who duly recognise the priority which religion most have over all other activities. W.'nes are also responsible for poor relief, public health, parish roads, provision and maintenance uf burial grounds and cemeteries and gr; :its to charitable Institutions, Before prejudging the Vestry v-i.in citizens must ;isk what is the record of the Vestries In these respects? The work of the Vestry with regard to the relief of the poor and social services can be evidenced from Vestry records where it may be noticed that far from standing still the expenditure of Vestries has mitre than doubled in the last ten years, and that no less than 50 per cent, of expenditure has been applied to poor relief and social welfare. With regard to roads the excellent road network of this island has fur generations aroused the envy ot neighbouring West Indian islands and the admiration of visitors from every quarter of the globe. The Vestries' road record stands very high. Only someone wholly ignorant of the conditions of burial grounds and cemeteries in other countries could seriously complain about burial grounds and cemIfl this island. Can it be that the outcry against the Vestries wherever there has been an outcry is based OB a misunderstanding of what the Vestry system is? W. Brie Jackson in the book mentioned above notes: "there is. of course, a certain type of elector who thinks that because he once voted lor a candidate, this gives him u right to ask the candidate (when he beeomea a member) to use influence on the elector's behalf. There is a general feeling that a membar exists to serve the interest of the electors, and it is not always easy to determine whether a member, in doing a good turn tor an elector is serving public or private lnten Under the present safeguards by which membership of Vestries is restricted and qualifications for voting are based on payment In the previous year of parochial taxes of not less than 54 80 there seem-, ttea likelihood of mem be: subjected to the importunities of electdH than there might well be if members are elected or seek office with the ideals of service to the community no! as clearly imprinted as thev are, say, In the United Kingdom. lion to th loss of efficiency which will inevitably result from ar inflated electoral roll and the submerging of parishes into large districts the proposed local government will cost the taxpayers more mooag, The raising of Bridgetown to the status of a municipality is something different. This is a step which ought to be taken but it can be taken within the Vestry system. The political party with a majority in the House of Assembly is pledged to support the Local Government Bill. But a political party grows in stature when it takes into consideration the objections which are made by the majority of responsible critics to proposed legislation. There can be no room for doubt that the majority of those with the greatest knowledge and experience of the Vestry systecn do not agree with the proposed local government bill. They consider that the Vestries Act can be amended and that Bridgetown should bear the corporate name of "the Mayor. Aldermen and Citizens of the City of Bridgetown." In view of the possibility that certain members of the Labour Party in the House of Assembly will in any case insist on the maintenance of more local government units than the three councils proposed in the Bill it seems prudent to retain the Vestry system with amendments to the Vestry Act and to raise the status of the City of Bridgetown. To bulldoze the local government bill through the legislature against the advice and protests of citizens with great records of public service on Vestries would be unstatesmanlike Sitting On The Fence EAGLE HALE THE clearing of land at Eagle Hall Corner will have attracted the attention of many who are hopeful of seeing district markets established in Bridgetown in the near future. The land which has been cleared has no connection with the proposed district markef. But opposite the clearing the tenants on Government owned land were given a month's notice in April to remove their properties and to leave in preparation for the clearing of a site on which a district market Is to be constructed under Ihe supervision of the S( Michael's Vestry District markets in Barbados have a long list of champions ar.d in 1948 legislation was passed empowering Vestries to operate district markets. The erection of a district market at Eagle Hall will, it is hoped, be the first of several markets to be established in Bridgetown and its suburbs. It is unfortunate for Barbados that there is no office of town and country planning in which all the requirements of a district market could be outlined by a competent architect. The government of Barbados has offered the assistance of the Colonial Engineer to the Vestry and the Committee of the Vestry responsible for supervising the erection of the Eagle Hall market will no doubt have consulted with contractors as to the type of building best suited for erection at Eagle Hall. But the standards of building in Barbados though deservedly high ore based on traditional styles designed for ages where pressure of space was not the important consideration it is today. What is needed at Eagle Hall is a market which will not only free the shopwalks and street corners of hucksters, but which will allow the free entrance and exit of motor vehicles. Nothing.will be gained if at Eagle Hall the cluster of hawkers along the sides of the streets is replaced by parked rows of cars, lorries or other wheeled transport. The planners of the Eagle Hall District Market must plan for customers who arrive on wheels as well as by foot. A parking place will have to be provided or a free right of way. The actual design of the market is also important. An attractive market at Eagle Hall will improve the appearance of a part of St. Michael which stands close to the most widely used highways of the island. Tourists ought to want to visit the Eagle Hall market. If it is attractively designed and surrounded by shade trees they will make a point of going there. The Vestry of St. Michael's is no doubt aware of all these points and will be giving them careful consideration before the plans for the district market are completed. It is possible, however, that the existence on the staff ol the Governor of the Windward Islands of an Executive Architect who was partly responsible for the town plan of Castries may have been overlooked. That executive officer periodically visits Barbados on official business. There seems no reason to believe that if his advice were asked as to the type of mar Met (most suitable for Eagle Hall it would not be readily given. A SHOUT Ume af> 1 offared BY XiTltAMM, (A HHI\S f* to wntf a dally column for Pravda If Stalin would nay me 1.000.000 roubles a wok tree of tax. forecast said—threat of snow at first and fine and warm later.' has been sent to a camp for trw re-education of the faithless." Psychiatrist and* Bridegroom On two occasions when a bride bridsjagroom was suing lo the church to be married, his "legs buckled under him and he was unable to walk." U the Medical Press Dr. Charles Berg, Harley-itreet psychiatrist give* this cxpUnaUon of his condition — T—otlana that a person will not admit are burled deep In has salad, bat they come lo the sartaec . In physical reaction which cannot be controlled. So the brldeIToom probably did not want to marry." Dr. Gubblnt. the Fleet-street • • a „ psychiatrist, writs. I 'Congratulations to my HarThla is how Nathaniel Gubtky fl c *- u rt eolleaaw on his brilof Pravda, would have wrlttcnl L" n d,i ' nosl s ot a case which it:_ g £" %  counterparts in other "As Stalin, god-like in hi.** h white and gold uniform, mountf ed tho steps, snow clouds, darl m and evil as the dogs and cac.nl %  bals of the so-called Western d#< mocracies. gathered in thilj Northern sky and cast tr-'iiB shadows, not only on the hu'hcd p bare-headed crowds In Rrd*4 Square, but also on the noble..*; fling features of our beloved Although I promised to devote every word to praise ot Stalin the offer was not accepted. I now propose to take iv,items of news from Moscow. radio and show him bow an < % %  pcrienced and imaginative columnist would have haiaUnl them. Here are the items: — "As Htalla aaecBded the stop* he raised his hand, and tie sun seemed to shine brighter." "Know fell la Moscow yesterday." The facts are that the sun shone and the snow fell on different days, but who would bother about facts when writing for a Communist newspaper? •We" have nil heard of the phrase 'He spends money lik ( a man with no arms.' leader and his ingrowing moustache. Tovarlch. "In a silence so Intense that the sobbing of an overwrought woman sounded like a herd of cows with ihe hirmugh*. Stalin t-ii %  -' his hand. "As it obeying a signal from %  superior officer, the snow clouds halted and rolled back, and the sun, a* bright as the spirit that watchcover our destinies and as warm a* the heart that loves us as his own children. shone over all. "That was Just another of Stalin's daily miracles, comrades, this time t.. show us how tusilv he will deal with our enemies %  Tincharwoman who shoub-d if* Just what the wetttvr "This describes perfectly the condition of a man who avoids %  SttUngj a restaurant bill if somebody else is likely to pay. "He docs not care to admit that he is a lick-a-penny sklnfllat. but so deeply Is this in stlnct buried in his mind thai, at the sight of a bill, an uncontrollable physical reaction temporarily paralyses his arms, keeping them out of his pockets "In other words, he aOH im*. want to spend money, a conclusion that could be reached only by a trained psychiatrist. "My advice to girls who are waiting at the church for a bridegroom with buckled legs Is to send her relatives to hog tie him with rope; and bring him to the altar on a stretcher." Into Battle WHEN I was very young. I had three wishes—to be a church bell ringer, to drive a tram, and to shoot flies with a tiny gun. A good fairy, disguised as a manufacturer of insecticides, has granted the last wish. In fact, he has not only pro. video a Uny anti-fly gun. but a uny machine-gun with a press button acUon, a barrel about 1 S m long, and an extreme ( range of about a yard. It flres million-, of rounds of atomised, insecticide a minute. With little the Devil Cat as Second in Command. I went into battle with my little gun against four bluebottles and two wasps. ; The enemy's centre was I formed by the four bluebottles' bulling on the window pane like Highland regiments defiantly blowing their bagpipes, his left I and right flanks by the two wasps circling the battlefield on air reconnaissance. His line of Tetreat was cut off by a closed door. I dont know what Tield Marshal Lord Montgomery would have done, but I attacked •his centre, ordering Lottie to guard our Ranks. I gave the nearest bluebottle a one-second burst from the gun. For a moment it buzzed louder than ever Then it dropped Ui threw up its six or eight hands ; and died. Another one-second burst finished a second bluebottle, and there Is no doubt that I would have routed their main army with 100 per cent, casualties If Lottie had not attacked without orders. She not only trapped a third bluebottle on the window pane with her paw. transferring it to her mouth to consume under the table, but got in the line of Are and held up the attack. Although I brought down the wasps with accurate ack-ack Are, the fourth bluebottle escaped through an open window. At a court martial to be held shortly Lottie will be charged with disobeying a lawful order while on active service, eating the enemy In defiance of Queen's Regulations, and with conduct prejudicial to good order and military discipline. The findings of the court will be promulgated. The TropicOf Mm-l.ado.\l Wh John Pi id cam SLAVERY" THE introduction of the African as a slave to Barbados, appears to r^ave lust taken place without any definite record of the exact date of its commencement. In June 1823, a Committee of the Council consisting of Messrs: Ken Hamden. Nathnn Lucas and John Rycroft Best was appointed lo Inquire Into the then state of Slavery in Barbados; and Dr. Lucas iccor. that he endeavoured to contribute the history of the introduction of Slavery and the encour..rnt held out to our ancstiors. as well as to they themselves, by the Mother Country. He states mat the report became voluminous, and was sent to England for publication. Or. Lucas quotas — "It Is not now perhaps In our power to give, from authentic sources of Record, the Introduction of Negro Slaves Into this, the most ancient of the British Colonies In the West Indies." Dr. Lucas continue!.—"The first Settlers here never dreamt of Sugar at their first coming: They brought English labourers with them, denominated "Christians" in all Deeds and Apprlsements, Indented to Serve for a period certain. These serving their iudenled time frequently rented a few acres of land from the great land holders, after the manner of England, for a yearly money rent. Some of these Leases are in my PDCTS: The profits were trifling, the cultivated plants for sale Tobacco and Cotton. "But the Civil War In England soon produced a new order of things. Introduced the Culture of Sugar, with it Negro Slavery "The Mother Country forgot she had Colonies; and the Dutch monopolized the whole trade of the Island. Import and export.—From the voyages of the Dutch West India Company to the Brazils, they car e to the knowledge and value i f Sugar making; they supplied the Island with Sugar Canes, Mr. Drax with the model of a Mill and Works, and impaitud the art of making Sugar. It was very soon found that White men could not stand the field culture and manufacture of Sugar, even if they could t a procured In sufficient numbers; and Negro Slaves, a.-, m the Brazils, were substituttd for them; and besides, the pride of Freedom creates such a difference of Rank, that White Labourers, no doubt, would not condescend to work in the field with them." "It is reasonable to suppose, that the Dutch being the Capitalist, possessing Ships and Manufactures, and SettU-v ments on the Coast of Africa, which England had not; as is' expressed said by Anders..r" in his Commerce. 'In loco;' did*, not bring Slaves to us, afar the manner of the PortugueseIn then Colonies, and reeelvedJ payment in Sugar. This i*j the most reasonable conjecture^ of Jjieir flrst introduction l here': for both General and \ Local history, to my knowledge at least. Is silent; all that we can now gather from Llgon. and Anderson I chiefly from Llgon however *l Our Records, at any rate trios1 *. in existence, are silent."' 1 *• a It is relevant here to describe '"mp of the history of tits wast oast of Africa, as it Is from this Quarter that most of the coloured people of the West Indir* BUD*. The fifteenth century was the era of the great voyages of dlsc-overy. During this century the outlines of the coast of Africa began to come Into focus. In 1482 the Portuguese mariner Diego Cao found the mouth of the Congo Hlver in We*t Africa, and In 1465 he sailed up this river lo the first falls, a distance of I as miles. The Portuguese founded colonies near the mouth of the Congo and endeavoured to convert the coastal trlives to Christianity: but made only a few attempts to explore the interior of thr region. Although! -a book called 'True Description of the Congo and Its Neighbouring Countries from Ihe Writings and Tales of Edward Lopez, a Portuguese.' was puhlishcd in 1591, little was done to develop this country. All Europe's eyes were turned to the New World, where Spain was becoming fabulously rich from the goleT and silver shipped from there. The resistance to work shown bv the natives of this section, (the New World), and the teachings of the Bishop of Chhipa, (see Article I of this series). opened up the slave trade from Africa. The English saw that other nations were making money out of the slave trade, and they followed the Portuguese traders in this respect. The Portuguese had long recognised the importance of Gambia, and had established several trading oosts alone the river of the same riarne. The English followed their ex.imple and annexed James Island, a waterless spot ten miles up the estuary of the Gambia, and turned this Island into a fortress. They later settled at Bathumt where they could more easily control the* river. The trndc. all in slaves. Ivory, beeswax, and gold dust, opened up the overland routes to the North and East and gave rise to settlements on the river which became the ports and terminals of the caravan routes. The enslavement of the African m the F-ncIis-h colonies was nothing exceptional in tho history of the world, as slavery in some shape or the other had been the common law of most nations in most ages; so the existence of the slave is no special shame or blame lo our forebearers. In many slates of society the doom of slavery may have bean a reprieve from death cither, as a prisoner In warfare or as a \rYoogdoer sentenced for his crime against society. It Is believed that the hut-e portion of the slaves brought to the West Indies belonged to the first named category. For more than two hundred years this horrible tradt continued, the West coast of Africa was depopulated not only by the exportation of Its men and women, but also by the wars and resultant famines and plagues which were a by-product of the slave trade. The white settlers and traders armed the coastal natives so that they could go Into the interior for slave raids. The tribes of the interior naturally fought .tgainst these aggressors, and battles were often furious. Ol II READERS SAY; "Lv$* Docile" To The tditor. The AduocoW— SIR,—In part of the report of my speech in the House on Tuesday, it is stated In on* sentence tnat I referred to the people "that if we had some people". less loath< Mr. Editor, do you think any politician so personally irresponsible as to refer to his people as "loathsori no erroneously misquoted were This also set in motion another prospect of the slave trade, the tribes of the Interior went further inland and fought other irlbes to bring ba,~k slaves to sell to ihe coastal natives, who in Uini sold them to the traders It Is felt that these wars were unnecessary and were only a means of obtaining gain from I Ukoiss unfoi uiniite wretches who i arers captured during battle and brouaht back to be sold as | slaves. In 1654, one visitor lo Barba| dos recorded — "This Island is Inhabited with i all sortes: with English. French. Dutch, Scotes. Irish. Spaniards they bring lues: with Ingones and miserabell NsQWri they doue alow as ery and ihaycr seed: thes Newors they doue alow as many wlfes as they will haue. sume will haue 3 or 4, according as they And thayer bodie abcl: our English heare doth think a negor child the flrst day it is born to be worth 051i. they cost tHcm noethinii the bringing up, they goe all ways naked: some planters will haue 30 more or less about 4 or 5 years ould: they selr them from one to the other as we doue shepe."'*' Another visitor recorded on the 12th of November 1710— B Barbados Isle inhabited by Slaves A And for one honest man tm thousand knaves R Religion to thee's a Romantick storey B Barbarity and ill gott wealth thy glory A All Sodom's Sins are centered in thy heart D Death in thy look and Death in every' Pun O Oh! Glorious Isle in Vilany excell S Sin to the Height—thy fate Is Heli."<*> The Quaker movement was, one of the flrat of such move-l ments to abhor slavery. George Fox. the founder, visited this Island In 1871. and records In his Journal how he councclled the Quakers on this Island to triim their slaves up in the fear of God, and to require their 1 overseers to deal mildly with: them, sad not to use cruelty towards them, as was then tooi often the custome. and after a | certain number of years of servies to set them free. John Smith, a Quaker vUitad Bi:badoa In 1742 and re-' corded—"They have Abund' Uses of Negroes on this Island some of their Estates In the Country' having upwards of! 200 of them. Nay I was told I of fme man that upon three! Estates had upwards of 900 Negroes and they use them coarsely giving the.n hardly any thing to Eat but a pint of Corn a day for each Negro and a little Salt.-> (To be Continued) 1. Lucas Manuscript Vol. 1. Miscellaneous, page* 42— 45. MM US Journal Vol.1 X. pages 15 17. 2. Henry Whistler's Journal of i the West India Expedition,' 1854. Sloanc M.S. 3820 British Museum. B.M.H.S Journal Vol. V p 185. 3. HMIIS Journal Vol. XV. page 50. 4 MM U.S. Journal Vol IX, page 83. ''less docile". The whole sentence should read 'if we had a LESS DOdLI people and a more politically conscious people, it would spell the end of his (the leader's) political career." PHOTOGRAPHS Copta of Local Photograph. Which have appeared In the AditHiitt" Xfirs/Kt/H-r Cam be ordered from ihe .. ADVOCATE STATIONERY "And You Should Have Seen the One 1 Caueht YesetnUy!" GUTTYHUNK — Pure Irish Linen Rod Lrne* with n 90 lbs. breakinc; sirs in. PITCHER'S also stock I FISHING LINE with ii hreukiiiK strain from .;'. %  lbs. to 3a lba. C. S. PITCHER & CO. Pl>. 4472 Why take chances with your baggage when travelling? For a very small premium we can issue you with A TRAVELLERS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE POLICY that will give you adequate cover and set your mind at rest. Our Agents will be pleased to give you full particulars and advice. DA COSTA & CO.. LTD.-AGENTS YACHT PAINTS Pilw loeluda : SUPERTROPICAL ANTIFOULING COMPOSITIONS •' INTERNATIONAL" Yh. Varm.ho SUNLIGHT ENAMEL (or topiidn and Interior decoration •• INTERNATIONAL" The frwteat name In marine paint. DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. COMMISSION DEPARTMENT. ,"""" I I mil GOLD BRAID BEFORE RELAX AFTER Every Bottle of GODDa^RDS GOLD BRAID RUM IS 3 YEARS OLD V. B. VAUGHAN. I ll ll l l i m l l l l l l ll llllll ll lll llll l ll l



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SUNDAY. JU.VE 22. 1S2 M M.U MI\. %  BIN M . r~.. % % % %  ... -i PaaSi MWM A 8>n"< i K.\ *nr> t MI ur • % %  . JBB> n. i MI %  m Ht.ly DHMMMtoa, • am Choral nan". .1 m Malmji-l Hanaan. i'i. Sunda; Sttwwl. T p m. Evrnm^i : I as MCTHOMST cnuRca JAM**. -T HUCJIV £ BS Cfet**: *f * MAT t M a it. Mr. P Daart. rlrv K E Tuwaf*. B A liTMn of Campawn II M I Labour Obstacles To Antigua's Prosperity lX>NDON Labour 'roubles m Anugua including the unwillingness of many men t> work In jgn.uliure. are C" of the main obstacles t, the bland'economic prosperity. "wording lo "Xh* Times Brillsli Colonies Review A survey o/ unemployment. In the Island in 1950 showed lh.it 19.5 pet cent, ol the population were unemployed and orm abcut hall ol lhee who Mp working at the tun* ol the sur vey had been continuously em ployed throughout the year • In Hte of this." says the article, "the unemployed have strong resarvalions about jli Miss India'in U.S. Mr Or. ItlU Mr Jt Crawford %  surowN %  m aahMl lo al ii cvinmi .rin.hr.Tim. • >m Mr Qraava. nasaasDA II SO a ir Mr Blackmail Hiinn eaten IT ftHlACHIMft API-OINTJVll lirniFI II am Rev T I p.m Ml G Bra.w.lrr DALKriTH II am Mr G villa T p m Mr C F Brae an. MONT II am w. L : p m II.. T J rurfc-j lOUTM UMTrtlCT: • am Waiih1 p.m. Mr SI PROVIDE-NCf: 11 %  n Mr VAl'XIIAU-r l| %.m p m Mr H dram see Circalt a.an Mr Toppu. am Revd S W. C. i-roM* T pm ) %  • O. M. Millar. -ItREWSni'RY II am Mr Hunt* T p.m. fUvd S W C. Crow RICES ll a.m Revd 1 W C Croua. t pm Mr. R. Carne* Sunday Sriionli ma*i al 1 p m. rRrNF7.ru mi' I -MI type of work they .ira rilUn|*U) accept, at !hr time of UM only one-fifth ct ihem wer. wilting to take any tori of iota that might be ofTe.-ea and although moi rf the were likely to be in agriculture. 7 ot p m * l y We ,n 20 W he was look R D ri,-i '"£ for agricultural wcrk and 03 per cent, said they would i turn t" work in the canefielrtf. "The tutur,. of Antit(u,i ruglie partly in the expansion ***• improvement of ugricuiiur* -u.. these occupational reservations could be a ijrioit.s obstacle Some of the estates claim thi.t the difficulty of letting a >uflieient and regular supply* ct labour reduce* Uu-ir eftlciency. as they are net able lo get some llsks done at the best possible time*' The prosperity of Anligux will always be determined largeb by the price of sugar, the artielc eontinue*. but it is beyond the power of the Antiguans to control this price. "But there are also factors controlling production costs ana yield,'' it adds, "and it is here that there Is a chance for tutun improvement, within the powei of the Antiguans themselves The efficiency and productivity o' the labour force should be mLucas creased, and the unnecessary f, c losses caused by industrial disputes avoid*.). "Continued experiment with r.rw varieties rf cane and improved methods of cultivation should be as fruitful in the luture an they have been in the past; and if a constant flow of factory could bMa Rescue Problems Discussed DOCKET CARTOON <>> Os'i' K I I %NC *N'I FK 0| ireta rite lack of Mirvl al equip mr i I wrd motor and uihng i. uhkh r*l t-rtween Use i tan it*, was com mr n ted upon b> Mr. O Krlslrk. Aet : rig A-atotant Vim.i i-i M %  .'t -; Vinreul. Hi. V Asosllnl. Director of CrQ \,,.i a Irinklad. re ilrwed Ihf Starch asid rtficiM" • irisnisaUon as plannid for the 1 -in n Caribbean. xpialnlni thai a draft -4AR Manual had alresd> been prepared as* lor waterd t the vsrtoMS eolanle. |i wsj mtemUd th" -i separate chapter should be ireiaied for -nv. sMIituJ out in detail i i-csciie proctl ne nope was Tort! would be made tUM at i eor Well, J.I. ...in if Waff* •.erraln .>,tJin present hate'i iurnl M|>T#I. I'"i rerrlWy .'.mil there') only <** pnniHe explanation'" DutchColonies Surpass B.WJ. UlUsM Kci|iiircnicnt MORAVIAN SHRVICIa ROFBt'CK STRIKTll a.m Moml... Serx'ice. prMeher: Bev A c ll Pusnm. CBDO to the M-A. 7 p.m Eeenlnc tarnca. preschrf Mr r C. IUWIII GRACE HILL: 11 am Marnins sr vice, prrarha*: Mr. O. R. l*wir: t pm r.-rnma Srr.iri praivri Mr. F. 0 LONDON i their political prngTess. the herland won huiu-.v Mrtalea toi ly lagged behind, have now tb* isowrw bul num rough devt! ']tm*'ni of the Hn I West Indies, of wlu,l. Utg ul j nute gou; Is a federattun WI'.I %  lominion status, saya "Tin l'i ijiiu-h Colonies Review.' m an -•lul. on the development low*rd elf-goven>mcnt m the Dutch Wel Indies. For the Dutch, iheie has been i\ v problvm of niU'.ratliig tenilorles,' It says. "Surinam and lh NetherLnids Antilles are independent of each other, with then ... own constitutions, govetnment... the vnriouh iienni.iiiiic-1 and parliaments." Who hmvm been generous ll is only 16 years since (he in impartini! Informal um and Dutch colonies m the Caribbean advice. •"** were dr-i -;rant*£t the iirfrage, the .nticle recalls Tnll hg been the (I'M ;< %  : i>k i, lltI1 f(tr r u ,thci progress were ol lb km,* in this ,roa. n.l it ig ,helved when th v Wgr intervene,! most sratiryhig t.. M Oi t right dIU) thc c Ufrruorieg supulu--' GovernniUiU found it puwiblc to important quant.lies of oil and send repn en t *.-. li Is also J(;iUKI e l9r hf AlUed war partitularl> pleasing to observe nui^hlne.iti i, ,n which ,„ lt42i QlUn Wllhelming iSSSl? ."— }*£" '?"^ >C l'. PWrifM lo call a conference in.mediately after the wsr to gMfM .i new status for all Dutch overseas territories This coniQOB was never lucid. It was m Uiinus |U n mints ft ;r icittlmn I \ i Co trot; OpetaI lional Requirements and Equipment at Small Airports and CoUnu.il (mi Av ..HI. "i B orrtc* Wing Coinmander rjglcsiieid in his eloarni No wi.iid %  UutiHl have been reached benol yhc purpose vt thit meeting. But many matter* which Uvt t*en dls%  .I -nlvi 1 "'. aad we have having With US' One Man In A Hundred | %  i v %  rocnusei ii liners, which nonnallx CtanrM Ot' aoult paaaenge;cceiul irnved at London Airport from New York with tinkargen numbar l paaaaasaan evei accommodated on the traru-.v crossing. lnciuiiiii) Hi. lylni craw ami Mwinl stuff, totalling 10. the Stratocrulaer had aboard n-> (ewe. than I IB people-—63 moihei*. one grandmother. 41 children . ami lu.t one male paaienget. Mi Frank Braun, uf Philadelphia, who travelled with hu id-month olu: laughter. Jill, to visit hif Wttva .*rants at Braintree. Essex The lemainder of the passanaai*. ware the British wives of Amen1 can Servicemen who. with then children returned to Britain u. *ee their families and friend.They will go back to the USA In August The B.O.AC Strafecruiser was specially chartered on their behalf, by an American >rnanisation which arranges foi Hrrtih C. |. Brides'' and then %  keep 111 lOUCh with th' %  intrj in. yasassjaan .>i Ilia iiaaaongerin Ihbj "Hying nursery was onU IthrM mi-nUi oM anil the otw Ml Iw.ih the it ja>l mill gian.tmothi-. HO AC Stewardesa Joan Otbann was kept busy during the tll#ht preparing Ix-ttlea of ind mixing baby food. SEA AND AIR TRAFFIC III Carlisle Bay we R a.%  '*a>-ni <•. I ii A Come' 1 Dr-r^RTfRf %  s t sswii ask Han i n.ii-. Mesa •' A'1 '/ 9 "I I W//1 \t,f • HIM .nv FORK M< aivn CaM* • •/tan %  60VEIAMLYI NOfHF.v ilie Dap.lblls^C'! %  M—In. Indonesia. fct 1MB. universal i MoeninC Bstvlr*. intu. 1 p m E%ai Mr. W St. Hill p m. Bvenlns SarI O.lrv p.m Kvfnina Sr%  r.kHi.nf fsstvii*, Dow rULNECK U %  o'fh Mr G nlns Sfriur pi*a( MONTOOMKHV Vlf. IM.h.r Ml Dl'NSCOMRK ^HOP HILL; t t P'rcn*r Mr. F. O smiin T. Mi noi *. K. O CBI RCR WFK-HFS ROAD t*S BaaSar afMr Mm II a.in. Divina S*rtx Ch*toiaii Rev. C. lahmsel. Prearhn. R>v. c. Bar row. 3 p m Sunda> ArhMl. 1 BJti t ..%  r,i and LiIurfFi C'Ubranl Rv V tihrnsal. AdflTea*. Eas>iSrli>i A BAPTIST THE ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST thedl ed Crltkdam there haa u-en u i:1 always consttuctlvp, UlsjHit solution. Th* Southern Area Confi er than condarnnatkm; vill be neld on Monday. June 2tougar would be reduced r | pa l items on the agenda will be ncitlirn^.r* "The production of foodstuffs the considarauon of I H.Q. Raprl should be expand"d so that the on Rovers and Scnim i;land would be leu dependant wnich deals with the pmbl. on expensive imports, and mioor these two r Iniafrnal inagUng ti> iliscusa i n d u s t r I e s—particularly the catas fualon. The lepoii suggcs-i n.i, .m.i reacua procedural in tourist trade — developed. If that the existence of Uiese two sec'*" ' %  '.. has u en onlr theae things can be accomturns making with Se.ntami V.'. Directoi Oenafal pllshed it may well be possibla Cubs four wings of the Scout of i.ivil Aviation. This will take increase the national income Movement, imposes too great P.' 4 "^ ""..Tuesday June Ma and improve the standard living %  —B.l' P. %  rsaaaag and Rarmon. pri wrvicat. UW Rav J B I Minuter in charse. • SO pin Mondaj. WanaSav. Fndat iriiiuni lul (UUIIU. ir.i wiu 0 ren %  .. %  i.. i b> Uw Re*. L. H' % % %  < %  ri.tkr. •AMUUUII Pai|r> aad Mn oi- Smnw. Listening Hours es p m Th* Newa, 4 10 Jud*-. 4 li p .n For Th* Co 4 30 p m Sunday Hull-Hot, rumpw of UW Waek, 5 15 p.m VaiiHv lUndbos. • II a.nt Masai mr. < 4> p m ProSTammF r.i and If i tar hid*-. 1 Ou p m Ttir Nwv p rn Horn* N* from BriUiin I'. l. ll* M bsii:i!l Colonial Appeal For The Blind ^S Brought In 821,000 t burden on the organtgatlon |l ''' House by the kind permakes A tvm u> ".n" ihwion m Sli Qeorga Beel, ("oinpajood ksadf %  PI % %  < nfi i ngi 111 '• %  l "' %  wprnai I m I also discuss the Week-end Ti.nnOW*. ingCoui rUCtadBI) Mr Among those jitteiulin K will ba C. R. C spine.' Uuivea f i uu v S.A.. Jrt| oi July Sth "• and reports, as has been well held .it (ha BrftJafa CouncQ B| demonstratefl by the result of an P •">• " subsequent Fridays the n-cnlnj, UuS^-rilaO' ol the .WHS^tSi J"" 5?, Ud C """ p SoclM,. Mr. Jhn Wltain, hinurll "''','."''' ?'".'; '"'IP 1 '" 1 !" ' ">• „„* nes* throughout the Colonial Tern.„,,,. "• tort". This was the first bro;idtorolmCQt MlOt4d he sent m cast Hppcnl eve,mnde for the ,„,, n( ^et/lharTI „ Colonies as a whole Mr WUaon, Ana Haadq T is am carifttn'an Vo*c*. l li p,m speaking from notes in Bniille Beckjes Road <>i lalenhniie 4853 tSS^mTm'&M£KTZ lo,d of ,ho pliBnt f a milUon JI-MBl.t: SA1A Th,Jumble tmnitid*. • p.m. From iha BditfMau, blind people and many thousandS;il, organlgad by Mrs. 14m Ta*kH 9 00 p m Btuioi Concert rUH. W on of others who suffer from blindfor Iha 1st riarbadoa Sea Scouts K;; n ih-tl I Noli %  --iii\\ UHIH TO Lrteve WASHINUTON. June ll. I'rofessor Owen Lattinmrr lunJM, States was reported tod to have made a "coruMionnl re' quest" for a yeir's leave of absence fnuii I'.lliinm.v John „„ !" Strathmni*. University where ho teaches. A University ipokearnan sai'i he made the rCQUeal BevaMI week* ago and hui lold nlllcialhe had a "tentative feeler" iron the Unlvtruty of New D*)h. India, lo leach there hir rm :H % %  dtmlc year. uffragc wa womei but th • %  xistlng Dutch constitution mad II impossible to grant responsible government to these territories This was modified in the autumn of 11*41. however, to r. aka poaalblc the transfer ot sovereignty to the Republic of Indonesia. All colonial regulations were thereby suspended %  1 i this applied equally to tha iffrltorles of the west Indies This has cleared the way I th* final settlement of the new in institution, which will give the two Caribbean territories com plete local autonomy. DlscosMona on this are still going on w th the Netherlands Clov ments -* t r SEAWELL AIIHIVAIM 11* n W 1 A .-„ Fi da, inuA 1 M*rasg %  %  na I 11 l.l M i: \l linsill VI AppfUiw*em Ol rillli AsaiaUat Ili.peiMer njqulrad to act as Assistant Dispense r at tnalely 3 months tn>m August. IC52. at a salary of SlOO 1 lua a Cost of Living :ilh. li.Mntment si OUld h Jun< V? f: Pimples Go Cause Killed in 3 Days d ivy ... 1 !'. K.i.strm lonia-i . -. . % %  •r dial I"'' %  1 .1 11 %  11 IViriiia, lims>"'nM*Vr" dear onr aala "-ft .nd n Nixoderm .,r (kla r,_.,Mc. VALOR COOKER STOVES %  : %  -. 9 Burner M...<1 9 S71.87 WHITE roili'KI AIN ENAMEL SINKS With Double Praiiiboard (if $83.64 complete with wa te and overflow ASTHMA MUCUS Dissolved First Day ii>. [lag vaair inlm. aan your rnargr. ruin vaur hMlih and ••akrn (or hrari In mini.it. MtTNOAiM — Iha lira•Cilpflon ol a ftrnmui di>Hor-*lrvulau* iinvuf li lh blS •iinealr cwrlixf Hi* .tu. fc TR* very Sral lv •>,. •Uai'Kl-nK iriiKua la diafKad, il.m fflMFm ires, % %  •> %  iIMin and raal I .1 >ii-rp No dtp*-*, rm -mDa'a. no IHI'CII.-TII. luii lah-biaaaani. laala(•.. MKNhAro laM.Ie al maala and h* ruiiiiif fraa Imn Axhma ar.i Bronrlillli In naat la nu lima, tun IhOblli pM mst hava iwlf.iad tar vran Mi:N04CO U SO %  uo-aaatul lhat II %  (naranlaad lo fit* *0>i fra*. •aiv ln.mMnf In I* huura and l'i "r ataaraur AMaaaala %  d'>1 t.*.k or, raluni l ampl* "~NDACO rroai r" lantaa praiarta r 7 Tm N Londor, 'rJ.Z iVss V£~ in *nKMJ J? t coll c,e N !" 4.10 pm lbs officers 1 4.11 p.a. ppsat aw laaa niuatn MUNDAY. JUNX t> The response, expressed ... U tatsM. a .ai M j^, ^ WcrfW to hp B^rty., 1 London, was a strlkim: aUon of the feeling of EmDire unity which such appealbring out. Thlt was well lllu'pm Tip Top Tuna*. • *s p m ^*P<"" iratcd by the public respon: Round-Up and Profiammr pBuda. 1 00 ,. p.m Tha Kaw. 7.10 p m Horn* Na- *" %  "i Pri-n Britain after I : ii i a %  SMMH nst ricne Mrs. Taylor begs tc those individuals and S12S. thank ..11 Bridgetown firms who gnuit. m well aa those who aaabted at the sale The State Department terday that an order to keep hin from leaving the country wa*. i--iie-l tn the Cuntoms Service. I -r.p %  :ii made for year'' Jamaica tllpm Collins th* WHI lndM> D m Miiair bf in* Krjim-u S It p R..I.O Newn*p). a Sa p m African I vav. %  S p m tnlerlud*. I W p m P The EdllorUIa. S OS p m LSMei OUreM t p m Thr SPA Orehr, J 45 p in Raport (mm Wimbledon I p m The Npwa. 10 10 pel New. 1 l# IS pm a*l*tl*e ISFvfew. 1" I Bedtime With I'. ..!. %  liuliu Offors JJO I r\ I'or Solution Of course, this appeal for th*> blind waa not on as large and urgent a scale as that for the Jamaica hurricane victimthan five minutes on the i Mr. WUaon, and B.B.C. official* ajiaonari deadlocK in said thai, i n thee difflruli time* in tinpn to-dla NEW DELHI, India, JtaM Premier J;:waharlal I^>ss orfon-.! h %  to l;el, Rusii by solve the Korean exchange f „ •hiteme Ind Gorman Marshal Btfai In Russia HOF, (;erman Jane 21. A German deporHe who rrUirrsad [rom .1 Bovlai laboui 1 ami two days ago claimed here to-day he saw former Carman Field Marnhal fritdrlch Von I'.iulus in 1 ing Russian uniform I lumod ii and Swedish Plane Waa Shot Down STOCKHOLM, June 11. A report showing that Sweden's nlsslne Dakota plane waa ihol down has been sent lo tha Govern;'„._.„.," .s,on.,.m Pollc "T.rr„id ... perudoner. .„,. not aand more,' ment by the Stockholm Police Laboratory according to authorU A^re^"? aS e bSS y aant to s the theme of many letters engtff-MSKSll^sssS 3 ^^* been located In 85 foal of water <" Lancashire with nothing in the neir the Swedish Baltic Island of ""W **l her small old ago penGothland. on who 9ent ,Pn "hillingi which It wag while searching for the v '* hart recrlved ns %  gift for her Dakota that the Swedish Catalin. h birthday Sever.il rther peoflying boat waa fired on by P lc '" ,hp,r nlnV>'-^>^P>>'eS>V>^ 42 who n-I *l Thursday I anything over £1.000 in response favourably niltad rOl '' %  ls ."' v "• M %  to such an appeal was considere'l functloa Nehru claimed iBUM JSH**' %  *' i: hi good. ^he am .orman prisoners were told Von) So officials of tha Society wentrieg ralvad tauluu tew hlng taetieal !urprised and delighted at th. "Wban I aay i,,.,,.. amuld io ail K„^i!Kr? w Aca >n 2 mall which reached theii offic ul to tind some solution, •* In tha naxt fortniuhl Well ovei iaa much aa n 5,000 letters biiiuttng a total ol he said. more than M.500 ($21,600) In Commenting Bums ranging from 6d. in stamp* '• Senator Alexainlei Wllcj £116 In one-pound notes sent geaUOn Itmt laaulinsj 'tulesiinen likw Nclu %  lnv>iMM>i<—i -...Mil" no nv .i method accaptad all parties roncet %  unilateral ,* no pood I r Paulus [O all "K r i ,„ K %  %  nnUni tot Ing there ins hlgj.l %  M ..'"hlle atav. J -II' HAM SAUSAGE—4-lb Ti UFILIJT uacuifi PEA HS PEACHES PINE APPLE HREAKrAST MU CARHOTS GOLD IV ft Roebuck Strcel II S TIPS Ttn^ SWEET CORN SANDWICH SPREAD—Bot oi rrw CHl'TNPV kriIUTNEY SAUCE \ It ROW Kl! M. A co„ t.rn. Dial 2070 & 4502 Frank B. Armstrong & Co., Ltd. Agent. Wr # apa-e-aNEW INDIA INSURANCE CO., LTD. r-r* 12 HIGH STREET Pas*j PHONE 4713 Wska I Sophlslicnlnd Shoppers Boy at . THE BROADWAY $ ALWAYS AHEAD IN STYLE AND BI M'l V See Our Plilr. Shdej in SEERSUCKERS, MOYGASHEI s SHARKSKIN, SPONS And Many Other Materials MORE PATTERNS IN AFRICAN PRINTS BROADWAY DRESS SHOP j .-.-.•.'.-.-.-.-^.-A'/'-V/V WW/AWV/AWA THIS WEEK'S SPECIAL MEAT PIES 8c. each B \iiii\mr, I \I,I mi;', 11 DIAL 4758 JAMES STREET III. MI4 l\l CASH ssi lilt FOII IIIIS \\l | K Galvd. Mesh Wire W Meih X 411" n. $1.50 per vard I .. X M" 1 IK)e. ., I X :III' I No. „ I .. > %  >'• S If i'< %  : in mi l'i \ ii".„ BAKBADOS HARDWARE CO. LTD. (TinHouse |Tof BaTgailu) N. :i. Swan M. IMIIIIIPH : 4lllti. 21W. .1531 \\{\ TRUFORM FLEXIBLE FOOTWEAR FOR CHILDREN JQSPz IDEAL FOR GROWING FEET MADE BY BRITISH CRAFTSMEN BACKED BY OVER FIFTY YEARS EXPERIENCE SUPPLIED BY YOUR LEADING STORES VI-ST0UT FOR YOUR HEALTH'S SAKE VI-STOUT I RESTORES YOUR HEALTH 2. BUILD YOUR STRENGTH 3. INCREASE YOUR VITALITY mm' 9CMJE8 .IT M.I. OIHHKHS &f siMF.oN HI \n t m int. utm



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PAf.t rrv SI-VBAY \n\.i( MI SUNDAY. JUNE J2, lJ IIU Kn\i\\a ui CI>IM;H.\M PAI.-IU.—PAKT I. When The Kings Home Was Bombed! Life On Ail Level* Laid On For The Sultan H\ KVe PfCMKH K A JEW ua; before i. -'Ifl'MI .-lUl Ul. Itolaee became one o< the Urst i.tnlmnga to laeeive a direct hi' lho Kin* an* tfuern .iere entertaining JOO dlabied men to a .11 UK* gi>oa. The siren.* •uundetl and tbr King, ihough afraid that some of the men might resent being dtked to take ,ver. ordered them to atasUar in the Grand Hall. Hi mm sui prised to kaaj |aM •hat M f Uie men had *aui Ud Ooering iHiMivvs a vole U thank* haIt**"—"tai*" beny the rnanc* ol Jtrim liia liauth I'.iiaca. On beptemSai S, 1940, a UIUU:I i on tue Palace. 1L * %  on September 10. Tbi King and Queen were at Winu d nuuid) on ine atafl MM %  hurt, but tons ol masonry i sent nurlling right over th* root QuadranCMI and almoinoo* in m* Nartt eVki was Mown out. QlMB, UK-t and ruui. I ine pitvati' apBrunanta, u*niud *ng UM Royal la-unxims am. jie*mg-ioouis. t h 0 Km, LaK.umed worki-nom and tin <*uen bow-windowed draWtiiKroorn. The *tol diving tower in tin wlmmitat pool tit used to bthe Norsk f^suervatory) watwisted out 'rf -bap* and thglass roof of tar Picture Galler> lay snalteied or. the floor—u> neaily 100 years before, it hav. ashed during ....iwuxnv By MARGUERITE PEACOCKE The DajllowMIt*) Bun i Palate. wa> DM I", in* urn nut UM aang ana s, %  again at wiiKiaur. LB aaaici .->.. uroopvu on UM EWO on tin -NoiUi laxjgc, rului IHJ of ine puuiemvii on uuij in* puim atM) maTBMMiy occupied Uir laxige ITU MIL' in I nter arm OH caoam -.I,nvuui ii'"-. %  MM ..... .11\o Uftrj hMU ground.-. 1 Lng 1 lieI a and QuMr.* No Quarter Nvtt day Uie Kan %  'tU'oad to UM Palace. Iwi day* UUx—on Friday. tn> l.iu. -hit. the King and Queer. wan living in temporary qua* ten becaase their on r*em> u.ir uniuhabltable, a divr i.oitit>.T drnaaed five bomb-. <>n UUk I'alaatx Two -apUxled HI front of th.building between Ihc ratluiR.s and ihr Wucam VMrtortu MnnorluL Quadrangle and >i" on ihr floor of the Chapul I'hi; I.I-I bomb made a hl< In UM na.f orly two fan n but it did to much ilnmaga wtatn i explo-itd Uutl rven today iff Chapel cannot b> UMd Queen VUMru* Bible. in Whieh all Ban I birth, had been recorded daring and klnoe hei reign, was la UM* debrla. All the wmdiivi I In tho Cliapel nnte-pnon. wore blown out .though Ufo-fiure i>rtralts of the tnt-KaaMT, thg bat) T-.ir and th* tale Empfnir Fruiu i"M'f •' Autufli wore unhanned. ,\ i-lawa*'. UV blaat RgM] Hi La .i corridor n niing at UuDucheaa of Ciunnruige aa pitted with brokt'i tgUMi .mH fragments ol a haiuiaotne ranging on uue side ol untouched. Tlir dlvtOKtiilM-r itaell eagg ahot U itir, b> Spitllrea. One menibrr of Uir crew baled out but his nai i i.in. I.MI.-II to .>..! % %  and %  WJ. kill, a ,iu a roof nut far away, McinwriWi' the King a n ii ;.i Mtutab time to mthli raxond lot of danuw i r hum,beforo they hii. (T "i\ n tour <*1 bUtaeeJ i^ond-n to vMH 'rlher homes thin had been bombed. SLA VBW GUEST i V-i ixpl^. Augu\ 1U14, wreck' i titti below UM uaattnent rooms wnicn nau u> u %  d i.. itinuiiiii route to avoid cong'-stion on toe ataua. Thr Kuig and K4-.< ier>iai•&• %  b—u i-> walk du*i. ,i. .;.i | M ini* were Ul "g an alcil Al liial I Uir PBlaOg wDi .1 mill tlir IIOM'J, luil Uur rule waa relaxed lalei .M,.I, laada were more olten "on man •*of!." Nu FrilU % %  1 < -i ;ii, Knuj tad QiMtn had been -Hi's room and wag fa. MM uUboraU-ly .-quipped than MUgfat l>e unargincd. It did not m th* leant re-aniibk' ^ subterranean. Slat* apartment. Th flowured wallpapci was l toed and a large %  ervlc* sink •ItpCMM U. view Kuga i-verod the hntileum rfoorina and a plain deal table i.oiinaJly used for sr.rting houwi old UBen, nuido a dregSIng table i (ho yueeo. Two lung (Tlmaon-broeadiHl ''>'•' %  end .i paii of inncftaU ta-ought down from upper rooms. Ml oddly in thes,. homely s Ur aukdtogl n.rrc wat. a umali, round gill il*le with :i lea-trav I.mi will 'wo white eupi and nucei gaeta be.iiniK Uv Rovi I creel There was an •Uatftc kctuV for maKUiK leu PgtfgTMN Eoi tii,. Queen, .. rMUet tMrne laid out in onlariarray by %  'oi.tman. botuevi of uMiieral water, glanseg, torche* notebooki ,ud petiiila—4n fftCl mui-h the same little collection >f handy Itoma whlrh the .nw •4c householder gathered into the room whero ln> family might mod sarelv await uVAll Clear mow i veated U National Suv.nga and tiUbeaquently handed to UM Treastirj to offeet paymenta due !u ,he K"v.il rmlK iirrter the Chrtl \M To the Palate during the wax yean came a constant stream ,,( Ubs nauons heroes: Dunkirk -urvivors, Baltic of Britain crews and men of the Bomber Sguad%  •},*. Eighth and Fourteenth Army men, cutnrnaiuioa, parairuopera, and men from th<* Ni rmandy beaches, Arnhcm and me croesing of the Maine, sailors from aubmarUMia and convoys, men and women who fought on gunaitea, m bomb disposal suuads. Civil Defence end Home Guard. HASTINGS, BARBADOS Dally and Longtcrm Ratequoted oo requesl. IVrmanrnl Geeeta wrlrnme. Dinner and t ...ki.il Parti-* arranged. 1 H BUCXXANO Proprietor. ^,.,-.-.- OKltNTAL PALACE M AIJ*wUAHTEHS rOK suuvRNima %  :*-.. INDIA, CHINA I ci;tix>N FLASHLIGHT BATTERIES by 18c. each CITY GARAGE No Courage And wiUi Uiein canMi Wives nod mothers. laUicrs and sweet. i-ut.. for each we* allowed to brlBgj two guests. For lome <.f Uie men decor..li d, UM DO m -ai ordeal .(.wall * an honour. In Uie presence of their Sovereign onn found tbemaalvee wanlmg m tho .outage they hao not lacked in me face of the enemy. It la net recorded, however that any lolluwed ine eaamplr of the Aaauraliau wbe, arriving .i UM* Palace to be drcoraUd IIIIMUI the first World War. wa se overcome with terror that u-slead ef enUrtng he hailed %  taxi aast drove aemy. To Buckingham Palace can* vfucen Wunelnuna with nothuig out tM cloinea sh stood up >n Anouasr exiled Sovereign, King ilawcon ol Norway, nod hi letters directed to tho Palac< Post Office so that hut own .aldreas might be kept secret. The Princeaaes paid only occasional visit.s until Uie King learned that the end of Uie *ai was imminent. Then he brought niuaughurrs back W buck.ogiam PalM-v and on VE Day. us ihp crow da surged up Ul th* Palace gale*, the Royal faaul> cgnM out on tiie bakony, when %  |olned by Mi Churcn< Ml No QsM Knest No Favour*; Tluue waa also a telepliorm so iDal when Use King look sheliai he vould lUNsp tn touch with Uio %  ulKidp world After Hi'oulhreak of war (be Hoval household and staff were •luichly redueed. The stall gs M railed Mp In their age groups. there beuig "no reaervaUon" for Rt.'.il servant*. The King's valet, who becanui D Guardsman and hi* chauffeur, who touted the Royal Horsu Guard*, were seconded for duty 10 the King. This was the most coOVgOMnl nrrangcnwnt, as the King's duties often look him to fUMsd to civlh.ms. so thai hi* personal attendants had tn <• %  members of the Service*. Throughout the war the King .-ore Ufa. uniform of one or other > %  iv-rvlcoe. Pruiceas EuaabeUi wore Uu uniform of a junajr ofBcer in dse A.T.S. in Uie last few we*k.i of me war sh. had been undergoing II driver's training course during .inch sho drove herseLf, for the i ii si Ume. down Constitution Hill nd through Uie Palace gaunv— -rlth 'L !" plates on her vehicle. On VJ Day Uie hong and (juuen again appeared on Uie i-alcony, while tneU daughum. i.'Picuously d rea r ed with Miuves round Uielr bead* ana i.iitecosnleed even by (he people they rubbed moulders with. I.pped out of Uie Palace by a de entraocg and miiaglisd wiU' me cheering crowd*. Meanwhile, two heavy lorraM e*mrted by armeii police guard had brought back to tho Palace • ni treasure* worth hundred* of 'nousands of pounds. Hut UVQ ramatatement of the Palace to >U pro-war position was a slow process that even to1 iy is not complete. SILTAN OMAR \U SAIM DD1N of Brunei (ssorneoi '-..MX., has coaae to England t-> view amr aapecta of BriUeh uie.* And he really cuukln • nave chosen a bethR vsaatage i oint lo view them ftoea WiUiout moving from his new home, just ouUkTe Croydon. he wlb be able to see how the rich run and how Uie middle-classei live. He can observe at one casual Inspection all Utat is good and all that Is terrible in British ..ichitecture He will also be able to note bow we react with i vUlUng if ten iv,around. From his Tower Suite tivy' %  -red and sUKSMMtructed Tudor outside, birdaeye maple furniture Venetian glass t-handeberv oink porcelain Inside at SO guinea* a week) he can look out Ol one window and see Use landscaped lawns. f*rracr~. golf • 'urse. swimming-pool, ruttng oath* and other costly appurtenance* of luxury hotel living The opposite window looks down a social step or two on a 'Jim, tree-lined avenue of semllet:irhed villas. For he ruler of the Empire'* biggest oil State itfl.ooo.iKio Worth produced last year), istaying in the guburbs. m go hotel on the wrong side of that chic county Surrey, and missing by the merest mil.or two the stigma of a London SB., postal dWtrlct number Contrasis The hotel's his'.ory u not unusual—,. monastery before the 1 Reformation prlva'e residenceof a brewer-king b< fore the find world w*r. Today it is a placof startling mntrasts. His Hlghne** on the way from his suite to the dhuHjn-im (If he doesnt get lost again In the corridors a he hnv k*M oner) will plot* th. 15th century mantelshelf In the lounge which bear* the trophic that proprietor Ala n Sanderson (who owns a lubrication oil biisincs*) won car racing The cloakroom leading off from the carved-o.nelled foyei sM esUUMsl) <-.iniod out n tli..t modernist motif whk-llooks so much like .. Neapolitan ice-cream Would he Highness like lo Ho*! Sanderson (who tnVBfl three speedway uacks. will tlk for hours on Uie subject Dog.raving Sondorion owni '.wo greyhound tracks. Oh Sundavs Would he like to meet a pertonallty to liven up Uie sokemi -eerie of bridge-players intent on ine game 1 Well. Orns |MBM g.iyed here on his last visit to .-gi..i I N*t Stmday The tceddina of Princru Eli;oi Hi ond the Birth of Prince Simple war-time menus were Charle*. Hoic Queen Mary served—Ue Royal family w 'eorched for lost treasures In the subject t> raUonlag like the Rou% %  baad "f me Duke ef Ldsnaarsh Vn whu-h h* has pesad. It happened this way H" con missioned artist Vaaco Lssa*iu io do a bronge head <>i inn, destined for ba> >—**—— — — tn the Palacino*, naarlt no part* imal slt*u.g ikes place on Monday •ad I --i>erria nroposfUon. tai/lolo found Ihe lvik<> ratlMH ii dlfflcull subject' 'He's too iriegukur pastures, come out %  eulpture." Bui be ws* a good sitter, although inclined i i -pod his pose by laughing lumping about Anyway, ihe work seams to haV* turned out well, i'hi He* came into the room. saw the head and taid imme-t .(lately -That's Poppa." Just Fabulous KKKNTLT I watched the I moat expensive ersonality in equal proporseems to me Uiat Hildega'dsVi Is s success story witho-ii much visible means of suppoil. So I went along to see Ana* Saseohss who 1* Hildegarde's m. ii-iif'r. clothes-buyer, director. i %  '' % %  '*("•!' organisei ..n.l .enature tune. "D-ding. Je Vous Alme Beau%  B gun UP her %  tana tii w.-'n parlnan If vou can spend ton minutet with Anna and net bo hy^u,tlfled intd belu-ving that hei partner is Uie mo. t beautiful and talenfed performer in Uie world, your powers of resistance are stronger than mine Ml** Soaenko. daughter at a ey boarding house koeper, u a dark-ba.red • On Page 11 "Meolifl FKU" Sr'Jrt DO YOU KNOW that wtvsa you swallow your food It start* on a |ournc> %  Abich i ikaa 2 %  covering a diKta.ii' 40 (eat"' i bU iiaih. mtMM keep moviiiK' roma'antly. %  %  %  heenmea disorganised. in. m i ( %  -'-I out-nf-aort*. TWr-*Haat*rniyae.p.rklio.' Andrews I.;. to prevent HluggishniiPa! Aiidnvis. tlie gentle laxative, helps th* wonderful :n of vour body to function a* renuliiilv RananaDaT Andrews for Inner Cleanliness cauoto£atoac g ^ssa UNIVERSAL— Dip or brush for positive protection ajjsinu White Ants. Borer*. Rot and Fungi. PIMM or polish over treated wood. No Odour. No fire-ma ECONOMICAL-Highly concentrated— laves carriage. OHute for use—gjoct further and costs less. PERMANENTCannot wash-out or evaporate. Combines with the fibres, toughens the timber and makes It firereststant. For permanent protection — faatm ATLASA WOOD PRESERVAi; Ai/os Prtttr.awt Co lid Crtth, Kent. Cngfond Detoih availably fnm H. JASON JONES S CO. LTD.. P.O. Sex 141. Barsidoi. m isi ^s Ms ntn i n"*r naa> • nsjp ^*?| PA MX COMES WITH tt.M.X SACROOI. KNOCKS OUT PAIN ON SAlf AT .... KNIGHTS LTD. ALL BRANCHES LOOK TO Y MJB ROOFS 111 The ralne Bust com*... your roof Is your sole proteotor and we have Everlt* sht. Galvanlaxl shaeta.the Paint and Roll-roofing you nead. BARNES ft CO.. LTD. ...you can't hold her in your arms forever YOU MUST FIND A HOUSE FOR YOUR BRIDE $V8£S£te Now if the house must stand up to all weather conditions, the bleaching of the sun, ihe dampness caused by soaking rains, the dirty signs of mildew, it all depends on the treatment you afford the wall surlaces inside and outside—that's why you should apply SNOWCEM CEMENT WATERPROOF COATING SNOW0EM protects the outside of your building from rain and moisture and improves its appearance. Its clean finish on inside walls and ceilings increases light reflection value by at least 20 per cent. SNOWCEM is hygienic since its valuable surface promotes maximum cleanliness and prevents the harbouring of germs. Supplied in the following popular Shades :— White, Cream, Pink, Silver drey, Green, Blue, Yellow and Terra Ootta. a On Sale at all Lumber and Hardware Stores



PAGE 1

SUNDAY. JtVE ii. us: *l'\0\Y ADViK ATE pxr.r SEVEN princess at Oxford lakes up the sword by PATRICK FORKKST T" i-KE u a hum 01 children voices from the main room or st Philip and St James Hull, in Lecklotd Road Oxlotd where intuaia are being given religioninstruction, but below tMN Is 'i tnon martial soundthe steely noi.v ot ihru-i aad purry. Taking fencing instruction in UM b i ol thla hall, several tim.o a week, arc II women undergraduates ol Oxlurd L'niver.ay One ol them i* 20 .-• >i M i' Dma of Ethiopia She w. m her econd year at Oxford, and la reading law Uke the other I rmbers of the Oxfoi %  ; I I mi Club e Is taking lro:iU often Be hoping m be chosen to tenc f>T the on against Cambridge A chance—next year *.( going abum ',:. ..„_ them '% %  Mr Cronia:' I'-lfU'EPMI U> Oxford name d'aniie* a*d OI>ini"' <*oafli "Will they V uood moiigh u_i % %  pfObal KOOd rnOOgl' c.MLbiMicr |h rear' %  • air u L-in No i> Will hav a gaod rhsmre ol beat;"* lhani i • I a air lied pi' U n I a Vine > Boneu and sscretarj i en,ngr rath other *h n Ben "<"-that baa 21 i.nd n hood Middle--' iiiini Mount s ..gain-: look Later M Rl •anay Lodgoaching pouioic And .noiiM -nr.cl a fair chance said M Ra<'kh*n. W. .vretary Do Trier told nxllm ea.'li member ol the %  IJ. lor.viKcn oUw; loin .. %  ling club nc art of fencing—a'thotisii leaning loward* small boat •MUM irTSj wan • nth uslasti %  about then Dewffna I roach Mr y 'lie ball %  blue in in>. who*. daughter. Fun Ceas Asirld. now at Oxiord Like Prince. •ebe or I pia she Is aLadt Marital r. Hall but her rt.„ nofane* I let; Pre den* Rackhi.ir and Secret.ti. Dw ling di.v cussing their pian*7or leant btiikling Ttmr 'itoughtjt are Oil Hilarv Irrni ni %  %  'iih tour of memlwi • Oxford IN III* BASfMLN T ol !!• %  *rUl i Cambridge Aud now listen to Mr. C L. de av turnout, oivmp. swordstnau and secretary of Uie Amateur Fencing Assocation. on 'he upsurge o[ •!>• sport in this country K< Hie London Fencing Club Ire old me There are between 7000 and 8000 members ol the sf*A and 3d0 clubs ca'ired *>. over the comnirr r.nh. find ii ihetr mankr*hip iu almqac caa) is tocraaatng rapid) v Detauae ol il* a* Interaat in the -oof rsnip naau as UtUe as as a weak and uia: .nr.udw. Maooa rrom qoaiilVO MWdars in about 300 areaa. Women score %  penning u an idoal sport for •ayi i in 1 :e advantags UVM neni Oeraune ot nar nsuurai poiae ana aoioi'.naaa. apon wliere pliystgue doe n reallv come into It Mr. de Beuumont aald Um: tha ooat or 'ji ajiaf. %  %  * (Ugh \ i ording to lue number l •aura leaaoBs lakan it should OOai an amateur s wot a.man or woman between 1 to 13 gulnen a yeavr after buying euu.pmen 1 Tha laraei. m:uuc glove anc foil. *aya Mr de Seaumosii tfnxikt con*. CiJ al UM m-W "Theo. of courat. UH^ .aat loi •earlie nUd Mr de Boaumoai togl me !ta eaura ."aaonn whlph gS aaaMeur* nt.~| toe %  pf.U' reasdn*. out up o about in< wore cueap and hornfli spectacles with pink green and yellow runs bouirm n 0* MusKi .r off the hawkers ou.sde tlie Kasrel-NJ bir' W:se in In* time the Director of Med.rai Serv.cea orougli: in an order *!iai no one :n -lie Se; vrea was to sear darK R!MV> without a medical per Within a for-mgh' rrneout of !o ot the ATS anf WAAF bad d*arded *hej g asses. the •.uuio^r "I HMn .n.nng 'lie %  toops was even lower it is reasonably certain that a test of London's young a omen now distorting the r ocautv and cluwm aou.d aho* •ame re-'Ult Tlie |rwat n oi people leas: of all the young do not need dai iernuptor -ir dl vmi or cycling when tru UM -kv oi .• the lea or im reading and writing in tne sun More than tli.it ir-.e eanng ol dai f. giastsi when Uisj an noi necessary can pern weaken the eyea to stmilgbl i the pirec'or ol Mfer.M>nable Bve out of tan 'o.de n doou wth the dark g asaea of a -trjage variety I.-IIOIIJ:, tru: sun was still down • %  nigh buildings of the %  %  • < % %  %  :. ; The nest morning l was out in %  Ovid with a anuad of voiuag >un'rv women lioaing They 'ere :n the full glare of the sun. Hot and drv. but there vere no dark glaswes Uiece. I iw 'ome women of m* Hoyml observer Corps at work under a II*'v did not need So ugly 1 wipp-x-' i ... MO good telling nrla in London i rhan how ugly they ii-iiiHelvee look, u tlone t-rrhBD* ttiev wtll get over this .:.J vanity as %  tot over oihars. I %  ill me age ol women between *u i id 50 Thev have the charm ton. good look.and C And *hev do not wear %  lu'-.v When I aat Den % %  I-en. Dunn* yon Fontanna meeting %  %  .'. kC* ml that I nave aald %  M. are vears i ysuoan itgngmvaD London lie-.ii fiita HBBB) ... Ifctj to Ywi'rr \ul Mv Mulher lii grow, longer ihe list ol tuples an* BM.C. Radio \otes jhild. lo,.,,, •„ lh, !" iu-b. .KI..J.I.-,, we i ,, „t l„ taM ,^^SZ,",!SSr mmma m tbt l..0i oluklmi wht) .irr arfovlhai b,,^ diM-UMinc with Dusl> %  •"• Hall >• til. Wmiwxtay Ana mo As i.i. an, UIHI it the hist pro li h ill be hesgvj next 2ih JUIM-. there will ^3ei.,.p.r-m u .,Kllth, fffSSil'S^E ""^ ehfl almost inrvt-bir I;will Itaga Other-, with icgnlts im . n.l ,(,-lopnaei %  This bre*l. i IW %  whole of the BBC'S Cillinn he West Indies' on that I llot youi M iinu ifirl at all. Yu're i-uLy ggfralag' A sUi nee roUov luii not beard beleee Aft.-i MM .. tUgeklng n't. Only when he pew UM ccgtwea* Md be nufce he i ,.i to,. .md kiiuint eruBapled -ill abowl him AN tNI>t.VJtMLNT It was a wrong aet by the adoptlve pMrgaMs ot thsac twu. They feared to tell their children lest m SJD doUUJ 'hey liM thvar love aiK> At. Hut lasting ;ifti' %  .•aep trust are far more Ukely to le pregerved by < mutu;il conildenee than by tiying to Eeeaacve a iktion. Suys Mis. Kurniuei-: If you love;i child, ami he know | il. yotl < 4n tell him anything lie Deeds '' date, fo met i-hour 1.78 and 9 5H | \\ imliliilon Ir* on Mettle Li.ua wf ilw All-Kni.larMl Club. .-va in mlrfituui i. tUve" brondci i* wMeti ludlblc here DM I will be o Jail. Rrpoti tren Wtmbsedon u the BBC* General itveiaeua Servuv with 0 r'iel Pwiry and rrcordi'. ><>niinevtsry aotne of the tughlieihts of the day's pla> the proeranuns betoel tatroduced b> Mm Rob rtoporl i'^-\ Tflmlilsdsi win be tn-oadeast twice tor Us* this ure.. ..* .IMI in. and ..gain at 9.15 pi i I %  %  •"> th> iwgiUtn besaaa W thai area In tin:' • .. .i :ti •-" % %  < %  'i11 '." noga i. Serial Hv Heurt James Tha ...and a plague of BLACK EYES • without harming nun. Well—how t., Tell him" And Tha new serial to be hen? In i. i Overseas Sorv.ee He must be told a.* soon as ..( tl. Bast the Bail i c start* to ask queaUons, eerUuoAy Lgdy" by Uamry J,m. aim I veil before he goes h. school. Some proo..ol< not ai v.cll known BOWexperts believe he cm ulai h UP) uch • %  i.ueful a knowledge even before he can ,sarvag io in-, in the preCaca '< %  Inl .Ik. novel which wai winter, bi IK* Dr II N Pratt. Ol the New ,nd 11WI IsWir) .'asnes ,Ui..riheYork Hoapltal, hlmseU an i UM lh> > i tnUon o* %  uve fulhei. Ulwvut the bt wa\ certain oung lady afTrontlng hoi 10 st.in Uie telling Is i>.v whisperiieaUnv The> young ladj I .g to trie iiulci 'Yea are my Amarn who speni half hei udopU'd son (or adopted duughtime %  b> IcT)." btsiveo "d inignaiilmity; lie htnl Tlic-n tho Ward adopted" bea fl lien SgM lonnv a term of endoarment. It the wrl i as a plaot of I ~ hould never be used, of course, of free %  xpreation. c.( irresistible la anything bul . happy aaaociaaction hg helo it miie dete*. non. table le e afraid or aslwjned. Ihe 1 ClKHlSr; YOU' had an infinite hope that she 1 One expert canles the doctors would never do griyUUni WI.H.K ineory one stage further. She in pui i ince of thi^ ideaj concepiBys. "The child should know he tlon of herself she re)ects two wits specially rhoaeu by hlk ptirentb admiral ulto the English -and had anothn mothe when Lord H'tfburloii jnd the Amerihe wa* born—a* soon as he beganj [can i>uelneaaman Oaapei Oood t.. vvondei • %  %  '*"* •ood, and snonrlea ihe Astiawgeoa rrom 1 The nnporUnre of telUiig Ihe I BHMidirasl in ten aptaodas the play .l.hlld he la adopted cannot be (will bo bwti ted A must aiaiuRnfl Itotj be children, and lhvlr delinquency .be.. exi in the may dale from the sudden dlsIIIK liuS m BUekj Wicket*, closure to them of the fact of !a inidsununoi play to -rkkellov' their adoption . ." C Qoraori Glover, which "Child Aotoptlon in the Modern 'v.ill bo b r oad c ae i at V IS p.m. on %  H'orid (Putnam), its. .Monday, lard June i SPY :: >///o\ 9 POTT SB It O \ I) $ I It KI. I In Paris London New York NEW washed f cyfiruthinol rWIC_E AS ECONOMICAL AS SOAP in %%  o•* ct w a*t"e r women are buying perfume this new waj INtXPEWSrVE HANDBAG PHIALS OP A COSTLY PEatfl • __./ perfuiae aaade than Goya yet it aat eon n littleThe perfume la (leys haadb*phiak %  kbr arw u thai at Goya'i workUin-ntf rosdy I %  .. Mti.ply baa of U. Thsse phial i wtvt inuwdu. rd bv Cio>%  thai a woman could carry perfume abooi I.T handbag so that al any moment of tl inauer where aba was. the could renew and refresh her iragTsaee Of a handbag paial of Oova perfutn' '-dav' PAB MVB8 YOt MONO In han 1 water much soap is wasted as scum f \B forms no wasu-' voap seuni Bvorv : ;. Icle of FAB goes to naha active cleansln. suds. i \n (.ivts inM.ii: nn TO nxrTHrs e FAB Soaks clean without nard scrubbing PABwashed clothes give mger wear — stay eah looking r*Jl SAVES TOB M TlMh AND HIBat \o need to boil, %  ileach. blue, .scrub or iinso with JAB. KAB .oaks even hi srork clothes clean in i.alf an hour 111 a-INlP %  afe for damt. ir hands PAH i e %  svervthliig Df 'ragraully *ar. FAB WASHES EVERYTHING BRIGHTER. WHITER. 'STOP C kbS fcV !" with Phensic I'HINSU lahhM Cl and psin hehinJ the cw rclic\c Muffy, congcMcl | IHTM'nn^l colinl : i Jisappear m no tune PrttNSl lbey ncillwr harm the heart \\ippiv oi r Ph • \\£ djowa hirh temperature, the Mine rime ...\ vou shwava e tsie < 1W0 MBIUS Ml FHOM RWIMMTIC NIKS. I HCnCHF. % % %  URUlliU IH OU'CK MIICF HUSO. Mhli PAINS. lrN?>. CWnS A r. "lilt J ^ [ bring beauty into wut liff .. %  %  %  rWfeWAswi %  '> r'-.i/i. a,.'. %  • i fir ouaxurrai i arnW '7 til) lasuai / sari aI'. riplxfj. .1 .-I ajg trkfjty. w/r/e/rff/r/rms M I%  -1. .pi. bra lial'v. in essV • I lira U ' 1' Mll.leliHtS a aide I'JT'V T. rlotfa 1 rocktall %  i Sarafesai .1 if ,1 %  eecdroL 1 I i at UH i ... %  I %  .-.. t 1..1 aeerj rrpi BACKACHE IS YOUR I WARNING H.. ki, h, U u .uill, ihe f.r.1 tirn sf Kianty Ito.il.lTkekaW.. %  relhehkMl'tU.c wkrnih., ,.i-,i o| asdss, kekgal al p—. Ii-.h Mmml flo.-n la .,, IM*.. tnd l->.b, ymm U>-tf .ti.Mn u h-..> .n ..a.,—.a.cM, TWe-il^l,• 11*11 a ..••,. • %  •*•>•• anrj (.HWaV ie.i, h* dwtar* n IUWM (ISWI pnwW IMJ k-ss-i Nl. ,.. kit M .— 1 hU~-J •1 IH'H todt ami pacMtii Than **ur Uaad > %  'l j—m baiksah* ihuipfiMri ind four lued fretinr ii raflfeJ b, labtHl brtlth ami .•"() Sou feel laara yaaiagaf. It.,..t aa I)aU a KWi (Ml. QMy 3 Ilaf ( UHle alallthHniUi Ji4 Dodds Kidney Pills SEWING YOUR OWN CLOTHES IS EXCITING WITH BROADCLOTHS in plain colours by Stylish vviii-ii'ilie combinatinnn are simple when you sow with "Tex-mado" Hroadclothn in plain OOsMSB. AlaO in fwilwi Mtri|x-H. or finrnl 'Icaigiia, they arc .m inapiration to work with . fine. long-laatiii|[ texture, sun-fast and tub (aat -perfect for women'* <1 r e —so. and men's shirts. "'rex-iniol. BnhBfMoaasI cut ami drape eaaily . and wash like %  dream Nicest of all 1the low coet— you'll \H> in fashion at half the pta AIW.IYK PJBJ I %  I m.idi' A %  k tor the ,0 11 %  I rth 1 1 % %  Ih (Uftranteej %  •buying a fabrn. # ^J-*sfi IC x DOMINION TEXTILE CO. LIMITED %  'TlX-MADf IS WEIL MADE



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Sl'VDAV JINF. 12. ItM SI'NTIW \nv<>< WT '' ".f THREE \i Ih. linrma : Human Emotion Admirably Protrayed TWO PICTURES currently advertised for showing uui the week-end supply a (east of entertainment for trios.who love drama and ?ood music It ia seldom that local Iheatre uoers get an opportunity to decide between t really first clan pictures shown at the same time at differmen and o( ent hou^. Women ? They're The Tougher Sex After All FARM AND GARDEN— B Y AGRICOLA AT 31, HE FELT LIU MT OLD MAN Pride of place goes to "A VI UFKTt AH N The five "uad—U A-"l Wn.nvi %  •I the BrkMnvn !'!.< houra of sasH aateruniiiiwti Vivien l-eigh M BUM Boia and Marlon Brando as 8tat>>y revel in sl-irdom In ihi W.u-iu I Hroa production which came from Ilroadway as a Pu.it/ei Prise Winner |o win the Academy Award. Bnndo a* the he-man with a Uueft iud and a bitter longut beCUM suspicious of the bun* tide* •'I his wife's stater. Vivien, after the los of the f .roily plantation* He doe* not lad to make in* clear whan she visits them in New Orleans and unloads trunks "f norgeous lurs. buiuttful clothes :md jewellery. Bui he S)eU "a line on her past' and devotee himself not merely to removing her from his home, but to breaking a romance which had sprung up l>etw*en his pal K.rl Maiden. Blanche as n 'ex-school maim" living in her dream world of long lost gentility otlends him when she d es cri bes him as a common animal and worse of all. 'a Polack." The lid ia off and Stanley 'goes to town' In his methods of ruin. Feminine charm and I'oquettiahneas a re lost on himKuthlewicsa %  "nl make up wmuV. he a virtue but Ihe balance is maintained when his wife, Stella, shows a deep and loving affect ion for her elder lister, the story of whose past she utterly rejects. Bui if Blanche. (Vivien Leigh) b) caught in Stanley's trap she does not surrender without one last struggle in whit*the audience aces every emotion known to the human soul admirably portrayed. A defeating combination uf her age and her post finds her pleading with Karl: *I have those things to offer which a man needs in a woman, richness of mind, tenderness of heirt And here is the moving beauty of fine drama with an appropriate barkground of music sufficiently colourful to embellish ever so slijm'ly the story. AT THE GLOBE MC.M'S moving drama of borbowg l love. 'INVITATION', starring Von Johnson, Domthv MrOuire. Ruth Roman and I>ouis BY Tilt UOCTllK WHAT are the differences L>*the mental euuiw; 1 T Trhe questions discussed m the 'lew edition of Anvan fead's standard work. Heredity.Schelnfelri m great detail the difference1 IKtie mile endowments Gardening Hints For Amateurs 100 girls born there u m the use of S 104 boys. It was With the kind help of Mr 1 long lime that male Tucker of the Department 01 e stronger and *o BetScien.e and Asp* urvive to birth The tarnation has been obtained, and 1. will he devoted to %  CMI.HU ( ushion Scale" Pas %  M BhjMl thought (or en.bryi.* we ha bit M reverse, in fact, is the truth Because males are biologically the weaker sex, more male than female embryos an.started uff on the road to life In octsM up for the greater loan amuru. males, not only in the embryo stage but in infancy, childhood, manhood and d age. Boys, incidentally, are more reluctant to be born than girls, who usually enter the world several days before boys can bring themselves to face it. I h-all Kb.k i'l liffi The Breadfruit WHAT a handsome tree U ih. 1 %  And what a valuable plant loo' If we took th. 11. to weigh the produce ol lure tree growtiuj umh-i m millions, terms M load would > %  • In season. It is th. %  t of th' 1 miui' known '". ,,1 '* h, -J" need for Importing rice A new perfume for YOU... nut* QiAfr I in* CM i-e served it ways, too wall "iinted here v 1 dead, it was for Indies that all weir •iI'II. H.>rnr,l Describe a liliRhl Ml trees as a whinwoolly formation kn about the stae ol a pea fastasied r to the plant By a black head, and of hill of minute redWh Inserts with !ti many feet' Thi i.li|.ht is ,.. 'C.xtwiy Cushion Scale** and t*e „.,, minute Insects inside toe wtatte cushion an the living young or i portant diaihe Scale tn-ect. and these young the in forms of W1 |] Ul time disperse nnd spread ap, 1 [kwuiajU) iiiv i +~* ha. ritkBB Hgtu-i,. a.s than Ihe female. As SrHrinfeM "J^lL., w v „, MtUM rl d of • % %  outsit: "stawkM m satneucaUy ""'*?' V&JL ,S £V-5 to Cttaa congtnietad. have a more ;,lls &?&£ V 3£? 28r?*l etVienl rntcmal chemical system, *!£ '' "" TSJTlFmSS _fff aad In various other ways are bio*WJ*J ,n ^^ ^JZSZJ, the' logirallj better adapted to resist '• "* %  Um £^ ln *!£ most of the modem human afTlic*W> -•£* ^ BV J, ^V none' remedy, if carried out systemauThe only smgle important di,%  *>. ' *" '' •• J !" 1 ** 1 ,** ease of childhood which take1 %  < M5 >ul that Jl or-Jj higher loll of girls than bovis pa.1 M the treatnient AHe. tttks whooping cough Why this has beer. -lone, the P'^^which should be so is a mystery. It is pray.d v. ith Ul*. Tnn. waasu equally a mystery why stammerran bg obtained (torn the ^saaj ng should be so rmuh eommnner Dep.ument of the Department of .mong boys than girlScli-nce and Agriculture. the second ship. Ih which, ehartered by %  .fru.il aikl -her econoiui*, i i I tba South Sea IsLnTT. %  793 History recorda, is you that the irtl sxpedlttofi .if m BUgh tailed ..s a mil. A nf the St Vincent and Jamah-1 to ba the original dittribtn these parts. a peculiar growth caprice Uiiailfllsll at some -ta irt to have lost the seedim like the .ultivated banana I t-ompensale. the clibli par of the fruit ha* develop*-' aUlili -'i "< •• tVw !•> %  ' nnuk d'pml m vt-s;a\ive metuvt lo rrnroduce Itself. Not inlx nuetstlv. we have heard the jack fruit, a native of India. Malay ami i.Vv'on. referred te as the male fruit This i< not Ihe caae the jaekfruit I* n dt-tlnct species in the same genus: it produre rrvltl ofl irreiulur ihapr, weiKhing as much as 50 to 0 Ih ( .nli i.-ntalning numerous seedi* emoe-ided in edible ntiln Of I similar consistency I "" closely related breadfruit VAN JOHNSON Guide Notes transmit without, as a general stale knaacta, being affected by them, spread of ih Colour blindness and haemophilia daryternus proneneas to sever. bleeding) ara two rat thaae d-ordersIt Is romnion knowledg that, through transmission by Quuen Victoria to some of her descendant.-, he gene (heredity factor) iisiponslble for haemophilia has plagued several of the Royal .,. '^T.-. %  --—**—• in reiateti oifaairu The spray must he applied_tji as fow , n a mist to wet the whole plant. twelve Tht breadrruii ... %  aopsga iad _ns of root Muckers which from the base of the Ires-. Men OnK £ Ml the wl Males suffer eapeclellv from and must bo repealed at twelve T h, ecrtain inherited disorders which day intervals Both loafa treaiby the women of Hie family may menls will destroy the rouni arise Taa lauaial fha ramaatv !• railara YOUTHFUL VIGOUR This yoDDg nil was bslag trematurelr seed by kldasf trouble Ha tails la his UtMa how Kruselien |a*a him back Na bMltliaftar %  MU of pain .* "1 sutTared for weeks from klda*/ troubla and felt Ilka aa aid nuu although I am only SI If 1 stooped to do anything II was agony/ t atralgbtan ap again. Bavsral people advlaai ma to try Kruschan Halts aa the* bad found thm wondarful I triad them aril fount they tars rae rallaf from pain and I fait better lu every y 1 shall keen on with the dally doss because 1 can now do my day's work and DO* %  •J any tba worse for It. Umeaa the kldnaya ranoUoa oartala acid waatea, 1 |ca4mo troui>i*v>ma a--baOBuaoba. rhatimsand )ioat*s laMsua Kruachan la one of the finaat aiureUos or kidnay ai-erimita. I'ha small dally dose keeps tne kidneys and other internal organs working smooth:y anl narurslly. so that the blood stream b parlflod soJ rigorous hasJtb rastoref # # Ask vu.f nsareat Chsmlst m Drus nkora tor krusthsa. lllVRAG^ 1 e aaaeae 1 -•••••*1 • a • • naeeaaeeee. .••••*•• %  •< • Ml'#t*l< toiiaitii (•ea*a*> •••• %  ••• Ml***l* > ••••!• %  • • • • t eea a ••• •• %  •••• rr' •aeaeaeaa The peri time \yuli the toffj mot nr BOURJOIS and so prevent Ihe Q, ^y root cutting" The sucki blighl. ,.. 1 en ov.d always with a poi QttU, nu.nbei two deM-rlbea they ara about 12 to II "Oat brown scnle* wh atoii K ihe stems nnd form high It Is b. the MCh .1 the leaf" AS .'lineno the buck iff f fifth This >rale blight must be troatCd in exactly the same wa> as the ( %  ..-•. .11Cusl ; OJ I t Wttf >> of luropr B s tsrs S^L" W M "" """ Fortunatel; „s ii %  eparate i mm# * m*m£ tng them well watered until th*Sehcinfeld showmatle ,1 pcdig^ee. % %  our present Que from haeiiiopbHia In 1 eiagramthe chlklron of 1 cannot surfer or esc* MM Airs. A. W. Scott takei htr guides • eisii the iViflftiintfol Home. ,H-n. M .ho Gtob.. on J* "'co^.^JtJ l 5£ "Sldnw. I. mother lnhTO---H, , 1 pitying parental love for a child Funds. whtta^tUfsraa uuSerl l'e obscure, but it is probably ^ ou ,ln 'hi-^pl-nts with flna gj In ill hoalth and Ihe sell assurance fot re f r „ h menL. for the eSssW dlli to different glandular makesulphur VThhl should he done to uf a beautiful woman that ah, ? J*l SE2X"*J Z** "*" %  %  U p in the two sexes Obeatty the tarty mom.ng when the B^kjUng *JPg3gjg' JJJ can wail tor the man she w mis. ** }£ g'^T,%ei the Home %  "*'•• but sulphur in a muslin or similar reou ed. "" %  " Dorothy, who suffered at an salstarH matron who showed !" c rUk early at from an attack of them around. The girls were very In "*? Ii rheumatic fever reeonotled hermuch impraasud with the Hone pre *JJ, ** oil M men may be de1 advantage In ndowment may 1 self agiinst her own desires lo a and" remarked on its -tfffl'jfW w *. el ili life .if splrurterhood. but Louis iuui neatness and on the disclpCalhcrn. an adormg father, is line and team spirit of Ihe ttUldpceparcd to exhaixt his great Ten, Who joiner! wholehenrtcdly wealth In an attempt to bring the in she names and songs. happiness of home and husband After refreshments were servto his child. With the mark of ed. prayers ware read by one of death upon her and only a year the boys of the Home, and before to live, she bellevea that Van is Taps and Dismissal Mrs. Scott tween the sexes is also seen in viaing 1 love with her and marries him. took tht opportunity to speak to 'he progress of gifted children light ,f ihe nurfari"ThrinV' "" lhPm hou4 hllf w v S fe week* near the wound; lift "the bushe: gssj gttackad Aa ri eotourad into get into the that when it mti'lv ; of 11, %  desired I SfMM .1 f im-nded when ., Alternatively, oot aV>out one U> verv fort them to know that there La Heels wttfaoh sfe' no evidence that women's biolouiunop.-ned bud, eat superiority qtin]ina them to ,,prtx Ihi do anything better than men exan d with cept hear and rear ^lldren. JSm/^ •-£ |g—^ ,-^a7 rooti, likl The Slow t hihl Thaae lnaecta ara called Thrlps. .„ u 1^1 or box of light, sand. An Important difference beAdult Thrlps enn fly. but when M)1 | ,„„( lightly covered with soil. they are wingless and keeping them' moist and shaded %  olour. Th* opening jn about six weeks, onar ~ petola are dtaeoleAirsd -,,7-^7 half'inches In dlamelc. • ml one fool long are Her father's machinations run the children. Boys usually turn their talents t<. blooms must be sprayed with H hooU should forai: when suffifoul of the designs of the beauiiHike lo Codringtoti t'olletcc goo<1 *">t m later life, but "Gammnlin". whim can be purrinuh strong, treat as root suckful Ruth Roman madly in love 7th Barbados with Miss Peinber* irls cven ln '"* %  uav *" re ottrn chased from the Seed Depnrtmeru ers 0J this method threa or WUI with Van. 'I can wait for a year*, ton ln charge hiked to Codriiurton co l nt wt,h ,he humdrum occuof the Department of Science pi n nls are quite possible tron\ The storv breaks nnd Dorothy College on the 14th June They l' a,Ion which happens to be nearand Agricullure. ,.„h .-uttlnu Ma a careful nurselesms for the first time that she did work for the Second Class nl n ml *?& %  • .. TnU compWae she answers to Iy man with one or two goo* has onlv 1 few more months to Badge, 0n ' lh commonest of paranihe questions asked by "Worried". bTeadfrult trees may roaka agood 85S S ?2--- ~*sS*?*^. rSS^SlTjrc Th L ""' ,ri h.-r dafPmtafj. -Thcrfare thing. Mr.. Butop w M ,kM to wrt* S" ", otSnto m-l-r lh,n wa,.l„,K Iu l,vc. c^ic punu of In. Brownlea hr.llh. 1> "oner na Hthir trSn Love conquered thu '"bnuuion who .tuodal !h. !„. ..tj „ u ,nli„n o," o!, some nbVS"" h a ^ d K*"u "T""' '""Sf The r ~ *P^ "' •• ...1 anrda which i> ratariuvla and devuteri husb-iid are nchlv are interested In the acttotuea of progress the rniWren and ln the Guide %  rhal'lo end Wlndu. (J). -1r ...... aiKi Movement MT> Biariop took the WORLD roryaiOHx acuvra fruit.. Finally. pi< Ihe frulU enre••peok Ihe I have hardly seen the play upon opportunity human emotion, more effectively Guide l.iw.s hrought to the screen.—J.K.B. On the 14th June Guides from I /" — —L.ES. if you irant to start in good tune raff upon a Smith Alarm dock to raaiind you right on time! This handsome alarm, \| v. DAV. N. goaf rer30hou^..toi A -.wnding In. ream. blleOJ-j|ieenca.*e>*ilhpUled liiliDgs, It has a 4-inch dial with full luminous nuroctal*. Alto arauaolc notvluni "1 The neat quntkn come, from '"",& „„, KOO ,. k them down JL %  *,. !f S k fK. C ?.^'„ ) ?"iJli. The 'roll. d.. not k^P '" visa me as to the use of dried i>.,,,i never helu^nflower seeda^ss a friend told ^/Cf a goo^l "me t./ pUnl^ %  me they are used In some way as '"" .,*,,. .. !" viia-nlii producl.'' Well "'--V<-*,, -'-*'*-V.**--'4 IRV-O-LITE PLASTIC GARDEN HOSE and GREEN'S LAWN MOWERS In 12 At 14' Sizes PLANTATIONS LTD. MORSES I HOI AN ROOT — %  .] ST tSSgSMS Sl • Or IHm'i MS. mm % %  r apa as s V • m lsst: • Na ail — lit, •-•i Jm TDUITED HWS1 rot ova SI uui BEWARE OF WORMS i Worn-tf-.t-* oW md yvmiUika. ISj ~. Twit. hufaMf to i*o*—l*-l •* Cmm < %  lodi'* Warm PwW Haato Vt M | n*i,..( \H. M— %  IMI. aa/i-aaa. k • JUS1 RECEIVED | III Ml'IIRKT'S VI IkRIN \KV PirMRDIEH \ \ I'It • < I'M it IK *. (. r.r. Also: HOMEOPATHIC RKHtlllFS WITCH lit KM. I.U. WTTCB HAZEL OlhT. DBASAL (. CARLION BROWN! KLECTRIC LIGHT FIXTL'RKS nnd . GLOBES in a variety of designs. V-eW.cC 'w H'holeaslr B.UII I>TUCK1>I 16. Roebuck St. Dial 2S1. WALL and CHI. i.NG rmnras and GLASS SHADES. l.hiiii und patterned. II.HTKI1 BULBS, screw and bayonet type. :. rnoV yarilly of FIXTL'RKS and FITTINGS nnd . lirhter and brighter home from . UAHBADOS tO-OIK 4 OTTOS FA # I OH I M. TO. EVERYTHING YOU NEED FOR LASTING BEAUTY l^ T -. !" Uir.k...lUi.. pesvad the afaVM <4 Tond'* be..rlt ||*"'> Peod'i oaTer fom a com l*k* •IdaMlf itdrodtilr TotUnrr \i.<,< ,1. Ii. .(' -r.(it..nr. ..... fatTC | ..l ifaSkadH d Poo %  ads' asaaa artsaasl ilh I' rnh'fk .' (Iniiiinnl rtst I (OMipleitori lipf. And fag 4.1-1 thi In J •-(-'•-1in mm llial JII.1 MM OB ..h I .1 rwit 1 ,,-i m POND'S c. P. N. S. WARE POOLE POTTERY DENTON CHINA ALL PRESENTS WRAPPED si:t-: otrjf insnt.tr n --THE CORNER STORE


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SUNDAY, JINT. 22. 1952 Sl'ViW UIVOCATE PACE TII1RTFKN HENRY ^e&to Khi Grow n Gordons Stands Supk&MJL IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only ~~ % % % %  — %  —^ SPECIAL Ol I IIIS nrr now available at our Kriiiirhra Tweedwide. I'OTATOKS -a lbs. DUTCH CUUNttl ( MIKKIKS—,.,r koi RABOOMAH COFFBB PKUNKS —Tins ncnn ONIONS I'suully Nuw 45 .411 •Jl ,:io .112 .72 Sp i^lii-.io> i and Snan Street Cunfccliuiirry Dye-* S .13 | Sweet l "i .11.;. \1 I nl.— 2-lt> 41 Slrii\\b