Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text



















Harbadros

'
ESTABLISHED 1895

' Natives Riot
24 Hurt As Police,
Shoot Into Crowd

CAPETOWN, June 18,
Rioting broke out on Wednesday in the native quarter
of the mining town of Odendaalsus in the Orange Free
State over the Nationalist government’s tightening of white



ee
FRIDAY, JUN





ite Supremacy Measures

| Paper Warns Big Atomic Programme :

Wu. Abcut
Leueos TotS. Launched In FrReer. |

(Prom Cat! Own Correspandent) tion in atomic energy has

The French, a pioneer
GRENADA, June 19. ($108,000,000) pro-

launched a new 37,600,000,00% francs

The on a4 ews C oh * » in m
supremacy measures. The West oe news eeea| gramme aimed at’ bringihg a French nuclear industry to

iting
“s reference to a moye to
United States extra-
territorial powers in Bermuda
finds that the issue holds @ w®rn-
ing to British Caribbean islands
which were leased as bases liable
to re-occupation in any emer-
gency,

Police fired into a melee, seriously injuring four na-
tives and wounding 20 others. A police station was. wreck-
ed, a police car burned, and some policemen injured.
Fighting flared when _ police -——-—— ——

tried to enforce an order requiring
mative negro women
special passes when they went on

the Furopean forefront in five-year. Notably omitted trom
French plans was any mention of developing the atom
bomb, f

Ton cabinet approved the details and provisionally |
settled to raiaé funds. Felix Gaillard, Secretasy of State for
Atovayes ‘ytd ministers that the “programme repre-
sents essential steps in the atomic activities ef France and

to carry | “fom AU Quarters:

ee












»
the streef. The, rioting. was pert : The newspaper strikim, son=} yj . i i
of fiery, opposition to Prime No Heat But nt amie ng a con-} will lead the country within the space of five years to
Minister Daniel F. Malan’s policies , abtegiy- ot Bae t A. f various uses of atomie energy in in ustry. , 5
in Capetown. ° KF, nce compared With the b. fa of| te said the main objective of ‘ iti > said Sli 9pers or Uncle Sam's Un-American Activi-|‘he project was to bulld new °
The chief opposition leader said , e |ties Committees, sees the possi-| ‘omic cold piles with a power other ves
his party will have nothing to do | ey, Repay ag Ail Ps er }5¢ 30,000 and 100,000 kilowatts ;
with: the newly Created. High f . \natives of the islands at the near-{ Wich may produce more than 2
Court Parliament. This Court} r Winter lest pretext . a one hundred pounds of platonium Birth To
‘was set up to overrule appeals to! ‘The situation gives an, utgen- within two years. .
the Court which killed the Gov-{ a to ascertaining + how free we Gaillard said under the new
ernment effort to remove 50,000; Auckland: The Aucklana tstand in the Commonwealth séple | {ve year plan the French Atomic Quadruplets
Cape coloured persons (those of | Power Board has no power to} jof the fundamental human. rights Fnergy Commission afso will:
mixed blotd) from the general|spare fcr heating its own office to which both Britain and the 1. Produce atom powered] © : ; 5 ;
voting list. this winter, so 40 girl employees United States are signatories”, the |'™°tor and research into the treat-f WEYMOUTH Massachusetts,
Malan proposed a Court Parlia-|are being measured for free oo e ay Editorial says, and asks whether rent of uranium to produce other June had
ment in which all members of! fleccy-lined ankle slippers. THIS SECTION of soven, undor Cpl. Grosves, won s8® Talliig Plate Gompetiignt oe Walkers’ yesterday {the momentous London Confer-| forms of energy. wala ll (atresia a ae ec
the Senate and House will sit as] Lisbon: A_ Lisbon policeman! here the Barbados Regiment is holding its Annual Camp. oft to rirht they are Cpl. Greaves, Pte. jence on Federation will preserve, 2, Build MP ar coe ne reve 3 ive i on
judges in secret to pass on the;has arrested himself. Officer] gealy, Pte. Stuart, R. M.; Pte Thompson, E.; L/Opl. Petorkitty Baand Pte, Alloyue, I. Major 0. F.C. {if not enhance these dignities, oe so of atomic r pak TN ebaitda bar the atiends
r 3 i Lisbor ds 4 5 se . i sor et,
Pere an a ee a Police, in asa ta Weaken: Yew wee rennet o = idtatMdebiaiecutie- ttle: salle ag o @® On Page 6 3. Prospect and exploit min- fing physician said it was “too early
embezzled funds entrusted to him. | | “= Terels such as uranium used info tell" if all will survive.
Determined to make an example | New Arrest atomic research in suitable areas? The fourth baby-—a boy, born
2 of himself he took a statement in ; : of France and overseas terrttor-Jone hour and six minutes after the |
MAy FACES fos ores gm fo dy France "Create in colleges ond Unt-[traaition, ‘The git te test to |
He then loched ee aE ae ea n I ance | vorsities a special course iMyarrive and the two hoys that fol-
0% cell and ited to ia oh - ; J : oo \lomic science. lowed, were veported in “goorl .
unisian and waited to be charged, } PARIS, June aes} ‘To finance this new plan the]condition”, They were placed in
Nicols | New arrests and searches were Cabinet will depend largely on ffour separate incubators.



as

Havenga, Seuth Africa's Minister!
of Finance: has a dog named
Katinka which drinks whisky es
u night cap. With its master.
Washington: A craze for shawls,

is sweeping America’s women, and
‘making city streets look curious-|

Problems

PARIS, June 19.
Premier Antoine Pinay’s Gov-
ernment after scoring a landslide

{
| Johannesburg:
|
|
}





reported in France’s drive against!
Red threats to Communist security ,
wf the state as government
nounced it would remove Commu-
nists from key positions. |
«Pclice in Toulon made the four
tecnth arrest yesterday
police raids on General Con-ade



the outcome of Premier Antoine

Yineay's Government backed loan The fother John arrived at the
{ the loan expected is as much ns} oepital following the fourth birth
95.000,000 francs ($271,415) of Jend-early today told newsmen “dl!
\oked reconstruction and capi- I can say is thank God it is all
tal investment, credits will be}ovew” The live birth of quadrun-
ufomatically freed.—wU.P. lets occurs once in 68 yerrs, 163
cases, Mrs. Manting, mother of



triumph on rearmament appro-|ly Victorian, Reason: Air-con-| ation of Labour CGT offices and inree older children, had spinal
priations is now facing questions ditioning is now so common that|\he Communist headquarters in, Japanese Exrviov anesthesia and remained semi-
of the waxione National Assembly , it is easy, in a light summer dress,| France’s naval port, two weeks ys ‘ ¢ nscious throughout the long
on the knotty Tunisian problem. | to catch cold from abrupt changes|ago, They hauled in Aime Ville- ° cl ordeal
i : ; ha ' REO; ee ter : + tl > * f
Last night only Communists dis-,|of temperature. And at Buftalo,|croze, a militant Communist andj Hopes For oser Dr. Robert Ryan, the family
. Wy aehy Ara)

sented as Deputies authorized the’ New Yor



bank has



former president of a special dele-





Government to spend 1,400,000,~ scent sprays for the gation of the village of Polnaris, | froneh Relations ci heerine malt that bother Meo
000,000 francs ($4,000,000,000) to! women customers. He had been ordered to appear; j slight ease of virus pneumonia
outfit 12 Army. divisions and 27) before the instructing magistrate} | ' , ‘

air wings by the end of the year. Washington: The

Such overwhelming unanimity
may be lacking once the Assembly | 51st day of a fast designed to in-
gets to the heart of the measures | duce God to show him signs of

to grant the uneasy North African } pig

Ministry. He forbade his



















installed

ise of its

Rev. J. J.

| Ivie, 57-yeor-old Ozark Mountains
preacher, died this week on the],



Fernend Orth, two days ago but
had failed to appear. He was
rought to the Place of Justice by)
special Surete inspectors fx in- |
terrogation.
The Federal Secretary of tho!


































PARIS, June 19, |): it was not serious and “if she
| The Japanese Ambassador Ku-| ,
mao Nivnaumura expressed hope
today that Japanese and French
tude relations’ will soon become
groser “Lor the benefit.of our coun

ls like
yorrow,””

12 Inches Long

it, she can sit up to-





















Protectorate greater self-govern- | famiyeteehave a doctor.cnier iho} Cammunis ad 5. Wark ; rahe thoi even! ja) He estimated the babies weighed
: ¢ a de adc nunist. Pp th r. Nishimury, who prewented hi -
i ee ” Ren house even if ‘he lost Conscious-}% Toulon haa Sastil EY: sveduitala +h President Mihoent hotween two amid three pounds 4
The French agree that Tunisian | ness, We signed a stntement to] ionne, was 4186 ordered to’ appear: Auriol on Tuosday to baoorne tic h and measite about 12 inches
reforms are in order but they are protect his family from any] >ut disappeared from his home| ifirst Nippon Envoy w France long. First qt tie quadruplets,
split on how far to go.—U.P, possible legal action over his] before police arrived. lsince the.end of World Wor ,{the irk was born at 10.23 \ p.m,
death. Two more arrests were made in told the preas he will work toward|#0'T then came the boys at 11.13,
Lages: Tail piece to the news oe geo but Ora cat better understanding between the 11,24 and 11,29.
of th airlir 1 >S i ‘efused 1o disclose who the per- ; ;
ctnekemaadod th ae eee sons arrested were ant indicated! R.S.M. Marshall, H. B. G, about to lob a Mills 36 Hand Grenade before he makes the squad which he ie Waid Be hoped trade relations cet Oke mir | ota mend
een oe tan: 5 5 sstsakal waa Ayer wet has been instructing, fire one cach, 0 ade reMVons) sid all were “normal and gooc
| Sapeeinn school children are un- ee ag Pk ng agp ; between France and Japan soonlsized”, The births were fifty days
able to take the General Certifi- | ieee nents ne aes e Will be expanded “for the benefit] premature but Mrs, Manning has |
cate of Education on the scheduled | ©@'led out new searches yester- ‘ of our countries.” He said}; een confined at the hospital for |
seo eee iar“ tomer oes! BQrbados Regimen ee a
; +: diaacs aidan patie 7 : as! ’ ‘1 the past several weeks in antici-
were aboard the plane, and now en oe city but results of the} Japan was greater than that of pation of an early arrival. At
the children must wait till dupli- a ee ee eee or wilt eat any other country. French cul-| one time she had been told to ex-
cates eae sah out from London. terior Charles Brune said ibe ee A B til d QO B W l , | tute has always been respected in} cost possible birth of quintuplets
as mn: e erma x : : ots he . Japan,-—-U.P, rut ex-rays la ’
star of “Call Me Madam”, fe A ee rae Gane ak see a egi oun a e Ss . bs ag ith a oh mi Hy ao
eenre Mexico, for a divorce. Brite Switzerland a demand NEW COL. SECRETARY 'mmediatel following each
e@ quipped to reporters: “Just aie aoe ; * ‘OR HAMAS ee 2 oe :
fal che nien, r z *' | 1 taking measures to remove per- I J E " F . F BA bi:th a Catholic priest baptized the
—LES. oe Se. positions in all gov- n en nds' RAINING LONDON, June 18 babtes. Then they were taken
| mment and defence offices whose | | J 4 | Anthony G, H, Gardner Brown) from the delivery room to incuba-
ie et nee as Saeex V e 43, eg oe eos me oor tors. Dr. Ryan who once deliv-
r f iS? e netions ey ti - jmee has been appointed Brit-| cred triplets sald the Manning
U.N. Would Agree oxercise." aca on f sh Colonial Secretary in the} quucruplets would remain in in-
; 7 rod Uae hoes arrests wrncwonak sine A : ae He succeeds G. P jet ators until they weighed five
¢ y as experts are pour- ALOe D , i ——(C.P, | poun :
To Rescreening ng over tons of seized eae puaste Oesten Unden, Foreign Minister pettel Whe i retiring: OF . LP Fr sill caching stabiledbe
raeae oe . > ‘rom recent police raids, The,returned from an interrupted WALKERS, St. Andrew, was a veritable battleground
“well, Well, Feather- ed 7 ; ‘ ea Menta toile tx cy racath Swe ; wareeetnyer) hee! foie rs ae
spoon, our fears of the R Prisoners Tih eee ek ee bapa Ned ny gg od mgs 5 yesterday when the Advoeate visited that area. The spite-
~ bene piven to am MUNSAN, Korea, June 19. “—""""| Soviet troops plunged into next| ful pinging of the .303 Lee Enfield Rifle, the purposeful
re dies adi Major General William Harri-| $2M. OFFERED FOR door Finland in 1939, The score} ehatter of the Bren Light Machine Gun, the ominous roar
ee son, senior U.N. Truce delegate, BUTLIN’S RESORT stood at one and perhaps two! of the two-inch mortar bomb and the impassioned thud of
Â¥ intimated that United Nations Swedish planes shot down by | the Mills 36 Hand Grenade, al! ioined together in a martial
London Srorees Service would agree to rescreening of LONDON, June 19, |Sovict fighters as Unden arrived a af ~ ; dai . i 4
f . . ‘ Communist prisoners of war be-| William C. Dunn of Chicago|by air from Italy. | discord of sound. ; ; :
Lawrie A pointed fore an armistice to determine how] ‘#8 Offered $2,254,000 for the) Sweden last night rejected in a te Meee, WAS, SOE Aes 8h: ERS “7
’ P many Reds want to return home. titra_medern vacation viliage on /note to Mocew the Soviet charge , the tae ieee a or i hnide 6“
“t with C vnist #-he Grand Bahama Island which|that a Swedish plane last Monday f ; cises In the nills in the Walkers
To Overseas Food 2 oe or’ agent eae tans ost its British builders $5,600,000 ;opened fire on Soviet fighters, It 3 Rescued From , area, carrying out part of the
ey aes. : Sete. tei nk . i was generally felt here that Rus- \ training programme at their An-
¢ touchy prisoner exchange stale- 2efore they ran short of cash. | § ) ere that Ru T’ 2 Wi pa RE de a
Corporation mate blocking the Korean arm-{ _ Proposals for the sale wer dis- | 6 aed taken the offensive.againat rain ‘reckage ee eee re numbers 7 am ,
istice. Harrison has offered re-|-iosed yesterday to shareholders }|wecen. asia 1 me 800. AY t A Wh i
THE Secretary of State for the|peatedly to rescreen prisoners if the company formed by Billy! Hope was all but lost for the MEXICO CITY, June 19. one Se coe hye ores A co C. F tS,
Colonies, Mr. Oliver Lyttelton,/after an armistice is signed. Butlin, Britain's vacation resort|Tecovery of the Swedish airforce Rescue crews recovered ah i aaee rae ae * ne: ae y * tip
has appointed Mr. Angus Lawrie,| Little or nothing has been said] «ing. jDakota, a “Flying Clisoon” which|} three bodies from — the whrtped hie r been omit + oie Po ie bp: ‘
of the Nairobi firm of accountants,}of another screening before an} It is believed that they will| Vanished last Friday with a crew)} wreckage of a small freight is sain ph 7a " the dines ro f nd,
Angus Lawrie, Jeremy and Co., | armistice. Meanwhile U.N. nego-} 1¢cept the offer, | of three and five radio students. train which derailed thirty spa n a 7 =) Tie tata
as 4 part-time member of the|tiators are ignoring the Commun- Dunn, Chairman of the Mer-| 4 laboratory specialist is ati miles south of here yester- |/ training.
Board of the Overseas Food Cor-,ist protest against a three-day chant Distillers Institute in studying a damaged life raft from day and toppled into a L pas be |
poration. Mr. Lawrie’s appoint-|recess in the truce talks reportedly f Chicago will form a new. company ie Dakota al: oSnee want eran -eot dam. Six persons were in- || Falling Plate |
ment will be for an. unspecified |considering even a longer pause} to buy the West Indian vacation |) Tan GAT ise bs ‘ilet hy ie ae jured, 1 alleen RAR ae kaa
period, determinable by the Sec-]to deprive Reds of the propaganda f village which is still not finished, pe - Cadet suenlaain that! | cccenad agate an Gical the
retary of State for the Colonies. platform.—UP. = el =(C-P0 the Dakota was shot down when | Authorities said they did camp site proper, covering rough-
IN “SNIPERS GULLY” i \bigadered qver Soviet HAVA! lL were riding in tbe “train's || 17_cur sree, cnet tren, woebens
ssf ; ‘bf |manoéuvres in the Baltic. : a ain's || were keenly contesting the Fall-
orn ees | Sweden has.admitted that one | ony cars but feared more | ing Plate competition, This con-
jof the Catalinas flew over Soviet rhe. ee oe soups. sists of six targets at 100 yards
} a mid-
|



Communists told West Germans to greet “Plague Gen- es ott, Camp Comm dunt, the
i Sieh ae ot dens da tae sokserthstress le ey Advocate saw riflemen put °
| er al Ridgw ry with strik 3, mas ; de mons trations, at ds in-! through thelr paces through Scotch Whisky :
flict defeat on him which he will never forget”. A call tO|*“Snipers’ Gully” This is a GUARANTEED ;
arms was sounded by Neus Deutshrand, official Soviet Zone! gully cut ou : i soi OLD MATURED
| Communist party newspaper lon that ¢ Oe ra re
| The Communist newspaper said, police “t n to erect a wall on ReTSoe * a ne
Ridgway is coming to Germany to Glienicke Farm through which} : “oe ‘tbe a ot Aereénte ’
inspect “territory from which an| the zonal border runs. ‘The farm! ,, |} mot Seid reel Sted tha
atteck egainst the German Demo-| land belongs to the Soviet zone s Cuore ae . routed fled *
cratic Republic, the People’s De-|Germany and the farmhouse to te Bost arinees |
mecracies and Soviet Union is to) West Berlin. ily to hat ‘st? e troo Ss )
be prepared just as two years ago West Berlin newspaper said +! The rifle mer ob i n ther ature z
(Republican Foreign Affairs Ad- Soviet zone were wrecking t f mopping up operations and he a J
viser) John Foster Dulles inspect- summer homes of West Berliners pas to go through the gully whera) :
ed South Korean attack bases”. in the Soviet zone. West Ber! there have been targets cunning-
| Meanwhile Communists took ers still have not rece i trave ly erected at vantage points â„¢ GARDINER AUSTINEC? Hs 4
A RIFLEMAN is seen here giving it to one of the “Snipers” as be is put through his paces in “Snip- new steps to seal off West Berlin’ permits to enter the zone to pro- When he comes suddenly upon} i ———— Agents ————-—-
ers’ Gully” by Lt. Sydney Lashley. : \from the Soviet zone. People’s tect their property @ On Page 5 | 9

{

|
}

territory Jast Friday but said it
was unarmed. On ‘Monday’ an-
other Catalina was shot down by
two Seviet MIG 15 fighters. Seven
crewmen were saved—-U.P,

die-aged man and two
children—a boy and a girl-
both about ten years of age.







German Communists Want
Huge Anti-Ridgway Riots

BERLIN, June 19.

East German Communists called for riots greater than
those that took place in France when General Matthew B.
Ridgeway, S..A.PE. Commander, arrives in West Germany

on Monday.









| ranee and six more targets at 500
yards and the sections which
knocked these over in the short-

est time are the winners, In the
case of a tie the section with
the highest number of rounds of
ammunition remaining is the win-
ner. Each detail of six is furnish-
ed with 50 rounds of ammunition
per man,

The competition is keener he-
cause battle sites are used on the
Lee Enfield rifle and there is no
adjustment to the set ranges of
4290 and 600 yards,



ee enemies



Ve %

Snipers’ G
Snipers’ Gully GILBEY'S

On a conducted tous of the
| Trtiping area be Major O. F, C
Vv

















my

PAG. TWO

wai







Caub Calling




Zarbados Regi
He was a



ol. "RT. Miche ©
t ocunandsnt of Local Forces and
Cup. W. A. #armer, one of _hisf
1.D.Ce. oa a
Off to Berlin <
=
‘AR CG. BH. ADAMS, CMG.
Ava Leader of the House of

embly,

ay T C. A., for Bermuda on his way ,
w Bor din via’ New York and
EA He has gone to attend
tings of the Executive Board
f of the General Council
.he International Congress of Fr
Lrade Unions (LC.F.T.U.),

The first meeting he said will
for two days and the
about a week He will the

eturh to London and will remair’
in England for about three wee!
having interviews with the Secre-



for

tary. of State for the Colonies anc ®

other people,

Mri Adams will also see his wif
in Bhgland on his way to and
trom Berlin as well as their son
‘Yom who is at Maudlin College,
Cxtord doing Modern Greats,

LLENCY THE GOvV-

left yesterday morning


















MR. G. H. ADAMS, ©.M.G.
Spent Six Weeks

RS. JOHN MOULSDALE,
ne of Mr, C. C. Skeeie,
of Agriculture, returned

| to England yesterday morning by
T.C.A,, via Canada

it is probable that he will be %* Weeks’ holiday with her rela

ttending one of the in
. Her Majedty the Queen who
will be awarding honours in Mid-
_July and will receive this C.MLG.
En Route To Dominica
"a AAJOR General Dermott Dun-
LWib lop, Seeurity Officer for
Overseas duties attached to the
Colonial Office, was intransit. from
St. Vincent yesterday. meérhing



tives’ at Codrington, She w as
accompanied by her little daughter
Caroline and hey sister Susan,
former stutent at the Conyent’ of
the Good Shepherd who will now
be going to school in England.

U.S. Visitors Leave

ETURNING
yesterday

to the U.S.A.
morning. b y

for Dominica by B.G, Airwave, B.W.1.A, via Antigua and Puerto

He is now continuing his tour ofgfRico were Mr.

the West Indies.

Major General Dunlop wh
acts in an advisory capacity t
all Colonial Governors. and Gove
ernments will be going to West.

Africa int September and Central

and East Africa towards the end
of the year.

intransit

i. from Trinidad by
T.C.A., yesterday morning on
‘heir way back to Canada were
Myr, and Mrs. F. Ivan

who were in Trinidad for the past
five days,

Mr, Howard is President of
Woodville and Co., (Canada) Ltd.,
with offices in Trinidad and an
affiliate office, K. J. Hamel-Smith
and Co. Ltd., in Barbados,

While in the Caribbean, Mr.
Howerd paid visits to British
Guiana and Venezuela on business
in the interest of his firm,

After Five Months

IPTER spending “ve months’
holiday in Barbados, Miss
Norma Albrant of Montreal, re-
turned home yesterday morning
by T.C.A, She was staying as a
guest of Mr, and Mrs. L, D. Frost
of River Plantation, St. Philip

Mr. Frost and. Miss Albrant’s
father served together in the
“Canadian Army during the last
wher,

“and Mr.

Edward Robinson,
Treasurer . of the Rockefeller
Foundation, Mr. H. H Bellows, a
stock broker of New York City
J. Gazecki, a Wall Street
business man They were holi-
daying here for the past five days
staying at the Aquatic Club.

Contractor From Trinidad

R,. MOHAMED ESACK, con-
tractor of Carapichaina,
Trinidad, arrived yesterday morn-
ing by B.W.1.A. for a short holi-

day is staying at Sandy
Bosch pow,

\Iso altiving from Trinidad
yeste-day bv B.W.1I.A. was Mrs,
V. Pig's ‘| who has come over
to join ther Mr. Hasmatali
at Indie: Cuest House, Wor-
thing

) Pi vrelall expects to be
here for about two weeks.
Back to Canada

TAFF Sgt. C, Ww. Anderson of

the Roye! Canedian Mounted
Police who was in ! »ados for six
weeks training ite Mounted

Police, returned to Canada yester-
day by T.C.A,, to resume his
duties in Ottawa,

He said that he had’a pleasant

stay in the island which he liked
very much and added that the ;
men of the Mounted Force were a
keen bunch,

after spending

a

Sugar Agronomist







* A* Py. £ TURNER, Sugar
Ly. Agyronor attached to
Colonial Development and Wel-
fe ri ‘ sarters in Trini-
t for St. Kitts yesterday

' B.W.1.A. after p:

iort routine yisit. He

ste ying at the Oceah View Hote



Mr. Turner expects to visit
Acdugus before’ returning to
Trini@ad.

U.S. Army Officer
T. WILLIAM L. JONES
Infantry, U.S. Army,
dete for Antigua and Puerte Rico

sterday morning by B.W.1.A.
tor the U.S.A. He came down
here from Korea three weeks ago
to see his sick father in Church
Village, St. Philip,

Lt. Jones is now on his way to
Camp Kilmer in New Jersey and
will be re-assigned from there to
Germany,

G,F.S, Anniversary
GIRLS’ FRIENDLY SO-
CIETY will be observing
their anniversary on Sunday 22nd
June, They will be attending a
Service at St. Cyprian’s Church
at 9.30 a.m. when there will be
a procession, sung Eucharist and

of

the

sermon. The Very Reverend the i

Dean will
- Preacher,

Acting Puisne Judge

RRIVING from St. Vincent

yesterday morning by B.G.
Airways were Mr. Justice
Manning and Mrs. Manning who
will be here for a few days stay-
ing at Enmore Hotel.

Mr. Manning who is Acting
Puisne Judge of the Windward
and Leeward Islands will be going
on to St. Kitts and Antigua on
Monday.

For U.K. Holiday
R. K. E. McKenzie, Manager
of Neil's Plantation and Mrs.
McKenzie, left for Canada yester-
day morning by T.C.A., where

be Celebrant and





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

e s
Piddingtons
Will Leave
LONDON
The original Commonwealth en-
‘tainments team, the Piddin,
tons, are quitting the stage
cutumn after a brilliant three-
year world tour.
Financially, at any rate, their
ctit looks like being as spectacu-
lay as their entry was audacious
i. «1949. Strictly according to
plan, which was to make some
vorey as quickly as possible as}
highly organised telepathy act,
‘ney now intend to transfer the
‘ack balance to their native

‘ustralia and start raising a
family,






jz

style.

It was made by Miss Nancy

the executive committee

Their biggest financial Al beral Federation
‘hough will not be the result meine. is Feally, no ight-hear
ne of their tours, but the sale human being
cf the copyright * ” of their fe. °

Miss

technique, They ate see thies, devoted wife and

ported to have refused

This is not so avaricious as it
sounds for The Piddingtons’ earn-
ings have varied enormously.

ay man hi
Two of their best weeks in 000 a year. They
Britain were at the Pailadium ge an karte tek eae
;where they were paid £600, and the family outings because

frank
fe are aoe =
Their radio turn-in. Britain

however, tho it ran for over a Another enjoy taking his
year after ing planned as a children on Sundays for an occasional day
single broadcast — is believed to bo ton. Even with a picni> iunch Touay

nearly

Food and wine

4 rr them less = either
of these weeks, et, when
Lesley Piddington thought-send
over the Atlantic or inside a
diving bell under water the B.B.C.
insuted her for £5,000.

os ee has controversy raged

so fiercely round a pair of artists.
The hon. secretary of the Occult
‘Committee of the Magic Circle
stake his reputation at the time
on the opinion that the Pidding-
tons use “normal methods” for
their mystifying act. In other
words, he indicated it was naive

and
; for
£1 3

Besnn

Husband No.
theatre



ENLEEW ASCROFT looks into the LSD of taking out a wife

NIGHT OUT
FOR TWO

£4—and stili going up

is becoming increasingly difficult fof the average man
Minimum cost
tor

to afford an evening out with his wife
of a theatre, and dinner in the West End afterwards
two, is now £2 for a modest evening-——but "4 at least for
am evening out in anything approaching the pre-war

An expense allowance for the family man, for the
maintenance of family goodwill, is a novel suz-
nat may be put before the Chancetlor of

juer,

tee, at
it brought tent and Te ager aate at the
relaxation. especial);

stressed this when she sai
mother will eventually fee! she
ines seen lask 5 the inside

1 ask 50 husbands

IT have conducted a quiz et 50
usban:

ess men.
at they ee te ene to cut

A
were enough to admit that family
will suffered in consequence.
fi. can mana
onth,” one you ~ husban id
me. (£1 os a tune plus 6s. for | : baby-sitter
used to

H*®::; are three acto er evening-

.; dinner
£2 5s.; drinks in
the interval and programme 5s

2 always fixes a

dinner and dancing

on aeras and wedding anni-

eu —— rete any-
days.



FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 1952








Seear, a mene of
@ recent Women's

ea. Kvery
the
id; “the most

of her own house.”

proxl-
include ye wervants,

expense.
ae ae the

wife and ie

vit

” has just been divorced
for cruelty
There were. of course. other

pee ype of cruelty cited in can





Simone Silva's six-change evening
dress blue tulle over a besic
taffeta and tulle petticoat, Halter
neckline is of white guipure lace.
See ; Six-change Dress,



out sne husband is
7 views to-morrow on

‘ain Lay oe a iiking to ee ‘ problems, 23-year-old Sylvia
ane t for £ ap ear me her honeymoon advice :
tre pe other ener bed sd ya Jne week is too short,” she Says,
Ts ack in wamration tei wives nate essential ‘to have

; j mi even a short one.
There 1s Try ‘MP fot Wolver: gmeylous price. To-day’s price: provides a more gradual transi-
hampton Mr Enoch John ion between her old life
Powell who cooks breakfast Whitehall look anc new housekeeping duties for

every morning and is a curry
specialist.

Peter Ustinov is
enthusiastic cook. He

the bride

Six-change dress

© all male civil servants look
alike? Twenty-four-year-old
See eae Miss Betty Humphfey

He thinks so.

an
has

GIRL who always gets her
they will spend a couple of weeks an — Png on iven me his recipe for a special Addressing a civil service confer A & picture in the papers, Simone
witha aie. MicKennic’s relatives ©© credit them with anything but which he serves with ence at Prestatyn, she said that Silva is a youn actress with

a sliperb sense of showmanship, pee ett. or cold meat and salad “Civil servants look much the jdeas about cloth <
: t lothes. She désigns
and then go on to England for On the other hand, early in the ot Peotis dinners: same the world over.” her own dresses and many are
about three and a half months’ proadcast series an tenepunders Cut a French loaf in fiiges not quite Miss Humphrey might nave easy to copy. }
holiday, judge at a Pid ac- No, 3 like likes to ae Poeaes Pe bot i tee aeies om OREVETION 10 WE os nas tote of evening gowns, but
To Work in Canada cused the B.B.C, SS tooling the otis hs athe to the chopped a gloves of nati and Afver watching nundr ot Lon- teduces their cost by Having ope
public” by treating the programme] © eee have a oe spread both sides of each slice don’s women civil sek vants on petticoat base. made with ayers
bread. Putin the oven and hea their way to work I findthat the Of pale blue taffeta and_ tulle.
. JOHN gp gag eal & as an entertainment instead of a] . local uit (jacket Over this she wears different
Vincent, scientifi tion. Cost 16s R ge dices, with just \ f
St, t, scientific investiga’ 7 : un, rabbit, run c short-sleeved white Ss. with just one layer o
atri morning by When the opposition countered as # is the louse, White or co.oured sandals tulle in the skirt a blue,
B.G left later in with of “subtle have to say “No, we [> ABBIT, served instead of veal, Cusually low-heeled) nylons no royal blue. mauve, pink or
i ee ee can’t ‘ord it,” it is even more drew protests from a of hat, plastic handbag and arti- yellov—she can add to them
the day by T.C.A. for methods simulating telepathy 90 for the women. Americans at London Airport's ficial pearls. Favourite colour indefinitely There is also one
wh inne as diesel for the radio,” Sydney eee Most wives are working barder resaurant—sod an apology from | Choice for suits: blue. grey and wet Diack. lace | ibis Seas
amond Con~ ~ ommi observed to-lay their hom BO. . unwelcome awn y| ske um e
ate nm. Company, of New ing 1 eee to put ieee they ‘an “—. on im @ restaurant. rabbit disguised H a forget-me-not tulle top over he
B eee Set oe aes roe .¢ 85 chiexen or veal can be usefu! oneymoons basic petticoat, vodice is
r ; ; — telepathy as entertain- So Suande who ite, at home cooking. H°w% y long should a honeymoon teamined with wos guipure lace.
men back makes good escal mi is st
R. Sma tan -MAC- In aiken of this alleged £ 10,000 shout put item to The leg : Hon. The df Service say “six days mauve and pink velvet flowers.
\ says: “I have make Tame rabbit must be used for these “paid leave” for permanents. The pink one has a huge cab
_ were mar- = a th next SOON before ys amo dishes ( three days for temporaries (the rose at the waist, with petal
ge if on Saturday at r ere is a secret. cost of entertaining goes 38. and. 4s. a lib; or classifications apply io the sta’l dropping down the skirt
Peter's lcan lurch are have always xid audiences: q 16s. each ane, Ee ces Wild pot their marriages). Another idea for the girl with one
ora in Bi los_ spending their leave it to you to judge.’” rabbit ate too io Ag To More romantic Mig x taken by fur evening stole Simone me has
} ferri 2 gtons ne: , the wild rabbit mafriage exper orman anc a satin lining to mi each
Mth sgt at “Merriville”, Rock pre Save Ss te Beedle eg Husband cooks Seiey is the increase. pone Sylvia Child w who run joint mar- dress. which clips in with press
wr followed. the setting of the Ni ta
ley. oO} ie Nip- riage hepiiness courses in Croy- studs. Fur tails can be oe
Mrs. the former a PR ma nguishing in . taking ver a i on today that more believe that two on at each end. Luxury to
Miss Sheila ~ prisoner-of-war cam p, his fore Ae aoa in their weeks J8 ies mi hl eatceg, to ssntrolder Re name in tiny
forests snetente B Before leaving every lin
of Marie studied telepathy with a comrade. ee conference, where this perfect WORLD GOPYRT out RESERVED
the late dee After rel he found i
and a mate n m much me ee a couple will give their Loudon Express Service,

en

Sui *
ind ed aoe maf 8 J.
&on,



The St. Michael’s Infirmary

The St. Michael’s Almshouse,
situated at Beckles Road, was
established over sixty years ago
for the destitute, sick and for
housing of the aged and poor.

The administrative duties are
in the hand of a Superintendent
guided by the Churchwardens
and Boards of Guardians. The
Parochial Medical Officers of the
parish visit the Institution, The
Foatae and females are kept in
separate compounds, The male
section has 210 and the female
247. ‘There is also a Children’s
Ward which contains 46 children
--23 girls and 23 boys. All the
inmates ar@ supervised by the
Matron and a staff of trained
nurses,

Many of the children in resi-
dence were born in the Institu-
tion while others were taken
there by ee of means, &
These are well lk after and
when they reach the age of Ld
gre instructed in elementary sub-
jects by a Schoolteacher, Some
of these children are transferred
io the Nightingale Memorial
Home when they are disc!
from the Institution in their mid-
teens,

The Maternity Ward has accom-
modation for 20 mothers and their

abies, To date there are 11 ex-
pectant mothers receiving pre-
nalal care and nine others in
Desidence,

During the day the women sit
and chat while some of the
stronger Ones read to the sick. mn
cheerful atmosphere. prevails and
with Rediffusion a few books
and magazines, they make the
best of these opportunities,

Religious services are perform-
ed by the Chaplain every Sunday.
Cormmunion is admi red to
the inmates once monthly. Work
is not compulsory but some of
the women assist the needlework~-
er in making garments for the in-
rates. Others occupy themselves
by making rag mats,

Superintendents

I tnink that I would be voicing
the sentiment of a great number



in the

of people and srpectany ae
y giving

parish of St. Michael
public recognition to the
Waites . (grandfather, father and
son) who are chiefly responsible
for administrative success of the
Institution. This family has ren-
dered exemplary service in the
administration of the St. Michael’s
Infirmary over a period of many
years,

Mr. Harold Waite is now the
Superintendant. His grand father
served for twenty-nine years and
his father for thirty-one years.
Mr, Harold Waite who succeedea
his father, has entered upon his
twenty-second year of service.

During their lerms of office
many improvements have been
effected, The Superintendent's
iy ge have been converted into

ing and recreation room for
the nurses; a wing has been added
to. house the ers: the nurses’
kitehén has” extended; and
the old nurses’ dormitory’ has
been enlarged and new quarters
neve been built for the nursing
staff.

Special mention must-be made
of the Laundry, There are 15
Jaundresses and this department
with its mechanical equipment
ean be compared with the best in
any other Institution. The admin-
istration building store room and
the kitchen have been renovated,
Gas has also been installed.

TB. Ward

A Clinic and dispensary have
been provided at the Parochial
Building and a T.B. Ward has
been built in the precincts of the
Institution. New Superintendent’s
quarters have bé@n built in recent
years, All ‘these improvements
and more have been brought
about by Mr, Harold Waite.

The inmates ko +) up communi-
cation with relatives and friends
who are allows’ fo visit on
Wednesday$. At Chrigtinas oer
Seventh Day “AcVentis.,

Street Boys, St. Michael's ON
Giris, James Street and St.
Patricks, render carols to the in-

Just Received

CHILDS’ PRAMS AND PUSH CARTS

PUSH CARTS .........

PRAMS

MADE BY THE LEADING BRITISH MANUFACTURER.

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

427)

DIAL



YOUR SHOE STORES

A

w





mates, There is also a_ special
treat and gifts are presented to

hree them. The Mobile Cinema also

visits and the Police Band renders ©
programmes of music. e=
fimes the children are taken to
see films,

On a visit to the Institution the
Advocate was much impressed by
the administration of this Institu-

tion and those responsible must
be congratulated for the work
done. A comfortable Institution

for the benefit of the old people
and the underprivileged is in-

deed a great service,





ck VSSwoRD



1. Does fen,
2 mittle
&. al
4
5.
8
7.
tie
ig. Where

ot \
1, “Winter: -5, ora :
10, 14, Pam: 15.
Novelty; : 2y:
Pier: Be, 5
Nominate: 4 =
Seale Ave! aig nde:

$18.50 $21.00 $30.90
$59.00

DIAL 4606

j
|

ees Spee Sas








PP SCSISSR,

EEO FR


















epher- ton was again entertaining troops
med ontered. pack te ROME, June 19

ck to une 19,
England with spinal] Ingrid Bergman and her hus-
disc. She arrived on a stretcher, }band = Italian Film Director

but has recovered.

Still well under 30, Lesley had
stage pretensions at three, when
her father, Rear-Acmiral Pope,
tried to dissuade her. He has
since admitted: “When she play-
ed Wendy in Peter Pan I knew I
was beaten,”

Bagasse Newspapers
Are Successful
SAVANNAH, Georgia.

Roberto Rossellini ran up against
an old Italian law Thursday and

had to think of a new name for
one of the Swedish actress’ new-
born twins.

The Rossellinis picked
“Isabelle” as the name for the
first arrival and “Ingrid” for the
second. But they were reminded




















‘ngrid Bergman Meets Snag In Naming Child

Ss

LALA ‘WHEATRES







od

OOS “oe

BARBAREES 1 TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
(DIAL 5170) AND CONTINUING DAILY



PLAZA

that Italian law stipulated that a
child’s name must not be the same
as either of the parents,

Friends who visited Miss Berg-
man said the actress was inclined
toward the Swedish name!
“Astrid” for the.second daughter
but would retain Ingrid as the
middie name, Miss Bergman's
two year old son Robertino met] *
his twin sisters today and told his| ;:
mother he liked them, — ti

SRA ESS






THE GREATEST
ADVENTURER

Rae

“’ “The

ALAA
We





"TEM
QCHARD GREE







oo
A Cuban sctentist) who has | REE 3 with Patricia Medina,
ow ‘ are See ’ (ial 2at0) i (Dial 5170) ! (Dial 8404) ‘ =
newsprint from canoes as seen 445 & 8.20 ‘| veasy 4.45 & 2 2) Today & Tom@lew
it successfully gunn to turn out y mtinuing Daily)! Goutinalag Dany 145 © 090 P EMPIRE ROXY
newspapers vannah, Georgia i b {| Douglas Fairbanks, crJ} SOUTH SEA SINNER » TO-DAY Only 4.30 & 8.15
The Savannah Morning News i BE ACADEMY nS es beironald ec anew PODAT 6 0. ae PM George RAFT in
printed ‘more. thah 2 "O00" siewie- 1 AWARD WENNER! Ic N si ciaechaentes DANCER TIME OUT POST IN MOROCCO
ae . AT " > and
page inserts on bagasse news-| } A STREETCAR ||FIGHTING OFLYNN | “Sait mass’ ee orauaine beliy TEE
print as part of its regular morh- N Yvonne De CARLO ‘Robert MITCHUM - song. RUSSILI 9 NO
ing edition, with the presses run- AMED DESIRE INCH BY INCH sciiaiaeemaiesigincagaion Lele keds et ae
ning at full speed and tension.]} { © Marion BRANDO Showing HIGH Jump-|| Sat, Special 1.80 p.m. HIS KIND OF WwoMAN TOMORROW to TUES. 445 & 8.15
Th Vivien LEIGH ing, Plat Racing Bte, ‘ William HOLDLEN
@ paper had already made { Chartes STARRETT
wat _ tt Sat. 1.0 P.M. Sai. Midnite Brian DONLEVY
shorter test runs and the printers} |) § Special 9) & TW | : Doublg FIGHTING in
sald that the new paper with-|'} “Bau MToUDS TE |. Acton "reed “avtemil] “NECA SS lll wantvontan | RADAR SUBMARINE. COMMAND
stood the tension well under] }) «reTURN of the oe eet «souTn OF and ie
normal publication conditions, { DURANGO Kip" “RED DESERT SODRATH VALLEY’ SPORTING rand Ti SAT. MID-NETE SPECIAL,
) Choties STARRE CHANCE SPY KING trankte LANE. in
Senor Joaquin de la Roza, who ties Den BARRY & = pe MAKE BALIEVE BALL ROOM
produced the bagasse paper, Midnite Sat ’ eee eee OLYMPIC ne
believes that the newsprint can anne aa FRONTIER eer ee oncas COWBOY ana the INDIANS
“ “RS RUDE” a ah 1a TO-DAY to MON 4 & 8.15 with
tt prota’ Sos as little as £24 Zina, WAKELY & REVENGE Whip WILSON & Lon MeCALLISTER Gene AUTRY
a ton uba’s present rate ofa | “COLORADO AMBUSH” i LASH LA RUB “WESTERN Preston WOSTER. ——-—
sugay production, he said, thal) Jonnny Mack BROWN | Fuzzy Si, JOHN RENEGADES" i
\ y N 2 3 in
island could turn out 4,000,000 SaaS SSS THE BIG CAT ROYAL
tons cf bagasse newsprint a year. 6 i

—B.U.P.



Listening Hours

FRIDAY,
4 Eiaalleienetctbiad an

June 20
. 19.76 M. 26.53 M

00 p.m. The News, 4.10. p.m. The
y Setvice, 415 p.m. Chartie Kunz,
p.m. Bedtime With Braden, 5,00
Cricket, 6.05 pm Lewn Tennis
5.15 p.m
} Mecchar
pm

dn



iC ©
bie dsc 10.90 pony.

7. 18 p.m, West Indian Dik ary, 4. 45 p.m,



Seng & Dance, 8.15 p.m Padio News-
veel, 0.29 p.n:. World Affairs, 8.45 p.m
loteclude, 8.55 p.m. Pion the Pditorials,
0.00 p.m. Ring Up ihe Cuitain, 10,00
p.m. Tae News, 10.10 p VS Talk
10.15 p.m. The Debate € 16





From the Ti me



p.m rire

POSSE EEO PITT P EP HOF
GAETY

The Garden—St. James
TODAY &*QOMORROW & 30 PLM.
“I BECAME A CRIMINAL” «&
“NOBODY LAVPS FORPVER

Progrer

ae }




NG OP TEXAS” «&
“RIDING Down The CANYON”

SUN, & MON. 6 9) PM

Mat. SUN 6 P.M
“HIGHWAY 301" Steve COCHRAN
PEED

OSS S SOS POSS IOS

Safer Roads!

“

5 SAPO, LSE CPPS

-

Victor MATURE

ay etek ee “VIVA VILLA”
And en the Road S| — PLU
DRIVE SAFELY |

>

Ni

D4
556556995906 |¢

i

These are Coming .. -
“SKIRTS AHOY” (Billy
“ANNE OF THE INDIES

Th helps

ensure



at's where a Gas iy wr t
: y and ae
meals on time





SOSSSSISSSS



PPODODDDHGOOOHDSOOHSPH HOD SS,

GLOBE

INVITES YOU TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 P.M. TO SEE



TO-MORROW NIGHT—MID-NIGHT
“FURY AT FURNACE CREEK”

ND
pha allace BEERY)
LOCAL TALENT SON PARADE



CKSTEIN—BSsther
” (Debra PAGET—Louis JOURDAN)

RPPODOPGDSAHPFPOPMPODOOP.G-ODO.OH

TODAY Oaly 4.30 & 8.90

THE mon ROOM Wiadle Serial

ith RADAR PATROL vs. SPY KING
Robert NEWTON : rans enor, eas. Ci NAY cetacean
TOMORROW & SUNDAY 4.30 & 8 &
Sat. 1.80PM. | Sat. Miani 1.30 P.M Sat Midnite Joel Me CR as
MAN FROM Serial
OKLAHOMA hii ey cheoghes SApDun TRAMP
and FLASH
LAKE PLACID GORDON Jemt CHANDLER 1 in
SERENADE Buster CRABBE DEPORTED



GG0R NEWS GIRLS!
FOR USERS OF -INNOXIA’

“The Loveliness that Lasts a
Lifetime”

FREE ADVICE on the use of
INNOXA preparations will
be offered
courtesy of ...

THE INTERNATIONAL
TRADING CORPORATION
LIMITED
(B.W.I, Agents for Innoxa)
By Miss Yvonne Durant—
holder the INNOXA
BOND STREET DIPLOMA,

Miss DURANT will be entirely at your service

|:
|
|
TO-DAY June 20th

| Between the hours of 8—11 a.m. and 2?—3.30 p.m.

of



AT oss

BOOKER’S (B’dos) DRUG STORES LTD.

BROAD STREET, and HASTINGS

WILLIAMS) (Alpha Pharmacy)

x
PQOPPODPPPPPHDPOPHOGS- DSS







een ear ee













FRIDAY, JUNE

20,

“a,

1952



300 New Books Will

Go Into Circulation

MANY book lovers rubbed their
yesterday as they looked throu

hands with pleasure
h the some 300 books which

o
=

were put on preview on Wednesday at the Public Library
prior to going into circulation on Saturday. ‘

Throughout the day a regular number of readers visit-
ed the preview room, though there were never more than

a dozen or so at a time.

The new books include
celebrities, and classics.

The reader who loves to read
the material James Boswell wrote
and likes the way he did it, will
be glad to know that Boswell’s
London Journal-Boswell’s Papers,
the largest and most important fing
of ‘English literary manuscript
ever made, is included among the
books. These papers enormously
enrich a knowledge of Boswell,
Dr. Jchnson and’ their eontem-
Poraries, besides events of the
second half of the 18th century.
In this Boswell is seen with some
of Pepys’ frankness and trust-
worthiness and Rousseau’s self
analysis—the dissection of motives
which makes the book’ so
interesting.

Aneurin Bevar’s “In Place Of
Fear” is also one of the books to
be in circulation on Saturday. In
this book you get an insight into
Bevan’s political life. When Bevan
entered politics about the end of
‘tthe 1914—18 great war, as a young
miner in a South Wales colliery,
his concern was with one practi-
cal question, he writes — where
power was in that state of Great
Britain and how it could be
attained by the workers.

“In Place of Fear”

In “In Place of Fear”, he
touches such subjects as Poverty,
The Rule of Parliament—Active
or Passive, Modern Man and
Modern Society, Private and
Collective Spending and the much
talked of Free Health Services,
besides other subjects.

With America’s Presidential
election so near at hand and

Eisenhower so much in_ the
spotlight, Gunther's “Eisen-
hower” will be of interest: to

many, Gunther has presented

the world with this book on the

General after searching through

every nook and cranny of his

eareer. In this book he is de-
scribed as being potentially the
most important man in the

Western World, the firat man

since William the Conqueror to

launch an invasion across the

English Channel and the first

American since Washington who

eould have had strong backing

for nomination as a Presidential
candidate from whichever par-
ty he chose.

Still fresh in one’s mind are
the headlined Count Folke Berna-
dotte made and now “To Jerusa-
lem,” the Paléstine journal of the

Count up ‘to the time of his
assassination, has been acquired
in this new collection for the

Barbados public. It is a day to day
record of difficult and dangerous
negotiations from which the per-
sonality of ‘the Count emerges
even more clearly than it did from
the calm retrospect of “Instead
of Arms.”
“Report From Formosa”

And with Formosa and China
taking important places in world
affairs, “Report from Formosa” by
H. Maclear Bate and Rene Grous-
set’s “The Rise And Splendour
Of The Chinese Empire’ will be of
much interest,

many contemporary subjects,

Formosa, the mysterious island
which may hold the keys of war
and peace, is very little known
to the outside world. Opinion on
Bate’s book is that it is the most
comprehensive account of the
island since Davidson's monu-
mental work pubiished 49 years
ago.

Comminism is such a force in
the world today that Paul Blan-
shard's “Communism, Democracy
and Catholic Power” is bound to
be of interest. His theme is “Two
great systems of power” and the
bock

jis a study of the dual

struggie for the soul of the
demoé¢ratic world,
Sport

Then in the field of sport there
is * ‘John L. Sullivan’ py Nat
Fleischer, This gives round by
round descriptions of his im-
portant fighis with such boxers
as Ryan, Corbett—the only man
by whom he was defeated—Jake
Kilrain and others, But besides
dealing with “John L.”, the book
has an appendix with a wealth
of interesting information.

For instance, it tells you that
from 1934 to 1950, through bouts,
exhibitions, televisions and radio
appearances, Joe Louis made
$4,298,812.72. It contains, too, a
history of the heavyweight cham-
pionships from the last of the
bare knuckle contests to the time
when Ezzafd Charles beat Joe
Walcott for the title. This history
starts from 1882 when Paddy
Ryan was knocked out by John
L. Sullivan,

The “must” for many will be
the “Who Is Who In World
Cricket” in which Frankie Worrell
is described as one of the most
brilliant right hand batsmen of the
world. A text to a picture of
Worrell in this book, reads—
Worrell whose batting in England
in 1950 gave untold delight. In
this book Weekes is “One of the
world’s greatest batsmen—Brad-
man type—annihilator of bowling.”

In the cricket line, too, there is
also Neville Cardus’ “Cricket All
The Year,”

Besides cricket, there are
“Cycling” by Rex Coley, Footbali
by Billy Steel, “The Weekend
Golfer” and other games and past-
times such as hand balancing.

Arts And Crafts

The new books also include
some on varioug arts and crafts.
(There is “Playing At Sight” for
violinists and istrumentalists
generally and other music books
and an anthology of German
poetry. Wetez3

Includéd in the new novels is
one that many will read if for
no other reason than that it was
writien by a West Indian—the
Trinidadian Indian, Samuel Selvon
This is one of many novels with
the usual subjects—love, mystery,
crime and so on. For the lover
of P. G. Woodhouse there is
“Barmy In Wonderland” and one
who knows what Woodhouse





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

“Honourable M.C.C. Gentlemen please to acquire consignment of cricket bats

Price Cut For U.S.
Industrial Alcohol

NEW YORK,

U.S. producers of industrial
alcohol have cut their prices by
20 cents a gallon and have dashed
Cuban hopes of getting a good
price for this season’s Cuban
blackstrap molasses. The market
for molasses is at present poor
beeause of a decline in demand
for alcohol and a large increase
in synthetic production.

Now that leading alcohol pro-
cucers have cut their prices from
75 to 55 cents per gallon, Cuban
demands for 20 cents a gallon
for molasses will also have to be
revised, importers believe, as it
takes two-and-a-half gallons of
blackstrap to make one gallon of
industrial alcohol.

Cuba, fighting to get the high-
est possible price, has sold some
12,000,000 gallons of blackstrap
at 20 cents a gallon to producers
of cattle feed. But there are big
additional quantities to be got rid
of and Cuba is understood to be
arranging to send 70,000,000 gal-
lons of blackstrap to the United
States to be stored until it can be
sold at the price Cuba wants.

Production of 350,000,000 ‘gal-
lons of molasses in Cuba is fore-
east for this year, as against last
year’s total of 288,625,000 gallons.
Cuba can only use some 80,000,
000 gallons a year herself and
must find export markets for the
remainder, —B.U.P.



very attractive. There are also the
usual
the exciting
boys like to



names that school

read,

and so on,
Of course there would scarcely

oti a is stage of | West.
Be S cotccon eh aie eaee on | Said, make it difficult to be eny-

affairs without something

Royalty being included. The three | thing but optimistic about

fund of cowboy stories with

“Cottonwood |
Gulch”, “Brush Country Killers’ |

|

Canadians
Draw On
Timber

By JOHN E. BIRD
Canada is no longer merely
“scratching” at her great treasure

house of natural resources.
Depyty and Development min-

ister H. A. Young said that
Canadians are beginning to bite

into the nation’s rich deposits of
minerals and oils, and are draw-
ing more wealth from vast stands
of timber.

Young said in an «interview
that the stepped up development
stemmed from _ three factors
exerting a strong upward pres-
sure on demand for mineral and
wood products. They are the rapid
erowth of world population,
various influences raising living
standards in underdeve oped
countries, and rapid technologi-
cal advances producing new uses
for metals and woods.

Canada’s spectacular develop-
ment of natural resource:
not confined to the iron ore de-
posits in Labrador nor the oil
fields in Alberta, Young said.

“There is a tendency to forget
that our present natural resource

was



development is nationwide,’ he
said. “It is taking place, in
greater or lesser degree, in most

of the provinces from the Atlantic
to the Pacific, and in the terrl-
tories in the far nerth.

Young gave a general picture
}of new developments by starting
|} with Newfoundiand and working
| These developments, he

the

are “Clarence House”, “The Queen | future of Canada.

writes, might say that the name is Mother” and “Our Young Prince”,

RED KEGULATIONS FORCE EVACUATION OF VILLAGES



RESIDENTS of. West Berlin who had summer cottages in a community separated from the Western Sec-

tor by a 100-yard strip of Soviet Zone, were ordered

recently to evacuate the cottages.

Communist

police told them they’d no longer be able to get to the cottages, when the new East German regula-
tions went into effect. Leaving their children on the West side of the separation point, these people
are shown carrying their furniture and other possessions from the cottage area to the Wost nn.

. right round the difficult S bend where
cleans thoroughly and
scientifically in the modern way.
Banish unpleasant, old-fashioned
methods! ‘Harpic’ is right up-to-date
safe and sure. Just sprinkle in



*Harpic’

the pan at night, then flush

it’s ca



morning —

*Harpit’ is safe to use in all
lavatories, including those i
connected to septic tanks.

aa aa aa ae!

o %





no brush can



in the







anew
| Sparkie—
without



effort



] Glittering, spotiess glass,

Windolene spread over the glass, gi



polish it lig

Win
/. at

j COME G4

ly. The result is f

In Newfoundland, the Domin-
}ion Steel and Coal Company is
mechanizing its Wabana Mines
and expanding production, The
Buchans Mining Co. has sunk @&
shaft to develop a new discovered
body of ore with many years of
productive life.



The Mindamar Metals Cor-
poration in Nova Scotia has re-
opened the former sterling lead,
zinc and copper mine. It is now

producing at a rate of 500 tons of
ore a day.

Developments in Labrador were
highlighted by Ungava. The Iron
Ore Co. of Canada expects to
produce 2,500,000 tons of ore
annually by 1954, 5,000,000 tons
by 1956, and 10,000,000 tons by
1960.

“With the opening of the St.
Lawrence ; Seaway production
coyld be expanded to 20,000,000
tons annually,” Young said.

Other developments in Quebec
include the new Allard Lake
titanium mine; a copper deposit
fn ‘the Gaspe Peninsula beings
developed by Noranda Mines; a
number of base metal and gold
prospects in the Chibougamau
district; the rich silver-zinc Bar-
vue -Mine at Barraute, and the
expansion of asbestos production

| at Asbestos.

T



and no water needed — just a little

Gole:



“In Ontario, iron ore production
is being expanded at Steep Rock
from 1,300,000 tons in 1951 to
an estimated 3,500,000 to 4,000,
000 tons in 1955, It is also being,
expanded @t Michipicoten, and
a new iron mine is being de-
veloped at Marmora, near Belle.
ville, and is expected to produce
by 1954,” Young gaid.

The’ Sherritt-Gordon Co, ex-
ets to produce at the rate of
2.200 tons of ore daily at its new
mine at Lynn Lake, Man., Young

. Estimated annual pro-





> it a moment to dry then

parkling perf

ectic

FOR WINDOV/S,

1@ Sore

made in Japan very cheap?”

JetsOn Empire
Air Routes:

t

Between now and
over 100 of Britain’s
mainline passenger circ jets j
and turbo-props, will be built for ‘
the world’s airlines, Many of these
will go into service on the Empire
air-routes. Output will expand still J
further as more production capac- *
ity is built up,

Attention is being concentrated
on three main types. One is the
Comet in two versions, one power-
ed by the DeHavilland Ghost
engine, the other by the Rolls-
Royee Avon engine. Then there is
the Vickers Viscount, powered by
a turbo-prop engine, and the huge
Bristol Britannia.

The Comet is now being pro-
duced at the rate of about one a
month and this is being steadily
increased. When, in1954, a second
production-line comes into opera-
tion for the Comet, the output at
that time will be doubled.

At present, there are 51 Comets
on order and these will be
delivered by 1955, Rolls-Royce
will produce Avon jet engines to
meet all orders for the Avon-
powered Comet and will do so
without interrupting production of
Avons for the R.A.F,

Viscount production is now
about one a month, but Vickers
hope to reach a rate of four a
month and eyentually six a month,
A huge new workshop. is now
being completed to build the ‘plane
and 54 Viscounts have been order-
ed for delivery by 1955,

At Bristol, 25 Britannia airliners
are being built for the British
Overseas Airways Corporation and
plans are being made for produc-
tion of this ‘plane elsewhere,

No other country in the world
not even the United States with
vast aircraft industry, can boast
of jet airliners already in commer-
cial use, The high-powered, high-
speed aircraft turned out by
British craftsman will do much
to bring all parts of the Empire
within easier and faster reach of

each other, f |
important matters which

will engage the attention of the
Aerjeultural Society when they |
hold their Annual General Meet-
ing this evening are “the ques-
tion of production, marketing and
distribution of locally grown pro-
visions and vegetabies,” and *‘the
introduction of a new poison
“Wartarin”, in the Society’s rat
campaign.”

Among other matters

well ,







—B.UP.

Agricultura! Soc.
Will Discuss
New Rat Poison

Two



set down

on the agenda are the appoint-
ment of officers and the election
of various committees, and the

appointment of representatives
on the Agricultural Board, the
Peasants Loan Bank and the

Sugar Industry Bank.

The meeting will also receive
the audited statement of accounts
and the report of the Committee
of Management for the year 1951.

The meeting takes place at 2
p.m. in the Bovell & Skeete
Building.

luction will be 17,000,000 pounds
of nickel, 9,000,000 pounds of
copper, 300,000 pounds of cébali
and 70,000 pounds of ammonium
pulphur fertilizer.

cap reat Papas tom
that

Relievesâ„¢ Peloitese
Comfort—Promotes Heal
ing. Tubes os jars,

bine p.

London Express Service

In Touch With Barbados

Coast Station

CABLE & WIRELESS (West Indies)
td, advise that the can now commu
jeate with the following ships through
hetr Barbados Coast Station

8.8 Archangelos, 8.8 Fides, 98.8.
Forester, s.s. De Grasse, s,s. Lady
dney, s.8. Mormac Saga, 8.8. Jotunf-
el, 8.8. Wanderer, s.s, Brazil, s.s
~votter, s.s. Lady Nelson, m.v. Argen-
tine, 4.8, Aleoa Polaris, s.s. Mongabarra,

Nottingham, s.s. Aleoa Cavalier,
Utilitas, 8.5, Bulkstar, s.8. Bianea,
maieca Producer, 8.8. Willemstad, s.a.

*olytrader, s.8. Samana, 5.8. Champoeg,



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a box always handy





KEPT ABSOLUTELY



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&. P.N. S. WARE



SEA AND AIR |

TRAFFIC

in Carlisle Bay

Sch. Laudalipho, M.V. Lady Joy, M.V

emsted, M.V. Caribee; Beh, Sun-
ine R., M.V. Compton
ARRIVALS

S.8. Canadian Challenger from Trini-

SEAWELL

\RRIVALS—by BOWL. A. on Weenesday |
From TRINIDAD:

\. Cherubin, T. Vineent, L
FE. Chavasse, R. Redclite, G

Carison, I. Certson, P. Carison
Pettit, M. Simpeon, BE, O'D
Hawkins, Hares, M. Cnr
e Years, MaGalines, H
V. Gallo,.&, Gallo

ARRIVALS —on Thursday
From TRIN WDAD:
€ Herbert, [4. Boonomicdes,
ul, M. Esack, R. Ross
DEPARTURES—by B.W.IA
Cam Wednesday

For TRINIDAD;
\. Me Fadden, T. Lash, W. ash, A
Mohammed, J. Morren, H, Morren, C
Quesnel, H. Morton, D. Ritter, J. Ritter,
tk Weeks, 1 Averboukh, J. Connel,
€ Gollop, B. Watson, D. Skinner, J
Kelly

DEPARTURES—on Thursday

For ANTIGUA:

FE. Watts, P. Turner,
Diiars, G. Trotman

For PUERTO RICO:

Mr, Lionel Carew, Lt, William Jones,
Mr Hartwell Bellows, Mr. Julian
Gajecki, Mr. Edward Robinson, Mr.
Louis Marshall, Mr, Hubert Callender,
Mr. Edgar Lashley, Mr. Trevor Moore

RATES OF EXCHANGE

JUNE 19, 1952
NEW YORK

Siegel,
Marshall
R





J
M

V. Pidre-

J. Biiars,



73.4

* pr, Cheques on
Bankers 71.7% pr
Sight or Demand
Drafts 21.5% pr
72.4% pr. Cable
TL.9*% pr Curreney 70.2% pr
Coupons 69.5°4 pr
CANADA
(including Newfoundland)
77.2% pr. Cheques on |
Bankers 13.4.6 pr. |
Demand Drafts 75,25 % pr
cecesseee Sit Drafts 15.1%% pr
77.2% pr. Cable bya ouie net
75.7% pr. Curreney 713.9% pr
scceecse Coupons 13.2% pr.





PAGE THREE





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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS aX ADVOCAT

beste a Peed

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridsetowa

Friday, June 20, 1952,



RESCUE WORK

! EARLY on Wednesday morning eight
members of a House of Assembly which
comprises twenty four persons voted
in favour of resolutions based on the
report of a Committee appointed to exam-
ine the establishment of administrative
professional and Technical officers in the
Barbados Civil Service.

When these resolutions have been ap-
proved by the Legislative Council and
receive the assent of the Governor, the
Salaries of all principal government offi-
cials and other specified office holders will
be revised. The salary of the Governor is
not affected although the Committee was
of the opinion that the present emoluments
of the Governor are inadequate and should
receive separaté consideration. :

*

The maximum expenditure involved in
the revision of salary scales is of the order
of $100,000 per annum. The maximum an-
nual potential cost of leave passages. for
the 945 persons who are eligible is esti-
mated at $200,000 while the actual expendi-
ture is expected to vary between $24,000
and $32,000 a year.

The increase in salary scales will be ef- -

fective from 1st April 1952.

The difficulty of recruiting personnel to
Barbados in recent years has been the
subject of continuous comment. Key offices
such as the Colonial Secretary, Attorney
General, Financial Secretary, Comptroller
of Customs, Accountant Generel and Audi-

.. ter General have Jain vacant from periods

ranging between 11 months and over two
years. And the salary paid to the Governor
of Barbados offers little attraction for
careerists.

The resolutions which were passed

_through the House of Assembly in the ses-

sion beginning on Tuesday and ending on
Wednesday morning must be considered in
the light of these difficulties,

| Could Barbados, the question has re-
peatedly been asked in recent years, alford
not to offer more attractive salaries and
conditions of service?

‘The Leader: of the House of Assembly,
the Leader of the Opposition and six sup-.
porters of the Labour” Party answered
that question decisively during the voting
which took place on these resolutions dur-
ing the session which began on Tuesday
afternoon.

| It may confidently be predicted that the
Legislative Council will agree with the ver-
dict of the House and that members of the
Council will approve of these resolutions
‘when they are introduced in the Council
Chamber.

| Had Barbados continued to offer salaries
and conditions of service far behind those
offered by other British Caribbean terri-
tories and other colonies the exit of Bar-
badians and other qualified persons from
this island would have continued
unchecked.

| The resolutions passed this week in the
House of Assembly will stop the exit, Bar-
bados seems to have obtained a reprieve
from the fate which has befallen the Lee-
wards in recent years when the running
down of the administrative machine was
vividly represented on one important occa-
sion by the presence in an in-tray of an
official of the secretariat of a large live
hen,

There are, however, certain cautionary
warnings which ought to be issued and
which present and future governinents of
Barbados no doubt will note. The raising
of salaries and the granting of leave pas-
sages will not improve the efficiency of
administration if the holders of posts are
not of the desired calibre. Some safeguard
seems to be necessary to ensure that hold-
ers of posts can be replaced by better quali-
fied persons should the existing shortage
of personnel ever cease,

| On the other hand the raising of salaries
and the provision of leave passages may not
noticeably decrease the number of key per-
sonnel who are always on the alert to
accept promotion when it is offered to them
lin some other outpost of Empire. Indeed
the greater mobility of movement allowed
to the substantial number of those entitled
to free leave passages will assist ambitious
holders of local offices to promote the in-
terests of their personal careers when on
Jeave,

The increased expenditure on higher salaries
and leave passages is going to add to the already
high cost of government administration: but fur-
ther expenditure may yet be necessarv to keep
the smaller number of first rate men who can
only be kept here by a bait of remuneration as
high as that to be obtained in more lucrative
posts within the British Colonial Service.

The government is to be commended for its
courage in supporting resolutions which had to
be carried through the legislature if Barbados’

administration was not to collapse in ruins.
The answer to the continuity of administration

is yet to be found, however. The speed with

which Governors, Colonial Secretaries and other



high officials pass through Barbados en route to
higher paid posts ci result in good admin-
istration It will_be well for this problem to
be tackled and-a solution found.



ee ee

CORTE eter

Bertrand Russell At 80 Tourists From Britain

ON 18 May Bertrand Russell
was eighty. He ought, by this
time, seem “venerable,”
especially as he is, after all, a
Philosopher, and indeed the
greatest philosopher alive, But he
is too full of life, youth, hope, wit
and provocation to assume the
tranquil dignity of age. He is very
much not retired. Since he was
seventy, he has published ten new
books—the tenth, called The Im-
pact of Science on Society,* ap-
peared recently--and several of
those books are as controversial
as any he has written. He broac-
casts and lectures regularly and
sends an occasional scorching let-
ter to the Press. A year or two ago
the hit the sea in a Scandinavian
air-crash, but swam with Socratic
calm and more than Socratic en-
ergy to safety. His appearance is
immensely distinguished: a trim,
erect figure with a fine head of
white hair and a face that is at
once sharply Voltairean and
gently humane. Ata time in
which pessimism is an almost
universal faith, and orthodox
religion is reclaiming so many
intellectuals, Lerd Russell re-
mains adamantly optimistic, anti-
clerical, utilitarian; he is unwa-
vering in his belief in reason, in
the necessity, and the practica-
bility, of rational solutions to the
problems of mankind.

Lord Russell has so far pub-
lished very little about the events
of his own life. The mos he has
said appeared in a symposium
called The Philosophy of Bert-
rand Russell printed at Evanston,
Illinois, in 1944. There the told
the curious story of his childhood.
His mother died when he was
two: his father, Viscount Amber.
ley, when he was three. He was
brought up in the house of his
grandfather, Lord John Russell,
then the first Earl Russell, who
died when he was six; thereafter
his grandmother was responsible
for hig upbringing. Lord Russell
thas described her as “a Puritan
with the moral rigidity of the
Convenanters, despising comfort,
indifferent to food, hating wine,
and regarding tobacco as sinful’.
The young Bertrand, was told
very little about his parents, and
was inevitably mystified. He was
‘twenty-one when he learned the
truth about their lives and opin-
ions, and the discovered with a
shock how much his father’s ex-
perience had been the analogue
of his own. For Lord Amberley,
too, had been a man of unortho-
dox béliefs. He ‘had, as a young
man, rejected Chridtianity to
become the disciple, and later
the friend, of John Stuart Mill.
Russell discovered that Mill had
been, in so far as an agnostic
could be, his godfather.

Lord Ambertey had paid the
penalty for his eccentricity, Du-
ring the General Election of 1868,
when he was a candidate, it
came out that he had ventured
the suggestion, at a private meet-
ing, . that nieth-ooeseel was. a
matter for the medical profession
to consider. He became at once
the target of slander and abuse.
He was called “The Vice-Count
Amberley” and a foul-mouthed
rake; though in truth he was a
shy and retiring man of the ut-
most propriety. He never found
another constituency, His son
must have recalled his father’s
experience when, in 1940, the
municipal authorities of New

Barbados Oil Seandal

From TRUTIL

WHEN the country rid_itselt
of its Socialist incubus, Britisn
interests all over the world which
had been hurt and. wronged,
because of official injustice or
neglect, looked with confidence
to the Conservative Govern-
ment for swift redress to restore
their damaged fortunes. Among
these interests was the British
‘Union Oil Company, which had
feceived | shocking treatment
from authorities in Barbados
functioning under the jurisdic-
tion of the Secretary of State for
the Colonies. Reference to this
treatment was made in a Truth
leading article eleven months
‘ago, but, as nothing has yet been
done to make amends, no apology
is needed for returning to the
subject. In 1919, the company
obtained leases over 78 per cent.
of the island’s available drillable
‘area. About oes ze
spent during the next twer
youre upon drilling fifty-two
Wells and oil was discovered in
sufficient quantity to convince
experts that it existed in abund-
ance at a depth of between
10,000 and 12,000 feet. Develop~
ment had to be suspended during

the war, and, in 1946, the com=.

was informed that the Bar-
Cede Government proposed to
take over the underground
rights, The company did not con-
test the Petroleum Bill which
was to give effect to this de-
cision, because it had received
‘assurances that, at the sugges-
tion of the Colonial Office in
‘London; the Barbados Govern-
ment had every intention of
. granting the company, in return
for the surrender of its leases,
fa prospecting licence over the
Whole island. Assurances could
Snot be official, because, until the
Government had acquired the
underground rights, it was obvi-





BARBADOS

Maurice Cranston
(Eminent broad lecturer on

easter, and
Social Philosophy at the University of
Lenden )

York fulfilled their election
pledges to expunge the vice of
Manhattan by banning Professor
Bertrand Russell from teaching
at the City College, on the
grounds that his published views
on marriage “encouraged im-
morality”.

Lord Amberley had wished his
two sons brought up as_ free-
thinkers, and appointed two
agnostics in his will as _ their
guardians. The Court of Chan-
cery, on the application of the
grandparents, set aside the will,
so that Bertrand Russell, as he
later put it, “enjoyed the bene-
fits of a Chrigtian upbringing.”
He was about fifteen when he
started thinking seriously and
critically about religion, and he
was unhappy for some years
after he decided he could no
longer believe. He was taught by
tutors, and his life as a boy was
a solitary one; his greatest pleas-
ure came from his discovery, at
the age of eleven, of mathematics,
something at which he could
really excel. “4

He was altogether happy a
Cambridge, His friends included
two men who later became very
eminent philosophers: A, N,
Whitehead and G, E. Moore, The
leading philosopher in Cambridge
at the time, however, was M"Tag-
gart, a Hegelian idealist. Lord
Russell listened to him with ad-
miration, and later read “avidly”
the works of F. H. Bradley, a
subtler metaphysician than
M’Taggart, but a Hegelian, too.
Neither influence produced Bert-
rand Russell the philosopher, He
realised his genius because he
was trained up to his fourth year
at Trinity in mathematics, and
the decisive influence in his in-
tellectual development was that
of Giuseppe Peano, the Italian
pioneer of modern mathematical
theory, whom he met in Paris in
1900, Following that meeting,
Lord Russell mastered Peano’s
symbolism and then evolved his
own, Peano had reduced the
special vocabulary of arithmetic
to three terms; Lord Russell went
on to prove that even these were
unnecessary, and “that a mini-
mum vocabulary for mathematics
is the same as for logic.” In the
Principles cf Mathematics (1903)
and more notably in the book
he wrote with Whitehead, Prin-
cipia Mathemaitea (1910), Rus-
sell made a revolutionary contri-
tion to philosophy, It was not
only that he succeeded in proving
that mathematics can be derived
from logic, but he developed in
‘the procesd certain logical tech-
niques which have changed the
methods, if not perhaps the
very nature, of philosophy. Rus-
sell has not been wholly in sym-

ith the revolution his
work has precipitated, and al-

though his point of view in”

branches of philosophy other
than logic has altered from time
to time, he has never been at one
with what is now the prevailing
school, dominated by his most
gifted pupil, Ludwig Wittgen-
stein, who died last year.
Lord Russell belongs to a
family which has taken a lead-
jing part in the politics of these

_—



ously debarred from disposing
pf them, but there was, or 50
the company had reason to think,
a firm understanding, reinforced
by the fact that the Governmen’
bficially accepted the Lepper
Report, which, among other
things, had recommended the
proposed arrangement. The com-
pany thereupon surrendered its
leases, as agreed, and began to
hegotiate with a Trinidad firm te
undertake the deep drilling,
when, to its astonishment, on ap-
plying for a provisional licence
to start operations, it met with
a blank refusal from the Bar-
bados Government, now duly
vested with the oil rights. Rarely
in the history of British admin-
istration has there been so open
a breach of faith.

When Lord Teviot raised the
ratter in the House of Lords,
he had no difficulty in disposing
of the argument of Lord Ogmore,
Socialist Colonial Under-Secre-
tary, that the company had later
been offered a prospecting
licence for 55 per cent. of the
island. He pointed out that this
amounted to no*more than 2%
er cent. of the drillable area,
Ingtead of the 78 per cent. cov-
€ by the original leases. What
is more, the terms of the offer
were such that even Lord Og-
more described them as “oner-
ous.” The circumstances in
which the company had come to
be dispossessed of its rights, and
robbed of the fruits of its pion-
“eering, make fantastic reading.
Once the Barbados Government
had become possessed of the
title deeds, it invited the British
Union Oil Company and the Gulf
Oil Company, a powerful Ameri-
ean concern, to apply for devel-

opment licences on almost
identical terms. This, in itself,
was an injustice, because it

meant that the American com-

Our Readers Say:

Gratitude
To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—-Kindly allow me _ the
privilege of using the columns
of your paper to express the pro-
found gratitude of the Students
of the Caribbean Trade Union
Training Course just completed
at the Y.M.C.A., Bridgetown.

I Wish to express to the Pub-
lic of Barbados our sincere ap-
preciation of their hospitality
and kindness generally, and to
thank especially those who made
it possible to hold various forms
of entertainments in our honour,

I want to assure the people of
Barbados that we shall be ever
grateful for the many kindnesses
extended to us during the twelve
weeks of the Course, and to let
them know that we fully recog-

j nise the fact that our stay would

have been dull and uninteresting
without their hospitality and
pleasant companionship.

I feel assured that the good
relationship established between
the people of Barbados and the
Students from the various terri-
tories of the Caribbean will lend
considerable momentum to the
movement to West Indian Feder-
ation, and that when Federation
becomes a reality, our pleasant
associations with the people of
this beautiful and captivating
island, will be recalled as one
of the great contributions to the
fundamentals of the Federal
structure.

Thanking you,
DONALD C. GRANADO,
for Caribbean T. U. Studems.
Y.M.C.A.,
Bridgetown,
13th June, 1952.

- Attlee Ministry had done, natu-

ADVOCATE

islands since the sixteenth cen-
tury. Several of his ancestors
have been famous rebels, and
he has inherited their stubborn
spirit. After the Boer War he
became a thorough-going pacifist,
and re one until 1940,
when he ® finally persuaded
that Hitler Was an evil worse
than war, For hid uncompromis-
ing attitud@ in 1916 he was ex-
pelled from his Fellowship of
Trinity and later put into prison.
He had a taken part in the
campaign for en’s suffrage.

In 1921 Lord Russell went to
Soviet Russia. He heard the fir-
ing squads, and returned with
none of the illusions that were
prevalent among his _ fellow
Socialists between the two wars.
He disliked and disapproved of
what he saw in Russia, and
remembered it when Stalin was
everybody’s. darling after 1942;
he Was unpopular in many quar-
ters then speaking ot Russia
as a menace to peace. Since he
ceased to be a pacifist, he has
been a Vigorous advocate of
world government. But he does
not think a world government
should be given any power be-
yond that necessary to maintain
peace, For the rest he recom-
emends devolution. This is» the

theme of his book Power (1938)

and of Authority and the Indi-
vidual (1949). He thinks that,
while security and justice require
centralised government control,
progress) requires the utmost per-
sonal initiative, so that transfer
of some severeignty from nation-
al governments to a world gov-
ernment should be balanced by
the transfer of other powers to
local governments.

As a philosopher, Lord Russell
has no patience with theoretical
ethics, but as a publicist he has
had much to say about contem-
porary morals. His views on
marriage and education have
inevitably attracted attention.
The book that was taken by care-
less readers to advocate adultery
suggested in fact that sexual im-
pulses should be “trained instead
of thwarted,” and that voluntary
self-sacrifice, prompted by love,
should. take the place of repres-
sion based on taboo, In educa-
tion, Lord Russell has never sug-
gested that children should have
no discipline, but rather that the
element of force in education
should be reduced to the barest
minimum, To discover that bar-
est minimum, he ran a school in
collaboration with his second
wife, Dora Russell. After this ex-
periment he returned to univer-
sity teaching, first in America
and then at Cambridge, where
he was reinstated as a Fellow of
Trinity during the Second World
War.

“My intellectual journeys,”
Lord Russell once confessed
“have been, in some respects,
disappointing. When I was young
I hoped to find religious satisfac-
tion in philosophy . . . I thought
‘of mathematics with reverence,
and suffered when Wittgenstein
led Me to regard it as nothing
put tautologies , . . Those who
attempt to make a religion of
humanism, which recognises
nothing greater than man, do not
sitisfy my emotions. And yet I
am unable to believe that, in the
world as known, there is any-
thing that I can value outside
human beings.

* Allen and Unwin 7s. 6d.

—The Spectator: May 16, 1952

pany, which had done nothing
ito establish the existence of oil
in the island, would reap the
benefit of all the British com-
pany’s geological surveys, pros-
pecting, installations and other
surveys. That, however, was a
minot consideration compared
with what followed. Because of
the terms. described by Lord
Ogmore as “onerous”, and, more
accurately, by Lord Teviot as
“hopeless,” the British firm de-
clined the offer, being convinced
that the proposal would prove
unworkable. The American com-
pany seemingly guided by some
preternatural instinct, was not
thus deterred. It accepted the
terms with a gay assurance, and
its optimism was not misplacde.
As soon as the British Union
Oil Company dropped out of the
race, the conditions were so
modified in favour of the Ameri-
cans that the proposition became
eminently feasible. As things
now stand, after the expendi-
ture of much time and money in
prospecting, jthe British Union
Oil Company has lost its rights,
and has received not one penny
‘of compensation. f; :

The to power of the
Conservative Government, which
might, have been expected to
show a keener sense of respons-
ibility towards British overseas
enterprises than the disastrous

rally aroused the hope that the
proceedings in Barbados would
be brought under searching re-
view, and the balance as far as
was possible, restored. It
omains an unfulfilled hope. Mr.
Oliver Lyttelton, the new Colo-
nial Secretary, questioned in the
House of Commons, denied that
there had been any discrimin-
ation against the British com-
pany. When Mr. Bernard Braine
then asked if more favourable
conditions had been offered to
the Americans after the British
had withdrawn, the Colonial
Secretary replied: “The Ameri-
can company received only the
same ofters as the British coms
pany.” Words are inadequate ta
express one’s astonishment that
Mr, ‘Lyttelton should not have
taken the trouble to ensure that
hé was accurately informed. The
true answer te Mr. Braine’s
question was on record, which
shows that_the.Colonial Secre-
tary had not bethered to see the
relevant documents. Two sets of
draft regulations were drawn up,
one for the British company, the
other for the American comnany.
Hed. Mr. Lyttelton examined
these sets, it would have been
impossible for him to tell the
House of Commons that they
were idéutical or even similar.

They Whe
ons on the reg

ried to





e' different. is








’ pressly de
British firm were la
wo the Americans,




































and million dollars (that’s about £357,143,-

vast country is park and forest land.

e}tubes, on
i n railway stations.

FRIDAY,

_JUNE_20,_1952_



























PHOTOGRAPHS

Copies of Local Photographs
Which have appeared in the

Advocate Newspaper

Can be ordered from the...

ADVOCATE STATIONERY



(By STANLEY BINNEY)

IT was interesting to read the figures
given of dollar revenue in Barbados from/
Canadian and American visitors recently.
These figures show that the tourist trade can
play an important role in the island’s econ-
omy. There is a possibility of losing some
of these dollars in the future, for the well-
known reasons,—the withdrawal of the two
Lady liners, and the possibility of sterling
hardening in relation to the dollar. In the
event of this happening, is it possible or de-
sirable to try and attract more people from
the U.K. and Europe?

If so, what can be done to attract the right
kind of people? There can be more publicity
given than the scanty news that can be
gleaned in England about the island. The
West India Committee and the Royal Em-
pire Society issue, on request, a fine pam-
phlet with facts about Barbados. There are
many classes of people in England who
would come to Barbados for a holiday, if
they knew of the advantages to be gained
from coming here.

There are retired business and professional
men, and people living on pensions, who find
the austerity living of Great Britain very
trying. These people have been finding sol-
ace in holidays on the Continent, but now,
owing to the reduced foreign currency al-
lowance, they feel frustrated. To be able to
go for a holiday to the sunny climate of this
island is a great boon as an alternative.

There are advantages as well as disad-
vantages to the possible English tourist. They
can be guaranteed unlimited sunshine in a
tropical atmosphere, without the disadvant-
ages of tropical life in many places. Here can
be had a constant supply of pure clean
water, and freedom from the anopheles mos-
quito that brings malaria: these features
tend to make the island attractive for holi-
day makers.

Electricity and a good supply of natural
gas add to the comfort of this island. There
is a variety of foods to choose from, Meat,







. SEINE TWINE—Fine, Medium, Cees:
. HBRRING TWINE & MULLET TWINE

C.S. PITCHER & Co.

H.M.Y.

Ne Toa has: aom ella

} x senna

A COMPLETE RANGE OF THESE
FINE RECEIVERS

butter, bacon, and other foods come from 5-TUBE TABLE mone, RADIO Sie Pee ss Sbiiath eit ri ‘ee
ali : 6-TUBE TABLE MODEL RADIO ........ Dees ee k

Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and Ameri-||| S"poRe TABLE MODEL RADIOGRAM ........ 275.00

ca. There are also many kinds of fruit to be 6-TUBE FLOOR en a gua i

8 d-—paw- 6-TUBE FLOOR MOD with

sampled—paw-paw, mango and bananas, as ‘Automatic Three Speea Changers) eas 515.00

LET US DEMONSTRATE ONE OF THE ABOVE SETS
AND JOIN THE HUNDREDS OF SATISFIED OWNERS.

C4

DA COSTA & CO., LID.

well as fresh eggs and good dairy milk.

The bathing is unbeatable anywhere in
the world, and it-is within easy reach from
anywhere in the island. These are some of
the facts of which British people are com-
pletely unaware.

To weigh against these advantages are—
the distance from the U.K. to Barbados, and
the poor service in shipping and air lines.

Travel agents could do much to help and
encourage travel. to the B.W.I. Much more
advertising could be done in Britain; very
little about this island is known by the gen-
eral public, even in London. The large pro-
vincial cities, especially in the Midlands,
would welcome information about such an
island as this, Jersey has recently encour-
aged tourists by a delightful travel film of
its island, and it was entitled “Holiday
Island.” It showed the picturesque coast and
boating, as well as buildings and resorts.

There are many good magazines for pub-
licity, which have a nation-wide circulation.
The following may be taken as examples—
“Go,” the new travel magazine; “Vogue,”
which recently published an article on
Jamaica,—“The Blue Peter”; ‘Illustrated’;
“Truth”; “Blackwood’s”; “The Queen”; and|¢
“Lilliput.”

A colourful and descriptive booklet could
be distributed through various travel agents
and hotels, and through the big departmental
stores, where people go to bureaux for in-
formation regarding holidays abroad. Much
could be done to increase this branch of the
tourist trade of Barbados, and it may yet
become, as Switzerland already is, an all-
year-round holiday resort.



When your only thought

is to keep cool in the
shimmering heat, you really
appreciate the fine cloth

of a Daks lightweight suit.
Add easy freedom, yet
perfect shirt control with
Daks self-supporting
trousers. No wonder so many
men have become Daks
converts for life.

SIMPSON TAILORED

Smokey The Bear Beats Firemen

From R. M. MacCOLL
WASHINGTON.
EVEN in these days of colossal figures —
budgets, arms expenditures, trade deficits,
and so forth — there is one item of a thous-

Og dbgesg
ee

000) which k tli i t.
) which makes a startling impac NOURISHING FOODS

For this is the amount of damage caused Cho 9 “f,, Just Arrived
in America by forest fires in 1951 alone, fires ‘ce Quali ty Split P
often started through the carelessness of Whole Peas

campers and picnickers.
If this seems an almost impossible figure,

Madeira Potatoes
it must be remembered that one-tenth of this

Peanut Butter

‘ (ous Gouda
Fe Degas | Stet

And it is now, as the long, intensely hot









summer gets underway, that, America’s pA
vigilant Forest Service begins to worry. EALS RELISHES
Tough, carefully trained forest rangers, ROASTS Madras Cw
2,500 strong, are prepared to fight the fires Chickens mae i a
at any time, using every means from hover- Terkeys al Chili Sauce
plane spotting 1» parachute jumping. talian Chili Sauce
But, valuable though their work is, it is on ao MEATS Thalien Ketchup yr
beloved “Smokey the Bear” who is known Oatvae Pioee res —
all over America as the chief symbol in the Kidneys Swe t Pick!
3 Sweet Breads thes nem
battle against forest fires. For Smokey is| Rabbits hho

Hams in Tins
Hams (Smoked)

as popular with Americans as was Mickey
Mouse a few years ago. |

Carrying a spade and wearing blue jeans|
and a Scout's hat, he begs and pleads for|
caution in the nation’s 630 million acres in| Pure Coffee—Nothing Added
forest land. Twenty million of | aR
Smokey are abroad — in buses, trams, and

roadside posters, in magaz nd}

] GODDARD'S or service |
sa ARISES

‘

Mango Sauce
COFFEE

Empire—Roast Daily

Chase & Sanborne



ENRICHED BREAD
WITH GRAVY
IS DELIGHTFUL





pictures



ines, a





FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 1952
Pc nea

Barbados Is Good Shop
Window For U.K. Goods

MR. AUBREY R. STARCK, O.B.E., Her Majesty’s
Trade Commissioner in the British West Indies, with head-
quarters in Trinidad, told the Advecate yesterday he felt
great pleasure at the progress which Barbados has made
in attracting visitors from North America who he thought
were valuable buyers of British goods. He described the
island as a shop window for British goods second only to
Bermuda in the British Caribbean.

, Mr. Starck arrived here on’ many firms who were looking to

Monday by -B.G. Airways from St. this area for expansion of their

Vincent and will be remaining trade.

until Thursday staying at the He said that he was also

Marine Hotel. pleased to learn of the interest
This is the first of a series of shown in the Barbados exhibit at

visits he is paying to the various the British Industries Fair which

parts of his territory since he re- he was told was most attractive
and: he believed that a number of
promising enquiries were received
from firms who hoped to be able
to buy some of the products of
Barbados like’ tortoiseshel, rum,
molasses and various other items.
Sugar Crop

Mr. Starck said he heard that
the sugar crop would be a little
less than what. was originally
forecast, but, nevertheless, it
seemed to him that Barbados was
going to reach her second high-
est production of sugar and he
hoped that it would in turn, put

a good deal of money into cir-

culation in the colony.

As regards the supply of
British goods he said: “The
situation is that in many items,
the deliveries are improving
and I am satisfied that we can
now meet a very high propor-
tion of the demands of the
colony.’

He was deeply conscious of
the fact that everybody here
had played a part in, not only
conserving dollars, but in earn-
ing them, and the West Indies
as a whole were undoubtedly





! MR. A. R. STARCK

turned from leave in England to-

wards the end of March.
helping



He said that he had decided to
come. to Barbados at the earliest
opportunity because he was con-
vinced of the ability of Barbedos
as an outlet for British goods, not
only to people in the West Indies,
but to people in the hard cur+
rency areas,

“In the last two or three years,
I have been very impressed with
the progress which has been
made -by ;Barbados to encouraye
the tourist trade which I am very

, pleased to see has had results and
I think that this island like Ber-
muda, is becoming a very im-
portant shop window for U.K.
goods.”

High Quality Goods

He said that he happened to
know that there were some of the
traders in Barbados who were
now showing great interest in
high quality goods for the visitor
who. wanted to buy them in
pleasant surroundings and in
ideal conditions. While here, he

‘was proposing to go around to

the various traders to offer
_ yassistance wherever it was re-
quired in placing them in touch
with suitable sources-of supply in
the United Kingdom.

When he was in the U.K., he
made an. official tour through the
provinces and visited many
(Chambers of Commerce where
he gave interviews to a large
number of exporters who wanted
- to have more information re-
garding requirements to the
British West Indies. He was de-
lighted to find that there were so

“DEFORMED EGG

the Mother Country
and the sterling area on its
hard, but, nevertheless short
road to recovery.

“Sterling, in spite of what is
sometimes theught, wiil come into
its Own once more and I am
quite confident that before long,
the situation will have greatly
improved. This does not mean
however, that we have to be com-
placent. As the Prime Minister
has said on many occasions, it is
a very. difficult road on which we
have to walk, but after my visit
to the U.K., I believe that the
people are conscious of the s1ave
situation they have to face and
they determined to win
through,

are

£20 For Removing
Rotile Of Rum

HIS WORSHIP Mr. C. L. Wal-
wyn, Acting Police Magistrate of

District “A’, yesterday ordered
Beresferd Blackett of Whitehall
Road, St: Michael, to pay a fine
£:20 to be piid by monthly

instalments of £5 per month for
removing one bottle of rum from
the Government Spirit Bond on
June 17.

There is an alternative of three
months’ imprisonment with hard
labour. An island constable saw
the defendant leave the Govern-
ment Spirit Bond with the bottle
of rum and reported the matter.

BARBADOS





ON

ADVOCATE

THE DOUBLE



Led by Major O. F. C. Walcott, on the extreme right, a detail of Officers and Serjeants double to the

Firing Point for Falling Plate Practice.

Motley Acting Inquiry Into Wharton’s

Churchwarden

Mr. E. D. Mottley, Acting
Senior Guardian, was yesterday
appointed by the Vestry of St.
Michael to act as Churehwarden
during the absence from the
colony of Hon. V. C. Gale, M.L.C.,

Churehwarden, from the 2Ist to

the 30th of the month, Wharton of Workmans,
Before the business of the

special meeting called for the

purpose was begun, the clerk to
the Vestry read the return of the
Sheriff, Mr. F. J. Cole, J.P., on
the recent bye-election, and the
Chairman of the Vestry, the
Very Revd.,Dean Hazlewood, ex-
tended a hearty welcome to Mr.
J. O. Tudor who was returned
at the poll.

The
the new
Mr. Tudor en
member of
welcomed him
and honourable
Michael.”

The Chairman said he was quite
sure that during Mr. Tudor’s
term of office, the Vestry wo/ld
be enriched by his wisdom and
experience.

Mr. A. S. Bryden also joined
in welcoming Mr. Tudor, He con-
gratulated him on winning the

Dr. A. S. Cato who performed
the post mortem examination at
the Public Mortuary at about
12.15 p.m. on June 15, said that
the body of the deceased . was
identified to him by the wife of
tthe deceased. There were ex-
tensive bruises on the chest and
two wounds on the chin. No
fracture of the skull was present,

Canadian Trade
CGor-iissioner Here

Gu Routine Visit

Mr. T. Grant Major, Canadian
Government Trade Commissioner

for the Eastern Caribbean with
headquarters in Trinidad, is now

Chairman in welcoming
member congratulated
being elected a
the Vestry and
to “this ancient
Vestry of St.



election, and said he had known cee in Barbados on a routine
him for 80 years in business, and | 2 ‘

as the Vestry was largely an ad- + nee Nesterday morn~
ministrative board whose func- 128 by T.C.A. from his head-

quarters and will be remaining for
about a week interviewing Gov-
ernment officials and some of the
businessmen,

ticns were to carry on the busi-
ness of the parish in a business-
like manner, he was quite sure
that Mr, Tudor would be of great
assistance to them, and he hoped

o ee Mr. Major |i "7
that they would continue to Ocean View ee ae
have that assistance for a long He told the
time. Advocate short-
Replying, Mr. Tudor thanked ly after arriving

that as a result
of the Trade
Liberalisation

Plan now in its
second year,
there had_ been
a considerable F
pick up in the
volume of sales
from Canada to
the British Car-
ibbean as a
whole and add-
ed: “It is a little
early in the year

the chairman and Mr. Bryden for
their hearty welcome, and said
he would endeavour to do his bit,
and carry out the pledge he made
on Nomination day, in the in-
terest of the parish.

The Vestry considered and
Approved an application from
Major T. Bowring for six months
leave from his duties as a Vestry-
man.





Death Adjourned

HIS WORSHIP Mr. C. L. Walwyn, Acting Coroner of
District “A”, yesterday adjourned the inquiry into the cir-
cumstances surrounding the death of 40-year-old Goul-
bourne Wharton until June 26.

St. George, died on his way

to the General Hospital after he was involved in an acci-
dent while driving his motor car along Hanson Hill, St.
George, on the morning of June 15.

but both kidneys showed haemor-
rhage. The liver was _ ruptured.
Shock, Haemorrhage

In his opinion death was due
to shock and haemorrhage from
the injuries described.

Sarah Wharton—wife of the de-
ceased — said that the deceased
left his home on June 14 for
Silver Beach where he said he

“was going for some friends, About

7.30 a.m, the following morning
she went to the General Hospital
and saw him apparently dead. At
12.30 p.m. the same day she
sae his body to Dr. A. S
Cato,

Police Constable Joseph Payne
attached to District “B” Police
Station said that on June 15 about
5.30 am. while riding a bicycle
along Hanson Hill, St. George, he
heard a noise behind him and
jooking, saw a motor car on the
left side of the road. He sudden-
ly saw the car swerve across the
road to the right and run into a
telephone pole and then it went
again to the centre of the road and
back ‘to the right, ending in a
canefield.

“I went to the scene of the ac-
cident for I was about 150 yards
away and helped to take the
driver from the car. I then rang
the District “B” Police Station
and the Police van took the driver
to the Hospital,” Police Constable
Payne told the court.

To the jury Payne said that a
part of the road was straight.

At this stage the Coroner ad-
journed further hearing until
June 26.

Rayside Given
Service Medal

His Excellency the Governor, in

Decree Issued For
Sale Of T.B. Radar

His Lordship the Chief Judge,
Sir Allan Collymore, Kt., yester-
day issued a decree for the sale
of the Motor Vessel T. B. Radar,
and fixed the sale value at
$35,000.

The decree was made in a
Colonial Admiralty Suit brought
‘ay the -owner of thd steamer
Amakura against the Motor
Vessel T. B. Radar, her cargo and
freight. In this suit application
was made by the plaintiff for the
sale of the vessel.



Mr. G. L, Farmer who was in-
structed by Mr. D. V. Bynoe,
solicitor of the firm of Messrs
Carrington & Sealy, appeared on
behalf of the owner of the
steamer Amakura. There was no
Jegal appearance on behalf of the
T. B. Radar.

A DEFORMED EGG, the second to be exhibited recently, was brought
to the “Advocate” yesterday by Calvin Wickham of Alleyne’s Lane,
Passage Road.
The fowl which laid this egg has been laying many normal eggs
for some time and has suddenly produced this freak.
Wickham said there is nothing peculiar about the fowl which
apparently enjoys very good health.

———

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— SSS

ae



to judge the full T. Grant Major the presence of Executive Com-

extent of the upward trend”. mittee, today presented the Im-
Referring to the Lady Boats he perial Service Medal to Mr.
said that when the service will be dames Telford Rayside, retired

discontinued, will be q miatter
for decision by the C.N.S. Com-
pany, but he understgod that the
Canadian National Steamship
Company would be operating a
freight and passenger service on
a commercial basis, the number
of ships and ports of call being
dependent entirely on the volume
of business offered.

Station Foreman of the Water-
works Department,

Mr. Rayside was awarded the
Imperial Service Medal on his
retirement after 38 years of
faithful service in the Public
Service of this Colony.

FILMS SHOT AT
VESTRY MEETING

_ The Filming Unit of the Educa-
tion Department was on hand at
the Special Meeting of the Vestry
yesterday morning, and _ shots
were taken while the meeting
was in progress.

These shots will be used as part
of an Educational Film. The



Mr. Major said that Mr, Roge:
Parlour who has been Vice-Con-
sul and Assistant Trade Com-
missioner at the Canadian Con-
sulate-General in Boston, is com-
ing cut to Trinidad in September
to replace Mr. D. H. Cheney as
Assistant Trade Commissioner.
Mr. Cheney has gone on leave at
the expiration of which he will
take over Mr. Parlour’s duties in
Boston.

Unit was under the direction of
Mr, Isaac Carmichael, Visual Aids
Officer.



PLAIN and
FLOWERED
DRESS

MATERIALS

JUST OPENED

WHITE SHARKSKIN
$1.86, $2.32 & $2.46 per yd.

WHITE SATIN
$1.59 & $2.42 per yard

WHITE HEAVY SPUN
$1.29 per yard

COL. MIAMI, in shades of

Grey, Torquoise, Gold,
Blue, Green, Fawn, Beige,
Pink and Rose @ $1.33
per yard

FLOWERED FERGUSON

FABRICS in small pat-
terns @ $1.84 and $2.04
per yard.












FFE 8 BEEPS,

PAGE FIVE









Barbados
Regiment

@ From Page 1.

them he must be able to fire at

once,
The Last Target

This is very good exercise for
snap shooting and training for
self-defence in an emergency.
There are seven targets and if a
rifleman misses one his attention
is drawn to it by his Platoon Offi-
cer who has been accompanying
him on training.

After he has spent his seventh
shot he is confronted at the ena
of the tour of Snipers’ gully with
a target that is being pulled by
a string and he is told that this
represents an enemy who is run-
ning away. He finds himself out
of ammunition but very few
young riflemen remember at first
that they can bayonet him.

Throwing the Grenade

Nearer down the beach R.S.M.
Marshall was instructing another
squad in the art of cleaning,
fusing, priming and throwing a
Mills 36 Grenade. The men
scored some very good hits on the
target, a piece of grape tree stuck
in the sand about fifty yards

away.

Still another squad were firing
the two inch mortar. Another
popular Platoon weapon, the Bren
L.M.G. was fired too from a
high plateau. e control was
good and the men obeyed their
fire orders quickly changing
effortlessly from the short sharp
bursts to prolonged bursts and
the single shot,

Full Training
, The men during their course of
training have also been exercised
in Fieldcraft—Movement without
arms—Firing from positions be-
hind cover —- Use of ground for
cover—Fieldcraft — The setting
and handling of mines and booby
traps—and of course, The practi-
cal handling of weapons.. |

Well Done

The lines were well laid out,
complete with Officers, Warrant
Officers and Sergeants’ and Other
Ranks’ messes and canteens,

The men were in good spirits
and seemed to be enjoying manly
training in the open air, The
members of the band too practice
hard and they built UP A consid-
erable amount of goodwill ‘among
the parishioners of St. Andrew
when, dressed in the colourful
Zouave uniform they played at
the Belleplaine Playing Field ‘on
Sunday afternoon for everyone's
entertainment,

Major O. F, C, Walcott told
the Advocate that they will strike
camp on Sunday.

DRINK
CLAYTON’S














GBEX
THE FAMILY SOAP
@ Gets skin really clean

©) Banishes perspiration odor



VALOR COOKER STOVES

Short Burners
2 Burner Model @ $56.14
3 Burner Model @ $71.87
Also

WHITH PORVELAIN ENAMEL SINES
With Double Drainboard @ $65.64
complete with waste and overflow

T., HERBERT, Ltd.
10 & 11 Roebuck Street



No. 1 Water Barge
Performs Well

The Number One Water Barge
performed satisfactorily when she
made her first trip to the Lady
Rodney anchored in Carlisle Bay
on Monday. Yesterday the
Advocate was told that the Barge
rolled Spite a lot while alongsi
the Rodney but this is expected
as the Barge is a flat bottomed
vessel with no keel which would
enable her to ride the waves.

The Number One Water Barge
is capable of pumping about 300
gallons of water per minute into
a vessel, This pump is operated
by diesel engines and it has a three
way branch for delivering water
to a ship.

This Barge has to be towed to
the ship which is awaiting the
delivery of water and at present
this job is being. done by the
Lord Combermere. The Barge
also carries a crew of four—three
deck hands and an engineer who
operates the pump. Her capacity
is about 90 tons.

Established Incorporated



TRY A BOTTLE OF ....

NAVITOL MALT
COMPOUND

(SQUIBB SYRUP of Vitamins
with Iron)

It contains fish liver oil, irradi-
ated ergosterol, ferrous sulphate,
riboflavin, thiamine hydrochloride
and niacinamide, in a vehicle con-
sisting of malt extract, sugar
fyrup, and flavours,

Excellent for Children

and Adults

On Sale at - - - -

KNIGHT'S §DRUG STORES.



B.W.LA. RESUME
GEORGETOWN—
B’DOS SERVICE

BRITISH West Indian Airways
yesterday resumed their direct
passenger air service between
Georgetown, British Guiana anda
Barbados, It is expected that
the normal services of this Air-
line will be restored next month,
now that the fuel supply is back
to normal.

It is planned to increase on the
normal schedule for the heavy
summer traffic and it is also pro-
posed to introduce Dakota DC-2’s
next month in place of the two
Lodestars now operating to St.
Kitts and St. Lucia. The Dakota
will carry 28 passengers as against
the 14 carried by the Lodestars,
and thus the passenger capacity
will be increased by 100 per cent.






ANNUAL HOLIDAY

Our CUSTOMERS and FRIENDS are asked to note
that our WORKSHOP will be closed as from Monday,
16th June, 1952, to Saturday, the 28th June, 1952, inclu-
sive, for the purpose of granting our Workmen their
ANNUAL HOLIDAY.

Arrangements have been made for emergency work
to be undertaken during this period and the receipt
of repairs and delivery of completed work will be
continued as usual.

Our Merchandise Department and Office will be open
to business as usual.

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

“ White Park Road.
St. Michael










Maple Leaf Table Butter per Ib. ..... 2.2.66. .06 0005s





Canadian Red Cheese per Ib. ..... 6.6 6 ec eee eee 13
" Pure Grease Proof Paper (small pkts.) .............+ 24
Heinz Chicken Gumbo Soup per tin ............ 49
Heinz Cream of Green Vegetable Soup per tin ... 49
Apie Peanut Butter per jar ..........0 6c eens 61
Heinz Beef Nood!s Soup per tin .. 49
Laghte Jeliles per pit... iicces cece eessevactes Ag
Wilo Cherry, Lime, Raspberry, Pineapple, Orange,
Strawberry, Lemon,
COURT WE FEIN Sie es'g a bie 0 50 bead woe Ag 8 ed wines Bree 1.46
Heinz Baked Beans with Pork per tin .............+++ 53
Ontots per 41D, Haren ois oe se ea daeskeesneas By J
CAVE Potatoes per 10-1b. parcel .........5.6, grees ter scees 1,08
Crawford’s Cream Crackers per tin ...........-.s405+ 1.20

The Above Items CASH and CARRY ONLY

SHEPHERD }

& CO., LTD.
10-13 BROAD ST,

COCKADE FINE RUM

| STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.
|





Full Text



PAGE 1

7TTO BARBADOS ADVOf VTT. FRIDAY. JI'NT M IM H ENCY THE GOV | Local Forces ands* on* ol l.TF DCs. Off to Berlin U. ADAMS. C-M.G.,*? or the House of %  "ft >e*ierday morning Bermuda on his way ''* lln "*"" *'"— ".._.. — J %  New York and ho* gone u. attend DI theExecutive Board General Council :. 1 Congress of Fri Ul %  < %  (IC.F.T.U.). he wid two days and the I .. WI-CK He will the i r,nndcm and will icmalr ;ih-uii three %  •' %  v. with the Seerc. I -|"M1 ^IA T* ITHJ .,,.1 SS, wll. aUo see his wlfasAf 1 ?' rf JO * MOULSDA! .5 jg"^ ^ in Eegland on his w to andl*!**" "*'*•" <* Mr. C. iMrUn i5 well a* their son ctor ^ Agricultu-; who l at Maudlin College, ll'J r n u, '-l jraetcrday i going Modern Greats ** %  *•. *" %  Canada after Spcndi It is probable lhat ha will be ,ix w ''^ hOUdl ng one „t Lhe mvestttlires m (-odrtng-on. Ms* MajeS*y the Quean who c 'Panled by her litUc daugh* '..ill be awarding honours In Ml*:E" !" ?? r> t h0r 5l ,rr %  < % %  , Sugar Ag ciomiil M M P E %  K W : \ Mr Turner expert* urtsil %  : • I'Of to U.S. ArmOfficL T. WILLIAM L JO u.a le.t for Amisua and Puerto Ri.-o lag bv H.W.I.A. for the U I nine ovn I left fatlv r Village, St. Philip. .. %  ; Cimp Kilmer in New Jersey arid oed from the r t" Germany. Piddingtons Will Leave Stage Sesterda> morning b B.W.I.A via Antigua „„ nhon hallII Sandy To Work In Canada Plddlngton show acM R JOHN I yesU Ivlng from Trinidad v B7W.I.A. was Mrs. *ho has ci Mr. Hasmatall I House. Wor' tpects t0 be . .riad.' TA1-T Sgi C W. Anderson of the Ro n Mounted who H %  . %  % %  i. ii %  i : i i Norms Albrant of Montreal rePolice, returned to Onm! turned home yesterday morning day by T.C.A.. to resume by T.C.A She was staying as a dulles in Ottawa, guest of Mr. and Mrs. L. D. Frost spending '.wi months' p, _*A. holiday in Barbados. Miss weeks 1 %¡ used the B.B.C. of "foollna th.public" by treating the programme (IONSALVES, a ps an entertainment Instead of a proprietor of St Vincent, scientific Investigation. -•rrivwd yesterday morning by When the oppoaltlon countered II a. Airways and left later in with suggest Ion* of 'subtle the day by T C A. for Canada mcthnclof simulating telepathy isreke will be engaged as dieacl fur the radio." Sydney plddingtor i:.t-v-isaak with the Diamond Connnn-commlttslly obterved that .eUon Company, of New they onl) Intended to put over '" %  simulated telepathy a. enlertstnOn Honeymoon mentl M R. AND MRS. IAN MACIn facl of diia alleged i: 14.000 PHF.RSON who were maraecret he blandly says"I have i I in Trinidad on Saturday at hcver said there Is a secret. I m*t Anglican Church are have nlwsyi mid sudlenres%  i")W in Barbados spending their leave it to you to Judge.'" %  r.eymoon at '•Merrlville", RockTherise of the Piddingtons stars lay. followed Hie setting of the NipMrs. Macpherton. the former pon sun. Sydney, languishing in Miss Sheila Lewis, is the daughter < "hnnei prisoner-of-war camp. "is ol Mrs. Marie Lewis of Rockley studied telep.itby with a comrade. and the late Alexander Lewis, After his release he found lb vhile her husband, sn engineer Australia Lesley Pop* wclcomine uiptoyod with the Bte. Msdellna the troops home. They sat on a Sydney beach, talked nod plnniif) of River Plantation, St. PhUlp He said thnt he had a ple„ M11 , Mr. Frw.1 and Mta* AlbrunVs ^y in the island which he Uked CH!?CS., 113. i.^hV so* oYhir.. • i I-5i "i together in the very much and added that the Mscplnmson of Glasgow. ScotKarf. m,, _, r Mn p,„id. n ag a hssMaa Anay BWSB| the laat man of the Moantad Wtntinrm % %  %  u-_i— "A^r. keen bunch. and and the late J. W Macpherton was again entertaining ironiv -^n Austria—when she was on medical grounds ordered back to England with a slipped spinal disc. She arrived on a stretcher, but has recovered. Still well under .1i\ LaaftSs; h ,| The St. Michael's Almsliousc. of people and especially i„ the .-.ales. There Is also a anaajaj &+ JS&"*** .*** ad at Beckles Road, was ,>... :.h ,,f St. Micluial by giving trwt and gifts are presented lo h rj her :. ""r-A^miral Poo.. ow sixty years ago public ncognlUon to the three tham. The Mobile Cinema also '*'" l ".* %  "•"*„'" r c ha for the destitute, sick and for Waiter, (grandfather, father and visits and the Police Hand renders slncr t admitted -When she playr ine nged and poor. son) who arc eliiefly rcsponsiblo piogrammcs of music Some'" ? !" 7& The St. Michael's Infirmary The administrative duties are tot Iva aucceaV of the ami's the children arc taken lo In ihe hand of a Superintendent Institution. This family has rensee illms. guided by the Churchwardens dared exemplary service in the __ and Boards of Guardians. The admlnlatration of the St, Michael's n %  vl,,t da! Medical Officers of the Infirmary over a period of many * and those responsible must compounds. The mole Mr. Humid Walte Is now the bo t-onKiatulated tor the work has 210 and the female Supertntondant. His grand father done*. A comfortable Institution hstre ts also a Children's served for twenty-nine years and ro* the benefit of the old people Ward which contains 46 children '•** father for thirty-one years, and the underprivileged Is in-23 girls and U boys. All the Mr. Harold Walte who succeedea d'-ed a great service. inmalea ore supervised by the n '* father, has entered upon hi%  %  — % % % %  Matron and a staff of trained twenty-second year of service. i beaten." During ihiir erms of office Many of the children in realmany improvements have been denca were born in the Instltu'"fTeeicd, riia Superintendent's tion while others were taken quarters have been converted Into tliere by mothers of poor means. '< dining and reereattga room for Thefe arc well looked after and 'he nurses; a wing bit been added when uhey reach the age of four ,n I'OUM* the matrons 'he nurses' are Instructed in elementary sub— kitchen has been extended; and jcels by a Schoolteacher. Some >'* old nun.es' dormitory has of these children are transferred been enlarged and new quarters to the Nightingale Memorial nnv '" been built lor the nursing Homo when they ore discharged staff. from the Institution In their mldSSWOHU The .Maternity Ward has accomn for 20 mothers and their TO date there are 11 ea> I at tanf moHiatg receiving preii oare and nine others In During the day the women alt and chat while some of the irtTongar ones read to tha sick. A i hesrful atmosphere prevails and -.'it.h Rediftusion and a few books and magaxinas. they make the Ol '.l.e-r "pportunities. Ileliaious services ate performed by the Chaplain every Sunday. Communion is administered to the Inmates once monthly Work II not compulsory but some of thl women assist the needlework.>f th-' I nsl I'ullon. New &u per in iendent's ivaj bdan nuiit in recent All these Improvements and more have been brought about by Mr. Hat W it* to th e Institution the Bttgttg*** NrKSIWIlOrS Are Suicoessful SAVANNAH, Georgia. A Cuban scientist who has developed a process for making newsprint from bagasse has seen it successfully used to turn out ir-spapers In Savannah, Georgia The Sowutnah Morning News printed more than 1,000 singlepage inserts on bagasse newsprint as part of its regular morning edition, with th* presse* running at full speed and tension The paper had already made *orter tesl runs and the printers said thai the new paper withstood the tension well under normal publication conditions. Sanor Jouquln dc la Roza, who produced the bagasse paper, believes that the newsprint can lie produced for as little as £24 .1 ton. At Cuba's present rate of. UEar production, he lakL tho island could turn out 4.000.000 tor." cf baiw-p newsprint a y-ei -B.t'.P. %  up UiM by iiUBtflnaUoa, SSf i i-n-ra mm pans sewasagSs, all ' Kiuw l^inais iaalalB|, tsi 'SUZiXS Listening Hours %  ;t. M. tun UDM nr mass The ir.-i cation with relat who arc alkiw Wedneidays. A\ Beventh Day -v Street Boys, St i> i ommuni%  ;.'.; friends n visit on I the ails Bay Michael's Old ajnidl i • rterMiwd to be good <• %  •. SB) > You won't MS Ti^nSi %  IBBB Usht Is sUl MM gal v* 'utperinlendenta I tnlnk that I would be voicing Q %  4 IS a sa. Tbe n / a Lh i: ie Kuiu 4 -i p 1. n*dllm Wllh Br..dr>i. .' 00 ~ > I'ettn %  os -n-i i irlluc %  IJ %  • ra P ni SML r 13 P 1 -.ilnn pf ILI-I >pa i %  11 : %  i—. • si Ms, . SIMM M MM T lip in iM India n..... ; .: ,. -„ St"iT S, Diner BI.. p n> 1' .,-.. Akan ^ S IS ,. .n %  1 P %  i 'nr tip 'ie ( li,11 %  10 k B I 1 *i Tike lleto. %  10. M .m ihr 1 .ira %  Just liveeived CHILDS' PRAMS AND PUSH CARTS \ (>4im ;* n.(..-i-t.. St. i,-. .* TODAY '0-MonrO • M I' >; i (in \i iaivi\ \T J %  vnnrot iivra roi %  > i r I B ___^ aofcn a MfPCLD : N utKrra A T ri'aitAi PUSH CARTS *18.5 S2I.00 S30.M $59.00 MADE BYTIIF LEADING BRITISH MAM'FACTITRKR. Safer Roads! T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606 '*;• DRIVE SAFELY %  T is becoming increasingly difficult (0* the average man 1 to afford un craning out with ma if c BS9 MB ost a theatre, and dlnnpr in the West End t %  d a •wo. Is now £3 for a modest evening bol *" > at lean :or an evening out in anything approachtns i:v style. Kn expanse allowannp for Uie family nun. t %  -: (caiatenance ol family goodwill, u a novel -. J? fEa sSefilS 1 "*** PU b ** or tl Chan.--' It was atatk by Miss Nancv Seear a naaxstJ of tne astecutive lommittee. at a (* %  em rt,,nens l.ibsral PediThUion mealiag. Mtlioogh n bro'jght ian;liT*r and clasers at th* Dseeuag. it Is really no ilfnt-hearied Mti F..-tliuuian being neroH retaratron esnecu^.' the liousrwlfe. Miss Baear " rhiidren on ^undui.s (or *n ortaslonal day U\p 0 nrignton stven wlUi a ptcnlluncii to-dav ,t costs him oearlv £3 Food and win* I ISSUE are three sample evening's, out budget* : llubwd He. 1 Ukfess His wife out every other •a^U^eveSm?' for^ean,' "•"!•**• -"ub.no, do II for fur. • £1 la. : snrar of faSMH %  > * wlrea all ; buns as ad | dinner in • %  ** ,n admraUoo > srttii wine a te: drinks ( n r'^er* is Tory MT* for Woverthe interval and programme 5. aainpton Mr Enoch John Huabaad Na Z always axes a f**ci: who cooks DreakfasT theauy and dinner and dancms ? !" 2 B ,! n ornin and B rurry on birthday and wedding an.:apeclal.it 1. but cannot afford ar. Ai-ior Peter UsUnov is an keeper." has |LI" been for rrueltT There ssere or course rue t ctei -a*e. out tarn r DM utttoue in tiki tiie familr IQh 1 1 rialculou' price To-day's price: la 9d a lb Whitehall look in enOfi more these days. _JK *s. coffee in ihe interv.ti 3 K. Sl?'SV n *" b nuiuaiasur Riven mr hh rreipe for a specia: bread which he wrvea with spearhetu or rold meat and salad 1 go out more c *jt a French HMI IB attsss out ihrnugti u> Uiw botuim butter wiuj (wo verf 'hopped doTM of sarllc >n •pread bosh aldwm of each allee i>r-> AUDIT, serred Instead ol vaai oaavt oiiord It." II la even mo., %  adrew procesLs from a party ol ao far ins women Americana at London Alrpon Most wives ore working Dard.r -p^f "rani-and on apology frocr lodoy in U*ir own !. than SP*-Sll l £* 0 ^ UD .. w *? eon e that dM pee war ln a^reslatirantrabbit disgulspc v„ iLuftsuJs BBae (Ml lasu 11, %  ? &&** 0 f <*" " e usefi ssssawt ssar the Mem aoasw v, !" hack lejgmoke* arood aacallop Husband cooks U:er watching nunareds ol London's women civil seivsnU on their way to work I nr.': nne-day un.for;u ;>a llllt 10 ihe sta 1 nof their marriages 1 More romantic view is -.avert o\ oast of esTsrtavarag seat e la. and] esaea. las. each). The places of a wild rabott are too email. Inetdentally, the wild rabbit popu luJlon m CJI tile increase. The Syitti Forestry OornoilsaUoera repot: nagc liann... to-day mat mare Lbmn 3J6.0W dot). Thev oeiieve rabbits wars killed m the r weeks is ideal. forosu last year, a UJJOO mcreaHefore leaving lor a Bournemou:'i a ysar before. But the conference where this perfec: rue nost still pay u married coople will five their tafcibg ever UM iK iu ai fc ii u uns duUea and csaoklag (rosa bis wife because he tlioughl be was r \ much asare etarieat aeuieloini mar .*• in Crorthat two Stmone S-lva'i | rf.en blmm lull* over %  j lafreia m4 fwlle penfeset NsASr aecshae *>fe swi>am let*. See Sn raartoe Oreit. 1 SWI j-aiorrow on saarrMs* probLema. J3-vear-okl SylrTa • me her heneymoon advice: week ts too shortshe says. %  out 'is essential :o nave a ttonevmoon even .1 short one It E rov.des a more eradoaJ trans.on between ner old home Ufa am new Housekeeping duties for the n'de~ Six-change dross \ UHU. wfn .tway, geu ner *a Diriure in t!-.'oapers S:mone 3iiva is a yo'iiactress with ideas about clothes She designs her own dresses and manv are easv to copy. She naa lots of evening gowns bureducea their coal by li.vn.i one pe'.tteoat Uoae. made WIUI layers of pale Olue tadeta and tulle. Over tiiis she wears d.ffererr 00c 'es. wuli |ut on* layer of mile in the ssin 3iy blue, ravsi blue, mauve, piok or vellow-she can add to them ,ndenn;-.eiv mere ts also one of black lace KMChad S.niour wearint 1 a lonret-me-no: 'ulle urn over hebasit peit:coe*. The oodice is 'rimmed with ehlta suipure looe The ruauve >op is strewn wim mauve ana tuns velvet Bowers rhe pink one has 1 huge cabbage rose at th* wu;s*. with oe'jila dropping down Uie kirt Another idea for -he Rirl with one fur evenina stoic Slmone has r linins to match each dress wmch clips m with press vud.i Pur tails -sn be cupped on aeach end Luxury touch is to embroider her name in Mny bends or. every tning wnm.n r-oi'Vrtioin I'swaavggi tea*-gsStWM '".ir'ngrid Bergman Meets Snag In Naming Child HOME, June 18. that Italian law stipulated that Ingrid Bergman and her huschild's name must not be the same hand Italian Film Director Ftobcrtn Kosscllini ran up against TI oad Italian law Thursday and bad lo think of a new name for one of the Swedish actress' newborn twins. BARBAREES TO-DAY 4.43 A 8.30 Pat (DIAL 5170) AND CONTINUING DAILY PLAZA L'llher of the parents. Friends who visited Miss Bergman said the actress was inclined %  "..aixi the Swedish name! "Astrid" for the.second daughter, it-.tt would retain Ingrid as the middle name. Miss Bergman's Trie Roaaellinls picked two year old son Robertino met Isnbelle" as the name for the hitwin slstarl today and told his tirst arrival ond ''Ingrid* for tho rooUstT hv liked them. econd. But they were reminded —U.P. PLAsfA 1 ill 11 KES MMKt WEWS FOR St IIS OF VJL^ \ A' N,JOHNS0N DOHOTHY.McCUlRE R UTJTJBOMAM 10-M0RHOH Niiiin— sBsaVKltHn "Ft'RY AT F1HNACK CRKgR" Victor MATURE VIVA VILLA" iWallace BEERY, — PLUS — LOCAL TALENT OX PARADE These are CsftBg .... "SKIHTS \HOV" 11,11% FfKSTEIN—Esther WILLIAMS) "ANM <>i llll IMHF.8" (Debrs PAGET—Louis JOURDAN) ^a M eaaaas I H I IHI I II I I tH tl Thr Lovllnrss thai Lasts 3 LifHime" m I KM. AI1VK I .MI the INNOXA m.-auutiess will be ottered Ursagh the eourtesy of . THE 1NTF It NATIONAL TRADIN'tl f'ORrO\TION (BAV.I. A,ems far Innova) By Mhs Yveaute Duraat— holder of the INNOXA BOND STREET DIPLOMA. Mi-.. Iillitvi will be rnllreI T al roar aerrW TO-DAY .Inne 20th Brlwrrn thr har-. of *—II .m na ?—1.M p.m. BOOKER'S (B'A) DRUC STORES LTD. BROAD STREET, anil HASTINCS (Alpha Pharmacy)


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FRIDAY, JUNE 20. 1J52 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE FIVE Barbados Is Good Shop Window For U.K. Goods MR. AUBREY R. STARCK. O B.E.. Her Majesty's Trade Commissioner la the British West Indies, with headquarters in Trinidad, told the Advocate vesterdav he felt great pleasure at the progress which Barbados lias mad.? in attracting visitors from North America who he thought were valuable buyers of British goods. He described the island as a shop window for British goods socond only to Bermuda in the British Caribbean. w S Urck arrived ban on many Arms who we.ro looking to Monday by B.G. Airway* from Si. this area for expansion oT their Vincent and will b remaining trade. until Thursday staying at the He said that ho wa also Marine Hotel. pleaaed to learn of the interest "nils is the flrst of a scn-3 of shown in the Barbados exhibit at visits he is paying to tho vartfl u the British Industries Fair which parts of his territory since he rehe was told was most attractive ..mi he baUand that a number of promising enquiries wen from firms who hoped to be ab'e to buy BOOM of Ihe pro'iu. | dl liko tortoiseshcll. mm, molasses and various other items. Sup;ar Crop Mr. Stare* raid he heard that the suHar crop would be a Utflt n what war i forecast, but, new thaiata, it seemed to him that Barbados was going to reach her *econd highest production of sugar and he I it would in turn, put a P"Od deol of money into etrln Ule colony. As retard-* the Minplv ol BrMSstl (oodhe *ald: "The -.Hu.iii'in Is that In m*ny Item the deliveries are Improving and I am oaUsfied 'hat we SU now meet a very high proportion of the demands of the colony.' Ife m deeply conscious of •he fail that everybody here had played a part In. not only conserving dollars, but In earnInp them, and the H>M tailM M a whole were undoubtedly helpine he Mother Country and UM sterling arei on It* hard. but. nevertheless short rnnd to recovery. "Sterling, In spile of what Is > I III lllllllll Barbados Regiment Led by Major O T. C. Wnlcolt, on th Firing Point for railing Plate Practice. MB. A. R. STARCK turned from leave in England towards the end o( Ifl urn. He said that he had decided to come to Barbados ai the earllS; opportunity because he was convinced of the ability ol Barb d< as an outu-t for British too I only to people in the West UMlea, s „ m ciitnes" thought, wUl come Into but to people in the hard mrits own once mure and 1 am rency areas. qillt ,. confident that be("i"In the last two or Ihree year.", the sltu.itinn will have greatly I have been very Uapra Unprovad. This dOM DO) BMRH the progress which hab i that v have to be cornmade by Barbados to cncoui.^e pUcent As the Prime Minister th t touml tfadfl I %  ,. ^,d on many occasions, it is pleased to see has had results and a very difficult road on which we I think that this is and like Berhave to walk, but after in. vi>:i muda. is becoming %  very Imto the U.K.. 1 believe thai the portant shop window for U.K. ,,,.,. %  •"nods. situation they have l<> r %  Hilfh Quality Ooods SELF ****** '" ""' He said that he happened to know that there were some %  ( tho traders in Barbados who now showing high quality goods Tor the who wanted to buy them in pleasant SHrrouiHlings and in ideal condition*. WhUfl here. h.< was proposing to go around to the various trader, (assistance wherever urbados who wtfa . great interest In £20 rfir KeinoVtllP joods Tor the visitor ** Hotllo Of Runt HIS WORSHIP Mr. C !.. Walwyn. Acting Police M District "A". xtstardaj i Blackttt of Whitehall quired in piecing them ... I u "\ "Ttea inptalmaotr. of £* per month for r "moving one bottla of rum from Government Spirit Bond on the United KinKdr. When he was In the U.K., he made an official tour through the provinces and visited m .Chambers of Commerce where he gave interviews In n ll B nn alternative of thre* number of exporters who wanted months' imprisonment with hard to have more information relabour. An Island constable saw gardlng requirements to the the d"f-ndfint leave the GovernBritish West Indies. He was dcmtnl Spirit Bond with the bottle HKhted to find that there were so of rum and reported the matter. Illl OK Ml II M.. Mi&Mvy Asting Churchwarden Mr. E. D. Melt ley. Acting Senior Guardian, was yesterday appointed by the Vestry of St. Michael to act as Churchwarden during the absence from the colony of Hon. V. C. Gale, M.L.C, Churchwarden. Irom the U t (o UM 30th of the month. Before the business of the special merlins called for the purpose was begun, the clerk to the Vi tn toad the return of the Sheriff. Mr. F. J. Cole. J.P.. on the recent bye-eeetion. and the of the Vestry. th Very Revd. Dean II izlewood. exmo to air. rudor who wits returned iXill. The Chairman in welcoming the new member congratulated Mr. Tudor on being elected %  Of the Vestry and welcomed him to "this ancient and honourable Vestry of St. Michael." The chairman said he was quite sure that during Mr. Tuaor*! term of ofltoe, the V-ny Vro/M be iiimhi'i v his wisdom and i (| %  .:! %  :. c. Mi A. S Bryden a! %  i in wcleiiiiiim; Mr. Tudor. He eonhim on winning the election, and said he had k) i • n bun nM 30 yean; in business, and as the Vestry was largely an administrative board whose functions were to carry on i ness of the parish In | like manner, he was Quite SUta thai Me. Tudor would he of great a'sislance to them, and he hoped that they would continue to hive that assistance for a long lime Replying, Mr. Tudor thanked the chairman and Mr. Bryden tor their hearty welcome, and said he would endeavour to do his bit, ou' the pledge he made on Nomination day. In the interest of the parish. The Vestry considered and Approved an application from Maior T. Bowring for six months leave from his duties as a Vestry# From Fan l. them he must be able to Are at| The Last Target This is very good exercise for snap shooUng and training for self-defence in an emer g ency. There are seven targets and if a rifleman misses one his attenUon is drawn to it by his Platoon Officer who has been accompanying him on training. After he ha* spent his seventh shot he is confronted at the ena of the tour of Snipers' gulU with a target that is being pulled by a string and he Is told that this represents an enemy who is running away. He finds himself out of ammunition but very few young riflemen remember at flrst that they can bayonet him. Throwing the Grenade Nearer down the bench K.S.M Marshall was insrrucUng another squad in the art of cleaning, fusing, priming and throwing %  Mills 36 Grenade. The men scored some very good hits on the target, a piece of grape tree stuck in the sand about fifty yard* away. Still another squad were, firing the two inch mortar. Another popular Platoon weapon, the BffB I. M.G was tired too frc high plateau. Fire control %  nod and the men obeyed their fire orders quickly changing effortlessly from the short sharp bursts to prolonged bursts and the single shot. Full Training HIS WORSHIP Mr. C L Wjlwyn. Actmg Coroner of JJ^vfK SS S5LS District "A", yesterday adjourned the inquiry into the cir| n Ft elder aft—Movement without cumstances surrounding the death of 40-year-old GoularmsFiring from positions bebourne Wharton until June 26. "* ^SSuZJlt* ^ n fC u Sifil Wharton of Workmans, St George, died on his way IZ^^^otmin^ndbSiby to the General Hospital after he was involved in an accitraps—and of course. The practident while driving his motor car along Hanson Hill, St. cal handling of weapons. tl. ffgt, on the morning of June 15. Well Done Dr. A. S. Calo who performed but both kidneys showed haemorThe lines were .well laid the post mortem examination at "hage. The liver was ruptured, complete the Public Mortuary at atiout Shock, Haemorrhage 12.15 p.m. on June IS. said thai in his opinion death was duo the bodv of the deceased wis tn shock and haemorrhage Irom identified to him hy the wife o( the injuries described. the deceasod. There were exSarah Whirton—wife of the dehrulses on the chwl and ceased — said that the deceased two wounds on the chin. Mo left his home on June 14 for n. i nun ntdoubts to Ua Inquiry Into Wharton's Death Adjourned out, Officers. VV.irr.iTit Officers and Sergeants' and Other Banks' messes ami canteens. The men wen* In good spirits and seemed to be enjoying manly tralnlnR In the open air. The members of the band too practice hard and they built up a consul:,uinK tor .omc frtendi. About ,hc 7 30 n.m. the following morn QaiUidiun Trade Coi ..Jssioiier Here Qo Ko-utiite Visil Mr. T. .Grant Majo Government Trade Coi ..ii, :iel parli when, dressed in the colourful -i Zouave uniform they played at she went to the General Hospital h Bc | k Illa | nr puylng field on ad saw him apparenUy dead. At Sundnv B nernoon far everyone's 't ..Pl f n L. ,"""* J"ay she rn tortainment. identified his body to Dr. A. S MftJor 0> %  •. c. Waleott told ,0 ; ., the Adi'ocafi' that they will strike Police Constable Joseph Payne ^ m p on Sumlay. attached to District "B" Police H Station said that on June 15 about 5 SO ajn. while riding _a bic>cl SO am. while riding a bicycle __ _, long Hanson Hill. St. George, he /Vo 1 WfltPV 00JV6 nvird a noise behind him aim Performs Well for the Eastern Caribbean with nean j headquarters i., Trinidad, is now j,„ kitllt( suw a „„,, nr on Ui. back tn Barbados on a routine j,. ft Blrte nf the toadHc Ruddpn. ..rival s^flarday Tuornv!dTo the^lgl^anYrun^Sto !. The Number One Water Harge mg by T.CA. Trom his headtelephone pole and then it went performed satisfactorily when she quarters and will be remaining for again to the centre of the road and made her Aril trip lo the Lady about a week interviewing fiovback to the right, ending In a Kodney anchored In Carlisle B ernment officials and some of the caneflcld. A DEFORMED EGO, tho second to be exhibited rccsnUy. was brought into the "Advocate" yesterday l>y Cilvtii Wickhun of Allcyav's I-sne, FnMkgP Road. The fowl which laid this egg has boon laying many normal eggs for some time and ha* suddenly produced this freak. Wickham said there Is notai-ig peculiar about the fowl which apparently enjoy* very good health. Decree Issued For Sale Of T.B. Radar Ills lj*r Monday. Yesterday the DRINK CLAYTON'S KOLA TONIC ODEX THE FAMILY SOAP O Gels skin raailr da* O Banlshts persplu'icn odor O Leaves body swset ami dainty i > %  -. MhM %  Jip ut thU Is expected driver from the car. I then rang as the Barge Is a flat bottomed the District "B" Police Station vessel with no keel which would and the Police van took the driveenable her l„ ride trie waves, to the Hospital," Tollce Constable The Number One Water Barge PVvne told the court, is capable of pumping about 300 To the Jury Payne said that a gallons of water per minute Into pert of the road w is straight. a vessel. This pump Is operated At this stage the Coroner adbv dlesel engines and it has a three jcurned further hearing until way bfflACtt f'>r delivering water I $6. His Ex the pi tent of the upward trend". mitlee, today presented the 1mI ng to the I-ady Boats he penal Service Medal to Mr. laid that when the service will be James Telford Rayslde, retired discontinued, will b#. „ matter Station foreman of the Waterfor decision by tho C.N.S. Comworks Department, pany, but he understood that the Mr. Ryyside was awarded the Ca n adia n National Steamship Imperial Service Medal on his Company would l>e openllog a retirement after 36 freight and passenger servlc on faithful nerv(ce in the Publ H commercial basis, the number Service of this Colony -T ships and ports of call being ship. I'his Barge has to be towed to the ship which is awaiting the delivery of water and at present this Job Is belnff done by the I,ord Combermcrc. The Barge nlso carries a crew of four—Ihree deck hand* and an engineer who llency the Governor, in operates the pump. Her capacity e of Executive Comis about 90 tons. Ro'yside Given Service Medal B.W.l.A. RESUME GEORGETOWN— B'DOS SERVICE i the volume BRITISH West Indian Airways yea "' yesterday resumed their direct passenger air service between Georgetown. British Guiana ami Barbados. It is expected that tho normal services of this Airline will be restored next month, now that tho fuel supply is back to normal. It in plsnned to Increase on the normal schedule for the heov> summer trafne and ft Is also pro* yesterday morning, and shot* posed to introduce Dakota DC-3's AwSfiZF %  £',! % Cn f n > r " was in progress. I>xlest.rf. now operating to St. !" l a J r ' n lrflVP %  "f an Educational Film. The will carry 28 p.sscngers as against which he will Unit was under the direction of the 14 carried by the Lodestars. dependent entirely of business offered. Mr Major said that Mr. Rogc Parlour who has been Vice-Consul FILMS SHOT AT VESTRY MEETING %  ring Unit of the EducaTRY A BOTTLE OT NAVITOL MALT COMPOUND F s -*4bv"*(SQUIBB SYRUP o/ Vitomi'ns with Iron) It contains fish liver oil, irradiated ergostrrol. ferrous culphalc, ribofiavin, thiamine hydrochlonde and niaclnamidc. In a vehicle consisting of malt extract, sugar syrup, and flavours. Excellent ftir Children and Adults On Sale at kUl.iHN Dili I. STORES. the exii taka Boto Mi Parlo dutir 01 Mr. Isaac Carmlchael, Vln Offlcer. %  1 Aids and thus the passenger capacity will bo Increased by 100 per i-ent. GARDEN REQUISITES WE CARRY A COMPLETE RANGE INCLUDING RAKES BOSS TROWKI.S WEEDING FORKS BOOING KNIVES HEDGE TRIMMERS LOPPING SHEARS SECATEURS LAWN SPRINKLERS TAP UNIONS, TAPS COMPLETE WITH UNION, WATIRINII CANS. HOSE MENDERS. SPOUTS. CLIPS AND CONNECTIONS AND THE POPULAR "SOLO" Si'RAYER, THE ONE-MAN SPRAYER WHICH OPERATES ON BOTH TIM I f AND DOWN STROKES DIVING A CONTIM (US SPRAY — ALSO — RANSOME LAWN MOWERS And ll In:, islltgfl* Popular POPE LAWN MOWERS WITH Kl'IIKEIE TYRED WHEELS HARRISON'S HARDWARE DEPARTMENT DIAL 2364 or 3142 PLAIN and FLOWERED ESS TERIALS •Jgajr iun\ii, WHITE SHARKSKIN SI 86. $2,32 4 EUtftr yd. WHITE SATTN $1.59 & S2.42 p.-, yard WBTJS HEAVY SPIN SI.29 per yard COL. MIAMI, in -li...l.-ol Gnjr, Torquoiv. Cold. Blue, '.ici,. Faun. It,,:'. Pink and ROM Iff *1J3 per yard FLOWERED FERGUSON I ABRICS in %  null palMm W Sl.M and *2.M pi-r yard. THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. ANNUAL HOLIDAY Out CUSTOMERS and FRIENDS are asked to note that our WORKSHOP will be cloned as from Monday. mill June, 1952, to Saturday, the 28(h June, 1952, inclusive, for the purpose of granting our Workmen their ANNUAL HOLIDAY. Arrangements have been made for emergenry work to be undertaken during this period and the receipt of repairs and delivery of completed work will be continued as usual. Our Merchandise Department and Office will be open to business as usual. THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LID While Park Road. St Mkkuwl CAVE SHEPHERD ft CO. LTD. 10-13 IROAO ST. w Leal Tjblc Duller prr lb SM1 ( niiJlin Krd ChfMf per lb 1.1 Pure Grew I'roof Pap-t r i.r -l llrini B"f Nood! INl per Un ** Luihus Jellies per pkt 1* mb h^rrv Um-, Itispbrrry. Pineapple, Orxaga. Slrawberrr. Lemon. r-T.m-.ll per Un l. Helm Baked B-ans ullh Pork per Un -W Onions per S-lb. parcel 7" PoUtoes per 10-lb. parcel + ...: l.t* ( iwfi -J's Cream Craekem per Un l.ti The Above ll-ms CASH and CARRY ONLT COCKADr. FINE RUM STA\SFKMM. SCOTT A TO. A?.



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Natives Riot Against 24 Hurt As Police Shoot Into Crowd CAPETOWN. June 18. Rioting broke out on Wednesday in the natto* quarter of the mining ;cwn of Oder.daalsus in the Orange Free State over the Nationalist government** tightening of whit-? supremacy measure*. Police lired into a melee, seriously injuring four natives and wounding 20 other*. A police awton WM wrecked, a police car burned, and sjme policemyn injured. Fighting flared when poUce special passe.* when they wont the street. The rioting was prftt of Aarf opposition 10 prune Minister DanM F. Millar's policies In Capet* wn. The chief opp.: hli pjrty will have nothing to do; with the newly created High Court Parliament. Thin Court wu set up to overrule uppers io lh>Court which killed the Government effort to remove 50,000 Cape coloured persons (those of mixed bio-d) Don lb voting list. Malan proposed a Court Parliament tn which nil members of he Senate and House will lit is judge* in secret to pass on the constitutionality o( their own acts. Pinay Faces Tunisian Problems HI\\I\. si no:\ te Supremacy Measures <>^s -- %  i I Paper Warns W.I. About \Leases To U.S. Big Atomic Programme Launched In France No Heat But Slippers For Winter Auckland: The Auckl tad I m power to fcfleea fcr boattni 1*1 *n office this winter, so 40 yirl OfOpUurM %  ra being measured (or DM i IN od ankle slippers. Lisbon: A Lisbon policeman has arrested himself. Officer Roger %  i Granclnha or the I.isbo i Police. In a moment of weakness ember^led funds entrusted to Mm. Determined to make n example of himself he took a statement In his official Capacity from hinr^lf fully admitting* the irregularity. Hi' thrn locked himself up In u cell and waited ti Ix 1 eh.irgcd. I Johannesburg: Nicola as Havens; i. South Africa*! Minister [ of Finance has a dog named Katinku which drinks whl.sky M night cap W!t* its mnster PARIS June 19 Waa*-button: A crass Premier Antnlnr Pmay"* Gov w^pln Americas women.and ernmem jiftcr • % %  -.. % %  "" kmr niy street* look curioustnumph on rearm jinem approlv Victon.'.ii. Iteason: Air-conprlallons Uj now facing QUMUOM ditlonmg Is now so lominon that of -he ;mxlou National Asscml i It i MI y, In a light rammer dress, on the knott) TunJ I m problem. > catch cold from abrupt changes Last night only Communists dlsof temperature. And -i\ BuAwo, •ented as Deputies authorised the New York, bank has Government to spend 1,400.000,cc:t sprays foithe u*e of it* ooo.ooo francs (H.ooo.ooo.oooi to women cuat outfit 12 Army divisions and 271 air wings bv the end of the year %  Washlnete-n: The Itev. J. J. Ilvfcr, .',;->>•'i--Id Ozark Mountains Such overwhelming unanimity i preacher. Iie r I Ol v von ** rallu.fi Plate OBip'tJUofi i.' tl-i-' ynterdky where the BsrbaSoo Regiment is holdiim it*. Annual Cimp. Lcfl to ii l.t ta-v .-.. Cpl. Oi<>*vea. PU. %  ealy. Ft*. Stiurt. R. M PM Thompson. E ; L. Cpl rrt-itun. aU snd PW. Walcett. Camp Oomsssndant ttsr4 nt 'hr ntreme lef! hi-hlnd IB* ttJ.-" New Arrests In France Ma'er %  The w*e rmnaa fewapaper M Janialra [Hetinrr'i refemico to a move to K'-nt the United States extrapowei* in Bermuda II *Q Mi.MS I'tirlbbewn UUnda r toaaed aa l.s-s llabld iiail<>n in any emar' striking a eon%  *• mm hs^srfla of Viet. eW* Un-Amar.. jr AotfWnittaea, co the noaaiwUCh huntinrt of tha natlvat ol the lalaaoi .ii the ncr%  : .;jiim cives jn urgatii rtalning how fmo we ..aul In the Commonwenllh scale of the fimdaim'fit.il ininuin rlaMi both Hriialn and the tJnlK-rt Stute-t are signatories", the aya, ami asks whathei the n "ii.i .awn London Conference on Federation will preafTve. if not enhance these dignities a tin Page %  may 1H? larking c get* to ihe heart of the moasurcfc to grant the uneasy North African Protectorate greater self-government. The French aaree thai Tunl-lan reforms are In order but they are rpllt on how far to fio.— V-P. | li l l lM H -Wei', well. Feather. spoon, onr fears o/ ffte fob being Olven to an American were ytJife arovndlfn." Lawrie Appointed To Overseas Food Corporation THE Secretary of State for the Colonies, Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, has appointed Mr. Angus Lawrie, of the Nairobi firm nf accountant*. Angus Lawrie. Jeremy and Co.. as a part-time member of the Board of the Overseas Food Corporation. Mr. Lawrie's appointment will be for an unspecified period, detennlliable by the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 1st day of a fast desir-. %  i i' %  to %  %  ." \ njm its Mtnuti.. Ho (orb-do hlr lamrrj-tp <• eu.er Ih.' hin^e even if he lost enn-i-i.'ti*. ness. He signed .i statemeni t.> ; I bta famfJ) from i over hlr -l--.,M, la*o.: T.til aaaoe to 1 tru^ airliner Hermes, which ath-landed in the desert Nigerian school children are unable to take the General Certilicate of Education on the scheduled date. The examination poper? were aboard the plane, and now the children must wnit till duplicates are sent out from London. Waahlni-ton: Ethel Merman star of "Cull Me Madam", flew to Cum.iViu .. Mexico, fi i div >ri She qulppc.i to reporters: "Juat I! r %  mti —II s. U.N. Would Agree To He8creening Red Prisoners MUNSAN, Kara* June la\ Uajor Qanaral WUilam Hanison, senior UN Truce delesate, intimated that United Nations would agree to roscrccnlng Communist prisoners of war before an armistice to determine how many Reds wont to return home. If the move met with Communist approval, it would solve the touchy prisoner exchange stalemate blocking the Korean ai i.-iice Harrison has offered repeatedly to rescreon prisoners after an armistice is signed. Little or nothing has been said of another screening before i armistice. Meanwhile U.N. ncgi tutor? arc ignoring the C'ommui ist protest stgalnst a thrve-day i a talks reportedly considering ovin a longer pause to deprive Reds of the propaxuudi platform.—UJf. PARlb Juna New arrest-, and aOercbi ;epoiled in Frsnee/s drlv. againstK. d tnie.itt> lo Commun. it %  t the stata I .!' *' mil arreal yeaeerda raids on Ocm Ition o( Labour I'GT nffn-es and, Comnuu i ngo. They haulad in An d rl-l 111 .... He had bc;ai ordered t i .inatruettng magistrate Orttt two days ato but had railed u appear, h u n • rougnt to the %  ret, i--. m i %  %  .:',ot The k'ed i . r v.>\ r-lfred (• jppeiir prwarrd fm-n his hewr before police arrived. Two more %  rf won aatei but autharltlea •cfus row j -.f thfsM agld five radio student*. A Uboratorv .-.peciall. : is still' 'studying a damaged ll/e raft from the Dakota ". % %  f on Monday. Communn*W t*i!d West %  (onUsting the Falling Plate competition. This con, sists of six target* at 100 yards 1 ranro and six more targets at 500 rds and the sections which i,. v.. ,i theee ovei In • eat time are the winners. In thi a tie the section will the highest number of rounds o %  remaining la the winner Each fkiail of elx l rurnlsBied with f>0 rounds of ammunition pjr man. '^petition is tceamcr i"ciuse batti sites are used on the EJ : Id rifle and there i 3 Rescued From Train Wreckage MEXICO CITY. Juno 1*. Rescue crews recovered tte>ee bodies fiom the wreckage of a smnll freight tram which derailed thirty miles south of here yesterday and toppled into a dam. Six r*r'on were inAi.ti.orilles sold they did DO! know how many persons were riding In the train's empty cars but feared more Wales would be found. The dead Included n middie-aged m^n arid two 1 % %  ii—a bov and %  ghi tolh about ten j ears of age. adjustment to the set ranges 2J0 and 600 vards. Snipers' (iully On a conducted lou* of the i Major O F. C. Camp Command.ot. tha %  aw rlfsagaa through fill gully eM .ibout '.wo yards arl h idenl covet para. Ad the rifleraan I, that his <' routed] 'he enemy. U) po : '.rupei* en's " trom entlbn or ascvelopiiii the atoaa | tariinet approved the (!'--tai's .m' or-v'stonully e funds. Keltx QatlUard. SocreUfy ot Stata !or I |Unry*lW m-nisters thai the reprc:TerTtia 1 **rcr:a In ihc atomic acti\ -^c an.i will lead the country within the apace ol five years IO %  :. mot ol nh.mlo ggaargy in industry." laid the main objective of Mother Gives Birth To Quadruplets WIYVoiJ rii \li.>*i?hiucttr.. June 10. Quadruplets -a girl and three io r -waaa bora alive Just before idnight, afga night to Mrs. Mar' n mrig, 7. but tlie attending phy.derSB Mid It was "too early Ii U if all will survive. The fourth l-ahy—a boy. born one hour and six minute after the first hlrth—wi. said to be in "f-ir* %  mdition The Kg %  '. arrive and the twd lowed, were leported Rl .ondltion". Tbcy wire ( % %  four aepnrute Invubatoni. 11 g Pall o nrrlvetl at ttw ii II • • % %  £ the fourth birlh Bnd Cirly today %  Id newsmen "111 I cat) say is (hank Goii m i •. i he li% i rth M q %  • %  c-up %  III 68 yrir*. 103 Maniifnab rnof rni of tnree older rhilihen, had --pirinl ncsthesm ird r~raaiiiM in., nc.ru5 Uirouiihout the lon^ -dral. Dr. Hobc-t nynn. |ha • •yiielan who n • %  %  tlvprles sai.l ihe mr.thi" had a li grit case of virii< pi" • t |1 'vss not %  -erious and "if h Is tike it, fhe can sit up to%  -rro-v." 12 Inches Long He eMlmateA the bmVWa vrtl*** |: *wren twt and ihiee pound* h son m'flsuce about 12 taehes I ng. Final of t*ie qundraplr*-. t.-.girl was born at 10.23 p.m, f Ihe buys ut 11.13. i IN and ii.S'Jbuild new Id piles with a power J0.0OO and 100.000 kilowatts ore than i, iii'ndii.i uoundk ^f ptasossran II \cnr*. O.dllr.rd raid under the new ,lan the Kranch Atomic Knergv Commission atto wJll' 1 FfOdiuee atom powered %  tor and research into trie treaten" of uranium to produce other nns of energy. J. Dulld up FrBnce Into one of the great centre* of atomic refearch In" lY I. Prospect and exploit mln%  Ii a uranium used in itnnic research i:i sultnble arcs? f | o"l overseas terntori i tatg Ifl college* and Unl%  %  pesstal course in omlc science i'ds new plan the c it&Mi win rt pend uugeij on %  "may's . srastsafUali to |T.siueni Vincam .'.urlol On Tuomluy fo haatHme t flr.l Nippon anvoy M Fran. SWUM the i ; War Ii, i batted uiidomlanding beiucen the rtsOBkL Ho said be hoped trade .• Vranos "d Japan soon • ill IK. expandenl "for the benellt if our countries." He said FrafsBO*! luitiri.i influence i n a) greater than that of ay nUier counlt>. Fn i uic ha always bei-n respected NDON. June 18 Anthony G. H. Qordner Brown M. momb-r oftt.t Colonial Siivm iinea tWQ has been appointed Brit*)' Colonial Seer, lary IJI the '.thimas He succeeds u I' • eihel who Is retiring.—tC.F._ ..ulh Shore Hospital upervisor .d ..ii were 'nocrnal and go.i i gad". The buibe were ilfty daymature but Mrs. Manning has •n confined at the hospital for I post several weeks In anUciion of an early arrival. At time she had been told to exK :l possible birth of quintuplet* %  -huwed no more m four rabies would be born. InunedlJtoly following swell bi: th a Catholic priest baptized the t.l-les. Then Utey were taken o ri the delivery room to Incub.i,i Dr. Ityan who onco dellvi. t trlpliti said the Mannini' '. truiileis wiaild remain in inunttt th. y weighed ftva --t'.F. SPEYIROYAV Scotch Whisky the heart of Scotland



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PACE FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. JUNE JO, 152 BARBADOS£& ADVOCATE r-i %  r -t I.U WH1 It. liUiMn Friday. June 20. 1952 ii I-:M i %  •: worn* EARLY on Wednesday morning eight members of a House of Assembly which comprises twenty four persons voted in favour of resolutions based on the report nf P Committee appointed to exam ine the establishment of administrative professional and Technical officer., in the Barbados Civil Service. When these resolutions have been approved by the Legislative Council and receive the assent of the Governor, the salaries of all principal government olflcials and other specified office holders will be revised. The salary of the Governor is not affected although the Committee was of the opinion that the present emoluments of the Governor are inadequate u receive separato consideration. The maximum expenditure involved in the revision of salary scales is of the order of $100,000 per annum. The maximum annual potential cost of leave passages for the 945 persons who are eligible is estimated at $200,000 while the actual expenditure is expected to vary between $24,000 and $32,000 a year. The increase in salary scales will be effective from 1st April 1952. The difficulty of recruiting personnel to Barbados in recent years has been the subject of continuous comment. Key offices such as the Colonial Secretary, Attorney General, Financial Secretary, Comptroller of Customs, Accountant General and Auditor Gcneial havu lain vacant from periods ranging between 11 months and over Vwo years. And the salai y paid to the (1 nfl I MM of Barbados often Itttla attraction for careerists. The resolutions, which were passed through the House of Assembly in the Kff. sion beginning' on Tuesday and ai Wednesday morning must be considered in the light of these difficulties. Could Barbados, the question has repeatedly been asked in recent JMtn, afford not to offer more attractive salaries and conditions of service? The Leader of the House of Assembly, the Leader of the Opposition and six supporters of the Labour Party answered that question decisively during the voting which took place on these resolutions during the session which began on Tuesday afternoon. I Jt may confidently be predicted that the Legislative Council will agree with the verdict of the House and that members of the Council will approve of these resolutions when they are introduced in the Council Chamber. 1 Had Barbados continued to offer salaries and conditions of service far behind those offered by other British Caribbean terrl tories and other colonies the exit of Barbadians and other qualified persons from this island would have continued unchecked. The resolutions passed this week in the House of Assembly will stop the exit. Barbados seems to have obtained a reprieve from the fate which has befallen the Leewards in recent years when the running down of the administrative machine was vividly represented on one important occasion by the presence in an in-tray of an official of the secretariat of a large live hen. There arc. however, certain cautionary warnings which ought to be issued and which present and future governments of Barbados no doubt will note. The raising of salaries and the granting of leave passages will not improve the efficiency of administration if the holders of posts are not of the desired calibre. Some safeguard seems to be necessary to ensure that holders of posts can be replaced by better qualified persons should the existing shortage of personnel ever cease. On the other hand the raising of salaries and the provision of leave passages may not noticeably decrease the number of key personnel who are always on the alert to accept promotion when it ll offered to them tin some other outpost of Empire. Indeed the greater mobility of movement allowed to the substantial number of those entitled to free leave passages will assist ambitious holders of local offices to promote the interests of their personal careers when on leave. The increased expenditure nn higher salaries and leave passages is going to add to Hie already high cost of governmtnt administration: but further expendltura may * b. necessarv u kn-p the smaller number of first rale men who ean dUB IKkept her*' K a ball .f remuneration at high as that to be obtained in inon posts within the British Coloni;.l Scrvur. The government ir t-i be commended for its courage In supporting resolutions which had to be carried thrciiKh the legislature If Barbados' administration wa< not to collapse in ruins. The answer to the continuity of administration Is yet to be found, hoWwtr. The which Governors, Cnin and other high officials pass through Barbados en route to higher paid posts cannot result In good administration It will be well for thll problem to be tackled and a rolutjon found. Bertrand Russell A180 Tourists From Britain ON 18 May Bertrand Russell was eighty. He ought, by this time, to seeni "vc especially as he Is. after all, a philosopher, and Indeed the *•*' greatest philosopher alive. But he is too full of life, youth, hope, wit and provocation to assume the tranquil dignity of age. He Is very much not retired. Since he was seventy, he has published te n new books—th tenth, called The ImV*ct of Science on Society,* appeared recently—and those books are as controversial as any he has written. He broadcasts and lectuies regularly and sends an occasional scorching letter to the Prcs. A year or two ago tie hit the sea In a Scandinavian air-crash, but swim with Socratie calm and more than Socratie energy to safety. His appearance Is immensely distinguished: a trim, erect figure with a line head of white hair and a face that Is at once sharply Voltalrean and rently humane. At a time in which pessimism is an almost universal faltr.i, and orthodox religion Is reclaiming so many Intellectual*. I> rd Rusacll remains adamantly optimistic. anUelerieal. utilitarian; he Is unwavering In his belief in reason In the necessity, and the practicabfUty, of rational solutions to the problems of mankind. Ird Russell has so far published very little about the events of his own life. The most he has s.i 1,1 appeared in a symposium called The Philosophy of Bertrand Russell printed at Evanston. Illinois, in 1641 There he tcld the curious story of his childhood. HIP mother died when he was two his father. Viscount Amberley, when he was three. He wai brought yp in the house of his grandfather. Lord John Russell, than the first Earl Russell, who died when he mat six; thereafter Ids grandmother was responsible for his upbrinnintt. l-"td Russell has described her aa "a Puritan with the moral rigidity of the Convenanters, despising comfort, Indifferent to food, hating wine, and regarding tobacco as sinful". The young Bertrand was told very Uttle about his parents, and was inevitably mystified. H WU twenty-one when he learned the truth about their lives and opinions, and he discovered with a shock how mueh till father's exI had l-een the analogue of hi* own. For Lord Amberley. too, had been n nun of unorthodox beliefs. II. had, as a young man, rejected Christianity to Ihe disciple, and later Ulfl friend, of John Stuart Mill. Russell discovered that Mill had been, in so far as un agnostic could be, his godfather. .Waurirr < rimsloii Musstsfs*. tM.tnlir ..t Lord Amberley had paid the penalty for his eccentricity. During the General Election of 186R, when he was a candidate, it came out that he had ventured the suggestion, at a private meeting, tht birth-control was a matter for the medlcnl profession to consider. He became at once the target of slander and abuse. He was called The Vice-Count Amberlev" and a foul-mouthed rake; though in truth he was a ih V n lrrlm ng H^ H nVver l *lound gifted pupil. Ludwltf W.i experience when, in 1940, municipal authorities of York fulfilled their election pledges to expunge the vice of Manhattan by banning Professor Bertrand RuSMl] from teaching at the City College, on the grounds that his published views on marriage "encouraged immorality". Lord Amberley had wished his two sons brought up as freethinker*, and appointed two agnostics In his will as their guardian*. The Court of Chancery, ,>n the application of the grandparents, set aside the will. so that Bertrand Russell, as he later put it. "enjoyed the benefits of a Christian upbringing." He was about fifteen when he started thinking seriously and critically about religion, and he was unhappy for some years after he decided he could no longer believe. He was taught by tutors, and his life as a boy was a solitary one-, his greatest pleasure came from his discovery, at the age of eleven. %  f mathematics, something at which he could really excel. He was altogether happy at Cambridge. His friends included two men who Inter became very eminent phllosophei s: A. N. Whltchead and O. E. Moore. The leading philosopher in Cambridge at the time, however, w.is MTaggart, a Hegelian Idealist. Lord Russell listened to him with udmlration, and later lead "avidly" UM work;* of r. II. Bradley, a subtler metaphysician than M'Taggart, but a Hegelian, too. Neither influence produced Bertrand Russell the philosopher. He realised his genius because he was trained up to his fourth year at Trinity In mathematics, and the decisive influence In his intellectual development was that of Giuseppe Peuno, the Italian pioneer of modern mathematical theory, whom he met in Paris in 1900. Following that meeting. Lord Russell mastered PMUMTI symbolism and then evolved his own. Pcano had reduced the special vocabulary of arithmetic to three terms; Lord fbiissul want on to prove thai even U unnecessary and "that a minimum vocabulary for mathematics %  me as for logic." In the PriiiHplfs of Mother-mrics (1803) and more notably in the book he wrote wtttj Wnltahaad, Prtiirlpia Mathetriallca (1910). Russell made n revolutionary contrition to philosophy. It was not only that he succeeded In proving that mathematics can be derived from logic, but he developed in the process* certain lofiie.il techniques which have changed the methods, if not perhaps the very nature, of philosophy. Russell has not been wholly In sympathy with the i evolution hit work has precipitated, and although his point of view In branches of philosophy other than logic has altered from time to time, he has never been at one with what i* now the prevailing —hoc!, dominated by his most pupil. Ludwig Wittgenthe family which has taken a leadNew ing part In the politics of the** island* since the slate* tury. Several of his ancestors: have been famous rebels, and he has inhered their stubborn spirit. After the Boer War he beenmo a thorough-going pacifist, and reinstated one until 1940. when he \*BM finally persuaded that Hitler was an evil worse than war. For his uneoinpromisin*; attitude in 1916 he was expelled from his Fellowship of Trinity and Liter put Into prison. He had alrs> taken pan in the i-mpaign for women's suffrage. In 1921 Lord Russell went to Soviet Russia. He hear* the firing squads, and returned with none of the Illusions that prevalent among his fello*Socialists between the two wars. He disliked and disapproved Of what he saw in Russia, and remembered It when Stalin was everybody* darling after 1942; he was unpopular In many quarters then for -leaking oi Russia as a menace to peace. Since he ceased to be a pacifist, he has: Keen a vigorous advocate of world government. But he does not think a world government should be given any power beyond that i.iceary to maintain peace. For ttM rest he recomsnendi deviation. This is the themof hi." book Pou-rr 11938) and of Auf'ority and (he JtuHrldual (1943). He thinks that. while securily and justice require centralised, government control, progrcsj requires the utmost personal initiative, so that trunsfei of some sovereignty from nalioni BUtrtS i i .i world government should lie balanced by the transfer of other powers to local governments. As a philosopher. Lord [{ %  .. has no patience with theoretical ethics, but as a publicist he has had much to say about contempotWj morals. His views on marriage and education have inevitably attracted attention. The book that was taken by careless readers to advocate adultery .suggested in fact that sexual impulses should be "tnlned intend of thwarted." 3nd that voluntary self-sacnllev. prompted by low should tatta. in* sdaea of reprs— slnn based on taboo. In ediifaHon. Lord Rusell has never suggested that children should hav no discipline, but rather that the element f force m education should be reduced to the barest minimum. To discover that barest miDimom i < %  ran %  school in collaboration with his second wife, Dora BuaseU. After th penment he returned to university teaching, lirst in America nd then at Cambridge, where h" was reim dd n n Fellow of Trinity during the Second World Wur. "My intellectual Journeys/ txird nussell once confessed "have been, in some respects, disappointing. When I v I hoped to find religious satisfaction in pJvlcxnohv ... I thought or mathemriiies with rev %  nd suffered when Wittgenstein 1. -I t>,ir. r. ard H ) notnlni i-i11 taiNotogiM . Those attempt to mike n rvllgf< humanism, which recognise? nnthlng greater thnn man. do no' ti f. mv emotions. And vet I :,. !., believe mat m % %  world as known, there is anything that I can value outsid human beings." • Allen and UnuHn 7s. 6d. —The Spectator: Mar 16. l q Barbados Oil Scandal From TRUTH WHEN the country rid iUelf of Its Socialist incubus, Hnti--n interests ell over the world which had been hurt and wronged. because of official injustice or neglect, looked with commence to the Conservative Government fur swift redress to restore Ihelr dimnged fortunes. Among these interests was the British Union Oil Company, which had received shocking treatmeti' from authorities In Barbados functioning under the lunsdiction of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. Reference to this treatment was made in a Truth leading article eleven months ago. tut, as nothing has yet been done to make amends, no apology is needed for returning to the subject. In 1919. the company obtained leases over 78 per cent. nf the Island's available drlllable %  ft*). About £1.000,000 was apent during the next twenty years upon drilling fifty-two •JUSJUI ana oil wss discovered in sufficient quantity to convince expert* that It existed In abundonce at a depth of between 10.000 und 12,000 feet. Development had to be suspended during the war, and. In 1946. the comu;mv WM informed that the Barbados Government proposed to take over the underground rights. The company did not content the Petroleum Bill whlcn WB5 to give effect to this decision, because it had received .-insurances that, at the suggestion o' th Colonial Office In London, the Barbados Government had every Intention of %  ranting the company, in return for the surrender of iu leases, n prospecting licenee over the Whole isbnd. Assurances could Ml be official, because, until the Government had acquired the underground rights, it was obviously debarred from disposing i>f them, hut there was. or so the companv had reason to thinn. a llrm understanding, reinforced by the fact that the Government LfflcUilly accepted the Lepper Beport. which, among otherthings, had recommended the proposed arrangement. The comE nv thereupon surrendered us ises. ns agreed, and began Jo negotiate with a Trinidad llrm to undertake the deep drilling. when, ta Ni %  etonMwnent, on applving for a provision .1 licence fo start operations, it met With n blank refusal from the B*rbade* Government now -iu y vested with the Sflfllhte. Rarely In the history of British administration has there been so open n breach of faith. Whe.i Lord Teviot raised the nittcr in the House of Lords, he had no difficulty in disposing of the argument of Lord Ogmore. Socialist Colonial Under-Secretary, that the company had later been offered a prospecting licence for 55 per cent, of the Island. He pointed out that this amounted to no %  more than 22 per centof ihe drillable are., instead of the 78 per cent, cov • ered Iw the original leases. What is more, the terms of the offer were such that even Lord Ogmore described Hwp as "onerous." The circumstances in which the company had come to be dispossessed of its rights, and robbed of the fruits of its plon'ecring. make fantastic reading. Once the Barbados Government had become possessed of the title deeds. It invited the Biitu-h Union Oil Company and the Gulf Oil Company. %  powerful American concern, to apply o| ineul licences on almost Identical terms. This, in itself, was i'i Injustice, bt meant thai the American comOur Readers Say: Gratiluilo To The Editor, The Advocate— SIR.—Kindly allow me th.'.' %  • in •XprCM one'astonishment that Mr. Lvttrlhvi should not have taken thtrouble ir> ensure th.it he was accurately informed. The true answer te Mr. Prune'' ... '.:.! %  V... shows that the. Colonrd Secretary had not bothered to see the i 'levant doeiiment.-.. Two sets of dr.ift rcgul.v'ons en 'o drawn up, one for th.^ BfW other for the American conv'iinv . %  tS, II would I him % %  ti II IV House of Commons Mutjcal; or even similar. They were dlfferer •? %  "•._ „ 5 .ii M LET IS DEMONSTRATE ONE OF THE ABOVE SETS AND JOIN THE HUNDREDS OF SATISFIED OWNKRB. &f DACOtlA & CO., LTD. Smokey The Bear Beats Firemen From R. M. MacCOIX WASHINGTON. EVEN in these days of colossal figures — budgets, arms expenditures, trade deficits, and so forth — there is one item of a thousand million dollars (that's about £357,143,000) which makes a startling impact. For this is the amount of damage caused in America by forest fires in 1951 alone, fires .iften started through the carelessness of campers and picnickers. If this seems an almost impossible figure,] it must be remembered that one-tenth of this vast country is park and forest land. And it i.>* now. as the lonp„ intensely holi summer gets underway, that America'.*.! vigilant Forest Service begins to worry. Tough, carefully trained forest rangers,: 2,500 strong, are prepared to fight the fires at any time, using every means from hoverplane spotting to parachute jumping. But, valuable though their work is, it is! beloved "Smokey the Bear" who is known all over America as the chief symbol in the battle against forest fires. For Smokey la I as popular with Americans as was Mickey I Mouse a few years ago. Carrying a spade and wearing blue leans. and a Scout's hat. he begs and pi caution in the nation's 630 million acres in I forest land. Twenty million pkl Smokey are abroad — in In tubes, on roadside posters, in magazines, and on railway stations. > &f&f&f&f&f&f •••• &f *•• %  • &f&f • &f&f&f &f •••••• &f • &f When your only tfcouirht IB to kocp cool ID the lering heat, yon renUy ) appreciate the fine cloth ota TttMa lightweight suit. Add eauy freedom, yet perfect flhirt control with Daki flX-Pupportinjt traoftora. No wonder so many men have become Dak* converts for life. MMPS0* TAILORED £xcluAJJJ6 to .... (Da fadta & Co., <£td Choice Quality "ST MEALS Chicken* Durkt Turkeys OTHER MEATS Ox Tongue* falven Liver Kldner* %  •) Ml Bread* RabblU IP t In Tin Hun* (Smoked) COFII.I: Empire—i:...i-,t Dally Ctuue A Sanbarn* rurr ('(.flee—-Nothing Added NOURISHING FOODS Jusi Arrive* Split Peaa Whole Peaa S.ilt Meal* Madeira OnUaa Madeira 1'oUUei Peanut Butter Gouda Cheese Marmalade 4-Th Una (Canadian) RELISHES Madnu Curry Helu 57 Sauee Helm llorae Radlah lleliu Chill Raaee Italian Chill Sauee ii-liiii Tomato Paste Italian Krtvhup ill' Sauee A I. Sauee Sweet Pickle* Mustard Pickles Celery Salt Mango Sauce KNRICHFD BREAD WITH GRAVY IS DELIGHTFUL GODDARD'S FOR SERVICE



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FRIDAY. JUXF. M. 193! 300 New Books Will Go Into Circulation MANY book lovers rubbed their hands wnh pleasure %  lay as they looked through the some 300 books which were put on preview on Wednesday at the Public Librarv prior to going i n t Q circulation on Saturday. Throughout the day a regular number of read.': ed the preview room, though there were never more than a dozen or so at a time. The new books Include manv contemporary subieclx, celebrities, and classics. .iJ 1 ,"' d r r who ,', !" A" re d •""•""•a. " %  %  "' ..'.?, 3unv l, v Dw kevs of war and ilkm ihe wax ha did it, win and pew i LUM# known be jlad to know that Bo.well> ,,. iha ouUJda • eld. 0,*>lo.i on Undon Joum.il-BoswsIlM Pipers. Bate* book Is that It if.hc ngst thol.ir^.st and most important find comn • lf lni of 'Qiglfch literary manuscript island stntr Davidscai ever miKle. is include! imon| the mental .. hooks. These papers enormon-l, enrich a knowledge or Boswelf, Cosmo I (,rce i i Dr. Jchnson and" Incheontemthe world locay thai Paul BlaiiJSSft. ,l"f. T."!' "' '•>' %  Damocmc, second half of the ljth century, and Catholic Poweris bound to In this Boswcll is oen with some be of ime.-tsl. His theme Is -Two of Pepysfrankness and buttgroal ...loins of powerand the worthiness and Rousseau's self book .. a study of the dual analysis—Ihe dissection of motives struggle for the soul of the which makes the hook so demonailc world interesting. Ancurin Bevnr. i BARBADOS ADVOCATE Fearalso one Of the "111 Place Of Sp,,,l Then „i the i.eld of sport llie.e be I,, clreutatkon Saturea? in JU£? t^2Z?**L, N this book you BjMtaW. In*. !" T? > Bevan-s political lc. When Devan „„,,„„, „,„.„' .„„ .uVboxTra fr'Tof." 0 ,'."" I" 0 "' ,h !" "' "-ily man miner In a South Wales colliery. Kilraui and gibers. But besides ! %2ZUL "01 r.rt?. 0ne p JS2i %  "• %  ""' w >"> "f" '', 'he book „ Britain and how I, could be ^'"nsi"^-." d !" !, you that attained by the workers. rom I934 w ,„„,„„>„ bou In Place of Fer exhibitions, televisions and radio In "In Place of Fear", h. appearances, Joe Louis made touches such subjects as Poverty. $4,298,812.72. It contains, too The Rule of Parliament—Act! or Passive, Modern Man a.._ Modern SociMy. Pnvalo and bare knuckle contest, to Hie time S" 1 "" hopo ? K ,' 8 1Un •- ood Collective Spending; and ihe much when Esaa.7! art_ i-. i~. PP,or this seasons Cuban %  KEfcp In Carlisle Bay %  H ran,,,! !" ML* Wtmh.r yoj arc coaviI etc in,, of .imply n—4 a if hmliCbildin|i unit, u vocr problem. Vitariint Moorak w w rti iwtd i* iT-PHOS He row key i Rood h-alfh ana ST-.. GfNIRAL TONIC iASTl" SEA WELL MIDAS \ ClMrubi". T. v %  Mi I V n*iii. L >Mri nfMtu. J. Honourabl* M.C.C. Gentlemen please mad* in Japan inriirslriul Alcohol NEW YORK, U.S. producers of Industrial history of the heavy weight chamSj. 00 0 hav <\cut th flf prices by nd plonships from the last of the 2? cen s a ••" %  W dashed Private and bare knuckle contests to tintime 1 the much when EziaiH Charles beat Joe Canadians Draw On Timber to acquire consignment of cr vary cheap'" Jets On Empire Air Itouten el bats London Eipress Serric* h\ Touch With Barbados Coast Station .... Is. s-M. M Te-. M MX, L OUIIo AfUUVAlf r nnoAD I Itcitsrii. Ii %  XtnoiiX'iU :^.k. it MOM DrpAPrrunra tn w i A r* Wr.' •... THTN1I1WI. '. Mr Faddnx, T Ijiih W \ 'luhammnl. J 14. .en. II Mot tan. C i Mrfcni. D Dlllri. J MilUt .'*. % %  ; I Ominp. Wat-on, D Mlnner. J K*kf DWUmnBS-on ThtirwlBV .'W'.l'A S Wana. P Turner. J lUn, I. I ,. li Tr,.l..„, lor f1'!C"m> RJCOMr Uonal Caraw, l.i William Jorura. ] Karl**!] Brlluwi Mr Julian f.:.)fi-kl Mr ra. .r.l Robiniton. Mi loula Marahall. Mr llubart Ollacter. M fMgar I—•Itiajt. Mr Ttntr Huuir [ /"Dignstive~~\ /tins of t:\aiAMiK Upwto Afttr xt>*i) a |irr< i !> W.'l |l-r Hoduced De Win Tablet*, new coni product to lhe>f Powder. They >-I convenient way •" %  diCcativcdiaordrtiawav frniti tVotne A.' -. jl diiMtv** one ot two on -rie loncue (or ptompt rm'Uf UMyU'li*'*. P!r.-\i>aiit lantuig; Da Will'* Anucid Tableta aia at9*..icrj e,l-w :,.< for (raahr.ea. In handy t rat off Mrrpi for pneltet or rundtar. SUotia-d Slat, 24 Tablets. Ecvnooiy Sue, CJ r.ibictt. %  .IIKI I1XK %  pa talked of Free Health besides other subjects. With America'* PrealatentUI election no near at hand and i.' Sulii' Eb-rnhowrr M> much In the spotllsht, duniher's "Elsent t, r "Whi Walcott for the title. This"histori g'""^"* molasses Tba BT JOIIN K. niitn Canada Is no Igogal tchins'' at her gre.il • ,tart< from Tstai ., ,, aSS. <"' !" ola 1, ot present poor -"cralcnin,-at her great teen San waTknlSLi oofV ?S^ because of a decline In deinand '"'"••' "' "•'liiml I leked oot b, John for „| C o h „, iaA „ argl lncre aso Dspntji and I in synthetic production. isuc II. A, V the -Who I. WhTTn "11o,n %  Now .""" I ~ d,n aln 1 *"Can d '" are besinoln, turner" srUI br of Interest la {-.T-k-", h(r ,, i!" ,.J," w U %  rs h.ne cut their pricesi from ml., tha nation's rath deposit. ,.t -an, Oanth.r baa presented u n^!!,, l ^l o,^ Vh 2 to M cent, per gallon, Cuban integrals ,,,,d oil,, and n thr nrtd it i. lKn,k on the 'IMP 1 m ^ demands for 20 cents a gallon i„„ more wealth from Oeneral .Her s-arVhrnTlnranal, ^ '^ A r ' h v han. to a .picture of revised, importer, believe, a. It In this hook he Is dr. d US r %  Inr I..OI :ie*i.i..'III nlti. haul. In Iw. _. .. world 1 Worrell in this bx.li. roads— takes tu-o-and-a-haU salloDs of Young said In an • P .ii.s..i am h.u,. cs U ti. n i..iiv ii.. Worrell whose batling m England blackstrap to make one gallon of that the ."lep.M'd up devi aSS iilu u ruiii Cn In the " 1V&0 ave l,,,,l ' ' e "hl. In Industriaf alcohol. .vi.inm.M turn, three farlon. wBiita Ttmfi. th this book Weekes H "One'of the Cuba, fluting to get the highexerting •vorld's greatest batsmen—Bradtt possible price. h.ns Nld %  OBH aur on kntaDd i i launeh an invaalon ar'roH the^"'an t>i>e-annihilalor of bowUng." 1X000.000_ gallons of blackstrap wood produeli They are the n.pW BnglMi Channel and tr S " *• frtakel line. ,00. there U %  n ^ %  %  ^..^^'SeT,!e "^S "' WOrlU f^ "" > '" II — ilan Triasssi|l aaa f*o MevlU. Cafdui* "Cricke, All ^^"^1, r !" „,KVrL^^^ Sri il,Hl Influenc ral Eni Irvine rould have had iitreng bachlns The Year.;J %  l ." !" ft !" '"Si^/u. be ,: "^ ta >""""" JV "P* 3 far nomination an a Presidential Besides crickcl, there are £*"> "P? Slid 70^00^ saE oun,,K ; • I,ml f^* 1 ^n |l 'K.eandidate from whichever par'CycUnr by R„ Colry. FootbaU ^"S^^Sj 'toX United S ty he ehov. by Billy Steel. -The Weekend BSUTtoTaTilPfija u"l.l' V "i csuTbe fr "">-'"l arid woods. Still fresh in one's mind ore Golfer" and other games and paflsoW _, ^ e ^ce Cuba wants Canada's (tpprtaeular tU-\ the headline;! Count Kuike Bernalimes such as band balancing. Production of 350.000,000 galrnp 1 f natural reaource-i was dotte made and now "To JerusaArth And Crafts ions of molasses in Cuba is fore' also include ,-ast for this year, as against last podti In Ubrador nor Count up to the time of his B nm on va-ious arts and craft?!, year's total of 288,625.000 gallon?. Held:: In Albert.i. Young said. assassination, has oeen acquired Tsere is "Playlnsj At Slgnt" for Cuba can only use some 80,000. l u furpet In this new eollectton for the violinists and insl umenullsti' 000 gallons a year herself and th.tt our present natural reaourt Barbados public, it Is a day to day geneialiy and other mustlc books must find export markets for the ..,,,,,, \ t rutlottwldi record of difficult and dangerous ail d an anthology of German remainder. —B-l'.P. raid. "It Is tnk'.ng place in negotiation* from which the perpoetry, — greater or leaser ,,< %  % %  .-. In ,,,.-l sonallty of the Count emerges included in the new novels Is ver y attractive. Thtre ore also t.J of the provinces from th.' even more clearly than it did from one that many will read If for usual fund of cowboy ••w.rir* w.ih. to the Pnclllc. and m ihe lerrl> the calm retrospect of "Instead no other reason than that H was th* exciting names that sclnxtl tories in the fur n-rlh of Arrne.*' written by a West Indian—the boy. like to read, "Coltonwood l Vn „ n „ „„,,.. __,.. ... "Report From Formosa" Trinidadian Indian. Samuel Selvon Gulch". "Brush Country Killers"; f .VV u ," And with Fon.".sa Hid China This is one of many novels with aUd so on. r ne development* b> taking important places In world the u.tual subjecte—love, mystery. Of course ther* would scarcely W1,h Newrouiul.and and WOfaun,. olt.lrs.-Reiv.il from Formosa" by crime and so on. For the lover be a cHoCon at this .tag. r-f westTh<* ,*"• %  H Uaclear Bata Hid Rene G outof P. G. Woodt-ouse there Is affairs without something on said make it duncuit to t> Mil 'The RaM And Splendour "Barmy In Wonderland" and one Royalty beinc included. The three """ but optttnlttlc about IM Of The Chinese Btnptn" H Dl Iw .f who taW| what Woodhouso .re "Clarence House". "The Queen I rature oCCanada. much inter.-st. writes, might say that the nnmo IsMotber" and "Our Young Prince". in Newfount-lund. Iha IXaato_,„ __—, %  — — ion Steel and Coal O0llinin H mechanizing Its Wabnua Mines III lt> HI I.I I \IMI\S I OIK i: I.VAH \il.\ OF VIIJ \.IS -mm** %  %  -fee? •y f. ^.' RESIDENTS of Wast Berlin wbo had •ummar ootug tar by a 100 yard strip of Soviet Zone, wore ordered yollea told ttaem thoy'd no longer be abla to get t Uons went into affectLeaving their children on are i-hown csrrying thslr furniture and other posse* mwalty separated from tho Western tece.ently to evacuate the milages. Commuiu-T tho cottages, when tha new Ea*t Oennan regnlahs Weat side of tha separation point, tha-o people ms from the cottage area to the Won Sector. (INP). ami expanding production. The Buchans Mining Co. has sunk a shaft to develop 1 new 1 J body of ore with many years of productive life. The Ml letals C01poralion In Nova Siotln has reopened the fORDSN .in.d by Norenda number of base metal and gold O il-iufamau dWtrtet; the itCfa silver-. •SIM Mine at barraute, expansion of a&b< at Asbestos. %  In Ontario, nori pre i>-. H being expand' from 1.300.000 USD an estimated 3.500.000 1. .( 000 tons in I9."r. u u ill*" beinr. expende.l J n. and new iron mlno Is being d) veloped at Marmora, near ilelle\ die. aiM prodtica by IBM." Young said. The St, Co. experts to.produce ft, the 1 ^ ''00 tons of ore daily at Its new re,no at Lynn Lake, Man.. Young I Estimated ,tinni;il pfOn Between now over loo <>f Brit mainline passer., • %  |t %  1 and turbo-props, will IK* built for v of these wilijrr. Into service on n a.r-routes. Output will vxp.iiM itQl further M rnort Itv as built up. Attention Is b*iiig com I tan Bhrec mam typajB, One is Ihe %  ed by Ihe Dellaeillancl <;IHK1 engine, tha othar In the Rollathe Vi inoiilh and ryenlually nix u month. A luge T li now being com % %  the "plane 1 >': counts havo Lv 1 • %  1 :iveiy by ISW, At in. to), 2.- hiitunnia airUnem thfl Urltisli %  pi in i' 1pnxlucUon ot 01 ban try in 1 inworld Be*: ..1 i'. %  Uhltad 1 %  latry, can boaal of jet airliners ilraadj 11 1 otnmi 1 cial use The high 1 1 out by British craftsman will do much all perls of ti %  vithta caater and faster reach of aacta oilier. — BIT /igricultura! Sac. Will Dhcuas New Hat i'nisi'ii Two Important matters v.nich It the aiteiition of the 1 B idety when they 1 Annual General Meeting this evening die tion of product.o-1. marketing aim distribution of locally ,.1 rlgioM and vegeUiblta,,"' uinl "the 111'.ioductlon of a new poison Warfarin", in the |o< I < :impoign." Among other n on the agenda are Bat olflcen and tl. 1 otaTunlHaea, and t %  ni r.f reprrwentalive'. on the Agricultural Board, thi IVasanta Loon Bank iuslry Bank. Tlie meeting will also receive % %  ,1 itftamanl of eporl %  ConunKtea i.; .T.-iagement for the %  The meeting tukes pliice at 2 P' %  ha Bovtl ISkeete Buildln-. %  II be 17.000.000 pound of oieJtel 9.000.000 pounds o I i0,oon pounds of cebal and 70.000 pounds of ammonlu luiphur fert Give glass .... right round the difficult S bend reach. 'HMpaS' tfean thoroughly and ;l!v .11 nc modern way. ...if, old Ij-hioncd r.vih.M.' M.irp.j'i'.righlup-io-datc —sale and sure. Jusl spnnkkli the pan 2t night, then ll> r.iornmg — it's easy. %  Hira>'u*afeloir*instI Urafo-Ws Iscssdlaa i'<^e ci.iamv.cd to MfSic latLt. brush %  AWV, A 1 asvc's a co Relieves pain, of Glittering, spotless glow. and no water needed —ju*l I Windokiic spread over the ahaa, K :i c it a momenl to dr> then polish it lightly. The rcvilt 1 m BSJBRW .•warm, nna Windole e —e rat* bara rasa^ Jy lUt la laHHldl" Rallavas* Pale—Ota Coaafon—Prookotae I lag. Tabes ee Vars. •caw -.ni. IM t(.ii..hitc ihip. ihroiioii I -lr IWlaWiOai Co*< Bl 18 ArchanackM. %  r.,lr., a %  oraatcr. %  %  D. U>*>*, %  %  l—> p.l. %  %  Warvd-rer. %  %  Bradi. • %  net I %  I'Sty Nrinf.il, m v Arnn ,r... % %  AlrM IVUII. . Mono** NntUnflui.., • Air.... t L'tlltUS, > %  nulhelar, %  %  B*al i-.lrarleT, %  a Sanum. %  f Chsnvpoaf. The World's Orvatvnt SKIN OINTMENT n si it. lau NW ViK nws-t. or. a-nhrra 71 %  la) i ,.. DHAS Draria Tl ir rbt >r rmrrnrv Tl Oo%Sj "..• SB 1'Af.AI.A uiwluetlna NDwfuiiitdlai.a Oiq* on 4>*!? ANTACID TABLETS No walar ncarfad faiNf carrMKi anvwftara — CsHias.W /am-Buk ">oothtnc, Hralin;, Antiseptic Kearp a l> .x ..(*ovhnn.l. REDIFFUSI0N Oilers a Commission of $1.50 in CASH lor every New Subscriber broughl to and accepted by the Company. KKIMI H'KION will pay m addlUon a bonua ol $25.M to any person who brings in tut-nt,. 'live Nan Suhsirih crs in one Calendar mut.th who lire acit'pted by Ihe Company. Hare always a supply n( Recmnmendati-ui Forms ready THRY CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE OFFICE Kr.DIFFl'KION :-: Tniial-ar Street. TAKE OFF THAT MASK OF PAIN WHIZZ TABI.DTS WnX HL'U'KI.Y BRING BUSY FROM ANY TVPF. Of PAIN. AND RKMKMH1K, WITH Till li: IDll. PACKING 1 III V HI KEPT AIISOI.UTEI.Y I RE8II FOR YOU . WIIIIM'.VIR YOU MAY WANT THEM





















Harbadros

'
ESTABLISHED 1895

' Natives Riot
24 Hurt As Police,
Shoot Into Crowd

CAPETOWN, June 18,
Rioting broke out on Wednesday in the native quarter
of the mining town of Odendaalsus in the Orange Free
State over the Nationalist government’s tightening of white



ee
FRIDAY, JUN





ite Supremacy Measures

| Paper Warns Big Atomic Programme :

Wu. Abcut
Leueos TotS. Launched In FrReer. |

(Prom Cat! Own Correspandent) tion in atomic energy has

The French, a pioneer
GRENADA, June 19. ($108,000,000) pro-

launched a new 37,600,000,00% francs

The on a4 ews C oh * » in m
supremacy measures. The West oe news eeea| gramme aimed at’ bringihg a French nuclear industry to

iting
“s reference to a moye to
United States extra-
territorial powers in Bermuda
finds that the issue holds @ w®rn-
ing to British Caribbean islands
which were leased as bases liable
to re-occupation in any emer-
gency,

Police fired into a melee, seriously injuring four na-
tives and wounding 20 others. A police station was. wreck-
ed, a police car burned, and some policemen injured.
Fighting flared when _ police -——-—— ——

tried to enforce an order requiring
mative negro women
special passes when they went on

the Furopean forefront in five-year. Notably omitted trom
French plans was any mention of developing the atom
bomb, f

Ton cabinet approved the details and provisionally |
settled to raiaé funds. Felix Gaillard, Secretasy of State for
Atovayes ‘ytd ministers that the “programme repre-
sents essential steps in the atomic activities ef France and

to carry | “fom AU Quarters:

ee












»
the streef. The, rioting. was pert : The newspaper strikim, son=} yj . i i
of fiery, opposition to Prime No Heat But nt amie ng a con-} will lead the country within the space of five years to
Minister Daniel F. Malan’s policies , abtegiy- ot Bae t A. f various uses of atomie energy in in ustry. , 5
in Capetown. ° KF, nce compared With the b. fa of| te said the main objective of ‘ iti > said Sli 9pers or Uncle Sam's Un-American Activi-|‘he project was to bulld new °
The chief opposition leader said , e |ties Committees, sees the possi-| ‘omic cold piles with a power other ves
his party will have nothing to do | ey, Repay ag Ail Ps er }5¢ 30,000 and 100,000 kilowatts ;
with: the newly Created. High f . \natives of the islands at the near-{ Wich may produce more than 2
Court Parliament. This Court} r Winter lest pretext . a one hundred pounds of platonium Birth To
‘was set up to overrule appeals to! ‘The situation gives an, utgen- within two years. .
the Court which killed the Gov-{ a to ascertaining + how free we Gaillard said under the new
ernment effort to remove 50,000; Auckland: The Aucklana tstand in the Commonwealth séple | {ve year plan the French Atomic Quadruplets
Cape coloured persons (those of | Power Board has no power to} jof the fundamental human. rights Fnergy Commission afso will:
mixed blotd) from the general|spare fcr heating its own office to which both Britain and the 1. Produce atom powered] © : ; 5 ;
voting list. this winter, so 40 girl employees United States are signatories”, the |'™°tor and research into the treat-f WEYMOUTH Massachusetts,
Malan proposed a Court Parlia-|are being measured for free oo e ay Editorial says, and asks whether rent of uranium to produce other June had
ment in which all members of! fleccy-lined ankle slippers. THIS SECTION of soven, undor Cpl. Grosves, won s8® Talliig Plate Gompetiignt oe Walkers’ yesterday {the momentous London Confer-| forms of energy. wala ll (atresia a ae ec
the Senate and House will sit as] Lisbon: A_ Lisbon policeman! here the Barbados Regiment is holding its Annual Camp. oft to rirht they are Cpl. Greaves, Pte. jence on Federation will preserve, 2, Build MP ar coe ne reve 3 ive i on
judges in secret to pass on the;has arrested himself. Officer] gealy, Pte. Stuart, R. M.; Pte Thompson, E.; L/Opl. Petorkitty Baand Pte, Alloyue, I. Major 0. F.C. {if not enhance these dignities, oe so of atomic r pak TN ebaitda bar the atiends
r 3 i Lisbor ds 4 5 se . i sor et,
Pere an a ee a Police, in asa ta Weaken: Yew wee rennet o = idtatMdebiaiecutie- ttle: salle ag o @® On Page 6 3. Prospect and exploit min- fing physician said it was “too early
embezzled funds entrusted to him. | | “= Terels such as uranium used info tell" if all will survive.
Determined to make an example | New Arrest atomic research in suitable areas? The fourth baby-—a boy, born
2 of himself he took a statement in ; : of France and overseas terrttor-Jone hour and six minutes after the |
MAy FACES fos ores gm fo dy France "Create in colleges ond Unt-[traaition, ‘The git te test to |
He then loched ee aE ae ea n I ance | vorsities a special course iMyarrive and the two hoys that fol-
0% cell and ited to ia oh - ; J : oo \lomic science. lowed, were veported in “goorl .
unisian and waited to be charged, } PARIS, June aes} ‘To finance this new plan the]condition”, They were placed in
Nicols | New arrests and searches were Cabinet will depend largely on ffour separate incubators.



as

Havenga, Seuth Africa's Minister!
of Finance: has a dog named
Katinka which drinks whisky es
u night cap. With its master.
Washington: A craze for shawls,

is sweeping America’s women, and
‘making city streets look curious-|

Problems

PARIS, June 19.
Premier Antoine Pinay’s Gov-
ernment after scoring a landslide

{
| Johannesburg:
|
|
}





reported in France’s drive against!
Red threats to Communist security ,
wf the state as government
nounced it would remove Commu-
nists from key positions. |
«Pclice in Toulon made the four
tecnth arrest yesterday
police raids on General Con-ade



the outcome of Premier Antoine

Yineay's Government backed loan The fother John arrived at the
{ the loan expected is as much ns} oepital following the fourth birth
95.000,000 francs ($271,415) of Jend-early today told newsmen “dl!
\oked reconstruction and capi- I can say is thank God it is all
tal investment, credits will be}ovew” The live birth of quadrun-
ufomatically freed.—wU.P. lets occurs once in 68 yerrs, 163
cases, Mrs. Manting, mother of



triumph on rearmament appro-|ly Victorian, Reason: Air-con-| ation of Labour CGT offices and inree older children, had spinal
priations is now facing questions ditioning is now so common that|\he Communist headquarters in, Japanese Exrviov anesthesia and remained semi-
of the waxione National Assembly , it is easy, in a light summer dress,| France’s naval port, two weeks ys ‘ ¢ nscious throughout the long
on the knotty Tunisian problem. | to catch cold from abrupt changes|ago, They hauled in Aime Ville- ° cl ordeal
i : ; ha ' REO; ee ter : + tl > * f
Last night only Communists dis-,|of temperature. And at Buftalo,|croze, a militant Communist andj Hopes For oser Dr. Robert Ryan, the family
. Wy aehy Ara)

sented as Deputies authorized the’ New Yor



bank has



former president of a special dele-





Government to spend 1,400,000,~ scent sprays for the gation of the village of Polnaris, | froneh Relations ci heerine malt that bother Meo
000,000 francs ($4,000,000,000) to! women customers. He had been ordered to appear; j slight ease of virus pneumonia
outfit 12 Army. divisions and 27) before the instructing magistrate} | ' , ‘

air wings by the end of the year. Washington: The

Such overwhelming unanimity
may be lacking once the Assembly | 51st day of a fast designed to in-
gets to the heart of the measures | duce God to show him signs of

to grant the uneasy North African } pig

Ministry. He forbade his



















installed

ise of its

Rev. J. J.

| Ivie, 57-yeor-old Ozark Mountains
preacher, died this week on the],



Fernend Orth, two days ago but
had failed to appear. He was
rought to the Place of Justice by)
special Surete inspectors fx in- |
terrogation.
The Federal Secretary of tho!


































PARIS, June 19, |): it was not serious and “if she
| The Japanese Ambassador Ku-| ,
mao Nivnaumura expressed hope
today that Japanese and French
tude relations’ will soon become
groser “Lor the benefit.of our coun

ls like
yorrow,””

12 Inches Long

it, she can sit up to-





















Protectorate greater self-govern- | famiyeteehave a doctor.cnier iho} Cammunis ad 5. Wark ; rahe thoi even! ja) He estimated the babies weighed
: ¢ a de adc nunist. Pp th r. Nishimury, who prewented hi -
i ee ” Ren house even if ‘he lost Conscious-}% Toulon haa Sastil EY: sveduitala +h President Mihoent hotween two amid three pounds 4
The French agree that Tunisian | ness, We signed a stntement to] ionne, was 4186 ordered to’ appear: Auriol on Tuosday to baoorne tic h and measite about 12 inches
reforms are in order but they are protect his family from any] >ut disappeared from his home| ifirst Nippon Envoy w France long. First qt tie quadruplets,
split on how far to go.—U.P, possible legal action over his] before police arrived. lsince the.end of World Wor ,{the irk was born at 10.23 \ p.m,
death. Two more arrests were made in told the preas he will work toward|#0'T then came the boys at 11.13,
Lages: Tail piece to the news oe geo but Ora cat better understanding between the 11,24 and 11,29.
of th airlir 1 >S i ‘efused 1o disclose who the per- ; ;
ctnekemaadod th ae eee sons arrested were ant indicated! R.S.M. Marshall, H. B. G, about to lob a Mills 36 Hand Grenade before he makes the squad which he ie Waid Be hoped trade relations cet Oke mir | ota mend
een oe tan: 5 5 sstsakal waa Ayer wet has been instructing, fire one cach, 0 ade reMVons) sid all were “normal and gooc
| Sapeeinn school children are un- ee ag Pk ng agp ; between France and Japan soonlsized”, The births were fifty days
able to take the General Certifi- | ieee nents ne aes e Will be expanded “for the benefit] premature but Mrs, Manning has |
cate of Education on the scheduled | ©@'led out new searches yester- ‘ of our countries.” He said}; een confined at the hospital for |
seo eee iar“ tomer oes! BQrbados Regimen ee a
; +: diaacs aidan patie 7 : as! ’ ‘1 the past several weeks in antici-
were aboard the plane, and now en oe city but results of the} Japan was greater than that of pation of an early arrival. At
the children must wait till dupli- a ee ee eee or wilt eat any other country. French cul-| one time she had been told to ex-
cates eae sah out from London. terior Charles Brune said ibe ee A B til d QO B W l , | tute has always been respected in} cost possible birth of quintuplets
as mn: e erma x : : ots he . Japan,-—-U.P, rut ex-rays la ’
star of “Call Me Madam”, fe A ee rae Gane ak see a egi oun a e Ss . bs ag ith a oh mi Hy ao
eenre Mexico, for a divorce. Brite Switzerland a demand NEW COL. SECRETARY 'mmediatel following each
e@ quipped to reporters: “Just aie aoe ; * ‘OR HAMAS ee 2 oe :
fal che nien, r z *' | 1 taking measures to remove per- I J E " F . F BA bi:th a Catholic priest baptized the
—LES. oe Se. positions in all gov- n en nds' RAINING LONDON, June 18 babtes. Then they were taken
| mment and defence offices whose | | J 4 | Anthony G, H, Gardner Brown) from the delivery room to incuba-
ie et nee as Saeex V e 43, eg oe eos me oor tors. Dr. Ryan who once deliv-
r f iS? e netions ey ti - jmee has been appointed Brit-| cred triplets sald the Manning
U.N. Would Agree oxercise." aca on f sh Colonial Secretary in the} quucruplets would remain in in-
; 7 rod Uae hoes arrests wrncwonak sine A : ae He succeeds G. P jet ators until they weighed five
¢ y as experts are pour- ALOe D , i ——(C.P, | poun :
To Rescreening ng over tons of seized eae puaste Oesten Unden, Foreign Minister pettel Whe i retiring: OF . LP Fr sill caching stabiledbe
raeae oe . > ‘rom recent police raids, The,returned from an interrupted WALKERS, St. Andrew, was a veritable battleground
“well, Well, Feather- ed 7 ; ‘ ea Menta toile tx cy racath Swe ; wareeetnyer) hee! foie rs ae
spoon, our fears of the R Prisoners Tih eee ek ee bapa Ned ny gg od mgs 5 yesterday when the Advoeate visited that area. The spite-
~ bene piven to am MUNSAN, Korea, June 19. “—""""| Soviet troops plunged into next| ful pinging of the .303 Lee Enfield Rifle, the purposeful
re dies adi Major General William Harri-| $2M. OFFERED FOR door Finland in 1939, The score} ehatter of the Bren Light Machine Gun, the ominous roar
ee son, senior U.N. Truce delegate, BUTLIN’S RESORT stood at one and perhaps two! of the two-inch mortar bomb and the impassioned thud of
Â¥ intimated that United Nations Swedish planes shot down by | the Mills 36 Hand Grenade, al! ioined together in a martial
London Srorees Service would agree to rescreening of LONDON, June 19, |Sovict fighters as Unden arrived a af ~ ; dai . i 4
f . . ‘ Communist prisoners of war be-| William C. Dunn of Chicago|by air from Italy. | discord of sound. ; ; :
Lawrie A pointed fore an armistice to determine how] ‘#8 Offered $2,254,000 for the) Sweden last night rejected in a te Meee, WAS, SOE Aes 8h: ERS “7
’ P many Reds want to return home. titra_medern vacation viliage on /note to Mocew the Soviet charge , the tae ieee a or i hnide 6“
“t with C vnist #-he Grand Bahama Island which|that a Swedish plane last Monday f ; cises In the nills in the Walkers
To Overseas Food 2 oe or’ agent eae tans ost its British builders $5,600,000 ;opened fire on Soviet fighters, It 3 Rescued From , area, carrying out part of the
ey aes. : Sete. tei nk . i was generally felt here that Rus- \ training programme at their An-
¢ touchy prisoner exchange stale- 2efore they ran short of cash. | § ) ere that Ru T’ 2 Wi pa RE de a
Corporation mate blocking the Korean arm-{ _ Proposals for the sale wer dis- | 6 aed taken the offensive.againat rain ‘reckage ee eee re numbers 7 am ,
istice. Harrison has offered re-|-iosed yesterday to shareholders }|wecen. asia 1 me 800. AY t A Wh i
THE Secretary of State for the|peatedly to rescreen prisoners if the company formed by Billy! Hope was all but lost for the MEXICO CITY, June 19. one Se coe hye ores A co C. F tS,
Colonies, Mr. Oliver Lyttelton,/after an armistice is signed. Butlin, Britain's vacation resort|Tecovery of the Swedish airforce Rescue crews recovered ah i aaee rae ae * ne: ae y * tip
has appointed Mr. Angus Lawrie,| Little or nothing has been said] «ing. jDakota, a “Flying Clisoon” which|} three bodies from — the whrtped hie r been omit + oie Po ie bp: ‘
of the Nairobi firm of accountants,}of another screening before an} It is believed that they will| Vanished last Friday with a crew)} wreckage of a small freight is sain ph 7a " the dines ro f nd,
Angus Lawrie, Jeremy and Co., | armistice. Meanwhile U.N. nego-} 1¢cept the offer, | of three and five radio students. train which derailed thirty spa n a 7 =) Tie tata
as 4 part-time member of the|tiators are ignoring the Commun- Dunn, Chairman of the Mer-| 4 laboratory specialist is ati miles south of here yester- |/ training.
Board of the Overseas Food Cor-,ist protest against a three-day chant Distillers Institute in studying a damaged life raft from day and toppled into a L pas be |
poration. Mr. Lawrie’s appoint-|recess in the truce talks reportedly f Chicago will form a new. company ie Dakota al: oSnee want eran -eot dam. Six persons were in- || Falling Plate |
ment will be for an. unspecified |considering even a longer pause} to buy the West Indian vacation |) Tan GAT ise bs ‘ilet hy ie ae jured, 1 alleen RAR ae kaa
period, determinable by the Sec-]to deprive Reds of the propaganda f village which is still not finished, pe - Cadet suenlaain that! | cccenad agate an Gical the
retary of State for the Colonies. platform.—UP. = el =(C-P0 the Dakota was shot down when | Authorities said they did camp site proper, covering rough-
IN “SNIPERS GULLY” i \bigadered qver Soviet HAVA! lL were riding in tbe “train's || 17_cur sree, cnet tren, woebens
ssf ; ‘bf |manoéuvres in the Baltic. : a ain's || were keenly contesting the Fall-
orn ees | Sweden has.admitted that one | ony cars but feared more | ing Plate competition, This con-
jof the Catalinas flew over Soviet rhe. ee oe soups. sists of six targets at 100 yards
} a mid-
|



Communists told West Germans to greet “Plague Gen- es ott, Camp Comm dunt, the
i Sieh ae ot dens da tae sokserthstress le ey Advocate saw riflemen put °
| er al Ridgw ry with strik 3, mas ; de mons trations, at ds in-! through thelr paces through Scotch Whisky :
flict defeat on him which he will never forget”. A call tO|*“Snipers’ Gully” This is a GUARANTEED ;
arms was sounded by Neus Deutshrand, official Soviet Zone! gully cut ou : i soi OLD MATURED
| Communist party newspaper lon that ¢ Oe ra re
| The Communist newspaper said, police “t n to erect a wall on ReTSoe * a ne
Ridgway is coming to Germany to Glienicke Farm through which} : “oe ‘tbe a ot Aereénte ’
inspect “territory from which an| the zonal border runs. ‘The farm! ,, |} mot Seid reel Sted tha
atteck egainst the German Demo-| land belongs to the Soviet zone s Cuore ae . routed fled *
cratic Republic, the People’s De-|Germany and the farmhouse to te Bost arinees |
mecracies and Soviet Union is to) West Berlin. ily to hat ‘st? e troo Ss )
be prepared just as two years ago West Berlin newspaper said +! The rifle mer ob i n ther ature z
(Republican Foreign Affairs Ad- Soviet zone were wrecking t f mopping up operations and he a J
viser) John Foster Dulles inspect- summer homes of West Berliners pas to go through the gully whera) :
ed South Korean attack bases”. in the Soviet zone. West Ber! there have been targets cunning-
| Meanwhile Communists took ers still have not rece i trave ly erected at vantage points â„¢ GARDINER AUSTINEC? Hs 4
A RIFLEMAN is seen here giving it to one of the “Snipers” as be is put through his paces in “Snip- new steps to seal off West Berlin’ permits to enter the zone to pro- When he comes suddenly upon} i ———— Agents ————-—-
ers’ Gully” by Lt. Sydney Lashley. : \from the Soviet zone. People’s tect their property @ On Page 5 | 9

{

|
}

territory Jast Friday but said it
was unarmed. On ‘Monday’ an-
other Catalina was shot down by
two Seviet MIG 15 fighters. Seven
crewmen were saved—-U.P,

die-aged man and two
children—a boy and a girl-
both about ten years of age.







German Communists Want
Huge Anti-Ridgway Riots

BERLIN, June 19.

East German Communists called for riots greater than
those that took place in France when General Matthew B.
Ridgeway, S..A.PE. Commander, arrives in West Germany

on Monday.









| ranee and six more targets at 500
yards and the sections which
knocked these over in the short-

est time are the winners, In the
case of a tie the section with
the highest number of rounds of
ammunition remaining is the win-
ner. Each detail of six is furnish-
ed with 50 rounds of ammunition
per man,

The competition is keener he-
cause battle sites are used on the
Lee Enfield rifle and there is no
adjustment to the set ranges of
4290 and 600 yards,



ee enemies



Ve %

Snipers’ G
Snipers’ Gully GILBEY'S

On a conducted tous of the
| Trtiping area be Major O. F, C
Vv














my

PAG. TWO

wai







Caub Calling




Zarbados Regi
He was a



ol. "RT. Miche ©
t ocunandsnt of Local Forces and
Cup. W. A. #armer, one of _hisf
1.D.Ce. oa a
Off to Berlin <
=
‘AR CG. BH. ADAMS, CMG.
Ava Leader of the House of

embly,

ay T C. A., for Bermuda on his way ,
w Bor din via’ New York and
EA He has gone to attend
tings of the Executive Board
f of the General Council
.he International Congress of Fr
Lrade Unions (LC.F.T.U.),

The first meeting he said will
for two days and the
about a week He will the

eturh to London and will remair’
in England for about three wee!
having interviews with the Secre-



for

tary. of State for the Colonies anc ®

other people,

Mri Adams will also see his wif
in Bhgland on his way to and
trom Berlin as well as their son
‘Yom who is at Maudlin College,
Cxtord doing Modern Greats,

LLENCY THE GOvV-

left yesterday morning


















MR. G. H. ADAMS, ©.M.G.
Spent Six Weeks

RS. JOHN MOULSDALE,
ne of Mr, C. C. Skeeie,
of Agriculture, returned

| to England yesterday morning by
T.C.A,, via Canada

it is probable that he will be %* Weeks’ holiday with her rela

ttending one of the in
. Her Majedty the Queen who
will be awarding honours in Mid-
_July and will receive this C.MLG.
En Route To Dominica
"a AAJOR General Dermott Dun-
LWib lop, Seeurity Officer for
Overseas duties attached to the
Colonial Office, was intransit. from
St. Vincent yesterday. meérhing



tives’ at Codrington, She w as
accompanied by her little daughter
Caroline and hey sister Susan,
former stutent at the Conyent’ of
the Good Shepherd who will now
be going to school in England.

U.S. Visitors Leave

ETURNING
yesterday

to the U.S.A.
morning. b y

for Dominica by B.G, Airwave, B.W.1.A, via Antigua and Puerto

He is now continuing his tour ofgfRico were Mr.

the West Indies.

Major General Dunlop wh
acts in an advisory capacity t
all Colonial Governors. and Gove
ernments will be going to West.

Africa int September and Central

and East Africa towards the end
of the year.

intransit

i. from Trinidad by
T.C.A., yesterday morning on
‘heir way back to Canada were
Myr, and Mrs. F. Ivan

who were in Trinidad for the past
five days,

Mr, Howard is President of
Woodville and Co., (Canada) Ltd.,
with offices in Trinidad and an
affiliate office, K. J. Hamel-Smith
and Co. Ltd., in Barbados,

While in the Caribbean, Mr.
Howerd paid visits to British
Guiana and Venezuela on business
in the interest of his firm,

After Five Months

IPTER spending “ve months’
holiday in Barbados, Miss
Norma Albrant of Montreal, re-
turned home yesterday morning
by T.C.A, She was staying as a
guest of Mr, and Mrs. L, D. Frost
of River Plantation, St. Philip

Mr. Frost and. Miss Albrant’s
father served together in the
“Canadian Army during the last
wher,

“and Mr.

Edward Robinson,
Treasurer . of the Rockefeller
Foundation, Mr. H. H Bellows, a
stock broker of New York City
J. Gazecki, a Wall Street
business man They were holi-
daying here for the past five days
staying at the Aquatic Club.

Contractor From Trinidad

R,. MOHAMED ESACK, con-
tractor of Carapichaina,
Trinidad, arrived yesterday morn-
ing by B.W.1.A. for a short holi-

day is staying at Sandy
Bosch pow,

\Iso altiving from Trinidad
yeste-day bv B.W.1I.A. was Mrs,
V. Pig's ‘| who has come over
to join ther Mr. Hasmatali
at Indie: Cuest House, Wor-
thing

) Pi vrelall expects to be
here for about two weeks.
Back to Canada

TAFF Sgt. C, Ww. Anderson of

the Roye! Canedian Mounted
Police who was in ! »ados for six
weeks training ite Mounted

Police, returned to Canada yester-
day by T.C.A,, to resume his
duties in Ottawa,

He said that he had’a pleasant

stay in the island which he liked
very much and added that the ;
men of the Mounted Force were a
keen bunch,

after spending

a

Sugar Agronomist







* A* Py. £ TURNER, Sugar
Ly. Agyronor attached to
Colonial Development and Wel-
fe ri ‘ sarters in Trini-
t for St. Kitts yesterday

' B.W.1.A. after p:

iort routine yisit. He

ste ying at the Oceah View Hote



Mr. Turner expects to visit
Acdugus before’ returning to
Trini@ad.

U.S. Army Officer
T. WILLIAM L. JONES
Infantry, U.S. Army,
dete for Antigua and Puerte Rico

sterday morning by B.W.1.A.
tor the U.S.A. He came down
here from Korea three weeks ago
to see his sick father in Church
Village, St. Philip,

Lt. Jones is now on his way to
Camp Kilmer in New Jersey and
will be re-assigned from there to
Germany,

G,F.S, Anniversary
GIRLS’ FRIENDLY SO-
CIETY will be observing
their anniversary on Sunday 22nd
June, They will be attending a
Service at St. Cyprian’s Church
at 9.30 a.m. when there will be
a procession, sung Eucharist and

of

the

sermon. The Very Reverend the i

Dean will
- Preacher,

Acting Puisne Judge

RRIVING from St. Vincent

yesterday morning by B.G.
Airways were Mr. Justice
Manning and Mrs. Manning who
will be here for a few days stay-
ing at Enmore Hotel.

Mr. Manning who is Acting
Puisne Judge of the Windward
and Leeward Islands will be going
on to St. Kitts and Antigua on
Monday.

For U.K. Holiday
R. K. E. McKenzie, Manager
of Neil's Plantation and Mrs.
McKenzie, left for Canada yester-
day morning by T.C.A., where

be Celebrant and





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

e s
Piddingtons
Will Leave
LONDON
The original Commonwealth en-
‘tainments team, the Piddin,
tons, are quitting the stage
cutumn after a brilliant three-
year world tour.
Financially, at any rate, their
ctit looks like being as spectacu-
lay as their entry was audacious
i. «1949. Strictly according to
plan, which was to make some
vorey as quickly as possible as}
highly organised telepathy act,
‘ney now intend to transfer the
‘ack balance to their native

‘ustralia and start raising a
family,






jz

style.

It was made by Miss Nancy

the executive committee

Their biggest financial Al beral Federation
‘hough will not be the result meine. is Feally, no ight-hear
ne of their tours, but the sale human being
cf the copyright * ” of their fe. °

Miss

technique, They ate see thies, devoted wife and

ported to have refused

This is not so avaricious as it
sounds for The Piddingtons’ earn-
ings have varied enormously.

ay man hi
Two of their best weeks in 000 a year. They
Britain were at the Pailadium ge an karte tek eae
;where they were paid £600, and the family outings because

frank
fe are aoe =
Their radio turn-in. Britain

however, tho it ran for over a Another enjoy taking his
year after ing planned as a children on Sundays for an occasional day
single broadcast — is believed to bo ton. Even with a picni> iunch Touay

nearly

Food and wine

4 rr them less = either
of these weeks, et, when
Lesley Piddington thought-send
over the Atlantic or inside a
diving bell under water the B.B.C.
insuted her for £5,000.

os ee has controversy raged

so fiercely round a pair of artists.
The hon. secretary of the Occult
‘Committee of the Magic Circle
stake his reputation at the time
on the opinion that the Pidding-
tons use “normal methods” for
their mystifying act. In other
words, he indicated it was naive

and
; for
£1 3

Besnn

Husband No.
theatre



ENLEEW ASCROFT looks into the LSD of taking out a wife

NIGHT OUT
FOR TWO

£4—and stili going up

is becoming increasingly difficult fof the average man
Minimum cost
tor

to afford an evening out with his wife
of a theatre, and dinner in the West End afterwards
two, is now £2 for a modest evening-——but "4 at least for
am evening out in anything approaching the pre-war

An expense allowance for the family man, for the
maintenance of family goodwill, is a novel suz-
nat may be put before the Chancetlor of

juer,

tee, at
it brought tent and Te ager aate at the
relaxation. especial);

stressed this when she sai
mother will eventually fee! she
ines seen lask 5 the inside

1 ask 50 husbands

IT have conducted a quiz et 50
usban:

ess men.
at they ee te ene to cut

A
were enough to admit that family
will suffered in consequence.
fi. can mana
onth,” one you ~ husban id
me. (£1 os a tune plus 6s. for | : baby-sitter
used to

H*®::; are three acto er evening-

.; dinner
£2 5s.; drinks in
the interval and programme 5s

2 always fixes a

dinner and dancing

on aeras and wedding anni-

eu —— rete any-
days.



FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 1952








Seear, a mene of
@ recent Women's

ea. Kvery
the
id; “the most

of her own house.”

proxl-
include ye wervants,

expense.
ae ae the

wife and ie

vit

” has just been divorced
for cruelty
There were. of course. other

pee ype of cruelty cited in can





Simone Silva's six-change evening
dress blue tulle over a besic
taffeta and tulle petticoat, Halter
neckline is of white guipure lace.
See ; Six-change Dress,



out sne husband is
7 views to-morrow on

‘ain Lay oe a iiking to ee ‘ problems, 23-year-old Sylvia
ane t for £ ap ear me her honeymoon advice :
tre pe other ener bed sd ya Jne week is too short,” she Says,
Ts ack in wamration tei wives nate essential ‘to have

; j mi even a short one.
There 1s Try ‘MP fot Wolver: gmeylous price. To-day’s price: provides a more gradual transi-
hampton Mr Enoch John ion between her old life
Powell who cooks breakfast Whitehall look anc new housekeeping duties for

every morning and is a curry
specialist.

Peter Ustinov is
enthusiastic cook. He

the bride

Six-change dress

© all male civil servants look
alike? Twenty-four-year-old
See eae Miss Betty Humphfey

He thinks so.

an
has

GIRL who always gets her
they will spend a couple of weeks an — Png on iven me his recipe for a special Addressing a civil service confer A & picture in the papers, Simone
witha aie. MicKennic’s relatives ©© credit them with anything but which he serves with ence at Prestatyn, she said that Silva is a youn actress with

a sliperb sense of showmanship, pee ett. or cold meat and salad “Civil servants look much the jdeas about cloth <
: t lothes. She désigns
and then go on to England for On the other hand, early in the ot Peotis dinners: same the world over.” her own dresses and many are
about three and a half months’ proadcast series an tenepunders Cut a French loaf in fiiges not quite Miss Humphrey might nave easy to copy. }
holiday, judge at a Pid ac- No, 3 like likes to ae Poeaes Pe bot i tee aeies om OREVETION 10 WE os nas tote of evening gowns, but
To Work in Canada cused the B.B.C, SS tooling the otis hs athe to the chopped a gloves of nati and Afver watching nundr ot Lon- teduces their cost by Having ope
public” by treating the programme] © eee have a oe spread both sides of each slice don’s women civil sek vants on petticoat base. made with ayers
bread. Putin the oven and hea their way to work I findthat the Of pale blue taffeta and_ tulle.
. JOHN gp gag eal & as an entertainment instead of a] . local uit (jacket Over this she wears different
Vincent, scientifi tion. Cost 16s R ge dices, with just \ f
St, t, scientific investiga’ 7 : un, rabbit, run c short-sleeved white Ss. with just one layer o
atri morning by When the opposition countered as # is the louse, White or co.oured sandals tulle in the skirt a blue,
B.G left later in with of “subtle have to say “No, we [> ABBIT, served instead of veal, Cusually low-heeled) nylons no royal blue. mauve, pink or
i ee ee can’t ‘ord it,” it is even more drew protests from a of hat, plastic handbag and arti- yellov—she can add to them
the day by T.C.A. for methods simulating telepathy 90 for the women. Americans at London Airport's ficial pearls. Favourite colour indefinitely There is also one
wh inne as diesel for the radio,” Sydney eee Most wives are working barder resaurant—sod an apology from | Choice for suits: blue. grey and wet Diack. lace | ibis Seas
amond Con~ ~ ommi observed to-lay their hom BO. . unwelcome awn y| ske um e
ate nm. Company, of New ing 1 eee to put ieee they ‘an “—. on im @ restaurant. rabbit disguised H a forget-me-not tulle top over he
B eee Set oe aes roe .¢ 85 chiexen or veal can be usefu! oneymoons basic petticoat, vodice is
r ; ; — telepathy as entertain- So Suande who ite, at home cooking. H°w% y long should a honeymoon teamined with wos guipure lace.
men back makes good escal mi is st
R. Sma tan -MAC- In aiken of this alleged £ 10,000 shout put item to The leg : Hon. The df Service say “six days mauve and pink velvet flowers.
\ says: “I have make Tame rabbit must be used for these “paid leave” for permanents. The pink one has a huge cab
_ were mar- = a th next SOON before ys amo dishes ( three days for temporaries (the rose at the waist, with petal
ge if on Saturday at r ere is a secret. cost of entertaining goes 38. and. 4s. a lib; or classifications apply io the sta’l dropping down the skirt
Peter's lcan lurch are have always xid audiences: q 16s. each ane, Ee ces Wild pot their marriages). Another idea for the girl with one
ora in Bi los_ spending their leave it to you to judge.’” rabbit ate too io Ag To More romantic Mig x taken by fur evening stole Simone me has
} ferri 2 gtons ne: , the wild rabbit mafriage exper orman anc a satin lining to mi each
Mth sgt at “Merriville”, Rock pre Save Ss te Beedle eg Husband cooks Seiey is the increase. pone Sylvia Child w who run joint mar- dress. which clips in with press
wr followed. the setting of the Ni ta
ley. oO} ie Nip- riage hepiiness courses in Croy- studs. Fur tails can be oe
Mrs. the former a PR ma nguishing in . taking ver a i on today that more believe that two on at each end. Luxury to
Miss Sheila ~ prisoner-of-war cam p, his fore Ae aoa in their weeks J8 ies mi hl eatceg, to ssntrolder Re name in tiny
forests snetente B Before leaving every lin
of Marie studied telepathy with a comrade. ee conference, where this perfect WORLD GOPYRT out RESERVED
the late dee After rel he found i
and a mate n m much me ee a couple will give their Loudon Express Service,

en

Sui *
ind ed aoe maf 8 J.
&on,



The St. Michael’s Infirmary

The St. Michael’s Almshouse,
situated at Beckles Road, was
established over sixty years ago
for the destitute, sick and for
housing of the aged and poor.

The administrative duties are
in the hand of a Superintendent
guided by the Churchwardens
and Boards of Guardians. The
Parochial Medical Officers of the
parish visit the Institution, The
Foatae and females are kept in
separate compounds, The male
section has 210 and the female
247. ‘There is also a Children’s
Ward which contains 46 children
--23 girls and 23 boys. All the
inmates ar@ supervised by the
Matron and a staff of trained
nurses,

Many of the children in resi-
dence were born in the Institu-
tion while others were taken
there by ee of means, &
These are well lk after and
when they reach the age of Ld
gre instructed in elementary sub-
jects by a Schoolteacher, Some
of these children are transferred
io the Nightingale Memorial
Home when they are disc!
from the Institution in their mid-
teens,

The Maternity Ward has accom-
modation for 20 mothers and their

abies, To date there are 11 ex-
pectant mothers receiving pre-
nalal care and nine others in
Desidence,

During the day the women sit
and chat while some of the
stronger Ones read to the sick. mn
cheerful atmosphere. prevails and
with Rediffusion a few books
and magazines, they make the
best of these opportunities,

Religious services are perform-
ed by the Chaplain every Sunday.
Cormmunion is admi red to
the inmates once monthly. Work
is not compulsory but some of
the women assist the needlework~-
er in making garments for the in-
rates. Others occupy themselves
by making rag mats,

Superintendents

I tnink that I would be voicing
the sentiment of a great number



in the

of people and srpectany ae
y giving

parish of St. Michael
public recognition to the
Waites . (grandfather, father and
son) who are chiefly responsible
for administrative success of the
Institution. This family has ren-
dered exemplary service in the
administration of the St. Michael’s
Infirmary over a period of many
years,

Mr. Harold Waite is now the
Superintendant. His grand father
served for twenty-nine years and
his father for thirty-one years.
Mr, Harold Waite who succeedea
his father, has entered upon his
twenty-second year of service.

During their lerms of office
many improvements have been
effected, The Superintendent's
iy ge have been converted into

ing and recreation room for
the nurses; a wing has been added
to. house the ers: the nurses’
kitehén has” extended; and
the old nurses’ dormitory’ has
been enlarged and new quarters
neve been built for the nursing
staff.

Special mention must-be made
of the Laundry, There are 15
Jaundresses and this department
with its mechanical equipment
ean be compared with the best in
any other Institution. The admin-
istration building store room and
the kitchen have been renovated,
Gas has also been installed.

TB. Ward

A Clinic and dispensary have
been provided at the Parochial
Building and a T.B. Ward has
been built in the precincts of the
Institution. New Superintendent’s
quarters have bé@n built in recent
years, All ‘these improvements
and more have been brought
about by Mr, Harold Waite.

The inmates ko +) up communi-
cation with relatives and friends
who are allows’ fo visit on
Wednesday$. At Chrigtinas oer
Seventh Day “AcVentis.,

Street Boys, St. Michael's ON
Giris, James Street and St.
Patricks, render carols to the in-

Just Received

CHILDS’ PRAMS AND PUSH CARTS

PUSH CARTS .........

PRAMS

MADE BY THE LEADING BRITISH MANUFACTURER.

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

427)

DIAL



YOUR SHOE STORES

A

w





mates, There is also a_ special
treat and gifts are presented to

hree them. The Mobile Cinema also

visits and the Police Band renders ©
programmes of music. e=
fimes the children are taken to
see films,

On a visit to the Institution the
Advocate was much impressed by
the administration of this Institu-

tion and those responsible must
be congratulated for the work
done. A comfortable Institution

for the benefit of the old people
and the underprivileged is in-

deed a great service,





ck VSSwoRD



1. Does fen,
2 mittle
&. al
4
5.
8
7.
tie
ig. Where

ot \
1, “Winter: -5, ora :
10, 14, Pam: 15.
Novelty; : 2y:
Pier: Be, 5
Nominate: 4 =
Seale Ave! aig nde:

$18.50 $21.00 $30.90
$59.00

DIAL 4606

j
|

ees Spee Sas








PP SCSISSR,

EEO FR


















epher- ton was again entertaining troops
med ontered. pack te ROME, June 19

ck to une 19,
England with spinal] Ingrid Bergman and her hus-
disc. She arrived on a stretcher, }band = Italian Film Director

but has recovered.

Still well under 30, Lesley had
stage pretensions at three, when
her father, Rear-Acmiral Pope,
tried to dissuade her. He has
since admitted: “When she play-
ed Wendy in Peter Pan I knew I
was beaten,”

Bagasse Newspapers
Are Successful
SAVANNAH, Georgia.

Roberto Rossellini ran up against
an old Italian law Thursday and

had to think of a new name for
one of the Swedish actress’ new-
born twins.

The Rossellinis picked
“Isabelle” as the name for the
first arrival and “Ingrid” for the
second. But they were reminded




















‘ngrid Bergman Meets Snag In Naming Child

Ss

LALA ‘WHEATRES







od

OOS “oe

BARBAREES 1 TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
(DIAL 5170) AND CONTINUING DAILY



PLAZA

that Italian law stipulated that a
child’s name must not be the same
as either of the parents,

Friends who visited Miss Berg-
man said the actress was inclined
toward the Swedish name!
“Astrid” for the.second daughter
but would retain Ingrid as the
middie name, Miss Bergman's
two year old son Robertino met] *
his twin sisters today and told his| ;:
mother he liked them, — ti

SRA ESS






THE GREATEST
ADVENTURER

Rae

“’ “The

ALAA
We





"TEM
QCHARD GREE







oo
A Cuban sctentist) who has | REE 3 with Patricia Medina,
ow ‘ are See ’ (ial 2at0) i (Dial 5170) ! (Dial 8404) ‘ =
newsprint from canoes as seen 445 & 8.20 ‘| veasy 4.45 & 2 2) Today & Tom@lew
it successfully gunn to turn out y mtinuing Daily)! Goutinalag Dany 145 © 090 P EMPIRE ROXY
newspapers vannah, Georgia i b {| Douglas Fairbanks, crJ} SOUTH SEA SINNER » TO-DAY Only 4.30 & 8.15
The Savannah Morning News i BE ACADEMY nS es beironald ec anew PODAT 6 0. ae PM George RAFT in
printed ‘more. thah 2 "O00" siewie- 1 AWARD WENNER! Ic N si ciaechaentes DANCER TIME OUT POST IN MOROCCO
ae . AT " > and
page inserts on bagasse news-| } A STREETCAR ||FIGHTING OFLYNN | “Sait mass’ ee orauaine beliy TEE
print as part of its regular morh- N Yvonne De CARLO ‘Robert MITCHUM - song. RUSSILI 9 NO
ing edition, with the presses run- AMED DESIRE INCH BY INCH sciiaiaeemaiesigincagaion Lele keds et ae
ning at full speed and tension.]} { © Marion BRANDO Showing HIGH Jump-|| Sat, Special 1.80 p.m. HIS KIND OF WwoMAN TOMORROW to TUES. 445 & 8.15
Th Vivien LEIGH ing, Plat Racing Bte, ‘ William HOLDLEN
@ paper had already made { Chartes STARRETT
wat _ tt Sat. 1.0 P.M. Sai. Midnite Brian DONLEVY
shorter test runs and the printers} |) § Special 9) & TW | : Doublg FIGHTING in
sald that the new paper with-|'} “Bau MToUDS TE |. Acton "reed “avtemil] “NECA SS lll wantvontan | RADAR SUBMARINE. COMMAND
stood the tension well under] }) «reTURN of the oe eet «souTn OF and ie
normal publication conditions, { DURANGO Kip" “RED DESERT SODRATH VALLEY’ SPORTING rand Ti SAT. MID-NETE SPECIAL,
) Choties STARRE CHANCE SPY KING trankte LANE. in
Senor Joaquin de la Roza, who ties Den BARRY & = pe MAKE BALIEVE BALL ROOM
produced the bagasse paper, Midnite Sat ’ eee eee OLYMPIC ne
believes that the newsprint can anne aa FRONTIER eer ee oncas COWBOY ana the INDIANS
“ “RS RUDE” a ah 1a TO-DAY to MON 4 & 8.15 with
tt prota’ Sos as little as £24 Zina, WAKELY & REVENGE Whip WILSON & Lon MeCALLISTER Gene AUTRY
a ton uba’s present rate ofa | “COLORADO AMBUSH” i LASH LA RUB “WESTERN Preston WOSTER. ——-—
sugay production, he said, thal) Jonnny Mack BROWN | Fuzzy Si, JOHN RENEGADES" i
\ y N 2 3 in
island could turn out 4,000,000 SaaS SSS THE BIG CAT ROYAL
tons cf bagasse newsprint a year. 6 i

—B.U.P.



Listening Hours

FRIDAY,
4 Eiaalleienetctbiad an

June 20
. 19.76 M. 26.53 M

00 p.m. The News, 4.10. p.m. The
y Setvice, 415 p.m. Chartie Kunz,
p.m. Bedtime With Braden, 5,00
Cricket, 6.05 pm Lewn Tennis
5.15 p.m
} Mecchar
pm

dn



iC ©
bie dsc 10.90 pony.

7. 18 p.m, West Indian Dik ary, 4. 45 p.m,



Seng & Dance, 8.15 p.m Padio News-
veel, 0.29 p.n:. World Affairs, 8.45 p.m
loteclude, 8.55 p.m. Pion the Pditorials,
0.00 p.m. Ring Up ihe Cuitain, 10,00
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10.15 p.m. The Debate € 16





From the Ti me



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POSSE EEO PITT P EP HOF
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FRIDAY, JUNE

20,

“a,

1952



300 New Books Will

Go Into Circulation

MANY book lovers rubbed their
yesterday as they looked throu

hands with pleasure
h the some 300 books which

o
=

were put on preview on Wednesday at the Public Library
prior to going into circulation on Saturday. ‘

Throughout the day a regular number of readers visit-
ed the preview room, though there were never more than

a dozen or so at a time.

The new books include
celebrities, and classics.

The reader who loves to read
the material James Boswell wrote
and likes the way he did it, will
be glad to know that Boswell’s
London Journal-Boswell’s Papers,
the largest and most important fing
of ‘English literary manuscript
ever made, is included among the
books. These papers enormously
enrich a knowledge of Boswell,
Dr. Jchnson and’ their eontem-
Poraries, besides events of the
second half of the 18th century.
In this Boswell is seen with some
of Pepys’ frankness and trust-
worthiness and Rousseau’s self
analysis—the dissection of motives
which makes the book’ so
interesting.

Aneurin Bevar’s “In Place Of
Fear” is also one of the books to
be in circulation on Saturday. In
this book you get an insight into
Bevan’s political life. When Bevan
entered politics about the end of
‘tthe 1914—18 great war, as a young
miner in a South Wales colliery,
his concern was with one practi-
cal question, he writes — where
power was in that state of Great
Britain and how it could be
attained by the workers.

“In Place of Fear”

In “In Place of Fear”, he
touches such subjects as Poverty,
The Rule of Parliament—Active
or Passive, Modern Man and
Modern Society, Private and
Collective Spending and the much
talked of Free Health Services,
besides other subjects.

With America’s Presidential
election so near at hand and

Eisenhower so much in_ the
spotlight, Gunther's “Eisen-
hower” will be of interest: to

many, Gunther has presented

the world with this book on the

General after searching through

every nook and cranny of his

eareer. In this book he is de-
scribed as being potentially the
most important man in the

Western World, the firat man

since William the Conqueror to

launch an invasion across the

English Channel and the first

American since Washington who

eould have had strong backing

for nomination as a Presidential
candidate from whichever par-
ty he chose.

Still fresh in one’s mind are
the headlined Count Folke Berna-
dotte made and now “To Jerusa-
lem,” the Paléstine journal of the

Count up ‘to the time of his
assassination, has been acquired
in this new collection for the

Barbados public. It is a day to day
record of difficult and dangerous
negotiations from which the per-
sonality of ‘the Count emerges
even more clearly than it did from
the calm retrospect of “Instead
of Arms.”
“Report From Formosa”

And with Formosa and China
taking important places in world
affairs, “Report from Formosa” by
H. Maclear Bate and Rene Grous-
set’s “The Rise And Splendour
Of The Chinese Empire’ will be of
much interest,

many contemporary subjects,

Formosa, the mysterious island
which may hold the keys of war
and peace, is very little known
to the outside world. Opinion on
Bate’s book is that it is the most
comprehensive account of the
island since Davidson's monu-
mental work pubiished 49 years
ago.

Comminism is such a force in
the world today that Paul Blan-
shard's “Communism, Democracy
and Catholic Power” is bound to
be of interest. His theme is “Two
great systems of power” and the
bock

jis a study of the dual

struggie for the soul of the
demoé¢ratic world,
Sport

Then in the field of sport there
is * ‘John L. Sullivan’ py Nat
Fleischer, This gives round by
round descriptions of his im-
portant fighis with such boxers
as Ryan, Corbett—the only man
by whom he was defeated—Jake
Kilrain and others, But besides
dealing with “John L.”, the book
has an appendix with a wealth
of interesting information.

For instance, it tells you that
from 1934 to 1950, through bouts,
exhibitions, televisions and radio
appearances, Joe Louis made
$4,298,812.72. It contains, too, a
history of the heavyweight cham-
pionships from the last of the
bare knuckle contests to the time
when Ezzafd Charles beat Joe
Walcott for the title. This history
starts from 1882 when Paddy
Ryan was knocked out by John
L. Sullivan,

The “must” for many will be
the “Who Is Who In World
Cricket” in which Frankie Worrell
is described as one of the most
brilliant right hand batsmen of the
world. A text to a picture of
Worrell in this book, reads—
Worrell whose batting in England
in 1950 gave untold delight. In
this book Weekes is “One of the
world’s greatest batsmen—Brad-
man type—annihilator of bowling.”

In the cricket line, too, there is
also Neville Cardus’ “Cricket All
The Year,”

Besides cricket, there are
“Cycling” by Rex Coley, Footbali
by Billy Steel, “The Weekend
Golfer” and other games and past-
times such as hand balancing.

Arts And Crafts

The new books also include
some on varioug arts and crafts.
(There is “Playing At Sight” for
violinists and istrumentalists
generally and other music books
and an anthology of German
poetry. Wetez3

Includéd in the new novels is
one that many will read if for
no other reason than that it was
writien by a West Indian—the
Trinidadian Indian, Samuel Selvon
This is one of many novels with
the usual subjects—love, mystery,
crime and so on. For the lover
of P. G. Woodhouse there is
“Barmy In Wonderland” and one
who knows what Woodhouse





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

“Honourable M.C.C. Gentlemen please to acquire consignment of cricket bats

Price Cut For U.S.
Industrial Alcohol

NEW YORK,

U.S. producers of industrial
alcohol have cut their prices by
20 cents a gallon and have dashed
Cuban hopes of getting a good
price for this season’s Cuban
blackstrap molasses. The market
for molasses is at present poor
beeause of a decline in demand
for alcohol and a large increase
in synthetic production.

Now that leading alcohol pro-
cucers have cut their prices from
75 to 55 cents per gallon, Cuban
demands for 20 cents a gallon
for molasses will also have to be
revised, importers believe, as it
takes two-and-a-half gallons of
blackstrap to make one gallon of
industrial alcohol.

Cuba, fighting to get the high-
est possible price, has sold some
12,000,000 gallons of blackstrap
at 20 cents a gallon to producers
of cattle feed. But there are big
additional quantities to be got rid
of and Cuba is understood to be
arranging to send 70,000,000 gal-
lons of blackstrap to the United
States to be stored until it can be
sold at the price Cuba wants.

Production of 350,000,000 ‘gal-
lons of molasses in Cuba is fore-
east for this year, as against last
year’s total of 288,625,000 gallons.
Cuba can only use some 80,000,
000 gallons a year herself and
must find export markets for the
remainder, —B.U.P.



very attractive. There are also the
usual
the exciting
boys like to



names that school

read,

and so on,
Of course there would scarcely

oti a is stage of | West.
Be S cotccon eh aie eaee on | Said, make it difficult to be eny-

affairs without something

Royalty being included. The three | thing but optimistic about

fund of cowboy stories with

“Cottonwood |
Gulch”, “Brush Country Killers’ |

|

Canadians
Draw On
Timber

By JOHN E. BIRD
Canada is no longer merely
“scratching” at her great treasure

house of natural resources.
Depyty and Development min-

ister H. A. Young said that
Canadians are beginning to bite

into the nation’s rich deposits of
minerals and oils, and are draw-
ing more wealth from vast stands
of timber.

Young said in an «interview
that the stepped up development
stemmed from _ three factors
exerting a strong upward pres-
sure on demand for mineral and
wood products. They are the rapid
erowth of world population,
various influences raising living
standards in underdeve oped
countries, and rapid technologi-
cal advances producing new uses
for metals and woods.

Canada’s spectacular develop-
ment of natural resource:
not confined to the iron ore de-
posits in Labrador nor the oil
fields in Alberta, Young said.

“There is a tendency to forget
that our present natural resource

was



development is nationwide,’ he
said. “It is taking place, in
greater or lesser degree, in most

of the provinces from the Atlantic
to the Pacific, and in the terrl-
tories in the far nerth.

Young gave a general picture
}of new developments by starting
|} with Newfoundiand and working
| These developments, he

the

are “Clarence House”, “The Queen | future of Canada.

writes, might say that the name is Mother” and “Our Young Prince”,

RED KEGULATIONS FORCE EVACUATION OF VILLAGES



RESIDENTS of. West Berlin who had summer cottages in a community separated from the Western Sec-

tor by a 100-yard strip of Soviet Zone, were ordered

recently to evacuate the cottages.

Communist

police told them they’d no longer be able to get to the cottages, when the new East German regula-
tions went into effect. Leaving their children on the West side of the separation point, these people
are shown carrying their furniture and other possessions from the cottage area to the Wost nn.

. right round the difficult S bend where
cleans thoroughly and
scientifically in the modern way.
Banish unpleasant, old-fashioned
methods! ‘Harpic’ is right up-to-date
safe and sure. Just sprinkle in



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the pan at night, then flush

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o %





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anew
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without



effort



] Glittering, spotiess glass,

Windolene spread over the glass, gi



polish it lig

Win
/. at

j COME G4

ly. The result is f

In Newfoundland, the Domin-
}ion Steel and Coal Company is
mechanizing its Wabana Mines
and expanding production, The
Buchans Mining Co. has sunk @&
shaft to develop a new discovered
body of ore with many years of
productive life.



The Mindamar Metals Cor-
poration in Nova Scotia has re-
opened the former sterling lead,
zinc and copper mine. It is now

producing at a rate of 500 tons of
ore a day.

Developments in Labrador were
highlighted by Ungava. The Iron
Ore Co. of Canada expects to
produce 2,500,000 tons of ore
annually by 1954, 5,000,000 tons
by 1956, and 10,000,000 tons by
1960.

“With the opening of the St.
Lawrence ; Seaway production
coyld be expanded to 20,000,000
tons annually,” Young said.

Other developments in Quebec
include the new Allard Lake
titanium mine; a copper deposit
fn ‘the Gaspe Peninsula beings
developed by Noranda Mines; a
number of base metal and gold
prospects in the Chibougamau
district; the rich silver-zinc Bar-
vue -Mine at Barraute, and the
expansion of asbestos production

| at Asbestos.

T



and no water needed — just a little

Gole:



“In Ontario, iron ore production
is being expanded at Steep Rock
from 1,300,000 tons in 1951 to
an estimated 3,500,000 to 4,000,
000 tons in 1955, It is also being,
expanded @t Michipicoten, and
a new iron mine is being de-
veloped at Marmora, near Belle.
ville, and is expected to produce
by 1954,” Young gaid.

The’ Sherritt-Gordon Co, ex-
ets to produce at the rate of
2.200 tons of ore daily at its new
mine at Lynn Lake, Man., Young

. Estimated annual pro-





> it a moment to dry then

parkling perf

ectic

FOR WINDOV/S,

1@ Sore

made in Japan very cheap?”

JetsOn Empire
Air Routes:

t

Between now and
over 100 of Britain’s
mainline passenger circ jets j
and turbo-props, will be built for ‘
the world’s airlines, Many of these
will go into service on the Empire
air-routes. Output will expand still J
further as more production capac- *
ity is built up,

Attention is being concentrated
on three main types. One is the
Comet in two versions, one power-
ed by the DeHavilland Ghost
engine, the other by the Rolls-
Royee Avon engine. Then there is
the Vickers Viscount, powered by
a turbo-prop engine, and the huge
Bristol Britannia.

The Comet is now being pro-
duced at the rate of about one a
month and this is being steadily
increased. When, in1954, a second
production-line comes into opera-
tion for the Comet, the output at
that time will be doubled.

At present, there are 51 Comets
on order and these will be
delivered by 1955, Rolls-Royce
will produce Avon jet engines to
meet all orders for the Avon-
powered Comet and will do so
without interrupting production of
Avons for the R.A.F,

Viscount production is now
about one a month, but Vickers
hope to reach a rate of four a
month and eyentually six a month,
A huge new workshop. is now
being completed to build the ‘plane
and 54 Viscounts have been order-
ed for delivery by 1955,

At Bristol, 25 Britannia airliners
are being built for the British
Overseas Airways Corporation and
plans are being made for produc-
tion of this ‘plane elsewhere,

No other country in the world
not even the United States with
vast aircraft industry, can boast
of jet airliners already in commer-
cial use, The high-powered, high-
speed aircraft turned out by
British craftsman will do much
to bring all parts of the Empire
within easier and faster reach of

each other, f |
important matters which

will engage the attention of the
Aerjeultural Society when they |
hold their Annual General Meet-
ing this evening are “the ques-
tion of production, marketing and
distribution of locally grown pro-
visions and vegetabies,” and *‘the
introduction of a new poison
“Wartarin”, in the Society’s rat
campaign.”

Among other matters

well ,







—B.UP.

Agricultura! Soc.
Will Discuss
New Rat Poison

Two



set down

on the agenda are the appoint-
ment of officers and the election
of various committees, and the

appointment of representatives
on the Agricultural Board, the
Peasants Loan Bank and the

Sugar Industry Bank.

The meeting will also receive
the audited statement of accounts
and the report of the Committee
of Management for the year 1951.

The meeting takes place at 2
p.m. in the Bovell & Skeete
Building.

luction will be 17,000,000 pounds
of nickel, 9,000,000 pounds of
copper, 300,000 pounds of cébali
and 70,000 pounds of ammonium
pulphur fertilizer.

cap reat Papas tom
that

Relievesâ„¢ Peloitese
Comfort—Promotes Heal
ing. Tubes os jars,

bine p.

London Express Service

In Touch With Barbados

Coast Station

CABLE & WIRELESS (West Indies)
td, advise that the can now commu
jeate with the following ships through
hetr Barbados Coast Station

8.8 Archangelos, 8.8 Fides, 98.8.
Forester, s.s. De Grasse, s,s. Lady
dney, s.8. Mormac Saga, 8.8. Jotunf-
el, 8.8. Wanderer, s.s, Brazil, s.s
~votter, s.s. Lady Nelson, m.v. Argen-
tine, 4.8, Aleoa Polaris, s.s. Mongabarra,

Nottingham, s.s. Aleoa Cavalier,
Utilitas, 8.5, Bulkstar, s.8. Bianea,
maieca Producer, 8.8. Willemstad, s.a.

*olytrader, s.8. Samana, 5.8. Champoeg,



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a box always handy





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SEA AND AIR |

TRAFFIC

in Carlisle Bay

Sch. Laudalipho, M.V. Lady Joy, M.V

emsted, M.V. Caribee; Beh, Sun-
ine R., M.V. Compton
ARRIVALS

S.8. Canadian Challenger from Trini-

SEAWELL

\RRIVALS—by BOWL. A. on Weenesday |
From TRINIDAD:

\. Cherubin, T. Vineent, L
FE. Chavasse, R. Redclite, G

Carison, I. Certson, P. Carison
Pettit, M. Simpeon, BE, O'D
Hawkins, Hares, M. Cnr
e Years, MaGalines, H
V. Gallo,.&, Gallo

ARRIVALS —on Thursday
From TRIN WDAD:
€ Herbert, [4. Boonomicdes,
ul, M. Esack, R. Ross
DEPARTURES—by B.W.IA
Cam Wednesday

For TRINIDAD;
\. Me Fadden, T. Lash, W. ash, A
Mohammed, J. Morren, H, Morren, C
Quesnel, H. Morton, D. Ritter, J. Ritter,
tk Weeks, 1 Averboukh, J. Connel,
€ Gollop, B. Watson, D. Skinner, J
Kelly

DEPARTURES—on Thursday

For ANTIGUA:

FE. Watts, P. Turner,
Diiars, G. Trotman

For PUERTO RICO:

Mr, Lionel Carew, Lt, William Jones,
Mr Hartwell Bellows, Mr. Julian
Gajecki, Mr. Edward Robinson, Mr.
Louis Marshall, Mr, Hubert Callender,
Mr. Edgar Lashley, Mr. Trevor Moore

RATES OF EXCHANGE

JUNE 19, 1952
NEW YORK

Siegel,
Marshall
R





J
M

V. Pidre-

J. Biiars,



73.4

* pr, Cheques on
Bankers 71.7% pr
Sight or Demand
Drafts 21.5% pr
72.4% pr. Cable
TL.9*% pr Curreney 70.2% pr
Coupons 69.5°4 pr
CANADA
(including Newfoundland)
77.2% pr. Cheques on |
Bankers 13.4.6 pr. |
Demand Drafts 75,25 % pr
cecesseee Sit Drafts 15.1%% pr
77.2% pr. Cable bya ouie net
75.7% pr. Curreney 713.9% pr
scceecse Coupons 13.2% pr.





PAGE THREE





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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS aX ADVOCAT

beste a Peed

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridsetowa

Friday, June 20, 1952,



RESCUE WORK

! EARLY on Wednesday morning eight
members of a House of Assembly which
comprises twenty four persons voted
in favour of resolutions based on the
report of a Committee appointed to exam-
ine the establishment of administrative
professional and Technical officers in the
Barbados Civil Service.

When these resolutions have been ap-
proved by the Legislative Council and
receive the assent of the Governor, the
Salaries of all principal government offi-
cials and other specified office holders will
be revised. The salary of the Governor is
not affected although the Committee was
of the opinion that the present emoluments
of the Governor are inadequate and should
receive separaté consideration. :

*

The maximum expenditure involved in
the revision of salary scales is of the order
of $100,000 per annum. The maximum an-
nual potential cost of leave passages. for
the 945 persons who are eligible is esti-
mated at $200,000 while the actual expendi-
ture is expected to vary between $24,000
and $32,000 a year.

The increase in salary scales will be ef- -

fective from 1st April 1952.

The difficulty of recruiting personnel to
Barbados in recent years has been the
subject of continuous comment. Key offices
such as the Colonial Secretary, Attorney
General, Financial Secretary, Comptroller
of Customs, Accountant Generel and Audi-

.. ter General have Jain vacant from periods

ranging between 11 months and over two
years. And the salary paid to the Governor
of Barbados offers little attraction for
careerists.

The resolutions which were passed

_through the House of Assembly in the ses-

sion beginning on Tuesday and ending on
Wednesday morning must be considered in
the light of these difficulties,

| Could Barbados, the question has re-
peatedly been asked in recent years, alford
not to offer more attractive salaries and
conditions of service?

‘The Leader: of the House of Assembly,
the Leader of the Opposition and six sup-.
porters of the Labour” Party answered
that question decisively during the voting
which took place on these resolutions dur-
ing the session which began on Tuesday
afternoon.

| It may confidently be predicted that the
Legislative Council will agree with the ver-
dict of the House and that members of the
Council will approve of these resolutions
‘when they are introduced in the Council
Chamber.

| Had Barbados continued to offer salaries
and conditions of service far behind those
offered by other British Caribbean terri-
tories and other colonies the exit of Bar-
badians and other qualified persons from
this island would have continued
unchecked.

| The resolutions passed this week in the
House of Assembly will stop the exit, Bar-
bados seems to have obtained a reprieve
from the fate which has befallen the Lee-
wards in recent years when the running
down of the administrative machine was
vividly represented on one important occa-
sion by the presence in an in-tray of an
official of the secretariat of a large live
hen,

There are, however, certain cautionary
warnings which ought to be issued and
which present and future governinents of
Barbados no doubt will note. The raising
of salaries and the granting of leave pas-
sages will not improve the efficiency of
administration if the holders of posts are
not of the desired calibre. Some safeguard
seems to be necessary to ensure that hold-
ers of posts can be replaced by better quali-
fied persons should the existing shortage
of personnel ever cease,

| On the other hand the raising of salaries
and the provision of leave passages may not
noticeably decrease the number of key per-
sonnel who are always on the alert to
accept promotion when it is offered to them
lin some other outpost of Empire. Indeed
the greater mobility of movement allowed
to the substantial number of those entitled
to free leave passages will assist ambitious
holders of local offices to promote the in-
terests of their personal careers when on
Jeave,

The increased expenditure on higher salaries
and leave passages is going to add to the already
high cost of government administration: but fur-
ther expenditure may yet be necessarv to keep
the smaller number of first rate men who can
only be kept here by a bait of remuneration as
high as that to be obtained in more lucrative
posts within the British Colonial Service.

The government is to be commended for its
courage in supporting resolutions which had to
be carried through the legislature if Barbados’

administration was not to collapse in ruins.
The answer to the continuity of administration

is yet to be found, however. The speed with

which Governors, Colonial Secretaries and other



high officials pass through Barbados en route to
higher paid posts ci result in good admin-
istration It will_be well for this problem to
be tackled and-a solution found.



ee ee

CORTE eter

Bertrand Russell At 80 Tourists From Britain

ON 18 May Bertrand Russell
was eighty. He ought, by this
time, seem “venerable,”
especially as he is, after all, a
Philosopher, and indeed the
greatest philosopher alive, But he
is too full of life, youth, hope, wit
and provocation to assume the
tranquil dignity of age. He is very
much not retired. Since he was
seventy, he has published ten new
books—the tenth, called The Im-
pact of Science on Society,* ap-
peared recently--and several of
those books are as controversial
as any he has written. He broac-
casts and lectures regularly and
sends an occasional scorching let-
ter to the Press. A year or two ago
the hit the sea in a Scandinavian
air-crash, but swam with Socratic
calm and more than Socratic en-
ergy to safety. His appearance is
immensely distinguished: a trim,
erect figure with a fine head of
white hair and a face that is at
once sharply Voltairean and
gently humane. Ata time in
which pessimism is an almost
universal faith, and orthodox
religion is reclaiming so many
intellectuals, Lerd Russell re-
mains adamantly optimistic, anti-
clerical, utilitarian; he is unwa-
vering in his belief in reason, in
the necessity, and the practica-
bility, of rational solutions to the
problems of mankind.

Lord Russell has so far pub-
lished very little about the events
of his own life. The mos he has
said appeared in a symposium
called The Philosophy of Bert-
rand Russell printed at Evanston,
Illinois, in 1944. There the told
the curious story of his childhood.
His mother died when he was
two: his father, Viscount Amber.
ley, when he was three. He was
brought up in the house of his
grandfather, Lord John Russell,
then the first Earl Russell, who
died when he was six; thereafter
his grandmother was responsible
for hig upbringing. Lord Russell
thas described her as “a Puritan
with the moral rigidity of the
Convenanters, despising comfort,
indifferent to food, hating wine,
and regarding tobacco as sinful’.
The young Bertrand, was told
very little about his parents, and
was inevitably mystified. He was
‘twenty-one when he learned the
truth about their lives and opin-
ions, and the discovered with a
shock how much his father’s ex-
perience had been the analogue
of his own. For Lord Amberley,
too, had been a man of unortho-
dox béliefs. He ‘had, as a young
man, rejected Chridtianity to
become the disciple, and later
the friend, of John Stuart Mill.
Russell discovered that Mill had
been, in so far as an agnostic
could be, his godfather.

Lord Ambertey had paid the
penalty for his eccentricity, Du-
ring the General Election of 1868,
when he was a candidate, it
came out that he had ventured
the suggestion, at a private meet-
ing, . that nieth-ooeseel was. a
matter for the medical profession
to consider. He became at once
the target of slander and abuse.
He was called “The Vice-Count
Amberley” and a foul-mouthed
rake; though in truth he was a
shy and retiring man of the ut-
most propriety. He never found
another constituency, His son
must have recalled his father’s
experience when, in 1940, the
municipal authorities of New

Barbados Oil Seandal

From TRUTIL

WHEN the country rid_itselt
of its Socialist incubus, Britisn
interests all over the world which
had been hurt and. wronged,
because of official injustice or
neglect, looked with confidence
to the Conservative Govern-
ment for swift redress to restore
their damaged fortunes. Among
these interests was the British
‘Union Oil Company, which had
feceived | shocking treatment
from authorities in Barbados
functioning under the jurisdic-
tion of the Secretary of State for
the Colonies. Reference to this
treatment was made in a Truth
leading article eleven months
‘ago, but, as nothing has yet been
done to make amends, no apology
is needed for returning to the
subject. In 1919, the company
obtained leases over 78 per cent.
of the island’s available drillable
‘area. About oes ze
spent during the next twer
youre upon drilling fifty-two
Wells and oil was discovered in
sufficient quantity to convince
experts that it existed in abund-
ance at a depth of between
10,000 and 12,000 feet. Develop~
ment had to be suspended during

the war, and, in 1946, the com=.

was informed that the Bar-
Cede Government proposed to
take over the underground
rights, The company did not con-
test the Petroleum Bill which
was to give effect to this de-
cision, because it had received
‘assurances that, at the sugges-
tion of the Colonial Office in
‘London; the Barbados Govern-
ment had every intention of
. granting the company, in return
for the surrender of its leases,
fa prospecting licence over the
Whole island. Assurances could
Snot be official, because, until the
Government had acquired the
underground rights, it was obvi-





BARBADOS

Maurice Cranston
(Eminent broad lecturer on

easter, and
Social Philosophy at the University of
Lenden )

York fulfilled their election
pledges to expunge the vice of
Manhattan by banning Professor
Bertrand Russell from teaching
at the City College, on the
grounds that his published views
on marriage “encouraged im-
morality”.

Lord Amberley had wished his
two sons brought up as_ free-
thinkers, and appointed two
agnostics in his will as _ their
guardians. The Court of Chan-
cery, on the application of the
grandparents, set aside the will,
so that Bertrand Russell, as he
later put it, “enjoyed the bene-
fits of a Chrigtian upbringing.”
He was about fifteen when he
started thinking seriously and
critically about religion, and he
was unhappy for some years
after he decided he could no
longer believe. He was taught by
tutors, and his life as a boy was
a solitary one; his greatest pleas-
ure came from his discovery, at
the age of eleven, of mathematics,
something at which he could
really excel. “4

He was altogether happy a
Cambridge, His friends included
two men who later became very
eminent philosophers: A, N,
Whitehead and G, E. Moore, The
leading philosopher in Cambridge
at the time, however, was M"Tag-
gart, a Hegelian idealist. Lord
Russell listened to him with ad-
miration, and later read “avidly”
the works of F. H. Bradley, a
subtler metaphysician than
M’Taggart, but a Hegelian, too.
Neither influence produced Bert-
rand Russell the philosopher, He
realised his genius because he
was trained up to his fourth year
at Trinity in mathematics, and
the decisive influence in his in-
tellectual development was that
of Giuseppe Peano, the Italian
pioneer of modern mathematical
theory, whom he met in Paris in
1900, Following that meeting,
Lord Russell mastered Peano’s
symbolism and then evolved his
own, Peano had reduced the
special vocabulary of arithmetic
to three terms; Lord Russell went
on to prove that even these were
unnecessary, and “that a mini-
mum vocabulary for mathematics
is the same as for logic.” In the
Principles cf Mathematics (1903)
and more notably in the book
he wrote with Whitehead, Prin-
cipia Mathemaitea (1910), Rus-
sell made a revolutionary contri-
tion to philosophy, It was not
only that he succeeded in proving
that mathematics can be derived
from logic, but he developed in
‘the procesd certain logical tech-
niques which have changed the
methods, if not perhaps the
very nature, of philosophy. Rus-
sell has not been wholly in sym-

ith the revolution his
work has precipitated, and al-

though his point of view in”

branches of philosophy other
than logic has altered from time
to time, he has never been at one
with what is now the prevailing
school, dominated by his most
gifted pupil, Ludwig Wittgen-
stein, who died last year.
Lord Russell belongs to a
family which has taken a lead-
jing part in the politics of these

_—



ously debarred from disposing
pf them, but there was, or 50
the company had reason to think,
a firm understanding, reinforced
by the fact that the Governmen’
bficially accepted the Lepper
Report, which, among other
things, had recommended the
proposed arrangement. The com-
pany thereupon surrendered its
leases, as agreed, and began to
hegotiate with a Trinidad firm te
undertake the deep drilling,
when, to its astonishment, on ap-
plying for a provisional licence
to start operations, it met with
a blank refusal from the Bar-
bados Government, now duly
vested with the oil rights. Rarely
in the history of British admin-
istration has there been so open
a breach of faith.

When Lord Teviot raised the
ratter in the House of Lords,
he had no difficulty in disposing
of the argument of Lord Ogmore,
Socialist Colonial Under-Secre-
tary, that the company had later
been offered a prospecting
licence for 55 per cent. of the
island. He pointed out that this
amounted to no*more than 2%
er cent. of the drillable area,
Ingtead of the 78 per cent. cov-
€ by the original leases. What
is more, the terms of the offer
were such that even Lord Og-
more described them as “oner-
ous.” The circumstances in
which the company had come to
be dispossessed of its rights, and
robbed of the fruits of its pion-
“eering, make fantastic reading.
Once the Barbados Government
had become possessed of the
title deeds, it invited the British
Union Oil Company and the Gulf
Oil Company, a powerful Ameri-
ean concern, to apply for devel-

opment licences on almost
identical terms. This, in itself,
was an injustice, because it

meant that the American com-

Our Readers Say:

Gratitude
To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—-Kindly allow me _ the
privilege of using the columns
of your paper to express the pro-
found gratitude of the Students
of the Caribbean Trade Union
Training Course just completed
at the Y.M.C.A., Bridgetown.

I Wish to express to the Pub-
lic of Barbados our sincere ap-
preciation of their hospitality
and kindness generally, and to
thank especially those who made
it possible to hold various forms
of entertainments in our honour,

I want to assure the people of
Barbados that we shall be ever
grateful for the many kindnesses
extended to us during the twelve
weeks of the Course, and to let
them know that we fully recog-

j nise the fact that our stay would

have been dull and uninteresting
without their hospitality and
pleasant companionship.

I feel assured that the good
relationship established between
the people of Barbados and the
Students from the various terri-
tories of the Caribbean will lend
considerable momentum to the
movement to West Indian Feder-
ation, and that when Federation
becomes a reality, our pleasant
associations with the people of
this beautiful and captivating
island, will be recalled as one
of the great contributions to the
fundamentals of the Federal
structure.

Thanking you,
DONALD C. GRANADO,
for Caribbean T. U. Studems.
Y.M.C.A.,
Bridgetown,
13th June, 1952.

- Attlee Ministry had done, natu-

ADVOCATE

islands since the sixteenth cen-
tury. Several of his ancestors
have been famous rebels, and
he has inherited their stubborn
spirit. After the Boer War he
became a thorough-going pacifist,
and re one until 1940,
when he ® finally persuaded
that Hitler Was an evil worse
than war, For hid uncompromis-
ing attitud@ in 1916 he was ex-
pelled from his Fellowship of
Trinity and later put into prison.
He had a taken part in the
campaign for en’s suffrage.

In 1921 Lord Russell went to
Soviet Russia. He heard the fir-
ing squads, and returned with
none of the illusions that were
prevalent among his _ fellow
Socialists between the two wars.
He disliked and disapproved of
what he saw in Russia, and
remembered it when Stalin was
everybody’s. darling after 1942;
he Was unpopular in many quar-
ters then speaking ot Russia
as a menace to peace. Since he
ceased to be a pacifist, he has
been a Vigorous advocate of
world government. But he does
not think a world government
should be given any power be-
yond that necessary to maintain
peace, For the rest he recom-
emends devolution. This is» the

theme of his book Power (1938)

and of Authority and the Indi-
vidual (1949). He thinks that,
while security and justice require
centralised government control,
progress) requires the utmost per-
sonal initiative, so that transfer
of some severeignty from nation-
al governments to a world gov-
ernment should be balanced by
the transfer of other powers to
local governments.

As a philosopher, Lord Russell
has no patience with theoretical
ethics, but as a publicist he has
had much to say about contem-
porary morals. His views on
marriage and education have
inevitably attracted attention.
The book that was taken by care-
less readers to advocate adultery
suggested in fact that sexual im-
pulses should be “trained instead
of thwarted,” and that voluntary
self-sacrifice, prompted by love,
should. take the place of repres-
sion based on taboo, In educa-
tion, Lord Russell has never sug-
gested that children should have
no discipline, but rather that the
element of force in education
should be reduced to the barest
minimum, To discover that bar-
est minimum, he ran a school in
collaboration with his second
wife, Dora Russell. After this ex-
periment he returned to univer-
sity teaching, first in America
and then at Cambridge, where
he was reinstated as a Fellow of
Trinity during the Second World
War.

“My intellectual journeys,”
Lord Russell once confessed
“have been, in some respects,
disappointing. When I was young
I hoped to find religious satisfac-
tion in philosophy . . . I thought
‘of mathematics with reverence,
and suffered when Wittgenstein
led Me to regard it as nothing
put tautologies , . . Those who
attempt to make a religion of
humanism, which recognises
nothing greater than man, do not
sitisfy my emotions. And yet I
am unable to believe that, in the
world as known, there is any-
thing that I can value outside
human beings.

* Allen and Unwin 7s. 6d.

—The Spectator: May 16, 1952

pany, which had done nothing
ito establish the existence of oil
in the island, would reap the
benefit of all the British com-
pany’s geological surveys, pros-
pecting, installations and other
surveys. That, however, was a
minot consideration compared
with what followed. Because of
the terms. described by Lord
Ogmore as “onerous”, and, more
accurately, by Lord Teviot as
“hopeless,” the British firm de-
clined the offer, being convinced
that the proposal would prove
unworkable. The American com-
pany seemingly guided by some
preternatural instinct, was not
thus deterred. It accepted the
terms with a gay assurance, and
its optimism was not misplacde.
As soon as the British Union
Oil Company dropped out of the
race, the conditions were so
modified in favour of the Ameri-
cans that the proposition became
eminently feasible. As things
now stand, after the expendi-
ture of much time and money in
prospecting, jthe British Union
Oil Company has lost its rights,
and has received not one penny
‘of compensation. f; :

The to power of the
Conservative Government, which
might, have been expected to
show a keener sense of respons-
ibility towards British overseas
enterprises than the disastrous

rally aroused the hope that the
proceedings in Barbados would
be brought under searching re-
view, and the balance as far as
was possible, restored. It
omains an unfulfilled hope. Mr.
Oliver Lyttelton, the new Colo-
nial Secretary, questioned in the
House of Commons, denied that
there had been any discrimin-
ation against the British com-
pany. When Mr. Bernard Braine
then asked if more favourable
conditions had been offered to
the Americans after the British
had withdrawn, the Colonial
Secretary replied: “The Ameri-
can company received only the
same ofters as the British coms
pany.” Words are inadequate ta
express one’s astonishment that
Mr, ‘Lyttelton should not have
taken the trouble to ensure that
hé was accurately informed. The
true answer te Mr. Braine’s
question was on record, which
shows that_the.Colonial Secre-
tary had not bethered to see the
relevant documents. Two sets of
draft regulations were drawn up,
one for the British company, the
other for the American comnany.
Hed. Mr. Lyttelton examined
these sets, it would have been
impossible for him to tell the
House of Commons that they
were idéutical or even similar.

They Whe
ons on the reg

ried to





e' different. is








’ pressly de
British firm were la
wo the Americans,




































and million dollars (that’s about £357,143,-

vast country is park and forest land.

e}tubes, on
i n railway stations.

FRIDAY,

_JUNE_20,_1952_



























PHOTOGRAPHS

Copies of Local Photographs
Which have appeared in the

Advocate Newspaper

Can be ordered from the...

ADVOCATE STATIONERY



(By STANLEY BINNEY)

IT was interesting to read the figures
given of dollar revenue in Barbados from/
Canadian and American visitors recently.
These figures show that the tourist trade can
play an important role in the island’s econ-
omy. There is a possibility of losing some
of these dollars in the future, for the well-
known reasons,—the withdrawal of the two
Lady liners, and the possibility of sterling
hardening in relation to the dollar. In the
event of this happening, is it possible or de-
sirable to try and attract more people from
the U.K. and Europe?

If so, what can be done to attract the right
kind of people? There can be more publicity
given than the scanty news that can be
gleaned in England about the island. The
West India Committee and the Royal Em-
pire Society issue, on request, a fine pam-
phlet with facts about Barbados. There are
many classes of people in England who
would come to Barbados for a holiday, if
they knew of the advantages to be gained
from coming here.

There are retired business and professional
men, and people living on pensions, who find
the austerity living of Great Britain very
trying. These people have been finding sol-
ace in holidays on the Continent, but now,
owing to the reduced foreign currency al-
lowance, they feel frustrated. To be able to
go for a holiday to the sunny climate of this
island is a great boon as an alternative.

There are advantages as well as disad-
vantages to the possible English tourist. They
can be guaranteed unlimited sunshine in a
tropical atmosphere, without the disadvant-
ages of tropical life in many places. Here can
be had a constant supply of pure clean
water, and freedom from the anopheles mos-
quito that brings malaria: these features
tend to make the island attractive for holi-
day makers.

Electricity and a good supply of natural
gas add to the comfort of this island. There
is a variety of foods to choose from, Meat,







. SEINE TWINE—Fine, Medium, Cees:
. HBRRING TWINE & MULLET TWINE

C.S. PITCHER & Co.

H.M.Y.

Ne Toa has: aom ella

} x senna

A COMPLETE RANGE OF THESE
FINE RECEIVERS

butter, bacon, and other foods come from 5-TUBE TABLE mone, RADIO Sie Pee ss Sbiiath eit ri ‘ee
ali : 6-TUBE TABLE MODEL RADIO ........ Dees ee k

Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and Ameri-||| S"poRe TABLE MODEL RADIOGRAM ........ 275.00

ca. There are also many kinds of fruit to be 6-TUBE FLOOR en a gua i

8 d-—paw- 6-TUBE FLOOR MOD with

sampled—paw-paw, mango and bananas, as ‘Automatic Three Speea Changers) eas 515.00

LET US DEMONSTRATE ONE OF THE ABOVE SETS
AND JOIN THE HUNDREDS OF SATISFIED OWNERS.

C4

DA COSTA & CO., LID.

well as fresh eggs and good dairy milk.

The bathing is unbeatable anywhere in
the world, and it-is within easy reach from
anywhere in the island. These are some of
the facts of which British people are com-
pletely unaware.

To weigh against these advantages are—
the distance from the U.K. to Barbados, and
the poor service in shipping and air lines.

Travel agents could do much to help and
encourage travel. to the B.W.I. Much more
advertising could be done in Britain; very
little about this island is known by the gen-
eral public, even in London. The large pro-
vincial cities, especially in the Midlands,
would welcome information about such an
island as this, Jersey has recently encour-
aged tourists by a delightful travel film of
its island, and it was entitled “Holiday
Island.” It showed the picturesque coast and
boating, as well as buildings and resorts.

There are many good magazines for pub-
licity, which have a nation-wide circulation.
The following may be taken as examples—
“Go,” the new travel magazine; “Vogue,”
which recently published an article on
Jamaica,—“The Blue Peter”; ‘Illustrated’;
“Truth”; “Blackwood’s”; “The Queen”; and|¢
“Lilliput.”

A colourful and descriptive booklet could
be distributed through various travel agents
and hotels, and through the big departmental
stores, where people go to bureaux for in-
formation regarding holidays abroad. Much
could be done to increase this branch of the
tourist trade of Barbados, and it may yet
become, as Switzerland already is, an all-
year-round holiday resort.



When your only thought

is to keep cool in the
shimmering heat, you really
appreciate the fine cloth

of a Daks lightweight suit.
Add easy freedom, yet
perfect shirt control with
Daks self-supporting
trousers. No wonder so many
men have become Daks
converts for life.

SIMPSON TAILORED

Smokey The Bear Beats Firemen

From R. M. MacCOLL
WASHINGTON.
EVEN in these days of colossal figures —
budgets, arms expenditures, trade deficits,
and so forth — there is one item of a thous-

Og dbgesg
ee

000) which k tli i t.
) which makes a startling impac NOURISHING FOODS

For this is the amount of damage caused Cho 9 “f,, Just Arrived
in America by forest fires in 1951 alone, fires ‘ce Quali ty Split P
often started through the carelessness of Whole Peas

campers and picnickers.
If this seems an almost impossible figure,

Madeira Potatoes
it must be remembered that one-tenth of this

Peanut Butter

‘ (ous Gouda
Fe Degas | Stet

And it is now, as the long, intensely hot









summer gets underway, that, America’s pA
vigilant Forest Service begins to worry. EALS RELISHES
Tough, carefully trained forest rangers, ROASTS Madras Cw
2,500 strong, are prepared to fight the fires Chickens mae i a
at any time, using every means from hover- Terkeys al Chili Sauce
plane spotting 1» parachute jumping. talian Chili Sauce
But, valuable though their work is, it is on ao MEATS Thalien Ketchup yr
beloved “Smokey the Bear” who is known Oatvae Pioee res —
all over America as the chief symbol in the Kidneys Swe t Pick!
3 Sweet Breads thes nem
battle against forest fires. For Smokey is| Rabbits hho

Hams in Tins
Hams (Smoked)

as popular with Americans as was Mickey
Mouse a few years ago. |

Carrying a spade and wearing blue jeans|
and a Scout's hat, he begs and pleads for|
caution in the nation’s 630 million acres in| Pure Coffee—Nothing Added
forest land. Twenty million of | aR
Smokey are abroad — in buses, trams, and

roadside posters, in magaz nd}

] GODDARD'S or service |
sa ARISES

‘

Mango Sauce
COFFEE

Empire—Roast Daily

Chase & Sanborne



ENRICHED BREAD
WITH GRAVY
IS DELIGHTFUL





pictures



ines, a


FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 1952
Pc nea

Barbados Is Good Shop
Window For U.K. Goods

MR. AUBREY R. STARCK, O.B.E., Her Majesty’s
Trade Commissioner in the British West Indies, with head-
quarters in Trinidad, told the Advecate yesterday he felt
great pleasure at the progress which Barbados has made
in attracting visitors from North America who he thought
were valuable buyers of British goods. He described the
island as a shop window for British goods second only to
Bermuda in the British Caribbean.

, Mr. Starck arrived here on’ many firms who were looking to

Monday by -B.G. Airways from St. this area for expansion of their

Vincent and will be remaining trade.

until Thursday staying at the He said that he was also

Marine Hotel. pleased to learn of the interest
This is the first of a series of shown in the Barbados exhibit at

visits he is paying to the various the British Industries Fair which

parts of his territory since he re- he was told was most attractive
and: he believed that a number of
promising enquiries were received
from firms who hoped to be able
to buy some of the products of
Barbados like’ tortoiseshel, rum,
molasses and various other items.
Sugar Crop

Mr. Starck said he heard that
the sugar crop would be a little
less than what. was originally
forecast, but, nevertheless, it
seemed to him that Barbados was
going to reach her second high-
est production of sugar and he
hoped that it would in turn, put

a good deal of money into cir-

culation in the colony.

As regards the supply of
British goods he said: “The
situation is that in many items,
the deliveries are improving
and I am satisfied that we can
now meet a very high propor-
tion of the demands of the
colony.’

He was deeply conscious of
the fact that everybody here
had played a part in, not only
conserving dollars, but in earn-
ing them, and the West Indies
as a whole were undoubtedly





! MR. A. R. STARCK

turned from leave in England to-

wards the end of March.
helping



He said that he had decided to
come. to Barbados at the earliest
opportunity because he was con-
vinced of the ability of Barbedos
as an outlet for British goods, not
only to people in the West Indies,
but to people in the hard cur+
rency areas,

“In the last two or three years,
I have been very impressed with
the progress which has been
made -by ;Barbados to encouraye
the tourist trade which I am very

, pleased to see has had results and
I think that this island like Ber-
muda, is becoming a very im-
portant shop window for U.K.
goods.”

High Quality Goods

He said that he happened to
know that there were some of the
traders in Barbados who were
now showing great interest in
high quality goods for the visitor
who. wanted to buy them in
pleasant surroundings and in
ideal conditions. While here, he

‘was proposing to go around to

the various traders to offer
_ yassistance wherever it was re-
quired in placing them in touch
with suitable sources-of supply in
the United Kingdom.

When he was in the U.K., he
made an. official tour through the
provinces and visited many
(Chambers of Commerce where
he gave interviews to a large
number of exporters who wanted
- to have more information re-
garding requirements to the
British West Indies. He was de-
lighted to find that there were so

“DEFORMED EGG

the Mother Country
and the sterling area on its
hard, but, nevertheless short
road to recovery.

“Sterling, in spite of what is
sometimes theught, wiil come into
its Own once more and I am
quite confident that before long,
the situation will have greatly
improved. This does not mean
however, that we have to be com-
placent. As the Prime Minister
has said on many occasions, it is
a very. difficult road on which we
have to walk, but after my visit
to the U.K., I believe that the
people are conscious of the s1ave
situation they have to face and
they determined to win
through,

are

£20 For Removing
Rotile Of Rum

HIS WORSHIP Mr. C. L. Wal-
wyn, Acting Police Magistrate of

District “A’, yesterday ordered
Beresferd Blackett of Whitehall
Road, St: Michael, to pay a fine
£:20 to be piid by monthly

instalments of £5 per month for
removing one bottle of rum from
the Government Spirit Bond on
June 17.

There is an alternative of three
months’ imprisonment with hard
labour. An island constable saw
the defendant leave the Govern-
ment Spirit Bond with the bottle
of rum and reported the matter.

BARBADOS





ON

ADVOCATE

THE DOUBLE



Led by Major O. F. C. Walcott, on the extreme right, a detail of Officers and Serjeants double to the

Firing Point for Falling Plate Practice.

Motley Acting Inquiry Into Wharton’s

Churchwarden

Mr. E. D. Mottley, Acting
Senior Guardian, was yesterday
appointed by the Vestry of St.
Michael to act as Churehwarden
during the absence from the
colony of Hon. V. C. Gale, M.L.C.,

Churehwarden, from the 2Ist to

the 30th of the month, Wharton of Workmans,
Before the business of the

special meeting called for the

purpose was begun, the clerk to
the Vestry read the return of the
Sheriff, Mr. F. J. Cole, J.P., on
the recent bye-election, and the
Chairman of the Vestry, the
Very Revd.,Dean Hazlewood, ex-
tended a hearty welcome to Mr.
J. O. Tudor who was returned
at the poll.

The
the new
Mr. Tudor en
member of
welcomed him
and honourable
Michael.”

The Chairman said he was quite
sure that during Mr. Tudor’s
term of office, the Vestry wo/ld
be enriched by his wisdom and
experience.

Mr. A. S. Bryden also joined
in welcoming Mr. Tudor, He con-
gratulated him on winning the

Dr. A. S. Cato who performed
the post mortem examination at
the Public Mortuary at about
12.15 p.m. on June 15, said that
the body of the deceased . was
identified to him by the wife of
tthe deceased. There were ex-
tensive bruises on the chest and
two wounds on the chin. No
fracture of the skull was present,

Canadian Trade
CGor-iissioner Here

Gu Routine Visit

Mr. T. Grant Major, Canadian
Government Trade Commissioner

for the Eastern Caribbean with
headquarters in Trinidad, is now

Chairman in welcoming
member congratulated
being elected a
the Vestry and
to “this ancient
Vestry of St.



election, and said he had known cee in Barbados on a routine
him for 80 years in business, and | 2 ‘

as the Vestry was largely an ad- + nee Nesterday morn~
ministrative board whose func- 128 by T.C.A. from his head-

quarters and will be remaining for
about a week interviewing Gov-
ernment officials and some of the
businessmen,

ticns were to carry on the busi-
ness of the parish in a business-
like manner, he was quite sure
that Mr, Tudor would be of great
assistance to them, and he hoped

o ee Mr. Major |i "7
that they would continue to Ocean View ee ae
have that assistance for a long He told the
time. Advocate short-
Replying, Mr. Tudor thanked ly after arriving

that as a result
of the Trade
Liberalisation

Plan now in its
second year,
there had_ been
a considerable F
pick up in the
volume of sales
from Canada to
the British Car-
ibbean as a
whole and add-
ed: “It is a little
early in the year

the chairman and Mr. Bryden for
their hearty welcome, and said
he would endeavour to do his bit,
and carry out the pledge he made
on Nomination day, in the in-
terest of the parish.

The Vestry considered and
Approved an application from
Major T. Bowring for six months
leave from his duties as a Vestry-
man.





Death Adjourned

HIS WORSHIP Mr. C. L. Walwyn, Acting Coroner of
District “A”, yesterday adjourned the inquiry into the cir-
cumstances surrounding the death of 40-year-old Goul-
bourne Wharton until June 26.

St. George, died on his way

to the General Hospital after he was involved in an acci-
dent while driving his motor car along Hanson Hill, St.
George, on the morning of June 15.

but both kidneys showed haemor-
rhage. The liver was _ ruptured.
Shock, Haemorrhage

In his opinion death was due
to shock and haemorrhage from
the injuries described.

Sarah Wharton—wife of the de-
ceased — said that the deceased
left his home on June 14 for
Silver Beach where he said he

“was going for some friends, About

7.30 a.m, the following morning
she went to the General Hospital
and saw him apparently dead. At
12.30 p.m. the same day she
sae his body to Dr. A. S
Cato,

Police Constable Joseph Payne
attached to District “B” Police
Station said that on June 15 about
5.30 am. while riding a bicycle
along Hanson Hill, St. George, he
heard a noise behind him and
jooking, saw a motor car on the
left side of the road. He sudden-
ly saw the car swerve across the
road to the right and run into a
telephone pole and then it went
again to the centre of the road and
back ‘to the right, ending in a
canefield.

“I went to the scene of the ac-
cident for I was about 150 yards
away and helped to take the
driver from the car. I then rang
the District “B” Police Station
and the Police van took the driver
to the Hospital,” Police Constable
Payne told the court.

To the jury Payne said that a
part of the road was straight.

At this stage the Coroner ad-
journed further hearing until
June 26.

Rayside Given
Service Medal

His Excellency the Governor, in

Decree Issued For
Sale Of T.B. Radar

His Lordship the Chief Judge,
Sir Allan Collymore, Kt., yester-
day issued a decree for the sale
of the Motor Vessel T. B. Radar,
and fixed the sale value at
$35,000.

The decree was made in a
Colonial Admiralty Suit brought
‘ay the -owner of thd steamer
Amakura against the Motor
Vessel T. B. Radar, her cargo and
freight. In this suit application
was made by the plaintiff for the
sale of the vessel.



Mr. G. L, Farmer who was in-
structed by Mr. D. V. Bynoe,
solicitor of the firm of Messrs
Carrington & Sealy, appeared on
behalf of the owner of the
steamer Amakura. There was no
Jegal appearance on behalf of the
T. B. Radar.

A DEFORMED EGG, the second to be exhibited recently, was brought
to the “Advocate” yesterday by Calvin Wickham of Alleyne’s Lane,
Passage Road.
The fowl which laid this egg has been laying many normal eggs
for some time and has suddenly produced this freak.
Wickham said there is nothing peculiar about the fowl which
apparently enjoys very good health.

———

GARDEN
REQUISITES

WE CARRY A COMPLETE RANGE INCLUDING

RAKES HOES TROWELS

WEEDING FORKS EDGING KNIVES HEDGE TRIMMERS
LOPPING SHEARS SECATEURS LAWN SPRINKLERS
TAP UNIONS, TAPS COMPLETE WITH UNION, WATERING CANS,

HOSE MENDERS, SPOUTS, CLIPS AND CONNECTIONS

AND THE POPULAR “SOLO” SPRAYER, THE ONE-MAN SPRAYER
WHICH OPERATES ON BOTH THE UP AND DOWN STROKES GIVING
A CONTINUOUS SPRAY

— ALSO —

RANSOME LAWN MOWERS

And the Increasingly Popular
POPE LAWN MOWERS WITH RUBBER TYRED WHEELS

HARRISON'S HAroware DEPARTMENT

DIAL 2364 or 3142

— SSS

ae



to judge the full T. Grant Major the presence of Executive Com-

extent of the upward trend”. mittee, today presented the Im-
Referring to the Lady Boats he perial Service Medal to Mr.
said that when the service will be dames Telford Rayside, retired

discontinued, will be q miatter
for decision by the C.N.S. Com-
pany, but he understgod that the
Canadian National Steamship
Company would be operating a
freight and passenger service on
a commercial basis, the number
of ships and ports of call being
dependent entirely on the volume
of business offered.

Station Foreman of the Water-
works Department,

Mr. Rayside was awarded the
Imperial Service Medal on his
retirement after 38 years of
faithful service in the Public
Service of this Colony.

FILMS SHOT AT
VESTRY MEETING

_ The Filming Unit of the Educa-
tion Department was on hand at
the Special Meeting of the Vestry
yesterday morning, and _ shots
were taken while the meeting
was in progress.

These shots will be used as part
of an Educational Film. The



Mr. Major said that Mr, Roge:
Parlour who has been Vice-Con-
sul and Assistant Trade Com-
missioner at the Canadian Con-
sulate-General in Boston, is com-
ing cut to Trinidad in September
to replace Mr. D. H. Cheney as
Assistant Trade Commissioner.
Mr. Cheney has gone on leave at
the expiration of which he will
take over Mr. Parlour’s duties in
Boston.

Unit was under the direction of
Mr, Isaac Carmichael, Visual Aids
Officer.



PLAIN and
FLOWERED
DRESS

MATERIALS

JUST OPENED

WHITE SHARKSKIN
$1.86, $2.32 & $2.46 per yd.

WHITE SATIN
$1.59 & $2.42 per yard

WHITE HEAVY SPUN
$1.29 per yard

COL. MIAMI, in shades of

Grey, Torquoise, Gold,
Blue, Green, Fawn, Beige,
Pink and Rose @ $1.33
per yard

FLOWERED FERGUSON

FABRICS in small pat-
terns @ $1.84 and $2.04
per yard.












FFE 8 BEEPS,

PAGE FIVE









Barbados
Regiment

@ From Page 1.

them he must be able to fire at

once,
The Last Target

This is very good exercise for
snap shooting and training for
self-defence in an emergency.
There are seven targets and if a
rifleman misses one his attention
is drawn to it by his Platoon Offi-
cer who has been accompanying
him on training.

After he has spent his seventh
shot he is confronted at the ena
of the tour of Snipers’ gully with
a target that is being pulled by
a string and he is told that this
represents an enemy who is run-
ning away. He finds himself out
of ammunition but very few
young riflemen remember at first
that they can bayonet him.

Throwing the Grenade

Nearer down the beach R.S.M.
Marshall was instructing another
squad in the art of cleaning,
fusing, priming and throwing a
Mills 36 Grenade. The men
scored some very good hits on the
target, a piece of grape tree stuck
in the sand about fifty yards

away.

Still another squad were firing
the two inch mortar. Another
popular Platoon weapon, the Bren
L.M.G. was fired too from a
high plateau. e control was
good and the men obeyed their
fire orders quickly changing
effortlessly from the short sharp
bursts to prolonged bursts and
the single shot,

Full Training
, The men during their course of
training have also been exercised
in Fieldcraft—Movement without
arms—Firing from positions be-
hind cover —- Use of ground for
cover—Fieldcraft — The setting
and handling of mines and booby
traps—and of course, The practi-
cal handling of weapons.. |

Well Done

The lines were well laid out,
complete with Officers, Warrant
Officers and Sergeants’ and Other
Ranks’ messes and canteens,

The men were in good spirits
and seemed to be enjoying manly
training in the open air, The
members of the band too practice
hard and they built UP A consid-
erable amount of goodwill ‘among
the parishioners of St. Andrew
when, dressed in the colourful
Zouave uniform they played at
the Belleplaine Playing Field ‘on
Sunday afternoon for everyone's
entertainment,

Major O. F, C, Walcott told
the Advocate that they will strike
camp on Sunday.

DRINK
CLAYTON’S














GBEX
THE FAMILY SOAP
@ Gets skin really clean

©) Banishes perspiration odor



VALOR COOKER STOVES

Short Burners
2 Burner Model @ $56.14
3 Burner Model @ $71.87
Also

WHITH PORVELAIN ENAMEL SINES
With Double Drainboard @ $65.64
complete with waste and overflow

T., HERBERT, Ltd.
10 & 11 Roebuck Street



No. 1 Water Barge
Performs Well

The Number One Water Barge
performed satisfactorily when she
made her first trip to the Lady
Rodney anchored in Carlisle Bay
on Monday. Yesterday the
Advocate was told that the Barge
rolled Spite a lot while alongsi
the Rodney but this is expected
as the Barge is a flat bottomed
vessel with no keel which would
enable her to ride the waves.

The Number One Water Barge
is capable of pumping about 300
gallons of water per minute into
a vessel, This pump is operated
by diesel engines and it has a three
way branch for delivering water
to a ship.

This Barge has to be towed to
the ship which is awaiting the
delivery of water and at present
this job is being. done by the
Lord Combermere. The Barge
also carries a crew of four—three
deck hands and an engineer who
operates the pump. Her capacity
is about 90 tons.

Established Incorporated



TRY A BOTTLE OF ....

NAVITOL MALT
COMPOUND

(SQUIBB SYRUP of Vitamins
with Iron)

It contains fish liver oil, irradi-
ated ergosterol, ferrous sulphate,
riboflavin, thiamine hydrochloride
and niacinamide, in a vehicle con-
sisting of malt extract, sugar
fyrup, and flavours,

Excellent for Children

and Adults

On Sale at - - - -

KNIGHT'S §DRUG STORES.



B.W.LA. RESUME
GEORGETOWN—
B’DOS SERVICE

BRITISH West Indian Airways
yesterday resumed their direct
passenger air service between
Georgetown, British Guiana anda
Barbados, It is expected that
the normal services of this Air-
line will be restored next month,
now that the fuel supply is back
to normal.

It is planned to increase on the
normal schedule for the heavy
summer traffic and it is also pro-
posed to introduce Dakota DC-2’s
next month in place of the two
Lodestars now operating to St.
Kitts and St. Lucia. The Dakota
will carry 28 passengers as against
the 14 carried by the Lodestars,
and thus the passenger capacity
will be increased by 100 per cent.






ANNUAL HOLIDAY

Our CUSTOMERS and FRIENDS are asked to note
that our WORKSHOP will be closed as from Monday,
16th June, 1952, to Saturday, the 28th June, 1952, inclu-
sive, for the purpose of granting our Workmen their
ANNUAL HOLIDAY.

Arrangements have been made for emergency work
to be undertaken during this period and the receipt
of repairs and delivery of completed work will be
continued as usual.

Our Merchandise Department and Office will be open
to business as usual.

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

“ White Park Road.
St. Michael










Maple Leaf Table Butter per Ib. ..... 2.2.66. .06 0005s





Canadian Red Cheese per Ib. ..... 6.6 6 ec eee eee 13
" Pure Grease Proof Paper (small pkts.) .............+ 24
Heinz Chicken Gumbo Soup per tin ............ 49
Heinz Cream of Green Vegetable Soup per tin ... 49
Apie Peanut Butter per jar ..........0 6c eens 61
Heinz Beef Nood!s Soup per tin .. 49
Laghte Jeliles per pit... iicces cece eessevactes Ag
Wilo Cherry, Lime, Raspberry, Pineapple, Orange,
Strawberry, Lemon,
COURT WE FEIN Sie es'g a bie 0 50 bead woe Ag 8 ed wines Bree 1.46
Heinz Baked Beans with Pork per tin .............+++ 53
Ontots per 41D, Haren ois oe se ea daeskeesneas By J
CAVE Potatoes per 10-1b. parcel .........5.6, grees ter scees 1,08
Crawford’s Cream Crackers per tin ...........-.s405+ 1.20

The Above Items CASH and CARRY ONLY

SHEPHERD }

& CO., LTD.
10-13 BROAD ST,

COCKADE FINE RUM

| STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.
|