Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




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’
ESTABLISHED 1895



KOJE ISLAND, Korea, June 16.
United States Eighth Army plans an extensive work
and play programme for Communist prisoners of war on
Koje once prisoners recognize Allied authority completely.
Brig. General Haydon L. Boatner Koje Commander
hopes to start the programme soon after he finishes splitting
the present large unruly compounds into small units.

= Earl Alexander, Britain's
Defence Minister inspected pri-
soner of war stockades Monday.
tee oo He toured the island in a jeep
driven by Boatner. Alexander was
; accompanied by Gen. James A.
Pla d B Van Fleet, U.S. Eighth Army
gue y Commander and a party of lead-
ing military and diplomatic figures.
Bunglers uins of Compound 76 where more
than 6,000 prisoners ae des-
perately to prevent ing broken
a sone ee, tS _]UP_into small units. Boatner told
Monday > duaeek the Savane Aiseander it was “a hell of a
shee . fight.’
ca anes that Alexander reviewed the 100-man
ks en » ea to pool honour guard drawn from' one
Europe’s steel and coal resources a anaitis
was the most constructive since |°O™P22Y of the Royal Canadian
the war, the way the treaty is Regiment and a company of the
written is endangering its success Queen’s Shropshire Light Infantry,
= In recognition of Alexander's
albert Roger Metral who is|service as Governor-General’ of
President of the Federation of|Canada, Canadian troops were
French Mechanical Industries} given a position on the right side
and Chairman of the National]jin the honour guard.
Committee on Armaments of the! Earl Alexander returned to
French Industry told a news con-]Tokvo after his tour.—(CP)
ference here that the Schuman
yy brated = topheavy,
P ed th “Super-dirig- '
eo ~~ ch 7 not taking tate coms U.S. Money Flow Tio
sideration the quality require- s . r
ments of the industry.
He said, “it is dangerous to let india Aids W orld
civil servants organize such an
enterprise the same as one would |

not ask noodle manufacturers to
make rubber.

Leaving

‘“Metral who is leaving for
Paris Tuesday after attending the
Industrial Fair at Toronto also sioned him to study India’s pro-
said that under the Government gramme of expansion in pig iron
of Premier Antoine Pinay, French | and steel industries and to report
currency is entering a phase of; to the bank what assistance she
stabilization and suggested that needed for new projects in these
financial realities may demand industries.
devaluation of tne French Franc
to 400 to the United States dollar
which he said appears to be

the Franc’s real purchasing *
value. =| Olympic Football
He said the authority exercised

by Pinay is restoring public con- | Draw Announced

fidence in the State’s finances.

Adter stressing, that French ex-| yy. grgy!ELSINKL, June 16.
ports to e dollar area had Ags r
fallen alarmingly in the last yeas for the Olympic games football

partly because of the high price|â„¢atches. The first countries in-







The group drove through the



OMNUS, New Delhi, June 16.

George Woods, leader of the
World Bank Steel Mission said
Monday that the free flow of
American capital to India was “in
the interest of the free world,
“Woods is in India as a represen+
tative of the World Bank Presi-
dent Eugene Black who commis-







—UP.



gested stabilization of currency as
well as the removal of exchange
controls which he is also advoca-
ting may permit the lowering of
prices and consequently the re-!
capturing of some lost export) Holland ws.
markets, ; vs. Italy, Egypt vs. Chile, Bud-
_He said United States’ dollar} garia vs. Soviet Union, Yugo Slavia
aid to France in the form of off-| vs, India, Norway ‘vs. Mexico,
shore purchases and military; Denmark vs, Greece, Rumania vs

in the first qualifying round.



the French payments position. jtain, Austria vs, the Saar and
—U.P. | Poland vs. France.—vU.P,



MR. J. O, TUDOR, Roebuck Street Provision Merchant,
defeated Mr. Dan F. Blackett, Editor and Publisher of the
Weekly ree Torch, by 85 votes in the bye-election for the
St. Michael Vestry which took place yesterday as a result
of the death of Mr, C. A. Brathwaite. The final results
as follows: Mr. J. O. Tudor 334; Mr. Dan F. Blackett
Five hundred and ninety seven

votes were cast, and fourteen
were spoilt. Polling was compar-
atively light throughout the day,
but a slight difference in the at-
tendance at the Polls was noticed
in the early morning and late
afternoon. The day’s proceedings
passed without incident, and
everything was quiet and orderly
Polling took place between 8
a.m, and 4 p.m. and the counting
which started at about 4.15 p.m.
lasted until about 4.50 p.m. .Mr.
FE. J. Cole, J.P., was _ Sheriff,
and Mr. R. M. Cave, J.P. acted
as Sub-Sheriff
After the Sheriff had declared
the results, Mr, J, O. Tudor
thanked the Sheriff, the Sub-
Sheriff and the polling officers for
the “admirable manner” in which
they had conducted the proceed-
ings. He said that it was his first
effort, and he had a doughty op-
ponent in Mr. Blackett. He there-
fore had beaten a good man.
Thanks For Support c
He also took the opportunity to
thank all those who found it con-|
venient to attend the polls and! and vote other than the desire
give him their support, and prom- to have a change in the system
ised to do his bit for the benefit; of the Local Government. _
of the parish and the island as a| Mr. Blackett said he appreci-
whole ated the help of those who as-
Mr. Dan F. Blackett said it was| sisted him, and the support given
undoubtedly a pleasure for him by those electors who voted for
to say that he accepted his defeat} him.



Mr. J. O. TUDOR

. Tudor in “a most gracious Mr. H. A. Tudor, in moving a,
aacen Mr. Tudor hed been| Vote of Thanks to the Sheriff and |
able to get 85 more voters than he|his Officers, remarked upon the|
had been able to get, but he felt|!jarmonious way in which the|
that the large number of votes proceedings. were conducted, and |
which he had received would en-|expressed the hope that they! ques Duclos asked National As-
courage him to come again, would be spared many years! sembly President Edouard Herriot,
arrange his
temporary freedom so he can pro-
test the circumstances of his ar-
rest from the floor of Parliament,
Communist Party
nuty wrote a four page letter to
Herriot in the cell of Sante prison
is awaiting the Govern-
t’s next step im its attempt to
prove its charges that he plotted
against the Internal security of the

He hoped that with the passing} more to conduct similar elections.
of the Vestry System he would Mr. Granville seconded the
meet Mr. Tudor when a majority| vote of thanks, and replying, the
of the population of the parish) Sheriff commented upon the
would have Kad the right to vote.|"“smooth running” of the cam-

Mr, Blackett expressed re-|paign, and said that in spite of
gret that less than 4 of the reg- keenness between the two
istered voters for the Vestry ndidates who were prominent
attended the Polls, and said he, and well known by all classes, it
was a bit surprised because he! did not in any way interfere with
could not say that there was|the harmony and quiet of the
any incentive for them to come: election











TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 162

ee epee ei an em

Lord Alexander Tours

Visits Prisoner Of War
Camps With Boatner





From All Quarters :

Substitute
For C’dian
Newsprint

Washington:



The recent prico
increase of Canadian newsprint
improved the chance thai
other types of mewsprint may |
in general use for
papers and magazines.

recently printed!

paper, a sugar cane waste product.
‘The experiment was highly suc-
According to its inventor,
Joaquin de la Roza, bagasse paper |
can be produced at considerably ;
less than half the present price!
of $126 per ton for Canadian news- |

Ottawa: There
mately 74,800,000 telephones in the
world or about three for every
Canada has 21 tele- |
phones for every 100 persons, aj}
ratio exceeded only by the U.S.
with 28 and Sweden with 24. |

India has exported 1.1
; million bales of cotton during the |
year ending April 30, 1952.
was exported to the United King-
dom, Hong Kong, Australia, New
the Netherlands, Bel-
gium, France, Switzerland, Italy,
the United States,
Germany and Canada.

from the Olympic Games in Hel-
sinki this summer will be sent to| they may have to cope with
66 countries via Stockholm, ac-| Australian Olympic
cording to an agreement between
the Finnish and Swedish tele-
graphic authorities.
Stockholm: Several

are approxi- |



100 persons.

Cambridge

ign ; Court Proposed

By HYLTON CLEAVER
AN all-Cambridge eight
been picked to represent
Olympic Regatta.
will be entered for the Grand
Challenge Cup at Henley, w

expected there. |

Those of 16 possibles, who hac
been tried on the Cam for the past
the | 8ix weeks and have not got ir
dorsal vertebrae of a dinosaur |Mfter all, have been formed into
¢{ two fours and will race in the
{ Olympic trials.

This will give the Thames crews
opposition which

have been found at a depth o
200 ft. in the Hoganas-Billesholm
clay mines in Southern Sweden.
The finds, which have been classi- ar —
fied as belonging to an animal them. The Olympic eight is:
‘that lived 150,000,000 years ago,
their kind in

Monaco: The second interna-
tional Riviera Tourist Rally with
55 participants from countries in
Western Europe was won by a
motor coach of the Swedish Trans-
European Bug Lines.

The Swedes were also awarded |
first prize for the best organiza- |

; h al cluding Sweden, winners four|{tion of the trip and the best-
of French products, Metral sug-| oe ago are not called on to play | Planned interior of the coach.
Babylon was
urishing centre of commerce in
King Hammurabi,

should extent

are the first D. D. ee Cee A, :

Training is now going on at Ely
{under Professor Raymond Owen.
The crew will move to Marlow on
June 9, but will not race at that

At Henley on June

| Harold Rickett will take over the
® coaching, and immediately after |
the regatta a switch will be made
to Putney for the final polishing

flo
The others are Dutch Antilles.) wine,
|Germany, Finland and Turkey. ‘reigned there about 2250 B.C. is
known for having imposed a law:
Brazil, United States | “Wine merchants may sell their
wines only at prices fixed by the
Wine sellers must’
| not admit to their premises noisy
intoxicated persons.
must hand over such persons to
those whose mission is to see that
perder is respected. Disobedience |
this law will
punished by death.”

hee Sapte a tae Fite endy are| Brian Lloyd, who as captain of
the Leander Club was entrusted
with the task of picking our eigh‘, |
done a good job, the mor: |
because he has had to leave oul
some of his close personal friends. |
After much counsel with
soaches and recon ce among . tes i ae ay
ce rae tat teeter cin ot mante in whieh he declared that ee taaih = ae hag ae
the 1951 Cambridge eight which’ While he was in favour of Feder- "st ante “ a ere tr
| swept aside all opposition ‘in the ,;#tion, he would not allow Jamaica}, Sauce 8 1 1

Authorities,

items is likely to improve greatly| Hungary, Luxembourg vs. Brie e,

1

Tudor Wins By 85 Votes |

At Vestry Bye-Election |



of that memorabl:
eight have failed to regain their
ie woe cr the Fa non ae ifucts and added: “Jamaica . will) South Africa.—CP)
‘and one left over, as it were, from
1950.—L.E.8.

Loan Scheme
For Trinidad
Sugar Workers

Last Saturday, the first part of}
jthe British pleadings was
ipleted.

Beckett dealt with Iran’s claim)
“abandoned its}

Beckett Continues |
U.K. Arguments
Over Oil Dispute

THE HAGUE, June 16.
Britain’s agent Sir Eric Beckett)
resumed the presentation of Brit-



Iranian oil

dispute before
International

PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 14
The Trinidad Government has
scheme whereby
canefarmers
to obtain loans
up to $1,000 to help build or buy
It takes effect from nex iment. I also make reservation a$, The United States will heip

that Britain had
rights to nationalized Iranian oil-
Persia founded this’ claim
on the British note following the}

sugar workers and



bring the parties together Beckett

explained.—U.P. The money is to



China’s Premier

Toasts Nehru
NEW DELHI, June

Chou En Lai has thanked Prime
Minister Jawaharlal Nehru for his
independent
message from Peiping on Monday,
At a banquet Saturday in honour

Borrowers will be able
pay by easy instalments depend-

pledged support an
The government has

po
bassador K, M. Pannikar
toast to Nehru saying
“independent Foreign
Policy had enabled the age old
friendship between
strengthened and
developed on a new basis.—U.P,

laying out new building areas
that may be provided by “ar

Polish Countess
Stabbed To Death

LONDON, June 16





Duclos Writes
To Herriot

PARIS, June 16.

leader Jac- and helped

a

36 year-old
and Britain for gallantry
as “the old. old story of a jealous|were the best
lover.” —U.P.



Advor

Koje Island









TRAFFIC JAM



TRAFFIC came to a standstill yesterday morning when lorries and carts of every description jammed



Permanent W.L. Appeal

1
PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 14,
| An important step towards West Indian federation was
made to-day with the circulation to all members of the
Caribbean Bar Council of a memorandum by the secretary
of the Trinidad and Tobago Bar Council, Isaae Hyatali, —
The memorandum follows the decision by the local
council to call a two-week conference of the British Carib-
bean Bar Associations to be held at Port-of-Spain in August,
| The object is to consider the formation of a permanent
| West Indian court of appeal and general council of British
| Caribbean Bar leading to the clarification and unification
of legal practice and colonial laws.
aiethppeenntalin _edinnimennsbciiprm en The meeting is expected to take
i place on August 25 and a pre-

ARGUMENT ENDS |liminary meeting of the Bai

Association of Trinidad and

IN EGG BATTLE Tobago will be held next Satur-

day, Hyatali points out in the
EILLES, June 16, a {\ memorandum that political federa-









{
|




argued
verbal battle continued un- f i
til one noticed he was in ounded upon a firm and uniform

, |basis would greatly assist in
front of an egg store. Then | the functioning of | Government
the argument lasted as long || and life when political union

as the supply of cggs.—U.P. comes,

| The memorandum also pointed
|out divergent legal practices in
'

E 9 various British Caribbean terri-
usta on t tories. For instance Jamaica
|follows the English practice gov-

ae erning the functions of counsel

| et JamMaiCa tnd Solicitors “white the “Wind.

ward and Leeward Islands and

{ e Tobago barristers are entitled to
‘Be Railroaded BE in every respect as solicitors



| Trinidad, Barbados and Brit-
jish Guiana have different form

GRENADA, June 16. }of compromises between the two

'To-day’s Daily Gleaner carried 5Ystems. Even the system of law

a statement of Hon, W. A, Busta~| had territorial differences, most

(From Our Own Correspondent

* ‘ , French civil law and_ British

> railr t ederation *T®
of the BW Btsmanto sald he Guiana has some notable relics
would not allow glamorous ideas|°f Old Roman and Dutch law

ito take the place of hard financial |similar to the legal practice of

not be railroaded into Federation
without full and undisputable evi-
dence that B.W.I. Federation will
benefit the islands and the region

“the | German Arms
as a whole. |
Sayi that he is prepared t
sign a vepert on ‘Penerktien re- | Cost $7,000m.
|

cently drafted by the Jamaica







egislature’s Committee, Busta-|

Cate said he did so with reserva. | —MeCloy

tions. “My reservations are thi} ‘
2 ‘will never agree to place powct | WASHINGTON, June, 16
jin the hands of a Federal Gov.! tt “wie dlectowed Monday ‘that
ernment to levy tax on any ui tintted States High Commissione:

whether Jamaica, Trinidad, %

Vincent or any other island for Germany John Me Cloy ha

told Congressmen that the c¢

Taxes On the people must b4 0f German rearmament will
levied by individual unitary gov- | exceed $7,000,000,000 during the
érnment not a Federal Govern- next three years.

to how a Federal Government is to; pay the bill with defence sup-

from ‘be financed because I have very port, funds and military equip
the Sugar Industry Labour Wel- graye responsibility not alone to ment in such quantities as maj

Fund which now stands at
vearly $1,500,000.

The objective of the scheme is te
old estate barrack
and to help workers
homes. The
will be free of interest but there
be a small service charge
of 50 cents per annum on every

Jamaica but 2lso \to the West be appropriate and availabk
Indian people and I must be abie| Me Cloy said,
to tell the people they will to)

better off not worse off undet fe’-; His views were in a statemer

Yration,” inserted in the record of the
Bustamante declared that some, 5¢nate Aen eo Com-~-
e0 su rted federation with-| Mitte earings on le =6peac

retina te of its ‘raved ontract subsequent to his testi

aspects because they are trying to, â„¢ONy given here in person la

make big jobs for themselves and , week. His statement will be i:

“jadded “but I shall do nothing| reply to a series of question
detrimental to Jamaica or the Wer ; pvt by Democratic Senator Guy

i Indies as a whole. I shall not fecd-| Gillette. It was ¢ made publ
erate if it is going to hurt rather | Monday. —U.P.!

than to help us. Federation is a
lifelong thing not just for now!

but always”. IWVest Must Live Up
To Their Ideology





Renison Opens

NEW YORK, June 16.

«
Hurricane Talks Sixty-one delegates from 12
countries to the World Assembly
(FÂ¥om Our Own Correspondent) | Moral Re-armament Conference
PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 16. |'which ended June 10th, on Mack-
Opening the fourth meeting of|inac Island, Michigan, left for
A beautiful Polish Countess who} the Eastern Caribbean Hurricand; London Monday aboard a special
served as a British spy with the|Committee at Kent House this} BOAC chartered plane and pro
European underground during the) morning Acting Governor Reni-, nounced the conference “was a
of|son expressed the hope that th@ great success,”
Allied servicemen to escape thé] deliberations would be happy and
Nazis, was stabbed to death in her] valuable
London hotel Monday.
Dennis George Muldowney

after|bers comprising Meteorologists He said: “The issue at stake is

allegedly confessing to the slaying.:and Telecornmunication officers of whether we meet on a basis cof
Scotland Yard called the slay-|the area, will consider ways and change and the guidance of God! 4

Christine Granville, | means of improving the onganisa~ pr conflict and war. 1 hope that!

by |tion and issue of hurricane warn-| America and the rest of the world,



to ensure that such



and could be
ordinated as to avoid confu

basis, —U.P

})\ tion, be some time in coming
an - eae Sa ote of justice oer
who was right, The |} present with us and properly

Egyptian delegate Prince Ismael
Izzet Hassan, told reporters at the
The meeting attended by repre- sirport here that the “West must
41,|sentatives of the Caribbean, tha live up to their ideology” if they
porter at the staid London Reform: United States and Canada, will want to win the friendship of the
Club, was arrested at the scenellast three days. Committee mem- | Arab bloc.
with murder

|

varnings particularly the Middle East, will
© co- be able to find new unity on this
I





Fi
{
*<
Shot In 7
STOCKHOLM, June 16. 7
Armed Swedish policemen
were tonight guarding the Soviet
Embassy here where crowds have
been demonstrating all day in
protest against the shooting down . a
by Soviet fighters of a Swedish UVORD ALEXANDER ®
Air Foree Catalina reseue plane coeadelieil
over the Baltic early this morn- | ra
ing.
The Swedish Air Force an- Big Three
nouneed that two of the seven .
crew members are suffering frorn .
bullet wounds. The other five Talks In
were not hurt. ain’ a’
The crew reported to Air Force oe *
Headquarters that an MIG 15 Washington
made seven attacks on the Cate-}
lina hitting it several times. The nae esheets laid
wreckage of the flying boat haal Ww SAREE ITO, J ms nae ‘
been spotted earlier. as 1ington is u ider thereat of a
At the same time Premier | Possible new Russian drive to
Erlander who is Acting Fore an | eit the West. British, French
Minister lodged ‘“‘a protest agaist | reo nited ch) ee ee ate
the alleged espionage activity of | ‘Monday a series of talks
Soviet Embassy personnel n 1 problems dividing the three
Sweden. Seven Swedes went in | Powers. a
the dock this morning in the bir- Korea, Indo-China and : Ger-
gest spy trial in neutral Sweden's |many are high pn the list of
* | history. —U., | problems. Talks get added
7 rgeney from the week-end dis-
“ . closure that Moscow is assigning
Kuznetsov ( of {its chief Deputy Foreign Minister
a j Andrei Gromyko to be Ambassa-
dor to London This looks to
Secrets From some officials ae a maior —
an move in the cold war a
. more than likely, one aimed at
Radioman lisrupting the British, French and
United States alliance which is
the heart of the Western defence
LONDON, June 1¢ ystem. Against this. backgrouné
The Soviet Embassy second |ihe Big Three powers will dis«
Secretary Pavel Kuzhetsov nayred | cuss among other things:
in London Court on ree, France’s desire for increased
the a” ol whom the Brit's) | american help in carrying on its
Foreign ee radioman i > 181,000,000,000 «a year war i
oy a stil in Ber-} Indo China
on on Mo y. The conduct of the Korean
Rumours over the week-«« nd ruee negotiations and the handling
said Kuznetsov left London eee ' |of Communist prisoners of war.
ee rng es Geor si How soon and under what
oar nh. on B - Nakeieh rir. conditions the Western Powers
ee a abil Nabe the official | ould offer to meet with Russians
with hie wite and son Mischa spert | ° discuss German issues,
the week-end in the Embas:» The Western Powers have taken
country house outside London the position that the Reds must
Kuznetsov, the fifth ranking |first_ agree to a political survey
Embassy officer was named in jof Germany Recently, however,
ch a the radio va- | there have beew indications that
tor, Wintsin Martin Maren » 24, | the nee and perhaps the
who was ordered to be held for] British ta meé@iing of Big a
trial on charges of giving secre “our officials might be held any-
information to the Soviet D.p-]was (cP)
lomat, —U.P. !





Hodgeson Made Romulo Will

en Broadcast
Commissioner ’
WASHINGTON, June 16,
CANBERRA, June }' Philippine Ambassador Carlos

External Affairs Minister Rich-] Romulo on June 19 will be inter-
erd Casey announced Monday the| viewed on the “Capitol Cloak-
appointment of Colonel William] room” Programme of the Colum-

R. Hodgeson as Australian High] bia Broadcasting System carried
Commissioner to South Africa. in a Mation-wide network,

Since 1949 Hodgeson has been Three correspondents will han-
in Tokyo as British Commor dle the interview which will coin-
wealth Representative on th tide with the celebration here of

Allied Council for Japan and head | “Rizal Day” in honour of Philip-

of the Australian Mission to Japan. ‘pines national herb Jose Rival



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PAGE TWO



Caub Calling



Ng a eee

MISSES ROSALIE AND JUNE KNIGHT

=" GEORGE SEEL, Comp-
troller for Development and
Welfare was a_ passenger for
Grenada by B.W.I.A. yesterday
evening on a four-day visit. He
was accompanied by Lady Seel
and they will be staying at Gov-
ernment House as the guests of
Sir Robert and Lady Arrundell.

Married In U,S.A.

“Dancing Time”’
HE Misses Rosalie and
June Knight, two of the
Scars to appear in “Dancing
Time” which is being present-
ed by the Barbados School of
Dancing at the Empire
Theatre on Friday, June 20.
There are still some seats
leit im the Orchestra and
house for this show and the
Balcony seats which are being

TS wedding took place in the sold in advance, are excellent

U.S.A, recently of Miss Ruth
Anne Moeckel, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Edmond Moeckel of
458 Meade Street, Orange, and
Mr. James Duke Smith, son of
Mrs. William Gilbert of 86 North
Grand Street, Elizabeth, and the
late P. F. Smith at Our Lady of
Lourdes Church, West Orange.

The groom is a Barbadian from
the Crane, St. Philip, and an old
Lodge boy who is now working in
the U.S.A. with Public Service
Electric and Gas.

The bride, a graduate of Mont-
clair High School, was given in
marriage by her father. She wore
a gown of skinner satin trimmed
with chantilly lace. A crown of
seed pearls held her illusion veil
and she carried a bouquet of
white Spring flowers.

Miss Lilian Bridge was maid
of honour, while her bridesmaids
were her cousin, Miss Barbara
Lyon and Miss Joan Sinclair. The
bestman was Mr. John Rodda
and the ushers were Mr. Edward
Moeckel and Messrs. Charles and
Owen Lyons.

The double-ring ceremony was
performed by Rev. Hugh Fitz-
simmons and the reception was
held at the Moresque,
Orange... The couple
left for Williamsburg
their heneymoon,

Agricultural Officer

R.°°V. E. GALE, son of
Hon'ble V. C. Gale, M.L.C.,
and Mrs. Gale, arrived from Eng-
land. yesterday morning by the
S.S. De Grasse. He was accompan-
ied by his wife and three-year-
old son Timothy and they are
staying at Garden Gap, Worthing.
Mr, Gale who is Agricultural
Officer in Nigeria has come over
to spend about four months’
holiday.

Barbadian Returns Home

RRIVING from Curacao’ by

K.L.M. chartered flight re-
cently was Mr. Ambrose Stcute,
son of Mrs. Adora Stoute of
Mount Hill, St. George.

An* old Combermerian, Mr.
Stoute had been working in Cura-
cao for the past six years with
C.P.I.M., during which time he
held various posts such as plant
operator in the treating depart-
ment and clerk in the wages ad-
ministration section of the ac-
counting department as well as
in the personnel section of the
Shipping department.

He -was also Secretary of the
Shell Sports Association and prior
to his departure, was President
of the Barbados Social Club and
a member of the Anglican Church
Council. He has just resigned
from the Company but his future
plans are unsettled.

to

West
afterwards
spend

for viewing a dancing dis-
play.

Bookings are still open
daily. aaat la

nescence
Vublic Kelations Adviser
R. PHILIP
RING,
Adviser to the Comptroller
Development and Welfare,
turned from Aptigua over
week end by B.W.I.A.
paying an official routine
He was accompanied

Hewitt-Myring.
On Business

Public

M* N. E, WILSON, dry goods
+ merchant of Swan Street, was
a passenger by B.W.1A, yesterday
morning for Puerto Rico en route
to New York and London. He has
gone up on a business visit which

will last for about six weeks.

MISS KATHLEEN BULPITT
Theatre Sister

Aa NG yesterday morning

by the S.S. De Grasse from
England was Miss Kathleen Bul-
pitt who has come to take up an

appointment as Theatre Sister
the Barbados General Hospital.

Miss Bulpitt who has had about
twelve years nursing experience,
did her training at Lewisham Hos-
pital in London. She then spent
a year at St. Thomas’ Hospital,
before ,going mn to St. Helen’s,
Hastings as Theatre Sister, a
position which she held for the
past five years,

She said that it was her first
trip abroad and she had a very
smooth crossing. It was quite a
pleasant experience and the peo-
vle on the ship were very friendly.

Miss Bulpitt said that except
for the trees and the colour, Bar-
bados was very much like England
and already she has begun to feel
at home and was sure she was
going to like it here.

at

BY THE WAY eee By Beachcomber

O stuffed owls have been ashore, so I says no th

: placed in a church belfry
in Norfolk to scare away bats.
The arrival in the belfry of un-
stuffed owls will lead to the
installation of two stuffed bats
to scare them away,

The old verger, toiling up the
stone steps, will find himself
ralled_ upon ‘to adjudicate be-
tween* the stuffed and the un-
stuffed. And so the long day
wears to its close,

From Mrs. Withersedge

to her sister Flo

NE. evening a_ sailor come
aboard, evidinkly avin mis-

lade isself and fuzzy in the ead.
E ast whither this old tub was
bound, so I says, umering im
like, Maddigasker, and then e
looks acrorst the river, and e says
tell me shipmate what is that
landfall I see yonder far aawy.
And I says Arreds Ferniture Dip-
pository, I says, and e says what
a@ rum name, is it Japanese, and
I says no Turkish, and what the
ell we was either! of us talkin
about I don't know. Is mind
was wdnderin and e sang a cou-
ple of vulgar lines and fell
‘ asleep on what we still call the
deck. And e woke up once and
said would e be knifed if e went

NOW IN

use
fell
me

is

ey
boms ereabouts, and e
asleep agen, got im ashore at dawn, Such
a sailors life. Flo......

Dr. Rhubarb’s corner

Ethel writes: My fiance
twangs his braces while he talks,
stretching them and letting them

In White and Colours

be 4 Costivy bit of writing
flip back against the sides of his 4 Visitea ditter
erentivy whe 1 t
chest, What ought I to do? Away (6) Recs,
8 Roce round coverage
Dr. Rhubarb s ay s: Say {5 Hound wing owed tt ae the
patiently and courteously, “Shall meet (4)
I sing something while you play @ /'s side ror areca. te)
for me on your braces?” That ~ 1 eat Kenham and
will put him out of countenance, rt in little credit. (7)
* sociated with baby feet
In passing (6) 2. The last word. (3)
2 § (8)
OOLS never tire of saying Down
that you cannot have a play 1 P isn't it? (7)
raf * ‘ ¢ , arri > utchers? Oh no (¥)
or a film about a happy marriage } time (anag.) (9)
because it is a dull subject. The } ‘te bushes to get the
‘ae “Voy 2 r Bird (5)
French film oyage en » in ok ‘
Amerique” is ‘the delightful story 6 He let reds bet under oove {3}
of a happy marriage. It is quiec 8 The end of 3. (3)
and intelligent, Nobody is 10 ‘ vile way to exist. (5)
. : 4 x + 12 Make tovable (6)
blackmailed, tprtured, or kicked *\5 Pur arty in 24° then 4
: ~ 2 nd ita
in the face. And it has that . wnonym (4)
touch of poetry which only }) can do this tu enaracter (5)
° ‘ : a Upse 1 i yo g
Frenoh films ean provide, You met n Cornwail: ” (3)
feel that the man _ behind the 1 PeeTon of yesterdays ourale
camera walked along whistling 16 Giisp fe "WAN YevE 8, | Assur @;
gaily, and was always coming by [} oath The 8 Wrath 9
chance on just what he wanted to Te : Qmsia want 3 Ramp 4
” 2 > 5 ‘one 7 eturned 4
photograph, The smell is of the “yinye > , Tone 7 pretunned, 9
open air, not the studio set. Thin
—_—————
STOCK
Tar ” m
AN ALL ROUND UTILITY CLOTH 36” o....ccccscseestsnseseeneeen $ .84
.
36” 89

PRINTED SHIOZE
NOW

LARGE SHIPMENT OF JOHNSON’S GOLDEN-DAWN WARE

OPENING

Single and in

. T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606 3

DIAL 4220

Sets. Tea, Dinner, Coffee



YOUR SHOE STORES

HEWITT-MyY-
Relations
for
re-
the
after
visit,
by Mrs,







Married At Pilgrim Holiness





A’ the White Park Pilgrim
Holiness Church on Thurs-
day, June 5, Miss 3ertine
Squires of on Kop”, St. Hill
Road, Carrington Village, and en

of the Unique Progres-
was married to Mr,

employe
sive Society,

J. Edward Brown of Boston,
Massachusetts,

The bride who was given in
marriage by her brother, Mr. Al-
lan Squires of Trinidad, wore
a dress of nylon ang lace and a
beautiful head-dress, a gift from
the U.S.A. She carried a bouquey
of anthurium lilies and rosebud»

She was attended by Miss Jean
Chandler as chief bridesmaid who
wore a dress of pink ny on and a
he :d-dress ‘of pink crinoline and
carried a posy of pink rosebuds
and forget-me-nots.

The flower girls were the
Misses Jean Ishmael, Esther
Clarke, Denise Rawlins, Marcia

Hunte, Marcia West and Sommer-
set Thomas. They all wore dress-
es of sheer with kilted skirts and
head - dresses of crinoline to
match and carried posies of for-
get-me-nots.

The ceremony which was fully
choral, was conducted by Rev.
I. M. Wickham. The duties of
bestman were performed by Mr.
Beresford Thomas, while those
ef ushers fell to Mr. Keith
Squires and Mr. Erro! Gay.

A reception was held at “Spion
Kop”, St. Hill Road, after which
the couple left for “Fleet View”.
Bathsheba, for their honeymoon.

Cricket and Accountancy

OY MARSHALL; the Barba-

dos and West Indies pro-
fessional who is now playing for
Lowerhouse in the Lancashire
League is looking ahead tothe
days when his cricket career will
finish, He has started studying
accountancy with a firm in Burn-
ley. Five days a week he is at the
office, from nime until five.’ This
still leaves him free to coach the
Lowerhouse players in the even-
ings and to play in any evening
games, and at week-ends,

And finally here is news of
Frankie Worrell, whose. 303 open-
fing partnership last week with
Radcliffe skipper Bill Greenhalgh

broke all league regords. Frank
and his skipper bo appeared in
a benefit match for the Lan-

cashire County professional, Win-
ston Place, at Whitefield last Sun-
day.

First Visit To W.I.

ISS FLORENCE MAHER
who owns the Alpha Re:-
taurant in Dublin, Ireland, is

now making her first trip to the
West Indies. She arrived yester-
dey morning from Southampton
en the De Grasse and will be
remaining until July 13 staying at
the Marine Hotel.

She said that she came out
principally to see her brother Mr.
R. J. Maher who is employed as
a driller in the oilfields in Trini-
dad. He expects to join her
shortly.

Police Officer in B.G.

M* F'REDERICK. CANNON,
a Police Officer stationed at
McKenzie, British Guiana, arrived

here on Sunday by the Lady
Rodney for about eight days’
holiday, He was accompanied by

his wife and they are
“Accra”, Rockley,
Judge Returns
R. E. C. JACKMAN, retired

staying at



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

4




CENTURY ago Ambas-

* sadors really mattered
To-day they are little more
than puppets gesticulatins
to order at the end of i
telegraph wire, But
although their power ha
declined they and thei

wives still have grea
advantar s. As observer
of the follies, the eccen-
tricities and frailties of
those who control our
destiny they have an

incomparable position. For
this reason their memoirs,
howcver trivial, are seldom
duil

Here 1s Signora lisabetta
Cerruti telling the story of her
life between 1923 and 1940*
During that time her husband

was [talen Ambassador succes.
s.vely in Pekin. Moscow, Rio de





ro Paris and Berlin. She
m and sat next to characters
2s dive as Hitler Einstein

Pansham Lama and the Duke of
Windsor Now she recounts her
memoirs im a book agrecably
spiced by acute observat'on and
move than a touch of feline
malice

The aristocrat

She talks of the personatities
met in Russia. There was
Chicherin. as Soviet Foreign
Minister. originally an aristocrat
reserving and ratifyin his
opulent tastes under the Bolshe-
vik regime; something of a snob
too. for he never failed to allude
in conversation to his aristocratic
Italian cousins in Genoa.

Litvinov who _ succeeded
Chicherin as Foreign Minister
was a very different character
He took Bolshevism seriously
and believed in austerity. Sig-
nora Cerru‘i's sharp eye noticed
that Mme. Litvinov (formerly
Miss Ivy Low of London) always
had holes in her stockings. and
was obliged to horrow a fur coat
from a State shop when she had
to pay an official visit with her
husband to Turkey.

Hitler and Eva




From Russia, afve: a bricf
interval! at Rio, the Cerrutis
moved in 1932 to Berlin where



t remained for three years.
Signora Cerruti frequently met
Hitler

On the
ing question of
attitude to women she natur-
ally had a firm view. He was,
she says. “completely asexual
in every way.” But her judg-
ment, based as it is on feminine
intuition—that most fallible
guide to truth—cannot be re-
garded as conclusive. The rela-
tions between Hitler and Eva
Braun remain as mysterious as
ever.

The Cerrutis were enter-
tained from time to time by
Goering This entertainment was
never dull. One's host might



perennially fascinat-
the Fuehrer's

een ENUU Aa UT EO

THE SIGNORA
SIZES UP
THE FAMOUS |

by ROBERT BL








SIGNORA CERRUT!
- + & matter of intuition.

begin by appearing dressed in
red velvet like a Renaissance
grandee.

A quick change and he would
eturn in grey breeches and a
rey shirt with purple stripes
hen accompaniea by thirty
rest guards in medieval
“costume he would escort nis
guests around his grotesque
estate at Karinhall.

Fiasco

When the Cerrutis visited him
there the show-pece was to be
the sight of a bull bison mating
with the female of the species.
but this. alas, ended in a comic
flasco. In no way disconcerted.
Goering hurried back aheag of
iS guests in order to change into
a costume of emerald green and
greet them with a lance in his
hand and a silver hunting horn
slung from his neck

In 1985 the Cerrutis, who
disapproved of Mussolini’s new
pro-German policy, were moved
to Paris. Two years later Musso-
lint decided to withdraw his
ambassador and they retired to
Rome.

Signora Cerruti had no use
for Mussolini, She tells the
story of a visit by Mr. Eden to
Rome on the eve of the Abys-
sinian war.

A luncheon was held in Eden's
honour. The Duce, determined

insult him, arrived late wear-
a patched old coat, an open
t, tennis shoes,
socks. He behaved as offen-
sively as possible throughout
the meai, and the party broke
up without a word being
exchanged between the two men.

Serious ? No

This is a book which wil! give
pleasure to many, It is not. and
does not claim to be, a serious
contribution to the history of
international relations. But it
gives a vivid picture of scenes
and people, and it may well be
remembered long after the more
solemn works of diplomatic
history have mouldered away
into dusty oblivion.

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED

* AMBASSADOR’S WIFE, = by
oun Cerruti (Allen and Unwin,
18s.).

London Express Service.

en == EE

LISTENING HOURS

TUESDAY, June 17, 1952
4.00 — 7.15 p.m 19.76 M, 25.53 M
4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The
Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. New Records,
4.45 p.m, Sandy MacI‘herson, 5.00 p m
Composer of the Week, 5.15 p.m. Nights
at the Opera, 6.00 p.m. Ulster Maga-
zine, 6.15 p.m. Meet the
weaith, 45 p.m. Sports Round-Up and
Programme Parade, 7.00 p.m, The News,
7.10 Home News from Britain
————

ROODAL





Judge of the Assistant
Court of Appeal and Mrs. Jack- EM
man, returned to Barbados on PIRE
Sunday morning by the Lady LAST TWO SHOWS TODAY
Rodney from St. Vincent where 4.45 & 8.30

they had been for a holiday.

CuOSSSWORD



Across
dropping a catch
IWoolNBS Snow porec

1 Lost
7 Any
) Sharm
l
I





olece of ding

ajority



Nas no ¢






























mir aetsesionnnssep-eteiipn i sate tees Sassen ssn Slit aaa sean

Alexander Korda Presents - - -
Vivien LEIGH Taree OLIVER
L

“THAT HAMILTON WOMAN”



WED. 18TH & THURS. 19TH
4.30 & 8.30
Eddy ARNOLD EN
“HOEDOWN”
AND
“HURRICANE ISLAND”
Starring:— Jon HALL
OLYMPIC

TODAY & TOMORROW 4.30 & 815
A Colossal Double

“MAKE BELIEVE BALLROOM”
and
“711 OCEAN DRIVE”

THUR, 19TH. ONLY: 4 30 & 8.15



“I JANE DOE"

with
John CARROLL — Vera RALSTON
and

“SLEEPY LAGOON”

2 DODSOSFOOFFF

AT

DRILL

Band Dance Orchestra

Admission’ by Ticket:

Common- P




DRAWING

FOR

THE FORESTERS'’
SCHOLARSHIP RAFFLE

By Mr. Lewis, Secretary B’dos Turf Club
takes place on SATURDAY, JULY 5TH

DANCE

AT THE

By kind permission of Colonel Michelin the Police

Raffle Tickets are still available at Singer Machine
Co., Co-operative Bank and A. E. Taylor Ltd.

7.76 — 10.30 p.m. ....,. % 53M 31.39 M
7.15 p.m. Rendezvous, 7.45 p m Fer
sonal Portrait, 8 00 pm John werent
8.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8,30 Fue
Report from Britain, 8.45 p.m. pst et
8.55 p.m, From the Editorials, 9. m3 at
Books to Read, 9.15 p.m. The Arts, 9.
m. Ray's A Laugh, 10 00 Pitt An
Newss, 10.10 p.m. News Talk, 1 a p.m.
Geoffrey Bumphrey Talking, 10. x

Returnto Pakistan. a

THEATRES



SD eos

ROXY

TODAY (Only) 4.90 & 8.15

“IT HAPPEN TO ONE MAN”
and

“A DANGEROUS PROFESSION”
with — George RAFT



WED. 18TH & THUR. 19TH
4.30 & 8.15

United Artist Double—
‘RED LIGHT"
with:— George RAFT
and

“QUEEN FOR A DAY"

ROYAL
LAST TWO SHOWS
30 & 8.15

Whole Serial—
“SUPERMAN” ‘:

TODAY
4.

WED, 18TH & THUR. 19TH
4.30 & 8.15
“HOEDOWN”

with:— Eddy ARNOLD
and
“MAKE BELIEVE BALLROOM”

with:— Frankie LANE



A

HALL

will supply the Music

SUBSCRIPTION $1.00

:

TUESDAY, JUNE 17,

Punch Made Up Some Riddles

About One Thing ~

— And They Were All
By MAX TRELL

“WELL,” said Mr. Punch, smil- |/
ing, “I've just thought of some
brand new riddles. And the curious |
thing about them is, they're all)
about one thing.” i

Mr. Punch was talking to every- |
one in the playroom—to Teddy the
Stuffed Bear, and Mary-Jane the
rag-doll, and General Tin, and
Knarf and Hanid.

“All about the same _ thing,
Punch?” said General Tin. “What
do you mean?”

Everyone else was glad that Gen-
eral Tin asked this question. For
they were all wondering, too.

All About Roads

Mr. Punch nodded. “They’re all
about Roads. But, of course,” he
added, “they’re about different
kinds of roads. I'll give you the
first riddle and you'll see just what
I mean.”

This was Mr. Punch’s first rid-
dle about a road:

1 cross the brooks and rivers
As well as any ship at sea;
But when | reach the ocean,
I know that trip is not for me!
“Now,” said Mr. Punch, smiling
again; “what sort of a road is
that? And let me give you a hint.
That road has a very special name,
though it really is a road.”

Hanid said eagerly: “Is it a
Bridge?”
“Yes indeed, my dear! That’s

just what it is! A road that goes
over the water is called a bridge.
And naturally it can’t cross the
ocean when it comes to it. The ocean
is much too wide for any bridge.”
Then Mr. Punch read his segond
poem about a road.
Before me stands a great big hill
With towering trees and rocks |
and snow
But do | climb it? No—not I!
Right through and through
that hill | go!
Mr. Punch looked around the |
room, waiting for someone to give |
him the answer. It was Mary-Jane









Punch asked Hanid ». riddle.

who guessed it. “A Tunnel?” she
said,

“Correct, Mary-Jane!” “And a
tunnel is a road, too. Now guess
this one.”

The people rarely walk on me,

But iron tracks I bear,
And trains go roaring on my back
And people ride most every-
where.

“Oh, 1 know!” cried Teddy the
Stuffed Bear. “I know what kind
of a road that is! It’s a—a.. .”
Teddy paused. “I can’t think of the

| name but I know just what it is.”

Knarf had to help Teddy out
(for he was quite sure that Teddy
really knew). “A Railroad,” he
whispered.

“Yes! A Railroad! A Railroad!”

Mr. Punch said that was right,
too. He said he had one last riddle
about a very wonderful kind of
road,

I’m every color, every hue

The tallest trees are not
high;
sun

as

The must shine, the rain
must fall ;
I’m like a roadway in the sky!
Everyone guessed that one! They
all shouted in one voice: “It’s a
Rainbow!”

And so it was.

PLAZA THEATRES

BRIDGETOWN BARBAREES ——OIsTIN
Sent ines (Dial 5170) (Dial 8404)
TODAY & TOMORROW ;|LAST 2 Shows TODAY ||Mat. Today 4.45 PM

430 & 8.30 445 & 8.30 p.m, “1 BECAME A cat

Stan ee chal SIERRA John Garfield &
: (Color) “NOBODY LIVES J
DALLAS Audie MURPHY and FOREVER

_Wanda

(Color) =
ae Thurs.

Gary COOPER and
Highway 301
Steve COCHRAN

——
Thurs. Special 1.30 p.m.
Charles Starrett Double:





Wed. & Thirs.
4.30 & 8.30 p.m.
“ILLEGAL ENTRY"

er ae TONITE 8.30

eo eo (on stage)
“BLONDE ALIBI"
Abbott & Costello NIGHT (CF, aAGtC
“IN SOCIETY” & ACTION! i
“Prof. CLIFFTON”

(French Magician)

Also the Western
Thrille

“SOUTH OF || Howard DUFF é& “BRAND OF FEAR”
Pe Vata “CALAMITY JANE” Jimmy Wakely
RENEGADES, oF THE SAGE") ‘Toward DUFF. 445 & 8.30 P.M,

Opening THURS

Opening FRIDAY

“SMART GIRLS



“ G DON’T TALK"
A STREETCAR Fee A LYNN” aa ;
NAMED DESIRE' ss FAYRBANKS || "HER KIND OF MAN



GLOBE

TO-DAY only 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.

‘“‘BOOMERANG”’

Dana Andrews

AND

“I'D CLIMB THE HIGHEST MOUNTAIN”
(SUSAN HAYWARD — WILLIAM LUNDIGAN).

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 4.45 and 8.30

STORMY WEATHER (LENA

HORNE — CAB CALLOWAY)

“ACT OF VIOLENCE”

Now in Stock - - - -

Flit Sprays

Flit Powder

Mistol in 42-02, & 2-02.
Habdy Oil

Paraffin Oil $1.80 per gal.

R. M. JONES



PI

ENGINEER B

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BAY STREET

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Yalb., %41b., 1%4lb., 134]b., 244b., 3lb.
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OPEN & BOX SPANNERS
PRESSURE GAUGES 0-400 Ib.

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

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Nujol in pts.
Petroleum Jelly
White, 23c, per Ib.
Yellow, 18c. per Ib.
Household Wax

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PE

yy”, VA’ 36”, ye”, 56”, 34”, %", 4%; 1%", 134”, z; 3”
BSF
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USS or NC
4”, fe”, 36”, Te”, Ye", ; a 56”, 34”

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MACHINES

DIAL 4269











1952













POSS STCOSF PPLE FSSOOSS,
Bread from
$&@an..,.
. ZEPHERIN’S,

or any good bakery,
but when you want to

ENJOY

good toast
You should have one of the

MOD) GAS COOKERS

Ci and see them
t your Gas Showroom, Ba:

y St .

4%

A
L 500605

GCAIETY

The Garden—St. James



TODAY and TOMORROW 8.30 p.m.

“BACHELOR ‘AND THE
BOBBY SOXER"
Cary GRANT &

“BLOOD ON THE ae



“CRY DANGER"
and
“SONG of the SOUTH”



HERE AT LASTY
FIVE ACADEMY
AWARD WINNER!



6

“A
Streetcar
Named
Desire’

w= ELIA KAZAN senean suse CHARLES K FELDMAN

AND

MARLON
BRANDO

EXCITING
WARNER
BROS.
PICTURE

TN TT III 8 LI ie I

urbY ourPiles

It is no longer necessary to s
pains, itching and torment from Piles
since the discovery of Hytex (formerly

* *nown as Chinaroid). Hytex starts to
work in 10 minutes and not only stops
the pain byt also takes out the swell-
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irritation thereby curbing other trou-
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Nervousness, Backache, Constipation,
loss of energy, eens and Irritable
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tee Hytex must stop your pile
pains and troubles or money back os
return of empty pac!

Pyorrhea and









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Bleeding
teeth mean
rhea or Trench
that will eventually cause you to lose

ims, sore mouth, or
at you are a victim of Pyor-
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our teeth and have to wear fi
fore your time. Since the
War these mouth diseases ve sp!
throughout the world so that now scien-
tists say that four out of every five le
are sufferers sooner or later. wi in
too iate, because they often cause not oly
ate, bec: ey often ca
the loss of teeth, but also chronic rheuma-
tism and heart trouble,

New Discovery Saves Teeth

the discove: it
Ty oO en American

scientist, fights these ¢: & new
and quick way. It penetrates right to the
root of the trouble, stops gums bleed-
ing the very first day, quickly the
foremene ges bd fo ein as zoom

ms the The follow tter
from Mr. W. W. B. shows the result that
Amosan users get: “I suffered from Trench
Mouth and Pyorrhea for ten fe My

ms were sore and bleeding and I

i¢»t four teeth, while several other teeth
were getting looser all the time. I tried
meny things and then heard of this new
discovery Aion In 24 hours after
Amosan my gums had progped .
The soreness in my mouth d enppesred
Ba loge tenth were ut igutar and thet
my loose were muc Tr
I could eat the hardest of food.”
Amosan works so fast and so certain
that it is guaranteed to your
from bleeding, end sore mouth and
your teeth to your complete satisf:
money back on return of empty
Don't take a chance on losing your teeth or
suffering the dangers from’ rheumatiam
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Amosan?.?4°%

For Pyorrhea--Trench Mouth

i











TUESDAY, JUNE

17,

1952



Animals Slaughtered To jy

Control Disease e

How U.K’s Farmers
Meet Menace To
Livestock Industry,

By L. F. EASTERBROOK

Agricultural of the
“News Chronicle” (London)

While he .was away on a
holida_ rerseas recéntly a tele-
gram wa. re.*ived by the wealthy
head of a famous United Kingdom
brewery firm notifying him that
the entire herd of pedigree cattle
on his estate had been destroyed
by official order.

This compulsory slaughtering of
some £20,000 of Guernsey cattle,
owned by Lord Iveagh, is one of
the latest, and the largest, live-
stock losses in Britain in recent
years. It was necessitated by the
United Kingdom’s inflexible war
on “foot and mouth” disease—a
malady which can infect all farm
animals with a cloven hoof—
cattle, pigs and sheep, Where in-
fection is proved, whether it is
of a one-acre man’s solitary pig
or, as in thé present case, of a
rich man’s prize herd of 163
cattle, the sick animals must be
destroyed by order of Britain's
Ministry of Agriculture as a safe-
guard for the whole country.

“Foot and mouth” disease is so
called because the first symptom
of it is a discharge from the mouth
or feet of the affected animal.
Since last November, there have
been over 160 outbreaks involving
many thousands of animals,

Spread By A Virus

The disease is spread by a virus
(minute organism carrying the in-
fection) that is so small that no
microscope reyeals it and the
finest filter will not separate it,
There are at least three types of
this virus and vaccination with one
type gives no immunity against
the others, So although vaccination
might be a safeguard up to a
point, it cannot guarantee 100 per
cent. success, The disease is rarely
fatal, but the fever and the pain
of eating and walking it causes
the animals results in such loss
of condition (and im cows a falling
off of milk yield) that farmers
would suffer heavy financial loss
if it were allowed to spread
throughout their sherds and. flocks.

This it would do very quickly

| J eee

disinfected.



if nothing was done about it, for
it is a most infectious disease. The
virus can even be carried by the
wheels of passing vehicles or by
the boots of a stockman who has
attended diseased animals. It is
suspected that most of the present
outbreaks were due to. virus
brought to Britain on the legs and
feathers of migrating birds.

For many years research into
the problem has been carried on
in Britain, but so far no solution
has been found, Therefore, to
hold the disease in check the very
drastic remedy has been resorted
to of slaughtering all animals in
a flock or herd in which there is
an outbreak. Any other animals
which have been in actual con-
tact with them are also killed off.
No movement of animals out of
an area of 15 miles around the
infected premises is permitted, or
within the area.

Government Pays
Compensation

Anyone leaving places where
there is infection must first wash
his hands and disinfect his boots
and, if practicable, change his
clothing, The Government pays
compensation, at market value,
for all animals slaughtered. But
it is hard for a man who may have
spent a lifetime building up his
stock to see his efforts wiped out
The necessity for such drastic
measures is, however, understood



FREE
ee BOA.







ana =." 23.

Even the wheels of this Farmer's bicycle is

throughout Britain, although until
aman can get his farm re-stocked
after the six weeks compulsory
waiting period, he is out of
business.

It is not unlike what happens
on the Gold Coast, for instance,
when cocoa trees have to be eut
down because of swollen shoot, to
prevent more trees being affected
Nevertheless, United Kingdom
farmers recognise that these
measures are in their interests in
the long run. They co-operate
fully with the Government in
carrying them out and their own
organisation, the National Farmers’
Union, fully endorses this policy
and would not have things other-
wise in the present state of
knowledge in tackling this disease.

The present outbreaks have
been among the most costly for
recent years, Nearly 20,000 animals
have had to be slaughtered, with
upwards of £500,000 paid in com-
pensation. But in France, where
the disease is left io take its
course and the animals recover, the
apnual! loss in terms of milk and
meat while they are ill, runs into
millions of pounds. French farmers
lose this not only in a bad year
tor foot and mouth disease but
every year, because the disease
has become permanently estab-
lished over a large part of that
evuntry. By the — slaughtering
policy this is being prevented from
happening in Britain.





“IRM



First chalienge made
to State

City Editor FREDERICK ELLIS

FF OR the first time since it was set up
as a State monopoly British Overseas

Airways Corporation

al liners

14

is likely to face |

free enterprise competition on. a regular

service.
Two of Britain’s

biggest private air

companies—Airwork Ltd. and Hunting Air

seeking

permission to run a

regular passenger service between Britain

and Nairobi,
with B.0.A.C,

Kenya, in direct competition

Their application has already been vetted
by the Air Transport Advisory Counei!, which — »

recentl

recommended increased epport unities

Br

for independent companies.

The application is now

and Civil Aviation. Mr

before the Mintste! of vi
Alan Lennox. Bovri m

@hho is expected to make his decision known shori!y



W

TABLETS WILL QUICKLY BRING RELIEF
FROM ANY TYPE OF PAIN. AND REMEM-
BER, WITH THEIR FOIL PACKING THEY’RE

KEPT ABSOLUTELY

WHENEVER YOU MAY WANT THEM.



SSS =

TAKE OFF THAT MASK
OF PAIN

HIZZ

FRESH FOR YOU...







BARBADOS

=

This sign warns farmers to steer clear

Little Activity On
Stock Exchange

LONDON, June 16

Very little activity was discern-
ible on the London Stock Ex-
change today.

Copper shares provided the
bright spot. They were early mark-
ed higher following the raising of
the United Kingdom price for the
metal by £50 per ton. But prices
finished under the day's best as a
result of profit taking. Giltedged
mostly eased one-eighth of a point
in small business.

The short-dated stocks however
were supported and gained a small
fraction. Small speculative busi-
ness in foreign bonds resulted in
Japanese gaining one point on the
day. Germans however finished
irregular after being one and a
half points up.

There was litue movement of
any sort among industrials. The
engineering groups recorded scat-
tered gains. Tobaccos however
were inclined to dullness while
the miscellaneous leaders shed a
few pence. Royal Dutch were in
request and gained five-eighths of
a point to 304. But the remainder
of the oil group was dull.

South African gold shares were
quietly firm with a good weekend
press aiding We Freddies and
Pioneers groups. Diamonds were
occasionally better*+—U.P,



THESE ARE THE PLANES

The tree enterprisers
flying

nnedon (Herts)
Frequency of the service and
tled

0 This compares with £140 by

will

Vice ise

s £252

from Blackbushe
the H.Q.s of the companies.

Hermes 40-seat planes

use Viking 27-seat

(Surrey) and

fares are still to be

Hut the sinele fare is expected to be under

B.O.A.C., whose daily
B.O.A.C.’s return

A '%OAC spokesman said yesterday : “ We can face

ipetition
If the new service is successful
set

icea prrees
LHWESE
H which has ig
ad by 66-ve
9s Offieer.in World War L

shipping
i\r-old Perey Hunting, a Royal Flying

Traffic is good on the route.”

the free enterprisers

k permission to fly on other Empire routes at

ARE THE MEN

iterests, ts

Airwork-which started with a Tiger Moth single-
ine pi®neein 1928, is the biggest private air firm in

vin, with} fleet of more than

It is

1 month

nterests of





250.

run from Mayfair offices by 45-year-old Myles

itl, who controls flights adding up to some 275,000
le {t is backed in the City by the power-
Lord Cowdray and

his family.
London Express Service



This world-wide

tion for you.



. Bathsheba Railway Station, and

ARRIVED!!
FERGUSON
DIESEL WHEEL

TRACTOR

display at our show-room we shall be pleased

to arrange a demonstration at your planta-



ADVOCATE



‘SEA AND AIR
TRAFFIC

Governor Opens
Social Centre

At Bathsheba







His Excellency the Governor
Sir William Savage on Saturday
evening officially opened the ibis
Secial Centre at Bathsheba, St.
Joseph. In Carlisle Bay
é
Rev. L. C. Mallalieu, Rector of M.V. Landy Patricia, Sch. 1 D
- a. = sor Sch tosarene Ser France pv
St Joseph and Chairman of St. Shitn, “Sen. Laudalpha MV. I \
Jas@ph Welfare Committee, made Sch Mary M Lew MI
the introductory remarks, He said; “VY Willenstad.
“Your Excellency, Lady Savage, wy. cacique trance}
Tadies and Gentlemen. It is my st. Lucia with cargo
pleasure and duty to ask you, 3.5. DeGras 0.235 fre M
Sir, formally to declare this Social ‘4%. jo won
Centre open. As you will’ have DEPARTUPES
Seen, it is not yet complete—the $.5. DeGraswse for Trinidad with ps
@rounds have yet to be de- "*
veloped—but as there is a de- Seawell
mand’ for it’s use we ¢ 6 ARRIVALS—by B.W.IA. on Friday
longer delay its roe a E Down Eb
Clay its forma] opening. K. Dotson, E. Dotson, G. Dots w
_ This Social Centre, he con- Dotson, J. Dotson, G. Trotman, A Oche
tinued,» has been made possible - anh oe = Rt gr re ag
Slaybaugh Siaybaugh, Coat
by the generosity cf Govern- Newsam. ij. Torts. Be Fingal), ), Ke
ment. who from Social Weltare = 4 J James, L Wooding
: f “ 1. O. B. Woeoding, C Wooding
=" have granted money far “ARRIVALS by BW LA. on Friday
fh purchese of this building From GRENADA
formerly known s . a S Evelyn, 1 Brewster, M. Chart
bow Hotel) ‘and ‘a the. Rain- E. Clark, S Clark, Z. Douglas
Hote an or its removal pDePARTURES—by BW.1A. on Friday
to this site and its renovation. for TRINIDAD
Gow ; c A. McLean, R. McLean, N. Gransau
. Nomar | has also placed at ¢ “Branch, J. Bourne 2. Knowles, <
our disposal the land of the old Gregory, &, Robinson, M. Baston, J

Gibbs, B. Figaro, A. Heyliger, M. Lar

other land purchased for the pretot. Noumagel, &. Mumphries,
purpose on which this building: DEPARTURES—by B.W.1 A. on Fride
now stands. For ANTIGUA

Rev. H. Me Alister, M. Chesterfieid

Charch Lands 4, Avi
it may be of interest to note bh With B

that over 100 years ago, this lana 'â„¢ Touch With Barbados
was part of the Church lands oi Coastal Station
this parish, or closely adjacent CABLE & WIRELESS (West Indies
to it, when the Rectory was on bd. advise that they can now conn

4 nicate with the following ships throue
Beach Mount Hill — a symbol of their Barbados Coast Station

Station





the long @4tadlished relation- ss ae Princ Cottica, Lad
ship between Church and State Neison Drupa, Golfito Mesn Verdc
my * North Stay Firdtjot angen souther
2 pee See has been established Distri ts, Mahiburg. 1 Reariids "Sorbenh
y a Social Committee appointed Stanmore, Bss0 France, Viannis, Utilita
a . S. Hele Regent Tig Wave Premie
by the Vestry, and will continue Ganeny Wacaten, Nerauidria, ‘rina?
oa be run by that committee as De Grasse, Planter, Barbaraann, Tist
ong as the Vestry so desires icastor fucito, Brazil, Quilme Pick
I ne Pacifie Forts Flaming oO Alee
As Chairman, I would like to ‘cippor. Cavinn, Alcon Polncis,’ Chats
record our thanks and gratitude De Barquismeto, Artillero, Ameri
. , Fort Townshend, Antontitte Usodimer
z Mr R. B Moulder who drew Aveentnenh Wevter, "Aleon “Cav te
plans and supervised ‘he con- suanue, Baron Elphinstone, Saman
struction to Mr. G. Riley, a Cusablanco, Thorsisie, Bacchus, Dolor
arishi ; - aces Trans Pacific, Mercator, Ivy Bank, Abi
parishioner who, as the contracto! Alfred Clegg. Ada Belle Likes. FE
removed the building and re- fethienem, Skauvann, Polycrown, Inq
constructed it according to plans, ierpreter, Archangelos, Telamon, N. 'l
He also thanked Mr. Merton (ita... Brotiingsborg, John | Howland
ontebello Hits, Esso I
McCarty (Secretary) Mr. Alfred Lord Liovd George, Giulia, Doreth
King (Treasurer) and the other Stevenson, Bugene Whilgard and
members of the committee for @™2d° Carib Soa
th#ir co-operation and help in ATES “RVG Mu
spite of the fact that some of RATE ‘soe ~ - ANGE
their meetings were abortive NEW YORK
He thanked too Miss Arne and Selling _tbwy ing
Mrs. Vaughn for their valuable “ 4/1°% ¢heques on Bankers 7
advice. In anticipation he Drafts 71 5/0
thanked Mr. Skeete of the Agri- 4y10% Cute ‘i
719 wreney 2/10
cultural Department for promis- Coupons a9 5/10
Lar) to come out to Bathsheba » Silver 20
and give advice and he'p in the re
77 2/106 ” , ankers 7% 5
matter of trees and ornamental ” ”'0% [usaues op pankers To!
plants for the grounds. Sight Drafte 78 2/10
Â¥ 210 Cabe
+ 7/10 « ene ™ ‘
_ Favourite Site ee Gepoun 13.310
Tt is desired, he went on, to (i! Silver 0



have this Centre open to the use
of the Parishioners of St. Joseph,
and of Social Organizations with-

On Falsification

in the peri. We have here, Of A
representatives of the Police 2 \ Ch >
any Scouts and Guides, and ccounts = |
St. Joseph's Men's Christian His Worshi >

p Mr. C. L. Walwyn,
Association. Athena this is City Police Magistrate, yester-
ihe Seaman btany the, contre oF cay ordered 20-vear-cid “Lion
Joseph lead to this favour- wares Wy Fane Mls teal ot me

next sitting of the Assize Court.

Parris, a gasolene salesman at
the Esso Servicenter, Is charged
with falsification of accounts in|
a charge book. |

ite rendezvous and some day we
may see “‘sign-posts” on all the
mainroads of this parish with the

e On Page 5

Now in effect

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PAGE THREE

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PAGE FOUR

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad St., Bridgetown



Tuesday, June 17, 1952

MODERN FISHING

THE value of the Fishery Research work
which has been carried out in Barbados
during recent years is illustrated by this
year’s catches of flying fish. Although 116
fishing boats were destroyed during 1951,
the catches of flying fish during 1952 are
estimated to be 33 per cent higher than the
catches for the comparative period in 1951.

Sinee the spectacular loss of fishing boats
late last year 58 boats have been repaired
and three new ones built by private boat-
owners, but not one of the 25 boats which
are being rebuilt under government super-
vision is yet completed. Barbados’ fishing
fleet in 1952 comprised 558 boats as com-
pared with 623 at the beginning of 1951.

Surely then it would have been reason-
able to expect that this year’s catches of
flying fish would be considerably less than
the catches made in 1951? It would have
been reasonable to have expected smaller
catches and there, would probably have
been smaller catches, had no fishery re-
search been carried on during recent years.

Fortunately for Barbados there has been
fishery research. Mr. Wiles has been able to
prove conclusively that much greater
catches of flying fish could be made when
gill nets were used than could be made
when the traditional methods of line hook-
ing and net-scooping were employed.

Already.in 1951 some 30 fishing. boats
were using gill nets and the experience of
these boats so convinced other fishermen of
the advantage of fishing with gill nets that
today ho less than 400 of the island’s total
fleet of 588 fishing boats are equipped with
gill nets.”

Barbadians ought to feel very grateful
to Mr. Wiles because without the wide-
spread use of gill nets in 1952 flying fish
instead of being reasonably plentiful
throughout most of the year would have
been, in very short supply.

The advantages of fishery research have
therefore been vividly demonstrated be-
cause of the shocking catastrophe which
overtook the island’s fishing fleet in 1951.
But Barbados would be unwise to wait for
catastrophes to point out lessons which
must be learnt.

The introduction of the gill net is only
one of the lessons to be learnt from the re-
search work carried out on the Investi-
gator by the Fishery Officer and his assist-
ants. Mr. Wiles has already reported on the
use of plankton as indicative of the most
profitable fishing-grounds and. he has
proved that flying fish are more plentiful
at certain periods of the day than at others.
But the difficulties of catching more fish are
real.

As presently organised the fishing indus-
try is a highly competitive industry in
which fishermen have no guarantee that
their catches will be sold unless their boats
return early to the shore,

The result of this cut-throat competition
is that fishing boats habitually leave the
fishing grounds before or during the opti-
mum periods of fish catching.

The work of the fishery research depart-
ment is therefore being hampered by the
existing organisation of the fishing indus-
try. Progress cannot be made until fisher-
men combine to market their catches co-
operatively and are prepared to pay for
cold storage facilities without which mar-
keting cannot succeed. Barbados fortun-
ately for fishermen is well supplied with
cold storage accommodation which can be
adapted for the special needs of the flying
fish industry if required, But fishermen.
themselves must first be convinced of the
need for new marketing methods, Fisher-
men cannot-be as conservative and as re-
sistant to new ideas as they are commonly
said to be. Iif that were so they would have
shown much greater resistance than they
have shown to the introduction of the gill
net. But, the government’s policy of con-
rolling the price of fish, granting loans to
fishermen, helping with half the cost of
replacing twenty-five new fishing boats
and in general’of behaving like a kindly
uncle to the whole fishing community, ex-
cellent though it may be in intention, has
the undesirable effect of leaving fishermen
to expect leadership from the government.

This is a great pity. Because unless the
fishermén of Barbados avail themselves of
the knowledge which the Barbados Fishery
Research office is making so rapidly avail-
able then their chances of improving their
status in the community will be postponed
and perhaps lost forever, while the com-
munity as a whole must inevitably suffer
because the fishing industry is patently not
Organised to exploit the excellent supplies
of flying fish off the Barbadian coasts.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Better Sugar Position, But
No Shipping Improvement

West India Committee Annual Report

LONDON. advisory committee in consulta-

A better position in regard tion with colonial representatives

| to sugar sales, but complete lack in London. Colonial interest has
of improvement in shipping ser- centred in efforts to ensure that
vices to the British West Indies as large a part as possible of any
are among the main features of increase in Commonwealth con-

West Indian developments during sumption should be reserved for
the past year, according to the Commonwealth producers, The
annual report of the West India 4ttitude of the West Indies Com-

Commit presented at the mittee, in consultation with the
Committee's annual general meet- British | West Indies Sugar
ing in’ Gondon on May 26. Association, has been that the

) entire increase of consumption

_ The report welcomes the #1gn- within the Commonwealth should
ing of the Commonwealth Sugar be reserved for Commonwealth
Agreement last December and producers.”
summarises production and price On _ special sugars: “In 1952
developments in such other West the Ministry of Food will again
Indian produce as rum, molasses, take 15,000 tons of yellow gro-
cocoa, bananas, cotton, citrus, cery sugars from the British
cigars and oil. West Indies, ailocated to pro-
But in a section on the shipping ducers in the same proportions
services to and from the West 2nd subject to the same condi-
Indies, it says: “It-is to be feared tions "a nena In ‘i eae
that, so far as passenger shipping Ct md 4 on ee ar a a
‘is concerned, Her Majesty’s Gov- Deen oS on ? a ieecdtens
ernment have abandoned any £°™ a 3 > D di st the
intention they may have had of sugars rae d in v4 a the
ensuring the maintenance of the Leeward Islands. In view o

prestige of British shipping in the re re euaaee a

West Indies, and have left the itea Kingdom while ration-
provision of such accommodation oa ian ee treatment of

chiefly to the French and the bein) econ-
Dutch, who, it must be confessed, cous ” yas
have performed their part ex- :
tremely well.” On bulk shipments of sugar:
The report also mentions the “Arrangements were put in hand
work of the Committee in draw- aoe 5 me 1952 ae
ing attention to the tax conces- °F rder moereuene
sions offered by certain Colonies bulk shipment involving anprox-
to new industries, Th imately one-third of the total
. e Committee
has pressed for a revision of the experteble sirpins fram the
UK tom policy. which k British West Indies and about
a y ch makes one-half of the quantity to be
investors in such Colonies liable exported to the United Kingdom.
for income tax payment in the [The arrangements have worked
United Kingdom on the full smoothly and bulk shipment will
amount of their tax-free earnings become the principal method of
lin the Colonies. conveying sugar to the United
In the 1951-52 year, the Com- Kingdom in future.”
mittee’s excess of expenditure On rum: “The extortionate
over income was kept down to duties on rum coupled with the
£47, but at the close of 1951 decreased spending power of the
there was an accumulated deficit people of the United Kingdom is
ef £8,558. The report expresses making it more difficult to main-
concern at the rapid increase in tain the demand for rum, sales
expenditure which the Committee which are so important to the
must face if it is to continue to economy of the British West
work effectively. Indies. Before the Budget a streng
Here are some extracts from “ppeal was again made to the
the text of the report: Chancellor of the Exchequer
On the Commonwealth Sugar Poimting out that the high: duties
Agreement: “It is unnecessary in Were strangling the industry and
this report to enter into details of thatthe only hope of a revival

the Agreement, which have been
set out at length elsewhere. The
Committee’s interest for the
future must be directed mainly to
securing every plpssible advan-
tage from an expanding Common-
wealth market for sugar and to
maintaining in particular the
traditional position of Common-
wealth sugar in the Canadian
Apart from this, the
principal concern of the Com-
mittee will lie in collaborating
with the British West Indies

lay in a substantial reduction of
the rates of duty, Unfortunately
the Chancellor has not seen fit to
make any change in these duties.”

On molasses: “Molasses prices
have fluctuated violently during
the last twelve months, and suf-
fered a particularly catastrophic
fall within recent weeks.”

On shipping services to and
from the West Indies: “It is to be
feared that, so far as passenger
shipping is concerned, Her Majes-
ty’s Government have abandoned

Sugar Association in the annual ®0Y intention they may have had
price fixing called for by the of ensuring the maintenance of
agreement, in maintaining the the prestige of British shipping in
continuance of the Agreement by the West Indies, and have left the
annual extensions and in keeping provision of such accommodation
a watchful eye on developments chiefly to the French and the
for a revival of the International Dutch, who, it must be confessed,
Sugar Agreement.” have perf: r ex-

On the International Sugar ‘¢mely well. The French, indeed,
Council: “The principal develop- have not been content even tu
ment during 1951 was the pro- allow matters to stand as they

an International Sugar Agree- Provided magnificent fast ships

ment to replace the existing With luxurious and ample pas-

peneepent, which thas been S@nger accommodation. All the
an

since the outbreak of efforts of the Merchants and Ship-
war. Both in this, and as an pers’ Standing Committee of the
intermediary between the con- West India Committee to secure
tracting parties, Baron Kronacker, @ change of attitude on the part of
Chairman of the Council, played Her Majesty’s Government have
an energetic part throughout the 80 far proved unavailing. The
year, Meanwhile the interests of Working Committee of the Mer-
the sugar producing colonies chants and Shippers’ Standing
have been in the care of the Committee did, however, perform

duction of a simplified draft of Were before the war, but have bee



United Kingdom Government



' LONDON

_ In a timely article, published
in the latest issue of the Inter-
national Monetary Funds’s “Staff
Papers”, Mr. H. A. Shannon, of
the Fund’s British Commonwealth
Division, explains why very few
colonial territories are in a posi-
tion to take measures by them-
selves to resist the effects of re-
cessions on their economies.

The local Currency Boards, he
points out, are merely automatic
money-changers, They issue colon-
ial currency against deposits in
London and take in colonial cur-
rency when a payment is being
made in London,

“They have no discretion in the
matter’, Mr. Shannon writes,
“Constitutionally, the rate of ex-
change is fixed in London by the
central authorities. The quantity
of money in circulation can be
increased only by depositing an
equivalent increase in sterling in
London; it can be decreased only
by an equivalent redemption in
sterling in London.”

The colonial authorities, there-
fore, can have no independent
monetary policy. Nor can the local
banks have an independent credit
policy, except within the narrow
limits determined by their own
“sound” banking practices,

This is particularly true where
local production is mainly on a
full cash basis, but is more
qualified where the banks have
some, though limited, local invest-

useful services during the year by



Colonial Curreney
And Commodity I

ment opportunities, Mr, Shannon
says, The ehanges of cash and
credit in a colonial territory are
primarily functions of the changes
in its balance of payments—the
preservation of which, he points
out, is not a primary consideration
of their economic policies,

The more favourable its bal-
ance, then the more sterling a
culony can deposit in London and
the greater will be the quantity
of its local cash. The more ad-
verse its balance, the more it
must reduce its quantity of local
cash to obtain the sterling in
London needed to meet the ad-
verse balance,

The position of the banking
system within the currency sys-
tems is fairly simple in principle,
Mr, Shannon explains, but varies
in detail from territory to terri-
tory. As the ultimate, legal
liability of a bank js to @édeem
its deposits on demand in" local
currency, it must keep its ultimate
reserves and general assets in a
place and in a form where they
are easily encashable jnto local
currency, This means London and
ere securities marketable

sere,

A large propotion of colonial
bank deposits are “redeposited” in
London; in short they become
part of colonial sterling balances.
Because of the economic structure
cf many territories, the banks
may, in fact, have little or no
appropriate outlet for their funds
in local investment.

‘Our Readers Say:

books,
vouchers ete., be sent to the Audi-
tor General for audit,

Friendly
To The Editor, The Advocate

Society

accounts, documents and

Now, Mr, Editor, when one care-

SIR,—I read with interest your fully reads the comments made by

Editorial published in your news- the Auditor General,

paper on Friday, 30th May,

the only

in deduction that can be made is

which you make reference to the that the manner in which some of

Auditor General's Report for the
year 1949-50,

In this article you make special
comment on an extract of the A.G,’s
report which refers to the very un-
satisfactory way in which some of
the officers of certain Frienaly
Societies make their returns to the
A.G, for audit and in some instanc-
es completely fail to comply with
section 35 of the Friendly Societies
Act which clearly states that all

the Societies are being conducted
is not in the interest“of the
subscribers, especially when it is
remembered the large sums of
money handled for their accounts.

T trust that the Government will
now take the necessary steps to
see that the administration of
the Friendly Societies is improved,

Yours faithfully,

NEGLIGENCE,

y
Recessions

maintaining contact with the Asso-
ciation of West Indian Trans-
atlantic Steamship lines on, and
by meeting to discuss, matters of
mutual concern,

“It has recently been learned
with regret that the Canadian
Government have decided that the
high’ cost of building passenger
ships forbids the replacement of
the “Lady” boats which have pro-
vided the popular passenger ser-
vices between Canada and the
West Indies as well as inter-
island services for the last twenty-
five years; and, although fast
cargo ships, each carrying twelve
passengers, will continue to oper-
ate, there is. no doubt that this
regrettable decision, justifiable as
‘we must agree that it is, will have
an adverse effect on the hotel and
tourist industries of the West In-
dies, despite the comp?nsating
effect of the air services. Even
more serjous will be the effect on
inter-island freight and passenger
services. It is idle to talk of fed-
eration and to lay elaborate plans
for a customs union if facilities
for the moving of goods between
the component parts of the terri-
lories con are removed. At
the same time your Executive
Committee remain always mind-
ful that trade with Canada is vita]
to the British West Indian colo-
nies, and of the need to maintain
in the minds of all concerned,
official, commercial and otherwise,
a lively: appreciation of this fact.”

Onvrottade representation: “Al-
though) agreement has now been
reached in regard to the setting
up of an official West Indian
Trade Commissioner service cov~-
ering Canada and the United
Kingdom, no new personnel have
yet been appointed, and conse-
quently the service continues to
be provided in Canada by Mr. Rex
ere pas his staff, and in

e ingdom by the West
India. Committee.” 7 : ”

On pioneer industries: “The year
was also notable for the work un-
dertaken by the West India
Coramittee in bringing to the at-
‘tention of the people of the United
Kingdom the een legislation
and measures had been in-
troduced in the various colonies
in order to attract new industries.
The Committee has also played a
prominent part in the attempt to
secure from Her Majesty’s Gov-
ernment an adjustment of the
machinery for relief from double
income tax, whereby at present
tax concessions granted in the
colonies to persons liable to United
Kingdom tax go to benefit, not
the industry which it was the in-
tention to benefit, or indeed the
peoples of the colonial territories,
but only the United Kingdom Ex-
chequer. In this connection the
Committee not only submitted a
memorandum to the Royal Com-
mission on Taxation of Profits
and Income, but also appealed
direct to the Secretary of State for
the Colonies, pointing out that
the position called for relief much
more speedily than was likely
to be provided through the Royal
Commission, It will be recalled
that in 1950 the Committee had
in responsible for bringing to
the notice of the British public the
official brochure of the Govern-
ment of Trinidad, “Opportunity
for Industry”, while in 1951 the
Committee similarly distributed
“Invest in Jamaica.” It will be
realized that-both of these opera-
tions involved a heavy strain on
the Committee's Limited resour-
ces, and members will be glad to
learn that the demand was met
quite adequately,”

' —B.U.P.

ieee

Boards



_Local investment opportuni-
tics vary from territory to terri-
tory according ot the degree of
industrialisation, but, in general
either because of the need of
uecess to legal tender in London
or the absence of. suitable local
outlets and local capital money
markets, the colonial banks hold

a high proportion
eee fon on of their assets

“These arrangements under the
Colonial Sterling Exchange Stan-
dard preclude local ‘currency
management’ or ‘central banking’
as ordinarily understood,’ says Mr.
Shannon:- “There js no local dis-
cretion..for..there are no local
fiduciary issues.”

This explains why very few
colonial territories vine en A
position to use monetary meas-
ures to soften the effects of
recessions — particularly in com-
modity prices-oh eir economies.

Currency Boards aim at holding
assets equal to about ten Tr
cent. in excess of their liabilities.
Usually, they are ‘held in the
am er Scene gilt-edged securi-

é € profits from the C
Boatds assets toh ceasenyt
source of inco;
governments, ne

an important item in colonial
revenues,

“Quite exceptional circumstan-
ces apart,” Mr. Shannon “the
colonial currenciés are a source
of profit to their governments,
and all_are more than fully
covered at their face value.”

Wild Eddoes

To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—I would Jike to direct the
attention of the hasing Pub-
lic to an apparant Food Product
resembling the Eddoe that is be-
ing marketed by loathsome ven-
dors. This item which is similar
to the Tannia or Dashene causes a
dreadful i tin the stomach
when eaten. T wild eddoes,
as they are called, grow along the
water course of Dunscombe and
Blowers, and being well known
by residents of that locality are
despised as Food. It is from this
locality that these vendors
emerge, gather them free of
cost and journey to town and
trade upon the ignorance of the
purchaser, who not knowing its
behaviour, suffer as a result.
OBSERVER




































TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 1952





BIG BILL DUFFY |

From NEWELL ROGERS

NEW YORK.

BLUSTERING “Big Bill” Duffy speakeasy
boss and one-time manager of heavyweight
fighter Primo Carnera, is dead.

And it is almost as if the gin age of Pro-
hibition died with him. New York of 1952
hardly remembers one of Broadway’s most
famous associates of top masters, though he
played a flambuoyant part in its vital, vivid
life.

He died in a house in a quiet fashionable
lane named Blossom Heath in a “good” Long
Island neighbourhood. Blossom Heath is
worlds away in atmosphere, though only a
few miles geographically from Garnet-street, =
in Brooklyn’s tough, dixty, waterfront sec- NEE y Mech
tion of Gowanus. , Lara

There Duffy was born 69 years ago and ALLENS aT Ace
grew up a young waterfront tough.

Before he was out of his ‘teens he was
held up for robbery. A few years later he
was in Sing-Sing for the same crime.

Two men deeply influenced six-foot, red-
faced Bill Duffy’s life. One was saintly
prison administrator Thomas Mott Osborne,
of Sing-Sing. The other was not, exactly
saintly beer baron Ownie Madden, one of
the “beer barons” of Prohibition.

Osborne took an interest in Duffy in pris-
on. When Osborne took charge of the
United States’ naval prison at Portsmouth,
New Hampshire, he took Duffy along with
him. Duffy became prison administrative
assistant. He entered the Navy and rose to
be a chief petty officer.

Out of the Navy, Duffy hit the gin-an-jazz
age on Broadway. He met Madden. Soon
he was proprietor of a Broadway nightclub,
La Vie. :

Dollars rolled in until August, 1922. In
that month Frankie Wallace of the under-
world was shot dead on the ballroom floor.
La mort closed La Vie.

But Duffy was now an experienced opera-
tor of “joints”. With the backing of Mad-
den, “Big Frenchy” de Menge and Marty
Krompier — all big business men of the
underworld — he opened more Prohibition
clubs — the Silver Slipper, the Frivolity,
and Rendezvous.

One of his quainter ventures was Bill
Duffy’s Olde English Tavern on West 44th-
street.

In his clubs, Duffy met fight managers.
He and Madden discovered money in the
“fight racket.” In 1927 Jack Dempsey fought] )
Jack Sharkey. Duffy was Dempsey’s chief
second. Dempsey fouled Sharkey. The
referee could not make up his mind whether
to count Sharkey out or give him the deci-
sion.

Duffy is given credit for screaming “Start
counting!” The referee counted Sharkey
out.

Madden and De Mange imported Primo
Carnera, the “Ambling Alp”. They made
Duffy Carnera’s manager. Again Big Bill
was given credit, rightly or wrongly, for
deals for Carnera’s opponents to “take dives”
in fights the Man Mountain should not have
won.

In 1934 Duffy “took a dive” himself in a
fight with the United States’ Treasury. He
went to jail for failing to file a return on
34,170 dollars in 1930 on earnings on Carnera.

After he got out, Prohibition was gone
from Broadway, and Duffy vanished too. He
opened “joints” in quieter suburban sections
on Long Island. New Yorkers were learning
to motor out into the country to drink, eat
and dance at night.

One of Duffy’s taverns was simply called
“The Place,”

In 1945, police raided Duffy’s tavern at
Oceanside, Long Island. Eighty-seven guests
and operators were arrested for gambling.
Duffy convinced the law he did not operate
the place, but just allowed them to use his
name.

He is survived by his wife, séven children,
and 14 grandchildren.

There was a requiem high mass in St.
Agnes Church, Rockville Centre, Long
Island for the boy for Gowanus.

PHOTOGRAPHS

Copies of Local Photographs
Which have appeared in the

Advocate Newspaper

ADVOCATE STATIONERY
























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into force of the trusteeship agreement
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export of bananas in 1951 amounted to
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TUESDAY, JUNE 17,

1952



Bus Owners—St. Michael

Vestry

THE BUS OWNERS-ST

Pleas Suit in which the Bus Owners are charging the Vestry
with assessing them for taxes at a figure at which they
ought not to be assessed and with laying illegal, unequal,
oppressive and unjust rates and assessments,
started before the Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore yester-
day and was adjourned Sine Die.

partial,

Suit

. MICHAEL VESTRY Common

Adjourned

House Of Assembly,
Seats Reshuffled

WHEN visitors attend the House
of Assembly this evening, they all
alike, will not be seeing a back

The adjournment was taken when Mr. G. H. Adams view of the Speaker and some
for two of the Bus Companies said that two different °! ye: Sees view of members
auditors the Vestry had retained to examine the Companies’ 3S #S been the case now for years,

books were not
was the mutual feeli

suitable firm to examine the Companies’ books and make
a report as to the correctness or

which had been made.
' The Court proceedings
is made.

The Three Bus Companies of
the suit are the National Motor
Omnibus Co., Ltd. and the Yonk-
ers Motor Omnibus Co., Ltd. on
whose behalf Mr, G. H. Adams,
associated with Mr. J. E. T
Brancker are appearing and the
Progressive Bus Co., + on
whose behalf Mr, E, W. Barrow
is appearing. The Solicitors for
each Company are Messrs, Year-
wood & Boyce.

The Vestry are represented by
Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., associated
with Mr, J, S. B, Dear and Miss
M. A. Reece, instructed by Messrs.
Carrington & Sealy, Solicitors.

The Yonkers Company claim
that when this year’s rates were
made, they were assessed and
rated at $644.03 in respect of a
profit of $5,236 derived from their
trade, .Because of this they have
been aggrieved on the following
grounds:—(a) Because they were
assessed at the sum of $5,236
whereas they ought not to have
been assessed on by that and (b)
Because the rate and assessment
are in other respects illegal, un-
oe” partial, oppressive and un-
ust.

Wrongly Assessed

In the case of the’ National
Company they were assessed and
rated at $757.51 in respect of a
profit of $6,012 and hold that they
should only have been assesserl
at $247,

The Progressive Company were
‘assessed and rated at $599.76 in
respect of a profit of $4,760 and
hold that they ought only to have
been assessed in respecc of $1,095.

The Companies stated that in
accordance with the Vestries Act
1911—5 they gave notice in
writing within the limited period
mentioned 1% the Churchwarden
of their intention to object to the
rates and of the grounds of such
objections.

Quite a large mumber of people
attended the Court to hear this
rates contest.

With the opening of the case,
Mr, Adams gave an outline of the
position. He said that it was in-
evitable that although counsel ap-
peared for one side or another,
he might, or the Court might
have views as to the state of the
law as to whether it should be or
should not be what it was. Any-
how, the Court had to admiriister
the law as it was,

As His Lordship and everybody
in the Court probably knew, a
trader might object to the rate
and the Vestry had a right to send
in an auditor to check the books.

Unfortunately, speaking as a
citizen, the Act said that a trader
might object to every single ac-
countant sent in:to check his book.
From that side of the law, it

might be possible, if a trader was

sufficiently i lical, that he

would never* his books check-
Cc lot Accept

For two erént reasons, his

clients had not found it possible
to accept either of two names
mentioned by the Vestry for in-
spection of books. He would say
na more then, other than that
they were acting in their legal
rights, f

But since speaking to Counsel
for the other side it was felt that
if a firm of accountants agreeable
to both sides could be got—in this
particular case Bovell & Skeete—-





@ From Page 3

words “To Bathsheba”, for
besides catering to the Social
life of the Parish we wish to ex-
tend facilities to the public of
this whole island by way
special charters and rents for or-
ganized entertainments,

On those occasions it will be
clased to the Public and notices
will be posted on a Notice-bcard
which is to be erected at the
Centre, The revenue from such
rents will go towards mainten-
ance and development. The lat-
rines and baths too will be opened
to the public and it is hoped that
the Sanitary Commissioners of
the Parish will contribute to
their maintenance. We hope to
develop the grounds 1s a Park and
Premenade with a bus and car
park at the lower end for which
a small parking fee will be
charged. :







-





Wetae by the Companies, but since, there

off seats and bright-coloured um-

HARRISONS

BROAD STREET

but the Speaker will be facing
everybody This has come about

that Bovell & Skeete would be a with a rearrangement of the
Speaker, Members, Clerks’ and
Visitors’ seats which was made

otherwise of the returns

bi the week adjournment.
- hen an Advocate reporter
are thus stayed until a report visited there late yesterday
evening, carpenters were still at

work finishing the change.

his clients would be agreeable to The old arrangment was this:
meee oe br og sano = bee A circular bannister was walls to
, or eete separate a certain section of
would be an acceptable person. visitors’ seats from the members’
Therefore, he said, at that stage, seats and the members backed
subject to Mr. Reece’s agreement, these visitors with the Speaker
he would suggest the adjournment facing them. Then the Speaker
of the case and meanwhile Mr. gat in the middle of a straight line
Tudor of Bovell & Skeete could joining the two horseshoes and in
go into the books and make a this way his back would be to-
rep@t as to the correctness or wards another section of the
ise of the return his client chamber where other visitors sat.
See 5 fox thas Westry | anid “* Now, however, all visitors’ ges
. Reec are together on both sides of a
that he yas Wee to soceve red passage way as soon as one enters
ion Mr. Adams had made. the chamber. And through this

suggesti:
He thought the firm of Bovell & passage way members have to
walk to reach their seats.

Skeete and particularly Mr. Tudor
Members will be sitting around

of that firm would _be an ad-
mltyble perege to sudtit the books. the same horseshoe table, but now

He added that it would be good backs will be to the visitors and
if the petitioner was summoned they will face the Speaker who
to -produce “all books, papers, will have a view of everybody,
etcetera, pertaining to trade dur- So when members want to get
ing the past year, ;

Mr. Barrow said that in the
matter of the petition of the Pro-
gressive Bus Company, he want-
ed to point out that the question
of appointing or agreeing to the
auditor did not arise because an
auditor. had been agreed upon
mutually between the Vestry and
the petitioner and the books had
RB ry been audited by, he be-
lieved, Mr. Pile, and the report
of the audit, to the best of his
knowledge, had been submitted
to the Vestry. before the rates
were laid. © : '

One Difficulty

There was one difficulty about
the petition, he said, a difficulty
which His Lordship would prob-
ably consider to be relevant to all
the _ petitions. It was their
opinion that interlocutory matters
in the petitions would have clear-
ed up a lot of the difficulties with
which the Court might be con-
fronted.

For they were in a position of
‘not knowing at all what dis-
crepancies, if any, had been dis- other parts of the island who are
closed, and were in dispute be- interested. They are waiting for
tween the Vestry and the Pro- 4g start.
gressive Company, . An association of the kind

Concerning this, His Lordship would have a fine venue for their
said that he was not going into it meetings and functions—the new
then, but would give the other Coleridge and Parry School Hall.
an opportunity and meanwhile Some of the Old Boys are seeing
tthe position could be examined a Coleridge and Parry Old Boys’
and what -mattéfs were in dispute Association in the future,
could be seen,

On the request of Mr. Reece, . THE BRITISH COUNCIL will
the books of the Progressive Com- be giving their usual monthly
pany were handed into Court to film show for _ residents of
be produced as exhibits when and Speightstown and its suburbs on
if evidence comes to be taken. Tuesday night, June 17 at 8 p.m.

Mr. Reece assured Mr, Barrow &t the Assembly Hall. ;
that his side was willing to allow They have promised a longer
the other side to examine any Programme this time as there was
matter connected with the Vestry O° film show given by them at the
and the present issue that they Assembly Hall last month.

Old Boys’

Coleridge and Parry School?
They think it would be a

tion for the two schools now t f
Parry Schools have been amalgamated. The likely n
is the ‘Coleridge and Parry Old Boys’ Association.’

Interviewing some of the Old
Boys of both schools, the Advocate
learnt that the formation of an
Old Boys’ Association of the old
Coleridge School was proposed in
the past, but the idea never mate-
rialised,

In St, Peter, St. Lucy, St. An-
drew and St. James, quite a num-
ber of old boys of the old Coler-
idge and Parry Schools are inter-
ested, And there are more from

might wish. Last month’s film show was put
The suit was then adjourned Off because the Pocket Theatre
sine die. Group. were staging Shakes-

peare’s ‘Twelfth aye 8 the =.
eee lowing night at the Coleridge an
New U.S. Ambassador Parry School Hall.

To Indo-China Nominated He civic CIRCLE of
WASHINGTON, June 16. Speightstown have every hope of
President Truman nominated staging a successful flower garden
Donald R. Heather on Monday for competition in St. Peter in July.
promotion from the rank of Min- About twenty garden owners
ister to full Ambassador to Viet~ have already entered for the com-
nam and Cambodia petition and more are likely to
The nomination was sent to the enter. é
Senate for Heather Those garden owners that have
was appointed Minister to Indo entered are sparing no pains to
China two years ago this month. keep their plots trim for the judg-
U.P. ing in the last week of July.

'



* oe eaters



overnor Opens Social Centre At Bathsheba

I further have visions of ex-
tending a Promenade along the
sea-front following the old rail-
way track from Tent-Bay to
Tenby Bridge. provided with

houses which was made possible
through the instrumentality of
loans from Labour Welfare Funds,
He recalled that he had visited
the St. Andrews Community
Centre on.Thursday, June 12, and
said there that the Centre at
Belleplaine was being used as an
argument against building other
centres in other parishes. How-
ever, he still had a continuous
faith in Community Centres,

He took the opportunity to pay
tribute to the work of the Social
Committee; then said, “T have
great pleasure je ones

heba Socia entre 0) "|
Pete R. A, Lee, Churchwarden |
of St. Joseph, moved a vote of
thanks which ‘was seconded by
Mr. L. E, Smith.

Mr. W. T. Gooding, gave a vote ;
of thanks for the visitors and Mr.!
G. H. Adams replied on behalf a
the parishioners of St. Joseph.

brellas and pavilions—a joy to
the youths of our Island and an
attraction to tourists. Such a
proposition, fantastic as it may
feem, has not been put forward
yet; I only venture to suggest it
now with the hope that it will
take root and grow. Sir, I take
great pleasure in asking you to
declare this Bathsheba Social





His Excellency in declaring the
Centre open said that it was only
two and a half years ago that
£20,000 had been voted for Wel-
fare Funds, and much good had
already been done. He had
noticed the improvement of



Plain and Brocaded Satin @ $2.91 yd. |
Allover Lace @ $3.44 and $4.13 yd.
Embroidered Organdie from $3.42 to
$4.52 yd.
Plain and Watered Taffeta from
$1.15 to $2.00 yd.
Bridal Veils from $8.50 to $12.75
Bridal Headdresses from $2.38 to $4.05











SPEIGHTSTOWN ROUND-UP

For Coleridge—Parry
WHAT ABOUT an Old Boys’ Association of the

number of the old boys of the two old schools are asking.

ereated
flower gardening among residents
of St. Peter.
brighter.

ting freshening showers of r
during the past two weeks.
tered 69 parts of rain last week.

9 parts fell on Tuesday,

District ‘E’ Courts,’ a policeman

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



STOWAWAY.

REMANDED

MARIO P. BRAZAO, an 18-
year-old car washer of Ma-
deira, was yesterday remand-
= a te, Prison until

e instant ,
triation to his hoon c.

Brazao arrived here over
the week end as a stowaway
on board the 8.8. “Nestor”,
and appeared before City
Police Magistrate Mr. H. A.’



Talma.

: ae were discussing a

etter from the Colonial Secretary

Week-end Thefts in which it was stated that the
Suggestion had been made and

A bicycle and a ram were Goyernment would be glad to get
among the haul taken by thieves their views on the matter.

during the week-end, according The letter from the Colonial

to Police Reports. Alfred Reid Secretary read: “The Shop Order,

reported that his bicycle valued 1946, made under the Shops Act,
$76.00 was stolen from outside the 1945, prohibits dry goods shops

Chiming Bells Club, Marchfield, from opening for business later

fast Saturday night. , than 5 p.m., on an ordinary closing

Louis, Licorish of Clevedale day and later than | p.m., on an

Black Rock, also reported to the early closing day, It has been sug-

Police that q ram valued $11.00 gested that a change should be

was taken from a pen sometime effected in the law so. that a shift

between 8.30 a.m. and 10.p.m. system could be introduced to
on the 14th instant. enable any shap to remain open
Other larceny reports tncluded up to 9 pan., with no increase in

a watch belonging to Mics Viola the working hours of a particular

Yearwood of Church Village assistant.

Girls’ School. Miss Yearwood “I shall be grateful if your

said the watch was taken from Union would submit views on this

her desk earlier during the month. matter for the consideration of the

She reported the matter on Sup. Government.” ae

day. ; Strong Opinions

albcheiplesspliaiiasiaga abo ae During ee qirons onions siv-

; : Sr. , g agains e@ suggestion, the

a side view of the visitors while minimum overtime figure of 27

speaking, they will have to twist cents an hour was quoted and

their normal positions slightly. mention was made of unbearable
One interesting feature is that dreary night hours.

with this change, the Speaker faces | Aagter: various members had

the Legislative Council, a form like strongly: expressed their views

that in England where the Speaker against the lengthening of the
of the House of Commons faces shop ‘closing time, Mr. Charlie
the House of Lords, Thomas, President of the Union,
eer expressed his own, as he said he
did not wish to influence the

e e general views in any way,

A ssociation He first said that the advantage
was posed by those who sought
the lengthening of opening time

were increased empl ent,

? He said that if he thought it

@ was a genuine idea for employing

more people, he would be the last

to show resistance, but he did not



This is the question quite a cincere,

It was the cheap fellow in the
od idea to have one assory back wees oe not wnmrey
i a e many that wan to get suc
hat the Coleridge ye introduced as legislation, That
type of employer was hoping that
when the front stores had closed
Residents of the parish have until gt 4.30, he would be able to get
eed end of June to enter the com- extra gales,
tition. rop-
Pe rhe idea of the competition has Ros R inices of ante yet t
keener interest oin P!n8, Jt was even Known tha
S instead of employing more—as it
was suggested, some places might
decrease their number of assistants
dry He argued, too, that when a man
get- wanted to buy a shirt and he had
ain 12 hours within which to buy it,
he would not buy more shirts than
if he had only two hours,

Overtime
So the present workers would
stand a greater chance of being
worked overtime for the poor in-
ducement of 27 cents an hour or
being exploited into working —,
hy

go

Gardens are looking

AFTER A LONG SPELL of
weather, St. Peter has beén

District ‘E’ Police Station regis-
On Monday, 60 parts of rain fell.

ALTHOUGH quite a few court
cases were called at District ‘E’
Police Courts last week, no fines
were imposed by Police Magis-
trate S. H. Nurse. LOUIE'S,

Most of the cases weré adjoukn- ~ Mr, Thomas then mentioned a
ed while one or two offenders fot pi pore e the inconveniences

: t week for which result,

Ca ae taal oF The Union also decided to
present Government a suggested
amendment to the Shop Closing
Act, It is felt that at present certain
stores include a variety of goods
in their stock and under the act
° they claim that they could open
Wants Reunion for long hours. For instance a
normal cloth store may include

LOWELL, Indiana, June 16, rum among its stock and then

Mrs. Barbara “Bobo” Rocke- claim the right to open as long as
feller said on Monday that she a rum shop; meanwhile he might
disliked the “emphasis on money” sell cloth.
which has been raised by the The Union wants the Act
creation of a $1,000,000 trust fund changed so that any such merchant
for her son Winthrop, Jr, will either have to set up separate

The child (3) is the son of concerns for such distinct variety
“Bobo” and Winthrop Rockefeller, of stock, or close his shop in
son of John D, Rockefeller Jr. The accordance with the earliest clos-
child’s father established the trust ing hour.
fund, The Union decided that members

She said her “chief. interest’»ig to the Wages Board should be
in reconcilation with her estr cHosen from the following: —
husband and in the welfare of the Messrs. G. L. Barrow, C. A.
child. She issued a statement: Smith, C. Thomas, Robert Kinch,
“make my position clear” she said E. C, Hewitt and Miss C, Rooney.

“I object to implications that my MOUNTED DISPLAY

son is now a millionaire. Actually
he will never see that million
dollars and under the terms of The Mounted Display at the
the trust certain maximum month~ Riding School of District “A
ly payments are set up which may today will include a new musical
or may not be adequate to his ride, jumping in pairs and musical
needs.” chairs in which the horses will get
She said the trust provides for 0” their mg — = the boxes
a maximum payment of $750 na Soe Enns be Pp tf «ae
monthly until the boy is 18 but hein vents "The Police
nothing is specified for minimum ae will also do some jumping



remarked.

.

Mrs. Rockefeller





|
|













payment. —U.P. and obedience tests,
— = tenets: spoaae
Shee eesawwwn Je nae SPeUKS ul viself s20hescne
Liquid or
Tablets

GlaPOâ„¢ piped Mote

Hetps to cleanse the system
from blood impurities

Impurities in the blood maycause rheumatic
aches and pains, stiff and painful joints,
boils, pimples and common skin disorders,
Clarke’s Blood Mixture helps to purify
the blood, cleanses the system and assists
in restoring good health.
a

SPECIAL LINES

Elite Striped Collar attached Size
Shirts, coat style, Sizes 1442 pair.
to 16 ins. @ $4.01. Gents

B.V.D. Union Suits no sleeves, Size:
Sizes 36 to 46 ins. — $4.50 pair.

per Suit.
Gents Khaki and White %4
length turn over top Hose,

CAVE SHEPHERD
& (0. LTD.

10—13 Broad Street



popu





Coroner will be






















if





FOR MEN



Clerks’ Union Not In |
Favour of Late Openings

THE CLERKS’ UNION yesterday unanimously decided |
that they are not in favour of the suggestion that dry goods |
shops should be permitted to be opened until 9 p.m. instead |
of the present 5 p.m, The unanimous vote came after many |
members had strongly opposed the suggestion for the in- |
creasing of the opening hours and decried the idea as an |
attempt to throw them back in the bad old days.

Baiwana Vendor,

Purchaser Fined |

Despite efforts by the Price Con- |
Law |
enforcement officers to stamp ou. }
profiteering on fruit and vegeta-|

trol Officers and other

bles, vendors and purchasers
alike continue to disregard the |
prices fixed by schedule, and |

sell and ‘buy at exorbitant prices
A vendor,

purchaser, Stella Miller, were |
yesterd:y brought before City |
Police Magisirate Mr. C. L. Wal-
wyn, on a “black market” charge

and each fined. Coward was fined |

£3 in 21 days with the alterna-
tive of one month's

ment for selling Miller bans nas



E la Coward, and a/|

imprison -

above the scheduled price. Miller

was ordered to pay 30/- within |
14

21 days or in default serve
days imprisenment.

Motorist Dies
After Accident

Goulbourne
man's St. George, died in the
casualty of the General Hospital
yesterday morning after he was
taken there from Hansen Hill
Road, St. George where he was
involved in ‘an accident while
driving his motor car M—1185
about 5.30 a.m, the same day,

His body was removed to the
Mortuary where a post mortem
examination was performed by
Dr, A. S. Cato, An inquest has
been fixed for June 19 when the
Mr. C. L. Wal-
wyn, Acting Police Magistrate of

believe such a representation was District “A”,

9 9595055099990595009
— WE OFFER

Cocktail Cherries

Cocktail Onions

Stuffed Olives

” Plain Olives

Tins Cocktail Biscuits
» Satted Peanuts

Pkes

Bots

Jelly Cr rstals

Blanc manges
" Icing Sugar
Bots. Lemon Essences

” Vanita Essences
Jars Mayonnaise
Prepared Mustard
» Currie
Tina Fruit Salad
OATS
Peaches
Apricots
Hams per Ib
Cheese per Ib

STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.

Headquarters tor Best Rum,
PAPEL tote ott otet,




Just Received...

at

Weatherhead’s

Tooth Picks (750 to box)

Sheath Knives

“Boots” Digene

Iodised Throat Tabs.

Aspirin Tabs, 100/s

Soda Bicarb, 4-o0z.
Pek,

—_ —

Worm Powders

Slick Brushless
Shaving Cream

Denture Fixative

Soltan Cream

Corn Solvent

K.L.O. Dry Cleaner

Phenosan Pills for
Poultry

|

1 Saccharin Tabs.
{
{

“Pascalls” Marshmallows
» Glucose Barley Sugar
“Boots”
Liver Pills

Back & Kidney Pills

Halibut Oil Caps.
100/8
Callard & Bowsers Nougat

Callard & Bowsers Butter
Scotch

Insulin
”
”

Planters Peanuts

Gator Roach Hives

Bug Blitzers

Caroid & Bile Salts Tablets
Evenflo Feeders

Blue Jay Corn Plaster

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD

LTD.
Head of Broad Street.

SELLING AGENTS FOR
BOOTS’ PURE DRUG CO.





10 to 11% ins, @ $1.57

Protex Suspenders,
S., M, Large—$1.80 per

Gents Towelling Sports Shirts
collar
sleeves,
Size Med. $3.71; Large $4.14.

Pure Irish Linen Hemstitched,
Initialed Handkerchiefs all

attached, short
Zipp Fasteners,

lar Initials @ $1.10

each.

Van Heusen Semi stiff collars
in style 11 and 99; sizes: 1412
to 18 ins. @ 8lc. each.

Boys % length turn over top
(faney striped)
Wool, and Wool & Cotton
mixture;
ins. @ $1.69; $1.32 per pair.

Hose in

Sizes: 8% to 10







Wharton of Work- |

+









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your step—
and your budget
... wonderful
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You'll feat free as a breeze in these

beautiful nylons by Aristoc, who are spocialiste

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get several pairs as quickly as you ca



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the aristocrat of stockings





\

DELIVER IN STYLE
— it’s good for
business



yl

COWLEY VAN

Here is a truck——and a van,
with the features and the

and
















distinguished styling of a car, These vehicles have plenty of
load space—120 cubic feet in the Cowley Van! They are
unrivalled for speedy deliveries because they have the road
performance of a car,

CAR-TYPE FEATURES THAT COUNT






All-~steel, car~«ty *
safety cab @ Th '
bar inde t4
wheel su er

smooths out ¢h 1gh-
est roads @ Fou reed
gear - box Wth stectiag
column gear ~chift © Hypold
rear exile for silence and tong Ie
@ Lockheed hydraulic br e Cab
door windows have controllable ventila-
tor sectia; @ HKumpers front and rear -

just like a car,

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.

Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504

CLOOCGCCOEO CLOSE LOL SLL LCL LA NN
SOMETHING NEW!
SOMETHING USEFUL! |

o 4

A SUPER ABSORBENT CELLULOSE SPONGE
(Not Rubber)
















B56555
COSCO OOSF”

’ . i .
in a variety of delightful colours and for every purpose %
For your Bath - For your Toilet : g

For your Baby—For your Household
It mossages the skin
It lathers soap into foam =
It is Hygienic — can be cleaned by boiling
Always Fresh and Clean

See Them and Get Yours To-day !

A

KNIGHT'S DRUG STORES






|

J

JUST RECEIVE



LION BRAND WHITE PEPPER
LION BRAND BLACK PEPPER

{

per 1 oz. Caster $ .39

} : per 1 oz. Caster .32
| COOMALT Sieatelele . per tin 1.40
j NEW ZEALAND CHEESE ..... . per 1 87

DANISH CAMEMBERT CHEESE.. per tin 1.32



DANISH BLUE CHEESE Sacdtbitesi eect per Ib 4.18
DANISH PORT SALUT bins iessvaantescaapcbeeiieade per Ib 1,16
CANADIAN LUSHUS JELLIES—5 Flavours........per pkt.-_ 1!
CANADIAN KING'S BEER comune per bottle .26
CANADIAN KING’S BEER ............ per 12 bottle Carton 2.88
CADBURY’S CUP CHOCOLATE. per tim .72
COCKADE FINE RUM
5

STA NSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.



_

“a

PAGE SIX









: BARBADOS
CLASSIFIED ADS. |Pomt_Netices| Pomusc satzs |
TELEPHONE 2508 i ee “a ate


























































































































































































TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 1952



ADVOCATE ,
|

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend- |



















SHIPPING NOTICES



























Applications for one (1) Vestry Exhi-| j;ARCLIFF’ in St. Lawrence Gap ; ; ; : : ; MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, New
BIRTH ! FOR SALE bition tenable ai the Lodge Schoo! will ene Eh Fion Bh. ‘ncn Gap. | ment) Order, 1952, No. 21 which will be published in the Official ZEALAND LINE LIMITED. The MV. “CACIQUE DEL
——naleinerenteerealicti seaman a ie be reeetved by the undersigned up tof2 Roods 37 Perches of ee iné ©" | Gazette of Monday, 16th June, 1952 (M.A.N Z CARIBE” will accept Cargo
WICKHAM. On June 10th, 1952, to] ——— 15 pm. On Tuesday, 17th June, 1952. im house to Dae 6 wien eed. to nt} te ri ; ; i 8.8. “GLO " ie scheduled to Passengers for St. Lucia, 5t.
~~ Wickham, wife of John Wickham, AUTOMOTIVE ae must pol sons of Parish-| present divided into two flats Each flat 2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and_-retail prices saii —_ Port Pirie "<4 ag yg pa 8
at Port of Spain, Trinidad—a_ daughigr _ ioners straitened cireumstances, and i } “ watt ; , - June “ elbourne June 1 a ay .
17.6. 52— Tn CAR-—-One (1) Studebaker (Champion) os not > less a 8% years nor Terms erendiates tae ane i rT on oe i oe — ee eden doe it a woes Ly A c aa eae ‘sa
in perfect running order. P. C. 9 than 14 years of age on the 2ist ; eae aiken a er escheat ranean tr Barbados ‘about Cargo
DIED APE E Go Lia Phone ann, °° (Buna, im io Be rove by ¢ Santional|hiencer. at mee ane) WHOLESALE | RETAIL PRICE |" cesor wo eeneen cmos we own |S fc," Mene AMR: Maa
co 15.6,52—t.t.n. | erinene which must accompany the servants sveevirs and garege, tn pera. PRICE a ample space for chilled and hard Srila Priaey 20 tt. s
« iG—On the! 16th June, 1952.) ~can—one v1) Fad Delve Dodac Car| Forms of applicatio mapection by appointment, ’ ‘ozen cargo. “MONEKA"
an See “S pitons sons ome) ears tienes at the Parochial easter cae ae tae ck . FOV ill. e funeral ca = . 2p. 7 means aac ——_—_— - ading for tran’ Trinidad
Road, Govt. Hill. | The funeral! Magazine Lane. Phone 3915. ome: SS. y CARRINGTON & SEALY, Butter--Table: In Prints | $136.20 per case of 100 | Leaiee fine Leeward and Winawere | @ Sos an eek
Hinds & Co., Tweedside Road, at 15.6.53-—-3n i we Very, Lucas Street, (Citedian Maple Leaf lbs in 1 Ib t $1.44 Islands. {
4:90 o'clock this evening for the! “CAR One 1996 Standard Car 10 h iehinediiaeserudianns Solicitors. + cranes — at) ! “= - prints .. «pet For further particulars apply—
Westbury Cemetery. Friegds are] in good working order with 5 yong | PHE SUGAR INDUSTRY AGRICUL- oa el oe i print.
ikon ot d-Daugh-| ties. Apply _to V. Gibson, Overseer. TURAL BANK ACT, 1943 “FHOP—At bora ¢ City Limits.) ——— ae a -* | FURNESS WITHY @ ©O., LTD.,
grim (Grand-Daugh-1 prior Park Plantati Dial To the ereditors r re orenic ” shed. | 16 :
ter) lon 3030. Hens against Gregg Belding spectelty | iorge shop with residence attached. | ith June, 1952. 17.6.52—1n | ont
17.6.52—1n 14.6.62—2n. | sy Andrew. Well rere = er place et) : sa ; DA COSTA & CO., LTD.,
—— eee als TAKE NOTICE that we the Trust eble for all kinds © ness. Good j
INNIna On the 16th day of JuneQ}] CAR — Vauxhall Velox, little used.) oy the abd » Trustees! | portunity for any ambitious person.
1ee2, Carlotta Wilhelmina (Mothen| OW>@!driven, good as new. Bial S078, Obtaite a tone ct eaiton are about 10) Residence contains large gallery, drawing i DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
of Mr. Kyle Inniss, Head-Teacher » ma *)| visions of the above Act against pie-| and dining rooms, kitchen, toilet and | i ;
of St. Reiners Buys pote | The! “GAR—podge Super-Delaxe, First-class said Plantation, in respect of the Agri- aay eee et “competition. at | |
funeral leaves her late residence,| . cultural year 1952 to 1 vate sale or ry a
Hindsbury Road, Saint Michael a Fag and owner-driven. "ie No mens has bash iiss aia short notice, For further details ring | BARBADOS EVENING INSTITUTE
4.15 o’cock this evening for Si 2 “|the Agricultural Aids Act, 1908, or the} 2°49: 15.6 .52—3n. j Commerci
Riichacl'’s Cathedral and thente pro-| “Cans—womie Oxford Saloon, Morris | ®Pove Act (as the case may be) in res- - — =o | cial Classes.
ceeds to the ‘Weetaity. Cunpotess Minor 4-Door Saloon, Wolseley 14 Saloon re ee such a: ene ve Pave fee pert P-0 . A |
Kyle, Alban, Carleton, eith . ’ . : - ited t th , ! w 5. e fe ee . 3
Claude, (Sons! Jasmine, Et ua aoe Beane, eer ee ee Loe. M ‘ARCHER ‘ant at Dayrell's Road, Christ Church. The | ADVANCED SHORTHAND TYPIST COURSE } NEW YORK SERVICE.
(daughiers), Paton (Grand-son).] |S Oey ee rt Royal Garage Ltd Trustee, dwelling house contains living room, | Applications are invited for entry to an Advanced Commercial |
17.6521" | Telephone 4504 “ 43.6.52—2n fe 8.8. vO two bedrooms, Kitchenctte, usual con- | Class, to be composed of twenty (20) students, and to be held at| 4 STEAMER sails May 9th-—arrives Barbados May 2ist.
_ srpeiceiniipnaagneeneas y "a ‘ : STEAMER sails May 28th—arrives
PEERY--On Monday, June 16, 1952 | “\OTORCYCLE—Norton 5 H.P. motor- 14.6.52,—8n, Berea peineisie, “dae tonkbe seapesties Combermere School, commencing in September, 1952, The Course! “ sue Th
Beats Perry Her funeral wi! Pony Vf " “ e 3 i |
peer eke femaense Church Wut ee, Cremend wale. Condition | very between the hours of 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. | of two years is designed to lead to the examination for the Junior | NEW ORLEANS SERVICE.
ates St ox mains ete Guar james & Roebuck Streets. Dial 4353 NOTICE The auie Witinie hwme will! be eat Shorthand-Typist Certificate of the Royal Society of Arts, (A copy, ne « A PIONEER” sails
Stine are adand’to xttehs Leg de wil Rx® Biscrion up for gate by. poblie competition at, our | of the syllabus may be seen on request at the Department.) Ls oa sails May 24th—arrives Barbados June 7th.
Bs. Arnelle eS Bt Albe: | New Morris Model J Cab over Engine pauaa Ge GAMES aeRO AES. Pen Two lectures a week will be given in each of the 3 subjects—
a , = \0-ewt. Vans $2400.00 N Morris Caw- Ni I , iti
Sealy, (Grandson). oo Nbccwt vane $0800.00, All excel: | the holding by me of the election of s YEARWOOD & BOYCE. |Shorthand, Typewriting and English—on Mondays to Thursdays in- CANADIAN SERVICE
‘Trinidad Papers Please ws a a1 at fot fast light delivery. Fort Royal | member to serve in the Vestry of the 13.6,52~9n. | Clusive, Students must take all three subjects. | .
es Garage Ltd., Telephone * parish of Saint Michael on the 16th day) — ———————OO OO : \UTHBOUND
THANKS 13.6.52—2n.| cf June, 1982, at the Patochial Build-} The undersigned will set up for sale | Applicants must have attained a minimum speed of 70 w.p.m. in 80
ws ais Pickup. | Cumberland Street, the following by yeilic od ition” at. their office Sh nd and 30 w.p.m. in Typewriting. They should also be pre- ‘ : ane ee Arrives Barbados
—_——- - Se , . is the result:— o. 1 - r oi my ° oe. =. May une
EOKSTEIN—We beg to thank all those Dial 4616, Courtesy Garage. ; vetoes |tgven on PHayaene sok a ous | pared to undergo a Qualifying Test for admission in each subject. BiG. TIBPA" es ge ewe May s0th June ith
who gent wreaths, cards, letters or i 14,6.52-—3n Mr, JOSEPH ONESIMUS TUDOR 334{ 1952 ‘at 2 p.m. the foliowing:— Applicants must be 18 years of age or over on Ist September, 1952. |.5.8. “ALCOA POINTER" | vo Tike June 13th 28th
any way expressed their sympathy in| -——--~— — syeeinteiet who was duly declared elected 250 shares in West India Biscuit Co B. BOOK-KEEPING * “A STEAMER” .. ° - June 27th July 12th
our recent sad bereavement TRUCK--One 5 ton Austin truck six} Mr. DANIEL PRANCIS Limited 111 shares in West India Rum ‘ | “A STEAMER" ty July 11th July 26th
Bana Eckstein, Dorothy Dé Silva, tires virtually mew, engine in perfect BLACKETT 249| Refinery Co. Limited | * }Applications will also be considered for entry to a beginners’
Raymond De Silva 11.6 §2—In. | condition. for appointment to jinspect | Dated this 1th day of June, 1952 | R, S.NICHOLLS & CO. | Book: keeping Course t be held at Combermere School on M ae
aa please itis hone 95 6.52—2n, F. J. COLE, Solicitors. - ‘se to at Com ere ool on Mondays,
MEMORIAM Sheriff & Returning ‘Officer — commencing in September, 1952. | a
ELECTRICAL. a soar cbe There is a limited number of vacancies for the Senior Book- |
fowbcin loving memorr of my dear! ———-_______-__——__. |F IQUOR LICENSE NOTICE AUCTION ~~~ 1 ie | ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
husband William Adolphus Low: } FRIGIDAIRE — General Electric Frig- "keeping Course. Applicants should possess an Elementary L.C.C. Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE
salled to rest June 16, 1943 ever to be | idaire, S-cubic ft. in excellent working 7 -_— ee .
cal ; i (TRAN! AND REMOVAL) 7 ———t--———-_: Certificate or its equivalent ‘
remembered by his loving wife Susan | order $175.00. Dial 4736, 14.6.52—3n. ‘THe applic: of Marrle Forde of UNDER THE SILVER = ”
Agusta Lowe and family. 1 Sabian | parce nearer asters ecamre Chiigeh Village, St. Philip, the purchaser Academic Classes. |
likrenwnese Aclooatie Ghenmersiak BC. | caien ik: aaeee abuae 864 - Of 1952, HAMMER C. GENERAL CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION—UNIVERSITY |
iD e : granted to Louise Holder in respect of
. S. MAFFEI & CO. LTD., Radio Emporium foo On Wednesday 16th by order of Mrs. | OF LONDON :
ground vy of on wall building at Cox
1 524.4 : W. A. Ross, we will seil ber furniture
SO ED: | HIM, Bt. Philip, to remove said Licerwe) 5‘ Rosemary", Sth ‘Ave. Belleville, Applications are invited for entry to the Junior Academic classes
o | PYB BATTERY SETS—Just a few left. a8 ky ro and ee Om seevaae which includes Morris Suite, Settee, 2 Rae ‘4
HUUSES | MAFFELS RADIO EMPORIUM. to residence at Chure lage, St.| arin Chairs, Rockers, Ormament commencing in September, 1952 and preparing for examination at
——- To.so—tin, |Eniip, and te use Ht at sueh Jar\\'Plant-stools, Waggon, Upright ; | Ordinary level in June, 1954
LEETON-ON-SEA, Maxwell Const | a | oe an eee nee Uphols. Dra Suite : : ¥ :
Fully furnished. ‘Telephone, Refrigera | “REFRIGERATOR on eee) Taae ie a oe Upright Arm ie ne Subjects offered are English, Mathematics, Latin, Spanish, History | CANADIAN SERVICE
tor, etc. Available for September, © | Refrigerator, Kerosene oil burner in . for Applicant pieces) Liquor all | op Geography. se
ber, November and December. Phor:| Good condition. Phone 2791. L. & H./7o:A. W. HARPER Esq in Mi + Oak and Rush chairs and | pe 2 From Montreal and Halifax
3450 or 3926. 14.6.52—S» | Willer, Electrical Engineers, Ree St. Police Magistrate, Dist. “Cc.” paar Bh at Din- There ate also a limited mumber of vacancies in ced f z
NAVY GARDENS — Fully furnishe. | tiie alin oo See nee eh eae ae i oe eee Chairs; Pictures, Congoleum, Glass ana | (a) Senior classes preparing for examination at Ordinary i ee Seililis Bapected Aretval
mosis nana e Seprenicones, 20 MECHANICAL Sn Monday, 30th day of June, 1952 at cha ~ Ea a i Iron i level in June, 1953; P Bridgetown, Barbados
position, st coe dae, en | o'clock a.m. at Police Courts, Dist,| Bedstesds Springs, Mattresses; sSaneg. | ' (b) Advanced classes preparing for examination at Advanced 0 set Se oe * or
.8.52—an : Your child’s dream comes a Presses and Dressing Tab’ ; mv. a imaged
ae true. Broadwood upright, tropical ve ay, ARPER:, | Machine, Latders, ‘Kitchen “Tables and SOOGETA. TPES SHS TOGA. ‘ re ON VESSEL” is jus at July “oth August
RIPLEY-ON-SEA — Maxwell Coart eee. Seperste, bridge on éach string Police Magistrate, Dis gther items. is ‘ | pective applicants may obtain further information and advice : . y
fully f£ ished, f, \ wal con ion. urry. on} See ee 1. * . i } je a
Clectrie, latte we, bedrooms, modes) 1a¥ing colony. Write P. O. Box 1380: |LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE Be En TROTMAN & Oo., | Tomveither: —
y e 0) . o.
conventences, From July on, Dial gaso | Phone b.82-Tn. |" “the application of Fitz Savoury, shop- Auctioneers j, . ARREPndinm. Depatiness of BAucation, yeeterey Se UNITED KINGDOM SERVICE
* i FURNITURE keener of Bootes eo pleat of scant 15.6,62+-2n. tween 10.00 a.m. and 12.30 p.m. on Saturday mornings.
a is se oO ‘ -
A lS NUL ctiacte. | SEMERY Soninleter In aamsedt oF BORER (Telephone 2589) ; From South Wales, Liverpool and Glasgow
WANTED 5 a One mM large sehouany desk and spinels shop etiached to residence | or (b) R. T. A. Johnson, Esq., B.A., L.C.P., Assistant Principal, ice > SEA
§ . by . containing five drawers | at axwe) ill, Ch, Ch., with Dist, EST | 7 i xpeeted Arrival
Bhi pete ee and one filing Grawer, all of cedar.|“A” for permission to use a Liquor ADVERTISING PAYS B | 49 Blue Waters, Christ Church. (Telephone 8587) ; Wales Liverpoel Glasgow a Bridgetown,
Complete with solid mahogany swivel | License a board and shingle | * (ec) H. R. Daniel, Esq B.A., L.C.P., Dean of Academic
HELP chatr, Suitable for office executive. | shop at d, St, Michael re On ree oa ea Sis. “EGGEN” 1. 9June 15 June 24 June 10 5
hen Price $160-00 Phone 3406. 7.6.52—4n Dated this of June, 1952 | Studies, Bush Hall, St. Michael. (Telephone 3487). Le; Sei te ‘130 June 5 July 14 July 1 Sein
Steer eas oniss, bane te wean ohice. Maghtiat F { application to be submitted to the Department of Edu-) °° | wy
typist for our office. Reply in writin Police Magistrate, Dist. “A” ‘orms of app , LARRINAGA” . Ena July Early August Mid August
e x, 7 “Hunte & Co.” LAd., Lower!) MISCELLANEOUS FITZ SAVOURY. cation by Saturday 26th July, 1952 and addressed as follows:— a .
roa treet Qualifications of appii-! Tat 7 pplicant ic
canta ‘must he “Attathed to application ty a Bk atk ene oe ee on in N.B—This application | will be. con: | ee a = Sage eee ae Studies.
14.6, oi : “ _ | sidered at a icensing Cour’ IS i asses——-The an ademic Studies.
eon) Via pee ee. ee ‘at Police Court, District “AY on Frida; / —_ } Academic cle eu ee + at eed ete UNITED KINGDOM AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE
MISCELLANEOUS Parma uncle ae tidied gic ci 3k OM Be nh a aad aeaa heuer anit KIDNEY PILLS Hy | =A fee of $5.00 per term payable during the first wee - From Antwerp, Rotterdam and London
on ae oor cna | covers all the subjects, 80% of the fees paid will be refunded at the
oe Emel E. A. McLEOD, i . :
CARIB BOTTLES—Return Carib Bottles “ORIAC” Synthetic Chamots Leathers ‘ “A , 34 - Arrival
A e & Sons, (B'dos) Ltd |are here again’ They are always soft Police Magistrpte, Dist, | 35 } end of a session to all students who have, in the opinion of the Prin: Antwerp pottergam Londen ——
6 ado

, at 1% cents each

Victoria





No@ appetite? No pep? The
rich, blood-building proper-
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“restore lost energy and wil)
,. keep you fit!

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

| i 9 NEW

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HE HORSEMAN’S YEAR BOOK
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2
THER STRUGGLE FOR BUROPE
(The most remarkable War
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FROM HERE TO ETERNITY
A wonderiul assortment of Books
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JOUNSON'S STATIONERY



15.6.52—4n

CSO

PLLA LL









and pliable and will give you all the
service and satisfaction of an expen-
sive Chamois Skin. Size 22 x 18
inthes only 4 cents each, Obtainabic
at HAR N'S HARDWARE STORE.
Tel. 2064 14.6.52—3n .

znsland's leading Dally. Newepeper now

vrriving in Barbados by Air only a few
days after publication in London. Con
tact: lan Gale, c/o Advocate Co,, Ltd
Local Representative, Tel. 3118.

17 4 63—t.f.n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTIC
(TRANSFER AND REMOVAL)

The application of Beryl Holder of
Sweet Bottom, St. George, purchaser of
liquor license No. 1052 of 1952 granted
to Clifford Holder in respect of ground
floor of a two storey woll and wooden

ding at Sweet Bottom, St. George
for permission to use the said Meense
ot a board and shingled shop attached

residence at Sweet Bottom, St
George and to use the sald license at
weh last described premises
Dated this 12th day of June, 1952
To:—C, W. RUDDER, Esq

Poice Magistrate, Dist, “B"

BERYL HOLDER,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at the Licensing Court to be
held on Friday 27th day of June 1952

11 o'clock a.m at Police Courts

“BR

W. RUDDER,
Dist. “B”
17,6,.52—1n,.











FOR SALE
Black ook “maguire M. sraren

Grace Hill School Gap. Spooner
Hill. 14.6,52—3n

pe BOS OSGGOVSGOOS SSO OS ¢
| ner a

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

GOVERNMENT EXHIBITIONS FOR BOYS AND GIRLS

Notice is herepy given that applications for Senior and Junior
First Grade, Primary to First Grade, Second Grade ang Renewal
of Second Grade Exhibitions tenable at Government-aided Second-
ary Schools will be received at the Department of Education,
Garrison, St. Michael, up to Monday, 30th June, 1952.
senior First Grade Exhibitions.

Candidates must be under 16 years
£&xhibitions of not more than five years’ duration may be awarded
annually to two boys and one girl.

Junior First Grade Exhibitions:

Candidates must be under 13 years
Seven Exhibitions of not more than five
awarded annually to five boys and two girl>
Primary to First Grade Exhibitions:


















































Dist






c
Police Magistrate,

teens |

The!

of age on June 30th. Three |

of age on June 30th.) ‘(jy)
vaenit duration may be! oF

| cipal, Dean and Lecturers, worked satisfactorily and attended regu-
| larly and punctually.

Students will be required to supply their own stationery
ybooks as required by the Lecturers.

and text
\
\4th Sune, 1952.

|

15.6.52—2n.

a

CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL AND HIGHER SCHOOL CERTIFICATE
EXAMINATIONS, 1952.

Forms of entry for the above Examination can be obtained from
‘the Department of Education, Garrison,
| Entries in respect of the Schoo] Certificate Examination, 1952,
— only be accepted from candidates falling within one or more
of the following categories:—
(i) Candidates who already hold a School Certificate or an
Oversea Junior School Cer ;
(ii) Unsuccessful entrants for the 1950 Schoo) Certificate Exami-
nation who have not re-entered in 1951, but who obtain an
authorization from the Syndicate to re-enter in 1952.
| (iii) Candidates who passed the Qualifying Test held in January
1951, but @id not take the School Certificate Examination
in December, 1951,
Candidates who failed the School Certificate Examination
in 1951 will be allowed to re-take the Examination in 1952
unless they have been notified that their performance in

|

}
|
|

>

Those smail but extra strong Candidates must be under 13 years of age on June 30th. in the 1951 Examination does not qualify them to re-enter

BEASS LOCKS you have been % Two Exhibitions of not more ot & born ee re “n arene . in 1952. :

rene: esate ¢ a annually to one boy and one girl. Candidates must be pupils of Ele-| :

JOUNSON'’S HARDWARE } FOR SALE mentary Schools. () os ‘a have guaend the Qualifying Test held in
bso ety se OOO OAS ictal cue Second Grade Exhibitions: uary, f



'





FURNITURE
AUCTION

al
VALLEY HILL, CHRIST CHURDK

(Between Carrington and
Yorkshire Estates),
WEDNESDAY 18th JUNE, 1952,
at 11,30 a.m

»~We are instructed to dispose of
the Furniture and Effects of th
ast Mr. ¢€ P. R, Greenidge
Viewing morning of sale.
Dining Table to seat 10, Serving
Te et of We aa ee
Upright Chairs, Pr. Tub Chairs,
Armchair, Occ. Cha rs, Sid boards;
Single Ended Settee, Liquor Case
end Stand, Pr. Kieney Tables.
lant Stands. Pr. Berbice Chairs
Wali Stand. Wali Brack-ts. Mirror
end Stand, Military Chest, Trays,












Cake Stand (ALA, IN MAHUG-
ANY). Marble Téyped Tate, Can-
Vas Chairs, Oct. ‘Tables, Corden
Serving Table, Several Kitchen
Tables, (hil sixex!, Cedar Book
Stained & Painted Book
ses, Ptd. & Plain Chairs, Ptd
Ware Cabinet. Chest of Drawers.
Tid, Press, Cedar
Chairs, Gallery Fur-
al Dining Table
Bonche Jingle iron Red and
Hair Mattress, Commode, Wash-
stand, Portable Gramophone,
Record Stand & Records, Fold-
jing. Card Table, 2 Valor Stoves
& Stands, ngle Burner Stove
Thermos F $, Silver, Glass
ware, China, Dinner Sets, Pyrex
Ware, Brassware ed Tra
Rugs, Suits, Shirts, Jerclothes
Shoes; Large Coll. Kitchen Uten-
fils, Crocker, Ovens, Books, Ot)
Lamps, Buckets, Pictures, An-
@hurium Lillies, Ferns, Plants. anc
Yarae Coll. of Oddments,

e
AUCTIONEERS
Joan ed. Biadon
& ce.

Phone 4640
Plantations Building.

neem ements









12 years of age on June 30th.

Candidates for Renewal of Second Grade Exhibitions must have
been holders of Second Grade Exhibitions which have expired.

Twenty Second Grade Exhibitions of not more than three years
duration including not less than ten first awards, may be awarded
annually.

_ Forms of application forthe above Exhibitions may be obtained
from the Department of Education where any Turther information
will be given.

Application forms accompanied by baptismal Certificates, must
be returned to the Department of Education, not later than Monday,
30th June, 1952,
28rd May, 1952.

be boys under

At HIGHCLERE FARM

St. Thomas




To reduce herd of well kept
dairy cattle, 12 Grade Guernsey
Cows, ail producing Milk. Call
early and make your selection.
Anv of these will make admirable

family cows. 14,6. 52—4n



ORIENTAL
PALACE

HEADQUARTERS FOR



Applications are invited fromm teachers and other suitably quali-
fied persons (men and women) for the two vacancies at: —
Christ Church Boys’ School.
2. The minimum qualification for entry to the teaching service

J SOUVENIKS is a School Certificate.
\) FROM “aa A 8. Applications must be submitted on the appropriate forms

THANIS

Pr. Wm. Hy. 5)

(E, 85 (b) for men and E, 35 (c) for women) which may be obtained
from the Department of Education, but candidates who have already
submitted one of these forms in respect of previous vacancies (now
filled) may apply by letter accompanied by a recent testimonial.

4. Any teacher who applies for a vacancy on the staff of another
school must inform his or her present Chairman of Managers and the
Head Teacher of any application for such a transfer.

5. All applications must be enclosed in
“Appointments Board” im the top left hand corner and must reach
| the Department of Education by Manfay, 90th June, 1952. Candidates

lare warned that canvassing may lead to their disqualification.
BATTERIES | 15.6.52—2n,
|

TWO VACANT POSTS OF TEMPORARY FIELD OFFICERS
by | IN THE DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE & AGRICULTURE
G.E.C.

Applications are invited for the two vacant posts of temporary
18c. each

Field Officer in the Department of Science & Agriculture.
»

Dia) 6466



|



9

jin the scale $1,200 by $72 to $1,920 per annum, plus the prevailing

| cost of living allowance payable to public officers, The posts are
temporary and non-pensionable and may be terminated at one month's
notice on either side,

3. The Officers will be required to furnish themselves with motor
transport and will be paid a mileage allowance in accordance with
current rates payable to Government Officers.

4, The main duties attached to these posts are soil conservation
} field work, leaf sampling of sugar cane, soil moisture determinations,
the application of chemical weedicides and insecticides, maize selec-
tion and sweet potato breeding.

5. Applications stating age, qualifications and experience shouid
be idressed to the Director of Agriculture, Department of Science
& Agriculture, Bridgetown and should be submitted not iater than the
2ist of June, 1952.

|
|
|
|
|
\
{
t

a





15.6.52—2n.

Candidates for first award of Second Grade Exhibitions must)

envelopes marked |

The fee for the School Certificate will be $15.12 and for
the Higher Certificate $26.88.

Forms must be completed and returned to this Department, to-
| -ether with a copy of the Birth/Baptismal Certificate and the Fees
| on or before Tuesday, Ist July, 1952.
| {.B, The Examinations of the Cambridge Local Examinations Syn-
dicate will not be held in Barbados after 1952.
|

| Department of Education.
| 15th May, 1952.

20.5.52—2n.



GENERAL CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION — UNIVERSITY OF
a LONDON — NOVEMBER, 1952

| ‘Forms of entry for the above examination may now be obtained
| from the Department of Education, Garrison.

Bach applicant will normally be required to offer five subjects at
Ordinary Levei. Candidates who wish to complete matriculation
| exemption will be permitted to take the necessary subject/subjects at
| Ordinary Level together with the required number of subjects at
| Advanced Level.

UNIVERSITY FEE

Ordinary Level — $2.40
Advanced Level — $4.80
| LOCAL FEE
Candidates taking neither Oral
nor Practical Examinations
| Candidates taking either Oral or
Practical Examination
Candidates taking both Oral and
. Practical Examination 50% of the University Fee
| Forms must be eompleted and returned to this Department,
‘together with a copy of the Birth/Baptismal Certificate and the Fees
| (University and Local), on or before Tuesday, Ist July, 1952.

{

40% of the University Fee

45% of the University Fee

MATRICULATION REGULATIONS

The beginning salary of each post will be $1,200 per annum |

| ‘Scheme A: The candidate must have obtained passes (not neces-
|
other than English, (c) either Mathematics or an approved Science
subject, and three other subjects, provided that :—

at least two of the subjects-are passed at Advanced Level
; chosen in accordance with the Regulations.
| Scheme B: The candidate must have obtained passes in
(a) English Language, (b) a language other than English, (c) either
Mathematies or an approved Science subject, and two other subjects
provided that !—

at least three subjects are passed on the same occasion, of

which at least two must be at the Advanced Level, the three

subjects being chosen in accordance with the Regulations.
Department of Educatior.

16th May, 1952.
20.5.52—2n.

| sarily on the same occasion) in (a) English Language, (b) a language |

Barbados

“FEDERAL VOYAGER” 13 June 16 June 23 June 9 July

Agents: PLANTATIONS LIMITED — Phone 4703
) *S99099000000000000000000000000000959555598F 559,

GARRARD 3 SPEED AUTOMATIC RECORD
CHANGERS

Just received! Going fast! Come and get yours !



MOUNTED POLICE DISPLAY

THE POLICE RIDING SCHOOL

District “A”

5.00 P.M., TUESDAY, 17TH JUNE
e

ADMISSION :

Reserved Seats

$1.00
Unreserved Seats

48

Box Office at Informa’ tion Bureau, Police Headquarters
e

A Farewell to Staff Sergeant Anderson of the
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
12.6.52.—4n.



THEY ARE TWO BARGAINS.

e
54 inch ANDAR CREASE RESISTING
SUITING
at $3.52 Per Yard.

Shades White, Parchment, Dawn, Pink, Tiger
Gold, Jewel & Bermuda.

SHARKSKIN at $2.80 per yd.

Shades Dawn, Pmk, Tiger Gold, Jewel,
Bermuda & White.

°
A. E. TAYLOR LTD.

Coleridge Street.

WHERE THERE ARE NO PARKING PROBLEMS
And where - - « =
QUALITY 1S HIGH
—: and :—
PRICES ARE LOW
-So Dial 4100

/_——<---"-]V-9#77HJ tO’>’"*"*”*™”*x*x“xnun’"”"”--vv.»_Lh6nxn”2qn2 nnn eee



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A EVERVTHING..

PCAN EXPLAIN iN ie _ Full Particulars at Your Disposal—

TUESDAY, JUNE 17, .19 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN
HENRY " BY CARL ANDERSON 7 , :
—— NATIONAL EMPLOYERS MUTUAL

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das?





PAGE EIGHT



Y.M.P.C. Seore First Win

COMBERMERE LOSE
BY AN INNINGS

THERE were good wickets at all grounds where the
Interm ite cricket ‘n es were played, and batsmen
made good scores. At Carlton, W. Drayton who went at

edi rate ag

number three in the batting order, hit 103 runs not out
while batting for Empire in the second innings. He hit
12 fours and a six in his 103 not out.

Only one outright victory was scored on Saturday, the
last day in the first Round of Intermediate cricket matches
and this was at Beckles Road where Y.M.P.C. won by an
innings and seven runs over Combermere; Y.M.P.C.—who

sored their first win— bowled out the schvolboys for 89
runs on the first day and replied with 185 runs.
























In their econd innings Com- ! Innis: Lb.w, b_ Austin i
bermere were again skittled out * a ee Smee b Austin "4
for 89 runs and the bowling hon- Lewis b Slirke 2
ours for Y.M.P.C, went to Burke, Phillips stpd. b mrankes &

a : > : e ikinson stpd. b Branker
Austin and Branker who took 1son b Archer 6
three wickets each, well b Branker 16

At the Mental Hospital, Black aly b Burke ’ il
Rock, Police declared in their WOGs ae s
first innings when the score wa ore se
200, in reply to the Mental Hos- Total 89
pital’s score of 185 runs made on se ts lea ii —_
the first day of play. C. Sealy 0 M R Ww
top-scored for Police with 57 and purke O78) ee
F. Smith was not out with 28 Austin 17 a hae ae
runs. Bowling for Mental Hospita ee as ; 3 f .
Skipper Knight took four of the « “Branket * we: aes
Police wickets for 51 and medium B. Hoyo: 2 0 8 0
pacer Chase three for 45

In their second turn at the Wanderers vs. Windward

ricke os al sco 128

vicket, Mental H pit al sc re ae windsvase 13
runs for five wickets and ther WINDWARD—First. Innings
declared, sending back on Police
who had collected 33 runs when Evelyn b J. Corbin 10

{. Thornton c Armstrong b
play ended \ J. Corbin 20
First Innings Lead Hl. Farmer Lb.w. b Proverbs 65

Windward got points for a first ! neon ¢ Sheets oh eee +}
innings lead over Wanderer c Mhyers b J. Corbih 12
when their match ended on Sat- e ¢ Armstrong b 7
urday. Batting first Wanderers , ’ Corbin . x
scored 173 runs and Windward & wijxie tnd : 1 aiaaie 7
replied with 233 runs, H. Farmer Farmer stpd ale 0
65 and R. Farmer 40 not out. Evelyn 1.b.w le 15

When play had ended Wander- Patras v
ers had scored 121 runs for th Total 233
loss of five Wickets in their sec- : oo , ca day
ond innings. G, Skeete was not BOWLING ee ‘eae
out with 37. J. Corbin 23 2 8 4

Empire also got points for a R. Packer 4 o 24 0

I I
first innings lead over Carlton at â„¢ overt 9 ? 35 1
Carlton. After declaring at 187 : aw ‘ acy 1 :
runs for the loss of two wickets G. Skeete 8 1 31 0
in their first innings, Empire P Patterson 5 1 14 0
bowled out Carlton for 108 runs
2 WANDERERS—s

A breezy 103 runs by W. Dray- z sphnieiiliaiah icin Beses etc
ton high-lighted the second inn Seale 1.b.w. b H. Farmer 25
ings of Empire. Drayton hit 12 ; froeeree cD eel 7

: awiess ¢ Thornto r
fours and a six in his 103 and Mayers b R Atkinson ae
enabled Empire to reach a total G. Skeete not out 37
of 167 for the loss of five wickets. © Packet Farmer b R, Farmer 16
Best bowler for Carlton in the â„¢ i 8 not out z
Empire second innings was R. oF
Hutchinson who captured three of Total (for 5 wickets) 121
the Empire wickets for 42 runs. aneiing

In the Pickwick-Cable & Wire- BOWLING ANATYSIS
less match Pickwick secured a yy papme: $ ean ey
first innings lead. Batting first, ». Wilkie 3 eae
Pickwick scored 256 runs and Le, Greenidge 2 0 a es
then dismissed the Cable & Wire- jf» Thornton 5 a eet
less team for 156 runs, O, Lash- pr Atkinson 3 ae a
ley bagged five wickets for 38 R. Farmer 2 0 2 Oo
runs and bowled 14 overs, three ®: H. Farmer 1 eae.
of which were maidens. H. Jor- . : ‘
dan also had a good spell. He Empire vs. Carlton
ended with figures of 16 overs, Empire First Innings (for 2 wkts.
four maidens, 38 runs, four declarea) “3 ees 187
wickets. a . 7 Cariton First Innings . 108

Cable & Wireless in their sec-
ond turn at the wicket scored 80 EMPIRE—Second Innings
runs for the loss of five wickets. 5 ron © Harding b ©. Gill 22
R. Croney scored 54 runs before W. Dravion hoivour ttnews 103
he was given out leg before the C, Beckles ¢ & b Hutchinson 15
wicket to the bowling of H. M. Armstrong stpd, b Hutchinson 2
Marshall. G, Clarke ¢ Proverbs b Hutchinson 1

C. Prescod not out 18
‘ Extras

Mental Hospital vs. Police Be
hawaii hada we Total (for 5 wkts) 167
Menta: Hospita ‘trst Innings 185 ae

POLICE FIRST INNINGS BOWLING ANALYSIS

C, Sealy b C, Knight 57 oO M R W
N. Haynes run out 20 Matthews i 0 18 1
S. Howard b Chase 3 Burke 3 o 6 Oo
C. Cheltenham Lbiw. b Wilshire 4 Edgehill 3 0 a. 3S
O, Warner b Knight 19 Gill 7 a Se
C. Springer c Wilshire b Chase 20 Cox 6 0 18 0
F. Forde b Knight 2 Hutchinson 5 0 42 3
E. Denny c Gaskin b Knight 2 Warding 3 0 13 0
D. Pinder b Chase 12

F. Smith not out 28 % i 7 i
ih Seerehe rat ont ® Cable & Wireless vs Pickwick

Extras 12

Pickwick Ist Innings 256
Total (for 9 wkts,) 206
o ~ CABLE & WIRELESS—First Innings
BOWLING ANALYSIS oe Matthews ec Peterkin b
gti arsha 3
Oo. Knight o * ee mi E. G, Skeete b Lashley =
Cc. Gaskin 13 1 55 O 4 kee h.b.w Bhi : * 4
G. Yarde 1 0 6 0 , ©, Cozier ¢ wkpr. (Evelyn)
P. Crichlow 4 1 5 y ar ae tie.
R. Chase 15 go age gs 8 roney ¢ Marshall b Lashley 42
J. Wilshire 3 0 22 1 |. H. King c¢ Moore b Jordan 0
¢ Seale b I ashley 1)
MENTAL HOSPITAL—Second Innings | | Branker stpd. wkpr. b Jordan 11
V. Boyee ¢ Denny b Springer ay «CN. T. Clarke b Lashley 4
G. Yarde c¢ Barker b Springer D, M. Archer not out ‘ 1
C. Best i.b.w. b Springer |. Standford J.b.w, Lashley 2
> Siow ¢ Springer b Barker Extras +r we
- Gaskin run out a
we Chase not out Total 156
E. Quintyne not out f oti
Extras i BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo M R W
Total (for five wickets decid.) 128 i Jorden 16 4 38 4
ashley 14 3 38 f
BOWLING ANALYSIS 1, Marshall 6 ae 1
o M R w ~N. Greenidge 5 0 14 0
E Denny + 1 18 o 2% Peterkin 5 3 25 0
D. Pinder 3 1 13 o G. Moore q 3 14 0
Cc, Sealy 3 2
@. aoriewer ; See lg CABLE & WIRELFSS—2na Innings
M. Hayne: ; Oe ea he s
B. Barker 2 0 14 I e eenrihewe ‘ Moore b Lashley 7
Hw King c¢ wkpr Evetyn) b
POLICE—Second Innings Jordan : 0
C. Springer c Worrell b Crichio i \. C. Cozier ¢ Kidney b Lashley 1
C. Sealy Lb.w. b Crichlow » RM. C y Lb.w. Marshall 54
S. Howard stpd. b Crichlow 7 keete stpd. wkpr. b Jordan 15
Cc. Warner b Gaskin b Lashley 0
F. Forde not out C not out 2
Cc. Cheltenham not out 4 ranker not out 0
Extras Extra 1
Total (for four wickets go Total (for 5 wkts. 80

BOWLING ANALYSIS
Combermere vs. Y.M.P.C. oy. jordan oe ae






BRynoe Scores
Double Century

MAGE



JOHN BYNOE

Tall burly John Bynoe, playin,
his first match for Em tein’ the
Second Division, hit a breezy 202
not out in 205 minutes in the Em~
pire first innings against Cen-
tral on Saturday, the last day of
the first round of Second Division
cricket matches.

Bynoe who was associated with
the Barbados Regiment team last
cricket season hit 27 fours and five
sixes in his 202. He was_ always
at ease against the Central bowl-
ing and paid none of the bowlers
any respect,

Empire gained first innings
points over Central who declared
in their first innings when the
score was 285 runs for seven
wickets. Empire replied. with 365
runs for six wickets declared and
when play ended Central had
scored 30 runs for the loss of two
wickets.

Combermere secured points for
a first innings lead over College.
Batting first. Combermere scored
191 runs and College scored 99
for six wickets .declared. Com-
bermere also declared in the
second innings when the score
was 27 for five wickets. At the
end of play College had scored 71
runs for the loss of three wickets.

At Erdiston, Y.M.P.C. gained a

first innings lead on Efrdiston
whom they bowled out for 105
runs, Y.M.P.C. in their first

innings scored 139 runs. In their
second turn at the wicket Y.M.P.C.
scored 61 runs for no wickets and
declared, but at the end of play
Erdiston had made 39 runs for
four wickets.

Second Division Cricket

Central vs. Empire at Central

Central 285 for seven wickets
declared, (C, Hinds 125 n.o.) and
30 for two wickets.

Empire 365 for six wickets de-
clared, (J. Bynoe not out 202).

Combermere vs. .College

Combermere 191 (Skeete 46, G.
Medford 3 for 17 and E, Griffith 3
for 33) and 27 for five wickets
declared.

College 99 for six wickets de-
clared and 71 for the loss of three
wickets..

Y.M.P.C, vs Erdiston

Y.M.P.C. 139 and 61 for no
wicket.

Erdiston 105 (1 Burke 3 for 24,
Butler 2 for 16) and 39 for four
wickets.

WHAT'S ON TODAY*

Police Courts—10.00 a.m,

Meeting of Legislative Coun-
cil—2.00 p.m.

Meeting of House of Assem-
bly—3.00 p.m.

Reunion at Queen’s College—
4.45 p.m.

Police Mounted Display, Dis-
trict A—5.00 p.m.

Extra Mural Youth Group
Meet at British Council—
5.00 p.m.

Basket Ball at Y.M.P.C.—7.80

p.m.
British Oouncil Films,
Speightstown—8.00 p.m.

REPORT

YESTERDAY

Rainfall from Cod

nil.
Total Rainfall for month to

date: 1.98 ins.
Highest Temperature: 87.5 °F
Lowest Temperature: 75.0 °F
Wind Velocity:

hour
Barometer:

THE WEATHER
11 miles per
(9 a.m.) 29,968,
| (3 p.m.) 29,908
TO-DAY
Sunrise: 65.44 a.m.
Sunset: 6.19 p.m.
Moon: Last Quarter, June 14

Lighting: 7.00 p.m.





Combermere First Innings 89 ©. Lashley 6 2 12 High Tide: 12.51 p.m.

Y.M.P.C. First Innings ; 185 G. Moore Low Tide: 6.46 aim. 6.39 p.m.
COMBERMERE—Second Innings N. Greenidge

L. Francis b Austin 0 HH. Marshall

They'll Do It Every Time

BUT SAPLEY REALLY
BELIEVED ’EM
WHEN THEY SAID,

“NO SPEECHES AT

THE COMPANY
DNNER-DANCE
THIS YEAR






Severe we ARE AT THE
ALLEGED DANCE. IT'S 11:30
PM. AND THERE ARE STILL
UMPTEEN SPEAKERS AT THE
HEAD TABLE To BE HEARD





JANITOR, I THINK IT'S
ONLY FITTING WE HAVE A

BLOTTER,OUR BELOVED
BOOKKEEPER =



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



In Intermediate Division ‘|





SPORTS WINDOW
WATER POLO
Whipporays “B” team meet
Harrison College “B” in a
Gents’ Water Polo match at
the Aquatie Club at 5.00 p.m.
to-day.

PIORWiON meet Fortress

and Carlton play Pirates in
First © Division Basketball
matches at Y.M.P.C.
Beckles Road, tonight. Play
begins at 7.30.

Ten Seore
Centuries

LONDON, June 16.

Batsmen held the mastery in
most parts of the country toda)
and no fewer than nine individual
centuries were recorded. A tenth
was made in Belfast by India’.
allrounder Phadkar on the first
day of the two day match with
Ireland,

Heading the honours list is Cyril
Washbrook who at 211 not out was
only 19 short of the highest in-
dividual score of the season when



he declared Lancashire’s innings
closed. against Somerset. The
declaration however was well

justified for before close of play
Somerset had lost six wickets for
104.

Jack Tkin who had béen, ineclud-
ed in the 12 players for the second
Test commencing Thursday was
unable to field in the Somerset
innings because of the recurrence
of his back trouble,

A fighting innings of 140 not out
by Compton narrowly failed to
give Middlesex first innings points
against Yorkshire at Lord’s. Com-
ina in after three wickets had
fallen for 33, he hit strongly all
round the wicket to make his first
century of the season in just over
three hours.

Laying of the new pitch at
Trent Bridge doesn’t seem to have
affected batsmen’s ability to score
heavily. Today both Joe Hard-
staff and Cyril Martin hit centur-
ies against Derbyshire’s attack
containing the three England
bowlers—Jackson, Gladwin and
Rhodes. As the first day was rain-
ed off a decision on first innings
ie all that can be expected to-
nrorrow.

The scoreboard follows: Middle-
sex vs. Yorkshire: Yorkshire 308
for 6 declared Young five for 137
and 18 for no wicket. Middlesex
277; Compton 140 not out.

Surrey vs. Essex: Surrey 256
for seven declared and 200 for
seven; Essex 118, Laker five for
50.

Glamorgan vs, Leicester: Lei-
cester (107 and 126 for five; Glam-
caer 325, E. Davies 91, Watkins

Worcester vs. Gloucester: Glou-
cester 345 for five declared and

18 for no wicket; Worcester 346 |‘

for six declared, Kenyon 118.

Hampshire vs, Northants: North-
ants 67 and 256 for four; Hamp-
shire 154 for nine declared,

Lancashire vs, Somerset: Lan-
eashire 3836 ‘for five declared,
Washbrook 211 not out; Somerset
104 for six.

Sussex vs. Cambridge: Cam-
bridge 368 for four declared, May
167; Sussex 269 for seven, Cox 121
not out,

Notts vs. Derby: Notts 309 for
five, Hardstaff 116, Martin 122..

Oxford University vs. Warwick-
shire: Warwickshire 384 for four
declared, Horner 140, Ord 143 not
eut; Oxford 113 and 24 for one.

In the two-day game India vs.
Treland, India are 289 for eight
leclared, Phadkar 103; [relang 60
for three,



Sea Scouts Beat
Boys’ Club Team

Sea Scouts beat the Boys’ Club
it District “A” in their Second
Division Basketball match yes-
terday by 29 points to 22,

T. Carter scored 12 points for
Sea_ Scouts while N. Barker and
E. Pollard scored nine each for
he Boys’ Club,



Sa



THIS WEEK’S ji! ON

SPECIAL
PEANUT CAKE

Gc. each

apeaiis qT
AKERIES Barn. ht! |

DIAL 4758
JAMES STREET



















ground, |°



TUESDAY, 1952

JUNE 17,



TENNIS CHALLENGERS
JACK KRAMER and DONALD

Chandler Sisters
score For Starfish

Starfish beat Ursuline Convent
4—0 and Goldfish beat Queen’s
College 5-—2 in their Ladies’ Water
polo matches yesterday at the
Aquatic Club.

For Starfish the Chandler sisters
Phyllis, Mollie and Patsy scored
2, 1 and. 1 respectively. For
Goldfish Peggy Pitcher and
Brenda Foster scored three and
two respectively while for Queen’s
College Clara Pasteur and Jill
Reid netted one each.

The referee was Archie Clarke.

Teday at 5.00 p.m, Wihipporays
“B” team meet Harrison College
“B” in a Gents’
Aquatic Club.

TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR
BEAT MANCHESTER

NEW YORK, June 15.

For the second time in 24 hours
Tottenham Hotspurs walloped the
English Champion Manchester
Jnited soccer team this time 7—1
before 24,582 fans at the Yankee
Stadium.

The Spurs, runner-up in the
English Football League this sea-
son, and last year’s title holder,
administered two solid setbacks
suffered by Manchester on their
}12-game tour in the United States |
and Canada. |

Manchester dropped a 5-0 de- |

nis champions, are coming to

Britain with PANCHO SEGURA |
to |

}

and RICHARD GONZALES
compete in the Searborough pro-
fessional lawn tennis tournament

(July 28—August 2). —L.E.S.



You Can Fiy
Almost Anywiiere
Wa

fixture at the



’ Regular Clipper service
is now provided to 83 |
countries and colonies on
{

cision to Tottenham in Toronto on |
Saturday.—C,P.



‘PILATE’S WIFE! |}
A religious Dramatte Performance

Presented b |
REEVES AND PARTY

=

NEW YORK

\- service by the luxurious
MY Prondenteâ„¢ or via San Juan by
popular, money-saving “E! Turista.

c.W



THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE
(By kind permission) '
|

FRIDAY & SATURDAY,
20th & 2ist June

Commencing at 8.0 P.M

HALL

Part of proceeds for the | E Uu R eo 2 E
Family Welfare Funds |
UNRESERVED SEATS 4/-, 3/-, | Re service by giant double-
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Enjoy stopovers in England, Ire-
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ist FILM SHOW in the Ball- |

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|X room at 830 p.m. on Wed- a PAA

i %s nesday, 18th June. rex ; aehbcte

4 he Programme includes:

% British News, and the short re ed ta
% Films, © . ee

iy “Shipping”

| Bereta etn AN AMERICAN
is rimina ustice”

1% also a Colour Cartoon Wortp AIRHAYS

Da Costa & Co., itd.

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invited) | Broad St. — Bridgetown
\

¢ No Admission Charge
. 15.6.52—3n.

% = (Members are cordially
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Phone 2122 (After business hours—2303)

*TM REG., PAA, ING.





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PAGE 1

i' M.I 1'ir.irr BARBADOS ADVOCATE II I s|>\^ II SI 17. 15J < Y.M.P.C. Score First Win In Intermediate Division COMISERMEKE LOSE in AiN INNINGS ;md batsmen who went at numb M IW runs not out id : rn-v II. hit • out ii Saturday, the lant da\ in i: and t!i InnYMl'C. won by an Inntagi and seven rum "vi Combannav*; Y.M.P.C v. in-bowled out the schoolboys for 80 %  d with 185 runs. Ityeue Scores Ihmhlr Cpntitrf In UMll Miii*" war* again a. for 89 rum and the I" 1 ours for iMIJ?J I to Buike, Iho look throe • I Ho pttal, Black %  200. in reply to pttal's score f 185 ran the first day ot play. C. Seal;, top-scored tor Polka vilh 57 am. r. Smith was not mil runs. Bowling for Mental Hosplta BUppei KnlpU took I i mcdiun %  r 45. in thai wicket. Mrntat HoapJtal %  declared, sanding back i who had mdad. First Inning* I*cnd %  innings lead over wandOKl arben tbaii mat I urday. Batting first :i rani and Wmdwirn replied with 233 iun.-. H, Farme 1 65 and R. Fnrmer 40 i. Whan pl.iv ha i ended Wanderers had -cored 121 nil lou ol I lift 'heir second inning> G Skcclc was not out with 37. %  al'o rot points for a C iriton il Carlton After declaring at 1*7 rum 'or the loH of W in their first innini l-.Aled out Cartton for lf rum A hr.iv II W l)i..' ton high-lighted the second Inn Ings of Empire. Drayl fours and a six In his 103 and enabled Empire to re of 167 for the loss of five wicket* Reft bowler for Carlton in the Empire second innings was R. Hutchtnson who capturi the Empire nk. | In the Pickwick-Cable A Wireless match Pickwick secured n first innings lead. Batting first. Pickwick acorad 256 inns and then dismissed the Cnt leaa taam for 156 runs. O. Ln-hley bagged live wick'runs and bowled 14 0V< Ihn of which were maid n' H. Jordan also had n good aa II In ended with figures of 16 overs, four maidens, 38 runs, foui wickets. Cable & Wireless bl fl ond turn at the wicket noied Bit runs for the toss of five wickets R. Croney scored 54 runsbefore he was given out let: before the wicket to ihe hoy* ling .if FI. Marshall. Menial Hospital n Roller %  • It ranker .ipd h Bwafcn .1.11. l I fUlWl.tNU ANALYSIS Wanderer* vs. Windward lajmii n WnmWAaw ifirsl feMMkai %  wtni a / %  < i' t inaa b J Cwhtn T\ fainn.r I : ; %  ? fl j I. SeORTS WINDOW WATEK POLO WhipptrsT* "B team Mrt HairMoii Collage • B" la > Of nit. Water Polo match at the A'i'i.itir Clnt> at Mm p.to to-day. BASKETBALL PtCKWICK me" fortr*" and Carlton play Pirate* in First Dm.ion Bank ft ball matchaa at T.H P.O. ground. Heckle-. Road, tonight. PUy begin* at 7.30. Ten Score Centuries Chandler SfatBM Soore For Marfisli n overt i. beat ifucen'a ( 'I in then iJidic Water -terday at the Aquatic Club. tier sisters %  Pal 2. 1 and 1 respective! %  Goldfish Peggy Pitcher and I later scored three and t.\u reaptx-tivcly while fur Quean's (.-•liege Clara Pasteur and Jill Itcid netted on* each. Tin nsteraa mi Archie Clarke. >-. .it 5.00 p.n.. WJupporavs B' team meet Harrison College 11" in a Gents' fixture at the Club. LONDON. June 16. ItntMnen held the mastery It most ports of the country toda. %  Tanner no4 b teak Bxtr* \ M.YRIS O M cwatn n a \ vMiiai a— Stale ibw b it. I'ac-.r I Mirkrlll ANiM. O • %  s %  3 Knipire vs. Carlton %  •"' "i-t InnlBii iUr 1 ku. etaaM %  aat lu.m, ] aatriaa—aaaaai imn. r Tvir c namina h c am %  i b w b vfntihewi %  M Arn* i. %  [•" %  M'pilal *n !•... %  •>• I"l M I I llt-l INMM, • Kniiiit Itatne. %  lloKaM h Cha-* NAI i m sn Matin**. JOHN BYNOF. Tall liurly John Bynoe, playlnn his first match for Empire in the SeeoiH! l>ivls#nn. hit a brt-ezy 202 not out In 205 minutes in the Empire lirst innings against Central on Saturday, ihe last day of IB* m round of Second Division cricket matches. Bynoc who was associated witli the Barbados Reipmeiit team last tricket season hit 27 fours and flvi' MXCS in his 202. He was always at ease against the Central bowlinii and paid none of the bowlers any respect. gained first innings n ar Central who declared heir llrst Innings when the score was 285 runs for seven Kmptrc replied with 365 runs for til wirki-ls declared and when play ended Central had scored 30 runs for the loss of two wiekets. Combermere secured points for a first Innings lead over College. Baiting first. Combermere scored 191 run* and College scored 99 for six wickets .declared. Combarroai %  also declared In the second innings wiien the score was 27 for five wickets. At the end of play College had scored Tl runs for the loss of three wickets. At Erdlston, Y.M.P.C. flamed a first Innings lead on Erdlston i whom they bowled out for 105 runs. Y.M.P.C. in then Bret innings scored 139 runs. In their Hocond turn at the wicket Y MI'C wored •'. runs for no a I declared, but at the end of play Erdlston had made 39 runs for 1 four w:ckeUSecond Division Cricket Central vs. Kmpirr :it Central C I 285 for seven wickets i (C. Hinds 125 n.o.) and SO for two wickets. %  365 for six wickets d>I dared. (J. Bynoe not out 202) Combermere vs. College Comlwrmerc 191 (Skeete 46. fl. Medford 3 for 17 and E. Griffith 3 for S3) and 27 for five wlrkcta !I9 for six wickets dei 71 for the Ions of three : wickets.. Y.M.P.C. n Knliston Y M l'<\ 139 nnd 61 for DO ticket. Bi 'ii 1"5 fl Rurke S for 24. Bl til %  for 161 and 39 for four u gat TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR BEAT MANCHESTER NKW YORK June 15. -tT Bum nine .ndiv.,1 < •'""•' """' "l, 2 ^""" lum wrp i. Hotspurs wjJlopth~ was w ll lhamplo.1 MMnchter da, .,! Ihr .w., .lay match will. JJ "•' """ %  '"Vankt.i i.-i in,! otaaumi g the honours list is Cyril 'ft ^g^ !" £L£i\, {•> i bignesl ii i urTarad by a? on thc-ir 12-game tout in %  and Canada. Mniein st.-r diopiM-d TENNIS CHALLF.NGF.ftS JACK KI.AMF.lt uad IXJrJALD i DGE, tarrnai Wn-.i,!nia champions, .ire -oming to ill. PANCHO SEGIIKA nd RICHARD eompete in the Scarborough prv %  (July 2—August 2>. Yotj Can Fly Alwoit Anyw.iere Ragwlar Clipper service U new provided to 83 countries and colonies on oM six continonrs. • l he season wher he declared Lancashire's innings anet, Th| avor was well tustlfiad (tir before close of play Somt.rM.-t uad lost six wickets for 104 •lark Ikln who had hen. titclndBd m the 12 players for Ui* second Tfat coiiiinoncing Thursday won unable t< Held in the Somerset InnUigs bacauaa of the i-wurrenc. ol his back trouble. A tinhling innings of 140 not out by C'ompion narmwly failed tc give Middleaex first innings points aajainat Vorkshtre at Lord's. Coming in aftti three -t ickcts had fallen Tor 33, he nil atnngCl] all round the wicket to inakc hi> lir>t euntury of the season in fUBl o*a ti.ree hours. Laying of the new $bch M Tranl Brl IB affected ) ity w wore haaytijr. Todaj' i"ti, Jot Hardstall and Cyril Martin hit centur|i osjatnat Deibyshin the three Englant Utiwlt-i Jackson, Clad win an. Rhodes. As the first day wv rained "ii % %  decision on first inning' i. all 'li.it ,.i T1 [>texpected to Tlie ^torrbnnrd follows: MiVorkahire Y"rkhnr SOU .' Iceland Young liv# for 137 S and IB f..i no wicket. Middles. > 277; Compton 140 not out. ; Surrey vs. Essex Suney 250 S for seven declared and 200 tor .* -.even; Essex 118. Laker live foi J to TW S. I %  OWI O. Kmshi <• (.a.* in O. Yaitl, • w.-..i i • a i vi MM %  oafftAJ laaaai aaaavH I %  %  %  %  DM % %  ntn O. Yanlr i naikr, I C D*t lb w b M rnthlon cSp.na.r h Ilirkri Cable A. Winl.sv vs Pickwick i. Ii,k-j %  C COBkSI [ what igvrbrw h Inrdan laaakaB b i^utwy l II Kum e M. H .i b Jordan i ley 'J ordan WHAT'S ON TODAYPolios Coartit 10M a.m. M.-etiiiK of Lt-KitUUre Coanctl 2.00 p.m. Meeting of Hoosa of AssamMy—3.00 p.m Reunion at QueenCollage4.4b p.m. Police Mounted Display. Din titCt A—0.00 IMII Bxtra Mural Tonth Oronp Meet at Brttisb Council 5.00 p.m. flasket Ball at Y.M.P.C.—7.10 Clamorgan vs. Leicester: Leicester ld-7 and 126 for five; Glammgan 325. E. Dav.cs 0L Wiitkuu: 107. Worcester vs. Gloucester: Gloucester 345 for live declared and 18 for no wicket; Wore* for six declait-d. Kenyon 118. Hampshire vs. Northanls: Northants 87 and 256 for four; HampBfrira 154 for nine ileel-.n--! Lancashire vs. Somer.'•' I. caahirc 336 for five declared. Wash brook 211 not out; Somcr-e'. 104 for six Sussex vs. Cambridge: Caml ridge 368 for four declared. May 1(17. Sussex 26P for seven. Cox 111 ,t out Derby Notts 300 Tor Ive. Har.UUIT 11C. Martin 122.. CocfOrd Cmversi:-. \ %  -. Warwickhlra. w.ti wtekshire 384 for four* Honv i 140 Ord 143 not mt; Oxford 113 Bl I ^1 tv 000. In the twK-ct.iv game India vs. Ireland. India arc 289 for eight leelared. Phadkar 103; Ireland i;o or three. •PILATE'S WIFE' a "ii t %  % %  D i-Mi % %  rttn in ii\ | • oiirnr II \i. IB) Mad i*imiauei.i fltinAV 8ATVKDAY. Part el proceed*, for ihr l a mil > S'dnrr I aaal* t MO'tmn r^is •/-. i I II > MIO ..t Till: iiii:i'.\i"i AQUATIC CUB and Visiting Members l By Courtesy of Ihv British Council there will be a FILM SHOW in the Ballroom at 8.30 D.m. on Wednesday. 18th June. The Programme includes: British News, and the short rilnu. "Shipping" and "Criminal Justice" also a Colour Cartoon (Members are cordially invited) No Admiaoion Charir 15.6.52—3n. NEW YORK Non-ttop service by tl* luvur.ouS Tl I'residentc" or via Sao Juan bj; popular, mooey-saviag fcSTurtiU. EUROPE Regular service by giant doubledecked "Strato" Clippi'-worlds farteit airliner' to Paris, Ron;-' En|oy RDpOvan la 1 inland. lr. land Venexuela Frequeat fligbti to all mala eMai by swift Convair-r>po CUppen For u MTcarions. aat your I m \a<^tr>r TROPICAL SUITINGS THESE ARE ALL NEW ARRIVALS Brown, rawn. Light and Dark Grey and Beige at $7.59. $7.99 $8 28 & $9.08 per yard CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10. II. 12 Jc Ii BROAD STRF.ET Sea Scotrts Beat /toys' Club Team "it-, boat the BOYS' Club • Metric! "A" in their Second n.-iMkctbali match faa- bj M point to 22. T. Carter scored 12 points for Sea Scouts while N. Barker and B I*i)lliri acorrd nine each for ii Boys' Club, PAN AMERICAN HOMO %  UHH'AYS Do C.,i. a Ce. IM a.*oa II B..de.iB fl,.-. 1111 a3! HEAL SORE DRY SKIN Mcmholatum' Balm heals Sore and Cracked Skin JU>I like magic and it is so simple to use You just RUB IT ON. 'Mentholatum' instuntlv stops irritation, soothes soreness and makes your skin tool and smooth. 'Mentholatum' is good for ALL Skin troubles. As it cools it soothes. As it soothes it relieves. As it relieves it heals. Quick—get a jar or tin to-day. -LIKE A.\ etiWUE WMB5LWr M TO BLEMISHED SKA That's, exactly what: NOXZF.MA any one who suffers from skin blemishes, rouglu i the Medicated Skin Creat. . is to fhynaaj n a Uttle your face. N O X Z E M A Blue Jar HERE'S ALL YOU DO— 1. Morning: — Apply NOXZEMA nil With a wet face cloth "Cream wash with Noxiema"—Just as you would with soap. Note how really clean your face looks and feels. After drying face, smooth on a protective film of greaseless Noxiema 2 Er.-tii'iu— Again "Cream wash with medicated Koanania". Wash away the day's Accumulation of dirt and grime Now massage dainty, ureaseless Noxrema into your face. Pal a little extra over any blemishes to help heal them. Do this for One Week, and "Note the Difference" with •IVOXZEMA The Medicated Skin Cream in the Little Blue Jar Obtainable at: BOOKER'S (B'dot) DRUG STORES LTD. BROAD STREET, and HASTINGS (Alpha Pharmacy) BXPANDBD METAL SHKKTS I" mnh 4' \ S' Iron 2" mesh I X !•> Iron 3" mesh 4' x ID' Iron %" mesh 4' x 8' Galvanised IIOI.TS & NUTS I" & ." diainelir CASHAOB BOLTS & NITS .VICV & W (IKINI)STONKS 2' diameter x K" FF.RROCHKTi: Kapid-llardenii^ < KMKNT wiiiTK iNowcasn ctsuan KKD & BUFF COI.ORCKKTK CEMENT 4267 Wilkinson & Haynes Co.. Ltd.



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PAfll I "I I BARBADOS .\DV(M ATE TUESDAY. JUNE IT. IM2 BARBADOSJI ADVOCATE Pi-lattS fci U> *4U C. Ltd.. Bi-oaS •.. %  ilSaalowa Tuesday. June 17. 1S52 MODKHIX I IMIIX. THE value of the Fishery Research work which ha been carried out in Barbados during recent yean is illustrated by this ilchM of flying fish. Although 116 Ashing boats were destroyed during 1951. the catches of flying fish during 1952 are estimated to be 33 per cent higher than the catches for the comparative period in 1951. Siti.f the spectacular loss of fishing boats lutr Ittl year M boats have been repaired and thrve new ones built by private boatImt not one of the 25 boats which are being rebuilt under government supervision is yet completed. Barbados* fishing Meet in 1952 comprised 558 boats as compared with 623 at the beginning of 1951. Sun-ly then it would have been reasonable to expect that this year's catches of flying fish would be considerably less than the catches made in 1951? It would have been reasonable to have expected smaller catches and there, would probably have been smaller catches, had no fishery research been carried on during recent years. Fortunately for Barbados there has been fishery research. Mr. Wiles has been able to prove conclusively that much greater catches of flying fish could be made when gill nets were used than could be made when the traditional methods of line hooking and net-scooping were employed. Aii... I' in 1951 some 30 fishing boats were using gill nets and the experience of these boats so convinced other fishermen of the advantage of fishing with gill nets that today no lew than 400 of the island's total fleet of 518 fishing boats are equipped with gill nets. Barbadians ought to feel very grateful to Mr. Wiles because without the widespread use of gill nets in 1952 flying fish instead of being reasonably plentiful throughout most of the year would have been in very short supply. The advantages of fishery research have %  n.irMie beHO vividly demonstrated because of the shocking catastrophe which overtook th# island's fishing fleet in 1951 But Barbados would be unwise to wait for catastrophes to point out lessons which must he lear'nt. The introduction of the gill net is only one of the lessons to be learnt from the research work carried out on the lnveatigator by the Fishery Officer and his assistants. Mr. Wiles has already reported on the use of plankton as indicative of the most profitable lishing-grounds and he has proved that Hying fish are more plentiful at certain periods of the day than at others. But the difficulties of catching more fish are real. As presently organised the fishing industry is %  highly competitive industry in which fishermen have no guarantee that then catches will be sold unless their boats return early to the shore. The result of this cut-throat competition is that fishing boats habitually leave the fishiiiL. ground! before or during the optimum periods of fish catching. The work of the fishery research department is therefore being hampered by the existing organisation of the fishing industry. Progress cannot be made until fishermen combine to market their cutches cooperatively and are prepared to pay for cold storage facilities without which marketing cannot succeed. Barbados fortunately for fishermen is well supplied with cold storage accommodation which can be adapted for the special needs of the flying fish industry if required But fishermen themselves must first be convinced of the need for new marketing methods. Fishermen cannot be us conservative and as resistant to new ideas as they are commonly said to be. Itf that were so they would have shown much greater resistance than they have shown to the introduction of the gill net But the government's policy of con,rolling the price of fish, granting loans to fishermen, helping with half the cost of replacing twenty-five new fishing boats and in general 'of behaving like a kindly uncle to the whole fishing community, excellent though it may be in intention, has the undesirable effect of leaving fishermen to expect leadership from the government. This Is a great pity. Because unless the fishermen of Barbados avail themselves of the knowledge which 'he Barbados Fishery Research office is making so rapidly available then their chances of improving their Status in the community will be DOStp ried and perhaps lost forever, while the community as a whole must inevitably suffer becausa the fishing Industry is patently not organised to exploit the excellent supplies of flying lish off the Barbadian coasts. Belter Sugar Position, But Xo Shipping Improvement \V -i Incliu < orin.iifie. Annual ll< poi i -— LONDON. BMN in consult*maintaining contact with the AIIOA better position in regard uoa with colonial rfpmtnUUvM ciatlon of Wast Indian Transto sugar .tales, but DOB Londmi. Colonial interest has atlantlc Steamship lint a on, and of improvement in shipping wrrent red In efforts to ensure that by meeting to discuss, matters ol vice* to The British West Indies •*-' I-Tge a part a* possible of any mutual conearn. are among the main features of Increaae In Commonwealth conWest Indian developments during >n'pUm should be reserved for "II has recently been learned the past year, according to the Con'^ !" IW "L , pI ."?." %  f Th Wl,n T ** npt !h 1 lh Canadian annual report of Ide Weil India altimde theWest Indies ComGovernment have decided that the Committee. presented at the £'"" % %  ln n ul, ,lon w "*> the high cost of building passenger Committee's annual general meet^'"lilJT^L CSf* h .? U fK *'! %  'Wds the .epUcement of i— ... t ,*— !" ... ->* Association, has been that the the "Lawiv" boat* which hava nroIng in London on May The report welcomes the ftuiiHHJIIII the the "Lady* boala which have prontire increase of consumption vlded the popular passenger ser'Caltn ihOUld iMr*>ai In tujn IL f mui~n extended lo molawri id oil. But in B section 01 Services to and ftIndie*, it says: "It ki to be feared _e<. Her Hi*?.** [~ 'SSBS Z^SSZ J& ^e .SSM" ernment have abandoned any '."!".. ,'ZZ. n-riStn. !" rt the m0 aenoua will be the effect on Intention they may have had ol fiSUr* I rian* In view ol the "Iw-ialalid frtltfit and paacngrr ensuring the maintenance ol the VS„,H_~S n ?5; „.„ „, J.V1 services. It u Idle to talk ol fedpreat... of MU* .hlppinf „. the d ," !" '""a "^SZtj* .ulr. to "•"" " d "> '" """"• ** Weal Indie., and have left the !J, V,„!SS Khudnnfwhlle^Utul'"' !" "nlon II lacllitto proWK ol auch accommodat.on K ."'XueL th? eatmwt^f ,or me n, " n "' ood! """"•" ehlrty Jo to. French and the ^^^T ,V beS",' T^%,?£££&?' **£•% Dutch, who, it muat be confewied. ..,,„„,, %  I ^i ,, concerned are rernoxed. At have perlormed their part ex%  1 *"Jie same lime your Executive tn-mely well." On nulk shipmenu f aaurar: \ "mmiltee rcrrain always mindThe report a'ao mentlona Ihe Arran.rmrnt. were put In hand Jultoal trade iUl t;liarta la vital work of the Committee in draw ' %  "> advance el the l5J aaurar to the British V.cat Indian eolo. Ing attention to the tax concesf~ • %  <**"'> %  % %  % %  %  "'' """L^J'J,"?!, '^ m *i m ^r %  ions olTetrd hv jLiklait. fsaloBtaa b l| k shlpmenl Involvlna appraxin the minds of all concerned, toTcv? Industrie, TS. r-rir.ml,tee '" %  ' one-third of the MM ofllcttl. commercial and otherwo*. U.K. tax policy which makes exportable surplus from the •> lively appreciation of this fact" British West Indira and about On trad.representation; "Alone-half of the quantity to be though agreement has now been • xporud to the rtilted Kinfdom. n'jehed In regard to the setting investors in such Colonies linble for income tax payment in the ^ mr rangemenU have worked up of an official West Indian United tongdom on the full .moolhl, and bulk shipment will Trade Commissioner service covamount of their tax-free earnings become the principal method of erlng Canadi .md the United tn the Colonies. conveying sugar to the Vnlted Kingdom, no new personnel have In the 1951-52 year, the ComKtnidom In future." yet been appointed, and mittee's excess of expenditure On rum: "The extortionate quenUy the service continues to over Income was kepi down to duties on rum coupled with the be provided in Canada by Mr. Rex £17. but at the close of 1851 decreased spending power of the Stollmeyer and his staff, and In there was an accumulated deficit people of the United Kingdom Is the United Kingdom by the West of £8,5 38 The report expresses making it more difficult to mainIndia Committee." roncern at the rapid increase in ti the demand for rum, sales _^ expenditure which the Committee which are so important to the . n P>neer Industrie* "The yeai must face If it is to continue to economy of the British West T^ff 0 " %  /or the work un•rork .fT.vtivelv IniiK.. Ihftnthe riudget a strong ctaJum by the West India Here ;ire some exliaets from "PPCal was ngun made to the J-J"T m ..J n brUl " n to the althe text of the report ** Government have abandoned chequer. In this connection thSugar Association in the aominl ,: > intention they my have had Committee not only submitted uring the maintenance of memorandum to the Roy.d ComP ice fixing called for" by the * aiireement. in maintaining the thc P'^tigc of British shipping in mission on Taxation of Profits continuance of the Agreement by *"* Wcst Indies, and have left the and Income, but also appealed annual extensions and in keeping provision of such accommodation direct lo the Secretary of State for a watchful eye on development., chiefly lo the French and the the Colonies, pointing out that for a revival of the International Duu; h, who. It must be confessed, the position called for relief much Sugar Agreement." have performed their part txmore ap—dlly than was likely On the International Sugar Jreroely well. The French, Indeed, to be provided irmnigh the Hoyal Council The principal develop","*' '"" bce <'<"Uent even to Commission, it will be recalled nient during 1951 was thc pro0,low "Miton to stand as they that in 1050 the Committee had •diction -if a simplified draft of wcrp winr* the war. but havo been responsible for bringlnito n International Sugar AgreeProvided magnificent fast ships the notice of Ihe British public the nient to replnce the existing wi th luxurious and ample pasofficial brochure of the Govern Atrreement.^ which has been nger accommodation. All the ment of Trinidad" "ODooriiimtv inrmam since the outbreak of effort of the Merchants and Shipfor Induslrv" while to IBM .hi "con f In^'^mm^'r ' S F, 0 """"^ •ers", Mr. H. A. Shannon, of the Fund's British Commonwealth Division, explains why very lew colonial territories are In a position to lake measures by themselves to resist the effects of recessions on their economics. The local Currency Boards, he points out, are merely automatic money-changers. They issue colonial currency against deposits in I-ondon and take in colonial currency when a payment is being made in London. "They have no discretion In thc matter", Mr. Shannon writes. "Constilulionally. thc rate of exchange is fixed in London by the central authorities. The quantity of money in circulation can be increased only by depositing tin eiimvalent Increase in -.iciling IT, London; it can be decreased only bv an equivalent redemption in sterling in London.'* The colonial authorities, therefore, can have no independent monetary policy. Nor can the local banks have an Independent credit policy, except within the narrow limits determined by their own "sound" banking practices. This is particularly true where local production is mainly on a full cash basis, but Is more qualified where the banks have some, though limited, local investnent opportunities, Mr. Shannon ^.a 7"" "hanges of cash and credit in a colonial territory are PMIII.UIIV functions of the changes in its balance of payments—the preservation of which, he polnta out, is not a primary consideration of their economic policies. Thc more favourable Its bal.tru.v then the more sterling a colony can deposit in London and the greater will be the quantity o< its local cash. The more adbalance, the more it mutt reduce Its quantity of local cash to obtain the sterling in London needed to meet the adverse balance. The position of the banking system within the currency systems is fairly simple In principle. Mr. Shannon explains, but varies in detail from territory to territory. As the ultimate legal liability of a hank is to splooni its deposits on demand in loci currency, it must keep its ultlmatu reserves and general assets In a place and !h a form where thev arc easily encashable into local -urrency. This means London and sterling securities marketable H.erv. A large propotion of colonial bank deposits are "redeposlled" in London; In short they become part of colonial sterling balances. Because of the economic Ktructure • ( many territories, the banks may, in fact, have little or no iiuprupnate outlet for their funds in local investment. LoogJ Investment opportunities vary from territory to territory according ot the degree of industrialisation, but. i n general, either because of tho need of access to legal tender In London oi the absence of suitable local outlets and local capital money markets, the colonial banks hold a high proportion of their assets .i Th e ^ arran ements under the lolonlal Sterling Exchange Standard preclude local 'currency management' or 'central banking' as ordminly understood,' savs Mr. Shannon. "There is no local discretion far there are n o local fiduciary issues.'' This explains why very few colonial territories are in .a position to uaa'monetary measures to soften the effects of recessions — particularly m commodity prices—on their economies Currency Boards aim at holding asset* equal to about ten pel rentin excess of their liabilities. Isually, they are held | n the torm of sterling gilt-edged securiU"\ !" Proms from the Currency Boards assets than becomes a a-Hirce of Income for their own novernmenu, and sometimes form an important item in colonial r-venues. Quite exceptional cimimstances apart." M r Shannon "the colonial currencies are a source of profit to their governments, nnd all are more than fully covered at their face value RIG BILL DUFFY From NEWELL ROGERS NEW YORK, i BLUSTERING "Big Bill" Duffy speakeasy boss and one-time manager of heavyweight fighter Primo Camera, is dead. And it is almost as if the gin age of Prohibition died with him. New York of 1952 hardly remembers one of Broadway's most famous associates of top masters, though he : played a nambuoyant part in its vital, vivid life. He died in a house in a quiet fashionable lane named Blossom Heath in a "good" Long Island neighbourhood. Blossom Heath is worlds away in atmosphere, though only a few miles geographically from Garnet-street, in Brooklyn's tough, dirty, waterfront section of Gowanus. There Duffy was born 69 years ago and grew up a young waterfront tough. Before he was out of his 'teenB he was held up for robbery. A few years later he was in Sing-Sing for the same crime. Two men deeply influenced six-foot, redfaced Bill Duffy's life. One was saintly prison administrator Thomas Mott Osoorne.j of Sing-Sing. The other was not exactly saintly beer baron Ownic Madden, one of the "beer barons" of Prohibition. Osborne took an interest in Duffy in prison. When Osborne took charge of the United States' naval prison ct Portsmouth, New Hampshire, he took Duffy along with him. Duffy became prison administrative assistant. He entered the Navy and rose to be a chief petty officer. Out of the Navy, Duffy hit the gin-an-jazzl age on Broadway. He met Madden. Soon he was proprietor of a Broadway nightclub. La Vie. Dollars rolled in until August, 1922. In that month Frankie Wallace of the underworld was shot dead on the ballroom floor. La mort closed La Vie. But Duffy was now an experienced operator of "joints". With the backing of Madden, "Big Frenchy" de Menge and Marty Krompier — all big business men of the underworld — he opened more Prohibition clubs — the Silver Slipper, the Frivolity, and Rendezvous. One of his quainter ventures was Bill Duffy's Olde English Tavern on West 44th-' street. In his clubs, Duffy met fight managers. He and Madden discovered money in the "fight racket." In 1927 Jack Dempsey fought Jack Sharkey. Duffy was Dempsey's chiel| second. Dempsey fouled Sharkey. The referee could not make up his mind whether to count Sharkey out or give him the decision. Duffy is given credit for screaminc "Start counting!" The referee counted Sharkey out Madden and De Mange imported Primo Camera, the "Ambling Alp". They made Duffy Camera's manager. Again Big Bill was given credit, rightly or wrongly, for deals for Camera's opponents to "take dives" in tights the Man Mountain should not have won. In 1934 Duffy "took a dive" himself in a fight with the United States' Treasury. He went to jail for failing to file a return on 34,170 dollars in 1930 on earnings on Camera. After he got out, Prohibition was gone from Broadway, and Duffy vanished too. He opened "joints" in quieter suburban sections on Long Island. New Yorkers were learning to motor out into the country to drink, cat and dance at night. One of Duffy*a taverns was simply called "The Place." In 1945, police raided Duffy's tavern at Oceanside, Long Island. Eighty-seven guests and operators were arrested for gambling. Duffy convinced the law he did not operate the place, but just allowed them to use his name. He is survived by his wife, seven children, and 14 grandchildren. There was a requiem high mass In St. Agnes Church. Rockville Centre, Long Island for the boy for Gowanus. PHOTOGRAPHS Copies ol Lotl Photographs H'ln. I, have appeared in fat Advocate A'esrapoper Can be ordered from the . ADVOCATE STATIONERY For HOME REPAIR ITEMS. Try: C. S. PITCHER & CO. Our Headers May: Frionilly StM'iely To The Editor, The ^deocalc SIR.—I read with interest your Editorial published in your newspaper on Friday, 30th May, in which you make reference to the Auditor lieneral's Report for the MMQ. In this nrUclo you mal i comment on an cxtiacl .>f it-port which refers to UM satisfactory way In which sorm of the officers of certiiin Friendly main their returns lo the i.idit and in some Instances completely fall to OOffl section 33 of the Friend 1> Act which clearly states that ail books, accounts, documents and vouchers etc.. be sent to thc Audit.'i Oneral for nudll. NOW, Mr. Editor, when one earef fully reads the comments made by I nor General, the only deduction that can be made Is that the manner In which some of the Societies are twins conducted is not In the Interest "of the subscribers, especially when It Is ienu>n.lcred tho large sums of money handled for their accounts. I tni Adrocate— SIR. -I would tike to direct tho .ittention of the Purchasing Public to an apparant Food Product resembling the Eddoe that U being marketed by loathsome vendors. This item which Is similar to the Tannla or Dashene causes s dreadful itching,in the stomach when eaten. Thrie wild eddoes, as tticy are called, grow along th water course of Dunscombc and Blosssjn, and being well known by residents of that locality are despised as Foci It Is from this locality that these vendors emerge, gather them free of cost and journey to town and trade upon the ignorance of the E urchaser. who not knowing Its chavlour, suffer as a result. OBSERVER H.M.V. RADIOGRAMS A COMPLETE RANGE OF THESE FINE RECEIVERS 5-TUBE TABLE MODEL RADIO I.I I 111 TABLE MODEL RADIO 5-TUBE TABLE MODEL RADIOGRAM •-TUBE FLOOR MODEL RADIOGRAM 6-Tl'BE I I.ml! MODEL RADIOGRAM (with Automatic Three Spefd < hanrrra) -LL,„ .. LET IS DEMONSTRATE ONE OF THE ABOIJ SETS AND JOIN THE HUNDREDS Or SATISFIED OWNERS I 98.30 1U.M J75.M 33010 515.M DA COSTA V CO.. LTD. DEVELOPMENT IN CAMEROON'S CONTINUED improvement in the financial position of the Cameroons is recorded in the 1951 report of the territory presented to the General -f\ssembly of the United Nations, For the second time since the coming into force of the trusteeship agreement there was a surplus of revenue over expenditure estimated at £204.000. The export of bananas in 1951 amounted to 5,750,000 tons compared with 4,750,000 tons of the previous year. The report states that the development of territory outside plantation lands leased to UM Cameroons Development Corporation depends on road improvements. Work I on these has already begun. The first three priorities include improvements ot important Victor!a-Benenda road; construction of a road connecting the Benuc Province and Bamenda Province systems which will open up the hitherto completely isolated area lying in the Benue Province; and the improvement of the roads from Maiduguri to Bana and southwards to effect a link between northern and southern halves of the territory. In finest quality NYLON — Both plain and in Flowered designs of wide variety. Da Costa & Co., Ltd. •'TO HOXOl It 1 Ol It t.l I SIS lilt IXI. OIT THE HKST" CH.4MPAGNE LaLts Rocdrrrr Champagnp Bain. Dry Loul* Raederer Champagne IVIntagrl Black A White Whiskey SchrrJo's Rye Whisker Try Dubonnet on uV Rocks Place t Fleeea of Ice la a Glass, fill with Dubonavt. —Dellghtral anytime daring the d.,. *wji too/ with I r.i.viw.i onr Apple Julrr Grape Juice Cyder Nectar Dutch Beer Taborr Beer Baas Ale Worthlnrtai. Ale C.utnnrsa Stout


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Tl I --h \\ JUKI IT, ltd BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE mi Bus Owners—St. Michael Vestry Suit Adjourned THE BUS OWNEKS-ST. MICHAEL VESTRY Common Pleas Suit in which the Bus Owners are charging the \ with assessing them for taxes at a figure at which thev ought not to be assessed and with laying illegal, unequal partial, oppressive and unjust rates and assessments, started before the Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore yesterday and was adjourned Sine Die. The adjournment was taken when Mr. G. H. Adams for twu of the Bus Companies said that two different House Of Assembly Se*t4 Reshuffled WHf.N vlsllan .iTVnd the House of Assembly this evening alike, will not be teeing a back virw Ol ihe Stoeakuand some of the front view of members auditor, the Vestry hadretimed to examine the Companies' Z^TSXte !" !" i? ££i books were not accepted by the Companies, but since, there everybody This ha* come about was the mutual feeling that Bovell & Skeete would be a with a rearrangement of th STOWAWAY REMANDED MARIO P BRAIAO. aa IS 7ar-old car washer af Mi dairn. waa rtsterday raaand ed at Olandairy Prison m-il th* 18th Instant aandlng rapatnatlou to his country Braaao mv*d h.r* o*w tha waak and as a atowawy on board the IB "Nwter and appeared bafora Oil* Pollca Maiutrata Mr. R A Talma. Weeft-emf ThefIs Clerks' Union Not In Favour of Late Openings THE CLERKS' UNION ysterdav unanimous!'. 'hey are not in favour of the suggestion that dry ^IRMIS shops should be permitted to be opened until 9 pm. instead %  praanl B |i m. The unanlOWUI vot came ajtfff many members had strongly opposed live auggCMlon l"i the Increasing of the opening horns and decried the idea as a*' attempt U> throw them back in the bad old clays ttaiiana \ endor. Purchaser Fined The UMoa van .iitcusslnij a letter ftom Ihe Colonial SevieUi y in huh ii waa suited thai thesuggestion had been made and A bicycle and a ram Ware Government would be i:U.l la n'i among the haul taken by ttuevaa theh views on the matter _, ^. . . suiUble firm to examine the Companies* books and make Spe.-k.-. M a tnbar s. Oscar ( .nd aurm tha week-id %  eeordii. k .The letter tnm the Cotooial .',',/. : asn ; £L"T~ %"">-"' t h — WaSasr russr^srsrj^j^ tisrsfz?, ; %  •* which MHO* been made. Whwn an AdxwcaU reporter $78.00 was stolen from outside th.HH-* The Court proceedings are thus stayed until a report visited ihere ute yesterday Chiming Bella club, IS made, ""a*, carpenters were still at -ast Saturday night work finishing the chars**. Lotus. Ucoriah his clients would be agreeable to The old arrangment was this: Black Kock. letting them examine the books. A circular bannister was built to Police that . Mr. Tudor of Bovell & Skeeto aeparate a certain section of was taken from a pen sometime effected la ihe la !" so UsM j shift Pur.-l.aaeT. atella Miller, wen would be an acceptable person, visitors' seats from the members' between 830 am and 10.p.m system could be introduced to £ '' ',; i-nugtu oeiora t it Therefore, he said, at that stage, seta and the members backed on the 14th instant. enable US) ri opan ..I*. £ V,.. W "' subject to Mr. Reece'a agreement, ihcse visitors with the Speaker Other larcenv reports included up to it p.m. will, Bo im-u-as.in "' : he would suggest the adjournment f actnK t hem. Then ihe Speaker n watch belonging to Mi s Viola 'he wo.king hours of a particular %  "" ""J n rt t "JJ" r J WK The Three Bus Companies of the suit are the National Motor Omnibus Co.. Ltd. and the Yonkers Motor Omnibus Co., Ltd. on whosa behalf Mr. G. H Adami, Associated wiih Mr. J. E. T. Bruncker are appearing and the Progressive Bus Co.. Ltd., ) read; "The Shop o di praffm i inn ,in ituit .>' March., tar g" l ," ,, than f. p m on an ordina., .-i. Una uu "' l ""''"' i < £ Lieoriah of Clewdale day and Inter ihan 1 p.m.. on an %  *£•• J? J "I'"' Ck. also reported to the eaily closing day. It has been sugw ""J j ; '"' *""* at ram valued U.0O SSd.thaT, clwinie rtoilld "J. Aj^. !" <*£* %  %  "£ of the case and meanwhile Mr tJtX ln xhr n ,iddle of a straight line Yeorwood of Church Village asstslant whose behalf Mr. E. W\ Barrow Tudor of Bovell & Skeete could j oming the two horseshoe* and in Glrla* School. Mm Yearwoo; "I shall be grateful if your Is appearing. The Solicitors for go Into the books and make a i^ls way his back would be toaaid the w-tch was taken fnim Unto" p .ul.i submit views each Compniy are Messrs. Yearrepsjet as to the correctness wood *V Boyce. otherwise of the return his client The Vestry are represented by had made. Mr. W. W. Reece. Q.C.. associated Mr. Reece for the Vestry i-ud with Mr. J. S. B. l>ear and Miss that ho was willing to accept th< M. A. Reece, instructed by Messrs. suggestion Mr. Adams had mad. i thh He thought the tirm of Bovell L Skeete and particularly Mr. Tudoi of that firm would be an admirable person to avl't the books. Carrtngton & Sealv. Solicitors. The Yonkers Company claim that when this year's rates were made, they were assessed and r.ted at SA44.03 in respect of a profit of $5,236 derived from their trade. Because of thia they have bean ignevtd on the fbDowbti grounds:—(aI Because they were a sse s se d at the sum of $5,236 whereas they ought not to have been assessed on by that and (bl __ Because the rate and as-es.ment ^^2" S^TCJ 1 ? *!!£ wards another section of the h-r riek eirl"er durii H matter lor thi "h;iniNn licrr other visitors *alShe reported the matter ui Sunt: V *"W B *"' Nhw. however, all visitois" seata day. Mrong Upii.ions are together on bolh sides of a Uurnig the strong opinion passage way as soon as one enters kRg UKttins i Unsugg.-.tio* the chamber. And through this a side view .if the vlsltora whila minimum ovartlaM (igurc of passage way members have to speaking. Uiey will have to twurt. vim i > mll hour was quoted and walk to reach their seau. U.eir normcl positi.ms slightly nsSSstknS was nxidc of unbearable Members wUl be sitting an-und Une intercting feature is that droary night hours. Bftf hirseshoe table, but now withi this change, the S|>e,ik % %  f >; •'* After various laamlllli had •iiundfiuiioii ol the gfv he days with the alt"ruulive of one BMOll mem bar selling Miiin baa nasl ,. scheduled price. Millei was ordered to iuiy 30withn [ 01 in dcf-uli days Imprisrnmrnt. MVilorisI Diet After rVcckleol To lighten i our step and yota budget . wonderful Aristae ntf&nt! V mi II ( %  l (nw % %  • bfMaain saaatWrisissBMarAitksss, % % %  pnr- !" •laioM %  liaii.fl oliiWhlhM TW Landa* rsasssa l~<<— .i--if ih.i Ui^. DUHM* >W An M UV •"•""'"l % %  n..>-u>luMn(acxh*ry mood. MMUI w.ih T( J".!•, virfwU \"i-d mutually between the Vestry and In the case of tha National the petitioner and the books had Company they were assessed and unady been audited by, he faaprofit of $8,012 and hold that they 0 f the audit, to the best of his should only have been assessed knowledge, had been submitted B, i M7 i _. .... to the Veatry before the ratei The Progrossive Company were wcrc laid. assessed and rated at $590.76 in respect of a profit of S4.7SO and One Diffirultv hold that they ought only lo have been assessed in respect of $1,005. There was one difficulty about The Companies stated that In the petition, hf. said, a difficulty Old Boys' Association !f For Coleridge—Parry? against the lengthening of the shop closing time. Mr. Charlie Thomas, President i the Union. expiessed his own. as he said he did not wish to influence the genera) views in any way. e first said that the advantage abouT*5.30 posed by those who sought Hibody CsWlbOUrna WharUm i I W mnii'.SI George, died n tlV caauiia of the General Hospital vesterday niornlug after he win Liken there from llansen Hill R*ad, 91. George when ba .' involved in an accident while driving his motor car M—11851 the same day removed to the I WHAT ABOUT an Old Boys' Association of the Coleridge and Parry School? This is Ihe question quite a number of the old boys of the Iwo old schools are asking. Lgthening of opening lime Mortuary where a post inert?" were increased employment. examination was performed b> He said that if he thought It l)r A S Catn. An inquest has was a genuine idea for employing been iixe.1 for June 19 when the | more people, he would be the last Coroner will be Mr. C. L. Wi.lto show resistance, but he did not wyn. Acting Police Magi-li.tt. iK-lieve such a representation was l>i tint "A". lin It was the cheap fellow In the Thev think It would be a good idea to have one assocleback street who did not employ tion for the two schools now that ihe Coleridge and tin Parry Schools have been amalgamated. The likely name is the 'Coleridge and Parry Old Boys* Association; Interviewing some of the Old Residents of the parish have until iTie companies stated that n the pelltlon, h P said, a difficulty n .1.1'^ ,., ,!T .1 r_j 1# t..- „U,_Ti, !" T .ccordance with the Vestries Act which His Lordship would probBoys of both schonls, tne Adi-ocofe the end of June to enter the com1911 5 they gave notice in ably consider to be relevant to all WTlUng within the limited period the petitions. It was their mentioned to the Churchwarden opinion th.t interlocutory matters of their intention to object to the in the petitions would have clearrales and of tha grounds of such ed up a lot of the difficulties with objections. which the Court might be conQulte a large number of people fronted, attended the Court to hear thi*: For they were in a position of rates contest. not knowing at With Uic opening of the rise, crepancles, if any Mr. Adams gave an outline <>f the closed, and were in dispute be %  fntercsled position. He said that it was inI ween the Vestry and the Prou Bl ,rt. evIUible that although counsel apgrcssivc Company, peared for one side or another. Concerning this. His Lordship he might, or the Court migl.t aaid that he WJS not going Into U have views as to the stale of the then, but would give the other law is to whether It should be or an opportunity and mennwhlle should not be what it was. Anythe position could be examined how, the Court had to administer and what mattefa weie in dispute Association the law as it was. could be many that wanted to get introduced as legislation. That type of employer was hoping that when the front stores had closed at 4.30, he would be able to get extra sales. The prices of goods were dropping. H was even known that learnt that the formation of an petition. Old Boys' Association of the old The idea of the competition h*s %  .Mo, S, U. Anfifef 52 %  --..--. MSftK,K drew and St James, quite a numAFTKK A LONG STEIA of dry " ar f d '. to th *J whon "T"' ber of old boys of the old Colerweather, St. Peter has been get!£&*_**£ a shi 'idge and Parrv Schools are interling freshening showers of rain 12 hours within hich to buy It. .11 what dlsesTed?" And" thw'are"more' from d'ui'ng' th* pa's' t"wo"week7. he wouldI not.buy more shlrb. than had been djaother pj.^ of hc lsland who B „ District E' Police Station regis' he tad only two hours. They are wailing for tered Sfl parti of rain last week. Overtime On Monday. <> P * rain fell a^ nc preie nt worke-** An association of the kind 9 parts fell on Tuesday. would have a fine venue for their ALTIIOl'GH quite a few court meetings and functions--the new cases were called at District 'E' Coleridue and Parrv School Hall, police Courts last week, no fines Some of the Old Bo are seeing were imposed by Police Magls*•" "Plotted inu. working extra Coletidn and Parry Old Boys' trate S. H. Nurse. m>T" TL, !" ,,, Vr n %  • the future, Must of the cases were adjotU-nj Mr Thomas then mentioned ed while one. or two offenders got fe JKW tf the income'—greater chanc.' Ol b0sss| •\ ked overtime for the poor inducement of 27 cents an hour A* Hk lordship and everybody On the request of Mr. Reece. THfe BMTISII fOl'NCIL will c R.D. 'It was a quiet week fo in the Court probably knew, a the books of the Progressive Comb c giving their usual monthly District 'E' Courts,' a policeman trader might object to ttie rate pany were handed into Court lo *" m how for residents of remarked. and the Vesiry had a right to send be produced as exhibits when an*' Speightstown and its suburbs on 1 __ in an auditor t" check the books, if evidence comes to be taken. Tuesday night June-17 at 8 p m. Unfortunately, speaking as a Mr. Recce assured Mr. BUTOW at the Assembly Hall. citizen, ihe Acl said that a tradei thai hi side was willing to allow They have promised a longer might object to every single acthe other side to examine any programme OUS time as there was countant sent in to check his book, matter connected with the Vestry " n,m ahow ^' vcn b ,hem Jt ,he From that side of the law. it and the present issue that they Assembly Hall last month, might be possible, If a trader was might wish. sufficiently diabolic.1, that he The suit was then adjourned would never*vat his books checksine die. „ f 0,J1 !^C 0, A ep New U.S. Ambauador For two dlRcnnt reasons, his , " ••%  "" cllenu had not found It pouiblo lo IndoXnina Nominated Xo accept either of two names WASHINGTON. J IVtrs. HoekatBUer Wants K.-ifiiiiiii hich result. The Union also decided to present Govei nment a suggested amendment lo the Shop Cloning Act. Il Is felt that at present c-eii.nn stores include a variety of goods In their itoek nad under the act they claim that they could o|en for long; hours. For instance a normal cloth store may Include rum among Its stock and then claim Ihe right to open as long as a rum shop; meanwhile he might The Union wants the Act i hanged so that any such merchant will either have to set up separate n,nccrns for such distinct variety Last month's him show was put LOWELL, Indiana, June 111, off because the Pocket Theatre Mrs. Baibara "Bobo" KockeGroup were staging Shakestdx^ said „n Monday that she pearc's 'Twelfth Night' the foldisliked the -emphasis on money' %  lowing night at the Coleridge and wn ich has been raised by the Parry School Hall. cre ,tion of a $1,000,000 trust fund THE CIVIC CIRCLE of torjaar son Wlnthiop. Jr. Speightstown have every hope of The child 3) is Uic son of .....dioned by the Vestry for inPresident Truman nominated sUffinif a successful flower garden "Bobo" and Winlhrop Rockefeller, of stock, or close his shop in Spection of books. He would say Donald R. Heather on Monday for competition In St. Peter in July. *>n of John I>. Rockefeller Jr. The accordance with the earliest closhOI more then, other than that promotion from the rank of MinAbout twenty garden owners "hild's father established the trust ing hour. they were acting in their legal ister to full Ambassador to Viethave already entered for the comlund. The Union decided that members rights. nam and Cambodia. petition and more arc likely to She said her "chief inleical"js tu the Wages Board should lie But since speaking to Counsel Thenomination was sent to the enter. in lecoruilation with her •stransM cnoscn from the following: — for the other side it was felt that Senate for confirmation. Heather Those garden owners thnt have husband and In the welfare of the Messrs. O. L. Banow, CA If a firm of accountants agreeable was appointed Minister to Indu entered arc sparing no pains to child. She Issued a statement. Smith, C. Thomas Robert Kinch, to both sides could be got—in this China two years ago this month. keep their plots trim tor the Judg"make my position clear'' she said E. C. Hewitt and Miss C. Rooney. particular case Bovell & Skeete— UP. ing in the last week of July. *'-'-'-''-''-'' WE OFFER n..u GsektaO nr CortUH onion* Slti*~l Olivr. Plain OIIVM Tin* Curhi. %  i Sartrd I'llirll> I Rim.. 1. Ilt£ Slid.! IV.II l"i rnmi'1 i Jmn Hayonnal** Pi*pl*d MuiUrd curnr . i i .. han .. Pvarh** Ai" .%  (STUART & SAMPSON (1938) LTD. %  ma aa aWias KM •• aa. J itvawnygy*'-'''-'-'-'-'-'-'-'-'-'-'' MOUNTED DISPLAY Governor Opens Social Centre At Bathsheba • From Page S 1 further have visions of exhouses which was made possible words "To Bathsheba", for tending a Promenade along the through the instrumentality of besides catering to the Social sea-front following the old railj^n, f Iom Labour Welfare Funds. life of the Parish wc wish to exway track from Tent-Boy to He recalled that he had visited tend facilities to the public of Tenby Bridge, provided with he Sl Andrews Community this whole island by way on) seats and bright-coloured urncenlre on Thuridnv, June 12, and special charters and rents for orbrellns ond pavilions—a joy to „id there that the Centre at g. nizod entertainments. h youths of our Island and an Bcllepl.iinc waa being used as an On those occasions It will ba attraction lo tourist*. Such a argument against building other cloed lo the Public and notices proposition, fantastic as It may centres in other parishes. Howwill be posted on a Notice-beard *n. has not been put forward ever, he still had a continuous which is to be erected at the yet: I only venture to suggest it faith in Community Centres. Centre The revenue from such now with Ihe hope that it will iic loo> tn e ooportunity to pay rents will go towards malntentake root and grow. Sir, I take trlbute lo ..he work of the Social nnce and development. The latgreat pleasure in asking you to committee; then said, "I have rines and baths too will be opened declare this Bathsheba Social g tea t pleasure in declaring this to ihe public and it is hoped that Centre open". Hstfasfaaba Social Cenlre open." the Smitary Commissionersof Welfare Fund's Mr. R. A. Lee. churchwarden the Parish will contribute to His Excellency in declaring the of St. Joseph, moved a vole oi their maintenance We hope to Centre open said that It was only thanks which 'aTM seconueo oy develop the grounds is a Park and two and a half years ago that Mr L. E. Smith Promenade with a bus and car £20.000 had been voted for WeiMr. W. T. flooding, gave voie park at the lower end for which fare Funds, and much good had of thanks for the visit. a snnll parking fee will be already '""ged. noticed "1 object to implications that ray son Is now it millionaire. Actually he will never see thai million dollars and under the terms of The Mounted Display at the the tiust certain maximum moii'hRiding School of District "A ly payments are set up which may today will include a new musical . ._ -il> lumnlna It. nnln anil nMll^g) OT may not be adequate lo IUS ridei. Jumping ".pairs and must need' chairs in which the horses will i She said maxim 1 trust provides for on their front feet on the as the music is played. There will be a number of ne\ % %  """ % %  t-* T ..,*,, There will be a number of new ,thly untU the boy is 18 liit khann WMU Thf( p 0 lrr ling is spacined for minimum d wU| flIfl0 QO ^^ JUII1Dlri|( nothing pay men! had G. H Adams replied on behalf ol ST Improvem'en, "?f the parishioners of St. Jo-ephlletpu lo i Iun*! tinay-item from bhinil impuritivm Imparities in in* hloud miyauM rheumatic aches and pnlas, *illf and painful (ulnts, bolls, plmpl*. and commas akin diseroarea. I Ln*. in....,i Mlirure halpa to purify the Mood, cleanse* inn sysisni nnd i in resiorini goon hcallb. Jlift /f.'c.'iivv/ . -at — Weatherhead's Tooth ntta (W i x> Sheath Knives "Bcmts" DffnaM ,, lodise,it Tub:-. .. Aspirin Tnhi. 100. s „ Soda llii.irli 4-i>/ Pck. „ Worm Pnwdeis „ Slick It rush less Shaving Cream „ Denture Fixative Soltan Cream ,, Com Solvent .. K.I.O. Dry Cleaner „ Phcnosan Pills for Poultry „ Saccharin Tabs. "Pascalls*' Marshmallows „ Glucose Barley Sugar "Boots" Insulin .. Li< „ Back & Kidney Pilli „ Halibut Oil Cap* Here is a truck anJ a van, wiih ihe I cat ores and chc liMin^ui-.hed styling of a car. These vehicles have plenty of load -.pace iw cubic feet in the Cowlcy Van! Thev arc unrivalled tor upccdy deliveries because they have the r< performance of a car. CanVTWI n*TUMS THAT COUNT Allotnl. < %  • %  h %  Ilua.pcr. bnH Specially for the IfrMy HARRISONS BROAD STREET Real beautiful Plain and Brocaded Salin It S2.9I yd. AIIOUT Lace a $3.41 and $4.13 >d. EmbroidcrMl I )r ...nnlir from $3.42 to $452 Ji. Plain and Watered Taffeta from $1.15 to $2.00 yd. Bridal Veils from $8.50 to $12.75 Bridal Headdresses from $2.38 to $405 Elite Striped Collar attached Shirts, i ..:i< style. She* 14", to ii. ins. 0 $401. B.V.D. Union Suits no sleeves, Sizes 3S to 40 ins. — $4.St) per Suit. Gents Khaki and White , length turn over top Hose, FORT ROYAL GARACE LTD. PattS* 2385 Sole Distributor. Phon* 04 SOMETHING VSEFMftA \ A SUPER ABSORBENT (ELIULOSE SPONfiE (Not Rubber) In a variety of delightful colours and fa svafl yurpose For your ll..lli fn For your Fl.hv y,,r y,,ur Household II in '.id. it..akin It lalhrr* in.ii Into fuam II U lljdrnlr f4 n be rlraned bt hoit|)| AIWJT. Fresh and Clean See Them and t Yours To-dat I KNIGHTS DRUG STORES '•--*-'-'-":•-----•-•.*.-.' --'.'.•.',-,-,-.'^*,-.-.^' SPECIAL LINES FOR MEN CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10-13 Broad Street Size 10 to 114 inn. '. i $ 1.57 pair. ticnta Protex Suapi'ndfrv Size: S„ M, Ijrije—$1.80 per pair. Cents Towrllinif Sports Shirts collar attached, short sleeves, Zipp Fasteners. Sire Med. $3.71: Large $414. Pure Irish l.iii.n ltiinslilch.il. Initialed Handkerchiefs all popular Initials t SI.HI each. Van lleusen Semi stiff collars in atyle II and TI siies: 144 to 18 ins. f(V 81e. each. Boys % length turn over top (fancy striped) Hose in Wool, and Wool & Cotton mixture; Sizes: 84 to 10 ins. r w $1.6$; $1.32 per pair. RECEIVED &f IMD mm PEPPER .. %  '.!''.> Ill V K PEPPER .N'f.M /I.M ,-,:, CHim KANIMI rAMKMIDIM' C HUM n t %  omsi DAmn PORT BAun per I or Caster per 1 or. Caster .. per tin per ft per tin .. per a Ier lb CANADIAN LUSirUS rtlTiltll I Flavours per pat. CANADIAN KINGS lll.l.H per IJOlSe CANADIAN KIM: s BEDI p.'r 12 bott ( AIIHUIIY'S CUP C1IOCOI.ATI: per t COCKADE FINE RUM sr.%\si-i:i.n. SHUT A to. LTD. I M J! l.U 1.16 .1!' n 3.611



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TUESDAY. Jl'XE 1?. lHt BARBADOS ADVOCATE FACE rilHEl Animals Slaughtered To Control Disease //oir {/. A '• Farmer* >lwt Menace 7 LivvxKnk industry, B* L. F. EAttTKRIMOOK I i.M.I.Ml Art "New-. I l,r,ii, |, Whilr he Waal away un a holldu. orseii* rernUy a telefilm wa.. r..lvetl b> the wealthy fioad of ,i famous UntUHl Kingdom brewery ana notifying rum that the entire herd of pedigree cattle on hit estate had bten by official order Thts tumpulsnry skuihterlna; of Mtme EW.000 uf Guernsey ,-ltle. owned by Lord Iveefh, Is one of the latest, and the largest, livestock losses in Britain in men*. years. It was necessitated by the United Kingdom's Inflexible war on "foot and mouth" disease—a malady which can infect all farm animals with a cloven hoof— cjlUe. pigs and sheep. Where infection Is proved, whether It is of a one-acre man's solitary plic or, as in the present case, of a rich man's prize herd erf Its cuttle, the sick; animals must be destroyed by order of Britain** Ministry of Agriculture as a safeguard for the whole country. "Pool and mouth" disease is ao called because the flr*t symptom of It is a discharge from the mouth or feet of the affected animal Since last November, there have bean over 160 outbreaks involving man> thousands of iinimaU. Spread By A Virus Cvm Ihe whrelft i>f Inis Fanner dlalnferted. The disease b spread by a virus (minute organism carrying the infection) that i' so small that uo microscope reveals it and the finest Alter will not separate It. There are at least three types of this virus and vaccination with one type gives no Immunity against the others. So although vaccination might be a safeguard up to e point, il cannot guarantee 100 per tent, success. The disease * rarely fatal, but the fever and the pain Of enting nd wnlking it causes Die animals results In such loss Of condition (and in cows a falling off of milk yield) that farmers would suffer heavy financial loss if It ware allowed iu spread throughout their -hards ;md docks. Tin* it would do vary quickly if nothing was done about it, for It is a most infectious disease. The virus can even be carried by the whtrls "f passing vehicles or by the boots of a stockman who has attended diseased anftnalt It hi suspected that most of the present outbreaks were due brought to Britain on the legs and feather* at mDMatlng birds. For many years research into the problem has been carried on in Britain, but so far no soluti.>n has been found. Therefore, to hold the disease in cluvk the vary drastic remedy has been rcaortod to of slaughtering ail animals in a dock or herd in which there is an outbreak. An. which have been in ac*a*l Dontact with them are -Ian killed off No movement of anil -il* out of ao area of 15 miles around the Infected premisewithin tbe area. ( %  nvrrninent Pays Compen&ation Anyont leaving place* where there Is infection artist (list wash his bands and dlslnfrr: and. if practicable, change his clothing. The Government pays compensation, at market value, for all animals slaughtered. Hut it Is hard for a man who may have spent .i lifetime building up his stock to see hi>. effortsriped art The nreesslty for eufi measurer i-. kwwwvar, understood throughout Britain, although until a man ran set hi* farm re-stocked aftei the six week* compulsory i-itlod. he is out Of HglBjaai lt Is not unlike what happens on the Gold Coast, for Instance, when cocoa trees have to be cut down because of swollen shoot, to prevent nwif tree \i-vi uSeM United Kingdom furmeis recognise thai these measures aie in their Interests In the long run. They co-operate fully with the Government In carrying them out and their owi organisation, the National Farmers • i p Iks and would not have thugs otherUM present state of kDOarlc Iga i t..-klinc thi* disease Th>present outbreaks haw been among the most costlyfot !-.. Nearly 20.0<)0 animals have had to be slaughtered, with upwards of £400,000 paid in compensation. But in France, where the nt*case Is left ,o take its course gnd the animals recover, the annual loss In terms of milk and meat while they are 111, runs Into millions of pounds. French farmers lose this not only in a bad yrai tor foot and mouth disease but every year, because the disease has become permanently established over a large part of tha* BMOltry By the slaughtering itnliry this is bring prevented from luippenlng in Britain. Little Activity On Stock Lxt-luui^c LONUON, June 18 Vcr> I "I. ... Uvitj wa; . u4e i :i the I^udou Stork Exchange today. Copper shares provided the bright spot They a ere eai 1> murkv\l Inglier following the laising "I th* 1 lied Kingdom price 1->< HsfJ met at by £50 per ton. But price* finished under the day's beat as a result of profM stnat. ciiitixigisi mustly cased one—eighth of %  point in small buhiness The short-dated stocks however were supported and gained a small fraction. Small .speculative busli.eas In foreign bonds resulted In Japanese gaining one point on the %  < I ierinaiiii however finished irregular urter being one and a half points up. Triere was II* tic movement of any sort among industrials. The engineering groups recorded scattered gains. Toliaeeos however were inclined lo dulbi<-* while* cllancous Iveder* shed n few pence. Hoyal Dutch were in request and gained lUe-etghliis of a point lu 30'. Rut the remainder of the oil group wus dull. South African gold share* were |lls>aimj the Governor Sir Wllltarr Savage o Saturday evening itied the c.nn'heba. St Joseph. Joseph WeliaiT t ommiltee. made lie seal "YouEaellency, Lad% Savage. .emeu It is in, pleasure and duty to ask you. Sir. formally i.. declare Uus Sort..! ( -n. As you will' have no* >Tt complete—the .' %  i M*n •• i>e debut a$ there it a de' it's use we can no longe, delay its forma] openang." Th: Social renter, he conhaa. been mad' by the generosiu r "sent who from | BUnwi, have grunt.-ii asoagi fui the iirchi>.-e of this builtim* kneani .^ the R*.inUll and for H to tr>i > Mi Alfred Kiog (TreaMirer) and the other %  tJ Of the committee let %  Iteration and help | •plte .if the fnct that some OI Iheh meetings were abortive He thanked loo M Arne ami Mrs. Vaughn for their valuable advice. In anticipation he thanked Mr. Skeet. of the Agricultural Departmetit for promising lo come out lo Bathsheb and give advice and hep in the matter ,,f t rt e and oruament.il plantfor the grounds. Favourite She Il Is desired, he went on, to have thla Centre open lo the us. of tinParishioners of SI Joseph and of Social OrganIxstinns withit. the parish. We have nere. representative of the Polio ilubs-. Scout* and Ouldes, ami SI Josephs Men's Christian taaoctstton. Although thU l not gvographlcaUy the centre .a tbe pariah, all roads In Si Joseph lead lo this favourite rendezvous and some day are miv see "slgn-posls* on all the m.Inroads nf this parlih with the • On Pttae S SEA AND AIR TRAFFIC In Carlisle Bay M V UN* > KxiN*. Sek UuSalflK MV AneuvAi* M \ ..„. %  i ma Sowcll vKIUVAla—a* B W I A . TIUrllDAD 1 %  A OrK.. a Wsaafesni >• l-.|' t H il H WB>.lir X DI|IM I...I-MTIHIbi • I A .in FTMB* MI.Ml s Urtawn, n Mrtmi. r. I Ulbb.. S lis-iI %  osi'Mcn'Hss %  •> n u i A . ni*' naUA Up | Mi Alliln. M L-KaUfW->l In Touch With Barbados Coastal Station %  Itl. TltiSr.' i i inn, Till K.itl T.. %  I A.arxlim-..S.-.in \.. Baroa l-HihuMt.-.. .ukiaai i H"in-.. i %  I ..i M \.i %  v.. ii, i ., rusaa. In%  ,. i.ini ijnm ii." Oiuua IMNUO' %  k.|*nv Whll**l and r KATKS m i\t n\ \,/ ,.,, Ftonlr.l Chat* I S IS 11VIKINGS LIKE THIS WILL COMPCTG /.GAINST THL HERMES First challenge made to State City Editor FREDERIC* ELIK FOR the first time since it was set up as a State monopoly British Overseas Airways Corporation is likely to tace free enterprise competition on 3 regular Santas Two of Britain's biigi'M ntorate inr companies—Airwork l.ld. and lliinlinu Air Tranaport—are seeking pennioiun 10 run a regular passenger service between Britain and Nairobi, Kenya, in ilirecl mmpctitinn with li.U.A.I Their application has ah each been M'III! by Ihc Air Trans|x>rl Advesory Couneil wtih recently recomm.'iideil InaoeaHd spiiraltmige.i sV>r independenl companies. TH* application In now below tftt MtnM Vkvuuport and Civil Aviation Mr Alan I %  Sao la oipeeted to mak** his decision Room THESE ARE THE PLANES %  rprUel aTLU laM Vigitig 27-sett .i ,iner.' (lyim: irom Ui.ick'iuslte (Surrey; and H the H Q %  M ctmipanlea. Uw irvtce and lare* nrr still lo be %  in tht < 1 n it lire \* expect en u> be under ,>ar, with flW Ov HOA( Whoae daily • planes B.O.A.C-' return %  % f apokeanun -aid yesterday : We can face n TraRlc Is good on the route." If it.i^ucressfui the free enterprisers i" ly nn mner banplre routes at %  THESE ARE THE HEM 'jitt nipping uiU-iesU, ts ir-old Percy Hunting, a Royai Flyins; '.ii World Wej I. Anw winch -aiti'i with a Tiger Moth single1 the higue.t private air firm an •vi'ii i fleet Of more than I nii Irom Maylatr nfflceh t>y 45-year-old Myles riivrhts nddinir up to some 276.000 rtll IM rarfcefl m thr City by ttte poucr' owdrav and 1U family > 'iMlan Enprsaa Servlos On I %  '..l.-ilii ;iliun i H Ac4'oustlH Cliurpiu Wonaap Mi C ivTaaarjn.l t ily Puttee MaauiUulv, yeaWraay ordered 20-ypnr-*U Lionel % %  arris to stand hU trial .,t ihr MPXI sitting of thr A*.-.. Parrls, H Kiisolr-m> ruli MII.IH m Ky. Servteantai with falslflratlon •>! account' ir I • harar bo>k New im elfecf 71M^kiZ 60-DAY EXCURSIONS lowril iWei ever offered '01 air fravaf TO CANADA J y -i:.MahH by NcxiH Sic Sh r llr FUSION will pay in addition a bonus of 125.01) .terw>n who brings j" Iwenty-Ave New Stihsrrili en in one Calendar month who ore accepted \>\ thr CompauiV. llarr always a supply of Keronimendalion Forma ready THKY CAN BE *)BTA1NF.I> AT THE OFFICE RKIlirFrSlON lr..lal:;..T Street. nuiTor aaasa tuu'll ** UN. a MW >W I'. P^KI.III : %  v>>ui smile •!' Whiter teeth in just one week — Your t^cth nerd Pcrtodent to %  tJM ih.-m WIIII tPerHodem cnniain> Irfau, I K-dicni th.il f.i' n wonderful •at \ou'l! flDCfcC youi iccttiatchiiKhtcr, c/riaacr .* MCI trrcm thanks to %  swe I too %  < h muM* I r .. Mattresses and Springs $15.58 | $14.36 Bedsteads 3ft.. 3ft. 6ins., 4ft. 6ins.. Priced at $18.18 up H.lttlt.AnOS 10-01: 1 OI TOX I \1 IOHY LTD. TAKE OFF THAT MASK OF PAIN WHIZZ TABI.KTS W1IX QUICKLY BRINK RELIEF FKOM ANY TYPE OF PAIN. AND REMEMBER. WITH THEIR FOIL PACKING TIIKYRK KEPT ABSOLUTELYFRESH FOR YOU . WIIINKVER YOU MAY WANT THEM ONE WHIZZ DOES THE WORK OF TWO ORDINARY TABLETS gSTOKES BNOe LTD— T$ MllilfrlPU I I IM.I SON DIESEL WHEEL TRACTOR This world-wide famou\ Tractor is now ou display at our shew -mom we shall be pleased tn arranfe a demonstration at rtur plantation for you. Also available for immediate delivery with vaporising oil or ^^isollne KiiRlne. FOR YOUR.... COURTESY GARAGE ROBERT THOM LIMITED. White Park Road Dial 4616 ^IRV-O-LITE PLASTIC GARDEN „. Q HOSE W and GREEN'S LAWN MOWERS Ii. \2 \ 14 Bag PLANTATIONS LTD. \



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PAGE SIX BARBADOS tr.VfH til TUESDAY. JUST. It. 1M! CLASSIFIED ADS. ,M,H !\TM t;s TtirpMOeU 2901 HIKTII June lath IfST. t. • I. <•> ;U I' i\vie 1*43. uT Hi K-f Innl". ot Barnabas BOM runa.-i %  aave* bar Hlndaburv BM a, aa MWhael %  CatheSral uvd Uierara Bt*%  I )-.'.! iOWar-l *•"" Mai %  .' ma i!* %  = %  ..i 4 y p in tod; ft Kusjri P.Ti-n Oturet Mill KALE AUTOMOTIVE CAB-Owe li fcudtUMr Clian.pion. : uerfrrt mMMi radar. PCs MAPTEI • C* Lid Phon nil PajM Drue 1>-U i NOTICE rAHH or it IOBBM H>MMM !• •"• 'II Yattr. ft iuUc* MibH at th* Lutfae Bcltaol wlU %  •* i*att*ad b> the tindrnUnvd up :• poi an Tut-iiv ink Jun*. lau Candida I*. p u .i be ;ie of Pai I not W U than I', yean no ,. awn 14 >eat* ol age an th* lit •ue. ifM. to b* pravva a* a Bapttami C ti te tasli whlrri mgn arcnmpany th I'llilK N.I IS GOVERNMENT NOTICES SHIPPING NOTICES REAL ESTATE i ... %  HKI nr 1 Bauds IT Perchce of Una The bnuaa M bulll af rtoiw and la al i.d into two nan Bach flat lontatiia draains ana dining i*au and kitchenette aoi.i.rtair. > badraaau with nlng wale* uprtair* U.uai fanvaAtt<: UOB ii drawn to the Control of Price* (Defence) ( AmendrnssBft] <-i IHa, No 21 which will inpublished In the Official Geseate f Monday. 16th June IfH | t G i!ui J. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail prices MI; traan Port[ ivie y *m. %  rhii. : -Table In Prlnlt (Canadian Maple bear)' are a* follows J^ ££, MZZZ'M'I*. badaa abaai August dak >. SaEal !" PoXi*^rai A T Kl.tC CAR one issS standard car is h a Stood work lit* cvrda-r with 9 %  iras Apply to V aibaon. Overt* ••rk Plantain l-ARSMorn* Oafartl aWloati, Worrl. %  nor 4-Dpnr alH). Woleeley 14 Saloon. I H lalaan. ite^nauioned Mot MOTOW-VCXE-Nortan t II P. awrtari nrtM i • %  % % %  % %  '''"' %  taai am tvMdaa *. %  . Ftf— C*a* ^ ^ THANKS I-1CK UP Naaj Mocita Mnaal J Cak avat tnali y i*wt V., law AU twanl !<>r !•' UBf dallvery For* Hoii .,:.T ..... th* Aar>nilli>ral AMi AM. Itas p il-n. Act %  •• Mm taw ma> rw n ..I Of III. I. nafrrt .1,1. 14th lOITJt i'al Tfuat-r I H'THAM Allornaj 14 • M —at NOTICE nnniiTios roat TM* vr.rr or TRE rAaiaw OP AIKT MICH^LI NOTICE 1* HEREBY OIVEK lhal 1hhoMlna by ma of Iha aletlion of mra t a to aanr* In (h* Vanry of lh* pariah af Sami H'h-ri an Iha UK), da-. Paracbial Bi.ua mat. rumba* la i. th. r**nift DM folia inain>-" inatl ompaUiv i ml itv-ii %  '"• aarai EUna Bk.tri". DofOft. > %  l>9 BB* Kavnwnd Dr ttlva I rUflK On* Rtaak %  !" ln* %  o*rfi for appointmrni to Inapvct IN MEMOKIAM lualk hmnt %  %  %  IS. I ev* I Oil HKVI 111 (USES I ELECT RICAL | K.GIOAIRE Oanatal Elwtric Prigtt> rnr*ll*nt worklna •Uu, c d.t tlltOa Dug ,T3a l4.€.U-Jn i-vn 1IA.IIR1 BETIi -JUM a law lafl M'Tt.! %  RADIO EMPllKll'M I M ' I ARTTCI-r %  ri. ..!.... i til b* -*t lor I • J an Fiutirr-Table. In Print* (CM Han Map\e Leafl WHOLESALE PRICE (not more thani RETAIL PRICE tlMto IXT case of 100 lb* in I lb. print. s.;*.' r f • %  '>'• '*'>•*'• f HOP At _ M %  *> •a-ltfi LVII %  asMPRl Ma far all ,,porn.tty far any aa>a>Uoua ^paraaa, j naaldant* conta.n. la.B* (lallr.,. drawl,,,,n* di.unfl reoma. hltch-i Mat nd i,tbElart.Klty aad -l malalled rviyat* %  *!• or aala b> tompatllton a< %  hort tiotwa Po< rUrlha. rlrtall. tin* *M *• a> 16th June 1952 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ThM V MOMBKA -"• ...*Vt Catao and PafaMNB. Dominlf*. AntifiM. Hoi.uartat NaU aad SI Kltta. aallUdl Praam] RW.1. BCMOOKER OWHBBr AnaOCIATIOM (BMC) i Mo. fddl I..W WALL l/*Ul a* i aaPaajta, i.i,.... u DwaXUNq "f M Iff! ol land atl.ch.-0 %  -ch Th* BARBADOS EVENING INSTITUTE Ooanmercia] OUaaea H^ Mcoa, Siwukip Co. %  in alactrxily to in* l*nai ira of II a m %  |*| i,. and 1 P m Tha ahoyy dwalllnc % ip for aala by uubli. a HtU*. Jma ntraat. no -am. VEARW louaa will %  lllday nth J l. air JOfWPH ONESIMUB Tvr>r>n I .... larad |act*d HANin l-RANCU ULACKkTT r-Mi-1 tin. mil dv of Jun* i**i Mfu-riff a % %  < OLE. ,...; OaV LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE llMAV-PTB AMD HMO>ALi Taa appll.-abnn of SUrrla ford. ( baVB* VUlnta. at Phtllp Iha purtl I UauO) Ucanm* No Bat af ffantad In IAUIM Holder in raapai iirotrnd floa* of n Walt building al Co* Hill, at Philip, to rantavr laid LKana* v. a boaid and hinala thop a-iarkad Th* undfrucnad will -H UP lot aal< v oublir fWHitiin' at UMir offlr< ID 1B1 IW B-Wtovtcli Stratt. B4i*lK>„F on FrtdavVh* h daV n. J„.H MI al I pm Ihafoi owml *a lharaa In Wart Limlttd 111 %  har*? i Rannm Co limlM R a Mcn'iif a. co. v. mm AUCTION Phihp. and Mi NAVY OAHDErnj — FUUT fi.rafahr 1.. .If Beam flbk rant. Phone SBH It • M—V j i r*fl ., Ma* %  • -i-.a*i ,.-i M| aaja July on D-M r?" ; rlaVat 1 on* FJerinilu* %  rrwi L a it ... Rana at i) la-an MECUANICAL %  .* Your dilld'i diaal oadwoad upttuht. %  vaaSB. awpaaat* brldaa on aa l.*autlful munition 1tun 'i irtni tetan) WrHa FOB EURMTLRE U WillHELP BTWO-TYPIRT -O Kt ' "ii'.t.'.Ta ct P Broad Site*t g canM m ha aRaSBMdl M .1,11-1 Ltd II. of .1 BR ... RM dag| ,llh wild mahogany i.atr l'i< IIBt an Pho.i. *. 7-r No gpneitit" No pBjB I h* rich. bliKMl-building, proper %  iar. of ^ EAST-PHOS wtll rntore 1<1 -> and wUI keep ). Idth na-. Of Jvili* Iflal %  %  *> i jftaEpH iiinbi for Appliranl a HABI-EW r>q l-oli*. MagWtKl*. IBM -C NB—ThM appliration will b* canaM r*d at a LUgflng Oauit to ha hah. .ii Uondav nfrth dav of Jum. l*U a I o'clock am at Polie* Court.. Dn>' LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE .f riti %  lavouiy. thi Brcalo Rd holder ol LH]' M fa of IBM gianlad UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER hi W*dn*ade\ lth b ird*i of H" Hoarmar. Pth At' Ballavill' ....ich unhid-. Mor. Hull*. Setta-. a Arro Chat". Bnrhai*. Ornarrwnt Tahlat. i-lant-atoolt. Waaaan. Uprlghl Chair*. I (*'.!. Drawing Bwom Sulla Balta*. I urtght Arm Chain A Rockera (11 CM' LUraar Cwhtn*! Ret Stand, all Mahogany: Oak and Kuah chain aad and othar Tablaa in Ptne. Dark '\rt Plrlim. Congohnrm. Glaat and Ina clock. Doubl* and Single Iran F-Uleadi Sprlnga. Haltraaaaa. hlabaa ^ Wathatand and Tahlaa; PalnlM aa* and Drawing Table-, au rha g Warklne. I araa-ra. KMchan Tablaa and % %  <"•' llama lale -t II o'clock TEBJ4S CASK Ui:\M.m TROTMAN CO.. Aurtlaneer* A ADVANCED SHORTHAND-TYPIST COURSE Applications in mviUd tor entry lo an Advancad Commercial Clasa, to be eotnpfBaid of lwent> (20) students, and to be held at Coaaaw-rmere School. cm>mencint[ In Septetnbei 1*52. The Course' of h*o years Is designed to lead to the examination for the Janior .S*rWrtiaiid-Ti/piI Ceritflcate of the Royal Society of ArU. (A copt of the syllabus may be gear, on request at the Department.) Two lectures n week will be given in each of Use 3 subject*— BOYCE .Shorthand Typewriting .,nd English—an Mondays to Thursdays in, i M• % %  chsBlYe SriidVitfi i-mat lalcv all three swbjVcti %  Applicant* must have attained a minimum speed of 70 w.pjn. In lu^cdnc. Sharthaiid and 30 w.pjn. In Typewriting They should also be prepai*M to undergo a QuaUfyrakf Test for admission in each subject. Applicants must be 18 years of age or over on 1st September. 18*2., B. ROOK-KEEPING Application* will also be nisflfered for entry to a bepssBtcrs' Book-keeping Course to be held at Combtrmerc School on Mondays commencing in September. 11152 There is a limited number ot vacancies for the Senior Bookkeeping Course Applicant* sh.mld po* Certificate or Itf equivalent. NEW YORK SERVICE. NEW ORLEANS SERVICE CANADIAN SERVICE rut I*A •TISTA'' "ALCOA June Slh June 14th June SSth J -.1inn I India H.i. A STEAMER' "IN" Elementary L.C.C. i ROBERT TBOM LTD.— NEW YORK e) OCLF SERVICE Awpiy:DA OOOTA CO.. LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE tilt IIDMIMAN YEAR BOOR IB rR STHI t.i.i.t ma I.I aori %  laablg war i. i m t i. in LIQl'OR LICENSE NOTICE IMVU. AND 1 I M..V M A Bat %  Hnldei "• %  reel tlotlom. SI Ororgr. purchoaer of quar licanaa No. 1061 of ISM gBBitai ti Clifford tlnlder rn i*.p*ct al ground noor of a two .lorry .ll and wa.-i... Wing at Bwaat Bottom. *t r>r.'S< oi n-rmlalan to uaa the asM Beam* I a board ami Mingled *hi>p altarl reeldetw* al Sweat Bottom. •i m and to use the said icei.er .h lavt ileai-ilbeil | Data* IBb i lb dai ..I June. IwW |> UlIrDER. taq .' . M i|latrat tt. "B"Ill.ltYl. ll"l I AagaWaat N B Th.. aspUCatain will ka conil-ied "t th* LrrewMiig Court to bv "Id on Prrday ITth day ol June ISU II ii,lock am at INoltce Courti i II ....I led U JOJI\>tt\ s IIARDriARI. r, Acndemlc Claasrs C. GENERAL CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION—UNIVERSITY OF LONDON Applications are Invited for entry to the Junior Academic classes coutraoncing in September. 1MI and i-reparlng for examination at Ordinary lerel in June. 19*4 Subjects offered are English. Mnthematics, Latin. Spanish. II,Rag Dv Oeography. There Rn> alsb n limited imn.bei <4 vncanciea In (a) Senior classes preparing tor examination at Ordinary level in June. 1953. (b) Advanced clashes preparing for examination at Advanced level in 1953 and 1954 Prospective applicants may obtain further Information and advice from 'either: — (ii) Th* Principal. I>epartment of Education, preferably between 10.00 a.m. and 12 SO p.m on Saturday morning* (Telephone 2589); nr r lc) H. R. Daniel. Esq.. B.A., L.C.P.. Dean of Acadasriic; Studies, Bi^h Hall. St. Michael. (Telephone 3487). Forms uf application to be submitted to the Departtnent of Eduation by Saturday 26th July. 1952 und addressed AS follows:— Cfjenmercial Classet-The Dt-an of Commercial Studies AcademicClassesThe Dean of Academic Studies. A fe* of $5.00 per term payable during the llrst wek of the term i covers all the subjects. 80r. of the fees paid will be refundtd at the ,-nd of a session to all student* who have, in the opinion of the Prtn! clDBl, Dtan and I-ecttners. worked satlsfactorUy and attended regu-, torly and punctually. StudenU wlU be lequixed lo supply their own sutlongTy and text, books as requlrsd by the L-x^urers i 16.9 ftl—In.) June. 1952. SAGUENAY TERMINALS CANADIAN SERVICE From Montreal and Halifax SKA WANK • nODLS" UAIUANO HHUNO" Montre.l %  aflfaa Baaaa Brldlrleaa. Barhade. St Stay 4 June 14 June It June SS June X J.:, ii Juir LB Julv n Ji,i> fdh Auguel UNITED KINGDOM SERVICE Fram South Wale*. Liverpool and Glasgow • %  naomi" %  'SUN WHIT%  MARIA nr LABHTNAOA UNITED KINGDOM ANT) CONTINENTAL SERVICE From Antwerp, Rotterdam and London l*d Arrlyal ii"iu % %  lurfia LaaSaa D* F1I1HI. VOV. Aiwts : PLANTATIONS LIMITED — PhoM RM mvp FURNITURE AUCTION l nv| IDA* i ,iai-i • in nt II Y ik.hi" B^-l i IMh UNI. ISS1 am .1 %  !-,S| Hi"I %  I, gad -.. || 1 h C*> Tabln ciwat. Trays. Int SUndl Hal. Hani. V Cak.Bland Rlftj .... ibtee. cardaa B aav*ral Krk-hee. %  I'tn A u m I M ih. I ,1 -I %  %  ,'n.f. Hair M. %  und. %  'art* I.. ..I A Hecorda, PoldIpg Card Tahl*. ? V-lor nM • I RiURi. Run. %  ITT.. .if Oddnseau. AUCTIONEERS J..ass* V4. RjfBtaloaB kv ro. PRgaw 4I9 ri-nlitl-nt hulldlnr ORIENTAL PALACE IILALH4UARTERS Ft'l. SOL'VKNlkS IMl\ CetENA CkYMIN GOVERN MENT NOTICES DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION GOVERNMENT KXH1B1TION8 FOB BO*8 AND OUUJI Nolle 1. lm.y given llwl apullMUou. lral Grade EaulblU-na; MM mual be under 13 years ol age seven hxhibltlona ol not mure lh.ui nve years c A.H....1 annually lo live boy. and Iwo glr' l-rlmary FlrM Gra4e Eahlblllon.: ctndidale. mual be under 13 year, ol Two Exhlblllont ol no! more Ihan ia yean' di annually to one boy and one girl Candidates inenlary Sthoola. S, Tandda1es toTst award of Second Grade Exhibitions muM ue boys under 12 years of age on June Suth. Candidates for Renewal of Second Grade Exhibitions must luvt. oeen holder" of Second Grade Exhibitions which have expired Twenty Second Grade Exhibitions of not more than three rear* iuration including not leas than ten first awards, may be awarded """Forms of application for the above Exhibitions may be obtalneri (rvm the Department of Education where any further information IwuJ be given. Awpllcallon forma aot^mpanleg by bapUamal Certlftcaies, asusi 1 be r. lamed to she Dapartaaacl of ssssssssssass, not later than Mondat 391h June. 1952. "Srtl May, 1932. J um3*11 ti duration may b< nice on Jin 3l;ri niion may be ;iwardt-it nust be pupils of Elet \ .iiiilliM .. MJlloui. AND UIOBEa. aLllooL CEETD7ICATE LVAMINATIOM., 1M Forrn* of enuy for the above Exa m i n ati on can be obtained Iron. inUi ...urtment of aalucauon. Garrison. Eniries In respect of the School CerUflcate ExajninaUon, 1B32 > .,ii only be accepted Irons candidates falling within one or more f tha following categories:— (i) Candidates who already hold a School CerUflcate or an Oversea Junior School Certilicate. %  II, Unsuccaasful entrants lor the 1950 School OrliucaU Examination who have not re-entered in 1951, but who obtain as. authorisation from the Syndicate to re-enter In ltS2. .in. Candidate* who nagged th* ^alif/lng Teal held in January 1961, but dad not Uke the School Certlficgte Examination In Uetember, 1931. (iv) Candidates who failed the School Certincate ExanunaUon in 1951 will be allowed to re-take the Examination in 1932 unless they have been notified that their performance in the 1951 Examination does not qualify Uum lo rv-env-i In 1952. (v) Candidates who have passed the Qualifying Test held i1 January, 1952. The fee for tha School Certificate will be 915.12 and f< the Higher Certificate >2 D .88. Form,' must be completed and i-eturned to this Department, toi-iher with a copy of the BWh/Baptlsrnal Certilicate ;ind the Fees it or before Tuesday, lit July, 1952. .8. The Examinations of the Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate will not be bald In Barbados after 1952. i partment of Education. 15th May, 1952. GARRARD 3 SPEED AUTOMATIC RECORD CHANGERS Just received Going fu( Come and gel yours TEXTUAL KMVIIIIl LTD. Corner Broad and Tadar Streets GENERAL CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION UNIVERSITY OF LONDON — NOVEMBER, 1932 frost i Ordsh! i may i be obtained Applications arc invited from teachers and other suitably qunliVed person.*, (men and women) fr the two vacancies at: — Christ Church Boys' School. 2. The minimum qualification for entry to the leaching service a achool Certificate. MMto ;r^;:r: SUEZZSZ -"5aa-*. t!" ..• * j. *--but candidates who have alr*ad> I Unary Level together w.lh the required tE. 35 (b) for from the I>epartment of Edurnti forms of entry for the above examinatio the Department of Education. Garrison. h applicant will normally be required to offer five subjects at Level. Candidates who wish to complete matricuUtlesi of subjects itt FLASHLIGHT BATTERIES by CJI.E.C. 18c. each CITY GARAGE VICTORIA STREET 40% of the University Fee 45% of the University Fc ivanced Level. I'NTVERSITT FEE Ordinary Level — $1.40 Advanced Level — M.80 LOCAL FEE Candidates taking neither Oral nor Practical Examinations Candidates taking either Oral or Practical &ariuhaUon Candidates taking both Oral and Practical Ex-arunatlen M% of the University Fee Forms must be completed and returned to this Department, i-ether with %  eopv of the Birth.Tsaptismal Certificate and the Fee.. (Uaawataatf .ie>rt Loeal), oa or before Tuesday. 1st July. 1952. MATRICIXATION REGULATIONS Sraeas* A : The candidate must have obtained passes (not necesMr fb on the same occasion) in la) English Language, (b) a languagDtbjag than English, (c) either Mathesnatics or an approved Science %  iiWeci. and three cither subjects, provided thai :— at least two of the subjects are passed at Advanced Level chosen in accordance with the Regulations rihssai B: The candidate must have obtained passes in ( i English Language, (b) a liuiKuage other than English, (c) either lubmllled one of these forms in respect of previous vacancies (IBM filled) may apply by letter accompanied by a recent testimonial. 4. Any teacher who applies for a vacancy on the staff of anoihci school must Inform hli or her present Chairman of Managers and tha Head Teacher of any application for such a transfer. 6. All appUcaUons must be enclosed in envelopes market! I "Appointments aVRtrd** in the top loft Band corner and must read: the Department of ErharaUon by Monday, loth June. 1962. Csmdidar.. or.warned 'hi' rmrvusvinc may lead to their disqauUfk-artrRt. IS 6 52—2ii TWO VACANT POSTS OF TEMPORARY FIELD OFFICERS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE & AGRICULTURE Applications arc invited for Hie two vacant posts of temporary' Fiekl Officer In the Department of Science Agriculture. 2. The beginning salary of c.ch post will be 91.200 per annun. .!c 11.200 by 372 lo $1,920 per annum, pluf. the pievalllng eost of living allowance pay,M. to public officers. The posts are and non-pensionable and may be terminated at one month's t:..li.e on oilher side. 3. The Officers will t>e required to furnish themselves with motoi transport and will be paid a mi>rife allowance in accords*** with ilnVi'tuiMOtit Cefitcer> ,main duiie, attached N aasM Bsssta are toil cOrustn field work, leaf aarapUnt! <4 sugnt cane, sell moisture determlnatum-. Mei-hematles or an approved Science subject, and two other 'u.ntion itf chrmiral weedirldes and insectieirlev anasM uled that r— tioi, ami rasas* polat.. I*ading at lea*t Ihree whjgctl ore passed on the same occasion, ot 5 Applications staling age. quaasslsslaloni and SSpi I* which ut least two tnusl I* at the Advanced Level, the three i.ctor of Agrtculhare. Department of Science subject being chosen In aecordance with the negulattons a Agriculture, Bridgetown and should be submitted not later than the | Department of Education 21S1 of June. 1962 lU May. 1952 15.6.52—in. I subject: 20.5.52—2 n SHARKSKIN at $2.80 per yd. Shades Dawn. Pink. Tiger Cold. Jewel. Bermuda & White. e A. E. TAYLOR LTD. Coleridgr Street. rVRSBI THKRK ARE NO PARKING PROBLEMS And where QUALITY IS HIGH —: and :— PRICES ARE LOW -So Dial 4100






ae al

a
a Te

TTT

arn. ereemeneni



’
ESTABLISHED 1895



KOJE ISLAND, Korea, June 16.
United States Eighth Army plans an extensive work
and play programme for Communist prisoners of war on
Koje once prisoners recognize Allied authority completely.
Brig. General Haydon L. Boatner Koje Commander
hopes to start the programme soon after he finishes splitting
the present large unruly compounds into small units.

= Earl Alexander, Britain's
Defence Minister inspected pri-
soner of war stockades Monday.
tee oo He toured the island in a jeep
driven by Boatner. Alexander was
; accompanied by Gen. James A.
Pla d B Van Fleet, U.S. Eighth Army
gue y Commander and a party of lead-
ing military and diplomatic figures.
Bunglers uins of Compound 76 where more
than 6,000 prisoners ae des-
perately to prevent ing broken
a sone ee, tS _]UP_into small units. Boatner told
Monday > duaeek the Savane Aiseander it was “a hell of a
shee . fight.’
ca anes that Alexander reviewed the 100-man
ks en » ea to pool honour guard drawn from' one
Europe’s steel and coal resources a anaitis
was the most constructive since |°O™P22Y of the Royal Canadian
the war, the way the treaty is Regiment and a company of the
written is endangering its success Queen’s Shropshire Light Infantry,
= In recognition of Alexander's
albert Roger Metral who is|service as Governor-General’ of
President of the Federation of|Canada, Canadian troops were
French Mechanical Industries} given a position on the right side
and Chairman of the National]jin the honour guard.
Committee on Armaments of the! Earl Alexander returned to
French Industry told a news con-]Tokvo after his tour.—(CP)
ference here that the Schuman
yy brated = topheavy,
P ed th “Super-dirig- '
eo ~~ ch 7 not taking tate coms U.S. Money Flow Tio
sideration the quality require- s . r
ments of the industry.
He said, “it is dangerous to let india Aids W orld
civil servants organize such an
enterprise the same as one would |

not ask noodle manufacturers to
make rubber.

Leaving

‘“Metral who is leaving for
Paris Tuesday after attending the
Industrial Fair at Toronto also sioned him to study India’s pro-
said that under the Government gramme of expansion in pig iron
of Premier Antoine Pinay, French | and steel industries and to report
currency is entering a phase of; to the bank what assistance she
stabilization and suggested that needed for new projects in these
financial realities may demand industries.
devaluation of tne French Franc
to 400 to the United States dollar
which he said appears to be

the Franc’s real purchasing *
value. =| Olympic Football
He said the authority exercised

by Pinay is restoring public con- | Draw Announced

fidence in the State’s finances.

Adter stressing, that French ex-| yy. grgy!ELSINKL, June 16.
ports to e dollar area had Ags r
fallen alarmingly in the last yeas for the Olympic games football

partly because of the high price|â„¢atches. The first countries in-







The group drove through the



OMNUS, New Delhi, June 16.

George Woods, leader of the
World Bank Steel Mission said
Monday that the free flow of
American capital to India was “in
the interest of the free world,
“Woods is in India as a represen+
tative of the World Bank Presi-
dent Eugene Black who commis-







—UP.



gested stabilization of currency as
well as the removal of exchange
controls which he is also advoca-
ting may permit the lowering of
prices and consequently the re-!
capturing of some lost export) Holland ws.
markets, ; vs. Italy, Egypt vs. Chile, Bud-
_He said United States’ dollar} garia vs. Soviet Union, Yugo Slavia
aid to France in the form of off-| vs, India, Norway ‘vs. Mexico,
shore purchases and military; Denmark vs, Greece, Rumania vs

in the first qualifying round.



the French payments position. jtain, Austria vs, the Saar and
—U.P. | Poland vs. France.—vU.P,



MR. J. O, TUDOR, Roebuck Street Provision Merchant,
defeated Mr. Dan F. Blackett, Editor and Publisher of the
Weekly ree Torch, by 85 votes in the bye-election for the
St. Michael Vestry which took place yesterday as a result
of the death of Mr, C. A. Brathwaite. The final results
as follows: Mr. J. O. Tudor 334; Mr. Dan F. Blackett
Five hundred and ninety seven

votes were cast, and fourteen
were spoilt. Polling was compar-
atively light throughout the day,
but a slight difference in the at-
tendance at the Polls was noticed
in the early morning and late
afternoon. The day’s proceedings
passed without incident, and
everything was quiet and orderly
Polling took place between 8
a.m, and 4 p.m. and the counting
which started at about 4.15 p.m.
lasted until about 4.50 p.m. .Mr.
FE. J. Cole, J.P., was _ Sheriff,
and Mr. R. M. Cave, J.P. acted
as Sub-Sheriff
After the Sheriff had declared
the results, Mr, J, O. Tudor
thanked the Sheriff, the Sub-
Sheriff and the polling officers for
the “admirable manner” in which
they had conducted the proceed-
ings. He said that it was his first
effort, and he had a doughty op-
ponent in Mr. Blackett. He there-
fore had beaten a good man.
Thanks For Support c
He also took the opportunity to
thank all those who found it con-|
venient to attend the polls and! and vote other than the desire
give him their support, and prom- to have a change in the system
ised to do his bit for the benefit; of the Local Government. _
of the parish and the island as a| Mr. Blackett said he appreci-
whole ated the help of those who as-
Mr. Dan F. Blackett said it was| sisted him, and the support given
undoubtedly a pleasure for him by those electors who voted for
to say that he accepted his defeat} him.



Mr. J. O. TUDOR

. Tudor in “a most gracious Mr. H. A. Tudor, in moving a,
aacen Mr. Tudor hed been| Vote of Thanks to the Sheriff and |
able to get 85 more voters than he|his Officers, remarked upon the|
had been able to get, but he felt|!jarmonious way in which the|
that the large number of votes proceedings. were conducted, and |
which he had received would en-|expressed the hope that they! ques Duclos asked National As-
courage him to come again, would be spared many years! sembly President Edouard Herriot,
arrange his
temporary freedom so he can pro-
test the circumstances of his ar-
rest from the floor of Parliament,
Communist Party
nuty wrote a four page letter to
Herriot in the cell of Sante prison
is awaiting the Govern-
t’s next step im its attempt to
prove its charges that he plotted
against the Internal security of the

He hoped that with the passing} more to conduct similar elections.
of the Vestry System he would Mr. Granville seconded the
meet Mr. Tudor when a majority| vote of thanks, and replying, the
of the population of the parish) Sheriff commented upon the
would have Kad the right to vote.|"“smooth running” of the cam-

Mr, Blackett expressed re-|paign, and said that in spite of
gret that less than 4 of the reg- keenness between the two
istered voters for the Vestry ndidates who were prominent
attended the Polls, and said he, and well known by all classes, it
was a bit surprised because he! did not in any way interfere with
could not say that there was|the harmony and quiet of the
any incentive for them to come: election











TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 162

ee epee ei an em

Lord Alexander Tours

Visits Prisoner Of War
Camps With Boatner





From All Quarters :

Substitute
For C’dian
Newsprint

Washington:



The recent prico
increase of Canadian newsprint
improved the chance thai
other types of mewsprint may |
in general use for
papers and magazines.

recently printed!

paper, a sugar cane waste product.
‘The experiment was highly suc-
According to its inventor,
Joaquin de la Roza, bagasse paper |
can be produced at considerably ;
less than half the present price!
of $126 per ton for Canadian news- |

Ottawa: There
mately 74,800,000 telephones in the
world or about three for every
Canada has 21 tele- |
phones for every 100 persons, aj}
ratio exceeded only by the U.S.
with 28 and Sweden with 24. |

India has exported 1.1
; million bales of cotton during the |
year ending April 30, 1952.
was exported to the United King-
dom, Hong Kong, Australia, New
the Netherlands, Bel-
gium, France, Switzerland, Italy,
the United States,
Germany and Canada.

from the Olympic Games in Hel-
sinki this summer will be sent to| they may have to cope with
66 countries via Stockholm, ac-| Australian Olympic
cording to an agreement between
the Finnish and Swedish tele-
graphic authorities.
Stockholm: Several

are approxi- |



100 persons.

Cambridge

ign ; Court Proposed

By HYLTON CLEAVER
AN all-Cambridge eight
been picked to represent
Olympic Regatta.
will be entered for the Grand
Challenge Cup at Henley, w

expected there. |

Those of 16 possibles, who hac
been tried on the Cam for the past
the | 8ix weeks and have not got ir
dorsal vertebrae of a dinosaur |Mfter all, have been formed into
¢{ two fours and will race in the
{ Olympic trials.

This will give the Thames crews
opposition which

have been found at a depth o
200 ft. in the Hoganas-Billesholm
clay mines in Southern Sweden.
The finds, which have been classi- ar —
fied as belonging to an animal them. The Olympic eight is:
‘that lived 150,000,000 years ago,
their kind in

Monaco: The second interna-
tional Riviera Tourist Rally with
55 participants from countries in
Western Europe was won by a
motor coach of the Swedish Trans-
European Bug Lines.

The Swedes were also awarded |
first prize for the best organiza- |

; h al cluding Sweden, winners four|{tion of the trip and the best-
of French products, Metral sug-| oe ago are not called on to play | Planned interior of the coach.
Babylon was
urishing centre of commerce in
King Hammurabi,

should extent

are the first D. D. ee Cee A, :

Training is now going on at Ely
{under Professor Raymond Owen.
The crew will move to Marlow on
June 9, but will not race at that

At Henley on June

| Harold Rickett will take over the
® coaching, and immediately after |
the regatta a switch will be made
to Putney for the final polishing

flo
The others are Dutch Antilles.) wine,
|Germany, Finland and Turkey. ‘reigned there about 2250 B.C. is
known for having imposed a law:
Brazil, United States | “Wine merchants may sell their
wines only at prices fixed by the
Wine sellers must’
| not admit to their premises noisy
intoxicated persons.
must hand over such persons to
those whose mission is to see that
perder is respected. Disobedience |
this law will
punished by death.”

hee Sapte a tae Fite endy are| Brian Lloyd, who as captain of
the Leander Club was entrusted
with the task of picking our eigh‘, |
done a good job, the mor: |
because he has had to leave oul
some of his close personal friends. |
After much counsel with
soaches and recon ce among . tes i ae ay
ce rae tat teeter cin ot mante in whieh he declared that ee taaih = ae hag ae
the 1951 Cambridge eight which’ While he was in favour of Feder- "st ante “ a ere tr
| swept aside all opposition ‘in the ,;#tion, he would not allow Jamaica}, Sauce 8 1 1

Authorities,

items is likely to improve greatly| Hungary, Luxembourg vs. Brie e,

1

Tudor Wins By 85 Votes |

At Vestry Bye-Election |



of that memorabl:
eight have failed to regain their
ie woe cr the Fa non ae ifucts and added: “Jamaica . will) South Africa.—CP)
‘and one left over, as it were, from
1950.—L.E.8.

Loan Scheme
For Trinidad
Sugar Workers

Last Saturday, the first part of}
jthe British pleadings was
ipleted.

Beckett dealt with Iran’s claim)
“abandoned its}

Beckett Continues |
U.K. Arguments
Over Oil Dispute

THE HAGUE, June 16.
Britain’s agent Sir Eric Beckett)
resumed the presentation of Brit-



Iranian oil

dispute before
International

PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 14
The Trinidad Government has
scheme whereby
canefarmers
to obtain loans
up to $1,000 to help build or buy
It takes effect from nex iment. I also make reservation a$, The United States will heip

that Britain had
rights to nationalized Iranian oil-
Persia founded this’ claim
on the British note following the}

sugar workers and



bring the parties together Beckett

explained.—U.P. The money is to



China’s Premier

Toasts Nehru
NEW DELHI, June

Chou En Lai has thanked Prime
Minister Jawaharlal Nehru for his
independent
message from Peiping on Monday,
At a banquet Saturday in honour

Borrowers will be able
pay by easy instalments depend-

pledged support an
The government has

po
bassador K, M. Pannikar
toast to Nehru saying
“independent Foreign
Policy had enabled the age old
friendship between
strengthened and
developed on a new basis.—U.P,

laying out new building areas
that may be provided by “ar

Polish Countess
Stabbed To Death

LONDON, June 16





Duclos Writes
To Herriot

PARIS, June 16.

leader Jac- and helped

a

36 year-old
and Britain for gallantry
as “the old. old story of a jealous|were the best
lover.” —U.P.



Advor

Koje Island









TRAFFIC JAM



TRAFFIC came to a standstill yesterday morning when lorries and carts of every description jammed



Permanent W.L. Appeal

1
PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 14,
| An important step towards West Indian federation was
made to-day with the circulation to all members of the
Caribbean Bar Council of a memorandum by the secretary
of the Trinidad and Tobago Bar Council, Isaae Hyatali, —
The memorandum follows the decision by the local
council to call a two-week conference of the British Carib-
bean Bar Associations to be held at Port-of-Spain in August,
| The object is to consider the formation of a permanent
| West Indian court of appeal and general council of British
| Caribbean Bar leading to the clarification and unification
of legal practice and colonial laws.
aiethppeenntalin _edinnimennsbciiprm en The meeting is expected to take
i place on August 25 and a pre-

ARGUMENT ENDS |liminary meeting of the Bai

Association of Trinidad and

IN EGG BATTLE Tobago will be held next Satur-

day, Hyatali points out in the
EILLES, June 16, a {\ memorandum that political federa-









{
|




argued
verbal battle continued un- f i
til one noticed he was in ounded upon a firm and uniform

, |basis would greatly assist in
front of an egg store. Then | the functioning of | Government
the argument lasted as long || and life when political union

as the supply of cggs.—U.P. comes,

| The memorandum also pointed
|out divergent legal practices in
'

E 9 various British Caribbean terri-
usta on t tories. For instance Jamaica
|follows the English practice gov-

ae erning the functions of counsel

| et JamMaiCa tnd Solicitors “white the “Wind.

ward and Leeward Islands and

{ e Tobago barristers are entitled to
‘Be Railroaded BE in every respect as solicitors



| Trinidad, Barbados and Brit-
jish Guiana have different form

GRENADA, June 16. }of compromises between the two

'To-day’s Daily Gleaner carried 5Ystems. Even the system of law

a statement of Hon, W. A, Busta~| had territorial differences, most

(From Our Own Correspondent

* ‘ , French civil law and_ British

> railr t ederation *T®
of the BW Btsmanto sald he Guiana has some notable relics
would not allow glamorous ideas|°f Old Roman and Dutch law

ito take the place of hard financial |similar to the legal practice of

not be railroaded into Federation
without full and undisputable evi-
dence that B.W.I. Federation will
benefit the islands and the region

“the | German Arms
as a whole. |
Sayi that he is prepared t
sign a vepert on ‘Penerktien re- | Cost $7,000m.
|

cently drafted by the Jamaica







egislature’s Committee, Busta-|

Cate said he did so with reserva. | —MeCloy

tions. “My reservations are thi} ‘
2 ‘will never agree to place powct | WASHINGTON, June, 16
jin the hands of a Federal Gov.! tt “wie dlectowed Monday ‘that
ernment to levy tax on any ui tintted States High Commissione:

whether Jamaica, Trinidad, %

Vincent or any other island for Germany John Me Cloy ha

told Congressmen that the c¢

Taxes On the people must b4 0f German rearmament will
levied by individual unitary gov- | exceed $7,000,000,000 during the
érnment not a Federal Govern- next three years.

to how a Federal Government is to; pay the bill with defence sup-

from ‘be financed because I have very port, funds and military equip
the Sugar Industry Labour Wel- graye responsibility not alone to ment in such quantities as maj

Fund which now stands at
vearly $1,500,000.

The objective of the scheme is te
old estate barrack
and to help workers
homes. The
will be free of interest but there
be a small service charge
of 50 cents per annum on every

Jamaica but 2lso \to the West be appropriate and availabk
Indian people and I must be abie| Me Cloy said,
to tell the people they will to)

better off not worse off undet fe’-; His views were in a statemer

Yration,” inserted in the record of the
Bustamante declared that some, 5¢nate Aen eo Com-~-
e0 su rted federation with-| Mitte earings on le =6peac

retina te of its ‘raved ontract subsequent to his testi

aspects because they are trying to, â„¢ONy given here in person la

make big jobs for themselves and , week. His statement will be i:

“jadded “but I shall do nothing| reply to a series of question
detrimental to Jamaica or the Wer ; pvt by Democratic Senator Guy

i Indies as a whole. I shall not fecd-| Gillette. It was ¢ made publ
erate if it is going to hurt rather | Monday. —U.P.!

than to help us. Federation is a
lifelong thing not just for now!

but always”. IWVest Must Live Up
To Their Ideology





Renison Opens

NEW YORK, June 16.

«
Hurricane Talks Sixty-one delegates from 12
countries to the World Assembly
(FÂ¥om Our Own Correspondent) | Moral Re-armament Conference
PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 16. |'which ended June 10th, on Mack-
Opening the fourth meeting of|inac Island, Michigan, left for
A beautiful Polish Countess who} the Eastern Caribbean Hurricand; London Monday aboard a special
served as a British spy with the|Committee at Kent House this} BOAC chartered plane and pro
European underground during the) morning Acting Governor Reni-, nounced the conference “was a
of|son expressed the hope that th@ great success,”
Allied servicemen to escape thé] deliberations would be happy and
Nazis, was stabbed to death in her] valuable
London hotel Monday.
Dennis George Muldowney

after|bers comprising Meteorologists He said: “The issue at stake is

allegedly confessing to the slaying.:and Telecornmunication officers of whether we meet on a basis cof
Scotland Yard called the slay-|the area, will consider ways and change and the guidance of God! 4

Christine Granville, | means of improving the onganisa~ pr conflict and war. 1 hope that!

by |tion and issue of hurricane warn-| America and the rest of the world,



to ensure that such



and could be
ordinated as to avoid confu

basis, —U.P

})\ tion, be some time in coming
an - eae Sa ote of justice oer
who was right, The |} present with us and properly

Egyptian delegate Prince Ismael
Izzet Hassan, told reporters at the
The meeting attended by repre- sirport here that the “West must
41,|sentatives of the Caribbean, tha live up to their ideology” if they
porter at the staid London Reform: United States and Canada, will want to win the friendship of the
Club, was arrested at the scenellast three days. Committee mem- | Arab bloc.
with murder

|

varnings particularly the Middle East, will
© co- be able to find new unity on this
I





Fi
{
*<
Shot In 7
STOCKHOLM, June 16. 7
Armed Swedish policemen
were tonight guarding the Soviet
Embassy here where crowds have
been demonstrating all day in
protest against the shooting down . a
by Soviet fighters of a Swedish UVORD ALEXANDER ®
Air Foree Catalina reseue plane coeadelieil
over the Baltic early this morn- | ra
ing.
The Swedish Air Force an- Big Three
nouneed that two of the seven .
crew members are suffering frorn .
bullet wounds. The other five Talks In
were not hurt. ain’ a’
The crew reported to Air Force oe *
Headquarters that an MIG 15 Washington
made seven attacks on the Cate-}
lina hitting it several times. The nae esheets laid
wreckage of the flying boat haal Ww SAREE ITO, J ms nae ‘
been spotted earlier. as 1ington is u ider thereat of a
At the same time Premier | Possible new Russian drive to
Erlander who is Acting Fore an | eit the West. British, French
Minister lodged ‘“‘a protest agaist | reo nited ch) ee ee ate
the alleged espionage activity of | ‘Monday a series of talks
Soviet Embassy personnel n 1 problems dividing the three
Sweden. Seven Swedes went in | Powers. a
the dock this morning in the bir- Korea, Indo-China and : Ger-
gest spy trial in neutral Sweden's |many are high pn the list of
* | history. —U., | problems. Talks get added
7 rgeney from the week-end dis-
“ . closure that Moscow is assigning
Kuznetsov ( of {its chief Deputy Foreign Minister
a j Andrei Gromyko to be Ambassa-
dor to London This looks to
Secrets From some officials ae a maior —
an move in the cold war a
. more than likely, one aimed at
Radioman lisrupting the British, French and
United States alliance which is
the heart of the Western defence
LONDON, June 1¢ ystem. Against this. backgrouné
The Soviet Embassy second |ihe Big Three powers will dis«
Secretary Pavel Kuzhetsov nayred | cuss among other things:
in London Court on ree, France’s desire for increased
the a” ol whom the Brit's) | american help in carrying on its
Foreign ee radioman i > 181,000,000,000 «a year war i
oy a stil in Ber-} Indo China
on on Mo y. The conduct of the Korean
Rumours over the week-«« nd ruee negotiations and the handling
said Kuznetsov left London eee ' |of Communist prisoners of war.
ee rng es Geor si How soon and under what
oar nh. on B - Nakeieh rir. conditions the Western Powers
ee a abil Nabe the official | ould offer to meet with Russians
with hie wite and son Mischa spert | ° discuss German issues,
the week-end in the Embas:» The Western Powers have taken
country house outside London the position that the Reds must
Kuznetsov, the fifth ranking |first_ agree to a political survey
Embassy officer was named in jof Germany Recently, however,
ch a the radio va- | there have beew indications that
tor, Wintsin Martin Maren » 24, | the nee and perhaps the
who was ordered to be held for] British ta meé@iing of Big a
trial on charges of giving secre “our officials might be held any-
information to the Soviet D.p-]was (cP)
lomat, —U.P. !





Hodgeson Made Romulo Will

en Broadcast
Commissioner ’
WASHINGTON, June 16,
CANBERRA, June }' Philippine Ambassador Carlos

External Affairs Minister Rich-] Romulo on June 19 will be inter-
erd Casey announced Monday the| viewed on the “Capitol Cloak-
appointment of Colonel William] room” Programme of the Colum-

R. Hodgeson as Australian High] bia Broadcasting System carried
Commissioner to South Africa. in a Mation-wide network,

Since 1949 Hodgeson has been Three correspondents will han-
in Tokyo as British Commor dle the interview which will coin-
wealth Representative on th tide with the celebration here of

Allied Council for Japan and head | “Rizal Day” in honour of Philip-

of the Australian Mission to Japan. ‘pines national herb Jose Rival



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a

PAGE TWO



Caub Calling



Ng a eee

MISSES ROSALIE AND JUNE KNIGHT

=" GEORGE SEEL, Comp-
troller for Development and
Welfare was a_ passenger for
Grenada by B.W.I.A. yesterday
evening on a four-day visit. He
was accompanied by Lady Seel
and they will be staying at Gov-
ernment House as the guests of
Sir Robert and Lady Arrundell.

Married In U,S.A.

“Dancing Time”’
HE Misses Rosalie and
June Knight, two of the
Scars to appear in “Dancing
Time” which is being present-
ed by the Barbados School of
Dancing at the Empire
Theatre on Friday, June 20.
There are still some seats
leit im the Orchestra and
house for this show and the
Balcony seats which are being

TS wedding took place in the sold in advance, are excellent

U.S.A, recently of Miss Ruth
Anne Moeckel, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Edmond Moeckel of
458 Meade Street, Orange, and
Mr. James Duke Smith, son of
Mrs. William Gilbert of 86 North
Grand Street, Elizabeth, and the
late P. F. Smith at Our Lady of
Lourdes Church, West Orange.

The groom is a Barbadian from
the Crane, St. Philip, and an old
Lodge boy who is now working in
the U.S.A. with Public Service
Electric and Gas.

The bride, a graduate of Mont-
clair High School, was given in
marriage by her father. She wore
a gown of skinner satin trimmed
with chantilly lace. A crown of
seed pearls held her illusion veil
and she carried a bouquet of
white Spring flowers.

Miss Lilian Bridge was maid
of honour, while her bridesmaids
were her cousin, Miss Barbara
Lyon and Miss Joan Sinclair. The
bestman was Mr. John Rodda
and the ushers were Mr. Edward
Moeckel and Messrs. Charles and
Owen Lyons.

The double-ring ceremony was
performed by Rev. Hugh Fitz-
simmons and the reception was
held at the Moresque,
Orange... The couple
left for Williamsburg
their heneymoon,

Agricultural Officer

R.°°V. E. GALE, son of
Hon'ble V. C. Gale, M.L.C.,
and Mrs. Gale, arrived from Eng-
land. yesterday morning by the
S.S. De Grasse. He was accompan-
ied by his wife and three-year-
old son Timothy and they are
staying at Garden Gap, Worthing.
Mr, Gale who is Agricultural
Officer in Nigeria has come over
to spend about four months’
holiday.

Barbadian Returns Home

RRIVING from Curacao’ by

K.L.M. chartered flight re-
cently was Mr. Ambrose Stcute,
son of Mrs. Adora Stoute of
Mount Hill, St. George.

An* old Combermerian, Mr.
Stoute had been working in Cura-
cao for the past six years with
C.P.I.M., during which time he
held various posts such as plant
operator in the treating depart-
ment and clerk in the wages ad-
ministration section of the ac-
counting department as well as
in the personnel section of the
Shipping department.

He -was also Secretary of the
Shell Sports Association and prior
to his departure, was President
of the Barbados Social Club and
a member of the Anglican Church
Council. He has just resigned
from the Company but his future
plans are unsettled.

to

West
afterwards
spend

for viewing a dancing dis-
play.

Bookings are still open
daily. aaat la

nescence
Vublic Kelations Adviser
R. PHILIP
RING,
Adviser to the Comptroller
Development and Welfare,
turned from Aptigua over
week end by B.W.I.A.
paying an official routine
He was accompanied

Hewitt-Myring.
On Business

Public

M* N. E, WILSON, dry goods
+ merchant of Swan Street, was
a passenger by B.W.1A, yesterday
morning for Puerto Rico en route
to New York and London. He has
gone up on a business visit which

will last for about six weeks.

MISS KATHLEEN BULPITT
Theatre Sister

Aa NG yesterday morning

by the S.S. De Grasse from
England was Miss Kathleen Bul-
pitt who has come to take up an

appointment as Theatre Sister
the Barbados General Hospital.

Miss Bulpitt who has had about
twelve years nursing experience,
did her training at Lewisham Hos-
pital in London. She then spent
a year at St. Thomas’ Hospital,
before ,going mn to St. Helen’s,
Hastings as Theatre Sister, a
position which she held for the
past five years,

She said that it was her first
trip abroad and she had a very
smooth crossing. It was quite a
pleasant experience and the peo-
vle on the ship were very friendly.

Miss Bulpitt said that except
for the trees and the colour, Bar-
bados was very much like England
and already she has begun to feel
at home and was sure she was
going to like it here.

at

BY THE WAY eee By Beachcomber

O stuffed owls have been ashore, so I says no th

: placed in a church belfry
in Norfolk to scare away bats.
The arrival in the belfry of un-
stuffed owls will lead to the
installation of two stuffed bats
to scare them away,

The old verger, toiling up the
stone steps, will find himself
ralled_ upon ‘to adjudicate be-
tween* the stuffed and the un-
stuffed. And so the long day
wears to its close,

From Mrs. Withersedge

to her sister Flo

NE. evening a_ sailor come
aboard, evidinkly avin mis-

lade isself and fuzzy in the ead.
E ast whither this old tub was
bound, so I says, umering im
like, Maddigasker, and then e
looks acrorst the river, and e says
tell me shipmate what is that
landfall I see yonder far aawy.
And I says Arreds Ferniture Dip-
pository, I says, and e says what
a@ rum name, is it Japanese, and
I says no Turkish, and what the
ell we was either! of us talkin
about I don't know. Is mind
was wdnderin and e sang a cou-
ple of vulgar lines and fell
‘ asleep on what we still call the
deck. And e woke up once and
said would e be knifed if e went

NOW IN

use
fell
me

is

ey
boms ereabouts, and e
asleep agen, got im ashore at dawn, Such
a sailors life. Flo......

Dr. Rhubarb’s corner

Ethel writes: My fiance
twangs his braces while he talks,
stretching them and letting them

In White and Colours

be 4 Costivy bit of writing
flip back against the sides of his 4 Visitea ditter
erentivy whe 1 t
chest, What ought I to do? Away (6) Recs,
8 Roce round coverage
Dr. Rhubarb s ay s: Say {5 Hound wing owed tt ae the
patiently and courteously, “Shall meet (4)
I sing something while you play @ /'s side ror areca. te)
for me on your braces?” That ~ 1 eat Kenham and
will put him out of countenance, rt in little credit. (7)
* sociated with baby feet
In passing (6) 2. The last word. (3)
2 § (8)
OOLS never tire of saying Down
that you cannot have a play 1 P isn't it? (7)
raf * ‘ ¢ , arri > utchers? Oh no (¥)
or a film about a happy marriage } time (anag.) (9)
because it is a dull subject. The } ‘te bushes to get the
‘ae “Voy 2 r Bird (5)
French film oyage en » in ok ‘
Amerique” is ‘the delightful story 6 He let reds bet under oove {3}
of a happy marriage. It is quiec 8 The end of 3. (3)
and intelligent, Nobody is 10 ‘ vile way to exist. (5)
. : 4 x + 12 Make tovable (6)
blackmailed, tprtured, or kicked *\5 Pur arty in 24° then 4
: ~ 2 nd ita
in the face. And it has that . wnonym (4)
touch of poetry which only }) can do this tu enaracter (5)
° ‘ : a Upse 1 i yo g
Frenoh films ean provide, You met n Cornwail: ” (3)
feel that the man _ behind the 1 PeeTon of yesterdays ourale
camera walked along whistling 16 Giisp fe "WAN YevE 8, | Assur @;
gaily, and was always coming by [} oath The 8 Wrath 9
chance on just what he wanted to Te : Qmsia want 3 Ramp 4
” 2 > 5 ‘one 7 eturned 4
photograph, The smell is of the “yinye > , Tone 7 pretunned, 9
open air, not the studio set. Thin
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HEWITT-MyY-
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for
re-
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after
visit,
by Mrs,







Married At Pilgrim Holiness





A’ the White Park Pilgrim
Holiness Church on Thurs-
day, June 5, Miss 3ertine
Squires of on Kop”, St. Hill
Road, Carrington Village, and en

of the Unique Progres-
was married to Mr,

employe
sive Society,

J. Edward Brown of Boston,
Massachusetts,

The bride who was given in
marriage by her brother, Mr. Al-
lan Squires of Trinidad, wore
a dress of nylon ang lace and a
beautiful head-dress, a gift from
the U.S.A. She carried a bouquey
of anthurium lilies and rosebud»

She was attended by Miss Jean
Chandler as chief bridesmaid who
wore a dress of pink ny on and a
he :d-dress ‘of pink crinoline and
carried a posy of pink rosebuds
and forget-me-nots.

The flower girls were the
Misses Jean Ishmael, Esther
Clarke, Denise Rawlins, Marcia

Hunte, Marcia West and Sommer-
set Thomas. They all wore dress-
es of sheer with kilted skirts and
head - dresses of crinoline to
match and carried posies of for-
get-me-nots.

The ceremony which was fully
choral, was conducted by Rev.
I. M. Wickham. The duties of
bestman were performed by Mr.
Beresford Thomas, while those
ef ushers fell to Mr. Keith
Squires and Mr. Erro! Gay.

A reception was held at “Spion
Kop”, St. Hill Road, after which
the couple left for “Fleet View”.
Bathsheba, for their honeymoon.

Cricket and Accountancy

OY MARSHALL; the Barba-

dos and West Indies pro-
fessional who is now playing for
Lowerhouse in the Lancashire
League is looking ahead tothe
days when his cricket career will
finish, He has started studying
accountancy with a firm in Burn-
ley. Five days a week he is at the
office, from nime until five.’ This
still leaves him free to coach the
Lowerhouse players in the even-
ings and to play in any evening
games, and at week-ends,

And finally here is news of
Frankie Worrell, whose. 303 open-
fing partnership last week with
Radcliffe skipper Bill Greenhalgh

broke all league regords. Frank
and his skipper bo appeared in
a benefit match for the Lan-

cashire County professional, Win-
ston Place, at Whitefield last Sun-
day.

First Visit To W.I.

ISS FLORENCE MAHER
who owns the Alpha Re:-
taurant in Dublin, Ireland, is

now making her first trip to the
West Indies. She arrived yester-
dey morning from Southampton
en the De Grasse and will be
remaining until July 13 staying at
the Marine Hotel.

She said that she came out
principally to see her brother Mr.
R. J. Maher who is employed as
a driller in the oilfields in Trini-
dad. He expects to join her
shortly.

Police Officer in B.G.

M* F'REDERICK. CANNON,
a Police Officer stationed at
McKenzie, British Guiana, arrived

here on Sunday by the Lady
Rodney for about eight days’
holiday, He was accompanied by

his wife and they are
“Accra”, Rockley,
Judge Returns
R. E. C. JACKMAN, retired

staying at



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

4




CENTURY ago Ambas-

* sadors really mattered
To-day they are little more
than puppets gesticulatins
to order at the end of i
telegraph wire, But
although their power ha
declined they and thei

wives still have grea
advantar s. As observer
of the follies, the eccen-
tricities and frailties of
those who control our
destiny they have an

incomparable position. For
this reason their memoirs,
howcver trivial, are seldom
duil

Here 1s Signora lisabetta
Cerruti telling the story of her
life between 1923 and 1940*
During that time her husband

was [talen Ambassador succes.
s.vely in Pekin. Moscow, Rio de





ro Paris and Berlin. She
m and sat next to characters
2s dive as Hitler Einstein

Pansham Lama and the Duke of
Windsor Now she recounts her
memoirs im a book agrecably
spiced by acute observat'on and
move than a touch of feline
malice

The aristocrat

She talks of the personatities
met in Russia. There was
Chicherin. as Soviet Foreign
Minister. originally an aristocrat
reserving and ratifyin his
opulent tastes under the Bolshe-
vik regime; something of a snob
too. for he never failed to allude
in conversation to his aristocratic
Italian cousins in Genoa.

Litvinov who _ succeeded
Chicherin as Foreign Minister
was a very different character
He took Bolshevism seriously
and believed in austerity. Sig-
nora Cerru‘i's sharp eye noticed
that Mme. Litvinov (formerly
Miss Ivy Low of London) always
had holes in her stockings. and
was obliged to horrow a fur coat
from a State shop when she had
to pay an official visit with her
husband to Turkey.

Hitler and Eva




From Russia, afve: a bricf
interval! at Rio, the Cerrutis
moved in 1932 to Berlin where



t remained for three years.
Signora Cerruti frequently met
Hitler

On the
ing question of
attitude to women she natur-
ally had a firm view. He was,
she says. “completely asexual
in every way.” But her judg-
ment, based as it is on feminine
intuition—that most fallible
guide to truth—cannot be re-
garded as conclusive. The rela-
tions between Hitler and Eva
Braun remain as mysterious as
ever.

The Cerrutis were enter-
tained from time to time by
Goering This entertainment was
never dull. One's host might



perennially fascinat-
the Fuehrer's

een ENUU Aa UT EO

THE SIGNORA
SIZES UP
THE FAMOUS |

by ROBERT BL








SIGNORA CERRUT!
- + & matter of intuition.

begin by appearing dressed in
red velvet like a Renaissance
grandee.

A quick change and he would
eturn in grey breeches and a
rey shirt with purple stripes
hen accompaniea by thirty
rest guards in medieval
“costume he would escort nis
guests around his grotesque
estate at Karinhall.

Fiasco

When the Cerrutis visited him
there the show-pece was to be
the sight of a bull bison mating
with the female of the species.
but this. alas, ended in a comic
flasco. In no way disconcerted.
Goering hurried back aheag of
iS guests in order to change into
a costume of emerald green and
greet them with a lance in his
hand and a silver hunting horn
slung from his neck

In 1985 the Cerrutis, who
disapproved of Mussolini’s new
pro-German policy, were moved
to Paris. Two years later Musso-
lint decided to withdraw his
ambassador and they retired to
Rome.

Signora Cerruti had no use
for Mussolini, She tells the
story of a visit by Mr. Eden to
Rome on the eve of the Abys-
sinian war.

A luncheon was held in Eden's
honour. The Duce, determined

insult him, arrived late wear-
a patched old coat, an open
t, tennis shoes,
socks. He behaved as offen-
sively as possible throughout
the meai, and the party broke
up without a word being
exchanged between the two men.

Serious ? No

This is a book which wil! give
pleasure to many, It is not. and
does not claim to be, a serious
contribution to the history of
international relations. But it
gives a vivid picture of scenes
and people, and it may well be
remembered long after the more
solemn works of diplomatic
history have mouldered away
into dusty oblivion.

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED

* AMBASSADOR’S WIFE, = by
oun Cerruti (Allen and Unwin,
18s.).

London Express Service.

en == EE

LISTENING HOURS

TUESDAY, June 17, 1952
4.00 — 7.15 p.m 19.76 M, 25.53 M
4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The
Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. New Records,
4.45 p.m, Sandy MacI‘herson, 5.00 p m
Composer of the Week, 5.15 p.m. Nights
at the Opera, 6.00 p.m. Ulster Maga-
zine, 6.15 p.m. Meet the
weaith, 45 p.m. Sports Round-Up and
Programme Parade, 7.00 p.m, The News,
7.10 Home News from Britain
————

ROODAL





Judge of the Assistant
Court of Appeal and Mrs. Jack- EM
man, returned to Barbados on PIRE
Sunday morning by the Lady LAST TWO SHOWS TODAY
Rodney from St. Vincent where 4.45 & 8.30

they had been for a holiday.

CuOSSSWORD



Across
dropping a catch
IWoolNBS Snow porec

1 Lost
7 Any
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TUESDAY, JUNE 17,

Punch Made Up Some Riddles

About One Thing ~

— And They Were All
By MAX TRELL

“WELL,” said Mr. Punch, smil- |/
ing, “I've just thought of some
brand new riddles. And the curious |
thing about them is, they're all)
about one thing.” i

Mr. Punch was talking to every- |
one in the playroom—to Teddy the
Stuffed Bear, and Mary-Jane the
rag-doll, and General Tin, and
Knarf and Hanid.

“All about the same _ thing,
Punch?” said General Tin. “What
do you mean?”

Everyone else was glad that Gen-
eral Tin asked this question. For
they were all wondering, too.

All About Roads

Mr. Punch nodded. “They’re all
about Roads. But, of course,” he
added, “they’re about different
kinds of roads. I'll give you the
first riddle and you'll see just what
I mean.”

This was Mr. Punch’s first rid-
dle about a road:

1 cross the brooks and rivers
As well as any ship at sea;
But when | reach the ocean,
I know that trip is not for me!
“Now,” said Mr. Punch, smiling
again; “what sort of a road is
that? And let me give you a hint.
That road has a very special name,
though it really is a road.”

Hanid said eagerly: “Is it a
Bridge?”
“Yes indeed, my dear! That’s

just what it is! A road that goes
over the water is called a bridge.
And naturally it can’t cross the
ocean when it comes to it. The ocean
is much too wide for any bridge.”
Then Mr. Punch read his segond
poem about a road.
Before me stands a great big hill
With towering trees and rocks |
and snow
But do | climb it? No—not I!
Right through and through
that hill | go!
Mr. Punch looked around the |
room, waiting for someone to give |
him the answer. It was Mary-Jane









Punch asked Hanid ». riddle.

who guessed it. “A Tunnel?” she
said,

“Correct, Mary-Jane!” “And a
tunnel is a road, too. Now guess
this one.”

The people rarely walk on me,

But iron tracks I bear,
And trains go roaring on my back
And people ride most every-
where.

“Oh, 1 know!” cried Teddy the
Stuffed Bear. “I know what kind
of a road that is! It’s a—a.. .”
Teddy paused. “I can’t think of the

| name but I know just what it is.”

Knarf had to help Teddy out
(for he was quite sure that Teddy
really knew). “A Railroad,” he
whispered.

“Yes! A Railroad! A Railroad!”

Mr. Punch said that was right,
too. He said he had one last riddle
about a very wonderful kind of
road,

I’m every color, every hue

The tallest trees are not
high;
sun

as

The must shine, the rain
must fall ;
I’m like a roadway in the sky!
Everyone guessed that one! They
all shouted in one voice: “It’s a
Rainbow!”

And so it was.

PLAZA THEATRES

BRIDGETOWN BARBAREES ——OIsTIN
Sent ines (Dial 5170) (Dial 8404)
TODAY & TOMORROW ;|LAST 2 Shows TODAY ||Mat. Today 4.45 PM

430 & 8.30 445 & 8.30 p.m, “1 BECAME A cat

Stan ee chal SIERRA John Garfield &
: (Color) “NOBODY LIVES J
DALLAS Audie MURPHY and FOREVER

_Wanda

(Color) =
ae Thurs.

Gary COOPER and
Highway 301
Steve COCHRAN

——
Thurs. Special 1.30 p.m.
Charles Starrett Double:





Wed. & Thirs.
4.30 & 8.30 p.m.
“ILLEGAL ENTRY"

er ae TONITE 8.30

eo eo (on stage)
“BLONDE ALIBI"
Abbott & Costello NIGHT (CF, aAGtC
“IN SOCIETY” & ACTION! i
“Prof. CLIFFTON”

(French Magician)

Also the Western
Thrille

“SOUTH OF || Howard DUFF é& “BRAND OF FEAR”
Pe Vata “CALAMITY JANE” Jimmy Wakely
RENEGADES, oF THE SAGE") ‘Toward DUFF. 445 & 8.30 P.M,

Opening THURS

Opening FRIDAY

“SMART GIRLS



“ G DON’T TALK"
A STREETCAR Fee A LYNN” aa ;
NAMED DESIRE' ss FAYRBANKS || "HER KIND OF MAN



GLOBE

TO-DAY only 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.

‘“‘BOOMERANG”’

Dana Andrews

AND

“I'D CLIMB THE HIGHEST MOUNTAIN”
(SUSAN HAYWARD — WILLIAM LUNDIGAN).

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 4.45 and 8.30

STORMY WEATHER (LENA

HORNE — CAB CALLOWAY)

“ACT OF VIOLENCE”

Now in Stock - - - -

Flit Sprays

Flit Powder

Mistol in 42-02, & 2-02.
Habdy Oil

Paraffin Oil $1.80 per gal.

R. M. JONES



PI

ENGINEER B

HIGH SPEED GRINDING

BAY STREET

POSSSSSSSSESSSSSSSSSSSSSSEO

Yalb., %41b., 1%4lb., 134]b., 244b., 3lb.
FILES
FLAT, ROUND, HALF ROUND, SQUARE

HIGH SPEED TWIST DRILLS
BODY REPAIR FLEXIBLE FILES
OPEN & BOX SPANNERS
PRESSURE GAUGES 0-400 Ib.

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

Flit in Gls., Qrs., Pts.
Nujol in pts.
Petroleum Jelly
White, 23c, per Ib.
Yellow, 18c. per Ib.
Household Wax

& CO., LTD.

PE

yy”, VA’ 36”, ye”, 56”, 34”, %", 4%; 1%", 134”, z; 3”
BSF
Yy”, 2”, V4”, ts”, 3%”, te’, Wy", x”, 56”, 34”

SAE or NF
Val’, a”, 36”, ve”, yy”, te’, 56”, 34”

USS or NC
4”, fe”, 36”, Te”, Ye", ; a 56”, 34”

.P. HAMMERS

MACHINES

DIAL 4269











1952













POSS STCOSF PPLE FSSOOSS,
Bread from
$&@an..,.
. ZEPHERIN’S,

or any good bakery,
but when you want to

ENJOY

good toast
You should have one of the

MOD) GAS COOKERS

Ci and see them
t your Gas Showroom, Ba:

y St .

4%

A
L 500605

GCAIETY

The Garden—St. James



TODAY and TOMORROW 8.30 p.m.

“BACHELOR ‘AND THE
BOBBY SOXER"
Cary GRANT &

“BLOOD ON THE ae



“CRY DANGER"
and
“SONG of the SOUTH”



HERE AT LASTY
FIVE ACADEMY
AWARD WINNER!



6

“A
Streetcar
Named
Desire’

w= ELIA KAZAN senean suse CHARLES K FELDMAN

AND

MARLON
BRANDO

EXCITING
WARNER
BROS.
PICTURE

TN TT III 8 LI ie I

urbY ourPiles

It is no longer necessary to s
pains, itching and torment from Piles
since the discovery of Hytex (formerly

* *nown as Chinaroid). Hytex starts to
work in 10 minutes and not only stops
the pain byt also takes out the swell-
ing, stops Bleeding and combat rve
irritation thereby curbing other trou-
bles caused by Piles such as Headache,
Nervousness, Backache, Constipation,
loss of energy, eens and Irritable
disposition. Get Hytex from your
druggist today under the positive

tee Hytex must stop your pile
pains and troubles or money back os
return of empty pac!

Pyorrhea and









Trench Mouth

TOOLS

TAPS & DIES

Stopped in 24 Hours

- Ya



Bleeding
teeth mean
rhea or Trench
that will eventually cause you to lose

ims, sore mouth, or
at you are a victim of Pyor-
‘outh, or some bad :

our teeth and have to wear fi
fore your time. Since the
War these mouth diseases ve sp!
throughout the world so that now scien-
tists say that four out of every five le
are sufferers sooner or later. wi in
too iate, because they often cause not oly
ate, bec: ey often ca
the loss of teeth, but also chronic rheuma-
tism and heart trouble,

New Discovery Saves Teeth

the discove: it
Ty oO en American

scientist, fights these ¢: & new
and quick way. It penetrates right to the
root of the trouble, stops gums bleed-
ing the very first day, quickly the
foremene ges bd fo ein as zoom

ms the The follow tter
from Mr. W. W. B. shows the result that
Amosan users get: “I suffered from Trench
Mouth and Pyorrhea for ten fe My

ms were sore and bleeding and I

i¢»t four teeth, while several other teeth
were getting looser all the time. I tried
meny things and then heard of this new
discovery Aion In 24 hours after
Amosan my gums had progped .
The soreness in my mouth d enppesred
Ba loge tenth were ut igutar and thet
my loose were muc Tr
I could eat the hardest of food.”
Amosan works so fast and so certain
that it is guaranteed to your
from bleeding, end sore mouth and
your teeth to your complete satisf:
money back on return of empty
Don't take a chance on losing your teeth or
suffering the dangers from’ rheumatiam
and heart trouble. Get Amosen from your

chemist today under this iron-clad guaran-
tee. You risk

Amosan?.?4°%

For Pyorrhea--Trench Mouth

i








TUESDAY, JUNE

17,

1952



Animals Slaughtered To jy

Control Disease e

How U.K’s Farmers
Meet Menace To
Livestock Industry,

By L. F. EASTERBROOK

Agricultural of the
“News Chronicle” (London)

While he .was away on a
holida_ rerseas recéntly a tele-
gram wa. re.*ived by the wealthy
head of a famous United Kingdom
brewery firm notifying him that
the entire herd of pedigree cattle
on his estate had been destroyed
by official order.

This compulsory slaughtering of
some £20,000 of Guernsey cattle,
owned by Lord Iveagh, is one of
the latest, and the largest, live-
stock losses in Britain in recent
years. It was necessitated by the
United Kingdom’s inflexible war
on “foot and mouth” disease—a
malady which can infect all farm
animals with a cloven hoof—
cattle, pigs and sheep, Where in-
fection is proved, whether it is
of a one-acre man’s solitary pig
or, as in thé present case, of a
rich man’s prize herd of 163
cattle, the sick animals must be
destroyed by order of Britain's
Ministry of Agriculture as a safe-
guard for the whole country.

“Foot and mouth” disease is so
called because the first symptom
of it is a discharge from the mouth
or feet of the affected animal.
Since last November, there have
been over 160 outbreaks involving
many thousands of animals,

Spread By A Virus

The disease is spread by a virus
(minute organism carrying the in-
fection) that is so small that no
microscope reyeals it and the
finest filter will not separate it,
There are at least three types of
this virus and vaccination with one
type gives no immunity against
the others, So although vaccination
might be a safeguard up to a
point, it cannot guarantee 100 per
cent. success, The disease is rarely
fatal, but the fever and the pain
of eating and walking it causes
the animals results in such loss
of condition (and im cows a falling
off of milk yield) that farmers
would suffer heavy financial loss
if it were allowed to spread
throughout their sherds and. flocks.

This it would do very quickly

| J eee

disinfected.



if nothing was done about it, for
it is a most infectious disease. The
virus can even be carried by the
wheels of passing vehicles or by
the boots of a stockman who has
attended diseased animals. It is
suspected that most of the present
outbreaks were due to. virus
brought to Britain on the legs and
feathers of migrating birds.

For many years research into
the problem has been carried on
in Britain, but so far no solution
has been found, Therefore, to
hold the disease in check the very
drastic remedy has been resorted
to of slaughtering all animals in
a flock or herd in which there is
an outbreak. Any other animals
which have been in actual con-
tact with them are also killed off.
No movement of animals out of
an area of 15 miles around the
infected premises is permitted, or
within the area.

Government Pays
Compensation

Anyone leaving places where
there is infection must first wash
his hands and disinfect his boots
and, if practicable, change his
clothing, The Government pays
compensation, at market value,
for all animals slaughtered. But
it is hard for a man who may have
spent a lifetime building up his
stock to see his efforts wiped out
The necessity for such drastic
measures is, however, understood



FREE
ee BOA.







ana =." 23.

Even the wheels of this Farmer's bicycle is

throughout Britain, although until
aman can get his farm re-stocked
after the six weeks compulsory
waiting period, he is out of
business.

It is not unlike what happens
on the Gold Coast, for instance,
when cocoa trees have to be eut
down because of swollen shoot, to
prevent more trees being affected
Nevertheless, United Kingdom
farmers recognise that these
measures are in their interests in
the long run. They co-operate
fully with the Government in
carrying them out and their own
organisation, the National Farmers’
Union, fully endorses this policy
and would not have things other-
wise in the present state of
knowledge in tackling this disease.

The present outbreaks have
been among the most costly for
recent years, Nearly 20,000 animals
have had to be slaughtered, with
upwards of £500,000 paid in com-
pensation. But in France, where
the disease is left io take its
course and the animals recover, the
apnual! loss in terms of milk and
meat while they are ill, runs into
millions of pounds. French farmers
lose this not only in a bad year
tor foot and mouth disease but
every year, because the disease
has become permanently estab-
lished over a large part of that
evuntry. By the — slaughtering
policy this is being prevented from
happening in Britain.





“IRM



First chalienge made
to State

City Editor FREDERICK ELLIS

FF OR the first time since it was set up
as a State monopoly British Overseas

Airways Corporation

al liners

14

is likely to face |

free enterprise competition on. a regular

service.
Two of Britain’s

biggest private air

companies—Airwork Ltd. and Hunting Air

seeking

permission to run a

regular passenger service between Britain

and Nairobi,
with B.0.A.C,

Kenya, in direct competition

Their application has already been vetted
by the Air Transport Advisory Counei!, which — »

recentl

recommended increased epport unities

Br

for independent companies.

The application is now

and Civil Aviation. Mr

before the Mintste! of vi
Alan Lennox. Bovri m

@hho is expected to make his decision known shori!y



W

TABLETS WILL QUICKLY BRING RELIEF
FROM ANY TYPE OF PAIN. AND REMEM-
BER, WITH THEIR FOIL PACKING THEY’RE

KEPT ABSOLUTELY

WHENEVER YOU MAY WANT THEM.



SSS =

TAKE OFF THAT MASK
OF PAIN

HIZZ

FRESH FOR YOU...







BARBADOS

=

This sign warns farmers to steer clear

Little Activity On
Stock Exchange

LONDON, June 16

Very little activity was discern-
ible on the London Stock Ex-
change today.

Copper shares provided the
bright spot. They were early mark-
ed higher following the raising of
the United Kingdom price for the
metal by £50 per ton. But prices
finished under the day's best as a
result of profit taking. Giltedged
mostly eased one-eighth of a point
in small business.

The short-dated stocks however
were supported and gained a small
fraction. Small speculative busi-
ness in foreign bonds resulted in
Japanese gaining one point on the
day. Germans however finished
irregular after being one and a
half points up.

There was litue movement of
any sort among industrials. The
engineering groups recorded scat-
tered gains. Tobaccos however
were inclined to dullness while
the miscellaneous leaders shed a
few pence. Royal Dutch were in
request and gained five-eighths of
a point to 304. But the remainder
of the oil group was dull.

South African gold shares were
quietly firm with a good weekend
press aiding We Freddies and
Pioneers groups. Diamonds were
occasionally better*+—U.P,



THESE ARE THE PLANES

The tree enterprisers
flying

nnedon (Herts)
Frequency of the service and
tled

0 This compares with £140 by

will

Vice ise

s £252

from Blackbushe
the H.Q.s of the companies.

Hermes 40-seat planes

use Viking 27-seat

(Surrey) and

fares are still to be

Hut the sinele fare is expected to be under

B.O.A.C., whose daily
B.O.A.C.’s return

A '%OAC spokesman said yesterday : “ We can face

ipetition
If the new service is successful
set

icea prrees
LHWESE
H which has ig
ad by 66-ve
9s Offieer.in World War L

shipping
i\r-old Perey Hunting, a Royal Flying

Traffic is good on the route.”

the free enterprisers

k permission to fly on other Empire routes at

ARE THE MEN

iterests, ts

Airwork-which started with a Tiger Moth single-
ine pi®neein 1928, is the biggest private air firm in

vin, with} fleet of more than

It is

1 month

nterests of





250.

run from Mayfair offices by 45-year-old Myles

itl, who controls flights adding up to some 275,000
le {t is backed in the City by the power-
Lord Cowdray and

his family.
London Express Service



This world-wide

tion for you.



. Bathsheba Railway Station, and

ARRIVED!!
FERGUSON
DIESEL WHEEL

TRACTOR

display at our show-room we shall be pleased

to arrange a demonstration at your planta-



ADVOCATE



‘SEA AND AIR
TRAFFIC

Governor Opens
Social Centre

At Bathsheba







His Excellency the Governor
Sir William Savage on Saturday
evening officially opened the ibis
Secial Centre at Bathsheba, St.
Joseph. In Carlisle Bay
é
Rev. L. C. Mallalieu, Rector of M.V. Landy Patricia, Sch. 1 D
- a. = sor Sch tosarene Ser France pv
St Joseph and Chairman of St. Shitn, “Sen. Laudalpha MV. I \
Jas@ph Welfare Committee, made Sch Mary M Lew MI
the introductory remarks, He said; “VY Willenstad.
“Your Excellency, Lady Savage, wy. cacique trance}
Tadies and Gentlemen. It is my st. Lucia with cargo
pleasure and duty to ask you, 3.5. DeGras 0.235 fre M
Sir, formally to declare this Social ‘4%. jo won
Centre open. As you will’ have DEPARTUPES
Seen, it is not yet complete—the $.5. DeGraswse for Trinidad with ps
@rounds have yet to be de- "*
veloped—but as there is a de- Seawell
mand’ for it’s use we ¢ 6 ARRIVALS—by B.W.IA. on Friday
longer delay its roe a E Down Eb
Clay its forma] opening. K. Dotson, E. Dotson, G. Dots w
_ This Social Centre, he con- Dotson, J. Dotson, G. Trotman, A Oche
tinued,» has been made possible - anh oe = Rt gr re ag
Slaybaugh Siaybaugh, Coat
by the generosity cf Govern- Newsam. ij. Torts. Be Fingal), ), Ke
ment. who from Social Weltare = 4 J James, L Wooding
: f “ 1. O. B. Woeoding, C Wooding
=" have granted money far “ARRIVALS by BW LA. on Friday
fh purchese of this building From GRENADA
formerly known s . a S Evelyn, 1 Brewster, M. Chart
bow Hotel) ‘and ‘a the. Rain- E. Clark, S Clark, Z. Douglas
Hote an or its removal pDePARTURES—by BW.1A. on Friday
to this site and its renovation. for TRINIDAD
Gow ; c A. McLean, R. McLean, N. Gransau
. Nomar | has also placed at ¢ “Branch, J. Bourne 2. Knowles, <
our disposal the land of the old Gregory, &, Robinson, M. Baston, J

Gibbs, B. Figaro, A. Heyliger, M. Lar

other land purchased for the pretot. Noumagel, &. Mumphries,
purpose on which this building: DEPARTURES—by B.W.1 A. on Fride
now stands. For ANTIGUA

Rev. H. Me Alister, M. Chesterfieid

Charch Lands 4, Avi
it may be of interest to note bh With B

that over 100 years ago, this lana 'â„¢ Touch With Barbados
was part of the Church lands oi Coastal Station
this parish, or closely adjacent CABLE & WIRELESS (West Indies
to it, when the Rectory was on bd. advise that they can now conn

4 nicate with the following ships throue
Beach Mount Hill — a symbol of their Barbados Coast Station

Station





the long @4tadlished relation- ss ae Princ Cottica, Lad
ship between Church and State Neison Drupa, Golfito Mesn Verdc
my * North Stay Firdtjot angen souther
2 pee See has been established Distri ts, Mahiburg. 1 Reariids "Sorbenh
y a Social Committee appointed Stanmore, Bss0 France, Viannis, Utilita
a . S. Hele Regent Tig Wave Premie
by the Vestry, and will continue Ganeny Wacaten, Nerauidria, ‘rina?
oa be run by that committee as De Grasse, Planter, Barbaraann, Tist
ong as the Vestry so desires icastor fucito, Brazil, Quilme Pick
I ne Pacifie Forts Flaming oO Alee
As Chairman, I would like to ‘cippor. Cavinn, Alcon Polncis,’ Chats
record our thanks and gratitude De Barquismeto, Artillero, Ameri
. , Fort Townshend, Antontitte Usodimer
z Mr R. B Moulder who drew Aveentnenh Wevter, "Aleon “Cav te
plans and supervised ‘he con- suanue, Baron Elphinstone, Saman
struction to Mr. G. Riley, a Cusablanco, Thorsisie, Bacchus, Dolor
arishi ; - aces Trans Pacific, Mercator, Ivy Bank, Abi
parishioner who, as the contracto! Alfred Clegg. Ada Belle Likes. FE
removed the building and re- fethienem, Skauvann, Polycrown, Inq
constructed it according to plans, ierpreter, Archangelos, Telamon, N. 'l
He also thanked Mr. Merton (ita... Brotiingsborg, John | Howland
ontebello Hits, Esso I
McCarty (Secretary) Mr. Alfred Lord Liovd George, Giulia, Doreth
King (Treasurer) and the other Stevenson, Bugene Whilgard and
members of the committee for @™2d° Carib Soa
th#ir co-operation and help in ATES “RVG Mu
spite of the fact that some of RATE ‘soe ~ - ANGE
their meetings were abortive NEW YORK
He thanked too Miss Arne and Selling _tbwy ing
Mrs. Vaughn for their valuable “ 4/1°% ¢heques on Bankers 7
advice. In anticipation he Drafts 71 5/0
thanked Mr. Skeete of the Agri- 4y10% Cute ‘i
719 wreney 2/10
cultural Department for promis- Coupons a9 5/10
Lar) to come out to Bathsheba » Silver 20
and give advice and he'p in the re
77 2/106 ” , ankers 7% 5
matter of trees and ornamental ” ”'0% [usaues op pankers To!
plants for the grounds. Sight Drafte 78 2/10
Â¥ 210 Cabe
+ 7/10 « ene ™ ‘
_ Favourite Site ee Gepoun 13.310
Tt is desired, he went on, to (i! Silver 0



have this Centre open to the use
of the Parishioners of St. Joseph,
and of Social Organizations with-

On Falsification

in the peri. We have here, Of A
representatives of the Police 2 \ Ch >
any Scouts and Guides, and ccounts = |
St. Joseph's Men's Christian His Worshi >

p Mr. C. L. Walwyn,
Association. Athena this is City Police Magistrate, yester-
ihe Seaman btany the, contre oF cay ordered 20-vear-cid “Lion
Joseph lead to this favour- wares Wy Fane Mls teal ot me

next sitting of the Assize Court.

Parris, a gasolene salesman at
the Esso Servicenter, Is charged
with falsification of accounts in|
a charge book. |

ite rendezvous and some day we
may see “‘sign-posts” on all the
mainroads of this parish with the

e On Page 5

Now in effect

TCA Sez, 60-DAY

EXCURSIONS

Lowest fares ever offered for air travel



TO CANADA

Regular flights by “North Star” Skyliners
ONLY $445.60 (B.W.1.)

from BRIDGETOWN to TORONTO
or MONTREAL and Return!

For complete information,
your Travel Agent or

GARDN«ER AUSTIN & CO. LTD.
Lower Broad Street — Phene 451% ‘a

TRANS-CANADA Air Lines

see





REDIFFUSION |

Offers. Commission of $1.50 in CASH for every New i

Subscriber brought to and accepted by the Company. |)!

REDIFFUSION will pay in addition a bonus of $25.00

,to any person who brings in twenty-five New Subscrib-

ers in one Calendar month who are accepted by the

Company, i
i

Have always a supply of Recommendation Forms ready

a a

THEY CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE OFFICE
REDIVFFUSION tet Trafalgar Street.











famous Tractor is now on i

COURTESY
GARAGE

ROBERT THOM





\ LIMITED.
” ; Also available for immediate delivery with
i ONE WHIZZ DOES THE WORK OF TWO vaporising oil or gasoline Engine. White Park Road
i ORDINARY TABLETS. - Dial 4616
1 ee rr STOKES & BYNOE LTD. AGENT SSS? >—E=—TEEEE——————— —— |



ne



PAGE THREE

Pera

Ped MA

TONIGH F-—Smile into your
* mirror— take a good look
at your t&

morning







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$15.58

NEXT— Cican your teeth
with Pepsodent
and evening,



THEN — Smile
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how a week of Pepsodent
makes your teeth whiter,
your smile simply dazzling

Sft.,

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Do this

tor

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‘

tian vou

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you'll see





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PAGE FOUR

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad St., Bridgetown



Tuesday, June 17, 1952

MODERN FISHING

THE value of the Fishery Research work
which has been carried out in Barbados
during recent years is illustrated by this
year’s catches of flying fish. Although 116
fishing boats were destroyed during 1951,
the catches of flying fish during 1952 are
estimated to be 33 per cent higher than the
catches for the comparative period in 1951.

Sinee the spectacular loss of fishing boats
late last year 58 boats have been repaired
and three new ones built by private boat-
owners, but not one of the 25 boats which
are being rebuilt under government super-
vision is yet completed. Barbados’ fishing
fleet in 1952 comprised 558 boats as com-
pared with 623 at the beginning of 1951.

Surely then it would have been reason-
able to expect that this year’s catches of
flying fish would be considerably less than
the catches made in 1951? It would have
been reasonable to have expected smaller
catches and there, would probably have
been smaller catches, had no fishery re-
search been carried on during recent years.

Fortunately for Barbados there has been
fishery research. Mr. Wiles has been able to
prove conclusively that much greater
catches of flying fish could be made when
gill nets were used than could be made
when the traditional methods of line hook-
ing and net-scooping were employed.

Already.in 1951 some 30 fishing. boats
were using gill nets and the experience of
these boats so convinced other fishermen of
the advantage of fishing with gill nets that
today ho less than 400 of the island’s total
fleet of 588 fishing boats are equipped with
gill nets.”

Barbadians ought to feel very grateful
to Mr. Wiles because without the wide-
spread use of gill nets in 1952 flying fish
instead of being reasonably plentiful
throughout most of the year would have
been, in very short supply.

The advantages of fishery research have
therefore been vividly demonstrated be-
cause of the shocking catastrophe which
overtook the island’s fishing fleet in 1951.
But Barbados would be unwise to wait for
catastrophes to point out lessons which
must be learnt.

The introduction of the gill net is only
one of the lessons to be learnt from the re-
search work carried out on the Investi-
gator by the Fishery Officer and his assist-
ants. Mr. Wiles has already reported on the
use of plankton as indicative of the most
profitable fishing-grounds and. he has
proved that flying fish are more plentiful
at certain periods of the day than at others.
But the difficulties of catching more fish are
real.

As presently organised the fishing indus-
try is a highly competitive industry in
which fishermen have no guarantee that
their catches will be sold unless their boats
return early to the shore,

The result of this cut-throat competition
is that fishing boats habitually leave the
fishing grounds before or during the opti-
mum periods of fish catching.

The work of the fishery research depart-
ment is therefore being hampered by the
existing organisation of the fishing indus-
try. Progress cannot be made until fisher-
men combine to market their catches co-
operatively and are prepared to pay for
cold storage facilities without which mar-
keting cannot succeed. Barbados fortun-
ately for fishermen is well supplied with
cold storage accommodation which can be
adapted for the special needs of the flying
fish industry if required, But fishermen.
themselves must first be convinced of the
need for new marketing methods, Fisher-
men cannot-be as conservative and as re-
sistant to new ideas as they are commonly
said to be. Iif that were so they would have
shown much greater resistance than they
have shown to the introduction of the gill
net. But, the government’s policy of con-
rolling the price of fish, granting loans to
fishermen, helping with half the cost of
replacing twenty-five new fishing boats
and in general’of behaving like a kindly
uncle to the whole fishing community, ex-
cellent though it may be in intention, has
the undesirable effect of leaving fishermen
to expect leadership from the government.

This is a great pity. Because unless the
fishermén of Barbados avail themselves of
the knowledge which the Barbados Fishery
Research office is making so rapidly avail-
able then their chances of improving their
status in the community will be postponed
and perhaps lost forever, while the com-
munity as a whole must inevitably suffer
because the fishing industry is patently not
Organised to exploit the excellent supplies
of flying fish off the Barbadian coasts.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Better Sugar Position, But
No Shipping Improvement

West India Committee Annual Report

LONDON. advisory committee in consulta-

A better position in regard tion with colonial representatives

| to sugar sales, but complete lack in London. Colonial interest has
of improvement in shipping ser- centred in efforts to ensure that
vices to the British West Indies as large a part as possible of any
are among the main features of increase in Commonwealth con-

West Indian developments during sumption should be reserved for
the past year, according to the Commonwealth producers, The
annual report of the West India 4ttitude of the West Indies Com-

Commit presented at the mittee, in consultation with the
Committee's annual general meet- British | West Indies Sugar
ing in’ Gondon on May 26. Association, has been that the

) entire increase of consumption

_ The report welcomes the #1gn- within the Commonwealth should
ing of the Commonwealth Sugar be reserved for Commonwealth
Agreement last December and producers.”
summarises production and price On _ special sugars: “In 1952
developments in such other West the Ministry of Food will again
Indian produce as rum, molasses, take 15,000 tons of yellow gro-
cocoa, bananas, cotton, citrus, cery sugars from the British
cigars and oil. West Indies, ailocated to pro-
But in a section on the shipping ducers in the same proportions
services to and from the West 2nd subject to the same condi-
Indies, it says: “It-is to be feared tions "a nena In ‘i eae
that, so far as passenger shipping Ct md 4 on ee ar a a
‘is concerned, Her Majesty’s Gov- Deen oS on ? a ieecdtens
ernment have abandoned any £°™ a 3 > D di st the
intention they may have had of sugars rae d in v4 a the
ensuring the maintenance of the Leeward Islands. In view o

prestige of British shipping in the re re euaaee a

West Indies, and have left the itea Kingdom while ration-
provision of such accommodation oa ian ee treatment of

chiefly to the French and the bein) econ-
Dutch, who, it must be confessed, cous ” yas
have performed their part ex- :
tremely well.” On bulk shipments of sugar:
The report also mentions the “Arrangements were put in hand
work of the Committee in draw- aoe 5 me 1952 ae
ing attention to the tax conces- °F rder moereuene
sions offered by certain Colonies bulk shipment involving anprox-
to new industries, Th imately one-third of the total
. e Committee
has pressed for a revision of the experteble sirpins fram the
UK tom policy. which k British West Indies and about
a y ch makes one-half of the quantity to be
investors in such Colonies liable exported to the United Kingdom.
for income tax payment in the [The arrangements have worked
United Kingdom on the full smoothly and bulk shipment will
amount of their tax-free earnings become the principal method of
lin the Colonies. conveying sugar to the United
In the 1951-52 year, the Com- Kingdom in future.”
mittee’s excess of expenditure On rum: “The extortionate
over income was kept down to duties on rum coupled with the
£47, but at the close of 1951 decreased spending power of the
there was an accumulated deficit people of the United Kingdom is
ef £8,558. The report expresses making it more difficult to main-
concern at the rapid increase in tain the demand for rum, sales
expenditure which the Committee which are so important to the
must face if it is to continue to economy of the British West
work effectively. Indies. Before the Budget a streng
Here are some extracts from “ppeal was again made to the
the text of the report: Chancellor of the Exchequer
On the Commonwealth Sugar Poimting out that the high: duties
Agreement: “It is unnecessary in Were strangling the industry and
this report to enter into details of thatthe only hope of a revival

the Agreement, which have been
set out at length elsewhere. The
Committee’s interest for the
future must be directed mainly to
securing every plpssible advan-
tage from an expanding Common-
wealth market for sugar and to
maintaining in particular the
traditional position of Common-
wealth sugar in the Canadian
Apart from this, the
principal concern of the Com-
mittee will lie in collaborating
with the British West Indies

lay in a substantial reduction of
the rates of duty, Unfortunately
the Chancellor has not seen fit to
make any change in these duties.”

On molasses: “Molasses prices
have fluctuated violently during
the last twelve months, and suf-
fered a particularly catastrophic
fall within recent weeks.”

On shipping services to and
from the West Indies: “It is to be
feared that, so far as passenger
shipping is concerned, Her Majes-
ty’s Government have abandoned

Sugar Association in the annual ®0Y intention they may have had
price fixing called for by the of ensuring the maintenance of
agreement, in maintaining the the prestige of British shipping in
continuance of the Agreement by the West Indies, and have left the
annual extensions and in keeping provision of such accommodation
a watchful eye on developments chiefly to the French and the
for a revival of the International Dutch, who, it must be confessed,
Sugar Agreement.” have perf: r ex-

On the International Sugar ‘¢mely well. The French, indeed,
Council: “The principal develop- have not been content even tu
ment during 1951 was the pro- allow matters to stand as they

an International Sugar Agree- Provided magnificent fast ships

ment to replace the existing With luxurious and ample pas-

peneepent, which thas been S@nger accommodation. All the
an

since the outbreak of efforts of the Merchants and Ship-
war. Both in this, and as an pers’ Standing Committee of the
intermediary between the con- West India Committee to secure
tracting parties, Baron Kronacker, @ change of attitude on the part of
Chairman of the Council, played Her Majesty’s Government have
an energetic part throughout the 80 far proved unavailing. The
year, Meanwhile the interests of Working Committee of the Mer-
the sugar producing colonies chants and Shippers’ Standing
have been in the care of the Committee did, however, perform

duction of a simplified draft of Were before the war, but have bee



United Kingdom Government



' LONDON

_ In a timely article, published
in the latest issue of the Inter-
national Monetary Funds’s “Staff
Papers”, Mr. H. A. Shannon, of
the Fund’s British Commonwealth
Division, explains why very few
colonial territories are in a posi-
tion to take measures by them-
selves to resist the effects of re-
cessions on their economies.

The local Currency Boards, he
points out, are merely automatic
money-changers, They issue colon-
ial currency against deposits in
London and take in colonial cur-
rency when a payment is being
made in London,

“They have no discretion in the
matter’, Mr. Shannon writes,
“Constitutionally, the rate of ex-
change is fixed in London by the
central authorities. The quantity
of money in circulation can be
increased only by depositing an
equivalent increase in sterling in
London; it can be decreased only
by an equivalent redemption in
sterling in London.”

The colonial authorities, there-
fore, can have no independent
monetary policy. Nor can the local
banks have an independent credit
policy, except within the narrow
limits determined by their own
“sound” banking practices,

This is particularly true where
local production is mainly on a
full cash basis, but is more
qualified where the banks have
some, though limited, local invest-

useful services during the year by



Colonial Curreney
And Commodity I

ment opportunities, Mr, Shannon
says, The ehanges of cash and
credit in a colonial territory are
primarily functions of the changes
in its balance of payments—the
preservation of which, he points
out, is not a primary consideration
of their economic policies,

The more favourable its bal-
ance, then the more sterling a
culony can deposit in London and
the greater will be the quantity
of its local cash. The more ad-
verse its balance, the more it
must reduce its quantity of local
cash to obtain the sterling in
London needed to meet the ad-
verse balance,

The position of the banking
system within the currency sys-
tems is fairly simple in principle,
Mr, Shannon explains, but varies
in detail from territory to terri-
tory. As the ultimate, legal
liability of a bank js to @édeem
its deposits on demand in" local
currency, it must keep its ultimate
reserves and general assets in a
place and in a form where they
are easily encashable jnto local
currency, This means London and
ere securities marketable

sere,

A large propotion of colonial
bank deposits are “redeposited” in
London; in short they become
part of colonial sterling balances.
Because of the economic structure
cf many territories, the banks
may, in fact, have little or no
appropriate outlet for their funds
in local investment.

‘Our Readers Say:

books,
vouchers ete., be sent to the Audi-
tor General for audit,

Friendly
To The Editor, The Advocate

Society

accounts, documents and

Now, Mr, Editor, when one care-

SIR,—I read with interest your fully reads the comments made by

Editorial published in your news- the Auditor General,

paper on Friday, 30th May,

the only

in deduction that can be made is

which you make reference to the that the manner in which some of

Auditor General's Report for the
year 1949-50,

In this article you make special
comment on an extract of the A.G,’s
report which refers to the very un-
satisfactory way in which some of
the officers of certain Frienaly
Societies make their returns to the
A.G, for audit and in some instanc-
es completely fail to comply with
section 35 of the Friendly Societies
Act which clearly states that all

the Societies are being conducted
is not in the interest“of the
subscribers, especially when it is
remembered the large sums of
money handled for their accounts.

T trust that the Government will
now take the necessary steps to
see that the administration of
the Friendly Societies is improved,

Yours faithfully,

NEGLIGENCE,

y
Recessions

maintaining contact with the Asso-
ciation of West Indian Trans-
atlantic Steamship lines on, and
by meeting to discuss, matters of
mutual concern,

“It has recently been learned
with regret that the Canadian
Government have decided that the
high’ cost of building passenger
ships forbids the replacement of
the “Lady” boats which have pro-
vided the popular passenger ser-
vices between Canada and the
West Indies as well as inter-
island services for the last twenty-
five years; and, although fast
cargo ships, each carrying twelve
passengers, will continue to oper-
ate, there is. no doubt that this
regrettable decision, justifiable as
‘we must agree that it is, will have
an adverse effect on the hotel and
tourist industries of the West In-
dies, despite the comp?nsating
effect of the air services. Even
more serjous will be the effect on
inter-island freight and passenger
services. It is idle to talk of fed-
eration and to lay elaborate plans
for a customs union if facilities
for the moving of goods between
the component parts of the terri-
lories con are removed. At
the same time your Executive
Committee remain always mind-
ful that trade with Canada is vita]
to the British West Indian colo-
nies, and of the need to maintain
in the minds of all concerned,
official, commercial and otherwise,
a lively: appreciation of this fact.”

Onvrottade representation: “Al-
though) agreement has now been
reached in regard to the setting
up of an official West Indian
Trade Commissioner service cov~-
ering Canada and the United
Kingdom, no new personnel have
yet been appointed, and conse-
quently the service continues to
be provided in Canada by Mr. Rex
ere pas his staff, and in

e ingdom by the West
India. Committee.” 7 : ”

On pioneer industries: “The year
was also notable for the work un-
dertaken by the West India
Coramittee in bringing to the at-
‘tention of the people of the United
Kingdom the een legislation
and measures had been in-
troduced in the various colonies
in order to attract new industries.
The Committee has also played a
prominent part in the attempt to
secure from Her Majesty’s Gov-
ernment an adjustment of the
machinery for relief from double
income tax, whereby at present
tax concessions granted in the
colonies to persons liable to United
Kingdom tax go to benefit, not
the industry which it was the in-
tention to benefit, or indeed the
peoples of the colonial territories,
but only the United Kingdom Ex-
chequer. In this connection the
Committee not only submitted a
memorandum to the Royal Com-
mission on Taxation of Profits
and Income, but also appealed
direct to the Secretary of State for
the Colonies, pointing out that
the position called for relief much
more speedily than was likely
to be provided through the Royal
Commission, It will be recalled
that in 1950 the Committee had
in responsible for bringing to
the notice of the British public the
official brochure of the Govern-
ment of Trinidad, “Opportunity
for Industry”, while in 1951 the
Committee similarly distributed
“Invest in Jamaica.” It will be
realized that-both of these opera-
tions involved a heavy strain on
the Committee's Limited resour-
ces, and members will be glad to
learn that the demand was met
quite adequately,”

' —B.U.P.

ieee

Boards



_Local investment opportuni-
tics vary from territory to terri-
tory according ot the degree of
industrialisation, but, in general
either because of the need of
uecess to legal tender in London
or the absence of. suitable local
outlets and local capital money
markets, the colonial banks hold

a high proportion
eee fon on of their assets

“These arrangements under the
Colonial Sterling Exchange Stan-
dard preclude local ‘currency
management’ or ‘central banking’
as ordinarily understood,’ says Mr.
Shannon:- “There js no local dis-
cretion..for..there are no local
fiduciary issues.”

This explains why very few
colonial territories vine en A
position to use monetary meas-
ures to soften the effects of
recessions — particularly in com-
modity prices-oh eir economies.

Currency Boards aim at holding
assets equal to about ten Tr
cent. in excess of their liabilities.
Usually, they are ‘held in the
am er Scene gilt-edged securi-

é € profits from the C
Boatds assets toh ceasenyt
source of inco;
governments, ne

an important item in colonial
revenues,

“Quite exceptional circumstan-
ces apart,” Mr. Shannon “the
colonial currenciés are a source
of profit to their governments,
and all_are more than fully
covered at their face value.”

Wild Eddoes

To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—I would Jike to direct the
attention of the hasing Pub-
lic to an apparant Food Product
resembling the Eddoe that is be-
ing marketed by loathsome ven-
dors. This item which is similar
to the Tannia or Dashene causes a
dreadful i tin the stomach
when eaten. T wild eddoes,
as they are called, grow along the
water course of Dunscombe and
Blowers, and being well known
by residents of that locality are
despised as Food. It is from this
locality that these vendors
emerge, gather them free of
cost and journey to town and
trade upon the ignorance of the
purchaser, who not knowing its
behaviour, suffer as a result.
OBSERVER




































TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 1952





BIG BILL DUFFY |

From NEWELL ROGERS

NEW YORK.

BLUSTERING “Big Bill” Duffy speakeasy
boss and one-time manager of heavyweight
fighter Primo Carnera, is dead.

And it is almost as if the gin age of Pro-
hibition died with him. New York of 1952
hardly remembers one of Broadway’s most
famous associates of top masters, though he
played a flambuoyant part in its vital, vivid
life.

He died in a house in a quiet fashionable
lane named Blossom Heath in a “good” Long
Island neighbourhood. Blossom Heath is
worlds away in atmosphere, though only a
few miles geographically from Garnet-street, =
in Brooklyn’s tough, dixty, waterfront sec- NEE y Mech
tion of Gowanus. , Lara

There Duffy was born 69 years ago and ALLENS aT Ace
grew up a young waterfront tough.

Before he was out of his ‘teens he was
held up for robbery. A few years later he
was in Sing-Sing for the same crime.

Two men deeply influenced six-foot, red-
faced Bill Duffy’s life. One was saintly
prison administrator Thomas Mott Osborne,
of Sing-Sing. The other was not, exactly
saintly beer baron Ownie Madden, one of
the “beer barons” of Prohibition.

Osborne took an interest in Duffy in pris-
on. When Osborne took charge of the
United States’ naval prison at Portsmouth,
New Hampshire, he took Duffy along with
him. Duffy became prison administrative
assistant. He entered the Navy and rose to
be a chief petty officer.

Out of the Navy, Duffy hit the gin-an-jazz
age on Broadway. He met Madden. Soon
he was proprietor of a Broadway nightclub,
La Vie. :

Dollars rolled in until August, 1922. In
that month Frankie Wallace of the under-
world was shot dead on the ballroom floor.
La mort closed La Vie.

But Duffy was now an experienced opera-
tor of “joints”. With the backing of Mad-
den, “Big Frenchy” de Menge and Marty
Krompier — all big business men of the
underworld — he opened more Prohibition
clubs — the Silver Slipper, the Frivolity,
and Rendezvous.

One of his quainter ventures was Bill
Duffy’s Olde English Tavern on West 44th-
street.

In his clubs, Duffy met fight managers.
He and Madden discovered money in the
“fight racket.” In 1927 Jack Dempsey fought] )
Jack Sharkey. Duffy was Dempsey’s chief
second. Dempsey fouled Sharkey. The
referee could not make up his mind whether
to count Sharkey out or give him the deci-
sion.

Duffy is given credit for screaming “Start
counting!” The referee counted Sharkey
out.

Madden and De Mange imported Primo
Carnera, the “Ambling Alp”. They made
Duffy Carnera’s manager. Again Big Bill
was given credit, rightly or wrongly, for
deals for Carnera’s opponents to “take dives”
in fights the Man Mountain should not have
won.

In 1934 Duffy “took a dive” himself in a
fight with the United States’ Treasury. He
went to jail for failing to file a return on
34,170 dollars in 1930 on earnings on Carnera.

After he got out, Prohibition was gone
from Broadway, and Duffy vanished too. He
opened “joints” in quieter suburban sections
on Long Island. New Yorkers were learning
to motor out into the country to drink, eat
and dance at night.

One of Duffy’s taverns was simply called
“The Place,”

In 1945, police raided Duffy’s tavern at
Oceanside, Long Island. Eighty-seven guests
and operators were arrested for gambling.
Duffy convinced the law he did not operate
the place, but just allowed them to use his
name.

He is survived by his wife, séven children,
and 14 grandchildren.

There was a requiem high mass in St.
Agnes Church, Rockville Centre, Long
Island for the boy for Gowanus.

PHOTOGRAPHS

Copies of Local Photographs
Which have appeared in the

Advocate Newspaper

ADVOCATE STATIONERY
























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into force of the trusteeship agreement
there was a surplus of revenue over ex-
penditure estimated at £204,000. The
export of bananas in 1951 amounted to
5,750,000 tons compared with 4,750,000
tons of the pre¢ious year.

The report states that the development
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to the Cameroons Development Corpora-
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TUESDAY, JUNE 17,

1952



Bus Owners—St. Michael

Vestry

THE BUS OWNERS-ST

Pleas Suit in which the Bus Owners are charging the Vestry
with assessing them for taxes at a figure at which they
ought not to be assessed and with laying illegal, unequal,
oppressive and unjust rates and assessments,
started before the Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore yester-
day and was adjourned Sine Die.

partial,

Suit

. MICHAEL VESTRY Common

Adjourned

House Of Assembly,
Seats Reshuffled

WHEN visitors attend the House
of Assembly this evening, they all
alike, will not be seeing a back

The adjournment was taken when Mr. G. H. Adams view of the Speaker and some
for two of the Bus Companies said that two different °! ye: Sees view of members
auditors the Vestry had retained to examine the Companies’ 3S #S been the case now for years,

books were not
was the mutual feeli

suitable firm to examine the Companies’ books and make
a report as to the correctness or

which had been made.
' The Court proceedings
is made.

The Three Bus Companies of
the suit are the National Motor
Omnibus Co., Ltd. and the Yonk-
ers Motor Omnibus Co., Ltd. on
whose behalf Mr, G. H. Adams,
associated with Mr. J. E. T
Brancker are appearing and the
Progressive Bus Co., + on
whose behalf Mr, E, W. Barrow
is appearing. The Solicitors for
each Company are Messrs, Year-
wood & Boyce.

The Vestry are represented by
Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., associated
with Mr, J, S. B, Dear and Miss
M. A. Reece, instructed by Messrs.
Carrington & Sealy, Solicitors.

The Yonkers Company claim
that when this year’s rates were
made, they were assessed and
rated at $644.03 in respect of a
profit of $5,236 derived from their
trade, .Because of this they have
been aggrieved on the following
grounds:—(a) Because they were
assessed at the sum of $5,236
whereas they ought not to have
been assessed on by that and (b)
Because the rate and assessment
are in other respects illegal, un-
oe” partial, oppressive and un-
ust.

Wrongly Assessed

In the case of the’ National
Company they were assessed and
rated at $757.51 in respect of a
profit of $6,012 and hold that they
should only have been assesserl
at $247,

The Progressive Company were
‘assessed and rated at $599.76 in
respect of a profit of $4,760 and
hold that they ought only to have
been assessed in respecc of $1,095.

The Companies stated that in
accordance with the Vestries Act
1911—5 they gave notice in
writing within the limited period
mentioned 1% the Churchwarden
of their intention to object to the
rates and of the grounds of such
objections.

Quite a large mumber of people
attended the Court to hear this
rates contest.

With the opening of the case,
Mr, Adams gave an outline of the
position. He said that it was in-
evitable that although counsel ap-
peared for one side or another,
he might, or the Court might
have views as to the state of the
law as to whether it should be or
should not be what it was. Any-
how, the Court had to admiriister
the law as it was,

As His Lordship and everybody
in the Court probably knew, a
trader might object to the rate
and the Vestry had a right to send
in an auditor to check the books.

Unfortunately, speaking as a
citizen, the Act said that a trader
might object to every single ac-
countant sent in:to check his book.
From that side of the law, it

might be possible, if a trader was

sufficiently i lical, that he

would never* his books check-
Cc lot Accept

For two erént reasons, his

clients had not found it possible
to accept either of two names
mentioned by the Vestry for in-
spection of books. He would say
na more then, other than that
they were acting in their legal
rights, f

But since speaking to Counsel
for the other side it was felt that
if a firm of accountants agreeable
to both sides could be got—in this
particular case Bovell & Skeete—-





@ From Page 3

words “To Bathsheba”, for
besides catering to the Social
life of the Parish we wish to ex-
tend facilities to the public of
this whole island by way
special charters and rents for or-
ganized entertainments,

On those occasions it will be
clased to the Public and notices
will be posted on a Notice-bcard
which is to be erected at the
Centre, The revenue from such
rents will go towards mainten-
ance and development. The lat-
rines and baths too will be opened
to the public and it is hoped that
the Sanitary Commissioners of
the Parish will contribute to
their maintenance. We hope to
develop the grounds 1s a Park and
Premenade with a bus and car
park at the lower end for which
a small parking fee will be
charged. :







-





Wetae by the Companies, but since, there

off seats and bright-coloured um-

HARRISONS

BROAD STREET

but the Speaker will be facing
everybody This has come about

that Bovell & Skeete would be a with a rearrangement of the
Speaker, Members, Clerks’ and
Visitors’ seats which was made

otherwise of the returns

bi the week adjournment.
- hen an Advocate reporter
are thus stayed until a report visited there late yesterday
evening, carpenters were still at

work finishing the change.

his clients would be agreeable to The old arrangment was this:
meee oe br og sano = bee A circular bannister was walls to
, or eete separate a certain section of
would be an acceptable person. visitors’ seats from the members’
Therefore, he said, at that stage, seats and the members backed
subject to Mr. Reece’s agreement, these visitors with the Speaker
he would suggest the adjournment facing them. Then the Speaker
of the case and meanwhile Mr. gat in the middle of a straight line
Tudor of Bovell & Skeete could joining the two horseshoes and in
go into the books and make a this way his back would be to-
rep@t as to the correctness or wards another section of the
ise of the return his client chamber where other visitors sat.
See 5 fox thas Westry | anid “* Now, however, all visitors’ ges
. Reec are together on both sides of a
that he yas Wee to soceve red passage way as soon as one enters
ion Mr. Adams had made. the chamber. And through this

suggesti:
He thought the firm of Bovell & passage way members have to
walk to reach their seats.

Skeete and particularly Mr. Tudor
Members will be sitting around

of that firm would _be an ad-
mltyble perege to sudtit the books. the same horseshoe table, but now

He added that it would be good backs will be to the visitors and
if the petitioner was summoned they will face the Speaker who
to -produce “all books, papers, will have a view of everybody,
etcetera, pertaining to trade dur- So when members want to get
ing the past year, ;

Mr. Barrow said that in the
matter of the petition of the Pro-
gressive Bus Company, he want-
ed to point out that the question
of appointing or agreeing to the
auditor did not arise because an
auditor. had been agreed upon
mutually between the Vestry and
the petitioner and the books had
RB ry been audited by, he be-
lieved, Mr. Pile, and the report
of the audit, to the best of his
knowledge, had been submitted
to the Vestry. before the rates
were laid. © : '

One Difficulty

There was one difficulty about
the petition, he said, a difficulty
which His Lordship would prob-
ably consider to be relevant to all
the _ petitions. It was their
opinion that interlocutory matters
in the petitions would have clear-
ed up a lot of the difficulties with
which the Court might be con-
fronted.

For they were in a position of
‘not knowing at all what dis-
crepancies, if any, had been dis- other parts of the island who are
closed, and were in dispute be- interested. They are waiting for
tween the Vestry and the Pro- 4g start.
gressive Company, . An association of the kind

Concerning this, His Lordship would have a fine venue for their
said that he was not going into it meetings and functions—the new
then, but would give the other Coleridge and Parry School Hall.
an opportunity and meanwhile Some of the Old Boys are seeing
tthe position could be examined a Coleridge and Parry Old Boys’
and what -mattéfs were in dispute Association in the future,
could be seen,

On the request of Mr. Reece, . THE BRITISH COUNCIL will
the books of the Progressive Com- be giving their usual monthly
pany were handed into Court to film show for _ residents of
be produced as exhibits when and Speightstown and its suburbs on
if evidence comes to be taken. Tuesday night, June 17 at 8 p.m.

Mr. Reece assured Mr, Barrow &t the Assembly Hall. ;
that his side was willing to allow They have promised a longer
the other side to examine any Programme this time as there was
matter connected with the Vestry O° film show given by them at the
and the present issue that they Assembly Hall last month.

Old Boys’

Coleridge and Parry School?
They think it would be a

tion for the two schools now t f
Parry Schools have been amalgamated. The likely n
is the ‘Coleridge and Parry Old Boys’ Association.’

Interviewing some of the Old
Boys of both schools, the Advocate
learnt that the formation of an
Old Boys’ Association of the old
Coleridge School was proposed in
the past, but the idea never mate-
rialised,

In St, Peter, St. Lucy, St. An-
drew and St. James, quite a num-
ber of old boys of the old Coler-
idge and Parry Schools are inter-
ested, And there are more from

might wish. Last month’s film show was put
The suit was then adjourned Off because the Pocket Theatre
sine die. Group. were staging Shakes-

peare’s ‘Twelfth aye 8 the =.
eee lowing night at the Coleridge an
New U.S. Ambassador Parry School Hall.

To Indo-China Nominated He civic CIRCLE of
WASHINGTON, June 16. Speightstown have every hope of
President Truman nominated staging a successful flower garden
Donald R. Heather on Monday for competition in St. Peter in July.
promotion from the rank of Min- About twenty garden owners
ister to full Ambassador to Viet~ have already entered for the com-
nam and Cambodia petition and more are likely to
The nomination was sent to the enter. é
Senate for Heather Those garden owners that have
was appointed Minister to Indo entered are sparing no pains to
China two years ago this month. keep their plots trim for the judg-
U.P. ing in the last week of July.

'



* oe eaters



overnor Opens Social Centre At Bathsheba

I further have visions of ex-
tending a Promenade along the
sea-front following the old rail-
way track from Tent-Bay to
Tenby Bridge. provided with

houses which was made possible
through the instrumentality of
loans from Labour Welfare Funds,
He recalled that he had visited
the St. Andrews Community
Centre on.Thursday, June 12, and
said there that the Centre at
Belleplaine was being used as an
argument against building other
centres in other parishes. How-
ever, he still had a continuous
faith in Community Centres,

He took the opportunity to pay
tribute to the work of the Social
Committee; then said, “T have
great pleasure je ones

heba Socia entre 0) "|
Pete R. A, Lee, Churchwarden |
of St. Joseph, moved a vote of
thanks which ‘was seconded by
Mr. L. E, Smith.

Mr. W. T. Gooding, gave a vote ;
of thanks for the visitors and Mr.!
G. H. Adams replied on behalf a
the parishioners of St. Joseph.

brellas and pavilions—a joy to
the youths of our Island and an
attraction to tourists. Such a
proposition, fantastic as it may
feem, has not been put forward
yet; I only venture to suggest it
now with the hope that it will
take root and grow. Sir, I take
great pleasure in asking you to
declare this Bathsheba Social





His Excellency in declaring the
Centre open said that it was only
two and a half years ago that
£20,000 had been voted for Wel-
fare Funds, and much good had
already been done. He had
noticed the improvement of



Plain and Brocaded Satin @ $2.91 yd. |
Allover Lace @ $3.44 and $4.13 yd.
Embroidered Organdie from $3.42 to
$4.52 yd.
Plain and Watered Taffeta from
$1.15 to $2.00 yd.
Bridal Veils from $8.50 to $12.75
Bridal Headdresses from $2.38 to $4.05











SPEIGHTSTOWN ROUND-UP

For Coleridge—Parry
WHAT ABOUT an Old Boys’ Association of the

number of the old boys of the two old schools are asking.

ereated
flower gardening among residents
of St. Peter.
brighter.

ting freshening showers of r
during the past two weeks.
tered 69 parts of rain last week.

9 parts fell on Tuesday,

District ‘E’ Courts,’ a policeman

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



STOWAWAY.

REMANDED

MARIO P. BRAZAO, an 18-
year-old car washer of Ma-
deira, was yesterday remand-
= a te, Prison until

e instant ,
triation to his hoon c.

Brazao arrived here over
the week end as a stowaway
on board the 8.8. “Nestor”,
and appeared before City
Police Magistrate Mr. H. A.’



Talma.

: ae were discussing a

etter from the Colonial Secretary

Week-end Thefts in which it was stated that the
Suggestion had been made and

A bicycle and a ram were Goyernment would be glad to get
among the haul taken by thieves their views on the matter.

during the week-end, according The letter from the Colonial

to Police Reports. Alfred Reid Secretary read: “The Shop Order,

reported that his bicycle valued 1946, made under the Shops Act,
$76.00 was stolen from outside the 1945, prohibits dry goods shops

Chiming Bells Club, Marchfield, from opening for business later

fast Saturday night. , than 5 p.m., on an ordinary closing

Louis, Licorish of Clevedale day and later than | p.m., on an

Black Rock, also reported to the early closing day, It has been sug-

Police that q ram valued $11.00 gested that a change should be

was taken from a pen sometime effected in the law so. that a shift

between 8.30 a.m. and 10.p.m. system could be introduced to
on the 14th instant. enable any shap to remain open
Other larceny reports tncluded up to 9 pan., with no increase in

a watch belonging to Mics Viola the working hours of a particular

Yearwood of Church Village assistant.

Girls’ School. Miss Yearwood “I shall be grateful if your

said the watch was taken from Union would submit views on this

her desk earlier during the month. matter for the consideration of the

She reported the matter on Sup. Government.” ae

day. ; Strong Opinions

albcheiplesspliaiiasiaga abo ae During ee qirons onions siv-

; : Sr. , g agains e@ suggestion, the

a side view of the visitors while minimum overtime figure of 27

speaking, they will have to twist cents an hour was quoted and

their normal positions slightly. mention was made of unbearable
One interesting feature is that dreary night hours.

with this change, the Speaker faces | Aagter: various members had

the Legislative Council, a form like strongly: expressed their views

that in England where the Speaker against the lengthening of the
of the House of Commons faces shop ‘closing time, Mr. Charlie
the House of Lords, Thomas, President of the Union,
eer expressed his own, as he said he
did not wish to influence the

e e general views in any way,

A ssociation He first said that the advantage
was posed by those who sought
the lengthening of opening time

were increased empl ent,

? He said that if he thought it

@ was a genuine idea for employing

more people, he would be the last

to show resistance, but he did not



This is the question quite a cincere,

It was the cheap fellow in the
od idea to have one assory back wees oe not wnmrey
i a e many that wan to get suc
hat the Coleridge ye introduced as legislation, That
type of employer was hoping that
when the front stores had closed
Residents of the parish have until gt 4.30, he would be able to get
eed end of June to enter the com- extra gales,
tition. rop-
Pe rhe idea of the competition has Ros R inices of ante yet t
keener interest oin P!n8, Jt was even Known tha
S instead of employing more—as it
was suggested, some places might
decrease their number of assistants
dry He argued, too, that when a man
get- wanted to buy a shirt and he had
ain 12 hours within which to buy it,
he would not buy more shirts than
if he had only two hours,

Overtime
So the present workers would
stand a greater chance of being
worked overtime for the poor in-
ducement of 27 cents an hour or
being exploited into working —,
hy

go

Gardens are looking

AFTER A LONG SPELL of
weather, St. Peter has beén

District ‘E’ Police Station regis-
On Monday, 60 parts of rain fell.

ALTHOUGH quite a few court
cases were called at District ‘E’
Police Courts last week, no fines
were imposed by Police Magis-
trate S. H. Nurse. LOUIE'S,

Most of the cases weré adjoukn- ~ Mr, Thomas then mentioned a
ed while one or two offenders fot pi pore e the inconveniences

: t week for which result,

Ca ae taal oF The Union also decided to
present Government a suggested
amendment to the Shop Closing
Act, It is felt that at present certain
stores include a variety of goods
in their stock and under the act
° they claim that they could open
Wants Reunion for long hours. For instance a
normal cloth store may include

LOWELL, Indiana, June 16, rum among its stock and then

Mrs. Barbara “Bobo” Rocke- claim the right to open as long as
feller said on Monday that she a rum shop; meanwhile he might
disliked the “emphasis on money” sell cloth.
which has been raised by the The Union wants the Act
creation of a $1,000,000 trust fund changed so that any such merchant
for her son Winthrop, Jr, will either have to set up separate

The child (3) is the son of concerns for such distinct variety
“Bobo” and Winthrop Rockefeller, of stock, or close his shop in
son of John D, Rockefeller Jr. The accordance with the earliest clos-
child’s father established the trust ing hour.
fund, The Union decided that members

She said her “chief. interest’»ig to the Wages Board should be
in reconcilation with her estr cHosen from the following: —
husband and in the welfare of the Messrs. G. L. Barrow, C. A.
child. She issued a statement: Smith, C. Thomas, Robert Kinch,
“make my position clear” she said E. C, Hewitt and Miss C, Rooney.

“I object to implications that my MOUNTED DISPLAY

son is now a millionaire. Actually
he will never see that million
dollars and under the terms of The Mounted Display at the
the trust certain maximum month~ Riding School of District “A
ly payments are set up which may today will include a new musical
or may not be adequate to his ride, jumping in pairs and musical
needs.” chairs in which the horses will get
She said the trust provides for 0” their mg — = the boxes
a maximum payment of $750 na Soe Enns be Pp tf «ae
monthly until the boy is 18 but hein vents "The Police
nothing is specified for minimum ae will also do some jumping



remarked.

.

Mrs. Rockefeller





|
|













payment. —U.P. and obedience tests,
— = tenets: spoaae
Shee eesawwwn Je nae SPeUKS ul viself s20hescne
Liquid or
Tablets

GlaPOâ„¢ piped Mote

Hetps to cleanse the system
from blood impurities

Impurities in the blood maycause rheumatic
aches and pains, stiff and painful joints,
boils, pimples and common skin disorders,
Clarke’s Blood Mixture helps to purify
the blood, cleanses the system and assists
in restoring good health.
a

SPECIAL LINES

Elite Striped Collar attached Size
Shirts, coat style, Sizes 1442 pair.
to 16 ins. @ $4.01. Gents

B.V.D. Union Suits no sleeves, Size:
Sizes 36 to 46 ins. — $4.50 pair.

per Suit.
Gents Khaki and White %4
length turn over top Hose,

CAVE SHEPHERD
& (0. LTD.

10—13 Broad Street



popu





Coroner will be






















if





FOR MEN



Clerks’ Union Not In |
Favour of Late Openings

THE CLERKS’ UNION yesterday unanimously decided |
that they are not in favour of the suggestion that dry goods |
shops should be permitted to be opened until 9 p.m. instead |
of the present 5 p.m, The unanimous vote came after many |
members had strongly opposed the suggestion for the in- |
creasing of the opening hours and decried the idea as an |
attempt to throw them back in the bad old days.

Baiwana Vendor,

Purchaser Fined |

Despite efforts by the Price Con- |
Law |
enforcement officers to stamp ou. }
profiteering on fruit and vegeta-|

trol Officers and other

bles, vendors and purchasers
alike continue to disregard the |
prices fixed by schedule, and |

sell and ‘buy at exorbitant prices
A vendor,

purchaser, Stella Miller, were |
yesterd:y brought before City |
Police Magisirate Mr. C. L. Wal-
wyn, on a “black market” charge

and each fined. Coward was fined |

£3 in 21 days with the alterna-
tive of one month's

ment for selling Miller bans nas



E la Coward, and a/|

imprison -

above the scheduled price. Miller

was ordered to pay 30/- within |
14

21 days or in default serve
days imprisenment.

Motorist Dies
After Accident

Goulbourne
man's St. George, died in the
casualty of the General Hospital
yesterday morning after he was
taken there from Hansen Hill
Road, St. George where he was
involved in ‘an accident while
driving his motor car M—1185
about 5.30 a.m, the same day,

His body was removed to the
Mortuary where a post mortem
examination was performed by
Dr, A. S. Cato, An inquest has
been fixed for June 19 when the
Mr. C. L. Wal-
wyn, Acting Police Magistrate of

believe such a representation was District “A”,

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" Icing Sugar
Bots. Lemon Essences

” Vanita Essences
Jars Mayonnaise
Prepared Mustard
» Currie
Tina Fruit Salad
OATS
Peaches
Apricots
Hams per Ib
Cheese per Ib

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(1938) LTD.

Headquarters tor Best Rum,
PAPEL tote ott otet,




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at

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—_ —

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Soltan Cream

Corn Solvent

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Back & Kidney Pills

Halibut Oil Caps.
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Callard & Bowsers Butter
Scotch

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SELLING AGENTS FOR
BOOTS’ PURE DRUG CO.





10 to 11% ins, @ $1.57

Protex Suspenders,
S., M, Large—$1.80 per

Gents Towelling Sports Shirts
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Pure Irish Linen Hemstitched,
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j NEW ZEALAND CHEESE ..... . per 1 87

DANISH CAMEMBERT CHEESE.. per tin 1.32



DANISH BLUE CHEESE Sacdtbitesi eect per Ib 4.18
DANISH PORT SALUT bins iessvaantescaapcbeeiieade per Ib 1,16
CANADIAN LUSHUS JELLIES—5 Flavours........per pkt.-_ 1!
CANADIAN KING'S BEER comune per bottle .26
CANADIAN KING’S BEER ............ per 12 bottle Carton 2.88
CADBURY’S CUP CHOCOLATE. per tim .72
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“a

PAGE SIX









: BARBADOS
CLASSIFIED ADS. |Pomt_Netices| Pomusc satzs |
TELEPHONE 2508 i ee “a ate


























































































































































































TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 1952



ADVOCATE ,
|

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend- |



















SHIPPING NOTICES



























Applications for one (1) Vestry Exhi-| j;ARCLIFF’ in St. Lawrence Gap ; ; ; : : ; MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, New
BIRTH ! FOR SALE bition tenable ai the Lodge Schoo! will ene Eh Fion Bh. ‘ncn Gap. | ment) Order, 1952, No. 21 which will be published in the Official ZEALAND LINE LIMITED. The MV. “CACIQUE DEL
——naleinerenteerealicti seaman a ie be reeetved by the undersigned up tof2 Roods 37 Perches of ee iné ©" | Gazette of Monday, 16th June, 1952 (M.A.N Z CARIBE” will accept Cargo
WICKHAM. On June 10th, 1952, to] ——— 15 pm. On Tuesday, 17th June, 1952. im house to Dae 6 wien eed. to nt} te ri ; ; i 8.8. “GLO " ie scheduled to Passengers for St. Lucia, 5t.
~~ Wickham, wife of John Wickham, AUTOMOTIVE ae must pol sons of Parish-| present divided into two flats Each flat 2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and_-retail prices saii —_ Port Pirie "<4 ag yg pa 8
at Port of Spain, Trinidad—a_ daughigr _ ioners straitened cireumstances, and i } “ watt ; , - June “ elbourne June 1 a ay .
17.6. 52— Tn CAR-—-One (1) Studebaker (Champion) os not > less a 8% years nor Terms erendiates tae ane i rT on oe i oe — ee eden doe it a woes Ly A c aa eae ‘sa
in perfect running order. P. C. 9 than 14 years of age on the 2ist ; eae aiken a er escheat ranean tr Barbados ‘about Cargo
DIED APE E Go Lia Phone ann, °° (Buna, im io Be rove by ¢ Santional|hiencer. at mee ane) WHOLESALE | RETAIL PRICE |" cesor wo eeneen cmos we own |S fc," Mene AMR: Maa
co 15.6,52—t.t.n. | erinene which must accompany the servants sveevirs and garege, tn pera. PRICE a ample space for chilled and hard Srila Priaey 20 tt. s
« iG—On the! 16th June, 1952.) ~can—one v1) Fad Delve Dodac Car| Forms of applicatio mapection by appointment, ’ ‘ozen cargo. “MONEKA"
an See “S pitons sons ome) ears tienes at the Parochial easter cae ae tae ck . FOV ill. e funeral ca = . 2p. 7 means aac ——_—_— - ading for tran’ Trinidad
Road, Govt. Hill. | The funeral! Magazine Lane. Phone 3915. ome: SS. y CARRINGTON & SEALY, Butter--Table: In Prints | $136.20 per case of 100 | Leaiee fine Leeward and Winawere | @ Sos an eek
Hinds & Co., Tweedside Road, at 15.6.53-—-3n i we Very, Lucas Street, (Citedian Maple Leaf lbs in 1 Ib t $1.44 Islands. {
4:90 o'clock this evening for the! “CAR One 1996 Standard Car 10 h iehinediiaeserudianns Solicitors. + cranes — at) ! “= - prints .. «pet For further particulars apply—
Westbury Cemetery. Friegds are] in good working order with 5 yong | PHE SUGAR INDUSTRY AGRICUL- oa el oe i print.
ikon ot d-Daugh-| ties. Apply _to V. Gibson, Overseer. TURAL BANK ACT, 1943 “FHOP—At bora ¢ City Limits.) ——— ae a -* | FURNESS WITHY @ ©O., LTD.,
grim (Grand-Daugh-1 prior Park Plantati Dial To the ereditors r re orenic ” shed. | 16 :
ter) lon 3030. Hens against Gregg Belding spectelty | iorge shop with residence attached. | ith June, 1952. 17.6.52—1n | ont
17.6.52—1n 14.6.62—2n. | sy Andrew. Well rere = er place et) : sa ; DA COSTA & CO., LTD.,
—— eee als TAKE NOTICE that we the Trust eble for all kinds © ness. Good j
INNIna On the 16th day of JuneQ}] CAR — Vauxhall Velox, little used.) oy the abd » Trustees! | portunity for any ambitious person.
1ee2, Carlotta Wilhelmina (Mothen| OW>@!driven, good as new. Bial S078, Obtaite a tone ct eaiton are about 10) Residence contains large gallery, drawing i DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
of Mr. Kyle Inniss, Head-Teacher » ma *)| visions of the above Act against pie-| and dining rooms, kitchen, toilet and | i ;
of St. Reiners Buys pote | The! “GAR—podge Super-Delaxe, First-class said Plantation, in respect of the Agri- aay eee et “competition. at | |
funeral leaves her late residence,| . cultural year 1952 to 1 vate sale or ry a
Hindsbury Road, Saint Michael a Fag and owner-driven. "ie No mens has bash iiss aia short notice, For further details ring | BARBADOS EVENING INSTITUTE
4.15 o’cock this evening for Si 2 “|the Agricultural Aids Act, 1908, or the} 2°49: 15.6 .52—3n. j Commerci
Riichacl'’s Cathedral and thente pro-| “Cans—womie Oxford Saloon, Morris | ®Pove Act (as the case may be) in res- - — =o | cial Classes.
ceeds to the ‘Weetaity. Cunpotess Minor 4-Door Saloon, Wolseley 14 Saloon re ee such a: ene ve Pave fee pert P-0 . A |
Kyle, Alban, Carleton, eith . ’ . : - ited t th , ! w 5. e fe ee . 3
Claude, (Sons! Jasmine, Et ua aoe Beane, eer ee ee Loe. M ‘ARCHER ‘ant at Dayrell's Road, Christ Church. The | ADVANCED SHORTHAND TYPIST COURSE } NEW YORK SERVICE.
(daughiers), Paton (Grand-son).] |S Oey ee rt Royal Garage Ltd Trustee, dwelling house contains living room, | Applications are invited for entry to an Advanced Commercial |
17.6521" | Telephone 4504 “ 43.6.52—2n fe 8.8. vO two bedrooms, Kitchenctte, usual con- | Class, to be composed of twenty (20) students, and to be held at| 4 STEAMER sails May 9th-—arrives Barbados May 2ist.
_ srpeiceiniipnaagneeneas y "a ‘ : STEAMER sails May 28th—arrives
PEERY--On Monday, June 16, 1952 | “\OTORCYCLE—Norton 5 H.P. motor- 14.6.52,—8n, Berea peineisie, “dae tonkbe seapesties Combermere School, commencing in September, 1952, The Course! “ sue Th
Beats Perry Her funeral wi! Pony Vf " “ e 3 i |
peer eke femaense Church Wut ee, Cremend wale. Condition | very between the hours of 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. | of two years is designed to lead to the examination for the Junior | NEW ORLEANS SERVICE.
ates St ox mains ete Guar james & Roebuck Streets. Dial 4353 NOTICE The auie Witinie hwme will! be eat Shorthand-Typist Certificate of the Royal Society of Arts, (A copy, ne « A PIONEER” sails
Stine are adand’to xttehs Leg de wil Rx® Biscrion up for gate by. poblie competition at, our | of the syllabus may be seen on request at the Department.) Ls oa sails May 24th—arrives Barbados June 7th.
Bs. Arnelle eS Bt Albe: | New Morris Model J Cab over Engine pauaa Ge GAMES aeRO AES. Pen Two lectures a week will be given in each of the 3 subjects—
a , = \0-ewt. Vans $2400.00 N Morris Caw- Ni I , iti
Sealy, (Grandson). oo Nbccwt vane $0800.00, All excel: | the holding by me of the election of s YEARWOOD & BOYCE. |Shorthand, Typewriting and English—on Mondays to Thursdays in- CANADIAN SERVICE
‘Trinidad Papers Please ws a a1 at fot fast light delivery. Fort Royal | member to serve in the Vestry of the 13.6,52~9n. | Clusive, Students must take all three subjects. | .
es Garage Ltd., Telephone * parish of Saint Michael on the 16th day) — ———————OO OO : \UTHBOUND
THANKS 13.6.52—2n.| cf June, 1982, at the Patochial Build-} The undersigned will set up for sale | Applicants must have attained a minimum speed of 70 w.p.m. in 80
ws ais Pickup. | Cumberland Street, the following by yeilic od ition” at. their office Sh nd and 30 w.p.m. in Typewriting. They should also be pre- ‘ : ane ee Arrives Barbados
—_——- - Se , . is the result:— o. 1 - r oi my ° oe. =. May une
EOKSTEIN—We beg to thank all those Dial 4616, Courtesy Garage. ; vetoes |tgven on PHayaene sok a ous | pared to undergo a Qualifying Test for admission in each subject. BiG. TIBPA" es ge ewe May s0th June ith
who gent wreaths, cards, letters or i 14,6.52-—3n Mr, JOSEPH ONESIMUS TUDOR 334{ 1952 ‘at 2 p.m. the foliowing:— Applicants must be 18 years of age or over on Ist September, 1952. |.5.8. “ALCOA POINTER" | vo Tike June 13th 28th
any way expressed their sympathy in| -——--~— — syeeinteiet who was duly declared elected 250 shares in West India Biscuit Co B. BOOK-KEEPING * “A STEAMER” .. ° - June 27th July 12th
our recent sad bereavement TRUCK--One 5 ton Austin truck six} Mr. DANIEL PRANCIS Limited 111 shares in West India Rum ‘ | “A STEAMER" ty July 11th July 26th
Bana Eckstein, Dorothy Dé Silva, tires virtually mew, engine in perfect BLACKETT 249| Refinery Co. Limited | * }Applications will also be considered for entry to a beginners’
Raymond De Silva 11.6 §2—In. | condition. for appointment to jinspect | Dated this 1th day of June, 1952 | R, S.NICHOLLS & CO. | Book: keeping Course t be held at Combermere School on M ae
aa please itis hone 95 6.52—2n, F. J. COLE, Solicitors. - ‘se to at Com ere ool on Mondays,
MEMORIAM Sheriff & Returning ‘Officer — commencing in September, 1952. | a
ELECTRICAL. a soar cbe There is a limited number of vacancies for the Senior Book- |
fowbcin loving memorr of my dear! ———-_______-__——__. |F IQUOR LICENSE NOTICE AUCTION ~~~ 1 ie | ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
husband William Adolphus Low: } FRIGIDAIRE — General Electric Frig- "keeping Course. Applicants should possess an Elementary L.C.C. Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE
salled to rest June 16, 1943 ever to be | idaire, S-cubic ft. in excellent working 7 -_— ee .
cal ; i (TRAN! AND REMOVAL) 7 ———t--———-_: Certificate or its equivalent ‘
remembered by his loving wife Susan | order $175.00. Dial 4736, 14.6.52—3n. ‘THe applic: of Marrle Forde of UNDER THE SILVER = ”
Agusta Lowe and family. 1 Sabian | parce nearer asters ecamre Chiigeh Village, St. Philip, the purchaser Academic Classes. |
likrenwnese Aclooatie Ghenmersiak BC. | caien ik: aaeee abuae 864 - Of 1952, HAMMER C. GENERAL CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION—UNIVERSITY |
iD e : granted to Louise Holder in respect of
. S. MAFFEI & CO. LTD., Radio Emporium foo On Wednesday 16th by order of Mrs. | OF LONDON :
ground vy of on wall building at Cox
1 524.4 : W. A. Ross, we will seil ber furniture
SO ED: | HIM, Bt. Philip, to remove said Licerwe) 5‘ Rosemary", Sth ‘Ave. Belleville, Applications are invited for entry to the Junior Academic classes
o | PYB BATTERY SETS—Just a few left. a8 ky ro and ee Om seevaae which includes Morris Suite, Settee, 2 Rae ‘4
HUUSES | MAFFELS RADIO EMPORIUM. to residence at Chure lage, St.| arin Chairs, Rockers, Ormament commencing in September, 1952 and preparing for examination at
——- To.so—tin, |Eniip, and te use Ht at sueh Jar\\'Plant-stools, Waggon, Upright ; | Ordinary level in June, 1954
LEETON-ON-SEA, Maxwell Const | a | oe an eee nee Uphols. Dra Suite : : ¥ :
Fully furnished. ‘Telephone, Refrigera | “REFRIGERATOR on eee) Taae ie a oe Upright Arm ie ne Subjects offered are English, Mathematics, Latin, Spanish, History | CANADIAN SERVICE
tor, etc. Available for September, © | Refrigerator, Kerosene oil burner in . for Applicant pieces) Liquor all | op Geography. se
ber, November and December. Phor:| Good condition. Phone 2791. L. & H./7o:A. W. HARPER Esq in Mi + Oak and Rush chairs and | pe 2 From Montreal and Halifax
3450 or 3926. 14.6.52—S» | Willer, Electrical Engineers, Ree St. Police Magistrate, Dist. “Cc.” paar Bh at Din- There ate also a limited mumber of vacancies in ced f z
NAVY GARDENS — Fully furnishe. | tiie alin oo See nee eh eae ae i oe eee Chairs; Pictures, Congoleum, Glass ana | (a) Senior classes preparing for examination at Ordinary i ee Seililis Bapected Aretval
mosis nana e Seprenicones, 20 MECHANICAL Sn Monday, 30th day of June, 1952 at cha ~ Ea a i Iron i level in June, 1953; P Bridgetown, Barbados
position, st coe dae, en | o'clock a.m. at Police Courts, Dist,| Bedstesds Springs, Mattresses; sSaneg. | ' (b) Advanced classes preparing for examination at Advanced 0 set Se oe * or
.8.52—an : Your child’s dream comes a Presses and Dressing Tab’ ; mv. a imaged
ae true. Broadwood upright, tropical ve ay, ARPER:, | Machine, Latders, ‘Kitchen “Tables and SOOGETA. TPES SHS TOGA. ‘ re ON VESSEL” is jus at July “oth August
RIPLEY-ON-SEA — Maxwell Coart eee. Seperste, bridge on éach string Police Magistrate, Dis gther items. is ‘ | pective applicants may obtain further information and advice : . y
fully f£ ished, f, \ wal con ion. urry. on} See ee 1. * . i } je a
Clectrie, latte we, bedrooms, modes) 1a¥ing colony. Write P. O. Box 1380: |LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE Be En TROTMAN & Oo., | Tomveither: —
y e 0) . o.
conventences, From July on, Dial gaso | Phone b.82-Tn. |" “the application of Fitz Savoury, shop- Auctioneers j, . ARREPndinm. Depatiness of BAucation, yeeterey Se UNITED KINGDOM SERVICE
* i FURNITURE keener of Bootes eo pleat of scant 15.6,62+-2n. tween 10.00 a.m. and 12.30 p.m. on Saturday mornings.
a is se oO ‘ -
A lS NUL ctiacte. | SEMERY Soninleter In aamsedt oF BORER (Telephone 2589) ; From South Wales, Liverpool and Glasgow
WANTED 5 a One mM large sehouany desk and spinels shop etiached to residence | or (b) R. T. A. Johnson, Esq., B.A., L.C.P., Assistant Principal, ice > SEA
§ . by . containing five drawers | at axwe) ill, Ch, Ch., with Dist, EST | 7 i xpeeted Arrival
Bhi pete ee and one filing Grawer, all of cedar.|“A” for permission to use a Liquor ADVERTISING PAYS B | 49 Blue Waters, Christ Church. (Telephone 8587) ; Wales Liverpoel Glasgow a Bridgetown,
Complete with solid mahogany swivel | License a board and shingle | * (ec) H. R. Daniel, Esq B.A., L.C.P., Dean of Academic
HELP chatr, Suitable for office executive. | shop at d, St, Michael re On ree oa ea Sis. “EGGEN” 1. 9June 15 June 24 June 10 5
hen Price $160-00 Phone 3406. 7.6.52—4n Dated this of June, 1952 | Studies, Bush Hall, St. Michael. (Telephone 3487). Le; Sei te ‘130 June 5 July 14 July 1 Sein
Steer eas oniss, bane te wean ohice. Maghtiat F { application to be submitted to the Department of Edu-) °° | wy
typist for our office. Reply in writin Police Magistrate, Dist. “A” ‘orms of app , LARRINAGA” . Ena July Early August Mid August
e x, 7 “Hunte & Co.” LAd., Lower!) MISCELLANEOUS FITZ SAVOURY. cation by Saturday 26th July, 1952 and addressed as follows:— a .
roa treet Qualifications of appii-! Tat 7 pplicant ic
canta ‘must he “Attathed to application ty a Bk atk ene oe ee on in N.B—This application | will be. con: | ee a = Sage eee ae Studies.
14.6, oi : “ _ | sidered at a icensing Cour’ IS i asses——-The an ademic Studies.
eon) Via pee ee. ee ‘at Police Court, District “AY on Frida; / —_ } Academic cle eu ee + at eed ete UNITED KINGDOM AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE
MISCELLANEOUS Parma uncle ae tidied gic ci 3k OM Be nh a aad aeaa heuer anit KIDNEY PILLS Hy | =A fee of $5.00 per term payable during the first wee - From Antwerp, Rotterdam and London
on ae oor cna | covers all the subjects, 80% of the fees paid will be refunded at the
oe Emel E. A. McLEOD, i . :
CARIB BOTTLES—Return Carib Bottles “ORIAC” Synthetic Chamots Leathers ‘ “A , 34 - Arrival
A e & Sons, (B'dos) Ltd |are here again’ They are always soft Police Magistrpte, Dist, | 35 } end of a session to all students who have, in the opinion of the Prin: Antwerp pottergam Londen ——
6 ado

, at 1% cents each

Victoria





No@ appetite? No pep? The
rich, blood-building proper-
ties of YEAST-PHOS will
“restore lost energy and wil)
,. keep you fit!

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

| i 9 NEW

Bovks:—
HE HORSEMAN’S YEAR BOOK
195%

2
THER STRUGGLE FOR BUROPE
(The most remarkable War
History ever printed)
FROM HERE TO ETERNITY
A wonderiul assortment of Books
have Just arrived to
JOUNSON'S STATIONERY



15.6.52—4n

CSO

PLLA LL









and pliable and will give you all the
service and satisfaction of an expen-
sive Chamois Skin. Size 22 x 18
inthes only 4 cents each, Obtainabic
at HAR N'S HARDWARE STORE.
Tel. 2064 14.6.52—3n .

znsland's leading Dally. Newepeper now

vrriving in Barbados by Air only a few
days after publication in London. Con
tact: lan Gale, c/o Advocate Co,, Ltd
Local Representative, Tel. 3118.

17 4 63—t.f.n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTIC
(TRANSFER AND REMOVAL)

The application of Beryl Holder of
Sweet Bottom, St. George, purchaser of
liquor license No. 1052 of 1952 granted
to Clifford Holder in respect of ground
floor of a two storey woll and wooden

ding at Sweet Bottom, St. George
for permission to use the said Meense
ot a board and shingled shop attached

residence at Sweet Bottom, St
George and to use the sald license at
weh last described premises
Dated this 12th day of June, 1952
To:—C, W. RUDDER, Esq

Poice Magistrate, Dist, “B"

BERYL HOLDER,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at the Licensing Court to be
held on Friday 27th day of June 1952

11 o'clock a.m at Police Courts

“BR

W. RUDDER,
Dist. “B”
17,6,.52—1n,.











FOR SALE
Black ook “maguire M. sraren

Grace Hill School Gap. Spooner
Hill. 14.6,52—3n

pe BOS OSGGOVSGOOS SSO OS ¢
| ner a

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

GOVERNMENT EXHIBITIONS FOR BOYS AND GIRLS

Notice is herepy given that applications for Senior and Junior
First Grade, Primary to First Grade, Second Grade ang Renewal
of Second Grade Exhibitions tenable at Government-aided Second-
ary Schools will be received at the Department of Education,
Garrison, St. Michael, up to Monday, 30th June, 1952.
senior First Grade Exhibitions.

Candidates must be under 16 years
£&xhibitions of not more than five years’ duration may be awarded
annually to two boys and one girl.

Junior First Grade Exhibitions:

Candidates must be under 13 years
Seven Exhibitions of not more than five
awarded annually to five boys and two girl>
Primary to First Grade Exhibitions:


















































Dist






c
Police Magistrate,

teens |

The!

of age on June 30th. Three |

of age on June 30th.) ‘(jy)
vaenit duration may be! oF

| cipal, Dean and Lecturers, worked satisfactorily and attended regu-
| larly and punctually.

Students will be required to supply their own stationery
ybooks as required by the Lecturers.

and text
\
\4th Sune, 1952.

|

15.6.52—2n.

a

CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL AND HIGHER SCHOOL CERTIFICATE
EXAMINATIONS, 1952.

Forms of entry for the above Examination can be obtained from
‘the Department of Education, Garrison,
| Entries in respect of the Schoo] Certificate Examination, 1952,
— only be accepted from candidates falling within one or more
of the following categories:—
(i) Candidates who already hold a School Certificate or an
Oversea Junior School Cer ;
(ii) Unsuccessful entrants for the 1950 Schoo) Certificate Exami-
nation who have not re-entered in 1951, but who obtain an
authorization from the Syndicate to re-enter in 1952.
| (iii) Candidates who passed the Qualifying Test held in January
1951, but @id not take the School Certificate Examination
in December, 1951,
Candidates who failed the School Certificate Examination
in 1951 will be allowed to re-take the Examination in 1952
unless they have been notified that their performance in

|

}
|
|

>

Those smail but extra strong Candidates must be under 13 years of age on June 30th. in the 1951 Examination does not qualify them to re-enter

BEASS LOCKS you have been % Two Exhibitions of not more ot & born ee re “n arene . in 1952. :

rene: esate ¢ a annually to one boy and one girl. Candidates must be pupils of Ele-| :

JOUNSON'’S HARDWARE } FOR SALE mentary Schools. () os ‘a have guaend the Qualifying Test held in
bso ety se OOO OAS ictal cue Second Grade Exhibitions: uary, f



'





FURNITURE
AUCTION

al
VALLEY HILL, CHRIST CHURDK

(Between Carrington and
Yorkshire Estates),
WEDNESDAY 18th JUNE, 1952,
at 11,30 a.m

»~We are instructed to dispose of
the Furniture and Effects of th
ast Mr. ¢€ P. R, Greenidge
Viewing morning of sale.
Dining Table to seat 10, Serving
Te et of We aa ee
Upright Chairs, Pr. Tub Chairs,
Armchair, Occ. Cha rs, Sid boards;
Single Ended Settee, Liquor Case
end Stand, Pr. Kieney Tables.
lant Stands. Pr. Berbice Chairs
Wali Stand. Wali Brack-ts. Mirror
end Stand, Military Chest, Trays,












Cake Stand (ALA, IN MAHUG-
ANY). Marble Téyped Tate, Can-
Vas Chairs, Oct. ‘Tables, Corden
Serving Table, Several Kitchen
Tables, (hil sixex!, Cedar Book
Stained & Painted Book
ses, Ptd. & Plain Chairs, Ptd
Ware Cabinet. Chest of Drawers.
Tid, Press, Cedar
Chairs, Gallery Fur-
al Dining Table
Bonche Jingle iron Red and
Hair Mattress, Commode, Wash-
stand, Portable Gramophone,
Record Stand & Records, Fold-
jing. Card Table, 2 Valor Stoves
& Stands, ngle Burner Stove
Thermos F $, Silver, Glass
ware, China, Dinner Sets, Pyrex
Ware, Brassware ed Tra
Rugs, Suits, Shirts, Jerclothes
Shoes; Large Coll. Kitchen Uten-
fils, Crocker, Ovens, Books, Ot)
Lamps, Buckets, Pictures, An-
@hurium Lillies, Ferns, Plants. anc
Yarae Coll. of Oddments,

e
AUCTIONEERS
Joan ed. Biadon
& ce.

Phone 4640
Plantations Building.

neem ements









12 years of age on June 30th.

Candidates for Renewal of Second Grade Exhibitions must have
been holders of Second Grade Exhibitions which have expired.

Twenty Second Grade Exhibitions of not more than three years
duration including not less than ten first awards, may be awarded
annually.

_ Forms of application forthe above Exhibitions may be obtained
from the Department of Education where any Turther information
will be given.

Application forms accompanied by baptismal Certificates, must
be returned to the Department of Education, not later than Monday,
30th June, 1952,
28rd May, 1952.

be boys under

At HIGHCLERE FARM

St. Thomas




To reduce herd of well kept
dairy cattle, 12 Grade Guernsey
Cows, ail producing Milk. Call
early and make your selection.
Anv of these will make admirable

family cows. 14,6. 52—4n



ORIENTAL
PALACE

HEADQUARTERS FOR



Applications are invited fromm teachers and other suitably quali-
fied persons (men and women) for the two vacancies at: —
Christ Church Boys’ School.
2. The minimum qualification for entry to the teaching service

J SOUVENIKS is a School Certificate.
\) FROM “aa A 8. Applications must be submitted on the appropriate forms

THANIS

Pr. Wm. Hy. 5)

(E, 85 (b) for men and E, 35 (c) for women) which may be obtained
from the Department of Education, but candidates who have already
submitted one of these forms in respect of previous vacancies (now
filled) may apply by letter accompanied by a recent testimonial.

4. Any teacher who applies for a vacancy on the staff of another
school must inform his or her present Chairman of Managers and the
Head Teacher of any application for such a transfer.

5. All applications must be enclosed in
“Appointments Board” im the top left hand corner and must reach
| the Department of Education by Manfay, 90th June, 1952. Candidates

lare warned that canvassing may lead to their disqualification.
BATTERIES | 15.6.52—2n,
|

TWO VACANT POSTS OF TEMPORARY FIELD OFFICERS
by | IN THE DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE & AGRICULTURE
G.E.C.

Applications are invited for the two vacant posts of temporary
18c. each

Field Officer in the Department of Science & Agriculture.
»

Dia) 6466



|



9

jin the scale $1,200 by $72 to $1,920 per annum, plus the prevailing

| cost of living allowance payable to public officers, The posts are
temporary and non-pensionable and may be terminated at one month's
notice on either side,

3. The Officers will be required to furnish themselves with motor
transport and will be paid a mileage allowance in accordance with
current rates payable to Government Officers.

4, The main duties attached to these posts are soil conservation
} field work, leaf sampling of sugar cane, soil moisture determinations,
the application of chemical weedicides and insecticides, maize selec-
tion and sweet potato breeding.

5. Applications stating age, qualifications and experience shouid
be idressed to the Director of Agriculture, Department of Science
& Agriculture, Bridgetown and should be submitted not iater than the
2ist of June, 1952.

|
|
|
|
|
\
{
t

a





15.6.52—2n.

Candidates for first award of Second Grade Exhibitions must)

envelopes marked |

The fee for the School Certificate will be $15.12 and for
the Higher Certificate $26.88.

Forms must be completed and returned to this Department, to-
| -ether with a copy of the Birth/Baptismal Certificate and the Fees
| on or before Tuesday, Ist July, 1952.
| {.B, The Examinations of the Cambridge Local Examinations Syn-
dicate will not be held in Barbados after 1952.
|

| Department of Education.
| 15th May, 1952.

20.5.52—2n.



GENERAL CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION — UNIVERSITY OF
a LONDON — NOVEMBER, 1952

| ‘Forms of entry for the above examination may now be obtained
| from the Department of Education, Garrison.

Bach applicant will normally be required to offer five subjects at
Ordinary Levei. Candidates who wish to complete matriculation
| exemption will be permitted to take the necessary subject/subjects at
| Ordinary Level together with the required number of subjects at
| Advanced Level.

UNIVERSITY FEE

Ordinary Level — $2.40
Advanced Level — $4.80
| LOCAL FEE
Candidates taking neither Oral
nor Practical Examinations
| Candidates taking either Oral or
Practical Examination
Candidates taking both Oral and
. Practical Examination 50% of the University Fee
| Forms must be eompleted and returned to this Department,
‘together with a copy of the Birth/Baptismal Certificate and the Fees
| (University and Local), on or before Tuesday, Ist July, 1952.

{

40% of the University Fee

45% of the University Fee

MATRICULATION REGULATIONS

The beginning salary of each post will be $1,200 per annum |

| ‘Scheme A: The candidate must have obtained passes (not neces-
|
other than English, (c) either Mathematics or an approved Science
subject, and three other subjects, provided that :—

at least two of the subjects-are passed at Advanced Level
; chosen in accordance with the Regulations.
| Scheme B: The candidate must have obtained passes in
(a) English Language, (b) a language other than English, (c) either
Mathematies or an approved Science subject, and two other subjects
provided that !—

at least three subjects are passed on the same occasion, of

which at least two must be at the Advanced Level, the three

subjects being chosen in accordance with the Regulations.
Department of Educatior.

16th May, 1952.
20.5.52—2n.

| sarily on the same occasion) in (a) English Language, (b) a language |

Barbados

“FEDERAL VOYAGER” 13 June 16 June 23 June 9 July

Agents: PLANTATIONS LIMITED — Phone 4703
) *S99099000000000000000000000000000959555598F 559,

GARRARD 3 SPEED AUTOMATIC RECORD
CHANGERS

Just received! Going fast! Come and get yours !



MOUNTED POLICE DISPLAY

THE POLICE RIDING SCHOOL

District “A”

5.00 P.M., TUESDAY, 17TH JUNE
e

ADMISSION :

Reserved Seats

$1.00
Unreserved Seats

48

Box Office at Informa’ tion Bureau, Police Headquarters
e

A Farewell to Staff Sergeant Anderson of the
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
12.6.52.—4n.



THEY ARE TWO BARGAINS.

e
54 inch ANDAR CREASE RESISTING
SUITING
at $3.52 Per Yard.

Shades White, Parchment, Dawn, Pink, Tiger
Gold, Jewel & Bermuda.

SHARKSKIN at $2.80 per yd.

Shades Dawn, Pmk, Tiger Gold, Jewel,
Bermuda & White.

°
A. E. TAYLOR LTD.

Coleridge Street.

WHERE THERE ARE NO PARKING PROBLEMS
And where - - « =
QUALITY 1S HIGH
—: and :—
PRICES ARE LOW
-So Dial 4100

/_——<---"-]V-9#77HJ tO’>’"*"*”*™”*x*x“xnun’"”"”--vv.»_Lh6nxn”2qn2 nnn eee



a


















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TUESDAY, JUNE 17, .19 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN
HENRY " BY CARL ANDERSON 7 , :
—— NATIONAL EMPLOYERS MUTUAL

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das?


PAGE EIGHT



Y.M.P.C. Seore First Win

COMBERMERE LOSE
BY AN INNINGS

THERE were good wickets at all grounds where the
Interm ite cricket ‘n es were played, and batsmen
made good scores. At Carlton, W. Drayton who went at

edi rate ag

number three in the batting order, hit 103 runs not out
while batting for Empire in the second innings. He hit
12 fours and a six in his 103 not out.

Only one outright victory was scored on Saturday, the
last day in the first Round of Intermediate cricket matches
and this was at Beckles Road where Y.M.P.C. won by an
innings and seven runs over Combermere; Y.M.P.C.—who

sored their first win— bowled out the schvolboys for 89
runs on the first day and replied with 185 runs.
























In their econd innings Com- ! Innis: Lb.w, b_ Austin i
bermere were again skittled out * a ee Smee b Austin "4
for 89 runs and the bowling hon- Lewis b Slirke 2
ours for Y.M.P.C, went to Burke, Phillips stpd. b mrankes &

a : > : e ikinson stpd. b Branker
Austin and Branker who took 1son b Archer 6
three wickets each, well b Branker 16

At the Mental Hospital, Black aly b Burke ’ il
Rock, Police declared in their WOGs ae s
first innings when the score wa ore se
200, in reply to the Mental Hos- Total 89
pital’s score of 185 runs made on se ts lea ii —_
the first day of play. C. Sealy 0 M R Ww
top-scored for Police with 57 and purke O78) ee
F. Smith was not out with 28 Austin 17 a hae ae
runs. Bowling for Mental Hospita ee as ; 3 f .
Skipper Knight took four of the « “Branket * we: aes
Police wickets for 51 and medium B. Hoyo: 2 0 8 0
pacer Chase three for 45

In their second turn at the Wanderers vs. Windward

ricke os al sco 128

vicket, Mental H pit al sc re ae windsvase 13
runs for five wickets and ther WINDWARD—First. Innings
declared, sending back on Police
who had collected 33 runs when Evelyn b J. Corbin 10

{. Thornton c Armstrong b
play ended \ J. Corbin 20
First Innings Lead Hl. Farmer Lb.w. b Proverbs 65

Windward got points for a first ! neon ¢ Sheets oh eee +}
innings lead over Wanderer c Mhyers b J. Corbih 12
when their match ended on Sat- e ¢ Armstrong b 7
urday. Batting first Wanderers , ’ Corbin . x
scored 173 runs and Windward & wijxie tnd : 1 aiaaie 7
replied with 233 runs, H. Farmer Farmer stpd ale 0
65 and R. Farmer 40 not out. Evelyn 1.b.w le 15

When play had ended Wander- Patras v
ers had scored 121 runs for th Total 233
loss of five Wickets in their sec- : oo , ca day
ond innings. G, Skeete was not BOWLING ee ‘eae
out with 37. J. Corbin 23 2 8 4

Empire also got points for a R. Packer 4 o 24 0

I I
first innings lead over Carlton at â„¢ overt 9 ? 35 1
Carlton. After declaring at 187 : aw ‘ acy 1 :
runs for the loss of two wickets G. Skeete 8 1 31 0
in their first innings, Empire P Patterson 5 1 14 0
bowled out Carlton for 108 runs
2 WANDERERS—s

A breezy 103 runs by W. Dray- z sphnieiiliaiah icin Beses etc
ton high-lighted the second inn Seale 1.b.w. b H. Farmer 25
ings of Empire. Drayton hit 12 ; froeeree cD eel 7

: awiess ¢ Thornto r
fours and a six in his 103 and Mayers b R Atkinson ae
enabled Empire to reach a total G. Skeete not out 37
of 167 for the loss of five wickets. © Packet Farmer b R, Farmer 16
Best bowler for Carlton in the â„¢ i 8 not out z
Empire second innings was R. oF
Hutchinson who captured three of Total (for 5 wickets) 121
the Empire wickets for 42 runs. aneiing

In the Pickwick-Cable & Wire- BOWLING ANATYSIS
less match Pickwick secured a yy papme: $ ean ey
first innings lead. Batting first, ». Wilkie 3 eae
Pickwick scored 256 runs and Le, Greenidge 2 0 a es
then dismissed the Cable & Wire- jf» Thornton 5 a eet
less team for 156 runs, O, Lash- pr Atkinson 3 ae a
ley bagged five wickets for 38 R. Farmer 2 0 2 Oo
runs and bowled 14 overs, three ®: H. Farmer 1 eae.
of which were maidens. H. Jor- . : ‘
dan also had a good spell. He Empire vs. Carlton
ended with figures of 16 overs, Empire First Innings (for 2 wkts.
four maidens, 38 runs, four declarea) “3 ees 187
wickets. a . 7 Cariton First Innings . 108

Cable & Wireless in their sec-
ond turn at the wicket scored 80 EMPIRE—Second Innings
runs for the loss of five wickets. 5 ron © Harding b ©. Gill 22
R. Croney scored 54 runs before W. Dravion hoivour ttnews 103
he was given out leg before the C, Beckles ¢ & b Hutchinson 15
wicket to the bowling of H. M. Armstrong stpd, b Hutchinson 2
Marshall. G, Clarke ¢ Proverbs b Hutchinson 1

C. Prescod not out 18
‘ Extras

Mental Hospital vs. Police Be
hawaii hada we Total (for 5 wkts) 167
Menta: Hospita ‘trst Innings 185 ae

POLICE FIRST INNINGS BOWLING ANALYSIS

C, Sealy b C, Knight 57 oO M R W
N. Haynes run out 20 Matthews i 0 18 1
S. Howard b Chase 3 Burke 3 o 6 Oo
C. Cheltenham Lbiw. b Wilshire 4 Edgehill 3 0 a. 3S
O, Warner b Knight 19 Gill 7 a Se
C. Springer c Wilshire b Chase 20 Cox 6 0 18 0
F. Forde b Knight 2 Hutchinson 5 0 42 3
E. Denny c Gaskin b Knight 2 Warding 3 0 13 0
D. Pinder b Chase 12

F. Smith not out 28 % i 7 i
ih Seerehe rat ont ® Cable & Wireless vs Pickwick

Extras 12

Pickwick Ist Innings 256
Total (for 9 wkts,) 206
o ~ CABLE & WIRELESS—First Innings
BOWLING ANALYSIS oe Matthews ec Peterkin b
gti arsha 3
Oo. Knight o * ee mi E. G, Skeete b Lashley =
Cc. Gaskin 13 1 55 O 4 kee h.b.w Bhi : * 4
G. Yarde 1 0 6 0 , ©, Cozier ¢ wkpr. (Evelyn)
P. Crichlow 4 1 5 y ar ae tie.
R. Chase 15 go age gs 8 roney ¢ Marshall b Lashley 42
J. Wilshire 3 0 22 1 |. H. King c¢ Moore b Jordan 0
¢ Seale b I ashley 1)
MENTAL HOSPITAL—Second Innings | | Branker stpd. wkpr. b Jordan 11
V. Boyee ¢ Denny b Springer ay «CN. T. Clarke b Lashley 4
G. Yarde c¢ Barker b Springer D, M. Archer not out ‘ 1
C. Best i.b.w. b Springer |. Standford J.b.w, Lashley 2
> Siow ¢ Springer b Barker Extras +r we
- Gaskin run out a
we Chase not out Total 156
E. Quintyne not out f oti
Extras i BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo M R W
Total (for five wickets decid.) 128 i Jorden 16 4 38 4
ashley 14 3 38 f
BOWLING ANALYSIS 1, Marshall 6 ae 1
o M R w ~N. Greenidge 5 0 14 0
E Denny + 1 18 o 2% Peterkin 5 3 25 0
D. Pinder 3 1 13 o G. Moore q 3 14 0
Cc, Sealy 3 2
@. aoriewer ; See lg CABLE & WIRELFSS—2na Innings
M. Hayne: ; Oe ea he s
B. Barker 2 0 14 I e eenrihewe ‘ Moore b Lashley 7
Hw King c¢ wkpr Evetyn) b
POLICE—Second Innings Jordan : 0
C. Springer c Worrell b Crichio i \. C. Cozier ¢ Kidney b Lashley 1
C. Sealy Lb.w. b Crichlow » RM. C y Lb.w. Marshall 54
S. Howard stpd. b Crichlow 7 keete stpd. wkpr. b Jordan 15
Cc. Warner b Gaskin b Lashley 0
F. Forde not out C not out 2
Cc. Cheltenham not out 4 ranker not out 0
Extras Extra 1
Total (for four wickets go Total (for 5 wkts. 80

BOWLING ANALYSIS
Combermere vs. Y.M.P.C. oy. jordan oe ae






BRynoe Scores
Double Century

MAGE



JOHN BYNOE

Tall burly John Bynoe, playin,
his first match for Em tein’ the
Second Division, hit a breezy 202
not out in 205 minutes in the Em~
pire first innings against Cen-
tral on Saturday, the last day of
the first round of Second Division
cricket matches.

Bynoe who was associated with
the Barbados Regiment team last
cricket season hit 27 fours and five
sixes in his 202. He was_ always
at ease against the Central bowl-
ing and paid none of the bowlers
any respect,

Empire gained first innings
points over Central who declared
in their first innings when the
score was 285 runs for seven
wickets. Empire replied. with 365
runs for six wickets declared and
when play ended Central had
scored 30 runs for the loss of two
wickets.

Combermere secured points for
a first innings lead over College.
Batting first. Combermere scored
191 runs and College scored 99
for six wickets .declared. Com-
bermere also declared in the
second innings when the score
was 27 for five wickets. At the
end of play College had scored 71
runs for the loss of three wickets.

At Erdiston, Y.M.P.C. gained a

first innings lead on Efrdiston
whom they bowled out for 105
runs, Y.M.P.C. in their first

innings scored 139 runs. In their
second turn at the wicket Y.M.P.C.
scored 61 runs for no wickets and
declared, but at the end of play
Erdiston had made 39 runs for
four wickets.

Second Division Cricket

Central vs. Empire at Central

Central 285 for seven wickets
declared, (C, Hinds 125 n.o.) and
30 for two wickets.

Empire 365 for six wickets de-
clared, (J. Bynoe not out 202).

Combermere vs. .College

Combermere 191 (Skeete 46, G.
Medford 3 for 17 and E, Griffith 3
for 33) and 27 for five wickets
declared.

College 99 for six wickets de-
clared and 71 for the loss of three
wickets..

Y.M.P.C, vs Erdiston

Y.M.P.C. 139 and 61 for no
wicket.

Erdiston 105 (1 Burke 3 for 24,
Butler 2 for 16) and 39 for four
wickets.

WHAT'S ON TODAY*

Police Courts—10.00 a.m,

Meeting of Legislative Coun-
cil—2.00 p.m.

Meeting of House of Assem-
bly—3.00 p.m.

Reunion at Queen’s College—
4.45 p.m.

Police Mounted Display, Dis-
trict A—5.00 p.m.

Extra Mural Youth Group
Meet at British Council—
5.00 p.m.

Basket Ball at Y.M.P.C.—7.80

p.m.
British Oouncil Films,
Speightstown—8.00 p.m.

REPORT

YESTERDAY

Rainfall from Cod

nil.
Total Rainfall for month to

date: 1.98 ins.
Highest Temperature: 87.5 °F
Lowest Temperature: 75.0 °F
Wind Velocity:

hour
Barometer:

THE WEATHER
11 miles per
(9 a.m.) 29,968,
| (3 p.m.) 29,908
TO-DAY
Sunrise: 65.44 a.m.
Sunset: 6.19 p.m.
Moon: Last Quarter, June 14

Lighting: 7.00 p.m.





Combermere First Innings 89 ©. Lashley 6 2 12 High Tide: 12.51 p.m.

Y.M.P.C. First Innings ; 185 G. Moore Low Tide: 6.46 aim. 6.39 p.m.
COMBERMERE—Second Innings N. Greenidge

L. Francis b Austin 0 HH. Marshall

They'll Do It Every Time

BUT SAPLEY REALLY
BELIEVED ’EM
WHEN THEY SAID,

“NO SPEECHES AT

THE COMPANY
DNNER-DANCE
THIS YEAR






Severe we ARE AT THE
ALLEGED DANCE. IT'S 11:30
PM. AND THERE ARE STILL
UMPTEEN SPEAKERS AT THE
HEAD TABLE To BE HEARD





JANITOR, I THINK IT'S
ONLY FITTING WE HAVE A

BLOTTER,OUR BELOVED
BOOKKEEPER =



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



In Intermediate Division ‘|





SPORTS WINDOW
WATER POLO
Whipporays “B” team meet
Harrison College “B” in a
Gents’ Water Polo match at
the Aquatie Club at 5.00 p.m.
to-day.

PIORWiON meet Fortress

and Carlton play Pirates in
First © Division Basketball
matches at Y.M.P.C.
Beckles Road, tonight. Play
begins at 7.30.

Ten Seore
Centuries

LONDON, June 16.

Batsmen held the mastery in
most parts of the country toda)
and no fewer than nine individual
centuries were recorded. A tenth
was made in Belfast by India’.
allrounder Phadkar on the first
day of the two day match with
Ireland,

Heading the honours list is Cyril
Washbrook who at 211 not out was
only 19 short of the highest in-
dividual score of the season when



he declared Lancashire’s innings
closed. against Somerset. The
declaration however was well

justified for before close of play
Somerset had lost six wickets for
104.

Jack Tkin who had béen, ineclud-
ed in the 12 players for the second
Test commencing Thursday was
unable to field in the Somerset
innings because of the recurrence
of his back trouble,

A fighting innings of 140 not out
by Compton narrowly failed to
give Middlesex first innings points
against Yorkshire at Lord’s. Com-
ina in after three wickets had
fallen for 33, he hit strongly all
round the wicket to make his first
century of the season in just over
three hours.

Laying of the new pitch at
Trent Bridge doesn’t seem to have
affected batsmen’s ability to score
heavily. Today both Joe Hard-
staff and Cyril Martin hit centur-
ies against Derbyshire’s attack
containing the three England
bowlers—Jackson, Gladwin and
Rhodes. As the first day was rain-
ed off a decision on first innings
ie all that can be expected to-
nrorrow.

The scoreboard follows: Middle-
sex vs. Yorkshire: Yorkshire 308
for 6 declared Young five for 137
and 18 for no wicket. Middlesex
277; Compton 140 not out.

Surrey vs. Essex: Surrey 256
for seven declared and 200 for
seven; Essex 118, Laker five for
50.

Glamorgan vs, Leicester: Lei-
cester (107 and 126 for five; Glam-
caer 325, E. Davies 91, Watkins

Worcester vs. Gloucester: Glou-
cester 345 for five declared and

18 for no wicket; Worcester 346 |‘

for six declared, Kenyon 118.

Hampshire vs, Northants: North-
ants 67 and 256 for four; Hamp-
shire 154 for nine declared,

Lancashire vs, Somerset: Lan-
eashire 3836 ‘for five declared,
Washbrook 211 not out; Somerset
104 for six.

Sussex vs. Cambridge: Cam-
bridge 368 for four declared, May
167; Sussex 269 for seven, Cox 121
not out,

Notts vs. Derby: Notts 309 for
five, Hardstaff 116, Martin 122..

Oxford University vs. Warwick-
shire: Warwickshire 384 for four
declared, Horner 140, Ord 143 not
eut; Oxford 113 and 24 for one.

In the two-day game India vs.
Treland, India are 289 for eight
leclared, Phadkar 103; [relang 60
for three,



Sea Scouts Beat
Boys’ Club Team

Sea Scouts beat the Boys’ Club
it District “A” in their Second
Division Basketball match yes-
terday by 29 points to 22,

T. Carter scored 12 points for
Sea_ Scouts while N. Barker and
E. Pollard scored nine each for
he Boys’ Club,



Sa



THIS WEEK’S ji! ON

SPECIAL
PEANUT CAKE

Gc. each

apeaiis qT
AKERIES Barn. ht! |

DIAL 4758
JAMES STREET



















ground, |°



TUESDAY, 1952

JUNE 17,



TENNIS CHALLENGERS
JACK KRAMER and DONALD

Chandler Sisters
score For Starfish

Starfish beat Ursuline Convent
4—0 and Goldfish beat Queen’s
College 5-—2 in their Ladies’ Water
polo matches yesterday at the
Aquatic Club.

For Starfish the Chandler sisters
Phyllis, Mollie and Patsy scored
2, 1 and. 1 respectively. For
Goldfish Peggy Pitcher and
Brenda Foster scored three and
two respectively while for Queen’s
College Clara Pasteur and Jill
Reid netted one each.

The referee was Archie Clarke.

Teday at 5.00 p.m, Wihipporays
“B” team meet Harrison College
“B” in a Gents’
Aquatic Club.

TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR
BEAT MANCHESTER

NEW YORK, June 15.

For the second time in 24 hours
Tottenham Hotspurs walloped the
English Champion Manchester
Jnited soccer team this time 7—1
before 24,582 fans at the Yankee
Stadium.

The Spurs, runner-up in the
English Football League this sea-
son, and last year’s title holder,
administered two solid setbacks
suffered by Manchester on their
}12-game tour in the United States |
and Canada. |

Manchester dropped a 5-0 de- |

nis champions, are coming to

Britain with PANCHO SEGURA |
to |

}

and RICHARD GONZALES
compete in the Searborough pro-
fessional lawn tennis tournament

(July 28—August 2). —L.E.S.



You Can Fiy
Almost Anywiiere
Wa

fixture at the



’ Regular Clipper service
is now provided to 83 |
countries and colonies on
{

cision to Tottenham in Toronto on |
Saturday.—C,P.



‘PILATE’S WIFE! |}
A religious Dramatte Performance

Presented b |
REEVES AND PARTY

=

NEW YORK

\- service by the luxurious
MY Prondenteâ„¢ or via San Juan by
popular, money-saving “E! Turista.

c.W



THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE
(By kind permission) '
|

FRIDAY & SATURDAY,
20th & 2ist June

Commencing at 8.0 P.M

HALL

Part of proceeds for the | E Uu R eo 2 E
Family Welfare Funds |
UNRESERVED SEATS 4/-, 3/-, | Re service by giant double-
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Enjoy stopovers in England, Ire-
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st By Courtesy of the Brit-
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ist FILM SHOW in the Ball- |

Travel Agent or









|X room at 830 p.m. on Wed- a PAA

i %s nesday, 18th June. rex ; aehbcte

4 he Programme includes:

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iy “Shipping”

| Bereta etn AN AMERICAN
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1% also a Colour Cartoon Wortp AIRHAYS

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PAGE 1

ptc.i TWO BABBADOS ADVOCATE TIT.SDW MM 1! CaJiib galting MIMEB KOIALIE AN S ilt OtOROI SEEL, CompI (or Development and Welfare v.-as a pauenRcr for %  .. : %  B 'A* I A yeati .> %  vWt He WBJ accompanied by Lady Seel and they will be staying at GovTit House as the Kueats of Si. Hobert and Lady Arrunu11. Married In U.S.A. T U w*ddiO| look place in the Uj of Mvw Ruth Anne Muetrkel, d.iii,.ni, i 0. .Mi %  nd -Mj.-. fc.tiiH^Ki Mo* ID I M 4a M Orange, and Mi*. William (.ill* I Grand Slreet. Elizabeth, and the late P. F. Smith at Uur L. lurdJ Churd), Weal Oti The Broom U a Barbadian from the Cm*, St. Philip, and an old Lodge boy who la now working In Ihe U.S.A. wllh Public ft Electric and Gas. The bride, a graduate* of MOD'clalr High School, was gr*1 marriage by her father. She wore a gown of skinner satin trimmed with phantlUy lace A Brown of •eed pearls held her Dlutton v. d and she carried a bmi'iutt < f whit* Spring A MJai Lilian Bridge M of honour, while her bride I %  Lyon and Miss Jon bestman was Mi find 'heusher* were Mr, 1 Moeckel and Mrwr. Churle*and Owen 1 mony WH performed l>v RffV. H Si was held it tt Ornnge. The couple afUH 'eft br their lieiieymoon. Agricultural Officer M B V F. CALF, son of _Hon1 M.I.I. %  i Dint bi AM U /' %  Onnr, Ho waf %  ceonuianHd i>v ins irlfe and threey e a rold aon Timothy i •tavimK at Qardm Gap. Worthing. Mr. Gale who is Agricultural Officer In Nigeria has com* over to *pcnd about lour months' holiday. Barbadian Returns Home A HHIVING from Cu %  fa. JLL.il charutrod night recently was Mr. Amur Mm of Mn, Adora Stouty ol rUM, St. George. 1 %  nln-rmen.in. Mr. Stoule had been VrOrUai in CltTaraan with C.P.I.M.. during which time he b as plant |n the treating departi clerk in the wages administration section of the acCOUnUng department as well as In the i I tton of the shipping dMparbnent ii %  u i i Be rotary of the Shell Bportl A-sociatlon and prior to his departure, was : of the Barbados Social ( a member of the Anirtii an Chun h He has Ju: -'. bran the Company bul I plans are linsotituj. > JUNK KNIGHT "Dancing Time" T il: Mlh-Kt Rosalia and June Knight, two of la* buua to ..I>IMI in "Dancing liaM" which w bung pie-euted by th. Bubaao* School of Dancing at the Empire Theatre on Friday, Juno JO. There art sUU BOOM seats lot in the Orchestra and Kause for this show and the Balcony seals which sre being sold in advance, are excellent for viewing a dancing display. Bookings are UU open *">• _tafl fublic Kclations Advlssr M u PHIUP HBW1 UNO, Public lU-lations AdVioSS to ihe Cumuli Uevelupnient and Well m ,, turned aVum A./ week end by B.W.I. A. after paying an Oncta] routine vlatt. He was accompanied by Mrs, Hewltt-MyrUig. On Business M R. N. E. WILSON, dry goods B *an Street, was r %  .VIA %.-.' %  %  .! morning fi>r Puerto Rico en route lo New Yoik i nd LondoB if.h I gOThS up OO a business visit WbJcfa MI88 KATHLEEN BULPITT Theatre Sister ARHIVINC yoMerday morning %  ~ G*J CrrSSSS from England was Miss Kathleen Bulpnt who has come to take up an •PpolnUne Sister at the Barbados General Hospital. llplll who has had about twelve years nuralng experience, did her tralnJnji at Lewiahani HQSpltal in l*>ndi,n. She I! %  St. Thomas' H Mi.it a I. Ing m to St. Helen's. HasUngj as Theatre Sister, a position which she held for the I a) t five She said that it was her llrst trip abroad tmd she had a verv smooth crossing. It was quite a %  nd the peoMendly Miss Bulpltl said that % %  i for the tree* nd Mie colour. It.irhados was v< tv much life and already she has begun to feel at home nnd was Koin* bo like II fa Married At Pilgrim Holinesi A tf arch on Thurs%  %  I Rood. Carrtngton Village niquf Piogrea to Mr. %  oi Boaton, Massachusetts. The bride who was marriage by her brother. Mi Alidad, wore beau'itul head-dress, a gift from .*-he """. -n Rusi'a There ** nn Soviet Pore;gn u ,.ris:ocrai ml 1 ..'lor he'never tV'ietl'io'aTiudr in ronver>a'.ion loli.s arocra:'r Italan coos:n* n Genoa i iv who *acc(y^lefl %  >re;gn Mmts:er i Rerent rhiracer nit Bo'hevtsm seriously and 0e:!ev*d m su*tnty 8lglime t-inov Uornieriv 'i of London > almtys had holi nt sod %  %  obliged to horrnw a Mr co from a sra'c -t-on th*i she lisd U oH"-; !" : vsit with her nisbind to Turkev Hifler and Eva From Rus'la. aliei a brief at H:o. t!te Cerrnils moved In 1033 to Berlin nere smflneg lor \\\r^ years C.nnti fr.-quently mei li %  On the per-nmally laacmating qiieiton ol the Puenrer's it to women si ally had n firm view H<' wa*. S!K says, "completely aaesual in every way" But her Judg ment based as It Is on feminine intuition-that most fallible guide to truth—cannot be reard>d a* conclusive The reia•itiru. Iwtween Hitler and Fva Braun remain a* mysterious as BSSH Tlie Cerrutis were entertuned from lime to tune bv (loermg Tinseniertainment was never dull. One's host might SICNORA CIRRUTi s saarlif el .-(..t,.„ bt-c.n by appeir.ng dressed r-d velvet like a RenaiMi %  ragtOM A quirk cnange and he ou-i J itum in grey breaches and a %  ey Uiiri with pu%  • i "ien accompanied by thirty rrt guards in tncdiriai %  he would ecort nusuesu around hu grotesque •siaie at Kar'.nhall. FijKO lbs :.:;H female of Hie ipecic* a!ss ended in a corns: hi no way disconcerted T.^ering hurried back anena of i4 nuests in order to change into i rostume of emerald treen and iem w.;h a Isnce .n n. .md and a silver hunting norn %  ^ 'rom his nerk In IBga the Cerruus, who d..•approved of Muasolni's new pr > German policy, w-re moved to Par.s Two years later Musaol.n: decided to w.iiidraw hu ambassador and they retired to Rwne. s unora Oerrutl had no use l Mussol'.n;. She lei-s -.he s'ory ol a visit by Mr Eden *o [some on the eve ol iht Abyasin. an war A luncheon was held in Eden a honour Tiie Duee. deienmned la Insult him. arrived late wearIAJI j patched o d coat, an open at.rt. tennis shoes, and no socks. Me behaved as orienSlvely as possible -.hroughout %  he meai. and the party broice up without a word being exchanged between '.he two men. Serious ? No Tins u a book wh.th will give pleasure to many. It is not and docs not claim to be. a serious contribution to the history ot international relations But u sivea a vivid picture of scene* .md people, and it may well be remembered long after the more solemn works of diplomatic history have mouldered away :n*.o dustv oblivion WORLD COPYHIOHT HBSRRVED %  T Punch Made Up Some Riddles — And Thty Were All About One Thing — By MAX i l;i i l "WELL," said Mr. Purch -mil ing, "I've Just though; t brand new riddles. And the earesva thing about Ihrm is, they're all about on* thing Mr. Punch was talking to everyone in the playroom —to Teddy the Stuffed Bear, and Mary-Jane the rag-dolt, and (ieneral Tin, and Knarf and Hanid. "All about the same thing. Punch!" said General Tin. "Vihst do you mean?" Everyone else was glad that (ieneral Tin asked this question. For they were all wondering, loo. All About Ituade Mr. Punch nodded. "They're all about Roads. But. of course," he added, "they're about different kinds of roads. Ill give you the first rlddlt and you'll see just what 1 mean." This was Mr. Punch's first riddie about a road; 1 cross the brooks and rivers Aa well as any ship at sea; But when 1 reach the ocean, I know that trip is not for me! "Now." said Mr. Punch, smiling again; "what sort of a road is that* And let me give you a hint. That road has a very special name, though It really Is a road Hanid said eagerly: "la It a Bridget" "Yes Indeed, my dear! That's Just what It Is! A road that goes over the water is called a bridge. And naturally it can't cross the xsan when it comes lo it. The ocean Is much too wide for any bridee." Then Mr. Punch read his second poem about a road. I B.-fore me stands a great hlg hill Wilh towering trees and rocks and snow lot do I climb U7 No—not It Right through and through that hill I iro! Mr. Punch looked around the rom. waiting for someone to giv* ai:a the answer. It was Mary Jane EAT ZEftlKRlNS. . i* any aood taharj. YOU •bould nave OM of UMJ MODERN GAS COOKERS C 411 I The Garden—SL Jaaaea TODAY and TOMORROW %  SO | "I I "l: *ND TIM nuaav SOX Car* GRANT 'M-OOD ON TBS MOON" Biibiri'. MIIlllt'M lilt h-li .1 • i I' -I AMBASSADORS Wlft. '..fabeftc Cerrali 'Alien sad UnlasJ. LamJoa .•'.. 3— U8TBWG UOU*8 TUESDAY. J-uw H, lM 1 1% — IS S* | as ss M si si s lllpm RojndMVOU*. 1 S p m Per .,,,.1 .portrait. B 00 p n. Jofln tisvill i, IS p in lUdio NiMit.1 S SO P "i .. ... v — w-r-Hi Horn tfcrnain. ** I* m Intlude The News. DaVb7 *rVie""*li"Vm "•• Recorai. 43 i in %  Uiiily Mac I lie STTS^-. st-.*. "tt is rsi^n iUr %  Jaa, 111 p m Meet •>. Common^ ... 10 a n* Nrw. Tslk The Ar1 h BY THE WAY... By Beachcomber •XWO stuffed owls have been %  1. placi-d in a church belfry* tt to scare away bats. The arrival In the belfn of unstuiT.'.i owli srtU lead to the lnstalla!ion of two stuffed bats to scare them away. Tinold -forgot toiling up the laps, win find bjnsfall balled upon to adju.ii> ti ' once and said would e be Xm|cd 1/ went 1 I sous no they use boms e-reahoiils, and 0 fell asleep aur. A procr 'and m* pot Im ashore at dairn. Such Is a .-ailor. life. Ho. . Dr. Rhuhnrh'n vitrnvr Hhel intles Mh fiance rti'anps his braces ichile he talks, rtrefcMN0 t'lcrn und ii'timu ihe-u 'Mjai-ml the *idcs of his chest. What ought / to doT Dr. Rhubarb a a y a: Say patiently nnd courteously, "Shall I sing sonn'thmi; while vou play fur me on your braces" Thai will put .'in,] out nf lounUn.incv. hi [Hissing F OOl^ 11LA.1 IM of saying rOU I .ninul have u piny or a Him about a happy mamaae because It la a dull ND> French film "Voyage en Ml Is the delightful story of a happy niarriafla It 1mile und Intelligent, Nobody Is blackmailed, tortured, or kicked in the fact*. And it has that touch of poetry which only r Yen oh Hlms can provide. You Mai IhM the man behind UM taoiere wrgdked elong wnlstluig gaily, and was always coming by chance on just what he wanted to photograph. The smell Is of the open an. not the itudlo iM 'w -. S e v 0 n D 1 1 1 1 r %  <1 1 • l\ %  0 14^ O io r _T T" %  1 ami HI rtti in %  1 auterwBl asieo 1 sju I ooveraie |4| i li ie ozone (gi Ham sod iei jt rn. ia.t %  1 1 1 tt asm n %  1 *^i l."J n,tt H M tr,rn "no 'U I J •VOU' MX STOW AN ALL ROUND UTILITY CLOTH 36'' .84 In While and Colours PRINT*:!! SIIIOZ*: 36" .89 Ol'l Xl\0. NOW I.AROK SIHPMI'.NT OF JOHNSON'S GOLDEN-DAWN WARE Sinirli' :ind in Sell. Ten. Dinner, Coffee T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS OIA1 *??n YOUR SHOF STORES OlAt. 4r>(V> EMPIRE l_\ST TWO saOWS TOD Vivien LCiail !C OLIVER SAMS.TON WOSAS" Miu mrii a THIS* ISTI I at a B aa Idv ARNOLD IK %  HOKDOWN" OB HIRUCANI ISLAND" larr.nc Jon HALL OLYMPIC (S in l in l StALLBOOM" %  nd •111 OCEAN DRIVr. Tin n ivni ONLY ss a s IS I IANB DOK" Joan CARHOLL VM. HAL8TON and "SlkSPT LAOOON-' ROXY TODAS iOll 4 SS A %  -IT HAJ11N TO omr. M ISTfet i THI-K a s.ii WRO United ArtUl 'SUD LIGHT' MBbl— Oeorge PAFT and "Ot'RRN SOB DATBOYAL WED ISTtl a THIR l"TH s st a s is • %  nosnoWNwllh Edd ARNOLD and %  NAHI BRLIRVR BALLaOOa' 1 with rrnkie L*HS_ DRA WING FOR THE FORESTERS' SCHOLARSHIP RAFFLE By Mr. Lewis, Secretary B'dos Turl Club lakes place on SATURDAY. JULY 5TB AT A DANCE AT THE DRILL HALL By kind permission of Colonel Michelln the Police V Band Dance Orchestra will supply the Musk $ AdmUsion by Ticket: SUBSCRIPTION $1.00 Raffle Tickets are still available at Singer Machine Co.. Co-operative Bank und A. E. Taylor Ltd. Punch asked Hanid riddle. who guessed It "A Tunnel*" she said. -Correct, Marj-JRns!" "And a tunnel is a road. too. Now gueaa this one." The people rarely walk on me, Hut iron tracks 1 bear, And trains go roaring on my back And people rids most everywhere. "Oh. I know!" cried Teddy the Stuffed Bear. "1 know what kind ot a road that 1st It's a—a !" Teddy paused. ~l ean't think of the name but I know Jusi what It Is." Knnrf had to help Teddy out (for he was quile sure that Teddy really knew). "A Railroad," hs whispered. "Yea! A Railroad! A Railroad!" Mr. I'uiu-h seal that was right, too. He said he bad one last riddle about a very wonderful kind of roml. I'm every clor. every hue The tailed trees are. not as high. The ran mint shine, the rain mart fall I'm like a read way in the sky! Keerjreaa Kuesied that one! They all .houleri in one voice: "It's a Rainbow!" And so I', was. Ill III AT I V* I I %  > I ACAMMV ill 1HD 11ISMH! Streetcar Named Desire" Klil Sprays Fill Powder Mistol in l 2-ui. & 2'oz. Habdy Oil Paraffin Oil $1.80 per sal. FUl in Gk, (Jr. Pis. N'ujol in p(s. Petroleum Jelly White, 23c. per lb. Yellow. 18c. per lb. Household Wax R. M. JONES & CO., LTD. J Agents. •.'-'-'-'-'-'-'-'•'-----'-'.•.-.-.---.-.-.-,-.^,-....,.. VVVV'-VVV.rf^..',-,*,-.',','.. •>->'-, M>", TOOLS TAPS & DIES PIPE V. W, %", %", %', If, IV, MV, 2", 3" BSF Vi", A". **. A". W. A". ', A". S', %" SAE or NF H-, A". *\ V USS or NC V*". A". **, A". Vi", A". *-. W ENGINEER B.P. HAMMERS V.lb., lb., lV4lb., lWb.. 2Milb., 31b. FILES FLAT, ROUND. HALF ROUND, SQUARE HIGH SPEED GRINDING MACHINES HIGH SPEED TWIST DRILLS BODY REPAIR FLEXIBLE FILES OPEN & BOX SPANNERS PRESSURE GAUGES 0-400 lb. W, A". %". A" ECKSTEIN BROTHERS BAY STREET %  ;•.-.•.•.-.-,-.-.-.-.-.-.-,-.-.-.-.-.•.•.-,-.-.-.-., DIAL 4269 .-.•.-.-.-,-.-.-..-,o-,-,-.i.i<.. CurbYourPiles Hi la no lonaer ncc*rjF 10 >uRar ln-.ii-. r Mr.* nnd tifnotnt lr.> I'll** %  I n. • III* rtl-i • %  "* of H.Us I fiM-marlr knnwn %  • t 'iimi.i a Mytam siarls I* %  "it In IS rnlnul** %  nd not >.I.I. Hop* in* (Win kui iltn tad*, nut tna .-.IIInc. arlapa fl*dtnr. and i ombaia narva %  rdlaikin lh#'l> iurbln( olhar Iroublaa iiuwl by Pll uch a* Haadarha, Narvmjan*aa. Batkachr Consl ipallon. low of rn-irv d'tnlll. and iPflUbl. dlspoalMnn Oal Mylaa from yoar druaslai today under th* Doaltlv* fuarantaa Mytaa niuat atop yauf oil* paJna and Iroublfa Or monay BSVCfe *• -•nun of amply packSaT*. Pyorrhea and Trench Mouth Slopped in 24 Hours balor* >ur tim* Since lh* arasl Weft4 Wat thaaa m*uih diaraaaa liae >pr*a*t Ihtouat-.Djt lha or!d to Ihal now aclanii.n iay ihal lour out of avar. By* paafria ara auHarar. ttoiar or later kV *atd I* -' and •lop meat dli'aara a*fOfa N IB loo lair. brraSiar thry olUn rauaa *M *M> lit* lou of laatn. but aJao (hranic rLaaata. Neiw Dlscovetty Sovas Tseth qnl< aay It panrtratM tUjht to th* or th* t ivubl*. nop. cuau Irsss alaad tha v-ri Btn day. quioaiy .un th* %  liiurrr P-Cefiif, lowlna I • I-1U.14 *i?'I?'*J?!*}*? ****** %  *> isslL~ yasb atvwaT *aas"SaaSJ . r* erUlos looaar al] tha tlm* I lr>M m>ny Ihlcii and than heard af Ihal BSV ejSaS T tSr t Aaiaa—la^H beuta a f Ury c Guorantaad Aaaaaa* wofka to fail and aa ssa.Si.s'va's.'iya Don't taar arhanc* auflarinf lb* dam and heart trouble todayu Amosaala.. r*w Pravrfcca-rrausai. NeesBa. v.a 7i7a as lha SM





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Sttrfrfffo EST ABU SHED 18&5 TUESDAY. JUNI PRICE FTVSsa^B^BU Lord Alexander Tours Koje Island Visits Prisoner Of War Camps With Boatner l-t tl I II JAM KOJE ISLAND. Korea. June 16. United States Eighth Army plans an extensive work and play proeramme for Communist prisoners ot war on Koje once prisoners recognize Allied authority completely. Brig. General Haydon L. Boatner Koje' Commander hopes to start the programme soon after he finishes splitting the present large unruly compounds into small units R • I Atex.-mdei. Britain'* Defen-r Minister inspected prlBy Steel Pool Plagued Bunglers NEW YORK, June 16. A lop French industrialist Munday attacked the Schuman Plan organization contending that although the Idea to pool Europe's steel and coal resources was the most construe' the war. the way the treaty is written is endangering its success. .tlbert Roger Metral who is [•resident of the Federation of French Mechanical Industrie.-, and Chairman of the National Committee on Armaments of tin French Industry told a news conference here that the Schuman Plan organization was lophcavy, and plagued with "Super-diri,:Isnt" which Is not taking Into consideration the quality requirements of the industry. He said. "It Is dangerous to let civil servants organize such an enterprise the same as one would not ask noodle manufacturers to make rubber. winer of war stockndes Monday He toured the island In a jeep %  Hiiatner. Alexander wa* accompanied by Gen, James A. V.in Fleet. U.S Eighth Army Commander and a party of leading military and diplomatic figures. The froup drove through the ins of Compound "6 where moie than 0.000 prisoners fought desU) prevent being broken up into small units. Boatner told It was "a hell of a fight; Alexander reviewed the lOd-inan mour guard drawn from' one company of the Royal Canadian Kcnum-iit and u company of the Queen's Shropshire Light Infantry. In recognition of Ai isnaPdM rvieias Governor-General ot Canada. Canadian troops were given .i position on the right side the honour guard. Alexander returned to T< kvo itu-i his tsnir —P Leaving leaving i... 'Meti Paris Tuesday after attending tli Industrial Fair at Toronto also said that under the Government Of Premier Antomc Pinay, French currency is entering a phase of stabilization and suggested that financial realities may demand devaluation of Uie French Franc to 400 to the United States dollar which he said appears to be the Franc's real purchasing value. He said ihc authority exercised I by Pinay is restoring puhllc con-' ndence in the State's finance* After stressing that French cx-> ports to the dollar area had fallen alarmingly in the last year partly because of the high price of French products, Metral suggested stabilization of currency as well as the removal of sjMtalOM controls which he is also advocating may permit the lowering of prices and consequently the recapturing of some In** export markets. He said United St... aid to Fiance in the form of oftahore purchases and military Items is likely to improve grcatlv the French payment* position. —t'.P. U.S. Money FIOH TO India Aids W orid OMNt'S New IJ-lhi lune Ift Woods, leader of the World Bik Steel Mission said Igatkaaj that the free flow of American capital to India was "In the interest of the free world. "Woods Is In India as a representative of the World Bank President Eugene Black who commissioned him to study India's programme oi expansion In pig Iron and steel industries and to report to the bank what assistance aha needed for new projects In these industries —w.r. From Ml (fcmrfers • Olympic Football Draw Aiuiuuiwed HELSINKI. June 16 IW was announced today te thl Olympic games football matches. The llrst countries including Sweden, winners four years ago are not called on H pla\ in Uie Wit qualifying round. The other* are Dutch Antillc-.. Finland and Turkey The eleven Opening matches are Holland am Brazil. United State, vs. Italy. Egypt vs. Chile. Bungaria vs. Soviet Union. Yugo Blavi i Norway vs. Mexli I-enmork vs. Greece. Rumania v Hungary, Luxembourg vs. Br tain, Auktria fa, th*. Soar and Poland vs. France.—U.F. Tudor Wins By 85 Votes At Vestry Bye-Election MR. J. O. TUDOR, Roebuck Street Provision Merchant defeated Mr. Dan F Blackrtt, Editor and Publisher of tl,. Weekly Paper Torch, by 85 votes in the bve-election for IhiSt. Michael Vestry which took place yesterday as a result of the death of Mr. C A. Brathwaite. The final resul: were as follows: Mr. J. O. Tudor 3M; Mr. Dan F BlackeSubstitute I <>r C'dian Newsprint W .th nit: Uui. The recent prh %  aggsjajN of Canadian newspriiu I has unproved the chance thai other types of newsprint ma> come in general use for mJ papers and magazines. In a tea' the Sivannah (G owc assn Morning News recently v mu-t part of it* adtttoB "ti begasot paper, a sugar cane waste product. 'i"he experiment was highly sue' ccssful. According to its Inventor. Joaqum dc la Ru2a. bagasse paper lie produced at considerably than half the present price of $126 per ton for Canadian newsprint. Ottawa: There are approslI moiety 74.800.000 telephones m the world or about three for every %  100 persons. Canada has 21 telephone* for every 100 persons, a j ratio exceeded only by the U.S. with 20 and Sweden wiih 24.. Delhi: India has exported 1.) million bales of cotton during the year ending April 30. 1W2. It was. exported to the United King| dom, Hong Kong. Australia. New Zealand, the Netherlands. Belgium. Trance. Switzerland. Italy, Japan, the United States. West (riiML.itiy and Canada Stockholm: News and 11-p.il t %  "in the Olympic Games in Helnki this summer will be sent to 86 countries via Stockholm, according to an agreement between the Finnish and Swedish telegraphic authorities. Hlorkholsa: Several of the dorsal vertebrae of a dinosaur have been found at a depth ol I 2 %  > participants from countries in Western Europe WH won h\ a motor coach of Uie Swedish TransEuropean Bus Lines. The Swedes were also awarded first prize for the boat organization of the trip and the hestplanned interior of the coach. it Mi' I. HI: Babylon waa a flourishing centre of commerce in wine King Hammurabi, who : retgned there about 2250 B.C. is | known for having imposed a liw: i '"Wine merchant* may sell their iv :,t prices llxed by the I Authorities. Wine sellers must not admit to their premises nols; or Intoxicated persons, Thcv must hand over such persons to those whose mission u to see that order is respected. Disobedience in regard to this law will be pUnastsad by death." •xterday morning when lorries and carts of every description (anunad Cambridge Permanent W.I. Appeal Eight For Helsinki 2 Swedes Shot In 7 MIG Onsets STtK'KIK MM Jin Aimed kgM Kuardnig the Sovt Embassy here where en • been itemonsttraung all ds> in orntc-,t ngnlna*. the Shooting do MI •Whirrs rrf I I I ns raaeuc plai %  iOdf the Baltic early (Ms morn< ma. Thf bVodlaa All t • nnnncrJ that two of the NvW m mamban arc auffailia* fror* hullet wounds The A hurl The crew reported to Air Forre Headquarters that an KM UOUt ALEX AN DTK Big Three Talks In Washington hitting it several times knge Of the Hying l>oal had the MtM turnKrl..i,d<-i Who is Acting •d espionage netivii. t I'T ini'l .11 Seven E di m the dock this morning in the I i gast spy trial In neutral I history Court Proposed By HYLTON CLEAVER AN all-Camhndgc eight hav been picked !. represent Brilaii In the Olympic Hegattn The; will be entered for the Grain Challenge Cup at Henley. wbflT' lhe> may have to cope with uV Australian Olympic eight. ,il expected there. Thoae of i possible*, srho hf< leen tried on the Cam for the par six weeks and have not got li Bfter all. have been formed Int. |W0 fOUri ami will race in Bh. Olympic trials. This will give the Thames rretv.•.ppositioii which should trXti'K, thwn. Tlie Olympic eight U ID. Maeklln lb w) A. 1. >brL^d. N. B. M. CUrk. *. A Sthassssry. %  • *•%. C B. M. i I W. A. 1). Hin-t kaas. D. M. Jentiens --tr-fc. J. P. K. Iflnde laast). Training Is now going on nt H inuler l^rufe^isor Raymond OWVfi The crew will move to Marlow on June 9, but will not rncat tl it RssJMtl At Henley on June 10 M' Harold Rlckett will take over the coaching, and Immediately aftci the regatta a switch will 1 i R to Putney for the final nollshini process. Brian Lloyd, who as captain ol the Lean er < with the task of picking our end TDK/I OF SI'AIiV June 14. 'pcrtant step luw.iuis Went Indian federaln>n wa: inadc t-da\ with |hl rir,i.lalnn I> all rncinlHTs <•. n \ nf th* Trinidad and TOM B*J Cooncfl Itaac Hyittll The memorandum tolloWl lite dwtffloTI bv the local i luncil to nil .i two-m tki mfarenct oi tha Bntith Caribir AsfOCtaUom to I" lielH at P(rt-of-Spnm In A Tim ibjad confddai Ihc furmalion of a pan Weat Indian court "f appi I aj council <>f Hritisl Ciiribbean Har IrndiriK to tha ckrlflcatton Hid unllteaUoi of IOKIII practice and colom.il lawn. '.•'<< Li lake place on August aj an,! BSJI meeting of the Bui on or Trinidad and refaau will lw held next Sntut i i Hv.tt.iii |.inu nut in th< mi moi sndum ttel palttlcal fedeia%  • %  >" ""• '""n oomlrts i .iui.iie.iOt -I....,,f ,., n.i ARGUMENT ENDS IN EGG BATTLE MARSKlU.Ks. Junr 1). MUnuikU'o black i-.l -ar armed who waa r u hi I Urn verbal balUe roolliHiea un Ul one noticed he ->n front of an rag store. Thru Uie ii KIMII m I i -I aa Ions as Use supply of en>.— II'. Kuznctsov l.i Secrets From Iladioninn LONDON, June If The Soviet Embassy ser Secretary Pavel Kumetsov nn I...niton Court on Saturdst the man to whom the Brit Foreign Offliv radioman r mcial secret* wa< 'ill in T don on Monda> Rumours over the week-i %  Kii'n.'.A left London wii he retiring Ambassador (lent /nrunln Oft the Russian s 'telaSMtrav. Mil' a II u %  assy spokesman said the offl vlth his wife and son Mlscha s[> the week-end In the fhnba< hOUBI ..utsnle I-ondon Ktirnetanv, the fifth ran> KmlMsas' offlrei wss named ul. i *..!!., Five hundred and ninety seven votes were cast, and fourteen WBf* spoilt Polling was comparatively light throughout the day, but a slight difference in the atTendance at the Polls was noticed D thiearly morning and latt afternoon Thr da passed without incident, anfl %  vi %  ivihing was rgnet and orderly Polling took place between 8 a m. and 4 p.m and the counting which started at about 4.15 pn lasted until about 4.M p.m. Mi F. J. Cola, J.P., w. I and Mr. R M Cave, .1 P ...U-i as Sub-Sheriff After the Sheriff had dadanfld the results. Mr. J O. Tudor thanked the Sheriff, the SubSheriff and the polling officers for the 'admirable manner" in which they had conducted the proceedings. He said that it was his first effort, and he had a doughty opponent in Mr. Blackett He therefire had beaten a good man Thanks For Support He also look the opportunity to thank all those who found it con-: venlent to attend the polls and gffsj him their support, and prom.ed to do his bit for the benefit | i.f the parish nnd the Island as n [ whole Mr. Dan F. Blackett said it waa) .indoubtedly a pleasure for him *Q say that he accepted his defeat by Mr. Tudor In "a most gracious manner." Mr. Tudor had been able io gel 85 more voters than he had been able to get, but he felt that the large number of votes which he had received would entourage him to come again. pad that with the passing of the Vestry System he would Tudor when a majority if the poDUlatlon of t: would have had the right to vote Mr. Blackett expressed regret that less than i of the registered votert for the Vestry led the Polls, and said h Beckett Continues U.K. Arginnente Over Oil Dispute THE HAGUE, June 18 Uritain's agent Sir Eric Beckett resumed the presentation of British arguments in the AngloIranian oil dispute before tho International Court of Justice 1 Monday. I-ast Saturday, the tint part of ;lie British pleading* was compMed Beckett dealt with Iran's Ha i i that Britain had "abandoned IU nationalised Iranian oil-1 undod this claim <>r, the British note following the AvcrCtl Hsrrlmon, to tsrtM lha jiarties ti.gether Beckett m hat men he has got together six ot ih.IWM i It ulu h swept aside all opposition In i Instance J.unalcu UM English practice goveitilng the functions of e-ninsel and solicitors while tha Windward nnd leeward Islandand TObasjD barrister* are entitled to an if. avtry respect as %  oUeHon i Bartaadaa ami iini GRENADA Juiut 111 "' %  tween she lw. To-da> %  l>sil> fileassMT twiied ayajema. Even the system of law u statament of Hon. W A liustn''".'' '"itorlal dlfferencos. moat SSBMI he declared thaa r oto Jl*L V ,VI ,"* while he was in favour -I Kederh*ad on Lngllsh common law %  I.,,,, i... would not allow Jamuiia S }***.* nrm ruo *' 1 , ln Fronch nvil law and British Busta Won't Let Jamuicu Be Kailroudetl information to (he Soviel lomat —I'V O. Tl IH n and vote other than the desire Io have a change in the system of the Local Government. Uackatt said he appreci. help of those who assisted him. and the support giver by those electors who voted for h.m. \: MA Tudor, in moving a Vote of Thanks to the Sheriff and i i.Don the •larmonlous way in which the proceedings were conducted, and "X pressed the hope that they i' .old he spared many yean nore to conduct similar elections. Mr. Granvllle seconded the vote of thanks, and replying, the Sheriff commented upon the 'smooth running" of the campaign, and said that In iptta "' %  oasO between the two les who were prominent Chiiul's Premier Toasts Nehru NEW DK1.HI. Jun. i %  i-lsl China's Pi.-micr Chou Eh Lai has thanked Prime 'awaharlal Net • ntli-pend<'nt Foreign Policy • ipiiia on Monday. At a banquet Saturdav m honour >' the build or bay homes. It takes affect from m tt month The money la to come fn > l the Sugar Industry Labour VMBb> Fund which now stand! it Fieailv $1,500,000 I The objective of tha scheme is to ; aripa out tho "ki ist..t barn i system and to help workers to get proper homes The |n-r. will be free of interest but trn re will be a smell service chai ga %  >f no v*de land. The government IsM made available $100,000 DM laying out new building aiutch |a imllar tii the legal practice of South ir to the legal practice i Africa. and well know n by all cl, a bit surprised because he j did not in any way Interfere with could not say that there waa I the harmony and quiet of the any Incentive for them to comeelection. Difcios Writes To Iferriot PARIS June 16. Jaded Communist leader Jacquaa IJuclos asked National Assembly President Edouard Heeriot, Monday night to arrange hi* t'-mpornry freedom so he can protest the circumstances of his ariiM from the floor of Parliament. Coannuanial I*arty De>'• -I f-Mjr pn*' IIeiTi(-t In the cell of Sante prison • awaiting i>. merit's next rtop in its attempt to charge* that he plotted %  gainst tho IntarnaJ lacurttj i-f Upstate.— v r. .loaded Into Federaln I would not allow to lake the place of hard ilnanci.il frets and added' "Ja n aa d OB • % % %  < not bt i dina*a*M Into I i without full and uudisputable evidence that B.W.I. Federation will lha islands and the region ... ., v.holr Saying that he is prepared 'o sign the report on Federation recently clrafte.1 by the Jamah n Legislature's Committee. Husti -; maata .said he did so with tlons. "My reacrv 'mns ai,ti J will never agree to plai. |-> ernmont t lev> tax on whether Jamaica Trinidad. S Vinrent or any other island Tax On tli, paopfa muit \ I l individual unitary BJOV %  ke roaosrvation • 'Ji-vi-rnment p i be financed baGatak grave raaponsibility n>>\ Jamaica but aw to the W<-r i ba ..t. ID tall will i %  better off no* worse off ul |-etpU> jiupiiort'M federation with* %  ii-ideration of its grav. r %  paota oaoaun thaw gra Irylng a n > %  ''' %  "'" •' %  P" : %  j<*s for themselveI '' ; staU-menl v. id-ieri "hut I shall do notl. question I't'tf^r-iHi Madi Goiisinissioiier CANBKHUA. External AfTan tnnounaod Mo ippolnunanl of I T Hodgeoon oi. Australian H I 'ommhwlii %  ifrtca. Slnoa ifl*t> ilodseson I Tokyo ... r.nt h i %  rolth RepreaotttaUvi on ;! %  < Mlie.1 Council for Jnp^in %  f the Australian MKIn the li*l of Talks get added i m the woate-aod wcrs %  hiKild offer to meet with Russians B iues. the position 'hat the Beds must tnst ;grec to i political survey %  sd> aUona hv \he *>tassSB> and pechaps the hare hava baa*, in he eVssasts, and nntNTI nTORht n ti %  re ught I Romulo Will lirtHiilea.Hl WAMONOTOM im Phiiippiiv i (iiiios Homuio on Juno IB will i Cloakroom" Progrmnp i %  ork. .ill hanIlr the It,t. %  1 in honour of Philiphm %  looo Rival — TJT. um ii t in German Arms Cost $7,000m. — ftfcCioy WASHINGTON .1 u il Monday tha' United Btataa High Con i r. HI. -....mm Id it the o i' t \'t man n •XOOOd $7,000,000,000 during the* ii-xt three years. The United .States will h<-lp pay the hill With 'I ft %  %  U h ... I ..piit'ipnat. and saM. m were in a statemen in the re-<*rd of Oil mat V .:,, i. Helattons Commitiee hr.iimgs on '' ulisequent to his tosll Polish Counten* Slabbed To Death LONDON. June II A beautiful Polish Cow ot r ved as a British sp> European underground during the war. and helped thousands fT Allied scf^icemen to escape the) Nazis, waa stabbed to death m 'uW London hotel Monday. Dennis George Muht %  porter at the staid London Heform Club, waa arrested at and charged with DhUl ng to the slaying. Scotland Ynrd cslla,) ^h,. .layin* of MrChristine 36 year-old widow, decorated by France and Britain for gallantry . "the old. old story of a leilouo faVar." v.r aetrunetiUl to Jamaica or the Wi It.dles aai ]'. not r> (rate if it is going to hi than to h""lp oi t lifelong thing not iust but always". I N moiratii iii in it waa —I Senator Gu> Reninon Operts Hurricane Talks P'Hrr-OF-SPAIN. Jun.. Ifl tin* fourth TI %  ( ommitte, at Kent House thta inormng Acting Gover-. that Ida ns would be happy and 1-afuataVl Th.iiiaaHtal sssndad b) rapi A est Musi Live Up Io Their Ideology NSW YOHK, Jun.16 SiXty-Ona delegates from 1 lountneft to the World Assembly U armament Conference runa lotii, on Mackii. ae Island. Michigan, left for .ilioard a spec! BOAC 'hartered plane ami pn a "was %  r. delegate l*rince Ismael luet IlassJii. told reporters at the rpori bora that tin"Wi-st asual df the Caribbenn. tho live up to their ideology" if they siAtrv and Canada, will want to win thrfriendship of tha latl three day. Comml ,,