Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


Sun

Fe LT
ESTABLISHED 1895



ap Advo

BARBADOS, og) ty

24-Year-Old Jailed For

Radio Operator Held s
Without Bail For Trial

LONDON, June 14.
WILLIAM MARTIN MARSHALL, 24-year-old Visitors To









. . PRICE
i bid

Giving Rus









SIX
®

sia Secrets

British jet And

‘Turbo-props
OVER 100 IN THREE YEARS



Nee iaithign lance =

RIDGWAY VISITS U



~

NKNOWN SOLDIER'S TOMB IN PARIS

mang

-



'
t
i

radio operator in the British Foreign. Office,

BETWEEN NOW AND 1955, well « ne hundred
has been formally charged with smuggling State Of Bivens geturbine mainline pass ireraft (jets
secrets to the Soviet Union. After the first hear- Barbados S08 SO fre) Wilh be Guilt for the witt ae
ing in the Magistrate’s court, Marshall was ordered The output will expand still ee © Proeeer

capacity is built up

edt ee. a a dates

to be held in prison without bail. He did not enter
a plea.

At the first hearing when he was charged earlier
at the Police station however, he said: “I deny
the charge.’’
ite Clyde T. Wilsoh ordered Marshall’s next

Spent $3m.



Gromyko New —° 0°:
‘ i number of eae ' jr ? A vor h
arkin vessels fr arbados A b reesgy f oweret y the
for the period 1051-52 was 4,827 7” m CASsSac or t Bi ' : '
as compared with 4,617 for the |



Magistr









































|
hearing in a week, at which time he would be expe eriod 1950—51 according to r
+2 xpected | P é 8 | rbo-prop et
to plead P the Annual report of the Barba- a ne on | One A Month
Sa Raniitack Wiabik wih Lethe ic ia alin i bre dos Publicity Committee. is eae wails eal
Scotland Yard anti-espionage agents arrested the youth] ‘There were less vessels disem- LONDON, June 14 |... a et oe ieee
who looks like a high school senior, in a London park last | barking passengers for the period The surprise appointment of Pe and t heiis stead
night. Marshall, formerly a radio operator in the British rts “ own the perio’ the roe deputy Foreign Minis- |; i Wi 384,. a secs
~ 2 : n ocaiaias saath ati a leans eed ° : <5 owever. nese numbers ter Andrei Gromyko as Ambassa- e af % et naa
Embas y in Moscow, specifically was accused of violating | cre 426 and 469 respectively. der to London forecasts a major Eta een
Britain’s Official Secrets Act by giving information on] "The report shows however that Soviet diplomatic offensive against |POUCS NP Shatin hers’ works.
“diverse dates and at diverse places” to Pavel Kuznetsov, | there was a considerable increase the rearmament of Germany, dip-]i}\ Guiput at that time wil be
second Secretary of the Soviet Embassy in London. The|in the number of calls made by lomatic sources said today. loubled. The number of Comets
hau a) ia Ge ee eulavis a Special Cruise Ships to Barbados ‘ . t of ee a wee
| charge said the information would be useful to an enemy. | Guring the 1951-52 season. Such! Sources said that Gromyko’s] 2 XR cee mee, Ae Ke and
Chief Inspector William Hughes ; calls totalled 8 as against 3 for the appointment, part of the biggest ; olls sted he oe by go
said that Mayaiait: “ice caerbated previous season. — at * Scviet diplomatic reshufles since m ares whe prog nee Steg =
adie weriiing Pine ‘Corie’ V ne la Visitors to the island from the she war, appears to signify Mos-][‘."* es XX ae Sh OFOers 105 ie
arm ith, Manca’ tatecat® os enezue United States, Canada and Vene- cow’s. readiness to negotiate, with | “Y°"-powered Comet and will do
Tila HOE Adentihed. ‘The Wocelin ° . zuela circulated the equivalent of the West on Ambauassadorial level 1° o sh ut t ae ae ae ateee
| Office refused to confirm ox deny | Russia Bre $3,031,055 .00 CW.1.) eras if the Sov iet proposal for a higher produ ion o von or the Ser-
the report that this second man | The report is.as follows:— a ees Tens Vi tion at the Wey
was Kuznetsov and that he hadj , ee eer bridge ore ent b r
claimed diplomatic immunity. The e tions It appeared that the diplomatic) 614", a Gon a
| Soviet Embassy did not comment.| BARBADOS PUBLICITY Sflensive (Would. be centred on! Dob ey, et eee
A Foreign Office spokesman de- MOSCOW, June 14 COMMITTEE } . > ee L suite bd: Is opposition tplan “ft tepping up p odueking
clined to say immediately whether] yyoscow has severed diplomatic ae Pree + ¢ > ’ en haees ies ee to . Ferman i440 six a month. Much of this {
ita . te di . | as Ss § atic : Ri yay, « ‘ ent, e 4zondor ap- : seh ea 7 ei
| Ramtatrvisee een callie gin eee REPORT 2 hres macia A waa sari Dw sn 3 a er ey |i wt | isi iin Sa
cere i Bes 4tlthe second such ac his year, sy me er, 8 rench flag. a a 30 nce tbe handled by becontract, with
Government would take no action | following the break with Cuba | Annual Report from Ist April, Behind them, wearing sunglasses, ig Gen lsentowc retiring NATO chief, (International Radiophoto) saree oe emcee or Leal embly ‘Weybridge,
feee would predate the jury in when Batista seized power. 1951 to 31st March, 1952 | <2 =e ire ee : + ; to Foreign Minister A na re¢ p) where 1 huge ney shop—now
Marshall’s case, — he ; Vyshinsky was ;: ae : almost complete ll be used for
Asked whether the Soviet Am-| In the Havana case, the Soviet . ‘ | o ‘ ih nsk} s announced to~; 4" ork Fifty-four Vise ‘
bassador Georgi Zarubin had been] press indicated that Cuban au- Publicity Committee om 6 res “ oe ie ve the shift of Ambassa- ave : Iready he ig yes ‘ nak tee
informed of the case the spokes-|{horities were acting under United} During the year the following! al a a Wastin Zarukin from London | delivery by 1955. ,
man said: “I think not.” Zarubin,|states influence. But now the|ladies and gentlemen served on| egeiuiner wngon and) follows the} “at Bristol, where 25 Britanni
} who was Ambassador in Canada|qeputy Russian Foregin Minister|the Committee:— e - peg or of Alewander Panyushkin ' a injing te belie tulle: for the
when the Soviet spy ring was|tolqg the Venezuelan Charge} J. Niblock, Esq.,—Chairman. | ~ Chin UP on to Peiping,! British Over A binary Corpor-
broken there in 1946, has just been |p’ Affaires formally “that the Ven-|__E. K. Walcott, Q.C., M.C.P — e ] Cl ee Ne) an > rs ee lation. toolit up is well ahead for
see Washington. He was|ezuelan Government obviously | Vice Chairman | ecammpaiaien maximum production. Pt seg ire
absolved of any part in the Cana-|acte orders of North American A. C. Boyce, Esq.—Hon, Trea- . ; being de for duplica
dian ring’s activities by the Cana- pote ae left unpunished crim- surer, Barbados has nothing to be ashamed about as regards ‘a pie ane’ toeaoiaae cupliceess
dian Investigating Commission, iral action of the Venezuelan Th Honourable The Colonial x T their housing when compared with other West Indian Transport Fares Io of the Prote turbo-prop engine
ee slice, the reaki - Secretary. : ve Sa nvator ans . j well. un. ¢ :
_ Conviction under the Official ecm ae tas Hon. V. C Gale, M.L.C. Gas eaches islands generally, the Secretary Manager of the Housing , : is well up mn the progress being
eee a icine of. internadiodint law.” Mrs. J. Niblock. Board, Mr, T. ©. Lashley, told members yesterday, Be Increased In B.G. © ' le alreraf
snalty o years sonment. ,

A. R, Toppin, Esq.



Prisoners

i fatory to ting “a report on his visit to Antigua, e el
That is the sentence now being] y]{ was reported in Caracas that} Miss J. Kysh—Secretary. A haat ame)ica and Trinidad. Ph cb: ila ;
served by Klaus Fuehs, canvicted|yenezuela has broken diplomatic) Mrs. G. Johnson—Asst, Secre- ° : \ Sucre 8 report will be ready for publication at the next) qy a ee Tee Tae SOD
of giving vital atomic secrets to|relations with Russia because the tary. | e ence 4 Pp . , GEORGETOWN, B.G. June 14. -
the Russians while working #8 one /Soviet showed “contempt toward | Miss F. Bullen— Clerk-in- | meeting of the Housing Board, British Guiana Government to- |

of Britain’s top atomic specialists. |the Venezpelan nation,” according




































































































- e -
Charge, Seawell Airport. Mr. Lashley added that Puerto/day announced that with effect Denionstrations
= ‘Ito a Foreign Office communique. ’ , , KOJE ISLAND, Korea, r o ’ Rico, due to Federal funds, were} trom July 21 rail and steamer 4 RD:
The Russian mission is expect- Financial Report [wo groups of stubborn com- l KK. Firms Seek doing very much work and Were | porvices will be curtailed’ | Against Ridgway
ed to receive departure orders to- A Grant of $32,290.00 was re-|munist war prisoners defiantly | “. very advanced in housing. Mr. throughout the colony, second | ¢
e “ day. ceived from Government for the|ignored orders and quickly learn- More Rights jLashley returned to the island/ (jase passage on railways will | ROME, June 14
onsptiracy The communique said Moscow] year 1951-1952, which wasjed a tear gas lesson in obedience - two weeks ago after a_ visit), apoliched: passenger arash Premier Alcide De Gasperi and
refused to receive the Venezuelan | $2,394.98. less than that applied/to their guards. In one of Koje’s| In © 1 Ln through other West Indian islands) -siways will go up eae tL vig {is Cabinet met today to survey
{ ] = =~ note of protest against “the un-| for. The Committee was advised! new five hundred man enclosures | n soltomies studying housing, from five to Bis mts sae hiss erni t plans for suppressing
nmcovere diplomatic conduct” of two Rus-| that Government was not pre-\c¢ommunists started singing and} At the meeting of the Board first class, thre c re fou 2 Pp eet ny Communist attempt to make
sian diplomats here, As a result| pared to approve an increase in! spouting demonstration at 5.00 a.m. (From Our Own Correspondent) — |vociorday it was decided to re- mite ray x ro four cents per | trouble hen General Matthew B
Eee Venezuela considers diplomatic re- | the Annual Grant until it was - Rede nt » warning It is expected that in the near[’. wend to the Government that]! ird class; ferry rates}; ete Se onl ee
? } After Reds ignored the warning . : ane 00a . Damerar ‘ 3
Fe 2. llations with the Russian Govern- | apparent that greater efforts} . 4 Sate ts cade Nake future English firms will not have the services of the two experts on | 2¢TOSs emerara and Berbice |, fou vy wisit to ¥
; a dozen tear gas grenades were ; c he U.K h session Ml a “
ment as broken and has instruct- | were made to obtain a larger thrown in the stockade and _pris- to get prmission from the HS) vided self-help housing be made|"vers wi go Up 50 per cent, | finister the Int x Mario
MEXICO CITY, June 14 ed their Charge D’Affaires in| amount of revenue from the com~) oners turned to weeping Treasury to form subsidiaries in) vvail ible to Barbados for a period | Y'% j6 to 24 cents first clas:, 8/Scelba gave the Cabinet a com-
tik ee atti ns meted os 1oq | Moscow to return immediately to | mercial community, With this in Five hundred Communists of {the colonies. Representations] or spout two to three months.|!9 12 cents second clas vhile } ensive repor nm measures
they fc und vi case ne s litical Venezuela.” view, a special appeal for new ther ‘of the small e slo ag (Seeking this were made last year! 6.6 experts, Messrs. Garcia and tariff on goods livestock and r in four cities whera
cer suivacy sages ti provoke subscriptions and for an increase i a : t a aaron 3 a at at a London meeting of the Com | Hanson vere seconded to the|/Parcels will be increased by 20! the ni SHAPE Commander will
Sah ae roa rel. The note sent to Moscow on | of subscriptions by those already ee € ee ae teder oni monwealth Financial Secretaries’} woot indies for a period of two}per cents, ome, Nap! Plarencaand
gover nment Presidential candidate Seay ae ert Venera dee subscribing, was made by the seranue ited i k z 1 blo ‘dless Conference, Hon, 4. R. W. Robert- years under the American Point) ,, } vinx f © the north
ee ‘ C Ee Pek tae eres ie eee Committee of The sani es grenad es, : fe bs tens . son, Financial Secretary, said!4 Programme, ie new charges are embodied | sip e headquarters which
1Z oo se oo ot charge D’Affaires Ley Krylov and | dos Chamber of Commerce. As aj quelling of to-day's vance 'O~|today he understood that geners! Ndi ieee in the recommendations made |, it inder See last night
R asinine. es jaained his aide M. S. Aliev for using | result, an increase of $1,760.00j|lowed the camp commandant) Ooicont is to be issued in the : Building Inspector _|by a Four Man Prove Cominit- | panned iy bite atin anti
oe 2 < yee: bo violent language in protesting the |over that of the previous year was Brig. General Haydon L. Boatner’s | tnited Kingdom by the Chancellor | The een ore Rs 3 oth aS tee appointed six months ago to! garthe a ener eee
Remote atior Saturday night artust Of two Russians at, Mai- collected. This was accounted for|nnnouncement the manths long t of the Exchequer, which wii re-|~°CD!4 Fas dT epee ey tae consider ways and means effect \. ly told Communists that their
pomene ano Dorms ae nthe queta Airport last Saturday. | mainly by the increase of regular | Koje Island prison mutiny ended.| ove the necessity of United > upeen. bed = oe SS ina the: wconomnies of tue ‘Tran ar eat hadulea® fen
vhen he atte ac © a > sirteiasd ten oH Y ain een . : SSIU) Wile y spector ¢ . S- i I . i
Palace of Fine Arts. ee Uruguay SRE oe Se: It is regretted that —UP, Kingdom companies obtaining eee te senior fica rh Michael port and Harbour’s Department Ito in Ror will not take

Three men arrested for des- vant malaihintns “Soluisenn” wins she. Se gs te Treasury approval for the form=| Fhe Commissioners had suggested The economies recommended are” pli ai
troytng government campaign Russia U.P bol ce 7 n R On P. B fo ation of subsidiaries in the colo~} nat the Build Tnepactor : be @ On page 6. “.

; : . ‘ . BIA Ue age 5 e 1 vecture t i tha re «Building Inspector ae
banners and posters reportedly} % e 4 nies. transferred to the Housing Board | 2°00%6%G99GG669GGGG69069SG99GGGGG99 FOU F9OVVIOON
confessed the planned disturb- 7 ne . | . Department if his services could % ss
ances. { | r th e o Tu tr dad, Janraica | Cheap Souvenirs be used there as in his present job x tho ho %

Sotomayor said “Agitators and Kk k | | ttl The Trinidad Government i8 he had very little to do. * MLCQ 0, 140 WV. &
elements affiliated with the move- e e a Ing oo 1 e Mr. J. D. M. Bell, Lecturer in| considering meysures to stop the; Mr, H. A. Tudor observed that} ¥ . . x
ment will try to provoke disorder Modern Economic History and importation of cheap Coronation when the post of clerk to the % hQCO: and %
vu aoe eee oe theatre. | N ti Of B il Research Lecturer in Industrial] souvenirs from Czechoslovaki | ¢ ommissioners of Health became | , ss

genera igue’ enriquz 1s ; , Relations at the University ofjand Germany. Aubrey Starck,| vacant, the Board could easily] X .
Jeading opposition candidate in| O 1ce raZl Glasgow, left for Trinidad yes-| U.K. Government Trade Commis-|poye allowed their Building In- % 0, those who x
Mexico 5 tense presidential race; terday evening by BWIA after | sioner, recently warned agains! |cnector to take up that post, as st ~
Ruiz Cortines + by the LONDON, June 14. spending three months in Barba-| these ‘cheap and tawdry” Coro~|too, he would be getting an in- % x
ee poke ne ae Foo || THE TIMES OF LONDON said that British trade and aoe, ec tecing to the Trade Union| nation.souvenirs branded in Eng-| creased salary. But instead of that R conomy eb x

ained yer Mex1c os ; . tesco er ’ _&' | students. . ‘ “insults”. ‘The ting . ate gr oar : nl ¥
years and is heavily favoured in| cultural influence in Brazil is declining because Britain He told the “Advocate” shortly eee en oy oo ond eenoti oo ea ri ee ee % x

> 6 elec ; ; : : ’ ; a 2 . tae 2 orts é , 8, | was sharge o » Scave ‘ . 4s :

ae re —U.P a ‘paying too little attention” to the South American abe berore mr ener ne vane ae Mr. J. A. Bain, is consulting thr | Dep irtment and also made him % A rare combination realised in x
ave public. It said at the same time that the influence of ork i eeie” pean el tie eS - Financial Secretary regarding |>jerk to the Commissioners. % 8
Germany, France, and Japan is increasing in fields where] <> jaa been most ki Se, ) steps to be taken agains! the im ‘ onaradita af % ‘
j 5 Britain has r ded 7 : . faloful te “hit mo the elaeee portation: of these cheap item The a oe ee ae letter x ~
COOK POURS Ina somnaiaaneiere review of Brazilian external trade ot “ot atiidenta:: eee jfrom Mr, J. Mi Hewitt, Secretary x « a 5 *
‘ ‘ ae : : c ae aan P * of the People’s Co-operative| $ ‘5 &
“PRODUCT” INTO the Times Rio De Janeiro correspondent said the recession] Ax far as the students were con- Wis. Court Of Appeal Trading Society, in) connection| © ‘THE LABEL WITH THE KEY %
, : in Anglo-Brazilian trade is expected this year primarily | cerned, he said that the eee, The oe : br ae a vase with the Board’s decision to ex-| % s
: racy Toh 1 hens « “ . ‘14 “0 , | ing thing had been a very hea thy } manen es’ ndian Cour’ 0 lore the possibiliti f estab-| Fe . ° ‘ gs %
BEY S F OGD pene Ereain may. iy sae pane ot cee — atmosphere of real companionship| Appeal and a General Council of lishing ms socaneatre shop at the % Wines, Brandies and Liqueurs %
4 ° hal the amount purchased in former seasons that had prevailed throughout) the British Caribbean Bar is to be} pine Housing Estate, % %
" aes ce ‘Ss sheep. The “There is the growing impres- the course. As a group, ar had! considered at a two-week Con it was decided that the co-oper~ | > K. WwW Vv PAARL TAWNY %

A Residency General spokesman : ° Pa i ; got on very well together, ference of the British Caribbean fic S0jn| B ee :

; ater a mich ¢ ities on here (in Rio) that not on oe : ative officer—Depertment of Sci- . ; x
said today that French authorities ussi1ans Clear By ee ves : oa ci nel i A “In many ways I have been} Bar Association at Port-of-Spain | ence wid . pietit ten outs ‘ st R K.W.V. Ceronation Wine x

vere investigating the alleged in trade matters but in her genera ; r 4 £ ure—would in 8
pteenpt at poisoning in the palace attitude Britain is paying too little wleasantly os by the pro- =n ; ag Sean eae s terview Mr. Hewitt and report | % * K.W.V. Old Brown Sherry x
:T ¢ Bey Bi is- : attention to Brazil and reasons for] 8ress tha e trade union move-~} toca r Councl-—isaac a'any | back to the Board, 1% ‘i ‘
pda err , eg eae Passage To this retraction do not always seem| ment has made in the Caribbean”,|Baid yesterday that political fed-| ‘The Secretary expressed the | % K. W.V. Amontillado Sherry %
couche lodged a formal demand e ; to be understood.” = ae ee eee ss an the et ay Ss Le oie view that a co-operative shop) % K. W.V. Old Oloroso Sherry x
with the Residency last night. to BerlinH hw The Times said that in the last| te™™ tories th some unions, g bu 1e administration of jus-|might be better if run by people| % x
investigate the matter : three years Germany's trade with level of achievement had beenjtice is ever present with and | of the same housing Scheme. 2 K.W.V. Sweet Vermouth. s
eels . eis ne ae ea enty t¢ higher than he honestly had ex-| properly founded upon a firm and ‘ . * <

hte er meen | ee Ses Brazil has ———- noch sae pected to find. Nevertheless, there] uniform basis, would greatly! ,., Road Widening % K. W.V. Dry Vermouth x
Slate’ omit cought fim. in the BERLIN, June 14. |Zentina as Brazil's, third largest| W%s # #teat deal of room for pro) assist in functioning with , the| 7° io consider purchasing the| & K. W.V. VAN DER HUM LIQUEUR 3}
act. 6k “pour! nine wiets é ede ; > Uni “totoe ena eress, for the building up of} Government and life when the|™Men* fo consider purchasing the ioc oir %
act of pouring a product’ WS ode . thr prin By supplier next to United States and) inions which were permanent political p00 came. property at the junction of % K. W.V. Superior “Key’’ Brandy . $
migals.to be served in the palace, the highway beer Berli d Britain. y and responsible associations pre- Beckles Road and Bay Street for] % : x
police said. t ghwaj etween Berlin an Because of the dollar crisis last pared to negotiate using the strike the purpose of widening and im-| $ 3

The Residency official refused to} the West and cleared the backlog| yes, aggravated by the failure of ; ; ' roving the site - *

ce whether th , that piled late vestardety: Wi year aggravate y the failure Of) weapon only in the last resort, + cae proving the site. x x
oe wieina Pars product, wag stl pops oe ae yester ay. estlthe Argentine wheat crop Brazilland horouring agreements to E rench Raids On This motion was made by Mr.) $ $
poison. He said a communique Ger an police said to-day only has looked to Europe. German,| which they had put their signa- John Beckles, x The %
went =, ued after labordtory te oe ee en clearanc@| French and Italian business firms] tures, ; Communists @ On Page 3 x %

yor. i ae checkpoint on the; },,Â¥e been active in Brazil and 2] Jn all their work he said that! si . vee. 4 4 x

bliaicieinnsee ligand east ent border, and traffic was Japanese trade mission is now|it was desirable that in nm any | R ihe ieciaes 1 LUCh WILL ACT AS } % “¢ $

3 proceeding normally negotiating a®reements. cases the emphasis within the enew eC FINANCIAL, ECONOMIC | * Pillars x
4 ,e ~ as f - is p —U.P. union should move away from a , eons ty 1 ee 4 ‘be x

C.D.C. Will Sell Its Last night there was « backlog er mctcaming leadese atk. Ot PARIS, June 14 | ADVISER TO WINDWARDS | % %

Fi 7 if. . 120 USE ae Soviets cleared wards organisations democratica ly | France renewed her nation wide (em Cur wk Cemensindeat) | % *

irst I at Cattle ee 7 i. six eae ey aon Plane Crashes Ti based on an informed membcr~|crackdown on the local Communist GRENADA, June 14 % oO %

instead c* the usual rate of fifteen, @ On page 10. * |party headquarters to-day with Mr. G. E. Luck, 30-year-old! $ .

3 “ § N 7 . 4 yee yer id) ¢ .

SALISBURY, South Soviets ¢ ' tous Sad 4 = a BN police raids near Paris and a/Guj ‘rly GBSS Assist- | x x

Rhodesia, June 14 aaeaetae Aiea ae sy English Charnel vital naval base at Toulon the} a; in February last! % %

The first cattle to be fattened} - n cs ne ¥ . " ‘ Ministry of Inte announced eur appoints f stant S ary| > >
on the Colonial Development pie ys ee re LONDON, June 14 RC. Congress W ill | The q ssaeertae art 5 earar as} (Fir soa e ee i eo ise tare 2 Hea lth >
Corporation's rar in Northern|4V4eC Osnriais , sais ney hearc An Airlines charter plane with | authorit lisclose nae see bari in conor ig 2

vo pea “eon «|persistent rumours that Commun-] ¢j “rsons aboar. os W 7 T one Cy eee aon vel Windwards after a transfer since | % %

eC eee i oe a elt ts planned a huge “loyalty rig gy i pe aye Meet Every 4. Ye Ars {militant Communists had. been|1949 from the Governor's office as | x x

year and the ers raised} 7 . vs , s ile ¢ arreata ‘ a sh late last| / “ ‘hi oaihnee q

on the ranch e marketed in|¢heck” of eighteen million east|motor failure and five survivors ROME, June, 14 oe Teds -— iat 2 oa s panes Bact oy ¢ nat x and *

1956 R. L, Rot Manager of |Germans and would place “dubi-| were later picked up by an Amer- TY ieealie aes 7? ede ee cee ot e ewes at) Windwards, has been appointed to | % X%

the oject an interview|ous elements’ under serveillance jican freighter, American Miller, he catholic action newspaper |Saint Etienne i outhern France | Financial and Economic) % >
lend take their radios off Brighton Il Quotidanmo said that the per-| Interior officials said|Adviser to the Windward, conse-| $ %

I 1 th iginal plans for| — ; The other three persons are}™Manent committee of the Inter- raids launched early this morning|quent upon the d to a ¥ ° &

0 i quarter mill on | This coincided with the new missing. The twin-engined Con-| national Eucharistic Cong! were “very successful” at Toul my post of 4 $ Happiness $
1 the timate market-}|Communist threats to separate the |sul was carrying : 1 pa 0 P ad decided that religious gather-|}where two tons of Communist)Smith. Mr. I % S
of 50.00 ttl ear had!Red run East Germans state from |sengers from Croydc rt to!ing ich as that recentiy held at (rae oe = ayer . Bachele $ x
Sa < t? y ent to' any western influence. ri Le } wrance. | Barcelon culd be eld ery | seize ir yreviou raic I ar ‘ bt 6 bb 6 OOF 64,6656"
wr luence —U.P. ye en UP. celia liom allay : : re ro wlth 4 rs’ Cer PIPER SPO V9OVO CDDP PP POIV PD CPIDEL PPI PLEE ADIT
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PALMOLIVE
GOOD FOR BABY
IS ESPECIALLY
GOOD FOR You!



Fer Lovetiness AU Ove ‘sey BATH SITE ehiasigien





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rela:

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HEAR IT AT TRAFALGAR STREET. \

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WITH

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a“ Two hits! Canada Dry Ginger Ale
-»-Canada Dry Water—two sparkling
beverages for mixing cr d. inking re-
freshment. “Pin-Point Carbonation”
gives them the long-lasting liveliness
that gives you long-lasting enjoyment.

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and WATER









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* Amenica’s Firsr Fumily of Beverages

PHONE 4541 AND BOOK YOUR ORDERS TO-DAY.

FIVE





e





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| AWARD WINNER | i
}

{ BASED ON THE ORIGINAL PLAY OF
)

















SUNDAY ADVOCATE

R TREVOR BOWRING,
M Direetor of Messrs, DaCuosui
and Co., Ltd. left for England on
Friday morning by the S.S. Gol-

y

; =
@ =







Every spoonful gives you














felis sihsibicapaclaesio~esiihadaions ean oll fito where he will spend about
five months’ holiday. He wa Ac-
mT © r e a n d m oO re companied by his wife and
deerme ite italiani ele tt anlar Poudaugoler anda his motner virs.
; Violet Bowring

é ' y d Omer passengers leaving for
ne n e 7 & y a n e U.K. py the Golfito were’ Mrs.
ae ee ee W. H. E Garrod, wife | of the
g q PChiet Engineer of the Waterworks
a t sg € S$ Ss } who has. gene home tor @ short
iene aieiaabtadietenninnee } hei day, Mr..C. Christie, “Assis=
tant Engineer of the Barbados
Electricity Supply Corporation
@ Every spoonful of ‘ Kepler’ gives you a rich who has gone up on :ong leave
supply of vitamins A and D. accompanied by his wife and
@ = These vitamins are nature's wonder workers, daughter Lorna, Mrs. L: V. White
= gg. health and freedom from iliness. of Essex who was returning home

en,

after spending. six months’ hof-
| day steying, with her niece Mrs.
|C. Be Dowding at “Brambiey”,
Waterford, and Miss Evelyn Out-
ram of St. Matthias who will be
spending five months’ ‘holiday

Engineer Ends Holiday
ETURNING to Trinidad dur-
ing the week by B.W.LA.

women, chiidren—all should start
& king tasty *Kepler’ to-day. ‘

EPLE





& BURROUGHS WELLCOME &@ CO. PRODUCT were -Mes-wmdy Mines An Wickman
' Avents oF > 5 rene and their daughter Geraldine who
o om eee were holidaying here for the pa;t
Sse two weeks staying at. Sandy
Beach Hotel, Worthing.
‘ iT M Mr. Wickman is an_ engineer
GUARANTEED SERVICE. Bh). Mr. Wickman is an engines bes.
atty “te, diendh bad “euteors a mOoNEOn aha Fo, Lae, Annual Reunion
that we heave ternovad erred | Minister Leaves UEEN’S COLLEGE Oid Girls
yi Amite in Ane . 27
Willian Henty Street to John | EV. HUGH McADISTER, are reminded of the Annual

ire
Luilding between the Modern Dyes
Shoppe and Johnson's Stationery on
Broad Street >

Minister of Stone Church in Re
Tcrento which is in — affiliation
| with the Pentecostal Assemblies
of Canada, returned * home on
| Thursday via» Antigua and Puerto
|Rico after spending six days in
Barbados in conjunction with his
*® uncle Rey, Harvey McAlister,
® conducting religious services at
the Steel Shed, Queen’s Park and
the Christian Mission. He was Ltd.,
| Staying at the Hotel R>yal.
uncle has however stayed on to from Trinidad on
) continue the services.
| Rev, Cy A, Barker,

union which takes place at
Queen's College on Tuesday, June
17th, at 4.45 p.m.

There will be a netball match
between. “Past’’ and “Present”
girls,

Attended Funeral
. H. O. B. WOODING, QC.
and a Director of B.W.1A
and Mr. Colin Wooding of
His Trinidad Leaseholds Ltd., arrived
Friday by
B.W.1L.A, They came over to at-
Superin- tend the funeral of Colin’s father
|tendent for the West Indics of which took place the same a‘ter-
the Pentecostal Church with noon.

headquarters in Trinidad who ar- Transferred To Washingtcn

Stee BALDINI & COW. |




ET -
POOP POOL PLOE DDD ®®O@GQOGHY DY

I’m glad it’s here
again !!

JUDGE
HEAVY





SeODE SOD,







‘rived with the McAlisters, will *
ENAMEL WARE |be remaining in Barbados ‘for [REGINALD McCONNEY
about ten days before returning was the guest of honou: at
home, - a party held at the home of Mr.
; * and Mrs. G. L. Hinds, Welches
SAUCEPANS — Black, Ivory. Green * Businéss And Pleasure Christ | Church, on Thursday

(all sizes and shapes) | R. ROBERT JAISINGH, a Night. “Reggie”, who is a Senior





> iti ; ,j. Clerk attached to the Accountant

MUGS 3 | dent in ‘Trinidad, one Py ome General's Department, has been

COFFEE & TEAPOTS—2 Pint $| sion Agent, was. ainong the pas- Seconded to the B.W.I. Central

KETTLES—6 Pint (Brown) >| sengers who arrived here on Labour Organisation Office us

JUGS—2 Pint (Ivory) @| Thursday by B.W.LA. He is on Washington, D.C, ‘on three

” $| a two-week visit on business Months’ probation in the first in-

FRY PANS — 10 $| coupled with pleasure. stance, and after that for a period

® ; YS | For Four Weeks Gaba’ te tein’ te me USA,

, RDWARE SUPPLIFS 3) APRS. OLGA GRANNUM and [atbr this monthe :

8 GENERAL : aN amie Miss Muriel Sealy arrived 8; ’
1 er ne ane be tcc uneed 3 by B.W.LA. on Thursday morn- Full-Time Job



$| ing from Trinidad. ' They have
’|/ come in for four weeks’ holiday
% | and will be staying at Indramer
j| Guest House, Worthing. This is ald Mervin Ishmael of Barbados
Miss Seaty's first visit to the who now lives in Leicester. Mer-
colony but Mrs, Grannum spends vin served in the British Army
her annual holiday here. for twe years before transferring
“Bim”’ to the R.A.F, from which he was
| HE name submitted by G, demobiliseq in 1948. Coming’ to
Rice, “Grey House’. Marine Leicester, he married a local gir’.
Gardens, “Bimbird” has been They now have two children,
accepted in its abbreviated form Mervin hopes to take his ESc.
as “BIM”, the name for the degree in the next two years with
Auster Aircraft of the B.L.A.C, Censtitutional Law as his special
The Committee of. Management Subject.
cordially invites Mr, G. Rice for Paid Routine Visit
|@ spin on Tuesday, 17th June, at R. C. Lk, CHADDERTON,

about 5.00 p.m., immediately fol- Si
lowing the christening ceremon- Superiaven taut sl pe oe
er Sewing Machine Company, re-

Oo 918 ACTORY work by day and
enor F law studies by night is the

regular programme of 26-year-









TO-DAY 2 SHOWS ° p.am.,
A STAGE SHIOW FOR THE FASAELY
ROBEL DO — The Strongest Man on Earth

See a motor cycle go over his chest

CLE F © ON = Famous French Magician

c ies.
the BOOHOD Bros. — Stunt Kings ay ie say turned to Barbados on Thursday
. ot age too, is invited to at- morning by B.W.LA. after a
; end the christeni “ ‘9 8 3 -W.LA. t a
Pit 18; House 36; Balcony 48: Box 60: truly pelasign to ieee a routine visit to British Guiana
Kids and Nurses: 15e. House: 20c, Balcony though the aircraft is technicaily Ses news in connection with
; part of the club, nis firm.

its existence
here would never have been pos-
| sible without the generous sup-
} port of all Barbadians, the Public

Scout Notes:





1ONIEE — FONIEE 8.30.

TYRONE POWER ANN BLYTH who so enthusiastically attende= EXEt Ww ] IVE
re the dance at Paradise Beach rt

| Club last year, the members ol
| Government who endorsed and The Executive Committee of the
aided the idea thus providing the island Scout Council met on
| inspiration for the members, and Monday last at Scout Headquar-
|the many business firms who %!S at 5 p.m. The Island Com-
contributed financially and mate- â„¢ssioner. presented reports on
rially towards ‘the erection of the (#) The 1st Caribbean Jamboree,
| hangar. To “Bajans” of every (2) Bob-o-Job Week Campaign,
| Walk of life, this is your club and (c) St. George’s Week's Cele-
| your “BIM”, ’ brations,

Remember too, that club mem- _ The “Bob-a-Job”

hh NEVER FORGEL YOU

TALENT AUDITION-—This Morning 9.30 a.m,

ROODAL









report reveal-

EMPIRE ROXY

| bership is open to every member ed that a total = $1,016.69 has
| ; been received from 25 Scout

: beh af TODAY TO TUF. 177TH 4.20 & 8 15){}| Of the community over the age of ‘oat

TODAY TO TUR. TH 4.45 & 8.15 rop Xo tae howiie 17 years) viaiE. and pe oll Groups, 3 Commissioners and 1

Alexander KORDA presents



|“BIM” is here to stay for the donation, A more detailed report

“ FIRST LEGION ”

: =F = benefit of the communit r will be published next week. Com-
Vivien LEIGH Laurence OLIVER |sincerely hope that BIN Jes missioners and Scouters in charge
With Charles BOYER | will be. along ss0on to ‘akke ve of Groups are reménded that all

And

ecards, used and un-used, should
have been returned to the Honor-
ary Treasurer of the Association,

‘ (ON WOMAN " | family grow.
THAT HAMILTO Sally FORREST | Keefe BRASSELE The Committee of Management



1



and members
OLYMPIC : s is “i Pon Ohta e Mr. Osborne, when collections
TODAY & TOMORROW 14.30 & 8.15 NEVER FEAR thanks to all who have made the mo ce aaah "ee eee
Humphrey BOGART IN ROYAL | club 4 reality, and express their pe ia fh a awe ta ay adiaatt
{ jiuncere desire to have you with detay as a complete statistical re-
“'SIROCCO LAST TWO SHOWS TODAY , them at the christening. port must be compiled from their
4.30 8.15 s
AND ; cm (PSS SSS OSS SS
Jon HALL in - - - Gc Al T Y
“COWBOY AND THE “ HURRICANE ISLAND” 4» | The Gara es
‘. en—St. James
INDIAN AND TODAY and TOMORROW 8.30 p.m. (Next Door
With Gene AUTRY ms MAT. TODAY — § P.M,
as OCEAN DRIVE Bing CROSBY — Jane WYMAN
TUE. TH WED. 18TH 4.30 @ & 1D With. Zdmond O'BRIEN i in
; Be ‘HERE COMES THE GROOM”

“MAKE BELIEVE BALLROOM” Fe won por TUE. NTH 4.30 @ 810 TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY 8.20pm.

a oo * | Q°RACHELOR AND. THE _ COTTON FROCKS
AND ote Saute } Cary GREOBBY soxer: ‘ELASTEX SWIM

4 “BLOOD ON THE MOON” ¥ COTTON FLORAL

Robert MITCHUM s

ESOT



NOW IN STOCK



BRIDGETOWN















and Mrs. DAVID BADLEY.

SSE
JANETTA DRESS SHOP
SUITABLE FOR THE HOT WEATHER

STRAPLESS | BEACH DRESSES

|

SUNDAY, 1952

Palin

Wedding At St. Matthias
ESTERDAY afternoon at St.
Matthias Church, at 4.30
o'clock. Miss Angela Mary Inniss,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. L.
Inniss of,"Burford’,, Golf Club
Road, wes married to Mr.. David
lierbert, Badley, son of Mr. and
Mrs. J. H. Badley of “Laving-
ton”, Fontabelle.

The ceremony which was fully
choral with Mr. G. C. Williams
at the organ, was conducted by
Rev. M. E. Griffiths.

The bride who was given in
marriage by her father, wore a
dress of Jace and nylon, featur-
ing a tight fitting bodice and long

JUNE 15,



pleeves ,with a_ scalloped lace
yolk outlined in beads, The full
skirt was of nylon with lace

ferming a peplum in front and |
continuing into a train at the
back. Her head-dress was a lace
juliet cap with finger tip veil and
the carried a bouquet of white
rosebuds and spltees- 2

She-owas attended by Miss
Wendy Inniss and* Miss Pamela
Reed as bridesmaids and the
Misses Dinah MacNeil and Chris-
tine Thomas as flower girls. They
were all similarly attired in
dresses of pink embroidered or-
gandie over full pink net
skirts. They wore shaped head-
dresses in pink net and organdy
and carried bouquets of pink
radiance rosebuds,

Mr. Trevor Davies performed
the duties of bestman, while those
of ushers fell to Messrs. David
Inniss, David Read, John Grace,



With ‘Amsterdam News’

EWS has been received that

Mrs. Muriel Rollins has ob-
tained a position on the Adver-
tising Staff of the Amsterdam
News, New York. Mrs. Roilins
who was with the Editorial De-
partment of the Advocate, left
the Colony for the U.S.A. in
March to reside with her mother
and sister.

‘A Son Bill Simpson and “Boo”. Patter-
ron,
MNONGRATULATIONS to Mr. A
and Mrs. Victor oe lend ae tahoe oe.
the birth of a son yesterday * . ‘oad, “¢
morning. This is their second neleae Th eens spent at
son and mother and babe are , @ Crane,

dceing. fine.
Dancing Display At C.H.S.
HE Headmistress of Codring-
ton High School invites all
members of the Old Girls’ Asso-
ciation to a dancing display which
will be held on the lawns of the

Leaving ‘lumorrow
D* AND MRS. A. O. HEN-
. DRICKS who have super=-
intended the work of The Church
of THE Nazarene during tie pagt
three years, will be leaving to-
morrow maening by B.W.1.A. for

school to-morrow afternoon at Puerte Rico on: their way to the
4.30 o'clock, U.S.A. On leaving © the island,
they wish to express their sin-

Svent Three Weeks cerest gratitude’ as well as to say
RS. NICHOLAS MUSKA- farewell to their many friends.

‘LUK whose husband is em- They will be directing the Bar-
ployed with Clarke’s Steamship bados Exhibit at their world-con-
Agency in Montreal, returned to vention in Kansas City,..Missouri.
Canada on Thursday morning by Trinidad Civil Servant

T.C.A. + after amending thi -* ISS EMILY JOHNSON, a
weeks’ holiday with her parents Civil § ;
Mr. and Mrs. G. D, Frost of ervant attached'to the

Port-cf-Spain branch of the Gen-

“Stanmore Lodge,” Black Rock. — eraj Post Office returned to Trini-

Off To Dominica
EAVING by B.G, Airways on
Thursday morning. for
Dominica were Mrs, E. Har-
greaves and her daughter Sheila
who were spending a _ holiday
here. They came down by the
S.S. Golfite about two weeks ago
from England and were staying
at Cacrabank Hotel.

Mr. Hargreaves who had come
up from Dominica to meet them,
has already returned. He is Chief
Electrical Engineer employed with
C.D.C. for Dominica and St. Vin-

dad on Wednesday night by
B.W.1.A. after spending a holiday
here staying at “Kingsley”, Bath<
sheba, and the Hotel Royal.
Military. Policemen
Commended

(Ft CREIGHTON SEALE and
: Pvt. Richard F. Ford, twa
military policemen of the 175th
MP Battalion were recently com-
mended by Lt. Col. James E.
Long, Stuttgart Post Provost
Marshal, for the apprehension of
suspects wanted for armed rob~«
bery two hours

bank : after receiving
Back Home - oe

e commendation reads in

R. MAITLAND JAMES and party “I want. to commend Cpl.
his small son Jeffrey re- Seale ang Pvt. Ford for their

turned home on Friday afternoon
by B.W.LA. from Trinidad where
they spent three weeks’ holiday.
Mr. James who is Manager of
Bata, Swan Street Branch, also
visited Tobago.

attention to duty, alertness and
decisive action in making this ap
prehension, Actions such as theirs
are indicative of the good work
being done by the military polica
of the 175th.”

MEETING

tees and friends of the movement.
Mr. F, J. Cole, J. P., former Pres-
ident of the old South Western
Local Association was unanimously
elected to the Chair and the busi-
ness of the meeting proceeded.
The following appointments were
then made: President: Mr. F, J.
Cole, J.P., Vice-Presidents: Mr.
H. A. Tudor, Hon. Dr. A, S, Cato
and Mr. R. M. Cave. Honorary
Secretary: Mr, C, B. Long, Hon-
orary Treasurer: Mr. V.° I. Car=
rington, The following were nom-
inated representatives to the Island
Scout. Council: Mr. F. J. Cole,
Mr. C. B, Long and Scouter A.
Smith of St, Matthias Group. Five
Scouters, five Lay members and
ene member of each Group Com-
mittee were elected to serve with
the officers on the Executive Com-
mittee of the Local Association.

Scout Headquarters

From Monday next, 16th June,
the office of the Resident Tutor
of the Extra Mural Department of
the University College of the West
Indies will be situated at Scout
Headquarters (telephone 4653),
| Mr, Aubrey Douglas-Smith who is
the Resident Tutor, is also Scout
Commissioner for the Southern
Area. Consequently, S.H.Q. will be
the Area Commissioner's H.Q. and
Mr. Douglas-Smith will also be
glad to deal with calls for Island
H.Q. The office will be open daily
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m._Mondays,
Fridays and on Saturdays from
|9 aam, to 1.00 p.m.

returns,

The Executive@Committee ap-
proved of the awa§d of the Scout’s
“Thanks Badge” to the following
persons:

Mr. H. N. Chandler, Mrs, F, J:
Cole and Mr. A. Masterton-Smith.
The presentations will be made at
the next meeting of the Island
Scout Council which will be held
at Scout Headquarters on Mon-
day 30th June at 5. p.m.

St. Michael-South Local

Association

The Local Association of the
St. Michael-South sub-area in the
Southern Area was successfully
launched on Thursday night last
at Scout Headquarters, Capt. R. A.
Sealy, the Assistant Commissioner
in charge of the St. Michael-South
sub-area, welcomed to the meeting
a very representative gathering of
Parents and Guardians, Scouters,
representatives of Group Commit-

SSS,

to Singers)

in colourful Designs
SUITS
TWO-PIECE

| In the presence of a large
| gathering, and under the Group



Soe € Mr. George
(Dial 2310) Bit Mdm Mater ai | Spencer, nine Cubs of the 3rd
To-day: und Tomor- || ragcy to rues, |] Lait 2, emews, Today AN ALL ROUND UTILITY CLOTH 367 oon $ .84 Bridgetown (Cathedral) Group
row 445 & 830 p.m. he ; ai ; In Whi 1 | Were invested at § p.m. on Tihurs-
145 & 830° p.m, Warners Action n te and Colours | day on the ds of the Cathe
ee ec { grounds -
STARLIFE™ SIERRA HIGHWAY 301 PRINTED SHIOZE 36” 89 |dral Chureh House.
with 1eyihott a favourite (Coler) Steve COCHRAN re a a eee. Py sug Pe ame cr ain ete tte kivae pn 8 o~ Ceremeny oft
including Doris DAY, Audié URPHY and Y o s ie Toup’s new
Soe MacRAB & Gene Wanda ENDRIX, Matinee Mon. a Tues) OPENING NOw mi Cube t aaa the parents. of a
Nelso —— 4.45 p.m. also 4 ubs turned out in full strengt!
Thurs, Special 1.30 p.m, Pe oe eee ‘NGOS ChtaEe i to see the investiture ef their
saaenar herrett Doible: LRIONDE ieee, | FOREVER” LARGE SHIPMENT OF JOHNSON’S GOLDEN-DAWN WARE eee
‘ DEATH VALLEY” “EN SOCTETY” Ti Oe ee

and
“RENEGADES OF
THE SAGE"

———

Wed, & Thurs,
40 & 850 pm

John Garfield & Single and in Sets.

e Tea, Dinner, Coffee

Tues. Night (only)

8.30



tenner
(on

elas
Stage) |



oun 7a Week. 480" be WLLRGAL ENTRY” pee tan. -Atomeda i

8.20 a.m Howard DUF® & Action! Mi |

Giant Double - - “CALAMITY JANE” |/PROFESSOR CLIFTON},
“DALLAS” (color) Also the Western

& SAM BASS”
Yvonne DE CARLO

Gary COOPER &

Thrille
“HIGHWAY, 301”



“BRAND OF FEAR”













are aa oe eee Howard DUFF Wakely 2 | . Nal 4790 YOUR SHOF STORFS

THE SAME NAME BY TENNESSEE WILLIAMS: WITH VIVIEN

LEIC

MARLON KIM KARL
34 BRANDO HUNTER MALDE



T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

The Ceremony proper was con-
ducted by Mr, Cyril Braithwaite
(S. M. Bethel) assisted by Miss
Edith Knight (C.M.) and Miss
Joan Wickham (A.C.M.).

After the Investiture Ceremony,
the G.S.M. eddressed both Cubs
end Parents complimenting them
on the correct path the boys had

| taken towards manhood. After the

DIAL 4606 ceremony the Cubs played games.

TCAR NAMED DESIRE

PLAZA

es IRS. 19th

pia 2310) AE i}















——_

a





SUNDAY, JUNE 15,

1952



At Fhe Cinema;

OPERATION STARLIFT

Hy

G. H.

GIVING A BOOST to the warmheartedness of Holly-
wood show business, STARLIFT, with a galaxy of sereen

personalities can be seen at

the Plaza, Bridgetowm It is a

musical film, but not the kind usually associated with Doris
Day and Gordon Macrae, both of whom take part. The
film is based on the actual activities of the stars when they
visit Travis Air Force Base to entertain treops awaiting

transport to the East, and th
°



DORIS DAY.
As such, the glamour and in-
terest of the film depends on the

encounters with the stars, who
play themselves, and the talent
specialties of several popular
~ singers and dancers. These high-
lights are strung together on an
unobstrusive thread of romance
whereby a movie star and a G.I.
from her home town reluctantly
pretend to be sweethearts, for the
sake of a publicity stunt, and
after due time, find there is no
need for pretense,

Though they play themselves,
Doris Day, Gordan Macrae,
Wirginia Mayo, Gene Nelson and
..Ruth Roman are all part of the

main cast, and we have Miss Day

singing “You’re Gonna Lose Your

Gal” and “ ‘S’ Wonderful” to an

audience reaction that leaves no

doubt as to her popularity. Mr.

Macrae and Lucille Norman sing
_ “What is This Thing Called Love”

which is also interpreted by the
danting of Gene Nelson—tops as
usual — and Janice Rule. Miss
Rulé is a newcomer to me, and
her dancing with Mr. Nelson is
almost on a par with his.

The guest stars include Jane
Wyman, James Cagney, Randolph
Scott, Phil Harris, Gary Cooper
and Frank Lovejoy, with the last
three in a riproarin’, shootin’ bar-

room drama of the wild and
woolly west!
The film is somewhat lengthy

and necessarily episodic, but you
get your fill of famous stars,
set to entertain the troops.

VLL. NEVER FORGET

YOU
Playing at the Globe, this film

all

TYRONE POWER.



e returning wounded,

stars Tyrone Power and Ann
Blyth with Michael Rennie in a
somewhat confused period drama
in which an atomic scientist,
obsessed by the grace and dignity
of the 18th century, and suffering
from a nervous breakdown, be-
comes reincarnated as one of his
ancestors and relives the events
recorded in an old diary. During
the first part of his sojourn in the
18th century, his foreknowledge
of events and scientific discover-
ies, plus a sprinkling of modern
expressions in his speech, set
him apart as a sort of wonder
man and a wit, but gradually he
is aecused of madness and witch-
craft, and when he regales the
beauteous Duchess of Devonshire
with a recital of her charms, her
popularity and her intellect as
though her demise had already
taken place, action is promptly
taken and he finds himself about
to be committed to the asylum.
Fortunately, he rejoins his own
century in the nick of time, pre-
sumably cured of his love for the
good old days.

_ The transition from the present
time to two hundred years ago is
emphasized by the change from
black and white to technicolor
photography, and though there are
some quite beautiful settings and
lovely costumes, some of the
backgrounds are obviously painted,
whieh [ found jarring.

Tyrone Power and Ann Blyth
make a charming couple—whose
romance was one thing not set
down in the diary—-but their act-
ing is stilted and I _ preferred
Mirhael Rennie as Mr. Power’s
colleague and friend and Dennis
Price as the effeminate fop of the
times,

SIERRA

_ SIERRA is a dramatic Western
in Technicolor showing at the
Plaza, Barbarees. Filmed in the
mountainous country of Utah, the
scenery is magnificent and a
glorious background for the action
of the film,

Starring young Audie Murphy,
Wanda Hendrix, Dean Jagger and
Burl Ives, it is the story of a
father and son who live the lives
of outlaws for fifteen years, owing
to the father’s conviction of mur-
der, on circumstantial evidence.
While rounding up wild horses
one day, the son meets a young
girl who is lost. It so happens that
she is a lawyer—which didn’t
seem highly eredible to me—but
with her help. and the timely con-
fession of the real killer, the

father is exonerated.

Both Audie Murphy and Dean
Jagger do good work—the former
as the bitterly anti-social son
whose loyalty to his father is in-
tense, and the latter as the parent
whose mistaken conviction has
forced his son to be an outlaw.
Burl Ives plays an interesting old
character—Lonesome—a friend in
need and a wandering minstrel.
Mr. Ives is famous for his inimita-
ble making and singing of Ameri-
can Folk Lore ballads to the ac-
companiment of his guitar and his
performance of these songs—
“Sarah”’—in particular, which is
sung to his mule—is admirable,
Wanda Hendrix is not particular-
ly convincing as the lady at-
torney, but she is pretty and is
adequate for the rest of the role.

As T mentioned at first, there is
plenty of action with an out-
standing sequence depicting the
stampede of over a hundred wild
horses. This is made more realis-
tic by some special angle photo-
graphy and it is the exciting
highlight of the film.



SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



rardening Hints PARM AND GARDEN xy acricoa

Grow More Food

HAVE YOU STARTED THAT
VEGETABLE GARDEN YET?
“ If not, do not delay. The
ground is still dry, yet the
showers which we have had have
softened it sufficiently to make
the digging of beds and the laying

In a short = =
start, ground w be
wet and cloggy. ad it will
therefore be much more difficult
in every way to lay out a garden.
an deciding what oe in
e vegetable garden, a_ good
plan to include certain foundation
things as permanent members,
thi that are used almost daily
in kitchen. These are Pars-
ley, Peppers, (sweet and hot)
Seasoning (Shallot, Thyme, Sweet
Marjoram) Bonavis, Peas, Spinach
Pumpkins, Okras. To keep up
a supply of these essential things
needs only a little forethought
in planting. Such ants as
Okras, Peppers and others often
seed themselves, and these seed-
lings, which are as a’ rule very
hardy, will found useful for
re-planting. vegetable garden
should be without a Spinach vine.
Once started, Spinach gives no
trouble providing it is near
something that it can climb on.
It needs no help, but will climb
and arfange itself, and will prove
a most useful member of the
vegetable garden, Spinach is not
a very popular green, Fv it is
rich in iron, and so v ble in
our diet. Its unpopularity is
probably due to the fact that it is
seldom cooked or served palata-
bly. If Spinach is well cooked
and rubbed through a sieve into
a puree, and served hot with a
sprinkling of cheese, or a spot of
butter on the top, it is one of the
nicest of our greens.

Considering how_ eratic the
imported supply of English Pota-
toes is, and the scarcity of yams
and sweet potatoes, it would only
be sensible to grow a crop of
English potatoes in the vegetable
garden. As these potatoes are
apt to rot if kept in large quanti-
ties for any length of time, it is
better to plant a small quantity
every few weeks, and so keep up
the supply of fresh new potatoes.

° ge skill is needed to grow
Eng potatoes. They can be

grown all the year round, but they”

the wet months from
te December.

Choice Of Sweet Potatoes

Consult tlre Department of
Science and Agriculture as to
the best kind of potato to plant.
It would be, a pity to plant just
anything and so yerhaps be dis-
appointed in the lack of suc-

cess.
Preparing The Bed
English potatoes can be plant-
éa in the ordinary vegetable
garden bed, but, it must be well
repared a couple of weeks be-
re the potatoes are due to be
planted. Fork in plenty of well
rotted pen manure, and some
feat mould from the Compost
Heap. Make the whole bed rich,
but light and friable.
To Plant
Choose small potatoes to plant,
and if this is not possible then
cut large ones in two or three
ieces. But remember, each pota-
or piece of potato, must have
referably

—

one eye or bud, and
two or three eyes.
potatoes, or pieces, four inches
deep and one foot apart. Plant
with the eyes up, and, if a cut
bit, with the cut part down. Two
weeks after the potatoes have
sprung, apply a dressing of
V.G.M. and four weeks later give
another application of this wse-
ful manure. These potatoes grow
close to the surface, so it will
probably be found necessary,
during their growth to bank the
earth up around them to keep
them covered. Because of this
tendency to grow up out of the
earth, some people plant the
potatoes in shallow drills or gut-
ters, so that they can more easily
be kept covered with earth.
When the potato foliage starts
to turn yellow and dry off it is

time to reap the potatoes. Care ¥

ener neat

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FOR YoU!



lant the }

THE PUMPKIN

FAMILY—IiL

To-day, we continue withthe cultural requirements oi

this group of economic plaris,

generally referred to it

literature as the cucurbits. First and foremost, they require

a rich soil medium for best

results—plenty of well rotted

pen manure preferably, or rich compost, thoroughly incor
ported into the planting sites; secondly, as a group they

prefer to be sown directly

in permanent positions rathe:

than transplanted from seed boxes or nurseries

Thirdly, an adequate supply of
moisture is mecessary, hence
plantings any time from May to
January are likely to be the most
Successful; Fourthly, they are all
subject to powdery mildew of the
leaves and, in the case of cucum-
bers and melons especially, unless
brought under control promptly
by spraying with Bordeaux mix-
ture or dusting with sulphur, this
disease is liable to spread and
eventually ruin an entire crop.
Pamphlet No. 3 of the Agricul-
ture Department tells all about the
disease and to quote: “To control,
the vines, on the first appearance
of the disease, should be thor-
oughly sprayed with a 4—4—50
Bordeaux mixture or dusted with
very finely ground sulphur.” We
Suggest, therefore, that growers
keep handy some sulphur so as
to be ready when the attack be-
gins, as it surely will come. Apply
the dust by gentle beating from
a muslin bag when there is
moisture on the leaves, To make
Bordeaux, follow the instructions
in*the pamphlet or seek the ad-
vice of an agvicultural officer who
will gladly help you in these or
similar troubles, until the neces-
salty experience is gained. Now,
for some further detail culturally.

The pumpkin may be regarded
as the most important food plant
of the group and probably the
hardiest. It often defies the normal
preparation of a well defined bed
and, so long as its main root can
get sufficient nourishment, the
vine soon rapidly spreads, It loves
a rubbish or compost heap to run
over and we have even seen it
quite happy and preductive over
a stone pile. Where field culti-
vation is taken seriously, a good
plan is to make up fairly lar,
mounds or hills, mixed with libefal
amounts of good dung; inserting
the seeds at the sides of the prep-
aration and leaving not more than
two or three plants to develop to
each hill. In the semi-shade of
widely spaced catch crops like
Indian Corn, pumpkins seem to
thrive. When the vines begin to
flower, examine the individual
blooms—some will be ‘male’ and
some ‘female’, which is a charac-
teristic of the group as a whole
must be taken when doing this
ob not to injure the potatoes.

se a long pronged fork. and in-
sert it well to one side of the
plant, lifting the whole clump
out at once. Should any of the
potatoes get injured, keep them
‘on one side to be used first.

LLLP LLLP OLA LLANELLI.

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f bees and other imsects are
numerous, hand pollination will
not be necessary but it often is

to ensure good creps. Experienced
farmers know this and act accord-
ingly, but beginners may over-
look this point,

Cucumbers, squash and melon
are more adaptable to the garden
bed, need less space than the
pumpkin but the procedure is the
same, Sow seeds in small, well
mangred hills, spaced about two

or three feet apart each way. On
farms where there is an old trash

come-top heap site with moist
ceeaying compost plentiful there-

in, se plants find a medium |
much to their liking, Cucumbers,
in )purtieular, appreciate some)

brushwood to run on, They beat
betier and the fruits are kept of
the ground where they are more
subject to fruit rots and boring
worms. Putting flat stones or bit
of old shingle under developing
molons is advisable. Do not le
cucumbers get over-ripe before}
harvesting. Let them be crisp and

tender for the salad bowl
Marrows and christophines like

some sort of arbour or fence to

run on. The _ christophine 1

propagated from a growing fru
and received detailed attention in|
these notes under date of Sunday, |
August 12, 1951.. |

BARBADOS Fi.) oiNG

From Page

In presenting his motion, M:
Beckles said he betkeved whey |
would agree with him that sine
the Board had entered upon th

Bay Land Housing project, vehi
cular. and pedestrian traffic had
increased considerably and ever

effort should be taken to minimis
the risk of accidents oecurring my
that area }

“My motion therefore seeks ta]
eliminate the blind corner at the
junction of Beckles Road and Bay |
Strect, which, if effected, would |
give greater freedom of move-|
ment to both pedestrian and vehi- |
cular traffic, particularly to those |
living in the area,” he said. |

Rented Houses

Following queries from Mr, |
Beckles and Mr. M, EB. Cox, the}
Board asked its Secretary to make |
investigations to see whether an
people were leaving their own
houses, seeking Government hous }
€s and renting their houses at ex- |
orbitant prices |

The Secretary will make the in- |
vestigations, but he imformed the |
Board that most of such rumours
that got around were false.

—_ a

4

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and American

want to be sure of the

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PAGE THREE




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W.L TEAM FOR CDA? | )ESTERDAY’S CRICKET

Olympics Will Cost £6,425,000
By 0. S. COPPLN

I HAVE BEEN waiting for some time now
for the opportunity to afford fans some in-
formation in connection with the proposed
West Indies tour to Canada this year.

It has been hailed in responsible quar-
ters as a good thing from the point of
view of the novelty, it will be the first
time that a representative West Indies
team will have toured Canada, and cer-
tainly it will provide the scope for trying

out some of our potential representatives against the Indian
team next year.

However, there should be some announcement by the West
Indies Cricket Board of Control as to whether the tour will
materialise at all.

WHAT OF LEAVE?

[. they are planning to send a full strength West Indies team,
to all intents and purposes then it will mean that this team
must of necessity include some of those players who will be
called upon to represent the West Indies in January next year.

This being so it will entail a complete adjustment in their
individual financial economy and it might be that they will be
faced with the possibility of applying for leave twice within
six months,

On the other hand there would be no useful point served
in sending “passengers” to represent the West Indies and that
is why some idea of plans in this connection is being justifiably

demanded,
OLYMPIC FINANCES
ITH Farnum’s impending departure for Helsinki to attend
the XVth Olympiad, I think that fans will be interested
in learning a few facts about the finances surrounding the stag-
ing of an Olympic Meet.

It will cost approximately £6,425,000 to stage the XVth
Olympiad, according to figures released by the Helsinki Organ-
ising Committee.

The competition sites and Olympic Villages constructed in
1938-39 and 1948-52 have cost £3,575,000 and the operational
cost of the Games will amount to £2,850,000.

In the face of this tremendous financial outlay, that might
pardonably be considered in these parts as almost mythical by
local standards, it is equally tantalising but nevertheless signi-
ficant that the organisers of the games, while not anticipating
great profits, do not expect a loss.

, REVENUE

HE revenue from admission tickets alone will be over

£1,000,000 while it is anticipated that the visitors to Hel-
sinki will spend about £1,400,000,

It has been pointed out that competition sites and Olympic
Villages have not been erected for the sole purpose of the
Olympiad; the sites will be used over and over again for
national meetings and the buildings in the Villages will be
used as workers’ flats after the Games

There will be seventeen sports in the programme, (swim-
ming, diving and water polo are counted as one). This was the
case with the 1948 Olympics staged in England.

For the benefit of those who are fortunate enough to plan
visiting the games I shall reproduce from “World Sport” a
selection of prices now current in Finland’s capital. These
Figures in the first place were supplied by the Press Bureau
of the Olympic Organisation in Helsinki. The prices are ap-
proximate and are based on a rate of 231 Finnish marks to
the American dollar which equals $1.52.

ACCOMMODATION

OR a first class Hotel (single room with telephone but no

bathroom) 30/- per day. Lunch in a first-class restaurant
cost from 7/6 to 13/- and lunch in the field canteen consisting
of soup, two sandwiches and a glass of beer 3/6. Dinner in a
second-class restaurant (soup, hot meal, milk, dessert) is 5/-.

The cost of a taxi is about 10d. per kilometre (5/8 of a
mile), with a minimum charge of about 3/-; hiarcut is 3/-,
cinema ticket 3/9 and a theatre ticket ranges from 6/- to 12/-,

As far as tipping is concerned a service charge of 10 per
cent is added to the bill in hotels and restaurants but the tip-
ping of taxi drivers and barbers is optional and not generally
practised in Finland.

B.C.L’s ANNUAL MEETING
OREMOST among the changes planned this season by the

,Barbados Cricket League, who held their Annual. Gen-
eral Meeting at the Modern High School yesterday is the
eee of the City and Central Leagues into two divi-
sions.

What formerly used to be the City League will now be
the City League and the Carlisle League and what used to
be the Central League will now be the Central League and
the Gun Hill League.

The purpose of this change is to enable teams in the
City League in the first instance and the Central League in
the second instance to play three day games while teams
in the Carlisle League and Gun Hill League will play two
day games.

The number of teams in the City Division will be eighe
and in the Carlisle Division there will be fourteen teams

competing.
STEADY IMPROVEMENT

EY are going from strength to strength and there is

every likelihood that if there is no loss of vision or
perspective by local cricket officialdom that efforts to assist
them in every way should bear fruit in the not too distant
future,

They plan to play a series of Sunday Trial games (Dean
of St. Michael’s and Rev. Godson please take note that these
start at 1.30 p.m. after Mass) that wili eveniuaily iead them up
to their best strength for their Annual fixture with the B.C.A.
In this connection they have arranged fixtures with the Em-
pire Club, Cable and Wireless, Carlton and, they
with Spartan.

hope, one



————





———



SUNDAY ADVOCATE
chicane iii ce ee oR NR alae



SPARTAN vs. COLLEGE.
Spartan Ist Innings (for 9

GOAT He ci PETE Se eevee s 347
College Ist Innings ........ 166
And (for two wickets) .... 1

Spartan who scored 347 for 9
wickets declared, foreed Harrison
College to follow on when they
skittled them out for 166 in the
first innings on a perfect wicket
at College on the second day of
their first division fixture. In the
10 minutes left for play in the
second innings, College lost two
wickets those of Camie Smith and
Worme, for a single run.

The Park team is in a very
strong position to carry off a two-
to-one victory, under any cireum-
stance, providing rain does not
completely wash out play next
Saturday.

Resuming their first innings of
290 for 6, Spartan lost the wicket
of Keith Walcott without addition
when Mr. Samuel Headley bowled
him in the first ball of the day.

Then Frank King, who is play-
ing his first season. with Spartan,
eame together with Cave in an
8th wicket partnership which pro-
duced 30 runs before the latter
was caught and bowled by Camie
Smith for 14. King who played
. hurricane innings contributed 34,
King and Phillips added another
27 runs for the 9th wicket, and
skipper Keith Walcott declared
the innings closed at 347 for nine
after about 35 minutes of play.

Hope Opens

The Collegians opened with
Emman Hope and M, Worme who
faced an accurate pace attack by
King and Phillips, The accuracy
of the attack was manifested by
the fact that during the first 25
minutes of the innings, only three
runs were scored, and that when
the first wicket fell with the score
at 5, play had been in progress
for 35 minutes,

Camie Smith filled the breach,
but was bowled by the first ball
he received by Frank King. Smith
suffered a similar fate at the hands
of L. F. Harris in the second in-
nings, thereby shattering all ho
of the College team swinging the
game.

C. Blackman and A. Alleyne,
two promising youngsters raised
the hopes of the College team when
in the first innings they played
some really sound cricket, Black-
man executing many elegant hooks
and drives off all bowlers, He
scored a very valuable 64 at num-
ber 3, and was out to a beautiful
return catch by Atkins Mr, Head-
ley contributed 16 and Fernando
Tuder, after starting shakily,
carried his bat for an undefeated
24 at number nine.

Pace Bowlers

The pace bowlers King and
Phillips were deadly accurate in
their first spells, and after wit-
nessing some really good spin
bowling from B. K, Bowen and
young N. Harris, spectators saw
Tony Atkins bowling with re-
markable success to take 4 for 31
in 9 overs. N, Grant took 2 for
13 in 4.1 overs.

By 5.40 the whole College
team were out for 166, and taking
their second turn at the wicket,
lost the wickets of Worme and
Smith for a single run, a leg bye.

Harris in this innings did the
damage when he opened the at-
tack with Frank King. Harris
moved two consecutive balls well
through the air, each claiming a
wicket.

EMPIRE vs. POLICE
BAO sis sys bay nese sce 255
Police 52 and (for 4 wkts) .. 155

Empire concluded their first

innings about 15 minutes before
the luncheon interval with the
seore at 255 yesterday the second
day of their cricket match with
Police at Empire. Police batting
first on the first day of play
seored 52 runs in their first inn-
ings and at the end of play
Empire had scored 185 runs for
the loss of six wickets.

Yesterday Conrad Hunte who
was undefeated with 109 runs
when play ended on the first day
only added five runs to this score
before he was bowled by Carl
Mullins, S. Rudder who was not
out with Hunte for 9 carried his
score to 37 not out,

Police in their second turn at
the wicket are now 155 runs for
the loss of four wickets. Best
bowling performance for Police
in the Empire first innings was
given by Bradshaw whose analy-
sis was 11 overs, one maiden, 42
runs, three wickets. Carl Mullins
who sent down 23 overs bowled
with some hard luck. He only
took one wicket for 75 runs.
Green who_bowled 16 overs took
two for 71 runs,

Shaky Start

Police in their second innings
started shakily but when C.
Blackman and W. A. Farmer
came together they put on a part-
nership which yielded 113 runs.
Both ibatsmen batted well but
Farmer was the first man to go

when he overplayed a yorker
from the burly Empire fast

bowler Barker. Farmer hit a
breezy 65 and shad one chance.
C. Blackman who on the other
hand was cautious and very
reluctant ‘to take chances was
bowled when his score was 170
about two minutes before the end

of play. :
The Empire fielding was ,not
at its best and about three

catches went abegging. DePeiza
did good work behind the stumps
but at times he became unduly
anxious,

Barker who bowled at a good
length and with some fire cap-
tured the four Police wickets. He
bowled 16 point two overs and
conceded 39 runs. The Police not
out batsmen are J. Byer eight
and A. Blenman naught,

PICKWICK vs. CARLTON.

Pickwick 226 and (without
RM ates alte Osea il
Carlton ..... 261

Faulty fielding at Kensington
Oval yesterday enabled the Carl-
ton team to amass a first innings
total of 261 in their match against
Pickwick. Carlton therefore has.a
first innings lead of 35 runs,

No less than eight catches were
dropped for the day. Brickie Lucas,
who top scored with 90, had three
lives. “Peppy” Hutchinson knock-
ed up 68 not out but he too had
three chances, aK

Three sixes were struck. Two
by Lucas off the bowling of
E. L. G. Hoad, Jnr., and Winston
Greenidage and the other by ‘“‘Pep-
py” Hutchinson off the bowling of
Edwards,

On the first Saturday Pickwick
made 226. When stumps were
drawn Carlton were six runs for
the loss of one wicket. The Black
Rock team yesterday added 255
to their overweek total.

A sixth wicket partnership be-
tween Brickie Lucas and Peppy
Hutchinson was the best of the
day. It realised 90 runs. Another
good partnership was the one be-
tween Harold Cox and Peppy
Hutchinson, the eighth wicket pair.
Cox made 25 and it was during
this partnership that Carlton crept
ahead of Pickwick’s total.

Skipper Makes 38

Carlton’s skipper, C. Boogles
Williams, made a valuable 38,
Charlie McKenzie, one of their
opening batsmen, carried his over-
week score of five to 23 before
he was caught by Joey Greenidge
off the bowling of Teddy Hoad
Jnr.

Teddy Hoad was the most suc-
cessful bowler for the Kensington
team, He was fairy steady, He was
especially good in the over in
which he claimed the wicket of
Reynold Hutchinson, He beat
Hutchinson with his first ball and
clean bowled him with the next.

Hoad sent down 31 overs, of
which six were maidens, and

took six wickets at an average of
just over 15 runs a wicket. Winston
Greenidge bowled eight overs and



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—————
en

RACING NOTES

By “BEN BATTLE”

THE T.T.C. JUNE MEETING

E IES for the June meeting in Trinidad closed on
Friday 1 with yet another record number of horses. I can
recall, not many years ago, when it was quite an event for 100
horses to be entered at the T.T.C. Xmas meeting, and these
‘would include a large G. class. Now, with no help from the
half breds, we find 127 horses taking entry in June. There
must be a limit somewhere, but so far there are no signs that
we are approaching it.

The biggest increase relative to the pre war days has been
in the C. and C.2 maidens. There are ne@ fewer than 26 of
these, and, in spite of the fact that they are well catered for—
there is a race each day for them—it is obvious that many will
go empty away. Nor is there any likelihood, if the present
rate of importation keeps up, of more than a very small pro-
portion earning their keep, even if the Trinidad Clubs continue

to encourage them, by framing races for them on a generous
scale.

This situation emphasises an interesting side of the West
Indian character—namely the instinctive preference for an
imported article. Few, if any, of the 26 horses, whose names
appear as entered for the C. and C.2 Maiden races, can have
cost less than £500 landed here, and it is quite likely that a
800d many of them cost appreciably more. Yet, try and sell
a well bred West Indian creole, two years old, for a reasonable
price, and you will quickly find that no one is interested. L
admit that I have no figures, but I should be surprised if the
two year old creoles, taken as a group, did not earn as much
per horse, as the imported horses, in the course of their racing
careers. Yet, as I say, they are practically impossible to sell
for what it costs to raise them. Truly a case of a prophet
never being without honour.

THE BARBADOS CONTINGENT

Entries from Barbados turned out much as I had pre-
dicted in last week’s article, except that neither Trimbrook
nor Flieuxce took entry. I must say that, looking at the races
in which the rest have been entered, I shall be\surprised if
they do not enjoy a succesful meeting. There surely cannot
be many in C. class to take the measure of Castle in the Air
and French Flutter, while Lunways is looking and going so
well that her chances in B. must be excellent, It is in the D.
and E. races however, that I fancy we hold the strongest hand,
and if Usher, Mary Ann and Apollo cannot pick up a couple of
nice races between them, I shall be disappointed. In the Trial
Stakes, we have lost what was our most promising entry in
Sunina, but both First Admiral and Columbus are entered,
and while neither can be expected to threaten Bright Light, 1

shall be surprised if they do not run well, particularly the
former.

MORE TWO YEAR OLDS
_ Apart from the activities of the horses consigned to Trint-
dad, there is little going on at the Paddock at present, It
seems a good opportunity to introduce some more of our two

year olds, and I shall start by asking Mr. Bethel’s Superjet, to
take a bow.

Superjet is by Jetsam out of Wedding Gift, and is a gelding
who has inherited the beautiful golden chestnut coat of his
sire. A refined, high quality two year old, he might be faulted
as being a thought too long in the back, and possibly a trifle
deficient in bone, but, in general there is plenty to like about
him. He goes abdut his work in a sensible way, and alfhough
he is a lot less advanced than Apply Sam, for instance, he
appears likely to come to hand reasonably quickly. Jetsam,
as a sire, is an unknown quantity to date, but his sire, Flotsam,
considering he stood only in Trinidad, must be considered to
have been one of the best local stallions. Wedding Gift was
rather a moderate mare in the tracks (she was by Tolgus), and
so far, has not proved a success at stud, being a rather shy
breeder up to the present. Superjet will be her first foal to

race in Barbados and it is quite on the cards that he may
redeem her reputation.

My second introduction this week will be another from
the Todds Stud—Sterling Dawn. A daughter of Sterling
Castle and Sunrise, she combines in her pedigree, the blood
of the first stallion of Classic Status to stand here, with that
of an outstanding creole broodmare. ‘She is certainly bred well
enough for anything, and being a fine, big, filly, with ample
scope for development and improvement, I shall be surprised
if she does not go far. Sunrise, so far, has tended to produce
far better colts than fillies, and it would be fitting if, in the
evening of her long and memorable career at stud, she threw
a filly good enough to carry on the line. Certainly Sterling
Dawn looks the part, and can only be objected on the grounds
that she is a trifle back at the knee. I look forward to seeing
her run, and run well in the years to comé.

WORDS OF WISDOM

I happened to be present the other morning at a small
and informal gathering of turfites, who were discussing, be-
lieve it or not, classifying and handicapping. The discussion
was strangely amicable for so controversial a subject, but a
remark was made, which I pass on to readers for their con-
sideration the next time they attend a gathering at which the
concensus of opinion is that all handicappers should be shot.
It was this—‘How is it that the same people who will wax ex-
ccedingly indignant, and even violent over their horse being
allotted, in their opinion, 2, 3, or even 5 lbs: too much in a
handicap, will cheerfully start the same animal in races in
which they have to put up 5, 10 or even 15 lbs. overweight?”

There is certainly some food for thought in that.







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SCOREBOARD







EMPIRE vs POLICE AT BMPIRE SPARTAN vs. COLLEGE
POLICE First Innings 52 Spartan—Iist Innings (cont'd)
Empire First Innings (Por 9 wkts. deelared) MT
0, Robinson Lb.w, b. Bradshaw 3 K. E. Walcott » Mr. Headley 58
C. Hunte b. Mullin 14 «E. W. Cave b Foster 0
W. Grant c. Taylor b. Bradshaw @ ¥F. King not out “
Cc. De Peiza stpd. (wk. Dodson) ®. Phillips ct. & b. C. Smith i4
b Green . 8 B. Bowen did not bat c
F. Smith 1b wb Green 0 Extras a
0. Fields run out : 5 S
EB. A V. William Bienman . Total for (8 wkts. decl'd mm
b. Byer 4 Ee
S. Rudder not out j Fall of wicket 1—-12, 2-165, 3-168
A. Holder c. Former b. Bradshaw 4 J an us, 6-2 tO, oe
King b. Blackina: se *r
H Barker run out 3 ROWLING ANALYSIS
Fxtras 16 S&S. Headley . —. 4 & 3
a. 8 1 il a7 2
Total 255 ©. Re x : 58 1
os G Foster 10 2 48 1
Fall of wkts, 4-15, 2-15, 3—5 a, Be Dados ° =
5-128, €—146, 2 195, & 208, . & $ oan 18 2 3 ss i
BOW Harrison College—ist Innings
LING ae R w E. Hope ct. ©. Griffith b King 2
C. Bradshaw E Tl 2 42 3 R> Worme b Phillips 4
¢. Mullins i Bot 3 7 C. Smith b F. King 6
E. Green 16 1 7 » ©. Blackman et & b Atkins 64
@_ Sobers & 6 14 o â„¢r. S. Headley ct. Atkins b F.
C. Blackman Pee ok aoe Phillips %
J. Byer : 3 0 7 1 A. Alleyne stpd. ‘wkpr.) Harrison
7 ? b N. Grant 16
oc. we oa Second Innings M. peceyom ad ct K. E. Walcott b -
eel Atkins 5
. oe es 10S. Hewitt ct K, E. Walcott b Atkins 10
C. Amey b Barker . 7 «&F. Tudor not out 24
Ww * farmer 6 Barker 6 © ronan! Se (wkpr) Harrison é
ver not out Bn _ ay Se
A. Slenman not eit ¢ ¥ ee M. Harris b N. Grant 18
Extras 4 aoe 13
Total (for 4 wkts.) 155 Tote 166
Ys 5 fe ce Fall of wickets: 1—5, 2—5, 3 *
ee Eh Pe 6 108. 7114, 81%, 91s
: BOWLING ¢ “YSIS
BOWLING ANALYSIS = Freee i ie
t, WwW » > 4 4 g 2
fl. Barker 6.2 ¢ Wes de a pillins 3 3 = .
W. Grant eos 1), © % Bowen. 13 mee
Cc. Rudder 9 1 2069) «OM #éHarris 3 3. 20
E. A. V. Williams W 2 36 © 4” Atnins 9 + ae ey
H. A. King .... 8 1 %@ © WN. Grant ti. a. &
A Holder eee 5 o 15 Q wee Collese—2nd Innings
‘ . M. orme b L, F. Harris 0
LODGE vs. WANDERERS . ¥F. Tudor not out 0
WANDERERS 323 ©. Smith b L. F. Harris 0
Lodge—ist Innings Extras 1
F, W. Cheeseman b E. Atkinson 9
G. De C, Stoute ¢ Evelyn b E. At- Total (for 2 wkts) 1
kinson * 10
Cc. Grant hit wicket b E. Atkinson 0 ickets: 1- Wa
J. A. C, Hutson b D. Atkinson $2 ee ee ee Pee
L. Murray ¢ Evelyn b N. Marshall 18 ¢ King % 2 2.
H. Welch b N. Marshall wl Harri 121 2
E. Shepherd b D. Atkinson 10 PICKWICK vs. CARLTON
J. E, Farmer c E, Atkinson b D PICKWICK—Ist Innings if 226
. Aine 10 Carlton—ist Innings
St. C, Reefer b E. Atkinson 4 ©. McKenzie c K. Greenidge b E
N. G. Wilkie b E. Atkinson 2 L. G. Hoad Inr 23
J. G. Outram not out 10 G. Chandler ¢ wkpr. Trotter b Ed
Extras 6 wards 0
, c. B. Williams b E. L. G. Hoad
Total 96 Int 38
Fall of wickets: 1—23. 2—24, 3-29, N. oc leone c Birkett b W. Green- ea
4-29, 5-51, 6-86, 7-83, 8—85, 9-06. R. Hutchinson b E, L. G. Hoad Jnr 1
. E. W. Marshall b K. Greenidge 2
BOWLING SNAL vers S G. Hutchinson not out 68
> e > ec ° rotter
N. Marshall 8 n F a gpree of aaee Trotter b e
e Ae Sart a H. Cox b E. L. G. Hoad Jnr 25
D. LAWLESS : > i G. Edghill c C. Greenidge b E
. a he L. G. Hoad Jnr 0
c ge—2nd Innings K. Warren ¢ E. L. G. Hoad Jnr.
G m if Stoute ec Skinner b Mar b W. Greenidge 2
sha’ 8 dea
E. Shepherd b E. Atkinson 2 ee he
>. Grant b D. Atkinson 5
L. Murray b St. Hill . 28 oy ca
e ba e D, Atkinson b Marshall 06 Fall of wickets tot 6 he. BR
: . Farmer run out 12 94 a aaaee | Bex
B. Reefer c E. Atkinson b D. Al: Sa ee ee ne
kinson 7 See ‘SIs
J. A. C. Hutson ib.w. b Lawless. 10 Reve Ae on: Ww
N. Wilkie c Marshall b St. Hill 26 5 Goddard 1 6 10
J. G. Outram not out 6 kK. Greenidge i4 5 33 1
F. Cheeseman did not bat © B Edwards Py a ae) i
Extras 5 £. L. G. Hoad Jnr 31 6 94 6
——. W. Gréenidge 8.5 2 32 2
Total M4 A, Hoag 2 . =
= tT. Birkett 2 . =>
Fall of wickets: 1—3, 2—8, 3-23, Pickwick—2nd Innings
4—23, S88, 6—67, 7—75, 8-100, 9-114. A £, Trotter not out 8
BOWLING ANALYSIS +E. Edwards not out 0
o M R W uxtras 3
D. Atkinson 9 3 25 2 amt
E. Atkinson 6 13 1 Tota ,
m. ferehaa ; = : otai .without loss) a4
L. St. Hill 75 2 Hee powLiic i.
H. L. Toppin 3 19° = ate AN R w
T. Lawless 2 6 1 Gg. Edghill 2 1 1 ~
K. Warren 1 — 7



YESTERDAY'S CRICKET

@ From Page 4
five balls and took two for 32. The
remaining two wickets were taken
by Joey Greenidge and Edwards
for 38 and 68 respectively,

day Lodge fell for 96 in their first
innings and soon after lunch were





all out again for 114.

Chiefly responsible for Lodge’s





SUNDAY ADVOCATE



India Scores Innings’
Victory Over Ireland

Hutton Hits Fourth
Century Of Season

(From Our Ow

n Correspondent)
LONDON, June 14.

ain prevented any play in two county matches today,
but in most parts of the country batsmen enjoyed them-

selves on slowish wickets. T

he two Cambridge Universit,

and England players--Sheppard and May led the way at
Hove where both recorded their fourth centuries of the
season against Sussex. Sheppard made 104 and May who is
undefeated, has hit the 16 fours in his 159.

Another century maker

was Tom Graveney of Glouces-

ter who reached 104 out of 345 for 5 declared against

Worcester.

England’s captain Len Hutton
who will be at Lord’s later this
week for the Second Test, also hit
his fourth century of the season
for Yorkshire against Middlesex
He batted just over four hours
In the la@st eight minutes of the
day Yorkshire left arm slow
bowler Wardle hit a quick 22, in-
cluding a six off the first ball he

received
One place where the bowlers
did get on top was at Ports-

mouth where Shackleton and Can-
nings of Hampshire bowled un-
changed, apart from one over to
dismiss Northants in two hours
for 67, Cannings at one stage took
four wickets without a run being
scored off him and finished with
6 for 41. Shackleton took 4 for
24,

Only a fighting innings of 55 by
Maurice Tompkin saved Leicester
from complete collapse against
Glamorgan at Neath, Glamorgan
Test all-rounder Watkins achieved
the best figures of his career with
5 for 16

The Indian tourists scored an
easy innings victory in the first of
their two-day games with Treland
at Dublin.

Scoreboard
Middlesex vs, Yorkshire—York-
shire 308 for 6; Hutton 132. ‘
Surrey vs. Essex—Surrey 256
for 7 declared; ‘Constable 70.
Essex 27 for 2. . .
Glamorgan vs. Leicester-——Lei-
cester 107. Glamorgan 116 for 3.
Hampshire vs Northants—
Northants 67. Hampshire 154
for 9. i
Sussex vs. Cambridge Univers-
itv—Cambridge 322 for 2.
“Worcestershire vs. Gloucester—
Gloucester 345 for 5 declared; Em-
mett 90, Graveney 104. Worces-
ter 14 for 0. :
Oxford University vs. Warwick
—Warwick 18h is i gi cic ye
ia beat Irelan y -
ares nine runs—India 304,

nings i
Ireland 126 and 169; Shinde 5
for 49.

Lancashire vs. Somerset and
Notts ve Derby—no play because
of rain.

On the first day of the match,
opening bat _ Norman Marshall
scored 117, Denis Atkinson 136

with N. G, Proverbs contributing!

2A.
Successful Bowler
The Lodge’s most successful
howler was G. Wilkie who took
ve for 70 in 14 overs.

f reel, 6.30 p.m
Minterlude, 8.55 p.m

‘eightlifting Assoc.
Elects Officers

Mr. Freddie Miller was re-
elected President of the Amateur
Weightlifting Association of Bar-
bados when the Association held
its first Annual General Meeting
during the week. Mr. Edwin
Rogers and Mr. J. Bullen were
appointed Vice-Presidents.

Mr. W. “Teacher” Grannum,
who acted as M.C, at the variou*
shows staged by the Association.
was re-elected Secretary while
Mr, John Marshall was made As-
s stant Secretary, Other appoint-
ments were: Mr F Marshall
hheasuice, Mr, Harold Webster,
Coach and the Committee of
Management: Messrs B. Banfield,
G. Clarke, S$, Holder, S. Rudder
and the other Officers

After being re-elected, Mr
Miller thanked members. He said
that the Association had got off to
a good start. His task was not an
eosy one but he was always hap-
p to be among the weightlifting
fraternity, He promised to con-
tinue to do his best for the As-

ciation.

No date was fixed for the Se-
nior Championships but it is like
1, to take place in August. The
tour to Trinidad has been fixed
fcr the middle of September, The
Senior Championships this year
will take the form of an elim-
ination. The winners will be se-
lected to visit Trinidad. All Iift-
evs are training very hard in pre-
piration for this competition,

The Association will soon be
making preparations to tour the
various parishes in an effort to
cceate more interest in weight-
lifting.

Listening Hours
SUNDAY JUNE LS, inhe

7M 9.76 M toe M

4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. inter

wo



lude, 4.15 pm. For The Common Good
430 p.m. Sunday Half Hour, 5.00 p.m
(Composer Of The Week, 5.15 p.m. Variety
Bandbox, 615 pain, English Magazine
' 45 p.m. Programme Parade and Inter
ude, 7.00 pm The News. 7.10 pan
‘pine News From Britain

71% — 10.45 Ow oeM staeM



- 7.15 pm, Caribbean Voices, 7.45 p.m

Radio News
Charlie Kunz, 8.45 p.m
From The Editorials

day Service, 8.15 p.m





Visitors To B’dos

@ from Page |





The Audited Accounts prepared

Messrs. Rovell & Skeete show

a balance hand to 3ist March

1952 of $9,004 98 ,

made up as follows:— |
1 Bank of Canada $ 7,744.98 |
Head Petty Cash }

Imprest 1 206.60
ecarell Petty Cash imprest 358.00 |

2 0,098.58

th

amount of $4,700.00

u

ada

ye

u

Of the Balance of $7,744.98 in
1e Royal Bank of Canada, the
represents
nexpended advertising in Can-
for the year 1949-1950
Which has been taken into account
W
le

) this coming year’s Budget. This

ayes a carry forward of

2,044.98 for* running éxpenses

nti! the Annual Grant Is

cceived from Government fo

@ year 1952—1953.

Annual Balance Sheet and
Accounts

From the Audited Accounts, it

V
j

i! be seen that Revenue & Ex-
enditure are as follows:



Balance brough! forward trom Jump in Joe, Jump in Robert | Ask your
31:3.51 8,320.69 A treeness on this gig
Goverhment Grant 32,290.00 Again it is the Government Decier for
ibseriptions from Hotetk And with themt; Sprees are big
Firms. ete 4,920.00 7 ?
indry Sales & Receipt 4,211.00 Remember bring your dress suit
eed Sharer your appetite | . - ene
$49,741.69 youl! hear talks in tha day-tun: a A eee
Salo . |
e $ 9,004.98 For Betsy says the old coy } 2 ¥
Ralene is fresh with milk ‘agate | b To eep
it will be noted that 75% of the] 4d Mm this little island a

nds expended were for advertis-

ny and publicity purposes.

Since September Ist, 1951, a

record of U.S., Canadian and Ven-
ce-nelan currency brought to the

@ On Page 15. They're going to learn “proredure
Whatever that may mean
And of the British habits "
A few points ey may xlean
; :
COMMONWEALTH Over three thousand dollars
PLAY HIGHLAND They hope to throw away
For ever In Barbados
There is the Sunny day
The following will represent ; ; as \
he Commonwealth Sports Club | en ee ea
to-morrow and next Sunday The people here are happs |
sainst Highland C.C. at High- There're hardships at all |
and, St. Thomas:—J. Graham sect tad oc lie Sleek aie |
; a 1e houses a ill mansions
Cayt.), J. Lorde, E, Brereton, E Tréba's food cat. end apare |
tleuck, StC Burke, StC. Black- | if the “house men” would look round |
van, D. Downes, C. Parris, x’ | Then they see the “night mare
. a . Daried * Alling .
Goddard, C. Perkins, FE. Alkins, A ‘a dew et thn. 0d heokate
veale (12th man) | Cried gentlemen take heed j
Play starts at 1.15 pm | Can you not see the thousands }
Of this land in. great need |
Can you not feel the pressure
To scrape a decent meat
Sunday League | oi. so scene aie
> - | More tempted now to steal?
* * . .
Competition D ymething with the money | Sparldin ENO’S Pruit Salt”
Don't spend thousands on two ‘hice’ in’ ; f e
~e € Help some the Starve-out Childrer ning 1 n mormng resner Yo |
Fixtures 1952 Serve many; not the fev mentally and physically. It clears the hex
- ee ote if you ave democratic cleanses anc! reireshes the mouth, rer
Ihe Fixtures for Sunday League Sey po! os your rep aenienas liverishnes: ENO
Competition games beginning June To grant two MP’s free. tri | symptoms iverishness st > ia
> and ending September 14 are May cause many to die | no harsh | utives. Its gentle laxative
om Ye . are re? 1 *~T ve
bo hi Games are of two days We're getting older dail) 1s non-hal i:-forming. ENO’S i uitabl
vs , The strong are getting weak for delicat tomachs, safe fo . I
JUNE 15 & 88 And when the big rains come in | aaa ¢ ate for children a







Strollers vs. Hadleighs
Cambridge vs. Belleplaine,
Everglade vs O.K. Cole,
Commonwealth vs. Highland,
JUNE 29 & JULY 6





4 collet Mt ore The free trip was Just fun
i ve . . . |
; bee ve eadieishs But then the two best comrades
Highland vs _Everela le : That they might send away
aaah i heginite. Know all about procedure
Strollers ve elle; , 1" ~ as much Me
Cambridge v Highland They know Ler . " |
aes ne ere ee Lou, Joe and Comrade Robert |
adieigh v Everglade f
an ar Agreed on thi all three
7 ae ae ‘To buy the money in J & R
7 Belleplaine And give Bajans # Spres
C’wealth Hadleighs d b
Cambridge vs. Everglade, nsore
; AUGUBT aus “ | spo r y
givollers vw. Bvergiade
Belleplaine vs, Com’ wealth J&R BAKERIES
Cambridge vs. O.K, Cole
Hadleighs vs. Highland
AUGUST & & 4% makers of
Strollers vs. Highland
Evergiade vs, Belleplaine
Cambridge vs. Commonwealth ENRICHED BREAD

Hadleighs vs. O.K. Cok





JUNE

The Topic

Last Week

What's
Two MP going to Ireland

You all will





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all this talk ? Lou questioned
Pray tell me whot is it °

You'll get more milk thar
alan Maat . pegular

To Hsten while they sit
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Poor Betsy house going leak invalids. |

You know when these boys come bach

When all is said and done

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SANS

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With ten minutes left for play, ©atly_downfall were Eric Atkin- ; eter ve inh 2% pan. British Concert Hall, 10.00 i ee ta 14

Pickwick opened their sepond. in- Son, Denis Atkinson and Norman ane ona eeoress Ne - ie cin, pe MeWe, ipte bie eee Tak. strotie: re. Corieitas and the blenders of gow:
x; with A. Tr er edwards Marshall. On the first day Eric heir first In & * 4 oY 5 pm, Lofiden Forum, 10.45 b.m Belleplaine vs. Hadleishs ~ asting freshness.
nings with A. Trotter and Edwards, 7 : ' 5 ~ ray 19. H, Welch 11 and G. Stoute,! The Bible In History And In Life . hi
Trotter was dropped by Williams took five wickets for 15 runs in boy goherd, J, Farmer and J. G.; MONDAY JUNE 16, 1958 Reralote yo" Curmeniestii J&R RUM mee eonesmer
in slips, At the end of play Trotter sees hid Skee ie aor 2? in Outram 10 each. \ eo Ee ee eM: “AN teams mentioned. last will a as ee eee see ee eee
was eight not out. 9 Pie Yesterday Marshall and Yesterday Murray showed him~ 400 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The be playing on their grounds. |
D ‘ Athi r a t Cniate self a steady bat when he kept @ Daily Service, 4.15 pam From The Third In an interview with the Sec- re
WANDERERS vs. LODGE. : sy se too me we cool when his team was in the? ’'osramme, anevat, er Tey Yes retary of this Competition, the | by
d 5 ' wi? 45 § Bi > > ’ ‘
Wanderers ...... : . 823 aa an wet aiis tank ‘bbe éG0 13 face of defeat and managed tof"), \;, P Welsh Miscellany, 6.15 p.m. Tip Advocate was told that negotia- ¢
Lodge 96 and . 114 in six Bika 1 “st Hill also cap muster 28 at number four. «Tor Tunes, 6.45 p.m. Sports Round-up fions have been begun re an over- | Pe
oO Ee aly Srna ' : ake a (| cod Programme Parade, 7.00 pam. The cage ‘ad ; sar. Asked}

Wanderers secured an innings tured two wickets for 23 runs in Then spinner Wilkie stuck true’ news, 7 10 p.m. Home News From Britain ane snk ay ndin " atte 24 dl
victory over Lodge School by 4 his 7.5 overs. to practice when he struck up a) 715 — 10.45 Oo mM wt.aeM about an; ou a oa B play a he
orclock yesterday, the second day _ The wicket was good, but the quick 26 at number 9. He regue yy je ey Airangers. Seoll known players. taking. part _
of their scheduled three-day First Lodge boys had no answer for the larly takes a go at the ball when qiai pin. Music Of The Reyiment*) but Joss known players like Jobn
Division Cricket match at Lodge concentrated attack of the Wan- his team is in difficulty, though he?) ts pin, Radio Newsree!, 8.80 p.m Trotman, K Dawson, and Ir-
School. Wanderers had amassed a_ derers bowlers. The bowlers just is best in the role of spin bowler. Airican Survey, 8.45 p.m. Interlude rotman, Ken vi ' (AVINGS
hurricane 328 on the first day and had a mastery over the batsmen Other batsmen reaching double |°55 p.m. From The Editorials, 9.00 p.m vine Austin are sure to prove good n
by the end ot that day's play had and ait‘slong ip was only a matter Saures were J. A.C, Huteon 10 “Ihab me. Rew lode’. Nay, None of these youngsters is taking

2 i . E. Farmer an . Reefer 6 pm. Gee 10.30 ‘ fs Biers 3s

sent back seven Lodge batsmen to of time before the defeat would 4@ ae eee m Sctanoy “Review 0.3 part in B.C.L. games this season.

the pavilion for 83 runs. Yester-

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PAGE SIX’ |



FLY THEM HOME 8B.O.A.C.

Wf your children are at NEY FOR THE COST OF
| A ONE WAY TICKET.
| Your children fly in swift,
| sure Specdbirds, attended
| by an experienced and
| friendly crew who took

after their every wish.

Consult your Travel Agent

School in the United King-
dom make arrangements
to bring them home for the
Summer holidays.

B.O.A.C’s student fares are
available to all full time
students in the United

Kingdom who are under 26 or British West Indian

years of age — they enjoy Airways.

the ROUND TRIP JOUR- | Lower Broad Street,
Bridgetown.

B.O.A.C. TAKES GOOD CARE OF YOU

«FLY BOA

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Life’s always fun for the
youngster who takes a morning
glass of sparkling Andrews for
Inner Cleanliness. She’s fit and
full of vitality at lessons and
playtime, thanks to Andrews’
gentle laxative action.

Andrews cleans the mouth,
settles the stomach, tones up the
liver and ensures regularity. It
also makes a refreshing drink
for any time of day; just one
teaspoonful is sufficient.

DO YOU KNOW why “ sparkling” drinks are so
refreshing ? They contain tiny bubbles of carbon dioxide gas.
When the liquid is swallowed these bubbles cling to the walls of
the stomach and the gas has a cleansing and soothing effect.
Effervescent Andrews takes this action, freshening the whole
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g taxarive



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Twa vs



Eyeing The
Weather

of us, when we return, like very
much to rub in our good fortune A
with “We sure know how to pick 6.
‘em.’

Be sure that rain betides.

golden set.

And by the bright track of

Just plain luck, you say? Prob-
ebly. But actually no special
talent is required to deveop a
semblance of skill in the
prophecy. It’s not necessary
build an observatory or send

his fiery car
Gives token of a.
art of row

to 7. Sunshine and shower,

‘

ts

If there’s one thing most of us 5. When (beetles, swallows,
like to boast of while on vacation, leaves) show their under-
it’s fine weather. Indeed, some sides.

The weary sun hath made a

(nippy,
ghastly, goodly day to-mor-

SUNDAY . ADVOCATE





Dear Mrs. Clarke, I am a girl
aged 16 years of age and I love
@ boy very much, but he goes out
with other girls too and I am very
jealous. Do you think I should
stop seeing him for a bit. It might
make him realise that I exist I
am cembly worried and wpset

about it. Please help me.
Dark Stranger”
**You know, dear, you have

said that you are in love with this
boy and how much you are jeal-
ous, but it Seems to me that this
is @ YTather one-sided affair. He
may not be in love with you and
if that is so he is entitled to go
out with any girl he likes—just
as you could go out with any boy.

However, for your own sake,
as you are in quite a state about
this fellow, it would be a good
thing to stop seeing him for a
time. It would give you a chance,
to get a grip on yourself and—
who knows—maybe: not seeing
you for a while may be the de-
ciding factor for this chap and you
both may come together after ail.
Certainly, I hope so, dear, as I
dearly love to see the young peo-
ple happy and in leve. It is one
of the few things that gives some
hope and promise to this sad and
disillusioned world of ours.

“Very worried,” writes,

1 am married and my husband
and I were very happy together.
A woman friend of mine came to
us on vacation and since she came
she has completely monopolised
my husband and stolen him from
me, He sees her all the time and
never takes me out any more
We don’t even speak now. He says
I can leave but that I cannot take
my child with me. Please advise
me,

**You poor dear, you certainly
have a very big ioad of worry.
Can’t you talk to your husband
and, without getting heated about
it, work this problem out. You
might even have a chat with this
woman. After all she was your
friend. Point out that several
fives will be ruined if your once
happy home is broken up, and that
such is not the best education for
a child in the formative years of
its.life. Thi» sould only be an in-
fatuation a» a man does not de-
sert his wife and child on the spur
of the moment—and especially
when his home-life has always
been a happy one. I feel, my
dear, that if you are diplomatic
and handle matters carefully that
all will work out well for you in
the end. At any rate please write

bP (Clear, Same, Rain) again
weather balloons, as Miss Linda See . Woven ‘ es
Christian seems to be doing at Sear iransport Fares
left. 8. Rainbow to windward, (foul,
fair, dry) falls the day: To Be Increased
As a matter of fi ct, it’s possible Rainbow to leeward, (damp,

for anyone, yes anyone, to sharp- fog, sun) runs away. % From Page 1. ;
en his weather eye merely by 5 i estimated to bring a revenue in-
studying the proverbs which fol- 9. Sound travelling far and] crease of nearly $412,000 and a
low. Each’ of these , is a belief wide, decrease in expenditure of near-
which weather authorities agree ly $300,000 in the full year. It
has a basis, of fact. A Se oe warm-|\; felt the combined effect will
; : er) day will betide. reduce ‘the Department's net
nerves, made 2 fox changes 1% 10. Sharp. homs do threaten| deficiency by $100,000 to Tess than
" ; 2, ; 2 -jam *
to correct, Only one of three sents calm, windy) weath
words in parenthesis in each case F Abnormal Loss
belongs there, You are to choose 11. When the (sundog, mist
the right word and cross out the wind) is in the south The report stresses that pub-
others. The rain’s in its mouth. lic revenue cannot indefinitely
oa . " carry an abnormal loss of trans-
1, If red the sun begins his !2. Thunder in spring ..,| port services and after noting
race (Warm, Cold, Frost) will] that the railways might eventu-
Be sure the (dew, rain, — Princoeee beef of eres a.
temperature) wil! fall apace 13, The (lower, higher, thinner) oo n ¢
pe Wi 1 the clouds, the finer’ the by the Sugar ‘Companies prove
2. If the sun goes pale to bed weather. a commodity can be more eco-

'Twill (clear, rain shine) to-

morrow it is said. tle) is on the grass,
3. Glimpse you e’er the green

ray 15,

Count the morrow a (loss er’s brush,
fine, chilly) day. The (floods, sweat, winds)
around you soon will rush,
4. When the grass is dry at



: i Answer: 1, Rain; 2. Rain; 3, Fine;

morning light. ’ 4. Ra 5. Leaves; 6 Goodly; 7. Rain,

< , clfaring 4 8 ul, damp; 9 Stormy; 10,

Look for (rain, clfaring, fog) Windy; 11. Wind; 12, Cold; 13. Highes,
before the night. 14. Dew; 15. Winds.





i} KLIM is pure, safe milk
[2] KLIM keeps without! refrigeration






KEIM QUALITY IS
AUNAYS UNIFORM |

vou bay KLIM MILK, you
onsistent purity and nutri-
1) each and every tin..+

ofk ;
aiue
; uv, June or December |
» always the same uniform <
cow's milk—uniform in the
neoteins, fat, carbohydrate,
‘aad minerals aeeded for

;OOD HEALTH,

é (a) KLIM is exceticnt fo- growing

= chiiuven

rome, 99

S| KLIM adds nourishmont to vi
— cooked dicheos KLI 4
6) KLIM is recommnencod for ty

infant fecding aT TAY
(7) KLIM is save in the specially

pocked tia

7} KLIM is produced undor strict.

est corirel



Take pure water, odd
KLIM, stir end you have
safe, pure milk.

FIRST

IN PREFERENCE
THE WORLD OVER



14, When the (dust, dew, this-
Rain will never come to pass.

Trace in the sky the paint-





nemically carried by the Road
Committee strongly counsels early
re-examination of the question of
the future of railways,

The Report also disclosed that
“unless considerable sums which
might exceed the total of the
Rehabilitation Programme are
spent on the replacement and
renewal of equipment within the
next 12 months, it is inevitable
that the present railway services
will break down.”

4388 BARBADOS

Feel

8 x 3 3-4



. >

faery
or
GETA

effectively, yet

you

|
| —quickly,
'

A
wm

=
=
az
rn
=—i
oS
1

AS PRO iow
en ee TCE ee

leaves
fresh and free from barmful

—arme* Mrs. Clarke’s Column

and let me know how things are
going. ie

“F.M.B.G.J.G.” writes,

I am writing to a pen-pal and
a few days ago I received a letter
from him asking me to become
engaggd to him. I have never
met this boy but I do know his

parents. Do you thipk I should
say yes.
**Well, my dear, I certainly

made sure that I saw my husband
before I made up my mind to
marry him, After all, even if you
know his people, you are not
pianning to marry them. Also
you are not in love at
least you have not said so
and it is a good thing to
be in love before making big de-
cisions like getting married. Per-
sonally, I should wait until I meet
this boy and I feel sure that if
you explain this when you write
to him next he will understand.
He would like to see you too, I
feel sure. So do not be impetu-
ous and remember the old saying
about marrying in haste and re-
penting at leisure.

Dear Mrs. Clarke,

I am 21 years of age and my
fiance, for whom I have a baby,
wants to marry me. His people,
however, do not like me and I
am very worried. I love him very
much indeed. What shall I do.

“Pinksy”...

**Marry him, my dear. You
are both in love and are at an
age to make your own decisions.
Also, for the sake of the child the
only answer is to get married. I
am always so sorry for little chil-
dren who have no proper home
life. They are missing so much
and they do not deserve such
treatment. If you are very diplo-
matic and nice about everything,
I feel sure that you will be able
to win the affections of his people
too, but the most important thing
is that two people are in love and
want to get married, So go ahead
and get married and let me give
an old woman's blessing to you
both.

To “Worried M.J.” Really, my
dear, this is a problem for a doc-
tor and a little ont of my scope.
I have forwarded your question to
the Family Doctor who will, I
know, help you to the best of his
ability.

**Don’t mind what you hear
and remember that allthis is a
very normal process and every
woman who has had a baby ex-

erienced the same—and there
ave been an awful lot of babies
born without causing any harm,
so stop worrying.

BETHEL—11.00 a.m. Mr. L. Mayers;
7.00 p.m. Rev. T. J. Furley.
DALKEITH—11.00 a.m. Mr. F. Moore,
770 p.m. Mr. G, Jones.
BELMONT—11.00 a.m, Mr. C. Forde;
7 00} p.m. Mr. G. Bascombe.

SOUTH DISTRICT—9.00 a.m. Mr. C.

Jones; 7.00 p.m. Mr. C. Knight.
PROVIDENCE—11.00 a.m. Rev. T. J.

Furley; 7.00 p.m. Mr, E. Browne.
VAUXHALL—9.00 a.m. Rev. T. J.

Furley; 7.00 p.m, Mr. G.
BAPTIST
THE ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST

11,00 am, Mating and sermon; 7.00
fm. Evensong and sermon, Preacher
for both services, the Rev. J. B. Grant,
L.Th. Minister in charge.

4.30 p.m Monday, Wednesday
Friday, training for youths.
be conducted by the Rev. L.
Clarke (Assist. Pastor)~and Mrs,
Browne.

ST. LEONARD'S CHURCH

800 a.m. Holy Communion, 9.00 a.m
Motins and Sermon, 3.00 p.m. Sunday
School, 7.00 p.m. Evensond and Sermon.

ROEBUCK STREET: 11 a.m. Morning

Harris.

and
This will
Bruce

Olga

Service; 7 p.m. Evening Service.
GRACE HILL: 11 a.m. Morning Ser-
vice; preacher: Mr. I. Oxley; 7 p.m.

Evening Service, preacher Mr, F. Deane.

ECK: 11 a.m. Morning Service,

preacher: Mr. W, Swire. 7. p.m. Even-
tng Service, preacher: Mr. O. Weekes
MONTGOMERY: 7 p.m. Evening Ser-
vice, preacher: Mr. D. Culpepper
DUNSCOMBE: 7 p.m. Evening Ser-
vice
SHOPHILL: 7 p.m. Evening Service,

preacher: Mr. W. S. Arthur
EBENEZER—11 a.m. Mr, V. F. St.
John; 7 p.m. Revd. S. W. C. Crosse,
BEULAH—11 a.m. Mr. Pat Deane; 7
p.m, Mr. J. Sargeant.
SHEWSBURY—11 a.m,
p.m. Mr. E, Brathwaite.

Mr, Hell, 7





CHURCH SERVICES ©



SUNDAY,. JUNE. 15,

SEWING

By PENNY NOLAN

illustrated today is
a simple but smart buttonqi-
down style. The bodice has
raglan sleeves with shaped cuffs
and a_ notched neckline. he
skirt is a seven gore.

In a recent column I explained
the draft for the raglan sleeye.
Before drafting the sleeve ypu
should design the notcned nok
line on a copy of your basic
front. Sketch the neckline ‘in
and hold the pattern up to you
before a mirror. The noyh
should come about on the collar
bones. Add about an inch +o
the center front for button lap.

The dress



The lap will have to have a
shaped facing because of the
curve of the neckline and the

notch. The back neckline is the

Same as the neckline of your
basic back.
Next draft the raglan sleeve

making the front sleeve seam

start at the notch in the neck-

line. .
The cuff is designed by draw-

ing a_ straight line the same
Jength as the bottom of the
sleeve. Half way along the line

measure up two inches for the
width of the cuff under the arm.
At each end of the line measure
up three inches for the width of
the cuff at the points. Make
the top line one inch longer than
the bottom line on each end for
the extension points. Add seams
all around and cut four pieces
by this cuff pattern. Two are
for the cuffs and two are for the
facings. The easiest way to
attach the cuff to the bottom of

RICES—11 a.m. Mr
7 p.m. Mr. S. Lorde.
Sunday Schools at 3 p.m,

ax THE SALVATION ARMY ......
PIE CORNER — 11.00 a.m. Holiness
Meeting, 3.00 p.m. Company Meeting,
7.00 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Major and
Mrs. W. Morris, Divisional Commander.
BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL—1l1 .00 a.m.
Holiness Meeting, 3.00 p.m Company
Meeting, 7.00 p.m. Salvation Meeting.
Major M. Smith.

WELLINGTON STREET — 11.00 a.m,
Holiness Meeting, 3,00 p.m. Company
Meeting, 7.00 p.m. Salvation Meeting,
Sr. Major T, Gibbs.
SPEIGHTSTOWN—11.00 a.m. Holiness
Meeting, 3.00 p.m. Company Meeting,
7.06 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Sr. Captain
W. Bishop

OISTIN—11.00 a.m, Holiness Meeting,
3.p.m, Company Meeting, 7.00 p.m,
Salvation Meeting. Lt. K. Gibbons.
FOUR ROADS — 11,00 a.m. Holiness

G. G. Harper;

Meeting, 3.00 p.m. Company Meeting,
7.0 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Major L
Rawlins.

DIAMOND CORINER—11.00 a.m. Holi-
ness Meeting, 3.00 p.m. Company Meet-
ing, 7.00 p.m. Salvation Meeting.
Captain L. Moore.

ST. MARY'S CHURCH
2nd Sunday After Trinity.

7.30 a.m, Matins & Litany, 8.00 a.m.
Low Mass, 9.00 a.m, Procession, Solemn
Mass & Sermon, 3.30 p.m. Sunday School.
4.00 p.m, Children's vespers, 4.15 p.m.
Baptisms, 7.00 p.m. Evensony, Sermon,
Procession & Te Deum.

ST. NICHOLAS E. 0. CHURCH

WELCHES ROAD—11 a.m Divine
Service Celebrant:— Rev. C. Barrow,
Preacher:—Rev. C Ishmael, 7 p.m
Evensong and Sermon Celebrant: -Rev.
C. Ishmael, Preacher:—Evangelist A.

Young
BAPTIST SERVICES
CALGARY BAPTIST CHURCH Bank

1952

CIRCLE

the sleeve. is with a piece of bias.
First face the cuff, clip the seams,
turn and press leaving the edge
that is to attach to the sleeve
open, Lay the cuff on the right
side of the finished sleeve and
lay .a piece of bias over it.
Stitch -all together, trim the
seams then turn the bias to the
inside and@ finish by hand.



The shaped facing for the
front and neckline should be
drawn on the patterns after
seoms have been added and
traced off. The facing should

in five pieces just like the bodice
neckline and these pieces should
be ceamed together before at-
taching the facing to the neck-
line.

The basic dart in the bodice
front may be stitchuc in or just
eased into» the waistline de-
pending on which is more be-
coming to your individual figure.

The back of ‘the skirt is in
three gores and may be cut by
waistline measure directly in the
cloth using’ only one length plod-
ed in the length wise crease.
Use your back waistline measure
divided by three with seam
allowance added for the top of
each gore. me

The front of the skirt has four
gores and is cut like the eight
gore skirt. Use a fourth of your
front waist measure with seams
added for the top of two gores
end add am inc> for button lap
to the top of the other two gores.
A facing for ‘thy front shcqjald be
designed the same width as the
front facing for the bodice and
cut separately.

Join the front facing to both
bodice and skirt before making
waistline seams. 3



SILENT. WIFE

Sydney: For three years — a
divorce judge heard — 37-year-
old Mrs. Olive Nita Boyle was
a silent wife. Whenever her hus-
band spoke to her she would
put down her book or knitting,
listen impassively throughout
then went on reading or knit-
ting without saying a word. Hed-
fey Vincent Boyle (38) was
granted a divorce on grounds of
desertion.

Toronto: The Rev. G. D. Fran-
cis of Aylmer, Ontario has been
given q plane by his congrega-
tion for his missionary work in
Western Canada and Alaska,

Rome; An elephant’s cemetery
has been dug up at Cannae,
Apulia where Hannibal defeated
the Romans in 216 B.C.

Hall, 11 a.m. Dr, United

George

Weatherspool.
Baptist Church Dash Valley, St.
7 p.m. Dr. Weatherspool.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Church of Christ, Scientist,
Bridgetown
Upper Bay Street

Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m,

Wednesdays 8 p.m. A _ service which
includes Testimonies of Christian Science
Healing.

SUNDAY, JUNE 15, 1952

Subject of Lesson-Sermon: God the
Preserver of Man,

Golden Text: Psalms 91: 1. He that
dwelleth in the secret place of the most
High shall abide under the shadow of
the Almighty.

The following Citations are included
in the Lesson-Sermon: The Bible: ,
the Lord appeared to Abram, and said
unto him, I am the Almighty God; walk
before me, and be thou perfect.

Genesis 17: 1

Science and Health with Key to the
Scriptures, by Mary Baker Eddy.

This patriarch illustrated the purpose
of love to create trust in good, and
showed the life-preserving power of
spiritual understanding, Page 579,





RATES OF “(XCHANGE

JUNE 14, 1952
NEW YORK
Selling Buying
73 4/10% Cheques on Bankers 71 8/10%
Sight or Demand
Drafts 71 6/10%
73 4/10% Cable
71 9/10% Currency 70 3/10%
Coupons 69 6/10%
50% Silver 20%
CANADA
77 3/10% Cheques on Bankers 75 5/10%
Demand Drafts 15.35%
Sight Drafts 75 2/10%
77 3/10% Cable
75 8/10 Currency 14%
Coupons 73 3/10%
50% Silver 20%



No, 712 RA2778

/
e.






HEADACHE
NERVE PAINS

after-effects. More than ever, in | NEURITIS: NEURALGIA |
| these high-pressure times, you
| should insist on using ‘ASPRO’ FEVERISHNESS

because of its SAFE action.

All Trade Enquiries to:

W. B. HUTCHINSON & CO.
MARHILL STREET, BRIDGETOWN



Ww



Made in England by
ASPRO LIMITED, Slough, Bucks

SORE THROAT
COLDS & ’FLU

PRICES WITHIN

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OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE

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In extra large
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Head and Chest Colds, Coughs





Of all good Stores

and Chemists



Colds, Coughs

Sore Throats

Bronchitis

For quick, sure relief rub
THERMOGENE Medica-
ted Rub all over your
chest, throat and back,
Its healing warmth re-
lieves congestion, and
breathing the pleasant
medicinal vapour it gives
off clears nose,
throat and lungs.

DOUBLE-ACTION

THERMOGENE

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In big glass Jars

TRS2I

and handy Tins







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There is only one blend - - -

J. D. Taylor's

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A Blend that satisfies at any time.

TRY THIS
Blended and bottled by - - -

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Roebuck Street





Dial 4335 \

SSE,



oN





SUNDAY, JUNE

15,



1952

WHIS BELT IS NEWS

By DOROTHY BARKLEY

LONDON
It’s the newest way of being
smart. It’s the latest craze in the
fashion world.

“Tt” is the elasticised belt in
webbing, canvas or.satin, or any
colour. It appears in every fash-
ion show, is being sold in every
fashion-conscious store. It varies
from the utilitarian style, two
inches deep, with no ornamenta-
tion, to the luxurious, four inch-
es deep, with gold stud patterns.

It is smart because it is elastic,
and so fits any size of waist; be-
cause it can be any colour and
can be worn with anything from
shorts to glamorous evening
skirt; because it is a good tonic
for a “tired” dress; because you
ean build up a-miniature ward-
robe—one belt to go with every
outfit, hs

In the. picture, a black elasti-
cised belt connects a white pique
skirt with a black poplin blouse
—and makes a useful town outfit.

& . s

At Ian Meredith’s collection
this week, the belt put in a fur-
ther appearance—in lime yellow.
Tt was worn with a grey evening
sweater, and a full black quisted
satin skirt, criss-crossed with sil-
ver thread. Over this went a black
quilted satin coat.

“Pink amethyst” and sea lav-
ender” were two shades making
their first appearance. Old col-
ours, dressed up as new, inctud-
ed Ruby Red, Venetian Red, In-
digo and Vatican Violet.

Poodle cloth, with a curly-
haired pile, was the most out-
standing among new materials. If
you own a poodle, you can now
jook like one—if you have a
poodle haircut, too.

Fisherman’s Basket

An import from Hongkong is
proving to be a best seller here.
It is a miniature fisherman's bas-
ket in wicker cane, fastening with
a peg in the authentic manner.

Women are buying them for pic-
nic-baskets, for work-baskets, or
even for handbags,

Fashion On The Wing

Having a connection with the
fashion world has its advantages
—especially if you live in Phila-
delphia. The International Fash-
ion Group of Philadelphia have
been invited to an Anglo-Ameri-
can gafden party in London in
August. Hostess will be Lady
(Kenneth) Clark, president of the
Incorporated Society of London
Fashion Designers.

The guests will travel over on
a special plane called “Fashion
Wing.” Before they leave they
will have a “flash bulbs and
headliner” party and will re-
christen the plane with cham-

pagne,
Birthday Party

Wien people in the fashion
world have anything to celebrate,
they do it in style. And so, when
Horrockses Pirouette—the chil-
dren's department — reached its
first anniversary, it marked the
oceasion with a birthday party,
complete with ice-creams, birth-
day cake and champagne (for the
grown-ups, of course),

At the same. time, the new
children’s collection was shown,
with children to mogel the new
styles. (Fortunately, their moth-
ers were present to coax and
wheedle them into place).

Pointers from the collection:
nyton is now used for all styles.
It washes easily, dries quickly and
needs little ironing. Dresses had
six-inch hems, and so were insur-
ed for a long life. White collars
were detachable for washing.

Smocking on bodies, back and
front, will continue to be popu-
lar since it makes a dress adap-
table to several sizes,

Finally. a colour note: deep reds
and vivid blues will be worn in
place of the pastel shades normal-
ly associated with children’s
clothes.



Cashmere Bouquet's gentle,
lather has been proved out
standingly mild for all. types

y Vell sh man rot ees fT cist)

the’ fragrance



VALOR COOKER STOVES

Short

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2 Burner Model @ $56.14

———

By DAVID CRAIG

A MIDDLE-AGED woman
knelt down in an Aberdeen bun-
galow. end offered a prayer of
thankfulness when news reached
Britain a few days ago that Long
Pin, No. 1 bandit in Malaya, had
been killed in a jungle battle near
Kuala Lumpur.

Mrs. Isobel Robertson, home on
sick leave from the bandit-
infested. distriet of Kuala Kuba
Bahru, in Selangor, has good
reason to rejoice at the death of
Long Pin.

He was military commander of
No. 1 Regiment “Malayan Races’
Liberation Army.” A £2,320 re-
ward was on his head.

For months he remained at
liberty—carrying out hit-and-run
attacks. Kuala Kuba Bahru was
one of his favourite hunting
grounds.

‘A Little Peace’

Two days ago, Mrs. Robertson
received a letter from her hus-
band, manager of two estates
which ended;—

“If only we could catch Long
Pin we might get a little peace for
a While.”

@ SAID Mrs. Robertson, yes-
terday: “By ‘a little peace’
my husband means that per--
haps We will new get an un-
broken night's rest, which
hes been rare during the last
four years of war.

“During that time we have vir-
tualiy been prisoners behind
barbed-wire fences.

“W are not the only ones. There
are hundreds of European fami-
lies who never know when an
attaek will be launched.

“That is what makes me so
angry when I read of those
cocktail parties, dinner parties,
and too much golf.







SUNDAY ADVOCATE



| Why A Woman Must Go
Back To Jungle War

“This may apply in places
like Singapore and Kuala Lum-
pur, but the only parties we
have are Communist parties led
by fanatics,

“People in these towns have
told me: ‘Awfully sorry youre
having such a rough time, old girl,
but they know as much about
jungle warfare as Aberdeen knew
about the London biitz.

Visitors Armed

“We seldom have visitors on the
estate,

“When we do it is grimly amus-
ing to see them leave revolvers,
rifles, and hand grenades in the
hall just as we at home here might
give our hostess coat, gloves, and
umbrella.

“If, on a rare occasion, I visit
ithe dentist or hair-dresser, If
travel in an armoured car with «
guard. After a four-mile trip
through deep jungle we reach the
main road, then go flat out for
Kuala Lumpur 20 miles away.

“If we see a car that has broken
down we pretend not to notice. It
may be genuine—but too many
were caught that way in the early
days.

@ “I live month in, month out
inside the perimeter of the es-
tate, seldom venturing fur-
ther than the garden. When

my husband leaves each morning
for work I begin my worrying for
the day. And he, in turn, prays the
bandits won’t attack the bungalow
in his absence.

“It is quite a touching reunion
in the evening when each finds
ihe other safe.

Bedtime Worst Time
“At night there is a strict cur-
few, Nineteen guards take up
\heir positions and floodlights bite
deep into the jungle.

‘Bedtime is about 9 p.m. This is,
perhaps, the worst time of the
day. The atmosphere is appres-
sive and heavy. A deathly, damp
silence hangs everywhere.

“Before the war began I used
to worry about tigers and snakes.
But not any more. They’re still
there, but it’s bandits we have
nightmares about now.”

@ THE Robertsons have been in

Malaya since 1920, When the
Japanese overran the country im
1942 Robertson escaped with her
son to Australia.

Her husband was a prisoner be-
hind Jap barbed wire for three
and a half years.

Now the Robertsons are behind
their own barbed wire fighting a
remorseless enemy so that rubber
can continue to be one of Britain's
biggest dollar-earners.

Sheltered In Bath

What makes them carry on?

What makes a woman like
Mrs. Robertson who recently
sheltered im a bath for two
hours while the Communist
thugs shot wp the bungalow,
want to go back?

She is home on an extended
leave because her nerves could not
stand the stillness and hidden ter~
‘rors of the jungle any longer.

She is a chain-smoker, and the
sound of a car back-firing makes
her want to scream, so that she
stays away from the city of Aber-
deen as much as possible,

But she is going back to her
jungle home in a few months.
Because, she says, “It is my duty
to be with my husband,

“We have both survived many
unpleasant things in Malaya. To
quit nuw would be to surrender
to Communism.

“Just now there is a war on:
there is no gin-slinging in the
jungle.”—L.E.8.

Wedding Etiquette

The Wedding Reception

Sometimes held
noon after a late
preference to the wedding
“Breakfast.” All the bridal at-
tendants are present and those
who have previously accepted
invitations, The reception gener-
ally takes place at the home of
the bride’s mother, or in- a hotel

which has been hired for the
occasion. The bride and groom
stand together in a convenient
place, generally several paces to
the left of the bride's mother, to
receive the congratulations and

good wishes of their friends. The
bride’s mother stands just inside
the door to receive the guests.
No person should monopolise

the attention of the bridal paw
for more than a moment_or two.
Guests them pass on to look at
where they have
inspection,
After a
refreshments are

the presents
been arranged for
and to talk
short interval

served,
The

together.

brides mother, father,

brothers, and sisters will act as

auxiliary hosts and hostesses, and
no guest should be neglected.
Special care should be taken
present special
bridegroom's
relations to
amongst the

guests to the
parents and near
see that
first to

have been welcomed the newly

married couple go together to the
nab
In a reasonabl

dining room
cuts the cake.
short time they retire to
rooms to dress for their journey.
Parental farewells and others
which may be affecting should be

where the

to

they are
be given
refreshments. When all the guests

in the after-taken in the privacy of the res-
wedding in pective rooms, and.the bride and be

bridegroom should make their
reappearance in good spirits.

It is all to the good, if music
is procurable, as it eliminates-
the necessity for strained a
at cheering the company’s spirits
and conversation will be more
free. The bride and groom dance
the first piece together, the
bride's father may claim the
second and the bridegroom’s
father the third.

The bridal attendants and
friends form up on the doorstep
and speed the happy couple on
their way. It is now, mercifully,
more fashionable to shower bless-
ings on their heads than rice or
confetti !

The menu is best given into the
hands of a caterer, who accustom-
ed as he is to such matters, will
ensure the smooth working- of
the arrangements. In the long
run, too, less expenses is entailed,
and wastage will be eliminated.

Arrangements must be made
for washing up if the full number
of glasses is ‘not provided. The
provision of champagne or other-
wise depends on the means of the
host. If it is provided it should be
given in charge of some experi-
enced person who can be relied
on to see that it is not wasted.
Slices of the cake are cut into
small pieces and handed round,
together with the champagne. It
is not necessary to provide indi-
vidual plates with the cake for
guests, am





Used cups and glasses should
unobtrusively collected and
washed, full dishes substituted
for empty ones, ash-trays emptied,
sand the room generally kept tidy.

Cloakrooms should be provided,

and bedrooms may be converted

to this purpose, where the ladies

may rest their gloves, hats, and
bags.

Presents are displayed | taste-
fully at the reception. Small

cards giving the names of the

donors are placed on_ each,
Cheques, of ¢éourse, are not dis-
played, but the donors of such

should have their ecards placed
with the rest. In no circumstances
t be unacceptable
’ or bridegroom's
taste be, omitted from the display.
This custom of displaying pres-
with ecards attached is fast
dying out. In this case a list of the
presents together with the names

should a
to the bri

ents

of the donors may be recorded.

The menu should be qualified
by the means of the bride’s fam-
Beverages consist of cham-

ily.
pagne for toasting the wedded

couple, cordials for the abstain-

ers, and young people, cider cup,
whiskey and soda, rum and soda,
rum and ginger, beer and coco-
nut water, and of course,
cream. There is also cake, sand-
wiches (different flavours), appe-
tizers, stuffed eggs, bouches and
other dainties, suppers,
and nuts,

The cake is the centrepiece of
be
of the
bride, so that she_is sereened from

decoration but should not

placed directly in front

tthe company’s view.





There is nothing in the world so elegant and refreshing .. .















ice-

sweets

—

Man About Town

MRS. DOROTHY WALCOTT of
SINGER’S SEWING ACADEMY,
is the lady to phone (4927), She
will tell you of the fascinating
EMBROIDERY CLASSES which
you can join at any time and for
so nomingi a cost. A course is 25
lessons with a practice period of
1% hours once a week, You'll
Jearn embroidery of Household
Linens, Lingerie, Undies, Floor
Rugs. Just thiik of it and then
phone!

*

WORSTED SUITINGS AND
RAYON SUITINGS at prices that
fully justify the recent textile
reductions ! Very excellent value
indeed. And Wison Hats and
Shirts, oh, yes! Arrow Shirts from
the States in glistening white or
coloured stripe designs. All of
these are to be found at R. H.
DWARDS LTD., on Broad Street
together with socks, ties and shoes
and @ range of Men’s and Boys’
Sports Shirts—dazzlers !

+ +

.
THIS NEW HOUSEHOLD
STORE on Lower Broad Street is
to bring to you the choicest selec-
tion of real, every-day needs.
Cigarette Cases and Leather Goods
complement Jewellery, Watches
and Electrical appliances, includ-
img Frigidaires and Deep Freezes,
Kettles and Hot-Plates. The vari-
ety is terrific and far more than
ean be listed here. You'll see it
ali at K. R. HUNTE & CO.,, LTD.,
and by the way, did I say Office
Furniture’ Z
.

LEN HUTTON,
bats, gloves, stumps and Cricket
talls have arrived at CAVE
SHEPHERD'S this week and make
an excellent showing in the Sports
Dept. Litesome Supports and
Protectors are included in the
equipment and so are Slazenger
Tennis Frames ranging from
$15.50, Table Tennis Bats are
available in different shapes and
weights from $2.28. You should
browse around up here!

* a *

hit-'em-for-six

GEORGE SAHELY & CO., are
trimming over with constantly
erriving new stock-—Blue, White,
Pink, Yellow Rayon Fancy Mar-
quisette and Fancy Doby Crepe in
laste] Shades—and it's brand new
at unbeatable prices. Crammed
against the walls are rainbow
hues and a multitude of materials
from which to choose and remem-
ber—all are new and fresh when,
bought at Geo, Sahely & Co, 19
Swan Street,

FROM BRITISH GUIANA to
Y. DE LIMA’S on Broad St. comes
a Jeweller expressly to carry out
repair work, or work of a
manufacturing nature, or engrav~-
ing, or the copying of a pattern.
Now this is. really something and,
what’s more, prices are extremely
reasonable for this specialised
work AND DELIVERY IS ON
THE NAIL. So give a tinkle to
Y. de Lima’s, 4644 and get that
job done at last!

your



WHITE LIGHTWEIGHT!
SHARKSKIN, 36 in. wide and|
only $2.11; Heavyweight Shark- |
skin, too, and Flowered RAYON
LINENS for $1.50 in large, bold
designs. And look at the PRINTS!
Only 68¢. each—can you possibly }
bei. it? You'll see them at|
ChASE’S, THE STORE THAT |
FREQUENTLY HAS EVERY-|
THING, and it has, too. FIBRE |
BUIT CASES from $6.75 downs to |

‘ : |
$2.90 in nine sizes. So there you |
are—-phone is
>





3393. |

+ . |

\

THE VERY NEWEST FLOOR |
COVERING is now in town, At}
Barbados Co-op. Cotton Factory |
the remarkable TINTAWN Mat- |
Ung
$9.90 and Squares from $11.28 to
$32.37 comes in many colours
and colour combinations, The per-
fect covering for wood or concrete
it's claimed as the hardest wearing
matting known and impervious to

burns. You should certainly see it, |

THE KELVINATOR I8 A,
We0DDING GIFT to be treasured!
At Manning’s Corner Store (4283)
or in the Electrical Dept. of Man- |

niwg & Co., Ltd. (4289) these
REYRIGERATORS are produced |
by American technicians in Brit- |
ain, Almost 5 cu. ft. capacity— |
ideal family size!—-this glittering,

Space saving cabinet with splen-

didly planned interior is a steal of

its kind for $415--with a 5 year

guarantee!
* *. *

IT’S APPLE GREEN AND A}
MONEY SAVER and very, very!
ativaetive. ‘This litthe Morris Con- |
vertible at the Fort Royal is way |
low down in price~and way high |
up in value with feather touch
(tcering, hydraulic braking, in-
dependent springing and incredi-
bly smooth operation, It won't be
heré long, y’know, because it’s toa
appealing for words (if I say so}
myself). Would you eare to phone |
about it?—Try 2362.





Ss





.oughing,- Strangling Asthma, |
Bronchitis Curbed in 3 Minutes |




0 you have attacks of Asthma or
sronchitis so bad that you choke
ond gasp for breath and can’t sleep?
Do you cough so hard you feel like
you were being ruptured? Do you
feel wenk, unable to work, and have
to ureful not to take cold and

t certain foods?

o matter how long you have suf-
ered or what you have tried, there
ts new hope for you In a Doctor's
twesertption called MENDACO, No

slopes, no smokes, no injections, no
atomizer, All you do ta take two
tosteloss tablets at monalis and your
eitacks seem to vatiah ke Tato,





and bring sound sleep the first night
so that you soon feel years younger
emt atronger,

# No Asthma In 2 Yoars

MENDACO not only brings almost
immediate comfort and free breath-
tog but builds up the system to ward
off future attacks, For instance, Mr.

eal



Men certainly like shirts of smart
“Tex-made”’ broadcloth! The
striking Dufferin Lesigns with
their handsome stripes on light or

comfortable, too.

simple to sew-— they



In
3 minutes MENDACO starts work-
jog through your blood aiding nature
‘o dissolve and remove strangling
phlegm, promote free easy breathing



dark backgrounds are big
favourites! So cool, and

And “Tex-made”’ materials are

and handle effortlessly You'll like
the way they wash and iron. .
and the way the colours stay fast!

Ask for ‘“Tex-made”’
by the yard, and look at the
famous identification bands and
“Tex-made”’ tag. They are your
guarantee of top quality and
lasting wear.

(. had Jost 40 Ibs,, suffered cough-



choking and strangling every

4.1
| night, couldn't sleep, expected to die,

MENDACO stopped Asthma spasma
jiret night and he has had none since
In over two yenra,

Money Back Guarantee

very firet dose of MENDACO
right to work circulating
‘ugh your blood ang helping na-
ure rid you of the effects of Asthma,
In no time at all MENDACO may
oagiiy make you feel years younger
inc atronger. Try MISNDACO under
an lron-olad mor vgeck Buarantee,

th








You be the Judrr you don't feel
entirely well, like a new person, and
fully satisfied aft taking MIEN






N-
PREG return the empty pack.
ige and the full purchase price wilt
be refunded. Get MENDACO from
your Chemist today and see how
well you sleep tonight and how much
better you will feel tomorrow, The

Mendaco?!:)'::s:

Eads Asthma ye Bronchitis we Hay F



| MEN like smart-patterned

drape easily

today. Buy it

iP



<

~—3 ft. wide $4.95—6 ft. wide \

"G699666606660004669090004%-

PAGE SEVEN



What a dream of vm

a figure... yours in
Meavdenfories.
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PAGE EIGHT





Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown



Sunday, June 15, 1952



FREE UNIONS

ON Thursday Mr. G. H. Adams C.M.G.
leaves Barbados for Berlin. He will be
attending two meetings which will be
held under the auspices of the Interna-
tional Conference*of Free Trade Unions.

At the first of these meetings Mr. Adams
will be attending as a representative of
the British West Indies on the Executive
Board of the International Confederation
of Free Trade Unions.

At the second he will be representing
Barbados at the first conference of the
General Council of I.C.F.T.U.

Mr. Adams’s visit to Berlin follows close
upon the formation of a Caribbean Divis-
ion of the Inter American Regional Or-
ganisation of-ICFTU. The decision to cre-
ate such a division which was made at the
recent conference in Barbados will be re-
ferred to the Executive Board in Berlin
for confirmation.

The formation of a Caribbean Division
of ORIT is truly a historic landmark in
the history of West Indian Trade Unions.

The territory covered by ORIT is so
vast, comprising as it does the whole of
the American Continent that the special
problems of the Caribbean area tended to
become submerged in the flood of Latin-
American affairs which clamour for
ORIT’s attention. Caribbean Unions need
all the help and guidance they can obtain
from the Inter-American Regional Or-
ganisation headquarters in Havana, But
fundamentally the success or failure of
Caribbean Trade Unions depends on the
ability to be found within the Unions
themselves and emancipation from the
leading strings of ORIT will give members
of the Caribbean division of ORIT oppor-
tunity to show their mettle.

At the same time the formation of the
Caribbean Division of ORIT is a challenge
to the member Unions and ipso facto a
challenge to the communities in which
the member unions operate.

There can be no question as to the ne-
cessity for the free unions to succeed. Mr.
Romualdi, Chairman of the meeting which
decided in favour of the formation of the
Caribbean Division of ORIT stated the po-
sition exactly, when he said that if the free
trade unions failed, the movement would
fail... fies a ‘ ‘

Tt cannot be too often repeated that there
exists to-day in the world two trade union
movements which ‘command world wide
allegiance. The Intecnational Confedera-
tion of Free Trade Unions whose first Gen-
eral Council meeting in Berlin Mr. G. H.
Adams is attending this month, repre-

_sents unions whose allegiance is to the
democratic way of life as understood and
practised in the free democracies. The
World Federation of Trade Unions on the
other hand is controlled and dominated by
Communists and is committed to a policy
of totalitarianism which is a negation of
the very freedoms for which the Free
Trade Unions have fought and still con-
tinue to fight.

Trade.Unions are young movements in
the West Indies and responsible Trade
Union leaders and officials will frankly
admit that their unions have not yet freed
themselves from the teething troubles
which must be expected from any pioneer
movement and which had naturally ,to be
encountered by organisations whose activ-
ities were primarily directed towards ob-
taining large pay packets for their mem-
bers,

As a result there is still to be found in
the West Indies suspicion of Trade Unions
on one side and on the other aggressive
attitudes on the part of some Unionists to
employers. Perhaps this kind of suspicion
will always exist in some degree because
of the failings of human nature: but
throughout the Caribbean area to-day the
majority of responsible employers are
prepared to co-operate and do co-operate
with local unions. It can even be said
that-the roles which the Unions now per-
form are appreciated by most employers.

The relationship between Trade Unions
and employers has therefore long passed
the “cat and dog” stage which is kept in
being only by politicians who have been
reluctant to forego so easy a method of
courting popularity with the uneducated.

The stage which has been reached in
the Caribbean is a stage far more ad-
vanced and far more important than the
mud-slinging contests of parochially
minded individuals. What is being decid-
ed in the Caribbean to-day is the direc-
tion of Trade Union movement.

Will it swing towards Moscow or will
it support the democratic nations among
whose members are included the fifty mil-
lion who are represented in the Interna-
tional Confederation of Free Trade
Unions ?

At the meeting held in Barbados during
the first- week in June the foundation
stone was laid on which to build a healthy

Caribbean Trade Union structure devoted
to the service not only of Trade Unions
members but to the Caribbean community
and to the countries of the Caribbean.

It is the duty of all who live in the
Caribbean to lend support wherever and
whenever it is required ‘to strengthen the
movement towards Free Trede Unionism.
Because ‘assistance given to the Free Trade
Unions strikes at the roots of the Com-
munist dominated rival Trade Unions
whose objective is subversion of the exist-
ing regimes and the inauguration of com-
munist totalitarian controls.

DIAL 999) aa; George tunte

It will be easier for the communities of
the Caribbean to support the Free Trade
Unions if the Unions strive to bafhish sus-
picion and if they concentrate their ener-
gies on educating their members to
greater understanding of their responsibil-
ities to the community. It would be tragic
for the free trade Unions and therefore
for the community if parochialism and
narrow self interest prevented the rap-
prochement between unionist and non-
unionist which is essential to the harmon-
ious progress of free societies. \/ith good-
will everything is possible.



DANGER

THE BISHOP of Lichfield put into
words recently at Wolverhampton what
has for many years been exercising the
thoughts of private individuals through-
out the world, Speaking of the people of
the United Kingdom the Bishop said that
“we were in danger of becoming two
nations with each party in turn deriding
and when in power'destructively undoing
what the other party had done.”

Such violent political quarrelling he
added did not make for stable government
and concluded that it would be a major
disaster if a time should ever be reached
when the political parties became end’ in
themselves and not means to an end.

The Bishop views British politics with
clear vision and a wholesome respect for
facts.

The United Kingdom as Mr. Winston
Churchill said at the time of the British
General Elections is to-day a party-divid-
ed country.

There is little likelihood of Barbados
ever sharing the fate of the United King-
dom for generations, because even if a
party form of government could operate
successfully in our diminutive assembly
the existence of more than two parties
will always hamper party government
here.

But what the Bishop of Lichfield said
about the danger of becoming two nations
is always present in a society where poli-
tical belief is based on blind faith in a po-
litical programme and is not the result of
careful thought. An illustration of this
lack of political thought is afforded by the
actual remark of a labour supporter in
Barbados when he replied to a suggestion
that a coalition government in the United
Kingdom might save the United Kingdom
from destruction with the comment that it
would be political death to the Labour
Party.

No greater vindication of the Bishop’s
perspicacity could be made. If political
parties become ends in themselves and not
means to an end it is only logical for the
good of the political party to be held in
greater esteem than the good of the coun-
try.

To such ridiculous ends can the misdi-
rection of human energies and abilities
lead.

It seems that the Bishop is a better
guide to the health of a polity than the
professed politician.



COLOUR

TO this generation of readers the Times
of London is regarded as something solid,
staid and responsible. It'can be trusted
most of them would say never to be sen-
sational, never to offend against good
taste. But most of its loyal readers must
have been given a jolt when they turned
to the foot of column two on page 6 on
Saturday May 31. Because there in block
letters was a headline running across the
whole column announcing Colour Bar For
Pigs. The sub-editor who thought that one
up deserves no doubt a medal or some
other decoration from some society which
makes studies of headlines. But the head-
line is dull and uninspiring when com-
pared to the subject matter over which it
stands.

Believe it or not, and most of us will be-
lieve it because the Times says so, all pigs
in the Republic of Ireland are now official-
ly white. And if they are not someone is
breaking the law.

Beginning this June in the Republic of
Ireland it is an offence to keep other than
a white pig.

Farmers have had a long time to pre-
pare for this practise of pig racial dis-
crimination.

They were prohibited in July 1951 from
using coloured pigs for breeding.

And the reason for the colour bar?

It is said that white pigs give better
bacon and pork,



SUNDAY AD

Before June is out “Dial 999”
will be the new way of calling the
Police by telephone. This new
development is only one of a series
of developments which have been
going on year after year behind
the scenes and which have been
| bringing the Police nearer to the
|mainstream of the community's
life

The

Police of Barbados are

servants of the people of Barba- pelice. grocery
So it is right that the oor eens lines with delivery ser-

dos.

vices which they perform an

VOCATE



lie in the policeman and he has
probably chosen the wrong pro-
fession.

The Central Police Station in
Bridgetown is the headquarters
for the island’s twenty-two police
formations. Here policemen en-
joy the facilities of a well-fur-
nis reading room, recreation

, bar and restaurant service.

Here they avail themselves of a

store run on co-

and here their hair-cuts cost

the services which they can per- less thay in Bridgetown.

| form should be recognised by the
|community, Only in this way can
‘the community appreciate how
|much they owe to the Police;
and only in this way will they be
| encouraged to make greater uses
of the Services of the Police.
| Most people in Barbados think
| of the Police as limbs of the law,
| as persons who walk around in a
|very conspicuous uniform carry-
| ing notebook and pencil and eager
to catch unsuspecting citizens in
| the act of wrongdoing.
| They regard them as people to
{be avoided rather than as friends
of law-abiding citizens.

Many persons have good rea-
sons for not wanting to see police-
men because they know that a
policeman’'s presence indicates tha’
‘their misdemeanours or crim
have been discovered, Others ob-
| ject to policemen on principle be-
cause they regard policemen as
j enemies to their personal freedom,
whether this freedom takes the
form of exceeding the speed limit
or of committing a public nui-
sance,

The conception of a policeman
as a positive contribution to the
stability of society is still grow-
ing. It has not yet reached ma-
turity.

Perhaps the people of Barbados
would be far more appreciative of

| their police force if they knew
more about them and saw them
off duty, in their restaurants, can-
Semis or even getting their hair
cut.

The policemen of Barbados (and
the 4 policewomen) are well dis-
ciplined., Without discipline a po-
lice force is not worth the paper
it is written on, Discipline, exem-
plified by springing to attention
and immediate execution of com-
mands must be present in a police
force as it is present in an army,
But discipline is merely the back-
hone st the skeleton” oan makes
a g policeman or geen.
There is room in the Police Force
for all the talents. A man ean be
employed as a carpenter, a store-
keeper, a photographer, a tele-

phone operator, a driver, a groom
or an orderly, A policeman n’s lot
in Barbados ought to be a happy

one. If it is not, the fault must






































By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS

LONDON, May

Anthony Eden, our tireless For-
eign Secretary, has completed the
last lap of what can only be de-
scribed as a ten-day European
steeplechase. He went to Benn.
to sign Germany's peace contract.
It was a terrible job as he had
to initial every single one of its
400 pages, in the course of a
morning. He also attended a ban-
quet in Bonn and another in
Cologne. Then he dashed to Paris,
to sign up the agreements and
guarantees to France that she
wanted to persuade her to join
the European Army, Then to
Strasbourg—the comparative peace
of the European “talking shop”"—
and from there to troubled Berlin,
where he went heavily guarded
against Communist demonstra-
tions,

All this serious and relevant
news thas fallen so thickly and
fast on the ground that Britain
has not quite come to picture the
new map of Europe. It will pro-
bably be seen by historians as
the week when the wartime “Big
Three” partnership finally broke
up into a greater number of ele-
ments, This Spring has seen two
new powers emerge into world
affairs and world commerce—first
Japan and now Germany. And a
tense situation is growing around
Berlin, One half of Germany is
being finally cut off from the
other—and that means the old
map of Europe we used to learn
from is radically altered,

a » 2

British opinion is much more
agitated about the situation in
South Africa than about develop-
ments in Europe, Everywhere
there is a sudden interest in the
intricacies of South African poli-
tics, and the most unexpected
people air precise information
about such abstruse matters as
the change of opinion on the
platteland, or the chances of the
Supreme Court successfully defy-
ing Dr. Malan.

mpletes Ten Day
Steeplechase

Eden Co

Folice have their own tailoring
‘dd laundry service: a bicycle re-
pair service afd of course their
own quartermaster store.

The Barbados Police are mem-
bers of a community where work
and play are carefully organised
and integrated into routine police
administration. But the routine
and disciplined arrangement of a
policeman’s life, reflected in the
neat arrangement of cots, kits and
shining metal in Police barracks
rooms or in the smart click of at-
tention Which denotes an officer’s
presence is only one aspect of a
policeman’s life. '

At police headquarters the fill-
ing in of card indices, crime re-
cords, statistics of accidents,

ae harts of cane fires occupy many

usy hours of policemen clerks’
days while policemen of the

°@.1.D. have the tasks of exam-

ing witnesses and of the collection
of fingerprints and development
of photographic records. .

The C.1.D. department is
proud of its “finger-print” work
and enlargements of the thumb
marks of two of the most daring
housebreakers to be tracked by lo-
cal finger-print detection adorn
their finger-print room. Charts
are kept of misdemeanours, lar-
ceny and other specific crimes.
special chart is kept for robbery
‘of poultry and livestock and for
bicycle thefts.

The C.I.D. is the most_excit-
ing department in which a Police-
man can work and one of its cor-
porals is presently at Scotland
Yard in London learning at first
hand how the most famous C.I.Dt
in the world sets about discover-
ing criminals.

One of the attractions of em-
ployment in the C.I.D. is the ab-
sence of policeman’s ‘uniform.

Sleuthing is best done without
advertisement. The C.D. are
justly proud, too of a locally con~-
Structed box which contains all
the gadgets necessary for
detection.

It is the only one of its kind
in Barbados and after one look
at its contents I was tempted
just momentarily to think what a
worthwhile robbery it would be,

crime

It's the sort of box any normal
boy must envy.

There are nearly six hundred
volicemen in the Force, however,
and only a small number can
achieve the ambition of becoming
C.1.D. personnel. But there are
many more interesting jobs to
be filled.

Very soon now the Police will
be equipped with a radio network
operating from headquarters and
controlling mobile patrol cars.
Policemen will be needed to man
the control wireless sets and
tu drive the patrol cars. After
investigations on the scene of the
crime this form of police activity
would appeal to me most. No
duubt many policemen will feel
the same. For the clerky types,
there are jobs with the immi-
gration department, the licensing
departmentss and the statistical
departments and the statistical
publish a weekly police gazette
which is printed on a_ small
duplicating machine and_ dis-
tributed to all British Caribbean
territories,

The Police Gazette notifies
everyone in the region to be on the
look out for wanted persons or
stolen goods.

Another fascinating police job is
that of the mounted policeman.
There is a mounted police detach-
ment at Bissex Hill and their rides
into the lesser known and roadless
Scotland districts must be very
satisfactory and worthwhile.

Everyone knows about the Police
Band: and many people are be-
coming aware of the Boys and
Girls Clubs,

These are run under Police
supervision and are helping to
tackle the important police duty

A of preventing crime. One splendid

advertisement for the Boys Clubs
is the boy now employed as a
tailor’s apprentice at the Central
Police Station.

Looked at from Coleridge Street
or from Baxters Road the_head-
quarters of the Police Station
seems very stern and grim: but
between these two points moye
daily a disciplined number of hu-
man beings upon whose co-ordin-
ated activities, intelligence, train-
ing and sense of duty depends the
maintenance of law and order in
Barbados.

Inside the Police Headquarters
in Bridgetown beats the heart of a
Force which is daily becoming
more trained and better equipped
to carry out the role of servants
of the people of Barbados.

We ought to be more proud of
our policemen, and more grateful
for the services they render us.





This sudden burst of interest in
South Africa, has of course, been
stimulated by the crisis, a crisis
that seems to have been deliber-
ately provoked by th2 National-
ist Government.

One of the recent turns in

» events in South Africa has been

the revival of Dr. Malan’s claim
to take over the Protectorates
which are within or beside tha
area of the Union but are still
governed directly from Whitehall.
In the present state of British
public opinion it is impossible to
imagine that any British Gov-
ernment could surrender the Pro-
tectorates. The question. being
asked is whether it might be pos-
sible, if the South African Na-
tionalists are defeatede at next
year’s election, for the British
Conservative Government to
reach some arrangement with a
more moderate South African
Government, In the present tem-
per of opinion even that gesture
might be impossible for a long
time as the distrust—which seems
to be mutual—between Britain
and Nationalist South Africa will
take time to be dissipated by any
future South African Government.

* * *

Queen Mary celebrated her 85th
birthday last month. And London
gave her a brave show of flags
to demonstrate its affection to the
old lady who has come to repre-
sent royalty in all its regality.

Queen Mary spent her eighty-
fifth birthday quietly, at her home
at Marlborough House. Prince
Charles and Princess Anne came
to visit their great-grandmother;
and the English rose society pre-
sented her with a prize bouquet
lof a variety of dark red rose that
she has been interested in—for
Queen Mary is a keen horticul-
turist as well as an enthusiastic
antique-collector.

oe *. *

A.E.R.E. has issued a report of
what it is up to. May I take that

ut of modern initial-jargon?

tain’s atomic-energy research
station has told the public a cer-
tain amount about its work both



towards preparing the first British

atom-bomb and advancing

ards energy from atomic power,
é

Harwell, about which the re-
port is published is known main-
ly as the place that Drs. Fuchs
and Pontecervo gleaned their in-
formation from—to deliver to their
Soviet masters. Harwell, though,
is not an atom-bomb factory. It
is a comparatively small research
station that has achieved some
remarkable results under Sir
John Cockroft — despite the lack
of technical co-operation from
the United States.

It is said that due to the dis-
coveries of British science the
bomb to be exploded off the North
West coast of Australia will be
technically superior to anything
attempted in the United States.
And presumably superior to Rus-
sian efforts.

ok *

Mr. Menzies, the Prime Minis-
ter of Australia, is used to hard
work. But one of his entourage
described his programme in Lon-

don a “grim”. He meant that the
programme was a bid crowded—

not that meeting members of the

Conservative Government could

be grim.
* * *

Fleet Street journalists are
sometimes worried by the lack of
thought among journalists. That,
briefly, is why the Fleet Street




suade 80-year-old Lord Russel!
to visit a Fleet Street Tavern and
stimulate our thought-processes.
He has explained that on gloomy
days he believes the world
running into an era of war and

self-annihilation; on bright days

he looks forward to the era of
greatest prosperity the world has
ever known.

We had him on a gloomy day—
he gave the world odds of about
6—4 against. ,

But it was stimulating, and
Fleet Street Forum has now pub-
lished on account of the discus-
sion, Many journalists talk more
nonsense than one _ journalist—
that is all we proved.



Krennalin versus Vatican

By CHARLES WINTOUR

The Russian film industry have
just given the British public a
fascinating picture of Stalin seen
through Soviet eyes, In The Fall
of Berlin the Soviet dictator ap-
pears as the kindly father of his
peoples, a man of infinite goodness
and almost divine wisdom.

Most Communists certainly be-
lieve that Stalin never made a
serious mistake in his life. The
myth of infallibility is so much
easier to maintain when no
admission of error is ever made.

But when the history of the
post-war years comes to be writ-
ten it will be found that Stalin
made many mistakes, and the big-
gest was his attack on the position
of the Roman Catholic Church in
the Soviet orbit of influence.

There are nearly 50 million
Roman Catholics living in coun-
tries under Soviet rule. The per-
secution of their church and its
leaders aroused the whole Catholic
world and led in 1949 to Papal
excommunication of the Commu-
nists.

France...

The trial of Cardinal Minds-
zenty in Hungary, the banishment
of Archbishop Beran of Prague,
ithe arrest of the Rumanian pre-
‘Mates, the attacks on the Church
in Poland—all these incidents
helped to build up the strength of



the Cummunist States to the full

and determined exercise of its
tical influence against the

interests of Soviet Communism.

Strategically, the Roman Cath-
olic Church is well placed to
engage in a struggle of this kind.
Everywhere in the world Roman
Catholics may be found in posi-
tions of influence. And in Europe
they dominate the political scene.

Look at France. Twelve of the
17 members of the French Cabinet
are Catholics. They include the
Prime Minister, M. Pinay, the
Foreign Minister, M. Schuman,
the Defence Minister, M. Pleven,
and M. Le Tourneau, the Minister
for Associated States,

Then there is M. Bidault, the
leader of the Mouvement Repub-
ficain Populaire, one of the parties
essential to the Government's
majority. He is a Catholic. And
so is General de Gaulle, the leader
of the right-wing Opposition.

Belguim, Italy .. .

But Catholic influence extends
much farther than this. It is
generally understood that promo-
tion at the Quai d'Orsay, the
French foreign office, is very diffi-
cult for non-Catholics. The some

to change its attitude from a will- Social Christian Party forming the|
ingness to live peaceably within Government is a Roman Catholic)

party.

Of course, Italy is a Roman
Catholic country, led by a Roman
Catholic Prime Minister, Signor
de Gasperi. But it may be sur-
prising for people to hear that
Herr Adenauer, the German
Chancellor, is a Roman Catholic.

And so is Dr, Figl, the Austrian
Chancellor, who has just been
visiting Britain. He is the head
of the Catholic People’s Party,
which exercises the predominant
influence in Austrian affairs.

Spain, Portugal .. .

This does not complete the
record of Roman Catholic politic-
ians in Europe. General Franco
of Spain is a Catholic, and so is
Dr. Salazar, the Premier of Por-
tugal. Their ministers are of the
same faith.

In predominantly Anglo-Saxoa
countries the Catholics have less
influence, Only one of the Empire
Premiers is a Catholic. He i3 Mr.
Louis St. Laurent of Canada.
Britain only 23 members of Parli-
ament are Catholics, of whom 15
are Socialists. Perhaps the most
prominent is Mr. Richard Stokes,
the former Lord Privy Seal. There
are no Catholics holding office in

thing applies to non-Catholic the present administration.
officers in the Army. . The United States has been
France’s northern neighbour, called a Roman Catholic country,

Belgium, is governed by a Cabinet so strong is the influence of the

the Roman Catholic Church and which is entirely Catholic, for the Catholic vote in certain key areas. !

tow-j














Forum was ‘formed. Not long ago
the journalists managed to per-

is

In|

SUNDAY, JUNE 15,

1952







































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SUNDAY, JUNE

15,



CRUISING



Concluding the account of
2 trip in. the 15ft. yach
H from Barbados
to St. Vincent, the Grena-
dines and Grenada.

—— |

Before I left Barbados I had
read a passage in a book by
Anita Leslie which made me feel
that I would never be satisfied
until I had sailed through the
Grenadines. I quote it here in
the hope that it. will also inspire
other local yachtsmen who are
considering making a cruise but
cannot quite make up their minds
to “take the plunge.”

It goes Jiké this: “Dreams can-
not cony up any more enticing
stretch fof a sailing boat than the
hundred islands of the Grenadi-
nes. Their names are like music,
English, French and Indian toned
Battowia, Mustique, Petit
Mustique, Montezumo Shoal, Anse
la Coite, Cannowan, Tobago Cays,
Frigate Island, London Bridge,
Les Tamtes — oh, magic isles,
mere splinters of volcanic rock
set like a granite necklace in
seas of jade and amethyst!’ ”

To her list of names I would
add one or two that appeal par-
ticularly to me; like World’s End
Reef, Petit Tobac, Baliceaux,
Jack a Man, All Awash and Sail
Rock— a steep white rock which
can be mistaken quite easily for

_






1952

The manageress of the hotel
gave us Some large jacks in
loaves of bread which we stowed
carefully in the cubby hole and
then walked down the beach ‘to
Port Elizabeth to clear the ship.

The government offices in
Bequia are very nicely arranged.
One small building houses the
Treasury, Police, Customs, Post
Office, Law Court, Revenue
Office end the wireless station.
After we had been cleared and
had had our bill of healtn
endorsed Corkie decided that he
wanted some stamps. “Just a
minute” said the clerk, and bob-
bed around into another little
office. It turned out that besides
being Harbour Master he was
also Post Master, Revenue
Officer, Wireless Operator, Treas-
urer and Clerk of the Court—a
magistrate goes over to Bequia
once a month from St. Vincent
—his only regret was that he did
not get separate salaries for each
of his posts.

Eventually we hoisted anchor
at 10 a.m. and used the outboard
to get out of the harbour. Once
out we hoisted sail and started
a battle with the sea which was
to last for over five hours. There
was a strong wind blowing and
the sea was rough, very steep
seas caused not by the wind but
by the current. Hurricane was

sailing under the large cruising
mainsail and the cruising jib, but

Ae
‘and

THE LIGHT ON CANNOUAN.—At night the lamp warns mariners
of the treacherous rvets that surround the harpour.

a schooner, But to get back to
prosaic statistics. There are some
six hundred islands and rocks in
the Grenadines and the majority
of them are uninhabited. The
largest island is Carriacou which
is seven miles long and two miles
wide, and the next in size is
Bequia. The islands are not high,
none being over 1,100 feet, but
being so small they look higher
than they really are.

The tides in the urea are partic-
ularly “strong, reaching nearly
5 m.p.h. in certain places and the

sea is shallow being an average
of 18 fathoms but getting very














Once a week a sloop brings mail and provisions to Cannouan.

is a big occasion in the lives of
to the jetty.

much shallower near the islands. tacked
reefs
around too and quite often one

There are some _ tricky

sees breakers far from land,
Clearing Ship
Byt to get back to Bequia and
our ship. We decided to make an
early start from Beguie so that
we would arrive in Cannouan in
time for luncheon,





HARRISONS

BROAD .STREET

——S eee

eo



SA-

although we were literally tear-
ing through the sea on a quarter
the tide was so strong against us
that our progress was painfully
slow, At last we rounded to
the lee of Isle Quatre and
Pigeon Island, which are very
close to’ Bequia, “atid sighted.an
island up to windward which our
Pilot said was Cannouan.

Weary Beat

So we trimmed .Hurricane to
point well above tihe island and
started a weary beat against
wind and tide. The tide took us
down, and we tacked up again:
the tide took us down, and we

This
the people and they all flock down

the tide
we tacked

vp again:

us down, and

ally.

I had been told on Bequia that

“

took
up
again, but we got there eventu-

IN







SUNDAY ADVOCATE

WHITE BEACHES and transparent blue-green sea are among

Mustique’s attractions.

a barracuda, but he had been on
the line for so long that he was
dead.

Still no jetty.” What's happened
te the jetty?” I asked our pilot,
who was looking around with a
puzzled expression on his face.
“Must have got washed away.” He
replied. This being the only possi-
ble explanation we entered a
harbour which looked reasonably
deep and had boats pulled up on
the beach. |

After putting out the anchor
and furling the sails we beckoned
to a boat which .was nearby
and the man came alongside.
“When did the jetty get washed
away” asked our Pilot, “We've
never had a jetty here” replied
the man” this is MUSTIQUE”.
Words failed us. We just looked
at our Pilot who seemed quite
unperturbed and mastering an
urge to murder him, went ashore.

It was then about five o’clock
and our first job was to find some-
where to sleep that night, Not
having even considered Mustique
a port of call we thought that we
would have to sleep on the beach,
but I had heard of Mrs, Hazell,
who owns the island, so we went
up to see her. She and hey
daughter and son-in-law Mr.
and Mrs. Maingot—were exceed-
ingly kind to us, They gave us a
lovely tea, invited us to spend the
night with them and sent a boy
to bring our baggage up from the
boat,

White Cedars

Mustique, to my mind is just
about the prettiest of the Grena-
dines. It is rather flatter than
most of the islands and when we
were there the grazing pastures
were parched brown, for like Bar-
bados there had been very little
rain there since November, White
Cedar trees grow wild all over
the island and Mrs. Hazell’s house
looks charming, standing on top
of a hill in the midst of a cedar
grove

The population of the island is
about a hundred and they e by
fishing and by growing corn and
cotton on share cropping ar-
rangement. The chief export of
Mustique, indeed the only one be-
sides cotton, is meat. Wild cattle
and sheep are plentiful on the
island and at intervals a deep
freeze launch comes from Mar-
tinique to buy the meat, The
animals are really wild and they
have to be shot with Mauser
rifles, Mr. Maingot also keeps some
sheep in enclosed pastures but he
has to be constantly on the watch



Ge

we should anchor near the jetty
so I was trying hard to spot it
while Corkie pulled in the fish-
ing line, which had been tied off.
To our surprise we had caught





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from $8.50 to $12.75

Bridal Headdresses from $2.38 to $4.05





eee SS oo Ee

{
;

out for “pirates” who land from
fishing boats at night to steal the
stock. ‘

The reefs around the island
abound with chub and lobsters
and there are ‘plenty of wild
pigeons in the forest, so with his
gun and his spear Mr, Maingot
can feed the family without any
difficulty. Of course there are a
couple of drawbacks to this little
paradise, In the wet season there
are swarms of mosquitoes—Mus-
tique means mosquito—and a hor-
rible thorny bush called C®oshie
has recently started to grow on the
island and is spreading fast.

We had a very nice dinner that
night—our barracuda and somé
excellent wild mutton and’ then
made arrangements to ship our
Pilot back to St. Vincent—he was
worse than useless and we were
sure we could do better ourselves.
Luckily, Mr. Maingot’s fishing
boat, which goes to St. Vincent
once a week to collect mail and
supplies, was leaving next. morn-
ing at five o’clock and could take
our Pilot along, We had to alter
our crew list and get him to sign
it lest someone should think that
we had disposed of him at sea, and
as a precaution we got Mr. Main-
got who is a J.P., to sign it as
well.

Change of Plan

The next morning we went for
a delightful walk and then re-
turned to the house to pack our
belongings. We had had to change
our itinerary because of our unex-
pected visit to Mustique and we
now planned to call at Cannouan
and Carriacou before reaching
Grenada. Mayero and the Tobago
Cays, unfortunately, “had to
crossed off the list.

There was a hard wind blowing
when we left Mustique and it con-
tinued all day. We started off in
fine fashion, however,.with smalt
mainsail and jib boomed out and
surfed along the seas with the tide
helping us. We soon passed Petit
Cay, Petit Mustique and Savan
Island and drew close to Petit
Cannouan. From there on the sea
was really rough and we had to
steer very carefully. The tide
turned against us too, and it took
a long time to get from there to
Jupiter Head, Cannouan. Just off
the Head the sea was rougher than
ever, but once we got around the
point it was like a millpond and
we were able to use the outboard
to take us into the harbour.

We were relieved to find that
the jetty was still there and after
entering the bay without hitting
any of the reefs shown on the
chart we dropped our anchor







be,

about a hundred yards from it
We had been told that a lad)
called Mrs. Antrobus might be

able to give us.a bed for the nigt
and so we located her first, Luck
ily the bed was vacant and so w
mover all our belongings into th
little house. Then we went up t
the rum shop with a_ fisherman
from Bequia, who had been very
helpful,'and in no time the whole
mate population of the island was
drunk expense. We, craft
ily, had been drinking grapefruit
juice with just a drop of rum in
it so we were quite capable
walking back dow the rough
path our ‘hotel’, while
guide stumbled several times.
Before we left next morning we



at our

lo our







went for a walk. 1: counted four
rumshops and there were all full.
The ronulation of C nnouan is
about 150, and I sippose : a
third of that number are males
As usual in the Grenadines the
women do the agricultural work
and not \ well, 1 mvet say
an’? the men fish or talk bou
fishing

TY jis a pretty island. lena bul
with some hieh hills. The heache
are wi weed the kathine is good
and the veonls, thourh very areu-
men‘ative—chiefly about which
is the faster fishing boat ir¢
great fun

“Hotel” Bill
We would have liked to stay

longer but we were due in Carri-



MINIATU RE__» IAN GALE

iced beers
The next morning we went
a walk up to the Hospital, whi












commands a lovely view, and then
‘turned to our Boardir Hous
op . We were told some hair
ul s stories about Kicke
Jenny, which we had to pass that
day on our way to Grendda, t
we set sail all the sa
Kickem Jenny, actua sb
having very well that da nd 1
ad a very calm tri cross
Grenada. Off Diamond Island \v
saw some mysterious fish whic
came uncomfortably close to tt
boat. We still do not. kn
whether they were sharks. bla
fish or porpoises, hut thev ha
very large fins in the middle of
their backs and they looked
enough to vush the boat over

they wanted to,
The sail along the leeward coa
of Grertada took a long tin
Bither we ‘got very hard puffs of
wind or none at all. When the su
was sinking, however, we reach
St. George’s, and tacked slow!
into the harbour, The water w
dead calm and although = ther
was very little wind the Hurri
eane glided slong
This was the end of the cruis
and we had managed to stic
our schedule. We had learned
lot of little things and enjoye
ourselves thoroughly; but mo
important of all was that Hurri-



smoothly

cane had justified our confidenc> |



Mrs. Hazeii's house on Mustique

acou that afternoon so after pay
ing our “hotel” bill of one dollar
each we had to leave.

The sail from Cannouan to
Carriacou was delightful. The
tide and wind were favourable
and the scenery was almost un-
believably beautiful. We passed to
the lee of Catholic Island, which
ws just off Mayero and then went
on to Union, the most impressive
looking of the Grenadines with
sharp high peaks” reaching intc
the sky. After going around Miss
Irene Point, Union, we tightened
sheets and headed for Hillsbor-
ough Bay, Carriacou.

Hillsborougn bay is a remark-
able place, it seems to be the
birthplace of howling puffs of
wind. We entered past a cheeky
little island called Jack a Man
and anchored near the jetty. We
had returned to civilization and
on landing we nervously dodged
speeding motor cars,

Hillsborough is clean, but there
is very little else to be said about
it except that it is even more life

less than Kingstown and has
pavements.
We were lucky in that the

schooner that brings ite and other
provisions once a week arrived
that afternoon, so we could hav:

nestles among white cedar tree:

in her. We were very proud of h«
as we turned, when climbing th
hill to our hotel in the fading
light, to see her lying peacefull
at anchor in the still water
Harbour.

THE END.



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PAGE TEN



Children Do Not
Read Enough

PRESENTING

children’s English both in

and in the results of external examinations, he was forced
to conclude that “enough reading is not done.”

The Speech Day which was
attended by His Excellency the
Governor, Sir Alfred Savage
K.C.M.G., and Lady Savage who
presented the prizes, covered the
two academie years 1950 and
1951.

The Headmaster, after extend-
ing a hearty. welcome to His

Excellency’ shd Lady Savage, Mrs. !

Bourne, M.@:P. and Mr. Ingram
two new members of the Govern-

ing Body of_the School, expressed \
received the §

regret at- having
renignstioass of Mr, and Mrs
Farmer, the’two retiring members
of the Governing Body, and saia
“tihey have given of their best to

the School, and have been a per- *

fect example of team spirit.”

Mr, Cumberbatch also welcom-~-
ed the Assistant Director of Edu-
cation, Mr. E. C. Theobolds, who
was attending Speech Day at thi

School for the first time, and
also Mr. Jordan, Chief Inspectc
of Schools.

He drew attention to the ahang«

“Old Cambridge

over from the L
1 Examination t





tificate




he Gene e of Educa-
ion, a shift which made it neces
ry for them to conaense the two
into one, and








pointed o at of the number
of candids applying for entry
into the *hool in the academic
year 1950 there were more suc
cesses n they could accommo-
date, He said that in spite of
“this major handicap” which ru
have telling effect on any ir






tution, they began the year wi
the “ustal determination and con-
fidence.”

Reviewing the rerults of — th
examinations for the two years
Mr, Cumberbatch said that of the
four candidates who were con-
sidered eligible for the 1950 Ox-

ford and Cambridge Scliool
tificate Examination, three of them
gained certificates, one of them
a girl, Catherine Lynch who was
awarded a Grade II Certificate
and placed 15th among all the
candidates. She obtained four
eredits and two distinctions and
narrowly missed her Grade |
Certificate. Conrad Hunte, anoth-
er of ‘the Successful candidates
was awarded a Grade III Certi-
ficate, obtaining five credits.

Cer-

Besi Scholar
By far 0 est candidate of the
jot was ©, Licorish who secured
a Grade I Certificate and was

placed 7th among the candidates
In ad@ition he was awarded a
distinction in Latin and placed
2nd in the island in that subject.
All told, there were seven Grade
I Certificates ihat year—six girls
and O, Licorish, Of the nine sub-
jects ‘offered, he was successful
in all,

Turning to the year 1951 which





Heragea th the Gencral Certif-
cate of Educ m by the joint
Board of Oxford and Cambridge
the Headmaster fave a short ex-
planation of the difference be-
tween this and the previous ex-

amination, and told parents that
whatever might be said for or
against this Examination, there
we: one thing which could be
seid Im its fayour. That was, that
the candidate must bring to
bear originality of thought and
comimon sense, and remoy ed the
possibility. of merely amassing a
number of facts and committing
them tod paper.

For the new Examination elev-
en candidates were offered for
the July Examination, Ten of the

candidates took eight subjects
each and the other took seven.
The opportunity to offer oral
Frenah presented itself for the

first time, and the eleven candi-

dates availed themselves of the

In:

Sixty years of leadership

HIS REPORT on
academic attainments of the Alleyne School at Speech
Day last Thursday, Mr. C. D. Cumberbatch, Headmaster,
told parents that from what was seen of some of the

wyoved/

THE TRUCK & BUS TYRE THAT WAS
ALREADY MORE POPULAR THAN ANY OTHER





SUNDAY ADVOCATE



EDUCATION NOTES : |

THE SCHOOLS

ed to show that there is something wrong with the admin- |
istration of the educational system and that the consequent
result is that the Zlementary Schools are not giving the
quality of service which they were intended or expected
to give.
I now suggest that the first step possibly a interview.
in the remedy to this most un- ok SS is ee a OL
hie - satisfactory situation 1s to rée-grade mu controversy. c
This, the Headmaster consider- {ne ywiementary Schools according maintain that it is unsuccesstul
cd quite good, and said that es~ io modern methods. picking out those pupils best =

the activities and

their written work at school

opportunity. All were successful
in French and in addition, seven
passed the oral test,

pecially was this so when it was [js would mean that ther¢ ed for the education of a more
cemembered that there was al- wouiq be kindergarten (or Nurs- advanced type and exercises an
ways a bit of a reluctance to speak cry) Scnools for children under undue influence upon the curricu-
in a foreign language under nor- 5 “years; jnfant Scuoois 5 w 7 ium and metnods of the school.
nal condiuons, more so when the years; Junior Schools 8 to 11 years; ‘he cogency of tunese criticisms is

cyes of the examiner were UpON ~enior Senools 12 to 14 years.

( wiaely recognised and in some
ine candidates, He felt what there

. because of its importance, here areas there 1s a tendency to lay
was no jusunable reason why a 4s a aescripuion of Wie (uncluons of greater suwess on the vleacners
nodern language should be writ- (ach scnool by Dr. R. W. Rich, Ssessments of the chiidren’s work
ven and not spoken. Principal of Leeas Training Coi- 4nd ability than on the results of
Mr. Cumberbatch in commend= jege: “Nursery schools aim at & formal examination.
ing one of the pupils for her abl¢ providing a suitable social and Training The Citizen
performance, said that (Clarence educational environment to sup- “As a resuit of this removal of
corde was one of the candidates pjement tne traning given in the many of the brighter chilaren the

who ollered eight subjects and jome, which may suiler throu ; :
cured passes in seven, What 5 y ; 8h pemor Scnool is faced with the

. poverty, inadequate hous: the probie
vas more, she numbered among unduly large or small rc of oer A eee eae maate
her successful subjects that of jamuy, ana the demands of in- whose full-time schooling will
‘mathematics, a gubject which “is qusiry upon tne parenis, There end at 14 or 15 years, and whose
the bane of many girls, She was are no iormal I@ssons, and the general average Of ability, especi-
ie oy condtaie. to secure @ume is spent largely in play atty in the more ‘academic’ ‘sub-
5 Ssediatinttaad Tit Sablon of the *tvities, story-telling, commuual jects is lower tnan at any previous
Sacdarie antl vitehhed nt Heads meals, and sieep, In a good nurs- stage in the Elementary System.
oar. 9a “Upon x, rutinising ery senool, all the furniture and During these years the school
ic estilts tor the Dest Wwe years equipment 1s specially designed must provide these prospective
‘ y tees that Gan the sehatnatic tur smail people, and a garden is citizens and workers with some
a Nahey Remares ait Gaited eins proviaed. Tne greatést empnasis equipment for entry into the world |
Facitior ik dave hie ware to is laid upOn the formation of right and stimulate a desire to weerel
aintale Aca sleniave ee reas habils OL personal hygiene and ine those faciliues for part-time edu-
is of the past on . YF acqurement of the art of living cauon which are avatiable for the}
os tne . in ie society of others. young ‘wage-earner. While Sas
Balanced Activities Trai scnoois are not ‘vocational’ in any
Terie 16 thi ail. ot “This training in healthy and DAtTow sense, they are ‘realistic’ in
! chuow’s accvities, Mr, Cum- S°¢lable living contmues to play their outlook, and in the most
rbaich said ‘school life tor the “" important part in the ite of Successful tle work of the scnool
id must be as well balanced as “© intant School, where the nat- are oo seco Seatenanp with
sible, Children should be eager ural imteresis and propensiues of the lite of the community in which
with each other not only Ue children form the basis of its oy eee siggy
! ¢ class room, but also on the activities. In the best schools of ok Se ae he Village
veld, Resuics in the field will ac- “45 type, the child has ample Colleges Which have been set up
proportion to the spirit 8COPe for free expression and free 18 CambridgeeDine. Each of these
and enthusiasm of both tramer ™°Vement and at the same time is includes a Senior School for
ind tranee, He added, “As far troduced to the printed and Children drawn from a number ot
is results go, we have reason to * ritten word and the world of Su varete villages and the ac-
feel a measure of satisfaction, at numbers, thus laying foundations pee i Bb schoot are based
ieast in the game section Fj for the basis of skills of reading, /@reely on the life and work ot
He referred _ briefly to the “Titing and arithmetic, There is the rural community in which it
school’s attainments in this sec- °°)Siderable difference of opinion & situated, Th addition -t0: tie
tion, and look opportunity to pay “Ste the stage at which formal S@nior school, each College pro-
“humble homage” to Conrad instruction in these should be ViEne Seren mere o

ea ntact Na







iue in

Hunte, “ the mos: promising cric- *V¢", but the tendency is to . education, and serves as a social



funu 5 " educational centre for the district.”

xeler the school has ever pone it until as late ‘as possible, © ‘ EE

een 0 s Pro- ond to deal with the subjects in 4. Be
Referring to ‘the School's Li- & concrete — and practical way.

brary, the Headmaster spoke of Through activities and play of all

the efforts made to encourage the ‘ids the child: gains enrichment
= of pence and said es T€- ence, while through painting
cent additions to the ibrary ~~o"). : a ?
iegahh thee pibabecs doncse rd modelling and instruction it finds
00. He referred to the need for ee for its rapidly growing
a room set apart from distractions POW SES. .

et one kind or another, and Junior School

warned parents that “from what “In the Junior School the infor
we have seen of some children’s ™al work of the previous si
English, both in their written becomes more sytematised.

Bell Will Lecture

: @ From Page 1.
ship of a stable and responsible

character,
T.U. Education |

{ its sensory and motor experi-

He said that one of the great
needs was tor further opportuni-
bes of education and we hupeu
and beleved that the

Wwaae

work at school and in the re- child learns mastery of its union course had helped in twat
suits of the external examina- language in speech, writing and respect and that there would be
,ons, we must conclude that reading; it becomes proficient in ‘4¢\ner courses,

mough reading is not done.” simple arithmetic calculation; it Mr. Bell said that

“rar too many children neg- Jearns something of the facts of CNcouraging that the Universicy
lect the simple rule of reading history and geography, and it is College of the West indies seem-
with en English Diedonary handy, Cneouraged to take an intelligent ed likely in the near fuvure to be
while olhhers again seer to suffer interest in the world of naturé, taking an even greater interest
from bookphobia,” the Headmas- Scope is given for practical crea- in the subject of Trade Union

ter said. He told of their efforts tive work in arts and crafts, sing- Education, b
to soive that problem, and said ing is regularly taught and there be done for Gut’ he Oeielia nee

hat they have instituted reading is organised physical _ tr:
periods throughout the school, which comtaees sci ficaliy Spnisations, the trade unions

planned exercises with entifically themselves must

it was also

‘a wealth play a major
Book Scheme of lively games, The peculiar P&'t in the educational aspect as
While on that subject, Mr, problem of the Junior School is ™ ¢Vety Other aspect of their

Cumberbatch informed the parents the reservation of the spontaneity development.
of the Book Scheme which was 4nd joyful activity of the Infant _ He expressed thanks to the
recently launched, and + warned school while securing the attain- â„¢@ny friends he had made in
hem that in future there would ment of standards of achievement Barbados for their extreme hos-
be no excuse for a child not hav- which must be insisted upon at Pitality and kindness to him. For
ing a particular textbook, this stage, when solid foundations that he said he had been very

The Headmaster referred to the should be laid for the later edu- happy. He liked the island very
hanges on the teaching staff, and cational structure, much and would certainly like

in concluding his Report, men- Secondary to come back some day. He also

\ioned the “welcome increase in “At the end of the Junior School thanked the Press for being gen-

he list of ‘Ss z

iat Epeodt Der, ore eaioeh ah stage a considerable number of T@lly helpful and courteous.

‘hose who had contributed to the °ildren pass from the “Blemen- _ Mr. Bell who will be in Trini-
“Secondary dad until Tuesday expects to

list of prizes. tary Sc hool” to i ,

Mr, Cumberbatch ended with a Schools” or various types. A selec- ive public lectures in Port-of-
tribute to the late ‘Sir John Gay Y0"./s made by means of an exam- Spain and San Fernando. From
Alleyne. rg which commonly consists there he goes to Jamaica where
gn: \ Rsithinatle getebinad wine + - is likely to remain for four or
| telligence Test’ of kind, baw _* days giving lectures before

returns to Scotland.

|
|
|



REGRADING _ |





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SUNDAY, JUNE 15,



Romance of Wackingham

Primate
BY MARGUERITE PEACOCKE

ON the afternoon of February
15, 1937, Queen Elizabeth had tea
at No. 145, Piccadilly, and then
quietly drove away to Bucking-
ham Palace.

The small crowd which cheered
her did not know that she was
moving house. Neither did they
know that almost 100 years ago
to the day Queen Victoria had
driven over the same ground.

Until three months before
Queen Elizabeth had been

Duchess of York, believing that
King Edward VIlI, her brother-
in-law, would reign for
years,

Instead, the 325-day king
had left the tiny room in
Buckingham Palace where he
had werked—he lived there
for only a few weeks—and
gone into exile.

Yet King Edward VIII had
been more accessible than any
previous Sovereign. His room —
the Chinese Room, conveniently
near the offices of the Palace
secretariat, and also close to the
King’s Entrance to the Palace—
saved him the bother of travers-
ing long corridors every time he
came and went.

‘The King’

It took the Palace staff some
time to realise that the King now
oceupied that little ground-floor
room,

Sometimes telephone callers,
having asked to speak to some
member of the household, were
put through in error direct to the
King’s extension,

“Who's that speaking?” asked
the caller, not hearing the voice
he had expected.

“The King,’ would be
reply. “Can I help you?”

The caller would apologise
profusely, “Quite all right,” the
King would say. “Now, what can
I do for you?”

When, on October 1, 1936, the
new King at last Went to live
in Buckingham Palace, he be-
came the first British monarch to
occupy the rooms which, in the
original Palace plans, had been

many

the

intended as the King’s private

suite.
Abdicated

A few weeks later they were
vacant again. The King had
abdicated,

With the accession of King
George VI and Queen Elizabeth

there was, for the first time for
many yeams, a young family at

the Palace.

Princess Elizabeth was
quite eleven and Princess Mar-
garet only six and a half. But
now Queen. Victoria’s precept
that children should be seen and
not heard no longer cast a gloom
over high-spirited Royal young-
sters.

Dignified visitors would
smile to hear the echo of girl-
ish voices, and sometimes,
happening to glance upwards,
would find themselves being
gravely inspected by two
small figures peeping from a
stairway.

It was decided that the Coro-
nation Day—May 12, 1937— fixed
for Edward VIII should remain,
which meant that the new King
and Queen had much less time

not

than most monarchs to prepare.
New Crown

Various changes of plan had to

be made now that the ceremony

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was to include a Queen Consort.

New robes were ordered for
Queen Elizabeth, and the ex-
quisite purple velvet which had
been specially woven for her as
Duchess of York with the status
of Princess (conferred on her by
King George V) was used to
make robes for her daughters, As
no suitable Consort’s crown
existed, a new one was made for
her, and the King’s crown had
to be adjusted to ensure a per-
fect fit.

King George VI was particu-
larly anxious that his crown
should be put on the right way
round, as back and front were
not easily distinguishable, and
the Archbishop of Canterbury had
the homely idea of marking the
front by attaching a small thread
to the one of the large stones.

Unhappily, some well-meaning
official tidied this little marker
away while the crown was lying
at the Abbey, and the Arch-
bishop’s slight hesitation at the
moment of crowning, noticed
when the film was shown, was
because the Primate paused to
search in vain for the missing
thread,

As crowns are literally, as well
as methaphorically, a burden to
the wearers, the King had light-
weight coronets specially designed
for his daughters.

A time schedule for the Coro-

nation was drawn up, and from
this Queen Elizabeth and King
George, working backwards,
evolved their own timé-table.

They had to arise before dawn

to be arrayed in their State





FLIES











SUNDAY

The

THE WHITE DRAWING ROOM AT BUCKINGHAM PALACE

robes and insignia,
hairdresser was summoned to
attend the Queen at an hour
when on any other day the Royal
residents would scarcely have
been awake,

On Guard

The week after the Coronation
saw an incident unparalled in the
Palace history,

One of the guests who dined
with, the King and Queen on
the Monday night was found
mounting guard the following
day on the gate through which
he had driven on the previous
evening.

The sentry, a private in the
New Zealand Territorial Army,
was also the South Maori mem-
ber of the New Zealand House of
Representatives, in which capac-
ity he had dined at the Palace.

Though this had never hap-
pened before, many of the King’s
guests had, as subalterns, taken
part in mounting the Palace
guard.

Indeed,

and the Court

the future King
Edward VIII, when Prince of
Wales and a_ junior officer,
mounted the guard on his father’s
residence,

In 1937 the King and Queen
held the first Courts of their
reign. The policy was to bring
the privilege of attending Courts
within the means of people who
were far from rich.

Red Mark
Dress regulations were laid
down, but while some Court
gowns were made by famous

INDIGESTION

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dress-houses, many
made up by “little dressmakers.”

And quite a number of the
people who curtsied to the King
and Queen at night would be
found at work in their offices as
usual next morning.

In the old days chaperons had
risked disqualification only by
being involved in scandalous pro-
ceedings, but from the reign of
George V onwards a small num-
ber of would-be chaperons were
being blacklisted for seeking to
exploit their privilege of attend-
ing a Court by accepting a fee
for presenting others.

Some even advertised their
services in the personal columns
of the newspapers.

If detected, the offender
would be debited with a small
red ink mark against her
name in the Lord Chamber-
lain’s books. Ir MEANT
“THAT IN FUTURE SHE WAS
BARRED FROM PALACE
FUNCTIONS.

The actual presentations fol-
lowed a rigid pattern, slightly
less than a minute being allowed
for each.

As each lady to be presented
arrived at the great Ballroom
door, she handed her card to a
Gentleman Usher, who passed it
to the Lord Chamberlain, who
announced her name,

others were

With deft touch another
official would spread out her
train and she would proceed to
make her curtsy.

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Another official waited,

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hand, to flick the train over each
wearers arm so that she might
not impede her successors.

Coronation month brought the
first Court Ball of the reign,
Again the Palace appeared in all
its regal splendour.

By ten o'clock some
guests had assembled in
State Ballroom. Soon
the doors were thrown open, the
band played the
Anthem, and the Lord Chamber-
lain and other officers
Household appeared, carrying
their staves of office and walking
backwards,

First came the King, wearing
one of his

2,000
the

her
sash of the Garter across her
shoulder, her tiara and other
jewels flashing in the rays of the
great crystal chandeliers.
Sifting

The rest of the Royal circl2
followed and took up their seats
on the dais. The King then gave
the Lord Chamberlain the signal |
for the band to strike up.

Dancing continued until the |
early hours, Even if the King}
and Queen had retired to their |
apartments, their departure was

afterwards |
National |

of the)

many full-dress uni-|
forms, and the Queen in one of|
most magnificent gowns, the}

|

|



|

not necessarily a signal for the |

eave,
State

rest of the guests to
As soon as the
were vacated, the
from the floor were sifted.
Seldom-worn family heir-
looms, when brought out to
grace a State function, often
have loose stones and loosen-
@ On Page 12.

Rooms |
sweepings |



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PAGE TWELVE







The Jew radu: gain
ing more influence in the com-
munity and in 1756 th ucceed
@d in having the exorbitan

and
Special taxes levied on their com-
munity subst reduced, and

antially






2 special < of only 210 Ibs. of
Muscovada Sugar was levied on
the whole Jewish Community.
heir greate period éf prosper-
ity and affluence appears to be
between 1761 and 1831. On Oc-
tober 8th 1761 an Act was passed
removing. the special taxation
levied on the Jews and declaring



that the hould be rated on the
same scale the other inhabi-
tants. One writer states that “An
unexpected conclusion to which

this study has led is that the Bar-
bados Congregation was only
smaller by twenty to twenty-five
per cent. than the contemporary
London Congregation of Spanish
and Portuguese Jews.” (1)

In the latter half of the eigh-
teenth century, the medical ser-
vices of Barbados were confined
to the Alms Houses, It was in
1786 that a subscription was*open-
ed for establishing ‘The Barbados
General Dispensary, for the relief
of the Sick poor.’ The ‘Barbados
Mercury” of October 28th, 1786
writing about the contributions



records—from that honour far be
it for me to detract; but Justice
to a humble remnant of a one
highly favoured state calls upon
me to observe, that, of the sum
subseribed to thi charity, up-
wards of one tenth was contribu-
ted collectively and _ individuall)
by the HEWBREW NATION
though their numbers fall short
of one twentieth of the white in
habitants of Barbados, and not

one hundredth part of the proper-
ty of the island is in their hands.”
The Jewish Year Book edited
by Jacobs and substantiated by
E. S. Daniels, states that by
Local Act of 1802—and of Parlia-
ment in 1820—all political dis-
abilities were removed and. ‘that
the Jews were granted even
greater privileges than the other
inhabitants of the island; as by
the terms of the latter Act, they
were allowed to have five repre-
sentatives from among themselves



who were to determine what
share of taxation of the island
should be levied upon then
Schomburgk differs from that re-
corded in the Jewish Year Book
with reference to the removal of
all political disabilities in 1802

he states “an act was introduced

in the local Legislature on the
22nd of February 1831, granting
the coloured population of the
Island the same _ political rights
as the white population,” which
assed the House on the 28th of
arch; he further states ‘that a

similar Act for the relief of His
Majesty's ‘subjects professing the
Jewish religion had received the
signature of the Governor on the
15th of May the same yaar.” Als
that both of these acts received
the King’s sanction,



The Jews in Barbados received
civil and political freedom before
these privileges were granted
them in England, as the Jewish
Civil Disabilities Act was not
passed there until 1833, when Lord
Macauley, made his memorable
speech on introducing the Reform
Rill. He called on the House of
Commons to stand forward to
prevent the excitement degener-
ating into leeds of violence. ‘In
old times” he said, ‘when the vil-
lens were driven to revolt by op-
pression, when a hundred thou-
sand insurgents appeared in arms




be
at once the in-

them and exclaimed, ‘I will

your leader,’ and

furiated multitude laid down their |



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on Blackheat, the King rode up nef



he People Of
bados—10

ty JOHN PRIDEAUX

ims and dispersed at his eam-
mand, Herein let us imitate him,
Let us say to our countrymen—
‘We are your leaders, Our law-
ful power shall be firmly exerted
to the utmost in your cause; and
our lawful power is such that it
nust finally prevail.”

Synagogue was destroyed
hurricane of lith August
, the exact date of its erec-
tion is not Known, but it is be-
lieved to have been about the
car 1679. The new Synagogue
is completed and consecrated on
the 29th of March 1833. The cost
of this new building was defrayed
the ninety influential Jews
resident in the Island. Mr. Hart
Lyon, a Jeweller, was the moving
soirit in its rebuilding, therefore,
the foliowing extract from the
‘Barbados Globe’ of April Ist,
333 will be of interest—‘It is
virty-seven feet high, and re-
ives considerable strength from
e rounding of the angles, which
are capped with large antique
cencers uniting a balustrated
parapet all round, the roof being
so little elevated as not to be per-
ceived. ‘The windows are lancel-
shaped, and tastefully harmonize
with the proportions of the build-
ing; a double flight of stone steps
on the north side, covered with a
Gothic Hood, leads to the gallery
vithin; the whole of the exterior
is lightly tinged of stone-colour,
nd scored out in blocks, and the
ppearance altogether is classical
ind chaste; The interior
orresgonds with the outer ap-
pearance; a light and tasteful gal-
ry occupies three sides of the in-

The
! t

he
1831

teriar supported by neat Doric
columns The reader’s desk in
he body of the edifice is suffi-

iently elevated to give a con-
picuous view of the person offi-
ciating. From the ceiling is sus-
pended at each corner infront of
the gallery a single brass chande-

lier, of eight lights, and in the
centre one of a_ similar kind
containing twenty-four, The area

of the building is paved in alter-
nate squares of black and white
marble; and the ceiling, painted
in reliefs, produces a most pleas-
ing effect, as well from the artist-
like manner in which it is execut-
is from the chasteness of its
design It is computed to hold
about three hundred persons.”

In the square opposite the Pub-
lic Library stands the ‘Montefiore
Fountain,” This fountain was
originally erected in Beckwith
Place, but was in 1940 removed
to its present site, In 1864, Mr.
John Montefiore, a wealthy mem-
ber of the Jewish community,
(whose son, Thomas Law Monte-
fiore, B.A., of Trinity College,
Cambridge, had been ordained as
Deacon by the Bishop of Glou-
ester and Briston in 1849), pre-
sented this mounment to the City.
of Bridgetown, and was in the
form of a drinking fountain. It is
a very massive and handsome
structure, In each of the four
sides is a marble statue, repre-
enting Justice, Fortitude, Tem-
perance, and Prudence, with the
following suitable inscriptions: —

“DO WRONG TO NONE.”
“LOOK TO THE END.”

“BE SOBER-MINDED”

“TO BEAR IS TO CONQUER.”

Around the entire structure in-
scribed in stone is the follow-
ing: —
“For the benefit of wayfarers,
This Drinking Fountain. was

presented to the City of Bridge-
town,

A.D. MDCCCLXIV.”
Owing to the devastation caused
‘by’ the hurricane of 1831, it is

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elaimed that the Jewish Com-
munity dechned from this year
many haying emigrated to Europe
ind the U.§.A.,
Philadelphia. In 1848 there were
71 Jews in the Island, 38 of whom
belonged to the congregation.
By 1873 the Congregation had
dwindled to such an extent that
they petitioned the Legislature for
relief from taxation of property
held by the Congregation, and in
1874 an Act was passed exempting
the Synagogue and its
perty from parochial and
taxes; as the proceeds

other

cipally devoted to the upkeep and |

support of the Jewish poor of the
Island. By 1899 the Congrega-
tion had declinéd to 17 or 18 in-
cluding women and children,

At the close of the 19th century |
and up to nis death in 1905, the |
Warden and local Trustee, Mr.|"emember the day when
E. S. Daniels, conducted service in’ Victoria attended the Thanksgiy-
at his death; ing Service in St. Paul’s to mark

the Synagogue, but

the property and funds

his “Notes on the History of the
Jews in Barbados,” published in
1909 states—“The Jews in Bar-
bados are now a feeble folk, num-
bering scarce half a dozen headed
by the Baezas.” And further—
“When the late Rev. Daniels was
alive, the services used to be held
in the Synagogue every Saturday
Morning. But since his death in
1995, and the appointment of no
successor services are held only
on festivals, by Mr, Joshua Baeza,
merchant, in Bridgetown. The
Synagogue is open every Satur-
day morning for anyone who cares
to go there to pray, but no_ one
goes. The lamp is always kept
burning before the Ark, and I be-
lieve ten Mosaical scrools are in
the Ark, in good preservation. But
the Synagogue lacks a congrega-
tion.” The Synagogue and its
property remained vested in Mr.
E_ I. Baeza until about a year be-
fore his death in 1934, when the
Synagogue and its property was
sold to a private individual, but
provision was made in the deed
that the graves were not to be
desecrated

It is fitting to end this series
with the words of the Rev, Canon
P. A. Farrar, quoted in his article
‘The Jews in Barbados,’ (B.M.H.S.
Journal, Vol IX, No. 3)—“al-
though their ways were not our
ways, yet the Jews of those days
of long ago, in spite of the dis-
abilities imposed on them showed
the Christians of this land how
to sicceed in the face of distress-
ing odds. More than that, at a
time when there was a slackness
in living, and a weakness in mor-
ality, they by their compact and
organized manner of life, set a
bright example of piety, of reli-
gious enthusiasm, and of the se-
curity and sanctity of family life.”

(To be continued)

Wilfred S, Samuel in ‘Review of the
Jewish Colonist in Barbados in the
year 1680,"
2 ‘The Barbadian Newspaper July Tth

1849,



ROADS AND BRIDGES

A grant of £42,000 from Her
Majesty’s Government has been
approved to meet 35 per cent, of
the cost of reconstruction of Gov-

ernment buildings, road: and
bridges. The remaining 65 per
cent. and the entire cost of re-)

pairing buildings'and roads main-)

tained by the local authorities
will be met from Jamaican funds

A grant of £80,000 from Her
Majesty’s Government has been
appreved towards the cost of

repairs at the University College
of the West Indies.
—B.U.P.

the ‘Consul’, the



th cms: 1S ey TIE see

Charles Me Enearney & Co.,Ltd.

Office 4493 — Workshop 4203 — Parts Department 4673

principally to}

pro-,

were prin- |

Buckingham Palace

ed

last a small fortune in jewel-

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



ims THE...



From Page
clasps, and from

il.
first to

lery must have awaited claim-

ants at the Palace Lost Pre-
perty Office.

| EBABRG AEN

The two remaining peacetime

easons brought one innovation: | .
i Derby Day Ball at which, for|}]* FOR
the first time, women guests ‘| :

re

Previously
‘bachelor’

the

stayed in her private apartments |
The Derby Ball i
another departure from tradi-
tion.
West End vogue, a breakfast
of ham, eggs and a haddock,
with tea and coffee, was sery-
ed at 2.30 a.m,

So authentic was the scene that
Palace servants old en

searcely

Royal Film 2? wae
On a summer's day in 1988 | APrints, 36” width — &
history walked again in Buck- ar 7c. * +
jingham Palace: “Queen Victoria” 4
descended from her carriage in ) Linens — all shades — 70c.
;the quadrangle. ~ and up

were | her
vested in the late Mr, E. 1, Baeza. |
Mr. N. Darnell Davis, C.M.G., in| Anna Neagle come to make 4

entertained,

there had been a
dinner during whieh
Queen either dined out or

included
Following the current

Ladies’ Cotton Panties — 2
2 for $1.20

oChildren’s Cotion Panties—

Flowered Spuns — Ass. De-
S ‘« signs — $1.00

« Georgettes — Solid Shades
t and Fl.—$1.12 per yd.

Flowered Silks — $1.44 per

Diamond Jubilee could

believe that’ this was

Se ieteteenmeentineiememeieeceteee ees



HOUSE

SHIPLOADS
OF NEW EXCITING VALUES

Men’s American Vests — 2
for $1.20

White Socks — 2 for $1.00

Gayly Coloured Cocks — 1
for $1.15

Khaki Shirts — $3.00
wigprerer & Drill — $1.05 &

Sport Shirts — from $2.40
Men’s Plastic

Belts — 80c.

Dress Shirts as cheap as
$2.64

Plaid Tweeds—54”

wide —

film yard $3.50 per yd.

The same old State coach Hats — Prices to suit your Shoes—$8.25 per pair & u
swung through the same centre Pocket -—- Styles to suit Gay Sport Shirts — $4.50 t
archway, drawn by the Windsor your Pocket. $4.95
greys. There were, the Royal :
postilions wearing just such Straw Bags — $3.00 & $3.50 Dress Shirts — $3.90, $4.25,
splendid liveries as in 1897. New Styled Pocket Books $4.73

real soldiers, riding their ac-
customed horses—a sugges-
tion made by the King, who
did not want the standard of
horsemanship to fall short.

The escort was provided by $3.00 & $4.50
New Shoes
White
~at

— Multicolour—
and other Colours
various Prices

All morning the two princesses

watched from second-floor win- |
dows,
jentranced, wi
| faces cuppe:
would run to another
get a better view. |
Old
mingled strangely that day. And
at the door of the Palace where

the
reigned so long, her great grand-

son's
autograph from the Queen Vic-
toria of 1938.



























CANADA DRY

Quinine Water

Phone 4541 For your Requiremen
& Enquiries







Sometimes they leaned, |
n the dow-sills,
in hands. Then they
window to

PETTICOATS

and new, false and true,

real Queen Victoria had

maids waited to beg an

30

NEXT WEEK
Bombs on the Palace. ‘The
ng’s guest who said “Old
Goering deserves a vote of

2702



THE BARGAIN

Gray Flannel — $3.25
Garberdine — 5
$3.72 per y

Shades —



FULL STOCK OF NYLON HOSIERY, HOUSECOATS,
BLANKETS, SHEETS, NIGHTGOWNS, SOCKS AND

HOUSE

SWAN STREET

S. ALTMAN
















Sa SSS

SPECIAL



1a” bore

a” ww
1%” =»
im?

”
2 1 2 ” =

a eg

os

{

No. 16 Swan St.

ANNUAL

ANNUAL HOLIDAY.

continued as usual.

to business as usual.

thanks.” The Ausiialian rs

lees diate tute LLSLEPELECPOEEOSPPOPEEEEE LSE AA AAPA ALPE, |

Elizabeth learns to drive. FO. R YO UR White
eecee 1 St.

%

M

%

%

%

Quinae x
QUININE 1%
WATER ih



es PRPS OP POOP

LAWN

12”

Make yours with





& 14’

in



ts



4, 4,4,4,4,4,4,¢
PLL LE 64





SS

TAKE OFF THAT MASK
OF PAIN

WihTZ 2

TABLETS WILL QUICKLY BRING RELIEF
FROM ANY TYPE OF PAIN. AND REMEM-
BER, WITH THEIR FOIL PACKING THEY'RE
KEPT ABSOLUTELY FRESH FOR YOU . .
WHENEVER YOU MAY WANT THEM.

ONE WHIZZ DOES THE WORK OF TWO
ORDINARY TABLETS

STOKES & BYNOE LTD.—AGENT

PAPAS PP PCE EA ALLA



IRV-O-LITE
PLASTIC GARDEN

HOSE
nd

GREEN’S
MOWERS

Sizes

PLANTATIONS LTD.
























STOKES & BYNOE

LTD —Agents

SEBEL OGSOOS






PINE APPLE

| 4 Aca RROTS
i$ GOLDEN

;

Roebuck Street

POOLS FOSE SF





26

Corrugated 6 ft.
Cormugated 7 ft.
Corrugated 8 ft.
Corrugated 9 ft.








—— ee





BARBADOS HARDWARE

¢
*
: HAM SAUSAGE—4-Ib. Tins
% | UFILLIT BISCUITS ‘
% | PEARS
PEACHES 3
ABREAKFAST ROLL

PODDD POOL DOGHD POPPY DODD PODS HY PPP DP LO PPG OF

SUNDAY, JUNE 15.



GALVANISED
PIPE

SUITABLE FOR WATER OR

GAS

24c.
30c.
36c.
58e.
7Ac.
84c.
1.60c.
1.72c.
2.00

Phones :

HOLIDAY

Park Road.
Michael

ASPARAGUS TIPS
SWEET CORN

OLIVES
CHUTNEY

CHUTNEY SAUCE

ARROW RUM.
PERKINS & CO..

LTD.

1952



——S eee

CASH OFFER

CO. LTD.

4406, 2109, 3534

Our CUSTOMERS and FRIENDS are asked to note
that our WORKSHOP will be closed as from Monday,
16th June, 1952, to Saturday, the 28th June, 1952, inclu-
sive, for the purpose of granting our Workmen their

Arrangements have been made for emergency work
to be undertaken during this period and the receipt
of repairs and delivery of completed work will be

Our Merchandise Department and Office will be open

SANDWICH SPREAD--Bot

Dial 2070 & 4502





GUAGE

BEST ENGLISH GALVANISED SHBETS !

eee

each $3.96
each $4.62
each $5.28
each’ $5.94

shee.

sheets :
sheets :
sheets :

“LADIES AND GENTLEMEN’

“THE BRIDE AND GROOM”

The supreme moment of
wonderful occasion

and
the supreme toast

HEIDSEICK & CO's.

DRY

MONOPOLE
CHAMPAGNE

THE CHAMPAGNE YOUR GUESTS

WILL PREFER.





a

Dry Monopole

Necilocinhe tl!
~
Y

5
Het wis *®





A. BARNES & CO., LTD.

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. |
















/ WANT TO KNOW
ONE THING ONLY.
OID SEVERN GO INTO
MRS DE LAZLON'S
CABIN LAST NIGHT?

NOW WHAT MADE NE *
LAURA! SO CAGEY? 7
7M SURE SHE'S )

HIDING SOME Bee





|
|



BY CHIC YOUNG



‘CHOVY PASTE IN THE )
PASTE IN THE p—

7
AND Now youve jou
GOT A PASTE y/ SOME PEOPLE
|IN THE EYE >" \ HAVE NO

ee { SENSE OF
| “~ HUMOR
Lo ae ee

in
\}}
.! ‘
- :
ff)
7.









NOW, EARTHLING, YOU

WILL PAY FOR YOUR
PRYING / RELEASE
THE ICE MONSTER!




irs e eer a | g
mj |] AS FLASH STEPS ud /
| 71 FORWARD, A DOOR i
oe BEHIND HIM...P
See ee ad 4 Gi i” S
| sek
CT wos
. “y :



BUT IM IN NO-
SPOT TO ARGUE / 7

/ IT OUGHT TO BE! THiS
CASE COMES FROM THE
BEST LEATHER GOODS
SHOP IN BERLIN?

" MUST BE! GUESS WE'LL

x MAYBE THIS KEY HAVE TO FORCE IT OPEN/
NOW, WHY WOULD HARRIS HAS A SPECIAL SHAME IT'S REALLY A
DELIBERATELY PUT THE MEANING OF ITS BEAUTIFUL CASE!
WRONG KEY ON A CASE... Pipeee r
AFTER HE LOCKS IT? yx ;

T FORBID YOU TO LEAVE THE HOUSE
TONIGHT 4 YOLI KNOW

THE DOCTOR SAID YOL

NEED MORE REST.’

BUT YOU'LL WEAR YOURSELF
OUT! YOU'VE HAD A HARD
DAy AT THE OFFICE -- NOW )
A S = SIT DOWN AND _/
YT ONY COINS | Vie SS PEAK!
FOR A WALK! wi ~ i

{ IT'S BEEN A PLEASURE TO HAVE
YOU BOTH... WE DON'T GET

NEILL MANY TOURISTS OUT HERE
eae THIS EARLY IN THE

LEAVING THIS ae SEASON ++»

AFTERNOON, JARS, MERRITT... la =) | beg
OUR CAR IS JUST ABOUT / § 7)5 ily IE bi pw \\ | | Se |
| tata ta® x
, Yj \ r arate ..
. | \ OT \ e
4 A ~- '

MEANWHILE, IN NEW YORK?
nie i
|

T'VE GOT NEWS FOR YOU
KIRBY... THE STATE POLICE
SPOTTED DUDE'S CAR AT
\ ct WESTVALE... HE CRASHED
| THROUGH THEIR ROAD

“

BE

Je

a















THIS IS A TOUGH JOB FOR A
BOY LIKE YOU, BUT YOUVE GOT!
ABOUT THIRTY SECONDS To

START MOVING! .

NEVER MIND ME! THOSE
ARE ( SMUGGLERS ARE GOING TO SHOOT
YOU? , YOUR BUDDIES/ARENT YOU

Ps —\_ GOING To HELP THEM? J










es tal ay) ys







LOOKS LIKE THIS) (YEAH?
—,



a

rea |

Hcy cole:









SUNDAY, JUNE 15, 1952
HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON





SUNDAY ADVOCATE





PAGE THIRTEEN









By Appointment
Gin Distillers
to the Late
King George V1

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE










SPECIAL offers to all Cash wad Credit Customers

Se





for Monday to Wednesday only







SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Hranches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street









Usually Now ‘ :
1
SOUPS, PICKLES Ete.
COCOAMALT ~ $140 — $1.35 Heinz Chicken Noodle Soup... $ .49
» Chicken Gumbo Soup... 49
ROYAL SAUSAGES 18 — ~.70 » Mieeed et Chew’ occcs ae
» Clam Chowder Soup... .55 Vea
UFILLET BISCUITS de ee Sitie Sean in
MARMALADE |. cisisiiicininapiie Mle me lh SR ee NN sccnriiemin A
KIDNEY & BEANS ....... cael ae
HERRINGS IN TOM. SAUCE... 45 — 42 oe ae em
SHERRIF'S, TABLE JELLIES 00000
VI SRIUT meses BO a 28 CORAM OP WHEAT UTI) oi. .ccisees sees
D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street
THE COLONNADE GROCERIES

The Place Goes Further

Your Dollar

Where







GUINNESS

STOUT
FOR STRENGTH





] P.O. BOX 304
BARBADOS

C. €. HARRISON & CO. (BARBADOS) Ltd.









.

PAGE FOURTEEN

















ADVOCATE


















































meres
PUBLIC NOTICES | PURI
CLASSIFIED ADS | IC SALES
° Da wid
: OLD HARRISC SOCIETY
TELEPHONE 2508 The [
zs annual general meeting of the ‘
©. Society, will be held at" Harrisan | REAL ESTATE AUCTION
DIED FOR SALE Collage om Fring, Sane, 8 Damm ROYAL NETHERLANDS
" AGENDA a = a" a ) :
Minutes BY AUCTION! LET D. PF. DE ABREU| BY ifstructions received I will, sel canes witi ona ‘Cargo
EVELYN--On June 14th, 1952, at the Secretary's Report - A TRAUNED AUCTIONEER WITH! at Corner of Lakes Folly and Cheapside STEAMSHIP co, Passengers for St
General Hospital, FITZ BERESFORD Appointr ce |YEARS OF EXPERIENCE (ALSO|on MONDAY 16th. from 11,30 a.m. ~) sawiag
EVELYN, retired’ butler. The funeral et ee ABROAD) AGCTION YOUR HOUSE-| fables, Upright Chairs, Tub aia soax- sATLING Dp wi gg Mg
; N, : 1 r : FROM EURO! Sail
leaves his late residence Bank Hall AUTOMOTIVE vet eee 15.6.52 HOLD FURNITURE, CARS. ETC. 1! ing Chairs, Book Case all in Mahog- es ‘The: Mv CANOE wit
Cross Road, St. Michael, to-day at 5.6.52—2.|wikl, ACCEPT "A COMMISSION! any Dining and other Tables, Wasson, M.S. BONAIRE, 13th June, 1952, atcept
4.00 p.m. for the Bank Hnill eren | G RANGING FROM 2 TO 7 PER CENT.| {ardérs, folding sereen, bedsteads and|\!'S: STENTOR, 27th June, 1952. for “Teuaue
Tooke und thence to the Weathare ha ae a. Cu, in Meat clase cong- EPs 7 |BE CHARITABLE I AM_ W!TH| Mattress-Kitchenware, earthenware and M.S. HESTIA, 4th July, 1962 Serr. .
Cemetery : oo Ska ee NOTICE fYou, 1 wit. A REASON-| gigssware, 2 burner ‘oll stove Electric SAILING TO BUROF Shiling Fridey aon thee.
ITOLEYNE HOYTE and RAWLE 4606 — Stariley HT, cHimeM, 7 oo am. |, Al! male citizens of the United States |ABLE PART OF- MY ‘COMMISSION 1 Singer Machine, Toaster.| @.S. WHLLEMSTAD, vith rh .
.6.52—2n. | between the ages of 18 and 26 residing/ANY REAL” DESERVINC CAUSE} aed ‘éstinghouse Refrigerator, Con-| SAILING TO TRINID. 2 actept Ca Ges v. 0 and Paseane he
aw ikke papers, please copy — | in Barbados are requested to call at/NAMED BY PERSONS GIVING ME Carpets — and a lot of Fregch AND Barriow
15.6.52—1n CAR—Dodge Super-Deluxe, First-class ie American Consulate from July 1 te|SUCH SALES. WHAT ABOUT | THE! Bowders other useful items.!.S. Nestor, b at,
B82 tet ahs & condition and owner-driven, $2,000. Dial] 31, 1952 for Selective Service Registration |"CANCER | CAMPAIGN SATISFAC- B cach bee's poeeeen ae ee oe n
4476. 12.6.52—-1n, miles the Universal Military Training TION TERMS. CONDITIONS, AND McKENZIE. 13.6.52—3n . AIRE, 30th June, 1962.

eee cen A NR

ALLEYNE—We beg through this medi-
im to return thanks to all those kind

THANKS

friends who sent wreaths or in an
way €
recent

death of Huldah 4
Jean Alleyne (Sister), The Weather-
head’

Cossou-



xpress
bere




vent, caused by th
lleyne



s family 15.6, 52—In



through this medium to thank a
those kind friends who sent wreaths







































“VENTNOR"—Unfurnished, Ist Ave
Belleville. Available Ist July. Phone
15.6. 52—1n

a6ed



EDUCATIONAL

MODERN HIGH SCHOOL.
Pupil



on

the

school

September 1952 are asked to ‘apply

s wh vould. like t slaced ANTIQUES — “oh every every “Ss ar ce cas oc en
Be eae ee cnie. cohosl for | Glass, Ching, old Jewels, fine giiver ARD offered to anyone finding or ||

0\ | Watercolours, Barly books, Maps, Auto- caving information as to whereabouts | | DIAL 4758
0

year 1953 which commences

Â¥

ed their sympathy in our




e

-We the undersigned beg

1







a waiting list form. Call or telephone

2846 and it will be posted to you.

date of the Entrance Examinstion, c
the results of which six free schola
ships will be awarded, will be announc
ed later.

L, A, LYNCH,

The

i

for | eraphs ete., at Gorringes Antique Shop Tripod with Universal
°. adjoining Royal Yacht Club. a 8 Beles head Wet near Paynes
3.2.62—t.f.n,/ ill, St. John’s on 2nd June Ring

aged’, 14.6,52—2n

Principal
25.5.52—6n,



NOTICE

QUEEN'S COLLEGE ENTRANCE

for

EXAMINATIONS
the School Year beginning
16th September, 195%.

Examination for Entrance to the

MAIN SCHOOL and JUNIOR DE-
PARTMENT will be held at
QUEEN'S COLLEGE on THURS-
DAY, 19th June, 1952, at 9.15 a.m
prompt
Candidates must be at Queen's Col-
* lege by 0.00 am
2. An Admission Card hos been sent to

each candidate who is eligible

to sit

the Examination Should any of

these Cards be lost,

will the cagdi-






Service Act PAYMEN



WITHIN 48 HOURS































CAR—1950 Hillman Minx, New Bat-{ All male citizens of the Un GUARANTEED. DIAL 3111. “OLIVE SAILING 4 nae SCHOONER
tery and in good condition. Dial 4019.| who attain the age of . — BOUGH", HASTINGS 15.652 1n.} 1NDER THE IVORY HAMMER ‘AD AND vs oes wenn,
10.6.52—8n.] sequent to July 31, 1952, are required - M.S. HESTIA, Dist st J Que & 2 ‘Téle.
hil icant il eben to register upon the day the: attain the| BY NAVY GARDENS A Very| 3 iy \tititfuctions. received from the) §- ®- MUsiON, aa ex: Ne, 4047
CAR — Vauxhall Velox, little used,| eighteenth anniversary of of |Desirable 3 Bedroom (with Basins &] Brij Council I will woe at “Wakefield” :
owner-driven, good as new. Diai 4476. their birth, or within five dave i Cupboards) 12 inch Stone Bungalow Whiteperke Rd, on June 20th;
12.6.52—t.£.n. | after. ‘about 7 yrs, old), Dining & Breakfast | (1) 1947-10 BLP. Se a in perfect

For further information, consult ghe|Hooms, 2 Toilets, Garage, Servant’s| werking order. R ;
American Consulate, Bridgetown, og Room, Everite Roof, A-1 Condition,| new a acquired, ee id rete

NS
CAR—CGne (1) Studebaker (Champion)
S.] bados. 27.5. oe. f.n. |Back Yard enclosed with Stone, about] eash. Sale at 2 p.m.

in perfect running order, P. C,

Canadian ia Steamship

MAFFEI & Co. Ltd. Phone 2787. wchiienstpiaemnieteeaniaiate saceeniiiaiaeainte nae . | 12,000 sq. ft. Going for Only Under
15.6.52—t.f.n N ICE eo i= AT HASTINGS - Seaside ee Sa.
~ OT Residences. IN BAY ST. — Two (2 ‘
CAR—One (1) Fiuid Drive Dodge Car THE PARISH OF ST. ANDREW |fedroom) Stone Residences (one Sea- 15.6.52—4n



$1,800.00 apply to Cosmgpolitan Garage,| Applications will be received for the |side), Going

























































































able only in Sweden will last you a life
time. Features include six extra char-
acter keys and the famous feather touch
typing. To introduce these machines we

day last the 10th June, and who] RBRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

—-----—-| desire to be considered for agri- Auctioneers » attabihe ‘
ST cultural employment in the U.S.A. 15.6.52—2n. ROBERTS STATIONERY
Wi jl quote you the lowest prices. BRAD- LO this year, are advised to report

SHAW & COMPANY. —§ 1,6.52—-S—t-f.n. ines at Queen’s Park on Tuesday, 17th} ¥

i
(= Lancia pth :
~ er ‘ CGAP—Hub cap marked “Buick” be-| June, 1952, at 8.30 a.m. bringing ‘
|
|
%
x







tween Courtesy Garage and Belloville,/ Call cards and vaccination certifi-
MISCELLANEOUS by Way of Constitution Road, Will

cates,
finder please return to Courtesy Garage 14 6.52
Co, Ltd.? 15, 6,52—1n 6.52.—







ARBADOS J DIAL 3301 9 HIGH STREET
AKERIES TD =. — =







| BRACELETS for watches in rolled -
€ ud, ehromiun, and stainless steel inf SILVER BRACELET-~lost between the
dies’ and men’s sizes. Also a nice} Colonade Store and the Post Office
»sortment of watches. K. R. Huntef Finder will be réwardéd on returning
& Co., So, Lite. 13.6.52—an,, to the Advocate Co. 13.6 .52—2n.

Ge. each



PEANUT CAKE 3||, MOUNTED POLICE DISPLAY

i AT
iors

| three-spe sed. Automatic Changers at P.C. WANTED

|s MAFFEL & CO, LTD., Radio Em Flyin. r



THE POLICE RIDING SCHOOL


















tnd pliable and will give you all the 19.6.53—In. (Between Carrington and ST, MICHAEL Reserved Seats sai ae iss $1.00
An_ attractive residence stand- Unreserved Seats eens seee eese 48

ing on 20 thousand sq. feet of
Land at Two Mile Hill contain-



ee Yorkshire Estates)
scrvice and satisfaction of an expen- i ae . e
sive Chamois Skin, Size 22 xX 18 ‘STENO-TYPIST | ‘Qualified steno WEDNESDAY 18th JUNE, 1952.
inches only 8 cents each, Obtainable

at HARRISON'S HARDWARE STORE.



typist for our office. Reply in writing t 11.30 a.m
to K. R Hunte & Co. Ltd., Lower We are instructed to dispose of

Tel. 2064 14.6 52--$n_| Broad Street. Qualifications of apyli- the Furniture and Bffects of the ing three Bed-rooms and ail e





date please apply immediately to (he) NN, —$<$—$———— NN | cants must be attached to application.” late Mr. C. P. R, Greenidge. |} modern conveniences. é i
Heaamistress for another one, 9s ~DaIMUS STOVME,— This name as} ag STD I VSN able to. seat 10, Serving Salitiiecibel’ sath \Duihes: :sitem Box Office at Information Bureau, Police Headquarters
PRE ards § 4 y | 7 o a va
ach candids ate at Queent College eer proves he, eet, Gh acbotience na Milas Wings istered Tabie, Set ot 6 Dining Cnaws, rr. ated within one inile of Bridge- e@
dh the morning of the Examination. PCE 8", URORy cheap inferior makes | hopital Nurse. bie eerful, Upright Chairs, Pr. ‘Tub: Chairs, town standing on 10,000 square
2. he list of successful candidates Will \i(jat do not Inst and which are danwer- willing to cncerne suitable occupa- Armehair, Occ. Chairs, Sideboard. feet of Land with several fruit

be

July,

er”

published in the “Barbados
Advocate’ on Sunday, the 20th of
1-
On Saturday, the 26th of July,
1962, 8. 6.52—2n

BARBADOS BRITISH WEST

and in the ‘Barbados Record

INDIES

ST. MICUARIYS GIRLS’ SCHOOL

SECONDARY DAY



HOOL



FOR GIRLS

A

Applications are invited from Gradu

ates for the post of
qualified to teach Mathematics, Ger
. Elementary Science and Botan, Sor

experience in teaching in Secondar
Schools will be a recommendation

SALARY SCALE Ist and 23nd_ class

Honours Degrees $1,584 by $72
$2,304 by $120--$2,704

oO

$1,416 by $60—$1,776 by $72—$2
Graduates who hold a Teacher's Di
ma will be paid an additional salary of

ther Graduates

$2.16 per annum,

A

co

payable at prevailing rates. The pos
tion on the Salary Scale would be de



cided by teaching experience in recog
nised Secondary Schools

The post is not a Government post
put is pensionable under the Barbado
Teacher's Pension Act

Passale expenses to Barbados will be
paid by the Governing Body of the
Scheol

The stccessful applicant will be re
quired to assume duties as from Janua
1953

Applications accompanied by — thre
recent testimonials, Medical certificate
of fitness, a Birth Certificate and a pho
tograph should be submitted to: The
‘Headmistress, St. Michael's Girls’ School
Martindales Road St. Michael l5a
























st of Living Allowance is now
i-

Assistant Mistress



eee ee ee See a



Bed-rooms, A Farewell to Staff Sergeant Anderson of the

trees, containing thre



ous, Primus stoves vise Ie lean fuel ‘el and an ‘are] UOn e@.@. care invalid or children, Can Single Ended Settee, Liquor C













ous), Sle acccemaa? a drive ear, Box M.C. ¢/o Adyoéate Co. and Stand, Pr. Kidney Tables, Sights, Water and all other con- Royal Canadian Mounted Police
ing apparatus made. ot ope Y 15.6.52—in Plant Stands, Pr. Berbice Chairs, veniences
hake Primus’ 1s available. G, W. Hutch- _ Hall Stand, Wall Brackets, Mirror 12.6.52.—4n.
inson & @o., Ltd. 6. —t.f.n. Ps Stand, Military Chest, Trays, ST. JAMES
MISCELLANEOUS Cake Stand (ALi. IN| MAHOG-
PTARO} Your child's dream comes ANY). Marble Topped Table, Can- Two Bungalows on the sea-side
Broadwood upright, — tropical Vas Chairs, Occ. Tables, Cordes Toilet, “path, “Moder eaten
model. Separate bridge on each string.| CARIB BOTTLES—Return Carib Bottles forving Table, mavers! ~iitchen Good ‘Bus Service, Excellent Loca-
eautifal condition, anette Owner] to A. S. Bryden & Sons, (B’dos) Ltd., Tables, (atl..st edar Book tion. :
caving colony. Write P. OQ. a 4 Lad Victoria Street, at 1% cents each, case, Somes = "Painted Bape 7
Pp 3 cases qd. & Tain Chairs, Pt . i
nome 9122, tn US62—an ||] Gite euinet, Chest at Drawers. Five genes, good. Land with
“Subscribe now to the Rea Telegraph HOUSE—Wanted early 1953 for years Pine Press; Pid. Press, Cedar coversi fect a ipes, nun with
‘ngland’s leading Da now} tease. Seaside House. Worthing, St Press. “Deck “Gherrs, Gallery Fur- y small house, suitable kitchen
rriving to Barbados by Air "a: oes i tew| Lawrénee or Maxwell Coast by careful niture Beg Dining |) Table, ‘gardening, six miles from town,
lays after publication In London. Con-j| English family. Box K c/o Advocate Benches, Singh tron Bed anc attractively priced
tact: kan Gale, ¢/o Advocate Co., Ltd. 13.6.52—2n. Hair Mattress, Commode, Wash-
Local Representative, Tel, 3118. —— gtand, Portable — Gramopnone, ST, PETER
0 17 4.69-t.t.n.| TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bonus Record Stand & Records, Fold-



Old fashion country house
tanding on ten acres Land com-
nanding @ beautiful view of the
country side, this Property is
ritable, for a country Club or
Guest House





from Rediffusion for 25 recommends ing Card Table, 2 Valor Stoves

WARM CLOTHING—2 Coats and other | tions in one calendar month, ie ee aoe
s, Silver

REPORTS OUTSTANDING PROGRESS

IN ITS 80TH YEAR

Paid to living Pelicyowners - 657,453.00
Paid to beneficiaries of de ra $ 18,

owners 5 ey
New e Insurance
Total ——
Assets



Thermos
lothing for child omed 9 youre. p04 6.881. HHL ate, China, Dinner Sets, Pyre
—— | 962,50 POCKET MONEY easily earned Ware, Brassware, Plated Trays
Rugs, Suits, Shirts, Underclothes
WHOLE PEAS--A small quantity of} 9Â¥ recommending 26 new supscribers to oak. Para is
,eas for Pigeons can be bought at ise REDIFFUSION in one month. Shons: Large Coll. Kishen Uten
per Ib From. J. A. 8. TUDOR & Go. 4.6. 52—10n sils, Crock Ovens, Books, O!'
Hoebuck Street. DD 652 Bin, re Lamps, Buckets, Pictures, An-
SS REDIFFUSION offers $1.50 cash for thur

Telephone 4709,





lies, Ferns, Planis, and
Co of Oddment



FOR RENT

Small Modern Residence, Good
Location. near town

each new Subscriber recommended by Lares

ANNOU NCEMENTS wins 4.6.52—10n e
AUCTIONEERS



1

.
i The Company ends its 80th year with the best record in
its history for volume of New Life Insurance, volume of Life
Insurance in Force and volume of Assets.

——_———
a SUPPLEMENT YOUR INCOME by
selling REDIF. | recommending REDIFFUSION. Obtain
time. Get a] ll particulars from the REDIFFUSION
4.6.52 -10n. office. 4.6,52—10n






EARN BIG MO?
USION in you
upply of forms te

i Apply:





CECIL JEMMOTT



‘
|








& co.









eal Estate And Commission



Hello Everybody ! Remember

Phone 4640

Agent,

Confederation Life

|

Plantations Building. 48 Tudor Street Phone 4563.

_ SSE







: .
x Distriet “A”
pincinrnsrsinenansidieeniaiaoernan: oan =
KINGSBEER - Lager, in 12-07. es FURNITURE
peeked in handy 1-Doz, cartons, pro- HEI P saat
}duet of National Breweries Ltd. of 5.00 P.M., TUESDAY, 17TH JUNE
erontenac Beer fame. For particulars
jcontact R. M, JONES & Co. LTD. Tel.| “LADY SALES CLERK—With some e
| 2053 12.6.52.—4n. torpartonce. Restonabe Salary offered to ia
$a | suitable applicant. ly*in person and at
| “ORIAC” Synthetic Chamois Leathers i co , ey . : n eee
are here again! They are always soft _ ing. Bookers ( 08) Drug Stores VALLEY HILL, CHRIST CHURCH ADMISSION :




















, 1 On
FOR SALE tl THE GRAND DANCE
Tae tome 0 semen which will be given by _- {it | NOOSOOSSOOSSSSSSSSSSoSnse ones Head Office ASSOCIATION Toronto
than 32th September 952 : |
15.6,.52--3n Mr. RALPH MAUL

At HIGHCLERE FARM (Owner of P-333) ARRARD 3 SPEED AUTOMATIC RECORD i WILLARD G. GRANT—Divisional Manager
™ OPO EAP SLES PES POPP Cc Z 2 R. J. MORRISON—Branch Manager
: TRUCK: One 1540. Bet $i I Petia wr ee ee ae ieee ; _ CHANSERS, : WM. M. (PAT) DATE—District Manager
S with, 3 1940 cr eee Bi e herd of we kept aé-hortoOw Night; 1éth June 1962 NT Just received! Going fast! Come and get yours! Branch Office: 1 Chacon Street, Port-of-Spain.
S Be BR) ade She tat te HU an ' oe
ge 225). x )« and make your selection j Refrest ¢ ’ a} nap a 7 ' € | ‘ a R - f
oe Bit Any of these wit make emetvetse BED Ds ; Se a : DENNIS E. WORME.
* Apply Mrs. ©. 'Worr ~ Hol :| i} ; Corner Broad and Tudor Streets i DAVID (Perry) EVELYN.
POOLE EE LEAS IAVAP | LE sae RS POSSCORSOOSOCODOCOONSNSenoNSoSONSOeSoNNancoe?



ume... Sea ee fee Pe


















Under £1,200 Each. City
Jetters of condolence, or in any wa» | Magazine Lane. Phone 3015. post of Caretaker at the Public Baths | Business Premises & Residences, Read
SAA ae empathy i cur Se 15.6.52—an.| at Belleplaine, Salary §8.00 per week.|My Ads in Last Sunday's and Tuesday's! UNDER THE DIAMOND CRUISER 20 June
Caer ccrenvernent caused by the| —=——-_ =——sese | Applicants must be resident of either | Advoeste. AT WORTHING MAIN RD., HAMMER UCTOR | 7. june “3 suit aR 13 Ju
death of Lilian Cossou CAR—One 1936 Standard Car 10 h.p oo leplaine, Walkers, Lakes, or|Facing Sea, Right-of-Way to Sea; a oe ee | DM 16 July July Say
Charles Beresford Brandford-{broth-| in good working order with § good|Corbins Districts. 3 Bedroom Bungalow Type, all Modern{ 1 fave been instructed ‘by One of the :
er) ‘lilian Branford-Hinds, iniece) | tires. Apply to V. Gibson, Overseer z Cc. A. SKINNER, Convenier Very Good Condition, latViaries to sell at No. 15 High Street
Beatrice Inez Millar, tiriend) Prior Park Plantation. Dial 2030, Clerk, “Comminsionere of Henith- |over 6,000 sa. ft.. Going Under £2,900. | we. ‘Thursday eet the 1k ot. 3.30 NORTHBOUND ‘agiduas
’ 156. 52—2n —an he Me for Almost anything in Real iene, 42 1 lady’ pee Fs fe se .
, _-- TT —— 19.6.52—3n. | Estate. Dial 3111 D. F. de Abreu, the following dresses, lady's Halifax
} o> . ann es ed oa . ” S i a & suits, 20 coats, 8 prs. pants, 6
GREEN—Mrs. Edith E. Green of Cane CAR—Ford Consul (black) in perfect Auctioneer & Real Ratate. Agent, “Olive woe’ : Se P, a june a“

“feld, Dominica, wishes to express he; | condition and done only 4,000 railes NOTICE Bough”, Hastings ; 15.6 4a, —e ene eee Xe eel a 16 June \ a7 June 2%8June 1 July
profound gratitude to the staff of the} Reason for selling owner now residing} Re_EREPLAINE COMMUNITY HALI - ones a * ‘tems. TERMS CASH . 28 June 6 July 8 ii July
Hospital for their most conn England, Can be seen at McRnearney] anp PLAYING FIELD ST. ANDREW | ,.SOUSE—One board and shingle House] ARCY A, SCOTT, Auctioneer iy Biuy

attention to her during be | & Co. or contact Mr, C, E. Clarke | “Nay be rented for ente: i. 20 x 11 with bedroom, shedroof and m8 . : ~ ss ale 19 July
> Ss Ph. 2631. 25.5.52 y r r entertainments of ~ it ‘ c 14.6.52
15.6.52—Ir jwan Street. one 5. all kinds, on application to the Paro- eae ee af t aT eee = ——_—— $$$ s
mes + a ake aie enn rome chial asurer of St ‘ ee | ere Boe 4 my 5.6.52—In July ff. } ‘
G RAPFITH—The ariftith tarntiy with "CAR Plymouth | 1940 in food | condi- pie ual Andrew or the |" —— es ae UNDER THE SILVER Re Aug. oe ake w aoe
eepest apprectation most sincerely ff tion, ea 8 ‘i - | .“HARCLIFF’ in St. Lawrence 4 s
eee’ hatha to all Who attended the# Truck 1939 Chevrolet in good condi- Soe" and nftterncon entet-| oy vist Church (on the Sea) standing of HAMMER ; antiga pe RN eT eee Oe ee
funeral. sent wreaths, cards, letters, tion, good tyres, Dial—2956. phy For Dances $15.00 15.6.52—3n, |2 Roods 37 Perches of land. ON TUESDAY 17th by order of Mr.
of sympathy, and who in various ways ¢ ae — Peterkins ae aes nett ele dice a aie The house is built of stone and ts at|@ecile Walcott we will sel! her Furni- | or further particulars, apply to—
rendered assistar the passing of} Ha oad. present divided into two flat Each flat|ture at “Archway House” Na Gar-
Mr William Edword Griffith, (in his Se EE NOTICE | Contains Grawit#' and dining +coms and dens, ee , GARDINER AUSTIN & CO LTD.—Agents
Sth. year,) late of Bush Hall Yard,| PICK UP — One Morris Pick-up. | BYE-ELECTION FOR THE VESTRY OF | kitchenette downstairs, 2 bedrooms with which includes ad
St, Michael, Dial 4616. Courtesy Garage THE PARISH OF SAINT MICHAEL running water upstairs Usual conve-|] Very nice Oval Dining Table, Antique
Vircent GriMith (son) Blanche Griffith 14.6.52—3n.1 Two persons having been nominated | nience Writing Bureau, Upright and Morris
(widow) Nurse Joan E. Griffith (grand- | for the Vestry of Saint Michael, a Poll Servants quarters and garage in yard.| Chairs, Coffee and Ornament Tables,
daughter) for the election of ONE will be taken Inspection by appointment, dial 3750, | nest of Tables, Cake Stand Corner and
- 15.6.52—I1n ELECTRICAL at the Parochial Sule Cumberland The above will be set for sale on Jume| Arm Chairs all in Mahee: Cedar Book-
Pre ‘ eae 3 = a Bridgetown, om Santer er 20th 1962 at 2 p. * at our Office. Shelf. Electric Fan, Electric Lamps,
SMITH—We “beg to return thahks to a instant Deginn! in tween e CARRINGTON & SEALY, | Piccures, Verandan Cnaurs, rhusi.
who attended the funeral, sent) “PRIiGIDAIRE "= Generel. Electric Frig- hours of 8 and 9 o’clock in the morning Lucas Street, Morris Arm-Chairs, Steel Chairs, Glass
wreaths, cards, letters of condolence, | iasire @ecubte 2 th excellent working | 70 closing, at. 4 p.m Solicitors. and China, Carpet ‘Rugs, Phillips Radio, ;
or in any other way rendered assist-| order $196.00. Didd 4736, 14.652-—8n. |, 2he, fol G STATIONS 11.6.52—9n, | Garrod Automatic Record Change. A GERMAN
ance during our réeént bereavement an. 2 ; : i pave ene a P ; the provis- Perfect condition Single Pine Bedsteads,|
caused by the death of Harry Smith FRIGERATOR — 10" . LAND — 2 Spots of land for sale. | Simmons Springs and Deep Sleep
The Smith family Refrigerator Kerosene ae a's Ne. 1 PORING STATION 7,286 sq. ft. & 5,606 sq. ft. Price, Mattresses, Very good Mahog: Pressses, By Albert Finger
15.6.52—1n. | Good condition. Phone 2791... L. & H. ate cree FLOOR o the, Pasochial reasonable. A: Headley; Deacons Rd.|Mahog: Duchesse Dressing Table; Be)
ngs. ters sur- 14. 6. 52~- jar Press, Singl I Bedstead, 4, i i
Sahn uthe Wood family thank ani] ae SMOtemet Eagehes Been a: Se begin with ‘as letters “A” to “Tr | eee cnnted Chast on bates and 4 This instrument possesses an Excellent Tone and a
those who attended the funeral, sent] | on eae ay opie Rizancs| INROPERTY comer Tweedside Road | Presa: Ice Chest, Rippungill 2 Burner Rpautiat oe a “ae finish.
flowers, letters, cards, or expressed EFPRIGERATOR — English Electric, é joor Of | suitable for grocery or Mechanical! oli Stove and Oven, Kitchen Cabinet, 2 are ed to call fo: demon:
their sympathy’ in other ways on the] g Wupie ft, $405,00. Excellent Condi- | Sr" Ree ree cre shop, Water and light installed. Apply | Burner Electric Stove, Blec: Kettle. | 1? stration
Wes, of their mother, Florence] i5, — gi, yr. motor guarantee. Call]. GROUND FLOOR of the Paro coune eS Hill, Tweedside Roms, oy | Larder, Kitchen Utensils, Tables and x CECIL MM
‘ood 2898. 11.6.52—4n. 1 var vt ial 48% 10.6.52—3n.j many other items, . J E OTT
39.6.5 2 tr Chial Bouildirgs is albottech te verte rs | ees Sale 11,30 o'clock. TERMS CASH ¥
pa * RS whose surnames begin With the letters 3 i de . : ; S x 48 sa Street — Phone
“ PYE BATTERY SETS—Just a few left.) (yp ¢5 4Z" (both inclusive) and the ee pee ome Be a apie BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,| $. pa cieaiat 4008
ENT esenicientirnnesae SAMIR. tf = ce thereto will be through the| well centered, A-1 business place suit- Auctioneers eee . PPPSF OSES PIOSSSS
FOR n 15.6.52—t-4.n.| Gateway situated at the Southern End Shia ifay call kievla cotenastnede. aaa 13.6, 52—2n. -
° of Sp Pues: | COLE, opportunity for any .ambitious person, |
POULTRY Sheriff & Returning’ Officer Residence contains large gallery, drawing UNDER THE SILVER
BoUsEe an see oP epee: | na, ining Zeomn, aiteben. tole aen HAMMER COMBERMERE SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION
chire, White Rock, Slack Giant, |“ wanmcn | Private sale or sale ive “competition at} On Thursday 19th by order of Mrs.
____ | Turkeys, young. $6,00 pr, Baby ones NOTICE short notice. For further details ting]J. C. Bovell, we will sell her furniture CHANGE OF DATE
“BELVEDERE”, Maxwell Coast. For 5} for Se. 3 weeks, Paddock Gap, Da PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH 2849 15.6.52—3n, | at “Jackson Ville,” Worthing,. which
months from lat August. Fully fur- | Costa Wall, Mrs. Theobalds Applications for one (1) Vestry Exhi- | ————————_——— —————— ineludes:—Round Tip-Top Table, Up-
nished. $120 per month. Phone 8188 15.6.5%—1n. | bition tenable at the Lodge School will} STONE WALL DWELLING HOUSE] tight Chairs, Sideboard, China Cabinet,
is ¢ $3—3n be received by the undersigned up to] With 4,004 square feet of land attached] Ormament ‘Tables, Rockers, Berbice WILL ALL Parents/Guardians and Scholarship Authori-
i Adios DUCKS KHAK! CAMPBELIQ: One]5 p.m, on Tuesday, 17th June, 1952, | at Dayrell’s Road, Christ Chureh. The| Chairs Morris Settee, all_in Mahogany: ties please note that th n n will k
“BRIGHT VIEW, Prospect * inition pe pair Khaki Campbello 1 Drake 3 Candidates must be sons of Parish-| dwelling house contains living room,;Glass & China; G.E.C. Refrigerator SI se no’ at e Entrance Examination will be held on |
‘ ‘all conveniences, 4 bedrooms, good | Ducks 6 months old. Magnificent|ioners in straitened circumstances, and two bedrooms, kitchenette, usual con-| (18 months old) Congoleum, Twin Bed- MONDAY, JULY 218T 9.00 A.M. |
sea bathing, bus service. Apply Hill} Laying strain, $24.00. must not be less than 8% years nor|Veniences, Government water installed,.| steods, Vono_ Springs & Beds, Gents i" es |
House, Ch. Ch. (Lodge Road) Mrs, PEEBLES, more than 14 years of age on the 2ist}House wired for electricity. Inspection |Compactum Dressing Tables, Double Change of date has been necessitated by am unfortunate
: 15.6.52—2n Bayleys, June, 1952, to be proved by a Baptismal|on application to the tenant Mr. Ince, | Bedstead, Vono Spring, all in Mahogany: clash of & : ; {
Susie vein eb, St. Philip, 11.6.58—3n.| Certificate’ which must accompany the] between the hours of 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. {Linen Press, Dressing Table Frese " of date with the Entrance Examination for Harrison
B applicatio a. daily combined, Iron stead, Bookshelves, College.
Ba FURNISHED "APARTMENT. Te ete s of applieation can be obtained| The above dwelling house will be get] Tea Trolley; Ironing Board, Larders, ge, }
Advocate 15.6,52—2n LIVESTOCK at the Parochial Treasurer’s Office up fe ale by public competition at, our] Kitchen Tables, 3-Burner Valor Stove & M. PINDAR Nl
ae , ee as A. T, KING, Office, James Street, on Friday 27th June | Oven and other items. ms |
‘ FURNISHED FLAT, at Dundee, St. “Cows-Two @) Case. Gem in nik Clerk, St. Joseph's Vestry instant at 2’pan. Sale 11.80 o'clock, TERMS CASH. Secretary, Governing Body }
Lawrence. Suitable for 2 only. Avail-| Apply “Cuthbert Rogers, near Rices, 14.6.52—3n. PeAT on in BOYCE, BRANEER TROTMAN & co. Combermere School.
able June 15th Onward, Phone oe. S:. Philip. 15.6.53—1n. | THE SUGAR INDUSTRY AGHICUL- . ia 6.$800n uctioneers 16.6.00-20, 14.6 |
t) ae renderers a rer eae ae I 7. TURAL NK 19438 5a—2n. i 2n.
4%..." Giles te SOevershree welt bred Holstein] Toe ‘the creditors ing speciaity| The undersigned will set up NERD eo Te
. Waynes g Bay - f OEY, > ol it of good y ci , . : —
. Drawing & Dinfig rooms.” # wee: iran Rien ars oe Rex eee Gregg Farm Plantation, oy es 18a Weak - ~ UNDER THE SILVER _ — =
4 wit a ve | ak Ps Te i, Dairy TAKE NOTICE that we the Trustees| towh, on Friday the 20th day of June HAMMER
coon set he he ila - m8 Sais Hothersal Turning, of the above Plantation are about to] 1952 at 2 p.m. the following On Wednesday 18th by order of Mrs.
Paynes Bay 18,6 i St. Michael. 14,6.52—2n. } obtain a jap of £3,500 under the pro-| 250 shares in West India Biscuit Co.JW,. A. Ross, we wat soli her furniture Who's 0 = : \
es ~ a vision: the above Act against the} Limited 111 shares in West india Rum] at ‘Rosemany”, ve. eville, 0 CRICKET
4 ie enue. Perret lear PUPS Four (@ Bull and Pups \ suit Plantation, in respect of the Agri-| Relinery Co. Limited 7 which ineludes’ Morris Sulte, ‘Settee, 2 : X
* Py “FApply uthbert Rodgers, near ‘Poulural year 1982 to 1953. R. S.NICHOLIS & CO. Arm Chairs, Rockers, Ornament Tables, (
2 ne A euros Pk rile an yk Phi.ip 15.6.52—1n.f No money has been borrowed under Solicitors. | Plant-stools, Waggon, Upright Chairs, by ROY WEBBER
Bee ee ee ee TL aweoai. ——— the Agricultural Aids Act, 1905, or the 15,6,52—5n. | Uphols. Drawing Room Suite Settee,
SAC OF Oeat, 6. oan oLOUNG kia aS Aveshire; ee Bay the case may be) in res- Upright ae gl err wu Wot oni doas this book
apenas hi ( wor ne} a nd, a is
NAVY GARDENS — Fully furnishea| Moore, "Mindsbury. oad, ‘St. Michael.! "Dated this 14th day of June 1952 OVERNMENT N y f’Maahogany:, Oak and Rush chairs and |{{ the test playing countries but pyro oy sane tahert
modern house, all conveniences, good] pia) 3764, 15.6.52—-1n. L. C. M. ARCHER (etal, i I Rockers; Underwood Typewriter: Din- th also the leading people behind
position, July to December IN Clusi ve. | nS Trustee, ing and other Tables in Pine, Deck e game.
Reasonable rent. Phone 2389 Per B. H. V. OUTRAM Chairs; Pictures, Congoleum, Glass and - also -
14,6.52-—Sn MECHANICAL ' "Attorney China; ¢lock, Double and ‘Single Tron THE BOOK ” )
aoa, tie 14.6.52 dn ga cece TO U.S.A. Bedsteads Springs, Mattresses; Mahog. OF “THE DOG )
ROOM—From July Ist at the MO A0 | TS remaining Workers who|.T. Washstand and Tables; Painted A most comprehensive work giving details of every type {
Gift Shop. Suitable for Dressmaking TYPEWRITERS,— This is HALDA have been photographed as well] Presses and Dressing Tables, Sewing of Dog. t
- Pe Spor, Matsdressing ete. Apply} from special alloy hardened steels avail. as those. who received calls to| Machine, Larders, Kitchen Tables and i
at Mayfair p.m, oo 5 naan | WOOK: These beautiful typewriters made Lost & FOUND Beport at Queen’s Park on Tues-| ster, items.
29.5.52—4n] by world famous Original Odhner-Facit nr § S| Sale at 11.30 o'clock. TERMS CASH. e

oe



Â¥, JUNE 15, 1952

10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Books:—
THE HORSEMAN'S YEAR BOOK



1952

â„¢ 7 STRUGGLE FOR EUROPE

most remarkable War

ver ee
TO ETERNITY
Sei Hine ¢ Books
Ss STAT ATIONER

extra Mes
ASS “tocks ion have been
for are at - -

JOHNSON’S HARDWARE

Se re ae RE



NOTICE

SOCIETY SERVICE
STATION

Now
OPEN FOR BUSINESS

Your In
j Sie Ses aahonee

SOCIETY PLT.

St. John.
11.6.52—3n.



| BLADON

e ce.
AFS., F.V.A.



FOR SALE

—_—

SWEETFIELD, St. Peter — An
Estate type house built of stone.
Contains large living room witb
French windows leading onto
covered verandahs with view of
sea. 3 bedrooms, kitchen, store-
rooms and usual outbuildings,
garage and servants’ quarters.
Approx. 2% acres well laid out
foe with right of way over

ac!

HILLCREST, Bathsheba — Sub-
stantially built modern stone
bungalow on brow of cliff afford-
ing fine view of this wild and
rocky coast. 3 good bedrooms,
living room, 2 side galleries,
kitchen, servants’ quarters and
garage. Electricity and mains
water. Over 6 acres

VILLA VICQUE, ST. VINCENT
—Beautifully situated house built
of local stone with magnificent
view, only 34% miles from Kings-
town, 1 mile Golf Club, 100. yards
Aavatio Chu Beagh with excel-

bedrooms,
2 Eee large lounge (23 x
15), (% x 18), and
aaa dings ete,

ESTAT sous St. James —
A ious home with
qi . ool location

its over!

hy looking coast.

ties on this popular coast with a
completely private and secluded
bathing beach. The grounds of
about 1% acres are well wooded
and could readily be converted
into one of the show places of
the Island. The house is of 2
storeys and possesses noticeable
character.

11, GRAEME HALL TERRACE—
Recently built 2 storey house
Septused a stone with everite
roof rge ving room, .
3 ows Witehen, aun, 2
servants’ rooms a garage
Offers in region of £4,000 con-
sidered. Would cost £5,000 plus
et présent building costs.

SEA FORT, ST. JAMBS—Care-
fully re- 2 storey house
on one 6f the most attractive sites
in this increasingly popular area.
Beautiful coral sand beach and
calm, saYe bathing. Dining room,
lourige, verandahs on both floors,
3 bedrooms, detached garage and
servants’ quarters. All services.

NEW BUNGALOW, ROCKLEY—
Commodious home with 3 bed-
rooms, large living r , wide
verandah With good view, kitchen,
pantry, servants’ quarters and
stonerooms. Good situation near
Golf Course. £4,300.

NEWTON LODGE, MAXWELL
COAST—Solidly constructed stone
house containing enclosed gal-
leries, eee Sia cee oo nS ee

dining rooms,
nae? aoe ae. “ie
Si tr ah as is og, Ava

RESIDENCE, FONTABELLE—2
storey house with self contained
annexe adjoining. Main house
contains large living and break-
fast rooms, 4 upstairs bedrooms,
usual offices, garage aud servants’

. Annexe has wide verandah,
room, 2 roomy

bedrooms
gorene. Good investment

THE caseem,
‘Modern
Anas



living ered
3 bedrooms with built-in ward~
robes, well fitted kitchen, be
with covered way to
servant’s quarters and all Pont
offices. All public utility services.
This property carries our highest
recommendation.

* —)
These two well construc’ Ppro-
t th approx. 4

acres of coast land are open ta
offers either a, a whole or
marnentey.

3
servants’ rooms, and
fernery. This pro is situated
on the best bath beach at St.
Lawrence, is wi
our opinion would be
for conversion into 4 guest
house.

RENTALS

furnished and unfarnished .
houses for rent.

e
REAL ESTATE AGENTS

AUCTIONEERS

Phone 4640
Plantations Building





SUNDAY,” JUNE 15, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE, FIFTEEN

VISITORS TO BARBADOS} CIRCULAR "The Truth in —_——— -











SPENT 3M. DOLLARS” | “2x22 Yous Horoscope

$ ‘
@ From Page 5. crease in the number of calls made |... oo June, 1952.
Island by ‘visitors Mas been kept by Speciel Cruise Ships to Bar-| I ha pati me re
by the banks: for the information bados durmg-the-1951—52 Season. | Candi at A fat sees , es
of; the Currency Conttel. Ofieer,. Such celts’ jotalled §. as againet 8 ~woned in the st Mi hael. Vestry Stare indicate one? “Woute sou like
who has very kindly made this tor the previous Season. Statistics tara . h 2 ieee ¢ the |to test free the skill of Pundit Tabore,
information available to the Com- for the year 1951—52 show an in- la ae a * - ieorattee . India’s most famous Astrologet, who b>
mittee. Taking the average for a creasé of 3,882 intransit passengers /@te Mr. C. A. Brathwaite. ancient science to
year, based .on the seven months and 1,343 disembarking passengers | useful nee
information available, the amount over that of 1950—51. Outside of | ’ Pe ao fe
o: Hard Currency accruing to the the Caribbean, the most marked / : Mee!) tion? The ac-
[sland through the tourist trade increase in this traffic was passen- | 9 MZ icuracy’ of his
works out at 2 total of $1,658,508.00 gers from the United States of | | predictions and
U.S. and Canadian Dollars, and America. the sound pract
436,272 Venezuelan Bolivars. Con- General Remarks a oe iver
verting this Hard Gurrency into Travel agents, representatives |/ |Horoscopes on
British West Indian Dollars at the ef transportation companies jour- | Business, Speeu-
rate of 70% premium for U.S. and pajists and photographers visiting \f | lation, Finances,
Canadian Dollars and 48'c. for the sland were given all possible | Love | - aftatrs,
each Bolivar, the substantial accictance and co-operation by the |
amount of $3,031,055.00 is cireu- Committee, . |
lated throughout the Island by” a-fresh supply of coloured post- | F
visitors from the above mentioned cards was obtained ang copies of |
countries. So far, no statistics ar@ «4 Short History of Barbados” by |

available as to the amount spent Neville Connell, M.A,. were added
by visitors from the Caribbean, to the stock of literature for sale |





“You are missing
one of the best

things in life until you sleep on a..

DUNLOPILLO

mattress

Try one at your furnisher—you will

















Friends, Enemies,
Lotteries, etc.,
have astounded
l|edubated people
{ \ the world over.
| George Mackey
}of New York be-
lieves that Tabore
must possess some sort of second-sight





Brown, Fawn,

: ROPICAL| tee"



Great Britain and elsewhere. ; a s To popularise his system Tabore will realise that Dunlopillo has made a

â„¢ ' at the Information Bureaux at the send you FREE your Astral Interpreta- contribution to modern living which

Advertisin Pier Head and Seawell Airport. tion if you forward him your full name ‘ a at
IN: s Framed photographs, depicting | (Mr. Mrs. or Miss}, address and date af 00 one should be without. Dunlopillo i :
‘ i wok ake scenes of Barbados, were supplie birth all clearly written ty yourself. No is the most comfortable, hygienic and $7.59, $7.99
ative Li é a j » C i - di ya money wanted for Astrologica’ K oat
40. Norfolk Street. London, W.C: Baths Se a FO" Sepia. st Rankine th., Dut. weal “Spent aie las economical mattress in the world. $8.28 & $9.08
2. During the year Barbados has. Presentathon "baskets of local | Postal Order for stationery, testimo tals Available now in all sizes for beds and 4
2 “ iy Os 7 3 s as 5 c }end other interesting literature, You will | .

been advertised in. “The Times,’ agwers were sent to all Special | § Ibe amazed at the remarkable” accuteey | also for baby’s cot. per yar

“The Daily Telegraph”, “The Illu-
strated London News”, “The Tat-
ler”, and “Travel World”. The

0 his statements about you and your |
affairs. Write now as this offer may not
again Address: PUNDIT |

Cruise Ships calling at Barbados |
during the,year. A tray made of |

rg —— @ a ge be made
local woods was presented to the TABORE, (Dept. 213-D)}, Upper Forjett |

THESE ARE ALL NEW ARRIVALS


























































ittee, was responsible for ¢ ;
Seen ane Display vat The Pueigte a snre ee May I take tine opportunity ta | street, Bombay 20, India, Postage to India | DOWDING FSTATES & TRADING CO. LTD, BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS
Colonial Office Display “Window war scheduled flights to Barbados. |“S*,,%°4, 10. be — ee 2S99999S9999599S9S9605 5%, ——— — sormraneetiainieed
for the months of October and. “Necessary repairs and renova. {tend at the Parochial Buildings, | > % | pee <- eee
November, 1951. Further exhibits tions to the Information Bureau Cumberland Street, opposite St ss % | Seeeseosussssss SOSSSOSBO GO APPFOP OOO
of local handicraft were supplied pier Head, were carried out ee eet Sooner) ee FOR SALE ¥| CAVE SHEPHERD & co LTD
for the Barbados Stall at the ’ . |Monday next, June re > y | a .
British Industries Fair, 1952. As ‘a result of tie visit of Mr." burs OF am. an P.M.,/ §$ PROPERTY — Fairfield Lance Q} : ° ”
CANADA:—Representative Mt. Charles. Allmon to Barbados in |#"d give me your vote. . $$ Black Rock Enquire M. Smith ¥ | 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET
C. R. Stollmeyer, Trade Commis- January, 1951, .a.section of the|,, With many thanks, in anticipa- | X% Grace Hill School Gap, Spooner: %
sioner for the British West Indies, “National ‘Geographic Magazine’ |ton, aie , S aceite =
British Guiana and The Bahamas, March 1952 issue;- containing a / remain, ¥ 22 PESOS SCCS GOSS >
37 Board of Trade Building, Mon- very well studied article support- | yours truly, { e
ttreal, Quebec. Advertisements ed by coloured and black and DAN F. BLACKETT. Hello’ Boye ane’ Gina f | POLED PODS OLSSSDOSSDODCLS LOSS SSDP ISI OEE
were placed in the ae white photographs taken: by the SS9SSG999S9S999598669656% C d D
newspapers and journals — Mon- author, was given to Barbados. ’ , i we | A n ance ; "
treal—“Star,” “La Presse’ Toron- There have been wélcome ex-|% . x ra ; W FOGARTY (B DOS)
to—"Star,” “Globe & Mail”; Ham- tensions and alterations to various % FOR SALE %| ll be given by THINK OF i In. :
ilton — “Spectator”; London — Hotels, Residential Clubs and | % S| Pee ee. re \ {
ancouver — “Sun”; “Canadian lishments being opened, thereby | $ ‘ 5 S| b Ra) Vp ag | ‘
Medical Association Journal”, adding attraction to the facilities | One Racing Bicycle % | Pe ee ae ee | THE FIT ‘j :
“L’Union Médicale” and the Can- which the Island has to offer to| % 3 | Teer TA coe ee. | Be
ada-West Indies Magazine”. the travelling publie: | $75.00 2 SanaAy Bit 1Pta PUBS ee .
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: _ The Barbados Hote? Association x | ADMISS?!0ON~ -o 2/+ AND oe ° : ;
~Representative The Wendell P. is to be congratulated on its for- Dictabie eames ie ee Dbaed. 2 Music by Mr. Perey Green's ORk . {Attention Tennis Players—
Colton Company, 122 East 42nd mation. can ARC WELDER ore attach. 9 | REFRESHMENTS ON SALE x ,
Street, New York 11, N.Y. Through The local press continues to give ments for soldering and brazing \& | §\} Don’t’ Miss it 8.6.52—3n. 1 %
this agency advertisements were its usual and much appreciated | & Rae 19th sul: ace Res >| % THINK OF $-
placed en York— Horeig co-operation, , ; x CAR: Pee ter ae hee % | x x i We have just opened
a pe, Bios: ay, eae Toorak Seen Pa ae % Garage, St. John 11.8.52—2n. % PODECPSSOSOSOOPOCOLY | THE PRICE % 4
mericé ; ston — ’ ris ommittee o e amber | ¢ | >
“Herald Traveller”, Christian Sci- of Commerce andthe Commis- Soseoeee eee, | 2
ence Monitor”; Baltimore—Sun”; sioner of Police in matters dealing WPSSS99SS999999599909 9H x EVERTON CLUB % é
Miami—"Herald”; Chicago— “Tes. with tourism is much ‘appreciated S REAI ESTAT % 1
une”; iladelphia —“Inquirer”’; by the Committee, y > |
Cleveland—“Plain Dealer”: Hart- V. C. GALE. x J E | ; The Committee & Members | d
ford — “Times”, ASTA News”, Acting Chairman, > ‘ ri : r % Everton
“Travel Agent”, “Travel Trade” JOAN KYSH. Edie Gee ce eee ee | In White, Red, Blue and Green
and “Holiday Magazine.” A Bar- Secretary. @. anida cs aa rare g | announce their : :
bados Window Display was placed : $ a A 3 ten tone bitiibal “a j
in various tourist agents and | $66s6ssesseseseses5000~ @ |S (1) Ao Pedvoom stone bungalow % |
transportation company windows ft i (2) Angther'S becseee tema ie! @ DANCE ¥ $7.00 per re-sirin ing
throughout the year. Exhibits of REALTORS LIMITED % called “Colleen” at Worthing %| x
local handicraft were also supplied % on the sea R ~ At QUEEN’S PARK HOUSE | ON LY
for display purposes in the U.S.A. % (3) A 4 bedroom stone bungalow » | %
News releases were prepared and OFFERS © 1 The home mene eee! S$ ¥ On Saturday Night, 21st June % | ™ ° >
issued to travel editors of news- os % rees House’ towether with 2% % o 1952 AT >
papers and magazines. THURCHILL a acres of land ust one mile | i F : . %
hrough the agency of these gure .betroans with. built. in ~ Hoa tack Wheeite Bevan ae : mare by yd Bd cot kd at +
Representatives information was COMM aathsa ree ne. Watet This property is suitable for com- ¥ | § rehestra : 15 Gl) NYL N (i x
. Din- a .
supplied to inquiries, literature igh Ragen CMG Gee eee mercial purposes, : aes M
distetputed and: contactesuacenciie two servants room?” cane aes thkdeet. dha ahove aud | SUBSCRIPTION: 2/- P, Cc S AFFEI & Cco., LTD. : 3
transportation companies, travel of way to Sea. A sound invest- compare prices and condi- % 5.5,52-— se , a :
agents etc,, in the interest of the |% ™°"% %° contact us now S tions. re | ‘ae TOP SCORERS IN TAILORING $6.50 per re-stringing
Committee. WYNDAL M4 D'ARCY A. SCOTT | :
VENEZUELA: The attention of Partly. 5 3 Auctioneer, % | $99996900990009999000%%
Bacnnome as a Louris resort was plaster Gn appiormnaty 0°00 % ; Middle Street, ¥ | ODSOSE &GPSSPODPDOPDS = - x
advertised in “Elite” Magazine, In square feet land, Situate at Rock- . 4
addition to the usual literature, San hs, Bus route and within & | oseoeosssesossososcsos® & FILM SHOW 3 % .
folders in Spanish were suppliea | % famous Rockiey Beach vine % at | ;
for distribution. The Committee reasonably priced, THE BARBADOS | ) 1 ‘
AQUATIC CLUB : mM. I (B DOS) .
(Local and Visiting <4
C AGREL. HEeet feet of land. Situate just off Rock- Members) ~
5 t a a . 8G ?
island in Veo ree Carrettg and sommes COLORADO EES LOO SOV OPEV CLO
ADVERTISING LITERATURE: magnificent view unobstructed to

the sea, Comprising three bed-
rooms, drawing and dining room,
kitchen, ‘lovely tiled toilet and
bath.

New Booklets, Hotel, Residential
Club and Guest House Leaflets,
places of Interest Leaflets, Shop-

‘| CLERKS’ UNION

0 A FEES SS SFOS SS

-

room at 8,30 p.m. on Wed-
nesday, 18th June,

ping Guides, Memo Greeting The Programme includes:

Laas. 0 POLOSOOOOTIS)

TUL

Downstairs Garage, servants
Cards and Bus Time Tables were %$ 1ooms. with Bath and. Toilet, Y.M.CA. HALL British News, and the short
issued. Fares of Hired Cars and | and quite’ enough room = for | Films,

POSSESSES OSO POSS PPPS OS

whatever you may require “Shipping”

and
“Criminal Justice’
also a Colour Cartoon
(Members are cordially
invited)
No Admission Charge
15.6.52—3n.

Exchange Rate Sheets were also

issued, + on Monday, 16th June,

at 5 p.m.
A GENERAL MEETING
y will be held
5 | AGENDA

SWEET FIELD

Lovely Stone House, comprising
upstairs three bedrooin
living room, dining roor
and baths, one with ub bath
and hot and cold water, gallery
Downstairs, spare reorns, kitchen
and shower'room. Standing on

or

Advertising Photography
During the year the Committee |
supplied, both locally and through | }
their Representatives abroad, free |
use of photographic enlargements

large
2 toilets











»

x

.
By Courtesy of the Brit-
ish Council there will be a
FILM SHOW in the Ball-

>





BOSCSS
s


















‘, ~
> r approximately 24 Acres of land § ; . TAPS & DIES
to transportation companies, travel about 100 yards from Gibbs Beach. § | . To discuss proposed 59%0SS60696000960000" % | r
agents, en etc., for display |} (spection by appointment only. ¥ changes in Shops’ Clos- + \ | PIPE
purposes and reproduction. Addi- | S P , ing Order. ( jn ae ae ” ¢ "0 ” "on 2”
tional negatives were added to the CAFS STAINS GOSTAGE S| To. di change: ! My", Val, Ye"; e", 0", 4%, He", 1", 1%0", Vee Ss
Committee’s stock of photographs A lovely cottage standing on 2 | ° Sep gery changes in |
ee ' Poods 27 Perches of land, situate ¢ Shops Act. | BSF
Statistics $ at St. Jamies Coast, having its own To receive names three ANNUAL Mth 2 IY bw ae aw age ge ” we
Thete ‘was a considerable in: |@ private bathing. Comprising tice Of whom Will be selects 6", Pe”, Ya", ote”, 0, ta”, Y0", at”, 0”, Ye




ed by Executive Com-
mittee to serve on
Wages Board for com-
ing two years.

toilet to main bedroom, drawing
2? and dining room, European Bath
and Toilet, with hot and cold
running water, modern up-to-date








BARN DANCE

in gid of

SAE or NF
’ %”, res "a", fos 5e”, %”




”



a



Schoorers Bring





: fae cere en ee Accept names for mem- . USS or NC
Coal, Rice, Copra ; ee Y. M. P. C. SM", Fe”, He", Te”, 2”, ah”, 6”, 4”
9 9 Pp LAND Any Other Business. ) | | iG 5 1

Near Upton Plantation: guaran- Due to the nature of the CRICKET SECTION




ENGINEER B.P. HAMMERS
Yalb., %41b., 1“lb., 1941b., 242lb., 3lb.

3 FILES

teed Electric Light




The schooner Lydia Adina, 41% siness i
sana ene Oe ae eile business to be discussed

At CLUB HOUSE,
Beckles Rd.

On JULY 5th

Near the St. James Coast.

is indebted to British West Indian ? N |
Airways Limited for their willing PUTER Ow | BARBADOS
co-operation with the distribution On approximately 19,000 square | |




yesterday morning from St. Vine Members and Non Members



Near the Rockley Golf Club are asked t make a special

effort to attend,



cent. She brought 100 tons of | ,

























M'
coal and 126 bags of copra. See gr % ery 2 ,
One hundred and fiags of char- REALTORS Li : d Non Members are welcome Music by the Caribbean © FLAT, ROUND, HALF ROUND, SQUARE
coal and 2,000 bags of rice were Imite ’ 3 y Troubadours the Zippiest 2 nes 5 . Mi
brought by the schooner Franklyn to hear the discussion but Band in the Land ° - ice $ HIGH SPEED GRINDING MACHINES
D.R. which came from British Peete may not take any active HIGH SPEED TWIST DRILLS
Guiana. She also brought 30 tons sae part. | Dancing 9 p.m, To 3 am. WS +H § ¢ s
of firewood, and 34 bunches of Sana ; Merchant Tailors BODY REPAIR FLEXIBLE FILES
a Sraiecectes. ABL/ARA Mpebuesks: Steet CHAS. THOMAS, | ny : ‘ “pa i
“Both schooners are consigned President. Ue pnnennnniedie a || OPEN & BOX SPANNERS
to the Schooner Owners’ Associa~ aa ae | Ce Cee a ay weriivrvirnitie,|% PRESSURE GAUGES 0-400 Ib.
ion. ‘ . e
%,
~
1y s
‘ HE'S ‘i ECKSTEIN BROTHERS
>
MY BRIDE THNKS WHEN I DO CARD TRICKS, BUT x % ees
THESE MUSCLE GUYS ARE $ VV ELL %
%



Axt_WARD 8 MATERIAL: a
TASTELESS
eee ~~ i

>
IF YOU AIN'T GOT ONE, 7 7 t\ SHE'LL GO OUT IN *WOW” FINISH™PULLING THE $ > ON
PEOPL HALL CLOSET iy .
HE = er AND RP HS COAT % ,
%
¢ ,
% THE WAY

TO BECOMING
A FUTURE
STRONG MAN

HE TAKES HIS NOURISHMENT AND HE TAKES
HIS FERROL, AND EVERYONE KNOWS THAT
FERROL BUILDS STURDY YOUNGSTERS

FERROL |

THE WORLD'S BEST TONIC

BOLTS & NUTS \” & ©.” diameter

CARRIAGE BOLTS & NUTS 5/16” & 39”
GRINDSTONES 2’ diameter x 6”
FERROCRETE Rapid-Hardening CEMENT
WHITE SNOWCRETE CEMENT

' RED & BUFF COLORCRETE CEMENT

MUTPETIVE — TORIC —S Tumi Ane?

We Offer....
EXPANDED METAL SHEETS
1” mesh 4 x 8 Iron
2” mesh 4 x 10 Tron
3° mesh 4 x 10’ Tron
%4” mesh 4 x 8’ Galvanised

PEEPS OTE SOFC LLL EAE MY

$565, OOh ee

Phone 4267

Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd.



Pre

oe

|
|
Ex? THANX ANDA TIP OF |
|
'

THE HATLO HAT 7D

We MRS .GRETTA GOULD,
SALT LAKE City |
UTAH ee

Sf AeA GMO A Ms eA? Smcagn er

oOo

*

%

%

.

%

*
BOYS WILL GO ONA TEAR! %&
*

| 5
*

%

%

.

x

%

4

\



PRLELEPEER PLOT PVSPPOTIOKES & BRIOE LTD. “AGENTS 9964956090995"







PAGE SIXTEi N

0000606 %.
i

9.Od-9-d-3-2-3-

9 nad9ooooe

$OOO-09909504944 pg

$0O6006

oe

acai
993-96

99949499000000500009S

94409400064,40996S95 13404936.

399904494 964904O909.9.599595000000000900000 99 001 9H

4 946.0064

54940O906SO

56990009O9O5999O42OO504SOODD OG 9 DIG 94H 48

3 $9949949$5900064



GPF PHOPLDDDE OSOY-PPD ODDO POPOOOGOH OOS HPP DOGS OOS GS



TRY KOLA AND VANILLA
ICE CREAM

~~ OR

ORANGE WITH PINE
i ALSO
~~ 5 WONDERFUL WAY TO GET
.
THE KIDDIES TO DRINK MILK
aa

=~







___ SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, JUNE 15, 1952
~* QPLOP DSL DEL DD PDD DO POOP DOD LOE OL Do H-0-DDO0- 0-

a eet a Eee een
PLD PDOP OOD OP DOP PPO VO CDDP P DPE POPP OL GIOE-G HDD PIDDTS OPO VIG DP PIO

ALL OVER BARBADOS
ou will find...

Quay:

«
*

@ODO-O-8-O-8

BOOP PEDIHIEEDO TS

$9-000060%

BEVERAGES

$44-24-06SSO444G4 24

POPULAR WHEREVER YOU GO.

THERE ARE 1.369 DEALER OUTLETS FROM WHICH

Q\1eG

BEVERAGES

09 $-S 259 ODO460OGSOHOGOLGHE

ARE RETAILED.

nn g
~~ AT WORK Gow
A ° Peter i
——I™ ih e) rn 4
loam e ay
Tw



BOTTLED BY

BOUTLERS








DELIVERING FROM OUR PLANT TO
WHOLESALE CUSTOMERS ALL OVER
. THE ISLAND



of

Delicious Flavours

£60444 90OO50O40O0509O09O0O4490000F 009004 BX

Oe ee, j :
== = we $

owen
KOLA CHAMPAGNE anmtbe $
no ¢
CREAM SODA ae
Noe >
ORANGE i
OQ >
Py $
NN .
i :
ODN 2
a ae P

mn
id
COOLERS & TUBS —~— :
oe
On Loan Free-of-Charge NIN

PIN ®
For Special Occasions Ai lata 3
y

Phone 1761 a 5058

OO-9.9-006

99990-9O9494 19-9990OGO4O40-0-8

DF 29-00H5404HOO4.00-8

(Barbados) LIMITED.

,



Full Text

PAGE 1

Sl'MBAY. JUNE IS. US? SCNDAf ADVOCATE i-\(.i i ivi: \ SCOREBOARD M CUIlli.l -If l l l l l ll l l I. Mi HMW> PMHi i-oijt* ri m innings n *sa.iaa aaaaata riM UHM. 'Far %  Maa* II. i' n.ii..w s K K Waic.i < %  Hum.. •> \i,. 1,4 K W Or.,,1 i'edstka t ? .'• D, Kr — '—• :• ftss 3.V51' F imiih i b >• i. aim im* %  I A V Wlllli T %  • C? • ^ Visitor* To B 9 do* India Scores Innings Victory Over Ireland llutton Hits Fourth Century Of Season (From Our Own (*urrepondent> LONDON. Jun Mj tram T*tr I %  I March I Boyai Rat. *> %  c—ad. P-.rr HM Pa •. I^M I M~M o( int. a 17 ;"" in tnada. the amiNinl <* ** 00 INI represents ..nexpended advertising In Cmcar !• if*** JUNI 15 NO. 228 The Topic of Last Week r-u^-,.,. „ .. Bate im-'.-mra .u.v pla\ in iwo countv nwitihr* iixi ^ ran taken into a..-ouni : „./ W country batsmen •nj.yed th.IJrSSSi .1 ., %  A V Wil <•• l.adai I.-.MHH i Fall of i M. 6 lot 7 114 a 1. 1 HOW i JM, in -i raw MM Hart*. AO-lav D* • r.,.i.„ C Grant Itit wk.-i L E Alklnaon J A C llulaon b D AiI Hun) %  E.rln b N \lar*hall M Wek-h b N Mar-hall E. SlwatKrg b D Aikm.n J E Farmer E Alklnaon b D AlhhMM R 91 C RHttr li E Alkln.i.n N O. Wllkle I. K AlklriMMl J O. Out ram not gut Extra* IOWLIM, ANA! VSIv M. Worm, to L F lla.i F Tudor not out < %  smith b L F Har iA T.-lal (for I wkU< Ta o( I I I ri< i'.i. i, ,, i \KI IMV fir KWICK I.I Irn.ns rarlUa lit I .K GreenldBe to I but >t?lv„ and England players Sheppard and Mav led Ov was n itcorded their fourth caanuriei of Uje season against Sussex Sheppurd made 104 and May who is undefeated, lias hit the 16 fours li tu* IN Another century maker was Tom Gravenry of (ilmice* tr who teached 104 out ofl 345 for 5 declared "n> was > KTts: ,nSl\.u-klM.m and Cannine* of Hampshire bowled • %  harmed, .ipart from one over 10 Northenla In two hour* (or 61 Cannlnas at one itate lnok row wieketl with'-ut a run betnir .; fm U BEBlawieMn "* i T .,.. .. ,"only ajMnjili u nn a e .ot W.? .„,, ,• 1 ",he"c-;,'..iu.; M 'of Maarl e Pompkln raved UW| % „,„, , a MoMr!l „ „.„„,,. w V eighlliftin^ A^MM*. Elects Officers \iIVedcbe \iilit i a ieeloeted Prcrtdent r>f The Amateur WcurhiliC ..r Barb.-<4oh when Ibe AaiocuiUoii hiti its fli-st Aniiuul General Meeting during (he week Mr Kdwtn Ron?is and Mi J liulU-ti vtsw.' % %  I \ u->'-PTenldent" W Teachi acted on M.C at thr varluir b> the A".x-laiiot n'-t'lct-led Seeretary whilf John Manhall .i-. mad.A.ill •' %  Annual Grant merit %  nnoal B,IIJIICC Sheet and \r countv ki I Bevenui k Kxndlluu I iUov i %  si:I %  I %  •i ,iii i* n • Ddad %  %  • lot idvectlaaiid pubwClt) puiposes. rice Stptomr-r lit IBM %  ,.., ,,( u B ind Venirrenci i>roughf to the On Pace 15 fT IS OF! bN SUKI'kI.SIM bow quick!? backaUk— kunbasu. rhtumaiK palna UH! urioar* (rgub!a due lu Impunnci ID IB Mood %  '.e^jent muka. I>oao'iH4KtechaK..i "nruj I>appT rcttaf by u ciraiuc dM kuiMv tutaai and to itunuknna ihclr acctoa > uu cao rcry upon thai i i-.nwn dturnJc aod uraaary OCWtpta. Many ihouMnda of and women ha*f >tihed >o (he good health %  ey hBTC rmincd by uuud| loaa'a Pilla. I ; Chai>ai.-r c warda I B WtllWni M, B."LAK. < npe, Trott.r b Kd %  f 1 li Moad Birk.ll i W I... O Dt C Sat) t %  fcaafcard C Orant U D .( oe I W Marvii„ii UK %  i> KntaM^ ii rnatai E. L O Hoad Jnr H CM b %  I. O H.—I Jnr (i Mo*l I O llvad Jnj aved Leleester complete rotlanae aaalnit Mmth alarnoraen Test all-rounder Watki,i^irr* of his career with The tndt.tn touHehl -wored an t-:y Innincs victor) In 'he nril of 'heir twn-dnv gamewith leeuvna bttn Srtirehoard Middlesex vt, Vorkihire—-York0 Holder 1 Officer' S Itnddri Fall of wirhef b D. Al*W> W ^i* %  *** iW* BOWI.INC ANAI-VS1R ate bovtl MG ANALYSIS kt 10 Ed*arda I. U Head Jnr II • I .... ,i.. a.a t I %  load I U.rk.t: 1 — ri'k-irk >• laalaf E Troiiat not out Edwardi not oui BOWI.IN'G ANALYSIS YESTERDAYS CRICKET • Froaa Paga 4 da* Lodge full for 96 in their Ural five balls and took two for 32 The innings and soon after lunch wen rimjiiiing two wicketwen :ll out aeain for IM by Joey areenidge and Edwards for 98 and 68 respectively. With ton minutes left for play, 1'ukwiik opened theti second bind Edwards. A. is dropped by Wpn s in slips. At the em wea elfht not out ...„ %  308 for 6; Hulton 1S1 Surrev VS. Essex—Surres (or 1 declared. Constable •• Kasex 27 lor 2 Glamorgan vs Leicester--Lai. ester 107. Glamorgan 116 tor 3 Haanpahlrt va N..rthanu Northanti 67 Hampshire IS* '"Sussex vs Cambridge Unlvorsitv—Cambndgi 322 for 2. %  ershire vs. Gloucesler Glouceater MS tor S decLaveeVJnmett SO. Graveney 104 Worcaaler 14 for 0. Oxford University Warwick l&S for 1. India beat Ireland by an inning* und nine runs—India WM h eland 126 nnd 169; Slunde B Lancashm VI Sonieraol Mad otta v( Derb> no play beenuae of rain. On the Ar*t day of ttte match, i ,uening bal Norman Manhall %  Will. Denis A^""". 1 with N. G Proverb* eontnbuiins' Warwick Afiw U-ing re QaQCtad. Mr > iller thanked members. He sai't tint the A'soclatlon had got off to "' Hi* task was not an ill eie was alwajl hapii to be among the -ctiMhftlng He ir.>mied to conin his lies) for the Aciatioti. No date we* hxeo for the 8e%  .r f'h.inipionships lut it Is like l to take ilnee in August. Th t'.ur to Trinidad has been flxeu fi r Ihe middle of September The N'nlor Champtonahips this year fill tke Ihe fiirtti of .m ellmrhe arinneri v. ill be aeI..-I.-.1 to visit Tnnklad All Itfte are training very riard in preI -ration for this competition rat uendaUon will soon be f .iking preparations to lour the viriuua parMic* | n an effort to rente more interest in weightI ing Listcning Hours COMMONWKALTH PLAY HIGHLAND Tha "ollowinjt will icpresent e Commonwealth Sports Club ..-morrow and next Bunda] i .mist Ihalilaiul C C .it High ind, St Thomas -J I ''a-, J Lotde, I llrerrton. K cfc-B* BtC Hlaeklan, it Dowaea C Parrls, I. ;.. days 1 .ration. JI-HI is a it i i Hadletgtv* • ; uhild, v. BWIIapla.nr > .-iriad* vi O K Cola I r u Et-rraladr itxv la a ii. pi . %  mlwtdar v> lliahiand im p m rif Ntwi. 4 10 y H l |. !" For TVI pm Sunday Hall Hour > ue pm nptiwr Ot ITU Wank, S-ll p in Variety idta.. Sir u .. IrtBUafe M.a.i.. %  %  . %  -,..-. i %  I ao v m Tna N — Ni- irimi iSiitaiii llnnu. al". %  .tflaito i i i a a oK Calf BallaplalBi Ua ipoi arly downfall were Erie Atkinson. Ileriis Atkinson and Norman Mm shall. On the ilrst day Erie A i. eels for 15 runs in %  van, Denli three fm I •vers and Marshall two for 27 in 9 overs Yesterday Marshall and u\MHi:ii:Wanderera lodge 6 and ^ a inn ? ivaiciu.1} imi oii-ii >•><. ,LOUQK, I>ents Atkinson took two WaCket I*for the respective amounts of 23. iu and 25 and Erie took one for IS In six overs. L. St, Hill also canWaialen % %  sccure-i an innings turwl two wickets for 23 runs In Victory over [>KIKC School by 4 his 7 S nvci %  o'clock yesterday, the second dav The wicket was good, but the Of their scheduled three-day flrgl Lodge boys hud no answer for the Division i i icket match at Lodge cmiccntrnled attack of the WanSchool. Wanderers had amassed a derers bowlers The bowlers juat hurricane 323 on the first day and had u mastery over the batsmen by the end of trtn' day'* play had and all along it was only a matter sent back seven Lodge batamen to of time before the defeat would the pavilion for 83 runs. Yesteroccur. Succcasful Bowler The Lodge"! most luceesaful %  •wler was G Wllk.c who took' v* rot 70 In M aval T The best scorers tor Lodge in, innings were L Mur-. i) ill II. Welch II and G. Stoiitc.; r. Shepherd. J Farmer and J. G t Mitram 10 each. Yesterday Murray showed hlmsteady bat when he kept ,.iol when hli team was In the %  of defeat and managed l", uster 2S at number fi Then spinner Wilkie stuck tr 1 ,,'i: i naay i-L lu lrtli.dt I Caillibaan Vuhaa. 7 *>• ( iarviea. Its p in h.-iio Ne-. .• Kun. a |i m S SI pm From Tha E.lll.ri.l. BrBJab Coo f fl U i<" ^J. *. Talk |. t Bit.I. In Hlrtu., And I MONKW It M IS I — I II IB Id I .1. ;:; %  Tha Nfi I : %  p.m rVfl Th. n.. rii. %  .'ii1*1 p m K-'.ni W—.I tn Bouvenlra m i.i.y 111 pm Tli. %  Round-ue ni Prearamne l'4iad<1i pi. Ttv \fT.. T II pm M r Nr*.< IS — v M in practice when he sjruck up quick 26 at number 9. He renu-sj i irlv takes a go at the ball whei Ins team iin difficulty, though he" l • best in the role of spin bowlei i!^^I^J !" A'^ffilS%-^&Vlii^-&65B, ijj-.roundm In n f.-w P~„ time xsvrtef&ttS Wj^^gpAm j^-ja^f^a-a*. re Suna* Btiujeo •nil Arranl'i %  n Haain N".K/n.| a V pa s.„... a . y • %  lam From The Edilonat-. ao %  WirakarU Mill" • %  -7-ir.l-i.laa _._ .. llurbiMxt \i ot AIN MILUOHS Of UMUa ojra. with identifi. finding, (not I t-JfV I %  iMii ^CLEANS YOUR TEETH H ^^ v CLEANS YOUR BREATH) '^^ v HELPS PREVENT DECAY; \ljw£ always krvsh fm la-aHa rl*hl oifler i.i-if wlta> C01GATE DINTAL CREAM Whether you arc coma IcKing; or simply oasd a I. tall). -l.ulMl.ig IOI11-. 11 AS i PIIOS u the aaearei to jour ptoblrm Vitamin* and minrrali combined it> | YEAST-PHOS BM your key (O good health n Mobiloil WINS Again AMEKKAS GREATEST SPEED CLASSK-1952 INDIANAPOLIS M MILE RAIL TROY KUTTMAS—Winner. hn ... i..^..l a lUtffclag l2- MPH lor Mil n..n-M..p milev—A new ..II tkBa r...-.,rd l..r thr moM |llBI| Kc in Ihe world—KITTMAVS Acajnin Special" was prolacled wilh Ml lllllllll—Ihe rat] an Mllllll.oll. sold in Burbad... h. tinleiidin,; (.araiiea and Service Slallon. lor %  louuli |iunihini; r.n e. or lor ordinary drivini:. hu. til.Inn-.I i-iiiiini|.roleellon. INSIST ON Mobiloil GARDINER AUSTIN CO.. LTD.—A(ila ' ITCHING INFLAMED SKIN P! R ataatlcaa ataiof -osaaad by raraae aadV. UM SBK aaaaea* drnlopa into imianm I'-g'r aad epea aorta antfaa dweac-t Thaiiaaarti a** akin aufl-rrr* ba* pea*' 1 ^ ihat ukara M aothiag aaara sam la reauln ibnDDD Preacnpuaa I b fam-aia liquid kaaJtr gaw peeetraia Iha Urftjnd Uua uaaaaa, ana** (I(eKenag ">• and JrlT oal UM if.fe.tkm Whateref fc>r a* tkkt oeabla M grnag TOO pain and d.RCZRMA, PSORIASIS. BOII.t FUfPTIONS, PBKKI V HEAT. StAlJVRIA SORr!. w aiNOVOKM laat a fee appUo.Ooa of •oaderfu D.D-D PfaSCTtpiwr. wUl giaa atai d tea•rlU be kkMaag' T) O II PmxripUnB n >oaaioabla from -aeantfi ar..l atorai r-arr-b-r. Otar i*aaa w I I a Armtroo| Ltd Brldgai')*TaUBT V1TF/' la the Onlf pain nil.. %  Log the valuable tonic Vluunin Bi When you tAka YEASTVITF. TableiH. flrat comi>K pain, relief — an end to throbbing h


PAGE 1

P ,0.1 FOl'BTCI S ^1 Mi 1\ lUVOCAil slMttAV JUNE IS. IM2 CLASSIFIED ADS. trifPHGHr 2501 DIFI> I > I W Road. HI Michael, lo-day -1 W..1I, • i rm mi RAW V.ik M v" ikM '-PI It S THANKS \l i i ,\i w* bag. ii m., .m lo r.lum ..i>fc. in all Ihoae kint IMrnBr who aerl wreath, or >n aniatariy In nu %  •rant ii -rd by I" 1 .,.., ,. i ;NH A % %  Weath-r tamtly It t UIn | II.-Ill 'glWd PC through thia medium ihiw kind friend* who M-IU wr**a*i in any w* rxpreaaed Bret* ompalhy in our TI irnl bfi'ivmuni ...itcd bIti death i.l Llian Coaaou. lt *a*lord Miarrdford .broth r i -Lilian Rrantnid-Ho naatrKc In*. Millar. ....•nd. I OH SALE AUTOMOTIVE Frm.ir (itlKU I'l III M SALES CAB 7-.pr.yr CM In 4 an. done ant) UN HI wile,i K M • •da* supar D alra* % %  %  ily .nfl ownrr-drlvm Ml.*" Dial 1MSJIn %  n ing CAB Vauahall Vto. Iitl.e uwd wocr-drlven. flood at new Dial 441B HJ.M Ml J ... (I Stl....!.-,..: %  |*rlxl running order. MAEFE. Co. Lid phon* r IAROne •] • %  . .1 .... X,. .M. la. I i rind Drive Daddji I ai ic Cearn opoiltari Garage Phone JUS i\—in %  -. I %  us**i IlMBh 'rEdith E .1 I %  profound nit.iucir I.. %  aldemtc lllren .RHIIIH-rM Orimlr, laml.y w dt M appreciation moml Btneen idiirn Thank' In All wl.it oltCnd*d 1 %  ipi.oeied aaa •***•** on Iha uastng %  ' rath poM late of Hum Hail Yard. Ht Michael I '.nmih i arm I Blanch* Grlrl (.-low Nunc Joan E Griffith igrar CAR—One IN* Blandard Cai U i aand workm*: order aim ir*V Aoply lo V Qlbaon. Ovi Prior P..7S PlanUOon. DUl 14 a W In OLD NtkRIiooilAN "Him Th* annual general mealing of the OH ftncirn will be hld at Hart ..on Collage on Friday. Jnn SB. al S p m MMN Mhiiataa Serrvtary'* Report Appointment ol Offker* General iuaaaara 19 • U -•* NOTICE itlrena of n. United between the age* n( II and M t Barbadoa arr rqi>r'trd ( % %  i Anavtean Camulatr trotn Jill 31. IU tor HrlttXKe S.rvlfc Rr| undar lha Unlvaraal MlhUrv 1 Srrvlca Art All mala clllaani of in* UnlWd St.tr•ho allaln thr aa** u* IB .vaara aurtrquant to July SI. IBM. an raajulrnt D irglitrt upon thr day tnay attain 11M •ahUvnlh annlvpiaar* of Ate d* of Ihclr (mill, or wllhla %  >• 4aya iharcifiar ror (urUiaa inloranalion. conii.li Jp* Amarlcan tonmUw, Bddfalown. Barbadoa aVlin NOTICE THK PAHUB OF T. AMI Apfrttcallona will b.rx-ltH f..r t*..oil of Ca>r(ak<* al Iha plitiir B.1II1. Bettaplaln*, Salary Nit par wrrl l>. ir.. %  Walkaia. Lakaa. or IhiliUli C. A. SKINNMt CWrk CoanmlBBlonrra ol Hr.lm KEAI. ESTATE AUCTION Y AUCII"-. 1 1. 1 in \KkM BY a,.trurtao-a raaaryad a| rt,fnp. of I YEAJU Or f X'r'.lill.*.Cl AI.Hi) ,, HVHAY AHHUAD ntit (aalW, Ka> ano Baatt I iaM ETC %  I.AHCINO PROM i Hi "1 CHAIIT I VOU 1 win AMY HEAL rjp.srHVlM. CAlffl %  %  "ATI1FAC%  Q -01 ivE Book caa> all In |ilU>| and <^har Tablaa, foldJi* BM— AppllcanU til %  real T pr. %  %  nh badfak ,1. oil atova %  knaar M1.n1>' laaajoaM IUM— Mar. CM rt. aad a k ol ra*;l • •"r All. ill" M.KKNT.IR. HB SHIPPING NOTICES ••NDER THE IVORY HAMMER matmrllona r-...,rd from lh Cmannl I will asi .1 "Wakafwld Rd. M Pllday Jun* BMh; MJ* Auatin Van in perfrtl trdor Rraaon for •afltol. mn ii ad *ft.l b* aold. Trmt CAR r..rd Conaul lb 1.1 >d 11 %  < m and dona o 'Ira-Hi lor aalMlafl OWrk n England. Can ba aa-r I .-.witacl Mr in pr''"' .oao riilr. ,.,w rraldlna %  M,-....nr. '. E. Clarta .All l-ixiioulM 1M ,L"n. no rri.annalilr 1 TriKk IBM* Chavmial %  ood rondl .,-1 ... %  .! ,ondl%  •lliii wrrathi . bad 1 • %  I) irrdrrrd I ,., %  • Haaidanm Road My ArtIn l*-l I 1 Advaraie. Al HiililliM, Mils NO Pacing jar*. Rtgv a Badmom Bung*.. . Vm a It r.f.mg Under KtMO Id lor Almoil -n Uxmu .-, Itr. I %  % %  'in n v .1. Uggaj or Real KaLate Al Bough", n fiHCTX!T (JBIPFII H Auriioo.. llgM I ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. Ill is.. FIOM BL'ROPB X %  *Or*A!RE. nth Jun* UBL J f* mjfniK, Jltri Jung. '|U J S HPSTTA. 4(h JJy ItU -111 is,. i„ uiuri -I S WMJJLM9TAD ITth Juna lkgf -AU4RU TO TRINIDAD. PARAMARIBO AttD BRITISH O0IAHA 1 s Naator Mih J un l#ag M 1 BONAIMB. Sth Jun*. 1M H S. ITKNTOR. Uih July. HH. >UUNO TO TRIMMJAB AMD I I MACAO %  -1 I1L9T1A. Hat Jury 1MJ F Ml --os BOM • CO.. LTD T*i* M V "CACbQUV TJMMI. CAR;HE will -i-ept Ora and n"—.' lo. 81 Lucia. IT Wncanl. Grenada and Anib*. Sailing TU*aday ITUj inaL Tka f V CARIMUBCir•ft! accept Cargo and Faiaangara (•a DornfMca, AnUgwa. Moalagrrat K*vt> and 81 KRta. Mailing Frkda. IMh Inat TV HV % %  MOJOItA" w.H accept Cargo .nd Paaaaglgara or imiiiiiKi. Ai.ligua. Mdi.laertat. NvBi aad at KBIa. tailing Miday fTlh mat rl W 1 IMIOOMM OMNIRI' ABBOCIATIOB laMO.) OigaJgBai Tato. Ma. gari (Canadian National Steamships TO-DAY'S NEWS M \MI IBK HOBkRMAN ft YEAR BOOK TBHl BTRI OULB I OB l HOPE •.'.I JORNHON • DlAIIOklRI "Tbv— araajf laut e.U. .( %  ..,„ •tAMi LOtKulooking for are al JOHNSON'S HAKDWAIE br ill kind. %  1.1..1 rn m mm larrtakee Fa* Parnieln* %  ..,! %  '* % % %  *l Andrr' 1 and nflarnnon en I 00 n s vj KLECTK1LAI. IIOtpAinK ,.-. 5-.-..HKOanaral ft 1aw Eleetnc FrlgHr.PRlOKHATOB — 00a n,|,igeiat..r Karoaena oil diiion itiona arai I har-trR-al Engtnrata. Eiujli.h Blectrlc. 1 „!! Condl, go-rantea Call 11 • 81—In VI I'AITfRV SMT^ Jiial a law left PTPI" RADIO EWTORfUM. Na. lul 1 TM. dTA' TI10 aitoV'Nl* M.OOR of lh Paro,1,1a! HuUdH.g1-Ikrlled lo Hh Iha letie" IVMva> and Iha he through 1'ic la Boutharn Ei.l HOUSES • mmriiF BTaatwell 1.1" ra* %  nthImm Iti Annual. Kuliy lr lined. tl ogr monm l,.>r_Blia MtKillT VIRW. Prmpert :i all i-nnvenietM-a. I ueoi.~ balhuig. hu. t\ •• Appl) 11.11 M>. Ch Cn '1'idge Rnadi %  H.H , 1 ly. M'li--ISHi;i> IAIiTMr-NT with dHout board Applv lo XYZ 0.1 Tin 15 g 91Ml. %  l_WT*ncp Suitable la* %  hie Jun* llth Onward f Avail : n*o IM I f 1, %  : %  am up ., argle, ii ItVJ Tg)lat aid 1 U LlXTON-ilN'-^FA Mj.wrll CdaM ..had TtJaphon. Refnger. .1-. ii-. |.r I'hi.i.. 111,. ill it u in MAW OARDKH8 lull) tornlahad n.oden. M> poaUlon. July to Decambe* inrlu* Reeannablr lenl Piione IM BOOM .Ffom Julv 1*4 at the Mayfgli I. ill Bhop Suitable for O piower Hbep. Hairdreealng elc Appl* fall 1 1.. a p in 1 Flu KICM MI*. Wtl .irkay.. y< POULTRY br*ad< Rock. Blaek W f Baby oka. Paddock Gal 153 DOCKi KHAKI CAMI'nrill) lie Khaki Campbell.. I in a U ..ii a montha old MagnnVent MM 00 Mi mini-Ravk SI Phin J 3M LIVESTOCK COWR Two It" Cowa fre* I .i.v> r,xr -.11 toed gpya "id mil m.lWf* \OfNci COW Holaleln A Ayrdhlra -nilk .11 pi.. App 1 I %  %  I M" I t'oart. St Michael ,,, :(TM 15 %  'in MECHANICAL NOTICK nw 1 1 is FOR TBE VIHT1T Of TME PARIRR OP HAPfT MICH Al I Two peraoni having been nggBMWMtilt fnt Iha Vaairy of Saint Michael, a Poll Iha election of ONE will ba taken the Parochial Muildirf*. C'umberl.-iiid si real. Bridget-wry on aloaday nenl the lalli Inatanl beginning a*fwgan thr houTB of %  and • o clock in lb* moaning and < %  lining at p.m. Thr following POLLING I.l*' bava beeq UTdetaj*< under the pre ton* of Iha Ballot An in-. I r-.H.I isi. gTATION ir rlRMT P1XK>B of the I'.i.i -' I!mldina* B allotted to volrra ".-e IUI aa begin wtth the letter* "A" ta -F I >retire (lap. Chrl.t Church ton Hie tt*a> .landing on I Rooda It Perch. I Th* ho.iw I. bu.lt of atone and la at Bach Aal lalna drawing and dining room* and kitchenette down.lnlra. 1 bedroom* with Uiual convai*r*to will ba bv wa< ••I the da. ol %  %  the li.illd.nK r l. COLX, Sharlfl t RalurrUng Ortlcer HI 6 5t NOTICE PARIRH OF *T J •" I-1 %  AppBaaiiona far on* Hi Ve.irv KahlhltWti tenable at th* Lodge School win be received by the nt>der-iaiie.l up to 5 p.m. on Tucoday. 17th June. IBM Candidate* muat b* aona of Parl icau-ra In atrailaned cltcumitance-. 1 muat nol be kr*a than H 1 ycara 1 more than 14 year, of are on the tl>t June, Ittl, to be proved by a Baptismal CartJBeMd which muat accompany appllcalloi. Form. -4 appllaai.on can be obtained the Parochial Treasurer OIBce A T KING. CWrk. Bt Joaeph* Vaairy. 14 a .? m TME Ta the **adMar* k.iai.i .-i.ln HOOSB %  HI :i male Houa ltd ^ ...1 1. 375* ptkd %  araoi %  r%a will ba aal tor aalc an rax %  I : p at at oar Orac* fABRtNOTON • UFALY. Lucaa Street. HolMMtara UNDER THE DIAMOND RAMMER I —111 o**n inatr uriil by ono of the HinajiMM 10 .all ai Ma 11 High Streoi H Thuradai noal Ih* Iftt* at 1 p m ha tallowing 1— II ilieaa*-. I atdi > ,1-. jo com-. I %  • panK .., I Ual loat.. J wrd* i AiH UAjkCY A. SCOTT. AlKtloi-e' UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER ON TL'fsDAY nth by order ol Mr Caall* Wal.-'t wwill aeil bar Fumicure at "Anrhwav Houae" Navy Oat-iH.r, rludaa Ver-.re Oval Du .. g Tabl*. AnlMfue Wrlllng Buroau. UpngM and Uorrla Chain COffa* ond i" .enl Tablaa. T-blea. Cak* Stand lorn.-, and -•' %  • all tMar.-* r-dar Bonkl-*nY NaXaoM CANADLAbl CRtJIM-Jt a•nJ'ii^gKS? N,TKUC ""•.. t Jiiai it Jung JO Jun* 3) Junp Jg June JuJf> II July 14 July %  alia 14 Juna Aerlaaa aalte I'll It Juno M Juno July 3 July U July 13 Juav S July July Aartvaa Hall* Aartvaa BTgaa B'daa BL JAMBB L-U>Y RODNtCY i-ANADJAN CUALUTNOCR LADY NELSON CDM. I-RUISER 1 ANADIAM CONSTBUCTOI LADY RODNEY 13 Jun* U Juno • Jury 14 July N July — ft Juna Jury iB July July M July I Jury 11 July 1* July a July St July 1 Aug I Price .. L.I 1 S7 % %  l*Hul'll(T\' ...i Tw*edidc Road %  liop. Waler und light \-. 1 illed Appl> Joeeph SI Hill. Twn-d-tne Koad. 01 443T 10 (1 Sl-p.i hnrder* of City limlti. i-ge ali .,. with rawldance altachew A nags Oood lot Any umliiiiiiM peraon. lain, large ga ami iliiung r.-.ir... kiltliei. Iml*t and bath. Electnelty and waler mdailed. ITi.ilt aile or aale bv cumieillkm at F01 furtliei J*JB IM M— Jn. Arm-Chalra. Steel Chain. (..** carpet Rug*. PhillipRadio, Oarrod Automatic Record Change Parfeei rondRnn Single linr licit.t.-oai and Deep Bleep ira. Very bond Mahog Pieaa>et, Ducorwe Draaaing Table: Preaa. Su-.gte Iron Bed'tend. painted Ognt of Drawer* ar 1 Cheat. Rlppuugill 1 Burm >|l H1o\* and Oven. Kitchen Cabinet. un*r ElerliiiStove. Elec Kelt, -rd*, KiM.an Utenalti. Table, and Sale 11 10 o-ctoCk. TEPM1 CASH %  R\NKrr*. TIOTMAN CO.. \i:.II..liverOTONE WA1 I. DWaTLUNG HOUSE nth 4'JO aqiiarr leet 11 limd attached %  r.-li The writing ratal i.nuf room. wo bcdrooiiia. kite hen-lie. oaual con. I waler ii-.alaUed 1 1V "' jjSrtaTllBO .hove dwelling raBUM will he Wl BM n Mi J.mea Stieet. nn FTMU .lh Jun* .mil a. DOYCE. % %  i a Si—to TAKE NOW: lh,.l Wg Ihg Trvrlr. of th* above Plantation ar* about lo obtain a loan of CJ.tOD undar (he proviatona of th* above Act again* i(--Id Flaelathw. In rewpeef of the Agri lPggJ .ear ISM to IMS sfn m.inev haa he*n borrowed imdri |h* AtJFKultUTBl Aldi Acl. IBM. 01 the abovo Act uOVEK.NMEM NOTICE MIOBATION TO X'.B.A. All rfrtiniiiinn Worhi | rvbo %  1 %  I I %  > VM I. 1 rails report al QuconV Par*, on Tui-d.iy lasl the lOlh Juoa, BDd i rod fin .i*n1 11lt111.1l 1 rt.ji]<,>iii.TiT 1:1 I 1 1 S 1 this .vtar. are advised lu rcp<.i I MAIN STtiooi. ,.,„i JUNlOll 111. PAI'TMFNT will lh*M at i units D >• IBM. -I t JS a in I andldali. nnl he al Q*.ea. OelA*'Ad'rrnVTon"ctrd haa been aenl t.. the E<*minotion Should any o Iheae C-rdi be lo.l. will I date pleaw apply Immediately In Ihi %  rnlng ol me Eianiinatioi. The loi ol Bu c c c aa t ul nindid-le. w Ihe "Barbed %  ... 'lh ..t Idoa "-cord„.,, „., ^ % %  V, %  <""< EflTATB ii An imputing ^pac-om hom* .... unlal ruircaandlng*. cool location on heigh ti overlooking roan. Town S mil** WINDY UIIJA RatiTJUvYjirs HIU. Modern iton* bungalow with large llvlni room. 9 bedroom., kitchen, loltet and .hower. front varandah, detached garage and aervanf acccaMaaaMkaa. Appro,. UB , n. of arowwl emloaed by atone wall Cool poniioti with unob*>r.,el*d view Unreal rlled pu bl lc rarvlea*. COVE SPVJTNG HOUSE, ST JA lffa a. One of th* f*w properlie* on thla popular coart with a completely private and arc hided bathing beach The ground* of about IS acraa aro well wooded and could readily be converted the Inland The houie la of 1 %  toreya II. (.RAEMF. MALI. TERKACE illy built 1 Moray conatruclrd o( atone Offort in i*Sion ol £4.40 ... %  id*rcd Won'il coat rS.OOO phia ?\ prearnl building coat* BBA F-HTf ST JAl fully re-modciiiii J >1i on on* of thr mini Increaalngly i".p.ilcir area al coral rand t^acn and bathing Dining mom. lounge, verandah-, on both floor*. 3 bodroomi. dvtachrd garage and %  ervanu' quarter. All a**vlc*o NEW RUNG AleOW ROCKI EY — CoiiiinodiouB home wilh 3 badlargtliving room, wide H4.KIIVIK1S KltlTlsll WIST INIHI l -1 Mill't \|| t.lrll si milll. r>r


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r !• \<.i rwi i n SINI1AY ADVOCATE SUNDA1 n Ml If, US! The People Of Barbados — 10 ln in. miit.ii d ir i ..llI'Kllll \i v H. ... I UUl %  leri Our lawhi ur iNiwer -hall be firmly eattrted IM .| (11|I ,-,I — A i, lllU IllnV^wl in MM IH 'HUB. HB^J I tl Thru %  • prosperIKl lB.'U t>tl I H m parsed ,..... s declaring '•tl on the same scale its the ofl* %  %  slutes lhi.1 "An l<> which Ay hm led i* thai Iht Harbadn> Congregation Wtl smaller bg tw.n> !.. rwan) per ccnl. than the i London Congregation of Spanish rluguese Jews." (1) in the latter halt ol I iwnih rantury, Irs %  178a Vhal II subscription w;i ert ; i naar) fr>r the relief of the Sick pnor' The "llarbudtw Hern %  %  honour f;u b" l! foi lanl "f rule [III upon utmost in > II law hi I postal i> MI.'II (hat •'. iil fln.illv pi lilt AU.J : Ihe exact date of its are. ka bill it ik behoved lu have been about the qmaejofue the 2Bth of March ISIS The coat aw building was defrayed I the ninety influential Jew-, i ndcnt In the Island, air. Hart i on. %  Jeweller, was the moving %  inl in tta rebuilding, therefore, a following extract from the Larbodos Globe" of April 1st. 133 will be of interest—"It Ifl even feet high, and rel..ll> i. %  n the island, 3H of wnoi he eongregaticj fly 1873 the Congregation had dwindled ta meh BO escb I .inn f..i relief fi-.cn tnxat li'ld b\ tin Coftj irtTi ..n AM ..i peseed %  the Byi part] rrean para Ual '> 1BW the Congrega-1'"•>"" Biirtingliani Palme aj %  rasa i age it. ,1 I i M . ami Ir.Kii l.rvl it. U.*.. %  MIUII fortune in MM-, i ten aaaaa asm awaMad kaaai JI.U .1 lllr I'jhir I.uo, Prol" II* Oil... I MuvaUun: j Ii gUMRB. %  .:.< 1 dlU tOSj -li'vil the Wueen either dined out or <'.ivrd in her private apartments ii* Dart* IUII HMiwava %  nollin driMtlurr frM tradlliu i. I..I1..HUI, thr inrreal Weal i ml vnsae, .. breakfast af aaaa. agga *—i %  kaddaafc. wttftj lew and vwKtr. a erv.1 at I.M -vss Koyal rilm < i .i in 19M iigain .ii BuckQueen Victoria" i ifc rill-:... EIAIM.AIX IKMM ton siiiiro\i* OF NEW EXCITING VALUES hor carriage In I dacllaad to n or 18 In* %  "'"<•? {** dudlng women and children. the quadrangle. At the close of the 19th century So authentic was the scan* that and up to oil death in 1M5, the Palace servants old enough to al Trustee. M. •••"'en.ber the day when Quean E S. Daniels, conducted service m Victoria ""ended the ThanksgivlgOgU. hut at his death."": Service in St. Paul'* to mark the property and funds were verted in the late Mr. E. 1, Baez; ruble strength from M N Darnell Davis, C.M.G., iti Ung of the angles, which ms %  NotCfc on the History of the WOd" With large antique T( .^ ti n aib ^iog." published in ncers uniting a balustrated 1B0B slaW$ _-rhe Jews in Bari .rapot all round, the roof being bados jrf now a tm&b folk, numi.tth rlcvated as not to be per, wr i n|| w „rce half a do*en headed r.-ived. The windows arr lancel1(V lho Baesas." And fuither haped and laMefuiiy harmonise -when the late Rev. Daniels was 4th the proportions of the huild. ihv) hl rivlc ,. H „,od to be held | < %  %  %  tone step* „ 1( Synagogue every Saturday i the north side, covered with r MofKi. lead* to the gallery ted collectiveh and Ii by the HEWIIREW NATION: though I i if Darbado one hundradth pan of the property of the i land iin i The Jewiah Vaar Booh adflad -uh*tnntiatcd hv iMun death in ,19-15. and the appointment of no .... the whole of the exterior ,,„, ,„„, ^.,-vices are held only %  lightly tinged of stone-coloui. and Uie ppearance altogethi The Intel* the outer ipI • i ve u-n Mosaical scrools .lumiLs I he reader s desk in lh ArKi | n good preservation. But the Synagogue lacks a lion The Synagogi proptTtv remalnrd i .ting From Ihe ceiling is tusE £ BaMunll | abou a yMr b e,I,I, ,1 .... ii cornel infront of f hia death in IM4, wi •he gallery •• "\ngle brasji ehandeSynagogue and Its property i of elghl Ighl and m the ;,,, private individual _i festivals, by Mr. Joshua Baeza merchant, in Bridgetown. The "'f 11 Synagogue is open every Saturmorning for anyone wtM to go there to prav. but no one goes. The lamp Is always kept burning before the Ark. and 1 bobody of the adlnea %  n'.i. ttovated to give _. ; icuoie view ,.f the person offi!M2li all political rtlv rlatillg From Ihe ceiling is sus:ufflcon< utie <> %  similar kind .'tntalninii twanty-four The area the rnaadang la paved in alter1 lack and white irfah and the catling, painted in reliefs, piodu,. ing aOaet, "• waa trom the artistlike manner In which it i* exeeut' am the fhartenees of Its It n 1820--all ; the Javi i ( igi the othei inhabitants of '' were allowed to have who wn I should be levli-d upon ihciu Schomburgk dm corded in the /< with referetice to the i nil politic;.i disabilities In 180*.:. he slates "an act was Introducad in the local Legislature on tru lie IJbrar> .-lands the Monlefl. 22nd of February 183i. granting Fountain.' This fountain was the coloured populatlo iginally erected In Beckwith as the tahlta population." which S ssed the Mouse on the 28th of %  rch; he further states that a similar Act for the relief o) HI Majesty's subjl Jewish r< DOT mi tin ISth of M that both of thei provision was made In the deed that Ihe graves were no! to be ii. secreted It is fitting to end this scries with the words of the Rev Canon P A. Fnrtar, quoted In his article The Jews In Barbados. (B.M.H 5 Journal. Vol IX, No. S)—"although their ways were not ig Serv Diamond Jubilee could i-clicve thai %  this was Anna Neagle come to make a %  Ira The same old State coach % %  wiiiig thiough the same centra archway, drawn by the Windsor the Royal wearing just such %  i.lrndid liveries as in 1887 The escort KM provided b> real Mtkfter*. riding their ae. usinmed horsea—u nuggetiou made in the King, who did nol want the standard of horsenwnehlp to fall short. All morning the two princesses \. ..Tched from second-floor windows. Sometimes they leaned. i upon the window-sills. < ;ippcd In hand*. Then they would run to annthei window lb get .. l->tte, viewOld and new, false and true. iingled strangely that day. And and Its at tfte door of the Palace where sled in Mi. the real Queen Victoria had reigned so long, her great grandsoil's mnlds wRitsd to beg an autograph fiom the Queen Victoria of 1938. NEXT WEEK UOUIIM> .-it the Palace. I lie ng' guest who said "Old Crfterlns deserves a vote of taauafcs.'The AuaUSalUn hero who ran away. Tha Palace shelter Prinreos lllliabelh IramP. to drive but the King's sanction. tws in Barbadi. civil and polmttaw vrtvlte* wr nrnaUNt Ihem In England, as Civil DbMbfiltlea *Cl wns nol p I Us memoralje i. introducing I House of Commons to stand forward to : lens wen IDll b 00When I hundred th.mrad In arms on Blackhcat. th< I will lie %  furiated multltud I eomputed IO hold w yci the Jcwg of now days out three hundred persons^ of | ong a((0 in ,pi to n f the disITI the iquara opposite.ihe PubnhimlP! | mDaB ed on them showed the Christians of this land now / aad In the face of distressing odds. More than that, at a time w hen then In living, and a weakness In morality, thev by their compact and organized manner of Hie. set a bright example of p'cty. of reh'huslasm, and of the security and sanctity of family life (To be ronftntied) 1 Wllfird S Samuel in -KWVMW ot Ih* jpwi.h CSSMtW In IUr>*. In tn %  rf < isso' __ 2 Th Baitadlan Nwipi>Pr July Hh ise>Place, but was in 19t0 removed to 1U present site. In 1864. Mr. .lohn nlonteliote. a wealthy meml*r of the Jewish community. (whose son. Thomas Law Monte%  A of Trinity College. Cambridge, had been ordained as i: by lha inshop of ciouw . Al ' Uriston lu 1849). preacts received sented this mounmr-nt to the City. .Ladi es I uiion I'aDlirs — 2 £ f-r si.ta " kildreu'. t olion Paatfgftri • %  3 for >i • ;Liarns — ill -ii ,,i.. — ;t, and ap 'Flowered Spuiu — \m \> :• ,,£„ gi M lieorgrtten — Solid Shade. t and PL—fl.|J per yd. Mowerrd Silks (1.44 per vard IUU Pu.es to suit your 11 ifyle i" mil vour Pocket straw Bags — i.00 & M.iU New Styled I'eehrt Book. M.at & 4.H Naw Shoe* HulUCOtOUl White end at variou Prtci Hrn'k Amrilvaii \ estn — t far IIM While nock* — I lor fl.M Gasly Coloured Cocks — 1 far HIS Khaki Shirts — S3.M lluureree A Brill — SI.9S X t*>. -•perl Shirts — front $2 44 Men\ PUslk Bella — 80c. Shoes—Ufa per p-ir A up ,. , Spori >lurK -I r.U A l>rev> Shlrt> — *J-94, 4. 1 !5. Gray Flannel — $3.25 liarberdinr '. -hades — S3 72 per >d. SPEIMAL i \su wren GALVANISED PIPE SUITABLE FOR WATER OR HAS i" bore w % %  r up pi" ,. 2" IW" 3" i" .. 24c. per fool Stt Mc 5*c 7c M ISfc 1.7te BAKBADOS HAROWARE CO. 111). v.. Iii Swau Si. MM, 2I0S. SM I I I.I. -I.Mh III NVI.IIN IIOSlhKl lllll-Hllirs BI.ANKITS. SHUTS Ml .11 K.OH N-IIIKS AMI rBTTU *>*TS THE BARGAIN HOUSE 2702 30 SWAN STREET S. ALTMAN town, and was in the drinking fountain. It Is D gagVra and handsome f the tour Mden Is n mBTbW statue. repr-eiitinn Justice. Fortitude, Temind I'nidenee. with the • ultable Insi-rlptloiis: — ROADS AND BRIDGES lie A grant of 1:42.1100 fr Malosty's Government has bee "DO WRONG TO NONE ,.|.pi..\.-.i "I1 IXJOK TO THK END." le c-M of %  HE SOHEK-MIN'DKD" crtirneni buildings, roe 'TO HEAR is TO 1 ONgUER bridgaa. Th.rtmunlng mt. and the 1 ''""e cost '•ribud In Spain m tamed b) the local -For the benellt of wayfarei I ill be in-', fmin Jiinuucan luno This Drinking Fountain was A gronl of £80.000 from Her presented to the City of Hri.i-cMajesty's Governmi-m haalban .,,„, 1 roVOd t-iwards the cost of A.D. MDC'CCLXIV." ,....i Univi College levastation caused of the West Indies the hurricane of 1831, it is of reSUthi 11I1. —at.ll.I' Zephy r Six \ M.d cat lo know, a superb car to own, this new Zephyr Six'! Powerful, smart, super-fast, it comv hnu s .-II tlumost-wanted features in modern motoring; teatned-up with its sister-model, the 'Consul', the 'Zephyr SIN' brtnga 'Five-Stai' Motorinn to the roads of lha world. tTav H:\llHtS 111 Till: ZEPHYR SIX INCLUDE: V.Lean-heKl taglne (68 b.h.p.) Supcr-uronf. ufsi.-eniunrj AM Steel Welded Intagral Bods Coisin—— l-^M* Maka yovrs with CANADA DRY Quinine Water .'#*.***,.' *. ::',:'. .•.',•,:;'.:','.••', Vi FOR YOUR \\\l \l HOLIDAY Uur CUSTOMERS and FKIKNDS arc asked to note that uui WORKSHOP will be closed as from Monday. %  % % %  > June. 1952. to Saturday, the 28th June. 1952, inchtsive, (or the purpose of granting our Workmen their ANNUAL HOLIDAY Arrangements have been made for emergency work to be undertaken during this period and the receipt of repairs and delivery of completed work will be continued as usual. Our Merchandise Department and Office will be open In business as usual. 1111, BARBADOS FOUNDRY LIDWhile Prk Road. St. Michael IRV-O-LITE PLASTIC GARDEN HOSE and GREEN'S LAWN MOWERS ot 14' S12 hone (541 rw >uur Requirement'. A I .1.11111 1. PLANTATIONS LTD. TAKE OFF THAT MASK OF PAIN WHIZZ T/VBl.KTS WU.l. QUICKLY BRING REI.IKK PBOll ANY TYPK OK PAW. AND BOOBfBKK. WITH TI1K1R FOIL PACKING THEY'RE KLPT ABSOLUTELY KRKSH FOR YOU . WIIFNKVLK TOO MAY WANT I 111 M EVIN IN5UBANCI COMPANItS WON' INSURI PERSON V.MOSE K.DNIV ARE NO' RK.MT — THBD0CT0RI I r< aWi le>l -rll ll !•> i<> MS kid.... IU.I..I. l-..U-1-i rl lf-lin|. I< Ir^ocnt oinibai. lUrplrnanro. Wf p-^ .• %  ^••PD nUd. Lbassi odd %  KKSWT P.H. .t. ih. <.. VnWj irmrfi. um b SM *i H-UUI.I< *,'l.. Dodd. K
| . rcuful. ttlatkf. Coil-iprurn Independent From Whstl Sujpeniloa; built-in X6nr-l.l. "CAIIKOTS GOLD EX JPEHM.XS Roebuck Street ASPARAOUS TIPS Tin. SWEET CORN SANDWICH SPREAD—Bnl DUIB CHUTNEY CIHITM-Y SAUC1 \ KHOW HUM. A fafjb. 1.1 If. Dial 2070 & 4502 w 26 GUAGE BEST EHCLISH GALVAHISBB SHEETS I I Corrugated 6 ft. ahee. • %  oaoh J3.96 Corvujated 7 ft. sheets: each $4.62 Corrugated 8 ft. sheets: each $5.28 Corrugated 9 ft. sheets : eaoh; $5.94 A BARNES a CO.. LTD SHHI "LADIES AND GENTLEMEN "THE BRIDE AND GROOM' he supreme moment ol a wonderful occasion and ihe supreme toast IIEIDSEICK & COY DRY M0N0P0LE CHAMPAGNE THC CHAMPAGNE YOUR GUESTS WILL PREFER. TOKS. .YSOI IH —A...



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1 PAGE TEN SUNDAI ADVOCATE SUNDAY. JUNE IS. 1M Children Bo Not Read Enough PRKSENTINC. HIS REPORT on the activities and ncaoVn rn\s of the Alleyne School at Speech Du List T-Miis^ay. Mr. C. V. Cumberbatch. Headmaster, told parents that from what was seen of some of the vhiUlit'ii's Kn^li>h both in their written work at school and in the results of external examinations, he was forced %  conclude that '•enough reading is not done." .fpporiuiulj. All were successful unarms sorts: REGRADING THE SCHOOLS DURING THE LAST FEW WEEKS I have endeavoured to show that there is something wrong with the administration of the educational system and that the consequent result is that the Elementary Schools are not giving the : quality of service which they were intended or expected to give. suggest that lha ni*t ie|> i***iLuy pnwU miervie* n and In addition, aavon rSHE u, Ibis moM anI'lm cxminUon is DM centra u . ui al last. taiLaiatiwi. HM-Uo iwt*-MOa irtutii crtiiuvvam*. 1U cntia Tlua, Uie Headaaastar considerXBB jo^mcuiary ajvuuoi* .i-m inai u i* ui.ux*iui %  ,-KAI. and said that elv IW flern nteabods pocaong uul Uiuaa jyupus beat suuwm ihu so whan a wu •n m WUAlU i mean uiai Un-rt i ue euucaiua. of j mow iemmbcrad ul itwre was alwouia bp gwiuvravw-n (or Nun.itivancwi i,im -im wwro .: U a reluctance lo speak l(f ^ciioou lor iiiilait-n under i.nuua nitiuei* upon Uie > % %  m .' iui'.*n i-inguag* unut-r norg Mam: litiam :>oio>is a to < "• •utu uieU.ou of Uie aciKiol. nial conmuuna, mure so wnen lb* yew*. Juiuut auiowb. 0 u> 11 years; '•• cuvaucr oa" um cr.uciaim 1* M icamuti'i were upon jUuur -jtuool* li 10 14 year*, v/iuciy in'ogniaea lay J^.I.,^)! reason wny a 1, ^ avM: ripuuii ol Uic .uucuufb ol greater sues* CM. Ui UMICOCO .itudem language stioula be writ|Ulll Mlt ooi by L/t. K. W. tuvb, > at lawmenta al Ui cnuaren a 1 coatmi'iidll-uicistal ot LRM> 11 tajfJSK 'Nuraexy schools uiy uum 1 U10 results > The Speech Day which .•.tended by Hi* Excellency the uovemoi Sir Alfred Savage K.C.M-0-. and Lady Savngt* who urenenled the pnws. covered the two vidrmk years 1950 and 1951 The? Hcnclitipstcr. alter extendin* hosts**welcome to His Excellency* und Udy Saa#c. Mn. Bourne. M.C.P. and Mr IngTam iiwmhrM of th* Goveminc Body of HSehoo*. expressed re k ici .it having received thr reaiKnain-< •* Mr. and Mi^ ft't^GweJSnR^BSK and"said in* • ol the pupils for her abl^ p.T.V.dini i-iutable social and Training The Citizen "tfaear have atven of their best ks ortorraauce, saia Uil L'Uivnce wuwllu(U a cnvirunmcni u> sup-As u rcuit ul uns nakBwal "f I lh*> Vhool snd have been a per !" e *•" e !" inc cunoida^> gtmamU Uie uauung given m uie many of Uie brigUuer chiluren Uu*' feetTx'-mplc ef loam uplrtt." *no ajlarwd cisdil subiecU and ,.„„„.. w mch may sutttr itaruugb ^uur Scnool la lies* wiUi VW Mr Cuinbcib-.ch alro welcomcund pauei in seven wnat p^uiy, uiadCMuatv Housing, uic prubiom of proviUiiig for ine ed the As--iflnl nirector of Edu%  mw. */> numbered among uuuu i y Ut^ or small sue of eaueauonal neuu ol the pup.. i-ation Mr. t C Thcobolds, wti. %  fcUvtessIul UOJWCI that ol jn demands ol inWIIOMJ lull-Uine schooung will was attending Speech Day at th' -ail" '. wnion u, ,_ lU> upou %  .!.,_ p^jwuo*. There vt m *i 14 ur la yeais, anu whoso School for tho (list time, an ol many girls, bne was ^r. llo Iunn -l htt—uP a and iho general average ol auiLly. eptci,r. Jordan. Chief Insi ^ure a unie u, (ptnt largely m play .11/ ui Uie mure %  siaaemlc' *ubaf Soboa activities, .tv.j-taUutg, eooui.Ui.aJ j t u ia iwwer man at t-ny pel VSM the <*iitnr C-oncluuing lug rcvuw of the „ ltJ1 .,. and ^tpIn a gooo nurs*i*go m uufcJeim-i.tary System. %  %  *• .. .,., UM luniiture and Uui.ng Kac year. Uie scbuol %  >iin.i*uig muipineni is spaeiaily oeaigned must provide uivac prospecovi\ AWAY NASTY COUGHS COLDS LUTE MAGIC *IIH HIGHLY MEDICATED BICKLET'S Wiillt ROB t^ !" mcouA can help you to success through personal postal tuition '-piloVtANDS Of MSN I 1 The Brnnen (Mlege. now yo eoa ret ere S m—rr ef UddW cold* to -uO fatter with tfca Suchtev White tub TWO-WAV *. %  -d. No other RUB has these m% Important Features 1 posuwo. were once aaatesa ca* They owe iheu ccs %  > I TtanoD — The Benneii I Cnrp* M (OUCATIOH M I ...W/ t a> m The "Old %  I. . tlon. 0 ard1 le It neces sary (or then 10 conden Into one. ami pointed exit lhiit of the number %  were more sucu !" i.r iinail people," ana garuen 11 < uizena anu worker. !*"• greatast e m p n a m iyuivm*ni lor eniry into uie woila id upon ui* lurmauon ot ngni and sumulsie a aes.r e to UUUM* ... Hriven to |U M ^-rgouai tiygien ana ine inoatlactiiuea for pnri-lima eaupu... yairemeni of the art of living CaUaOtt wmch ax* avatlaole lor Uie .1. ma society 01 odiers. young wsge-eaxner. Wmle biu Training .-cuoois act not "voca This training in healthy ana ,J ,UW *"• "*•> M past." 1' il.xii.-ed Activities t '"••* Of 'N ',.Mr.cum^S^S^J^TIL tieTei successful Ue wg o. m c W oo. date. He isid etfuen FT.H%  ftiey hern" the nm wt< n and eonI Rerfgey ng the rtsvJti of 11 ! S tlflcaie Exn-r.ioa'lon. three of tlw^i'i gained certineatea, one of theni girl. Catherine Lomch who was uccessful Uie work of the sonool I Kept ui tioav relalionsnip W1U1 ...d -vhooi 'life lor the '" '! up ~21^ 1 t^,^* S %  '-MarVSflft r^"S!^of ""> "'• "' U conunumiy m wn.cn •" I cnilox^forn?u^SlS SS *' -P^Ot 9**** ctlvlUea. In Uw best schoola of m Uua coimexion are the Village, 11s type. Uie chily has ample ol 'r*" wmct ? " ve ..been wt up trasj expruaawn and free *" Cambr,cuiere. kach of Uiese | icivamaw MKI at the same Unas la "i c ^2 lu ?^L Scho L_ fm d 10 the pruned and chllgwi drawn from 0 number u i ritlen word and to, world of M-rrounding villages and Uie ac] jnibcrs. Uius laying foundations ||VlU a of die school are based r Uie basis of skuu of reading '-"Koly on Uie life and worK oj ritina and arithmetic. There i> Uie rural fomniunily in wiuoh H .;i. mui of aeieaaB %  "leaaai in ggai n oai •>•, OK it^nSiTornS S T r ^t ^ Ch C UC8 P '%  ess shouiii 1*' %  "'" Vlini : K|n,K '•' 'oiitiMHii'iv. —'-leatlon. and servea as a social cational centre for the district." narrowly nTisatd her Oi Ceniocu'e. Conrad Hunte. _... er of Wic Successful candldalci; arary, UM Heudmastcr wat awarded a Grade UI Ogrl fining five credits. ,,: eager 11 uiner not only nxxn, but al1 .sin acii 1 10 the gplril id entbusiaain ol oxin tauaasr e. He added, "As far %  ...,. %  %  1 . ii.uii, at Mbi in Uie game section. . Lnwily u> the . aiul nm a n ui m thu secawtrdad %  Grade II Certified'. '>". and no* opporiunuy to pay ....,'_., nnd placed 15th among all the humble homage" to Conrad Tap^a---irT*V7 llnaOraaJ enndidiite,. She obtained foul Jiome %  • the .noii promising crlc*^^Jfc \7tFf ££& nnd two distinctions.and g *• ho0 ha •* P !" JSTti^dSl JSh t£ sibSSl m Erring. to ihe Sohoor. ^ i^SS^ASSn .. addiuuii!, 10 ine l..urary '";•„ whllt through painUng. () ... iir bTOUfbl ihc numtor, almost to ['''S !" ^ 1^ ^'""iLr ^ . tar I. referred to the n~d fo. V^-we?" '" U "*** *""*"* lot aejj 1 who secured J roo:l1 %  * P't "'" distractions a Grade I Certificate snd wat ui ""* k ld %  another, and Junior School rlswd Tth among the cgndidgtM %  t "" J Parents Uiat "from what In the Junior School UieinforIn ndelf'ton he WBJ Bward^l B *' "**• •* n ol * n ciuldien'a !" al work or the previoui stgeja Latin snd placed tl '*" n both In their written comes more aytemalised. The tie island in tiuit subject. '"" K j: s* 11001 nd m ln r * ^ nU f *" Tn mastery of Its own A:; told, "here liUI 0* the external ex-minai-oiguage _in_ speech, writing and 1 Certlflca'cs that yesr—aix girls •1 • o. 1. nine sub1 ; offered, he n IL at school and in the remild learns 11s of the external examinelanguage in uu. we must conclude that leading, it become* proficient In cuih reading is nol dona." '"m^lc arithmetic calculation Bell I ill Lcclur. m Froas Page 1. ship ul a siuuie ana responsible character. T.U. Education %  1 n wat one "t UM peal needs was lor furtnei opporuiniUes ul tuuc*uiii anu las iiupeu and baueved uiat the ussW unu'ii course Ima lielpca in Ui respeot ana uun Uiere would u*Mr. bell said Uiat ws successfi %  • •"" Biaaj children negiearns something of the fact* of eiu.mraging ttsal U a >imi hai>ay, "wmiraa>wl lo Uika *n lnu>tUg*nt *i lka* In the nei %  again seen to suffer '-'tercst tn the world of nature, taking an even 1 .-ate off asa, Uu IK-UjiiaaBo;,^ pj %  dge >T *"id. lie (old of their effort* the Ifnn fin tn *,ive thai problem, and aaid .n.iiiuied reading .,t.nous Hiroughoul the school. nni.nrtiJi.. and told t.;irents '.hst _, lever mlRht be said for or Book Scheme .igsist thl* Examination, there WhUe on thai subject. Mr. WP one thina which could be Cumberbatch informed the parents Its furonr Ths" was, thnOf the Book Scheme which il seal ease • LmviiM.s I u.lie, leatn1 IHUIIw o greater intoicst Scope 1* given for practical croBui ihe subject of Trade Um.m nve work in axta and crafts, singLuut-atlon, bul whatever mujht .ng is regularly taught and theioe „one for that by outside orU organised physical training tamaauons. the trade unions p V U,nned\xerc 1 ^wiE^ n ^^ *** mu 1 •* !" lively games. Th. wealth peculiar part In the educational aspect problem'of"the Junior" School",; m •.._ SDecl wf Ule 1 the reservation of the sponUnelty %Uopmentnnd joyful activity of thp Infant He expressed thank.to the N cendidate must bring m reeendy launched, and wnrned school "while securing the attainman / rt "d he had made in bear orieiiuiilij >•( Ihoutfht nnd hem thai in future there would ment of standards of achievement Barbados for their extreme hoshc %  no excuse for a child not havwhich must b e insisted upon at P'y "<* kUndneas to him. For poiibili imtHHrH .< "ig a particular textbook. this stag*, when solid foundation* that he sold he had been very nnd coinmlttlne The Headmaster referred to the should be laid for the later eduhappy. He liked the island very number of lac rational structure. Secondary "At the end of the Junior Scho isldersble number them to paper. Iiji took eight subject* .set Speech Uay. and thanked all %  who had conttlbSatl to the ^' s '^„r? ,h r,„" f T n ThT oppartunity to offer orsl list of prlies. School to "Secondary rYancsh |M<--onted itself for the Mr. Cumberbatch ended wllh I -. i.nd the -i'ven eandltribute to the late Sir John Gaj dates availed themselves of Saw SVTHE TRUfK 4 BUS TYRE THAT WAS ALREADY S'.flftE POPULAR THAM ANY OTHER iixt> year* oJ kadenh.-i ryrc-making have taught liunlop that ihcre is no sianJuv nil —c%eo the nio.i %  ooMSsful irri can be WiicirJ. That's IL. ; hai hat been done to the 11 Truck asM Uu1 fit i> USp deiBU--'rt turn d this tine basic psnern a lyre that is endrch NOT and l.Ml'Kt A Ml 111 r*t\dSS hnlliani 116, is now ready uch snd would certnlnly like to come back some day. He also thanked the Press for being generally helpful and courteous. Mr Bell who will be in Trlnt'Sccon'dary ,lrt i^r. I raiton anJ **££** Ssi2?^ M ostwat^li/ FACTORY INSPECTION Don't let the Factory Inspector catch you napping. Commence now and fence around your Machinery. We can supply the EXPANDED METAL at prices that defy competition. DUNLOP TRUCK AND BUS TYRE 3C" CENTRAL EMPORIUM Comer Broad & Tudor Sts. Select These Tvres at Unbeatable Prices From ECKSTEIN BROS—Bay St. %  s**A-i : : %  -. 1 , ATLAS PAINTS combln.robu.il economical protection with iplandld decorative fInUh. Sugar Ettatt Managers, Engineers, Building Contractors, Architects, specify ATLAS iKOncAi CADC iruHOus eajHMfl) PAIMTS PRODUCED IN ENGLAND BY THE MAKERS OF "ATLAS A" WOOO PIIIIIRVATIVI M. JASON JONES FRANK B. ARMSTRONG LTD.—AgenU. ATLAS PRtSEAVATtVE CO. LTD ERITH. KENT. ENGLAND TASIA .---; -V •'/•V-fM r' ' -"' luses wear PRO! YOUR ENGINE ... lubricate with detergent...stable...protective



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SUNDAY. JINK II 1952 -1 M>AY ADVOCATE PACI II.F.VEN KOIII.UK • %  IPurkiiiglmm Pillar Primate Tied Cotton On To The Crown BY MARGUERITE PEACOCKE ON trie afternoon of February IS, 1937. Quevn Elizabeth hod lea at No. 145. Piccadilly, and then quietly drove* HHQi \-< Bucfctaff* ham Palace. The mail CfOWd A ,ih cheered her did nol kr moving house. Neither did lhe> know thiii almost IUU veari ago to the day Qu< driven aver MM same ground. Until three months before Quern Elizabeth had been Duchess of York. t lievtng that King Edward VIII. hei brolherIn-law. would reign for manv yean. Instead, the 375-day kin* had left the liny ram In Rurklngham I'.I.H.where he had work*d—he lived there fee only a few week*-and gone Into exile. Yet King Edward VII) h.i I been more actaaaluta than any i irevum SoeerelgB. His room — he Chinese Room, conveniently near the oftVes of ihe Ptlace secretariat, and auto close to tho King's Enlrance tr> ihe Palf %  saved him Wie 1-othfr of traversing long corridors every time he came and wen!. •The Kmult took the Palace stall some time to realise that the King now occupied that little ground-floor room. Sometime* telephone callers, having asked to speak to some member of the household, were put through in error direct to the King's extension. "Who's that ipeafcmo?" asked the caller, not hearing the voice he had expected. The Kino," would be the reply. Can t help you?* The culler would apologise S rofuaely. "Quite all right." the ing would say. "\ou\ what con J do for you?" When, on October 1. 1936, the new King at last went to live in Buckingham Palace, he became the first British monarch t-. occupy Uie rooms which, in the original Palace plans, had been Intended as the King's private suite. Aliiln it< .I A few weeks later they were vacant again. The King had abdicated. With the accession of King George VI and Queen i:ii7-ibeth there WBS. for the first time for many yeas*, a young family at the Palace. Princess Elizabeth was not quite eleven and Princess Margaret only six and a half. But now Queen Victoria's precept that children should be seen and not heard no longer cost a gloom over high-spirited Itoval youngsters. Dignified visitorwould %  mile to hear the echo of girlish voice*, and sometime*, happen Ins to uUnce upwards, would find I'I. in %  Wrs being gravely Inspected by two small figure* peeping from %  stairway. It was decided that the Coronation Day—Mav 12. 1937— Axed for Edward VIII should remain, which meant that the new King %  ad Queen had much less tlm than most monarch* to prepare. Ne' Crown Various changes of plan hnrl to be made now I'.st the nreanonj r... THE WHITFJ DRAWING ROOM AT BUCKINGHAM PALACE (0 include a Queen Consort. New lobes were ordered for Queen Elizabeth, and the exquisite purple velvet which had bten specially woven for her as Duchess of York with the status of Princess (conferred on her by King George V) was used to make robes for her daughters. As no suitable Consort's crown existed, a new one was made for her. and the King's crown had to be adjusted to ensure a perfect fit. King George VI was particularly anxious that his crown should be put on the right way round, as back and front were not easily distinguishable, and the Archbishop of Canterbury had Ihe homely Idea of marking the front by attaching a small thread to the one of the large *tone*. Unhappily, some well-meaning OffleU] tidied this little marker away while the crown was lying at Ihe Abbey, and the Archbishop's slight hesitation at the NIMWrnl of crotcnino, noticed u'hm [he Hint u>as shoum. was because the Primate paused to search in rain for the missiny Ihrcad. As crowns ore literally, as well ..s iitelh.tphoricatly. a burden to the %  '.< Ban, the King had lightweight coronets speclnlly designed for his daughters. A time M-hedule for the Coronation was drawn up. and from this Queen Elizabeth and King George. working backwards, evolved their own timc-tnble. They had to arise before dawn to be arrayed in their State robea and insignia, and the Court h.ui.u.ei w;isummoned t> attend the Queen at an hour when on am other day the Royal leMdents would scarcely have been awake. On Cuiird The week after the Coronation saw an incident unparallod in the PeJaca history. One ..f the gue*t who dined with the King and Queen on the Monday night wa* found mounting u.nl the fallow lux day on the gate through which he had driven on the previou* evening. The sentry, a private in the Naw K aa lati d Territorial Army, was ills., the South Maori member of the New Zealand House of %  .dives, in which capacity he had dined at the Palace. Though this had never happened liefore, mnny of the King's guests had. as subalterns, taken part in mounting the Palace guard. IndVrd, the future Kino; Edward VIII. u'hen Prince of Waii* and a Junior officer, mounted the ouard on his father's residence. In 1937 the King and Queen held the first Courts of their reign. The policy was to bring Ihe privilege <•( ultending Courts within the means of people who were f.ir from rich. Bed Murk III. ,;ul .1 '"is weie laid down, but while some Court gnwns were made by famous dress-house's, many nthm %  iran made up far) "little nie>Miu>kers." And quite .' numbei of the people whu CUltaM to tinKing and Queen at night would l>e found al work in then i Usual next BxOTI In the old days ch.iperon* hnd risked disqunlillcution only by being involved in tcandaloua prubui from the reign of Otorge V onwnnlr* a small number of would-be ehapanau *rara being blacklist*-*! for seeking to exploit their privilege of attending a Court by accepting a fee for presenting others. Some even advertised their services in the personal columns of the newspapers. If detected, the offender would he debited with a small red Ink mark ., mi-i her name In the l."nl Chamberlain'* book-. IT MEANT THAT IN Fl Tt Ri; SHE WAS H\RHi:n FROM I'ALAt i: FUNCTIONS. The actual presentations followed a rigid pattern, slightly less than a minute lieing allowed for each. As each lady to 1*presented arrived t the great Ballroom door, she handed her cud to ii Usher, who paused it to the Lord Chamberlain, who announced her name. With deft touch another official would spread out her train and *he would proceed to make her curtsy. Train Flick Another official u-aiicd, u-fc m htmd, in flick Ihg train over each li-earer's arm so that she mlyht not llHfjeas her successors. Coronation month brought the flist Court Rail of the reign. Again the Palace appeared In all its regal splendour. tl.v ten o'clock some 2.000 gugflla had jiiembled in the State Ballroom. Soon afterwards ihe doors were thrown open, the plajMd the National Anthem, and the lrd Csiamberl:dn and other officers of the • I appeared. currying %  %  -. of oftVe and wnlklng backwards. First came the King, wearing MM ,,f his many full-dress uniforms, and the Queen in one >•! her most magnificent gowns, ihe sash of the Garter across her %  noulder her tiara and other (eweU tln*hing In the rays of the great crystal chandeliers. Siftinc The rest of the Royal fjnuj Ud took up their seats I on tho dais. The King then gave the lrd Chamberlain tho signal for the band to strike up. Dancing: continued until Ihe early houi*. Even if the Kin*, and Queen had retired to their apartments, their depsrturu was not necessarily a signal for the reat of the guests to leave. A* soon us the Slate Room* wera vacated, the sweepings from the floor were sifted. Srldom-wom family heirloams, when brought out to grace a Stale r*mclton, often h-vve 1oo*c stone* and loo*en* On Page IZ TO* feel worm eel, dpru*d. or rn*rll7 rwn Sewn %  *>ui or two %  aty of BwckfiM Tonic WtiM will quickly rntora loti energy end lone up tho whole nrvoui iyum. Gl*bi| MM •liaJKy ll letlfei )OU II. fever and aihauii on and remember, putk'iit TOON; Wine b p*cnJhesknfele sfiar lllneab (Wife %  BICKFAST TOIVI^ W1\E %  STOP FAIN QUICKLY M^t with \ Phensic The famous ihrccfoKI action of PIll'NSK' labk-is RELIEVES PAIN. SOOTHES NERVES, COUNTERACTS DEPRESSION. No mailer how mam Che \\itu. no mailer hownv./nyoui ncm-s, hoe .. you feel, PHENSIC ablets will hi relief and comfort, quickly and itfcl] member mil —PHENSIC ttblca nciihcr harm the heart nor upsi-t IDC siomach. Don't accept substitutes Keep a supply of PHENSIC tablets by you I fhensi* enstc 1 TWO TABLETS e> BRING QUICK — RELIEF ^V Ph I FOR RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO, NERVE PAINS,. j ^HEADACHES. NEURALGIA, FLU, COLDS & CHILLS^/ Bourn-vita STOMACH PAINS DUI TO INDIGESTION Trr lust ONE DOSB of MACLHAN BRAND STOMACH POWIH-H I an %  drntilicsllv biilinw>1 iuilltall quickly ICIKVCI Siomach I'aim, Flatulence, Hcuibum, NaoaH er Acidity due to IndtgciUoa. It M( UK' i O Ml O Ho* HI. Bridgetown FLIT KiLLS FLIES quickly and cleanly Contaminated food mean* waste, danger to health, and loss of. money. Spray Flit, and clear flies off TOUT premises, h This sure-lire killer is I'V ^ deadly lo flics and other J^fcj. food-Uamaging %  h_Z5Av pcsls.. t IT1MCQ L4M1TSD. ill-ill ALB££1 IT.. CAMbCN TOWN. f. 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PACK 101 It SUNDAY ADVOCATE -I HDAY, lONB 1'. IM CHROMIUM IB W other example The only workable nourcc "f the element chromium b Chromite. ii compound of chromium. Iron and %  lined in Russia. art Turkey. Chromium 1B known • %  viT)where a* the platm* %  n laps, hardware and W Mting;. but it has Alloyed with steel, for irfaee hardness, and it Is from chromiu.n I rives its resistance to corrosion. As well ai being UM ajum of chromium, crude chromite ure Is used to make h ea l r eiarll ru j intbnck.. and cements for the constructior. ol fui "'' OffMfc meaning colour, because it* compounds are almost always coloured. Known as chrome pigments, some of those -the ehmmatc zinc and barium for example -an, •<-louring paints, linoleum, mbbl tant hi tanning, ami potassium dlchi ,, „r wool, silk art leather. Other ,,. U C1 | ,„ photography and In H I.C.I. makes a complete range of chroma plgn* the paint, Unotoum art i employing chromium compound., as catalysts In the manufacture -1 avlatloi not, an industrial alcohol. "Trade Mark ol ImarrUI '}UT... IMi: .1 ... M Ul \: ... •tori its ami r-iv-....r .... latl b4h wrtUNi ii >r-.l..i>lte. Mflt i; %  Mir I trttten. i %  BO i bo JfootioB you mine, Parker 'W irouU maid %  Hi-.-t diaoaniina pfMeol l' your own naa, •>in|w\raTdraTiting ni-t[iiiin'iit liaacver been lll.iir. new Parker'51' % %  >l pen is \ M> mini ."..i •I-I.II i > %  Try The Advecate Stationm ... for those ItOOliS you need W.l. TEAM FOR C!DA? Olympics Will Cost 16. i2S 9 0M //. a. > i urns I H.v, | g i„ r Mine time now for the opportunity to ulTnid fans some Information in connection with the proposed West Indies tour to Canada this year. I been hailed in responsible q a good thing from the point of I the novelty, it will Uthe first time thai a rape—antattve Weal Indies team will have loured Canada art <•lll In hotels and restam. | ping of taxi drivers and barbers is optional ami no' practised m Finland BJC.L'S ANNUAL MKKTIM; F ORKMOST among the chanaai plannod ttui neion 11 lha Barbados Cricket league, who held UMU Annual Oeneral Meeting al the Modern Huh S. 1 sub-division of the City and Central Leagues Into two divisions. What formerly used lo be the Cilv Lefug will now be the City League and the Carlisle League and what used to be the Central League will now be the Central League art the Gun Hill League. The purpose of this chain, i ill teams in the Cil> Le-igue in I uiee and thv Cenlral leaguein the second instance to play three clay gam In the Carlisle League and Gun Hill League will play two day game' The number of teams in the City Division will be eight and in the Carlisle Division there will b> competing. STEADY IMPROVKMKNT rEfW are going from strength to -drenglh and there Ii M eVer} likelihood that if then Is no loss of vision or perspective by tocol cricket oAVlalda to assist Uicin in evir> way should Ifuture Thcv plan to play of si UicnaeVi and Rev. Oodson ul. ihal these start at 1.30 p.m. uftcr Han) that v.i!i aventu i to their best strength for tholr Annual flxtun In this connection thev have arranged flxtll plre Club. Cable and Win-!, with Spartan. ) ESTERDA Y'S CRICKET Yesterday Com. *) was undefeated wtth 100 runs when play ended on the first day %  only added live runs to thi* n-ore • before he was bowled by Cart Mullms. S. Rudder who was not sPARTAN Spartan 1st jilN) .. • %  College 1st Inalngs \a.i (for twe M i hy Bradshaw whose analysecond Innings. College lost two * w >' ov ? T ?' o nr !" ** Tt {* 2 wlekets those of Camie Smith and f"" 5 three wickets. Carl Mulltns (or a sii'le run who !icnt down M ove bo*!^ The Park team is in a very ^ * m h ?\* t lu ^ k " on y a was 'zxrjr&sz Sv^S 1 !" ^ siai> !" provldlnj rln does not ,wo "" niM IT w,h out play next Sh.ky Sl.rt ,, ra y : .. m _. Police in Iheir second inningx llcsuminj Iheir lim inning, ol UM ahaklly but when C J) r..r Spartan lot the wicket BUckmnn and W. A. Farmer "' Keith Walcott uilhout addition c me together they put on a partMrSamuel llendley bowled nerahip which yielded US runs. him In the flr.1: hall of the day. Both batsmen batted well but Then rrank King, who Is pi.,r.rmer was the first man to go Inii hu flr-l season with Spartan, when ho v..,,.i. lv ,.,i ; yoikei Alih Cave in an from the burly Empm r—i 8th wlekel partlMtlblp which probowler Barker. Farmer hit a 1 runs lief ihe latter breezy 65 and riad one chance. was caufht and bowled by Camie C. Blockman who on the other la 14. King who played hand wa cautious and very %  hurricane innings contributed M. reluctant to take chances w Kin, and PhilllpT added another ?lf, '<• %  h £T* X? JS „ • *^ JVJ %  — >"— ,.hii turn mlniilfw rmrrp llii> ••nil to, the tn wicket, and ibout two minutes before the end Skipper Keith Walcott declared r -i p '" y --_ 1 i itauni closed at 347 for nine' it 35 minutes of play. Balding was not its best and about three catches went abegglng. DePeiza did good work behind the stumps %  MM tJa^ns IiUl .,, times he became unduly The l ollegians opened with anxious. Emman Hope and M. Worme who Barker who bowled at a good %  1 .n.ni.it.pact attack by hruUi ind nrftti BonM Sn otKing and Phillips. The accuracy lured the four Police wicket*. He> of the attack was manifested by bowled 16 point two overs and .bat during the first 25 conceded 39 rum. The Police not ( the innings, only three out batsmen are J. Byer eight runs were scored, and that when and A. Blcnman naught. the first wicket fell with the score ,,d been ,„ pro*re pu !"!" > !" ZSX? Smith filled the breach. _,..!""' ,!! but WM bowled by the first ball '"i"~_ .„,.,.. v „...,_!" H.. ..„^4.r.^i hv F.ank Vina tmiih Faulty fielding at KcnMngton ^fI^.^lnUl.rf^XMnd. O 4 '" •"' ">>led the C.rli i iilTri, h! iL U !" a ^n! %  < <" m to •"" nr ' innings A. Alley i No lean than eight catches were DIU cum an ami n rtiieyne, k _. ,, ,. ., . prcmlslnl youngsters raised d *l P rt or ^''> ; !" '' 1 ^ !" ". the hopes of the College team whi in the first innings they played some really sound cricket. Black" ** ?J* ... -"*fc %  :% %  .. %  ihr<* chances. %  ho top scored with 90. had thi-ee lives. "Peppy"' Hutchinson knocked up 68 not out but he too had man executing id drives off all ny elegant hooks Three sixes were struck. T.v and drives off all bowlers. He. i,,- H „#r it. 'i,„„.i.„. scored a very valuable 64 num% ^"^ j^' aLTwtarton 1 was out to a beauUlul £„^Sg.!'~3 the'o^er b y "ft !" ,". h ^" Un ', M ^ HC ^; f>" "'"<*'"" "If U,e bowling of iljuted IB and Fernando £lklly. „„ y,,. „„, s,, urday Pickwick ..ii.a bli bat for an undefeated made 2 26. When 24 at number nil stumps drawn Carlto, the loss of one wicket. The Black Pace Bowlers Rock pam yesterday added 255 pace bowler. King and 1O ,„„,. ovonrak 1O ^, A sixth wicket partnership iietween Brickie Lucas and Peppy Th. Phillips were deadly accurate their first spell*, and after wit.__, nessing tome really good spin Hutchln „ n wn , hc ,,,„ of nc bowling froin 11. K. Bowen and d |t n ltaKl go runs. Alloth. in.rk.bl. sucje,, ,., ,.kc 4 for 31 gSStolS^jaL, -V.' 1 I arn N. Grant took 2 for Cox ,„ adc M ,JJ „ wa< ,,„,.,„, 13 ill 4.1 overs. ( nis partnership that Carlton crept By 5.40 the whole College „ he ad of pickwi.k s lotal art out for 166, and taking th.ir neood turn at the wicket. Skipper Makes 38 lost the wickets of Worme and Carlton's skipper, C. Boogies Sn.ith for a single run. a leg bye. Williams, made a valuable 3B, ll.rrls in this Innings did the Charlie McKenile, one of their damage when he opened the atopeI ing batsmen, carried his overlack with Frunk King. Harris weck lcon ol nvc |o 23 before moved two consecutive balls well he was caug ht D y Joey Grecnidge through the air, each claiming a „„ ,„ e b„„Ung of Teddy Hood wicket. Jnr. „„., „„,,,. Teddy Hoad was the most sucIMI'IBI t rui.il t. cessful bowler loi the Kensington I theii crleM match with 'lean bowled him with the next. 1 Empire. Police batting Hoad sent clmvn 31 BM 01 first on the first day of play which six were maidens, and scored S2 runs in their first inntook six wickets at an average of I ii the end of play Just over 15 runs a wicket. Winston %  .red IBS runs for Grccnldge bowled eight overs and the loss uf six wickets. *> On Page 5 RACING NOTES By -/;\ f7l77/.l*;*• IB T.T.C. JUNK MKKTING ENTRIES for the June meeting in Trinidad closed on Friday laft with yet another record number of horses. 1 can recall, not many years ago. when it was quite an event for 100 horses to be entered at the T.T.C. Xmas meeting, and these would Include a large G. class. Now, with no help from thi half bred*, we find 127 horses taking entry in June. There must be a limit somewhere, but so far there are no signs that we are approaching it. The biggest increase relative to the pre war days has been in the C. and C.2 maidens. There arc net fewer than 26 of these, and. in spite of the tact that thiy are well catered for— there is a race each day for them—it is obvious that many will go empty away. Nor is there anv likelihood, if the present rate of Importation keeps up. of more than a very sirnll proportion earning their tees, even if ihe Trinidad Club* continue to encourage them, by framing races for them on a generous scale. Thi? situation emphasises an interesting side of the West Indian chancier—namely Ihe instinctive preference for an imported article. Few. if any, of the 26 horses, whose names appear as entered for the C. ami ("2 Maiden races, can have cost less than £500 landed here, and it is quite likttly tht a ;OS CONTINGENT %  ntriag from Barbados turned out much as I had predicted in last W*efc*i Brtsfiftff, amass) that neither Trimbrook %  k entry. 1 must gay th;.t. looking at the race* in which the rest have been entered. I shall beMTirprlsed if thev do not enjoy a succesful meeting. There surely cannot be many in C. class lo take the measure of Castle in the Air and French Flutter, while Lunways is looking and going so well that her chances in B. must be excellent. It is in the D. and E. races however, that I fancy we hold the strongest hand, and if Usher, Mary Ann and Apollo cannot pick up a couple of %  i between Ihem. I >li ill be disappointed. In the Trial Stakes, we have lot what was our most promising entry in Sunina. but both First Admiral and Columbus are entered, ;nd while neither ran be expected to threaten Bright Light. I shall be surprised if thev do not run well, particularly the former. MORE TWO YEAR OLDS Apart from the activities of the horses consigned to Trlnl%  ie is little going on nt the Paddock at present. It i-cems a good opportunity to Introduce some more of our two v. ,r olds, and I shall start by asking Mr. Bethel's Saperjet, tfl take a bow. Saperjet is by Jetsam out of Wedding Gift, and Is a gelding Who h -; inherited the beautiful golden chestnut coat of his sire. A refined, high quality two year old. he might be faulted as being n thought too long in the back, and possibly a trifle : in bone. but. hi gener.tl there is plenty to like about bin. He goes abdit his work in a sensible way. and although he Is a lot less advanced than Apply Sam. for instance, he ippeors likely to come to hand reasonably quickly, flotsam, \ is an unknown quantity to dale, but his sire. Flotsam. ring he stood only in Trinidad, must be considered to %  '• one of the best local sUllions. Wedding Gift war rather a moderate mnre in the tracks (she was by Tolgus). and so far. hns not proved a success at stud, being a rather shv ip to the present Superjet will be her first foal to r.ire In Barbados Cuiitura help* to dni ... { %  unpUa Md Utltofte. ail aln. you ban %  btserjrota Ii>velt -Un. 1 luiiani. tocMhfnM %  ad tl %  4-TU.W, oewny UUnr, U* Mp flown ..f4..itf irf mildly lofrilamtl OJU.UM Soap wig Mfeffuard you nal .iral WM. hir • tablet today. C uticura SOAP i \". BAD witch who m y, j. became GOOD Wl'-ytiML yaVJpiU gf^fej 11 iiM I V>3 H N^jgi ^^^r AvJ ^'MsM& mmm • \^*1P'V-V'I VQ IlllfWll 'BnaC^...w i S m$4 t IBM One ,U< Hanvcl ai ipto ill.lOri-M, willi Ioy*l Pudiling ..-. winJcccd around ant c.icicl -*nt of only a batarl of heir arm. Ihe> %  .round... ncibrcjd b.,.1^ \ (as (hfm ll -. the ,..„! lb %  Roy*l PudJing %  And Ihe nth d *iM)pk*st.l-iih Ho.., I'uJdi •hr ncci hoihcicd anyone mgMir You'll turn your famHy into angels, too! Jinl -mi iiniil ilii i tawM ihrtra IUT. ih. Min.-iiii) v ~i I i-IIH-" of Royal •* Itaddiasx. iWll --^ asea imnimx ha.k ^^^ *\ ^^^ foiam.l-3 & r W dcliei'.anflatonjf A I *\\ V\ .atiilla.c1x.ti.Uiic y ifM llil and huticrwon-h. /f JT H C\ /f If SOLD BY ALL LEADING DEALERS Hercules THI Hfftcims even a MOTOR COMPANY LTD a .aa.acM lacuaa. ) Tie faest 8/cyc/e Bu/M K^y nawnsvnrinTi T. GEODES GRANT LTD.. BRIDGETOWN IHE RIGHT lOEA BUT A BIT



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SUNDAY, II NE 15. laffit ^i \|> \\ \|>.... in IWCit THRU \i I litI IIICMIU : OPERATION STARLIFT ferMi* HinK FARM AND GARDEN-* AGMCOLA (' %  row Mure r'ood K ., HAVE YOU STARTED THAT | %  V* VEGETABLE GARDEN YET* ~ If not, do not de4a>. The GIVING A BOOST to the warmheartedness of Holly$££. X£ we Save £d k£ wood show business. STARUFT, with a galaxy of screen reftened II iu(Bdntl to asako peraoru,lities etc be seen at the Plan, Bridgetown. It is *e digging ot bed. and the laying MM tilrn. but not the kind usually associated with Doris ^Vahe^irnTwhln St sS Duy and Gordon Macrae, both of whom take part. T>ie mm start, the ground film is based on the actual activities of the stars when they • and cloggy, and .ivis An Force Base to entertain troops awaiting therefore oe much more dim, transport l„ ,l„. Ea,t ,n.l the returning wounded. ryiMM Power ami Aim Myth with Michael Rennic in %  M.iif,.hal confused period drama in which an atornkscientist, "li.t %  -<* I'v the urace and dignity iif thIHth century, and suffering frani nervous breaJKtown. banes reincarnated win THK Pl*MPKI\ I \H1LY—11 To-day. we continue wK Ah ultural r•• **aj bul u often la egctable garden, it In food January ait likely -., be the mo I I to Include certain foundation Successful; FQUIhJi tnings as permanent member*. Bib|aGl to pewdjgy miliU-w at the 1D| y things that are used almost daily leaves and in the case ol i-utumlook tl in the kitchen. These are Parabe !" and melons especially, unleaa ( oers so.uah and n ley. Pepper*. t"weet and hoi i brouakl umi.. ce. b*. MWIln £*Uot, ThymejJSweet u, sp..,>.nK wlttl Bordeau* mla ,. than the wrjorom) Bx.naTte. l*a.ab^nach Uin „, lUtsfn L wlln L ,|,,[... nis ,,„. *. W P ,,p dL*ao Is liable to spread and .. s mall, well Mred I i : apt-it each wa> On l.l.., :i HAY. As such, the glamour and in. torest of tinftim depends -m UKencounter. With the stars, who "^"iiSSt nnd the talent p, ^ y H. 0 ""*'."..". %  "". :^.",V Um to two hundred ve ancestors and relives the events Pumpkin*, ultras To d in an old diary. During a supply of theae essential things eventually r L the first part of his aojourn in the needs only a little forethought p jmil hi rt xo 3 of the \ 18th century h.s foreknowledge In Planting. Such £*" tu.e Depaclnvftil t*IK ..II ^n., ,l„ "I event*and scientific discoverOftras, I>eppcrs and others often %  r .,_ „_ ,.-.. plu. a •rinUk* or modem ed theSSTves. and thc^ ..,,g. w. J 1 ^ "* c-sprcuion, in his veech. set Unas, which are as a rule vary ,',? h ,. ,,„..,„. ,n.,„l .V^'W ...??,-,. o..rt as a aort of wonder liardy, will bo found us. rul tor '"*; '" V^ '"• Plant, in, nun and a wit but iradually he n-iSnlavt. Ho vegetable gj.rden !" hu a|.ied wirn a <—s—50 ruici •.,. then hku. I ,i l V midne*^n7wttciV* sh„5ld be without a 3pln.,ch vine ^X' !" ^ n,',''' T?'', "w ^ '"-"',"' %  T" ...I i'hen he — the Once started. Spinach Jives no v r S' "nely mound .ulphui We kr, ., *.--1 t„ inn %  • ,s rCrnU. of Svonahlre trouble providing it *.. nenr so'. therefore, that grower, b,.,,, ith a recital of hei charms her >oniethinii that it can .limb on "-p han.ly some sulphur jo as the c pZwTif ,. ...Sleet M needs no help, but will climb '" '"• ready when the attack be. • noush her d, mlsc hsil alraadv !" d arrange itaelt. and will prove Una, aa it surely UI ,-ome Appla an Hulli.ia Del Hones ,.. ml 'ke !" place artten oroVnotlT %  m ot ""ul member of the the dust by gentle beating from .1 shingle under ,1c: tod he hnds himself about vegetable garden. Spinach is not I muslin bag whan the „ e* n Do ,„,l I, I-' commilted to the nsvlum very PPular green, yet It Is ir.oiatun' on the leaves. To make encumbers tot ,,\, fortunately he rejoins Ins' uwn r tn ln ,ron and *. valuable In Bordeaux, follow lh in-:i-ucuona hamMlng. !%  them ba %¡ aDturv in the nick of time ore, IUT dlet lx unpopularity is fnthe (wmphlel or seek the adten,I, t,„ UM ... i bowl E suinably cured of h ye for the Probably due u. the fact that H is vie* of an afakaaltural uiHee, who M -md old days, seldom cooked or served polatawill gladly help you In these or some The transition from the present Dly ?. SDU ?*5 h ..ji C I 1 .. C ^ > .!^ slnular troubles, nniil the nsoBSrun on, fhe cblistophlne %  nulrcl years a an Ls : na rubbed through a sieve Into ^jy experlem-e la gained. Now. propagated Cram a growing I emphasized by the change from u R'^fM, a SS? S „". for %  om ,u,, "* r '"""" •'"""' %  ll >%  %  '""' ""'' %  '" %  black and white to teXlicolur P !" klinl of cheese, or a spot of Th( pum|)1 ,,„ nu> „. ,e K au..sl ,„ 1 male, date ,,f S„..,la, llhotoer.nhv and thouali thepTare buttw ? "" '"''' SS "he most Important food plBI I 1151 "^^^^3^m^^^^S^S= !" a„s,. .so No more .iff cr-forty fatigue! If yen' -. ii i.n)oy life aa you ahmiM. ino llatlewa to take a k -on and huppv Interest In ill thm foal on arouml you. this advsrtleoment liMi gooil news lor you i wi*nty yi'ara, countlean numNTB of r Un worM li.ive pgotrad ihat, if you 1 I vaJorfy, your ateady •tergy and cheeriuloeaa will bOfehyOQ anl yotE* fiien.ls. To remain %  'el youjur.frny, and full of energy again, algdi Uikuw Be-.. fortifies the over-forties SF\ vinv G1FST %  jn gMflVflfOfl B\Rrl\l>OS D. u and l^.ngterm Bates II •.-,! an Request. r %  in in. ill fiuraU vsi l-i'ini' I tinner and Cecktall I'srttes arranged J II IIUCKI-AND. Proprietor. ORIENTAL PALACE litAIKJJAUTERS roR SOIVKMKS rk(> INDIA, CHINA a lt.Vl.1IN THANIS s obviously painted, tocs iMf alul mi, S of yams PP" from nrr nomiOIV.II IBIK !" ...I> ^ %  pretend to be sweethearts, for the !" L 7f7T":—"". %  "**"" %  '" iOCS lJ r %  l,Q w %  *-'*•* %  '"* "" J— %  ....J ,„ ln rf ... kg, t found ..mng. .we,, patatoej. rt -ouW.only J*. ,£ %  ^.ThPne,,, the It after due time, find there K no Tyrono „,„ , ^ Blylh K,Erf ootalocs m The vegettble vine ,.n rap..n, spreads 1; love. Be ,kl> '1 (l.lflllllaUllllllf" ivhrtkl" "T^ *^ .L. KreM Page .Muling a ports Day. Gordan M.icrae. thing not set _( ^ rot ,, kf ,p t n > aIgr quanti. I lit" Ibi'ir aki'lm I** i -at%  lima -• HI -„ In the diary—but "their actJJJJ 'K,;",,,', "iingui' of'ume, it is quite aaDps ovt* ,,e ",r ._.f^, !" in "tllMd and I preferred ^ Ur ,„ p ^,„, m .ll ou.ntlty a stone pile WI. .. a ,,„•, • irhael Rennie as Mr. Power,, rv f^ w weeks, and "*> keep up vnuon is taken seriously, u 1,00a %  I league and friend and Dennis j,,. supply of fresh new potatoes, plan l| to make up fairly large/ •he rffemmate lo,, of ihe No special skill 1* needed to grow mounds or hills, mixed with IJbei-1 times. IViglish potatoe. They can be•amounts of good dung. Ineertllafj it gr.rwn all the year round, but thor Ihe seeds at the I < (>^hy.n prefer the wet months from aration and leaving not mecember. iwo ar three plant*, to davaktp t.. 'Ruth Romad ire ;.I1 part of the main ea>t. and we have Miss Day singing "You're Oonna 1-ose Your ^illd H'Ki'inn ; %  %  %  %  %  houU ie taken to minlnui %  %  <;.ir in %  '.' %  1 %  -fill' %  udJeore reacUoo thai doubt as lo her populanl-. Mr. M t Lucille Norman sinC "Wh;n U TIUi Tin.... Called Love" vhich is tlso Interpret. .1.11.ung of Gene Nelson—tops as usual — and Janice nut. Man pi^.. ^.. OT .„,. • ,n mountainous country of Uteh. the 1 mC WMI Mr moon is scenery u. magnificent and o almost on a par with hi!. gtelloui Uackground for the action would Choice Of Swe*t Potatoei each hill In the semi-shade of R „, SIERRA is .A drami.t., W rr, -.y,^,, llr ,. j^^rtment ..f widely gJ>Md oatcb CtOpi like „„.,...,, 1. ,-. I. ,. u. .' v.lu rechnieolor showing at the -_^ d Ajn-icuiturc as to Indian Corn, pumpkins scom to „i ktrbarssM. Filmetl In the (fp heat kind of potato to plant, thrive. Vfhen UM vines begin to living in the ei* It would be a pity lo plant just flower, examine the ^dividual Itenlc.t lion-. anything and SO perhaps be dlsblooms !" some Will IKin.de' and Follu*ing uucrtes from 1 r •':""' y"tht Um. m pp |nted Randolph Slarnng youm, Audle Murphy. eem Hvndrlx. Dean J agger and the lack of 'female', which 1 tolWk of the group Set*. Phil Harris, Oary cooper ^ m ^ and l-Vank LoVatoy, tl ihree in a riproarm'. ghootin' bai room drama of the wi.i. and „f 0U [[-| woolly west! The film Is somew 1 and necessarily episodic, hut yoi net your nil of lamouj stara, al aei in entertain the troops. PreparingTb Bed Ives. it is the story of a English poUtoes co: id son who live the lives ad in the ordinary for fifteen years._owing garden bed. but, it must be I'LL NEVE* FORGET VOII Playing at the Olohe. this film %  %  eU to the lather"* conviction of murprepared a couple of weeks beder. on circumstantial evidence, fa^ the potaitoes are due to be While rounding up wild horses planted. Fork in plenty of well trie son meets a young f„oed pen manure, ..nd some girl who is lost. It so happens that fc p^^ fron, the Compost %  lawyer—which didnt „ Makt „,, W hol. bed rich, fession of the resJ killer, the %  rmw Choose small potatoes to platii. father is exonerated. an d if this Is not possible then Roth Audie Murphy and Dean cut large ones In two or three Jagger do good work—the former .j^es. But remember, each potapiece of potato, must hif" 1 characBorkV.-. ..ml Mr M. F. 1 whoU* Boai ' "> : %  '• .... must be Ukon when doing this p,,.,... ,^,|,. leaving • II,.. J OD not lo ln ) utf ,hc pnt.. 1 1 % %  m hmis "Vr "„ Use a long pronged lurk atul In,.. JIL ., -n thell ItouaM at ex%  ert it well to one side of the orbltunl prices plant, lifting trte whole clump The secretary will make the • out at once. Should my of the v H 1 potatoes get injured, keep them BOOM thai %  •' of sudtrurnoUri pn one aide to be used Bnt OUJl *'" %  utor ^v///,V.V/.VeVAV.W//.v//,^^^v.v.^^',^^^'.'.'^-'',^•/ ; J ONCE AGAIN ... 1 bilterly ..nil-.. hose loyalty to his fathei one eve or bud. and prefe and the latter as the parent f£j £f thrw ?cs P i„ nt .h^ abb mistaken £viction ha^. |^ w Q plec e,. lour .r.cte.—Ixmesome—a friend in • %  *e W up. and^d ed and a wan.lenng min*trel. bit. with the cut part Ives is famous for his in.initaweeks aner the nche Plant .1 cut Tiro potatoes have of %  making and singing of AmcriSprung, apply a dressing can Folk Lore ballads to the acV.Q.M. and four weeks later give r.-mpaniment of his guitar and his another application of this i-se,e of these songs— ful manure. These potatoes grow "Sarah"—In particular, which Is close to the .surface, so it will sung to his mule—Is admirable, probably be found necessary, Hendrlx is not particularduring their growth to bunk the lv convincing as the lady atnii ^ up around them to keep • ,„.* i,ut she is pretty and is ihtm covere d. Because of this a toquatc for the rest of the role. ^e nrt enry to grow up out of the I l ir-cnlioned at first, there Is egrth 1(Wnc ,^,-nip plant Ihe 1" "• ( "•• l|, "> lth ( n _"i" pctatoes in shallow drills or guttandlni sequence iMplrtlnf J8; J^ w lhj thc y can mor tm n THE WELL-KNOWN CORO JEWELLERY EARR1NC.S. BROOCHES 'ft NCCK1 1 WIIITF, ft MUl.Tl COLOURBD STONES Also 1 These are Best Quality Costume %  '' wcll.-i v m patterns you'll sin.ply love. Such as jp advertised in your Canadian and An Fashion Books. II you want to I"IUM oi ihe best, always Iry . LOUIS L. BAYLEY TVRONK POWER. ...-. a hundred wild irapny and it Is the eselling to turn yellow and dry highlight of the film. til earth. 1 starts iff it Ii time to reap the potatoes. Care ** Itolf.in Lane $ Phone 39119 OF nd Aqu (lull (.ill lloolli IMione IS97 Itch Germs Killed in 7 Minutes < lii"* onlr hill tin. -" %  •r*. Ni 'aifnuf -insi %  > —c -i" N.cv" '1 '-.I.I 1%  NIxoderm far Skia Traaklas ******•* aa a >a aa>> > * a * If you teen, an alarm clock that you can ofieaya reisa.— %  eearsl.i ndndeome eta, qra___--t nunUralaly prlcad—yo* mm %  1 |U 43 • • • • • choose ., South llerm. Right On; puwd ftnmm. 1 ls.1 -nh fti.l 111-111" OB.n-m.di AHo oam A M*Wr iru-M alamt dodi Hji.jyCMiilw.nir* si. Snu'tfi/ffakma *$& . aEir.' Y0U3 LOOK OUT For News About KOO Ready yourself to Ret aboard KOO'S Ml I;KI 1,(1 Hill Ml ol BVTBB VALVES and FINEST PRODVCTS, • .,. and >tart the new week rkfkt! The Big News on Wednesday. June 18th and remember — IT'S KOO FOR YOU! HERRINGS FRESH 1 of in TOMATO SAUCE (-Sleep Sho Mattresses $15.58 end Springs $14.36 Bedsteads 3ft, 3ft. 6ins„ 4ft. 6ins. Priced at $18.18 up it mil liftts CO-OP. t O TTOiX LV. 1 1 TO It r Til. E. P. N. S. WARE POOLE POTTERY DENTON CHINA ALL PRESENTS WRAPPED SI.I 0HII /(/>/'/ I ) II m m THE CORNER STORE



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BUMM1 II M 15. 1IM SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGF si M s Jv~ Why A Woman Must Go Back To Jungle War ii i>\\ in (RAi<; A MIDDLE-AGED i Aberdeen bun;.ilow ml offered a prayer of thankfulness when new* reached Britain a tew day ago ihnt Long Pin. No. 1 bandit in Malaya, had told %  "This i*|/ apply M ptacei %  BgON and Ka*l Lain%  People in the*towns hsv to vorry nbout tiger*_and snakes te is aboul t p.m. Tin-, ia, IM the worrt time of the The slaaoepnerc is appr** thly. dami •Awfully sorry > nu '* B been killed in a jungle battle Kuila 1 Aim pur Mrs Isobel Robertson, home on MCk UNIX banditUHr ll of Kuala Kuba flahru. In Selangor. ha* good to reintee at the death of Long Pin. Ho was miliUry commander ot No. 1 Regiment "Mala> Liberation Army" A I "end. For months he remained a! arrvlng out hit-and-run *!_,",-ICn*-. i any more. They're still tihtl Htr. *>w.u**^ wv^ r*4i IK*t *n T %  %  *"*> *.i having such a rough time. old gin. there, but It's bandits but they know .is much about iTare as Aberdeen knew about UM I-ondon bltt?. rl0 'mjirc about now." hav. Visiton Arrned "We seldom hnn* visitors on the %  Hah %  When we do it la grimly amusing in sec them leave I rifles, and hand grenades in th.hall just as we It home here might -T i our hostesK OMI, gloves, and l.U-rf. Kuala Kubo Rahru was one of hi* favour!!.hunting h -' '"' v travel in an armoured ear '4 I litU Pi>nri>' guard. After a four-mil* trip %  *• %  %  IIa.High deep Ivrujlv W* reneh the Two day. ago, Alra. Robertson mam road, then go flat out foi letter from her husKuala Lumpur 20 bund, manager of two estate* hirti ended;— 'If onl] den Loua Pin we might get a little i gj MB Mra. RoberUoo. yesterday: "By a little peace 1 m> lu-li.i ,i mem* iii.it perhaps w, wtll Raw gei an u hroken night's real, which my hush ind I %  If mate .i ear that haa broken down we pretend not to MttOI '-~ may be genuine—but loo many were caught th.it wa> in the early days. a> "I live month In. month onl inside the perimeter of the rotate, seldom venlnrlnr far that th • IM CbrrlMM Itavi born m >• i %  since ItM. VYkea the lapai %  verran the country In 1042 Robertson escaped with he. Mm to Australia. Her husband was a prisoner behind .'p barbed wue for three and a naif roars. Now the Robertsons ar* behind •heir n barbed wue lighting i. ram. -< :•• enemy so that rubber oan < linue to be one of Britain'* won. I visit b*gg--i dollar-earner*. r-dresacr. I MielU-rrd In Hath l .ikes them carry on* What muk-t a uwnan like M# ftobt-rtuii'\ u>ho rrcrnllv *l vU. rd in a balh for two four while the Comtssaaiit Ik., a skat ap (he hunoalmr wmui to go bark? /Mast Mout%v)n UKIHlkOMIl lAUiniT. ( FROM BKIII-H .ll\NA i* UNGER'8 SEWING uAKfcMV v DK LIMA'S on Broad 91 cososa is th* lady to pbooa t427>. She u JcwaUer expressly to .-ny out w.ll tell you ut th.i mtolDKRY CLAaSta* which n >.jlaeturtng nature, or *o*ravi can otn al any lim* ind lor in*;, or lheupyuig <>f .i paaicrn. ,. Bominaa a coil. A coui lomaUiajig ami taaaona with a practice pen.-i of what'* mor, pru1', liouisi nunI waafe Vou'tl i.Ji-mabh Nl Ik -|. .;i I.I:I.I\ ERV IS ON .n.-i. Flour TH* NAIL Bo |lva %  Rugs. Just think of U .nl then V dg Lim--••. 4M4 gad got that phone J ul > done at last '. VlUgSIII. silllNt.S AND llllllf I. I (. II T M H O II T RAVI IN SITTINGS at prices lhat M. VkhsKlv v.da *nd fully justifv th r recent textile only SZ.II. Heavyweighl Shark•eductions' Ve.. x.-Hletil v;,lue :.. % %  too ItoWSftd 1LAYON tUtet-d. And Wdson i %  *,! hrm Bhlrki frani w> ^ >> ,k > -i' "• PRINTS! lag in kiitenuu: srhata or • %  % %  •* •"' %  can you pos*ibly nktured stripe design.All of '* t' You'll see them at th*ie are to be found at R 11 l'i.AS*r THE STOR1 EDWARDS LTD on a n.\ MAS EVBRVtojrth*r with looka, Uag and ahoeg ,•'•>'•: %  "£, ''"''* %  '— MHI K . %  (. .if Mm' • >r-KS from W.75 dou KartJ Shirta-daulers T || i s NOT HOI'ftMlOU* mOftT mi Uiwer liroad Street is to ixiiig lo yuu th*, clUMcaat gggBBreal, every-day DCdH GHtratt* faiea and l^Nither Goods pU'iikCiu Jewellery. Watthea nway. % %  r.m.i [THIS BELT IS NEWS Bv IrOROTHY BARKI.FY Women .ire buying thorn for picic-ba*ket. for work-l>a*ke1i-, oi LONDON ***" for handbag*. It's the newest way of being __ . __ .... gmart. It's the tattm craze in th* PagJiinn • h'indie.is ni luropaan families who never know when an t';ick will be launched "Thn" IJI icMI molcci me so atfrp -ihtu bssgag *"i an extended 'c.ive beeaus* 1 h*r nerves %  auld >">' ^tand the stillness arid hlddan hfl .-ors Of the juiiKte any longer Bhe IK i-h.im-smoker, and Uu the garden. When %  Bund ..f -t car i'.+-f1ring makes h morning her want to scream, so that she iway from the era of Abers much .tp.*sihle her home in a hrw months ie. she says, "It Is my duty with my husband. have both survived m .ny i-.uit thingH in Malaya. To would be to i Till: YIRV MtYI.SI HOOK covnuna ii •** in u.wn. i kabl* T1NTAWN Matide M S6 ft. wida ,, v Dctrtcal %  PfUaausaa. OTjaAg£ -1(m n*td %  n i-mg u % %  n nd ntij^; %  %  %  I % %  ;. *e it IIS ill iioN. hit-'aao-l p it KIIVIMMIK IS A MI n BWNO 'S this i the Ktoi tries ni showing in tl ft I L d ,..,i %  ItlOEHA PORS are | ar* includad In lha %  . Unerii clans in Brtt..-, %  Tnni:i i from fa i||£0 TaW* T*nn Bati ird •( net wlln spien. iilabl* HI eUflkrani ghapet l *d mtarior is a st*al of weights from 2.2M You dioul.l Hi kind for SI l w a g ground up here .1 '.-. ihe last for work I begin my worrying* 'or rtay* i the day. And he. In turn, prays the deen .i bandits won't ;iH;.ck the bungalow But in his absence jungle "It is quite ,t tourhlng reunion Becau n the eveniug when each finds to be he ..thrr safc. "We unple. Bedtime Wont Time quit i "At night there is a strict curto Omimuntam. of those Tew. Nineteen guards take up "Just new there I* S"Hl ffi^Jr' ,, n,, i r nr ^"T !"li 1 O0dll hlh ""' ft.? I n, t J MUn ln m *H r.lOKf.l .Xllll^ ft CO. an UN tl'l'l.. ..RUN INU -i and too much ootf. deep In to Ihe ] jungle -L*.B. f, ( r| ,, „ n >%v K | rrtving n*> ll -^ '"*-• %  Whtta, atlraetltw. ThM huhUom ConIi i Mai ii llbl* -.il is waj LsBtssBB^Lsl :l 1 mm 'q<.high 1'sstel S %  •* %  v ii vallM v-. ilit liMtlier touch t it unbe \ dra die brakiOBi mafaaut %  %  mooUi operation V won't b* i-pin win. 11 %  %  %  %  v, beeaus* it's ton in -all art rum and hreah a*a i api <>^ oi i say -" l-,.ui;hl % %  % %  I. .v • % %  19 The Wedding Reception %  noon after 1 %  : %  %  icl 11 i are vRatlons, Used i-upn and glasses should (• unobtrusively collected and washed, full dishes substituted for empty ones, ash-travo emptied, .and the room generally kept tidy. previously iCQftdad M procurable, as'il ellnunate*Cloakrooms, slmulil IKprovided. The rWBHlon gjtaarthe necessity for ^trained attempts *nd bedi>iorii may be converted held in i a late wedding in jiectlve rooms, and. the bride ind th* weddii egroom should make then All the bridal atreappearance In good spirits. '! %  I) ' -ill t. %  th* good. ,'" skirt with n blaclt poplin blouse Horrockses Piroueite—the chll—ond makes a useful town outfit, drens department — reached its llrst anniversary, it msiked the • • • occasion with a birthday party. At lan Meredith's collection complete with Ice-creams, blrththis week, the belt put in a furday rake and champagne (for the ther appearance—in lime yellow, grown-ups, of course). It was worn with a Hrev evenlnn sweater and a full black quisted At th* same time, toe new satin skirt, tilw iiOMtHl with 'ilchildren's ealhvllon was shown, ver %  bread, Over this went a black with children to moiiel the new quilted ssrtln coat. style*. (Fortunstcly. their mothers were pres e nt to coax and "Pink amethyst" and sea lavwheedle them Into place). endcr" were two shades making their first sppearance. Old colPointers from the collection, ours, dragged Up U new, Includnylon Is now used for all styles, ed Rubv Red, Venetian Red. InIt washe-. easily, dries quickly and dig and Vatican Violet. needs little ironing. Dresses had Poodle cloth, with a curlysix-inch hems, and sown haired pile, was the most outed for a long life. White ly taki imiiie oi n cheering' the company*! •.ph-i'. hJ thfc botal nd con v an Ussrt win be more may n which has been hired for the free. The bride and groom dsnee ha*"ficcaaion. The bride and groom the first piece together, the stand together In a convenient bride's father may chum the „.L place, gen. I paces to ( eeond and th.iu idegrnoin'-I. WilDll . ^ %  .,..!,. ..,.,I,.,. I.. r ..i.... where the Indies i-l.iv. haU. and thar, to (athar tftg Uiird. the congratulations and nood wishes of 'heir friends. The The bridal bride's mother stands just inside friends form uu lha door to receive the guest: NO person should monopolise the attention of the bridal pair for more than t. mome.t or two. Qnaatl then paas on to look at the presents wner* th*v hava I een arrangod for inspection, to talk together. Afler the doorstep sjieed the happy couple lifulry, H..' .oughing, Strangling Asthma, Bronchitis Curbed in 3 Minutes l.ort Interval ; erred. Qyj i'iIda othesp Presents iire displayeil lastefully id the leceplion. Small %  arda giving the ntme* of the donors .ire placed on each. ,_,.__, Ctiaxiues. of course, are not dtatendanu and lllnVliot provided The .hie for washing. bridegroom's parents and near provision of champagne or otherrelations to see that they are wise depends on the means of thr Smocking on bodies, back and .'mongsi the nrst to be given host. If it is provided ft should be front, will continue to be popurefreshments When all the guests juven In charge of some experilar smce it makes a dress adaphave been welcomed the newly enced person who can be relied table to several sizes. 'narried couple go together to the Q to see thai it is not wnsted. dining room where th* brldu slices of the eake are cut Into Finally a colour note: deep reds 'ut* the cake. In a reasonablyl small piece* and handed round. roving to be a DCSX aener nere. and vivid blues will be worn In short tlma they retire to their together with the champagne It t la a miniature fisherman's baspi.-iee of the pastel shades normalrooma to drag* for their Journey. %  nut necessary t> provide Indiket in wicker cane, fastening with ly associated with children's Parental farewells and others vtdual plate:; with the eake for a peg In the authentic manner, clothes. which may be affecting should be guests. •• standing'among new materials. If you own a poodle, you can now look like one—if you have a poodle haircut, too. ri-.herma it's An import from ng to be a best Basket Hongkong i* <-ller here. Beverages consist of chaini tttf ton-ting Ihe wadded ordials for the abstainers, and young people, cider cup. whiskey and "1... rum and soda rum and ging>r. beer and coconut water, and of course. Icecream. There is also rake, sandsriobai (diffareni flavours), appenitTed eggs, bouches and other dainties, KUPIMYB. swaafs ind nsga. Thi* rake i* the centrepiece of %  tHO boi -.hotild not be .1 ctd M' -T irt %  i-i i %  Mil %  i si %  %  ni I rrn>V* tr"Blii. i. "••(. %  v brMiiiliiM i %  | so i ti < ( i ..ii MRtfi f*l yar roHnaw • %  •-I nlrt)nf>r N. *•**-• k t .— UPINDACtlm I r 1-rln*l "<.Ki*dlai* i ..t-rl mid *i. t.r-ath:n but bullili up (haif-ata'ii t. war* •rr ftiii* •ii.-k rwie...i. K>. I -• Hire lin..i.li> laa-Iva • ,.i„l ik i • very -.1 i %  .|w. . nlghi %  %  i.i M %  .., tMk I lh full tail I. i— t'M. .. -i't ruiMlNl %  I h..r„l.( (.,(,. ..n I .... h •ill i—i is—crrm id. Mend a co Whiit a dreiui u figure... yourp in ABSJM Your new fashion* rani Ink?" riap* until fool fi ire is in •hap* .. b**g#JI*ar] nnlurslly upliite.l. lap separ it<*d. And SV bra lo do eiactlv that' Ukgl > mouUisyou. kimnrg .out rots yaur cuivr* mang| u-h.Une Irr il.-aee hoi* i our figure can loofcl W %  %  voiile colors and tftbrft %  • lfauine Maidetifoini sierea ar* madY oi Ij in ilia Uuitad SUl*t of An Iharaka lar *v*rr typa of figure. r • m RECEIVED I III MI'HKIV S VITKRINABV it) MI mi s A. \.. B.B.. t'.t'.. DD.. n:.. J.K.. r..IIS win II II \/i i. in; win It 11 \/.ll. OINT. I U \->M. (. tUUlaV VROWM U liotraalc t, ll.i.il IlruxgUl l.;i. Koebuek SI. Iii.il %  l ; V-V^-'-V'*'*V',*,V.**-,V*^*>OC< 1 l : -.-. LAVENDER the world's uot tuiaous Laverader HDLBT II OLD a O D tTmBST L O B i MEN like rVJU shirts Men certainly likr Hliirl-.! i -Tex-mndf" brotukktthl The atrikiiin IJutrprin Udfligni '-'•'itli their hiiiidHome Ktrif'H on lii:di dark backgrounds are hig Cavouritce! So cool, and CHnfortable, too And 'Tox-miiile" malfrutln arc gfanple lo aww —lh*y drips ( grnd handlf effortloagly You'll liv.*(be way they wash nnri iron . and the way the colours stay fasi 1 Aak for *Tex-made' n l.iv Buy n by the yard, and look al (IK* famoug identilical i ran V


PAGE 1

I' U.I SUNDAY ADVOCATK SI'NUAV. JUNE IS. 111! BAipDOS^jk ADVOCATE r.i.i. h* ifc. .W....U c Sunday. June IS. IS52 FHEK UNIONS ON Thursday Mr. G. H Adams CMC. Berlin. He will be attending two meetings which will be held Under the auspices of the InternaConference*oI Free Trade Unions. At tin Iimeettagl Mr. Adams will be attending as a representative of the British West Indie-* on the Executive i the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions. At the second he will be representing Barbados at the first conference of the Q, re) Council of I.C.F.T.U. Mr. Adams's visit to Berlin follows close upon the formation of a Caribbean Division o| the Inter American Regional Organisation of ICFTU. The decision to cre•i i division which was made at the recent conference in Barbados will be referred to the Executive Board in Berlin for confirmation. Trie formation of a Caribbean Division !:!!' || tvuli I historic Inndmark in the history of West Indian Trade Unions. The territory covered by ORIT is so vast, comprising as it does the whole of the American Continent that the special problems of the Caribbean area tended to become submerged in the flood of LatinAmerican affairs which clamour for ORIT's attention. Caribbean Unions need all the help and guidance thy can obtain from the Inter-American Regional Organisation headquarters in Havana. But fundamentally the success or failure of Caribbean Trade Unions depends on the ability to be found within the Unions themselves and emancipation from the leading strings of ORIT will i;ive members Of the Caribbean division of ORIT opportunity tu show their mettle. At the same time the formation of the CmhU-an Division of ORIT is a challenge to the member Unions and ipso facto a challenge to the communities in which the member unions operate. There can be no question as to the necessity for the free unions to succeed. Mr. Romualdi. Chairman of the meeting which decided in favour of the formation of the Caribbean Division of ORIT stated the position exactly, when he said that if the EPM trade unions failed, the movement would It cannot be too often repeated that there exists to-day m the world two trade union movements which -command world wide allegiance. The International Confederation of Free Trade Unions whose first General Council meeting in Berlin Mr. G. H. Adams is attending this month, represents unions whose allegiance is to the "democratic way of life as understood and practised in the free democracies. The World Federation of Trade Unions on the other hand is controlled and dominated by Communists and is committed to a policy of totalitarianism which is a negation of the very freedoms for which the Free Trade Unions have fought and still continue to light. Trade* Unions are young movements in the West Indies and responsible Trade Union leaders and officials will frankly admit that their unions have not yet freed themselves from the teething troubles which must be expected from any pioneer movement and which had naturally .to be encountered by organisations whose activities were primarily directed towards obtaining large pay packets for their members. As a result there is still to be found in the West Indies suspicion of Trade Unions on one side and on the other aggressive %  tUtlftdM on the part of some Unionists to I %  mployers. Perhaps this kind of suspicion will always exist in some degree because of the failings of human nature: but throughout the Caribbean area to-day the majority of responsible > mployers are prepared to co-operat-and do cooperate with local unions. It can even be said thatthe roles which the Unions now perform are appreciated by most employers. The relationship between Trade Unions and employers has therefore long passed the "cat and dog" stage which is kept in being only by politicians who have been reluctant to forego so easy a method of courting popularity with the uneducated. The stage which has been reached In \WCaribbean is a stage far more advanced and far more important than the mud-slinging contests of parochially minded individuals. What is being decided in the Caribbean to-day is the direction of Trade Union movement. Will it swing towards Moscow or will It support the democratic nations among whose members are included the fifty million who are represented in the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions ? At the meeting held in Barbados during the first-week in June the foundation stone was laid on which lo build a healthy Caribbean Trade Union structure devoted to the service not only uf Trade Unions member*i but to the Caribbean community and to the countries of the Caribbean. It is the duty of all who livo in the Caribbean to lend support wherever and whenever it is required to strengthen the movement towards Free Tr. -le Unionism. Because'assistance given to the Free Trade Unions strikes at the roots of the Communist dominated rival Trade Unions whose objective is subversion of the existing regimes and the inauguration of communist totalitarian controls. It will be easier for the communities of the Caribbean to support the Free Trade Unions if the Unions strive to banish suspicion and if they concentrate their energies on educating their members to greater understanding of their responsibilities to the community. It would be tragic for the free trade Unions and therefore for the community if parochialism and narrow self interest prevented the rapprochement between unionist and nonunionist which is essential to the harmonious progress of free societies. V/Hfc goodwill everything is possible. DIAL ?>>> — \ (ieorife llunte It's the tort of box any norm*) I>oy must envy. I ,LI>SIX hundred! %  oUBMMn in the Force, however, •nd only a small number can ,ii.h;-ve the ambition of becoming Before JUM h out "Dial 9M" lie I ihe policeman and he h-.s will ba Ihe new way of calling the pro! -bly chosen the wrong BffoPolice by telephone. This new fr>. merit is only one of a series Tie Central Police Station in of davelopi m-i it which have been Brittle town Is the headquarters going on year alter year behind for the island's twenty-two police the scenes and which have been formations. Here policemen enc I.D. personnel. But there are bringing the Police nearer lo the k" the facilities of a well-furmany more Interesting Job* to malnslieam of tho community' %  iil'fiajr reading room, recreation y, tilled. Hf e %  *<*. nor and restaurant service. Very soon now Ihe Police will The Police of Barbados .ire Here they avail themselves of a |>g equipped with a radio network] servant* of the people of Barbapa-ifkiocery itore run on eooperating from headquarters and. dos So it Is right that the ser. operative lines with delivery sercontrolling mobile patrol cars. which they perform anflpgxHatJnd here their hair-cut* cost f ohecmen will be needed to innn| thr services which they can perlass Tha In Bridgetown. toe control wireless seta and| ba recognised by the ^Foiue have their own tailoring t^, drive the patrol cars. After community. Only In this way can %  lauidry service: a bicycle reinvestigations on the scene of the 1 the community appreciate how pair service and of course their crime this form of police activity much thev ow( lo the Police: own quartermaster store. would appeal to me moat. No and only In this way will they be The Barbados Police are memj„ubt many policemen will feel encouraged to make greater uses bers of a community where work ,. K gam*. For the clerky types i r the Services of the Police. and play are carefully organised ti.oro aro Jobs with the immiMost people In Barbados think and integrated into routine police gration department, the licensing >f the Police as limbs of the law, administration But Ihe rouUne ( as persons who walk around in a and disciplined arrangement of a very conspicuous uniform carrypoliceman's life, reflected In the ing notebook and pencil and eager neat arrangement of cots, kits and to catch unsuspecting citizens In shii the act of wrongdoing. PHOTOGRAPHS Copies of Locl Photographs Whick hvc •ppearal in the VtlnntiitiXeirspaper Can be ordered from the . ADVOCATE STATIONERY Dtsfl and the statistical departments and the statistical publish a weekly police gazetv which Lfl printed on a small ing metal in PoUce barracks dup i, ca(in g machine and dism or In the smart click of Mtribute* to all British Caribbean They regard them as people to tentlon Which denotes an officer's be avoided rather than as friends presence of law-abiding citizens. pollcemai Many persons have good really one s life. spect of a The l>\\4.LKII THE BISHOP of Uchfltrid pal Into words recently ut Wolverliampton what hag lor many years been exercising the thoughts of private individuals throughout the world. Speaking of the people of the United Kingdom the Binhop said that "we were in danger of becoming two nations with each party in turn deriding and when in powor'destruclively undoing what the other party had done." Such violent political quarrelling he added did not make for stable government and concluded that it would be a major disaster if a time should ever be reached when the political parties became end* in themselves and not means to an end. The Bishop views British politics with clear visfon and a wholesome respect for facts. The United Kingdom as Mr. Winston Churchill said at the time of the British General Elections is to-day a party-divided country. There is little likelihood of Barbados* BW sharing the fate of the United Kingdom for generations, because even if a party form of government could operate successfully in our diminutive assembly the existence of more than two parties will always hamper party government here. But what the Bishop of Licht.eld said about the danger of becoming two nations is always present in a society where political belief is based on blind faith in a political programme and is not the result of careful thought. An illustration of this lack of political thought is afforded by the actual remark of a labour supporter in Barbados when he replied to a suggestion that a coalition government in the United Kingdom might save the United Kingdom from destruction with the comment that it would be political death to the Labour Party. No greater vindication of the Bishop's perspicacity could be made. If political parties become ends in themselves and not means to an end it is only logical for the good of the political party lo be held in greater esteem than the good of the country. To such ridiculous ends can the misdirection of human energies and abilities lead. It seems that the Bishop is a better guide to the health of a polity than the professed politician. Police Gaiette notifies in the region to be on the „,(,-. At police headquarters the tilllook out for wanted penon* •>' men* because the, knot that a ** £•* gssrdl-idicsssa. cr^restolen goods. policeman s presence indicates that. JJ^ oi^jj'nrf* VcupJ rninj Another iscinatlng police job U their misdemeanours £ crimes* PfJ** !" ^ ^.fcerneri clerks' that of the mounted policeman have been disco* Ted Others objTj davB h ile policemen of the There is a mounted police detach)ect to policemen on principle be-J^r,. navt lhf a sks of exammC nt t Blssex Hill and their ridw "" ing witnesses and of the collection jiilo the lesser known and roadie**! they rcgai d poll form of exceeding the speed limit or of committing a public nuiof photographic records. satisfactory and worthwhile. 1 The CID department is Everyone knows about the Police proud of Its "Anger-print" work Ban d: and many people are beThc .onception of a policeman ^L^CS*^f JS d'.rinS loming aware ^ th B yS Bnd ,.. p.,Mtivi contribution to the !" rk * i wa ,*,JT^& ht l?. <;,rls C,ub stability of society is still growhu-.ehreake.s '-> be tracke.d b> lo^.^ aieninundcr police ing li has not yet reached ma*!L*gZZ£bf^£2? cSfls "U*vWofl and .re helping to 'urity. lhrt w,J'f.mi,ZLr, S %  •*' %  the important police duty Perhaps the people of Barbados %  kt & l^Sl 0. pWCCtUni crime. One splendid would be far more appreciative of ^,^^'l^iXr^Sm advertisement for the Boys Club. their Police force if they knew ^Jji,,**"^ J.&tS a n d fo. %  the boy now employed as a more about them and saw them !" .gP ,5Lfi tailor's apprentice at the Central off duty. In their restaurants, canWc 2S*£l!l> is the most excltPolice Station. teens or even getting their hair SJoirtmenl In which a Policelooked at from Coleridge Street CU .L.. -.'._ m ,? n can wot k and one of its coror from Baxters Road the headTho pollceinen of Barbados (and "JJ" U u presently at Scotland quarters of tho Police Station %£j£SS£Ti£i£?*^£ KSinUdon leimln, aj first iems very stern and grim: but uSKtJirS?£2&l21 L££ "-"> how the most famous C I IT: ,*,„.„ these two points move U. SEtri^0^ DKc olme e5emT " lh world ,s about dl,MVfr *& disciplined number of huand Immediate execution of comOne of the attractions of cm„ipd activities, intelligence, trainmands must be present In a police ployment In the C I.D. is the abi n g a nd sense of duty depends tnr force as it la present in an army, sence of policeman's uniform. maintenance of law and order in But discipline is merely the backSleuthing Is best done'Without narbados. Inside the Police Headquartcii bone of the skeleton" which make* advertisement. The C.IJ3. gnori poUcem.ToT policewoman, justly proud, too of.a local.y con^'JffiiS^HS uTiSuTof There Is room In the Police Force structed box which contains all a ,-, xim „ for all the talents. A man can be '-he Kadgels necessary for crime ***** w employed u a carpenter, a store.ejectIon. keeper, a photographer. _._teleJ^tojh^on.^ on^-. ^ %  ((f ho {teo ^ or BarlMldwl hlch IS dolly becoming trul!K-l and be!t*r equlpiied the only one ot lit kind ra out Ihe rote of %  ervanB H,rlJ,d,s arid iillor one look ot the people of Barbadu.. was templed We ought lo be more proud of photographer, a teleSSr'ASiS'S %  ;; -* conjenl, %  -JjM-JJJTJSSS Sl'SS.'SSUi one Eden Completes Ten Day Steeplechase DAV ,D TEMPLE MaSSH ^ggtSrSttUgXH .rrbomo-^ nrad h v e .nc r p , Br .r. rds energy from atomic power. by Ihe crisis, a crisis I i to have been dellberLONDOT4, May stimulated Anthony^ Eden N our Urejen ForJjat l ^^^ l ^ ^"ViStarurtHarwell, about which tfie reeign Sevretao. has completed the '\ c, Go ^ !"!" y port U published is known mainlast lap of what can only be delsl Government. r^ ^ ^ ^^ th>t Drs ^^ scribed as a ten-day European Q ne 0 f the recent turn* in nnd I'ontccervo gleaned their inKteeplechase. He went lo Benn, ^ye.,1, m south Africa has been formation from—to deliver to their to *ign Germany s peace contract. he ..-vival of Dr. Malan's claim Soviet masters. Harwell, though. It was a terrible Job as he had tt> lakc UV1 .,tne protectorates is not iin atom-bomb factory. I' lo initial every single one of Its w hich are within or beside tho is a comparatively small research 400 pages, in the course of a ami o( Ihc Union but are still station that has achieved >rnmg. He also attended a bangoverned directly from Whitehall, rem irkable results under quet ir. Bonn !" %  notner in ] n lhe present state of British John Cockroft — despite the lack Cologne. Then he dashed to Paris, pu blic opinion it is impossible to 0 f technical co-operation from to sign up the agreements and nia gi n e that anv British Govthe United States. guarantees to France that she C mment could surrender the ProIt is said that due to the disw jntcd to persuade her to join icctorates. The question being coverles of British science the the European Army, Then to agkcj | 6 whether it might bo poshomb to be exploded off the North Strasbourg—the comparative peace s|b lc, If the South African NaWest coast of Australia will be of the European "talking shop — UonaUsU are defeated* at next technically supenor to anything and from there to troubled Berlin, mit election, for the British attempted in the United SUtes. whenhe went heavily guarded Conservative Government to And presumably superior to Rusagalnst Communist demonstratcuc h some arrangement with a sian efforts, lions. more moderate South African • • nil fta*. .,, %  ,* otifi — •%  Government. In the preaent ternMr. Mcn/ies. the Prime Minis-,„,i. fS Vhioiiv Ti P r nf opinion even that gesture ter of AustraUa. is used to hard nm ftas """..T? ."a, Mrttn ml hl ** "npossiblo for a long work. But one of his entourage fast on the ground that Brluun llme he d i llru&l whlch ^^ d( scrlbcd hI programme in Loni n ln q ^SV P U ni W ** mutual_ltween BriU.in don a "grim". He meant that the rtM* t, P L^r'h stor an Pro ^ •""' Nationalist South Africa will programme was a bid crowdednt b, wee b k vSi & wiXT'BB _"~. !'! ft ***#" v ? B meeting members of the For IH i \i i. Itl.l'Allt ITEMS. Try : C. S. PITCHER & CO. H.M.V. RADIOGRAMS A COMPLETE RANGE OF THESE FINE &ECEIVERS :.I I Hi: TABLE MCHIH. RADIO *.•*•?? 6-TliHE TABLE MODEL RADIO 14.S.00 r. it iw TABLE MODEL RADIOGRAM 275.00 6-T17BE FLOOR MODEL RADIOGRAM 1XS.00 G-TI'BE FLOOR MODEL RADIO•> Oo..mm.t. O.n-rv.l.v. OwCTnm.nl up into a greater number of ele• • • bc aTlm.^ ^ ^ menu. This Spring has seen two Queen Mary celebrated her 85th VXo „. c 1f _„, m..rn-11-tHr e new l^c r jfj^rtj birthday U.I month And London .soSnu^lwriedTyThe Vack of affairs and worW^nwnc—first gave her a brave show of flags lhllUKhl umong journalists. That Japan and now Germany. And a to demonstrate its affection to tho briefly Is why the Fleet Street tense situation is growing around old lady who has come to reprcForum' was formed. Not long Ud Berlin. One half of Germany Is .cnt royalty in all iU >ghty the Journalist* managed to perbeing finally cut off from tho Queen Mary spent her eightyBUa de 80-year-old Lord Huc!l other—and that mean* Uie old fifth birthday quietly, at her homo to v(ait a pj wt street Tavern and map of Europe we used to lcam at Marlborough House. Prince mimulate our thought-processes from is radically altered. Charles and Princess Anne came n c has explained that on gloomv to visit their grt-at-grandinollier; ,j ayg ne believe* tho world i> • and ihe English rose society preru nnlng Into an era of war and British opinion is much more scnted her with a prtge bouquet self-annihilation; on bright days agitated about the situation In of a variety of dark red rose that be looks forward to the era of South Africa than about develops he has been Interested in—for g rea teit prosperity the world ha> merits in Europe. EverywheriQueen Mary U a keen horticulever known. there is a sudden interest in the turist as well oa nn enthusiastic yy e had him on a gloomy day intricacies of South African pollantique-collector. he gave the world odds of about lies, and the most unexpected &—* against. people air precise Information A.E.R.E. has Issued a report of But it was stimulating, and about such abstruse matters as what it is up to. May I take that flue! Street Forum has now pul>the change of opinion on tha out of modem initial-jargon? ushed on account of the dlscusplalfcland. or the chances or the Britain's atomic-energy research a i on> tAuxy journalists talk more Supreme Court successfully defystation has told the public a cernonsense than one journalist ng Dr. Malan. t ain amount about its work both that Is all we proved. In finest quality NYLON — Both plain and in Flowered designs of wide variety. Kremlin vmms Vatican By CHARLES WINTOUR The Russian film industry havo just given the British public a fi.scin.iting picture of Stalin seen through Soviet eyes. In The rail of Berlin the Soviet dictator appears a* the kindly father of hut peoples, a man of infinite goodness and almost divine wisdom. Most Communists certainly belitve that Stalin never made a serious mistake in his life. Tho myth of infallibility is so much 'easier lo maintain when no admission of error is ever made But when the history of the post-war years comes to be written it'will be found that gUlm made many mistakes, and the biggest was his attack on the position of the Roman Catholic Church In %  i orbit of influence. There are nearly 50 million Roman Catholics living in countries under Soviet rule The persecution of their church and Its leaders aroused the whole Catholic world and led in 1949 to Papal excommunication of the Communists. France . The trial of Cardinal Mindlzenty In Hungary, the banislimsnt of Archbishop Benin of Prague, tho arrest of the Rumanian prelate-.-, the attacks on the Church in Inland—all these incidents helped to build up the strength of the Roman Catholic Church and to change its atutude from a willnigmess to live peaceably within the Cummunist States to the full And determined exorcise of Its lolitical influence against the interests of Soviet Communism. Strategically. Uie Roman Catholic Church is well placed to engage In a struggle of this kind. Everywhere in the world Roman Catholics may be found in positions of Influence. And in Euiopo they dominate tho political scene. Look at France Twelve of the 1 !" members of the French Cabinet ara Catholics. They Include tho P im Minister, M. Pinay. the V reign Minister. M. Schuman, the Dsfsmca Mln rMi M. Piano, nnd M. Le Tourneau. the Minister for Associated States. Then there is M. Bidault. the liader of the Mouvcmcnt Repubficaln r*>pulaire. one of the parties essential to the Go\ > majority. He U %  Catholic. And i al de G.tnllc. ihe leader of Ihiright-wing Opposition. llvlunim. link . Hut C atBobc tnfluMC* extends much farther than this. It la generally understood lh.it promotion at the Qua i d'Orsay. the Pi I 'ich foreign office. Is very difficult for non-Catholic*. T*-e .-•- %  thing applies to non-Catholic officers in the Army. France's northern neighbour. Belgium, is governed by a Cabinet which Is entirely Catholic, for the n Party forming the ; a Ilinnan CathoUc Social Chmlm Government 1 party. Of course. Italy Is a Roman Catholic country, led by a Roman Catholic Prime Minister, Signoi de Gnsperi. But it may be sur£ rising for people to hear that err Adenauer, the German Chancellor, is a Roman Catholic. And so is Dr. Figl, the Austrian Chatit'fllor, who has just been visiting Britain. He Is the head of the Catholic People's Party, which exercises the predominant influence In Austrian affairs. Spain. Poriiu-iil . This does not complete the record of Roman Catholic poliUclana in Europe. General Franco of Spain is a Catholic, and %o is Dr. Salaiar. the Premier of Portugal, Their ministers are of the tame faith. In predominantly Anglo-Saxon countries the Catholics have lw influence. Only one of tho Einpirt Premiers is a Catholic. He ii MLouis St. Laurent of Canada. Pi Bnt.un only 23 members of Parliament are Catholics, of whom IS are Socialists. Perhaps the most prominent is Mr. Richard Stoke.-, the former Lord Privy Seal. Ther.; ttboUci holding office in the present administration. The United States has been Koman Catholic country. hi the influence of the Catholic vote in certain key areas. Da Costa & Co., Ltd. DEFINITELY!! nn: BKST KIM rOK COCKTAILS IS GODDARD'S 3-YEAR OLD GOLD BRAID RUM


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24-Year-Old Jailed For Giving Russia Secrets Radio Operator Held Without Bail For Trial RIDGWAY VISITS UNKNOWN SOLDIER'S TOMB IN PARIS LONDON, June 14 WILUAM MARTIN MARSHALL, 24 year old radio operator in the British Foreign Office, has been formally charged with smuggling State secrets to the Soviet Union. After the first hear ing in the Magistrate's court, Marshall waa ordered to be held in prison without ball. He did not enter a plea. At the first hearing when he was charged earlier at the Police station however, he said: "I deny the charge." i Clyde T Wilsoh . wssk, at which tim.he would be expected tn pit Scotland Yard ;in'i-rlt ilK the report thai il.i* serond man %  M Ku/.u'tw end Out he hail dtBlfllMUc in.nuiililv. Tin%  : il ass? did ii"" i A Foreign Office spoki %  Britain would ask Moscow to call K %  11. Government woul which would prcJUdka tl Mai-'..ill's cant, Asked whether th ( Soviet Am/ambin had been %  man aaUl 1 think not" Zarubln. who was Ambassador in Crfnndu when thi Soviet spy ring was i '.i tn Washlngtoi ahoohred the Canadian Hi'.':' Heating Conii'i Convletton tender Iha Official Si 'IAl I ,M I. .1 IT .i\ 1)11111 K i.dtv of 14 years' Impel now being .wwlci.-d %  • r %  ..lit: the> Russians while working an one • Bril pecialtstg —r.p. Conspiracy Uncovered In Mexico MEXICO CITY, June 14. they found rrl* • • ) naklng i" .serious dlsturbeneee'' against the %  %  warn*-d ". to tOUCh "IT %  VH ii it LratioD Saturday night when I cart pi Bv l 1 | Arts. r trowtng government campaign mi postern confessed the planned disturb%  sM B I mayor said "Agin • iqenl will trj to pn within and outside Ihe thcii General Miguel I! leading opposition candidate Ira %  %  presidential r. Ruiz Cortinec Is supported by the nt party which mainI.UIKM powef in Mexico tor 2^ 1 i% IIIMVII.. favoured UM July 6 ate MOSCOW, June 1* Moscow has severed dlplimiall relations with Venezuela. It W*J the second such act Mils year IV Lkiwhtl the break with Cuba Bfaad power. In the Havana case, the Soviet % %  iicated Ulat Cuban auiMra acting undi-r United States influence. But now the deputy Russian Foregin Minister told t h • %  Vanaiiiafan Charge D A:I..II.-> formally "that the Venii| in Government obviously %  ted on orders of North American tos.es and left unpunished crimiral action of the Venezuelan polka, thereby breaking elementary comii.oiiiy raooainaad forms i.f inter national law." It was reported in Carucas that Venezuela has broken diplomat! relation* with Russia because the Soviet Showed "contempt toward | %  \. ,,/inlan nation," according ( to %  Foreign Oftlce communique. The Russian mission is OKpcd ,.i to ra* tve departure orders today. The communique said Moscow refused to receive the Venezuelan note Of urole-t against "the undiplomatic conduct" •>' two Buagtan diplomats here. As u result Veaecuela eonakten diplomatic rath ihe Ruaatan Qovamment as broken and has instructed their Charge D'AfTaire* In %  turn immediately to Venezuela." Visitors To Barbados Spent $3in. The number of passengers cmbaiking on vessels from Barbados for the period 1051-52 was 4,837 as compared with 4.617 for the period 1950—51 according to the Annual report of the Barbados Publicity Committee. There were less vessels disembarking passenger* for the period 1951-52 than shown for the period 1950-51 however. These numbers Mi 426 and 460 respectively The report shows bowevei that there was a considerable Increase in the number of calls made by Special Cruise Sntpa to Bartmdot during the 1951-52 season Buel calls totalled 8 as against 3 for UN previous season. Visitors to lh* island 1mm the Untied States. Canada and Veneniela circulated the equivalent of M.031.05S 00 (W.I ) The leport is as follows — BARBADOS PIRMCITY COMMITTEE REPORT ?> VIIDUHI Report from lit April.i 1951 in 31M March. 1S52 Publicity Cominitttfe During the year the follow ladles and gentlemen served the Committee:— J Nlbltick, Esq.,—Chairman E. K. Walcolt, Q.C. M < I' V"i CfMsrlMM A t" lloyce. Esq.—/Ion. Tree-I surer. %  I in Honourable Th* Colonial I Secretary. Hon. V. C. Gale, M L.C Mrs. J. Niblock A. R. Toppln, Eaq. Miss J. Kysh—Secretary. Mrs O. Johnson— Am. 9ec**< Inaa p! JTiiMiii Cleefc-wi. Cfiort/e, .SiBiii'il ytirporf. Financial Report A Grant of S32.29O.O0 waj rtcclvcd from Government for the year 1951-1952, which was S2.394.98 less than that applied for The Commute*was advised Q \.innienl WBg nut prepared to approve an Increase in the Annual Grant until it was apparent that greater efforts d to obtain .i largaj amount of revenue from the commercial community. With this in view, a special appeal for new subscriptions and for an Increase of subscriptions by those already subscribing, was made by the Tourist Committee of The Barbados Chamber of Commerce. As a result, an increase of f1,760.00 over that of the previous read wai %  collected. This was accounted for £ AFTl* nAOHO A WUATH at the tomb at Ibc Unknown KoU r In Paris. Hen Mal'hew 11. nidgway, new ^E^aX^ J Barbados Housing Compares Well With Other W.l. Islands' British Jet And Turbo-props OVEK mo l\ THREE YEZAJtS RKTWf IN NOV of Britati and tui ,U up .-**-or POW%  19 >w twalai One A Month %  %  1 I %  %  ''i. and ..... %  production at A r th. B> %  %  Gromyko Yew Xmbfissadnt To Lmit/an > .\\ Jum H The nurpi 1 %  1 %  air to Lon .,... ."'I U*UI\ Souroai laid lhai .1 ; 1 port Oi lb bigge-,1 m Viet dipkanotM i i' .ippcors to signify Moa* 1 %  1 W*er.| n Amb issadoruil level 1 tho s '\ %  pi % %  ; 11 MI a higher 1 evi I Foul >powei 1 it %  ppi trad th 11 ih. %  "oi 'nti.-1 .i Una in where <• %  p the Laboui r.„u to fiernu.n'P 1 The LnniiitM C inn m n< mat wnote India in.it lance u belie* bo Pan bjn iXlnuttar A 1 %  ,;i thee with th shin ol A 1 /. iruktn from London to w.iHiiingiiiii and fotlowi ii" %  I fl. IW.,.' r IP Gas Teachei Prisonerb Obedience Hjrbados Ins m thmn lo !• ashamed about B ibetr housing when compared with othw West Lndli iilandii i?t.iH'ially. Ihe SccreUrv Manager uf Hitlluu.sin. Hwrd. Mi 1 0< l...sMe>. told members yeateiUa> | *\ t > \V4'rrHs*>(\ In It.(,. 1 vurefatorv 1 pr< cniuia .1 meet on hia vimi to Anttytua \ -yu^rtRico. JmmmScm snO Trtntdnu. f nils laark will '. with %  huge 1 ; %  I for Urn 1 ad for uj are tor iiupiicating T1-111 v i,....i L'I.M.. T 1 rocreai being % %  'l'ln:. report win (>iready for publication %  the n*Kl meeting of the 11'HIMJM: H.UKI. The note eant tfl Moscow on Tuesday said that Venezuela demanded the recall of the Bo\ let Charge D'AfTaires Ley Krylov and M. S. Ahey for using violent language in pruust:ng thai arrest of tWo Hussiniis at Maiaueta Airport last Saturday. J mainly by the Increase of reSUlai •iic (he 1 subscrlptionn. It is regretted that only South American countries lew new Hubacrtberi responded to Mill maintaining relation' with the appeal. Russia.—t-'.P. I On Pate S KOJR ISLAND, Korea. Two grout* of stubborn com-' munist war prisoners Ignored orders and quickly learn-j •'<( .1 tear gas lesson In ot 1 10 their guards. In one of Koje's new live hundred miin — COfnmunlgtl sUKcd singing and %  houttng o'enionstr.ition at 5.00 a.m. Attet Raidi ignored the wandng dozen tear gas grenades were thrown In the itOCKade and prbonan turned to weepmg. five hundred CaVnasOl nother or the small %  efitaod to be flngerrHti''' they were pernai 1 grenades. The quick and bloodless OjUMtUlng of ti—lay'it dellatice followed the ramp commandant 1 1 km J Boausar*! announeemenl the mtaitha lung Kie Islam prison mutiny enricd. —U.P. U.K. Finns Seek More Rights In (lalonivn COOK IHJfURS' ^PRODUCT" INTO, BEVS FOOD TUNIS, June 14 A Eteetdenry (.eneral spokesman iiithoritiea were inweetlgaUng the alleged I '• % % % %  ,,f (| l( 1 lid Tunis%  %  1 formal demand with ihe Beisdene) Laat niaht to cook Who fled laat mifht utter a ,1.1 % %  duct* into police The Residency official rerUaed to Kiy whelhei '•mmunique 1 .r. U.K. Taking Too Little Notice Of Brazil LONDON. June 14. Tilt; TIMES OF LONDON said that British trade and cultural influence in Brazil is declining because Britain is "paying too little attention" to the South American republic, it said at the same time t!,at the influence of Germany. France, and Japan is increasing in fields where Britain has receded. In a comprehensive review of Brazilian external trade, the Times Ri<> De JaneiKi correspondent said the iccessioti in Anglo-Brazilian trade is expected this year primarily tag Britain may buy 130,000 tons of Brazilian cotton, half the amount purchased In former seasons Bell Will Lecture III '! 'ilatl. Jan' lira Ii 1 fi>ected that in the new future Eiuclish linns will not have to get pimlssion from the UK the colonial Ki-pn-scnlatioiv. seeking thl < > i1 a nu 'ling ol Ibe ComMlth Financial Secretaries' • ,. .frii-r.,. Iloo A. It. W. Hohert1 Fl l.l. •. : ad in u> United Kingdom by tinrh.meelli.i • ; %  q r a will ra . ,tv i.f united H ceenpiDsee ob tainin g Treanurv -ition uf Mi Laahlej added thm iiieri-. to federal fu in bousing. Mr %  d to Ihe island iwo sreafe >go iftee a visit through othti Weal Ibduil island' tudylng hotulng. AI ihe raaatfiig %  >( the Boaro dad to rc.. 1 raeal that 1 %  '' r-help %  be mad* avail ible lo HarrMidos fa l pgtiOd 1.1 ..ix.iii two to three monthg ... (ports, Messrs. Cinrelu and eondad io the w\ %  let i-'i .1 partod --' hw 1. r ihe American l*oin BuiltlinK Inspector 11. B '" t'H ">e they b no room for the ervleei ol Uv Pudding Inspei i"i ol the fommls: Health for St. Mich approval for the form-, 1(ii r^mOTiarioners hnd sugge-te.l lib nil.me%  Kussians Clear Passage To Berlinllighway BEKUN. Ju Soviets to-duy speeded up Ute 4 Berlin bound trucks on %  ty between Berlin and the Wc*t and cleored the backlog that )>i|edi up lute yesterdao*. We*t C.DdC W ill Sell lls Pfrsl Fai Cattle IBURY, South Rhodesia. June 14 The llrst rattle tn be fattened On the Colonial l>evetopment Corporate a Northern Bechuar.aland will be sold this I %  en the r.uKh will be marketed in 1956 It. IRobinson. Mi TI gild in an %  pound* %  marketing ..r M 1' There is Ihe growing impression here (in Itlo) that not onl> In trade mattem but In her general altitude BrlUiln in paying t.x. Iiltlc jittentH,n to Brazil and reasons for thb retraction do not always eeem lo lie understood." The Times said that in Ihe last three years Germany's trade with Brazil has increased twenty time* id to-day Germany tied with ArgenUna as Brazil's third largest supplier next to United si Brit* in. Because of the dollar crisis last year aggravated by the failure of the Argentine wheat crop BrfegD ,-ollce .aid to-day only jhas i ookcd ^ Eu ro,^. German, tin trucks waiting for clearance Fiench „ ld !,.,„„„ business flrme at the Soviet checkpoint on thoj tave Q^, acllve n Brazil and ramr was J Kill together, '•In many waya I have l>een ,. I I l-l H> U I (IT., grew that the trade union move. lubliemr he said and added that in some let 1 itnnes with some unions, the level of achievement had been highir tfi.01 he honestly had eiw-eled to find. Ncverthelesa. there was a great deal of room for progress, for the building up of unions which were p nd responsible aaaociatlons prepared to negotiate using the strike reapon only 1" the list rcfort, -r .>uring agreement to which they hud put their slg-isCheap Souvenin The Tnnid.iil On* II Lectun 'ires t" slop the rUstori and importation of cheap Coronation in Industrie, %  ouvenira from University of | and Germany. AubtO) Btarch Trhddad v,*-1 U.K Government Trmb BWIA afterlatonar, reeentl) wamad aginn*' ths In Barba-itheec "cheap ait Ing normally. lit there was a backlog of i2fi. trucks as Soviet* cleared ... 1, %  : %  %  ;: ihe usual rate of fifteen. again m-day barred Allied miliuiT Meanwhile Allied offldals said they heard %  lets pl.miied ,1 huge eheck" of eighteen million east Germans and would place "dubiH ota" under serveillance %  negotiating agrai —U.F. Plane Crashes In English Channel I>>NIX>N. June 14 An Airlines charter plane wi eight persons aixiard went down in the English Channel owing to motor failure and five survivors were l^ter picked up by an AmerICan fxalghter, Ameri*ai Miller. off Firighton ••her three persona are This eo the new mhing. The twm-engmed O Communist in raits to separate Uie ml wacarrying HM run East Germans state from sengers from Cm *,,jingH -rn influence. (motor races at Le Mans. France. | Barceli iatlonf Importi •" Mr. J. A. Bun, is cOHtilUng Ov Financial Secretary regarding ', 1 to be Ulna egabu the lm %  from Europe. W.l. Court Of Appe.l The question of folium. asanent W.•• Indian Court of Appeal end %  General Council ot the British Caribbean Bar is to he considered at a twi.-v ei %  : the Britten C * i %  Bar Association at [•..rt-of-Sp.r.ii next August The Secretary of the local Bat round! Isi.iv Hv.i'.m Baid yesterdiy that (.ohtical federation may be : % %  : %  •' ing but the administration of justice Is ever present wltti founded upon a firm and uniform basis. would greatly assist In functioning with the Government and life when the political union rank*. tun in all then v.oik he rjafte that it was desirable that In 1: m> cases the emphasis within the ...... few outstanding leaden and tort.,id. organ! Bttotu deeaocratk %  > based on an inforn.ed me tub r• • Pi It K.C. Gon£r<>8 ^ ill Meefl Every 1 Yt ars -IT. ROME. Juj. The catholic action ni II Qaolidano said that manent eommltMe of ule International Eutharistie Congf*ses %  be held t very —t-F.'foiir yean.—U.F. French Kstlals said raida lain.' %  where two tons of C already had been seized In previous raids. -t.r. hat the Building *.. IM if..11 inn Board ni if his services could ba u %  d them ea In hi proeenl i.f %  1) little tO do kfi 11 A Tudoi 1 beerved thai when ti>. 1 to Ihe %  1 1 "1 I1 MM ,.t tn.. Board could easily %  allowed then BuUdhlg In 0 laki up thai poet, m 1 1 .ni in... 1 ..,l..rv lint msti-Mit or that taken Mr. Sh.ir|* wti-i of tht Bi Rvengtni >nt and also made him .Fiimissioiiers. to operiill.e Mmp 1 .1 lettei rrom Mi J M. Hewitt, Secretary of the I'copies Co-opei 'iv. Trading s>" lety, In < lion : .1 ix; the poeail lichiiig a co-operative shop at the no rtoustng i It % %  ..! %  decided that the 1 o opei ive ollleer —Department of Sc: %  i AgTicullure—would |i report back to the iteanL 5 Secretary expressed the v ew that u co-operative shop \ might be better if run by people I O Of t.'ie same nOUalng Scheme. I \ Koad Wideninu o The Board will ask the Govern\ II.O* In UK'' J pioperty at the Junction of I y Road and Bay Street for the purptoc of widemnif and bit proving the .1. Tins motion was made by Mr. %  %  < kles. a> 0a Page 3 '.I URGETOWN, It'. Juiu. N BMUah OuJana Chwen u nenl leday aiknosgMMd thai wiii tffeel from July 21 i .ni and eteomar mil be nnoughniii |h isa passage on railway* win .I...U lietl; ih.sMiii;. i I.n, ,., Iways will go up one eenl %  I tO is.' i.l pi | ii. first i lass three to (Ouj i mile third elns' fei, roas Denteraj i 1 : I It to •* oanti Hi 1 cents aecnnd elns t.nilT II. i parcels will be U ini* l b. M %  m tinreiomnictKialions made b] .. roui Man Provi .. %  %  i a/Byi and m< at piK the ecoponuai % %  : ti • %  Ti iirt nnd Harboui The eeonea lea ra gj On pair C. VtA\vr T*> Slop DriiUHlslialioiis V^iiinsi 'tifl'jttaji !((i\IK June 14 par) and %  to mHktf %  !|ll.-A 11 | are on Monday [tab %  %  %  %  %  which %  %  %  %  Jhe choice oft ihoM who hscoqni&si Quality, and o$ tho AS who employ fcconomu.. A rare combination realised in K. W. V. "THE LABEL WITH THE KEY I Winea, Hntntlirs and lAqimun K. W.V. PAAKL TAWNY K.W.V. Coronation Wine K.W.V. Old Brown Sherry K. W. V. Amontillado Sherry K. W. V. Old Oloroso Sherry K.W.V Sweet Vermouth. K. W. V. Dry Vermouth K.W.V. VAN DER HUM LIQUEUR K.W.V. Superior "Key" Brandy The \ i o LUCh WILL urr i.V //MU7i/„ womme i/M fSBM TO MXDWAKDS MA. June 14. Mr. C. F.I-uck, t0-jn d %  %  etai i i if thi 'er since %  %  I.f It!.' ds, b.ts been ap| I I a i Kb holds the i1 tea of Arts. Law I B Tcuchera' Certificate of Education. Pillars of I tea tth ami Happiness



PAGE 1

SUNDAY, JUNE IS, 1M2 M SUAV ADVOCATE CRUISING IN MINIATURE H\ i\\ i.Al.i: Concluding Uir ... -mini of i trip In the lMt radi MurrlMH rmn Barbs** U St. Vineent. Ihe Greaadlnen and C.reiuula. Befnre 1 left Barbados I had Mad a passage in a book by Anita Leslie which made me feel that I would never be satisfied until I had sailed through the Grenadines, 1 quote It here in the hope that it will also inspire other local yachtsmen who are considerm* maklnj a cruise but cannot quit? make up their minds to talte> tfe* plunge." It goon lik* this: "Dreams cannot .injure up any more enticing %  tretQh fur a sailing boat than the hundred Islands of the Grenadines. Their names are like mu*,i, English. French and Indian toned — Battowia, Mustlquc. Petit Mustique, Montczumo Shoal. Ansc la Coite. Cannouan, Tobago Cays, Frigate Island, London Brio"?, Les Twites — oh, nuigic isles. man splinters of volcanic rock set like a granite necklace in seas of Jude and amethyst! To her list of names I would add one oc two that appeal particularly lo me; like World's End Reef, Petit Tobac. Baliceaux. Jack a Man. All Awash and Sail Rock— a steep white rock which ran be mistaken quite easily for anageress of the hotel gave us some large loaves of bread which we stowed in the cubby hole and then walked down the beach to Port Elizabeth to clear I The government office* in Bcquia an ..rrangod. One small building nouses the Treasur: Police, Custom*, post Office, Law Court, Revenue Office end the wireless station. After we had been cleared and had h,,d our bill of healtn endorsed Cork!* decided that he wanted some stamps "Just a minute" said the clerk, and bobbed around Into another little office. It turned out that besides being Harbour Master he was also Post Master. Revenue Officer. Wireless Operator. Treasurer and Clerk of the Court—a magistrate goes over to Requi i once a month from St. Vincen'. —his only regret was that he did not get separate salaries for each of his posts. Eventually we hoisted iinrhor at 10 a.m. and used the outboard to get out of the harbour. Once out m hoisted sail and started a battle with the sea which was to last for over five hours. There was a strong wind blowing and the $e was rough. aen seas caused not bv the wind but by she current. HwrHcnru* was sailing under the large cruising mainsail and the cruising )lb, but • A 0 w ** !" T r ^ ^PP < •^ 1 %  %  %  i, %  • J THE l.n.HT ON CANNOUAN At night tb lamp wai of the treacherous reels that surround the hsrootir. n schooner. But to get back to prosaic statistics. There are some six hundred islands and rocks in the Grenadines and the majority of them are uninhabited. The largest Island is Carriacou whicit Is seven miles long and two miles wide, and the next In siz r Bequln. The islands are not high, none being over 1.100 fag*, MM being ao small they look higher than they really are. The tides in the area are particularly strong, reaching nearly 5 mp.h, in certain places and the sea is shallow being an average of 18 fathoms but getting very nlthough we were literally tearing through the sea on a quarter DM ndiwas so strong against us that our progress was painfully slow. At last we rounded to the lee of Isle Quatrc and Pigeon Island, which arc very close to Bcquia. \irnd sighted-an Island up to windward which our Pilot said was Cannouan. Weary Bent So we trimmed Hurricane to point well above the Island and started a weary beat against wind and tide. The tide took us down, and we tacked up again: the tide took us down, and we WHITE BEACHES and tran.pi MuttltjiM's attraction-, a barracuda, but he had been on the line for >o Wig that he wai dead. Still no jetty What's happened to the jetty? %  I ..sked our pilot, who was looking around with a puzzled expression on his face. "Mud have got washed M replied. This being the only possible explanation we I rrf l f t rl I harbour which looked reasonably deep and had boats pulled up on the Msssssi After pulling out the anchor and furling the sails we beckoned to a boat which was nearby and the man came alongside. ••When did the jetty get washed away" asked our Pilot. "We've never had a Jetty her.'' replied the man" this is MUSTHJUE". Words failed us. We just looked •1 ou Pilot who seemed quite unperturbed and mastering an urge to murder him. went ashore. It was then about five o'clock and our first Job was to find somcwhiie lo sleep that night. Not having even considered Musllque a port of call we thought that n) would h.iv," to sleep on the beuch, but I had heard of Mrs. Maxell, v '"> .iwns the island, so we went l.. see her. She and he* daughter and son-in-law — Mr. .mi Mi Maillgot—wen I %  I ingry kind to us. They gave us a %  invited us lo spend the night with them and sent a boy to bring our baggage up from the boat. While Cedars Mustique, to my mind is just about the prettiest of the Grenadines. Il is rather flatter than moat uf the Islands and when we were there the grazing postures were parched brown, fur like Barbados there had been very little rain there .since NovcmU-r. White Oodar b?0B grow wild all over the Island and Mrs. Hazcll's house looks charming, standing on top of %  hill In the midst ( %  The population of the Island is about a bundrad and the? Ua bj tad by crowing com and cotton on a share cropping arrangement The chief export of Miistique. Indeed the only one besides cott<-n. is meat Wild Catttl and sheep are plentiful on the Island and at intervals a deep freeze Inunch comes from Martinique to buy the meat. The 'animals ore really wild and they have to be shot with Mauser rifles. Mr. Malngot also keeps some sheep in enclosed pastures but ho has to be constantly on the watch 'mm it We h ,d been told that a lad) called Mrs. And able to give us a bed f \> % %  little bout* Then "ith a fisherman qula. who had ken ver> helpful. the whole mal? poi drank ti oin rxpenat Bj i leen drink inn grapefruii %  it so we were nude capable el w.ilktnc path lo our h •-, %  I led .''.-I .. -.I. %  Baton went f^r a walk 1 o > %  rumshouT I third >•( that "i. \ rltnaa the %  • ihe Hftieultiti iin-i not i well, l • %  % %  %  i. ,. WW %  %  man* dive -hi. il> ..' %  IM wnk h grrrtt fun. Hold" Bill .. %  .. ... longer but w*e> were due U' rfl u-ed beers Tlie nexi morning Wf a walk Up to the li • i II commands a lovely view, and thin tig HOUM %  %  p %  V trie hairi K lo pass th i* %  %  I %  %  Kk-kcm %  Grenada I-land v saw gOsM came um • ba I w.aiii <ver n th-v wanted to. The sail along the leeward coa--ong Um d puffs of wind or nona %  all \vi-> st OeoraVa int.. ihe harbour 'l'h. %  %  Uttla wtiul Ihe Haiti • ane slirte.l l|on| -moothU %  il U %  .'i little ihlni %  i i l! at cane li Hi JuatsSed I d eut for "piralag arha und hom fishing boats at night to steal the stock. The Mats around the island abound with chub and lobster and there are plenty of wild In the forest, so with bil gUn and his spear Mr. Malngot can feed the family without iny difficulty. Of course there are a couple of drawbacks to this little paradise. In the wet aataoo there are swarms of mosquitoes— Mu>lique means mosquito—and a horrible thorny bush called Coshie has recently started to grow on th. island and is spreading fast. We had ,i v.. in.,, dlnnei th it night—our i,m ,, i excellent wild mutton aiul t -n made arrangements to ship < ir Pilot bock to St. Vincent worse than useless and we *i re %  run e could do bettei Luckily. Mr. t4alngOt'l tUtmt boat, which goes to St. Vincent once a week to collect mail and BuppUas, was leaving next morning nt live o'clock and could take our Pilot along. We had to alter list and got him to sign it lest %  Mneone should think that wo hid disposed of him at sea. and as a precaution we got Mr. Maingot who is a J.P., to sign It as well. Change nf Plan The next morning we went for a delightful walk and then relurncd to the house lo pack our belongings. We had had to change i OUT unexpected visit to Mustique and we now planned U eai] at cuntiouuii and Carrlacou before raactung CrKiibdu. Mayero and the Tobago Cays, unfortunately, had to Ba crossed wff the li'l. Ham anal a hard wind blowing when we left Mustique and it continued nil day. We started off in Boo fashion, howevor, with smal! mninsall and lih boomed out and surfed along the seas with the tide helping us. We •• Cay, P 'it Mustique and Savnn Island nnd drew r!o*e to IVtlt From Ihe i the MM 1 rough and v.. bad i" .steer very carefully. The tide -1 It took %  lorur time to get from there lo JupiterHead. Cannou.i Ihe sesi was rougher than ever, hut once we Rot around th* point it was like %  millnond anil we were able lo use the outboaid to take us into the harbour. We were relieved to 11 nd 0*1 the jttv was still thrre and aft. entering the hv without hlttln: nnv of the rOtfs sthOWB OH the chart we dropped OUI MESSRS A. S BRVDEN SONS (BARBADOS), LTD. PO. BOX ao, BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS PHOSFERINE for more confidence! If lack of confidence wxrries you and you feel tired and depressed through overwork remember how very useful I'MOM I K1NU uaibeei to others in t similar M"e. Mrs. Haselis house on MusUq acou that ufternouu so after pay win our "hotel" bill of one dOttti ea< h ra h;h Bav. Carriacou. HUbborouan bgj u .. ratnarfcahla place, it seem* to inIba birthplace of howling puffs o( Wind. We entered past a cheek.> hitie island caUnd -lack %  Mm ., .< ad near the (attj we had retuniad to cJvili7tion and on landing we nervously ttpdaad speeding motor cars. Hi %  rOUgta is .lean, hut there %  it except that it is even more life less thin Kingstown nnd hav pavements. We were luckv in that th*schooner thot brings ire and other provisions once a week arrived ih it afti-rnoon, so we could ba* in her. We weiv VOl proud ol ha a* we turned, when .In | inn I., our natal ll > %  Itghl. lo see her lying pi lit anchor 111 the BUD • II..I IM on Till: END Once a week a doop brings mall and providon* to Cannouan. This is a big occasion in the lives of the people and they all flock down to the Jetty much shallower near the islands, tacked t*p again: the tide took There are some tricky reefs us down, and we tacked up around too and quite often ono again. Lut we got there eventusees breakers far from land. ally. Clearing Ship I had been told on Bcquia that But to get back to Bequis and we should anchor near the jetty our ship. We deckled to make an so I was trying hard lo spot it earlv start from Bequla so that while Corkie pulled in the flshwe would arrive in Cannouan in ing line, which had been tied off. time for luncheon, To our surprise we had caught V VINCENT AND THE 0RENAD1NEH Jllxl IflTi'llV-f/ . — Ut — Weatherhead's ..s (750 lo box) Ihaatb K "Uootr-" %  lodltad Throat Tab .. Aspirin T.ii um i Soda Ho arb, %  oi Pck Wa P %  .!. Sh.k [iiushless Shaving Craai I ih'.' un i %  otttn Cream „ Corn Sc ( lvent .. Kl.O. Dry Cleaner I'hi no: iin I'-II tM Poult IV ., Saccharin Tabs. "Pascalls" Marsh mal lows „ Glucose Bar lev Buggl "Boots" Insulin ,. Live, I .. Hack & Kidney Pills ., Halibut Oil Cap*. 1007s Callard & Bowsers Nougat Callard & Bowsers Butter Planters Peanuts QatOI Rot h I lives hug Blltzai (moid \ Idle Salt. Tablet* Fei Jay CoI' BKl'tr. HlAlllllllllAII LTD. Ilrjid 9t IWOAII Slfrrl. SKI.I.ING AOBRS KX BiMiiv |.|:KK in i i. CO. V PHOSFHRINBrnay be lust what you Deed to put back strength and energy. PHOSFERINE i vives the appetite and, in ao d il revives keenneM for work, tor enterprise. PHOSFERINE herpa to build up staying power g i ves you reserve of patience and goodwill when you need them moat. in ttsht spaad waass %P4BT. % liquid or tablet form, a Tablets ml PHOSFERINB aqua) io drape. THE GREATEST OF ALL TONICS for Depressiso, Dtbility. IndlgMUxi, Specially HARRISONS BROAD STREET %  Real J^eautiful Plain and Brocaded Satin u StSI yd. Allovcr La. %  Mill. B.V.D. ITnlea Bulti M llnvi. Sizes M lo 411 ins. — MJtl per Suit, (ients Khaki and White ', length turn .iver top Hose. CAVE SHEPHERD & (0., LTD. 10-13 Broad Street Si. 10 lo Il'i inr,. -ii $1.37 pair, ( %  enls Prolex Sus|M-iulcr-.. si/, s. M. Lmrfr—flMpn pair. GMH Towellilii; SjM.rK Sliirl-. colliir .in ,.i 1^ il short sleeves. /ipp Kiistencrs. si/. M.d. $3.71; l.arm-sl II Pure Irisli Linen Hcmstililu-tl. Initialed Handkerchiefs all popular Initials fi $1.10 each. Van IleuM-n Semi siifl collars in Hlylc II nnd 99; siii4-s: II 1 %  lo IH ins. '/ Klc. each. Boya % lenifth turn over lop (fanc> striped) Hose in H..0I and WOOl & ddt-.n mixture; %  !/> %  K'-j to 10 ins i $1.69; $1.32 per pair. SOMETBMN6 XKW! soill/H/Vf, USEFUL! &f A 8CPB ABS0RI1LNT IELI.ULOSF. SPONGE (Not Rubbci) In n variety of delightful colours and fi>r every purpose. n Ball) fur your Toilet For 0Ur Bub) -For your Household It nuauico the skin Il lathers soap Into foam It Is ll> sii-filc can be cleaned In IH.II Ins i: i Fresh and (lean See Them aad (irt Years Te-aay KNIGHTS DRUG STORES DKLIGHT YOUR PARTIES M//7/ TBftt *-; FINE FRENCH WINES Hilnvr just rerrlvrd a sliipmcnt of Fine FRENCH WINES from M.-.MT. SH Mil. A FILS FRKRFS — France nn) vrDtn per bottle 3.85 DE HE \r.\'H |047 3.00 MACON IM7 J.7S CHATEAU NOT DU PAPE m; .. .. 3.M 1 i>\ l-s in 1 HONE — HM; .. „ 300 Bl AUJOLAIS IM7 , „ .. 3.00 si. JUUKH 1043 9M WHITE WlNFst CHABL1S I'MT u T bottle 3 65 !::[()!( 1947 ., 275 HIESLINl I Wine) — 19 ..... 3 12 r.EWUEl [Rhine Winel IM .. .. 356 I A 'lorn BLA1S i KilNK — IMO „ 4.30 The rulluwlni (.ixxlii have htst keen received tram IIEIN/ In (anada MIXED PICKLE HeUii SWEET Ml Kl B I i nWKlt PICKLE |i iW CHOW IAUCE .DISH DRIED : KR per Jar .97 ", ". M ,. .. J7 ,. -M .. .. M7 „ -M STANSFELB. SCOTIA #0.. #.r.






Sun

Fe LT
ESTABLISHED 1895



ap Advo

BARBADOS, og) ty

24-Year-Old Jailed For

Radio Operator Held s
Without Bail For Trial

LONDON, June 14.
WILLIAM MARTIN MARSHALL, 24-year-old Visitors To









. . PRICE
i bid

Giving Rus









SIX
®

sia Secrets

British jet And

‘Turbo-props
OVER 100 IN THREE YEARS



Nee iaithign lance =

RIDGWAY VISITS U



~

NKNOWN SOLDIER'S TOMB IN PARIS

mang

-



'
t
i

radio operator in the British Foreign. Office,

BETWEEN NOW AND 1955, well « ne hundred
has been formally charged with smuggling State Of Bivens geturbine mainline pass ireraft (jets
secrets to the Soviet Union. After the first hear- Barbados S08 SO fre) Wilh be Guilt for the witt ae
ing in the Magistrate’s court, Marshall was ordered The output will expand still ee © Proeeer

capacity is built up

edt ee. a a dates

to be held in prison without bail. He did not enter
a plea.

At the first hearing when he was charged earlier
at the Police station however, he said: “I deny
the charge.’’
ite Clyde T. Wilsoh ordered Marshall’s next

Spent $3m.



Gromyko New —° 0°:
‘ i number of eae ' jr ? A vor h
arkin vessels fr arbados A b reesgy f oweret y the
for the period 1051-52 was 4,827 7” m CASsSac or t Bi ' : '
as compared with 4,617 for the |



Magistr









































|
hearing in a week, at which time he would be expe eriod 1950—51 according to r
+2 xpected | P é 8 | rbo-prop et
to plead P the Annual report of the Barba- a ne on | One A Month
Sa Raniitack Wiabik wih Lethe ic ia alin i bre dos Publicity Committee. is eae wails eal
Scotland Yard anti-espionage agents arrested the youth] ‘There were less vessels disem- LONDON, June 14 |... a et oe ieee
who looks like a high school senior, in a London park last | barking passengers for the period The surprise appointment of Pe and t heiis stead
night. Marshall, formerly a radio operator in the British rts “ own the perio’ the roe deputy Foreign Minis- |; i Wi 384,. a secs
~ 2 : n ocaiaias saath ati a leans eed ° : <5 owever. nese numbers ter Andrei Gromyko as Ambassa- e af % et naa
Embas y in Moscow, specifically was accused of violating | cre 426 and 469 respectively. der to London forecasts a major Eta een
Britain’s Official Secrets Act by giving information on] "The report shows however that Soviet diplomatic offensive against |POUCS NP Shatin hers’ works.
“diverse dates and at diverse places” to Pavel Kuznetsov, | there was a considerable increase the rearmament of Germany, dip-]i}\ Guiput at that time wil be
second Secretary of the Soviet Embassy in London. The|in the number of calls made by lomatic sources said today. loubled. The number of Comets
hau a) ia Ge ee eulavis a Special Cruise Ships to Barbados ‘ . t of ee a wee
| charge said the information would be useful to an enemy. | Guring the 1951-52 season. Such! Sources said that Gromyko’s] 2 XR cee mee, Ae Ke and
Chief Inspector William Hughes ; calls totalled 8 as against 3 for the appointment, part of the biggest ; olls sted he oe by go
said that Mayaiait: “ice caerbated previous season. — at * Scviet diplomatic reshufles since m ares whe prog nee Steg =
adie weriiing Pine ‘Corie’ V ne la Visitors to the island from the she war, appears to signify Mos-][‘."* es XX ae Sh OFOers 105 ie
arm ith, Manca’ tatecat® os enezue United States, Canada and Vene- cow’s. readiness to negotiate, with | “Y°"-powered Comet and will do
Tila HOE Adentihed. ‘The Wocelin ° . zuela circulated the equivalent of the West on Ambauassadorial level 1° o sh ut t ae ae ae ateee
| Office refused to confirm ox deny | Russia Bre $3,031,055 .00 CW.1.) eras if the Sov iet proposal for a higher produ ion o von or the Ser-
the report that this second man | The report is.as follows:— a ees Tens Vi tion at the Wey
was Kuznetsov and that he hadj , ee eer bridge ore ent b r
claimed diplomatic immunity. The e tions It appeared that the diplomatic) 614", a Gon a
| Soviet Embassy did not comment.| BARBADOS PUBLICITY Sflensive (Would. be centred on! Dob ey, et eee
A Foreign Office spokesman de- MOSCOW, June 14 COMMITTEE } . > ee L suite bd: Is opposition tplan “ft tepping up p odueking
clined to say immediately whether] yyoscow has severed diplomatic ae Pree + ¢ > ’ en haees ies ee to . Ferman i440 six a month. Much of this {
ita . te di . | as Ss § atic : Ri yay, « ‘ ent, e 4zondor ap- : seh ea 7 ei
| Ramtatrvisee een callie gin eee REPORT 2 hres macia A waa sari Dw sn 3 a er ey |i wt | isi iin Sa
cere i Bes 4tlthe second such ac his year, sy me er, 8 rench flag. a a 30 nce tbe handled by becontract, with
Government would take no action | following the break with Cuba | Annual Report from Ist April, Behind them, wearing sunglasses, ig Gen lsentowc retiring NATO chief, (International Radiophoto) saree oe emcee or Leal embly ‘Weybridge,
feee would predate the jury in when Batista seized power. 1951 to 31st March, 1952 | <2 =e ire ee : + ; to Foreign Minister A na re¢ p) where 1 huge ney shop—now
Marshall’s case, — he ; Vyshinsky was ;: ae : almost complete ll be used for
Asked whether the Soviet Am-| In the Havana case, the Soviet . ‘ | o ‘ ih nsk} s announced to~; 4" ork Fifty-four Vise ‘
bassador Georgi Zarubin had been] press indicated that Cuban au- Publicity Committee om 6 res “ oe ie ve the shift of Ambassa- ave : Iready he ig yes ‘ nak tee
informed of the case the spokes-|{horities were acting under United} During the year the following! al a a Wastin Zarukin from London | delivery by 1955. ,
man said: “I think not.” Zarubin,|states influence. But now the|ladies and gentlemen served on| egeiuiner wngon and) follows the} “at Bristol, where 25 Britanni
} who was Ambassador in Canada|qeputy Russian Foregin Minister|the Committee:— e - peg or of Alewander Panyushkin ' a injing te belie tulle: for the
when the Soviet spy ring was|tolqg the Venezuelan Charge} J. Niblock, Esq.,—Chairman. | ~ Chin UP on to Peiping,! British Over A binary Corpor-
broken there in 1946, has just been |p’ Affaires formally “that the Ven-|__E. K. Walcott, Q.C., M.C.P — e ] Cl ee Ne) an > rs ee lation. toolit up is well ahead for
see Washington. He was|ezuelan Government obviously | Vice Chairman | ecammpaiaien maximum production. Pt seg ire
absolved of any part in the Cana-|acte orders of North American A. C. Boyce, Esq.—Hon, Trea- . ; being de for duplica
dian ring’s activities by the Cana- pote ae left unpunished crim- surer, Barbados has nothing to be ashamed about as regards ‘a pie ane’ toeaoiaae cupliceess
dian Investigating Commission, iral action of the Venezuelan Th Honourable The Colonial x T their housing when compared with other West Indian Transport Fares Io of the Prote turbo-prop engine
ee slice, the reaki - Secretary. : ve Sa nvator ans . j well. un. ¢ :
_ Conviction under the Official ecm ae tas Hon. V. C Gale, M.L.C. Gas eaches islands generally, the Secretary Manager of the Housing , : is well up mn the progress being
eee a icine of. internadiodint law.” Mrs. J. Niblock. Board, Mr, T. ©. Lashley, told members yesterday, Be Increased In B.G. © ' le alreraf
snalty o years sonment. ,

A. R, Toppin, Esq.



Prisoners

i fatory to ting “a report on his visit to Antigua, e el
That is the sentence now being] y]{ was reported in Caracas that} Miss J. Kysh—Secretary. A haat ame)ica and Trinidad. Ph cb: ila ;
served by Klaus Fuehs, canvicted|yenezuela has broken diplomatic) Mrs. G. Johnson—Asst, Secre- ° : \ Sucre 8 report will be ready for publication at the next) qy a ee Tee Tae SOD
of giving vital atomic secrets to|relations with Russia because the tary. | e ence 4 Pp . , GEORGETOWN, B.G. June 14. -
the Russians while working #8 one /Soviet showed “contempt toward | Miss F. Bullen— Clerk-in- | meeting of the Housing Board, British Guiana Government to- |

of Britain’s top atomic specialists. |the Venezpelan nation,” according




































































































- e -
Charge, Seawell Airport. Mr. Lashley added that Puerto/day announced that with effect Denionstrations
= ‘Ito a Foreign Office communique. ’ , , KOJE ISLAND, Korea, r o ’ Rico, due to Federal funds, were} trom July 21 rail and steamer 4 RD:
The Russian mission is expect- Financial Report [wo groups of stubborn com- l KK. Firms Seek doing very much work and Were | porvices will be curtailed’ | Against Ridgway
ed to receive departure orders to- A Grant of $32,290.00 was re-|munist war prisoners defiantly | “. very advanced in housing. Mr. throughout the colony, second | ¢
e “ day. ceived from Government for the|ignored orders and quickly learn- More Rights jLashley returned to the island/ (jase passage on railways will | ROME, June 14
onsptiracy The communique said Moscow] year 1951-1952, which wasjed a tear gas lesson in obedience - two weeks ago after a_ visit), apoliched: passenger arash Premier Alcide De Gasperi and
refused to receive the Venezuelan | $2,394.98. less than that applied/to their guards. In one of Koje’s| In © 1 Ln through other West Indian islands) -siways will go up eae tL vig {is Cabinet met today to survey
{ ] = =~ note of protest against “the un-| for. The Committee was advised! new five hundred man enclosures | n soltomies studying housing, from five to Bis mts sae hiss erni t plans for suppressing
nmcovere diplomatic conduct” of two Rus-| that Government was not pre-\c¢ommunists started singing and} At the meeting of the Board first class, thre c re fou 2 Pp eet ny Communist attempt to make
sian diplomats here, As a result| pared to approve an increase in! spouting demonstration at 5.00 a.m. (From Our Own Correspondent) — |vociorday it was decided to re- mite ray x ro four cents per | trouble hen General Matthew B
Eee Venezuela considers diplomatic re- | the Annual Grant until it was - Rede nt » warning It is expected that in the near[’. wend to the Government that]! ird class; ferry rates}; ete Se onl ee
? } After Reds ignored the warning . : ane 00a . Damerar ‘ 3
Fe 2. llations with the Russian Govern- | apparent that greater efforts} . 4 Sate ts cade Nake future English firms will not have the services of the two experts on | 2¢TOSs emerara and Berbice |, fou vy wisit to ¥
; a dozen tear gas grenades were ; c he U.K h session Ml a “
ment as broken and has instruct- | were made to obtain a larger thrown in the stockade and _pris- to get prmission from the HS) vided self-help housing be made|"vers wi go Up 50 per cent, | finister the Int x Mario
MEXICO CITY, June 14 ed their Charge D’Affaires in| amount of revenue from the com~) oners turned to weeping Treasury to form subsidiaries in) vvail ible to Barbados for a period | Y'% j6 to 24 cents first clas:, 8/Scelba gave the Cabinet a com-
tik ee atti ns meted os 1oq | Moscow to return immediately to | mercial community, With this in Five hundred Communists of {the colonies. Representations] or spout two to three months.|!9 12 cents second clas vhile } ensive repor nm measures
they fc und vi case ne s litical Venezuela.” view, a special appeal for new ther ‘of the small e slo ag (Seeking this were made last year! 6.6 experts, Messrs. Garcia and tariff on goods livestock and r in four cities whera
cer suivacy sages ti provoke subscriptions and for an increase i a : t a aaron 3 a at at a London meeting of the Com | Hanson vere seconded to the|/Parcels will be increased by 20! the ni SHAPE Commander will
Sah ae roa rel. The note sent to Moscow on | of subscriptions by those already ee € ee ae teder oni monwealth Financial Secretaries’} woot indies for a period of two}per cents, ome, Nap! Plarencaand
gover nment Presidential candidate Seay ae ert Venera dee subscribing, was made by the seranue ited i k z 1 blo ‘dless Conference, Hon, 4. R. W. Robert- years under the American Point) ,, } vinx f © the north
ee ‘ C Ee Pek tae eres ie eee Committee of The sani es grenad es, : fe bs tens . son, Financial Secretary, said!4 Programme, ie new charges are embodied | sip e headquarters which
1Z oo se oo ot charge D’Affaires Ley Krylov and | dos Chamber of Commerce. As aj quelling of to-day's vance 'O~|today he understood that geners! Ndi ieee in the recommendations made |, it inder See last night
R asinine. es jaained his aide M. S. Aliev for using | result, an increase of $1,760.00j|lowed the camp commandant) Ooicont is to be issued in the : Building Inspector _|by a Four Man Prove Cominit- | panned iy bite atin anti
oe 2 < yee: bo violent language in protesting the |over that of the previous year was Brig. General Haydon L. Boatner’s | tnited Kingdom by the Chancellor | The een ore Rs 3 oth aS tee appointed six months ago to! garthe a ener eee
Remote atior Saturday night artust Of two Russians at, Mai- collected. This was accounted for|nnnouncement the manths long t of the Exchequer, which wii re-|~°CD!4 Fas dT epee ey tae consider ways and means effect \. ly told Communists that their
pomene ano Dorms ae nthe queta Airport last Saturday. | mainly by the increase of regular | Koje Island prison mutiny ended.| ove the necessity of United > upeen. bed = oe SS ina the: wconomnies of tue ‘Tran ar eat hadulea® fen
vhen he atte ac © a > sirteiasd ten oH Y ain een . : SSIU) Wile y spector ¢ . S- i I . i
Palace of Fine Arts. ee Uruguay SRE oe Se: It is regretted that —UP, Kingdom companies obtaining eee te senior fica rh Michael port and Harbour’s Department Ito in Ror will not take

Three men arrested for des- vant malaihintns “Soluisenn” wins she. Se gs te Treasury approval for the form=| Fhe Commissioners had suggested The economies recommended are” pli ai
troytng government campaign Russia U.P bol ce 7 n R On P. B fo ation of subsidiaries in the colo~} nat the Build Tnepactor : be @ On page 6. “.

; : . ‘ . BIA Ue age 5 e 1 vecture t i tha re «Building Inspector ae
banners and posters reportedly} % e 4 nies. transferred to the Housing Board | 2°00%6%G99GG669GGGG69069SG99GGGGG99 FOU F9OVVIOON
confessed the planned disturb- 7 ne . | . Department if his services could % ss
ances. { | r th e o Tu tr dad, Janraica | Cheap Souvenirs be used there as in his present job x tho ho %

Sotomayor said “Agitators and Kk k | | ttl The Trinidad Government i8 he had very little to do. * MLCQ 0, 140 WV. &
elements affiliated with the move- e e a Ing oo 1 e Mr. J. D. M. Bell, Lecturer in| considering meysures to stop the; Mr, H. A. Tudor observed that} ¥ . . x
ment will try to provoke disorder Modern Economic History and importation of cheap Coronation when the post of clerk to the % hQCO: and %
vu aoe eee oe theatre. | N ti Of B il Research Lecturer in Industrial] souvenirs from Czechoslovaki | ¢ ommissioners of Health became | , ss

genera igue’ enriquz 1s ; , Relations at the University ofjand Germany. Aubrey Starck,| vacant, the Board could easily] X .
Jeading opposition candidate in| O 1ce raZl Glasgow, left for Trinidad yes-| U.K. Government Trade Commis-|poye allowed their Building In- % 0, those who x
Mexico 5 tense presidential race; terday evening by BWIA after | sioner, recently warned agains! |cnector to take up that post, as st ~
Ruiz Cortines + by the LONDON, June 14. spending three months in Barba-| these ‘cheap and tawdry” Coro~|too, he would be getting an in- % x
ee poke ne ae Foo || THE TIMES OF LONDON said that British trade and aoe, ec tecing to the Trade Union| nation.souvenirs branded in Eng-| creased salary. But instead of that R conomy eb x

ained yer Mex1c os ; . tesco er ’ _&' | students. . ‘ “insults”. ‘The ting . ate gr oar : nl ¥
years and is heavily favoured in| cultural influence in Brazil is declining because Britain He told the “Advocate” shortly eee en oy oo ond eenoti oo ea ri ee ee % x

> 6 elec ; ; : : ’ ; a 2 . tae 2 orts é , 8, | was sharge o » Scave ‘ . 4s :

ae re —U.P a ‘paying too little attention” to the South American abe berore mr ener ne vane ae Mr. J. A. Bain, is consulting thr | Dep irtment and also made him % A rare combination realised in x
ave public. It said at the same time that the influence of ork i eeie” pean el tie eS - Financial Secretary regarding |>jerk to the Commissioners. % 8
Germany, France, and Japan is increasing in fields where] <> jaa been most ki Se, ) steps to be taken agains! the im ‘ onaradita af % ‘
j 5 Britain has r ded 7 : . faloful te “hit mo the elaeee portation: of these cheap item The a oe ee ae letter x ~
COOK POURS Ina somnaiaaneiere review of Brazilian external trade ot “ot atiidenta:: eee jfrom Mr, J. Mi Hewitt, Secretary x « a 5 *
‘ ‘ ae : : c ae aan P * of the People’s Co-operative| $ ‘5 &
“PRODUCT” INTO the Times Rio De Janeiro correspondent said the recession] Ax far as the students were con- Wis. Court Of Appeal Trading Society, in) connection| © ‘THE LABEL WITH THE KEY %
, : in Anglo-Brazilian trade is expected this year primarily | cerned, he said that the eee, The oe : br ae a vase with the Board’s decision to ex-| % s
: racy Toh 1 hens « “ . ‘14 “0 , | ing thing had been a very hea thy } manen es’ ndian Cour’ 0 lore the possibiliti f estab-| Fe . ° ‘ gs %
BEY S F OGD pene Ereain may. iy sae pane ot cee — atmosphere of real companionship| Appeal and a General Council of lishing ms socaneatre shop at the % Wines, Brandies and Liqueurs %
4 ° hal the amount purchased in former seasons that had prevailed throughout) the British Caribbean Bar is to be} pine Housing Estate, % %
" aes ce ‘Ss sheep. The “There is the growing impres- the course. As a group, ar had! considered at a two-week Con it was decided that the co-oper~ | > K. WwW Vv PAARL TAWNY %

A Residency General spokesman : ° Pa i ; got on very well together, ference of the British Caribbean fic S0jn| B ee :

; ater a mich ¢ ities on here (in Rio) that not on oe : ative officer—Depertment of Sci- . ; x
said today that French authorities ussi1ans Clear By ee ves : oa ci nel i A “In many ways I have been} Bar Association at Port-of-Spain | ence wid . pietit ten outs ‘ st R K.W.V. Ceronation Wine x

vere investigating the alleged in trade matters but in her genera ; r 4 £ ure—would in 8
pteenpt at poisoning in the palace attitude Britain is paying too little wleasantly os by the pro- =n ; ag Sean eae s terview Mr. Hewitt and report | % * K.W.V. Old Brown Sherry x
:T ¢ Bey Bi is- : attention to Brazil and reasons for] 8ress tha e trade union move-~} toca r Councl-—isaac a'any | back to the Board, 1% ‘i ‘
pda err , eg eae Passage To this retraction do not always seem| ment has made in the Caribbean”,|Baid yesterday that political fed-| ‘The Secretary expressed the | % K. W.V. Amontillado Sherry %
couche lodged a formal demand e ; to be understood.” = ae ee eee ss an the et ay Ss Le oie view that a co-operative shop) % K. W.V. Old Oloroso Sherry x
with the Residency last night. to BerlinH hw The Times said that in the last| te™™ tories th some unions, g bu 1e administration of jus-|might be better if run by people| % x
investigate the matter : three years Germany's trade with level of achievement had beenjtice is ever present with and | of the same housing Scheme. 2 K.W.V. Sweet Vermouth. s
eels . eis ne ae ea enty t¢ higher than he honestly had ex-| properly founded upon a firm and ‘ . * <

hte er meen | ee Ses Brazil has ———- noch sae pected to find. Nevertheless, there] uniform basis, would greatly! ,., Road Widening % K. W.V. Dry Vermouth x
Slate’ omit cought fim. in the BERLIN, June 14. |Zentina as Brazil's, third largest| W%s # #teat deal of room for pro) assist in functioning with , the| 7° io consider purchasing the| & K. W.V. VAN DER HUM LIQUEUR 3}
act. 6k “pour! nine wiets é ede ; > Uni “totoe ena eress, for the building up of} Government and life when the|™Men* fo consider purchasing the ioc oir %
act of pouring a product’ WS ode . thr prin By supplier next to United States and) inions which were permanent political p00 came. property at the junction of % K. W.V. Superior “Key’’ Brandy . $
migals.to be served in the palace, the highway beer Berli d Britain. y and responsible associations pre- Beckles Road and Bay Street for] % : x
police said. t ghwaj etween Berlin an Because of the dollar crisis last pared to negotiate using the strike the purpose of widening and im-| $ 3

The Residency official refused to} the West and cleared the backlog| yes, aggravated by the failure of ; ; ' roving the site - *

ce whether th , that piled late vestardety: Wi year aggravate y the failure Of) weapon only in the last resort, + cae proving the site. x x
oe wieina Pars product, wag stl pops oe ae yester ay. estlthe Argentine wheat crop Brazilland horouring agreements to E rench Raids On This motion was made by Mr.) $ $
poison. He said a communique Ger an police said to-day only has looked to Europe. German,| which they had put their signa- John Beckles, x The %
went =, ued after labordtory te oe ee en clearanc@| French and Italian business firms] tures, ; Communists @ On Page 3 x %

yor. i ae checkpoint on the; },,Â¥e been active in Brazil and 2] Jn all their work he said that! si . vee. 4 4 x

bliaicieinnsee ligand east ent border, and traffic was Japanese trade mission is now|it was desirable that in nm any | R ihe ieciaes 1 LUCh WILL ACT AS } % “¢ $

3 proceeding normally negotiating a®reements. cases the emphasis within the enew eC FINANCIAL, ECONOMIC | * Pillars x
4 ,e ~ as f - is p —U.P. union should move away from a , eons ty 1 ee 4 ‘be x

C.D.C. Will Sell Its Last night there was « backlog er mctcaming leadese atk. Ot PARIS, June 14 | ADVISER TO WINDWARDS | % %

Fi 7 if. . 120 USE ae Soviets cleared wards organisations democratica ly | France renewed her nation wide (em Cur wk Cemensindeat) | % *

irst I at Cattle ee 7 i. six eae ey aon Plane Crashes Ti based on an informed membcr~|crackdown on the local Communist GRENADA, June 14 % oO %

instead c* the usual rate of fifteen, @ On page 10. * |party headquarters to-day with Mr. G. E. Luck, 30-year-old! $ .

3 “ § N 7 . 4 yee yer id) ¢ .

SALISBURY, South Soviets ¢ ' tous Sad 4 = a BN police raids near Paris and a/Guj ‘rly GBSS Assist- | x x

Rhodesia, June 14 aaeaetae Aiea ae sy English Charnel vital naval base at Toulon the} a; in February last! % %

The first cattle to be fattened} - n cs ne ¥ . " ‘ Ministry of Inte announced eur appoints f stant S ary| > >
on the Colonial Development pie ys ee re LONDON, June 14 RC. Congress W ill | The q ssaeertae art 5 earar as} (Fir soa e ee i eo ise tare 2 Hea lth >
Corporation's rar in Northern|4V4eC Osnriais , sais ney hearc An Airlines charter plane with | authorit lisclose nae see bari in conor ig 2

vo pea “eon «|persistent rumours that Commun-] ¢j “rsons aboar. os W 7 T one Cy eee aon vel Windwards after a transfer since | % %

eC eee i oe a elt ts planned a huge “loyalty rig gy i pe aye Meet Every 4. Ye Ars {militant Communists had. been|1949 from the Governor's office as | x x

year and the ers raised} 7 . vs , s ile ¢ arreata ‘ a sh late last| / “ ‘hi oaihnee q

on the ranch e marketed in|¢heck” of eighteen million east|motor failure and five survivors ROME, June, 14 oe Teds -— iat 2 oa s panes Bact oy ¢ nat x and *

1956 R. L, Rot Manager of |Germans and would place “dubi-| were later picked up by an Amer- TY ieealie aes 7? ede ee cee ot e ewes at) Windwards, has been appointed to | % X%

the oject an interview|ous elements’ under serveillance jican freighter, American Miller, he catholic action newspaper |Saint Etienne i outhern France | Financial and Economic) % >
lend take their radios off Brighton Il Quotidanmo said that the per-| Interior officials said|Adviser to the Windward, conse-| $ %

I 1 th iginal plans for| — ; The other three persons are}™Manent committee of the Inter- raids launched early this morning|quent upon the d to a ¥ ° &

0 i quarter mill on | This coincided with the new missing. The twin-engined Con-| national Eucharistic Cong! were “very successful” at Toul my post of 4 $ Happiness $
1 the timate market-}|Communist threats to separate the |sul was carrying : 1 pa 0 P ad decided that religious gather-|}where two tons of Communist)Smith. Mr. I % S
of 50.00 ttl ear had!Red run East Germans state from |sengers from Croydc rt to!ing ich as that recentiy held at (rae oe = ayer . Bachele $ x
Sa < t? y ent to' any western influence. ri Le } wrance. | Barcelon culd be eld ery | seize ir yreviou raic I ar ‘ bt 6 bb 6 OOF 64,6656"
wr luence —U.P. ye en UP. celia liom allay : : re ro wlth 4 rs’ Cer PIPER SPO V9OVO CDDP PP POIV PD CPIDEL PPI PLEE ADIT
a


=

PAGE TWO

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{ BASED ON THE ORIGINAL PLAY OF
)

















SUNDAY ADVOCATE

R TREVOR BOWRING,
M Direetor of Messrs, DaCuosui
and Co., Ltd. left for England on
Friday morning by the S.S. Gol-

y

; =
@ =







Every spoonful gives you














felis sihsibicapaclaesio~esiihadaions ean oll fito where he will spend about
five months’ holiday. He wa Ac-
mT © r e a n d m oO re companied by his wife and
deerme ite italiani ele tt anlar Poudaugoler anda his motner virs.
; Violet Bowring

é ' y d Omer passengers leaving for
ne n e 7 & y a n e U.K. py the Golfito were’ Mrs.
ae ee ee W. H. E Garrod, wife | of the
g q PChiet Engineer of the Waterworks
a t sg € S$ Ss } who has. gene home tor @ short
iene aieiaabtadietenninnee } hei day, Mr..C. Christie, “Assis=
tant Engineer of the Barbados
Electricity Supply Corporation
@ Every spoonful of ‘ Kepler’ gives you a rich who has gone up on :ong leave
supply of vitamins A and D. accompanied by his wife and
@ = These vitamins are nature's wonder workers, daughter Lorna, Mrs. L: V. White
= gg. health and freedom from iliness. of Essex who was returning home

en,

after spending. six months’ hof-
| day steying, with her niece Mrs.
|C. Be Dowding at “Brambiey”,
Waterford, and Miss Evelyn Out-
ram of St. Matthias who will be
spending five months’ ‘holiday

Engineer Ends Holiday
ETURNING to Trinidad dur-
ing the week by B.W.LA.

women, chiidren—all should start
& king tasty *Kepler’ to-day. ‘

EPLE





& BURROUGHS WELLCOME &@ CO. PRODUCT were -Mes-wmdy Mines An Wickman
' Avents oF > 5 rene and their daughter Geraldine who
o om eee were holidaying here for the pa;t
Sse two weeks staying at. Sandy
Beach Hotel, Worthing.
‘ iT M Mr. Wickman is an_ engineer
GUARANTEED SERVICE. Bh). Mr. Wickman is an engines bes.
atty “te, diendh bad “euteors a mOoNEOn aha Fo, Lae, Annual Reunion
that we heave ternovad erred | Minister Leaves UEEN’S COLLEGE Oid Girls
yi Amite in Ane . 27
Willian Henty Street to John | EV. HUGH McADISTER, are reminded of the Annual

ire
Luilding between the Modern Dyes
Shoppe and Johnson's Stationery on
Broad Street >

Minister of Stone Church in Re
Tcrento which is in — affiliation
| with the Pentecostal Assemblies
of Canada, returned * home on
| Thursday via» Antigua and Puerto
|Rico after spending six days in
Barbados in conjunction with his
*® uncle Rey, Harvey McAlister,
® conducting religious services at
the Steel Shed, Queen’s Park and
the Christian Mission. He was Ltd.,
| Staying at the Hotel R>yal.
uncle has however stayed on to from Trinidad on
) continue the services.
| Rev, Cy A, Barker,

union which takes place at
Queen's College on Tuesday, June
17th, at 4.45 p.m.

There will be a netball match
between. “Past’’ and “Present”
girls,

Attended Funeral
. H. O. B. WOODING, QC.
and a Director of B.W.1A
and Mr. Colin Wooding of
His Trinidad Leaseholds Ltd., arrived
Friday by
B.W.1L.A, They came over to at-
Superin- tend the funeral of Colin’s father
|tendent for the West Indics of which took place the same a‘ter-
the Pentecostal Church with noon.

headquarters in Trinidad who ar- Transferred To Washingtcn

Stee BALDINI & COW. |




ET -
POOP POOL PLOE DDD ®®O@GQOGHY DY

I’m glad it’s here
again !!

JUDGE
HEAVY





SeODE SOD,







‘rived with the McAlisters, will *
ENAMEL WARE |be remaining in Barbados ‘for [REGINALD McCONNEY
about ten days before returning was the guest of honou: at
home, - a party held at the home of Mr.
; * and Mrs. G. L. Hinds, Welches
SAUCEPANS — Black, Ivory. Green * Businéss And Pleasure Christ | Church, on Thursday

(all sizes and shapes) | R. ROBERT JAISINGH, a Night. “Reggie”, who is a Senior





> iti ; ,j. Clerk attached to the Accountant

MUGS 3 | dent in ‘Trinidad, one Py ome General's Department, has been

COFFEE & TEAPOTS—2 Pint $| sion Agent, was. ainong the pas- Seconded to the B.W.I. Central

KETTLES—6 Pint (Brown) >| sengers who arrived here on Labour Organisation Office us

JUGS—2 Pint (Ivory) @| Thursday by B.W.LA. He is on Washington, D.C, ‘on three

” $| a two-week visit on business Months’ probation in the first in-

FRY PANS — 10 $| coupled with pleasure. stance, and after that for a period

® ; YS | For Four Weeks Gaba’ te tein’ te me USA,

, RDWARE SUPPLIFS 3) APRS. OLGA GRANNUM and [atbr this monthe :

8 GENERAL : aN amie Miss Muriel Sealy arrived 8; ’
1 er ne ane be tcc uneed 3 by B.W.LA. on Thursday morn- Full-Time Job



$| ing from Trinidad. ' They have
’|/ come in for four weeks’ holiday
% | and will be staying at Indramer
j| Guest House, Worthing. This is ald Mervin Ishmael of Barbados
Miss Seaty's first visit to the who now lives in Leicester. Mer-
colony but Mrs, Grannum spends vin served in the British Army
her annual holiday here. for twe years before transferring
“Bim”’ to the R.A.F, from which he was
| HE name submitted by G, demobiliseq in 1948. Coming’ to
Rice, “Grey House’. Marine Leicester, he married a local gir’.
Gardens, “Bimbird” has been They now have two children,
accepted in its abbreviated form Mervin hopes to take his ESc.
as “BIM”, the name for the degree in the next two years with
Auster Aircraft of the B.L.A.C, Censtitutional Law as his special
The Committee of. Management Subject.
cordially invites Mr, G. Rice for Paid Routine Visit
|@ spin on Tuesday, 17th June, at R. C. Lk, CHADDERTON,

about 5.00 p.m., immediately fol- Si
lowing the christening ceremon- Superiaven taut sl pe oe
er Sewing Machine Company, re-

Oo 918 ACTORY work by day and
enor F law studies by night is the

regular programme of 26-year-









TO-DAY 2 SHOWS ° p.am.,
A STAGE SHIOW FOR THE FASAELY
ROBEL DO — The Strongest Man on Earth

See a motor cycle go over his chest

CLE F © ON = Famous French Magician

c ies.
the BOOHOD Bros. — Stunt Kings ay ie say turned to Barbados on Thursday
. ot age too, is invited to at- morning by B.W.LA. after a
; end the christeni “ ‘9 8 3 -W.LA. t a
Pit 18; House 36; Balcony 48: Box 60: truly pelasign to ieee a routine visit to British Guiana
Kids and Nurses: 15e. House: 20c, Balcony though the aircraft is technicaily Ses news in connection with
; part of the club, nis firm.

its existence
here would never have been pos-
| sible without the generous sup-
} port of all Barbadians, the Public

Scout Notes:





1ONIEE — FONIEE 8.30.

TYRONE POWER ANN BLYTH who so enthusiastically attende= EXEt Ww ] IVE
re the dance at Paradise Beach rt

| Club last year, the members ol
| Government who endorsed and The Executive Committee of the
aided the idea thus providing the island Scout Council met on
| inspiration for the members, and Monday last at Scout Headquar-
|the many business firms who %!S at 5 p.m. The Island Com-
contributed financially and mate- â„¢ssioner. presented reports on
rially towards ‘the erection of the (#) The 1st Caribbean Jamboree,
| hangar. To “Bajans” of every (2) Bob-o-Job Week Campaign,
| Walk of life, this is your club and (c) St. George’s Week's Cele-
| your “BIM”, ’ brations,

Remember too, that club mem- _ The “Bob-a-Job”

hh NEVER FORGEL YOU

TALENT AUDITION-—This Morning 9.30 a.m,

ROODAL









report reveal-

EMPIRE ROXY

| bership is open to every member ed that a total = $1,016.69 has
| ; been received from 25 Scout

: beh af TODAY TO TUF. 177TH 4.20 & 8 15){}| Of the community over the age of ‘oat

TODAY TO TUR. TH 4.45 & 8.15 rop Xo tae howiie 17 years) viaiE. and pe oll Groups, 3 Commissioners and 1

Alexander KORDA presents



|“BIM” is here to stay for the donation, A more detailed report

“ FIRST LEGION ”

: =F = benefit of the communit r will be published next week. Com-
Vivien LEIGH Laurence OLIVER |sincerely hope that BIN Jes missioners and Scouters in charge
With Charles BOYER | will be. along ss0on to ‘akke ve of Groups are reménded that all

And

ecards, used and un-used, should
have been returned to the Honor-
ary Treasurer of the Association,

‘ (ON WOMAN " | family grow.
THAT HAMILTO Sally FORREST | Keefe BRASSELE The Committee of Management



1



and members
OLYMPIC : s is “i Pon Ohta e Mr. Osborne, when collections
TODAY & TOMORROW 14.30 & 8.15 NEVER FEAR thanks to all who have made the mo ce aaah "ee eee
Humphrey BOGART IN ROYAL | club 4 reality, and express their pe ia fh a awe ta ay adiaatt
{ jiuncere desire to have you with detay as a complete statistical re-
“'SIROCCO LAST TWO SHOWS TODAY , them at the christening. port must be compiled from their
4.30 8.15 s
AND ; cm (PSS SSS OSS SS
Jon HALL in - - - Gc Al T Y
“COWBOY AND THE “ HURRICANE ISLAND” 4» | The Gara es
‘. en—St. James
INDIAN AND TODAY and TOMORROW 8.30 p.m. (Next Door
With Gene AUTRY ms MAT. TODAY — § P.M,
as OCEAN DRIVE Bing CROSBY — Jane WYMAN
TUE. TH WED. 18TH 4.30 @ & 1D With. Zdmond O'BRIEN i in
; Be ‘HERE COMES THE GROOM”

“MAKE BELIEVE BALLROOM” Fe won por TUE. NTH 4.30 @ 810 TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY 8.20pm.

a oo * | Q°RACHELOR AND. THE _ COTTON FROCKS
AND ote Saute } Cary GREOBBY soxer: ‘ELASTEX SWIM

4 “BLOOD ON THE MOON” ¥ COTTON FLORAL

Robert MITCHUM s

ESOT



NOW IN STOCK



BRIDGETOWN















and Mrs. DAVID BADLEY.

SSE
JANETTA DRESS SHOP
SUITABLE FOR THE HOT WEATHER

STRAPLESS | BEACH DRESSES

|

SUNDAY, 1952

Palin

Wedding At St. Matthias
ESTERDAY afternoon at St.
Matthias Church, at 4.30
o'clock. Miss Angela Mary Inniss,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. L.
Inniss of,"Burford’,, Golf Club
Road, wes married to Mr.. David
lierbert, Badley, son of Mr. and
Mrs. J. H. Badley of “Laving-
ton”, Fontabelle.

The ceremony which was fully
choral with Mr. G. C. Williams
at the organ, was conducted by
Rev. M. E. Griffiths.

The bride who was given in
marriage by her father, wore a
dress of Jace and nylon, featur-
ing a tight fitting bodice and long

JUNE 15,



pleeves ,with a_ scalloped lace
yolk outlined in beads, The full
skirt was of nylon with lace

ferming a peplum in front and |
continuing into a train at the
back. Her head-dress was a lace
juliet cap with finger tip veil and
the carried a bouquet of white
rosebuds and spltees- 2

She-owas attended by Miss
Wendy Inniss and* Miss Pamela
Reed as bridesmaids and the
Misses Dinah MacNeil and Chris-
tine Thomas as flower girls. They
were all similarly attired in
dresses of pink embroidered or-
gandie over full pink net
skirts. They wore shaped head-
dresses in pink net and organdy
and carried bouquets of pink
radiance rosebuds,

Mr. Trevor Davies performed
the duties of bestman, while those
of ushers fell to Messrs. David
Inniss, David Read, John Grace,



With ‘Amsterdam News’

EWS has been received that

Mrs. Muriel Rollins has ob-
tained a position on the Adver-
tising Staff of the Amsterdam
News, New York. Mrs. Roilins
who was with the Editorial De-
partment of the Advocate, left
the Colony for the U.S.A. in
March to reside with her mother
and sister.

‘A Son Bill Simpson and “Boo”. Patter-
ron,
MNONGRATULATIONS to Mr. A
and Mrs. Victor oe lend ae tahoe oe.
the birth of a son yesterday * . ‘oad, “¢
morning. This is their second neleae Th eens spent at
son and mother and babe are , @ Crane,

dceing. fine.
Dancing Display At C.H.S.
HE Headmistress of Codring-
ton High School invites all
members of the Old Girls’ Asso-
ciation to a dancing display which
will be held on the lawns of the

Leaving ‘lumorrow
D* AND MRS. A. O. HEN-
. DRICKS who have super=-
intended the work of The Church
of THE Nazarene during tie pagt
three years, will be leaving to-
morrow maening by B.W.1.A. for

school to-morrow afternoon at Puerte Rico on: their way to the
4.30 o'clock, U.S.A. On leaving © the island,
they wish to express their sin-

Svent Three Weeks cerest gratitude’ as well as to say
RS. NICHOLAS MUSKA- farewell to their many friends.

‘LUK whose husband is em- They will be directing the Bar-
ployed with Clarke’s Steamship bados Exhibit at their world-con-
Agency in Montreal, returned to vention in Kansas City,..Missouri.
Canada on Thursday morning by Trinidad Civil Servant

T.C.A. + after amending thi -* ISS EMILY JOHNSON, a
weeks’ holiday with her parents Civil § ;
Mr. and Mrs. G. D, Frost of ervant attached'to the

Port-cf-Spain branch of the Gen-

“Stanmore Lodge,” Black Rock. — eraj Post Office returned to Trini-

Off To Dominica
EAVING by B.G, Airways on
Thursday morning. for
Dominica were Mrs, E. Har-
greaves and her daughter Sheila
who were spending a _ holiday
here. They came down by the
S.S. Golfite about two weeks ago
from England and were staying
at Cacrabank Hotel.

Mr. Hargreaves who had come
up from Dominica to meet them,
has already returned. He is Chief
Electrical Engineer employed with
C.D.C. for Dominica and St. Vin-

dad on Wednesday night by
B.W.1.A. after spending a holiday
here staying at “Kingsley”, Bath<
sheba, and the Hotel Royal.
Military. Policemen
Commended

(Ft CREIGHTON SEALE and
: Pvt. Richard F. Ford, twa
military policemen of the 175th
MP Battalion were recently com-
mended by Lt. Col. James E.
Long, Stuttgart Post Provost
Marshal, for the apprehension of
suspects wanted for armed rob~«
bery two hours

bank : after receiving
Back Home - oe

e commendation reads in

R. MAITLAND JAMES and party “I want. to commend Cpl.
his small son Jeffrey re- Seale ang Pvt. Ford for their

turned home on Friday afternoon
by B.W.LA. from Trinidad where
they spent three weeks’ holiday.
Mr. James who is Manager of
Bata, Swan Street Branch, also
visited Tobago.

attention to duty, alertness and
decisive action in making this ap
prehension, Actions such as theirs
are indicative of the good work
being done by the military polica
of the 175th.”

MEETING

tees and friends of the movement.
Mr. F, J. Cole, J. P., former Pres-
ident of the old South Western
Local Association was unanimously
elected to the Chair and the busi-
ness of the meeting proceeded.
The following appointments were
then made: President: Mr. F, J.
Cole, J.P., Vice-Presidents: Mr.
H. A. Tudor, Hon. Dr. A, S, Cato
and Mr. R. M. Cave. Honorary
Secretary: Mr, C, B. Long, Hon-
orary Treasurer: Mr. V.° I. Car=
rington, The following were nom-
inated representatives to the Island
Scout. Council: Mr. F. J. Cole,
Mr. C. B, Long and Scouter A.
Smith of St, Matthias Group. Five
Scouters, five Lay members and
ene member of each Group Com-
mittee were elected to serve with
the officers on the Executive Com-
mittee of the Local Association.

Scout Headquarters

From Monday next, 16th June,
the office of the Resident Tutor
of the Extra Mural Department of
the University College of the West
Indies will be situated at Scout
Headquarters (telephone 4653),
| Mr, Aubrey Douglas-Smith who is
the Resident Tutor, is also Scout
Commissioner for the Southern
Area. Consequently, S.H.Q. will be
the Area Commissioner's H.Q. and
Mr. Douglas-Smith will also be
glad to deal with calls for Island
H.Q. The office will be open daily
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m._Mondays,
Fridays and on Saturdays from
|9 aam, to 1.00 p.m.

returns,

The Executive@Committee ap-
proved of the awa§d of the Scout’s
“Thanks Badge” to the following
persons:

Mr. H. N. Chandler, Mrs, F, J:
Cole and Mr. A. Masterton-Smith.
The presentations will be made at
the next meeting of the Island
Scout Council which will be held
at Scout Headquarters on Mon-
day 30th June at 5. p.m.

St. Michael-South Local

Association

The Local Association of the
St. Michael-South sub-area in the
Southern Area was successfully
launched on Thursday night last
at Scout Headquarters, Capt. R. A.
Sealy, the Assistant Commissioner
in charge of the St. Michael-South
sub-area, welcomed to the meeting
a very representative gathering of
Parents and Guardians, Scouters,
representatives of Group Commit-

SSS,

to Singers)

in colourful Designs
SUITS
TWO-PIECE

| In the presence of a large
| gathering, and under the Group



Soe € Mr. George
(Dial 2310) Bit Mdm Mater ai | Spencer, nine Cubs of the 3rd
To-day: und Tomor- || ragcy to rues, |] Lait 2, emews, Today AN ALL ROUND UTILITY CLOTH 367 oon $ .84 Bridgetown (Cathedral) Group
row 445 & 830 p.m. he ; ai ; In Whi 1 | Were invested at § p.m. on Tihurs-
145 & 830° p.m, Warners Action n te and Colours | day on the ds of the Cathe
ee ec { grounds -
STARLIFE™ SIERRA HIGHWAY 301 PRINTED SHIOZE 36” 89 |dral Chureh House.
with 1eyihott a favourite (Coler) Steve COCHRAN re a a eee. Py sug Pe ame cr ain ete tte kivae pn 8 o~ Ceremeny oft
including Doris DAY, Audié URPHY and Y o s ie Toup’s new
Soe MacRAB & Gene Wanda ENDRIX, Matinee Mon. a Tues) OPENING NOw mi Cube t aaa the parents. of a
Nelso —— 4.45 p.m. also 4 ubs turned out in full strengt!
Thurs, Special 1.30 p.m, Pe oe eee ‘NGOS ChtaEe i to see the investiture ef their
saaenar herrett Doible: LRIONDE ieee, | FOREVER” LARGE SHIPMENT OF JOHNSON’S GOLDEN-DAWN WARE eee
‘ DEATH VALLEY” “EN SOCTETY” Ti Oe ee

and
“RENEGADES OF
THE SAGE"

———

Wed, & Thurs,
40 & 850 pm

John Garfield & Single and in Sets.

e Tea, Dinner, Coffee

Tues. Night (only)

8.30



tenner
(on

elas
Stage) |



oun 7a Week. 480" be WLLRGAL ENTRY” pee tan. -Atomeda i

8.20 a.m Howard DUF® & Action! Mi |

Giant Double - - “CALAMITY JANE” |/PROFESSOR CLIFTON},
“DALLAS” (color) Also the Western

& SAM BASS”
Yvonne DE CARLO

Gary COOPER &

Thrille
“HIGHWAY, 301”



“BRAND OF FEAR”













are aa oe eee Howard DUFF Wakely 2 | . Nal 4790 YOUR SHOF STORFS

THE SAME NAME BY TENNESSEE WILLIAMS: WITH VIVIEN

LEIC

MARLON KIM KARL
34 BRANDO HUNTER MALDE



T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

The Ceremony proper was con-
ducted by Mr, Cyril Braithwaite
(S. M. Bethel) assisted by Miss
Edith Knight (C.M.) and Miss
Joan Wickham (A.C.M.).

After the Investiture Ceremony,
the G.S.M. eddressed both Cubs
end Parents complimenting them
on the correct path the boys had

| taken towards manhood. After the

DIAL 4606 ceremony the Cubs played games.

TCAR NAMED DESIRE

PLAZA

es IRS. 19th

pia 2310) AE i}















——_

a


SUNDAY, JUNE 15,

1952



At Fhe Cinema;

OPERATION STARLIFT

Hy

G. H.

GIVING A BOOST to the warmheartedness of Holly-
wood show business, STARLIFT, with a galaxy of sereen

personalities can be seen at

the Plaza, Bridgetowm It is a

musical film, but not the kind usually associated with Doris
Day and Gordon Macrae, both of whom take part. The
film is based on the actual activities of the stars when they
visit Travis Air Force Base to entertain treops awaiting

transport to the East, and th
°



DORIS DAY.
As such, the glamour and in-
terest of the film depends on the

encounters with the stars, who
play themselves, and the talent
specialties of several popular
~ singers and dancers. These high-
lights are strung together on an
unobstrusive thread of romance
whereby a movie star and a G.I.
from her home town reluctantly
pretend to be sweethearts, for the
sake of a publicity stunt, and
after due time, find there is no
need for pretense,

Though they play themselves,
Doris Day, Gordan Macrae,
Wirginia Mayo, Gene Nelson and
..Ruth Roman are all part of the

main cast, and we have Miss Day

singing “You’re Gonna Lose Your

Gal” and “ ‘S’ Wonderful” to an

audience reaction that leaves no

doubt as to her popularity. Mr.

Macrae and Lucille Norman sing
_ “What is This Thing Called Love”

which is also interpreted by the
danting of Gene Nelson—tops as
usual — and Janice Rule. Miss
Rulé is a newcomer to me, and
her dancing with Mr. Nelson is
almost on a par with his.

The guest stars include Jane
Wyman, James Cagney, Randolph
Scott, Phil Harris, Gary Cooper
and Frank Lovejoy, with the last
three in a riproarin’, shootin’ bar-

room drama of the wild and
woolly west!
The film is somewhat lengthy

and necessarily episodic, but you
get your fill of famous stars,
set to entertain the troops.

VLL. NEVER FORGET

YOU
Playing at the Globe, this film

all

TYRONE POWER.



e returning wounded,

stars Tyrone Power and Ann
Blyth with Michael Rennie in a
somewhat confused period drama
in which an atomic scientist,
obsessed by the grace and dignity
of the 18th century, and suffering
from a nervous breakdown, be-
comes reincarnated as one of his
ancestors and relives the events
recorded in an old diary. During
the first part of his sojourn in the
18th century, his foreknowledge
of events and scientific discover-
ies, plus a sprinkling of modern
expressions in his speech, set
him apart as a sort of wonder
man and a wit, but gradually he
is aecused of madness and witch-
craft, and when he regales the
beauteous Duchess of Devonshire
with a recital of her charms, her
popularity and her intellect as
though her demise had already
taken place, action is promptly
taken and he finds himself about
to be committed to the asylum.
Fortunately, he rejoins his own
century in the nick of time, pre-
sumably cured of his love for the
good old days.

_ The transition from the present
time to two hundred years ago is
emphasized by the change from
black and white to technicolor
photography, and though there are
some quite beautiful settings and
lovely costumes, some of the
backgrounds are obviously painted,
whieh [ found jarring.

Tyrone Power and Ann Blyth
make a charming couple—whose
romance was one thing not set
down in the diary—-but their act-
ing is stilted and I _ preferred
Mirhael Rennie as Mr. Power’s
colleague and friend and Dennis
Price as the effeminate fop of the
times,

SIERRA

_ SIERRA is a dramatic Western
in Technicolor showing at the
Plaza, Barbarees. Filmed in the
mountainous country of Utah, the
scenery is magnificent and a
glorious background for the action
of the film,

Starring young Audie Murphy,
Wanda Hendrix, Dean Jagger and
Burl Ives, it is the story of a
father and son who live the lives
of outlaws for fifteen years, owing
to the father’s conviction of mur-
der, on circumstantial evidence.
While rounding up wild horses
one day, the son meets a young
girl who is lost. It so happens that
she is a lawyer—which didn’t
seem highly eredible to me—but
with her help. and the timely con-
fession of the real killer, the

father is exonerated.

Both Audie Murphy and Dean
Jagger do good work—the former
as the bitterly anti-social son
whose loyalty to his father is in-
tense, and the latter as the parent
whose mistaken conviction has
forced his son to be an outlaw.
Burl Ives plays an interesting old
character—Lonesome—a friend in
need and a wandering minstrel.
Mr. Ives is famous for his inimita-
ble making and singing of Ameri-
can Folk Lore ballads to the ac-
companiment of his guitar and his
performance of these songs—
“Sarah”’—in particular, which is
sung to his mule—is admirable,
Wanda Hendrix is not particular-
ly convincing as the lady at-
torney, but she is pretty and is
adequate for the rest of the role.

As T mentioned at first, there is
plenty of action with an out-
standing sequence depicting the
stampede of over a hundred wild
horses. This is made more realis-
tic by some special angle photo-
graphy and it is the exciting
highlight of the film.



SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



rardening Hints PARM AND GARDEN xy acricoa

Grow More Food

HAVE YOU STARTED THAT
VEGETABLE GARDEN YET?
“ If not, do not delay. The
ground is still dry, yet the
showers which we have had have
softened it sufficiently to make
the digging of beds and the laying

In a short = =
start, ground w be
wet and cloggy. ad it will
therefore be much more difficult
in every way to lay out a garden.
an deciding what oe in
e vegetable garden, a_ good
plan to include certain foundation
things as permanent members,
thi that are used almost daily
in kitchen. These are Pars-
ley, Peppers, (sweet and hot)
Seasoning (Shallot, Thyme, Sweet
Marjoram) Bonavis, Peas, Spinach
Pumpkins, Okras. To keep up
a supply of these essential things
needs only a little forethought
in planting. Such ants as
Okras, Peppers and others often
seed themselves, and these seed-
lings, which are as a’ rule very
hardy, will found useful for
re-planting. vegetable garden
should be without a Spinach vine.
Once started, Spinach gives no
trouble providing it is near
something that it can climb on.
It needs no help, but will climb
and arfange itself, and will prove
a most useful member of the
vegetable garden, Spinach is not
a very popular green, Fv it is
rich in iron, and so v ble in
our diet. Its unpopularity is
probably due to the fact that it is
seldom cooked or served palata-
bly. If Spinach is well cooked
and rubbed through a sieve into
a puree, and served hot with a
sprinkling of cheese, or a spot of
butter on the top, it is one of the
nicest of our greens.

Considering how_ eratic the
imported supply of English Pota-
toes is, and the scarcity of yams
and sweet potatoes, it would only
be sensible to grow a crop of
English potatoes in the vegetable
garden. As these potatoes are
apt to rot if kept in large quanti-
ties for any length of time, it is
better to plant a small quantity
every few weeks, and so keep up
the supply of fresh new potatoes.

° ge skill is needed to grow
Eng potatoes. They can be

grown all the year round, but they”

the wet months from
te December.

Choice Of Sweet Potatoes

Consult tlre Department of
Science and Agriculture as to
the best kind of potato to plant.
It would be, a pity to plant just
anything and so yerhaps be dis-
appointed in the lack of suc-

cess.
Preparing The Bed
English potatoes can be plant-
éa in the ordinary vegetable
garden bed, but, it must be well
repared a couple of weeks be-
re the potatoes are due to be
planted. Fork in plenty of well
rotted pen manure, and some
feat mould from the Compost
Heap. Make the whole bed rich,
but light and friable.
To Plant
Choose small potatoes to plant,
and if this is not possible then
cut large ones in two or three
ieces. But remember, each pota-
or piece of potato, must have
referably

—

one eye or bud, and
two or three eyes.
potatoes, or pieces, four inches
deep and one foot apart. Plant
with the eyes up, and, if a cut
bit, with the cut part down. Two
weeks after the potatoes have
sprung, apply a dressing of
V.G.M. and four weeks later give
another application of this wse-
ful manure. These potatoes grow
close to the surface, so it will
probably be found necessary,
during their growth to bank the
earth up around them to keep
them covered. Because of this
tendency to grow up out of the
earth, some people plant the
potatoes in shallow drills or gut-
ters, so that they can more easily
be kept covered with earth.
When the potato foliage starts
to turn yellow and dry off it is

time to reap the potatoes. Care ¥

ener neat

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Ready yourself to get aboard
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and start the new week right!

The Big News on Wednesday, June

|
18th and remember — IT’S KOO |
}



FOR YoU!



lant the }

THE PUMPKIN

FAMILY—IiL

To-day, we continue withthe cultural requirements oi

this group of economic plaris,

generally referred to it

literature as the cucurbits. First and foremost, they require

a rich soil medium for best

results—plenty of well rotted

pen manure preferably, or rich compost, thoroughly incor
ported into the planting sites; secondly, as a group they

prefer to be sown directly

in permanent positions rathe:

than transplanted from seed boxes or nurseries

Thirdly, an adequate supply of
moisture is mecessary, hence
plantings any time from May to
January are likely to be the most
Successful; Fourthly, they are all
subject to powdery mildew of the
leaves and, in the case of cucum-
bers and melons especially, unless
brought under control promptly
by spraying with Bordeaux mix-
ture or dusting with sulphur, this
disease is liable to spread and
eventually ruin an entire crop.
Pamphlet No. 3 of the Agricul-
ture Department tells all about the
disease and to quote: “To control,
the vines, on the first appearance
of the disease, should be thor-
oughly sprayed with a 4—4—50
Bordeaux mixture or dusted with
very finely ground sulphur.” We
Suggest, therefore, that growers
keep handy some sulphur so as
to be ready when the attack be-
gins, as it surely will come. Apply
the dust by gentle beating from
a muslin bag when there is
moisture on the leaves, To make
Bordeaux, follow the instructions
in*the pamphlet or seek the ad-
vice of an agvicultural officer who
will gladly help you in these or
similar troubles, until the neces-
salty experience is gained. Now,
for some further detail culturally.

The pumpkin may be regarded
as the most important food plant
of the group and probably the
hardiest. It often defies the normal
preparation of a well defined bed
and, so long as its main root can
get sufficient nourishment, the
vine soon rapidly spreads, It loves
a rubbish or compost heap to run
over and we have even seen it
quite happy and preductive over
a stone pile. Where field culti-
vation is taken seriously, a good
plan is to make up fairly lar,
mounds or hills, mixed with libefal
amounts of good dung; inserting
the seeds at the sides of the prep-
aration and leaving not more than
two or three plants to develop to
each hill. In the semi-shade of
widely spaced catch crops like
Indian Corn, pumpkins seem to
thrive. When the vines begin to
flower, examine the individual
blooms—some will be ‘male’ and
some ‘female’, which is a charac-
teristic of the group as a whole
must be taken when doing this
ob not to injure the potatoes.

se a long pronged fork. and in-
sert it well to one side of the
plant, lifting the whole clump
out at once. Should any of the
potatoes get injured, keep them
‘on one side to be used first.

LLLP LLLP OLA LLANELLI.

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f bees and other imsects are
numerous, hand pollination will
not be necessary but it often is

to ensure good creps. Experienced
farmers know this and act accord-
ingly, but beginners may over-
look this point,

Cucumbers, squash and melon
are more adaptable to the garden
bed, need less space than the
pumpkin but the procedure is the
same, Sow seeds in small, well
mangred hills, spaced about two

or three feet apart each way. On
farms where there is an old trash

come-top heap site with moist
ceeaying compost plentiful there-

in, se plants find a medium |
much to their liking, Cucumbers,
in )purtieular, appreciate some)

brushwood to run on, They beat
betier and the fruits are kept of
the ground where they are more
subject to fruit rots and boring
worms. Putting flat stones or bit
of old shingle under developing
molons is advisable. Do not le
cucumbers get over-ripe before}
harvesting. Let them be crisp and

tender for the salad bowl
Marrows and christophines like

some sort of arbour or fence to

run on. The _ christophine 1

propagated from a growing fru
and received detailed attention in|
these notes under date of Sunday, |
August 12, 1951.. |

BARBADOS Fi.) oiNG

From Page

In presenting his motion, M:
Beckles said he betkeved whey |
would agree with him that sine
the Board had entered upon th

Bay Land Housing project, vehi
cular. and pedestrian traffic had
increased considerably and ever

effort should be taken to minimis
the risk of accidents oecurring my
that area }

“My motion therefore seeks ta]
eliminate the blind corner at the
junction of Beckles Road and Bay |
Strect, which, if effected, would |
give greater freedom of move-|
ment to both pedestrian and vehi- |
cular traffic, particularly to those |
living in the area,” he said. |

Rented Houses

Following queries from Mr, |
Beckles and Mr. M, EB. Cox, the}
Board asked its Secretary to make |
investigations to see whether an
people were leaving their own
houses, seeking Government hous }
€s and renting their houses at ex- |
orbitant prices |

The Secretary will make the in- |
vestigations, but he imformed the |
Board that most of such rumours
that got around were false.

—_ a

4

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PAGE THREE




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W.L TEAM FOR CDA? | )ESTERDAY’S CRICKET

Olympics Will Cost £6,425,000
By 0. S. COPPLN

I HAVE BEEN waiting for some time now
for the opportunity to afford fans some in-
formation in connection with the proposed
West Indies tour to Canada this year.

It has been hailed in responsible quar-
ters as a good thing from the point of
view of the novelty, it will be the first
time that a representative West Indies
team will have toured Canada, and cer-
tainly it will provide the scope for trying

out some of our potential representatives against the Indian
team next year.

However, there should be some announcement by the West
Indies Cricket Board of Control as to whether the tour will
materialise at all.

WHAT OF LEAVE?

[. they are planning to send a full strength West Indies team,
to all intents and purposes then it will mean that this team
must of necessity include some of those players who will be
called upon to represent the West Indies in January next year.

This being so it will entail a complete adjustment in their
individual financial economy and it might be that they will be
faced with the possibility of applying for leave twice within
six months,

On the other hand there would be no useful point served
in sending “passengers” to represent the West Indies and that
is why some idea of plans in this connection is being justifiably

demanded,
OLYMPIC FINANCES
ITH Farnum’s impending departure for Helsinki to attend
the XVth Olympiad, I think that fans will be interested
in learning a few facts about the finances surrounding the stag-
ing of an Olympic Meet.

It will cost approximately £6,425,000 to stage the XVth
Olympiad, according to figures released by the Helsinki Organ-
ising Committee.

The competition sites and Olympic Villages constructed in
1938-39 and 1948-52 have cost £3,575,000 and the operational
cost of the Games will amount to £2,850,000.

In the face of this tremendous financial outlay, that might
pardonably be considered in these parts as almost mythical by
local standards, it is equally tantalising but nevertheless signi-
ficant that the organisers of the games, while not anticipating
great profits, do not expect a loss.

, REVENUE

HE revenue from admission tickets alone will be over

£1,000,000 while it is anticipated that the visitors to Hel-
sinki will spend about £1,400,000,

It has been pointed out that competition sites and Olympic
Villages have not been erected for the sole purpose of the
Olympiad; the sites will be used over and over again for
national meetings and the buildings in the Villages will be
used as workers’ flats after the Games

There will be seventeen sports in the programme, (swim-
ming, diving and water polo are counted as one). This was the
case with the 1948 Olympics staged in England.

For the benefit of those who are fortunate enough to plan
visiting the games I shall reproduce from “World Sport” a
selection of prices now current in Finland’s capital. These
Figures in the first place were supplied by the Press Bureau
of the Olympic Organisation in Helsinki. The prices are ap-
proximate and are based on a rate of 231 Finnish marks to
the American dollar which equals $1.52.

ACCOMMODATION

OR a first class Hotel (single room with telephone but no

bathroom) 30/- per day. Lunch in a first-class restaurant
cost from 7/6 to 13/- and lunch in the field canteen consisting
of soup, two sandwiches and a glass of beer 3/6. Dinner in a
second-class restaurant (soup, hot meal, milk, dessert) is 5/-.

The cost of a taxi is about 10d. per kilometre (5/8 of a
mile), with a minimum charge of about 3/-; hiarcut is 3/-,
cinema ticket 3/9 and a theatre ticket ranges from 6/- to 12/-,

As far as tipping is concerned a service charge of 10 per
cent is added to the bill in hotels and restaurants but the tip-
ping of taxi drivers and barbers is optional and not generally
practised in Finland.

B.C.L’s ANNUAL MEETING
OREMOST among the changes planned this season by the

,Barbados Cricket League, who held their Annual. Gen-
eral Meeting at the Modern High School yesterday is the
eee of the City and Central Leagues into two divi-
sions.

What formerly used to be the City League will now be
the City League and the Carlisle League and what used to
be the Central League will now be the Central League and
the Gun Hill League.

The purpose of this change is to enable teams in the
City League in the first instance and the Central League in
the second instance to play three day games while teams
in the Carlisle League and Gun Hill League will play two
day games.

The number of teams in the City Division will be eighe
and in the Carlisle Division there will be fourteen teams

competing.
STEADY IMPROVEMENT

EY are going from strength to strength and there is

every likelihood that if there is no loss of vision or
perspective by local cricket officialdom that efforts to assist
them in every way should bear fruit in the not too distant
future,

They plan to play a series of Sunday Trial games (Dean
of St. Michael’s and Rev. Godson please take note that these
start at 1.30 p.m. after Mass) that wili eveniuaily iead them up
to their best strength for their Annual fixture with the B.C.A.
In this connection they have arranged fixtures with the Em-
pire Club, Cable and Wireless, Carlton and, they
with Spartan.

hope, one



————





———



SUNDAY ADVOCATE
chicane iii ce ee oR NR alae



SPARTAN vs. COLLEGE.
Spartan Ist Innings (for 9

GOAT He ci PETE Se eevee s 347
College Ist Innings ........ 166
And (for two wickets) .... 1

Spartan who scored 347 for 9
wickets declared, foreed Harrison
College to follow on when they
skittled them out for 166 in the
first innings on a perfect wicket
at College on the second day of
their first division fixture. In the
10 minutes left for play in the
second innings, College lost two
wickets those of Camie Smith and
Worme, for a single run.

The Park team is in a very
strong position to carry off a two-
to-one victory, under any cireum-
stance, providing rain does not
completely wash out play next
Saturday.

Resuming their first innings of
290 for 6, Spartan lost the wicket
of Keith Walcott without addition
when Mr. Samuel Headley bowled
him in the first ball of the day.

Then Frank King, who is play-
ing his first season. with Spartan,
eame together with Cave in an
8th wicket partnership which pro-
duced 30 runs before the latter
was caught and bowled by Camie
Smith for 14. King who played
. hurricane innings contributed 34,
King and Phillips added another
27 runs for the 9th wicket, and
skipper Keith Walcott declared
the innings closed at 347 for nine
after about 35 minutes of play.

Hope Opens

The Collegians opened with
Emman Hope and M, Worme who
faced an accurate pace attack by
King and Phillips, The accuracy
of the attack was manifested by
the fact that during the first 25
minutes of the innings, only three
runs were scored, and that when
the first wicket fell with the score
at 5, play had been in progress
for 35 minutes,

Camie Smith filled the breach,
but was bowled by the first ball
he received by Frank King. Smith
suffered a similar fate at the hands
of L. F. Harris in the second in-
nings, thereby shattering all ho
of the College team swinging the
game.

C. Blackman and A. Alleyne,
two promising youngsters raised
the hopes of the College team when
in the first innings they played
some really sound cricket, Black-
man executing many elegant hooks
and drives off all bowlers, He
scored a very valuable 64 at num-
ber 3, and was out to a beautiful
return catch by Atkins Mr, Head-
ley contributed 16 and Fernando
Tuder, after starting shakily,
carried his bat for an undefeated
24 at number nine.

Pace Bowlers

The pace bowlers King and
Phillips were deadly accurate in
their first spells, and after wit-
nessing some really good spin
bowling from B. K, Bowen and
young N. Harris, spectators saw
Tony Atkins bowling with re-
markable success to take 4 for 31
in 9 overs. N, Grant took 2 for
13 in 4.1 overs.

By 5.40 the whole College
team were out for 166, and taking
their second turn at the wicket,
lost the wickets of Worme and
Smith for a single run, a leg bye.

Harris in this innings did the
damage when he opened the at-
tack with Frank King. Harris
moved two consecutive balls well
through the air, each claiming a
wicket.

EMPIRE vs. POLICE
BAO sis sys bay nese sce 255
Police 52 and (for 4 wkts) .. 155

Empire concluded their first

innings about 15 minutes before
the luncheon interval with the
seore at 255 yesterday the second
day of their cricket match with
Police at Empire. Police batting
first on the first day of play
seored 52 runs in their first inn-
ings and at the end of play
Empire had scored 185 runs for
the loss of six wickets.

Yesterday Conrad Hunte who
was undefeated with 109 runs
when play ended on the first day
only added five runs to this score
before he was bowled by Carl
Mullins, S. Rudder who was not
out with Hunte for 9 carried his
score to 37 not out,

Police in their second turn at
the wicket are now 155 runs for
the loss of four wickets. Best
bowling performance for Police
in the Empire first innings was
given by Bradshaw whose analy-
sis was 11 overs, one maiden, 42
runs, three wickets. Carl Mullins
who sent down 23 overs bowled
with some hard luck. He only
took one wicket for 75 runs.
Green who_bowled 16 overs took
two for 71 runs,

Shaky Start

Police in their second innings
started shakily but when C.
Blackman and W. A. Farmer
came together they put on a part-
nership which yielded 113 runs.
Both ibatsmen batted well but
Farmer was the first man to go

when he overplayed a yorker
from the burly Empire fast

bowler Barker. Farmer hit a
breezy 65 and shad one chance.
C. Blackman who on the other
hand was cautious and very
reluctant ‘to take chances was
bowled when his score was 170
about two minutes before the end

of play. :
The Empire fielding was ,not
at its best and about three

catches went abegging. DePeiza
did good work behind the stumps
but at times he became unduly
anxious,

Barker who bowled at a good
length and with some fire cap-
tured the four Police wickets. He
bowled 16 point two overs and
conceded 39 runs. The Police not
out batsmen are J. Byer eight
and A. Blenman naught,

PICKWICK vs. CARLTON.

Pickwick 226 and (without
RM ates alte Osea il
Carlton ..... 261

Faulty fielding at Kensington
Oval yesterday enabled the Carl-
ton team to amass a first innings
total of 261 in their match against
Pickwick. Carlton therefore has.a
first innings lead of 35 runs,

No less than eight catches were
dropped for the day. Brickie Lucas,
who top scored with 90, had three
lives. “Peppy” Hutchinson knock-
ed up 68 not out but he too had
three chances, aK

Three sixes were struck. Two
by Lucas off the bowling of
E. L. G. Hoad, Jnr., and Winston
Greenidage and the other by ‘“‘Pep-
py” Hutchinson off the bowling of
Edwards,

On the first Saturday Pickwick
made 226. When stumps were
drawn Carlton were six runs for
the loss of one wicket. The Black
Rock team yesterday added 255
to their overweek total.

A sixth wicket partnership be-
tween Brickie Lucas and Peppy
Hutchinson was the best of the
day. It realised 90 runs. Another
good partnership was the one be-
tween Harold Cox and Peppy
Hutchinson, the eighth wicket pair.
Cox made 25 and it was during
this partnership that Carlton crept
ahead of Pickwick’s total.

Skipper Makes 38

Carlton’s skipper, C. Boogles
Williams, made a valuable 38,
Charlie McKenzie, one of their
opening batsmen, carried his over-
week score of five to 23 before
he was caught by Joey Greenidge
off the bowling of Teddy Hoad
Jnr.

Teddy Hoad was the most suc-
cessful bowler for the Kensington
team, He was fairy steady, He was
especially good in the over in
which he claimed the wicket of
Reynold Hutchinson, He beat
Hutchinson with his first ball and
clean bowled him with the next.

Hoad sent down 31 overs, of
which six were maidens, and

took six wickets at an average of
just over 15 runs a wicket. Winston
Greenidge bowled eight overs and



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—————
en

RACING NOTES

By “BEN BATTLE”

THE T.T.C. JUNE MEETING

E IES for the June meeting in Trinidad closed on
Friday 1 with yet another record number of horses. I can
recall, not many years ago, when it was quite an event for 100
horses to be entered at the T.T.C. Xmas meeting, and these
‘would include a large G. class. Now, with no help from the
half breds, we find 127 horses taking entry in June. There
must be a limit somewhere, but so far there are no signs that
we are approaching it.

The biggest increase relative to the pre war days has been
in the C. and C.2 maidens. There are ne@ fewer than 26 of
these, and, in spite of the fact that they are well catered for—
there is a race each day for them—it is obvious that many will
go empty away. Nor is there any likelihood, if the present
rate of importation keeps up, of more than a very small pro-
portion earning their keep, even if the Trinidad Clubs continue

to encourage them, by framing races for them on a generous
scale.

This situation emphasises an interesting side of the West
Indian character—namely the instinctive preference for an
imported article. Few, if any, of the 26 horses, whose names
appear as entered for the C. and C.2 Maiden races, can have
cost less than £500 landed here, and it is quite likely that a
800d many of them cost appreciably more. Yet, try and sell
a well bred West Indian creole, two years old, for a reasonable
price, and you will quickly find that no one is interested. L
admit that I have no figures, but I should be surprised if the
two year old creoles, taken as a group, did not earn as much
per horse, as the imported horses, in the course of their racing
careers. Yet, as I say, they are practically impossible to sell
for what it costs to raise them. Truly a case of a prophet
never being without honour.

THE BARBADOS CONTINGENT

Entries from Barbados turned out much as I had pre-
dicted in last week’s article, except that neither Trimbrook
nor Flieuxce took entry. I must say that, looking at the races
in which the rest have been entered, I shall be\surprised if
they do not enjoy a succesful meeting. There surely cannot
be many in C. class to take the measure of Castle in the Air
and French Flutter, while Lunways is looking and going so
well that her chances in B. must be excellent, It is in the D.
and E. races however, that I fancy we hold the strongest hand,
and if Usher, Mary Ann and Apollo cannot pick up a couple of
nice races between them, I shall be disappointed. In the Trial
Stakes, we have lost what was our most promising entry in
Sunina, but both First Admiral and Columbus are entered,
and while neither can be expected to threaten Bright Light, 1

shall be surprised if they do not run well, particularly the
former.

MORE TWO YEAR OLDS
_ Apart from the activities of the horses consigned to Trint-
dad, there is little going on at the Paddock at present, It
seems a good opportunity to introduce some more of our two

year olds, and I shall start by asking Mr. Bethel’s Superjet, to
take a bow.

Superjet is by Jetsam out of Wedding Gift, and is a gelding
who has inherited the beautiful golden chestnut coat of his
sire. A refined, high quality two year old, he might be faulted
as being a thought too long in the back, and possibly a trifle
deficient in bone, but, in general there is plenty to like about
him. He goes abdut his work in a sensible way, and alfhough
he is a lot less advanced than Apply Sam, for instance, he
appears likely to come to hand reasonably quickly. Jetsam,
as a sire, is an unknown quantity to date, but his sire, Flotsam,
considering he stood only in Trinidad, must be considered to
have been one of the best local stallions. Wedding Gift was
rather a moderate mare in the tracks (she was by Tolgus), and
so far, has not proved a success at stud, being a rather shy
breeder up to the present. Superjet will be her first foal to

race in Barbados and it is quite on the cards that he may
redeem her reputation.

My second introduction this week will be another from
the Todds Stud—Sterling Dawn. A daughter of Sterling
Castle and Sunrise, she combines in her pedigree, the blood
of the first stallion of Classic Status to stand here, with that
of an outstanding creole broodmare. ‘She is certainly bred well
enough for anything, and being a fine, big, filly, with ample
scope for development and improvement, I shall be surprised
if she does not go far. Sunrise, so far, has tended to produce
far better colts than fillies, and it would be fitting if, in the
evening of her long and memorable career at stud, she threw
a filly good enough to carry on the line. Certainly Sterling
Dawn looks the part, and can only be objected on the grounds
that she is a trifle back at the knee. I look forward to seeing
her run, and run well in the years to comé.

WORDS OF WISDOM

I happened to be present the other morning at a small
and informal gathering of turfites, who were discussing, be-
lieve it or not, classifying and handicapping. The discussion
was strangely amicable for so controversial a subject, but a
remark was made, which I pass on to readers for their con-
sideration the next time they attend a gathering at which the
concensus of opinion is that all handicappers should be shot.
It was this—‘How is it that the same people who will wax ex-
ccedingly indignant, and even violent over their horse being
allotted, in their opinion, 2, 3, or even 5 lbs: too much in a
handicap, will cheerfully start the same animal in races in
which they have to put up 5, 10 or even 15 lbs. overweight?”

There is certainly some food for thought in that.







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SCOREBOARD







EMPIRE vs POLICE AT BMPIRE SPARTAN vs. COLLEGE
POLICE First Innings 52 Spartan—Iist Innings (cont'd)
Empire First Innings (Por 9 wkts. deelared) MT
0, Robinson Lb.w, b. Bradshaw 3 K. E. Walcott » Mr. Headley 58
C. Hunte b. Mullin 14 «E. W. Cave b Foster 0
W. Grant c. Taylor b. Bradshaw @ ¥F. King not out “
Cc. De Peiza stpd. (wk. Dodson) ®. Phillips ct. & b. C. Smith i4
b Green . 8 B. Bowen did not bat c
F. Smith 1b wb Green 0 Extras a
0. Fields run out : 5 S
EB. A V. William Bienman . Total for (8 wkts. decl'd mm
b. Byer 4 Ee
S. Rudder not out j Fall of wicket 1—-12, 2-165, 3-168
A. Holder c. Former b. Bradshaw 4 J an us, 6-2 tO, oe
King b. Blackina: se *r
H Barker run out 3 ROWLING ANALYSIS
Fxtras 16 S&S. Headley . —. 4 & 3
a. 8 1 il a7 2
Total 255 ©. Re x : 58 1
os G Foster 10 2 48 1
Fall of wkts, 4-15, 2-15, 3—5 a, Be Dados ° =
5-128, €—146, 2 195, & 208, . & $ oan 18 2 3 ss i
BOW Harrison College—ist Innings
LING ae R w E. Hope ct. ©. Griffith b King 2
C. Bradshaw E Tl 2 42 3 R> Worme b Phillips 4
¢. Mullins i Bot 3 7 C. Smith b F. King 6
E. Green 16 1 7 » ©. Blackman et & b Atkins 64
@_ Sobers & 6 14 o â„¢r. S. Headley ct. Atkins b F.
C. Blackman Pee ok aoe Phillips %
J. Byer : 3 0 7 1 A. Alleyne stpd. ‘wkpr.) Harrison
7 ? b N. Grant 16
oc. we oa Second Innings M. peceyom ad ct K. E. Walcott b -
eel Atkins 5
. oe es 10S. Hewitt ct K, E. Walcott b Atkins 10
C. Amey b Barker . 7 «&F. Tudor not out 24
Ww * farmer 6 Barker 6 © ronan! Se (wkpr) Harrison é
ver not out Bn _ ay Se
A. Slenman not eit ¢ ¥ ee M. Harris b N. Grant 18
Extras 4 aoe 13
Total (for 4 wkts.) 155 Tote 166
Ys 5 fe ce Fall of wickets: 1—5, 2—5, 3 *
ee Eh Pe 6 108. 7114, 81%, 91s
: BOWLING ¢ “YSIS
BOWLING ANALYSIS = Freee i ie
t, WwW » > 4 4 g 2
fl. Barker 6.2 ¢ Wes de a pillins 3 3 = .
W. Grant eos 1), © % Bowen. 13 mee
Cc. Rudder 9 1 2069) «OM #éHarris 3 3. 20
E. A. V. Williams W 2 36 © 4” Atnins 9 + ae ey
H. A. King .... 8 1 %@ © WN. Grant ti. a. &
A Holder eee 5 o 15 Q wee Collese—2nd Innings
‘ . M. orme b L, F. Harris 0
LODGE vs. WANDERERS . ¥F. Tudor not out 0
WANDERERS 323 ©. Smith b L. F. Harris 0
Lodge—ist Innings Extras 1
F, W. Cheeseman b E. Atkinson 9
G. De C, Stoute ¢ Evelyn b E. At- Total (for 2 wkts) 1
kinson * 10
Cc. Grant hit wicket b E. Atkinson 0 ickets: 1- Wa
J. A. C, Hutson b D. Atkinson $2 ee ee ee Pee
L. Murray ¢ Evelyn b N. Marshall 18 ¢ King % 2 2.
H. Welch b N. Marshall wl Harri 121 2
E. Shepherd b D. Atkinson 10 PICKWICK vs. CARLTON
J. E, Farmer c E, Atkinson b D PICKWICK—Ist Innings if 226
. Aine 10 Carlton—ist Innings
St. C, Reefer b E. Atkinson 4 ©. McKenzie c K. Greenidge b E
N. G. Wilkie b E. Atkinson 2 L. G. Hoad Inr 23
J. G. Outram not out 10 G. Chandler ¢ wkpr. Trotter b Ed
Extras 6 wards 0
, c. B. Williams b E. L. G. Hoad
Total 96 Int 38
Fall of wickets: 1—23. 2—24, 3-29, N. oc leone c Birkett b W. Green- ea
4-29, 5-51, 6-86, 7-83, 8—85, 9-06. R. Hutchinson b E, L. G. Hoad Jnr 1
. E. W. Marshall b K. Greenidge 2
BOWLING SNAL vers S G. Hutchinson not out 68
> e > ec ° rotter
N. Marshall 8 n F a gpree of aaee Trotter b e
e Ae Sart a H. Cox b E. L. G. Hoad Jnr 25
D. LAWLESS : > i G. Edghill c C. Greenidge b E
. a he L. G. Hoad Jnr 0
c ge—2nd Innings K. Warren ¢ E. L. G. Hoad Jnr.
G m if Stoute ec Skinner b Mar b W. Greenidge 2
sha’ 8 dea
E. Shepherd b E. Atkinson 2 ee he
>. Grant b D. Atkinson 5
L. Murray b St. Hill . 28 oy ca
e ba e D, Atkinson b Marshall 06 Fall of wickets tot 6 he. BR
: . Farmer run out 12 94 a aaaee | Bex
B. Reefer c E. Atkinson b D. Al: Sa ee ee ne
kinson 7 See ‘SIs
J. A. C. Hutson ib.w. b Lawless. 10 Reve Ae on: Ww
N. Wilkie c Marshall b St. Hill 26 5 Goddard 1 6 10
J. G. Outram not out 6 kK. Greenidge i4 5 33 1
F. Cheeseman did not bat © B Edwards Py a ae) i
Extras 5 £. L. G. Hoad Jnr 31 6 94 6
——. W. Gréenidge 8.5 2 32 2
Total M4 A, Hoag 2 . =
= tT. Birkett 2 . =>
Fall of wickets: 1—3, 2—8, 3-23, Pickwick—2nd Innings
4—23, S88, 6—67, 7—75, 8-100, 9-114. A £, Trotter not out 8
BOWLING ANALYSIS +E. Edwards not out 0
o M R W uxtras 3
D. Atkinson 9 3 25 2 amt
E. Atkinson 6 13 1 Tota ,
m. ferehaa ; = : otai .without loss) a4
L. St. Hill 75 2 Hee powLiic i.
H. L. Toppin 3 19° = ate AN R w
T. Lawless 2 6 1 Gg. Edghill 2 1 1 ~
K. Warren 1 — 7



YESTERDAY'S CRICKET

@ From Page 4
five balls and took two for 32. The
remaining two wickets were taken
by Joey Greenidge and Edwards
for 38 and 68 respectively,

day Lodge fell for 96 in their first
innings and soon after lunch were





all out again for 114.

Chiefly responsible for Lodge’s





SUNDAY ADVOCATE



India Scores Innings’
Victory Over Ireland

Hutton Hits Fourth
Century Of Season

(From Our Ow

n Correspondent)
LONDON, June 14.

ain prevented any play in two county matches today,
but in most parts of the country batsmen enjoyed them-

selves on slowish wickets. T

he two Cambridge Universit,

and England players--Sheppard and May led the way at
Hove where both recorded their fourth centuries of the
season against Sussex. Sheppard made 104 and May who is
undefeated, has hit the 16 fours in his 159.

Another century maker

was Tom Graveney of Glouces-

ter who reached 104 out of 345 for 5 declared against

Worcester.

England’s captain Len Hutton
who will be at Lord’s later this
week for the Second Test, also hit
his fourth century of the season
for Yorkshire against Middlesex
He batted just over four hours
In the la@st eight minutes of the
day Yorkshire left arm slow
bowler Wardle hit a quick 22, in-
cluding a six off the first ball he

received
One place where the bowlers
did get on top was at Ports-

mouth where Shackleton and Can-
nings of Hampshire bowled un-
changed, apart from one over to
dismiss Northants in two hours
for 67, Cannings at one stage took
four wickets without a run being
scored off him and finished with
6 for 41. Shackleton took 4 for
24,

Only a fighting innings of 55 by
Maurice Tompkin saved Leicester
from complete collapse against
Glamorgan at Neath, Glamorgan
Test all-rounder Watkins achieved
the best figures of his career with
5 for 16

The Indian tourists scored an
easy innings victory in the first of
their two-day games with Treland
at Dublin.

Scoreboard
Middlesex vs, Yorkshire—York-
shire 308 for 6; Hutton 132. ‘
Surrey vs. Essex—Surrey 256
for 7 declared; ‘Constable 70.
Essex 27 for 2. . .
Glamorgan vs. Leicester-——Lei-
cester 107. Glamorgan 116 for 3.
Hampshire vs Northants—
Northants 67. Hampshire 154
for 9. i
Sussex vs. Cambridge Univers-
itv—Cambridge 322 for 2.
“Worcestershire vs. Gloucester—
Gloucester 345 for 5 declared; Em-
mett 90, Graveney 104. Worces-
ter 14 for 0. :
Oxford University vs. Warwick
—Warwick 18h is i gi cic ye
ia beat Irelan y -
ares nine runs—India 304,

nings i
Ireland 126 and 169; Shinde 5
for 49.

Lancashire vs. Somerset and
Notts ve Derby—no play because
of rain.

On the first day of the match,
opening bat _ Norman Marshall
scored 117, Denis Atkinson 136

with N. G, Proverbs contributing!

2A.
Successful Bowler
The Lodge’s most successful
howler was G. Wilkie who took
ve for 70 in 14 overs.

f reel, 6.30 p.m
Minterlude, 8.55 p.m

‘eightlifting Assoc.
Elects Officers

Mr. Freddie Miller was re-
elected President of the Amateur
Weightlifting Association of Bar-
bados when the Association held
its first Annual General Meeting
during the week. Mr. Edwin
Rogers and Mr. J. Bullen were
appointed Vice-Presidents.

Mr. W. “Teacher” Grannum,
who acted as M.C, at the variou*
shows staged by the Association.
was re-elected Secretary while
Mr, John Marshall was made As-
s stant Secretary, Other appoint-
ments were: Mr F Marshall
hheasuice, Mr, Harold Webster,
Coach and the Committee of
Management: Messrs B. Banfield,
G. Clarke, S$, Holder, S. Rudder
and the other Officers

After being re-elected, Mr
Miller thanked members. He said
that the Association had got off to
a good start. His task was not an
eosy one but he was always hap-
p to be among the weightlifting
fraternity, He promised to con-
tinue to do his best for the As-

ciation.

No date was fixed for the Se-
nior Championships but it is like
1, to take place in August. The
tour to Trinidad has been fixed
fcr the middle of September, The
Senior Championships this year
will take the form of an elim-
ination. The winners will be se-
lected to visit Trinidad. All Iift-
evs are training very hard in pre-
piration for this competition,

The Association will soon be
making preparations to tour the
various parishes in an effort to
cceate more interest in weight-
lifting.

Listening Hours
SUNDAY JUNE LS, inhe

7M 9.76 M toe M

4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. inter

wo



lude, 4.15 pm. For The Common Good
430 p.m. Sunday Half Hour, 5.00 p.m
(Composer Of The Week, 5.15 p.m. Variety
Bandbox, 615 pain, English Magazine
' 45 p.m. Programme Parade and Inter
ude, 7.00 pm The News. 7.10 pan
‘pine News From Britain

71% — 10.45 Ow oeM staeM



- 7.15 pm, Caribbean Voices, 7.45 p.m

Radio News
Charlie Kunz, 8.45 p.m
From The Editorials

day Service, 8.15 p.m





Visitors To B’dos

@ from Page |





The Audited Accounts prepared

Messrs. Rovell & Skeete show

a balance hand to 3ist March

1952 of $9,004 98 ,

made up as follows:— |
1 Bank of Canada $ 7,744.98 |
Head Petty Cash }

Imprest 1 206.60
ecarell Petty Cash imprest 358.00 |

2 0,098.58

th

amount of $4,700.00

u

ada

ye

u

Of the Balance of $7,744.98 in
1e Royal Bank of Canada, the
represents
nexpended advertising in Can-
for the year 1949-1950
Which has been taken into account
W
le

) this coming year’s Budget. This

ayes a carry forward of

2,044.98 for* running éxpenses

nti! the Annual Grant Is

cceived from Government fo

@ year 1952—1953.

Annual Balance Sheet and
Accounts

From the Audited Accounts, it

V
j

i! be seen that Revenue & Ex-
enditure are as follows:



Balance brough! forward trom Jump in Joe, Jump in Robert | Ask your
31:3.51 8,320.69 A treeness on this gig
Goverhment Grant 32,290.00 Again it is the Government Decier for
ibseriptions from Hotetk And with themt; Sprees are big
Firms. ete 4,920.00 7 ?
indry Sales & Receipt 4,211.00 Remember bring your dress suit
eed Sharer your appetite | . - ene
$49,741.69 youl! hear talks in tha day-tun: a A eee
Salo . |
e $ 9,004.98 For Betsy says the old coy } 2 ¥
Ralene is fresh with milk ‘agate | b To eep
it will be noted that 75% of the] 4d Mm this little island a

nds expended were for advertis-

ny and publicity purposes.

Since September Ist, 1951, a

record of U.S., Canadian and Ven-
ce-nelan currency brought to the

@ On Page 15. They're going to learn “proredure
Whatever that may mean
And of the British habits "
A few points ey may xlean
; :
COMMONWEALTH Over three thousand dollars
PLAY HIGHLAND They hope to throw away
For ever In Barbados
There is the Sunny day
The following will represent ; ; as \
he Commonwealth Sports Club | en ee ea
to-morrow and next Sunday The people here are happs |
sainst Highland C.C. at High- There're hardships at all |
and, St. Thomas:—J. Graham sect tad oc lie Sleek aie |
; a 1e houses a ill mansions
Cayt.), J. Lorde, E, Brereton, E Tréba's food cat. end apare |
tleuck, StC Burke, StC. Black- | if the “house men” would look round |
van, D. Downes, C. Parris, x’ | Then they see the “night mare
. a . Daried * Alling .
Goddard, C. Perkins, FE. Alkins, A ‘a dew et thn. 0d heokate
veale (12th man) | Cried gentlemen take heed j
Play starts at 1.15 pm | Can you not see the thousands }
Of this land in. great need |
Can you not feel the pressure
To scrape a decent meat
Sunday League | oi. so scene aie
> - | More tempted now to steal?
* * . .
Competition D ymething with the money | Sparldin ENO’S Pruit Salt”
Don't spend thousands on two ‘hice’ in’ ; f e
~e € Help some the Starve-out Childrer ning 1 n mormng resner Yo |
Fixtures 1952 Serve many; not the fev mentally and physically. It clears the hex
- ee ote if you ave democratic cleanses anc! reireshes the mouth, rer
Ihe Fixtures for Sunday League Sey po! os your rep aenienas liverishnes: ENO
Competition games beginning June To grant two MP’s free. tri | symptoms iverishness st > ia
> and ending September 14 are May cause many to die | no harsh | utives. Its gentle laxative
om Ye . are re? 1 *~T ve
bo hi Games are of two days We're getting older dail) 1s non-hal i:-forming. ENO’S i uitabl
vs , The strong are getting weak for delicat tomachs, safe fo . I
JUNE 15 & 88 And when the big rains come in | aaa ¢ ate for children a







Strollers vs. Hadleighs
Cambridge vs. Belleplaine,
Everglade vs O.K. Cole,
Commonwealth vs. Highland,
JUNE 29 & JULY 6





4 collet Mt ore The free trip was Just fun
i ve . . . |
; bee ve eadieishs But then the two best comrades
Highland vs _Everela le : That they might send away
aaah i heginite. Know all about procedure
Strollers ve elle; , 1" ~ as much Me
Cambridge v Highland They know Ler . " |
aes ne ere ee Lou, Joe and Comrade Robert |
adieigh v Everglade f
an ar Agreed on thi all three
7 ae ae ‘To buy the money in J & R
7 Belleplaine And give Bajans # Spres
C’wealth Hadleighs d b
Cambridge vs. Everglade, nsore
; AUGUBT aus “ | spo r y
givollers vw. Bvergiade
Belleplaine vs, Com’ wealth J&R BAKERIES
Cambridge vs. O.K, Cole
Hadleighs vs. Highland
AUGUST & & 4% makers of
Strollers vs. Highland
Evergiade vs, Belleplaine
Cambridge vs. Commonwealth ENRICHED BREAD

Hadleighs vs. O.K. Cok





JUNE

The Topic

Last Week

What's
Two MP going to Ireland

You all will





15 NO. 228






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out of the system. When
kidney action is inadequate and
fails to filter the blood properly,



all this talk ? Lou questioned
Pray tell me whot is it °

You'll get more milk thar
alan Maat . pegular

To Hsten while they sit
. :

Poor Betsy house going leak invalids. |

You know when these boys come bach

When all is said and done

then discover

SANS

rs &

Prue

ep

PAGE FIVE

“fivery Picture tells a Story?

Do washing,

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~~ 1, stooping bring sagging pater

pain and discomfort are the
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With ten minutes left for play, ©atly_downfall were Eric Atkin- ; eter ve inh 2% pan. British Concert Hall, 10.00 i ee ta 14

Pickwick opened their sepond. in- Son, Denis Atkinson and Norman ane ona eeoress Ne - ie cin, pe MeWe, ipte bie eee Tak. strotie: re. Corieitas and the blenders of gow:
x; with A. Tr er edwards Marshall. On the first day Eric heir first In & * 4 oY 5 pm, Lofiden Forum, 10.45 b.m Belleplaine vs. Hadleishs ~ asting freshness.
nings with A. Trotter and Edwards, 7 : ' 5 ~ ray 19. H, Welch 11 and G. Stoute,! The Bible In History And In Life . hi
Trotter was dropped by Williams took five wickets for 15 runs in boy goherd, J, Farmer and J. G.; MONDAY JUNE 16, 1958 Reralote yo" Curmeniestii J&R RUM mee eonesmer
in slips, At the end of play Trotter sees hid Skee ie aor 2? in Outram 10 each. \ eo Ee ee eM: “AN teams mentioned. last will a as ee eee see ee eee
was eight not out. 9 Pie Yesterday Marshall and Yesterday Murray showed him~ 400 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The be playing on their grounds. |
D ‘ Athi r a t Cniate self a steady bat when he kept @ Daily Service, 4.15 pam From The Third In an interview with the Sec- re
WANDERERS vs. LODGE. : sy se too me we cool when his team was in the? ’'osramme, anevat, er Tey Yes retary of this Competition, the | by
d 5 ' wi? 45 § Bi > > ’ ‘
Wanderers ...... : . 823 aa an wet aiis tank ‘bbe éG0 13 face of defeat and managed tof"), \;, P Welsh Miscellany, 6.15 p.m. Tip Advocate was told that negotia- ¢
Lodge 96 and . 114 in six Bika 1 “st Hill also cap muster 28 at number four. «Tor Tunes, 6.45 p.m. Sports Round-up fions have been begun re an over- | Pe
oO Ee aly Srna ' : ake a (| cod Programme Parade, 7.00 pam. The cage ‘ad ; sar. Asked}

Wanderers secured an innings tured two wickets for 23 runs in Then spinner Wilkie stuck true’ news, 7 10 p.m. Home News From Britain ane snk ay ndin " atte 24 dl
victory over Lodge School by 4 his 7.5 overs. to practice when he struck up a) 715 — 10.45 Oo mM wt.aeM about an; ou a oa B play a he
orclock yesterday, the second day _ The wicket was good, but the quick 26 at number 9. He regue yy je ey Airangers. Seoll known players. taking. part _
of their scheduled three-day First Lodge boys had no answer for the larly takes a go at the ball when qiai pin. Music Of The Reyiment*) but Joss known players like Jobn
Division Cricket match at Lodge concentrated attack of the Wan- his team is in difficulty, though he?) ts pin, Radio Newsree!, 8.80 p.m Trotman, K Dawson, and Ir-
School. Wanderers had amassed a_ derers bowlers. The bowlers just is best in the role of spin bowler. Airican Survey, 8.45 p.m. Interlude rotman, Ken vi ' (AVINGS
hurricane 328 on the first day and had a mastery over the batsmen Other batsmen reaching double |°55 p.m. From The Editorials, 9.00 p.m vine Austin are sure to prove good n
by the end ot that day's play had and ait‘slong ip was only a matter Saures were J. A.C, Huteon 10 “Ihab me. Rew lode’. Nay, None of these youngsters is taking

2 i . E. Farmer an . Reefer 6 pm. Gee 10.30 ‘ fs Biers 3s

sent back seven Lodge batsmen to of time before the defeat would 4@ ae eee m Sctanoy “Review 0.3 part in B.C.L. games this season.

the pavilion for 83 runs. Yester-

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PAGE SIX’ |



FLY THEM HOME 8B.O.A.C.

Wf your children are at NEY FOR THE COST OF
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Consult your Travel Agent

School in the United King-
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Eyeing The
Weather

of us, when we return, like very
much to rub in our good fortune A
with “We sure know how to pick 6.
‘em.’

Be sure that rain betides.

golden set.

And by the bright track of

Just plain luck, you say? Prob-
ebly. But actually no special
talent is required to deveop a
semblance of skill in the
prophecy. It’s not necessary
build an observatory or send

his fiery car
Gives token of a.
art of row

to 7. Sunshine and shower,

‘

ts

If there’s one thing most of us 5. When (beetles, swallows,
like to boast of while on vacation, leaves) show their under-
it’s fine weather. Indeed, some sides.

The weary sun hath made a

(nippy,
ghastly, goodly day to-mor-

SUNDAY . ADVOCATE





Dear Mrs. Clarke, I am a girl
aged 16 years of age and I love
@ boy very much, but he goes out
with other girls too and I am very
jealous. Do you think I should
stop seeing him for a bit. It might
make him realise that I exist I
am cembly worried and wpset

about it. Please help me.
Dark Stranger”
**You know, dear, you have

said that you are in love with this
boy and how much you are jeal-
ous, but it Seems to me that this
is @ YTather one-sided affair. He
may not be in love with you and
if that is so he is entitled to go
out with any girl he likes—just
as you could go out with any boy.

However, for your own sake,
as you are in quite a state about
this fellow, it would be a good
thing to stop seeing him for a
time. It would give you a chance,
to get a grip on yourself and—
who knows—maybe: not seeing
you for a while may be the de-
ciding factor for this chap and you
both may come together after ail.
Certainly, I hope so, dear, as I
dearly love to see the young peo-
ple happy and in leve. It is one
of the few things that gives some
hope and promise to this sad and
disillusioned world of ours.

“Very worried,” writes,

1 am married and my husband
and I were very happy together.
A woman friend of mine came to
us on vacation and since she came
she has completely monopolised
my husband and stolen him from
me, He sees her all the time and
never takes me out any more
We don’t even speak now. He says
I can leave but that I cannot take
my child with me. Please advise
me,

**You poor dear, you certainly
have a very big ioad of worry.
Can’t you talk to your husband
and, without getting heated about
it, work this problem out. You
might even have a chat with this
woman. After all she was your
friend. Point out that several
fives will be ruined if your once
happy home is broken up, and that
such is not the best education for
a child in the formative years of
its.life. Thi» sould only be an in-
fatuation a» a man does not de-
sert his wife and child on the spur
of the moment—and especially
when his home-life has always
been a happy one. I feel, my
dear, that if you are diplomatic
and handle matters carefully that
all will work out well for you in
the end. At any rate please write

bP (Clear, Same, Rain) again
weather balloons, as Miss Linda See . Woven ‘ es
Christian seems to be doing at Sear iransport Fares
left. 8. Rainbow to windward, (foul,
fair, dry) falls the day: To Be Increased
As a matter of fi ct, it’s possible Rainbow to leeward, (damp,

for anyone, yes anyone, to sharp- fog, sun) runs away. % From Page 1. ;
en his weather eye merely by 5 i estimated to bring a revenue in-
studying the proverbs which fol- 9. Sound travelling far and] crease of nearly $412,000 and a
low. Each’ of these , is a belief wide, decrease in expenditure of near-
which weather authorities agree ly $300,000 in the full year. It
has a basis, of fact. A Se oe warm-|\; felt the combined effect will
; : er) day will betide. reduce ‘the Department's net
nerves, made 2 fox changes 1% 10. Sharp. homs do threaten| deficiency by $100,000 to Tess than
" ; 2, ; 2 -jam *
to correct, Only one of three sents calm, windy) weath
words in parenthesis in each case F Abnormal Loss
belongs there, You are to choose 11. When the (sundog, mist
the right word and cross out the wind) is in the south The report stresses that pub-
others. The rain’s in its mouth. lic revenue cannot indefinitely
oa . " carry an abnormal loss of trans-
1, If red the sun begins his !2. Thunder in spring ..,| port services and after noting
race (Warm, Cold, Frost) will] that the railways might eventu-
Be sure the (dew, rain, — Princoeee beef of eres a.
temperature) wil! fall apace 13, The (lower, higher, thinner) oo n ¢
pe Wi 1 the clouds, the finer’ the by the Sugar ‘Companies prove
2. If the sun goes pale to bed weather. a commodity can be more eco-

'Twill (clear, rain shine) to-

morrow it is said. tle) is on the grass,
3. Glimpse you e’er the green

ray 15,

Count the morrow a (loss er’s brush,
fine, chilly) day. The (floods, sweat, winds)
around you soon will rush,
4. When the grass is dry at



: i Answer: 1, Rain; 2. Rain; 3, Fine;

morning light. ’ 4. Ra 5. Leaves; 6 Goodly; 7. Rain,

< , clfaring 4 8 ul, damp; 9 Stormy; 10,

Look for (rain, clfaring, fog) Windy; 11. Wind; 12, Cold; 13. Highes,
before the night. 14. Dew; 15. Winds.





i} KLIM is pure, safe milk
[2] KLIM keeps without! refrigeration






KEIM QUALITY IS
AUNAYS UNIFORM |

vou bay KLIM MILK, you
onsistent purity and nutri-
1) each and every tin..+

ofk ;
aiue
; uv, June or December |
» always the same uniform <
cow's milk—uniform in the
neoteins, fat, carbohydrate,
‘aad minerals aeeded for

;OOD HEALTH,

é (a) KLIM is exceticnt fo- growing

= chiiuven

rome, 99

S| KLIM adds nourishmont to vi
— cooked dicheos KLI 4
6) KLIM is recommnencod for ty

infant fecding aT TAY
(7) KLIM is save in the specially

pocked tia

7} KLIM is produced undor strict.

est corirel



Take pure water, odd
KLIM, stir end you have
safe, pure milk.

FIRST

IN PREFERENCE
THE WORLD OVER



14, When the (dust, dew, this-
Rain will never come to pass.

Trace in the sky the paint-





nemically carried by the Road
Committee strongly counsels early
re-examination of the question of
the future of railways,

The Report also disclosed that
“unless considerable sums which
might exceed the total of the
Rehabilitation Programme are
spent on the replacement and
renewal of equipment within the
next 12 months, it is inevitable
that the present railway services
will break down.”

4388 BARBADOS

Feel

8 x 3 3-4



. >

faery
or
GETA

effectively, yet

you

|
| —quickly,
'

A
wm

=
=
az
rn
=—i
oS
1

AS PRO iow
en ee TCE ee

leaves
fresh and free from barmful

—arme* Mrs. Clarke’s Column

and let me know how things are
going. ie

“F.M.B.G.J.G.” writes,

I am writing to a pen-pal and
a few days ago I received a letter
from him asking me to become
engaggd to him. I have never
met this boy but I do know his

parents. Do you thipk I should
say yes.
**Well, my dear, I certainly

made sure that I saw my husband
before I made up my mind to
marry him, After all, even if you
know his people, you are not
pianning to marry them. Also
you are not in love at
least you have not said so
and it is a good thing to
be in love before making big de-
cisions like getting married. Per-
sonally, I should wait until I meet
this boy and I feel sure that if
you explain this when you write
to him next he will understand.
He would like to see you too, I
feel sure. So do not be impetu-
ous and remember the old saying
about marrying in haste and re-
penting at leisure.

Dear Mrs. Clarke,

I am 21 years of age and my
fiance, for whom I have a baby,
wants to marry me. His people,
however, do not like me and I
am very worried. I love him very
much indeed. What shall I do.

“Pinksy”...

**Marry him, my dear. You
are both in love and are at an
age to make your own decisions.
Also, for the sake of the child the
only answer is to get married. I
am always so sorry for little chil-
dren who have no proper home
life. They are missing so much
and they do not deserve such
treatment. If you are very diplo-
matic and nice about everything,
I feel sure that you will be able
to win the affections of his people
too, but the most important thing
is that two people are in love and
want to get married, So go ahead
and get married and let me give
an old woman's blessing to you
both.

To “Worried M.J.” Really, my
dear, this is a problem for a doc-
tor and a little ont of my scope.
I have forwarded your question to
the Family Doctor who will, I
know, help you to the best of his
ability.

**Don’t mind what you hear
and remember that allthis is a
very normal process and every
woman who has had a baby ex-

erienced the same—and there
ave been an awful lot of babies
born without causing any harm,
so stop worrying.

BETHEL—11.00 a.m. Mr. L. Mayers;
7.00 p.m. Rev. T. J. Furley.
DALKEITH—11.00 a.m. Mr. F. Moore,
770 p.m. Mr. G, Jones.
BELMONT—11.00 a.m, Mr. C. Forde;
7 00} p.m. Mr. G. Bascombe.

SOUTH DISTRICT—9.00 a.m. Mr. C.

Jones; 7.00 p.m. Mr. C. Knight.
PROVIDENCE—11.00 a.m. Rev. T. J.

Furley; 7.00 p.m. Mr, E. Browne.
VAUXHALL—9.00 a.m. Rev. T. J.

Furley; 7.00 p.m, Mr. G.
BAPTIST
THE ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST

11,00 am, Mating and sermon; 7.00
fm. Evensong and sermon, Preacher
for both services, the Rev. J. B. Grant,
L.Th. Minister in charge.

4.30 p.m Monday, Wednesday
Friday, training for youths.
be conducted by the Rev. L.
Clarke (Assist. Pastor)~and Mrs,
Browne.

ST. LEONARD'S CHURCH

800 a.m. Holy Communion, 9.00 a.m
Motins and Sermon, 3.00 p.m. Sunday
School, 7.00 p.m. Evensond and Sermon.

ROEBUCK STREET: 11 a.m. Morning

Harris.

and
This will
Bruce

Olga

Service; 7 p.m. Evening Service.
GRACE HILL: 11 a.m. Morning Ser-
vice; preacher: Mr. I. Oxley; 7 p.m.

Evening Service, preacher Mr, F. Deane.

ECK: 11 a.m. Morning Service,

preacher: Mr. W, Swire. 7. p.m. Even-
tng Service, preacher: Mr. O. Weekes
MONTGOMERY: 7 p.m. Evening Ser-
vice, preacher: Mr. D. Culpepper
DUNSCOMBE: 7 p.m. Evening Ser-
vice
SHOPHILL: 7 p.m. Evening Service,

preacher: Mr. W. S. Arthur
EBENEZER—11 a.m. Mr, V. F. St.
John; 7 p.m. Revd. S. W. C. Crosse,
BEULAH—11 a.m. Mr. Pat Deane; 7
p.m, Mr. J. Sargeant.
SHEWSBURY—11 a.m,
p.m. Mr. E, Brathwaite.

Mr, Hell, 7





CHURCH SERVICES ©



SUNDAY,. JUNE. 15,

SEWING

By PENNY NOLAN

illustrated today is
a simple but smart buttonqi-
down style. The bodice has
raglan sleeves with shaped cuffs
and a_ notched neckline. he
skirt is a seven gore.

In a recent column I explained
the draft for the raglan sleeye.
Before drafting the sleeve ypu
should design the notcned nok
line on a copy of your basic
front. Sketch the neckline ‘in
and hold the pattern up to you
before a mirror. The noyh
should come about on the collar
bones. Add about an inch +o
the center front for button lap.

The dress



The lap will have to have a
shaped facing because of the
curve of the neckline and the

notch. The back neckline is the

Same as the neckline of your
basic back.
Next draft the raglan sleeve

making the front sleeve seam

start at the notch in the neck-

line. .
The cuff is designed by draw-

ing a_ straight line the same
Jength as the bottom of the
sleeve. Half way along the line

measure up two inches for the
width of the cuff under the arm.
At each end of the line measure
up three inches for the width of
the cuff at the points. Make
the top line one inch longer than
the bottom line on each end for
the extension points. Add seams
all around and cut four pieces
by this cuff pattern. Two are
for the cuffs and two are for the
facings. The easiest way to
attach the cuff to the bottom of

RICES—11 a.m. Mr
7 p.m. Mr. S. Lorde.
Sunday Schools at 3 p.m,

ax THE SALVATION ARMY ......
PIE CORNER — 11.00 a.m. Holiness
Meeting, 3.00 p.m. Company Meeting,
7.00 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Major and
Mrs. W. Morris, Divisional Commander.
BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL—1l1 .00 a.m.
Holiness Meeting, 3.00 p.m Company
Meeting, 7.00 p.m. Salvation Meeting.
Major M. Smith.

WELLINGTON STREET — 11.00 a.m,
Holiness Meeting, 3,00 p.m. Company
Meeting, 7.00 p.m. Salvation Meeting,
Sr. Major T, Gibbs.
SPEIGHTSTOWN—11.00 a.m. Holiness
Meeting, 3.00 p.m. Company Meeting,
7.06 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Sr. Captain
W. Bishop

OISTIN—11.00 a.m, Holiness Meeting,
3.p.m, Company Meeting, 7.00 p.m,
Salvation Meeting. Lt. K. Gibbons.
FOUR ROADS — 11,00 a.m. Holiness

G. G. Harper;

Meeting, 3.00 p.m. Company Meeting,
7.0 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Major L
Rawlins.

DIAMOND CORINER—11.00 a.m. Holi-
ness Meeting, 3.00 p.m. Company Meet-
ing, 7.00 p.m. Salvation Meeting.
Captain L. Moore.

ST. MARY'S CHURCH
2nd Sunday After Trinity.

7.30 a.m, Matins & Litany, 8.00 a.m.
Low Mass, 9.00 a.m, Procession, Solemn
Mass & Sermon, 3.30 p.m. Sunday School.
4.00 p.m, Children's vespers, 4.15 p.m.
Baptisms, 7.00 p.m. Evensony, Sermon,
Procession & Te Deum.

ST. NICHOLAS E. 0. CHURCH

WELCHES ROAD—11 a.m Divine
Service Celebrant:— Rev. C. Barrow,
Preacher:—Rev. C Ishmael, 7 p.m
Evensong and Sermon Celebrant: -Rev.
C. Ishmael, Preacher:—Evangelist A.

Young
BAPTIST SERVICES
CALGARY BAPTIST CHURCH Bank

1952

CIRCLE

the sleeve. is with a piece of bias.
First face the cuff, clip the seams,
turn and press leaving the edge
that is to attach to the sleeve
open, Lay the cuff on the right
side of the finished sleeve and
lay .a piece of bias over it.
Stitch -all together, trim the
seams then turn the bias to the
inside and@ finish by hand.



The shaped facing for the
front and neckline should be
drawn on the patterns after
seoms have been added and
traced off. The facing should

in five pieces just like the bodice
neckline and these pieces should
be ceamed together before at-
taching the facing to the neck-
line.

The basic dart in the bodice
front may be stitchuc in or just
eased into» the waistline de-
pending on which is more be-
coming to your individual figure.

The back of ‘the skirt is in
three gores and may be cut by
waistline measure directly in the
cloth using’ only one length plod-
ed in the length wise crease.
Use your back waistline measure
divided by three with seam
allowance added for the top of
each gore. me

The front of the skirt has four
gores and is cut like the eight
gore skirt. Use a fourth of your
front waist measure with seams
added for the top of two gores
end add am inc> for button lap
to the top of the other two gores.
A facing for ‘thy front shcqjald be
designed the same width as the
front facing for the bodice and
cut separately.

Join the front facing to both
bodice and skirt before making
waistline seams. 3



SILENT. WIFE

Sydney: For three years — a
divorce judge heard — 37-year-
old Mrs. Olive Nita Boyle was
a silent wife. Whenever her hus-
band spoke to her she would
put down her book or knitting,
listen impassively throughout
then went on reading or knit-
ting without saying a word. Hed-
fey Vincent Boyle (38) was
granted a divorce on grounds of
desertion.

Toronto: The Rev. G. D. Fran-
cis of Aylmer, Ontario has been
given q plane by his congrega-
tion for his missionary work in
Western Canada and Alaska,

Rome; An elephant’s cemetery
has been dug up at Cannae,
Apulia where Hannibal defeated
the Romans in 216 B.C.

Hall, 11 a.m. Dr, United

George

Weatherspool.
Baptist Church Dash Valley, St.
7 p.m. Dr. Weatherspool.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Church of Christ, Scientist,
Bridgetown
Upper Bay Street

Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m,

Wednesdays 8 p.m. A _ service which
includes Testimonies of Christian Science
Healing.

SUNDAY, JUNE 15, 1952

Subject of Lesson-Sermon: God the
Preserver of Man,

Golden Text: Psalms 91: 1. He that
dwelleth in the secret place of the most
High shall abide under the shadow of
the Almighty.

The following Citations are included
in the Lesson-Sermon: The Bible: ,
the Lord appeared to Abram, and said
unto him, I am the Almighty God; walk
before me, and be thou perfect.

Genesis 17: 1

Science and Health with Key to the
Scriptures, by Mary Baker Eddy.

This patriarch illustrated the purpose
of love to create trust in good, and
showed the life-preserving power of
spiritual understanding, Page 579,





RATES OF “(XCHANGE

JUNE 14, 1952
NEW YORK
Selling Buying
73 4/10% Cheques on Bankers 71 8/10%
Sight or Demand
Drafts 71 6/10%
73 4/10% Cable
71 9/10% Currency 70 3/10%
Coupons 69 6/10%
50% Silver 20%
CANADA
77 3/10% Cheques on Bankers 75 5/10%
Demand Drafts 15.35%
Sight Drafts 75 2/10%
77 3/10% Cable
75 8/10 Currency 14%
Coupons 73 3/10%
50% Silver 20%



No, 712 RA2778

/
e.






HEADACHE
NERVE PAINS

after-effects. More than ever, in | NEURITIS: NEURALGIA |
| these high-pressure times, you
| should insist on using ‘ASPRO’ FEVERISHNESS

because of its SAFE action.

All Trade Enquiries to:

W. B. HUTCHINSON & CO.
MARHILL STREET, BRIDGETOWN



Ww



Made in England by
ASPRO LIMITED, Slough, Bucks

SORE THROAT
COLDS & ’FLU

PRICES WITHIN

THE REACH OF ALL
OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE

SS



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In extra large
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Head and Chest Colds, Coughs





Of all good Stores

and Chemists



Colds, Coughs

Sore Throats

Bronchitis

For quick, sure relief rub
THERMOGENE Medica-
ted Rub all over your
chest, throat and back,
Its healing warmth re-
lieves congestion, and
breathing the pleasant
medicinal vapour it gives
off clears nose,
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DOUBLE-ACTION

THERMOGENE

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In big glass Jars

TRS2I

and handy Tins







When You think of RUM.
There is only one blend - - -

J. D. Taylor's

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A Blend that satisfies at any time.

TRY THIS
Blended and bottled by - - -

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Dial 4335 \

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oN


SUNDAY, JUNE

15,



1952

WHIS BELT IS NEWS

By DOROTHY BARKLEY

LONDON
It’s the newest way of being
smart. It’s the latest craze in the
fashion world.

“Tt” is the elasticised belt in
webbing, canvas or.satin, or any
colour. It appears in every fash-
ion show, is being sold in every
fashion-conscious store. It varies
from the utilitarian style, two
inches deep, with no ornamenta-
tion, to the luxurious, four inch-
es deep, with gold stud patterns.

It is smart because it is elastic,
and so fits any size of waist; be-
cause it can be any colour and
can be worn with anything from
shorts to glamorous evening
skirt; because it is a good tonic
for a “tired” dress; because you
ean build up a-miniature ward-
robe—one belt to go with every
outfit, hs

In the. picture, a black elasti-
cised belt connects a white pique
skirt with a black poplin blouse
—and makes a useful town outfit.

& . s

At Ian Meredith’s collection
this week, the belt put in a fur-
ther appearance—in lime yellow.
Tt was worn with a grey evening
sweater, and a full black quisted
satin skirt, criss-crossed with sil-
ver thread. Over this went a black
quilted satin coat.

“Pink amethyst” and sea lav-
ender” were two shades making
their first appearance. Old col-
ours, dressed up as new, inctud-
ed Ruby Red, Venetian Red, In-
digo and Vatican Violet.

Poodle cloth, with a curly-
haired pile, was the most out-
standing among new materials. If
you own a poodle, you can now
jook like one—if you have a
poodle haircut, too.

Fisherman’s Basket

An import from Hongkong is
proving to be a best seller here.
It is a miniature fisherman's bas-
ket in wicker cane, fastening with
a peg in the authentic manner.

Women are buying them for pic-
nic-baskets, for work-baskets, or
even for handbags,

Fashion On The Wing

Having a connection with the
fashion world has its advantages
—especially if you live in Phila-
delphia. The International Fash-
ion Group of Philadelphia have
been invited to an Anglo-Ameri-
can gafden party in London in
August. Hostess will be Lady
(Kenneth) Clark, president of the
Incorporated Society of London
Fashion Designers.

The guests will travel over on
a special plane called “Fashion
Wing.” Before they leave they
will have a “flash bulbs and
headliner” party and will re-
christen the plane with cham-

pagne,
Birthday Party

Wien people in the fashion
world have anything to celebrate,
they do it in style. And so, when
Horrockses Pirouette—the chil-
dren's department — reached its
first anniversary, it marked the
oceasion with a birthday party,
complete with ice-creams, birth-
day cake and champagne (for the
grown-ups, of course),

At the same. time, the new
children’s collection was shown,
with children to mogel the new
styles. (Fortunately, their moth-
ers were present to coax and
wheedle them into place).

Pointers from the collection:
nyton is now used for all styles.
It washes easily, dries quickly and
needs little ironing. Dresses had
six-inch hems, and so were insur-
ed for a long life. White collars
were detachable for washing.

Smocking on bodies, back and
front, will continue to be popu-
lar since it makes a dress adap-
table to several sizes,

Finally. a colour note: deep reds
and vivid blues will be worn in
place of the pastel shades normal-
ly associated with children’s
clothes.



Cashmere Bouquet's gentle,
lather has been proved out
standingly mild for all. types

y Vell sh man rot ees fT cist)

the’ fragrance



VALOR COOKER STOVES

Short

Burners

2 Burner Model @ $56.14

———

By DAVID CRAIG

A MIDDLE-AGED woman
knelt down in an Aberdeen bun-
galow. end offered a prayer of
thankfulness when news reached
Britain a few days ago that Long
Pin, No. 1 bandit in Malaya, had
been killed in a jungle battle near
Kuala Lumpur.

Mrs. Isobel Robertson, home on
sick leave from the bandit-
infested. distriet of Kuala Kuba
Bahru, in Selangor, has good
reason to rejoice at the death of
Long Pin.

He was military commander of
No. 1 Regiment “Malayan Races’
Liberation Army.” A £2,320 re-
ward was on his head.

For months he remained at
liberty—carrying out hit-and-run
attacks. Kuala Kuba Bahru was
one of his favourite hunting
grounds.

‘A Little Peace’

Two days ago, Mrs. Robertson
received a letter from her hus-
band, manager of two estates
which ended;—

“If only we could catch Long
Pin we might get a little peace for
a While.”

@ SAID Mrs. Robertson, yes-
terday: “By ‘a little peace’
my husband means that per--
haps We will new get an un-
broken night's rest, which
hes been rare during the last
four years of war.

“During that time we have vir-
tualiy been prisoners behind
barbed-wire fences.

“W are not the only ones. There
are hundreds of European fami-
lies who never know when an
attaek will be launched.

“That is what makes me so
angry when I read of those
cocktail parties, dinner parties,
and too much golf.







SUNDAY ADVOCATE



| Why A Woman Must Go
Back To Jungle War

“This may apply in places
like Singapore and Kuala Lum-
pur, but the only parties we
have are Communist parties led
by fanatics,

“People in these towns have
told me: ‘Awfully sorry youre
having such a rough time, old girl,
but they know as much about
jungle warfare as Aberdeen knew
about the London biitz.

Visitors Armed

“We seldom have visitors on the
estate,

“When we do it is grimly amus-
ing to see them leave revolvers,
rifles, and hand grenades in the
hall just as we at home here might
give our hostess coat, gloves, and
umbrella.

“If, on a rare occasion, I visit
ithe dentist or hair-dresser, If
travel in an armoured car with «
guard. After a four-mile trip
through deep jungle we reach the
main road, then go flat out for
Kuala Lumpur 20 miles away.

“If we see a car that has broken
down we pretend not to notice. It
may be genuine—but too many
were caught that way in the early
days.

@ “I live month in, month out
inside the perimeter of the es-
tate, seldom venturing fur-
ther than the garden. When

my husband leaves each morning
for work I begin my worrying for
the day. And he, in turn, prays the
bandits won’t attack the bungalow
in his absence.

“It is quite a touching reunion
in the evening when each finds
ihe other safe.

Bedtime Worst Time
“At night there is a strict cur-
few, Nineteen guards take up
\heir positions and floodlights bite
deep into the jungle.

‘Bedtime is about 9 p.m. This is,
perhaps, the worst time of the
day. The atmosphere is appres-
sive and heavy. A deathly, damp
silence hangs everywhere.

“Before the war began I used
to worry about tigers and snakes.
But not any more. They’re still
there, but it’s bandits we have
nightmares about now.”

@ THE Robertsons have been in

Malaya since 1920, When the
Japanese overran the country im
1942 Robertson escaped with her
son to Australia.

Her husband was a prisoner be-
hind Jap barbed wire for three
and a half years.

Now the Robertsons are behind
their own barbed wire fighting a
remorseless enemy so that rubber
can continue to be one of Britain's
biggest dollar-earners.

Sheltered In Bath

What makes them carry on?

What makes a woman like
Mrs. Robertson who recently
sheltered im a bath for two
hours while the Communist
thugs shot wp the bungalow,
want to go back?

She is home on an extended
leave because her nerves could not
stand the stillness and hidden ter~
‘rors of the jungle any longer.

She is a chain-smoker, and the
sound of a car back-firing makes
her want to scream, so that she
stays away from the city of Aber-
deen as much as possible,

But she is going back to her
jungle home in a few months.
Because, she says, “It is my duty
to be with my husband,

“We have both survived many
unpleasant things in Malaya. To
quit nuw would be to surrender
to Communism.

“Just now there is a war on:
there is no gin-slinging in the
jungle.”—L.E.8.

Wedding Etiquette

The Wedding Reception

Sometimes held
noon after a late
preference to the wedding
“Breakfast.” All the bridal at-
tendants are present and those
who have previously accepted
invitations, The reception gener-
ally takes place at the home of
the bride’s mother, or in- a hotel

which has been hired for the
occasion. The bride and groom
stand together in a convenient
place, generally several paces to
the left of the bride's mother, to
receive the congratulations and

good wishes of their friends. The
bride’s mother stands just inside
the door to receive the guests.
No person should monopolise

the attention of the bridal paw
for more than a moment_or two.
Guests them pass on to look at
where they have
inspection,
After a
refreshments are

the presents
been arranged for
and to talk
short interval

served,
The

together.

brides mother, father,

brothers, and sisters will act as

auxiliary hosts and hostesses, and
no guest should be neglected.
Special care should be taken
present special
bridegroom's
relations to
amongst the

guests to the
parents and near
see that
first to

have been welcomed the newly

married couple go together to the
nab
In a reasonabl

dining room
cuts the cake.
short time they retire to
rooms to dress for their journey.
Parental farewells and others
which may be affecting should be

where the

to

they are
be given
refreshments. When all the guests

in the after-taken in the privacy of the res-
wedding in pective rooms, and.the bride and be

bridegroom should make their
reappearance in good spirits.

It is all to the good, if music
is procurable, as it eliminates-
the necessity for strained a
at cheering the company’s spirits
and conversation will be more
free. The bride and groom dance
the first piece together, the
bride's father may claim the
second and the bridegroom’s
father the third.

The bridal attendants and
friends form up on the doorstep
and speed the happy couple on
their way. It is now, mercifully,
more fashionable to shower bless-
ings on their heads than rice or
confetti !

The menu is best given into the
hands of a caterer, who accustom-
ed as he is to such matters, will
ensure the smooth working- of
the arrangements. In the long
run, too, less expenses is entailed,
and wastage will be eliminated.

Arrangements must be made
for washing up if the full number
of glasses is ‘not provided. The
provision of champagne or other-
wise depends on the means of the
host. If it is provided it should be
given in charge of some experi-
enced person who can be relied
on to see that it is not wasted.
Slices of the cake are cut into
small pieces and handed round,
together with the champagne. It
is not necessary to provide indi-
vidual plates with the cake for
guests, am





Used cups and glasses should
unobtrusively collected and
washed, full dishes substituted
for empty ones, ash-trays emptied,
sand the room generally kept tidy.

Cloakrooms should be provided,

and bedrooms may be converted

to this purpose, where the ladies

may rest their gloves, hats, and
bags.

Presents are displayed | taste-
fully at the reception. Small

cards giving the names of the

donors are placed on_ each,
Cheques, of ¢éourse, are not dis-
played, but the donors of such

should have their ecards placed
with the rest. In no circumstances
t be unacceptable
’ or bridegroom's
taste be, omitted from the display.
This custom of displaying pres-
with ecards attached is fast
dying out. In this case a list of the
presents together with the names

should a
to the bri

ents

of the donors may be recorded.

The menu should be qualified
by the means of the bride’s fam-
Beverages consist of cham-

ily.
pagne for toasting the wedded

couple, cordials for the abstain-

ers, and young people, cider cup,
whiskey and soda, rum and soda,
rum and ginger, beer and coco-
nut water, and of course,
cream. There is also cake, sand-
wiches (different flavours), appe-
tizers, stuffed eggs, bouches and
other dainties, suppers,
and nuts,

The cake is the centrepiece of
be
of the
bride, so that she_is sereened from

decoration but should not

placed directly in front

tthe company’s view.





There is nothing in the world so elegant and refreshing .. .















ice-

sweets

—

Man About Town

MRS. DOROTHY WALCOTT of
SINGER’S SEWING ACADEMY,
is the lady to phone (4927), She
will tell you of the fascinating
EMBROIDERY CLASSES which
you can join at any time and for
so nomingi a cost. A course is 25
lessons with a practice period of
1% hours once a week, You'll
Jearn embroidery of Household
Linens, Lingerie, Undies, Floor
Rugs. Just thiik of it and then
phone!

*

WORSTED SUITINGS AND
RAYON SUITINGS at prices that
fully justify the recent textile
reductions ! Very excellent value
indeed. And Wison Hats and
Shirts, oh, yes! Arrow Shirts from
the States in glistening white or
coloured stripe designs. All of
these are to be found at R. H.
DWARDS LTD., on Broad Street
together with socks, ties and shoes
and @ range of Men’s and Boys’
Sports Shirts—dazzlers !

+ +

.
THIS NEW HOUSEHOLD
STORE on Lower Broad Street is
to bring to you the choicest selec-
tion of real, every-day needs.
Cigarette Cases and Leather Goods
complement Jewellery, Watches
and Electrical appliances, includ-
img Frigidaires and Deep Freezes,
Kettles and Hot-Plates. The vari-
ety is terrific and far more than
ean be listed here. You'll see it
ali at K. R. HUNTE & CO.,, LTD.,
and by the way, did I say Office
Furniture’ Z
.

LEN HUTTON,
bats, gloves, stumps and Cricket
talls have arrived at CAVE
SHEPHERD'S this week and make
an excellent showing in the Sports
Dept. Litesome Supports and
Protectors are included in the
equipment and so are Slazenger
Tennis Frames ranging from
$15.50, Table Tennis Bats are
available in different shapes and
weights from $2.28. You should
browse around up here!

* a *

hit-'em-for-six

GEORGE SAHELY & CO., are
trimming over with constantly
erriving new stock-—Blue, White,
Pink, Yellow Rayon Fancy Mar-
quisette and Fancy Doby Crepe in
laste] Shades—and it's brand new
at unbeatable prices. Crammed
against the walls are rainbow
hues and a multitude of materials
from which to choose and remem-
ber—all are new and fresh when,
bought at Geo, Sahely & Co, 19
Swan Street,

FROM BRITISH GUIANA to
Y. DE LIMA’S on Broad St. comes
a Jeweller expressly to carry out
repair work, or work of a
manufacturing nature, or engrav~-
ing, or the copying of a pattern.
Now this is. really something and,
what’s more, prices are extremely
reasonable for this specialised
work AND DELIVERY IS ON
THE NAIL. So give a tinkle to
Y. de Lima’s, 4644 and get that
job done at last!

your



WHITE LIGHTWEIGHT!
SHARKSKIN, 36 in. wide and|
only $2.11; Heavyweight Shark- |
skin, too, and Flowered RAYON
LINENS for $1.50 in large, bold
designs. And look at the PRINTS!
Only 68¢. each—can you possibly }
bei. it? You'll see them at|
ChASE’S, THE STORE THAT |
FREQUENTLY HAS EVERY-|
THING, and it has, too. FIBRE |
BUIT CASES from $6.75 downs to |

‘ : |
$2.90 in nine sizes. So there you |
are—-phone is
>





3393. |

+ . |

\

THE VERY NEWEST FLOOR |
COVERING is now in town, At}
Barbados Co-op. Cotton Factory |
the remarkable TINTAWN Mat- |
Ung
$9.90 and Squares from $11.28 to
$32.37 comes in many colours
and colour combinations, The per-
fect covering for wood or concrete
it's claimed as the hardest wearing
matting known and impervious to

burns. You should certainly see it, |

THE KELVINATOR I8 A,
We0DDING GIFT to be treasured!
At Manning’s Corner Store (4283)
or in the Electrical Dept. of Man- |

niwg & Co., Ltd. (4289) these
REYRIGERATORS are produced |
by American technicians in Brit- |
ain, Almost 5 cu. ft. capacity— |
ideal family size!—-this glittering,

Space saving cabinet with splen-

didly planned interior is a steal of

its kind for $415--with a 5 year

guarantee!
* *. *

IT’S APPLE GREEN AND A}
MONEY SAVER and very, very!
ativaetive. ‘This litthe Morris Con- |
vertible at the Fort Royal is way |
low down in price~and way high |
up in value with feather touch
(tcering, hydraulic braking, in-
dependent springing and incredi-
bly smooth operation, It won't be
heré long, y’know, because it’s toa
appealing for words (if I say so}
myself). Would you eare to phone |
about it?—Try 2362.





Ss





.oughing,- Strangling Asthma, |
Bronchitis Curbed in 3 Minutes |




0 you have attacks of Asthma or
sronchitis so bad that you choke
ond gasp for breath and can’t sleep?
Do you cough so hard you feel like
you were being ruptured? Do you
feel wenk, unable to work, and have
to ureful not to take cold and

t certain foods?

o matter how long you have suf-
ered or what you have tried, there
ts new hope for you In a Doctor's
twesertption called MENDACO, No

slopes, no smokes, no injections, no
atomizer, All you do ta take two
tosteloss tablets at monalis and your
eitacks seem to vatiah ke Tato,





and bring sound sleep the first night
so that you soon feel years younger
emt atronger,

# No Asthma In 2 Yoars

MENDACO not only brings almost
immediate comfort and free breath-
tog but builds up the system to ward
off future attacks, For instance, Mr.

eal



Men certainly like shirts of smart
“Tex-made”’ broadcloth! The
striking Dufferin Lesigns with
their handsome stripes on light or

comfortable, too.

simple to sew-— they



In
3 minutes MENDACO starts work-
jog through your blood aiding nature
‘o dissolve and remove strangling
phlegm, promote free easy breathing



dark backgrounds are big
favourites! So cool, and

And “Tex-made”’ materials are

and handle effortlessly You'll like
the way they wash and iron. .
and the way the colours stay fast!

Ask for ‘“Tex-made”’
by the yard, and look at the
famous identification bands and
“Tex-made”’ tag. They are your
guarantee of top quality and
lasting wear.

(. had Jost 40 Ibs,, suffered cough-



choking and strangling every

4.1
| night, couldn't sleep, expected to die,

MENDACO stopped Asthma spasma
jiret night and he has had none since
In over two yenra,

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very firet dose of MENDACO
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In no time at all MENDACO may
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th








You be the Judrr you don't feel
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fully satisfied aft taking MIEN






N-
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ige and the full purchase price wilt
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well you sleep tonight and how much
better you will feel tomorrow, The

Mendaco?!:)'::s:

Eads Asthma ye Bronchitis we Hay F



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iP



<

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PAGE SEVEN



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PAGE EIGHT





Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown



Sunday, June 15, 1952



FREE UNIONS

ON Thursday Mr. G. H. Adams C.M.G.
leaves Barbados for Berlin. He will be
attending two meetings which will be
held under the auspices of the Interna-
tional Conference*of Free Trade Unions.

At the first of these meetings Mr. Adams
will be attending as a representative of
the British West Indies on the Executive
Board of the International Confederation
of Free Trade Unions.

At the second he will be representing
Barbados at the first conference of the
General Council of I.C.F.T.U.

Mr. Adams’s visit to Berlin follows close
upon the formation of a Caribbean Divis-
ion of the Inter American Regional Or-
ganisation of-ICFTU. The decision to cre-
ate such a division which was made at the
recent conference in Barbados will be re-
ferred to the Executive Board in Berlin
for confirmation.

The formation of a Caribbean Division
of ORIT is truly a historic landmark in
the history of West Indian Trade Unions.

The territory covered by ORIT is so
vast, comprising as it does the whole of
the American Continent that the special
problems of the Caribbean area tended to
become submerged in the flood of Latin-
American affairs which clamour for
ORIT’s attention. Caribbean Unions need
all the help and guidance they can obtain
from the Inter-American Regional Or-
ganisation headquarters in Havana, But
fundamentally the success or failure of
Caribbean Trade Unions depends on the
ability to be found within the Unions
themselves and emancipation from the
leading strings of ORIT will give members
of the Caribbean division of ORIT oppor-
tunity to show their mettle.

At the same time the formation of the
Caribbean Division of ORIT is a challenge
to the member Unions and ipso facto a
challenge to the communities in which
the member unions operate.

There can be no question as to the ne-
cessity for the free unions to succeed. Mr.
Romualdi, Chairman of the meeting which
decided in favour of the formation of the
Caribbean Division of ORIT stated the po-
sition exactly, when he said that if the free
trade unions failed, the movement would
fail... fies a ‘ ‘

Tt cannot be too often repeated that there
exists to-day in the world two trade union
movements which ‘command world wide
allegiance. The Intecnational Confedera-
tion of Free Trade Unions whose first Gen-
eral Council meeting in Berlin Mr. G. H.
Adams is attending this month, repre-

_sents unions whose allegiance is to the
democratic way of life as understood and
practised in the free democracies. The
World Federation of Trade Unions on the
other hand is controlled and dominated by
Communists and is committed to a policy
of totalitarianism which is a negation of
the very freedoms for which the Free
Trade Unions have fought and still con-
tinue to fight.

Trade.Unions are young movements in
the West Indies and responsible Trade
Union leaders and officials will frankly
admit that their unions have not yet freed
themselves from the teething troubles
which must be expected from any pioneer
movement and which had naturally ,to be
encountered by organisations whose activ-
ities were primarily directed towards ob-
taining large pay packets for their mem-
bers,

As a result there is still to be found in
the West Indies suspicion of Trade Unions
on one side and on the other aggressive
attitudes on the part of some Unionists to
employers. Perhaps this kind of suspicion
will always exist in some degree because
of the failings of human nature: but
throughout the Caribbean area to-day the
majority of responsible employers are
prepared to co-operate and do co-operate
with local unions. It can even be said
that-the roles which the Unions now per-
form are appreciated by most employers.

The relationship between Trade Unions
and employers has therefore long passed
the “cat and dog” stage which is kept in
being only by politicians who have been
reluctant to forego so easy a method of
courting popularity with the uneducated.

The stage which has been reached in
the Caribbean is a stage far more ad-
vanced and far more important than the
mud-slinging contests of parochially
minded individuals. What is being decid-
ed in the Caribbean to-day is the direc-
tion of Trade Union movement.

Will it swing towards Moscow or will
it support the democratic nations among
whose members are included the fifty mil-
lion who are represented in the Interna-
tional Confederation of Free Trade
Unions ?

At the meeting held in Barbados during
the first- week in June the foundation
stone was laid on which to build a healthy

Caribbean Trade Union structure devoted
to the service not only of Trade Unions
members but to the Caribbean community
and to the countries of the Caribbean.

It is the duty of all who live in the
Caribbean to lend support wherever and
whenever it is required ‘to strengthen the
movement towards Free Trede Unionism.
Because ‘assistance given to the Free Trade
Unions strikes at the roots of the Com-
munist dominated rival Trade Unions
whose objective is subversion of the exist-
ing regimes and the inauguration of com-
munist totalitarian controls.

DIAL 999) aa; George tunte

It will be easier for the communities of
the Caribbean to support the Free Trade
Unions if the Unions strive to bafhish sus-
picion and if they concentrate their ener-
gies on educating their members to
greater understanding of their responsibil-
ities to the community. It would be tragic
for the free trade Unions and therefore
for the community if parochialism and
narrow self interest prevented the rap-
prochement between unionist and non-
unionist which is essential to the harmon-
ious progress of free societies. \/ith good-
will everything is possible.



DANGER

THE BISHOP of Lichfield put into
words recently at Wolverhampton what
has for many years been exercising the
thoughts of private individuals through-
out the world, Speaking of the people of
the United Kingdom the Bishop said that
“we were in danger of becoming two
nations with each party in turn deriding
and when in power'destructively undoing
what the other party had done.”

Such violent political quarrelling he
added did not make for stable government
and concluded that it would be a major
disaster if a time should ever be reached
when the political parties became end’ in
themselves and not means to an end.

The Bishop views British politics with
clear vision and a wholesome respect for
facts.

The United Kingdom as Mr. Winston
Churchill said at the time of the British
General Elections is to-day a party-divid-
ed country.

There is little likelihood of Barbados
ever sharing the fate of the United King-
dom for generations, because even if a
party form of government could operate
successfully in our diminutive assembly
the existence of more than two parties
will always hamper party government
here.

But what the Bishop of Lichfield said
about the danger of becoming two nations
is always present in a society where poli-
tical belief is based on blind faith in a po-
litical programme and is not the result of
careful thought. An illustration of this
lack of political thought is afforded by the
actual remark of a labour supporter in
Barbados when he replied to a suggestion
that a coalition government in the United
Kingdom might save the United Kingdom
from destruction with the comment that it
would be political death to the Labour
Party.

No greater vindication of the Bishop’s
perspicacity could be made. If political
parties become ends in themselves and not
means to an end it is only logical for the
good of the political party to be held in
greater esteem than the good of the coun-
try.

To such ridiculous ends can the misdi-
rection of human energies and abilities
lead.

It seems that the Bishop is a better
guide to the health of a polity than the
professed politician.



COLOUR

TO this generation of readers the Times
of London is regarded as something solid,
staid and responsible. It'can be trusted
most of them would say never to be sen-
sational, never to offend against good
taste. But most of its loyal readers must
have been given a jolt when they turned
to the foot of column two on page 6 on
Saturday May 31. Because there in block
letters was a headline running across the
whole column announcing Colour Bar For
Pigs. The sub-editor who thought that one
up deserves no doubt a medal or some
other decoration from some society which
makes studies of headlines. But the head-
line is dull and uninspiring when com-
pared to the subject matter over which it
stands.

Believe it or not, and most of us will be-
lieve it because the Times says so, all pigs
in the Republic of Ireland are now official-
ly white. And if they are not someone is
breaking the law.

Beginning this June in the Republic of
Ireland it is an offence to keep other than
a white pig.

Farmers have had a long time to pre-
pare for this practise of pig racial dis-
crimination.

They were prohibited in July 1951 from
using coloured pigs for breeding.

And the reason for the colour bar?

It is said that white pigs give better
bacon and pork,



SUNDAY AD

Before June is out “Dial 999”
will be the new way of calling the
Police by telephone. This new
development is only one of a series
of developments which have been
going on year after year behind
the scenes and which have been
| bringing the Police nearer to the
|mainstream of the community's
life

The

Police of Barbados are

servants of the people of Barba- pelice. grocery
So it is right that the oor eens lines with delivery ser-

dos.

vices which they perform an

VOCATE



lie in the policeman and he has
probably chosen the wrong pro-
fession.

The Central Police Station in
Bridgetown is the headquarters
for the island’s twenty-two police
formations. Here policemen en-
joy the facilities of a well-fur-
nis reading room, recreation

, bar and restaurant service.

Here they avail themselves of a

store run on co-

and here their hair-cuts cost

the services which they can per- less thay in Bridgetown.

| form should be recognised by the
|community, Only in this way can
‘the community appreciate how
|much they owe to the Police;
and only in this way will they be
| encouraged to make greater uses
of the Services of the Police.
| Most people in Barbados think
| of the Police as limbs of the law,
| as persons who walk around in a
|very conspicuous uniform carry-
| ing notebook and pencil and eager
to catch unsuspecting citizens in
| the act of wrongdoing.
| They regard them as people to
{be avoided rather than as friends
of law-abiding citizens.

Many persons have good rea-
sons for not wanting to see police-
men because they know that a
policeman’'s presence indicates tha’
‘their misdemeanours or crim
have been discovered, Others ob-
| ject to policemen on principle be-
cause they regard policemen as
j enemies to their personal freedom,
whether this freedom takes the
form of exceeding the speed limit
or of committing a public nui-
sance,

The conception of a policeman
as a positive contribution to the
stability of society is still grow-
ing. It has not yet reached ma-
turity.

Perhaps the people of Barbados
would be far more appreciative of

| their police force if they knew
more about them and saw them
off duty, in their restaurants, can-
Semis or even getting their hair
cut.

The policemen of Barbados (and
the 4 policewomen) are well dis-
ciplined., Without discipline a po-
lice force is not worth the paper
it is written on, Discipline, exem-
plified by springing to attention
and immediate execution of com-
mands must be present in a police
force as it is present in an army,
But discipline is merely the back-
hone st the skeleton” oan makes
a g policeman or geen.
There is room in the Police Force
for all the talents. A man ean be
employed as a carpenter, a store-
keeper, a photographer, a tele-

phone operator, a driver, a groom
or an orderly, A policeman n’s lot
in Barbados ought to be a happy

one. If it is not, the fault must






































By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS

LONDON, May

Anthony Eden, our tireless For-
eign Secretary, has completed the
last lap of what can only be de-
scribed as a ten-day European
steeplechase. He went to Benn.
to sign Germany's peace contract.
It was a terrible job as he had
to initial every single one of its
400 pages, in the course of a
morning. He also attended a ban-
quet in Bonn and another in
Cologne. Then he dashed to Paris,
to sign up the agreements and
guarantees to France that she
wanted to persuade her to join
the European Army, Then to
Strasbourg—the comparative peace
of the European “talking shop”"—
and from there to troubled Berlin,
where he went heavily guarded
against Communist demonstra-
tions,

All this serious and relevant
news thas fallen so thickly and
fast on the ground that Britain
has not quite come to picture the
new map of Europe. It will pro-
bably be seen by historians as
the week when the wartime “Big
Three” partnership finally broke
up into a greater number of ele-
ments, This Spring has seen two
new powers emerge into world
affairs and world commerce—first
Japan and now Germany. And a
tense situation is growing around
Berlin, One half of Germany is
being finally cut off from the
other—and that means the old
map of Europe we used to learn
from is radically altered,

a » 2

British opinion is much more
agitated about the situation in
South Africa than about develop-
ments in Europe, Everywhere
there is a sudden interest in the
intricacies of South African poli-
tics, and the most unexpected
people air precise information
about such abstruse matters as
the change of opinion on the
platteland, or the chances of the
Supreme Court successfully defy-
ing Dr. Malan.

mpletes Ten Day
Steeplechase

Eden Co

Folice have their own tailoring
‘dd laundry service: a bicycle re-
pair service afd of course their
own quartermaster store.

The Barbados Police are mem-
bers of a community where work
and play are carefully organised
and integrated into routine police
administration. But the routine
and disciplined arrangement of a
policeman’s life, reflected in the
neat arrangement of cots, kits and
shining metal in Police barracks
rooms or in the smart click of at-
tention Which denotes an officer’s
presence is only one aspect of a
policeman’s life. '

At police headquarters the fill-
ing in of card indices, crime re-
cords, statistics of accidents,

ae harts of cane fires occupy many

usy hours of policemen clerks’
days while policemen of the

°@.1.D. have the tasks of exam-

ing witnesses and of the collection
of fingerprints and development
of photographic records. .

The C.1.D. department is
proud of its “finger-print” work
and enlargements of the thumb
marks of two of the most daring
housebreakers to be tracked by lo-
cal finger-print detection adorn
their finger-print room. Charts
are kept of misdemeanours, lar-
ceny and other specific crimes.
special chart is kept for robbery
‘of poultry and livestock and for
bicycle thefts.

The C.I.D. is the most_excit-
ing department in which a Police-
man can work and one of its cor-
porals is presently at Scotland
Yard in London learning at first
hand how the most famous C.I.Dt
in the world sets about discover-
ing criminals.

One of the attractions of em-
ployment in the C.I.D. is the ab-
sence of policeman’s ‘uniform.

Sleuthing is best done without
advertisement. The C.D. are
justly proud, too of a locally con~-
Structed box which contains all
the gadgets necessary for
detection.

It is the only one of its kind
in Barbados and after one look
at its contents I was tempted
just momentarily to think what a
worthwhile robbery it would be,

crime

It's the sort of box any normal
boy must envy.

There are nearly six hundred
volicemen in the Force, however,
and only a small number can
achieve the ambition of becoming
C.1.D. personnel. But there are
many more interesting jobs to
be filled.

Very soon now the Police will
be equipped with a radio network
operating from headquarters and
controlling mobile patrol cars.
Policemen will be needed to man
the control wireless sets and
tu drive the patrol cars. After
investigations on the scene of the
crime this form of police activity
would appeal to me most. No
duubt many policemen will feel
the same. For the clerky types,
there are jobs with the immi-
gration department, the licensing
departmentss and the statistical
departments and the statistical
publish a weekly police gazette
which is printed on a_ small
duplicating machine and_ dis-
tributed to all British Caribbean
territories,

The Police Gazette notifies
everyone in the region to be on the
look out for wanted persons or
stolen goods.

Another fascinating police job is
that of the mounted policeman.
There is a mounted police detach-
ment at Bissex Hill and their rides
into the lesser known and roadless
Scotland districts must be very
satisfactory and worthwhile.

Everyone knows about the Police
Band: and many people are be-
coming aware of the Boys and
Girls Clubs,

These are run under Police
supervision and are helping to
tackle the important police duty

A of preventing crime. One splendid

advertisement for the Boys Clubs
is the boy now employed as a
tailor’s apprentice at the Central
Police Station.

Looked at from Coleridge Street
or from Baxters Road the_head-
quarters of the Police Station
seems very stern and grim: but
between these two points moye
daily a disciplined number of hu-
man beings upon whose co-ordin-
ated activities, intelligence, train-
ing and sense of duty depends the
maintenance of law and order in
Barbados.

Inside the Police Headquarters
in Bridgetown beats the heart of a
Force which is daily becoming
more trained and better equipped
to carry out the role of servants
of the people of Barbados.

We ought to be more proud of
our policemen, and more grateful
for the services they render us.





This sudden burst of interest in
South Africa, has of course, been
stimulated by the crisis, a crisis
that seems to have been deliber-
ately provoked by th2 National-
ist Government.

One of the recent turns in

» events in South Africa has been

the revival of Dr. Malan’s claim
to take over the Protectorates
which are within or beside tha
area of the Union but are still
governed directly from Whitehall.
In the present state of British
public opinion it is impossible to
imagine that any British Gov-
ernment could surrender the Pro-
tectorates. The question. being
asked is whether it might be pos-
sible, if the South African Na-
tionalists are defeatede at next
year’s election, for the British
Conservative Government to
reach some arrangement with a
more moderate South African
Government, In the present tem-
per of opinion even that gesture
might be impossible for a long
time as the distrust—which seems
to be mutual—between Britain
and Nationalist South Africa will
take time to be dissipated by any
future South African Government.

* * *

Queen Mary celebrated her 85th
birthday last month. And London
gave her a brave show of flags
to demonstrate its affection to the
old lady who has come to repre-
sent royalty in all its regality.

Queen Mary spent her eighty-
fifth birthday quietly, at her home
at Marlborough House. Prince
Charles and Princess Anne came
to visit their great-grandmother;
and the English rose society pre-
sented her with a prize bouquet
lof a variety of dark red rose that
she has been interested in—for
Queen Mary is a keen horticul-
turist as well as an enthusiastic
antique-collector.

oe *. *

A.E.R.E. has issued a report of
what it is up to. May I take that

ut of modern initial-jargon?

tain’s atomic-energy research
station has told the public a cer-
tain amount about its work both



towards preparing the first British

atom-bomb and advancing

ards energy from atomic power,
é

Harwell, about which the re-
port is published is known main-
ly as the place that Drs. Fuchs
and Pontecervo gleaned their in-
formation from—to deliver to their
Soviet masters. Harwell, though,
is not an atom-bomb factory. It
is a comparatively small research
station that has achieved some
remarkable results under Sir
John Cockroft — despite the lack
of technical co-operation from
the United States.

It is said that due to the dis-
coveries of British science the
bomb to be exploded off the North
West coast of Australia will be
technically superior to anything
attempted in the United States.
And presumably superior to Rus-
sian efforts.

ok *

Mr. Menzies, the Prime Minis-
ter of Australia, is used to hard
work. But one of his entourage
described his programme in Lon-

don a “grim”. He meant that the
programme was a bid crowded—

not that meeting members of the

Conservative Government could

be grim.
* * *

Fleet Street journalists are
sometimes worried by the lack of
thought among journalists. That,
briefly, is why the Fleet Street




suade 80-year-old Lord Russel!
to visit a Fleet Street Tavern and
stimulate our thought-processes.
He has explained that on gloomy
days he believes the world
running into an era of war and

self-annihilation; on bright days

he looks forward to the era of
greatest prosperity the world has
ever known.

We had him on a gloomy day—
he gave the world odds of about
6—4 against. ,

But it was stimulating, and
Fleet Street Forum has now pub-
lished on account of the discus-
sion, Many journalists talk more
nonsense than one _ journalist—
that is all we proved.



Krennalin versus Vatican

By CHARLES WINTOUR

The Russian film industry have
just given the British public a
fascinating picture of Stalin seen
through Soviet eyes, In The Fall
of Berlin the Soviet dictator ap-
pears as the kindly father of his
peoples, a man of infinite goodness
and almost divine wisdom.

Most Communists certainly be-
lieve that Stalin never made a
serious mistake in his life. The
myth of infallibility is so much
easier to maintain when no
admission of error is ever made.

But when the history of the
post-war years comes to be writ-
ten it will be found that Stalin
made many mistakes, and the big-
gest was his attack on the position
of the Roman Catholic Church in
the Soviet orbit of influence.

There are nearly 50 million
Roman Catholics living in coun-
tries under Soviet rule. The per-
secution of their church and its
leaders aroused the whole Catholic
world and led in 1949 to Papal
excommunication of the Commu-
nists.

France...

The trial of Cardinal Minds-
zenty in Hungary, the banishment
of Archbishop Beran of Prague,
ithe arrest of the Rumanian pre-
‘Mates, the attacks on the Church
in Poland—all these incidents
helped to build up the strength of



the Cummunist States to the full

and determined exercise of its
tical influence against the

interests of Soviet Communism.

Strategically, the Roman Cath-
olic Church is well placed to
engage in a struggle of this kind.
Everywhere in the world Roman
Catholics may be found in posi-
tions of influence. And in Europe
they dominate the political scene.

Look at France. Twelve of the
17 members of the French Cabinet
are Catholics. They include the
Prime Minister, M. Pinay, the
Foreign Minister, M. Schuman,
the Defence Minister, M. Pleven,
and M. Le Tourneau, the Minister
for Associated States,

Then there is M. Bidault, the
leader of the Mouvement Repub-
ficain Populaire, one of the parties
essential to the Government's
majority. He is a Catholic. And
so is General de Gaulle, the leader
of the right-wing Opposition.

Belguim, Italy .. .

But Catholic influence extends
much farther than this. It is
generally understood that promo-
tion at the Quai d'Orsay, the
French foreign office, is very diffi-
cult for non-Catholics. The some

to change its attitude from a will- Social Christian Party forming the|
ingness to live peaceably within Government is a Roman Catholic)

party.

Of course, Italy is a Roman
Catholic country, led by a Roman
Catholic Prime Minister, Signor
de Gasperi. But it may be sur-
prising for people to hear that
Herr Adenauer, the German
Chancellor, is a Roman Catholic.

And so is Dr, Figl, the Austrian
Chancellor, who has just been
visiting Britain. He is the head
of the Catholic People’s Party,
which exercises the predominant
influence in Austrian affairs.

Spain, Portugal .. .

This does not complete the
record of Roman Catholic politic-
ians in Europe. General Franco
of Spain is a Catholic, and so is
Dr. Salazar, the Premier of Por-
tugal. Their ministers are of the
same faith.

In predominantly Anglo-Saxoa
countries the Catholics have less
influence, Only one of the Empire
Premiers is a Catholic. He i3 Mr.
Louis St. Laurent of Canada.
Britain only 23 members of Parli-
ament are Catholics, of whom 15
are Socialists. Perhaps the most
prominent is Mr. Richard Stokes,
the former Lord Privy Seal. There
are no Catholics holding office in

thing applies to non-Catholic the present administration.
officers in the Army. . The United States has been
France’s northern neighbour, called a Roman Catholic country,

Belgium, is governed by a Cabinet so strong is the influence of the

the Roman Catholic Church and which is entirely Catholic, for the Catholic vote in certain key areas. !

tow-j














Forum was ‘formed. Not long ago
the journalists managed to per-

is

In|

SUNDAY, JUNE 15,

1952







































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CRUISING



Concluding the account of
2 trip in. the 15ft. yach
H from Barbados
to St. Vincent, the Grena-
dines and Grenada.

—— |

Before I left Barbados I had
read a passage in a book by
Anita Leslie which made me feel
that I would never be satisfied
until I had sailed through the
Grenadines. I quote it here in
the hope that it. will also inspire
other local yachtsmen who are
considering making a cruise but
cannot quite make up their minds
to “take the plunge.”

It goes Jiké this: “Dreams can-
not cony up any more enticing
stretch fof a sailing boat than the
hundred islands of the Grenadi-
nes. Their names are like music,
English, French and Indian toned
Battowia, Mustique, Petit
Mustique, Montezumo Shoal, Anse
la Coite, Cannowan, Tobago Cays,
Frigate Island, London Bridge,
Les Tamtes — oh, magic isles,
mere splinters of volcanic rock
set like a granite necklace in
seas of jade and amethyst!’ ”

To her list of names I would
add one or two that appeal par-
ticularly to me; like World’s End
Reef, Petit Tobac, Baliceaux,
Jack a Man, All Awash and Sail
Rock— a steep white rock which
can be mistaken quite easily for

_






1952

The manageress of the hotel
gave us Some large jacks in
loaves of bread which we stowed
carefully in the cubby hole and
then walked down the beach ‘to
Port Elizabeth to clear the ship.

The government offices in
Bequia are very nicely arranged.
One small building houses the
Treasury, Police, Customs, Post
Office, Law Court, Revenue
Office end the wireless station.
After we had been cleared and
had had our bill of healtn
endorsed Corkie decided that he
wanted some stamps. “Just a
minute” said the clerk, and bob-
bed around into another little
office. It turned out that besides
being Harbour Master he was
also Post Master, Revenue
Officer, Wireless Operator, Treas-
urer and Clerk of the Court—a
magistrate goes over to Bequia
once a month from St. Vincent
—his only regret was that he did
not get separate salaries for each
of his posts.

Eventually we hoisted anchor
at 10 a.m. and used the outboard
to get out of the harbour. Once
out we hoisted sail and started
a battle with the sea which was
to last for over five hours. There
was a strong wind blowing and
the sea was rough, very steep
seas caused not by the wind but
by the current. Hurricane was

sailing under the large cruising
mainsail and the cruising jib, but

Ae
‘and

THE LIGHT ON CANNOUAN.—At night the lamp warns mariners
of the treacherous rvets that surround the harpour.

a schooner, But to get back to
prosaic statistics. There are some
six hundred islands and rocks in
the Grenadines and the majority
of them are uninhabited. The
largest island is Carriacou which
is seven miles long and two miles
wide, and the next in size is
Bequia. The islands are not high,
none being over 1,100 feet, but
being so small they look higher
than they really are.

The tides in the urea are partic-
ularly “strong, reaching nearly
5 m.p.h. in certain places and the

sea is shallow being an average
of 18 fathoms but getting very














Once a week a sloop brings mail and provisions to Cannouan.

is a big occasion in the lives of
to the jetty.

much shallower near the islands. tacked
reefs
around too and quite often one

There are some _ tricky

sees breakers far from land,
Clearing Ship
Byt to get back to Bequia and
our ship. We decided to make an
early start from Beguie so that
we would arrive in Cannouan in
time for luncheon,





HARRISONS

BROAD .STREET

——S eee

eo



SA-

although we were literally tear-
ing through the sea on a quarter
the tide was so strong against us
that our progress was painfully
slow, At last we rounded to
the lee of Isle Quatre and
Pigeon Island, which are very
close to’ Bequia, “atid sighted.an
island up to windward which our
Pilot said was Cannouan.

Weary Beat

So we trimmed .Hurricane to
point well above tihe island and
started a weary beat against
wind and tide. The tide took us
down, and we tacked up again:
the tide took us down, and we

This
the people and they all flock down

the tide
we tacked

vp again:

us down, and

ally.

I had been told on Bequia that

“

took
up
again, but we got there eventu-

IN







SUNDAY ADVOCATE

WHITE BEACHES and transparent blue-green sea are among

Mustique’s attractions.

a barracuda, but he had been on
the line for so long that he was
dead.

Still no jetty.” What's happened
te the jetty?” I asked our pilot,
who was looking around with a
puzzled expression on his face.
“Must have got washed away.” He
replied. This being the only possi-
ble explanation we entered a
harbour which looked reasonably
deep and had boats pulled up on
the beach. |

After putting out the anchor
and furling the sails we beckoned
to a boat which .was nearby
and the man came alongside.
“When did the jetty get washed
away” asked our Pilot, “We've
never had a jetty here” replied
the man” this is MUSTIQUE”.
Words failed us. We just looked
at our Pilot who seemed quite
unperturbed and mastering an
urge to murder him, went ashore.

It was then about five o’clock
and our first job was to find some-
where to sleep that night, Not
having even considered Mustique
a port of call we thought that we
would have to sleep on the beach,
but I had heard of Mrs, Hazell,
who owns the island, so we went
up to see her. She and hey
daughter and son-in-law Mr.
and Mrs. Maingot—were exceed-
ingly kind to us, They gave us a
lovely tea, invited us to spend the
night with them and sent a boy
to bring our baggage up from the
boat,

White Cedars

Mustique, to my mind is just
about the prettiest of the Grena-
dines. It is rather flatter than
most of the islands and when we
were there the grazing pastures
were parched brown, for like Bar-
bados there had been very little
rain there since November, White
Cedar trees grow wild all over
the island and Mrs. Hazell’s house
looks charming, standing on top
of a hill in the midst of a cedar
grove

The population of the island is
about a hundred and they e by
fishing and by growing corn and
cotton on share cropping ar-
rangement. The chief export of
Mustique, indeed the only one be-
sides cotton, is meat. Wild cattle
and sheep are plentiful on the
island and at intervals a deep
freeze launch comes from Mar-
tinique to buy the meat, The
animals are really wild and they
have to be shot with Mauser
rifles, Mr. Maingot also keeps some
sheep in enclosed pastures but he
has to be constantly on the watch



Ge

we should anchor near the jetty
so I was trying hard to spot it
while Corkie pulled in the fish-
ing line, which had been tied off.
To our surprise we had caught





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Bridal Veils



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Plain and Watered Taffeta from

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from $8.50 to $12.75

Bridal Headdresses from $2.38 to $4.05





eee SS oo Ee

{
;

out for “pirates” who land from
fishing boats at night to steal the
stock. ‘

The reefs around the island
abound with chub and lobsters
and there are ‘plenty of wild
pigeons in the forest, so with his
gun and his spear Mr, Maingot
can feed the family without any
difficulty. Of course there are a
couple of drawbacks to this little
paradise, In the wet season there
are swarms of mosquitoes—Mus-
tique means mosquito—and a hor-
rible thorny bush called C®oshie
has recently started to grow on the
island and is spreading fast.

We had a very nice dinner that
night—our barracuda and somé
excellent wild mutton and’ then
made arrangements to ship our
Pilot back to St. Vincent—he was
worse than useless and we were
sure we could do better ourselves.
Luckily, Mr. Maingot’s fishing
boat, which goes to St. Vincent
once a week to collect mail and
supplies, was leaving next. morn-
ing at five o’clock and could take
our Pilot along, We had to alter
our crew list and get him to sign
it lest someone should think that
we had disposed of him at sea, and
as a precaution we got Mr. Main-
got who is a J.P., to sign it as
well.

Change of Plan

The next morning we went for
a delightful walk and then re-
turned to the house to pack our
belongings. We had had to change
our itinerary because of our unex-
pected visit to Mustique and we
now planned to call at Cannouan
and Carriacou before reaching
Grenada. Mayero and the Tobago
Cays, unfortunately, “had to
crossed off the list.

There was a hard wind blowing
when we left Mustique and it con-
tinued all day. We started off in
fine fashion, however,.with smalt
mainsail and jib boomed out and
surfed along the seas with the tide
helping us. We soon passed Petit
Cay, Petit Mustique and Savan
Island and drew close to Petit
Cannouan. From there on the sea
was really rough and we had to
steer very carefully. The tide
turned against us too, and it took
a long time to get from there to
Jupiter Head, Cannouan. Just off
the Head the sea was rougher than
ever, but once we got around the
point it was like a millpond and
we were able to use the outboard
to take us into the harbour.

We were relieved to find that
the jetty was still there and after
entering the bay without hitting
any of the reefs shown on the
chart we dropped our anchor







be,

about a hundred yards from it
We had been told that a lad)
called Mrs. Antrobus might be

able to give us.a bed for the nigt
and so we located her first, Luck
ily the bed was vacant and so w
mover all our belongings into th
little house. Then we went up t
the rum shop with a_ fisherman
from Bequia, who had been very
helpful,'and in no time the whole
mate population of the island was
drunk expense. We, craft
ily, had been drinking grapefruit
juice with just a drop of rum in
it so we were quite capable
walking back dow the rough
path our ‘hotel’, while
guide stumbled several times.
Before we left next morning we



at our

lo our







went for a walk. 1: counted four
rumshops and there were all full.
The ronulation of C nnouan is
about 150, and I sippose : a
third of that number are males
As usual in the Grenadines the
women do the agricultural work
and not \ well, 1 mvet say
an’? the men fish or talk bou
fishing

TY jis a pretty island. lena bul
with some hieh hills. The heache
are wi weed the kathine is good
and the veonls, thourh very areu-
men‘ative—chiefly about which
is the faster fishing boat ir¢
great fun

“Hotel” Bill
We would have liked to stay

longer but we were due in Carri-



MINIATU RE__» IAN GALE

iced beers
The next morning we went
a walk up to the Hospital, whi












commands a lovely view, and then
‘turned to our Boardir Hous
op . We were told some hair
ul s stories about Kicke
Jenny, which we had to pass that
day on our way to Grendda, t
we set sail all the sa
Kickem Jenny, actua sb
having very well that da nd 1
ad a very calm tri cross
Grenada. Off Diamond Island \v
saw some mysterious fish whic
came uncomfortably close to tt
boat. We still do not. kn
whether they were sharks. bla
fish or porpoises, hut thev ha
very large fins in the middle of
their backs and they looked
enough to vush the boat over

they wanted to,
The sail along the leeward coa
of Grertada took a long tin
Bither we ‘got very hard puffs of
wind or none at all. When the su
was sinking, however, we reach
St. George’s, and tacked slow!
into the harbour, The water w
dead calm and although = ther
was very little wind the Hurri
eane glided slong
This was the end of the cruis
and we had managed to stic
our schedule. We had learned
lot of little things and enjoye
ourselves thoroughly; but mo
important of all was that Hurri-



smoothly

cane had justified our confidenc> |



Mrs. Hazeii's house on Mustique

acou that afternoon so after pay
ing our “hotel” bill of one dollar
each we had to leave.

The sail from Cannouan to
Carriacou was delightful. The
tide and wind were favourable
and the scenery was almost un-
believably beautiful. We passed to
the lee of Catholic Island, which
ws just off Mayero and then went
on to Union, the most impressive
looking of the Grenadines with
sharp high peaks” reaching intc
the sky. After going around Miss
Irene Point, Union, we tightened
sheets and headed for Hillsbor-
ough Bay, Carriacou.

Hillsborougn bay is a remark-
able place, it seems to be the
birthplace of howling puffs of
wind. We entered past a cheeky
little island called Jack a Man
and anchored near the jetty. We
had returned to civilization and
on landing we nervously dodged
speeding motor cars,

Hillsborough is clean, but there
is very little else to be said about
it except that it is even more life

less than Kingstown and has
pavements.
We were lucky in that the

schooner that brings ite and other
provisions once a week arrived
that afternoon, so we could hav:

nestles among white cedar tree:

in her. We were very proud of h«
as we turned, when climbing th
hill to our hotel in the fading
light, to see her lying peacefull
at anchor in the still water
Harbour.

THE END.



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PAGE TEN



Children Do Not
Read Enough

PRESENTING

children’s English both in

and in the results of external examinations, he was forced
to conclude that “enough reading is not done.”

The Speech Day which was
attended by His Excellency the
Governor, Sir Alfred Savage
K.C.M.G., and Lady Savage who
presented the prizes, covered the
two academie years 1950 and
1951.

The Headmaster, after extend-
ing a hearty. welcome to His

Excellency’ shd Lady Savage, Mrs. !

Bourne, M.@:P. and Mr. Ingram
two new members of the Govern-

ing Body of_the School, expressed \
received the §

regret at- having
renignstioass of Mr, and Mrs
Farmer, the’two retiring members
of the Governing Body, and saia
“tihey have given of their best to

the School, and have been a per- *

fect example of team spirit.”

Mr, Cumberbatch also welcom-~-
ed the Assistant Director of Edu-
cation, Mr. E. C. Theobolds, who
was attending Speech Day at thi

School for the first time, and
also Mr. Jordan, Chief Inspectc
of Schools.

He drew attention to the ahang«

“Old Cambridge

over from the L
1 Examination t





tificate




he Gene e of Educa-
ion, a shift which made it neces
ry for them to conaense the two
into one, and








pointed o at of the number
of candids applying for entry
into the *hool in the academic
year 1950 there were more suc
cesses n they could accommo-
date, He said that in spite of
“this major handicap” which ru
have telling effect on any ir






tution, they began the year wi
the “ustal determination and con-
fidence.”

Reviewing the rerults of — th
examinations for the two years
Mr, Cumberbatch said that of the
four candidates who were con-
sidered eligible for the 1950 Ox-

ford and Cambridge Scliool
tificate Examination, three of them
gained certificates, one of them
a girl, Catherine Lynch who was
awarded a Grade II Certificate
and placed 15th among all the
candidates. She obtained four
eredits and two distinctions and
narrowly missed her Grade |
Certificate. Conrad Hunte, anoth-
er of ‘the Successful candidates
was awarded a Grade III Certi-
ficate, obtaining five credits.

Cer-

Besi Scholar
By far 0 est candidate of the
jot was ©, Licorish who secured
a Grade I Certificate and was

placed 7th among the candidates
In ad@ition he was awarded a
distinction in Latin and placed
2nd in the island in that subject.
All told, there were seven Grade
I Certificates ihat year—six girls
and O, Licorish, Of the nine sub-
jects ‘offered, he was successful
in all,

Turning to the year 1951 which





Heragea th the Gencral Certif-
cate of Educ m by the joint
Board of Oxford and Cambridge
the Headmaster fave a short ex-
planation of the difference be-
tween this and the previous ex-

amination, and told parents that
whatever might be said for or
against this Examination, there
we: one thing which could be
seid Im its fayour. That was, that
the candidate must bring to
bear originality of thought and
comimon sense, and remoy ed the
possibility. of merely amassing a
number of facts and committing
them tod paper.

For the new Examination elev-
en candidates were offered for
the July Examination, Ten of the

candidates took eight subjects
each and the other took seven.
The opportunity to offer oral
Frenah presented itself for the

first time, and the eleven candi-

dates availed themselves of the

In:

Sixty years of leadership

HIS REPORT on
academic attainments of the Alleyne School at Speech
Day last Thursday, Mr. C. D. Cumberbatch, Headmaster,
told parents that from what was seen of some of the

wyoved/

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SUNDAY ADVOCATE



EDUCATION NOTES : |

THE SCHOOLS

ed to show that there is something wrong with the admin- |
istration of the educational system and that the consequent
result is that the Zlementary Schools are not giving the
quality of service which they were intended or expected
to give.
I now suggest that the first step possibly a interview.
in the remedy to this most un- ok SS is ee a OL
hie - satisfactory situation 1s to rée-grade mu controversy. c
This, the Headmaster consider- {ne ywiementary Schools according maintain that it is unsuccesstul
cd quite good, and said that es~ io modern methods. picking out those pupils best =

the activities and

their written work at school

opportunity. All were successful
in French and in addition, seven
passed the oral test,

pecially was this so when it was [js would mean that ther¢ ed for the education of a more
cemembered that there was al- wouiq be kindergarten (or Nurs- advanced type and exercises an
ways a bit of a reluctance to speak cry) Scnools for children under undue influence upon the curricu-
in a foreign language under nor- 5 “years; jnfant Scuoois 5 w 7 ium and metnods of the school.
nal condiuons, more so when the years; Junior Schools 8 to 11 years; ‘he cogency of tunese criticisms is

cyes of the examiner were UpON ~enior Senools 12 to 14 years.

( wiaely recognised and in some
ine candidates, He felt what there

. because of its importance, here areas there 1s a tendency to lay
was no jusunable reason why a 4s a aescripuion of Wie (uncluons of greater suwess on the vleacners
nodern language should be writ- (ach scnool by Dr. R. W. Rich, Ssessments of the chiidren’s work
ven and not spoken. Principal of Leeas Training Coi- 4nd ability than on the results of
Mr. Cumberbatch in commend= jege: “Nursery schools aim at & formal examination.
ing one of the pupils for her abl¢ providing a suitable social and Training The Citizen
performance, said that (Clarence educational environment to sup- “As a resuit of this removal of
corde was one of the candidates pjement tne traning given in the many of the brighter chilaren the

who ollered eight subjects and jome, which may suiler throu ; :
cured passes in seven, What 5 y ; 8h pemor Scnool is faced with the

. poverty, inadequate hous: the probie
vas more, she numbered among unduly large or small rc of oer A eee eae maate
her successful subjects that of jamuy, ana the demands of in- whose full-time schooling will
‘mathematics, a gubject which “is qusiry upon tne parenis, There end at 14 or 15 years, and whose
the bane of many girls, She was are no iormal I@ssons, and the general average Of ability, especi-
ie oy condtaie. to secure @ume is spent largely in play atty in the more ‘academic’ ‘sub-
5 Ssediatinttaad Tit Sablon of the *tvities, story-telling, commuual jects is lower tnan at any previous
Sacdarie antl vitehhed nt Heads meals, and sieep, In a good nurs- stage in the Elementary System.
oar. 9a “Upon x, rutinising ery senool, all the furniture and During these years the school
ic estilts tor the Dest Wwe years equipment 1s specially designed must provide these prospective
‘ y tees that Gan the sehatnatic tur smail people, and a garden is citizens and workers with some
a Nahey Remares ait Gaited eins proviaed. Tne greatést empnasis equipment for entry into the world |
Facitior ik dave hie ware to is laid upOn the formation of right and stimulate a desire to weerel
aintale Aca sleniave ee reas habils OL personal hygiene and ine those faciliues for part-time edu-
is of the past on . YF acqurement of the art of living cauon which are avatiable for the}
os tne . in ie society of others. young ‘wage-earner. While Sas
Balanced Activities Trai scnoois are not ‘vocational’ in any
Terie 16 thi ail. ot “This training in healthy and DAtTow sense, they are ‘realistic’ in
! chuow’s accvities, Mr, Cum- S°¢lable living contmues to play their outlook, and in the most
rbaich said ‘school life tor the “" important part in the ite of Successful tle work of the scnool
id must be as well balanced as “© intant School, where the nat- are oo seco Seatenanp with
sible, Children should be eager ural imteresis and propensiues of the lite of the community in which
with each other not only Ue children form the basis of its oy eee siggy
! ¢ class room, but also on the activities. In the best schools of ok Se ae he Village
veld, Resuics in the field will ac- “45 type, the child has ample Colleges Which have been set up
proportion to the spirit 8COPe for free expression and free 18 CambridgeeDine. Each of these
and enthusiasm of both tramer ™°Vement and at the same time is includes a Senior School for
ind tranee, He added, “As far troduced to the printed and Children drawn from a number ot
is results go, we have reason to * ritten word and the world of Su varete villages and the ac-
feel a measure of satisfaction, at numbers, thus laying foundations pee i Bb schoot are based
ieast in the game section Fj for the basis of skills of reading, /@reely on the life and work ot
He referred _ briefly to the “Titing and arithmetic, There is the rural community in which it
school’s attainments in this sec- °°)Siderable difference of opinion & situated, Th addition -t0: tie
tion, and look opportunity to pay “Ste the stage at which formal S@nior school, each College pro-
“humble homage” to Conrad instruction in these should be ViEne Seren mere o

ea ntact Na







iue in

Hunte, “ the mos: promising cric- *V¢", but the tendency is to . education, and serves as a social



funu 5 " educational centre for the district.”

xeler the school has ever pone it until as late ‘as possible, © ‘ EE

een 0 s Pro- ond to deal with the subjects in 4. Be
Referring to ‘the School's Li- & concrete — and practical way.

brary, the Headmaster spoke of Through activities and play of all

the efforts made to encourage the ‘ids the child: gains enrichment
= of pence and said es T€- ence, while through painting
cent additions to the ibrary ~~o"). : a ?
iegahh thee pibabecs doncse rd modelling and instruction it finds
00. He referred to the need for ee for its rapidly growing
a room set apart from distractions POW SES. .

et one kind or another, and Junior School

warned parents that “from what “In the Junior School the infor
we have seen of some children’s ™al work of the previous si
English, both in their written becomes more sytematised.

Bell Will Lecture

: @ From Page 1.
ship of a stable and responsible

character,
T.U. Education |

{ its sensory and motor experi-

He said that one of the great
needs was tor further opportuni-
bes of education and we hupeu
and beleved that the

Wwaae

work at school and in the re- child learns mastery of its union course had helped in twat
suits of the external examina- language in speech, writing and respect and that there would be
,ons, we must conclude that reading; it becomes proficient in ‘4¢\ner courses,

mough reading is not done.” simple arithmetic calculation; it Mr. Bell said that

“rar too many children neg- Jearns something of the facts of CNcouraging that the Universicy
lect the simple rule of reading history and geography, and it is College of the West indies seem-
with en English Diedonary handy, Cneouraged to take an intelligent ed likely in the near fuvure to be
while olhhers again seer to suffer interest in the world of naturé, taking an even greater interest
from bookphobia,” the Headmas- Scope is given for practical crea- in the subject of Trade Union

ter said. He told of their efforts tive work in arts and crafts, sing- Education, b
to soive that problem, and said ing is regularly taught and there be done for Gut’ he Oeielia nee

hat they have instituted reading is organised physical _ tr:
periods throughout the school, which comtaees sci ficaliy Spnisations, the trade unions

planned exercises with entifically themselves must

it was also

‘a wealth play a major
Book Scheme of lively games, The peculiar P&'t in the educational aspect as
While on that subject, Mr, problem of the Junior School is ™ ¢Vety Other aspect of their

Cumberbatch informed the parents the reservation of the spontaneity development.
of the Book Scheme which was 4nd joyful activity of the Infant _ He expressed thanks to the
recently launched, and + warned school while securing the attain- â„¢@ny friends he had made in
hem that in future there would ment of standards of achievement Barbados for their extreme hos-
be no excuse for a child not hav- which must be insisted upon at Pitality and kindness to him. For
ing a particular textbook, this stage, when solid foundations that he said he had been very

The Headmaster referred to the should be laid for the later edu- happy. He liked the island very
hanges on the teaching staff, and cational structure, much and would certainly like

in concluding his Report, men- Secondary to come back some day. He also

\ioned the “welcome increase in “At the end of the Junior School thanked the Press for being gen-

he list of ‘Ss z

iat Epeodt Der, ore eaioeh ah stage a considerable number of T@lly helpful and courteous.

‘hose who had contributed to the °ildren pass from the “Blemen- _ Mr. Bell who will be in Trini-
“Secondary dad until Tuesday expects to

list of prizes. tary Sc hool” to i ,

Mr, Cumberbatch ended with a Schools” or various types. A selec- ive public lectures in Port-of-
tribute to the late ‘Sir John Gay Y0"./s made by means of an exam- Spain and San Fernando. From
Alleyne. rg which commonly consists there he goes to Jamaica where
gn: \ Rsithinatle getebinad wine + - is likely to remain for four or
| telligence Test’ of kind, baw _* days giving lectures before

returns to Scotland.

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SUNDAY, JUNE 15,



Romance of Wackingham

Primate
BY MARGUERITE PEACOCKE

ON the afternoon of February
15, 1937, Queen Elizabeth had tea
at No. 145, Piccadilly, and then
quietly drove away to Bucking-
ham Palace.

The small crowd which cheered
her did not know that she was
moving house. Neither did they
know that almost 100 years ago
to the day Queen Victoria had
driven over the same ground.

Until three months before
Queen Elizabeth had been

Duchess of York, believing that
King Edward VIlI, her brother-
in-law, would reign for
years,

Instead, the 325-day king
had left the tiny room in
Buckingham Palace where he
had werked—he lived there
for only a few weeks—and
gone into exile.

Yet King Edward VIII had
been more accessible than any
previous Sovereign. His room —
the Chinese Room, conveniently
near the offices of the Palace
secretariat, and also close to the
King’s Entrance to the Palace—
saved him the bother of travers-
ing long corridors every time he
came and went.

‘The King’

It took the Palace staff some
time to realise that the King now
oceupied that little ground-floor
room,

Sometimes telephone callers,
having asked to speak to some
member of the household, were
put through in error direct to the
King’s extension,

“Who's that speaking?” asked
the caller, not hearing the voice
he had expected.

“The King,’ would be
reply. “Can I help you?”

The caller would apologise
profusely, “Quite all right,” the
King would say. “Now, what can
I do for you?”

When, on October 1, 1936, the
new King at last Went to live
in Buckingham Palace, he be-
came the first British monarch to
occupy the rooms which, in the
original Palace plans, had been

many

the

intended as the King’s private

suite.
Abdicated

A few weeks later they were
vacant again. The King had
abdicated,

With the accession of King
George VI and Queen Elizabeth

there was, for the first time for
many yeams, a young family at

the Palace.

Princess Elizabeth was
quite eleven and Princess Mar-
garet only six and a half. But
now Queen. Victoria’s precept
that children should be seen and
not heard no longer cast a gloom
over high-spirited Royal young-
sters.

Dignified visitors would
smile to hear the echo of girl-
ish voices, and sometimes,
happening to glance upwards,
would find themselves being
gravely inspected by two
small figures peeping from a
stairway.

It was decided that the Coro-
nation Day—May 12, 1937— fixed
for Edward VIII should remain,
which meant that the new King
and Queen had much less time

not

than most monarchs to prepare.
New Crown

Various changes of plan had to

be made now that the ceremony

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was to include a Queen Consort.

New robes were ordered for
Queen Elizabeth, and the ex-
quisite purple velvet which had
been specially woven for her as
Duchess of York with the status
of Princess (conferred on her by
King George V) was used to
make robes for her daughters, As
no suitable Consort’s crown
existed, a new one was made for
her, and the King’s crown had
to be adjusted to ensure a per-
fect fit.

King George VI was particu-
larly anxious that his crown
should be put on the right way
round, as back and front were
not easily distinguishable, and
the Archbishop of Canterbury had
the homely idea of marking the
front by attaching a small thread
to the one of the large stones.

Unhappily, some well-meaning
official tidied this little marker
away while the crown was lying
at the Abbey, and the Arch-
bishop’s slight hesitation at the
moment of crowning, noticed
when the film was shown, was
because the Primate paused to
search in vain for the missing
thread,

As crowns are literally, as well
as methaphorically, a burden to
the wearers, the King had light-
weight coronets specially designed
for his daughters.

A time schedule for the Coro-

nation was drawn up, and from
this Queen Elizabeth and King
George, working backwards,
evolved their own timé-table.

They had to arise before dawn

to be arrayed in their State





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SUNDAY

The

THE WHITE DRAWING ROOM AT BUCKINGHAM PALACE

robes and insignia,
hairdresser was summoned to
attend the Queen at an hour
when on any other day the Royal
residents would scarcely have
been awake,

On Guard

The week after the Coronation
saw an incident unparalled in the
Palace history,

One of the guests who dined
with, the King and Queen on
the Monday night was found
mounting guard the following
day on the gate through which
he had driven on the previous
evening.

The sentry, a private in the
New Zealand Territorial Army,
was also the South Maori mem-
ber of the New Zealand House of
Representatives, in which capac-
ity he had dined at the Palace.

Though this had never hap-
pened before, many of the King’s
guests had, as subalterns, taken
part in mounting the Palace
guard.

Indeed,

and the Court

the future King
Edward VIII, when Prince of
Wales and a_ junior officer,
mounted the guard on his father’s
residence,

In 1937 the King and Queen
held the first Courts of their
reign. The policy was to bring
the privilege of attending Courts
within the means of people who
were far from rich.

Red Mark
Dress regulations were laid
down, but while some Court
gowns were made by famous

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dress-houses, many
made up by “little dressmakers.”

And quite a number of the
people who curtsied to the King
and Queen at night would be
found at work in their offices as
usual next morning.

In the old days chaperons had
risked disqualification only by
being involved in scandalous pro-
ceedings, but from the reign of
George V onwards a small num-
ber of would-be chaperons were
being blacklisted for seeking to
exploit their privilege of attend-
ing a Court by accepting a fee
for presenting others.

Some even advertised their
services in the personal columns
of the newspapers.

If detected, the offender
would be debited with a small
red ink mark against her
name in the Lord Chamber-
lain’s books. Ir MEANT
“THAT IN FUTURE SHE WAS
BARRED FROM PALACE
FUNCTIONS.

The actual presentations fol-
lowed a rigid pattern, slightly
less than a minute being allowed
for each.

As each lady to be presented
arrived at the great Ballroom
door, she handed her card to a
Gentleman Usher, who passed it
to the Lord Chamberlain, who
announced her name,

others were

With deft touch another
official would spread out her
train and she would proceed to
make her curtsy.

Train Flick

Another official waited,

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hand, to flick the train over each
wearers arm so that she might
not impede her successors.

Coronation month brought the
first Court Ball of the reign,
Again the Palace appeared in all
its regal splendour.

By ten o'clock some
guests had assembled in
State Ballroom. Soon
the doors were thrown open, the
band played the
Anthem, and the Lord Chamber-
lain and other officers
Household appeared, carrying
their staves of office and walking
backwards,

First came the King, wearing
one of his

2,000
the

her
sash of the Garter across her
shoulder, her tiara and other
jewels flashing in the rays of the
great crystal chandeliers.
Sifting

The rest of the Royal circl2
followed and took up their seats
on the dais. The King then gave
the Lord Chamberlain the signal |
for the band to strike up.

Dancing continued until the |
early hours, Even if the King}
and Queen had retired to their |
apartments, their departure was

afterwards |
National |

of the)

many full-dress uni-|
forms, and the Queen in one of|
most magnificent gowns, the}

|

|



|

not necessarily a signal for the |

eave,
State

rest of the guests to
As soon as the
were vacated, the
from the floor were sifted.
Seldom-worn family heir-
looms, when brought out to
grace a State function, often
have loose stones and loosen-
@ On Page 12.

Rooms |
sweepings |



FOSS

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PAGE TWELVE







The Jew radu: gain
ing more influence in the com-
munity and in 1756 th ucceed
@d in having the exorbitan

and
Special taxes levied on their com-
munity subst reduced, and

antially






2 special < of only 210 Ibs. of
Muscovada Sugar was levied on
the whole Jewish Community.
heir greate period éf prosper-
ity and affluence appears to be
between 1761 and 1831. On Oc-
tober 8th 1761 an Act was passed
removing. the special taxation
levied on the Jews and declaring



that the hould be rated on the
same scale the other inhabi-
tants. One writer states that “An
unexpected conclusion to which

this study has led is that the Bar-
bados Congregation was only
smaller by twenty to twenty-five
per cent. than the contemporary
London Congregation of Spanish
and Portuguese Jews.” (1)

In the latter half of the eigh-
teenth century, the medical ser-
vices of Barbados were confined
to the Alms Houses, It was in
1786 that a subscription was*open-
ed for establishing ‘The Barbados
General Dispensary, for the relief
of the Sick poor.’ The ‘Barbados
Mercury” of October 28th, 1786
writing about the contributions



records—from that honour far be
it for me to detract; but Justice
to a humble remnant of a one
highly favoured state calls upon
me to observe, that, of the sum
subseribed to thi charity, up-
wards of one tenth was contribu-
ted collectively and _ individuall)
by the HEWBREW NATION
though their numbers fall short
of one twentieth of the white in
habitants of Barbados, and not

one hundredth part of the proper-
ty of the island is in their hands.”
The Jewish Year Book edited
by Jacobs and substantiated by
E. S. Daniels, states that by
Local Act of 1802—and of Parlia-
ment in 1820—all political dis-
abilities were removed and. ‘that
the Jews were granted even
greater privileges than the other
inhabitants of the island; as by
the terms of the latter Act, they
were allowed to have five repre-
sentatives from among themselves



who were to determine what
share of taxation of the island
should be levied upon then
Schomburgk differs from that re-
corded in the Jewish Year Book
with reference to the removal of
all political disabilities in 1802

he states “an act was introduced

in the local Legislature on the
22nd of February 1831, granting
the coloured population of the
Island the same _ political rights
as the white population,” which
assed the House on the 28th of
arch; he further states ‘that a

similar Act for the relief of His
Majesty's ‘subjects professing the
Jewish religion had received the
signature of the Governor on the
15th of May the same yaar.” Als
that both of these acts received
the King’s sanction,



The Jews in Barbados received
civil and political freedom before
these privileges were granted
them in England, as the Jewish
Civil Disabilities Act was not
passed there until 1833, when Lord
Macauley, made his memorable
speech on introducing the Reform
Rill. He called on the House of
Commons to stand forward to
prevent the excitement degener-
ating into leeds of violence. ‘In
old times” he said, ‘when the vil-
lens were driven to revolt by op-
pression, when a hundred thou-
sand insurgents appeared in arms




be
at once the in-

them and exclaimed, ‘I will

your leader,’ and

furiated multitude laid down their |



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MODERN GAS COOKERS §

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At your Gas Showroom, Bay St

COOSA AE ALS,

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EVERY EXPERIENCED DOCTOR
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FOR IF THE KIDNEYS ARE
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on Blackheat, the King rode up nef



he People Of
bados—10

ty JOHN PRIDEAUX

ims and dispersed at his eam-
mand, Herein let us imitate him,
Let us say to our countrymen—
‘We are your leaders, Our law-
ful power shall be firmly exerted
to the utmost in your cause; and
our lawful power is such that it
nust finally prevail.”

Synagogue was destroyed
hurricane of lith August
, the exact date of its erec-
tion is not Known, but it is be-
lieved to have been about the
car 1679. The new Synagogue
is completed and consecrated on
the 29th of March 1833. The cost
of this new building was defrayed
the ninety influential Jews
resident in the Island. Mr. Hart
Lyon, a Jeweller, was the moving
soirit in its rebuilding, therefore,
the foliowing extract from the
‘Barbados Globe’ of April Ist,
333 will be of interest—‘It is
virty-seven feet high, and re-
ives considerable strength from
e rounding of the angles, which
are capped with large antique
cencers uniting a balustrated
parapet all round, the roof being
so little elevated as not to be per-
ceived. ‘The windows are lancel-
shaped, and tastefully harmonize
with the proportions of the build-
ing; a double flight of stone steps
on the north side, covered with a
Gothic Hood, leads to the gallery
vithin; the whole of the exterior
is lightly tinged of stone-colour,
nd scored out in blocks, and the
ppearance altogether is classical
ind chaste; The interior
orresgonds with the outer ap-
pearance; a light and tasteful gal-
ry occupies three sides of the in-

The
! t

he
1831

teriar supported by neat Doric
columns The reader’s desk in
he body of the edifice is suffi-

iently elevated to give a con-
picuous view of the person offi-
ciating. From the ceiling is sus-
pended at each corner infront of
the gallery a single brass chande-

lier, of eight lights, and in the
centre one of a_ similar kind
containing twenty-four, The area

of the building is paved in alter-
nate squares of black and white
marble; and the ceiling, painted
in reliefs, produces a most pleas-
ing effect, as well from the artist-
like manner in which it is execut-
is from the chasteness of its
design It is computed to hold
about three hundred persons.”

In the square opposite the Pub-
lic Library stands the ‘Montefiore
Fountain,” This fountain was
originally erected in Beckwith
Place, but was in 1940 removed
to its present site, In 1864, Mr.
John Montefiore, a wealthy mem-
ber of the Jewish community,
(whose son, Thomas Law Monte-
fiore, B.A., of Trinity College,
Cambridge, had been ordained as
Deacon by the Bishop of Glou-
ester and Briston in 1849), pre-
sented this mounment to the City.
of Bridgetown, and was in the
form of a drinking fountain. It is
a very massive and handsome
structure, In each of the four
sides is a marble statue, repre-
enting Justice, Fortitude, Tem-
perance, and Prudence, with the
following suitable inscriptions: —

“DO WRONG TO NONE.”
“LOOK TO THE END.”

“BE SOBER-MINDED”

“TO BEAR IS TO CONQUER.”

Around the entire structure in-
scribed in stone is the follow-
ing: —
“For the benefit of wayfarers,
This Drinking Fountain. was

presented to the City of Bridge-
town,

A.D. MDCCCLXIV.”
Owing to the devastation caused
‘by’ the hurricane of 1831, it is

teamed-up with

the world.

Construction.





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elaimed that the Jewish Com-
munity dechned from this year
many haying emigrated to Europe
ind the U.§.A.,
Philadelphia. In 1848 there were
71 Jews in the Island, 38 of whom
belonged to the congregation.
By 1873 the Congregation had
dwindled to such an extent that
they petitioned the Legislature for
relief from taxation of property
held by the Congregation, and in
1874 an Act was passed exempting
the Synagogue and its
perty from parochial and
taxes; as the proceeds

other

cipally devoted to the upkeep and |

support of the Jewish poor of the
Island. By 1899 the Congrega-
tion had declinéd to 17 or 18 in-
cluding women and children,

At the close of the 19th century |
and up to nis death in 1905, the |
Warden and local Trustee, Mr.|"emember the day when
E. S. Daniels, conducted service in’ Victoria attended the Thanksgiy-
at his death; ing Service in St. Paul’s to mark

the Synagogue, but

the property and funds

his “Notes on the History of the
Jews in Barbados,” published in
1909 states—“The Jews in Bar-
bados are now a feeble folk, num-
bering scarce half a dozen headed
by the Baezas.” And further—
“When the late Rev. Daniels was
alive, the services used to be held
in the Synagogue every Saturday
Morning. But since his death in
1995, and the appointment of no
successor services are held only
on festivals, by Mr, Joshua Baeza,
merchant, in Bridgetown. The
Synagogue is open every Satur-
day morning for anyone who cares
to go there to pray, but no_ one
goes. The lamp is always kept
burning before the Ark, and I be-
lieve ten Mosaical scrools are in
the Ark, in good preservation. But
the Synagogue lacks a congrega-
tion.” The Synagogue and its
property remained vested in Mr.
E_ I. Baeza until about a year be-
fore his death in 1934, when the
Synagogue and its property was
sold to a private individual, but
provision was made in the deed
that the graves were not to be
desecrated

It is fitting to end this series
with the words of the Rev, Canon
P. A. Farrar, quoted in his article
‘The Jews in Barbados,’ (B.M.H.S.
Journal, Vol IX, No. 3)—“al-
though their ways were not our
ways, yet the Jews of those days
of long ago, in spite of the dis-
abilities imposed on them showed
the Christians of this land how
to sicceed in the face of distress-
ing odds. More than that, at a
time when there was a slackness
in living, and a weakness in mor-
ality, they by their compact and
organized manner of life, set a
bright example of piety, of reli-
gious enthusiasm, and of the se-
curity and sanctity of family life.”

(To be continued)

Wilfred S, Samuel in ‘Review of the
Jewish Colonist in Barbados in the
year 1680,"
2 ‘The Barbadian Newspaper July Tth

1849,



ROADS AND BRIDGES

A grant of £42,000 from Her
Majesty’s Government has been
approved to meet 35 per cent, of
the cost of reconstruction of Gov-

ernment buildings, road: and
bridges. The remaining 65 per
cent. and the entire cost of re-)

pairing buildings'and roads main-)

tained by the local authorities
will be met from Jamaican funds

A grant of £80,000 from Her
Majesty’s Government has been
appreved towards the cost of

repairs at the University College
of the West Indies.
—B.U.P.

the ‘Consul’, the



th cms: 1S ey TIE see

Charles Me Enearney & Co.,Ltd.

Office 4493 — Workshop 4203 — Parts Department 4673

principally to}

pro-,

were prin- |

Buckingham Palace

ed

last a small fortune in jewel-

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



ims THE...



From Page
clasps, and from

il.
first to

lery must have awaited claim-

ants at the Palace Lost Pre-
perty Office.

| EBABRG AEN

The two remaining peacetime

easons brought one innovation: | .
i Derby Day Ball at which, for|}]* FOR
the first time, women guests ‘| :

re

Previously
‘bachelor’

the

stayed in her private apartments |
The Derby Ball i
another departure from tradi-
tion.
West End vogue, a breakfast
of ham, eggs and a haddock,
with tea and coffee, was sery-
ed at 2.30 a.m,

So authentic was the scene that
Palace servants old en

searcely

Royal Film 2? wae
On a summer's day in 1988 | APrints, 36” width — &
history walked again in Buck- ar 7c. * +
jingham Palace: “Queen Victoria” 4
descended from her carriage in ) Linens — all shades — 70c.
;the quadrangle. ~ and up

were | her
vested in the late Mr, E. 1, Baeza. |
Mr. N. Darnell Davis, C.M.G., in| Anna Neagle come to make 4

entertained,

there had been a
dinner during whieh
Queen either dined out or

included
Following the current

Ladies’ Cotton Panties — 2
2 for $1.20

oChildren’s Cotion Panties—

Flowered Spuns — Ass. De-
S ‘« signs — $1.00

« Georgettes — Solid Shades
t and Fl.—$1.12 per yd.

Flowered Silks — $1.44 per

Diamond Jubilee could

believe that’ this was

Se ieteteenmeentineiememeieeceteee ees



HOUSE

SHIPLOADS
OF NEW EXCITING VALUES

Men’s American Vests — 2
for $1.20

White Socks — 2 for $1.00

Gayly Coloured Cocks — 1
for $1.15

Khaki Shirts — $3.00
wigprerer & Drill — $1.05 &

Sport Shirts — from $2.40
Men’s Plastic

Belts — 80c.

Dress Shirts as cheap as
$2.64

Plaid Tweeds—54”

wide —

film yard $3.50 per yd.

The same old State coach Hats — Prices to suit your Shoes—$8.25 per pair & u
swung through the same centre Pocket -—- Styles to suit Gay Sport Shirts — $4.50 t
archway, drawn by the Windsor your Pocket. $4.95
greys. There were, the Royal :
postilions wearing just such Straw Bags — $3.00 & $3.50 Dress Shirts — $3.90, $4.25,
splendid liveries as in 1897. New Styled Pocket Books $4.73

real soldiers, riding their ac-
customed horses—a sugges-
tion made by the King, who
did not want the standard of
horsemanship to fall short.

The escort was provided by $3.00 & $4.50
New Shoes
White
~at

— Multicolour—
and other Colours
various Prices

All morning the two princesses

watched from second-floor win- |
dows,
jentranced, wi
| faces cuppe:
would run to another
get a better view. |
Old
mingled strangely that day. And
at the door of the Palace where

the
reigned so long, her great grand-

son's
autograph from the Queen Vic-
toria of 1938.



























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/ WANT TO KNOW
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OID SEVERN GO INTO
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LAURA! SO CAGEY? 7
7M SURE SHE'S )

HIDING SOME Bee





|
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BY CHIC YOUNG



‘CHOVY PASTE IN THE )
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7
AND Now youve jou
GOT A PASTE y/ SOME PEOPLE
|IN THE EYE >" \ HAVE NO

ee { SENSE OF
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irs e eer a | g
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| 71 FORWARD, A DOOR i
oe BEHIND HIM...P
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T FORBID YOU TO LEAVE THE HOUSE
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BUT YOU'LL WEAR YOURSELF
OUT! YOU'VE HAD A HARD
DAy AT THE OFFICE -- NOW )
A S = SIT DOWN AND _/
YT ONY COINS | Vie SS PEAK!
FOR A WALK! wi ~ i

{ IT'S BEEN A PLEASURE TO HAVE
YOU BOTH... WE DON'T GET

NEILL MANY TOURISTS OUT HERE
eae THIS EARLY IN THE

LEAVING THIS ae SEASON ++»

AFTERNOON, JARS, MERRITT... la =) | beg
OUR CAR IS JUST ABOUT / § 7)5 ily IE bi pw \\ | | Se |
| tata ta® x
, Yj \ r arate ..
. | \ OT \ e
4 A ~- '

MEANWHILE, IN NEW YORK?
nie i
|

T'VE GOT NEWS FOR YOU
KIRBY... THE STATE POLICE
SPOTTED DUDE'S CAR AT
\ ct WESTVALE... HE CRASHED
| THROUGH THEIR ROAD

“

BE

Je

a















THIS IS A TOUGH JOB FOR A
BOY LIKE YOU, BUT YOUVE GOT!
ABOUT THIRTY SECONDS To

START MOVING! .

NEVER MIND ME! THOSE
ARE ( SMUGGLERS ARE GOING TO SHOOT
YOU? , YOUR BUDDIES/ARENT YOU

Ps —\_ GOING To HELP THEM? J










es tal ay) ys







LOOKS LIKE THIS) (YEAH?
—,



a

rea |

Hcy cole:









SUNDAY, JUNE 15, 1952
HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON





SUNDAY ADVOCATE





PAGE THIRTEEN









By Appointment
Gin Distillers
to the Late
King George V1

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE










SPECIAL offers to all Cash wad Credit Customers

Se





for Monday to Wednesday only







SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Hranches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street









Usually Now ‘ :
1
SOUPS, PICKLES Ete.
COCOAMALT ~ $140 — $1.35 Heinz Chicken Noodle Soup... $ .49
» Chicken Gumbo Soup... 49
ROYAL SAUSAGES 18 — ~.70 » Mieeed et Chew’ occcs ae
» Clam Chowder Soup... .55 Vea
UFILLET BISCUITS de ee Sitie Sean in
MARMALADE |. cisisiiicininapiie Mle me lh SR ee NN sccnriiemin A
KIDNEY & BEANS ....... cael ae
HERRINGS IN TOM. SAUCE... 45 — 42 oe ae em
SHERRIF'S, TABLE JELLIES 00000
VI SRIUT meses BO a 28 CORAM OP WHEAT UTI) oi. .ccisees sees
D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street
THE COLONNADE GROCERIES

The Place Goes Further

Your Dollar

Where







GUINNESS

STOUT
FOR STRENGTH





] P.O. BOX 304
BARBADOS

C. €. HARRISON & CO. (BARBADOS) Ltd.






.

PAGE FOURTEEN

















ADVOCATE


















































meres
PUBLIC NOTICES | PURI
CLASSIFIED ADS | IC SALES
° Da wid
: OLD HARRISC SOCIETY
TELEPHONE 2508 The [
zs annual general meeting of the ‘
©. Society, will be held at" Harrisan | REAL ESTATE AUCTION
DIED FOR SALE Collage om Fring, Sane, 8 Damm ROYAL NETHERLANDS
" AGENDA a = a" a ) :
Minutes BY AUCTION! LET D. PF. DE ABREU| BY ifstructions received I will, sel canes witi ona ‘Cargo
EVELYN--On June 14th, 1952, at the Secretary's Report - A TRAUNED AUCTIONEER WITH! at Corner of Lakes Folly and Cheapside STEAMSHIP co, Passengers for St
General Hospital, FITZ BERESFORD Appointr ce |YEARS OF EXPERIENCE (ALSO|on MONDAY 16th. from 11,30 a.m. ~) sawiag
EVELYN, retired’ butler. The funeral et ee ABROAD) AGCTION YOUR HOUSE-| fables, Upright Chairs, Tub aia soax- sATLING Dp wi gg Mg
; N, : 1 r : FROM EURO! Sail
leaves his late residence Bank Hall AUTOMOTIVE vet eee 15.6.52 HOLD FURNITURE, CARS. ETC. 1! ing Chairs, Book Case all in Mahog- es ‘The: Mv CANOE wit
Cross Road, St. Michael, to-day at 5.6.52—2.|wikl, ACCEPT "A COMMISSION! any Dining and other Tables, Wasson, M.S. BONAIRE, 13th June, 1952, atcept
4.00 p.m. for the Bank Hnill eren | G RANGING FROM 2 TO 7 PER CENT.| {ardérs, folding sereen, bedsteads and|\!'S: STENTOR, 27th June, 1952. for “Teuaue
Tooke und thence to the Weathare ha ae a. Cu, in Meat clase cong- EPs 7 |BE CHARITABLE I AM_ W!TH| Mattress-Kitchenware, earthenware and M.S. HESTIA, 4th July, 1962 Serr. .
Cemetery : oo Ska ee NOTICE fYou, 1 wit. A REASON-| gigssware, 2 burner ‘oll stove Electric SAILING TO BUROF Shiling Fridey aon thee.
ITOLEYNE HOYTE and RAWLE 4606 — Stariley HT, cHimeM, 7 oo am. |, Al! male citizens of the United States |ABLE PART OF- MY ‘COMMISSION 1 Singer Machine, Toaster.| @.S. WHLLEMSTAD, vith rh .
.6.52—2n. | between the ages of 18 and 26 residing/ANY REAL” DESERVINC CAUSE} aed ‘éstinghouse Refrigerator, Con-| SAILING TO TRINID. 2 actept Ca Ges v. 0 and Paseane he
aw ikke papers, please copy — | in Barbados are requested to call at/NAMED BY PERSONS GIVING ME Carpets — and a lot of Fregch AND Barriow
15.6.52—1n CAR—Dodge Super-Deluxe, First-class ie American Consulate from July 1 te|SUCH SALES. WHAT ABOUT | THE! Bowders other useful items.!.S. Nestor, b at,
B82 tet ahs & condition and owner-driven, $2,000. Dial] 31, 1952 for Selective Service Registration |"CANCER | CAMPAIGN SATISFAC- B cach bee's poeeeen ae ee oe n
4476. 12.6.52—-1n, miles the Universal Military Training TION TERMS. CONDITIONS, AND McKENZIE. 13.6.52—3n . AIRE, 30th June, 1962.

eee cen A NR

ALLEYNE—We beg through this medi-
im to return thanks to all those kind

THANKS

friends who sent wreaths or in an
way €
recent

death of Huldah 4
Jean Alleyne (Sister), The Weather-
head’

Cossou-



xpress
bere




vent, caused by th
lleyne



s family 15.6, 52—In



through this medium to thank a
those kind friends who sent wreaths







































“VENTNOR"—Unfurnished, Ist Ave
Belleville. Available Ist July. Phone
15.6. 52—1n

a6ed



EDUCATIONAL

MODERN HIGH SCHOOL.
Pupil



on

the

school

September 1952 are asked to ‘apply

s wh vould. like t slaced ANTIQUES — “oh every every “Ss ar ce cas oc en
Be eae ee cnie. cohosl for | Glass, Ching, old Jewels, fine giiver ARD offered to anyone finding or ||

0\ | Watercolours, Barly books, Maps, Auto- caving information as to whereabouts | | DIAL 4758
0

year 1953 which commences

Â¥

ed their sympathy in our




e

-We the undersigned beg

1







a waiting list form. Call or telephone

2846 and it will be posted to you.

date of the Entrance Examinstion, c
the results of which six free schola
ships will be awarded, will be announc
ed later.

L, A, LYNCH,

The

i

for | eraphs ete., at Gorringes Antique Shop Tripod with Universal
°. adjoining Royal Yacht Club. a 8 Beles head Wet near Paynes
3.2.62—t.f.n,/ ill, St. John’s on 2nd June Ring

aged’, 14.6,52—2n

Principal
25.5.52—6n,



NOTICE

QUEEN'S COLLEGE ENTRANCE

for

EXAMINATIONS
the School Year beginning
16th September, 195%.

Examination for Entrance to the

MAIN SCHOOL and JUNIOR DE-
PARTMENT will be held at
QUEEN'S COLLEGE on THURS-
DAY, 19th June, 1952, at 9.15 a.m
prompt
Candidates must be at Queen's Col-
* lege by 0.00 am
2. An Admission Card hos been sent to

each candidate who is eligible

to sit

the Examination Should any of

these Cards be lost,

will the cagdi-






Service Act PAYMEN



WITHIN 48 HOURS































CAR—1950 Hillman Minx, New Bat-{ All male citizens of the Un GUARANTEED. DIAL 3111. “OLIVE SAILING 4 nae SCHOONER
tery and in good condition. Dial 4019.| who attain the age of . — BOUGH", HASTINGS 15.652 1n.} 1NDER THE IVORY HAMMER ‘AD AND vs oes wenn,
10.6.52—8n.] sequent to July 31, 1952, are required - M.S. HESTIA, Dist st J Que & 2 ‘Téle.
hil icant il eben to register upon the day the: attain the| BY NAVY GARDENS A Very| 3 iy \tititfuctions. received from the) §- ®- MUsiON, aa ex: Ne, 4047
CAR — Vauxhall Velox, little used,| eighteenth anniversary of of |Desirable 3 Bedroom (with Basins &] Brij Council I will woe at “Wakefield” :
owner-driven, good as new. Diai 4476. their birth, or within five dave i Cupboards) 12 inch Stone Bungalow Whiteperke Rd, on June 20th;
12.6.52—t.£.n. | after. ‘about 7 yrs, old), Dining & Breakfast | (1) 1947-10 BLP. Se a in perfect

For further information, consult ghe|Hooms, 2 Toilets, Garage, Servant’s| werking order. R ;
American Consulate, Bridgetown, og Room, Everite Roof, A-1 Condition,| new a acquired, ee id rete

NS
CAR—CGne (1) Studebaker (Champion)
S.] bados. 27.5. oe. f.n. |Back Yard enclosed with Stone, about] eash. Sale at 2 p.m.

in perfect running order, P. C,

Canadian ia Steamship

MAFFEI & Co. Ltd. Phone 2787. wchiienstpiaemnieteeaniaiate saceeniiiaiaeainte nae . | 12,000 sq. ft. Going for Only Under
15.6.52—t.f.n N ICE eo i= AT HASTINGS - Seaside ee Sa.
~ OT Residences. IN BAY ST. — Two (2 ‘
CAR—One (1) Fiuid Drive Dodge Car THE PARISH OF ST. ANDREW |fedroom) Stone Residences (one Sea- 15.6.52—4n



$1,800.00 apply to Cosmgpolitan Garage,| Applications will be received for the |side), Going

























































































able only in Sweden will last you a life
time. Features include six extra char-
acter keys and the famous feather touch
typing. To introduce these machines we

day last the 10th June, and who] RBRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

—-----—-| desire to be considered for agri- Auctioneers » attabihe ‘
ST cultural employment in the U.S.A. 15.6.52—2n. ROBERTS STATIONERY
Wi jl quote you the lowest prices. BRAD- LO this year, are advised to report

SHAW & COMPANY. —§ 1,6.52—-S—t-f.n. ines at Queen’s Park on Tuesday, 17th} ¥

i
(= Lancia pth :
~ er ‘ CGAP—Hub cap marked “Buick” be-| June, 1952, at 8.30 a.m. bringing ‘
|
|
%
x







tween Courtesy Garage and Belloville,/ Call cards and vaccination certifi-
MISCELLANEOUS by Way of Constitution Road, Will

cates,
finder please return to Courtesy Garage 14 6.52
Co, Ltd.? 15, 6,52—1n 6.52.—







ARBADOS J DIAL 3301 9 HIGH STREET
AKERIES TD =. — =







| BRACELETS for watches in rolled -
€ ud, ehromiun, and stainless steel inf SILVER BRACELET-~lost between the
dies’ and men’s sizes. Also a nice} Colonade Store and the Post Office
»sortment of watches. K. R. Huntef Finder will be réwardéd on returning
& Co., So, Lite. 13.6.52—an,, to the Advocate Co. 13.6 .52—2n.

Ge. each



PEANUT CAKE 3||, MOUNTED POLICE DISPLAY

i AT
iors

| three-spe sed. Automatic Changers at P.C. WANTED

|s MAFFEL & CO, LTD., Radio Em Flyin. r



THE POLICE RIDING SCHOOL


















tnd pliable and will give you all the 19.6.53—In. (Between Carrington and ST, MICHAEL Reserved Seats sai ae iss $1.00
An_ attractive residence stand- Unreserved Seats eens seee eese 48

ing on 20 thousand sq. feet of
Land at Two Mile Hill contain-



ee Yorkshire Estates)
scrvice and satisfaction of an expen- i ae . e
sive Chamois Skin, Size 22 xX 18 ‘STENO-TYPIST | ‘Qualified steno WEDNESDAY 18th JUNE, 1952.
inches only 8 cents each, Obtainable

at HARRISON'S HARDWARE STORE.



typist for our office. Reply in writing t 11.30 a.m
to K. R Hunte & Co. Ltd., Lower We are instructed to dispose of

Tel. 2064 14.6 52--$n_| Broad Street. Qualifications of apyli- the Furniture and Bffects of the ing three Bed-rooms and ail e





date please apply immediately to (he) NN, —$<$—$———— NN | cants must be attached to application.” late Mr. C. P. R, Greenidge. |} modern conveniences. é i
Heaamistress for another one, 9s ~DaIMUS STOVME,— This name as} ag STD I VSN able to. seat 10, Serving Salitiiecibel’ sath \Duihes: :sitem Box Office at Information Bureau, Police Headquarters
PRE ards § 4 y | 7 o a va
ach candids ate at Queent College eer proves he, eet, Gh acbotience na Milas Wings istered Tabie, Set ot 6 Dining Cnaws, rr. ated within one inile of Bridge- e@
dh the morning of the Examination. PCE 8", URORy cheap inferior makes | hopital Nurse. bie eerful, Upright Chairs, Pr. ‘Tub: Chairs, town standing on 10,000 square
2. he list of successful candidates Will \i(jat do not Inst and which are danwer- willing to cncerne suitable occupa- Armehair, Occ. Chairs, Sideboard. feet of Land with several fruit

be

July,

er”

published in the “Barbados
Advocate’ on Sunday, the 20th of
1-
On Saturday, the 26th of July,
1962, 8. 6.52—2n

BARBADOS BRITISH WEST

and in the ‘Barbados Record

INDIES

ST. MICUARIYS GIRLS’ SCHOOL

SECONDARY DAY



HOOL



FOR GIRLS

A

Applications are invited from Gradu

ates for the post of
qualified to teach Mathematics, Ger
. Elementary Science and Botan, Sor

experience in teaching in Secondar
Schools will be a recommendation

SALARY SCALE Ist and 23nd_ class

Honours Degrees $1,584 by $72
$2,304 by $120--$2,704

oO

$1,416 by $60—$1,776 by $72—$2
Graduates who hold a Teacher's Di
ma will be paid an additional salary of

ther Graduates

$2.16 per annum,

A

co

payable at prevailing rates. The pos
tion on the Salary Scale would be de



cided by teaching experience in recog
nised Secondary Schools

The post is not a Government post
put is pensionable under the Barbado
Teacher's Pension Act

Passale expenses to Barbados will be
paid by the Governing Body of the
Scheol

The stccessful applicant will be re
quired to assume duties as from Janua
1953

Applications accompanied by — thre
recent testimonials, Medical certificate
of fitness, a Birth Certificate and a pho
tograph should be submitted to: The
‘Headmistress, St. Michael's Girls’ School
Martindales Road St. Michael l5a
























st of Living Allowance is now
i-

Assistant Mistress



eee ee ee See a



Bed-rooms, A Farewell to Staff Sergeant Anderson of the

trees, containing thre



ous, Primus stoves vise Ie lean fuel ‘el and an ‘are] UOn e@.@. care invalid or children, Can Single Ended Settee, Liquor C













ous), Sle acccemaa? a drive ear, Box M.C. ¢/o Adyoéate Co. and Stand, Pr. Kidney Tables, Sights, Water and all other con- Royal Canadian Mounted Police
ing apparatus made. ot ope Y 15.6.52—in Plant Stands, Pr. Berbice Chairs, veniences
hake Primus’ 1s available. G, W. Hutch- _ Hall Stand, Wall Brackets, Mirror 12.6.52.—4n.
inson & @o., Ltd. 6. —t.f.n. Ps Stand, Military Chest, Trays, ST. JAMES
MISCELLANEOUS Cake Stand (ALi. IN| MAHOG-
PTARO} Your child's dream comes ANY). Marble Topped Table, Can- Two Bungalows on the sea-side
Broadwood upright, — tropical Vas Chairs, Occ. Tables, Cordes Toilet, “path, “Moder eaten
model. Separate bridge on each string.| CARIB BOTTLES—Return Carib Bottles forving Table, mavers! ~iitchen Good ‘Bus Service, Excellent Loca-
eautifal condition, anette Owner] to A. S. Bryden & Sons, (B’dos) Ltd., Tables, (atl..st edar Book tion. :
caving colony. Write P. OQ. a 4 Lad Victoria Street, at 1% cents each, case, Somes = "Painted Bape 7
Pp 3 cases qd. & Tain Chairs, Pt . i
nome 9122, tn US62—an ||] Gite euinet, Chest at Drawers. Five genes, good. Land with
“Subscribe now to the Rea Telegraph HOUSE—Wanted early 1953 for years Pine Press; Pid. Press, Cedar coversi fect a ipes, nun with
‘ngland’s leading Da now} tease. Seaside House. Worthing, St Press. “Deck “Gherrs, Gallery Fur- y small house, suitable kitchen
rriving to Barbados by Air "a: oes i tew| Lawrénee or Maxwell Coast by careful niture Beg Dining |) Table, ‘gardening, six miles from town,
lays after publication In London. Con-j| English family. Box K c/o Advocate Benches, Singh tron Bed anc attractively priced
tact: kan Gale, ¢/o Advocate Co., Ltd. 13.6.52—2n. Hair Mattress, Commode, Wash-
Local Representative, Tel, 3118. —— gtand, Portable — Gramopnone, ST, PETER
0 17 4.69-t.t.n.| TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bonus Record Stand & Records, Fold-



Old fashion country house
tanding on ten acres Land com-
nanding @ beautiful view of the
country side, this Property is
ritable, for a country Club or
Guest House





from Rediffusion for 25 recommends ing Card Table, 2 Valor Stoves

WARM CLOTHING—2 Coats and other | tions in one calendar month, ie ee aoe
s, Silver

REPORTS OUTSTANDING PROGRESS

IN ITS 80TH YEAR

Paid to living Pelicyowners - 657,453.00
Paid to beneficiaries of de ra $ 18,

owners 5 ey
New e Insurance
Total ——
Assets



Thermos
lothing for child omed 9 youre. p04 6.881. HHL ate, China, Dinner Sets, Pyre
—— | 962,50 POCKET MONEY easily earned Ware, Brassware, Plated Trays
Rugs, Suits, Shirts, Underclothes
WHOLE PEAS--A small quantity of} 9Â¥ recommending 26 new supscribers to oak. Para is
,eas for Pigeons can be bought at ise REDIFFUSION in one month. Shons: Large Coll. Kishen Uten
per Ib From. J. A. 8. TUDOR & Go. 4.6. 52—10n sils, Crock Ovens, Books, O!'
Hoebuck Street. DD 652 Bin, re Lamps, Buckets, Pictures, An-
SS REDIFFUSION offers $1.50 cash for thur

Telephone 4709,





lies, Ferns, Planis, and
Co of Oddment



FOR RENT

Small Modern Residence, Good
Location. near town

each new Subscriber recommended by Lares

ANNOU NCEMENTS wins 4.6.52—10n e
AUCTIONEERS



1

.
i The Company ends its 80th year with the best record in
its history for volume of New Life Insurance, volume of Life
Insurance in Force and volume of Assets.

——_———
a SUPPLEMENT YOUR INCOME by
selling REDIF. | recommending REDIFFUSION. Obtain
time. Get a] ll particulars from the REDIFFUSION
4.6.52 -10n. office. 4.6,52—10n






EARN BIG MO?
USION in you
upply of forms te

i Apply:





CECIL JEMMOTT



‘
|








& co.









eal Estate And Commission



Hello Everybody ! Remember

Phone 4640

Agent,

Confederation Life

|

Plantations Building. 48 Tudor Street Phone 4563.

_ SSE







: .
x Distriet “A”
pincinrnsrsinenansidieeniaiaoernan: oan =
KINGSBEER - Lager, in 12-07. es FURNITURE
peeked in handy 1-Doz, cartons, pro- HEI P saat
}duet of National Breweries Ltd. of 5.00 P.M., TUESDAY, 17TH JUNE
erontenac Beer fame. For particulars
jcontact R. M, JONES & Co. LTD. Tel.| “LADY SALES CLERK—With some e
| 2053 12.6.52.—4n. torpartonce. Restonabe Salary offered to ia
$a | suitable applicant. ly*in person and at
| “ORIAC” Synthetic Chamois Leathers i co , ey . : n eee
are here again! They are always soft _ ing. Bookers ( 08) Drug Stores VALLEY HILL, CHRIST CHURCH ADMISSION :




















, 1 On
FOR SALE tl THE GRAND DANCE
Tae tome 0 semen which will be given by _- {it | NOOSOOSSOOSSSSSSSSSSoSnse ones Head Office ASSOCIATION Toronto
than 32th September 952 : |
15.6,.52--3n Mr. RALPH MAUL

At HIGHCLERE FARM (Owner of P-333) ARRARD 3 SPEED AUTOMATIC RECORD i WILLARD G. GRANT—Divisional Manager
™ OPO EAP SLES PES POPP Cc Z 2 R. J. MORRISON—Branch Manager
: TRUCK: One 1540. Bet $i I Petia wr ee ee ae ieee ; _ CHANSERS, : WM. M. (PAT) DATE—District Manager
S with, 3 1940 cr eee Bi e herd of we kept aé-hortoOw Night; 1éth June 1962 NT Just received! Going fast! Come and get yours! Branch Office: 1 Chacon Street, Port-of-Spain.
S Be BR) ade She tat te HU an ' oe
ge 225). x )« and make your selection j Refrest ¢ ’ a} nap a 7 ' € | ‘ a R - f
oe Bit Any of these wit make emetvetse BED Ds ; Se a : DENNIS E. WORME.
* Apply Mrs. ©. 'Worr ~ Hol :| i} ; Corner Broad and Tudor Streets i DAVID (Perry) EVELYN.
POOLE EE LEAS IAVAP | LE sae RS POSSCORSOOSOCODOCOONSNSenoNSoSONSOeSoNNancoe?



ume... Sea ee fee Pe


















Under £1,200 Each. City
Jetters of condolence, or in any wa» | Magazine Lane. Phone 3015. post of Caretaker at the Public Baths | Business Premises & Residences, Read
SAA ae empathy i cur Se 15.6.52—an.| at Belleplaine, Salary §8.00 per week.|My Ads in Last Sunday's and Tuesday's! UNDER THE DIAMOND CRUISER 20 June
Caer ccrenvernent caused by the| —=——-_ =——sese | Applicants must be resident of either | Advoeste. AT WORTHING MAIN RD., HAMMER UCTOR | 7. june “3 suit aR 13 Ju
death of Lilian Cossou CAR—One 1936 Standard Car 10 h.p oo leplaine, Walkers, Lakes, or|Facing Sea, Right-of-Way to Sea; a oe ee | DM 16 July July Say
Charles Beresford Brandford-{broth-| in good working order with § good|Corbins Districts. 3 Bedroom Bungalow Type, all Modern{ 1 fave been instructed ‘by One of the :
er) ‘lilian Branford-Hinds, iniece) | tires. Apply to V. Gibson, Overseer z Cc. A. SKINNER, Convenier Very Good Condition, latViaries to sell at No. 15 High Street
Beatrice Inez Millar, tiriend) Prior Park Plantation. Dial 2030, Clerk, “Comminsionere of Henith- |over 6,000 sa. ft.. Going Under £2,900. | we. ‘Thursday eet the 1k ot. 3.30 NORTHBOUND ‘agiduas
’ 156. 52—2n —an he Me for Almost anything in Real iene, 42 1 lady’ pee Fs fe se .
, _-- TT —— 19.6.52—3n. | Estate. Dial 3111 D. F. de Abreu, the following dresses, lady's Halifax
} o> . ann es ed oa . ” S i a & suits, 20 coats, 8 prs. pants, 6
GREEN—Mrs. Edith E. Green of Cane CAR—Ford Consul (black) in perfect Auctioneer & Real Ratate. Agent, “Olive woe’ : Se P, a june a“

“feld, Dominica, wishes to express he; | condition and done only 4,000 railes NOTICE Bough”, Hastings ; 15.6 4a, —e ene eee Xe eel a 16 June \ a7 June 2%8June 1 July
profound gratitude to the staff of the} Reason for selling owner now residing} Re_EREPLAINE COMMUNITY HALI - ones a * ‘tems. TERMS CASH . 28 June 6 July 8 ii July
Hospital for their most conn England, Can be seen at McRnearney] anp PLAYING FIELD ST. ANDREW | ,.SOUSE—One board and shingle House] ARCY A, SCOTT, Auctioneer iy Biuy

attention to her during be | & Co. or contact Mr, C, E. Clarke | “Nay be rented for ente: i. 20 x 11 with bedroom, shedroof and m8 . : ~ ss ale 19 July
> Ss Ph. 2631. 25.5.52 y r r entertainments of ~ it ‘ c 14.6.52
15.6.52—Ir jwan Street. one 5. all kinds, on application to the Paro- eae ee af t aT eee = ——_—— $$$ s
mes + a ake aie enn rome chial asurer of St ‘ ee | ere Boe 4 my 5.6.52—In July ff. } ‘
G RAPFITH—The ariftith tarntiy with "CAR Plymouth | 1940 in food | condi- pie ual Andrew or the |" —— es ae UNDER THE SILVER Re Aug. oe ake w aoe
eepest apprectation most sincerely ff tion, ea 8 ‘i - | .“HARCLIFF’ in St. Lawrence 4 s
eee’ hatha to all Who attended the# Truck 1939 Chevrolet in good condi- Soe" and nftterncon entet-| oy vist Church (on the Sea) standing of HAMMER ; antiga pe RN eT eee Oe ee
funeral. sent wreaths, cards, letters, tion, good tyres, Dial—2956. phy For Dances $15.00 15.6.52—3n, |2 Roods 37 Perches of land. ON TUESDAY 17th by order of Mr.
of sympathy, and who in various ways ¢ ae — Peterkins ae aes nett ele dice a aie The house is built of stone and ts at|@ecile Walcott we will sel! her Furni- | or further particulars, apply to—
rendered assistar the passing of} Ha oad. present divided into two flat Each flat|ture at “Archway House” Na Gar-
Mr William Edword Griffith, (in his Se EE NOTICE | Contains Grawit#' and dining +coms and dens, ee , GARDINER AUSTIN & CO LTD.—Agents
Sth. year,) late of Bush Hall Yard,| PICK UP — One Morris Pick-up. | BYE-ELECTION FOR THE VESTRY OF | kitchenette downstairs, 2 bedrooms with which includes ad
St, Michael, Dial 4616. Courtesy Garage THE PARISH OF SAINT MICHAEL running water upstairs Usual conve-|] Very nice Oval Dining Table, Antique
Vircent GriMith (son) Blanche Griffith 14.6.52—3n.1 Two persons having been nominated | nience Writing Bureau, Upright and Morris
(widow) Nurse Joan E. Griffith (grand- | for the Vestry of Saint Michael, a Poll Servants quarters and garage in yard.| Chairs, Coffee and Ornament Tables,
daughter) for the election of ONE will be taken Inspection by appointment, dial 3750, | nest of Tables, Cake Stand Corner and
- 15.6.52—I1n ELECTRICAL at the Parochial Sule Cumberland The above will be set for sale on Jume| Arm Chairs all in Mahee: Cedar Book-
Pre ‘ eae 3 = a Bridgetown, om Santer er 20th 1962 at 2 p. * at our Office. Shelf. Electric Fan, Electric Lamps,
SMITH—We “beg to return thahks to a instant Deginn! in tween e CARRINGTON & SEALY, | Piccures, Verandan Cnaurs, rhusi.
who attended the funeral, sent) “PRIiGIDAIRE "= Generel. Electric Frig- hours of 8 and 9 o’clock in the morning Lucas Street, Morris Arm-Chairs, Steel Chairs, Glass
wreaths, cards, letters of condolence, | iasire @ecubte 2 th excellent working | 70 closing, at. 4 p.m Solicitors. and China, Carpet ‘Rugs, Phillips Radio, ;
or in any other way rendered assist-| order $196.00. Didd 4736, 14.652-—8n. |, 2he, fol G STATIONS 11.6.52—9n, | Garrod Automatic Record Change. A GERMAN
ance during our réeént bereavement an. 2 ; : i pave ene a P ; the provis- Perfect condition Single Pine Bedsteads,|
caused by the death of Harry Smith FRIGERATOR — 10" . LAND — 2 Spots of land for sale. | Simmons Springs and Deep Sleep
The Smith family Refrigerator Kerosene ae a's Ne. 1 PORING STATION 7,286 sq. ft. & 5,606 sq. ft. Price, Mattresses, Very good Mahog: Pressses, By Albert Finger
15.6.52—1n. | Good condition. Phone 2791... L. & H. ate cree FLOOR o the, Pasochial reasonable. A: Headley; Deacons Rd.|Mahog: Duchesse Dressing Table; Be)
ngs. ters sur- 14. 6. 52~- jar Press, Singl I Bedstead, 4, i i
Sahn uthe Wood family thank ani] ae SMOtemet Eagehes Been a: Se begin with ‘as letters “A” to “Tr | eee cnnted Chast on bates and 4 This instrument possesses an Excellent Tone and a
those who attended the funeral, sent] | on eae ay opie Rizancs| INROPERTY comer Tweedside Road | Presa: Ice Chest, Rippungill 2 Burner Rpautiat oe a “ae finish.
flowers, letters, cards, or expressed EFPRIGERATOR — English Electric, é joor Of | suitable for grocery or Mechanical! oli Stove and Oven, Kitchen Cabinet, 2 are ed to call fo: demon:
their sympathy’ in other ways on the] g Wupie ft, $405,00. Excellent Condi- | Sr" Ree ree cre shop, Water and light installed. Apply | Burner Electric Stove, Blec: Kettle. | 1? stration
Wes, of their mother, Florence] i5, — gi, yr. motor guarantee. Call]. GROUND FLOOR of the Paro coune eS Hill, Tweedside Roms, oy | Larder, Kitchen Utensils, Tables and x CECIL MM
‘ood 2898. 11.6.52—4n. 1 var vt ial 48% 10.6.52—3n.j many other items, . J E OTT
39.6.5 2 tr Chial Bouildirgs is albottech te verte rs | ees Sale 11,30 o'clock. TERMS CASH ¥
pa * RS whose surnames begin With the letters 3 i de . : ; S x 48 sa Street — Phone
“ PYE BATTERY SETS—Just a few left.) (yp ¢5 4Z" (both inclusive) and the ee pee ome Be a apie BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,| $. pa cieaiat 4008
ENT esenicientirnnesae SAMIR. tf = ce thereto will be through the| well centered, A-1 business place suit- Auctioneers eee . PPPSF OSES PIOSSSS
FOR n 15.6.52—t-4.n.| Gateway situated at the Southern End Shia ifay call kievla cotenastnede. aaa 13.6, 52—2n. -
° of Sp Pues: | COLE, opportunity for any .ambitious person, |
POULTRY Sheriff & Returning’ Officer Residence contains large gallery, drawing UNDER THE SILVER
BoUsEe an see oP epee: | na, ining Zeomn, aiteben. tole aen HAMMER COMBERMERE SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION
chire, White Rock, Slack Giant, |“ wanmcn | Private sale or sale ive “competition at} On Thursday 19th by order of Mrs.
____ | Turkeys, young. $6,00 pr, Baby ones NOTICE short notice. For further details ting]J. C. Bovell, we will sell her furniture CHANGE OF DATE
“BELVEDERE”, Maxwell Coast. For 5} for Se. 3 weeks, Paddock Gap, Da PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH 2849 15.6.52—3n, | at “Jackson Ville,” Worthing,. which
months from lat August. Fully fur- | Costa Wall, Mrs. Theobalds Applications for one (1) Vestry Exhi- | ————————_——— —————— ineludes:—Round Tip-Top Table, Up-
nished. $120 per month. Phone 8188 15.6.5%—1n. | bition tenable at the Lodge School will} STONE WALL DWELLING HOUSE] tight Chairs, Sideboard, China Cabinet,
is ¢ $3—3n be received by the undersigned up to] With 4,004 square feet of land attached] Ormament ‘Tables, Rockers, Berbice WILL ALL Parents/Guardians and Scholarship Authori-
i Adios DUCKS KHAK! CAMPBELIQ: One]5 p.m, on Tuesday, 17th June, 1952, | at Dayrell’s Road, Christ Chureh. The| Chairs Morris Settee, all_in Mahogany: ties please note that th n n will k
“BRIGHT VIEW, Prospect * inition pe pair Khaki Campbello 1 Drake 3 Candidates must be sons of Parish-| dwelling house contains living room,;Glass & China; G.E.C. Refrigerator SI se no’ at e Entrance Examination will be held on |
‘ ‘all conveniences, 4 bedrooms, good | Ducks 6 months old. Magnificent|ioners in straitened circumstances, and two bedrooms, kitchenette, usual con-| (18 months old) Congoleum, Twin Bed- MONDAY, JULY 218T 9.00 A.M. |
sea bathing, bus service. Apply Hill} Laying strain, $24.00. must not be less than 8% years nor|Veniences, Government water installed,.| steods, Vono_ Springs & Beds, Gents i" es |
House, Ch. Ch. (Lodge Road) Mrs, PEEBLES, more than 14 years of age on the 2ist}House wired for electricity. Inspection |Compactum Dressing Tables, Double Change of date has been necessitated by am unfortunate
: 15.6.52—2n Bayleys, June, 1952, to be proved by a Baptismal|on application to the tenant Mr. Ince, | Bedstead, Vono Spring, all in Mahogany: clash of & : ; {
Susie vein eb, St. Philip, 11.6.58—3n.| Certificate’ which must accompany the] between the hours of 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. {Linen Press, Dressing Table Frese " of date with the Entrance Examination for Harrison
B applicatio a. daily combined, Iron stead, Bookshelves, College.
Ba FURNISHED "APARTMENT. Te ete s of applieation can be obtained| The above dwelling house will be get] Tea Trolley; Ironing Board, Larders, ge, }
Advocate 15.6,52—2n LIVESTOCK at the Parochial Treasurer’s Office up fe ale by public competition at, our] Kitchen Tables, 3-Burner Valor Stove & M. PINDAR Nl
ae , ee as A. T, KING, Office, James Street, on Friday 27th June | Oven and other items. ms |
‘ FURNISHED FLAT, at Dundee, St. “Cows-Two @) Case. Gem in nik Clerk, St. Joseph's Vestry instant at 2’pan. Sale 11.80 o'clock, TERMS CASH. Secretary, Governing Body }
Lawrence. Suitable for 2 only. Avail-| Apply “Cuthbert Rogers, near Rices, 14.6.52—3n. PeAT on in BOYCE, BRANEER TROTMAN & co. Combermere School.
able June 15th Onward, Phone oe. S:. Philip. 15.6.53—1n. | THE SUGAR INDUSTRY AGHICUL- . ia 6.$800n uctioneers 16.6.00-20, 14.6 |
t) ae renderers a rer eae ae I 7. TURAL NK 19438 5a—2n. i 2n.
4%..." Giles te SOevershree welt bred Holstein] Toe ‘the creditors ing speciaity| The undersigned will set up NERD eo Te
. Waynes g Bay - f OEY, > ol it of good y ci , . : —
. Drawing & Dinfig rooms.” # wee: iran Rien ars oe Rex eee Gregg Farm Plantation, oy es 18a Weak - ~ UNDER THE SILVER _ — =
4 wit a ve | ak Ps Te i, Dairy TAKE NOTICE that we the Trustees| towh, on Friday the 20th day of June HAMMER
coon set he he ila - m8 Sais Hothersal Turning, of the above Plantation are about to] 1952 at 2 p.m. the following On Wednesday 18th by order of Mrs.
Paynes Bay 18,6 i St. Michael. 14,6.52—2n. } obtain a jap of £3,500 under the pro-| 250 shares in West India Biscuit Co.JW,. A. Ross, we wat soli her furniture Who's 0 = : \
es ~ a vision: the above Act against the} Limited 111 shares in West india Rum] at ‘Rosemany”, ve. eville, 0 CRICKET
4 ie enue. Perret lear PUPS Four (@ Bull and Pups \ suit Plantation, in respect of the Agri-| Relinery Co. Limited 7 which ineludes’ Morris Sulte, ‘Settee, 2 : X
* Py “FApply uthbert Rodgers, near ‘Poulural year 1982 to 1953. R. S.NICHOLIS & CO. Arm Chairs, Rockers, Ornament Tables, (
2 ne A euros Pk rile an yk Phi.ip 15.6.52—1n.f No money has been borrowed under Solicitors. | Plant-stools, Waggon, Upright Chairs, by ROY WEBBER
Bee ee ee ee TL aweoai. ——— the Agricultural Aids Act, 1905, or the 15,6,52—5n. | Uphols. Drawing Room Suite Settee,
SAC OF Oeat, 6. oan oLOUNG kia aS Aveshire; ee Bay the case may be) in res- Upright ae gl err wu Wot oni doas this book
apenas hi ( wor ne} a nd, a is
NAVY GARDENS — Fully furnishea| Moore, "Mindsbury. oad, ‘St. Michael.! "Dated this 14th day of June 1952 OVERNMENT N y f’Maahogany:, Oak and Rush chairs and |{{ the test playing countries but pyro oy sane tahert
modern house, all conveniences, good] pia) 3764, 15.6.52—-1n. L. C. M. ARCHER (etal, i I Rockers; Underwood Typewriter: Din- th also the leading people behind
position, July to December IN Clusi ve. | nS Trustee, ing and other Tables in Pine, Deck e game.
Reasonable rent. Phone 2389 Per B. H. V. OUTRAM Chairs; Pictures, Congoleum, Glass and - also -
14,6.52-—Sn MECHANICAL ' "Attorney China; ¢lock, Double and ‘Single Tron THE BOOK ” )
aoa, tie 14.6.52 dn ga cece TO U.S.A. Bedsteads Springs, Mattresses; Mahog. OF “THE DOG )
ROOM—From July Ist at the MO A0 | TS remaining Workers who|.T. Washstand and Tables; Painted A most comprehensive work giving details of every type {
Gift Shop. Suitable for Dressmaking TYPEWRITERS,— This is HALDA have been photographed as well] Presses and Dressing Tables, Sewing of Dog. t
- Pe Spor, Matsdressing ete. Apply} from special alloy hardened steels avail. as those. who received calls to| Machine, Larders, Kitchen Tables and i
at Mayfair p.m, oo 5 naan | WOOK: These beautiful typewriters made Lost & FOUND Beport at Queen’s Park on Tues-| ster, items.
29.5.52—4n] by world famous Original Odhner-Facit nr § S| Sale at 11.30 o'clock. TERMS CASH. e

oe



Â¥, JUNE 15, 1952

10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Books:—
THE HORSEMAN'S YEAR BOOK



1952

â„¢ 7 STRUGGLE FOR EUROPE

most remarkable War

ver ee
TO ETERNITY
Sei Hine ¢ Books
Ss STAT ATIONER

extra Mes
ASS “tocks ion have been
for are at - -

JOHNSON’S HARDWARE

Se re ae RE



NOTICE

SOCIETY SERVICE
STATION

Now
OPEN FOR BUSINESS

Your In
j Sie Ses aahonee

SOCIETY PLT.

St. John.
11.6.52—3n.



| BLADON

e ce.
AFS., F.V.A.



FOR SALE

—_—

SWEETFIELD, St. Peter — An
Estate type house built of stone.
Contains large living room witb
French windows leading onto
covered verandahs with view of
sea. 3 bedrooms, kitchen, store-
rooms and usual outbuildings,
garage and servants’ quarters.
Approx. 2% acres well laid out
foe with right of way over

ac!

HILLCREST, Bathsheba — Sub-
stantially built modern stone
bungalow on brow of cliff afford-
ing fine view of this wild and
rocky coast. 3 good bedrooms,
living room, 2 side galleries,
kitchen, servants’ quarters and
garage. Electricity and mains
water. Over 6 acres

VILLA VICQUE, ST. VINCENT
—Beautifully situated house built
of local stone with magnificent
view, only 34% miles from Kings-
town, 1 mile Golf Club, 100. yards
Aavatio Chu Beagh with excel-

bedrooms,
2 Eee large lounge (23 x
15), (% x 18), and
aaa dings ete,

ESTAT sous St. James —
A ious home with
qi . ool location

its over!

hy looking coast.

ties on this popular coast with a
completely private and secluded
bathing beach. The grounds of
about 1% acres are well wooded
and could readily be converted
into one of the show places of
the Island. The house is of 2
storeys and possesses noticeable
character.

11, GRAEME HALL TERRACE—
Recently built 2 storey house
Septused a stone with everite
roof rge ving room, .
3 ows Witehen, aun, 2
servants’ rooms a garage
Offers in region of £4,000 con-
sidered. Would cost £5,000 plus
et présent building costs.

SEA FORT, ST. JAMBS—Care-
fully re- 2 storey house
on one 6f the most attractive sites
in this increasingly popular area.
Beautiful coral sand beach and
calm, saYe bathing. Dining room,
lourige, verandahs on both floors,
3 bedrooms, detached garage and
servants’ quarters. All services.

NEW BUNGALOW, ROCKLEY—
Commodious home with 3 bed-
rooms, large living r , wide
verandah With good view, kitchen,
pantry, servants’ quarters and
stonerooms. Good situation near
Golf Course. £4,300.

NEWTON LODGE, MAXWELL
COAST—Solidly constructed stone
house containing enclosed gal-
leries, eee Sia cee oo nS ee

dining rooms,
nae? aoe ae. “ie
Si tr ah as is og, Ava

RESIDENCE, FONTABELLE—2
storey house with self contained
annexe adjoining. Main house
contains large living and break-
fast rooms, 4 upstairs bedrooms,
usual offices, garage aud servants’

. Annexe has wide verandah,
room, 2 roomy

bedrooms
gorene. Good investment

THE caseem,
‘Modern
Anas



living ered
3 bedrooms with built-in ward~
robes, well fitted kitchen, be
with covered way to
servant’s quarters and all Pont
offices. All public utility services.
This property carries our highest
recommendation.

* —)
These two well construc’ Ppro-
t th approx. 4

acres of coast land are open ta
offers either a, a whole or
marnentey.

3
servants’ rooms, and
fernery. This pro is situated
on the best bath beach at St.
Lawrence, is wi
our opinion would be
for conversion into 4 guest
house.

RENTALS

furnished and unfarnished .
houses for rent.

e
REAL ESTATE AGENTS

AUCTIONEERS

Phone 4640
Plantations Building


SUNDAY,” JUNE 15, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE, FIFTEEN

VISITORS TO BARBADOS} CIRCULAR "The Truth in —_——— -











SPENT 3M. DOLLARS” | “2x22 Yous Horoscope

$ ‘
@ From Page 5. crease in the number of calls made |... oo June, 1952.
Island by ‘visitors Mas been kept by Speciel Cruise Ships to Bar-| I ha pati me re
by the banks: for the information bados durmg-the-1951—52 Season. | Candi at A fat sees , es
of; the Currency Conttel. Ofieer,. Such celts’ jotalled §. as againet 8 ~woned in the st Mi hael. Vestry Stare indicate one? “Woute sou like
who has very kindly made this tor the previous Season. Statistics tara . h 2 ieee ¢ the |to test free the skill of Pundit Tabore,
information available to the Com- for the year 1951—52 show an in- la ae a * - ieorattee . India’s most famous Astrologet, who b>
mittee. Taking the average for a creasé of 3,882 intransit passengers /@te Mr. C. A. Brathwaite. ancient science to
year, based .on the seven months and 1,343 disembarking passengers | useful nee
information available, the amount over that of 1950—51. Outside of | ’ Pe ao fe
o: Hard Currency accruing to the the Caribbean, the most marked / : Mee!) tion? The ac-
[sland through the tourist trade increase in this traffic was passen- | 9 MZ icuracy’ of his
works out at 2 total of $1,658,508.00 gers from the United States of | | predictions and
U.S. and Canadian Dollars, and America. the sound pract
436,272 Venezuelan Bolivars. Con- General Remarks a oe iver
verting this Hard Gurrency into Travel agents, representatives |/ |Horoscopes on
British West Indian Dollars at the ef transportation companies jour- | Business, Speeu-
rate of 70% premium for U.S. and pajists and photographers visiting \f | lation, Finances,
Canadian Dollars and 48'c. for the sland were given all possible | Love | - aftatrs,
each Bolivar, the substantial accictance and co-operation by the |
amount of $3,031,055.00 is cireu- Committee, . |
lated throughout the Island by” a-fresh supply of coloured post- | F
visitors from the above mentioned cards was obtained ang copies of |
countries. So far, no statistics ar@ «4 Short History of Barbados” by |

available as to the amount spent Neville Connell, M.A,. were added
by visitors from the Caribbean, to the stock of literature for sale |





“You are missing
one of the best

things in life until you sleep on a..

DUNLOPILLO

mattress

Try one at your furnisher—you will

















Friends, Enemies,
Lotteries, etc.,
have astounded
l|edubated people
{ \ the world over.
| George Mackey
}of New York be-
lieves that Tabore
must possess some sort of second-sight





Brown, Fawn,

: ROPICAL| tee"



Great Britain and elsewhere. ; a s To popularise his system Tabore will realise that Dunlopillo has made a

â„¢ ' at the Information Bureaux at the send you FREE your Astral Interpreta- contribution to modern living which

Advertisin Pier Head and Seawell Airport. tion if you forward him your full name ‘ a at
IN: s Framed photographs, depicting | (Mr. Mrs. or Miss}, address and date af 00 one should be without. Dunlopillo i :
‘ i wok ake scenes of Barbados, were supplie birth all clearly written ty yourself. No is the most comfortable, hygienic and $7.59, $7.99
ative Li é a j » C i - di ya money wanted for Astrologica’ K oat
40. Norfolk Street. London, W.C: Baths Se a FO" Sepia. st Rankine th., Dut. weal “Spent aie las economical mattress in the world. $8.28 & $9.08
2. During the year Barbados has. Presentathon "baskets of local | Postal Order for stationery, testimo tals Available now in all sizes for beds and 4
2 “ iy Os 7 3 s as 5 c }end other interesting literature, You will | .

been advertised in. “The Times,’ agwers were sent to all Special | § Ibe amazed at the remarkable” accuteey | also for baby’s cot. per yar

“The Daily Telegraph”, “The Illu-
strated London News”, “The Tat-
ler”, and “Travel World”. The

0 his statements about you and your |
affairs. Write now as this offer may not
again Address: PUNDIT |

Cruise Ships calling at Barbados |
during the,year. A tray made of |

rg —— @ a ge be made
local woods was presented to the TABORE, (Dept. 213-D)}, Upper Forjett |

THESE ARE ALL NEW ARRIVALS


























































ittee, was responsible for ¢ ;
Seen ane Display vat The Pueigte a snre ee May I take tine opportunity ta | street, Bombay 20, India, Postage to India | DOWDING FSTATES & TRADING CO. LTD, BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS
Colonial Office Display “Window war scheduled flights to Barbados. |“S*,,%°4, 10. be — ee 2S99999S9999599S9S9605 5%, ——— — sormraneetiainieed
for the months of October and. “Necessary repairs and renova. {tend at the Parochial Buildings, | > % | pee <- eee
November, 1951. Further exhibits tions to the Information Bureau Cumberland Street, opposite St ss % | Seeeseosussssss SOSSSOSBO GO APPFOP OOO
of local handicraft were supplied pier Head, were carried out ee eet Sooner) ee FOR SALE ¥| CAVE SHEPHERD & co LTD
for the Barbados Stall at the ’ . |Monday next, June re > y | a .
British Industries Fair, 1952. As ‘a result of tie visit of Mr." burs OF am. an P.M.,/ §$ PROPERTY — Fairfield Lance Q} : ° ”
CANADA:—Representative Mt. Charles. Allmon to Barbados in |#"d give me your vote. . $$ Black Rock Enquire M. Smith ¥ | 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET
C. R. Stollmeyer, Trade Commis- January, 1951, .a.section of the|,, With many thanks, in anticipa- | X% Grace Hill School Gap, Spooner: %
sioner for the British West Indies, “National ‘Geographic Magazine’ |ton, aie , S aceite =
British Guiana and The Bahamas, March 1952 issue;- containing a / remain, ¥ 22 PESOS SCCS GOSS >
37 Board of Trade Building, Mon- very well studied article support- | yours truly, { e
ttreal, Quebec. Advertisements ed by coloured and black and DAN F. BLACKETT. Hello’ Boye ane’ Gina f | POLED PODS OLSSSDOSSDODCLS LOSS SSDP ISI OEE
were placed in the ae white photographs taken: by the SS9SSG999S9S999598669656% C d D
newspapers and journals — Mon- author, was given to Barbados. ’ , i we | A n ance ; "
treal—“Star,” “La Presse’ Toron- There have been wélcome ex-|% . x ra ; W FOGARTY (B DOS)
to—"Star,” “Globe & Mail”; Ham- tensions and alterations to various % FOR SALE %| ll be given by THINK OF i In. :
ilton — “Spectator”; London — Hotels, Residential Clubs and | % S| Pee ee. re \ {
ancouver — “Sun”; “Canadian lishments being opened, thereby | $ ‘ 5 S| b Ra) Vp ag | ‘
Medical Association Journal”, adding attraction to the facilities | One Racing Bicycle % | Pe ee ae ee | THE FIT ‘j :
“L’Union Médicale” and the Can- which the Island has to offer to| % 3 | Teer TA coe ee. | Be
ada-West Indies Magazine”. the travelling publie: | $75.00 2 SanaAy Bit 1Pta PUBS ee .
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: _ The Barbados Hote? Association x | ADMISS?!0ON~ -o 2/+ AND oe ° : ;
~Representative The Wendell P. is to be congratulated on its for- Dictabie eames ie ee Dbaed. 2 Music by Mr. Perey Green's ORk . {Attention Tennis Players—
Colton Company, 122 East 42nd mation. can ARC WELDER ore attach. 9 | REFRESHMENTS ON SALE x ,
Street, New York 11, N.Y. Through The local press continues to give ments for soldering and brazing \& | §\} Don’t’ Miss it 8.6.52—3n. 1 %
this agency advertisements were its usual and much appreciated | & Rae 19th sul: ace Res >| % THINK OF $-
placed en York— Horeig co-operation, , ; x CAR: Pee ter ae hee % | x x i We have just opened
a pe, Bios: ay, eae Toorak Seen Pa ae % Garage, St. John 11.8.52—2n. % PODECPSSOSOSOOPOCOLY | THE PRICE % 4
mericé ; ston — ’ ris ommittee o e amber | ¢ | >
“Herald Traveller”, Christian Sci- of Commerce andthe Commis- Soseoeee eee, | 2
ence Monitor”; Baltimore—Sun”; sioner of Police in matters dealing WPSSS99SS999999599909 9H x EVERTON CLUB % é
Miami—"Herald”; Chicago— “Tes. with tourism is much ‘appreciated S REAI ESTAT % 1
une”; iladelphia —“Inquirer”’; by the Committee, y > |
Cleveland—“Plain Dealer”: Hart- V. C. GALE. x J E | ; The Committee & Members | d
ford — “Times”, ASTA News”, Acting Chairman, > ‘ ri : r % Everton
“Travel Agent”, “Travel Trade” JOAN KYSH. Edie Gee ce eee ee | In White, Red, Blue and Green
and “Holiday Magazine.” A Bar- Secretary. @. anida cs aa rare g | announce their : :
bados Window Display was placed : $ a A 3 ten tone bitiibal “a j
in various tourist agents and | $66s6ssesseseseses5000~ @ |S (1) Ao Pedvoom stone bungalow % |
transportation company windows ft i (2) Angther'S becseee tema ie! @ DANCE ¥ $7.00 per re-sirin ing
throughout the year. Exhibits of REALTORS LIMITED % called “Colleen” at Worthing %| x
local handicraft were also supplied % on the sea R ~ At QUEEN’S PARK HOUSE | ON LY
for display purposes in the U.S.A. % (3) A 4 bedroom stone bungalow » | %
News releases were prepared and OFFERS © 1 The home mene eee! S$ ¥ On Saturday Night, 21st June % | ™ ° >
issued to travel editors of news- os % rees House’ towether with 2% % o 1952 AT >
papers and magazines. THURCHILL a acres of land ust one mile | i F : . %
hrough the agency of these gure .betroans with. built. in ~ Hoa tack Wheeite Bevan ae : mare by yd Bd cot kd at +
Representatives information was COMM aathsa ree ne. Watet This property is suitable for com- ¥ | § rehestra : 15 Gl) NYL N (i x
. Din- a .
supplied to inquiries, literature igh Ragen CMG Gee eee mercial purposes, : aes M
distetputed and: contactesuacenciie two servants room?” cane aes thkdeet. dha ahove aud | SUBSCRIPTION: 2/- P, Cc S AFFEI & Cco., LTD. : 3
transportation companies, travel of way to Sea. A sound invest- compare prices and condi- % 5.5,52-— se , a :
agents etc,, in the interest of the |% ™°"% %° contact us now S tions. re | ‘ae TOP SCORERS IN TAILORING $6.50 per re-stringing
Committee. WYNDAL M4 D'ARCY A. SCOTT | :
VENEZUELA: The attention of Partly. 5 3 Auctioneer, % | $99996900990009999000%%
Bacnnome as a Louris resort was plaster Gn appiormnaty 0°00 % ; Middle Street, ¥ | ODSOSE &GPSSPODPDOPDS = - x
advertised in “Elite” Magazine, In square feet land, Situate at Rock- . 4
addition to the usual literature, San hs, Bus route and within & | oseoeosssesossososcsos® & FILM SHOW 3 % .
folders in Spanish were suppliea | % famous Rockiey Beach vine % at | ;
for distribution. The Committee reasonably priced, THE BARBADOS | ) 1 ‘
AQUATIC CLUB : mM. I (B DOS) .
(Local and Visiting <4
C AGREL. HEeet feet of land. Situate just off Rock- Members) ~
5 t a a . 8G ?
island in Veo ree Carrettg and sommes COLORADO EES LOO SOV OPEV CLO
ADVERTISING LITERATURE: magnificent view unobstructed to

the sea, Comprising three bed-
rooms, drawing and dining room,
kitchen, ‘lovely tiled toilet and
bath.

New Booklets, Hotel, Residential
Club and Guest House Leaflets,
places of Interest Leaflets, Shop-

‘| CLERKS’ UNION

0 A FEES SS SFOS SS

-

room at 8,30 p.m. on Wed-
nesday, 18th June,

ping Guides, Memo Greeting The Programme includes:

Laas. 0 POLOSOOOOTIS)

TUL

Downstairs Garage, servants
Cards and Bus Time Tables were %$ 1ooms. with Bath and. Toilet, Y.M.CA. HALL British News, and the short
issued. Fares of Hired Cars and | and quite’ enough room = for | Films,

POSSESSES OSO POSS PPPS OS

whatever you may require “Shipping”

and
“Criminal Justice’
also a Colour Cartoon
(Members are cordially
invited)
No Admission Charge
15.6.52—3n.

Exchange Rate Sheets were also

issued, + on Monday, 16th June,

at 5 p.m.
A GENERAL MEETING
y will be held
5 | AGENDA

SWEET FIELD

Lovely Stone House, comprising
upstairs three bedrooin
living room, dining roor
and baths, one with ub bath
and hot and cold water, gallery
Downstairs, spare reorns, kitchen
and shower'room. Standing on

or

Advertising Photography
During the year the Committee |
supplied, both locally and through | }
their Representatives abroad, free |
use of photographic enlargements

large
2 toilets











»

x

.
By Courtesy of the Brit-
ish Council there will be a
FILM SHOW in the Ball-

>





BOSCSS
s


















‘, ~
> r approximately 24 Acres of land § ; . TAPS & DIES
to transportation companies, travel about 100 yards from Gibbs Beach. § | . To discuss proposed 59%0SS60696000960000" % | r
agents, en etc., for display |} (spection by appointment only. ¥ changes in Shops’ Clos- + \ | PIPE
purposes and reproduction. Addi- | S P , ing Order. ( jn ae ae ” ¢ "0 ” "on 2”
tional negatives were added to the CAFS STAINS GOSTAGE S| To. di change: ! My", Val, Ye"; e", 0", 4%, He", 1", 1%0", Vee Ss
Committee’s stock of photographs A lovely cottage standing on 2 | ° Sep gery changes in |
ee ' Poods 27 Perches of land, situate ¢ Shops Act. | BSF
Statistics $ at St. Jamies Coast, having its own To receive names three ANNUAL Mth 2 IY bw ae aw age ge ” we
Thete ‘was a considerable in: |@ private bathing. Comprising tice Of whom Will be selects 6", Pe”, Ya", ote”, 0, ta”, Y0", at”, 0”, Ye




ed by Executive Com-
mittee to serve on
Wages Board for com-
ing two years.

toilet to main bedroom, drawing
2? and dining room, European Bath
and Toilet, with hot and cold
running water, modern up-to-date








BARN DANCE

in gid of

SAE or NF
’ %”, res "a", fos 5e”, %”




”



a



Schoorers Bring





: fae cere en ee Accept names for mem- . USS or NC
Coal, Rice, Copra ; ee Y. M. P. C. SM", Fe”, He", Te”, 2”, ah”, 6”, 4”
9 9 Pp LAND Any Other Business. ) | | iG 5 1

Near Upton Plantation: guaran- Due to the nature of the CRICKET SECTION




ENGINEER B.P. HAMMERS
Yalb., %41b., 1“lb., 1941b., 242lb., 3lb.

3 FILES

teed Electric Light




The schooner Lydia Adina, 41% siness i
sana ene Oe ae eile business to be discussed

At CLUB HOUSE,
Beckles Rd.

On JULY 5th

Near the St. James Coast.

is indebted to British West Indian ? N |
Airways Limited for their willing PUTER Ow | BARBADOS
co-operation with the distribution On approximately 19,000 square | |




yesterday morning from St. Vine Members and Non Members



Near the Rockley Golf Club are asked t make a special

effort to attend,



cent. She brought 100 tons of | ,

























M'
coal and 126 bags of copra. See gr % ery 2 ,
One hundred and fiags of char- REALTORS Li : d Non Members are welcome Music by the Caribbean © FLAT, ROUND, HALF ROUND, SQUARE
coal and 2,000 bags of rice were Imite ’ 3 y Troubadours the Zippiest 2 nes 5 . Mi
brought by the schooner Franklyn to hear the discussion but Band in the Land ° - ice $ HIGH SPEED GRINDING MACHINES
D.R. which came from British Peete may not take any active HIGH SPEED TWIST DRILLS
Guiana. She also brought 30 tons sae part. | Dancing 9 p.m, To 3 am. WS +H § ¢ s
of firewood, and 34 bunches of Sana ; Merchant Tailors BODY REPAIR FLEXIBLE FILES
a Sraiecectes. ABL/ARA Mpebuesks: Steet CHAS. THOMAS, | ny : ‘ “pa i
“Both schooners are consigned President. Ue pnnennnniedie a || OPEN & BOX SPANNERS
to the Schooner Owners’ Associa~ aa ae | Ce Cee a ay weriivrvirnitie,|% PRESSURE GAUGES 0-400 Ib.
ion. ‘ . e
%,
~
1y s
‘ HE'S ‘i ECKSTEIN BROTHERS
>
MY BRIDE THNKS WHEN I DO CARD TRICKS, BUT x % ees
THESE MUSCLE GUYS ARE $ VV ELL %
%



Axt_WARD 8 MATERIAL: a
TASTELESS
eee ~~ i

>
IF YOU AIN'T GOT ONE, 7 7 t\ SHE'LL GO OUT IN *WOW” FINISH™PULLING THE $ > ON
PEOPL HALL CLOSET iy .
HE = er AND RP HS COAT % ,
%
¢ ,
% THE WAY

TO BECOMING
A FUTURE
STRONG MAN

HE TAKES HIS NOURISHMENT AND HE TAKES
HIS FERROL, AND EVERYONE KNOWS THAT
FERROL BUILDS STURDY YOUNGSTERS

FERROL |

THE WORLD'S BEST TONIC

BOLTS & NUTS \” & ©.” diameter

CARRIAGE BOLTS & NUTS 5/16” & 39”
GRINDSTONES 2’ diameter x 6”
FERROCRETE Rapid-Hardening CEMENT
WHITE SNOWCRETE CEMENT

' RED & BUFF COLORCRETE CEMENT

MUTPETIVE — TORIC —S Tumi Ane?

We Offer....
EXPANDED METAL SHEETS
1” mesh 4 x 8 Iron
2” mesh 4 x 10 Tron
3° mesh 4 x 10’ Tron
%4” mesh 4 x 8’ Galvanised

PEEPS OTE SOFC LLL EAE MY

$565, OOh ee

Phone 4267

Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd.



Pre

oe

|
|
Ex? THANX ANDA TIP OF |
|
'

THE HATLO HAT 7D

We MRS .GRETTA GOULD,
SALT LAKE City |
UTAH ee

Sf AeA GMO A Ms eA? Smcagn er

oOo

*

%

%

.

%

*
BOYS WILL GO ONA TEAR! %&
*

| 5
*

%

%

.

x

%

4

\



PRLELEPEER PLOT PVSPPOTIOKES & BRIOE LTD. “AGENTS 9964956090995"




PAGE SIXTEi N

0000606 %.
i

9.Od-9-d-3-2-3-

9 nad9ooooe

$OOO-09909504944 pg

$0O6006

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acai
993-96

99949499000000500009S

94409400064,40996S95 13404936.

399904494 964904O909.9.599595000000000900000 99 001 9H

4 946.0064

54940O906SO

56990009O9O5999O42OO504SOODD OG 9 DIG 94H 48

3 $9949949$5900064



GPF PHOPLDDDE OSOY-PPD ODDO POPOOOGOH OOS HPP DOGS OOS GS



TRY KOLA AND VANILLA
ICE CREAM

~~ OR

ORANGE WITH PINE
i ALSO
~~ 5 WONDERFUL WAY TO GET
.
THE KIDDIES TO DRINK MILK
aa

=~







___ SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, JUNE 15, 1952
~* QPLOP DSL DEL DD PDD DO POOP DOD LOE OL Do H-0-DDO0- 0-

a eet a Eee een
PLD PDOP OOD OP DOP PPO VO CDDP P DPE POPP OL GIOE-G HDD PIDDTS OPO VIG DP PIO

ALL OVER BARBADOS
ou will find...

Quay:

«
*

@ODO-O-8-O-8

BOOP PEDIHIEEDO TS

$9-000060%

BEVERAGES

$44-24-06SSO444G4 24

POPULAR WHEREVER YOU GO.

THERE ARE 1.369 DEALER OUTLETS FROM WHICH

Q\1eG

BEVERAGES

09 $-S 259 ODO460OGSOHOGOLGHE

ARE RETAILED.

nn g
~~ AT WORK Gow
A ° Peter i
——I™ ih e) rn 4
loam e ay
Tw



BOTTLED BY

BOUTLERS








DELIVERING FROM OUR PLANT TO
WHOLESALE CUSTOMERS ALL OVER
. THE ISLAND



of

Delicious Flavours

£60444 90OO50O40O0509O09O0O4490000F 009004 BX

Oe ee, j :
== = we $

owen
KOLA CHAMPAGNE anmtbe $
no ¢
CREAM SODA ae
Noe >
ORANGE i
OQ >
Py $
NN .
i :
ODN 2
a ae P

mn
id
COOLERS & TUBS —~— :
oe
On Loan Free-of-Charge NIN

PIN ®
For Special Occasions Ai lata 3
y

Phone 1761 a 5058

OO-9.9-006

99990-9O9494 19-9990OGO4O40-0-8

DF 29-00H5404HOO4.00-8

(Barbados) LIMITED.

,




PAGE 1

SUNDAY, JINK IS. 1M2 SUNDAY ADVOCATK PA.il. TIIIKII I V HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON pnp FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND I .iT GOT JJFS CCfl -"X jpu"kLi txcrs CAR AT *I7S~.*LE... ~e C3-S-ED TUJBDuSU "•< *SO THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK a RAY MOORES WO)—! NMOMINOMCITMOSEH Ml I '.' ftLBtCAfii ',; >. %  .' M • r] •W.\ \OU0BUIIE5?AEN'rwxi f S0IN610HEIP1MEMJ, L is is theft** Kir Gearg* VI Gordons Stands Suptem& IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only M IAI. WFEH arc nun available al our Hum.li. s Tnrrdwidr. N|u-ii>lii-ioMii and Swam Slrrel Usually Now ('(HOAMA1.T *l.40 — ILM KOVAI. SAUSAOI B 7K — .70 IKI1.I.IT BISCUITS M \KMAI.\IIK QBBHNGS IN TOM. SAI'< K VI STOUT in — LM .47 — .41 .43 .30 — .42 .21! SOUPS, PICKLES Etc llrini Chicken NINHIII' DOTS .. Chicken (•umlxi Soup Prp|>cr Pol Soup Clam Chouder Soup II"rw H uli-li IllrSII ( I ( I Mill |( KKI.ISII i mi i i SAUCE KIDNEY & BEANS LEMON PIE KILLING MINT JK.I.I.V MIKKKIK'S. TABLE JELLIES l Kr.AM Of WIIKAT -• lour lit,11 II iI. •,! % %  Further GUINNESS STOUT FOR STRENGTH C r. HARRISON & CO. (BARBADOS) Ltd. P.O. BOX 304 BARBADOS ,.



PAGE 1

PAGE SIX' SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. JUNE IS, 1SI H %  %  :ii.. t. unrasto. ITD. *? Mrs. C/.*r&c?'s Co/umn SEWING CIRCLE E^ FLY THEM HOME BO AC I* your raildren ..i. at .-1i ..I in the Untied Kingdom make ,iiinK'i"i"K to bring 11 home for th* Summer 1...I..1 ,3 B.O.A.C'r. '.iml.nl fare* arc available i.. all full Inr studcnl* in idI nil< d Kingdom who ate under 2 yearn of .-.;I hey enjoy lhe HOI MI TRIP JOIKNEY FOR THE COST OF A ONE WAY TICKET. Your rhlldrni II y in awlfl, turs Speedblrd*. attended by an r\nrrirnrrd and Ifi.nill. i-rrw who look after linn every wish. Comull your Travel Agent or llr, N.I, Writ India. Airways. IdtM Broad Street Bridfetown I.O.A.C. TAKES GOOD CARE OF YOU FLY BOA ( %  mtriSH IHIK-I \URWATI CORPORATION Eyeing The Weather I If there'* nil. ttUna IB like 1o bOMl Of wlnliOil if us, when art) return, like vaT, much to rub in our ICXMI fortUM with "We ure know boa just plain uuk. you %  ;.>: Prob. ul.v Hut actuall) % %  talent is no re Op ;t semblance of skill in '.' a prophecy, tt'l % %  build an obmTvatory m weather ballooni Christian temi to be Itfl As a matter of ft ct. ixfm MjaSfMj y< I RAJ 1 i to % % %  <' phb. wFiitlu-r eve merely by studying tin provorl ..filch follow. Each .( thOM i .1 belief which weather authortUei agree has a basi-. of I Wr've ni.n1-' .1 few Ctatagtt In them, of COUl I Only DM I i worn* in parenthesis in • belonirs then70u tra the right w i out the others. I If red the ftlfl rwcln* hi-! race Be w A 2. If the sun goes pale to bod Twill (dWi rain iilnr> tomorrow it is sold. 3. Glimpse you e'er the gnatl ray Doom the morrow %  < iio*e line, chilly) day. When the gra*s Lg
  • .it morning light. Look fur (rain. rl r jrlmt, foil Ix'fore the nifiht. lib's such FUN mitt INNER CLEANLINESS! life's always fun for the youngster who takes a morning gla of sparkling Andrews for Inner Cleanliness. ShcS lit and full of vitality at lessons and playtime, thanks to Andrews' gentle laxative action. Andrews deans the mouth, settles the stomach, tones upthe liver and ensures regularity. It also makes a refreshing drink for any time of day; ju*t one leaspoonful is sufficient. DO YOU KNOW n-hy sparkling" drinks are so refreshing f They contain liny bubbles of carbon dioxide gat. When the liquid is szeallotoed these bubbles cling to the tvalls of the stomach and the gas has a cleansing and soothing effect. Effervescent Andreus takes this action, freshening the whoU system, through Inner Cleanliness. 5. When (beetle*, swallows, leave-,) show their underlie sure thai rain betides. fi The weary sun hath made a %  Deien set. AM by the bright track of .. token of a (nippy, ghastly, goodly day to-morrow. M Ud shower. (Clear. Same. Rain) again tomorrow. H Rainbow to windward, (feu! fair, dry) falls the day: Rainbow to leeward, (damp, foe. awn) runs away. I Suuiid travelling far and wide. A (eleartng. stormy, warmer) day will betide. 10 Sharp horns do threaten Micky, calm, windy) weathWlu-n the (Mindoc. mlal Hindi kg in the south The rain's in its mouth. Thunder in spring i Harm, Cold. Froat) will bring. i lower, higher, thinner) the clouds, the liner the When the (dual, dew, thisll'-i OH the grass. Hain will never come to pass. Trace in the nky the painter's brush. The t Hoods, sweat, winds) around you soon arlll rush. inn 1 Ham; 1 Rain, 3. Fine; i Mtn s Goodli. r. Rain. Po.il. DeaNn), ("lark.-, f am a oirl %  ari oi awe and I lore a buy try much, bur he ooet out u'Hh 'her girU loo and / am very Do i*ou t'dnk / should 0 hli for a bit If mipht "Ok* oim reoiise thai I exiii I VI lerolblp u-ori.i-d and upset &0ttl it. Please help me. Dark Siranwr' • %  You know. dear, you have aatU 'hat you are in love with Ibis %  out, but it aoamto me that this U a rath.r i.ne-sided affair. He b* in urea with you and 'o he is •ntitled to go lut with anv girl he likes— just ai you could gn out with any boy. However, for your own sake, as you are m quite a state about %  bis fellow, it would be a good thing to stop seeing him for a time It would give you a chance, 10 get a grip on yourself ind— who knows—maybe Dpi you for a while mav be the deeding factor (or this chap and you both may come together after ail Certainly, I hope so, dear, as I dearly love to see the young penpie happy and In love, it i one of the few things that gives win nape and promise 'o this sad and disillusioned world of our*. • %  Verb itfoerled," u'rties, am married ana my husband i -I I utere reru happy togelher. loinan friend of mine came to n on vacation and stnee she came •be has cotiipleielis monopolised ill husband and stolen him from n*e. He sees her all (he time and nerjer takes me out any more We don't eicn speak now. He says I can leave but that I cannot take my child with mr. Please adelsc me. ••You poor dear, you certainly have a very big load <' warty Can't you talk to your husband and, without getting heated about it, work this problem out. You might even have a chat with this woman. After all she wai your friend. Point out that several lives will tie ruined if your onee h;.ppy home is broken up. and that such la not the best education for a child in the formative years of itf life. Thi. --ould only be an infaiuaHon as a man does not desert his wife and child on the spur of the moment—and especially v.*ien his home "F M.B.GJ.G u-niet, I am u'ritino to a pen-pal and a feu* days ago I receired a letti" from him asfctny gw to become %  -npay/d to hi's I RpJ* met this boy bur I do know his perrnn. Du you MUpJt I should My yes. ••Well, my dlar. I certainly made sure that I saw my husband beiore I made up my mind to rnarry him. After all. even if you know his people, you are not piBnning to marry tAem. Al you are not in love — at leait you have not said so nnd it is a good thing U> I* m N,ve baton making big decisions like getting married. Personally, I should wait until I meet this boy and I feel sure that if you explain this when you write to him next he will understand He would like to see you too. I feel sure. So do not be impetuous and remember the old saying about marrying in haste and repenting at leisure. Dear Mrs. Clarke, I am 21 years of mue and my /lance, for irhom I have a baby. %  van!* to marry me. Has people. -i" am likj na and I am very worried. I love Htm i"i murVi indeed. Whar shall / do. "Pinksy". ••Marry him. my dear. You are both in love and are at an age to make your own decisions Also, for the sake of the child the only answer is to get married. I am always so sorry for little children who have no proper home life. They are missing so much and they do not deserve such treatment. If you are very diplomatic and nice about everything. I feel sure that you will be able to win the affections of his people too. but the most Important thing is that two people are in love and want to get married. So go ahead and get married and let me give an old woman's blessing to you both. To "Worried MJ." Really, my dear, this is a problem for a doctor and a little out of my scope. I have forwarded your question to the Family Doctor who will, I know, help you to the best of his ability. %  "Don't mind what you hear and remember that allahls Is a very normal process and every woman who has had a baby experienced the same—and there have been an awful lot of babies born without causing any harm, so stop worrying. By PENNY NOLAN the sleeve is with a pieee of bias. First face the cuff, clip the seams. The dress illustrated today H Iurn and p^^ leaving the edge simple but smart bi.ttonv1that is to attach to the sleeve TIM style. The bod raglan rleeves with shaped and a note) ad neckline. nkirt Is a seven gore. In a recent column I explained the draft for the ragl .. Before drafting the should design the note Un? on a copy of front. Sketch the n< ekline open. Lay the cuff on the right f* side of the ni..*hed sleeve and lay Stitch leave v-> u ied n.-Arour basic p.ece of bias over it. all together, trim the then turn the bias to HM inside and finish by hand. The shaped facing for the front and neckline should be drawn en the patlerti I after have been added and and hold the pattern ip to you traced off. The facing ihould before a mlrrcr. 1h . BVa pieces just like the bodice should come about on i.ie colur neckline and Uicte pieces thould bones. Add about an inch -to h* reamed together before atth9 enter frint for button lap uchlng the facing to the neckline. The basic dart in the bodice front may be stitchiV. in or lust eased Into the waistline depending on which is more becoming to ycur individual figure. The back of the skirt is in three gores and may be cut by waistline me-i*ure directly in the cloth using only one length ploded in the length wise crease. 'Use your back waistline measure divided by three with seam allowance added for the top of each gore. The tront of the skirt has four gcres and; is cu'. like the eirht m ra ,kui u m fourth Of your 11mit waist measure with, seams udded for the top of two gores ;'iicl add an lnc< for button lap to the top of thr other two gores. A facing for th-i front she s ild be designed the same width as y* front facing for the bodice and cut separately Join the front facing to both bodice and skirt before making waistline seams. SILENT WIFE The lap will have to have a shaped facing because of lha curve of the neckline and iho notch. The back neckline is the same as the neckline of your basic back. Sydney: For three years — a Next draft the raglan sleeve divorce Judge heard — 37-yearmaking the front sleeve seam old Mrs. Olive Nita Boyle was start at the notch in the necka silent wife. Whenever her busline. band spoke to her she would The cuff is designed by drawput down her book or knitting, ing a straight line the same listen impassively throughout length as the bottom of the then went on reading or knitsleeve. Half way along the line (j n g without saying a word. Hedmeasure up two inches for the | CY Vincent Boyle (38) was width of the cuff under the arm. -ranid a divorce on grounds of At each end of the line measure desertion up thrw inches lor the width of xarootoThe Rev. G. D. Franpoints. Make ^ of Ay mer> Ontario has been the cuff at the the top line one inch longer than i.imr-Ms s&^-Atf&s £ n £ ESS" all around and cut four pieces Western Canada and Alas**. by this cuff pattern. Two are Horn*: An elephant's cemetery for the cuffs and two are for the has been dug up at Cannae. facings. The easiest way to Apulia where Hannibal defeated attach the cuff to the bottom of the Romans in 216 B.C. 12 Cold. 13 HlStw*. T ran spot I Fares To Be farewell # I mm Page 1 estimated to bring a revenue increase of nearly (412,000 and a decrease in expenditure of nearly $300,000 in the full year. It Is felt the combined effect will reduce the Department's net deficiency by $100,000 to leas than a million dollars. Abnormal I >n> Mr. G Jonn UU.MONT-n oo am. Mr C ren**: 1 or p m Mr. O. BunnM ROCTH DISTHICT-S OS am. Mr. C J.ynn: 700 tm Mr C Knight ritoVtUKNCi: 11 OS am H'> T. 1. rU'ler. 7 00 p m Mr V. Brown* VAUXJIALL SOS am Rev r J. rnaMgl TOO pm. Mr. G ll-r.i. BAPTIST T1IS ST JAMBS NATIONAL IIAPT1ST l> m Even*on( and M-ITIHMI Cictidrr (or holh asrvlTM. |h* Hfv J. B. Giant. L Th MinlitnIn chars*. • 30 p m M...-I.) u'Mundir and r>May. tramins lor youth* Tim win he (oiKlui-tnl by the Rev. 1, flrurr C'aik* >A*I>1 Pailon "and Mr. Olga Brown* vr | FONARD'S CHURCH %  00 am Holy Communion. • 00 %  m Mi'tim and Sermon 3 00 p.m. Sunday School. 7 0S pm Kvmaond and Sermon. IIOKIU'CK STRF.rr II %  M S*rv..r, 7 i> in P*ttlng ServW*. GflAc'E llll.t. Hi nlnS a* ; 7 p i tv*nln| tmkf. preacher Mr F Dwane FUIJJECK Ham Mornlns Service, irea.her Mr W Bwire 7pm Evennt*ch*r: Mr O Weeke. MONTGOMERY t p m Ev-rrimg Set* CM*, preacher Mr D dlpepper DUN8XTOMHJC: T p rn EvenlpS Sersiiomiu. ; P i preacher Mr W S EBENEZEH II a. John. 7 p m Hevrt lir.l'I.AH-11 am EMnlns Service. RICES II am Mr G O Harper, 7pm Mr S lorde Sunday School* al 1 p m THE SALVATION ARMY PIE CORNER 1100 am. Hollnea. Mrenns. 3 00 p m. Company Ma*iins. 7.00 p m Salvation Mactlna. Maior #nd Mr. W. Morrl.. DiMmorial Commander niHIX.ETllWN CENTRAL—II SO am. Hollneea Maellns. 100 p m Company J.Mllns. 7 00 pm 8-lvaUo.i Meeting. Major M Smith WELLINGTON STREET — 1100 am H.'llneaa Meelins. 3 00 pm Company Meellna. TOO p.m. Salvation Mcetlna, Fi Ma)or T Gtbba. SPSIOirmoWN11 OO am. Hollneu Mretinn. S M pm Company Meeting, 7oG pm Salvation Keel ins Mr Captain V HI.,..,, OISTIN 1100 am Hollnea* M**llntt. 3 pm. Company MeeUni. 7 00 pm. S.lvatlon Mealing. Lt. K. UlbOon* FOUR HOADfl — |l 00 j. m Holme.. Medina. SOD pm Company Meeting, 7.* p m aalvaUon M**tln Major L Raolln. niA\it)Nii cr.p'VER It 00 a.m. HoU.! 300 pm Compuny Meetin*. 7 00 pm Salvation Meeuns Captain I. Moor* ST MAIIY'H CHURCH Ind Sunday A Her Trinity 7.B1 am. Malino ft Litany. %  00 a m Lew >M SOU am I>roc**alon. Solemn Slari a. Sermon. 3 JO p m Sunday School. 400 pm Children'. ve*p*ra, 4 IB pm Bapliama. 700 pm Eveniony. Sermon. P roca—Ion Sr T* Drum. 8T NICHOLAS K O CHURCH Wt.l.-lins ROAD Ham Divine 8>rvlc* Celebrant — R*v C Barrt.' PreacherRev. C Ithmael. 7 p m EvenuHig and Sermon Celebrant: Rev C Ithmael Preacher %  Ringfi, i A rilRISTIAN StlKNti; I .r.l < hand af Chrl.l. -.I.ntl.l. BrMieUwa Upper Bay Sired Sunday* II am and 7 p m. Wednesday. I p.m. A aervlc* which include. Te-ttmonle. or ChrUtian Science Heal Inf. St'NIlAY. JUNE IS. Itai hableet .1 Le*M*-Serai>B: God the Pr*wrv*r ol Mai. (i.lara Te.l. I'.alin. fl I He thai dwelleih in Uta *ecrct place ol the moit Hish fhall abide under Hie ihadow of th* Aimlshly. The lallewlnf • luil.in are IndadaS la Ik* L*aaaa.S*(aB: Th* MH.I. th* Lord appeared to Ahum, and ald unto him. I am th* Almlahty God; walk beiore me, and be thou perfect tl. % %  ITI Srlenre and Healta *llh Kef I. < %  %  "laiur... br Mary Baker Edd*. Thi* palrlarch illu.lr.iej the purpoa* ol love to create tru*t in aood. and %  howed the Hlepreierv ii'B power 0( %  i 'ini. Pas* STS KATSg Of 'CXUIASVE JUN 14. 1 MFWS %  nv NSW YORK Selllaa TS 4/10% Chequer on Bankei ahl gr Dwmand Dratu 7J I HI' cobl* 71 0 10*. Currency Coupon. BO** Miller CANADA T7 J 10% Cheque, on Banke: Demand DrafU Slfhl Draft* 77 J 10% cabas TS 110* e Currency Coupon* 7.1 5 10% T8JJ-. 7S 1 io (7| KLIM l, -an. .ol. m \2] r(*-w a la each aad arare na. • • i ', ; i. HI UnrmbM *' %  VF i ihi uni uniform 1 '-— %  % %  •.... %  ....;-.. %  :"• %  \^*"^v / Is %  ... ,.,>_i. otiiliil .ion BARBADOS 8 3 3-4 No. 712 KA2778 I i>>/ IT \ '" %  J ^Ovl/y l ...in*im. V. AAAAAW A\W. [4! KLIM 1. aaaimi I 1 ^ro^ii Sj KLIM odd. Mrt- 'M 1. K KLIM 1. .'.r.iv'. ( • Infant fa 17/ KLIM i. .aw l rtkS F cJail F J— fi aackrd ti 1 \9J KLIM 11 prao[jc**i ,.^-r nj.ii.t lor WWA -S whenyoustop your headache! for C LEAN~L UWER INESS Golds, Coughs Sore Throats Bronchitis to titffl for- tors -n J hondy Tins "•an aad cam Gala*. Cuatka For quick, sure relief rub THERMOGENE Mediated Rub all over your cheit, throat and back. Its healing warmth relieves congestion, and breathing the pteatant medicinal vapour it give, off clean note, i throat and lungs. W 'J? M M| tttm *ad Siia*. .trie*. GET A PACKET OF ASPRO'TOD.Y The* you've got tie QU/CKaeuioM to DOUBLE-ACTION THERMOGENE MEDICATED RUB In big glass ]on and handy Tim KLIM Bart'Sere MILK PIRST IN PIIFEICNCI THI WORLD OVIR ASPRO' loses no time—it ACTS —quickly, effectively, yet leaves '<-h and 'roe from harmful jlter-effecti. More than ever, in %  ese high-pressure times, you ,hould insist on using 'ASPRO' Because of Its SAFE action. W. . HUTCHINSON A CO. MARHILL STREET. BRIDGETOWN Made %  %  *•-. %  ASMO LIHirtO Slaof tvcki HEADACHE NERVE PAINS NEURITIS %  NEURALGIA FEVERISHNESS SORE THROAT COLDS 4 'FLU PSICK WITHIN THE REACH Of ALL oBTi.im itiimin Whm You think of RUM. There is only one blend • J. D. Taylor's Special Rum (with the Illstlnrtlv. FUvoBT) A Blend that satisfies at any time. TRY THIS BLEND. Blended and bottled by • JOII.X II. TAYLOR A sins LTD. Roebuck Street Dial 4335



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    PAC.I %  sr\liA\ V0V04 \ n vi HOA1 H Ml 1.1. 1K ALL OYEII It AlllIAIIOS You will find (fil/** /;ii/ifu./s POPULAR WHEREVER YOU GO. THERE ARE UM DEALER OUTLETS FROM WHICH BEVERAGES ARE RETAILED. HO I TEE It UY /torn _ HMM*M MMMMMM*M ^H



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    PACT TWO SUNDAY ADVOCATE amtm asild. c.Ira .ootiung Bath Size PALMOUVE SUNDAY. JUNE 15. IM2 ixtra-mild PAIMOLIVE SOOTHES BABY'S TENDER SKIN Potrrvolive—od# ot *• hnail ingrcdicnh—give, a creamy, tmoolh • %  • %  o m.W lalhar thru tootlHei awov M-rifobwi ai ar away dut. A doi'.y Pi''*olive ba* will W**p you* boby comfortable rtr.>thed domiy. Rsmaotbar. Palmoli* it • %  fro mild . ealra toctfung' £/ery spoonful gives you more and more energy and fitness! M R TF l: EVO :: r Mt Friday morning li> uv B S (••!• • '• ipoonlul ol %  Ka-pler (I MSypBf of vlumliu A *n D. • rrktM omim ATB naiura'i wonder work an, i Mm and freedom from Illness. • M.i. ooman, chi.drrn-all ihould ran i -F,| f„t r •Kapler' ro-doy. KEPLER: CM,UVJ| Oil WITH MAII EXTRACT SAUCEPANS f'm glad it's here %  again !.' II IM.I HEAVY ENAMEL WARE Black. Ivory Green (nl! size* and shapes) MUGS COFFEE r> TEAPOTS—S Pin: KETTLES6 Pint (Brown) TUGS 3 Plnl (Ivory) FRY PANS 10" i***" EASY MONEY! REDIFFUSION lili-i I %  ...mm, MM of SIM ill CASH lot ever* new Sub >rlber broun.ii lo and accepted by the paid -.ftr-i the insinuation has been mad, If I Oil I ( SION ,, : IM addition pay a Bonus of %  Mv-fivr now subscribers n . %  RI mrrr .VN .„„t ,..,,,, mo MiiM.V in MI i ire lime. reiax wi !" REDIFFUSION van mSTTfM I.IVIKKI.\; ill \K II VI TIIAKAI.C.AR STREET. — HARDWARE' H.ll > HKKETT STUEltT ,tfce Mrs. i I* du i ..' Walerford. and M bo Kill be spending five mo Engineer Ends Holiday D ETUFINING |o Ti.i.idad lur** %  "i* %  %  • %  B.W I A. —. A*.-. u. .. Q Bine •* %  i the p„,I %  %  thmK Mr. Wiekman Is an i with Mesit:. M E. tnd C"Ud. Minister Leaves R KV. 11 UG II M ALis. 11. Minister of Stone Chun i in T. ranto which is in affiliation %  nth Ua> IVnlecosUl Afwenn.lirl'. returned home on Thuiaa.iy vis Antigua and Puerto Rico after spending six days in Barbados In conjunction wit i hlf uncle Rev. Harvey McAlisi. conducting religious %  the Steel Shed, Queen's Park th Christian Mission. H Pwiib CtdSinq. Wedding At St. Matthias V^ESTERDAY afternoon at St. Mr. n.i Mr.. IfAVIII R-WII.IV Annual Reunion ,UEENS COLLEGE Od Girls re reminded of the Annual M Reunion which takes place at tained 0 h i Tuesday. June Using Staff of lb News, New York. Matthias Church, at 4.30 o'rlnrK. Miss Angela Mary Inniss, daughter of Mr. and Mi H 1.. Inniss of Purford Oolf Club married to Mr. David Herbert Badley. son of Mr. and Mrs. J. II. Badley of 'Lavlngton\ Fnntaoellc The .ererrjony which was fully .oral with Mr. G. C William* m the organ, waa conducted by Rev. M. E. Griffiths. The bride who was given in marriage by her father, wore are I <>i lace and nylon, featuring a light lining bodice and long .With a walloped lace volk outlined in beads. The full %  kM was of nyh>n with lace r ruling a peplum In front and conU n uim into a train at tha i back. Her head-dress was a lace j n.li'-t rap with finger tip veil and She ...nml ., boiiquri of whit* rosebuds and spli ,... w attended by Mis* Wi-ndv Inn.s und Miss Pamela Reed as bridesmaids and the Misses Dinah MacNcll and Chriatme Thomas as flower girls. They were all similarly attired [q ed that dresses of pink embroidered orMunel Rollins has obHandle over very full pink net position on the Advcrkir's. They wore xhaped headWith 'Amsterdam News' VIEWS has bee Amsterdam dresses in pink net and organdy Mrs. Ho | m-. nnd rorried bouquets of pin k .1.'..TII "Past" and "Pre-ent" partment of the Advocate, lelt Mr. Trevor Da vies performed dels, the Colony for the U.S.A. in the duties of boatman, while those Attended Funeral March to reside with her mother if ushers fell to Meaar-. David M R H. O. B. WOODING. <, c "" "*' n 1 n i ^ David Read John Grace. .,,..1 D.rector of B.W I A A Son "",' Simpson and "Boo" Patter. l.tl. and Mr. Colin Wooding of /^ONGRATUIATIONS to Mr. ,. ivMix at the Hotel H -val. His Trinidad Leaseholds l.i.i i and Mrs. Victor Brewster on f ... r S> ?.. **" j d •* Bup uncle has however staved mi to from Trinidad on Friday by 'e birth of n son yesterday ,,'" 1?' L UD "d. and the eonttnne Ihe services. B.W.I.A. They came over to atmorning. This is their second 'JSZESZTL — H'-v. C. A. Barker, Superintend the funeral of coin's fathei eon and mother and babe are lendcnt for the West Indies of which look place the same e'terrietng fine the ~ Pentecostal Church with noon, headquarters in Trinidad wh nved with the McAlisten. bo remaining in Barbados about ten days before home. Business And Pleasure VfK KOBfcRT JAISINGH. a -* %  '* %  British Guianesc now rasl dent In Trinidad, as a t'ornmi ion Agent, was among the passengers who arriverl heron Thursday by B.W.I.A. He is on a two-weak visit on business COuPiSd with plea.-urc. For Four Weeks M HS OLOA GRANNUM and bffj Sealy arrived by It.W.I^. on Thursday mornbjnai Trinidad 'ITiey have COme in fOT fOtir weeks' holiday s.l OKI SI K.I SIIO I OK llll FAMStLl 11*111 I Dl Ihe Slrongcsl Man on I -firth Scr .i motor cycle tin over lli> chel I llll IOS — Kamous Franch Magician Ike%  ••IIIMI Kr... — Stunt Kingl I'll l: BHM Ml Hulroiiv IX: Boil II" Kid. and Niirxc-.: lie. Ilomr 2<11 oolon her a llr.ithllcl,!-. The Trnne. Leaving Iontorrow Dancing Display At C.H.S. ryi. AND MRS. A. O HEN. iwn i rTransferred To Washing tc-n epllF. lleadmistren. ..t rodring%  -' DRICKS who have superZL. *t,. TanT"REGINALJ) Mil'OMNKY %  • %  Inn 1IW School invite, nil intended the worlof The Church returnii % %  B1 • 'he uesl ot honou, al members of Ihe Cdd Olrls' Assoor TIIK Nsjarenc during t.ie part .1 party held at the home of Mi nation to a dancing display which three years, will be leavini: found Mrs. G. U Hinds. Wclfhcwill be held on the lawns of lbs morrow mojiung by B.W I.A. for Christ Church, on Thursday School to-morrow afternoon ot Puerto Rico on their way to the night. "Reggie-, who 1a Senior .30 o'clock. " lcav '" •*• Island. Clerk attached to the Accountant ___. T.-. VIJ..U. ey wl ,0 express their m le ""^ to !" UIM is here to stay for the benefit of the conununlly. Bn d we sincerely hope that "BIM Jr." II be along *oon to make ID • 'a"iily grow. The Cnmnilttee of Managemenl an.I members of the club wish IT express their wholehearu-d thanks to all who have made the club %  reality, .tnd express their have you with them at the christen "Grey House", Marine Leicester, ha married G.irden", "Bimblrd" has been They now have Iwn e •ccepUd in Its abbre Vl ated form Marvin hopes to take his l8c J atraasto^ulrnad 0 rteli ChW Lon "stut'tgarV PV. t" Prov^t lb* name for the >l.ree in the next two years with BaeSeaTllsSnaar^rili^^S M*" 1 "". tor the apprehension of AUSWT Aircraft of the B.L.A C. Crn-titutionaJ Law as hi. special 5 l ^Jf '"J ^Sfi P Jf^ *,". wspocts wanted for armed robhe i.ommittce of Management subject. cen| bery two hours after receiving nvttea Mr. G. RICL* for Paid Routine Visit Rock Home? warning. M K. ( L. CHADDEKfciS. WH. M^"N" MsS and !" T^S'Z.nJSZ'r 'l" M su,,,,, ; ,enden, of the SingM h, small son Jeffrey reEk ^^"TSF*? £& er Sewing Machine Company, returned borne on Friday afternoon attention to riutv hwine snrf turned lo Harba, k* on Thurd.iy by B.W.I A from Tr.n.dad where ^^nc^S'mS^^Zl.ey .pent three weeks' holiday, ureh. naion. Actions such as theirs Manager of aro mdlcativw of the good work Branch, air %  cordjally a spin oi about 5.00 p.m.. immediately fojlowmx |ba ehriNtening .eremu.iThe public too. is Invited to attend the chrisiening for "BIM" truly belongs to Barbados. Although the aircraft U technica.lv part of ihe club, its <| ,, : i never have been possible without the generous support of all Barbadians, the public who so enthusiastically nttendri ihe dance at Paradise Beach "ie members o: • %  "t who endorsed an,! %  Mad tne idea th irning by 4-oullne vi F' and TI.I ; l.iii'. B.W.I.A 0 Brittstl Ci i.ina Mr. James who connection with Bata. Swan Street %  %  being done by the military polica of the 175th/' ."•••mil Vofn .* EXECUTIVE GOMMITTEE MEETING lees and friends of the movement. The Executive Committee of tin returns. Una Die ft?* 1 *? Seoul Ooundl met or. The Fxeciiti.-eAfo.nmiUee apMr. F, J. Cole .1 p"former" PreV' lion for the members, anil Monday lost at Seoul HeadquarProved of the .,o#d of the Scout's Ident of Ihe old South Weatani many business firms who %  '' "' I""The bland Com"Thanks Badgeto the following Local Association was unanimously misslonrr pic-entcl reparta on persons: elected ,„ tr,. chair and %  tal The K, Caribbaail Jamboree, Mr. H. N. Chandler. Mrs. F. J. „ess of tn meSlng nrnteidea. b-oJ0t> Weak C % % %  : % %  and Mr. A. Masterton-Smith. The following ZSaJn!= %  rnlations will be made at then madePresidentMr ri U meeting of Ihe Island Cole. Jr. Vice-president. Mr ,1. Scoot Ooundl which will be held H. A. Tudor, Hon nr A s Cite that a total of JI.0I6.S9 has M Scout Headquarters on Monand Mr R M Cave it !" !" !" been received from JS Scout "* *>, June .,, .-, p.m. Secretary: It."b BI Low io^ Groui.s. 3 Commissioners and I ,i:.iv TreasurerMr V f Car oonallon. A more detailed r,-pon Si. Mlchnel-Soulh Local melon. The following were' nomwll be published next week. ComAssociation mated representative, to the Island missi. ners and Scouters In charge The l/>eal Association of Ihe Scout Council. Mr F J Cole i.fRioups are reminded that ..II SI. Iflchaol-SouUl Juh-area in the Mr. C. B. Loruj and Scouter A' red and un-usetl. should Si.iilhem Area was lucccsstolh Smith of St. Matthias Group Five nave been returned lo Ihe HonorUuncbad on Thursday night last Seouleci. five Lay members and ai-y Irrasurer of the Association, at Seoul Headquarters, dpi. R A no member of each Group CornMr. osbornc. when colleclion. Seal?, the Assistant Commissioner mlttee were elected to serve with Th.e Scouters in charge of Ihr St. Michael-Soulh the offlcrs on the Executive Comrho have cardf mi1ratoiaad thenMib-.i-.-a. wclc-mod to the meeling isked to do so without a very < cojoplete statistlrnl reParanll and Guardians. Scouters, ipile.1 from their re| CommitIt The Garden— 81. James TOOAV ..vd TOMOBFOW I S) p R MAT TODAY .i |-M P ''"" lf "|!V fwM WYUAN Mia* (UMM tag oaoOM" !SIiA\ A tWD.VgaDAV SJ0 p, t HI ion %sra ,„, noi.ni•OMR cuiv r.KANT a, I ON III) MOOV H.sWrl MITCIU'M IWITIA IHIISS SHOP (Next l>oor to Skl(erfl) SIITABI.I KIR Till HOT WkATIIUI STRAPLESS Hi M 11 DRESSES COTTON FROCKS in colourful Daaigni ELASTEX SWIM SUITS COTTON I I til; M TWO-PIECE BV STOCK AN ALL ROI'N'O I'TH.ITV CLOTH In While and Colours PRINTED SIIIOZE 36" S SI WRBJVBVG now I.ARC.E SHIPMENT OF JOHNSON'S COLDKN-DAWN WARE a Single and in Sels. Tea, Dinner. CoTTee T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS a?7f> VD! IR SHOF STORFS niAU 4MV. FIVE \< \lMY . 1II I Hit II7M7II / / of the Local Aasocfatio". Scout Headquarters From Monday next, lflth June, the omee of the Hesident Tutor ot the Extra Mural Department of the University College of the West Indies will be situated at Stout Headquarters (telephone 4653), Mr. Aubrey Dcniglas-Smith who is the Resident Tutor, is also Scout Commissioner for the Southern Area. Consequently, S.H.Q. will be the Area Commissioner's H.Q and Mr Doug las-Smith will also ba glad lo deal with calls for Island H.Q. The office will be open dally from S a.m. to 4 p.m.—Mondays, Fridays and on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1.00 p.m. In the presence of a largo gathering, and under the Group Scoutmaster ship of Mr. George Spencer, nine Cubs of the 3rd Bridgetown (Cathedral) Group were Invented at 3 p.m. on Thursday on the grounds of the Cathedral Church House. It wa* the first Caretnonv of. It Kind stnea ihe Group's new regime, and ihe parents of the tuto turned out in full strength to see the investiture af their sonr The Ceremony proper was conducted by Mr. Cyril Braithwalta (S. M. Bethel) assisted by Miss Edith Knight (CM ) and Miss Joan Wickham (A.C.M.). After the Investiture Ceremony, the GSM. addressed both Cuba and Parents complimenting them on the correct path the boys had (..ken towards manhood. After the HTcmony the Cuba played games A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE BASED ON THE ORIGINAL PLAY OF THE SAME NAME BY TENNESSEE WILLIAMS WITH LEIGH MARION KIM KARL BRANDO HUrsTER MALDEN PLAZA B'TOWN (DIAL 2310) nn its. 19th



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    SINDW. JUNE is. IK! SUNDAY ADVOCATE VISITORS TO BARBADOS the Mand UtfOUfjII the tourist trade works out at a total of $l,ag,oB.oo U.S and Canadian Dalian, and 436.272 Vemzuelan Bolivars. Convi -ting this Hard Clirrenrv into British We-t Indirn Dollars M the rate of "<•'< premium for U.S. and Canadian Dollars and I each Bolivar, i h • substantial amount of $3,031.OS Yon is circulated throughout (hmdon News *, "The Toiler-, aad Tr.vi i Woii.t fla Commit tev. was responsible for the Barbados Display at The Colonial Office Display Window for th.months of October and Novatnbar, 1951. Further exhibits of local handicraft were supplied for the Barbados Stall at the llrili-h Industries Fair, 1992. CANADA:—Representative Mr. C. R StollmcyPT. Trade Commls%  aMBr for u„British West Indies, British Guiana and The Hahr.mas, 37 Board of Trade Building, Montreal. Quebec. Advertisements were placed in the following . ihe Committee for display nl heawefl Airpon. Prescmat|t.>laskit ps ealling at Barbados during the >aur. A tnt\ local woods was pres e nted to the •irst Linea Aeropostal Venaaolano Plane .operating this Airlines regular scheduled flights lo Barbados. Necessary repaint and renovations to the Information Bureau. nn ii. sgi ,.iin-d out. As a result of the visit of Mr.' Charles Allmon lo Barbados in Tidiu.iis, 1951. a section of the "Nttlonnl Geographic Magazine" March 1952 issue, containing a very well studied article supported by coloured and black and white phoU>graphs taken bv the author, was given to Barbados Tbera have been w*-leoihe extensions and alterations to varinui Hotels, Residential Clubs and Guest Houses as well as new establishments being opened. Iherebv %ddmg attraction to the facilities which the Island has to offer to the travelling public. The BarL.M.* 11 of** Association is to be congrat ulrt ttl on it* fo r IiiuUuii. The local press eOnUnUH to give Its usual and much appreciated co-operation. The co-operation given bv the Tourist Committfv of the ChambPr of Commerce and the Commissioner of Police in matters dealing with tourism is much appreciated by thp Committee. V C GALE, Acting Chairman. JOAN KYSH. REALTORS LIMITED OFFERS %  iipbnam. ai-t running iar, C.n>l..i* Dr.w>* -,.M Dttlin Room. Kilrhrn. Oaii|> and 'IM Government Hill. th June. 1952. I have been nominated to be a Candidate to fill the vacancy ceated fa the St Michael Vestrv through the sad passing of the. Mr Mr. C. A. Hrathwaite The Truth in Your Horoscope Would M>.I Ukr Ii iw *l Ih. •tan indWat* (or you Wnu!S o.i IK* to IMM ii- -i.m Taker*. InSU • mon umum Aura %  SCIMI -LIKIlo uaaful puipou* KM b'.i'i UP To populaiiw 1 I •end you FHIT 'our A"r: iKin ii MI farvarri M IB %  MiMMrni and Sail ol birlh all rlaarli .mi<. 0 f assM n,-.,..^ %  saatd hM AatraMs Poflasr i(,. h.n -nW in B* i, p.-1-i iifo>r iir MsWamnT, toMi"* *i I %  nd niiwr laaw stlng iHsrstun %  May 1 taRc on* opportunity to | ask you to be good enough tn ;attend at the l>arochial Building*, iCumlierland Street, opposite St iMdry's Church on Election Bay— Monday next, June 16th between the hours of a ajn. and A p.m.. and give me your vote. With many thanks, in anticipation. I beg to remain, yours truly. DAN P. BLACKETT %  i .1 hi. matrn.rnl. aboln AdStSM PtTNniT TABOSC. Drwl 113-U'. 1'ivrr FertSU "Ion are missioK one of Ibe best tiling in life unlil you slpep on a .. mattress Try one at your rurnnher— >cn siU n^aliv that Dunlopillo has n>.ide a lonrrihution to modem living *ruch no one should be without l)imU is the most comfortable, hygiene and eivnomkal ntalues* ID the %  -mlJ Available Rase in all urn for btJt aod also lor baby'toi. t^wntvo rcr^rr* Ta*rHNrt cr im. B"iiK:rr.wN tA*srvot '--, FOR SALE \ /**'*''-''''*''-'..V^V,V///////,V//,W/////V.'/V///'V''/V.' ^ l-ROI'XHTV TaBltald I—* 9 %  lack Hock Bnaun* M rumti. V i Srhool Gi> SpoonrtV FOR SALE Dili' llai inRimir J7S.00 One iio-sjn voii gasflt ito urtablr u-aaatonnrr lypo Amrrl %  rt AKC V/RM>I:„ „„„ ., Ulh i lor >•-I MM I REAL ESTATE Iluirk 4-dOci Hfd A f*S Brat lukn II Soclclv A Harass, SI John II a U 2i A Grand Dance | j Hr< WassS) NJsaaia and 1 s. j j •Hi -IH IM nni j H -i John on SUIHUV nlli 1Mb Jtiif 1S&S AlfMISSUi.N r %  Mr PhjSfl llrrraa %  > nt.i IIKSIIMI-.V i %  \ii ll.nl Bfan '' M SS—3r. ^ EVERTON CLUB 1 The Commlltre A Member* SAY! THINK OF THE FIT AND THINK OF THE PRICE A WORSTED SUIT ONLY $65.00 P. C. S. MAFFEI & CO., LTD. TOP SCORF.RS IN TAILORING' w.v.v.v.v/.v.v/.v*//y//v//.v/.w/.'.v.v.v,vA-,'i TROPICAL SUITINGS Brown. Kawn. Liflhi and Dark Grey and Beige at *7.i9. $7 99 $8.28 6t $9.08 per yard THESE ARE ALL NEW ARRIVALS CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10. II. 12 & l> ItKOAIJ bTREET j; Win. F0GARTY (BDOS) LTD. •j &f %  AlU'ntioit TvnniH Players— We have |ust opened id mm NYLON GUT In Wkilr. Itnl. Klur .mil llrrrn SIM per rr-slringing SeJsonsjets Bring Goal. Ri--, Copra The schooner Lydia Artina, 41 tons, arrived In Carlisle Bay y.sterriuy morning from St. Vincent. She brought 100 tons of coal and 126 bags of copra. One hundred and hags of charcoal anJ 2.000 bags of rice were brought by the schooner Franklyn D.R. which came from British Guiana. She aI*o brought 30 tons Of firewood, and 34 bunchss of fresh fruit. Both schooners are consigned lO the Schooner Owners' Association. 15 GUAGE NYLON GUT $6.5(1 prr rf-slrin^in); &f Win. HKiAIITV (life) LTD. TODLS T.M'S tt DIBS PIPE %  '.". '.••. v, % % %  %", %-. i*. iy\ lv, r, % % %  %  BSF '.". A". " BAI Of NF 1 1", ,..". V. rV. V". ft". *". %" USS ..r NC '.." V, ', H-.J4" ENCINEER B.P HAMMERS Ml). :l ilK. 1141b., l 3 :.lb. 2141b., 31b. FILES FLAT. ROUND, HALF ROUND. SQUARE IIGH SPEED (IKINDINC. MACHINES HU',11 SPEED TWIST DRILLS HODY REPAIR FLEXIBLE FILES OPEN Si BOX SPANNERS PRESSURE GAUGES 0-400 lb. They"11 Do It Every Time ECKSTEIN BROTHERS BAY STREET FERHOL THE WORLD'S BEST TONIC DIAL 4269 $ •m OII.'r .... EXPANDED METAI. SHEETS iiu'sli 1' i H Iron 2" mcth i' x 10' Iron 3" mesh 4' \ If Iron .iiu'si. i v K Qalvaalatd SOUS < Nl TS y & ," dbinoler CAJUUAOC BOLTS & NUTS .V16' A ",•• OBINDBTOMB8 -'