Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


ESTABLISHED 1895



Illegal Border Crossers
Liable To Jail And Fine

BERLIN, June 12

EAST GERMANY today published a new

security decree which renders people illegally
crossing the border liable to an immediate sentence
of two years’ imprisonment and a heavy fine. It
went into force four days ago. It applies to people
crossing the West Berlin perimeter as well as to
those who violate the East German border with
West Germany and the Fast German Baltic coast-
line.

The decree, issued by Vice Premier Walter
Ulbricht, Politburo Chief, on behalf of the ailing
Prime Minister Otto Grotewhol, instructs security
forces to enforce their general watch against
“diversionists, spies and terrorists.’

Recently 1,000 East Germans fled into West
Germany following Eastern security measures
) which aim to seal off the Eastern Zone’s 18,000,000

inhabitants from all Western influence.
Anyone charged under the new
order may be fined up to 2,000

Lodge Gives
Goddard Its
ne Honour

Mr. John Goddard, O.B.E., West

idies captain was yesterday pre-
ented with the highest award
1at an old boy can receive from
His alma mater, a copy of the
Lodge School shield, in recdgni-
tion of the honour which he had
brought to the West Indies and the
Lodge School itself by his out-
Standing leadership of the West
Indies teams in the Internatior
cricket field

Hon, Dr. H. G, Massiah, M.L.C..
himself an old Lodge Boy and at
present chairman of the Govern-
ing Body of the Lodge School,
made the presentation, after the
annual Past vs Present matoh at
the Lodge School grounds

Mr, ty W,

=

Justice B. Chenery

From All Quarters





East Marks (officially equal to was the first to pay tribute to the
f oe = achievements of John Goddard.

Oo ee oan oe But frst he reminded the boy
eae ‘ e especially that there was no game

to two years in prison. The decree W

; played in the School that devel-
had the effect of extending the Inner oped that team spirit, and de-
penalties for illegally crossing the manded at its best level such
East-West German ‘ frontier a e powers of concentration, applica-
cover border violations around the ets r tion and perseverance that are so
West Berlin perimeter. jnecessary to the producing of
The Allied high commiseion met SOME: i a ee taal) oe re ie citizens as the game of

in blockade-threatened West Ber-!oung Filipino who made a bet to Cr se hii ak hala he
lin to discuss the new Russian/go round the world in 14 months lekel, he said, taught them

to take the rough with the smooth
and the Lodge School might just-
ly be proud that John Goddard
who led the West Indies to vic-
tory against England in the West
Indies, in England and in India
Land who had lost to a stronger
team in Australia had exemplified
those characteristics in the qual-
ity of his leadership.

He spoke of the type of unre-

@ On

Barbados Hotel
Rates Attractive
To U.S. Visitors

squeeze around this isolated West-
ern outpost. The commission's visit
here from Bonn was a gesture of
Allied support for West Berliners
who have lived through one
Russian blockade and are afraid
that the Russians may be plotting
another.

The West German government
gave its reassurance by sending its
Finance Minister Fritz Schaeffer
here to discuss plans for Federal
economic aid to West Berlin's
endangered industries.

with 100 dollars (£35) arrived in
Turin this week. If he wins the
bet, Miss Jean Adams of Manila
will marry him, and his rival,
Mauritius Valenciano, with whom
he made the bet, will step aside
and pay him 5,000 dollars as a
wedding gift. He plans to be back
in Manila before December 4,
when the 14 months expire. So
far he has spent 60 of the 100
dollars.

MELBOURNE: A_ comfortable
stay-down strike has been organ-
\ised by 52 members of the govern-
ment-owned shale mine at Glen
Davis, New South Wales. They



Page 6.



Communists meanwhile set up
& public school campaign of hate|* . a J ,
and rearmament against the West Toescaldngs sateen hie. tnciaion
in East Germany, To-day is!

“Teacher's Day” in Germany. At! *® close the mine because it does















JUNE 33,

Kast Germans Impose Rigid Security Decree

RECEIVING

AWARD





PRICE : FIVE CENTS



HON. DR. H. G. MASSIAH presents W.1. captain John Goddard with a copy of the Schoo! Shield at a

function at the conclusion of the Annual Past vs.

Compound 66
Is Trouble

KOJE ISLAND,

Korea, June, 12
number 66 where
bficer prisoners are housed and
which is regarded as a possible
trouble spot in the dispersal of
communist camps, is expected to
be broken up soon, possibly to-
morrow.

According to usually reliable|_
sources to-day the British Com-
monwealth troops will probably
(take part in any precautions
|taken against resistance by pris-
oe when their camp is enter-
ed before they are dispersed.

, Now that the toughest com-
pound, number 76, has been split

Compound









Present cricket match

at Lodge Sehool yesterday

Supreme Court
Spot On Koje|\Challenges Malan

PRIME MINISTER Dr.

South

Africa’s

Parliament
highest court faced its first court challenge to-day.

suit filed yesterday in the country’s Supreme Court four

persons of mixed race in the (

the act violates the South African constitution by permit-
ling the Gove rnment to take away their voting rights

Acheson Sends
Notes To Eden





_——

(Red Delegate Obstinate

On Prisoner

xchange
Issue At Truce Talks

MU NSANE Korea, June 12
CHIEF COMMUNIST Korean ffuce negotiator soft
ened his denunciation of the Allies’ to-day but remained
obstinate on the prisoner exchange issue, the last obstacle

to the armistice :
Maj. Gen. William K. Harrison, head United Nations
negotiator, told reporters he attached no significance to
North Korean General Nam I!’s omission of any mention











of the riot ridden Allied prisoner camps on Koje island
i. Harrison told the Reds during
the 38-minute meeting at Pan
1 ° ' . res
. nunjom that no fu er conces-«
Unions And sions will be forthcoming on the
. - April 28 Allied prisoner proposal
yr 1go a" Another Red demar 2 ”
Govt. Discuss |,a%ts, Re come ees
; willing to force repatriation of
Steel Cri ‘ S some 100,000 internees who hav
XK A « ndicated they would not rejoin
the Reds voluntarily
WASHINGTON, June 12. The Communists insist on the
en ae aia and Gov-|return of all 169.000 Allied held
evr ant a theathiat 6 ee te personnel. Des spite his moderate
a . . ktm : » i ntinued ¢t he
strikebound steel plants to produce prisoners violated the Genev
weapons for U.S, troops fighting Convention and widened the
vie oe breach of disagreement over pris-
he three way meeting was iNfoner exchange. He did not u
line with an agreement made last} usual terms slaughter and n
Monday when negotiations for thefto describe Allied treatmer
‘ontract for 650,000 steelworkers § prisoners (cP,
in the United States collapsed - —
At that time, steelworkers agree U) N BI 1
with steel company negotiators t e °° as
re-open enough plants to produce

stee! needed for Korean armament

Chinese

howevey President Truman ha
told Congress that while this migh 27 , 1 ‘
CAPETOWN, June 12. heljy some, it would not satisfy alif | SHOU. KOREA, June 12
Daniel Malan’s new law giving | defence needs, Truman has pressed nd cant aus Shoe ‘Cities
veto power over the nation’s} for Congressional legislation giv- Jp oa on: two Western front. hill
Pi a Oe RY permission to ofoe ausin’ ith deadly explosives and barn-
seize the steel industry, thus end shee’ Canale cae 4 nd
ing the strike, It is illegal to strike ‘ites ae All ee ae a $
Cape Province, claimed that} against Government, Four time F ir nh of th , ‘Kore eek
in vo days the Senate has r« oiteat dition ont Seam are
jected by top heavy margins pro S Me rye y ee . it
r po to give Truman the seizure Stepped “up fghting’ broke out
he Opposition United Party owers he asieed for, it: voted ing aturday round Chorwon, 48
which has been fighting Malan’s oP le asked ' : ile north of Seoul when U.N,
se eens attempts to tighten ou a to ask him #0 invoke une ifantry captured two high points,
ial segregation is paying for Taft-Hartley act Ss anti-strike ine pie have tried unsuccessfully
the court action, The move coin-]Juction provisions.—©,P, yvery day since to knock the Allies
cided with the announcement that vhaneite back «P).

4 joneviolent of eivil

campaign
ditohediehce against race. seureda-











Shoemaker Drops m
1 tion regulations would star r ”
sneetings througout RaSsian bocu. aeuataes igealebanas Scares up, it is believed that most others And Schuman June 26 , ch as Pr equal tec
pied, Communist ruled zone,|P20. "cot up a kitelen at the pit, | 2:W-LA. are hoping to get a! will raise no difficulties, but it } The Supreme Court suit arose) Mead In Court
teachers were exhorted to “in-|}ead, and send down hot meals}24mber of Americans and other] is realised that compound number WASHINGTON, June 12 |from an attempt by the Malan T ] ft Cl »
crease defence readiness.” three times daily. holiday makers to come to Barba-|66 may prove an _ exception to ~~ wy of State Dean Ache-|Governme nt to eut voting rights | Luther Wooding, a shoemake 1e marge
4 | » dos during the summer months.| this. United States troops have , has sent messages to the Brit-/ guaranteed by the constitution to! of Vrafalgar Street collapsed it ’ }
Schools will be called upon to| MADRID: To answer a charge} Mr, Eamon Luengo, the Company’s| carried out clearing four com-Jish and French Foreign Ministers! 50,000 coloured people, The high|the Police Magistrate's Court this} , mn we ae % Jy Wales
furnish thousands of young re- jof stealing clothes worth £3, 48-|Sales Representative of San Juan,| pounds already dispersed. dealing with the suggested meet | c« irt declared this law unconsti-}evening about 4.20 o’cloc ra] SOU Police Magistrate of Dis-
5 : ; 375.0 : g ab 2 k a A che veri
uits for the 375,000-man army | year-old Maria Rosa walked 120|Puerto Rico, told the Advocate| British officers report that}ing with the Soviet Union on/tutional. In reply, the Government died almost immediately, just as] )') YOSCaY eae er
oa Germany Mab seeretie het miles from her village to the} yesterday. hammering has been heard from{@rmany it was learned here to-|barrelled through a law setting up His Worship Mr. H, A, Talma -was : ; pete ng aoe . gg " .
he gp tobe hove aiveess Dente iedo assize court. She was} He said that hotel rates here|the compound for the past few!“ “. Rs se ot | Pe ae as the super Supreme {making prefatory remarks to dis- ae the lp jl Moet a eee
taflicated st ' jecautee and the judge sent herJare very attractive and visitors days. Mechanical trench diggers] , ips Se oe sai - mieerades, | Cour e powered to override thé) charging his son George who wa: hesaaaiet Ewlon Com ue ieee
The Miuish Catmeeuieet ia from America could get the benefit] have . probed for five days for], °°" Sle | “ia Pavia 2 aie veel A nesticnes (CB). constitutional charged with the larceny of twoling his bicycle valued at £15 12s
g Berlin, Major General C. F. C WASHINGTON: In Baltimore,}°! the U.S. Currency exchange. possible tunnels out of the en=}4).), reply tO. ths ‘Soviet. odie of , ; a bottles of brandy, the property ot} ¢d. on May 11
* Coleman, protested to the Russians | Maryland, Dr. Robert Seluger, fi ane va an are closure but they have not found]\yay 25 “su gesting four-power I * PI dD m a ‘ Mr. Walwyn said that from the
today against kidnapping of three!director of the National Committee }!°r erto Co yesterday morn~| any. talks on Germany a “1 Creorge ooding was represent-] evidence he had come to the con-
West Berliners from the British|on Alcoholic Hygiene reports that|!>% by B.W.I.A, was in Trinidad] Brig. General Boatner, United It was understood that the State; matca ans jed by Mr, G. H, Adams lusion that there was no inten~
sector last Tuesday. jalcoholism is “the most democratic for discussions with Mr, Richard) States camp commandant, to-day|Department had asked the United £500 000 | Luther Wooding had been in thejtion on the part of the accused
; of all afflictions, Rich man, poor] Willis, the Company’s Commercial) received two spokesmen from the] St ites Ambassador in Paris James vo _ ‘Court listening to the hearing offto deprive the owner of the bi-
The victims were two news-| man—drink plays no favourites,” Manager, with regard to the|compound at their own request.{Dunn to clarify the statement on ¥ ithe case cycle
papermen and an inn-keeper still : ganizing of package tours from! Prisoners’ leaders from severalgthe situation issued by the French Swamp Scheme Cox said that on May 11 he
hela by the Rossias isi. Cole- a, én sete eae oe Puerto Rico to Barbados during|compounds have met General{Government that it wanted a Big left his bicycle at home and went
man’s protest said they were “on| accidentally started while in Zag-|ije summer season, 3oatner over the past few days. |Four meeting on Germany to be} K ING STON, Jamaica, June 11 ; eq pout. When he returned he found
beg —_ of the oe eee en eae = ree from, a He said that there were many is ; --U.p, {held in the near future, ~ G vernment.. is sutgattting pro-| FRENCH PAINTER DIES} ))ai i: was missing and later bo
when Russian soldiers and East Gaining speed, it careered alon ‘ 6 tr . US. ser There was 1 amediate com-{ oan ° me day saw the accused with
German” police seized them at} Bi witles-an hous. ‘Whe. track visitors from the U.S A, to Puel to cK 1 ng 10 immec ia Mb‘ BON pe \ to Colonial Development PARIS, June 12 i He eikea the nacieee ate
; UP. A h } Rico who did not know anything ae viniiae ment on the text of messages|Corporation for a £500,000 swamp | t Jules Adil d
gunpoini. —vU.P. | was cleared for the train, w rich about Barbados and went on to St. ELECTRICITY which Acheson sent to Anthony rociamation tate euicatea French painter Jules Adler died] je had taken it up and the ac-
‘came to a stop only two miles from yen at " ’ den a Robe | payee Shq T1168 pansion |jast night at the home for aged}cused said that he only wanted
eiaibiaiee l Cair th Pp . Nee had Thomas where they paid huge RATIONED IN RIO Eden and Robert Schuman cheme. Representatives of C.D.C. ts 1 at 1 t N } t
airo, when its furnace adie . oat é 4 —UP. sente artists and show people a O-[to borrow i
| burned low. prices for hotel accommodation. : UF coming to Jamaica shortly for dis-] ert Sur Marne, aged 87 Millar said that Cox used to
Nehru Stresses BRISBANE: Women passengers He was sure that when the; RIO DE JANEIRO, June 12. 7 cussions of the proposals which} —(U.P.) lend. him the bicyele
‘ 1 lin a 1,600-berth liner took over the amenities which Barbados had to Electricity will once more be J ca Interested include drainage of the swamp|—
Indian Neutrality |ship’s kitchen and organised em-|°%er to those visitors were made) rationed in Rio. _ The National ; - lands to the Western end of the
1 Seana meals when the crew}*mown, in addition to the hotel! Council for the Water Electric i; B ili h island, where Government owns}
NEW DELHI, June, 12. | went on strike. They ran a cafe-|'“tes, the island could look forward| Energy ordered severe restric- n ruisn 3,000 aeres, and preparing then:|
Prime Minister Jawarhalal|teria service—and made the cap-|t@ many U.S, visitors coming here tions from 5,30 p.m. to 8 p.m, for rice cultivation, |
Nehru to-day re-affirmed in Par-| tain queue. for tis, dinner with|for their summer holidays, —(U.P.) Honduras Offer eee large ae rs. will |
i i i 2;everyone else.—L.E.S. also be brought under the scheme}
ee — nea ie can e e ® (From Sincet On ya which is intended to achieve self
‘ p 7, GSTON, Jamaica aut it nls ; ‘ + |
| can say whether the world will Ja 8 Re ject aris Police Suspended On Great interest is being shown aoe g eee erento
survive the ne few years = (Pp J . fe Jamaica on the report that the sy pl sGR "Sharp “Chalvuamot
i fully or not. If disaster breaks . 2 } Ch \ 7 0; Cla 5 ' Government of British Honduras|;,°U°. 0%. oiarp, /ae) ig
it will come to the entire world. Russian Claim | A 1a ees mmunism j in contact with the Govern- : a aie ee ae ea |
Even so, our policy, should be to : | ments of ‘Trinidad, Barbados and} ie een et net
avoid that disaster, and even if TOKYO, June, 12. | PARIS. June 12. Jamaica for the importation of} «ag at tas eo re tae indus-|
it comes we should be in position] The Japanese Foreign Office p * To azricultural workers from these|'° a look over the rice "
to try and stop it. I would like|rejected the Russian claim that | PARIS POLICE CHIEF Jean Baylot has suspended|isiands to assist the mainiand j‘"y of that country.—(CP)
the remainder of the area of|the San Francisco peace treaty} , 22 members of the Paris police and transferred about 50 ay in the second part of its
Asian countries to make it clear|is illegal and re-affirmed the| thers to new posts ‘in the interests of security”, a spokes-|“°velopment plan C a P of |
awe ‘ » | ete at envovs are | . ¢ . Mhe Jamaica Government has 4auD. ro UCI
tk eek wae uewie a oe, a peat standing oe SFA: OY police headquarters said tonight. Unconfirmed] ajready considered the invitation .
will not enter war in any event. have no diplomatic sta MPO oie KA Fame ae 4 get, : cauerae oho - ‘ + |
“T would also like India and! that Japan is again an independ-| ‘'eports said Baylot took these measures after examination Saas tiem? GG oe ee l'‘o0 Much Sugar |
other countries to declare against|/ent nation. Russia did not sign of documents seized during recent raids on Communist |@UT#* Government to send fur-

the use of weapons like the atom the peace treaty which became

Party headquarters in Pari
and hydrogen bomb.’’—U.P effective » April 28. or P.





infiltrated into the Paris police ,severe security most of them were
, force of 20,000 men immediately | believed to
WATE HING « ric KET s' by 1948. Police headquarters de- : velling recently
| clined to give further details



ricket ground as

vester day

SCHOLARS of the Lodge School seated around the ‘ they watched the Past vs. Present

Sch nds



s.

Communists were known to haveafter the end of the war but after

about the new security measures.

The suspended policeman will



|

|
|

face a os tribunal short-
ly. They were ordered today to
hand in their "yevalvens and their
| pollec cards. Some of these men
bel-eved to include police officers
\are uspected of having informed
he Communist Party about se-
| cuity measures taken for Gen-
eral Ridgway’s arrival. Papers}

ganed by “Communist Association
of the Paris Police Force” have

j been distributed recently at police





the

ee

e

Jryted States
ria in West

r details

of the

a

A

nd
frica

a

far

re

i'! over the island to be
te

en
Fy



INTER-ISLAND
TELEPHONE SYSTEM

ve





spent years
have been dismissed]P nama and Cuba and have been

to England,

as

anxious |
hear further details of the plan



contract offer-
and the settlement terms to be
incorporated,

Jamaicans who

in

the
Li-

reported

KIT TS June 12.

The cae ‘iblp Electra arrived
from Jamaica yesterday. It is un
jderstood Cable and Wireless will
jinvestigate the possibility of in
si tiling a wireless telephone serv
| ic between St. Kitt Nevis and
Anguilla

Seventy ht ontract workei
left for the United State viz
A ua to work in pi harvestin

|headquarters here congratulating
}pelice on not arres’ing demon-
ators j Ridgwa

lashes. Unconiirmed reports said}
jalte epee a0’ policemen had beer
ended id 107 more mover

‘Speed Can TI







WASHINGTON, June 12

J, McCloy, United States
Higt Commissioner, urged a
veedy Senate ratification of the
western agreements on Ger-
r thwart the mighty cam-
paign originating in the Kremlin
f destroying them. Testifying
fore the Senate Relations Com-
ttee McClov aid Communists’
alternative brandishment of
tr tr ‘ t f ere

t

prevent
m joining the
rees
McClos 1id
eat to peacefu
velopment of
ip is with the
m the Kre
tifie that





We



W

their
the

ind
Germar

Wes

t

miin.’
niin



pro



HAVANA, Cuba, June 12.
*resident Fulgencio Batista said
night that Cuba is producing

more sugar than the world
buy. He said he is
almost 20 per cent of

crop off the market
cu’ 1953 production b

(CP),



almost a



COO Dies

‘ATICAN CITY, June,
Pius XII learned
sorrow’ of the death of
Michael Faulhaber of
whose passing reduced
he Sacred College of Cardinals
to new low of 46 “princes of
the churches”
Fauihaber was the last
Cardinal appointed
Pope Benedict
1922. The
ij se ha
70

12.



tinal
Ger

nany
the

sur-
by



in Sacred College



an

eer Soi





prevent the ratification, and said
that speed was important.”

McCloy estimated all six coun-
tries participating in the Euro-
pean defence force inder the
North Atlantic Treaty should
rati t agreement by autumn
if 1e table is met it was
like t the first German mili-
tary contingent would be launched

}
~U.P

going to}

|

this }

|

and}

|
|

“with |

|

XV who |

authorized |



when mother’s milk is lacking

in quantity or quality
LACTOGEN

a modified powdered milk,
is one of the most suitable
foods for baby.

0



A NESTLE PRODUCT



1 GRANT

GEDDES LTD Agents





PAGE TWO



Caub (Calling

IS Excellency
and Lady Savage
panied by Majcr Dennis Yaug

the

Governor

accom-



Private Secretary, wil attend the

Opening Ceremony of
sheba Social Centre
at 5 p.m.

Pilate’s Wife
CHARLES W

Party will present
“Pilate’s Wife” at the
College Hall fo-night and
morrow night, at 8.00 p.m.

the Bath-

R.

and the

will go to the
Funds. Tickets can be
for 4/-, 3/-, 2/- and 1/6.
Left For Canada
R. CLIFFORD MANNING,
Retired Chairman of the
Board of Directors of Messrs Man-
ning & Co., Ltd., left far Canada

Family
obtained



yesterday morning by %.C.A. for
about five months’ holiday. He
was accompanied by Man-
ning.



Mr. WILLIAM GREEN.
Medical Student

RRIVING by T.C.A. fiom

Canada was Mr. William
Green, son of Mrs. Clara Green
of “Viriok”, Top Rock, and the
late Sydney Green of Dominica.
“Billy” has now completed his
pre-medical course at Loyola
Jesuit College, Montreal, where
he obtained his B.A. degree. He
will be proceeding to the United
Kingdom where he will complete
his studies. Meanwhile he is glad
to be back in ‘sunny Barbados’
for the
his mother
pleasure of
again.

have
his friends

and to
meeting



Tallulah Bankhead’s long and
eagerly awaited memoirs have
now reached her London publisher
in manuscript,

A swift dip into them has shown
me that they certainly do not lack

the candour of th. olocaust that
mates everything Beata does
ms * *

Her cight ,years in London left
her with a rich store of sparkling
anecdotes of society as well as
the stage. We shall see blushes on
many @ noble face this autumn,
and many a heart is already
palpitating,

Since becoming Prime Minister,
Mr. Churchill has not stayed much
at Chequers, He prefers Chartwell,

* * * ”

Chequers, given to the nation
by Lord Lee in 1917, is kept ever-
ready by the curator, Mrs. Rose

Hill,-and a staff of 15, mainly
W.R.ALF,
The ‘house can be used by

others if the Prime Minister does
not want it. First on the list is
the Chancellor of the Exchequer,
then the Foreign Secretary, the
Colonial Secretary, and the Ameri-

can Ambassador.
All Mod. Con.
Denis Compton was over-
whelmed with offers of houses

for sale after I said last January
that he was seeking a home.

Now he has found one—with
thatched roof, four bedrooms,
two bathrooms, and half an acre
at Gerrads Cross, “And it is just
49 minutes to Lord’s,”’ says
Compton,

2000-Mile Drive

Back from a_ five-weeks’ trip
to Kenya is 27-year-old Lord
Monk Bretton. From Nairobi he



Dixie Is A Girl Friend He Can’t Jilt

TOGETHER

THREE proud men and a jeal-
ous elephant, who have helped to
make . 500-acre Whipsnade the
only “Natural” zoo of its kind in
the world, were recently helping
to prepare it for a “coming of
age” celebration next week, All
have been working there since
it first opened in 1931 and each
admits. “it is my whole life.”

The jealous elephant is 49-
year-old Dixie, who “belongs” to
64-year-olq keeper George
Braham,

George and Dixie have been
together for 29 years and_ both
came to Whipsnade from Bostock’s

to-morrow

REEVES |

Queen's

to-
This
play is a religious dramatic per-
formance and part of the proceeds
Welfare



Tallulah Sends

Mr. and Mrs.

Quiet Wedding

A QUIET wedding took piace
at St. Matthies Church yes-
terday afterncon when Mr. Allan
Roy Sattaur a prominent “A”
Class cyclist of Chancery Lane,
Christ Church, took as his bride
Miss Juliett Colutti daughter of
Mr. Joseph Colutti of Chancery
Lane.

The bride was given in mar-
riage by her father while the

duties of best man were perform-

ed by Mr. A. G. Johnson. The
nuptial knet was tied by Rev.
M. E. Griffiths, Vicar of St. Mat-

thiags Church,
The honeymoon is being spent
Silver Sands, Christ Church.

To Attend Conférence
R. J. E. BOURNE of Cable
& Wireless leaves this after-
(Friday) for Trinidad to
meeting of the Eastern
Hurricane Committee
which is to be held in Port-of-
Spain from the 16th—19th June.
Mr. Bourne has gone to repre-

at

noon
attend a
Caribbean

sent Cable & Wireless at the
Conference.

Back Again

B. AVERBOUKH of the

R.
M New Yalta Project of Diego
Martin, Trinidad, is back in Bar-

summer holidays with pados for a short stay. He arrived
the on Wednesday night by B.W.1.A.,

and is the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
Simon Altman of Harts Gap.

drove 2,000 miles to the Belgian
Congo and back.

“A terrible journey,” he says.
“We spent as much time under-
neath the car as in it.”

Two Best Years

Girl whe is having two
“coming-out” seasons is Marilyn
Hartley, 17-year-old daughter of
jam maker and former England
golfer W, Lister Hartley,

Reason? So many debutante
parties have been crowded into
this season that her parents have
decided to present her next year.

* at *

“But I have had so many in-
vitations,” says Marilyn, “that I
have persuaded my parents to let
me ‘do’ the season. It will give me
extra poise and confidence,”

‘Helpful’ Prince

A Royal painting by Simon
Elwes which events have made
symbolic is almost finished after
three years,

J * *

It shows King George VI
handing his daughter Elizabeth
the sash of the Order of the
Garter. To many he will seem

to be handing over his throne.

Grouped protectively around the
girl who is now Queen are the
Dukes of Norfolk and Gloucester
and Lord Halifax. Elwes recently
spent several days at Windsor
painting the Queen and the Queen
Mother in the clothes they wore
at the ceremony.

* ” *
Queen is much more
slender,’ he says. Prince Charles.
who was. allowed to watch,
“wanted to squeeze all my col-
ours out for me.”
Fighting De Melen
Moreau De Melen was Belgium's

“The

NOW. FOR

Circus when it closed down.

“Life here isn’t as exciting as
it was at the circus, but it is
p-easanter,’” Mr, Braham said,

He is keeper in charge of the
zoo’s five elephants, but he is the
only man who can manage Dixie,
who is worth £1,500 and weighs
nearly four tons,

29

Swung Round
“She’s a one-man girl and is
very jealous, so I have had to stay
a bachelor all my life,”’ he smiled.
As he spoke he turned his back
on Dixie, and walked forward, but
Dixie caught him by the arm with



NOW IN

In White and Co

PRINTED SHIOZE

OPENING

LARGE SHIPMENT OF JOHNSON’S GOLDEN-DAWN WARE

Single and in Sets.

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220



STOCK

AN ALL ROUN

D UTILITY CLOTH 36”
lours

Bie 5 cake La diva ahs casopdindecansinys

NOW

Tea, Dinner, Coffee



YOUR SHOE STORES



1

Spent Two Morths

BARBADOS ADVOCATE







For The U.K. Fairbanks Awarded

ISS JIEL GALE, daughter of .

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. L. Ga RS. ROBERT CHALLENOR, Chilean Order Of Merit
of “Abingdon”, Dalkeith, re- wife of the Hon’ble Mr. Chal-
turned home yesterday from lenor of “Valery,” Collymore LONDON, June 12
Trinidad by B.W.1.A. She was/Rock is among tne passengers who Hollywood screen star Douglas
accompanied by her nephew,#re due to leave Barbados this Fairbanks was awarded the
Master Brian McCartney, Jij]'â„¢orning by the Elders and Fyffes Chilean Order of Merit for ser-
spent two months with Mr. and|5-S. Golfite for England. vices in South America during
Mrs. C. G. McCartney. Mrs. Mc- Mrs. Challenor who will be on a World War II, during a ceremony
Cartney is her sister six-month visit will see her two at the Chilean Embassy where a
5 a children George and Hetty. The dinner was given in his honour

Sea Rangers Dance former is at school at Eton and by the Chilean Ambassador,
FJUHE Sea Rangers will hold a|the latter is working in London. —(U.P.)
ee —* ian oo nel re Other passengers leaving by the —————————€,
June, a ‘ p-m, us oa ; ar 3. 4 L
is for the purpove of raising Senile Ste Se See Se eves CROSSWORD

funds to finance the troop and
it is up to, their friends to give
them their ‘utmest support.

The dance will be held at the
Crane Hotel in an atmosphere!
where everyone can enjoy a good
dance, Therefore it is not merely
getting entertainment for your
money, but supporting a worthy
cause.

.
Superintendent

_Telephone Co.
R. A. W. MAILE, General
Superintendent of the Bar-










the O:ympia Club were en- months’ holiday.



iams,
Mrs. L. V. White. Mr. and Mrs.

D. A. Williams,

Miss Amy C. Arthur, Miss Sybil E.
Arthur,
Mr. and Mrs, Trevor Bowring and
daughter,
Chaffee, Mr. and Mrs. G. Cripps
and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. E. S.
Chambers,
Christie and daughter, Capt. and
Mr
e

Mrs. Violet E. Bowring,

Mrs. Kathleen P.

Mr. and Mrs. C. J.

St. John Hodson and two
“Colonel and Mrs. C. de

m, Mrs, Violet Ross-
» Mr. and Mrs. E, B. Will-
Miss Elizabeth Williams,







Miss Elizabeth



















pados Telephone Co, Ltd fete tor|SIaddin, Miss “evelyn Outram, LE] T [| | TT
Antigua yesterday morning by Garrod Soe ie | _K. Across
B.W.LA. on a ten-day visit. He We wend Mrs. S. Smith, 1, vegetable repository. (5, 4)
has gone to advise on the tele- = T. W. Astorga and Mrs, C. F. 4G. Bete tae None? gdp Se
= : Hera ra be a i . Pride resu rom *
phone service which is being oper-]*°"T€T and two children 11. With native following it is otfer-
ate x0ve 2 ng a choice. (
suas ABO Sake ‘ 13. What the adder may do? (3)
For U.S. Holiday-- L ° t ° Me it Usually a matver of tessnyey (*)
ROY SATTAUR. EAVING for the U.S.A. and istening mours 18 Implements broken footwear.
Canada yesterday morning py . bs sod Cae)
Light Music B.W.1A., via Antigua and Pueftol soe — dap e e JUNE 18. 10ee sna AB. Rot Pa on anran fnatructor, (7)
EMBERS tri . f Rico were Mr. and Mrs. Jean] ~———— tea sane Deata Daan: Aaah 21. Make the gent step over rope
B and friends o Blondin. They have gone for to] 4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m, The holders. (4. 4)

Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. Charlie Kunz, Pa Down

>rtai i , : 4.20 p.m, Bedtime With Braden, 5.00 . At least it can rob. (5)
tertained to a programme of Mr. Blondin is Manager of Sam}. m. Isle Of Man Tourist Trophy Races, - Steany application of mind. (9)
light music which was held ai Lord’s Castle. ‘ 45.15 p.m. The Wightman Cup, Britain 3. Yard I get milk from, (5)
the British Council on Wednes- Also leaving for the UfS.A. yid| vs. U.S.A. 5.20 p.m. Listeners’ Choice, ¢ Provides & steamer in picom: 43)
day night. Some of the numbers Antigua and Puerto Rico yester- is p18 savention’ mise, das oe 6. Dossibiy’ sold for a tanner, (D
heard were — “Prelude in G day by B.W.1A., was Mrs, E. F.| Sports Round-up and Programme 8. Let, but not in tennis. (5)
minor” y achmanio “Waltz Murray of First Avenue, Belle-} Perade, 7.00 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m 9. Without delay. (4)

y ene ‘ . 7 5 12. Late Chinese ounce. (4)
in © sharp minor” by Chopin, ville. She has gone to visit her pore ee Bra M & a1g¢Mm 15. Scope now provides it. (4)
“Nocturne in D flat major’ by Son Peter who resides in South}? !* — 0: ane a 18: it's a up. & id get logs. (4)
Purcell, “Softly awakes my Carolina. E 7-15 pm. West Indian Diary, 7.30 p.m ta’ Pata et ORT deme 8)
heart” and “Love come to my On Business Sie pant iio aeWeal, Sto ee Solution of yesterday's puzale.—-Across:
aid” by Marion Anderson, and ME: KENNETH GRANNUM,] World Affairs, 8.45 p.m. The Wightman }; Aton: 4, Star: 8 Reason 10. Slap:

« ‘ Pa has on os aol free Cup, Britgin vd. USA. 850 p.m Utter; 17. Lie: 19, Surgeon; 21, Bet:
blso the “Jamaican Rhumba”. Managing Director of Mod-| CNP: der'4.ss ‘pm. From ‘The “Edi: $3 ‘Bkeins: 28 Bark: 26 Smoke Down!

The programme wa’ organised erne Hat Limited, left for Canada} ¢o\\cis, 9.00 p.m. Ring Up The Curtain, Hate ae se Seen a ba Opnes a

by the Cultural Officer, Miss yesterday morning by T.C.A. on a] iv.00 p.m. The News, 10.10 pin. News or Atlot: 14 Lense: 16. Push: 18. Bue:
Joan Smith and was thoroughly business visit in the interest of his] Ta!k. 10.15 p.m. The Debate Continues. 9. Gem

enjoyed by everyone. Members
are locking
functions of
future.

On Holiday From B.C.
R. AND MRS, CHARLES
BOURNE and infant were

arrivals from Vancouver, British
Columbia, on Monday via Puerto
Rico and Antigua for a holiday
which they are spending with
Mrs. Bourne’s parents, Mr. and

Mrs. G. A. Farmer of “Oughter-

son”, St, Philip.

For Cable Arid Wireless
R. CLIVE COOK arrived
from Trinidad by B.W.I.A.

yesterday morning. He has come
to join Cable & Wireless and
during his stay here will be stay-
ing at ‘“Waterlco”, St. Lawrence.

firm. He expects to be away for
about two months.

enjoyed Holiday

RS. EVE GOODSON of Eng-

land, returned home yester-
day morning by T.C.A. via Mon-
treal after spending five and a
half months’ holiday staying at
the Ocean View Hotel and Aquati¢
Court.

She said that it was her first
visit to the island and she had a
very enjoyable holiday. The cli-
mate, she added, was perfect and
she hoped to come back in the
near future,

by

Back To Canada
R two

ETURNING to Canada
T.C.A. yesterday after
weeks’ holiday were Mr. and Mrs.
R. B. Reed who were staying at

Cacrabank Hotel.
Mr. Reed is Manager of Tele-
phone Sales of T.C.A. in Toronto.

Off To U.K,

EAVING for Canada yesterday

« by T.C.A,. intransit for Eng-
land were Mr, Herbert. A. Dow-
ding, Director of Lower Estate and
Dayrell’s Dairy Farm and Mrs.
Dowding.

Mr. Dowding will be away for
six months on business cotple
with pleasure, while his wife w.
be remaining for three months.

While in the U.K., they will see


















forward to
this nature

more
in the

Defence Minister when the Korean
War started,

He wanted to form a volunteer
battalion; but his Government fell
and he lost office.

The battalion was formed, how-
ever. And de Melen joined—the
first Defence Minister I know to
volunteer for the front.

* *

° their daughter, Margaret who is
In Korea, where the battalion OTe ena School
served with the 29th Brigade, - at ness

On Long Leave
CHARLES ALLEYNE,

de Melen met the Hon, Rowland

Winn, heir of Lord St. Oswald. R.

Tall, distinguished de Melen|4+Â¥# popular member of the Em-
was a guest last week at Winn’s|Pire Club, and a Civil Servant
wedding in London, attached to the Income Tax De-

partment, left for the U.S.A. yes-
terday morning via Antigua and
Puerto Rico by B.W.1LA. He is
on six months’ leave, the greater
part of which he is spending in
the U.S.A,

Leaving on the same "plane on
her way to the U.S.A., was Miss
Bhirley Herbert who has gone to
reside with her mother,

For Health Reasons

RRIVING from St. Vincent

yesterday morning by B.G.
Airways was Mr, F. Gill, Engineer
for Orange Hill Estates Ltd. He
has come over for medical. treat-
ment and will be here for about
two weeks staying with his
brether Mr. O. Gill of Speights-
town.

Also arriving by the same op-
j portunity were Mr. Frank Noth-

: ; . nagel, Director of Bottlers (Bar-
His parliamentary mail and a|pbados) Limited who was there for

taxi awaited him. He drove to the}a holiday and Mr, R. C. Hazell, a
station, caught a London train and! Vincentian who has been working
worked during the journey. there with Cable and Wireless for

He attended Commons in the| the past year.
afternoon before rushing back to Mr. Hazell has now been trans-
Ramsgate to rejoin his launch and| ferred to Barbados and is staying
a West-bound convoy, at “Sea Queen”, Hastings,

Father Knew

It would have been no surprise
if Neil Roger had joined one of
the far-flung cable and telephone
interests of his father, wealthy
Aberdonian Sir Alexander Roger.

But Neil became a dress de-
signer. What did father think?
“He always thought I would do
something odd,” says Neil.

Rush Job

When he commanded a motor-
launch during the war Alan Len-
nox-Boyd, the new Minister of
Transport and Civil Aviation,
often left Portsmouth escorting an
east-bound convoy, stayed on the
bridge all night and arrived at
Ramsgate next morning,

* ”



*

SSBEESSS9SCOO FIERO
GAIETY

The Garden—St. Tames
TODAY and TOMORROW 2B 20 pm
“BORN TO BE BAD"

Joan FONTAINE &
‘SEALED CARGO’ Dana ANDREWS

MIDNITE SATURDAY
Charles STARRETT Double

}

YEARS



“SOUTH OF DEA VALLEY’
her trunk and swung him around “RENEGADES OF 1 SAGE”

again,

“That's because she doesn’t like
me to ignore her while I talk to
strangers,’ said Mr, Braham.

Man with the longest service is
49-year-old Overseer Philip Bates

“T was working on the farm here
when the London Zoological Soci-
ety bought the estate in 1927 and
was invited to stay to help turn
it into a zoo,” Mr, Bates said.

Headkeeper Albert Cole has
been looking after wild animals
for 44 years and has ridden nearly

SUN; and Mon: 8.30 pm
Mat: Sunday 5 p.m
Bing CROSBY in -

“HERE COMES THE GROOM"
SOGSESGOOO688

Opening 10D AY

445 & 830 PM. &
Continuing to SUNDAY







every. species, including gnus,
rhinos and ostriches. —L.E.S.
ss sigdued uta $ .84
stssangbaaisntcuivanoioangtees 89
STEVE COCHRAN
VIRGINIA GREY - GABY ANDRE
warren ano ovacerce oy ANDREW STONE
PLAZA OStIN
DIAL. 4606 | (DIAL 8404)







10.30 p.m

PLAZ

Allan Rocky LANE,
So

From The Third Programme.



TUBBY HUBBY DIET

Bernerd Wicksteed
reports his third day on
the diet of square mecis
for round husbands.

OR three days and
nights now we have
kept body and_ soul

together on the Tubby Hubby
diet and They are delignted.
I think They had u secret fear
that we might die on Their
hands or something.
Breakfast is still the worst, 1

tind In the good old days
before They thought of this
remodeliing experiment I was

never hungry in the morning,
but now I am famished.

On behalf of other martyrs of
the breakfast table who, in a
weak moment, may have allowed
themselves to get in a similar
plight. I have raised this ques-
tion of what to do when you
are stil) hungry after a meal.

They said it is quite simple.
You munch an apple or a raw
carrot. and They gaye me one of
each in a brown paper bag.

When no ene was looking 1
tried myself on the scales last
night, but they © still said
12st. 2lb. However, as I have
had my hair cut. I must be a
bit lighter,





Dinner

MY THIRD DAY

cMenu

Breakfast

Two rashers streaky bacon
and tomato, grilled

Two slices toast, buttered
thinly

Coffee or tea

Lunch

Grapefruit
Two poached eggs on toast

Large portion cauliflower
au gratin

Any fresh fruit

Small cup of clear soup



fortified with glass of
sherry
Plate of cold meat

(chicken, ham, or such-like)
Green salad, optional

Baked apple and—today’s

treat—a tiny spoonful of

sugar or treacle, yum yum.
Coffee

London Express Service





Opening TO-DAY FRIDAY, I3th

4.45 & 8.30 p.m. & Continuing Daily

a

nA

COLOR ay JECHMICOLOR

A UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL PICTURE
BARBAREES

(Dial 5170) DOWNTOWN

THEATRES |

— =

PLAZA





AUDIE ””? WANDA
MURPHY - HENDRIX
BURL DEAN
IVES - JAGGER













BRIDGETOWN







OISTIN














ARBAREES
(Dial 2310) BARS. (Dial 8404)
TODAY (3 Shows) pit aes eae 4h euey
2.30 4.45 & 8.30 p.m, Today 445 & 8.30 p.m, es " 4 8.30 as
& Continuing & Continuing Daily per i va
Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m Warners Action
ee STARLIET ee SIERRA Packed Thriller
a hoa ats (Color) HIGHWAY 301
wi a host of favourite: ‘
including Doris DAY, Audie MURPHY and Steve COCHRAN
Gordon MacRAE & Gene Wanda HENDRIX
Nelson Sat. Special 1.30 p.m.
SAT Special 9.90 @ 1°30 Sat: Special 1.30 a.m. || RIDERS OF THE DUSK
“CHEROKEE UPRISING’ BLACK EAGLE Whip Wilson &

Whip WFLSON and
‘WESTERN RENEGADES’
Johnny Mack BROWN



MIDNITE SATURDAY
“GOLDEN STALLION"

(Color)
Roy ROGERS
“WELLS FARGO
GUNMASTER”

Charles Starett

Coming Soon

FIGHTING O°



William Bishop &

DESERT VIGILANTE

Douglas Fairbanks,








“PIONEERS”
Tex Ritter







MIDNITE SAT.
Roy ROGERS Double
SONG OF TEXAS &
“RIDING DOWN

the CANYON"

FLYNN
Jr.










Presented by the
Barbados School of

Dancing

at the EMPIRE THEATRE

on FRIDAY 20th JUNE

Matinee
5.00 p.m.

Night Show
8.30 p.m.

“DANCING

TIME’

BOOKINGS OPEN

AT
THE EMPIRE THEATRE
ON
FRIDAY, 13TH JUNE
Daily 8.00 a.m, — 12.00 noon and
1.00—4.00 p.m.
Saturday 8.00 a.m. — 12.00 noon

ORCHESTRA & BOXES $1.20; CIRCLE






‘

HOUSE 60¢.

$1.00;

(all reserved)

BALCONY 72 Cents (So









ld in advance)





a









FRIDAY, JUNE 13, 1952
1 Y9996550055999090509904 | TODAY, 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
e You can RELAX better | and
With |
REDIF FUSION Continuing Daily, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
after you e had that warm -
bath it ta just 8 MINUTES } 4
for the water to be hot and % .f
& IN YOUR BATH TUB | = 2 /T
if you have one of those g iF *
% MODERN GEYSERS % f HPF
z From your Gas Showroom, $$ _ f
*% Bay Street > «* F
|% CALL AND SEE THEM TODAY. } * ey
OCCCESOOSOOOSCSOSOOOGR The ere MPA
’ Tay, a E.
C | Cl b ie vs VIRGINIA
oon u | cae ey
y ‘ ST. JAMES % the “*

Saturday, 14th June

and each following
Saturday

DANCE

in a delightful setting

— Excellent Buffet —

$4.00 (no Admission
Charge)

Early Booking
Advisable



MORGAN

CLUB

For - - -
CHAMPAGNE
and other Prizes

For Reservation for our
Summertime Special
Dance Dial: 4000

EMPIRE
Opening TODAY — 2.30 & 8.30
and Continuing
Alexander KORDA presents - -
Vivien LEIGH — Laurence OLIVIER
in

“THAT HAMILTON WOMAN”

SATURDAY 14th at 1.30 p.m,
William Elliott in
“WAGON WHEELS WESTWARD”

and
“IN OLD CALIFORNIA”
Starring John WAYNE
SATURDAY 14th — Midnite Special

Republic Whole Serial - -
“ZORRO'S BLACK WHIP”

OLYMPIC
TODAY to MON. 16th—4.20 & 8.15
Humphrey BOGART in

“SIROCCO"



and
“COWBOY AND THE INDIAN”
_

SAT, 14th at 1.30 p.m,
John WAYNE in
“FIGHTING KENTUCKIAN”"



and
“SPORTING CHANCE”



$$$.
SAT. Mth Midnite Special
Whole Serial - - -

“GHOST OF ZORRO”









ROODAL THEAT





:Skiag > NEISON

/ fling > ROMAN
"Hopp + (Srise Senne
A JAMES

W to |
i Our d/ K CAGNEY

GIs/

«

f
¢



‘

._ ae
WANICE RULE DICK WESSON RON

RY

DIRECTED BY ROY DEL R UTH

SCREEN PLAY By JOHN KLORER anoKARL KAMB:
Musical Ovrection Ray Hemndort

A B'TOWN
(DIAL 2310)

RES
ROXY

TODAY—Last Two Shows 4.30 & 8.15)
“INSIDE STORY”
and
RIO GRANDE
With John WAYNE

SAT. 14th to TUE. 17th 4.30 & 8.1
United Artists Double - - -

PLAZ













“FIRST LEGION"
With Charles BOYER
dd

an
Sally FOREST — Keete BRASS:
in

“NEVER FEAR”

SAT. 4th — Midnite Special
Whole Serial - - -

“RADAR PATROL ys.

ROYAL

TODAY only — 4.30 & 8.15
TOKYO FILE 212

and

SPY \KING’

“NOTORIOUS”
with Cary Grant — ingrid Bergman!
SS

SAT. l4th & SUN. 15th 4.30 & 8.1
Jon HALL in

“HURRICANE ISLAND”
and

“Til OCEAN DRIVE”
with Edmond O'BRIEN



GLO

BE

TO-DAY TO MONDAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.

ee
Tr you believe
nothing else, believe
that I love you !°?

Forget Yo
"=< POWER "BLYTH



“Wio are you?
What world have

you come from?”

Tt ]
| Ee

Pe mia aoe a

TOMORROW 1.30 p.m. SUNDAY 5 p.m.

A SHOW FOR

THE FAMILY
SEE

ROBELDO (Strongest Sian on Earth)

See a motor cycle ridden over his chest
FLORENCE AND CLIFFTON
(French Magicians)
_ See a human body floating in the air

THE BooDOoOo

BROTHERS

Stunt Kings — Cycle Artists
THE WESTERN RHYIHM BOYS

TO-MORROW
ALL STARS

Singing Negro Spirituals

MID-NITE —
TALENT SHOW



Guest Artiste
BAMBINO (6 years old Child Dancer)

JOHNAY APOLLO

See To-morrow’s Advocate for Photos!

GLO

Plus
— DOLE FACE

BE









FRIDAY, JUNE 13, 1952



Care Would Have |G
Saved Ten Lives |

SO FAR THIS YEAR,
as a result of road accidents.
been saved if the drivers of vehicles concerned had not
been in such a hurry and had driven with more care,
Colonel R: T. Michelin, Commissioner of Police, told con-
ductors and drivers in his annual talk at the Empire
Theatre yesterday afternoon.

Seated on the platform with
Col. Michelin, were Mr. Rawle
a igh Mr. Gilbert Archer
o} e ways and Transport
Department, Capt. F. C. Parris,
Mr. Kenneth Sandiford of the
Bus Concessionaries Association,
Mr. E. Massiah and Mr, H. A.
Tudor.

Mr. Garner, who acted as
Chairman, introduced Col. Miche-
lin and later endorsed the Com-
missioner’s remarks. He told
drivers and conductors that the
Commissioner’s talk was of great
importance to them.

Mr. Sandiford also addressed
the audience after which a vote of
thanks wags moved by Mr, H. A.
Tudor.

Colonel Michelin stressed that
there was need for plenty of
improvement in the driving and
conducting of buses, as_ there
were 156 buses in the island.

“It has been my custom for the
past two years to have a talk
with you at the end of the licens-
ing year and before you come up
to renew your licenses to drive
and conduct public service ve-
hicles. Your licences are re-
newable as from the 3rd of June.
When you renew your licenses
I want you to bear in mind during
the ensuing year what J am
going to say today,” said Colonel
Michelin.

During the past twelve months
242 buses have béen involved in
accidents. 83 drivers and 96 con-
duetors have .been warned and
prosecuted before the Courts. Five
eonductors have had their licenses
suspended. The, driving. in the
island would be eonsiderably imm-
proved if everyone displayed more
road manners. A number of
crivers have no. ti t for
other persons using fhe road. They
carry on as if they were on a
private roadway, stopping in the
middle ofthe road to speak to or
pick up friends,. parking on a
corner and pulling up several feet
from the curb. In fact, only
thinking of thee own convenience
and having no regard for anyone
but themselves. I want you to
remember the other road users.
If everyone does this it will make
eriving- on our narrow roads
easier and safer.”

“So far this year, ten (10)
persons have been killed as a re-
sult of road accidents. All these
lives might have been saved if
the drivers of the vehicles con-
cerned had not been in such a
hurry and had driven with more
eare, One of the most ghastly
accidents took place a few weeks
ago, on a Sunday afternoon Three
hittle children were sitting quietly
on the steps of their home
waiting for their father to bring
the car around to take them for
a drive. Suddenly a car coming
along, the road crashed into them
end knocked them unconscious.
They subsequently died in Hos-
pital. Think of these young lives
being brought abruptly to an end.
Jt is appalling and it should be
possible to prevent accidents of
this nature,” he said.

“During the year 1951, there
were 1,165 accidents reported to
the Police. The main causes of
accidents are: (1) improper over-
taking, that is, not waiting your
turn but trying to cut in when
the road is not yours, (b) poor
judgement of drivers and* (c) pe-
destrians not looking where they
are going.”

“There are more accidents on
Saturday than any other day, and
between 12.00 noon and 1.00 p.m.
and 4.00 p.m. and 5,00 p.m. are
the jtimes whan most accidents
occur:

“Last year sixty-nine (69) Bus
Drivers received Good Driving
Badges. This year 91 Drivers
qualify for the award of this



gon

FOR
ENGLISH



‘respects

REFRIGERATOR

PRODUCTS
CALL

MANNING & CO, LTD.
Electrical Dept.



SS



ten persons have been killed!
All these lives might have}

badge. The badge this year is
red with blue stripes. You should
be proud of wearing these badges.
They are an outward and visible
sign of good driving for 12
months. They should also help
you to get employment when you
need it.

“You drivers are responsible
for the safety and comfort of
the passengers you carry. Observe
tne rules of the road, practise
road manners, drive within the
speed limit and make your pas-
sengers’ trip as comfortable and
safe as possible.

“To the conductors.—You are
responsible for looking after the
passenger. Do not allow your
bus to be overcrowded. By
allowing more than five in a seat
you are not only breaking the
law but making it uncomfortable
for five other people. Rules are
made to be obeyed. You are
there to see that the regulations
are carried out. In England the
passenger obeys the orders of the
eonductor. If he says the bus is
full, that is final and there is no
argument. Teach your public to
obey your instructions. See that
the bus only stops at approved
Bus Stops. Always be neat and
tidy in your person. No one
anyone in dirty and
shabby clothes and unshaven.
Keep your bus clean and remem-
ber the passenger is never wrong.
Be lite, courteous and helpful
to m on all occasions, no
matter how exasperating they
may be. Do not allow indecent
language or disorderly conduct
to take place in the bus. Remem-
ber you are a licensed conductor.
Live up to what the public expect

from the wearer of the Con-
ductor’s Badge,
“Last year seventy-one (71)

Conductors received Good Con-
duet Badges. This year 77 con-
ductors qualify for this badge.
“I thank you all for coming
here today and hope that you will
endeavour to give the travelling
public a safe and comfortable
ride, and make the roads of this
island safer for everyone to use.



world
Dolphin
threads with a theoretical break-
ing strain of 78 pounds.

E. Australian

B.G. Has Colony
Wide Hospital Plan



only a fow miles across

GEORGETOWN, June 4.

THE BRITISH GUIANA GOVERNMENT has a com-
prehensive scheme for the establishment of hospitals,
cottage hospitals and special medical facilities at strategic

points all over the Colony.

These will be established

according to a formula of priorities, and it is expected

__ that the programme should be

One Ton Shark

Caught On Li

The largest shark ever

was landed
Cuttyhunk

The fish, which was cau,
waters,

me
caught

by hook or line anywhere in the
recently on a
Line

39

ght in

measured

Remember it takes very little//6ft. 3in, long, had a girth of 8ft.
Jonger to get there when you|!lin. and weighed 2,352lbs. This
drive with care and regard for|capture has enabled the success-
others. ful fisherman to claim the world

“Courtesy creates courtesy. Let /record,
i

all of us who drive motor vehicles |
practise more road manners—we



An Australian newspaper

gives

7 ie ithis account of the capture:
weal a by it,” Colonel “, . . The party set out on
ri }Friday evening and anchored
“ ora the night, spending Sat-
urday obtaining the _ seal-bait

. =

1 Go ) necessary _to lure their quarry.
Dr vers, wductors The first indication that a mon-
Rewew Licences ster shark was in the vicinity

came around 2 a.m. on Sunday

when those on board were dis-

So far 2,424 drivers and 44!turbed by
conduptars thave ‘renewed their | knocking

the
the

banging

of hungry

and
shark

licences. The majority of appli-| which, attracted by the bait hang-

cants are bringing their licences
to the Traffie Department and
leaving them until the following
day.

Very few
sent by post.

Three Corporals and three Po-\
lice Constables are looking after
the renewing of licences.

licences are being





| propeller

Seized Propeller
“When, finally, it
in its huge

seized
jaws,
launch shook from stem to stern,
and those on board knew they
could capture ‘a real big ’un!’”

ing from the side, nosed around
the boat,

the
the

It was daylight before they

1 attempted to hook the monster,

20'- FINE FOR but were almost immediately suc-
cessful, At 6.30 a.m. they began

INDECENT LANGUAGE playing the outsize shark and

brought it alongside in the good

A fine of 20s was imposed on! time of forty-five minutes. Luckily
Ismay Griffith of bahcgshy Lane,|the shark kept to the surface of

St. Michael yesterday by His

tle water: had it dived to the bot-

Worship Mr. C. L. Walwyn, Act-|tom the task, would have been

ing Police Magistrate of District}â„¢uch more difficult.
“A” who found her guilty of us-/ “as
on Nel-| water.

ing indecent language
son_ Street.



taken in five

The fisherman had

Finally it
fathoms of

considered

The fine aid in 14\ Using a much heavier line, a 54-
days or in pA ie im-|thread, but fortunately the 39-
prisonment with hard labour.|thread was decided upon, thus

Island Constable Maynard arrest-! enabling the angler
ed Griffith.

===



ECONOMY
COMBINED



ALL
ELECTRIC

— Dial 4289





world’s record.

WASHING
MACHINE

to secure the ~







“on the move” by next year.
This was disclosed when the
Legislative Council met to dis-
cuss motions by Hon, Daniel
Debidin aimed at providing social

and other services in his con-
stituency on the Est Coast,
Demerara.

The Governor told the Coun-
cil that the matter had been dealt
with in the 10-year plan. Since
then there had been proposals
by the Venn Commission for the
erection of 16 hospitals along the
coastal belt and that Commission
paid that those hospitals should
be built as early as possible, The
Commission, the Governor said,
probably realised that, for finan-
cial reasons, it might be some
time before those hospitals could
be built,

Requirements

The position of which district
must be served first is to be con-
sidered im the light of the re-
quirements of the Colony as a
whole, The Venn Commission
itself reported that the majority
of estate (sugar) hospitals should
remain in use for the next few
years until it is possible to as-
sess the hospital requirements of
the rural population as a whole
in the light of fallen. morbidity
rates.

Realising the position,
ever, the Director of
Services had drawn up a com-
prehensive programme for the
next few years for the construc-
tion of rural hospitals through-
eut the colony wherever needed.
The programme will be submitted
to the Legislative Council Medi-
eal Advisory Committee for con-
sideration as to priorities which
would be granted.

how-
Medical



RATES OF EXCHANGE

12TH JUNE, 1952
Selling Buying
' NEW YORK
73 3/10% Cheques on Bankers 71 6/10%
Sight or Demand
Drafts 71 4/10%
73 3/10% Cable
71 8/10% Currency 70 1/10%
Coupons 68 4/10%%
50% Silver 20%
CANADA

Cheques on Bankers
Demand Drafts
Sight Drafts

Cable

Currency

Coupons

Silver

15 3/10%
15.15%
15%
5/10% 73 B/10%
73 1/10%
20%



|
eeth Loose
eo Bleed

Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and
Loose Teeth mean that you may
have Pyorrhea, Trench Mouth or
} perhaps some bad disease that will
| sooner or later cause your teeth to

fall out and may also cause Rheu-
| matism and Heart Trouble. Amosan
stops gum bleeding the first day,
| ends sore mouth and quickly tight-
eng the teeth. Iron clad guarantee
| Amosan must make your mouth well
| and save your teeth or money back
on return of empty package, Get
Amosan from your chemist today
| The guarantee protects you.









What you need are the life-
giving vitamins and minerals

oe

“ito the full! You'll feel
stronger, healthier wit> .










The quality
Metal Polish



the

nameeewyetsanagenit, ‘


isn't going to step me having a paddle.”
London Express Service

sea

Five Killed
In Plane Crash

GREEN RIVER, Utah,
June 11.
Five persons, including an eight

a hs

SEA AND AIR
TRAFFIC



month oki boy -were killed in-
stantly when a chartered plane
crashed and burned 65 air miles!
a _.__' south of here. The chartered
Beecheraft Bonanza plane, be-

longing to the Rigg Aircraft Com-
pany of Grand Junction, Colorado,

In Carlisle Bay



acti, Mary Caroline, Soh Gita M., crashed shortly after taking off

Sch. Laudalpha, Sch. Cyril Smith, Sch 7 ing o ‘ é

Gardenia, M.V. Compton, M.V. Willem- from the RUNING on ee the one

stad, Sch. Rosarene, Sch. Burma p,, Strip 40 miles south of Hanksville

Sch, Henry D. Wallace, in rugged southeastern Utah,

—U.P.
ARRIVALS UE
M.V. Daerwood, from St. Lucia, M.V
Moneka from Dominica.
ARRIVALS — BY B.W.LA

ON THURSDAY

From TRINIDAD
Cc. Cook, M. Sealy, O. Grannum,
McCartney, E. Gunstone, E

WANTED

B
Humphries,

M. Guillo, R.~TJaisingh, C Quesne!, C
Chaderton, J.Gale, P. Ernest
DEPARTURES BY BWIA OLD GOLD

ON THURSDAY
ror ANTIGUA

H. Rodenbusch, R, Dixon, A. Maile
For PUERTO RICO: AND
Charles Watts, Kathryn Watts, Jean
Blondin, Elsie Murray, John Blondin,
Likerty Cabral, Helen Coull, Kenneth,
Coull, Ian Coull, Charles Alleyne, Shir-
ley Herbert, Hugh MeAlister

in Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station ©

OR IN PIECES IN
SCRAP FORM

The very highest

Cabie and Wireless (W.1,) Ltd. advise
that they can now communicate with market prices paid
the following ships through their Bar-
bados coast station at your ers...
S.S. Settler, ss. Lady Rodney, s.¢ your Jewell .
Mormac Tern, s.8. Chariton Venus, 5.5

American Vespucel, s.s. Sunetta, s,s Y De I IM
Giulie, s.s. Salte, s,s, Ocean Monarch, A
as, K, Bittencourt, s.s, Prospector, s.s, # -

African Moon, s.s. Neaera, 5.8. Monalisa,
ss. Hercuba, «s.Krios, 5.5. Esso Sao
Poulo, s.s. Casablanca, 6.5. Ganges, 5.8
Sunwatt, as. Koll, s.0. Regent Lion, 5.5
Bluemaster, ss, Generel Artigas, 4.5.
Soursern Countess, 8.5. Alcoa Polaris,
ss. Antoniotto Usodimare, ss. A
Petrioet, s.s, Esito, s.s, Challenger,

& CO., LTD.

20 BROAD ST.
Phone ; 4644



6.8
Linga, s.s. Matina and 6.8. Mabelryan





—$—<—$—<—<——



SE

NOW PACKED

Nelloggs

Get yours today
while the supply lasts!

YOURS! Accept this 4-in-1 measuring spoon now in every
package of delici Kellogg’s ALL-BRAN!

MODERN: Ail spoon measuring sizes—in one! Tabie
spoon and teaspoon on one side! Half-teaspoon and

quarter- on other side. Handier than 4 separat:
spoons. W; easily, quickly. Acidproof!
Offer made to uaint you with the sweeter-tagting

and crispier Kellogg's 4LL-BRAN of
and measuring n to make muffins everybody loves.
Light! Tendest Recipe on ali-BRAN box.

Laxative, too! If suffering from constipation due to

ay! Use ALL- BRAN



World most populate



PAGE THREE

-



PAIN

QUININE-—THE FOURTH INGREDIENT IN ‘ANACIN’

How does ‘ ANACIN ' relieve pain so fast, so effectively? A few years
ago leading scientists discovered that the secret lay in the exact balancing
of three famous medicines (Phenacetin, Caffeine and Acetylsalicylic Acid)
with a FOURTH ingredientc—QUININE. And *Anacin’s’ Quinine acts
synergistically with the other medicines to soothe aches, bring down
feverish temperatures, restore a real sense of well-being !

Pains from fever ? Colds ? Headaches ?

Do you suffer from Toothache ? Rheumatism ? Neuralgia?
any of these pains ? Menstrual Pains? Then ‘ANACIN’® will
bring you immediate relief, cast out

pain with amazing speed !

GAST OFF PAIN—AT ONCE!

Yes, for a very little you can buy a 2-tablet envelope of ‘ANACIN '—
enough to bring you fast relief from a‘bout of pain! ‘Anacin ’ is also
available in handy 20-tablet boxes and in bottles of 50 tablets. Share
in the benefits of this great new scientific discovery !

ARM YOURSELF AGAINST PAIN
GET SOME ‘ANACIN’ ToDAy!



Doctors and dentists recommend ‘ ANACIN *. In Great
Britain alone over 12,000 use it in their surgeries.



REDIFFUSION

{
)
| Offers a Commission of $1.50 in CASH for every New
| Subscriber brought to and accepted by the Company.



REDIFFUSION will pay in addition a bonus of $25.00
to any person who brings in twenty-five New Subscrib-
ers in one Calendar month who are accepted by the
Company

Have always a supply of Recommendation Forms ready

THEY CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE OFFICE
REDIFFUSION Hd ‘Trafalgar Street. .















TOP—1 tab):
BOTTOM—"4 teaspo... > ,

(oe SpoOm

vespeca

" MODERN RED” PLASTIC:
Handy! Easy to wash!

ii EVERY BOX OF

LL-BRAN

ack of bulk in tho aiet, enjoy a bowlful of Kellogg’s



ALL-BRAN every And drink plenty of water.
D ; natural laxative food!

Mus Cet your ALL-BRAN 4-in-1 moons spoon
nov ly is limited. Visit your grocer quick! Offer
made by \logg’s of Battle Creek, Mich.

—













PAGE FOUR

—

ead ADVOCATE

| a CY a |

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown

Friday, June 13, 1952

SOLDIERS

TO-DAY the Barbados Regiment goes
to camp at Walkers’ Savannah in St. An-
drew. oo

In 1951 and 1950 the Annual Camp of
the Regiment was held at the Garrison
Headquarters. This year the Regiment is
holding its second outdoor camp since its
formation.

The advantages of a camp away from
headquarters are apparent. At headquar-
ters everything is laid on, as it were, to
employ a military expression. Instead, at
camp, the soldiers and officers are given
the opportunity of experiencing military
training and of improvising in the field.
Barbados is a very tiny island and field
exercises are therefore limited in extent,
but the open country of Belleplaine and
the hills near Chalky Mount offer excellent
scope for exercises.

Soldiers can concentrate on fieldcraft in
Belleplaine in a way that would be quite
impossible on the Garrison Savannah, Ad-
vancing over various types of country: the
use of camouflage in open and forest land:
signalling and the use of ground cover are
examples of fieldcraft which can be de-
monstrated and practised better in St.
Andrew’s coastlands than anywhere else
in Barbados.

The suitability of the terrain for hand
grenade throwing and rifle and Bren gun
firing is also apparent.

The Barbados Regiment comprises 355
soldiers and more than 300 will be at the
camp from to-day until June 22 when the
camp ends.

Soldiers in peace time tend to be forgot-
ten persons. It is difficult for the general
public to sustain interest in arms when the
cease fire has sounded. The fact of the
Barbados Regiment’s existence ought not
to be surprising in an island which played
so important a role in the defence of the
British Caribbean during the eighteenth
century. But the lukewarmness of public
opinion in favour of a soldiery and the
natural reaction against a military estab-
lishment in times of peace have not pre-
vented the Barbados Regiment from grow-
ing to its present strength.

The tradition of the British Army still
lives in Barbados, To-day’s camp at Walk-
ers’ Savannah is a reminder that this
island still possesses a regiment of soldiers.
upon whose military. traming and éxperi-
ence this island must rely in the event of
any emergency. A small weli trained regi-
ment of soldiers is all that is required in
time of peace.

But should the services of a large num-
ber of soldiers ever again be required for
the defence of any of the British Carib-
bean territories the Barbados Regiment
will provide a ready nucleus for their
training. The announcement made earlier
this year that the Imperial Government
was reserving funds for the re-formation
of the West India Regiment has aroused
hopes that recruits for Imperial Forces
can be supplied through the Barbados
Regiment.

When a South Caribbean Battalion is
formed in Trinidad the Barbados Regi-
ment will become an integral part of this
battalion and its officers will be eligible
for Queen’s Commissions.

It seems that the perseverance and de-
votion to duty of officers, warrant officers
and men of the Barbados Regiment, as ex-
emplified by the large attendance at this
year’s annual camp will soon be rewarded
when greater recognition of the role to be
played by locally recruited soldiers in
maintaining imperial defences is paid by
re-formation of the West Indian Regiment.

When the West Indian Regiment has
been reformed the Barbados Regiment
may expect to employ a greater perma-
nent cadre than nineteen. Meanwhile the
Regiment has to depend on the co-opera-
tion of employers and goodwill of soldiers

.for a large attendance at its annual camp
when the most intensive military training
of the year is carried on. The size of this
year’s camp is a tribute to the co-operation
of employers and soldiers and exemplifies
the support which the Regiment is receiv-
ing from the government and the public.

East Afriea Tourist Trade

THE growing importance of the tourist
trade to the economy of the East African
territories is strikingly illustrated by the
fact that it is now estimated to be worth
£5,000,000 a year as compared with an
estimated £500,000 in 1948. This is reveal-
ed in the fourth annual report of the Gen-
eral Manager of the East Africa Tourist
Travel Association,

In the context of balance of payments
the chairman (Mr. R, de S. Stapledon)
says the tourist trade last year was ex-
ceeded in value only by the cotton, sisal
and coffee trades—and that at a time of
high produce prices. Report adds: “Under
conditions of international freedom of
movement there is no telling to what limit
East Africa’s potential in the tourist trade
may reach.”





|
|

RN




































Baxter Quits As Dramatic | Britons To Leave China |

By BEVERLEY BAXTER

It was not an easy decision to
take. For ten years I had been
the dramatic critic of the London
Evening Standard, writing a
weekly column which appeared on
Fridays; and then came the mo-
ment when I had to say to my old
friend Lord Beaverbrook: “The
curtain must come down.” For
once the critic could speak the
same words as Hamlet and say
that the rest was silence.

A questing mind might wonder
(a) How an M.P. could be a dra-
matic critic and (b) having be-
come one, why give it up?

The answer to the first part of
that question is that in Britain
we have not yet accepted the idea
of the professional politician un-
less of course he becomes a min-
ister. The idea is that an ordinary
private member carries on his
profession or occupation in his
spare time as best he can, con-
centrating on those subjects of
debate in which he has special
knowledge or interest,

The tradition of the writer-
politician has been long éstablish-
ed in Parliament here. Sheridan
wrote plays and even managed the
Covent Garden’ Theatre at the
same time as he was Under-f§»c-
retary for Foreign Affairs. Gib-
bons wrote much of “Decline and
Fall” in the House of Commons
Library. Disraeli did a certain
amount of writing there but his
real heart was in politics. John
Buchan loved, to work in the
Library where from the window
you can see the ancient Thames
and hear the peremptory hooting
of tugs as they approached West-
minster Bridge.

I have summoned these great
men from the mists merely to illu-
strate my argument, Let me re-«
peat that the writer politician is
a long established figure in the
British Parliament.

Awkward

Admittedly it was awkward for
me on occasion to attend a first
night when a big debate was tak-
ing place, but by altering dates
and various other devices it work-
ed well enough until the Conser-
vatives won last year’s election.
Sustained by only a small major-
ity and with an immense amount
o! contentious legislation the
House of Commons has become a
concentration camp fer the Gov-
ernment’s supporters. From early
afternoon and sometimes to day-
light we trudge through the Lob-
bies voting, voting, voting. When
‘we show some lack of enthusiasm
as the Division bells go for the
tenth time, the Chief Whip looks
at us as Frederick the Great look-
ed at his Grenadiers who were
reluctantly preparing to make yet
another charge against the enemy
and shouted “You dogs! Do you
want to live for ever?”

The Lobby had ruled out the
foyer for me. Every night is a
first night at Westminster and
there is no trouble about sitting
it out until the end of the per-
formance. No trouble at all.

At first I experienced a sense of
relief at leaving the theatrical

world. A critic has to see plays
which no man in his senses would

sit through, and to fill his column
the critic must sometimes force
himself to show an interest in a
subject which he does not feel.
Yes there is a certain relief at
being out of it.

Yet one has only to set down
these words to wonder if the feel-
ing will persist. For ten years Sir
Laurence Olivier has solemnly re.
quested the honour of my presence
at the first presentation of this or
that: Rodgers and Hammerstein
were equally solicitous about the
premieres of OKLAHOMA, CAR-
OUSEL and SOUTH PACIFIC:
John Gielgud was no less desirous
that I should be present at the
birth of his newest triumph,

The cynic might observe at this
point that they were equally so-
licitous about the presence of the
critics from the Times, Telegraph,
Observer, Express, Mail and so on,
That is true, Sweet are the uses
of advertisement and it was for us



By EPHRAIM HARDCASTLE

FIRST of the newspaper as-
tro.ogers, R. H. Naylor, whose
prewar Sunday Express column
made him the most widely read
of them all, died yesterday. He
had been ill for q long time.

He was a £5 a week assistant
in another astrologer’s office when
John Gordon, on a sudden hunch,
commissioned him to cast a horo-
scope of Princess Margaret in the
week she was born.

* Me

*

* It proved so popular that he
wes engaged to do a _ regular
monthly article for a year. In
his first article he predicted dis-
aster to the airship R101. On the
day the prediction was published,
R101 was destroyed with most of
its crew and passengers.
Oy ° w .

Naylor’s mail leaped for a
period to 27,000 letters a week.
When at the height of his popu-
larity, he and John Gordon found

themselves in the deck at the
Mansion House together on
charges of “being rogues and

vagabonds” indulging in fortune

telling. As they walked to the

dock Gordon asked Naylor to

predict the result of the ease.
Naylor replied, “Case dismissed,

each side to pay its own costs.”
That was the result.

DECLINED

LORD Beaverbrook’s television
debut has prompted brisk action
from the other side of the Atlan-
tic.

I hear the cameras were wait-
ing for him— and so was a con-
tract if he would sign it. He
would not.

EPSTEIN MADONNA
IN a London foundry I saw
Jacob Epstein’s latest and ‘“per-
haps my best work”—a 13ft. high
Madonna and boy Jesus.
It was waiting to be
lead.

cast in

The Name That Millions

Knew-anp now ne steprep To FAME

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Critic
to tell London the good (or bad)
tidings about their offerings. ©
Like Horses

Like horses the critics are sup-
posed to go better in company, so
each senior critic is sent two seats
on the aisle, and by senior critics
I merely mean those writing for
the principal newspapers. A
critic from a quarterly review or
a high brow weekly would get
only one ticket and not necessarily
on the aisle.

Inevitably a London first night
audience becomes something of a
repertory company in itself. The
critics are not only a permanent
body but usually have the same
seats no matter what theatre it is.
Then there are the ticket agency
managers who come so as to de-
cide how much, if any, of a
library deal they should make.

They will buy tickets in bulk
according to the warmth of the
reception and their own judgment,
and then sell them to their clients
plus a booking fee.

Then there is a small group of
people who have a standing order
with the box office for every first
night. It seems incredible but it
is true. Sir Louis Sterling and
his wife, well in their seventies
go to the theatre sometimes four
nights a week if there is a glut
of new _ productions. So do
Edward Sutro and his wife, he
being a descendant of the famous
Edwardian dramatist, There are
others too which ought to con-
vince anyone that the British are
a tough breed. Finally there is
a gallery First Nighters’ Club
which regularly fills that part of
the theatre known as the gods,
They are keen critics of the drama
being much given to booing or
cheering according to their mood.
There is a bloodless war between
the critics and the gallery be-
cause their verdicts are seldom
the same.

Celebrities

Finally there are the celebrities
who have been invited by the
management to give tone to the
affair. Famous film stars, cele.
brated actors who are “resting”
peers and the raging beauties of
the moment. No wonder there is
always a crowd outside to see us
arrive and depart, It is part of
the London circus.

Sometimes the audience is so
spectacular that the play itself
has no chance to compete. Cer.
tainly I found that in 1942 when
I produced my own play “It
Happened in September” at St.
James’ Theatre. If I ever write
another play I shall invite only
the critics and let the ordinary
public make up the rest of the
audience. An author does not
want competition *from the stalls.

Looking back on those ten years
I can begin to feel a quickening of
the pulse at some of the glorious
memories that will never fade,
There was that period in the war
when Laurence Olivier and
Ralph Richardson (who were en-
dangering everybody’s lives ex-
cept the Germans as Fleet Air
Arm Pilots) were asked “by the
Government to revive the glories
of the Old Vie which nad ‘been
destroyed by a bomb.

They took the New Theatre in
St. Martin’s Lane, they paid
themselves a mere pittance, they
gathered a group of famous actors
and they gave to us such pro-

ductions of Shakespeare and
Shaw and Tchekhov and Euripi-
des as may never again be
equalled.

Because of the bombing and
the blackout theatres opened at
6.30 p.m, and people came direct
from their offices and workshops,
As the war went on they looked
increasingly to the drama to ex-
press their spirit as a people, for
the Englishman is too reserved
to reveal his own emotion, ®

Henry

I remember the night when
Olivier’s Old Vie Company gave
us such an inspiring production
of Henry IV that when the cur-
tain fell, both the audience and
the actors were in tears, Great-

ness was in the very air. Shake- hope you enjoyed the experience.



speare had come back from the
sixteenth century to give voice
to England fighting for her life
against a darker enemy than
Elizabethan England ever knew.

Then there was that incredible
evening when they played Shaw’s
“Arms and the Man” on the very
night that Bulgaria had offered to
cease fighting for the Germans
and fight for the Russians in-
stead. Shaw's 40-year-old satire
on Bulgaria suddenly became
more topical than tomgrrow’'s
newspaper. We were in tears
again but this time with outrage-
ous laughter.

I remember one first night
when a V.1. hovered over the
theatre going round and round in
the air. Instinctively the audi-
ence rushed to the «sides and
stood against the walls while the
actors being actors went on with
the play. Then fe buzz bomb
buzzed off somewhere else, the
audience returned to their seats
oe. finally booed the actors for
a d performance of a bad play.
I must say it seems pretty tough
looking back on it now.

Nothing will ever kill the
theatre. If there had never been
such a thing as the printing press,
if there had never been books of
record, the theatre would be the
continuing historian of the cus-
toms and speech of a people. The
plays of Euripides in Ancient
Greece more truly portray the
character of that nation than the
feuds which harass it today.

To the surprise of the manage-
ments the British people in the
war did not want tawdry things
in the theatre. For one thing the
6.30 openings had brought a new
public for the living drama. As
I have indicated typists and
clerks came direct from their
offices. Soldiers on leave who
had enough knockabout in action
came to see plays by the masters
not by the novices.

Golden Age
There was a _ golden age of
action developing before our

eyes. Jo! Gielgud was reaching
the height of his powers and as
I have indicated Laurence Olivier
was bringing an audacity and
even genius to production and
acting. Michael Redgrave was
moving up, Ralph ichardson
was vitalising everythirig he
touched and Alec Guinness was
discovering that high intelligence
can be displayed even when
speaking memorial lines,

Vivien Leigh was growing in
stature, Sybil Thorndike, Edith
Evans and Lilian Braithwaite
were proving that maturity has
charms that youth will never
know, Tyrone Guthrie, John
Fernald and a boy genius named
Peter Brook were breaking all
rules and founding a new era of
production.

Then came the impact of the
poets. Christopher Fry wrote
“The Lady’s Not for Burning”
which was really a_ ballet of
words, I mean precisely that. He
made words dance and London
hailed him like a _ conqueror.
Other poets followed and the pub-
lic clamoured for the best.

I wish I could put on record
that the London theatre is as full
of splendour as it was then, The
Impetus of those years has sub-
sided, the glory has dimmed. We
still have great acting when it is
given a chance but our authors
seem unable to illumine the
shadowed age in which we live.

So as a critic I put down my
pen. I would like to think that
in those years I encouraged the
best and cadtigated the vulgar
and the second rate. If some of
the criticisms were harsh I tried
never to break an actor’s heart.
The critic must love his medium
whether it is the théatre, the
cinema, art, music or books and
he must fight for the eternal
values. I loved and still love the
theatre,

At any rate in what I have
written in this London Letter I
have put you in the seat on the
aisle at a London first night. I



When it appears- it will sur-
prise those whe associate Epstein
with such distorted statues as
Adam,

- *

For this three-ton group is
beautiful and natural. It shows
Jesus as a sensitive, curly headed
boy. His mother stands close be-
hind him. Under a nunlike hood
her eyes stare fearfully.

The Madonna and Child will
adcrn a bridge joining two Georg-
jan houses in London’s Caven-
dishsquare, occupied by the Con-
vent of the Holy Child.

SUMMER COLOURS

THOUGH the Queen has made
no official command, she has pri-
vately asked the, Royal Family
land \Ladies-in-Wajting to wear
half mourning until the end of the
summer,

This means black, grey, white,
or mauve. From Norman Hart-
nell the Duchess of Kent has or-
dered an outfit of steel grey and
black,

‘TRUTH’ DEAL

RONALD STAPLES, cultured, xt

astute head of the publishing
firm -which bears his name, has
acquired a majority shareholding
in the weekly review Truth,
Truth’s editor, Collin Brooks,
tells me: “I remain editor and
chairman.”
* * *

Staples is one of Britain’s
foremost taxation experts.

With much celebration, he
announced last year the publica-
tion of a quarterly magazine,
Foyer, which had Lord Hare-
wood, Sacheverell Sitwell, and
Sir Steuart Wilson on the edi-
torial board. It folded up after
two issues,

DIPLOMATIC BEAUTY

BEAUTY and fashion thronged
Buckingham Palace when the
Queen met London diplomats and
their wives,



Who are the most beautiful
among the diplomatic wives?

My choice: Madame Manuel
Bianchi, wife of the Chilean
Ambassador, and Mme. Roberto
de Mendoza, wife of Cuba’s
representative. 5

Mme, Bianchi, mother of two
soms, and of a daughter born
last March, was previously mar-
ried to a British officer killed on
D Day. Mme. de Mendoza, too,
has three children, lives in Mr.
Churchill’s former, home, — 28,
Hyde Park Gate.

TOUGH FAMILY

HOME, from Australia is meat
multi-millionaire, Lord Vestey.
He has the family toughness
which helped create the great
business empire jhe now heads.

After a stroke in Australia last
February, he was not expected
‘to live. But now at 69 he is mak-
ing a_ remarkable _ recovery,
though, of course, still far from
normal health,

Once the Vesteys’.. wealth was

centred on_ the s of the
Argentine. Now, » chang-
ing world conditiol is , being

on a great new domain in
Australia and New Zealand.
> .

There the Vesteys have vast
numbers of sheep and cattle —
but the Australian drought has
caused heavy losses.

They also have great ra
packing stations, In one which
Lord Vestey visited 18,500 lambs
‘were killed ina day, and more
than 71,000 in a week.

WINE AND WATER

MOST novel party of the
season so far was given by
Flavia, daughter of Air Chief
Marshal Sir Alec Coryton. She
put her guests in boats and took
them on the Serpentine in Hyde
Park.

They took a gramophone and
all necessary party equipment,
and reported this method of
mixing water with the drinks a
complete success.—L.E.S.

meat-

-

FRIDAY, JUNE 13,

PHOTOGRAPHS

Copies of Local Photographs
Which have appeared in the

Advocate Newspaper

Can be ordered from the...

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

1952











£300 million lost Hongkong
isolated

By GUY EDEN

THE great British merchant firms are to
evacuate Red China at once. Investments
worth £300 million—maybe more—will be
lost.

Mr. Eden, the Foreign Secretary, an-
nounced plans for a withdrawal in the
House of Commons. :

Heads of the big firms in consultation
with the Government have come to the con-
clusion that it is useless to hope for a quick
improvement in the situation in whiel
ish and other foreign enterprise
blackmailed by the Communistsy

Tens of thousands of pounds
paid by the companies in penal taxes, fines,
and oppressive labour rules forcing them to
pay Chinese employees whether at work or
not.

Commercial debts owed by China to Brit-

Whatever it may be in Hardwave, Kitchen
Supplies, Building Materials and Tools,
C. S, PITCHER & CO. will most likely have it!




4-49-99

CASTINGS:

Negro Pots—2—3—4—
“ 6 gall. sizes.
F DANISH POTS:
1—2—3—4 gall. sizes.

Cc.
PITCHER & CO.,

ish firms are believed to amount to BOX IRONS:
£60,000,000. This, too, will probably be Ph, 4472 614”, —71,",—8"
lost.

TINNED FRYING

; ' f
The Foreign Office thinks the chances 0 PANS 10”~11"_-12”

the companies getting compensation for
their abandoned property are very small.

The decision has not been made by the
Government but by the firms who have
made their own plans in concert with each
other. But the Government will help by
safeguarding the interests of British em-
ployees and organising the actual evacua-
tion.

After that, only a few small British trad-
ers will be left in Red China—and even they
may come out soon. About 100 British men
and women are involved. Before the war
there were 10,000 engaged in business in
China.

Among other big firms getting out are the
British-American Tobacco Company, Shell,



A COMPLETE RANGE OF THESE
FINE RECEIVERS

; : 5-TUBE TABLE MODEL RADIO ........ patti $ 98.30
Butterfield and Swire, «nd Jardine, Mathe 6-TUBE TABLE MODEL RADIO ........ Pek genres 145.00
the effect of TUBE FLOOR MODEL RADKOGRAM <-- 9000

isi 6-TUBE FLOOR MODEL RADIOGRAM ....... ; :
The effect of the decision on Hongkong,|} ¢"ipBE FLOOR MODEL IOGRAM (with
where there is a big British commercial Automatic Three Speed Changers) .......... 515.00

LET US DEMONSTRATE ONE OF THE ABOVE SETS
AND JOIN THE HUNDREDS OF SATISFIED OWNERS.

°

DA COSTA & CO., LID.

colony, has been under examination by

Whitehall experts.

It is recognised that the withdrawal
will leave Hongkong isolated, but no de-
cision affecting the colony will be faken
for the present.

The evacuation from Red China will not

aan

involve a break in diplomatic relations.
Britain has a diplomatic representative in
Peking and although he has been there for
many months he has not yet been received
by the Red Foreign Minister.

Mr. George Mitchell, secretary and vice-
chairman of the China Association, which
represents Brftish business in China, said:
“If our merchants do withdraw the Chinese
will be the principal losers. The China trade
has never been more than 2 per cent. of
Britajn’s total trade. On the other hand,
British merchants have transacted more
than half of China’s overseas business.”



Light
Weight
Tweeds

A New Shipment of
11/12 oz. WOOLLENS
in stripe design — Fawn
and Blue grounds



and

Takoradi Harbour Project

A full account of what is considered to be
the largest British-built harbour project of
recent times—a vast extension of the port of
Takoradi in West Africa—has been publish-
ed in London.

The extension of Takoradi, the only deep
water harbour of the Gold Coast for ocean
going vessels, has been made in order to cope
with Africa’s steadily increasing trade in
cocoa, manganese, bauxite and timber, all of
which are now being shipped out in vast
quantities.

Alterations, when finally completed, will
enable six ships to be berthed alongside the
main quay instead of three, and in addition
provision of anchorage accommodation for
a large number of dcean-going vessels, tugs
and lighters. The new timber depot, con-
sisting of four thousand feet of quay walls.
2 four-hundred feet by hundred and fifty

PARSON’S GREY

Priced from $10.34

Da Costa
| & Co., Ltd.





FINE FOODS ARRIVE!

NEW ARRIVALS
Cheddar Cheese in tins

een



feet sheds for sawn timber, a new oil berth, oan
and extensive railway sidings, are also being am
erected. The original bauxite loading berth ee
had been dismantled and re-erected on the Conatien Bacon
outer side of the lee break-water. All plant Tonic Water
and machinery have been operated by Afri- Siti IN Tine
cans specially trained by the contractors. Grapes
One of the biggest undertakings facing the —_
consulting engineers—Messrs. Rendel, Palm: Pears
Peaches
Apricots

moval of Cox’s Fort Hill, a local lafidmark
80 feet high and covering an area of 24 acres
consisting of shale and lacerite. This had to



be removed and deposited so as to reclaim



49 acres of space from the sea for railways,

er and Tritton—and the contractors—Messrs. |

Taylor Woodrow (Africa) Ltd.—was_-the re-

yards and establishments. DELIGHTFUL SAUCES
Italian Ketchup

Other difficulties were that all cement,

FOR QUICK LUNCHES
Fillet: Steak |

steel and contractor’s plant had to be sup- Steeliniedl ar. aoa

plied from Great Britain which meant that. Fresh Sausages i Mango Sauce

with the exception of sand, aggregate and Fete ate eer oer

timber, practically every item had to be or- Hams in tins Cerebos Salt

dered from United Kingdom. Spare parts for “Enjoy the Finest Tasting on hoe
everything had to be kept in stock and skill- Rum Black Pepper

ed personnel housed on the spot to undertake GOLD BRAID Fresh Vegetables and
repairs. Because no suitable berthing place 3-Â¥r.-Old | Celery



was available in the initial stages, ships car-|
rying cement had to be anchored in the open!
sea and unloaded into African canoes.

The total value of the contract is estim-|
ated to be £3,000,000. \

is GODDARDS

FOR BEST GROCERY SERVICE.







FRIDAY,

ee

P

JUNE 13, 1952

arents Urged



Governor Praises

Alleyne

School

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR, Sir Alfred
Savage, K.C.M.G., yesterday evening warned parents and
friends who attended Speech Day at the Alleyne School
that theCommunity Centre at Belleplaine was being used
in other parishes as an argument against building other

centres.

His Excellency exhorted the people of St.,Andrew to

clear the name of their parish, if the information he had |

was ‘illfounded or on the other hand if there was any truth
in the allegation that the venture had failed, to renew their

efforts

It was the first Speech Day of the School in two years,

and on this occasion, Lady Savage, wife of His Excellency, |

as on the last occasion, presented the prizes.

_His Excellency the Governor ar~
rived accompanied by Lady Sav-
age and his A.D.C. Major Denis
Vaughan, and were greeted with
= first bars of the National An-

em.

The School's choir then enter-
tained the audience with a num-
ber of well-rendered songs, after
which a small dramatic troupe
added to the entertainment with
Stanley Houghton’s THE DEAR
DEPARTED, a play in one act.
Like the songs, this play was well
received.

The lighter part of the after-
noon’s programme ended, the
Headmaster Mr. C, D..Cumber-
batch, presented a very compre-
hensive report on the school’s ac-
tivities and attainments duri
past two years, during?
sounded a note of w
“enough reading was 4

it bei
done by the; pupils of: the choak

payin}
Following the Headmaster’s
port, Lady Savage pre y
prizes, and after His
had addressed the gat
Revd, Father Woodr







4

Re--

anxious that the community centre
and spirit of this parish should
be fully developed.

I intend to speak to you to-day
about the value of education not
as a means of earning a living, but
in order to enjoy a fuller life. To
my great relief, I found that the
Royal Bank of Canada had writ-
ten the speech for me, The Bank
issues a monthly letter dealing
with all kinds of subjects and the
current letter is headed “The
Beauties of Learning.” I hope the
Press will publish it for I can
do no more this afternoon than
quote a few extracts,

“It is only natural that much
of the learning of early years
ef practical life. Parents sacrifice
‘their selfish interests to provide
‘their children with the best edu-

the should be devoted to making a go
t *

yeation in preparation for making

a living. But there is also. even
in-elementary school education, a
Sort of knowledge that does not
contribute to making a living but
to-better living. This is the door

of St. Andrew and Chairman of through which we enter upon a
the Governing Body of the School, kingdom of beauty, literature, art
moved. a vote.of thanks to His Ex- and culture.
cellency and) Lady Savage.

“To go on learning past the

The gathering then ‘inspected schoolday period is to continue
exhibits of needlework ‘und art developing taste and enjoyment.
done by the pupils of the School, We train our eyes and our ears
following which they were enter- and our judgement, so that we
tained by the Headmaster, awaken the spirit of fine percep-

> tion of beauty, of generous admir-
Governor's Speech ation for what is noble and true.
His Excellency said;—

Reverend Chairman, Members Many Definitions
of the Governing Body, Ladies “There are many definitions of

and Gentlemen. culture, but the sort of culture

I must first congratulate the ; 7
: J ; . we have in mind includes three
Headmaster, as I did. two years attributes.

ago on my last visit, on a really
“It trains workers to have bet-

interesting and comprehensive
report. ter understanding of the ins-

The academic and othér suc- and-outs of their jobs, so that
cesses are a tribute to his work they know how they fit in with
and that of the teachers, A fam- the laws of production and con-
ous Headmaster once said to me sumption. It helps workers to
“A school can be successful for a develop their true selves through
few terms even with a poor Head- intellectual or manual activity,
master provided the teachers are :
good”. Here in St. Andrew, judg- “Culture qualifies everyone to
ing from the results, you are for- assume his responsibilities as a
tunate in having a good Ffead- ag and asa gen, net oat

. in is , is tra union
master and good teachers. D4 a te at ee
My wife and I enjoy school community and in the world
speech days for a number of rea- community, It makes freedom
sons. Certainly not because I more neal by increasing its scope.

have to make a speech. I assure
you it is almost as painful for us
as it is for you who have to listen.
Certainly first, we like children.
Secondly, there is always a com-
munity spirit which we enjoy and
which should be fostered. Thirdly,
there is usually some music and
singing or a play—such as
have enjoyed this afternoon—and
fourthly, we lodk upon it as a
holiday from Bridgetown,

“Culture enables a man _ to
develop to the utmost of his
desire and ability, fullness of
living physically, morally, intel-
lectually and artistically. It helps
him to weed out the non-essen-
tials, to cleave to the significant
in knowledge, and to think
clearly, It enables him to become
all that he is created capable of
being... . “Out ‘of continued

learning there come advantages

For this afternoon, there is a not to be otherwise gained. One
fifth reason. We have a particu- that will commend itself to many
lar affection for this parish be- is the ability. of self-expression.
cause of our past.affiliations with Another tis skill in’ doing things
other St. Andrew parishes, and in a creative way. These—self-
now, Mr, Cumberbatch has pro- expression and making—are ways
duced another reason in that a in which we can in some meas-
namesake of mine was once Head- ure discharge the obligation we
master here, feel as debtors to life,

I would like to*take this oppor- “Of greatest importance, per-
tunity to be reassured about the haps, is the ability that continued
Community Centre here, It is be- learning gives us to think
ing used in some ot parts@@$ an straight. We are apt to drift into
argument’ against, building other a way of thinking with our hopes
centres, Perhaps of am) ijl
formed; if so, and I do hope so, .
do obtain some publicity and clear “Straight thinking is based
the name of St. Andréw. Om the upon knowledge. How can a man
other hand, if there-is any truth think if he doesn’t know?
in the allegation that tHe re I,must leave it at that, but I
has failed, renew your éfforts; for commend the whole arti-
you have got in Fether Woot to your attention.
a priest and leader who deserves ee
the greatest support you can Bye, cotta wus. ane Se ee
§ ; ‘os Se is to ask the Headmaster to
Difficult Period. _... grant the school a full day's holi-
The world, including Barbados, antaede : in honour
is going through a! difficult period be
with so much distrust and fear.
Nations and individuals are look-
ing sideways at each other, and
if you look sideways even at your
friends you get a distorted view. _ Charles Dash of Golden Ridge,
It may be that Barbados is get- St. George, reported that on
ting a little tired of my repeated Tuesday at about 8.30 p.m. he
exhortation for co-operation and parked his moter car G.154 in
goodwill, but I would say to any- the yard at St. Anns Vicarage, St.
one who criticizes me—‘How far J°S¢Ph.
have you helped or hindered “the On Wednesday at about 6.40



CAR BURNT

community spirit?’ I agree that am; he was ifformed: that the
what is wanted is action and not car had been completely destroy-
It is insured. ©

words and that is why I am so ed by fire,




Plain and



HARRISONS

BROAD STREET

SSS Ss

Bridal Headdresses from $2.38 to $4.05







Plain and Brocaded Satin @ $2.91 yd.
Allover Lace

Embroidered Organdie from $3.42 to

Bridal Veils...

To Clear St. Andrew’s Name



MR. C. 8S. HEWETT
(New T.C.A. Operation Manager)

New T.C.A.
Operations
Manager

MONTREAL,

The appointment of C,
Hewett, a veteran of 30 years in
the transportation industry, as
operations manager, Atlantic
Region, has been announced by
Trans-Canada Air Lines. He
succeeds F. M. McGregor who

was in Barbados recently and
who has now resigned.

Mr. Hewett joined the airline
as a radio operator in 1938 and
shortly after was appointed
station manager at Vancouver, In
1943 when the Canadian Govern-
ment Trans-Atlantic Air Service
was inaugurated, he was posted
to Prestwick, Scotland, as liaison
officer in charge of the airline’s
operations there. In 1946 he re-~
turned to Montreal as base man-
ager in charge of TCA’s domestic
and international terminals at
Dorval Airport and a year later
became assistant to the Atlantic
Region operations manager.

Born in Dorking, Surrey, Mr.
Hewett served during World War
I as a radio operator with the

British Merchant Navy and the
Royal Navy Reserve, and was
later chief radio operator on

many of the large Cunard and
White Star passenger ships on
the North Atlantic. Prior to join-
ing TCA, he entered the Pacific
Coast Radio Service of the
Department of Transport.

Baker Steals Bags:
40'- Fine Iniposed

Charles Lewis, a baker of Gra-
zettes Road, St. Michael, was
yesterday fined 40s to be paid in
14 days or one month's imprison-
ment with hard labour by His
Worship Mr. C, L. Walwyn for
stealing two flour bags belonging
to Zephirin’s Bakery,



Sgt. Alleyne attached ‘to the
Central Police Station prosecuted
for the Police from information
received. The case for the prose-
cution was that Lewis who was
working at Zephirin’s Bakery
for about four months was discoy-
ered yesterday with two flour bags
tied around his waist as he was
in the street.

John Harding, an employee at
the Bakery, saw the defendant
and asked him what he had tied
around his waist. Eventually Mr.
Zephirin came on the spot and
gave the defendant over to. Island
Constable Seale.

Mr. Zephirin valued the flour
bags at 3s and said that for some
time there were complaints in the
Bakery about things that were
missing, but he never suspected
the defendant. The keeper of the
criminal record said that the de-
fendant had two previous convic~
tions for larceny when he was a
juvenile.

Before fining him Mr. Walwyn
told Lewis that he was heading
for a long term of imprisonment
and if he appears in the court on
another charge of larceny he
would be sent to prison as he
now had a conviction against him.



SIR GEORGE SEEL
ADDRESSES TRADE

UNION COURSE

Seel, K.C.M.G.
Gomptroller of the Development
and Welfare Organisation will be
the speaker when the last session
of the .Trade Union Training
course takes place this morning
at 11 o'clock at the Y.M.C.A
buildings in Pinfold Street, St
Michael.

The session is open to the pub-
lic,

Sir George












e

@ $3.44 and $4.13 yd.

$4.52 yd.
Watered Taffeta from
S115 to $2.00 yd.

from $8.50 to $12.75

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Ch. Ch. Vestry Join In Objecting
To Local Government Bill |

CHRILT CHURCH
pe ition prepared by the representatives of various Ves- |
bjecting to the local Government Bill and asking |
the Governor, the Legislature and the Secretary of State |



Bell Answers
4 Queries For
Civil Service

It is difficult to draw sdany
distinct line as to what section
of the Civil Service should join
Trade Unions, Mr. J. D. M. Bell,
research worker and lecturer in
industrial relations at Glasgow
University, told a group cf Civil
Servarts during an address yes-
terday at the British Council, but
they could form groups in grades
and on this basis decide how
beneficial it would be for any
grade.

Mr. Bell based his
on answers to four
which he first posed: 1.
a Civil Servant? 2. Should Civil
Servants form or join Trade
Uniens? 3. Are Civil Service
Trade Unions in any _ special
position? and 4. Should Civil

address
questions
What is

* Service Trade Unions co-operate

with outside organisations?

He first termed the Civil Ser-
vant as being essentially an em-
ployee cf the Government, but
went on to show a difference be-

tween Civil Servants as such in
the United Kingdom and _ those
in some other places like Bar-

bados.

He said they would necessarily
be wider branches in a piace like
the Unifeq Kingdom than in Bar-
bados as there would be distinc-
tions between. the coal miners,
the dock workers and such like
industrial workers as against the
industrial workers who were
more directly concerned with
executing the policy of the Gov-
ernment.

It was, he added, the non-in-
dustrial Civil Servant, of whom
he intended speaking.

A Guide

The whole question, he ob-
served, was the type of relation-
ship between the Civil Servant
and his employer as this would
be in some measure a guide for
the decision as to whether the
Civil Servant should think of
joining a Trade Union,

There was difficulty
ing a line within the ranks of
the non-industrial Civil Servant,
he said. Recently there was a
Committee set up in the United
Kingdom to advise the Govern-
ment how far it was appropriate
for a Civil Servant to engage in
outside activities. The principle
on whieh the report was based
was that it was possible to draw
a line through the Civil Service
and give a different measure , of
political freedom to those above
than to those below.

“In my opinion,” he sajd, “it is
not possible to draw a line with-
out being unfair to somebody.”

He mentioned that in England
teachers, post office workers and
some other workers were not
actually Civil Servants, but came
under the local authority so the
question of post office workers
and teachers did not arise in the
problems of the Civil Service.

On the question of whether a
Civil Servant should join or form
a Trade Union, he first talked on
the relevant question of whether
members of the salaried middle
class should join. Looking around
the world today, one would be
inclined to think it was totally



in draw-

an academic question — why
should they not do so? They did
have organisations, but were
they in the true sense of the
word Trade Unions,

By the middle class was not
meant today that kind of inde-
pendent small scale producer

which was meant some years ago.
In the bigger way was meant the
higher groups of paid workers,
more particularly salaried work-
ers. These groups contained a
large number of people with
specialist knowledge of all kinds,

clerical workers, technical work-
ers, teachers, civil servants and
so on,

“Salaried workers do form their
organisations,” he said. ‘“*Wheth-
er they should link up with Trade
Unions of the wage earning
classes is a question that depends
on what social status they assign
themselves.”

Good Trade Unionists

In the majority of countries,
Civil Servants formed organisa-
tions and maintained functions
which were Trade Union func-
tions — the improvement of their
working conditions. In fact, he
said, though they were not good
starters, Civil Servants generally
were good Trade Unionists.

He said that it was not a desir-
able principle that Civil Servants
should be actually bound by the

@ On page 6.

«






Peppers (Crned)
Pepper Sauce—40c., 20c. bot.
Mango Chutney — 72c., 6c.
Pineapple Jam—4sc. per bot.





THE

trics



ior the Colonies to reject the Bill. :

Befcre signing the petition, the Vestry however made
amendment that the boundaries between St. Michael
and Christ Church should remain unchanged |

pecs ma The Vestry then dealt with an

Parish Round-Up agreed with minor amendments (
certain recommendations which

Mr. C. S. MacKenzie and Mr. H

St. G. Ward had suggested should

Chicken Has
Three Legs

THREE LEGGED CHICK
t on June 3 and. owned by
Seibert Bovee has been the centre

A

born



of aittYaction in St. John from
the -day it was hatched among
six Other chickens. The freak
chicken apvears normal in other

respects and is hearty. Parish-
ioners vay four cents to see the
chicken

* . .

THE Advocate understands that
full production has been start-
ed at Wakefield Candy Factory
At present work is going on in
two shifts and approximately 70
workers are emvloyec, One shift
works from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. and
the pther from 2 to 10 p.m. The
factory closes from 10 pm, to 6
am. each night.

* * .

DESPITE frequent showers,
there was still a good attendance
at the Bathsheba Social Centre,
where the Barbados Police held
an entertainment in aid of Police
Clubs on Tuesday night last. The
Police Band wasin attendance,
and thrilled those present with a
varied programme of music.

Through the courtesy of the
British Council, there was a free
film-show at the St. Joseph's Girls’
School in Horse Hill on Tuesday
evening last, The show lasted
for about one hour and was thor-
oughly enjoyed by the crowd,

* * +

ROCK-CRUSHING _ operations
after a two months cessation wera
resumed at Gagg's Hill on Monday
last. The rocks are taken from
Joes River quarry, and are used
on the many St. Joseph's roads
damaged during the rains last
year and in 1950, Some of these
roads have already been repaired,
some are being repaired at pres-
ent, while nothing has been done
to others, as yet,

MRS, MALVINA NICHOLLS of

Harris Village is 102 years old
She was born June 9, 1850 at
Cambridge, St. Joseph and had
five children. Three daughters
and two sons. All of them have
predeceased her, She was one
of 17 children. In_an interview
with “Grand-Ma Mally” as she
vine Khown, the Advocate corres-

pondent learned that Mally'’s was

the hard way of life and she
never went to school, At the ear-
ly age of eight she was doing
agricultural labour, which she
gave up only 16 years ago
“Mally” possesses a very good

memory and recalled for the bene-
fit of the press, some hair-raising
anecdotes of the 1898 storm, the
May Dust and other incidents.
Mally was married to a distant
cousin, James Wolsley Nicholls itp
1874. He died in 1908,





Daerwood, Moneka
. ne _ .°

Bring Fresh Fruit

The Motor Vessel Daerwood
which arrived from St, Lucia yes-
terday morning brought 251
bunches of fresh fruit, five drums
of coconut oil and ten cartons of
peanut butter.

Eighteen casks of fresh fruit,
one crate of cabbages, and five
barrels of fruit arrived by the
motor vessel Moneka which called
here from Dominica yesterday
morning.

As these vessels came alongside
the Wharf there was a great stir
in the crowd which was awaiting
the vessels. Donkey carts and
trucks were taken to the side of

the vessels for the unloading of
cargo,
One man was nearly injured

when a barrel of fruit fell to the
ground missing his right foot by
a matter of inches, Cranes went
into operation for the removal of
the bigger boxes and _ barrels
from the holds of the vessels.

MAIL NOTICES

Mails for Madeira, United
Amsterdam and Antwerp by the
Willemstad will be closed at the
erat Post Office as under:

Parcel Mail 10.00 avin Registered,
Mail at 2.00 p.m., Ordinary Maj) at 2.30)
pm. on the 16 1952 |
Mails for St Dominica, Mont-|
serrat, Antimue St Kitts Bermuda,
Bostone lifax and Montreal by the
RMS,* y Rodney will he closed at
the Geherdl Post Office ax onde

Parcel Mail and Registered
900 aim, Ordinary Mall at 9.30 am, on
the 14th June, 1952,



M.S
Gen





June,
Lucia,

30c. bot.

(a







|

Kingdom, |

Mail at}





ON SHOPPING TIME

Right in the Home Products Department of the
IDEAL STORE you can Select the following:—

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LTD.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street

PAGE FIVE



VESTRY signed the joint

be contained in the Vestry’s reply |
te the Select Committee appointe }
by the House to deal with th |





Maude Bill.

Among the recommendations
was stated that no specific reason
had been advanced by anyone t
show why the present Vestry sy
tem could not be amended to mee
modern conditions,

|
|

Refreshing
&

Invigorating

Parsimony

It was also pointed out that ii
ene of the reasons for discarding
the present Vestry system was th¢
criticism that the Vestries haa
been parsimonious in the expendi-
ture on the social services such as
Poor Relief, Health, etc, the Ves-
try had therefore drawn up
summary of Expenditure for the}
parish over the last ten years,

In the summary of expendi
ture it was shown that Poor

Relief in 1943-—1944 was §$29,-

725.65 as against $67,820.00 for)

the year 1952—53. Under the}

head Sanitation $11,862.47 was
expended in 1943—44 wherea,
$42,833.00 was expended under |
this same head for the year)

1952—53.

The Vestry in its recommenda-
tions also stressed that to enlarge
the existing unit as administered
by their Vestry to that of a much
larger unit proposed by the Loval
Government Bill, would definitely
entail a substantial increase in the
administrative costs with a corre
sponding diminution of the close
contact and efficiency in adminis
tering the services mentioned and
as envisaged by the Local Govern. |
ment Bill.

Amendments

THE CYCLISTS CHOICE

They also suggested that some
wmendments to the present Ves-
tries Act which would improve
the present system and so bring
it in line to suit modern conditions
could be effected—for example
Che lowering of the franchise t«
include any taxpayer; reducing by
half, the qualification for member
ship of the Vestry; the method of
making Trade Returns; and the
method of making assessments on
house property to provide for 6
revaluation quinquennially and
the compulsory notification of the
change of ownership as is now the
ease with land,

The Vestry further stated that
iney were willing to discuss with
Government any proposed amend-
ments to the present Vestries Ac!
and could assure them of thei
wholehearted co-operation at any
time in the matter.



CYCLE TYRES

From Stockists throughout BARBADOS





—

Police Sergeants
Transferred



VALOR COOKER STOVES

Sgt. C. Murrell















who was one
of the sergeants prosecuting for
the Police in the District “A’* 2B oer ee ‘
Police Courts has now been trans- | } 3 Sister $4 él @ $56.
ferred to the Central Investiga- | } urner Model @ $71.87
tion Department. He has been re-
placed by Sgt. H, Alleyne who 4 Also
was in oharge of the Crab Hill { were Double Drainboard @ staan
Sub Station, St. Luey e .
Sgt. Marshall who was attach- complete with waste and overflow
ed to the Central Investigation Stiin
Department has been transferred Established T. HERBERT, Ltd. Incorporated
to the Holetown Police Station 1860 10 & 11 Roebuck Street 1926
a SSS
W A . e H E S OLS POEOOLEPOOPEOVLTOLESO?



GOLD, STEEL or
CHROMIUM

Models for ladies or gents
FULLY GUARANTEED !

ENJOY

TO-DAY'S SPECIAL

PRUNE

15 & 17 Jewels

A wonderful new range on
show at outstanding



prices

LESS SSSL EFL LLL OIOL OL OO OL OEP OOOO OEE YS



Today at your jewellers .. .
Y. De LIMA | 3
& €O., LTD. 8 q
“wane canes” $\) PHOENIX & CITY PHARMACY
SHOPPING CENTRE ,
3 8 SODA FOUNTAINS







‘otets PAA OLE OOCOOCOCBOCS



CBOSS.





SS

JUST RECEIVED



LION BRAND WHITE PEPPER per 1 oz. Caster $ .39









LION BRAND BLACK PEPPER per | oz. Caster .3%

e COOMALT . per tin 1.40

NEW ZEALAND CHEESE o..cccccsccsssscssisscscsssvesessecsses per ib .87

DANISH CAMEMBERT CHEESE per tin 1.32

DANISH BLUE CHEESE . per 1.18

DANISH PORT SALUT per tb 1.16

CANADIAN LUSHUS JELLIES—5 Flavours per pkt. .18

Cherry Jam — 48¢. per bot. CANADIAN KING'S BEER _ per bottle .26
Honey — 44c. per bot. CANADIAN KING'S BEER per 12 bottle Carton 2.88
Shaddock Rind — 40c. per th CADBURY’S CUP CHOCOLATE per tin .72

COCKADE FINE RUM

SS FFF

Sd
STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.







PAGE SIX

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508
























BARBADOS ADVOCATE

a a a a LRA ee

PUHLIC SALES (PUBLIC NOTICES |

a i



REAL ESTATE NOTICE

| ASSISTANT TEACHERS’ NOTICE









DIED FOR SALE All assistant and Relief Teachers in
HOUSE-—One Board & Shingle house | Elementary Schools are hereby notified
1” x 10° x 7 with Galv’d Shed 1@ x 107 | that the monthly Meetii takes place
; Eten neem lattached, situated at Harrison’s Plant.|at the ¥.M.C.A., on "detueday 14th
GRAFFITH—On the 12th June at his resi- Yard, St. Lucy, Apply to C. Ward,|June at 11.00 a.m. Teachers are asked
dence Bush Hall Yard, int Mich- AUTOMOTIVE Bromefield Plant.. St. Lucy to be punctual.
ael. William Edward Griffith (ate . "'12.6.52—2n. c. C. D. ROACHFORD,
retired Engir Foreman at M/S seanhie elie id a Secretary A.T.W.U
D. M. Simpso Co.) The funeral! CAR—Dodge S@per-Deluxe, First-class! “HARCLIFF” in St. Lawrence Gap, 12.6.52—2n
leaves his late side nce at 4 o'clock | condition and owner-driven. $2,000, Dial | Christ Church (on the Sea) standing on -
this evening for the Westbury) 4476, 12,6.52—1n.]2 Roods 37 Perches of land NOTICE
Cemetery Friends are invited om ;_.The house is built of stone and is at PHILIP
Blanche (Widow) Vincent an CAR — Vauxhall Velox, little used, present divided into two flats. Each flat eam Seo:
Martin (Sons), Millicent Thorn-] ,.7 n Di cantata? i APPLICATIONS for one Or more
owner-driven, good as new. Dial 4476 | contains ‘drawing and dining rooms and *
hill, Blanche Lloyd, Louise Pres- 12.6.52—t.f.n. | kitchenette downstairs, 2 bedrooms with | Vacant St. Philip's Vestry Exhibitions
cod, Joan Griffith (Daughters) running water upstairs. Usual conve-|‘t¢"able at the Combermere School, will
13.6.58-—In CAR—Ford Prefect 10 h.p. in good | niences oe seseeved, “Se Tie SanSenen -
working order Five good tyres only Servants quarters and garage in yard, later -then Mondey 10th June, IO08.

——_—

FOR RENT

done 27,000 miles Apply N. E. Corbin
c/o DaCosta & Co. Dry is ;
11.6,52—2n. }
os,
CARS—Morris Oxford Saloon, Morris ;
Minor 4-Door Saloon, Wolseley 14 Saloon,
Austin A-40 Saloon, Reconditioned Mor- j
‘



HOUSES

ris Cowley l0ewt. Pick-Up. For good
used cars, see Fort Royal Garage Lid










“BELVEDERE”, Maxwell Coast. For 5] Telephone 4504 13,6.52—2n.
months from Ist August Fully fur-
nished. $120 per month Phone 8188 New Morris Model J Cab over Engine |
. 13.6.52—3n. | 10-cwt. Vans $2400.00 New Morris Cow-
a 10-cwt, Vans $2580.00. All excel-
for fast light delivery. Fort Royal

len
Garage Ltd., Telephone 4504

ANNOUNCEMENTS

13.6,52—2n |







Candidates must be sons of Parishioners |
in straitened circumstances and must

be not less than 10% years nor mere

than 12% years old on the Ist
1962.
A birth Certificate must be forwarded

Inspection by appointment, dial 3750
The above will be set for sale on June
20th IMR at 2 p.m at our Office
CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Lucas Street,



eee 6.52—9n with an application form obtained from
. the Parochial Treasurer's Office,
On Friday 13th inst. at 2 p.m. at our tae 2 SCOTT,
Office, No. 17, High Street:— lerk to the Vestry,
15 Shares Barbados Fire Insurance Co. St. Philip.
52 Shares Barbados Foundry Ltd. 7.6.52—Tn
18 Shares Barbados Ice Co. Ltd. *
429 Shares W.I. Rum Refinery Ltd NOTICE

40 Shares Barbados Distilleries Ltd.

BYE-ELECTI
180 Shares Central Foundry Ltd ON FOR TEE VEerey OF

THE PARISH AINT
1150 Shares Barbados Rediffusion Ser-| Two persons Sevine ete nesmmneted
OF “st aeaes (Preference) A. Barnes & wd & ee ee * a
: or the e o will be taken
EARN BIG MONEY by ae ‘a, ELECTRICAL Co., at the Parochial Bulldings, Cumberland
FUSION in your spare time. t i COTTLE CATFORD & CO. |Street, Bridgetown, on Monday next
supply of forms to-day. 4.6.52—10n Sasa 2. Ges Biase seer the 16th instant beginning between the
Refrigerator, Kerosene oil burner in ES s9—8n. [hours of 8 and 9 o'clock in the morning

jood condition. Phone 2791. L. & H.
Miller, Electrical Engineers, Reed St.
13.6,52—3n.

WANTED



REFRIGERATOR — English Electric,
HELP 6 eubic ft. $395.00 Excellent Condi-
tion — 3% yr. motor guarantee Call
2998 11,6.52—4n.







EXPERIENCED NURSE and general











Servant. Apply before 9 a.m, or after
5 p.m Mrs Noel Goddard, Paynes LIVESTOCK
Bay, ‘St. James 13,6.52—2n
—| —
GOATS—Three Goats — all fresh in
MISCELLANEOUS milk Apply Weatherhead, Aontebene
1.6.32—3n
nae YOUR OWN PROGRAMMES| ~*~ ="
on a e. 8.6.52—5n.
POULTRY

ne
HOUSE—Wanted early 1953 for years











lease, ‘Seaside House Worthing, St
Lawrence or Maxwell Coast by careful DUCKS—KHAK*% CAMPBELLO: One
English family Box K c/o Advocate.|nair Khaki Campbello 1 Drake 3
‘ 13.6,52—2n.! Ducks 6 months old. Magnirticent
Laying strain. $24.00
TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bonus Mrs, PEEBLES,
from Rediffusion for 25 recommenda Bayleys,
tions in one calendar month. St. Philip. 11.6.52—3n
4.6.52—10n
$62.50 POCKET MONEY easily earned CELLANEO!
by recommending 25 new sunscribers to MIS US
REDIFFUSION in one month =
fs 0
Serer. £.6-82—10n.| oaT—One boat 21 x 5 suitable for
REDIFFUSION offers $1.50 cash for! ‘%.!s or engine. Apply to W. King, Fitz
each new Subscriber recommended by| V'!!"ae, St. James 13.6, 52—2n



ou. re ee ee ee ee
r BEAUTY SOAP. Bring out your Beau-



4.6.52—10m

fy with the Milk and Almond Oil in
POSITION WANTED—Young man de-;| WILLOW" Beauty Soap Get a few

sires work as Clerk or Bookkeeper Has | cakes today from your Suppliers
experienie and Certificate. 13.6.52—8n
men 0/P ASVORAIS 12 6 52—2n BRACELETS for watches in rolled
gold, chromiun, and stainless steel in
SUPPLEMENT YOUR INCOME by} !@dies’ and men’s sizes Also a_ nice
recommending REDIYFFUSION, Obtain ortment of watches. K. R. Hunte
full particulars from the REDIFFUSION | © Co., Ltd 13,6. 32-—-Gn

CAKE & BISCUIT MAKERS—Limited
quantity being sold at half price $1.28
City Garage Victoria Street.

11.6.52—3n

office.

4.6.52—10n.

LOST & FOUND













30 PRODUCTS—We have in stock,







Flit Sprays; Flt in gls ars ae Fiit

o powder Nujol in pints, isto. in %

“LOST o7 & 2 oz, Petroleum Jelly, Handy Oil,

= - _-- varaffin Oil Household Wax. R. .
SILVER BRACELET—lost bet the| JONES & CO LITD., Agents.

Colonade .Store and the Post Office.! 7.6. 52—3n

Finder will be rewarded on returning) ——$—$—$—$—$—$———————— ee

to the Advocate Co 13.6,52—2n. ES— Lushus Jellies all Flavours







Also Lemon Pie Filling 38c¢

th
TICKETS —Series HH-—9140, II—9600, M. Ford, 35 Roebuck, St. Dial 2489.
JJ—1946 to 1949, LL—4485, PP—8061 to 13.6,52—2n
2066, MM—2905, 2906, 2907 Finder | -—— —



lease return to Fred Davis, Prince_ of
ales Rd., Bank Hall, 13.6.52—I1n,

CIRCULAR

KINGSBEER — Lager, in 12-0z. bottles
peeked in handy 1-Doz. cartons, A pro-
cuet of National Breweries Ltd. of
Frontenac Beer fame. For particulars
contaet R. M, JONES & Co. LTD. Tel
2053 12,6,52.—4n,





PIANO: Your child's dream comes
true, Broadwood upright, tropical
model, Separate bridge on each string.
Leautiful condition, Hurry Owner
leaving colony, Write P, O. Box 135 or
Phone 3122, 10.6.52—Tn.

“RAYON PONGEE — 36” wide many
ecclours 72c, a yard, THANI BROS.
11.6,52.—2n

pice epremcentnsirsacaane acetates
Subseribe now to the Datly Telegraph
England's leading Daily Newspaper now
»rrving in Barbados by Air only a few
deys after publication in London. Con-
‘wet: kan Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltd.
Local Representative, Tel. 3118.
17.4.52—t.f.n,
——_$$

SOUPS:—Campbells & Heinz Soups all

Kinds, and Heinz Tomato Ketchup
W. M. Ford, 35 Roebuck St. Dial 3489

18.6,52—2n.



T.NNED FRUITS:— Pears, Peaches,



Grapes, Gauvas, Fruit Salad & Pineap-
ple Slices Large & Small. W. M. Ford,
'S Roebuck Street, Dial 3489
13.6.52--2n.
WHOLE PEAS—A small quantity of
peas for Pigeons can be bought at lic
per tb From, J. A. 8. TUDOR & Co.
11,6.52—Sn

Roebuck Street.





9th June, 1952.
To My Fellow Ratepayers,
I have to-day been nominated
as a Candidate to serve on the
Vestry of St. Michael due to the

ADVERTISING PAYS BEST

lamented death por: OC, A,
Brathwaite.

As two Candidates have been
nominated, a Poll will be taken
on Monday, June 16th, 1952 at the
Parochial Building, Cumberland
Street, opposite St. Mary's Church
between the hours of 8.00 a.m,
and 4 p.m,

5 ag the large increase in the ARTICLE
number of Voters, I fing it im-}; ;
possible to visit you personally,j®utter-Table: in Tins
and I therefore have had to adopt
this method of reaching you.

Se EE

of

Attention is drawn to th

Official Gazette of Thursday 12th

prices of “Butter—Table” are as





” ” ”



——_

{

UE nna

GOVERNMENT NOTICE



WHOLESALE PRICE
(not more than)

$92.20 per
100 lbs, in 1-lb, tins
$49.79 per case of



and closing at 4 p.m.
The following POLLING STATIONS
have been provided under the provis-

SS cpr
SHARES—200 £1 shares West India
Rum Refinery; priced to yield 5%% in-



terest (less income tax). Phone Mr. | ions of the Ballot Act 1931.
Webb, 4796. 12.6.52—2n. |No_ 1 POLLING STATION
The FIRST FLOOR of the Parochial
STONE WALL DWELLING HOUSE | Bui'dings ts allotted to voters whose sur-
with 4,004 square feet of land attached |names begin witl the letters “A” to “I”
at Dayrell’s Road, Christ Church. The} (both inclusive) and the = entrance
dwelling house contains living room, |thereto will be by way of the door of

two bedrooms, kitchenette, usual con-|the Churehwarden's Office

veniences, Government water installed. |No. 2 POLLING STATION
House wired for electricity. Inspection The GROUND FLOOR of the Paro-
on application to the tenant Mr. Ince, |chial Buildings is allotted to voters
between the hours of 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. | whose surnames begin with the letters
daily. “J" to “Z" (both inclusive) and the

The above dwelling house will be set} entrance thereto will be through the
up for sale by public competition at our | Gateway situated at the Southern End
Office, James Street, on Friday 27th June | of the building.

———





nstant at 2 p.m. PF. J. COLE,
YEARWOOD & BOYCE, Sheriff & Returning Officer.
Solicitors 10.6.52—6n
13.6.52—9n 7
NOTICE
OLIVER OE ee ee
fore sometimes called and known by the
AUCTION name of Oliver James of the parish of

Saint Michael in this Island, Medicai
Practitioner,, hereby give public notice
that on the Third day of June 1952 I
formally and absolutely renounced re-~
Iinquished and abandoned the use of



| MORRIS TEN SALOON — damaged
by fire. We are instructed to offer this
‘car by Auction at the Courtesy Garage



Jon Friday 13th June at 2 p.m. Johnjmy said surname of ‘Oliver and then

M. Bladon & Co., Auctioneers. assumed and adopted and determined

8.6.52—I. |thenceforth on all occasions whatsoever

Sanaa SER RRRRENSEET to use and subseribe the name of

FRIDAY, 18TH AT 2 PM “Wesley-James" instead of the said
MC ENEARNEY’S GARAGE VAUX-|surname of “James.”

HALL SEDAN CAR IN GOOD WORK- And i give further notice by 4 Deed

ING ORDBR. 12 H.P

R. ARCHER McKENZIE
8.6

Poll dated the Third day of June 1959
duly executed and attested and (record-
52—4n. Jed in the Registration Office of this
—— - a" “ Island on the Eleventh day of June

FORD CONSUL—1952 Model 1,600 | 1052) I formally and absolutely renounc-
miles only, damaged in accident. Wejed and abandoned the said surname of
are instructed to offer this car by Auc-|“James" and declared that I had as-
tion at McEnearney’s Garage on Friday | sumed and adopted and intended thence-
13th June at 2.30 p.m. John M. Bladon |forth upon all occasions whatsoever to









& Co,, Auctioneers. 8.6.52—4n. |use and subscribe the name of “Wesley-
eS prpand James” instead of “Jaines'’’ and so as
BY instructions received I will sell/to be at all times thereafter called

at Corner of Lakes Folly and Cheapside |jnown and describel by the name of
on MONDAY 16th. from 11.30 a m. |Wesley-James” exclusively
Tables, Upright Chairs, Tub and Hocm Dated the llth day of June, 1962

ing Chairs, Book Case all in Mahog-
any Dining and other Tables, Waggon,

OLIVER WESLEY-JAMES.
late OLIVER JAMES



larders, folding screen, bedsteads and 13.6.52—2n
Mattress Kitchenware, earthem ware QT | ce
glassware, 2 burner oil stove Electric
hot plate, Singer Machine, Toaster,| NOTICE
Kettle, Westinghouse Refrigerator, Con: BARBADOS. eee

leur carpets — and a lot o: eyeh 7
oan rs and other useful items ASSISTANT COURT OF Brgy
TEPMS CASH. ‘ Re: Workman's Compensa! "
= Re ee, eo ee NOTICE is hereby given that Fitz-

Gerald Jackson formerly residing at

Brathwaite’s Gap, Saint Michael, died as
a result of injuries sustained by him in
the course of his employment with the

‘INDER THE IVORY HAMMER

i Yi td., and

y instructions received from the | National Motor Omnibus Co., Ltd,
thepranee Co. I will sell on Friday, | that eomepanes Hey has been paid into
June 18th at Mesgrs Cole & Co's Garage, | the Cour Sa
Probyn St., (1) 1950 Hillman-Minx Car. ALL the dependents of the eee

{ d in accident) Sale at 2 p.m, |named Fitz-Gerald Jackson,
oe cans Vincent Griffith, Auction- |ere hereby requested to appe

at the
— the 26th June, 1952, at 10 na eM:

8.6.52—4n | Arsistant Court of Appeal on
Dated this 16th day of June, 1952,

F. G. TALMA,
Clerk, Assistant Court of Ane As.

Bell Answers



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

ON TUESDAY 17th by order of Mr.
Cecile Walcott we will sell her Furni
ture at “Archway Hous®” Navy Gar-

dens,



which includes

Very nice Oval Dining pele os _

Writing Bureau, Upright an orris

Chairs, Coffee and Ornament Tables,

nest of Tables, Cake Stand Corner and ueries or
Arm Choire all in Mahow: Cedar Book- - a °

Shelf, ilectric Lampe,

ricwures, Verandan Cnaurs, musn, I ervice

Morris Arm-Chairs, Steel Chairs, Glass
and China, Carpet Rugs, Phillips Radio,

Garrod Automatic Record Change Page 5.
Perfect condition Single Pine Bedstesds i. From
Simmons Springs and Deep Sleep|law in such matters as whether

Mattresses, Very good Mahog: Pree: they should join Trade Unions or
able;

Behan! . Dochtess.... Utossne not. His own view was that
Bedstead, , ‘s :
Gream painted Chat ot enonets and|{there should be voluntary deci-

Pree; Ice Chest, Rippungill 2 Burner|sions and he‘ could hope, in fact,
oil Stove and Oven, Kitchen Cabinet, 2) ¢hot Civil Servants shoulda form

v +, Kett : z . . aad
Burner Eicken Usensiis’ “Tables and|their organisation for Civil Ser-
many other items. vants,

Sale 11.30 o'clock, TERMS CASH
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers
18.6,52—2n

As to whcther Civil Servants
were in any special position, he
said that they were. ’

The very basis of Trade Union
action outside the Civil Service
was to withdraw labour if tha
employer was not to be persuaded.
Was the Civil Servant then to be
denied that right to struggle?
The position in Britain was that

Prices there was now no law curbing the

e Control of (Defence)

(Amendment) Order, 1952, No. 20 which will be published in the right of the Civil Servant outside

June, 1952. the Police, though in practice the

2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling | isnt was scarcely theirs. So there

follows: — had to be some final means of

arriving at the settling of disputes
abet between Civil Servants and Gov-
ernment; and thus arose the im-
portance of arbitration as there
had to be a tribune—an impartial
tribune which would mean that



case of

$1.00 per Ib tin

n|never could the word of the Gov-
‘ x pn eees ‘petit . 7 72 x % Ib, tin em the ernment be entirely an last word.
ellow Ratepayers to attend a e ‘inte ¢ So, he said, arbitration and the
Parochial Building, Cumberland Rees = ibs tile Whitley system.
Street, on Monday next, June rints | ‘T96c per 1 Ib
16th, 1952 between the hours of (Penksinn Stasie eerie ‘ | print Differences
8.00 a.m, and 4.00 p.m. and place] Leaf") $144.20 per case of :
your X opposite the name of i ie 100 lbs. in 1-lb On the last question—co-oper-
J. O. TUDOR in the interest of vinta: ‘1 $1.62 per 1 1b |ation with outside organisations—
yourself and the Parish as Butter-Table: In Prints en ar bi print he said that it was true there were
whole, (Canadian “Olive’”) $131.20 per case of some differences. He said that
Vote TUDOR and you will have 100 lbs. ih 1-lb groups usually preferred to,
no regrets. prints . _.1 $1.39 per 1 b,/together. The differences
Yous for Service, print shown in the development of
J.O. TUDOR. |. separate. organisations, \
12.6.52—4n., 13.6.52.—In It was of course accentuated
asi a i bl cy sometimes by a feeling of antag-
. 2 SSOSSSSSSSG9SS9SSS9S9GSS, |Onism when the one class felt














=



ORIENTAL
PALACE

HEADQUARTERS FOR
SOUVENIRS
FROM INDIA, CHINA &
CEYLON

THANI'S

Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Diai 3466



FURNITURE

for Home & Office

at Money-Saving Prices

NEW & Renewed Wardrobes,
Bureaus, Chest-of-Drawers, Bed-
steads 2-feet to 5-feet wide,
Springs, Laths, Washstands $8 up,
Nightchairs, Towel, Shoe & Hat-
racks—TABLES for Dining, Kitch-
er & Paney Use, China, Bedroom
& Kitchen Cabinets, Larders.







DRAWING ROOM FURNITURE
in_ Morris. Caned and other types,
DESKS with flat or sloping tops,
Spring-seat and other Othee
Chairs, Bookracks

NOTICE
SOCIETY SERVICE
STATION

Now
OPEN "FOR BUSINESS

PIANOS, Banjios—Pram, Go-Cart
Metal ard Wardrobes Trunke $8
up; Typ writer, Kitchen Sink $4.50,
Enamel): a Ware Drainers, $3






Magic Le atern $6.00
iat g Your Patronage is Invited
: % GAS—OILS—KEROSENE %
4
o| » . > ,
L.S.WILSON 3/8 = socmwry rir
é]% St. John. s
Spry St — Dial 4069 @] % 11.6.52—3n. %
: ‘ ° A
® OOOOP 000% VCOSSCSSS $99S99S99S0909









5,
FOR SAI E N|deed, he said, it was seldom that
one from the industrial class of
nance successful unions came out to
ts " pa the iniddle class organisation,
One Racing Bicyele e finally said that Civil Ser-
vice should contain certain groups

of workers and the various groups
would realise at what standard
they were and how far. because
cf their association with’ the Gov-
ernment, it would not be politic
to join a Union.

.
On Manslaughter
Cl ‘ ge

The Police who had charged
Eunice Newton of St. George with
the murder of her husband George |
Newton on May 9, amended this!
charge on Wednesday to one of|

jmanslaughter after six witnesses|
had given evidence in the prelim-|

$75.00

One 110/220 Volt Single Phase
ble transformer type

”

portal aa
can ARC WELDER with attach-
ments for soldering and brazing
$150.00

One



§ 1938 Buick 4-door Sedan
CAR, Best offer takes it. Society
a Garage, St. John 11,8.52—2n,

|Beecre!
oe

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Gift Wrapping Paper

Birthdays, Weddings
Baby Gifts

Window and Coin







for
and



Envelopes inary hearing which is going on
Solid Brass Locks of {before His Worship Mr. C. W.)
all sizes Rudder at District “B” Police

All These JUST OPENED Station,
by Mr. G. B. Niles is appearing on
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY mawait “ Eunice a
7 jca eviaence was given Vv r.
& HARDWARE A S. Cato, Further hearing was

BOVSSSSSSSSOS8EN6SS0S0R\ adjourned until today. '



%|prejudices against the other, In- |



FRIDAY, JUNE 13, 1952

snclavomaneieeiptnaieteeennsiginas teeeeetaseememnabete
ENGLAND'S PRINCESS NOW A QUEE)'| SHIPPING NOTICES



PICTURED DURING HER RECENT trip to Canada and the U. S., Princess:
Elizabeth is shown in a regal pose (left) during a state function. Ai

right, the Princess appears in a

gayer mood at an informal affair



Lodge Gives Goddard

Its Top

from page 1

lenting and downright fight that
had characterised Australian cric-
ket ffOm the time the game be-
gan to be developed in Australia
and referred to the fact that the
West Indies need not blame God-
dard for the defeat of the West
Indies against such opposition
seeing that England, whom the
West Indies had defeated had
not won the “Ashes” in their se-
ries of Tests with Australia since
1934,

The most competent critics had
had nothing but praise for the
excellence of Goddard’s leader-
ship throughout and he counselled
the boys to emulate Goddard’s
example and make themselves by
dint of hard work, application
and practice, cricketers who might
not only bring fame and glory to
the Lodge School but to Barbados
and the West Indies as a whole
a: John Goddard had done.

Not in the forseeable future
could he imagine any leader who
could remotely challenge their
Test team hero as a possible lead-
er,

John Goddard, Mr. Kidney, the
next speaker, said, was an old
stager to him. He knew his qual-
ities, his grit and determination
and could testify to the fact that
Goddard had always played the
game in the right spirit and for
the good of the game as well.

Mr. Kidney reminded the boys
that theirs was a great heritage
which had been handed down to
them by Old Lodge boys with
whom he had played. He recalled
Tim Tarilton and Percy Good-
moh, men, whom he considered
were worthy of taking their place
in any international cricket team
in the world.

Nothing could be accomplished
without determination and a dog-
ged spirit whether it be in the
schoolroom or on the field of play.

He was glad that they had not
withdrawn from the First Divis-
ion competition because he had
always fought for the principle
that the schools should play in
‘tthe First Division competition
and get the feeling of playing
against better competition.

The Lodge School were good
losers. They had been losing for
a long time but every now and
again they produced a good one.

Hon. Dr. Massiah, before mak-
ing the presentation said that
ho was very pleased on behalf
of the Old Boys’ Association and
4 so of the Governing Body’ of
the School to make the presenta-
tion.

Any institution whose boys
could go out into the world and
in the field of human endeavour
achieve such success as Mr. John
Geddard has done should be
justly proud.

There were many walks of life
in which boys of that School in
their lifetime had achieved such
distinction as haq further en-
hanced the glory both of that

School and of the island as well.
He hoped that all the’ boys
gathered there that day would

take to their hearts and use as
an example for all their future
work and Hfe, what had been
done by Mr. John Goddard.

He had brought into play on
the cricket field all the citizen-
ship and decency he had learnt
at. that school and he was more
than gratified that afternoon.

In the cricket match he had
seen that one young Goddard, a
left hander, knew how to use the
cover drive of the left handers
and he was hoping that if he
got the proper coaching and
would emulate his relations ten-

,

MOUNTED P

Oe

5.00 P.M., TUESDAY, 17TH JUNE

e
_ ADMISSION:
Reserved Seats Lady $1.00
Unreserved Seats 8
e
Box Office at Information Bureau, Police Headquarters
: |
1 Farewell to Staff Sergeant Anderson of the |
{ Royal Canadian Mounted Police |
H 12.6,52.—4n.

SSeS

OLICE DISPLAY”

THE POLICE RIDING SCHOOL

District “A”

a

Honour

acity in the game that he also in
time would bring more credit to
the school,

He had great pleasure in asking
Mr. Goddard to accept the shield
which came _ from the staff and
members of the school as a trib-
ute to him for his work and the
honour which, he had brought
the school,

Mr. Goddard said that on tours
he had been accustomed to pre-
paring the batting order but that
afternoon he had been put in last
to bat and he had been told to
twipe as it was getting late.

Roy Marshall and he had
toured Australia, he said, and
they had often talked about
their school. He had always liked
Lodge and he would always car-
ry it in his heart.

They had just completed a
very pleasant afternoon's cricket
and they would see from the
teores that the Old Boys were
improving with each game.

Since he had captained Barba-
dos in 1946, he had been away
for three tours and he was glad
to say that in his absence two
old Lodge boys had captained the
Barbados teams’ in his absence.
Charlie Taylor hzd taken a Bar-
bados team to British Guiana and
his very good friend Wilfred
Farmer had led Barbados very
successfully against Jamaica and
had not only brought them victory
but had made such a mammoth
score that he himself in Austra-
lia did not believe it.

Mr. Goddard then presented
Mr. Farmer, Headmaster with 5
photograph of the West Indies
team in Australia on behalf of
Roy Marshall and himself.



Bank See Scope For
B. Guiana Long
Range Plan

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, June 12.

The two man mission from the
International Bank for Recon-
struction told a press conference
to-day, Thursday, they were pre-
pared to suggest that the Bank
send a survey mission of four or
five men for one to two months to
make a detailed study and recom-
mend a long range, well balanced
development programme to the
British Guiana government,

Patterson, French head of the
Mission stated that they believed
that good possibilities existed in
British Guiana in the major fields
of water control, drainage, hydro-
electric power, sugar, rice, timber,
paper pulp, minerals, cattle ranch-
ing, roads and bridge construc-
tion and smaller industries,

During the eight day meeting
the Mission visited the greater
part of the colony travelling
mostly by B.G. Airways plane.
To-day they met the Legislative
Council and the Georgetown
Chambers of Commerce,

The Mission is leaving Friday
for the United States,



St. George Water
Problem Acute

The water problem in_ St.
George is acute. For some time
now residents of some districts
have been experiences cuts last-
ing four hours from 6,00 a.m. to
10.00 am. then from 3.00 p.m.
to 8.00 p.m. Residents get in
their water supplies before 6.00
a.m. and between the hours of
8.00 and 9.00 p.m,


































































The M.V. “CARIBBEE” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
Antigua, Montserrat,

St. Kitts. Sailing
June.

M.S. BONAIRE, 13th June, 1952. “MONEKA" will
M.S. STENTOR, 27th June, 1952 accept Cargo and Passengers for
M.S. HESTIA, 4th July, 1952 Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
SAILING TO EUROPE Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Fri-
M.S. WHLLEMSTAD, 17th June, 1952. Gay Uh inst.
SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO The M.V. “CACIQUE DEL
AND BRITISH GUIANA CARIBE” will accept Cargo and
M.S. Nestor, 14th June, 1952. Passengers for St. Lucia, St.
M.S. BONAIRE, 30th June, 1952. Vincent, Grenada, and Aruba,
M.S. STENTOR, llth July, 1952. .
SAILING To

TRINIDAD AND
AO

CURAC.
M.S. HESTIA, 21st July, 1952.
S. P. MUSSON, SON @ CO., LTD.
Agents









SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Sails Sails
MontrealHalifax Boston B'dos B'dos
LADY NELSON... .... 9 Jupe 12 June 4 June 23 June % June
CANADIAN CRUISER +» 20 June 23 June — 2 July 3 July
CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 30 June 3 July - July 13 Juy
LADY RODNEY .. .... Uduly M4 July i6July WJuly 2 July
NORTHBOUND Arvives Sails Arrives Arrives Ayrives Arrives
B'dos B’dos St. John Boston Halifax Montreal
tA RODNEY .. 15 June. 16 June — , 21 June 28June 1 July
CHALLENGER .. 23 J 28 June SJuly 18 July 8 July 11 July
LADY NELSON" ¢ July. SJuly 19 July 22 July
c DN CRUISER ++ 14 July 18 July 26 July 29 July 1 Aug.
CONSTRUCTOR 24 July 29 July 5 Aug. 8 Aug. 10 Aug.
LADY RODNEY 7 Aug. 9 Aug. 19 Aug. 20 Aug. 23 Aug.

For further particulars, apply to—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD.—Agents.



As
eo

-












SPOTS

a

C"G* TRANSATLANTIQUE

Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica





From Southampton
*““DE GRASSE 4th June, 1952
“COLOMBIE” 19th June, 1952
*“DE GRASSE” 12th July, 1952
“Not calling at Guadeloupe

SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE

From Barbados Arrives Southampton
“COLOMBIE”

Arrives Barbados
16th June, 1952
2nd July, 1952
24th July, 1952

“ 13th July, 1952 25th July, 1952
*“DE GRASSE” 6th Aug., 1952 16th Aug., 1952
*“DE GRASSE” 29th June, 1952 9th July, 1962

*Sailing direct to Southampton

HOUSEWIVES
You can modernise your kitchen with one of our

ENAMEL TABLE TOPS
Smart, Easy to Clean, and at Moderate Prices

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

Corner Broad and Tudor Streets

ANNUAL HOLIDAY

Our CUSTOMERS and FRIENDS are asked to note
that our WORKSHOP will be closed as from Monday,
16th June, 1952, to Saturday, the 28th June, 1952, inclu-
sive, for the purpose of granting our Workmen their
ANNUAL HOLIDAY.

Arrangements have been made for emergency work
to be undertaken during this period and the receipt
of repairs and delivery, of completed work will be
continued as usual.

Our Merchandise Department and Office will be open
to business as usual.

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LID.

White Park Road.
St. Michael



SOCSSSOOS SSS POOPPOOP FOO

Wm. FOGARTY (pos) LTD.

Sd

JUST RECEIVED
36 in. PLAIN PLASTIC

in Red, Green, and Blue — @ 67c. per yard
Sd

36 in. FIGURED PLASTIC

83c., 90c. and 97c. per yard



Sd

48 in. FIGURED PLASTIC

$1.38 per yard
¢

Wm. FOGARTY

YORSISSSSSOOSS

SOOO PSOS FOSSPOVOOS

OS

(BOS) LTD.





> ~

*





FRIDAY, JUNE 13, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN







renee ECs eensaaaneasntanaaassiaiiitiainenislal
Rew meee eee mmmneemcnteerenes seme nes Speen 'SOSSOSSS5

Â¥ POOOPEEOEE CSCS PPS E

| }

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON % FOR ALL YOUR FRIENDS

% YOUR DISTINGUISHED
wile wen ia , Axoen
FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES
MISS LOVAT-1 HAVE TO ASK Vi
this denruawan nat a vouncaan) 4 || ST wae roy 747 |
LATE LAST NIGHT ? | | (7 was BY vOoUR ; yOu BEAST! ) | ce
INVITATION 26. xy
WAY DON'T VOL #
fm TELL HIM > % 5
— “> |
V rent
N i or eee J Tt TK ARENT you jill |
: \ Ht) roar : } ( GOING TO PUT * )
a Zo ¥ j EP : > ME BACK WHERE
gs 4 4s Vy | > JUSTAS ) pay / YOU FOUND ME ? )
pe N é / > THOUGHT jy >a) —— Sj]
ee AL rn S33 i hc As ee estes — / 4
ES ro IW QUEEN MARLA.! ...AND HE IS 20 ...70 THE ARENAS %

aE
-

There is Nothing Better cn
% the Market thane

S&S
Rum
Blended and Bottled by

STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LID.






Headquarters for Best Ram.

PCS LEA OGLE
O9SSS9F9SS 99999999595 9397,

;

















% Holiday Entertainment

. ‘
x

%

%

%

%
1 & c

+ uni *}
% Ae 4
Pa

- c
12









Q MIXED VEGETABLES in
x tins



s
x SLICED HAM

LAME TONGUES in tins
% CORNED MUTTON in tins %
. ROAST BEEF in tins ;
x VEAL LOAF in tins

% LUNCHEON BEEF in tins
ss And Our Popular

x FIVE STAR RUM

% ©
% INCE & CO.
x LTD.

s 8 & 9, ROEBUCK ST.

%, 3
| 963446:556666G6O6OGOGSSOSOR >



e Listerine Tooth Paste is compounded
of more than 14 carefully selected in-
gtedients, precisely balanced to give
you maximum polishing and cleansing
qualities without danger to the enamel.
Listerine Tooth Paste leaves your
mouth feeling fresher, cleaner, sweeter.
Try it today!



































SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only























WaNh ees SeceaTION:! a ee abe QUICKLY / PRINCE TO THE ARENA! ) BUTCHER / QUICK. WE







SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Hranches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street

GARL HAS CAPTURED

I'D JUST LIKE TO MORE EARTHMEN ...

MEET DR. CARSON /
yh ge +.

MUST STOP HIM!
Cr <

we

pn





Usually Now
DESSERTS

All Assorted Flavours

Royal Gelatine Desserts .... $ .22 BS
Tins Cadbury Cup Chocolate 12 66 Blancmange ..............:. AL ’
Royal Puddings ............ 16
Tins Spag in Tom Sauce: .... sh 20 Monk-Glass Blane ..,....... 2 ;
MOMMY A MUMIOR oe Ci sy kode vali le’
Quaker Oats pkgs. .......... 63 60 Hartley's -Jelles: iis ici cn eceecare
CRIME MMM ACh adc ok Ce cela Wek
Raspberries Tins ............ 93 84 Tower Jellies ..... ;
Bird’s Jellies eR

Tins Trim: (Lunch: Meat) .. $ .86 $ .80





HITLER STARTED IT BUT HIS GANG ; ADOLPH HAD A BEAUTIFUL SET
YOU CAN ALWAYS YEARS AGO FOR HIS OF THUGS IS OUT/ OF PLATES MADE FOR PRINTING

COUNT ON A CROOK TO WHAT'S THE THE MONEY! 17'S THE C.1.R's!



PROBLEM? JOB TO FIND THOSE PLATES... " Honey Co Ss re
ce) eet Mie as 26 22 ey Comb Sponge ..........sescecgees

EUROPEAN BLACK



—T MARKET!



D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

THE COLONNADE GROCERIES

The Place Where Your Dollar Goes Further



% GUESTS AND YOURSELF
BUT WE. DON'T WHILE, IN THE THRONE . YOU MUST COME FAKING THEM THE INSUBORDINATE







THE JACKSON TRIAL — ax mann

ALL THROUGH THE COUNTRY the fame of
Jesse Jackson (the smartest crook in the West)
spread from the large towns to the loneliest
outposts of the desert. The Law hated him, and
the dream of Marshal Tex Arnold’s life was to
eapture Jackson. One really formidable enemy
he had — ‘Doc’ Hayman and his gang. And this
is the story of the struggle between these two, a
battle of wits and nerve, of singing bullets and
hard riding.

ADVOCATE STATIONERY |







BRINGING UP FATHER







ORDER A 7x =N STEAKS /
4





BROAD STREET & GREYSTONE











; 646,56 608000*
THERE'S T t EVERY COP IN THIS AREA IS YEAH... I CAN DO THE JOS POR S 999999999 OSS OOPS OOPS FOE CEE LEP LLB LLL LLLP ALLL PLLA LALAAAADDAPAADE

4
AHEAD, LOOKING FOR A BLUE oe FOR YOU, MISTER...BUT PAINTS % 3
7 SEDAN WITH A BUSTED iy |GOTTA ORY, YOU KNOW... IT'LL x g
FENDER! WE GOTTA TAKE A COUPLE O/ x

‘.
% %
: :
* %
FENDER! WHAT DO e >
YOU CARE HOW $ %
THE CAR x 2

LOOKS£ ¥








<

Tat nay)

% ENJOY
% THESE
% WINE

3 MEALTH .

THe prink of FOMMECK THESE SPECIALS
HEA LTH JERSEY TOMATO JUICE 10 oz. tir
JERSEY TOMATO JUICE 16 07. t

in
SYMINGTON'S PEA FLOUR 16 oz. tins ‘
KEILLER’S JAMS 1 W® tins 6 tins lots @
ESCOFFIER ANCHOVY SAUCE 6 oz. bottles 36






A ae



Pe

~—_————- —_—
THAT OUTDOOR BARBECUE MOTHER -DID YOU SEE THAT T INVITED MY COUSIN FISHIN)
I BUILT TURNED OUT TOBE _/ OUTDOOR GRILL DADDY BUILT? AND HG WIFE AND CHILDREN /
b> A BIGGER JOB THAN I = € 2, OVER TONIGHT FOR A FEAST-,
EXPECTED? BUT AT LEAST C3 ar) } ALSO LINCLE KUNKLE AND <
WE'LL GET A LOT OF i st YES -ISN'T IT < AUNTY BELLUM” — MusT_J
PLEASURE OLIT OF IT. ; oxak WONDERFUL ? >» CALL THE BUTCHER AND
‘





Wr eee ie YOU \ f IF | COULD ¢ Rl?” GAP THEY E~GONE~ | [THEY Go





i er
IN TH T A yo \\t N HIM < q ee. SIM SAFE | | THEV RE ore N HOT or COLD JACOB'S COCKTAIL WATER BISCUITS .... 60:
MHInD PATROL) Worse FA eT No THE VELLOW-«#] ME GB > Now % FOODS ;
: oF « f ? x ‘s
%
> x WHITE GRAPES... in 16 oz. ard 30 oz, tins ‘
j . S PURPLE GRAPES in 124 oz. and 30 oz. tin ) + ? mn 1 %
1 df ¥ FRUIT COCKTAIL in 16 oz. and 30 oz. tin Al | | Y NI / | %
~ ra L 4 J s
ig % COCOMALT , in 1 t® tins f 4R484 3
R NESTOMALT in 1 â„¢ tins 3
% BOURN-VITA ..... ; in 4 th & 1 %} tin > “ 2
$ KRAFT ICE CREAM MIX in 4 oz. & 12 oz. tins & Co : Ltd. x
% LIDANO ICE CREAM POWDER in 1 1B tin ° 3
< COWLAC MALTED MILK in 14 oz. tin ae : ua ae
$ HORLICKS MALTED MILK in 1 18 tin ‘YOUR GROCERS — HIGH STREE! S
1X VITACUP in 4 1b tins
$ TONO in 1 ® tin %
LOOM SOOO OOOO OC SOOO OOOOP POO OGOOOOO OOO OCLC PEEL RLPCL EPPS SPP PPSO



PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, JUNE 13, 1952

D , Lou wees Past Hold Pres. to saeieaccaaaa Ifyou have discomfort
AFAR CALIMG . «sess nore an te

Draw In Cricket Match
that the acid balance of your stomach is upset. Over acidity causes

Led by West Indies captain John Goddard an Old
Lodge Boys’ team yesterday held the Present Boys to a heartburn, flatulence, and indigestion. Put things right as quick as you
can with * Dolsa’. Dolsa swiftly reaches all the surfaces of the stomach















Before a crowd
of 100,000 spec
tators, including
the Rt. Hon
Winston Church-
ill, Newcastle
United) the hold-

ers, retained the
Football Associ-
ation Challenge
Cup by beating
Arsenal by one
goal to nil in

draw in the Annual Past vs. Present fixture at the Lodge
School grounds.

Batting first the “Past” scored 180 runs for the loss of
five wickets and declared at tea. On resumption the Present
Boys scored 151 for 9 by close of play.

| wall with its gentle, neutralizing action.

Dol Ss a Recommended for:



the Final at The wicket was a perfect one with a good pace in it indigestion
Wembley Stadi- but the bowlers had little further success after Outram RESTORES DIGESTION Dyspepsia
a wieek cae had dismissed Cave, one of the opening batsmen for the Dolsa is made ide * correctly Heartburn
il oa, sr | salanced, ind lly pack ;
Blackburn Rov- Past” team for 0. bes ae Ae coitnlnnaiel aaa Flatulence, ete.

dose. This avoids abrupt over al-
. oll

kalization, a frequent source of |

further discomfort, since the di- oa a

—
sa
“

S

Veteran Theo Alleyne in a
courageous innings that combined
" > “@ > some beautiful drives through. the
rau s¢ ORER covers and some lofty lifts to the
cutflield, coupled with some strokes
everyone would not care if they

ers of 61 years
ago by winning
the trophy two
years in succes-
sion.







| gestion is impaired if the neces-

j sary acid juices essential in the

| digestive process are eliminated, ®
Jolsa is always gentle, settling te

d soothing in its action, seda- ———




%,

»
J






66 96 9 forgot, top scored with a most j ve and ag
oO « valuable 66 before he retired un- } fens; Fe t the dost lator if dis-
hh Os defeated. | comfort is still felt, But whenever
rE Skipper John Goddard obliged pain persists, see your doctor, 15 MEASURED DOSES IN EACH PACK
with a free but nevertheless pur- ents: T. S. GARRAWAY & CO.,, Bridgetown ’



poseful innings of 45 before he
was out well caught by Murray
off the bowling of Johnson. Mur-
ray took a running catch off a
skier backward of mid-on when
skipper Goddard mistimed what
was obviously intended to be a
powerful stroke.

Bad Start
The Present boys started off dis-

mn





And In iingland

The English Soccer season has sition. In this they have become
just finished, as has that in Bar- 1 ters, and although they have
bados, The prestige that West In- no: managed to win the Cup, they
dian cricketers have gained may a treat to watch. The ball
be achieved by football posses from man to man, the ball

CALLING






from this area in due cours It never ieaving the ground, and es ares ‘im ities
is of interest to note the different netimes not travelling more + aa _ eel f arenas
conditions and tendencies in the than a few yards, but with clock- hon e S aa was ve *) up |
play in the two places Jih precision, The centre forward j ee zs sli he Cave ee hei
The grounds in Barbados are p| a different role to that of ot fae . a 2 - ka wand ajudeed
vastly different from English Neweastle. He interchanges with Ter aan ithe « Welch oe him- A. J, MOTTRAM
pitches: the English player i ith olleagues on the forward line, if ~ it if ee ay aed ret trick
his best on a “heavy” or wet that the opposing centre half rot a iy be bowled next ball
pitch. This makes for better ball j: in two minds whether to leave ¥ DR ret e e .
control, the players being able to his position in the centre of the How noe ‘Stoute and Reifer r ]
— oe ball = oe aera i'S field or follow and mark his cen- twe Pe cartasiare with some free é ts enn tS MEN!
real anc true place for playing ¢t forward. It is in this baffling ra a anes # 4 imi
constructive football. pesition the defence find them- SOOrIRS ees cine Geoute Wat ;

The team which was succesS- selye and any of the forward
ful in the Knockout Competition |jne are able to take the centre
was remarkably clever, but, com- forward’s position and “have a
pared to English Soccer players, ”



stopped the rot before Stoute went e
l.b.w. to Headley for a most useful
25. Reifer was later caught by a

Farmer off Goddard for the top




; BO Pr 3

they were not keen enough to Their football is beautiful to score of 48. LONDON

ee none : = : ‘ ‘ar ¢ spectacular but a 4 .

— ee ie si ‘Sinema aie wateh, and — fail ~ bring ae pea idly, yr tecet ON JUNE 13 AND 14 British tennis will be on trial Here’s
& é them s "eSS, ave see » two a 5 . J ih ; . .

tice guicatyle of the two niost teams aneptioned. whan’ renteut 6 and when stumps were arawp At Bologna, the men tackle Italy in the third round of the

successful teams in England, jing and the honours are just for the day Goddard, a young Davis Cup. The women stay at home to meet the United

hander was then delighting the















teams with completely different ajo » : Ste % :
styles. Newcastle United won the Path MR. THEO ALLEYNE who top- crowd with some fine defensive States in the Wightman Cup. | a
F.A. Cup, which is equivalent to Newcastle just managed to get scored with 66 for the Old Boys. stroke play to save the ee 4 Neither of these matches may result in a British vic-
the Barbados Knockout Competi- the upper hand in the cup tie, did and carried out his bat for 12 tory, but they will give an indication as to the extent of Message
tion. Every professional team in the reason being that cup tie runs, the progress made by the y : le re oO
England can compete, right down football is of a very vigorous na~- : . Scores _ > bY the younger players. |
to the little clubs, leading up to ture, and sometimes skill is for- Warwick Suffer zig he “PAST” 6 The advance of such promis- Wightman Cu If they w | for You
the great final at Wembley, where sotten in the keen rivalry for the a ae re ca 66 ing youngsters as Roger Becker vill ee cites wi te ae Tae eras
the two teams left in compete at honour of going to Wembley to ifth Defeat S. Headley e Grant b Wilkie 82 and, Susan Partridge who will D ib : i ete Sat Ree HIE YI
the vast Wembley Stadium, be- | lay for the greatest of all prizes J. D. Goddard ¢ Murray b Johnson 45 both be playing in these Sa eer oe ee It EK a ished
fore a crowd of 100.000 people, in English football, the F.A. Cup. (From Our Own Correspondent) BE BB eee tid V3 sii eee = n these tees Truly the Americans are giants, WHY WAT ONE WE to get a SUIT Furnis
; Nse : * ’ via t y oT Murre as ‘a g p ave <= “e eB eve re ing * : * ~
on a perfect pitch with fresh Newcastle’s dash and speed and = # qe. Ce out 10 wiiernesy any es paths) os opti- Since the event was instituted in when you ean come right into the IDEAL STORE
green turf. ceen shooting gains them success LONDON, June 12. Extras 12 sa BS usiasts in this 1923 they have won the trophy on 3 } : _ :
New Recerd n the Cup, while Tottenham’s Country champions Whrwick abe "Tho tae os oe saa —— that the 19 of the 23 occasions, and get a fine SUIT in one hour in our READYMADE
setae cate onsiste style € erits suffer ir fi 2g ota or § wkts.) is not too far distant when It is 22 years sinc Sn gle y ;
Newcastie were able to create 60? istent style in football merits suffered their fifth defeat of the Total N - ae n is 22 years since England . ;
a new anand by winning the cov- their suecess in League play. season at Birmingham where ROWLING Britain will end the Australian tecorded a yictory, when “Hele DEPARTMENT. We guarantee you a Perfect Fit the
eted Cup for two years running, Lancashire required only two days _ o MR OW and American monoply in the 1930 side won 4—3, IDEAL WAY.
which created a record likely to C ; ‘th ; I pores ae noe eireere sar Water , 1 7 ; Bie, eee Ag i , In the following years untii
stand for a long time. Newcastle riffi as in took his overnight score o Fame 4: ges scond week-end in June 1939, when th ar cause : .
; : FP Oo ff svnnahtte See > . : : PE , nh e war caused the
Unirione sd Wie i Boat Stingo C.C. ReWinndetitatadtad tet $$ | wit 'aw how far ih optinism event tobe suspended, America |f[| TWEED SURES cnn s52.86 a $66.4
; ar to the olc plan of years I t ° wa ae c Senet os 6 1 aoe . used to win by a margin of four
ago. A rule was adopted before COE x wigo alte 176. Warwickshire collapsed bad- Murray ; 1 3 0 ey , ad alive A 7 ‘ *
p 16, fe collap AG ateon 2 : Despite Becker’s recent rapid Matches to three or five to two. TWEED SPORTS COAT ou. cc 39.16
the War under which a »layer is ly in the second innings and were eioiite ss 2 20 e s c rapi : , : . e
offside sae arid ibe thio cleo A LARGE crowd of about 600 all out for 127. ay : ee 3 © improvement, however, it seems —— vat resumption in 1946
nak ' y ee a SE an sleve no sine , PRESE c ers between him and the goal line S@8W an _ Eleven, captained by PRESENT likely that it will be left to the : y PURE LAMBS’ WOOL 5 Ss
when the ball is last played. As feresford Griffith defeat Stingo Another two-day victory was Murray ¢ Cave, b Ferigs » old firm of Mottram and Paish ™0re clearly marked. In those : L SPORTS COAT..... te 61.65
a result, attacking football has C-C. at Stingo, St. John, on Sun- secured by Worcestershire over fou Lines, Paenioe 0 to carry the flag for Britain, In Six years England has gained ‘
deteriorated. ‘Teams have concen- “ay_last. The game was begun Somerset who like Warwick are Reiter ¢ Farmer b Goddard #\ some ways this is unfortunate ‘two successes in 42 matches. PURE GABARDENE PANTS ... 29.01
trated on defence, using. .their 09 Sunday, June 1, and was con~ still without a win, orcester- Farmer c¢ Cave b Farmer . “8 pecker is a player of real prom- One of these was last year
centre half, who used to be the CWded shortly after’4 pm: Raa shire’s captain Bird made his Wilkie c Goitie’p Farmer... 6 ise who, with the correct hand- When Jean Quertier, who is in
brains behind all attacks, as a Scores: Stingo 113 and 161; Grif- highest score of the season before Goddard not out ‘ 12 Jing could reach world class, He ‘he side this year, defeated
“policeman”. It is his job to keep fith’s XI 105 and 181 for ee Worcestershire declared at 358 for Outram c¢ Alleyne » Cave .. : is always anxious to. lear by Shirley Fry.
se guard the ‘centre for- Hero of the game was ennis 9, Somerset fared badly against Johnson not out 5 ayi agains biel ik . ave ¢ er 0 {
ce © UATE On the ee emai Cobham who seored 123 not out the pace-bowling of Perks and Extras : playing against men of greater | Strengthened 9 .
s z J i eee Wy nS ae nie ae 4 a ; ~ experience. The American team is likely
started this just before the War, in Griffith's XI second innings, after following on 221 behind, Total (for 9 wkts.’ 151 But he isconly likely set a to be strengthene .
with a player called Roberts. 2nd took 11 wickets for 81 runs were dismissed by the spinners of a wee anaes Sipe y MEPL NO Heb Ae Lee rengthened by the return 10, 11,12 & 13 Broad Street
Goals became a rarity, and play in the match, In the first innings Jenkins in the second innings : , ® ao SE ancé to play in the actual tie of Louise Brough, winner of
became duller in consequence “he had scored 23 not out in four arinie ie oe if the issue has been settled one eleven Wimbledon titles since she - a aie
ten ae way or the other after the first first played there in 1946. Last



5
)
made minutes, Surrey Loses Headley : :
y Goddard 6 1-73 : three or four matches. If the tie year she suffered from tennis

UCT ee 4 17 :
. 8 goes the full distance, his ap- ielbow and was consequently not

When a fresh start was
after the War many ways









Skinner

















































































tried by various teams to circum-~ For the first time this season Gave 1 0 ! ! earan ill be | ted 4 ef I
vent this, The most successful Surrey have lost first innings pearance wi e limited to ex- at her. best, and was dropped
— been Perens United and SPORTS WINDOW points. In a slow scoring game oe a ae Pl * from the side, We I fi Sa k |
ottenham fotspur. Newcastle at Lianelly, Glamorgan secured Te s Many oung ayers eg Rs y ‘@ ean su rom Stock
use the W plan, with their two Modern High School will a lead of nine and captured one Wint Pulls Muscle Most of the Italian team are in , noe sein es recovered, and Peg
inside forwards well back to play Fortress a return Surrey wicket before close. But ; tLeir early twenties. As a result see at to win back her
break, and start attacks, with basketball match tonight at as there is a short day tomorrow, ARTHUR WINT, Olympic 400 of the far sighted policy pursued ? Th 7 ee tearm . CRITTALL STEEL SLIDING FOLDING DOORS.
we very ee oan jer the ¥.M.P.C. it is unlikely that there will be a metres and A.A.A, half-mile py the Italian authorities, in : e are side is one of the
players on the wing, Leading this The other match for to- definite result. champion, has pulled a muscle encouraging youth they have strongest for some time and the The Ideal Door for
attack is a player who has gained night is the Pickwick-Har- during training, and will not run many excellent young ‘players, coaching of Fred Perry has add- Door f Verandahs
international fame, aie RS rison College Match, Scoreboard in competitions for two weeks. such as Sausto Gardini, G. Merle, °4 tits proficiency. But Ameri- The Whole Door slides and folds to one side.
renowned for his great speed and While Modern H ig h The injury is not serious, but no and Rolando del Bello. ea, with Louise Brough, Maureen
powerful shooting. The plan in School have not yet scored Worcestershire beat Somerset dcubt bearing the Olympic Games : Connolly, Doris Hart, Shirley . an ;
ee the ee ie {ors 4 win, Fortress have scored by an innings and 54 runs, Wor- in mind, Wint is not ae iw The form these young Italian Fry and Pat Todd, holds the Supplied in two Sizes...

(eae s Phe ed cant Agate oaly two. cestershire 858 for 9 declared, risks. The injury prevented him players have shown this season, aces, and the British girls wil it — 6 2” = ”

bri . it tt halt-beed “gia : College defeated Pick- itird 158, Hazell 5 for 82, Somer- from assisting Polytechnic Har~ suggests that Britain’s interest in do well to improve on last as with é seshined _ : 3 wit x ? 3" heh

important Gus. “iglloercan centre wick im their first match and et 137 and 167, Jenkins 6 for 64, riers in their vo haan sane the Davis Cup may _ end at one victory vegibe i fi wit &

Fe A Be corms Sacmatiadh now that the Pickwick team University last ursday. » Bologna. ; ‘A

halt ie an. this hide 8 oor’, Baa are fitter, it will be interest- Lancashire beat Warwickshire McDonald Bailey was also absent tenteuote-vear-ola » Gardin CRITTALL FRENCH DOORS

Burt the taen the fede eee ng seeing how they will by an innings and 49 runs, Lanca- from the team, as he felt it un- | 421) gangling youth, has already + 9” wie we |
fea 1a cea ate he show against College in this shire 338, Ikin 118, Warwickshire wise to run so — aoe retitn+ Po oien Mottram this vear, in the THE BARBADOS ex 9” high

the centre forward uses his extra return, ron ing; from the Unt Nae recent French Championships AQUATIOCLUB CRITTALL STEEL WINDOWS

area e reach the ball before the Sei In the Yorkshire vs. Gloucester- . His ener i Ng bene (Local & Visiting Members r Vari
centre half, and when he does so, ~~~ = shire match Yorkshire made 406 He Did li lect year when he beat Gardner only) arious widths and heights with or |
the goal is at his merey, the two for 7 declared, Gloucester 232 and Molloy the American ace who without Ventilators. |
ee te eee WEATHER REPORT 181 for 5. SYDNEY; An old-age pensioner Ws much fancied for the title, SATURDAS : SUNS 4TH THE MODERN WINDOW FOR THE MODERN HOME
under this defensive plan, Y Mr. “Mic ‘ > ste Gardini as layer 0 AT 8.30 P.M

; ; ai . ; : ‘ F Ni J. M. Michel of Sandstone, stamped ar a play .M.

‘i Lightning Thrusts on er from Codrington In the Oxford University VS. \estern Australia, has sent a the highest class. sia eiparcte == aie

Newcastle used this methoc y aan Kent match Kent made 243 and (che for £20 to a Melbourne here, } & TROUPE "PHONE : 42
consistently with success, The totes Rainfall; for Month to 241 for 4; Oxford 223. Hospital rae qrestinent he had _ lf the struggle that sarees will entertain with re
lightning thrust down the mid- Boa 1.80 ins. : there in 1899. He wrote “I’ve men face is stiff, the task before } f
dle upsets the stonewall defence ae pun: pens F. .en trying to pay for 63 years, the women is monumental. h The Miser oe °
of most teams. and has gained sowest Temp: 0 °F. ' aa Y aaa Staal They will meet one of the Human Hen ° °

: : ‘ ; ‘ ” ut did not get the chance. Now y wi

roe wnoeee 38 the Cup for the cece 15 miles per WHAT'S ON TODAY Ive saved the money from my &trongest teams that has a The Fakirs Rope Trick

s o s€asons : sion.” repres erica in 5 D

The other team does the com- Barometer (9 am.) 29.989 Court of Ordinary 11.00 a.m. ona represented ho ™ “ Electric Chatr
plete opposite. Tottenham Hot- (3 p.m.) 29.981 Basket Ball, YÂ¥.M.P.C. 7.30 | (%6666969099999999999SS9SSS9OSSSOSIO FIFI FF OF OH Clifton Mind Reading Act
spur relies upon very closely-knit TO-DAY p.m. s Hypnotism, Etc., Ete.
team work to beat the othe Sunrise: 5.44 a.m. Mobile Cinema, Summervale, Rg
team, The main plan of their at- Sunset: 6.19 p.m. St. Philip 7.30 p.m. e THE BOODHOO BROS.
tack is for the wing man, inside Moon: Full, June 8 Police Band at Charity Con- | $ Indian Stunt Kings and
forward, and half-back, to work | Lighting: 7.00 p.m cert, Queen’s College 8.00 8 Boneless’ Wonders f
very close together, and they High Tide: 7.59 am., 9.01 p.m. : | Etc., Ete. F
weave patterns, with very close ee. : Films at British Council 8.15 | e Also DANCING by ‘
passing from man to man, to pull ow Tide; 1.58 a.m., 2.30 p.m, P-m,. | Caribbean Troubadours }
the opposing defence out of po- from 10.30 p.m.













[ They'll Do Tt Every 4 lime Reviniored U, 5, Patent Often j THINK OF To batertainment * Dance







/ WAS THAT GUY IN A HOSPITAL
OR ON A VACATION ++ NONE
OF THE DAMES AROUND HERE

11.6.52,—3n.



A YOU SHOULDA SEEN THE
UTTLE RED-HEADED NURSE
I HADâ„¢WOW! IM IN THE









THE CONCEITED























JOINT TWO MINUTES AND GIVE. HIM A TUMBLESHE J APES! AND

MAKE A DATE WITH HER FOR Ye MUSTVE HAD A NEW / THOSE MORONS AND

WHEN I GET OUTTHEN THERE <7 PERSONALITY LISTENING TO HIMâ„¢ BUSTED

Pile Shr eae cee ke 7 ee hi ee PIN AND \%

KNOCKOUT BUT WATTLE TELL f 4 ANSAD a THINK y
/ 2 BET THE 1x OF 3

DROOLBERRY-
J YOU ABOUT THE NIGHT NURSE = A ye Adm | j/ OIETITIAN WENT
FOR HIM INA -
BIG WAY AND
GAVE HIM AN
EXTRA DIGH OF

Tapa PS |




|
| THE FIT
|

§ THE PRICE qe
| A WORSTED
SUIT



* Van Heuson







- ‘Austin Reed |
j







% | * Consulate
& iow: VWrondtutte Anniversaries } | * Elite
i irthdays, Christenings, ete. | *
, ONLY 5 OO 2 | DIAMOND RINGS neuer
Ness? ‘ x | GOLD. & SILVER SHIRTS to complement your
——— x Sif JEWEL RICE TAILORED Tropical,
eiet'STENING en : AT S| See your Jewellers... | Irish Linen and Moygashel
; Li E z | . " ;
| _| BLOWASH Mi See ie. g S| ¥ “ De LIMA Suits a u wardrobe of com-
SS RECOUNT tis SPITAL $s P. < S. MAFFEI & co LTD. x | ‘ | petitive prices!
Sas) THANX 4 $ S| & CO.,LTD. | C.B.Ri:
x ‘TOP SCORERS IN TAILORING’ x | 20 BROAD ST. - B. Rice & Co. of tonen Lane
s % | and at MARINE GARDENS

08 - 04 G -S .
. PPE OSES SSO SSS SSPOSS SSS SSS SS SSS OSS TOSSOS











Full Text



PAGE 1

FRIDAY. JIM II. I* BARHADOS ADVOCATE I' \(.l -IMS "ENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN STRANKS ft GEORGE DAVIES BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS BUT MIS GANG OF THUGS 16 OUT/ WHATfc THE FRO0lE ? APOLPH UAPA BEAUTIFUL SET OF PLATES MAPE FOR PRINTING THE MONEV.' IT'S THE Cl B'S JOB TO FIND THOSE PLATES... ,ANP SOON/ BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS RIP KIRBV BY ALEX RAYMOND ttAH„i : OW DO TMI --i FOB *OJ. m%Tvt...njr Qbvrv 1 SOTTA 30V. *DU .NC*S„. I XE A OXPLf O 1 f>Y*... THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK a RAY MOORES THIRC W-TOOL-/ woc-~ f ACT.' List OP v/AV////yi -.'rO ALL YOCR I K1FNOS VOI K DUTIWH BOD l <.I I -I\\|| VOI RS| I I There la Nothin* iirltT on thr Market than* S & S Rum Hl--iiJ.il and Bullied by mm i .SIMPSO.N (1938) LTD. Ilolidav Fnlrrlainmrnt >; Mlxril VIIIFT sBLFS In lln. ; SLICF.D HAM I LAMB TONIUFN In lln i CORNED MITTON In Um UHAST BKF.F In Um VF.AI, l.OAF In lint I I M HF.ON 111 I I In llni And our r..i>ui ir FIVF: STAR RUM &f INCE & CO. LTD. %  >. KOF.RI I R ST. IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only M'M'IAI. III! I.IIS ure % %  iiviiiliibli' Ml amr lfriiiirlii' I'•-rdwidr, S|ii'ii;lilsloi. II Mill "..! II Nil III Usually Now Tins Trim: (l.unrh: M.nt) f JM S Nil Tins Cadbury <'ii|i < I I.. i..72 l HI Spau in luni Sauce: .... .'.II l(u. .1. i Oal.s ,,l, ,;s i;:l Rnspbprrlc Tina 9:1 H.ir Kings 2li lift .27 •till -I .22 DESSERTS All As.in.-UMi Mas nun it..Mil ii.-l.iiin.. Pamrti .22 jflS/S* lll.iiuiii.ini:.. .13 £H lti>>ill I'II. Iil111 .ic Monk-GuuM MMC XX J.-lln I'llililinus Hnthg s jriiir. ( liivi-rs Jrllii--. T..i-r Jrllirs Bird's MHM Ili.nrv ( .'tub S|MIIIKI> S .2.1 .21 .21 .14 .20 .IK D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street T 11 E C i. o H 1 \ i I; 6 II O c: E ll I E S Tk I'luciII /! %  %  • lour Ihillur (,nis Vurthvr I III: IAt It.SON IIU1I MAX WHIMI AM. THROUGH THE CX)UNTRY the Funi o, j.'sse ,i,itks'ni (tin : iii.ii N t orooh In UK spread from tha Largo towns to tho I outposts of the desert. The Law h*Ud him, EM. ih. 1 'iM'iitii of Marshal Tex Aniold'l life was to capture Jackson Oiw really tormidsbla anam) li.Ii.nl 'I ><•' Hayman and Ins nun,;. And this is the story of the slruimle batWOaU tlMM tw<>. I battle of wits and nerve, if sincinn bullets and hard tiding. \lVO< MI MAIIO.\I:IIV ItKUAII STREET -S. (.KEYSTONE ;^v.*v>v>v>vvvw.vvvx^^^ .;•.;•••'•••''• %  •' %  '•'•'•'•'''''•'''•''', mCwji tow pmBS r EXJ10V THESE EI.XE MBALTM WHITE GRAPES PURPLE CHAPES FRUIT COCKTAIL COCOMALT NKSTOMALT IIOURN-VITA THE DRINK OF KRAFT ICE CREAM MIX LIDANO ICE (REAM POWDER COWLAC MA1.TKIJ MILK IIOHLICKS MALTED MIIJX VITACUP TONO in MI "/ i 1S| CM and M <" 'ii in 16 or., and 30 ox. Una in in i "> Una m A i m tin. in 4 n Ac II in I 14 en in 1 in ( 1 tinn i in < h Must; SPECIALS JERSEY TOMATO jrii i JERSEY TOMATO JUICE irt -.tin 24 .-..li KElLUER'fl \ iflS I %  > tin I ESCOFTIER AN( HO* i*x un ALLEYNE &f X: Co. VOI II I.HOVIIIV AIMI1LK Ltd. IIM.II VI ItKI.I |/,',V.V^//.V/.'////^//'.V//V//X,V/VAVA'.VAV//.V'.' '-*.'-' iWAV.V////1



PAGE 1

ESTABLISHED 1895 FRIDAY .11". PRICE nvr East Germans Impose Rigid Security Decree Illegal Border Crossers Liable To Jail And Fine BERLIN, June 12 JT AST GERMANY today published a now security decree which renders people illegally crossing the border liable to an immediate sentence of two years' imprisonment and a heavy fine. It went into force four days ago. It applies to people crossing the West Berlin perimeter as well as to those who violate the East German border with West Germany and *he East German Baltic coast line. The decree, issued by Vice Premier Walter Ulbricht, Politburo Chief, on behalf of the ailing Prime Minister Otto Groiewhol. instructs security forces to enforce their general watch against "diversionists, spies and terrorists." Recently 1,000 East Germans fled into West Germany following Eastern security measures which aim to seal off the Eastern Zone's 18,000.000 inhabitants from all Western influence. Anyone charge" under the new Frum \tl QunrliT' order may be fined up 1o 2.000 East Marks (officially equal to about £170 but in practice work." out to about £43; and sentenced to two years in prison The dBCroe had the effect of extending tha penalties for Illegally crossing the East-West German frontier to cover border violations around the West Berlin perimeter. The Allied high commission met in blockade-threatened West Berlin to discuss the rvtr* %  ound thai tool em outpost. The commi< here from Bonn w,i> .. Allied support for West Berlmers who have lived through one Russian blockade and are afraid that the Russians may be plotting another The West Qarman gDvariunant gave its reassurance by BBlldlllg III Flnam-e Minister Frit/ here to dUcUM plans for Federal economic aid to Wcsi BorUBs endange i Winner Gets Girl BOMB; Prd Lamberts. • King Filipino wiut made a bet to DM World in 14 month* with l no dollars (£35) arrived in i if he wini Hi* J< i Adami of Mani>a win marry him and bis. rival, Mauiitius vaiaDnano, wltta whoa at will *tep aside nd pad 'inn D.000 dollars as a wedding (oft He plans to be back ,i Hanua before December 4. when the 1* month.* expire. So far ho has spent 611 of the 100 MhLriotKNr A corniortabli stay-down strike has been organI i i>y 52 members of tlugovernCommunists meanwhile sat up invnt-owned sliato mine Bl Glen B public school camping,, of h .v South Wales. Tl\ey end rearmament aasltui the W--1 "> ""> wl "^ dow n u, ,ul ,hu In East Germany. To-day is *'--''"?* re !" r lU d ci f i ^ "Teach.iermany. At ', iSSf i;nithrOtJITTOn-n^;-n <*cu-,l^ 1 y set Up a kitchen at the pltte m. piad. C o fa w unlil ruled teachers were exhorted C r o as t defence readiness.' Schools win be caUad upon to I i tnousands of yOUB| regjuit* for the 375.000-1 Ecst Qannaay is preparing. Plans for requiring rifle training m all high schools have aln Indicated The British Commandant in Botlln, Major General C. F. C. COleman. protested to thi toe" ay against kidutippn • 'liners from the British sector last Tuesday. Th victims were two newspapermen .nd an inn-ki i helu by the Communists. Coleman's pretest said the.\ STOra Hie edge of Hie British border" when R'Ikui aoldtorj and East German police seized them .it eunpoln.. —U.P. Icaa fhe mine because it d Thev have a gramophi •H J rerorra. und thMr ramlllea have set up a kitchen at the pil i i down hot men three times dally MAIIKID: To answer a charge of scaling clothes worth £3. 48Man u KOMI walked 120 null-, from her village to the aariaa court She acquitted and the lUdgja loan ITI bii own car. WASHINGTON: In luitn, Maryland Dr Roban Seiuger. dlrjeUN of the National committee on Alcoholic Bygicn,. ro y OTta tli.it alcoholism b> "the most dan of all .rll.. • ..:. Rich man, poor iran—drink plays no favourites." t'AIKO: An empty train i-< cidentally sUrted while in Zag.izig, some 60 miles from Cairo. Caning aaaad. it careered along Bl 50 mile* la hour. Th track rod for the train, which cLimc loa stop only two n I Cairo, when its furnaoa bod i timed low IllllsitWI f _,J.*„ JV-.*a !" He. m a LdOO-berth liner took over th. lniHail neutrality slips km hen and organised emj\ehru SI reason NEW DLUII, June. 12. Prime Minuter Jawarhaial Nehru to-day re-arnrmed in Parliament Indian neutrality in the event o[ war. He said "No man can say whether the world Will Juiviu' the next few years peacefully or nut. If disaster breaks' it will come to too entire world. Even so, our policy, should be to avoid that disaster, and even %  ( it comes we should be in position to try and stop it 1 would like the remainder of the area of Asian countries to mar.' Jo the ergency meals when the crew B-ont on Strike. They ran a caf. lena service—und made the caj tain queue for his dinner with evtrvonc else.—L.ILS Japs Reject Russian Claim Lodge Gives Goddard Its Top Honour M apta Goddard. O.B.E. West %  % %  Min me highest s/aj I old boy can receive from a %  wtor, .. eabi ad the U-dgc School shield, in reedgxun of the honom which he had ught to Uie W.st Indies and the Lodge School iiielf hv leadership of the Won ..... | rfcshH field. Hon. Dr H (; M,.siah. M.I.C.. Imaoll mi old l-odge Bag urnian of the C. went[ Body of the Lodge School. presentation, after the t vs Present mat oh at the Lodee School grounds. Mr. Justice J. W. B. Choner> II tinnrM to pat tubule to tho hievements of John Goddard But first he reminded the hov especially that there was no game Played Ut the School that developed that team spirit. ..nd demanded at Its best level such 4 concent ration, application and perseverance W, necessary to the prodinin, .f good citizens as the game of cricket Cricket, he said, taught them take the rough with the smooth and tho Lodge School might juirt%  !"• proud that John Goddard who led Uie West Indies lo vicagaJnal ftigi imi n n W.-M Indies, in England and in India who had lost to a stronger learn in Australia had exemplified ose characteristics in the qualh-adershlp. He spoke of the type of unrea> On Page 6. III IS 4 • Red Delegate Obstinate On Prisoner Exchange Issue At Truce Talks Ml N 12. CHIEf COMMl MM Kon ,t.il his dgtnunriation il the Allies ln-d> bui rcn 1 I bottnato on '!> %  pi i '" i > % %  ^•'^••i • ii %  %  irn Maj ii.'ti Vi illu.ni K. Bai %  .,•.„ told rffporten h* .itiachci i North K (> Is Trouble Spot On Koje KOJK ISLAND. Korea, JllOO, II Compound number whurs : -uners are housed and B uch is regarded BS a possible tumble spot In the dispen>.d of mmunist camp^. io expected to hroken up BOOn, paslb|v tomorrow. According to usualh sources to-day the British Comni DnOra when their camp il before they are dispersed Now thul the Mupil | i-'und. number 76, ha bMn sova III>, II is believed that mmi others will raise no difficult lea. but is realised that compound number W may prove an %  *m-eptli.n to this. United States troops have carried out clearing four ived two spokesmen from the >mpound at their own request aders from several impounds have met GMM 'I %  n 'i p %  [s)w days. t r ELBcmcvn RATIONED l\ Kin RIO UK JANEIRO. June 12 Klectricity will once more be tioned m Rio. The Nation :il for the Water Kleclr y ordered severe restrl. from .'vJO p.m. to 8 p.m —fb.p.i nil not enter "I would also TOKYO. June, 12. The Japanese Foreign Omc* rejected the Russian claim that Ihe San Francisco peace treaty is illega. and re-afnrmed the j powers that they | stand that Soviet envoys here other countries to declare against I the use of weapons like the ; and hydrogen bomb."—l'.P. any event.'have no diplomatic standing now like India and'that Japan Is again an independnation. Russiu did not psjaea treaty which bee. rliv April 28.—C.F. WAN III.M; IIIIIKI'I Paris Police Suspended On (JmYges Of Ctommunism PARIS. June 12. PARIS POLICE CHIEF Jean Baylol has suspended 22 members of the Pans put ice and transferred about 50 lo new posjta 'in Ihe interests of security", a spokesman at police headquarters said tonight ihu-onfirmed leports said Baylot txik these measures after examination 4 docummX* seized during i ecent raids (in Communist Party headquarter*, in Pans. BWnlBta srera known to have .fler the end of the war lut aftei poUr ffato i ropy or th* School SliUkl st s istch at Lodge School yit*r tsghtan la) %  Rl %  .:'"". i[>:iy|ng fur • ut ... t The moi • i -ith the announctmant that lun-yiuli in < civil I nions And (iovl. Discuss Steel Crisis Acheson Sends Notes To Eden %  And Sell unia 11 the steel indu-t, >. tlin i %  Q • nmant, Poui tin %  %  ,..(. %  ,.. %  l bj lop % %  in m. rruman U i ha ,i k, i (at %  %  .1 ) %  > .ivh nun in imolt. I Taft-llarlley act's .mli-slnk. in ilon I'Mi i" ..... aali i %  Buprama court mil an WASHINCTON. Juti12 X D] ll.r M ,1 Seeratr> %  •( Si,,!.n.-.„i Ait,, u, ,m M,I,H L m-hu ll ''' %  •"''la UM um uirantead by tl naUtution bo > jmd Franefa i tn %  >< "• rui.nin-.i l *-<, ll w n,,. high %  '' %  i %  .i.. I.I. ,r II,I Jaw unconatlwiih the SovM Union on|luUonal In raply. u..<;..vrriii.)ciii Ned through i. law setting up %  %  pad lo ovatrUa tha %  miany It was lenmivl nere b> lbs y. I '•! %  I Hntain, ind Iba unllad States are maauna in reply t.> tha So" a) Dad td suggest ii IK four-pow HIII .I.-K! that the State %  %  tha United it.-s Ambasaador In Paris Jamea unn to clarify the stall RuaUon laauad by ihPranel %  ni ih.it ii aranlad i Big an naathif on Oerroany t.. he Id in the neai future. %  fin on the text .if messages llfti Aebeaon atnt t. Anthony rvleri i l:. art Bel —I'.P • ii nidii-i.uv %  lions—(C.P.) eonaUtuUo WASHINGTON June IZ. .: T .Mil nit tosjathi i io-daj t t\ tn. raoaenttia at a fe> ikabound ipona 'in i's t i Kara* BB aj ntaeunj il line with an BgnaUMBll in.i'l M.n.l.iy when MfOUaUoni Ii W 0 itaalwo %  tha United Btatea col A that Ion.' I>-.IAIIKII .I.'H'I [ % %  ii ni.nigh | i %  t I %  irmamant i'...i.i.f,i ituawn bai il i i oofraaa tii.it mi. tl %  it would not to product 11 1 in-..i. Jamaica Plans €500.000 Swamp Scheme I une II ii .. a % %  .il..in..1 l)evrlii|xiieiit %  i fm .i tsoo.ooo nrMna I gMUMBOn ; I I heme HcpresenUtlves of C.U.C .< • 'KM-,.141 /,. OrooM lh*ad In Courl i.'it'"' Wat ig> %  .h.--iN.ii,fi Trafalcai Buoai ...iiapMM Ui Ih I'I.IH. M Court tin iboul 12ii ,.viik and ni iihnust Imincdialely. iu*t at Ml Woranip Mi II A Talma *: in..King prafatoi tin .nig ins BOB Oaorga who arai i r.'i |ha Ii i "y of Iwi boil • t brandy, tin >.i [) V Bcott, U orm Win-hug a*ai rapraaaol i.y Mr O, II A i th) i IfOOdJna had been in tin Mir t, tin baarlni II infiltrated into (he furl• i of 2fi.oon men inunadlataiy curity most of than were batlavad to have been dhunlaaad by 1048 Police headquarters de' I details -buut the new security measures The suapanded irttunnan win IB. r a disciplinary tribunal short%  ran ordered today to Ihatr nvolvers and theli i card*. Some of these men la include police officer* art uspeeted of having Igdornwd iiunist Party about secuutv measures taken I %  way's arrival. Papers Allocution %  Part Police Force" have i -f the t .lni INTER-ISLAND fELEPHONK SYSTEM < g to Jamaica shortly for dis(usslons of the proposals which t nimage of the twamp lands to the Western end of the i-:.Tni wi Tit awni S.000 acres, and preparing tii.n %  idtivation. ''In-! largr swamp areas will ... %  nli ndfi %  . provlda iiiportable surplus, fj H sh..ip. ( hainruiifcid h created Agricultural ii. ni Coiajrarauon will v*. rtly li>%  isiting Itntish Guiana %  : ice Induati -f that ctwnuy—^i 1 .-nt of ti., '-rt iba Darfcat and 1 IbSS production tn almost a 1 Cardinal Dies VATICAN LITV. Jur sorrow" of the death || arre-'ing demon1 1 Kttl v ton a A iruiiii. -:.id| Seven:. %  w<.;ke Ihel SO pohren ror the United Slates v I 10" more 1 I H SI KITTS. J • 1 Kuuihsber of ft.wn Jamalcn taslarday. Il %  0| reduced < (able and Wireless will ihl Saerad College of Cardinals r /estigate the |. BsJbUlty ol MI td the new low of 4 princes of Hlng a 'lurches* 1 haber was the last sur-1 : vicing Cardinal appointed by ihe late Pop panadkl XV who CoUaga! .Ihorbied I I* lute &* when mother's milk is lacking in quantity or quality LACTOGEN a modified powdered milk, is one of ihe most suitable foods for baby. Speed Can Thwart Kremlin f the Lodge School seated around the cricket aroand st the Lodge School sronnds yester dsy thsy wstched the Past vs. Present WASHINGTON. Jui %  : 1 1 %  -. Htgh ComRusasonar, urged %  Bl 1 'e ratillcation of the •lemenu on Certhwart the mighty camimgn originating in the Kremlin jfiom destroying them. Testifying 11*fore the Senate Relations CornkfcCloy said Communists' ['alternative brandlshment of prevent W. 1 -m joining tha W> U 1 rees McCloy said "their on I reat to ; i-rogressr %  nl Iba raUBeauon, and said 1 r that speed was important." McCloy estimated all *ix couni>ar1icipating u <. 1953 ran -.'ites. German-, and Prai JACTOSEI/ A NESTLE PRODUCT —V.T 1 i.H.m> (.KANT LTD — Airnt.


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EYB55XXLI_FOQANG INGEST_TIME 2011-10-12T16:41:28Z PACKAGE UF00098964_02907
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

PACE TWO RA>trI\IH)S ADVOC \TE FRIDAY JVST. 13. 1 Qahib Qallinq. For The U.K. II 1 ariii Lady Savj^i panie>| by M.ijcr D-iinii wughan. Mentary, **i i Opening Ceremony i>( the Balh*heba Social Centre to-morrow at 5 p.m. Pilate". Wife M R. CHAJILn I and party will pn n r Collcg*' Ha'l fo-mcht anport_ s S (Matfor England vices in South America during Mrs. Challenor who will be on a World War II. during a ceremony 'i visit will see her two at the Chilean Embassy where a children George and Hetty. The dinner was given in hit honour former Is at school at Eton and by the Chilean Ambassador. the latter Is w -rklng In London. Other passenger* leaving by the (...Int.. ail Mr*. /.my M Arthur. Miss Amy C Arthur. Miss Sybil E. Arthur. Mrs. Violet E. Bowrlng. Mi and Mn. Trevor Bowrtng and eUuitliter. Mrs. Kathleen P. —(U.r.) CROSSWORD winT^annri 1 ia daughter. Mr and Mrs. E. S l^inJES ..Urs. Mr ..nd Mrs. C J. Crane Hot*. a here %  M rnaritj , getting entertainment (or your '''" t "Tlh i?^ t f ^tln. a worth, Sfc£ £ . ^TuTc^l o t A fSlsrnh. Violet RouSupennt -r.dfnt WIrn*r?Mr. „n,i Mr, E. B Will^ Telephone Co. I'"•., " %  Eiuabeth w,ium. M H A W MA1I.F General I M,a L v White Mr. and Mrs. M .5 ,1 \L Zl PA Williams. Mis. Eluabeth Mao.T-.Xonl l". '.! lettfm Sf"S MU *"* Outran,. B.w" A a! %  t.',i-,l... v„i< He %  ;'."1"l..." %  :• %  "" "..?. Sm.th. has gone to advise 00 the telei 3 U 1 5 H 1 ,o 1 '. 1 t %  J J R Ji | phone service which is being operled by Government. For U.S. Holiday Mr. T. W. Astorga and Mrs, C F," Farrcr and two children L EAVING for the US.A. and Canada yesterday morning. It W I A Via Arabia and lU• %  I A brtde w i>> ha i Rico were Mr. and Mn. JOB: "' BVmdtri Tb*| I'.ive gone for rVo %  BBswrina' bolfti > Mr. :: nasnr of s^ Listening /fours Act,,.. r i-riici; iu Kride rcauiurtfl Irom IUCCM*, in 11. With native fo.:nwlug It U oBini a ciiolce. I5I U. What tha addrr m* dot (SI if UauailT %  ma-.ier or inttrnt (4> la uiiowrrrd witimut a atrip. II) IV lrap:oi.iii broScn toots'" UIAX tMttvt With %  iiii.H MM afta* vou have had that w..m bath It UKn Juit I UIMTIS for lh*> -in to bo hot and 1.1 lOIB BATH TIB If you hava on* of thoor MODERN GEYSERS fram our Ooa Bar "'"* CALL AWa SIB 11 Colony Club ST. JAMES Saturday. 11th June and each following Saturday DANCE in a delightful setting — Excellent Buffet — $4.00 (no Ail miss in n Charge) TODAY. !. CM a IN r.M. BBd l^Hlnalng DaUj. 4 A . p.m. The fassasj ,^4 MAVO V**^ NELSON ".Wlau* ft ass, "W !" yt^c ROMAN A'V Mr. WILLIAM liKlKKN. Medical Studcfnt KKIVING by Quiit Wedding Light Muaic Ql in wakrfjdjng look plae) ma KM HERS and friends "I the O.ympia Club were lerday afternton when Mr All-*" Ivrtalned lo a programme Inenl "A" light music which was held srf Lord's Castl thi Hnilsh Council on WednesAlso lenvini; for the I7.S.A. vsa' CfaurCh, took as his brtda day night. Some of the numbers Antigua iind Puerlo Rico ilMtl Coluttl dauaktai ..f hird were "Prelude in G day by B.W.I.A., was Mrs. E. F. I *h ColUttt if > rTti|i.mi"r C II. pm Invrnilon In Mu-e. • 5 pm 'l-'i Bound up and Piogismir.i Parodo TOO p m Th N.. 7 10 p m llom* Now! rrnm Bofam — la w HUN I 1I.M M World AhV-.rt. b • Cup. Britain V Int-tli.dc. < 55 | Th'.'Nswi, ID 10 | p.m. Tha Dohat*rtom Tha Thud P To Attend Conference enjoyed Holiday A n U n |:j.„ C„ M or rVf lfS -VI <.<1)S'nt .-,-,%  ; "Vil %  '•k '. Pop Rock, and the wlll(ll u ,„ ^ ^eld In l'rt-ofHrTlv i 1 i !" 1 Vancouver. British half months' holiday staying at late Sydney Green of Dominica, spam from the 16th— 19th June Cnlumb ' <* Monday via Puerto tha Octwm Vkew HOW and AquaUC "Billy" h* now completed his Mr liour t c has a(1 „ ( ,„ ,,..„.W0 and Antigua for a holiday Court. jiie-medical course at 1-oyola Ben rjahle *? WlrataH It the whlch "'•y are 'Pending with She laid thai it was her first Jeaull College, Montreal, where c yn r C rence Mrs Bou^ne,,l parents. Mr. and visit to the Island and she had he obtainrd his B A dagraa. Ba Mrs, G. A. Farmer of "Oughtervary aojoyabla holiday. The iliwiU be proceeding to the U Back Again '"""• s ''hilip. mate, she added, was rjerfeet Kingdom where he win comptou mR „ AVEHIKHJKII of n,o For Cable And Wireleii r""^^ 10 coma tmck ln his Studies. Mcatiwlul, L. IVI N ,. 1V Yalta Project Of DtgO VfH. CLIVE COOK amved R..L Tn CannA* to be back m i.nh> Il.nh.dM ., l1tn -r.,nui. t d. ,s back in BarM from Trinidad be HWIA . wJSSSLJ 0 Lanadl1 for the summer t^ldayi wito $Mt<* %  ahort ataj He arrived yeslerdav morning He has come '^'"NING to Canada Ml mother and lo have -ho ()I1 W..l.,csday night !>>• IIW I.A.. to join Cable A Wi.eleM and pleasure of meeting his friends and l(l lhe KU „, „, Ml ;ill)j Ml f ur|n({ ^ ^ ^ J*^ ^_ mg at "Waterlro". St. I %  fata Simon Altm.ui of Harts Gap. Tallulah Sends The Bomb hen lha K yoluntati Father Knew mmimmi JR. JO,* r s ."s M ; „I,,-,, ff^c?JSS;r ) i' 'SS^ ...rh. r .r. ,„ u-*, „ %  „ ir'^K.'.r::,;:;',':::,,'::;"^,:;:;.,;;! "-*i "• %  *: *-. her with a rich store of sparkling uiilfer W Lifter Hartley t/ thr ,ta„-. Wo ,h.ll ro blu* !" .m pattle. h.vo b r ,„ S3StoS IT^Iti^iltto 2£ Iwi"''i mw • noblo rtcr this autumn. .|„. „,„.„; H,,i h. putntl O.V. w,,m I, ,r ft I ^f,l IS^ ,i^ suss " "" %  : "" r ":xi ,p r !" i.^L£iaid" *ms Since bccomlnc Prime Minister, .But I hitve hurt io many In"""!..? l f B l 1 J "' k %  w,,m Mr r _Ch.,reb,l l h„n,„„„v„.mu,„ v,,,t, ',,, %  ;. Ma.^n. ""ha, I %  '""""' '" b """" att-nequom. He proterj Chn.-II | .. „i,.,| ,„,. p ,„ n U ti> let me 'do' the sensnu. It will give mo t-hequera. given to the nation extiu iKH.se and C0Dfld0DCf.<* It would have been no sutprl.se by Lord Lee In 11117, is kept tin 'Helpful' Princo "ell Hoger had Jollied one ot Hnf.X JT T X" SSI Bo"l P pal!,tm" Simon '"' ""-"u"ll eable ^d telephone wii.p """ "' "' """Bwo .vent, have made "il"eui ot hi. father, wealth, ^ %  symbolic is almosl unlshcd after AlK-idonhin Sir Alexander Hogei three year.. But Neil became a dress d,• • signer. What did lather think .... Amba.do.. „, J hni w „„ „, ii n0 When he !" .W moto ..... ,, ipM p,..t.viiM-l> „,„| ,h. launch during the war Alan l*oAll Mini. Con. girl who is now Queen are the MBt-Boyd, the new Minister %  •' Deni. ConptOB was overrjukes or Noitolk and (!l.,u,sslei Transpcrt and Civil Avian whelmed with ofTer. of houses ,„ d ,„„, ]h |, r ,, x ,;,„„ t „,. n ,| v often left Portamouth escorting .llj l.lt 1 ..... ... V-L. . 1 1 I 1 .......... %  .1 L I %  W.R A.F. The house l others If the Prune Minister doe'-i . want it. First on the lisl |i Ihe Chnmi then the for sale after I said last January g „ .,. v ri | djv .s .d Wmdsoi cMt-bound convoy, slaved that he was seeking ihM ,,. tl nli.i k thl Quai and the Queen brKlge all night and arrl Now he has found ..n. wilt, M „, ju ., „, lm c ,„, hl 8 h-J wor ,. Hamsgate next morning. atche.Milr Drive ^wanted lo squec:e all tiiu colHe attended Commons in the Back from a rivc-weeks' trip ours mil 1afternoon before rushing back to Kenya is 17-yaar-Old Lord I i .IUMI:. Ie Mrlrn Ramsgate to rejoin tun launch Monk BictUin From Nairobi he Moraau l>e Melcn was Belgium's west-bound convoy. Story. Wl I %  %  1 %  %  Dtso 7)0 | ia. <\ do mar a* %  pood — JO Rol im on sa in rnalructor. Jl Urn Uie s*nt at Holders, it. 4> I .!-.. 1. At least it can rob. (I) a. suMdi application of mind. (HI ( Yard I gat mliK from. () provldt- a sw*mfr in Bloom. Ill Not met in aailve or la n 7 ill S. poaMbli ao'.d tor a unnw. a Lt. oul "Ol in trnnls. tft V. Without delsv. tti 13. Ll Chln#*a ounce. ,41 15 Hrnpe now prcivia IV 1*1 II ni up. it' 17. HKW J*op w-ntid iota. (*l If, mtuni isat word dowB. Ill %  DUUI* : -*r(sa: j i fa—A Xt II. fci BBBs-.tt ; a:trL-, 1I|* 2. Raaolute I Wto>. 5. rr€lr: 6 Aii-rUon 1 Krl at; I*. !•>>•: lo. Turt: 1 ". 'I'tA restarday after two week*' holloa) < r.Mr and Mrs It. II Iteid rho ware staying at C.MI.II .,nk Hotel Mr. Reed Is Manager of Telephone Sales of T.C.A. m Toronto, Off To U.K. L BAYING for Canada veataroaj by T.C.A. inlransit for Ensland wan Mi Herbert A. DOWding. Dtraetor .if Lower Estate and Farm and Mrs Dowd in it. Mr. IJnwdmg will he away foi six months on business llIn lt, ~.k> % %  n main ng f- Uirea rnonw. While in the u K. thaw Will -ee iffhter, Marcaraf who u Mtendlnsj Arts BducaUooaJ IctMol it 1 ring in Ijimdon. On Long Leave M R. CHAItl.KS Al.l.KYN,: popul; i nambar "f the Empire Club, and a Civil Servant attached to the inooma Tag Department, hft for the c s \ p lerday morning via Antigua and Puerto Rko hy II.W.I.A. He u on six months' lea^c, the greater part of which he is spemiinii in the U.S.A. Laavini on In. aMni 'plane on Mr waj to ml U B A waa Miss Elhlriey Herbert who has gone to raaMo wtth her mother. For Heitlth Reasons Dixie Is A Girl Friend He Can't Jilt TOGETHER NOW FOR 29 YEARS THREE proud men and a htalClrcui Wbao n dosed down. her trunk and swung him around ous elephant, who have helped to "Life hart lent as exciting an ugaln. make 500-ucre Whlpenadc the n was M the drcua, hut it Is "That's because she doesn't like only -natur.il" roc een looking after wild animals Georjte and Dixie have been As he spoke he turned his back fi> r 44 years and has ridden nearly together for 29 years and both l Dixie, and wallud foiwanl. but tveiy specie*, including gnu-. came to Whipsnade from Bootock's Dixie caught him by The ami with ihiuos and ostiu-h.es. —L.L.S. \ R1I1VING from St. VmeaJ i %  i: ; Airways wi 'I' GUI ^lglneor for Orange Hill Estates Ltd He has come over Cor medical treat* rnetrl and will be bar* for about two weeks staying with his brother Mr. o. Gill of spalghtatown. Al" arriving by the same opportunity were Mr. Frank Nothnapel. Dtraetor Ot Bottlers (Bar: tmltad who was there d o holidav and Mr 1( V Haaell, Vlneentlan who hai been worMi %  nd Wlrelei tot rear. Mi Ha* fciM ,i in Bai i %  i tl H I Qi i itn it Th* l, tr.lrn Si I ,m- %  BORN io ni nin Joim niMTAl:.: ii i i> i I BOO' Dana ANDHEWI Mtr -An an* Chan HTAHHETT Doabl* -oi ni HI I,I M i, v ,, , i HI Ml, \ I %  %  II \u\ Their htn*J* or somelriin*. HUl ine worst l tind In the S"od old days before Tiiev thought ot this -,' %  never hungry in the momng but nj* I am lamuUied. On benall ul other martyrs oi thP tireakrast table ho In a weak moment mav have allowed ihcnistflve* io ge: ln a similar plight. 1 have raised this question ol what to do when vou are still hungry after a meal. They said It is quite simple. You munrh an apple or a raw cnrrot and They gave me one of r*ich in a brown paper bag When no nwas to.iking 1 trlrd mrselt on 'he scales lasl night. Out thev still said I3*i. 31b. However, as I have had inv hajr ml. I must be a bi/ llghler. TUBBY HUBBY DIET Bc:nerd WUkstcod reports his third day en tho diet of square BHMil for rojnd husbands. F Olf three days and D '* • hare kept body and soul tog?tncr on the Tubby Hutby diet and They are dlUfnted i be* had nutbi MY THIRD DAY Q^Menu Breakfast Two raahan all aill bacon and tomato, trilled Two sh'p. toast, fluttered thlnlt Coffee or lei -\ 6IBS0N HARRIS PBANBS LOVEcJOY a LUCILLE NORMAN LOuEll* PAPONS BANDOLPH SCOTT t, > BWH fWMAN ... p.r a icE WYMORE Lunch Grapefruit two Boarhed %  :!on toast Ijrjr portion jullMourr as gralln lag) fresh frail Dinner Small rup of clear soup fortified with gum of sherry Plate of eold nn-.it (chicken, ham, or aBch-lkhr) (irecn salad, optional Baked apple and—toda>*a Ireal—a llnr apoonful nf Coffee •pa-aalaa S ItMlVi I Itlll Vl I Ilia •..•45 y H.im B.aaa. if Ca>aatlaaaalaa S H.-ilT A UNIVIRSAL INURMTWttAL PICTURE PI A af A"**" ,l %  •14/4 Till 11 III S BKIIMiHtlHN miai ma i TODAY iJ Showai 1 U a BJO r 1 A Conliimlntf Daily 14,. .-. P i "l VBIII I '" sae.ui a ss a i a i HikiiKii i raisiNi, Whip WILSON and "i -mis .i M ,. vnt. IK US MLLS tABOO %  NSHSTTB NOW f.V STOCK AN AM. ROUND L'TH.ITV C'l.OTH In While and Colours |.M PRINTED SIII0ZE 36'' on I MM. iXOtV I.ARCK SHIPMENT OK JOHNSONS GOLDEN-DAWN WARE Sinylc and in Si-Is. Tea. Dinner. CofTee T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL *220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4l,0h BAKBARHS SIERRA IPiNil Hal Sptctal I 34 ,i n BLACK EAGLE DESERT VIGILANTE FIGHTING O'FLYNN OouSll I London Express Service MURPHY • HENDRIX %  UIL DilH IVES • JAGGER Pat-Ned Thrill* HIGHWAY 301 Kov HlXiCHS Presented by ihe tttirbatlos Sehool /' al ilir EMPIRE THEATRE n FRIDAY 20th JUNE WORGETYOU 39-. 1 %  c *" ** fKMNKOIOa j "DAJVCIJVG TM3ME BOOKINGS OPEN AT THE EMPIRE THEATRE ON FRIDAY. ISTII Jl'NE I>*ll> 8.B0 s.iB. — 12.00 noon and I.ee—.B* p.m. Salarday 8.00 a.m. — IZ.tO noon. BOXES *1.20: CIRCLE SI.00 IIOCSE AOe. (all reserved) BALCONY 1% CenU (Sold In advance> !" POWER"" BLYTH iff" 9 RENNIE %  • %  WORROV* I. IS r .m,. MISIH1 %  w mt A IIO I OH I HI Itwill SEE RBRII DO (Sfvatageal w„ •_ i.,ik) See a motor cycle ridden over his chesl IIIIHIMI VMI I I II I I OS. (French Magicians) See a human bfKly floating in Ihe air %  III BMBOa UNO I III IIS Sjunt Kings — Cycle Arlists %  ill "isinis RiitaiiM ions Singing Negro Spirituals — lUMORnow wia>in — %  HI II si in* HUM *IIII Guest Artiste BAMBINO (6 years old Child Dancer) Plus JBIISS1 4PRII • •• %  I I \t I S,-



ESTABLISHED 1895



Illegal Border Crossers
Liable To Jail And Fine

BERLIN, June 12

EAST GERMANY today published a new

security decree which renders people illegally
crossing the border liable to an immediate sentence
of two years’ imprisonment and a heavy fine. It
went into force four days ago. It applies to people
crossing the West Berlin perimeter as well as to
those who violate the East German border with
West Germany and the Fast German Baltic coast-
line.

The decree, issued by Vice Premier Walter
Ulbricht, Politburo Chief, on behalf of the ailing
Prime Minister Otto Grotewhol, instructs security
forces to enforce their general watch against
“diversionists, spies and terrorists.’

Recently 1,000 East Germans fled into West
Germany following Eastern security measures
) which aim to seal off the Eastern Zone’s 18,000,000

inhabitants from all Western influence.
Anyone charged under the new
order may be fined up to 2,000

Lodge Gives
Goddard Its
ne Honour

Mr. John Goddard, O.B.E., West

idies captain was yesterday pre-
ented with the highest award
1at an old boy can receive from
His alma mater, a copy of the
Lodge School shield, in recdgni-
tion of the honour which he had
brought to the West Indies and the
Lodge School itself by his out-
Standing leadership of the West
Indies teams in the Internatior
cricket field

Hon, Dr. H. G, Massiah, M.L.C..
himself an old Lodge Boy and at
present chairman of the Govern-
ing Body of the Lodge School,
made the presentation, after the
annual Past vs Present matoh at
the Lodge School grounds

Mr, ty W,

=

Justice B. Chenery

From All Quarters





East Marks (officially equal to was the first to pay tribute to the
f oe = achievements of John Goddard.

Oo ee oan oe But frst he reminded the boy
eae ‘ e especially that there was no game

to two years in prison. The decree W

; played in the School that devel-
had the effect of extending the Inner oped that team spirit, and de-
penalties for illegally crossing the manded at its best level such
East-West German ‘ frontier a e powers of concentration, applica-
cover border violations around the ets r tion and perseverance that are so
West Berlin perimeter. jnecessary to the producing of
The Allied high commiseion met SOME: i a ee taal) oe re ie citizens as the game of

in blockade-threatened West Ber-!oung Filipino who made a bet to Cr se hii ak hala he
lin to discuss the new Russian/go round the world in 14 months lekel, he said, taught them

to take the rough with the smooth
and the Lodge School might just-
ly be proud that John Goddard
who led the West Indies to vic-
tory against England in the West
Indies, in England and in India
Land who had lost to a stronger
team in Australia had exemplified
those characteristics in the qual-
ity of his leadership.

He spoke of the type of unre-

@ On

Barbados Hotel
Rates Attractive
To U.S. Visitors

squeeze around this isolated West-
ern outpost. The commission's visit
here from Bonn was a gesture of
Allied support for West Berliners
who have lived through one
Russian blockade and are afraid
that the Russians may be plotting
another.

The West German government
gave its reassurance by sending its
Finance Minister Fritz Schaeffer
here to discuss plans for Federal
economic aid to West Berlin's
endangered industries.

with 100 dollars (£35) arrived in
Turin this week. If he wins the
bet, Miss Jean Adams of Manila
will marry him, and his rival,
Mauritius Valenciano, with whom
he made the bet, will step aside
and pay him 5,000 dollars as a
wedding gift. He plans to be back
in Manila before December 4,
when the 14 months expire. So
far he has spent 60 of the 100
dollars.

MELBOURNE: A_ comfortable
stay-down strike has been organ-
\ised by 52 members of the govern-
ment-owned shale mine at Glen
Davis, New South Wales. They



Page 6.



Communists meanwhile set up
& public school campaign of hate|* . a J ,
and rearmament against the West Toescaldngs sateen hie. tnciaion
in East Germany, To-day is!

“Teacher's Day” in Germany. At! *® close the mine because it does















JUNE 33,

Kast Germans Impose Rigid Security Decree

RECEIVING

AWARD





PRICE : FIVE CENTS



HON. DR. H. G. MASSIAH presents W.1. captain John Goddard with a copy of the Schoo! Shield at a

function at the conclusion of the Annual Past vs.

Compound 66
Is Trouble

KOJE ISLAND,

Korea, June, 12
number 66 where
bficer prisoners are housed and
which is regarded as a possible
trouble spot in the dispersal of
communist camps, is expected to
be broken up soon, possibly to-
morrow.

According to usually reliable|_
sources to-day the British Com-
monwealth troops will probably
(take part in any precautions
|taken against resistance by pris-
oe when their camp is enter-
ed before they are dispersed.

, Now that the toughest com-
pound, number 76, has been split

Compound









Present cricket match

at Lodge Sehool yesterday

Supreme Court
Spot On Koje|\Challenges Malan

PRIME MINISTER Dr.

South

Africa’s

Parliament
highest court faced its first court challenge to-day.

suit filed yesterday in the country’s Supreme Court four

persons of mixed race in the (

the act violates the South African constitution by permit-
ling the Gove rnment to take away their voting rights

Acheson Sends
Notes To Eden





_——

(Red Delegate Obstinate

On Prisoner

xchange
Issue At Truce Talks

MU NSANE Korea, June 12
CHIEF COMMUNIST Korean ffuce negotiator soft
ened his denunciation of the Allies’ to-day but remained
obstinate on the prisoner exchange issue, the last obstacle

to the armistice :
Maj. Gen. William K. Harrison, head United Nations
negotiator, told reporters he attached no significance to
North Korean General Nam I!’s omission of any mention











of the riot ridden Allied prisoner camps on Koje island
i. Harrison told the Reds during
the 38-minute meeting at Pan
1 ° ' . res
. nunjom that no fu er conces-«
Unions And sions will be forthcoming on the
. - April 28 Allied prisoner proposal
yr 1go a" Another Red demar 2 ”
Govt. Discuss |,a%ts, Re come ees
; willing to force repatriation of
Steel Cri ‘ S some 100,000 internees who hav
XK A « ndicated they would not rejoin
the Reds voluntarily
WASHINGTON, June 12. The Communists insist on the
en ae aia and Gov-|return of all 169.000 Allied held
evr ant a theathiat 6 ee te personnel. Des spite his moderate
a . . ktm : » i ntinued ¢t he
strikebound steel plants to produce prisoners violated the Genev
weapons for U.S, troops fighting Convention and widened the
vie oe breach of disagreement over pris-
he three way meeting was iNfoner exchange. He did not u
line with an agreement made last} usual terms slaughter and n
Monday when negotiations for thefto describe Allied treatmer
‘ontract for 650,000 steelworkers § prisoners (cP,
in the United States collapsed - —
At that time, steelworkers agree U) N BI 1
with steel company negotiators t e °° as
re-open enough plants to produce

stee! needed for Korean armament

Chinese

howevey President Truman ha
told Congress that while this migh 27 , 1 ‘
CAPETOWN, June 12. heljy some, it would not satisfy alif | SHOU. KOREA, June 12
Daniel Malan’s new law giving | defence needs, Truman has pressed nd cant aus Shoe ‘Cities
veto power over the nation’s} for Congressional legislation giv- Jp oa on: two Western front. hill
Pi a Oe RY permission to ofoe ausin’ ith deadly explosives and barn-
seize the steel industry, thus end shee’ Canale cae 4 nd
ing the strike, It is illegal to strike ‘ites ae All ee ae a $
Cape Province, claimed that} against Government, Four time F ir nh of th , ‘Kore eek
in vo days the Senate has r« oiteat dition ont Seam are
jected by top heavy margins pro S Me rye y ee . it
r po to give Truman the seizure Stepped “up fghting’ broke out
he Opposition United Party owers he asieed for, it: voted ing aturday round Chorwon, 48
which has been fighting Malan’s oP le asked ' : ile north of Seoul when U.N,
se eens attempts to tighten ou a to ask him #0 invoke une ifantry captured two high points,
ial segregation is paying for Taft-Hartley act Ss anti-strike ine pie have tried unsuccessfully
the court action, The move coin-]Juction provisions.—©,P, yvery day since to knock the Allies
cided with the announcement that vhaneite back «P).

4 joneviolent of eivil

campaign
ditohediehce against race. seureda-











Shoemaker Drops m
1 tion regulations would star r ”
sneetings througout RaSsian bocu. aeuataes igealebanas Scares up, it is believed that most others And Schuman June 26 , ch as Pr equal tec
pied, Communist ruled zone,|P20. "cot up a kitelen at the pit, | 2:W-LA. are hoping to get a! will raise no difficulties, but it } The Supreme Court suit arose) Mead In Court
teachers were exhorted to “in-|}ead, and send down hot meals}24mber of Americans and other] is realised that compound number WASHINGTON, June 12 |from an attempt by the Malan T ] ft Cl »
crease defence readiness.” three times daily. holiday makers to come to Barba-|66 may prove an _ exception to ~~ wy of State Dean Ache-|Governme nt to eut voting rights | Luther Wooding, a shoemake 1e marge
4 | » dos during the summer months.| this. United States troops have , has sent messages to the Brit-/ guaranteed by the constitution to! of Vrafalgar Street collapsed it ’ }
Schools will be called upon to| MADRID: To answer a charge} Mr, Eamon Luengo, the Company’s| carried out clearing four com-Jish and French Foreign Ministers! 50,000 coloured people, The high|the Police Magistrate's Court this} , mn we ae % Jy Wales
furnish thousands of young re- jof stealing clothes worth £3, 48-|Sales Representative of San Juan,| pounds already dispersed. dealing with the suggested meet | c« irt declared this law unconsti-}evening about 4.20 o’cloc ra] SOU Police Magistrate of Dis-
5 : ; 375.0 : g ab 2 k a A che veri
uits for the 375,000-man army | year-old Maria Rosa walked 120|Puerto Rico, told the Advocate| British officers report that}ing with the Soviet Union on/tutional. In reply, the Government died almost immediately, just as] )') YOSCaY eae er
oa Germany Mab seeretie het miles from her village to the} yesterday. hammering has been heard from{@rmany it was learned here to-|barrelled through a law setting up His Worship Mr. H, A, Talma -was : ; pete ng aoe . gg " .
he gp tobe hove aiveess Dente iedo assize court. She was} He said that hotel rates here|the compound for the past few!“ “. Rs se ot | Pe ae as the super Supreme {making prefatory remarks to dis- ae the lp jl Moet a eee
taflicated st ' jecautee and the judge sent herJare very attractive and visitors days. Mechanical trench diggers] , ips Se oe sai - mieerades, | Cour e powered to override thé) charging his son George who wa: hesaaaiet Ewlon Com ue ieee
The Miuish Catmeeuieet ia from America could get the benefit] have . probed for five days for], °°" Sle | “ia Pavia 2 aie veel A nesticnes (CB). constitutional charged with the larceny of twoling his bicycle valued at £15 12s
g Berlin, Major General C. F. C WASHINGTON: In Baltimore,}°! the U.S. Currency exchange. possible tunnels out of the en=}4).), reply tO. ths ‘Soviet. odie of , ; a bottles of brandy, the property ot} ¢d. on May 11
* Coleman, protested to the Russians | Maryland, Dr. Robert Seluger, fi ane va an are closure but they have not found]\yay 25 “su gesting four-power I * PI dD m a ‘ Mr. Walwyn said that from the
today against kidnapping of three!director of the National Committee }!°r erto Co yesterday morn~| any. talks on Germany a “1 Creorge ooding was represent-] evidence he had come to the con-
West Berliners from the British|on Alcoholic Hygiene reports that|!>% by B.W.I.A, was in Trinidad] Brig. General Boatner, United It was understood that the State; matca ans jed by Mr, G. H, Adams lusion that there was no inten~
sector last Tuesday. jalcoholism is “the most democratic for discussions with Mr, Richard) States camp commandant, to-day|Department had asked the United £500 000 | Luther Wooding had been in thejtion on the part of the accused
; of all afflictions, Rich man, poor] Willis, the Company’s Commercial) received two spokesmen from the] St ites Ambassador in Paris James vo _ ‘Court listening to the hearing offto deprive the owner of the bi-
The victims were two news-| man—drink plays no favourites,” Manager, with regard to the|compound at their own request.{Dunn to clarify the statement on ¥ ithe case cycle
papermen and an inn-keeper still : ganizing of package tours from! Prisoners’ leaders from severalgthe situation issued by the French Swamp Scheme Cox said that on May 11 he
hela by the Rossias isi. Cole- a, én sete eae oe Puerto Rico to Barbados during|compounds have met General{Government that it wanted a Big left his bicycle at home and went
man’s protest said they were “on| accidentally started while in Zag-|ije summer season, 3oatner over the past few days. |Four meeting on Germany to be} K ING STON, Jamaica, June 11 ; eq pout. When he returned he found
beg —_ of the oe eee en eae = ree from, a He said that there were many is ; --U.p, {held in the near future, ~ G vernment.. is sutgattting pro-| FRENCH PAINTER DIES} ))ai i: was missing and later bo
when Russian soldiers and East Gaining speed, it careered alon ‘ 6 tr . US. ser There was 1 amediate com-{ oan ° me day saw the accused with
German” police seized them at} Bi witles-an hous. ‘Whe. track visitors from the U.S A, to Puel to cK 1 ng 10 immec ia Mb‘ BON pe \ to Colonial Development PARIS, June 12 i He eikea the nacieee ate
; UP. A h } Rico who did not know anything ae viniiae ment on the text of messages|Corporation for a £500,000 swamp | t Jules Adil d
gunpoini. —vU.P. | was cleared for the train, w rich about Barbados and went on to St. ELECTRICITY which Acheson sent to Anthony rociamation tate euicatea French painter Jules Adler died] je had taken it up and the ac-
‘came to a stop only two miles from yen at " ’ den a Robe | payee Shq T1168 pansion |jast night at the home for aged}cused said that he only wanted
eiaibiaiee l Cair th Pp . Nee had Thomas where they paid huge RATIONED IN RIO Eden and Robert Schuman cheme. Representatives of C.D.C. ts 1 at 1 t N } t
airo, when its furnace adie . oat é 4 —UP. sente artists and show people a O-[to borrow i
| burned low. prices for hotel accommodation. : UF coming to Jamaica shortly for dis-] ert Sur Marne, aged 87 Millar said that Cox used to
Nehru Stresses BRISBANE: Women passengers He was sure that when the; RIO DE JANEIRO, June 12. 7 cussions of the proposals which} —(U.P.) lend. him the bicyele
‘ 1 lin a 1,600-berth liner took over the amenities which Barbados had to Electricity will once more be J ca Interested include drainage of the swamp|—
Indian Neutrality |ship’s kitchen and organised em-|°%er to those visitors were made) rationed in Rio. _ The National ; - lands to the Western end of the
1 Seana meals when the crew}*mown, in addition to the hotel! Council for the Water Electric i; B ili h island, where Government owns}
NEW DELHI, June, 12. | went on strike. They ran a cafe-|'“tes, the island could look forward| Energy ordered severe restric- n ruisn 3,000 aeres, and preparing then:|
Prime Minister Jawarhalal|teria service—and made the cap-|t@ many U.S, visitors coming here tions from 5,30 p.m. to 8 p.m, for rice cultivation, |
Nehru to-day re-affirmed in Par-| tain queue. for tis, dinner with|for their summer holidays, —(U.P.) Honduras Offer eee large ae rs. will |
i i i 2;everyone else.—L.E.S. also be brought under the scheme}
ee — nea ie can e e ® (From Sincet On ya which is intended to achieve self
‘ p 7, GSTON, Jamaica aut it nls ; ‘ + |
| can say whether the world will Ja 8 Re ject aris Police Suspended On Great interest is being shown aoe g eee erento
survive the ne few years = (Pp J . fe Jamaica on the report that the sy pl sGR "Sharp “Chalvuamot
i fully or not. If disaster breaks . 2 } Ch \ 7 0; Cla 5 ' Government of British Honduras|;,°U°. 0%. oiarp, /ae) ig
it will come to the entire world. Russian Claim | A 1a ees mmunism j in contact with the Govern- : a aie ee ae ea |
Even so, our policy, should be to : | ments of ‘Trinidad, Barbados and} ie een et net
avoid that disaster, and even if TOKYO, June, 12. | PARIS. June 12. Jamaica for the importation of} «ag at tas eo re tae indus-|
it comes we should be in position] The Japanese Foreign Office p * To azricultural workers from these|'° a look over the rice "
to try and stop it. I would like|rejected the Russian claim that | PARIS POLICE CHIEF Jean Baylot has suspended|isiands to assist the mainiand j‘"y of that country.—(CP)
the remainder of the area of|the San Francisco peace treaty} , 22 members of the Paris police and transferred about 50 ay in the second part of its
Asian countries to make it clear|is illegal and re-affirmed the| thers to new posts ‘in the interests of security”, a spokes-|“°velopment plan C a P of |
awe ‘ » | ete at envovs are | . ¢ . Mhe Jamaica Government has 4auD. ro UCI
tk eek wae uewie a oe, a peat standing oe SFA: OY police headquarters said tonight. Unconfirmed] ajready considered the invitation .
will not enter war in any event. have no diplomatic sta MPO oie KA Fame ae 4 get, : cauerae oho - ‘ + |
“T would also like India and! that Japan is again an independ-| ‘'eports said Baylot took these measures after examination Saas tiem? GG oe ee l'‘o0 Much Sugar |
other countries to declare against|/ent nation. Russia did not sign of documents seized during recent raids on Communist |@UT#* Government to send fur-

the use of weapons like the atom the peace treaty which became

Party headquarters in Pari
and hydrogen bomb.’’—U.P effective » April 28. or P.





infiltrated into the Paris police ,severe security most of them were
, force of 20,000 men immediately | believed to
WATE HING « ric KET s' by 1948. Police headquarters de- : velling recently
| clined to give further details



ricket ground as

vester day

SCHOLARS of the Lodge School seated around the ‘ they watched the Past vs. Present

Sch nds



s.

Communists were known to haveafter the end of the war but after

about the new security measures.

The suspended policeman will



|

|
|

face a os tribunal short-
ly. They were ordered today to
hand in their "yevalvens and their
| pollec cards. Some of these men
bel-eved to include police officers
\are uspected of having informed
he Communist Party about se-
| cuity measures taken for Gen-
eral Ridgway’s arrival. Papers}

ganed by “Communist Association
of the Paris Police Force” have

j been distributed recently at police





the

ee

e

Jryted States
ria in West

r details

of the

a

A

nd
frica

a

far

re

i'! over the island to be
te

en
Fy



INTER-ISLAND
TELEPHONE SYSTEM

ve





spent years
have been dismissed]P nama and Cuba and have been

to England,

as

anxious |
hear further details of the plan



contract offer-
and the settlement terms to be
incorporated,

Jamaicans who

in

the
Li-

reported

KIT TS June 12.

The cae ‘iblp Electra arrived
from Jamaica yesterday. It is un
jderstood Cable and Wireless will
jinvestigate the possibility of in
si tiling a wireless telephone serv
| ic between St. Kitt Nevis and
Anguilla

Seventy ht ontract workei
left for the United State viz
A ua to work in pi harvestin

|headquarters here congratulating
}pelice on not arres’ing demon-
ators j Ridgwa

lashes. Unconiirmed reports said}
jalte epee a0’ policemen had beer
ended id 107 more mover

‘Speed Can TI







WASHINGTON, June 12

J, McCloy, United States
Higt Commissioner, urged a
veedy Senate ratification of the
western agreements on Ger-
r thwart the mighty cam-
paign originating in the Kremlin
f destroying them. Testifying
fore the Senate Relations Com-
ttee McClov aid Communists’
alternative brandishment of
tr tr ‘ t f ere

t

prevent
m joining the
rees
McClos 1id
eat to peacefu
velopment of
ip is with the
m the Kre
tifie that





We



W

their
the

ind
Germar

Wes

t

miin.’
niin



pro



HAVANA, Cuba, June 12.
*resident Fulgencio Batista said
night that Cuba is producing

more sugar than the world
buy. He said he is
almost 20 per cent of

crop off the market
cu’ 1953 production b

(CP),



almost a



COO Dies

‘ATICAN CITY, June,
Pius XII learned
sorrow’ of the death of
Michael Faulhaber of
whose passing reduced
he Sacred College of Cardinals
to new low of 46 “princes of
the churches”
Fauihaber was the last
Cardinal appointed
Pope Benedict
1922. The
ij se ha
70

12.



tinal
Ger

nany
the

sur-
by



in Sacred College



an

eer Soi





prevent the ratification, and said
that speed was important.”

McCloy estimated all six coun-
tries participating in the Euro-
pean defence force inder the
North Atlantic Treaty should
rati t agreement by autumn
if 1e table is met it was
like t the first German mili-
tary contingent would be launched

}
~U.P

going to}

|

this }

|

and}

|
|

“with |

|

XV who |

authorized |



when mother’s milk is lacking

in quantity or quality
LACTOGEN

a modified powdered milk,
is one of the most suitable
foods for baby.

0



A NESTLE PRODUCT



1 GRANT

GEDDES LTD Agents


PAGE TWO



Caub (Calling

IS Excellency
and Lady Savage
panied by Majcr Dennis Yaug

the

Governor

accom-



Private Secretary, wil attend the

Opening Ceremony of
sheba Social Centre
at 5 p.m.

Pilate’s Wife
CHARLES W

Party will present
“Pilate’s Wife” at the
College Hall fo-night and
morrow night, at 8.00 p.m.

the Bath-

R.

and the

will go to the
Funds. Tickets can be
for 4/-, 3/-, 2/- and 1/6.
Left For Canada
R. CLIFFORD MANNING,
Retired Chairman of the
Board of Directors of Messrs Man-
ning & Co., Ltd., left far Canada

Family
obtained



yesterday morning by %.C.A. for
about five months’ holiday. He
was accompanied by Man-
ning.



Mr. WILLIAM GREEN.
Medical Student

RRIVING by T.C.A. fiom

Canada was Mr. William
Green, son of Mrs. Clara Green
of “Viriok”, Top Rock, and the
late Sydney Green of Dominica.
“Billy” has now completed his
pre-medical course at Loyola
Jesuit College, Montreal, where
he obtained his B.A. degree. He
will be proceeding to the United
Kingdom where he will complete
his studies. Meanwhile he is glad
to be back in ‘sunny Barbados’
for the
his mother
pleasure of
again.

have
his friends

and to
meeting



Tallulah Bankhead’s long and
eagerly awaited memoirs have
now reached her London publisher
in manuscript,

A swift dip into them has shown
me that they certainly do not lack

the candour of th. olocaust that
mates everything Beata does
ms * *

Her cight ,years in London left
her with a rich store of sparkling
anecdotes of society as well as
the stage. We shall see blushes on
many @ noble face this autumn,
and many a heart is already
palpitating,

Since becoming Prime Minister,
Mr. Churchill has not stayed much
at Chequers, He prefers Chartwell,

* * * ”

Chequers, given to the nation
by Lord Lee in 1917, is kept ever-
ready by the curator, Mrs. Rose

Hill,-and a staff of 15, mainly
W.R.ALF,
The ‘house can be used by

others if the Prime Minister does
not want it. First on the list is
the Chancellor of the Exchequer,
then the Foreign Secretary, the
Colonial Secretary, and the Ameri-

can Ambassador.
All Mod. Con.
Denis Compton was over-
whelmed with offers of houses

for sale after I said last January
that he was seeking a home.

Now he has found one—with
thatched roof, four bedrooms,
two bathrooms, and half an acre
at Gerrads Cross, “And it is just
49 minutes to Lord’s,”’ says
Compton,

2000-Mile Drive

Back from a_ five-weeks’ trip
to Kenya is 27-year-old Lord
Monk Bretton. From Nairobi he



Dixie Is A Girl Friend He Can’t Jilt

TOGETHER

THREE proud men and a jeal-
ous elephant, who have helped to
make . 500-acre Whipsnade the
only “Natural” zoo of its kind in
the world, were recently helping
to prepare it for a “coming of
age” celebration next week, All
have been working there since
it first opened in 1931 and each
admits. “it is my whole life.”

The jealous elephant is 49-
year-old Dixie, who “belongs” to
64-year-olq keeper George
Braham,

George and Dixie have been
together for 29 years and_ both
came to Whipsnade from Bostock’s

to-morrow

REEVES |

Queen's

to-
This
play is a religious dramatic per-
formance and part of the proceeds
Welfare



Tallulah Sends

Mr. and Mrs.

Quiet Wedding

A QUIET wedding took piace
at St. Matthies Church yes-
terday afterncon when Mr. Allan
Roy Sattaur a prominent “A”
Class cyclist of Chancery Lane,
Christ Church, took as his bride
Miss Juliett Colutti daughter of
Mr. Joseph Colutti of Chancery
Lane.

The bride was given in mar-
riage by her father while the

duties of best man were perform-

ed by Mr. A. G. Johnson. The
nuptial knet was tied by Rev.
M. E. Griffiths, Vicar of St. Mat-

thiags Church,
The honeymoon is being spent
Silver Sands, Christ Church.

To Attend Conférence
R. J. E. BOURNE of Cable
& Wireless leaves this after-
(Friday) for Trinidad to
meeting of the Eastern
Hurricane Committee
which is to be held in Port-of-
Spain from the 16th—19th June.
Mr. Bourne has gone to repre-

at

noon
attend a
Caribbean

sent Cable & Wireless at the
Conference.

Back Again

B. AVERBOUKH of the

R.
M New Yalta Project of Diego
Martin, Trinidad, is back in Bar-

summer holidays with pados for a short stay. He arrived
the on Wednesday night by B.W.1.A.,

and is the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
Simon Altman of Harts Gap.

drove 2,000 miles to the Belgian
Congo and back.

“A terrible journey,” he says.
“We spent as much time under-
neath the car as in it.”

Two Best Years

Girl whe is having two
“coming-out” seasons is Marilyn
Hartley, 17-year-old daughter of
jam maker and former England
golfer W, Lister Hartley,

Reason? So many debutante
parties have been crowded into
this season that her parents have
decided to present her next year.

* at *

“But I have had so many in-
vitations,” says Marilyn, “that I
have persuaded my parents to let
me ‘do’ the season. It will give me
extra poise and confidence,”

‘Helpful’ Prince

A Royal painting by Simon
Elwes which events have made
symbolic is almost finished after
three years,

J * *

It shows King George VI
handing his daughter Elizabeth
the sash of the Order of the
Garter. To many he will seem

to be handing over his throne.

Grouped protectively around the
girl who is now Queen are the
Dukes of Norfolk and Gloucester
and Lord Halifax. Elwes recently
spent several days at Windsor
painting the Queen and the Queen
Mother in the clothes they wore
at the ceremony.

* ” *
Queen is much more
slender,’ he says. Prince Charles.
who was. allowed to watch,
“wanted to squeeze all my col-
ours out for me.”
Fighting De Melen
Moreau De Melen was Belgium's

“The

NOW. FOR

Circus when it closed down.

“Life here isn’t as exciting as
it was at the circus, but it is
p-easanter,’” Mr, Braham said,

He is keeper in charge of the
zoo’s five elephants, but he is the
only man who can manage Dixie,
who is worth £1,500 and weighs
nearly four tons,

29

Swung Round
“She’s a one-man girl and is
very jealous, so I have had to stay
a bachelor all my life,”’ he smiled.
As he spoke he turned his back
on Dixie, and walked forward, but
Dixie caught him by the arm with



NOW IN

In White and Co

PRINTED SHIOZE

OPENING

LARGE SHIPMENT OF JOHNSON’S GOLDEN-DAWN WARE

Single and in Sets.

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220



STOCK

AN ALL ROUN

D UTILITY CLOTH 36”
lours

Bie 5 cake La diva ahs casopdindecansinys

NOW

Tea, Dinner, Coffee



YOUR SHOE STORES



1

Spent Two Morths

BARBADOS ADVOCATE







For The U.K. Fairbanks Awarded

ISS JIEL GALE, daughter of .

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. L. Ga RS. ROBERT CHALLENOR, Chilean Order Of Merit
of “Abingdon”, Dalkeith, re- wife of the Hon’ble Mr. Chal-
turned home yesterday from lenor of “Valery,” Collymore LONDON, June 12
Trinidad by B.W.1.A. She was/Rock is among tne passengers who Hollywood screen star Douglas
accompanied by her nephew,#re due to leave Barbados this Fairbanks was awarded the
Master Brian McCartney, Jij]'â„¢orning by the Elders and Fyffes Chilean Order of Merit for ser-
spent two months with Mr. and|5-S. Golfite for England. vices in South America during
Mrs. C. G. McCartney. Mrs. Mc- Mrs. Challenor who will be on a World War II, during a ceremony
Cartney is her sister six-month visit will see her two at the Chilean Embassy where a
5 a children George and Hetty. The dinner was given in his honour

Sea Rangers Dance former is at school at Eton and by the Chilean Ambassador,
FJUHE Sea Rangers will hold a|the latter is working in London. —(U.P.)
ee —* ian oo nel re Other passengers leaving by the —————————€,
June, a ‘ p-m, us oa ; ar 3. 4 L
is for the purpove of raising Senile Ste Se See Se eves CROSSWORD

funds to finance the troop and
it is up to, their friends to give
them their ‘utmest support.

The dance will be held at the
Crane Hotel in an atmosphere!
where everyone can enjoy a good
dance, Therefore it is not merely
getting entertainment for your
money, but supporting a worthy
cause.

.
Superintendent

_Telephone Co.
R. A. W. MAILE, General
Superintendent of the Bar-










the O:ympia Club were en- months’ holiday.



iams,
Mrs. L. V. White. Mr. and Mrs.

D. A. Williams,

Miss Amy C. Arthur, Miss Sybil E.
Arthur,
Mr. and Mrs, Trevor Bowring and
daughter,
Chaffee, Mr. and Mrs. G. Cripps
and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. E. S.
Chambers,
Christie and daughter, Capt. and
Mr
e

Mrs. Violet E. Bowring,

Mrs. Kathleen P.

Mr. and Mrs. C. J.

St. John Hodson and two
“Colonel and Mrs. C. de

m, Mrs, Violet Ross-
» Mr. and Mrs. E, B. Will-
Miss Elizabeth Williams,







Miss Elizabeth



















pados Telephone Co, Ltd fete tor|SIaddin, Miss “evelyn Outram, LE] T [| | TT
Antigua yesterday morning by Garrod Soe ie | _K. Across
B.W.LA. on a ten-day visit. He We wend Mrs. S. Smith, 1, vegetable repository. (5, 4)
has gone to advise on the tele- = T. W. Astorga and Mrs, C. F. 4G. Bete tae None? gdp Se
= : Hera ra be a i . Pride resu rom *
phone service which is being oper-]*°"T€T and two children 11. With native following it is otfer-
ate x0ve 2 ng a choice. (
suas ABO Sake ‘ 13. What the adder may do? (3)
For U.S. Holiday-- L ° t ° Me it Usually a matver of tessnyey (*)
ROY SATTAUR. EAVING for the U.S.A. and istening mours 18 Implements broken footwear.
Canada yesterday morning py . bs sod Cae)
Light Music B.W.1A., via Antigua and Pueftol soe — dap e e JUNE 18. 10ee sna AB. Rot Pa on anran fnatructor, (7)
EMBERS tri . f Rico were Mr. and Mrs. Jean] ~———— tea sane Deata Daan: Aaah 21. Make the gent step over rope
B and friends o Blondin. They have gone for to] 4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m, The holders. (4. 4)

Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. Charlie Kunz, Pa Down

>rtai i , : 4.20 p.m, Bedtime With Braden, 5.00 . At least it can rob. (5)
tertained to a programme of Mr. Blondin is Manager of Sam}. m. Isle Of Man Tourist Trophy Races, - Steany application of mind. (9)
light music which was held ai Lord’s Castle. ‘ 45.15 p.m. The Wightman Cup, Britain 3. Yard I get milk from, (5)
the British Council on Wednes- Also leaving for the UfS.A. yid| vs. U.S.A. 5.20 p.m. Listeners’ Choice, ¢ Provides & steamer in picom: 43)
day night. Some of the numbers Antigua and Puerto Rico yester- is p18 savention’ mise, das oe 6. Dossibiy’ sold for a tanner, (D
heard were — “Prelude in G day by B.W.1A., was Mrs, E. F.| Sports Round-up and Programme 8. Let, but not in tennis. (5)
minor” y achmanio “Waltz Murray of First Avenue, Belle-} Perade, 7.00 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m 9. Without delay. (4)

y ene ‘ . 7 5 12. Late Chinese ounce. (4)
in © sharp minor” by Chopin, ville. She has gone to visit her pore ee Bra M & a1g¢Mm 15. Scope now provides it. (4)
“Nocturne in D flat major’ by Son Peter who resides in South}? !* — 0: ane a 18: it's a up. & id get logs. (4)
Purcell, “Softly awakes my Carolina. E 7-15 pm. West Indian Diary, 7.30 p.m ta’ Pata et ORT deme 8)
heart” and “Love come to my On Business Sie pant iio aeWeal, Sto ee Solution of yesterday's puzale.—-Across:
aid” by Marion Anderson, and ME: KENNETH GRANNUM,] World Affairs, 8.45 p.m. The Wightman }; Aton: 4, Star: 8 Reason 10. Slap:

« ‘ Pa has on os aol free Cup, Britgin vd. USA. 850 p.m Utter; 17. Lie: 19, Surgeon; 21, Bet:
blso the “Jamaican Rhumba”. Managing Director of Mod-| CNP: der'4.ss ‘pm. From ‘The “Edi: $3 ‘Bkeins: 28 Bark: 26 Smoke Down!

The programme wa’ organised erne Hat Limited, left for Canada} ¢o\\cis, 9.00 p.m. Ring Up The Curtain, Hate ae se Seen a ba Opnes a

by the Cultural Officer, Miss yesterday morning by T.C.A. on a] iv.00 p.m. The News, 10.10 pin. News or Atlot: 14 Lense: 16. Push: 18. Bue:
Joan Smith and was thoroughly business visit in the interest of his] Ta!k. 10.15 p.m. The Debate Continues. 9. Gem

enjoyed by everyone. Members
are locking
functions of
future.

On Holiday From B.C.
R. AND MRS, CHARLES
BOURNE and infant were

arrivals from Vancouver, British
Columbia, on Monday via Puerto
Rico and Antigua for a holiday
which they are spending with
Mrs. Bourne’s parents, Mr. and

Mrs. G. A. Farmer of “Oughter-

son”, St, Philip.

For Cable Arid Wireless
R. CLIVE COOK arrived
from Trinidad by B.W.I.A.

yesterday morning. He has come
to join Cable & Wireless and
during his stay here will be stay-
ing at ‘“Waterlco”, St. Lawrence.

firm. He expects to be away for
about two months.

enjoyed Holiday

RS. EVE GOODSON of Eng-

land, returned home yester-
day morning by T.C.A. via Mon-
treal after spending five and a
half months’ holiday staying at
the Ocean View Hotel and Aquati¢
Court.

She said that it was her first
visit to the island and she had a
very enjoyable holiday. The cli-
mate, she added, was perfect and
she hoped to come back in the
near future,

by

Back To Canada
R two

ETURNING to Canada
T.C.A. yesterday after
weeks’ holiday were Mr. and Mrs.
R. B. Reed who were staying at

Cacrabank Hotel.
Mr. Reed is Manager of Tele-
phone Sales of T.C.A. in Toronto.

Off To U.K,

EAVING for Canada yesterday

« by T.C.A,. intransit for Eng-
land were Mr, Herbert. A. Dow-
ding, Director of Lower Estate and
Dayrell’s Dairy Farm and Mrs.
Dowding.

Mr. Dowding will be away for
six months on business cotple
with pleasure, while his wife w.
be remaining for three months.

While in the U.K., they will see


















forward to
this nature

more
in the

Defence Minister when the Korean
War started,

He wanted to form a volunteer
battalion; but his Government fell
and he lost office.

The battalion was formed, how-
ever. And de Melen joined—the
first Defence Minister I know to
volunteer for the front.

* *

° their daughter, Margaret who is
In Korea, where the battalion OTe ena School
served with the 29th Brigade, - at ness

On Long Leave
CHARLES ALLEYNE,

de Melen met the Hon, Rowland

Winn, heir of Lord St. Oswald. R.

Tall, distinguished de Melen|4+Â¥# popular member of the Em-
was a guest last week at Winn’s|Pire Club, and a Civil Servant
wedding in London, attached to the Income Tax De-

partment, left for the U.S.A. yes-
terday morning via Antigua and
Puerto Rico by B.W.1LA. He is
on six months’ leave, the greater
part of which he is spending in
the U.S.A,

Leaving on the same "plane on
her way to the U.S.A., was Miss
Bhirley Herbert who has gone to
reside with her mother,

For Health Reasons

RRIVING from St. Vincent

yesterday morning by B.G.
Airways was Mr, F. Gill, Engineer
for Orange Hill Estates Ltd. He
has come over for medical. treat-
ment and will be here for about
two weeks staying with his
brether Mr. O. Gill of Speights-
town.

Also arriving by the same op-
j portunity were Mr. Frank Noth-

: ; . nagel, Director of Bottlers (Bar-
His parliamentary mail and a|pbados) Limited who was there for

taxi awaited him. He drove to the}a holiday and Mr, R. C. Hazell, a
station, caught a London train and! Vincentian who has been working
worked during the journey. there with Cable and Wireless for

He attended Commons in the| the past year.
afternoon before rushing back to Mr. Hazell has now been trans-
Ramsgate to rejoin his launch and| ferred to Barbados and is staying
a West-bound convoy, at “Sea Queen”, Hastings,

Father Knew

It would have been no surprise
if Neil Roger had joined one of
the far-flung cable and telephone
interests of his father, wealthy
Aberdonian Sir Alexander Roger.

But Neil became a dress de-
signer. What did father think?
“He always thought I would do
something odd,” says Neil.

Rush Job

When he commanded a motor-
launch during the war Alan Len-
nox-Boyd, the new Minister of
Transport and Civil Aviation,
often left Portsmouth escorting an
east-bound convoy, stayed on the
bridge all night and arrived at
Ramsgate next morning,

* ”



*

SSBEESSS9SCOO FIERO
GAIETY

The Garden—St. Tames
TODAY and TOMORROW 2B 20 pm
“BORN TO BE BAD"

Joan FONTAINE &
‘SEALED CARGO’ Dana ANDREWS

MIDNITE SATURDAY
Charles STARRETT Double

}

YEARS



“SOUTH OF DEA VALLEY’
her trunk and swung him around “RENEGADES OF 1 SAGE”

again,

“That's because she doesn’t like
me to ignore her while I talk to
strangers,’ said Mr, Braham.

Man with the longest service is
49-year-old Overseer Philip Bates

“T was working on the farm here
when the London Zoological Soci-
ety bought the estate in 1927 and
was invited to stay to help turn
it into a zoo,” Mr, Bates said.

Headkeeper Albert Cole has
been looking after wild animals
for 44 years and has ridden nearly

SUN; and Mon: 8.30 pm
Mat: Sunday 5 p.m
Bing CROSBY in -

“HERE COMES THE GROOM"
SOGSESGOOO688

Opening 10D AY

445 & 830 PM. &
Continuing to SUNDAY







every. species, including gnus,
rhinos and ostriches. —L.E.S.
ss sigdued uta $ .84
stssangbaaisntcuivanoioangtees 89
STEVE COCHRAN
VIRGINIA GREY - GABY ANDRE
warren ano ovacerce oy ANDREW STONE
PLAZA OStIN
DIAL. 4606 | (DIAL 8404)







10.30 p.m

PLAZ

Allan Rocky LANE,
So

From The Third Programme.



TUBBY HUBBY DIET

Bernerd Wicksteed
reports his third day on
the diet of square mecis
for round husbands.

OR three days and
nights now we have
kept body and_ soul

together on the Tubby Hubby
diet and They are delignted.
I think They had u secret fear
that we might die on Their
hands or something.
Breakfast is still the worst, 1

tind In the good old days
before They thought of this
remodeliing experiment I was

never hungry in the morning,
but now I am famished.

On behalf of other martyrs of
the breakfast table who, in a
weak moment, may have allowed
themselves to get in a similar
plight. I have raised this ques-
tion of what to do when you
are stil) hungry after a meal.

They said it is quite simple.
You munch an apple or a raw
carrot. and They gaye me one of
each in a brown paper bag.

When no ene was looking 1
tried myself on the scales last
night, but they © still said
12st. 2lb. However, as I have
had my hair cut. I must be a
bit lighter,





Dinner

MY THIRD DAY

cMenu

Breakfast

Two rashers streaky bacon
and tomato, grilled

Two slices toast, buttered
thinly

Coffee or tea

Lunch

Grapefruit
Two poached eggs on toast

Large portion cauliflower
au gratin

Any fresh fruit

Small cup of clear soup



fortified with glass of
sherry
Plate of cold meat

(chicken, ham, or such-like)
Green salad, optional

Baked apple and—today’s

treat—a tiny spoonful of

sugar or treacle, yum yum.
Coffee

London Express Service





Opening TO-DAY FRIDAY, I3th

4.45 & 8.30 p.m. & Continuing Daily

a

nA

COLOR ay JECHMICOLOR

A UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL PICTURE
BARBAREES

(Dial 5170) DOWNTOWN

THEATRES |

— =

PLAZA





AUDIE ””? WANDA
MURPHY - HENDRIX
BURL DEAN
IVES - JAGGER













BRIDGETOWN







OISTIN














ARBAREES
(Dial 2310) BARS. (Dial 8404)
TODAY (3 Shows) pit aes eae 4h euey
2.30 4.45 & 8.30 p.m, Today 445 & 8.30 p.m, es " 4 8.30 as
& Continuing & Continuing Daily per i va
Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m Warners Action
ee STARLIET ee SIERRA Packed Thriller
a hoa ats (Color) HIGHWAY 301
wi a host of favourite: ‘
including Doris DAY, Audie MURPHY and Steve COCHRAN
Gordon MacRAE & Gene Wanda HENDRIX
Nelson Sat. Special 1.30 p.m.
SAT Special 9.90 @ 1°30 Sat: Special 1.30 a.m. || RIDERS OF THE DUSK
“CHEROKEE UPRISING’ BLACK EAGLE Whip Wilson &

Whip WFLSON and
‘WESTERN RENEGADES’
Johnny Mack BROWN



MIDNITE SATURDAY
“GOLDEN STALLION"

(Color)
Roy ROGERS
“WELLS FARGO
GUNMASTER”

Charles Starett

Coming Soon

FIGHTING O°



William Bishop &

DESERT VIGILANTE

Douglas Fairbanks,








“PIONEERS”
Tex Ritter







MIDNITE SAT.
Roy ROGERS Double
SONG OF TEXAS &
“RIDING DOWN

the CANYON"

FLYNN
Jr.










Presented by the
Barbados School of

Dancing

at the EMPIRE THEATRE

on FRIDAY 20th JUNE

Matinee
5.00 p.m.

Night Show
8.30 p.m.

“DANCING

TIME’

BOOKINGS OPEN

AT
THE EMPIRE THEATRE
ON
FRIDAY, 13TH JUNE
Daily 8.00 a.m, — 12.00 noon and
1.00—4.00 p.m.
Saturday 8.00 a.m. — 12.00 noon

ORCHESTRA & BOXES $1.20; CIRCLE






‘

HOUSE 60¢.

$1.00;

(all reserved)

BALCONY 72 Cents (So









ld in advance)





a









FRIDAY, JUNE 13, 1952
1 Y9996550055999090509904 | TODAY, 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
e You can RELAX better | and
With |
REDIF FUSION Continuing Daily, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
after you e had that warm -
bath it ta just 8 MINUTES } 4
for the water to be hot and % .f
& IN YOUR BATH TUB | = 2 /T
if you have one of those g iF *
% MODERN GEYSERS % f HPF
z From your Gas Showroom, $$ _ f
*% Bay Street > «* F
|% CALL AND SEE THEM TODAY. } * ey
OCCCESOOSOOOSCSOSOOOGR The ere MPA
’ Tay, a E.
C | Cl b ie vs VIRGINIA
oon u | cae ey
y ‘ ST. JAMES % the “*

Saturday, 14th June

and each following
Saturday

DANCE

in a delightful setting

— Excellent Buffet —

$4.00 (no Admission
Charge)

Early Booking
Advisable



MORGAN

CLUB

For - - -
CHAMPAGNE
and other Prizes

For Reservation for our
Summertime Special
Dance Dial: 4000

EMPIRE
Opening TODAY — 2.30 & 8.30
and Continuing
Alexander KORDA presents - -
Vivien LEIGH — Laurence OLIVIER
in

“THAT HAMILTON WOMAN”

SATURDAY 14th at 1.30 p.m,
William Elliott in
“WAGON WHEELS WESTWARD”

and
“IN OLD CALIFORNIA”
Starring John WAYNE
SATURDAY 14th — Midnite Special

Republic Whole Serial - -
“ZORRO'S BLACK WHIP”

OLYMPIC
TODAY to MON. 16th—4.20 & 8.15
Humphrey BOGART in

“SIROCCO"



and
“COWBOY AND THE INDIAN”
_

SAT, 14th at 1.30 p.m,
John WAYNE in
“FIGHTING KENTUCKIAN”"



and
“SPORTING CHANCE”



$$$.
SAT. Mth Midnite Special
Whole Serial - - -

“GHOST OF ZORRO”









ROODAL THEAT





:Skiag > NEISON

/ fling > ROMAN
"Hopp + (Srise Senne
A JAMES

W to |
i Our d/ K CAGNEY

GIs/

«

f
¢



‘

._ ae
WANICE RULE DICK WESSON RON

RY

DIRECTED BY ROY DEL R UTH

SCREEN PLAY By JOHN KLORER anoKARL KAMB:
Musical Ovrection Ray Hemndort

A B'TOWN
(DIAL 2310)

RES
ROXY

TODAY—Last Two Shows 4.30 & 8.15)
“INSIDE STORY”
and
RIO GRANDE
With John WAYNE

SAT. 14th to TUE. 17th 4.30 & 8.1
United Artists Double - - -

PLAZ













“FIRST LEGION"
With Charles BOYER
dd

an
Sally FOREST — Keete BRASS:
in

“NEVER FEAR”

SAT. 4th — Midnite Special
Whole Serial - - -

“RADAR PATROL ys.

ROYAL

TODAY only — 4.30 & 8.15
TOKYO FILE 212

and

SPY \KING’

“NOTORIOUS”
with Cary Grant — ingrid Bergman!
SS

SAT. l4th & SUN. 15th 4.30 & 8.1
Jon HALL in

“HURRICANE ISLAND”
and

“Til OCEAN DRIVE”
with Edmond O'BRIEN



GLO

BE

TO-DAY TO MONDAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.

ee
Tr you believe
nothing else, believe
that I love you !°?

Forget Yo
"=< POWER "BLYTH



“Wio are you?
What world have

you come from?”

Tt ]
| Ee

Pe mia aoe a

TOMORROW 1.30 p.m. SUNDAY 5 p.m.

A SHOW FOR

THE FAMILY
SEE

ROBELDO (Strongest Sian on Earth)

See a motor cycle ridden over his chest
FLORENCE AND CLIFFTON
(French Magicians)
_ See a human body floating in the air

THE BooDOoOo

BROTHERS

Stunt Kings — Cycle Artists
THE WESTERN RHYIHM BOYS

TO-MORROW
ALL STARS

Singing Negro Spirituals

MID-NITE —
TALENT SHOW



Guest Artiste
BAMBINO (6 years old Child Dancer)

JOHNAY APOLLO

See To-morrow’s Advocate for Photos!

GLO

Plus
— DOLE FACE

BE






FRIDAY, JUNE 13, 1952



Care Would Have |G
Saved Ten Lives |

SO FAR THIS YEAR,
as a result of road accidents.
been saved if the drivers of vehicles concerned had not
been in such a hurry and had driven with more care,
Colonel R: T. Michelin, Commissioner of Police, told con-
ductors and drivers in his annual talk at the Empire
Theatre yesterday afternoon.

Seated on the platform with
Col. Michelin, were Mr. Rawle
a igh Mr. Gilbert Archer
o} e ways and Transport
Department, Capt. F. C. Parris,
Mr. Kenneth Sandiford of the
Bus Concessionaries Association,
Mr. E. Massiah and Mr, H. A.
Tudor.

Mr. Garner, who acted as
Chairman, introduced Col. Miche-
lin and later endorsed the Com-
missioner’s remarks. He told
drivers and conductors that the
Commissioner’s talk was of great
importance to them.

Mr. Sandiford also addressed
the audience after which a vote of
thanks wags moved by Mr, H. A.
Tudor.

Colonel Michelin stressed that
there was need for plenty of
improvement in the driving and
conducting of buses, as_ there
were 156 buses in the island.

“It has been my custom for the
past two years to have a talk
with you at the end of the licens-
ing year and before you come up
to renew your licenses to drive
and conduct public service ve-
hicles. Your licences are re-
newable as from the 3rd of June.
When you renew your licenses
I want you to bear in mind during
the ensuing year what J am
going to say today,” said Colonel
Michelin.

During the past twelve months
242 buses have béen involved in
accidents. 83 drivers and 96 con-
duetors have .been warned and
prosecuted before the Courts. Five
eonductors have had their licenses
suspended. The, driving. in the
island would be eonsiderably imm-
proved if everyone displayed more
road manners. A number of
crivers have no. ti t for
other persons using fhe road. They
carry on as if they were on a
private roadway, stopping in the
middle ofthe road to speak to or
pick up friends,. parking on a
corner and pulling up several feet
from the curb. In fact, only
thinking of thee own convenience
and having no regard for anyone
but themselves. I want you to
remember the other road users.
If everyone does this it will make
eriving- on our narrow roads
easier and safer.”

“So far this year, ten (10)
persons have been killed as a re-
sult of road accidents. All these
lives might have been saved if
the drivers of the vehicles con-
cerned had not been in such a
hurry and had driven with more
eare, One of the most ghastly
accidents took place a few weeks
ago, on a Sunday afternoon Three
hittle children were sitting quietly
on the steps of their home
waiting for their father to bring
the car around to take them for
a drive. Suddenly a car coming
along, the road crashed into them
end knocked them unconscious.
They subsequently died in Hos-
pital. Think of these young lives
being brought abruptly to an end.
Jt is appalling and it should be
possible to prevent accidents of
this nature,” he said.

“During the year 1951, there
were 1,165 accidents reported to
the Police. The main causes of
accidents are: (1) improper over-
taking, that is, not waiting your
turn but trying to cut in when
the road is not yours, (b) poor
judgement of drivers and* (c) pe-
destrians not looking where they
are going.”

“There are more accidents on
Saturday than any other day, and
between 12.00 noon and 1.00 p.m.
and 4.00 p.m. and 5,00 p.m. are
the jtimes whan most accidents
occur:

“Last year sixty-nine (69) Bus
Drivers received Good Driving
Badges. This year 91 Drivers
qualify for the award of this



gon

FOR
ENGLISH



‘respects

REFRIGERATOR

PRODUCTS
CALL

MANNING & CO, LTD.
Electrical Dept.



SS



ten persons have been killed!
All these lives might have}

badge. The badge this year is
red with blue stripes. You should
be proud of wearing these badges.
They are an outward and visible
sign of good driving for 12
months. They should also help
you to get employment when you
need it.

“You drivers are responsible
for the safety and comfort of
the passengers you carry. Observe
tne rules of the road, practise
road manners, drive within the
speed limit and make your pas-
sengers’ trip as comfortable and
safe as possible.

“To the conductors.—You are
responsible for looking after the
passenger. Do not allow your
bus to be overcrowded. By
allowing more than five in a seat
you are not only breaking the
law but making it uncomfortable
for five other people. Rules are
made to be obeyed. You are
there to see that the regulations
are carried out. In England the
passenger obeys the orders of the
eonductor. If he says the bus is
full, that is final and there is no
argument. Teach your public to
obey your instructions. See that
the bus only stops at approved
Bus Stops. Always be neat and
tidy in your person. No one
anyone in dirty and
shabby clothes and unshaven.
Keep your bus clean and remem-
ber the passenger is never wrong.
Be lite, courteous and helpful
to m on all occasions, no
matter how exasperating they
may be. Do not allow indecent
language or disorderly conduct
to take place in the bus. Remem-
ber you are a licensed conductor.
Live up to what the public expect

from the wearer of the Con-
ductor’s Badge,
“Last year seventy-one (71)

Conductors received Good Con-
duet Badges. This year 77 con-
ductors qualify for this badge.
“I thank you all for coming
here today and hope that you will
endeavour to give the travelling
public a safe and comfortable
ride, and make the roads of this
island safer for everyone to use.



world
Dolphin
threads with a theoretical break-
ing strain of 78 pounds.

E. Australian

B.G. Has Colony
Wide Hospital Plan



only a fow miles across

GEORGETOWN, June 4.

THE BRITISH GUIANA GOVERNMENT has a com-
prehensive scheme for the establishment of hospitals,
cottage hospitals and special medical facilities at strategic

points all over the Colony.

These will be established

according to a formula of priorities, and it is expected

__ that the programme should be

One Ton Shark

Caught On Li

The largest shark ever

was landed
Cuttyhunk

The fish, which was cau,
waters,

me
caught

by hook or line anywhere in the
recently on a
Line

39

ght in

measured

Remember it takes very little//6ft. 3in, long, had a girth of 8ft.
Jonger to get there when you|!lin. and weighed 2,352lbs. This
drive with care and regard for|capture has enabled the success-
others. ful fisherman to claim the world

“Courtesy creates courtesy. Let /record,
i

all of us who drive motor vehicles |
practise more road manners—we



An Australian newspaper

gives

7 ie ithis account of the capture:
weal a by it,” Colonel “, . . The party set out on
ri }Friday evening and anchored
“ ora the night, spending Sat-
urday obtaining the _ seal-bait

. =

1 Go ) necessary _to lure their quarry.
Dr vers, wductors The first indication that a mon-
Rewew Licences ster shark was in the vicinity

came around 2 a.m. on Sunday

when those on board were dis-

So far 2,424 drivers and 44!turbed by
conduptars thave ‘renewed their | knocking

the
the

banging

of hungry

and
shark

licences. The majority of appli-| which, attracted by the bait hang-

cants are bringing their licences
to the Traffie Department and
leaving them until the following
day.

Very few
sent by post.

Three Corporals and three Po-\
lice Constables are looking after
the renewing of licences.

licences are being





| propeller

Seized Propeller
“When, finally, it
in its huge

seized
jaws,
launch shook from stem to stern,
and those on board knew they
could capture ‘a real big ’un!’”

ing from the side, nosed around
the boat,

the
the

It was daylight before they

1 attempted to hook the monster,

20'- FINE FOR but were almost immediately suc-
cessful, At 6.30 a.m. they began

INDECENT LANGUAGE playing the outsize shark and

brought it alongside in the good

A fine of 20s was imposed on! time of forty-five minutes. Luckily
Ismay Griffith of bahcgshy Lane,|the shark kept to the surface of

St. Michael yesterday by His

tle water: had it dived to the bot-

Worship Mr. C. L. Walwyn, Act-|tom the task, would have been

ing Police Magistrate of District}â„¢uch more difficult.
“A” who found her guilty of us-/ “as
on Nel-| water.

ing indecent language
son_ Street.



taken in five

The fisherman had

Finally it
fathoms of

considered

The fine aid in 14\ Using a much heavier line, a 54-
days or in pA ie im-|thread, but fortunately the 39-
prisonment with hard labour.|thread was decided upon, thus

Island Constable Maynard arrest-! enabling the angler
ed Griffith.

===



ECONOMY
COMBINED



ALL
ELECTRIC

— Dial 4289





world’s record.

WASHING
MACHINE

to secure the ~







“on the move” by next year.
This was disclosed when the
Legislative Council met to dis-
cuss motions by Hon, Daniel
Debidin aimed at providing social

and other services in his con-
stituency on the Est Coast,
Demerara.

The Governor told the Coun-
cil that the matter had been dealt
with in the 10-year plan. Since
then there had been proposals
by the Venn Commission for the
erection of 16 hospitals along the
coastal belt and that Commission
paid that those hospitals should
be built as early as possible, The
Commission, the Governor said,
probably realised that, for finan-
cial reasons, it might be some
time before those hospitals could
be built,

Requirements

The position of which district
must be served first is to be con-
sidered im the light of the re-
quirements of the Colony as a
whole, The Venn Commission
itself reported that the majority
of estate (sugar) hospitals should
remain in use for the next few
years until it is possible to as-
sess the hospital requirements of
the rural population as a whole
in the light of fallen. morbidity
rates.

Realising the position,
ever, the Director of
Services had drawn up a com-
prehensive programme for the
next few years for the construc-
tion of rural hospitals through-
eut the colony wherever needed.
The programme will be submitted
to the Legislative Council Medi-
eal Advisory Committee for con-
sideration as to priorities which
would be granted.

how-
Medical



RATES OF EXCHANGE

12TH JUNE, 1952
Selling Buying
' NEW YORK
73 3/10% Cheques on Bankers 71 6/10%
Sight or Demand
Drafts 71 4/10%
73 3/10% Cable
71 8/10% Currency 70 1/10%
Coupons 68 4/10%%
50% Silver 20%
CANADA

Cheques on Bankers
Demand Drafts
Sight Drafts

Cable

Currency

Coupons

Silver

15 3/10%
15.15%
15%
5/10% 73 B/10%
73 1/10%
20%



|
eeth Loose
eo Bleed

Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and
Loose Teeth mean that you may
have Pyorrhea, Trench Mouth or
} perhaps some bad disease that will
| sooner or later cause your teeth to

fall out and may also cause Rheu-
| matism and Heart Trouble. Amosan
stops gum bleeding the first day,
| ends sore mouth and quickly tight-
eng the teeth. Iron clad guarantee
| Amosan must make your mouth well
| and save your teeth or money back
on return of empty package, Get
Amosan from your chemist today
| The guarantee protects you.









What you need are the life-
giving vitamins and minerals

oe

“ito the full! You'll feel
stronger, healthier wit> .










The quality
Metal Polish



the

nameeewyetsanagenit, ‘


isn't going to step me having a paddle.”
London Express Service

sea

Five Killed
In Plane Crash

GREEN RIVER, Utah,
June 11.
Five persons, including an eight

a hs

SEA AND AIR
TRAFFIC



month oki boy -were killed in-
stantly when a chartered plane
crashed and burned 65 air miles!
a _.__' south of here. The chartered
Beecheraft Bonanza plane, be-

longing to the Rigg Aircraft Com-
pany of Grand Junction, Colorado,

In Carlisle Bay



acti, Mary Caroline, Soh Gita M., crashed shortly after taking off

Sch. Laudalpha, Sch. Cyril Smith, Sch 7 ing o ‘ é

Gardenia, M.V. Compton, M.V. Willem- from the RUNING on ee the one

stad, Sch. Rosarene, Sch. Burma p,, Strip 40 miles south of Hanksville

Sch, Henry D. Wallace, in rugged southeastern Utah,

—U.P.
ARRIVALS UE
M.V. Daerwood, from St. Lucia, M.V
Moneka from Dominica.
ARRIVALS — BY B.W.LA

ON THURSDAY

From TRINIDAD
Cc. Cook, M. Sealy, O. Grannum,
McCartney, E. Gunstone, E

WANTED

B
Humphries,

M. Guillo, R.~TJaisingh, C Quesne!, C
Chaderton, J.Gale, P. Ernest
DEPARTURES BY BWIA OLD GOLD

ON THURSDAY
ror ANTIGUA

H. Rodenbusch, R, Dixon, A. Maile
For PUERTO RICO: AND
Charles Watts, Kathryn Watts, Jean
Blondin, Elsie Murray, John Blondin,
Likerty Cabral, Helen Coull, Kenneth,
Coull, Ian Coull, Charles Alleyne, Shir-
ley Herbert, Hugh MeAlister

in Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station ©

OR IN PIECES IN
SCRAP FORM

The very highest

Cabie and Wireless (W.1,) Ltd. advise
that they can now communicate with market prices paid
the following ships through their Bar-
bados coast station at your ers...
S.S. Settler, ss. Lady Rodney, s.¢ your Jewell .
Mormac Tern, s.8. Chariton Venus, 5.5

American Vespucel, s.s. Sunetta, s,s Y De I IM
Giulie, s.s. Salte, s,s, Ocean Monarch, A
as, K, Bittencourt, s.s, Prospector, s.s, # -

African Moon, s.s. Neaera, 5.8. Monalisa,
ss. Hercuba, «s.Krios, 5.5. Esso Sao
Poulo, s.s. Casablanca, 6.5. Ganges, 5.8
Sunwatt, as. Koll, s.0. Regent Lion, 5.5
Bluemaster, ss, Generel Artigas, 4.5.
Soursern Countess, 8.5. Alcoa Polaris,
ss. Antoniotto Usodimare, ss. A
Petrioet, s.s, Esito, s.s, Challenger,

& CO., LTD.

20 BROAD ST.
Phone ; 4644



6.8
Linga, s.s. Matina and 6.8. Mabelryan





—$—<—$—<—<——



SE

NOW PACKED

Nelloggs

Get yours today
while the supply lasts!

YOURS! Accept this 4-in-1 measuring spoon now in every
package of delici Kellogg’s ALL-BRAN!

MODERN: Ail spoon measuring sizes—in one! Tabie
spoon and teaspoon on one side! Half-teaspoon and

quarter- on other side. Handier than 4 separat:
spoons. W; easily, quickly. Acidproof!
Offer made to uaint you with the sweeter-tagting

and crispier Kellogg's 4LL-BRAN of
and measuring n to make muffins everybody loves.
Light! Tendest Recipe on ali-BRAN box.

Laxative, too! If suffering from constipation due to

ay! Use ALL- BRAN



World most populate



PAGE THREE

-



PAIN

QUININE-—THE FOURTH INGREDIENT IN ‘ANACIN’

How does ‘ ANACIN ' relieve pain so fast, so effectively? A few years
ago leading scientists discovered that the secret lay in the exact balancing
of three famous medicines (Phenacetin, Caffeine and Acetylsalicylic Acid)
with a FOURTH ingredientc—QUININE. And *Anacin’s’ Quinine acts
synergistically with the other medicines to soothe aches, bring down
feverish temperatures, restore a real sense of well-being !

Pains from fever ? Colds ? Headaches ?

Do you suffer from Toothache ? Rheumatism ? Neuralgia?
any of these pains ? Menstrual Pains? Then ‘ANACIN’® will
bring you immediate relief, cast out

pain with amazing speed !

GAST OFF PAIN—AT ONCE!

Yes, for a very little you can buy a 2-tablet envelope of ‘ANACIN '—
enough to bring you fast relief from a‘bout of pain! ‘Anacin ’ is also
available in handy 20-tablet boxes and in bottles of 50 tablets. Share
in the benefits of this great new scientific discovery !

ARM YOURSELF AGAINST PAIN
GET SOME ‘ANACIN’ ToDAy!



Doctors and dentists recommend ‘ ANACIN *. In Great
Britain alone over 12,000 use it in their surgeries.



REDIFFUSION

{
)
| Offers a Commission of $1.50 in CASH for every New
| Subscriber brought to and accepted by the Company.



REDIFFUSION will pay in addition a bonus of $25.00
to any person who brings in twenty-five New Subscrib-
ers in one Calendar month who are accepted by the
Company

Have always a supply of Recommendation Forms ready

THEY CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE OFFICE
REDIFFUSION Hd ‘Trafalgar Street. .















TOP—1 tab):
BOTTOM—"4 teaspo... > ,

(oe SpoOm

vespeca

" MODERN RED” PLASTIC:
Handy! Easy to wash!

ii EVERY BOX OF

LL-BRAN

ack of bulk in tho aiet, enjoy a bowlful of Kellogg’s



ALL-BRAN every And drink plenty of water.
D ; natural laxative food!

Mus Cet your ALL-BRAN 4-in-1 moons spoon
nov ly is limited. Visit your grocer quick! Offer
made by \logg’s of Battle Creek, Mich.

—










PAGE FOUR

—

ead ADVOCATE

| a CY a |

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown

Friday, June 13, 1952

SOLDIERS

TO-DAY the Barbados Regiment goes
to camp at Walkers’ Savannah in St. An-
drew. oo

In 1951 and 1950 the Annual Camp of
the Regiment was held at the Garrison
Headquarters. This year the Regiment is
holding its second outdoor camp since its
formation.

The advantages of a camp away from
headquarters are apparent. At headquar-
ters everything is laid on, as it were, to
employ a military expression. Instead, at
camp, the soldiers and officers are given
the opportunity of experiencing military
training and of improvising in the field.
Barbados is a very tiny island and field
exercises are therefore limited in extent,
but the open country of Belleplaine and
the hills near Chalky Mount offer excellent
scope for exercises.

Soldiers can concentrate on fieldcraft in
Belleplaine in a way that would be quite
impossible on the Garrison Savannah, Ad-
vancing over various types of country: the
use of camouflage in open and forest land:
signalling and the use of ground cover are
examples of fieldcraft which can be de-
monstrated and practised better in St.
Andrew’s coastlands than anywhere else
in Barbados.

The suitability of the terrain for hand
grenade throwing and rifle and Bren gun
firing is also apparent.

The Barbados Regiment comprises 355
soldiers and more than 300 will be at the
camp from to-day until June 22 when the
camp ends.

Soldiers in peace time tend to be forgot-
ten persons. It is difficult for the general
public to sustain interest in arms when the
cease fire has sounded. The fact of the
Barbados Regiment’s existence ought not
to be surprising in an island which played
so important a role in the defence of the
British Caribbean during the eighteenth
century. But the lukewarmness of public
opinion in favour of a soldiery and the
natural reaction against a military estab-
lishment in times of peace have not pre-
vented the Barbados Regiment from grow-
ing to its present strength.

The tradition of the British Army still
lives in Barbados, To-day’s camp at Walk-
ers’ Savannah is a reminder that this
island still possesses a regiment of soldiers.
upon whose military. traming and éxperi-
ence this island must rely in the event of
any emergency. A small weli trained regi-
ment of soldiers is all that is required in
time of peace.

But should the services of a large num-
ber of soldiers ever again be required for
the defence of any of the British Carib-
bean territories the Barbados Regiment
will provide a ready nucleus for their
training. The announcement made earlier
this year that the Imperial Government
was reserving funds for the re-formation
of the West India Regiment has aroused
hopes that recruits for Imperial Forces
can be supplied through the Barbados
Regiment.

When a South Caribbean Battalion is
formed in Trinidad the Barbados Regi-
ment will become an integral part of this
battalion and its officers will be eligible
for Queen’s Commissions.

It seems that the perseverance and de-
votion to duty of officers, warrant officers
and men of the Barbados Regiment, as ex-
emplified by the large attendance at this
year’s annual camp will soon be rewarded
when greater recognition of the role to be
played by locally recruited soldiers in
maintaining imperial defences is paid by
re-formation of the West Indian Regiment.

When the West Indian Regiment has
been reformed the Barbados Regiment
may expect to employ a greater perma-
nent cadre than nineteen. Meanwhile the
Regiment has to depend on the co-opera-
tion of employers and goodwill of soldiers

.for a large attendance at its annual camp
when the most intensive military training
of the year is carried on. The size of this
year’s camp is a tribute to the co-operation
of employers and soldiers and exemplifies
the support which the Regiment is receiv-
ing from the government and the public.

East Afriea Tourist Trade

THE growing importance of the tourist
trade to the economy of the East African
territories is strikingly illustrated by the
fact that it is now estimated to be worth
£5,000,000 a year as compared with an
estimated £500,000 in 1948. This is reveal-
ed in the fourth annual report of the Gen-
eral Manager of the East Africa Tourist
Travel Association,

In the context of balance of payments
the chairman (Mr. R, de S. Stapledon)
says the tourist trade last year was ex-
ceeded in value only by the cotton, sisal
and coffee trades—and that at a time of
high produce prices. Report adds: “Under
conditions of international freedom of
movement there is no telling to what limit
East Africa’s potential in the tourist trade
may reach.”





|
|

RN




































Baxter Quits As Dramatic | Britons To Leave China |

By BEVERLEY BAXTER

It was not an easy decision to
take. For ten years I had been
the dramatic critic of the London
Evening Standard, writing a
weekly column which appeared on
Fridays; and then came the mo-
ment when I had to say to my old
friend Lord Beaverbrook: “The
curtain must come down.” For
once the critic could speak the
same words as Hamlet and say
that the rest was silence.

A questing mind might wonder
(a) How an M.P. could be a dra-
matic critic and (b) having be-
come one, why give it up?

The answer to the first part of
that question is that in Britain
we have not yet accepted the idea
of the professional politician un-
less of course he becomes a min-
ister. The idea is that an ordinary
private member carries on his
profession or occupation in his
spare time as best he can, con-
centrating on those subjects of
debate in which he has special
knowledge or interest,

The tradition of the writer-
politician has been long éstablish-
ed in Parliament here. Sheridan
wrote plays and even managed the
Covent Garden’ Theatre at the
same time as he was Under-f§»c-
retary for Foreign Affairs. Gib-
bons wrote much of “Decline and
Fall” in the House of Commons
Library. Disraeli did a certain
amount of writing there but his
real heart was in politics. John
Buchan loved, to work in the
Library where from the window
you can see the ancient Thames
and hear the peremptory hooting
of tugs as they approached West-
minster Bridge.

I have summoned these great
men from the mists merely to illu-
strate my argument, Let me re-«
peat that the writer politician is
a long established figure in the
British Parliament.

Awkward

Admittedly it was awkward for
me on occasion to attend a first
night when a big debate was tak-
ing place, but by altering dates
and various other devices it work-
ed well enough until the Conser-
vatives won last year’s election.
Sustained by only a small major-
ity and with an immense amount
o! contentious legislation the
House of Commons has become a
concentration camp fer the Gov-
ernment’s supporters. From early
afternoon and sometimes to day-
light we trudge through the Lob-
bies voting, voting, voting. When
‘we show some lack of enthusiasm
as the Division bells go for the
tenth time, the Chief Whip looks
at us as Frederick the Great look-
ed at his Grenadiers who were
reluctantly preparing to make yet
another charge against the enemy
and shouted “You dogs! Do you
want to live for ever?”

The Lobby had ruled out the
foyer for me. Every night is a
first night at Westminster and
there is no trouble about sitting
it out until the end of the per-
formance. No trouble at all.

At first I experienced a sense of
relief at leaving the theatrical

world. A critic has to see plays
which no man in his senses would

sit through, and to fill his column
the critic must sometimes force
himself to show an interest in a
subject which he does not feel.
Yes there is a certain relief at
being out of it.

Yet one has only to set down
these words to wonder if the feel-
ing will persist. For ten years Sir
Laurence Olivier has solemnly re.
quested the honour of my presence
at the first presentation of this or
that: Rodgers and Hammerstein
were equally solicitous about the
premieres of OKLAHOMA, CAR-
OUSEL and SOUTH PACIFIC:
John Gielgud was no less desirous
that I should be present at the
birth of his newest triumph,

The cynic might observe at this
point that they were equally so-
licitous about the presence of the
critics from the Times, Telegraph,
Observer, Express, Mail and so on,
That is true, Sweet are the uses
of advertisement and it was for us



By EPHRAIM HARDCASTLE

FIRST of the newspaper as-
tro.ogers, R. H. Naylor, whose
prewar Sunday Express column
made him the most widely read
of them all, died yesterday. He
had been ill for q long time.

He was a £5 a week assistant
in another astrologer’s office when
John Gordon, on a sudden hunch,
commissioned him to cast a horo-
scope of Princess Margaret in the
week she was born.

* Me

*

* It proved so popular that he
wes engaged to do a _ regular
monthly article for a year. In
his first article he predicted dis-
aster to the airship R101. On the
day the prediction was published,
R101 was destroyed with most of
its crew and passengers.
Oy ° w .

Naylor’s mail leaped for a
period to 27,000 letters a week.
When at the height of his popu-
larity, he and John Gordon found

themselves in the deck at the
Mansion House together on
charges of “being rogues and

vagabonds” indulging in fortune

telling. As they walked to the

dock Gordon asked Naylor to

predict the result of the ease.
Naylor replied, “Case dismissed,

each side to pay its own costs.”
That was the result.

DECLINED

LORD Beaverbrook’s television
debut has prompted brisk action
from the other side of the Atlan-
tic.

I hear the cameras were wait-
ing for him— and so was a con-
tract if he would sign it. He
would not.

EPSTEIN MADONNA
IN a London foundry I saw
Jacob Epstein’s latest and ‘“per-
haps my best work”—a 13ft. high
Madonna and boy Jesus.
It was waiting to be
lead.

cast in

The Name That Millions

Knew-anp now ne steprep To FAME

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Critic
to tell London the good (or bad)
tidings about their offerings. ©
Like Horses

Like horses the critics are sup-
posed to go better in company, so
each senior critic is sent two seats
on the aisle, and by senior critics
I merely mean those writing for
the principal newspapers. A
critic from a quarterly review or
a high brow weekly would get
only one ticket and not necessarily
on the aisle.

Inevitably a London first night
audience becomes something of a
repertory company in itself. The
critics are not only a permanent
body but usually have the same
seats no matter what theatre it is.
Then there are the ticket agency
managers who come so as to de-
cide how much, if any, of a
library deal they should make.

They will buy tickets in bulk
according to the warmth of the
reception and their own judgment,
and then sell them to their clients
plus a booking fee.

Then there is a small group of
people who have a standing order
with the box office for every first
night. It seems incredible but it
is true. Sir Louis Sterling and
his wife, well in their seventies
go to the theatre sometimes four
nights a week if there is a glut
of new _ productions. So do
Edward Sutro and his wife, he
being a descendant of the famous
Edwardian dramatist, There are
others too which ought to con-
vince anyone that the British are
a tough breed. Finally there is
a gallery First Nighters’ Club
which regularly fills that part of
the theatre known as the gods,
They are keen critics of the drama
being much given to booing or
cheering according to their mood.
There is a bloodless war between
the critics and the gallery be-
cause their verdicts are seldom
the same.

Celebrities

Finally there are the celebrities
who have been invited by the
management to give tone to the
affair. Famous film stars, cele.
brated actors who are “resting”
peers and the raging beauties of
the moment. No wonder there is
always a crowd outside to see us
arrive and depart, It is part of
the London circus.

Sometimes the audience is so
spectacular that the play itself
has no chance to compete. Cer.
tainly I found that in 1942 when
I produced my own play “It
Happened in September” at St.
James’ Theatre. If I ever write
another play I shall invite only
the critics and let the ordinary
public make up the rest of the
audience. An author does not
want competition *from the stalls.

Looking back on those ten years
I can begin to feel a quickening of
the pulse at some of the glorious
memories that will never fade,
There was that period in the war
when Laurence Olivier and
Ralph Richardson (who were en-
dangering everybody’s lives ex-
cept the Germans as Fleet Air
Arm Pilots) were asked “by the
Government to revive the glories
of the Old Vie which nad ‘been
destroyed by a bomb.

They took the New Theatre in
St. Martin’s Lane, they paid
themselves a mere pittance, they
gathered a group of famous actors
and they gave to us such pro-

ductions of Shakespeare and
Shaw and Tchekhov and Euripi-
des as may never again be
equalled.

Because of the bombing and
the blackout theatres opened at
6.30 p.m, and people came direct
from their offices and workshops,
As the war went on they looked
increasingly to the drama to ex-
press their spirit as a people, for
the Englishman is too reserved
to reveal his own emotion, ®

Henry

I remember the night when
Olivier’s Old Vie Company gave
us such an inspiring production
of Henry IV that when the cur-
tain fell, both the audience and
the actors were in tears, Great-

ness was in the very air. Shake- hope you enjoyed the experience.



speare had come back from the
sixteenth century to give voice
to England fighting for her life
against a darker enemy than
Elizabethan England ever knew.

Then there was that incredible
evening when they played Shaw’s
“Arms and the Man” on the very
night that Bulgaria had offered to
cease fighting for the Germans
and fight for the Russians in-
stead. Shaw's 40-year-old satire
on Bulgaria suddenly became
more topical than tomgrrow’'s
newspaper. We were in tears
again but this time with outrage-
ous laughter.

I remember one first night
when a V.1. hovered over the
theatre going round and round in
the air. Instinctively the audi-
ence rushed to the «sides and
stood against the walls while the
actors being actors went on with
the play. Then fe buzz bomb
buzzed off somewhere else, the
audience returned to their seats
oe. finally booed the actors for
a d performance of a bad play.
I must say it seems pretty tough
looking back on it now.

Nothing will ever kill the
theatre. If there had never been
such a thing as the printing press,
if there had never been books of
record, the theatre would be the
continuing historian of the cus-
toms and speech of a people. The
plays of Euripides in Ancient
Greece more truly portray the
character of that nation than the
feuds which harass it today.

To the surprise of the manage-
ments the British people in the
war did not want tawdry things
in the theatre. For one thing the
6.30 openings had brought a new
public for the living drama. As
I have indicated typists and
clerks came direct from their
offices. Soldiers on leave who
had enough knockabout in action
came to see plays by the masters
not by the novices.

Golden Age
There was a _ golden age of
action developing before our

eyes. Jo! Gielgud was reaching
the height of his powers and as
I have indicated Laurence Olivier
was bringing an audacity and
even genius to production and
acting. Michael Redgrave was
moving up, Ralph ichardson
was vitalising everythirig he
touched and Alec Guinness was
discovering that high intelligence
can be displayed even when
speaking memorial lines,

Vivien Leigh was growing in
stature, Sybil Thorndike, Edith
Evans and Lilian Braithwaite
were proving that maturity has
charms that youth will never
know, Tyrone Guthrie, John
Fernald and a boy genius named
Peter Brook were breaking all
rules and founding a new era of
production.

Then came the impact of the
poets. Christopher Fry wrote
“The Lady’s Not for Burning”
which was really a_ ballet of
words, I mean precisely that. He
made words dance and London
hailed him like a _ conqueror.
Other poets followed and the pub-
lic clamoured for the best.

I wish I could put on record
that the London theatre is as full
of splendour as it was then, The
Impetus of those years has sub-
sided, the glory has dimmed. We
still have great acting when it is
given a chance but our authors
seem unable to illumine the
shadowed age in which we live.

So as a critic I put down my
pen. I would like to think that
in those years I encouraged the
best and cadtigated the vulgar
and the second rate. If some of
the criticisms were harsh I tried
never to break an actor’s heart.
The critic must love his medium
whether it is the théatre, the
cinema, art, music or books and
he must fight for the eternal
values. I loved and still love the
theatre,

At any rate in what I have
written in this London Letter I
have put you in the seat on the
aisle at a London first night. I



When it appears- it will sur-
prise those whe associate Epstein
with such distorted statues as
Adam,

- *

For this three-ton group is
beautiful and natural. It shows
Jesus as a sensitive, curly headed
boy. His mother stands close be-
hind him. Under a nunlike hood
her eyes stare fearfully.

The Madonna and Child will
adcrn a bridge joining two Georg-
jan houses in London’s Caven-
dishsquare, occupied by the Con-
vent of the Holy Child.

SUMMER COLOURS

THOUGH the Queen has made
no official command, she has pri-
vately asked the, Royal Family
land \Ladies-in-Wajting to wear
half mourning until the end of the
summer,

This means black, grey, white,
or mauve. From Norman Hart-
nell the Duchess of Kent has or-
dered an outfit of steel grey and
black,

‘TRUTH’ DEAL

RONALD STAPLES, cultured, xt

astute head of the publishing
firm -which bears his name, has
acquired a majority shareholding
in the weekly review Truth,
Truth’s editor, Collin Brooks,
tells me: “I remain editor and
chairman.”
* * *

Staples is one of Britain’s
foremost taxation experts.

With much celebration, he
announced last year the publica-
tion of a quarterly magazine,
Foyer, which had Lord Hare-
wood, Sacheverell Sitwell, and
Sir Steuart Wilson on the edi-
torial board. It folded up after
two issues,

DIPLOMATIC BEAUTY

BEAUTY and fashion thronged
Buckingham Palace when the
Queen met London diplomats and
their wives,



Who are the most beautiful
among the diplomatic wives?

My choice: Madame Manuel
Bianchi, wife of the Chilean
Ambassador, and Mme. Roberto
de Mendoza, wife of Cuba’s
representative. 5

Mme, Bianchi, mother of two
soms, and of a daughter born
last March, was previously mar-
ried to a British officer killed on
D Day. Mme. de Mendoza, too,
has three children, lives in Mr.
Churchill’s former, home, — 28,
Hyde Park Gate.

TOUGH FAMILY

HOME, from Australia is meat
multi-millionaire, Lord Vestey.
He has the family toughness
which helped create the great
business empire jhe now heads.

After a stroke in Australia last
February, he was not expected
‘to live. But now at 69 he is mak-
ing a_ remarkable _ recovery,
though, of course, still far from
normal health,

Once the Vesteys’.. wealth was

centred on_ the s of the
Argentine. Now, » chang-
ing world conditiol is , being

on a great new domain in
Australia and New Zealand.
> .

There the Vesteys have vast
numbers of sheep and cattle —
but the Australian drought has
caused heavy losses.

They also have great ra
packing stations, In one which
Lord Vestey visited 18,500 lambs
‘were killed ina day, and more
than 71,000 in a week.

WINE AND WATER

MOST novel party of the
season so far was given by
Flavia, daughter of Air Chief
Marshal Sir Alec Coryton. She
put her guests in boats and took
them on the Serpentine in Hyde
Park.

They took a gramophone and
all necessary party equipment,
and reported this method of
mixing water with the drinks a
complete success.—L.E.S.

meat-

-

FRIDAY, JUNE 13,

PHOTOGRAPHS

Copies of Local Photographs
Which have appeared in the

Advocate Newspaper

Can be ordered from the...

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

1952











£300 million lost Hongkong
isolated

By GUY EDEN

THE great British merchant firms are to
evacuate Red China at once. Investments
worth £300 million—maybe more—will be
lost.

Mr. Eden, the Foreign Secretary, an-
nounced plans for a withdrawal in the
House of Commons. :

Heads of the big firms in consultation
with the Government have come to the con-
clusion that it is useless to hope for a quick
improvement in the situation in whiel
ish and other foreign enterprise
blackmailed by the Communistsy

Tens of thousands of pounds
paid by the companies in penal taxes, fines,
and oppressive labour rules forcing them to
pay Chinese employees whether at work or
not.

Commercial debts owed by China to Brit-

Whatever it may be in Hardwave, Kitchen
Supplies, Building Materials and Tools,
C. S, PITCHER & CO. will most likely have it!




4-49-99

CASTINGS:

Negro Pots—2—3—4—
“ 6 gall. sizes.
F DANISH POTS:
1—2—3—4 gall. sizes.

Cc.
PITCHER & CO.,

ish firms are believed to amount to BOX IRONS:
£60,000,000. This, too, will probably be Ph, 4472 614”, —71,",—8"
lost.

TINNED FRYING

; ' f
The Foreign Office thinks the chances 0 PANS 10”~11"_-12”

the companies getting compensation for
their abandoned property are very small.

The decision has not been made by the
Government but by the firms who have
made their own plans in concert with each
other. But the Government will help by
safeguarding the interests of British em-
ployees and organising the actual evacua-
tion.

After that, only a few small British trad-
ers will be left in Red China—and even they
may come out soon. About 100 British men
and women are involved. Before the war
there were 10,000 engaged in business in
China.

Among other big firms getting out are the
British-American Tobacco Company, Shell,



A COMPLETE RANGE OF THESE
FINE RECEIVERS

; : 5-TUBE TABLE MODEL RADIO ........ patti $ 98.30
Butterfield and Swire, «nd Jardine, Mathe 6-TUBE TABLE MODEL RADIO ........ Pek genres 145.00
the effect of TUBE FLOOR MODEL RADKOGRAM <-- 9000

isi 6-TUBE FLOOR MODEL RADIOGRAM ....... ; :
The effect of the decision on Hongkong,|} ¢"ipBE FLOOR MODEL IOGRAM (with
where there is a big British commercial Automatic Three Speed Changers) .......... 515.00

LET US DEMONSTRATE ONE OF THE ABOVE SETS
AND JOIN THE HUNDREDS OF SATISFIED OWNERS.

°

DA COSTA & CO., LID.

colony, has been under examination by

Whitehall experts.

It is recognised that the withdrawal
will leave Hongkong isolated, but no de-
cision affecting the colony will be faken
for the present.

The evacuation from Red China will not

aan

involve a break in diplomatic relations.
Britain has a diplomatic representative in
Peking and although he has been there for
many months he has not yet been received
by the Red Foreign Minister.

Mr. George Mitchell, secretary and vice-
chairman of the China Association, which
represents Brftish business in China, said:
“If our merchants do withdraw the Chinese
will be the principal losers. The China trade
has never been more than 2 per cent. of
Britajn’s total trade. On the other hand,
British merchants have transacted more
than half of China’s overseas business.”



Light
Weight
Tweeds

A New Shipment of
11/12 oz. WOOLLENS
in stripe design — Fawn
and Blue grounds



and

Takoradi Harbour Project

A full account of what is considered to be
the largest British-built harbour project of
recent times—a vast extension of the port of
Takoradi in West Africa—has been publish-
ed in London.

The extension of Takoradi, the only deep
water harbour of the Gold Coast for ocean
going vessels, has been made in order to cope
with Africa’s steadily increasing trade in
cocoa, manganese, bauxite and timber, all of
which are now being shipped out in vast
quantities.

Alterations, when finally completed, will
enable six ships to be berthed alongside the
main quay instead of three, and in addition
provision of anchorage accommodation for
a large number of dcean-going vessels, tugs
and lighters. The new timber depot, con-
sisting of four thousand feet of quay walls.
2 four-hundred feet by hundred and fifty

PARSON’S GREY

Priced from $10.34

Da Costa
| & Co., Ltd.





FINE FOODS ARRIVE!

NEW ARRIVALS
Cheddar Cheese in tins

een



feet sheds for sawn timber, a new oil berth, oan
and extensive railway sidings, are also being am
erected. The original bauxite loading berth ee
had been dismantled and re-erected on the Conatien Bacon
outer side of the lee break-water. All plant Tonic Water
and machinery have been operated by Afri- Siti IN Tine
cans specially trained by the contractors. Grapes
One of the biggest undertakings facing the —_
consulting engineers—Messrs. Rendel, Palm: Pears
Peaches
Apricots

moval of Cox’s Fort Hill, a local lafidmark
80 feet high and covering an area of 24 acres
consisting of shale and lacerite. This had to



be removed and deposited so as to reclaim



49 acres of space from the sea for railways,

er and Tritton—and the contractors—Messrs. |

Taylor Woodrow (Africa) Ltd.—was_-the re-

yards and establishments. DELIGHTFUL SAUCES
Italian Ketchup

Other difficulties were that all cement,

FOR QUICK LUNCHES
Fillet: Steak |

steel and contractor’s plant had to be sup- Steeliniedl ar. aoa

plied from Great Britain which meant that. Fresh Sausages i Mango Sauce

with the exception of sand, aggregate and Fete ate eer oer

timber, practically every item had to be or- Hams in tins Cerebos Salt

dered from United Kingdom. Spare parts for “Enjoy the Finest Tasting on hoe
everything had to be kept in stock and skill- Rum Black Pepper

ed personnel housed on the spot to undertake GOLD BRAID Fresh Vegetables and
repairs. Because no suitable berthing place 3-Â¥r.-Old | Celery



was available in the initial stages, ships car-|
rying cement had to be anchored in the open!
sea and unloaded into African canoes.

The total value of the contract is estim-|
ated to be £3,000,000. \

is GODDARDS

FOR BEST GROCERY SERVICE.




FRIDAY,

ee

P

JUNE 13, 1952

arents Urged



Governor Praises

Alleyne

School

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR, Sir Alfred
Savage, K.C.M.G., yesterday evening warned parents and
friends who attended Speech Day at the Alleyne School
that theCommunity Centre at Belleplaine was being used
in other parishes as an argument against building other

centres.

His Excellency exhorted the people of St.,Andrew to

clear the name of their parish, if the information he had |

was ‘illfounded or on the other hand if there was any truth
in the allegation that the venture had failed, to renew their

efforts

It was the first Speech Day of the School in two years,

and on this occasion, Lady Savage, wife of His Excellency, |

as on the last occasion, presented the prizes.

_His Excellency the Governor ar~
rived accompanied by Lady Sav-
age and his A.D.C. Major Denis
Vaughan, and were greeted with
= first bars of the National An-

em.

The School's choir then enter-
tained the audience with a num-
ber of well-rendered songs, after
which a small dramatic troupe
added to the entertainment with
Stanley Houghton’s THE DEAR
DEPARTED, a play in one act.
Like the songs, this play was well
received.

The lighter part of the after-
noon’s programme ended, the
Headmaster Mr. C, D..Cumber-
batch, presented a very compre-
hensive report on the school’s ac-
tivities and attainments duri
past two years, during?
sounded a note of w
“enough reading was 4

it bei
done by the; pupils of: the choak

payin}
Following the Headmaster’s
port, Lady Savage pre y
prizes, and after His
had addressed the gat
Revd, Father Woodr







4

Re--

anxious that the community centre
and spirit of this parish should
be fully developed.

I intend to speak to you to-day
about the value of education not
as a means of earning a living, but
in order to enjoy a fuller life. To
my great relief, I found that the
Royal Bank of Canada had writ-
ten the speech for me, The Bank
issues a monthly letter dealing
with all kinds of subjects and the
current letter is headed “The
Beauties of Learning.” I hope the
Press will publish it for I can
do no more this afternoon than
quote a few extracts,

“It is only natural that much
of the learning of early years
ef practical life. Parents sacrifice
‘their selfish interests to provide
‘their children with the best edu-

the should be devoted to making a go
t *

yeation in preparation for making

a living. But there is also. even
in-elementary school education, a
Sort of knowledge that does not
contribute to making a living but
to-better living. This is the door

of St. Andrew and Chairman of through which we enter upon a
the Governing Body of the School, kingdom of beauty, literature, art
moved. a vote.of thanks to His Ex- and culture.
cellency and) Lady Savage.

“To go on learning past the

The gathering then ‘inspected schoolday period is to continue
exhibits of needlework ‘und art developing taste and enjoyment.
done by the pupils of the School, We train our eyes and our ears
following which they were enter- and our judgement, so that we
tained by the Headmaster, awaken the spirit of fine percep-

> tion of beauty, of generous admir-
Governor's Speech ation for what is noble and true.
His Excellency said;—

Reverend Chairman, Members Many Definitions
of the Governing Body, Ladies “There are many definitions of

and Gentlemen. culture, but the sort of culture

I must first congratulate the ; 7
: J ; . we have in mind includes three
Headmaster, as I did. two years attributes.

ago on my last visit, on a really
“It trains workers to have bet-

interesting and comprehensive
report. ter understanding of the ins-

The academic and othér suc- and-outs of their jobs, so that
cesses are a tribute to his work they know how they fit in with
and that of the teachers, A fam- the laws of production and con-
ous Headmaster once said to me sumption. It helps workers to
“A school can be successful for a develop their true selves through
few terms even with a poor Head- intellectual or manual activity,
master provided the teachers are :
good”. Here in St. Andrew, judg- “Culture qualifies everyone to
ing from the results, you are for- assume his responsibilities as a
tunate in having a good Ffead- ag and asa gen, net oat

. in is , is tra union
master and good teachers. D4 a te at ee
My wife and I enjoy school community and in the world
speech days for a number of rea- community, It makes freedom
sons. Certainly not because I more neal by increasing its scope.

have to make a speech. I assure
you it is almost as painful for us
as it is for you who have to listen.
Certainly first, we like children.
Secondly, there is always a com-
munity spirit which we enjoy and
which should be fostered. Thirdly,
there is usually some music and
singing or a play—such as
have enjoyed this afternoon—and
fourthly, we lodk upon it as a
holiday from Bridgetown,

“Culture enables a man _ to
develop to the utmost of his
desire and ability, fullness of
living physically, morally, intel-
lectually and artistically. It helps
him to weed out the non-essen-
tials, to cleave to the significant
in knowledge, and to think
clearly, It enables him to become
all that he is created capable of
being... . “Out ‘of continued

learning there come advantages

For this afternoon, there is a not to be otherwise gained. One
fifth reason. We have a particu- that will commend itself to many
lar affection for this parish be- is the ability. of self-expression.
cause of our past.affiliations with Another tis skill in’ doing things
other St. Andrew parishes, and in a creative way. These—self-
now, Mr, Cumberbatch has pro- expression and making—are ways
duced another reason in that a in which we can in some meas-
namesake of mine was once Head- ure discharge the obligation we
master here, feel as debtors to life,

I would like to*take this oppor- “Of greatest importance, per-
tunity to be reassured about the haps, is the ability that continued
Community Centre here, It is be- learning gives us to think
ing used in some ot parts@@$ an straight. We are apt to drift into
argument’ against, building other a way of thinking with our hopes
centres, Perhaps of am) ijl
formed; if so, and I do hope so, .
do obtain some publicity and clear “Straight thinking is based
the name of St. Andréw. Om the upon knowledge. How can a man
other hand, if there-is any truth think if he doesn’t know?
in the allegation that tHe re I,must leave it at that, but I
has failed, renew your éfforts; for commend the whole arti-
you have got in Fether Woot to your attention.
a priest and leader who deserves ee
the greatest support you can Bye, cotta wus. ane Se ee
§ ; ‘os Se is to ask the Headmaster to
Difficult Period. _... grant the school a full day's holi-
The world, including Barbados, antaede : in honour
is going through a! difficult period be
with so much distrust and fear.
Nations and individuals are look-
ing sideways at each other, and
if you look sideways even at your
friends you get a distorted view. _ Charles Dash of Golden Ridge,
It may be that Barbados is get- St. George, reported that on
ting a little tired of my repeated Tuesday at about 8.30 p.m. he
exhortation for co-operation and parked his moter car G.154 in
goodwill, but I would say to any- the yard at St. Anns Vicarage, St.
one who criticizes me—‘How far J°S¢Ph.
have you helped or hindered “the On Wednesday at about 6.40



CAR BURNT

community spirit?’ I agree that am; he was ifformed: that the
what is wanted is action and not car had been completely destroy-
It is insured. ©

words and that is why I am so ed by fire,




Plain and



HARRISONS

BROAD STREET

SSS Ss

Bridal Headdresses from $2.38 to $4.05







Plain and Brocaded Satin @ $2.91 yd.
Allover Lace

Embroidered Organdie from $3.42 to

Bridal Veils...

To Clear St. Andrew’s Name



MR. C. 8S. HEWETT
(New T.C.A. Operation Manager)

New T.C.A.
Operations
Manager

MONTREAL,

The appointment of C,
Hewett, a veteran of 30 years in
the transportation industry, as
operations manager, Atlantic
Region, has been announced by
Trans-Canada Air Lines. He
succeeds F. M. McGregor who

was in Barbados recently and
who has now resigned.

Mr. Hewett joined the airline
as a radio operator in 1938 and
shortly after was appointed
station manager at Vancouver, In
1943 when the Canadian Govern-
ment Trans-Atlantic Air Service
was inaugurated, he was posted
to Prestwick, Scotland, as liaison
officer in charge of the airline’s
operations there. In 1946 he re-~
turned to Montreal as base man-
ager in charge of TCA’s domestic
and international terminals at
Dorval Airport and a year later
became assistant to the Atlantic
Region operations manager.

Born in Dorking, Surrey, Mr.
Hewett served during World War
I as a radio operator with the

British Merchant Navy and the
Royal Navy Reserve, and was
later chief radio operator on

many of the large Cunard and
White Star passenger ships on
the North Atlantic. Prior to join-
ing TCA, he entered the Pacific
Coast Radio Service of the
Department of Transport.

Baker Steals Bags:
40'- Fine Iniposed

Charles Lewis, a baker of Gra-
zettes Road, St. Michael, was
yesterday fined 40s to be paid in
14 days or one month's imprison-
ment with hard labour by His
Worship Mr. C, L. Walwyn for
stealing two flour bags belonging
to Zephirin’s Bakery,



Sgt. Alleyne attached ‘to the
Central Police Station prosecuted
for the Police from information
received. The case for the prose-
cution was that Lewis who was
working at Zephirin’s Bakery
for about four months was discoy-
ered yesterday with two flour bags
tied around his waist as he was
in the street.

John Harding, an employee at
the Bakery, saw the defendant
and asked him what he had tied
around his waist. Eventually Mr.
Zephirin came on the spot and
gave the defendant over to. Island
Constable Seale.

Mr. Zephirin valued the flour
bags at 3s and said that for some
time there were complaints in the
Bakery about things that were
missing, but he never suspected
the defendant. The keeper of the
criminal record said that the de-
fendant had two previous convic~
tions for larceny when he was a
juvenile.

Before fining him Mr. Walwyn
told Lewis that he was heading
for a long term of imprisonment
and if he appears in the court on
another charge of larceny he
would be sent to prison as he
now had a conviction against him.



SIR GEORGE SEEL
ADDRESSES TRADE

UNION COURSE

Seel, K.C.M.G.
Gomptroller of the Development
and Welfare Organisation will be
the speaker when the last session
of the .Trade Union Training
course takes place this morning
at 11 o'clock at the Y.M.C.A
buildings in Pinfold Street, St
Michael.

The session is open to the pub-
lic,

Sir George












e

@ $3.44 and $4.13 yd.

$4.52 yd.
Watered Taffeta from
S115 to $2.00 yd.

from $8.50 to $12.75

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Ch. Ch. Vestry Join In Objecting
To Local Government Bill |

CHRILT CHURCH
pe ition prepared by the representatives of various Ves- |
bjecting to the local Government Bill and asking |
the Governor, the Legislature and the Secretary of State |



Bell Answers
4 Queries For
Civil Service

It is difficult to draw sdany
distinct line as to what section
of the Civil Service should join
Trade Unions, Mr. J. D. M. Bell,
research worker and lecturer in
industrial relations at Glasgow
University, told a group cf Civil
Servarts during an address yes-
terday at the British Council, but
they could form groups in grades
and on this basis decide how
beneficial it would be for any
grade.

Mr. Bell based his
on answers to four
which he first posed: 1.
a Civil Servant? 2. Should Civil
Servants form or join Trade
Uniens? 3. Are Civil Service
Trade Unions in any _ special
position? and 4. Should Civil

address
questions
What is

* Service Trade Unions co-operate

with outside organisations?

He first termed the Civil Ser-
vant as being essentially an em-
ployee cf the Government, but
went on to show a difference be-

tween Civil Servants as such in
the United Kingdom and _ those
in some other places like Bar-

bados.

He said they would necessarily
be wider branches in a piace like
the Unifeq Kingdom than in Bar-
bados as there would be distinc-
tions between. the coal miners,
the dock workers and such like
industrial workers as against the
industrial workers who were
more directly concerned with
executing the policy of the Gov-
ernment.

It was, he added, the non-in-
dustrial Civil Servant, of whom
he intended speaking.

A Guide

The whole question, he ob-
served, was the type of relation-
ship between the Civil Servant
and his employer as this would
be in some measure a guide for
the decision as to whether the
Civil Servant should think of
joining a Trade Union,

There was difficulty
ing a line within the ranks of
the non-industrial Civil Servant,
he said. Recently there was a
Committee set up in the United
Kingdom to advise the Govern-
ment how far it was appropriate
for a Civil Servant to engage in
outside activities. The principle
on whieh the report was based
was that it was possible to draw
a line through the Civil Service
and give a different measure , of
political freedom to those above
than to those below.

“In my opinion,” he sajd, “it is
not possible to draw a line with-
out being unfair to somebody.”

He mentioned that in England
teachers, post office workers and
some other workers were not
actually Civil Servants, but came
under the local authority so the
question of post office workers
and teachers did not arise in the
problems of the Civil Service.

On the question of whether a
Civil Servant should join or form
a Trade Union, he first talked on
the relevant question of whether
members of the salaried middle
class should join. Looking around
the world today, one would be
inclined to think it was totally



in draw-

an academic question — why
should they not do so? They did
have organisations, but were
they in the true sense of the
word Trade Unions,

By the middle class was not
meant today that kind of inde-
pendent small scale producer

which was meant some years ago.
In the bigger way was meant the
higher groups of paid workers,
more particularly salaried work-
ers. These groups contained a
large number of people with
specialist knowledge of all kinds,

clerical workers, technical work-
ers, teachers, civil servants and
so on,

“Salaried workers do form their
organisations,” he said. ‘“*Wheth-
er they should link up with Trade
Unions of the wage earning
classes is a question that depends
on what social status they assign
themselves.”

Good Trade Unionists

In the majority of countries,
Civil Servants formed organisa-
tions and maintained functions
which were Trade Union func-
tions — the improvement of their
working conditions. In fact, he
said, though they were not good
starters, Civil Servants generally
were good Trade Unionists.

He said that it was not a desir-
able principle that Civil Servants
should be actually bound by the

@ On page 6.

«






Peppers (Crned)
Pepper Sauce—40c., 20c. bot.
Mango Chutney — 72c., 6c.
Pineapple Jam—4sc. per bot.





THE

trics



ior the Colonies to reject the Bill. :

Befcre signing the petition, the Vestry however made
amendment that the boundaries between St. Michael
and Christ Church should remain unchanged |

pecs ma The Vestry then dealt with an

Parish Round-Up agreed with minor amendments (
certain recommendations which

Mr. C. S. MacKenzie and Mr. H

St. G. Ward had suggested should

Chicken Has
Three Legs

THREE LEGGED CHICK
t on June 3 and. owned by
Seibert Bovee has been the centre

A

born



of aittYaction in St. John from
the -day it was hatched among
six Other chickens. The freak
chicken apvears normal in other

respects and is hearty. Parish-
ioners vay four cents to see the
chicken

* . .

THE Advocate understands that
full production has been start-
ed at Wakefield Candy Factory
At present work is going on in
two shifts and approximately 70
workers are emvloyec, One shift
works from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. and
the pther from 2 to 10 p.m. The
factory closes from 10 pm, to 6
am. each night.

* * .

DESPITE frequent showers,
there was still a good attendance
at the Bathsheba Social Centre,
where the Barbados Police held
an entertainment in aid of Police
Clubs on Tuesday night last. The
Police Band wasin attendance,
and thrilled those present with a
varied programme of music.

Through the courtesy of the
British Council, there was a free
film-show at the St. Joseph's Girls’
School in Horse Hill on Tuesday
evening last, The show lasted
for about one hour and was thor-
oughly enjoyed by the crowd,

* * +

ROCK-CRUSHING _ operations
after a two months cessation wera
resumed at Gagg's Hill on Monday
last. The rocks are taken from
Joes River quarry, and are used
on the many St. Joseph's roads
damaged during the rains last
year and in 1950, Some of these
roads have already been repaired,
some are being repaired at pres-
ent, while nothing has been done
to others, as yet,

MRS, MALVINA NICHOLLS of

Harris Village is 102 years old
She was born June 9, 1850 at
Cambridge, St. Joseph and had
five children. Three daughters
and two sons. All of them have
predeceased her, She was one
of 17 children. In_an interview
with “Grand-Ma Mally” as she
vine Khown, the Advocate corres-

pondent learned that Mally'’s was

the hard way of life and she
never went to school, At the ear-
ly age of eight she was doing
agricultural labour, which she
gave up only 16 years ago
“Mally” possesses a very good

memory and recalled for the bene-
fit of the press, some hair-raising
anecdotes of the 1898 storm, the
May Dust and other incidents.
Mally was married to a distant
cousin, James Wolsley Nicholls itp
1874. He died in 1908,





Daerwood, Moneka
. ne _ .°

Bring Fresh Fruit

The Motor Vessel Daerwood
which arrived from St, Lucia yes-
terday morning brought 251
bunches of fresh fruit, five drums
of coconut oil and ten cartons of
peanut butter.

Eighteen casks of fresh fruit,
one crate of cabbages, and five
barrels of fruit arrived by the
motor vessel Moneka which called
here from Dominica yesterday
morning.

As these vessels came alongside
the Wharf there was a great stir
in the crowd which was awaiting
the vessels. Donkey carts and
trucks were taken to the side of

the vessels for the unloading of
cargo,
One man was nearly injured

when a barrel of fruit fell to the
ground missing his right foot by
a matter of inches, Cranes went
into operation for the removal of
the bigger boxes and _ barrels
from the holds of the vessels.

MAIL NOTICES

Mails for Madeira, United
Amsterdam and Antwerp by the
Willemstad will be closed at the
erat Post Office as under:

Parcel Mail 10.00 avin Registered,
Mail at 2.00 p.m., Ordinary Maj) at 2.30)
pm. on the 16 1952 |
Mails for St Dominica, Mont-|
serrat, Antimue St Kitts Bermuda,
Bostone lifax and Montreal by the
RMS,* y Rodney will he closed at
the Geherdl Post Office ax onde

Parcel Mail and Registered
900 aim, Ordinary Mall at 9.30 am, on
the 14th June, 1952,



M.S
Gen





June,
Lucia,

30c. bot.

(a







|

Kingdom, |

Mail at}





ON SHOPPING TIME

Right in the Home Products Department of the
IDEAL STORE you can Select the following:—

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LTD.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street

PAGE FIVE



VESTRY signed the joint

be contained in the Vestry’s reply |
te the Select Committee appointe }
by the House to deal with th |





Maude Bill.

Among the recommendations
was stated that no specific reason
had been advanced by anyone t
show why the present Vestry sy
tem could not be amended to mee
modern conditions,

|
|

Refreshing
&

Invigorating

Parsimony

It was also pointed out that ii
ene of the reasons for discarding
the present Vestry system was th¢
criticism that the Vestries haa
been parsimonious in the expendi-
ture on the social services such as
Poor Relief, Health, etc, the Ves-
try had therefore drawn up
summary of Expenditure for the}
parish over the last ten years,

In the summary of expendi
ture it was shown that Poor

Relief in 1943-—1944 was §$29,-

725.65 as against $67,820.00 for)

the year 1952—53. Under the}

head Sanitation $11,862.47 was
expended in 1943—44 wherea,
$42,833.00 was expended under |
this same head for the year)

1952—53.

The Vestry in its recommenda-
tions also stressed that to enlarge
the existing unit as administered
by their Vestry to that of a much
larger unit proposed by the Loval
Government Bill, would definitely
entail a substantial increase in the
administrative costs with a corre
sponding diminution of the close
contact and efficiency in adminis
tering the services mentioned and
as envisaged by the Local Govern. |
ment Bill.

Amendments

THE CYCLISTS CHOICE

They also suggested that some
wmendments to the present Ves-
tries Act which would improve
the present system and so bring
it in line to suit modern conditions
could be effected—for example
Che lowering of the franchise t«
include any taxpayer; reducing by
half, the qualification for member
ship of the Vestry; the method of
making Trade Returns; and the
method of making assessments on
house property to provide for 6
revaluation quinquennially and
the compulsory notification of the
change of ownership as is now the
ease with land,

The Vestry further stated that
iney were willing to discuss with
Government any proposed amend-
ments to the present Vestries Ac!
and could assure them of thei
wholehearted co-operation at any
time in the matter.



CYCLE TYRES

From Stockists throughout BARBADOS





—

Police Sergeants
Transferred



VALOR COOKER STOVES

Sgt. C. Murrell















who was one
of the sergeants prosecuting for
the Police in the District “A’* 2B oer ee ‘
Police Courts has now been trans- | } 3 Sister $4 él @ $56.
ferred to the Central Investiga- | } urner Model @ $71.87
tion Department. He has been re-
placed by Sgt. H, Alleyne who 4 Also
was in oharge of the Crab Hill { were Double Drainboard @ staan
Sub Station, St. Luey e .
Sgt. Marshall who was attach- complete with waste and overflow
ed to the Central Investigation Stiin
Department has been transferred Established T. HERBERT, Ltd. Incorporated
to the Holetown Police Station 1860 10 & 11 Roebuck Street 1926
a SSS
W A . e H E S OLS POEOOLEPOOPEOVLTOLESO?



GOLD, STEEL or
CHROMIUM

Models for ladies or gents
FULLY GUARANTEED !

ENJOY

TO-DAY'S SPECIAL

PRUNE

15 & 17 Jewels

A wonderful new range on
show at outstanding



prices

LESS SSSL EFL LLL OIOL OL OO OL OEP OOOO OEE YS



Today at your jewellers .. .
Y. De LIMA | 3
& €O., LTD. 8 q
“wane canes” $\) PHOENIX & CITY PHARMACY
SHOPPING CENTRE ,
3 8 SODA FOUNTAINS







‘otets PAA OLE OOCOOCOCBOCS



CBOSS.





SS

JUST RECEIVED



LION BRAND WHITE PEPPER per 1 oz. Caster $ .39









LION BRAND BLACK PEPPER per | oz. Caster .3%

e COOMALT . per tin 1.40

NEW ZEALAND CHEESE o..cccccsccsssscssisscscsssvesessecsses per ib .87

DANISH CAMEMBERT CHEESE per tin 1.32

DANISH BLUE CHEESE . per 1.18

DANISH PORT SALUT per tb 1.16

CANADIAN LUSHUS JELLIES—5 Flavours per pkt. .18

Cherry Jam — 48¢. per bot. CANADIAN KING'S BEER _ per bottle .26
Honey — 44c. per bot. CANADIAN KING'S BEER per 12 bottle Carton 2.88
Shaddock Rind — 40c. per th CADBURY’S CUP CHOCOLATE per tin .72

COCKADE FINE RUM

SS FFF

Sd
STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.




PAGE SIX

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508
























BARBADOS ADVOCATE

a a a a LRA ee

PUHLIC SALES (PUBLIC NOTICES |

a i



REAL ESTATE NOTICE

| ASSISTANT TEACHERS’ NOTICE









DIED FOR SALE All assistant and Relief Teachers in
HOUSE-—One Board & Shingle house | Elementary Schools are hereby notified
1” x 10° x 7 with Galv’d Shed 1@ x 107 | that the monthly Meetii takes place
; Eten neem lattached, situated at Harrison’s Plant.|at the ¥.M.C.A., on "detueday 14th
GRAFFITH—On the 12th June at his resi- Yard, St. Lucy, Apply to C. Ward,|June at 11.00 a.m. Teachers are asked
dence Bush Hall Yard, int Mich- AUTOMOTIVE Bromefield Plant.. St. Lucy to be punctual.
ael. William Edward Griffith (ate . "'12.6.52—2n. c. C. D. ROACHFORD,
retired Engir Foreman at M/S seanhie elie id a Secretary A.T.W.U
D. M. Simpso Co.) The funeral! CAR—Dodge S@per-Deluxe, First-class! “HARCLIFF” in St. Lawrence Gap, 12.6.52—2n
leaves his late side nce at 4 o'clock | condition and owner-driven. $2,000, Dial | Christ Church (on the Sea) standing on -
this evening for the Westbury) 4476, 12,6.52—1n.]2 Roods 37 Perches of land NOTICE
Cemetery Friends are invited om ;_.The house is built of stone and is at PHILIP
Blanche (Widow) Vincent an CAR — Vauxhall Velox, little used, present divided into two flats. Each flat eam Seo:
Martin (Sons), Millicent Thorn-] ,.7 n Di cantata? i APPLICATIONS for one Or more
owner-driven, good as new. Dial 4476 | contains ‘drawing and dining rooms and *
hill, Blanche Lloyd, Louise Pres- 12.6.52—t.f.n. | kitchenette downstairs, 2 bedrooms with | Vacant St. Philip's Vestry Exhibitions
cod, Joan Griffith (Daughters) running water upstairs. Usual conve-|‘t¢"able at the Combermere School, will
13.6.58-—In CAR—Ford Prefect 10 h.p. in good | niences oe seseeved, “Se Tie SanSenen -
working order Five good tyres only Servants quarters and garage in yard, later -then Mondey 10th June, IO08.

——_—

FOR RENT

done 27,000 miles Apply N. E. Corbin
c/o DaCosta & Co. Dry is ;
11.6,52—2n. }
os,
CARS—Morris Oxford Saloon, Morris ;
Minor 4-Door Saloon, Wolseley 14 Saloon,
Austin A-40 Saloon, Reconditioned Mor- j
‘



HOUSES

ris Cowley l0ewt. Pick-Up. For good
used cars, see Fort Royal Garage Lid










“BELVEDERE”, Maxwell Coast. For 5] Telephone 4504 13,6.52—2n.
months from Ist August Fully fur-
nished. $120 per month Phone 8188 New Morris Model J Cab over Engine |
. 13.6.52—3n. | 10-cwt. Vans $2400.00 New Morris Cow-
a 10-cwt, Vans $2580.00. All excel-
for fast light delivery. Fort Royal

len
Garage Ltd., Telephone 4504

ANNOUNCEMENTS

13.6,52—2n |







Candidates must be sons of Parishioners |
in straitened circumstances and must

be not less than 10% years nor mere

than 12% years old on the Ist
1962.
A birth Certificate must be forwarded

Inspection by appointment, dial 3750
The above will be set for sale on June
20th IMR at 2 p.m at our Office
CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Lucas Street,



eee 6.52—9n with an application form obtained from
. the Parochial Treasurer's Office,
On Friday 13th inst. at 2 p.m. at our tae 2 SCOTT,
Office, No. 17, High Street:— lerk to the Vestry,
15 Shares Barbados Fire Insurance Co. St. Philip.
52 Shares Barbados Foundry Ltd. 7.6.52—Tn
18 Shares Barbados Ice Co. Ltd. *
429 Shares W.I. Rum Refinery Ltd NOTICE

40 Shares Barbados Distilleries Ltd.

BYE-ELECTI
180 Shares Central Foundry Ltd ON FOR TEE VEerey OF

THE PARISH AINT
1150 Shares Barbados Rediffusion Ser-| Two persons Sevine ete nesmmneted
OF “st aeaes (Preference) A. Barnes & wd & ee ee * a
: or the e o will be taken
EARN BIG MONEY by ae ‘a, ELECTRICAL Co., at the Parochial Bulldings, Cumberland
FUSION in your spare time. t i COTTLE CATFORD & CO. |Street, Bridgetown, on Monday next
supply of forms to-day. 4.6.52—10n Sasa 2. Ges Biase seer the 16th instant beginning between the
Refrigerator, Kerosene oil burner in ES s9—8n. [hours of 8 and 9 o'clock in the morning

jood condition. Phone 2791. L. & H.
Miller, Electrical Engineers, Reed St.
13.6,52—3n.

WANTED



REFRIGERATOR — English Electric,
HELP 6 eubic ft. $395.00 Excellent Condi-
tion — 3% yr. motor guarantee Call
2998 11,6.52—4n.







EXPERIENCED NURSE and general











Servant. Apply before 9 a.m, or after
5 p.m Mrs Noel Goddard, Paynes LIVESTOCK
Bay, ‘St. James 13,6.52—2n
—| —
GOATS—Three Goats — all fresh in
MISCELLANEOUS milk Apply Weatherhead, Aontebene
1.6.32—3n
nae YOUR OWN PROGRAMMES| ~*~ ="
on a e. 8.6.52—5n.
POULTRY

ne
HOUSE—Wanted early 1953 for years











lease, ‘Seaside House Worthing, St
Lawrence or Maxwell Coast by careful DUCKS—KHAK*% CAMPBELLO: One
English family Box K c/o Advocate.|nair Khaki Campbello 1 Drake 3
‘ 13.6,52—2n.! Ducks 6 months old. Magnirticent
Laying strain. $24.00
TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bonus Mrs, PEEBLES,
from Rediffusion for 25 recommenda Bayleys,
tions in one calendar month. St. Philip. 11.6.52—3n
4.6.52—10n
$62.50 POCKET MONEY easily earned CELLANEO!
by recommending 25 new sunscribers to MIS US
REDIFFUSION in one month =
fs 0
Serer. £.6-82—10n.| oaT—One boat 21 x 5 suitable for
REDIFFUSION offers $1.50 cash for! ‘%.!s or engine. Apply to W. King, Fitz
each new Subscriber recommended by| V'!!"ae, St. James 13.6, 52—2n



ou. re ee ee ee ee
r BEAUTY SOAP. Bring out your Beau-



4.6.52—10m

fy with the Milk and Almond Oil in
POSITION WANTED—Young man de-;| WILLOW" Beauty Soap Get a few

sires work as Clerk or Bookkeeper Has | cakes today from your Suppliers
experienie and Certificate. 13.6.52—8n
men 0/P ASVORAIS 12 6 52—2n BRACELETS for watches in rolled
gold, chromiun, and stainless steel in
SUPPLEMENT YOUR INCOME by} !@dies’ and men’s sizes Also a_ nice
recommending REDIYFFUSION, Obtain ortment of watches. K. R. Hunte
full particulars from the REDIFFUSION | © Co., Ltd 13,6. 32-—-Gn

CAKE & BISCUIT MAKERS—Limited
quantity being sold at half price $1.28
City Garage Victoria Street.

11.6.52—3n

office.

4.6.52—10n.

LOST & FOUND













30 PRODUCTS—We have in stock,







Flit Sprays; Flt in gls ars ae Fiit

o powder Nujol in pints, isto. in %

“LOST o7 & 2 oz, Petroleum Jelly, Handy Oil,

= - _-- varaffin Oil Household Wax. R. .
SILVER BRACELET—lost bet the| JONES & CO LITD., Agents.

Colonade .Store and the Post Office.! 7.6. 52—3n

Finder will be rewarded on returning) ——$—$—$—$—$—$———————— ee

to the Advocate Co 13.6,52—2n. ES— Lushus Jellies all Flavours







Also Lemon Pie Filling 38c¢

th
TICKETS —Series HH-—9140, II—9600, M. Ford, 35 Roebuck, St. Dial 2489.
JJ—1946 to 1949, LL—4485, PP—8061 to 13.6,52—2n
2066, MM—2905, 2906, 2907 Finder | -—— —



lease return to Fred Davis, Prince_ of
ales Rd., Bank Hall, 13.6.52—I1n,

CIRCULAR

KINGSBEER — Lager, in 12-0z. bottles
peeked in handy 1-Doz. cartons, A pro-
cuet of National Breweries Ltd. of
Frontenac Beer fame. For particulars
contaet R. M, JONES & Co. LTD. Tel
2053 12,6,52.—4n,





PIANO: Your child's dream comes
true, Broadwood upright, tropical
model, Separate bridge on each string.
Leautiful condition, Hurry Owner
leaving colony, Write P, O. Box 135 or
Phone 3122, 10.6.52—Tn.

“RAYON PONGEE — 36” wide many
ecclours 72c, a yard, THANI BROS.
11.6,52.—2n

pice epremcentnsirsacaane acetates
Subseribe now to the Datly Telegraph
England's leading Daily Newspaper now
»rrving in Barbados by Air only a few
deys after publication in London. Con-
‘wet: kan Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltd.
Local Representative, Tel. 3118.
17.4.52—t.f.n,
——_$$

SOUPS:—Campbells & Heinz Soups all

Kinds, and Heinz Tomato Ketchup
W. M. Ford, 35 Roebuck St. Dial 3489

18.6,52—2n.



T.NNED FRUITS:— Pears, Peaches,



Grapes, Gauvas, Fruit Salad & Pineap-
ple Slices Large & Small. W. M. Ford,
'S Roebuck Street, Dial 3489
13.6.52--2n.
WHOLE PEAS—A small quantity of
peas for Pigeons can be bought at lic
per tb From, J. A. 8. TUDOR & Co.
11,6.52—Sn

Roebuck Street.





9th June, 1952.
To My Fellow Ratepayers,
I have to-day been nominated
as a Candidate to serve on the
Vestry of St. Michael due to the

ADVERTISING PAYS BEST

lamented death por: OC, A,
Brathwaite.

As two Candidates have been
nominated, a Poll will be taken
on Monday, June 16th, 1952 at the
Parochial Building, Cumberland
Street, opposite St. Mary's Church
between the hours of 8.00 a.m,
and 4 p.m,

5 ag the large increase in the ARTICLE
number of Voters, I fing it im-}; ;
possible to visit you personally,j®utter-Table: in Tins
and I therefore have had to adopt
this method of reaching you.

Se EE

of

Attention is drawn to th

Official Gazette of Thursday 12th

prices of “Butter—Table” are as





” ” ”



——_

{

UE nna

GOVERNMENT NOTICE



WHOLESALE PRICE
(not more than)

$92.20 per
100 lbs, in 1-lb, tins
$49.79 per case of



and closing at 4 p.m.
The following POLLING STATIONS
have been provided under the provis-

SS cpr
SHARES—200 £1 shares West India
Rum Refinery; priced to yield 5%% in-



terest (less income tax). Phone Mr. | ions of the Ballot Act 1931.
Webb, 4796. 12.6.52—2n. |No_ 1 POLLING STATION
The FIRST FLOOR of the Parochial
STONE WALL DWELLING HOUSE | Bui'dings ts allotted to voters whose sur-
with 4,004 square feet of land attached |names begin witl the letters “A” to “I”
at Dayrell’s Road, Christ Church. The} (both inclusive) and the = entrance
dwelling house contains living room, |thereto will be by way of the door of

two bedrooms, kitchenette, usual con-|the Churehwarden's Office

veniences, Government water installed. |No. 2 POLLING STATION
House wired for electricity. Inspection The GROUND FLOOR of the Paro-
on application to the tenant Mr. Ince, |chial Buildings is allotted to voters
between the hours of 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. | whose surnames begin with the letters
daily. “J" to “Z" (both inclusive) and the

The above dwelling house will be set} entrance thereto will be through the
up for sale by public competition at our | Gateway situated at the Southern End
Office, James Street, on Friday 27th June | of the building.

———





nstant at 2 p.m. PF. J. COLE,
YEARWOOD & BOYCE, Sheriff & Returning Officer.
Solicitors 10.6.52—6n
13.6.52—9n 7
NOTICE
OLIVER OE ee ee
fore sometimes called and known by the
AUCTION name of Oliver James of the parish of

Saint Michael in this Island, Medicai
Practitioner,, hereby give public notice
that on the Third day of June 1952 I
formally and absolutely renounced re-~
Iinquished and abandoned the use of



| MORRIS TEN SALOON — damaged
by fire. We are instructed to offer this
‘car by Auction at the Courtesy Garage



Jon Friday 13th June at 2 p.m. Johnjmy said surname of ‘Oliver and then

M. Bladon & Co., Auctioneers. assumed and adopted and determined

8.6.52—I. |thenceforth on all occasions whatsoever

Sanaa SER RRRRENSEET to use and subseribe the name of

FRIDAY, 18TH AT 2 PM “Wesley-James" instead of the said
MC ENEARNEY’S GARAGE VAUX-|surname of “James.”

HALL SEDAN CAR IN GOOD WORK- And i give further notice by 4 Deed

ING ORDBR. 12 H.P

R. ARCHER McKENZIE
8.6

Poll dated the Third day of June 1959
duly executed and attested and (record-
52—4n. Jed in the Registration Office of this
—— - a" “ Island on the Eleventh day of June

FORD CONSUL—1952 Model 1,600 | 1052) I formally and absolutely renounc-
miles only, damaged in accident. Wejed and abandoned the said surname of
are instructed to offer this car by Auc-|“James" and declared that I had as-
tion at McEnearney’s Garage on Friday | sumed and adopted and intended thence-
13th June at 2.30 p.m. John M. Bladon |forth upon all occasions whatsoever to









& Co,, Auctioneers. 8.6.52—4n. |use and subscribe the name of “Wesley-
eS prpand James” instead of “Jaines'’’ and so as
BY instructions received I will sell/to be at all times thereafter called

at Corner of Lakes Folly and Cheapside |jnown and describel by the name of
on MONDAY 16th. from 11.30 a m. |Wesley-James” exclusively
Tables, Upright Chairs, Tub and Hocm Dated the llth day of June, 1962

ing Chairs, Book Case all in Mahog-
any Dining and other Tables, Waggon,

OLIVER WESLEY-JAMES.
late OLIVER JAMES



larders, folding screen, bedsteads and 13.6.52—2n
Mattress Kitchenware, earthem ware QT | ce
glassware, 2 burner oil stove Electric
hot plate, Singer Machine, Toaster,| NOTICE
Kettle, Westinghouse Refrigerator, Con: BARBADOS. eee

leur carpets — and a lot o: eyeh 7
oan rs and other useful items ASSISTANT COURT OF Brgy
TEPMS CASH. ‘ Re: Workman's Compensa! "
= Re ee, eo ee NOTICE is hereby given that Fitz-

Gerald Jackson formerly residing at

Brathwaite’s Gap, Saint Michael, died as
a result of injuries sustained by him in
the course of his employment with the

‘INDER THE IVORY HAMMER

i Yi td., and

y instructions received from the | National Motor Omnibus Co., Ltd,
thepranee Co. I will sell on Friday, | that eomepanes Hey has been paid into
June 18th at Mesgrs Cole & Co's Garage, | the Cour Sa
Probyn St., (1) 1950 Hillman-Minx Car. ALL the dependents of the eee

{ d in accident) Sale at 2 p.m, |named Fitz-Gerald Jackson,
oe cans Vincent Griffith, Auction- |ere hereby requested to appe

at the
— the 26th June, 1952, at 10 na eM:

8.6.52—4n | Arsistant Court of Appeal on
Dated this 16th day of June, 1952,

F. G. TALMA,
Clerk, Assistant Court of Ane As.

Bell Answers



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

ON TUESDAY 17th by order of Mr.
Cecile Walcott we will sell her Furni
ture at “Archway Hous®” Navy Gar-

dens,



which includes

Very nice Oval Dining pele os _

Writing Bureau, Upright an orris

Chairs, Coffee and Ornament Tables,

nest of Tables, Cake Stand Corner and ueries or
Arm Choire all in Mahow: Cedar Book- - a °

Shelf, ilectric Lampe,

ricwures, Verandan Cnaurs, musn, I ervice

Morris Arm-Chairs, Steel Chairs, Glass
and China, Carpet Rugs, Phillips Radio,

Garrod Automatic Record Change Page 5.
Perfect condition Single Pine Bedstesds i. From
Simmons Springs and Deep Sleep|law in such matters as whether

Mattresses, Very good Mahog: Pree: they should join Trade Unions or
able;

Behan! . Dochtess.... Utossne not. His own view was that
Bedstead, , ‘s :
Gream painted Chat ot enonets and|{there should be voluntary deci-

Pree; Ice Chest, Rippungill 2 Burner|sions and he‘ could hope, in fact,
oil Stove and Oven, Kitchen Cabinet, 2) ¢hot Civil Servants shoulda form

v +, Kett : z . . aad
Burner Eicken Usensiis’ “Tables and|their organisation for Civil Ser-
many other items. vants,

Sale 11.30 o'clock, TERMS CASH
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers
18.6,52—2n

As to whcther Civil Servants
were in any special position, he
said that they were. ’

The very basis of Trade Union
action outside the Civil Service
was to withdraw labour if tha
employer was not to be persuaded.
Was the Civil Servant then to be
denied that right to struggle?
The position in Britain was that

Prices there was now no law curbing the

e Control of (Defence)

(Amendment) Order, 1952, No. 20 which will be published in the right of the Civil Servant outside

June, 1952. the Police, though in practice the

2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling | isnt was scarcely theirs. So there

follows: — had to be some final means of

arriving at the settling of disputes
abet between Civil Servants and Gov-
ernment; and thus arose the im-
portance of arbitration as there
had to be a tribune—an impartial
tribune which would mean that



case of

$1.00 per Ib tin

n|never could the word of the Gov-
‘ x pn eees ‘petit . 7 72 x % Ib, tin em the ernment be entirely an last word.
ellow Ratepayers to attend a e ‘inte ¢ So, he said, arbitration and the
Parochial Building, Cumberland Rees = ibs tile Whitley system.
Street, on Monday next, June rints | ‘T96c per 1 Ib
16th, 1952 between the hours of (Penksinn Stasie eerie ‘ | print Differences
8.00 a.m, and 4.00 p.m. and place] Leaf") $144.20 per case of :
your X opposite the name of i ie 100 lbs. in 1-lb On the last question—co-oper-
J. O. TUDOR in the interest of vinta: ‘1 $1.62 per 1 1b |ation with outside organisations—
yourself and the Parish as Butter-Table: In Prints en ar bi print he said that it was true there were
whole, (Canadian “Olive’”) $131.20 per case of some differences. He said that
Vote TUDOR and you will have 100 lbs. ih 1-lb groups usually preferred to,
no regrets. prints . _.1 $1.39 per 1 b,/together. The differences
Yous for Service, print shown in the development of
J.O. TUDOR. |. separate. organisations, \
12.6.52—4n., 13.6.52.—In It was of course accentuated
asi a i bl cy sometimes by a feeling of antag-
. 2 SSOSSSSSSSG9SS9SSS9S9GSS, |Onism when the one class felt














=



ORIENTAL
PALACE

HEADQUARTERS FOR
SOUVENIRS
FROM INDIA, CHINA &
CEYLON

THANI'S

Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Diai 3466



FURNITURE

for Home & Office

at Money-Saving Prices

NEW & Renewed Wardrobes,
Bureaus, Chest-of-Drawers, Bed-
steads 2-feet to 5-feet wide,
Springs, Laths, Washstands $8 up,
Nightchairs, Towel, Shoe & Hat-
racks—TABLES for Dining, Kitch-
er & Paney Use, China, Bedroom
& Kitchen Cabinets, Larders.







DRAWING ROOM FURNITURE
in_ Morris. Caned and other types,
DESKS with flat or sloping tops,
Spring-seat and other Othee
Chairs, Bookracks

NOTICE
SOCIETY SERVICE
STATION

Now
OPEN "FOR BUSINESS

PIANOS, Banjios—Pram, Go-Cart
Metal ard Wardrobes Trunke $8
up; Typ writer, Kitchen Sink $4.50,
Enamel): a Ware Drainers, $3






Magic Le atern $6.00
iat g Your Patronage is Invited
: % GAS—OILS—KEROSENE %
4
o| » . > ,
L.S.WILSON 3/8 = socmwry rir
é]% St. John. s
Spry St — Dial 4069 @] % 11.6.52—3n. %
: ‘ ° A
® OOOOP 000% VCOSSCSSS $99S99S99S0909









5,
FOR SAI E N|deed, he said, it was seldom that
one from the industrial class of
nance successful unions came out to
ts " pa the iniddle class organisation,
One Racing Bicyele e finally said that Civil Ser-
vice should contain certain groups

of workers and the various groups
would realise at what standard
they were and how far. because
cf their association with’ the Gov-
ernment, it would not be politic
to join a Union.

.
On Manslaughter
Cl ‘ ge

The Police who had charged
Eunice Newton of St. George with
the murder of her husband George |
Newton on May 9, amended this!
charge on Wednesday to one of|

jmanslaughter after six witnesses|
had given evidence in the prelim-|

$75.00

One 110/220 Volt Single Phase
ble transformer type

”

portal aa
can ARC WELDER with attach-
ments for soldering and brazing
$150.00

One



§ 1938 Buick 4-door Sedan
CAR, Best offer takes it. Society
a Garage, St. John 11,8.52—2n,

|Beecre!
oe

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Gift Wrapping Paper

Birthdays, Weddings
Baby Gifts

Window and Coin







for
and



Envelopes inary hearing which is going on
Solid Brass Locks of {before His Worship Mr. C. W.)
all sizes Rudder at District “B” Police

All These JUST OPENED Station,
by Mr. G. B. Niles is appearing on
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY mawait “ Eunice a
7 jca eviaence was given Vv r.
& HARDWARE A S. Cato, Further hearing was

BOVSSSSSSSSOS8EN6SS0S0R\ adjourned until today. '



%|prejudices against the other, In- |



FRIDAY, JUNE 13, 1952

snclavomaneieeiptnaieteeennsiginas teeeeetaseememnabete
ENGLAND'S PRINCESS NOW A QUEE)'| SHIPPING NOTICES



PICTURED DURING HER RECENT trip to Canada and the U. S., Princess:
Elizabeth is shown in a regal pose (left) during a state function. Ai

right, the Princess appears in a

gayer mood at an informal affair



Lodge Gives Goddard

Its Top

from page 1

lenting and downright fight that
had characterised Australian cric-
ket ffOm the time the game be-
gan to be developed in Australia
and referred to the fact that the
West Indies need not blame God-
dard for the defeat of the West
Indies against such opposition
seeing that England, whom the
West Indies had defeated had
not won the “Ashes” in their se-
ries of Tests with Australia since
1934,

The most competent critics had
had nothing but praise for the
excellence of Goddard’s leader-
ship throughout and he counselled
the boys to emulate Goddard’s
example and make themselves by
dint of hard work, application
and practice, cricketers who might
not only bring fame and glory to
the Lodge School but to Barbados
and the West Indies as a whole
a: John Goddard had done.

Not in the forseeable future
could he imagine any leader who
could remotely challenge their
Test team hero as a possible lead-
er,

John Goddard, Mr. Kidney, the
next speaker, said, was an old
stager to him. He knew his qual-
ities, his grit and determination
and could testify to the fact that
Goddard had always played the
game in the right spirit and for
the good of the game as well.

Mr. Kidney reminded the boys
that theirs was a great heritage
which had been handed down to
them by Old Lodge boys with
whom he had played. He recalled
Tim Tarilton and Percy Good-
moh, men, whom he considered
were worthy of taking their place
in any international cricket team
in the world.

Nothing could be accomplished
without determination and a dog-
ged spirit whether it be in the
schoolroom or on the field of play.

He was glad that they had not
withdrawn from the First Divis-
ion competition because he had
always fought for the principle
that the schools should play in
‘tthe First Division competition
and get the feeling of playing
against better competition.

The Lodge School were good
losers. They had been losing for
a long time but every now and
again they produced a good one.

Hon. Dr. Massiah, before mak-
ing the presentation said that
ho was very pleased on behalf
of the Old Boys’ Association and
4 so of the Governing Body’ of
the School to make the presenta-
tion.

Any institution whose boys
could go out into the world and
in the field of human endeavour
achieve such success as Mr. John
Geddard has done should be
justly proud.

There were many walks of life
in which boys of that School in
their lifetime had achieved such
distinction as haq further en-
hanced the glory both of that

School and of the island as well.
He hoped that all the’ boys
gathered there that day would

take to their hearts and use as
an example for all their future
work and Hfe, what had been
done by Mr. John Goddard.

He had brought into play on
the cricket field all the citizen-
ship and decency he had learnt
at. that school and he was more
than gratified that afternoon.

In the cricket match he had
seen that one young Goddard, a
left hander, knew how to use the
cover drive of the left handers
and he was hoping that if he
got the proper coaching and
would emulate his relations ten-

,

MOUNTED P

Oe

5.00 P.M., TUESDAY, 17TH JUNE

e
_ ADMISSION:
Reserved Seats Lady $1.00
Unreserved Seats 8
e
Box Office at Information Bureau, Police Headquarters
: |
1 Farewell to Staff Sergeant Anderson of the |
{ Royal Canadian Mounted Police |
H 12.6,52.—4n.

SSeS

OLICE DISPLAY”

THE POLICE RIDING SCHOOL

District “A”

a

Honour

acity in the game that he also in
time would bring more credit to
the school,

He had great pleasure in asking
Mr. Goddard to accept the shield
which came _ from the staff and
members of the school as a trib-
ute to him for his work and the
honour which, he had brought
the school,

Mr. Goddard said that on tours
he had been accustomed to pre-
paring the batting order but that
afternoon he had been put in last
to bat and he had been told to
twipe as it was getting late.

Roy Marshall and he had
toured Australia, he said, and
they had often talked about
their school. He had always liked
Lodge and he would always car-
ry it in his heart.

They had just completed a
very pleasant afternoon's cricket
and they would see from the
teores that the Old Boys were
improving with each game.

Since he had captained Barba-
dos in 1946, he had been away
for three tours and he was glad
to say that in his absence two
old Lodge boys had captained the
Barbados teams’ in his absence.
Charlie Taylor hzd taken a Bar-
bados team to British Guiana and
his very good friend Wilfred
Farmer had led Barbados very
successfully against Jamaica and
had not only brought them victory
but had made such a mammoth
score that he himself in Austra-
lia did not believe it.

Mr. Goddard then presented
Mr. Farmer, Headmaster with 5
photograph of the West Indies
team in Australia on behalf of
Roy Marshall and himself.



Bank See Scope For
B. Guiana Long
Range Plan

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, June 12.

The two man mission from the
International Bank for Recon-
struction told a press conference
to-day, Thursday, they were pre-
pared to suggest that the Bank
send a survey mission of four or
five men for one to two months to
make a detailed study and recom-
mend a long range, well balanced
development programme to the
British Guiana government,

Patterson, French head of the
Mission stated that they believed
that good possibilities existed in
British Guiana in the major fields
of water control, drainage, hydro-
electric power, sugar, rice, timber,
paper pulp, minerals, cattle ranch-
ing, roads and bridge construc-
tion and smaller industries,

During the eight day meeting
the Mission visited the greater
part of the colony travelling
mostly by B.G. Airways plane.
To-day they met the Legislative
Council and the Georgetown
Chambers of Commerce,

The Mission is leaving Friday
for the United States,



St. George Water
Problem Acute

The water problem in_ St.
George is acute. For some time
now residents of some districts
have been experiences cuts last-
ing four hours from 6,00 a.m. to
10.00 am. then from 3.00 p.m.
to 8.00 p.m. Residents get in
their water supplies before 6.00
a.m. and between the hours of
8.00 and 9.00 p.m,


































































The M.V. “CARIBBEE” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
Antigua, Montserrat,

St. Kitts. Sailing
June.

M.S. BONAIRE, 13th June, 1952. “MONEKA" will
M.S. STENTOR, 27th June, 1952 accept Cargo and Passengers for
M.S. HESTIA, 4th July, 1952 Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
SAILING TO EUROPE Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Fri-
M.S. WHLLEMSTAD, 17th June, 1952. Gay Uh inst.
SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO The M.V. “CACIQUE DEL
AND BRITISH GUIANA CARIBE” will accept Cargo and
M.S. Nestor, 14th June, 1952. Passengers for St. Lucia, St.
M.S. BONAIRE, 30th June, 1952. Vincent, Grenada, and Aruba,
M.S. STENTOR, llth July, 1952. .
SAILING To

TRINIDAD AND
AO

CURAC.
M.S. HESTIA, 21st July, 1952.
S. P. MUSSON, SON @ CO., LTD.
Agents









SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Sails Sails
MontrealHalifax Boston B'dos B'dos
LADY NELSON... .... 9 Jupe 12 June 4 June 23 June % June
CANADIAN CRUISER +» 20 June 23 June — 2 July 3 July
CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 30 June 3 July - July 13 Juy
LADY RODNEY .. .... Uduly M4 July i6July WJuly 2 July
NORTHBOUND Arvives Sails Arrives Arrives Ayrives Arrives
B'dos B’dos St. John Boston Halifax Montreal
tA RODNEY .. 15 June. 16 June — , 21 June 28June 1 July
CHALLENGER .. 23 J 28 June SJuly 18 July 8 July 11 July
LADY NELSON" ¢ July. SJuly 19 July 22 July
c DN CRUISER ++ 14 July 18 July 26 July 29 July 1 Aug.
CONSTRUCTOR 24 July 29 July 5 Aug. 8 Aug. 10 Aug.
LADY RODNEY 7 Aug. 9 Aug. 19 Aug. 20 Aug. 23 Aug.

For further particulars, apply to—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD.—Agents.



As
eo

-












SPOTS

a

C"G* TRANSATLANTIQUE

Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica





From Southampton
*““DE GRASSE 4th June, 1952
“COLOMBIE” 19th June, 1952
*“DE GRASSE” 12th July, 1952
“Not calling at Guadeloupe

SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE

From Barbados Arrives Southampton
“COLOMBIE”

Arrives Barbados
16th June, 1952
2nd July, 1952
24th July, 1952

“ 13th July, 1952 25th July, 1952
*“DE GRASSE” 6th Aug., 1952 16th Aug., 1952
*“DE GRASSE” 29th June, 1952 9th July, 1962

*Sailing direct to Southampton

HOUSEWIVES
You can modernise your kitchen with one of our

ENAMEL TABLE TOPS
Smart, Easy to Clean, and at Moderate Prices

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

Corner Broad and Tudor Streets

ANNUAL HOLIDAY

Our CUSTOMERS and FRIENDS are asked to note
that our WORKSHOP will be closed as from Monday,
16th June, 1952, to Saturday, the 28th June, 1952, inclu-
sive, for the purpose of granting our Workmen their
ANNUAL HOLIDAY.

Arrangements have been made for emergency work
to be undertaken during this period and the receipt
of repairs and delivery, of completed work will be
continued as usual.

Our Merchandise Department and Office will be open
to business as usual.

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LID.

White Park Road.
St. Michael



SOCSSSOOS SSS POOPPOOP FOO

Wm. FOGARTY (pos) LTD.

Sd

JUST RECEIVED
36 in. PLAIN PLASTIC

in Red, Green, and Blue — @ 67c. per yard
Sd

36 in. FIGURED PLASTIC

83c., 90c. and 97c. per yard



Sd

48 in. FIGURED PLASTIC

$1.38 per yard
¢

Wm. FOGARTY

YORSISSSSSOOSS

SOOO PSOS FOSSPOVOOS

OS

(BOS) LTD.





> ~

*


FRIDAY, JUNE 13, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN







renee ECs eensaaaneasntanaaassiaiiitiainenislal
Rew meee eee mmmneemcnteerenes seme nes Speen 'SOSSOSSS5

Â¥ POOOPEEOEE CSCS PPS E

| }

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON % FOR ALL YOUR FRIENDS

% YOUR DISTINGUISHED
wile wen ia , Axoen
FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES
MISS LOVAT-1 HAVE TO ASK Vi
this denruawan nat a vouncaan) 4 || ST wae roy 747 |
LATE LAST NIGHT ? | | (7 was BY vOoUR ; yOu BEAST! ) | ce
INVITATION 26. xy
WAY DON'T VOL #
fm TELL HIM > % 5
— “> |
V rent
N i or eee J Tt TK ARENT you jill |
: \ Ht) roar : } ( GOING TO PUT * )
a Zo ¥ j EP : > ME BACK WHERE
gs 4 4s Vy | > JUSTAS ) pay / YOU FOUND ME ? )
pe N é / > THOUGHT jy >a) —— Sj]
ee AL rn S33 i hc As ee estes — / 4
ES ro IW QUEEN MARLA.! ...AND HE IS 20 ...70 THE ARENAS %

aE
-

There is Nothing Better cn
% the Market thane

S&S
Rum
Blended and Bottled by

STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LID.






Headquarters for Best Ram.

PCS LEA OGLE
O9SSS9F9SS 99999999595 9397,

;

















% Holiday Entertainment

. ‘
x

%

%

%

%
1 & c

+ uni *}
% Ae 4
Pa

- c
12









Q MIXED VEGETABLES in
x tins



s
x SLICED HAM

LAME TONGUES in tins
% CORNED MUTTON in tins %
. ROAST BEEF in tins ;
x VEAL LOAF in tins

% LUNCHEON BEEF in tins
ss And Our Popular

x FIVE STAR RUM

% ©
% INCE & CO.
x LTD.

s 8 & 9, ROEBUCK ST.

%, 3
| 963446:556666G6O6OGOGSSOSOR >



e Listerine Tooth Paste is compounded
of more than 14 carefully selected in-
gtedients, precisely balanced to give
you maximum polishing and cleansing
qualities without danger to the enamel.
Listerine Tooth Paste leaves your
mouth feeling fresher, cleaner, sweeter.
Try it today!



































SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only























WaNh ees SeceaTION:! a ee abe QUICKLY / PRINCE TO THE ARENA! ) BUTCHER / QUICK. WE







SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Hranches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street

GARL HAS CAPTURED

I'D JUST LIKE TO MORE EARTHMEN ...

MEET DR. CARSON /
yh ge +.

MUST STOP HIM!
Cr <

we

pn





Usually Now
DESSERTS

All Assorted Flavours

Royal Gelatine Desserts .... $ .22 BS
Tins Cadbury Cup Chocolate 12 66 Blancmange ..............:. AL ’
Royal Puddings ............ 16
Tins Spag in Tom Sauce: .... sh 20 Monk-Glass Blane ..,....... 2 ;
MOMMY A MUMIOR oe Ci sy kode vali le’
Quaker Oats pkgs. .......... 63 60 Hartley's -Jelles: iis ici cn eceecare
CRIME MMM ACh adc ok Ce cela Wek
Raspberries Tins ............ 93 84 Tower Jellies ..... ;
Bird’s Jellies eR

Tins Trim: (Lunch: Meat) .. $ .86 $ .80





HITLER STARTED IT BUT HIS GANG ; ADOLPH HAD A BEAUTIFUL SET
YOU CAN ALWAYS YEARS AGO FOR HIS OF THUGS IS OUT/ OF PLATES MADE FOR PRINTING

COUNT ON A CROOK TO WHAT'S THE THE MONEY! 17'S THE C.1.R's!



PROBLEM? JOB TO FIND THOSE PLATES... " Honey Co Ss re
ce) eet Mie as 26 22 ey Comb Sponge ..........sescecgees

EUROPEAN BLACK



—T MARKET!



D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

THE COLONNADE GROCERIES

The Place Where Your Dollar Goes Further



% GUESTS AND YOURSELF
BUT WE. DON'T WHILE, IN THE THRONE . YOU MUST COME FAKING THEM THE INSUBORDINATE







THE JACKSON TRIAL — ax mann

ALL THROUGH THE COUNTRY the fame of
Jesse Jackson (the smartest crook in the West)
spread from the large towns to the loneliest
outposts of the desert. The Law hated him, and
the dream of Marshal Tex Arnold’s life was to
eapture Jackson. One really formidable enemy
he had — ‘Doc’ Hayman and his gang. And this
is the story of the struggle between these two, a
battle of wits and nerve, of singing bullets and
hard riding.

ADVOCATE STATIONERY |







BRINGING UP FATHER







ORDER A 7x =N STEAKS /
4





BROAD STREET & GREYSTONE











; 646,56 608000*
THERE'S T t EVERY COP IN THIS AREA IS YEAH... I CAN DO THE JOS POR S 999999999 OSS OOPS OOPS FOE CEE LEP LLB LLL LLLP ALLL PLLA LALAAAADDAPAADE

4
AHEAD, LOOKING FOR A BLUE oe FOR YOU, MISTER...BUT PAINTS % 3
7 SEDAN WITH A BUSTED iy |GOTTA ORY, YOU KNOW... IT'LL x g
FENDER! WE GOTTA TAKE A COUPLE O/ x

‘.
% %
: :
* %
FENDER! WHAT DO e >
YOU CARE HOW $ %
THE CAR x 2

LOOKS£ ¥








<

Tat nay)

% ENJOY
% THESE
% WINE

3 MEALTH .

THe prink of FOMMECK THESE SPECIALS
HEA LTH JERSEY TOMATO JUICE 10 oz. tir
JERSEY TOMATO JUICE 16 07. t

in
SYMINGTON'S PEA FLOUR 16 oz. tins ‘
KEILLER’S JAMS 1 W® tins 6 tins lots @
ESCOFFIER ANCHOVY SAUCE 6 oz. bottles 36






A ae



Pe

~—_————- —_—
THAT OUTDOOR BARBECUE MOTHER -DID YOU SEE THAT T INVITED MY COUSIN FISHIN)
I BUILT TURNED OUT TOBE _/ OUTDOOR GRILL DADDY BUILT? AND HG WIFE AND CHILDREN /
b> A BIGGER JOB THAN I = € 2, OVER TONIGHT FOR A FEAST-,
EXPECTED? BUT AT LEAST C3 ar) } ALSO LINCLE KUNKLE AND <
WE'LL GET A LOT OF i st YES -ISN'T IT < AUNTY BELLUM” — MusT_J
PLEASURE OLIT OF IT. ; oxak WONDERFUL ? >» CALL THE BUTCHER AND
‘





Wr eee ie YOU \ f IF | COULD ¢ Rl?” GAP THEY E~GONE~ | [THEY Go





i er
IN TH T A yo \\t N HIM < q ee. SIM SAFE | | THEV RE ore N HOT or COLD JACOB'S COCKTAIL WATER BISCUITS .... 60:
MHInD PATROL) Worse FA eT No THE VELLOW-«#] ME GB > Now % FOODS ;
: oF « f ? x ‘s
%
> x WHITE GRAPES... in 16 oz. ard 30 oz, tins ‘
j . S PURPLE GRAPES in 124 oz. and 30 oz. tin ) + ? mn 1 %
1 df ¥ FRUIT COCKTAIL in 16 oz. and 30 oz. tin Al | | Y NI / | %
~ ra L 4 J s
ig % COCOMALT , in 1 t® tins f 4R484 3
R NESTOMALT in 1 â„¢ tins 3
% BOURN-VITA ..... ; in 4 th & 1 %} tin > “ 2
$ KRAFT ICE CREAM MIX in 4 oz. & 12 oz. tins & Co : Ltd. x
% LIDANO ICE CREAM POWDER in 1 1B tin ° 3
< COWLAC MALTED MILK in 14 oz. tin ae : ua ae
$ HORLICKS MALTED MILK in 1 18 tin ‘YOUR GROCERS — HIGH STREE! S
1X VITACUP in 4 1b tins
$ TONO in 1 ® tin %
LOOM SOOO OOOO OC SOOO OOOOP POO OGOOOOO OOO OCLC PEEL RLPCL EPPS SPP PPSO
PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, JUNE 13, 1952

D , Lou wees Past Hold Pres. to saeieaccaaaa Ifyou have discomfort
AFAR CALIMG . «sess nore an te

Draw In Cricket Match
that the acid balance of your stomach is upset. Over acidity causes

Led by West Indies captain John Goddard an Old
Lodge Boys’ team yesterday held the Present Boys to a heartburn, flatulence, and indigestion. Put things right as quick as you
can with * Dolsa’. Dolsa swiftly reaches all the surfaces of the stomach















Before a crowd
of 100,000 spec
tators, including
the Rt. Hon
Winston Church-
ill, Newcastle
United) the hold-

ers, retained the
Football Associ-
ation Challenge
Cup by beating
Arsenal by one
goal to nil in

draw in the Annual Past vs. Present fixture at the Lodge
School grounds.

Batting first the “Past” scored 180 runs for the loss of
five wickets and declared at tea. On resumption the Present
Boys scored 151 for 9 by close of play.

| wall with its gentle, neutralizing action.

Dol Ss a Recommended for:



the Final at The wicket was a perfect one with a good pace in it indigestion
Wembley Stadi- but the bowlers had little further success after Outram RESTORES DIGESTION Dyspepsia
a wieek cae had dismissed Cave, one of the opening batsmen for the Dolsa is made ide * correctly Heartburn
il oa, sr | salanced, ind lly pack ;
Blackburn Rov- Past” team for 0. bes ae Ae coitnlnnaiel aaa Flatulence, ete.

dose. This avoids abrupt over al-
. oll

kalization, a frequent source of |

further discomfort, since the di- oa a

—
sa
“

S

Veteran Theo Alleyne in a
courageous innings that combined
" > “@ > some beautiful drives through. the
rau s¢ ORER covers and some lofty lifts to the
cutflield, coupled with some strokes
everyone would not care if they

ers of 61 years
ago by winning
the trophy two
years in succes-
sion.







| gestion is impaired if the neces-

j sary acid juices essential in the

| digestive process are eliminated, ®
Jolsa is always gentle, settling te

d soothing in its action, seda- ———




%,

»
J






66 96 9 forgot, top scored with a most j ve and ag
oO « valuable 66 before he retired un- } fens; Fe t the dost lator if dis-
hh Os defeated. | comfort is still felt, But whenever
rE Skipper John Goddard obliged pain persists, see your doctor, 15 MEASURED DOSES IN EACH PACK
with a free but nevertheless pur- ents: T. S. GARRAWAY & CO.,, Bridgetown ’



poseful innings of 45 before he
was out well caught by Murray
off the bowling of Johnson. Mur-
ray took a running catch off a
skier backward of mid-on when
skipper Goddard mistimed what
was obviously intended to be a
powerful stroke.

Bad Start
The Present boys started off dis-

mn





And In iingland

The English Soccer season has sition. In this they have become
just finished, as has that in Bar- 1 ters, and although they have
bados, The prestige that West In- no: managed to win the Cup, they
dian cricketers have gained may a treat to watch. The ball
be achieved by football posses from man to man, the ball

CALLING






from this area in due cours It never ieaving the ground, and es ares ‘im ities
is of interest to note the different netimes not travelling more + aa _ eel f arenas
conditions and tendencies in the than a few yards, but with clock- hon e S aa was ve *) up |
play in the two places Jih precision, The centre forward j ee zs sli he Cave ee hei
The grounds in Barbados are p| a different role to that of ot fae . a 2 - ka wand ajudeed
vastly different from English Neweastle. He interchanges with Ter aan ithe « Welch oe him- A. J, MOTTRAM
pitches: the English player i ith olleagues on the forward line, if ~ it if ee ay aed ret trick
his best on a “heavy” or wet that the opposing centre half rot a iy be bowled next ball
pitch. This makes for better ball j: in two minds whether to leave ¥ DR ret e e .
control, the players being able to his position in the centre of the How noe ‘Stoute and Reifer r ]
— oe ball = oe aera i'S field or follow and mark his cen- twe Pe cartasiare with some free é ts enn tS MEN!
real anc true place for playing ¢t forward. It is in this baffling ra a anes # 4 imi
constructive football. pesition the defence find them- SOOrIRS ees cine Geoute Wat ;

The team which was succesS- selye and any of the forward
ful in the Knockout Competition |jne are able to take the centre
was remarkably clever, but, com- forward’s position and “have a
pared to English Soccer players, ”



stopped the rot before Stoute went e
l.b.w. to Headley for a most useful
25. Reifer was later caught by a

Farmer off Goddard for the top




; BO Pr 3

they were not keen enough to Their football is beautiful to score of 48. LONDON

ee none : = : ‘ ‘ar ¢ spectacular but a 4 .

— ee ie si ‘Sinema aie wateh, and — fail ~ bring ae pea idly, yr tecet ON JUNE 13 AND 14 British tennis will be on trial Here’s
& é them s "eSS, ave see » two a 5 . J ih ; . .

tice guicatyle of the two niost teams aneptioned. whan’ renteut 6 and when stumps were arawp At Bologna, the men tackle Italy in the third round of the

successful teams in England, jing and the honours are just for the day Goddard, a young Davis Cup. The women stay at home to meet the United

hander was then delighting the















teams with completely different ajo » : Ste % :
styles. Newcastle United won the Path MR. THEO ALLEYNE who top- crowd with some fine defensive States in the Wightman Cup. | a
F.A. Cup, which is equivalent to Newcastle just managed to get scored with 66 for the Old Boys. stroke play to save the ee 4 Neither of these matches may result in a British vic-
the Barbados Knockout Competi- the upper hand in the cup tie, did and carried out his bat for 12 tory, but they will give an indication as to the extent of Message
tion. Every professional team in the reason being that cup tie runs, the progress made by the y : le re oO
England can compete, right down football is of a very vigorous na~- : . Scores _ > bY the younger players. |
to the little clubs, leading up to ture, and sometimes skill is for- Warwick Suffer zig he “PAST” 6 The advance of such promis- Wightman Cu If they w | for You
the great final at Wembley, where sotten in the keen rivalry for the a ae re ca 66 ing youngsters as Roger Becker vill ee cites wi te ae Tae eras
the two teams left in compete at honour of going to Wembley to ifth Defeat S. Headley e Grant b Wilkie 82 and, Susan Partridge who will D ib : i ete Sat Ree HIE YI
the vast Wembley Stadium, be- | lay for the greatest of all prizes J. D. Goddard ¢ Murray b Johnson 45 both be playing in these Sa eer oe ee It EK a ished
fore a crowd of 100.000 people, in English football, the F.A. Cup. (From Our Own Correspondent) BE BB eee tid V3 sii eee = n these tees Truly the Americans are giants, WHY WAT ONE WE to get a SUIT Furnis
; Nse : * ’ via t y oT Murre as ‘a g p ave <= “e eB eve re ing * : * ~
on a perfect pitch with fresh Newcastle’s dash and speed and = # qe. Ce out 10 wiiernesy any es paths) os opti- Since the event was instituted in when you ean come right into the IDEAL STORE
green turf. ceen shooting gains them success LONDON, June 12. Extras 12 sa BS usiasts in this 1923 they have won the trophy on 3 } : _ :
New Recerd n the Cup, while Tottenham’s Country champions Whrwick abe "Tho tae os oe saa —— that the 19 of the 23 occasions, and get a fine SUIT in one hour in our READYMADE
setae cate onsiste style € erits suffer ir fi 2g ota or § wkts.) is not too far distant when It is 22 years sinc Sn gle y ;
Newcastie were able to create 60? istent style in football merits suffered their fifth defeat of the Total N - ae n is 22 years since England . ;
a new anand by winning the cov- their suecess in League play. season at Birmingham where ROWLING Britain will end the Australian tecorded a yictory, when “Hele DEPARTMENT. We guarantee you a Perfect Fit the
eted Cup for two years running, Lancashire required only two days _ o MR OW and American monoply in the 1930 side won 4—3, IDEAL WAY.
which created a record likely to C ; ‘th ; I pores ae noe eireere sar Water , 1 7 ; Bie, eee Ag i , In the following years untii
stand for a long time. Newcastle riffi as in took his overnight score o Fame 4: ges scond week-end in June 1939, when th ar cause : .
; : FP Oo ff svnnahtte See > . : : PE , nh e war caused the
Unirione sd Wie i Boat Stingo C.C. ReWinndetitatadtad tet $$ | wit 'aw how far ih optinism event tobe suspended, America |f[| TWEED SURES cnn s52.86 a $66.4
; ar to the olc plan of years I t ° wa ae c Senet os 6 1 aoe . used to win by a margin of four
ago. A rule was adopted before COE x wigo alte 176. Warwickshire collapsed bad- Murray ; 1 3 0 ey , ad alive A 7 ‘ *
p 16, fe collap AG ateon 2 : Despite Becker’s recent rapid Matches to three or five to two. TWEED SPORTS COAT ou. cc 39.16
the War under which a »layer is ly in the second innings and were eioiite ss 2 20 e s c rapi : , : . e
offside sae arid ibe thio cleo A LARGE crowd of about 600 all out for 127. ay : ee 3 © improvement, however, it seems —— vat resumption in 1946
nak ' y ee a SE an sleve no sine , PRESE c ers between him and the goal line S@8W an _ Eleven, captained by PRESENT likely that it will be left to the : y PURE LAMBS’ WOOL 5 Ss
when the ball is last played. As feresford Griffith defeat Stingo Another two-day victory was Murray ¢ Cave, b Ferigs » old firm of Mottram and Paish ™0re clearly marked. In those : L SPORTS COAT..... te 61.65
a result, attacking football has C-C. at Stingo, St. John, on Sun- secured by Worcestershire over fou Lines, Paenioe 0 to carry the flag for Britain, In Six years England has gained ‘
deteriorated. ‘Teams have concen- “ay_last. The game was begun Somerset who like Warwick are Reiter ¢ Farmer b Goddard #\ some ways this is unfortunate ‘two successes in 42 matches. PURE GABARDENE PANTS ... 29.01
trated on defence, using. .their 09 Sunday, June 1, and was con~ still without a win, orcester- Farmer c¢ Cave b Farmer . “8 pecker is a player of real prom- One of these was last year
centre half, who used to be the CWded shortly after’4 pm: Raa shire’s captain Bird made his Wilkie c Goitie’p Farmer... 6 ise who, with the correct hand- When Jean Quertier, who is in
brains behind all attacks, as a Scores: Stingo 113 and 161; Grif- highest score of the season before Goddard not out ‘ 12 Jing could reach world class, He ‘he side this year, defeated
“policeman”. It is his job to keep fith’s XI 105 and 181 for ee Worcestershire declared at 358 for Outram c¢ Alleyne » Cave .. : is always anxious to. lear by Shirley Fry.
se guard the ‘centre for- Hero of the game was ennis 9, Somerset fared badly against Johnson not out 5 ayi agains biel ik . ave ¢ er 0 {
ce © UATE On the ee emai Cobham who seored 123 not out the pace-bowling of Perks and Extras : playing against men of greater | Strengthened 9 .
s z J i eee Wy nS ae nie ae 4 a ; ~ experience. The American team is likely
started this just before the War, in Griffith's XI second innings, after following on 221 behind, Total (for 9 wkts.’ 151 But he isconly likely set a to be strengthene .
with a player called Roberts. 2nd took 11 wickets for 81 runs were dismissed by the spinners of a wee anaes Sipe y MEPL NO Heb Ae Lee rengthened by the return 10, 11,12 & 13 Broad Street
Goals became a rarity, and play in the match, In the first innings Jenkins in the second innings : , ® ao SE ancé to play in the actual tie of Louise Brough, winner of
became duller in consequence “he had scored 23 not out in four arinie ie oe if the issue has been settled one eleven Wimbledon titles since she - a aie
ten ae way or the other after the first first played there in 1946. Last



5
)
made minutes, Surrey Loses Headley : :
y Goddard 6 1-73 : three or four matches. If the tie year she suffered from tennis

UCT ee 4 17 :
. 8 goes the full distance, his ap- ielbow and was consequently not

When a fresh start was
after the War many ways









Skinner

















































































tried by various teams to circum-~ For the first time this season Gave 1 0 ! ! earan ill be | ted 4 ef I
vent this, The most successful Surrey have lost first innings pearance wi e limited to ex- at her. best, and was dropped
— been Perens United and SPORTS WINDOW points. In a slow scoring game oe a ae Pl * from the side, We I fi Sa k |
ottenham fotspur. Newcastle at Lianelly, Glamorgan secured Te s Many oung ayers eg Rs y ‘@ ean su rom Stock
use the W plan, with their two Modern High School will a lead of nine and captured one Wint Pulls Muscle Most of the Italian team are in , noe sein es recovered, and Peg
inside forwards well back to play Fortress a return Surrey wicket before close. But ; tLeir early twenties. As a result see at to win back her
break, and start attacks, with basketball match tonight at as there is a short day tomorrow, ARTHUR WINT, Olympic 400 of the far sighted policy pursued ? Th 7 ee tearm . CRITTALL STEEL SLIDING FOLDING DOORS.
we very ee oan jer the ¥.M.P.C. it is unlikely that there will be a metres and A.A.A, half-mile py the Italian authorities, in : e are side is one of the
players on the wing, Leading this The other match for to- definite result. champion, has pulled a muscle encouraging youth they have strongest for some time and the The Ideal Door for
attack is a player who has gained night is the Pickwick-Har- during training, and will not run many excellent young ‘players, coaching of Fred Perry has add- Door f Verandahs
international fame, aie RS rison College Match, Scoreboard in competitions for two weeks. such as Sausto Gardini, G. Merle, °4 tits proficiency. But Ameri- The Whole Door slides and folds to one side.
renowned for his great speed and While Modern H ig h The injury is not serious, but no and Rolando del Bello. ea, with Louise Brough, Maureen
powerful shooting. The plan in School have not yet scored Worcestershire beat Somerset dcubt bearing the Olympic Games : Connolly, Doris Hart, Shirley . an ;
ee the ee ie {ors 4 win, Fortress have scored by an innings and 54 runs, Wor- in mind, Wint is not ae iw The form these young Italian Fry and Pat Todd, holds the Supplied in two Sizes...

(eae s Phe ed cant Agate oaly two. cestershire 858 for 9 declared, risks. The injury prevented him players have shown this season, aces, and the British girls wil it — 6 2” = ”

bri . it tt halt-beed “gia : College defeated Pick- itird 158, Hazell 5 for 82, Somer- from assisting Polytechnic Har~ suggests that Britain’s interest in do well to improve on last as with é seshined _ : 3 wit x ? 3" heh

important Gus. “iglloercan centre wick im their first match and et 137 and 167, Jenkins 6 for 64, riers in their vo haan sane the Davis Cup may _ end at one victory vegibe i fi wit &

Fe A Be corms Sacmatiadh now that the Pickwick team University last ursday. » Bologna. ; ‘A

halt ie an. this hide 8 oor’, Baa are fitter, it will be interest- Lancashire beat Warwickshire McDonald Bailey was also absent tenteuote-vear-ola » Gardin CRITTALL FRENCH DOORS

Burt the taen the fede eee ng seeing how they will by an innings and 49 runs, Lanca- from the team, as he felt it un- | 421) gangling youth, has already + 9” wie we |
fea 1a cea ate he show against College in this shire 338, Ikin 118, Warwickshire wise to run so — aoe retitn+ Po oien Mottram this vear, in the THE BARBADOS ex 9” high

the centre forward uses his extra return, ron ing; from the Unt Nae recent French Championships AQUATIOCLUB CRITTALL STEEL WINDOWS

area e reach the ball before the Sei In the Yorkshire vs. Gloucester- . His ener i Ng bene (Local & Visiting Members r Vari
centre half, and when he does so, ~~~ = shire match Yorkshire made 406 He Did li lect year when he beat Gardner only) arious widths and heights with or |
the goal is at his merey, the two for 7 declared, Gloucester 232 and Molloy the American ace who without Ventilators. |
ee te eee WEATHER REPORT 181 for 5. SYDNEY; An old-age pensioner Ws much fancied for the title, SATURDAS : SUNS 4TH THE MODERN WINDOW FOR THE MODERN HOME
under this defensive plan, Y Mr. “Mic ‘ > ste Gardini as layer 0 AT 8.30 P.M

; ; ai . ; : ‘ F Ni J. M. Michel of Sandstone, stamped ar a play .M.

‘i Lightning Thrusts on er from Codrington In the Oxford University VS. \estern Australia, has sent a the highest class. sia eiparcte == aie

Newcastle used this methoc y aan Kent match Kent made 243 and (che for £20 to a Melbourne here, } & TROUPE "PHONE : 42
consistently with success, The totes Rainfall; for Month to 241 for 4; Oxford 223. Hospital rae qrestinent he had _ lf the struggle that sarees will entertain with re
lightning thrust down the mid- Boa 1.80 ins. : there in 1899. He wrote “I’ve men face is stiff, the task before } f
dle upsets the stonewall defence ae pun: pens F. .en trying to pay for 63 years, the women is monumental. h The Miser oe °
of most teams. and has gained sowest Temp: 0 °F. ' aa Y aaa Staal They will meet one of the Human Hen ° °

: : ‘ ; ‘ ” ut did not get the chance. Now y wi

roe wnoeee 38 the Cup for the cece 15 miles per WHAT'S ON TODAY Ive saved the money from my &trongest teams that has a The Fakirs Rope Trick

s o s€asons : sion.” repres erica in 5 D

The other team does the com- Barometer (9 am.) 29.989 Court of Ordinary 11.00 a.m. ona represented ho ™ “ Electric Chatr
plete opposite. Tottenham Hot- (3 p.m.) 29.981 Basket Ball, YÂ¥.M.P.C. 7.30 | (%6666969099999999999SS9SSS9OSSSOSIO FIFI FF OF OH Clifton Mind Reading Act
spur relies upon very closely-knit TO-DAY p.m. s Hypnotism, Etc., Ete.
team work to beat the othe Sunrise: 5.44 a.m. Mobile Cinema, Summervale, Rg
team, The main plan of their at- Sunset: 6.19 p.m. St. Philip 7.30 p.m. e THE BOODHOO BROS.
tack is for the wing man, inside Moon: Full, June 8 Police Band at Charity Con- | $ Indian Stunt Kings and
forward, and half-back, to work | Lighting: 7.00 p.m cert, Queen’s College 8.00 8 Boneless’ Wonders f
very close together, and they High Tide: 7.59 am., 9.01 p.m. : | Etc., Ete. F
weave patterns, with very close ee. : Films at British Council 8.15 | e Also DANCING by ‘
passing from man to man, to pull ow Tide; 1.58 a.m., 2.30 p.m, P-m,. | Caribbean Troubadours }
the opposing defence out of po- from 10.30 p.m.













[ They'll Do Tt Every 4 lime Reviniored U, 5, Patent Often j THINK OF To batertainment * Dance







/ WAS THAT GUY IN A HOSPITAL
OR ON A VACATION ++ NONE
OF THE DAMES AROUND HERE

11.6.52,—3n.



A YOU SHOULDA SEEN THE
UTTLE RED-HEADED NURSE
I HADâ„¢WOW! IM IN THE









THE CONCEITED























JOINT TWO MINUTES AND GIVE. HIM A TUMBLESHE J APES! AND

MAKE A DATE WITH HER FOR Ye MUSTVE HAD A NEW / THOSE MORONS AND

WHEN I GET OUTTHEN THERE <7 PERSONALITY LISTENING TO HIMâ„¢ BUSTED

Pile Shr eae cee ke 7 ee hi ee PIN AND \%

KNOCKOUT BUT WATTLE TELL f 4 ANSAD a THINK y
/ 2 BET THE 1x OF 3

DROOLBERRY-
J YOU ABOUT THE NIGHT NURSE = A ye Adm | j/ OIETITIAN WENT
FOR HIM INA -
BIG WAY AND
GAVE HIM AN
EXTRA DIGH OF

Tapa PS |




|
| THE FIT
|

§ THE PRICE qe
| A WORSTED
SUIT



* Van Heuson







- ‘Austin Reed |
j







% | * Consulate
& iow: VWrondtutte Anniversaries } | * Elite
i irthdays, Christenings, ete. | *
, ONLY 5 OO 2 | DIAMOND RINGS neuer
Ness? ‘ x | GOLD. & SILVER SHIRTS to complement your
——— x Sif JEWEL RICE TAILORED Tropical,
eiet'STENING en : AT S| See your Jewellers... | Irish Linen and Moygashel
; Li E z | . " ;
| _| BLOWASH Mi See ie. g S| ¥ “ De LIMA Suits a u wardrobe of com-
SS RECOUNT tis SPITAL $s P. < S. MAFFEI & co LTD. x | ‘ | petitive prices!
Sas) THANX 4 $ S| & CO.,LTD. | C.B.Ri:
x ‘TOP SCORERS IN TAILORING’ x | 20 BROAD ST. - B. Rice & Co. of tonen Lane
s % | and at MARINE GARDENS

08 - 04 G -S .
. PPE OSES SSO SSS SSPOSS SSS SSS SS SSS OSS TOSSOS












PAGE 1

FRIDAY JIVF. 13. lt&2 BARBADOS AHV.n til PACE THKl.t. Care Would Have j Saved Ten Lives SO F AR THIS YEAR, ten persons have been killed as a result of road accidents. All these lives mitfht have been saved if the drivers of vehicles concerned had not been in such a hurry and had driven with more care, Colonel R. T. Michelm. Commissioner of Police, told conductors and drivers in his annual talk at the Empire Theatre yesterday afternoon. Seated on the platform with Col. Michelln, Were Mr. Rawlv Gamer and Mr. Gilbert Archer of the Highways and Transport Department. Capt. F. C. Parrls. Mr. Kenneth Sandiford ol the Bus Concessionaries Association, Mr. E Massiah and Mr. B A Tudor Mr. Garner, who acted as Chairman, introduced Col. Micnelln and later endorsed the Commissioner's remarks. Ho told drivm and conductors that the Commissioner's talk was of great importance to Itiiin Mr Sandiford also addressed the audience after which a vote of Thanks waj moved by Mr. H. A. Tudor Colonel Michelln stressed that there * need for plenty of improvement in the driving and conduct ins of buses, as there were l.tfi buses In the island. "It has been my custom for the past two years to have a talk with you at the end of the licensing year and before you come up to renew your licenses to drive and conduct public service vehicles Your bcences are renewable as from the 3rd Of June. When you renew your bcenaes 1 want you to bear in mind during the ensuing year vehat J am going to say today," said Coional Michelln During the past twelve months 242 buses have been involved in accidents. 83 drivers arid 96 conductors have been warned and prosecuted before the Courts. Five conductors have had their licenses suspended. The driving in the Island would be considerably ifniTovcd if everyone displayed more road manners. A number of drivers have no thought (or other persons usrnglhc road. They carry on as if they were on a private roadway, stopping in the middle of the read to speak to or pick up frtendi.. parking on a corner and pulling up several fret from the curb. In fact, only thinking of the* own convenient and having no regard for anyone but themselves. 1 want you to remember the other road users if evitvone does this it will make diving on our narrow roads easier and safer." "So far this year, ten (10) persons have been killed as a reSuit of road accidents. AH these lives might have been saved If the drivers of the vehicles concerned hud not been In such a hurry and hud driven with more care. One of the most ghastly accidents took place a few weeks ago. on a Sunday afternoon Three little children were sitting quietly on the StMg of their home waiting for their father to bring the car arouiu! tf take them for a drive. Suddtn1> u cur coming along the road C. a.livd into them and ko.K-ked them unconscious. Thev subsequently died In Hospital. Think of these young lives being brought abruptly to an end. It Is appalling and it should be possible to prevent accidents of this nature." he said. During the year 1M1, there were 1.165 accidents reported to the Police. The main causes of accidents are: (1) improper overtaking, lb-it Ifl, nut waiting your turn but trying to cut in when tne road is not yours, lb) poor Judgement of drivers andMO pedetrinns not looking where they are going 'There U* %  .iccidents on Sr.turdny than any other day, and between 1200 noon and ,0 Pm and 4.00 p.m. and S.00 p.m. are the times whfln most accidents occur "Last year sixty-nine (68) Bus Drivers received Good Driving Badges. This year 91 Drivers qualify for the award of this badge. The badge this year is red with blue stripes You should he proud of wearing these budges They are an outward and vMNI sign of good driving for 12 months. They should also help rou to get employment when vou. Dead it 'You drivers are responsible for the safety and comfort of the passengers you carry. Observu tne rules of the road, practise road manners, drive within the speed limit and make your passengers' trip as comfortable and safe as possible. "To the conductors.—You are responsible for looking after the passe n ge r Do not allow your bus to be overcrowded. By .illowing more than five in a seat you are not only breaking tho law but making it uncomfortable for five other people Rules are made to be obeyed. You are there to see that the regulation? arc carried out. In England the passenger obeys the orders of the conductor. If he says tin bus la full, that is final and there 1> no argument. Teach your public to they your instructionSee that log bus only stops at approved Bus Stops. Always be neat and tidy in your person. No one respects anyone in dirty and shabby clothes and unshaven. Keep your bus clean and remember the passenger is never wrong He polite, courteous and helpful :<> them on all occasions, no ocmer how exasperating they may be. Do not allow Indecent language or disorderly conduct to take place m the bus Remember you are a licensed conductor Live up to what the public expect from the wearer ol the Cono tic tor's Badge. "Last year seventy-one (71) Conductors received Good Conouct Badges. This year 77 ec uuctors qualify for this badge "I thank you all for coming here today and hope that you will endeavour to give the travelling public a safe and comfortable ride, and make the roads of ibis island safer for everyone to use. Remember it takes very little longer to get there when you orive with care and regard for others. "Courtesy creates courtesy. Let all of us who drive motor vehicles practise more road manners—we u-ill ;ill profit by It," COI..IK-I Mi.helm ended. TRIUMPH OVER PAIN QUIHIHE-THE FOURTH MREDItMT IK %  ANACIN' Hew does ANACIN relieve fum so f m. to eftectlwly A fa* years ago lead >r.f icicniim dneo-*'ei the tr-ret lay inctieeiact balancing of threeUrnouirned.onet iPhenatetin. (-tHdneand Ac<-t>lulicyle*er..r. temperature*, reatere a real sets* of well. ben.*. One Ion Shark Caught On Line Drivers, Qo>i\Ju<'t<>rs R-n w Ucenoas So far 2,424. drivers and 44 rondurtfgrs tiave> renewed trie.! UcanCVJ The majority of applicants arc bringing their licences lo the l i .mil Department and leaving them until the following day. Very few licences are bei: B.C. Has Colony Wide Hospital Plan GEORGETOWN. June 4 THE BRITISH GUIANA GOVERNMENT has a comprehensive scheme for the establishment of hospitals, COttelgC taCKsfritaJl and spt-cial medical fnrilitirs at .strategic points all over the Colony. These will bo established according to a formula of priorities, and ii is expected that the programme should IK"on the move" by next year. This was disclosed when the legislative Council met to discuss motions by Hon. Daniel Debldin aimed at providing social tmd other services in his constituency on the Eay' Coast, The Usntsstl ihaxk ever caught me raraby hook or line ,.nvhere In tinThe Governor told the Counworld was landed recently on a Cl1 lhat u,c matter hud been dealt Dolphin Cutty-hunk Line 39 *•'"> In the 10-yci plan Since threads wild ,. theoretical breakttvn there had bssn proposals of 78 pounds. by the Venn Commission for Uie ,_, , erection of Id hospitals along the The ash. which *u caught |n eossttSj belt and that Commission ?<. -^""i a.*-* !" n? e *U it *' ,t < 1 ,h %  lli06 n*('i!als Should 6ft. 3in. long had a girth of 8fl ^ buih „ n[ ftS J^.y,, rhe ll.n and we.ghed' ^*-Th Comrnl „ ion h ; Governor Said, W&^^%faF55i Tf^^VnSHi fl be n o a me „.. i clal reasons, it might be lome lime beforo those hospitals could An Australian newspaper Vive* bs built. this account o( Ihi captura Krf|tiirenirnK . The paitv set out on The position of which district Friday evenmii and anchored must be served first c to be condurlnj the night, spending Satald (sugar) hospitals should SEA AND AIR TRAFFIC In Carlisle Bay v-h s. . Care Hat. sr tint MUIIVALK M.V Uaeiwuod. Iron. M l.xrla M V V.Kiirk. Hunt Ifcinuim* \HRIVAI S P I ON THtrn^DA* • %  '"HI TRlWiniH l. ,k M Hrely. o Gimnunt. ]l ••I .. ... I 'i. Oii He H JBuincr. .. < •• n, I'fl'ARTUsUtS BV nu ON Tlit'NSDAV I I AMI..1A ii lusjanbuwri H DUOS, A M.K. I .r 1'irCHTO tOCO Ch-rleWall.. KUHIIMI Wall.. J M I llloiidln. H.t,. Mu...., J..I | ..„,.,, uasr tl cs aeal. iit-i^i <-o U ii K.H.H Coell. Ian Cm.ll. Cbsssss Allrrtu Shir II II' H..eh •U.Aii-'r, in Touch With Barbados CoMtal SU(ion Five KUUHI In Plane Crash OHeflM RIVXR, Uteb. Julie I 1 Kmi-ixriis. in.iuiiing an eijht nOOth oki b0P were killed Hl-i.intly when u chartered plane era had Ud burned 6:< an inile Baacnoralt BIBMIIIIT plane. u>-loii^ing lo ihe Riga An. raft Con j anof (iraiul Junction, Colorado, Md i hortly after taking ..IT f;om the mining company l.iiulin. strip *0 niils MHlth I llnnksville in nigged aouthi i —V.P. \ Do >e sarYee from ( 1 **f of that paint PI Paim l.om lever f Cold. I Headache* Toou.the Rheuiiutii-n N-uni(n f MenmualPain.' Then 'ANACIN *,ll br-H ou immediate rlief. cut ou( pain with smaiing ipeed LAST Off PAIM AT OHCt f Yea. tof a ee*7 imis you on buy > WWW envelope of ANACIN "— %  noufh to bnn| you last relief from a bout of pain '. 'Anaon >i alto amiable In handy 20-raDln bo>iei and In boiiln cl SO iiblcii. Share in the benefiti of thu jreai m KientiRc dixovery AMU YOURSELF ABAIMST PAID GET SOME ANACIN TODA 17 urday obtsUl necessary to lur The first indlcati star shark was ame around h — m* % %  ..,•. Oiriulh Uvell MarIll the uimt> Sunday when those on board were dis|ha banging and Teniaui In use for the nexi few years until it u possible to turbed by knocking of the hungry shark £** the lu*,iu.l r..,unements of which, attracted by the bait hanging from the side, nosed mound the Seized Propeller When, finally, It seized "Three SrLraU and .hree PotZgS* '" '.<• ""• lice Constables are looking after the renewing of licences. 20'FINE FOR INDECENT LANGUAGE A line of 20s was Imposed 01 Ismay GrllTlth of Mahogany Lane. St. Michael yesterday by His Worship Mr. C L. Walwyn. Acting Police Magistrate of District "A" who found her guilty of using indecent language on NclK>n Street. The Una Is to be paid In n days or In default 14 days' Imprisonment with hard labour Island Constable Maynard arrested Griffith. al population as a whole IlKhl of fuller. nu.il.Wmy %  ..(.-ftealisln* the position, howvveg-, the Dlreclor of Medical tlie %  taeWgtl had drawn up a comih. i >'**hei."ive programme for the h shook from S~ten. < :.! %  .. r %  *' %  %  •' fc* the ronstru.and those on board knew they llr "> *>* rural hospitals throughcould capture 'a nid big 'un!'" R Ut the colony wherever needed It was daylighl Iwlore they The proeramnv will he submitted attempted to hook the monster, tn the I^plilatlve Council Medil ui mn almost immediately sueeal Advisory Committee for concassful. At 6.30 a.m. they began sideralinn as lo priorllie, which playing the out sireshark and I brought it aloocslda In UM K-^-' (.ii.. o| forty-live minutes. Luckily the shark kept to the surface of bad .t .ii\i(( to the bottom the tusk would have been much morw difficult. Finally It M taken In five fathoms of water. %  nxideriHi using a much heavlei line, a 44ft thread, bul fortunately the 39thread was decided upon, thus enabling the angler to secure the . %  sttUar. M I—a, Rodney, a e Mornta.Tarn, % %  Cha>ni Venue. -*. A %  vt>u-i .. Smetti M Qkllte, < %  Sallr an <)t<>an Monarch. • %  J K. Ulllrli.-niirl. %  > frOi.^-CloT. II. Airk-an Moon. .. NH>H • Uoiuliu. i.i.a. a. Knee, a a San Bee eiolo. a a Casablanca, a.a O—gi . %  unw*^ >* K..U. . M-u lie*. % %  Bii ilJaltV faw Sn t f • • ... Antanwllo U--Un WANTED OLD GOLD AND SILVER JEWELRY OR IN MOM IN SCRAP FOKM The very hlihenl market prlres paid at your Jewellers , Y. Del.l>l\ A t'O.. I. I'll. SO SHOAD BT. rboate ; 1 M ItlMIMItl It ENGLISH ELECTRIC RODUCTS BEAUTY AND ECONOMY COMBINED rVOUld le cranted ma ftn\TE3r OF EXCIIA 1ITH ATHE. isu MHag NSW VOIh %  SfSBfl %  i in-. H nanfcer Sishl U r DunerM 1 SIM ii 4/ier. Cable i a/ian n I^IO*-. m 0'ia-r w* C4NAIIA IS 3 •W. 7S li'. SlSht DrafU W-. t Cable i r. id'. IS %  '.'• Coupon* Tl I/IO•. Silver SW Uai 'I itss Doctor* and dentim rel :>u in < ASM lor ever. New Milisrriber brought l" .uuI iii-cepteil h\ llie Cnmpany. REDIFPU8ION will pay in ;ul.h i .i boDUg oi S25.tW U) ID} pgrtOfl who bruins in Iwenly-Hve New SubscrihHI id i.ne ( nlendiir month who are accepted 1>\ the 'ompany Ha .-e always a supply of Hecmimicndation Forms ready THEY TAN BE OBTAINED AT THE OFFICE %  UUU t UUtm -Traialgar Street. Teeth Loose Gums Bleed (all OL. _, _. mi'Um ati'1 lloart Tr".iM •nneaen •'die auru Ul.-dina lh' ll f.'-fa ar risouih and qassw "•> %  *n the taelti. Iron clad anarenli' Amoean mtsel fnafce y...ir mouti, w,u and aai,.'" i.eth (W moe.v bailt oa teturn ot -rnply pn. kas' 'Ift WASHING MACHINE FOR ALL ENGLISH ELECTRIC PRODUCTS CALL MANNING & CO., LTD. Electrical Dept. Dial 4289 FOOD-MIXER YEAST-P CENIB AL T AT NO EXTRA COST! •OTTOM-V*lcas|„. • oa *hoiyl€ssyiowashl NOW PACKED III EVFRY BOX OF *&&& ALL-BRAN %  •*" i.„i, F r v...11. :.. .' ...%  .. > s.^ ir.-i ~i u-ii A — /'or u radiant thine Oat yours today while the supply lasts! YOUttSI Accept this 4 m 1 measuring ,K-. v %  package of delicisua Kplloig'a *XL-BAN! MOOUINl All spoon measuring sizes in one! Table %  poon and teaspoon on one side! Half-te^ap'on in! quarter-teaspoon on rtlipr idr. Handier than spoons. Waanaa eaaily, .uickly. ActdproofF Offer made U> acqi...' vou willi the and crispier Kellogg a /.u. IIRAN of today' Uae A and measuring spoon to make muffina everybody loves. Light! Tender! Recipe %  i AU.KKAN bos. Laxative, too! If %  ufT-ruig from constipation due to %  \ enjoy a bowlful of Kellogg's %  And drink plenty of water. I w U Uxativsj food! %  %  Ai.i.-nnAN 4-in-l mersuring spooi. Lai 'I \'mt your grocer quick! Offer ..: H.l'!e Crevk, Mich. *&&* I hr quality Metal PolUh



PAGE 1

I Kill.Y JIVF i:l. 1M2 HVKIIUHK ADVU1 ATI. PAGI rive Parents Urged To Clear St. Andrew's Name Governor Praises Alleyne School HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR. Sir Alfred Savage. K.C.M.G., yesterday evening warned parenU and friends Who attended Speech Day at the Alleyne School that the*Community Centre at Belleplaine was beinx used in other parishes as an argument against building other centres. His Excellency exhorted the people of Sl.jWiuA to clear the name of their parish, if the information he had was illfounded or on the other hand if there was anv truth in the allegation that the venture had failed, to renew their efforts It was the first Speech Day of the School in two years, and on this occasion, Lady Savage, wife of His Excellency, as on the last occasion, presented the prizes. His Excellency the Governor aranxious that the community centre lived accompanied by Lady Sav.ind spirit of this parish should Ke and his ADC. Major Denis bo fully developed Vaughan. and were greeted with the ttrst bar* of the National AnI inUmd to speak lo you to-day them, about the value of education not TV----— w i fc ** weans of earning a living, but r.SS ^^1^''J^,".'"'Z' •" """" %  •" "W fuller US TO ;.".;;,' r'„" !" <, "," m x "ir'u^ r !*,' B ,k t-sr^Si at added !O the cnlonnlnment with '" lh "*"*. '"' ""' Tn t *?"* Houghton's THE DEAH las ucs a monthly letter dealing DEPARTED. %  plav In -.e act. w h al1 klIuis of subjects and the Like the Bongs, this play was well current letter is headed "The [.( %  •...-.I Beauties of Learning." I hope the Press will publish It for I can The Hunter part of the afterdo no more this afternoon than noon s programme ended, the quote a few extracts.. Headmaster Mr. C. D. Cumberbatch, presented a very compre"It Is only natural that much henslve report on the school's acof ,„, learnin, o[ „ r v ,...,,. ,^x Si " %  •£ ^T^:;I:I\!?I^ FuMwin K the Headmatteri Bt U ** n *Bul xixcrv ,s port. Ljriv Savage presented the ,n •wn-enTy sili.-.l education. .1 prize-. ,ind after Hi* EJirelleney • on "' knowled** that does not had addressed the Katikarlog, lb* contribute to making a living but Revd. Father WoudrudferReetorto better living. This is the door of St. Andrew and Chairman of through which we enter upon a the Governing Body of the School, kingdom of beauty, literature, art moved a vole, of Uiaiiks to His Exand culture. ccllency and Lady Savage. To go on learning past the The jiaUuruig Oven inspected srhoolday period Is to continue exhibits of needlework -nd art developing taste and enjoyment, done by the pupils of the School, We train our eyes and our ears following which they were enter-n d our judgement, so that we lamed by the Headmaster. awaken the spirit of line perception of beautx of generous admiration for what Is noble and true. Ch. Ch. Vestry Join In Objecting To Local Government Bill Bell Answers 1 Queries For Civil Scr* ice MR. C. 8 HEWETT (New TCA Operation Manag") New TjOA. Operations Manager It ti difficult ta .Unct line as to what section the Civil Si-iv,,.BtKNlld join ade Unions, Mr. J D, M. Hell, .earth worker and aKturei 0 nduMnal relations at Glasgow -entity, told a gJRMIB <"t Civil Servnrts during an a ddri ft %  •taedaj at the British Council, but and on this basis decide how beneficial n would l-e (ui anj pads Mr. Bell based hi* ail ill — on answers lo four which he first posed: 1. Wlnl ,v Civil Servant" 2 Should Civil l CHURCH VK8TRV the |oii i-, ii; '., ihe repteeentatl %  • rvw iinu'i.t Hill and %  ture and the Secrctar) i I 1 he 1 Uw Hill : %  the Vestry howi vei mad %  an amcndinrni Ihut the bounds The Vetlrj then dial) with an %  Hoi aikno* amstndms-nli 1 Mr C S. Ms. I Mi 1 M Q. War 1 %  tn cantata ee it the Select ( by the lions.to deal with \iBUI Amrnii 1 I had bean %  I1 ... why the w I no* t %  %  Chicken Has Hi tee'Legs A THREE LaXlOBD CHICK Ad wned < u 1it the centra %  t %  m 1 ai t %  .v. 1 H normal in Other reSsMtcts und I* hearty. Parlshta*crs nay four cents to ate the Servants form or Join Trade cl Unions* 3. Are Civil Seix.. <• Trade Unions In any tpagaal THE Advix-ntiunli-istuinl.s thai in Ute cxpandlpostuon? and 4. Should .. .. lurtion has been starttun on the social Sen-ice Trade Unions co-op-1 rartr> l'-"i Htliel. IK'.lth. etc. the V' wiih outside nrnonisalions' otl In "> I 1 1 v r > up He Hrst termed the Civil s,-r' ... %  : . t> of EauiendlUin as being essentially an emworkei re 1 uurt km year: |0 2 pm 2 lo 10 pin from 10 |im I'antimony n srea also posjiMsl out thai U eta .^r UM reaaoi %  \ asti kss BM MONTREAL The appointment of C. S. Hewelt, a veteran of 30 years in the transportation industry, as operations manager, Atlantic itcgion, has been announced by Tr.ms-Ca.iada Air Lines. He P 1 ^** '' r *f 0. IHJI as against SI7.at0.0l. tor the tear til l If* t ndrr Usf lir.nl s.Mll.lltm gll.KCf.4T M.. • xprideil in 1H43 - wlirrr.. >l!K.;.i ii" iv \|Miidrd IIIHI, %  tills -jmr head for the *r*r I SSI—S3. TinV1-.11> in Us iivimttu'iul.• in-'.-,i thai t<> anlanie 1M3 when the Chiliad ment Trans-Atlantic t^.*Prel'^rk ral ^UnH W M \£H !" lhe dock orkcr ""d ** %  -•> like and thrilled those present with | thr eXtsUng Hint a* Sllllllllllt u < r Many Definitions "Thrrtare many definitions of culture, but the sort of culture have In mind includes three he intended speak; A Guide Bom in Dorking. Surrey. Mr. The whole question InuliHewelt served during World War „ r ved. was the type Of lelallonUJ.I J" I.. operator with the h ,,, between the Civil Sarvanl British Merchant Navy and the „„,, h |s employer a. th Royal Navy H, e.v, an.l I'jghiv eii)o>ed by the crowd. laving comprehensive It trains workers to have better understanding of the inslater chief radio operator on many of the large Cunard and White Star passenger ships on the North Atlantic. Prior to joining TCA. he entered the Pacific Coast Radio Service of the Department of Transport. Kind,' for think of Tin academic and other sueand-ouls of their jobs, so that m .1 tribute to his work they know how they fit in with and that of the teachers A famthe laws of production and conous Headmaster once said to me sumption. It helps workers to "A school can be successful for a develop their true selves throus*. fete terms even with a poor Headintellectual or manual activity, master provided the teachers good". Here in St. Andrew, Judging from the results, you are fortunab in having master and good t "Culture qualifies everyone to isume his responsibilities on a Readperson and as, a citizen, not only 111 1.1workshop, hi,, trad* union and his family, but also In his My wife and I enjoy school community and in the world speech days for a number of rcacommunity. It makes freedom sons. Certainly not because I more peal by increasing Its scope. have to make a speech. I assure .-^,.1...— .>.* .. you it is almost as painful for us A "3S U t 1? blvt "L. T J as it If for vou who have to listen f^elfP to the utmost of his v first . like children. ** nd %  bHHy. fullness of S.-rondl. there K nlwavs a comhvmjI Physically, morally. Inteii:uS;,"Jw.rht^;/S ;<*'<•"* %  * artistically. It helps which should Infostered. Thirdly. ^ ,m *? w ^* d ou 1 th '*""-''^nthere Is usually some music and * aU >. 1 *'J c e ? ve lo th 5 "'gmflrant sinning or a plav-such as we ln knowledge and to think have enjoved this aftirnoon-and ctearty. It enables him lo become fourthly; we look Upon it as a £ * he '^ !" tcd capable of holiday from Bridgetown. P*** \ ^9 * ""' learning there come advantages For this afternoon, there Is 0 not to be otherwise gained. One fifth reason. We have a particuthat will rommend itself to manv lar affection for this parish beis the ability of self-expression, cause of our peii_^(filiations with Another Is skill In doing thingi other St. Andrew parishes, and in a creative way. These—sellnow. Mr Cuinberba.ch has proexpression and making—are ways l!;ikrr Situls Uau-: 40'Fiiw ImpcMed Charles Lewis, a baker of Grazeltcs Road, St. Michael, was i) lined 40s to be paid 14 days the decision as Civil Servant should joining a Trade Union. There was difficulty In drawing a line within the ranks of the non-Industrial Civil Servant. he said. Recently there was a M Bat Up m lhe United Kingdom to H\ ise the G in.I--..1 <;. AineiHlnients Thei ... %  %  imeasnneana la UM present Ve in-. Act whuii would Impro ther the damaged during thrains last UM 1 ind in I9S0. Smi • %  or th.%  it ID line to nut modern condttk ads have already been repaired could b) sfssc te d lor example n being repaired %  •' prosIlk knvorlni of tin(ranchlas t ent. while MUuni hag been dona Include any laspeyer; reductna 1 %  \.t, half UM nualincatton for intii b ei • e ship of tinvrtrj. the method ol MRS MALViNANlCHoi.i_s.it irutkln| Trade Return H 1 Village m 102 years old meih.-i of makhtif easaasri i. 1 June !•. IBAti .1' hnuw ii'i'i' in pi >. Cambridge; !St Joseph and had recaluatiuri i|uliniu. nnlully and five chiliirrn Tone daughMfi UM compulsorj iwaJOcaUoti of the i. All of them have rham | y,^,H-r< • her She was one ease with land. that It was possible to draw ,,, n children In an tot*rvte line through the Civil Service w ,u. "Ciraiul-Mn Mctly" • slu inty wan willii. K i.. ,|.M ., wl i,. _..d give a dlfToruut meaaurv % %  ,. known, lb*AovOrOlr %  orresOovenune I HI%  iioiiths imprisonpolitical rreedom to those above pondent learned that Mallv's waments to tl* pr> .mvK w,m hard labour by HU hll n to Ihote below. ihe hard w..v <.f life ...ul she and OOtlld ajaure Ihap Worship Mr. C. L. Walwyn for "In my opinion," he sajd. "it nesi-i went to srhool. Al the earul operation ll BP' stealing two Hour bags belonging nn( po^f,,^ ,„ (lraw „ Une Wlth lv aiir of Plgbt hl wu rMog I to Zephtrio's Bakery. Sgt. Alleyne attached to the Central Police Station prosecuted loi The i iformation received. llM seeg for the prosecution rai th.it i'wi.. e/l -" ' ^^.^'.nT-^^'n-: out being unfair to somebody." agrlcullural labour, which He mentioned that in England gave up only Mi .cars ago lenctMM, post offlea workers and "Maiiy" poiaMeiei %  vtf, some other workers '. %  .ere not insgnory and reealled for the boneactually Civil Servants, bul con. M >r lhe pros*, loine ii.dr-raising under the local authontt so the BeendOtes of the 18''H sionu. for about four months was discovered yesterday with two flour bags pr ^ c ^' ' ,h tied around his waist as he in the street. winker Mi". I i %  '"I ''loi i %  i the Mally was man I -in, James Wolsley NlcholU SO 1874 He died in 108 duced anottM i in that a In which we can In some meanJohn Harding, an employee at MM Bakery, saw the defendant and asked him what he had lied around his waist Eventually Mr. Zephirln came on the spot and gave the defendant over to Island Constable Seale. I Eat ruo.rri, Monrka Ilriirjir Fn.sh Fruil namesake of mine was once Headure discharge the obligation master here, feel I would like tolake this opportunity to be reassured about the Community Centre here. It is being used in some otHbr parts SS an irgumerrt against, bujldimj other centres. I'rrh.ips f do in debtors to life. "Of greatest Importance, perhap>. is the ability that continued learning gives us to think straight. We are apt to drift into way of thinking with our hopes tfjaanand our fears and do obtain some publicity and clear th,nan r of St Andrew OB thi other hand, if theoa l anv Jruth in the allegation thj tlW ^ariWnI. renew your efforts.* for vou have got in Father WoodrofTe a priest and leader who deserves the greatest support y— ignorance. based Civil Service. On the question of whether n Civil Servant should )otn or form a Trade Union, he first talked on the relevant question ol whether ncnilx-i%  inlass should loin. Looking around he world today, one would be nclined to think it was totally The Motor Vessel Darrwood m academic question — why which wed froni St 1. i should they not do so? They did lerdav inOTning brought 2& 1 have organisations, but were bunches of fresh fruit, live drum* Mr. Xephirin valued the flour they bl the true BSfaw "I the of coconut nil and ban esfftoni H bajgj at M and isdd thai BH HUM ansrd rrads Ublonj i. utter. time there weie complaints In the By the middle class was not Eighteen casks of fresh fiud. Hakery about things that were meant todav that kind of indeone crate of cabbages, missing, but he never suspected pendent small scale producer barrels of fiiot Slfftved by lhe lih* defendant. The keeper of the which was meant some years ug< re %  I Ms*eka whim < iltsd criminal record said that the de| n the bigger way was meant the h-re from Dominica jaslarn'ai fendant had two pre\-ious convlchigher groups of paid wi gi rrnojl. tions for larceny when he was a more particularly salaried workA* these vessels came alongside Police Sergeoiftj IVarsft rred %  Of the •*meant-. pr.iMt uting for 1 now bi ''ti u.it, 1.1 rod to the Central tn turn Ileparlmetil. He has l--.ii M Sut ii AUarne ami was In nhargc of UM ii ,i. R||l %  M i .. Si(t. Marshall who was attarhad i" the Central Inv, Department has i t I o Uw Ho* Pollci Station Jitraight thinking upon knowledge How think If he doesn't know"" I must leave it al that, but I would commend the whole artii-Te to your siMentimi Juvenll". ers. These groups contsdm 1 .i UM Wh.nf than was a great stir large number of people with in the crowd which was awaiting specialist knowledge of all kinds, the vessels. Donkey ear's and cleiical arorfcen. lechnk .1 erorktrucks were taken to the side of ers, teacher^, civil Mrvontl and :he vessels for the unloading of so on. S..I..I.. i .-Kei do foci thell One man MS ne.uh Diflirtili Period The world, including Barbados. Is g-'ing through a difficult period with so much distrust and fear. Nations and Individuals are looking sideways at each other, and if you li-ok sidewava even at your fnends you get a distorted view Well, we now come to the most K important part of the afternoon. ft ll to ask the Headmaster to grant the school a full day's holiday and no homework In honour of this occasion. CAR BURNT Charles Dash of Golden Ridge, It ma? be UM* Barbados is getSt George, reported that on ting a little tired of my repeated Tuesday al about 8.30 p.m he ro-operaUon and porfced his motor car O 154 In goodwill but I would say to any>* %  st St Anna Vicarage. St. one who criticizes me—"How far J^P''have you helped or hindered "the Qn Wednesday at about G 40 community spirit?" I agree that n m he was informed that the what is wanted is action and not car had been completely destroywords and that Is why I am so cd by fire. It Is Insured. BpJ n fining him Mr. Walwyn told Lewis that he wa heading for a long term of im.n and If he :ii|-iirs in the court on another charge of larceny he Salariwi works** do fdnn thell One man was ne.uU mjii.cn dd I* sent to pnj^U" organ isa I ions." he said. "Whelh. when a barrel of fruit fell to the er they should link up with Trade ground missing his right foot hv Unions of the wage earning i matter of inches. Ciunes went cl asses Is a queslion that depend!. Into operation for the ramovaj of on what social slalus they assign lhe bigger boxes and barn. %  i %  from lhe holds of the vessels. (.'nil Trade L'n.onisU In lhe majority of countr.r. MAIL NOTICES Civil Servants formed organisaM rfi -•> KaasOaai lions and maintained fun. te* Sir George Seel, K.C M.G. wh „ iotI t „„ c % %  niiiijil_wu_l a aaaM %  h. Comptro.I. I i liM 1 VI Kipmeni |lont he lmpl ( V er..< nt ot it and Weir.ne Oi-gynisatlon will ne wor k lll( conditions. In fact, he v*n t% ~< i* the spealun hen the last session Mld lhoH .,|, h) ., ,„,. ,„,, Q .eta lmm.jm darters, Civil Servantgwnei fj ivere good Trade Unionists. i ..i.„.. Haiifa. and He said that It was not a de-ir• ^*l •""•' rv*ni> n< fi—iel !•-. %  .1 Mall i IIANISII I AMK.MIIHM per tin IMNISH in IT: CHZtn per H i1RT -\li': per lb Ml per pkl. CANADIAN KIN'i 1 BB R per bottle CANADIA1. KINi/s BBn per 12 botlle earton (AUIlUltY'S CUP CNOCOLATI per tin I IKK Mil MM: KIM 1.40 .•7 I 32 1.18 1.18 .IP .18 280 .71 sT.%xsi-i:i.n. sforr A to. i.rn.



PAGE 1

I'W.I nr.iiT BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY JCNI 13, 132 WWCISTU U'l.\ r-ATI % %  flH •I 100.000 prrUlorv Ike Kt HM Wln-.l.n ( hun h in. Newoneani t'n.l.tli Ihr holders, retained the Foalbjll Assorl.tlli'ii t liilUri;;. Cap In In.I r. Ar>.'i .1 In loal In nil tn Ihr ill Wembley Midi UBI. lind equalled Ihr record of Blarkhum Rov. era ot bl >wr\ •(" by winning Ihr Ir.ipln Ml veirs In Miinslan. "Soccer" In B'doe And In England iU SI \MM I 1NNKV %  just finished, as hat that In Bar%  :I I % %  ronrtiin %  %  %  iiii In this they have id .a though thev hnv ('up. they I a treat to watch. The ball ihe halt he ground, and • %  not (ravelling more bu iitj clocfc%  i f.>rward Past Hold Present To Draw In Cricket Match t tin John Goddard an Old %  ..day held the Present Boj fixture at the Lodge School grounds. %  I five wickets and declared at tea. On resumption the Present i 'i by cinw of play The wicket mi a pwfMt one frith a enod peo but the bowlera had lit 11* further aucceai aftar Out ram had illimlaml Cava, <>ne .>( rhe opening batamen for the %  •p.-iM team for o. ^_^_____ Vtienn Then Allc\ne " a —%  ^„^_—^—_—-^—^ uaiinaenua innings that combined Irlvi through the (i some loftv l.< would n" 1 earn ii uaej %  \ ..Hi.il .(III ^Baaaaat ^H Skipper John Goddard obliged ^K u th free bin nevertheleni pur^^^^ I pwful innings of 4f. before he ^F>/" out well caught hv Murray the bowling of Johnson. Murr took a running catch "ft a skier backward of mid-on when Iklppei Qoddard mif tuned what was obviously intended tn be p %  verfut stroke. li:\\IS M'K IOI S Olll.11 in Barbados art > role lo that of from En* U He interchain 1 'he English player i %  %  rward line. r.tnhalf pitch T In two minds whether m leave con trni. the phi] • ire of I keep th • 1-aii on real and Irue ploce fm plB! constructive fOCM %  < %  D The LIMN. ful m the Knockout Compttil i ,oi.< to take the centre wan iniarkabbF defer, but em -have a pared tn English Soccer players. ere not keen enough t" rhelr rootball is beautiful to %  *avc %  rtoh, and cannot fail to bring ive neon the twe %  I i aUonad, irhen i •< %  il teams in ii,i thi honour! are Just team i .en n tha FA Cup, which u equrvaleni to Newcastle just managed to get ti„. Barbadn Kneehaul I % %  % % %  % %  i naaa n the BUS He, lion. Every professional team if the reaaon being Unit cup tie England can compete, right down i %  ill la of e sery vigorous na10 tka HUle elube. leading up 10 • ire, and sometime, skill is fortho great flnul an Ilen Il the keen rivalry for the the two teams left In compete ut > !" r of goina to Wembley to Wenbun Stadium, be' " P !" i fore a crowd if Hm on a perfect pitch with fre-m giean tiuf. New Recnrd Newcastle wen ,i oe* %  %  ated <'ni> 'or %  which en % %  %  iik.lv to stand fin ,i loni me Newcastle play in i. raal open Mn.iiai to the oldl Pgo. A uilc Wl the War under which %  playet off'iiii'. iinleee there ire two play ers iM'twit-n him uiid the unal line When the hall i. 1 1 ; !.i • a result, attacking football % %  > deti i. %  UaUKl un daCanra. umu i\*i %  brainbehind all I "l-lm n an*' : :, j. .Euard on ihe i entre f--' wo id. The nOahl i HtarfII re the w i. Ooale d plaj duller m coneequeni e When %  fresh star; %  M • H) %  uuiiii| have been "• To) i than Hotepui %  %  use the w pinn with their two inside forwards well bach to break, and i with tw.i vary eten I pUyei i on 1 Leading this %  int. ;i wned for bii peel speed and powerful %  hootbuj The plan In thi attack I f wards and the wing man I on to the boll long enough t" brte| out tha half-backs, %  Important, the ''policeman centre half", in this way creating an open paee 25 or 30 yards from S ial. The Idea then is to push bt ball into the the centre r< speed lo reach the ball before the centre half, and when he does so. the goal is at his mercy, the two full backs being well spread out under tliidereocWe plan Liffhlnini; Thrusts i-.le used this method consistently with aueei %  I. noaewuU defence of most %  th.m success in the Ct la:t two sc_: i The other team doe. ., '... %  Hot %  : %  team U thea team. The main plan ••( then attack Is for the wing man. Inafda forward, nnd half-hark, to work -, %  loejathei and than vlth very close pasting from man To m.m to pull the Opposing defence OVA Of DOSPORTS WINDOW %  ,.11.11 Higa leheal III play Fortress a return aaakatball mirh tonight at id.\ H.P.C. The nthrr iiutrh for twilight at Hie I'Kkwick-llJrllon tiillege Mati'h. While Modern High Bcewrel haae oaf ret rorrd uin. rurlraaa have ieeted ,1. two I ullrir drfrsled I'li'kulek it: Ihelr llrsl mat. Ii .mil now thai the I'lrkwlek learn are llltrr. i* will be inlerrslnit MCIIIC how Ihey Hill be* Hani Oauage in thai iflurn WEATHER REPORT VEHTERDAY Hal n fall from Cod ri met on Nil. Total Rainfall for Month lo Date: 1.80 in*. Highest Temp: HQ.& *F laWMl Temp: 77.0 F. Wind Velocity 15 mllss Pr hour. Rarometor (0 a.m.) •Jf.OW i I am ) 29.921 TODAY Benrlae: Md a.ai. B.19 p.m. Moon. full. June 8 I-ighUiif 7.O0 p.iu High Tldr. 7 Mi mr MB THEO ALLEYNE who tor scored with 86 for the Old Boys Warwick Suffer Fifth Defeat rootball, tha F.A. Cup. %  h and speed and Otini gains Ihem success ID, while Tottenham's %  h.dl merits Un i success in League piny. Griffith's XI Beat Stingo C.C. A LAROI erowd of about 600" Kleven, captained by Ol I h defeat Stingo ( < %  al BttOJO, St John, on Sunday last. The game was begun n Sunday, Ju, l, and was con-d iintiW iHn 4 p.m. wh .i.! go I It 'i d nil: arlfBth'l XI 105 and IHl foi [| Ul Mini ol |he name was Dennis h0 %  COWd 123 not out in Griffith'* XI M'lvmd innmir too* : keti loi 81 runs in tht mat.h In the Aral innings he had fcoirt M *n" ln four ll ••FTon %  %  IX)NDON. June 12 CountJrv champions Whrwick suffered their tlfth defeat of tin season at Birmingham where Lancashire requited only two davs i. ,in innings victory. Jack w. % %  > %  Ikm took his overnight score of 7H y'""" not out lo 118 and Lancashire t/ukM I first Innings lead ol 171 Wei i h k bhf Hapaed b ly in the second innings an*l were nil out for 127. Bad ti*rt %  troustj Thre.arlekete fell o ur bails of (hmedium >aeed outswingers of Ilarol' 'irmcr Murray was snipped up n tlie slip hv < .truck m nronl and way adjudged IbW ind although Welch Rot himir out of the way of a hat trick •i he too. was bowled next ball "for a "duck". However, Moute ind Ketrer. PO youngsters srlttl lORia free brokee and goKi timing topped the r "' batore stoute went I b.w. to Meadlev for a most useful Ileifer was later eatlgM I" Farmer off (;-idarri for the loj core of 43. Tanner WH ntrt spe-tneular but tm made a stubborn 3R at number •I ind when stumps were drawn :.,v Goddard. a young lef bandar ." then delighting tht crowd ertth s.nne hoc defensive stroke piny to save Uie game. Me | rr-ed out his bat for U runs Scores -PAST' T W AttaMM n-l" M s HMdlev %  Qtant I. wuior • ii Qttddid %  ; %  J-ho"" 1 Dr R a. aklnnri not oul w A rtimr i> Morrv ^ Il I. Miuun noi "• CXtTM If you have discomfort 8116" Calirig . • ,hen its more than l.kcl> mat the acid balance of ynui Uocnach toagaat Oxer aculit' Caaajai heartburn, ilatulcnct^and indigestion. Put things nghl j. quick as you can with 'Doha'. Doha s*ifll> reaches all the surfaces of the uomach ...ill with its gentle, neutralizing action. Dolsa 1 isioutt •ICItTIM - % %  %  MaAabnaMawraS i.nir.1 di-miBilvi. win Uw %  InJiKi-Mi-m lh nUA (CdaU nrrl l>w M< TTRAM 1? Totsl kilto British Ten n is On Trial LONDON. ON JUNE 13 AND 14 British tennis will be on trial. At Bologna, the men tackle Italy in the third round of the L/avis Cup. Ihe women stay at home to meet the United Stabaa in the Wight man Cup. Neither of these mate-he.may result in a British victory, but they will give an indication M lo the extant ot the progress made by the younger players. The h promisAigntnum Cup. if Ihey win ii in| youngsters a Koge, Becked Will be U* % %  ipaet sinc^ and Susan Partridge, who will LMVtd beat Goiiain both be playing In these aventa, Truly the Americans are giants. has created a new wave of i,pUSince the event area InatttUtad in niism amongst enthusiasts in this itf2J the) have won the tro P :i> on country. Th-re are hopes thai the 19 r the 23 occasions. %  OWI IN'. I line is not too far distant v. hen A w and American mononty m the s international field, j The second week-end U) June i will show ho' is lustifled. HiM Another two-day vietol | <,ecureuitof .till without a win. Worcwiei shire's .-nptaln Bird md Ms Sj"* liilirst fcore of the season bcfon, ; i..i.i, ,'.... I : il DftH fl'l o T.l %  il Bomereti fared badly against J.-hi.-. ihe p.ic<>-l>uwlliiK of Perks Ud nflcr following on 221 behind. -,., wen tlii Daant t e Danarm recent rapid improvement ooweee r it seems 11 it will be left to the old lirm of Moltram ai to carry the flag for Britain, in Orm ways this is unfnrtunalc la.ker Is a player of n-al prom%  1.1. In..-id Worcestershire beat Somerset i an Inning! and M runs, Worrestei hire 868 'or 9 deelan d |Urd laB H.i/ell S for 82. &OOMTfrODI el 111 and 167, Jenklni for m 22 years since England •i victory, art* it-3ii side won 4—S. In the fu.luwmg years until 11*39. when the war caused thtfar this optimism event to be suspended, America used to win by a margin of four matches to three or live to two. Since the resumption in 1946 however her puperlorlty has been %  niy inaiked. six years England hus gained two successes in 42 mal One of those was last year ho. with the correct handwhon Jr *'" Ouertlcr. who f 111 I could reach world class. He %  *"• >il ""'is V s,,. .w.ated I Shirley Kiy. playing against men of greater Mrenytheiied • fiance, The American team is likely lint he is only likely to -it "iigthened by the return w chance 1 to play in tin Loukn Brough, arhuiei of 1 if the Issue has been % %  %  leven Wimbledon llthn since she i arej or ih,. oCher after the am Bret played there la i4fl. Last I ihii. ur four inalrhes. If \f-.-. (fared rTern 'emus 1 goes the full di-'tanie. his ant Ibow and was consequently not ace will be limited to enat her best, and was dropped hlbition games. hn M M f") l l Y '!!" l f'" V T „, Sh to " "-covered, and ^L^^, 1 ;.. !" i V. SJ5 %  dcl-rm,nr,i lo win bark her ...dr onrlv twenties. As a result j ^ ARTHUR WINT, Olympic 400 c f Hie far .illhleil poUejpui.ued T En „|„. J !" d „ „ .„„| AAA hall-mile by h o Italian autK-n.,.In .. "''' ,'"'L S "' 1 ',? !" ", ,, %  ".[,' .hamplon, has pulled a musrli,. nouuraBlnK ,outh Ihag l'mr Fred Wr?T 1,'' I .I,ir,h training, and will not run ,„ V1 ..|lrnt fount i>l--v t -r. "" " "' Frc '',''"> ^ !" r ln competitions for two week.. >u h „ suo Gurdlm Q "..'^ pr, .'.". clc !" y :..5 l ".A n l^_The injury is not serious, outju, anlt F(olando l1pt |u.|] t \\ inl Pulls Muscle ._. but no I, ..ht hearing the Olympic QanMi mind, Wint is not taking any L: Deashlrg heat Wavwkkahln and 49 runs, Lanca3S8. Ikiu 118 Warwickshire .(12 In the Yorkshire vs. (iloucciei;.hue match Yorkshire made 4(Hi tor 7 declared. Gloucester 232 and IHI for 5 In the Oxford University vs Kent match Knt made 243 and >', for 4; Oxford 223. WHAT'S ON TODAY Mobile Ola c in a. Summrrvilr 8t. Philip 7.30 p.m. Police Bund at Charity Con cert. Queen's College 8.00 The form there young Italian The injury prevented him ,,layers have shown tins season. .skating Polytechnic Har3 MggaaUi lliut Britain's intens* Davis Cup may end at Bologna. Cwanty-one year-old Qea unl h Ud. gangling ytmth. ha 'tram this year, in the n .cut French Championships His performance at Wimbledon %  rear when he beat Q 11 %  Mollny Ihe American BCg who w is much fancied for the title, stamped Gardini as %  player of the highest class. If the struggle that Britain's men lam is stiff, the task before the women II monumental. They will meet one of the strongest teams that has ever represented America In the in thrlr matc,h with Lond Universitv last Thursday. E. McDonald Bailey was also absent fr<4i the team, as he felt un, t.. run so soon after returnRI ihe United Sta tes Ife Did It with Louise Brough, Maureen Connolly. Doris Hart. Shirley Fry and Pat Todd. holds thi '%  and the British girl< will do well to improve on 1. | one victory. SYDNEY; An Old-age pensioner M J. M. Michel of s Western Austrahi has sent a tm t2D to a Melbourne I || ,| [Or treatment he had ihere m 1899. He > Ing to pay for 63 years. 1 ut did not get the chance NOW |ve -aved the mum \ from my I SAY! THINK OF .THE PRICE Till-' BARBADOS .AQUATIC CL1 II (Ixieal A Visiting Member* only) SATt HDAV. JUNE 14TII AT 8.30 P.M. CLIFTON TROlTi: will entertain with The Miser Bream Human Hen Ihe Fakirs Rope Trlrk Electric Chair (Urion Mind Reading Act Hypnotism, Etc. Etc. Tilt: I'.u hm BROS. Indian Stunt Kings and Boneless Wonders Etc.. Etc. Also DANCING b> .ul.he.in Troubadours Ir.ini 10.30 inn ADMISSION To Entertainment & Dance 2/11.6.52.—3n, A WORSTED SUIT $65.00 ONLY AT P. C S. MAFFEI & CO.. LTD. •TOP SCORERS IN TAILORING' GIFTS 1 or Meddlius, Annlvenurie* Itirthday*. ChriilenUigs, ate. m ufOND KIN;S GOLD A SILVER JEWEL! S-BiY (tea rear lewellara . Y. De LIMA A fO.. LTO. 20 BROAD ST. and al MAKIN't: (;\ll!iivs .*..'.*.'.'.'.-.-.-.-,'. '^".'X.*.*^.'.','.', WHY WAIT ONE WEEK lo gel a SUIT Furnished w hen you can come riijht into Ihe IDEAL STORK and cl ;i line Sl'lT in one hour in our RF.ADYMADF. DEPARTMENT We guarantee you a Perfect Fit the IDEAL WAY TWEED SUITS $53.88 & SBS.54 TWEED SPORTS COAT MJI PURE LAMBS' WOOL SPORTS COAT 1,1.65 PURE l. M! MMil si PANTS 29.01 Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10, il. 12 & 13 Broad Street II t9 r*g sai/tplff iVMN SVearA— CatlTTALL STEFX SLIDING FOLDING DOORS The Ideal Door for Verandahs The Whole Door slides and folds to one side. Supplied in two Sizes . With 4 leave* — 6' i" wide < V V high With 6 leaves — 9' 3" wide 7' 2" hlsta CK1TTALL FRENCH DOORS V S" wide X T " high (RITTALL STEEL WINDOWS Various widths and hrighls wllh v without VfviUlators. THE MODERN WINDOW FOR THE MODERN HOME WILKINSON & HAiNES CO., LTD. Austin Reed Van II. IIMII. Consulate Flile Aertex SHIRTS In complement your RICE TAILORED Tropical, Irish Linen and Moygaahel Suits — a wardrobe of competitive prices C It. Ricv If Co. •• H.M.. Ul



PAGE 1

PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FKIDAT. JVNE 11. iaa CLASSIFIED ADS. !" H lM SALKS TELEPHONE 2501 DBD r.Riiiii.i dance 11 %  i 11'U v.. .i eel William tu*.Til i. Foreman at M/S D M v.-i AC*' The fun Iwtii rue late tnHmfi at 4 r>rle*k .,. %  -, Bjiiirlw .Wu*.' ViiHfnt arw Martin ifUni Millwcnl Thornhill blanche I.hd Lwif Pie tVd Joan GnlRtli ruBhtrri> IJ • SB—In IOII IIIM For tul. r sits ANN Ol St 'EMEKTS EARN lllu MU.MV r FUSION in your -p. aupply of form. l->-d.v ,,. RBMV 4 • M—lOn WANTED HELP FOR KALE AUTOMOTIVE CAK-U*. S*r DtliUI Flrat-clara i.ngltien and ..* r.ar-u,. .en. HMO ~ iieu REAL ESTATE HOOIB One Board A Shingle nn i* i Ti"i cu d viol IBV %  w rtectMd ulu.ird at llarrlnon'i Plant Yard. 81 Lur> Apply to C Wart. ilro-nefleld Plant SI Locj 11 • t* Jr. PUBLIC NOTICES NOTICE AMUIAKT TtA< HUM NOTHI A,I • — in.1,1 and fialiar Teacher. la h p in awl %  % %  -rhtn* order Five Boorl l>rei only anno Tf.OBO mllei Apply N F. CarMn IMU CD Dry Ooodi > SI l*..rntc Gap. Chrlit Churrh ion tha Se.i .landing on V It.. #J Bj I'm r I I .. .1 The houar ) %  bulll of rtOn* and at preient divided Into two flat. Each Hal %  onl-iM diluting „, a air.mg ram and Hkhmrltf d-wnalalri. 1 bedrriomi with running water upetalr* Ulual convegarage in yard Servant! iiin Inapectrea a. j|>p..inii.,at Share. Berbadoa Dtillllerlee Ud IBB Share* Central Foundry Ltd %  arbodoa Redlrtuelo'i InELECTRICAL I MBJ I|M rr*i L *, ii iBeat *i .. W .ii. tii B l..r. BeOctrtD. l.c-ellenl Condlir guarantee Call ire Lid ft MM l-rala. COTTLS, CATFOBO f. CO MM t< %  .11 II S*-*n FlHARES-JOo SI Briar** Wax tndi n.nt, HaMnrry. priced lo .laid S"*-. In lrr.it ilau Income tax* Phone Mi Wabfa 17M II .SS-tr ENGLAND'S PRiNCESS NOW A QUEEi SHIPPING NOTICES ::• i, NOTICE itJBaV AI11JCATIONS lor on* %  H-ant *t lailllpl lanabla it th Comawmtr. SCIMOI. am racalvad kry tha undanldiyad nol t IMT tha Mandi. llh JUT.C. IBU Candldalaa aSUpt ba %  llanad % %  MH • oi Par ld hl—Bf B I i. i ll<* i .n IBS year, nor mon* old on the lit BVptamBV. I I ba Torvaidad Parochial Traaauiar'i OflVa p i w %  conT Clark lo tha Va.tr> SI. Phlllt rXrritlFNCED NlTflsr and danrral Sarvani Applv bafoia V a.m or aflrrr 5 p m Mr Vnal (li-ddard. Paynm %  BV, > IrMBHM 11IBU3n MISCELLANEOUS CHOOST VOl'R OVM l'Hi*iHAMMI> rail Cooal by Carafut rVw K c a Advorata IllO-ft TWENTY-PI VIC DOIJ^RS axua n..n„ from HadlflMalon for J M3 1U POCKFT MONEY t—Ay .-..na.l by rerummarMllnf 71 new lurtx-iibai. tc fUDtrrVRIuN ii orta month II U—10n %  I BO raih for PUrilltiiV WAN1 I rdtaa .. ,.i Clcr • rwpnlarixand OillArla I.IVESTOCTK OOAT*—Thrw OoU — all fra.h rri .Hk Apph Wcntrwrhaad, fniMiibaKa lit .11-ln POULTRY STONF. WALL 1>*H.U.N(. HOUSB %  a wlrad for • %  „ ,ppl-atl'. U balwaan lha houra or 11 %  m ana %  p m Tb abova dwelling hour* will ba atl %  IP for aal* by public lompatmon at our nmca, J.ma. 8lraat. .KI Friday rih Jun • %  I p m YKAHWOOD A BOYCE NOTICE ni iiinuiN mi' TIII vi.ni m mr. FAUBH HI SAINT Mil MA1I. r--u uriBMia having baan nocnlnata.'. for tha Vamtry of Saml MKnaal, %  Poll Irar lha auction of ONE will ba taken i tha Parochial nulldlne., Cumberland Mreet. Bridget own. on Monday neat the Itth inalanl beflniung l) i tw B W Ihe houra of I and • o'clock In th* morning %  ..I cloilng al 4 a rn. The following POLLINQ STATrOfln have been provided under Ihe pro via... of the Ballot Art 1MI .. I rolXINti STATION Tha FIKHT FliOOR o* Ihe Parochial lui'dlng* la allotted lo voter* whoae uIBBMi begin with lha letlera "A" lo I Mtjfe inrlualvei and the hereto Will be by wav of lha ha Churchwarden'! Office B 1 POLLINQ BTATION The (illilUND FLOOR of the Parohial Buildingi n alkillad to votera -.lioee lurnamea begin ilh (ha lelten J' to Z* iboih inclutivei and the nlrance thereto will be ihrough 'lateway Nlualed at thr Southern End he building F J COUL. ShertS A Returning IH-CKS KlIAKk CAMPBELLO: One t K".li Campbtllo I >utka t moeitne old Magtuix % %  • i jylng etraln g>4 00 v.. "TTrmit. na . Bl Philip II W-ln AUCTION MISCELLANEOUS I MtiNRIH TfN SALOON — aaaeagad I ba Sre Wa aie m.tnicled lo offer thla I car by Auction al lha Courtriy Oaragi | nn Friday 11th June at 1 p.m. Johr Bladon A Co Auetkmeera. St M an ItEAimROAl* Ii. .i t i JETS lor strppT.rMr.NT YnirR I^ n reconuuerHiiin: ll):m-v I Kill parllculaifrom lha KTPIrrirsn>N office II fct-ISn LOVF A I OI Ml CAKE A I1IHCCIT MAKEH.S l.lmltad ii.tiiiniv being wild it hail prtca *'. I My Oaraga Victoria Btraryt II t &S-en SILVER PRj^CI L-otona.lFlntfeT U.II be r I Ad %  r Co 1 HI returnlncl II | %  | WHO PftOEMICTB-We have In ilocn. j Fill Bpcavi. Fill In %  >• qr> Dearal N.ilol in pint.. MlaM I I or A SO*. PMroleum Jelly. Hnnd> : lloniahold Wl i CO LTD Agettta TRTKETS Reric. HM dlio, TI %  •. JJ—I*4fl lo IMS. II .1 i %  ^:^^ BMI, — I eTBatS l'-l P CIRCULAR i ckad In handy I-Dor rartona A proicl of National Biawrrle* Ltd of Piontenac Beer lime For parUculara M JONES A Co LTD Tal 1 11 I M -4n riAMr> Your ehiid'. dr-."i c,m,- llroadwood upright. tropical autlful condition Ihir ..ving colony Wrlle P O. Boa l or •none 2l?I )• I SB— Tn %  tloura T* a yard THAN! 11KUS. II t U —In y.berrlbe new to the Dally TalegraBh 'idinf D.tly Newapapar no" %  inir tn Barbadoa by Air only a few rafter publication In londcn Con'. June 16th. 1952 at the Parochial Building. Cumberland Street. oppoBlIt bl mm between ihe 11ours of 8.00 n.m. und 4 p.m. Die to the large increase In the number iif Volets. 1 find It 1m. possible to visit you personally, and I therefore have had to adopt Iliis BlBtbod rf ji':iiung you. I am therefore appealing to my fellow K..t.M.;w>(o ,i',ti-nd Bl the Parochial Building, Cumberland Street, on Monda> rMxL June 16th, 1952 between the hours of 8.00 a.m. and 4.00 p.m. and place your X Opposite the name of J. O. Tl'DOK In Ihe IDttrBBl Of yuvtrself and ihe Parish as whole. Vote TUDOR U nd you will have no regrets. Yours ft r Service, J. O. TUDOR 12.6.52—411 FURNITURE for Home & Office ul \IIIIII\ '..mini ITICBS NEW AT Renawcd Wardrobes. %  Drawcn. B*d-tead. l.facl to li.at wide. Spring.. LainWairnland. SB up Nigh'rh.ir.. Tow.l S'loa A llat1 \IILEk (or Dining. Kitrh • r A Panr-v Vtr China Bedroom AKitchen CBBMBtB, I.ndart DRAW' MTtlRE %  DESKS witi> flat of .taping tope. PIANO"! Banle—Pram n-Cart Maul and Wardioba. Tti • n -I-. T>P MrlbM Kinie, H.nk MM. Klian.all A V.ir I.,.-n.i. SJ am St on L.S.WILSON T.NrflED FRUITS:Pawn. PVachea. apei. Oaiivu., Frull S-lml A Plnrap. • Slice. Large A Small W M Ford, Btrevt, mm 34S U licit |PFARA .mall quantity 0 be bought at lie S TUDOR A Co FRIDAY, i -l II AT I P M Ml.' KNEAUNF.Y S (iAHAGE VAI'X HALL SaVXAN CAR IN OOOD WOlfKOK MIIUBH II II P B. AIM MIS McKfN/ll: s s a 4n >rjrjo 'issT-i HJBJ M.,1, damaged In aecider .ire tnetructed to offer IhU car 1 lion at MeEncamey'i Gange on 12th June at 1 SB p m John M | .11. tm n n il BY InMructlona received I will sail at corner of lakei FMlv and i_n ..„ MONDAY llth from II I." ea. Upright Chalre. Tub and lug Chain. Booh Ceee all In MahogBllf Dining and other Table., Waggon, lard-ra folding arreen. beditrad. and Miltnrea Kllchenware, earthenware and glaaiware. I burner oil Move EarctrH hot plate. Singer Machine. TOaiter. K-i*. Weetlnghouie Befrlgarntor. Congoleum carpets — and a tot of Frer,ch BJtUl J ll 'INDER THE IVORY HAMMER T.H..I Caah VKicant Qiiajuri. AUiUinPICTUIIO DURING HfR tKINT trip to Canada and the U. S.. PrincesKli/ubt'lh is shown in a regal pose (left) during a state function. A right, the Princess appears In a swer mood at an informal affair Lodge Gives Goddard Its Top Honour ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. SAfUNO FROM |1'ROPB i x noNAntE, isth Jtaae, laH. : N STTMTOH, STlb June. IBU I t Mr sTIA. 4th July, IBM • AIUKO TO RUBOPB W ii.ijai!*T.M>. Ulh June. IBM AlllM. ro TRINIDAD PABAMABUBO AND RJUTISM I.I IAN \ f S Neator. lIUi June, IMS I S BONAIRE. SSth June, ISM I S STaMTUtl. llth July. ISM HAILINU TO TRINIDAD AMD CVKACAO > | IIEfiTTA Slat July, IBU. P Ml'SSOH. SON CO.. LTD BatBSJBl -W/,','.V.V,VAV//aVaW The M V %  CAHll!l"EE erUl accept Cargo and Bwaaengen for Draraaeica, Antigua. Montaerrat. Navn and Si. Kittr Sallm Friday SMh Jeate •ntm is.v >ccept targo and OorrunMa. Antigua, Manlaerral. Nevti and S4 Kltti. Sailing Frtday USk in.t Tn* M V "CACIQUE DEL CARIBE" will accept Cargo and P aali r aBi r a for Bt. Lucia. St Vincent. Grenada, and Aruba. Sailing Tuaadav ITUi inat. Ill atBouvss uwMir ASaOCIATtON iDfCl Ceaalgmaa — T.U Ne. IBal Canadian National Steamships II I 13—4Vl NOTICK iiMVF-H WEBUEV-J/MBB hereto. ( .it aomellmei called and nown by the i.ame of Oliver Jamea of the pariah of saint Michael in thla laiand. Medrcai I'racliLuner.. hereby give p'ii that on the Third day of June 1MB I lorrnally and abtolutely renounced re. i i ii.iihro and abandoned the uae ol my MM aurruune of -OUver' and then .•-limed and adopted and determined Ihaiirefortb on all arcane->• whataoevi to uie and aubarrlbe Die name i Wr>lr<-Jamaa in.tead of Ihe aa Poll dated die Third day of June IB only eaaculed and .fleetad and ..l in ih>Rcgi.tration Office I,land on Ihe El-' Mali I formally and. abaotulelv %  d and abandBnad th* aald BUI "Jamea" and declared that I had aa i .nn.il and adoptrd and inti nded Ihenc* f.,rtli upon al) orcaalon. wh-UoeVar In — -.-. *ubecrlbe Ihe name of "WeaJe: initead ol "Jaini and "i aa IIIKH in.i.nfl.r c-.ltd %  ..( "Vlth laol J me. IW OLIVER WlSLXY-JAMEaV Ulc OI..VEH JAMES 13 I M—n ba .. ra %  'i time* IheieafU crlbel by ihe 1,ill ll ADO* NOTICE IN THE IT COURT OF API I.Mbarebv given thai FlIS%  oMCll rc-ldltm a1 Dap. SJ.HH Michael, dird al ISUBBBSl ^^ *. %  '"I aH ,. | ....... % %  been paid ahov. AUVERTISING PAYS KtST UNOFR TIIF SILVER HAMMER Anhwav HOUBV' Navy Oar which Incladei ice Oval Dining Table. Anll<|ui Bureau. Upright and Coffee and Ornam MorrM Kna-Chtui, Btel t i and China, Carpet Riup. Phillip" R-idm H-i.-l AiitomaUc Rcord Chanuc I'rrfact condlimn Rinsle < in. -.pritiga -ivrt Deep Blaap Mallreaac. Very good Mnhog Prcairfi. MajMI DOBraMBB DlBMlrl| Tubli Cedar Pre-a, Single Iron liad.taad. iv .m painU'd CTk-at of Drawer* and lea CB BBt Ilippungill 1 Burner Pit Stove anal Oven, Kitchen Cantnrt. 1 Utimer Oeetric Stove. Eire B>lt.a l-idar. Kitchen Uten.Hn. Table* and ireni other it.'i.. I Sale II SO o'clock TERMS CASH I i \NKI K TROTH AN A CO.. AueUaneer* MA. tba dapendenli named FlU-Ooeald Jackaoi are h-relx i'"n-' A.tl.lant Cuurt ofI AP ",.. %  :', %  ';'" %  lli'LVu BeF O TA1AIA. Clerk. Aaatnanl < nun of Appeal Ag. SI 1 GOVERNMENT NOTICE Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) i Amendment) Older, IBS2. No. 20 which will be published In the Official GaWtt* of Thursday 12th June. 1M2 2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail sellinK r.ices of "Butter—Table" are as follows:— I'uUer-Tsble: in Tins (Canadian Maple l-'i.f'l M,tier-Table: (Canadian lu Prints 'Olive" 1 WHOLESALE PRICE (not more than) SU2.20 per case of 100 lbs. In 1-lb. tins $49.79 per case of 72 x f lb. tin B|H Bs in l-lb, tB8.20 per 100 lbs. print-. $144 20 per case 100 Ihs. In 1-lb. ptaMl *i;n %  pr c too lbs. In print* Bt Of 1-lb RETAIL PRICE (not more thanl $1 00 per lb tin 7&c per I lb tin 90c per print $1.&S per 1 print $1.30 per print ORIENTAL PALACE HlLADtw BARTERS iTOR HOUVENlKH r-ROM INDIA, CHINA J CEYLON THAN.$ v/,Vay/;v/'-'*'.v*v-'/'w>'/: Bell Answers 1 Queries For Civil Service m From Pace 5. law in such matters as whethei thev should join Trade Unions or not. His own view was that theie should be voluntary decisions and he could hope, in Lict. tl. j Civil Servants should form their organisation for Civil Servants. As to wh-fher Civil Se-vants any -,iecial potiUon. he said 'hat they w-ere. The very basis of Trade Union action outside the Civil Service was to withdraw labour If tha employer was not to be persua*ltd. Was the Civil Servant then to be denied that right to struggle" The position in Britain was that %  now no law curbing the right of th* Civil Servant outside Hie Police, though In practice tho right was scarcely theirs. So there had to be some final means of arriving at the settling of disputes 1 %  ctween Civil Servants and Government; and thus arose the Importance of arbitration as there had to be a tribune—an nnii.ntial tribune which would mean that t.ever could the word of the Government be entirely the last word Bo, he said arbitration and the Whit ley system. Difference* On the last question—co-operation with outside orgwilsaUotrs— he said that H was true there were •OaM differences. He said that groups usually preferred to t.-I. 'HIT Th. differences %  irOrfO in the developrnen' >eparate organisations. It was of course Eecentuated %  I by a feeling of anUiit|Bm when the one class felt — bf • from page I i.ting and downright light that id characterised Australian cric%  : from Uie time the game be'ii to be developed in Australia •id referred to Ihe fact that the LBM need not blame Goddard fM the defeat of the West Indies against such opposition seeing that England, whom the West Indies had defeated had rot won the "Ashes" In their series of TetrU with Australia since 1934. The most competent critics had had nothing but praise for the 0Xc*UtnM of Goddard'* leaderitlip throughout and he counselled MB* boys to emulate GoddnrdS e-r^rnple and make themselves by dm* of hard work, application and practice, cricketers who might not onlv bring fame and glory to (he Ixaige School but to Barbados and the West Indies as a wrioic John (ioddard had done. Not In the furseeable future e> lij h,iniagme any lender who uld remotely challenge their Te^t team hero us a possible leader John Goddard. Mr. Kidney, tha icxt speaker, said, was an old itager to him. He knew his qualirit and determination itid could testify to the fact that Cxtdard had always played the the right spirit and for tl % %  wood of the game as well. r Kidney reminded the boys 'I.it theirs wag a great heritage ilch had been handed down to them by Old Lodge boys with hum he had played. He recalled Tnrtlton and Percy Ooodvhom he considered worthy of taking their place nterniitlonal cricket team hi the world. Nothing could be accomplished u shout determination and a doggt d spirit whether it be in the schoolroom or on the Held of play. ile was glad that Ihcy had not withdrawn from the First Divia... competition because he had always fought for the prbMhlll that the schools should play In the] First Division cnmi*>tition nd get the feeling of plajrhaf iipnlnst better competition. 1 lie Lodge School were good losers. They had been losing for long tune but every now and iiK-nn they produced a good one. Hon. Dr. Massiah. before mak; the presentation said that %  v.very pleased on behalf t>( the Old Boys' Association and to of the Governing Body of ho School to make the presentaAny institution whose boys >ild go out into the world and n the field of human endeavour ichieve such success as Mr. John ioddard hat done should be justly proud. There were many walks of life In which boys of that School In UVfUr lifetime had achieved such iiistinctlon as had further enhanced the glory both of that Srhooi and of the island as well. He hoped that all the boys caihered there that day wou.d t Ju tn their hearts and use as .in example for atl their future v. oik and life, what had been .lone by Mr. John Goddard. He had brought Into play on the cricket Held all the citizenship and decency ho had learn* at that school and he was more tlian gratified that afternoon. In the cricket match he had %  en that one young Goddard, a left hander. knew how to use the ever driTB of the left banders and he was hoping that if he got tho proper coaching and would emulate his relations tenacity HI the game that he also in time would bring more credit to the school. He had great pleasure in asking Mr. Goddard to accept the shield which came from the staff and iiietnlx'is of the school I ute to him for his work and the honour which he had brought the school. Mr Goddard said that on tours he had been accustomed to preparing the batting order but that afternoon he had been put in last to bat and he had been told to swipe as it was getting late. Roy Marshall and he had toured Australia, he said, and they had often talked about their school. He had always liked Lodge and he would always < rj it in his heart. They had Just completed very pleasant afternoon's cricket and they would see from the scores that the Old Boys were improving with each game. Since he had captained Barbados in 1940. he had been away for three tours and he was glad lo say that in his absence two old Lodge boys had captained the liarbados teams in his absence. Charlie Taylor hd taken a Barbados team to British Guiana and his very good friend Wilfred Farmer had led Barbados very successfully against Jamaica and had not only brought them victory but had made such a mammoth Score that he himself in Australia did not believe it. Mr. Goddard then presented Mr. Farmer, Headmaster with > photograph of the West Indies team in Australia on behalf of Roy Marshall und himself. BOl'TBBOUND Balh> Balla tall. Arrtree Sallf ManarealNalllai Re. I.i %  a = Bdee 1 ADY NE1JION # June 11 Jur.i SO June S3 Jurat 11 Jur S3 Juno S4 June "iNADIAN CHL'lrUSB t July S Ju>* ANADIAN CONRTRL'CTUJt Bt June S Julj U July a JurLADY ROOrfaTY .. 11 July 14 Jul] IB Jul: is July SI July NOBTRBOt'ND Anrleea Balla Arrleee Aerlvee AerteoB A'Hr.. B'daa if.., St John Baoaao 1 *DY RODNEY .. IS June IB June — IT Juno SB June 1 July 1MAD1AN HALlJOfGKH IS June It July I Jur |l July \nv NELSON q JuIf t Jury It July St Jury DM CRUISER .. U July It July It Jury I* July 1 Aug C 'NAD1AN 'ONSTRUCTOR 14 July Bl July t Aug. t Aug. IS Aug. I \DY BODNTY .. 7 Aug t Aug. It Aug. 20 Aug. Tl Aug : further parUculara, apply M— GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents. '.V, -,--*,'a*a*a*a*a-* V-'a-a-.*.*-*,*a-.*,',---,-.-,----''a'.*.'**a*C"G"TRANSATLANTIQUE SalllDg* from Southampton to Guadeloupe. MarMnluae. iv i r !i .it..Trinidad. La Guaira, Curacao St Jamaica From Southampton -DE GRASSE . 4th June. 1952 "COLOMBIE" 19th June, 1952 DE GRASSE" 12th July. 1952 Arrives Barbados 16th June, 1952 2nd July, 1053 24th July. 1952 •Not calling at Guadeloupe SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE From Barbados Arrives Southampton COLOMBIE I3th July. 1952 25th July. 1952 DE GRASSE' 6th Aug., 1952 16th Aug., 1052 •DE GRASSE" 29th June. 1952 9th July. 1952 %  Sailing direct to Southampton %  '''//,'/.'.' w//^////////>WyV/////w/^#wy 1 Hank See Scope F S1.IKI .48 THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. AWIAL HOLIDAY Our CUSTOMERS and FRIENDS arc asked lo note that our WORKSHOP will be closed as from Monday, %  ftth June. 1952, to Saturday, the 28th June, 1*52, inclusive, for the purpose of granting our Workmen their ANNUAL HOLIDAY. Arrangement* have been made for emergency work lo be undertaken during this period and the receipt of repairs and delivery of completed work will be continued as usual. Our Merchandise Department and Office will be open lo business as usual. THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. While Park Road St Michael r 'WW/AV///,VW,w//.VV.V/W//W/'-' Win. FOGARTY (1MB) LTD. Box Office al Informant n Bureau. Toiler Head.iuarler* i Pin welt tu • ih, 1 12.6.52.—4n. ^ .MIST It I 'f I tl i;It 36 in. PLAIN PLASTIC in Ked. Ql.ia, "d Blue — la 67e. per yard 36 in. FIGURED PLASTIC Ha, 0c. and 7c. per yrd &f 48 in. FIGURED PLASTIC S1.3K per yard &f Wat. FOGARTY (BIHIS) LTD.



PAGE 1

I'M. I I HAKHAItOS AUVOCtTK I'RIDW JIM It USt BAFPD^A ADVOCATE Baxter Quits As Dramatic Britons lo Leave ChinaII PHOTOGRAPHS rrl.W4 kr DM A*MM C*.. LM.. ITMI SI. KII4I n* VI.KLIV RAMIR Critir SOI llll KS TO-DAY the Barbados Regiment oes lo camp at Walkers' Savannah in St Andrew. In 1951 and 1950 the Annual Camp of th.togiiMnl was held at the Garrison Headquarters. This year the Regiment is its second outdoor camp .since its Formation. Tin .i.iv.iM.i: m <'f a camp away from headquarters are apparent. At headquarBrythlng is laid on. as It were, to employ a military expression. Instead, at camp, the soldiers and officers are Riven the opportunity of experiencing military training and of improvising in the field. Barbados is a very tiny island and field %  | are therefore limited in extent, but the open country of Belleplaine and the hills near Chalky Mount offer excellent scope for exercises. Soldiers can concentrate on fieldcraft in Belleplaine in a way that would be quite impossible on the Garrison Savannah. Advancing over various types of country: the use of camouflage in open and forest land: signalling and the use of ground cover are examples ol fieldcraft which can be demonstrated and practised better In St. Andrew's co;istiands than anywhere else in Barbados. The suitability of the terrain for hand \ throwing and rifle and Bren gun tiring is also apparent. The Barbados Regiment comprises 355 %  oldiort and more than 300 will be at the camp from to-day until June 22 when the camp ends. Soldiers in peace time tend to be forgotten persons. It is difficult for the general public to sustain interest in arms when the cease fire has sounded. The fact of the Barbados Regiment's existence ought not to be surprising in an island which played so important a role in the defence of the British Caribbean during the eighteenth century But the lukewarmness of public opinion in favour of a soldiery and the natural reaction against a military establishment in times of peace have not prevented the Barbados Regiment from growing to its present strength. The tradition of the British Army still lives in Barbados. To-day's camp at Walkers' Savannah is a reminder that this island still possesses a regiment of soldiers. iim wh')5c mltttarp training anil experience this island must rely in the event of any emergency. A small well trained regiment "f soldiers is all that is required in time of peace. But should the services of a large number of soldiers ever again be required for the defence of any of the British Caribbean territories the Barbados Regiment will provide a ready nucleus for their training. The announcement made earlier this year that the Imperial Government was reserving funds for the re-formation of the West India Regiment has aroused hopes that recruits for Imperial Forces can be supplied through the Barbados Regiment. When a South Caribbean Battalion is formed in Trinidad the Barbados Regiment will become an integral part of this battalion and its officers will be eligible for Queen's Commissions. It seems that the perseverance and devotion to dUty of officers, warrant officers and men of the Barbados Regiment, as exemplified by the large attendance at this year's annual camp will soon be rewarded when greater recognition of the role to be played by locally recruited soldiers in maintaining imperial defences is paid by re-formation of the West Indian Regiment. When the West Indian Regiment has bom reformed the Barbados Regiment may expect to employ a greater permanent cadre than nineteen. Meanwhile the Regiment has to depend on the co-operation of employers and goodwill of soldiers .for a large attendance at its annual camp when the most intensive military training Of the year is carried on The size of this year's camp is a tribute to the co-operation of employers and soldiers and exemplifies the support which the Regiment is receiving from the government and the public. I ..• Afriru %  m iri'.i Trade* THE : iwing importance of the tourist trade to the economy of the East African territories is strikingly illustrated "by the fact that it is now estimated to be worth L 5.000.000 a year as compared with an estimated £ 500.000 in 1948. This is revealed in the fourth annual report of the General Manager of the East Africa Tourist Travel Association. In the context of balance of payments the chairman (Mr. R. de S. Stapledon) says the tourist trade last year was exi. i -led in value only by the cotton, sisal and coffee trades—and that at a time of I ire pines Report adds: "Under • I ii i. • the dram-i London \ || ori€4 SeSlv'colun^ whfch aoMafed on L k ho !" ** '" * U P' "•"•* %  *$9 *P pU>ed Shawi : . .. i i II r i it i %  pear, had comr back front the Mxlpenlh century to five voice lo England fighting for her life against a darker enemy than Elizabethan England ever knew. Then there was that incredible r !" h"l h.7'm"a.'"io"m."oid ""> *"•*' """ " ,w •"" 1 ht <" %  < Bulgaria had offered to —d by IgfUOC critic, ceane lighting for the German. those writing for and fight for the principal Ik-i.verl.rook 'The on ,he M *. nd •>> senior critics cease fighting curtail !" *\3tn7doin'T !" '" — wrtUn '•* *" d "•"' "" '1' ""*" %  f,rST ?h.^rttic^cLT!oasJc Ihi " principal new.paners. A stead. Shav. iO-yeai-ol.1 satire "" SeiTi. rUnJat^nd i2t "•' "%  quarterly ".lew •>' on Bulgaria suddenly bscarne HS^thH^S wls.nlSS *""•". high brow weekly would gel more topical than tomorrow's A o,^^.^nlnanvuihi wonder ""'y !" ck •""' "" "eesarlly newspaper We were in tears g&togrtE and Jo? h.X be. J^f' <^T" th',' ",'?" OU """"" come one why give ,t up'£%£, ^Kr/TlSi* The "ni.mtar one flmnight thT,'"uue.tTon "2 toJZ CS, £"S .re^oToniy'a p^nan !" J*a V.l. hovered over 5,. that question is that in Britain usually h.vc the name theatre going round and round In of the proressionai politician un,^ h ticket agency cnc rushed to the sides and S?.'^' U uK. h |! SS'SfJIii-.S; manager, wno eoVne so a, tfdei ood .gainst th. W.IU while the f ,Pt^L. ^S !" n7. * %  how much, if any, of a ctors being actors went on with p^o„ m TXcupa?£, "£ n,s U&^J&+*M?tk* *• %  Then m. bu bomb apan inri. M bi I >•< %  ecntral debate knowledge or interest. They will buy ticket* m bulk buzzed off ..7^* .£ S*. ...Kt^tr^f "rcord-n* to "he warmth of tho -udienee returned to 1 ?f Zi,i^£ b^,irt-[ nccption and th,-.r m judgm-nt, nd flnaUy booed th< LS* ^? l S.~t h ^ an l ,hcn -" lh U.e.r client. ? bad wrfornuince of where else, the to their seati he actors tor bad play. plu& .1 booking U<\ I must say it se*ms pretty tough Tho tradition of the writerThen Ihrre It < %  .mall group of ,0O t -n ^^ g %  !" -. „, politician has beer, long esUblishpeople who have a standing order w I !" h,n v. Wl ,* v r *'" w thc •d m Parliament here. Sheridan with the box office for every first 'neatre. if there had never been wrote plays and even m&naged the night. It seem* incredible but it *" uc n !" ia t %  ,nc printing pres*. Covent Garden Thenlre at tho ll "> %  •' Sir Louis Sterling and ,nc r had never been books of Si.me time as he was Under-!!*his wife, well in their seventies > !" rd. the theatre would be the retarv for Foreign Aflairs Gtbo fo the theatre sometimes four ontinumg historian of the eusbons wrote much of "Decline and n -hts a week if there i a glut lom "". speech of a people. The rail" in the House of Commons "f new production.. So do gW of "Wipldes In Ancienl labrarv. Uisraeli did a certain Edward Sutro and hi* wife, he Greece more truly portray th* %  BKMsDl f wnlmg UICTL. but his being a descendant of the famous character of that nation than the real heart was in politics. John Kdwardlar. dramatist. There are leuo* which harass it today. Buchnn loved to work in the others too which ought to conTo ln "urprlse of the managel.ti irj < ht'ip IMva th,. window vtOC* .myone that the British are nients the British people m^the you can sec the ancient Thames it tough breed. Finally there is war did not want tawdry things and hear the peremptory hooting a gallery First Nightem' Club i" *" e toeaire. For one thing the of tug* an they approach.tt Westwhich regularly nil* that part of 6 30 openings h.id brought a new minster Bridge. trie theatre known as the gods, public for the living drama. As I have summoned these great They arc keen critics of the drama -, have Indicated typists and men from th c mlsu merely to illubeing much given to booing or !" ' cam f, 1 d,recl r0m !h ?' r Itfaji n.y argument. Let me recheering according to their mood, offices. Soldier* on leave who peat that the writer politician is There is a bloodless war between "ad enough knockabout in action a long established figure In the %  %  critics and the gallery became to see plays by the masters Brtsssfi I*arllament. cause their verdicts are seldom ol bv ,nc novices. the same. -, .. Awkward Golden Age Admittedly it was awkward for Celebrities There was u golden age of me on occasion to attend a flrjt Finally there arc the celebrities ction developing before our night when a big debate was Ukwho have been invited by the e/" John Gielgud was reaching big place, but by ..n-magement lo give tone to Ihe m height of his powers and as and various other device?, it workaffair. Famous film stars, cele. have indicated Laurence Olivier d well enough until the Conserbrated actors who are "resting" was bringing an audacity and vfcUv.ii won lii-t year's election, peers and the raging beauties of even genius to production and Sustained by only a small majorthe moment. No wonder there is %  cling. Michael Redgrave was ilv and with an immense amount always a crowd outside to see us moving up. Ralph Richardson of contentious legislation the arrive and depart. It is part of was vitalising everything he House of Commons has become a the London circus. touched and Alec Guinness was concentration camp for the GovSometimes the audience is so discovering that high intelligence ernment's supporters. From early spectacular that the play Itself can be displayed even when afternoon and sometimes to dayhas no chance to compete. Car. Hiking memorial lines, light w r trudge through th c Lobtamly I found lhat in 1S42 when Vivien Leigh was growing in bies voting, voting, voting. When 1 produced m v own play "It stature, Sybil Thorndlke, Edilh we show some luck of enthusiasm Happened in September" at St. Evans and Lilian Brailhwuite as tho Division bells .go for lhc James' Theatre. If I ever write were proving .that maturity has I'-nth time, the Chief Whip looks another plav I shall invile only charms that youth will never ut us as Frederick the Grent UKikthe critics and let the ordinary know. Tyrone Guthrie, John ed at his Grenadiers who wrm public make up the rest of thc Fernald and a boy genius named nUi.I..iii.y preparing to make yet audience. An author does not pet r Brook were breaking all another charge against the enemy want competition 'from the stalls, rules and founding a new era of and shouted "You dogs! Do you Looking back on those ten year., production. want to live for ever?" I can begin to feel a quickening of _.„ „_ ,. , .. The U.bb>. had ruled out Ui. ^"^ tFtit XttS? P^ cSLXT^i "wrote zsr&n, iSftSe '.„„ !" ^ure-ncr^eV' a S*w2E'.' aw Iber. i.< no trouble about sitting *"."„ muSESZ, fwhn were an words. I mean precisely lhat. He ,1 out until the end of the perSJ„.„ m everybody's h,tZ?~ m word, dunce and Undoa formance. No trouble at all. *'".",'„"" Ge !" .„ '„" ri ~, A h "''*o him like a conqueror. At llrst I experienced a sense of ^Vm Punts) !" ??? .sited %l the ,hcr ""ls followed and thc pubgg. "a SSfl "? theatrical S 0 m .rnm.n, aged tin ?i', hc a!, 1 ^ 1 prC ** nU,,on of ,n,s OI .30 7m n, ii.Hl 'SrfZ'Irect be 11 and "cailigated the "vulgar" thatdodgers nrf ii ; n .. n .i..in T* rc —. .._ J _-_ . ~ _ were i premit from Iheir ofllces and irkshops an< lne wrond r,le W ^ r !" .w^ai ihe criticisms were harsh ind Hammersteln illy aolicitou of OKI^AHOMA. CARi lwr 1 1 (ni ,i w „, Sn^Cgud ^TlcJ^r^ ^3~ ttliS^'BtSU? ,hr ^-e-a'l'llpn emotion. Henry IV The cynic might observe at this 1 remember the night when ,£',;,„ point lhat they were nqually MOlivicr's Old Vic Company gave i,ICUirc lintous about the presence of thn us such an inspiring production At any rate in whal 1 have entk fraca Urn ITmes, Telegr.ipli -,f Hcnij IV that when the curWritten U tall I.<.iHii.N LatbH 1 1,1 '""'. l-.xprc M..il .out MI on. lain tell boUl ttM lUdJasMsj il %  i h.,v.put m| ,n lh, s..,t i,n th,That is true. Sweet are the uses the actors were in tears. Greataisle at a London flrsl night. 1 in the very air. Shake-hope you enjoyed the experience. ii...w-*B e As ,he war *en\ on"lhVy'Tookcd ,ne criticisms were harsh I tried of OKf^illOMA. CARlm rM ,„ l ,, v ... h „ dram a 0 x never to breal an actor's heart a %  ——if,,r The crl, 'c n>u' love his medium t6o rmrS whether it is thc theatre, the cinema, art, music or books and he must light for the eternal lues. I loved and still love the of advertisement and it was for is DSSM £300 million lost —Hongkong isolated By GUY KDEN THE ureat British merchant firms are to evacuate Red China at unce. Investments worth 11300 million—maybe more—will be lot*. Mr. Eden, the Foreign Secretary, announced plans for a withdrawal in the House of Commons. Heads of the big tlrms in consultation with the Government have come lo the conclusion that it is useless to hope for a quick improvement in the situation in which British and other foreign enterprises are beiii. blackmailed by the CommuniatsfEH Tens of thousands of pounds have Been paid by the companies in penal taxes, fines, and oppressive labour rules forcing them to pay Chinese employees whether at work or not Commercial debts owed by China to Brit ish tirms are believed lo amount to £60,000,000. This. too. will probably be lost. The Foreign Office thinks the chances of I the companies getting compensation forf their abandoned property are very small. The decision has not been made by the Government but by the Arms who have made their own plans in concert with each other. But the Government will help by safeguarding the interest** of British employees and organising the actual evacuation. After that, only a few small British traders will be left in Red China—and even they may come out soon. About 100 British men and women are involved. Before the war there were 10,000 engaged in business in China. Among other big tirms getting out are the British-American Tobacco Company, Shell, Butterlield and Swire, and Jardine. Matheson and Company. The effect of the decision on Hongkong, where there is a big British commercial colony, has been under examination by Whitehall experts. It is recognised that the withdrawal will leave Hongkong isolated, but no decision affecting the colony will be take.. for the present. The evacuation from Red China will not involve a break in diplomatic relations. Britain has a diplomatic representative in! Peking and although he has been there for many months he has not yet, been received by the Red Foreign Minister. Mr. George Mitchell, secretary and vicechairman of the China Association, which: represents British business in China, said : t "If our merchants do withdraw the Chinese! will be the principal losers. The China trade has never been more than 2 per cent. of. Britain's total trade. On the other hand.i British merchants have transacted morei than half of China's overseas business." Copies of Local Photographs Which have appeared in the A ffrom i iV*p wnpapvr Can be ordered from the . ADVOCATE STATIONERY Whatever it may be in Hardwa.e, Kitchen Supplies, Building Materials and Tools, C. S. PITCHER Ii CO. will most likely have it! The Name That Millions Kll€ h \AX HOW m VI I 1MM H TO I AMIBy i i-HK \IM IIARDCASTU. KIHST of the newspaper ..--tro.ogtTS, K. II Naylor, whose prvw-ir Sunday Express column made him the most widely read 0( them all, died yesterday. He had been ill for u long time. He was a £5 a week assistant in another astrologers office when John Gordon, on a sudden liun.i.. commissioned him lo casl a horoscope of l"rineess Margaret in the week she was born. It proved so popular thai he w. s engaged to do a regular monthly article for a year. In his in -t article he predicted dlsajta la the airship KI01. On the day the prediction was published. K101 was destroyed with most of Its crew and passengers. Naylor's mall leaped Bfjj | period to 27,000 letter a week. When ui the height of his popularity, he and John Gordon found themselves in the dock al Ihe Mansion House together on charges of 'being rogues and vagabonds" indulging in fortune telling. As they walked to the dock Gordon asked Naylor to predict the result cf the taw. Naylor replied, i each fide to pay its own costs." That wiis the result DECLINED %  •ORl) Beaverbrook's television debut has prompted brisk iin from Baa other Side of the At'.mU I hear the cameras were wailing for him— and so was a contract if he would sign It. He would not. KPSTEIN MADONNA IN a London foundry I aw Jacob Epstein's latest and perhaps my best work"-a 13ft. high Madonna and bo> It was waiting to be cast in lead. When it appears' It will surprise those who associate Epstein with such distorted statues as Adam. For this three-ton group is beautiful and natural. It shows Jesus as a sensitive, curly headed boy. His mother stands close behind him. Under a nunlike hood her eyes stare foarfully. The Madonna and Child will •ulrrn a bridge joining two Georgian house-* In London's Cvendtshsquare, occupied by the Convent of the Holy Child. SUMMER COLOURS THOUGH the Queen has made no official command, she has privately asked the Koyal Family and 'Ladics-ln-Wa#insi to wear half :'n ui -111111 until the end of the summer. This means black, grey, white, or mauve. From Norman Hartr.ell the Duchess of Kent has ordered an outfit of steel grey and black. TRITH DEAL RONALD STAPIJS, cultured, it-tute head of the publishing Urn. which bears his name, has acquired a majority shareholding la the weeklv review Truth. Truth's editor. Collln Brooks. telU me: I remain editor and chairman." Staples U one of Britain's forenu&t taxation experts. With much celebration, he .innoimod Last >t,ic tha puhUcation of a quarterly magazine. Foyer. Which had Lord Harewood. Sachcverell Sit well, and Sir Bteuan Wilson on the editorial board. II folded up after two Issues DIPLOMATIC REALTY BEAUTY and fashion thronged Buckingham Palace when ihe at l-xidon diplomats and %  Who arc the most beautiful among the diplomatic wives? My choice: Madame Manuel Bianchl, wife of the Chilean Ambassador, and Mme. Roberto de Mendoia, wife of Cuba's representative. Mme. Bianchi, mother of two sons, and of a daughter born last Maruh. was previously married to a British officer killed on D Day. Mme. de Mendoia, too, has three chUdren, lives In Mr. Churchill's former home, 28. Hyde Park Gate TOUGH FAMILY HOME, from Australia Is meal nuilti-rnillionjiire. Lord Vestey. He has the family toughness which helped create the great business empire he now heads. After Febru.ii ,o live, in* a though, normal Once centred Argent) in* a stroke In Australia last V. he was not expected Bui now at 69 he is makremarkuble recovery, of course, still far from baattti the Vosteya' wealth WM on the jsntlpas of the N( w. ******* changnid ooiidltiotaaT* Is being in a great new domain In lla and New Zealand. There the Vestcys have vast numbers of sheep and cattle — but the Australian drought has caused heavy losses. They also have great r.ieatK eking stations. In one which rd Vestey visited 18.500 lambs were killed In a day. and more than 71.000 in a week. WINE AND WATER MOST novel party of the season so far was given by Flavia, daughter of Air Chief Marshal Sir Alec Coryton. She put her guests in boats and took them on the Serpentine In Hyde Park. They took a gramophone ami all necessary party equipment, and reported this method of mixing water with the drinks a complete success.—L.E.S. Takoradi Harbour Project A full account of what is considered to be the largest British-built harbour project of recent times—a vast extension of the port of Takoradi in West Africa—has been published in London. The extension of Takoradi. the only deep water harbour of the Gold Coast for ocean going vessels, has been made in order to cope with Africa's steadily increasing trade in | cocoa, manganese, bauxite and timber, all of which are now being shipped out in vast quantities. Alterations, when finally completed, will enable -six ships to be berthed alongside the main quay instead of three, and in addition provision of anchorage accommodation for a large number of ocean-going vessels, tugs and lighters. The new timber depot, con-, sisting of four thousand feet of quay walls I 2 four-hundred feet by hundred and fifty j feet sheds for sawn timber, a new oil berth and extensive railway sidings, are also bein^ erected. The original bauxite loading berth had been dismantled and re-erected on the outer side of the lee break-water. All plant and machinery have been operated by Africans specially trained by the contractors. One of the biggest undertakings facing the consulting engineers—Messrs. Rendel, Palm er and Tritton—and the contractors—Messrs Taylor Woodrow (Africa) Ltd.—was the re-: moval of Cox's Fort Hill, a local landmark, 80 feet high and covering an area of 24 acres consisting of shale and la.erite This had U> be removed and deoosited so as to reclaim 49 acres of space from the sea for railways, yards and establishments. Other difficulties were that all cement, steel and contractor's plant had to be supplied from Great Britain which meant that, with the exception of sand, aggregate and timber, practically every item had to be ordered from United Kingdom. Spare parts for everything had to be kept in stock and skilled personnel housed on the spot to undertake repairs. Because no suitable berthing place was available in the initial stages, ships carrying cement had to be anchored in the open sea and unloaded into African canoes. The total value of the contract is estimated to b £3.000,000. q* *) O -i CASTINGS: Negro Pots— 2—3—4— 6 gall, sizes. DANISH POTS: 1—2 3 4 gall, sixes. BOX IRONS: 6'/a",-7y 8 \-*" TINNED PRYING PANS 10"—11"—IT H.M.V. RADIOGRAMS A COMPLETE RANGE OF THESE FINE RECEIVERS i t m TABLE MODEL RADIO .!!'" >; -II 111 TABLE MODEL RADIO IfMf 5-TUBE TABLE MODEL RADIOGRAM 275-* C-TI'BE FLOOR MODEL RADIOGRAM 33t.M t; i i in FLOOR MODEL RADIOGRAM (wMh Automatic Three Speed Changers) ... 51S.M LET IS DEMONSTRATE ONE OF THE ABOVE SETS AND JOIN THE HTNDREDS OE SATISFIED OWNERS. D4 (O-li ICO., LTD. Light Weight Tweeds A New Shipment of 11/12 ox. WOOLLENS in stripe design — Fawn and Blua grounds and PARSONS GREY Priced from $10.34 Da Costa & Co., Ltd FMKE HHHtS ARRIVE! NEW ARRIVALS Cheddar Cheese In (In Gouda Cheese Maeoronl Saafhettl Potatoes Onions C anadlsn Baron Sehweppes Took Water FRUIT IN TINS Grapes Guavaa Apples Pears Peaehc* AprteoU Special Relishes FOR Qt'ICK LI'NCHES in i if .II illl. BACCES Fillet Steak Italian Krtrhup hi sit.. v> A.I. Sauce Swrelbreads H.P. Sanee tre-ili Sausage* Mango Sanee M In red Steak Manto Chutney Calves Lhrer Celery Halt llaim In tins Cerebos Salt Sandwich Relish En>o> lar Finest Tastini White Pepper Wm D Black Pepper GOLD BRA Fresh Vefetab.es aad S-Vr.-OU Celery us GonnAHOs KM BEST CKOCERI SERVICE.