Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


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res ae a

a a ee

Establishment Of Unified —. saath | ee
ian M3 At Birthday
Trade Union Movement Urged | }

Parade
“TRADE UNIONISTS in Conference at Hastings:





ESTABLISHED 1895 ‘SATURDAY PRICE : FIVE CENTS,

ae











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f M t rately : 1 wade
House yesterday morning urged the establish- ; Folly Wins nee
ment of a unified trade union movement worthy to | /arnum For / aug ‘The crowd
be respected throughout the civilized world by em- inland Fund Frontenac ea: cagemeinn
ployer and government alike. : : . fy palit
It he-first hr ye : f : a THE Fund to defray the ex- } Wee}

_ it was the first publie session since the conference was penses of Ken Farnum to the up ce { The Parade, e ially wked
officially opened by His Excellency Sir Alfred Savage in|] Olympic Gamos ‘in ‘ Helsinki e by its : ,
the Legislative Co . 7 E =e 7 next month will be closed on ‘ . IX J
ee ve Council Gerieber on Wednesday, and dele Wednesday next, June 11, Gipsy Beats Mischief | ane Beaten
gates were given the opportunity to put before the confer If you have not yet con- icon te of Major ¢
ence the problems and. grievances experienced in theix | tributed yon still have a few by Be iss yacht Folly, skippered | platoons Tre eo
respective territories days to send your donation to »y Bert Toppin sailed mutifully | from the

Chairman of the Conference is from holding the viow that the the Royal Bank of Canada, Troan afternoon 6 win the ; Major R. A. St
ok ee a ee ae ue movement should he tie mene held in. Carlile “Hey — beak! aaa, Con \
,RI-T., who is acting in the developed and strengthened did | goal , 6 Moyra Blait, sec * aineak Teed fhe. commiahe Major s
pace. Mr. Francisco Aguirre,jevery thing in their power to ae Prev. Ack. a S minutes, Folly oma oa Bie W: wan. oer ese : :
eneral _ Secretary of O.R.LT.,| Strangle trade unionism. Such Frank Hall 5.00 last year, —~ a ae 1 » Parade tak , 2
Fe 7 arrived, Mr ae me attitude of the majority | y. a. w, Ferguson The race was two rounds ane | M ser W: : i 7.50 am. Five
Sia ams, C.P., C.M.G,,! of employers in Trinidad and To- T’dad Terazzo ‘onditions were quite suitable fo! nutes la! he handed
ni r. A, P. Alexander, mem-|bago, and he believed in the Expert 5.00 he Seagulls, From the fl ; | UE ee Ae eo ;
ber of the sub-committee of] other parts of the West Indies, i a ee Sou memeed’ ace ax tee 1 RT











‘ t was evide ‘ould ae Ea |
O.R.LT., and President of the} The employers seemed to feel Total $1,681 27 be ‘the vane aren roe M ‘helin, 0.8. ‘col h r |
wee 3 Waterfront Workers'|that trade unionism was their 3 Be: anc recetved: the Ger 1s

bane _ Wa ra Workers’ th ism ait and receivec mw General oSaitte
oat ‘ eee chair ate ee oer a winted SS “kippy of the Intermediate Class HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor inspects the Cadets at the Parade the Garrison on Thursday. His Excellency the Governor

On Thursday the conference| eventually ei t to take h aaa but quickly got away ftom them.| Major A. 8. Warren, O.C. cadets conducts the Governor on his tour. >) the inspection party are Col awceompanied by Lady Sav i

t at 2 o'clock j e erence | Cveniuaily want to take the man-| ° She then went on to overtike| R. T. Michelin and Lt. Col. Connell. Major Denis Vaughar AD
net a 3 Cece in the afternoon,| ager’s desk and run their busi- rie et CASOT | Dauntless, Invader, also of the arrived at 8.00 H
a after Mr. Adams had ex-| ness. Intermediate and Imp and Rain-
pressed the thanks of the Confer-| Mr. Marcano urged that there

Sor he Wee oa e : ¥ St st ° weompanied by the Moun
ence to Sir George Seel for plac.|was need for educating the woe O T dk bird o e D Class, e gave! S | ws. k » Police under the -comman: x
ing the Gantareast feont” at| ployee and empleyer” alike in pens O ay nese boat. § gaint. : fi Ia i OOC | ee : rl = ft Ser meant AD Sees Pol}
Hastings House at their disposal,|what trade unionism meant, He} a en ee bis. | Roa shee sp sali min. tr

i Ne
Sir George replied, welcoming;expressed the hope that the con-) The 1952 Cricket Scasoy «| lUdament to keep the lead. The S ttlement me through the east
ied, ‘ pe the & 952 k ason opens] nie el . ;

the delegates. Sir George ex-|ference would have a strong and/ to-day when 15 matches under the| OMY other boat which stood a

ed e ° r
vw the Savannah
e. itories | Ass vovra Blair but Movra eee j es 7 S eeeaaleeare ‘Sooke: ike eke
pressed the hope that their la-| lasting effect on the condition of|euspices of the Barbados Cricke: a oh ! Pest li Orn L z t Ex e 1 His Excellency took the R
bours and whatever organisation|the workers in these territories, Association gets unde Moyra Blair but Moyra gave 14 | i 4 cp whine ais a 7

. and then w ?
they might set up would bejand that the employers would) A new feature of this season} DUtes to the C boat. inspect the Parade. After t)



























Qni ‘ da i “ e ; _
inured to the benefits of agricul-|eventually open their eyes and, Will be the alteration in. {he eeu take’ Reeateed prey ang (From Our Own Correspondent) WASHINGTON, June 6 papers rat wheal
bare apd industry in the Carib-/co-operate with trade unionists in'award of points. The Board of] Ralph Baghill’ Poll, en tess Tha LONDON, June 6. Pesce talke to etd the stecif “s)e ag een ;
bean area, and more especially to|their efforts to better the work-| Management at a recent mecti» car 3 gill, xe . | ht +} aloe ik i ne Tate h . wa T atrtlee ee * ae The Governor then vacated the
those who took part in ; -y| ers’ situati ; i : ae ase last year, did not do excen- the close of the second day’s play in the Test here tike took on « hopeful air tod dais and the Royal Salut va
0 took part in industry] et situation, and the ultimate ‘greed to the following ally well durt the RB.Y.C..| * . a A ’ 1s three Ang a) me :
and agriculture and earned their| betterment of the situation of the Season hat out te a sand nar2|. Hngland with five wickets to fall are still 83 short of India’s f ie ey een teams t given for Her Majest ee
living thereby. employers, (a) The abolition of the per cance ig Rie + eeee Ree first innings’ total of 292. teeta eons thle ene The ee de joir
5 g aeieds “ ar x ” n “ Sy D ar D P ‘ . Mntens: : é fain “a headdress wert eroyv ed
ar aritalee ate ape M eal “ig Bove “aris tik h (b) That the award of points in, *tontenae Trophy. { It was a most satisfactory position as far as the tourists | White House Senate (loo three ‘cheer were. given. f¢
ay xs rj Miarcano said, “ y y is > é awé § in . . : ‘ ei a te
Mr, Ramouldi had presented the disease of fibensiloata Wien all matches should be: Tn gg or Gapay, and inching are concerned for the batsmen out are Hutton, Simpson : ym el a o a mocrall | Majesty the Queen s
report of O.R.I.T. was Mr. H. N,| when once allowed to spread, will 6 points for a win; 2 points {farted together. Gipsy proved May, Compton and Watkins. But the question Hazare must Sicat inner aes Aeae a There wa napine
pread, P yahoos bt that sh yh : b 1 ht that the strike of 650,001 Js His E>
Critchlow of British Guians end in destruction. Poverty for a lead on first innings;' “evond doubt that she can whip be ask himself oh saan sah ; : , | 1t that the strike 50,000 PSalute and then His
sh Guiana. etenas the oT eerie , | point for losing on firct, Mischief anytime they start to- 2e asking himiself tonight is whether the position would el workers might be settled Pretumed to the dai V
Assistance | deetrAGHBEMR CHAE trade cudeece innings; 2 points each for a. ‘ether. She finished nearlv » min- not have been even brighter had he elected to declare the Jover the week-end persuaded th }ihe Royal Salute when the Ro
He told the Chairman ‘hat they|ism on the correct lines will tie on first innings; 3 points "It? and a half ahead of Mischief, first thing this morning following the overnight rain = — ste das Se oe =e mrabontd Wee BEUR eae vd {
at the conference could assure’ bring prosperity, health and bet- each for a tir in a completed Tr ° h d The probiem confronting him C) caste, ee eee oe won't Gate Feniglts
him that they were looking for-, ter conditions, not only for work- match; 1 point each fox K e |was not easy, He had only 272 on ute s independe 0 their i
IT Ff ; : ‘ , , : es Ps Tl ames ae t %. Steelm: Assistant te are:
ward to bag T. for its assistance ers, but for employers and the a deci or Phe es aylor nig te * |the board and England's side U.S Authority ; a pee : Satin OP ES ey
in matters affecting their interest, world at large. also agreed to award 2 ° fairly bristled with batsmen—the 2s ' {
: a one don union management talk
and for that reason, he felt that | points for a first innings Will Get New Post first seven have all made an | : " cific ‘kn Trine ‘we
they should be affiliated to the) _ Intercolonial Flavour | lead even if the match” is tury in Test cricket ea In Bermuda ic tun ee De paren ¢ Trinidad Fuel
organisation. | Mr, R. Clarke (Barbados) said | eventually lost outright Prony Oilk ovat Correspongent!, His decigion was to continue to| > behal jog cP :
He said that there were some that he was very much pleased The maximum number of Th eS ema neta bat and in the circumstances he! 7 oo a Ban Lifted
a ad ass e oints at one team «ga e first Principal of ithe “ioe S > Shi
Subjects which he was most to see that they had assembled point that o team ¢ acuta Collage Pt » West Indies|¢ould not be criticised, | O osed ae pi =
particularly interested in hay- there with intercolonial flavour ee ee cee will be ra _ b> * ic CB zs wear GRA Goiblanil's: Tins teakes howl 4 Goes Werkers From, Our Own Corresy :
ing discussed. The first was and hoped that the originators of SIX points. Losing out er 5. Wu, feylor C.DRi, ee” onerote ate Soa! : Z PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 6
family allowances, then there| the meeting would make it their) ight, as well as on firs} giving up his office later this year ae ot eee. om ee Nt BERMUDA, June 5 Strike In Italy The ban imposed by — the
was a house purchasing scheme business to see that conferences | Fe innings, no pt ints awardec o take up another appointment, aes salt atin eal ital of _ Provision in the United States 5 Trinidad Government on tne u
for workers and freedom from)of that kind continue. | The various Clubs have been Dr, Taylor was knighted in the he F ainiy. Wakemen tor ty 21) .88e8 (agreement) Bilk to give the ROME, June «. f aviation fuel last month as &
vietietention by weivate el He said that he had no person-j«ircularised by the Secretary Queen’s Birthday Honours List, sw ah amamen for onty 21 \nited States.Government exclu- \aljan Housewives began cook-|re.ult of the strike in the US
ployers and Government of | al grievance to put up as a mem-~ apprising them of the change,in jhis being one of two knighthoods|"Â¥8S and Sl a8 persenal cost of jive jurisdiction to deal with se , everything but gas as {Oil Industry will end on ne &
trade union officials and tra Btn Barbados Workers’ the point system. in Jemaica’s Honours. List, they: curity offences committed in Rer estimated 15,000" pas worker: | according to an official aonounce-
unions, nion, ” b he would like to, Official umpires for the series other being Hon, Kenneth O'’Con-=| Tonignt Hazare must be WON! nuda ig meeting with consider- oughout went on. strike for Pment this utter rt
He particularly stressed thelstress. the intercolonial condi-/ \pening to-day are:— nor, Chief Justice. : jdering what his own off-spinner | a bie opposition in the House off ou days demanding pay raise, }announcement \ made after
necessity of family allowances] tions, ! | London Reports that Princess/Ghulam Ahmed might have done|‘\)‘., abl . na other beneiits. overnment received a cable from
for people in the West Indies} Mr. Clarke urged the setting) ume 7, 14 and 21 Alice, Chancellor of the Univer-}to England’s openers in the same | “’S°™?Y- (he strike which began at mid- | the Secretary of State that sin
whom he said did not usually { up of a West Indian Federation | Lodge vs. Wandt rers at Lodge sity and the inter-University | time for there can be no doubt Vow under consideration is af night was called by both Com-flar_, restrictions in the ur ed
have two or three children, but|of trade unions in order that one | aha L. KH. King and G Council are now considering the | that the wicket became easier} proposed message to the Govern-]| n unist and non-Communis, | Kingdom will not be effective
usually reared very large fam-)colony might get to know the| /'dshaw. ant heel choice of a successor, , ifter the second application of the|!or stating that the House consid-funions following the collapse offafter June 8 :
ilies. | grievances of other colonies anc! PickW ick , i ka at “ Dr, Taylor who is now. in Lon-|heavy rol er the. subjection of British sub-|last minute company and unioi aa Ez ~ MT E TO
Mr. Critchlow promised that|that would agitate for the enact-| aaa ‘ : alcott and L. don is soetien oo ee - But even though he did not] jects to jurisdiction of an alien| negotiations swt the ministry in RED LEG/ L .
i ss p é 7 a » egislation which would! opellos, amMaica next month hore lak~| .nioy the s: ‘ - ) - at ay 1 aa ahi ‘in. | Ro » ‘
Me. would, discuss the matters he\ment of legislation sascha nd) "umpire vs. Police at Bank Hall, ing up ‘his new. appointment |“2Jy the same response as Laker | court, however friendly, is ‘“in-| Rome ; aoe enti LEAVE U.S.
oned with the threejbe of benefit to the working!, “mpire vs ‘ 4d : ; Ghulam Ahmed has still had a| tolerable interference with in- By midday when paghetti IASHINGTON. June (
on g | classes 2 »5 concer Umpires; F, L, Walcott and D.) which will be outside the West eee : : ; 2 aie WASHINGTON, Jt
committees that had been set up.;classes of the colonies con erned. | re tocd Indies but there has been no|™O0St successful day and has al-) herent rights of the subject’ wodles and other = : na isa: Maclat’ asibaisador: ts
Continuing, he told of his activ-; 2 , ij “hte 2s eee ee * tae read roved himself to he to noontime dishes should have beet eee —
ities with labour unions since the|. He called for a boycott of any College vs. Spartan at College announcement yet on the nature ate cent Waor toe cae d to| The message agrees with the }couoking, gas in Rome, Milan United State r Mt bs 4 une
year 1905, recounting some of the|‘tade pana Mae leetene uP @ On page 8 of the appointment. the South Africans and alnean | ced to safeguard United States | Naples and elsewhere was dow! anyushkin announ
benefits that had been obtained} 0Vernight and whose leaders were ‘ 4 p Fe.

sy P the > wa leaving his post
to the Australians on previous |?aseS in Bermuda against com-]|io a whisper and housewives were hat he was le )



to take up a new ap

through such movements as the|Mly seeking power to further} mission security offences by} .naking the best of it with char Pcueeea
2018 ce °

British Commonwealth Labour] their own ends, Mr, Clarke sais ff is > ree For 67 British subjects and suggest il stoves. fe declined to. discu with
Conference, the W.F.T.U. and|“We should have an interchange | Qa CO e a in S ‘ 1 For 67 that amendments be prepared to sologna, SBalerno and a few He dec lined to A ve
now recently, the LC.F.T.U. Hej! workers to see and know cons | e Today he “bow led 44 overs to the colony’s criminal law to 1or cities were more fortunate } reporters t . a ¢ rah , : Ts

also mentioned Workmen’s Com-| ditions in other places whereby ike 4 for 67 and it is a striking : ican relations. Asked 1 n

‘ . ‘ J 1ents Tv
provide suitable -punishment to ictly local arrangements there

|
pensation and Rent Restriction, | We, can assist in alleviating any | estimony to his aceuraey that only 7 where fod them with Acheson, he replied
}

| e e ;
iny. Brit ‘ ct who ‘. ) ga going. But else : ; sinks
Mr. L, J. Macano, a representa-| sufferings which a brother is un- ; wo fours were hit off him ple os ee who commit- | in private. and munieipalls J conversation was devoted rain
tive of the Trinidad and Tobago] dergoing.” ; Only the fifth wieket partner- oe a renee ned plants, workers went out. | to questions of the protoco

Workers’ Council, expressed on @ On Page 5 ship of 90 in two and a quarter! The message moved by Mr, Ed- UP. —UP.











behalf of His Council _ their hours between Watkin indjmund Gibbons has the support e
thanks to the representative of nay PHILADELPHIA, June 6. Graveney held him up and en-|!of the Speaker Sir John Cox. Olle.
Q.R.1.T. for having them at the)| STARTING ON MON Jersey Joe Walcott’s manager Felix Bocchicchio said |#bled England to come within —C.P.

Conference, and said that it gave the exciting adventure story
them the opportunity to bring be- SLOW BOAT TO MAR-

‘ 4 triking distanc a’ al.
that the world heavyweight champion who successfully |isin# distance of India’s total





a f : » 4 After Hazare’s decision to bat - 4 .
fore the Conference the griev- SEILLES defended his title against challenger ex-champion Ezzard| jn this morning it took just over 5,000 Witness THE BARBADOS SCHOOL
spots — a Finger 0 en erat nace te the Charles last night with a unanimous decision was willing {half an hour to dispose of India’s se Gah as '
oer atueae To "TUs. ee EVENING ADVOCATE: to defend his crown in September against the winner of aris Cootaeatin ene was al- Birtnday Parade
a ie a, A - “Me: m i Rs ety . , }Mmos n ayable during 1e course ¥
He gave an instance of how NOW ! the proposed match between Harry Matthew and Rocky |o¢ 3.3 overs during which het Prem Our Own Correspondent) OF DANCING
some employers in Trinidad, far Marciano, After that, bout Walcott will start a world tour. |claimed four wickets—two ‘of PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 6.
me >. sei $$$ $$$$_$____-— —--—_----—— Sees * eee oes oe on them via Watkins in the leg trap About 5,000 men, women an
; nose like an irate bull in the late} This gave England 70 minutes children gathered on _ Port-of
FARNUM WINNIN 5 SeRRiOnS Walcott, not only capti vatting before lunch and neither|Spain’s wet Queen's Park Savan- Presents
ated most of 21,599 fans in the]rtytten nor Simpson could have]. sterday morning under the

Municipal Stadium, but also cap









] '
en too happy abe the pros-| nelouds and dripping umbrellas >

an mact 1 , . . . : tig

a fit al ‘tr fh rirg . of three | ent They provresced feirly com-| Vitness the first parade in hon- coos 7 wit
ng onic) n the first defe nce of fortably prsinst th sen tr f-}out of the Queen’s official birth-

his crown, It was a good fight and ee ee BO we aoe aa) a ‘ie i\cay ‘

{ produced the second largest ' i? nf c tam van ay

gross receipts in Philadelphia St mart aie ea ; ae jean bt. Wa the first time sinee} Ya’ ¥ ’

ring history--a gate of $210,313) 5% : i B i ’ toria reign that an English <9. 4 Wd i Om

tack & television radio fee of $175,< Ph rence thulam Ahmed in ‘ has’ beer “ honoured i. - ‘

000 on Pare 3) ; , eee



: bout the Empire, is Ex-!
Each fighter getting thirt | ae 2 :

bent. of the net proceed houl ma pile a iia minted on! Vi Vk”
b fe 0 shoi trick Mu ten 1 rd ¢ /
receive about $100,000. Only th Russia Lifts . air si r aor mounted on d os ‘

the salute







,
Walcott, 19644 lbs., who knock- ceed ae es a na ctees GRENADA, June 6

frst Jack Dempsey and Gene om par nding units comprisin; ak \
Tunney bout fought in the same . : wee Pi a i , aa : g +
sladium tWenty-dix yeors yey Rerlin Blockade 1 forces anid te detachment Under the distinguished es. *
raduced pres delste.: mu iits of marines a avy ir : o
kote BERLIN, June 6 land } patronage of His Excellency \
: Russia yielded to the { ( aeRO }} - é -
Charles, the eleven to five fav-|States demand and lifted th gs ’ , } the Governor and oe!
urite was' deeply disappointed} blockade of the outlying United iA e-Suver Gets 7
hut did uot critieize officials. He|states administered district of if | Lady Savage
tald: “1 thought I had won but} cerlin. Less than 24 hours aft C ertificate |
: , wee vote for me, so T have [the strong United States prot | i | AT THE
\
1
|



























i fetta x P = rey x ras ;
ed out Ezzard in Pittsburgh last} a,.; ever \t the Quees Birthday Parade tik
July, let his lighter pt sere cea Steinstuetken and issued permi ssterday Governor Arundell pre- | “4h 4 Ak
fighting in most of the rounds last}? 16@ inhabitants to travel back sented the Certificate of the Royal |
night, But Charles was so siug-{4"d forth to the rest of Western; Humane Society to Courtney Ren-! - ON -
gish at 191% Ibs the heaviest of Berlin. wick 23-year-old Customs clerk |
his career, that his forcing was But the East German Com irded = for hi aving from | FRIDAY 20TH JUNI
slightly less than thrilling in some nunist government at the arne mwhning two crew members of :
sessions and Walcott’s smashing] ime slapped the United § Canadizn Constructor at St | VATINER 5.99 P.M
right-hand and left-hook counters} $14,000,000 Bill fox telephone Gcorge pier November 23 1950.)
took the play het we Ww pn Berlin TI overnor also presented a! NIGHT 8.30 P.M
(Round bss Paw Negeription] "nd Western German i ( the warrant as Island Seout Commis- | ,
» oer ¢ ’ M Ww > ‘
@ On Page 3 Jest seven year a sione » Mr A. F ee | Booking can |
~ at the EMPIRE
{CHESON TO GO ON rs . i | aes
| A Wiser 90 BRAZIL Lxplanation Demanded From Rhee | THEATRE
| WASHINGTON, June 6 KOREA, June. 6 sembly men. } as follows
The State Department to-day r Republic of Korea national A week ago the assembly ve~| ~ ;
gti Dean Acheson, Secretary of embly emandex President toed” Rhee’s declaration of mar-| : & Friday, 13th June ane
Ke ROP 9 go to Brazil On | mn Rhee explain v 1e tial law by a majority vote.| . Z } ie
ae! ; My + ea on “ . | . rule xy martial law Under the constitution Rhee was} ™ YY Daily 8.00 am - 12.00
vould. 6 a? “Seal d 1 sat aa ,j The assembly free from required to comply but he re-) \S :
Ii cap \ ti is rohe will ; wexive ¢ {threat of arrest by United i- fused. United State mbassador | Noon and 1—4 p.m
ie oA CERT guia tae 1 pre on Rhee raise John J. Muccio ar ed today | , :
' June 25 or from the United Stat : ; . Saturda th: 8.06
oe a ; : mage sina ei nei ulurday, 4th: 8 i
fter his return from Britain, He] iMtorun : big emne nd bearing struction n Presi-|
1 not Tied visit 7 massed q resolution demanding dent Truman who earliet ent . ‘ |
ther hatin American... count personal explanation from the note ¢ Rhee expressing “shock | a.m.—12.00 Noon :
KEN FARNUM smiles as he wins again—this time the 1,000 metre from the Trinidadian Matthieu and fter his stay in Brazil, the State | Presider t for the failur to tiand rement t the political | i
Lisle Carmichael. Neither Matthien nor Carmichael had it in them to give the champion cyclist a ! Department spokesman said. martial law and another asking f : le ® 2
real ru. ' —,P. the release of eleven arrested




PAGE TWO



Canub (Calling



Mr. HARKA de POEL

AJOR G. NICOLE, Director
of Civil Aviation of British
Guiana, left for Trinidad intran-
sit for British Guiana on Thurs-

day evening by B.W.LA., aft
spending a holiday in Barbede.s
staying at the Crane Hotel. He

‘was accompanied by his wife.
Major Nicole who was on lon
leave, spent the greater paft in
the U.S.A., and came on to Buir-
bados' for a week before return-
ing home. .
Trinidad Proprietor
R. SEUDAT SAMAROO,
proprietor of Samaroo’s
Soda Water Factory of San Fer-
nando,. one of the largest and
most modern in the Caribbean,
arrived from Trinidad on Wed-
mesday by B.W.1.A. on a business
visitâ„¢and is staying at Indromer
Guest] ouse,

Spent Six Weeks
EAVING for Trinidad on
Wednesday night by B.W.1.A.,
intfansit for British Guiana were



Mr; and Mrs. J, Gonsalves and
family and Miss Mary Lopes,
daughter of Mr. Reggie Lopes,

Proprietor of Alec Russell & Co.,
Ltd., Commission Agents of the
West Indies with headquarter> in
Georgetown.

They had been holidaying bere
for the past six weeks staying i!
“Accra”, Rockley.

Mr. Gonsalves
the’ wholesale department of
Messrs, Wm. Fogarty Ltd., of
Geargetown, while Miss Lopes is
employed »s a Secretary in her
father's office,

On Holiday
R. HARCOURT
formerly of the reportorial
staff of this ncwspaper, arrived
from Aruba on Wednesday eve-
ning by B.W.LA., after a two-day
stop-over at Trinidad,

Mr. Pilgrim is an employee of
the Lago Oil & Transport Com-
pany Ltd., affiliate of the Stand-
ard Oil Compatiy (N. J.) and is
alse Advertising Manager of the
Aruban Weekly News magazine
“The Local”. He will spend ten
weeks’ vacation here,

Engaged

HE engagement was recently

announced hetween Miss
Joyce Manning, eldest daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. C. Manning of
“Hazel Cot”, Hindsbury Road,
end Mr. FE. W. Grant onlv son of
Mr, and Mrs, D, E. Grant of Bridge
Road and a member of Empire
Club.

Awarded Diploma

R. GEORGE B. BASCOMBE,

Cutter on the staff of C. B.
Rice & Co., (Tailor) has been
awarded the Diploma of the Tailor
& Cutter Academy of London, in
an examination in the Art of'Cut-
ting gentlemen’s garments held
on the 28t'. May following the
completion. of a Correspondence
Course,

is Manager of

PILGRIM,



Crazy Dutchman Leaves
good things must come

7 all
an end.

Even to a “sejour”
in the Tropical Paradise—Barba-
dos, Mr. Harka de Poel better
known as ‘the “Crazy Flying
Dutchman” told Carib shortly
before leaving for Puerto Rico

by B.W.LA. on Thursday.

When a traveller discovers the
West Indies, he always will be
astonished as soon as he _ sees
Barbados. So was I. Everybody
told me that the outrider of the
Antilles looked flat and small.
But next time wherml see a tour-
ist going to the Antilles, I will
tell him to go to the Tropical
Paradise, because it is worth
while,

All the islands in the Caribbean
are small. But not all are clean,
healthy and friendly as Barba-
dos, And not all the other islands
are the home of the flying fish.

I, as most of the visitors to the
island, enjoyed my stay. I did
like the island so much that I
intended to have a holiday after
fwe years of travelling. But the
firme has come that I have to say
‘Tot ziens” to all my friends of
he “Tropical Paradise’,

I want to say thank you to all
the directors of the Schools and
Colleges for the help; to all my
listeners; to the boys as Pat,
David, Bruce, Bob and hundreds
more, who took me as their
nearest friend. Then I want to
say goodbye to all the girls of
the Tropical Paradise and be
sure, when I feel lonely I always
think of the sweethearts of Bar-
bados, In Dutch we say Tot ziens
(till we meet again) and that’s
what I want to say to Barbados
and all the friends on this little,
but friendly island in the blue
Caribbean, This is not the last
time I will visit Barbados and
I will be seeing you, and be sure
I shall not forget to make more
propaganda for your Tropical
Paradise fh the blue Caribbean.

People of Barbados, stay as you
are; don’t let your “Charm” go,
as it went in many other places:

but keep it up and keep your
little island as it is—clean,
friendly and healthy. The sun

and the sea breeze will do the
rest and let us hope, that when
I come back, I shall find as many
friends as I did this time.

Be good and “tot ziens”,

Attended Convention

ASTOR J. O. EMMERSON,
Secretary-Treasurer of the
Caribbean Mission of Seventh
Day Adventists, stationed in
Trinidad, returned home on
Thursday evening by B.W.ILA.
after spending about two weeks
here staying at the Hotel Royal.

Pastor Emmerson who had
come over to attend the Conven-
tion of the Leeward Islands

Mission of S.D.A., stayed over for
another week for the purpose of
auditing the mission’s books.

P,M,O. Returns

R, E. W. ROBERTS, P.M.O.

of St. Michael and Mrs
Roberts of “Sunnyside”, Black
Rock, returned from the U.S.A.
via Puerto Rico on Thurscay
evening by B.W.LA. after an
absence of five weeks.

Mrs. Roberts who went up tu
the U.S.A. in the interest of her
health told Carib that she has
benefited greatly from her visit
and is much improved,

Spending a Week
PENDING a week’s holiday in
Barbados is Miss Olive
Jeffrey of Antigua. She arrived
on Thursday evening by B.W.I.A,
and is staying with Mrs. B.

Codrington of Brittons Hill.

On Business

AR. ERNEST HUNTE, Direc-

tor of K, R. Hunte and Co.,

Ltd. was a peeneneeg for Trini-

dad on Thursday €vening by

B.W.1LA, He has gone on a busi-

ness visit and is cxpected to
return today.



Pastor M. G. NEMBHARD

S.D.A. President

JDASTOR M. G. NEMBHARD,

President of the Leeward
Islands Mission of Seventh Day
Adventists, was among the pas-
sengers leaving on Thursday eve-
ning by B.W.LA., for Trinidad.
While there, he will make a trip
to St. Lucia and Dominica in the
interest of the work of the Lee-
ward Islands Mission before re-
turning to Barbados about the
latter part of July with his family.

For C.T.C. Talks

“THE Surinam Delegation at-
tending the Caribbean Trade
Union Conference which is being
held at Hastings House, arrived
yesterday morning via Trinidad
by B.W.LA. It comprises the
colony's labour leader Mr. L. E.
Eliazer, Mr. C. Carron, represen-
tative of the Paranam Workers’
Union, Mr. S. Shukrula repre
sentative of the Surinam Wofk-
ers’ Organisation and Mr. H.
Soeperman, representative of the
Surinam Miners’ Union.

Others delegates arriving for
the conference were Mr, Clarence
Fergusson, General Secretary of
the Grenada Workers’ Union who
arrived on Thursday morning by
B.G. Airways from St. Vincent
and Mr. S. M. Shakoor, M.B.E,
General Secretary of the Man
Power Citizens’ Association who
arrived on Wednesday night by
BW.LA. via Trinidad,

They are all staying at the
Marine Hotel,
Son and Heir
N WEDNESDAY a son was

born to Mr. and Mrs. Regi-
nald King of Hindsbury Road.
Mrs. King is the former Avis
Brewster. Mother and babe are |
doing well.

Surprise Party

ISS BETTY CARRINGTON
- celehrated her birthday on
Wednesday, 4th June. To
mark the occasion a_ surprise
barty was held at the home of her
parents “Parade View”, Hastings,
where many of her friends gath-
ered to celebrate.

Studying Radiography

ISS RUTH FELDMAN who
left the colony last year for
England has been successful in
her first year’s exam.
Ruth is studying Radiography
at King’s College. She is the

BARBADOS

Mrs. Mesta
Goes To See
The President.

From SAM WHITE
PARIS.

Mrs. Pearl Mesta, the ebullient
party-throwing U.S. Ambassador
to Luxemburg, mounts the gang-|
way at Le Havre to-day on*he:
way back to Washington.

During her voyage across, she
will be wrestling with a problem.
Shall she make her customary
large donation to the Democratic |







daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. G.
Feldman of Navy Gardens.

Intransit

NTRANSIT from the U.S.A.

via Puerto Rico on Thursday
evening by B.W.1A. was Lt.
David P. Pettit of the U.S. Army
stationed at Camp Tortuguero
with the Replacement Training |
Centre at San Juan,

He has now gone to visit his
brother Capt. H, B, Pettit who
is in command of the U.S. Marine
detatchment stationed in Trini-
dad.



The Nightingale Memorial Home

THE Nightingale Memorial
Home situated at Belfield, Black
Rock, formerly a private resi-
dence and donated by Dr. W.

Nightinga-e, was officially opened
On the 15th December, 1947 by the

Schools. In the afternoon cach
child dees some gardening—there
is a garden plot provided for
each of them. There is also a
kitchen garden on the premises
ut their time is only given to

then Governor Sir Hilary Blood. is by way of learning how to

This Home provides facilities of transplant

home and good training for chil-
dren particularly destitutes. The
parents cf some of these children
are still alive but the aim of the

home is to cater especially to
orphans. The first ten children
were transferred from St. Mich-

ael’s Almshouse on the 31st Janu-
ary, 1948,

Shortly after there was an ad-
dition of 10 o:hers and since then
the numbers have been steadily
increasing. There are now 18 girls
and 17 boys in residence but there
is acccmmodation for 60.

Children are admitted from the
age of five and are discharged at
the age of 18 years. Of the 17
boys two are apprenticed to motor
mechanics, one a meron, one is
employed as a delivery boy and
another as messenger, There are
three girls who are being trained
fn needlework, nursing, and laun-
da ‘ng.

Education

Tue younger girls and boys at-
tend the Westbury Girls’ and the
St. Stephen’s’ Boys’ and Girls’



After leaving school the girls
are detained for a whole year in
order to learn general house-
keeping. It is a general rule that
the children should attend ser-
vices at St. Stephen's. These chil-
dren are also given religious in-
struction and as many as 16 are
confirmed. They attend services
under escort.

Quite recently
started to instruct the girls in
Handicrafts. The boys will also
learn how to make s‘ippers etc.

classes were

Each child has a bedside cup-
board and these are all attrac-
tively decorated with toys, pic-
tures ‘and ornaments. There are
separate apartments for shoes,
clothing and toilet accessories,

Their clothes are provided by the
Home but the older boys and
girls are ellowed to buy them*
selves anything required,

The Home

The Home is run by a Vestry
Grant end is supervised by Miss.
Grace Bryan, assisted by four

NEW ARRIVALS

HAT SHAPED WALL VASES
FEATHER PILLOWS



attendants. Nurse Bryan who is
known by’ the children as
“Mether” was previously at the
General Hospital. After some
years of private nursing during
which time she was nurse to Gov-
ernor Newlands, she was recom-
mended for a year’s training at
the Princess Alice College, Bir-
mingham in 1946, It is her aim to
create as much as_ possible a
‘home’ atmosphere. The Attend-
ants are known as “Auntie” to the
children,

Library
There is a small library con-
taining picture books and _ story

books. On entering the Dormitory
the Advocate was impressed by
the cleanliness and attractive-
ness prevailing. At Christmas
there is a treat for the inmates
and they are presented with
gifts, Any ailment is treated by
the nurse herself and there is

general inspection.

In March this year a wing was
built to accommodate the dining
hall. The second storey now forms
an extension of the girls’ dormi-
tory and the dining hall is on the
first floor, The boys and girls live
as one family and it is to be hoped |
that in the future that homeless
boys and girls will enjoy the fa-
cilities offered by this Institution.

Se es Ce

$2.20
$3.42 each

GENUINE LEGHORN HATS

WOMEN’S WIDE BRIM



T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4606

Pepty? Or shall she wait and
see if the Republicans nominate |
Eisenhower—and then back Ike
if they do?

The scale of her munificence |
—she is the widow ofa steel
baron — to Truman's’ election
funds at the last/ Presidential
election, found its reward in her
appointment to Luxembourg.
Her problem _,before Truman

decided not to run again, was
nerve racking: she likes Luxem-
bourg, likes Truman and likes
Ike. Now the problem js simpli-
fied : will the Democrats be out-
raged if she switches allegiance, |
ond, on the other hand, will her |
close friends, the Eisenhowers,
forgive her if she doesn’t?

To many friends and to many
visiting American politicians,
Mrs. Mesta has talked frankly of
Ler difficulties. All, including the
Eisenhowers, have failed to Qe-
solve them.

Now ‘she has decided that her
only way out is to “get the feel
of things in Washington.” and
especially to have a frank, heart-
to-heart chat with her old friend
Harry Truman.

Marry? Never
Off on what for him is a new

kind of treasure hunt is much-
married Dominican diplomat,
Porfirio Rubirosa, whose third |

niarriage, to tobacco heiress Doris!
Duke, ended recently in divorce. |
Now Rubirosa, who is Domini-

can minister in Paris, is fitting
up an expedition to hunt for
sunken treasure

off the San
Domingo coast. }
As for his other plans, Rubirosa
says: “I am definitely finished |
with marriage. I shall never marry |
again, In future my ideal woman |
will be simply the woman you
love.”
People
Diverced : Film star Martine
Carol from Hollywood _ night
club owner Steve Crane, former
husband of Lana Turner,
Miss Carol announced this in|
Paris, added laconically:
my work will prevent me from|

I thought it was only fair that
I should give him his freedom.”

Married: Spanish dancer Car-
men Amaya to guitarist Juan
Aguero. Cf a London visit Carmen
says: “The audiences were so
cold they might have been stand-
ing out on a Scottish moor during
a snowstorm,”

Events

A Paris newspaper has launched
a campaign to soften those ogres
of Paris life the concierges or
caretakers who keep guard out-|
side every Paris apartment house. |
The newspaper is awarding the|
title of “Queen of Concierges” to
the one “who is most imbued
with courtesy and kindness.” i

What goes on in Russia? Lyons
silk manufacturers, who are doing
a £500,000 annual export trade
with Russia, hoped to increase it
by manufacturing materials
decorated with portraits of Soviet
leaders, especially Stalin. After
large stocks had been produced,
the Russian response was a
categoric “No,”

Said a Russian buyer: “We
want your silks, but please with-
cout those portraits of Stalin.”

QUOTE OF THE WEEK
He Said It

Professor Mondor, on increases
in the birth-rate for twins In
view of the state of the world
it is not surprising that more and
more new arrivals prefer to have
company.” —L.E.S.

Pope Has Recovered
VATICAN CITY, June 6

Vatican sources reported that

the Pope’s slight fever completely



disappeared this morning. The
76-year-old Pontiff who was
stricken with a slight attack ot
influenza on Wednesday recited
his usual morning mass today
and had a heavy schedule of

audiences for today and tomor-
row_and a beatification ceremony
on Sunday.

It is still not certain that the
Pontiff would descend to St.
Peter's basilica on Saturday eve-
ning in connection with the
beatification of the Italian Sister
Bertilla Bosecardin of the teach-
ing sisters of the Order of St.
Dorotea of the Sacred Heart.

Cardinal Francis Spellman
Archbishop of New York was
received in a private audience by
the Pope last night. —U.P.



CROSSWORD

|
|
|
|



|

}

|

‘ Across ;

1. Render impossible, (7)

8. Near go for frult, tt seems. (6)
To young Joseph it suggests
music. (3)

. And the man should follow to
make the play, (4) |

. What makes Terry all? (8)

.» Plane. (6) 15, Halt. (4)
. Extract from a cobra tall, (4)





19, Feed from our smin. (7)

21, The hiker’s portmanteau. (8) |

22. Beastly resetting of trees, (5) |

23. Home. (4) |
Down

1. How to make a hub sitp, put j

into print. (7)

2. His surname was Hood. (5)

3. Sounds vain but isn't, (4)

4. Large! More than that, (8)

bd. Avject few
6 Formation
Mary. (4)

iG)

in which you find
The price

7 (4)
9 Your legal
Po

to be paid
portion (6)
da bike wheet
rT than requests
y strung educat

Â¥ to dip in tt




tS)
(3)










(Poe: Tr
Dance 2
Down: 1
4. Cur



4.00—7.15 p m.

Service,

ADVOCATE








TUBBY

Tuesday night.

8 the second day of
this Tubby Hubby
diet ror heavyweight
husbands draws to a close
Wicksteed is still on his feet.
He seemed to be wilting a bit
after breakfast, but his trainers
and seconds said that would be
all right. They would give him
the Luxury Lunch treatment.
This was fresh salmon and
cost 6s. 6d. a portion in the
restaurant I went to, but They
said that was all right, too,
because I could pay for it out of
the money I'd saved by doing
no serious drinking.

* * *

Tubby Hubbies will have to
learn to endure this attitude. It
seems to be part of the diet. Just
because you are so good natured
that you allow Them to remodei
you into a dream husband They
seem to think They are doing
you @ good turn.

Think how wonderful it will
be, They said yesterday, when
you Can skip up and down the
stairs like a ballet dancer. You’ll
be able to run_ useful little
errands all day long. Won't that
be fun ?

“Oh, frightful fun,” I saia,
* * «

That glass of skimmed milk
for lunch is an ironic touch,
don't you think? Where can
you be sure of skimmed milk
in the City of London ? There’s
plenty of it at home. In fact
this bulging breadwinner gets
nothing else at the best of
times use the creamy top
of the milk is reserved for the
children’s stewed fruit and
porridge,

Maybe it is skimmed in the
City, too. But your honour is
at stake. You're mot certain.

BY THE WAY

HE hot
the

sun having melted
inferior marine-glue

used for plugging holes in the
deck,
was yesterday
Mrs.
Saucy urchins,
“As | melted

the Saucy Mrs, Flobster
invaded by what
Withersedge described as
who thought the

glue was honey. The

ship's cat got stuck, and in try-
seeing him for the next 18 months | nae” :

to rescue it Mrs. Wither-

sedge became glued to the spot.
A
boots, and helped her to safety.
Rear-Admiral Sir Ewart Hodg-

longshoreman removed her





Second Day of the—

Purge Pauker
HUBBY ; (80! Guker
DIET. e+Bernard Wicksteed |

runs into a skimmed milk problem

1

rest

capitalist and counter revolution-
ary,

You've given your word to
Them that you'll drink nothing
eae but a glass of skimmed
milk.

“A glass of skimmed milk

Romanian

} one-time tough dariing of inter-
national

destined today for a Red purge

SATURDAY, JUNE 7, 1952



‘RomaniaMay eS

TO-NIGHT

THE GREAT
CLIFTON

and his partner
FLORENCE in a
Show full of

VIENNA, June 4, |
Pauker,
Foreign

Ana 59-year-old |

Minister





and
communisnr seemed |

n her home town. Radio Bucha-|
accused fer of being pro-

Western sources expressed the}

belief that Ana and two former

please miss,” you say brightly. ministers who also were attacked |
“We only sell cow’s milk.” in a broadcast are being made i
she says. scapegoats for Red Romania’s|
“Well, get a glass of that and current economic woes. Last)
skim it.” you say. week she was kicked out of| At
She gives you a queer look and Romania communist party's
goes 2 eae § Skeets oe =. For the —— at) CLUB
one 01 Tr colleagues, en east she still holds the Foreign
She comes back she has a glass Ministry, —(CP)

of milk that might be anything.

All the same, though I
wouldn't admit it to Them, I

don’t feel too bad on the whole. %

;
3
Qo
c
4
+
=
o
°
S$
t

:





MY SECOND DAY

saccharin (no sugar)

Luxury lunch

Boiled salmon
Green sala (no peas,
potatoes or cream)
Fresh fruit salad
Glass of skimmed milk
(No roll and butter)

Dinner

Any lean meat you can get
hold of
Generous portion of
spinach
Cheese (half your ration)
An apple
Coffee (preferably black)



By BEACHCOMBER

son, paying a routine visit of
inspection, said to the caretaker.
“You really must not leave your
boots on deck. And what are all
these children doing?” Mrs.
Withersedge explained what, had
occurred, and the Admiral said
mournfully. “What a craft! It’s
time she was broken up.” “If you
ask me” replied Mrs, Wither-
sedge, “she was broken up years
ago, only nobody seems to realise
it.”



LISTENING HOURS

SATURDAY, JUNE 7, 1952
phe 05% 19. 76M, 25 53M

The Daily
Northern
5.05 p.m





40p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m
4.15 p.m. B.B.C
p.m Oricket,

a,
Interlude, 5.15 p.m. Music for Dancing,
6 p.m
Frankie Howard goes
Sports Round-up and Programme Parade.

6.15 p.m
6.45 p.m.

Magazine,
East,

Sceo:tisn



7 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m, Home News
from Britain.
7.15—P0.30 pm. ....... 25.53M, 31 32M







7.15 p.m. Behind the News, 7.45 p.m

Sports Review, 8.15 p.m. Rio News-
reel, 8.20 p.m. Radio Theatre, 10 p m.
The News, 10.10 p.m. News Talk, 10.15

r.m,. Music Magazine, 10.30 p.m. Variety
Fanfare.

Knarf Went Fishing for Stars

— But General Tin Said He Couldn't Keep Them —

By MAX TRELL

IT was a bright moonlight night.
Knarf, the Shadow, quietly tiptoed
ever to the corner where his sister
Hanid was sleeping and tapped her
lightly on the shoulder. “Hanid!’’
he whispered. “Wake up!”

At this Hanid, who couldn’t imag-
ine what was the matter, sprang to
her feet in alarm. She made so much
noise that ‘Teddy the Stuffed Bear
Mr. Punch, General Tim the tin
soldier, and Mary-Jane the rag-doll
all woke up and began asking:
“What’s the matter? What’s the
matter?”

“Nothing’s the matter,” Knarf
said. “l just woke Hanid up to tell
her that the moon was shining and
that it was a wonderful night to
go down to the pond,”

“Why?” asked everyone else in
the room.

“To fish for the stars, that’s
why,” answered Knarf.

Foolish Idea

At first everyone thought this
was a very foolish idea, on account
of you can’t fish for stars in the
pond because, as everyone knows,
the stars are in the sky.

“Oh, no! They’re in the pond,”
insisted Knarf. “I saw them there.”

Finally General Tim, who had
travelled a great deal, and had
seen lots of things, and knew about
almost everything, nodded his head.
“Knarf may be right. Now and
then, on very special nights, the
stars are in the pond. But,” he
added, “it isn’t easy to fish for
them.”

“1 know it,” said Knarf. “You
need a net with a long stick. And
you also need a big jar to put the
stars in after you fish them up.”

By this time everyone had
changed their minds, and they all
made themselves ready to go fish-

| ing for stars in the pond Hanid

found a net (which the children
used for the goldfish), and Teddy
found a long stick. Mary-Jane and
Mr. Punch both discovered a jar.
[t used to have jelly in it, but now
it was empty.

Then they all set out.

“There they are! There are the
stars!” Teddy exclaimed when they
reached the edge of the pond.

“There are millions of them float-

ing on top of the water!”



nee



y let Sam
sad Lael gyn ee
Bee le

ot Ano gotten

Rupert cannot uncerstand Podgy’s
silence, and for sorme moments he
waits wondering whether to follow
him. While he jssitates there are
cheerful shouts, amd more of his
frends, first Willie the Mouse, and
then Rex and Reggie Rabbit, hurry
to join him, “ Hoomy, you've













Punch said they'd sell the stars

Everyone had a turn fishing for
the stars,

“What will we do with them
when we have a full jar?”’ Teddy
asked.

Knarf said: “We'll keep them.”

Mr. Punch said: “We'll sell them
to the fireflies.”

One to Wear

Hanid said: “I’d like one to wear
in my hair.”

But General Tin said: “There’s
only one thing to do with stars that
you fish out of the pond. You hide
the jar under a rock, and on the
first cloudy night you pour them
back into the pond.”

Knarf and Hanid and Mr. Punch
and Teddy and Mary-Jane all
wanted to know why you had to do
that.

“It’s only fair,” said the Gen-
eral. “The stars don’t belong to us.
They belong to everybody. And
when it’s a cloudy night and the
stars don’t shine in the sky, you
have to throw them back into the
pond so that they can climb up into
the sky again, and shine as they
always do. It would be a pity if we
took all the stars. Isn’t it enough
fun just being able to fish for
them?”

So they all decided that General
Tin was right, And when they had
a full jar, twinkling with stars,
they hid the jar under a stone. And
the very next night when it was
cloudy they poured them back into
the pond, and let them get back
is the sky and shine for every-

ody.





our ball,’ cries Willie, ** Let’s
kind some more~pals and have a
* “T just saw Podgy.”* says
“but he wouldn't speak
to be busy tainkin
ung!’ exclaims Reggie.
an odd thing for Podgy to

frer the

me.
Rupert
He se












: The Garden—St. James $





PORE VEES AIOE

GAIETY

MORGAN

A Summertime Special’

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Last Show TO-NITE 8.30 pm, %

“HELLZA POPPIN" and al DINNER
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Breakfast “FRONTIER REVENGE” % by Reservation only
Grapefruit SLash LA RUE Pusey ST. JOHN
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Two slices of toast lightly % MAT. SUN. 5 p.m »
buttered “FOLLOW THE BOYS” x
Taste of marmalade George RAFT & x
Coffee or tea, with ‘ “CUBAN PETE” 9

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Yes, tonight—if you use Lustre-Creme

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BRIDGETOWN BARBAREES OISTIN
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SATURDAY, JUNE 7. 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE







‘

INDIA IN GooD —_ Walcott Retains % fue Vins. Sy AND AIR | iSivca'ty Hak

POSITION Heavyweight Title on c.crmmm | TRAFFIC | Blood Pressure

ST. LUCIA, June 5. headaches at




























oy Grenades -arr: torre || palpitation * . a
@ From Page 1 Hazare had beaten Hutton in the pera Sane: ewinging right high on Walcott’s night first an eae aa 0 ee Oa He teal abrvy «08 ant
es . toss but imside an hour his first ROUND 1.—Charles got off to head. Joe drove a left to Charles for two to 94 for : resins 9 — fer from poor sleep, loss of memory
pes yew p=. Shae when he had three batsmen were in the pavi- a small lead in the first round as head and missed a haymaker right J. Johnson 1a SS Gresham Sr Ok Citamas %i* and : Bee Ta denon
y . lion with only 43 runs on the he concentrated his attack on Wal- as Charles danced away. Charles grim 22 Sch. Everdene, MV. Lady Joy. MV. | hy Ht a saure, This is a
England s Let Off Board. cott’s body. Charles landed swing- landed a left hook to Joe’s boc'y, Following on shortly before tea}?! cn Sh. Weney D, Wallace, Sch. | mysterious disease that causes more
But England’s let off was only Bedser bowling very accurately ing lefts and rights to the body then a right to the body They Grenada opened their second|Gardenia, Sch. Frances W pee boemcions bre Sere on ama Uaenily
temporary, for when Ghulam Started the rot by beating D. K. while Joe merely tapped light boxed slowly and carefully. innings and at the close of play ARRIVALS ie taken for some simple ailment. If
Ahmed came into the attack he Gaekwad with a ball which drew lefts, Just before the bell Waleott ROUND 12.—They_ clinched, was 150 for 8. ee ee en ee SS Licts, | You suffer fram any of these symp.
quickly made amends and im him forward and then whipped drove a hard-left to body and then both missed. ~- The referee Grenada continued on Thurs-! Ayents tor nok suameukiae on Fe Fe eae ie or a parairtia acne;
the fourth over Hutton was oe the bat and pad. missed a haymaker right hat told them to start fighting. Wal- day at the crease with their over-|& Co, Ltd = oh ; = and you should start, treatment at
caught in his leg trap—appro~ oy attempted to hit Jenkins brought a howl from the crowd. cott landed a right to the jaw. night score 150 for 8 and exactly DEPARTURES By BW LA ones. The very firat dose o ‘
priately by Ramchand. oe for six before getting a proper ROUND 2-—Walcott took the Action slowed to a walk. Just oa he ur ‘ater Pierre fell vietim vor AOE ree a | Oty erty, teduces am Bisod
Caution had been the keynote look at the bowler and was yards imitiative in the second round, before the bell Charles landed a to Crick closing the visitors’ |: Lewie Ur Bete ne ae. | Dvesure and makes you feel years
of England's start which producea@ down the wicket when Evans driving two hard left hooks to terrific right to the champion’s second innings for 196, Fletcher! fer Trinidad: H. Mayers, J. Emmet unger in & few Gays. Get Moree
18. The runs were not valuable stumped him, and Umrigar Charles body in the first few sec- jaw. Walcott seemed hurt but was undefeated for 54. fron, ©. Resende, T. Hawkins, J. Cum- | ‘rom your chetat et welt ahd
with three full days ahead, but flashed wildly at a ball from True- onds. Joe landed a hard right to walked in straight to his corm@r — §t, Lucia wor the trophy by an! 4) cape NPG? Medtord. G Forde, | UNe or Taoney back on return of
wickets were and india had man playing in his first Test for Charles’ side and the crowd roar- at the bell innings and 19 runs: Crick took‘! Lande bBo ae eee | sinpty package.
struck a vital blow. Evans to bring off a fine catch ed. Charles boxed cautiously. Joe ROUND 13— Charles drove a 6 wickets for 29 seen OOF tune S Nicde 1 Whatton 8} cae
But not until 48 runs were om Shculder-high behind the wicket. gained a slight edge in the round. hard left hook to Walcott’s stom- In the presence “ot a lar ciceatte eae t
the board did they meet with ROUND 3.—At the start of the ach at the start of the thirteenth crowd, Mro Prat Bo Deaqee} 2!" pavans =
further success and again it was Collapse Feared third round Walcott landed a ter- reund. The Referee warned wife of the actin . Admi Seta | ON THURSDAY “- Cx
th Ahmed—Ramchand combina— rific left hook to Charles’ jaw, Charles. Walcott averted Charles’ presented the cus to De Fog) Prem Antigua: Olive Jeffery ~)

: On WEDNESDAY }
captain of St. Lucia.| Frem Trintaad U. Marehoek, O i

f
. ie >
Eyre, J. Joaquin, B. Evelyn, ener” &D> FOR
son, 8. Samaroo, 'M. Abdool Ws Va . 4
t 4 >
% *

tion which disposed of Simpson One feared rather than hoped then a hard right to the jaw. attack with left jabs to the head. ,
who had batted nearty 90 that an Indian collapse was immi- Charles danced away and then Walcott drew blood from a cut peg
minutes for 23. ment and there were few on the drove a left hook to Waleott’s over Charles right eye. Charles

This rate of run getting was 8tound who expected such a re- bod connected a stiff right to Waltott’s

Prizes were also presented to
outstanding performers in the},





Oe

G. Corbin, D. Cerbin, P ty






y. rn th

typical of the whole day, for En— Very especially as Hazare and ROUND 4,—At the end of the jaw. Walcott was warned by the ri ying a re eae * Cron
gland were concerned with not Manjrekar made such a poor third round Charles was warned referee for hitting on the break. erie Se ee me Seer het
giving chances and Indian bowl— “tart. Hazare’s first run came from against low blows. In the fourth Walcott drove a left to Charles’ Cho IDV 6 WES ¢. Hi}, M. Grell, & Gret, A. Pilgrim, ?
ers were just that bit short og What was meant to be a eover round Charles drove a left to Joe’s bead and drew blood from Charles” . I | ¥ Sew i, SNakoor, ©. Silva, I. Silva
length which made stroke play ive off Jenkins but which went body. Charles landed a right to face. They traded several hard >» Ae ee eS
dangerous proposition. down to long leg, and Manjrekar the jaw and Walcott replied with punghes. Prevert From Trinidad: W. Vincent-Brown

At this stage in the proceed~ ‘was twice beaten and nearly a right to the head. ROUND 14 —Cherles was ag- he a Waller, B. Nigolle, 1. Williams, V
ings Hazare introduced his leg bowled playing reckless shots at Charles was aggressive and gressive at the start of the four- EF ishing Trips Bavwtak. i; veenial c. “kein
spinner Shinde for the benefit the same bowler. drove two light lefts to Walcott. teenth round He drove a hard { ana, A. Drayton, &. Figaro, F.. fink

of Compton and immediately he One-was reminded at this stage Joe landed a right to Charles jaw. right to Walcott’s jaw and the

son, H. Hinkson, E. Rogers, A. Williams
struck a length. But it was not Of the West Indies first Test at Charles hit low with the left and champion retreated. Charles land-

Veuy few fishing Boats from thé}", Wwiias, P. Stampe

various St. Michae a Ss oP
Compton who fell first. Instead it Manchester two years ago. the referee warned him again. ed a left and a right to the head sxt Sai Dale tote ventordatt =" wer WEmereaeah o4
was May who played over a ball Admittedly there the wicket ROUND 5.—Walcott missed a Walcott clinched, Charles missed car ae rae Trinidad: S, Carter, J. Mahon

ichis aa Secs cee highs Fa
well pitched up to him and was 2s already wearing but the bats- right but followed with a left to a left but landed a right to Wal- This was because of the high|y “Xnan, F. Ellis, C. Cumberbaten, R









. : “ inds and choppy sea, kes, L. St. Aubyn, C. St. Aubyn
ciean bowled—62 for 3. men all made the same fault of the body, Walcott drove several cott’s temple They clinched. we y Parkes, eo rae
rs attempting. quick run getting be- left jabs to Charles’ jaw and then Walcott drove a sharp left hook on eal tes mpoerns » - M Mallet A Wipneuya bh *puckl ,

Indians On Top fore they had their eye in. a sweeping right to Ezzard’s head to Ezzard’s jaw. Charles missed icarned. Up i 9.00" Woles G. Best, C. Chadderton, M Rahal, 8
Peter May who has already This was just what the Indians just before the bell. The crowd with a right, but scored with two yesterday evdein only 120 ‘. ds | WF copes gr Metaniven, St. Gonaslies
age three quick centuries oleae Toe ee an 5 pina long lefts to the body at the bell. of dolphin wale enid, in the Fish : Gonsalves, V. Gonshives, A. Gon
0 i i ma ui J —The r 22 7 ‘ a
an thar eter We and India ean for perhaps seven or eight falls ROUND 6.—They started care- gered tam to fght at ie gta MMagbet. This was 2 catch brought — oye 9 re
very much on top. They looked 20d then suddenly the bat, would ‘fully in the sixth round and ex- the fifteenth round. Charles 1% by the fishing boat “Sonny CANADIAN RATES
It too, f ze flash and it was as much luck as changed light left hooks to the Grove a left and a right to the Boy". Selling Buying

Their fielding was first class by aga if the ball went off the oe ere ere 2 pane pas champion’s body, Blood ran from , JUNE 6, 1962 gta’
with Gopi rekar . atcotts side and the referee Walcott’s nose. Walcott dro’ 16 3/10% Cheques on Bankers 74 5
oumigeniae ie gpa a a a Hazare and Manjre- warned him against low blows right to the jaw and 4 Seore S Mm h Winds mere Pratt ee
Ramchand positive menace in the ‘/8!,Werenot made to pay fortheir once more, A glancing right off howled. Joe stabbed two lefts to 18 16 9/10% Cable
leg trap. early , and by lunch the head of the challenger and the Charles’ face. Charles drove a 4 8/10% Curreney RN

The wicket was, however, a@ry— when 72 runs were on the board, crowd roared. Walcott drove a jeft and a right to Joe’s body. In St. Peter ‘ ae ate
ing out and becoming much “ ; both ba had played some right to the head and then a left Walcott replied with a right. , bes id S
than it had been early on. But im Setesane Manjrekar being hook to the body, then another Charles retorted with a left to the High winds threatened -houses
drying out, occasional balls icularly severe onthe slow left to the body and a right to the body and ‘a right to the head. in many districts in St. Peter on
beginnin t Fr men off his back foot. The power head, Charles held on. Charles was warned f low Thursday and yesterday morning.

g to pop. From one such ihe put into his shot: be ROUND 7.—Walcott od very Tel. Avooe "a tte ee ¥ ; ; Wary
Compton, playing forward to <%,.? is shots can . alcott looked very blows. Charles drove a long left Residents were forced to button eh?
Ahmed became Ramchand’s third queers by the fact that when he confident and Charles looked wor- to the jaw and the champion re~ down windows and doors. A a
victim, a 65 he had hit ten ried. At the start of the seventh plied with a right. They traded At the Mount district a kitchen INDER
enn was a situytion where any-— . ene Pi raat hare, lofts blows as the bell ended the fight. was blown from its foundation Z a

fae might have happened. Four Hazare Opens Out with the left hand and a lump ap- sree mae ® Wa. sty Shoe aver. .
thane wero down. for 90 and "5M peared under Charles ton aon ET ee a ee ae een enna EEE mmnserratnesin eo A en ee
low a Syusisoss of a fot Hazare at first content to be Walcott drove a stiff left jab to ws

But Graveney and Watkins who the silent partner opened out after Charles’ jaw. Ezzard replied with



i Junch and runs came at more 4 left to the body and the referee
lose bowling by Shinde Gear than one a minute. Hazare dis- aguin warned him against low ff
the game around. Never really Played some delightful cover blows. They exchanged lefts to the 0:
top of the bowling, they newer, ves, and could not have re- face. When the bell rang blood
theless defended doggedly ‘ana {orded his highest score of the dripped from the cut under choose
slowly ghe score mounted. Grave— ‘0%, 4t,a more appropriate mo- Charles’ left eye. :
ney reached his 50 after two and ment, When the score reached 254 ROUND .8.—They exchanged extra mild, extra soothing
a quarter hours including one six Hazare and Manjrekar had beaten short rights. Walcott drove a hard ‘
off Shinde and seven fours. ws ore ae ioe aes bet right to Charles’ jaw. ee Bath Size

j 4 i Y y Hazare and janded a hard right to Walcott’s
wos amen df looked as._if Marchant inthe 1961-82 series i jaw and the crowd roared. Wal- PALMOLiV
the partnership would see Eng- India. f cott thumped a hard right to
land safely through the day But they were not destined to Charles’ back, the challenger bent
Ahmed struck for the fourth time. ‘#X¢ matters much further. At © and when he straightened up, Joe
Watkins, still two short of a half o'clock and just when it looked as connected a hard right to Charles’
century, was out Lbw., and a ‘hough they were set for night chin, Walcott moved after him &
bright 20 minutes of Evans another Hutton bowling switch and Charles clinched. Fans booed.
brought the proceedings to a brought back Bedser, and Hazare Walcott drove a right to Charles’ or
close. : play ‘oleae ea ne hogey the lee head and Ezzard replied with stift ap

i ball who yj o Joe’s he just before
W.I. Again gathered his third victim in no je"? 7s head 3 er

i se coeees Spetatr ” Wolsne “unce manner. Hazare had ROUND 9.——At the start of the 7
into Headingley Cricket Ground batted neasiy foue and a balf ninth round Charles looked. grim. \ £
between the lunch and tea inter— hours, for his and apart from ‘They exchariged’ half a dozen iF
val on Thursday might have beem two chan Peth

5 one , Oar ex- hes, then Charles landed a #

pardonably excused for thinking tremely di he had not wee, : : nded 1

; —— ard left hook to Walcott’s jaw.
that) the 1960" West. imdses ne made a mistake. If he was more Joe shook his head. Charles drove ph ’
pattern was’ familiar. At the only Uaturel in a batsman sesking 2,*€eePing left hook to the cham- tra-in//d PALMOLIVE
pattern wa ; a n seeking 3.°0\"*t ti
crease mia dark ec nes is regain wate = a meine of gia oS Bale es rans SOOTHES BABY’S TENDER SKIN i
were taking complete comman ow scores. evious six ,;o Se ahs 4
of an England attack which Hut- innings he had totalled only 39, then six punches to Joe’s body.) — — Palmolive—made of the finest ingredients—gives a creamy-

BISCUITS

ini > ;, Charles landed another right and

tof, perraiae oa a —_ oh tail om hegre in ee ae Pralcots replied vite, a right ia oie smooth extra-mild lather thot soothes away irritation as it gently
less thought than rapidity. But the other quickly followed him. ann ore sent Hard a re Aa s floats away dirt. A daily Palmolive bath will keep your baby
the scoreboard showed the loss of Only one run had been added to WAlcott aie = - . += es, ee forte! freshed a ‘ spades 3
only three wickets and at 6 o’clock the total and Manjrekar gave ing a right t en a left ook to the comfortable . . . refreshed . . . dainty. Remember, Palmolive is
the two batsmen had betweem Trueman his second wicket when ne Mg mg another right exiro-mild . . . extra, soothing?
them, added 222 runs. he edged one into a leg trap and JUS OUND’ \ oT ‘

Heroes of this run getting spree Alan Watkins made a, superb ee 10.— jalcott landed a . ly
were India’s Captain, Hazare, a catch low down on his left hand § ean t to Charles body, then XN Uy,
compact greying-haired figure who side. Manjrekar whose first cen- ase drove four hard punches xs
from a distance looks not unlike tury of the tour it was, was to the body at the start of the =
a larger edition of Everton Weekes, cheered enthusiastically all the we ae ae 2 -
and Vijay Manjrekar, baby of the way back to the dressing room. alcott replied with a right to
Indian side who bears decided re- Gopinath came and went with- the body. Charles landed a right
semblance at the crease to Frank out scoring and visions of a sec- to Walcott’s jaw and the cham
Worrell. ond and possibly final collapse pion held on. Walcott landed a

Saved India loomed up as the England bowl- light left to Charles head.
brs admirably supported in the Opening a cut on the side of the Fer Loveloess 4 Over buy BATH SIZE PALMO

These two batsmen certaimhy field attacked Mantri and Ram- challenger’s right eye. Charles y Live
saved India today om a wicket chand. But these two survived the drove a hard right to the jaw at peer oo
which looks full of runs but which final half hour to leave India in the bell.
may soon be visited by rain. a satisfactory, even if not a win- | ROUND 11.—Charles appeared

When they came together the ning position. fresh with both his cuts patched
prospects of India lasting until To bat are: Ramchand, Shinde, up. The challenger scored a left
tea time were not over great. and Ghulum Ahmed. hook to the body, then landed a
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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS ef ADVOCATE

irwcnae = ae wernt LS = rm re Foe ts om ue

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown

—_———$—e

Saturday, June 4, 1952

TRADE UNIONS

A MEETING in Barbados of a branch of
the International Confederation of Free
Trade Unions is an event of great impor-
tance in the history of the island.

Trade Unionism in the world today is
sharply divided between Communist-
dominated and free Trade Unions. The
rift between the two union ideologies was

effected in 1949. In March 1949 a mani-
festo describing the World Federation of
Trade Unions as dominated by Commun-
ist organisations was issued by the British
Trades Union Congress, the United States
Congress of Industrial Organisations and
the Dutch Federation of Trade Unions,
who had withdrawn from membership of
the World Federation of Trade Unions on
January 25, 1949.

Similar action was taken by free trade
union federationssand councils in Austra-
lia, New Zealand, Belgium, Switzerland
and Sweden among other countries.

In June 1949 the dissenting unions held
a cofiference in Geneva which was attend-
ed by 127 delegates from thirty-eight
national federations of Trade Unions
claiming to represent 45,000,000 members.

In the sare year the Communist-dom-
inated World Federation of Trade Unions
held a conference in June and this was
attended by delegates representing 71,000,-
000 members in forty-five countries.

When the free trade unions established
on December: 7, 1949, the International
Conféderation of Free Trade Unions with
headquarters in Brussef& a membership of
about 50,000,000 was claimed.

The significant fact about international
Trade Unions today therefore is the cleav-
age which exists between trade unions
which are loyal to the concepts and tradi-
tions of.the Western democratic way of
life and those trade unions which are very
efficiently organised and are busily en-
gaged in inculcating Communist tech-
niques and beliefs throughout the world.
In the British Caribbean the avant-garde
of Communism is already firmly estab-
lished. Communists today make no secret
of their affiliations and a travelling sales-
man of Communist beliefs and doctrines
was recently reported in the West Indian
Press to be looking forward to the day
when all the peoples of the West Indies
should become Communist,

The presence in Barbados therefore of
delegates who are representatives of the
trade unions of the free world is a subject
for congratulation.

The Inter-American Regional Organisa-
tion of Free Trade Unions is faced with
the task of combating the propaganda and
activities of representatives of the Com-
munist-dominated World Federation of
Trade Unions,

There is ho merit in speculation as to
the desirability or need of trade unions in
the West Indies. The enemy today of pro-
gress in the West Indies is not the internal
friction which used to exist between the
“haves” and the “have-nots.” The progress
of the West Indies entirely depends on the
united efforts of all its people to stabilize

the society which has already emerged
and through education and training to
continue to build sure foundations for the
future. The enemy to West Indian pro-
gress is an enemy from outside; an enemy
who consciously or_ unconsciously owes
allegiance to the most powerful and des-
potic ruler ever yet known to world his-
tory—the dictator whose decrees are |
issued from the Kremlin in Moscow. The
weapons chiefly employed by this enemy
are words.

In the West Indies these words are
aimed to creaté racial disunity, to foment
class hatred and to encourage the corrup-
tion of morals and degradation of the
human character.

The International Confederation of Free
Trade Unions is organised to defeat the
insidious propaganda which is dissemin-
ated from Soviet Russia. Quite recently
the Government of the Gold Coast was
compelled to stop a subsidised airborne
service of Communist literature direct
from Moscow to the Gold Coast.

The menace of Communism is not a
bogey invented by Wall-street financers:
nor is it the fiction of. journalists seeking
to titillate the mental appetite of its read-
ers. It is real. Communist propagandists
are highly trained to exploit the differen-
ces of race and class. The West Indies
therefore owe much to the outspoken
frankness of Mr. Grantley Adams, C.M.G.
and other distinguished ieaders of tiade
union movements for their allegiance to
the International Confederation of Free
Trade Unions. Whatever the defects and
teething troubles of West Indian Trade
Unions the essential fact to be borne in
mind by all West Indians, whether trade



unionists or plain citizens, is that the |
leading unions of the area are taking up |
the cudgels in defence of the democratic
as opposed to the totalitarian way of life.
That is something for which we must all

|
|
be grateful.







Our Common Heritage —7

The Age of Reform

As the nineteenth century
began to get under way, it
became increasingly clear that
slavery in the West Indies was
doomed. Bewildered by the
strong current of abolitionist

opinion in England, some of the
planters sought to stem the tide
by accepting measures to im-
prove the lot of the slaves, The
flogging of females was abol-
ished, the punishment of males
was restrained, labour on Sun-
day was forbidden and _ the
slaves were granted the rights
owning property and giving
evidence in a court of law.

But such improvements in the
slave code were not accepted
everywhere, and this gave fresh
impetus to the abolitionist cam-
paign in England, That cam-
paign was not, of course, an
isolated thing, It was a part of
the great liberating movement
that brought reform to England
itself, making trade union action
legal, humanising the penal
code and passing the measure
that gave the vote to the English
middle classes in 1832. That
this movement was to effect the
West Indies so strongly was
chiefly due to William Wilber-
force, whose name was used as
a battle-cry by the slaves in
Barbados during the insurrec-
tion in Barbados in 1816; an4
when his thealth was broken,
the cause he had championed
so effectively was taken up by
Thomas Fowell Buxton.

In the West Indies, as in
England, religion was to play a
powerful part in the reforming
movement. The Methodists, the
Moravians and the Baptists had
won the deep gratitude of the
slaves by their missionary
activities. John Smith, _ the
Methodist parson, died in Brit-
ish Guiana in 1824, a martyr to
the cause of bringing education
and the Christian religion to
the slaves. The year before that,
the Wesleyan Chapel in Bridge-
town was destroyed by a section
of the white population who felt
that the Methodists were unset-
tling the minds of the slaves by
teaching them ideas of equality.
The Moravians fought to get
schools started for the slave
population, And it was a West
Indian delegation of Baptists
that helped to bring things to a
head in England in 1833 and
finally persuaded the English to
abolish slavery as “repugnant
to the principles of the British
Constitution and of the Chris-
tian religion.”

The Church Strengthened

In the early part of the nine-
teenth century, the role played
by the Anglican Church was
not a noble one. “For a century
and a half the doors of the
Established churches were closed
against the hundreds of tihou-
sands of heathens by whose
physical labour the industrial
structure was upheld” wrote >a
former Principal of Codrington
College. Except for the Society
for the Propagation of the Gos~
pel, which gave Christian
instruction of the slaves on the
Codrington estates in accordance
with the will of Christopher
Codrington, the Church of Eng-
land showed no sign of believ-
ing that the slaves possessed
immortal souls. “We — cannot
deny” wrote Alfred Caldicott
“that, the vast majority of
our fellow-subjects in the West
Indies lived in unrelteved
heathenism amid the so-called
‘parishes’ of Jamaica, Barbados
and the Leeward Islands.”

But Canning, the great Eng-
lish statesman who was_ then
Leader of the House of Com-
mons, saw the current of events
and decided to strengthen the
Anglican Church in the West
Indies in 1824, He realised that
emancipation was inevitable and
took steps to prepare the Church
to play its part in that great
revolution. The West Indies was
divided into two dioceses and
two eminent men were chosen
to guide the Anglican Church
through this critical time. Chris-
topher Lipscomb was appointed

Bishop of Jamaica, with the
Bahamas and Honduras under
his care. William Hart Cole-

ridge was selected as Bishop of
Barbados and his diocese inclu-
ded the Leeward Islands, St.
Vincent, Grenada, Trinidad and
British Guiana,” The Bishops
were instructed to report on the
state of the Church “particu-
larly as it relates to the slave
population” and to ascertain
“the best means of diffusing the
benefits of religious instruction
to that part of the Community.”
To prove its profound interest
in sych instruction the British

Government undertook to pay
the administrative expenses of
the two dioceses, placed the

clergy under the control of the



OUR READERS SAY:

Black Market Selling

To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR.—I am inclined to think
that the hard living in Barbados
is caused in some way by many
sellers.

In several .districts shopkeep-
ers apply their minds to robbing
customers out of the weights and
measures due to them. Some
shopkeepers give customers the
maximum weights of fifteen
ounces of any article as one
pound of avoirdupois which is
equivalent to sixteen ounces. I
have already seen a shopkeeper
with a pint tin pressed in at the
top to prevent it from taking up
the portion of fluid for which it
was made to hold.

On the other hand, hawkers
who sell oranges, limes and other
fruits are not always willing to
tell the prices of their articles.
To ask one the price of bananas
the answer may be “How many
do you want?”, When you say
the amount you want, you will
get whatever the hawker wants
to give for the money. Some
will not sell except the amouht
needed is stated. These deeds
help to create bad living in the
island; not only done by the
town-sellers but most sellers
throughout the island.

I was in Christ Church parish
a week ago, and saw a fish-seller
retailing fish at eight cents each
and yet I heard that the retail
price of one was seven cents by
the law ane ;

In order to get rid of this dis-

Bishops and provided funds ‘for
the more immediate supply of
persons in holy orders.”

Coleridge’s first task was to
increase the supply of clergy.
Here he had to fight all over
again the battle that had been
waged against men like Sir
John Gay Alleyne who wanted

to keep the Codrington founda-

tion as a secondary school for
boys. But Coleridge’s efforts
were successful and in 1828

Codrington College was estab-
lished as a training college for
clergy and the grammar school
was removed to the site where
it began its independent exis-
tence as the Lodge School.
Several years before Cole-
ridge came to Barbados, the
Combermere Charity School
had been started for coloured
and Negro children and the
Central School for poor whites.
Encouraged by this, the Bishop
set about the task of building
schools and by the end of his
episcopate, in spite of the disas-,
trous ihurricane of 1831, thef!
number of ‘schools had risen’t
from eight to eighty-three anJ
the number of children on theis
roll from five hundred to sever
thousand. He steadily increased
the number of clergy = an
churches and gradually th

Negroes gave up such practices
ay

‘



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Hy F. A. Hleyos

William Hart Coleridge

one section destroying the cane-
fields and estate houses and the
other burning down the chapels
erected by the Dissenters for
the slaves. It is small wonder
that the prophets of despair
predicted that emancipation
would bring disaster and that
the British West Indies would
follow the example of Haiti, by
exterminating. the whites and
setting up a black republic.
Coleridge, like his colleague
in Jamaica, took up his task in
the firm conyiction that his duty
as a Christian Bishop was not
to dncrease the hostility between
the planters and the slaves but
to neal the breach between
these two classes through the
principles of Christian fellow-
ship. He carefully instructed
his clergy that they should
enlist the support and co-opera-
tion of the planters in their
work among the slaves. For
him it was a matter ofsthe first
importance that the work of the
Church should proceed in such
a way that it would win the
confidence of the Negroes and
at the same time secure the
goodwill of their masters. But,
where a vital principle arose,
he wWeuld not agree to any com-
promise. When the Rev. W. M.
Hart., Rector of St. Lucy, was
charged: before a Court. of

WILLIAM HART COLERIDGE

as howling ovey their dead and
offering food at their graves.
Moreover, during the five years
following emancipation, he in-
spired the formation of twenty-
two Friendly Societies which
encouraged thrift and self-help
among its 2,574 members,

All this was only part of the
vast programme Coleridge set
himself and, besides, he had to
find time to visit the other ter-
ritories of this diocese, For two
hundred years the Established
Church in the West Indies had
been without the services of a
Bishop and its members, in the
words of a certain lamentation,
had been left to wander “in the
wilderness as sheep without a

shepherd.” Coleridge worked
heroically to make up for the
neglect of the past but after

eighteen years his magnificent
energy began to fail and in 1842
he was forced by ill-health to
retire from the See, After
returning to England, he became
first Warden of St. Augustine’s

College, Canterbury, and held
that post until his death in
1849.

The Reconciler

The situation facing Coleridge
and .Lipscomb, when they came
to the West Indies, was delicate
and dangerous, The Barbadian
insurrection of 1816 thad been
followed by a revolt in British
Guiana in 1823 and this in turn
was to be followed later by an
even more formidable upheaval
in Jamaica, Moreover, under
Buxton’s leadership, the aboli-
tionist campaign gathered pace
and momentum and few seemed
to expect that the great issue
could be settled without vio-
lence and bloodshed. It was not
a happy state of affairs, with

honesty I hope that for the sake
of the poor people the Govern-
ment may appoint district in-
spectors who will see that people
sell their goods at prices not ex-
ceeding those which are made by

the Government.
THEODON.

Dominica And Winnie
To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—It will be remembered
that one of the several pressing
state affairs of paramount im-
portance which Mr, Winston
Churchill tackled immediately
on his assumption of office as
Prime Minister of Great Brit-
ain, the result of the General
Election of 25th Oct., 1951, was
the question how to put an end
to the “cold war’ which threat-
ened to flare up into actual hos-
Ailities between Great Britain
and her former gallant ally and
thereby plunge the } ms into
a war, the like cf which no
human eye has witnessed since
the creation of the world. Asa
means towards that end, Mr.
Churchill proposed a meeting of
“The Big Three’ — the Heads
of the Governments of Great
Britain, the United States of





America and Soviet Russia —
with a view to arriving at a
workable understanding between
the three former allies, whose
gallantry and united blogdy
sacrifice won World War I,
and thereby save themselves,
and the other countries of
Europe, from becoming vassal

States of Nazi Germany, for all

Grand Sessions for preaching
ideas of equality to the slaves,
Coleridge stood firmly by him
and it was largely due to his
support that the Rector was
eventually pardoned by the
King. For he could not accept
as Christian doctrine the plea
of the planters that it was right
to maintain certain “distince-
tions” as “necessary to safety.”
Yet Coleridge had no desire to
follow the example of the Dis-
senters and incur the perma-
nent antagonism of the planters.

He was determined not to
identify himself completely with
any one section. He _ insisted

that the Church should seek to
win the support of both sections
by the thorough and earnest
manner in which it did its pas-
toral work,

The remarkable thing about
Coleridge is that he succeeded
in the extremely difficult role
he set himself. Gradually he
persuaded all classes to look on
the Church ag the one integra-
ting force in the island, His
work in this respect did more
than anything else to bring
about a easure of reconcilia-
tion between planter and slave
and prepare them for the great
change that was to come, It
was mainly due to this that the
far-reaching social revolution,
known as the abolition of
slavery, took place peacefully.
His labours, like those of Lips-
comb in Jamaica, were largely
responsible for the happy ,cir-
cumstance that emancipation in
the West Indies—described as
one of the turning points in the
history of human progress—was
carried out without any of the

wild excesses that had been
mournfully p¥ophesied ten
years before.

times, The reaction from

Capitol Hill to Mr, Churchill's
proposal, not being encouraging,
he publicly declared his detgr-
mination to meet His Excellency
Joseph Stalin, whether Presi-
dent Truman joined him or not.

Feeling that this Great and
Strong Man of Our Times de-
served the support and encour-
agement of every man and
woman within the British Com-
monwealth of Nations, for his
indomitable courage, and de-.
termination to try alone, if ne-
cessary, to save the world from
becoming blasted into bits; and
knowing the sentiment of my
fellow-countrymen and women
on the subject, I sent Mr.
Churchill, on the morning fol-
lowing the afternoon of his
memorable declaration (13th
November last) the following:
“The Right Honourable

Prime Minister of England

No. 10 Downing Street
London.
On behalg of the people of
Dominica, B.W.I., I send you
hearty congratulations on your
projected Russian policy, which,
if adopted, will save the war-
crippled World the ‘unspeak-
able horrors and devastation of
an atomic war, draw upon you
and yours the blessing of Heav-
en, and for which, Posterity will,
the more, bless and cherish your

memory.”
Yours etc.,
W. W. WYLLIS,
Ex-Journalist.



’
|
|
i
|

|

| Moenday—Being a thirsty wayfarer in the







1952

SATURDAY, JUNE 7,





NOBODY'S ©
DIARY

City of Bridgetown I approached the
Italian drinking fountain just opposite
the Waterworks.

But when I tried to push the cock in
and the water out I hurt my thumb.

It was just as well because people with
stronger thumbs than mine get a bath
from the splash.

I am sure the waterworks would fit a
cock which does credit to this lovely
oasis in the City: and there must be
enough cement and masons available to
construct a proper cistern.

While the waterworks do their stuff
the Civic Circle will no doubt plant
some flowering shrubs in this miniature
park and then someone might be inter-
ested enough to construct some stone
seats.

Tuesday—The side of the Public Buildings
which does not contain the House of
Assembly has three beautiful stained
glass windows.

As you go up on one side you read
“Render unto Caesar the things. that





are Caesar’s” and as you come down on
the other “And to God the things that
are God's”. Upstairs another stained
glass window which has been damaged
commemorates the beautiful words “Un-
less the Lord build the House their
labour is but lost that built it.”

On the other side there is a hideous
modern structure labelled Ladies Lunch-
eon Room or something to that effect.
If there is a stained glass window hidden
by this monstruosity I wouldn’t be able
to tell you being a stranger in those
parts.

Outside the Public Buildings nailed on
to a shade tree is an ugly sign about cars.

What is required is a neat little note
saying “The samaan tree which is com-
mon in Port-of-Spain is rare in Bridge-
town: this tree was planted here by .. .”
“Or simply a little board saying “This is
not a samaan tree: though it looks like

”



one.
Wednesday—After all the heat that has been
generated about electricity someone

wants us to take our clothes off: or near-
ly all, To keep cool I suppose. Personally
I wear my shirt flapping over my neatly
cut blue shorts and open from top to
bottom. And I know just enough about
electricity to keep my shirt on and to be
thankful for what lightI get in this
island of darkness.

The other night when the lights went
out my four-year-old son outeclamoured
Claudius with screams for “Lights.”
When he got light in candle form he
didn’t like the way the flame jumped. I
can remember when it was funny to re-
peat the story “look at moonlight com-
ing out of a*half-pint bottle.” The way

some people go off the deep end about

electricity you’d think they weren’t

brought up on oil lamps and pressure

lanterns, Ah! well.
Thursday—They’re on about women now.
Madariaga is good about women. He

quotes J. B. Moreton who published his

impressions of the English West Indies in
1793 and who reproduced a local adage
which went like this:

“Creole Misses when scarcely ten
Cock their eyes and long for men.”
That was a long time ago and presum-
ably there has been some progress since
then but there sure seems a lot of spade
work yet to be done for women. Why not
a Queen Elizabeth Home for Young

Women?

It’s her birthday isn’t it.

Friday—The Barbadian I would like to see
written up more than any other is the
one whose face hangs painted in the
House of Assembly restaurant.

He is described as the Father of the
Agricultural Societies. “What a good
name to leave behind you.”

Saturday—That reminds me. Who left be-
hind those two rusty guns up in the en-
trance to the House of Assembly? Maybe
they have a history, but at present it
covered in dust. Better present them to
the Garrison Officers Mess, what! Or de-
tail a cleaning party. in Part-one orders
for gun cleaning. Have we got enough
guns for an exhibition? If so we coulc
cart them all up to the Garrison anc
leave them there,

P.S. Little Bo-peep has lost her shee;
and I know where it is—lying on the St
James beach with its tummy open anc
smelling like overnight flying-fish.

Russian Manoeuvres Conducted Off Japan

TOKYO, June 6.
RUSSIA is conducting naval and air man

| oeuvres off the northern tip of Japan, accord

ing to Japanese Press reports.

Kyodo News Agency quoted the Japanese
national police headquarters in Kushiro on
Hockaido Island as saying that Russian war-
ships and planes are operating off Nemuro
on the western tip of the island.

It said vibrations of shells used in target

jpractice could be felt in Japanese coastal
}towns and searchlights have been seen.

—U-P.

PHOTOGRAPHS

Copies of Local Photographs

Which have appeared in the

Advocate Newspaper
Can be ordered from the...









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»



SATURDAY, JUNE 7, 1952

52

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Unified Trade Union
Movement Urged

from page 1
The Barbados deiegate empha-
sised the need for a social secur-
ity scheme throughout the Carib-
bean area in order that workers
might have some remuneration
on which to live after they shall

have reached old age.
Mr. R. C. Tello (British Gui-
ana) addressing the conference,

said that at one stage of the re-
port presenteq by Mr. Ramouldi,
the acting Chairman of the con-
ference on the working of
O.R.1.T., he was prepared to turn
on a bombardment against it, but
since hearing the excuse and ex-
planation given by the chairman,
he was forced to sympathise with
them in their efforts to surmount
the vatious obstacles and hurdles
which they encountered.
Highlight

There was however, one high
light that could not possibly pass
anyone of them without giving
the impression that O.R.ILT, ad-
mitted that within its present or-
ganisation, work within the
Caribbean would have been diffi-
cult because the amount of work
ascribeq to the functions of
O.R.LT. was so voluminous that
the Caribbean had to be satisfied
with second or third place,

Mr. Tello said that it was well
known that it was almost impos-
sible to divorce entirely any
labour movement from politics,
but politics as it is related to the
trade union movement, was, he
thought something to be wel-
comed; especially when the poli-
tics was evolved from the trade
union movement, rather than the

trade union movement evolved
from politics.
“Politics have so surrounded

this great movement, that it

has brought us at cross roads.

I can hardly say if we are going

forward or backwards. I throw

out this to those people who are
anxious to serve and to employ
the means of legislation and
compulsion by legislation
rather than using the machin-
ery which is really suited to
democratic trade unions,” Mr.

Tello said.

He observed that in .Barbados
the two things were so integrated
because of the paucity of neces-
sary talent. It had been spoken
privately and openly that it was
the wish of the leaders that this
important organisation should
run yarallel with rather than in
an integration that, one could
hardly differentiate between the
tr7o.

Political Movement

Mr, Adams haq said that the
future of the West Indies depend-
ed a great deal on the growth of
trade unionism strong and pow-
erful and side by side with a po-
litical movement which was
purely labour. That, he said, im-
pressed him as an acknowledge-
ment of the fact that these two
must go side by side,

He recalled how a very “histo-
rical political speech” almost
paralysed the C.L.C, and because
these people associated with the
C.L.C, had seen the necessity of
having two organisations, not
separate, certainly united but not
amalgamated, growing side by
side. He felt confident that now
they were about to enter into the
organisation of the Caribbean
Trade Congress, they should
approach this matter with the
feeling that there must be a
growth of these two organisa-
tions, not as he said integrated,
but growing side by side.

“Tt am not prejudiced to poli-
ticians, but if to-day we should
ask these men who are doing
very good and admirable work in
the political field to give up poli-
tics and te come solely and undi-
videdly into the trade union
movement, I ask the question—is
that a fair request to make to po-
liticians? Is it fair for the field of
politics in the Caribbean? I say
no.”

Mr. 'Tello sounded a note of
warning in pointing out that if

they persisted in leafiing on peo-
ple who were kind to them and
whose intentions were good, but
were primarily politicians, they
would be facing the danger of de-
veloping a labour movement that
was necessarily from habit, a de-
pendent one, They were facing
the danger of labourites who
some day would find themselves
almost lost at sea because there
was not some great politician on
whom to lean, nor was there any
encouragement if they allowed
the workers to grow up with the
feeling that there must be some
great politician to lead them,

Danger

Concluding he said: “The dan-
ger is that some day, there might
be a dearth of such- people, or
the international political move-
ment would be of such that it
would take up all the time of
these great men and we would
find the leaders of trade unions
like lost sheep without a shep-
herd, a shepherd that was kind,”

He .urgtd that this danger
could bé corrected at this stage
before they all live to regret it
and posterity blame them for it.

Mr. Roberts (Trinidad)
pointed out that there were 28
trade unions in Trinidad and



SS



DOULTON





each leader thought of fighting
individually rather than col-
lectively. He expressed concern
over the apathy of the work-
ers and their indecision as re-
gards which unionists should
leaqd them, and said that one
found that politicians often
told the workers that the lead-
ers of the unions were not
qualified to lead them.

He also spoke of their lack of
interest in classes organised for
their own benefit, and said that
often those selected to lecture
often arrived to find that the
workers themselves were absent.

There was no. co-operation
among the working Class people
of Trinidad, he said,. and in his
view, Trinidad in this respect was
very backward, Every leader, he
‘said, was in fear of losing the
workers of his union, and they
were all at a loss as to what to
do.

Mr. C. Fergusson (Grenada)
brought greetings from the Gre-
nada Workers’ Union,, and said
that they in Grenada hoped that
the Conference would do some-
thing to the everlasing benefit of
the West Indies as a whole.

He urged delegates to the Con-
ference to take as their maxim a
quotation of the ancient philo-
sopher Socrates “I have laboured,
not to mock, not to lament, but
to understand the actions of
men,” and build on it, and then

they would have laboured to un-
derstand the problems cf the
West Indies.

Compensation

Those problems concerred each
of the various territories in the
area, he said. There were such
things as workmen's compensa-
tion—a sore question in Grenada
and many of the other islands—
the education of the trade union
members — a question of par-
amount importance to all the
islands—and he was glad in the
latiet. respect to see that it had
been urged that they would
utilise the facilities offered by the
University College of the West
Indies,

The other important question
was the question of federation
which was very important to the
working class people of the islands,
because it touched on their very
economic existence.

Mr. Fergusson dréw attention to
the restrictions placed on certain
persons who, because they were
labouring towards bettering the
condition of the working class peo-
ple were labelled Communists,
and urged that there should be
freedom of movement between
the islands,

Mr, C. P, Alexander, member
of the Sub-Committee of O.R.LT.,
and a vice chairman of the Con-
ference, gave a brief account of
the growth of the LC.F.T.U, and
its agencies. He observed that in
politics, like religion, each and
everyone had his own concept, but
in the ranks of trade unionism,
there was no difference in con-
cept in the principle of trade
unionism. Trade unionists, no
matter what part of the world they
might be, had ‘an identical con-
cept, provided that their minds
were not flavoured with any form
of politics,

He stressed the importance of
building up and maintaining a
strong, powerful and unified la-
bour movement, but warned that
they should steer cleay of indi-
vidual politics.

Statesmanship

He expressed great admira-
tion for statesmanship, but said
he had no admiration for poli-
ticians, no matter how great
such politicians might be. A
statesman, he said, was not
merely a politician, and he ad-
mired one who identified him-
self as a statesman of his coun-
try and one who was prepared
te do everything possible for
the benefit of his colony as a
whole. They in the Caribbean
had a great deal of experience
with politicians. He had no
umbrage and he fit that one’s
political career could be of great
benefit to one’s country.

The trade union movement
could also subscribe to the build-
ing of a country in the interest of
the working class people, It was
a great movement, and he was
sure delegatés would realise its
importance, It was a movement
which was going to place in the
hands of willing trade unionists
something which, if wisely used,
could be of great interest to all

trade union movements in the
Caribbean,

He recalled the observation
made by the Secretary of the

British Trade Union Congress that
what the British Trade Union had
received was not like manna fall-
ing from heaven, but something
which they had struggled and
fought for, and exhorted delegates
and trade unionists in the Carib-
bean to struggle and fight to obtain
and enjoy the respect of the em-
ployer and the government.

He was not un,.indful that the
unification of trade unions in the
West Indies called for a great deal

— ———





_ TRY HARRISON'S Fox

WEDDING GIFTS
ANNIVERSARY
BIRTHDAY PRESENTS

Our Stocks, all quite new, include

HIGH GRADE PLATED WARE

(Fish Knives and Forks, Tea and Coffee Spoons, Toast Racks, Waiters,

Condiment Sets, Mounted Bread Boards, Silver Table Bells, etc.)

FIGURINES
(The latter with beautiful lace effects) and

A wide range of the famous

and

& ADDERLEY







CARLTON

in which we have over 100 pieces, all different, from which you may choose



——



CAVALRY MARCH PAST



A DETACHMENT of Mounted Police, under the command of Staff Sergeant Anderson of the Royal

Canadian Mounted Police, “march past” the saluting base at the Queen





‘s Birthday Parade on Thursday.



of struggle, and emphasised that
it was their duty to go all out
to maintain such unification. He
said that while under the aegis
of the LC.F.T.U., and O.R.LT.,
they looked forward to a great deal
of assistance, but trade unionists
in the Caribbean were not will-
ing to fall and allow the I.C.F.T.U.

Famous Magician
Returns To B’dos

Professor Robert Clifton, a
magician who recently arrived in
Barbados—his second visit in four
years—will be giving a show in

executive to dé their domestic PYpnotism and magicianship at
work. Club Morgan to-night and at the
Globe Theatre on the 14th and

Great Sacrifices 15th.
This magician, a 52-year-old
“We must be prepared to go Frenchman, is supposed to be able

all out and build a unified trade
union movement worthy to be re-
spected throughout the civilized
world. It is a hard task and it is
for us to make up our minds and
determine what part we will play
in. this great task.’ We have to
make great sacrifices. which are
worthwhile making, so that those
who come after us will find a
foundation upon which to work, I
am sure that the hardest task is
the beginning, but the most of
all is the maintenance of that
which is established,

“Trade unionism, as such, has
never in its history accomplished
all its requirements overnight,”
Mr. Alexander said, “There has
been long struggle in the trade
union movement throughout the
civilised world,*and in the estab-
lishment of our unification we
have to take the same road as the
others have taken to build their
movement and not be satisfied with
its achievements until such. time
as we have been able to command
the 1espect of each and everyone
within the respective territories.”

“A unified trade union movement
will be useless unless its respec-
tive units or associates, are each
and everyone’in themselves strong,
It will be the obligation of this
central body to see to it that all
free trade union movements in
the respective territories become
stronger than they ever were in
the past.” ;

to hypnotise one and then send
needles through the person’s face,
and besides this and many other
tricks, he is an acclaimed fire
eater, though the latter feat is
not on his programme for to-
night. ,

Since 14 years old when Robert
Clifton decided he could do a bit
in the magician line and when
he went on the stage for his school
pals, he has travelled in many
countries to perform the many
tricks he has acquired the knack
of doing.

He has visited
Switzerland and England wher
he attracted large audiences and
during the war he also performed
to American troops.

His present aide is a fellow
country woman called Florence.
He has arranged to act in concert
with the Boodhoo brothers,

Fishing Boat
Prograninie Held Up

A shortage of certain material
is still holding up the Fishing
Boat Building programme whieh
is in progress at the grounds of
the Fisheries Office. Already keels
have been laid for twelve boats.
Some of the boats are already
planked,

It is proposed to build 25 new.
boats, The frames for the other
13 are stored away at the Fisheries
Office.

A quantity of silver bali arrived
during the week from British
Guiana, Flexible wood for spars
arrived from St. Lucia,

There is however still a great

Belgium, Ttaly

Finally Mr. Alexander pledged
himself to be “pioneer of this great
and important co-ordinated and
central body of the Caribbean
Trade Union Movement,” and
said, “I am sure that the unifi-
cation of this movement will be
greatly admired by all West In- need for Santa Maria hardwood,
dian statesmen like Mr, G, H. Silver bali and other hardwood
Adams who have not only ex- for the interior of the boats,
pressed to the world that they are
great politicians, but have mani- / x \
fested thelr desire to serve the 30 « For “peeding
working class people.” Such class-
es of politicians were to be ad- Wesley Denny of Porters, Su
mired by all free trade unionists. James was fined 30/- to be paid

“We should always be prepared in 14 days or one month’s im-
to guard ourselves against poli- Prisonment by His Worship Mr,
ticians who are only willing ta C. L, Walwyn yesterday for
disrupt rather than to assist in driving a motor van on Black

1oad at 30 miles per hour.
Cpl. Jones attached
Traffic Branch said



building a great society of trade
unionism in the civilised world.” to

that he

the
was
Ramouldi Replieces Same vite ae

on duty on Black Rock Road on
March 20 when he saw the van
being driven at a fast rate. He
checked the speed of the van and
saw it was being driven at 30 miles
per hour and the speed limit on

Mr. Ramouldi, the Acting Chair-
man in his reply to the various
observations thanked the various
speakers for their remarks and
criticisms, either expressed or im-

plied, and said that there were that road is 20 miles per hour.
lifferences between individual 7
groups. NO ACCIDENTS

After explaining the position of
O.R.1.T., he warned that the great-
est danger which could come to
the movement now was the in-
filtration of Communist _ fifth
columnists into their midst, though

On the Police Reports yester-
day there were no cases of major
accidents over the Bank-Holiday
period. There were many excur-
sions and picnics but the day was



he shared the denunciation of the ®" uneventful one for motorists,
tactics of labelling people who

were fighting to better conditions.

of the working class people com- such agency, with a view to
munists. .., furthering the education of thi

One of the important tasks with trade unionists in these parts,

which the movement was faced He observed that there was a
was the promotion of legislation reactionary feeling that the work-

relating to the unemployment of
children, and said it was one of
the most important pieces of social

ing class people should not enter
politics, and countered that if
businessmen, merchants and such

legislation which they could proO- others took part in politigs, so
mote. 7 much so should the workers,
He also urged the establish- The Conference then adjournet

ment of a coursé or courses in the anq jater went into Committee to




coming year in co-operation with deal with matters on the Agenda,
the University College of the West A plenary session was held last
Indies, the Colonial Development night at nine o'clock,

and Welfare Organisation or any

»
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Delight

60 Gauge —



with Arabesque Heel
“feet enhancing”

|
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t

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WARE

an ietlitinailt





My Lord's



“ Sheer ”

15 Denier
shades.

Available in fine colours
and Sunbreeze.

$2.86 per pair



Record Crowd
Attends Carnival

A record crowd went to Queen’s

Park on Thursday last for the
annual carnival staged by the
Loyal Brothers of the Stars. As
scon ag the gates were opened
thcre was a Continuous flow of
people going in and out of Queen’s
Park and the gatekeepers had
seme trouble with the crowd
which at times appeared to be

unruly.

There was a good exhibition of
costumes worn by men and
women, Some men were wearing
formal dress and one man pre-
sented a colourful sight when he
appeared before the Park House
dressed in top hat, tails, b’ue
gloves, a red walking stick and
wine coloured shoes. He had
beside him a girl wearing an
evening dress with red gloves to
match those he was wearing.

The stalls afforded many forms
of entertainment such as the lucky
dip, the wheel of fortune and
dart throwing. In the Park House
a concert was staged and a fee of

1/+»had to be paid before one
could enter the room.
One play .was based on the

West Indian way of life showing
the housewife and the difficulties
she experienced in trying to
make “two ends meet.”

There wes much applause at the
end of this play but a repeat per-
formance was not given. In the
steel shed a fair crowd danced
to the music of a stee! band.

{3 For Riding
Without Licence

His Worship Mr, E, A. MeLeod,
Police Magistrate of District “A’,
yesterday ordered Ernest Best of
Will, St. Michael, to
pay a fine of £2 in 14 days or one
month's imprisonment with hard
labour for exceeding the speed
limit while riding the autocycle
J—344 on Black Rock Road on
June 4 about 11,05 a.m,

The same magistrate also fine |
Best £3 for riding the same auto-
eycle on Black Rock road without
having a licence. This fine is to
be paid in two months or there
is an alternative of two months’
imprisonment with hard labour

Both cases were brought by Cpl
Jones and Police Constable 466
Lashley of the Traffic Branch at
Central Station,

Letters Of
Administration

In the Court of Ordinary yes-
terday the Chief Justice Sir
Allan Collymore granted the
petition of Samuel Sobers of St.
Matthias Village, Christ Church,
for Letters of Administration to
the estate of his mother Bertha
Louisa Sobers, deceased,

Mr. D. H. L. Ward, instructed
by Messrs. Hutchinson & Ban-
field, Solicitors; appeared for the
petitioner.

The will of Arnold A, King of
St. Michael was admitted to
probate,

WATER FLOODS
PLAYING FIELD

At the Princess Alice Playing
field groundsmen are preparing
cricket pitches, It is however very
doubtful that these wickets will
be ready for the coming cricket
season,

Whenever there is high tide and









the sea is rough, water flows over
the breakwater and floods the
southern end of the field.

The Pavilion is regularly rent-

ed for dances, The last big dance
was Mrs, A, L, Stuart's “Revuede-
ville’ Dance on Wednesday night.
This was one of the largest dances
ever to be held in the Pavilion
The grounds were well lighted.

eee



in new

of Dawn

CAVE

10,14,













& CO., LTD.







OBITUARY
Mr. G* C. Eckstein |

THE deat}
dence Casab
of Mr
formerly
stein Bros,
bus Owners,

Georgie he
known was the
ate Benjamin
founded the business
Eckstein’s was

and three
in the main
nes as garage proprietors and the
first owners of public motor trans-

th occurred at hi
Maxwell] Co
George ce. Ecksteir
of the firm of Eck
garage proprietors i!

nea



cs was familiarly
third son of th |

Eckstein who}
In the ear- |
locate

of the

bus

lier years

an eightstown

Si

OnS took par

pert from Speightstown t
sridgetown. Georgie who was al-
ways dapper and debonair set
standard in dress, as an ardent}
Lorticulturist he was distin-|
guished a ‘the driver with th
rose” |
Ry quiet but astute financi:i
nvestments he was able to retire

at a comparatively early age and
according to him became = a
“country gentleman” \

He eschewed politics and Wes}
always ready with some quip at]
the expense of the Vestries and}
the Legislature but his interest |
was deep. A gay companion and
easy* of approach he made and



retained until his death many
friends gathered from all sections
of society.



In recent years failing healtt
limited his activities but he en-
deavoured to keen contact witt
those whose friendship he h°<
enjoyed.

He was married to Mis
Croney and had one daughter

To his sorrowing widow ar
daughter deepest sympathy wil
be extended.

‘
Mr. Gladstone
Bowen
The death occurred last weck

at the Tercentenary Wards of th
General Hospital of Mr, Glad
stone Bowen of the Gulf Oil Cor
poration in this island.

Mr. Bowen after leaving scho.
was a clerk in Bridgetown. HE
joined the British West Indi
Regiment in the 1914-18 War an
served in Egypt where he rose |
the rank of Sgt. Major On bh
return he was employed in tl

hat department of Messrs. 1!
Costa & Co,, Ltd. Back in khal
he was a_ highly efficient Se:

geant Major in the Barbados Vo
unteer Force. Later he left |
Costa’s and opened his own pi
vate business and when this wi
not successful he left for Briti
Guiana.

Returning to Barbados a yea
ago he worked at Seawell Ati
port supervising the construc,ic!

of the runway and later join
Gulf Oil,

Always a_ burly figure. M
Bowen despite his sixty yea

was of a rugged constitution an
his short illness and unexpecte
death was a severe shock to hi
family and friends. He leaves 1
mourn their loss two daughter
one on the Staff of Queen's Coll
ege and the other of St. Mich rel
Girls’ School and one son popul

Spartan footballer, To these an
other sorrowing relatives dee}
est sympathy.



Paint, Board
Stolen

Reginald Holder of Pound
Gap, Westbury Road, reporte
the larceny of 50 gallons of re

paint valued $200 and 500 feet «

board valued $60 from Snogs
Quarry at Bush Hall betwee
12.30 p.m, on May 29 and 6(
a.m. on May 30.

Captain B. Austin of Ken
House, Christ Church, repoct
that his house was broken an
entered by an unknown man be

tween 12,30 a.m, and 1,00 p,m, o1
Wednesday. Nothing was stoler

The thief entered through a:
open bedroom window and mac
his escape, leaving behind th
lifing of a cap

An attempt was made to brea!
the Colonnade Store during Wed
nesday night. Kenneth Brath
waite, an employee of the sam
store, reported the incident to the

Police. He stated that a_ loc)
was removed from ong of th
doors.

A Fire at Lascelles Plantatio
St James, at about 11,00 a.m
on Thursday burnt four and
half acres of second crop rip
canes, two acres of second cro;
ratoons, four acres of trash an
five acres of sour grass, the pro
perty of P, G. Seales of Good
land, Christ Church.

& a= oe 4 EE

& CHRISTIAN SCIENCE !
@ = READING ROOM

has the courage ¢











“Charity
conviction. Charity is Love," and }
Love opens the eyes of the blind
rebukes error, and casts it out
¢ Chatity never flees before error )
lest it should suffer from an
encounter
( From Miscellaneous Writings
By Ma Baker Edd
This book ’ be read, bor
rowed or purchased at the Reading
Roor
Open: Tuesdays, Wednesdays
Fridays 10 am 2 p.m. and on
Saturdays 10 a.m 12 o'clock
q ALL ARE WELCOME 4

SHEPHERD

12 & 13 Broad St.




































































PAGE FIVE _
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USE

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FOR CATTLE
A general Tonic and Appetizer, Damp the feed
and sprinkl® Mixture on it /

KOSSOLIAN
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increases the EGG yielq of Laying Birds
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KOSSOLIAN BLOOD MIXTURE for RACE HORSES
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PAGE SIX

GCenoeirinD ADS.



IN MEMORIAM



B

HAREWOOD -—



memory of our

dear mother Core ho departed thir
life on June 6th, 1951

We miss you much, our hearts ar

sore
As time goes by we miss you more,
Your kindly ways, your loving face,
No one can fill your vacant



Ever to be remembered by your loving
children Belfield, Swnley, Ruby ana
Raiph 7.6.52—Ilr

ANNOUNCEMENTS

selling REDIF-
time. Get
4.6.52

EARN BIG MONEY »b
FUSION in your spare
10n

supply of forms to-day









COOK—"Experionced Cook” Apply
Mrs. Otho Dowding, Pine Hill between
8 and 10 a.m 5.6. 52—4n

SERVANT-.Experienced general ser-
vant for smali modern bungalow. Two
in family. Apply, With references, b«
fore 10 in the morning or after in th
evening to Mrs. Scaife, La Garoupe
Cave Hill. 7.6.52—1n

SITUATION Young Exgivnman, 26
single, ex-Royal Navy, now in London

seeks good Situation in Barbados. Smart

appearance, top salesman, and drive

Excellent references. PETER SMITH

C/o Advocate. 7.6.52—2n





MISCELLANEOUS



REDIFFUSION offer
each new Subscriber
you

$1.50 cash
recommended

fo
b
a 4.6.52—10n
TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bon
from Rediffusion for 25 recommends
tions in one calender month
4.6.52--10n
ee
$62.50 POCKET MONEY easily earnec
by recommending 25 new suoscribers t
REDIFFUSION in one month
4.6,52—10n







SUPPLEMENT YOUR INCOME b

recommending REDIFFUSION Obtni:
full particulars from the REDIERUSIO?
office. 4.6. 524-100

ae



PERSONAL

The publie ape hereby warned again
giving credit to my wife, @WENDOLY!.
Fields (nee NILES) as I do not hol.
myseif responsible for her or anyone else
contracting any debt or debis in my



ae 8 unless by «a written order signed
iv e.
GEORGE FIELDS,
Country Road,
St. Michael.

. -7,8.52—2n,

The public are hereby warned inst
giving credit to my wife A
ADINA BURKE (nee FORDE) as I do no!
hold myself responsible for her or any
one else contracting any debt or debts in
my; neme uniess by a written order



signed by me
- JAMES THOMAS BURKF,
Ruby,
St. Philip.
7.6.52—2n

——————
The public are hereby warned again
giving credit to my wife ELISE YARDE
ineéé ROWEN) as I do not hold mysel
tesponsible for her or anyone else con
tracting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me

FREDERICK YARDE,
Bayeroft Rd, Carringten's Village,
St, Michael
1.6.52—2n

y ets
The publloonas hereby warned against

gas eredit “te my wits, a
AE ONES: (nee. arrison as

day ot eadaksanyneht responsible f)
her or ampens cise contracting ar.

debt or debts In my name unless by 4

written order signed by me,
OLRICK SEAFIELD JONES,
Salters.

St. George.
5.6.52—2n

The public are hereby warned against
riving © “to my wite, HELENA
CODRINGTON (nee BUTCHER), as
do not hold myself responsible for her
or anyone else contracting any debt or

debt: in my name unless by a weitt
order signed by mea.
CHARLES CODRINGTON,
Giebeland,
St. George
§.6.52-—2n
The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to ’ wife MABFI
LILIAN PARRIS (nee Daniel) as I do
not hold myself responsible for her or
anyone else cortracting any debt or
debts in my name unless by @ written
order signed by me
ROPERT CECII, PARRIS,
St. Hill's Road,
Carrington Village
St. Michae
§.6.52—2n

ee

- ORIENTAL
PALACE

“HEADQUARTERS FOR
SOUVENTIKS



FROM INDIA, CHINA &
CEYLON

-THANIS

Pr. Wm. Hy, St. Pitas J466

PLE EEALPE LPAI PPP FESSTS

*s
: ;
5
r
) ¢
; YMP.O
g e x
s
> Through the courtesy of S. P.
MUSSON, SON & CO. LTD
§ AGENTS OF K.L.M. ROYAL

DUTCH ATRILINES_ there will be
a showing of the fifm

‘EUROPEAN

On MONDAY %th June 1952s at
$30 p.m. at the Club House for
Members and Friends.

5.6.52—an.

6AM AA SEAL AASLA ES,

Third Annual
Benefit Show & Dance

In Aid
ST.

a

HOLIDAY





of The CH. CH. and
JOHN'S BABY WELFARE
LEAGUE CLINICS

At DRILL HALL, Garrison

FRIDAY, July 4th 1952 at 8.45 p.m.
Under the distinguished Patronage

of Sir George and Lady Seel,
Madame Ifill presents

“The Star Buds School
of DANCING

Pos

in a Variety of classical dances
auch as Ballet, Musical Comedy—
A Novelty Dance ‘Kitten on the
5 A S$ Dance “Rose in
The Bud Parasol" etc
By. kind permission of Col.
Michelin and under the direction
of Capt Raison, A.R.C.M.,,
M.B.F The Police Band will
supply the Music
ADMISSION $1.00
Dancing after the Show. Tickets
from Committee or “The Starj
‘ud"”. Bar and Refreshments

—

TELEPHONE 2508

[epee eT

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



NOTICE
Offers in writing will be received by
Courtesy Garage, White Park Road for
One (1) Ford Prefect Car
damaged in accident,

FOR SALE

nme |

“A
AUTOMOTIVE up to 4.00 p.m. | land,





REAL ESTATE

UHLIC SALES

'—Lower Black Rock, St.

THLONE’
recently | Michael, standing on 1/8 of an acre of

containing 3 bedtooms, draw:
breakfast oe

tl ' 1.6.52—4n a dining room. teem,

- SS ) dres: room, garafe and spacious
mediante Gelyea Gpealnabla for use| BARBADOS CO-OPERAT/VE Mpply on Sree to Mr Glndys Best
on any Type Crawler (Track) Tractor BANK Lee Sore ae
Prices are only a fraction of U.S.A ORDINARY GENERAL ETING , ’

Courtesy Garage Dial 4616.
1,6.52—6n

Notice is hereby given that
Ordinary General Meeting of the

equivalent

the





REDFORD DELIVERY VANS — for
mmediate delivery — Courtesy Garage
Dial 4616 1.6.52—6n

Constitution Road,

June, 1952 at 5 p.m

| purposes :—
CAR—1950 Hillman Minx; im first class|1. To receive and consider the Direc-

order, Dial 2304. 7.6.52—3n tors’ Report, the Profit and Loss

——$—$—_$_—$_—— Account, the Balance Sheet, a State-
CARS—Austin A-70 Hampshire Saloon,

ment of Income and Expenditure,
V-2 Pilot Saloon, Consul 4door Saloon | and the Auditor’s Report. The
All owner-driven and in condi-
tion. CHARLES MCkNEARNES

on Thursday, 12th
for the following | ssie





p.m

above Reports and Accounts will be























& Co 2 & 29th ay of February, 1952. | yo 7 _

Ltd 7.6.52—3n. | 2 ‘o transact the Ordinary business of P *

Dahideaied Abt the Company ¥ 18 Barbados Fire Insurance Co.
CAR—One (1) Mortis Minor, ag good as By order of the Board 18 = * Ice Co P

ew Apply: H. M. Farther, Henly, St. | OQ. E. M&SLLINGTON, 9 Zi wit kt ‘ ory Lid e
= te ELL IE paipcaonyelngrs

: actol s

CAR -— Morris Oxford, 1952 saloon; ansesenaecsesStiteh .
reen. 5,000 miles, one owner, perfect NOTICE COTTLE CATFORD & CO.,
midition. Dial 8509, 7.6.5—3n 4.6.52—6n,
CA a PARISH OF ST. PHILIP -— aaperoneneemaniatrmenie
CAR—Vauxhall Velox 18 h,p. 11 months

id, done 6,000 miles, Polychrome Beige |, APPLICATIONS for one or more

ith red upholstery. Owner driven, | Vacant § Philip's Vestry Exhibitions AUCTION

tenable at the Combermere School, will
be received by the undersigned not
later than Monday i6th June, {952
Candidates must be sons of Parishioners
In straitened circumstances and must
be not less than 10% years nor more’
than 12’ years old on the Ist September

m be seen at Courtesy Garage, $2,400.
7.6.52—t.f.n.

rn
CARS—One (1) Triumph “Mayflower”
voon in first class condition. Mileage
iow, tyres and battery like new. One (1)
Morris “Bight” newly painted; condition
cellent, Chelsea Garage (1950) Ltd.
Phone 4849. ‘ 7.6.52—3n.

OHNSON SEA HORSE—5 h.p. out

with an application form obtained from
the Parochial Treasurer's Officer,
P W. SCOT,





‘


































board motor, scarcely used, $350 Clerk to the Vestry Wednesday next ith June at 12.30 p.m,

Vial 3062 4.6.52—3n St. Philip, |her entire lot of houserold furniture

a 7.6.52— which includes:—2 Upholstered couches

MOTOR CYCLE--Ariel 350 ¢.c, Red | and 4 chairs all on castors, Sideboard,

unter Twin Port Spring Frame. 5 Mahog, tables, Card table, Rush chairs,

\illeage 19,000. D. Barker, Phone 3971. NOTICE Mirror, dining room chairs, Bureau,

4.6,52—6n. Chest of Drawers, iron and wooden

isin + VESTRY BYE-ELECTION bedsteads, mattresses, pictures, larder,

TRACTORS—Massey-Harris and. Fer- 1 HEREBY give notice that I have ap-|pmall carpet, Treadle machine, bed-

uson with numerous attachments. | pointed the Parochial Building, Cumber-|room ware, glass ware, and many other

purtesy Garage Dial 4616 land Street, Bridgetown as the placejitems of interest. Terms cash.
1.6.52—Gn | where Parishioners of the parish of St. D’ARCY A. SCOTT,
Michael and other persons duly qualified Auctioneer.
TRACTOR—One (1) Farm all A-/to vote at any election of Vestrymen 7.6.52—4n.

Cractor with Pneumatic Lift and Mower.|for the said Parish may assemble on

Apply: Manager, Four Square Factory | Monday, the 9th day of June, 1952, be-
Ltd., St. Philip. 20.5.52—6n. | tween the hours of 10 and 1) o'clock in
the morning to elect a Vestryman for
TRUCK TIP END HYDRAULIC |the Parish of St. Michael in the place
[OIST — One (1) Only, New—for im-|Christopher Augustus Brathwaite, de-
nediate delivery. Dial 4616. Courtesy | ceased. ’
Garage. 1.6.52—6n. PERCY H. BURTON,
—_————— Parochial Treasurer,
RUCKS—Ong (1) 1948 Bedford Truck, St, Michael.
1) 1951 Fordson Truek, (1) 1939 Ford’ 28.5.52-~6n.

veuck with Dual Gear, (1) 1949 Bedford





ch All the above are in good con-
ition On view at Rovlaty Estate. NOTICE
it 220. .52—3n.
eee. eee ——"" | All male citizens of the United States
tween ie ages 0: 8 and 26 residing
ELECTRICAL in Barbados are requested to call at

the American Consulate from July to
31, 1952 for Selective Service Registration
under the Universa) Military Training

—_———————————
BATTERI£S—Buckland Batteries—First
to start and ‘ast to finish, Fully guar-






























































BUNGALOW
known as

On Friday 13th inst



By





by Publie C

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors.



Stonewall Bungalow

named Company will be held at the Rock, ee oe Black

Children’s Goodwill League's Hall, off| feet of land yee equare ;

thereto.
The above property will be set up for
at our Office,
James Street, on 6th June, at 2)

22,.5.52—8n

UNDER THE DIAMOND

HAMMER

instructions received from
I will sell by

Gap,

" . the
A birth Certificate must be forwarded | 2xecutors of the estate of Miss Maude

Alleyne, Deed.
at her house situate at Westbury Main
Road below St. Leonard's

auction

on

at our Office,








ae

EDUCATIONAL

THE LODGE .
ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS

For boys wishful of entering
school in September term of 1952, an
Entrance Examination will be held at
the Lodge School on Saturday June 21st,
beginning at 10 o'clock a.m

Applicants must not be younger than
8 years and 6 months or older than 14
years on date of Examination

Parents are asked to notify the Head
Master not later than Saturday 14th
June that they intend to enter their
boys for the above examination. They
must «also send in particulars about
the name and ages of the candidate
No boy will be allowed to sit the
entrance Examination unless such in-
formation has been submitted to the
Headmaster by the above mestioned
date



this

W. A FARMER, ©
Headmaster

5.6.52—5n.
ciliceepeecnienena nae

COMBERMERE SCHOOL.
ENTRANCE EXAMINATION TO
MAIN SCHOOL
1. Admissions to the School for the
agademic year 1952-53 will take place

in next.

2. The Entrance Examination Will
be held in the Sehool Hall on Friday,
July iéth, at 9.00 a.m.

3. Candidates will be accepted for
examination who will be not less than
10 years and 6 months, nor more than
12 years 6 months on the Ist Septern-
ber next.

4. Parents/Guardians must notify
the Headmaster in writing not later
than Monday, June 23rd, if they wish
their sons/wards to sit the examina-
Such = application, (no special
must state the boy's date of
birth, supported by birth/baptism cer-
tifieate. It should also state the school
he is now Seen aSg. | SDK must be
accompanied by a ‘estimonial
from the H of that school,

5. Candidates will provide their own

p@hell (s}, pen and ruler, Light refresh-
ments will be on gale at the School
Canteen

6. Will Vestries and all other schol-

arship awarding authorities please sub-
mit their lists of candidates in accordance
with the foregoing conditions.
M. PINDAR,
Governing Body,
Combermere School.
5.6.52—3n

Secretary,

ted to the co
a waste of time to send up
in which his client was)
charged by the Police with com-
indecent assault on an
ll-year-old girl.

case

mitting

The prosecution

there



Shopkeeper
Discharged

His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma,
Police Magistrate of
Wednesday discharged 27-yea:
Eldon Seale, a shopkeeper of Bank |
Hall, St. Michael after Mr. G.)
Niles —defence counsel—submit-
urt that it wos

e

The Police alleged that the

Addressing the court Mr. Niles |
said that the only evidence the)
court had before it, was the evi-|
dence of the girl herself. The girl,
said how the defendant encour-|
aged her to go into the room.
But there was no evidence to show
that the defendant took or drag-
ged the girl into the room.

i
me gn haa told ser ana oe) SAP PING

court was entitled to take into
consideration the time of the al-
leged offence. She said that the |
defendant held her by her hand
and dragged her into the room, .
yet there was no confirmation Of | sail from Port Pirie May Sist, Dev
that at all by the other witnesses June 5th, Melbourne June 14th,

who were called by the prosecu-
tion,

She also said that she shouted | frozen cargo.
“murder” and still no one went
| to her rescue.



POST OFFICE NOTICE

AIR MAILS

Effective 6th June, 1952, Air Mails will be closed at the General Post Office,

as follows:—

(Cancelling Previous Schedules)































District “A”, |
r-old ;

of- |

fence was committed on May 17...

alleged that the, oie : ;

defendant on May 17 while in, appetising; its beefy goodness makes food

Roebuck Street dragged the 11-|

year-old girl into a house and
committed indecent assault.

SATURDAY, JUNE 7, 1952

BOVRIL

gives your
meals the

goodness of
real BEEF



Good cooks know the value of Bovril. Its.
rich flavour makes the simplest meal tasty and

| more nutritious. Bovril is the concentrated
goodness of beef.

BOVRIL

PUTS BEEF INTO YOU’:

NOTICES









MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEw
ZEALAND LEMITED.
(M.A.N Z_ LINE) .V. “CARIBBEE” will accept
S.S. “GLO' * is scheduled to o and Dom-

M
passengers for

inieay Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis,

St. Tth

y tts, Sailing Sa jay

at
-
this vessel

and hard

June.

M.V. “MONEKA" will accept
eargo and passengers for Domin-
ica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis,
St,’ Kitts, Sailing Friday ‘13th,

Vv,

June th, Brisbane July

Barbados about Augus!
In addition to general

has ample space for chilled

Cargo accepted on through Bills of
Leading for transhipment at Trinidad to
British Guiana, Leeward and Windward
Islands.

For further particulars apply—

FURNESS WITHY & CO., LTD.,
TRINIDAD.

+ “CACIQUE DEL CAR-
will accpet cargo and pas-
St. Vincent,
‘ing Wednes-

M.
IBE’
sengers for St. et

Aruba, Sal
day, llth June.

B.W.1. SCHOONER 0’
ASSOCIATION (INC.)

and im
DA COSTA & CO., LTD Consisnee Tele. No. 4047

BARBADOS, B W.1

Sy HARRISON LINE

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM

























































onteed for 12 months, | aerate —_~ Service Act. DESTINATION Time Day DESTINATION Time \ Day ‘i
‘ e) Garage oe
Jobrson's Stables and Garage Ltd., Phone Hg attain bn as ae os a _ From Leaves ee
4049, 4205. 7,6.52—3n.| sequent to July 31, 1952, are required | AFRICA to register upon the day they attain the Thursda: .S. “SELECTOR' . Liverpool &
FRIGIDAIRE DEEP real|cighteenth anniversary of the day of 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday 11.45 a.m. y Wisapew 1tth Me ti dees
Ser ee ks ae, tas Ot ee Oe ert HONG KONG 11.45 am.| Monday S.S. “TRIBESMAN” London & .
e 7.6.82—2n | For further information, consult ghe|ANTIGUA 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday 11.45 a.m.| Thursday ! M/brough 9th May 5th June
Vmabbies” Jigsaw [reece CSRS ee Te 9.30 am.| Saturday |S.S. “INTERPRETER” _ .. London 23rd May 5th June
compiate with stan, eat and Sea pone: RSet ; INDIA 11.45 a.m.| Monday 5.8. “EXPLORER” - | Liverpool 3ist May 14th June
oS i te oe DE, nee Garene NOTICE ARUBA 11.45 a.m.| Monday 2.00 Pm. Feqoesiax
seen e 1 .
Taba) wad, Phone tol”. 45 an.| applications for one’ or mare Vestry Sars eee ee ee
une Exhibitions tenable at the Combermere | AUSTRALIA 11.45 am.| Monday INDONESIA 11.45 a.m.| Monday ° Vessel
hool of the annual value of £5 will ll air 5 di 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday a For Closes in Barbados
MECHANICAL WS "received by” the undersigned upto] @ seh a ¥ ‘7 D- a vat | wae S.S. “CRAFTSMAN” . Liverpool 3rd June
ST 18th of June 19! : ad . - y ¢
LTURAL EQUIPMENT — in- fj .| (air to Panama only)| 9.00 a.m.) Frida: j
chading. Side delivery, Rakes, for aoe cee th Pee eau Ro ” JAMAICA 11.45 a.m. ey ad further inferimntion apply to
4 ass rakes, bd .m.
ST ed Se, Teta chery Se | ee aT taal a Sate oh ea EAS | ee heer Vie 4 DACOSTA & CO,, LTD.—Agents
Seinen a | SR Baptinnal Cortincste must be to oe | ee JAPAN 11.45 am.| Monday =|
ificate ’ wo }
TY ‘S — Smith-Corona port- Wanted IEE ‘the ‘Application Form, which BERMUDA 11.45 a.m.| Monday 11.45 a.m., Thursday ‘
‘ble ‘Typewriters, featuring page-eud| may be obtained from the Parochial 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday -
indicator, 8%, tase mach. as ae Office. , yen" MALAYA 11.45 a.m.| Monday Steamship Co.
oe”: | MBEEG.8 88. Par, Treasurer, St Thoinas, | BORNEO 11.45 am.| Monday 3.00 pm Bogenny
i eT 76.52—3n. 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday 9.00 a.m.| Friday One.
MISCELLANEOUS 9.00 a.m.| Friday
THE SUGAR INDUSTRY MARTINIQUE -| 2.30 pm.| Tharsday
CHILD'S CRIB, size 34” by 62” to- TURAL BANK ACT, 1943 J _m, 9.30 am.| Saturday
wether with a mattress. very eason- a ie creates. holding specialty lens |BR. GUIANA +. 2.00 bn er * Rue oi nae
able, my 6.52 72n | TAKE N that we, ‘the Own : MAURITIUS 11.45 a.m. onday NEW RK VICE.
latest Rat extermina-}of the above Plantation ‘are about to) BR, HONDURAS 11.45 a.m.| 'Monda 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday STEAMER
tor produced In America,” contains Ctvidions, of ihe Meive Ae canam oP ae! 9.00 a.m.| Friday f SERADEEEE unity MEGS Sithoerat tina thacee aon Ture teth
Warfarin, practically harmless to live- . Plantar + Veg (Ste Age. BURMA 11.45 a.m.} Monday ‘ = pe cities. cies N as
stock. Get yours at Knights Ltd. ag iat ia , m9 oe MEXICO 11.45 a.m.| Wednesday
Te nae teeintn. PRUPSL Sey tase nau eapaptiea wits 300 am:| Page 9.00 am.| Friday aw. Cee Saree
ESSO PRODUCTS—We have in stock. | ihe AErcuNta the vcase’ far te ts The “ALCOA PIONEER” sails May 10th—arrives Barbados May 24th
ae mueeyss Saat oe ars, pints: Pilt | raspect of such year : CANADA (Direct) ..| 2,00 p.m.| Wednesday | MONTSERRAT 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday A STEAMER sails May 2%th—arrives Barbados June 1th. ,
owder Sue Pints is Hendy Oil, | Dated this 4th day of June, 1952. = via T’dad ..| 9.00 am.| Friday 9.30 a.m.| Saturday
m & 2 of, Petroleum Jelly, Handy Oi] “FOUR SQUARE ESTATES LTD 9.30 am.| saturday <-~oniheniatatieaeaprnlgeinecitinerpotndemanasieanincesmivijicuniiiitiinacnddaiicitiiidisintaranits
2a! ax. . . en ” * . bth.
‘ONES & CO LITD., Agents. owners, |caNaL ZONE” ..| 11.45 a.m.| Monda: NEW ZEALAND 11.45 a.m.| Monday CANADIAN SERVICE
7,.6,.52—3n per E. - ROBINSON, 9.00 am barren (all air) 11.45 a.m Thursday
o Te naging Director . Th. ; 2, . | SOUTHBOUND
FEBD/MANURE — Limited quantity eee ae erans nly) "9.00 am. Pday” “Montreal Arrives Barbed
vailable; suitable for fruit trees. Con- | 7>—Sagan INDUSTRY AGRICUL- CENTRAL AMERICA| 11.45 a.m.) Wednesday nama only : m. } y ja ella ieatront ves Barbados
tact K. R. Hunte & Co., Ltd: ween TURAL BANK ACT, 1043 Concent C.Z.) ..| 9.00 am.| Friday PALE | eae BB. RENARD to 8 ea syune ste
027 6.52--3D- | ry the creditors holding specialty lens |'CEYLO & ..| 11.45 am.) Monday STINE 12.3 ™ oanthte |s8. “ALCOA POINTER” |. i * June 13th June 28th
HOUSEHOLD EQ of all] against FOUR SQUARE Factory, St 2.00 p.m.) Wednesday 3 oe Fide y “A STEAMER” .. -. 0... June arth Jul 2th
description. Owen T. Allade, 10 Roebuck TAK® NOTICE that we the Ownérs 9.00 am.| Friday 9.00 a.m. y ‘A STEAMER’ Eine ee uly a
Stree’ a : -5.52—t.f.m. 1 34 the above Plantation are about to m.| Monda NORTHBOUND
PANTS White Guvoriom geatna | UM Atek cmt Be[CHINA «| M80 S| ene i143 Sim:| Thursday | SR
ee P Su. 9.822, | Stid Plantation, in respect of the Agri- ,
ee a | ure, oar asd se et unger | PUERTO RICO 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
“Subscribe now to the Datly Telegraph | 0°, iiicuitural Aids Act, 1905, or the |CUBA ..| 11.45 a.m., Wednesday 9.30 am.| Saturday | Apply:— DA COSTA & CO.,LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE
©ngland’s leading Dally Newspaper nOW | oyove Act (as the case may be) in 9.00 a.m Frida |
srriving ‘in Barbados by Air anly & few | “Gopect of wich year. a | ” ST. CROIX, V1. 11.45 am.| Wednesday | === rooosesessoossooes
eye San Gele, c/o Advocate Co, Lad. | pied, this ih aay oC ORY trp. ‘'|CURACAO ..| 11.45 am.! ‘Monday 9.30 a.m.| Saturday :
fae, Rereminer SO. Tr ade03.0 B. S. ROBINSON. 11.0 O08.) | SRO lee. mrees 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday A Hot Water Bath
“S per B. S. . . ‘ p-m, e
We are offering one Ovaltine Shaker =e dn pomne rT % 2.00 p.m. Wednesday 2.80 pm. ‘Feamocay HAVE A LOOK AT THE
i shoe cath Ge fe Oren. teen “INDUSTRY ~SSRIcuL- — n> om —* ST. LUCIA 2.30 p.m. Thursday Morning Noon ot Nishi
$1.39 each, purchas au - % . . mm.
ae the end of the manth Present your | "#® TURAL BANK ACT, ipas ‘a ' 7. 9.30 a.m.j| Saturday a xOW 30 CAN HAVE
—— IGHT : To the creditors holding specialty Mens} DUTCH GUIANA ..| 11.45 a.m.| Monday
7,.6.52--3n. | against FOUR SQUARE Plantation, 9:00 am.| Fri ST. THOMAS, V.1 11.45 a.m.} Wednesday To the turn of a tap
St. Philip. m. day 2 eis ; 4 Wednes
TAKE NOTICE that we, the owners 9.80 a.m.| Saturday GEYSERS
FOR RENT of the above Plantation are about. to} EUROPE .. ww | 11.45 am.| Monday ' At Your Gas Showrooms
- be ered Rene Naat ‘against te 3 p.m. Oy apa ST. VINCENT at 2 20 a3 Perey
said Plantation, in respect of the Agri- . a.m, om | urd:
HOUSES cultural year 1982 to 1983. a I
N has been borrowed under| FIJI .. ee | 11.45 a.m ‘ond: SOUTH AMERICA ..| 11.45 a.m.|/ Monday
BUNGALOW — One (1) modern fur- the Agricultural ids Act, 1905, or the 11.45 am ee (except Venezuela) | 11.45 | Thursday TO-DAY
be
ished Bungalow and FLAT at Cora! Seve: Ay ake your case may bed in i ‘ednesd, y AT QUEEN’S PARK.
Chas, Worthings, Good sea, bathing. |'4ited this 4th day of June, 192. | FR. GUIANA ..| 11.45 am.| Monday |TORTOLA .. 2.90 p.m. Wednesday FURNISH T0-D AY
sands, Worthings. * “qes2—3n,| FOUR SQUARE ESTATES LTD. | 9.00 a.m.| Friday 9.30 a.m. | THE re ee
; | "S MONEY-SAVING DAY! THE ‘ Ss
FLAT & HOUSE—Fully furnished, St. per B, S. ROBINSON. |G. BRITAIN ..| 11.45 a.m.} Monday TRINIDAD .. 11.45 a.m.| Monday IT’S MONEY-SAVING DAY 7 SEAR
awrence on-Sea, Phone 3503. Nee Oe ta 8h 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday 11.45 a.m.| Wednesday Bedsteads, Beds, Springs, Laths,
. 20.3.52—t.f.n : 9.00 a.m Friday 11.45 a.m.| Thursday Cradies, = Tans, Soci Ser 1952 BARBADOS 1952
HOUSE—Fully furnished house at Bue| THE SUGAR INDUSTRY AGRICUL 9.00 a.m. rriaay eh a tay aimee Pye raha ’
ters Terrace, for August, September TURAL BANK ACT, I GRENADA ..| 9.80 am.] Mon@ay | 9.30 am.| Saturday TABLES for Dining, Kitchen & ; 4
nd October, Phone 8391. To the creditors holding specialty liens 2.00 p.m Friday | Fancy use, Larders, Waggons, Tea ,
7.6.52—t4.n,| against WELOMTOWN Plantation, St. Wy . |ULS.A, 11.45 a.m yey Rishon’, & Beanoot “aga All kinds of Amusements
re TAKE NOTICE, that 1, the Attorney |q _. | 2.80 pm.| Thursday 2.00 p.m. ednesday en & app eds ings, , Am d
Situate in gota For full par-} of the above Plantation ans about ie UADELOUPE 9.30 re Satenday | 9.00 a.m Friday ea Sh eh Os seek M for Young and Old y
cullars contact W. 8. Ward, J. NN. [oietn, of ihe above Act against the Bald a cents eaeues Office and soon || IPS BIGGER AND
oddard & Sons, 76-52 2n | Diantation, in respect of the Agricul. |HATTI | 11.45 am.| Monday VENEZUELA .. ‘or oe Prey” ends BeWoad’ and Rauh, Rage ‘ BETTER ,
NAVY GARDENS — Fully furnished | tufal Aids Act, 1905, or the above Act 11.45 am.| Thursday 2.00 p.m. y Mate $1.20 up » , ‘ ;
odern house, al) conveniences, good } tn respect of such year 1952 | a Two 3-piece Deal Tables )75 x 54” % y,
spsaetila 48 , race aie eee Dated tole NS FACTORY LTD eT for Table Tennis, ete--BARGAINS! > m
easonable rent one . vid " , 4
ROOM—From July 1st at the Mayfair ee ee, 6.6.52. ; oy ; 6 Adults ............. iy A
Swear then Woirdrening ete, Appt (90080008009 9999999 9999999099999 FS |] LS WILSO ;
Mavfair 4 to 6 p.m. & i ee a a ea ee) ae ee ae we y
V 29.5. 52—4n NOTICE . EF O R § A | KE $ BPRY STREET. DIAt. 4009 " ;
ss ? 4 ~ , s
VIVILLA"—-St. Lawrence Gap. % st " , % s 66: 66SSSSSSSSSSSSSS6665"
edrooms ete. Apply to D'Arey A. > oF
cott, Middle Street. Dial 2645. There are no embalmers % N : GOSSVSSGOVSI00008000800000000080060069656056504"
5.6.52—2n.]1 ave been approached by sev- > s|> x
a | UR atepayers of St. Michael] ® it Barbades . WARCY A. SCOTT Sie CARPENTERS— 3
LOST & FOUND | with the request that [ offer my- OTHERS SAY... |S Real Estate Agent and Auctioneer offers Reelestate of all S|
self as a Candidate for the vacant Plumbing is not Embalm- $ % descriptions at the right price. On my extensive list isa 4 X& Have You a Full Range of TOOLS ?
seat on the St. Michael’s Vestry ing. %1% bedroom bungalow on the sea at St, James, and a 3 bedroom
LOST regretfully eaused by the death e ¥]X bungalow at Welches on the sea. Mortgages can be arranged. IF NOT, WHY NOT?
MS sot our Respected friend, ye 3 % So before purchasing see They are Obtainable at. . .
CAToOne ll) black and white cat.|Mr. C. A. Brathwaite and have} WE SAY . . . x D’ARCY A. SCOTT
Iale: fluffy. Strayed from “Plymouth,” |consented to place my services at Buy at least 25 one dollar x . : THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
ear Belair on the Crane coast. Con-| their disposal. Shares in our Company. x Middle Street.- Dial 2645
ct Colin Bayley, Plymouth, or Cyo We are erecting this e MI e rect. 2 = Corner Broad and Tudor Streets
| Loule 1D. Baviey, deweller, Bridastown J. ©. TUDOR. year a modern gaso- 34 S,445:4:666666400S9S9CSOSS9VSSSSO POOP OVOP POO POOP |
ace lene station at our a

Re ye te so) a ae es ee ener ee In the first year of
i *
§ T0-DAY'S NEWS FLAS business ‘we aid. 5%

















RUBBER FERRULES FOR
WALKING STICKS

Also Sample lots of
WALKING STICKS ;

SOLID BRASS LOCKS
All now opened by:
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

HOLIDAY

All meals and service sup-
plied in your own cottage
on a quiet secluded beach
with perfect bathing.; $8.50
rer day for single ons or
$15.00 double. Apply ‘Beach-
lands’, St. James or Phone
0157.


















$1.5.52.—6n.



We invite you to share in|

our profits.

SELF-HELP
ENTERPRISES LTD.

Tweedside Road, St. Michael
PHONES :
Day 3958



Night 2939

KEEPS ENGINE CLEANER- SMOOTHER RUNNING

/

EXTRA MOTOR OIL





SATURDAY, JUNE 7, 1952
PAGE SEVEN



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON

TOAST TO
YOUR
-HEALTH!!







i -

BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES



FORTUNATE THAT

SS Gl | ee | ur WINCARNIS Wx
M | ASSIST YOU TO GUARD IT
BUY A BOTTLE TO-DAY.

“a “eas
10 LIKE TO Have ANE pik agen aap sy vee
A uooK











—







Ee ESS ee

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Tuesday to Saturday only

— ———











SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Branches Tweedside,

Speightstown and Swan Street
Usually Now

SOUPS : CANNED FRUITS

Campbell's Vegetable ...... $ 33 — § .30












. FRUIT COCKTAIL (Large).. $1.19
~ Consomme 45 — A2 5 * (Small) 61
a Cream of FRUIT SALAD . 85
GRAPES (Small) .. ; in
Mushroom ........ AS en 42 i (Large) ». ai ea aa

7

PROB See icishissoureistancsnvisaticss . 614 — &.



2 PEACHES (Brook's) $ 81
(Imperial) wn... eo ER

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

GRAPE FRUIT — Tins ...... 55 48 PEARS (Brook's) .
PREMIER SOUP POWDER .. 23 — 20 caer ene
APRICOT JUICE ooo... y | eee 34 RASPBERRIES (Chivers)

” Smedley’s) «.
CORONATION WINE... 144 — 1.20 Gentes.

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PAGE EIGHT





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Successful Athletic Sports Meet

10 Yards
Added To Flat
Race Track

flat race tr

was

Thursday's
Kensington reme:
found to be 10 yards

five successive and breath takin


















record were returned mn
third and last day of the bi
B.A.A.A ithletic spor ied
This meant th n ad
to be sc atched, { uw r
ners remained ti The
ning line was carried up the ne -
Sary 10 yard

The fir apparent record
the Trinidadian Harewood 21
seconds for the 220 yards. This was
followed by 17 1/5 seconds for th
girls under 16, 150 yards n
when in a heat D. F. Dou ‘
Lodge School, an under 16 bo
did the 220 in 2/5 seconds
everybody was 5 ng and won

dering whether it was the spring
track that was causing the pheno
menal running. Another 220 yard
heat for boys under 16 was
done in apparent record time
the girls 220 which Hyacinth
Inniss won. But after this the track
Was remeasured,

Two new records were
this last day In the 220
Boys under 16, Thompson from
Coleridge Parry set the new time
of 23.8 seconds, clipping 2.4 sex
onds off the record established
J. Gittens only this
yace was run on the right le 1
-—220 yards, though the two heat
for it were run on a short tr

The other record was set up by
the Trinidadian Agostini who did
the 220, boys over 16, in 22.2 sec
onds, beating Pat Haynes two yea
old record of 235 seconds



ana

et
yards,



year,





ck

Farnum In Top Form

Ken Farnum won both races he
entered—the two mile which he
did in 5 minutes, 33 seconds and
the 1,000 metre. Farnum thus end
ed the three day meet undefeated
and has shown himself in the top
of form—at no time winning only
narrowly, but always convincing-
ly. Knowing that he is going to
Helsinki later this yeay, it was
a treat and satisfaction watch-
ing him win in this thorough way
and realising that the only way
the Trinidadian Matthieu or the
Guianese Liddell could hdve beat-
en him was if he had fallen. That
powerful last lap sprint and es
pecially the last two hundred
yards sprint, was always em-
ployed to carry him to a win by
many bicycle lengths,

There is no
what standard of riding
will be at Helsinki, but when
John Skinner was seen to win
all his races in which Farnum
had not entered, winning from
the Trinidadian Matthieu who is
going to Helsinki, and from the
Guianese Liddell, many regretted
that Skinner will not be going
to Helsinki also, Riding with the
other riders, Farnum excepted,
Skinner was completely master
and with Skinner in a race when
Farnum was out, there was never

exactly
there

knowing

any fear that a visitor would
earry away the honour of win-
ning.

One thing can be said for the

Guianese Liddell, and that is that
he was always at a disadvantage
By his little showing. one could

not help feeling that he is better
than Matthieu and perhaps even
Skinner. He arrived for the sec

ond day of the meet and made a
surprisingly good second to Far-
num in the half mile, despite the

effects of seasickness. He was
later involved in a_ spill and
turned out Thursday with his
left thigh heavily bandaged and
there is little doubt that he was
yiding under much pain and
could not put all the effort neces-
sary into his sprint. He seem
full of energy.
Track Good

The track was good, unaffected,
except for a little springiness
which, if anything would have
assisted the athletes, by the rain
on the previous evening.

The first event-—the 1 mile cycle
(Roadster 3 Speed) was won by
B,D. Parris in 2 minutes 47.8 sec-
onds, with H. Miller and C, Brew-
ster taking second and third place
respectively. The race was a fast




race, compared with time
returned this meet for “B’.Clas
and Intermediate for the same
distance.

Next event was the 220 yard
flat and as was ext ed he
Trinidadians took both first and
second places. Hare i. wt
had on Monday won the 100
again beat his fellow country
man, Agostini, though in thi
race only by a few inche The
police. Rouse, took third place
some four yards behind.

Rouse beat the gun, but hi
inferiority as a sprinter, com-



CONVINCING

WIN



EARLE McLEOD winning the two-mile cycle race for “B” Olass at
Kensington Oval on Thursdyy, the final day of the three-day A.A.A.B.

Intercolonial Athletic and Cycle Meeting.

Julien (Trinidad) was third

pared with Harewood and Agos-
ii, was seen within 50 yards
the two visitor dashed past
m,.
Harewocd’ vin over Agostini
a convineing though only
wwrow., Agostini put every effort
ito his sprint but Harewood was
running with real grit and did
not give an inch
Neither the Police Archer not
Inniss entered this’ race and one
wondered whether they had

given up the hope
Trinidadians.

Second Win

this,

of beating the

After Tall Yvonne Gibbs
cored her second win of the
meet when she won the 150
yards in a time which had to be
seratched because the track was
found to be short. Gibbs won by
many yards from Shorey and
Rollins who respectively took
second and third places,

Thompson set a new time for
the 220 yards, boys under 16~
23.8 seconds 2.4 seconds less than
the J, Gittens record which he
made earlier this year. Thomp-
son who is fairly tall with strong,
loose muscles, is a good sprinter
ind does it with effort, In win-
ning, he beat the dogged Lodge
School boy D. F. Dougall and
Archer who came third,

Only two entered for the girls
over 16, 220, Hyacinth Inniss and
P, Thompson and as was expected,
Inniss was winner by a wide mar-
gin.

After dropping Liddell in the
scratch for the 1,000 metres, Far-
num proceeded to win this race
from Carmichael and Matthieu,

Agostini set a new timer for the
220 Yards boys over 16 which he
won from K. Jones and M. Lyn-
ton, we did the distance in 22.2
seconds, There is no doubt that
if he had better competition, he
would have cone the distance in
even better tim for Agostini
eontinually glanced back at the
other competitors who were away
behind and not putting no
thing like the effort he has been
seen to put in sprints at the other
two days of the meet.

Best In B1

C. Marshall won the 2-mile
cycle, Class Bl in 5 minutes 58.2
seconds, comparatively poor time.
There is little doubt that of these
B1 riders Marshall is the best. He
can just ride as he likes, general-
ly, and then sprint out and win.

Advocate Reporter Earle Mc-
cod won convincingly in the two
miie cycle, class B from M, V
Carter and Trinidad Julien, Carter
is a fair sprinter, but when it
comes to a distance behind a mile
and there happens to be an_ oc-
easier of a gruelling few laps
McLeod's endurance tells. He
pulled out from the others who
were just all blown and could only
see him pass without any appre-
ciable effort to prevent it.

The two mile cycle, Intermedi-
ate, was won by R, “Flash” Brath-
waite, with Foster second and
Boyce third. “Flash” is a fai

ider, but the win counts for less
when it is known that Hill of
Holborn and Pat Gomez of Trini-
dad who did not remain for the
last day of the Meet, did not en-
ter, for both of these riders beat
him the first two days

Then Farnum scored another
vin in the two mile from the
frinidadians Matthieu and Lewis

ho respectively came second an«!

Police Win Relay

| They’ li Do It Every

Ee 2 WHATTA YA TR)
bf ie Se TO GWE ME? I
NOPE... you I SAW iT»











I NEVER DID FIELD,1939! DON'T TELL

FIGHT TIGER \ ME! ILL BETCHA EVERy-

RUDD-you THING I GOT! IT WENT
| MUST HAVE IT ), THE LIMIT,RIGHTP HE
MIXED UP wiTH [ GOT THE DECISION«:

SOME OTHER
CLEAR AS



I REMEMBER IT



Police won the 440 yards relay [ L ee 9

; ow Tide: 9.26 a.m., 9.17 p.m.
from Notre Dame and the Visitors, |
Police team which was really a

Registered US Patent Office

‘Time
















LISTEN TO
FLANNEL MOUTH!
THE ONLY THING HE
EVER GOT RIGHT W4S
THE ADDRESS OF THE
UNEMPLOYMENT
BUREAU *++sHIM
TELLING TONY:













1N








LIKE I ALW

TIME~BUT BIGMOUTH




ays
SAY IT AIN'T THE
FIGHTERS THAT'S
PUNCHY» IT'S THE ,2

V. Carter was second and

strong this Meet were Blenman
Marshall, Archer and Rouse. The
Notre Dame team were Trevor
Inniss, Trotman, Mason and Tony
Wickham, while the visitors were
Harewood, Agostini, Grenada’s
Gittens and a Trinidadian cyclist

As usual, Harewood who start-
ed for the visitors, handed over
his baton after he had established
a lead of some 10 yards, but the
second police runner regained the
lost ground and handed over with
a lead. Then, too, there was a
faulty handover to Agostini who
was to make the last hundred. The
lead was too long for him to catch
up with Rouse, though, perhaps if
Notre Dame had anybody on the
homestretch but “Bomber” Wick-
ham, Agostini would have over-
taken him.

The five mile, Bl was won by
Long from Trinidad, with C. A.
Marshall second and Grant third
This was only the second win by

a visitor in the cycle events for
the Meet.
Laps Field
Next came the fairly exciting

five mile Class B which Ellis won
in 13 minutes 55.4 seconds when
he lapped the whole field, Peters
of Trinidad excepted, In this race
was seen the folly of allowing a
cyclist to get too long a lead. The
riders, MeLeod, Carter and the
others stayed behind as Ellis tried
to increase his lead, just watching
each other and banking on Ellis’
dropping back after he _ had
achieved what they thought he
had only set out for—the lap prize.
But when they realised what was

ppening, it was too late, for they
ay not the stamina to catch up
with him, and even if they had it,
there were not sufficient laps,
Ellis was still riding strong.

Boye! won the five mile, Inter-
mediate, with “Flash” Brathwaite
econd and Smart third, but the
race was a slow one, being done
even beyoud the time limit

In the five mile, Class A which [c

Farnum did not enter, John Skin-
ner won from Matthieu and |
Keizer cawe third. The Trini-
dadian Lewis won the lap prize, |
two pair of cycling wheels. Skin- }

—<—_—_"-_----- avr |
WHAT'S ON TODAY |:

Police Courts—10.00 a.m.

First Division, Intermediate
and Second Division Cricket
matches at various grounds
—1.30 p.m.

Netball (Queen's College vs
Queen's College Old Girls’)
at Queen’s College — 4.45
p.m.

Basketball at Y.M.P.C.,
Beckles Road—7.30 pm.





i
WEATHER REPORT
YESTERDAY

Rainfall from Codrington: .02
inch

Total Rainfall for month to
date: 1.19 ins.

Highest Temperature: 87.5 °F

Lowest Temperature: 77.5 °F

Wind Velocity: 16 miles per !
hour |

Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.994,
(3 p.m.) 29.920 |

TO-DAY

Sunrise: 5.42 a.m.

Sunset: 6.18 p.m.

Moon: First Quarter, May 31

Lighting: 7.00 p.m.
High Tide: 2.26 a.m., 3.35 p.m.





By Jimmy

TONY AND

TIGER WEREN'T
EVEN FIGHTING
AT THE SAME

Hark o |





FANS ARE
ALL ALIKE
THEY ONLY
TALK TO YOU
ABOUT THE |
ONES YOU









WOULDN'T EVEN
BELIEVE THE
RECORD BOOK!










nev's win was by about three cycle
engths, and sprint how he might,
it ; evident that the Trinidad-

Matthieu could not













ian eatch uf
1th Milt
Putting The Shot
Strong man Payne, firema
on the putting of the shot—the
hucking a 25-pound i ball.
H ent i 4) feet, 44% inches to
. t foot, 9 inches from polige
Denny and the Trinidadian Harg-
wood
McD. Lloyd is beaten in the
880 flat by Trevor niss who has
t ved hi elf to be a runner of
this meet. The win was Close,

no more than half a body, but it
wa decided win and though
Ll putting everything into
t ‘ ts then, he could not hav
won fr the determined yout)
Inniss

From about the last 300 yards
when Inniss overtook everybody
Ise and hac ulllcient burst @
peed that he could have over-
taken Lloyd, but preferred to re-
main two yards behind, it was
seen that he had soraething up his
sleeve. He moved out about the
last 110 yards and Llovd fought
hard, but he could not win, The
Police Shannon took third place
some yards behind

John Skinner followed up his
winning streak —- with Farnum
ibsent—by winning the “Devil

Takes the Hindmost” from Keizer
nd Brathwaite. Matthieu did not
enter this event.

At the conclusion of the Meet,
Mr. Justice Chenery, President of
the Athletic Association com-

mended those who had helped to
stage a successful meeting and
thanked the public for the enthu-
siasm with which they had sup-
ported the sports. He also thanked














e mercantile community for middle distance runner.
donating prizes. ta ae - ———__—__—_— —
Results were as follows: Fe .
‘our everr ane sve Cri¢cket Season Opens Today
lat F dD Parris, 2nd H Miller, 3rd . d
C. Brewster. Time 2 min , 4/5 sees
220 YARDS FLAT (Men) . ue 5 Es
Record: 21.6 secs, A. Hunte (B'dos), ,- from page 1 ; _ Foundation vs. | War lerer: i
1950) Umpires: H. B. Jordan and €. Foundation, Umpires: C. Colly-
t Harewooc T 1 Ag T), Gibson. more and S. Cole
Srd Rouse T 2 € 1 Q E
? Under 3 and ee Pan Leeward vs. Pickwick at Fos
Y 18.6 secs. 1952) Wanderers vs. Windward at Bay Umpires: P. Phillips and S. Gilkes |
Gibbs, 2nd R. Shorey, Sd N’ fmpires: J. Lewis and T. Sisnett Comber mere Vs ¢ ollege a, Coun
ime s secs e ’ bag ; a fen nives . Clarke an
YARDS FL (Boys Under WW _ Carlton oie or — mpire 3, Clarke and
Thompson D. F gDougall, aed Umpires: . Roach anc , Hare , .
che Time 3 se . , }
Roe ae f Pa tk wae ‘ombermere at’ Windward vs. Lodge at Wimd-
2 YARDS FLAT (Girls ‘Over 16) |, *-MLP.C. vs. Combermere at oq > Umpires: G. Clarke an
ist H. Inniss, 2nd P. Thompson Beckles Road. Umpires: lL. H. 4 Bayelsa
: - vARES wenee® ate ri" uy each and C, Small. Lunch 3.30 p.m. to 3.45 anc
vad tty aE 4 i han ; Mental Hospital vs. Police at |, pe EAA toes
Lynton. Time 2 secs. (Record) Black Rock. Umpires: G. Forde *tUâ„¢ps drawn at 6 p.m.
2 MILE CYC (Class B-1) blac OCK. mpires: G, Forac
ist C. Marshall, 2nd Long, 3rd Grant. and W. Bayley.
Time 5 rain. af aOR ini Cable & Wireless vs. Pickwick
2 UE "LE (Class or 1 ines .
Ist McLeod, 2nd Carter, 3rd Julien (Tt), “t Boarded Hall. Umpir i
rime 5 min 4/5 sec Batson and J, Hinds

2 MELE CYCLE (Intermediate)
Record: M Tu Bidos) 5.8.2
951
Ist Brathwaite
Time 5 min

rd Boyce





eCs
MILE CYCLE (Class A)





(E K Fornun Bidos) 5.8.4,
1951)
ist Farnum, 2nd Matthieu, 3rd Lewis
Time 5 min 3 secs
40 YARDS RELAY (Open)

lst Police, 2nd Notre Darne
Pime 45,2 secs
5 Mae OYCLE (Class B-1)
ist Long (T), 2nd Marshall, 3rd Grant
‘Time 15 min. 7 sees
5 MELE ©MOLE (Class B)
Ist Willa, Sid Peters (T, Time
min. 55 2/5 secs
(> MIL
Boyee,
Time

ord Visite

13

(Intermediate)
2nd R. Brathwaite, 3rd
15 min. 31 sec

Ist H
D. Smart
Oo MILE CYCLE (Class A>
Skinne tad Matthieu ra
Time mir 7 on
thk SHOT (Open)
d Hare
Sho LT ARDS Dane

t T. Inn anc a, ot

Shannon rin
DEVIL, TAKES
Ist Skinner 2nd

in. 2 1/5 see
HINDMOST
3rd Brath





THE
Keizer

“

. Erdiston vs. Y.M.P.C. at Erdiston, |
Umpires: C. Archer and R. Parris.
Central vs, Empire at Vaucluse.

Umpires: A, Harewood and S
Beckles.
.
Sports Window
THE fast playing, skiiful




A a

. © usually means pain ~ the pain of indigesti
Cow’s milk by itself you see, is apt to form a

LLOWD

LEFT is Trevor Inniss winning



Ends

REATEN

eae

rom the long distance runner McD,

Lloyd by half of a body. Lloyd who won the mile and three mile had

not banked on such competition

this and this helped defeat him.

However, Inniss who earlier lowered Louis Lynch's 19-year-old 440
record for boys over 16, proved himself to be a grand, determined

SECOND DIVISION
ind 14



Y.M.P.C, team are scheduled
to meet the Modern High
School to-night at Basketball
at the Y.M.P.C. In the other
match, Harrison College Old
Boys’ will meet Fortress.
These latter teams are much
of a muchness, with ever so
slight an edge perhaps on the
side of the Old Boys’, and
there will doubtless be a tus-
sle in this match.
Play starts at 7.30 p.m.



Need botile-feu
babies be

5

cry-babies :

.

Certainly not ! Baby's cry



baby’s stomach. ‘Pat's why wise nurses and mother
Robinson’s ‘ Patent’ Barley. This famous cereal enahi

bottle-fed babies to digest their food as easily as n

milk and pre



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| PHARMACY

oo







University College of
the West Indies

ter
ne

EXTRA MURAL DEPT.

A course of six (6)
DISCUSSION TALKS
by 5
Aubrey Douglas-Smith, M.A.

Current Affairs

at ¥.MLC.A.
ON MONDAYS

DERINDINY

JUNE 9th at 8 p.m.

Fee for Course $1.00

Members of Extra Mural
Association 84c.

Single Lectures 18¢

5 a earn ae ne ee ey ema

PICTURES |
AT |
|

1
1





|


















SATURDAY, JUNE 7, 1952



~NEW COT

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r LCI i "• IIAKHMMIs ADVOCATE SAW UAY, JUNE T. 1*52 Qahib QaUinq. Crazy Dutchman Leaves T gtMd thing* must come Rico %  of ClWl Al %  n for British Guiana on Ttaun day evening tn B W i.A aft spending a holiday in Barb tk staying at the CnUM Hotel. H< WM accompanied by btl wife. Major Nicole arl leave, spent the greater imfi i the U.S.A., dim %  badoa for a week lief HIT returning home. Trinidad Proprietor M R. SEUOAT BAMAJtOO pr> 'in LotOf Of Se>mand I •laughter of M Proprietor of Alec Russell & Co. ii mmlaston Agents cif the West Indies with headquarterin Gi'Or gc town, Thov had l>een holidaying b< • for tho past six weeks stay ins U \r.i.i'\ Hnckley. M' 'loiisalves is Manager of the wholesale department of .fees. Wm F igarti Ltd of Lopts i emfmred %  s Se c re ta ry In her ftMr*i iiflicc. On Holiday M R. HARfomtT I'lMIRIM. frnmerly and M Manager of the Atubm Weekly News magazine "The Local**, lie will spend ten weak*' Vacation here. Engaged T in: %  recently • an Miss Joyce Manning, eldest daughter Of Mr i Ifn C. Manning of Hfl burv Hond. •nd Mr R W. i Mr. and .Mrs. D. FGrant (if Hrids Road und ii mrmber Of Fmpliv Ctnn Awarded Diploma M R. GEORGE D. BASCOMOE, Cutter (in tin R1Q| ACo, 'Tailor) Has been awardad lha Dtploin %  of tinTailor A Cutter Aesidwny of I nn examination in the Art "( Cutting gentleman*! garmants held on |bs W. M.iv following it* ciiiyilelion of a Qonigpondanci Course. leaving for Puerto nico gaj by IIWIA. on Thursday. Mi. %  the %  ba always *iii be %  icd as soon as he eoes %  It.utui,los. So was I, Everybody | tii-i the outrides of locked flat and sri Hut next time w*ier 1 see a t< U | :.. th, Antilles. I %  i II him to gci to the Trop Paradise because It is wi < i-lands in the Caribbean *re mall. But not all %  IwlHlJ and friendly aj Barbados. And not all the OUM g lha home itf the flying tlsh. ttors to the red n tay, l did island •') much that I to have II holiday after I .r travotUng Bui th.time has come that I have to say rfl) lions'' to all my friends <>( Pastor M. G. NfSfBIIARII S.D.A. President iDASTOR M. G NEMBHARD. president of the Leewnrd Islands Mission of Seventh Day to say thank you to all AdventisU, was among the pas4 the Schools and acngers leaving on Thursday evefor the help; to all my nm g_ by B.W.I.A.. for Trinidad to the boys as Pat, while there, he will make a trip n i'i Brut*, Roto and hundredto St. Lucia and Dominic;, m th.%  ho took me as their interest o! the work of the Leefnend. Then 1 want to ward Islands Mission before re'.iv giHKlbve to all the girls f ur ning to Barbados alxmt th Helical Paradise and be latter part of July with his family UTS), when I feel lonely I always think of the sweethearts of BarFor C.T.C Talk* bark* In Dutch we say Tot nens %  -ill am meat -gain) and that's T^HE Surinam Delegation ntWhat I want to aay to Harbadc* tending the Caribbean Trade .ind ..II thfriends on this little. Unlon Conference saUeh is being %  -II, iMand in the blue ,,,.,,, (l Hastings RoUaW, arrived a This is n„ he last ygterday morning via Trinidad .1 wiD v.s.t llarlwdoi and bv „ W I A. It comprises the h II ^ UJV' %  nd be %  • colony's Ui-mr leader Mi L I L£!l.£? 7 £m OT ^ EUaier. Mr. C. Carron, reprasanpropagnnda f^ y.Hi, Tropical lntivi llf lhc p antMrn Workers' I ..i..diMfli the blue Caribbean. Unil n „,. s Shukrula repre..f Barbados stay aa you ^^.ve of the Surinam Work..M. d-int let your 'Charmgo. CIg Organisation and Mr. H. a. it went In many otfter places: Soeperman. representative of the ESfL^S ^ P ""H H' 1 yOUr Surinam M.nefs' Union Jr'LiJ ^ >1 i.i." 'JT* ,, "r ''"'leit arriving for friend y and healthy. The auB lhp Minfl t ,, K .. w ,. re Mr. Clarence \ V', T W iL'. d J h Mis Roberts who went up to tho U.S.A. in the Interest of her JI i 'lei-rated her htrhd_, Wednesday. 4th June. To mark the occasion %  surorlse uarty was held at the home of her parents "Parade View". Mastines. wr-re mnv of her friends gathrii to celebrate. Studying Radiography JVT SS RUTH FELDMAN who und Is much Improved. Sp -ndino a Week S PENDING a week's holiday in llarlmdns is Miss Olive Jeffrey of Antigua. She arrived on Thursday evening by B.W.l.A. and is staying with Mrs. B. Cdnngton of Brittons Hill. Ruth is studying Radiographs* at King's College. She daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. Q, Feldmon of Navy Gardens. Intrnnsit NTRANSIT from the U.S.A. Puerto Rico on Thursday evening by B W.I.A. was LI. On Business Davld J> Pct,il of thc us Arm y M n rwvFsr V.V-v'rv . aUUoned at Camp Tortuguco R ERNEST HUN TE. DirecW Rh the R.-pla.-emcnt Tntntag tor of K. R. Hunle and Co. Centre at S.n Ju.m a passengeg, for TrlnlHe has now gone to visit hi.* ....."" nur8< ii y evening by brother (apt. M. U. Pettit who B W.I.A He lias gone on a bust| in command of trie US. Marine %  "" Vl '" '""' '' '.xin'cteH tu det.itchment stationed in Tritnletum today. ,j H( L The Nightingale Memorial Home niK Nightingale M al Bchooln. la tag altsgnoon each rlosni al Beintld, Black thild ., gnrdtn plot provided for dancs and donated by Dr. W. each of them. There is also a Nighlingae, was oitkiall.-. oin-iwd kitchen garden on the premises On the 15ih December, 11(47 by th;'*ut their lime is only given to then Governor Si, Hilary BIMHI.%I1S by way of learning how to I In II | provide* fa cul t i es Of transplant, homo and good training for ihilAfter leaving school the girls dien particularly destitutes. The are detained for a whole your in l pome Of Ufetta Children order to learn general houseare still live but the aim %  : ... keeping. It Is a general rule that hornj is to cater ssgsscudly to the children should attend serorpnana. Th,Brat ten children vieaa at St. Stephens Thes. chllwere tranafarred from St. Michdren are also given religious inael's AJmShOUM cm the 31st JdmiMmcUOD and as many as 1 are ury. 148. .i.nilrmed. They attei.d %  Shortly aftci i Iunder a eorl dition of 10 o.hers and suite then (Juilc recentl>' il.is cs were the numbers have been staadLj darted t-. butrucl the girls IB increasing. There are now 18 girls MandierafU. The boys wll also and IT i. %  r | i,.., UMTS le.on how to make I Ippsn Sjtc is acec mmodalion for 60. I %  child has a bedside cupChildren arc admitted Mm WS bOOld and these are all Sttrac* age of five and are discharged at lively decorated with toy, picthe age -t 1 MI v gad Then clothes are provided bv the a* messenger. There are Home but the older ban and three girls who are being tni.ned girl are .-llowed to buy'them* (n needl.Hvork, nurMiig. and launselves anything required ,n _. ., The Home r.diientmn TUB younger girls and boys atThe Home is run by a Vestry lb iry Girls' an I the Cram tmd is supervised bv Miss St Stephen's Boys/ and Girls' Grace Bryan, assisted by four attendants, Nucc Bryan who .s known by the children as "Mother" was previously ,'t the General Hospital. After some years of private nursing during which time "he was nurse to Governor Ncw'ands. she wan recommended for a year's training at the Princess Alice College. Birmingham in 1946. It Is her aim to create as much as posalMs 'home' atmosphere. The Attendants are known as "Auntie" to the children. Library Th. re r, a small library containing picture books and story books. On entcruw the I>irmitoi> the Ad vacate, was impressed by the cleanliness and attractiveneas prevailing. At Chrattnuu there la a treat for the InBUtaa and they are presented with gifts. Any ailment Is treated bv the nurse herself and there (a general inspection. In March this year u win was built to accommodate the dJnln | hall. The second Moray now forml an extension of the girLs' dormitory and the dining hall Is on lh-> first floor. The boys nn,t R irU I ve as one family and It is to be hoped that in Ihe future that homeless boys and girls will enjoy the facilities offered Inthis Institution Mrs. Mesla Goes To See The President ir.m S.\M u in 11 PARIS. Mrs. Pearl Mesta. thc ebullient party-throwing US. Ambaaaador 11 Luxemburg, mounts the gangway at Le Havre to-dav i n *he ury back to Washington. During her voyage across, she will be wrestling with a problem. Shall she make her cu tonsary large donation to the DemocraUc Pagtjt Or shall she sratt and .•ee if the Republicans nominate Elsenhower—and then back Ike if ihi y do? The scale of her munificence —she is the widow of a steel oaron — to Truman'a election funds at the last Presidential election, found its reward in hei appointment to Luxembourg. Htr problem .before Truman decided not to run again, was nerve inking: she likes Luxembourg, likes Truman and likes Ik Row the problem is slmpllhed will th e Democrat* be outraiied If she switches allegiance ..r.d. on the other hand, will her close friends, the Eisenhowers. lernva her if she doesn't' To many friends and to many wilting American politicians Mrs. Mesta has talked frankly of I her difficulties. All. including .the Eisenhowers, have failed to e*olve them Now she baa decided that her only way out is to "get the feel of things in Washington." and %  M eeially to have a frank, heartb -heart chat with her old friend Harry Truman. Marry? Never Off on what for him is a new kind of treasure hunt Is muchmarried Dominican diplomat Porfirio Rubirosa, whose third marriage, to tobacco heiress Doris Duke, ended recently m divorce HOW Rubirosa. who is Dominican minister in Paris, Is flttlng up an expedition to hunt for sunken treasure off the San As for his other plans. Rubirosa %  ays. "I am definitely finished with marriage. I shill never marrv again. In future my ideal woman will be simply the woman you love." People Divorced %  Film star Marttne Carol from Hollywood night club OHM Steve Crane, former hushand of Lana Turner. Miss Carol announced this in Pans, added laconically: "As my work will prevent me from seeing him for the next 18 months I thought It was only fair that] I should giv 0 him his freedom." Married: Spanish dancer Carlien Amaya to guitarist Juan Aruern. Of a London visit Carmen Savt 'Th,. audiences were so row they might have been standOn a Scottish moor during turm." K ven ts A Paris newspaper has launched i i unpalgn to soneu tiuwc ogres of Paris life the concierges or caretakers who keep guard oui%  %  %  %  .i|..n'ment house. paper Is awarding thei idle of "Queen of Concierges" to I the one "who Is most Imbued with oourteay and kindnoas." What goes on in Russia? Lyons silk manufacturers, who are doing a 1500.000 annual export trade with Russia, hoped to In by manufacturing materials decorated with portrait* of Soviet leaders, especially Stalin. After lurge stocks had been produced. U:< Russian response was a categoric "No." Said a Russian buyer: 'We want your silks, but please without those portraits of Stalin." Ql'OTKOF THE WEEK He Said It I'M frNM.r Mondor. .,i in Ihe birth-rate for twins : In tat" of the state of the world it is not surprising that more and more new arrivals prefer to have company." —I..E.S. Pope Hiu Recovered VATICAN CITY, June 6 Vatican sources reported thai Ins Pop*' slight fever completely ed this in.lining. The Vti-jtM! -old Poniill who wa. sin.ken with a slight attack of influcn. i on Wednesday redted his usual inorning mass today ami had a heavy schedule of audiences for today and tomorrow and a beatillcatlon ceremony on Sunday it la -mi not certain that the Pontiff would descend to St. • isUlca on Saturday evening In connection with the a nf the Italian sister BerUtla lloscardin of tt 'TH slaters "t the Order of St.. Dundea of the S n M.I II. MI: %  I Francis Sp<-llman Anhbi.shnp of New York was rate au Hence '•' %  i %  last night —t'.P. i niiss\voiii~ Secoiul Day of the — TUBBY HUBBY O I El . Bernard Wickstood runs into a ikimmed milk problom Tuesday night. A S the second day of thui Tubby Hubby diet tor heavyweight husbands draw* to a close Wlcssleed U still on hU feet. He seemed u> be wllUng a bit *fier breaitfajit. but his tra.ners nJ seconds said uiat would be all nght. rhey would give turn ine Luxury Lunch trealm'nt. This was tresn salmon and cost Sa. 6d. a portion in the restaurant I went to. but Thar sid thai wm* all nght. too. ijecauao I could pay for u out of 'ne money I'd saved by doing no serioua drinking Tubby Hubbies will nave to tearn to endure UiU attitude. It -"ems to be part of Lhe diet. Jus! %  *-euse you are *o good natured -flat you allow Them to re n -Jei you into a dream ousband They •eeca to think Tbc> arc ao ng Kou t icood turn Think now wonderful It will oc. They said yesterday, when voxi ean skip up and down >ne stairs like a ballet dancer. You'll e able to run useful little errands all day long. Won'-. *iia; be fun? "Ob. rngn:fui run.i saio. for lunch is an ironic touch. ion i >u U inutt I win. .ui you be sure of sk.mmcd milk in Ule City of London ? There's pleniy of It ai home. In fact tin* bulging breadwinner gets noth:ng else at ihe best of ujnea oeoauae the creamy top >t ihe in :R IIrena stewed fruit and porriem Maybe It la skimmed in the ciiy. too. Bui your honour is at stake. You're no: cer.a.u. Them tiiat you'll drink nbuiiog ( lunch but a glass of skimmed glass of skimmed milk nam" you say brgtitly "We ordy sell coWs milk." si.ngg Well, get a glass of that and skim it. you say. • you a queer look and for a conference With one of her colleagues When she come* back she has a (lau of milk Uiat might be anything M L > ,he m *though I w.siidnt admit It to Them I don t feel too bad on the whole ........ CUT THIS OUT...... MY SECOND DAY Breakfast Grapefruit An* aSSon! MIU lifer Two allt^. a? ,.. ,-i i .MI, bat terra Taalp of in wm iiifi.I ..III-..., f.A .,th •karrhj Romania }fu\ PutgePaukcr VIENNA June 4 Ana Paukcr. .v.,( '"' "' %  V • T. M„ : % %  ,., ..,„, ana Bna a tough darling %  naUonal communism seemed, destined today for a Red purge in her home town. Radio Bucharest accused tie: "p n a ll s l and counter reYOtuuei • ..: Western sources expressed the belief HUM Ana and tmlnlsters who also wenattacked In a broadcast are bung made scapegoats for Red Romania's current economic woes. Last week she was kicked out of Romania communin party's politbiiio. F..r the moment at lead she still holds the Foreign! — P m aeaMtn M-SI IY.it.kir llow.rd son %  Sporu Round-up and Pro J L_ r n — ir • i — 1 • NEW A It It I \ AIS HAT KIIAPKD WALL VASES $2. 2 0 FEATHKR PILLOWS 342 wh GENUINE III.PIOUN HATS WOMKNS WIDE BRIM $4.47 MAIDS' NARROW BRUI S3.53 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIM. 4606 Aim** R eader inipoaioi. m Near go :or fruit, it mean. iS> To. rjevas] #osso i H a* an ? isi 15. Halt. Mi Extract from a cobra tail. I4i i 1. reed from our shin. i~. Tbr tilSirs portmsnteau. <• %  Beaatly mcttini of trees, til Foolish Idea At first everyone thought this was a rery foolish idea, on account of you can't fish for stars In thc pond because, as everyone knows, tha stars are In tha sky. "Oh. no! They're In the pond," Insisted Knarf. "1 saw them there." Finally General Tim, who had travelled a great deal, and had seen lots of things, and knew about almost tverything. nodded hia head. "Knarf may be right Now and then, on very special nights, the stars are In the pond. But," he added, "it isn't easy to fi*h for them." "I know It." said Knarf. "You need a net with a long stick. And you also need a big jar to put the stars In after you Ash them up." By this time everyone had changed their minds, and they al) made themselves ready to go Ashing for stars In the pond. Hanld found a net (which tha children used for the goldfish), and Teddy found a long stick. Mary-Jans and Mr. Punch both discovered a Jar. It used to have Jelly in it. but now it waa empty. Then they all set otrt, "There they are! There are the •tars!" Teddy exclaimed when they reached the edge of the pond. "There are millions of them Moating on lop of the water!" 'TMIK hot sun hi %  aV the Inferior marine-glue inspection, said to the caretaker, used for plugging holes In the "You really must not loave your deck, the -S'aury Mrs. Flobiter boots on deck. And what are all was yesterday invaded by what these children doing?" Mrs. Mrs. Wlthersedge described as Withersedge explained what, had saucy urchins, who thought oho occurred, and the Admiral snld melted glue was honey. The mournfully. "What a craft! It's %  hip's cat got stuck, and in trytj me fte waf broken up." "If you Wither:i>k mc rpp,,^ Mrs Wllhcr .edge, "she was broken up years LISTENING HOURS Knarf Went Fishing for Stars — But General Tin Said He Couldn't K By MAX I Id I I. IT was a bright moonlight night. Knarf. the Shadow, quietly tiptoed ever to the corner where hit sister Hanid was sleeping and tapped her lightly on the shoulder. "Hanid!" he whispered. "Wake op!" At this Hanid, who eouldnt imagine what was the matter, sprang to her feet in alarm. She mado so much noise that Teddy the Stuffed Bear Mr Punch, (icneral Tim the tin soldier, and Mary-Jane the rag-doll all woke up and began asking: "What's the matter? What's the mntter?" "Nothing's the matter." Knarf said. "I fust woke Hanld op to tell her that thc moon waa shining and that it was a wonderful night to go down to tha pond." "Why?" asked everyone else In the room. "To fish for the stars, that's why." answered Knarf. Everyone had the stars. "What will we do with them when we have a full jar?" Teddy asked. Knarf said: "Well keep them." Mr. Punch said: "Well sell them to the fireflies." One to Wear Hanid said: "I'd like one to wear In my hair." But General Tin said: "There's only one thing to do with stars that you fish out of the pond. You hide the Jar under a rock, and on the first cloudy night you poor them back Into the pond." Knarf and Hanid and Mr. Punch and Teddy and Mary-Jane all wanted to know why you had to do that "It'a only fair," said the General. "The stars don't belong to us. They belong to everybody. And when it's a cloudy night and the sura don't shine in tha aky. you hava to throw them back Into the pond so that they can climb up Into the sky again, and shine aa they always do. It would be a pity if w< took all the stars. Isn't it enourh fun Just being able to fish for them?" So they sll decided that General Tin was right. And when they had a full Jar. twinkling with stars, they hid the Jar under a stone. And the very next night when it was cloudy they poured them back into the pond, and let them get back into the sky and shire for everybody. GLOBE lO-atti 10 taOSIft. .('H.llam, 33. Home. |4i I Mm a !. Mow to make a hut} %  "[>. put Inta print. i7i 2. Hl> auriam* waa Hood. (S| a. sounds -ain but um. 141 4. Large i a'ora than tbat. .irmmd a b.*r wr'ier )S> '.iHipr tiun reo.ua IS. Pound in tht 'JO Accessor) to Mating. Rupert and the Toy Scout—2 trr**i %  i> i riadiuii ; r*i i i I oii-n-, H" la ria*. IT. am, iB NOH. Hopri __ tak-not, and lot >o rx as MBoo tna g vtwthw to vilow %  vVh* sw | .. ihtr< j„ %  hew*, nd seen oi hi* r nsadl. first Will-* rh Mou. *nd men Ho its' *>* Rjhh -. ', to win hun. I1OOM>. Ruperi. bid h* wouldn't Hr •ectlri* Tn h* ball! < %  %  ' TONY ATKINSON "SUr DmlBYRON ROLLOCK -Mar The Lord Blraa TaaLORD SUDAN (Calypao) "Thr Baby In lha Well" KEITH SEAI KV %  Don'l III .",,Me" ARTHUR MOOItK "I've lot my Mind on You" The SHOW WWi More BOUNCE To The OUNCE



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^ .TIRIiW JUNE 7 l52 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE FIVE I iiified Trade Union Movement Urged CAVALRY >l\ll. II HAM from eage 1 The Barbados delegate empriassed the need for a social securM throughout t bean urea in order that worker, might have some i.n %  I old *.([' Mr. R. C. Tello (British Gui%  i said that at one stage of the rv%  Ing Chairman of the ference on the u.mki..g caili leader though! individually rather tha lectiv.l. He %  jtpn nd :over the apathy ot triers and their indecision as regards which ulead them, and said that one found that politician told the worker* thai tha leaders of the unions were not qualified to Wad them. He also spoke of than iinterest In classes organised for of their own benefit, and said that olt.I.T.. he waa prepared to tuin often those selected to lectu on a bombardment against it. but often arrived to And that the since hearing tha excuse and exworkers them^elve*. were absent u given by (ha Chairman, There was no co-operation he was forced to sympathise with among Ihc working class people D then efforts to surmount of Trinidad, he said,, and in hi*, rtaui obstacles and hurdles viow, Trinidad in this respt-ci was which they encounti'ir.t very backward. Every leader, ha lli<:hllht said, was In fear of losing ths Then .one high wo'kers of his union, and thev light that could not possibly pass WM n at ,0 * M ln whBl ''' without giving *>• _ ,_ . the impression that O.IM.T. adMr. C. Fernusson (Grenada* mittedjhat within its present orbrought greetmg-. from the Greganisation, work within the nada Workers Union. Caribbean would have been diftlthat they in Grenada hoped that cult because the amount of work the Conference would do someascribed to the functions of thing to the everlasing benefit of O.B.I T. was so voluminous that the West Indies aa a whole. CBITUARY Mr. (.• Q. Eeluteifl HIE dt A DETACHMENT of Mounted Polic#. under the eommsncl of Stall gargssnl Andrrion of the Royal Csnnd.au Mounted Police, "march past" the saluting baa* at the Quo* i Birthday Parade on Thur-day OBIT WBI so voluminous that %  **-ra inoies as a *n*ic. _, "' Returns To B'dot Mr. Tello I place kid thai il was well k„'„,vn Vha, it ;;.. ;,i„,o ,mji" . Socruu. -I h.v. laboured, said tha, vvhil,. undo, lb. .,.... ,iblc lo divorce entirely anv not *> "">. not lo lament, but M ui 1 Record Crated Atlenat Carnival %  ,l, v not xo mocR, not o inmeni, uin ••' %  ••* • %  • %  %  >' % %  anil OR.l.T.. labour movement from mlitics to understand the actions of they looked forward t<> a great deal itotrssor Bobert Clifton, I \' ST^\Mc7un^X^u!lh, men/' and build on it, and then of assistance, but .'lagu,.., who recant* arrived P-rfc union movement was he they would have laboured to ll wan not willBarbados—his second visit In rbu %  thought something to" be welch-rstand the probl. corned: agpeelally whan the pollW ^ Indies. lies was evolved from the Uadi i'l < ml t<> gu %  %  %  „ lie was %  knaMvn was the third SOB oi Is* I ill* ear. : %  i: i ;in P rt ii Blown ti aalr set standard in dress a* an .mien: i ortsrulturiai ha aai 'the .ti ivtv %  %  l<\ quiet bul nveslm nl %  • ice -rdlng tn him became %  ill 11 IM [ ..III He oa che .md was %  Iwajn u ads s In MOM tht BXpangc Of UN Vestries and tha Laftslatura bul MI Lntete I \ iMinpanion and • i manj %  %  In ini ling healM 1 mllad his s< tlvttvei i "' ha enIi ivoui td % %  ki %  %  friendship ha h Bjcvad Ha m n an lad lo M Cronaj and had sorrowing kdo-a Com pen sat ion Those problems concert-od each t ( Uv v.irlous territories in the 0 last (or th< i sfa) the hif to fall and allow the l.CF.T.U. 79M -Will | N > giving a sh... A daughter deepes. Utlvs lo dd their domestic WWjhWI .. .. d m stt t*MW .s h .p Wt e.e ... ^ Club Morgan to-night and ,.i the "" ", %  " %  Ml|,,us "" w *>' Globe Theatre on ihe li:ii i % % %  pen had %  Inch at times appear* t <:real Sacrifices K'lli. This magician, a M< | Wa mual be prepared to go Frenchman, is supposed to bit able Mr. (slltllstoiM' \lt>\\ I'll Union mnvrmeiit. lather than the trade union movement evolved from pol thii sreat gflawasagajl that It area he ,d The !" wpl ' **' ch all out and build'a unified trad? to hypnotise one "and then send ~ ^T„'" has brouVhl us aVeraa. Void. thln •• workmen, compensaurn. lYOrth, to be renandlM SrMlgh the per**.'W " ---' ^"'hit.o,, .. T(u ^^ l ,, UMI t( I can hardly say If we are going -"'— a ** Q"' IJ specled throughout the civilized and besides this and many othei ,,":*„% '' ' Teicenten..i | I lagsaart or haekwardu I throw :ind many of the other islanu ., hard task and it is tricks, he Is an acclaimed Arc r !" **? 1 "' "•"' %  ""K Oeneral Hospital 1 4 M out this to thoae people who are the education of the Uade union f 0r U s to make up our minds and eater, though the latter feat is ,'""''' *""!? %  .£. "''"L. 1 "*" pr !" s,on Bowen of the Gulf Oil Cot anxious to serve and to employ members — a question of pardeteimlne v.iat part we will play not on his programme for to• mled a colourfui sight when ho poffUon in Ihia island, the means of legislation and amount Importance to all the j n tht. great task." We have to nieM appeared before the Park Hci. • Mi llow ..-.wing scho. rompuMon by leglaUtlon islands—and he was glad in tha make great sacrifices which 61 e Since 14 ycra old when Robert dte, ** d ,n Io P ha V "*. ue a %  clei k n, BrtdM rather than using the machlnlatief respect to see that II had worthwhile making, so that those Clifton decided he could do a bit Riovo ' a nii %  ''•*" %  >ick and Joined the British Wtt Indl ery which bi really Milted to been urged that they would who come after u< will And a in Ihe magician line and whan winc co'o*"*''' shoes. He had Regiment m the 1914-111l War ni. d-maeralle trade unions." Mr. utilise the (acihties oRered by the foundation upon which t„ work. I he went on the stage for his school "^'d" h,m •"" *ring an served in Eg>Pt WhtTl h Tello said. Ul Ivaralty College of the West am aure thst the hardest task is pals, he has travailed In many BVenm ,, ""' s w h '** lovCT to IM rank M .Sgt. Majoi On h He obser\-ed that in Barbados Indies. the beginning, but the most of countries to perform tha matrV ma,, h lhose he *"* waring. r ct urn "'."'V'"'"^ 1" V Uta tWO thinewere a* mtegrattd The other important question all Is the maintenance of that tricks he has -nulled the kiu.. Th stalU afforded many forms hat dapartment v< because of lha paucity of neccswas the question of federation whkp [ s vs u,i,|i>hed. ' entertainment such ,.s th,. lu.ky 0!,,a L ,, ! 11" [ %  "ken which was very Important to the -tfade Ch, h*J IIhas visited Belgium. II..1', #* • whaal of fortune ..n placed on c ertain „„,„„ muVenit m uVnUfhotll Ihe Hi. pieaont aide Is a fellow O"* P'* wa l d " the Quionhardly dlffarani n the „,,,„„, who, because they were dvlUfe( lw „. l(i lllul 1Tt lht ,. s ; b ( „ ulll tt „ m m ,,,,„.,, F1 „ t ,. M( ( Weal Ind-n w..y ,.f llf. knowing U Rrtliiung to Barbados a ye. T^S!^ JfT!iL£S^SS!i -21! !^^" ? %  unie*oo we He has arranged u. act in concert • housewife and the dlfteulUee lllu hf> w< 7. h.-,t at Seawall All lnothers !/had to tie paid bet ne ild enter the the Political Movenicnl 11 nlttton Ol the win king chug peok^ pie were labelled Conmiunist Mr. Adams had said that the und urgc< i tna t there should be es depend(recdum of movement between ad %  greal deal on the growth or Inc 4a i Bndai trade unionism stnmg and powM c p Alexander, membei erful and side by side ith a poLlttcaJ inovrment which was kbour. That, he said, 1m•n aj .,n .icknowledgemeiit of the fact that these two must go side by side. to take the san MM with the Boodh .Ken to build their i %  with its achievements until such lime as we ha%*e been able to command '.of each and I tha Sub-Committee of O.H.I T„ W|thln tno ieip0 ctive territories. md a vice chairman of the Con„ A unlfled „.„,,,. unlon movcmcnt knowledge\<• t...ed ........ ..i th< f i .....-, „iont OfuneM with hard i nl that now rent, provided that their minds hlmaelf to be "pionee r of this great -Jinei labour for exceeding the ter into the were not flavoured with miy form ind im|>ortant co-onlinated and A quantity of silver ball arrived limit while riding the aulocyt e the Caribbean of politics. central body of the Caribbean during the week from Hrltish J3 on Black Itork Road Ul they shoul I He stressed the importance of Trade Union Moveinent,and Guiana. Hexible wo.xl for spars June 4 about 11.05 a.m. approach this matter with thi building up and InaUtalnlng .1 said, "I am sure that the unifi%  !" d '""" s: The same .Magistrate alto fi-l Kr.-tn.ilil ItlHtl ol I feeling that there must be a s t r0 ng pou-erful and unilied lacation %  thii movement will be There is howc.cr still a great Bast 1 aine tutfl hou i d ile ^ r c \ mi 0 f i n ,n. dlnn statesmen like Mr. G. H %  llv "'* %  > Md Other hardwood having .. licence. Tim paint valued VJO" and : toe) but growing side by side. vidual politics. Adams who have not only exfor the interior of the boats. be paid in two months or there board vali "I am not prejudiced 1 ,P0| the world 1h*t the — i^tti., t Statn man ship great as, bul have mam*tt\' w n . a % %  Imprlsonmenl with hard I laaln td %  :•' Uw OU %  %  OP |'rUIIWS Both cases were bn.ugln by C| J..1 Paint, Board Stolen *re should are doinn very good and adnunible work in the political lield n. ive up poli•.. come -solely and undividedlv into the trade union movement, I ask Ihe question—is th.it a fair request in make to poI it fair for the Held of polities i" ihe Caribbean? I say Mr. Tello Bounded a note of warning in pointing out that if 1 leaning on people who were kind to them and whose intentions were good, but politicians, they He expressed great admirewoiklng class people." Bu I tton for sUlcsirun'hip. but said he hid no admiration for politicians, mi matter how sreat such politicians might he. A -i ti.-iii.m. he said. *• not merely a politician, and he admired one who identified himself a> a *i.irM" 11 of hut country and one who was prepared te do ever>thlnc possible for the bcnclit of his colony as a whole. They In the Caribbean li irl a sreat deal of experkme With politicians. He had and Polie.I % % %  MO I 15'. I. II.ill I lit.30 pin on M .. IT, i.n \l:iv 30 ..!.-!.. it \M.III, ..f Ken lb.ii'-.-. Chi u 1 Church, repo that his botsM entered bj in unknown man be M .. in and 1.00 p.m Dl Nothing was si. lei Tinthief entered thnnniii %  open l.clio in WlndOW '"lit iii<< his escape, having behind .._. Usnng of .1 ., Ail all i>tI'l ;,, the C.il. 1 niiade BtOTC during Wad< % %  ii '" ; id SI "' s,, y nl hl Kenneth Bri.II. Letter* Of Admininl ration pendent one. Thev were facing The" trade union movement piled, and laid that there were %  iger of labourites who could also subacribe to the uuilddifferoncn between uidividual •ome da* would find themselves ing 0 f u country In the interest of groups. • lost nt sea because there h ; WOTkm g class people It was Alter explaining the position of was not some great politician on „ -^.^ movement, and he was O.K I.T.. he warned that the greetwhom to lean, nor was there any su „ delegates would realise It., cst danger which could come encouragement if they allowed iniD „ r ,. ;i n.e. ft was a movement the movement now was the the workers to Brow uo with the wmih wafi going to place in the flltratJ n f '"mmun.st lift, feeling thnt there must be some h s „ f W1 |ling trade unionists columnists into their midst, though 1 lncm something which, if wisely used, he shared Ihe denunciation of the ~ eesfld be of great Interest to nil tactics Ol labelling I" Dlincer ^ m moV ements In "'"' """ ,1 Concluding he said: "The danL^'^,,,, nt ih workir ger is that some day. there might t, !" 11 dearth of such people, or He recalled es of poiiiiu.ins "were to be adWo:. D Di ol Porhani, s. Laalue] of the Tramc Br ., baa trade anJoniat 'M* W-S fined 30 1-. ... j st.,ti "We should alwavs be prepared %  14 days or one month's init„ ,-uar.i . 1 Lnsl pollprteonment by His Worship Mr. ticiana who are only willing to C, L tValwm >e-t,il,.> t, disrupt rather than to assist In driving a motor van on Bin.* building a treat society of trade IOM a* 10 m uag P*r hour. vnioni'-n. 10 the ( nilised world." CpL Jones attuched to th' ii said that he wan in the C< Itumoiilili Kepliees —teadaj tn. on duty on lllack It-K-k Ilou,| on Allan O.llyinoi,. granted -.uldi. the Acting ClialrMarch 20 when he mm Uie van petit r .., ... (tobart ,.. man ui iu re,.lv to the various Irt-ing driven at a fast rate. He Matthias Village. Christ Church, AU "" "'"'t' 1 '' 1 "" "' "" %  %  UOM thanked th* VgriOUl Checked the s|>eed of Ihe van a. [•>•< n-l'-'il-'d the ineidinl to 1 Police He stated thai a I ased. wai removed from II I. Wai I 1 ioor\ ( f Oniii r ,i j„-.,~n# fix —C J 1. • %  .!• • >> ,.•>' %  observation* .IUHIK-II *"* vin-u ...*.va.-M .a.c |nvu "i in.vmi uri'i i*r i> %  > *1*t& !" **2^£-t SeCff ..ti^i-l^ ii rnari foi iheir remarks arvl K-W it was being dr.v/onvent hat aejfttea l earear eenfct be e* greal ... pas h-ur and the speed limit on Louisa 8 L': m iEbLk &? U U, ,"' l *.r„ r'L^, SELS* S! thit there were thatroad is 20 m.les p. Mr. D. II l NO ACCIDENTS On th< . then 11 cci dents period Tn. by Meaars. Hutclnnson & Bai ii'*id. s-ihiit'.i-, appeared f< ths petitl %  I Reno '. fa TIM "-ill of Arnold A, King ill ere no cases of mail h |hf mijVemt n i was laced Ml ,.,,.,,,,, ,,..,, .. ,. ; 80 n. ment would ie of such that it British Trade• UnjonJ^g*^ ,n ; f „,. the prttmoUon %  ,,> faellng thai UM workWhenevei then would lake Up all the lime of Whatthe *Wau}TWdlLV^.^ rtu ,tlng to th. Ol 0 ln ,,, s ^^^ thould not enter the sal these great men and we wonld received wsavnot lug | hgg %  ddldren. and said tt w— < %  %  ed ooTities. and countered that karate, and to n„d the leaden of trade unions ing from he-ven. buteonsethtog important pieces of and of the Held like losi .beep without a ahe,>vvhich; ^ had ^' !" "' .,.. %  ; „, hl t , (()lk ,,,,, |n ,.,., ilyrent,e P herd that was kind, f^fg^-SS,S^t!l£^Sb .... '"... %  (. -. %  sh..id the woraw Big dance that this danger gn£*_!lff!K iVY?~^i?: Se also urged the establishj^ CcnierWice then adjourns cnt of a COUrte Or course* In the nd a(cr wCn | n 0 cjommiltCe t \ ill'" DaW %  OH Web rith nudtera on the Agcmia. Thl %  om of UH la A rtre at I..." II. I'lantallo S< .I ,,.: % % %  \ ..t->nt HO 1 on Thursday burnt four and half acres of second crop ri|i emirs, two ,11 it ratoons, four acres of trash an live ,.< res of %  ui gre 1. lw %  pcrty ol I' <: Scab f (i I..II.I. Chnst Chinch. 5 CHRISTIAN SCIENCE i READING ROOM HOME-DRESSMAKERS ARE THRILLED WTTH -l.ul.— I 1 hn'IIV .11 %  r-l It .1 nd %  that r urged that this danger and traaVbe co BlU stage bean to struggle and light to obUin before Ihei all live lo regret it nd enjoy the respect or the emment 01 %  ^' ffOSfffc the Ihe'cmversMvCoHege of the W ;Tplen^"S2on was held lav ever iO be he.d in the P..._ „-,!, %  ^R unification of trade unions In the Indies, the Colonial n lgbt st nine o'clock. The grounds wen well lighted trade union." In Trinidad and West Indies called for a great deal mid Welfare Organ.sat !" i I %  ii.^in.i %  ~ 11 • a vsenssaan 1 1 f 2 SuOmli.' %  !" a AH. Ai<. waa>coatg %  Wfi TRY HARRISON'S FOR WEDDING GIFTS ANNIVERSARY and BIRTHDAY PRESENTS Our Stocks, all quile new. include 11 u.i 1 (,111 in nATBB n:\111: ll'i-,h Kiiivi-s and Kofk*. Tea and t'offre SpMina. Toiisl Karks. W.iilrrs. I'imdiiiH 111 S,i. .M..111U11I Braaal Bo.-inls. Silver Table Bells alc.l IMH i.io.x A \inn:iu.i:r FKumiXES (The latter with beautilul laee effect*) and 1 „„/, romp if Ihe famem 1 Mil III V II l//#. in which we have i\er 100 pieces, all diUcrent. fr*nn which \u may IIUHIMCAMAY NYLONS 3or "Sheer flight 60 (iuu^e %  15 />' H I nh Arabesque Heel in new "fCCl L'llll.llK %  Av.nliihlu m line HJlotlTt <>1 DsWfl Cloud. Il.ncitniini and Sunbrcc/c. $2.80 per pair CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad St. versatile, lasting beauty ' FABRICS Wint pour Kotr>*.sewir.| to be I SBOsMl W.m clothei that looh BBS i millionr c cose nsl-lonoih.i.|? Thn pou w*nt -Cslsneta' 1 itifni For ihe unusual qualitf 0< i' '.* if i their kuuutr aoS rt.l.7 ol (KTurt (Was • pfu'eniofiil perfection to evor*fmm| fou rnaks OiT-drewss, .-• '.in", gown WM) chiidf tn't wear . ll wtll M UM '"•• ot your Irlcndi .I* ..,S** a -*** :+** ,c.^ t4t ^^ 9rii.il. Ctlantu timitsd, tsnoon. art u* rropr*toi$aftfm trad* Mar* 'CsMAsaT ANIAMTED OPINIONS fil Saiy* Mr. Leo King TOO CAN MMJ0M IT BUM. THE NUKEIEST TREATTo£fe The Perfection oi Conleotion MADE IN U.K. WALTERS PALM' TOFFEE LTD. PALM' WORKS. LONDON. W. 3 %  %  %  %  I %  %  a %  I %  %  %  %  %  %  JIM !MII A Full i;.ni..f of • IH IU>\ ron:niY CHOWi — Also — (HICK I IllllltS WATI:R PANS CKI.IXi.OII) KINGS ele. Seleet early from • %  II. JASON JONES & CO., LTD. AGENTS. %  %  %  %  %  I %  v.w FOR BEST RESULTS FROM YOUR STOCK USE KOS.SOI.UN MINER \l. MIXTIRE will. Vitaasln D FOR CATTLE A generial Tonfe and Appodser. Damp ihe ford snd sprinkle Mixture M it / KOSSOIIXN MINUAL MIXTIRE with VlUatln DIi Increaaa -i of i-aymg Birds and improves Ap|>ctit< and Digest Inn KOSIOUAM BLOOD MIXTIRE for RACE HORSES JU- KOSSOl I\N IOI>I/EI> SALTS KOHOUAN I-.I.I/I i. SALT LICKS KNIGHTS LTD.


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n<.I III.Ill HUIIIMMIS \I)\(X\TK BATCRDA1 Jl M 7 HO Successful Athletic Sports Meet Ends NEW COTTON 10 Yards Added To Flal Race Track Kensn>gl< %  %  %  HA A A %  %  ning tin'%  %  %  %  i everybody was i hoat tor boys W the girl* 22" %  was reeaaaiured. %  %  %  odcr 16. Thorn] f 23 H neond %  :iiis i>tr %  race was run im UM I I —220 yards, though tinI fur it weir run oil a ihort ti '<'' %  The other rec.. the Trlnldadlan Agoetiii Ihe 220, b*>ys nvold record at £3 5 M Fnrnitm In Top r'orm K>"' f %  I entered — ihe two mile rrfcsOR i i III S minutr*. 33 second Che 1.000 metre K.o iiurn UtU ed the three day meet uraaafl .JKI h of form ;il M time winning only aiv. but .,i..i ly. Knowing that he is going to Helsinki later this s treat ami ing him win In tbil thorough way ond : the Trinidadlan M.itUiieu 0 Cuianesc LiddeU could Ufl en htm was if he had falh powerful last lap peclally thr last two yard), sprint, u ployed to rarry him to %  Tin-ni no i.-" Ing exact I \ what standard of will inat KaWnk, bul whoa 1 Skinner ra all his racaj In which t [•red, winning Ihe Trlnld rbo I golr.g to ll'l'ink and from the Gultme I th*l SMiuHit wilt mH bo golitx 1 II. .* thr nth'-i %  ccoptea. Bklnn and i %  whan I any i carry away the honour Of wfn%  he v i disadvantage not h better jhaa Matthieu and i thinner He arrived for U OOd daa f the meet and made a surpi'-i num in the half mil I'tTipi %  i DP r IB %  ""' turned out Thurad IJ a lUi nil left tJ ed and • iiilin.: HsStar much pain and couln the previous evening. The firsi event the I n 'Roadster 3 Speed I P. D. Pirris in 2 minutes 11 %  • %  %  Brov %  trr *:iksr .: %  '. I i %  if..' %  %  iid Intermediate tot thr J20 yard. %  i-\ %  liad on Mondnv %  man. \yostin. though %  U e mm. Im! hi LA RLE McLBOD wuuuug ttio two mile cycle rsc for "B" OlaM at Kcn.iiton Oval on Tbnr*d IT. Ihe final day of the three day A.A A n Intercolonial Athletir and Cyrlr Meeting V. Carter w* %  econd and Jnllen (TrinidadI *tbird Ktrong thii lice I Marshall. Arenei and Rouaa. The Notre Deo ra Trevor InniBi, Trotman, Mamn ai %  II .-.re wood, Agnstini. Q| %  %  ad ("1 UM visitors, banded ovei his baton after h. tome IO yard*, but tha nati regained ""' ad i lull. Too. 'tn I'.' %  ,i: fauna bandovti to Agostim who ndred, The •no long for him to catch Up with House, though, perhaps i' Notre Dame had anybody on the i but %  IIOII.II.I-" Witkham, Agostlnl would have overtaken him. The fhra nlla, Bl vast won h> Trinidad, with C A Marshall second and Grant tliini This was only the second Win by a visitor in the cycle < % %  ll. Meet %  I Agos%  as the la HI. :.. igh only i wood ><... and ratohed Itecause the track was found to be short. Gibb* won by %  id.'fn.m Sin. ivaly took second and third Thompson et ,i new tune for ..ird*. boys under 16— %  %  i.... i J QlttatM record vrhleh he made eeriu-r this wear rhetnpmn who ,s f.miv t ai a U Inoao rnuaclee, is ,i gw\ sprtntar 4 ntng. hi• ^ %  ,,,i L-HIRO V I>ougoll and %  • came third, Only two entered lor Ihe glrll over 16, 220, Hyacinth Inniss and 1 gin. After dropping Liddell In the % %  !1 I 0 .-.in this race fropi Carnuchael and Matthieu Agohtiid -t .. new Uaa 120 Yard* uoy. i.vr \% *h., h he i M I.ynI >n. ,. the 1st ,u. i TI ll no doubt that .ii. Ml bettei rompa ir ttop, i.. would havi Ustanca In for Agoktinl tl> glan i-d hail. ..ii,. i i. II., %  %  ma nd . (%  >! %  thing iik. i ti., b> seen to put m %  nrtflta al the other two day* of the meet. Be-M In 111 C M.i shall won the 2-mih Ml in :> minutes 58 2 ktlveb imiii time le i oubl that <>f Uu i bent Mr %  i rinl out and "• ID Reportei Bai M M od iv m convtnt Inib in the t*B from M. V i. %  kdad Till Ian Cartel is a fair wprintpr, but when It i distance behind a mile ,ind there happens to be an oei .i gruelling few laps. tatla. He it from the others who were lust all blown and could onl> lea bun puss without any appreeltort t<. prevent it The Iwo nnlr rvrle. Intermediate, was % % %  i %  ...lit! nrith roatai aacond and II grea third. "Flash'' at %  I : ider, but the %  In -.hen it ll lUUHU th.it Hill ol ilolborn and Put . i I U dirt n.rt i-nter this ovent %  0 had helped to uccaaaftil meeting and thanki>d the publk for the enthu slaam with which bftoy had supportod the aporti Ra also thanked the mercantile rommunlty for %  %  il %  i HII %  iii it i MI % %  *•* Miller. Sid C Ihr.Mrt Tin." I %  nu rani i I i < %  IMIUI nn.vn:v CAVE SHEPHERD & (0.. LTD. I". II. 12 & 13 Broad St. CHECK ON YOUR NEEDS UI3UIY tomtx ii. in ".'UHI $1.08 • II III TI. 1111*1.1.X %  \ in* ^iiU.a 97c. ALSO win 11 UM: I WIIIHII it ins wide at $1,15 LGPr ll Tiovor Inui** winning > inn the lonu dill r McD. Lloyd by half of a body. Lloyd who woo the mile and throe mile had not banked or ntea eoa sH and this helped defeat him. However, laalsa who earner lovmed Loiun Lynch's lit year old 440 record for boya over 16, proved himself to be grind, determined middle dssfeHMI %  Cricket Season Opens Toda) Laps Field MM uV i".mi. exdting five mile CUUM IJ whkh D In 13 minuU-s 56 I he lopped the wh of Trinidad i Kcepted In I wa* een the folly of allowing a %  eyetlsl to get too lonu 'i lead. Tlu riders, McLcod. Cartel and 0* others stayed behind as EUis tried to increase his lead. )utt watching i and banking on Elli-dropping back iftei he ha Ii. II |U T %  '•• %  . i \ t-1 %  i i i i Bai • i "•" i' %  UBM • I M (HHs lle !" %  I SM 1ARBH ift> Ov.r M 111 ActMlln.. 2nd K J..ne., 3rd M l.fil> Ttmr f.f • %  • Ii Mil l I %rll il l- n-u .( %  •I (Irani. i a i %  %  • 111 > I \l It i ,>•• Hi I i mm >T In n MVI % %  f> from page 1 pmntrta: H. B. Jordan and X-* I • I. I '-ll Ml \ I I I UMl 14 Wanderers VS. Wimivv.i. J. Lewis and T Carlton vs. Empire at CarltOl 1'inpin.f.. W. Roach and W. Han UIXKI. Y.ILP.C. VI Combermere ai Dacklai Hoad. Umpires: L H. toaefa and < BnwL Mtntal Hospital vs. PoUea %  laok Rock Umplrea <; IV ind W i'. Cable A Wirehtfi Ptckwlck led H..H. Un i : Ba> . I entr.il l t'mpires: A. Harewood 'and S Bechlea. I-.IUI. V. %  %  1-eiwaid vs. Umpires: P. Philip i mere Umpire n qiarka end Hall %  % %  Q Urrtra and hunch 3 4fi and •umps drawn .1 0 p.m 1 I'ulHu, Ind % %  %  MI> in ii i i... ni> %  . ....... Ski..WHAT'S ON TODAY Police Court* 10 00 a.m. Pi rat Dlvlalon. Inte modi Ate and Second Dlvi-ion Ori< kci matches at varloua ground— 1.30 p.m. Netball (Queen'* College Vs. Queen'College Old OliW'l at Queen's CoUoge — 448 p.m. Basketball at Y.M.P.C. Bookies Rosd~730 pm. i ,r. rvri.l n leai %  — 1 %..1 III 111 1 \KI llll HINUMOS1 £ ^>^3% Sports Window THE fast playing, ski. fid VM P.O. team are achoduled to ii. .i un iiedani ma School tonight al Basketball at the Y.M.P.C. In the other match, ifarrlnoii College Old Boys' will meet Fortress. Those latter teams are much of a muehne**, with ever u -light >n edge peihapa on the side of the Old Boys', and there will doubtless w < %  hi in thi. match. Play starts at 7.30 p.m. r A ra WEATHER REPORT YESTERDAY Rainfall from Codrlngton .02 Inch Total Rainfall for month to date: MB UM. Hlgheat Temperature 1741 T Lowest Tomperaturo: 77.(. T Wind Velocity: lfl mtlci per hour Barometer: dam} 39.904, .1 :n ) ""'-' %  TODAY Hmirlse: 6 42 a JO. Bunsat: 0 IS pm. Moon: Fir-t Quarter. May U LighUng: 7.00 p.m. HtKh Tide: 8.2ft a.m.. 3.3R p.m. Lo Tut. i ' V'i T/ 3 Need bott/e-feu babies bo cry-babies? 'sS^y" /^ *> Osrajash; not I Baby*a cry •^ i. MIIV means pain a> ResBti %  kfc] %  -. II \-1 Metleapi a i... baby's %  lUMnson'i 'PMeil' tariey, i ha re hoitki. c, : %  j im eihcr's milt and ;" %  pa sg %  d J % %  ...I aa II ROBINSON'S 'esTinr BARLEY iT PAYS TO USE THE BEST Thai I. \\l>. ..MI Hhoulj bu. HAM) PAINTS We hove New Stocks of .. BMM IM BODM PADtN Grey. Dark (ire. Oak BraWIg, B'dns I.njhll A Hark St.uir. Tropiejl Whip Red •8* I n.nirt-HiiNh MAKIN1 I'tlVIS IVstttv, Craaaa, Tulip Qraeaa MATINTO M \1 1'XtVTS eTsdie I Creen i 'IM IM i 11 poa pajM i s. Brlthi Red. V.rev Mid OrecM ftKtn Brillljnl ALtMIMIM PAIM n.rd Qeaaj PERMANENT <;KEB\ PAINT V.I „r ,dd I'.im ,:jid Iheumalism While Ycu Sleep nt. Dlislecii • „! A>.l. n ,.-, I,,., C % %  %  .... C,.i-'.. 1.1.1 • i N. "' [ ..Cystax PARADE PICTURES AT CITY PHARMACY Ihe Sign of OUSIMT & IIAVNES CO., Iimmily liillfsr i the Wnl Indiev i, MM maw I'HT \ IOUIO ..I ita IC1 nisi ENMMM uaa by >„!,., II I.,-. 'I \ Current Affairs al X M.t' \ ON MONDAYS i I %  "I "I teaaabari al i aara Mural AsaoeUUan 84e. M I. h .lurev IBe COUCHS n*.\MEL has ooaquerad teas of %  thousands of cou|faa. For c ai it has been rttoraaieaded by Doctors, Nurice, Hospitals iitd Sanctons everywhere. The ,reason? Simply this. It cosj' nns soluble laciocreosote .1 in (he I .imc! labotBsOJia and this ingredient rulers yaw bloods l ream and staBakl 11Kuouble st it toot. That u *hy I Jinel is so effective .nd way it acts son •borough** I'rom thelsaidoae Faaari eaaaa tha Loflaroed beonslual passage^ and bailds up yooe pavcer* ol rcintanoa wnlk it is dostaeyinc ihe germs which have taueed tae OOHBBI e* oaki I he moment you siatpcet 'nu,r catch s kough or cold, take Fame! Syrup and you will hare >iarteU on the road to recovery Always keep a bottle ui tha house. FAIV1EL SYRUP Obuinjpu in n§o iiJM — frtm ail Tttdt mqrnw M pm Frank B. Armstrong Led. BRIDOETOWN M FOR Li i i LE FEET! uov i eat i sfloe* Iran. f/1 -TAtCS 1-g •* i/l -. i-io *S H m HO $5 W <5 %



PAGE 1

SA1VWA\ JIM :. \*ii IIWthMMts AKVlK VTI I'U.I I M N I HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON CHILDOEM& COSTbMB PARTY "IDMHOOW TOW** MALL FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BLONDIE i\ -LI 3S BY CHIC YOUNG ^ FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS AND HOW 00 VOU KNOW V YOU...MXI MV NAA-E ..MEV.-.WUAT AM J APE ALWAYS I SAVING THAT'S SO FONNV BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS H_L JUST TAKE H \ CAW HOffVJ AVJAV PPOM Tl*CMJEr3 BELL AN Ofv€ MIM A 1XJHOW6E -TM ^. 16 MAOOiFi0*V RIP KIRBY 3Y ALEX RAYMOND '.AM5 TWITS AKX' %  60 i*T-tETENTMOUANO : THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK ft RAY MOORES A TOAST TO YOUR HEALTH!! LET WINCARNIS TONIC WINE ASSIST YOU TO GUARD IT BUY A BOTTLE TO-DAY. IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Tuesday to Saturday only SVIA I VI Ol I I.IIS iirinun imiiliiulr u| our lti.ni. Ins Titrrdaide. S|i. iyhlslin. ii mill MM III! Nlrrll SOUPS: Campbell's Yi'ut'tublc „ CMMHM I, < I'MIM nf Mushroom KLIM S" GK.Al'K FKUIT — Tin ... IKi II in; sin r POWOBI APRICOT JUICK toHONATioN mm SI'KY ROYW. WHISKY BED — "Cnrib" Usually Now s JM — s :.u> .45 — U.I I — .55 — .2:1 — %  III — III — I M .24 — 12 Ml ,|K .211 :u 1.20 4.IUI .20 (WMII Mil ITS J 1 III 11 < IMKTAII. (IdWf*) SI.19 1 1 Small) . t lltl IT MAI.MI .85 H ( %  IE \IT | 1 Snull) .34 | (lATfr) r.: 1 I'l \i m (BfMkt) $ .•! *" ilin.im.il, .11 IMAKS illrouk'B) IIM Aiiii imm S|.14 IN .82 II a H XM'IU UKIIS (t'lilvrrs) .77 N 'omwril> MKAHItl 1(1(11 S .M M rm.\:s (OUvt HIMIHII 7 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street T II I < O L 0 A V \ U i: (. HO( EIIIES VM^V'#.>.W..V.VV.^.VV^ FOR THE KIDDIES GOLDEN VOICE STORY RECORD BOOKS AND GOLDEN VOICE NURSERY RECORD BOOKS I ALICE'S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND HENNY PENNY JACK AND THE BEANSTALK THE THREE BEARS LOST TOYS' CONCERT CINDERELLA I I 80C. EACH O.S SALE AT ADVOCATE STATIOMEMY IIIIOAII VIIIEET ^-. %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  .^ %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  .^ %  .W.VS.W.-.W^^ \













res ae a

a a ee

Establishment Of Unified —. saath | ee
ian M3 At Birthday
Trade Union Movement Urged | }

Parade
“TRADE UNIONISTS in Conference at Hastings:





ESTABLISHED 1895 ‘SATURDAY PRICE : FIVE CENTS,

ae











Se















f M t rately : 1 wade
House yesterday morning urged the establish- ; Folly Wins nee
ment of a unified trade union movement worthy to | /arnum For / aug ‘The crowd
be respected throughout the civilized world by em- inland Fund Frontenac ea: cagemeinn
ployer and government alike. : : . fy palit
It he-first hr ye : f : a THE Fund to defray the ex- } Wee}

_ it was the first publie session since the conference was penses of Ken Farnum to the up ce { The Parade, e ially wked
officially opened by His Excellency Sir Alfred Savage in|] Olympic Gamos ‘in ‘ Helsinki e by its : ,
the Legislative Co . 7 E =e 7 next month will be closed on ‘ . IX J
ee ve Council Gerieber on Wednesday, and dele Wednesday next, June 11, Gipsy Beats Mischief | ane Beaten
gates were given the opportunity to put before the confer If you have not yet con- icon te of Major ¢
ence the problems and. grievances experienced in theix | tributed yon still have a few by Be iss yacht Folly, skippered | platoons Tre eo
respective territories days to send your donation to »y Bert Toppin sailed mutifully | from the

Chairman of the Conference is from holding the viow that the the Royal Bank of Canada, Troan afternoon 6 win the ; Major R. A. St
ok ee a ee ae ue movement should he tie mene held in. Carlile “Hey — beak! aaa, Con \
,RI-T., who is acting in the developed and strengthened did | goal , 6 Moyra Blait, sec * aineak Teed fhe. commiahe Major s
pace. Mr. Francisco Aguirre,jevery thing in their power to ae Prev. Ack. a S minutes, Folly oma oa Bie W: wan. oer ese : :
eneral _ Secretary of O.R.LT.,| Strangle trade unionism. Such Frank Hall 5.00 last year, —~ a ae 1 » Parade tak , 2
Fe 7 arrived, Mr ae me attitude of the majority | y. a. w, Ferguson The race was two rounds ane | M ser W: : i 7.50 am. Five
Sia ams, C.P., C.M.G,,! of employers in Trinidad and To- T’dad Terazzo ‘onditions were quite suitable fo! nutes la! he handed
ni r. A, P. Alexander, mem-|bago, and he believed in the Expert 5.00 he Seagulls, From the fl ; | UE ee Ae eo ;
ber of the sub-committee of] other parts of the West Indies, i a ee Sou memeed’ ace ax tee 1 RT











‘ t was evide ‘ould ae Ea |
O.R.LT., and President of the} The employers seemed to feel Total $1,681 27 be ‘the vane aren roe M ‘helin, 0.8. ‘col h r |
wee 3 Waterfront Workers'|that trade unionism was their 3 Be: anc recetved: the Ger 1s

bane _ Wa ra Workers’ th ism ait and receivec mw General oSaitte
oat ‘ eee chair ate ee oer a winted SS “kippy of the Intermediate Class HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor inspects the Cadets at the Parade the Garrison on Thursday. His Excellency the Governor

On Thursday the conference| eventually ei t to take h aaa but quickly got away ftom them.| Major A. 8. Warren, O.C. cadets conducts the Governor on his tour. >) the inspection party are Col awceompanied by Lady Sav i

t at 2 o'clock j e erence | Cveniuaily want to take the man-| ° She then went on to overtike| R. T. Michelin and Lt. Col. Connell. Major Denis Vaughar AD
net a 3 Cece in the afternoon,| ager’s desk and run their busi- rie et CASOT | Dauntless, Invader, also of the arrived at 8.00 H
a after Mr. Adams had ex-| ness. Intermediate and Imp and Rain-
pressed the thanks of the Confer-| Mr. Marcano urged that there

Sor he Wee oa e : ¥ St st ° weompanied by the Moun
ence to Sir George Seel for plac.|was need for educating the woe O T dk bird o e D Class, e gave! S | ws. k » Police under the -comman: x
ing the Gantareast feont” at| ployee and empleyer” alike in pens O ay nese boat. § gaint. : fi Ia i OOC | ee : rl = ft Ser meant AD Sees Pol}
Hastings House at their disposal,|what trade unionism meant, He} a en ee bis. | Roa shee sp sali min. tr

i Ne
Sir George replied, welcoming;expressed the hope that the con-) The 1952 Cricket Scasoy «| lUdament to keep the lead. The S ttlement me through the east
ied, ‘ pe the & 952 k ason opens] nie el . ;

the delegates. Sir George ex-|ference would have a strong and/ to-day when 15 matches under the| OMY other boat which stood a

ed e ° r
vw the Savannah
e. itories | Ass vovra Blair but Movra eee j es 7 S eeeaaleeare ‘Sooke: ike eke
pressed the hope that their la-| lasting effect on the condition of|euspices of the Barbados Cricke: a oh ! Pest li Orn L z t Ex e 1 His Excellency took the R
bours and whatever organisation|the workers in these territories, Association gets unde Moyra Blair but Moyra gave 14 | i 4 cp whine ais a 7

. and then w ?
they might set up would bejand that the employers would) A new feature of this season} DUtes to the C boat. inspect the Parade. After t)



























Qni ‘ da i “ e ; _
inured to the benefits of agricul-|eventually open their eyes and, Will be the alteration in. {he eeu take’ Reeateed prey ang (From Our Own Correspondent) WASHINGTON, June 6 papers rat wheal
bare apd industry in the Carib-/co-operate with trade unionists in'award of points. The Board of] Ralph Baghill’ Poll, en tess Tha LONDON, June 6. Pesce talke to etd the stecif “s)e ag een ;
bean area, and more especially to|their efforts to better the work-| Management at a recent mecti» car 3 gill, xe . | ht +} aloe ik i ne Tate h . wa T atrtlee ee * ae The Governor then vacated the
those who took part in ; -y| ers’ situati ; i : ae ase last year, did not do excen- the close of the second day’s play in the Test here tike took on « hopeful air tod dais and the Royal Salut va
0 took part in industry] et situation, and the ultimate ‘greed to the following ally well durt the RB.Y.C..| * . a A ’ 1s three Ang a) me :
and agriculture and earned their| betterment of the situation of the Season hat out te a sand nar2|. Hngland with five wickets to fall are still 83 short of India’s f ie ey een teams t given for Her Majest ee
living thereby. employers, (a) The abolition of the per cance ig Rie + eeee Ree first innings’ total of 292. teeta eons thle ene The ee de joir
5 g aeieds “ ar x ” n “ Sy D ar D P ‘ . Mntens: : é fain “a headdress wert eroyv ed
ar aritalee ate ape M eal “ig Bove “aris tik h (b) That the award of points in, *tontenae Trophy. { It was a most satisfactory position as far as the tourists | White House Senate (loo three ‘cheer were. given. f¢
ay xs rj Miarcano said, “ y y is > é awé § in . . : ‘ ei a te
Mr, Ramouldi had presented the disease of fibensiloata Wien all matches should be: Tn gg or Gapay, and inching are concerned for the batsmen out are Hutton, Simpson : ym el a o a mocrall | Majesty the Queen s
report of O.R.I.T. was Mr. H. N,| when once allowed to spread, will 6 points for a win; 2 points {farted together. Gipsy proved May, Compton and Watkins. But the question Hazare must Sicat inner aes Aeae a There wa napine
pread, P yahoos bt that sh yh : b 1 ht that the strike of 650,001 Js His E>
Critchlow of British Guians end in destruction. Poverty for a lead on first innings;' “evond doubt that she can whip be ask himself oh saan sah ; : , | 1t that the strike 50,000 PSalute and then His
sh Guiana. etenas the oT eerie , | point for losing on firct, Mischief anytime they start to- 2e asking himiself tonight is whether the position would el workers might be settled Pretumed to the dai V
Assistance | deetrAGHBEMR CHAE trade cudeece innings; 2 points each for a. ‘ether. She finished nearlv » min- not have been even brighter had he elected to declare the Jover the week-end persuaded th }ihe Royal Salute when the Ro
He told the Chairman ‘hat they|ism on the correct lines will tie on first innings; 3 points "It? and a half ahead of Mischief, first thing this morning following the overnight rain = — ste das Se oe =e mrabontd Wee BEUR eae vd {
at the conference could assure’ bring prosperity, health and bet- each for a tir in a completed Tr ° h d The probiem confronting him C) caste, ee eee oe won't Gate Feniglts
him that they were looking for-, ter conditions, not only for work- match; 1 point each fox K e |was not easy, He had only 272 on ute s independe 0 their i
IT Ff ; : ‘ , , : es Ps Tl ames ae t %. Steelm: Assistant te are:
ward to bag T. for its assistance ers, but for employers and the a deci or Phe es aylor nig te * |the board and England's side U.S Authority ; a pee : Satin OP ES ey
in matters affecting their interest, world at large. also agreed to award 2 ° fairly bristled with batsmen—the 2s ' {
: a one don union management talk
and for that reason, he felt that | points for a first innings Will Get New Post first seven have all made an | : " cific ‘kn Trine ‘we
they should be affiliated to the) _ Intercolonial Flavour | lead even if the match” is tury in Test cricket ea In Bermuda ic tun ee De paren ¢ Trinidad Fuel
organisation. | Mr, R. Clarke (Barbados) said | eventually lost outright Prony Oilk ovat Correspongent!, His decigion was to continue to| > behal jog cP :
He said that there were some that he was very much pleased The maximum number of Th eS ema neta bat and in the circumstances he! 7 oo a Ban Lifted
a ad ass e oints at one team «ga e first Principal of ithe “ioe S > Shi
Subjects which he was most to see that they had assembled point that o team ¢ acuta Collage Pt » West Indies|¢ould not be criticised, | O osed ae pi =
particularly interested in hay- there with intercolonial flavour ee ee cee will be ra _ b> * ic CB zs wear GRA Goiblanil's: Tins teakes howl 4 Goes Werkers From, Our Own Corresy :
ing discussed. The first was and hoped that the originators of SIX points. Losing out er 5. Wu, feylor C.DRi, ee” onerote ate Soa! : Z PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 6
family allowances, then there| the meeting would make it their) ight, as well as on firs} giving up his office later this year ae ot eee. om ee Nt BERMUDA, June 5 Strike In Italy The ban imposed by — the
was a house purchasing scheme business to see that conferences | Fe innings, no pt ints awardec o take up another appointment, aes salt atin eal ital of _ Provision in the United States 5 Trinidad Government on tne u
for workers and freedom from)of that kind continue. | The various Clubs have been Dr, Taylor was knighted in the he F ainiy. Wakemen tor ty 21) .88e8 (agreement) Bilk to give the ROME, June «. f aviation fuel last month as &
vietietention by weivate el He said that he had no person-j«ircularised by the Secretary Queen’s Birthday Honours List, sw ah amamen for onty 21 \nited States.Government exclu- \aljan Housewives began cook-|re.ult of the strike in the US
ployers and Government of | al grievance to put up as a mem-~ apprising them of the change,in jhis being one of two knighthoods|"Â¥8S and Sl a8 persenal cost of jive jurisdiction to deal with se , everything but gas as {Oil Industry will end on ne &
trade union officials and tra Btn Barbados Workers’ the point system. in Jemaica’s Honours. List, they: curity offences committed in Rer estimated 15,000" pas worker: | according to an official aonounce-
unions, nion, ” b he would like to, Official umpires for the series other being Hon, Kenneth O'’Con-=| Tonignt Hazare must be WON! nuda ig meeting with consider- oughout went on. strike for Pment this utter rt
He particularly stressed thelstress. the intercolonial condi-/ \pening to-day are:— nor, Chief Justice. : jdering what his own off-spinner | a bie opposition in the House off ou days demanding pay raise, }announcement \ made after
necessity of family allowances] tions, ! | London Reports that Princess/Ghulam Ahmed might have done|‘\)‘., abl . na other beneiits. overnment received a cable from
for people in the West Indies} Mr. Clarke urged the setting) ume 7, 14 and 21 Alice, Chancellor of the Univer-}to England’s openers in the same | “’S°™?Y- (he strike which began at mid- | the Secretary of State that sin
whom he said did not usually { up of a West Indian Federation | Lodge vs. Wandt rers at Lodge sity and the inter-University | time for there can be no doubt Vow under consideration is af night was called by both Com-flar_, restrictions in the ur ed
have two or three children, but|of trade unions in order that one | aha L. KH. King and G Council are now considering the | that the wicket became easier} proposed message to the Govern-]| n unist and non-Communis, | Kingdom will not be effective
usually reared very large fam-)colony might get to know the| /'dshaw. ant heel choice of a successor, , ifter the second application of the|!or stating that the House consid-funions following the collapse offafter June 8 :
ilies. | grievances of other colonies anc! PickW ick , i ka at “ Dr, Taylor who is now. in Lon-|heavy rol er the. subjection of British sub-|last minute company and unioi aa Ez ~ MT E TO
Mr. Critchlow promised that|that would agitate for the enact-| aaa ‘ : alcott and L. don is soetien oo ee - But even though he did not] jects to jurisdiction of an alien| negotiations swt the ministry in RED LEG/ L .
i ss p é 7 a » egislation which would! opellos, amMaica next month hore lak~| .nioy the s: ‘ - ) - at ay 1 aa ahi ‘in. | Ro » ‘
Me. would, discuss the matters he\ment of legislation sascha nd) "umpire vs. Police at Bank Hall, ing up ‘his new. appointment |“2Jy the same response as Laker | court, however friendly, is ‘“in-| Rome ; aoe enti LEAVE U.S.
oned with the threejbe of benefit to the working!, “mpire vs ‘ 4d : ; Ghulam Ahmed has still had a| tolerable interference with in- By midday when paghetti IASHINGTON. June (
on g | classes 2 »5 concer Umpires; F, L, Walcott and D.) which will be outside the West eee : : ; 2 aie WASHINGTON, Jt
committees that had been set up.;classes of the colonies con erned. | re tocd Indies but there has been no|™O0St successful day and has al-) herent rights of the subject’ wodles and other = : na isa: Maclat’ asibaisador: ts
Continuing, he told of his activ-; 2 , ij “hte 2s eee ee * tae read roved himself to he to noontime dishes should have beet eee —
ities with labour unions since the|. He called for a boycott of any College vs. Spartan at College announcement yet on the nature ate cent Waor toe cae d to| The message agrees with the }couoking, gas in Rome, Milan United State r Mt bs 4 une
year 1905, recounting some of the|‘tade pana Mae leetene uP @ On page 8 of the appointment. the South Africans and alnean | ced to safeguard United States | Naples and elsewhere was dow! anyushkin announ
benefits that had been obtained} 0Vernight and whose leaders were ‘ 4 p Fe.

sy P the > wa leaving his post
to the Australians on previous |?aseS in Bermuda against com-]|io a whisper and housewives were hat he was le )



to take up a new ap

through such movements as the|Mly seeking power to further} mission security offences by} .naking the best of it with char Pcueeea
2018 ce °

British Commonwealth Labour] their own ends, Mr, Clarke sais ff is > ree For 67 British subjects and suggest il stoves. fe declined to. discu with
Conference, the W.F.T.U. and|“We should have an interchange | Qa CO e a in S ‘ 1 For 67 that amendments be prepared to sologna, SBalerno and a few He dec lined to A ve
now recently, the LC.F.T.U. Hej! workers to see and know cons | e Today he “bow led 44 overs to the colony’s criminal law to 1or cities were more fortunate } reporters t . a ¢ rah , : Ts

also mentioned Workmen’s Com-| ditions in other places whereby ike 4 for 67 and it is a striking : ican relations. Asked 1 n

‘ . ‘ J 1ents Tv
provide suitable -punishment to ictly local arrangements there

|
pensation and Rent Restriction, | We, can assist in alleviating any | estimony to his aceuraey that only 7 where fod them with Acheson, he replied
}

| e e ;
iny. Brit ‘ ct who ‘. ) ga going. But else : ; sinks
Mr. L, J. Macano, a representa-| sufferings which a brother is un- ; wo fours were hit off him ple os ee who commit- | in private. and munieipalls J conversation was devoted rain
tive of the Trinidad and Tobago] dergoing.” ; Only the fifth wieket partner- oe a renee ned plants, workers went out. | to questions of the protoco

Workers’ Council, expressed on @ On Page 5 ship of 90 in two and a quarter! The message moved by Mr, Ed- UP. —UP.











behalf of His Council _ their hours between Watkin indjmund Gibbons has the support e
thanks to the representative of nay PHILADELPHIA, June 6. Graveney held him up and en-|!of the Speaker Sir John Cox. Olle.
Q.R.1.T. for having them at the)| STARTING ON MON Jersey Joe Walcott’s manager Felix Bocchicchio said |#bled England to come within —C.P.

Conference, and said that it gave the exciting adventure story
them the opportunity to bring be- SLOW BOAT TO MAR-

‘ 4 triking distanc a’ al.
that the world heavyweight champion who successfully |isin# distance of India’s total





a f : » 4 After Hazare’s decision to bat - 4 .
fore the Conference the griev- SEILLES defended his title against challenger ex-champion Ezzard| jn this morning it took just over 5,000 Witness THE BARBADOS SCHOOL
spots — a Finger 0 en erat nace te the Charles last night with a unanimous decision was willing {half an hour to dispose of India’s se Gah as '
oer atueae To "TUs. ee EVENING ADVOCATE: to defend his crown in September against the winner of aris Cootaeatin ene was al- Birtnday Parade
a ie a, A - “Me: m i Rs ety . , }Mmos n ayable during 1e course ¥
He gave an instance of how NOW ! the proposed match between Harry Matthew and Rocky |o¢ 3.3 overs during which het Prem Our Own Correspondent) OF DANCING
some employers in Trinidad, far Marciano, After that, bout Walcott will start a world tour. |claimed four wickets—two ‘of PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 6.
me >. sei $$$ $$$$_$____-— —--—_----—— Sees * eee oes oe on them via Watkins in the leg trap About 5,000 men, women an
; nose like an irate bull in the late} This gave England 70 minutes children gathered on _ Port-of
FARNUM WINNIN 5 SeRRiOnS Walcott, not only capti vatting before lunch and neither|Spain’s wet Queen's Park Savan- Presents
ated most of 21,599 fans in the]rtytten nor Simpson could have]. sterday morning under the

Municipal Stadium, but also cap









] '
en too happy abe the pros-| nelouds and dripping umbrellas >

an mact 1 , . . . : tig

a fit al ‘tr fh rirg . of three | ent They provresced feirly com-| Vitness the first parade in hon- coos 7 wit
ng onic) n the first defe nce of fortably prsinst th sen tr f-}out of the Queen’s official birth-

his crown, It was a good fight and ee ee BO we aoe aa) a ‘ie i\cay ‘

{ produced the second largest ' i? nf c tam van ay

gross receipts in Philadelphia St mart aie ea ; ae jean bt. Wa the first time sinee} Ya’ ¥ ’

ring history--a gate of $210,313) 5% : i B i ’ toria reign that an English <9. 4 Wd i Om

tack & television radio fee of $175,< Ph rence thulam Ahmed in ‘ has’ beer “ honoured i. - ‘

000 on Pare 3) ; , eee



: bout the Empire, is Ex-!
Each fighter getting thirt | ae 2 :

bent. of the net proceed houl ma pile a iia minted on! Vi Vk”
b fe 0 shoi trick Mu ten 1 rd ¢ /
receive about $100,000. Only th Russia Lifts . air si r aor mounted on d os ‘

the salute







,
Walcott, 19644 lbs., who knock- ceed ae es a na ctees GRENADA, June 6

frst Jack Dempsey and Gene om par nding units comprisin; ak \
Tunney bout fought in the same . : wee Pi a i , aa : g +
sladium tWenty-dix yeors yey Rerlin Blockade 1 forces anid te detachment Under the distinguished es. *
raduced pres delste.: mu iits of marines a avy ir : o
kote BERLIN, June 6 land } patronage of His Excellency \
: Russia yielded to the { ( aeRO }} - é -
Charles, the eleven to five fav-|States demand and lifted th gs ’ , } the Governor and oe!
urite was' deeply disappointed} blockade of the outlying United iA e-Suver Gets 7
hut did uot critieize officials. He|states administered district of if | Lady Savage
tald: “1 thought I had won but} cerlin. Less than 24 hours aft C ertificate |
: , wee vote for me, so T have [the strong United States prot | i | AT THE
\
1
|



























i fetta x P = rey x ras ;
ed out Ezzard in Pittsburgh last} a,.; ever \t the Quees Birthday Parade tik
July, let his lighter pt sere cea Steinstuetken and issued permi ssterday Governor Arundell pre- | “4h 4 Ak
fighting in most of the rounds last}? 16@ inhabitants to travel back sented the Certificate of the Royal |
night, But Charles was so siug-{4"d forth to the rest of Western; Humane Society to Courtney Ren-! - ON -
gish at 191% Ibs the heaviest of Berlin. wick 23-year-old Customs clerk |
his career, that his forcing was But the East German Com irded = for hi aving from | FRIDAY 20TH JUNI
slightly less than thrilling in some nunist government at the arne mwhning two crew members of :
sessions and Walcott’s smashing] ime slapped the United § Canadizn Constructor at St | VATINER 5.99 P.M
right-hand and left-hook counters} $14,000,000 Bill fox telephone Gcorge pier November 23 1950.)
took the play het we Ww pn Berlin TI overnor also presented a! NIGHT 8.30 P.M
(Round bss Paw Negeription] "nd Western German i ( the warrant as Island Seout Commis- | ,
» oer ¢ ’ M Ww > ‘
@ On Page 3 Jest seven year a sione » Mr A. F ee | Booking can |
~ at the EMPIRE
{CHESON TO GO ON rs . i | aes
| A Wiser 90 BRAZIL Lxplanation Demanded From Rhee | THEATRE
| WASHINGTON, June 6 KOREA, June. 6 sembly men. } as follows
The State Department to-day r Republic of Korea national A week ago the assembly ve~| ~ ;
gti Dean Acheson, Secretary of embly emandex President toed” Rhee’s declaration of mar-| : & Friday, 13th June ane
Ke ROP 9 go to Brazil On | mn Rhee explain v 1e tial law by a majority vote.| . Z } ie
ae! ; My + ea on “ . | . rule xy martial law Under the constitution Rhee was} ™ YY Daily 8.00 am - 12.00
vould. 6 a? “Seal d 1 sat aa ,j The assembly free from required to comply but he re-) \S :
Ii cap \ ti is rohe will ; wexive ¢ {threat of arrest by United i- fused. United State mbassador | Noon and 1—4 p.m
ie oA CERT guia tae 1 pre on Rhee raise John J. Muccio ar ed today | , :
' June 25 or from the United Stat : ; . Saturda th: 8.06
oe a ; : mage sina ei nei ulurday, 4th: 8 i
fter his return from Britain, He] iMtorun : big emne nd bearing struction n Presi-|
1 not Tied visit 7 massed q resolution demanding dent Truman who earliet ent . ‘ |
ther hatin American... count personal explanation from the note ¢ Rhee expressing “shock | a.m.—12.00 Noon :
KEN FARNUM smiles as he wins again—this time the 1,000 metre from the Trinidadian Matthieu and fter his stay in Brazil, the State | Presider t for the failur to tiand rement t the political | i
Lisle Carmichael. Neither Matthien nor Carmichael had it in them to give the champion cyclist a ! Department spokesman said. martial law and another asking f : le ® 2
real ru. ' —,P. the release of eleven arrested

PAGE TWO



Canub (Calling



Mr. HARKA de POEL

AJOR G. NICOLE, Director
of Civil Aviation of British
Guiana, left for Trinidad intran-
sit for British Guiana on Thurs-

day evening by B.W.LA., aft
spending a holiday in Barbede.s
staying at the Crane Hotel. He

‘was accompanied by his wife.
Major Nicole who was on lon
leave, spent the greater paft in
the U.S.A., and came on to Buir-
bados' for a week before return-
ing home. .
Trinidad Proprietor
R. SEUDAT SAMAROO,
proprietor of Samaroo’s
Soda Water Factory of San Fer-
nando,. one of the largest and
most modern in the Caribbean,
arrived from Trinidad on Wed-
mesday by B.W.1.A. on a business
visitâ„¢and is staying at Indromer
Guest] ouse,

Spent Six Weeks
EAVING for Trinidad on
Wednesday night by B.W.1.A.,
intfansit for British Guiana were



Mr; and Mrs. J, Gonsalves and
family and Miss Mary Lopes,
daughter of Mr. Reggie Lopes,

Proprietor of Alec Russell & Co.,
Ltd., Commission Agents of the
West Indies with headquarter> in
Georgetown.

They had been holidaying bere
for the past six weeks staying i!
“Accra”, Rockley.

Mr. Gonsalves
the’ wholesale department of
Messrs, Wm. Fogarty Ltd., of
Geargetown, while Miss Lopes is
employed »s a Secretary in her
father's office,

On Holiday
R. HARCOURT
formerly of the reportorial
staff of this ncwspaper, arrived
from Aruba on Wednesday eve-
ning by B.W.LA., after a two-day
stop-over at Trinidad,

Mr. Pilgrim is an employee of
the Lago Oil & Transport Com-
pany Ltd., affiliate of the Stand-
ard Oil Compatiy (N. J.) and is
alse Advertising Manager of the
Aruban Weekly News magazine
“The Local”. He will spend ten
weeks’ vacation here,

Engaged

HE engagement was recently

announced hetween Miss
Joyce Manning, eldest daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. C. Manning of
“Hazel Cot”, Hindsbury Road,
end Mr. FE. W. Grant onlv son of
Mr, and Mrs, D, E. Grant of Bridge
Road and a member of Empire
Club.

Awarded Diploma

R. GEORGE B. BASCOMBE,

Cutter on the staff of C. B.
Rice & Co., (Tailor) has been
awarded the Diploma of the Tailor
& Cutter Academy of London, in
an examination in the Art of'Cut-
ting gentlemen’s garments held
on the 28t'. May following the
completion. of a Correspondence
Course,

is Manager of

PILGRIM,



Crazy Dutchman Leaves
good things must come

7 all
an end.

Even to a “sejour”
in the Tropical Paradise—Barba-
dos, Mr. Harka de Poel better
known as ‘the “Crazy Flying
Dutchman” told Carib shortly
before leaving for Puerto Rico

by B.W.LA. on Thursday.

When a traveller discovers the
West Indies, he always will be
astonished as soon as he _ sees
Barbados. So was I. Everybody
told me that the outrider of the
Antilles looked flat and small.
But next time wherml see a tour-
ist going to the Antilles, I will
tell him to go to the Tropical
Paradise, because it is worth
while,

All the islands in the Caribbean
are small. But not all are clean,
healthy and friendly as Barba-
dos, And not all the other islands
are the home of the flying fish.

I, as most of the visitors to the
island, enjoyed my stay. I did
like the island so much that I
intended to have a holiday after
fwe years of travelling. But the
firme has come that I have to say
‘Tot ziens” to all my friends of
he “Tropical Paradise’,

I want to say thank you to all
the directors of the Schools and
Colleges for the help; to all my
listeners; to the boys as Pat,
David, Bruce, Bob and hundreds
more, who took me as their
nearest friend. Then I want to
say goodbye to all the girls of
the Tropical Paradise and be
sure, when I feel lonely I always
think of the sweethearts of Bar-
bados, In Dutch we say Tot ziens
(till we meet again) and that’s
what I want to say to Barbados
and all the friends on this little,
but friendly island in the blue
Caribbean, This is not the last
time I will visit Barbados and
I will be seeing you, and be sure
I shall not forget to make more
propaganda for your Tropical
Paradise fh the blue Caribbean.

People of Barbados, stay as you
are; don’t let your “Charm” go,
as it went in many other places:

but keep it up and keep your
little island as it is—clean,
friendly and healthy. The sun

and the sea breeze will do the
rest and let us hope, that when
I come back, I shall find as many
friends as I did this time.

Be good and “tot ziens”,

Attended Convention

ASTOR J. O. EMMERSON,
Secretary-Treasurer of the
Caribbean Mission of Seventh
Day Adventists, stationed in
Trinidad, returned home on
Thursday evening by B.W.ILA.
after spending about two weeks
here staying at the Hotel Royal.

Pastor Emmerson who had
come over to attend the Conven-
tion of the Leeward Islands

Mission of S.D.A., stayed over for
another week for the purpose of
auditing the mission’s books.

P,M,O. Returns

R, E. W. ROBERTS, P.M.O.

of St. Michael and Mrs
Roberts of “Sunnyside”, Black
Rock, returned from the U.S.A.
via Puerto Rico on Thurscay
evening by B.W.LA. after an
absence of five weeks.

Mrs. Roberts who went up tu
the U.S.A. in the interest of her
health told Carib that she has
benefited greatly from her visit
and is much improved,

Spending a Week
PENDING a week’s holiday in
Barbados is Miss Olive
Jeffrey of Antigua. She arrived
on Thursday evening by B.W.I.A,
and is staying with Mrs. B.

Codrington of Brittons Hill.

On Business

AR. ERNEST HUNTE, Direc-

tor of K, R. Hunte and Co.,

Ltd. was a peeneneeg for Trini-

dad on Thursday €vening by

B.W.1LA, He has gone on a busi-

ness visit and is cxpected to
return today.



Pastor M. G. NEMBHARD

S.D.A. President

JDASTOR M. G. NEMBHARD,

President of the Leeward
Islands Mission of Seventh Day
Adventists, was among the pas-
sengers leaving on Thursday eve-
ning by B.W.LA., for Trinidad.
While there, he will make a trip
to St. Lucia and Dominica in the
interest of the work of the Lee-
ward Islands Mission before re-
turning to Barbados about the
latter part of July with his family.

For C.T.C. Talks

“THE Surinam Delegation at-
tending the Caribbean Trade
Union Conference which is being
held at Hastings House, arrived
yesterday morning via Trinidad
by B.W.LA. It comprises the
colony's labour leader Mr. L. E.
Eliazer, Mr. C. Carron, represen-
tative of the Paranam Workers’
Union, Mr. S. Shukrula repre
sentative of the Surinam Wofk-
ers’ Organisation and Mr. H.
Soeperman, representative of the
Surinam Miners’ Union.

Others delegates arriving for
the conference were Mr, Clarence
Fergusson, General Secretary of
the Grenada Workers’ Union who
arrived on Thursday morning by
B.G. Airways from St. Vincent
and Mr. S. M. Shakoor, M.B.E,
General Secretary of the Man
Power Citizens’ Association who
arrived on Wednesday night by
BW.LA. via Trinidad,

They are all staying at the
Marine Hotel,
Son and Heir
N WEDNESDAY a son was

born to Mr. and Mrs. Regi-
nald King of Hindsbury Road.
Mrs. King is the former Avis
Brewster. Mother and babe are |
doing well.

Surprise Party

ISS BETTY CARRINGTON
- celehrated her birthday on
Wednesday, 4th June. To
mark the occasion a_ surprise
barty was held at the home of her
parents “Parade View”, Hastings,
where many of her friends gath-
ered to celebrate.

Studying Radiography

ISS RUTH FELDMAN who
left the colony last year for
England has been successful in
her first year’s exam.
Ruth is studying Radiography
at King’s College. She is the

BARBADOS

Mrs. Mesta
Goes To See
The President.

From SAM WHITE
PARIS.

Mrs. Pearl Mesta, the ebullient
party-throwing U.S. Ambassador
to Luxemburg, mounts the gang-|
way at Le Havre to-day on*he:
way back to Washington.

During her voyage across, she
will be wrestling with a problem.
Shall she make her customary
large donation to the Democratic |







daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. G.
Feldman of Navy Gardens.

Intransit

NTRANSIT from the U.S.A.

via Puerto Rico on Thursday
evening by B.W.1A. was Lt.
David P. Pettit of the U.S. Army
stationed at Camp Tortuguero
with the Replacement Training |
Centre at San Juan,

He has now gone to visit his
brother Capt. H, B, Pettit who
is in command of the U.S. Marine
detatchment stationed in Trini-
dad.



The Nightingale Memorial Home

THE Nightingale Memorial
Home situated at Belfield, Black
Rock, formerly a private resi-
dence and donated by Dr. W.

Nightinga-e, was officially opened
On the 15th December, 1947 by the

Schools. In the afternoon cach
child dees some gardening—there
is a garden plot provided for
each of them. There is also a
kitchen garden on the premises
ut their time is only given to

then Governor Sir Hilary Blood. is by way of learning how to

This Home provides facilities of transplant

home and good training for chil-
dren particularly destitutes. The
parents cf some of these children
are still alive but the aim of the

home is to cater especially to
orphans. The first ten children
were transferred from St. Mich-

ael’s Almshouse on the 31st Janu-
ary, 1948,

Shortly after there was an ad-
dition of 10 o:hers and since then
the numbers have been steadily
increasing. There are now 18 girls
and 17 boys in residence but there
is acccmmodation for 60.

Children are admitted from the
age of five and are discharged at
the age of 18 years. Of the 17
boys two are apprenticed to motor
mechanics, one a meron, one is
employed as a delivery boy and
another as messenger, There are
three girls who are being trained
fn needlework, nursing, and laun-
da ‘ng.

Education

Tue younger girls and boys at-
tend the Westbury Girls’ and the
St. Stephen’s’ Boys’ and Girls’



After leaving school the girls
are detained for a whole year in
order to learn general house-
keeping. It is a general rule that
the children should attend ser-
vices at St. Stephen's. These chil-
dren are also given religious in-
struction and as many as 16 are
confirmed. They attend services
under escort.

Quite recently
started to instruct the girls in
Handicrafts. The boys will also
learn how to make s‘ippers etc.

classes were

Each child has a bedside cup-
board and these are all attrac-
tively decorated with toys, pic-
tures ‘and ornaments. There are
separate apartments for shoes,
clothing and toilet accessories,

Their clothes are provided by the
Home but the older boys and
girls are ellowed to buy them*
selves anything required,

The Home

The Home is run by a Vestry
Grant end is supervised by Miss.
Grace Bryan, assisted by four

NEW ARRIVALS

HAT SHAPED WALL VASES
FEATHER PILLOWS



attendants. Nurse Bryan who is
known by’ the children as
“Mether” was previously at the
General Hospital. After some
years of private nursing during
which time she was nurse to Gov-
ernor Newlands, she was recom-
mended for a year’s training at
the Princess Alice College, Bir-
mingham in 1946, It is her aim to
create as much as_ possible a
‘home’ atmosphere. The Attend-
ants are known as “Auntie” to the
children,

Library
There is a small library con-
taining picture books and _ story

books. On entering the Dormitory
the Advocate was impressed by
the cleanliness and attractive-
ness prevailing. At Christmas
there is a treat for the inmates
and they are presented with
gifts, Any ailment is treated by
the nurse herself and there is

general inspection.

In March this year a wing was
built to accommodate the dining
hall. The second storey now forms
an extension of the girls’ dormi-
tory and the dining hall is on the
first floor, The boys and girls live
as one family and it is to be hoped |
that in the future that homeless
boys and girls will enjoy the fa-
cilities offered by this Institution.

Se es Ce

$2.20
$3.42 each

GENUINE LEGHORN HATS

WOMEN’S WIDE BRIM



T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4606

Pepty? Or shall she wait and
see if the Republicans nominate |
Eisenhower—and then back Ike
if they do?

The scale of her munificence |
—she is the widow ofa steel
baron — to Truman's’ election
funds at the last/ Presidential
election, found its reward in her
appointment to Luxembourg.
Her problem _,before Truman

decided not to run again, was
nerve racking: she likes Luxem-
bourg, likes Truman and likes
Ike. Now the problem js simpli-
fied : will the Democrats be out-
raged if she switches allegiance, |
ond, on the other hand, will her |
close friends, the Eisenhowers,
forgive her if she doesn’t?

To many friends and to many
visiting American politicians,
Mrs. Mesta has talked frankly of
Ler difficulties. All, including the
Eisenhowers, have failed to Qe-
solve them.

Now ‘she has decided that her
only way out is to “get the feel
of things in Washington.” and
especially to have a frank, heart-
to-heart chat with her old friend
Harry Truman.

Marry? Never
Off on what for him is a new

kind of treasure hunt is much-
married Dominican diplomat,
Porfirio Rubirosa, whose third |

niarriage, to tobacco heiress Doris!
Duke, ended recently in divorce. |
Now Rubirosa, who is Domini-

can minister in Paris, is fitting
up an expedition to hunt for
sunken treasure

off the San
Domingo coast. }
As for his other plans, Rubirosa
says: “I am definitely finished |
with marriage. I shall never marry |
again, In future my ideal woman |
will be simply the woman you
love.”
People
Diverced : Film star Martine
Carol from Hollywood _ night
club owner Steve Crane, former
husband of Lana Turner,
Miss Carol announced this in|
Paris, added laconically:
my work will prevent me from|

I thought it was only fair that
I should give him his freedom.”

Married: Spanish dancer Car-
men Amaya to guitarist Juan
Aguero. Cf a London visit Carmen
says: “The audiences were so
cold they might have been stand-
ing out on a Scottish moor during
a snowstorm,”

Events

A Paris newspaper has launched
a campaign to soften those ogres
of Paris life the concierges or
caretakers who keep guard out-|
side every Paris apartment house. |
The newspaper is awarding the|
title of “Queen of Concierges” to
the one “who is most imbued
with courtesy and kindness.” i

What goes on in Russia? Lyons
silk manufacturers, who are doing
a £500,000 annual export trade
with Russia, hoped to increase it
by manufacturing materials
decorated with portraits of Soviet
leaders, especially Stalin. After
large stocks had been produced,
the Russian response was a
categoric “No,”

Said a Russian buyer: “We
want your silks, but please with-
cout those portraits of Stalin.”

QUOTE OF THE WEEK
He Said It

Professor Mondor, on increases
in the birth-rate for twins In
view of the state of the world
it is not surprising that more and
more new arrivals prefer to have
company.” —L.E.S.

Pope Has Recovered
VATICAN CITY, June 6

Vatican sources reported that

the Pope’s slight fever completely



disappeared this morning. The
76-year-old Pontiff who was
stricken with a slight attack ot
influenza on Wednesday recited
his usual morning mass today
and had a heavy schedule of

audiences for today and tomor-
row_and a beatification ceremony
on Sunday.

It is still not certain that the
Pontiff would descend to St.
Peter's basilica on Saturday eve-
ning in connection with the
beatification of the Italian Sister
Bertilla Bosecardin of the teach-
ing sisters of the Order of St.
Dorotea of the Sacred Heart.

Cardinal Francis Spellman
Archbishop of New York was
received in a private audience by
the Pope last night. —U.P.



CROSSWORD

|
|
|
|



|

}

|

‘ Across ;

1. Render impossible, (7)

8. Near go for frult, tt seems. (6)
To young Joseph it suggests
music. (3)

. And the man should follow to
make the play, (4) |

. What makes Terry all? (8)

.» Plane. (6) 15, Halt. (4)
. Extract from a cobra tall, (4)





19, Feed from our smin. (7)

21, The hiker’s portmanteau. (8) |

22. Beastly resetting of trees, (5) |

23. Home. (4) |
Down

1. How to make a hub sitp, put j

into print. (7)

2. His surname was Hood. (5)

3. Sounds vain but isn't, (4)

4. Large! More than that, (8)

bd. Avject few
6 Formation
Mary. (4)

iG)

in which you find
The price

7 (4)
9 Your legal
Po

to be paid
portion (6)
da bike wheet
rT than requests
y strung educat

Â¥ to dip in tt




tS)
(3)










(Poe: Tr
Dance 2
Down: 1
4. Cur



4.00—7.15 p m.

Service,

ADVOCATE








TUBBY

Tuesday night.

8 the second day of
this Tubby Hubby
diet ror heavyweight
husbands draws to a close
Wicksteed is still on his feet.
He seemed to be wilting a bit
after breakfast, but his trainers
and seconds said that would be
all right. They would give him
the Luxury Lunch treatment.
This was fresh salmon and
cost 6s. 6d. a portion in the
restaurant I went to, but They
said that was all right, too,
because I could pay for it out of
the money I'd saved by doing
no serious drinking.

* * *

Tubby Hubbies will have to
learn to endure this attitude. It
seems to be part of the diet. Just
because you are so good natured
that you allow Them to remodei
you into a dream husband They
seem to think They are doing
you @ good turn.

Think how wonderful it will
be, They said yesterday, when
you Can skip up and down the
stairs like a ballet dancer. You’ll
be able to run_ useful little
errands all day long. Won't that
be fun ?

“Oh, frightful fun,” I saia,
* * «

That glass of skimmed milk
for lunch is an ironic touch,
don't you think? Where can
you be sure of skimmed milk
in the City of London ? There’s
plenty of it at home. In fact
this bulging breadwinner gets
nothing else at the best of
times use the creamy top
of the milk is reserved for the
children’s stewed fruit and
porridge,

Maybe it is skimmed in the
City, too. But your honour is
at stake. You're mot certain.

BY THE WAY

HE hot
the

sun having melted
inferior marine-glue

used for plugging holes in the
deck,
was yesterday
Mrs.
Saucy urchins,
“As | melted

the Saucy Mrs, Flobster
invaded by what
Withersedge described as
who thought the

glue was honey. The

ship's cat got stuck, and in try-
seeing him for the next 18 months | nae” :

to rescue it Mrs. Wither-

sedge became glued to the spot.
A
boots, and helped her to safety.
Rear-Admiral Sir Ewart Hodg-

longshoreman removed her





Second Day of the—

Purge Pauker
HUBBY ; (80! Guker
DIET. e+Bernard Wicksteed |

runs into a skimmed milk problem

1

rest

capitalist and counter revolution-
ary,

You've given your word to
Them that you'll drink nothing
eae but a glass of skimmed
milk.

“A glass of skimmed milk

Romanian

} one-time tough dariing of inter-
national

destined today for a Red purge

SATURDAY, JUNE 7, 1952



‘RomaniaMay eS

TO-NIGHT

THE GREAT
CLIFTON

and his partner
FLORENCE in a
Show full of

VIENNA, June 4, |
Pauker,
Foreign

Ana 59-year-old |

Minister





and
communisnr seemed |

n her home town. Radio Bucha-|
accused fer of being pro-

Western sources expressed the}

belief that Ana and two former

please miss,” you say brightly. ministers who also were attacked |
“We only sell cow’s milk.” in a broadcast are being made i
she says. scapegoats for Red Romania’s|
“Well, get a glass of that and current economic woes. Last)
skim it.” you say. week she was kicked out of| At
She gives you a queer look and Romania communist party's
goes 2 eae § Skeets oe =. For the —— at) CLUB
one 01 Tr colleagues, en east she still holds the Foreign
She comes back she has a glass Ministry, —(CP)

of milk that might be anything.

All the same, though I
wouldn't admit it to Them, I

don’t feel too bad on the whole. %

;
3
Qo
c
4
+
=
o
°
S$
t

:





MY SECOND DAY

saccharin (no sugar)

Luxury lunch

Boiled salmon
Green sala (no peas,
potatoes or cream)
Fresh fruit salad
Glass of skimmed milk
(No roll and butter)

Dinner

Any lean meat you can get
hold of
Generous portion of
spinach
Cheese (half your ration)
An apple
Coffee (preferably black)



By BEACHCOMBER

son, paying a routine visit of
inspection, said to the caretaker.
“You really must not leave your
boots on deck. And what are all
these children doing?” Mrs.
Withersedge explained what, had
occurred, and the Admiral said
mournfully. “What a craft! It’s
time she was broken up.” “If you
ask me” replied Mrs, Wither-
sedge, “she was broken up years
ago, only nobody seems to realise
it.”



LISTENING HOURS

SATURDAY, JUNE 7, 1952
phe 05% 19. 76M, 25 53M

The Daily
Northern
5.05 p.m





40p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m
4.15 p.m. B.B.C
p.m Oricket,

a,
Interlude, 5.15 p.m. Music for Dancing,
6 p.m
Frankie Howard goes
Sports Round-up and Programme Parade.

6.15 p.m
6.45 p.m.

Magazine,
East,

Sceo:tisn



7 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m, Home News
from Britain.
7.15—P0.30 pm. ....... 25.53M, 31 32M







7.15 p.m. Behind the News, 7.45 p.m

Sports Review, 8.15 p.m. Rio News-
reel, 8.20 p.m. Radio Theatre, 10 p m.
The News, 10.10 p.m. News Talk, 10.15

r.m,. Music Magazine, 10.30 p.m. Variety
Fanfare.

Knarf Went Fishing for Stars

— But General Tin Said He Couldn't Keep Them —

By MAX TRELL

IT was a bright moonlight night.
Knarf, the Shadow, quietly tiptoed
ever to the corner where his sister
Hanid was sleeping and tapped her
lightly on the shoulder. “Hanid!’’
he whispered. “Wake up!”

At this Hanid, who couldn’t imag-
ine what was the matter, sprang to
her feet in alarm. She made so much
noise that ‘Teddy the Stuffed Bear
Mr. Punch, General Tim the tin
soldier, and Mary-Jane the rag-doll
all woke up and began asking:
“What’s the matter? What’s the
matter?”

“Nothing’s the matter,” Knarf
said. “l just woke Hanid up to tell
her that the moon was shining and
that it was a wonderful night to
go down to the pond,”

“Why?” asked everyone else in
the room.

“To fish for the stars, that’s
why,” answered Knarf.

Foolish Idea

At first everyone thought this
was a very foolish idea, on account
of you can’t fish for stars in the
pond because, as everyone knows,
the stars are in the sky.

“Oh, no! They’re in the pond,”
insisted Knarf. “I saw them there.”

Finally General Tim, who had
travelled a great deal, and had
seen lots of things, and knew about
almost everything, nodded his head.
“Knarf may be right. Now and
then, on very special nights, the
stars are in the pond. But,” he
added, “it isn’t easy to fish for
them.”

“1 know it,” said Knarf. “You
need a net with a long stick. And
you also need a big jar to put the
stars in after you fish them up.”

By this time everyone had
changed their minds, and they all
made themselves ready to go fish-

| ing for stars in the pond Hanid

found a net (which the children
used for the goldfish), and Teddy
found a long stick. Mary-Jane and
Mr. Punch both discovered a jar.
[t used to have jelly in it, but now
it was empty.

Then they all set out.

“There they are! There are the
stars!” Teddy exclaimed when they
reached the edge of the pond.

“There are millions of them float-

ing on top of the water!”



nee



y let Sam
sad Lael gyn ee
Bee le

ot Ano gotten

Rupert cannot uncerstand Podgy’s
silence, and for sorme moments he
waits wondering whether to follow
him. While he jssitates there are
cheerful shouts, amd more of his
frends, first Willie the Mouse, and
then Rex and Reggie Rabbit, hurry
to join him, “ Hoomy, you've













Punch said they'd sell the stars

Everyone had a turn fishing for
the stars,

“What will we do with them
when we have a full jar?”’ Teddy
asked.

Knarf said: “We'll keep them.”

Mr. Punch said: “We'll sell them
to the fireflies.”

One to Wear

Hanid said: “I’d like one to wear
in my hair.”

But General Tin said: “There’s
only one thing to do with stars that
you fish out of the pond. You hide
the jar under a rock, and on the
first cloudy night you pour them
back into the pond.”

Knarf and Hanid and Mr. Punch
and Teddy and Mary-Jane all
wanted to know why you had to do
that.

“It’s only fair,” said the Gen-
eral. “The stars don’t belong to us.
They belong to everybody. And
when it’s a cloudy night and the
stars don’t shine in the sky, you
have to throw them back into the
pond so that they can climb up into
the sky again, and shine as they
always do. It would be a pity if we
took all the stars. Isn’t it enough
fun just being able to fish for
them?”

So they all decided that General
Tin was right, And when they had
a full jar, twinkling with stars,
they hid the jar under a stone. And
the very next night when it was
cloudy they poured them back into
the pond, and let them get back
is the sky and shine for every-

ody.





our ball,’ cries Willie, ** Let’s
kind some more~pals and have a
* “T just saw Podgy.”* says
“but he wouldn't speak
to be busy tainkin
ung!’ exclaims Reggie.
an odd thing for Podgy to

frer the

me.
Rupert
He se












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SATURDAY, JUNE 7. 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE







‘

INDIA IN GooD —_ Walcott Retains % fue Vins. Sy AND AIR | iSivca'ty Hak

POSITION Heavyweight Title on c.crmmm | TRAFFIC | Blood Pressure

ST. LUCIA, June 5. headaches at




























oy Grenades -arr: torre || palpitation * . a
@ From Page 1 Hazare had beaten Hutton in the pera Sane: ewinging right high on Walcott’s night first an eae aa 0 ee Oa He teal abrvy «08 ant
es . toss but imside an hour his first ROUND 1.—Charles got off to head. Joe drove a left to Charles for two to 94 for : resins 9 — fer from poor sleep, loss of memory
pes yew p=. Shae when he had three batsmen were in the pavi- a small lead in the first round as head and missed a haymaker right J. Johnson 1a SS Gresham Sr Ok Citamas %i* and : Bee Ta denon
y . lion with only 43 runs on the he concentrated his attack on Wal- as Charles danced away. Charles grim 22 Sch. Everdene, MV. Lady Joy. MV. | hy Ht a saure, This is a
England s Let Off Board. cott’s body. Charles landed swing- landed a left hook to Joe’s boc'y, Following on shortly before tea}?! cn Sh. Weney D, Wallace, Sch. | mysterious disease that causes more
But England’s let off was only Bedser bowling very accurately ing lefts and rights to the body then a right to the body They Grenada opened their second|Gardenia, Sch. Frances W pee boemcions bre Sere on ama Uaenily
temporary, for when Ghulam Started the rot by beating D. K. while Joe merely tapped light boxed slowly and carefully. innings and at the close of play ARRIVALS ie taken for some simple ailment. If
Ahmed came into the attack he Gaekwad with a ball which drew lefts, Just before the bell Waleott ROUND 12.—They_ clinched, was 150 for 8. ee ee en ee SS Licts, | You suffer fram any of these symp.
quickly made amends and im him forward and then whipped drove a hard-left to body and then both missed. ~- The referee Grenada continued on Thurs-! Ayents tor nok suameukiae on Fe Fe eae ie or a parairtia acne;
the fourth over Hutton was oe the bat and pad. missed a haymaker right hat told them to start fighting. Wal- day at the crease with their over-|& Co, Ltd = oh ; = and you should start, treatment at
caught in his leg trap—appro~ oy attempted to hit Jenkins brought a howl from the crowd. cott landed a right to the jaw. night score 150 for 8 and exactly DEPARTURES By BW LA ones. The very firat dose o ‘
priately by Ramchand. oe for six before getting a proper ROUND 2-—Walcott took the Action slowed to a walk. Just oa he ur ‘ater Pierre fell vietim vor AOE ree a | Oty erty, teduces am Bisod
Caution had been the keynote look at the bowler and was yards imitiative in the second round, before the bell Charles landed a to Crick closing the visitors’ |: Lewie Ur Bete ne ae. | Dvesure and makes you feel years
of England's start which producea@ down the wicket when Evans driving two hard left hooks to terrific right to the champion’s second innings for 196, Fletcher! fer Trinidad: H. Mayers, J. Emmet unger in & few Gays. Get Moree
18. The runs were not valuable stumped him, and Umrigar Charles body in the first few sec- jaw. Walcott seemed hurt but was undefeated for 54. fron, ©. Resende, T. Hawkins, J. Cum- | ‘rom your chetat et welt ahd
with three full days ahead, but flashed wildly at a ball from True- onds. Joe landed a hard right to walked in straight to his corm@r — §t, Lucia wor the trophy by an! 4) cape NPG? Medtord. G Forde, | UNe or Taoney back on return of
wickets were and india had man playing in his first Test for Charles’ side and the crowd roar- at the bell innings and 19 runs: Crick took‘! Lande bBo ae eee | sinpty package.
struck a vital blow. Evans to bring off a fine catch ed. Charles boxed cautiously. Joe ROUND 13— Charles drove a 6 wickets for 29 seen OOF tune S Nicde 1 Whatton 8} cae
But not until 48 runs were om Shculder-high behind the wicket. gained a slight edge in the round. hard left hook to Walcott’s stom- In the presence “ot a lar ciceatte eae t
the board did they meet with ROUND 3.—At the start of the ach at the start of the thirteenth crowd, Mro Prat Bo Deaqee} 2!" pavans =
further success and again it was Collapse Feared third round Walcott landed a ter- reund. The Referee warned wife of the actin . Admi Seta | ON THURSDAY “- Cx
th Ahmed—Ramchand combina— rific left hook to Charles’ jaw, Charles. Walcott averted Charles’ presented the cus to De Fog) Prem Antigua: Olive Jeffery ~)

: On WEDNESDAY }
captain of St. Lucia.| Frem Trintaad U. Marehoek, O i

f
. ie >
Eyre, J. Joaquin, B. Evelyn, ener” &D> FOR
son, 8. Samaroo, 'M. Abdool Ws Va . 4
t 4 >
% *

tion which disposed of Simpson One feared rather than hoped then a hard right to the jaw. attack with left jabs to the head. ,
who had batted nearty 90 that an Indian collapse was immi- Charles danced away and then Walcott drew blood from a cut peg
minutes for 23. ment and there were few on the drove a left hook to Waleott’s over Charles right eye. Charles

This rate of run getting was 8tound who expected such a re- bod connected a stiff right to Waltott’s

Prizes were also presented to
outstanding performers in the},





Oe

G. Corbin, D. Cerbin, P ty






y. rn th

typical of the whole day, for En— Very especially as Hazare and ROUND 4,—At the end of the jaw. Walcott was warned by the ri ying a re eae * Cron
gland were concerned with not Manjrekar made such a poor third round Charles was warned referee for hitting on the break. erie Se ee me Seer het
giving chances and Indian bowl— “tart. Hazare’s first run came from against low blows. In the fourth Walcott drove a left to Charles’ Cho IDV 6 WES ¢. Hi}, M. Grell, & Gret, A. Pilgrim, ?
ers were just that bit short og What was meant to be a eover round Charles drove a left to Joe’s bead and drew blood from Charles” . I | ¥ Sew i, SNakoor, ©. Silva, I. Silva
length which made stroke play ive off Jenkins but which went body. Charles landed a right to face. They traded several hard >» Ae ee eS
dangerous proposition. down to long leg, and Manjrekar the jaw and Walcott replied with punghes. Prevert From Trinidad: W. Vincent-Brown

At this stage in the proceed~ ‘was twice beaten and nearly a right to the head. ROUND 14 —Cherles was ag- he a Waller, B. Nigolle, 1. Williams, V
ings Hazare introduced his leg bowled playing reckless shots at Charles was aggressive and gressive at the start of the four- EF ishing Trips Bavwtak. i; veenial c. “kein
spinner Shinde for the benefit the same bowler. drove two light lefts to Walcott. teenth round He drove a hard { ana, A. Drayton, &. Figaro, F.. fink

of Compton and immediately he One-was reminded at this stage Joe landed a right to Charles jaw. right to Walcott’s jaw and the

son, H. Hinkson, E. Rogers, A. Williams
struck a length. But it was not Of the West Indies first Test at Charles hit low with the left and champion retreated. Charles land-

Veuy few fishing Boats from thé}", Wwiias, P. Stampe

various St. Michae a Ss oP
Compton who fell first. Instead it Manchester two years ago. the referee warned him again. ed a left and a right to the head sxt Sai Dale tote ventordatt =" wer WEmereaeah o4
was May who played over a ball Admittedly there the wicket ROUND 5.—Walcott missed a Walcott clinched, Charles missed car ae rae Trinidad: S, Carter, J. Mahon

ichis aa Secs cee highs Fa
well pitched up to him and was 2s already wearing but the bats- right but followed with a left to a left but landed a right to Wal- This was because of the high|y “Xnan, F. Ellis, C. Cumberbaten, R









. : “ inds and choppy sea, kes, L. St. Aubyn, C. St. Aubyn
ciean bowled—62 for 3. men all made the same fault of the body, Walcott drove several cott’s temple They clinched. we y Parkes, eo rae
rs attempting. quick run getting be- left jabs to Charles’ jaw and then Walcott drove a sharp left hook on eal tes mpoerns » - M Mallet A Wipneuya bh *puckl ,

Indians On Top fore they had their eye in. a sweeping right to Ezzard’s head to Ezzard’s jaw. Charles missed icarned. Up i 9.00" Woles G. Best, C. Chadderton, M Rahal, 8
Peter May who has already This was just what the Indians just before the bell. The crowd with a right, but scored with two yesterday evdein only 120 ‘. ds | WF copes gr Metaniven, St. Gonaslies
age three quick centuries oleae Toe ee an 5 pina long lefts to the body at the bell. of dolphin wale enid, in the Fish : Gonsalves, V. Gonshives, A. Gon
0 i i ma ui J —The r 22 7 ‘ a
an thar eter We and India ean for perhaps seven or eight falls ROUND 6.—They started care- gered tam to fght at ie gta MMagbet. This was 2 catch brought — oye 9 re
very much on top. They looked 20d then suddenly the bat, would ‘fully in the sixth round and ex- the fifteenth round. Charles 1% by the fishing boat “Sonny CANADIAN RATES
It too, f ze flash and it was as much luck as changed light left hooks to the Grove a left and a right to the Boy". Selling Buying

Their fielding was first class by aga if the ball went off the oe ere ere 2 pane pas champion’s body, Blood ran from , JUNE 6, 1962 gta’
with Gopi rekar . atcotts side and the referee Walcott’s nose. Walcott dro’ 16 3/10% Cheques on Bankers 74 5
oumigeniae ie gpa a a a Hazare and Manjre- warned him against low blows right to the jaw and 4 Seore S Mm h Winds mere Pratt ee
Ramchand positive menace in the ‘/8!,Werenot made to pay fortheir once more, A glancing right off howled. Joe stabbed two lefts to 18 16 9/10% Cable
leg trap. early , and by lunch the head of the challenger and the Charles’ face. Charles drove a 4 8/10% Curreney RN

The wicket was, however, a@ry— when 72 runs were on the board, crowd roared. Walcott drove a jeft and a right to Joe’s body. In St. Peter ‘ ae ate
ing out and becoming much “ ; both ba had played some right to the head and then a left Walcott replied with a right. , bes id S
than it had been early on. But im Setesane Manjrekar being hook to the body, then another Charles retorted with a left to the High winds threatened -houses
drying out, occasional balls icularly severe onthe slow left to the body and a right to the body and ‘a right to the head. in many districts in St. Peter on
beginnin t Fr men off his back foot. The power head, Charles held on. Charles was warned f low Thursday and yesterday morning.

g to pop. From one such ihe put into his shot: be ROUND 7.—Walcott od very Tel. Avooe "a tte ee ¥ ; ; Wary
Compton, playing forward to <%,.? is shots can . alcott looked very blows. Charles drove a long left Residents were forced to button eh?
Ahmed became Ramchand’s third queers by the fact that when he confident and Charles looked wor- to the jaw and the champion re~ down windows and doors. A a
victim, a 65 he had hit ten ried. At the start of the seventh plied with a right. They traded At the Mount district a kitchen INDER
enn was a situytion where any-— . ene Pi raat hare, lofts blows as the bell ended the fight. was blown from its foundation Z a

fae might have happened. Four Hazare Opens Out with the left hand and a lump ap- sree mae ® Wa. sty Shoe aver. .
thane wero down. for 90 and "5M peared under Charles ton aon ET ee a ee ae een enna EEE mmnserratnesin eo A en ee
low a Syusisoss of a fot Hazare at first content to be Walcott drove a stiff left jab to ws

But Graveney and Watkins who the silent partner opened out after Charles’ jaw. Ezzard replied with



i Junch and runs came at more 4 left to the body and the referee
lose bowling by Shinde Gear than one a minute. Hazare dis- aguin warned him against low ff
the game around. Never really Played some delightful cover blows. They exchanged lefts to the 0:
top of the bowling, they newer, ves, and could not have re- face. When the bell rang blood
theless defended doggedly ‘ana {orded his highest score of the dripped from the cut under choose
slowly ghe score mounted. Grave— ‘0%, 4t,a more appropriate mo- Charles’ left eye. :
ney reached his 50 after two and ment, When the score reached 254 ROUND .8.—They exchanged extra mild, extra soothing
a quarter hours including one six Hazare and Manjrekar had beaten short rights. Walcott drove a hard ‘
off Shinde and seven fours. ws ore ae ioe aes bet right to Charles’ jaw. ee Bath Size

j 4 i Y y Hazare and janded a hard right to Walcott’s
wos amen df looked as._if Marchant inthe 1961-82 series i jaw and the crowd roared. Wal- PALMOLiV
the partnership would see Eng- India. f cott thumped a hard right to
land safely through the day But they were not destined to Charles’ back, the challenger bent
Ahmed struck for the fourth time. ‘#X¢ matters much further. At © and when he straightened up, Joe
Watkins, still two short of a half o'clock and just when it looked as connected a hard right to Charles’
century, was out Lbw., and a ‘hough they were set for night chin, Walcott moved after him &
bright 20 minutes of Evans another Hutton bowling switch and Charles clinched. Fans booed.
brought the proceedings to a brought back Bedser, and Hazare Walcott drove a right to Charles’ or
close. : play ‘oleae ea ne hogey the lee head and Ezzard replied with stift ap

i ball who yj o Joe’s he just before
W.I. Again gathered his third victim in no je"? 7s head 3 er

i se coeees Spetatr ” Wolsne “unce manner. Hazare had ROUND 9.——At the start of the 7
into Headingley Cricket Ground batted neasiy foue and a balf ninth round Charles looked. grim. \ £
between the lunch and tea inter— hours, for his and apart from ‘They exchariged’ half a dozen iF
val on Thursday might have beem two chan Peth

5 one , Oar ex- hes, then Charles landed a #

pardonably excused for thinking tremely di he had not wee, : : nded 1

; —— ard left hook to Walcott’s jaw.
that) the 1960" West. imdses ne made a mistake. If he was more Joe shook his head. Charles drove ph ’
pattern was’ familiar. At the only Uaturel in a batsman sesking 2,*€eePing left hook to the cham- tra-in//d PALMOLIVE
pattern wa ; a n seeking 3.°0\"*t ti
crease mia dark ec nes is regain wate = a meine of gia oS Bale es rans SOOTHES BABY’S TENDER SKIN i
were taking complete comman ow scores. evious six ,;o Se ahs 4
of an England attack which Hut- innings he had totalled only 39, then six punches to Joe’s body.) — — Palmolive—made of the finest ingredients—gives a creamy-

BISCUITS

ini > ;, Charles landed another right and

tof, perraiae oa a —_ oh tail om hegre in ee ae Pralcots replied vite, a right ia oie smooth extra-mild lather thot soothes away irritation as it gently
less thought than rapidity. But the other quickly followed him. ann ore sent Hard a re Aa s floats away dirt. A daily Palmolive bath will keep your baby
the scoreboard showed the loss of Only one run had been added to WAlcott aie = - . += es, ee forte! freshed a ‘ spades 3
only three wickets and at 6 o’clock the total and Manjrekar gave ing a right t en a left ook to the comfortable . . . refreshed . . . dainty. Remember, Palmolive is
the two batsmen had betweem Trueman his second wicket when ne Mg mg another right exiro-mild . . . extra, soothing?
them, added 222 runs. he edged one into a leg trap and JUS OUND’ \ oT ‘

Heroes of this run getting spree Alan Watkins made a, superb ee 10.— jalcott landed a . ly
were India’s Captain, Hazare, a catch low down on his left hand § ean t to Charles body, then XN Uy,
compact greying-haired figure who side. Manjrekar whose first cen- ase drove four hard punches xs
from a distance looks not unlike tury of the tour it was, was to the body at the start of the =
a larger edition of Everton Weekes, cheered enthusiastically all the we ae ae 2 -
and Vijay Manjrekar, baby of the way back to the dressing room. alcott replied with a right to
Indian side who bears decided re- Gopinath came and went with- the body. Charles landed a right
semblance at the crease to Frank out scoring and visions of a sec- to Walcott’s jaw and the cham
Worrell. ond and possibly final collapse pion held on. Walcott landed a

Saved India loomed up as the England bowl- light left to Charles head.
brs admirably supported in the Opening a cut on the side of the Fer Loveloess 4 Over buy BATH SIZE PALMO

These two batsmen certaimhy field attacked Mantri and Ram- challenger’s right eye. Charles y Live
saved India today om a wicket chand. But these two survived the drove a hard right to the jaw at peer oo
which looks full of runs but which final half hour to leave India in the bell.
may soon be visited by rain. a satisfactory, even if not a win- | ROUND 11.—Charles appeared

When they came together the ning position. fresh with both his cuts patched
prospects of India lasting until To bat are: Ramchand, Shinde, up. The challenger scored a left
tea time were not over great. and Ghulum Ahmed. hook to the body, then landed a
———_—_—__—











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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS ef ADVOCATE

irwcnae = ae wernt LS = rm re Foe ts om ue

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown

—_———$—e

Saturday, June 4, 1952

TRADE UNIONS

A MEETING in Barbados of a branch of
the International Confederation of Free
Trade Unions is an event of great impor-
tance in the history of the island.

Trade Unionism in the world today is
sharply divided between Communist-
dominated and free Trade Unions. The
rift between the two union ideologies was

effected in 1949. In March 1949 a mani-
festo describing the World Federation of
Trade Unions as dominated by Commun-
ist organisations was issued by the British
Trades Union Congress, the United States
Congress of Industrial Organisations and
the Dutch Federation of Trade Unions,
who had withdrawn from membership of
the World Federation of Trade Unions on
January 25, 1949.

Similar action was taken by free trade
union federationssand councils in Austra-
lia, New Zealand, Belgium, Switzerland
and Sweden among other countries.

In June 1949 the dissenting unions held
a cofiference in Geneva which was attend-
ed by 127 delegates from thirty-eight
national federations of Trade Unions
claiming to represent 45,000,000 members.

In the sare year the Communist-dom-
inated World Federation of Trade Unions
held a conference in June and this was
attended by delegates representing 71,000,-
000 members in forty-five countries.

When the free trade unions established
on December: 7, 1949, the International
Conféderation of Free Trade Unions with
headquarters in Brussef& a membership of
about 50,000,000 was claimed.

The significant fact about international
Trade Unions today therefore is the cleav-
age which exists between trade unions
which are loyal to the concepts and tradi-
tions of.the Western democratic way of
life and those trade unions which are very
efficiently organised and are busily en-
gaged in inculcating Communist tech-
niques and beliefs throughout the world.
In the British Caribbean the avant-garde
of Communism is already firmly estab-
lished. Communists today make no secret
of their affiliations and a travelling sales-
man of Communist beliefs and doctrines
was recently reported in the West Indian
Press to be looking forward to the day
when all the peoples of the West Indies
should become Communist,

The presence in Barbados therefore of
delegates who are representatives of the
trade unions of the free world is a subject
for congratulation.

The Inter-American Regional Organisa-
tion of Free Trade Unions is faced with
the task of combating the propaganda and
activities of representatives of the Com-
munist-dominated World Federation of
Trade Unions,

There is ho merit in speculation as to
the desirability or need of trade unions in
the West Indies. The enemy today of pro-
gress in the West Indies is not the internal
friction which used to exist between the
“haves” and the “have-nots.” The progress
of the West Indies entirely depends on the
united efforts of all its people to stabilize

the society which has already emerged
and through education and training to
continue to build sure foundations for the
future. The enemy to West Indian pro-
gress is an enemy from outside; an enemy
who consciously or_ unconsciously owes
allegiance to the most powerful and des-
potic ruler ever yet known to world his-
tory—the dictator whose decrees are |
issued from the Kremlin in Moscow. The
weapons chiefly employed by this enemy
are words.

In the West Indies these words are
aimed to creaté racial disunity, to foment
class hatred and to encourage the corrup-
tion of morals and degradation of the
human character.

The International Confederation of Free
Trade Unions is organised to defeat the
insidious propaganda which is dissemin-
ated from Soviet Russia. Quite recently
the Government of the Gold Coast was
compelled to stop a subsidised airborne
service of Communist literature direct
from Moscow to the Gold Coast.

The menace of Communism is not a
bogey invented by Wall-street financers:
nor is it the fiction of. journalists seeking
to titillate the mental appetite of its read-
ers. It is real. Communist propagandists
are highly trained to exploit the differen-
ces of race and class. The West Indies
therefore owe much to the outspoken
frankness of Mr. Grantley Adams, C.M.G.
and other distinguished ieaders of tiade
union movements for their allegiance to
the International Confederation of Free
Trade Unions. Whatever the defects and
teething troubles of West Indian Trade
Unions the essential fact to be borne in
mind by all West Indians, whether trade



unionists or plain citizens, is that the |
leading unions of the area are taking up |
the cudgels in defence of the democratic
as opposed to the totalitarian way of life.
That is something for which we must all

|
|
be grateful.







Our Common Heritage —7

The Age of Reform

As the nineteenth century
began to get under way, it
became increasingly clear that
slavery in the West Indies was
doomed. Bewildered by the
strong current of abolitionist

opinion in England, some of the
planters sought to stem the tide
by accepting measures to im-
prove the lot of the slaves, The
flogging of females was abol-
ished, the punishment of males
was restrained, labour on Sun-
day was forbidden and _ the
slaves were granted the rights
owning property and giving
evidence in a court of law.

But such improvements in the
slave code were not accepted
everywhere, and this gave fresh
impetus to the abolitionist cam-
paign in England, That cam-
paign was not, of course, an
isolated thing, It was a part of
the great liberating movement
that brought reform to England
itself, making trade union action
legal, humanising the penal
code and passing the measure
that gave the vote to the English
middle classes in 1832. That
this movement was to effect the
West Indies so strongly was
chiefly due to William Wilber-
force, whose name was used as
a battle-cry by the slaves in
Barbados during the insurrec-
tion in Barbados in 1816; an4
when his thealth was broken,
the cause he had championed
so effectively was taken up by
Thomas Fowell Buxton.

In the West Indies, as in
England, religion was to play a
powerful part in the reforming
movement. The Methodists, the
Moravians and the Baptists had
won the deep gratitude of the
slaves by their missionary
activities. John Smith, _ the
Methodist parson, died in Brit-
ish Guiana in 1824, a martyr to
the cause of bringing education
and the Christian religion to
the slaves. The year before that,
the Wesleyan Chapel in Bridge-
town was destroyed by a section
of the white population who felt
that the Methodists were unset-
tling the minds of the slaves by
teaching them ideas of equality.
The Moravians fought to get
schools started for the slave
population, And it was a West
Indian delegation of Baptists
that helped to bring things to a
head in England in 1833 and
finally persuaded the English to
abolish slavery as “repugnant
to the principles of the British
Constitution and of the Chris-
tian religion.”

The Church Strengthened

In the early part of the nine-
teenth century, the role played
by the Anglican Church was
not a noble one. “For a century
and a half the doors of the
Established churches were closed
against the hundreds of tihou-
sands of heathens by whose
physical labour the industrial
structure was upheld” wrote >a
former Principal of Codrington
College. Except for the Society
for the Propagation of the Gos~
pel, which gave Christian
instruction of the slaves on the
Codrington estates in accordance
with the will of Christopher
Codrington, the Church of Eng-
land showed no sign of believ-
ing that the slaves possessed
immortal souls. “We — cannot
deny” wrote Alfred Caldicott
“that, the vast majority of
our fellow-subjects in the West
Indies lived in unrelteved
heathenism amid the so-called
‘parishes’ of Jamaica, Barbados
and the Leeward Islands.”

But Canning, the great Eng-
lish statesman who was_ then
Leader of the House of Com-
mons, saw the current of events
and decided to strengthen the
Anglican Church in the West
Indies in 1824, He realised that
emancipation was inevitable and
took steps to prepare the Church
to play its part in that great
revolution. The West Indies was
divided into two dioceses and
two eminent men were chosen
to guide the Anglican Church
through this critical time. Chris-
topher Lipscomb was appointed

Bishop of Jamaica, with the
Bahamas and Honduras under
his care. William Hart Cole-

ridge was selected as Bishop of
Barbados and his diocese inclu-
ded the Leeward Islands, St.
Vincent, Grenada, Trinidad and
British Guiana,” The Bishops
were instructed to report on the
state of the Church “particu-
larly as it relates to the slave
population” and to ascertain
“the best means of diffusing the
benefits of religious instruction
to that part of the Community.”
To prove its profound interest
in sych instruction the British

Government undertook to pay
the administrative expenses of
the two dioceses, placed the

clergy under the control of the



OUR READERS SAY:

Black Market Selling

To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR.—I am inclined to think
that the hard living in Barbados
is caused in some way by many
sellers.

In several .districts shopkeep-
ers apply their minds to robbing
customers out of the weights and
measures due to them. Some
shopkeepers give customers the
maximum weights of fifteen
ounces of any article as one
pound of avoirdupois which is
equivalent to sixteen ounces. I
have already seen a shopkeeper
with a pint tin pressed in at the
top to prevent it from taking up
the portion of fluid for which it
was made to hold.

On the other hand, hawkers
who sell oranges, limes and other
fruits are not always willing to
tell the prices of their articles.
To ask one the price of bananas
the answer may be “How many
do you want?”, When you say
the amount you want, you will
get whatever the hawker wants
to give for the money. Some
will not sell except the amouht
needed is stated. These deeds
help to create bad living in the
island; not only done by the
town-sellers but most sellers
throughout the island.

I was in Christ Church parish
a week ago, and saw a fish-seller
retailing fish at eight cents each
and yet I heard that the retail
price of one was seven cents by
the law ane ;

In order to get rid of this dis-

Bishops and provided funds ‘for
the more immediate supply of
persons in holy orders.”

Coleridge’s first task was to
increase the supply of clergy.
Here he had to fight all over
again the battle that had been
waged against men like Sir
John Gay Alleyne who wanted

to keep the Codrington founda-

tion as a secondary school for
boys. But Coleridge’s efforts
were successful and in 1828

Codrington College was estab-
lished as a training college for
clergy and the grammar school
was removed to the site where
it began its independent exis-
tence as the Lodge School.
Several years before Cole-
ridge came to Barbados, the
Combermere Charity School
had been started for coloured
and Negro children and the
Central School for poor whites.
Encouraged by this, the Bishop
set about the task of building
schools and by the end of his
episcopate, in spite of the disas-,
trous ihurricane of 1831, thef!
number of ‘schools had risen’t
from eight to eighty-three anJ
the number of children on theis
roll from five hundred to sever
thousand. He steadily increased
the number of clergy = an
churches and gradually th

Negroes gave up such practices
ay

‘



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Hy F. A. Hleyos

William Hart Coleridge

one section destroying the cane-
fields and estate houses and the
other burning down the chapels
erected by the Dissenters for
the slaves. It is small wonder
that the prophets of despair
predicted that emancipation
would bring disaster and that
the British West Indies would
follow the example of Haiti, by
exterminating. the whites and
setting up a black republic.
Coleridge, like his colleague
in Jamaica, took up his task in
the firm conyiction that his duty
as a Christian Bishop was not
to dncrease the hostility between
the planters and the slaves but
to neal the breach between
these two classes through the
principles of Christian fellow-
ship. He carefully instructed
his clergy that they should
enlist the support and co-opera-
tion of the planters in their
work among the slaves. For
him it was a matter ofsthe first
importance that the work of the
Church should proceed in such
a way that it would win the
confidence of the Negroes and
at the same time secure the
goodwill of their masters. But,
where a vital principle arose,
he wWeuld not agree to any com-
promise. When the Rev. W. M.
Hart., Rector of St. Lucy, was
charged: before a Court. of

WILLIAM HART COLERIDGE

as howling ovey their dead and
offering food at their graves.
Moreover, during the five years
following emancipation, he in-
spired the formation of twenty-
two Friendly Societies which
encouraged thrift and self-help
among its 2,574 members,

All this was only part of the
vast programme Coleridge set
himself and, besides, he had to
find time to visit the other ter-
ritories of this diocese, For two
hundred years the Established
Church in the West Indies had
been without the services of a
Bishop and its members, in the
words of a certain lamentation,
had been left to wander “in the
wilderness as sheep without a

shepherd.” Coleridge worked
heroically to make up for the
neglect of the past but after

eighteen years his magnificent
energy began to fail and in 1842
he was forced by ill-health to
retire from the See, After
returning to England, he became
first Warden of St. Augustine’s

College, Canterbury, and held
that post until his death in
1849.

The Reconciler

The situation facing Coleridge
and .Lipscomb, when they came
to the West Indies, was delicate
and dangerous, The Barbadian
insurrection of 1816 thad been
followed by a revolt in British
Guiana in 1823 and this in turn
was to be followed later by an
even more formidable upheaval
in Jamaica, Moreover, under
Buxton’s leadership, the aboli-
tionist campaign gathered pace
and momentum and few seemed
to expect that the great issue
could be settled without vio-
lence and bloodshed. It was not
a happy state of affairs, with

honesty I hope that for the sake
of the poor people the Govern-
ment may appoint district in-
spectors who will see that people
sell their goods at prices not ex-
ceeding those which are made by

the Government.
THEODON.

Dominica And Winnie
To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—It will be remembered
that one of the several pressing
state affairs of paramount im-
portance which Mr, Winston
Churchill tackled immediately
on his assumption of office as
Prime Minister of Great Brit-
ain, the result of the General
Election of 25th Oct., 1951, was
the question how to put an end
to the “cold war’ which threat-
ened to flare up into actual hos-
Ailities between Great Britain
and her former gallant ally and
thereby plunge the } ms into
a war, the like cf which no
human eye has witnessed since
the creation of the world. Asa
means towards that end, Mr.
Churchill proposed a meeting of
“The Big Three’ — the Heads
of the Governments of Great
Britain, the United States of





America and Soviet Russia —
with a view to arriving at a
workable understanding between
the three former allies, whose
gallantry and united blogdy
sacrifice won World War I,
and thereby save themselves,
and the other countries of
Europe, from becoming vassal

States of Nazi Germany, for all

Grand Sessions for preaching
ideas of equality to the slaves,
Coleridge stood firmly by him
and it was largely due to his
support that the Rector was
eventually pardoned by the
King. For he could not accept
as Christian doctrine the plea
of the planters that it was right
to maintain certain “distince-
tions” as “necessary to safety.”
Yet Coleridge had no desire to
follow the example of the Dis-
senters and incur the perma-
nent antagonism of the planters.

He was determined not to
identify himself completely with
any one section. He _ insisted

that the Church should seek to
win the support of both sections
by the thorough and earnest
manner in which it did its pas-
toral work,

The remarkable thing about
Coleridge is that he succeeded
in the extremely difficult role
he set himself. Gradually he
persuaded all classes to look on
the Church ag the one integra-
ting force in the island, His
work in this respect did more
than anything else to bring
about a easure of reconcilia-
tion between planter and slave
and prepare them for the great
change that was to come, It
was mainly due to this that the
far-reaching social revolution,
known as the abolition of
slavery, took place peacefully.
His labours, like those of Lips-
comb in Jamaica, were largely
responsible for the happy ,cir-
cumstance that emancipation in
the West Indies—described as
one of the turning points in the
history of human progress—was
carried out without any of the

wild excesses that had been
mournfully p¥ophesied ten
years before.

times, The reaction from

Capitol Hill to Mr, Churchill's
proposal, not being encouraging,
he publicly declared his detgr-
mination to meet His Excellency
Joseph Stalin, whether Presi-
dent Truman joined him or not.

Feeling that this Great and
Strong Man of Our Times de-
served the support and encour-
agement of every man and
woman within the British Com-
monwealth of Nations, for his
indomitable courage, and de-.
termination to try alone, if ne-
cessary, to save the world from
becoming blasted into bits; and
knowing the sentiment of my
fellow-countrymen and women
on the subject, I sent Mr.
Churchill, on the morning fol-
lowing the afternoon of his
memorable declaration (13th
November last) the following:
“The Right Honourable

Prime Minister of England

No. 10 Downing Street
London.
On behalg of the people of
Dominica, B.W.I., I send you
hearty congratulations on your
projected Russian policy, which,
if adopted, will save the war-
crippled World the ‘unspeak-
able horrors and devastation of
an atomic war, draw upon you
and yours the blessing of Heav-
en, and for which, Posterity will,
the more, bless and cherish your

memory.”
Yours etc.,
W. W. WYLLIS,
Ex-Journalist.



’
|
|
i
|

|

| Moenday—Being a thirsty wayfarer in the







1952

SATURDAY, JUNE 7,





NOBODY'S ©
DIARY

City of Bridgetown I approached the
Italian drinking fountain just opposite
the Waterworks.

But when I tried to push the cock in
and the water out I hurt my thumb.

It was just as well because people with
stronger thumbs than mine get a bath
from the splash.

I am sure the waterworks would fit a
cock which does credit to this lovely
oasis in the City: and there must be
enough cement and masons available to
construct a proper cistern.

While the waterworks do their stuff
the Civic Circle will no doubt plant
some flowering shrubs in this miniature
park and then someone might be inter-
ested enough to construct some stone
seats.

Tuesday—The side of the Public Buildings
which does not contain the House of
Assembly has three beautiful stained
glass windows.

As you go up on one side you read
“Render unto Caesar the things. that





are Caesar’s” and as you come down on
the other “And to God the things that
are God's”. Upstairs another stained
glass window which has been damaged
commemorates the beautiful words “Un-
less the Lord build the House their
labour is but lost that built it.”

On the other side there is a hideous
modern structure labelled Ladies Lunch-
eon Room or something to that effect.
If there is a stained glass window hidden
by this monstruosity I wouldn’t be able
to tell you being a stranger in those
parts.

Outside the Public Buildings nailed on
to a shade tree is an ugly sign about cars.

What is required is a neat little note
saying “The samaan tree which is com-
mon in Port-of-Spain is rare in Bridge-
town: this tree was planted here by .. .”
“Or simply a little board saying “This is
not a samaan tree: though it looks like

”



one.
Wednesday—After all the heat that has been
generated about electricity someone

wants us to take our clothes off: or near-
ly all, To keep cool I suppose. Personally
I wear my shirt flapping over my neatly
cut blue shorts and open from top to
bottom. And I know just enough about
electricity to keep my shirt on and to be
thankful for what lightI get in this
island of darkness.

The other night when the lights went
out my four-year-old son outeclamoured
Claudius with screams for “Lights.”
When he got light in candle form he
didn’t like the way the flame jumped. I
can remember when it was funny to re-
peat the story “look at moonlight com-
ing out of a*half-pint bottle.” The way

some people go off the deep end about

electricity you’d think they weren’t

brought up on oil lamps and pressure

lanterns, Ah! well.
Thursday—They’re on about women now.
Madariaga is good about women. He

quotes J. B. Moreton who published his

impressions of the English West Indies in
1793 and who reproduced a local adage
which went like this:

“Creole Misses when scarcely ten
Cock their eyes and long for men.”
That was a long time ago and presum-
ably there has been some progress since
then but there sure seems a lot of spade
work yet to be done for women. Why not
a Queen Elizabeth Home for Young

Women?

It’s her birthday isn’t it.

Friday—The Barbadian I would like to see
written up more than any other is the
one whose face hangs painted in the
House of Assembly restaurant.

He is described as the Father of the
Agricultural Societies. “What a good
name to leave behind you.”

Saturday—That reminds me. Who left be-
hind those two rusty guns up in the en-
trance to the House of Assembly? Maybe
they have a history, but at present it
covered in dust. Better present them to
the Garrison Officers Mess, what! Or de-
tail a cleaning party. in Part-one orders
for gun cleaning. Have we got enough
guns for an exhibition? If so we coulc
cart them all up to the Garrison anc
leave them there,

P.S. Little Bo-peep has lost her shee;
and I know where it is—lying on the St
James beach with its tummy open anc
smelling like overnight flying-fish.

Russian Manoeuvres Conducted Off Japan

TOKYO, June 6.
RUSSIA is conducting naval and air man

| oeuvres off the northern tip of Japan, accord

ing to Japanese Press reports.

Kyodo News Agency quoted the Japanese
national police headquarters in Kushiro on
Hockaido Island as saying that Russian war-
ships and planes are operating off Nemuro
on the western tip of the island.

It said vibrations of shells used in target

jpractice could be felt in Japanese coastal
}towns and searchlights have been seen.

—U-P.

PHOTOGRAPHS

Copies of Local Photographs

Which have appeared in the

Advocate Newspaper
Can be ordered from the...









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»
SATURDAY, JUNE 7, 1952

52

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Unified Trade Union
Movement Urged

from page 1
The Barbados deiegate empha-
sised the need for a social secur-
ity scheme throughout the Carib-
bean area in order that workers
might have some remuneration
on which to live after they shall

have reached old age.
Mr. R. C. Tello (British Gui-
ana) addressing the conference,

said that at one stage of the re-
port presenteq by Mr. Ramouldi,
the acting Chairman of the con-
ference on the working of
O.R.1.T., he was prepared to turn
on a bombardment against it, but
since hearing the excuse and ex-
planation given by the chairman,
he was forced to sympathise with
them in their efforts to surmount
the vatious obstacles and hurdles
which they encountered.
Highlight

There was however, one high
light that could not possibly pass
anyone of them without giving
the impression that O.R.ILT, ad-
mitted that within its present or-
ganisation, work within the
Caribbean would have been diffi-
cult because the amount of work
ascribeq to the functions of
O.R.LT. was so voluminous that
the Caribbean had to be satisfied
with second or third place,

Mr. Tello said that it was well
known that it was almost impos-
sible to divorce entirely any
labour movement from politics,
but politics as it is related to the
trade union movement, was, he
thought something to be wel-
comed; especially when the poli-
tics was evolved from the trade
union movement, rather than the

trade union movement evolved
from politics.
“Politics have so surrounded

this great movement, that it

has brought us at cross roads.

I can hardly say if we are going

forward or backwards. I throw

out this to those people who are
anxious to serve and to employ
the means of legislation and
compulsion by legislation
rather than using the machin-
ery which is really suited to
democratic trade unions,” Mr.

Tello said.

He observed that in .Barbados
the two things were so integrated
because of the paucity of neces-
sary talent. It had been spoken
privately and openly that it was
the wish of the leaders that this
important organisation should
run yarallel with rather than in
an integration that, one could
hardly differentiate between the
tr7o.

Political Movement

Mr, Adams haq said that the
future of the West Indies depend-
ed a great deal on the growth of
trade unionism strong and pow-
erful and side by side with a po-
litical movement which was
purely labour. That, he said, im-
pressed him as an acknowledge-
ment of the fact that these two
must go side by side,

He recalled how a very “histo-
rical political speech” almost
paralysed the C.L.C, and because
these people associated with the
C.L.C, had seen the necessity of
having two organisations, not
separate, certainly united but not
amalgamated, growing side by
side. He felt confident that now
they were about to enter into the
organisation of the Caribbean
Trade Congress, they should
approach this matter with the
feeling that there must be a
growth of these two organisa-
tions, not as he said integrated,
but growing side by side.

“Tt am not prejudiced to poli-
ticians, but if to-day we should
ask these men who are doing
very good and admirable work in
the political field to give up poli-
tics and te come solely and undi-
videdly into the trade union
movement, I ask the question—is
that a fair request to make to po-
liticians? Is it fair for the field of
politics in the Caribbean? I say
no.”

Mr. 'Tello sounded a note of
warning in pointing out that if

they persisted in leafiing on peo-
ple who were kind to them and
whose intentions were good, but
were primarily politicians, they
would be facing the danger of de-
veloping a labour movement that
was necessarily from habit, a de-
pendent one, They were facing
the danger of labourites who
some day would find themselves
almost lost at sea because there
was not some great politician on
whom to lean, nor was there any
encouragement if they allowed
the workers to grow up with the
feeling that there must be some
great politician to lead them,

Danger

Concluding he said: “The dan-
ger is that some day, there might
be a dearth of such- people, or
the international political move-
ment would be of such that it
would take up all the time of
these great men and we would
find the leaders of trade unions
like lost sheep without a shep-
herd, a shepherd that was kind,”

He .urgtd that this danger
could bé corrected at this stage
before they all live to regret it
and posterity blame them for it.

Mr. Roberts (Trinidad)
pointed out that there were 28
trade unions in Trinidad and



SS



DOULTON





each leader thought of fighting
individually rather than col-
lectively. He expressed concern
over the apathy of the work-
ers and their indecision as re-
gards which unionists should
leaqd them, and said that one
found that politicians often
told the workers that the lead-
ers of the unions were not
qualified to lead them.

He also spoke of their lack of
interest in classes organised for
their own benefit, and said that
often those selected to lecture
often arrived to find that the
workers themselves were absent.

There was no. co-operation
among the working Class people
of Trinidad, he said,. and in his
view, Trinidad in this respect was
very backward, Every leader, he
‘said, was in fear of losing the
workers of his union, and they
were all at a loss as to what to
do.

Mr. C. Fergusson (Grenada)
brought greetings from the Gre-
nada Workers’ Union,, and said
that they in Grenada hoped that
the Conference would do some-
thing to the everlasing benefit of
the West Indies as a whole.

He urged delegates to the Con-
ference to take as their maxim a
quotation of the ancient philo-
sopher Socrates “I have laboured,
not to mock, not to lament, but
to understand the actions of
men,” and build on it, and then

they would have laboured to un-
derstand the problems cf the
West Indies.

Compensation

Those problems concerred each
of the various territories in the
area, he said. There were such
things as workmen's compensa-
tion—a sore question in Grenada
and many of the other islands—
the education of the trade union
members — a question of par-
amount importance to all the
islands—and he was glad in the
latiet. respect to see that it had
been urged that they would
utilise the facilities offered by the
University College of the West
Indies,

The other important question
was the question of federation
which was very important to the
working class people of the islands,
because it touched on their very
economic existence.

Mr. Fergusson dréw attention to
the restrictions placed on certain
persons who, because they were
labouring towards bettering the
condition of the working class peo-
ple were labelled Communists,
and urged that there should be
freedom of movement between
the islands,

Mr, C. P, Alexander, member
of the Sub-Committee of O.R.LT.,
and a vice chairman of the Con-
ference, gave a brief account of
the growth of the LC.F.T.U, and
its agencies. He observed that in
politics, like religion, each and
everyone had his own concept, but
in the ranks of trade unionism,
there was no difference in con-
cept in the principle of trade
unionism. Trade unionists, no
matter what part of the world they
might be, had ‘an identical con-
cept, provided that their minds
were not flavoured with any form
of politics,

He stressed the importance of
building up and maintaining a
strong, powerful and unified la-
bour movement, but warned that
they should steer cleay of indi-
vidual politics.

Statesmanship

He expressed great admira-
tion for statesmanship, but said
he had no admiration for poli-
ticians, no matter how great
such politicians might be. A
statesman, he said, was not
merely a politician, and he ad-
mired one who identified him-
self as a statesman of his coun-
try and one who was prepared
te do everything possible for
the benefit of his colony as a
whole. They in the Caribbean
had a great deal of experience
with politicians. He had no
umbrage and he fit that one’s
political career could be of great
benefit to one’s country.

The trade union movement
could also subscribe to the build-
ing of a country in the interest of
the working class people, It was
a great movement, and he was
sure delegatés would realise its
importance, It was a movement
which was going to place in the
hands of willing trade unionists
something which, if wisely used,
could be of great interest to all

trade union movements in the
Caribbean,

He recalled the observation
made by the Secretary of the

British Trade Union Congress that
what the British Trade Union had
received was not like manna fall-
ing from heaven, but something
which they had struggled and
fought for, and exhorted delegates
and trade unionists in the Carib-
bean to struggle and fight to obtain
and enjoy the respect of the em-
ployer and the government.

He was not un,.indful that the
unification of trade unions in the
West Indies called for a great deal

— ———





_ TRY HARRISON'S Fox

WEDDING GIFTS
ANNIVERSARY
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Our Stocks, all quite new, include

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——



CAVALRY MARCH PAST



A DETACHMENT of Mounted Police, under the command of Staff Sergeant Anderson of the Royal

Canadian Mounted Police, “march past” the saluting base at the Queen





‘s Birthday Parade on Thursday.



of struggle, and emphasised that
it was their duty to go all out
to maintain such unification. He
said that while under the aegis
of the LC.F.T.U., and O.R.LT.,
they looked forward to a great deal
of assistance, but trade unionists
in the Caribbean were not will-
ing to fall and allow the I.C.F.T.U.

Famous Magician
Returns To B’dos

Professor Robert Clifton, a
magician who recently arrived in
Barbados—his second visit in four
years—will be giving a show in

executive to dé their domestic PYpnotism and magicianship at
work. Club Morgan to-night and at the
Globe Theatre on the 14th and

Great Sacrifices 15th.
This magician, a 52-year-old
“We must be prepared to go Frenchman, is supposed to be able

all out and build a unified trade
union movement worthy to be re-
spected throughout the civilized
world. It is a hard task and it is
for us to make up our minds and
determine what part we will play
in. this great task.’ We have to
make great sacrifices. which are
worthwhile making, so that those
who come after us will find a
foundation upon which to work, I
am sure that the hardest task is
the beginning, but the most of
all is the maintenance of that
which is established,

“Trade unionism, as such, has
never in its history accomplished
all its requirements overnight,”
Mr. Alexander said, “There has
been long struggle in the trade
union movement throughout the
civilised world,*and in the estab-
lishment of our unification we
have to take the same road as the
others have taken to build their
movement and not be satisfied with
its achievements until such. time
as we have been able to command
the 1espect of each and everyone
within the respective territories.”

“A unified trade union movement
will be useless unless its respec-
tive units or associates, are each
and everyone’in themselves strong,
It will be the obligation of this
central body to see to it that all
free trade union movements in
the respective territories become
stronger than they ever were in
the past.” ;

to hypnotise one and then send
needles through the person’s face,
and besides this and many other
tricks, he is an acclaimed fire
eater, though the latter feat is
not on his programme for to-
night. ,

Since 14 years old when Robert
Clifton decided he could do a bit
in the magician line and when
he went on the stage for his school
pals, he has travelled in many
countries to perform the many
tricks he has acquired the knack
of doing.

He has visited
Switzerland and England wher
he attracted large audiences and
during the war he also performed
to American troops.

His present aide is a fellow
country woman called Florence.
He has arranged to act in concert
with the Boodhoo brothers,

Fishing Boat
Prograninie Held Up

A shortage of certain material
is still holding up the Fishing
Boat Building programme whieh
is in progress at the grounds of
the Fisheries Office. Already keels
have been laid for twelve boats.
Some of the boats are already
planked,

It is proposed to build 25 new.
boats, The frames for the other
13 are stored away at the Fisheries
Office.

A quantity of silver bali arrived
during the week from British
Guiana, Flexible wood for spars
arrived from St. Lucia,

There is however still a great

Belgium, Ttaly

Finally Mr. Alexander pledged
himself to be “pioneer of this great
and important co-ordinated and
central body of the Caribbean
Trade Union Movement,” and
said, “I am sure that the unifi-
cation of this movement will be
greatly admired by all West In- need for Santa Maria hardwood,
dian statesmen like Mr, G, H. Silver bali and other hardwood
Adams who have not only ex- for the interior of the boats,
pressed to the world that they are
great politicians, but have mani- / x \
fested thelr desire to serve the 30 « For “peeding
working class people.” Such class-
es of politicians were to be ad- Wesley Denny of Porters, Su
mired by all free trade unionists. James was fined 30/- to be paid

“We should always be prepared in 14 days or one month’s im-
to guard ourselves against poli- Prisonment by His Worship Mr,
ticians who are only willing ta C. L, Walwyn yesterday for
disrupt rather than to assist in driving a motor van on Black

1oad at 30 miles per hour.
Cpl. Jones attached
Traffic Branch said



building a great society of trade
unionism in the civilised world.” to

that he

the
was
Ramouldi Replieces Same vite ae

on duty on Black Rock Road on
March 20 when he saw the van
being driven at a fast rate. He
checked the speed of the van and
saw it was being driven at 30 miles
per hour and the speed limit on

Mr. Ramouldi, the Acting Chair-
man in his reply to the various
observations thanked the various
speakers for their remarks and
criticisms, either expressed or im-

plied, and said that there were that road is 20 miles per hour.
lifferences between individual 7
groups. NO ACCIDENTS

After explaining the position of
O.R.1.T., he warned that the great-
est danger which could come to
the movement now was the in-
filtration of Communist _ fifth
columnists into their midst, though

On the Police Reports yester-
day there were no cases of major
accidents over the Bank-Holiday
period. There were many excur-
sions and picnics but the day was



he shared the denunciation of the ®" uneventful one for motorists,
tactics of labelling people who

were fighting to better conditions.

of the working class people com- such agency, with a view to
munists. .., furthering the education of thi

One of the important tasks with trade unionists in these parts,

which the movement was faced He observed that there was a
was the promotion of legislation reactionary feeling that the work-

relating to the unemployment of
children, and said it was one of
the most important pieces of social

ing class people should not enter
politics, and countered that if
businessmen, merchants and such

legislation which they could proO- others took part in politigs, so
mote. 7 much so should the workers,
He also urged the establish- The Conference then adjournet

ment of a coursé or courses in the anq jater went into Committee to




coming year in co-operation with deal with matters on the Agenda,
the University College of the West A plenary session was held last
Indies, the Colonial Development night at nine o'clock,

and Welfare Organisation or any

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and Sunbreeze.

$2.86 per pair



Record Crowd
Attends Carnival

A record crowd went to Queen’s

Park on Thursday last for the
annual carnival staged by the
Loyal Brothers of the Stars. As
scon ag the gates were opened
thcre was a Continuous flow of
people going in and out of Queen’s
Park and the gatekeepers had
seme trouble with the crowd
which at times appeared to be

unruly.

There was a good exhibition of
costumes worn by men and
women, Some men were wearing
formal dress and one man pre-
sented a colourful sight when he
appeared before the Park House
dressed in top hat, tails, b’ue
gloves, a red walking stick and
wine coloured shoes. He had
beside him a girl wearing an
evening dress with red gloves to
match those he was wearing.

The stalls afforded many forms
of entertainment such as the lucky
dip, the wheel of fortune and
dart throwing. In the Park House
a concert was staged and a fee of

1/+»had to be paid before one
could enter the room.
One play .was based on the

West Indian way of life showing
the housewife and the difficulties
she experienced in trying to
make “two ends meet.”

There wes much applause at the
end of this play but a repeat per-
formance was not given. In the
steel shed a fair crowd danced
to the music of a stee! band.

{3 For Riding
Without Licence

His Worship Mr, E, A. MeLeod,
Police Magistrate of District “A’,
yesterday ordered Ernest Best of
Will, St. Michael, to
pay a fine of £2 in 14 days or one
month's imprisonment with hard
labour for exceeding the speed
limit while riding the autocycle
J—344 on Black Rock Road on
June 4 about 11,05 a.m,

The same magistrate also fine |
Best £3 for riding the same auto-
eycle on Black Rock road without
having a licence. This fine is to
be paid in two months or there
is an alternative of two months’
imprisonment with hard labour

Both cases were brought by Cpl
Jones and Police Constable 466
Lashley of the Traffic Branch at
Central Station,

Letters Of
Administration

In the Court of Ordinary yes-
terday the Chief Justice Sir
Allan Collymore granted the
petition of Samuel Sobers of St.
Matthias Village, Christ Church,
for Letters of Administration to
the estate of his mother Bertha
Louisa Sobers, deceased,

Mr. D. H. L. Ward, instructed
by Messrs. Hutchinson & Ban-
field, Solicitors; appeared for the
petitioner.

The will of Arnold A, King of
St. Michael was admitted to
probate,

WATER FLOODS
PLAYING FIELD

At the Princess Alice Playing
field groundsmen are preparing
cricket pitches, It is however very
doubtful that these wickets will
be ready for the coming cricket
season,

Whenever there is high tide and









the sea is rough, water flows over
the breakwater and floods the
southern end of the field.

The Pavilion is regularly rent-

ed for dances, The last big dance
was Mrs, A, L, Stuart's “Revuede-
ville’ Dance on Wednesday night.
This was one of the largest dances
ever to be held in the Pavilion
The grounds were well lighted.

eee



in new

of Dawn

CAVE

10,14,













& CO., LTD.







OBITUARY
Mr. G* C. Eckstein |

THE deat}
dence Casab
of Mr
formerly
stein Bros,
bus Owners,

Georgie he
known was the
ate Benjamin
founded the business
Eckstein’s was

and three
in the main
nes as garage proprietors and the
first owners of public motor trans-

th occurred at hi
Maxwell] Co
George ce. Ecksteir
of the firm of Eck
garage proprietors i!

nea



cs was familiarly
third son of th |

Eckstein who}
In the ear- |
locate

of the

bus

lier years

an eightstown

Si

OnS took par

pert from Speightstown t
sridgetown. Georgie who was al-
ways dapper and debonair set
standard in dress, as an ardent}
Lorticulturist he was distin-|
guished a ‘the driver with th
rose” |
Ry quiet but astute financi:i
nvestments he was able to retire

at a comparatively early age and
according to him became = a
“country gentleman” \

He eschewed politics and Wes}
always ready with some quip at]
the expense of the Vestries and}
the Legislature but his interest |
was deep. A gay companion and
easy* of approach he made and



retained until his death many
friends gathered from all sections
of society.



In recent years failing healtt
limited his activities but he en-
deavoured to keen contact witt
those whose friendship he h°<
enjoyed.

He was married to Mis
Croney and had one daughter

To his sorrowing widow ar
daughter deepest sympathy wil
be extended.

‘
Mr. Gladstone
Bowen
The death occurred last weck

at the Tercentenary Wards of th
General Hospital of Mr, Glad
stone Bowen of the Gulf Oil Cor
poration in this island.

Mr. Bowen after leaving scho.
was a clerk in Bridgetown. HE
joined the British West Indi
Regiment in the 1914-18 War an
served in Egypt where he rose |
the rank of Sgt. Major On bh
return he was employed in tl

hat department of Messrs. 1!
Costa & Co,, Ltd. Back in khal
he was a_ highly efficient Se:

geant Major in the Barbados Vo
unteer Force. Later he left |
Costa’s and opened his own pi
vate business and when this wi
not successful he left for Briti
Guiana.

Returning to Barbados a yea
ago he worked at Seawell Ati
port supervising the construc,ic!

of the runway and later join
Gulf Oil,

Always a_ burly figure. M
Bowen despite his sixty yea

was of a rugged constitution an
his short illness and unexpecte
death was a severe shock to hi
family and friends. He leaves 1
mourn their loss two daughter
one on the Staff of Queen's Coll
ege and the other of St. Mich rel
Girls’ School and one son popul

Spartan footballer, To these an
other sorrowing relatives dee}
est sympathy.



Paint, Board
Stolen

Reginald Holder of Pound
Gap, Westbury Road, reporte
the larceny of 50 gallons of re

paint valued $200 and 500 feet «

board valued $60 from Snogs
Quarry at Bush Hall betwee
12.30 p.m, on May 29 and 6(
a.m. on May 30.

Captain B. Austin of Ken
House, Christ Church, repoct
that his house was broken an
entered by an unknown man be

tween 12,30 a.m, and 1,00 p,m, o1
Wednesday. Nothing was stoler

The thief entered through a:
open bedroom window and mac
his escape, leaving behind th
lifing of a cap

An attempt was made to brea!
the Colonnade Store during Wed
nesday night. Kenneth Brath
waite, an employee of the sam
store, reported the incident to the

Police. He stated that a_ loc)
was removed from ong of th
doors.

A Fire at Lascelles Plantatio
St James, at about 11,00 a.m
on Thursday burnt four and
half acres of second crop rip
canes, two acres of second cro;
ratoons, four acres of trash an
five acres of sour grass, the pro
perty of P, G. Seales of Good
land, Christ Church.

& a= oe 4 EE

& CHRISTIAN SCIENCE !
@ = READING ROOM

has the courage ¢











“Charity
conviction. Charity is Love," and }
Love opens the eyes of the blind
rebukes error, and casts it out
¢ Chatity never flees before error )
lest it should suffer from an
encounter
( From Miscellaneous Writings
By Ma Baker Edd
This book ’ be read, bor
rowed or purchased at the Reading
Roor
Open: Tuesdays, Wednesdays
Fridays 10 am 2 p.m. and on
Saturdays 10 a.m 12 o'clock
q ALL ARE WELCOME 4

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PAGE SIX

GCenoeirinD ADS.



IN MEMORIAM



B

HAREWOOD -—



memory of our

dear mother Core ho departed thir
life on June 6th, 1951

We miss you much, our hearts ar

sore
As time goes by we miss you more,
Your kindly ways, your loving face,
No one can fill your vacant



Ever to be remembered by your loving
children Belfield, Swnley, Ruby ana
Raiph 7.6.52—Ilr

ANNOUNCEMENTS

selling REDIF-
time. Get
4.6.52

EARN BIG MONEY »b
FUSION in your spare
10n

supply of forms to-day









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Mrs. Otho Dowding, Pine Hill between
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SERVANT-.Experienced general ser-
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fore 10 in the morning or after in th
evening to Mrs. Scaife, La Garoupe
Cave Hill. 7.6.52—1n

SITUATION Young Exgivnman, 26
single, ex-Royal Navy, now in London

seeks good Situation in Barbados. Smart

appearance, top salesman, and drive

Excellent references. PETER SMITH

C/o Advocate. 7.6.52—2n





MISCELLANEOUS



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each new Subscriber
you

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recommended

fo
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a 4.6.52—10n
TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bon
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PERSONAL

The publie ape hereby warned again
giving credit to my wife, @WENDOLY!.
Fields (nee NILES) as I do not hol.
myseif responsible for her or anyone else
contracting any debt or debis in my



ae 8 unless by «a written order signed
iv e.
GEORGE FIELDS,
Country Road,
St. Michael.

. -7,8.52—2n,

The public are hereby warned inst
giving credit to my wife A
ADINA BURKE (nee FORDE) as I do no!
hold myself responsible for her or any
one else contracting any debt or debts in
my; neme uniess by a written order



signed by me
- JAMES THOMAS BURKF,
Ruby,
St. Philip.
7.6.52—2n

——————
The public are hereby warned again
giving credit to my wife ELISE YARDE
ineéé ROWEN) as I do not hold mysel
tesponsible for her or anyone else con
tracting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me

FREDERICK YARDE,
Bayeroft Rd, Carringten's Village,
St, Michael
1.6.52—2n

y ets
The publloonas hereby warned against

gas eredit “te my wits, a
AE ONES: (nee. arrison as

day ot eadaksanyneht responsible f)
her or ampens cise contracting ar.

debt or debts In my name unless by 4

written order signed by me,
OLRICK SEAFIELD JONES,
Salters.

St. George.
5.6.52—2n

The public are hereby warned against
riving © “to my wite, HELENA
CODRINGTON (nee BUTCHER), as
do not hold myself responsible for her
or anyone else contracting any debt or

debt: in my name unless by a weitt
order signed by mea.
CHARLES CODRINGTON,
Giebeland,
St. George
§.6.52-—2n
The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to ’ wife MABFI
LILIAN PARRIS (nee Daniel) as I do
not hold myself responsible for her or
anyone else cortracting any debt or
debts in my name unless by @ written
order signed by me
ROPERT CECII, PARRIS,
St. Hill's Road,
Carrington Village
St. Michae
§.6.52—2n

ee

- ORIENTAL
PALACE

“HEADQUARTERS FOR
SOUVENTIKS



FROM INDIA, CHINA &
CEYLON

-THANIS

Pr. Wm. Hy, St. Pitas J466

PLE EEALPE LPAI PPP FESSTS

*s
: ;
5
r
) ¢
; YMP.O
g e x
s
> Through the courtesy of S. P.
MUSSON, SON & CO. LTD
§ AGENTS OF K.L.M. ROYAL

DUTCH ATRILINES_ there will be
a showing of the fifm

‘EUROPEAN

On MONDAY %th June 1952s at
$30 p.m. at the Club House for
Members and Friends.

5.6.52—an.

6AM AA SEAL AASLA ES,

Third Annual
Benefit Show & Dance

In Aid
ST.

a

HOLIDAY





of The CH. CH. and
JOHN'S BABY WELFARE
LEAGUE CLINICS

At DRILL HALL, Garrison

FRIDAY, July 4th 1952 at 8.45 p.m.
Under the distinguished Patronage

of Sir George and Lady Seel,
Madame Ifill presents

“The Star Buds School
of DANCING

Pos

in a Variety of classical dances
auch as Ballet, Musical Comedy—
A Novelty Dance ‘Kitten on the
5 A S$ Dance “Rose in
The Bud Parasol" etc
By. kind permission of Col.
Michelin and under the direction
of Capt Raison, A.R.C.M.,,
M.B.F The Police Band will
supply the Music
ADMISSION $1.00
Dancing after the Show. Tickets
from Committee or “The Starj
‘ud"”. Bar and Refreshments

—

TELEPHONE 2508

[epee eT

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



NOTICE
Offers in writing will be received by
Courtesy Garage, White Park Road for
One (1) Ford Prefect Car
damaged in accident,

FOR SALE

nme |

“A
AUTOMOTIVE up to 4.00 p.m. | land,





REAL ESTATE

UHLIC SALES

'—Lower Black Rock, St.

THLONE’
recently | Michael, standing on 1/8 of an acre of

containing 3 bedtooms, draw:
breakfast oe

tl ' 1.6.52—4n a dining room. teem,

- SS ) dres: room, garafe and spacious
mediante Gelyea Gpealnabla for use| BARBADOS CO-OPERAT/VE Mpply on Sree to Mr Glndys Best
on any Type Crawler (Track) Tractor BANK Lee Sore ae
Prices are only a fraction of U.S.A ORDINARY GENERAL ETING , ’

Courtesy Garage Dial 4616.
1,6.52—6n

Notice is hereby given that
Ordinary General Meeting of the

equivalent

the





REDFORD DELIVERY VANS — for
mmediate delivery — Courtesy Garage
Dial 4616 1.6.52—6n

Constitution Road,

June, 1952 at 5 p.m

| purposes :—
CAR—1950 Hillman Minx; im first class|1. To receive and consider the Direc-

order, Dial 2304. 7.6.52—3n tors’ Report, the Profit and Loss

——$—$—_$_—$_—— Account, the Balance Sheet, a State-
CARS—Austin A-70 Hampshire Saloon,

ment of Income and Expenditure,
V-2 Pilot Saloon, Consul 4door Saloon | and the Auditor’s Report. The
All owner-driven and in condi-
tion. CHARLES MCkNEARNES

on Thursday, 12th
for the following | ssie





p.m

above Reports and Accounts will be























& Co 2 & 29th ay of February, 1952. | yo 7 _

Ltd 7.6.52—3n. | 2 ‘o transact the Ordinary business of P *

Dahideaied Abt the Company ¥ 18 Barbados Fire Insurance Co.
CAR—One (1) Mortis Minor, ag good as By order of the Board 18 = * Ice Co P

ew Apply: H. M. Farther, Henly, St. | OQ. E. M&SLLINGTON, 9 Zi wit kt ‘ ory Lid e
= te ELL IE paipcaonyelngrs

: actol s

CAR -— Morris Oxford, 1952 saloon; ansesenaecsesStiteh .
reen. 5,000 miles, one owner, perfect NOTICE COTTLE CATFORD & CO.,
midition. Dial 8509, 7.6.5—3n 4.6.52—6n,
CA a PARISH OF ST. PHILIP -— aaperoneneemaniatrmenie
CAR—Vauxhall Velox 18 h,p. 11 months

id, done 6,000 miles, Polychrome Beige |, APPLICATIONS for one or more

ith red upholstery. Owner driven, | Vacant § Philip's Vestry Exhibitions AUCTION

tenable at the Combermere School, will
be received by the undersigned not
later than Monday i6th June, {952
Candidates must be sons of Parishioners
In straitened circumstances and must
be not less than 10% years nor more’
than 12’ years old on the Ist September

m be seen at Courtesy Garage, $2,400.
7.6.52—t.f.n.

rn
CARS—One (1) Triumph “Mayflower”
voon in first class condition. Mileage
iow, tyres and battery like new. One (1)
Morris “Bight” newly painted; condition
cellent, Chelsea Garage (1950) Ltd.
Phone 4849. ‘ 7.6.52—3n.

OHNSON SEA HORSE—5 h.p. out

with an application form obtained from
the Parochial Treasurer's Officer,
P W. SCOT,





‘


































board motor, scarcely used, $350 Clerk to the Vestry Wednesday next ith June at 12.30 p.m,

Vial 3062 4.6.52—3n St. Philip, |her entire lot of houserold furniture

a 7.6.52— which includes:—2 Upholstered couches

MOTOR CYCLE--Ariel 350 ¢.c, Red | and 4 chairs all on castors, Sideboard,

unter Twin Port Spring Frame. 5 Mahog, tables, Card table, Rush chairs,

\illeage 19,000. D. Barker, Phone 3971. NOTICE Mirror, dining room chairs, Bureau,

4.6,52—6n. Chest of Drawers, iron and wooden

isin + VESTRY BYE-ELECTION bedsteads, mattresses, pictures, larder,

TRACTORS—Massey-Harris and. Fer- 1 HEREBY give notice that I have ap-|pmall carpet, Treadle machine, bed-

uson with numerous attachments. | pointed the Parochial Building, Cumber-|room ware, glass ware, and many other

purtesy Garage Dial 4616 land Street, Bridgetown as the placejitems of interest. Terms cash.
1.6.52—Gn | where Parishioners of the parish of St. D’ARCY A. SCOTT,
Michael and other persons duly qualified Auctioneer.
TRACTOR—One (1) Farm all A-/to vote at any election of Vestrymen 7.6.52—4n.

Cractor with Pneumatic Lift and Mower.|for the said Parish may assemble on

Apply: Manager, Four Square Factory | Monday, the 9th day of June, 1952, be-
Ltd., St. Philip. 20.5.52—6n. | tween the hours of 10 and 1) o'clock in
the morning to elect a Vestryman for
TRUCK TIP END HYDRAULIC |the Parish of St. Michael in the place
[OIST — One (1) Only, New—for im-|Christopher Augustus Brathwaite, de-
nediate delivery. Dial 4616. Courtesy | ceased. ’
Garage. 1.6.52—6n. PERCY H. BURTON,
—_————— Parochial Treasurer,
RUCKS—Ong (1) 1948 Bedford Truck, St, Michael.
1) 1951 Fordson Truek, (1) 1939 Ford’ 28.5.52-~6n.

veuck with Dual Gear, (1) 1949 Bedford





ch All the above are in good con-
ition On view at Rovlaty Estate. NOTICE
it 220. .52—3n.
eee. eee ——"" | All male citizens of the United States
tween ie ages 0: 8 and 26 residing
ELECTRICAL in Barbados are requested to call at

the American Consulate from July to
31, 1952 for Selective Service Registration
under the Universa) Military Training

—_———————————
BATTERI£S—Buckland Batteries—First
to start and ‘ast to finish, Fully guar-






























































BUNGALOW
known as

On Friday 13th inst



By





by Publie C

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors.



Stonewall Bungalow

named Company will be held at the Rock, ee oe Black

Children’s Goodwill League's Hall, off| feet of land yee equare ;

thereto.
The above property will be set up for
at our Office,
James Street, on 6th June, at 2)

22,.5.52—8n

UNDER THE DIAMOND

HAMMER

instructions received from
I will sell by

Gap,

" . the
A birth Certificate must be forwarded | 2xecutors of the estate of Miss Maude

Alleyne, Deed.
at her house situate at Westbury Main
Road below St. Leonard's

auction

on

at our Office,








ae

EDUCATIONAL

THE LODGE .
ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS

For boys wishful of entering
school in September term of 1952, an
Entrance Examination will be held at
the Lodge School on Saturday June 21st,
beginning at 10 o'clock a.m

Applicants must not be younger than
8 years and 6 months or older than 14
years on date of Examination

Parents are asked to notify the Head
Master not later than Saturday 14th
June that they intend to enter their
boys for the above examination. They
must «also send in particulars about
the name and ages of the candidate
No boy will be allowed to sit the
entrance Examination unless such in-
formation has been submitted to the
Headmaster by the above mestioned
date



this

W. A FARMER, ©
Headmaster

5.6.52—5n.
ciliceepeecnienena nae

COMBERMERE SCHOOL.
ENTRANCE EXAMINATION TO
MAIN SCHOOL
1. Admissions to the School for the
agademic year 1952-53 will take place

in next.

2. The Entrance Examination Will
be held in the Sehool Hall on Friday,
July iéth, at 9.00 a.m.

3. Candidates will be accepted for
examination who will be not less than
10 years and 6 months, nor more than
12 years 6 months on the Ist Septern-
ber next.

4. Parents/Guardians must notify
the Headmaster in writing not later
than Monday, June 23rd, if they wish
their sons/wards to sit the examina-
Such = application, (no special
must state the boy's date of
birth, supported by birth/baptism cer-
tifieate. It should also state the school
he is now Seen aSg. | SDK must be
accompanied by a ‘estimonial
from the H of that school,

5. Candidates will provide their own

p@hell (s}, pen and ruler, Light refresh-
ments will be on gale at the School
Canteen

6. Will Vestries and all other schol-

arship awarding authorities please sub-
mit their lists of candidates in accordance
with the foregoing conditions.
M. PINDAR,
Governing Body,
Combermere School.
5.6.52—3n

Secretary,

ted to the co
a waste of time to send up
in which his client was)
charged by the Police with com-
indecent assault on an
ll-year-old girl.

case

mitting

The prosecution

there



Shopkeeper
Discharged

His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma,
Police Magistrate of
Wednesday discharged 27-yea:
Eldon Seale, a shopkeeper of Bank |
Hall, St. Michael after Mr. G.)
Niles —defence counsel—submit-
urt that it wos

e

The Police alleged that the

Addressing the court Mr. Niles |
said that the only evidence the)
court had before it, was the evi-|
dence of the girl herself. The girl,
said how the defendant encour-|
aged her to go into the room.
But there was no evidence to show
that the defendant took or drag-
ged the girl into the room.

i
me gn haa told ser ana oe) SAP PING

court was entitled to take into
consideration the time of the al-
leged offence. She said that the |
defendant held her by her hand
and dragged her into the room, .
yet there was no confirmation Of | sail from Port Pirie May Sist, Dev
that at all by the other witnesses June 5th, Melbourne June 14th,

who were called by the prosecu-
tion,

She also said that she shouted | frozen cargo.
“murder” and still no one went
| to her rescue.



POST OFFICE NOTICE

AIR MAILS

Effective 6th June, 1952, Air Mails will be closed at the General Post Office,

as follows:—

(Cancelling Previous Schedules)































District “A”, |
r-old ;

of- |

fence was committed on May 17...

alleged that the, oie : ;

defendant on May 17 while in, appetising; its beefy goodness makes food

Roebuck Street dragged the 11-|

year-old girl into a house and
committed indecent assault.

SATURDAY, JUNE 7, 1952

BOVRIL

gives your
meals the

goodness of
real BEEF



Good cooks know the value of Bovril. Its.
rich flavour makes the simplest meal tasty and

| more nutritious. Bovril is the concentrated
goodness of beef.

BOVRIL

PUTS BEEF INTO YOU’:

NOTICES









MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEw
ZEALAND LEMITED.
(M.A.N Z_ LINE) .V. “CARIBBEE” will accept
S.S. “GLO' * is scheduled to o and Dom-

M
passengers for

inieay Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis,

St. Tth

y tts, Sailing Sa jay

at
-
this vessel

and hard

June.

M.V. “MONEKA" will accept
eargo and passengers for Domin-
ica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis,
St,’ Kitts, Sailing Friday ‘13th,

Vv,

June th, Brisbane July

Barbados about Augus!
In addition to general

has ample space for chilled

Cargo accepted on through Bills of
Leading for transhipment at Trinidad to
British Guiana, Leeward and Windward
Islands.

For further particulars apply—

FURNESS WITHY & CO., LTD.,
TRINIDAD.

+ “CACIQUE DEL CAR-
will accpet cargo and pas-
St. Vincent,
‘ing Wednes-

M.
IBE’
sengers for St. et

Aruba, Sal
day, llth June.

B.W.1. SCHOONER 0’
ASSOCIATION (INC.)

and im
DA COSTA & CO., LTD Consisnee Tele. No. 4047

BARBADOS, B W.1

Sy HARRISON LINE

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM

























































onteed for 12 months, | aerate —_~ Service Act. DESTINATION Time Day DESTINATION Time \ Day ‘i
‘ e) Garage oe
Jobrson's Stables and Garage Ltd., Phone Hg attain bn as ae os a _ From Leaves ee
4049, 4205. 7,6.52—3n.| sequent to July 31, 1952, are required | AFRICA to register upon the day they attain the Thursda: .S. “SELECTOR' . Liverpool &
FRIGIDAIRE DEEP real|cighteenth anniversary of the day of 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday 11.45 a.m. y Wisapew 1tth Me ti dees
Ser ee ks ae, tas Ot ee Oe ert HONG KONG 11.45 am.| Monday S.S. “TRIBESMAN” London & .
e 7.6.82—2n | For further information, consult ghe|ANTIGUA 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday 11.45 a.m.| Thursday ! M/brough 9th May 5th June
Vmabbies” Jigsaw [reece CSRS ee Te 9.30 am.| Saturday |S.S. “INTERPRETER” _ .. London 23rd May 5th June
compiate with stan, eat and Sea pone: RSet ; INDIA 11.45 a.m.| Monday 5.8. “EXPLORER” - | Liverpool 3ist May 14th June
oS i te oe DE, nee Garene NOTICE ARUBA 11.45 a.m.| Monday 2.00 Pm. Feqoesiax
seen e 1 .
Taba) wad, Phone tol”. 45 an.| applications for one’ or mare Vestry Sars eee ee ee
une Exhibitions tenable at the Combermere | AUSTRALIA 11.45 am.| Monday INDONESIA 11.45 a.m.| Monday ° Vessel
hool of the annual value of £5 will ll air 5 di 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday a For Closes in Barbados
MECHANICAL WS "received by” the undersigned upto] @ seh a ¥ ‘7 D- a vat | wae S.S. “CRAFTSMAN” . Liverpool 3rd June
ST 18th of June 19! : ad . - y ¢
LTURAL EQUIPMENT — in- fj .| (air to Panama only)| 9.00 a.m.) Frida: j
chading. Side delivery, Rakes, for aoe cee th Pee eau Ro ” JAMAICA 11.45 a.m. ey ad further inferimntion apply to
4 ass rakes, bd .m.
ST ed Se, Teta chery Se | ee aT taal a Sate oh ea EAS | ee heer Vie 4 DACOSTA & CO,, LTD.—Agents
Seinen a | SR Baptinnal Cortincste must be to oe | ee JAPAN 11.45 am.| Monday =|
ificate ’ wo }
TY ‘S — Smith-Corona port- Wanted IEE ‘the ‘Application Form, which BERMUDA 11.45 a.m.| Monday 11.45 a.m., Thursday ‘
‘ble ‘Typewriters, featuring page-eud| may be obtained from the Parochial 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday -
indicator, 8%, tase mach. as ae Office. , yen" MALAYA 11.45 a.m.| Monday Steamship Co.
oe”: | MBEEG.8 88. Par, Treasurer, St Thoinas, | BORNEO 11.45 am.| Monday 3.00 pm Bogenny
i eT 76.52—3n. 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday 9.00 a.m.| Friday One.
MISCELLANEOUS 9.00 a.m.| Friday
THE SUGAR INDUSTRY MARTINIQUE -| 2.30 pm.| Tharsday
CHILD'S CRIB, size 34” by 62” to- TURAL BANK ACT, 1943 J _m, 9.30 am.| Saturday
wether with a mattress. very eason- a ie creates. holding specialty lens |BR. GUIANA +. 2.00 bn er * Rue oi nae
able, my 6.52 72n | TAKE N that we, ‘the Own : MAURITIUS 11.45 a.m. onday NEW RK VICE.
latest Rat extermina-}of the above Plantation ‘are about to) BR, HONDURAS 11.45 a.m.| 'Monda 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday STEAMER
tor produced In America,” contains Ctvidions, of ihe Meive Ae canam oP ae! 9.00 a.m.| Friday f SERADEEEE unity MEGS Sithoerat tina thacee aon Ture teth
Warfarin, practically harmless to live- . Plantar + Veg (Ste Age. BURMA 11.45 a.m.} Monday ‘ = pe cities. cies N as
stock. Get yours at Knights Ltd. ag iat ia , m9 oe MEXICO 11.45 a.m.| Wednesday
Te nae teeintn. PRUPSL Sey tase nau eapaptiea wits 300 am:| Page 9.00 am.| Friday aw. Cee Saree
ESSO PRODUCTS—We have in stock. | ihe AErcuNta the vcase’ far te ts The “ALCOA PIONEER” sails May 10th—arrives Barbados May 24th
ae mueeyss Saat oe ars, pints: Pilt | raspect of such year : CANADA (Direct) ..| 2,00 p.m.| Wednesday | MONTSERRAT 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday A STEAMER sails May 2%th—arrives Barbados June 1th. ,
owder Sue Pints is Hendy Oil, | Dated this 4th day of June, 1952. = via T’dad ..| 9.00 am.| Friday 9.30 a.m.| Saturday
m & 2 of, Petroleum Jelly, Handy Oi] “FOUR SQUARE ESTATES LTD 9.30 am.| saturday <-~oniheniatatieaeaprnlgeinecitinerpotndemanasieanincesmivijicuniiiitiinacnddaiicitiiidisintaranits
2a! ax. . . en ” * . bth.
‘ONES & CO LITD., Agents. owners, |caNaL ZONE” ..| 11.45 a.m.| Monda: NEW ZEALAND 11.45 a.m.| Monday CANADIAN SERVICE
7,.6,.52—3n per E. - ROBINSON, 9.00 am barren (all air) 11.45 a.m Thursday
o Te naging Director . Th. ; 2, . | SOUTHBOUND
FEBD/MANURE — Limited quantity eee ae erans nly) "9.00 am. Pday” “Montreal Arrives Barbed
vailable; suitable for fruit trees. Con- | 7>—Sagan INDUSTRY AGRICUL- CENTRAL AMERICA| 11.45 a.m.) Wednesday nama only : m. } y ja ella ieatront ves Barbados
tact K. R. Hunte & Co., Ltd: ween TURAL BANK ACT, 1043 Concent C.Z.) ..| 9.00 am.| Friday PALE | eae BB. RENARD to 8 ea syune ste
027 6.52--3D- | ry the creditors holding specialty lens |'CEYLO & ..| 11.45 am.) Monday STINE 12.3 ™ oanthte |s8. “ALCOA POINTER” |. i * June 13th June 28th
HOUSEHOLD EQ of all] against FOUR SQUARE Factory, St 2.00 p.m.) Wednesday 3 oe Fide y “A STEAMER” .. -. 0... June arth Jul 2th
description. Owen T. Allade, 10 Roebuck TAK® NOTICE that we the Ownérs 9.00 am.| Friday 9.00 a.m. y ‘A STEAMER’ Eine ee uly a
Stree’ a : -5.52—t.f.m. 1 34 the above Plantation are about to m.| Monda NORTHBOUND
PANTS White Guvoriom geatna | UM Atek cmt Be[CHINA «| M80 S| ene i143 Sim:| Thursday | SR
ee P Su. 9.822, | Stid Plantation, in respect of the Agri- ,
ee a | ure, oar asd se et unger | PUERTO RICO 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
“Subscribe now to the Datly Telegraph | 0°, iiicuitural Aids Act, 1905, or the |CUBA ..| 11.45 a.m., Wednesday 9.30 am.| Saturday | Apply:— DA COSTA & CO.,LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE
©ngland’s leading Dally Newspaper nOW | oyove Act (as the case may be) in 9.00 a.m Frida |
srriving ‘in Barbados by Air anly & few | “Gopect of wich year. a | ” ST. CROIX, V1. 11.45 am.| Wednesday | === rooosesessoossooes
eye San Gele, c/o Advocate Co, Lad. | pied, this ih aay oC ORY trp. ‘'|CURACAO ..| 11.45 am.! ‘Monday 9.30 a.m.| Saturday :
fae, Rereminer SO. Tr ade03.0 B. S. ROBINSON. 11.0 O08.) | SRO lee. mrees 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday A Hot Water Bath
“S per B. S. . . ‘ p-m, e
We are offering one Ovaltine Shaker =e dn pomne rT % 2.00 p.m. Wednesday 2.80 pm. ‘Feamocay HAVE A LOOK AT THE
i shoe cath Ge fe Oren. teen “INDUSTRY ~SSRIcuL- — n> om —* ST. LUCIA 2.30 p.m. Thursday Morning Noon ot Nishi
$1.39 each, purchas au - % . . mm.
ae the end of the manth Present your | "#® TURAL BANK ACT, ipas ‘a ' 7. 9.30 a.m.j| Saturday a xOW 30 CAN HAVE
—— IGHT : To the creditors holding specialty Mens} DUTCH GUIANA ..| 11.45 a.m.| Monday
7,.6.52--3n. | against FOUR SQUARE Plantation, 9:00 am.| Fri ST. THOMAS, V.1 11.45 a.m.} Wednesday To the turn of a tap
St. Philip. m. day 2 eis ; 4 Wednes
TAKE NOTICE that we, the owners 9.80 a.m.| Saturday GEYSERS
FOR RENT of the above Plantation are about. to} EUROPE .. ww | 11.45 am.| Monday ' At Your Gas Showrooms
- be ered Rene Naat ‘against te 3 p.m. Oy apa ST. VINCENT at 2 20 a3 Perey
said Plantation, in respect of the Agri- . a.m, om | urd:
HOUSES cultural year 1982 to 1983. a I
N has been borrowed under| FIJI .. ee | 11.45 a.m ‘ond: SOUTH AMERICA ..| 11.45 a.m.|/ Monday
BUNGALOW — One (1) modern fur- the Agricultural ids Act, 1905, or the 11.45 am ee (except Venezuela) | 11.45 | Thursday TO-DAY
be
ished Bungalow and FLAT at Cora! Seve: Ay ake your case may bed in i ‘ednesd, y AT QUEEN’S PARK.
Chas, Worthings, Good sea, bathing. |'4ited this 4th day of June, 192. | FR. GUIANA ..| 11.45 am.| Monday |TORTOLA .. 2.90 p.m. Wednesday FURNISH T0-D AY
sands, Worthings. * “qes2—3n,| FOUR SQUARE ESTATES LTD. | 9.00 a.m.| Friday 9.30 a.m. | THE re ee
; | "S MONEY-SAVING DAY! THE ‘ Ss
FLAT & HOUSE—Fully furnished, St. per B, S. ROBINSON. |G. BRITAIN ..| 11.45 a.m.} Monday TRINIDAD .. 11.45 a.m.| Monday IT’S MONEY-SAVING DAY 7 SEAR
awrence on-Sea, Phone 3503. Nee Oe ta 8h 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday 11.45 a.m.| Wednesday Bedsteads, Beds, Springs, Laths,
. 20.3.52—t.f.n : 9.00 a.m Friday 11.45 a.m.| Thursday Cradies, = Tans, Soci Ser 1952 BARBADOS 1952
HOUSE—Fully furnished house at Bue| THE SUGAR INDUSTRY AGRICUL 9.00 a.m. rriaay eh a tay aimee Pye raha ’
ters Terrace, for August, September TURAL BANK ACT, I GRENADA ..| 9.80 am.] Mon@ay | 9.30 am.| Saturday TABLES for Dining, Kitchen & ; 4
nd October, Phone 8391. To the creditors holding specialty liens 2.00 p.m Friday | Fancy use, Larders, Waggons, Tea ,
7.6.52—t4.n,| against WELOMTOWN Plantation, St. Wy . |ULS.A, 11.45 a.m yey Rishon’, & Beanoot “aga All kinds of Amusements
re TAKE NOTICE, that 1, the Attorney |q _. | 2.80 pm.| Thursday 2.00 p.m. ednesday en & app eds ings, , Am d
Situate in gota For full par-} of the above Plantation ans about ie UADELOUPE 9.30 re Satenday | 9.00 a.m Friday ea Sh eh Os seek M for Young and Old y
cullars contact W. 8. Ward, J. NN. [oietn, of ihe above Act against the Bald a cents eaeues Office and soon || IPS BIGGER AND
oddard & Sons, 76-52 2n | Diantation, in respect of the Agricul. |HATTI | 11.45 am.| Monday VENEZUELA .. ‘or oe Prey” ends BeWoad’ and Rauh, Rage ‘ BETTER ,
NAVY GARDENS — Fully furnished | tufal Aids Act, 1905, or the above Act 11.45 am.| Thursday 2.00 p.m. y Mate $1.20 up » , ‘ ;
odern house, al) conveniences, good } tn respect of such year 1952 | a Two 3-piece Deal Tables )75 x 54” % y,
spsaetila 48 , race aie eee Dated tole NS FACTORY LTD eT for Table Tennis, ete--BARGAINS! > m
easonable rent one . vid " , 4
ROOM—From July 1st at the Mayfair ee ee, 6.6.52. ; oy ; 6 Adults ............. iy A
Swear then Woirdrening ete, Appt (90080008009 9999999 9999999099999 FS |] LS WILSO ;
Mavfair 4 to 6 p.m. & i ee a a ea ee) ae ee ae we y
V 29.5. 52—4n NOTICE . EF O R § A | KE $ BPRY STREET. DIAt. 4009 " ;
ss ? 4 ~ , s
VIVILLA"—-St. Lawrence Gap. % st " , % s 66: 66SSSSSSSSSSSSSS6665"
edrooms ete. Apply to D'Arey A. > oF
cott, Middle Street. Dial 2645. There are no embalmers % N : GOSSVSSGOVSI00008000800000000080060069656056504"
5.6.52—2n.]1 ave been approached by sev- > s|> x
a | UR atepayers of St. Michael] ® it Barbades . WARCY A. SCOTT Sie CARPENTERS— 3
LOST & FOUND | with the request that [ offer my- OTHERS SAY... |S Real Estate Agent and Auctioneer offers Reelestate of all S|
self as a Candidate for the vacant Plumbing is not Embalm- $ % descriptions at the right price. On my extensive list isa 4 X& Have You a Full Range of TOOLS ?
seat on the St. Michael’s Vestry ing. %1% bedroom bungalow on the sea at St, James, and a 3 bedroom
LOST regretfully eaused by the death e ¥]X bungalow at Welches on the sea. Mortgages can be arranged. IF NOT, WHY NOT?
MS sot our Respected friend, ye 3 % So before purchasing see They are Obtainable at. . .
CAToOne ll) black and white cat.|Mr. C. A. Brathwaite and have} WE SAY . . . x D’ARCY A. SCOTT
Iale: fluffy. Strayed from “Plymouth,” |consented to place my services at Buy at least 25 one dollar x . : THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
ear Belair on the Crane coast. Con-| their disposal. Shares in our Company. x Middle Street.- Dial 2645
ct Colin Bayley, Plymouth, or Cyo We are erecting this e MI e rect. 2 = Corner Broad and Tudor Streets
| Loule 1D. Baviey, deweller, Bridastown J. ©. TUDOR. year a modern gaso- 34 S,445:4:666666400S9S9CSOSS9VSSSSO POOP OVOP POO POOP |
ace lene station at our a

Re ye te so) a ae es ee ener ee In the first year of
i *
§ T0-DAY'S NEWS FLAS business ‘we aid. 5%

















RUBBER FERRULES FOR
WALKING STICKS

Also Sample lots of
WALKING STICKS ;

SOLID BRASS LOCKS
All now opened by:
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

HOLIDAY

All meals and service sup-
plied in your own cottage
on a quiet secluded beach
with perfect bathing.; $8.50
rer day for single ons or
$15.00 double. Apply ‘Beach-
lands’, St. James or Phone
0157.


















$1.5.52.—6n.



We invite you to share in|

our profits.

SELF-HELP
ENTERPRISES LTD.

Tweedside Road, St. Michael
PHONES :
Day 3958



Night 2939

KEEPS ENGINE CLEANER- SMOOTHER RUNNING

/

EXTRA MOTOR OIL


SATURDAY, JUNE 7, 1952
PAGE SEVEN



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON

TOAST TO
YOUR
-HEALTH!!







i -

BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES



FORTUNATE THAT

SS Gl | ee | ur WINCARNIS Wx
M | ASSIST YOU TO GUARD IT
BUY A BOTTLE TO-DAY.

“a “eas
10 LIKE TO Have ANE pik agen aap sy vee
A uooK











—







Ee ESS ee

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Tuesday to Saturday only

— ———











SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Branches Tweedside,

Speightstown and Swan Street
Usually Now

SOUPS : CANNED FRUITS

Campbell's Vegetable ...... $ 33 — § .30












. FRUIT COCKTAIL (Large).. $1.19
~ Consomme 45 — A2 5 * (Small) 61
a Cream of FRUIT SALAD . 85
GRAPES (Small) .. ; in
Mushroom ........ AS en 42 i (Large) ». ai ea aa

7

PROB See icishissoureistancsnvisaticss . 614 — &.



2 PEACHES (Brook's) $ 81
(Imperial) wn... eo ER

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

GRAPE FRUIT — Tins ...... 55 48 PEARS (Brook's) .
PREMIER SOUP POWDER .. 23 — 20 caer ene
APRICOT JUICE ooo... y | eee 34 RASPBERRIES (Chivers)

” Smedley’s) «.
CORONATION WINE... 144 — 1.20 Gentes.

= ; sieey en STRAWBERRIES ............,
SPEY ROYAL WIILISKY ...... 150 — 4,00 PRUNES (Clive Brand)
BEER — “Carib”

D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

_ ESS “aw 7
at P 100K OuT, \ Hy | How THIS
pee et . PRE. i; it @ FLASH /—AN }\ \) | BOY LIKES
a on q s S\\| | THE TASTE
! Fe ee, 5 / Le E
A - IS > : 4 f ; OTE :

nina LET ee





Se eae
p= °

THE COLONNADE GROCERIES
The Place Where Your Dollar Goes Further

A

1 REPEAT, SAVED MY NECK SO I SAYING THAT'S SO i YOU EVER LEARN I'M

MWSIEU HAZARD... YOU COULD GET WHAT . ON YOUR SIDE? 3909
GIVE MEZE , THEY WANTED/ ie “ ; a dew
BRIEFCASE! 24a. : F ~Z , a
1 " i= - 7 F:





y YOU.,.YOU JOHNNY, YOU BIG
60 THAT'S IT/ You MY NAME...HEY...WHAT AM ARE ALWAYS KNUCKLEHEAD...WON’T |

POOP POOP POV ORBBOB666.66666664 4
PROPOSE SPE SOOOCOOOL LAL EM PLP EPL PLP PLPPLVSAOS?.,
%,

FOR THE KIDDIES

GOLDEN VOICE STORY RECORD BOOKS }
AND

GOLDEN VOICE NURSERY RECORD BOOKS :

vs
>



I'LL. JUST TAKE HIS Ba
EAR HORN AWAY FROM ‘~

THE DINNER BELL AN’ GIVE | 8
HIM A SLIRPRISE -THIS | & A Beefy % %
x $
: ‘
‘+ ’ * 2
: ALICE’S ADVENTURES IN S
sy %
S WONDERLAND S
x x
s :
° ¥
s HENNY — PENNY , S
: :
$ x
$
e
(RE BEARER RNG) [sbi teee Xs) | coteec a bee \| | seucenen tee eereatue | ue oa] 8 JACK AND THE BEANSTALK
Pee 15 THE TEN THOUSAND Ae te Ag ANSWER IT, HONEY... L e bom 5) %
iT caer ~ on

4,
OG GOIE

: THE THREE BEARS
LOST TOYS’ CONCERT

CINDERELLA

THE SMUGGLE
GREEN VALLEYS \WA \ THE NUGELE
NOT FAR. IMAGINE~\

By i ; sie ay ! ; S i ~ so I E UNE oa o , “| THERES OuR cary” | 80c. EACH

RRACKS : ee ig , bet sd ae it $
WEGOTA DIRECT j HEAR ABOUT IT# | | is $ bee oe j . ? ¢ x
ORDER FROM THE abana / 4 A “ s . PSE - Z 3
ore = | . a . ‘ : ts i at ¢
Sir: ; | : a R “ %
eens = = S ~ x — % ’ . i “
{ o| Lae. : sips : ON SALE AT — ¥
7s ae
Svat . " es wre % »
s,
: VOCATE STATIONERY .
% >
% £ 4 a \ 4 A 4 Ss
‘ >
% ¥
ly >
io ve "sre ¥
ls
1% BROAD STREET »
1 x
~ xX
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Â¥
LL OIOOOMOA AMA LOGY 4600 0OO < OOOO POOP OPPOSES OSSD




PAGE EIGHT





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Successful Athletic Sports Meet

10 Yards
Added To Flat
Race Track

flat race tr

was

Thursday's
Kensington reme:
found to be 10 yards

five successive and breath takin


















record were returned mn
third and last day of the bi
B.A.A.A ithletic spor ied
This meant th n ad
to be sc atched, { uw r
ners remained ti The
ning line was carried up the ne -
Sary 10 yard

The fir apparent record
the Trinidadian Harewood 21
seconds for the 220 yards. This was
followed by 17 1/5 seconds for th
girls under 16, 150 yards n
when in a heat D. F. Dou ‘
Lodge School, an under 16 bo
did the 220 in 2/5 seconds
everybody was 5 ng and won

dering whether it was the spring
track that was causing the pheno
menal running. Another 220 yard
heat for boys under 16 was
done in apparent record time
the girls 220 which Hyacinth
Inniss won. But after this the track
Was remeasured,

Two new records were
this last day In the 220
Boys under 16, Thompson from
Coleridge Parry set the new time
of 23.8 seconds, clipping 2.4 sex
onds off the record established
J. Gittens only this
yace was run on the right le 1
-—220 yards, though the two heat
for it were run on a short tr

The other record was set up by
the Trinidadian Agostini who did
the 220, boys over 16, in 22.2 sec
onds, beating Pat Haynes two yea
old record of 235 seconds



ana

et
yards,



year,





ck

Farnum In Top Form

Ken Farnum won both races he
entered—the two mile which he
did in 5 minutes, 33 seconds and
the 1,000 metre. Farnum thus end
ed the three day meet undefeated
and has shown himself in the top
of form—at no time winning only
narrowly, but always convincing-
ly. Knowing that he is going to
Helsinki later this yeay, it was
a treat and satisfaction watch-
ing him win in this thorough way
and realising that the only way
the Trinidadian Matthieu or the
Guianese Liddell could hdve beat-
en him was if he had fallen. That
powerful last lap sprint and es
pecially the last two hundred
yards sprint, was always em-
ployed to carry him to a win by
many bicycle lengths,

There is no
what standard of riding
will be at Helsinki, but when
John Skinner was seen to win
all his races in which Farnum
had not entered, winning from
the Trinidadian Matthieu who is
going to Helsinki, and from the
Guianese Liddell, many regretted
that Skinner will not be going
to Helsinki also, Riding with the
other riders, Farnum excepted,
Skinner was completely master
and with Skinner in a race when
Farnum was out, there was never

exactly
there

knowing

any fear that a visitor would
earry away the honour of win-
ning.

One thing can be said for the

Guianese Liddell, and that is that
he was always at a disadvantage
By his little showing. one could

not help feeling that he is better
than Matthieu and perhaps even
Skinner. He arrived for the sec

ond day of the meet and made a
surprisingly good second to Far-
num in the half mile, despite the

effects of seasickness. He was
later involved in a_ spill and
turned out Thursday with his
left thigh heavily bandaged and
there is little doubt that he was
yiding under much pain and
could not put all the effort neces-
sary into his sprint. He seem
full of energy.
Track Good

The track was good, unaffected,
except for a little springiness
which, if anything would have
assisted the athletes, by the rain
on the previous evening.

The first event-—the 1 mile cycle
(Roadster 3 Speed) was won by
B,D. Parris in 2 minutes 47.8 sec-
onds, with H. Miller and C, Brew-
ster taking second and third place
respectively. The race was a fast




race, compared with time
returned this meet for “B’.Clas
and Intermediate for the same
distance.

Next event was the 220 yard
flat and as was ext ed he
Trinidadians took both first and
second places. Hare i. wt
had on Monday won the 100
again beat his fellow country
man, Agostini, though in thi
race only by a few inche The
police. Rouse, took third place
some four yards behind.

Rouse beat the gun, but hi
inferiority as a sprinter, com-



CONVINCING

WIN



EARLE McLEOD winning the two-mile cycle race for “B” Olass at
Kensington Oval on Thursdyy, the final day of the three-day A.A.A.B.

Intercolonial Athletic and Cycle Meeting.

Julien (Trinidad) was third

pared with Harewood and Agos-
ii, was seen within 50 yards
the two visitor dashed past
m,.
Harewocd’ vin over Agostini
a convineing though only
wwrow., Agostini put every effort
ito his sprint but Harewood was
running with real grit and did
not give an inch
Neither the Police Archer not
Inniss entered this’ race and one
wondered whether they had

given up the hope
Trinidadians.

Second Win

this,

of beating the

After Tall Yvonne Gibbs
cored her second win of the
meet when she won the 150
yards in a time which had to be
seratched because the track was
found to be short. Gibbs won by
many yards from Shorey and
Rollins who respectively took
second and third places,

Thompson set a new time for
the 220 yards, boys under 16~
23.8 seconds 2.4 seconds less than
the J, Gittens record which he
made earlier this year. Thomp-
son who is fairly tall with strong,
loose muscles, is a good sprinter
ind does it with effort, In win-
ning, he beat the dogged Lodge
School boy D. F. Dougall and
Archer who came third,

Only two entered for the girls
over 16, 220, Hyacinth Inniss and
P, Thompson and as was expected,
Inniss was winner by a wide mar-
gin.

After dropping Liddell in the
scratch for the 1,000 metres, Far-
num proceeded to win this race
from Carmichael and Matthieu,

Agostini set a new timer for the
220 Yards boys over 16 which he
won from K. Jones and M. Lyn-
ton, we did the distance in 22.2
seconds, There is no doubt that
if he had better competition, he
would have cone the distance in
even better tim for Agostini
eontinually glanced back at the
other competitors who were away
behind and not putting no
thing like the effort he has been
seen to put in sprints at the other
two days of the meet.

Best In B1

C. Marshall won the 2-mile
cycle, Class Bl in 5 minutes 58.2
seconds, comparatively poor time.
There is little doubt that of these
B1 riders Marshall is the best. He
can just ride as he likes, general-
ly, and then sprint out and win.

Advocate Reporter Earle Mc-
cod won convincingly in the two
miie cycle, class B from M, V
Carter and Trinidad Julien, Carter
is a fair sprinter, but when it
comes to a distance behind a mile
and there happens to be an_ oc-
easier of a gruelling few laps
McLeod's endurance tells. He
pulled out from the others who
were just all blown and could only
see him pass without any appre-
ciable effort to prevent it.

The two mile cycle, Intermedi-
ate, was won by R, “Flash” Brath-
waite, with Foster second and
Boyce third. “Flash” is a fai

ider, but the win counts for less
when it is known that Hill of
Holborn and Pat Gomez of Trini-
dad who did not remain for the
last day of the Meet, did not en-
ter, for both of these riders beat
him the first two days

Then Farnum scored another
vin in the two mile from the
frinidadians Matthieu and Lewis

ho respectively came second an«!

Police Win Relay

| They’ li Do It Every

Ee 2 WHATTA YA TR)
bf ie Se TO GWE ME? I
NOPE... you I SAW iT»











I NEVER DID FIELD,1939! DON'T TELL

FIGHT TIGER \ ME! ILL BETCHA EVERy-

RUDD-you THING I GOT! IT WENT
| MUST HAVE IT ), THE LIMIT,RIGHTP HE
MIXED UP wiTH [ GOT THE DECISION«:

SOME OTHER
CLEAR AS



I REMEMBER IT



Police won the 440 yards relay [ L ee 9

; ow Tide: 9.26 a.m., 9.17 p.m.
from Notre Dame and the Visitors, |
Police team which was really a

Registered US Patent Office

‘Time
















LISTEN TO
FLANNEL MOUTH!
THE ONLY THING HE
EVER GOT RIGHT W4S
THE ADDRESS OF THE
UNEMPLOYMENT
BUREAU *++sHIM
TELLING TONY:













1N








LIKE I ALW

TIME~BUT BIGMOUTH




ays
SAY IT AIN'T THE
FIGHTERS THAT'S
PUNCHY» IT'S THE ,2

V. Carter was second and

strong this Meet were Blenman
Marshall, Archer and Rouse. The
Notre Dame team were Trevor
Inniss, Trotman, Mason and Tony
Wickham, while the visitors were
Harewood, Agostini, Grenada’s
Gittens and a Trinidadian cyclist

As usual, Harewood who start-
ed for the visitors, handed over
his baton after he had established
a lead of some 10 yards, but the
second police runner regained the
lost ground and handed over with
a lead. Then, too, there was a
faulty handover to Agostini who
was to make the last hundred. The
lead was too long for him to catch
up with Rouse, though, perhaps if
Notre Dame had anybody on the
homestretch but “Bomber” Wick-
ham, Agostini would have over-
taken him.

The five mile, Bl was won by
Long from Trinidad, with C. A.
Marshall second and Grant third
This was only the second win by

a visitor in the cycle events for
the Meet.
Laps Field
Next came the fairly exciting

five mile Class B which Ellis won
in 13 minutes 55.4 seconds when
he lapped the whole field, Peters
of Trinidad excepted, In this race
was seen the folly of allowing a
cyclist to get too long a lead. The
riders, MeLeod, Carter and the
others stayed behind as Ellis tried
to increase his lead, just watching
each other and banking on Ellis’
dropping back after he _ had
achieved what they thought he
had only set out for—the lap prize.
But when they realised what was

ppening, it was too late, for they
ay not the stamina to catch up
with him, and even if they had it,
there were not sufficient laps,
Ellis was still riding strong.

Boye! won the five mile, Inter-
mediate, with “Flash” Brathwaite
econd and Smart third, but the
race was a slow one, being done
even beyoud the time limit

In the five mile, Class A which [c

Farnum did not enter, John Skin-
ner won from Matthieu and |
Keizer cawe third. The Trini-
dadian Lewis won the lap prize, |
two pair of cycling wheels. Skin- }

—<—_—_"-_----- avr |
WHAT'S ON TODAY |:

Police Courts—10.00 a.m.

First Division, Intermediate
and Second Division Cricket
matches at various grounds
—1.30 p.m.

Netball (Queen's College vs
Queen's College Old Girls’)
at Queen’s College — 4.45
p.m.

Basketball at Y.M.P.C.,
Beckles Road—7.30 pm.





i
WEATHER REPORT
YESTERDAY

Rainfall from Codrington: .02
inch

Total Rainfall for month to
date: 1.19 ins.

Highest Temperature: 87.5 °F

Lowest Temperature: 77.5 °F

Wind Velocity: 16 miles per !
hour |

Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.994,
(3 p.m.) 29.920 |

TO-DAY

Sunrise: 5.42 a.m.

Sunset: 6.18 p.m.

Moon: First Quarter, May 31

Lighting: 7.00 p.m.
High Tide: 2.26 a.m., 3.35 p.m.





By Jimmy

TONY AND

TIGER WEREN'T
EVEN FIGHTING
AT THE SAME

Hark o |





FANS ARE
ALL ALIKE
THEY ONLY
TALK TO YOU
ABOUT THE |
ONES YOU









WOULDN'T EVEN
BELIEVE THE
RECORD BOOK!










nev's win was by about three cycle
engths, and sprint how he might,
it ; evident that the Trinidad-

Matthieu could not













ian eatch uf
1th Milt
Putting The Shot
Strong man Payne, firema
on the putting of the shot—the
hucking a 25-pound i ball.
H ent i 4) feet, 44% inches to
. t foot, 9 inches from polige
Denny and the Trinidadian Harg-
wood
McD. Lloyd is beaten in the
880 flat by Trevor niss who has
t ved hi elf to be a runner of
this meet. The win was Close,

no more than half a body, but it
wa decided win and though
Ll putting everything into
t ‘ ts then, he could not hav
won fr the determined yout)
Inniss

From about the last 300 yards
when Inniss overtook everybody
Ise and hac ulllcient burst @
peed that he could have over-
taken Lloyd, but preferred to re-
main two yards behind, it was
seen that he had soraething up his
sleeve. He moved out about the
last 110 yards and Llovd fought
hard, but he could not win, The
Police Shannon took third place
some yards behind

John Skinner followed up his
winning streak —- with Farnum
ibsent—by winning the “Devil

Takes the Hindmost” from Keizer
nd Brathwaite. Matthieu did not
enter this event.

At the conclusion of the Meet,
Mr. Justice Chenery, President of
the Athletic Association com-

mended those who had helped to
stage a successful meeting and
thanked the public for the enthu-
siasm with which they had sup-
ported the sports. He also thanked














e mercantile community for middle distance runner.
donating prizes. ta ae - ———__—__—_— —
Results were as follows: Fe .
‘our everr ane sve Cri¢cket Season Opens Today
lat F dD Parris, 2nd H Miller, 3rd . d
C. Brewster. Time 2 min , 4/5 sees
220 YARDS FLAT (Men) . ue 5 Es
Record: 21.6 secs, A. Hunte (B'dos), ,- from page 1 ; _ Foundation vs. | War lerer: i
1950) Umpires: H. B. Jordan and €. Foundation, Umpires: C. Colly-
t Harewooc T 1 Ag T), Gibson. more and S. Cole
Srd Rouse T 2 € 1 Q E
? Under 3 and ee Pan Leeward vs. Pickwick at Fos
Y 18.6 secs. 1952) Wanderers vs. Windward at Bay Umpires: P. Phillips and S. Gilkes |
Gibbs, 2nd R. Shorey, Sd N’ fmpires: J. Lewis and T. Sisnett Comber mere Vs ¢ ollege a, Coun
ime s secs e ’ bag ; a fen nives . Clarke an
YARDS FL (Boys Under WW _ Carlton oie or — mpire 3, Clarke and
Thompson D. F gDougall, aed Umpires: . Roach anc , Hare , .
che Time 3 se . , }
Roe ae f Pa tk wae ‘ombermere at’ Windward vs. Lodge at Wimd-
2 YARDS FLAT (Girls ‘Over 16) |, *-MLP.C. vs. Combermere at oq > Umpires: G. Clarke an
ist H. Inniss, 2nd P. Thompson Beckles Road. Umpires: lL. H. 4 Bayelsa
: - vARES wenee® ate ri" uy each and C, Small. Lunch 3.30 p.m. to 3.45 anc
vad tty aE 4 i han ; Mental Hospital vs. Police at |, pe EAA toes
Lynton. Time 2 secs. (Record) Black Rock. Umpires: G. Forde *tUâ„¢ps drawn at 6 p.m.
2 MILE CYC (Class B-1) blac OCK. mpires: G, Forac
ist C. Marshall, 2nd Long, 3rd Grant. and W. Bayley.
Time 5 rain. af aOR ini Cable & Wireless vs. Pickwick
2 UE "LE (Class or 1 ines .
Ist McLeod, 2nd Carter, 3rd Julien (Tt), “t Boarded Hall. Umpir i
rime 5 min 4/5 sec Batson and J, Hinds

2 MELE CYCLE (Intermediate)
Record: M Tu Bidos) 5.8.2
951
Ist Brathwaite
Time 5 min

rd Boyce





eCs
MILE CYCLE (Class A)





(E K Fornun Bidos) 5.8.4,
1951)
ist Farnum, 2nd Matthieu, 3rd Lewis
Time 5 min 3 secs
40 YARDS RELAY (Open)

lst Police, 2nd Notre Darne
Pime 45,2 secs
5 Mae OYCLE (Class B-1)
ist Long (T), 2nd Marshall, 3rd Grant
‘Time 15 min. 7 sees
5 MELE ©MOLE (Class B)
Ist Willa, Sid Peters (T, Time
min. 55 2/5 secs
(> MIL
Boyee,
Time

ord Visite

13

(Intermediate)
2nd R. Brathwaite, 3rd
15 min. 31 sec

Ist H
D. Smart
Oo MILE CYCLE (Class A>
Skinne tad Matthieu ra
Time mir 7 on
thk SHOT (Open)
d Hare
Sho LT ARDS Dane

t T. Inn anc a, ot

Shannon rin
DEVIL, TAKES
Ist Skinner 2nd

in. 2 1/5 see
HINDMOST
3rd Brath





THE
Keizer

“

. Erdiston vs. Y.M.P.C. at Erdiston, |
Umpires: C. Archer and R. Parris.
Central vs, Empire at Vaucluse.

Umpires: A, Harewood and S
Beckles.
.
Sports Window
THE fast playing, skiiful




A a

. © usually means pain ~ the pain of indigesti
Cow’s milk by itself you see, is apt to form a

LLOWD

LEFT is Trevor Inniss winning



Ends

REATEN

eae

rom the long distance runner McD,

Lloyd by half of a body. Lloyd who won the mile and three mile had

not banked on such competition

this and this helped defeat him.

However, Inniss who earlier lowered Louis Lynch's 19-year-old 440
record for boys over 16, proved himself to be a grand, determined

SECOND DIVISION
ind 14



Y.M.P.C, team are scheduled
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Play starts at 7.30 p.m.



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PAGE 1

SATURDAY, JUNE 7. 162 BARBADOS ADVOCATK I'U.I lllla.t. INDIA IN GOOD WalcottRetains POSITION Hea vyweigh t Title • Prom Page 1 Ranvhand's leg trap when he had made only three. I -i Land l,el on Hut England's let Off was only temporary, lur when Ohulam Ahmed came into the attack he quickly nude amends and in the fourth over Hutton was taught m hi* leg trap—appro— pr.alely by Ramchand. Caution had been the keynote of England's start which produi-ed 18 Tlp runs were not valuable with three full days ahead, but wickets were and India had % %  truck a vital blow. But not until 48 runs were on the board did they meet with lu-thcr success and again it want th Ahmed—Ramchand combinetion which disposed of Simpson who had batted nearly <*i> minutes fur 2J. This rate of run getting was t.vplcal of the whole day. Tor England were concerned with not giving chances and Indian bowlers were Just that bit short of length which made stroke play drngerous proposition. At this stage in the proceedings Hdzarc introduced hi* 1*K spinner Shinde for the benefit of Corapton and immediately hestruck a length. But it was not Compton who fell first. Instead it was May who played over a boll well pitched up to him and was* cioan bowled— 92 for S. hull.Hi's On Top Peter May who has already produced three quick centuries •>n beautiful wickets, had taken an hour over 16 and Indiu wero vtry much on top. They looked ii too. Their fielding was Hrst class with Gopiriath and ManJrefcaUr outstanding in the covers and Kamchand positive menace In ttia> leg trap. The wicket was. however, drying out and becoming much easier than it had been early on. But in drying out. occasional balls were beginning to pop. Prom one such Compton. playing forward to Ahmed became Ramchand'* third victim. It was a siti\-ttoii where anything might have happened. Four wickets were down for 90 and there were even visions of a follow on. But Grareney nnd Watkins who was given the benefit of the first loose bowling by Shinde brouht the game around. Never really on top of the bowling, they nevertheless defended doggudlv and slowly (he score mounted. Grave— ney reached his 50 after two and a quarter hours including one six off Shinde and seven fours. Bui Just when it looked as if Watkins would follow suit and the partnership would see England safely through the day. Ahmed struck for the fourth rime. Watkins. still two short of a half century, was out l.bw.. and : bright 11U minutes of Kvnns brought the proceedings to at close. w.i. Again The casual spectator wulkniK inln Heading-*? Cricket Ground between the lunch and tea interval on Thursday might have been pardonably excused for thinkm.; that the 1950 West Indies tour had been revived. Certainly th attempted to hit Jenkins for six before getting a prupei loo* ;il the bowler and was yard.down the wicket when Evans stumped him, and Vnuu Manned wildly at a ball from True man pi lying in his f.r*r Test for Evans to bring off %  tin*catch shrulder-high behind the wicket. Collapse Feared One feared rather than hoped that an Indlm collapse was Imminent and there want few on th." ground who exported such a recovery especially ,,s Hezar and Miinjrefcar made such a poor stari llazare's Urst run came from awl '-vaa meant to be a gaver drivr off Jenkins but which went dow;i to lone leg. and M.mjrek • was twice btaten and nearH bowled playing reckless shots at the same bowler. Or*.was reminded at this wane Of the West Indies first Test al Manchester two years ago. Admittedly there the wick, i was already wearing but the bowmen all mad* the same fault of attempting quick run getting before they had their eye In. This was just what the Indiins were doing. It was noticeable that a batsman would remain oulet for perhaps seven or eight balls and then suddenly the batwould flash and It was a* much luck a* judgment if the ball went off the middle. However. Haxare and Manirekar were not made to pav for their early indiscretions, and bv lunch when 72 runs were on the board, both hetsmen had plived some very nice shots, Manirekar being particularly severe on the slow men off his back foot. The power h* put Into his shots can be ludged by the fact that when he had reached 65 he had hit ten fours. ifuznre Opens Out llazare at llrst content to bo the silent partner opened out after lunch and runs came at more than one a minute. Hazare displayed some delightful cover drives and could not have recorded his highest score of the tour at a more appropriate moment When the score reached 201 Haure and Manjrckar had beaten the previous best Indian Test partnership of 211 by Hazare and Merchant In the 1951-52 series In India. • But they were not destined to take matters much further. At 6 o'clock and Just when it looked as though they wore set for night another Hutton bowling switch brought back Bedser, and Hasan playing for I single down the le-side edged the bail to Evans who gathered his third victim In no ur.i-ertaJn manner. Hazare had twitted nearly four and a halt hours, for his runs, and apart fropi two chances early on—both extremely difficult—he had not HI id*a mistake. If he was more subdued than Is his wont that was only natural In a batsman aeefcmi: tn regain form after a string of low scores. In his previous six innings he had totalled only 39. As so often happens In a big partnership when one man went, the other quickly followed him. Only one run had been added to the total and Manirekar gave Trueman his second wicket when he edged one Into a leg trap and Alan Watkins made a superb catch low down on his left han<< side. Manjrekar whose first century of the tour It was. w.. cheered enthusiastically all the way back to the dressing room. Gopinath came and went wit. •ut scoring and visions of a second and possibly rlnal collapse loomed up as the England bowlers admirably supported In the Hold attacked Mantri and Ramchand. But these two survived the final half hour to leave India in .i satisfactory, even if not a winning position. To bat are: Ramchand. Shinde end Ghulum Ahmed. • r rom rage 1 not Mi 1 —Charles got off to .i small lead In the Brat round as mg leftlb* body wh I drove %  hard • left to body and mi*scd a haygoasst rikht that brought a howl from the crowd. ROUND J. -Walcoit took the utfatlve In the aacono round, driving two hard left hooks to Charles bo %  ) few sec.11 ught t< .le ,m.l the crowd roarHgtl* .!"> %  ..;* in Hie round ROIM. .1. Al ri.e .t..rt "f the third round Wnlcott landed a ternfie kefl nook I then a hard right to the Jaw. Charles d) D lh> drove a loft hook tn bed] urn M> i \ and .f lha U against low Mows In the fourth bodv. Cb the law .. a right lo the head. Charles was aggressive and diove twn light 1eft< '<> Walcott. Joe landed %  n-dit to Charles jaw. Charles hit low with the left and the referee warned him again. i:m M> '. '. right hut followed with %  Mil to the body. Wileoit dm loft jabs to Coal I ra u I than a sweepii: ,rd's head Just before Ihe hell The crowd fasrsd R(H'M) ft, is,. ...„led carefully in th,. sixth roun i changed light left hooks to the body Charles drove a hard right %  .. \'. warned him against low Mow* once more. A glancing right off the head of the chullcutfer and the crowd roared. Walcnf right to the head and then a left hook to the body, than left to the body and a tight to the head. Charles held on. ROIND 7.—Walcott looked very confident and Charles looked worried. Al the start of the seventh round they excrianged hard lelta to the body. Walcott laaded two with the left h..nd and a lump appeared under ("hail*left eve Walcott drove a stiff lefl i< iaw. Exzard replied with a left to the hod> Ind the nf.-iei again warned him against low blows. They exchanged lefts to the fare. When the hell rani; bl<**i dripped from the cut under %  fin HOI \ii H. n exchanged .short rights Walcott drove a hard right to Charles' jaw. Charles landed a hard right to Walcott'l law and the crowd roared Walcott thumped a bard nght '<• Charles' back, the challenger bent and when he straightened up, Joe conned, d a hard right lo Charleschin. Walcott moved after him and Charles clinched Fans booed. Walcott drove %  light fa head and Exzard replied with gUn rights to Joe's head )ust liefora the bell. BOUND 9.Ai Uu atari Of thfl ninth round Churl... looked grim Ttnv c\*li..nged half a dozen S unches, then Charles landed n Bid loft hook to W Joe sliook his head. Charles drovu a sweeping left hook to the champion's jaw. The crowd roared. Charles connected a ham radii, then MX punches to Jo* I'd..i l*-s landed another tight ; mi Walcott ruplie.! with a right to the head that sent Exzard In %  '' %  Walcott went after Caff i ing a right then a left hook to the Jaw. Walcott landed another right Just before the bell. BOUND I*.—Walcott landed a short right to Charles body, then Charles drove four hard punches to the body at the dart of the tenth round. Walcott replied with a right to the body. Charles landed a right te Walcott'l law and the ehaniplon held on Waleott landed a light left to Charles head, opening a cut on the side of tho challenger's right eye. Charles drove a hard right to the law at the bell. ROIND 11.—Charles appeared fresh with both his cuts patched up The challenger scored a left hook to the body, then landed n swinging right high On Wakolt's haad. Joe drove a left to Charles %  .. danced away Chaise* landed i then a right to lha body Trnv boxed slowlv and carefulU not M It—They cuncasd, then both nu>ed • Tbi t*>ld them t. atari lighting Walcott landed a right lo the jaw. Action slowed to a walk Just before the bell Charles landed a terrific right to the champion a iaw. WaUott seemed hurt but walked in straight to hi* corner at tho bell KOIMI IS— Charles drove a bard Kft hook to Wale, ach .it the start of the thirteenth round The Referee wanted Charles. Walcott averted Charles 1 aitaek with lefl labt bo the head Walcott drew htoi Charles connected n stiff right to W utott*l jaw Walcott was warned by the %  lefl to Charlai 1 %  i Ch.irle-' face They tzadsd several hard %  ftoi'ND u —Chi rtai il the start of the fourteenth round He drovi ri/fht to Walcott'.-. jaw and tho champion rltxagHad Charles landed a left and a rigbl to the lira.* Walcott ounehed Charlc landed a righ| to Wal%  pie The. elmched Walcott di left hook to Ezzat't narks! misse-I with | right but scored with twj long Ufts to the body at the bell ROIND .—The referee ordered them to tight at the start of the nftcenth round Charles drove I left .in.) a rigfajl to the champion's body Blood ran from Walcott's nose Walcott drove a right to the inw and the crowd howled Joe stahl-ed two lefts to Charles' face Charles drove left and a right to Joe'a bodv Walcott replied with u right. Charles retorted with u left to the a right to the head. Charles was warned for low blows. Charles drove a long left to the jaw and the champion replied with a right. They traded blows as the bell ended the fight —T.P. St. Lucia Wins Cork Cup neat o o.. Oaanaftasaasl 'ine 5. Grenada earned their overmgh! first innings acora al ODg for two t 94 for all. Oreaham 32. T Ptl| a | Crej Mia opened their second innli.gs and at the elose of play was 150 for S. Grenada continued on Thuislaj a) the crea \>, ith (hi night score 130 for and exactly one h ir later Pierre fell victim to Ci k closing the mings for 196. Fletcher efaatad for 54. St. Luctg won" th*tronliy by ajj I IS runCnek took I : : rum In the presence of a large 1 Prod E. Dega w|ft of the acting Admli prawn led the CUD to D. F J Clarke. Captau St. Luctg Prizes wer, .,. o present.,1 t. ouUUnding pet for mere In the., series SEA AND AIR TRAFFIC Hear! Trouble caused by High Blood Pressure %  skaai saaaWii galw to faV assaatat al oaot '. aaghj aaaa'a UaasaM ti*liil W|hr lltil'in Setrfl i-liin:. 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PAGE 1

I'M I 101 R HARBADOUiVoi Ml SITVRDAV. 'I'VE I, II'' BA^AD(5^ ADVOCATE Our Common HrrilM|(r —7 Ik. F. A. Ihrat ......l. c. w •.-. • %  w" Saturday. Junr 7, 152 William Hart Coleridge 118 AIM IMOX* A MEETING m Barbados of a branch -m. died in British Guiana in 1824. a martyr fo the cause of bringing Mhieauon and the Christinn religion lo Ihe slaveThe year If"i %  • that. the Wesleyan Chapel in Bridgetown was destroyed by n section of the white population who felt that the Mc'.indisls were unsettlinu the minds of the slaves by te.irhing them ideas of equality The Moravians fought to gel schools started for the slavepopulation. And it was a West Indian delegation . Baptists that helped to bring things lo a head in England in 1833 and finally persuaded tinI-ngli-h \<> SboUsk slavery as "rcpugnaii-. to the principles of tt Constitution and of the ChrisUan religion" The Church Strengthened In the early part of the nineteenth cenlury, the role played |,v the Anglican Church was ,,,,, ri „ohlc one. "I'lir %  • rcntur> „nd -i half the door, "f the Established churchos were closed against the hundreds of thousands of heathens by whose physical labour the Industrial structure was uphold" wrote I former Principal of Cndrington CMUtSjS, Except for the Society for th( Propagation of the Gospel, which gsvs Chrtstun instruction of the slaves on Uie Codrlncton sal it** in seooraanei with UM will of ChrtfAOBMr C'odrtngtmi, the Church of EngUuid %  bowed no sign >' bUting that the slaves possessed immortal soul-. "We cannot deny" wrote Alfred Caldlcon -thai. the vast majority of our fellow-subjects in the WSSj Indies lived In unrelieved heathenism amid the Bo-callcd 'parishes' of Jamaica. Barbados and the Leeward Islands." Hut Canning, the great English statesman who was then Leader of the House of Commons, saw the current of events ami decided to strengthen the Anglican Church in the West Indies In 1824. He realised that emancipation was inevitable and took step* to prepare the Church to play Its part in that great revolution. The West Indies was divided into two dioceses and two eminent men were chosen u. guide the Anglican Chun I> through this iTitical lime. Christopher Llpsromb was appointed BIshOB W Jamaica, with the Ilahamas and Honduras under I William Hart Coleri.lge w;i;. cWtnl < l>il ".' ' BUMdM UK) hlS diocese included the Leewan! Island 1 -. St. Vincent, Grenada, Trinidad and British Guiana The Bishops were Instructed to report on the state of the Church "particularly as relates to the slave population" and to ascertain •the best means of diffusing the bstssflts of religious instruction lo that part of the Community. To prove h profound interest in such instruction the British Government undertook to pay the administrative expenses of the two dioceses, placed the clergy under the control of the III i . ''I'd funds foi ipply of %  trdcrs." last's flrsl task was to increase the supply of clergy. Here he had lo right all over again the battle that had been waged against men like Sir to keep UM i odrtnfSOB foundation as l tool sos boys. But Coleridge's efforts were successful and in 1828 Codrington College was established as a training college for clergy and the grammar school was removed to the site where it began Us independent existhe Ixlge School. years before Coleridge came to Barbados, the Combcrmcre Charity School had been started for coloured und Negio niluren and the Central BchOO. faff poor whites. Encouraged l>\ this, the Bishop sel about the task of building schools and by the end of his episcopate, in BSStCS) of ihe disas-. trous hurricane of 1831, the*. one section destroying the caneflelds pnd estate bou s e u and the other burning down the chapels .rected by the Dissenters for the slaves. It is small wonder that ihe propiets of despair predicted that emancipation would bring disaster and that would folio* :he example of Haiti, bj i xterminating the whites and milling up a black republic. Coleridge, like his colleague in Jamaica, look up his task in the nrm conviction that his duty as a Christian B.Mwp was not to Increase the hostility between the planters and the slaves but To neal the b:*ach between these two classes through the principles of Christian fellow |Up He carefully instructed Ills clergy that they should enlist the support nnd co-operation M the planters in their work among the slaves. For him it was a mutter of .the first importance that the work of the Church should proceed In such way that it would win the number of 'schools had risen** confidence of the Negroes and from eight to eighty-throe ara/ll st the same time secure the the number of < hildrcn on thci.ll goodwill of their masters. But, roll from fkvs hundred to sevei II where a vital principle arose, thousand. He steadily incrcasffX*B he %  -.Id not agree lo any comUM number of clergy an I promssr. When thi low W M. ehurehs* and gradually th-l Ilaru. Rector of SI Lucy, was gave up such practices charged before a Court of WILLIAM HART COLKRHX-K as howling over their de.nl Mod offering fi--i it ihi-ir graves. Moreover, during ilk ve years lollowing emancipation, he Inspired the formation of twenlyIWO Friendly Societies which encouraged tin ift and self-help among its 2.574 members. All this was only part of the vast programme Coleridge set himself and. besides, he had to find time to visit the other territories of his diocese. For two I,.,:. :.-! %  !..IV. (hi:, lied Church in the West Indies had been without the services of n Bishop ind it* members, in th..words of n certain lamentation, had boon left to wander "in the wilderness us sheep without a shepherd." Coleridge worked ; %  • %  to make up for the nsstoet of the past but after eighteen years his magnificent energy began, to fail and in 1842 forced by ill-health to mile from the See. AftCl returning to England, he became tn-i WardMl i>f -St. Augustine's CoUoffQ, I'.m'erlmi v. mid held that post until his dealh in 1B49. The Reconciler The ittuatloO fating Coleridgu and Upseornb, when ton OSUM lo the West Indies, was delicate and dangerous. The Barbadian insurrection of 1816 had been followed by a revolt in British Cuiau.i in 1823 and this in turn was to be followed Liter by an even more formidable upheaval in Jamaica. Moreover, under Buxton's leadership, the al>olitlonlst campaign gathered pace and miwuentum and few seemed i gpoet that the great Issue COUld !> %  • M'ttled without vioDd bloiwtshed. It was not a huppv state of affairs, with Grand Sessions for preaching %  doss of equality to the slave-. Ci.lendge stood firmly by him and it wui largely due to his ruppnrt that thr Rector wo* eventuall* pardoned by the King. POT lie eould not accept iu> Christian doctrine the plea of line planters that it was right to maintain certain "distinctions' as "necessary to safety." Vet Coleridge hnd no desire to follow the example of the Di-Mmtcrs and incur the permanent antagonism of the planters. He was determined Dot t-> Identify himself completely with any one section. He Insisted that the Church should seek to win the support of both sections bv the thorough and earnest manner In which It did its pastoral work. The remarkable thing about Coleridge is that he succeeded in the extremely difficult role he set himself. Gradually he ltd all classes to look on the Church na the one integrating force in the island. His work In this respect did more than anyUiing else to bring about n measure of reconciliation between planter and slave and prepare them for the great change that was to come. It was mainly due to this that the far-reaching social revolution, known as the abolition of slavery, took place peacefully. His labours, like thoee of Upseornb in Jamaica, were largely responsible for the happy circumstance that emancipation in the West Indies—described as one of the turning points in the history of human progress—was carried out without any of thrwild excesses that had been mournfully prophesied ten years before. Ol It Hi:All! US SAY: hoBSMtS T hope that for the sake of the poor people the Government may appoint district inspectors who will see that people sell their goods at prices not exceeding those which are made by UM Government THEODON. Hluvk Hurhl Svlling To The Editor. The Advocate, Silt 1 am Inclined lo think that the hard living In Barbados is caused in some way by many :,Ueiln several districts shopkeepers apply their minds to robbing customers out of the wcightsand fo jhr Editor. The measures due to them. Some shopkeepers give customers the maximum weights of riflecn ounces of any article ss one pound of avoirdupois which iequivalent lo sixteen ounces. I have already seen %  shopkeeper with a pint Un pressed in at the top to prevent it from taking up the portion of fluid for which it was made to h-UI. On the other hand, hawkers who sell oranges, lime? and other fruits are not always willing to tell the prices of their orticlcs To ask one the price of bananas the answer may be "How many do you want?". When you say the amount you want, you will get whatever the hawker wants to give for the money. Some will not sell except the amount needed is stated. Theso deeds help 10 create bad living In the Island; not only done b) the town-soUert but most sellers throughout the island. I was in Christ Church parish a week ago. and saw a llsh-scllcr retailing nsh at eight cents each and vet I heard that the rfMQ price'of one was sevct UM In order to get rid of this diIhiminicn Anil Wiimir Adooescs SIN. U ill le renumbered that one of the MversJ pressing 11 ol paramount Importance which Mi. Winston Churchill bKklOd inttaB of office as Prim* Minister of Great Britain, the result of the General Election of 25th Oct.. 1*51. was UM question bow to put an end to the "cold v.ir' which threatened to flare up into actual hostilities between Great Britain and her former gallant ally and thereby pttmge the Nations Into a war. ihe like if which no i ro has witnessed ssoes Uon ol the world. As a wards thai end. Mr. Churchill proposed a meeting ol "The Big Tnrct:" — ihe Heads of UM Governments of Great Britain, Ihe cmted States of lo arriving at. a woritabb betwi %  • the three former SIIMS, whose gallantry and united bloody won Woild WD II. and thereby save thi %  other countries ot %  States of Nazi Germany, for all times. The reaction from Capitol 11 %  ) %  to Mr. Churchill's proposal, not being encouraging, he publicly declared his determination ta i icet His Excellency Joseph Stalin, whether President Truman joined him or not. Peeling Hut this Great and Slrcng Man of Our Tunes defcerved the support and encourSgi n.eni of every man and woman wi;hin the British Comilth of Nations, for his indomitable courage, and determination to try alone, If ne%  %  the world frcm | blasted into bits, and knowing th,sentiment of my fellow-countrymen and women on the subject. I sent Mr. Churchill, on the morning following the afternoon of his ibis declaration (13th November last) the following'The Bight H.mour-hle Eh r.ccr Churchill Prime Minister of England No. 10 Downing Street On behalf of the people of Dominica. B.W.I.. I send you hearty congratulations on your projectet Russian policy, which, if adopted, will save the warcnppled World the unspeakable horrors and devastation of an atomic war draw upon you and yours the blessing of Heaven, and for which. Posterity will. the more, bless and cherish your memory." Yours etc.. W. W WYI.l.IS. Ex-Journalist. NOBODY'S DIARY Monday—Being a thirsty wayfarer in the| City ut Bridgetown I approached the Italian drinking fountain just opposite the Waterworks Bui when I tried to push the cock in and the water out 1 huit my thumb. It was just as well because people with stronger thumbs than mine get a bath from the splash. I am sure the waterworks would fit a cock which does credit to this lovely oasis in the City: and there must be enough cement and masons available tu [ construct a proper cistern. While the waterworks do their stuff! the Civic Circle will no doubt plant ; some flowering shrubs in this miniature park and then someon** might be inter-, ested enough to construct some stone seats. Tuesday—The side of the Public Buildings which does nut contain the House of Assembly has three beautiful stained Class windows. As you go up on one side you read "Render unto Caesar the things that are Caesar's" and as you come down on the other "And to God the things that are God's". Upstairs another stained glass window which has been damaged commemorates the beautiful words "Unless the Lord build the House their labour is but lost that built it." On the other side there is a hideous modern structure labelled Ladies Luncheon Room or something to that effect. If there is a stained glass window hidden by this monstruosity I wouldn't be able to tell you being a stranger in those parts. Outside the Public Buildings nailed on to a shade tree is an ugly sign about cars. What is required is a neat little note saying "The samaan tree which is common in Port-of-Spain is rare in Bridgetown: this tree was planted here by . ." "Or simply a little board saying "This is not a samaan tree: though it looks like one." Wednesday—After all the heat that has been generated about electricity someone wants us to take our clothes oil or nearly all. To keep cool I suppose. Personally I wear my shirt flapping over my neatly cut blue shorts and open from top to bottom. And I know just enough aboul electricity to keep my shirt on and to be thankful for what light I gel in this island of darkness. The other night when the lights grant out my four-year-old son outclamoured Claudius with screams for "Lights." When he got light in candle form he didn't like the way the flame jumped. I can remember when it was funny to repeat the story "look at moonlight coming out of a "half-pint bottle." The way some people go off the deep end about electricity you'd think they weren't brought up on oil lamps and pressure lanterns. Ah! well. Thursday—They're on about women now. Madariaga is good about women. He quotes J. B. Morcton who published his impressions of the English West Indies in 1793 and who reproduced a local adage which went like this: "Creole Misses when scarcely ten Cock their eyes and long for men." That was a long time ago and presumably there has been some progress since then but there sure seems a lot of spade work yet to be done for women. Why not a Queen Elizabeth Home for Young Women? It's her birthday isn't it Friday—The Barbadian I would like to see written up more than any other is the one whose face lutngs painted in the House of Assembly restaurant. He is described as the Father of the Agricultural Societies. "What a good name to leave behind you." Saturday—That reminds me. Who left behind those two rusty guns up in Ihe entrance to the House of Assembly? Maylu they have a history, but at present it covered in dust. Better present them tc the Garrison Officers Mess, what! Or de tail a cleaning party in Part-one order; for gun cleaning. Have we got enough guns for an exhibition? If so we coulc cart them all up lo the Garrison anc leave them there. P.S. Little Bo-peep has lost her shee; and I know where it is^—lying on the S; James beach with its tummy open am smelling like overnight flying-fish. Kissian Manoruvrrs Conducted Off Japan TOKYO. June 6. RUSSIA is conducting naval and air man oeuvres off the northern tip of Japan, accord ing to Japanese Press report:'. Kyodo News Agency quoted the Japanese national police headquarters in Kushiro on Hockaido Island as saying that Russian warships and planes are operating oft Nemuro on the western tip of the island. It said vibrations of shells used in target practice could be felt in Japanese coastal towns and searchlights have been seen. —UP. PHOTOGRAPHS Copies of Local Photographs Which hove appeared in the Can be ordered from the . ADVOCATE STATIONERY OUR STOCK oi COLZMAN LANTERNS Includes 300 and S00 eandlepowor. lo burn on Karotcn* and Gaaolena. WE HAVE aUo l l uS llJ GASOLENE IRONS and . %  SPARE PARTS. C. S. PITCHER & CO. ph. 4472 H.M.V. RADIOGRAMS A COMPLETE RANGE OF THESE FINE RECEIVERS 3-TUBE TABLE KOHL RADIO *.*??? 6-Tt'BE TABLE MODFL R\l>IO 145 00 5-Tl'BE TABLE 11 i RADIOGRAM :7...0(i 6-TI'BE FLOOR MODEL RADIOGRAM :[30.00 6-Tl'BE FLOOR MODEL RADIOGRAM (with _,,„ Automatic Thr*e Sprtd ("hanarral 515.011 LET IS DEMONS! KATE ONE OF THE ABOVE -I l~ AND JOIN THE HUNDREDS OF SATISFIED OWNERS, &f D4 COSTA tt CO.. I ID. lilihl Weight Twffds A new shipment of 11/12 OL Woollens in slripe design—Fawn and Blue grounds.... und PARSONS GREY Prieed from $10.34 Da Costa & Co., Ltd. '•*'*'*'*'*'*'*'*'* ****'*'*',•*•,',', *,*„',-. •* '.-.',', ; -, ',-, v >">'..• -V.W.V, -,*,;• £ KEEP IN THE PINK — with a — CANADA DRY DRINK Ginfrr Ale Onmt Fin* .\,iplr K..I Sorrell Quinine Tnlc Soda Water. FRESH VRC.FTABLrN AND CELERY. Milk IMI Turkeys Mitk-l-.l (liukrii. Milk-fed Ducks in .--.,-,I Rabbits Calves Liver Calves Sweetbread*. Veal. Hams. lii:. k Fillet Steaks. NEW ARRIVALS < in.i!n..M. Ciwomel OkOM Sanborn Coffee ln.sL.nl (utTi-r Emplre CotTrc irxowid dsll*) Cube -in %  ir lelnr So*ar Smoked Kipprrs Smoked M iilil... k JYosrn Haddock I in/, n Salmon Chilled I::.:ENJOY THESE TO-DAY AND ALWAYS SHOP AT <. O II II A I I I S ^***,^*-*,*,^vw-*^',*-*,*,*,f-',*-*,*,'-'--. v



PAGE 1

PAGR SIX BAJtBADOS ADVOCATE SATURIMV, JUNE 1, IBS* CLASSIFIED ADS. %  •I III %  < MIIIIIA I'l III l< SALES TELEPHONE 2301 IX MEM0R1AM HAIIIK: %  I %  We ml* you nm .0.1 loving face. fiX>\ an 7 • M—li AWOi NCBMBNT8 WAMIII HELP *App.v tall ifXMam tungaloev Two -BM In I OH MIK AI'TOMOTUT BULL: OIII/W' Tractor fraciitm rf UIA v Qnw Dial *i* 1. M n NUTICK Often in wtium will be Oourtaay Oarage. Wmu M Oa>e 11 Perd Prefect C IEAL KTATI PEDFORO DrjJVBeYY VANS Iff mmnlUlf dei.ver> — Co%arl*> Garage IM.1 Mia i • %  BARBADOS (O-OPERAT/Vr BANK UM1TE0. <>ini\tii uiMiAt nimc Notice M hrreBy given Out the Clrdinarr O —r al KHIIM of ihe ate**. twined Cnmpar.v will he l.e d at the Chlldrer I Goodwill League Hall, off ConaUluUen Road, on Tnurede.-. lam June. Iraki at S p m for In* following ATHXOKT— Lower Mac* lto>> %  *. Ui'hOOl. •Ur.dUif on l.a frf Bn acre of >'ii eoeitaining j bed mania, drawing dreaafc* rearr*. garage and •partoua .aid B e aatr M tight WC and Bat* M-pIv on premise* lo Mr* flladya Baal fl a In Filet aWM. •.IBaia a-owaa —..-< TBOTAaVfclaaTr Tc 1 I ih. %  ts: CM Morris CM ran S.ax-[.%  HM : „aj „..., %  .''," %  .' CAlV-VBvJh>l Veto* llhp II mnlh Id. dan* .• mllca. Pouchraana BtBRe (h red uphnWtVry Owner ilrim >n be aeeei al Courtee* Oarage M> 7 B •—I I n Car.10 In I 1 e-ve-vlng l Ova II •1TUATION Young Ri %  ingle. e-Ro\el NAT. now In Londci. a*u fond Ml until II M n-.btdo*, fcni I rppenranea. lop ta lawn art, and drl i •-'.*.. TOM SMITH CAIIfl-Onc III Tilumpn % %  ta>fl"" von %  ftr*t >*• condition Mileage v.. IMM and battery like) net* Ona ill (..in. "Right" newly pentad. eo.tdiUoa ( .llen_. CheVeee Oaraga %  IHO M -.. MIACRLLANI OUs TWTNTV-HVI: IXiliARfl eatia Bo fr.m Urdiii.i.i"! \oi as lacttnuaeitd. lion* In ' %  4 a -tar I POCKET MONEY eatii) ear >mitending .1 arw luoacflbcn RjanrrvnoN In ona m %  OTFLEMFNT vni'H iscoarr i -. %  .. IAH. irpJBlU' o-lre *••%  IT.ItMI.VW. Aaot.nl lha Balance B*tee1. a Stale"iant o( Iraonva and Eapawdllura. and ana Auditor %  Hanon Tha abova Baworl a ana] ArcounU will a* • %  pjg M I 1 frl.fL..,. \V,i To lianaaat lha Oratlnarv buifan of tha Coanpan* Br ordar of tha Banrd NOTICE Mill If M*'T"H CVClJt-Anal MO c a Baal •>nta* Twin Port RBtlng R"J* %  ilaaga IfJH D BaffBer FWBtta^aaTi. %  Wll.ll ... Arm.icATios's a^arl Bt Phi Up a Vr.tr.I EKhlbltKini mabk al lb. f m-.bamwra Brhool. will r tar.ivaal b lha >inanignad no* ilar than Monday lath Juno, IffBt Cmdldatn mil \* win of P i %  trnltanad rlriumRawn and a not laaa JBan MS yaara nor than kl'i vaara old on Uio lat Sapiambol A birth Cattlfleala mual ba forwarded with an appltcalMn^ fonv ohlamnl Iron, lha Pani %  ""*• f> %  w Bcon. > llriK to Iht \. SI Rnllip s m NO ALOW Slonawall Bungalow moana aa Banyan Baacb, Bngniop. Blacfe -. laml allchaal, with II,tW aquara %  -•< jl land loarato. 11 a aboaa praaaartj wiU bo art up por %  .. b Public Coanpatition al our OnVa, JaBaM Btroat. on Friday tin Juna. al 1 YEARWOOD BOVCB. I III I \IIOMl lHt I.iUM.l -I IHMH. irll\<> BKAMINATIONa r bo.. wlaaahU of anloruui th. arnaoi IP f) p aanBor lornt of IBM. ar BMlim BaamlnoUon will Ma hald at w Lodga Bcnaaal an ftaiwralnr Juna flat. B*flB>ni"l at IB o cMCh a m ApaHlraina naual not ba younaar than • Mgr* anal mnnlhi or oMar Ulan II -\ data of Examination i la notifi lha Maad BO* latar lhan SaO'rday Iffh aaBta ln>. mjHH IBM aaau* m parttrul ItBa rm>* anal agon af lha So Bay will Ba alliaad b, Mirataa I..r-li-l"-i unlaaa *uah faa-nuillun hna baan tubmlttad ••1 lha akova — %  On Friday lath Inet al our Of s.. |7. Hlgti Btroai:— li BBnraa Bnrbadoa Plra haauranca % %  3 FBBBfa V Ltd IB _ lew Co LM BO ,. tl Hum Raflnary Ltd • M Bnrbadoa Co-Oparativa Cotton F-tory Ltd COTTUt CATTORO CO.. Mtafigfi AUCTION UNDEB THE DIAMOND HAMMER I -.!• -t. m vitora of lha i %  na. IV,1 I r ...1 In-ii r BuH H I B* aall bv aiKtlOn Wailbui WfldB i TIIACTOBS. Maaaar-ll-ul >iaon with numaroua OaJBgB Dial al IB %  .1 r-r THA<-TOR—Ona i|) Fnm all A itii r^BMururtH Lin -i.d M-wi %  I TRUCK TIP HIST Ona I BUD IIYltHAUI-IC I Only. New-for ImDl*l **"l Courlaay NOTICE III < TION I lirHFJIY giva not) i...ir,ird lha Parochial B,,i! -nd Btrart, Hri iho placo pariin of Si ratal) < ( ... IBM •I Va.irvmr. %  aaambla uri %  ) %  \ UCKB-Or/ ill IBM Bedford Titiek. IBM Fordaon Ttuf*. Ill IB fordac* W.lh Dual Oaar ilr IBaa FUdfOfd iwX All lha abovo ar* in Wajn-Mor.ii... lha Hh day of J twtan Iho hour, of IB and I) o'clock in lha morning to alact J Vaitryman foi IhO Pariah of Bl Michael In tha plan ChnHophar Auguatua Brathwait*. da PXRCY H BURTON. Parochial TiaOiuiBi, St MMhwl ElaECTKICAL St Ulchaal win* TiitJi* VFTMC1MA' %  frJUQ p Ttua TV % %  %  f i ni -.-i T ,a ri'V.i -. Fl lF VABDf i I:IIIIKUK VAROC, Id CiirlnajBan'* VUlagc. V Mt.r... 1B.M-tn ; l. ,. Ill, MW ". I ir-i.d .>'l IKIPK St*** a %  UAVURI :i oir. ; %  NIV %  • "'•""':,", %  nad nraaaU .^uonatkla ^ %  inlM" bv % %  •Rlpi "Clar iMr'd l in* cuicrt BArnLD JOWMB. 51 CJaorgr • ii M nffj yacrs n.lbl. far hor Fhm. aaVMl JlO-BAW-Ona Upholatvivl couchai d chalra ail on catlora, Sideboard Mahog labloa. Card Ubtt, Ruih chain lirror. dining room i halrm. Bureau heat of Drawer* IN I and woodae. bxdalaad* irallr n i t. i iclnrn. larder carpet. Tread I • machine, bad • -it. Blaaa ware, and man. othan CARCY A SCOTT. iiMMI KMr-Kr RCHOOL IM'IMI FBAMtRATBOl* TO MAIM -. IKMII. I Admiaaltata lo lh* School for nr IBW-U -ill take place M iiKinOtr neat The Entrance Eaemmalton dill '.kl in IBe Sthool Hall on Friday, lath, al BOB a ra Candadatoa will ba accepted for mil *lmn who will ba not laaa than IB yaara and • monlha. nor more than IS yaara fl iwonUia an Iho I at 1—10 — Paranta/Oiiardlana muat .,( %  (. Ugta warda lo alt the eaamlnaSuch applMatk*. 'i dato o %  uBpor t ad by blrUv'baptiam carIt BhouM alao alula the arhool -ruling and muat be aoaomgenMid by %  bti-f Tmr. a a Hl rrflga lha II I O %  iO>cil i %  enU *l araBlp d ruler Light WreehIII ba an aale al the Brhool 1 Vralr ,. .mi II other acholaiiaa % % %  % %  aJaa •a aub-: .11..-' rdjaajH i e> ndiUona M M'Mi SecraU Com Shopkeeper Discharged His WorBhip Mr. H. A. TslmB. PollOB Maiistrste of District *'A WcdnesdBy dJicharfd 27-y*BJ-olu Ddon SfMle, a shopkeeprr . consideration the time of the al. leged iilfence. She said that the defendant held her by her hand • und dragged her into the room, j yet there wag no confirmation of;, that at all by the other wiineascii who were called by the prosecution. She -! M> said that she shouted • %  murder" and still no one wenl to her rescue. BOVRIL gives your meals the goodness of real BEEF Oood cooks know the value of Bovru. rich flavour makes the umplest meal tasr* sfad appetising; ; ' beefy go od fare s intakes food more nutritious Bo-ril is the ctmcmtrafd goodnen of beef. BOVRIL PUTS BEEF INTO YOtl\ SHIPPING NOTICES POST OFFICE NOTICE till MAILS ElUctivc ii:h Jun. 185J. Air Mail, will br closed al Ihe General Pol OIBce. as follows:— (t .mr, llin.f #r %  ..ii.,1.1a. lUitAbla for fruit treee Con%  i, P Hunl* at Co Lid .•"''..n. rRK SUOAB OfDTJSTBT AOBM.LLa Ihe rradlleVh.Ml.n .B.rUll. "•" aialaal I.I.IVI rianlallaa, Bl. Philip TAKE MiTlCB that wa. tha Ownere ^rov.ihtiia ol the above Act agaltl UN .id PlattUllon. In re.peet of the AgriLUIUITBI yam itu to IBM No money ha been borrowed undo lh* Agricultural Alda Art, IBBft nr Ihe iBove Act ear Doted Ihl* *th d*y ol June. ISM FOUR BQUARK BaTATaal LTD par %  R RORINSCN Managlnu Dlracur a Bt.Bg KOl'rUTJIOlJl MUTPBtBatT of all deacrlptton Owen T Allda* IIS Hoabuci. ,ret Dial SBM>. H | i i,.r Bar i %  ROPEBT I rCJl PiuBrUS. HI mil* l;..*d. |S| Vllag. ORIENTAL PALACE HC/.IXJ'L'ARTEHS FX>R Kfll'VENIKM FatOM INI11A. Mil\ J iHLON THANIS V. ML P. c. I •Tl.ii I* I* AOI NTS %  i| K <; DUTCH AIRIIHI* M a of ihe flfka „ j II UriAN HOLIDAY \ mi MONHAY Hh June IBM.BI s i -^.. Third Annual Ilfirffil BW e Damt I" Am %  T JOHN* BABY WRI LaUODg a DflCB Al IIRIII HALL, natrl.a't gJBnnaBT J i i" I Jj -l *' %  p m Under Ihe ai.'.ini .. h.-d PatioragOl Sir Cnagr und Lady Seal. %  ••Ihf Slar lluds Srhool of DA.\(l.\(i an a Arielof claim a l danoaa iMvtalcal ComodyK.nen on the I Pataj.iletc BV kind i-miai... of Col under tl* direction Of Copt Ralaon Ml r V U %  F Tht Poltee Band will auppl, the MuMc tn MI.in v tiat. ur Tho atari Bar and IHiothrmr.lt Subacilba now to the Dally Telegraph ngbUMl* leading Dally Newapaper no* "King 'a Batbadoa b Air only a few .. after publication In I ondon Con art Inn Oala. c o Advocate Co Lad aggal HepieeenUUve. Tel BUB 11 '! i t n ShakKNIOim LTD FOR in:VI HOUSES ni-NCAI.OW One ili modem fur-I ad Bungalow and PLAT at Cora: nda Worthlnga Oood aea bathing uply Ml* Alma Laahlay. N B Coral nil*, worthing*. ie;d %  fumiahed. St IIOUKE--Fully fuinialied hou t.rTerrace, for Auguat, nd Ortober Phone BJ11. INM.KOVLI I iLirbareeaHill Pot full par Mfaatei W B Ward. J |* A Som e.a a. NAVY OAHDBN* — Fully %  aatll houae. all coti."niai %  ll.xi July I" Oei-eniltet .nnable rent Jtionr UBB ( ,r .Ini I tag gagal |T,.l,ilVr II.-IM >n fl Bhup %  war Shop July 111 at the Mayfnir 11table ror Dreaamaking Hi.'.in-.-.: a etc Appl> VI1J.A -ril l-i oma etc Applv |1 gS SHe.l lo D'Arcy I OSI & I Ol Ml LOST I %  black :ind nhlle Cat Btraved from -pit-mouth/ Pn Ihe Crane roaU. ConTO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH Kl 1IHKK rERKULEM FOB u M KIM. 3TICKH Alto Sample lots of WALKING STICKS ; SOLID HRASS LOCKS All now opened by: JOHNSON'S STATIONERY 4k HARDWARE ....in %  •tall. Ilea POUB SQIABK Faetery. SI AUSTRALIA (all air) MTSTRAUA ..| (air to Panama only) | BAHAMAS BB, OUIANA BR. HONDURAS BU11MA CANADA (Direct) via T'dad CAPiAL ZONE CENTRAL AMERICA (except C.Z.) CEYLON aialn* Philip TAKF NOTlCi: lh_. I ihe abovo Plantation are about (I-III a li-an ul £1L0(B) under loi>n of tho above Act aselnit tha ..ud I'lanlation, In raapert of lha Agtl. ullural year IBM lo lBU So money haa been borrowed .tndei he Agrlcullur.l Alda Art. IBM. Art ,. h yenr lay bei u %  a, IBM KACTl'BV LTD Owner ft ROBINSON. Managing Director IBg II'UAI INDISTBt .. = B4Cl'L TIBAL BANK ACT. UhU I* lha aredllara feeldlag .aaelaily Utaa .,..,..1 Ml mi'AM Plantallaa. J ihe above Planlalton are about • %  am a loan of ftM.OOB under B IgM I'lanlation. In raape.l of the An aitural year IBM to IBB). No nvoakB* haa Boon the Agricultural *m* Dated thla tlh day ol June, IBM FOUR BQL'Alta. RBTATBe. LTD. 11.45 a.m. 2.00 p.m. 1.00 ajn 2N p.m. 9.10 am 11 45 a-m. 11 4ft a.m. U.4ft ajn. 11 46 am. II 45 a-m. 9.00 a.m. 11.45 a-m 11.45 2.00 s-m 11.45 2.00 9.00 a.m p.m .i in DESTINATION Monday Wednesday Friday Wednesday Saturday Thursdav Monday Thursday Monday Friday Monday Friday Monday Wednesday Monday Wednesday Friday HONG KONG INDONESIA MARTINIQUE MAURITIUS Mil -I <••. IMM -•" •'' %  ' II Rtl. BANK ACT. ISta Ta lha tredlter. baldlaf apaclalty IW"...I...I SILlMIOWa pelet TAKF NTOTICK. llial I. IO, BL Ihe eggj) I loan of Cacaw %  : iho proit the —id afgl A Ida i, laepert DU.'I HAYMANB FACTOMV LTD. V A IIVNOR. Attorne> NOTICE I have been aoproaehed by sojvcrul Ratepayer of St. Mieharl with the request that I offer myfttlf as a Candidate for the vacant -tat on the St. Michael's Vestry regretfullv caused by the death j| our Respected friend, the late Mi C. A. Brathwaite and have consented to place my services at their disposal. J. O. TUDOR DOMINICA DOM. REPUBLIC DUTCH GUIANA FH GUIANA (ST BRITAIN f:i'ADELOUPE 11.45 a.m. 2.00 p.m. 1.00 am. 2,00 p.m. 9.00 am 9.30 am 11.45 a.m.! 9.00 a.m 11.45 a.m. 9.00 a.m 11.4ft a.m. 2.00 p.m 9.00 a.m. 11.45 a.m 2.00 p.m 9.00 a.m {{.daSaeV MEXICO Friday Wednesday MONTSERRAT Day "UMll.ll. At'STBAXJA, van ZB ALAND LINK llllim fM A.ft R UNBI B S OIJiVVSBtTT.R'' lg echeduled ta tU from Pott Plrle May Slat. Ihrvonport I luna Ml,. Uelbouma June Ulh. Sydney I lune Stlh, Briabano July Sat, arrtving al I I .i b.idoa about Auatial eth. In addition lo general cargo Uiia vaaBet kas atriplo apoco for chilled and hard Cargo accepted on through BUla of | lading for Itnnihlpment al Trinidad to llriuah Guiana, Leeward and Wind*aid I...nda. For further parUaNlara apply— I RNBBB WtTBT B Co.. LTD.. I TBIMDAB. MV "CABIBBBXwill accept canto and paa u p g aea for Dcttnina. Antigua, Montaerral Ntv.i. St Kitti Sailing Saturday Tib June. M.V MONRKA" wilt accept cargo and poaaangera for Dominica. Antigua, Montaarrat, Navli, It. KmSalting p lHJ x l]t)l M.V. ''CACIQUE DKL CARIBF' win acopet cargo sad pas•arigeri for St. Lucia. St Vincent. Orenada. Aruba sailing Wedne.. day. lllh June. Ii Vi 1 BCBOOKBK OWNIR8' ASSOCIATION I'I %  l.am... — Tele He. 4041 to HARRISON LINE OrjTWARD FROM THE CNITatD KINOIXlal 11.45 a.m. 11.45 s.m. 2.00 p.m 11.45 a.m. 9.00 am. 11.45 ajn. 9.00 a.m. | U.45 a-m. ( 2.00 p.m. t.00 a.m. I 11.45 a.m 11.45 a.m 11.45 a.m 9.00 ;. m 11.45 am 2.00 p.m tVOO a.m 9.SO a.m. 2 00 p.m 2.SO pm. 9 SO a.m U.45 a.m 11.45 a.m Saturday Monday Friday Wednesday Friday Monday WadnffeBday Friday Monday Wednesday Friday Wednesday Friday MondayThursday Wednesday Wednesday Friday Monday Friday Monday, WtpdaaMda] IMday Monday Thursday Monday Prlday Monday Wednesday Frl.lay Moriaay Friday Thursday Saturday Monday Thursday NEW ZEALAND .. I (•H air) NEW ZEALAND (air to Panama only) PALESTINE PHILIPPINES PIIEHTO RICO ST CROIX. VI ST. THOMAS. VI ST. VINCENT SOUTH AMERICA (except Venezuela) 11.45 am 11.45 a.m. 11.45 a-m. i 11 45 a.m. 11.45 am., 2.00 p.m. 9.00 a.m. U.45 a.m. 2.00 p.m.! 9 00 a.m. [ 11.45 a.m-1 9.00 a.m.11.45 a.m. I 11.45 ajn.. U.45 a.m 2 00 p.m., 9 00 a.m : 2.30 p.m 9.SO son. U.45 a.m. 2,00 p.m. 9.00 a.m. U.45 a.m. 9.00 a.m. 2.00 p.m. 9.SO a.m. | U.45 a.m. j U.45 a.m. I U.45 ajn. I 9.00 a.m U.45 a.m 2.00 p.m 9.00 a.m. U.45 a.m U.45 a.m ; 1.00 pm 9.50 a.m 1 u .45 a m ; 9.30 a.m.1 i 2.00 p.m. I 2.80 p-nvl 2.30 p.m. 9.SO am ( U.45 a.m.; 9.SO a.m.j 9.30 a.m.i 9.SO a.m.; Monday Thursday Monday Thursday Monday Wednesday Friday Monday Wednesday. Friday Monday Friday Monday Thursday Monday Wedne-.da> Friday Thursday Saturday Monday Wednesday Friday Wednesday Friday Wednesday Saturday Monday la Wa aa tBF Monday Friday Monday Wednesday Friday Monday Thursday Wednesday Saturday Wednesday Saturday Wednesday Thursday S S. s s. |S s. 19 S. SELICTOR*' TRIBESMAN" INTERPRETER' EXPLORER" From .. Liverpool k Glasgow . London k M/brough . London Liverpool 17th May 1st June 9th May 23rd May 31st May .1th June 5th June 14th June HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED EJNODOII % fJgRSj S.B. "CRAFTSMAN" I'm? further Ln/ormtitlon apply to DA COSTA Fr Liverpool Ooaes In Bar badoa 3rd June 4% CO.. LTD.— AffeoU AAcoa, S*aam&hipC. 9/u. NEW YORK SERVICE. I Barbadoa May II.I NEW ORLEANS SERVICE. CANADIAN SERVICE BOt'TBBOl'ND • %  TTNDgteV' •-TIRTA.. *Ala?OA POntTBJt" -A BTKAMRB-' "A STEAMRR 1 NORTBBOUND BAILS PROM Maalreal MV lath May > u. June lMh m s Juna I4lh Juna 2BTh July ISth July Path ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK OCLF SERVICE Araiy:DA COSTA 4% CO^ LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE VENEZUELA U.45 U.45 BJR a.m 2 00 pm 9.SO am 11 45 U.45 U.45 9.00 9.30 .i pa RJB :> 03 .. n I B 11.45 a.m I i"i D in t.00 a.m U.45 2.00 ii m p 0 Thursday Saturday Wednesday Saturday Thursday Saturday Monday Thursday Wednesday Saturday Monday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Monday WednatKlay Friday Monday Friday A Hot Water Bath ItAVK A LOOK AT THI . Mernlaa Neea ar Nlahl NOW 0*i CAN BAVB All Wnlta leneral Post Offlce. 60.52. YOUR HOLIDAY All meals and IWTtBg MIBplied in your own cottage on a Q Jlet a a c hided beach with perfect bathing.; $8-50 Fr day for single parsons or $15.00 double. Apply 'Benchlands', St. James or Phone 0157. SI .5.52.—6n :J SOHK SAY . S Triare ar* no rmbaltneis O I in Barbados S J; OTHERS SAY . o Plumbing is not EmbalmX in* •; WE SAY ... Buy at least 25 one dollar V Shards In our Company. N We are erecting this o year a modern gasox lane station at our Tweedslde hendquarters In the first year of businesa we paid 5% dividends. We invite you to share in our oronts SELF-HELP ENTERPRISES LTD. Funeral Dlrecaors and I iul.riiV.-r-. Tweedslde Road. St Michael PHONES Day 3SI ROBERT A. ( Colon! i :////-v//.v.vtV/.*.v-VtV.'.v.Wt'tV'V'V. FOR SALg WO&fi I.ARKE, I'listniaster. Ta uta tarn ef a tap QIVBRBS Al Tear uu ahowraaaaa arVary Beaeenaaly Prleed FURNISH TO-DAY ITS MONBT-SAVINr. DAT' Uadataada. Bed*. Sprlnsi, LMba, .Itdtt, Pramm, ()•>•• art tlureaua. Wardrrtbc* Ciirita of Dvawar*. Waha\J.rvd. NlahS-cBalr* — TABIXfl for Dining Kllchen A Chin. Cabin* DRAV.U KIWB4M I M.'.M na.ru i. I rosing board*. Benchea. SIOOU In Wood Cab mat*. up—DBAWINfi •TIlfJlTTRX — Screen laundering i.e ar.d thfrt tuh. Hope yB0>>ej0w000C S COME ONE! N co L. S. WILSON ir\iu a i%Ra i 3 bedroom %  ,:.Li l;) .v. B Baal Estate Agent Rltd AuctioBeer offers ;• Bsaarigtiapi at the right price. On my ej ; bedr.*om biiiinalow on the sea at St. Jamct J. bunnalow al Welches on the sea. Mortgag ^ So before purchasing S4N! D'ABCY A SCOTT. | Middle Slieel. Dial 2M5. ':....-.-.-.-^.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.' %  •-•-*-•---'-•-'•"*-'-'-•-'-'-'-'-'-'%  %  '•'-'-'-'-'-'-'-" TO-DAY AT QUEEN'S rAKK THE LOYAL BBOrTHt:R3 Or THE STAB.. 1952 lailoMfi mi CARNIVAL All kind, at Amiuemeow lor Yuc ud Old IT'S BIGGER AND BETTER o ADMISSION I Adult. 1/4 i |; Chlldraa 1/IlllVT MISS R I (ini'i;\ri;nv11:inV..ii a Full Range of TOOLS ? rr NOT. win MOT t They are Obtainable at . MIII: i I:\IH.\I. KMi'imii M Corner Broad and Tudor Street* — Night 2939 ^ KEEPS ENGINE CLEANERSMOOTHER RUNNING £jSOJ EXTRA MOTOR OIL



PAGE 1

iarbaitoei ^f\V\W" LSTABUSHED IOSIL, ..T — %  Establishment Of Unified Trade Union Movement Urged PRICE TRADE UNIONISTS in Conference at Hastings Houw yesterday morning urged the establish meat of a unified trade union movement worthy to i>e respected throughout the civilized world by era ployer and government alike. It wos the firs* public Ml officially opened by His Kxcollencv Sir Alfred Savaee in the Lefftahrtivt Council Chamber on Wednp-d-iv and deleUSn the opportunity to put b. i once ih. problen and t in their % %  '-Triton.,. from holrtuiK the vis Kamouldi, .1 representative tr;ide union moui. n th. developed mid strength, isco Aguirro every thing in their p., 1. of nHIT '"lunilf trade unionism. Such rrivad Mr |*u the attitude of the majorm of employers i n Trinidad and Tobago, and he believed in 'he other parts of the West Indie* of OR.IT., who phice of Mr Ki.it General Sanaurv who hat not yet C H Adam* M.C.P.. CMC and Mr A P Alexander, member of the sub-committee O.R.I.T.. and President of tl Waterfront Workei Union. Trinida-I. are men of the Con!. On Thursday the confer) met at 2 o'clock in the i.ftcrn, and after Mr. Adams had expressed the thanks of the Conference to Sir George Seel for placing the Conference Room at Hastings House at their disposal Sir George replied, welcom ng the delegates. Sir George expressed the hope that their labours and whatever organisation they might set up would be inured to the benefits of agriculture aod industry in the Caribbean area, ;md more those who took part in industrv and agriculture and c.-irncd their living thereby. The first delegate to address the conference yesterday ,.ftcr Mr. Rflmouldi had presented the report of OR.IT. was Mr H Crltohlow .f British Guiana seemed to fc, I it mum for Fnthnd linid Hit: 1 as] % % %  KtB l-.ur.-nn to IB* %  'am 11. laktiik] nt-t month will be clo-ed on Wi-dur-dsy nest Jim* 11. It b*1 ot yet con< ""! (ill havs s few •-it ycur donaUuu to In" Royal B.suk of Canada. BarrlajM Bank and IBs Office of tB0 Advocate Qoal 1'J.iao on Amt. Prev. AcB $1,671 T frank Hall . on V. A W. rsrgtt-oii Tdad Tsrasio Expert '> o. Total Sl.SRl The employ thai trade in enemy. th:it it wanted to dictate to ihem. ond that ,t would the manager s desk and run then bu i;e:-Mr Marcano urged that there was need for educating the ployee and employei alike what trade unionism meant II, expressed the hop* that thconThe 1053 Cfl jerence would have a strong arvi IJWIHR effect on the oofldtti the worker* in Ihcse Hrrltorti and that the employers would A ray* | eventually open their eyes and ill <,, %  Hie co-operate with 'rade unionists m 'ward of poiM t" better the workManagement >>• ituation. and the ultimate greed to the folk Cricket Season i Opens Todav at the betterment of the -ituation of the 1. p hW Bfl "We are all one family." Mr nrcano like the 1 which when once allowed to iBrcad, will ierd fn destruction. Poverty 1 %  -..revolution and Assistance destruction, whereas trade unionHe told the Chairman 'hat they] ism o n the correct I •> fie conference could assure bring prosperity, health and betthai they were looking forter condition', not only for workward to O.K.I.T. for its assistance "rs. hut for emplover* and the in matters affecting their interest world at large and for that reason, he felt that ted (o the Intercolonial Flavour organisuhon Mr. R. Clarkfl (Barbados) said' He ttaid that there were M>mr ihat ho was very much pleased j subjects which he mi moil to see that they had assembled particularly interested in havthere with intercolonial flavour' ins discussed. The flr*t was and hojwd that the originators of, family allowances, then there the meeting would make it then waa a house purchasing scheme QU itOM to sec thai t for Marker* and freedom from of that kind r.ntinuc victimisation by private emHe said thai he had no personpluyer* and (iovernmrni l L al grievance to put up as a memirade union officials ind tr4d*„i>w ot life Barbados WoikeruDlusta. rCmon. haf tie would like Folly W ins Frontenac Cup Race Gipiv IMIB Mitchi*f I ' %  *!. sailed BBnuWuily on iimrMi.T arternoon % win thai hicta wo. '•ailUOc liio Sh, %  lorrB Bialr wcond. bj ubou: iw* mmutai. roll) also worwaj last year. The r., u wu | va muiids am. %  onditinns wrrv quile sultablr fot he S BB BU I U rron the h# m u 1 .. 1 iBBat, %  ihf Inter r — jj > % %  M quickly got awav ft. n She then went on to ovorl Oauntloas, rnvader. also 0/ the | rntermediate and Imp and Rnlnird of the D ClaM BM pm •hose boats a minute. Bert Toppln used his irood udgmenf to keep the lead. The' only other boat which stood n hanc* of overtiklnr Follv was. rtoyra Blalr Imt Moyra ifave 14 ninutes to the C boat. billing with Pert Topoln ••! -row were Desmond Blad* Ralpta MghUI. Folly, as was the, ase last yer. did not do '11 during the R H Yf* Saason, but put In .1 good net -' ormTice tn win the '''rontenac Tronhy In thU Mischief tarted 'otfHher CKwy UIOVM •Tond (tonht that she ear whip Mischief anvfimo thev tj I %  •til 1* ShrtnlaheH nestrlv 1 mln-fmd a h.lf .iheiid of M n. He ijecei p.n ulai the W. lity of family tor people in whom Inin have two or 1 illes. Mr. Critchlow pro the intercolonial eomii %  ssed thelstreM illowance* tlons. 'st Indies Mi Clarke unttd the >wtinir up of a West Indian K 1 %  ( trade unions In order that ontv tffip fumcolony might get to know thej 'gnevnn.-eo( Otbtl COkXlltl tfld Urad Ida'j that would agitate foi tl .. linI • eantassj system n MUa 1 ail DJatBhtt should lie 8 points for a win: 2 points Tor a lead on first UmBUJBJ %  1 .1 %  I %  %  Taylor Knighlvtt: g%  Stff Cot /Vow Pnul %  "> will oe yveu I ml } „ ,, „, The first Principal of .the Unl* l and '" l "'" i .i>ii( Collese of Ifae Wesl [ndii l **< %  BIX l nr. T. W. J. Taylor C U.K.. u iiv %  Tght. .ving ui hit office latei this yeiu "" v '' 1 miiinit ;.,K. inothei aopolntmonl nr. Taylor was knightM i„ I'.inhda. Honours I-1st %  %  %  ** '"'• ban*n>B fl pprliinf them of th change ,ui ois being one of two kniKhUi also meo!ii)ne ( | W01 kmen's ('..111 pensati.-i Bltd Kent l!< Mr. 1.. J. Mai.,1110. a rapresentalive of the Trinidad and Tobago VVorVi-' Council, expressed on behaif of His Council their thanks to the representative of O.R.I T. for having them at the Conference, and said that it gave them the opportunity to bring before the Conference the gnevance.i and the remedies which thev felt should be mentioned. Attitude To T.Us. He gave an instance of how some employers in Trinidad, far STARTING ON MONDAY the exciting adventure slor SLOW BOAT TO MARSKILLES by Michael lUatinis. Book jour oop* of Ihe KVt.MNG ADVOCATE NOW I chford. College v and D. Spartan at College On page B he would discu-. the matters hc.mcnt of legislation whtrh would I'M*"' had mentioned with the three be of benefit to the working! Bmpin : committees that had been tat Up, •-. f Uu coLoahH concerned. S !" B TS i .! J r Continuing, he told of his acttvHe called for a ooycott of any redl union which sprang up veinighl and who>e leadl nly Maklni powar 10 Iheo OWII erulr Mi CltTBl I "We should have un inlerchangi % %  i workers to lea ud ID ditions in othei ol.. %  h ..il it in aUtflal sufferings which %  brothei 1 undergoing." • On Page S Chief "Justice. dertng wh.n London Reports that Princess iGhulam Ahn Alice. Chancelloi of the I'nlvei %  DM tnt> r-Uri vei n 1 "urn.il an BOW considering lh<%  i| .1 -u'ceMor. nl.., %  HI Lonloo 1Mtpettea to iJamaica nexi monlh be' ing up his new appninlioeii' hich will !* %  Outaldo the West Indies !>ul *hce gall beaB DO BinoUBCBBttni >et on the nature it the Mpoiiiiment Walcott Retains Heavyweight Title i'UlLAUEI-PHlA. June ti. Jersey Joe Walcott's manager Felix Bocchicchio said that the world heavyweight champion who successfully defended his title against challenger ex-champi(.n Ezzard Charlsi las) Dlght wiih i uuisninoui farPaBtpti was willmi: to defend his crown in September against the WIIIIHT ol the proposed match between Harry Matthrv, and Ro C k\ Marciami. After that, bout Walcott will start a world tour. % %  Kb his nose like Ui nate bull m resilons WaJcotl .... %  I 1 good fight and 1 %  1 • 1 • •tl -, ed mi*ht have Hon.Inge 1.11 then h %  the 1 %  1 .<. %  %  %  roler, But oven titouflfe %  %  %  ful day nd hw .iii...l> pfuvod \\ %  BauUi \i %  'i She Austral I For m .1, 87 a %  I ( Ml. I u I 1 %  %  %  I 'd. I thought I had won be for a %  libu 4 %  %  • Euard ., Plttsbui Kit hi :. %  '., *t of thi rfht. Ikt 1 I Ing WHV '' %  ""' % %  %  %  W hal 1 led k*fl Ron ml a On rage 3 KEN FABNUM inUlea as be wins again—UUa UaM Uit 1,000 Dastrf fiom Ui Tnnidsdlan MatUuen and Lasla Oarnlchael Nslther atatthlen nor Csnaichael had it in UMD to give U>a champion real ru V \an:so\ m GO O\ Van TO BRAZIL I%  p atfr • %  • etar\ of Brazil or would v to Brsul tUrt %  %  Britain Hi I %  %  itbl American Departrnen* sp^. -ti'kinr thai IT Mm %  kel iMrtnerW'l I'M %  ml, r K.p ..f BO %  boan i-' '" M.I %  tl abled England to com* within %  Aftew Ha/are's dsrcLalflM HI thif. mornii half an hour | ast four batsmen I.ikii was alnost tHBptapeb >f 3.3 ..v. 1 W hlch iauned four wickets—two of heni Til W.itki'r. in the leg it.11 I %  Ihe I prMitif.ri in u> Ifeuss I I ..nl.lv Ike a 1 1.1 nteseasja to I r • 1 iliiui Uiat the Hou 1 Uon <>f lltitish subUi lurbpiletion ..1 in alian %  it mi •. hoe "IT r 1 ii'inii \ to arable InBBHlStencS .r1 1 inherent rights of the ,.I.I. The message ugrvw with UM . haaea in Bermudn .iguiuM eommlaalon aeciuily oasnei %  • that .uiiMid'iitni 1 osloey 1 erlmlauu la ile •puiaBshnasni to ..Li-. 1 arho eon \ IT.iieo %  lilte Hou A alati-io. %  lei Km. • :iit thai tidrib oi nr the 1 1 1 ite to put nit unl 1 Irgislo' puto %  -I ,in unliai %  I < % %  (,'r.s Workers Strike in tlaly -XL 1 an* I.. I .11111: I .it mill 1.tit WBJ called Is I I uii.st and following Mo 1 urn.in.tompan) %  %  t% %  UaM lUBM I uthei %  taould %  Phi mund Gibbons has th> supp%  if the Speaker Sir John OSBL .KiMMI Wilniaw ltirtrilu> Parade and 'i %  1 whlapct ind mi 1 : thing the host of it vee.g, %  ... 11,.. .0.1 ., tov .111 v i.M.ii ..1 than hui %  1 %  1 rjul Big Crow 11 AtBirthda> m Parade %  1 icheUn OB I %  %  Major 1>< %  r illce nod. 1 % %  1 % %  %  Ftoyal Cai .. I the Bai %  His Bscellei s.iiuie and rhoti %  he Ncond it" TBe rjeewi %  • :iven foi H< 1 M I aeddsi i .1 DP Majaekji -hr tjuean. riiere si,into an ( %  timed %  be 'tov.,: B > %  ,1 i a % %  Broken The plat 1 ndepandann up area* Trinidad fuel Han Lifted i" il; 1-or-Sl'AlN I'ne lain inipolcl %  %  %  %  %  ooutMfffnenl %  >• rnmenl ret 1 Sotretary %  %  ia)dem win 1 Jim, in RRD LEGATE TO LEAVE U.S. Unltsl Btat •hat he l x • %  %  1 %  • %  1 them With Ail.to QjBeBttSl flr/ssirr I if Is 'Serlin Blockade Ur.Kl.iN. j M >l.ilfe il ne fcede of the out! '< rlin. 1^ •he strong Unit-*l s (U-d troops roi iloeUruj the %  steinstuetken and o istf mhabiUuiU PI DM 1 If SI'AfN ibottt ". MM ajM rii %  %  1 ared .-n Port-ol I .irifl under Iho nfl urtj.iell.i ado in lion11 01 tha Qi .1 birUiny J It UB HI Bntflahj ii.irioaraxi 1 Hfai Ex1 Oovi mounted • a thi j .1 dment j 1 I ifr-Sawr (Jets Certificate >iEN >'.A lum 1. \i ..ii'ieii pn %  • %  .. %  Wt %  ..n. s tnss '<< %  "Nf v k 23-yaei 44 1 But • avlng from runs; two 1 sswdlaa <>.>-lru(lor ..• St • HIKHIOOO Bill fos rt ItoO. •.. 1 ,\ '.i %  /eater n C %  I'.P %  ('> t I'r-' %  I rtial l;.w nnd .mother a^kirnf the release of eleven arre <.. If THE BARBADOS SCHOOL OF DANCING "0AJVCWG ri.fii;" Undfi 1 InliIl %  1 'i IBM i pntronni:.si HBI RaeaUcsM] ISM Ooassasii and l.lldy SUV !!!{(' AT Till i::tiiiiti: THEATRE • ON %  11.Ill IV, MTII i I ,1 \IIM 1 • P.M Miam isi %  M .,, II,.I MIM'.I llll \|lll a& foil l-ricl;,\ 1 :,!. Junt l>u,l> S.M %  ,„ Noon and I—I p m Salanla] Mil tM „ 111.— VI (HI Noon