Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

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Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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‘

ESTABLISHED 1895

>



FRIDAY, MAY 30, 1952



3 More Vestries Object io Local Government Bill

St. Thomas, St. Philip, St. Joseph | sCWRECEIVES CHAMPION HOUSE CUP
Follow St. Michael Vestry’s Lead

"THREE more Vestries met yesterday at their

respective vestry rooms and decidéd to become
signatories of the joint petition prepared by repre-
sentatives of the various vestries objecting to the
Local Government Bill, and asking the Governor,
the Legislature and the Secretary of State for the
Colonies to reject the Bill in its entirety.

Vestries signing the seven-point document were St.
Thomas, St. Philip, both by unanimous agreément, and St.
Joseph, by a mere three-two majority. St. Michael has al-
ready signed the Petition, while Christ Church is prepared
to sign, provided an amendment put forward by them is ac-
cepted by the other Vestries.

In St. Joseph there was a mere —— arom ona eee
quorum present when the Vestry
discussed the Petition which seeks
to have the Local Government Bil]
rejected, and in which it is sug-
gested that a Permanent Joint
Standing Committee appointed by
the Vestries are fully prepared to
put forward concrete detailed pro-
posals for suitable amendments to
the existing system of local gov-
ernment so as to meet the objec-
tions raised in the Maude Report.

First Action

Action to this end was_ first
initiated by the Vestries of St.
John and St. George who in a
letter to the various vestries asked
that two representatives be ap- |
pointed by eich Body to prepare;
a petition objecting to the Bill.

Only five members and the
Chairman were present and after



Church Will Consider
Local Government Eill

The Church may also make
representation to Government
regarding the Local Govern-
ment Bill which is now being
considered by a Select Com-
mittee of the House of As-
sembly and against which the
Vestries have prepared a
Joint Petition objecting to
the Bill.

Members of the Olergy will
meet to-day to discuss the Bill
as it affects the Church, it
was stated yesterday.



a two-hour long debate on the
Petition, the present Local
ernment Bill and_ the

Maude Report, the Vestry accept-}

ed the Petition by a‘ three-two 2 T

majority Voting against the Open C. . e e
Petition were Mr. L. E. Smith and

Mr. Branch. Voting in favour of | His Excellency

@ On Page 5 |Sir Alfred Savage, K.C.M.G
; will open the Caribbean Trade
U.N. Delegates



Union Conference (1.C.F'T.U.)
jand (O.R.1.T.) which will be
here in the

> hel Legislati : c ; ret Tl
Call Reds’ Bluff i pela. Chamber on Wednesday, | made in an organized conspiracy |

June 4. The
open at 10 a.m,

At the Opening Ceremony, Mr.
G. H. Adams, C.M.G., M.C.P.,
President General of the Barbados
Workers’ Union will introduce
His Excellency, after whose open-
ing address Mr, Francisco Aguirre,
General Secretary of the Inter-

Conference will
PANMUNJOM, May 29.
The Communists challenged the
United Nations to back down
from their “final” Korean peace
proposal or break off the truce
talks.

United Nations negotiaters re+
fused

be baited by another Apt
‘ 4 % 7 Regional , nisation,
an AORES ues et i ee ma

Among matters wn on
the Agenda for consideration by
the Conference are the Nominu-
tion of the Conference Board, the
Approval of the Conference By-

Major-General William K, Har~ peaeeindtie” > ae nis he

rison, Senior Allied delegate told ‘¢,, ‘
Nam today that the only obstacle | wet cis a The | Conterenes

to a quick armistice was the
Communist “chagrin” at learning
that only 70,000 of 169,000
prisoners want to return to Com-

of an Executive Committee.
munism.
Nam did not repeat the threat

Kirkwood For
of the past two days to turn loose
a 1,000,000 man Communist force London Talks

in North Korea in revenge for so-
eilled ‘massacres’ on Koje island,
—U.P.

42 Workers Leave
‘or U.S.A. Today

Forty-two agricultural workers
will leave Seawell this morning
at 7.00 o’clock by Resort Airlines

General Nam Il, Senior Com-
munist delegate. They called the
Reds’ apparent bluff by offering
a long recess, but Nam insisted on
another meeting tomorrow.



(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, May 29.
Lord Lyle’s cousin, Mr. Robert
Kirkwood, member of the Jamaica
Legislative Council, is in London
for two months of business talks.
As Chairman of the Citrus
Growers Association of Jamaica,
he will discuss with the Ministry
of Food a ten year contract for



for Wisconsin, U.S.A. to work]|the supply of concentrated orange

for the Milwaukee Gardens| juice.

Association. In July as. Chairman of the
The aircraft which is taking}Jamaican Sugar Manufacturers

the. men touched down at Sea-] Association he will open trade

well Airport yesterday afternoon
at 1.15 and stayed overnight
with its crew of throe—Capt: L.
M. Oates, Capt, P. H. Browne
and First’ Officer Clinton Jossey
who were at the Ocean View Hotel.

Two Barbadians who
working in Florida returned home
hy the aircraft.

discussions on sugar.

_ Mr. Kirkwood went to Jamaica
in 1936 as representative of his
family’s firm.

His eighteen-year-old_ daughter
Caroline has her out
be at
nister

were} party on June 25th, It 4
the House of Transport
Mr. Alan Lennox-Boya.

HYDRANT KURSTS



CLERKS FROM DACOSTA & CO. and passersby watch water
gushing from the burst hydrant in Mahon’s Alley between the
Ativocate Co. Ltd. & Knights Pharmacy yesterday.

The Waterworks Department detailed a gang who quickly repaired
the damage.

| possession of weapons.

zinal G Will ese
. |paratively minor charge of
oniginal, overnor |qgealment of weapons or illegal
|

the Goyerhor|rrest of Duclos and his wife Gil-
>| berte

also consider the appointment h





FRENCH —
GRAB RED
LEADER

PARIS, May 29.

The French government met in
an emergency session to decide
what action should be taken’
against Jacques Ducies, Communist
Party leader, arrested during last
night’s. wild demonstrations in
Paris. The squat, bald leader of the
second most powerful Communist
| Party this side of the irom cur-
tain, was taken into custedy with
|his wife, his chauffeur and body-
‘guard when a loaded revolver,
ja truncheon, two carrier pigeons

ei antisense

, and a radio receiver were tound
in their sleek black limousine
Duclos is Yyeing questioned by



judicial police 1 i
[guarded Patiee of Justice on 1
jde City on the Seine River in
the shadow cf jcarby Notre Do m2
Palace.

Under French law the govern-
ment does not have te lift parlia-
mentary immunity to. which
Duclos is entitled if it can be
proved he was caught red handed
}in illegal action.



Blue House was Champion House





Judicial author-
ities were attempting to deter-
| mine if this procedure could b>
jfollowed and thus permit Duclo
(to be prosectited under the com-

con

Une Communist pris aI
The Interior Minister, Charle;
Brune summoned a_i midnigh

press conference to announce th: ers. [First reports thdicated

rigadier Gen@ral Haydon
He denounced demonstra- Brigad vengral Hayd
tions yesterday in which one riote
was killed, 100 police injured, 27
still hospitalized, and 718 arrests

oners immediately
This is the

began

ngainst the State by Communis! |
“Troops” |

The government could decide|
to press for prosecution against,
Duclos on the grave charges of
conspiring to overthrow the state, |
a crime which can draw the max-}
imum death penalty.—U.P.

“Mndians Face
A Hard Fight

(From Uur Own Correspondent)

LONDON, May 29,

gate of the compound,
to repair the damaged fenc
dispei se
United States and _ British
troops hurling tear sas bombs and |
») fring rifles. in the are
Koje prison compounds and be-
gan splitting rebellious Red war)
prisoners into smaller groups. |
The prisoners threw rocks at
advancing troops, sang Commun-|
jist songs and moved back and
forth in seesawing masses, but no |
injuries were reported on either |
The Indians will have to fight side during the first four hours |
ard tomorrow to avoid defeat by|0f the operation. Ri marked the;
Somerset at Taunton. Despite , | first time that Allied troops have |
fine innings of 83 by D. K. Gae-|entered the spraviiing cone |
ar olding some 80, iehard r- |
ey Ware Ba oUt Mey za ese and ee prisoners aia a}
; ‘ ; . series 0 sloody prison riots e-
iat ha cugteeeteine tee ae gan more than two months ago.

: . ; d Brig. General Haydon L, Boat-
by 220 runs with 6 wickets in ner, tough new commandant of
hand. : ‘ Koje camp ordered combat trooy
For the second time in a week] into the compounds to regain full





Surrey won their match in two]eontrol over the captives and
days. In a low scoring game they!break them up into smaller anc
beat County champions Warwick,| more manageable groups. for
who have yet to win a champion-|transfer to smaller . compowhds. |

ship match this season, by 69 runs
urrey, 37 for 1 overnight. lost
their last 9 wickets for 101, On a
dry dusty pitch, off spinner Eric ;mum of 500 men each
Hollies made the ball break vici-| Shortly after noon to-day sold |

ously and took 6 for 62. Had it not }iers from British King's Shrop
been for a patient innings of 43 in'shire Light Infantry ond United
2 hours by opening bat Eric Bedser | States Ninth Regiment moved int |
it is doubtful if Surrey would|Compound 66 whieh holds North: |
@ On Page 8. Korean officers The area was’

clouded with tear gas as troops;
Britain Talks

moved forward and began knock-/}
Tough To Chinese

ing down huts. In all guard posts
‘soldiers manned .30 calibre ma-
chine guns silent but ready.
During the first four
LONDON, May 29.
| Britain rejected Chinese Com-
munist allegations that Chinese in
Hong Kong are being persecuted.

The present compounds hold an
average of 6,000 men each. The
new compounds will hold a maxi- |



hours |
prisoners were formed into ,
groups However none had ac-j
tually been removed from the old}
compounds to the newly con-,
{ In a tough talking note the|were ordered out of the area after
British called the charges “Irre-jthe first few hours. About fifty
|sponsible calumnies” and expres®|men each from the Shropshires
‘ed regret that the Peiping regime | and Ninth Regiment made up an
support, cer said the original order had
The Chinese Communist regime | been for only about twenty mer
|}was recognized by the. British —U"
| Labour Government which Prime



structed enclosures. Newsmen |
should have given them official linitial task force A British offi-
| : :
Minister Winston Churchill de- ,
Ike Goes Home

Tomorrow

PARIS, May 29.
Eisenhower will leav
by air for Washington Saturda
afternoon according to his Stafi
Officers at Supreme Allied Head-
quarters for Europe,

They said the General will take
off: from Paris’ Orly airport t
(1.00 p.m. GMT) Saturday in, his

| feated last fall. Ever since recog-
|nition the Reds have snubbed
| Britain. They have never bother-
ied to send diplomatic representa-
| tives here.
| As a result of the crack down
against Reds in Hong Kong thc
| Peiping Government sent a protest
| to Britain.
| Britain’s reply delivered in
| Peiping Monday and made public
today rejected all illegation;
| categorically.—U.P.

General



| . cwn plane ageompanied by bi
Savannah Reduticés wife, They said the flight plan

would be arranged so that Eisen-
hower would touch down at Wash ~
ington’s National airport Sundsey
afternoon.

afternoon.—U.P,

Tranquillity Lead

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT OF SPAIN, May 29.

Savannah Clib reduced Tran-
quillity’s lead this afternoon by
{winning three of four matches.
Btanding at the close of play was
| Tranquillity 10 points, Savannah Prank

Rhee Imposes

DOROTHY KING Captain of Blue Honse receives the Chamapior
at the conclusion of tiie Athletic Sports held at Queen's College yesterday.

compounds or used real forc
was kidnapped on May 7 at
Officers said he one was hurt during demonstration
munists have been seén evtting a hole in the fence on the
Communists had refused the ordei





with 58 points.

Allies Use Tear Gas To

x ? 43 e :
Separate, fied Prisoners

KOJE ISLAND

was killed an

May 29,
unde

to-night in compoufid 66 \vhere allied troops eurlier used
tear gas to break up demo.ustration by North Korean offic

the shooting was accidental!
Boatner, commandant of all

Koje camps holding 80,000 Chinese and North Korean pri
he investigation
first time U.N.

troops have entered the
e since Colonel Francis Dodd
id held hostage for 78 hours
Com

e and ignored the order to



<< KFarttam For
Finland Fund

HAVE you yet contributed
to this Fund?

Time is running short. Re
member the Olympic Games
are in July and Ken Farnum
will have to leave Barbados
en route to Helsinki before
the Olympic Games begin.

Send your donation TO-
DAY to the Royal Bank of
Canada, Barclay’s Bank or the
Office of the Advocate,

Goal $2,880.00
Amt. Prev. Ack.., $1,174.41
Staff of Audit Dept.

(Public Buildings) 17.24
F. A. ©. Clairmonte 5,00
Everton Sports Club 5.00
Joseph Tudor 5.00
Providence 4.00

Total $1,210.65

Reds Step Up



Offensive |

SEOUL, May 29.
Chinese Communist artiller
and mortar pounded United Na-
tions advance positions on th
Western Front Wednesday with
the heaviest fire of 1952

Some Allied officers thought ti

7,126 vounds barrage may hav
been the Communists’ response t
‘their truce negotiator threat <
‘retaliation for alleged mnistreat

ment of Red prisoners of war. Bi
Fighth Army Headquarters

there was still no military evi
dence of Communist preparatior
to unleash their full 1,000,000-ma

army against United Nations linet
Allied infantrymen retaliate
northwest of the truce village ¢

Panmunjom — by raiding thre
Communist hills in a three prong
ed assault that killed or wounde
105 Chinese. Seven Red soldier
were stabbed to death by Unitec
Nations bayonets in savage hanc
to hand fighting.

North-west of Yonchon, Allied
patrols intercepted two Chines
companies ang scattered then
béefére the cob tart an attact

United States tanks rolled int
the “Iron Triarigle’’ Red built-u;
area north of Kumswa and blasted
81 bunkers, six machine gun pos
tions and 12 trenches, Other ‘anks



knifed into a_ valley outh of
Pyongyang and damaged 15 bunk
ers There wa no ignifice
iction on the Eastern Front

Martial Law In. South Korea’

o : : Lieutenant ern cre _ '
|7. When the series resumed this LONDON. May 29 oh Areas set tities i vam ae
afternoon, Tranquillity were 9|;ay RALPH WALWING in Pusa iaine Waiane " ree
; points Savannah 4. South Korea Dr oe ' eet ins Tver
ate rg Maries’ tase An attempt by Syngman Rhee, telling his people that “a fa
|Mancini and A. deVerteuil 7—6,|/"°sident of South Kores to stage reaching Communist plot’? was ‘be-
6—2, 5—7, 7—5. a virtual military coup threatened jing hatched against him
* Mixed Doubles—P. Patterson

war tonight and
the truce talks.
. Syngman Rhee, seeking to keey
himself in power in the Presiden-
tial election which must take place

their position at

jand Mrs. R, Bancroft beat G
| Gianetti and Miss M. Archer 3—6,
6—1, 6—2.

Men’s Singles—A. Skinner won
|from D. Worme 6—1, 4—6, 6—4.
| Ladies Doubles — Miss G. da| before June 22, imposed martial
| Verteuil and. Mrs. O. Galt lost to|law in Pusan the wartime capital



Fe United Nations conduct of the

Miss G. Pilgrim and Miss D. Wood Then he arrested nine members of t

6—3, 6—3,

[Parliament and tried to remove

General Van. Fleet,‘ Commander
of the Allied Eighth Army fleyv
into Pusan yesterday anc w the
President in his closely guarded

Villa
They met twice again today and
Van Fleet tried to persuade Rhe«
nge his mind about movin:
Gener Lee Chang Chung

hampion of Red House wi
Eurica Simmons of Class B wit!
‘|tem points. Blue House champion



House Cup from Mrs. D. A. Wiles

E. Simmons
‘Champion At
| Q.0. Sports

A gathering of friends of th
and

| secsoot parents were enter-
tained to an afternoon of enjoy-
ment when the annual athletic
sports were held at Queen’s Col-
lege yesterday. As
pected from
the recent

could be ex
the performance et
Girls inter-scho
sports, the Queen College ath
letes exhibited great keenness an
1 high competitive spirit

Vietrix

Ludorum and als

was Coraline Waterman with 8
points, Green House Cora Worrel!
with,10 points, and Yellow House
Pantla Hoyte with 6 points,

The House Champion cup went
to Blue House and was receive:
by its captain Dorothy King, Blue
received 58
points, Red
35 points.

The sprint event in the senio;
division attracted much attention
and spectators saw the keen rival
ry between H. Inniss and J. Col
lymore result in a defeat for
former champion Inniss.

At the conclusion of the sport
‘ @ On Page 8.

.

Tories To Vet
C.D.C.Schemes

From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, May 29.
The Government is to vet
Colonial Development Corporation
schemes in future it was an-
nounced in the House of Lords
jlonight by the Earl of Munster
|.Jnder-Secretary to the Colonial

points, Green 53
50 points and Yellow



| Office

| “We can have no repetition of
| the disastrous groundnut = and
| Gambia egg schemes” he said.

Before a new scheme is launch-
ed the Colonial Secretary will re-
juire enough information from
the Corporation to judge if a good
ase has been made out,

He will expect someone outside
the Corporation to share the ris!

it may be some free enterprise
body in the colony or at home o
a Colonial Government,

“The Corporation must keep
peculative projects down to
minimum,” he said.

Lord Oxgmore (Socialist) said
the Corporation’s Annual Report
hows it has to carry a loss of
£414 million but he was led
believe the figure i nearer
£ 6,000,000

i ind other Peers urged the
jovernment to let the Corpor
on write off these losses Lod
Munster refused

Queen Mother
Pilots Plane

LONDON, May 28
1t was disclosed Thursday tl
ihe Quecn Mother Elizabeth pil
ed Britain’s new “Comet” jet at
‘ner during part of the flight ove:
urope last Friday with Prince
Margaret.

On her return she sent a me
age to the “Sixhundred’’. squad
on of which she is honorary Ai
Commodore saying: “I took oy
is first pilot” at 40,000 feet. Tr
message added “What the passer
sers thought I really would not

© to say’’.—U,P.





General Lee w



meeting and af yards flew with |
\ Fleet to South Korean Army
feadquarte

Rhee main purpose

iaintain control of the Sout
Korean Army — he is its Com

mander-in-Chief—to help him i:
struggle for wer agair
P. lament

Parliament contro! th

Pre denti l electi« n And tor ight
it challenged Rhee. 96 vote )
three it ied on him to lift
Martial law

He has: heeded the cal



|
|

; called to a third |



United States Take
Threat Of Mass
Attack Seriously‘

WASHINGTON, May 29"

COMMUNIST HINTS cf renewed large scale waffare
in Korea have been received in Washington with deadly
seriousness. ‘They have sharpened the belief of top ee
authorities that Chinese and North Korean Commung§ts,
having built up a 1,000,000 man army and a more powerful
a'r force Quring-the 11 months of the Truee Talks. may
now. laufich @ Major offensive.

Official public statements here
have generally been limited to
emphasizing the capability of the
tiacking, but ever since
Talks déadlocked sev-

Senate Cuts
Truman’s Aid

Reds for
the Truce

ral weeks ago, officials have beer
wivately talking of a Req crive >
is a growing possibi ity rogramimee
Armistice negotiation ialled zs f
‘ c C —
upon the insistence by tne Unites WASHING TOT May § 1, :
Nations command Wat none oi Trumutirs fore gn a "he r ae
its Chinese and North Korean ys ided for the Sonat Ris 8 ae
rene 4 IME es cay carryias
ap res) B. sul ‘ 0 a wa
Fapw ves RGM ne TOs BT et least $1 200,000000 Té4s thah the

home Red negotiators have bee
equally firm in rejecting voluiiary
repatriation

$7,900,006 ,060 he asked to frm the
free world against Communist ay-
rression The Senate last night
ite: Ppassed a $6,700,000, 000m, tual se-
wurity bill after defeatiig three
fforts to ctt the total still frriher.
The House last week cut Truman's
request to $6,162,600,000

The sure would provide
military ison and sit t four
aid to ted Stites ““riends and

No one in the United S
government seems to see any rea
hope for resolving the issue
Moreover officials speculate tha:
with new tensions building up i:
Germany because of Russian re

sistance to West German inde-
pendence and rearmament, meri oiies inelu@ing Latin American
in the Kremlin probably do no\|¢ountries. The Senate spread its

now see the advantages to a truc cut equally over all ttems im the



in Korea which were open to ther | pill, The House concentrated its
a few weeks ago. —O.P slash on military and “defence
support” and economic aid for

ere giving Truman what he

asked for other nations.

The Bill would provide $200,-
000,000 less than the amount con-
sidered by General Fisenhower

Blockade
Continues Aint aN See ek ae

minimum. Commit-
BERLIN, May 29. |ree's consideration ‘of ; the oa
Armed Soviet guards “turned ee ye Sa cute
back United States and_ British Pasty $6,900,000,000. ; iA ‘habe
hignwey paeete 2o pe a Sauer case he replied ae Senos oa
sec >» any, y * . snicls ae re ene
man Communists “continued the boa jue See hae : :
queeze on ern

West Berlin

Pact
During the



Truman and the Mu ecur=
communication lity Director, W. Averill Harriman,
workers eompleted emergency in-}also made strong pleas
stallations which restored West/further cuts. The President
telephone and telegraph to normaljnew. slashes yould be just
following Communists severance|the Kremlin wanted.
of exchanges and underground] The Senate passed the bill on a

said
what

cables. 64 to 10 roll call after slicing off
$208,000,000 on the amendment
The British Foreign Seeretary]by Senator Russell B. ‘Long.

ule this morning including a visi Jearlier had trimmed $1,000,000,-
British Military Govern-}900 from the programme. Long’s
}ment headquarters at Lancaste: [amendment actually a $200,101,000
Ifouse, dedication of an English}cut was approved on a 37 to 34
{garden, inspection of West Berlin }roll call vote after the Senate re-
| police and a visit to the City Hall, jected three efforts to trim tha

total by $500,000,000 or $400,000 -

jet Eden began a busy sched-''The Foreign Relations Committee

to th

| Smiling Berliners crowded to

sce Eden whose visit has heartened The Senate glso wrote in 1
the city as East German Commun- amendment by Senator James P.
ists continued their cut off mea-|Kem to ban military or economic
ures. The United States armylafd to any country which ships
held a farewell ceremony here for} war materials or strategic goods
Major General Daniel Noce, Chief} behind the Iron Curtain, A simi-
of Staff of the United Stas Euro- jar amendment was pissed last .
pean Command, who ts leaving tol year but was later relaxect when
return to the United States as}the administration objected that it
Inspector General of the Army would clip United States allies.
U.P. U.

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PAGE TWO

ne



anib (Calling

a EV. H. V. ARMSTRONG,
Rector of St, Philip, was
among the passengers leaving by
T.C.A. for Canada yesterday
morning. He has gone up on a
visit in the interest of his health
amd was accompanied by Mrs.
Armstrong.
Edifor Of U,S. Mag.
EAVING for Trinidad by
B.W.LA. on Wednesday night
on the first leg of his journey
back to the U.S.A. was Mr. L. B.
Reynolds, Editor of The Message,
® monthly religious magazine
Which is published in Nashville,
Tennessee and has a circulation
of 100,000 mainly in the U.S.A.

Mr. Reynolds who was in Bar-
bados for the past week, staying
at the Hastings Hotei, had attend-
ed the Seventh Convention of
the Leeward Islands Mission of
Seventh Day Adventists.

He has just completed a tour
6f the West Indies which started
tn May 5 in Jamaica dnd took
him to Puerto Rico, Trinidad and
Barbados. On his return home,
he intends publishing two or
three articles on Jamaica and one
on the West Indies as a whole.

While in Jamaica, he visited
Kingston, Montego Bay and
several smaller centres and spoke
in several of the churches. In
Kingston, he was observing the
economic life and the changes
‘which seemed to be in the making
in Jamaica’s bauxite industry, the
Prospects -of which people are
looking at as something that
‘would change their status.

From Jamaica he went on to
Puerto Rico and visited San
Turce which is a part of San Juan,
He spent a week there visiting
with the Spanish folk and spoke
in the Spanish Church. He then
went on-to Trinidad before com-
ing to Barabdos.

Dance G.I.U.
‘ARIB understands that, the
Dance Committee and mem-
bers of Club 2 of the Girls’ In-
dustrial Union, are making the
necessary preparations to make
their dance on the 3lst May a
sliecess.
The dance will take place at
the Union Rooms, Constitution
Road.

= For Tennis Games
\& MONG the passengers leaving
by B.W.1LA. on Wednesday
night for Trinidad was Mr. Eric
lor, a member of the Savan-
nah Tennis team now engaged in
a tournament with Tranquillity.

Winding Up Tour
R. HARM POST, representa-
tive for the Caribbean
area and South America of
Bruynzeel Surinam Plywood and
Lumber Co., Ltd. with headquar-
ters in Surinam arrived here
yesterday morning from Trini-
dad on a_ routine visit and is
staying at the Ocean View Hotel.
He is now winding up his tour
of the area having already visited
Aruba, Curacao, Jamaica, Ven-
ezuela, Caracas and Trinidad. He
expects to return home tomorrow

via_ Trinidad.

On Holiday

PENDING a_ week's holiday
5 here are MrgRonald Reed of
the Reservations Department of
T.C.A’s office in Toronto and Mrs,
Reed who arrived yesterday
morning from Canada by T.C.A.
They are staying at Cacrabank
Hotel.





Envoy Mesta in U.S. |

{
}



MARS. PERLE MESTA, American
Minister. to Luxemburg, smiles
for the news photographers on her
arrival in New York aboard the
liner America. She was asked
what the people of Luxemburg
thought of Gen. Dwight Bisen-
hower, “Ike is loved in that coun-
try,” she said, but quickly added:
“And 40 is Margaret Truman.”
She immediately left for ‘Vash-
ington to report to the U. S. State
Department. ¢International)



f

MAIDS WIDE BRIM

DIAL 4220



WOMEN’S COLOURED BEACH HATS ...

MAIDS STRAWS—White & Coloured
BOYS SAILOR STRAWS
MEN’S TRILBY STRAWS: Cream, Grey, Tan ....

Peach on a Perch

DAUGHTER of the sun,
Helen Becker feels free as a
bird as she cavorts by the
surf at Miami Beach, Fla.
Perhaps the reason is that she
is using a perch normally used
by the gulls.

(International)



May Settle In W.I.

RRIVING by the M.V. Bruno

from England yesterday
morning was Rev. Dorothy Wil-
son, formerly Associate Minister
of the City Temple, London and
Minister of Muswell Hill Con-
gregational Church,

Rey. Wilson who was in the
West Indies last year has now
returned with a possibility of
settling in these parts.

Since leaving this area she has
done a great deal of travelling
visiting such places as Ceylon
Siam, Malaya, India and Aus-
tralia,

During the war, Rev. Wilson
did a lot of broadcasting over the
B.B.C., and was hoping to lecture
and broadcast in Australia last
year but an accident on the ship
on her way to that country frus-
trated her plans as she had to
spend several months in hospitals
in Sydney and London,

Somewhere in the 1930’s she
was in Barbados and preachéd at
the James _ Street Methodis
Church at the time when Rev
T. E. Newton was Superinten-
dent Minister,

Back From Canada

R,. AND MRS. J. A. H. KINCH

returned yesterday morning
by T.C.A. from Canada where
they had been for the past four
weeks.

Mr. Kinch who is in charge of
the Airlines department of T.C.A.
visited T.C.A’s offices in Montreal
and Toronto to familiarise him-
self with operations.

His wife and he also made a

trip to New York while in
Canada,

BY THE

I THINK Brighton will have
some difficulty: in getting a
casino, In a country where neith-
er football pools nor the Stock
Exchange count as gambling the
mere mention of roulette, baccarat
or chemin de fer suggests Con-
tinental debauchery on an enor-
mous scale,

Anyhow, is not life on the pier
dashing enough, with Six Pictures
of a Parisian Lady in her Bou-
doir? If Brighton is to become
the Nice or Monte-Carlo of Sussex
the helk-stall men will have to
give away a coloured balloon with
every jellied eel, and there will be
many a turnip flung during the
Battle of Flowers in West-street.
... “Allow me to stake for you,
little lady.”

“Thanks a lot. Vis-
scount, pray replenish my glawss
with some of that fruity port
wine.”

Snibbo
EAR Sir,

I don’t see why Snibbo, which

is the People’s Vadeymec me,
should come into a programe of
highbrow music. Its proper place
is with the light stuff, such as .n
the interval of a dance band’s
numbers, which the band-leader
could announce all about what it
does, which wouldn’t bother the
nobs who want to listen to Tolstoy
all the time, In our family my
aunt takes it for hiccups, my
father oils his bat with it, my
mother rubs it on the floor, my
brother cured a wart oa his leg
with it, and my uncle Tom found
it took damp-stains off a scullery
wall. What's all that got to do
with Bach?

Yrs. truly, Ron Guppy.

A protest
EAR Sir,

No amount of Jesuitical
casuistry will disguise the fact
that a radio programme spon-
sored by Snibbo can be nothing

but a vulgar attempt to sell more



Sila ee
AY——By Beachcomber

Attended S.D,A.

Convention
ETURNING to Trinidad on
Wednesday night by B.W.LA.
after attending the Seventh Day
Adventists Convention were
Pastor B.L. Archbold, President of
the South Caribbean Conference
of S.D.A. and Pastor Earl Parch-
ment, Youth Leader of the Carib-
bean Union who were staying
with Pastor and Mrs. O, P. Reid
of Station Hill and Pastor F. S.
Thompson, President of the
Caribbean Union who was stay-
ing at the Hotel Royal.

Pastor J. O. Emmerson, Treas-
urer of the Caribbean Union who
had also attended the Convention,
is staying over to audit the
mission bowvks. He expects to
leave sometime next week,

On Caribbean Tour

M* AND MRS. RONALD

MURPHY of Wellington,
Shropshire, England are now in
Barbados for a short stay. They
arrived yesterday morning by
T.C.A. from Bermuda after having
\ravelled out from England on the
Queen Elizabeth to New York
where they flew by Colonial Air-
lines to Bermuda.

Mr. Murphy who is touring the
Caribbean on business in the
interest of his firm, is Managing
Director of Wreken Brewery Co.,
Ltd, He left England on May 14
and is due to return home on
June 17,

From Barbados Mr. and Mrs.
Murphy will visit Trinidad, British
Guiana and Jamaica before re-
turning to New York to take the
Mauretania back to England.

This is their first visit to Bar-
bedos and their impressions are
very favourable.

Mr. and Mrs. Murphy are stay-
ing at the Ocean View Hotel

Malvern Dance
COMMITTEE of well-known
young ladies of the Malvern

Netball Club has been appointed
to make the preparations for their
Club’s Dance to-night at Queen's
Park, Every effort is being made
to make the entertainment a suc-
cess,

Labour Commissioner,



Trinidad
M* SOLOMON HOCHOY,
Labour Commissioner of

Trinidad, returned home yester-
day by B.W.LA. after spending
about six days here staying at
the Hastings Hotel,

While in Barbados Mr, Hochoy
delivered a series of lectures to
the Trade Union students at the
Y.M.C.A. covering the functions
of a labour department and tihe
responsibilities of a Commis-
sioner of Labour,

En-route To U.S.A.

ISS HAZEL BOYCE, Steno-

typist of the Caribbean
Union, Port-of-Spain, returned to
Trinidad yesterday evening by
B.W.1.A. on her way to,the U.S.A.
where she will stay for an in-
definite period,

Miss Boyce came over to Barba-
dos a month ago and was staying
at Codrington Hill, St. Michael,
with Mrs. Elsa Spencer, Head
Teacher of St. Silas’ Girls’, St.
James,

At the airport to see her off
and wish her bon voyage were
Mr, Noel Seales and many of her
relatives and friends.



































of that commodity. The spectacle
of great music and poetry and
drama being dragged at the heels
of this apparently miraculous
panacea is one from which every
sensitive listener will shrink in
consternation. The very name
Snibbo is more suggestive of this
brash and = graceless twentieth
century than of the great ages
of Art and Literature. You might
as well obscure a Turner land-
scape in the National Gallery
with a poster advertising a
coughing mixture,*
Yours indignantly,
H, Stacey Farragut,





"(Memo from. Chairman to
Boird of Snibbo: What about
it?) ;

The intelligence quotient

O wonder that more and more

people are beginning to be
doubtful about the benefits of
what is today called education,
“Educational Psychologists” (sic)
are debating the effectiveness of
methods of assessing the “Intelli-
gence Quotient” of a pupil, and
the psychiatrists are working out
a two-plane chart of reaction-
stimulus to rating tests for 10-plus
children. By the time reaction-
stimulus is shown on a television
screen in all schoolrooms, the
average intelligence quotient of
the units of student personnel will
have proved that B.3 intelligences
can be raised to A.4 plus by care-
ful retulation, And what more
can any parent desire?

Smarten up your hooves

On this occasion the horses were
unusually well groomed, even
to their hooves, which sparkled
with a coat of aluminium paint.
This innovation caused favourable
comment, and we'll venture the
horses liked it, too.—Aluminium
News Montreal.

And I’ll venture the aluminiurn
people liked it, too.



JUST IN TIME FOR

THE HOLIDAYS.

LEGHORN .............05.



YOUR SHOE STORES

$1.00
$3.10
$1.14
$1.17
$1.84

$2.52 $2.88

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606






























































BARBADOS

ADVOCATE



Knarf Found an Empty Shell

—And He Thought Someone Should Live in It—

By MAX TRELL

KNARF found an empty snail-
shell. He poked his head inside and
called loudly several times—‘“Is

anyone home, is anyone home?” |

But no one answered. So he was
quite sure that the snail who had

lived in the shell had gone away |
Though why he had gone away

Knarf couldn't imagine.

“Maybe,” Knarf said to himself,
“he grew too big for this shell, and
moved into a bigger one.” But
Knarf couldn’t be sure about it be-
cause no one was there to say.

Then Knarf decided that he ought
to do something with the empty
shell. “It’s not broken at all. There’s

he thought, “if I can find somebody
else who wants to live in it.”

Just then Knarf’s sister Hanid
came along.

“It’s a good empty snail-shell,”
he explained. “Somebody else might
Want to live in it.”

“Who?” asked Hanid.

Under Nearby Rock

Hanid went and called Blackie the
Beetle who lived under a nearby
rock, “Knarf just found an empty
snail-shell with nothing broken
about it. We think somebody else
ought to live in it.”

“An excellent idea,” said Blackie.
“But who?”

“We don’t know,” said Hanid.

“l know an earthworm named
Sam who lives just under the left-
handed root of the old apple tree,”
said Blackie suddenly. “I'll ask
him.” So Blackie went to the left-
handed root of the old apple tree
and rapped several times on the
root. By and by Sam the earthworm
stuck his head out.

“Who's calling?” said Sam, look-
ing around. “If it’s a robin I’m not
here.”

“It’s Blackie,” said Blackie,
“Knarf just found a very good, very
sound, very empty snail-shell with
nobody in it.”

“So?” said Sam.

“Somebody ought to live in it
on account of its empty. How would
you like to live in it?”

“T’d like it fine,” said Sam. “Only,”

nothing wrong with it. | wonder,” |



would stick out. So all in all 1 think
I'm too big for a snail-shell.”

With that Sam pulled himself
back into his hole,

“Ive got another idea,” said
Blackie to Hanid. “I know a slug. A
slug looks just like a snail except
that it hasn’t got a shell. A slug
is just the thing.”

So Blackie went looking for the
slug, and finally found it resting
under a mulberry bush,

In a Hurry

“Good-morning,” said the slug to
Mackie. “What are you rushing
around for? Are you in a hurry?”

“I'm looking for you,” replied
Blackie—and then he explained
about the empty shell, But the slug
shook its head. “No, thank you. If
I wanted a shell, | would have grown
one long before now. I don't like
staying inside a shell. I like to ¢
out and move around.”

“I guess nobody wants to live
that shell,” Knarf said after (Ul:
and Hanid told him about ask
the earthworm and the slug. “I wis
I hadn’t found it.”

At that instant Hanid, who had
gone to take a last look at the shel!
suddenly shouted: “Come here!
Look! Somebody's moved in!”

And sure enough, when Knart

and Blackie looked, they saw a tiny

web in front of the door to the



he added the next moment, “if my





empty shell. A spider had moved

head got in it, my tail would stick | in! “Good luck!” Knarf shouted in
out. And if my'tail got in it, my head! to her. “It’s your house now!”





FRIDAY,

a

Pearls Add

Your Prettiness

The superstition that pearls
mean tears s@ems to have been
entirely forgotten today. Or per-
haps it is that fashion defies
superstition, when it concerns a
popular vogue! Whichever way it
may be, pearls are undoubtedly
the jewellery fashion of the day.
They are outstanding in a period
when beads, “jewels”, “gold”,
silver, and glittering baubles are
worn by all women at all times.

I have never understood the
false superstition about pearls,
which are far too lovely to be
passed by because of some fool-
ish saying.

Becoming To All

Whereas gilt, and some coloured
stones co not suit all and sun-
dry, pearls are universally be-
coming. Their gleaming lustre
brings out the best points of a
woman's complexion. And even
if the usual creamy pearls do
not blend with certain skin tone,
there are the newer pastel tints
of the day — pink, blue, mauve
and grey to choose from. You
will have noticed, too, that two
or even three colours ally very
pleasingly. And how wonderfully
well do these “beads” decorate a

plain outfit — the high-necked
day dress, or the low-necked
evening frock. The new dark

sweaters simply cry out for a
fancy necklet. And although the
single, double and treble rows
are still popular, new arrange-
ments are as striking as they are
unusual.

Fashion Your Own Necklet
Fortunately pearls are far less
expensive now than they were a
year or so ago, And, by the
way, pearls, the ordinary round
kind, as well as more elaborate
drops, can be bought singly, so

that you can work out some ex-

travagant ideas for yourself, For
it is quite possible you have

some broken strings tucked away
somewhere,
two intermingle very well.

beads as well, The

I thave recently retrieved a

box full of broken necklets and

transformed them into most ap-

pealing necklaces, bracelets and

Elizabeth Taylor On The Hop

ELIZABETH TAYLOR on the
hop. As soon as she has finished
“The Girl Who had Everything,”
MGM will start her off on
“Athena,” a story about health
fiends.

IN Hollywood they are busy
selling tickets for seats in London
to view the Coronation. Prices
range from £3 5s, to £32 12, 6d.
for the best places,

~~ CROSSWORD



























She nas nota ae 40 suist on. (5)

ne has no’ s ex. .

Mature. (4) 10, Dread. (4)

. Rasp. (5)

. In final Soccer results, too. (4)

A moist adjective. (5)

. None provide the light. (4)

. Colloquially a mere trifle. (4)

. Eager to bend the knee, (4)

2. Level. (*)

A ride by Turkish decree. (5)

25. Is in succession to a decree. (4)
Winter conveyance. (4)

27. A peneer to a large number.





somes
Sesaehoor

reas
Por








If it. (6
Some ‘ers play on

More Palignant. thi a Pat '
a? 3. Popular applause. (7)
settle

This cap is arresting. (3
You could call them iunere. (6)
"Tw: and jump. (4) j

B8Se3eF2 gp pe

5 )

copper? (4
Ripe given by pine ? (4)
The way you go. (3)
ja ARE ae
Bees: of : ba ae mote
PR MYE SRG Sip siete ote

: 24, Posts: 17, Rut: 18, Awe:

GARETY

The Garden—St. James
TODAY & TOMORROW 8 30 P.M
“KID GALAHAD"

Wayne MORRIS &
“CASABLANCA”
Humphrey BOGART

“SUN, & MON 4.45 & 8.30 P
“ON MOONLIGHT BAY"
Doris DAY — Gordon MacRAE

MIDNITE SAT.
“BLACK EAGLE” William BISHOP
“DESERT RENEGADE"
Charles STARRETT





. .






























GIANT THRILLS...
TERRIFIC ACTION...
in WARNER’S
RE-RELEASE of —

DODGE
Cmury

STARRING
ACTION STAR
ERROL FLYNN

With

Olivia DeHAVILLAND
Ann SHERIDAN,
Bruce CABOT
Alan HALE, Snr.

Victo JORY ¢
and OTHERS x
BARBAREES (DIAL 5170)
Opening—
: TO-DAY (Friday)
$ 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
X and Continuing DAILY
-


















REFRESHING political note
from Virginia. Francis Miller is
running there for the U.S, Senate
and he describes the incumbent
Senator Harry Byrd as “tired.”

The 65-year-old Senaor prompt-
ly challenges Miller to a race up
the side of Old Rags Mountain,
8,200ft, high. And Miller accepts
—“if the Senator will discuss some
campaign issues at the top.”

LATEST hot-weather wear for
American men is a shantung silk

EMPIRE
Opening To-day 2.30 & 8.30 and
Continuing Dally 4.45 & 8.30
Tr LDEN HORDE”
cca. oe OF GENGHIS KHAN
Color by Technicolor
Starring
Ann BLYTH — David FARRAR
EXTRA

2 Ree, Musical Short—
KING COLE AND HIS TRIO

SAT. at 1.30
MAN FROM
OKLAHOMA







SAT. MIDNITE
HOEDOWN





and
Hurricane Island

OLYMPIC
Today to Mon. 4.30 & 8.15
Repubiie's Whole New Serial—
DESPERADOES' OF THE WEST
with
Richard POWERS—Roy BANCROFT
2% hours of Solid Action!

Gat. at 1.30
Bells of Rosita
and







Sat. Mid-nite
Whole Serial



Along The

Zorro’s Black
Navajo Trail Whip





ROODAL THEATRES









THEATRES

shirt. Cost—£19 19s. ;

A BOOM is going on in en-
cyclopedias, Cynics say it’s be-
cause of all the radio and TV
quiz programmes, ‘and the huge
prizes they give for knowledge.

THOUSANDS of en
sporting big shiny buttons in their
lapels reading: “I like Ike.” But
there is a man in New York who
is causing laughter and occasional
indignation. His button reads
“Ike likes _me.”—L.E,S,













ROXY

TO-DAY ONLY 4.30 & 8.15
“PASS PORT TO PIMLICO”

and
“DON'T TRUST YOUR HUSBAND”

Opening To-morrow 430 & 8.15
Johnny WESSMULLER in
“JUNGLE MAN-HUNT”

and
“CHINA CORSAIR”
with
Jon HALL



Sat. Mid-nite—Whole Serial
“DON DARE DEVIL RIDES AGAIN"

ROYAL

To-day only 430 & 8.15
Fred McMURRAY
in

“SINGAPORE”
and
“THE LOST MOMENT”

Sat. & Sun. 4.30 & 8.15
Gary COONER. in
“CLOAK AND DAGGER"

and
“THE ADV. OF DON JUAN”









BARBAREES
(DIAL 5170)

TODAY 4 45 & 8.30 p m
& Continuing Daily

Action-packed
Entertainment . . .

RE4RELEASE
Errol FLYNN in —

DODGE CITY

Olivia De HAVILLAND

———
Sat. Special 1.30 p.m
LAW OF THE
BADLANDS
Tim Holt &
PRAIRIE LAW
George O'Brien

—————————

DIAL 2310
TODAY (3 Shows)
2.30 — 4.45 & 8.30 p m.
and Continuing Daily
4.45 & 8.30 p.m,

“THE TANKS
ARE COMING”

Steve Cochran
Mari Aldon

Sat. Special 9.30 & 1.30
vharles STARRETT Double
SOUTH OF DEATH
VALLEY &
RENEGADES OF THE
SAGE
OO
——
MIDNITE SAT.
“CHEROKEE UPRISING”
Whip WILSON and
WESTERN RENEGADES"
Johnny Mack BROWN









Warner





Coming

TO-DAY 5 & 8 30 AND

AED SKIES
LET)

CONSTANCE
SMITH

JEFFREY





“COLT 45"
(Color)
Ruth ROMAN
Rudoiph SCOTT

GLOBE

OISTIN
(Dial 8104)
fODAY & TOMORROW
4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
“HELLZAPOPPIN &
“BAGDAD” (Color)
Maureen O'HARA
Paul CHRISTIAN
een
———OOO
Sat. Special 1.30 p.m.
COWBOY CAVALIER
Jimmy Wakely &
SILVER RAIDERS
Whip WELSON

MIDNITE SAT,
RED DESERT
Don Barry &

FRONTIER REVENGE
Lash La Rue
Fuzzy St. John






SUN & MON.

4.45 & 8.30 p.rh.
“CUBAN PETE”














even brooches. You can combine
a couple of long strings of pearls,
but instead of just allowing them
to hang down onto your topless
evening dress, tie them together
with a ribbon bow at one side of
the neck in a quite effective
manner.

“Lover’s Knot” Necklet

You can have your pearls re-
strung into a “lover's knot”
necklet. One short row can be
left as originally threaded, and
another row arranged into three
bows, and attached at intervals
to the first necklet. You might
well copy this idea.

If you have a_ double-rowed
choker, give this an original touch
by fastening a jewelled brooch
over it at one side of the throat.
You can effectively attach your
“clips” to a necklace, but do
make sure they are secure.

To Catch the Eye
The four short rows of pearls
finished at either end with a
coloured stone catch the eye.
These are tied in a loose bow on
to a choker necklet of pearls that
has beads interspersed into it
This bow, by the way, is caught
with invisible threads to keep it
in place. The five strand necklet
looks lovely against the back-
ground of your plain dress, It
also brings out the pearliness of
the teeth.
Always Remember

Harking back to synthetic
pearls, let me give you a tip or
two about them. Clean them
regularly. They'll look all the
better for a good rubbing with
tissue paper. Don’t, on any ac-
count wash them. It will ruin

their lustre, and if they are not
particularly good ones, take off
their “skin.” ,

Thread them on nylon, It is
much less liable to break than
ordinary pearl thread. You can
often buy it with a wire already
attached as a needle. If you
want to lengthen a_ necklace,
thread with knots between. To
get these even, stab a hatpin
into a pincushion, Begin by
fixing to the clasp, then thread



TRY OVEN FRESH SERVICE

Get some of these for your

holiday

Delicious











only 38c.





Don Porter &
“FOLLOW The BOYS”

Mid-Nite Sat. Show
LOCAL TALENT

on PARADE
Pie ss
NO WAY OUT

(Richard WIDMARK)
and

Diamond HorseShoe

(Betty GRABLE Dick HAYMES)
TALENT CONTESTANTS

GERALD DAISLEY—
Here Comes Heaven

DOUG GRIFFITH—
You Can Do No Wrong

WINSTON RUDDER—
It only happens when I dance
with you

AL BARNETT—
Till we Meet Again

NEVILLE SYMMONDS—
Crazy For Love

DARNLEY WADE—
Too Young To Know

GORDON GILKES—
May The Lord Bless You

BASIL CALLENDAR—
Bewitched & Bothered













MARIE & SHORTCAKE BISCUITS

obtainable in 4lb. Pkgs only 32¢.

per Pkge or per lb. only 54.

SHIRLEY BISCUITS

only 46c.

WIBIX SODA CRACKERS

On sale everywhere

The West India Biscuit Co., Ltd.



MAY 30, 1952

To

a pearl, tie a knot around the
hatpin, push the knot up close to
the pearl, then pull out the hat-
pin. Slip on another pearl and
knot as before. If you only want
the row a little longer, only put
knots at each end. Actually
knotted necklets are wise be-
cause they save the beads scat-
tering alk over the place if they
do happen to break.

A Clip On The Ear

Earrings which clip on to, or
go through the ears have never
been more fashionable than they
are just now. And they are becom-
ing—if the ears are worthy of
them. “

But ears aren't just alike,
Some are pretty, some could be
made much prettier than they
are. Shiny ears are as much a
make-up fault as a shiny nose.
If they do show, they need a
little make-up so, that their skin
tone will be the same as your
face. The skin of the ears is
generally a trifle shiny. A light
touch with the powder-puff will
put a stop to this.

Or you can use Cake make-up.
Tf cake make-up is used, touch
the sponge to the ear in one or
two places, then spread or blend
with the finger-tip.

This make-up will tone down
any redness to whiagh the ears
may be prone,

LISTENING HOURS

FRIDAY, MAY 30, 198
4.00—7.15 p.m. 19.76M 25.53M





4 00 p m. The News, 4.10 p.m, The
Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. Charlie Kunz,
450 p.m. Bedtime with Braden, 5 00 p.m.
The Oaks, 5.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice,

6.00 m. Merchant Navy Programme,
6.15 on Invention of Music, 6.45 p.m.
Sports Round-Up and Programme

Parade, 7.00 p.m, The News, 7.10 p.m.

Home News from Britain.
7.15—10 30 p.m. 25 58M 31.32M



iit aI

p. We: 7.45 p.m.

7.15 p.m. West Indian Diary, *

Song and Dance, 8,15 p.m. Radio en

reel, 8.30 p.m. World Affairs, 8 < LY

igierne, WEE a Mi Stain a

900 p.m. Ring p " ani

News, 10.10 p.m. News ’

30.18 out The Debate Continues, 10.30
p.m. From the Third Programme.

aie

picnic






























per lb.








per lb.
















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With the important ad-
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inconsistently low!

This latest shipment
offers a remarkable
choice of colours and
weights — calculated to
cool the hottest day!

C.B. Rice
& Co.



FRIDAY, -MAY. 30, , 1952

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Mounties’ Dogs Take

Refresher Courses
—And Re-graduate

* Royal Canadian Mounte

CALGARY, Alta.
ti Police dogs smartest of the

species—still have to go back to school once in a while.
That's why six of the “force’s finest” were in Calgary

on a two-week refresher course in the trick
ing, tracking, guarding criminals and seni

of hidden liquor.
When they completed t
ated again.

Central African
Territories Talk

Ow Closer Union

The Conference on the proposed
Federation of Southern Rhodesia,
Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland,
which has been holding discus-
sions at Lancaster House since
April 23, concluded today with the
adoption of a resolution of sincere
loyalty and devotion to Her
Majesty The Queen and the Royal
Family

The Conference has reached
agreement on a draft Constitu-
tional Scheme. This will be pub-
lished as a White Paper as soon
as possible and will, for the
first time, provide an opportunity

for the fullest explanation and
diseussion of la definite draft
Scheme, both in the United

Kingdom and Ceiiral Africa

The conference has agreed on
all important matters of principle
including the setting up of a
Federal Legislature and Executive
the maintenance of the Protec-
torate status of the two Northern
Territories and of the self-govern-
ing status of Southern Rhodesia
within the Federation; the eom-
position of the Federal Assembly
(including two elected Africans
from each of the three Territories) ;
the division of powers between
the Federal and Territorial Gov-
ernments; the financial implica-
tions of Federation; the appoint-
ment and functions of a statutory
African Affairs Board; the estab-
lishment..of a Federal Supreme
Court, and the procedure for
amending the Federal Constitution.
The conference re-affirmed and
gave effect in the draft Scheme
to earlier assurances on the sub-
ject of African land ri ,

It was decided to appoint Fiscal,
Judicial and Public Service
Commissions to fill in the details
of certain parts of the draft Con-
stitution in the light of principles
accepted at the Conference, As
soon as the reports of these Com-
missions are available it is intend-
ed that a further Conference
shall be held to put the draft
Constitutional Scheme into final
form. It is hoped that this Con-
ference will take place in the
last quarter of this year.

The Conference recorded its
regret at the absence from the
discussions of African representa-
tives from. the. two Northern
Territories, pore paid tribute to
the -contmbtition’ of =the African
vepresentatives from Southern
Rhodesia,

The Conferehce believes it has
devised a draft Federal Scheme
which will work and will safe-
guard the essential~interests of
the three Territories and of all
their inhabitants.

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

29th May, 1952

Cable and Wireless (W.I, Lid. advise
that they can now communicate with
the following ships ‘hrough their Barba-
dos coast station:—

§.8. Willemstad, S.S. Patuca, 8S.S. Bet-
wa, $.S, Seavigil, S.S. Alcoa Roamer,
S.S. Sardegna, S.S. Canadian Construc-
tor, S.S. Sundale, S.S. 5S. Inez, SS.
Bruno, SS Samana, &S_ Craftsman,
SS Unimuay, S.S Lady Rodney, S.S.
Carmen, SS Ivy Bank, S§_ Christian-
bergh, & El Aleto SS. Southern
Ctiies, SS. Elisa, SS



Juno, S.S. At-

lantic Air, SS Esso Philadelphia, 8.8.
Helder, S.S. Dewdale, S ©. Andreagritti,
ss

Alcoa Puritan, SS. Mormacstars





t giant was slain by

ENTIRE PROCEEDS

arts of attack-
ng out caches

he refresher, the dogs gradu-

Their graduation consisted of
showing an audience at Calgary's
Vietoria Park their talents all
done with unbelievable control at
the commands of their masters.

The dogs—all German Shep-
herds from detachments in Alberta
and British Columbia—make more
headlines than their masters and
they showed how they did it.

A man came running out of a
clump of brushes shooting blanks
from a pistol. ““Buck’’ was on him
in a flash, grabbed his gun arm,
forced him to drop the weapon
and stood guard over him until
cabled off by his master.

At ‘one-word command, they
sat down, laid down, stopped,
started, turned, “Silver” jumped
a seven-foot fence with ease
“Asta”, nose plastered to the
ground, found a man in nothing
flat after he had laid down a trail
as clever as a fox by running witn
huge stride, walking sideways,
jumping obstacles and doubling

. back on his tracks half a dozen

times;

Then the “booze hounds’
showed the skill that have made
them famous throughout the
world.

The command ‘search booze’
sent one dog off, criss-crossing the
huge fleld where two bottles of
liquor had been hidden beneath
the ground.

After several minutes cruising,
it picked up the scent and began
digging furiously. One bottle was
triumphantly produced. The other
was unearthed seconds later.

Corporal Gordon Teeft of
Sydney, N. S. explained that the
dogs were taught to recognize
four scents-human, both dead and
alive, gunpowder and liquor.

He said the dogs begin
training when between
seven months and a year

old and are ready for police work
after six months training. They
are trained to obey -only thei!
masters and work with only the
one man throughout their careers
Canadian Mailer

When the dogs become old,
they are placed on the pension
list,

Corporal Teeft said most of the
RCMP dogs are German Shepherd
because the breed has the neces-
sary intelligence and adaptability
for the work,

The dogs in the course came
from Nelson, B.C., Westlock,
Alta., Grand Forks, B.C., Silver-
dale, B.C., Parksville, B.C., and
Calgary.



Jitney Driver
Dies In Accident

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. GEORGE’S May 23,

Tragedy stalked a party of
prospective recruits for U.S., farm
work as they hustled to the capi-
tal last Saturday morning. Charles
Benjamin, young owner-driver of
the jitney in which they travelled,
met instant death when, apparent-
ly, he lost control and the vehicle
ran into a_lgw parapet at the side
of the road and toppled over the
embankment, The fatal accident
occurred at Woodford on the
western main road.

A coconut tree checked the jitney
in its career down a steep incline
and escape of the passengers

I> PLEASE NOTE

WIN $40.00

Here is a simple Cross Word puzzle which can help you to
win $40.00 for only one shilling.

At the same time you wil!

be doing your bit to help send Barbados’ sole Olympic hope to

Helsinki dext July. mane? gow ope er your om,

1. Te SAP RNS Geen Seen ee ee Tee OER: win

prize.

2. In the event of there being no correct solution the one
containing the least errors which is opened first by the
Editor will win the prise.

: 66—Meager.
© HORIZONTAL i
1—Performs. n— net les had gorelt in Ar
i ing given

s ie Yorasofecied Gide te {0 the children ot Lot?
temple in Jerusalem? > patos
Sis at a
pal molding.

‘visions of time. VEBTICAL
Taos piece. month.
Printer’s measure.

In what E were Pharaoh's for tantalum.
host
truth.

treet railway (abbr.)

‘A border city in. the land of

1 .
IAN what place were Joghua's
men alte ow

ig—Fenitential season

19—Lam
Bevicmation. 21—C, gume.
Eternity. of shem.
mound. reek letter.
Topas hummingbird. 36— Tiny.
jun god. 7 it pulse.
Soest 31 Boveee cheer.
te ir believers warned the moon.
ae 36 is the reputed author of
5 eae 3 the Psalms?
Eq faa nara ag
#0—Bronze .
ial ‘Whi cd the field in which
Todas OR an ae" wanted?“
—Bow om aon s has the 4g—Watenful
e. - cain {e—Tora.
bird. 40—Ocean.
Name ..... 0 Kseala ORM ts br bdea dae cses theses ase sone 9 ee

soeces .-- Address .
TO FARNUM FOR

Entries can be posted or delivered to the “Ad vocate Stationery” or Advertising Office



A HANDY GIFT FOR EISENHOWER



SMILING GEN. DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER receives a farewell gift which
+ he might put to good use if he winds up in a heated political campaign.
The fire chief of Louveciennes, the town in which NATO head-
quarters is located, is shown shaking hands with Ike just after he had
given him a fire helmet. Mayor is second from right. (Internation!)



Ablack F avours Regular.
Broadcasting For Antigua

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA,

Mr. Kenneth Ablack, Regional Broadcasting Officer for!
the Eastern Caribbean recently visited Antigua for the {first
time. He discussed broadcasting matters in general and,
in particular, the possibility of establishing a broadcasting
service in Antigua,

| B.G’s New Radio
Studio May

Mr. Ablack favours the intro-
duction of a regular bvreadeast-
ing service here snd at a later
date when the city’s overhead
wiring is improved, a rediffusien
service could be introduced.

Mr. Ablack took several re-

Be Best In W.L cordings of music by the. Hell’s

(Salis ast eis Gate” Steel Band If these re-
rem ur ¢ n Corresponden i

GEORGETOWN, May 15 cordings are good enough, it is

understood taey will be used as
sound background to the film of
the band which was taken here
two months ago by a British Film

Mr. Harry Temple, radio engin-
eer, arrived on Tuesday on sec-
ondment for about six months to
the B.G. United Brbadcasting

Co., to instal equipment as fai Unit Mr. Ablack is quite im-
as transmitters go, at the new sates with the Hells Gate’
ar

receiving station which will be
erected at the south-western end
of St. Philip’s playground, George-
town. It is expected the station
would take about four months to
complete, and it is hoped to start
building operations within two of Antigua’s most successful left
months. When completed, the arm pace bowler Eustace Waleott
building will cost approximately is very much like that of Frank
$70,000, which would not include Worrell. Tall, slim Walcott got
the installation of electronic equip- ten wickets in the match. He is

Mr. Ablack was a guest at jhe
Antigua Beach Hotel He saw
the first test match, Antigua /vs,
the Empire Cricket Club of: Rar-
bados and he says that the action

ment 1 Barbadian who joined the Lee-
r wards Police Force three y ;
Mr. Temple came to the West ago seer

Indies in 1947 and set up the new
studio in Kingston, Jamaica, and
one in Port-of Spain, Trinidad,
in 1949.

A number of Antiguan Cricket
enthusiasts gathered at the Recre-
ation Grounds one morning and
listened for an hour to an inter-
esting talk and demonstrations on
cricket by Mr. Ablack.

Ronald Smith Is
Civil Engineer“:

‘From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. GEORGE'S, May 23,
Mr, Ronald Smith, formerly of
the local branch of Cable and
Wireless and a Barbados _ trainee
in telegraphy, has qualified in
Canada as a Civil Engineer.
He graduated on May 8, at the
Nova Scotia ‘Technical School
where he spent two years after

The architects of the new studio
for Georgetown are Messrs. Wat-
kins & Partners. When the new
studio is in operation an entirely
new aerial system will be m use
which will improve coverage in
rural areas. Mr. Temple said
that judging from the prelimin-
ary plans he had seen—-/inal
architects’ plans are still in pre-
paration— the Georgetown sta-
tion will be one of the finest in
the Caribbean—if not the best



Transmitting site will be at
Thomas Lands on the Atlantic
seaboard, and the present one at
Lodge Village, southeast George-
town, will be used as an interim

er a previous three-yeay course at
sh ~ Acadia University,

without serious injury was. mira- He has now taken up an
culous, two being treated in appointment with a firm of Con-
hospital, but Benjamin was sulting Engineers in Bridgetown,
hurled out to crash in a rocky Nova Scotia,

ravine some thirteen feet away Mr. Smith is elder son of Mr.
from where the vehicle was S. H. Smith, Managing-Director
stopped. of Messrs Jonas Browne & Hub-

At Gouyave the same afternoon
a large gathering attended the
funeral of the driver whose little
bus, constructed on a car chassis,
was popularly known as “Last
Train.”

bard here, and Mrs, Smith

His younger brother, Raymond,
who was attached to the Public
Health Engineering Unit, Wind-
ward and Leeward Islands, is wow
studying Radio in Canada,









NEW CLOSING DATE

3. Entrance fee of one shilling (1/-) must be enclosed with
each solution along with name and address on the coupon
printed below.
Any entry which is not accompanied by the entrance fee
will be immediately destroyed.
All entrants for this competition agree to abide by the
decision of the Editor of the Barbados Advocate.
The competition will be closed on Friday, 30th May, at
4 p.m,
All envelopes must be clearly marked CROSS WORD
PUZZLE COMPETITION and addressed to the Editor, the
Barbados Advocate, 34 Broad Street.
The name of the winner will be published in the Sunday
Advocate of June 1.

~~ oo a

51—Shoshonean Indian. 63—Kunob.

53—Observed. 65—In addition.

55—Spirit of the air 66—Transgression.

56—Asparagus. 67—How many mites did ti 00F
57—To what were the breast- widow throw into tl ea-

plates of the locusts com- sury?

ared? 70—Which of Judah's so: vas
5a—Stupor. slain by the Lord?
60—Climax. 72-—~Mother,
62—Serf. 14—Symbol for silver.





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Colenial Trade
Unions Are Patchy

—JOHN

In a frank examinatio:

May issue of “New Comnx
effect of varied help given
British T.U.C., and more late
ation of Free Trade Unions.

This is his answer:

“The results to date are
places, equally discouraging
assess what fruits will come
national Conference of Fre»
ganisation to cover the wal
projected and a callege is iv
He continues
‘Symptomatic ot the present
posiuon is the state of Nigeria.
After two years of chaos and con-
Tusien, consequent on pouitical
feuds ang political adventuring,
the trade union situation is nov
ginning to sort itself out, thanks
‘o the initiative of the organised
workers and to the influence

*a delegation from the I.C.F.7T.\

which visited West Africa lat
year. The Communist-domina-
ied Nigeriam Labour Congress h
lost over 100,000 members, and
its pre-Soeviet general secretary
has resigned. An action commit-
tee leads those who see industrial
progress through democratic
methods

“What they must do to progress
further is much the problem of
Colonial trade unions everywhere
They must make sure that mem-
bers pay their contributions regu-
jarly, since no officials can afford
#@ run the union or live theim-
selves on a hand-to-mouth ba
They must put forward demands
that are possible of achievement
and not just puffed up to retain
the interest of the men A Reg-
istrar of Trade Unions might hei)

them to keep their books bett
without interfering with thew
finances. He could further out

line anq demonstrate the virtues
of friendly benefit schemes whici
might be run to encourage ihe
regular payment of subscription
and which, in this country in 1h
last century, helped many orga:

isations over the first difficult
stile
“It is in the way they tackl

these basic problems that trade
unions in the Colonies will! flou
ish as well administered guard-
ians of working-class standard,
or will perish amid a confusion
of manifestoes, wild demands and
personal and political ambitio s,
There have already been enov«)
of these... At all = coets,
Administration must avoid wish-
ing trade unions on workers wo
are not ready for them, as hi
pened in Nigeria after the war
“On the other hand, it is wll
that the unions in British Colon’ »
have a freedom that is denied to
organisations in French territor-
ies... This opportunity for indiv-
idual. development may yet pro-
vide the key to a widening trace
union horizon in those Colonics
which are part of the Britivh
Commonwealth,”

th



MAIL NOTICE



Mails for Martinique, Guadelouy,
Deminica, United Kingdom and Fran
by the S.S. Colombie will be closed at
the General Post Office as under

Parcel Mail at 3 p.m, on the th
May, Registered Mati at ® a.m, and
Ordinary Mai) »* 10.15 a.m. on the 3ist
May, 1952
—



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requent flights to al] main cities
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——





WALTON

LONDON, May 15,
of the trade union situation in

the Colonies, Mr. John Walton asks in an article in the

mwealth” what has been the
by the Colonial Service, th |

ly, the International Confeder- |
|
Farm Workers |
Send Money
For Red Cross

(From Our

patchy; encouraging in som
in others. It is too early
» from the plans of the Inter
Trade Unions for regional ©)
d, though an office in Accra
be set up in Ceylon.”

Own Correspondent

GEORGETOWN, May 15,
The bateh of farm workers from
British Guiana who were sent to
the U.S.A. last year have got t
gether and subscribed $120 (U.S.)
half of which they have donated
to the Red Cross Society “which
was nice in serving us will
light lunches during the time w»
were waiting for selection,” and
$60 to the Children’s Doreag Club
which accomodated us during the
time of selection and which is
doing such good work amon
children,”

80

In letters home the boys disclos<
that the big tobacco company em
pleying them, is so satisfied with

their work “they would be glad
to have 300 B.G., boys this year
and ‘are actually keeping places

for them.”

So far there is no definite word
from Government circles whether
British Guiana will | sendin
farm workers to t' ULS.A., the
year, Ne 4ecdais or confirmation

wird oe obtained about an
ilteration to the original unde
standing given to British Guian

» send a full quota this year
Last year only part of the quot.
of 100 were sent

RATES OF EXCHANGE

THURSDAY, 29th May, 1952
NEW YORK
Selling Buying
73 1/10 Cheques on Bankers 71 4/10
Sight or Demand
Drafts 71 2/10
73 1/10% Cable
vi 610 Currency oo 816
Coupons 69 2/10
wo Silver 20%
CANADA
76 8/10% Cheques on Bankers 74 6/10
Demand Drafts 74.45
Sight Drafts 143/10
76 2/10% Cable
i4 8/10" Currency 7% 1/10"
Coupons 72 4/10
50% Silver 20
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PAGE THREE |






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—



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PAGE_ FOUR

eal ADVOCATE

Sorelfesme ere BO Lg





Sine aes

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown

Friday, May 30, 1952 : ae

_—_—

PLAIN SPEECH

THE report of the Auditor General on
the audit of the Accounts of the Colony for
the year 1949-50 has been published as a
Supplement to the official Gazette of May
15, 1952.

This document which gives a comprehen-
sive account of Government Revenue and
Expenditure during the period under re-
view is noteworthy for two other reasons.
Indeed its comment on Friendly Societies
deserves full reproduction in this island’s
Press.

In May 1952, it is startling for any citizen
to read that “the audit of the accounts of
the Friendly Societies for the year 1949 has
not yet been completed” and that it is not
possible to state the number of Friendly
Societies in existence at the close of the
last calendar year as the 1949 accounts of
some of the Friendly Societies have not yet
reached this office.”



»

Everyone knows that there are more than
100 friendly societies in existence in Bar-
bados and everyone knows the large part
friendly societies play in the life of the
community. Less people, however, are
aware of the existence of a report made on
the Friendly Societies of the West Indies
by an official sent out by the Colonial Office
in London some years ago.

The reasons for withholding that report
from publication have not been made
known by the Colonial Office, but keeping it
from public circulation has clearly not
benefited the West Indies.

“The audit of the accounts of the Friendly
Societies and of the Trade Unions” writes
the Auditor General in his latest report
occupies almost the whole time of two ex-
perienced clerks owing to the unsatisfac-
tory way in which some of the accounts are
kept and rendered for audit. In spite of the
great deal of instruction given to the offic-
ers of some of the Societies and the ad-
verse reports made year after year there
has on the whole been little improvement.
Generally speaking the control exercisea
over both the income and expenditure of
these Societies leave much to be desired.
Some of the officers seem either unable or
funwilling to carry out their duties effi-
ciently. The accounting records are often

. both inadequate and inaccurate.”

Really this is plain speaking and the
public is entitled to ask what steps are the
Government taking to see that Friendly
Societies conduct their affairs as they
should be conducted.

The Auditor General also turns a spot-
light on “delays in the rendering of the 1949
accounts of the Barbados Workers Union in
a form which could be considered proper
for audit examination”.

Instructions, it is noted, were issued by
the Auditor General's Department during
the year under review which “if carefully
followed, should place the accounts of this
Union on a proper footing and should mini-
mise to some extent the difficulty which the
Union officials appear to experience as the
accounting requirements laid down for
their guidance are both simple and ortho-
dox”. At the time of writing on the 30th
May 1951, the Auditor General states that
the examination of the Barbados Workers
Union 1949 Accounts are still in progress
and “it is hoped that this will be completed
shortly.”

‘Tm pleasant contrast it is refreshing to
note that the accounts of the Clerks’ Union,
the Shipping and Mercantile Association,
the Sugar Producers’ Federation and the
*Bus Owners’ Association “have been aud-
ited and the annual financial statements
submitted by them duly certified.”

On the policy of government expendi-
ture the Auditor General considered it
necessary to direct attention to the extent
to which several of the amounts appropri
ated exceeded the actual requirements.

“While it igrealised that it is undesirable
that supplementary provision should be
continually sought yet it is felt that a higher
standard of precision should be aimed at
and a greater effort made to curtail infla-
tion of the original estimates.”

What could be sounder advice?

Late though it is in appearing the report
of the Auditor General on the audit of the
accounts of the colony for the year 1949-50
deserves the attention of every’ voter. .

So It's Hack Te
Never-Never Land

WASHINGTON,

AFTER nearly a fortnight of freer shop-
ping, what’s the score among America’s
storekeepers?

Just 12 days ago the Government de-
cided to suspend “Regulation W’—mean-
ing that the minimum requirements con-
trolling hire-purchase—the old “never-
never”—were swept away.

This controversial step was taken in an
attempt to bolster American business
which was sagging rather alarmingly. Has
it worked?

The answer seems to be—Yes, up to a

point.—L.E.S.

WASHINGTON,.

Across the country the glad cry
gOes up “Nothing down and years
to pay.” It comes from merchants
}and shopkeepers, big- and little,
and greets the news that Wash-
ington has cut out all the regu-
lations about hire-purchase.

From now on that new car,
fridge, or TV set will be bought
on terms worked out between the
buyer and seller—it is strictly up
to them.

Will this prove to be the long-
awaited “shot in the arm” which
will brisk up slow spring busi-
ness? We shall see.

To help things along, the banks
tre to announce new credit poli-
cies.

And a sign of brighter times
comes from New Yorks stock
market. News of relaxed hire-
purchase controls sent shares in
TV, cars and electric gadgets like
fridges and washing machines
up by more than 14s.

The president of Emerson Radio
and Gramophone’ Corporation,
Benjamin Abram, said there will
be 25 percent. more employment
in the radio and TV industry
and TV will be in the homes of
people who could not previously
afford it.

Dr. Douglas Kelly, of the Uni-
versity of California, is one of
America’s top psychiatrists (he
psycho-analysed 22 Nazi war
criminals just before they were
tried at Nuremberg) .

Now he makes the serious sug-
gestion that all members of Con-
should submit to psycho-













He says: “Since these men have
the power of life or. death for
many of our citizens it would
seem reasonable that the citizens
might ask for reassurance of their
mental capacity”.

But Dr. Gregory Zilboorg, Pro-
fessor of Clinical Psychiatry at
the New York Medica) College,
takes sharp issue with him.

“Psychiatrists as psychiatrists
have as much wisdom as anyone

“Abraham Lincoln used ‘o cpy
and threaten suicide. He ran out
of his own wedding—and only
got married because his wife
caught him.

“St. Paul was a very intense

British trade in China, like
that of other foreigners there,
has filtered to that enormous
land through the Treaty Ports
all through this country. These
ports were established as depots
where foreigners could reside
and trade from the time of the
Boxer Riots, an unsuccessful
attempt to get rid of foreigners
from China, The ports include,
not onl® sea parts, such as
Foochow and Swatow, but also
many river ports, such as Can-
ton in the south, Hankow along
the huge Yang-tse river in
Central China, with massive
Shanghai near its mouth, and
Tientsin further north.

The development of trade
along this coast and these rivers
depended on regular shipping
services. A Chinese-owned ship-
ping service was always avail-
able, but British-owned ships
have all this century been more
numerous. There developed the
cnormous interests of Jardine
Matheson, the Glasgow firm
with wharfs and docks every-
where flying the “red duster”,
The freights they carried from
port to port ineluded pigs, silks,
rice, sugar, tea, blackwood for
furniture, and lacquer, The

: ruption, and their service satis-

Shell Company had its installa- fet all, ‘ ccrneee Weta eee mes

tions everywhere. Other promi- ; n
nent traders included British- Whereas this was an inter; united against the Japanese
American Tobacco, owned by Métional service in China be- iaggressor, but since the War,
Wills ; “tween the wars, the rivalry inflation of a terrible kind has
z between foreigners for the made their currency useless,
These companies had con- freight trade along China’s and this has led to unwilling-

tidence in placing their capital
in Ch@ha between the wars, as
the Treaty Ports where they
were placed were privileged to
have “extra-territoriality”, For-
cigners resident in them could
only be tried in law-courts
administered by their own



Education

To The Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—I have read a letter writ-
ten by AMATEUR in which the
writer attempts to vindicate the
policy of the Educational Authori-
ties as far as elementary schools
are concerned, In doing so, he has
criticised previous notes which
were written by J.E.B., I believe,
in last Sunday’s issue of this paper.
It is not surprising to find some-
one referring to those notes, I
myself, found them very readable
and instructive. But they could not
be otherwise, for were they not
written by one who knows?

It should not be understood that
J.E.B., had malice aforethought.
He was reasonable enough to sug-
gest that the instruction given in
the elementary schools should be
regraded. He did not suggest that
it should be discarded. Anyone
giving his views, especially on
Education, should be moved by a
public+spiritedness which com-
mends itself to all readers, regard-
less of their immediate interest in
Education or not. Perhaps the last
two lines in the motto of this
paper were in his mind: ‘For the
future in the distance and the good
that I can do.’ It is indeed pathetic
to. think of the large number of
children who, when they are
adults, will never find joy in sim-
ple books on Arithmetic, English
etc., because of their limitations in
these subjects due to inadequate
teaching during their school-days.

Therefore, I agree with those
paragraphs in which “Amateur”



else, which means little’, he says. -

man, whom phychiatrists would

1 ‘ Re
American Column

New Cars For Everyone
On Pay-As-You-Drive

.

(From R. M. MacCOLL)

call hysterical. They shoulg not
assume the role of guide to good-
ness and greatness.

Governor Tom Dewey, of New
York who ran twice for the Pres-
idency and failed twice, advises
a convention of ministers to “stick
to the Gospel in your sermons—
don’t be tempted to go wandering
off into politics’.

The Agriculture Department
tells housewives that there will
be more meat for them than was
expected this year. This sur-
prises the experts, who thought
there would be less.

Judy Garland turns down a
suggestion that her biography
should be written and published
in the autumn.

“I've got a lot of years still to
go”, she remarks.

The Human Touch: Charles
Campbell, British Government
Press liaison man in Washington
says that when he made a speech
in Dallas, Texas, the other day a
lecal paper said: “He sounded
like Winston Churchill— with the
overtones of a night-club enter-
tainer”.

There is again. great concern
in the State of New York over

the upsurge of open contempt
for the law and the display of
naked gangsterism. Wi the
brutal revenge murder of young
Arnold Schuster—the man who
led the police tothe arrest of
bank robber Willie Sutton—
fresh in everyone’s memory,
there come now two new and
shocking episodes,

For some time past a king-
pin bookie named Harry Gross
has been behind bars, but at first
when given a chance to tell a
tale in court which cculd have
indicted scores of high police
jofficials on corruption’ charges,
he resolutely refused to open his
mouth.

Then something happened to
‘change his mind—there have
Leen rumours that his sentence
will be’ greatly reduced as a
reward and Harry has
been “singing” to such good
effect that the scandal is spread-
ing to very high places.
Suddenly the underworld
fstrikes back again. Harry's

younger brother Jack, aged 25,

British Traders In China
Between The Wars

By. E. M. BINNEY

country’s laws. Thus, the em-
ployees of these firms felt sure
of receiving justice in a law-suit
as they would in their own
country,

This was essential at that
time, for the hinterland of
China was not controlled be-
tween the wars by any central
government. It was often in-
fested by bandits, and many a
“Shell” or B, A. T. man lost his
life at their hands, or was held
to ransom until his Company
“paid up” for his return, Local
Generals were the tax-gatherers
in the various provinces, and
they had their own armies, of
varying training and strength.
Some were “anti-foreign” in
outlook, others were said to
have Communist views,

The Customs duties on goods
coming from abroad were
gathered for the Chinese gov-
ernment between the wars by
foreigners, and their employees
included Portuguese, Japanese,
“White Russians”, and other
nationals as well as_ English.
They were universally admitted
to be above bribery and cor-

coast was very marked, Japan
coveted more, and she sub-
sidised her merchant vessels,
so that they were able to take
freights at uneconomical rates,
and thus run other shipping off
certain routes, We know_ that
her aim was largely political,

Our Readers Say:

writes: “Now the policy of Educa-
tion which at present obtains in the
island is the policy of the Govern-
ment—i.e., it has the approval of
the head of the administration and
of the representatives of the
people. Consequently the author of
any adverse comment aimed at the
present policy must automatically
display a lack of confidence in the
Government and the Administra-
tive chief.”

“I, however, incline to the view
that the author of ‘Educatiqu
Notes’ suffers not from any such
lack of confidence, but rather from
ignorance of the subject upon
which he/she pretends to speak
with authority.”

‘The inference to be drawn from
these paragraphs is that it is silly
to entertain any opinion about edu-
cational matters, unless such opin-
ions agree with those of the de~
partment concerned and, as a
corollary, the only persons who can
express an opinion are those who
are in charge of education in the
island. This seems an effective way
of adopting Gestapo measures
without making a show of doing
so.

There was nothing wrong with
the notes. Indeed they were
authoritative enough to be inserted
in the volume entitled “In-
structions to Teachers”. There
is no doubt about it that the
children are not well taught in
English and Arithmetic in
the elementary schools. If the
teachers are capable of teaching
these subjects, then the trouble lies
either in a lack of earnestness on
their part, or in a faulty arrange-

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

lis set upon as he strolls along
a busy New York street, pushed
finto a doorway, and beaten up.

Growls one of his assailants in
a gravel voice: “This will teach
your brother ‘to keep his trap
shut”, and almost at the same
time the telephone rings it! the

home of assistant corporation
counsel Victor Herwitz, who is
prosecuting 18 of the policemen
involved by the revelations.

“Just lay off— understand?”
Says a vice.

End this intimidation is the
cry of New York citizens, or law
and order face defeat.

In a few days the United
States Supreme Court in all its
majesty will hand down an his-
toric decision—whether Presi-
dent Truman's seizure of the
steel industry was or Was not
constitutional.

Meanwhile ‘in another of the
series of receptions which he
and Mrs. Truman are holding
jin the reopened White House, the
President entertains the judi-
ciary—headed by Chief Justice

Vinson and others of the
“Nine Old Men” ‘as_ President
Truman

, once called them in a
moment of anger.
There are smiles, polite chaiter
—and the word steel is out.

One of America’s top psycho-
logists, Dr. Livingston Welch, of
Cornell University's medical
school, is holding a one-man
show in New York of terracotta
portrait busts which he has ex-
ecuted in his spare, time.

Says he: “We're living in an
age where beauty. is despised.

“So instead of making ugly
statues of beautiful things I
make ugly statues of ugly things
and puta little humour into
them”. - 1

The Human Tcuch: At last_a
mother-in-law, traditionally
Jampooned in erican vaude-
ville ang stage folklore just as
much as in Britain, emerges as
a startling heroine of sorts.

At Beaver, Pennsylvania, two
prisoners break out the
county jail. And police arrest
43-year-old Mrs. Bertha John-
json, the mother-in-law of one
of them, charged with having
smuggled in a hacksaw hidden
in a lemon meringue pie.





for to invade China, as she did,
she needed to know the har-
bours and waterways of that
country. “Trade follows the
flag” might be re- written for
pre-war Japan as” flag
follows trade.”

While all this activity took
place along the rivers and coast
of China, trade inland was held
up by lack of good roads and
railways. Huge Westernised
modern cities grew up in .the
Treaty Ports, with banks, offices,
newspaper companies, shops,
factories theatres and cinemas,
fine hotels and wide streets In-
land, old-fashioned Chinese
towns went on unmodernised.
Their streets were narrow, rick~
shas were the main mean of
transport instead of cars,
markets were congested by
jostling mobs, zich merchants
existed alongside others fed
mainly on polished rice and
suffering from. beri-beri, and
hospitals were scaree. Local
taxes did not. go:‘towards the
erection of hospitals and schools.

While the areas where for-
‘eigners had their Treaty Ports
flourished through honest trade
and dealing, the masses of the

ness to deal with individual
firms. British firms have had to
leave their assets, such as docks
and oil installations. It would
seem that the Board of Trade or
the Foreign Office will have to
appoint negotiators to barter
goods with the “New China”.

ment of the werking of the schools.
I am’ much inclined ‘to the latter
view. Too hoc oe is + oe up
in preparing elaborate schemes in
the ks provided, and too little
time to the actual teaching. This
leads to adapting Transcription as
la short-cut to showing a day’s
work even in Arithmetic, which by
its very nature, is a mental sub-
ject and is taught, not only for its
practical value, but also for the
mental discipline which it affords.
Mental discipline_is always a slow
‘and tedious proces. It is peculiar-
ly individualistic. and never gen-
eral. But the idea of the class-
teacher nowadays is to get some
‘work down in the children’s books
within the prescribed period
‘whether it is understood or not.
This is a common fault in all the
schools. It is only reasonable to
conclude that it is brought about
by the presure of circumstances
‘over which the teachers have no
control, The same observations
may be made about the teaching
of English; too little is thought of
educating and too much of copying
from the blackboard. Whilst it is
true that Schemes of work serve
to show an Inspector what ground
has been covered it is untrue to say
‘that they indicate that the neces-
sary teaching has been accom-
plished.

“Amateur” writes as if he has no
actual contact with teaching. In-
deed I would be surprised to learn,
that he has ever taught’ any one
successfully. But he must not be
discouraged in his attempt to ex- |
press his opinions. Perhaps they
will improve with age.

ENEAS.



FRIDAY, MAY. 30, 3952

The People You Meet On
Your DAY OFF

By BEVERLEY BAXTER

AFTER the close confinement of West-
minster, I felt a natural desire, at the end
of the week, to seek new settings and see
new faces.

The opening of the Royal Academy offer-
ed both such attractions, and I wended my
way at. noon to that sanctum of hopes
fulfilled and hopes deferred.

The first person I encountered was Mr.
Attlee. After the recent General Election
it was said in the smoke-room that he
looked five years younger for having shed
the responsibility of government; and that
Mr. Churchill looked five years younger
because he had acquired it.

Incidentally, Mr. Attlee had a great suc-
cess as an after-dinner wit the other night
at the Canada Club. When I charged him
with this at the Academy he almost blush-
ed and said that it was quite spontaneous.

Lord (“Larking through the Lobbies”’)
Mancroft wil) have to look to his laurels.

TWO DAVIDS

Still searching for new faces, I ran
across two David Grenfells. You will -re-
member that he was once Secretary for
Mines. His dual appearance at the Acad-
emy was first himself in person, and then
as a bronze head. I have lost my cata-
logue, but whoever did it knew his busi-
ness—or his craft. It is a fine head.

Then I encountered Lord Brabazon, who
sat in the Commons for so long before he
was elevated. As you should know, he
holds the first British pilot’s certificate, a
fact which once appeared in print as “He
was the first certified Englishman to fly.”

Leaving the Academy, I exchanged com-
pliments with Harry Crookshank, the
Leader of the House of Commons, who
was making his entrance.

THERE is nothing so refreshing as @
change.

I liked Munnings’ caprice of a ghost
haunting the bedroom of his faithless wife
(or so it seemed to me), but where was the
horse? ‘*Sunset over Jerusalem,’’? by an
artist named Winston Churchill, has a
strong brooding sense of fate, and Lord
Alexander’s two studies cf Canada in
winter hold their own on merit.

The nudes were well balanced between
the pleasant and the unpleasant—and I
hasten to add that I am not referring to
Lord Alexander’s paintings. As we have
said, they were winter studies. ~

WE LAUGHED

Still, like John Gilpin, on pleasure bent,
I joined the throng at the Foyle’s Literary
Luncheon in honour of Miss Hermione
Gingold and Mr. Jimmy (Schnozzle)
Durante, who have both broken into print.

It is generally accepted that stage comics
are dull creatures away from the theatre,
and are given to melancholy. Therefore let
me declare that Miss Gingold and Mr.
Durante made two of the funniest speeches
that London has heard for a long time.

At the end of the function, that eminent
scholastic figure, Lord Rector Jimmy Ed-
wards, summarised the various speeches,
including those by two Beverleys, with a
wit that never missed its mark.

Douglas Fairbanks, the American who
is a knight of the British Empire, presided
with a pleasant dignity that suggests he
would make an admirable Under-Secre-
tary for Foreign Affairs if he ever decides
to become one of us—which he very near-
ly is.

On the whole, I thoroughly enjoyed my
day off and felt much better for it.

THE VOICE

AT the memorial service for that good
and noble woman Lady McGowan, the
congregation was deeply moved by the
singing of Schubert’s “Ave Maria” by a
young man with a fine tenor voice.

Few who were there knew that the sing-
er was the grandson of Lord McGowan.
His name is Peter D’Arcy Stephens, the
son of the McGowans’ widowed daughter,
Mrs. D’Arcy Stephens.

He is a remarkable young man, with
much of his grand-father’s love of adven-
ture, To study life and people, he took a
job as a waiter for a time. Now he is a
pupil of Madame Elena Gerhardt, who
says that he is very gifted.

Here is a letter from my old friend
Desmond Young, the literary brigadier
who fought Rommel in the desert and then
made a tidy fortune by biographing him
and putting him in a film.

Desmond, who writes from Guernsey,
challenges my statement of last week that
the divorces in Hollywood outnumber its
production of films.

“The divorce rate in Hollywood,” he
declares, “is no higher than that for the
U.S.A. as a whole. Actually, the rate for
the U.S.A., is not as high as that of Swit-
zerland.” *

According to statistics, Hollywood pro-
duced 429 films in the last recorded year,
1950. It is hard to believe that the
divorces, did not exceed that figure.

The brigadier should remember that
most of the film stars go elsewhere to cut
the nuptial knot—for example, Nevada,
where divorce is almost a major industry.

But this Switzerland business interests
me. Is it the mountains that put ideas in
their heads?—L.E.S.














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FRIDAY, MAY 36, 1952

Martindale Will Keep
Sweepstake Ticket

AFTER twenty minutes’ deliberation at the Court of
Common Pleas yesterday a special jury unanimously de-
cided that Lambert Martindale, one of the claimants of
the Sweepstake ticket F—9547 which won £500 at the
Spring: Meeting of 1949, had established his claim,

a a €cision was against Clement Gill, Joseph Drakes,
ur Broomes and Le Roy Branker, who Martindale’s
counsel, Mr, D. H. L. Ward, said had conspired together
= roe peer tiadale out of the money.
earing of the case which went have hea: i .
on four days, was presided over Spring Meeting Sue 1949. 24
by the Chief Justice Sir Allan “It is beyond dispute.” he said
Collymore who summed it up to “that Mr. F. E, C, Bethell bought
the jury yesterday. , the winning ticket and that
Mr. Ward was instructed by ticket was delivered to him by
Messrs Haynes & Griffith, Solici- defendant Martindale. There is
tors, Counsel for the four plain- no doubt about that. —
tiffs-claimants was Mr. W. W. “Mr, Bethell having id $5¢
Reece, Q.C., instructed by Messrs. on account to Martindale, paid
Hutchinson & Banfield, Solicitors. also $50) to the plaintiff, he being
The’ claimants who are of in doubt as to who was the
Braggs Hill all hold that they rightful owner of the ticket.
bought the winning ticket from “Martindale having delivered
ticket seller Belfield Taitt who the ticket to Mr. Bethell, then
said he sold both parties from the sued him for the balance of the
winning book but could not re- purchase money — £500. Know-
member to whom the winning ing that he had paid $50 to the
ticket was sold. plaintiffs, and knowing that they

Sixpence Shares were claiming the ticket, he puts
The one side, Gill and others the money in Court and hence

claimed that they had each had you have now to decide who is
a sixpence sh®@re in the ticket entitled to the money which is
which Gill kept in his possession. in the Court,

They said that when it was known Establishing Claim

that that ticket had won, Mar- “So that though you have the
tindale visited Gill who had not plaintiff and the defendant as the
yet heard and told him he had law prescribes, both are — the
heard as much and asked him to four plaintiffs and the defendant
allow him to see the ticket. Gill, — really claimants of the money
he claimed, unsuspectingly allow- and you should be satisfied be-
ed him to keep the ticket while fore you find for one or the
they went to get a newspaper to other. To put in another way,
check the truth of the rumour of your verdict should be if you
a win, and Gill said he was walk- find that- the plaintiffs have es-

ing in front of Martindale on their tablished their claim for the
way to get a newspaper. money or that the defendant
gfhen When a ticket was re- Martindale has established his

turned, it was discovered that it ¢]
was a substitute.

But Martindale brought evi-
dence to show that Gill ‘and
Branker, two of the plaintiffs, had
at times when it was known that
the particular ticket had won,
said in conversation to others,
that they had not won and Gill
had further said that he had the
back number to Martindale's.

Besides, the ticket seller, Taitt,
corroborated Martindale’s evi-
dence that when he sold him a
ticket of the winning book, he
was alone and not in the presence
of the four other claimants. He
denied too, that he was present
when Gill alleged he had given
receipts to the other three share-
holders. J

Names Written

Defence Counsel’ too, submit-
ted that Gill had’ lied in the face
of facts he had not foreseen, Gill
had said before a Police Magis-
trate that he had written the
three names of his partner-claim-
ants across the back of the ticket
on’ a long and a short side and
Cc. A. Coppin who gave expert
evidence as to erasures on the
tickets said that there were only
erasures on of one of the
long sides and no signs of lead
pencil writing all along the long

for the money.

“If on review of the evi-
dence you do not believe that
either the plaintiffs or the de-
fendant have or has established
a certain claim, then you should
indicate that in your verdict.

“Now w I say that, I am
not suggesting that as an easy
toss or easy way out of this case.
I am not suggesting you should
say, “well to save time and
trouble, find that nobody is right”
because it is your duty in accor-
dance with the oaths you have
taken to examine the evidence
you have heard, having due re-
gard to all the arguments.”

Reviewing the claims, he said
thatthe four plaintiffs were say-
‘ing that they in a syndicate or-
ganized by Gill, bought the
ticket at Branker’s shop from
Taitt. Gill kept it in his posses-
sion until the Saturday, the last
day of the race meeting, when,
according to Gill, Martindale
went to,Gill and _managed to get
it from him, Gill discovering
with constqrnation his
ticket was substituted,

A Summary

Put briefly, he said, Martin-
dale’s claim was based. .on the
version that he bought the win-
ning ticket, not at the time and

that

side or on a short side. lace as was alleged by Gill.
ncihen, in this ease, Gl said he Martindale had told them that he
only writtém across a long qiq not even know the number,

side and Mr.
hg had changed
evidence in the
evidence—Coppin being an
partial witness.

The Chief Justice first told the
jury that it was not their concern
in any way to deal with any pre-
vious trial which had taken place
in connection with the matter.
There had been certain deposi-
tions given before the Police
Magistrate which were put before
them in evidence for purposes of
argument.

“We know,” he said “that there
was a case and the defendant in
this case was charged and , he-
was acquitted; that ended the
matter,

“You and I do not know the
course that trial took in the minds
ef the jury who were trying it
and therefore you wipe that out
of your minds altogether. I say
that because as Mr. Ward has
rightly put to you, this is not a
criminal trial which engages your
attention now. In a criminal trial,
proof must be to the satisfaction
of the jury trying the case, proof
such as would leave a jury with-
out reasonable doubt before that
jury can convict. But the stan-
dard of proof in this particular

Ward argued that hut that he had taken it home
j ‘ 4 there and 0} 3
oe a ae young w An Watts,
to write certain names on_ it.
That would mean that the plain-
tiffs planned together to get him
in trouble, to procure the pro-
ceeds of the winning ticket —
that Gill, Broomes, Drakes and
Branker conspired together when
they discovered that Martindale
had the winning ticket.

Those were the two versions,
the main issue for them, the
jury, when they came to say
which side satisfied them as te
the claims.

The Chief Justice then briefly
repeated the arguments of coun-
sel for the two sides,

He finally said: “Your task,
you well may agree with me, is
not-entirely an enviable one and
is mot so easy. The claims are
there before you and if you are
satisfied that either side has es-
tablished a claim, your verdict
would be in accordance with
that. It is entirely a matter of
fact and it is a matter entirely
for you.”

After retiring for about 20
minutes, the jury returned with
a verdict in favour of Martindale.

im-



case is not so high, as Mr. Ward CERTIFIC ATES
ight ut, ,

: Sethe weight of the evidence is PRESENTED TO
what will guide you. You are POLICEMEN

entitled to take into account all
the probabilities which arise in
considering whether you_ believe
this or that piece of evidence or
whether you accept the version
given by the witnesses of the one
side or of the other.
A Civil Matter

“Otherwise, for your purposes,
you are concerned with a_ civil
matter, the proof of which is not
so high as in a criminal charge.”

He told them that they would
also have regard to the demean-
our of the witnesses during their
testimony before them and how
they stood up under cross-exam-
ination.

“Now,” he said, “the ticket F
9574 in the Spring» Meeting of
1949 won a consolation prize in

COMMENDATION Certificates
were presented to N.C.O’s_and
men of the, Barbados Police Force
at a Parade at Central Station
yesterday morning. The recip-
ients were engaged in the inves-
tigation which resulted in the

of Carlton Brewster for the mur-
der of Norma Haswell,

Those receiving certificates for
their zeal, devoton to duty and
tenacity were: * Inspector G.
Springer, Station Sergeant Mar-
shall, Sergeant, C. Ree Cp).
205 L. Devonish, Cpl. -269~J.
Watts, P.C. 384 O. Marshall, P.
112 G. Bourne and P.C. 139 1.
Warner. :

Certificates were presented to
H.P.C. 34 C. W. Philips and

the shape, of the horse Fanny y'p/C, 37 J. Wilkinson for their
Adams. It is now 1952 and vigijance, alertness and observa-
therefore so far as time g0€S, tion above the average in detect-

some of the evidence which you jng two cases of larceny.



arrest and subsequent conviction *

_ ed guilty before





TRINIDAD



ATHLETES



Some of the Trinidad athletes and cyclists at Kensi

verday afternoon. Reading left to right they are W. Spencer eee
dad lady cyclist who will take part in a special cycling event for
ladies), H. Harewood (athlete for the 100, 220 and 440 yds. Men), M.
Agostini (sprinter), D. Matthieu the Trinidad Olympic hope in’ the
cycling Division and U. Lewis. These two will ride in the A Class

against the local wheelsmen.



More Vestries
Follow Lead

@ From Page 1.
the petition were Mr. Carter, Mr.
W. R. Coward and Mr. Gill.

Mr. Smith spoke for almost an
hour and a half against the Peti-
tion and argued that the Vestry
should, as they did in the case of
the Maude Report, consult the
rate payers before taking any
such action.

He said he could not sign the
Petition because the advocates of
such a document had not set out
any reasons which convinced him
that he should object to the Bill,

When the motion for the ac~
ceptance of the Petition was
earried, the Chairman suggested
that the Clerk should contact
those members who were not
present and ask those who so de-
sired to sign the petition. This
met with strong objection from
Mr. Smith who said that the Clerl:
should not have to go around
asking Vestrymen to sign the
petition, because the Vestry room
was the place for conducting the
business of the parish.

The Chairman’s suggestion was
put in the formt of a motion by
Mr. W. R, Coward, and again
carried by a three-two majority.
The Clerk was given a week in
which to get the signatures of
those members who desire to sign
the Petition.

In St. Philip the Vestry reached
their decision after Mr. D. D.
Garner and Mr. R. B. Skeete, the
two delegates who had attended
two joint meetings of the Vestries
throughout the island, had re-
ported that the majority of the
Vestries after lengthy sessions
had agreed in principle to a
Municipality, but thought that the
other ten Vestries should con-
tinue to function with proper
amendments to the Vestry Act.

Unanimous

The St. Thomas Vestry also,
> gable agreed to the peti-

on.

Members signing the petition
were: Rev: H. C. Shepherd, Chair-
man, Mr. K, Sandiford, Hon, J. A.
Mahon, Mr. W. T. Gooding, Mr.
L, D. Gill, J.P., Mr. S. A. Walcott,
Mr, V. E. Reeves and Mr. C. M,
Collins. Mr, J. H. Thorne is on
leave and excuses were offered
for Messrs. A, E. Cave and D. A.
Watson who were indisposed.

Those present signed four sheets
which were attached to the peti-
jtion. These sheets will be for-
warded to: His Excellency the
Governor; Hon, J. D. Chandler,
President of the Legislative Coun-
cil and other members of the
Council; His Honour Mr, K. N. R.
Husbands, Speaker of the House
of Assembly and other members
of the General Assembly and the



Right Hon. Oliver Lyttleton,
D.S.C., M.C., M.P., Principal
Secretary of State for the
‘Colonies.
LECTURE
TO-NIGHT
Nurse Sands will deliver a

lecture over fhe public address
system of the Mobile Cinema at
the Belleplaine Playing Field St.
Andrew at 7.30 tonight.

Her subject will be “Maternity
and Child Welfare” and this wiil
be accompanied by the film
“Give Your Child a Chance”
sla by the Barbados Film
Unit.

To Marry Jantaican

KINGSTON, Ja., May 28.

Arthur Winkworth, private of
‘the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, pleads
a Court Martial
today to forging the name of his
commanding officer to a document
giving him permission to marry
a coloured Jamaican girl and was
sentenced to six months deten-
tion camp. Winkworth had a
good record last war in which he
was taken prisoner.—(CP)

- SPECIAL OFFER OF -

108—20 inch ALL LEATHER “HANDY” BAGS

FITTED WITH ZIPP FASTENER

Labourer
For Sessions

HIS Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod
Police Magistrate of District “A”,
yesterday committed 39-year-old
labourer George Forde of Nelson
Street, St.
sitting of the Court of Grand
Sessions on a charge of having

Carnal knowledge with an 1l-
year-old girl.
The charge stated that the

offence was committed on April
3. Sgt. King attached to the Central
Station prosecuted for the Police
in the preliminary ‘hearing,

Thirty-three-year-old labourer
Wilfred Jones of Flint Hall, St.
Michael was yesterday remanded
until June 4, when he appeared
before His Worship Mr. C, L.
Walwyn Acting Police Magistrate
of District “A” on two charges of
wounding Ina Jones and Ruth
Aliman on May 23.



Princess Alice
Schal. Awards

The Princess Alice Scholarships
to the University College of the
West Indies for 1952 have been
awarded to Ancile Liewellyn of
Queen's Royal College, Trinidad
and Hopeton Gordon of Calabar
High School, Jamaica. They will
both read for the BSc. General
Degree.

An anonymous donor has en-
abled the University College of
the West Indies to establish twa
scholarships open to en and
women resident in the British
Caribbean Colonies and under the
age of 20.

The scholarships are called the
Princess Alice Scholarships after
f1.R.H. Princess Alice, Countess of
Athlone, who is Chancellor of the
University College.

3 Fires At Frizers

y Three fires occurred at Frizers
Plantation, St, Joseph, within
four days. One fire oecurred on
Sunday and two on Wednesday.
The fire on Sunday broke out at
about 3.30 p.m. and burnt two
and three quarter acres of fourth
erop ripe canes and one and a
quarter acres of trash.
The first fire on



Wednesday
occurred at about 7,00 a.m, and
burnt four acres of second crop
ripe canes. At 12,30 p.m. the other
re burnt ten acres of second
crop ripe canes The canes are the
property of Jose River Estates
Ltd. and were insured.

“CYRIL E. SMITH”

BRINGS FUEL

The Schooner Cyril E. Smith,
56 tons, arrived in Carlisle Bay
yesterday morning from British
Guiana, She brought in 113 pieces
of Wallaba posts, 64 pieces of
greenheart and 300 bags ef char-
coal..

The Schooner Belqueen which
also arrived yesterday from St.
Vincent brought in 670 bags of
copra, five bags of cassava starch,
three bags of peanuts, five bags
of cocoanuts, three bags of char-
coal and three packages of fresh
fruit.

The Steamship Athelbrook
which called yesterday from
Trinidad brought no cargo, This
286-ton ship thas as its agents
Jason Jones.

Fire Att Steel Shed

The quick action of the Fire
Brigade saved the Steel Shed at
Queen’s Park from damage when
a fire broke out at the shed at
about 3.00 a.m. on Wednesday.

$57 PIG STOLEN
Joseph Archer of Grazettes
Road, St. Michael, reported to
‘the Police that his pig, valued
£57.00 was stolen from a pen at
the Public Market during
Wednesday night. The Police are

cerrying out investigations.







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

WHITHER
EDUCATION ?

MR. J. E. BROME, Assistant Editor of the Barbados
Advocate and President of the Barbados Press Club, led
off a discussion at the Press Club Building on Wednesday
night on the subiect “Whither ucucation.

This was a part of the programme of discussions on
matters of public interest sponsored by the Barbados Press

Michael to the next”

Club.

Mr. A. .E. S. Lewis, M.C.P.,
was chairman and there was a
good turnout of those interested
in lecal educational problems.

Mr. Brome observed that he
would have liked to have led off
a discussion on the “Decline of
Education” but in deference to
the wishes of his colleagues he
would endeavour to point out to
them the answers to the query,

Growth
He traced the growth of the
local educational system from
1875, prior to which period, he

Said, there were patchwork edu-
cational methods which could
hardly be dignified by the name
“system”,

He said that in 1875 Bishop
Mitchinson who was known to be
an educationist of a very high
order was appointed chairman of
ithe Eduoation Comr iission and
was assisted by Dr. J. W. Car-
rington in the laying of a foun’ a-
tion which was to be the envy
af other West Indian colonir 3.

Pioneer

Mr, Brome told his audience
of records which showed that it
was Mitchinson who laid the
foundation of our system so that
Primary, Secondary and Univer-
sity Education were placed on a
proper basis and by the excellent
regulations then made, it had
happened more than once that
boys who had started their school
life in the Primary School had
been successful in gaining the
Barbados Scholarship which al-
lowed them to pursue their stud-
ies at an English University.

Trinidad Follows

He recalled how” thirty-years
later, 7915 to be exact, Mr. J. N.
Greenhalgh, another master of
educational methods and admin-
istration was. loaned from the
island on secondment to Trinidad
to recast and reshape their sy3-
tem on the lines of the Barbados
system laid down by Mitchinson.

Mr. Brome quoted a few names
of eminent scholars in ail fields
of learning which the system had
produced. He quoted for exam-

le, Abel Greenidge, Senior
Wrangler, Emtage, Mathematical
Don at Oxford, Greaves, Astrono-
mer Royal, E. M. Sealy, Exhibi-
tioner at Balliol, Henry Beaujon
Gooding, Principal of Wycliffe
Hall, Freeman Boyce, another ex-
hibitioner at Oxford, and now
Classical Professor at Codrington
College, Belfield Clarke, Harley
Street Specialist, Chris Springer,
Oxford Double First and Head-
master of Parry-Coleridge School.
Laymen Count

He stressed however that Bar-
bados, however, was not to be
judged by her eminent scholars
but the simple men and women
who make up the elusive collec-
tion known as “the community”
and it was but fair that they
should be equipped with the es-
sential tools of citizenship.

The present system was not
doing this, Mr. Brome claimed.
Age ‘grouping should not have
preceded compulsory education,
and judging by the figures on the
school roll the time had come
when there should be compul-
sion,

The attempt to enforce upon
elementary teachers the responsi-
bility for teaching, Latin, Span-
ish and Elementary mathematics
was only so much window dress-
ing while the basic principles of
education were being neglected.

Grievances

The teachers themselves had
their grievances and there were
instances of victimisation which
‘would naturally tend to make
them discontented and so under-
mine the standard of their work.

There was no justification for
making a period of 20 years the
eligible iod for teachers to
qualify for higher rates of pay
when only ten years were requir-
ed as qualification for a_ head-
mastership or headmistresship.

Erdiston trained personnel
were exempted and there were
cases in which teachers who had
taught the Erdiston graduates and
who had put in as much as nine-
teen and a half years had had to
be content with a maximum of
$130 per month while those whom
they had taught went on to $180

Pupil Teachers Go

The abolition of the pupil
teacher system was also regret-
table and there was that risk that
teachers who had been brought
straight from the Secondary
Schools with certificates were apt
to consider themselves above the
suggestions of the heddmaster
who had not their certificates but
who was nevertheless trained
and experienced in teaching.

Observations came from the
floor to the effect that the teach-
ers themselves. were against age
grouping but there was no one,
to “bell the cat”. Counter ob-

servation was that the teachers |

as a body had expressed them-

PARASOLS.

LADIES PARASOLS IN ...



selves ,
though they criticised it individ-
ually and privately.

It was also explained that a
ruling of the I.L.O. was inter-
preted to be applicable to the

pupil teacher syetem here and it
was therefore abolished,

was levelled at the
idolatry of degrees
overdone and it ‘resulted first in
attracting

sesondly in
teacher on many occasions.

the eminent scholars whose names
were mentioned earlier were the
products of men in the Elementary
Schools without degrees,
son,
Com Lermere School.

At Bathsheba T's Be SOLUBLE.

Bathsheba will be opened on Sat- |
urday, June
His Excellency the Governor, Sir
Alfred Savage. |

St. Joseph Vestry, the Chairman,
Rev.
Commissioners of
sider the erection of a latrine at|
Tent’s Bay,
sanitary
which is
fishing
tory, and that because there was
no water |
unable to get water to clean their |
fish



Under exceptional circumstances we bought these at a big discount off
the manufacturers wholesale price. They are large roomy Bags and being
all real Leather will last for years.
A Good BAG for “Week-ends” or Travel
RETAIL PRICE IN ENGLAND IS 50/- ($12.00)

BUT OUR PRICE TO YOU IS ONLY $7.20 ea.

This bargain is obtainable only from

HARRISON'S





Dial 2352
Broad Street





===



BLACK ....... serecsee,, $3.50, $4,72, $5.09
NAVY. BROWN UVa WO Tre 9 Ok
PLAIDS .......... sees $6.24, $6.35, $6.56
Also PLASTIC ...... riyrresy iter ee |

These can be obtained in our Millinery Dept.



_ CAVE
SHEPHERD
& CO, LTD.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street





= SS

PAGE FIVE

GEORGE PAYNE'S

1S

GOOD COCOA























in agreement with, it al-

LL.O. Ruling

bitter criticism

present day ®
It was being

Trenchant and

two impostors and
choosing the wrong



It was pointed out that some of

FINE —
PURE

Parkin-

Adams, Jones, and also of



Cemmunity Gertre

Open On June 14 |

|
at}



The Community Centre

14th, at 5 p.m. by

At yesterday's meeting of the’

Mallalieu urged that the TRY OVEN FRESH SERVICE
Health con-! se g

He pointed out that)
conditions at that Bay |

fast becoming a big
unsatisfac- |

Get some of these for your

centre were

supply, people were

holiday picnic



Delicious

MARIE & SHORTCAKE BISCUITS

NEW ARRIVALS

AT
obtainable in $lb. Pkgs only 32¢.
WEATHERHEAD'S
per Pkge or per lb. only 54¢
¢

Evenflo Feeders

Evenflo Teats

Evenflo Caps & Discs

Gator Roach Hives

Caroid & Bile Salts Tablets

Blue Jay Corn Plasters

Neflson’s Cherries in
Maraschino 1-Ih & 4-Ib
Boxes

Neilson’s Rosebuds

Neilson’s Nut Roll

Cherry Blossom

Eat More (Peanut Chew)

O.H, Henry Bars

V118 Films

V130 Films

K135 Colour Films

620 Colour Films

120 Colour Films

Bath Caps

Johnson's Baby Talcum

Palmer’s Hair Success

Lloyd’s Adrenalin Cream

Boot’s Insulin

Ronson Lighter Kits

Boot’s Family Liniment

Boot’s Worm Syrup

Hoodoo Ant Tape

Maltlevol

Spot Dice

French Chalk (Best)

Skol Sun Lotion

Fresh Vegetable Seeds

Fresh Flower Seeds

Junket Tablets

Coty’s Talcum,

Kleenex Tissues

Kotex

Modess

Nail Files

Torch Batteries

Canasta Playing Cards

Household Rubber Gloves

Waldorf Toilet Paper

Hind’s Honey & Almond
Cream (U.S.A)

Boot'’s Mineral Salts
(For Cattle)

SHIRLEY BISCUITS

only 46c. per lb.



WIBIX SODA CRACKERS

only 38¢. per lb.

On sale everywhere

The West india Biscuit Co., Ltd.

TO-DAY’'S
SPECIAL!!

a veal delight

PINEAPPLE

CREAMS
at KNIGHTS



BRUCE
WEATHERHEAD
LTD. ;

Head of Broad Street.










STANSFELD. SCOTT & CO. LTD.

y

LD

eS —

7 a For This
Originally Week
“KARDOMAH TEA '4-tb Pkt. .........-. $ 39 ~-$-.35
O.K. COFFEE }-tb Pkt. pies 10 64
| CANADIAN SARDINES per tin ; ’ 20 18
CRAWFORD’S CREAM CRACKERS per tin 1.64 1.20
\ CREMOLA JELLY CRYSTALS per pkt. .........- $ 19
i DENMOR BONELESS HAMS 2'4-Ib . $3.76 4-D 5.65 ?
to LION WHITE PEPPER per 1-oz. tin eS ¥ 49 4
j LION CURRY POWDER per 4-oz. tin ......... 46
C & B DRIED MINT per hottle .... 2.00... cceuse, 39
C & B DRIED SAGE per bottle Siac ee EVe Cen Eg es 34
APIE PEANUT BUTTER 1-Ib bottle ..... 61
> APIE PEANUT BUTTER 2-Ib bottle ......... 1,04
COCKADE FINE RUM
4
{
(









PAGE Sit



BARBADOS

CLASSIFIED ADS. 'r" (PUBLIC NOTICES) PUHLIC SALES |

TELEPHONE











































2500



FOR SALE





















































between the

NOTICE

All male citizens of the United States
ages of 18 and 26 residing |



REAL ESTATE

—— seems
BUNGALOW —



Stonewall Bungelow

in Barbados are requested to call at the | known as Banyan Beach, Brightop, Black























































ADVOCATE

ee

SEA AND AIR



¢

PCR PSO

Provided Lunther

PORT DOVER, Ont.







t American Consulate fyom July 1 to 31,|Rock, Saint Michael, with 11,100 square T AFF ( That windbreak down on the
Ww = 1952, for Selective Service Registration <—. of aes reto, farm can provide shelter in more
under the Universel Military Traiming “© Above property will be set up ways
‘ Service Act | sale by Public Competition at our One . a — ber Ontario's oldest
. 4 t AUTOMOTIVE All male citizens of the United States | James Street. on Friday 6th June, at 2 AMS SEGG0OOO ne. oi Souther Vnietigs Gegen
ary Cemeters who attain the age of 18 years sub-| p.m vtid dieiesis plented windbreaks was cut ont
tter al | #e@uent to July 31, 1952, are required r iD & BOYCE, during the past winter, and it wi
Keith ite Ae Morris Oxford, ee ae | to register upon the day they attain the Solicitors In Carlisle Bay ork timbers and ‘umber for
582 29.5.8 eighteenth anniversary of the day of! 22.5 te) Sch. Lucille Smith, Sen. Cloudia .S..| * b
"CAR—Dedge Special DeLuxe (X-68- their birth. or within five days there- —-——— Sch. Enterprise S., Sch, Gita M.. Sch. | @ n@Ww barn. 3 f
THANKS paipases Svecia) eee lave, | LAND 1% acres land situated at|Sunshine BR. MV. Lady Joy, M.V That does not mear protection
—_ 3 300 Gr nearest Barnes 4476, 3903. | . Foe. further information. conmult the Upper Jeokman's Gap, St. Michael. no | Compton, Lady Nealsen, M4 Vv. Blue Star. | has been lest on the W. H.
nn ee aa ey . ” - “i 4 ? e late, Bridgetown, ar- | reasonable offer refu pply to A 8 5
MEYVERS—i beg through t eae 20.5,ae-4.2.n ee Son , m5 52 t.{.n.|NMoore, near Canewood, St Michael, - Sch, Cyril B Smith 56 tons under Barrett Estate, Lege there
return thanks to all those kind friends ra ee a ae ee | 90.5.52—In. | Capt. L Ohware from a auines still is a dense — of oT
who sent af or — ore *refec oS. a, Metor vessel Tune. 7 tons under! » sou side oO e
any way. express oe Exceliont condition. $1,400,00 Phowe NOTICE | “WILTSHIRE PLANTATION’ and/|Capt. Heiberg from London F nee ce Se All of the stand-
my recerit bereavement caused by the | 5976 Mornings 28.5.52—4n Re: Estate of | dwellinghouse “WHITE HAVEN” situate S.S. Athelbrook 286 tons under Capt. ~ th i 1 ation
death of BM. B. Meyers, ——_—~ —— EDWARD SINCLAIR FIELDS. |in St. Philip with about %2 acres of| Cook from Trinidad ‘ng grow iS natura regener:
Florrie Meyer vidow 90.5 52—1 ‘HILLMAN CAR", 2961 ‘model in gece deceased lland made up aa follows 10a acres SEAWELL from the old trees and is now
condition, carrying big tyres. Dia NOTICE is hereby given that all per-jarable, 7 acres tenantry, 22 acres in 40 to 50 feet tall,
IN MEMORIAM or 3757. 29.5.52—4N. | eons having any debt or claim upon or | sour grass, 71 acres in roads and woods DEPARTURES--By BW IA li hh d hed an
———— TT, oo aitig,, | Sffecting the estate of Edward Sinclair |ete., also 4 fan mills, 1 motor truck. 1 on Wednesday The old trees ha reac
SPRINGER In loving of ¢ PILOT CAR—In excellent condition, | Fields late of the parish of Saint Phiitp| bull, 2 cows, 1 horse, '2 donkeys and 1| For TRINIDAD average height of 75 feet, and
dear beloved © Mags « Springs Owner aaeen May 2, see St) who died in this Island on the 10th day | donkey-cart. Together also with 1,870 B_ Archbold, 1. Drakes, J Ailevoft.) were an average of 18 inches in
who departed life May 29, iba: | MeRnearney’s Garage, Call 4493." | of October, 1951 are hereby required to | shares in Three Houses Factory Limited.|D. ‘Allcroft. A. Allcroft, J. Hamilton, diameter at stumps he Sixty
“Tj memories fade and life depart "-|gend in particulars of their claims duly | inspection by appointment, Phone Mr.|R. Hamilton, G. Corbin, D. Corbin, N
You’! li forever it i hes Bak. | eae eee all A. | attested to the undersigned care of |A. T. Skeete, “Bentley” 2535. The| Taylor, R Gibson, EB. Parchment, E | trees were cut and yi about
Marion Weckes (mother), Gloria PRACT One oa Le a Nowen | Messrs. Hutchinson & Banfield, Solici-| above property will be set up to public| Taylor. C Batson, J. Petrie, C. Lord.| 10,000 board feet of lumber.
ter), The Springer { Tractor with Pneumatic Lift and Mower. | tors, James Street, Brigdetown, on or|competition for sale to the highest|F. Thompson, § Bishop, E. Burton, J The trees were planted in
(1. §.5a—1n. | Apply: Manager, Four eae eal before the Sth day of August, 1952 after| bidder beyond the appraised value at 2| Gatherer, C. Todor, EB. Davie-Smith s 3 000 all ings
| Lid., St. Philip we Ss | which date we shall proceed to distribute | p.m. on Friday the 6th day of June 1952) Ishmeel, L. Reynolds Makeul Habib 1878, when 3,000 small seedlings
FOR RENT | the assets of the estate among the parties|at our Office, For further particulars | ARRIVALS—By B.W I A. on Wednesday | were bought from a nursery in
entitled thereto haying regard to the | and conditions of sale apply to the under-| From TRINIDAD ihe Niagara peninsula, The seed-
celal All cacndoweaiistibba ELECTRICAL debts and claims only of which we shall} signed. J. Davis, R. Wilson, E. Hall, L ii were planted in long rows in
UUSES, Dan aa ae aes —. | then have had notice and that we shall CARRINGTON & SEALY, Cuthbert, F. George, K. Osvik, 8S. | N85 Pp
sin REFRIGERATOR—1951 5.3ft. G.E.C.|n0t be Mable for assets so distributed Lucas Street, | folder, S. Archer, J Perreira, G. Sper | the vegetable garden and in 1880
ips: ety lone | Refrigerator $400.00. Telephone 5076] 4ny person of whose debt or claim 23.5.52-—-13n | cer, V. Spencer, V. Roberts, J. Roberts.| some were transplanted to their
ATTRACTIVE NEW FU RNISHED mornings . 28.5.52--4n. | We Shall not have hed notice at the time N. Hoyland, L. Long, F. Julien R, Pet-] nresent locations.
ROOM HOUSE in country, 6 mile ° eee ee | Of such distribution LAND—18,909 sq. ft. House Spot, next | ers, H. Bernard, H. Boyce, C. Hodgkin-| * The windbreak was thinned
Bridgetown Large sh ded ground And all persons indebted to the said|/to Lady Hutson’s House, Pine Hill. |son, J. .Nicole. Major J. Nicole, P
always cool, Suitable 1—2 GuaTt: $80. 00 LIVESTOCK estate are requested to settle their| Telephone Mrs. Gibbons 0117 Monrava, D. Oteiza, C. Oteiza. out by removing every other tree
Phone 4942 30,.5.52—11 accounts without delay. : 30.5.52—2n ARRIVALS — By B.W.1.A. on Thursday/ jn the winter of 1919-20.
BURNLEY— Britons : 77 | Dated the Ssh day of May, 1902 ome | CFrom TRINIDAD On several occasions it was
—Brittons Hill, Unfurnished COW—One Guernsey Cow, first calf CHARLES CARLTON BROWNE, THIS ATTRACTIVE HOME R. Bynoe, Gross-Custard, P. Rawlins, th uce
From ist June. C. B. Sisnett. Phone) Apply G. L. Harford, Norwood, St CAROL FIELDS, An extremely well built modern three|#. Scandella, L. Wharton, H. Post,| necessary to mow e spruc
3374 or 4548 28.5.52—t.{.n.] James 28.5. 52-31 Qualified Executors of the | bedroom (or two bedrooms and den) |W Anthony, R. Landry, R. Landry, M.| secdlings which had come up in
aan a -| ——- ——_- — -——_ | Wil’ of EDWARD SINCLAIR | BUNGALOW of stone and concrete con-| Mayers, B. Simpson, D. Mathieu, a the orchard, because the trees
BILTMORE—Fittz Village, St. James FYELDS, Deceased. struction. Combined forty feet living- | Lewis, H. Harewood, M, Agostini. were so prolific. Some of the
On sea, Three Bedrooms, Dining and POULTRY 30.5.52—4n |room and gallery, fully cupboarded | Giikes, A. Berryman, J Meee an dlings in the e
Drawing rooms. Electricity, running water —_— -———-——_ | Canadian styled kitche::, Floor to ceiling | ARRIVALS—-By B.W.I.A. on ursday] seedhi gs i Cee we
in each room. Garage and servant's roon POULTRY—Three 13) Hampehire Hens. | NOTICE cedar lined double bedroom closets From PUERTO BE ee acta sold in 1924 to local residents who
p> Enc TCM -SE8-P cockere! and & nimber of Chekd, ims | =~] ORAM GITEMS.. herstotece See ed winnie ‘Toone tor vegetables, | Mn Moench, Mr Beecher Swafford. | could pay 25 cents to dig up 100
P . . ° a mt ; rt rs a es 2 mee
FLAT FULLY FURNISHED. In Grey | Rorted tock. Apply to Mrs. Husband. | seine mnelle Wiltshire’ of” Worthing | Garage with breezew:y to house and | Mrs, Margaret Jean Young, Miss Shella] and take them away.—B.U.P.
stone House’ Balmoral Gap, Hastings | ~4, Howsing Scheme ; View Road in the parish of Christ | detached self-containec maid’s quarters./M. ~Terente Young, Mrs. Marjorie
Juge-December inclusive. “Dial 3729. as 200-9 529n- | Church “in this Island’ Engineer hereby |The Property ts coolly and delighstully | Ditrank, Mins Gladys Griffith, Miss
ee ES. | PULLETS—Gne hundred imported | Rive public notice that on the @th day /situated, within Saleen over knee Ph, Saas, | arta ay BW.LA
HOUSE—At Clapham, opposite the Hampshire Dullets 5 weeks old froin|of May ee ataandianed’ wy ean i oe . '29.5.52—t fn ' on Thursday ORIENTAL
St. Michael. Phone 2542 A-A" grade. Laying Strain, Byed | renounce ae hail rethaln ae” For ANTIGUA
ied aieik from hens a 2 ly | the use of my said surname of “Wilt- or Al _ en J.
26.0.2ar-an | Ome vine OEE PRR AERIE | ata. hen “spn! "ena adovtes Hinde wy. Mek ¥- Bier: 3:
. s vw | Rock | 29.5.62~2n, |and determined thence forth on al! WANTED Shillingford v famm, ae
LORNE—Hastings. Modern Bungalow occasions whatsoever to use and sub- Davies, J. Davies, | a
Sen View ou niitae. i an o seribe the surname of “Gittens” insteac, | eee, Laki, A. Byron, M. Byron.
ues ouse. Dial 2560 ;
a7 ee ee tater ky HEL? , UARTERS FO!
= snemmeniennaetite | Oe series | “bady Rodney” Calls Here |} SPATS UVENis “O*
MARKHAM—Unfurnished on the see wee a COOK—A_ reliabi ook also a house
side, Hastings, 2 bedrooms with | i DECCA RECORDS: Clearances, Three ote Pe tian once, thin eiand aan sleep io ~ Seed pay to the On June 2. ; | FROM INDIA, CHINA &
eee pau mences: |, Gar tnsgiic' | ‘or $2.00. The Travellers Club, Brad-| on the 20th day of May 1952) 1 formally | right persons. Apply to Mrs. Gonsalves! The R.M.S. Lady Rodney arrives CEYLON
= ise Court, Hastings Phone | saw Building, St. Michael's Row. and absolutely renounced and abandoned |“‘Highland”, Green Hill, St. Michael.| Were from Montreal, Halifax, Bos- 1
r ween “7 22.5,.52-—t.f.n. |/the said surname of oe ae and between the hours 5 and 6 ear sa—on.|ton and Bermuda on Monday |
‘i Stalin "ani > apn gE declared that I have assumed and adopted ee |
4 Seen neluging Fr Sere eee “DRIED FRUITS—Reisins 51 cents per|and~ intended thenceforth upon all 3 te morning, June 2, and leaves the |
Stor Phone goo te, \CePhOr® | ib. Currants 43 cents per Ib. C.|eccasions whatsoever to use—and sub-| Typist and Stenographer — ry &-| come night for St. Vincent, Gren- |
cm sio7 Phone 2224 30.5. 52-—2n 1 li t
usion, Phone 22 “| Herbert, 55 Tudor Street, City seribe the name of “Giltens” Instead ot cording to ability. Apply hy letter to! "i. “mrinidad and B.G.
"i or wrns 30.5.52—2n. | “Wiltshire” and so as to be at all times | Box No. 51, Advocate Co. Lid. | ’
ANNOUNCEMENTS KE ee kee cn an (ee Sal See SAS GEES" | __ntenenniinieteinanilieien attic: | ae eoonee of |
st quality a the name of “ s* i
VTACAN, - r Ponte, all sizes. Price $5.75 each ated the 29th day of May 1952 Wanted by Barbados Publicity Com- %
A FEW VACANCIES stil exist fo: | Reliance Shirt Depot. Palmeito. Street OTHELLO. GITTENS, mittee — egy sesiviant to take cheree % 10 Day's NEWS FLASH
students in the following classes being , 29.5. 52—6n. Late Othello Wiltshire. of Information Bureau, Seawel irport 2) -
a by the Barbados Polytechnic + ie 20.5.52—8n. | A eee of typing and ee ) =
Book- keep: shorthand, typing, handi- | \fANIGURE SETS, shavin desirable. lication in writing to The 4 | Sean SRT Ae necioee
s § . : . ig sets, and ' ¥ x RUBB FERRULES FOR
crates bas ket i ma : ete ; cookin bith ates Neal tee Mer iak tee teed — Chairman, Barbados Publicity Committee, 8 Sponsored b: y | aan = ae
taeeiiy ond dre nakirigy, uchool. sub traveller. K. R, Hunte & oo. 1 OTICE P.O. Box 242, getown bah mean Mr. and Mrs. E. D. MOTTLEY j ALKIN 3 iCKS
ceonomics, public speaking etc. Enro, |!©Wer Broad Street. -5. AKE N ae In ald of St. Mary's Choir | WISDEN CRICKETER
man Sess mine Te evenins re. soean |, PUASTIC TABLE COVERS — With a MISCELLANEOUS — at the | ALMANACK 1952
oe NEUE hat ys" | nursery designs for children 48” x 48 BISMAG PRINCESS ALICE |
FARLEY HALL COUNTRY CLUB, st BB Te ape at Tapa, Ce Oran ROOM—Unfurnished Room in private PLAYING FIELD | BEST QUALITY
Peter 6 now open ta members and thelr } “T° | _ That INTERNATIONAL CHEMICAL ee “Cola Lady" Gia hauenase: TO-NIGHT | BRASS PADLOCKS
a ial i ny Pi “ROLLEICORD CAMERAS, Two (2) | COMPANY LIMITED, a British Company. | ne '30,5.52-—3n Sean” Seok |
aris =" |only world famous Rolleicord 1952 model | Manufacturing Chemists, whose trade or These are all new arrivals to
aK Iyva6 «CATT AMm@6©§©» | Cameras now in stock, As further sup-| business address is The Factory, Braydon ADMISSION 2/- ¥
TAKE NOTICE plies are now restricted, this is an ex- neat: London, N., England has applied TAKE NOTICE idlidin bey Aer Cate Gittene’ vk > JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
Came AT Be n'ntde * ial ‘ni0. Tart a eas a : ie oe aes Sa) 3 & HARDWARE
cameras, A, G. St. Hil . Dial 3199. at x in respect of ir Refreshments on le s
‘A CENTURY 1 23.5,52—in. |\cinal and pharmaceutical preparations DINACRIN ~
ae VETS ONE Bravia) and will be entitled to register the same | That WINTHROP PRODUCTS EHO. 8 a MAMMALS ALTERS |
phat, ALFRED BIRD & SONS, LIM- Subscribe now to the Datly Telegraph | after one month from the 28th day of | cerporation en and end nee
, om company organized under the | England's leading Daily Newspaper now | May 1952 unless some person shall in the | the laws the State | tlaite S laws of Great Pritain, Manufacturers | arriving in Barbados b: yy Air only a few | meantime give notico in duplicate to me | hited Sees of America, Manufacturers ‘
and Merchants, whose trade or business | days after Sublisaian sy London. Con- |at my office of opposition of such regis- | whose trade or business ‘address is 1450 CARPENTERS— ¢
Sgmeee is Devonshire Werks, Birmingham | tact: Kan Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltd, | tration. aoe eee aa can be seen onwage Naw bigs a vee eee ¥
12. gland, has applied for the registra-| Local Representative, . 8118. on application at my office. Stat merica, 8 app! ‘or the ¥
tion of a trade mark in Part “A" of | la 17.4.59—t.f.n,| Dated this 12th day of May 1952. cegistration of a trade mark in Part Have You a Full Range of TOOLS ? ?
ter in respect of baking powder e Tradg Marks, te 9 oo Register oe vee of eee WHY NOT? v
and all substances used as food or as WIN 3 Registrar o! ie an rmaceutical preparations, an NOT. ° y
ingredients in food, and will be entitlut | warm Winter Ceol minute, ace 28.5.52—3n, | will be entitled to register the’ same Raul r ‘
te, register the same after one month! Gardens, Phone $172. 29.8.52—2n apie one month from the ~~, say ot They are Obtainable at». . $
f the 2th day of May, 1982 unless ele aes | ay unless some person sh in the
some person shall in the meantime give WAXED BOXES—Speciaily repared TAKE NOTICE meantime give notice in dirplicate to me MPO
php oh Palapye Nicaea ee for storing Fish, and other phridvable p R.A sore, irede "mark an me: rae CENTRAL EE. RIUM :
fon 0 oh reg . "commodities in dee e 3 al 7
trade mark can be seen on application jwell sulted for ‘sending Coeava chee an application at my Corner Broad and Tudor Streets :
st my oMoe eit ana sone woesdccks Rind, ete., overseas, Withnall, Dated this 12th day io Niny Ma: hee
ee uh 2th day _o ay 5: , lle 3409
fh. WittaMs, A ee 30.5.52—n Registrar of ma Goh.
Registrar of Trade Marth ‘ | 28.5.52—3n, if
29.6.52—20





[ey

ARRIVED

Another Shipment of the |

POPULAR

84180 GAS COOKERS

A few of
been boaked
Prices-@h next shipmeny will be

Dighe renee

these have nov sei

Why hot -rail at your Gos Show.
rooms; Huy Street TO-DAY anc
secure big. of these coojrers

eee ee,
°





“oc SMe 4, eee ee



Â¥,
- v ren a>
x No TICE &
x 9
.)
1; Seeretaries of Cricket Clubs x
. tabling part in the competitions ¥
e“teniutied that subscriptions %
; are. payable prior to (h cor
mencement of the season on June 3
Tth, ‘
& 2° Members who have not paid &
o their ubseriptiongs for 62 are
3%@ asked to do so before the annual
% general meeting scheduled for
@ friday 30th May, 1952
THE BARBADOS CRICKET
% ASSOCIATION INC,
W. F,. HOYOS, %,
e Hony. Secty x
Â¥ %



i

REAL.

*

=

j

ESTATE |

D'ARCY A. SCOTT
Reat Estate AGENT AND
AUCTIONEER

of Middle Street
offers for sale from his ex-
tensive list: —
A three bedroom stone bun-
galow on the sea, below
Oistin,

And
BARBAREES HOUSE with
2% Acres of land. It is with-
in one mile from Bridge-
town.

tf you are
pro)
his

interested in
rties, why not overlook
st, or dial 2645.

28.5.52--3n

ace iomespaenrereenecttsameiatecresilal i i



oN ke ak
GE 5
For Weddings,

Birthdays, Christenings, ete.
DEAMIOND RINGS

oniversaries

GOLD & SILVER
INWELLERY
See_your Jewellers .. .

YY. De LIMA
& co., Lom.

20 Bi AD

ind at MAKINE GARDENS

0 RARE Er 2 RENO Re NEE SMILE TR



PERSONAL



warned against
giving credit to my wife, DORIS
“ARTER (nee Ames) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone else
contracting any debt or debts in my
name unless by a written order signed
by me
COLEN CARTER,
Palmetto Square,

St. Michael,

The pubiie are hereby
29.5.52—2n



TAKE NOTICE

@avalier






That R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO
COMPANY a corporation organized and
existing under th laws of the State
of New Jersey, United States of Amer-
ica, Tobaceo Manufacturers, whose trade
or business address is Main and Fo

Streets, Winston-Salem, North Carolina,
U.S.A. has applied for the registratfon
of a trade mark in Part “A” of Registen
in respect of tobaceo and tobacco
produets, cigarettes, cigars, smoking
tobacco, snuff, smokers’ articles,
cigarette paper, matches, cigarette cases,
sigar and cigarette holders, pipes for
smoking tobacco(, and will be entitled
to register the same after one month
from the 28th day of May, 19652,
inless some person shall in the mean-

tration The trade mark can be
» upplication at my office,
Dated this 12th day of 1962.

H. 5
Registrar of Trade Marks.
28.5.52—3n

seen



ia

RAM’'S
POPULAR HAIR DYE
It’s the BEST of Hair Dyes

It’s beautifying
It’s harmless and easy to
apply
It does not dirty your Pillow
Now obtainable at

SESE ELSES EES

KNIGHT'S Ltd.

OLTON’S DRUG STORE,
Swan St,

WALKES’ DRUG STORE,
Tudor St,, — and

I. E. GOODING,

Broad St.,

COO

Busby

Alley, — Agent. Ni
VOGAL SIOES | '

2 OSES





FOR RENT

Valuable business premises on
Rickett Street above the Post
Office with back entrance on Mar-
Frontage contains two
doors and large show
Ideally suitable for any



rect
‘ ec
ndow.







: of business, especially a
Drug Store. In close proximity to
3 places and the ‘Bus
Also cool and spacious
upstairs over the premises
referred to above. These offices
| anc business premises will be
rented separately or together as
be desired Apply to:—

EVFLYN, ROACH & Co., Ltd.,
Ricketi Street
245.62—tfn

parking
Stands.
ff



time give notice in duplicate to me
it my offee of opposition of such regis-



That LIGGETT & MYERS TOBACCO
COMPANY, a_ corporation

under the laws of the State of New
Jersey, United States of America, Man-
ufagturers, whose trade or business
address is 630 Fifth Avenue, New York
2 State of New York, U.S.A. has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in

of smoking tobacco and cigarettes, and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 28th day of
May 1952, unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition such
registration. The trade mark can be seen
on application at my ice.

Dated this 12th day uw Ma

Registrar of Trade Marks.


















FOR SALE

290 Shares
WEST INDIA KLISCUIT CO.,
Limited.
Apply R. S$. Nicholls & Co.,,
Solicitors,
Roebuck Street.
Phone 3925
27.5.52—1n,

Come and enjoy yourself
At

BONNETT’S
Annual Cotton Dance

At
QUEEN’S PARK HOUSE

TO-MORROW NIGHT

MAY 31ST, 1952

ABT

j The Loyal Brothers
of the Star

a,
——

Proudly Presenta \
1952 BARBADOS i
CARNIVAL, {)
At QUEEN'S PARK &
ON Hy

THURSDAY, 5th and
SATURDAY, 7th JUNE

COSTUME BANDS
STEEL BANDS
ADVERTISING BANDS

HISTORICAL BANDS

In order to raise the standard of
Carnival in this island the Steer-
ing Committee would appreciate

clubs

——

cam>

the co-operation of firms,

and individuals being as original N,

as possible,

Admission: Adults 1/6 Children 1/-
Bookings for Booths and Stands

contact Sobers

Lane.

Closing date for above will be
closed on 3rd June, 1952
MORE PARTICULARS LATER

Registration of Costumes, Bands
and Individuals Contact Mr. C. A.
Nurse, c/o Poor Law Board.

Special Prize of $30.00 awarded
for best appropriate Rhyme
Calypso Special Performances by
the Boodoos Brothers and Party.

Mr, C. Morris,

SREB



TAKE NOTICE



That JONKOPENGS OCH VULCANS
TANDSTICKS FABRIKSAKTIEBOLAG,
« joint stock company organized under
the lows of Sweden, Match Manufacturers,
whose trade or business address is 16,
Vestra, Storgatan, Jonkoping, Sweden,
nas applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in respect
of matches, and will be entitled to reg- |
ister the same after one month from the
28th day of May 1952, unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice ~ in



VALOR C OOKER STOVES

Short Burners
2 Burner Model @ $56.14
3 Burner Model @ $71.87

Also

| WHITE PORVELAIN ENAMEL SINKS
With Double Drainboard @ $65.64
|] complete with waste and overflow

Established T. HERBERT, Ltd. Incorporated
1860 10 & 11 Roebuck Street 1926

ATTENTION

BUS DRIVERS, TAXI DRIVERS AND BUS
CONDUCTORS



cuplicate to me at my e of opposi-
tlon. The trade ee can be seen on
oer at my office.

ated this 12th day st May 1952.

Registrar of Trade Marks.
28.5.52—3n

FURNISH TO-DAY

The Money Saving Way

Popular Bureaus, Bedsteads,
Beds, Wardrobes, Washstands $8.00
up, Coil and Fiat Springs
TABLES for Dining, Kitchen and
Fancy use, Larders, Waggons, Tea
Trolleys, Sideboards — Kitchen,
China and Bedroom Cabinets,
Liquor Cases $5.50 up — DRAW.
ING ROOM FURNITURE, Rush
Furniture for Little and Big Sereen
Frames, Ironing & Laundering
Boards, Benches, Office-height
Stools in wood and rush Rope
Mats $1 20 up.







| Ls. WILSON

SPRY STREET. DIAL



Postponement
of Drawing

By kind permission of the
* Commissioner of Police the
DRAWING for the

Foresters’ Scholarship \

RAFFLE |

which

should have taken

place to-day has been post-
poned to Saturday July 5th |||
At DRILL HALL



The hour will be announced

| later.

}



-_—_——

— lle



The Commissioner of Police will give his Annual
Talk on Public Service Vehicles at the Empire Cinema
at 11 a.m. on Saturday, 31st May.

ALL M@TORISTS ARE INVITED

you order

A SUIT

from....

A.E. TAYLOR LTD.

not only are the Shoulders nicely padded to’ hide any
deformities but the Material is of the Best. Linings
specially matched and the Fit is guaranteed and the
Price is bound to be Right, because we have the Stock
bought at the Right Time and at the right Price.

we are
is is no Jo

Remember until the 3lst Ma

giving a
Special discount of 10 per cent.

e

A. E. TAYLOR LTD.

Coleridge Street. :

where
Prices are guaranteed to be the same as any other
Store but with 10% deducted.

DIAL: t-3 4100

LS



| Spruce Windbreaks |









TO
Let them all Advertise but when

FRIDAY, MAY 30, 1952

SHIPPING NOTICES





SOUTHBOUND Satis Sails Sails “Pace See.
RODNEY .._.. “- ey 3 May <<. 2 June
CANADIAN CHALLENGER .. 30 = ll June 12 June
NELSON .. os -» @June 12June 14 June June bs =|
eee CRUISER +s wie * june - July July
CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR June 4 July
oo ae ~ Hduy 16 July ius 8 July



Sere = Bes st John Boston sees Montreal
ASOPERUGIOR 2 2ume tyme sume IB tims, * jue
«CHALLENGER... ‘eine 28 June 5 July Py Bik i ll yay

CDN CRUISER +» M July 19 July 735, % oad.
CARB 4 29 July 5 be 8 Aug. 10 Aug.
LADY “RODNEY


For further particulars, apply to—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD.—Agents.




























"G TRANSATLANTIQUE

Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe,
heat whe le tae Coane See





“ May, 1952 ist May, 1952
4th June, 1962"... .. 16th June, 1952

*Not calling at Guadeloupe
SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE

From Barbados. Arrives Southampton
*“DE GRASSE” .... 19th May, 1968. vw oom 20 May, 1962
“DE “Grasse” vies 29th June, 1952... .. 9th July. 1952

The T. S. S.. GOLFITO will be arriving from
Southampton on Sunday, Ist June at 6 a.m. and will
be sailing at 10 a.m, the same morning for TRINIDAD.
There is ample 1st Class Accommodation available

for Trinidad.

Apply ....

Get some of these for your

holiday picnic
Delicious
MARIE & SHORTCAKE BISCUITS

obtainable in $lb. Pkgs only 32¢.

per Pkge or per lb. only 54.

SHIRLEY BISCUITS

only 46¢. per lb.

WIBIX SODA CRACKERS

only 38c. per ib.

On sale everywhere

The West India Biscuit Co., Ltd.





FRIDAY, MAY ‘36, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN’ *

|









“%

PLPC CSEES OPE
FOR ALL YOUR FRIENDS
YOUR DISTINGUISHED
GUESTS AND YOURSELF

There is Nothing Better on
the Market than

S&S§
Rum
Blended and Bottled by

HELP
STUART & SAMPSON

(1938) LTD.
TOOTH Headquarters for Best Rum. \
'509665466466666699966600

SO OPOPIE SO SOSS FSO SSSSSOSO“

DECAY Holiday Entertainment








BY CARL ANDERSON

—_

POLST L LOL

NO FINER®
TOOTH PASTE TO





caine ae om
GOL CSESEAEAEELAITF



















+++THE WAY THAT
MRS. OF LAZLON LEFT
THAT JEWELLERY
LYING ABOUT...
ANVONE WOULD

SOMEONE TOOK 'SIGHTS'

Ler’
ON THAT STUFF LAST .a

CAPTAIN PAGET IS
‘| STANDING THE
\STRAIN...

++ ANDO SHORTLY AFTER
t SAW MARK SEVERN

ONLY 4 FOOL WOULD
HOIST THE SWAG
FIRST NIGHT OUT —














.
WITH NO CHANCE OF
GETTING RID OF IT..



THINK THAT SHE Ca Sak ’
WANTED /T
S
ah / %
Cuh ; x
oni Gaeaneet eam © %
Da
LISTERINE Tooth Paste helps stop tooth decay 3 important ways x
1. LISTERINE Tooth Paste actually helps remove >
destructive bacteria. $
2. It attacks dull film which holds bacteria against %
tooth surfaces. : | MIXED VEGETABLES in
3. It even helps to remove mouth acids! % tins
Hurry now and buy LISTERINE Tooth Paste... brush after every % SLICED HAM
meal and fight woth decay...clean teeth brighter... KEEP BREATH %
BLONDIE FRESH FOR HOURS AND HOURS! % LAMB TONGUES in tins
i You'll like % CORNED MUTTON in tins
its refreshing %

ROAST BEEF in tins
VEAL LOAF in tins

mint flaver, too.



7 BLONDIE -- I'VE JUST
GOT A MINUTE TO CATCH














NAY CORT AND % LUNCHEON BEEF in tins
*.
a: 8 And Our Popular
%,
yet x FIVE STAR RUM
~ mn x o
s
1x
§ INCE & CO.
%,
*
$ LTD.
%,
ig >
[X 8 & 9, ROEBUCK ST.
9656565655 OOOO OEP HSD










IT PAYS







YOU TO DEAL HERE

eres gac at _————e—aaa =o
eminaaneate ai SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only











WHATEVER IT IS
THAT’S HIDING HERE
WON'T BE ANY MATCH
FOR THIS HEAT BLASTER!
DITHINK I'VE CORNERED
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PAGE EIGHT a BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, MAY 30, 1952 ¥
9 3] KF ALL STARS TEA! . aii
H oO I ii 1 e ~~ I ant i oO r . . Ma S . ¥ u CS ia Hi t ae ee rr ree ne eee POSOTS
Record 508 37, * >

Brighter Cricket

But Wickets Are Still The Key
By DENNIS HART

fl
_ For Cork Cup | y

PGS GOSSGED

SO OF

LONDON, 18,

The 1952 cricket season has started under a decided
financial shadow. Attendances last season were ten per
cent. below those of 1950 when the West Indies toured
England. And it is perhaps expecting too much of an
already weakened Indian touring team that this summer
they will be able to halt the slide.

What is needed is an internal ‘blood transfusion’; some
means of brightening county cricket so that spectator in-
terest is maintained.

} play resumed on Wednesday
at Victoria Park, with St. Helene
not out 58 Dominica were dis-
\ missed for 157, 1. Shiflingford
36, D. Mount 30, C. Emanuel 18,
| Jemmott 21 Barrow five for 69
{ Forced to follow-on Dominica
{in their second innings scored 7
for one at close of play Mount
not out 2, C. Shillingford not out
| 4.
| Previous highest total in the
; Cork. .Cup tournaments was 418
by Grenada in 1910 when thi
series was inaugurated.

| St. Lucia climaxed a gloraous

| first innings with the record
| breaking total of 508 all out when

PPSSSSSO

OS



One such suggestion has. been
put forward recently by Mr. F.

ss Sports Window ER Imes, former Surrey and

be interesting.

Carlton has defeated
Y.M.P.C. who recently beat
College and they will myst
likely sweep through the
inexperienced Modern boys.

Play starts at 7.30 p.m._



The purpose could easily be de-
teated if a county scored slowly,
und then bowled negatively to
bring opponents down to their
own rate, ee

Apart from which, cricket is
already becoming a slave - to
viatistics without introducing new

tables and records. These only

serve to destroy the true spirit
4 the game.

player. It is that a ISSO? S | |
f tuble be compiled showing a balls % E , .
Basketball matches tonight per run averane for cae county » ote DANCE ened
at the Y.M.P.C. are Harris- Such a table it‘is claimed would . Your Are Invited to Attend
on College versus Pirates be an incentive to faster scoring. s
and Carlton versus Modern % A G d ONLY 36 00 EA
High School. Both Collese While it may be interesting for x ran " t
and Pirates are fairly strong ine statistician, it dves not unfor- * 5
teams and this mafch should tunately, provide the answer. e



The All Stars team of Trinidad which arrived in th
three-day Whitsun meet. Left to right they are H
Peters and L. Long. There are no “A” class riders among them
rider. The others will ride in the “B”

Trinidad

. Bernard, H. Be



B.F.F.A. TROPHIES

he island on Wecnesday night to take part in the
yyce, C. Hodgkinson, F. Julien, R.

Boyce is the only Intermediate





From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. LUCIA, May 28. *
!







DANCE

Sponsored by

The Police & St. Philip Girl Guides

Ideal for the Tropits
©

P,C.S. MAFFEI

at
K.G.V.M. PARK, 8ST. PHILIP

SLOSS SO SFOS

On FRIDAY 30TH MAY

Music by Police Full Dance 8)
Orchestra j



ADMISSION BY TICKETS 2/6 g |
Dancing from 9 p.m. to 3 a.m. ¥
Refreshments on sale—BAR SOLID

& Co. Ltd.

Top Scorers in tailoring
Tickets can be obtained from St. Y
Philip Girl Guides, Four Rds » | Prince Wm. Henry Street ~
Police Stn. and St. Cecilia \ |

Barracks, Passage Road
| 3365666444645 9COSOS:

Many a good innings in the cold

i PRESENTED T' F
at Ot ene per minute, has been Cyclists Here ) TONIGHT lash

i,
E. Simmons |
invaluable to the side, THE trophi for’ the 1932 :



r *
7; * mid enthralling to spectators, seison competitions run b he
Champion ing to sp ae Ue

Barbados Friendly F all

For instance, who can forget Kensington Oval yesterday after- Association will be cee

Godfrey Evans’ heroic effort for noon and saw the contingent of night at the Fortress Club, Light-\\
England in the fourth Test at cyclists and athletes from Trini- foot Lane, at 8 p.m. by Mr ©. Ss

the trophies were presented by delaide jn 1947? When he came dad go through their paces in aes acu an ‘}



C9095 OFO GOP PSSST GPA CFS SSLE SVS LSP

PPSSSOSSOSOOS





SSSSELG
@ From Page 1

PLO ELIF

SS
IBS









Ist A, Newton, (Blue House); 2nd M. Denis Compton for two and a The cyclists are E. Long (B
Headley. areen House); 3rd E. Dottin, quarter hours and defeat was Class), F. Julien (B Class), R.
ellow Hous

ellow | Hi Suerte 3 » 2 Peters (B Class), H. Bernard (B
EVENT 3.—SPRINT (Under 1 ") averted, It is one of the slowesta ' a
Ist P. Hoyte, (Yellow rear 2am, innings on record. During = H. Boyce (Intermediate),





Co 1, é yocate’ > rts itor ses
Mrs. D. A. Wiles. to the wicket just after tea on preparation for Saturday, the first the at A ee |
EVENT 1,—OBSTACLE (Open) the foursh day, England were day of the three-day Whitsun Knockout Cup—Rangers FO; : )
Ist J. Hunte, (Red House); 2nd A. 255 for eight, and nothing. it meeting which will be staged by Challenge Cup We: fecriesaaee j |
Raison, ‘Blue House); 3rd E. Riley, (Red geemed could prevent an Austra- the Amateur Athletic Association : Vela j
EVENT 2—SPRINT (11—<13 yrs.) lian victory. Evans stayed with of Barbados. coe Hs
t

OLYMPIC
PREVIEW ! |



IN
LONG LIFE

LIGHTNESS

gil, (Yellow House; 3rd L. Atkinson, stay he made ten runs and morefjC. ee (B_ Class) these
ue ouse) 4 * 4 4 > . ars * :
coe emezing still was at the wicketgjare the members of the All St#ys
EVENT 4.—POTATO (Over 13. yrs.) ; ‘ ; : inid: le Tri
lst E. Simmons, (Red House), Snags, “anety-five minutes before scoringtf-lub of Trinidad—while Trinidad

Collymore, (Yellow House); ‘3rd G. at all. is represented in the “A” Class

Teeth Loose

Gums Bilee:





; Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and
Forde, (Blue House}. In the Holmes table, this section by D. Mathieu—an Olym- T ; ;
. ae : : 1 s : ~ . § aw € ’ Loose Teeth rr that you may °
BYENT 5.—-POTATO (Under 18 yrs.) innings would not even be - pic hope of that island--and U.j| have Pyorrhea, Trench Mouth of Ken Farnum Barbados
Ist C, Worrell, (Green House); 2nd c, â„¢nings would not even be men 1 : } ; perhaps some bad disease that wilt Olympic Selectee matches
Waterman, ‘Blue House): 3rd I. Good. tioned as an also-ran. But it Lewis another member of the All sooner or la » your teeth to
ing, (Blue House)



wheels with David Matthieu

et Stars Club.
EVENT 6.—PLANT POT (Over 18 yrs.) aved England, and even tie sont Trinidad’s Olympic hope.

fall out and y alag cause Rhet
ase Australian ritics wer The Ait Stars team arrived in
Ist. C. King, (Blue House); 2nd R biased astralia Critice = ' 5 :

matism and Heart Trouble, Amosan




Hope, (Red House); ard M. Rollock. loud in their praises, the island ,by, B.W.I.A._ on ends sore 1
(Blue House). It is possible to quote other Wednesday night and was met at ens the te 1
EVENT 1.-HOOP (Under 18 yrs.)

Amosan n
and save
on return ¢

: * rs.) | instances. There, was the tima the airport by the Secretary of
Cave, iGreen House ira seen P- when Hobbs and Sutcliffe batted the A.A.A.B. Mr. G. Rocheford
(Blue House), ’ all day on a real Brisbane ‘sticky’ and the Assistant Secretary Mr.





Michael Agostini and Hend-

ony et ick H a th | Ne ti
EVENT 8.—SPRINT (Over 15 yrs.) fo. 283 runs. Once again scoring W. Jermmott There were also The guarantee pr j) rickson arewood as ey | im 7 pom
Ist J. Collymore, (Yellow House); 2nd t fast, but it e of local cyclists to greet the boys as ») meet local stars Inniss, | ae pine LT,
Hi, fontes, {med House) Srd ¥. Gibbs, Woe nce rene DWu tt Wes Oe Ob Soy landed end some of thece { $9999966699655556696960, ||| Blenman, Archer and Rouse. mee oe
(Red House). the finest exhibitions of batting ey landed and some o NESE N= FPS PGS ESOGIGIT GSS COS 9OO "

DUNLO

Best on £arth

“ |
| See Trinidad’s sprint aces |

SEAMLESS _
RUBBER BOOTS
$7.16 per pair

Dottin, (Yellow House); 3rd N. Amory on
(Green House)
EVENT I1—THERF & BACK

which was a batsman’s paradise Argostini (sprinter) arrived in
last season, would naturally have the island by B.W.I.A. yester-
(Over 1% yrs.) « faster scoring rate than Lan- day morning. They were also ac-
Ist L. Hutchinson, (Blue House); 2nd cashire whose wicket at Old companied by the Trinidad lady
A. Barker, (Yellow House); 3rd Y. Trafford is more sporting. cyclis; Vilmer Spencer. She will
vane: Geeta pie . And so we see the whole be participating in a special
J i (Over 15 yrs. 5 i t for ladi

ist H. Inniss, (Red House), P, Norris, snatter comes back to the old cycling event for ladies. r
(Yellow House); ard E. Pollard, (Blue question of wickets, Make them The Guianese cyclist Liddell
ea Vous i nd : sporting to give batsmen and and the Grenada runner Gittens

2 % yrs.
Ist M. Thompson, (Green House): 2nd bowlers an equal chance, and are expected to-day.

Ist C. Waterman, (Blue House), 2nd B. shire, who played at Trent, Bridge, Harewood (sprinter) and M. g At ST, LUCY'S RECTORY

Whit-Monday June 2, 1952
@ Stalls: Handicrafts, Provis-
x ion, Sweets, Cakes, Ice

Md Creams, Games









% Mrs. Rosalie Alleyne has
§ kindly consented to open
% the Fair at 1 o’clock.

31ST, WHIT-MONDAY,
JUNE 2ND and THURS-
DAY, JUNE 5TH.

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, -LTD.

$A ALS ALLL SSIS SE

|

COLONIAL SPORTS
MEETING at Kensington
Oval on SATURDAY, MAY |









|
See Miss Wilma Spencer |
Trinidad’s lady cyclist in
action,
Come to...
The A.A.A’s Big INTER- |

$ ADMISSION 1/- 4} 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street
N. Waite, (Green House); 3rd M. Gibbs, tnere would be no need to compile $ 3 =~ ieee
(Red TGH. JUMP (Over 11 yrs.) any more tables and records. ‘seossosesosessssssseet —— a

















a 4
Ist S. Springer, (Green House); (2nd Ind n I vn
N. Cook, (Yellow House); 3rd K. Yarde, Further, there would be an lans ace
(Green House). 4 ft. 1 in, end once and for all to the
EVENT 13.—EGG & SPOON

“Ne
c business of ‘bumpers’ and ‘body- A H. d } igl
Ist C. reinvents (ohueait onsen and N, line’ bowling. Fast bowlers would ar at
Amory, (Green House); 3rd J. Maynard, not have to eh pe ball ae
(Red House) k Sion way down the wicket to obtain @ From Page 1
BYENT ii ee Ls height. The art of real fast have reachéd 100. Set to make 188
ist’ P. Browne, (Red House); 2nd p, bowling could be revived, in place to win Warwickshire found the

Scott, (Red House); ard N. Worrell, of the present medium paced task beyond them and were all!
(Green House) i

swingers which are the stock-in- out for 118

EVENT 15.—BUNNY (Under i yra.) ck o

ist J. Thompson, (Green House); 2nd irade on feather-bed wickets, At

M,. Deane, (Yellow House); 3rd P. Hoyte,
(Yellow House),

‘ Lords a century by Geoffrey
Batten, te, ware benefit. 2 et Laneashire to finish
EVENT 16.—SACK (Open) Getter stroke play would be en- the day in a strong position
Ist M. Wood, (Green Housel: dnd ¥. couraged by bowlers attacking the against the MCC, He scored 101
Gibbs, (Red House); ard P. Fitzpatrick, stumps al] the time, and not before being bowled by Trevo:
See a Sica” ae bowling negatively, They are Bailey and helped his side to reach
(House Contest—Under 18 yrs.) foreed to do this on easy wickets 329 in reply to the MCC's 230.

Ist Blue; 2nd Re Eo Oren to keep the runs down. As a re- The MCC lost wickets quickly in

EVENT 18.— *s sa e
Tatas Geuthate-O ver 18: S350 sult the batsmen’s scoring range

Ist Blue; 2nd Red; 3rd Green, is limited.
EVENT 19.—SCHOOL BOYS' RACE






their second innings and were 2%

28

for 4 at the close,

anata a us

EVENT 9—SPRINT (18—15 yrs.) ever seen on a bad wicket. cluded Ken Farnum, M. Carmich- %

1st E. Simmons, (Red House); @nd J ael, and the Holborn group of & A FETE
Atherley. (Blue House); 3rd J. Black- The table would be misleading cyclists. x £ sat
man, e) s ne s

EVENT 10.—-SRIPPING (Under 13 yrs) /D another respect. Nottingham- U. Lewis, D. Mathieu, H.]¥

Matches might finish early, and

At Bristol, Tom Graveney show

(1816 yrs.) ‘ ries Cy ewer, But i ‘
Ist R. Webster; 2nd C. Haynes; 3rd H coms ies become fewer, edit. © brilliant form in making hi
Brathwaite. what matter. It is EOE second century of the season. He
EVENT %—OLD GIRLS’ RACE «ble to earn fifty runs than have pjayved the Sussex attack and
Ist Ednith Vaughn; 2nd Cicely Gittens. ug hundred served up on a plate. : " é and

EVENT 21—LITTLE VISITORS’ RAC scored 171.
(7 yrs, and Under)

7 lead ; County secretaries m argue Glamorgan seemed to be on the
tet Horace Springer; 2nd Marva Mose- |) 9 games ending unter tie three road to victory against Kent ut
; oays would deprive them of the Pontypridd. In the first innings
chird day gate money, The an- they scored 375 to Kent’s 209 ard





WEATHER REPORT
YESTERDAY

Rainfall from Codrington: nil

Total Rainfall for month to
date: 2.17 ins.

Highest Temperature: 87.5 °F

Lowest Temperature: 75.5 °F

Wind Velocity: 14 miles per
hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.958,
@ p.m.) 29.891

TO-DAY
Sunrise: 540 a.m.
Sunset: 6.18 p.m.
Moon: New, May 23
Liglfing: 7.00 p.m.
High Tide: 7.24 a.m
Low Tide: 8.54 p.m.



| They'll Do It Every ‘Time

SEE IT's A Quiz
PROGRAM=BUT EVERY
TIME THE PANEL GETS
THE RIGHT ANSWER THEY
PLAY LEAPFROG UNTIL
THEY MOVE UP TO THE





wer of course, is that they would
be more than compensated by
the bigger crowds the brighter
cricket would attract.

—L.E.S.



WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Ordinary at 11.00
a.m,

Netball, St. Michael's Girls’
School—4.30 p.m.

“Twelfth Night” at Queen’s
College—4.45 p.m.

Basket Ball at Y.MQA, —
7.30 p.m

Police Band at Boys’ Club and
Girls’ Guide Dance, King
George V Park—9.00 p.m.



ITS DIZZY BUT NOT

MUCH DIZZIER THAN

MOST OF THE PROGRAMS

WE'VE GOTs0O YOU KNOW
ANYBO!

HEAD OF THE CLASS« // UH-SORRY.
THE ONE WHO MAKES WE'RE NOT IN

THE MOST JUMPS
GETS



THE MARKET FOR
ANY NEW SHOWS
YOU'LL HAVE TO

BA, PARDON ME NOW

IVE GOT TO MAKE

by close of play had captured 5
+a second innings wickets for
Scoreboard: Somerset vs Indians
Somerset 330 (Lawrence 103 not
out) and 128 for 4. Indians 238.

Glamorgan vs Kent, Kent 209
and 85 for 5. Glamorgan 375,

Gloucester vs Sussex. Sussex
208 and 37 without loss, Glouces-
ter 447 for 7 declared.

MCC vs Lancashire. MCC
and 28 for 4, Lancashire 329.

Northants vs Hampshire, Hamp-
shire 267 and 33 for 2. Northants
268 for 8 declared. (Shackleton 3
for 75).

Surrey vs Warwick, Surrey 154
and 138. Warwick 105 and 118.

Oxford University vs Worcester
Worcester 272 and 69 without loss
Oxford 412 for 8 declared (P,
Blake 130, R, Wollocombe 119).

By Ju

921
231





IY PROGRAM
DIRECTORS ARE
£4, ULCER PRONE:
ene |
fy OSes eh
ASTORIA t. Ny sg



ian co niles inhesiamayeniaeeatinnsaeitlantediienanaetate





And buy a Carib
A tense incident-in the Trinidad
Barbados Tornado tournament —
generous in victory — the Barbadian
skipper hurls alife saver toa gallant
but gasping victim of a Tornado

turnover. ;

Asa reminder why don't you attend
the grand Tornado Dance at the
Crane on Saturday 3lst May and
remember, say “Gimme a Carib”
and absolutely no one will give you
$100.22 — try it.







Full Text

PAGE 1

FRiDW. MAT M. Ia*52 R\RRADOS ADVOCATE PAGE TUBES 1 Mounties' Dogs Take Refresher Courses — Ami Re-grxtdunie CALGARY, Alta. Kuyjl Canadian Mounu|l PolkM dufc> smarti-si uf Ihe U have to K<> back to school once in a whil.\ Thai's why MX uf ihe "force's tinest" were in Calnarv <-n a twowotk relreaher course in th tricky art* of attacking, tracking. Kuardintf criminals and rnifnnR out caches of hidden liquor. When they completed the refresher. |] a ted again. —— Their iirjicliialii.il ronsTssaeal <>l -homing .in MdtoOM .it Calaar.\ let. rl;i Par* their talent* all done with UMMU the command* ol their masters The dogs—all German %  topherds from del-, hmnll in All11 and British Columbia—make moo headline* than thenMM 'proposed they showed how they did It A man came running out Central African Territories Talk Oas (Closer Union A HANDY GIFT FOR EISENHOWER Up ^asM j^| %  * %  •*& ;..KHE Colonial Trade I 11ions Are Patch> —JOtfS WALTQPf LONDON Ma %  %  umlnatloi ul the trade in Itie Colonii 4i John v. ilton aaka bn an arttsta In ti. \la> issue of "New Comnittnwealth'" what lias btCffl tk rir.ii oi varied help given by the C inlet, ih British T.UC and mure l.iti lv. tin \< lei nati %  i hi anewei i eeuila to stati aging in som plac es equally din n otnere, it %  too eerlj I i roni the plain oi UM Intai latinenco of Vt\ • Trade Uniona lot reajionaj oi %  i i hi' w< %  %  %  lu h tMaagfMpui ..good used he winds up in a heated political campaign. Tfea am ( Men NATO h<*dil mown shaking handl with Ike just after he hsil g.vui i,:-r i < %  i \t„,. : |g 3M .iii.ii tvota n.t.i i;'! %  %  gate Ahlaok Favours !{< k gular Broadrasling For Antigua (From Our Own Correspondent! ANTIGUA. \li KanjMih Ablaok K. ional Biogrticaetins Qft lu gi tor %  in recently %  \ i for the I rst .(.aonM h.Mnplonulu ..! 1:., Drggl UM ujin oi After two yoara ol chaa ul on po.itic. 'ruds and imlr niion utuatwa 'tataaaag %  10 the inihaUve of the iorkers and to |h inrluen-e a Uelegalion |n>m the I C T T t white* Msitt'u \\. %  \ i vear. The Conummist -dom I lad Nigerian laib->tir l'ngre out the likclihoivl ol aaaBfei il' "ithanc*. DISPRIN to relieve pain ir le* arU %  < wapleteh MSk-Mr • Oacker lorrtlm %  PalalaHe •aasstaf'gaa toir.KOHilF.'K IWN M .. %  i run "i t.um an I %  .i.iii.i ho wei MH1.00U members, %  | i""-^" 1 *' %  rtrti %  U .ubaeribod >l.:o (U B haa reoigiMd. An actm ., lf ,,, w(ll) .. 1 „„ tav j tee leadh those wlm ee inon : roadcaatins n uunugh , ,^,! u m particular, Ihe pos %  %  i blishii wthod | IJ( |, t huKtoog during law service In A; • the aintenan of the ProlecThen showed them the "booze hounds' ihe skill that have mad' s famous throughout tna li.G's Netr Itiuliu Studio Hay H