Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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<4

t

ESTABLISHED 1895



hav



WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 1952







PRICE: FIVE CENTS



‘

Germany Admitted To European Army

Six Nations

Enabling Treaty

; 5 PARIS, May 27,
el history-making treaty to mass soldiers of rearmed
Germany into a 43-division force with troops of five other
European nations was signed to-day in this capital of
Germany’s ancient enemy. :
The ceremony was followed immediately by a sweep-
ing declaration of American and British support which
bound the United States closer to Europe than ever before.
The declaration promised in general terms that Anglo-
American troops will remain in Europe as long as it is
necessary for peace and that joint action will be taken
against any breakup of the new European army, such as
the withdrawal of militarily resurgent Germany.
maine lpia a Chancellor Konrad Adenauer of
West Germany who is his own
Foreign Minister was the first to
put his signature to the document
{ which mey usher in a new era in
|Europe and he was followed by
| the Foreign Ministers of Belgium, |

France, Italy. Luxembourg and
the Netherlands.





In France

PARIS, May 27. . ;
General Matthew Ridgway Nod _ The signing ceremony took place
United States General to land in| i" tilt and tapestred ‘Salon D'hor-
World War II invasion, returned| 108°” of Quai D'orsay against the
to France to: take! over the Sus eens, of increasing Soviet
preme Allied Command of Europe oe ae on P.O A]
trom retiring Genatal Eisenhower. Gatwbakic Glizh [ty ae scans ee
he former Uni' ations se c as ESE. Sane)
mander in pa eee es European Defence Community |
sprawling Orly airport here to (EDC) Treaty as it is officially
assume command of the defences known was only one of ten ‘docu- |
of the Western Alliance which ments signed to-day to strengthen
oe, to preven a new Korea pies” alliance against Soviet
eruption in all the world. = e
His arrival oiididen » the The American pledge of support
launching of a new se oak | Ben contained in a declaration by

which may lead to a new block- Secretary of State Dean Acheson,
ade of West Berlin by the Rus-| Ptitish Foreign Secretary Anthony
sians, and as the Communist part- Eden, and French Foreign Minis=
ies loosed a torrent of threats’ te? Robert Schuman. Eden post-}
against the West. An indication of | POned his scheduled departure for
the tension was a line of 200 hel-| Hanover, Germany, to-night jin
meted French gendarmes lining 0'der to hold Big Three talks with
the runways through which Ridg- Acheson and Schuman to-morrow
way’s Constellation taxied to the|° the mounting Soviet threat.
main terminal after setting down
at 11.07 a.m. G.M.T.—U.P,

Newbold Takes
Oath As Panama

Governor
NEW YORK, May 27.

a General John. H. :
Seid, MRR Gem; | SUGAR CANE EXPERTS

Panama Canal zone. The oath WILL MEET HERE

will be administered by Karl R./

Bendetsen, Under Secretary of tha (From Our Own Correspondent)

Army at Pentagon Building. PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 27
The Eighth Congress of the In-



The three ministers lunched to-
day with five other EDC Foreign
| Ministers and informally discussed
what action the Soviets may take.
Acheson according to informed
quarters reassured the wavering
French that the door is still open
to more talks with the Soviets des-
pite the signing of the peace pact
with Germany and the European
Army Treaty.—U.P.







The appointment of eneral
Newbold was confirmed by the | ternational Society of Sugar Cane
Senate last week. He succeeds} Technologists is to be held in
Brigadier General Francis K.| Barbados in April. Delegates from
all over the world attending the
parley will visit sugar cane
plantations in Jamaica, Barbados,
British Guiana and Trinidad.

Russians

Newcomer.—U,P.



The Russians barred Uni

Berlin blockade.

furt in West Germany
incident.

- Telephone |
Lines Cut
In Berlin

BERLIN, May 27
Communists cut telephone com-
munications between East and
West Berlin and 17 long distance
lines between West Berlin and
West Germany on Tuesday. Eight
telegraph lines also were cut



However Soviet border
along the 110-mile Autobahr

BRIG. GEN, JOHN NEWBOLD

BOAC Graft Sighted



cations between West Berlin and



Berlin Blockade

police patrols from the main super-highway linking Wegt
Germany and Berlin in what may be the prelude to a new
other Allied and German traffic travelling in both directions

regular United States military morning train from Frank-
also arrived



By Rescue Plane

LONDON, May 27.

A British Overseas Airways
four-motor Hermes Aircraft which !
crashed in French West Africa |
yesterday, was sighted by a rescue
plane according to a BOAC spokes-
man.

He said a B.O.A.C. Argonau
which flew over the reported scene,
of the aircraft’s
230 miles south of Port Etienne

| for

( canton thus far teletype communi-

West Germany were not affected.

It appeared to be the first blow
in promised Communist reprisals
West Germany's signing of
the Peace Pact with the Western
Allies yesterday. West Berlin,
110 miles inside the Soviet Zone,
feared a renewal of the near para-

| lyzing Red blockade of 1948-49.

Earlier to-day Russian border

forced-landing | guards again barred Allied military

motor patrols from the city’s

had spotted the plane partially] only highway link with the West

buried in some soft sand.
the port wing was damaged.

He said/110 mile

road to Helmstedt
Patrols which aid stranded motor-

The crew of the Argonaut re-| ists had been periodically banned

ported ‘considerable — activity”
around the plane which carried
eight crewmen and ten passengers
when it left London on Sunday
en route to Lagos, Nigeria. But
the extent of casualties if any are
not yet known.—wU.P.







between May 8 and May i7, but
since then had not been troubled.
To-day as before, Russians gave
‘no explanation for their action.
A civilian freight and passenger
traffic on the highway still flowed
normally.—«?

Russian Air Foree Is

NEW YORK, May 27,




| this country a powerful long range

Secretary of the Air Force| atomic attack, Finletter said
Thomas Finletter said Tuesday‘) writing in the current issue of
that soon Russia will be able to! Aviation Age Magazine: “This
swiftly deal a “devastating and} long range atomic capability of
possibly fatal blow’ to this| our potential adversary continues |
nation’s military and industrial} to grow.”

resources,





The Soviet Union possess
capability of directing

es the







He said t
Truman’s plan

wings ready by



ave 126 cor
mid 1955 ¢t





against! United States Air Force will face

|



Party Clashes
Expected In
Primaries

WASHINGTON, May 27.

Presidential candidates of both
Republican and Democratic par-
ties will ‘clash to-day in four
states in critical contests involv-
ing national convention delegates.
On the Democratic side 102 dele-
gate votes were at stake in the
Texcs and Kentucky State con-
ventions and the Florida primary.

Republicans elected 60 delegates
in the Texas and Connecticut con-
ventions, Major contests involved
supporters of Senator Robert A.
Taft and Generali Eisenhower in
the Texas Republican convention
and Senators Richard B. Russel}
and Estes Kefauver in the Florida
Democratic primary,





Kentucky democrats were ex-
pected to give Vice-President
Alben W. Barkley 26 delegate

votes for the Democratic presi-
dential nomination. The Eisen~
hower campaign organization fig-
ured on winning almost all 22
Connecticut Republican delegates.
A heated battle was under way
among Texas Republicans who
will have 38 votes at the National
Convention.

Taft won the bitterly contested
first round of victory last night in
a fight for the control of Texas
delegation. However Eisenhower

{supporters said they may take the

fight all the way to Chicago.
Taft's backers were firmly in con-
trol of the State Republican organ-
ization as Eisenhower hopefuls
were beaten in bid after bid to
win seats in the Texas Convention
which will meet to-day to choose
the State’s 38-man delegation to
the National Convention,

There was also battle in the
Democratic ranks in Texas as pro-
Truman delegations from 27 coun-
ties were frozen out of the party’s
State Convention. This assured
a pro-Truman bolt trom the con-
vention to-day and two Texas
delegations at the National Con
vention. The State Credentials
Committee, ruled that pro-Tru-
man delegates should be seated.

Florida primary provided a re-
match between Russell and Ke-
fauver the South’s two candidates
for the Democratic presidential
nomination. Russell who defeated
Kefauver in an earlier popularity
contest primary in Florida on May
7, said he expected to win 20 of
the 24 Florida delegates elected
in to-day’s ballotting—U.P,

Renew

BERLIN, May 27,
ted States.and British military

guards did not interfere with

n across the Soviet Zone. The

in Berlin without
This action nevertheless was
viewed as the first of what may
become a _ series of retaliatory
Soviet and East German measures
for the separate peace treaty sign-
ed by the Western Big Three and
Western Germany yesterday,
Allied authorities adopted a
“wait and see” attitude toward the
speculation that the Soviet may
intend to renew the 1948-49 total
land blockade of Western Berlin.
Russians once before this month
halted Allied military police
patrols on the super highway but
finally lifted the ban on May 17,
ten days later. The new ban also
came only a few hours after the
Communist East German govern-
ment announced it had ordered



tween East and West Germany
and other “strong measures... .
to prevent further infiltration of
subversive elements, spies and
terrorists.”

United States military police
patrols ran into trouble when they
set out at 8.00 a.m. (3 a.m. E.S.T.)
ym the first of their regular round-
trip patrols alomg the highway.
They travel in sedans equipped
with two-way radios with orders
to curb speede$; and aid any
motorists found in distress.

United States authorities said
Russian border guards at Helm-
stedt and Berlin check points
offered no.explanation for refusing
passage. On the previous occasion
this month, the Soviets had
charged that the Allies were il-
legally sending armed patrols
along the highway.—wU.P.







-——--——_ —

A Threat

“heavy odds” against the Russians.

He said by 1954 the Red Air
Force will probably outnumber
the r forces of the . North
Atla Treaty Organization by
“about three to two” in the tactical




atomic bombs will
ably be “over half again as

as our strategic air command
"—U.P,

prot




Sign


















reinforcement of the border be-§

FIRST P
f OF





WHIPPORAYS score their first goal against Police in the water polo match played at the Aquatic

Club yesterday.

Whipporays won the game 7-3. (See page 7).

” Howse Pass
Third Parties

o

Mexico Finds

*

Insurance Bil) For Cattle Disease

THE House of Assembly yes+
terday with but little debate pass-
ed a Bill to make provisions for
the protection of Third Parties
against risks arising out of the use
of motor vehicles,

Notice of this Bill was given on
December 18 and it was read a&
first time on January 8 On
January 15 the Bill was read a
second time and referred to a
Select Committee. The Select
Committee reported back to the
House yesterday but made no sub»
stantial changes,

The objects and reasons read:—

The Bill seeks to apply to this
Island the principle of compulsory
insurance against third-party risks
arising out of the use of motor
vehicles on , publie roads and
based on similar legislation exist-
ing in United Kingdom,
Guiana and Trinidad, 4

2. Clauses 3 and 4 make it un-
lawful for anyone to use a motor
vehicle on a public road without
being insured against liability for
causing death or bodily injury to
any person by the use of such
vehicle. Provision is also made
in Clause 4 to enable hospitals to
recover from the insurer expenses
reasonably incurred in treating
injured persons. A similar pro-
vision is contained in Clause 19
to cover the fees of medical
practitioners who render emerg-
ency treatment to persons injured
in road accidents.

3. Under the provisions of
Clause 8 every driver of a motor
vehicle is required to produce a
certificate of insurance to a con-
stable on request, but if he fails
to do so, he is allowed a further
period of five days from the date
of the request in which to produce
it to a police station,

4. Clause 9 enables a third
party to recover from an insurer
the amount of any judgment he
may obtain, notwithstanding that
the policy may be voidable or can-
celled, and Clause 10 provides
that in the event of an insured
person becoming insolvent, his
rights against the insurer shall be
transferred to and vest in the third
party. The remaining clauses of
the Bill contain various detailed
provisions for implementing the
principles of the Bill; for ex-

man arm





Attack On’

. The Communists threatened to unleash their 1,000,000-| former King Baw

(By PAUL HAWKINS)
MEXICO CITY, May 27,
Mexican livestock industry expected to return to in















| Argentin:

N ]
he first quarter of 1952 totalled
1203 a cit

U.S-Argentine
- Wool Trade
Rose InMarech

(By HARRY W. FRANTZ)
WASHINGTON, May 27,
from Argentina sharply im-
ol imports for the first-quar-
of this ye vere only about one third in volume and
alue o e same quarter in 1951. Another bright
just released by the Commerce De-
se in the seasonal imports of green

}
trade
rad

1 in March but total v

in Mareh doubled over
the Argentine have al-

no extract

rts from



i) imports «
or Argentina



in the

valued 4





ved at wes Speaker To
vases cees| Represent

“ B’dosAtC.P.A,



kere His Honour the Speaker of the
House of Assembly Mr. K,. N. R.
Husbands hag unanimously
selected by the Barbados Branch
of the Commonwealth Parliamen-
tary Association to represent Bar-
bados at the .Conference and a
General Meeting of the Association
t be held in Ottawa in early
Af

j
f

ict ent
varehouses) f
11,621





valued been

016,694 in Februar

Import of un



m
wool fror Argen
6,368,719
und 2ro: veight valued at

t



1anufact
were

i
|
|
|

ina in Viareh

$3,546,594 compared to February’s

272.244 pounds valued at $1,954 September. The date has not yet

877. Imports of Argentine wool in| been fixed

An invitation was received from

Branch of the







he Canadian
2 Parliamentary

7,85 t 85,461,391 mmonwealth
rune ilued ; $30,357,088 inf A nation to send a- delegate to
he 1 quarter last ur the Conference Transport ex-
The wool boom th followed enses of the delegate will be
tt t of the Koi nflict
re hed a peak durir I fir
yu r of 1951 after hich im-|the px
ports into the Unite ( \ return,







lefrayed by the Canadian Branch
rom the port of embarkation to
t of entry into Canada and
ind whilst in Canada the
delegate will be the guest of the



lined

































; “ . Import of green en from | Canad Sranc
ternational meat trade in September, will climax its fitst{ aysoentina in March Bere 3,403,589 The. me Same will last for
test tube victory over hoof and mouth disease, When the, pounds valued at $241,476 and the} ubout one week and after. that
United States opens its borders again to Mexican cattle! first quarter total was 8,607,291 | delegates will make a tour of the
shipments, it will mark for the first time in scientific history oe Pieri “b ' ‘; Neha t In the | principal centres of Canada which
ime quarter o O51 ir or were " rr — ree .
that vaccines have dealt a death blow to Aftosa. 760.208 | 5-0 nish ports weretmay last between three and four
a ~~ Hoof and mouth infection hav« $109,964 i aio ~~. I’ eeks,
been stamped out before by abso ar hegre ; : : ‘1
lute slaughter and quarantine}, ie ' oe nv " fin ‘ ; Mt i |
Feeds Attach: | |rcte shen ase were wiles ere 400.071 pounds valued ‘Oil Strik Up
the. vacciiation pro r mmc. $1,646,323 against 7,087,342 pounds I r e Ss
P ene the Mexican veterinarians believe) * ee - et in serves Aj ; Cl if
~ » se " ver CO lave heen meow: SS rier tota were ( 9
U.N. Positions |i 0c ices guarier Wels were (1083)) Ae (onarees
conquered here without vaccine ~ ; - a
While there is no definite assur< O14 against (1951) 34.4 ;
SEOUL, May 27 ance that Aftosa may not recur pounds valued (From Our Ows: Correspondent)
mmunist, tirgymen rs hit they claim any possible outbreaks = it LONDON, May 27.
ations | nes in six attacks oon eer ee ene could hs ne creignt rales from Britain
western _ ‘Ol whi their tsa alec quickiy ana economically | fy vn to the est Indies and the
frasy delves’ kf Ssnminton Mexico has not had a hoof and BWA, Cancel Hahanas’ were ‘inereased today
threatened a new major offensive, | Muth outbreak since August 16, ’ ° dus owing to the continuation of the
Reds sent 300 men against a single 1951, when several herds of cattle Special I lights American oil strike. The in-
hill 50 miles north of Seoul at kis Fracuz Pan were stricken jcrease was made necessary be~
the head of the traditional route 1e proposed lifting of the t ed | Tis tha oft cau B.O.A.C, are now only
through the Uijongbu Corridor, States embargo would allow one 1f W hitsuntide jable to offer a once weekly
year’s absence of the virus and the : jthrough shipment between Brit-
Eighth Army troops were on the | indication of vaceine battle} "PORT OR GDA re ent lain and the Caribbean. Remain
alert all across the 155 mile bat-| has proved suceessful, A long fight, Tho adh ; oe I joan ‘ jing freight has to be tran-
tle-front. Communist artillery |here against Aftosa bayan ortly | vie, fleas, hoe ye or W A. ser~| shipped in New York to another
opened the hill assault with more | after the first « were reported) wich if Tees BEsbhos i}eompany and an additional
than 2,000 rounds of ammunition. | in December 1946 | OUR would bet eight charge has to be paid.
Then infantrymen struck ana Since then the United States and! bic ie a ae a1 | cos : ;
battled Allied troops for four|Mexico have spent more than) (co) reat or = severa .C, have increased their
hours and twenty minutes before | 16,000,000 on partial extermina ‘ hn Divleton: acti Manager x ey ~ cover this addi-
they were hurled back, tion and vaccination programmes.| of B.W.TA stated to hat the "| Stink | i
3 100 Losses More than 1,000.00 cattle wer a aa be - edt ee ya Che position i be aan
SSCs Peds : f : me na | compan could not ut on 1ej;again tomorrow when SOLA,
The attack cost the Reds at least ae I sc = COUr RE A oy ; usual special Whitsuntide Holi- | trafic officials will “decide
‘ ce 1 1 Di co OSC. ) o ht }
100 casualties, United States and Mexican vet=| Ain whelher ite Gharge shouldbe
A Said ' ve Mex ice | 1@ cuts came into effect ly}maintained unt . conditions
Five similar probes were thrown | erinarians centred on vaccines! josi month as a. result. f ‘th e 1 scone ena ine Ne wees
ac i my after the c a os 4 i [ i ecome normal or whether
back with heavy Red los : after the cry of angry peasants) tijel crisis followir the U.S, oil! B.O.A.C. should pay the increase
United States Marines of the First and slaughter of their herds.) jndustry strike, ; themselve RO Noe a eae
Division were guard of part of —U-P, | ean”
the western sector but censorship | | rr
would not permit an anhounce- | re }
ment as to whether they were in-| V indsor Home |
volved in to-day’s fighting. | |

Patrols were ranging into no-
man’s land last night and early
to-day ran into groups of Com-
munists as large as sixty men.|
West of Chorwon a United Nations |
patrol ambushed Red scouts and

Amid Revived Topic
On Abdication

LONDON, May 27.
The Duke of Windsor returned}



Killed five in a twenty minute |i» England to-day to find his 1936
fight. bdieation a revived subject of
5 : : itt controv y twe the
Fifth Airforce fighter bombers | 7 fat i t Yr a és . Tir a iY a
struck again at Communist front jon ope 1k, publisher of th

line bunkers and rear area trans-



-? Daily Expre
Oo port and supply. UP Windsor disembarked from th
n page 6. ae ner Queen Elizabeth at South
\\ mpton and drove traight to tr
r : } horne of his mother Queen M
-g. . ~ . Vno 85 ri old terday
Nam Il Threatens Massed (3) 00000 80°

im I

l H

U.N. Forces

PANMUNJOM, May 27,

broadcast said the late
Dawson,

Geottrey
Times,
inst th

ard VIIL who had

of
fe Franc
Beaverbrook in a recent
|
editor” of



vung public opinion ag

in North Korea against the Eighth Army of the] believed he could gain aceeptanc:
United Nations in retaliation for the so-called “massacre” } 0! @ motganatic marrioce to My
of Red prisoners on Koje Island. North Korean General|\){!" Simpson and keep the
Nam Il, senior Red delegate, delivered the gravest threat} Wickham Steed. another former
of renewed full-scale bloody warfare in Korea since the}editor of The Times who suceeed-

truce negotiations began last July. ed Dawson,

Boy Did Lessons
With Bullet Im Leg

LONDON, May 27.
A 13 year old boy who did not
want to get his friend in trouble
sat stoically through morning
session at school yesterday and
then staggered home to tell his
mother he had been shot,

The bullet had been fired ac-
cidentally from an old German
pistol brought to school by one
of Edward Wilson’s classmates.

The desk cover hurriedly
slammed down over the pistol,
caused it to fire. The startled
teacher confiscated the gun but
could not find the bullet or any-
one injured. At the noon recess
however, Mrs. Nellie Wilson
found that her son had walked
half mile home with his trouse:
leg smeared with blood.



He said he did not want to

le ; Laroe long range panvees aay anything in school because|They said they would 1
y sapabie o

there might be trouble. Edward
|} was taken to the hospital to have
jthe bullet removed.

—C.P.



in # blunt letter
He told the United Nations that} Printed in The Times, to-day that
masses of North Koreans and! Beaverbrook’s resurrection of the
Chinese Red soldiers massed in}4bdication question at this time of
front of the 155-mile ed de-|â„¢ourning for George VI, was a
fence line could not “sit by” while\ Public misdeed and heinous
communist prisoners of war were} He said Dawson had followed






being “slaughtered” on Kojc { blic opinion not di it. Th
The warning brought varied r¢ | Duk ‘ ecretary 1 W ‘
actions from United Nations offi 1 not comment.—UwU.P,

cials, Chief United Nations spoke
man Brig. General William P
Nuckols described it as a military
threat. Major General William
K. Harrison, new senior delegate
said it was “propaganda”.

Trinidad Lead
In Lawn Tennis





Nam's threat came as the Allied j a ho Sa
troops on the western front wer« MPORT-OF 'M 7 2
alerted for a possible Red attack Trinid lead hadi ‘
down in the classic “Uijon;: 3 ; 5 :
corridor” of invasion leading to} 4
Seoul. The threat also came fol-), oe
lowing the disclosure yesterda The +
that 237 Red prisoners have died : ;
recently in camps—122 killed b eee Doubles % ‘a ;

United Nations guns and 115 exe-|, bmg

cuted by their fellow captive ee Nothnage 1 Ar
Nam's choice of words recalled) °~® f 7: Dawe

| the veiled warning made bs :

Chinese Communists before they vi t b ‘ I

entered the war in November 1950 WwW

Ladies Singles-



j idly by” while the United Nations! Mixed Doubles



army overrun North 1 I 7 i
| threatened the Manchurian front-,17 ail ) M
ler —U.P, Mi D. Vv 3.

pi

“They're everything
I look for”

“But seldom find, except in

da Maurier, L suppose you

mean. But what exactly do
4 you took for in a cigarette?”?
i»













“Flavour—which can
, \ only come from tobacco
that is rather special.
Then, of course, perfect
smoothness—which means
a comfortable throat,”

|
I
|

J
42"

* Coolness too? Well, that’s
seen to by the du Maurier filter
tip. And no bits of loose tobacco

’

in the mouth—filter tip again.’

| Jie
yA

“Yes—all that. D’you know, this
du Maurier filter tip is just about
the finest

idea for improving a

| ' ”
| smoke that I've ever come across.
{

|

Smoke fo your throat's content

du MAURIER \

THE EXCLUSIVE FILTER TIP CIGARETTE

SOLE DISTRIBL v N HAYNES CQO., LTD., BRIDGETOWN

$1.04 for 5
MADE IN ENGLAND



om 186



es





WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 1952

BARBADOS ADVOCATE













"a

THE BY ae










THE SALVATION ARMY

Por the maimtenance of its local
werk, The Salvation Army will
@brerve its Annual Tag-Day in
St. Michsel and the joining Par-
ishes.on Friday @th June. Tags
will be

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Home From Korea



M® A. dek.,. FRAMPTON, Agri-
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D5 3 ’ A. + - > trees O48.

Film Board Chief Jones Sar of tan ' SC TORY DANCE Place Your Orders With Us Now



R ELTON VILLANEUVA
President of the Film Board
of Trinidad and Manager of Re-
public Pictures, returned to Trini-
lad on Monday evening by
B.W.I.A. after paying a short
business visit here. He was stay-
ing at the Hastings Hotel.
Off To Trinidad
EAVING for Trinidad on Mon-
« day evening by B.W.I.A
was Mrs. V. M. Hoberts of Geov-
ernment Hill. She has gone to
visit her husband’s daughter Joan
who is ill.

On Annual Visit
RAVING for Canada via Trini-

—based on the proposition
that round husbadds still
deserve a square heal ..

Lato Of success:
ire Taubdy Hubby dret wily t % wm the Oity

By Bernard Wicksteed :
V YELL They have ae * m ONber we grow
started me off on ey again
They put me on tt at â„¢ | was given the menu on

ho has taken














JOUN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.
Roebuck Street

Te be he'd

1O.NIGHTE

AT QUEEN'S PARK HOURE
Constitution Read
Music by C. B. BROWN
and His Orchestra
ADMISSION %-
Pancing from 8 pm te t am
REFRESHMENTS ON SALE



KH arrived on Monday eveni g
Antigua by BWIA. ang is
esent Staying with Mr. WA

-rawferd at Pegwel enor
hrist Church. Tn
Jones who is or
eave fram Camp Ki
fersey, has covered
miles to get here fr
aving travelled via lg
Aleutians and Port Arthu

Leaving Barbados ten

£0, Re Joined the U.S. Army at |
served during World Way i :

rope with the Third Army |
inder General Patton '







breakfast time yester- 4 Sip of paper and put on

’ yoROUr fo stick to |
day and aiterwards - Saat * r
tried to tell me | looked ‘ cau il
slimmer already

~~
at h
The whole Wy se a ye
â„¢ was We Rhustan

TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. Last Shows
VENGEANCE VALLEY (Burt Lancaster)



TODAY & TOMORROW 4% pm










































: Sanat : 3 ta, “HE'S MY @DY" d
dad on Monday by B.W.LA ANITA BJORK At the cessation af hostilities | trick, bs a Corks 2 an
a " ae af hostilita break asd Yo @vercame an s
was Mr. J. C. Kreindler Man- No to Rank offer. he spent five years at Boston | because me | a bf nant c= ‘ “prrTsBURGH : d
aging Director of Messrs. G. W. ; i University where he ma oned . a ae “hen ee é a. men ae = Bion WAYNE, Randolph SCOTT FOLLOW THE SUN (Glenn Ford)
Hutchinson and» Co., Lid., and Miss Bjork refuses History and got his M.A. degree | areaAkiast I get any other beater eed to make Rriday and Sat. 8.30 pom Erode areata aioe tla Stee ertiate sie micecop ie Diegivesic
the Modern, Dress Shoppe’ wus FRLONDE Swedish fim {> Higher Education in i0si.| Q day when They ake sor Bee colvcianh Wan at “KID GALAMAD" - OPENING TOMORROW 5 & 8.30 P.M.
Mas gone Up on his-annial busi actress Anita Bjérk, who During last summer he graduated | cys to ct me oe onthe Son coe eS Wayne MORRIS & ’ ak P
ness visit and is expected to be appeared in the Swedish film rom the Infantry Schoo} at Fort | t seat hardship to put him on . “CASABLANCA NI Be
away for about two weeks. xt Strindberag’s Miss Julie coe Georgia and later went There was nal 3 wiass ot 3 diet that he \ : BOG. - ; 4
i has declined an offer to’ ic the Far East with the Thira| orange juice, parched egg o wou! kee uw =~—tté—<:C(i:é‘L SSS
On Business 3 i Rank film i infantry Division, “® THRE] foes (unkatiered), a Slice kr: 19 days and sen
EAVING for Trinidad on Mon- Bean’ a n m in On his ao sa eae | nd marmalade. and ie cont libe a ven Gan tere
day by B.W.1.A. on a busi- “The offer was to appear Lt. Jones will he wee. oS DAD SABE al Over again, We'll see : i |
isit was Mr 5 ' . ao > ill be re-assigned to .
et wae eee in. The Long .. Memory Germany. signed to | = ruby t START HEADING
of “Landscape”, St. as. Oppaesite John Mills. Sh ene ars !
expects to be away for about ten velieed be cae ike ts und r Visiting The Island ou won’ ren re «CUT THIS OUT TT FOR THE PLAZA
days. ‘ontract to make a film in . A. BRANCH, wife notice YOM ate Gh a diet and 3 =; : ;
‘ Stockholm for an American _of the Commissioner of all ‘ee im rou we eas : THEATRE BECAUSE
: Intransit company. Police of the I ing so slim and h me §
: ‘TRANSIT from Haiti via *~ terton rz» +0 rived from Antigua cn Mone> that youll get @ job on the §
NTR ndan Ket ahs - Keen : : gua on Mor mS and earn ; sat 3
Re Kates WL 8 ere evening by B.W.T.A. on a vist pounds a week. ;
Monday evening was Mr. A. Nor- Spent A Month oad the island and is Staying as a i ww FIRST DAY
ris Hughes, President of the EAVING for Trinidad on Mon- 84st of Col. O. St. A’ Duke of | My son John ?MY .
Executive Council of the Carib- Jy gay by B.W.1.A. intransit >': “™n’s Fort, Garrison t DIAL 2610 (DIAL 5170) on 5






NO _ sooner baa thes
4 said this than I! felt
ravenousiv hungry, | ist
have been psycholo; or
something becausr :
for porridge I ney

bean Tourist Association aor for British Guiana were Mr. and On Long Leave |
erry ne a ies or aeowrell — —— ae “ their R. AND MRS. Gc. f£ |

After a $ , * little son Gerald. They had spent THOMAS and th sugh- |
= es teenie rae a month's holiday staying at their ter Janet arrived here > a
us way to G é s ‘é



To-day & To-morrow

cMenu

Breakfast
Matt glass ef orange juice.

Last 2 Shows To-day Today & Tomorrow
4.30 & 8.30 p.m 4.30 & 8.30 p.m
“LULLABY OF Teghnicolor Double
BROADWAY" |] “LOOK for the
Doris DAY & SILVER LINING”



4.45 & 8.30 p.m
“FLAMINGO ROAD”
Joan Crawiord &
LAND BEYOND










Monday |



















































. . n " ee rden MacRAE & THE LAW
¥ ‘Tourist seaside residence “Rosamund”, from Antigua for 4 short holiday ! more than Mat for br -.5 fast One poaehed egg en thin Pn ee Cuekuane “SOUTH of 8ST. LOUIS" Dick Foran
the headquarters of the Tourist Worthing. Their other son Peter before leaving by the Colombie | any Wie. : laast. eee John GARFIE Joel MacCREA
Association have been moved who had come over with them, has for the Unit eer — My son John, aged five Stice of thin toast light'y THURS “Seca Ps = || Thurs. Special 1.20 Friday & Saturday
al saad $ : he United Kingdon They rgu t red lad ar THURS. Special 1.30 p.m. re. oe pom 4.45 & 8.30
from Trinidad to Antigua and it returned to school at the Lodge. are staying at the St. tawrencs | Was Most intrigued buitere mare ade “COWBOY " CAVALIER” “CUBAN PETE” CMbEnaASaoehie a
is contemplated to move them t0 Mr. Willems is a Director of Hotel, — Reet seal te Sean’ mana 8 One cup of colter, withent Jimmy WAKELY & MUG TOWN “BAGDAD” (Color)
New York when circumstances wijjems Timber and Trading Co., Mr. Thomas who is with ha eit cream or sugar. Rr eo File ae Foe Bal CHRISTIAN
warrant it. Ltd. clays Bank in Antigua. is now on > Was told he must a a \ction=pac! ob
Mr. Louis Law has been ap- With Barcl Bank # hong in Antigua, is now on ee ae So Be ay wunch OPENING THURS. Prams Agtionspacked =a SS
pointed Executive Director of the 1 arciays Ban : " | One glass temato juice. ih & S88 ¥.w. EASE COWBOY CAVALIER
eae FTER spending three weeks . ; ate, @5 ile : ish ill i and Continuing Daily Errol FLYNN in — 7 ” Wakela
Association, G da Wed j as Daddy Broiled white Osh or grilled THE TANKS ARE Jimmy Wakely &
Back From Antigua holiday in Barbados, Mr. renada edding | as big a sole COMING” | oy POPE, CEEY SILVER RAIDERS
D. J. Brown left on Monday ISS MABEL McNEILLY Green salad with lemon Steve COCHRAN ee Le BAVILLAND Whip WHLSON
R. ALGIE SYMMONDS, one evening hy B.W.I.A. for Trini- daughter of Mrs. Kathleen pice Eat Hp creem, “Sat, Special 9.30 & 1.30 WO Tae ” IDNITE SA
7 . g by Wee Ak r -d Mr ath! | ; A . ‘ F THE MIDN' T.
YA of the members at te Bs dad on iis way back to British McNeilly, and clerk to the| i ne “ae Charies Starrett. Doubie BADLANDS. RED DESERT
pire Sports Team which played @ Guiana where he is employed with Grenada Building and Loan} . SOUTH OF DEATH Tim Holt & Don Barry &
series of games in Antigua, arriv- parciays Bank. :

é Association, was recent! wedded
ed here on ee ae aaron While here he was staying at to Mr. Kenneth D Wiaimermels }
ee asap “Rhonda” Rockley Beach. English plantation engineer resid-|
— Se. tee - a e Business And Pleasure ent in British Guiana.

VALLEY &




PRAIRIE LAW
George O'Brien





FRONTIER REVENEE
Lash La Rue



Stop arguing and
get on with your porridge.”



Clear soup.
Liver (timned or tresh).

MORES UReen seen pamers H RARE NS CRSERERHEREE: Senne cme ERROERERORR Ens seneen®:

[ATTA O eemen ae neees cease a0 ones eeEne ss OnENe TKDE SC RARERERERSROR ERE



Pa ehMac Pe COLL LLLP OOP OE EC al MPM RM
aaa aaa













I : 2 5 Cauliflower, tomate (no

Brancker and other members of R. A. B. DeLIMA, Director While the ceremony was al Couldn s sie * potatoes).

the Team have gone on to St. of Alphonsa B. De Lima, SUiet and simple one, a fare | B° he st couldn't a Generous portion of cheese

Kitts where they will spend a Jewellers of ‘Trinidad and Barba- DUMber of friends and well} aorvides it a ee wan oe An apple. . EMPIRE ae ; ROXY

short time before returning home. dos, returned home on Manday Wishers of the bride witnessed } make him so big that Seer tan ete teas TO-DAY & TOMORROW 4.45 & 8.15 i Vacghs MONROE ® His One.

Best Place - evening after a week's visit here the union which was solemnised | eventually hed have Ww stop London Express Service | Broderick CRAWFORD — Judy io .

R. GUSTAV PABST, Jnr.. of 2 business coupled with pleasure, by the Revd, Adam Thompson, | aaa eee eee, } in (HOLLIDAY “CARNEGIE HALL”
Washington, D.C., arrived De ven, *gmpanied by Mrs. The bi ide, striking a charming | BORN YESTERDAY “gee ADMAAAL Was A LADY”

on Monday by B.W.1.A. v¥ia Lima, They were guests of picture in an elegant creation of ; | — EXTRA - with

Antigua for a month's holiday fe: hee of Maxwell, slipper satin, was given away by |



TEHAIKOVSKY’'S
NUTORACKER SUITE




Edmond O'BRIEN —Wanda HENDRIX
her uncle, Mr. George MeNeilly, i

After Three Months while My, Frank Baeger, a friend

which he is spending as a guest
at the Ocean Vew Hotel.






OPENING SAT. 430 & 8.15

TORNADO |





f OPENING FRI. ‘2 30 & 8.20 Johnny WIBSSMULLER
,Mr. Pabst who is paying his Are spending there months’ °f the groom from British Guiana, | OTE cattun ahaoe: 7
second visit to the island said holiday here, Miss Agatha #¢ted as bestman. .. . OF GENGHIS KHAN



“JUNGLE MAN HUNT”
that it is the best place he knows. Sealy and Miss Cynthia Sealy re- | There were no bridesmaids, but






DANCE





| , and ¢
He came here four on ago to turned to Trinidad on Monday by the bride's sister, Sheila, stood in| ° OLYMPIC tis “CHINA CORSAIR
spend one day and eventually B.W.1.A. They were staying aiKendance as the vows were TO-DAY LAST 2 SHOWS 4.30 & 8.15 ROYAL
spent thirty-one, with Dr. and Mrs. W. L. Wood- exchanged. Mrvagsectiry |






‘ En-Route To U.K. ing + ranevilis’ am Rock. = Honeymooning at Quarantine
R. Cc. J. SONGHURST, ey had come over to be present Station, Mr. Pennycook leaves this
Advertising Manager of the sober birth of Mrs. Wooding's ee Be. to be joined
British American Tobacco Com- * ater by his wife. ‘
pany in London, England, left on Spent The Week-End Miss Shelia McNeilly left the

AT WARNER BROS.

er
THE ‘CRANE HOTEL

“THE JACKIE ROBINSON STORY” TO-DAY & TOMORROW 4,30 & 8.15
with Jackie ROSRERCH “PASS PORT TO PIMLICO”
(himself)

and
and “DON'T TRUST YOUR HUSBAND”

“NORTH WEST STAMPEDE” with
Starring Fred McMURRAY










PHILIE.

COCHRAN: CAREY xi

Screen Piay by ROBERT HARDY ANDREWS @












j James CRAIG — Joan LESLIP -
Monday evening by B.W.I.A. R. O. H. JOHNSON of ee ie em whee she SATURDAY, S3ist May at 9 p.m. Ore cto ge FOMERESS GIT OCU 7s ae
7 for Trinidad and Jamaica on his Johnson's Stationery who 80¢s to meet the family of her Admission: $1.00 " 40) / Cr LO.in —_ 7 e
way back home. He was here was in Trinidad for the week end, fiance, a Welsh Fusilier stationed ro RROW (Thurs) ee eee ‘aamana “SINGAPORE”
on a business visit and was stay- returned home on Monday morn- here during last year’s Tickets obtained from—




&
SARABAND with Stewart GRANGER

ing at the Ocean View Hotel. ing by B.W.1.A. in Technicolor

disturbances.



and
“THE LOST MOMENT”



Advocate Stationery Dept., C. F. Harri-

PLAZA
son & Co., Ltd, Louis Bayley

Boltor, Lane, Aquatic Beauty Salon, ||| BRIDGETOWN-~(DIAL 2310)
Royal Barbadas Yacht Club and Mem. 4.45 and 8.30 p.m. Also
bers of the Tornado Association.








While The Sun Shines

Who knows what this year
will bring? It may be blister-
ingly hot for months on end,
Whatever the weather, come
what may, you must be really
prepared for the hot sunshiny
days. Beware of sunburn, which
is a very different story to sun-
tan. With such a warm climate,
it is a problem, A brilliantly hot
day can so easily amaze — and
delight —. us by appedring after

a cool period. Then off comer

our suits, and into the lightest,
seantiest frocks we scamMmper, to
sit in the sun, And, in less time
than it takes for me to write,
the skin is burned, and the
misery begins. It may not be
noticeable at once, the joy of
relaxation in the sun’s rays
makes us “sun happy”. But next
day, even the same evening—
the skin can irritate, burn, and
look, so ugly red!
Be Prepared

When the weather encourages
you to don your clothes, rub a
e0od suntan lotion or cream into
all the parts that are to be ex-
posed. There are so many on the
market to-day that you can get
them from any chemist or
beauty counter, and choose
liquid or cream as you prefer.
You can, if you like, use pan<
cake make-up for your face.
That staves off sunburn, but it
does not encourage tanning, es-
pecially if you lubricate the
face with cream first of all,
which js a wise thing to do to
save the skin drying.

ail have a true skin which con-
tains the blood vessels, nerves,
fat qelils and other pigments
which are the decisive factors on
which we determine our ability
to tan. If the pigments are
evenly distributed you will tan
evenly, The girls who possess
skins of medium colour and
thickness, must take their sun-
bathing more cautiously. Those
of you with more delicate skins
have to guard against over-ex-
posure and take sunning very,
very carefully, The thin, sensi-
tive skin that burns so easily
should be sun-bathed under a
sunshade, which does not make
it so brown, but yet doesn’t get
red and uncomfortable, either.
Daily Lubrication

Be careful to follow the general
rule, five minutes each side to
begin with, with outstretched
arms so that the sun gets to the
undersides, increasing the dose
with each time, You can, of
course, sunbathe three or four
times q day—and eventually
just lay in the sun all day. But
if you want to get really brown
the need for oiling and creaming
persists the whole time. The
more the oiling the browner the
ukin—and the oil does save the
skin getting dry and shrivelled,

Tf you have been sunning
don't go straight in and wash the
face with soap and water, don’t
take a bath however sticky you
may feel. Cream tiie face, and
wait until you have quite cooled
off for your bath.

idéa to rub oil into the body

immediately after your morning

bath. It gives your skin that

smooth, satiny appearance.
Last Hints

Your legs have to look good
when they are so lengthily ex-
posed to all and sundry, so any
fuzz has to be eliminated,
Shaving isn’t wise. It hardens
the hairs and makes them grow
coarse, You can use the cream
removers that are specified for
the under arms. Maybe you'd
prefer them. They are certainly
very @asy to use. When the hairs
show signs of reappearing just
repeat the treatment.

A last warning—do wear dark
glasses in the sun’s glare. They'll
make you feel more comfort-
able, and they will prevent
wrinkles around the eyes. Take
them off while you sunbathe, by
all means, but only for a while
to prevent getting white “clown
like” circles. And how attrac-
tive the sun glasses are! They
can add a great deal to your
Summertime beauty.

Listeni

istening Hours
WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 1952

41.00-—7,15 19.76M. 26.53M.

4.00 p.m, The News. 4.10 p.m, The
Daily Service. 4.15 p.m. B.B.C. Midland
Light Orchestra, 5.00 p.m, The Derby
5.15 p.m. Cavaleade of Melody. 6 55
pm. Interlude, 6 00 p.m. Scottish Mag-
azine. 6.18 pm. The SPA Orchestra
630 p.m. Think on These Things. 6 45

ee 8.30 p.m.



. tions have to be cancelled or changed
» so that we can accommodate others.



FRIDAY 2.30, 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
and Continuing Daily at 4.45 and







IMPORTANT
NOTICE

Due to the aviation gasolene short-
age we have been forced ta restrict
our operations. Please advise us as
early as possible whenever reserva-










Passengers who hold reservations








3 Phone 4267 for
GALVANISED CORRUGATED SHEETS

26 Gauge and 28 Gauge

EVERITE CORRUGATED SHEETS
EVERITE TRAFFORD TILES

STANDARD HARDBOARD
The Board of 1,000 Uses

INSULATING WALLBOARD
WALLBOARD MOULDINGS
WOOD MOULDINGS, corner & flat
ALUMINIUM MOULDINGS,



Phone 4267.

WILKINSON & HAYNES (0, LTD.




Tropicals

Study Your Skin





















Let down those shoulder straps pm Sports Round-up and Programme aE poaenaae wae eras at least
Skins vary so considerably from the word so when you in- ae ies e News. 7.10 p.m 7 ours before fli and onward ‘i

me that the tanning process differs tend to suntan, Even five minutes Tis 1090" a eh 25.58M 31,32M or return reservations must be Tropical Worsteds may
fer them. It isn’t easy to define in the sun will leove their mark, ree

vary in quality but at
C. B. Rice’s the sents
is consistently high.

checked at local BWIA offices 48
hours before the departure of the
onward or return flight. Reserva-
tions will be subject to cancellation
without notice if these requirements
are not observed.

your own skin, but you should and they just stay there for a . 715 pm Calling the West Indies
watch it carefully to work out long time regulating their colour 745 .P-â„¢. By Request 815 p.m. Radio

; «. . Newsreel. 8 30 8
your own particular sun intake with the rest of (he body, and count 848 Pp m “Interlude, 8.88 pte
---or is it “extake”? don't, alas, catch up. Legs seem From the Editorials 9.00 p.m, The Last

Under the first layer of scaly to need more oil than any other Hope 10.00 pm. The News. 10.10 p.m

top skin known as epidermis, we part of the body. It's a good io 30 a 7 hae Rar nan ethane

JUST IN TIME FOR





With the important ad-
dition that prices in re-
lation to quality are
inconsistently low!

We trust you will appreciate that
the strict enforcement of these rules

i
) ALLE MAE MB















3 ‘during the present emergency are in
SQ the best interests of the travelling
THE HOLIDAYS. re ae fers a, cemarkable
offers a re
| | BRITISH WEST INDIAN choice of colours and
WOMEN’S COLOURED BEACH HATS ......... $1.00 cool the hott i
E ; i cool the hottest day !
MAIDS WIDE BRIM LEGHORN ................ $3.10
MAIDS STRAWS—White & Coloured .......... $1.14
BOYS SAILOR STRAWS ...................... $1.17 | | c. B. Rice
MEN’S TRILBY STRAWS: Cream, Grey, Tan .... $1.84 $2.52 $2.88
ae | & Co.











Serchant Tailers

T. R EVANS & WHITFIELDS

“ DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606







TEDNESDAY, MAY 28,

1952



‘our Hong
Long Police
ret Medals

"our George Medals are among
ards to members of the Hong
ag and Federation of Mal-

Police Force announced in
Â¥ 6th... iss ue. ..of.. the
adon Gazette. Two of the
dals aré awarded to Detective
2-Inspector James Hidden and
wective Constable Chu Fook.
2 Colonial Police Medal for
antry is awarded to Police
istable Chan Sik Wah. are
i of the Hong Kong Police

mn September, 1950, a police
ty visited a hillside hut in the
w Territories where an armed
ig was in hiding. As the police
woached, the gang opened fire,
ins one constable. Under fire,

en went to the help of the
@ constable, and later placed
tself in front of the Divisional
werintendent when the latter
‘ fired on from a concealed well

i away.
hu Fook, single-handed,
sled a cornered bandit who

d@ point-blank at him and then
! detective attacked, wounded,
‘disarmed the bandit.

" Sik Wah had a opullet-
vest badly damaged by a
let fired at close range, but
ded to cover the Divisional
erintendent throughout the
The citation concludes,

3 imperturbable demeanour
constant smile under fire were
example in the highest tradi-
of valour and devotion to

e”
‘eorge Medals are also
@ded to Police Recruit Tan

a Siew, aged 19, a National
iceman, and to Special Con-
e Wan Amran bin. Wan
af, 24 both of the Federation
Malaya Police Force.

fan Amran was a member of
Yolice Jungle Squac of nine
rming a routine patrol on an
e in Sungei Siput, Perak, on
ary 19 when the patrol was
shed by about 25 bandits.

of the patrol were killed
ight and two others seriously
mded by the initial burst of
_ The three unwounded mem~=
_of the patrol fought off the
agement, after three of them
_ been killed, two by Wan

n.
F hroadiner 23, 1951, an en-
ament took place between
ge and bandits in the Rengam
« of Johore. | Armed with a

un, Tan Tien Siew was left
bi off a bandit attack while

latoon Commander withdrew
organise a counter attack.
_Tin Siew, who had had only
E months’ service, was

ded in the leg but fought off
ated assaults, inflicting heavy
alties.

@ On page 7.

Che Nizam:
4 Gourmet

BOMBAY, May 6.

je Nizam of Hyderabad,
an Ali Khan Bahadur, is in
§ respects abstemious and

t-fisted, but he cannot bear
rting his “economy first” atti-
_ to his food.
fty taxicabs were waiting for
special chartered plane when
arrived in Bombay from
erabad today to carry his
tasters, 30 baskets of poultry
_two score potfuls of water
gn from the sacred tank in
capital,
xtyeight-year-old Osman Ali
well, and his physicians
ed a change of climate.
n Ali thought of going to
zerland, but since none of
_celebrated ancestors have
ted the seas, the Nizam said
vill always rather follow the
ions of my forefathers than
the Indian Ocean’.

/ he came to Bombay, where
weather is torrid and sticky.
Osman Ali Khan, despite his

refuses to eat



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

> oe

f a

{ * aft
NY j
a ey |
bel : y Wa
PS
aN |
J
ie
, ~ en

« . . . + ; .
“As commander-in-chief of the British Home Guard it sure makes me happy to tell you that your
long-service medals are already being manufactured in Japan.”

- Labour Welfare
Fund Collects $2m.



Mr..F. L. WALCOTT, (L) in introducing a Resolution
in the House of Assembly yesterday evening to approve the
Sugar Industry (Rehabilitation, Price Stabilisation and
Labour Welfare) Order 1952, on which money will be raised
on this year’s crop, disclosed that the Labour Welfare Fund
collected $2,210,645 of which $1,013,271 was added in 1951
alone. The Resolution was passed. ’

The schedule to the Order *——

States that there shall be raised

(a) on all sugar manufactured in
this Island during the year
one thousand nine hundred
and fifty two a levy at the
rate of thirteen dollars and
twenty cents per ton;

(b) on all faney molasses manu-
factured in this Island during
the year one thousand nine
hondoed and fifty-two a levy
at the rate of thirteen dollars
and twenty cents per three
oat and thirty wine gal-
ons.

3. All moneys received by the
Sugar Production and Export
Control Board by way of the levy
raised under Article 2 of this
Order on all sugar and fancy
molasses manufactured during the
year one thousand nine hundred
and fifty two shall be paid by the
said Board to the Sugar Industry

Capital _ Rehabilitation Reserve
Board,,the Sugar. Industry Price
Stabilization Board and
the Go' ory eae itive Com-
mittee the following propor-
tions: —

(a) to the Industry Capital

Rehabilitation Reserve Board
at the rate of four dollars and
eighty cents per ton in re-
spect of sugar and at the rate
of four dollars and eighty
cents per three hundred and
thirty wine gallons in respect
of fancy molasses;
(b) to the Sugar Industry Price
Stabilization Reserve Board
at the rate of six dollars per
ton in respect of sugar, and
at the rate of six dollars per
three hundred and thirty wine
gallons in respect of fancy
molasses;
to the Governor-in-Executive
Committee at the rate of two
dollars and forty cents per
ton in respect of sugar, and
t the rate of two dollars and
orty cents per three hundred
and thirty wine gallons in re-
spect of fancy molasses.

a
°
~~

In moving che passing of the
Resolution Mr. Walcott gave fig-
ures the position of the
respective funds. hese disclosed
that the Rehabilitation Reserve
Fund collected $3,300,000 between

1947 and 1951, and of that total





In The House
Yesterday

When the House met yesterday,
Mr Adams laid the following
papers:—

Message No, 12/1952 dated 22nd
May, 1952, from His Excellency
the Governor to the Honourable *
the House of Assembly with ref-
erence to the Address from the
Honourable House requesting that
its gratitude be forwarded to

Congressman Powell and his Com-
mittee for their opposition to the
McCarran Bill

Annual Report of the Depart
ment of Science and Agriculture
for the .year 1950—51

Post Office Advances for pay-




ment of money orders to 3ist
March, 1952.

The following notices were
givén:—-

Resolution to place the sunt of

$1,440 at the disposal of the Gov-
ernor-in-Eecutive Committee to
supplement the Estimates 1952—52,
Part I.--Cuprent, as shown in, the
Supplementary Estimates, 1952-53,
No. 6, which form the schedule
to this Resolution

Resolution to authorise
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to lease 29 acres of land at Sea-
well Plantation to small holders
in accordance with section 12 of
the Executive Committee Act,
1891 (1891—22) as amended by the
Executive Committee | (Amend-
ment) Act, 1951

Resolution to authorise the ex-
penditure from Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare Scheme D, 217
(Suspense) Account of the amount
of $65,875 and such other sums as
will from time to time be neces-
sary for meeting the cost of capi-
tal improvements and alterations
at the Central Livestock Station,
the Pine Plantation and District
Agricultural Stations.

The House passed a Bill to
make provisions for the protec-
tion of Third Parties against risks
arising out of the use of motor
vehicles and for purposes inciden-
tal thereto,

A Bill to make further provision
ir respect of the appointment of
a Puisne Judge

A Resolution to approve the
order entitled “The Sugar Indus.
try (Rehabilitation, Price Stabil
zation and Labour Welfare)
Order, 1952", made by the Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee un-
der the provisions of sections 3
(1) (ce) and 4 (3) of the Sugar
yndustry (Rehabilitation, Price
Stabilization and Labour Welfare)
Act 1947 (1047--13)

The House accepted the amend-

the



House Pass Temporary |

London Express Service

Bill For Puisne Judge -

THE House of Assembly yesterday passed a Bill to |
make further provision in respect of the appointment of a}

Puisne Judge.

In the objects and reasons of the Bill, it is pointed out |
that the Chief Judge and Crown Law Officers {Additional |
Judge) Act, 1951, was to provide for the temporary appoint: |
ment of a puisne judge to assist the Chief Judge in dealing |
with the large outstanding volume of work in the Superior |

Courts,

This need still exists and the present bill therefore |



seeks to extend the operation of the Act from June 30, 1952, |
when it will expire to March 31, 1953

In addition, the opportunity
has been taken to provide that the
puisne judge shall have the same
qualifications as the Chief Judge.

Mr. G. H, Adams (L) who took
charge of the Bill said that it was
a temporary one in which the
Chief Judge had asked that the
appointment should continue be-
eause he still needed agpsistance.
They had to make the appoint-
ment temporary because there
was a Select Committee which
was considering the change under
the Judicial Act, but owing to his
absence from the island as well as
the absence of the junior member
for St. James among other things,
the Committee was unable to meet
as regularly as they would have
liked. They were however going
ahead with the matter now until
the time came when they had to
appoint this temporary judge.

He said that there was provision
made in the Act that the person
appointed should have the neces-
sary qualifications to make hin
suitable for the post of Chief
Judge from the point of view of
years. The person appointed
should be as qualified as the Chie
Judge. He therefore moved that
the Bill be read a second time.

Mr. M. E. Cox (L) seconded,

Mr. R, G. Mapp (L) said that he
‘would like to ask the leader of the
House if the Government was
satisfied that the aims and objects
of the measure were really being
achieved. As far as he could
understand, when the Puisne
Judge was sitting, the Chief Judge
was away and they were really
not dealing with the large out-
standing volume of work which
Was set out in the Object and
Reasons of the Bill.

He hoped his information was
wrong and if so, he would ap-
preciate/ if the Government mem-
bers of the House would tell him
so, People whose business brought
them day by day to the law courts
had told him that and he hoped

he thought the Bill was_one which |
was long overdue and’ the legal
departments as a whole should t

re-organised, He was glad to se

some attempt was being made in |
that direction and more especially |
ithe assurance whidr the leader vu! |
the House had given a_ few)
moments ago that the matter we
under consideration.

He hoped that the Judicial Aci
of which mention was made by th
‘Leader would be sufficiently com- |
prehensive to make the necessar) }
amendments to the jurisdiction of
the respective courts. The time hac’
come when the jurisdiction of th
Petty Debt Court and the Assist
ant Court of Appeal should be ex-
tended.

For the benefit of the last han-
ourable member who had just sal

wn He would say that his in
‘ormation was not in order. Tho
tirne had definitely come whe
there was need for the appoint
ment of a Puisne Judge.

Mr. & E. 8, Lewis (L) said that
when the Bill first came to the
House, he enquired about build-
ing a new court so that both
Judges could sit simultaneously
because he felt that it would
facilitate matters.



In the present Bill he saick that
he was rather surprised to see thal
sub-clause two had stated that the
Puisne Judge should have the
same qualifications as the Chief
Judge. If this had been inserted
in the first Bill it would have been
all right, but if they were extend-
ing the Bill now that they were
going to appoint some one to the
job, it seemed as if they were
throwing some aspersions at the
person holding the office. That
was how it looked to him. Some
might feel that this provision
should have been in the permanent
Bill

The, Bill was finally given its |
second reading and papsed in,
Committee through all its stages. |












10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH
CELLOPHANE PAPER

Has Arrived
To

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

WE ARE SELLING OUT
OUR STOCK OF

WINDOW GLASS

A Bargain tor Builders
JOHNSON’S HARDWARE

WATCHES

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CHROMIUM

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FULLY GUARANTEED !

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A wonderful new range on
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Today at your jewellers . . .

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& €O., LTD.

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SHOPPING CENTRE







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7

PAGE THREE



Tosca Eau de Cologne
A711
of "47

“47

f the deli

cla Eau de Cologne are it

ous fragrance of

and che freshness

standing quale

“a7u" Tosca Perfume
\alluring and fascinating - a breath ot

romance

}
e— ne

Sam TOS CH

RG s male 1 |

The Genuine “4711” Eau de Cologne comes from Cologne on
Rhine; it is now again obtainable in the original quality, made
according to the famous and secret formula since 1792.





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DIFFERENCE!

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oniousness, nerts of the Legisiative Council ; + » i
i pre- 00,000 was spent. The Price 4 ‘ or the Cones it was wrong, because the Chief |
bs Ba Bg an oa Stapilization Fund stands at ComenitentAgt 1082 , Judge of the island was getting on U. Ss l 1 | .
‘tasters. He brought there- ope ie. while the Labour Wel- pte, House | gdiourned until in years and if there was a lot of oe Do ar Down | 4
‘a round dozen of them with fare Fund realised | $2,210,645 of aday ned work to be done and he needed |
r r whieh amount $1,013,271 was col- help he ee ee Was getting it : MONTREAL, May 27, | S
* lecte n . ul sure: 1 e wor was no he United States dollar was}
Seas ae oe oe Of this $300,000 allocated from AMENDMENTS being done, they would continue at a discount of 19/16 per’ cent| \
than his favdurime tanis— the Labour wee 2 yi ACCEPTED to get é bill of pa — bees in terms Canadian funds. On Mon- |
Stir Alam tank—.in Hydera= (0% Fit o fit a ae ee — =: and he did not day was down 1/32 from Friday’s | .
City. He therefore had no we ‘the Housing Loan, the The House of Assembly yester- that a Cera an Fey Pi gt team RODE TET6
ative but, to, charter a amount realised was $900,000, en¢ (1 rctative Council tg the Bill 4 Long Overdue Pound sterling wag. $2.14. 11/16 | age
OP Bg Brae ‘the O11, a nich $08,160 has been pertaining to the Consular Con- Mr. ©. E. Talma (1) said that own 9/16 from Friday. ee # oe
x. repaid. ventions Act, 1952, :





Pita WLS

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For real relief from rheumatic pains it is
they are da oi OF OUR









correct their §

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a ae ees

Tol a Aco lat) LL Circe Troubles. -

Charles MeEnearney & (o., Lid.



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FRAMPTON, Agri-

M* : whe :

Adviser & t
Comptroller for Developmént an
Welfare who went over to the
Leeward Islands on a special visit
returned from Antigua on Mon-
day by B.W.1LA.

Film Board Chief
MoM“ ELTON VILLANEUVA,
President of the Film Board
of Trinidad and Manager of Re-
public Pictures, returned to Trini-
jad on Monday evening by
B.W.1.A. after paying a short
business visit here. He was stay-
ing at the ‘To Te Hotel.
Off To Trinidad
EAVING for Trinidad on Mon-
« day evening by B.W.I.A.
was Mrs. V. M. Hoberts of Gov-
ernment Hill. She has gone to
visit her husband’s daughter Joan
who is ill.

On Annual Visit

EAVING for Canada via Trini-
dad on Monday by B.W.LA
was Mr. J. C. Kreindler Man-
aging Director of Messrs. G. W.
Hutchinson and» Co., Ltd., and
the Modern Dress Shoppe. He
has gone up on his annual busi-
ness visit and is expected to be
away for about two weeks.

On Business
EAVING for Trinidad on Mon-
day by B.W.1,A. on a busi-
ness visit was Mr. Wilfred Alston
of “Landscape”, St. Thomas. He
expects to be away for about ten
days.

Intransit
J NTRANSIT from Haiti via
Antigua by B.W.I.A,._ on
Monday evening was Mr, A. Nor-
rig Hughes, President of the
Executive Council of the Carib-
bean Tourist Association which
meeting he had just attended.
After a brief stop at Seawell,
Mr. Hughes left for Trinidad on
his way to Grenada. He said that
the headquarters of the Tourist
Association have been moved
from Trinidad to Antigua and it
is contemplated to move them to

New York when circumstances
warrant it.
Mr. Louis Law has been ap-

pointed Executive Director of the
Association, 3

Back Frem Antigua

R. ALGIE SYMMONDS, one

of the members of the Em-
pire Sports Team which played a
series of games in Antigua, arriv~
ed here on Monday by B.W.I.A.
after what he described as a pleas-
ant stay in the island.

The Manager, Mr. J, E. T.

Brancker and other members of
the Team have gone on to St.
Kitts where they will spend a
short time before returning home.

Best Place -

R. GUSTAV PABST, Jnr., of

Washington, D.C., arrived
on Monday by B.W.I.A. via
Antigua for a month’s holiday
which he is spending as a guest
at the Ocean Vew Hotel.
,Mr. Pabst who is paying his
second visit to the island said
that it is the best place he knows.
He came here four a ago to
spend one day an eventually
spent thirty-one.

En-Route To U.K.

R. Cc. J, SONGHURST,

Advertising Manager of the
British American Tobacco Com-
pany in London, England, left on
Monday evening by B.W.I.A.
for Trinidad and Jamaica on his
way back home. He was here
on a business visit and was stay-
ing at the Ocean View Hotel.

While The Sun

Who knows what this year
will bring? It may be blister-
ingly hot for months on end,
Whatever the weather, come
what may, you must be really
prepared for the fot sunshiny
days. Beware of sunburn, which
is a very different story to sun-
tan. With such a warm climate,
it is a problem, A brilliantly hot
day can so easily amaze — and
delight —- us by appedring after
a cool period. Then off come'
our suits, and into the lightest,

Sscanticst frocks we scafnper, to *

sit in the sun, And, in less time
than it takes for me to write,
the skin is burned, and the
misery begins. It may not be
noticeable at once, the joy of
relaxation in the sun’s. rays
makes us “sun happy”. But next
day, even the same evening—
the skin can irritate, burn, and
look, so ugly red!
Be Prepared

When the weather encourages
you to don your clothes, rub a
gcod suntan lotion or cream into
all the parts that are to be ex-
posed. There are so many on the
market to-day that you can get
them from any chemist or
beauty counter, and choose
liquid or cream as you prefer.
You can, if you like, use pan-
cake make-up for your face.
That staves off sunburn, but it
does not encourage tanning, es-
pecially if you lubricate the
face with cream first of all,
which js a wise thing to do to
save the skin drying.

Study Your Skin

Skins vary so considerably
that the tanning process differs
for them. It isn’t easy to define
your own skin, but you should
watch it carefully to work out
your own particular sun intake
-—~or is it “extake”?

Under the first layer of scaly
top skin known as epidermis, we

Carub (Calling



ANITA BJORK
No to Rank offer.

Miss Bjork refuses

PBUONDE Swedish film

actress Anita Bjérk, who
appeared in the Swedish film
ot Strindberg’s Miss Julie,
has declined an offer to
Star in a Rank fitm in
England.

The offer was to appear
in The Long Memory,
appasite John Mills. She
refused because she is under
contract to make a film in
Stockholm for an American
company.

. Loniton Brpiess Service



Spent A Month
EAVING for Trinidad on Mon-

day by B.W.1.A. intransit
for British Guiana were Mr. and
Mrs. Leon Willems and_ their

little son Gerald. .They had spent
a month’s holiday staying at their
seaside residence ‘Rosamund”,
Worthing. Their other son Peter
who had come over with them, has
returned to school at the Lodge.

Mr. Willems is a Director of
Willems Timber and Trading Co.,
Ltd. «

With Barclays Bank
FTER spending three weeks’
holiday in Barbados, Mr.
D. J. Brown left on onday
evening by B.W.1.A. for Trini-
dad on his way back to British
Guiana where he is employed with
Barclays Bank.
While here he was staying at
“Rhonda”, Rockley Beach.
Business And Pleasure
R. A. B. DeLIMA, Director
of Alphonsa B.. De Lima,
Jewellers of Trinidad and Barba-
dos, returnecl home on Monday
evening after a week's visit here
on business coupled with pleasure,

He Was accompanied by Mrs.
De Lima. They were guests of
Mrs, A. A. Belmar of Maxwell,

Christ Church.

After Three Months
FTER spending there months’
holiday here, Miss Agatha
Sealy and Miss Cynthia Sealy re-
turned to Trinidad on Monday by
B.W.I.A. They were staying
with Dr. and Mrs. W. L. Wood-
ing of “Winsville’, Black Rock.
They had come over to be present
eg birth of Mrs. Wooding's

aby.

Spent The Week-End
R. O. H. JOHNSON of
Johnson's Stationery who
was in Trinidad for the week end,
returned home on Monday. morn-
ing by B.W.1.A.

ail have a true skin which con-
tains the blood vessels, nerves,
fat aelis and other pigments
which are the decisive factors on
which we determine our ability
to tan. If the pigments are
evenly distributed you will tan
evenly. The girls who possess
skins of medium colour and
thickness, must take their sun-
bathing more cautiously. Those
of you with more delicate skins
have to guard against over-ex-
posure and take sunning very,
very carefully, The thin, sensi-
tive skin that burns so easily
should be sun-bathed under a
sunshade, which does not make
it so brown, but yet doesn’t get
red and uncomfortable, either.
Daily Lubrication

Be careful to follow the general
rule, five minutes each side to
begin with, with outstretched
arms so that the sun gets to the
undersides, increasing the dose
with each time. You can, of
course, sunbathe three or four
times a day—and eventually
just lay in the sun all day, But
if you want to get really brown
the need for oiling and creaming
persists the whole time. The
more the oiling the browner the
ukin—and the oil does save the
skin getting dry and shrivelled,

Tf you have been sunning
don’t go straight in and wash the
face with soap and water, don’t
take a bath however sticky you
may feel, Cream tiie face, and
wait until you have quite cooled
off for your bath.

Let down those shoulder straps
from the word go when you in-
tend to suntan, Even five minutes
in the sun will leeve their mark,
and they just stay there for a
long time regulating their colour
with the rest of ihc body, and
don’t, alas, catch up. Legs seem
to need more oil than any other
part of the bady. It's a good





Home From Korea

I T. WILLIAM L. JONES of the
~ U.S. Army who was in Ke rea
week ago with thx Third In-
fantry Division under Major
General Thomas Cross

. ty Is now In|
sarbados to see his father Mr. }
ere L, Jones Snr. of Church |
iNage, St. Philip, who has taken |
He arrived on Monday

, . day evening }
Antigua by B.W.LA. and is |

4 pr — Staying with Mr. W. A |
Crawfor at Pegwel anor,
Christ Church, i at
: Lt. Jones who is on one mont} 's |
eave from Camp Kilmer in New |
Jersey, has covered some
miles to



12,000

r get here from Kores

having travelled via Alaska, the

Aleutians and Port Arthur.
Leaving Barbados ten years

“g0, he joined the U.S, Army and
served during World War ‘IL in
Europe with the Third Army
under General Patton, :

At the cessation of hostilities,
he Spent five years at Boston
University where he Majored in
History and got his M.A. degree
in Higher Education in 1951.
During last summer he graduated
from the Infantry Sehool at Fort
panning bn Georaia and later went
tc the Par East wit i
infantry Division. oe

On his return to the ULS.A,
Lt, Jones will be re-assigned to
Germany,

Visiting The Island
ME. 3.8. A. BRANCH, wife

» of the Commissioner of
Police of the Leeward Islands,
arrived from Antigua on Monday

Tae by B.W.I.A.
© the island and is staying as a
guest of Col. O. St. A’ Duke of
St. Ann’s Fort, Garrison,

On Long Leave
Me: AND MRS. ¢. B&,

THOMAS and their daugh-
ter Janet Arrived here on Monday
from Antigua for :
before leaving by the Colombie
for the United Kingdom
are staying at the St.
Hotel,

Mr. Thomas who is with Bar-

clays Bank in Antigua, is now on
long leave,

on a visit

Lawrence

Grenada Wedding

ISS MABEL McNEILLY,
daughter of Mrs. Kathleen
MeNeilly, and clerk to the
Grenada Building and Loan

Association, was recently wedded
to Mr. Kenneth D. Pennycook.
English plantation engineer resid-
ent in British Guiana.

While the ceremony was a
guiet and simple one, a large
number of friends and well

wishers of the bride witnessed
the union which was solemnised
by the Revd, Adam Thompson,

The bride, striking a charming
picture in an elegant creation of
Slipper satin, was given away by
her uncle, Mr. George MeNeilly,
while My. Frank Baeger, a friend
of the groom from British Guiana,
acted as bestman.

There were no bridesmaids, but
the bride’s sister, Sheila, stood in

aiKendance as the vows were
exchanged,
Honeymooning at Quarantine

Station, Mr. Pennycook leaves this
week-end for B.G., to be joined
later by his wife.

Miss Shelia McNeilly left the
island en-route to Wales where she
goes to meet the family of her
fiance, a Welsh Fusiliey stationed

here during last year’s
disturbances.
Shi
tTve:
idea to rub oil inio the body

immediately after your morning

bath. It gives your skin that

smooth, satiny apperrance.
Last Hints

Your legs have to look good
when they are so lengthily ex-
posed to all and sundry, so any
fuzz has to be eliminated.
Shaving isn’t wise. It hardens
the hairs and makes them grow
coarse, You can use the cream
removers that are specified for
the under arms. Maybe you'd
prefer them. They are certainly
very @asy to use, When the hairs
show signs of reappearing just
repeat the treatment.

A last warning—do wear dark
glasses in the sun’s glare. They'll
make you feel more comfort-
able, and they will prevent
wrinkles around the eyes. Take
them off while you sunbathe, by
all means, but only for a while
to prevent getting white “clown
like”

circles. And how attrac-
tive the sun glasses are! ‘They
can add a great deal to your

summertime beauty.

2 e
Listening Hours
WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 1952
4,.00-—7,.15 - 76M 25.53M

400 p.m, The News,
Daily Service. 4.15 p.m.
Light Orchestra.
5.15 pm

4.10 p.m.
B.B.C.

The
Midland
5.00 p.m. The Derby
Cavaleade of Melody. 8.55
pm. Interlude. 6.00 p.m. Scottish Mag-
azine. 6.15 pm. The SPA Orchestra
630 p.m. Think on These Things 6 45
Pm Sports Round-up and Programme
‘arade 700 pm. The News. 7 10 Pm
Home News From Britain.
7.16—10,30 25.53M 31,32M

715 pm. Calling the
7.45 p.m. By Request
Newsreel, 830 p.m. Statement of Ac-
count. 845 pm. Interlude. 8.55 p.m
From the Editorials 9.00 P.m, The Last
Hope. 10.00 p m. The News. 10 10 p.m
News Talk. 1015 pm. Mid-week Talk
1020 pm. N.B.C, Symphony Orchestra

West Indies
8.15 p.m. Radio

JSUST IN TIME FOR
THE HOLIDAYS.

MEN’S TRILBY STRAWS: Cream, Grey, Tan ...,

ee

$1.00
$3.10
$1.14
$1.17

$1.84 $2.52 $2.88

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220



YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4606

a short holiday }

They |



|







BARBADOS ADVOCATE
















THE SALVATION ARMY

For the maintenance of its local
work, The Salvation Army will
observe its Annual Tag-Day in
St. Michael and the joining Par-
ishes.on Triday 6th June Tags
worded “To Help Others” will be
‘on sale




The Members of
NOTRE DAME SPORTS OLUB
Remind You of Their



—based on the proposition
that round husbafds still

: :
=
‘
deserve a square fheal ...
By Bernard Wicksteed
WELL. They have it in order to grow
started me off on Sit again . an
the Tubby Hubby diet. fuily. 1 had it in the City
They put me on it at mt wes, Gan See pam 36
breakfast time yester- & sup oO
day and attorwands my hopgue fo gtick Oe.
tried to tell me I loo unless can w shes
slimmer already, inibe %



Music by C.
and His Orchestra
ADMISSION %/-

Dancing from # p.m. to 3 am

REFRESHMENTS ON SALE



The whole thing
trick, | am
because the breaklasi
They gave me Wasnt
very different trom the
breakfast I get any other
day when They e ot

trying to get me de- xtra ; without
tubbied lass ot | batdship Bean tapas nian

is a
certain,




RTODAY & TOMORROW * % p.m.
. “HE'S ae avy”

an
“PITTSBURGH”
NE -





“KID GALAHAD”
Wayne MORRIS &

“CASABLANCA”
Humphrey BOGART :

OW MAN TY

START HEADING
FOR THE PLAZA
THEATRE BECAUSE

Ds .
se

There was half a
orange juice. poached egg on
toast (unbuttered), a Slice
of toast and marmalade, and
black coffee without sugar.







12 days and
if you like it you ¢

5
£
>
=

al over again. We'll see.
That's whole
They said. The

idea,

zB Tubey ‘
bb: diet is painless.

Alter’ a bit vou won't even von CUT THIS OUT sasecns
notice vou are on a diet and -y

all the time you'll be grow-
and handsome

the

ing so slim

that you'll get a job on the

films and earn, thousands of
is a week.
























MY FIRST DAY
cMenu

My son John

No sooner had
4 said this than 1 felt
ravenously hungry, Tr ‘ust
have been psycholog: i or
something. because. t
for porridge. I neve L
more than that for bre... 1Aasi
any time.

My

They

Breakfast

Halt glass of orange juice,

One poached egg on thin

toast.

son John, aged five Slice of thin toast light'y





was most intrigued because hbuitered, marmalade or
I didn't have porridge jelly.
said he wasn't going to ea Ove cup of coffee, without
his either. cream or sugar.

He was told he must + ta
that he would grow into a Lunch

big man
“As big as Daddy ?"

e
nave to eat his
“Because W

One glass temato juice.
Broiled white fish or grilled



er kE seeped RES ECERS HROAGEs) 88 Se eC RRSRRERE REESE RA SEASRRR AERO CRORE Se

Ae CReeeeneEnrnseseccepames «CORE OSCRRER ROR ERS Ss Uenegc see EReneseteeseesnasseneaseseeed

porridge if all it did was to
so big that
stop

‘Er, yes. a5 big a: sole.
Daddy.” Green salad with lemon
“ Well, why doesn’t Daddy apie but no cream,
porridge ? “ nme slice pineapple.
want [0 Coffee.
make him smaller.” rs
“As small as me?” Dinner
“Now stop arguing and §
get on with your porridge.” § Siam of caaerty 4
y 3 = Liver (tinned or tresh).
Couldn't see it j Cauliflower, | tomate (ne
: a <
Be he still couldn't see Genenane paetien of cheese
why he had to eat § n apple
Se

suns conssecenaseusenesousssosasens|
make him

eventually he'd have to London Express Service

TORNADO
DANCE

AT

THE ‘CRANE HOTEL

SATURDAY, 3lst May at 9 p.m.
Admission; $1.00
Tickets obtained from—

Advocate Stationery Dept., C. F. Harri-
son & Co,, Ltd, Louis Bayley
Boltor, Lane, Aquatic Beauty Salon,
Royal Barbados Yacht Club and Mem-
bers of the Tornado Association.

}



~

|
| Wanwen BROS. fs "
STEVE pute ara,

COCHRAN CAREY - atoon

Screen Play by ROBERT HARDY ANDREWS @
4 t PMI SEWER

TOMORROW (Thurs)

PLAZA

BRIDGETOWN-~(DIAL 2310)
4.45 and 8.30 p.m. Also

8.30 p.m.





IMPORTANT
NOTICE

Due to the aviation gasolene short-

age we have been forced to restrict

* our operations. Please advise us as
early as possible whenever reserva-

jie tions have to be cancelled or changed
** so that we can accommodate others.



Passengers who hold reservations
must purchase their tickets at least
72 hours before flight and onward
or return reservations must be
checked at local BWIA offices 48
hours before the departure of the
onward or return flight. Reserva-
tions will be subject to cancellation
without notice if these requirements
are not observed,




We trust you will appreciate that
the strict enforcement of these rules
‘during the present emergency are in
the best interests of the travelling
public as a whole,

BRITISH WEST INDIAN








FRIDAY 2.30, 4.45 and 8.30 p.m,
and Continuing Daily at 4.45 and

WEDNESDAY,

MAY 28, 1952

WE HAVE IN STOCK:

Packages Tenderleaf Tea 14, Blue‘Cross Tea, Nectar
Tea %4, Kardomah Tea, Liptons Tea, Red Rose Tea,
Typhoo Tea, Iustant Chase & Sanborne Coffee. Maxwell

House Coffee.

Also
Van Houten Drinking Chocolate, Fry’s Hot Chocolate,

Peter’s Cocoa
Rountrees Cocoa.

Roebuck Street










George Payne Cocoa, Frys Cocoa and

Place Your Orders With Us Now

JOUN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.

TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. Last Shows

| VENGEANCE VALLEY
and

FOLLOW THE SUN
OPENING TOMORROW 5 & 830 P.M.

(Burt Laneaster)

(Glenn Ford)





BRIDGETOWN
DIAL 23810
Last 2 Shows To-day
4.30 & 8.30 p.m
“LULLABY OF
BROADWAY"
Doris DAY &
“THEY MADE ME A
CRIMINAL"
___ John GARFIELD
THURS. Special 1.30 p.m.
“COWBOY ~ CAVALIER”
Jimmy WAKELY &
“SILVER RAIDERS”
_____ Whip WILSON fa
OPENING THURS. Enter
445 & 8.320 p.m.
and Continuing Daily
“THE TANKS ARE












RENEGADE OF THE Gi

EMPIRE
TO-DAY & TOMORROW 14,4 & 8.15
Broderick CRAWFORD — Judy

in (HOLLIDAY
“BORN YESTERDAY”

— EXTRA —-

TEHAIKOVSKY'S
NUTORACKER SUITE
__-
OPENING FRI, '2 30 & 8.30
“THE GOLDEN HORDE”

. . . OF GENGHIS KHAN

OLYMPIC

‘0-DAY LAST 2 SHOWS 4.30 & 8.15

‘THE JACKIE ROBINSON STORY”
with Jackie ROBINSON
(himself)

and
“NORTH WEST STAMPEDE”
Starring
James CRAIG — Joan LESLIE









a





TOMORROW ONLY 4 30 & $8.15
Yvonne DeCARLO in —
HOTEL SAHARA &
SARABAND with Stewart GRANGER
in Technic



|
}



(DIAL
Today & Tomorrow
4.0 & 8.30 p.m
Teghnicolor Double

“LOOK for the
SILVER LINING”
Gordon MacRAE &
“SOUTH of ST. LOUIS"
Joel MacCREA
Thurs. Special 1.30 p.m
“CUBAN PETE”
Don Porter &
MUG TOWN
Friday 4.45 & 8.30
Action-packed
Entertainment
RE4RELEASE
Errol FLYNN i —
DODGE chy
Olivia De HAVILLAND

it. |] Sat, Special 1.30 p.m

» Speci 30 & 1.30 LAW OF THE MIDNITE SAT.

Charles Starrett Double BADLANDS - RED DESERT

SOUTH OF DEATH Tim Holt & Don Barry &
VALLEY & PRAIRIE LAW FRONTIER REVENEE

THE











5170) (Dial 8404)
To-day & To-morrow
4.45 & 8.30 p.m
“FLAMINGO OAD”
Jean Crawford &
LAND BEYOND
THE LAW
Dick Foran


















Priday & Saturday
4.45 & 30 p.m
“HELLZAPOPPIN &
“BAGDAD” (Color)
Paul CHRISTIAN
Maureen O'HARA,

=
Sat. Special 1.30 p.m.

COWBOY CAVALIER
Jimmy Wakely &
SILVER RAIDERS

Whip WILSON



Brien



Lash La Rue

ATR
ROXY

TO-DAY & TOMORROW 4.30 & 8.1
Vaughn ee & His ORC.

in
“CARNEGIE HALL"
and
“THE ADMIRAL WAS A LADY”
with
Edmond O'BRIEN —Wanda HENDRIX

























OPENING SAT. 430 & 8.15
Johnny WIESSMULLER
in

“JUNGLE MAN
and

“CHINA @ORSAIR"

ROYAL

TO-DAY & TOMORROW 4.30 & 8.15
“PASS PORT TO PIMLICO"

HUNT’



“DON'T rrusr “YOUR HUSBAND"
Fred McMURR, AY

FRI. (Only) 4.30 & 8.15

Fred McMURRAY

“SINGAPORE”



| Phone 4267 for
GALVANISED CORRUGATED SHEETS

26 Gauge and 28 Gauge

EVERITE CORRUGATED SHEETS
EVERITE TRAFFORD TILES

STANDARD HARDBOARD
The Board of 1,000 Uses

INSULATING WALLBOARD
WALLBOARD MOULDINGS
WOOD MOULDINGS, corner & flat
ALUMINIUM MOULDINGS



Phone 4267.

WILKINSON & HAYNES €0., LTD.























Tropical Worsteds may
vary in quality but at
C. B. Rice’s the quality.
is consistently high.

With the important ad-
dition that prices in re-
lation to quality are
inconsistently low!

This latest shipment
offers a remarkable
choice of colours and
weights — calculated to
cool the hottest day !

Cc. B. Rice
& Co.

wterchant Tailors



a








ee



2 ER TEI

WEDNESDAY, MAY 28,

1952



Four Hong
Kong Police
Get Medals

Four George Medals are among
awards to members of the Hong

Kong and Federation of Mal-
aya Police Force announced in
May. 6th...issue,.of. the

London Gazette. Two of
medals are awarded o Detective
Sub-Inspector James Hidden and
Detective Constable Chu Fook.
The Colonial Police Medal for
Gallantry is awarded to Police
Constable Chan Sik Wah. are
members of the Hong Kong Police
Force.

In September, 1950, a police
party visited a hillside hut in the
New Territories where an armed
gang was in hiding. As the police
approached, the gang opened fire,
killing one constable. Under fire,
Hidden went to the help of the
dead constable, and later
himself in front of the Divisional
Superintendent when the latter
was fired on from a concealed well
15 yards away.

Chu Fook, single-handed,
tackled a cornered bandit who
tired point-blank at him and then
tried to hurl a hand grenade.
The detective attacked, wounded,
and ‘disarmed the bandit.

nau Sik Wah had a pullet-
proof vest badly damaged by a
bullet fired at close range, but
helped to cover the Divisional
Superintendent throughout . the
fight. The citation concludes,
‘His imperturbable demeanour
and constant smile under fire were
an example in the highest tradi-

tion of valour and devotion to
duty.”
George Medals are also

awarded to Police Recruit Tan
Tien Siew, aged 19, a National
Seryiceman, and to Special Con-
stable Wan Amran bin. Wan
Manaf, 24 both of the Federation
ot Malaya Police Force.

Wan Amran was a member of
a Police Jungle Squad of nine
performing a routine patrol on an
estate in Sungei Siput, Perak, on
January 19 when the patrol was
ambushed by about 25 bandits.
Four of the patrol were killed
outright and two others seriously
wounded by the initial burst of
fire, The three unwounded mem~
bers of the patrol fought off the
engagement, after three of them
had been killed, two by Wan
Amran.

On November 23, 1951, an en-
gagement took place between
police and bandits in the Rengam
crea of Johore, | Armed with a
Brengun, Tan Tien Siew was left
to hold off a bandit attack while
his Platoon Commander withdrew
to organise a counter attack.
Tan Tin Siew, who had had only
seven months’ service, was
wounded in the leg but fought off
repeated assaults, inflicting heavy
casualties.

On page 7.

A Gourmet

BOMBAY, May 6.

The Nizam of . Hyderaba
Osman Ali Khan Bahadur, is in
most respects abstemious and
tight-fisted, but he cannot bear
adopting his “economy first” atti-
tude to his food.

Fifty taxicabs were waiting for
his special chartered plane when
he arrived in Bombay from
Hyderabad today to carry his
foog tasters, 30 baskets of poultry
and two score potfuls of water
drawn from the sacred tank in
his capital.

Sixtyeight-year-old Osman Ali
is not well, and his physicians
w&dvised a change of climate.
Osman Ali thought of going to
Switzerland, but since none of
his celebrated ancestors have
crossed the seas, the Nizam said
“I will always rather follow the
traditions of my forefathers than
cross the Indian Ocean”.

So he came to Bombay, where
the weather is torrid and sticky.
But Osman Ali Khan, despite his
parsimoniousness,
anything that has not been pre-
viously sampled by his official
food tasters. He brought there-
fore a round dozen of them with
him,

Moreover, the Nizam has never
drunk water from any source
other than his favourite tank—
the Mir Alam tank— in Hydera-
bad City. He therefore had no
alternative but to charter a
special , plane to Bombay—and
spend £300 on it—to carry the
water.

I,

The
Tire,
pounds

and service

absorbi
bumps.

refuses to eat.

which

“« s 2 ; j .
“As commander-in-chief of the British Home Guard it sure makes me happy w tell you that your

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



long-service medals are already being manufactured in Japan.”



- Labour Welfare
Fund Collects $2m.

Mr. F. L. WALCOTT, (L) in introducing a Resolution
in the House of Assembly yesterday evening to approve the
Sugar Industry (Rehabilitation, Price Stabilisation and
Labour Welfare) Order 1952, on which money will be raised
on this year’s crop, disclosed that the Labour Welfare Fund
collected $2,210,645 of which $1,013,271 was added in 1951
alone. The Resolution was passed.

The schedule to the Order *——

states that there shall be raised

(a) on all sugar manufactured in
this Island during the year
one thousand nine hundred
and fifty two a levy at the
rate of thirteen dollars and
twenty cents per ton;

(b) on all faney molasses manu-
factured in this Island during
the year one thousand nine
hundred and fifty-two a levy
at the rate of thirteen dollars
and twenty cents per three
hundred and thirty wine gal-
lons.

3. All moneys received by the
Sugar Production and Export
Control Board by way of the levy
raised under Article 2 of this
Order on all sugar and fancy
molasses manufactured during the
year one thousand nine hundred
and fifty two shall be paid by the
said Board to the Sugar Industry

Capital Rehabilitation Reserve
Board, - ee ee. Price
Stabilization ve Board and
the Go' or-ine tive Com-
mittee in the follo propor-
tions: —

(a) to the Sugar Industry Capital
Rehabilitation Reserve Board
at the rate of four dollars and
eighty cents per ton in re-
spect of sugar and at the rate
of four dollars and eighty
cents per three hundred and
thirty wine gallons in respect
of fancy molasses;

(b) to the Sugar Industry Price
Stabilization Reserve Board
at the rate of six dollars per
ton in respect of sugar, and
at the rate of six dollars per
three hundred and thirty wine
gallons in respect of fancy
molasses;

(c) to the Governor-in-Executive
Committee at the rate of two
dollars and forty cents per
ton in respect of sugar, and

t the rate of two dollars and
orty cents per three hundred
and thirty wine gallons in re-
spect of fancy molasses.

In moving che passing of the
tees chiohing ihe pousion of the
ures on 0} e
respective funds, Brose disclosed
that the Rehabilitation Reserve
Fund collected $3,300,000 between
1947 and 1951, and of that total
$3,100,000 was spent. The ce
Stabilization Fund stands at
$3,952,000, while the Labour Wel-
fare Fund realised $2,210,645 of
which amount $1,013,271 was col-
lected in 1951.

Of this $300,000 allocated from
the Labour Welfare Fund to Play-
ing Fields, $147,525 had been
spent to the 31st March last.

On the Housing Loan, the
amount realised was $980,000, and
the amount advan was $874,-
917, of which $98,160 has been
repaid.

Firestone Super-Balloon
runs on only 24
of air, increases comfort
of your car by
ng road shocks and
In addition, you receive

greater skid Protection with the

Skid Resistors

in the Safety-

Grip Tread, Blowout Protection,

with new
ping, and Long Life with Fire-

stone’s
poundi

The Jyre with Builtin Dependability

improved Gum-Dip-

exclusive tread com-

ng.





In The House
Yesterday

When the House met yesterday,
Mr, Adams laid the following
papers:—

Message No. 12/1952 dated 22nd
May, 1952, from His Excellency
the Governor to the Honourable *
the House of Assembiy with ref-
erence to the Address from the
Honourable House requesting that
its gratitude be forwarded w
Congressman Powell and his Com-
mittee for their opposition to the
McCarran Bill.

Annual Report of the Depart-
ment of Science and Agriculture
for the year 1950.

Post Office Advances for pay-
ment of money orders to 31st
Mareh, 1952

The following notices were
givén:—

Resolution to place the sunt of
$1,440 at the disposal of the Gov-
ernor-in-Eecutive Committee to
supplement the Estimates 1952—52,
Part 1.—Cuprent, as shown im, the
Supplementary Estimates, 1952-+58,

No. 6, which form the schedule
to this Resolution
Resolution 1o authorise the

Governor-in-Exeecutive Committee
to lease 29 acres of land at Sea-
well Plantation to small holders
in accordance with section 12 of
the Executive Committee Act,
1891 (1891—22) as amended by the
Executive Committee (Amend-
ment) Act, 1951

Resolution to authorise the ex-
renditure from Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare Scheme D. 217
(Suspense) Account of the amount
of $65,875 and such other sums as
will from time to time be neces-
sary for meeting the cost of capi-
tal improvements and alterations
at the Central Livestock Station
the Pine Plantation and District
Agricultural Stations.

The House passed a
make provisions for the
tion of Third Parties aguinst risks
arising out of the use of motor
vehicles and for purposes inciden-
tal thereto,

A Bill to make further provision
ir respect of the appointment of
a Puisne Judge.

A Resolution to approve the
order entitled “The Sugar Indus-
try (Rehabilitation, Price Stabil
zation and Labour Welfare:
Order, 1952", made by the Gov
ernor-in-Executive Committee ur
der the provisions of sections 3%
al) (te) and 4 (3) of the Sugar
industry (Rehabilitation, Price
Stabilization and Labour Welfare)
Act, 1947 (1947--13)

The House accepted the amend-
ments of the Legislative Council
to the Bill intituled the Consular
Conventions Act, 1952

The House adjourned
Tuesday next at 3 p.m

Bill to
protec-

until



AMENDMENTS
ACCEPTED

The House of Assembly yester-
day accepted the amendments of
the Legislative Council to the Bill
pertaining to the Consular Con-

ventions Act, 1952.









London Express Service

House Pass Temporary
Bill For Puisne Judge |

THE House of Assembly yesterday passed a Bill to|
make further provision in respect of the appointment of a|

Puisne Judge.

In the objects and reasons of the Bill, it is pointed out |
that the Chief Judge and Crown Law Officers (Additional |
Judge) Act, 1951, was to provide for the temporary appoint- |
ment of a puisne judge to assist the Chief Judge in dealing ;
with the large outstanding volume of work in the Superior |

This need still exists and the present bill therefore |
seeks to extend the operation of the Act from June 30, 1952, |
when it will expire to Marc

Courts.

In addition, the opportunity
has been taken to provide that the
puisne judge shall have the same
qualifications as the Chief Judge.

Mr. G. H, Adams (L) who took
charge of the Bill said that it was
a temporary one in which the
Chief Judge had asked that the
appointment should continue be-
eause he still meeded apsistance.
They had to make the appoint-
ment temporary because there
was a Select Committee which
was considering the change under
the Judicial Act, but owing to his
absence from the island as well as
the absence of the junior member
for St. James among other things,
the Committee was unable to meet
as regularly as they would have
liked. They were however going
ahead with the matter now unti!
the time came when they had to
appoint this temporary judge.

He said that there was provision
made in the Act that the person
appointed should have the neces-
sary qualifications to make him
suitable for the post of Chief
Judge from the point of view of
years. The person appointed
should be as qualified as the Chief
Judge. He therefore moved that
the Bill be read a second time.

Mr. M. E. Cox (L) seconded.

Mr. R, G. Mapp (L) said that he
would like to ask the leader of the
House if the Government was
satisfied that the aims and objects
of the measure were really being
achieved. As far as he could
understand, when the Puisne
Judge was sitting, the Chief Judge
was away and they were really
not dealing with the large out-
standing volume of work which
was set out in the Object and
Reasons of the Bill.

He hoped his information was
wrong and if so, he would ap-
preciatey if the Government mem-
bers of the House would tell him
so. People whose business brought
them day by day to the law courts
had told him that and he hoped
it was wrong, because the Chief
Judge of the island was getting on
in years and if there was a lot of
work to be done and he needed
help he hoped he was getting it.
But surely if the work was not
being done, they would continue
to get a bill of that sort coming
year after year and he did not
think they would get anywhere at
that rate,

Long Overdue
Mr. ©. E. Talma (L) said that



| RHEUMATIC | |





Ta ine eee:

for Kidney and



need a medicine to tone them
De Witt’s Pills are i
prepared for this very purpose.
They have a ing and
toning them up so
that these vital om
return to their normal function of clearing
{ the system of impurities.
} @ De Witt’s Pills have been widety used are made specially for |
=o the world with it meee BACKACH © |
Ss confirmed man nkty
letters ont to us by pn: few longed for LUMBAGO
relief from rheumatic pains and found it SCIATICA
[oe eres ee ime Wir oe JOINT PAINS
chemist and obtain a supply right away. Ta



|

h 31, 1953 |
he thought the Bill was_one whic!
was long overdue and’ the legi!
departments as a whole should |

re-orgunised. He was glad to st

some attempt was being made in |
that direction and more especially |
the assurance whicSr the leader 0 |
the House had given a_ few)
moments ago that the matter was |
under consideration.

He hoped that the Judicial Aci |
of which mention was made by the |
‘Leader would be sufficiently com |
prehensive to make the necessary |
amendments to the jurisdiction o!
the respective courts. The time hac’
come when the jurisdiction of th
Petty Debt Court and the Assist
ant Court of Appeal should be ex-
tended.

For the benefit of the last hon-
ourable member who had just sal
own he would say that his in-
‘ormation was not in order. The
time had definitely come whe
there was need for the appoint
ment of a Puisne Judge.

Mr. A E. 8. Lewis (L) said that
when the Bill first came to the
House, he enquired about build-

ing a new court so that both
Judges could sit simultaneously
because he felt that it would

facilitate matters.



In the present Bill he said that
he was rather surprised to see that
sub-clause two had stated that the
Puisne Judge should have the}
same qualifications as the Chief
Judge. If this had been inserted
in the first Bill it would have been
all right, but if they were extend-
ing the Bill now that they were
going to appoint some one to the
job, it seemed as if they were
throwing some aspersions at the
person holding the office. That
was how it looked to him. Some
might feel that this provision
should have been in the permanent
Bill

The, Bill was finally given its |
second reading and papsed in}
Committee through all its stages. |

U.S, Dollar Down |

MONTREAL, May 27, |

The United States dollar was}
at a discount of 19/16 per cent)
in terms Canadian funds, On Mon-
day was down 1/32 from Friday’s
close that is, it took $0.98 7/16
Canadian to buy $1 American, The
Pound sterling was $2.74 11/16
down 9/16 from Friday.






















OUR GUARANTEE -

De Witt's Pills are
made under strictly
nea conditions

the ingredients
all conform to rigid
standards of purity.








Bladder Troubles





10-DaY'S NEWS FLASH
CELLOPHANE PAPER

Has Arrived
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WE ARE SELLING ovuT
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& €O., LTD.

20 BROAD ST., and at
MARINE GARDENS
“SHOPPING CENTRE





tN
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034



























â„¢

PAGE THREE





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Perfume and the freshness of 47
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ta ee IN

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The Genuine “4711” Eau de Cologne comes from Cologne on
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| according to the famous and secret formula since 1792.





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= ——

TAKE ADVANTAGE
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OF

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THE CORNER STORE _

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a ET NN = -



PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown



Wednesday, May 28, 1952

———$—



C.D.C, FATLURE

THE report of the Colonial Development
Corporation for 1951, as summarised in the
Advocate of May 21, contains a very gloomy
forecast for the future of the small West
Indian islands.

The Dominica Grouped Undertaking,
according to the report, shows little chance
of ever showing a profit to the Corporation.

The pessimism of this statement is im-
portant because time and again the West
Indies are blamed for failure to show initi-
ative. “If only the people would combine
together”: “if only they would invest more
capital”, are frequent criticisms made by
the newcomers to the Caribbean.



—



Critics often mean well but very often
critics are persons with no experence of
conducting enterprises in any other
country.

Not infrequently their presence in these
territories is due to their inability to suc-
ceed in bigger countries.

But Lord Reith is a successful person and
Lord Reith is saying something quite differ-
ent, so far as Dominica is concerned. And
what he says will hot encourage others to
try where the Colonial Development Cor-
poration has failed.

The Grouped undertaking in Dominica
included citrus, banana and coconut plan-
tations, a citrus packing station and a hydro-
electric scheme. Great hopes were built up
when this undertaking was launched; now
the chance of its ever showing a profit to
the Corporation is remote. The history of
the Colonial Development Corporation
linked as it is in the public mind with the
enormous Overseas Food Corporation
groundnut fiasco does not encourage confi-
dence. In the West Indies its activities are
best known perhaps for the rebuilding of
Castries but even this work has been halted
for lack of funds.

Prospects for British Guiana consolidated
Goldfields are said to be good and long-term
prospects for British Guiana Timbers are
fair. — a
| "ni Trinidad there is cautious optimism in
the expression that the Corporation’s
cement development” ought to be a sound
investment.” ieee

In British Honduras the stock-farm has
been abandoned and the Fort George Hotel
in Belize will show no profit to the Corpor-
ation. If this list of enterprises in the Carib-
bean warrants the view that many of the
brighter spots of the Corporation’s work are
in the Caribbean area then the outlook for
the Corporation can only be described as
black.

The reasons for the Corporation’s failures
are in fact given welcome publicity by Lord
Reith. The Corporation has suffered in the
past ‘from inaccurate estimating and in-
competence, from rising costs and short-
ages of materials, and always over the
majority of the enterprises there are the
perils of the tropics, vagaries of wind and
flood and drought of ravage and’ disease.”

There is a great difference between this
penitent cry of mea maxima culpa and the
shrill hysteria of the British Press when
the Colonial Development Corporation was
born. Then the cry was “develop the colo-
nial garden for the good of the colonial
peoples and of course for the benefit of the
residents of the United Kingdom.”

The Overseas Food Corporation and the
Colonial Development Corporation were
born beeause of political pressure from poli-
ticians who knew little of the colonies they
were to develop. They came into being at a
period when finding “jobs for the boys” was
a major political pre-occupation in the
United Kingdom,

Jobs were found for the boys: the Press
of Great Britain supported the politicians
in playing to the gallery. Millions of pounds
were squandered. Even in 1951 the squan-
dering was still going on. “Losses have to
be written off, £4,500,000 of them at the
end of 1951 or rather since there is literally
no writing off, that sum has to be carried
like a millstone round the neck.”

Concurrently with all this money going
down the drain West Indian territories are
in great need of money to finance deep
water harbours, and airports and to im-
prove agriculture and communications.
Perhaps none of these schemes would show
a profit to the Corporation but proper com-
munications would at least give the West
Indies a reasonable chance to promote their
own schemes which will succeed. The Cor-
poration’s great failure to achieve success
in the Deminica Grouped Undertaking will
act instead like a wet blanket on schemes
for development in other islands. It would
be tragic for the West Indies if a Govern-
ment Corporation which, was created to
benefit Colonial peoples should act as a
deterrent to private investors in the West
Indies.

i
|
|

|

|
|

|has been abused by strangers
, with British passports. What
| is the remedy?







Is It Too Easy To
Become British? |

| This Oath of Allegiance—

‘I swear by Almighty God, that

I will be faithful and bear true
allegiance to Her Majesty, Queen
Elizabeth the Second, her Heirs,
and Successors, according to

law.’

DOES it surprise you to know
that 60 Russians, who bought a
fourpenny form and filled it up
have become British this year’?

It cost each of them a little
more than that before becoming
one of us, but not enough to dis-
courage any determined would-
be Briton,

The Government promise, of
an independent inquiry into the
cure-by-kindness methods of
Broadmoor prompts a_ wider
question: “Are the British, be-
sides being the most civilised
people the world has ever
known, also too soft-hearted foc
their own good?”

In particular: “Is it too easy
to become British?

Look at the figures. In the
first quarter of the year more
than 800 aliens were granted
certificates of naturalisation,

Since the end of the war in
Europe more than 58,000 have
sworn the oath of allegiance to
the Crown, and have been lost
among the mass of Britons.

Most of them, so far as any-
one knows, have settled down
among us to lead useful, honest
lives.

‘WRONG ’UN’

BUT, now and then, a “wrong
‘un” is given the blessing of a
British passport and all the
rights and privileges which we
take for granted.

Their discovery casts doubt
upon the usefulness of the four-
penny form and the security
check it involves.

Example: A Dutch - born
diamond broker has had _ his
British citizenship taken away
from him by the Home Secre-
tary.

This man was jailed for 18
months for smuggling within
16 days of taking the oath of
allegiance to Britain.

When he appeared before the
Deprivation of Citizenship Com-
mittee he was described as “one
‘of the big shots of the smuggling
trade.” A Customs investigator
said this man had been under

AMERICAN COLUMN:

A Man Not A Bit Like Taft

WASHINGTON.

VERY level - headed indeed is
47-year-old Senator Wayne
Morse, who comes from the Far
Western State of Oregon, who
once taught “argumentation” at
the Universities of Wisconsin
and Minnesota, and is a type of
Republican very different, say,
from Senator Taft,

Morse is one of the Liberal
group in the Republican Party
and nothing at ail like an Iso-
lationist.

Now out he comes
“reactionary elements” in _ his
party against “trying to throw
the party’s weight behind the
unreasonable demands of the
steel companies for a price in-
crease.”

Many people are saying that
Truman, by siding with the
steel workers, has clinched the
union vote for the Democrats
at the Presidential Election.

Probably with this in mind.
Morse tells his colleagues: ‘You
may well alienate the indepen-
dent voters if they get into the
habit of identifying the Repub-
licans with the big business
viewpoint in the steel dispute.”
DON’T LOOK now, General
Eisenhower, but the Taft sup-
porters are up to a_ rather
naughty trick. They are circu-

to warn

By GEORGE SCOTT

eonstant suspicion since the end
of May 1948—two years before
he became British,

THREE QUESTIONS

I ASKED the Home Office—-
which has the final say on alt “i
want to be British” applications
—these three questions:—

ONE: Is it the practice of the
Home Office to give the benefit
of the doubt to an applicant for
naturalisation against the un-
proved suspicions of Scotland
Yard and the Customs author-
ities?

TWO: Is it the practice of the
Home Office to give the benefit
of the doubt in cases where files
have been destroyed by the
Gestapo and it is therefore im-
possible to check on the of
h refugee applying for British

citizenship?
THREE: How many applica-
tions for naturalisation have

been turned down since the

- war?

Last night a Home Office
official gave the same reply to
each of the questions; “We
cannot answer that,”

NO NATIONALITY

THIS official reluctance to tell
us about our new neighbours
does not stop us from building
up a picture of the process of
becoming British. Before a man
(or woman) is granted British
citizenship his background is
scrutinised by Special Branch
men of Scotland Yard or pro-
vincial police forces, and by
M.L5

But how can anyone check on
the past of a man who, before
naturalisation. was of "no
(nationality?”

That term may well hide the
horrors of war which turned
human beings into despair-sick
refugees. Britain has given
them sanctuary.

But it could also provide a
convenient way for unpathetic,
undesirable foreigners to curtain
unscrupulous and unsavoury

pasts.
WHAT CHECK?
SOME such men have certain-
ly been given sanctuary in our
proper eagerneg#: to succour
genuine refugees from Red Shirt.

Black Shirt, and Brown Shirt
persecution.
But what sort of security

check is it that lets through to
citizenship our smuggler and
men like atom scientist Bruno
Pontecorvo, Fuchs, Carl Strauss,

From R. M. MacCOLL

‘lating copies of a petition which
calls on you to answer 21
searching questions on political
issues.

Sample: “Will you clean
house in the State Department,
starting with Dean Acheson?
THE peculiar night life of
Washington includes some pit-
falls, I hear the sag story cf
an out-of-town visitor who,
feeling the need of further irri-
gation after the official closing
time of 2 a.m., wound up in a
notorious night haunt. A bottle
of alleged champagne was fol-
lowed by a bill for £28,

Turning to protest, the visitor
thought better of it as he ob-
served three large gents with
disarranged noses and ears rignt
behind him, What's more, the
three chummily joined his table
land all called for drinks—add-
ling £10 to the bill.

Yes, it’s springtime

nation’s capital.
THE big stride forward in the
economic 16t of America’s
Negroes in the past decade has
been striking. As I strolled
about the streets to-day I
moticed that Cadillac after
Cadillac had black faces inside
it. :

in the



Our Readers Say:

Re-Education Notes

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR, — I have not been
favourably impressed by the
content of the current series of
articles entitled “Education
Notes.” Firstly because, from the
tone of these “Notes” it. seems
that the writer makes these
adverse comments with “malice
aforethought” and not as one,
who had given great considera-
tion to the matter, who had de-
voted much time to the study of
the methods, scope and trends of
Education in the modern world,
Secondly because, as the_writer
very likely knows, the rector
and his Education staff are pre-
cluded by virtue of their status
as Civil Servants, from freely de-
fending the policy of government
against those who are wont to
make mischievous remarks on
such policy. ;

It is taken for granted that
the community at large has con-
fidence in the capacity of the
‘head of the administration to
discharge his duties with
efficiency,

It is also taken for granted
that the community has confi-
dence in the ability of its re-
presentatives in the House of
Assembly to look after its (the
community’s) interests.

Now the policy of Education
which at present obtains in this
Island is the policy of the Gov-
ernment—i.e. it has the approval
both of the head of the adminis-
tration and of the representatives
of the people, Consequently the
author of any adverse comment
aimed at the present policy must
automatically display a lack of
confidence in the government and
the administrative chief.

I, however, incline to the view
that the author of “Education
Notes” suffers not from any such
lack of confidence but rather
from ignorance of the subject
upon which he/she pretends to
speak with authority.

I am sure that the “Notes” do
not impress persons who have a

knowledge of the worldwide pro-
gress in Education based on the
principles which guide our Edu-
cation officers in the formulating
of a local policy. The “Notes”
may, however, succeed in con-
fusing those who for some reason
or other might not have any
knowledge of the prerequisites
of such progress.

To the author I would suggest
the following remedial treatment
Go to the public library, There
you will find a good collection
of books on the of
Education and the various
methods of Education developed
and practised over the years up
to the present day. You will
discover how these methods
developed and what difficulties
(and they are multitudinous)
they seek to overcome.

In addition you will find works
on Educational Psychology which
is playing an increasingly im-
portant role in modern education.

When you would have studied
but a few of these works you will
begin to understand that the
problem of Education in a chang-
ing world is vast and insuper-
able and that its solution, even
in regard to our local require-
ments, is not by any means
within the limitations of your

own presumably narrow -

spective and even more diminu= |

tive store of knowledge of the
subject.

Yours ar it.

Electricity Supplies

To The Editor, The Advocate—
_ SIR,—Judging by the follow-
ing letter which appeared in the
Times of May 6th the * same
difficulties which now beset the
Barbados Electric Co., are being
experienced in England.

“Lord Brabazon, as always, is
frank and forthright in his state-
ments and his long experierice
in connection with electricity
supply entitles him to speak
with authority. At the same
‘time, it ought to be stated that

‘and Antonin Raidl—who peddled |
information about Czech emigres
in Britain to the Czech secret
police in Prague?

Well, herg is the routine for
all would-be Britons. First, they
must live im this country for at
least 12 months immediately be-
fore applying foe caturalisation.
They must have spent four of
the previous seven years either
in Britain, in British territory,
or in Crown service.
an line those 60 Russians,

ey pay their fourpence — for
the four-page, white foolscap
form, called A.1, at the Station-
ery Office in London’s Kings-
way.

The form poses 11 questions,



ll simple. The applicant signs

a statement about his own
character, already printed for
him, which reads: “I am of good
character and have sufficient
knowledge of the English

language. I am financially
solvent.”

Four Britons mut sponsor
him

Next, the foreigner advertises
his application for naturalisa-
ition in t local papers, pays
2s. 6d. as fee for witnessing
his declaration, and sends off his
form, with £2, to the Home

Office.
£20 IN ALL

THE applicant then waits
while the police check his state-
ments. In London this may take
up to six months; in the
provinces up to three months.

If these inquiries leave him
with a clean record he will be
naturalised, after paying another
£18, making £20 in all, to the
Home Office, !

Occasionally — and here the
Broadmoor analogy is complete
—Britain pays an incalculable
price for keeping her pride in
sanctuary.

What is the alternative? Is
the Home Office to refuse
naturalisation every time the
police or Customs are ‘not quite
sure” about a man, or have
“suspicions” of him they cannot
prove?

Or is that mocking the
principle of British justice by
which a man is wholly innocent
until he is proved wholly

ilty?

he price of “indisputable
Safety” is a secret police force.
The risky virtues of tolerance
and liberty that go with a British
passport are worth better
custodians than that. And better
safeguards.—L.E.S.

“MANY clergymen are taking
flying lessons,” said an official
Jat the big Bolling Field Air
Force base near Washington
“They make. excellent pilots,
because they have good moral,
mental, and physical require-
ments. They are rarely bothered
with the emotional disturb-
ances found in some applicants
for licens.”

HERE in Washington the tem-
perature is up in the mid-
eighties, the girls are sporting
their thinnest summer frocks,
the air-conditioners are mur-
muring slumberously in all the
offices, and you can almost see
the chestnut leaves unfold,
AND in Philadelphia Dr. I. S.
Ravdin, of the University of
Pennsylvania Medical School,
attacks the “ghost surgeon.”
“Ghost surgery” is a growing
practice among = unscrupulous
medicos whereby, unknown to
the patient,;who is already un-
der an anaesthetic, a strange
surgeon is called in to conduct
an unnecessary operation, gets
his fee, and leaves again.

The Two



HEADLINE: “Ideal Day Lures
Thousands into Traffic Jams.”
THE HUMAN TOUCH: Top
notice in Washington shop win-
dow: “We make ordinary shoes
toeless for you in 20 minutes.”



the British Electricity Authority
does not, as he suggests, re-
gard as abhorrent competition
with coal or gas. On the con-
trary, it bas proclaimed the
principle that consumers should
have freedom of choice in the
use of the fuel and appliance
most suited to their needs.

Lord Brabazon says that elec-
tricity is both “dear and defi-
cient”, rnéss must be con-
sidered with regard to the prices
of other’ ities. With elec-
‘trical planf costing three times
as much as before the war, and
with the cost of fuel, labour, and
materials all very high, it can
hardly be expected that electric-
ity prices can escape the conse-
quences of such increases, “As
was stated in the 1951-52 annual
report of the British Electricity
Authority, the average price for
electricity sold to domestic, com-
mercial, and small power con-
sumers was some 8.3 per cent.
below the pre-war price. This
was only possible because . of
ithe increased consumption . ct
electricity. Prices have risen
somewhat since then, but the
general comparison still holds
good, If over-all consumption
is to be seriously curtailed ahd
the plant not used to its exist-
ing capacity, a substantial in-
crease in the price of electricity
will be unavoidable.

- In_ regard to deficiency of
supply, this, too, is a relative
matter. Domestic consumers are
consuming at least two-and-a-
half times the amount of elec-
tricity they did before the war,
and the general output is more
than double. While electricity
is not as abundant as we should
like, the industry has no need
to be ashamed of its achieve-
ments. With the general tenor
of Lord Brabazon’s letter most
people in the electricity supply
industry will be in agreement’”.

T think it will be read with
interest by the Chamber of Com-
merce as it was written by Lord
Citrine.

Yours,
JOHN CITIZEN.



Immigration
Bills

(From the “New York Herald Tribune”)

OBJECTIONS to the McCarran-Walter
immigration bill come from so many quar-
ters and go so deeply to fundamental
questions of national policy that the
Senate can do no less than to hear out all
criticism fairly. To hear it in prolonged
debate on upward of 200 amendments
which opponents threaten to offer is the
hard way of doing it. The orderly method,
and the fairest, is to recommit it to the
Judiciary Committee for new hearings, at
which the substitute measure offered by
Sen. Herbert H. Lehman, D., N.Y., would
be considered together With the McCarran-
Walter bill.

The Senate’s duty to weigh, justly, every
major criticism against this measure is
compelling. Only once in a generation does
the opportunity arise to shape a new im-
migration policy which will affect the lives
of perhaps millions of persons in the
future. That the task should fall in the
present abnormal period of world tension
and unrest is unfortunate; it makes all
the heavier the responsibility on Con-
gress to draft the soundest possible leg-
islation. The McCarran-Walter bill has
good and bad points, both in its general
aims and in its multitude of particular
sections. It makes a genuine effort to codi-
fy the bewildering miscellany of laws,
proclamations, executive orders, regula-
tions and treaty clauses amassed during
the last thirty years and longer. It ends,
in principle at least, the immigration ban
against Orientals, which has been an in-
ternational sore point for three decades.

At the same time, it retains the old
quota system based on the national origins
of the country’s population in 1920; a sys-
tem deliberately designed to favour the
countries of Western and Northern Europe
over those of Central and Eastern Europe.
It avoids the opportunity to temper this
unequal policy by providing for utilization
of the unused quotas of favoured countries
for less-favoured nations (such as Greece
and Latvia) whose quotas have been mort-
gaged beyond the year 2000.

As to particular provisions of the bill, its
opponents fairly riddle it with criticism;
some of it, undoubtedly, unfair. But the
charge that the bill’s provisions for immi-
gration of foreign colonials in this hemis-
phere is discriminatory against the coloured
peoples in the Caribbean area does de-
serve close examination. And the Senate’s
best thought should be applied in weigh-
ing new provisions which would place the
naturalized citizen in jeopardy of deport-
ation for actions he may have taken far
in his past life, or might take in the future.
Even if the justification is to give a broad
control over outright subversives and’
criminals who gain citizenship, does this
accord with fundamental American princ-
iples of equality in citizenship? This news-
paper doesn’t believe so. Opponents of the
McCarran-Walter bill have asked search-
ing questions on matters of basic national
policy, and the answers require from the
Senate an exercise of highest statesman-
ship.



Commonwealth Trade Day

THE West Indies are well represented at
the British Industries Fair, where Common-
wealth Trade Day was celebrated last week.

The day was marked by visits to the
Commonwealth section of the Fair at Earl’s
Court, London, by Mr, Oliver Lyttelton,
Secretary of State for the Colonies, Lord
Salisbury, Secretary of State for Common-
wealth Relations, and Mr. Peter ‘Thorney-
croft, President of the Board of Trade.

The British West Indies occupied an im-
pressive proportion of the section. They dis-
played their sugar, fruits, rum, cocoa,
honey, the world-famous Sea Island cotton,
and the attractive products of handcrafts
such as basketwork and wood-carving,
weaving, and embroidery,

The Jamaican stand included an exhibit
by the bauxite industry, the first time that
this newly-developed industry had been
staged by Jamaica as an individual exhibit.

A feature of the Trinidad and Tobago
stand was its magnificent display of anthu-
rium lilies, which is now almost a tradition.
As well as the famous Trinidad asphalt and
other well-known products on this stand,
two of the island’s new industries were re-
presented by displays of bottled lager beer
and stapled boxes,

On a neighbouring stand the attractions
of Barbados as a tourist centre were dis-
played.

These West Indian exhibits stood among
the displays of the Commonwealth coun-
tries, of Nigeria, the Gold Coast, and Sierra
Leone, of Hong Kong and Malaya, Malta

and Cyprus—displays that gave an impres-
sive idea of the magriitude of the Common-
wealth’s production especially of raw mate-
rials. Representatives in bright national cos-
tumes lent added colour to some of the
stands.

In a broadcast on the eve of Common-
wealth Trade Day, the President of the
Board of Trade reminded listeners that the
Commonwealth countries did one-third of
all the world’s trade in 1951.










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WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 1952



BARBADOS. ADVOCATE





Common Pleas Suit Continues

More Evidence Will
Be Heard Today

__ MOST of the evidence was being led fo both the Plain-
tiffs and the defendant yesterday in the Court of Coasaah
Pleas suit of Clement Gill, Joseph Drakes, Arthur Broomes
Sion - ay Branker cae Lambert Martindale who are

usputing the ownership of the Turf Club Spring Meeti
ticket F—9574 of 1949 which won £500. wae

Yesterday was the second day of the hearing of this
case and the Chief Judge Sir Allan Collymore who
is presiding adjourned the case until today when the re-
mainder of evidence will be taken and counsel will address
the special jury which has been empanelled.

The parties in the suit are all Police and charged with the
from Braggs Hill and both sides larceny of the ticket.
are claiming they bought the He was never present in
ticket from Belfield Taitt a ticket Branker’s shop when Gill bought
seller, Taitt said that he sold any ticket from Taitt, he said.
tickets from the particular book to Nor had he ever asked Gill fora
both parties, but he does not Share in any of his tickets. He
remember who got the winning also said that he had never bought
ticket. a any ticket from Taitt at Branker’s

Of the plaintiffs, the ticket was Shop. He denied, too, his ever
actually bought by Gill, they are 80iN8 to Gill's house and asking
alleging, and the other three who him to allow him to see his
were present each contributed a ticket.

sixpence, Referring to the allegation that
On the first day of hearing Gill ae wg B eed & shop and-there-
gave evidence to prove that ore could count well enough for

all purposes, he said he used to
sell ice and snowball but any
writing which was involved in
this connection was done by Mar-
garette Watts.

Cross Examined
Cross-examined, he said he had

Martindale had known the num-
ber of the ticket which he had
bought and on hearing it had won
told him and the two of them left
his home to borrow a newspaper
and check to see whether it had
acutally won, While on the way n

for the ne
oe newepeber,, Martindase. 0 garette Watts wrote the names on

whom he had shown his tickets j
~ the ticket no one else beside him-
and who still had them on him, self was present. Watts started

Miter 8 Ucke wae Rando Hon writing. the names on the ticket
; n il. i ,
he found that it was another ticket brother ad chen while” a

and not his ticket. was writing and had taken his
. pen and written the names.
_ Evidence Brought When he went home after meet-
Evidence for Martindale had jng Walker, he had gone home
been that Branker and Gill had immediately and found the others
in conversation with people said of his home in the sitting room.
that they had not had the winning The tickets were placed over his
ticket. He had also brought reputed wife’s bedroom door,
evidence to prove his buying the When they had started looking at
ticket. the tickets the winning ticket was
The plaintiffs are represented by about the third which had been
Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., instructed looked at.
by Hutchinson & Banfield Solici- He said that when he was ar-
tors. Martindale is represented rested, he had made a statement

House Pay Tribute To

Adams, Leader of the House, Mr.
F. ©. Goddard, Leader of the
Opposition, Mr. W. A. Crawford,
Mr.
E. D. Mottley,
spoke in glewing terms of Mr.
Braithwaite’s
public life of the island.

pathy, Mr. Adams said that Mr.
Braithwaite was in every sense
of the word, as far as democratic
representation in this island was
concerned, a pioneer.
who,



Porter’s Case

. Adjourned

The case in whieh rles
Darlington a porter of Chances
Lane, St. Michael, is charged by
the Police with the unlawful
ee geo of three bags of manure

vas adjourned yesterday by His
Worship Mr, E. A. MoLeod, Police
Magistrate of Distrist “A uastil
June 10> Counsel in the case is
<. mi W. Barrow for Darlington

: Sgt. King at.ached to the
Central Station is presecuting for

the Police fro

- m infoir
received, re ea
The charge stated that the



offence was commit.ed o1 May 5.
Cpl. Kinch told the court yester-
day that he saw the defendant
loading the three bags of manure
on to a t.uck and became suspici-
oe oeer the delendant to
iccompan, im ¢ >» Centr
ae y » the Central
y The defendant was standing in
Church Street, City, wit, the bags
of manure, "
‘€ross examined by Mr, Barrow,

HOUSEWIVES complain that eggs are in short supply.
egg in the picture is a heartening single handed effort to solve the
problem. This egg that weighs just over four ounces was layed by a
six months’ old Leghorn hen owned by Mrs. Enid Millington of Fifth

The larger

Avenue, Hart's Gap.





Late
Christopher Braithwaite

THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY yesterday evening paid
tribute to the late Mr. Christopher Braithwaite, a former
member of that Chamber, and a “pioneer of democratic
representation in this island” whose funeral took place at
the St. Michael’s Cathedral within two hours of.the House
passing a Resolution of Sympathy to his sorrowing relatives,

The Resolution read:—

“Be it resolved that the House of Assembly place on
record its profound sympathy at the passing of the late
Christopher Augustus Braithwaite, member of the House of
Assembly from 1924 to 1940 and that a copy of this resolu-
tion be sent to his family.

Tribute was paid by Mr. G. H.

that the defendant could have
bought the manure from a person
unknown to the Police,

PAMENT WITH LULLET
WOUND IMPROVES

Repo:ts from the General
Hospital are that Patient Arnold
Cave of. Welchman Hall, — St.
Thomas, is impioving everyday.
Cave was admitted to the Hospital
on May 2, suffering from a. bullet
wound in his chest. Before being
taken to the Hospital he was seen
by. Dr. W. H, Johnson,

Verona Jackman (17) of Hansen
Tenantry, St. George, who was
taken to the General Hospital after
a baby was found in a 54-foot
well on May 23, is also reported
to be making good progress,

It, was alleged that Jackman
was the mother of the child,

The baby died some minutes
after it was admitted to the Generai
Hospital.

“MAREA HENRIETTA”
BRINGS MIXED CARGO



democratic pioneer in Barba-

dos, the name of Christopher

Augustus Braithwaite.

Mr. F. C. Goddard seconded
the motion for the Resolution,
and joined in paying tribute to
the memory of Mr. Braithwaite.
He referred to his service both
in the. House of Assembly and
as a Vestryman, and recalled that
he had served in the capacity
of Churchwarden on three occa-
sions, and acted in such a capac-
‘ity only a week ago during the
absence from the island of Hon.
Vv. C. Gale the present Church-

Vv. B. Vaughan and Mr.
all of whom
contribution to the

Moving the Resolution of Sym-



All of them
since his advent into the

by Mr. D. H. L. Ward instructed to Sergt. Elcock. . ago. warden
‘ ; H id h 1 . House of Assembly 28 years ago, ; ' ee ‘The Schooner Marea Henrietta
Ae omg Haynes & Griffith, the oe ne = ee ore had been successful in bearing the ; Mr. Goddard said “He was a (43 tons) sailed into Carlisle Bay
; torch of progress and democracy real public spirited man, not only yesterday morning from St, Lucia

did he know the numbers himself
and he allowed that he was sur-
prised when Walker told him he
had heard he had the winning
ticket.

His going to Jones to check to

ic ~ confirm Watts telling him he had
of the tickets had won a consola won was because Jones and he

tion horse, Fanny Adams, .
: ass di were friends.
iis jad bought all his tikets “Wegt witness was the _tcke
He. ‘couti@unidt’ "remetaber. where seller Belfield Taitt who is by
he wa OEE hi r where trade a painter. He said that on
he was when he bought the ticket December 24, 1948, he sold a book
in quate i cameo ot are Gein FS te
; rious Sat . 9579, He sold Oswald Mayers o
On the last'@ayror the races of Castle “Grant ‘onep Carrie Jordan
this particular meeting, he was of the same district, at Branker’s
near home when he saw Prince Shop, Branker two, Clement Gill
Walker fixing his car, Walker two, Drakes one and on leaving
spoke to him and told him he had there he saw Martindale and sold
heard from the boys of the dis- him the last ticket. He said the
trict that he had the ticket-which fact that it was Christmas eve
won Fanny Adams and he told helped him to remember to whom
him he had not looked at his he sold these tickets. He did not
tickets up to then. know who had got the winning
On going home he told Margar- ticket. ;
ette Watts to look at the tickets While at Branker’s shop no
and check with the newspaper he one had asked for a share in any
had brought home, Watts told him ee ee an at the ica
age and gavebim: the when he sold the tickets there,
: but some 15 feet away at a neigh-
bouring shop.

Claim The Ticket

In March Gill came to him and
told him to claim a share in the
ticket and he would give him a
receipt for it and in this way a
i might be able to get back the
tion Watts had passed on to him ‘ticket fscm Martindale, but he
and called a _ friend, named ; ; j
“ ie? , old him he would have nothing to
Buggie” Jones who suggested to Go with such an affair
him that they should: check the Cross-examined he said he
ticket with shopkeeper Branker’s bought that book with the win-
paper. They went to Branker and ning ticket from the Turf Club on
got the paper and returned to December 22, 1948.

Jones’ home, He said that Gill had not ex-

After this, about mid-night, he plained his “so as to get back the
and Gertrude Watts, his reputed ticket from Martindale.” He said
wife took the ticket to Taitt to that Martindale told him in Gill’s
opera’ eee ere On took no that Gill was claiming

e tic o Prince Walker. who the ticket.
took him to one Bethell to Margarette Watts said she lived
negotiate the sale of the ticket. with her aunt Gertrude Watts,
He was paid $50 on account, Martindale's ported ee ‘

His brother and he were re- | She told o artindale’s bring-
turning from Bethell when they ing home a race ticket and told
met Branker and some other men her to write three names he call-
in a car. One of the men sugges- ed on it. She had her lead pencil
ted that they should hold him and had begun to write the names
then. when her brother entered. She

He heard nothing more of it took a pen from him and wrote

until the following morning when the names in ink, She then cor-

. ; ‘ en roborated Martindale’s evidence
Re imew Beinell wie intoemen 2am as to Martindale’s asking her to

he could not pay him the re- ; rage”

i check the tickets with the news-

mainder of the money as other paper after the last day of the

people were claiming the owner- yaces,

ship of the ticket. Cross-examined she _said
Later he was arrested by the @ On page 7.

9 CRDSODODV9S99OF
“

Lambert Martindale, rockblaster
said he had tickets on the Spring
Meeting, 1949. Margarette Watts,
a young woman who lived at him
and to whom he had given the
tickets to keep, told him that one

Identification

He remembered that when he
brought home this ticket in ques-
tion he had told her to write hea
name, another relative’s and his
on it and this writing assisted him
in the identification.

He left home after the informa-

SOOO

-

fou

CARPETS

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French—in size 6ft. 4" x 9ft. 5” $165.54
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English in size 9ft. x 9ft. $119.98

9ft. x 10ft. 6” $107.31 & $139.98
Oft. x 12ft. $122.64 & $152.28

4,
SOO? SOS SLOOP? ot

$336.00

©
‘ D366
‘ PAGO oo 7

in
Dr. O’Neale and their colleagues
of 30 years or so ago, who blazed
the path, and even against oppos-
ition,
people cf this island to see that
it was possible for them to be
adequately represented
sons other than those who until
that day,
birth or wealth, were the rulers
of this colony.

exceptionally strong personality”,
Mr. Adams said, “and of necessity
he had clashes
some of his friends,
with his enemies”.

say from the bottom of his heart
that Mr. Braithwaite and himself
had
altered his respect for him.

Braithwaite was one of the found-
ers of the Barbados
League, and said that “such great
prestige
has stood us in good stead’.
said that those of them who part-
e

days, lookd and tried to heal the
breach.
had never heard anyone question
his sincerity or failed to pay or
have a sense of gratitude for ail
that he had done for the demo-
cratic cause of Barbados.

years”
have shown the way to the people
of Barbados for sticking to their
own, relying on thir own people
to represent them, rather than to
perpetuate the feeling
upper class should run the affairs
of the colony”.

that the feelings of the members
of the House that the democratic

fact that he had also given so
many years of service as a Ves-
tryman to the

she

SPOCCSLOSSS PS OOOCOSE EOE OOPS



4,4 44 4
> - SLL? * SO? 4/4,

in politics, but in the fieid of
sport in which he was always a
leader. He was a past president
of the Barbados Athletic Associ-
ntion, as well as a prominent
member of the Barbados Cricket
Association, and gave unstinting-
ly of his time and money.

He was well-known as a cham-
pion in any cause which he
thought was right and was never
known to lay down the cudge!s.

Barbades owed much to him, under Capt. A. Selby and brought
in 77 bunches of fresh fruit, five
bags of cocoanuts and 632 bags of
charcoal.

She is consigned to the Schooner
Owners’ Association.

Car Catches Fire

The upholstery and rear tyres
of motor car M-2642 were burnt
when the car caught fire along
Belle Gully Road, St. Michael, at
a 11.45: p.m., on Monday, It
was being driven by George Baker
of Goodland, St. Michael,

The car is valued $500,
insured.

made it possible for the



by per-

either by accident of

Long Service
Mr. W. A. Crawford said he
regarded it a very great privi+
lege to be able to add his quota
of tribute upon the passing of a
@ On Page 6.

St. Lucia Has Started

A Yacht Club
—25 Members

ST. LUCIA. has just started a yacht club with a mem-
bership of 25 which is increasing daily, Col. Eric James,
the colony’s Chief of Police now here for a short holiday
told the Advocate yesterday.

He said that they have a small Committee including Mr.
Frank Barnard as Commodore, Mr. Bell, Secretary and him-
self as Vice Commodore. They have already received ad-
vice and assistance from the Barbados and Trinidad Yacht
Clubs and have decided to adopt the tornado class as their
standard boat.

Referring to the Police Force he
said that they were a very con-
tented lot. The Force is com-
posed mainly of St. Lucians with
20% Barbadians who mix well

with their comrades in St. Lucia
end take a great interest in all

Strong Personality
“Mir. Braiunwaite was a man of

sometimes witn It is

and even



Mr. Adams said he could truely

a‘ clash, and it had never

Mr. Adams recalled that Mr.

Progressive

of the previous years

He
a from Mr. Braithwaite in those

He was quite sure he

“His greatest contribution of
said Mr. Adams, ‘was to

unrest in St. Lucia, he said that
when he left everything was quiet
and peaceful. The last sugar strike
was in March when they had to
post policemen at Cul de Sac and
Roseau sugar factories for about
a month. They also had a de-

that the

7 sorts of sport including athletics, tachment from Grenada during
H . a nr than football and chiefly cricket. At that time’ which remained for
ag rs Sree an ‘their Annual Sports Meeting about two weeks, but there was

which took place on St. Lucia’s no disorder.

Day, December 13, he said wat Col. James is now doing his

force of the island owes much to : : Tine j remel u ,
him, should be put on record. a Barbadians did, extremely second tour of duty in St. Lucia.
Nor was he unmindful of the : He came out a year ago on a three-

year contract at the expiration of
which he will probably return to
England.

q ove

P.C, Griffith, one of their out-
standing Barbadian cricketers, is

parochial life of at present representing the colony









the Country. in the Windward Islands os oa
He knew Mr. Braithwaite : Tournament now taking place in .
most of them would have St. Lucia. : English & Shorthand
known him, only as a child Cork Cup Finals , i
knew his father, but he was (Col, James said that he is hoping ee enviar dn ps bados

to return home to see the finals
of these games.

sure that everyone of them
would always remember, per-

cr any other kind ot “A", like to
meet me (or one of mine) in the

haps more than any other Asked whether there was any lists at any time?
oF LLP PPE RLF 6’, Bring your most difficult English

Book with you to Combermere any



‘i Saturday (noon), Why not get a
check up once 4 month.
Cc. B. ROCK,
Gold Medalist,
First Prize Essayist,
“Rockcrest”,
Oistin Hill, Ch. Ch.



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s

Kinch said that he did not think

whether real or imaginary,
political faith of which he wis
the disciple gathered new disci-

ples because of its success but as

brushed tt
dose of radical socialism.

the House of Assembly in
but the faith of his older support-
ers, the land owning and business
section
until his death.
and

three times Churchwarden of the

musician and continued to serve
as an accompanist or organist on |}
many occasions

He was never married and
leaves to mourn their loss four
brothers and other relatives. To
those deepest sympathy will be |
extended. |

Club. ; Bath Mits
Nor was Mr. Braithwaite'’s in- Sadan fa tag: len SN gore
terests confined to politics and eth mga Eyebrow
sport. He was a tolerably good Hye Stoppers
Also

99OCOOCOOTOOOUe,

PAGE FIVE



OBITUARY

Mr. CA. Brathwaite.
J.P. :

THE death occurred at his resi-
dence Constitution Road on. Mon-
day evening of Mr. Christopher
Aucustus Braithwaite, J.P.

Mr. Braithwaite was an out-
standing figure in the community
To young and old, friend and c-
quaintance he was known as
“Crissy” and he maintained to the
ena a bon homie which won him
the affection of many people.

VERMOUTH

Wherever you fing the best

you'li find

Martini

Vermouth.

After his early years as a Clerk
he entered business on his own
and set up an establishment in
Roebuck Street e Was always
interested in public affairs taking
aclive parts in the debating socie-
ties, the Bridgetown Brotherhood
and it was not surprising when
he entered politics, He was elect-
ed to the St. Michael's Vestry in
1922 and under the aegis of th
late Dr. O’Neale and with the
support of the Herald a powerfu
weekly he stood for election te
the House of Assembly and wor
a St. Michael seat in 1925

Here it was that Crissy becam«
the lone representative of a new
celitical faith and almost a
legendary figure. The Legislature
in those days was largely conser-
vative in outlook but Dr, O'Neal
with his new Democratic League
had begun proselytising anc
Crissy was his strongest disciple
The campaign in the bye-election
was keen and clean. Mr. 'C. L
Chenery then Editor of the “Bar-
bados Advocate’ and Mr. G. A.
Braithwaite of the Democratic
League represented to differing
political faiths, The League won.
And it will be recollected by those
who have lived a generation after
that this was the parting of the
political ways opening up new
vistas of thought in a community
living contentedly under the
regime of “the good days”.

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Torino (Italy)



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In the House now as in the Ves-
try he thundered against id
The

Se

the war brought its unpredictable Establishe
changes the now Liberal faith of stablished T, HERBERT, ‘Ltd. Incorporated
Braithwaite and his followers was 1860 10 & 11 Roebuck Street 1926

aside by the = stronger

Mr. Braithwaite lost his seat in

1944

kept him in the Vestry

his views
respected
He wa






Here
experience were
and his worth recognised,
parish. In March this year he
was appointed Senior Guardian
and recently acted Churchwarden

of the Parish.

REPARATIONS

A fresh shipment of
arrivedfrom Canada,

the following

Outside politics he took an in-
terest in games of all kinds and
athletics and was the founder and
only President of the Empire Club,

Spun-Cream Home Perman-
ent Wave.

Spun-Cream Refill Kits

Soapless Oil Shampoo

Hair Pomade in Tubes

Blue Grass Solid Cologne

Sun Tan Oil

Liquid Bronze-Glo

He was also President of the
Athletic Association, Despite the
many changes in the fortunes of
the Club he never relaxed his in-
terest in nor financial hold on the

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for Stock Taking on

Tuesday, 27th May
Wednesday, 28th May
Thursday, 29th May.

Our Dispensing Depart-
ment will, however, be open
for Prescriptions only,

Bruce Weatherhead Ltd.

27,5,52—2n,

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Lt







PAGE SIX



House Pass
Insurance Bill

@ From Page |







ample, lause 16 imposes juty
on persons agains whom claim
are made tO give wilormauioh as
fo Whether or not they are in-
sured, Clause akes it obliga-
tory to jsurren certificates of
insurance when policies are can-
celled, and Clause 22 imposes
penalties for forging certificates;
in addition Clause 26 empowers

the Governor-in-Executive Com-

mittee to make Regulations with

the approval of the Legislature for

carrying the Bill into effect.
Worrted

Discussing the Bill, Mr. C. E
Talma (L). said that Clause 9 was
worrying him.

He said ‘that section 4 of this
clause would affect very much the
small car owner who happened to
be involved in a collision. There
were cases where the clause did
not cover the entire liability, he
said, and in his opinion this clause
created a lot of hardship.

Mr, G. H. Adams (L) explained
to Mr. Talma that the sum in-
volved depended on whom the
vehicle owner struck, If the car
had struck a man of some mean
and he sued for £5,000 the Insur-
ance Company might have to pay
that sum. But if the amount for

which the company becomes liable

exceeds the insurance of the
vehicle, then they could obtain
that. extra amount from thie

vehicle owner

He said that this section was.an
attempt to protect the third party
to every extent without being
hard on the insurance company.

Mr. O. T. Allder (1) felt that
some of whateMr. Talma had said
deserved consideration, He. saic
that there were about six to seven
thousand vehicles on the road to-
day. Sorne were already insureci
but this Bill was going to compe!
them to take out Third Party
Insurance. *

He said that it would appear a
though this seheme was going t
make a lot Df'money and if mone
were going to be made, Goverti-
ment should run it. He felt thai
certain "by$ owners were going to
increase their fares.

. . .
A Limit

Mr. R. G. Mapp (L) said th:
he g thought Mr, Talma had
waised a point in Clause 4.
He said eet some car struck a
man and the man was worth so
much, it meant that the insurance

company, would have to pay more | insured,

and then, recover it from the car
owner,

He said that if for argument a
man of good means was killed in
an accident and he left his d«
pendents well taken care of, he
did not see why that man should
get more than the man who wus
working for $80 a month. He
said that Government should: mak «
21 limit. to the sum ‘which the
insurance company could elaiimn
from the car owner.

Army Gliders
Abolished

Gliders and glider troops are to
be Abolished. They are out-dated.












This decision has been reached!
atier = confei es between the
War Office and Air Ministry on
the fulure « irberne o tions, |

Only & ion is that possibly |
fa small unber of glide cou
be {for carrying eSsit |

iky aquipment ina erg |

rE ily Hit

R hind this decision

rt extreme

vulnerability of

‘ers under modern conditions
jevelopment secret troop-
earrying aircraft that can land in
Limited spaces and improvements
in the use of paratroops.

Training of glider pilots
virtually ceased.

11 Drown

FORMOSA, Argentina, May 27.
Eleven persons were drowned

of

has





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



24 KILLED IN

| House Pay
COLLISION

e a communicate
Tribute with the followis® snips through their
















In Touch With Barbados

Coastal Station
CABLE & WIRELESS (W,14
rdvise that they can now

NOTICE

Live








Parbados Coast Sta’ ret PURn tonettathe thous. sal
TOKYO, May 27. nests eae Nor Empire Glencoe, s.s. ice. \daeiis OE ieatibia ce ee
United States Navy _head- @ From Page 5 Se eae oe tae pairing houses that | am now car- |}
quarters said 24 South Korean Barbadian who served the coun- Romana, ».s. Helder, &s Nenera, ss ae Sy ee ee
eamen were killed and 21 in+ try jong and well. Mr. Brath- Yellow Tavern, %.s. Bonito, s.s Auri- pr easel 9 sitet. shes” tia
‘ qi : ies t . . 4 a3 cae jn Cul@, 5.8. Jean, m.v. Almak, s.s. Aleoa - a an eh
aired last Wednesday when the waite died, as one might say in +ioneer ss Bl Aleto, se S Maven 4563 or apply at my Home Ad-
South Korean, Navy Frigate political harness, and he was sure +=. Ganymedes, s.s. Esso Rochester. ||] coy “"'* Yood: Howell's Cross
Apnok and the | amununition that he did as he would have ‘Alabama, ss. Dodin Marsano. = s .. TULIUS BEST
carrier USS, Mont Backer jyiched, endeavouring to carry fon Heluhts, ss. bones pe es Builder & Contrac
collided in Korean waters. oF the dutias imposed by the local Garth, Sa | iGaibae tier. Gonenion Designer & General Wood-Work«
The two, ships were steaming overnment of the metropolitan Pivadavis. ss Willemstad, 5.8. Olga, 28.5. 52—1n
» formation..in the darkness * , ¥ 8. Hororata, s.s. Durham, s.s. Euros
a a ; 9 parish—duties which he began sO &% 5 Ss. Ambrosio, $s. Thorshammer, §.5
wren the signal was given to . LS
han urse, The Apnok moved â„¢@ny years ago, and which he Amakura, s.s. Atlanticair, s.s. Rangi- PPPOE
hange Col . P m discharged efficiently down ‘ne, #8, Sunwalt, ss Lancero, 5.8.
in front of the Backer which re- are y Atlantic Voyager.’ 5.8. Urania, s,s
versed her engines but not in time through the years. American Eagle, s.s. Helena, s.s. Trop- RAFFLE
to avoid the collision which oc- He said that it was largely que] churus, s.s. Ganymedes, » s- Cartor. -5 ses





No Representation

curred at 9.30. pan. to his activities in the local gav-
Vice AdmiralC, Lurner Joy the, ernment system of, Barbados that
Commander of Naval Forces in those bodies begarf to pay atten-
ne, Far Bast..expressed his tion to the poor and needy “in
neart-felt sympathy to the Re- our midst”. ,
rublie of Korea Navy Mr. Crawford recalled that Mr.
—UP. Braithwaite was one of the found-
j ; = and the moving Ye aby of the
thei 9 2 old) Democratic ague which
Sailor 8° Union ia so much to blaze the trail for
S ri ke political progress in the colony.
t In U.S. He was also one of the moving
spirits in the St. Michael’s Broth-
SAN FRANCISCQ, May 27. erhood which did such splendid
The Sailors’ Union of the Pacific pocial service to the colony so
FL tured their stop-work meet~ many years ago, and in that
ne my a a. me ane sphere—he also rendered a most
against the Pacific Coa ipping « - ‘ ,
iia: dk DAE dueonmde for wees ignificant contribution
nuereases and overtime at sea
Harry Lundberg, head of the
union, who announced the strike Mr... Crawford recalied bey it
ist night said members voted for happened that when Mr. Braith-
3,300. to, 67. waite came to the House of Assem-
The strike laid up ships manned bly as a member, the masses of
by the union at all United States the people were without repre-
ports, but its effects were felt sentation of any sort in the leg-
chiefly On the Pacific coast. Ships islature and said that largely by
now in. Henolulu will be allowed his efforts, he made easier the
to return to the mainland. How- way for the majority of them
cver some of these ships were who followed him into the legis-
exernpted from the strike since jature and he might well be re-
the union promised to sail ships gatded as one of the pioneers. of
ewe cargo to the Far Gupecrstic legislation in Barba-
cme Mr. V. B. Vaughan —_ 1:
Mottley joined in the tribute; the
CANES BURNT latter pier that the Leader
- wf the House adjourn in order
Four and a half acres of first that members Bm pay their last
‘rop ripe canes were burnt when jegnects to the passing of Mr.
u fire occurred at Lascelies Planta- Braithwaite.
tion, St, James, at about 7.15 p.m., .
on Monday. They are the property Mr. Adams said that any mem-
of P, G, Seales of Goodland, Christ bers who desired to attend the
Chureh, and were insured, funeral were at liberty to do so,
Another fire at Enterprise, but due to presure of Govern-
Christ Church, burnt 50 holes of ment business, he could not ad-
second crop ratoons, property of journ the House until next week.
Garfield Holder of the same He was quite prepared to adjourn
address, The ratoons were nol for five minutes as a further mark
of respect.

—-- tet emcee erecta enema Smaart

- GOVERNMENT NOTICES

VACANT POST OF SENIOR HEALTH NURSE, DEPARTMENT
OF MEDICAL SERVICES





Applications are invited for the pensionable post of Senior Health
Nurse, Department of Medical Services.

Salary will be on the scale of $1,200 x 72 -— $1,440 per annum,
tn addition, a temporary non-pensionable cost of living allowance
will be payable in accordance with approved rates.

Uniform is provided,

The appointment will be on two years’ probation and subject to
the selected applicant being passed as medically fit for employment
in the Public Service,

The successful applicant will be posted to the Health Centre,
Speightstown, in the first instance where furnished quarters are pro-
vided and will be subject to transfer to any Public Health area in the
Colony, woe eee

Applicants must be registered nurses and midwives and hold the

} Certificate of the Royal Sanitary Institute for Health Visitors and

School Nurses,
\pplicants should present in writing a full curriculum vitae to
include age, educational qualifications and experience.
Applications should be addressed to the Colonial Secretary, Pub-

lic Buildings, Bridgetown to reach his office not later than 3lst May,

1952,
24.5.52.—2n. —



\a

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Vacanies in the Elementary T: Service
Applications are invited from teachers (women) with at least 10
years’ teaching experience for the Headships of the following schools: —
Eagle Hall Junior School—St, Michael
St. Patrick’s Girls’ School—Christ Church.
The minimum professional qualification required is the Certificate

Tuesday when a launch carrying |A of the Department or exemption therefrom.

35 passengers
Parana River.

the
pas-
sengers were saved by the Mari-
time Prefecture launch searching
the river
darkne
The launch was carrying pas-
sengers to the steamer Ciudad de
Corrientes anchored in mid-

eapsized in
Twenty-four





stream due to low water in the ]®&Velopes marked “Appointments Board” in the top left hand corner

port here. The launch was ap-
parently caught in a whirlpool,

Some of the victims were Para-
guayan political exiles bound foi
Buenos Aires.

Stay fresh all da
Lifebuoy Toilet Soap w
Its deep-cleansing lath
fresh, so much longer.

FOR PERSONAL FRESHNESS ALWAYS

(ABT O71 110-85

long—just use
ever you wash,

sct a tablet now,
and stay fresh all the tine

Salary will be in accordance with the Government Scale for Head
Teachers in Grade I Elementary Schools.

Candidates who have already submitted application forms in re-

in the early morning }spect of previous vacancies (now filled) may apply by letter, accom-

panied by a recent testimonial. All other candidates should make
application on the appropriate form which may be obtained from the
Department of Education. All applications must be enclosed in
ind must reach the Department of Education by Saturday, 31st May,

1952. Candidates are warned that canvassing may lead to their dis-
qualification,

19th May, 1952.

9.2.52—7n |

ally keeps you



a LEVER propor













That took place at Warren's

WHEN THE

GER~ FIRE
fe youf



Factory on Saturda, the Winning



SAPO

Numbers are

12 — 122 — 9















A HINTZEN
Warren's Factory

28 .5.52—1n,

UNGUENTINE
QUICK

A MODERN ANTISEPTIC
TUBES or JARS

FOR SALE

METHODIST MANSE

Queen St., Speightstown

The building is solid stone and
contains drawing and dining
rooms, three bedrooms, study etc.,
electric lights and modern sani-
tation standing on 21,025 sq. ft
land or thereabouts



7 ee

NOTICE

1. Secretaries of Cricket Clubs
taking part in the competitions
are reminded that subscriptions
are payable prior to the com-
mencement of the season on June
7th,

2. Members who \\ave not paid
their. subscriptions for 1952 are
% asked:to do so before the annual













An excellent site for commercial
purposes

Tnspection on application to Mr
H. Marville, Speightstown Boys’








Ԥ general mecting sheduled for School,

. ier 3th May, 19¢! Howell not Iater than the Sth
F BARBADOS CRICKET Tune

. ASSOCIATION INC Offers for same can be submitted
, W. F. HOYOS, to Mr. V. B. St. John, C/o N. B.

> Hony. Secty

22.5.52—3n
%

94,54



Tiles and woodwork gleam and sparkle after
a quick rub with Vim on « damp cloth. Vim cleans
quickly, smoothly — kecos surfaces bright and
polished, without a scratc!:, | se Vim for pots and pans,
sinks and baths — a// you.> cleaning.

Vile

cleans ever) ng
smoothly anc i






aa

au%



| Nase a LEVER eropuer
[SLED PSSCSSOPOOS OS POTSOOV TT POP SSSI SSS PISS P PP PPO PO

{CPOE OT EE)

LPL PPP AVPPPPPPPPP PPP LLP?

59994



OCS



-

Time to relax—made per-
feet by your enjoyment of
favourite radio programmes
brought to you by private
line direct from our studios,
with the B.B.C. and New
York; No interference or
tuning!

WITH

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| disturbed rest or










































WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 1952



When your BACK |
ACHES... |

Backache is usually caused by lazy kidneys.
The kidneys are the blood’s filters. When
they get out of order, excess acids and
poisonous wastes stay in the system.
Then backache, headache, rheumatism,
that ‘tired out’ feeling
soon follow. To make your kidneys work
properly - and to keep them in good order —

| use Dodd’s Kidney Pills. Dodd’s Kidney

Pills quickly rid your over-burdened blood
of excess acids and wastes se that pure,

_ fresh blood flows to every nerve and muscle.

and
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in
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LONDON ——

SI8SCO = PAINTS - Stocked ,by T
Herbert Ltd., Plantations Ltd., Carter
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Factory, N. B. Howell, G. W. Hutchin-
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Foundry Ltd., Watkins & Co. Ltd
and the B’dos Hardware Co,

Ltd





}





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ot, Resertod,
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tay Hf Ww oy





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White shoes, to pass muster
in company, must be spot-
less, immaculate. Use &
Propert’s White Renovato
or Propert’s Shuwhite. No
surer way of making sure
‘that white shoes are white!

PROPERT'’S

SHUWHITE & WHITE RENOVATOR











In Cartons with Sponge iby
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adorned in the fragrance men love.



453)

ae 2
iy 4

ya ire he ns



‘ij HERE are very good reasons why ‘ Oyaltine’ is the world's

z most popularaid to sleep. Experience has amply demon-
strated its outstanding qualities. A cup of this delicious beverage,
taken at bedtime, helps to soothe the nerves, assists you to relax
and composes the system for natural, refreshiny sleep.

While you sleep ‘ Ovaltine’ provides food elements—including
vitamins—of exceptional nutritive value. in easily digestible form,
to reinforce your nervous vitality, your strength and energy. That
is why ‘ Ovaltine’ sleep is the best kind of sleep—so tranquil and
restorative that it helps you to greet the morning bright-eyed and
cheerful—feeling and looking your best.

Doctors and nurs?s everywhere recommend ‘ Ovaltine’ as a bed-
time beverage. it definitely stands in a class by itself. It costs
so little—it gives so much.



OVALTINE
BISCULES

\
| Drink delicious



Dainty and delightfully crisp,

: 2
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* Ovaltine ' Bis. u ureideal = | yn
for all eceasions: “hey are |
made from the finest in |
gredients, include a pro-
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*Ovaltine’ and are highly |
nourishing and digestible | R hi 7 d
The next time rder or est a arm
* Ovaltine * remember to in | R
clude a packet of © Ovaltine ; RY /
Biscuits’ as well. You will | estorative Sleep
enjoy their delicate and

| distinguished flavour Sold im airtight tins by all Chemists and Stores

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 28

ERE PARA





WH

PA





1952

ATROOPERS NOW GUARD RED PRISONERS





AS DEFIANT RED WAR PRISONERS threatened new outbreaks on Koje Island, an American airborne force has

moved in to bolster the tightened guard

over the rebel Communists. In the picture above, Red POWs are

shown using spiked-tipped tent poles for weapons as they defiantly brush up on bayonet drill in preparation

for further trouble. Shortly before arrival of the U.S. 187th

Boatner, new Koje commander said: “They'll soon learn who is boss.”

—_.

Indians—Essex

Mateh



Drawn

(From Our Own Correspondent)

There was a tight

LONDON, May 27.

; i finish to the Indians match with
Essex which ended in a draw

at Ilford today. A powferful

Indian recovery headed by Phadkar and Manjrkar who put
on 136 in two hours for the fifth wicket enabled Hazare to
declare at 368 for 6, leaving Essex to get 154 in 74 minutes.

The challenge was aecepted by
Insole who opened the Essex
innings with Dodds. .In the first
20 minutes they put on 43 before
Insole was caught by Ramecnand
off Shinde. Although wickets con-
tinued to fall steadily, Essex did
not give up the chase for runs
but H. G. Gaekwad was difficult
to get away and when stumps
were drawn Essex with the last
pair at the wicket were still ten
runs. behind struggling avoid
defeat.

Gaekwad captured five for 44,

During the match, Bailey of
Essex who is being considered for
the England team, hurt the third
finger of his bowling hand t ying
to catch Hazare low-down in the
slips and may not be fit in time
for the Test.

In the county games individual
honours went to Maurice Tompkin
who for the first time in his career
hit two separate hundreds in
Leicester’s victory over Middlesex,
Good bowling by the two Austra-
lians Jackson who took four for
36, and Walsh, four for,40, result-
ed in Middlesex being dismissed
for 215, and although. Leicester
lost an early wicket when thev
batted the second time Tx mpkin
followed up _ his first innings 156
by scoring 107 not out to bring
them to victory by seven wickets,

As a result of today’s games,
Middle still head thé County
Championship with 48 points and
six games, followed by Surrey 40
points in 4 games and Yorkshire
36 in 4,

Yorkshire have won _ three
games, the fourth against Somer-
set being abandoned without even
a first innings decision being
reached

Scoreboard:— Yorkshire beat
Derbyshire by an innings and 26
runs, Yorkshire 385 for 9 declared.
Derbyshire 116 and 243, Halliday
6 for :

Lancashire beat Notts by an
innings -and 29 runs. Lancashire
392 for 9 declared, Notts 165 and
195. Poole 51 not out. Hilton 5 for
87.

Hampshire beat Sussex by eight
wickets, Sussex 178 and 214.
Shackleton 5 for 70. Hampshire
300 and 93 for 2. :

Worcestershire beat Warwick-
shire by 169 runs, Worcestershire
274 and 256 for 6 declared.
Warwickshire 210 and 151, Hitch-
cock 53, Perks 4 for 37.

Leicester beat Middlesex by
seven wickets. Middlesex 407 for
5 declared and 215. Hdrich 69.

to



























Helsinki next July.

1. The first correct solution
the prize.

Editor will win the prize.

HORIZONTAL

1—Performs.

5—Lucky number.
temple in Jerusalem?

14—Clocl: face.

15—Papal veil.

16—Cleave.

17—Near.

18—Divisions of time.

20—Wedging piece.

22—Printer’s measure.

25-—Bitter vetch.
26--Dry, as wine.
27--Caressive touch.
28—Predatory birds.

Precludes
—-Skids to the side.
a Eccentric wheel-part.



not to lie agains






Frost. ;
Worthless bit.
Land-measure.

“International





l= PLEASE

WIN $40.00

is a simple Cross Word puzzle which can help you to
en gt0.00 hr galy one shilling. At the same time you will
be doing your bit to help send Barbados’ sole Olympic hope to
r Enter now and try your skill.

RULES

10—Whe was ejected from the

23—In what sea were Pharaoh's
chariots and host drowned?

horns has th

Leicester 412 for 6 declared and
212 for 3. Tompkin 107 not out.
sssex drew with the Indians.
Indians 195 and 368 for 6 declared.
Essex 410 and 144 for 9.

Glamorgan versus Somerset;
match drawn, Glamorgan 361 and
235 for 6 declared, Somerset 199
and 260 for 4. Stephenson 114,

Gloucester vs Kent match
drawn. Gloucester 254 and 330
for 4 declared. Young 125, Milton
117 not out, Kent 337 and 178 for
6.

Water Polo



Bonitas And
Whipporays Beat
IC. And Police

Jonitas “B” defeated their
rivals Harrison College “B” to the
tune of five—nil in their Water
Polo match at the Aquatic Club
yesterday ‘afternoon. The match
was watched by a fair amount of
fans and Bonitas had the edge
on their rivals all through tne
game,

The Bonitas goal scorers were
Browne, two goals, Rogers, two
goals and P, Fletcher, one goal.

In the other match, Police was
beaten 7—3 by the Whipporays

\“B” team. Again Whipporays had

the better part of the game. The
1eferee was Mr. A, Clarke,
, . °
S. African Union
) is ri
Secretary Freed
CAPETOWN, South Africa.
May 27.

Garment workers union secre-
tary Emil.Sachs whose arrest
touched off widespead rioting was
released in $700 bail Tuesday
on condition that he attends no
public meetings.

lt was his second appearance
in the Supreme Court in two days
on charges of violating the sup-
pression of Communism Act by
twice defying the Government
order against public speaking and
tts order to give up his union
past.

His release coincided with the
return to work of striking mem-
bers of the Garment Workers
Union who rioted when he was
arrested Saturday while making a
speech. He was released on bail.
Promptly made another speech
and was arrested.—U.P.







opened by the Editor will win

2. In the event of there being no correct ‘solution the one
containing the least errors which is opened first by the

65—Meager.
6?—Therefore.

69—Sign. ;
71—What peoples had dwelt in Ar
rior to the land being given
to the children of Lot? ;

73—Musician's baton.
75—Spikenard.

7 ‘ountry roads.
77—Curved molding.

VERTICAL
1—Jewish manth,
2—Quote.
3—Symbol for tantalum.
4—Cunning.
5—Flies aloft,
6—Wanders from truth.
7—Duet. A
8—Street railway (abbr.)

9—A border city in the land of

Judah
oup.




men defeated?



ey Seavey. 12—Inner lining of the iris.
yy What giant was slain by

. David?

41—Exclamation. ;
Das isrity. 26—-Descendants of Shern.
/44--Golf mound. 27-—Greek letter.

: i ix 29—Tiny.
»45--Topaz hummingbird. 29—Tins :
46—Sun god. 30—Split pulse.
| @1—Spadices. 31—College cheer.

Slipped. d 33On the moon.
an lievers , 33—
50—What are believ rs warne ee

36—Who is the reputed author of

the Psalms?
37—Dubious.
39—Tibetan gazelle.
40--Bronze money.

43—Who owned the field in which

Abraham was buried?

45—Watchful.
47—-Pig-

48—T
49—Ocean.





NOTE NEW CLOSING

what place were Joshua's

Airborne Infantry Regiment, Brig. Gen Haydon

(International Soundphoto)

St. Lucia Score
478—9 Against

Dominica

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. LUCIA, May 27.

The second match in the Wind-
ward Islands’ Cork Cup Cricket
series opened on Monday, St.
Lucia versus Dominica.

St. Lucia batted all day today
to amass the huge total of 478
runs for 9 wickets, Griffith miss-
Ing his century.by two runs. St.
Lucia’s overnight score of 178
for one was increased by *ix runs
when the second wicket fell,
Deterville going out in the sec-
ond over for 83, and the third
wicket fell at 197, Augier being
caught at 64. Lunchtime score
was 264 for 3, Griffith 36, Drys-
dale 41.

On resumption, Drysdale went
out without adding to his total
Teatime score was 364 for 4.
Close of play 478 for 9.

Scores: Barrow 37, Deterville
83, Auguer 64, Drysdale 41, Phil-
lips 39, including 4 sixes and 2
fours in 19 minutes, Joseph 29,
Haynes 16, Dr. Clarke (Capt.)
2, Ellick not out 17, Stheline not
out 39.

Fall of wickets 1—57, 2—184,
3—197, 4—275, 5—319, 6—387,
7—399, 8—414, 9—463,

The weather was fine and the
crowd was the largest ever to
witness the games.





Common. Pleas

@ From Page 5

had put the ticket in her pocket
bag. About 26 tickets were in the
bag and about 18 had the names
written on them. She said that
it had taken her a fairly long
time to go through the tickets on
the last night of the races as she
went through all.

She said that Martindale left
the house with the newspaper and
the ticket. She saw when he re-
turned later that night with the
newspaper anq the ticket.

It had taken her about three to
four hours to find the winning
ticket.

When she wrote the names on
the ticket her aunt, grandmother,
her brother and Martindale were
present.

She denied writing the names
only on the last night of the
races,

Harold Trotman, a cabinet
maker of Braggs Hill, said that on
March 12, 1949, between 9 and 12
he was at Branker’s shop reading
a newspaper when someone came
in and began talking about the
winning ticket and Branker said
he did not have it.

Another Taitt, Stanley Taitt of
Horse Hill gave evidence of his
having heard Gill say he did not
have the winning ticket.

The case continues to-day.



3.
printed below.

. will be immediately destroyed.

°: decision of the Editor of the Barbados Advocate.

" 4 p.m.

1.

Advocate of June 1.

51—Shoshonean Indian

53—Observed. A

55—Spirit of the air.

56— Asparagus.

37—To what were the breast-
plates of the locusts com-
jared?



Zi
PT



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|

Ne

WN [| |

5

tT TN TN

PT tT ENN Tt tT
PT NN TENN |

BEREVEREEEN
LT ANN TP



Pt | ENN TLE

N



Address





Entrance fee of one shilling (1/-) must be enclosed with
each solution along with name and address on the coupon

Any entry which is not accompanied by the entrance fee
All entrants for this competition agree to abide by the
The competition will be closed on Friday, 30th May, at
All envelopes must be clearly marked CROSS WORD
PUZZLE COMPETITION and addressed to the Editor, the

Barbados Advocate, 34 Broad Street.
8. The name of the winner will be published in the Sunday

DATE




| | EW | | AS

7 PROCEEDS TO FARNUM FOR FINLA

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

99604

OOSCSS SO5006H
In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Lucille Smith, Sch. Cloudia S-
Sch. Enterprise S.. Sch. Gita M., Sch.
Sunshine R., Lady Noleen, M.V.
Star, M.V. Lady Joy, Sch D'Ortac, M.V.
Cacique Del Caribe and M.V Compton.

ARRIVALS

Schooner Morea Henrietta 43 tons from
St. Lucia under Capt. A. Selby Consign-
ed to Schooner Owners’ Association
Lindsyd II.

ARRIVALS BY B.W.LA.
ON MONDAY
From Puerto Rico:
Gustav Pabst, Hubert F.
William Jones.
DEPARTURES BY B.W.1LA.
ON MONDAY
For Trinidad: ’

McD. Brathwaite, C Songhurst, W
Alston, J. Kreindler, BE. Thompson, T
Walrond, L. Willems, P. Willems, G.

DEPARTURES

Lady Silver, Sch, Franklyn D:; R » Sch.
Willems, L Edgehill, H Okhash, A
DeLima, A. De Lima, v Roberts, D
Brown, A. Sealy, C Sealy, L. Soodeen,
S. Patterson, N. Hoyland, L Villanueva,

Smith, Lt

©. Paddock, L. Phillips N, Hughes,
—_———__.
> ‘ , }
RATES OF EXCHANGE
Selling NEW YORK Buying
72.9% pr. Cheques on
Ponkers 71.3% pr.
Sight or demand
Drafts 71 1% pr.
72.9% pr. Cable a o
71.4% pr. Currency 69.8% pr.
Coupons 69.1% pr.

CANADA
tincluding Newfoundland)
pr. Cheques on

Bankers 74.1% pr
Demand Drafts 73 95> pr.
Sight Drarts 73.8% pr
75 8% pr. Cable
74.3% pr. Currency 72.6% pt
Coupons 71.9% pr.



Hongkong Police

@ from page 3
A Colonial Police Medal for
Gallantry is awarded to L/Cpl.

Pilus bin Sinong, aged 23, of the
Federation of Malaya Police Force
for his part in the engagement in
the Rengam area of Johore on
November 23.

Pilus shot and killed a bandit
sentry, and led a charge into the
bandit camp, throwing a grenade
which probably killed another
bandit.

For bravery during the Fiji hur-
ricane last January, Lorima
Dakunivosa, 30, a wireless opera-
and meteorological assistant, of
Yasawa-I-Rara, Fiji, is awarded
the British Empire Medal.

During the storm, Dakunivosa
extracated and repaired a trans-
nitting set from a wrecked hut
ut his exposed hill meteorological
station, installed it in the one
remaining house where the rest
of the villagers had taken refuge,
and was able to resume reporting
to the important central weather
cffice at Nadi.





WHAT’S ON TODAY

Courts of Appeal and Petty
Debt—10 a.m.
Court of Common Pleas—10.30

a.m.
Basket Ball, Second Division
at Harrison College, Dis-
trict A and Modern High
School at 5,00 p.m.
Presentation of Medals at Dis-
trict A—5.00 p.m.
“Twelfth Night” at Parry-Col-
eridge School—5.00 p.m.

Recipes
Readers of the Barbados





“Advocate” are asked to send
in recipes tor publication.
These recipes will be publish-
ed over a period of one month
after which time a poll will
be held and contributors will
be asked to decide the best
recipe of the month. The win-
ner will be awarded a prize.
Each entry must be accom-
panied by the following cou-
pon.

TO: THE WOMEN’S EDITOR
ADVOCATE.

NAME:

ADDRESS:

RECIPE NAME:





63—Knob.

orn aecition,

66—Transgression.

67—How any mites did the poor
widow throw into the trea-
sury?

10—Which of Judah’s son was

siain by the Lord?
72— Mother.
74—Symbol for silver.

7a
Lae
EE




X
WT?

Paw a
TE ARS
Ta
a TT 1

14

ANN | tT

YAP
rr





ND. FUND





* SBA AND AIR '

TRAFFIC :

Blue

REVLON



REVLON

REVLON



@ Heap up breakfast bowlfuls
Sipwest ellogg’s Corn Flakes.
y’re fresher’ ! So

|
|

wer” of corn a |
and its whole-kernel values, / }
in iron, Vitamin B,, niacin! =

A in
Kellogg's Core Flakes,



NEW EKCO RADIO FIVE VALVE SET ‘

The hottest and cutest little
set you ever did see, Lipstick
red and French nude, ideal as
a personal set.

© A. BARNES & CO., LTD. |



REVLON REVLON REVLON



Just what you've been

waiting for—

REVLON!

Lipstick — all shades

Nail Polish —frosted and plain

REVLON!

Cuticle Remover

NOTA

Velvet Remover

Call or telephone early

NOTAY

for yours

WM. FOGARTY (B'DOS) LTD. |

NOTAAY



NOTAAY NOTAdY



a

Hors



for
hotels,

Universally accepted

installation in offices,
schools and public buildings of

all kinds,

SUPPLIED AND LAID BY

DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., LTD.
IN 18 COLOURFUL SHADES. |

OUR SEMTEX DEPT. will be pleased to quote



MTE

BANE NEWk

>

PAGE SEVEN



*

MADE BY THE MONKS OF BUCKFAST ABBE










BY

If you feel worn out, depressed, or
generally run down a glass or two
a day of Buckfast Tonic Wine will
quickly restore lost energy and
tone up the whole nervous system.
Giving new vitality it fortifies you
against fever and exhaustion and
remember, Buckfast Tonic Wine
is especially valuable
after illness,











‘TONIC WINE,














GALVANISED CORRUGATED SHEETS

24 Gauge x 6 ft., 7 ft, 8 ft., long $5.00, $5.04, $7.36
per Sheet

26 Gauge x 8 ft., 9 ft. 10 ft. long $5.60; $6.30; $7.00
per Sheet

GALVANISED RIDGE CAPS
15 ins. wide x 6 ft, long at $2.62 each

GALVANISED NAILS at 37c, per Ib.

RUBBEROID ROOFING :—
in Rolls 3 ft. wide x 36 ft. long at $10.00 per Roll

BARBADOS HARDWARE CO. LTD.

No. 16 Swan St. Phones: 4406, 2109, 3534
of Listinelion

RESILIENT DECORATIVE TILES



(

you a Firm Price for the Floor of your Choice.

al

Please Phone 3372 or 3007 or Call in to see US.

3/ot |

w
a



)
W

PAGE EIGHT



CLASSIFIED ADS, remue sericss



Seaireeempengnipntinemannsrenatnannsomarmeutiodatentnvarsacaates

DIED







FIELDS--On May 28th 195
Indian Ground, St. Pete Helena A
Fields. Her fimeral took piace at All
Saints’ Church the same day

Archibald Fields (son), Barton and Carl

(grandsons), Elaine Fields grand-

daughter), H. I. Gill 28 5.52

MERRITT.On May 27. 1952. Richard

Merritt. The funeral leaves his late
Tesidence Layne's Gap, Martindales
Road at 4.30 p.m. to-day for the
Westbury Cemetery Friends are

asked to attend
Gwen and Ira Merritt (daughters)
28.5. 52—1n



SMALL~On Tuesday 27 May, 1952—
Elesha Small, Her funeral will leave
her late residence,School Gap, West-
bury Road at 4.30 p.m. to-day for
the Westbury Cemetery. Friends are
asked to attend.

Mr. & Mrs. Inniss Hall

28.5.52—1n



THANKS

ee
THOMAS—The family of the late Bruce
Thomas beg through this medium to
return thanks to all those kind frierids
who sent wreaths, letters of condo-
lence, or in any way expressed sym-

pathy in their recent bereavement.
, 27.5.52—in

EDUCATIONAL |

OO
CHRIST CHURCH eee, FOUNDATION

SOK
ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1952

Applications for entry to the School in
September, 1952, must be made on the
official form which can be obtained at
the Schvol on Mondays—Fridays between
9,30 a.m. and $,00 p.m.

Applicants must be between the ages
of 8 years and 11 years, 6 months on fhe
Ist of September, 1952

The entrance examination will be held
at the School on Friday, 13th June, 1952,
at 9.30 a.m. There will be no accom-
modation at the School for Parents or
Guardians on that day.

Application forms must be returned to
the Headmistress not later than Friday,
30th May, 1952,



11.5.52— gn



CHRIST CHURCH
GIRLS' FOUNDATION SCHOOL
Foundation Scholarships
There will be one or more vacancies
for Foundation Scholars at the Christ
Church Girls’ Foundation School in
September, 1952. 3
An Examination will be held at the
School at 9.30 a.m. on Friday 13th
June, 1952. Forms of application can be
obtained from the Secretary, Mr. D. E. M.
Malone, at Harrison College, and must
be returned to him together with a Birti,
or Baptismal Certificate not later than
3.00 p.m. on Friday 30th May, 1952
Candidates must be—

()) The Children of parishoners of
Christ Church who are in strait-
ened circumstances

(2) Between the ages of 10 and 12
inclusive on the day of the exam-
ination, i.e. 13th June, 1952

EB. M. MALONE,
Secretary-Treasurer,
Governing Body,
Ch. Ch. Girls’ Foundation School.
18,.6,.52—4n

. CHRIST CHURCH
BOYS’ FOUNDATION sCHOOL
Samuel Kirton Scholarships

There will be one or more vacancies
for Samuel Kirton Scholars at the
Christ Church Boys’ Foundation School
in September, 1952.

An examination will be held at the
School at 9.30 a.m. on Saturday, 14th
June, 1952. Forms of application can be
wbtained from the Secretary, Mr. D, E. M.
Malone, at Harrison College, and must
be returned to him together with a Birth
or Baptismal Certificate not later than
3.00 p.m. on Friday, 30th May, 1952.

Candidates must be—

(1) Children attending an Elementary
School in the parish of Christ

Churah.
(2) The children of parishioners of
Christ Church who are in strait-

circumstances,

(3) Between the ages of 10 and 12
inelusive on the day of the exam-
ination, i.e, Idth June, 1952

D. EB, M. MALONE,
Secretary-Treasurer,
Governing Body,
Ch. Ch, Boys’ Foundation School,
18.5.52—4n



CHRIST CHURCH

BOYS’ FOUNDATION SCHOOL
Foundation Scholarships

There will be one or more vacancies
for Foundation Scholars at the Christ
Church Boys’ Foundation School in
September, 1952.

An Examination will be held at the
Schoo! at 9:30 a.m. on Saturday Mth
June, 19862. Forms of application can be
obtained from the Secretary, Mr. D. E, M.
Malone, at Harrison College, and must
be returned to him together with,a Biyth
or Baptismal Certificate not later than
3.00 p.m. on Friday 30th May, 1952.

Candidates must be— '

1) The children of parishoners of
Christ Church who are in strait-
ened circumstances.

(2) Between the ages of 10 and 12
inclusive on the day of the exam-
ination, i.e. 14th June, 1952.

D. BE. M. MALONE,
Secretary-Treasurer,
Governing Body,
Ch. Ch, Boys’ Foundation §chool
18.5,52—4n

THE LODGE SCHOOL
Entrance Examinations

For boys wishful of entering this
School in the September term of 1952, an
entrance Examination will be held at the
Lodge School on Saturday June 21st, be-
ginning 10 o'clock a m.

Applicants must not be younger than
& years and 6 ranths A aaer than 14
years on date o amination,
ia W. A. FARMER,

Headmaster
21,5.52—6n

















WEST INDIA urr co.
Limited
Apply R. S. Nicholls & Co
Solicitors,
Roebuck Street
Phone 3925
27.5.52--In



——
ARRIVED

Another Shipment of the

POPULAR

$4180 GAS COOKERS

A few of these have no yet
been booked.

Prices of next shipment will be
higher.

Why not cail at your Gas Show-
rooms, Bay Street TO-DAY anc
secure one of these cookers.



For Weddings, Anniversaries
Birthdays, Christenings, etc.
DIAMOND RINGS
GOLD & SILVER
JEWELLERY

See your Jewellers ...

‘YY. De LIMA
& €O., LTD.

20 BROAD ST.
and at MARINE GARDENS





LEPHONE 2508

ea



| FOR SALE

AUTOMOTIVE

948





Dodge Saloon 9. Owner
nd in excellent condition. Phone
B, Cole & Co,, Lad 28.5.52-—-3n
CAR—Dodge, 1946 Special DeLuxe,!
(X88). In apple-pie order, brand new
paint job, $2,500 Cash, Dial 4476.
25.5.52—t.f.n,

28,000
B.







CAR,—Morris 8. 1947 model.

miles in good order, Apply:

Gill, Waterford, St. Michael
28.5,52-—2n.

a



CAR—One Prefect Ford in good con-
dition, 1948 model, 5 new. tyres, new
upholstery, low mileage, Owner driven.
Price $875. J. St. Hill, Tweedside Road.
Dial 4837.

CAR—Ford Prefect late 1980 model.
Geneeal ym ns.
i: ae "8.5.

Phone .f.m.

CAR—1950 Ford Prefect 7,400 =.







Fixcellent condition, $1,400,00 ©

5076 Mornings. 28.5.52—4n
CA, eas 2 seater .

Morris Pp. door saloon

model, Morris Oxford 13,000 miles,

owner driven and in opts condi-

Fort Koyal Gar: * e
tion oval age ave.
a

5504

NOTICE
All male citizens of the United States
between the ages of 18 and 26 residing
in Barbados are requested to call at the |

American Consulate from July 1 to 31,| known as Banyan Beach, Brightog, Black
1952, for Selective Service Registration | Rock, Saint Michael, with 11,100 square
Military Training feet of land thereto

under the
Service Act

All male citizéns of the United States
who attain the age of 18 years sub-
Sequent to July 31, 1958, are required
to register upon the day they attain the

Universal





eighteenth anniversary of tWe day of
their birth, or within five days there-
after

For further information, eonsult the
American Consulate, - Bri . Bar-
bados -8.52--t fon.

4 CE
Q cae Le JOSEPH
ICA! ‘or ane it)

Exhibition Tenable at

will be received by the undersigned up
to 2 p.m. on Thursday 29th May, 1952

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PUHLIC SALES |

|
|

Bungalow

REAL ESTATE

BUNGALOW tonewall







The above property will be set up fo |
sale by Public Competition at our Office,
James Street, on Friday 6th June, at 2
p.m

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors
22.5.52

“WILTSHIRE PLANTATION’ and

dwellinghouse “WHITE HAVEN” situate

én



in St. Philip with about 202 acres of
land made up as follows: 192 acres
frable, 7 acres tenantry, 22 acres in

Sour gtass, 71 acres in roads and woods
etc., also 4 fan mills, 1 motor truck. 1

1) Vestry | bull, 2 cows, 1 horse, 2 donkeys and 1
Queen's College | donkey-cart.

Together also with 1,870
shares in Three Houses Factory Limited.
Inspection by appointment. Phone Mr.

T. Skeete, “Bentley” 2535 The

c dates must be the daughters of | 4. iy
pasion th draitenea efreumstances, | above property will be Set up to public

and must not be less than 9
than 12 years
mber 1952, to be proved

baptismal certificate which must accom-

pany the application Forms of appli-
bom can be obtained at the Parochial
surer’s Dffice.
KING,

A. B.
Clerk, St. Joseph's Vestry.
27.5.52—in

NOTICE
APPLICATIONS for one or more vacant
St. Michael's Vestry Exhibitions at
"S COLLEGE will be received by
tl Clerk of the Vestry up to 12 noon
on_ Wednesday, 28th May 1952.
Candidates must be the daughters of

CAR—in exalt condition, | Parishioners in straitened circumstances

Ownet ore Ma; be seen
McEnearney’s Garage.
ee 28.5.52-—8n.

ELECTRICAL

cetacean anneal
FPRIGIDAIRE,—Westinghouse in #90d/ 12 noon.

working order Dial
trical.

PYE RADIO—Model
condition, Very little used.
new. Phone 4136

4086. T -

39G. Excelient*
Practically
28.5.52—1n
$.3ft. G.E.C
Telephone
28.5.52—4n



~1961
$400.00





Refrigerator
mornings



REFRIGERATOR
Model 64 A. Trouble free, as new
years guarantee. Ilnone 4136

28,5.52—In



LIVESTOCK

- One Holstein Cow first calf
Phone 95—289
21.5.52-—3n.
GOAT--One pure bred Sanaan_ Goat,
1 year old, Apply to Fred Sobers,
Deacons Road. 27.5,.52—3n.

cow
Riving 22 pts per. day.



POULTRY i

CHICKS—New Hampshires, Plymouth
Rocks White Giants. Dial 4259.
28.5.52—2n.

MISCELLANEOUS
Shind, old Jewels, ine. silver

Glass, China,

Watercolours. Early books, Maps, Auto-
graphs etc., a, Seen Antique Shop
id. Roy: ‘acht Club.
ane 3.2.62—t,£.n.

—————

“BENBOW's DOG MIXTURE"—a gen-
eral tonic which brings a dog to his best
condition, Suitable for dogs of all
ages and all breeds. Prices 60c. and
$1.08. Knight's Ltd,











CHEESE—Five-tb Tins 12-0z. Tins.
Wholesale & Retail. W. M. Ford, 35
Roebuck St. Dial 3489. 28.5.52—2n.

CEREALS—Corn Flakes, Shredded
Wheat, All Bran, Oat Flakes in Tins and
Loose Tapioca. W. M. Ford, 36 Roebuck





St. Dial aso 28.5.52—2n .

~ GOAL—About a tons coal for sale.

Apply: Gas Co., y Street.
27,5.52-3n.



COW--One Guernsey Cow, first calf.
Apply G. L. Harford, Norwood, St.
James 28,5. 52—3n

DECCA RECORDS: Clearances, Three
for $2.00, The Travellers Club, Brad-
shaw Building, St. Michael's Row.









22.5.52—t.f.n.

“DRIED - un Raisins, Cur-
rants & Mixed Peel, All Fresh Stock.
W. M. Ford, {5 Roebuck St. Dial 5489.
28.5,52—2n.

“DO-DO”" Tablets relieve Asthma and

ease difficult breathing. Price 5/- box
Fresh arrived. Knight's

Ltd,

shipment just





25.5.52-—3n.} closed on Thursday next the 29th
——|and will be re-opened at BARROWS on | Tables, Step Ladder, Canvas Cot, Garden

at |} 8nd must not be less than 9 nor more

than 12 years of age on the 2nd Sep-

1952, to be proved by a Baptismal

Certificate which must accompany th:
ay ation.

of application will be issued and

vet at the Vestny Clerk's Office

the hours of 10 a.m. and

BE. C. REDMAN,
Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry.



NOTICE
VESTRY BYE-ELECTION
I HEREBY give notice that I have ap-

8076 | Pointed the Parochial Building, Cumber-

Jand Street, Bridgetown as the place
where Parishioners of the parish of St

English Electric. | Michael and other persons duly qualified
3}]to vote at any

election of Vestrymen
for the said Parish may assemble on
Monday, the 9th day of June, 1952, be-
tween the hours of 10 and 11 o'clock in
the morning to elect a Vestryman for
the Parish of St. Michael in the place
Christopher Augustus Brathwaite, de-

ceased
PERCY H. BURTON,
Parochial Treasurer,
St, Michael.

28.5. 52--6n. | Misses Shilstone we will sell their fur-



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY __
AGRICULTURAL BANK ACT.
To the creditors ho! if spectalty

against WANSTEAD & ROCKPLEASANT | Cabinet 4

gon all in Mahogany, Black Marble Registrar of —_ eo
Pictures, Curtains, Glass ‘
Brass, Silver and Plated

Ware, Forks, Spoons, Cutlery etc., San-

TAKE NOTICE

Plantations, St. Michacl & St. James

TAKE NOTICE that I, the Owner of |Top Table,
the above Plantations am about to obtain |and China,
provisions

a of £1,000 under the of
the e Act

1952 to 1953.

No money has been borrowed under |Wooden Bedsteads with Springs
the Agricultural Aids Act, 1905, or the |Mattresses, Dressing Tables,
above Act (as the case may be) in re- jrored

spect of such year.
Dated this 26th day of May, 1952.
Cc. McD. Morris
Owner
27.5. 52—3n,





NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. PETER
The Parochial Treasurer's Office will
be closed as from May 28th to June 4th

25.5.52—3n.| both days inclusive.

Signed G. S. CORBIN,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Peter
27.5.52—3n



NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH
APPLICATIONS for one (1)
Exhibition tenable at the
School will be received by the under-
2 p.m. on Thursday, 29th
May 1952.

Candidates must be the sons of Parish-
joners in straitened circumstances, and
must not be less than 10% years nor
More than 12% years of age on the Ist
of September 1952, to be proved by a
baptismal certificate which must accom-
pany the application.

Forms of application can be obtained
at the Parochial traern Office

Vestry



P . KING 3 5 ie ‘
. : ers &c. Silver Tea Service and Bells;
Clerk, St. Philip's Vestry. |ciocks, Lamps. Pyréx Ware, Mahog.
at, 0; e-a Douvdie and Single Beasteads Springs and
Deep Sleep Mattresses, Hair. Beds;
Chest of Drawers, Couches. Dressing
NOTICE Tables, Iron Bedstead, Screens, Cham-
PARISH OF 8T. LUCY ber Ware. Electrolux Oil. Refrigerator,
The Parochial Office, St. Lucy will be| 2 Burner Oil Stove, Coal Stove, Larders,
inst | Ware Presses Kitchen Utensils &

For cleaning the lens of your glasses | Saturday, tae Ist inst

try a Clearsight Pen, price only 2/-.

Obtainable at Knight's Ltd.



DRIED ‘FRU¥T—Prunes,
|
|

ROLLEICORD CAMERAS. Two (2)
only world famous Rolleicord 1952 model
Cameras now in stock. As further sup-
plies are now restricted, this is an ex-
cellent opportunity to get one of these
cameras, A, G, St, Hin Ltd. Dial 3199.

23.5.52—n.

SEERSUCKER—In ten lovely Check
designs 36° wide. Usually $1.12 yard,
Reduced to $1.02 yard. Special price for
wholesalers at Kirpalani $2 Swan Street.

28.5.52—1n

Subscribe now to the Dally Telegraph
England's leading Daily Newspaper now
arriving in Barbados by Air only a few
days after publication in London. Con-
tact; ¥an Gale, c/o Adv Co., Ltd.
Local Representative, Tel. Tad





t.f.n.



TINNED FRUIT — Grapes. Large
Small, Peas Large & Small,
L



W. M. Medford, 35 Roebuck
28.5.52-—2n

TINNED MEATS — Luncheon Beef,
Corned Mutton, Corned Beef with

Brisket Beef

W. M. Ford, 36
St. Dial 3489 28.5.



PERSONAL





The public are hereby warned agatnst
giving credit to any person or persons
whomsoever in my name as I do not
hold myself responsible for anyone con-
tracting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me.

OSWALD ROCK,

Pie Serner,
27.5.$2—2n,

The public are hereby warned against
Biving credit to my wife, URSILLA
BROWNE (nee Spencer) as } do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone else
contracting any debt or debts in my
nome unless by a written order signed

by me
REYNOLD BROWNE,

.
St. James,
27.5.52—2n,

IT PAYS 10 ADVERTISE







REAL ESTATE

°

D’'ARCY A, SCOTT
Reav Estate AGENT AND
AUCTIONEER

of Middle Street
offers for sale from his ex-
tensive list: —
A three bedroom stone bun-
galow on the sea, below
|] Oistin,

And
BARBAREES HOUSE with
' 1] 2% Acres of land. It is with-
in one mile from Bridge- |j}
town. |
If you are interested in |}}
properties, why not overlook
his list, or dial 2645.
28.5.52—8n



25.5.52—8n, | from 8 a.m. to 12 noon.
ee OSWALD L.

& Buldinge on or before the Sist day of |
& Small, Prunes, Pineapples and | distribute the assets of the said estaie

Cereal, Roast Beef, Veal Loaf, & Tin®|or claim

tg the {ime

Office hours Tuesdays and Thursdays
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturdays



. DEANE,
Parochial Treasurer,

St. Lucy,
28.5, 52--2n

— er

NOTICE
Re the Estate of
CHARLES TO!

'GTON AUGUSTUS
T

GH

NOTICK IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim upon
or affecting the Estate of Charles Tor-
rington Augustus Knight late of Blades
Hill in the parish of Saint Philip in this
island, who died in this island on 2nd
day of September 1949 are hereby re-
quired to send in their claims, duly at-
tested to - the undersig§ed Timothy

ae eae, Public Trustee of th«

los qualified Administrator
of the Estate of

Charles Torrington |
Augustus Knight deceased, Pub.ic

uly 1952 after which | shal) proceed (|

among the parties entitled thereto having
regard to the debts and claims only ot
soon 1 shall ee nase One poy. and

at not be liable for assets +0
distestoutea to any person of whose debt
I shall not have had notice ot |
of such distribution,

years nor | competition
of age on the 2na|pbidder beyond the appraised value at 2
by “|p.m. on Friday the 6th day of June 1952

1943 Extension Dining Table
Hens |Screw), Couch, Ornament Tables, China

against the said Planta- jaree "
tions in respect of the Agricultural year [and Old China Tea Service, Oak Chairs

Combermere | and Ornament Tabies,

for sale to the highest

at our Office. For further particulars

and conditions of sale apply to the under
signed,
CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Lucas Street.
23.5.52—i3n





THIS ATTRACTIVE HOME

An extremely well built modern thre
bedroom jor two bedrooms and den)
BUNGALOW of stone and concrete con-
struction. Combined forty feet living-
room and gallery, fully cupboarded
Canadian styled kitchen. Floor to ceilin:
cedar lined double bedroom closets
Attractively laid out garden with friu
trees ‘and ample room for vegetables
Garage with breezeway to house and
detached self-contained maid’s quarters
The Property is coolly and delightfully
situated within easy reach of main road
at Worthing, Offers over £4,000 zee 8562
28.5.51—1n



AUCTION



UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By instructions received I will, sell on
Thursday, May 29th (1) chattel House
20 x 8 om the spot, located at corner of
Lightfoots Cross Lane and Chapman's
Street. Spot can be rented, Terms cash
Sale at 1 p.m

VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer

27,8. 52—an. |





UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Thursday 29th by order of the

niture at “Lauriston” Strathclyde

which includes

(with patent

Rockers and Arm Chairs, Wag-

Glass, Large Old China Bowl

and Rockers, Single Iron and ee
an

good Mir-

Press, Lady's Desk, Folding
Screen all in Mahogany, M.T. Wash-
stand, Chamber Ware, Mirrors, Books,
Linen Press, Planters Desk, Larders,
Kitchen Tables, Lawn Mower, Cement

Pots, Perfection 3-Burner Oil Stove and
other items, | jeune
Sale 11.30 o'clock, Terms Cash
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER
On Wednesday 4th June by order of

The Executors to the Estate of the Late
E. L. Skeete we will sell the Furniture

at “Whitehaven,” St. Philip which in-
cludes,
Extension Dining ‘Table,

1 t
Waggon, Sees
Sideboards, Rock-
Card Table, Hat-

Chairs, Liquor Case

ers, Folding Chairs,



FOR RENT

- HOUSES

ATTRACTIVE NEW FURNISHED #
ROOM HOUSE in country 6 miles
Bridgetown Large shaded grounds,
alWays cool. Suitable 1—2 adult, $80.00
Phone 4942 28.5.52—1n.





BURNLEY—Brittons Hill, Unfurnished
From ist June. C. B. Sisnett. Phone
3374 or 4548 28.5.52—t.f.n.

BILTMORE—Fittz Village, St. James,
On sea. Three » Dining and
Drawing rooms. Electricity, running water
in each room. Garage and servant's room.
Dial 0155. ° 17.5.52—t.i.n.

FLAT FULLY FURNISHED. In ‘Grey-
stone House’ Balmoral Gap, Hastings
June-December inclusive. Dial 3729.
22.5.52—t.f.n.
furnished, St.
3503.

20.3.52—4.f.n.

ROOM--On the seaside
Phone 8401.









WAT & HOUSE—fully
Lawrence on-Sea. Phone



for rent.
11.5.53—t.f.n.



(with running
toilet and fs
27.5. .

HOUSE—At Clapham, apposite the ¥,
Michael. Phone 2542 7

rooms
in 2), kitehen,



St
28.5.52—2n

ANNOUNCEMENTS

a
FASHION BOOKS—Attention Ladies:
To help with your sewing problems we
now offer the latest French Fashion
Books styles for Mid-summer, Randali,
Reed Street 28.5.52—2n





Your Broken Dental Plate can be re-
paired Be wise balance your budget,
the cost of living is high remember ao
stiteh in time saves nine. Square Dea!
Dental Lab. Upper Reed Street
28.5.52—2n

TAKE NOTICE
CENTURY

(And Cricketing Device)
That ALFRED BIRD & SONS, LIM-
YTED, a company organized under the
laws of Great Britain, Manufacturers
and Merchants, whose trade or business
address is Devonshire Works, Birm!
12, England, has applied for the -
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of baking powder
ind all substances used as food or as
ingredients in food, and will be entitled
to register the same after one mont!
from the day of May 1952 unless
some Shall in the meantime give
notice in duplicate to me at my ice
of opposition of such registration. The
trade mark can be seen on application
at my ice.
Dated this 12th day of May 1952.

H. WILLIAMS,









That JONKOPINGS OCH VULCANS
fANDSTICKS FABRIKSAKTIEBOLAG,
4 joint stock company organized under
the laws of Sweden, Match Manufacturers,
whose trade or business address is 16,
Vastra, Storgatan, Jonkoping, Sweden,
has applied for the ition of a trade
tark in Part “A’! of ister in respect
of matches, and will be entitled to reg-
ister the same after one month from the
28th day of May 1962, unless some person

stand, Revolving Book Cases, Double z
Ends’ Settee, Large Book Case (Glass es Yt ae mn ee,
Doors) Flat Top Desk, Revolving Chair} tion ‘The trade mark can be (opp on
all in 7 B.W. Chairs & Rock-| ication at my office. Fepre! 9
ers, Percival Settee, Pine Bookshelves, | “PMC te :

Leather Uphols,, Sofa & Arm S,
Set of Cut Glass Table Glass (91 Pieces)
Dinner Service; Royal Worcester Tea Ser-
vice; Glass and China; Pit. Ware in
Entre Dishes, Spoons, Forks, Fish &
Fruit Knives, Dish Covers, Cutlery Carv-



Bench. Books Linen and many other
items of interest. Sale 11,30 o'clock.
Terms Cash

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,
uctioneers.

A
28,5,52-—2n.,

WANTED











—_——
GENERAL SERVANT, Kitchen Maid
wanted. Apply: Mrs Lisle Bailey.
‘avilion, Hastings 28.5.52——In
MANAGER—A apable manager for
4 small Sugar Estate. Contact Mayers,

Advocate Advertising Dept



52—dn.
NURSE,—Experienced Nurse, quarters
provided. Call Mrs. Bryan, No. 7 The
Oarrison 28.5.52—1n



RADIO-ELECTRICIAN for our Elec-
trical Department, Apply in person. Wm.





Fogarty (B'dos) Lid 22.5.52—t.f.n
Wanted by Barbados Publicity Com-
mittee — lady assistant to take charge

of Information Bureau, Seawell Airport,
A knowledge of typing and Spanish
Cesirable. ‘Application in writing to The
Chairman, Barbados Publicity Committee,
1.0, Box 32, Bridgetown

28.5. 52

on



MISCELLANEOUS







all persons indebted to tho
said fre, are udered to settle their
see lay.
Dated this 27th day of May, 1952.
TIMOTHY THEOPHILUS
HEADLEY,
Qualified Administrator of
the Estate of
AUGUSTUS KNIGHT,
deceased.
28.5,52—4n.
a
,
LOST & FOUND
LOST



TSSING from Car near Rockley Golf
Club, Lady's navy-blue handbag contain-
‘ing watch and wedding ring of
sentimen value. Any person giving
information leading to recovery will be
well rewarded. all Brooke, Paradise
Beach Club, between 6 and 7 p.m. ‘

27.5.52-—2n,



—





SWEEPSTAKE TICKET-—Series P.9020
Finder please return same to W. Thomas
Hothersal Turning, St. Michael. Reward
offered, Turf Club please take note

28.5.62—1n





SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS—Series JJ |
S41L and 3464. Finder please return
same to Darnley Edghill, Marchfield,
St. Philip. 28.5, 52—In

in turtlesheil



PAIR OF GLASSES

SHORT STORIES,
VERSE—For the
Accepted material
after publication.
King, New Era
Thomas,

ARTICLES and
“Christmas Mirror’
will be paid for
Send Mss, to I HH.
Press, Sharon, St.



26.5,52—2n.

Pains in Back
Nervous, Rheumatic?

Wrong foods and drinks. worry,
overwork and frequent colds often put
a strain on the Kidneys and Kidney
and Bladder Troubles are the true
cause of Excess Acidity, Getting Up
Nights, Burning Passages, Leg Pains
Nervousness, Dizziness, Swollen An-
kles, Rheumatism, Puffy Eyelids. and
feeling old before your time Help your
kidneys purify your blood with Cys-
tex. The very first dose starts helping
your kidneys clean out excess acids
and this will quickly make you feel like
new. Under the money-back guarantee
Cystex must satisfy completely or cont
nothing, Get Cystex from your chem-











frames between A. BARNES & CO.,,









LTD. and C.R.B. Reward to finder. |
Dial 4476. 38.5.52—t.f.n. |
SSSSSSSSSSGSSSSSSSSSESS", |
.
SRA VIEW GUEST
HOUSE :
TINGS BARBADOS \)
Ul new management. })
Daily and longterm rates % |
uoted on +equest
ent guests ;
welcome. %
Dinner and Cocktail
parties arranged. |
J, H. BUCKLAND, %
Proprietor. ys
R

j

make Cystex' Ist today

‘The Guar-
‘Ver Kidneys. Rnewmat:





FOR RENT












Valuable business premises on
Rickett Street above the Post
Office with back entrance on Mar-
hill Street, Frontage ec:
entrance doors and
window. Ideally suitable for any
class of business, especially
Drug Store, In close proximity
3 parking place and the "Bus
Stands. Also cool and spacio
offices upstairs over the premises
referred to above These offices
anc business premises will be

ted separately or together as
' be desired. Apply to
EVELYN, ROACH & Co., Ltd

Rickett Street
24.5.52—t f 4





ca hates i inane ee aie iertstel oa aaae etaneasedie nae taaet tsa
a

Dated this 12th day of May 1952.
H, WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks.
28.5.52-3n,

ASTHMA MUCUS

Loosened First Day

Don't let coughing, sneezing, chok-
ing attacks of! Bronchitis or Asthma
ruin your sleep and energy another
day or night without trying MiN-
DACO, This great medicine is not a
smoke, injection or spray, but works
through the blood, thus reaching the
lungs and bronchial tubes. The first
dose starts helping nature immedt-
ately 3 ways. 1. Helps loosen and re-
move thick strangling mucus, 2. Thus
promotes freer breathing and sounder,
more refreshing sleep. 3. Helps allevi-
atef coughing, wheezing,@ sneezing.
Quick satisfaction or money back
guaranteed. Get MENDACO from
chemist today,





corporation organized and
the

Jnited States of America, Manufacturers

TAKE NOTICE
DINACRIN

That WINTHROP

laws of the State of

whose trade or business address is 1450
Broadway, New York, New York, United
States of America, has applied for the

in
and pharmaceutical
will

of a trade mark

ee} in Part
preparations,
be entitled to register the same

after one month from the 28th day of

May 1952 unless some person
meantime give notice in duwplica’

shai in the
to me

at my office of opposition of such reg-
istration. The trade mark can be seen
on application at my office,

COMPANY
Manufacturing Chemists, whose trade or
business address is The Factory, Braydon {|
Road, London, N., England has applied
for the registration of a trade mark
Part “A” of Register in respect of med-
icinal and pharmaceutical preparations,
and will be entitled to register the same

|
|
|

|

|

1952.

Registrar of Trade Marks.
28.5.52—3n

TAKE NOTICE

BISMAG

INTERNATIONAL CHEMICAL
LIMITED, a British Company,

Dated this 12th day A Ma:



That

in

after one month from the
May 1952 unless some
meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration: The trade mark can be seen
on application at my office.



That LIGGETT & MYERS TOBACCO
COMPANY, a _ corporation
under the laws of the State of New
Jersey, United States of America, Man-
ufacturers, whose trade or _ business
address is 630 Fifth Avenue, New York
20 State of New York, U.S.A. has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A’’ of Register in respect
of smoking tobacco and cigarettes, and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 28th day of
May 1952, unless some person shalk in
the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be seen
on application at my office.
Dated this 12th day of May 1952.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
28.5.52—3n

TAKE NOTICE

Cavalier





That BR. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO
COMPANY a corporation organized and
existing under the laws of the State
of New Jersey, United States of Amer-
iea, Tobacco Manufacturers, whose trade
or business address is Matin and rue
Streets, Winston-Salem, North C a,
U.S.A. has applied for the registratfon
of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register

in respect of tobacco and tobacco
roducts, cigarettes, cigars, smoking
obacco, snuff, smokers’ articles,

cigarette paper, matches, cigarette cases,
sigar and cigarette holders, pipes for
smoking tobacco(, and will be entitled
to register the same after one month
from the 28th day of May, 1952,
anless some person shall in the mean-
time give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration, The trade mark can be seen
on_upplication at my office.

Dated this 12th day of 1952.

H.
Registrar of Trade Marks.
28.5.62—3n



GOVERNMENT NOTICE



WAR DAMAGE TO BRITISH PROPERTY IN FRANCE
- Announcements in the Board of Trade Journal on February ist,

1947 and June 7th, 1947, gave details of arrangements between H.M.
Government and the French Government relating to compensation in
respect of war damage to British property in France, and notified the
final date for the registration of claims as December 31st, 1947.

An extension of the final date for the submission of claims to July
7th, 1952, has now been granted under Article 37 of Law No. 52—5 of
January 3rd, 1952, to those British subjects, Corporations and Associa-
tions whose claims were, or would have been, rejected because they
were submitted after December 31st, 1947.

It should, however, be noted that this law does not permit the re-
consideration of claims which have been finally rejected for any

other reason,

Claims must be made to the French War Damage authorities direct

and should be in the French language.

H.M. Government can accept

no responsibility for the actual filing and prosecution of claims.
24.5.52,.—2n.





TEDDER : Roderick Owen
MY INDIA: Jim Corbett

THE BOOK OF UNVEILING: M. R. Newbolt
TIME TO REMEMBER : Lloyd Douglas

CARDS for
received :

all

of many

young people.



S. P. C.K. BOOK DEPARTMENT

C. F. HARRISON & CO., LTD.

__A short list of new titles and replacements from a large
shipment of Books, etc., just received :—

ADVENTURES IN TWO WORLDS: Cronin

VENTURE TO THE INTERIOR: Van der Post
CHILDREN OF KAYWANA : Mittelholzer
LIEUTENANT HORNBLOWER: C. S. Forester
PHOENIX RISING: Marguarite Steen

LONDON PARTICULAR : Christianna Brand

THE TROUBLE AT NUMBER SEVEN: Gerald Bullett
BARMY IN WONDERLAND: P. G. Wodehouse

READINGS IN ST. JOHN’S GOSPEL :
THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO ST, MARK:

occasions especially Birthday

PENGUIN and PELICAN BOOKS, PAN BOOKS
BOOKS, available in great quantity: BASILDON BOND
WRITING PAPER, AIR MAIL ENVELOPES, etc.

FATHERS AND MOTHERS PLEASE NOTE :
parents and teachers we have made a careful
selection of books and pamphlets on sex instruction for
These may be inspected at this branch.

DO NOT FAIL TO INSPECT OUR BOOK BARGAIN
SECTION

Telephone 4427




















William Temple

Vincent Taylor

Cards just

GUILD

At the request

WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 1952

$s.
Ms.
M.S.
M.S.
MS.
M.S. WH
SAILING TO
AND
s.s.
M.S. Nestor,
M8. BONAIRE, 30th June,
MS.
& G To
CURACAO
M.S. HESTIA, 2ist , 1952.
8. BP. MUSSON, & Co. trp”







OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM

Vessel _ From “ Leaves Due
S.S. “MERCHANT” . Newport Barbados
. Liverpool oe gay 1 May

S.S. “COLUMBIA STAR” Liverod 7th May May
$.S. “TRIBESMAN” jon &

M/brough 9th May 27th May
5.S. “SELECTOR” Liverpool &

Glasgow 17th May ist June



HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM

Vessel For Closes in Barbados
S.S. “GRELROSA” Liverpool 15th May
S.S. “HERDSMAN” London 22nd May

For further information apply to

DA COSTA & CO,, LTD.—Agents



Canadian National Steamships





SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Satls Aarives = Salls
Montreal Hi Boston = B'dos Bidos
LADY ROD) mae is .. May 22May %May 32 ine 3 June
CANADIAN GER .. 30 May 2 June _ Ml June 12 June
LADY * pe ‘ 9June 12 ine 14 June = wae a ig
CAN. CRI : @June 23 June _ . :
CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 30 June 33 = yay Bsus
LADY RODNEY a ist li July 14 Suly 16 July 25 July 3 July
NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrt Arrt ven
Bidos Bidos St. John = Boston: patrag Montreal
ce, ee ++ 29 May 29 May 5 June _ 8 June a ve
CONSTRUCTO; 2 8 June 15 June _ 1 1 June
LADY | RODNEY Sate iS sane - We euny 8 gue
CHALLENGER . 23 June 26 June 57 18 July *8 ll July
a aes wy Be
. oe uly ug.
ACONSTHY CT 24 July 29 Jul 5 rm pe 10 A
UCTOR iy ly ug. ug.
LADY RODNEY .. 7Aug. 9 Aug. 19 AUS. 9°Ang’” 23 AUB.



for further particulars, apply to—

C"G" TRANSATLANTIQUE

*eetede a 9 gg ag to Conactoves,, Mprtintene

From Southampton
“COLOMBIR” .... May
*“
4th June,



1952 ....

21st
16th Ji

1952... ..

. Be

*Not calling at Guadeloupe
SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE

From Barbados.
*“DE GRASSE” .... 19th May
“COLOMBIE” .... ist :

*“DE GRASSE” .... 29th June,

FRY PANS,

Are Yours in Order?

1952 .... 29: wi
1962.” igth dune” 1908
Oth ‘July: 1968

1952... ..



FRY PANS

If not —

They Are Obtainable at —

THE CENTRAL

EMPORIUM

Corner Broad and Tudor Streets

clan nee nnconbanoetaiteoe:



REALE

Property

’Phone 4640

RIDE A....

HOPPER
BICYCLE

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY

White Park Road.
St. Michael
Office : 4326 Workshop : 4546
Merchandise: 4528 iw 4650

FOR SALE
HOUSE RENTALS

JOHN M. BLADON «& CO.

Real Estate Agents, Auctioneers & Building Surveyors

STATE

& Land









Plantations Building

ITD.











WEDNESDAY

MAY 28, 1952






















BY CARL ANDERSON

BY CHIC YOUNG

DADDY, WHEN YOu
GET MARRIED, WHO IS
THE BOSS IN THE HOUSE-- 7 bi! ‘
THE HUSBAND OR ea. And

THE WIFE ? iS =

YOU'RE RIGHT-- TT
HE SAID THE J
SBAND





i FOLD
YOU SO

KEEP YOUR EYES

OPEN FOR THE

SLIGHTEST TRACE

|. OF PLANT LIFE, Al
CALE!

WITH US/ LET'S SEE
WHAT THIS UNCOVER /

DON'T TALK!

TAKE BRIEF CAGE... \
SOMEBODY'LL GET ff

AMERICAN EMBASSY...
NO ONE ELSE...






GOOD TRY, HAZARD...
RA I'VE HAD IT...LISTEN,..
wy FAVOR FOR ME...




©] ARE YOU ALL RIGHT...
P| DID THEY HIT You,
| HARRIS?






MOTHER'S UNCLE

=| =



500 A WORD YOLI GAIL ~ | | =
TOCALLON SOL" Aso sa
af YOUR OFFICE YOU COLUI.0 kar
Ld Teil. Mee =e =





Y AFTER you...1 WANT
YOU IN FRONT OF ME...
WHERE I CAN SE
YOU /

OH,NO, DUDE! YOU'RE COMING
\ IN WITH ME! FIRST I GET
r LILI, THEN YOU GET THE
HERE WE MONE

ARE, KIRBY...
R ROOM |S AF

THE HEAD OF THE

eee ok My

MONEY NOW... CAN'T
FACE HER...








THE WATCHERS ARE —“\GO0D. WE LL
postin AS YOU ORDERED.) WAIT FOR
THE MESSAGE WILL seats,
OME THRU SOON. Si

Bw 367



BARBADOS







ADVOCATE



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making
this mistake?

Nine out of ten women wear the
wrong shade of face powder without
realizing it. You see, most ordinary
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No wonder they cannot make you
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But Pond’s Powder is different
Before Pond’s shades were evolved,
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SGE Bee?

Cans

€¢ dy =H
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IT PAYS YOU





PAGE NINE

tnt etn NNN ee RR






~K lavelier wear

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COMES WITH

RAIN

s/—
\

NACROOL
KNOCKS OUT
PAIN
ON SALE: AT 44.

KNIGHT'S LTD.

ALL BRANCHES

SSSA SPOT OOO |







lle:
SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only
——————————————————————————————









SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Branches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street

Pkgs. Bridal Icing Sugar . $
Pkgs. Lipton’s Tea (4 Ib.) ....

Tins Beetroot .............,
Tins Two Cardinal Coffee .,.,

Bottles Mayonnaise

a

THE COLO
The Place Where





Tins Heinz Macaroni with Cheese .34





Usually Now |
i
44 $ 40 B 4 inane ‘ .
cf /
: SAUSAGES
>
79 72 ad
> > ara Imperial Oxford Sausages 16-0z. .69
38 35 6, = Vienna Sausages 10-oz. .90





4-oz. 40

se ‘ Imperial Frank-furters Sausages 12-07. ... $ 94

ot Walls Oxford Sausages 16-07. ............ 69

» Pork Sausages l6-oz. .......,...... 82

+06 90 Swifts Vienna Sausages 4-oz. ..,......... 43
: “ Cambridge Sausages 16-0z. .............. 69

Smorgans Sausages 16-0z, ................ 81

51 4g Royal Cambridge Sausages 1-oz. ........ 78

‘ ‘ Imperial Frank-furters Sausages 12-02, 93

NNADE



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Sea

PAGE TEN



“This Could be Greatest Year for British and Empire Athletes’

(By E. McDONALD BAILEY)

(The Holder of the world’s 100 metres record)

THE year 1952 will probably go down in athletics his-
tory as the best—ever for British and Commonwealth per-
forn I have seen enough, both in England and various
parts of the world, during the past twelve months or so,
to be able to make such a prediction without having to hold
my tongue in my cheek

ers.



The reign of t U.S.A. in the the shorter distance at Helsinki
track events is ning to a close. 1 am certain that his tremendous
And rovide one or finishing spurt will put him there
two shake-ups e field events, or thereapouts,
for so g ¢ vated by the British athletes backing up
Continentals Bannister will be John Parlett, of

Focal point of thi year, of whom we have still to see the
course, is Helsinki. It is there best, and Chris Chataway, whe
that I leok for our crowning must be in with an astounding
triumphs and a bigger proportion chance in the 5,000 metres,
of gold medals for Britain's But don*t forget that the Com-
athletes than at any previous monwealth can produce a few
Olympic meeting “good-uns” when it comes to

oe . a 7), these events,

Why am I so optimistic? Well. — Ganada can offer Bob McFar-
for one thing there is a bumpei

lane (quarter and half mile) who
the 1948 Games at



crop of world-class runners in

appeared in



the British Isles and the Com- ibley and who has a victory
monwealth. For another, tre- over Arthur Wint to his credit.
mendous progress has been made From the same country comes
since 1948. This has been partly Don Scott McEwen, who won the
due to a more enlightened ap- Milwaukee Indoor Games . two
proach to competitive athletics Wile event in 9 mins 15.7 -sec-
by the governing bodies, with ona. and Jack Carrell’ who has
consequent improved coaching , 499 metres in 48 secs, to this
und training facilities, and partly nase : . :

Australia’s miler Don McMillan
is another I would not rule out
of the reckoning.

Back again with the British
stars we have big John Savidge
who gets nearer to world class
every time he putts the shot and
who may well go close in his
chosen event.

I should be accused of false
modesty if I did not include my-
self in the list of possibles.
Some folks are inclined to think
that 1951 saw me at my peak.
4 But although 31 is, comparatively
speaking, a ripe old age for a
sprinter, I am out to prove them
wrong, And I make no secret of
the fact that I have high hopes
of taking the 100 metres -+ and
the 200 for good measure.






















If I .get just
one of them
though, f shall
still be well sat-
isfied, for it is 27
years since Brit-
ain last took an
a sprint

Our girls too
have never been
in an Olympics
with such won-
derful chances
—_—w7-~_- jcompletely fit June Foulds could
take the 100 metres. And, des-
jpite the determination of the
incomparable Fanny Blankers-
Koen, winner of four gold medals











it the 1948 Games, I look to
Sheila Lerwill, holder of the
world-record, to win the high

z jump.
i ee Seiten «4° Most danger fo June Foulds I
oe . : ‘¥ expect to come from 20 year old
is SP Australian Majorie Jackson, I
had the pleasure of seeing her
BAILEY BREAKS THE TAPE- tun while I was down-under and
first again. Will he do the same believe me, she could beat many
at Helsinki? good class male sprinters,

Also from Australia there are
to much greater keenness among Shirley Strickland (80 metres
athletes themselves. The idea of hurdles) Ray Weinburg who has
running just for the sake of run- a time for the 120 hurdles of 14
ning is on the way out. There seconds, and John Treloar, Olym-
is 100, a far more serious ap- pic semi-finalist four years ago,
proath to the often boring busi- who may upset all my plans in
ness of preparation and a greater the 100 metres,
inclination to fight.

In events there is not so much









































of the “after you Claude” atti-
tude. And this has resulted in
better times and figures all
round.

Add to this the healthy respect
reflected in all written or spoken
references made in the United
States to the formerly dispar-
aged British and Commonwealth
athletes, and the fact that the
land of the Almighty Dollar
does not so far appear to have
thrown up the usual running,
phenomenon, and you will Sec hy
that there is good reason fot
sanguine prediction.

But from generalities to par-
ticularities. From whom, on. this’
side of the Atlantic and in the
Commonwealth, do I expect
fireworks at Helsinki’

First, I think I would put
Arthur Wint the great Jamaicar
runner, and captain of their
team this year, who must have
a wonderful chance in the 40
metres of retaining the title he!
so brilliantly snatched from un-
der the nose of Herb McKenley
in 1948, i

Arthur is training for both the. 4
S00 and the 400 metres events,;
but I feel his best chance will be
in the shorter distance. And there
*s no doubting his own deter-
mination (o add another gold
medal tp the one he already
owns,

Tinen there is Roger BarirHisenry
(1,500 metres) the 22-year-oldsy
former Oxford miler, currently {4
reported to be swapping over to
the half-mile as a means of in-9
creasing his speed over the
longer distance, Roger must have
a wonderful chance of running
away with the title. I was liter-, gportsman of the Week”
ally astounded by his speed when¥onataway, Olympic hope.

I saw him clock that 4 min. 9.9~

second miles at the New Zealand Neither must I forget Yvette
Centennial Games 18 months Williams, versatile New Zealan-
ago; if he does decide to go for der who should do well in what-

They ll Do



Chris





hey lo Tt Every Time _ hunch. Nac gad By Jimmy Hatlo

‘THEN WHEN SAID PARTY is“
NOTIFIED AS PER INSTRUCTIONS».
OUR GAL IN THE MIDDLE GETS THIS



ITY THE POOR TELEPHONE OPERATOR,

FRINSTANCE, A LONG-DISTANCE CALLER

WILL. GIVE een } ibtondlleath
—- U














‘AND, OPERATOR»
BE SURE TO LET
ME KNOW WHEN
THE THREE MINUTES
ARE UP!





Today Is"
Derby Day

By G. CHANDLER
LONDON, Monday.
Sport-loving Britons spent
busy week-end studying form
books and entry lists in an
endeavour to find the winner of
the nation’s most popular sport-
ing event the Derby Stakes which
will be run off at Epsom on
Wednesday. Forty top-flight thor-
oughbreds will contest the one and
a half mile event which will be
the richest in the history of the
race. It will be worth £20,587 to
the winner compared with £ 19,386
the previous record set one year
ago, The world famous ‘race
which takes its name from the
twelfth Earl of Derby was first run
at Epsom in 1780 and except for
breaks during two world wars
when ten “substitute” races were
run at Newmarket, the classic has
always been run over the horse-
Shoe shaped track.

The track is regarded as a true
test of speed and stamina for
three-year-old colts each of
whom will carry 126 pounds.

The start is at the bottom of a
hill and for the first four furlongs
the horses have a steady climb,
then comes a drop until the fam-
ous lefthand bend at Tattenham
Corner is reached. It is from this
bend four furlongs from the win-
ning post that the horses begin to
make their final effort over fairly

level ground until the last 200
yards which is slightly uphill
During the first 50 years the

Derby attracted little attention but
today there is worldwide interest
especially in countries running
sweepstakes on the result, the most
famous of which is the Irish Hos-
pital Sweep, the winner of which
nets £50,000,

In addition, the famous event
draws nearly half a million spec-
tators most of whom go to see the
colourful surroundings apart from
the running of the race. Facing
the grand siand on a hill around
which the race is run the public
will mill around gaily decorated
marquee tents, bookies stands,
fried fish stalls, icecream barrows
and shooting galleries whiie fur-
ther afield an amusement fair
complete with roundabouts pro-
vides a riot of colour in contrast
with the green turf of the winding
racetrack,

No Derby scene would be com-
plete without its gypsies whose
brightly painted caravans have
now been forced to camp well
away from the track, But this
will not prevent them from ming-
ling with crowds to tip “cert” win-
ners or offer to tell your fortune.
The grandstand will be packed
with representatives of many na-
tions, with Dukes and Earls and
high-ranking officials and owners
occupying the most exclusive part
of the stands. This year however,
there will be no member of the
Royal Family present as the Court
is still in mourning for the late
King George.—U.P.

Cable Arid Wireless
Defeat Carlton

Cable and Wireless defeated
Carlton in a cricket match played
at Boarded Hall on Saturday,
May 24, Carlton batting first scored
62 all out. E. W. Marshall top
scored with 24not out and F. B.
Edghill scored 23, They came to-
gether in an eighth wicket partner-
ship when Carlton had lost seven
wickets for 16 runs and saved
their team from complete collapse.
R. Croney, H. H, King and E. L.
Branker took 3 wickets each for
2, 7, and 23 runs respectively.
Cable and Wireless replied with
93, C. Seale top scored with 32
while N, T. Clarke scored 16, For
Carlton George Edghill took four





wickets for 13 runs, while F.
Edghill and K, Warren bagged
three each for 13 and 17 runs

respectively.



ever event she chooses to enter,
My oe opinion is that she
stands. most chance in the long
jump,

Quite an impressive list isn’t!
it. And it is by no means com-;
plete — Bill Nankeville, Len
Eyre and Europesn 200 metres;
champion Brian Shenton are only;
three I have not dwelt upon. |;

But those I have
will make the best in the world!
go all out. And although the!
chief challenge is likely to come:
from the United States, I feel
that this time we have the trump
eards, Unless someone holds an
unexpectedly strong hand, Brit-
ain and the Commonwealth are
going to pick up quite a few
tricks at Helsinki in July.

mentioned ;

GET OFF THE
LINE, OPERATOR,
AND STAY OFF!!
HELLO, YVONNE=sHE
TREATED HER LIKE A F
DOG+NOT THAT SHE'S

ANY ANGEL,HERSELF, <7
YUNDERSTAND = AND
ANOTHER THING
ANO-“BLABBA-

ri

———,

wfcvuavi

BE COPR. 1952 KING FEATURES SYNDICATE. ¢





BARBADOS





Record Entries For

Intercolonial Sports
. THREE DAY



ADVOCATE





MEET

OPENS SATURDAY

‘(By 0. S. COPPIN)

A record number of two

hundred and sixty-two entries

have been accepted by the Amateur Athletic Association
of Barbados for the forthcoming three-day Intercolonial

Cycle and Athletic Meet w

hich opens at Kensington on

Saturday, May 31, continues on Monday, June 2 and ends

on Thursday, June 5.

The Association have doubtless
made an all-out effort to inject
some life into the Meet since I
see that they have invited top
ranking cyclists and athletes to
take part in the events,

Right Step

This is a step in the right
direction for there can be no
individual performances of-any

varticular merit except they ‘arc
made in competition against the
best available representatives from
other territories and have Also
been made under conditions that

generally obtain in other
territories.
The Association have broken

new ground in the encouragement
cf the younger athletes in their
having invited Walter Gittens,
the Grenada Boys’ Secondary
School Athletic star to take part
in the School events.

I see also that he has been
entered for the 880 yards, the
High Jump and the Long Jump
all Open events, ;

Interesting Record

Gittens’ record is an interest-
ing one. In the recent Windward
Islands Inter-School tournament
Gittens won the 40 yards, 880
yards and Long Jump crowning
his performance with the credit-
able achievement of winning the
High Jump at 5 feet 11% inches.
This is several inches higher than
what our local boys have been
returning for the past few years.

In addition to this Gittens ran
second in the 100 yards and 220
yards to H. Bain, his’ fellow
Grenadian whom, I understand,
he beat over the same distance
at their school sports.

On the athletic side too, fans
will be afforded the opportunity
for seeing George Lewis, veteran
sprint champion of Trinidad, who
although he has been running for
many years now still has plenty
of fire in him as was evidenced
by his showing in the recent
International Sports Meeting of
the A.A.A., of Trinidad when he
beat the American invitees.














































Invitation Race

There will be a special invita-
tion 60 yards dash in which it is
expected that Lewis, Archer,
Blenman and Inniss will be seen
in this event.

Turning to the cycling events
there seems to have been a wealth
of talent attracted in tthe three
classes. In the “A” class there
will be the Berbice Wheel champ
Walter Liddell who is the lead-
ing cyclist on form in B.G, today.

From ‘Trinidad -comes_ the
Olympic hope David Matthieu
while the All Stars Club of
Trinidad are again making the
trip.

The local stars spearheaded by
Barbados’ own Olympic hope,
Ken Farnum, L. Carmichael, D.
Keizar, returning to the track
after a lay off, Johnnie Skinner,
holder of the local five mile record
in the “A” and _ Intermediate
classes, R. Sattaur and the newly
promoted Darey Yarde will
be there to give battle to the
Intercolonial invitees.

Farnum’s Farewell

I understand however that
Farnum will be seen only in the
short distances, 4 mile, mile and
two mile because the grass track
is slower than the road on which
Farnum is spending most of his
time training seriously for Hel-
sinki where he will have to ride

|



WEATHER REPORT
YESTERDAY

Rainfall from Codrington: .01

Total Rainfall for month to
date: 2.06 ins.

Highest Temperature: 86.5 °F

Lowest Temperature; 72.5 °F

Wind Velocity: 9 miles per
hour

Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.979,
(3 p.m.) 29.910

TO-DAY

5.40 a.m.

Sunset: 6.18 p.m.

Moon: New, May 23
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

High Tide: 5.33 a.m., 7.03 p.m.
Low Tide: 12.19 p.m.

Sunrise:





all
|



MAY 28, 1952

WEDNESDAY,



s “ «
PEF POSSSS 2700"

6506
POCSSSS SO SSOS SSS FOOT S SSP SOP SEF OPED

Sal 4
GLP?



59999998



cn a speedy board track. The
grass track would therefore tend
to slow his muscle down,

Farnum assures me that he
intends to ride to give the public
the opportunity of seeing him
against the champs from other
colonies before he leaves,

Locals in Training

The local athletes are in serious
training and Hunte expects to re-
turn a time better than 50 seconds
for the 440 yards. Archer and
Blenman of the local constabulary
have been in training for the Police
Sports and should be in good
form for the sprint events while
in the ‘long distances Hill and
Lloyd will battle in the 880 yards,
one mile and three mile t:at ¢aces.




ONLY $36.00 EA.

Novelties *

Novelties of this meeting are
the parade of the athletes on the
first day which should be well
worth seeing and the fact that
the prizes for most of the events
will be presented immediately
after the finish of the event,

P,C.S. MAFFEI
This is based on the model of

& Co, Lid.
the Olympics and is the method | $ Top Scorers in tailoring

Ideal for the Tropics \
®

s
used in B.G., and Trinidad and ‘ %
is aimed to eliminate a lot of the Prince Wm. Henry Street x

i r: s S, ».
hey ie eee of the $$$5995669595S59$999SS59S6$5995995955550868596560



ooo





SUITINGS

FOR

SUMMER!!

28” KHAKI DRILL ........ @ $1.53, $1.58, $1.69 Yd.
28” WHITE DRILL ............ $1.31, $1.66, $1.69 Yd.
28” WHITE LINEN DRILL ......... $2.38, $2.95 Yd.
28” IRISH LINEN .................. $3.15, $4.49 Yd.
54” IRISH LINEN CRASH ................ $4.33 Yd.
fe SUED CRASH oe eek ks $3.66 Yd.



Cave Shepherd & Co. Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street





A



And buy a Carib

A tense incident in the Trinidad
Barbados Tornado tournament —
generous in victory — the Barbadian
skipper hurls alife saver toa gallant
but gasping victim of a Tornado

turnover.

Asa reminder why don’t you attend
the grand Tornado Dance at the
Crane on Saturday 3lst May and
remember, say “Gimme a Carib”
and absolutely no one will give you

$100.22 — try it.

,





ad

(





|





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PAGE 1

WIIM,I,\ mi m, mi IIXRBAIHIs ADV04 \ll HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON / FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD . BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE OAVIES BLONDIF f~* DADOV. WHEN V*XJ /1 GET MARRIED, WHO IS (THE BOSS IN THE HCUSE• v THE HUSBAND CO ~>-—t THE WIFE BY CHIC YOUNG THE r" .. IfOUfs FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK a RAY MOORES I'M.I \INf Are YOU making this mistake? Sin' mil Kr4r iii. "'"' %  -W'I* "' !l• Jm.i.i BMNM laaalWfcj il. ^ .. K, MM ,.r,lm,iv !.*• |> anU.iid-.l wiltiol %  n — rtii haa i li N '" %  %  ) .nlv.t ... Ik iMhjwvb Hui l'„n,| 1\.„.|.-, ..linVr.-m H.I..., p ritiwUi w M i. iiu.1.m*K..( ih..-tiii}>|.-in>iio* niin.lml. Q| Igvetj iiL. IIMH,• %  Iw i toih *ei m -:i.i n%  ..|.,. io dUoo ih, 1,.,1.1,-n timiii.i K i<> Bahavpawq -km MM P ii UaftJ MMIII.NI HMM i 1Ml ,„ i.i i r.mg, ,,f ti.iii,,,,,^ tlwdm, '-. Il MM dMl gjMjJ (• %  rllliaii. .' 11..%  %  %  4ag type Mil.h) I-. ih. **M vm rt n P Pmrdei i.. nveal il hidd Vigour Restored, Glands Hade Young In 24 Hours Ii %  no Lma-ar nici — JT to watt' %  -rfn low & f *ttour and wwbo J '-a* a^rv^-r M b*-lr n,r mmira */••*]. aiWIakin. Itprm.V i •! •IT la In plMNr.t • laaUKUt rnrma. I ab.olm.i. iimliu d'* •* with aland ov %  '••i'' la fclnfift •• rouifc •> % %  iam*. 1* w.-rki alt. •! % %  %  I in* aland* and narvao, and t>ul• %  . tWh blood a>I *arv 1" .. %  i-ura tut iri aa*a> anJ f*>' ur and powr. API tlii* amuiu, np aland %  . aour roaUrar. cJU4 YI-TAJH •i'M".i Ii Laa baa* p" %  >uada and la now %  tatrlbul* I I -jiUlia l.'f* unrtar a pilrtni-. ..nr.oii.y back. VI-TAB lit auk* mi foal full o -. >i7*iiartcniitonaitr<"wT you mr*u ratara ttoa *mpi< afa and (at jnur nran I-TAIIS coat* littl>. atal tb '-Tabs-""" „,... £ KTt'v" j.i ii„ ,i %  I.4.I.. r..., t. i i' i r. h.i|. I.iw-L. I jl..4, PW4 I 1m in ..tin. ii haalna boa i. ,n, .Il i .iii.l n ... iin.i ... >uut pin-.-. Ih,.,. i i i ^ 43 PON vs \ i: I I'u w in n #M#.V COMB WITH H.lt.X SAtROOL KNOCKS OUT PAIN ON Sit! *r KNICHTS LTD. ALL BRANCHES IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only ~" -^ — %  %  -^r — -——-..m -. ___ i M'l I \l. Ol I I.US artmm .itailiiMr m our Knimlirs Tilliaiajia. S|i. ii;lilsl.,i. % %  ,n,i S'MUM Sl.-i'vl Usually H*W I'l.' Briihil Icinif BaflM S ,44 Pkiis. Uataaa Te> (} il>.i if Tins |:.TII,I,.I ag Tins iirhi7 Hacafaal iiii Ckataa :ti Tins Tim (iirdiiutl ( ..llr, . |.im iiniiii-s MajaaMha si .72 .mi is SAVSACrES liniM-riul Oxford Sttiisuges 16-IK. .69 Vli'iiuu SiiiiHUKrs IO-III, .!!(! 4-oi. .40 liiipcnu. I rMiik-furtvrs Sunsti^-s I2.II/. llls tt\f(ll| Sll||HII K |., Ili-ox Pork SaiiaiiiceK 18-oa Kwids Vienna StiuafM i-ot. ,. (iimhridge S M uu|{e It-oc Smoriiiuis Smioes 16-o*. Koyiil ( umbridue Sausunri U-tn Impt-riul t-'rank-furttTH SausaKes 12-i. DV. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street T II E O I O \ \ ii i; c H O i : E III B S Thf fafawa 11/.,.,,. Yaur Uullar fVof further '/AWVAW///AW,V.',',v/,V,',v, NEW PAN BOOKS NOW OPENED BY '^A'***V-XrtaVVi-VV, ;s x%WVOCx%TE STATIONERY IHIOAII STHIXT AMI I;III.ISTM: 7 s; '***'''''"WW**W/-srss.'S.Vi*t W W W<4^V•/•A',^V...',',V.Vy/.V.V.V^/,'.V^/.V.V,V.VAV.V.^/.V.V.



PAGE 1

B IBS ID06 AWln vn WEDNESDAY, M \. U ItM Ccodb Calling fat ihr i %  \ '1411a on MonV. I.A. Film Board Chief M K)M VILl \NEUVA. -.he Film Boaid i Tiinldad and Manager of Republn Pictures, returned io Trininii Monday ever, mi: b) n w i A nfier paying a short lall ncre He v. the Hastings Hotel Off To Trinidad I HO kit Trinidad on Mon4 day evening by B.W.I A. M II I Oov• u! ILlll She bU HM t' % %  • | daughter Joai .. ill On Annual Vi.it L I \vi\<; lor Canada via TriniM nday by B.W.I.A was Mr. J C Kreindler Mannalng Dtractor "f Messrs. G. w llutchinson and Co., Ltd anr UM Modern Dress Shoppo Hi has gone up on hit annual business visit and is expected to be %  bout two weeks. On Business L EAVING lor Trinidad on Monday by 11 W.I. A on a business vl^t wa Mr Wilfred Alston of i^indvnpe". St. Tboma -s to b* away for about ter Intrantit J NTRANSIT from Haiti via Antigua by B.W.I A on Monday evening was Mr. A. Norrtfl Hughe*. President of the •>.e Caribbean Tourist Association which meeting he had just attended After %  brief stop at Saawell. Mr. Hughes left for Trinidad on •<> Grenada. He said that the headquarter! of the Touris* Don have been moved : MM t" AMigua and it is contemplated to move them to %  %  Mr. Louis Law has been appointed r %  %  '.or of the itlon. Back From Antirua M R. ALG1E SYMMONl.S cM .if The members of th.Empire Sports Team which pla\ed a aeries of names in AnUgua, arrived hero on Monday by B.W.I.A. :fter what he described as a pleasant lav in the island The Manager. Mr. J K. T (Iranekei und other members of the Team have gone on to St Kitts wheie they will spend a 'hort time before returning home Beit Place • M R. GUST A V PABST. Jnr.. >.t Washington, DC, arrived on Monday by B.W.I.A Yta Antigua '.ir i month"* holiday vrhlch ha t the Ocean vr* n..n' Mi Pabst who is paying hu ajcond visit to the Island said that it is the best place he knows He came here four years ago to %  pew) "nr> 5h i .rni for in An .'ill mmt % %  al Pararll Church %  ... who ii on on. month-, '. •w lm. f, .. and Pan ArUw * l*M*SJ itarbad,* Mn .—w, Ul'S Europ. .„„ lhc T, Worn] Paiioi, A dem* M" M l! %  Advertising Manager of the British Amerkan Tot %  a • ,:i B iny in l.onilon, Engt.n l>\ 11. W I A lot Trinidad and Jamaica on his i home. He was here HU ,i bu<-i | u/aa. staving at the Ocean View Hotel. Spant A Month L EAVING for Trinidad on Honda] by B.W.I A intr.msi* for British Guian-, were Mr and eon wWafH and ttoaft little sun Gerald Tru-y had spent I at their -. aside raridanct H.i..,:r.i l:i i Wi>ithing Their ether son Peter who had come ovei with thiin. hu returned to school at the Lodge. Mr. W.Uems It a Director of Willems Timber .nul Trading Co Ltd With Barclayi Bank A fTER spending three weeks' holidai m Barbados, Mr. U J Brown left on Monday evening i H W I A for Trinl. , Oman*, where he i employed with Whil. hire he was staving at hiK.ru... B ek)a> Beach Buiineaa ^nd Pleasure M R A H DcLIMA. Diietloi of Ah'honsi n U,. Lin,.. %  I. .. dos, return -, Monday watujM .!'' VIH! hare on busine*^ cn upled ftth pleasure. Ha was accompanied by Mrs IXLlaaa. Tluv mam quests ot Mrs. A .'. %  After Thrde Month* A FTER kpeitdnig iheie months' holiday here, Mis* Agatha Sri> and Miss Cynthia Sealv returaad to Trinidad on Monday by 11.W.I A. They were staying with Dr and Mrs W. L Wooding of "WlniviUe", Black Rock. They had come over to be present at the birth of Mrs. Wo,Hii,, K s '• % %  by. Spent The Week-End M R O. H JOHNSON of Johnson\ Huttunerv who rai in Trinidad for the week end. returned home on Monday mornIni i % %  n w i A %  lur.iig |„ , h L?V" G r,.", "" •' %  UAA. vuibM TV i,ud l" s J ,.* i 'o UM island and is stayi-J La M On Long Leave R AND MRS er Janet arnvvu bare it\ Monday for the United k.ngd. Mr Thomas who is wt'h Barclays Bank in Antigua b long Itavg Grenada Weddina *IS HABKL MeNeilly. ; n d clerk to the GmuMta Building dn ,i Loan P1M ^ Kenneth D 1-, Eiurtiah pianution engineer resident in British Guiana. While the ceremony was a, Quiet and luwt \ i.umber of f n | wtahera of Lhe bride witneasetl bf the Itevd Adam Thompson. alssnuit .reaUon of Upper satin, was give. %  Mr George MrNeiiiv. Prank B,.eg. "' Uu ** %  %  Guiana, acted as beitman. Thenweie no bridesmaids but the briap's sister > aifceruiaiHc u th. vowa were ;ed. htaoaymountng at Quarantine .v.itmn. Mr. Pennycook leaves this *eea-end for B.C., 'o be loined later by his wife %  ^ %  u'lla McN'elllv left the Itland en-mute to w* ( ie ; goes to meet the family of her nance, a Welsh Fusilier stationed here d u r i n : ., i i While The Sun Shines BIOBM whai this *aai will btingT It may be blisterA tot monthj on end. Ihe weather. ooitM aaaQ) ffHvwt §M delight — us by appearing after IHTiod Then off come' OUT suits, and into Hie lightest, scantiest frocks we scamper, to it m the sun. And, in less time than ll lakes for me lo write. dn is bumed, and the misery begin*. It may not be noticeable at once, the Joy of relaxation in the sun's rays makes us "sun happy". But next day. even the same evening— the akin can irritate, hum. and look, so ugly red! Be Prepared When the weather encourages don your clothes, rub a Dtaa idiion or cream Into all the parts that are to be exPOM-.1. There are so many op the maraskt to-day that *OU them from any chemist or beauty counter, and choose liquid or cream as you prefer. if ymi like, use panke-up for jour faie. Tbal staves off sunburn, but it doe* not encourage tanning, Ball you lubricutc the fata wilh cream first of all, a thing to do to I -kin , %  i io -kin which contamg the blood (at oells and other pigment.* which are the decisive factors on which we determine our ability to tan. If the pigments are evenly distributed you will tan evenly. The girls who poaanpl skins of medium colour and thirknets. must take their sunbathing mm. rautiously. Those of you with more delicate skins have to guard auainst over-exposure and take sunning very. very careful 1> The thin, sensitive skin that burns so easily should be sun-bathed under a sun*hade, which does not make it so brown, but yet doesn't get red and uncomfortable, either. Daily Lubricultnn lie careful to follow Ihe general rule, five minute: each R&g U> l-egin with, with OUMntebed arms so that the sun nets lo the undersides, increasing the dose with each time. You can, of course, sunbathe three ox four limes j, day—and eventually Just lay in the sun nil day. But if you want to get really brown HM need for oiling und creaming pcisisu the whole time The more the oiling the browner the i>kin—and the oil does save the skin gelling dry ,m,i shrivelled. If you have been sunning '"u" T no liaighl in i Ii th< face wild soap and water, don't tk. a b .in boon* i fou naa tool I roan %  race I wnn until you Ravi |Ultg ioolrd %  •ll foi y.mr bath '1 dl "U n OOS 'ambler straps tnnii the woru K %  hoi you intend to suntan swan (Ive minutes n the mn n h irk ml they |ust stay there for a ).>nc time KgUUttmi their cot our with the rest cf ifi( body, and don l, alas, catch kip Left toon to need more oil than any other part of the body its a good rub ml |n ,. %  I, 1 KB II km thai i ooth, -iit.nv unosiranee. Lust Hints Your legs have to look good wtkOB they are so Inngthilv exied to all and aundi t^iz has to be ellmina'ed. Shaving isn't wise. It hardens %  ne hairs nnrt makes tln-in Bow coarse. You can use the rream rornovora thai ire an the under arms Maybe you'd prefer thrm. The, .no certainly %  to u.-r Wl n (he hairs ^how slims of reappearing lust repeat the treatment. A last warning-do wear dink %  Uaaaai „i the .im's gjare T lOJ i' make you feel more comfort!" %  , M 'bey WHI prevent] wiinkles around the ayag Take 'hem WT while you i,the. ra ma, but only for %  wlnlto i %  i.-vi-nt gatUna white "eiown %  Ive | ircles. And bow ittra,liTO the sun glasses uw) Thev can add %  gn ii summertime beauty. Listening Hums ..is Tlir N.* 4 ID p, n) The IOP B ,s .—P I !" "(• "P* On;hirn p m Think on Ttw^ Thiin. s *s v m Bporu ii,-. .lap und *" P.raitr T OS p m Thr Kr. "* '"*> BUMSIBM C-lllilB ili r WM Indlri %  %  P Bl Hv H-4UKI I l p „, B, dl Ne.-recl a W p m •li.tf.m.ni 0 At TOunl IU gin Interlude | sfl p %  > Press ii Jtnin.ti.1, M p ,„ Th. L>< H.vp,. ID DO p m The N*. to ID p m Ne*T.lh ill. p m Mid VNk •ntlk ID m p .. %  i JUST ii\ TIME FOR THE HOLMOAYS. WOMENS 11H.1H KM i aaaca HATS MAIDS WIDE HKIM LEGHORN MAWS STRAWS—While & Coloured HOYS SAII.IIK STRAWS MEN S TRH.RV STRAWS: Creom. (irev, Tun -Mm JIM ji.n ll S2.S2 *2.K8 T. R. EVANS .Sc WHITFIELDS DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606 \ THE TUBBY HUBBY g&* DIET ^ f -based on H> propocittofi that louod kusbands tlill dcs-iv. a >qua< RwaJ By Hrrn.irJ Hu-ksued nil •.! \ um\ \a>ir r tSa tnaaiUnaaar ..I IU mat it, T-i. SHKatta' An%  l'H %  *' %  %  "' Ta# I ItFtiMtl anal ifte lOSBSlaC Fat— *n Jim* Taa> STSraSd To Krlp OM"l, -ill ^ rtC> .l-lrC \V V Ttkty pu: me t aj a AlWraaaRU %  • The .*• thuia •* a :r-a ASM &ecu*, thai tg^^^H .*i* Ui* u*> whrii th. del me vie There I %  !!. II.-. ..'Ii. %  Mil 1 an i Dounaa sreek. \/\ \I,/I /(•* said un 'nan i rsKiuuii. ,iun*r\ i nave '• .tu* tor DorriAatf 1 iw %  -a-l at] I dkin": !\AW said iv aMi \U I M %  .. ... • %  >•< i jn .was w sniw JBalraga.n Md .1 uw at* WE HAVE IN STOCK: Packages Tenderie-if Tea '. Blue'Cros* Tea. Nectar Kardomah Tej. Uptons Tea, Heel Roae Tea. IVa. Instant Chase & Sanbome Coffee. Maxwell Also rlnlunaj Ctaoeotate, Ttl% H' Choioia-.o. %  :e..rge Payne Cocoa. Trys C-' • irriers With I'a Now JOII\ II. I \M OH A SO\S LTD Hoi buck .Street Dial 4335 1.1 OKI a OniMn r -vhacsaner rest ortntlpkr u bat i u fr lor a snfa Ui aiake lit-r rvi u .u: aui ONTMifht iiuMnn.i laaa aaaae <>t nw ~ia t sust wlikMut lia a asa ip UUua lopui turn .ui 53BP£S •" I a*u 1 d and Jen gl k. %  .. -•: %  ' .*. r>H ee (.411 It The Garden—U. JUIM Ml. \ 1 41 MiW.IHBO** f %  t %  HI *l' rrrrsatiai-M TO-DAY U| & 8.31) I'M Last Shuws VKNCKANCE V.AU.EY (Burt Lancaster) und FOLLOW THE SUN (Glenn Kurd) OPENING TOMORROW 5 & 8.30 P.M. r 12S& \ .CUT TH*S OUT •II M4N T T I all I III tUIM. %  OR III! I'l &f ./ IHltlRI 1114 VHSI lmx^ PLAZA THEATRE*





PAGE 1

F WEDNESDAY, MAY iK. IDS] BVRRADOS ADVlX ITI MCI IIII-II Four Hong KongPolice Get Medals Four George Mexial* ai* amoiiK wards to member* M f the Honit Kong MiM Fict.i ol Malaya Police Force announced in May 6th I %  %  H* mm ft bB* 1-OMSIM fin iM i T. og the medals are awarded to Detective Sub-Inspector Janice Hidden and Detective Constable Chu Fook The Colonial Police Medal Cor Gallantry Is awarded ty Police constable C'ltku Slk Wah Ail arw mwubeii of the Horif Kong Pol in* In September. 1900, a police party visited a hillside hut in the New Territories where an armed aan| was in hiding. As the police approached, the gang opened Are, killing one constable Under Or*. Hidden went to the help ol the dead constable, and later placed himself in front of the Divisional Superintendent when the latter wa* fired on from n concealed well IS yards away. Chu Fook. single-handed, i.n'Ued ,i cornered bandit who llred point-blank al him and then tried to hurl u hand grenade The detective attacked, wounded, and disarmed the bandit. i-nau sue Wah had a DUlletproof vest badly damaged by a bullet fired at clone range, but helped to cover the Division*! Superintendent throughout Untight. The citation concludes. "His imperturbable demeanour nd constant smile under fire were an example in the highest tradition of valour and devotion to duty." George Medals are also awarded in Police Recruit Tan Tien Siew. aged 19. a National Scm.eman. and to Special ConMa ble Wan Am ran bin Wan Manaf. 24 both of tin Federation ot Malaya Police Force. Wan Amran was a member of •i Police Jungle Squad of nine performing a routine patrol on an estate in Sungel Siput, Perak. on January 10 when thr patrol was ambushed by about 25 bandits. Four of the patrol were killed outright and two others seriously Mounded by the Initial burst of Hie. The three unwounded members of the patrol fought off the (ugagement. after three of them nad been killed, two by Wan Amran. On November 23. 1951, an enruigemeiu took place between p-Jice and bandits in the Rengum .---•a of Johore. Armed with a Ehvuun, Tan Tien Siew was left to hold off a bandit attack while till Platoon Commanocr withdrew to organise a counter attack. Tan Tin Slew, who had had only seven months' service, was wounded in the leg but fought off repeated assaults, inflicting heavy lO-UftiS MWS HA SH M i I tii'H \\i i• \i'i c Ma* Arrive*! TOIINSON s si MIONt RV wi: ARC st:i LINO on Ol R STOCK OF WINDOW OLAMS Bargain tor Builder* JOHNSON'S lUKDHARI. 3 *.> As nimtmin*!..-in hit-1 <>l Ihe iinli*ri Ifonwti'mirj j| nrre mafcsl lang-M'rnYr maJiih art .i/tvudN hctnn manufttCtU F\r>nw* Serv.ce Labour Welfare House Pass Temporary Fund Collects $2m. Bill For Puisne Judge WATCHES (.OLD. STfcEL ar CIIEOMIUM Model* for ladle* or genta HItCl tif'ARANTEEn 15 17 JeweU A wonderful new ran show at ouUlanding prin Today at your Jewellers . V. De LIMA A III., i in 10 BROAD ST tod Bl M WtlNE GAKDENH siloi'l'INt'l t FNTRK ^ WTOSC.A. The Genuine '4711" Kau de Cologne comes from Cologne on Rhine; it Is now again obtainable In the original quality, made according" %  • *he famous and secret foiniul.1 siricf 1792. Mr. F. L. WAJXOTT. on all sugar manufactured In this Island during the year one thousand nine hundred and fifty two a levy nt the rate of thirteen dollar* and twenty cents per ton; lb) on aU fancy molasses manufactured in this Island during the year one thousand nine hundred and fifty-two a levy at the rate of thirteen dollars and twenty cents per three hundred and thirty wine gallons. 3. AU moneys received by the Sugar Production and Export Control Board by way of the levy raised under Article 2 of this Order on all sugar and fancy molasses manufactured during the year one thousand nine hundred and fifty two shall be paid by the said Board to the Sugar Industry Capital Rehabilitation Reserve Board, the Sugar Industry Price Stabilization Reserve Board and the Governor-ln-Executive Committee in the following proportions:— (a) to the Sugar Industry Capital Rehabilitation Reserve Board at the rate of four dollars and eighty cents per ton In respect of sugar and at the rate of four dollars and eighty cents per three hundred and thirty wine gallons in respect of fancy molasses. (b) to the Sugar Industry Price Stabilization Reserve Board at the rate of six dollars per ton In respect of sugar, and at the rate of six dollars per three hundred and thirty wine gallons in respect of fancy molasses: (c) to the Governor-in-Executive Committee at the rate of two dollars and forty cents per ton in respect of sugar, and £ the rate of two dollars and rty cents per three hundreu and thirty wine gallons In respect of fancy molssses. In moving ne passing ot the Resolution Mr. Walcott gave figurea showing the position of the respective funds. These dUcloseu that the Rehabilitation Reserve Fund collected $3,300,000 between 1847 and 1M1, and of that tot. i $3,100,000 was spent. The Prk Stabilization Fund stands al $3,992,000. while the Labour Welfare Fund realised $2,210,645 of which amount $1,013,271 was collected in 1861. Of this $300,000 allocated froi the Labour Welfare Fund to Pla' lng Fields. $147323 had bet spent to the 31st March last. On the Housing Loan, the amount realised was $880,000. an I the amount advanced was $874 917. of which $98,180 has beer repaid. In Thf Hotisv Yostortiay at is* N" ii ifci aw II. | Ihe Ittmir ot A — •'iT lo Id" AtMrriH ilirftnui-i %  %  • Una "iii 11. ajntlliidt' ha l. (or (hnr < |ipo-!' %  'i i to T*" McOman BUI. t R|>nn nl llir n*p*H< mnl .if Bolenn ana AfrleultUK 1-50 II POM Ofllcr r-i.nl of mom M-teh. ISM The i. u vi srii 1.W 1.1 thr aitp.v,.,\ of U I %  npt>MHiicnl llif gHHnatai IHM is. Pun i cuiTri. %  M .i,ii..i %  > a... N.ippl*ni*niai) Latlnuttci. IWHfas. No . which i....Ihf DM KfaolulK.ii In ...nfcoiiitf UM (,. %  ..Ml. I in kw MM ol land well Plantation lo >null noidci. in sactlnn is f tho Exoc>ill>r (\viimllnAt, 11*1 IdBI 131 % %  alm-l.tlrxl liv |ha Iiiil"i \m.mBl Ad. IWI RMotullon lo aulhorlM ihr ••> |...dllillr %  !.. % %  > CIOIIMI D*Vrlop. ment and Wrll.te Srhwnr D an uni ..i thr •mwiil itl 4*IS -.id inch ->thrr mma > %  will Irom tuna to tlma bo nrrnr. tnr n.rrlMis UM iot of rjpiUl ImprovamanU nd alteration. •I the Cunlral l.n.-t.-SI the Pin* PUnlaUOfi and Ulitilc-| ABTlcultutal SlBllom Th!!.I-.-.-.I %  Hill i.. make provUlona lor thr pinlr-' tlon ol Tlilrd paitir* afulnat tlaka %  rlilna out <.f UV tchlclaone lo piirpoaeI Ihei A bill I a Puiane Judge A RMolulUm t approve UM older entitled The H,i*ar li.d... try 'RchabitltaUon. Price Stabll /. lion -nd |-Ubour Well-ir Hide*. IBM inadr hv % %  %  %  1>r the piOTtteVni "I '(inm 3 111 | .."d 4 W ol the Sutar I,, %  ,' in II %  •tlon .nd Laboiu Wcllaiei Act 1MT 'in; II' Trip llmi-e mieptMl tha .•niend, I..I | | bafM illvt t;o.iinil s. the IliU ti.i.Li %  ... Ail. IMS T^THE House ol Aaawmbly ytsterday passed a Bill i rnakv further provision in respect of the appointment <>f . Puisne Judge. In the objects and reasons of Ihe Hill, u is pointed "it that the Chief Judge and Crown Law Officer; (Additional Judge) Ai i. 1951, was lo provide foi the teroporary appoint' if a puisne Judge to assist the Chief Judge In dealing with the Inrge outstundim; v.iiumt' ol wik in the Superioi C uits This need si ill exists and the present hill therefore leeta to extend the operation of " Art lnmi June :.(>. K*' 1 when u will expire to March •'! 1951 In addition, the opportunity h* Uiousbl tht Bill 11. I.N iMt'ii taken to provide that the wa% Umg ovSrdUP Bllo puisne Judge shall have the s-nic dppartini'ni Bl %  < whose 1 should t in ml ill cations as the Chlrf Judge, reorganised. K* .is Sji Mr. <;. II. Adams iL) who look SOBM Sttasnol •' %  bSflDg mad .1 .. %  .,:..i loa and % % %  • % %  • .1 IssjiDnrars ana In which the iho ussurance whtcV tht I Chief Judge had asked that the the House had given a feu Bppoinlmenl should continue benvmi.nK .igo that Ihe n cause he still iieinled iSisUiu-e. under .-onslderation. Tiu-y had to make ihc appointment temporary because there was a Select Committee which Was cvnsideiiuK the change under the JudKial Act, but owing to hi, prehei.sive to make the abaenoB from the island as well as am^i.n,rta thi;, I ( the absence ol the junior membci He hoped thnl the Judicial A<* of which manUon era madetr) ti Leader would he siiiiieienily tor St. James among other things. Bitttee eras unable '<> meet as regularly a? they would have liked. They were however going ahead with the matter now untl' the time came whan they had %  appoint this temporary' )o|ie. He said that Uiere ease provision made in the Act that the parSQD appointed should have the necessary qualiik-atlonto make Inui %  .uitable lor the post of Chief Judge from the point of view ol The person appointed should bo us qualified as tht* Chici Judge. He therefore moved thai the Dill be read a second time. Mr. M. E. Co* (L) seconded. Mr. II. G. Mapp iL) said that hi would like to ask the leader of the Huti.se if the Government was Mitislled that the aims and otBja) I of the measure were really being raatn nchicA'ed. As Car us he could understand, when the Puisne Judge was iittlng. the Chief Judge was away and they were really not deeding with the large outstanding volume of work which was set out in the Object and Reasons of the Bill. %  itThe Ume h 1 come when the jurisdiction of l> t'etiv IJcbt Court and the AMIS' ant Court of Appeal thould in* e\ tended. |*oi the benefit of the last hnn mi..Me member who had just ; %  4p.*t, he; would soy that his Inf.i n iUon was not In order. Th time had definitely come whe ij ere .'.. mi-il for Ihe .ippoin' ment of a I'ultne Judge. Mr. .Il I, S. Lewm (Ll sold that uhiii the Hill llrsl came to thHouse, he enquired alxtut build.ng a new couit ^ ti il botl ludges could sil siinultaneously Uccause he felt that it would %  aeilHata matters AMENDMENTS ACCEPTED The House of Assembly yesterday accepted the amendments ol the Legislative Council to the Bill pertaining to the Consular ConvantiOOl Act, 1S52. He hoped his information was wrong and if so, he would appreciate if the Government mem1-1 nf the House would tell him 0 Paepla whose business brought by day to the law courthad told him that and he hope., it wag wrong, because th" Chut Judge of the island was getting on 111 years and If there wan a lot of work to lie done and he needoi help he hoped he wan getting M But sueely If the work was not bsjtnfl done, Uioy would emittim to get a bill of that sort comim: % %  ii gnat year and he did no: IblDS tle> would get anywhere „ %  %  11 %  ,t< I "UL; Overdue Mr. V. i:. Talma cen 111 the permanent llil Tin Bill was final! I ic.Hing and pajwted inittee through all Its stage .' U.S, Dollar Down MONTREAL. May 27. Th.* United States dollar was 1 11I a discount of 19/10 per' cent in terms Canadian funds. On Monday was down 1/32 from Friday', elosc lhat is, it took S0.K8 7/HI Canadian to buy SI American. The Pound sterling waa $2.74 11/IS down 9/Hi from Friday r,rt$fottt The Firestone Super-Balloon Tire, which runs on only 2< pounds of air. Increases comfort and service of your car by absorbing rood shocks and bump* In addition, you receive Kicite 1 skid Protection with the Skid Resi-tors in the SafetyCrip Tread. Blowout Protection. erian new unproved OussHDfeaptflaj, jnd Long Ijfe with Firestone's exclusive tread compounding. JAc Jyto wilh fiuilLitt all over the world with great suceen This it amply confirmed by many ihankf %  >' letters sent to ua by people who longed lor reiiel from rhenmaut pauu and tound it after trying De Wrtfs Pilli Why ant try Ihem for yoor trouble r Go to yonchetDisl and obtain a supply nc>" away. 1 *wn*Uy rlra ring De Witt's Pills snj

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<4

t

ESTABLISHED 1895



hav



WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 1952







PRICE: FIVE CENTS



‘

Germany Admitted To European Army

Six Nations

Enabling Treaty

; 5 PARIS, May 27,
el history-making treaty to mass soldiers of rearmed
Germany into a 43-division force with troops of five other
European nations was signed to-day in this capital of
Germany’s ancient enemy. :
The ceremony was followed immediately by a sweep-
ing declaration of American and British support which
bound the United States closer to Europe than ever before.
The declaration promised in general terms that Anglo-
American troops will remain in Europe as long as it is
necessary for peace and that joint action will be taken
against any breakup of the new European army, such as
the withdrawal of militarily resurgent Germany.
maine lpia a Chancellor Konrad Adenauer of
West Germany who is his own
Foreign Minister was the first to
put his signature to the document
{ which mey usher in a new era in
|Europe and he was followed by
| the Foreign Ministers of Belgium, |

France, Italy. Luxembourg and
the Netherlands.





In France

PARIS, May 27. . ;
General Matthew Ridgway Nod _ The signing ceremony took place
United States General to land in| i" tilt and tapestred ‘Salon D'hor-
World War II invasion, returned| 108°” of Quai D'orsay against the
to France to: take! over the Sus eens, of increasing Soviet
preme Allied Command of Europe oe ae on P.O A]
trom retiring Genatal Eisenhower. Gatwbakic Glizh [ty ae scans ee
he former Uni' ations se c as ESE. Sane)
mander in pa eee es European Defence Community |
sprawling Orly airport here to (EDC) Treaty as it is officially
assume command of the defences known was only one of ten ‘docu- |
of the Western Alliance which ments signed to-day to strengthen
oe, to preven a new Korea pies” alliance against Soviet
eruption in all the world. = e
His arrival oiididen » the The American pledge of support
launching of a new se oak | Ben contained in a declaration by

which may lead to a new block- Secretary of State Dean Acheson,
ade of West Berlin by the Rus-| Ptitish Foreign Secretary Anthony
sians, and as the Communist part- Eden, and French Foreign Minis=
ies loosed a torrent of threats’ te? Robert Schuman. Eden post-}
against the West. An indication of | POned his scheduled departure for
the tension was a line of 200 hel-| Hanover, Germany, to-night jin
meted French gendarmes lining 0'der to hold Big Three talks with
the runways through which Ridg- Acheson and Schuman to-morrow
way’s Constellation taxied to the|° the mounting Soviet threat.
main terminal after setting down
at 11.07 a.m. G.M.T.—U.P,

Newbold Takes
Oath As Panama

Governor
NEW YORK, May 27.

a General John. H. :
Seid, MRR Gem; | SUGAR CANE EXPERTS

Panama Canal zone. The oath WILL MEET HERE

will be administered by Karl R./

Bendetsen, Under Secretary of tha (From Our Own Correspondent)

Army at Pentagon Building. PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 27
The Eighth Congress of the In-



The three ministers lunched to-
day with five other EDC Foreign
| Ministers and informally discussed
what action the Soviets may take.
Acheson according to informed
quarters reassured the wavering
French that the door is still open
to more talks with the Soviets des-
pite the signing of the peace pact
with Germany and the European
Army Treaty.—U.P.







The appointment of eneral
Newbold was confirmed by the | ternational Society of Sugar Cane
Senate last week. He succeeds} Technologists is to be held in
Brigadier General Francis K.| Barbados in April. Delegates from
all over the world attending the
parley will visit sugar cane
plantations in Jamaica, Barbados,
British Guiana and Trinidad.

Russians

Newcomer.—U,P.



The Russians barred Uni

Berlin blockade.

furt in West Germany
incident.

- Telephone |
Lines Cut
In Berlin

BERLIN, May 27
Communists cut telephone com-
munications between East and
West Berlin and 17 long distance
lines between West Berlin and
West Germany on Tuesday. Eight
telegraph lines also were cut



However Soviet border
along the 110-mile Autobahr

BRIG. GEN, JOHN NEWBOLD

BOAC Graft Sighted



cations between West Berlin and



Berlin Blockade

police patrols from the main super-highway linking Wegt
Germany and Berlin in what may be the prelude to a new
other Allied and German traffic travelling in both directions

regular United States military morning train from Frank-
also arrived



By Rescue Plane

LONDON, May 27.

A British Overseas Airways
four-motor Hermes Aircraft which !
crashed in French West Africa |
yesterday, was sighted by a rescue
plane according to a BOAC spokes-
man.

He said a B.O.A.C. Argonau
which flew over the reported scene,
of the aircraft’s
230 miles south of Port Etienne

| for

( canton thus far teletype communi-

West Germany were not affected.

It appeared to be the first blow
in promised Communist reprisals
West Germany's signing of
the Peace Pact with the Western
Allies yesterday. West Berlin,
110 miles inside the Soviet Zone,
feared a renewal of the near para-

| lyzing Red blockade of 1948-49.

Earlier to-day Russian border

forced-landing | guards again barred Allied military

motor patrols from the city’s

had spotted the plane partially] only highway link with the West

buried in some soft sand.
the port wing was damaged.

He said/110 mile

road to Helmstedt
Patrols which aid stranded motor-

The crew of the Argonaut re-| ists had been periodically banned

ported ‘considerable — activity”
around the plane which carried
eight crewmen and ten passengers
when it left London on Sunday
en route to Lagos, Nigeria. But
the extent of casualties if any are
not yet known.—wU.P.







between May 8 and May i7, but
since then had not been troubled.
To-day as before, Russians gave
‘no explanation for their action.
A civilian freight and passenger
traffic on the highway still flowed
normally.—«?

Russian Air Foree Is

NEW YORK, May 27,




| this country a powerful long range

Secretary of the Air Force| atomic attack, Finletter said
Thomas Finletter said Tuesday‘) writing in the current issue of
that soon Russia will be able to! Aviation Age Magazine: “This
swiftly deal a “devastating and} long range atomic capability of
possibly fatal blow’ to this| our potential adversary continues |
nation’s military and industrial} to grow.”

resources,





The Soviet Union possess
capability of directing

es the







He said t
Truman’s plan

wings ready by



ave 126 cor
mid 1955 ¢t





against! United States Air Force will face

|



Party Clashes
Expected In
Primaries

WASHINGTON, May 27.

Presidential candidates of both
Republican and Democratic par-
ties will ‘clash to-day in four
states in critical contests involv-
ing national convention delegates.
On the Democratic side 102 dele-
gate votes were at stake in the
Texcs and Kentucky State con-
ventions and the Florida primary.

Republicans elected 60 delegates
in the Texas and Connecticut con-
ventions, Major contests involved
supporters of Senator Robert A.
Taft and Generali Eisenhower in
the Texas Republican convention
and Senators Richard B. Russel}
and Estes Kefauver in the Florida
Democratic primary,





Kentucky democrats were ex-
pected to give Vice-President
Alben W. Barkley 26 delegate

votes for the Democratic presi-
dential nomination. The Eisen~
hower campaign organization fig-
ured on winning almost all 22
Connecticut Republican delegates.
A heated battle was under way
among Texas Republicans who
will have 38 votes at the National
Convention.

Taft won the bitterly contested
first round of victory last night in
a fight for the control of Texas
delegation. However Eisenhower

{supporters said they may take the

fight all the way to Chicago.
Taft's backers were firmly in con-
trol of the State Republican organ-
ization as Eisenhower hopefuls
were beaten in bid after bid to
win seats in the Texas Convention
which will meet to-day to choose
the State’s 38-man delegation to
the National Convention,

There was also battle in the
Democratic ranks in Texas as pro-
Truman delegations from 27 coun-
ties were frozen out of the party’s
State Convention. This assured
a pro-Truman bolt trom the con-
vention to-day and two Texas
delegations at the National Con
vention. The State Credentials
Committee, ruled that pro-Tru-
man delegates should be seated.

Florida primary provided a re-
match between Russell and Ke-
fauver the South’s two candidates
for the Democratic presidential
nomination. Russell who defeated
Kefauver in an earlier popularity
contest primary in Florida on May
7, said he expected to win 20 of
the 24 Florida delegates elected
in to-day’s ballotting—U.P,

Renew

BERLIN, May 27,
ted States.and British military

guards did not interfere with

n across the Soviet Zone. The

in Berlin without
This action nevertheless was
viewed as the first of what may
become a _ series of retaliatory
Soviet and East German measures
for the separate peace treaty sign-
ed by the Western Big Three and
Western Germany yesterday,
Allied authorities adopted a
“wait and see” attitude toward the
speculation that the Soviet may
intend to renew the 1948-49 total
land blockade of Western Berlin.
Russians once before this month
halted Allied military police
patrols on the super highway but
finally lifted the ban on May 17,
ten days later. The new ban also
came only a few hours after the
Communist East German govern-
ment announced it had ordered



tween East and West Germany
and other “strong measures... .
to prevent further infiltration of
subversive elements, spies and
terrorists.”

United States military police
patrols ran into trouble when they
set out at 8.00 a.m. (3 a.m. E.S.T.)
ym the first of their regular round-
trip patrols alomg the highway.
They travel in sedans equipped
with two-way radios with orders
to curb speede$; and aid any
motorists found in distress.

United States authorities said
Russian border guards at Helm-
stedt and Berlin check points
offered no.explanation for refusing
passage. On the previous occasion
this month, the Soviets had
charged that the Allies were il-
legally sending armed patrols
along the highway.—wU.P.







-——--——_ —

A Threat

“heavy odds” against the Russians.

He said by 1954 the Red Air
Force will probably outnumber
the r forces of the . North
Atla Treaty Organization by
“about three to two” in the tactical




atomic bombs will
ably be “over half again as

as our strategic air command
"—U.P,

prot




Sign


















reinforcement of the border be-§

FIRST P
f OF





WHIPPORAYS score their first goal against Police in the water polo match played at the Aquatic

Club yesterday.

Whipporays won the game 7-3. (See page 7).

” Howse Pass
Third Parties

o

Mexico Finds

*

Insurance Bil) For Cattle Disease

THE House of Assembly yes+
terday with but little debate pass-
ed a Bill to make provisions for
the protection of Third Parties
against risks arising out of the use
of motor vehicles,

Notice of this Bill was given on
December 18 and it was read a&
first time on January 8 On
January 15 the Bill was read a
second time and referred to a
Select Committee. The Select
Committee reported back to the
House yesterday but made no sub»
stantial changes,

The objects and reasons read:—

The Bill seeks to apply to this
Island the principle of compulsory
insurance against third-party risks
arising out of the use of motor
vehicles on , publie roads and
based on similar legislation exist-
ing in United Kingdom,
Guiana and Trinidad, 4

2. Clauses 3 and 4 make it un-
lawful for anyone to use a motor
vehicle on a public road without
being insured against liability for
causing death or bodily injury to
any person by the use of such
vehicle. Provision is also made
in Clause 4 to enable hospitals to
recover from the insurer expenses
reasonably incurred in treating
injured persons. A similar pro-
vision is contained in Clause 19
to cover the fees of medical
practitioners who render emerg-
ency treatment to persons injured
in road accidents.

3. Under the provisions of
Clause 8 every driver of a motor
vehicle is required to produce a
certificate of insurance to a con-
stable on request, but if he fails
to do so, he is allowed a further
period of five days from the date
of the request in which to produce
it to a police station,

4. Clause 9 enables a third
party to recover from an insurer
the amount of any judgment he
may obtain, notwithstanding that
the policy may be voidable or can-
celled, and Clause 10 provides
that in the event of an insured
person becoming insolvent, his
rights against the insurer shall be
transferred to and vest in the third
party. The remaining clauses of
the Bill contain various detailed
provisions for implementing the
principles of the Bill; for ex-

man arm





Attack On’

. The Communists threatened to unleash their 1,000,000-| former King Baw

(By PAUL HAWKINS)
MEXICO CITY, May 27,
Mexican livestock industry expected to return to in















| Argentin:

N ]
he first quarter of 1952 totalled
1203 a cit

U.S-Argentine
- Wool Trade
Rose InMarech

(By HARRY W. FRANTZ)
WASHINGTON, May 27,
from Argentina sharply im-
ol imports for the first-quar-
of this ye vere only about one third in volume and
alue o e same quarter in 1951. Another bright
just released by the Commerce De-
se in the seasonal imports of green

}
trade
rad

1 in March but total v

in Mareh doubled over
the Argentine have al-

no extract

rts from



i) imports «
or Argentina



in the

valued 4





ved at wes Speaker To
vases cees| Represent

“ B’dosAtC.P.A,



kere His Honour the Speaker of the
House of Assembly Mr. K,. N. R.
Husbands hag unanimously
selected by the Barbados Branch
of the Commonwealth Parliamen-
tary Association to represent Bar-
bados at the .Conference and a
General Meeting of the Association
t be held in Ottawa in early
Af

j
f

ict ent
varehouses) f
11,621





valued been

016,694 in Februar

Import of un



m
wool fror Argen
6,368,719
und 2ro: veight valued at

t



1anufact
were

i
|
|
|

ina in Viareh

$3,546,594 compared to February’s

272.244 pounds valued at $1,954 September. The date has not yet

877. Imports of Argentine wool in| been fixed

An invitation was received from

Branch of the







he Canadian
2 Parliamentary

7,85 t 85,461,391 mmonwealth
rune ilued ; $30,357,088 inf A nation to send a- delegate to
he 1 quarter last ur the Conference Transport ex-
The wool boom th followed enses of the delegate will be
tt t of the Koi nflict
re hed a peak durir I fir
yu r of 1951 after hich im-|the px
ports into the Unite ( \ return,







lefrayed by the Canadian Branch
rom the port of embarkation to
t of entry into Canada and
ind whilst in Canada the
delegate will be the guest of the



lined

































; “ . Import of green en from | Canad Sranc
ternational meat trade in September, will climax its fitst{ aysoentina in March Bere 3,403,589 The. me Same will last for
test tube victory over hoof and mouth disease, When the, pounds valued at $241,476 and the} ubout one week and after. that
United States opens its borders again to Mexican cattle! first quarter total was 8,607,291 | delegates will make a tour of the
shipments, it will mark for the first time in scientific history oe Pieri “b ' ‘; Neha t In the | principal centres of Canada which
ime quarter o O51 ir or were " rr — ree .
that vaccines have dealt a death blow to Aftosa. 760.208 | 5-0 nish ports weretmay last between three and four
a ~~ Hoof and mouth infection hav« $109,964 i aio ~~. I’ eeks,
been stamped out before by abso ar hegre ; : : ‘1
lute slaughter and quarantine}, ie ' oe nv " fin ‘ ; Mt i |
Feeds Attach: | |rcte shen ase were wiles ere 400.071 pounds valued ‘Oil Strik Up
the. vacciiation pro r mmc. $1,646,323 against 7,087,342 pounds I r e Ss
P ene the Mexican veterinarians believe) * ee - et in serves Aj ; Cl if
~ » se " ver CO lave heen meow: SS rier tota were ( 9
U.N. Positions |i 0c ices guarier Wels were (1083)) Ae (onarees
conquered here without vaccine ~ ; - a
While there is no definite assur< O14 against (1951) 34.4 ;
SEOUL, May 27 ance that Aftosa may not recur pounds valued (From Our Ows: Correspondent)
mmunist, tirgymen rs hit they claim any possible outbreaks = it LONDON, May 27.
ations | nes in six attacks oon eer ee ene could hs ne creignt rales from Britain
western _ ‘Ol whi their tsa alec quickiy ana economically | fy vn to the est Indies and the
frasy delves’ kf Ssnminton Mexico has not had a hoof and BWA, Cancel Hahanas’ were ‘inereased today
threatened a new major offensive, | Muth outbreak since August 16, ’ ° dus owing to the continuation of the
Reds sent 300 men against a single 1951, when several herds of cattle Special I lights American oil strike. The in-
hill 50 miles north of Seoul at kis Fracuz Pan were stricken jcrease was made necessary be~
the head of the traditional route 1e proposed lifting of the t ed | Tis tha oft cau B.O.A.C, are now only
through the Uijongbu Corridor, States embargo would allow one 1f W hitsuntide jable to offer a once weekly
year’s absence of the virus and the : jthrough shipment between Brit-
Eighth Army troops were on the | indication of vaceine battle} "PORT OR GDA re ent lain and the Caribbean. Remain
alert all across the 155 mile bat-| has proved suceessful, A long fight, Tho adh ; oe I joan ‘ jing freight has to be tran-
tle-front. Communist artillery |here against Aftosa bayan ortly | vie, fleas, hoe ye or W A. ser~| shipped in New York to another
opened the hill assault with more | after the first « were reported) wich if Tees BEsbhos i}eompany and an additional
than 2,000 rounds of ammunition. | in December 1946 | OUR would bet eight charge has to be paid.
Then infantrymen struck ana Since then the United States and! bic ie a ae a1 | cos : ;
battled Allied troops for four|Mexico have spent more than) (co) reat or = severa .C, have increased their
hours and twenty minutes before | 16,000,000 on partial extermina ‘ hn Divleton: acti Manager x ey ~ cover this addi-
they were hurled back, tion and vaccination programmes.| of B.W.TA stated to hat the "| Stink | i
3 100 Losses More than 1,000.00 cattle wer a aa be - edt ee ya Che position i be aan
SSCs Peds : f : me na | compan could not ut on 1ej;again tomorrow when SOLA,
The attack cost the Reds at least ae I sc = COUr RE A oy ; usual special Whitsuntide Holi- | trafic officials will “decide
‘ ce 1 1 Di co OSC. ) o ht }
100 casualties, United States and Mexican vet=| Ain whelher ite Gharge shouldbe
A Said ' ve Mex ice | 1@ cuts came into effect ly}maintained unt . conditions
Five similar probes were thrown | erinarians centred on vaccines! josi month as a. result. f ‘th e 1 scone ena ine Ne wees
ac i my after the c a os 4 i [ i ecome normal or whether
back with heavy Red los : after the cry of angry peasants) tijel crisis followir the U.S, oil! B.O.A.C. should pay the increase
United States Marines of the First and slaughter of their herds.) jndustry strike, ; themselve RO Noe a eae
Division were guard of part of —U-P, | ean”
the western sector but censorship | | rr
would not permit an anhounce- | re }
ment as to whether they were in-| V indsor Home |
volved in to-day’s fighting. | |

Patrols were ranging into no-
man’s land last night and early
to-day ran into groups of Com-
munists as large as sixty men.|
West of Chorwon a United Nations |
patrol ambushed Red scouts and

Amid Revived Topic
On Abdication

LONDON, May 27.
The Duke of Windsor returned}



Killed five in a twenty minute |i» England to-day to find his 1936
fight. bdieation a revived subject of
5 : : itt controv y twe the
Fifth Airforce fighter bombers | 7 fat i t Yr a és . Tir a iY a
struck again at Communist front jon ope 1k, publisher of th

line bunkers and rear area trans-



-? Daily Expre
Oo port and supply. UP Windsor disembarked from th
n page 6. ae ner Queen Elizabeth at South
\\ mpton and drove traight to tr
r : } horne of his mother Queen M
-g. . ~ . Vno 85 ri old terday
Nam Il Threatens Massed (3) 00000 80°

im I

l H

U.N. Forces

PANMUNJOM, May 27,

broadcast said the late
Dawson,

Geottrey
Times,
inst th

ard VIIL who had

of
fe Franc
Beaverbrook in a recent
|
editor” of



vung public opinion ag

in North Korea against the Eighth Army of the] believed he could gain aceeptanc:
United Nations in retaliation for the so-called “massacre” } 0! @ motganatic marrioce to My
of Red prisoners on Koje Island. North Korean General|\){!" Simpson and keep the
Nam Il, senior Red delegate, delivered the gravest threat} Wickham Steed. another former
of renewed full-scale bloody warfare in Korea since the}editor of The Times who suceeed-

truce negotiations began last July. ed Dawson,

Boy Did Lessons
With Bullet Im Leg

LONDON, May 27.
A 13 year old boy who did not
want to get his friend in trouble
sat stoically through morning
session at school yesterday and
then staggered home to tell his
mother he had been shot,

The bullet had been fired ac-
cidentally from an old German
pistol brought to school by one
of Edward Wilson’s classmates.

The desk cover hurriedly
slammed down over the pistol,
caused it to fire. The startled
teacher confiscated the gun but
could not find the bullet or any-
one injured. At the noon recess
however, Mrs. Nellie Wilson
found that her son had walked
half mile home with his trouse:
leg smeared with blood.



He said he did not want to

le ; Laroe long range panvees aay anything in school because|They said they would 1
y sapabie o

there might be trouble. Edward
|} was taken to the hospital to have
jthe bullet removed.

—C.P.



in # blunt letter
He told the United Nations that} Printed in The Times, to-day that
masses of North Koreans and! Beaverbrook’s resurrection of the
Chinese Red soldiers massed in}4bdication question at this time of
front of the 155-mile ed de-|â„¢ourning for George VI, was a
fence line could not “sit by” while\ Public misdeed and heinous
communist prisoners of war were} He said Dawson had followed






being “slaughtered” on Kojc { blic opinion not di it. Th
The warning brought varied r¢ | Duk ‘ ecretary 1 W ‘
actions from United Nations offi 1 not comment.—UwU.P,

cials, Chief United Nations spoke
man Brig. General William P
Nuckols described it as a military
threat. Major General William
K. Harrison, new senior delegate
said it was “propaganda”.

Trinidad Lead
In Lawn Tennis





Nam's threat came as the Allied j a ho Sa
troops on the western front wer« MPORT-OF 'M 7 2
alerted for a possible Red attack Trinid lead hadi ‘
down in the classic “Uijon;: 3 ; 5 :
corridor” of invasion leading to} 4
Seoul. The threat also came fol-), oe
lowing the disclosure yesterda The +
that 237 Red prisoners have died : ;
recently in camps—122 killed b eee Doubles % ‘a ;

United Nations guns and 115 exe-|, bmg

cuted by their fellow captive ee Nothnage 1 Ar
Nam's choice of words recalled) °~® f 7: Dawe

| the veiled warning made bs :

Chinese Communists before they vi t b ‘ I

entered the war in November 1950 WwW

Ladies Singles-



j idly by” while the United Nations! Mixed Doubles



army overrun North 1 I 7 i
| threatened the Manchurian front-,17 ail ) M
ler —U.P, Mi D. Vv 3.

pi

“They're everything
I look for”

“But seldom find, except in

da Maurier, L suppose you

mean. But what exactly do
4 you took for in a cigarette?”?
i»













“Flavour—which can
, \ only come from tobacco
that is rather special.
Then, of course, perfect
smoothness—which means
a comfortable throat,”

|
I
|

J
42"

* Coolness too? Well, that’s
seen to by the du Maurier filter
tip. And no bits of loose tobacco

’

in the mouth—filter tip again.’

| Jie
yA

“Yes—all that. D’you know, this
du Maurier filter tip is just about
the finest

idea for improving a

| ' ”
| smoke that I've ever come across.
{

|

Smoke fo your throat's content

du MAURIER \

THE EXCLUSIVE FILTER TIP CIGARETTE

SOLE DISTRIBL v N HAYNES CQO., LTD., BRIDGETOWN

$1.04 for 5
MADE IN ENGLAND



om 186



es


WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 1952

BARBADOS ADVOCATE













"a

THE BY ae










THE SALVATION ARMY

Por the maimtenance of its local
werk, The Salvation Army will
@brerve its Annual Tag-Day in
St. Michsel and the joining Par-
ishes.on Friday @th June. Tags
will be

WE HAVE IN STOCK:

+ a ‘Cross Tea, Nectar
Packages Tenderleaf Tea %4, Blue‘Cross Tea, : a
Tea %%4, Kardomah Tea, Liptons Tea, Red Rose Tea,
Typhoo Tea, Instant Chase & Sanborne Coffee, Maxwell



?
:



; "
werded “To Help Others’







Home From Korea



M® A. dek.,. FRAMPTON, Agri-
I cultural Adviser 4&0 the



HUBBY






T. WILLIAM L. JONES of ti - House Coffee

o nptroller for D ave a t - U.S. Ar ia i 7 a : = Also
v ‘ ny Ove “ ~ \ o
ue yard Islands on a special visi nix \ i ; The Members of Van Houten Drinking Chocolate, Fry’s Hot Chocolate,
returned f Antigua on Mon- ‘ M } NOTRE DAME SPORES CLUB Peter’s Cocoa, George Payne Cocoa, Frys Cocoa and
in BW S now i eee a ee Rountrees Cocoa

D5 3 ’ A. + - > trees O48.

Film Board Chief Jones Sar of tan ' SC TORY DANCE Place Your Orders With Us Now



R ELTON VILLANEUVA
President of the Film Board
of Trinidad and Manager of Re-
public Pictures, returned to Trini-
lad on Monday evening by
B.W.I.A. after paying a short
business visit here. He was stay-
ing at the Hastings Hotel.
Off To Trinidad
EAVING for Trinidad on Mon-
« day evening by B.W.I.A
was Mrs. V. M. Hoberts of Geov-
ernment Hill. She has gone to
visit her husband’s daughter Joan
who is ill.

On Annual Visit
RAVING for Canada via Trini-

—based on the proposition
that round husbadds still
deserve a square heal ..

Lato Of success:
ire Taubdy Hubby dret wily t % wm the Oity

By Bernard Wicksteed :
V YELL They have ae * m ONber we grow
started me off on ey again
They put me on tt at â„¢ | was given the menu on

ho has taken














JOUN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.
Roebuck Street

Te be he'd

1O.NIGHTE

AT QUEEN'S PARK HOURE
Constitution Read
Music by C. B. BROWN
and His Orchestra
ADMISSION %-
Pancing from 8 pm te t am
REFRESHMENTS ON SALE



KH arrived on Monday eveni g
Antigua by BWIA. ang is
esent Staying with Mr. WA

-rawferd at Pegwel enor
hrist Church. Tn
Jones who is or
eave fram Camp Ki
fersey, has covered
miles to get here fr
aving travelled via lg
Aleutians and Port Arthu

Leaving Barbados ten

£0, Re Joined the U.S. Army at |
served during World Way i :

rope with the Third Army |
inder General Patton '







breakfast time yester- 4 Sip of paper and put on

’ yoROUr fo stick to |
day and aiterwards - Saat * r
tried to tell me | looked ‘ cau il
slimmer already

~~
at h
The whole Wy se a ye
â„¢ was We Rhustan

TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. Last Shows
VENGEANCE VALLEY (Burt Lancaster)



TODAY & TOMORROW 4% pm










































: Sanat : 3 ta, “HE'S MY @DY" d
dad on Monday by B.W.LA ANITA BJORK At the cessation af hostilities | trick, bs a Corks 2 an
a " ae af hostilita break asd Yo @vercame an s
was Mr. J. C. Kreindler Man- No to Rank offer. he spent five years at Boston | because me | a bf nant c= ‘ “prrTsBURGH : d
aging Director of Messrs. G. W. ; i University where he ma oned . a ae “hen ee é a. men ae = Bion WAYNE, Randolph SCOTT FOLLOW THE SUN (Glenn Ford)
Hutchinson and» Co., Lid., and Miss Bjork refuses History and got his M.A. degree | areaAkiast I get any other beater eed to make Rriday and Sat. 8.30 pom Erode areata aioe tla Stee ertiate sie micecop ie Diegivesic
the Modern, Dress Shoppe’ wus FRLONDE Swedish fim {> Higher Education in i0si.| Q day when They ake sor Bee colvcianh Wan at “KID GALAMAD" - OPENING TOMORROW 5 & 8.30 P.M.
Mas gone Up on his-annial busi actress Anita Bjérk, who During last summer he graduated | cys to ct me oe onthe Son coe eS Wayne MORRIS & ’ ak P
ness visit and is expected to be appeared in the Swedish film rom the Infantry Schoo} at Fort | t seat hardship to put him on . “CASABLANCA NI Be
away for about two weeks. xt Strindberag’s Miss Julie coe Georgia and later went There was nal 3 wiass ot 3 diet that he \ : BOG. - ; 4
i has declined an offer to’ ic the Far East with the Thira| orange juice, parched egg o wou! kee uw =~—tté—<:C(i:é‘L SSS
On Business 3 i Rank film i infantry Division, “® THRE] foes (unkatiered), a Slice kr: 19 days and sen
EAVING for Trinidad on Mon- Bean’ a n m in On his ao sa eae | nd marmalade. and ie cont libe a ven Gan tere
day by B.W.1.A. on a busi- “The offer was to appear Lt. Jones will he wee. oS DAD SABE al Over again, We'll see : i |
isit was Mr 5 ' . ao > ill be re-assigned to .
et wae eee in. The Long .. Memory Germany. signed to | = ruby t START HEADING
of “Landscape”, St. as. Oppaesite John Mills. Sh ene ars !
expects to be away for about ten velieed be cae ike ts und r Visiting The Island ou won’ ren re «CUT THIS OUT TT FOR THE PLAZA
days. ‘ontract to make a film in . A. BRANCH, wife notice YOM ate Gh a diet and 3 =; : ;
‘ Stockholm for an American _of the Commissioner of all ‘ee im rou we eas : THEATRE BECAUSE
: Intransit company. Police of the I ing so slim and h me §
: ‘TRANSIT from Haiti via *~ terton rz» +0 rived from Antigua cn Mone> that youll get @ job on the §
NTR ndan Ket ahs - Keen : : gua on Mor mS and earn ; sat 3
Re Kates WL 8 ere evening by B.W.T.A. on a vist pounds a week. ;
Monday evening was Mr. A. Nor- Spent A Month oad the island and is Staying as a i ww FIRST DAY
ris Hughes, President of the EAVING for Trinidad on Mon- 84st of Col. O. St. A’ Duke of | My son John ?MY .
Executive Council of the Carib- Jy gay by B.W.1.A. intransit >': “™n’s Fort, Garrison t DIAL 2610 (DIAL 5170) on 5






NO _ sooner baa thes
4 said this than I! felt
ravenousiv hungry, | ist
have been psycholo; or
something becausr :
for porridge I ney

bean Tourist Association aor for British Guiana were Mr. and On Long Leave |
erry ne a ies or aeowrell — —— ae “ their R. AND MRS. Gc. f£ |

After a $ , * little son Gerald. They had spent THOMAS and th sugh- |
= es teenie rae a month's holiday staying at their ter Janet arrived here > a
us way to G é s ‘é



To-day & To-morrow

cMenu

Breakfast
Matt glass ef orange juice.

Last 2 Shows To-day Today & Tomorrow
4.30 & 8.30 p.m 4.30 & 8.30 p.m
“LULLABY OF Teghnicolor Double
BROADWAY" |] “LOOK for the
Doris DAY & SILVER LINING”



4.45 & 8.30 p.m
“FLAMINGO ROAD”
Joan Crawiord &
LAND BEYOND










Monday |



















































. . n " ee rden MacRAE & THE LAW
¥ ‘Tourist seaside residence “Rosamund”, from Antigua for 4 short holiday ! more than Mat for br -.5 fast One poaehed egg en thin Pn ee Cuekuane “SOUTH of 8ST. LOUIS" Dick Foran
the headquarters of the Tourist Worthing. Their other son Peter before leaving by the Colombie | any Wie. : laast. eee John GARFIE Joel MacCREA
Association have been moved who had come over with them, has for the Unit eer — My son John, aged five Stice of thin toast light'y THURS “Seca Ps = || Thurs. Special 1.20 Friday & Saturday
al saad $ : he United Kingdon They rgu t red lad ar THURS. Special 1.30 p.m. re. oe pom 4.45 & 8.30
from Trinidad to Antigua and it returned to school at the Lodge. are staying at the St. tawrencs | Was Most intrigued buitere mare ade “COWBOY " CAVALIER” “CUBAN PETE” CMbEnaASaoehie a
is contemplated to move them t0 Mr. Willems is a Director of Hotel, — Reet seal te Sean’ mana 8 One cup of colter, withent Jimmy WAKELY & MUG TOWN “BAGDAD” (Color)
New York when circumstances wijjems Timber and Trading Co., Mr. Thomas who is with ha eit cream or sugar. Rr eo File ae Foe Bal CHRISTIAN
warrant it. Ltd. clays Bank in Antigua. is now on > Was told he must a a \ction=pac! ob
Mr. Louis Law has been ap- With Barcl Bank # hong in Antigua, is now on ee ae So Be ay wunch OPENING THURS. Prams Agtionspacked =a SS
pointed Executive Director of the 1 arciays Ban : " | One glass temato juice. ih & S88 ¥.w. EASE COWBOY CAVALIER
eae FTER spending three weeks . ; ate, @5 ile : ish ill i and Continuing Daily Errol FLYNN in — 7 ” Wakela
Association, G da Wed j as Daddy Broiled white Osh or grilled THE TANKS ARE Jimmy Wakely &
Back From Antigua holiday in Barbados, Mr. renada edding | as big a sole COMING” | oy POPE, CEEY SILVER RAIDERS
D. J. Brown left on Monday ISS MABEL McNEILLY Green salad with lemon Steve COCHRAN ee Le BAVILLAND Whip WHLSON
R. ALGIE SYMMONDS, one evening hy B.W.I.A. for Trini- daughter of Mrs. Kathleen pice Eat Hp creem, “Sat, Special 9.30 & 1.30 WO Tae ” IDNITE SA
7 . g by Wee Ak r -d Mr ath! | ; A . ‘ F THE MIDN' T.
YA of the members at te Bs dad on iis way back to British McNeilly, and clerk to the| i ne “ae Charies Starrett. Doubie BADLANDS. RED DESERT
pire Sports Team which played @ Guiana where he is employed with Grenada Building and Loan} . SOUTH OF DEATH Tim Holt & Don Barry &
series of games in Antigua, arriv- parciays Bank. :

é Association, was recent! wedded
ed here on ee ae aaron While here he was staying at to Mr. Kenneth D Wiaimermels }
ee asap “Rhonda” Rockley Beach. English plantation engineer resid-|
— Se. tee - a e Business And Pleasure ent in British Guiana.

VALLEY &




PRAIRIE LAW
George O'Brien





FRONTIER REVENEE
Lash La Rue



Stop arguing and
get on with your porridge.”



Clear soup.
Liver (timned or tresh).

MORES UReen seen pamers H RARE NS CRSERERHEREE: Senne cme ERROERERORR Ens seneen®:

[ATTA O eemen ae neees cease a0 ones eeEne ss OnENe TKDE SC RARERERERSROR ERE



Pa ehMac Pe COLL LLLP OOP OE EC al MPM RM
aaa aaa













I : 2 5 Cauliflower, tomate (no

Brancker and other members of R. A. B. DeLIMA, Director While the ceremony was al Couldn s sie * potatoes).

the Team have gone on to St. of Alphonsa B. De Lima, SUiet and simple one, a fare | B° he st couldn't a Generous portion of cheese

Kitts where they will spend a Jewellers of ‘Trinidad and Barba- DUMber of friends and well} aorvides it a ee wan oe An apple. . EMPIRE ae ; ROXY

short time before returning home. dos, returned home on Manday Wishers of the bride witnessed } make him so big that Seer tan ete teas TO-DAY & TOMORROW 4.45 & 8.15 i Vacghs MONROE ® His One.

Best Place - evening after a week's visit here the union which was solemnised | eventually hed have Ww stop London Express Service | Broderick CRAWFORD — Judy io .

R. GUSTAV PABST, Jnr.. of 2 business coupled with pleasure, by the Revd, Adam Thompson, | aaa eee eee, } in (HOLLIDAY “CARNEGIE HALL”
Washington, D.C., arrived De ven, *gmpanied by Mrs. The bi ide, striking a charming | BORN YESTERDAY “gee ADMAAAL Was A LADY”

on Monday by B.W.1.A. v¥ia Lima, They were guests of picture in an elegant creation of ; | — EXTRA - with

Antigua for a month's holiday fe: hee of Maxwell, slipper satin, was given away by |



TEHAIKOVSKY’'S
NUTORACKER SUITE




Edmond O'BRIEN —Wanda HENDRIX
her uncle, Mr. George MeNeilly, i

After Three Months while My, Frank Baeger, a friend

which he is spending as a guest
at the Ocean Vew Hotel.






OPENING SAT. 430 & 8.15

TORNADO |





f OPENING FRI. ‘2 30 & 8.20 Johnny WIBSSMULLER
,Mr. Pabst who is paying his Are spending there months’ °f the groom from British Guiana, | OTE cattun ahaoe: 7
second visit to the island said holiday here, Miss Agatha #¢ted as bestman. .. . OF GENGHIS KHAN



“JUNGLE MAN HUNT”
that it is the best place he knows. Sealy and Miss Cynthia Sealy re- | There were no bridesmaids, but






DANCE





| , and ¢
He came here four on ago to turned to Trinidad on Monday by the bride's sister, Sheila, stood in| ° OLYMPIC tis “CHINA CORSAIR
spend one day and eventually B.W.1.A. They were staying aiKendance as the vows were TO-DAY LAST 2 SHOWS 4.30 & 8.15 ROYAL
spent thirty-one, with Dr. and Mrs. W. L. Wood- exchanged. Mrvagsectiry |






‘ En-Route To U.K. ing + ranevilis’ am Rock. = Honeymooning at Quarantine
R. Cc. J. SONGHURST, ey had come over to be present Station, Mr. Pennycook leaves this
Advertising Manager of the sober birth of Mrs. Wooding's ee Be. to be joined
British American Tobacco Com- * ater by his wife. ‘
pany in London, England, left on Spent The Week-End Miss Shelia McNeilly left the

AT WARNER BROS.

er
THE ‘CRANE HOTEL

“THE JACKIE ROBINSON STORY” TO-DAY & TOMORROW 4,30 & 8.15
with Jackie ROSRERCH “PASS PORT TO PIMLICO”
(himself)

and
and “DON'T TRUST YOUR HUSBAND”

“NORTH WEST STAMPEDE” with
Starring Fred McMURRAY










PHILIE.

COCHRAN: CAREY xi

Screen Piay by ROBERT HARDY ANDREWS @












j James CRAIG — Joan LESLIP -
Monday evening by B.W.I.A. R. O. H. JOHNSON of ee ie em whee she SATURDAY, S3ist May at 9 p.m. Ore cto ge FOMERESS GIT OCU 7s ae
7 for Trinidad and Jamaica on his Johnson's Stationery who 80¢s to meet the family of her Admission: $1.00 " 40) / Cr LO.in —_ 7 e
way back home. He was here was in Trinidad for the week end, fiance, a Welsh Fusilier stationed ro RROW (Thurs) ee eee ‘aamana “SINGAPORE”
on a business visit and was stay- returned home on Monday morn- here during last year’s Tickets obtained from—




&
SARABAND with Stewart GRANGER

ing at the Ocean View Hotel. ing by B.W.1.A. in Technicolor

disturbances.



and
“THE LOST MOMENT”



Advocate Stationery Dept., C. F. Harri-

PLAZA
son & Co., Ltd, Louis Bayley

Boltor, Lane, Aquatic Beauty Salon, ||| BRIDGETOWN-~(DIAL 2310)
Royal Barbadas Yacht Club and Mem. 4.45 and 8.30 p.m. Also
bers of the Tornado Association.








While The Sun Shines

Who knows what this year
will bring? It may be blister-
ingly hot for months on end,
Whatever the weather, come
what may, you must be really
prepared for the hot sunshiny
days. Beware of sunburn, which
is a very different story to sun-
tan. With such a warm climate,
it is a problem, A brilliantly hot
day can so easily amaze — and
delight —. us by appedring after

a cool period. Then off comer

our suits, and into the lightest,
seantiest frocks we scamMmper, to
sit in the sun, And, in less time
than it takes for me to write,
the skin is burned, and the
misery begins. It may not be
noticeable at once, the joy of
relaxation in the sun’s rays
makes us “sun happy”. But next
day, even the same evening—
the skin can irritate, burn, and
look, so ugly red!
Be Prepared

When the weather encourages
you to don your clothes, rub a
e0od suntan lotion or cream into
all the parts that are to be ex-
posed. There are so many on the
market to-day that you can get
them from any chemist or
beauty counter, and choose
liquid or cream as you prefer.
You can, if you like, use pan<
cake make-up for your face.
That staves off sunburn, but it
does not encourage tanning, es-
pecially if you lubricate the
face with cream first of all,
which js a wise thing to do to
save the skin drying.

ail have a true skin which con-
tains the blood vessels, nerves,
fat qelils and other pigments
which are the decisive factors on
which we determine our ability
to tan. If the pigments are
evenly distributed you will tan
evenly, The girls who possess
skins of medium colour and
thickness, must take their sun-
bathing more cautiously. Those
of you with more delicate skins
have to guard against over-ex-
posure and take sunning very,
very carefully, The thin, sensi-
tive skin that burns so easily
should be sun-bathed under a
sunshade, which does not make
it so brown, but yet doesn’t get
red and uncomfortable, either.
Daily Lubrication

Be careful to follow the general
rule, five minutes each side to
begin with, with outstretched
arms so that the sun gets to the
undersides, increasing the dose
with each time, You can, of
course, sunbathe three or four
times q day—and eventually
just lay in the sun all day. But
if you want to get really brown
the need for oiling and creaming
persists the whole time. The
more the oiling the browner the
ukin—and the oil does save the
skin getting dry and shrivelled,

Tf you have been sunning
don't go straight in and wash the
face with soap and water, don’t
take a bath however sticky you
may feel. Cream tiie face, and
wait until you have quite cooled
off for your bath.

idéa to rub oil into the body

immediately after your morning

bath. It gives your skin that

smooth, satiny appearance.
Last Hints

Your legs have to look good
when they are so lengthily ex-
posed to all and sundry, so any
fuzz has to be eliminated,
Shaving isn’t wise. It hardens
the hairs and makes them grow
coarse, You can use the cream
removers that are specified for
the under arms. Maybe you'd
prefer them. They are certainly
very @asy to use. When the hairs
show signs of reappearing just
repeat the treatment.

A last warning—do wear dark
glasses in the sun’s glare. They'll
make you feel more comfort-
able, and they will prevent
wrinkles around the eyes. Take
them off while you sunbathe, by
all means, but only for a while
to prevent getting white “clown
like” circles. And how attrac-
tive the sun glasses are! They
can add a great deal to your
Summertime beauty.

Listeni

istening Hours
WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 1952

41.00-—7,15 19.76M. 26.53M.

4.00 p.m, The News. 4.10 p.m, The
Daily Service. 4.15 p.m. B.B.C. Midland
Light Orchestra, 5.00 p.m, The Derby
5.15 p.m. Cavaleade of Melody. 6 55
pm. Interlude, 6 00 p.m. Scottish Mag-
azine. 6.18 pm. The SPA Orchestra
630 p.m. Think on These Things. 6 45

ee 8.30 p.m.



. tions have to be cancelled or changed
» so that we can accommodate others.



FRIDAY 2.30, 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
and Continuing Daily at 4.45 and







IMPORTANT
NOTICE

Due to the aviation gasolene short-
age we have been forced ta restrict
our operations. Please advise us as
early as possible whenever reserva-










Passengers who hold reservations








3 Phone 4267 for
GALVANISED CORRUGATED SHEETS

26 Gauge and 28 Gauge

EVERITE CORRUGATED SHEETS
EVERITE TRAFFORD TILES

STANDARD HARDBOARD
The Board of 1,000 Uses

INSULATING WALLBOARD
WALLBOARD MOULDINGS
WOOD MOULDINGS, corner & flat
ALUMINIUM MOULDINGS,



Phone 4267.

WILKINSON & HAYNES (0, LTD.




Tropicals

Study Your Skin





















Let down those shoulder straps pm Sports Round-up and Programme aE poaenaae wae eras at least
Skins vary so considerably from the word so when you in- ae ies e News. 7.10 p.m 7 ours before fli and onward ‘i

me that the tanning process differs tend to suntan, Even five minutes Tis 1090" a eh 25.58M 31,32M or return reservations must be Tropical Worsteds may
fer them. It isn’t easy to define in the sun will leove their mark, ree

vary in quality but at
C. B. Rice’s the sents
is consistently high.

checked at local BWIA offices 48
hours before the departure of the
onward or return flight. Reserva-
tions will be subject to cancellation
without notice if these requirements
are not observed.

your own skin, but you should and they just stay there for a . 715 pm Calling the West Indies
watch it carefully to work out long time regulating their colour 745 .P-â„¢. By Request 815 p.m. Radio

; «. . Newsreel. 8 30 8
your own particular sun intake with the rest of (he body, and count 848 Pp m “Interlude, 8.88 pte
---or is it “extake”? don't, alas, catch up. Legs seem From the Editorials 9.00 p.m, The Last

Under the first layer of scaly to need more oil than any other Hope 10.00 pm. The News. 10.10 p.m

top skin known as epidermis, we part of the body. It's a good io 30 a 7 hae Rar nan ethane

JUST IN TIME FOR





With the important ad-
dition that prices in re-
lation to quality are
inconsistently low!

We trust you will appreciate that
the strict enforcement of these rules

i
) ALLE MAE MB















3 ‘during the present emergency are in
SQ the best interests of the travelling
THE HOLIDAYS. re ae fers a, cemarkable
offers a re
| | BRITISH WEST INDIAN choice of colours and
WOMEN’S COLOURED BEACH HATS ......... $1.00 cool the hott i
E ; i cool the hottest day !
MAIDS WIDE BRIM LEGHORN ................ $3.10
MAIDS STRAWS—White & Coloured .......... $1.14
BOYS SAILOR STRAWS ...................... $1.17 | | c. B. Rice
MEN’S TRILBY STRAWS: Cream, Grey, Tan .... $1.84 $2.52 $2.88
ae | & Co.











Serchant Tailers

T. R EVANS & WHITFIELDS

“ DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606




TEDNESDAY, MAY 28,

1952



‘our Hong
Long Police
ret Medals

"our George Medals are among
ards to members of the Hong
ag and Federation of Mal-

Police Force announced in
Â¥ 6th... iss ue. ..of.. the
adon Gazette. Two of the
dals aré awarded to Detective
2-Inspector James Hidden and
wective Constable Chu Fook.
2 Colonial Police Medal for
antry is awarded to Police
istable Chan Sik Wah. are
i of the Hong Kong Police

mn September, 1950, a police
ty visited a hillside hut in the
w Territories where an armed
ig was in hiding. As the police
woached, the gang opened fire,
ins one constable. Under fire,

en went to the help of the
@ constable, and later placed
tself in front of the Divisional
werintendent when the latter
‘ fired on from a concealed well

i away.
hu Fook, single-handed,
sled a cornered bandit who

d@ point-blank at him and then
! detective attacked, wounded,
‘disarmed the bandit.

" Sik Wah had a opullet-
vest badly damaged by a
let fired at close range, but
ded to cover the Divisional
erintendent throughout the
The citation concludes,

3 imperturbable demeanour
constant smile under fire were
example in the highest tradi-
of valour and devotion to

e”
‘eorge Medals are also
@ded to Police Recruit Tan

a Siew, aged 19, a National
iceman, and to Special Con-
e Wan Amran bin. Wan
af, 24 both of the Federation
Malaya Police Force.

fan Amran was a member of
Yolice Jungle Squac of nine
rming a routine patrol on an
e in Sungei Siput, Perak, on
ary 19 when the patrol was
shed by about 25 bandits.

of the patrol were killed
ight and two others seriously
mded by the initial burst of
_ The three unwounded mem~=
_of the patrol fought off the
agement, after three of them
_ been killed, two by Wan

n.
F hroadiner 23, 1951, an en-
ament took place between
ge and bandits in the Rengam
« of Johore. | Armed with a

un, Tan Tien Siew was left
bi off a bandit attack while

latoon Commander withdrew
organise a counter attack.
_Tin Siew, who had had only
E months’ service, was

ded in the leg but fought off
ated assaults, inflicting heavy
alties.

@ On page 7.

Che Nizam:
4 Gourmet

BOMBAY, May 6.

je Nizam of Hyderabad,
an Ali Khan Bahadur, is in
§ respects abstemious and

t-fisted, but he cannot bear
rting his “economy first” atti-
_ to his food.
fty taxicabs were waiting for
special chartered plane when
arrived in Bombay from
erabad today to carry his
tasters, 30 baskets of poultry
_two score potfuls of water
gn from the sacred tank in
capital,
xtyeight-year-old Osman Ali
well, and his physicians
ed a change of climate.
n Ali thought of going to
zerland, but since none of
_celebrated ancestors have
ted the seas, the Nizam said
vill always rather follow the
ions of my forefathers than
the Indian Ocean’.

/ he came to Bombay, where
weather is torrid and sticky.
Osman Ali Khan, despite his

refuses to eat



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

> oe

f a

{ * aft
NY j
a ey |
bel : y Wa
PS
aN |
J
ie
, ~ en

« . . . + ; .
“As commander-in-chief of the British Home Guard it sure makes me happy to tell you that your
long-service medals are already being manufactured in Japan.”

- Labour Welfare
Fund Collects $2m.



Mr..F. L. WALCOTT, (L) in introducing a Resolution
in the House of Assembly yesterday evening to approve the
Sugar Industry (Rehabilitation, Price Stabilisation and
Labour Welfare) Order 1952, on which money will be raised
on this year’s crop, disclosed that the Labour Welfare Fund
collected $2,210,645 of which $1,013,271 was added in 1951
alone. The Resolution was passed. ’

The schedule to the Order *——

States that there shall be raised

(a) on all sugar manufactured in
this Island during the year
one thousand nine hundred
and fifty two a levy at the
rate of thirteen dollars and
twenty cents per ton;

(b) on all faney molasses manu-
factured in this Island during
the year one thousand nine
hondoed and fifty-two a levy
at the rate of thirteen dollars
and twenty cents per three
oat and thirty wine gal-
ons.

3. All moneys received by the
Sugar Production and Export
Control Board by way of the levy
raised under Article 2 of this
Order on all sugar and fancy
molasses manufactured during the
year one thousand nine hundred
and fifty two shall be paid by the
said Board to the Sugar Industry

Capital _ Rehabilitation Reserve
Board,,the Sugar. Industry Price
Stabilization Board and
the Go' ory eae itive Com-
mittee the following propor-
tions: —

(a) to the Industry Capital

Rehabilitation Reserve Board
at the rate of four dollars and
eighty cents per ton in re-
spect of sugar and at the rate
of four dollars and eighty
cents per three hundred and
thirty wine gallons in respect
of fancy molasses;
(b) to the Sugar Industry Price
Stabilization Reserve Board
at the rate of six dollars per
ton in respect of sugar, and
at the rate of six dollars per
three hundred and thirty wine
gallons in respect of fancy
molasses;
to the Governor-in-Executive
Committee at the rate of two
dollars and forty cents per
ton in respect of sugar, and
t the rate of two dollars and
orty cents per three hundred
and thirty wine gallons in re-
spect of fancy molasses.

a
°
~~

In moving che passing of the
Resolution Mr. Walcott gave fig-
ures the position of the
respective funds. hese disclosed
that the Rehabilitation Reserve
Fund collected $3,300,000 between

1947 and 1951, and of that total





In The House
Yesterday

When the House met yesterday,
Mr Adams laid the following
papers:—

Message No, 12/1952 dated 22nd
May, 1952, from His Excellency
the Governor to the Honourable *
the House of Assembly with ref-
erence to the Address from the
Honourable House requesting that
its gratitude be forwarded to

Congressman Powell and his Com-
mittee for their opposition to the
McCarran Bill

Annual Report of the Depart
ment of Science and Agriculture
for the .year 1950—51

Post Office Advances for pay-




ment of money orders to 3ist
March, 1952.

The following notices were
givén:—-

Resolution to place the sunt of

$1,440 at the disposal of the Gov-
ernor-in-Eecutive Committee to
supplement the Estimates 1952—52,
Part I.--Cuprent, as shown in, the
Supplementary Estimates, 1952-53,
No. 6, which form the schedule
to this Resolution

Resolution to authorise
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to lease 29 acres of land at Sea-
well Plantation to small holders
in accordance with section 12 of
the Executive Committee Act,
1891 (1891—22) as amended by the
Executive Committee | (Amend-
ment) Act, 1951

Resolution to authorise the ex-
penditure from Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare Scheme D, 217
(Suspense) Account of the amount
of $65,875 and such other sums as
will from time to time be neces-
sary for meeting the cost of capi-
tal improvements and alterations
at the Central Livestock Station,
the Pine Plantation and District
Agricultural Stations.

The House passed a Bill to
make provisions for the protec-
tion of Third Parties against risks
arising out of the use of motor
vehicles and for purposes inciden-
tal thereto,

A Bill to make further provision
ir respect of the appointment of
a Puisne Judge

A Resolution to approve the
order entitled “The Sugar Indus.
try (Rehabilitation, Price Stabil
zation and Labour Welfare)
Order, 1952", made by the Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee un-
der the provisions of sections 3
(1) (ce) and 4 (3) of the Sugar
yndustry (Rehabilitation, Price
Stabilization and Labour Welfare)
Act 1947 (1047--13)

The House accepted the amend-

the



House Pass Temporary |

London Express Service

Bill For Puisne Judge -

THE House of Assembly yesterday passed a Bill to |
make further provision in respect of the appointment of a}

Puisne Judge.

In the objects and reasons of the Bill, it is pointed out |
that the Chief Judge and Crown Law Officers {Additional |
Judge) Act, 1951, was to provide for the temporary appoint: |
ment of a puisne judge to assist the Chief Judge in dealing |
with the large outstanding volume of work in the Superior |

Courts,

This need still exists and the present bill therefore |



seeks to extend the operation of the Act from June 30, 1952, |
when it will expire to March 31, 1953

In addition, the opportunity
has been taken to provide that the
puisne judge shall have the same
qualifications as the Chief Judge.

Mr. G. H, Adams (L) who took
charge of the Bill said that it was
a temporary one in which the
Chief Judge had asked that the
appointment should continue be-
eause he still needed agpsistance.
They had to make the appoint-
ment temporary because there
was a Select Committee which
was considering the change under
the Judicial Act, but owing to his
absence from the island as well as
the absence of the junior member
for St. James among other things,
the Committee was unable to meet
as regularly as they would have
liked. They were however going
ahead with the matter now until
the time came when they had to
appoint this temporary judge.

He said that there was provision
made in the Act that the person
appointed should have the neces-
sary qualifications to make hin
suitable for the post of Chief
Judge from the point of view of
years. The person appointed
should be as qualified as the Chie
Judge. He therefore moved that
the Bill be read a second time.

Mr. M. E. Cox (L) seconded,

Mr. R, G. Mapp (L) said that he
‘would like to ask the leader of the
House if the Government was
satisfied that the aims and objects
of the measure were really being
achieved. As far as he could
understand, when the Puisne
Judge was sitting, the Chief Judge
was away and they were really
not dealing with the large out-
standing volume of work which
Was set out in the Object and
Reasons of the Bill.

He hoped his information was
wrong and if so, he would ap-
preciate/ if the Government mem-
bers of the House would tell him
so, People whose business brought
them day by day to the law courts
had told him that and he hoped

he thought the Bill was_one which |
was long overdue and’ the legal
departments as a whole should t

re-organised, He was glad to se

some attempt was being made in |
that direction and more especially |
ithe assurance whidr the leader vu! |
the House had given a_ few)
moments ago that the matter we
under consideration.

He hoped that the Judicial Aci
of which mention was made by th
‘Leader would be sufficiently com- |
prehensive to make the necessar) }
amendments to the jurisdiction of
the respective courts. The time hac’
come when the jurisdiction of th
Petty Debt Court and the Assist
ant Court of Appeal should be ex-
tended.

For the benefit of the last han-
ourable member who had just sal

wn He would say that his in
‘ormation was not in order. Tho
tirne had definitely come whe
there was need for the appoint
ment of a Puisne Judge.

Mr. & E. 8, Lewis (L) said that
when the Bill first came to the
House, he enquired about build-
ing a new court so that both
Judges could sit simultaneously
because he felt that it would
facilitate matters.



In the present Bill he saick that
he was rather surprised to see thal
sub-clause two had stated that the
Puisne Judge should have the
same qualifications as the Chief
Judge. If this had been inserted
in the first Bill it would have been
all right, but if they were extend-
ing the Bill now that they were
going to appoint some one to the
job, it seemed as if they were
throwing some aspersions at the
person holding the office. That
was how it looked to him. Some
might feel that this provision
should have been in the permanent
Bill

The, Bill was finally given its |
second reading and papsed in,
Committee through all its stages. |












10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH
CELLOPHANE PAPER

Has Arrived
To

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

WE ARE SELLING OUT
OUR STOCK OF

WINDOW GLASS

A Bargain tor Builders
JOHNSON’S HARDWARE

WATCHES

GOLD, STEEL or
CHROMIUM

Models for ladies or gents
FULLY GUARANTEED !

15 & 17 Jewels

A wonderful new range on
show at outstanding prices

Today at your jewellers . . .

Y. De LIMA
& €O., LTD.

20 BROAD ST., and at
MARINE GARDENS
SHOPPING CENTRE







j

7

PAGE THREE



Tosca Eau de Cologne
A711
of "47

“47

f the deli

cla Eau de Cologne are it

ous fragrance of

and che freshness

standing quale

“a7u" Tosca Perfume
\alluring and fascinating - a breath ot

romance

}
e— ne

Sam TOS CH

RG s male 1 |

The Genuine “4711” Eau de Cologne comes from Cologne on
Rhine; it is now again obtainable in the original quality, made
according to the famous and secret formula since 1792.





:

:







u

e

|



i
il

|

|

éi



:












“/adte

DIFFERENCE!

,



|

|







i



ih
|



|

a

;



oniousness, nerts of the Legisiative Council ; + » i
i pre- 00,000 was spent. The Price 4 ‘ or the Cones it was wrong, because the Chief |
bs Ba Bg an oa Stapilization Fund stands at ComenitentAgt 1082 , Judge of the island was getting on U. Ss l 1 | .
‘tasters. He brought there- ope ie. while the Labour Wel- pte, House | gdiourned until in years and if there was a lot of oe Do ar Down | 4
‘a round dozen of them with fare Fund realised | $2,210,645 of aday ned work to be done and he needed |
r r whieh amount $1,013,271 was col- help he ee ee Was getting it : MONTREAL, May 27, | S
* lecte n . ul sure: 1 e wor was no he United States dollar was}
Seas ae oe oe Of this $300,000 allocated from AMENDMENTS being done, they would continue at a discount of 19/16 per’ cent| \
than his favdurime tanis— the Labour wee 2 yi ACCEPTED to get é bill of pa — bees in terms Canadian funds. On Mon- |
Stir Alam tank—.in Hydera= (0% Fit o fit a ae ee — =: and he did not day was down 1/32 from Friday’s | .
City. He therefore had no we ‘the Housing Loan, the The House of Assembly yester- that a Cera an Fey Pi gt team RODE TET6
ative but, to, charter a amount realised was $900,000, en¢ (1 rctative Council tg the Bill 4 Long Overdue Pound sterling wag. $2.14. 11/16 | age
OP Bg Brae ‘the O11, a nich $08,160 has been pertaining to the Consular Con- Mr. ©. E. Talma (1) said that own 9/16 from Friday. ee # oe
x. repaid. ventions Act, 1952, :





Pita WLS

aa











) Ser , YOU CAN
Here is real relief TAKE ADVANTAGE

For real relief from rheumatic pains it is
they are da oi OF OUR









correct their §

Firestone

§
:
:
:
i



|
ires Si -Ball sluggi |
The Firestone uper pn a cave |
Tire, which runs on only om Sn Pid ons
pounds of air, increases comfort pruned tel this cory y
and service of your car by They have a | ;
absorbing road shocks and i setion oa thn Kage OF
bumps. In addition, you receive ne dig eevee
greater skid Protection with the ee =~ Senotion |
Skid Resistors in the Safety- the system of impurities.
Grip Tread, Blowout Protection, @ De Witt’s Pills have been widety used are made specially for | Cl J I I ER Y GLASSWARE
with new improvéd Gum-Dip- all over the world with great success BACKACH * | ’
i ‘ : ‘ This is amply confirmed by many thankful M
a 4 mp LUMBAGO
ping, and Long Life with Fire letters sent to us by Je who longed for
; stone’s exclusive tread com- relief from rheumatic pains and found it SCIATICA ‘AND Ez \.RTHENW<«£ L.RE
4 south after trying De Witt’s Pills. Why not JOINT PAINS
4 er e = try them for your trouble? Go to your RHEUMATIC |
: chemist and obtain a supply right away, PAINS e
The Fyre with Builtin Dependability
; OUR GUARANTEE



WE ARE STOCKED WITH
A FINE ASSORTMENT
OF THE ABOVE LINES

THE CORNER STORE |

De Witt's Pills are
made under strictly
hygienic conditions
and the ingredients
all conform to rigid
standards of purity.



——~ ‘

a ae ees

Tol a Aco lat) LL Circe Troubles. -

Charles MeEnearney & (o., Lid.



|



lee








FRAMPTON, Agri-

M* : whe :

Adviser & t
Comptroller for Developmént an
Welfare who went over to the
Leeward Islands on a special visit
returned from Antigua on Mon-
day by B.W.1LA.

Film Board Chief
MoM“ ELTON VILLANEUVA,
President of the Film Board
of Trinidad and Manager of Re-
public Pictures, returned to Trini-
jad on Monday evening by
B.W.1.A. after paying a short
business visit here. He was stay-
ing at the ‘To Te Hotel.
Off To Trinidad
EAVING for Trinidad on Mon-
« day evening by B.W.I.A.
was Mrs. V. M. Hoberts of Gov-
ernment Hill. She has gone to
visit her husband’s daughter Joan
who is ill.

On Annual Visit

EAVING for Canada via Trini-
dad on Monday by B.W.LA
was Mr. J. C. Kreindler Man-
aging Director of Messrs. G. W.
Hutchinson and» Co., Ltd., and
the Modern Dress Shoppe. He
has gone up on his annual busi-
ness visit and is expected to be
away for about two weeks.

On Business
EAVING for Trinidad on Mon-
day by B.W.1,A. on a busi-
ness visit was Mr. Wilfred Alston
of “Landscape”, St. Thomas. He
expects to be away for about ten
days.

Intransit
J NTRANSIT from Haiti via
Antigua by B.W.I.A,._ on
Monday evening was Mr, A. Nor-
rig Hughes, President of the
Executive Council of the Carib-
bean Tourist Association which
meeting he had just attended.
After a brief stop at Seawell,
Mr. Hughes left for Trinidad on
his way to Grenada. He said that
the headquarters of the Tourist
Association have been moved
from Trinidad to Antigua and it
is contemplated to move them to

New York when circumstances
warrant it.
Mr. Louis Law has been ap-

pointed Executive Director of the
Association, 3

Back Frem Antigua

R. ALGIE SYMMONDS, one

of the members of the Em-
pire Sports Team which played a
series of games in Antigua, arriv~
ed here on Monday by B.W.I.A.
after what he described as a pleas-
ant stay in the island.

The Manager, Mr. J, E. T.

Brancker and other members of
the Team have gone on to St.
Kitts where they will spend a
short time before returning home.

Best Place -

R. GUSTAV PABST, Jnr., of

Washington, D.C., arrived
on Monday by B.W.I.A. via
Antigua for a month’s holiday
which he is spending as a guest
at the Ocean Vew Hotel.
,Mr. Pabst who is paying his
second visit to the island said
that it is the best place he knows.
He came here four a ago to
spend one day an eventually
spent thirty-one.

En-Route To U.K.

R. Cc. J, SONGHURST,

Advertising Manager of the
British American Tobacco Com-
pany in London, England, left on
Monday evening by B.W.I.A.
for Trinidad and Jamaica on his
way back home. He was here
on a business visit and was stay-
ing at the Ocean View Hotel.

While The Sun

Who knows what this year
will bring? It may be blister-
ingly hot for months on end,
Whatever the weather, come
what may, you must be really
prepared for the fot sunshiny
days. Beware of sunburn, which
is a very different story to sun-
tan. With such a warm climate,
it is a problem, A brilliantly hot
day can so easily amaze — and
delight —- us by appedring after
a cool period. Then off come'
our suits, and into the lightest,

Sscanticst frocks we scafnper, to *

sit in the sun, And, in less time
than it takes for me to write,
the skin is burned, and the
misery begins. It may not be
noticeable at once, the joy of
relaxation in the sun’s. rays
makes us “sun happy”. But next
day, even the same evening—
the skin can irritate, burn, and
look, so ugly red!
Be Prepared

When the weather encourages
you to don your clothes, rub a
gcod suntan lotion or cream into
all the parts that are to be ex-
posed. There are so many on the
market to-day that you can get
them from any chemist or
beauty counter, and choose
liquid or cream as you prefer.
You can, if you like, use pan-
cake make-up for your face.
That staves off sunburn, but it
does not encourage tanning, es-
pecially if you lubricate the
face with cream first of all,
which js a wise thing to do to
save the skin drying.

Study Your Skin

Skins vary so considerably
that the tanning process differs
for them. It isn’t easy to define
your own skin, but you should
watch it carefully to work out
your own particular sun intake
-—~or is it “extake”?

Under the first layer of scaly
top skin known as epidermis, we

Carub (Calling



ANITA BJORK
No to Rank offer.

Miss Bjork refuses

PBUONDE Swedish film

actress Anita Bjérk, who
appeared in the Swedish film
ot Strindberg’s Miss Julie,
has declined an offer to
Star in a Rank fitm in
England.

The offer was to appear
in The Long Memory,
appasite John Mills. She
refused because she is under
contract to make a film in
Stockholm for an American
company.

. Loniton Brpiess Service



Spent A Month
EAVING for Trinidad on Mon-

day by B.W.1.A. intransit
for British Guiana were Mr. and
Mrs. Leon Willems and_ their

little son Gerald. .They had spent
a month’s holiday staying at their
seaside residence ‘Rosamund”,
Worthing. Their other son Peter
who had come over with them, has
returned to school at the Lodge.

Mr. Willems is a Director of
Willems Timber and Trading Co.,
Ltd. «

With Barclays Bank
FTER spending three weeks’
holiday in Barbados, Mr.
D. J. Brown left on onday
evening by B.W.1.A. for Trini-
dad on his way back to British
Guiana where he is employed with
Barclays Bank.
While here he was staying at
“Rhonda”, Rockley Beach.
Business And Pleasure
R. A. B. DeLIMA, Director
of Alphonsa B.. De Lima,
Jewellers of Trinidad and Barba-
dos, returnecl home on Monday
evening after a week's visit here
on business coupled with pleasure,

He Was accompanied by Mrs.
De Lima. They were guests of
Mrs, A. A. Belmar of Maxwell,

Christ Church.

After Three Months
FTER spending there months’
holiday here, Miss Agatha
Sealy and Miss Cynthia Sealy re-
turned to Trinidad on Monday by
B.W.I.A. They were staying
with Dr. and Mrs. W. L. Wood-
ing of “Winsville’, Black Rock.
They had come over to be present
eg birth of Mrs. Wooding's

aby.

Spent The Week-End
R. O. H. JOHNSON of
Johnson's Stationery who
was in Trinidad for the week end,
returned home on Monday. morn-
ing by B.W.1.A.

ail have a true skin which con-
tains the blood vessels, nerves,
fat aelis and other pigments
which are the decisive factors on
which we determine our ability
to tan. If the pigments are
evenly distributed you will tan
evenly. The girls who possess
skins of medium colour and
thickness, must take their sun-
bathing more cautiously. Those
of you with more delicate skins
have to guard against over-ex-
posure and take sunning very,
very carefully, The thin, sensi-
tive skin that burns so easily
should be sun-bathed under a
sunshade, which does not make
it so brown, but yet doesn’t get
red and uncomfortable, either.
Daily Lubrication

Be careful to follow the general
rule, five minutes each side to
begin with, with outstretched
arms so that the sun gets to the
undersides, increasing the dose
with each time. You can, of
course, sunbathe three or four
times a day—and eventually
just lay in the sun all day, But
if you want to get really brown
the need for oiling and creaming
persists the whole time. The
more the oiling the browner the
ukin—and the oil does save the
skin getting dry and shrivelled,

Tf you have been sunning
don’t go straight in and wash the
face with soap and water, don’t
take a bath however sticky you
may feel, Cream tiie face, and
wait until you have quite cooled
off for your bath.

Let down those shoulder straps
from the word go when you in-
tend to suntan, Even five minutes
in the sun will leeve their mark,
and they just stay there for a
long time regulating their colour
with the rest of ihc body, and
don’t, alas, catch up. Legs seem
to need more oil than any other
part of the bady. It's a good





Home From Korea

I T. WILLIAM L. JONES of the
~ U.S. Army who was in Ke rea
week ago with thx Third In-
fantry Division under Major
General Thomas Cross

. ty Is now In|
sarbados to see his father Mr. }
ere L, Jones Snr. of Church |
iNage, St. Philip, who has taken |
He arrived on Monday

, . day evening }
Antigua by B.W.LA. and is |

4 pr — Staying with Mr. W. A |
Crawfor at Pegwel anor,
Christ Church, i at
: Lt. Jones who is on one mont} 's |
eave from Camp Kilmer in New |
Jersey, has covered some
miles to



12,000

r get here from Kores

having travelled via Alaska, the

Aleutians and Port Arthur.
Leaving Barbados ten years

“g0, he joined the U.S, Army and
served during World War ‘IL in
Europe with the Third Army
under General Patton, :

At the cessation of hostilities,
he Spent five years at Boston
University where he Majored in
History and got his M.A. degree
in Higher Education in 1951.
During last summer he graduated
from the Infantry Sehool at Fort
panning bn Georaia and later went
tc the Par East wit i
infantry Division. oe

On his return to the ULS.A,
Lt, Jones will be re-assigned to
Germany,

Visiting The Island
ME. 3.8. A. BRANCH, wife

» of the Commissioner of
Police of the Leeward Islands,
arrived from Antigua on Monday

Tae by B.W.I.A.
© the island and is staying as a
guest of Col. O. St. A’ Duke of
St. Ann’s Fort, Garrison,

On Long Leave
Me: AND MRS. ¢. B&,

THOMAS and their daugh-
ter Janet Arrived here on Monday
from Antigua for :
before leaving by the Colombie
for the United Kingdom
are staying at the St.
Hotel,

Mr. Thomas who is with Bar-

clays Bank in Antigua, is now on
long leave,

on a visit

Lawrence

Grenada Wedding

ISS MABEL McNEILLY,
daughter of Mrs. Kathleen
MeNeilly, and clerk to the
Grenada Building and Loan

Association, was recently wedded
to Mr. Kenneth D. Pennycook.
English plantation engineer resid-
ent in British Guiana.

While the ceremony was a
guiet and simple one, a large
number of friends and well

wishers of the bride witnessed
the union which was solemnised
by the Revd, Adam Thompson,

The bride, striking a charming
picture in an elegant creation of
Slipper satin, was given away by
her uncle, Mr. George MeNeilly,
while My. Frank Baeger, a friend
of the groom from British Guiana,
acted as bestman.

There were no bridesmaids, but
the bride’s sister, Sheila, stood in

aiKendance as the vows were
exchanged,
Honeymooning at Quarantine

Station, Mr. Pennycook leaves this
week-end for B.G., to be joined
later by his wife.

Miss Shelia McNeilly left the
island en-route to Wales where she
goes to meet the family of her
fiance, a Welsh Fusiliey stationed

here during last year’s
disturbances.
Shi
tTve:
idea to rub oil inio the body

immediately after your morning

bath. It gives your skin that

smooth, satiny apperrance.
Last Hints

Your legs have to look good
when they are so lengthily ex-
posed to all and sundry, so any
fuzz has to be eliminated.
Shaving isn’t wise. It hardens
the hairs and makes them grow
coarse, You can use the cream
removers that are specified for
the under arms. Maybe you'd
prefer them. They are certainly
very @asy to use, When the hairs
show signs of reappearing just
repeat the treatment.

A last warning—do wear dark
glasses in the sun’s glare. They'll
make you feel more comfort-
able, and they will prevent
wrinkles around the eyes. Take
them off while you sunbathe, by
all means, but only for a while
to prevent getting white “clown
like”

circles. And how attrac-
tive the sun glasses are! ‘They
can add a great deal to your

summertime beauty.

2 e
Listening Hours
WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 1952
4,.00-—7,.15 - 76M 25.53M

400 p.m, The News,
Daily Service. 4.15 p.m.
Light Orchestra.
5.15 pm

4.10 p.m.
B.B.C.

The
Midland
5.00 p.m. The Derby
Cavaleade of Melody. 8.55
pm. Interlude. 6.00 p.m. Scottish Mag-
azine. 6.15 pm. The SPA Orchestra
630 p.m. Think on These Things 6 45
Pm Sports Round-up and Programme
‘arade 700 pm. The News. 7 10 Pm
Home News From Britain.
7.16—10,30 25.53M 31,32M

715 pm. Calling the
7.45 p.m. By Request
Newsreel, 830 p.m. Statement of Ac-
count. 845 pm. Interlude. 8.55 p.m
From the Editorials 9.00 P.m, The Last
Hope. 10.00 p m. The News. 10 10 p.m
News Talk. 1015 pm. Mid-week Talk
1020 pm. N.B.C, Symphony Orchestra

West Indies
8.15 p.m. Radio

JSUST IN TIME FOR
THE HOLIDAYS.

MEN’S TRILBY STRAWS: Cream, Grey, Tan ...,

ee

$1.00
$3.10
$1.14
$1.17

$1.84 $2.52 $2.88

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220



YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4606

a short holiday }

They |



|







BARBADOS ADVOCATE
















THE SALVATION ARMY

For the maintenance of its local
work, The Salvation Army will
observe its Annual Tag-Day in
St. Michael and the joining Par-
ishes.on Triday 6th June Tags
worded “To Help Others” will be
‘on sale




The Members of
NOTRE DAME SPORTS OLUB
Remind You of Their



—based on the proposition
that round husbafds still

: :
=
‘
deserve a square fheal ...
By Bernard Wicksteed
WELL. They have it in order to grow
started me off on Sit again . an
the Tubby Hubby diet. fuily. 1 had it in the City
They put me on it at mt wes, Gan See pam 36
breakfast time yester- & sup oO
day and attorwands my hopgue fo gtick Oe.
tried to tell me I loo unless can w shes
slimmer already, inibe %



Music by C.
and His Orchestra
ADMISSION %/-

Dancing from # p.m. to 3 am

REFRESHMENTS ON SALE



The whole thing
trick, | am
because the breaklasi
They gave me Wasnt
very different trom the
breakfast I get any other
day when They e ot

trying to get me de- xtra ; without
tubbied lass ot | batdship Bean tapas nian

is a
certain,




RTODAY & TOMORROW * % p.m.
. “HE'S ae avy”

an
“PITTSBURGH”
NE -





“KID GALAHAD”
Wayne MORRIS &

“CASABLANCA”
Humphrey BOGART :

OW MAN TY

START HEADING
FOR THE PLAZA
THEATRE BECAUSE

Ds .
se

There was half a
orange juice. poached egg on
toast (unbuttered), a Slice
of toast and marmalade, and
black coffee without sugar.







12 days and
if you like it you ¢

5
£
>
=

al over again. We'll see.
That's whole
They said. The

idea,

zB Tubey ‘
bb: diet is painless.

Alter’ a bit vou won't even von CUT THIS OUT sasecns
notice vou are on a diet and -y

all the time you'll be grow-
and handsome

the

ing so slim

that you'll get a job on the

films and earn, thousands of
is a week.
























MY FIRST DAY
cMenu

My son John

No sooner had
4 said this than 1 felt
ravenously hungry, Tr ‘ust
have been psycholog: i or
something. because. t
for porridge. I neve L
more than that for bre... 1Aasi
any time.

My

They

Breakfast

Halt glass of orange juice,

One poached egg on thin

toast.

son John, aged five Slice of thin toast light'y





was most intrigued because hbuitered, marmalade or
I didn't have porridge jelly.
said he wasn't going to ea Ove cup of coffee, without
his either. cream or sugar.

He was told he must + ta
that he would grow into a Lunch

big man
“As big as Daddy ?"

e
nave to eat his
“Because W

One glass temato juice.
Broiled white fish or grilled



er kE seeped RES ECERS HROAGEs) 88 Se eC RRSRRERE REESE RA SEASRRR AERO CRORE Se

Ae CReeeeneEnrnseseccepames «CORE OSCRRER ROR ERS Ss Uenegc see EReneseteeseesnasseneaseseeed

porridge if all it did was to
so big that
stop

‘Er, yes. a5 big a: sole.
Daddy.” Green salad with lemon
“ Well, why doesn’t Daddy apie but no cream,
porridge ? “ nme slice pineapple.
want [0 Coffee.
make him smaller.” rs
“As small as me?” Dinner
“Now stop arguing and §
get on with your porridge.” § Siam of caaerty 4
y 3 = Liver (tinned or tresh).
Couldn't see it j Cauliflower, | tomate (ne
: a <
Be he still couldn't see Genenane paetien of cheese
why he had to eat § n apple
Se

suns conssecenaseusenesousssosasens|
make him

eventually he'd have to London Express Service

TORNADO
DANCE

AT

THE ‘CRANE HOTEL

SATURDAY, 3lst May at 9 p.m.
Admission; $1.00
Tickets obtained from—

Advocate Stationery Dept., C. F. Harri-
son & Co,, Ltd, Louis Bayley
Boltor, Lane, Aquatic Beauty Salon,
Royal Barbados Yacht Club and Mem-
bers of the Tornado Association.

}



~

|
| Wanwen BROS. fs "
STEVE pute ara,

COCHRAN CAREY - atoon

Screen Play by ROBERT HARDY ANDREWS @
4 t PMI SEWER

TOMORROW (Thurs)

PLAZA

BRIDGETOWN-~(DIAL 2310)
4.45 and 8.30 p.m. Also

8.30 p.m.





IMPORTANT
NOTICE

Due to the aviation gasolene short-

age we have been forced to restrict

* our operations. Please advise us as
early as possible whenever reserva-

jie tions have to be cancelled or changed
** so that we can accommodate others.



Passengers who hold reservations
must purchase their tickets at least
72 hours before flight and onward
or return reservations must be
checked at local BWIA offices 48
hours before the departure of the
onward or return flight. Reserva-
tions will be subject to cancellation
without notice if these requirements
are not observed,




We trust you will appreciate that
the strict enforcement of these rules
‘during the present emergency are in
the best interests of the travelling
public as a whole,

BRITISH WEST INDIAN








FRIDAY 2.30, 4.45 and 8.30 p.m,
and Continuing Daily at 4.45 and

WEDNESDAY,

MAY 28, 1952

WE HAVE IN STOCK:

Packages Tenderleaf Tea 14, Blue‘Cross Tea, Nectar
Tea %4, Kardomah Tea, Liptons Tea, Red Rose Tea,
Typhoo Tea, Iustant Chase & Sanborne Coffee. Maxwell

House Coffee.

Also
Van Houten Drinking Chocolate, Fry’s Hot Chocolate,

Peter’s Cocoa
Rountrees Cocoa.

Roebuck Street










George Payne Cocoa, Frys Cocoa and

Place Your Orders With Us Now

JOUN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.

TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. Last Shows

| VENGEANCE VALLEY
and

FOLLOW THE SUN
OPENING TOMORROW 5 & 830 P.M.

(Burt Laneaster)

(Glenn Ford)





BRIDGETOWN
DIAL 23810
Last 2 Shows To-day
4.30 & 8.30 p.m
“LULLABY OF
BROADWAY"
Doris DAY &
“THEY MADE ME A
CRIMINAL"
___ John GARFIELD
THURS. Special 1.30 p.m.
“COWBOY ~ CAVALIER”
Jimmy WAKELY &
“SILVER RAIDERS”
_____ Whip WILSON fa
OPENING THURS. Enter
445 & 8.320 p.m.
and Continuing Daily
“THE TANKS ARE












RENEGADE OF THE Gi

EMPIRE
TO-DAY & TOMORROW 14,4 & 8.15
Broderick CRAWFORD — Judy

in (HOLLIDAY
“BORN YESTERDAY”

— EXTRA —-

TEHAIKOVSKY'S
NUTORACKER SUITE
__-
OPENING FRI, '2 30 & 8.30
“THE GOLDEN HORDE”

. . . OF GENGHIS KHAN

OLYMPIC

‘0-DAY LAST 2 SHOWS 4.30 & 8.15

‘THE JACKIE ROBINSON STORY”
with Jackie ROBINSON
(himself)

and
“NORTH WEST STAMPEDE”
Starring
James CRAIG — Joan LESLIE









a





TOMORROW ONLY 4 30 & $8.15
Yvonne DeCARLO in —
HOTEL SAHARA &
SARABAND with Stewart GRANGER
in Technic



|
}



(DIAL
Today & Tomorrow
4.0 & 8.30 p.m
Teghnicolor Double

“LOOK for the
SILVER LINING”
Gordon MacRAE &
“SOUTH of ST. LOUIS"
Joel MacCREA
Thurs. Special 1.30 p.m
“CUBAN PETE”
Don Porter &
MUG TOWN
Friday 4.45 & 8.30
Action-packed
Entertainment
RE4RELEASE
Errol FLYNN i —
DODGE chy
Olivia De HAVILLAND

it. |] Sat, Special 1.30 p.m

» Speci 30 & 1.30 LAW OF THE MIDNITE SAT.

Charles Starrett Double BADLANDS - RED DESERT

SOUTH OF DEATH Tim Holt & Don Barry &
VALLEY & PRAIRIE LAW FRONTIER REVENEE

THE











5170) (Dial 8404)
To-day & To-morrow
4.45 & 8.30 p.m
“FLAMINGO OAD”
Jean Crawford &
LAND BEYOND
THE LAW
Dick Foran


















Priday & Saturday
4.45 & 30 p.m
“HELLZAPOPPIN &
“BAGDAD” (Color)
Paul CHRISTIAN
Maureen O'HARA,

=
Sat. Special 1.30 p.m.

COWBOY CAVALIER
Jimmy Wakely &
SILVER RAIDERS

Whip WILSON



Brien



Lash La Rue

ATR
ROXY

TO-DAY & TOMORROW 4.30 & 8.1
Vaughn ee & His ORC.

in
“CARNEGIE HALL"
and
“THE ADMIRAL WAS A LADY”
with
Edmond O'BRIEN —Wanda HENDRIX

























OPENING SAT. 430 & 8.15
Johnny WIESSMULLER
in

“JUNGLE MAN
and

“CHINA @ORSAIR"

ROYAL

TO-DAY & TOMORROW 4.30 & 8.15
“PASS PORT TO PIMLICO"

HUNT’



“DON'T rrusr “YOUR HUSBAND"
Fred McMURR, AY

FRI. (Only) 4.30 & 8.15

Fred McMURRAY

“SINGAPORE”



| Phone 4267 for
GALVANISED CORRUGATED SHEETS

26 Gauge and 28 Gauge

EVERITE CORRUGATED SHEETS
EVERITE TRAFFORD TILES

STANDARD HARDBOARD
The Board of 1,000 Uses

INSULATING WALLBOARD
WALLBOARD MOULDINGS
WOOD MOULDINGS, corner & flat
ALUMINIUM MOULDINGS



Phone 4267.

WILKINSON & HAYNES €0., LTD.























Tropical Worsteds may
vary in quality but at
C. B. Rice’s the quality.
is consistently high.

With the important ad-
dition that prices in re-
lation to quality are
inconsistently low!

This latest shipment
offers a remarkable
choice of colours and
weights — calculated to
cool the hottest day !

Cc. B. Rice
& Co.

wterchant Tailors



a





ee



2 ER TEI

WEDNESDAY, MAY 28,

1952



Four Hong
Kong Police
Get Medals

Four George Medals are among
awards to members of the Hong

Kong and Federation of Mal-
aya Police Force announced in
May. 6th...issue,.of. the

London Gazette. Two of
medals are awarded o Detective
Sub-Inspector James Hidden and
Detective Constable Chu Fook.
The Colonial Police Medal for
Gallantry is awarded to Police
Constable Chan Sik Wah. are
members of the Hong Kong Police
Force.

In September, 1950, a police
party visited a hillside hut in the
New Territories where an armed
gang was in hiding. As the police
approached, the gang opened fire,
killing one constable. Under fire,
Hidden went to the help of the
dead constable, and later
himself in front of the Divisional
Superintendent when the latter
was fired on from a concealed well
15 yards away.

Chu Fook, single-handed,
tackled a cornered bandit who
tired point-blank at him and then
tried to hurl a hand grenade.
The detective attacked, wounded,
and ‘disarmed the bandit.

nau Sik Wah had a pullet-
proof vest badly damaged by a
bullet fired at close range, but
helped to cover the Divisional
Superintendent throughout . the
fight. The citation concludes,
‘His imperturbable demeanour
and constant smile under fire were
an example in the highest tradi-

tion of valour and devotion to
duty.”
George Medals are also

awarded to Police Recruit Tan
Tien Siew, aged 19, a National
Seryiceman, and to Special Con-
stable Wan Amran bin. Wan
Manaf, 24 both of the Federation
ot Malaya Police Force.

Wan Amran was a member of
a Police Jungle Squad of nine
performing a routine patrol on an
estate in Sungei Siput, Perak, on
January 19 when the patrol was
ambushed by about 25 bandits.
Four of the patrol were killed
outright and two others seriously
wounded by the initial burst of
fire, The three unwounded mem~
bers of the patrol fought off the
engagement, after three of them
had been killed, two by Wan
Amran.

On November 23, 1951, an en-
gagement took place between
police and bandits in the Rengam
crea of Johore, | Armed with a
Brengun, Tan Tien Siew was left
to hold off a bandit attack while
his Platoon Commander withdrew
to organise a counter attack.
Tan Tin Siew, who had had only
seven months’ service, was
wounded in the leg but fought off
repeated assaults, inflicting heavy
casualties.

On page 7.

A Gourmet

BOMBAY, May 6.

The Nizam of . Hyderaba
Osman Ali Khan Bahadur, is in
most respects abstemious and
tight-fisted, but he cannot bear
adopting his “economy first” atti-
tude to his food.

Fifty taxicabs were waiting for
his special chartered plane when
he arrived in Bombay from
Hyderabad today to carry his
foog tasters, 30 baskets of poultry
and two score potfuls of water
drawn from the sacred tank in
his capital.

Sixtyeight-year-old Osman Ali
is not well, and his physicians
w&dvised a change of climate.
Osman Ali thought of going to
Switzerland, but since none of
his celebrated ancestors have
crossed the seas, the Nizam said
“I will always rather follow the
traditions of my forefathers than
cross the Indian Ocean”.

So he came to Bombay, where
the weather is torrid and sticky.
But Osman Ali Khan, despite his
parsimoniousness,
anything that has not been pre-
viously sampled by his official
food tasters. He brought there-
fore a round dozen of them with
him,

Moreover, the Nizam has never
drunk water from any source
other than his favourite tank—
the Mir Alam tank— in Hydera-
bad City. He therefore had no
alternative but to charter a
special , plane to Bombay—and
spend £300 on it—to carry the
water.

I,

The
Tire,
pounds

and service

absorbi
bumps.

refuses to eat.

which

“« s 2 ; j .
“As commander-in-chief of the British Home Guard it sure makes me happy w tell you that your

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



long-service medals are already being manufactured in Japan.”



- Labour Welfare
Fund Collects $2m.

Mr. F. L. WALCOTT, (L) in introducing a Resolution
in the House of Assembly yesterday evening to approve the
Sugar Industry (Rehabilitation, Price Stabilisation and
Labour Welfare) Order 1952, on which money will be raised
on this year’s crop, disclosed that the Labour Welfare Fund
collected $2,210,645 of which $1,013,271 was added in 1951
alone. The Resolution was passed.

The schedule to the Order *——

states that there shall be raised

(a) on all sugar manufactured in
this Island during the year
one thousand nine hundred
and fifty two a levy at the
rate of thirteen dollars and
twenty cents per ton;

(b) on all faney molasses manu-
factured in this Island during
the year one thousand nine
hundred and fifty-two a levy
at the rate of thirteen dollars
and twenty cents per three
hundred and thirty wine gal-
lons.

3. All moneys received by the
Sugar Production and Export
Control Board by way of the levy
raised under Article 2 of this
Order on all sugar and fancy
molasses manufactured during the
year one thousand nine hundred
and fifty two shall be paid by the
said Board to the Sugar Industry

Capital Rehabilitation Reserve
Board, - ee ee. Price
Stabilization ve Board and
the Go' or-ine tive Com-
mittee in the follo propor-
tions: —

(a) to the Sugar Industry Capital
Rehabilitation Reserve Board
at the rate of four dollars and
eighty cents per ton in re-
spect of sugar and at the rate
of four dollars and eighty
cents per three hundred and
thirty wine gallons in respect
of fancy molasses;

(b) to the Sugar Industry Price
Stabilization Reserve Board
at the rate of six dollars per
ton in respect of sugar, and
at the rate of six dollars per
three hundred and thirty wine
gallons in respect of fancy
molasses;

(c) to the Governor-in-Executive
Committee at the rate of two
dollars and forty cents per
ton in respect of sugar, and

t the rate of two dollars and
orty cents per three hundred
and thirty wine gallons in re-
spect of fancy molasses.

In moving che passing of the
tees chiohing ihe pousion of the
ures on 0} e
respective funds, Brose disclosed
that the Rehabilitation Reserve
Fund collected $3,300,000 between
1947 and 1951, and of that total
$3,100,000 was spent. The ce
Stabilization Fund stands at
$3,952,000, while the Labour Wel-
fare Fund realised $2,210,645 of
which amount $1,013,271 was col-
lected in 1951.

Of this $300,000 allocated from
the Labour Welfare Fund to Play-
ing Fields, $147,525 had been
spent to the 31st March last.

On the Housing Loan, the
amount realised was $980,000, and
the amount advan was $874,-
917, of which $98,160 has been
repaid.

Firestone Super-Balloon
runs on only 24
of air, increases comfort
of your car by
ng road shocks and
In addition, you receive

greater skid Protection with the

Skid Resistors

in the Safety-

Grip Tread, Blowout Protection,

with new
ping, and Long Life with Fire-

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poundi

The Jyre with Builtin Dependability

improved Gum-Dip-

exclusive tread com-

ng.





In The House
Yesterday

When the House met yesterday,
Mr, Adams laid the following
papers:—

Message No. 12/1952 dated 22nd
May, 1952, from His Excellency
the Governor to the Honourable *
the House of Assembiy with ref-
erence to the Address from the
Honourable House requesting that
its gratitude be forwarded w
Congressman Powell and his Com-
mittee for their opposition to the
McCarran Bill.

Annual Report of the Depart-
ment of Science and Agriculture
for the year 1950.

Post Office Advances for pay-
ment of money orders to 31st
Mareh, 1952

The following notices were
givén:—

Resolution to place the sunt of
$1,440 at the disposal of the Gov-
ernor-in-Eecutive Committee to
supplement the Estimates 1952—52,
Part 1.—Cuprent, as shown im, the
Supplementary Estimates, 1952-+58,

No. 6, which form the schedule
to this Resolution
Resolution 1o authorise the

Governor-in-Exeecutive Committee
to lease 29 acres of land at Sea-
well Plantation to small holders
in accordance with section 12 of
the Executive Committee Act,
1891 (1891—22) as amended by the
Executive Committee (Amend-
ment) Act, 1951

Resolution to authorise the ex-
renditure from Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare Scheme D. 217
(Suspense) Account of the amount
of $65,875 and such other sums as
will from time to time be neces-
sary for meeting the cost of capi-
tal improvements and alterations
at the Central Livestock Station
the Pine Plantation and District
Agricultural Stations.

The House passed a
make provisions for the
tion of Third Parties aguinst risks
arising out of the use of motor
vehicles and for purposes inciden-
tal thereto,

A Bill to make further provision
ir respect of the appointment of
a Puisne Judge.

A Resolution to approve the
order entitled “The Sugar Indus-
try (Rehabilitation, Price Stabil
zation and Labour Welfare:
Order, 1952", made by the Gov
ernor-in-Executive Committee ur
der the provisions of sections 3%
al) (te) and 4 (3) of the Sugar
industry (Rehabilitation, Price
Stabilization and Labour Welfare)
Act, 1947 (1947--13)

The House accepted the amend-
ments of the Legislative Council
to the Bill intituled the Consular
Conventions Act, 1952

The House adjourned
Tuesday next at 3 p.m

Bill to
protec-

until



AMENDMENTS
ACCEPTED

The House of Assembly yester-
day accepted the amendments of
the Legislative Council to the Bill
pertaining to the Consular Con-

ventions Act, 1952.









London Express Service

House Pass Temporary
Bill For Puisne Judge |

THE House of Assembly yesterday passed a Bill to|
make further provision in respect of the appointment of a|

Puisne Judge.

In the objects and reasons of the Bill, it is pointed out |
that the Chief Judge and Crown Law Officers (Additional |
Judge) Act, 1951, was to provide for the temporary appoint- |
ment of a puisne judge to assist the Chief Judge in dealing ;
with the large outstanding volume of work in the Superior |

This need still exists and the present bill therefore |
seeks to extend the operation of the Act from June 30, 1952, |
when it will expire to Marc

Courts.

In addition, the opportunity
has been taken to provide that the
puisne judge shall have the same
qualifications as the Chief Judge.

Mr. G. H, Adams (L) who took
charge of the Bill said that it was
a temporary one in which the
Chief Judge had asked that the
appointment should continue be-
eause he still meeded apsistance.
They had to make the appoint-
ment temporary because there
was a Select Committee which
was considering the change under
the Judicial Act, but owing to his
absence from the island as well as
the absence of the junior member
for St. James among other things,
the Committee was unable to meet
as regularly as they would have
liked. They were however going
ahead with the matter now unti!
the time came when they had to
appoint this temporary judge.

He said that there was provision
made in the Act that the person
appointed should have the neces-
sary qualifications to make him
suitable for the post of Chief
Judge from the point of view of
years. The person appointed
should be as qualified as the Chief
Judge. He therefore moved that
the Bill be read a second time.

Mr. M. E. Cox (L) seconded.

Mr. R, G. Mapp (L) said that he
would like to ask the leader of the
House if the Government was
satisfied that the aims and objects
of the measure were really being
achieved. As far as he could
understand, when the Puisne
Judge was sitting, the Chief Judge
was away and they were really
not dealing with the large out-
standing volume of work which
was set out in the Object and
Reasons of the Bill.

He hoped his information was
wrong and if so, he would ap-
preciatey if the Government mem-
bers of the House would tell him
so. People whose business brought
them day by day to the law courts
had told him that and he hoped
it was wrong, because the Chief
Judge of the island was getting on
in years and if there was a lot of
work to be done and he needed
help he hoped he was getting it.
But surely if the work was not
being done, they would continue
to get a bill of that sort coming
year after year and he did not
think they would get anywhere at
that rate,

Long Overdue
Mr. ©. E. Talma (L) said that



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|

h 31, 1953 |
he thought the Bill was_one whic!
was long overdue and’ the legi!
departments as a whole should |

re-orgunised. He was glad to st

some attempt was being made in |
that direction and more especially |
the assurance whicSr the leader 0 |
the House had given a_ few)
moments ago that the matter was |
under consideration.

He hoped that the Judicial Aci |
of which mention was made by the |
‘Leader would be sufficiently com |
prehensive to make the necessary |
amendments to the jurisdiction o!
the respective courts. The time hac’
come when the jurisdiction of th
Petty Debt Court and the Assist
ant Court of Appeal should be ex-
tended.

For the benefit of the last hon-
ourable member who had just sal
own he would say that his in-
‘ormation was not in order. The
time had definitely come whe
there was need for the appoint
ment of a Puisne Judge.

Mr. A E. 8. Lewis (L) said that
when the Bill first came to the
House, he enquired about build-

ing a new court so that both
Judges could sit simultaneously
because he felt that it would

facilitate matters.



In the present Bill he said that
he was rather surprised to see that
sub-clause two had stated that the
Puisne Judge should have the}
same qualifications as the Chief
Judge. If this had been inserted
in the first Bill it would have been
all right, but if they were extend-
ing the Bill now that they were
going to appoint some one to the
job, it seemed as if they were
throwing some aspersions at the
person holding the office. That
was how it looked to him. Some
might feel that this provision
should have been in the permanent
Bill

The, Bill was finally given its |
second reading and papsed in}
Committee through all its stages. |

U.S, Dollar Down |

MONTREAL, May 27, |

The United States dollar was}
at a discount of 19/16 per cent)
in terms Canadian funds, On Mon-
day was down 1/32 from Friday’s
close that is, it took $0.98 7/16
Canadian to buy $1 American, The
Pound sterling was $2.74 11/16
down 9/16 from Friday.






















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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown



Wednesday, May 28, 1952

———$—



C.D.C, FATLURE

THE report of the Colonial Development
Corporation for 1951, as summarised in the
Advocate of May 21, contains a very gloomy
forecast for the future of the small West
Indian islands.

The Dominica Grouped Undertaking,
according to the report, shows little chance
of ever showing a profit to the Corporation.

The pessimism of this statement is im-
portant because time and again the West
Indies are blamed for failure to show initi-
ative. “If only the people would combine
together”: “if only they would invest more
capital”, are frequent criticisms made by
the newcomers to the Caribbean.



—



Critics often mean well but very often
critics are persons with no experence of
conducting enterprises in any other
country.

Not infrequently their presence in these
territories is due to their inability to suc-
ceed in bigger countries.

But Lord Reith is a successful person and
Lord Reith is saying something quite differ-
ent, so far as Dominica is concerned. And
what he says will hot encourage others to
try where the Colonial Development Cor-
poration has failed.

The Grouped undertaking in Dominica
included citrus, banana and coconut plan-
tations, a citrus packing station and a hydro-
electric scheme. Great hopes were built up
when this undertaking was launched; now
the chance of its ever showing a profit to
the Corporation is remote. The history of
the Colonial Development Corporation
linked as it is in the public mind with the
enormous Overseas Food Corporation
groundnut fiasco does not encourage confi-
dence. In the West Indies its activities are
best known perhaps for the rebuilding of
Castries but even this work has been halted
for lack of funds.

Prospects for British Guiana consolidated
Goldfields are said to be good and long-term
prospects for British Guiana Timbers are
fair. — a
| "ni Trinidad there is cautious optimism in
the expression that the Corporation’s
cement development” ought to be a sound
investment.” ieee

In British Honduras the stock-farm has
been abandoned and the Fort George Hotel
in Belize will show no profit to the Corpor-
ation. If this list of enterprises in the Carib-
bean warrants the view that many of the
brighter spots of the Corporation’s work are
in the Caribbean area then the outlook for
the Corporation can only be described as
black.

The reasons for the Corporation’s failures
are in fact given welcome publicity by Lord
Reith. The Corporation has suffered in the
past ‘from inaccurate estimating and in-
competence, from rising costs and short-
ages of materials, and always over the
majority of the enterprises there are the
perils of the tropics, vagaries of wind and
flood and drought of ravage and’ disease.”

There is a great difference between this
penitent cry of mea maxima culpa and the
shrill hysteria of the British Press when
the Colonial Development Corporation was
born. Then the cry was “develop the colo-
nial garden for the good of the colonial
peoples and of course for the benefit of the
residents of the United Kingdom.”

The Overseas Food Corporation and the
Colonial Development Corporation were
born beeause of political pressure from poli-
ticians who knew little of the colonies they
were to develop. They came into being at a
period when finding “jobs for the boys” was
a major political pre-occupation in the
United Kingdom,

Jobs were found for the boys: the Press
of Great Britain supported the politicians
in playing to the gallery. Millions of pounds
were squandered. Even in 1951 the squan-
dering was still going on. “Losses have to
be written off, £4,500,000 of them at the
end of 1951 or rather since there is literally
no writing off, that sum has to be carried
like a millstone round the neck.”

Concurrently with all this money going
down the drain West Indian territories are
in great need of money to finance deep
water harbours, and airports and to im-
prove agriculture and communications.
Perhaps none of these schemes would show
a profit to the Corporation but proper com-
munications would at least give the West
Indies a reasonable chance to promote their
own schemes which will succeed. The Cor-
poration’s great failure to achieve success
in the Deminica Grouped Undertaking will
act instead like a wet blanket on schemes
for development in other islands. It would
be tragic for the West Indies if a Govern-
ment Corporation which, was created to
benefit Colonial peoples should act as a
deterrent to private investors in the West
Indies.

i
|
|

|

|
|

|has been abused by strangers
, with British passports. What
| is the remedy?







Is It Too Easy To
Become British? |

| This Oath of Allegiance—

‘I swear by Almighty God, that

I will be faithful and bear true
allegiance to Her Majesty, Queen
Elizabeth the Second, her Heirs,
and Successors, according to

law.’

DOES it surprise you to know
that 60 Russians, who bought a
fourpenny form and filled it up
have become British this year’?

It cost each of them a little
more than that before becoming
one of us, but not enough to dis-
courage any determined would-
be Briton,

The Government promise, of
an independent inquiry into the
cure-by-kindness methods of
Broadmoor prompts a_ wider
question: “Are the British, be-
sides being the most civilised
people the world has ever
known, also too soft-hearted foc
their own good?”

In particular: “Is it too easy
to become British?

Look at the figures. In the
first quarter of the year more
than 800 aliens were granted
certificates of naturalisation,

Since the end of the war in
Europe more than 58,000 have
sworn the oath of allegiance to
the Crown, and have been lost
among the mass of Britons.

Most of them, so far as any-
one knows, have settled down
among us to lead useful, honest
lives.

‘WRONG ’UN’

BUT, now and then, a “wrong
‘un” is given the blessing of a
British passport and all the
rights and privileges which we
take for granted.

Their discovery casts doubt
upon the usefulness of the four-
penny form and the security
check it involves.

Example: A Dutch - born
diamond broker has had _ his
British citizenship taken away
from him by the Home Secre-
tary.

This man was jailed for 18
months for smuggling within
16 days of taking the oath of
allegiance to Britain.

When he appeared before the
Deprivation of Citizenship Com-
mittee he was described as “one
‘of the big shots of the smuggling
trade.” A Customs investigator
said this man had been under

AMERICAN COLUMN:

A Man Not A Bit Like Taft

WASHINGTON.

VERY level - headed indeed is
47-year-old Senator Wayne
Morse, who comes from the Far
Western State of Oregon, who
once taught “argumentation” at
the Universities of Wisconsin
and Minnesota, and is a type of
Republican very different, say,
from Senator Taft,

Morse is one of the Liberal
group in the Republican Party
and nothing at ail like an Iso-
lationist.

Now out he comes
“reactionary elements” in _ his
party against “trying to throw
the party’s weight behind the
unreasonable demands of the
steel companies for a price in-
crease.”

Many people are saying that
Truman, by siding with the
steel workers, has clinched the
union vote for the Democrats
at the Presidential Election.

Probably with this in mind.
Morse tells his colleagues: ‘You
may well alienate the indepen-
dent voters if they get into the
habit of identifying the Repub-
licans with the big business
viewpoint in the steel dispute.”
DON’T LOOK now, General
Eisenhower, but the Taft sup-
porters are up to a_ rather
naughty trick. They are circu-

to warn

By GEORGE SCOTT

eonstant suspicion since the end
of May 1948—two years before
he became British,

THREE QUESTIONS

I ASKED the Home Office—-
which has the final say on alt “i
want to be British” applications
—these three questions:—

ONE: Is it the practice of the
Home Office to give the benefit
of the doubt to an applicant for
naturalisation against the un-
proved suspicions of Scotland
Yard and the Customs author-
ities?

TWO: Is it the practice of the
Home Office to give the benefit
of the doubt in cases where files
have been destroyed by the
Gestapo and it is therefore im-
possible to check on the of
h refugee applying for British

citizenship?
THREE: How many applica-
tions for naturalisation have

been turned down since the

- war?

Last night a Home Office
official gave the same reply to
each of the questions; “We
cannot answer that,”

NO NATIONALITY

THIS official reluctance to tell
us about our new neighbours
does not stop us from building
up a picture of the process of
becoming British. Before a man
(or woman) is granted British
citizenship his background is
scrutinised by Special Branch
men of Scotland Yard or pro-
vincial police forces, and by
M.L5

But how can anyone check on
the past of a man who, before
naturalisation. was of "no
(nationality?”

That term may well hide the
horrors of war which turned
human beings into despair-sick
refugees. Britain has given
them sanctuary.

But it could also provide a
convenient way for unpathetic,
undesirable foreigners to curtain
unscrupulous and unsavoury

pasts.
WHAT CHECK?
SOME such men have certain-
ly been given sanctuary in our
proper eagerneg#: to succour
genuine refugees from Red Shirt.

Black Shirt, and Brown Shirt
persecution.
But what sort of security

check is it that lets through to
citizenship our smuggler and
men like atom scientist Bruno
Pontecorvo, Fuchs, Carl Strauss,

From R. M. MacCOLL

‘lating copies of a petition which
calls on you to answer 21
searching questions on political
issues.

Sample: “Will you clean
house in the State Department,
starting with Dean Acheson?
THE peculiar night life of
Washington includes some pit-
falls, I hear the sag story cf
an out-of-town visitor who,
feeling the need of further irri-
gation after the official closing
time of 2 a.m., wound up in a
notorious night haunt. A bottle
of alleged champagne was fol-
lowed by a bill for £28,

Turning to protest, the visitor
thought better of it as he ob-
served three large gents with
disarranged noses and ears rignt
behind him, What's more, the
three chummily joined his table
land all called for drinks—add-
ling £10 to the bill.

Yes, it’s springtime

nation’s capital.
THE big stride forward in the
economic 16t of America’s
Negroes in the past decade has
been striking. As I strolled
about the streets to-day I
moticed that Cadillac after
Cadillac had black faces inside
it. :

in the



Our Readers Say:

Re-Education Notes

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR, — I have not been
favourably impressed by the
content of the current series of
articles entitled “Education
Notes.” Firstly because, from the
tone of these “Notes” it. seems
that the writer makes these
adverse comments with “malice
aforethought” and not as one,
who had given great considera-
tion to the matter, who had de-
voted much time to the study of
the methods, scope and trends of
Education in the modern world,
Secondly because, as the_writer
very likely knows, the rector
and his Education staff are pre-
cluded by virtue of their status
as Civil Servants, from freely de-
fending the policy of government
against those who are wont to
make mischievous remarks on
such policy. ;

It is taken for granted that
the community at large has con-
fidence in the capacity of the
‘head of the administration to
discharge his duties with
efficiency,

It is also taken for granted
that the community has confi-
dence in the ability of its re-
presentatives in the House of
Assembly to look after its (the
community’s) interests.

Now the policy of Education
which at present obtains in this
Island is the policy of the Gov-
ernment—i.e. it has the approval
both of the head of the adminis-
tration and of the representatives
of the people, Consequently the
author of any adverse comment
aimed at the present policy must
automatically display a lack of
confidence in the government and
the administrative chief.

I, however, incline to the view
that the author of “Education
Notes” suffers not from any such
lack of confidence but rather
from ignorance of the subject
upon which he/she pretends to
speak with authority.

I am sure that the “Notes” do
not impress persons who have a

knowledge of the worldwide pro-
gress in Education based on the
principles which guide our Edu-
cation officers in the formulating
of a local policy. The “Notes”
may, however, succeed in con-
fusing those who for some reason
or other might not have any
knowledge of the prerequisites
of such progress.

To the author I would suggest
the following remedial treatment
Go to the public library, There
you will find a good collection
of books on the of
Education and the various
methods of Education developed
and practised over the years up
to the present day. You will
discover how these methods
developed and what difficulties
(and they are multitudinous)
they seek to overcome.

In addition you will find works
on Educational Psychology which
is playing an increasingly im-
portant role in modern education.

When you would have studied
but a few of these works you will
begin to understand that the
problem of Education in a chang-
ing world is vast and insuper-
able and that its solution, even
in regard to our local require-
ments, is not by any means
within the limitations of your

own presumably narrow -

spective and even more diminu= |

tive store of knowledge of the
subject.

Yours ar it.

Electricity Supplies

To The Editor, The Advocate—
_ SIR,—Judging by the follow-
ing letter which appeared in the
Times of May 6th the * same
difficulties which now beset the
Barbados Electric Co., are being
experienced in England.

“Lord Brabazon, as always, is
frank and forthright in his state-
ments and his long experierice
in connection with electricity
supply entitles him to speak
with authority. At the same
‘time, it ought to be stated that

‘and Antonin Raidl—who peddled |
information about Czech emigres
in Britain to the Czech secret
police in Prague?

Well, herg is the routine for
all would-be Britons. First, they
must live im this country for at
least 12 months immediately be-
fore applying foe caturalisation.
They must have spent four of
the previous seven years either
in Britain, in British territory,
or in Crown service.
an line those 60 Russians,

ey pay their fourpence — for
the four-page, white foolscap
form, called A.1, at the Station-
ery Office in London’s Kings-
way.

The form poses 11 questions,



ll simple. The applicant signs

a statement about his own
character, already printed for
him, which reads: “I am of good
character and have sufficient
knowledge of the English

language. I am financially
solvent.”

Four Britons mut sponsor
him

Next, the foreigner advertises
his application for naturalisa-
ition in t local papers, pays
2s. 6d. as fee for witnessing
his declaration, and sends off his
form, with £2, to the Home

Office.
£20 IN ALL

THE applicant then waits
while the police check his state-
ments. In London this may take
up to six months; in the
provinces up to three months.

If these inquiries leave him
with a clean record he will be
naturalised, after paying another
£18, making £20 in all, to the
Home Office, !

Occasionally — and here the
Broadmoor analogy is complete
—Britain pays an incalculable
price for keeping her pride in
sanctuary.

What is the alternative? Is
the Home Office to refuse
naturalisation every time the
police or Customs are ‘not quite
sure” about a man, or have
“suspicions” of him they cannot
prove?

Or is that mocking the
principle of British justice by
which a man is wholly innocent
until he is proved wholly

ilty?

he price of “indisputable
Safety” is a secret police force.
The risky virtues of tolerance
and liberty that go with a British
passport are worth better
custodians than that. And better
safeguards.—L.E.S.

“MANY clergymen are taking
flying lessons,” said an official
Jat the big Bolling Field Air
Force base near Washington
“They make. excellent pilots,
because they have good moral,
mental, and physical require-
ments. They are rarely bothered
with the emotional disturb-
ances found in some applicants
for licens.”

HERE in Washington the tem-
perature is up in the mid-
eighties, the girls are sporting
their thinnest summer frocks,
the air-conditioners are mur-
muring slumberously in all the
offices, and you can almost see
the chestnut leaves unfold,
AND in Philadelphia Dr. I. S.
Ravdin, of the University of
Pennsylvania Medical School,
attacks the “ghost surgeon.”
“Ghost surgery” is a growing
practice among = unscrupulous
medicos whereby, unknown to
the patient,;who is already un-
der an anaesthetic, a strange
surgeon is called in to conduct
an unnecessary operation, gets
his fee, and leaves again.

The Two



HEADLINE: “Ideal Day Lures
Thousands into Traffic Jams.”
THE HUMAN TOUCH: Top
notice in Washington shop win-
dow: “We make ordinary shoes
toeless for you in 20 minutes.”



the British Electricity Authority
does not, as he suggests, re-
gard as abhorrent competition
with coal or gas. On the con-
trary, it bas proclaimed the
principle that consumers should
have freedom of choice in the
use of the fuel and appliance
most suited to their needs.

Lord Brabazon says that elec-
tricity is both “dear and defi-
cient”, rnéss must be con-
sidered with regard to the prices
of other’ ities. With elec-
‘trical planf costing three times
as much as before the war, and
with the cost of fuel, labour, and
materials all very high, it can
hardly be expected that electric-
ity prices can escape the conse-
quences of such increases, “As
was stated in the 1951-52 annual
report of the British Electricity
Authority, the average price for
electricity sold to domestic, com-
mercial, and small power con-
sumers was some 8.3 per cent.
below the pre-war price. This
was only possible because . of
ithe increased consumption . ct
electricity. Prices have risen
somewhat since then, but the
general comparison still holds
good, If over-all consumption
is to be seriously curtailed ahd
the plant not used to its exist-
ing capacity, a substantial in-
crease in the price of electricity
will be unavoidable.

- In_ regard to deficiency of
supply, this, too, is a relative
matter. Domestic consumers are
consuming at least two-and-a-
half times the amount of elec-
tricity they did before the war,
and the general output is more
than double. While electricity
is not as abundant as we should
like, the industry has no need
to be ashamed of its achieve-
ments. With the general tenor
of Lord Brabazon’s letter most
people in the electricity supply
industry will be in agreement’”.

T think it will be read with
interest by the Chamber of Com-
merce as it was written by Lord
Citrine.

Yours,
JOHN CITIZEN.



Immigration
Bills

(From the “New York Herald Tribune”)

OBJECTIONS to the McCarran-Walter
immigration bill come from so many quar-
ters and go so deeply to fundamental
questions of national policy that the
Senate can do no less than to hear out all
criticism fairly. To hear it in prolonged
debate on upward of 200 amendments
which opponents threaten to offer is the
hard way of doing it. The orderly method,
and the fairest, is to recommit it to the
Judiciary Committee for new hearings, at
which the substitute measure offered by
Sen. Herbert H. Lehman, D., N.Y., would
be considered together With the McCarran-
Walter bill.

The Senate’s duty to weigh, justly, every
major criticism against this measure is
compelling. Only once in a generation does
the opportunity arise to shape a new im-
migration policy which will affect the lives
of perhaps millions of persons in the
future. That the task should fall in the
present abnormal period of world tension
and unrest is unfortunate; it makes all
the heavier the responsibility on Con-
gress to draft the soundest possible leg-
islation. The McCarran-Walter bill has
good and bad points, both in its general
aims and in its multitude of particular
sections. It makes a genuine effort to codi-
fy the bewildering miscellany of laws,
proclamations, executive orders, regula-
tions and treaty clauses amassed during
the last thirty years and longer. It ends,
in principle at least, the immigration ban
against Orientals, which has been an in-
ternational sore point for three decades.

At the same time, it retains the old
quota system based on the national origins
of the country’s population in 1920; a sys-
tem deliberately designed to favour the
countries of Western and Northern Europe
over those of Central and Eastern Europe.
It avoids the opportunity to temper this
unequal policy by providing for utilization
of the unused quotas of favoured countries
for less-favoured nations (such as Greece
and Latvia) whose quotas have been mort-
gaged beyond the year 2000.

As to particular provisions of the bill, its
opponents fairly riddle it with criticism;
some of it, undoubtedly, unfair. But the
charge that the bill’s provisions for immi-
gration of foreign colonials in this hemis-
phere is discriminatory against the coloured
peoples in the Caribbean area does de-
serve close examination. And the Senate’s
best thought should be applied in weigh-
ing new provisions which would place the
naturalized citizen in jeopardy of deport-
ation for actions he may have taken far
in his past life, or might take in the future.
Even if the justification is to give a broad
control over outright subversives and’
criminals who gain citizenship, does this
accord with fundamental American princ-
iples of equality in citizenship? This news-
paper doesn’t believe so. Opponents of the
McCarran-Walter bill have asked search-
ing questions on matters of basic national
policy, and the answers require from the
Senate an exercise of highest statesman-
ship.



Commonwealth Trade Day

THE West Indies are well represented at
the British Industries Fair, where Common-
wealth Trade Day was celebrated last week.

The day was marked by visits to the
Commonwealth section of the Fair at Earl’s
Court, London, by Mr, Oliver Lyttelton,
Secretary of State for the Colonies, Lord
Salisbury, Secretary of State for Common-
wealth Relations, and Mr. Peter ‘Thorney-
croft, President of the Board of Trade.

The British West Indies occupied an im-
pressive proportion of the section. They dis-
played their sugar, fruits, rum, cocoa,
honey, the world-famous Sea Island cotton,
and the attractive products of handcrafts
such as basketwork and wood-carving,
weaving, and embroidery,

The Jamaican stand included an exhibit
by the bauxite industry, the first time that
this newly-developed industry had been
staged by Jamaica as an individual exhibit.

A feature of the Trinidad and Tobago
stand was its magnificent display of anthu-
rium lilies, which is now almost a tradition.
As well as the famous Trinidad asphalt and
other well-known products on this stand,
two of the island’s new industries were re-
presented by displays of bottled lager beer
and stapled boxes,

On a neighbouring stand the attractions
of Barbados as a tourist centre were dis-
played.

These West Indian exhibits stood among
the displays of the Commonwealth coun-
tries, of Nigeria, the Gold Coast, and Sierra
Leone, of Hong Kong and Malaya, Malta

and Cyprus—displays that gave an impres-
sive idea of the magriitude of the Common-
wealth’s production especially of raw mate-
rials. Representatives in bright national cos-
tumes lent added colour to some of the
stands.

In a broadcast on the eve of Common-
wealth Trade Day, the President of the
Board of Trade reminded listeners that the
Commonwealth countries did one-third of
all the world’s trade in 1951.










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TO-NIGHT

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 1952



BARBADOS. ADVOCATE





Common Pleas Suit Continues

More Evidence Will
Be Heard Today

__ MOST of the evidence was being led fo both the Plain-
tiffs and the defendant yesterday in the Court of Coasaah
Pleas suit of Clement Gill, Joseph Drakes, Arthur Broomes
Sion - ay Branker cae Lambert Martindale who are

usputing the ownership of the Turf Club Spring Meeti
ticket F—9574 of 1949 which won £500. wae

Yesterday was the second day of the hearing of this
case and the Chief Judge Sir Allan Collymore who
is presiding adjourned the case until today when the re-
mainder of evidence will be taken and counsel will address
the special jury which has been empanelled.

The parties in the suit are all Police and charged with the
from Braggs Hill and both sides larceny of the ticket.
are claiming they bought the He was never present in
ticket from Belfield Taitt a ticket Branker’s shop when Gill bought
seller, Taitt said that he sold any ticket from Taitt, he said.
tickets from the particular book to Nor had he ever asked Gill fora
both parties, but he does not Share in any of his tickets. He
remember who got the winning also said that he had never bought
ticket. a any ticket from Taitt at Branker’s

Of the plaintiffs, the ticket was Shop. He denied, too, his ever
actually bought by Gill, they are 80iN8 to Gill's house and asking
alleging, and the other three who him to allow him to see his
were present each contributed a ticket.

sixpence, Referring to the allegation that
On the first day of hearing Gill ae wg B eed & shop and-there-
gave evidence to prove that ore could count well enough for

all purposes, he said he used to
sell ice and snowball but any
writing which was involved in
this connection was done by Mar-
garette Watts.

Cross Examined
Cross-examined, he said he had

Martindale had known the num-
ber of the ticket which he had
bought and on hearing it had won
told him and the two of them left
his home to borrow a newspaper
and check to see whether it had
acutally won, While on the way n

for the ne
oe newepeber,, Martindase. 0 garette Watts wrote the names on

whom he had shown his tickets j
~ the ticket no one else beside him-
and who still had them on him, self was present. Watts started

Miter 8 Ucke wae Rando Hon writing. the names on the ticket
; n il. i ,
he found that it was another ticket brother ad chen while” a

and not his ticket. was writing and had taken his
. pen and written the names.
_ Evidence Brought When he went home after meet-
Evidence for Martindale had jng Walker, he had gone home
been that Branker and Gill had immediately and found the others
in conversation with people said of his home in the sitting room.
that they had not had the winning The tickets were placed over his
ticket. He had also brought reputed wife’s bedroom door,
evidence to prove his buying the When they had started looking at
ticket. the tickets the winning ticket was
The plaintiffs are represented by about the third which had been
Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., instructed looked at.
by Hutchinson & Banfield Solici- He said that when he was ar-
tors. Martindale is represented rested, he had made a statement

House Pay Tribute To

Adams, Leader of the House, Mr.
F. ©. Goddard, Leader of the
Opposition, Mr. W. A. Crawford,
Mr.
E. D. Mottley,
spoke in glewing terms of Mr.
Braithwaite’s
public life of the island.

pathy, Mr. Adams said that Mr.
Braithwaite was in every sense
of the word, as far as democratic
representation in this island was
concerned, a pioneer.
who,



Porter’s Case

. Adjourned

The case in whieh rles
Darlington a porter of Chances
Lane, St. Michael, is charged by
the Police with the unlawful
ee geo of three bags of manure

vas adjourned yesterday by His
Worship Mr, E. A. MoLeod, Police
Magistrate of Distrist “A uastil
June 10> Counsel in the case is
<. mi W. Barrow for Darlington

: Sgt. King at.ached to the
Central Station is presecuting for

the Police fro

- m infoir
received, re ea
The charge stated that the



offence was commit.ed o1 May 5.
Cpl. Kinch told the court yester-
day that he saw the defendant
loading the three bags of manure
on to a t.uck and became suspici-
oe oeer the delendant to
iccompan, im ¢ >» Centr
ae y » the Central
y The defendant was standing in
Church Street, City, wit, the bags
of manure, "
‘€ross examined by Mr, Barrow,

HOUSEWIVES complain that eggs are in short supply.
egg in the picture is a heartening single handed effort to solve the
problem. This egg that weighs just over four ounces was layed by a
six months’ old Leghorn hen owned by Mrs. Enid Millington of Fifth

The larger

Avenue, Hart's Gap.





Late
Christopher Braithwaite

THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY yesterday evening paid
tribute to the late Mr. Christopher Braithwaite, a former
member of that Chamber, and a “pioneer of democratic
representation in this island” whose funeral took place at
the St. Michael’s Cathedral within two hours of.the House
passing a Resolution of Sympathy to his sorrowing relatives,

The Resolution read:—

“Be it resolved that the House of Assembly place on
record its profound sympathy at the passing of the late
Christopher Augustus Braithwaite, member of the House of
Assembly from 1924 to 1940 and that a copy of this resolu-
tion be sent to his family.

Tribute was paid by Mr. G. H.

that the defendant could have
bought the manure from a person
unknown to the Police,

PAMENT WITH LULLET
WOUND IMPROVES

Repo:ts from the General
Hospital are that Patient Arnold
Cave of. Welchman Hall, — St.
Thomas, is impioving everyday.
Cave was admitted to the Hospital
on May 2, suffering from a. bullet
wound in his chest. Before being
taken to the Hospital he was seen
by. Dr. W. H, Johnson,

Verona Jackman (17) of Hansen
Tenantry, St. George, who was
taken to the General Hospital after
a baby was found in a 54-foot
well on May 23, is also reported
to be making good progress,

It, was alleged that Jackman
was the mother of the child,

The baby died some minutes
after it was admitted to the Generai
Hospital.

“MAREA HENRIETTA”
BRINGS MIXED CARGO



democratic pioneer in Barba-

dos, the name of Christopher

Augustus Braithwaite.

Mr. F. C. Goddard seconded
the motion for the Resolution,
and joined in paying tribute to
the memory of Mr. Braithwaite.
He referred to his service both
in the. House of Assembly and
as a Vestryman, and recalled that
he had served in the capacity
of Churchwarden on three occa-
sions, and acted in such a capac-
‘ity only a week ago during the
absence from the island of Hon.
Vv. C. Gale the present Church-

Vv. B. Vaughan and Mr.
all of whom
contribution to the

Moving the Resolution of Sym-



All of them
since his advent into the

by Mr. D. H. L. Ward instructed to Sergt. Elcock. . ago. warden
‘ ; H id h 1 . House of Assembly 28 years ago, ; ' ee ‘The Schooner Marea Henrietta
Ae omg Haynes & Griffith, the oe ne = ee ore had been successful in bearing the ; Mr. Goddard said “He was a (43 tons) sailed into Carlisle Bay
; torch of progress and democracy real public spirited man, not only yesterday morning from St, Lucia

did he know the numbers himself
and he allowed that he was sur-
prised when Walker told him he
had heard he had the winning
ticket.

His going to Jones to check to

ic ~ confirm Watts telling him he had
of the tickets had won a consola won was because Jones and he

tion horse, Fanny Adams, .
: ass di were friends.
iis jad bought all his tikets “Wegt witness was the _tcke
He. ‘couti@unidt’ "remetaber. where seller Belfield Taitt who is by
he wa OEE hi r where trade a painter. He said that on
he was when he bought the ticket December 24, 1948, he sold a book
in quate i cameo ot are Gein FS te
; rious Sat . 9579, He sold Oswald Mayers o
On the last'@ayror the races of Castle “Grant ‘onep Carrie Jordan
this particular meeting, he was of the same district, at Branker’s
near home when he saw Prince Shop, Branker two, Clement Gill
Walker fixing his car, Walker two, Drakes one and on leaving
spoke to him and told him he had there he saw Martindale and sold
heard from the boys of the dis- him the last ticket. He said the
trict that he had the ticket-which fact that it was Christmas eve
won Fanny Adams and he told helped him to remember to whom
him he had not looked at his he sold these tickets. He did not
tickets up to then. know who had got the winning
On going home he told Margar- ticket. ;
ette Watts to look at the tickets While at Branker’s shop no
and check with the newspaper he one had asked for a share in any
had brought home, Watts told him ee ee an at the ica
age and gavebim: the when he sold the tickets there,
: but some 15 feet away at a neigh-
bouring shop.

Claim The Ticket

In March Gill came to him and
told him to claim a share in the
ticket and he would give him a
receipt for it and in this way a
i might be able to get back the
tion Watts had passed on to him ‘ticket fscm Martindale, but he
and called a _ friend, named ; ; j
“ ie? , old him he would have nothing to
Buggie” Jones who suggested to Go with such an affair
him that they should: check the Cross-examined he said he
ticket with shopkeeper Branker’s bought that book with the win-
paper. They went to Branker and ning ticket from the Turf Club on
got the paper and returned to December 22, 1948.

Jones’ home, He said that Gill had not ex-

After this, about mid-night, he plained his “so as to get back the
and Gertrude Watts, his reputed ticket from Martindale.” He said
wife took the ticket to Taitt to that Martindale told him in Gill’s
opera’ eee ere On took no that Gill was claiming

e tic o Prince Walker. who the ticket.
took him to one Bethell to Margarette Watts said she lived
negotiate the sale of the ticket. with her aunt Gertrude Watts,
He was paid $50 on account, Martindale's ported ee ‘

His brother and he were re- | She told o artindale’s bring-
turning from Bethell when they ing home a race ticket and told
met Branker and some other men her to write three names he call-
in a car. One of the men sugges- ed on it. She had her lead pencil
ted that they should hold him and had begun to write the names
then. when her brother entered. She

He heard nothing more of it took a pen from him and wrote

until the following morning when the names in ink, She then cor-

. ; ‘ en roborated Martindale’s evidence
Re imew Beinell wie intoemen 2am as to Martindale’s asking her to

he could not pay him the re- ; rage”

i check the tickets with the news-

mainder of the money as other paper after the last day of the

people were claiming the owner- yaces,

ship of the ticket. Cross-examined she _said
Later he was arrested by the @ On page 7.

9 CRDSODODV9S99OF
“

Lambert Martindale, rockblaster
said he had tickets on the Spring
Meeting, 1949. Margarette Watts,
a young woman who lived at him
and to whom he had given the
tickets to keep, told him that one

Identification

He remembered that when he
brought home this ticket in ques-
tion he had told her to write hea
name, another relative’s and his
on it and this writing assisted him
in the identification.

He left home after the informa-

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‘ PAGO oo 7

in
Dr. O’Neale and their colleagues
of 30 years or so ago, who blazed
the path, and even against oppos-
ition,
people cf this island to see that
it was possible for them to be
adequately represented
sons other than those who until
that day,
birth or wealth, were the rulers
of this colony.

exceptionally strong personality”,
Mr. Adams said, “and of necessity
he had clashes
some of his friends,
with his enemies”.

say from the bottom of his heart
that Mr. Braithwaite and himself
had
altered his respect for him.

Braithwaite was one of the found-
ers of the Barbados
League, and said that “such great
prestige
has stood us in good stead’.
said that those of them who part-
e

days, lookd and tried to heal the
breach.
had never heard anyone question
his sincerity or failed to pay or
have a sense of gratitude for ail
that he had done for the demo-
cratic cause of Barbados.

years”
have shown the way to the people
of Barbados for sticking to their
own, relying on thir own people
to represent them, rather than to
perpetuate the feeling
upper class should run the affairs
of the colony”.

that the feelings of the members
of the House that the democratic

fact that he had also given so
many years of service as a Ves-
tryman to the

she

SPOCCSLOSSS PS OOOCOSE EOE OOPS



4,4 44 4
> - SLL? * SO? 4/4,

in politics, but in the fieid of
sport in which he was always a
leader. He was a past president
of the Barbados Athletic Associ-
ntion, as well as a prominent
member of the Barbados Cricket
Association, and gave unstinting-
ly of his time and money.

He was well-known as a cham-
pion in any cause which he
thought was right and was never
known to lay down the cudge!s.

Barbades owed much to him, under Capt. A. Selby and brought
in 77 bunches of fresh fruit, five
bags of cocoanuts and 632 bags of
charcoal.

She is consigned to the Schooner
Owners’ Association.

Car Catches Fire

The upholstery and rear tyres
of motor car M-2642 were burnt
when the car caught fire along
Belle Gully Road, St. Michael, at
a 11.45: p.m., on Monday, It
was being driven by George Baker
of Goodland, St. Michael,

The car is valued $500,
insured.

made it possible for the



by per-

either by accident of

Long Service
Mr. W. A. Crawford said he
regarded it a very great privi+
lege to be able to add his quota
of tribute upon the passing of a
@ On Page 6.

St. Lucia Has Started

A Yacht Club
—25 Members

ST. LUCIA. has just started a yacht club with a mem-
bership of 25 which is increasing daily, Col. Eric James,
the colony’s Chief of Police now here for a short holiday
told the Advocate yesterday.

He said that they have a small Committee including Mr.
Frank Barnard as Commodore, Mr. Bell, Secretary and him-
self as Vice Commodore. They have already received ad-
vice and assistance from the Barbados and Trinidad Yacht
Clubs and have decided to adopt the tornado class as their
standard boat.

Referring to the Police Force he
said that they were a very con-
tented lot. The Force is com-
posed mainly of St. Lucians with
20% Barbadians who mix well

with their comrades in St. Lucia
end take a great interest in all

Strong Personality
“Mir. Braiunwaite was a man of

sometimes witn It is

and even



Mr. Adams said he could truely

a‘ clash, and it had never

Mr. Adams recalled that Mr.

Progressive

of the previous years

He
a from Mr. Braithwaite in those

He was quite sure he

“His greatest contribution of
said Mr. Adams, ‘was to

unrest in St. Lucia, he said that
when he left everything was quiet
and peaceful. The last sugar strike
was in March when they had to
post policemen at Cul de Sac and
Roseau sugar factories for about
a month. They also had a de-

that the

7 sorts of sport including athletics, tachment from Grenada during
H . a nr than football and chiefly cricket. At that time’ which remained for
ag rs Sree an ‘their Annual Sports Meeting about two weeks, but there was

which took place on St. Lucia’s no disorder.

Day, December 13, he said wat Col. James is now doing his

force of the island owes much to : : Tine j remel u ,
him, should be put on record. a Barbadians did, extremely second tour of duty in St. Lucia.
Nor was he unmindful of the : He came out a year ago on a three-

year contract at the expiration of
which he will probably return to
England.

q ove

P.C, Griffith, one of their out-
standing Barbadian cricketers, is

parochial life of at present representing the colony









the Country. in the Windward Islands os oa
He knew Mr. Braithwaite : Tournament now taking place in .
most of them would have St. Lucia. : English & Shorthand
known him, only as a child Cork Cup Finals , i
knew his father, but he was (Col, James said that he is hoping ee enviar dn ps bados

to return home to see the finals
of these games.

sure that everyone of them
would always remember, per-

cr any other kind ot “A", like to
meet me (or one of mine) in the

haps more than any other Asked whether there was any lists at any time?
oF LLP PPE RLF 6’, Bring your most difficult English

Book with you to Combermere any



‘i Saturday (noon), Why not get a
check up once 4 month.
Cc. B. ROCK,
Gold Medalist,
First Prize Essayist,
“Rockcrest”,
Oistin Hill, Ch. Ch.



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Kinch said that he did not think

whether real or imaginary,
political faith of which he wis
the disciple gathered new disci-

ples because of its success but as

brushed tt
dose of radical socialism.

the House of Assembly in
but the faith of his older support-
ers, the land owning and business
section
until his death.
and

three times Churchwarden of the

musician and continued to serve
as an accompanist or organist on |}
many occasions

He was never married and
leaves to mourn their loss four
brothers and other relatives. To
those deepest sympathy will be |
extended. |

Club. ; Bath Mits
Nor was Mr. Braithwaite'’s in- Sadan fa tag: len SN gore
terests confined to politics and eth mga Eyebrow
sport. He was a tolerably good Hye Stoppers
Also

99OCOOCOOTOOOUe,

PAGE FIVE



OBITUARY

Mr. CA. Brathwaite.
J.P. :

THE death occurred at his resi-
dence Constitution Road on. Mon-
day evening of Mr. Christopher
Aucustus Braithwaite, J.P.

Mr. Braithwaite was an out-
standing figure in the community
To young and old, friend and c-
quaintance he was known as
“Crissy” and he maintained to the
ena a bon homie which won him
the affection of many people.

VERMOUTH

Wherever you fing the best

you'li find

Martini

Vermouth.

After his early years as a Clerk
he entered business on his own
and set up an establishment in
Roebuck Street e Was always
interested in public affairs taking
aclive parts in the debating socie-
ties, the Bridgetown Brotherhood
and it was not surprising when
he entered politics, He was elect-
ed to the St. Michael's Vestry in
1922 and under the aegis of th
late Dr. O’Neale and with the
support of the Herald a powerfu
weekly he stood for election te
the House of Assembly and wor
a St. Michael seat in 1925

Here it was that Crissy becam«
the lone representative of a new
celitical faith and almost a
legendary figure. The Legislature
in those days was largely conser-
vative in outlook but Dr, O'Neal
with his new Democratic League
had begun proselytising anc
Crissy was his strongest disciple
The campaign in the bye-election
was keen and clean. Mr. 'C. L
Chenery then Editor of the “Bar-
bados Advocate’ and Mr. G. A.
Braithwaite of the Democratic
League represented to differing
political faiths, The League won.
And it will be recollected by those
who have lived a generation after
that this was the parting of the
political ways opening up new
vistas of thought in a community
living contentedly under the
regime of “the good days”.

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3 Burner Model @ $71.87

Also

WHITE PORVELAIN ENAMEL SINKS
With Double Drainboard @ $65.64
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In the House now as in the Ves-
try he thundered against id
The

Se

the war brought its unpredictable Establishe
changes the now Liberal faith of stablished T, HERBERT, ‘Ltd. Incorporated
Braithwaite and his followers was 1860 10 & 11 Roebuck Street 1926

aside by the = stronger

Mr. Braithwaite lost his seat in

1944

kept him in the Vestry

his views
respected
He wa






Here
experience were
and his worth recognised,
parish. In March this year he
was appointed Senior Guardian
and recently acted Churchwarden

of the Parish.

REPARATIONS

A fresh shipment of
arrivedfrom Canada,

the following

Outside politics he took an in-
terest in games of all kinds and
athletics and was the founder and
only President of the Empire Club,

Spun-Cream Home Perman-
ent Wave.

Spun-Cream Refill Kits

Soapless Oil Shampoo

Hair Pomade in Tubes

Blue Grass Solid Cologne

Sun Tan Oil

Liquid Bronze-Glo

He was also President of the
Athletic Association, Despite the
many changes in the fortunes of
the Club he never relaxed his in-
terest in nor financial hold on the

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8 BeBwmmeaeA 8
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a’







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We hereby notify our cus-
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for Stock Taking on

Tuesday, 27th May
Wednesday, 28th May
Thursday, 29th May.

Our Dispensing Depart-
ment will, however, be open
for Prescriptions only,

Bruce Weatherhead Ltd.

27,5,52—2n,

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AND SILVER
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OR IN PIECES IN
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Only ONE POUND of PURINA DOG CHOW
ivailable in Meal and Checker form is equa)
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te

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Under exceptional circumstances we bought these at a big discount off



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A Good BAG fer “Week-ends” or Travel
RET/.'L. PRICE IN ENGLAND IS 50/- ($12.00)

BUT OUR PRICE TO YOU EIS ONLY $7.20 ea.

This bargain is obtainable only from





Dial 2352
Broad Street

en





Lt




PAGE SIX



House Pass
Insurance Bill

@ From Page |







ample, lause 16 imposes juty
on persons agains whom claim
are made tO give wilormauioh as
fo Whether or not they are in-
sured, Clause akes it obliga-
tory to jsurren certificates of
insurance when policies are can-
celled, and Clause 22 imposes
penalties for forging certificates;
in addition Clause 26 empowers

the Governor-in-Executive Com-

mittee to make Regulations with

the approval of the Legislature for

carrying the Bill into effect.
Worrted

Discussing the Bill, Mr. C. E
Talma (L). said that Clause 9 was
worrying him.

He said ‘that section 4 of this
clause would affect very much the
small car owner who happened to
be involved in a collision. There
were cases where the clause did
not cover the entire liability, he
said, and in his opinion this clause
created a lot of hardship.

Mr, G. H. Adams (L) explained
to Mr. Talma that the sum in-
volved depended on whom the
vehicle owner struck, If the car
had struck a man of some mean
and he sued for £5,000 the Insur-
ance Company might have to pay
that sum. But if the amount for

which the company becomes liable

exceeds the insurance of the
vehicle, then they could obtain
that. extra amount from thie

vehicle owner

He said that this section was.an
attempt to protect the third party
to every extent without being
hard on the insurance company.

Mr. O. T. Allder (1) felt that
some of whateMr. Talma had said
deserved consideration, He. saic
that there were about six to seven
thousand vehicles on the road to-
day. Sorne were already insureci
but this Bill was going to compe!
them to take out Third Party
Insurance. *

He said that it would appear a
though this seheme was going t
make a lot Df'money and if mone
were going to be made, Goverti-
ment should run it. He felt thai
certain "by$ owners were going to
increase their fares.

. . .
A Limit

Mr. R. G. Mapp (L) said th:
he g thought Mr, Talma had
waised a point in Clause 4.
He said eet some car struck a
man and the man was worth so
much, it meant that the insurance

company, would have to pay more | insured,

and then, recover it from the car
owner,

He said that if for argument a
man of good means was killed in
an accident and he left his d«
pendents well taken care of, he
did not see why that man should
get more than the man who wus
working for $80 a month. He
said that Government should: mak «
21 limit. to the sum ‘which the
insurance company could elaiimn
from the car owner.

Army Gliders
Abolished

Gliders and glider troops are to
be Abolished. They are out-dated.












This decision has been reached!
atier = confei es between the
War Office and Air Ministry on
the fulure « irberne o tions, |

Only & ion is that possibly |
fa small unber of glide cou
be {for carrying eSsit |

iky aquipment ina erg |

rE ily Hit

R hind this decision

rt extreme

vulnerability of

‘ers under modern conditions
jevelopment secret troop-
earrying aircraft that can land in
Limited spaces and improvements
in the use of paratroops.

Training of glider pilots
virtually ceased.

11 Drown

FORMOSA, Argentina, May 27.
Eleven persons were drowned

of

has





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



24 KILLED IN

| House Pay
COLLISION

e a communicate
Tribute with the followis® snips through their
















In Touch With Barbados

Coastal Station
CABLE & WIRELESS (W,14
rdvise that they can now

NOTICE

Live








Parbados Coast Sta’ ret PURn tonettathe thous. sal
TOKYO, May 27. nests eae Nor Empire Glencoe, s.s. ice. \daeiis OE ieatibia ce ee
United States Navy _head- @ From Page 5 Se eae oe tae pairing houses that | am now car- |}
quarters said 24 South Korean Barbadian who served the coun- Romana, ».s. Helder, &s Nenera, ss ae Sy ee ee
eamen were killed and 21 in+ try jong and well. Mr. Brath- Yellow Tavern, %.s. Bonito, s.s Auri- pr easel 9 sitet. shes” tia
‘ qi : ies t . . 4 a3 cae jn Cul@, 5.8. Jean, m.v. Almak, s.s. Aleoa - a an eh
aired last Wednesday when the waite died, as one might say in +ioneer ss Bl Aleto, se S Maven 4563 or apply at my Home Ad-
South Korean, Navy Frigate political harness, and he was sure +=. Ganymedes, s.s. Esso Rochester. ||] coy “"'* Yood: Howell's Cross
Apnok and the | amununition that he did as he would have ‘Alabama, ss. Dodin Marsano. = s .. TULIUS BEST
carrier USS, Mont Backer jyiched, endeavouring to carry fon Heluhts, ss. bones pe es Builder & Contrac
collided in Korean waters. oF the dutias imposed by the local Garth, Sa | iGaibae tier. Gonenion Designer & General Wood-Work«
The two, ships were steaming overnment of the metropolitan Pivadavis. ss Willemstad, 5.8. Olga, 28.5. 52—1n
» formation..in the darkness * , ¥ 8. Hororata, s.s. Durham, s.s. Euros
a a ; 9 parish—duties which he began sO &% 5 Ss. Ambrosio, $s. Thorshammer, §.5
wren the signal was given to . LS
han urse, The Apnok moved â„¢@ny years ago, and which he Amakura, s.s. Atlanticair, s.s. Rangi- PPPOE
hange Col . P m discharged efficiently down ‘ne, #8, Sunwalt, ss Lancero, 5.8.
in front of the Backer which re- are y Atlantic Voyager.’ 5.8. Urania, s,s
versed her engines but not in time through the years. American Eagle, s.s. Helena, s.s. Trop- RAFFLE
to avoid the collision which oc- He said that it was largely que] churus, s.s. Ganymedes, » s- Cartor. -5 ses





No Representation

curred at 9.30. pan. to his activities in the local gav-
Vice AdmiralC, Lurner Joy the, ernment system of, Barbados that
Commander of Naval Forces in those bodies begarf to pay atten-
ne, Far Bast..expressed his tion to the poor and needy “in
neart-felt sympathy to the Re- our midst”. ,
rublie of Korea Navy Mr. Crawford recalled that Mr.
—UP. Braithwaite was one of the found-
j ; = and the moving Ye aby of the
thei 9 2 old) Democratic ague which
Sailor 8° Union ia so much to blaze the trail for
S ri ke political progress in the colony.
t In U.S. He was also one of the moving
spirits in the St. Michael’s Broth-
SAN FRANCISCQ, May 27. erhood which did such splendid
The Sailors’ Union of the Pacific pocial service to the colony so
FL tured their stop-work meet~ many years ago, and in that
ne my a a. me ane sphere—he also rendered a most
against the Pacific Coa ipping « - ‘ ,
iia: dk DAE dueonmde for wees ignificant contribution
nuereases and overtime at sea
Harry Lundberg, head of the
union, who announced the strike Mr... Crawford recalied bey it
ist night said members voted for happened that when Mr. Braith-
3,300. to, 67. waite came to the House of Assem-
The strike laid up ships manned bly as a member, the masses of
by the union at all United States the people were without repre-
ports, but its effects were felt sentation of any sort in the leg-
chiefly On the Pacific coast. Ships islature and said that largely by
now in. Henolulu will be allowed his efforts, he made easier the
to return to the mainland. How- way for the majority of them
cver some of these ships were who followed him into the legis-
exernpted from the strike since jature and he might well be re-
the union promised to sail ships gatded as one of the pioneers. of
ewe cargo to the Far Gupecrstic legislation in Barba-
cme Mr. V. B. Vaughan —_ 1:
Mottley joined in the tribute; the
CANES BURNT latter pier that the Leader
- wf the House adjourn in order
Four and a half acres of first that members Bm pay their last
‘rop ripe canes were burnt when jegnects to the passing of Mr.
u fire occurred at Lascelies Planta- Braithwaite.
tion, St, James, at about 7.15 p.m., .
on Monday. They are the property Mr. Adams said that any mem-
of P, G, Seales of Goodland, Christ bers who desired to attend the
Chureh, and were insured, funeral were at liberty to do so,
Another fire at Enterprise, but due to presure of Govern-
Christ Church, burnt 50 holes of ment business, he could not ad-
second crop ratoons, property of journ the House until next week.
Garfield Holder of the same He was quite prepared to adjourn
address, The ratoons were nol for five minutes as a further mark
of respect.

—-- tet emcee erecta enema Smaart

- GOVERNMENT NOTICES

VACANT POST OF SENIOR HEALTH NURSE, DEPARTMENT
OF MEDICAL SERVICES





Applications are invited for the pensionable post of Senior Health
Nurse, Department of Medical Services.

Salary will be on the scale of $1,200 x 72 -— $1,440 per annum,
tn addition, a temporary non-pensionable cost of living allowance
will be payable in accordance with approved rates.

Uniform is provided,

The appointment will be on two years’ probation and subject to
the selected applicant being passed as medically fit for employment
in the Public Service,

The successful applicant will be posted to the Health Centre,
Speightstown, in the first instance where furnished quarters are pro-
vided and will be subject to transfer to any Public Health area in the
Colony, woe eee

Applicants must be registered nurses and midwives and hold the

} Certificate of the Royal Sanitary Institute for Health Visitors and

School Nurses,
\pplicants should present in writing a full curriculum vitae to
include age, educational qualifications and experience.
Applications should be addressed to the Colonial Secretary, Pub-

lic Buildings, Bridgetown to reach his office not later than 3lst May,

1952,
24.5.52.—2n. —



\a

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Vacanies in the Elementary T: Service
Applications are invited from teachers (women) with at least 10
years’ teaching experience for the Headships of the following schools: —
Eagle Hall Junior School—St, Michael
St. Patrick’s Girls’ School—Christ Church.
The minimum professional qualification required is the Certificate

Tuesday when a launch carrying |A of the Department or exemption therefrom.

35 passengers
Parana River.

the
pas-
sengers were saved by the Mari-
time Prefecture launch searching
the river
darkne
The launch was carrying pas-
sengers to the steamer Ciudad de
Corrientes anchored in mid-

eapsized in
Twenty-four





stream due to low water in the ]®&Velopes marked “Appointments Board” in the top left hand corner

port here. The launch was ap-
parently caught in a whirlpool,

Some of the victims were Para-
guayan political exiles bound foi
Buenos Aires.

Stay fresh all da
Lifebuoy Toilet Soap w
Its deep-cleansing lath
fresh, so much longer.

FOR PERSONAL FRESHNESS ALWAYS

(ABT O71 110-85

long—just use
ever you wash,

sct a tablet now,
and stay fresh all the tine

Salary will be in accordance with the Government Scale for Head
Teachers in Grade I Elementary Schools.

Candidates who have already submitted application forms in re-

in the early morning }spect of previous vacancies (now filled) may apply by letter, accom-

panied by a recent testimonial. All other candidates should make
application on the appropriate form which may be obtained from the
Department of Education. All applications must be enclosed in
ind must reach the Department of Education by Saturday, 31st May,

1952. Candidates are warned that canvassing may lead to their dis-
qualification,

19th May, 1952.

9.2.52—7n |

ally keeps you



a LEVER propor













That took place at Warren's

WHEN THE

GER~ FIRE
fe youf



Factory on Saturda, the Winning



SAPO

Numbers are

12 — 122 — 9















A HINTZEN
Warren's Factory

28 .5.52—1n,

UNGUENTINE
QUICK

A MODERN ANTISEPTIC
TUBES or JARS

FOR SALE

METHODIST MANSE

Queen St., Speightstown

The building is solid stone and
contains drawing and dining
rooms, three bedrooms, study etc.,
electric lights and modern sani-
tation standing on 21,025 sq. ft
land or thereabouts



7 ee

NOTICE

1. Secretaries of Cricket Clubs
taking part in the competitions
are reminded that subscriptions
are payable prior to the com-
mencement of the season on June
7th,

2. Members who \\ave not paid
their. subscriptions for 1952 are
% asked:to do so before the annual













An excellent site for commercial
purposes

Tnspection on application to Mr
H. Marville, Speightstown Boys’








Ԥ general mecting sheduled for School,

. ier 3th May, 19¢! Howell not Iater than the Sth
F BARBADOS CRICKET Tune

. ASSOCIATION INC Offers for same can be submitted
, W. F. HOYOS, to Mr. V. B. St. John, C/o N. B.

> Hony. Secty

22.5.52—3n
%

94,54



Tiles and woodwork gleam and sparkle after
a quick rub with Vim on « damp cloth. Vim cleans
quickly, smoothly — kecos surfaces bright and
polished, without a scratc!:, | se Vim for pots and pans,
sinks and baths — a// you.> cleaning.

Vile

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 1952



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ACHES... |

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Then backache, headache, rheumatism,
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‘ij HERE are very good reasons why ‘ Oyaltine’ is the world's

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strated its outstanding qualities. A cup of this delicious beverage,
taken at bedtime, helps to soothe the nerves, assists you to relax
and composes the system for natural, refreshiny sleep.

While you sleep ‘ Ovaltine’ provides food elements—including
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to reinforce your nervous vitality, your strength and energy. That
is why ‘ Ovaltine’ sleep is the best kind of sleep—so tranquil and
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Doctors and nurs?s everywhere recommend ‘ Ovaltine’ as a bed-
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The next time rder or est a arm
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WEDNESDAY, MAY 28

ERE PARA





WH

PA





1952

ATROOPERS NOW GUARD RED PRISONERS





AS DEFIANT RED WAR PRISONERS threatened new outbreaks on Koje Island, an American airborne force has

moved in to bolster the tightened guard

over the rebel Communists. In the picture above, Red POWs are

shown using spiked-tipped tent poles for weapons as they defiantly brush up on bayonet drill in preparation

for further trouble. Shortly before arrival of the U.S. 187th

Boatner, new Koje commander said: “They'll soon learn who is boss.”

—_.

Indians—Essex

Mateh



Drawn

(From Our Own Correspondent)

There was a tight

LONDON, May 27.

; i finish to the Indians match with
Essex which ended in a draw

at Ilford today. A powferful

Indian recovery headed by Phadkar and Manjrkar who put
on 136 in two hours for the fifth wicket enabled Hazare to
declare at 368 for 6, leaving Essex to get 154 in 74 minutes.

The challenge was aecepted by
Insole who opened the Essex
innings with Dodds. .In the first
20 minutes they put on 43 before
Insole was caught by Ramecnand
off Shinde. Although wickets con-
tinued to fall steadily, Essex did
not give up the chase for runs
but H. G. Gaekwad was difficult
to get away and when stumps
were drawn Essex with the last
pair at the wicket were still ten
runs. behind struggling avoid
defeat.

Gaekwad captured five for 44,

During the match, Bailey of
Essex who is being considered for
the England team, hurt the third
finger of his bowling hand t ying
to catch Hazare low-down in the
slips and may not be fit in time
for the Test.

In the county games individual
honours went to Maurice Tompkin
who for the first time in his career
hit two separate hundreds in
Leicester’s victory over Middlesex,
Good bowling by the two Austra-
lians Jackson who took four for
36, and Walsh, four for,40, result-
ed in Middlesex being dismissed
for 215, and although. Leicester
lost an early wicket when thev
batted the second time Tx mpkin
followed up _ his first innings 156
by scoring 107 not out to bring
them to victory by seven wickets,

As a result of today’s games,
Middle still head thé County
Championship with 48 points and
six games, followed by Surrey 40
points in 4 games and Yorkshire
36 in 4,

Yorkshire have won _ three
games, the fourth against Somer-
set being abandoned without even
a first innings decision being
reached

Scoreboard:— Yorkshire beat
Derbyshire by an innings and 26
runs, Yorkshire 385 for 9 declared.
Derbyshire 116 and 243, Halliday
6 for :

Lancashire beat Notts by an
innings -and 29 runs. Lancashire
392 for 9 declared, Notts 165 and
195. Poole 51 not out. Hilton 5 for
87.

Hampshire beat Sussex by eight
wickets, Sussex 178 and 214.
Shackleton 5 for 70. Hampshire
300 and 93 for 2. :

Worcestershire beat Warwick-
shire by 169 runs, Worcestershire
274 and 256 for 6 declared.
Warwickshire 210 and 151, Hitch-
cock 53, Perks 4 for 37.

Leicester beat Middlesex by
seven wickets. Middlesex 407 for
5 declared and 215. Hdrich 69.

to



























Helsinki next July.

1. The first correct solution
the prize.

Editor will win the prize.

HORIZONTAL

1—Performs.

5—Lucky number.
temple in Jerusalem?

14—Clocl: face.

15—Papal veil.

16—Cleave.

17—Near.

18—Divisions of time.

20—Wedging piece.

22—Printer’s measure.

25-—Bitter vetch.
26--Dry, as wine.
27--Caressive touch.
28—Predatory birds.

Precludes
—-Skids to the side.
a Eccentric wheel-part.



not to lie agains






Frost. ;
Worthless bit.
Land-measure.

“International





l= PLEASE

WIN $40.00

is a simple Cross Word puzzle which can help you to
en gt0.00 hr galy one shilling. At the same time you will
be doing your bit to help send Barbados’ sole Olympic hope to
r Enter now and try your skill.

RULES

10—Whe was ejected from the

23—In what sea were Pharaoh's
chariots and host drowned?

horns has th

Leicester 412 for 6 declared and
212 for 3. Tompkin 107 not out.
sssex drew with the Indians.
Indians 195 and 368 for 6 declared.
Essex 410 and 144 for 9.

Glamorgan versus Somerset;
match drawn, Glamorgan 361 and
235 for 6 declared, Somerset 199
and 260 for 4. Stephenson 114,

Gloucester vs Kent match
drawn. Gloucester 254 and 330
for 4 declared. Young 125, Milton
117 not out, Kent 337 and 178 for
6.

Water Polo



Bonitas And
Whipporays Beat
IC. And Police

Jonitas “B” defeated their
rivals Harrison College “B” to the
tune of five—nil in their Water
Polo match at the Aquatic Club
yesterday ‘afternoon. The match
was watched by a fair amount of
fans and Bonitas had the edge
on their rivals all through tne
game,

The Bonitas goal scorers were
Browne, two goals, Rogers, two
goals and P, Fletcher, one goal.

In the other match, Police was
beaten 7—3 by the Whipporays

\“B” team. Again Whipporays had

the better part of the game. The
1eferee was Mr. A, Clarke,
, . °
S. African Union
) is ri
Secretary Freed
CAPETOWN, South Africa.
May 27.

Garment workers union secre-
tary Emil.Sachs whose arrest
touched off widespead rioting was
released in $700 bail Tuesday
on condition that he attends no
public meetings.

lt was his second appearance
in the Supreme Court in two days
on charges of violating the sup-
pression of Communism Act by
twice defying the Government
order against public speaking and
tts order to give up his union
past.

His release coincided with the
return to work of striking mem-
bers of the Garment Workers
Union who rioted when he was
arrested Saturday while making a
speech. He was released on bail.
Promptly made another speech
and was arrested.—U.P.







opened by the Editor will win

2. In the event of there being no correct ‘solution the one
containing the least errors which is opened first by the

65—Meager.
6?—Therefore.

69—Sign. ;
71—What peoples had dwelt in Ar
rior to the land being given
to the children of Lot? ;

73—Musician's baton.
75—Spikenard.

7 ‘ountry roads.
77—Curved molding.

VERTICAL
1—Jewish manth,
2—Quote.
3—Symbol for tantalum.
4—Cunning.
5—Flies aloft,
6—Wanders from truth.
7—Duet. A
8—Street railway (abbr.)

9—A border city in the land of

Judah
oup.




men defeated?



ey Seavey. 12—Inner lining of the iris.
yy What giant was slain by

. David?

41—Exclamation. ;
Das isrity. 26—-Descendants of Shern.
/44--Golf mound. 27-—Greek letter.

: i ix 29—Tiny.
»45--Topaz hummingbird. 29—Tins :
46—Sun god. 30—Split pulse.
| @1—Spadices. 31—College cheer.

Slipped. d 33On the moon.
an lievers , 33—
50—What are believ rs warne ee

36—Who is the reputed author of

the Psalms?
37—Dubious.
39—Tibetan gazelle.
40--Bronze money.

43—Who owned the field in which

Abraham was buried?

45—Watchful.
47—-Pig-

48—T
49—Ocean.





NOTE NEW CLOSING

what place were Joshua's

Airborne Infantry Regiment, Brig. Gen Haydon

(International Soundphoto)

St. Lucia Score
478—9 Against

Dominica

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. LUCIA, May 27.

The second match in the Wind-
ward Islands’ Cork Cup Cricket
series opened on Monday, St.
Lucia versus Dominica.

St. Lucia batted all day today
to amass the huge total of 478
runs for 9 wickets, Griffith miss-
Ing his century.by two runs. St.
Lucia’s overnight score of 178
for one was increased by *ix runs
when the second wicket fell,
Deterville going out in the sec-
ond over for 83, and the third
wicket fell at 197, Augier being
caught at 64. Lunchtime score
was 264 for 3, Griffith 36, Drys-
dale 41.

On resumption, Drysdale went
out without adding to his total
Teatime score was 364 for 4.
Close of play 478 for 9.

Scores: Barrow 37, Deterville
83, Auguer 64, Drysdale 41, Phil-
lips 39, including 4 sixes and 2
fours in 19 minutes, Joseph 29,
Haynes 16, Dr. Clarke (Capt.)
2, Ellick not out 17, Stheline not
out 39.

Fall of wickets 1—57, 2—184,
3—197, 4—275, 5—319, 6—387,
7—399, 8—414, 9—463,

The weather was fine and the
crowd was the largest ever to
witness the games.





Common. Pleas

@ From Page 5

had put the ticket in her pocket
bag. About 26 tickets were in the
bag and about 18 had the names
written on them. She said that
it had taken her a fairly long
time to go through the tickets on
the last night of the races as she
went through all.

She said that Martindale left
the house with the newspaper and
the ticket. She saw when he re-
turned later that night with the
newspaper anq the ticket.

It had taken her about three to
four hours to find the winning
ticket.

When she wrote the names on
the ticket her aunt, grandmother,
her brother and Martindale were
present.

She denied writing the names
only on the last night of the
races,

Harold Trotman, a cabinet
maker of Braggs Hill, said that on
March 12, 1949, between 9 and 12
he was at Branker’s shop reading
a newspaper when someone came
in and began talking about the
winning ticket and Branker said
he did not have it.

Another Taitt, Stanley Taitt of
Horse Hill gave evidence of his
having heard Gill say he did not
have the winning ticket.

The case continues to-day.



3.
printed below.

. will be immediately destroyed.

°: decision of the Editor of the Barbados Advocate.

" 4 p.m.

1.

Advocate of June 1.

51—Shoshonean Indian

53—Observed. A

55—Spirit of the air.

56— Asparagus.

37—To what were the breast-
plates of the locusts com-
jared?



Zi
PT



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BEREVEREEEN
LT ANN TP



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Address





Entrance fee of one shilling (1/-) must be enclosed with
each solution along with name and address on the coupon

Any entry which is not accompanied by the entrance fee
All entrants for this competition agree to abide by the
The competition will be closed on Friday, 30th May, at
All envelopes must be clearly marked CROSS WORD
PUZZLE COMPETITION and addressed to the Editor, the

Barbados Advocate, 34 Broad Street.
8. The name of the winner will be published in the Sunday

DATE




| | EW | | AS

7 PROCEEDS TO FARNUM FOR FINLA

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

99604

OOSCSS SO5006H
In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Lucille Smith, Sch. Cloudia S-
Sch. Enterprise S.. Sch. Gita M., Sch.
Sunshine R., Lady Noleen, M.V.
Star, M.V. Lady Joy, Sch D'Ortac, M.V.
Cacique Del Caribe and M.V Compton.

ARRIVALS

Schooner Morea Henrietta 43 tons from
St. Lucia under Capt. A. Selby Consign-
ed to Schooner Owners’ Association
Lindsyd II.

ARRIVALS BY B.W.LA.
ON MONDAY
From Puerto Rico:
Gustav Pabst, Hubert F.
William Jones.
DEPARTURES BY B.W.1LA.
ON MONDAY
For Trinidad: ’

McD. Brathwaite, C Songhurst, W
Alston, J. Kreindler, BE. Thompson, T
Walrond, L. Willems, P. Willems, G.

DEPARTURES

Lady Silver, Sch, Franklyn D:; R » Sch.
Willems, L Edgehill, H Okhash, A
DeLima, A. De Lima, v Roberts, D
Brown, A. Sealy, C Sealy, L. Soodeen,
S. Patterson, N. Hoyland, L Villanueva,

Smith, Lt

©. Paddock, L. Phillips N, Hughes,
—_———__.
> ‘ , }
RATES OF EXCHANGE
Selling NEW YORK Buying
72.9% pr. Cheques on
Ponkers 71.3% pr.
Sight or demand
Drafts 71 1% pr.
72.9% pr. Cable a o
71.4% pr. Currency 69.8% pr.
Coupons 69.1% pr.

CANADA
tincluding Newfoundland)
pr. Cheques on

Bankers 74.1% pr
Demand Drafts 73 95> pr.
Sight Drarts 73.8% pr
75 8% pr. Cable
74.3% pr. Currency 72.6% pt
Coupons 71.9% pr.



Hongkong Police

@ from page 3
A Colonial Police Medal for
Gallantry is awarded to L/Cpl.

Pilus bin Sinong, aged 23, of the
Federation of Malaya Police Force
for his part in the engagement in
the Rengam area of Johore on
November 23.

Pilus shot and killed a bandit
sentry, and led a charge into the
bandit camp, throwing a grenade
which probably killed another
bandit.

For bravery during the Fiji hur-
ricane last January, Lorima
Dakunivosa, 30, a wireless opera-
and meteorological assistant, of
Yasawa-I-Rara, Fiji, is awarded
the British Empire Medal.

During the storm, Dakunivosa
extracated and repaired a trans-
nitting set from a wrecked hut
ut his exposed hill meteorological
station, installed it in the one
remaining house where the rest
of the villagers had taken refuge,
and was able to resume reporting
to the important central weather
cffice at Nadi.





WHAT’S ON TODAY

Courts of Appeal and Petty
Debt—10 a.m.
Court of Common Pleas—10.30

a.m.
Basket Ball, Second Division
at Harrison College, Dis-
trict A and Modern High
School at 5,00 p.m.
Presentation of Medals at Dis-
trict A—5.00 p.m.
“Twelfth Night” at Parry-Col-
eridge School—5.00 p.m.

Recipes
Readers of the Barbados





“Advocate” are asked to send
in recipes tor publication.
These recipes will be publish-
ed over a period of one month
after which time a poll will
be held and contributors will
be asked to decide the best
recipe of the month. The win-
ner will be awarded a prize.
Each entry must be accom-
panied by the following cou-
pon.

TO: THE WOMEN’S EDITOR
ADVOCATE.

NAME:

ADDRESS:

RECIPE NAME:





63—Knob.

orn aecition,

66—Transgression.

67—How any mites did the poor
widow throw into the trea-
sury?

10—Which of Judah’s son was

siain by the Lord?
72— Mother.
74—Symbol for silver.

7a
Lae
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>

PAGE SEVEN



*

MADE BY THE MONKS OF BUCKFAST ABBE










BY

If you feel worn out, depressed, or
generally run down a glass or two
a day of Buckfast Tonic Wine will
quickly restore lost energy and
tone up the whole nervous system.
Giving new vitality it fortifies you
against fever and exhaustion and
remember, Buckfast Tonic Wine
is especially valuable
after illness,











‘TONIC WINE,














GALVANISED CORRUGATED SHEETS

24 Gauge x 6 ft., 7 ft, 8 ft., long $5.00, $5.04, $7.36
per Sheet

26 Gauge x 8 ft., 9 ft. 10 ft. long $5.60; $6.30; $7.00
per Sheet

GALVANISED RIDGE CAPS
15 ins. wide x 6 ft, long at $2.62 each

GALVANISED NAILS at 37c, per Ib.

RUBBEROID ROOFING :—
in Rolls 3 ft. wide x 36 ft. long at $10.00 per Roll

BARBADOS HARDWARE CO. LTD.

No. 16 Swan St. Phones: 4406, 2109, 3534
of Listinelion

RESILIENT DECORATIVE TILES



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PAGE EIGHT



CLASSIFIED ADS, remue sericss



Seaireeempengnipntinemannsrenatnannsomarmeutiodatentnvarsacaates

DIED







FIELDS--On May 28th 195
Indian Ground, St. Pete Helena A
Fields. Her fimeral took piace at All
Saints’ Church the same day

Archibald Fields (son), Barton and Carl

(grandsons), Elaine Fields grand-

daughter), H. I. Gill 28 5.52

MERRITT.On May 27. 1952. Richard

Merritt. The funeral leaves his late
Tesidence Layne's Gap, Martindales
Road at 4.30 p.m. to-day for the
Westbury Cemetery Friends are

asked to attend
Gwen and Ira Merritt (daughters)
28.5. 52—1n



SMALL~On Tuesday 27 May, 1952—
Elesha Small, Her funeral will leave
her late residence,School Gap, West-
bury Road at 4.30 p.m. to-day for
the Westbury Cemetery. Friends are
asked to attend.

Mr. & Mrs. Inniss Hall

28.5.52—1n



THANKS

ee
THOMAS—The family of the late Bruce
Thomas beg through this medium to
return thanks to all those kind frierids
who sent wreaths, letters of condo-
lence, or in any way expressed sym-

pathy in their recent bereavement.
, 27.5.52—in

EDUCATIONAL |

OO
CHRIST CHURCH eee, FOUNDATION

SOK
ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1952

Applications for entry to the School in
September, 1952, must be made on the
official form which can be obtained at
the Schvol on Mondays—Fridays between
9,30 a.m. and $,00 p.m.

Applicants must be between the ages
of 8 years and 11 years, 6 months on fhe
Ist of September, 1952

The entrance examination will be held
at the School on Friday, 13th June, 1952,
at 9.30 a.m. There will be no accom-
modation at the School for Parents or
Guardians on that day.

Application forms must be returned to
the Headmistress not later than Friday,
30th May, 1952,



11.5.52— gn



CHRIST CHURCH
GIRLS' FOUNDATION SCHOOL
Foundation Scholarships
There will be one or more vacancies
for Foundation Scholars at the Christ
Church Girls’ Foundation School in
September, 1952. 3
An Examination will be held at the
School at 9.30 a.m. on Friday 13th
June, 1952. Forms of application can be
obtained from the Secretary, Mr. D. E. M.
Malone, at Harrison College, and must
be returned to him together with a Birti,
or Baptismal Certificate not later than
3.00 p.m. on Friday 30th May, 1952
Candidates must be—

()) The Children of parishoners of
Christ Church who are in strait-
ened circumstances

(2) Between the ages of 10 and 12
inclusive on the day of the exam-
ination, i.e. 13th June, 1952

EB. M. MALONE,
Secretary-Treasurer,
Governing Body,
Ch. Ch. Girls’ Foundation School.
18,.6,.52—4n

. CHRIST CHURCH
BOYS’ FOUNDATION sCHOOL
Samuel Kirton Scholarships

There will be one or more vacancies
for Samuel Kirton Scholars at the
Christ Church Boys’ Foundation School
in September, 1952.

An examination will be held at the
School at 9.30 a.m. on Saturday, 14th
June, 1952. Forms of application can be
wbtained from the Secretary, Mr. D, E. M.
Malone, at Harrison College, and must
be returned to him together with a Birth
or Baptismal Certificate not later than
3.00 p.m. on Friday, 30th May, 1952.

Candidates must be—

(1) Children attending an Elementary
School in the parish of Christ

Churah.
(2) The children of parishioners of
Christ Church who are in strait-

circumstances,

(3) Between the ages of 10 and 12
inelusive on the day of the exam-
ination, i.e, Idth June, 1952

D. EB, M. MALONE,
Secretary-Treasurer,
Governing Body,
Ch. Ch, Boys’ Foundation School,
18.5.52—4n



CHRIST CHURCH

BOYS’ FOUNDATION SCHOOL
Foundation Scholarships

There will be one or more vacancies
for Foundation Scholars at the Christ
Church Boys’ Foundation School in
September, 1952.

An Examination will be held at the
Schoo! at 9:30 a.m. on Saturday Mth
June, 19862. Forms of application can be
obtained from the Secretary, Mr. D. E, M.
Malone, at Harrison College, and must
be returned to him together with,a Biyth
or Baptismal Certificate not later than
3.00 p.m. on Friday 30th May, 1952.

Candidates must be— '

1) The children of parishoners of
Christ Church who are in strait-
ened circumstances.

(2) Between the ages of 10 and 12
inclusive on the day of the exam-
ination, i.e. 14th June, 1952.

D. BE. M. MALONE,
Secretary-Treasurer,
Governing Body,
Ch. Ch, Boys’ Foundation §chool
18.5,52—4n

THE LODGE SCHOOL
Entrance Examinations

For boys wishful of entering this
School in the September term of 1952, an
entrance Examination will be held at the
Lodge School on Saturday June 21st, be-
ginning 10 o'clock a m.

Applicants must not be younger than
& years and 6 ranths A aaer than 14
years on date o amination,
ia W. A. FARMER,

Headmaster
21,5.52—6n

















WEST INDIA urr co.
Limited
Apply R. S. Nicholls & Co
Solicitors,
Roebuck Street
Phone 3925
27.5.52--In



——
ARRIVED

Another Shipment of the

POPULAR

$4180 GAS COOKERS

A few of these have no yet
been booked.

Prices of next shipment will be
higher.

Why not cail at your Gas Show-
rooms, Bay Street TO-DAY anc
secure one of these cookers.



For Weddings, Anniversaries
Birthdays, Christenings, etc.
DIAMOND RINGS
GOLD & SILVER
JEWELLERY

See your Jewellers ...

‘YY. De LIMA
& €O., LTD.

20 BROAD ST.
and at MARINE GARDENS





LEPHONE 2508

ea



| FOR SALE

AUTOMOTIVE

948





Dodge Saloon 9. Owner
nd in excellent condition. Phone
B, Cole & Co,, Lad 28.5.52-—-3n
CAR—Dodge, 1946 Special DeLuxe,!
(X88). In apple-pie order, brand new
paint job, $2,500 Cash, Dial 4476.
25.5.52—t.f.n,

28,000
B.







CAR,—Morris 8. 1947 model.

miles in good order, Apply:

Gill, Waterford, St. Michael
28.5,52-—2n.

a



CAR—One Prefect Ford in good con-
dition, 1948 model, 5 new. tyres, new
upholstery, low mileage, Owner driven.
Price $875. J. St. Hill, Tweedside Road.
Dial 4837.

CAR—Ford Prefect late 1980 model.
Geneeal ym ns.
i: ae "8.5.

Phone .f.m.

CAR—1950 Ford Prefect 7,400 =.







Fixcellent condition, $1,400,00 ©

5076 Mornings. 28.5.52—4n
CA, eas 2 seater .

Morris Pp. door saloon

model, Morris Oxford 13,000 miles,

owner driven and in opts condi-

Fort Koyal Gar: * e
tion oval age ave.
a

5504

NOTICE
All male citizens of the United States
between the ages of 18 and 26 residing
in Barbados are requested to call at the |

American Consulate from July 1 to 31,| known as Banyan Beach, Brightog, Black
1952, for Selective Service Registration | Rock, Saint Michael, with 11,100 square
Military Training feet of land thereto

under the
Service Act

All male citizéns of the United States
who attain the age of 18 years sub-
Sequent to July 31, 1958, are required
to register upon the day they attain the

Universal





eighteenth anniversary of tWe day of
their birth, or within five days there-
after

For further information, eonsult the
American Consulate, - Bri . Bar-
bados -8.52--t fon.

4 CE
Q cae Le JOSEPH
ICA! ‘or ane it)

Exhibition Tenable at

will be received by the undersigned up
to 2 p.m. on Thursday 29th May, 1952

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PUHLIC SALES |

|
|

Bungalow

REAL ESTATE

BUNGALOW tonewall







The above property will be set up fo |
sale by Public Competition at our Office,
James Street, on Friday 6th June, at 2
p.m

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors
22.5.52

“WILTSHIRE PLANTATION’ and

dwellinghouse “WHITE HAVEN” situate

én



in St. Philip with about 202 acres of
land made up as follows: 192 acres
frable, 7 acres tenantry, 22 acres in

Sour gtass, 71 acres in roads and woods
etc., also 4 fan mills, 1 motor truck. 1

1) Vestry | bull, 2 cows, 1 horse, 2 donkeys and 1
Queen's College | donkey-cart.

Together also with 1,870
shares in Three Houses Factory Limited.
Inspection by appointment. Phone Mr.

T. Skeete, “Bentley” 2535 The

c dates must be the daughters of | 4. iy
pasion th draitenea efreumstances, | above property will be Set up to public

and must not be less than 9
than 12 years
mber 1952, to be proved

baptismal certificate which must accom-

pany the application Forms of appli-
bom can be obtained at the Parochial
surer’s Dffice.
KING,

A. B.
Clerk, St. Joseph's Vestry.
27.5.52—in

NOTICE
APPLICATIONS for one or more vacant
St. Michael's Vestry Exhibitions at
"S COLLEGE will be received by
tl Clerk of the Vestry up to 12 noon
on_ Wednesday, 28th May 1952.
Candidates must be the daughters of

CAR—in exalt condition, | Parishioners in straitened circumstances

Ownet ore Ma; be seen
McEnearney’s Garage.
ee 28.5.52-—8n.

ELECTRICAL

cetacean anneal
FPRIGIDAIRE,—Westinghouse in #90d/ 12 noon.

working order Dial
trical.

PYE RADIO—Model
condition, Very little used.
new. Phone 4136

4086. T -

39G. Excelient*
Practically
28.5.52—1n
$.3ft. G.E.C
Telephone
28.5.52—4n



~1961
$400.00





Refrigerator
mornings



REFRIGERATOR
Model 64 A. Trouble free, as new
years guarantee. Ilnone 4136

28,5.52—In



LIVESTOCK

- One Holstein Cow first calf
Phone 95—289
21.5.52-—3n.
GOAT--One pure bred Sanaan_ Goat,
1 year old, Apply to Fred Sobers,
Deacons Road. 27.5,.52—3n.

cow
Riving 22 pts per. day.



POULTRY i

CHICKS—New Hampshires, Plymouth
Rocks White Giants. Dial 4259.
28.5.52—2n.

MISCELLANEOUS
Shind, old Jewels, ine. silver

Glass, China,

Watercolours. Early books, Maps, Auto-
graphs etc., a, Seen Antique Shop
id. Roy: ‘acht Club.
ane 3.2.62—t,£.n.

—————

“BENBOW's DOG MIXTURE"—a gen-
eral tonic which brings a dog to his best
condition, Suitable for dogs of all
ages and all breeds. Prices 60c. and
$1.08. Knight's Ltd,











CHEESE—Five-tb Tins 12-0z. Tins.
Wholesale & Retail. W. M. Ford, 35
Roebuck St. Dial 3489. 28.5.52—2n.

CEREALS—Corn Flakes, Shredded
Wheat, All Bran, Oat Flakes in Tins and
Loose Tapioca. W. M. Ford, 36 Roebuck





St. Dial aso 28.5.52—2n .

~ GOAL—About a tons coal for sale.

Apply: Gas Co., y Street.
27,5.52-3n.



COW--One Guernsey Cow, first calf.
Apply G. L. Harford, Norwood, St.
James 28,5. 52—3n

DECCA RECORDS: Clearances, Three
for $2.00, The Travellers Club, Brad-
shaw Building, St. Michael's Row.









22.5.52—t.f.n.

“DRIED - un Raisins, Cur-
rants & Mixed Peel, All Fresh Stock.
W. M. Ford, {5 Roebuck St. Dial 5489.
28.5,52—2n.

“DO-DO”" Tablets relieve Asthma and

ease difficult breathing. Price 5/- box
Fresh arrived. Knight's

Ltd,

shipment just





25.5.52-—3n.} closed on Thursday next the 29th
——|and will be re-opened at BARROWS on | Tables, Step Ladder, Canvas Cot, Garden

at |} 8nd must not be less than 9 nor more

than 12 years of age on the 2nd Sep-

1952, to be proved by a Baptismal

Certificate which must accompany th:
ay ation.

of application will be issued and

vet at the Vestny Clerk's Office

the hours of 10 a.m. and

BE. C. REDMAN,
Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry.



NOTICE
VESTRY BYE-ELECTION
I HEREBY give notice that I have ap-

8076 | Pointed the Parochial Building, Cumber-

Jand Street, Bridgetown as the place
where Parishioners of the parish of St

English Electric. | Michael and other persons duly qualified
3}]to vote at any

election of Vestrymen
for the said Parish may assemble on
Monday, the 9th day of June, 1952, be-
tween the hours of 10 and 11 o'clock in
the morning to elect a Vestryman for
the Parish of St. Michael in the place
Christopher Augustus Brathwaite, de-

ceased
PERCY H. BURTON,
Parochial Treasurer,
St, Michael.

28.5. 52--6n. | Misses Shilstone we will sell their fur-



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY __
AGRICULTURAL BANK ACT.
To the creditors ho! if spectalty

against WANSTEAD & ROCKPLEASANT | Cabinet 4

gon all in Mahogany, Black Marble Registrar of —_ eo
Pictures, Curtains, Glass ‘
Brass, Silver and Plated

Ware, Forks, Spoons, Cutlery etc., San-

TAKE NOTICE

Plantations, St. Michacl & St. James

TAKE NOTICE that I, the Owner of |Top Table,
the above Plantations am about to obtain |and China,
provisions

a of £1,000 under the of
the e Act

1952 to 1953.

No money has been borrowed under |Wooden Bedsteads with Springs
the Agricultural Aids Act, 1905, or the |Mattresses, Dressing Tables,
above Act (as the case may be) in re- jrored

spect of such year.
Dated this 26th day of May, 1952.
Cc. McD. Morris
Owner
27.5. 52—3n,





NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. PETER
The Parochial Treasurer's Office will
be closed as from May 28th to June 4th

25.5.52—3n.| both days inclusive.

Signed G. S. CORBIN,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Peter
27.5.52—3n



NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH
APPLICATIONS for one (1)
Exhibition tenable at the
School will be received by the under-
2 p.m. on Thursday, 29th
May 1952.

Candidates must be the sons of Parish-
joners in straitened circumstances, and
must not be less than 10% years nor
More than 12% years of age on the Ist
of September 1952, to be proved by a
baptismal certificate which must accom-
pany the application.

Forms of application can be obtained
at the Parochial traern Office

Vestry



P . KING 3 5 ie ‘
. : ers &c. Silver Tea Service and Bells;
Clerk, St. Philip's Vestry. |ciocks, Lamps. Pyréx Ware, Mahog.
at, 0; e-a Douvdie and Single Beasteads Springs and
Deep Sleep Mattresses, Hair. Beds;
Chest of Drawers, Couches. Dressing
NOTICE Tables, Iron Bedstead, Screens, Cham-
PARISH OF 8T. LUCY ber Ware. Electrolux Oil. Refrigerator,
The Parochial Office, St. Lucy will be| 2 Burner Oil Stove, Coal Stove, Larders,
inst | Ware Presses Kitchen Utensils &

For cleaning the lens of your glasses | Saturday, tae Ist inst

try a Clearsight Pen, price only 2/-.

Obtainable at Knight's Ltd.



DRIED ‘FRU¥T—Prunes,
|
|

ROLLEICORD CAMERAS. Two (2)
only world famous Rolleicord 1952 model
Cameras now in stock. As further sup-
plies are now restricted, this is an ex-
cellent opportunity to get one of these
cameras, A, G, St, Hin Ltd. Dial 3199.

23.5.52—n.

SEERSUCKER—In ten lovely Check
designs 36° wide. Usually $1.12 yard,
Reduced to $1.02 yard. Special price for
wholesalers at Kirpalani $2 Swan Street.

28.5.52—1n

Subscribe now to the Dally Telegraph
England's leading Daily Newspaper now
arriving in Barbados by Air only a few
days after publication in London. Con-
tact; ¥an Gale, c/o Adv Co., Ltd.
Local Representative, Tel. Tad





t.f.n.



TINNED FRUIT — Grapes. Large
Small, Peas Large & Small,
L



W. M. Medford, 35 Roebuck
28.5.52-—2n

TINNED MEATS — Luncheon Beef,
Corned Mutton, Corned Beef with

Brisket Beef

W. M. Ford, 36
St. Dial 3489 28.5.



PERSONAL





The public are hereby warned agatnst
giving credit to any person or persons
whomsoever in my name as I do not
hold myself responsible for anyone con-
tracting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me.

OSWALD ROCK,

Pie Serner,
27.5.$2—2n,

The public are hereby warned against
Biving credit to my wife, URSILLA
BROWNE (nee Spencer) as } do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone else
contracting any debt or debts in my
nome unless by a written order signed

by me
REYNOLD BROWNE,

.
St. James,
27.5.52—2n,

IT PAYS 10 ADVERTISE







REAL ESTATE

°

D’'ARCY A, SCOTT
Reav Estate AGENT AND
AUCTIONEER

of Middle Street
offers for sale from his ex-
tensive list: —
A three bedroom stone bun-
galow on the sea, below
|] Oistin,

And
BARBAREES HOUSE with
' 1] 2% Acres of land. It is with-
in one mile from Bridge- |j}
town. |
If you are interested in |}}
properties, why not overlook
his list, or dial 2645.
28.5.52—8n



25.5.52—8n, | from 8 a.m. to 12 noon.
ee OSWALD L.

& Buldinge on or before the Sist day of |
& Small, Prunes, Pineapples and | distribute the assets of the said estaie

Cereal, Roast Beef, Veal Loaf, & Tin®|or claim

tg the {ime

Office hours Tuesdays and Thursdays
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturdays



. DEANE,
Parochial Treasurer,

St. Lucy,
28.5, 52--2n

— er

NOTICE
Re the Estate of
CHARLES TO!

'GTON AUGUSTUS
T

GH

NOTICK IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim upon
or affecting the Estate of Charles Tor-
rington Augustus Knight late of Blades
Hill in the parish of Saint Philip in this
island, who died in this island on 2nd
day of September 1949 are hereby re-
quired to send in their claims, duly at-
tested to - the undersig§ed Timothy

ae eae, Public Trustee of th«

los qualified Administrator
of the Estate of

Charles Torrington |
Augustus Knight deceased, Pub.ic

uly 1952 after which | shal) proceed (|

among the parties entitled thereto having
regard to the debts and claims only ot
soon 1 shall ee nase One poy. and

at not be liable for assets +0
distestoutea to any person of whose debt
I shall not have had notice ot |
of such distribution,

years nor | competition
of age on the 2na|pbidder beyond the appraised value at 2
by “|p.m. on Friday the 6th day of June 1952

1943 Extension Dining Table
Hens |Screw), Couch, Ornament Tables, China

against the said Planta- jaree "
tions in respect of the Agricultural year [and Old China Tea Service, Oak Chairs

Combermere | and Ornament Tabies,

for sale to the highest

at our Office. For further particulars

and conditions of sale apply to the under
signed,
CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Lucas Street.
23.5.52—i3n





THIS ATTRACTIVE HOME

An extremely well built modern thre
bedroom jor two bedrooms and den)
BUNGALOW of stone and concrete con-
struction. Combined forty feet living-
room and gallery, fully cupboarded
Canadian styled kitchen. Floor to ceilin:
cedar lined double bedroom closets
Attractively laid out garden with friu
trees ‘and ample room for vegetables
Garage with breezeway to house and
detached self-contained maid’s quarters
The Property is coolly and delightfully
situated within easy reach of main road
at Worthing, Offers over £4,000 zee 8562
28.5.51—1n



AUCTION



UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By instructions received I will, sell on
Thursday, May 29th (1) chattel House
20 x 8 om the spot, located at corner of
Lightfoots Cross Lane and Chapman's
Street. Spot can be rented, Terms cash
Sale at 1 p.m

VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer

27,8. 52—an. |





UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Thursday 29th by order of the

niture at “Lauriston” Strathclyde

which includes

(with patent

Rockers and Arm Chairs, Wag-

Glass, Large Old China Bowl

and Rockers, Single Iron and ee
an

good Mir-

Press, Lady's Desk, Folding
Screen all in Mahogany, M.T. Wash-
stand, Chamber Ware, Mirrors, Books,
Linen Press, Planters Desk, Larders,
Kitchen Tables, Lawn Mower, Cement

Pots, Perfection 3-Burner Oil Stove and
other items, | jeune
Sale 11.30 o'clock, Terms Cash
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER
On Wednesday 4th June by order of

The Executors to the Estate of the Late
E. L. Skeete we will sell the Furniture

at “Whitehaven,” St. Philip which in-
cludes,
Extension Dining ‘Table,

1 t
Waggon, Sees
Sideboards, Rock-
Card Table, Hat-

Chairs, Liquor Case

ers, Folding Chairs,



FOR RENT

- HOUSES

ATTRACTIVE NEW FURNISHED #
ROOM HOUSE in country 6 miles
Bridgetown Large shaded grounds,
alWays cool. Suitable 1—2 adult, $80.00
Phone 4942 28.5.52—1n.





BURNLEY—Brittons Hill, Unfurnished
From ist June. C. B. Sisnett. Phone
3374 or 4548 28.5.52—t.f.n.

BILTMORE—Fittz Village, St. James,
On sea. Three » Dining and
Drawing rooms. Electricity, running water
in each room. Garage and servant's room.
Dial 0155. ° 17.5.52—t.i.n.

FLAT FULLY FURNISHED. In ‘Grey-
stone House’ Balmoral Gap, Hastings
June-December inclusive. Dial 3729.
22.5.52—t.f.n.
furnished, St.
3503.

20.3.52—4.f.n.

ROOM--On the seaside
Phone 8401.









WAT & HOUSE—fully
Lawrence on-Sea. Phone



for rent.
11.5.53—t.f.n.



(with running
toilet and fs
27.5. .

HOUSE—At Clapham, apposite the ¥,
Michael. Phone 2542 7

rooms
in 2), kitehen,



St
28.5.52—2n

ANNOUNCEMENTS

a
FASHION BOOKS—Attention Ladies:
To help with your sewing problems we
now offer the latest French Fashion
Books styles for Mid-summer, Randali,
Reed Street 28.5.52—2n





Your Broken Dental Plate can be re-
paired Be wise balance your budget,
the cost of living is high remember ao
stiteh in time saves nine. Square Dea!
Dental Lab. Upper Reed Street
28.5.52—2n

TAKE NOTICE
CENTURY

(And Cricketing Device)
That ALFRED BIRD & SONS, LIM-
YTED, a company organized under the
laws of Great Britain, Manufacturers
and Merchants, whose trade or business
address is Devonshire Works, Birm!
12, England, has applied for the -
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of baking powder
ind all substances used as food or as
ingredients in food, and will be entitled
to register the same after one mont!
from the day of May 1952 unless
some Shall in the meantime give
notice in duplicate to me at my ice
of opposition of such registration. The
trade mark can be seen on application
at my ice.
Dated this 12th day of May 1952.

H. WILLIAMS,









That JONKOPINGS OCH VULCANS
fANDSTICKS FABRIKSAKTIEBOLAG,
4 joint stock company organized under
the laws of Sweden, Match Manufacturers,
whose trade or business address is 16,
Vastra, Storgatan, Jonkoping, Sweden,
has applied for the ition of a trade
tark in Part “A’! of ister in respect
of matches, and will be entitled to reg-
ister the same after one month from the
28th day of May 1962, unless some person

stand, Revolving Book Cases, Double z
Ends’ Settee, Large Book Case (Glass es Yt ae mn ee,
Doors) Flat Top Desk, Revolving Chair} tion ‘The trade mark can be (opp on
all in 7 B.W. Chairs & Rock-| ication at my office. Fepre! 9
ers, Percival Settee, Pine Bookshelves, | “PMC te :

Leather Uphols,, Sofa & Arm S,
Set of Cut Glass Table Glass (91 Pieces)
Dinner Service; Royal Worcester Tea Ser-
vice; Glass and China; Pit. Ware in
Entre Dishes, Spoons, Forks, Fish &
Fruit Knives, Dish Covers, Cutlery Carv-



Bench. Books Linen and many other
items of interest. Sale 11,30 o'clock.
Terms Cash

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,
uctioneers.

A
28,5,52-—2n.,

WANTED











—_——
GENERAL SERVANT, Kitchen Maid
wanted. Apply: Mrs Lisle Bailey.
‘avilion, Hastings 28.5.52——In
MANAGER—A apable manager for
4 small Sugar Estate. Contact Mayers,

Advocate Advertising Dept



52—dn.
NURSE,—Experienced Nurse, quarters
provided. Call Mrs. Bryan, No. 7 The
Oarrison 28.5.52—1n



RADIO-ELECTRICIAN for our Elec-
trical Department, Apply in person. Wm.





Fogarty (B'dos) Lid 22.5.52—t.f.n
Wanted by Barbados Publicity Com-
mittee — lady assistant to take charge

of Information Bureau, Seawell Airport,
A knowledge of typing and Spanish
Cesirable. ‘Application in writing to The
Chairman, Barbados Publicity Committee,
1.0, Box 32, Bridgetown

28.5. 52

on



MISCELLANEOUS







all persons indebted to tho
said fre, are udered to settle their
see lay.
Dated this 27th day of May, 1952.
TIMOTHY THEOPHILUS
HEADLEY,
Qualified Administrator of
the Estate of
AUGUSTUS KNIGHT,
deceased.
28.5,52—4n.
a
,
LOST & FOUND
LOST



TSSING from Car near Rockley Golf
Club, Lady's navy-blue handbag contain-
‘ing watch and wedding ring of
sentimen value. Any person giving
information leading to recovery will be
well rewarded. all Brooke, Paradise
Beach Club, between 6 and 7 p.m. ‘

27.5.52-—2n,



—





SWEEPSTAKE TICKET-—Series P.9020
Finder please return same to W. Thomas
Hothersal Turning, St. Michael. Reward
offered, Turf Club please take note

28.5.62—1n





SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS—Series JJ |
S41L and 3464. Finder please return
same to Darnley Edghill, Marchfield,
St. Philip. 28.5, 52—In

in turtlesheil



PAIR OF GLASSES

SHORT STORIES,
VERSE—For the
Accepted material
after publication.
King, New Era
Thomas,

ARTICLES and
“Christmas Mirror’
will be paid for
Send Mss, to I HH.
Press, Sharon, St.



26.5,52—2n.

Pains in Back
Nervous, Rheumatic?

Wrong foods and drinks. worry,
overwork and frequent colds often put
a strain on the Kidneys and Kidney
and Bladder Troubles are the true
cause of Excess Acidity, Getting Up
Nights, Burning Passages, Leg Pains
Nervousness, Dizziness, Swollen An-
kles, Rheumatism, Puffy Eyelids. and
feeling old before your time Help your
kidneys purify your blood with Cys-
tex. The very first dose starts helping
your kidneys clean out excess acids
and this will quickly make you feel like
new. Under the money-back guarantee
Cystex must satisfy completely or cont
nothing, Get Cystex from your chem-











frames between A. BARNES & CO.,,









LTD. and C.R.B. Reward to finder. |
Dial 4476. 38.5.52—t.f.n. |
SSSSSSSSSSGSSSSSSSSSESS", |
.
SRA VIEW GUEST
HOUSE :
TINGS BARBADOS \)
Ul new management. })
Daily and longterm rates % |
uoted on +equest
ent guests ;
welcome. %
Dinner and Cocktail
parties arranged. |
J, H. BUCKLAND, %
Proprietor. ys
R

j

make Cystex' Ist today

‘The Guar-
‘Ver Kidneys. Rnewmat:





FOR RENT












Valuable business premises on
Rickett Street above the Post
Office with back entrance on Mar-
hill Street, Frontage ec:
entrance doors and
window. Ideally suitable for any
class of business, especially
Drug Store, In close proximity
3 parking place and the "Bus
Stands. Also cool and spacio
offices upstairs over the premises
referred to above These offices
anc business premises will be

ted separately or together as
' be desired. Apply to
EVELYN, ROACH & Co., Ltd

Rickett Street
24.5.52—t f 4





ca hates i inane ee aie iertstel oa aaae etaneasedie nae taaet tsa
a

Dated this 12th day of May 1952.
H, WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks.
28.5.52-3n,

ASTHMA MUCUS

Loosened First Day

Don't let coughing, sneezing, chok-
ing attacks of! Bronchitis or Asthma
ruin your sleep and energy another
day or night without trying MiN-
DACO, This great medicine is not a
smoke, injection or spray, but works
through the blood, thus reaching the
lungs and bronchial tubes. The first
dose starts helping nature immedt-
ately 3 ways. 1. Helps loosen and re-
move thick strangling mucus, 2. Thus
promotes freer breathing and sounder,
more refreshing sleep. 3. Helps allevi-
atef coughing, wheezing,@ sneezing.
Quick satisfaction or money back
guaranteed. Get MENDACO from
chemist today,





corporation organized and
the

Jnited States of America, Manufacturers

TAKE NOTICE
DINACRIN

That WINTHROP

laws of the State of

whose trade or business address is 1450
Broadway, New York, New York, United
States of America, has applied for the

in
and pharmaceutical
will

of a trade mark

ee} in Part
preparations,
be entitled to register the same

after one month from the 28th day of

May 1952 unless some person
meantime give notice in duwplica’

shai in the
to me

at my office of opposition of such reg-
istration. The trade mark can be seen
on application at my office,

COMPANY
Manufacturing Chemists, whose trade or
business address is The Factory, Braydon {|
Road, London, N., England has applied
for the registration of a trade mark
Part “A” of Register in respect of med-
icinal and pharmaceutical preparations,
and will be entitled to register the same

|
|
|

|

|

1952.

Registrar of Trade Marks.
28.5.52—3n

TAKE NOTICE

BISMAG

INTERNATIONAL CHEMICAL
LIMITED, a British Company,

Dated this 12th day A Ma:



That

in

after one month from the
May 1952 unless some
meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration: The trade mark can be seen
on application at my office.



That LIGGETT & MYERS TOBACCO
COMPANY, a _ corporation
under the laws of the State of New
Jersey, United States of America, Man-
ufacturers, whose trade or _ business
address is 630 Fifth Avenue, New York
20 State of New York, U.S.A. has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A’’ of Register in respect
of smoking tobacco and cigarettes, and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 28th day of
May 1952, unless some person shalk in
the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be seen
on application at my office.
Dated this 12th day of May 1952.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
28.5.52—3n

TAKE NOTICE

Cavalier





That BR. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO
COMPANY a corporation organized and
existing under the laws of the State
of New Jersey, United States of Amer-
iea, Tobacco Manufacturers, whose trade
or business address is Matin and rue
Streets, Winston-Salem, North C a,
U.S.A. has applied for the registratfon
of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register

in respect of tobacco and tobacco
roducts, cigarettes, cigars, smoking
obacco, snuff, smokers’ articles,

cigarette paper, matches, cigarette cases,
sigar and cigarette holders, pipes for
smoking tobacco(, and will be entitled
to register the same after one month
from the 28th day of May, 1952,
anless some person shall in the mean-
time give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration, The trade mark can be seen
on_upplication at my office.

Dated this 12th day of 1952.

H.
Registrar of Trade Marks.
28.5.62—3n



GOVERNMENT NOTICE



WAR DAMAGE TO BRITISH PROPERTY IN FRANCE
- Announcements in the Board of Trade Journal on February ist,

1947 and June 7th, 1947, gave details of arrangements between H.M.
Government and the French Government relating to compensation in
respect of war damage to British property in France, and notified the
final date for the registration of claims as December 31st, 1947.

An extension of the final date for the submission of claims to July
7th, 1952, has now been granted under Article 37 of Law No. 52—5 of
January 3rd, 1952, to those British subjects, Corporations and Associa-
tions whose claims were, or would have been, rejected because they
were submitted after December 31st, 1947.

It should, however, be noted that this law does not permit the re-
consideration of claims which have been finally rejected for any

other reason,

Claims must be made to the French War Damage authorities direct

and should be in the French language.

H.M. Government can accept

no responsibility for the actual filing and prosecution of claims.
24.5.52,.—2n.





TEDDER : Roderick Owen
MY INDIA: Jim Corbett

THE BOOK OF UNVEILING: M. R. Newbolt
TIME TO REMEMBER : Lloyd Douglas

CARDS for
received :

all

of many

young people.



S. P. C.K. BOOK DEPARTMENT

C. F. HARRISON & CO., LTD.

__A short list of new titles and replacements from a large
shipment of Books, etc., just received :—

ADVENTURES IN TWO WORLDS: Cronin

VENTURE TO THE INTERIOR: Van der Post
CHILDREN OF KAYWANA : Mittelholzer
LIEUTENANT HORNBLOWER: C. S. Forester
PHOENIX RISING: Marguarite Steen

LONDON PARTICULAR : Christianna Brand

THE TROUBLE AT NUMBER SEVEN: Gerald Bullett
BARMY IN WONDERLAND: P. G. Wodehouse

READINGS IN ST. JOHN’S GOSPEL :
THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO ST, MARK:

occasions especially Birthday

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BOOKS, available in great quantity: BASILDON BOND
WRITING PAPER, AIR MAIL ENVELOPES, etc.

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SECTION

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Cards just

GUILD

At the request

WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 1952

$s.
Ms.
M.S.
M.S.
MS.
M.S. WH
SAILING TO
AND
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M8. BONAIRE, 30th June,
MS.
& G To
CURACAO
M.S. HESTIA, 2ist , 1952.
8. BP. MUSSON, & Co. trp”







OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM

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. Liverpool oe gay 1 May

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Canadian National Steamships





SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Satls Aarives = Salls
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Bidos Bidos St. John = Boston: patrag Montreal
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*eetede a 9 gg ag to Conactoves,, Mprtintene

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*“
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1952 ....

21st
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1952... ..

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1952 .... 29: wi
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1952... ..



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clan nee nnconbanoetaiteoe:



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WEDNESDAY

MAY 28, 1952






















BY CARL ANDERSON

BY CHIC YOUNG

DADDY, WHEN YOu
GET MARRIED, WHO IS
THE BOSS IN THE HOUSE-- 7 bi! ‘
THE HUSBAND OR ea. And

THE WIFE ? iS =

YOU'RE RIGHT-- TT
HE SAID THE J
SBAND





i FOLD
YOU SO

KEEP YOUR EYES

OPEN FOR THE

SLIGHTEST TRACE

|. OF PLANT LIFE, Al
CALE!

WITH US/ LET'S SEE
WHAT THIS UNCOVER /

DON'T TALK!

TAKE BRIEF CAGE... \
SOMEBODY'LL GET ff

AMERICAN EMBASSY...
NO ONE ELSE...






GOOD TRY, HAZARD...
RA I'VE HAD IT...LISTEN,..
wy FAVOR FOR ME...




©] ARE YOU ALL RIGHT...
P| DID THEY HIT You,
| HARRIS?






MOTHER'S UNCLE

=| =



500 A WORD YOLI GAIL ~ | | =
TOCALLON SOL" Aso sa
af YOUR OFFICE YOU COLUI.0 kar
Ld Teil. Mee =e =





Y AFTER you...1 WANT
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YOU /

OH,NO, DUDE! YOU'RE COMING
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r LILI, THEN YOU GET THE
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ARE, KIRBY...
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THE HEAD OF THE

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OME THRU SOON. Si

Bw 367



BARBADOS







ADVOCATE



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Sea

PAGE TEN



“This Could be Greatest Year for British and Empire Athletes’

(By E. McDONALD BAILEY)

(The Holder of the world’s 100 metres record)

THE year 1952 will probably go down in athletics his-
tory as the best—ever for British and Commonwealth per-
forn I have seen enough, both in England and various
parts of the world, during the past twelve months or so,
to be able to make such a prediction without having to hold
my tongue in my cheek

ers.



The reign of t U.S.A. in the the shorter distance at Helsinki
track events is ning to a close. 1 am certain that his tremendous
And rovide one or finishing spurt will put him there
two shake-ups e field events, or thereapouts,
for so g ¢ vated by the British athletes backing up
Continentals Bannister will be John Parlett, of

Focal point of thi year, of whom we have still to see the
course, is Helsinki. It is there best, and Chris Chataway, whe
that I leok for our crowning must be in with an astounding
triumphs and a bigger proportion chance in the 5,000 metres,
of gold medals for Britain's But don*t forget that the Com-
athletes than at any previous monwealth can produce a few
Olympic meeting “good-uns” when it comes to

oe . a 7), these events,

Why am I so optimistic? Well. — Ganada can offer Bob McFar-
for one thing there is a bumpei

lane (quarter and half mile) who
the 1948 Games at



crop of world-class runners in

appeared in



the British Isles and the Com- ibley and who has a victory
monwealth. For another, tre- over Arthur Wint to his credit.
mendous progress has been made From the same country comes
since 1948. This has been partly Don Scott McEwen, who won the
due to a more enlightened ap- Milwaukee Indoor Games . two
proach to competitive athletics Wile event in 9 mins 15.7 -sec-
by the governing bodies, with ona. and Jack Carrell’ who has
consequent improved coaching , 499 metres in 48 secs, to this
und training facilities, and partly nase : . :

Australia’s miler Don McMillan
is another I would not rule out
of the reckoning.

Back again with the British
stars we have big John Savidge
who gets nearer to world class
every time he putts the shot and
who may well go close in his
chosen event.

I should be accused of false
modesty if I did not include my-
self in the list of possibles.
Some folks are inclined to think
that 1951 saw me at my peak.
4 But although 31 is, comparatively
speaking, a ripe old age for a
sprinter, I am out to prove them
wrong, And I make no secret of
the fact that I have high hopes
of taking the 100 metres -+ and
the 200 for good measure.






















If I .get just
one of them
though, f shall
still be well sat-
isfied, for it is 27
years since Brit-
ain last took an
a sprint

Our girls too
have never been
in an Olympics
with such won-
derful chances
—_—w7-~_- jcompletely fit June Foulds could
take the 100 metres. And, des-
jpite the determination of the
incomparable Fanny Blankers-
Koen, winner of four gold medals











it the 1948 Games, I look to
Sheila Lerwill, holder of the
world-record, to win the high

z jump.
i ee Seiten «4° Most danger fo June Foulds I
oe . : ‘¥ expect to come from 20 year old
is SP Australian Majorie Jackson, I
had the pleasure of seeing her
BAILEY BREAKS THE TAPE- tun while I was down-under and
first again. Will he do the same believe me, she could beat many
at Helsinki? good class male sprinters,

Also from Australia there are
to much greater keenness among Shirley Strickland (80 metres
athletes themselves. The idea of hurdles) Ray Weinburg who has
running just for the sake of run- a time for the 120 hurdles of 14
ning is on the way out. There seconds, and John Treloar, Olym-
is 100, a far more serious ap- pic semi-finalist four years ago,
proath to the often boring busi- who may upset all my plans in
ness of preparation and a greater the 100 metres,
inclination to fight.

In events there is not so much









































of the “after you Claude” atti-
tude. And this has resulted in
better times and figures all
round.

Add to this the healthy respect
reflected in all written or spoken
references made in the United
States to the formerly dispar-
aged British and Commonwealth
athletes, and the fact that the
land of the Almighty Dollar
does not so far appear to have
thrown up the usual running,
phenomenon, and you will Sec hy
that there is good reason fot
sanguine prediction.

But from generalities to par-
ticularities. From whom, on. this’
side of the Atlantic and in the
Commonwealth, do I expect
fireworks at Helsinki’

First, I think I would put
Arthur Wint the great Jamaicar
runner, and captain of their
team this year, who must have
a wonderful chance in the 40
metres of retaining the title he!
so brilliantly snatched from un-
der the nose of Herb McKenley
in 1948, i

Arthur is training for both the. 4
S00 and the 400 metres events,;
but I feel his best chance will be
in the shorter distance. And there
*s no doubting his own deter-
mination (o add another gold
medal tp the one he already
owns,

Tinen there is Roger BarirHisenry
(1,500 metres) the 22-year-oldsy
former Oxford miler, currently {4
reported to be swapping over to
the half-mile as a means of in-9
creasing his speed over the
longer distance, Roger must have
a wonderful chance of running
away with the title. I was liter-, gportsman of the Week”
ally astounded by his speed when¥onataway, Olympic hope.

I saw him clock that 4 min. 9.9~

second miles at the New Zealand Neither must I forget Yvette
Centennial Games 18 months Williams, versatile New Zealan-
ago; if he does decide to go for der who should do well in what-

They ll Do



Chris





hey lo Tt Every Time _ hunch. Nac gad By Jimmy Hatlo

‘THEN WHEN SAID PARTY is“
NOTIFIED AS PER INSTRUCTIONS».
OUR GAL IN THE MIDDLE GETS THIS



ITY THE POOR TELEPHONE OPERATOR,

FRINSTANCE, A LONG-DISTANCE CALLER

WILL. GIVE een } ibtondlleath
—- U














‘AND, OPERATOR»
BE SURE TO LET
ME KNOW WHEN
THE THREE MINUTES
ARE UP!





Today Is"
Derby Day

By G. CHANDLER
LONDON, Monday.
Sport-loving Britons spent
busy week-end studying form
books and entry lists in an
endeavour to find the winner of
the nation’s most popular sport-
ing event the Derby Stakes which
will be run off at Epsom on
Wednesday. Forty top-flight thor-
oughbreds will contest the one and
a half mile event which will be
the richest in the history of the
race. It will be worth £20,587 to
the winner compared with £ 19,386
the previous record set one year
ago, The world famous ‘race
which takes its name from the
twelfth Earl of Derby was first run
at Epsom in 1780 and except for
breaks during two world wars
when ten “substitute” races were
run at Newmarket, the classic has
always been run over the horse-
Shoe shaped track.

The track is regarded as a true
test of speed and stamina for
three-year-old colts each of
whom will carry 126 pounds.

The start is at the bottom of a
hill and for the first four furlongs
the horses have a steady climb,
then comes a drop until the fam-
ous lefthand bend at Tattenham
Corner is reached. It is from this
bend four furlongs from the win-
ning post that the horses begin to
make their final effort over fairly

level ground until the last 200
yards which is slightly uphill
During the first 50 years the

Derby attracted little attention but
today there is worldwide interest
especially in countries running
sweepstakes on the result, the most
famous of which is the Irish Hos-
pital Sweep, the winner of which
nets £50,000,

In addition, the famous event
draws nearly half a million spec-
tators most of whom go to see the
colourful surroundings apart from
the running of the race. Facing
the grand siand on a hill around
which the race is run the public
will mill around gaily decorated
marquee tents, bookies stands,
fried fish stalls, icecream barrows
and shooting galleries whiie fur-
ther afield an amusement fair
complete with roundabouts pro-
vides a riot of colour in contrast
with the green turf of the winding
racetrack,

No Derby scene would be com-
plete without its gypsies whose
brightly painted caravans have
now been forced to camp well
away from the track, But this
will not prevent them from ming-
ling with crowds to tip “cert” win-
ners or offer to tell your fortune.
The grandstand will be packed
with representatives of many na-
tions, with Dukes and Earls and
high-ranking officials and owners
occupying the most exclusive part
of the stands. This year however,
there will be no member of the
Royal Family present as the Court
is still in mourning for the late
King George.—U.P.

Cable Arid Wireless
Defeat Carlton

Cable and Wireless defeated
Carlton in a cricket match played
at Boarded Hall on Saturday,
May 24, Carlton batting first scored
62 all out. E. W. Marshall top
scored with 24not out and F. B.
Edghill scored 23, They came to-
gether in an eighth wicket partner-
ship when Carlton had lost seven
wickets for 16 runs and saved
their team from complete collapse.
R. Croney, H. H, King and E. L.
Branker took 3 wickets each for
2, 7, and 23 runs respectively.
Cable and Wireless replied with
93, C. Seale top scored with 32
while N, T. Clarke scored 16, For
Carlton George Edghill took four





wickets for 13 runs, while F.
Edghill and K, Warren bagged
three each for 13 and 17 runs

respectively.



ever event she chooses to enter,
My oe opinion is that she
stands. most chance in the long
jump,

Quite an impressive list isn’t!
it. And it is by no means com-;
plete — Bill Nankeville, Len
Eyre and Europesn 200 metres;
champion Brian Shenton are only;
three I have not dwelt upon. |;

But those I have
will make the best in the world!
go all out. And although the!
chief challenge is likely to come:
from the United States, I feel
that this time we have the trump
eards, Unless someone holds an
unexpectedly strong hand, Brit-
ain and the Commonwealth are
going to pick up quite a few
tricks at Helsinki in July.

mentioned ;

GET OFF THE
LINE, OPERATOR,
AND STAY OFF!!
HELLO, YVONNE=sHE
TREATED HER LIKE A F
DOG+NOT THAT SHE'S

ANY ANGEL,HERSELF, <7
YUNDERSTAND = AND
ANOTHER THING
ANO-“BLABBA-

ri

———,

wfcvuavi

BE COPR. 1952 KING FEATURES SYNDICATE. ¢





BARBADOS





Record Entries For

Intercolonial Sports
. THREE DAY



ADVOCATE





MEET

OPENS SATURDAY

‘(By 0. S. COPPIN)

A record number of two

hundred and sixty-two entries

have been accepted by the Amateur Athletic Association
of Barbados for the forthcoming three-day Intercolonial

Cycle and Athletic Meet w

hich opens at Kensington on

Saturday, May 31, continues on Monday, June 2 and ends

on Thursday, June 5.

The Association have doubtless
made an all-out effort to inject
some life into the Meet since I
see that they have invited top
ranking cyclists and athletes to
take part in the events,

Right Step

This is a step in the right
direction for there can be no
individual performances of-any

varticular merit except they ‘arc
made in competition against the
best available representatives from
other territories and have Also
been made under conditions that

generally obtain in other
territories.
The Association have broken

new ground in the encouragement
cf the younger athletes in their
having invited Walter Gittens,
the Grenada Boys’ Secondary
School Athletic star to take part
in the School events.

I see also that he has been
entered for the 880 yards, the
High Jump and the Long Jump
all Open events, ;

Interesting Record

Gittens’ record is an interest-
ing one. In the recent Windward
Islands Inter-School tournament
Gittens won the 40 yards, 880
yards and Long Jump crowning
his performance with the credit-
able achievement of winning the
High Jump at 5 feet 11% inches.
This is several inches higher than
what our local boys have been
returning for the past few years.

In addition to this Gittens ran
second in the 100 yards and 220
yards to H. Bain, his’ fellow
Grenadian whom, I understand,
he beat over the same distance
at their school sports.

On the athletic side too, fans
will be afforded the opportunity
for seeing George Lewis, veteran
sprint champion of Trinidad, who
although he has been running for
many years now still has plenty
of fire in him as was evidenced
by his showing in the recent
International Sports Meeting of
the A.A.A., of Trinidad when he
beat the American invitees.














































Invitation Race

There will be a special invita-
tion 60 yards dash in which it is
expected that Lewis, Archer,
Blenman and Inniss will be seen
in this event.

Turning to the cycling events
there seems to have been a wealth
of talent attracted in tthe three
classes. In the “A” class there
will be the Berbice Wheel champ
Walter Liddell who is the lead-
ing cyclist on form in B.G, today.

From ‘Trinidad -comes_ the
Olympic hope David Matthieu
while the All Stars Club of
Trinidad are again making the
trip.

The local stars spearheaded by
Barbados’ own Olympic hope,
Ken Farnum, L. Carmichael, D.
Keizar, returning to the track
after a lay off, Johnnie Skinner,
holder of the local five mile record
in the “A” and _ Intermediate
classes, R. Sattaur and the newly
promoted Darey Yarde will
be there to give battle to the
Intercolonial invitees.

Farnum’s Farewell

I understand however that
Farnum will be seen only in the
short distances, 4 mile, mile and
two mile because the grass track
is slower than the road on which
Farnum is spending most of his
time training seriously for Hel-
sinki where he will have to ride

|



WEATHER REPORT
YESTERDAY

Rainfall from Codrington: .01

Total Rainfall for month to
date: 2.06 ins.

Highest Temperature: 86.5 °F

Lowest Temperature; 72.5 °F

Wind Velocity: 9 miles per
hour

Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.979,
(3 p.m.) 29.910

TO-DAY

5.40 a.m.

Sunset: 6.18 p.m.

Moon: New, May 23
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

High Tide: 5.33 a.m., 7.03 p.m.
Low Tide: 12.19 p.m.

Sunrise:





all
|



MAY 28, 1952

WEDNESDAY,



s “ «
PEF POSSSS 2700"

6506
POCSSSS SO SSOS SSS FOOT S SSP SOP SEF OPED

Sal 4
GLP?



59999998



cn a speedy board track. The
grass track would therefore tend
to slow his muscle down,

Farnum assures me that he
intends to ride to give the public
the opportunity of seeing him
against the champs from other
colonies before he leaves,

Locals in Training

The local athletes are in serious
training and Hunte expects to re-
turn a time better than 50 seconds
for the 440 yards. Archer and
Blenman of the local constabulary
have been in training for the Police
Sports and should be in good
form for the sprint events while
in the ‘long distances Hill and
Lloyd will battle in the 880 yards,
one mile and three mile t:at ¢aces.




ONLY $36.00 EA.

Novelties *

Novelties of this meeting are
the parade of the athletes on the
first day which should be well
worth seeing and the fact that
the prizes for most of the events
will be presented immediately
after the finish of the event,

P,C.S. MAFFEI
This is based on the model of

& Co, Lid.
the Olympics and is the method | $ Top Scorers in tailoring

Ideal for the Tropics \
®

s
used in B.G., and Trinidad and ‘ %
is aimed to eliminate a lot of the Prince Wm. Henry Street x

i r: s S, ».
hey ie eee of the $$$5995669595S59$999SS59S6$5995995955550868596560



ooo





SUITINGS

FOR

SUMMER!!

28” KHAKI DRILL ........ @ $1.53, $1.58, $1.69 Yd.
28” WHITE DRILL ............ $1.31, $1.66, $1.69 Yd.
28” WHITE LINEN DRILL ......... $2.38, $2.95 Yd.
28” IRISH LINEN .................. $3.15, $4.49 Yd.
54” IRISH LINEN CRASH ................ $4.33 Yd.
fe SUED CRASH oe eek ks $3.66 Yd.



Cave Shepherd & Co. Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street





A



And buy a Carib

A tense incident in the Trinidad
Barbados Tornado tournament —
generous in victory — the Barbadian
skipper hurls alife saver toa gallant
but gasping victim of a Tornado

turnover.

Asa reminder why don’t you attend
the grand Tornado Dance at the
Crane on Saturday 3lst May and
remember, say “Gimme a Carib”
and absolutely no one will give you

$100.22 — try it.

,





ad

(





|






PAGE 1

tf%el l> y&xm 3 ESTABLISHED 1895 WEDNESDAY, MAY 28. 1952 PRIC ran CENTS Germany Admitted To Em opean Army Six Nations Sign Enabling Treaty . . HAKIS. Ml] il A history-making treaty to mass soldiers ol rearmed any into .i IS-divUon force with troops ol iiv,other European nations was sinned to-day in this capital of t.ermany s ancient enemy The ceremony was followed immediately bv ,i sweeiibound the United States closer to Europe than ever before I he declaration promised in general terms that American troops will remain in Europe as long as it is necessary for peace and that ioint action will l,. against any breakup ol the new Em ipean army, such U the withdrawal of militarily resurgent den. Chancellor 1 the first to [which may tnhet It-urupr and ha waa follows i, v I the ran nH "iirg and %  -Nell.. Ridgway In France PARIS, ftlaj |7 Matthew Ridgway, first United Suites General to land in World War II invasion. NtuiMd to France to lake over the Stlpi'mc Allied Command of Europe from retiring GIMn] Eisenhower. The former United Nation* Com' i %  111 %  %  %  :i K %  % %  %  sprawl in* Orly alrpOtl lu-u(0 %  ""itw command of in. of the Western Alliance which prevent new Korea i in nil the world. His arrival coincided with the launching of a new campaign v huh n lead to a new blockade of West Berlin by the Rus"i.ms. and as the Communist parties loosed a torrent of threats The sign in g mmou took place In tilt and tapestrrd 'Salon Dhorloge" of Qua! D'orsay against the background of Vhlefa may'arid up to %  worst menace to paaci outbreak of thg KonUI war. Tho European Defence Community ( %  DC) Ti. %  known mi only one of ton'declined to-day to sfa i %  aggression. To American plodgo of support 1 4 State Deen Acheson. Brttlah F. reign Becretarv Anthonv Eden, and Knmh F..r, :. Robert Sehuman Men |HihtParly Clashes Expected In Primaries WASHINGTON. May 27. ntlal candidates of both ..rid Democratic parUei Will daab to-diiy ui four In critical contests involvoventlon delegates U 102 delc.* %  n a! stake in the %  K i State conn Florida primary. IHpubl:. N tielegotei Connaettcul oonInvolvcd %  Senator Robert A T %  .no Gtneral Baanhrmrai In the Texas lii-publicm eouvcntiou and Benatari Richard itusseil i i K-tt\Ki.rjuv.-r m the Florida pi binary. K' ntu. %  up < %  > g|t VUa Praaidaat .: i ej '.,t,... .'-. delegate the Democratic presidei Hal n in ition. Tho Bkssor..I organization flawinning almost all 22 %  ii.-lenate>. \ hatile was under way .• v.i RepabUeang Mho lie National Convention. Ta(t won the hitlerly contested tnrf round .if victory last night in again*) the West. An IndlcaUon of P oned hBl %  cheduted departure for %  '-Ul r "< ,hl ecatrol of Texas • 'K'll was a line of 200 hel-l Ha, ,v, "' v '" %  """. tO-nlgh1 i-. delegation. However Eisenhower motgrj French gendarmes" lining ."jf 1 ,n '" !" the runway: through which RidtfAcr, e*on and Sehuman to Constellation taxied to the " *• mounttoi 1 nain terminal after setting down II IIV ar GMT— r.r Nrvvbolrf Takes Oath AK Panama Governor NEW YORK. May 27. BrisStdi"General John 11 s** %  bold. wiIIBTPirorn at 4 pun. EST to1 rOvernor <C Fop Ministers and Informally discussed what action the Soviets i Acheron according to informed quarters reassured the French that the door Is still open to more talks with the Soviets despite the signing o| i with Germany and the European Army Treaty .—r.r. MRS iff CA \K /V./V./Y/V Will MEET ill in from Our Own Cnor>i> PORT-OP-SPd N The y of the Ini.l Society ol SUJM: Cam held in 11 \ %  all over the world attending tho parley will visit Mner erne plantations m .lamai. a, Barbados. Bntlsh Guiana and Trinidad. Dportan laid Ihaj may lake the fight all • to Chicago. i were (irmly In conBkato RapuhUean organization as Eisenhower hopefuls %  n n bid after bid to win seats in the Toxal Which Will meet to-day to chexwo tho State's 38-mtm deleRiitlon to I Convention, waa alao battle, in the i.inks in Texas as proTruman delggattons from 27 counit of the pal '>'.Btate Convention. This assured u pro-Truman bolt from the conand two Texas delcssLlom at the National Convention. The State Credentials Committee, ruled that pro-Truman delagjatea should bo seated. primarv provide.1 a re1 I'tisscll and Kei.uvei the ngixUdataa for the Democratic presidential i Ruaaall who defeated Kafauver In an earlier popularity rnnry in Florida on May %  i.-I tii win 2" of the 24 Florida delegates elected i-i i<>-day's ludlotting.—I'.r. Russians Renew Berlin Blockade BERUN. Miiy 21 The Russians barred United States.and British military police patrols from th main .super-highway linking Weft iny and Berlin in what may be the prelude to a new Berlin blockade. However Soviet border guards did not Interfere with other Allied and German traffic travelling in both direction! along the 110-mile Autobahn across the SOViel /.one. The regular United States military morning train from Frankfurt In West Germany RUM arrived in Berlin without U. S-A rgen tine Wool Trade Rose In March (Bj M \iiitv W I it INTO) lay 27. %  share (iuari),ports ol tjreen .' Inn 'arch doubled OVOV ,ve alWHIPPORAVH xcors their llrt soal igaUMt PeUca Clnb yetttrgay Whipporay^ srea tbe (SBM ~ 3(Kee pigs 7). Mexico Finds Cure House Pass Third Parties Insurance Bill roi* Cattle Disease incident. Telephone Lines Gut In Berlin BERLIN, M Communists cut telcpl. %  miinicalioii.s between East and BRH. C.EN. JOHN NEWB4ILD I West llerlm and 17 long distance ~"^"^~^"~ I linen betuccn West Berlin and %  s* h 4 f *-._, e. c* Is _i Wnrt Oarmany on Tuesday. Elifht HO.-\lIUlltC %  • tAlntim. B\ Res<'Ue IMane ] cations betwaen Wa i I West Germdiiv wernot I It appeared to he the first blow i | Part will, the Western Allie. ve-terday Went Berlin. no miles Inaloa thi s feared a renewal of the near parai blockade Of 1948-49. IJONDOH. May 27. A Bi four-motor Hermes Aircraft which erashed In French West Africa waa sighted bv a rescue nrdinit to a BOAC spokesHe said a B.O.A.C, Argonaut I over the reported scene. forced-la tiding : ol Port Btttnna had spotted the plant BarUalU buried in some soft ar.> nas jad. The cm of tlie Argonaut re-M-livlty" around the ptgDi 1'in'it crewmen and ten passengers lafl LonJan on Sunday en route to Logos, Nigeria. But 'of casualties if any are .oown.—t'.F. Earlier to-dav Russl-n tKirder guards again barred Allied military %  • %  patnli f i "in I only highway link wii; tio noliroad to < Pi ists had b< '' %  bdimid M I) H and May 17. hut since than I troubled. To-day as liefore. RUSM en. expl li • i action. A rivili.oi freight and passenger tiafflc on (be hlghwaj 'ill flowid normally.—*" This action neverthc!> I the Urst of what may rlM of retaliatory id Kst German i I troaty signw. *ern Big Three and jn nrday. Allot! authorities adopted a attltudi toward fcfca thai the Soviet n.y th 1948-49 total %  H Merlin. one i i fore 'Jus month police %  thi -o|.r hi, -. f \Rlt [ted the ban on May 17, The ncu ban also name only a f*w houraltar the Communist Batt German governi t had ordered %  • i>f the border be%  West Germany i '•tilling measures .... I further Infiltration of .( %  nts. spies and %  United military potiee I A lien they ;t.00 a.m. (3 ..i: KST I thatr regular round l' lit the highway. • quipped with two-way r. speede|. and aid any %  N dlatiaaa, %  Id I bird %  ,.t HelmBerth ehecfc points for refusing I I Lhc pnvloui occasion I latsj hsil A. war* Illegally sending armed patrols along the highw> —tl.r. THE House of Assembly yaterduy with hut little debute patsHill to make provisions for tiM protection ol Thiid Parties gainst risks arising out of the us* T motor \< Notice of this Bill was given ost Deeembei 18 and It was read a Brat time on January 8. On January 13 the Bill was read a eoimd lime and leferred to a Select Committee. The Select Committee reported back to th* yesterday but marie no substantial chunges. aetl and reasons read: — The ihii aeaki la apply to this island the principle of compulsory Insurance against third-party risks out of the use of motor vehicles on public roads and lb baasd on similar Irgi.Liium exls'iog in UW United Kingdom, Brltash Guiana and Trinidad. Clauses 3 and 4 make it unful for unvone to use a motor vehicle on | puhln RMd with.iut l-'ing insured against liability fining death or bodily injury to any person by the use of such vehicle. Provision is also nude in Clause 4 to enable hospital' to %  frem the Insurer expenses reasonably tneurred in treating Injured pereoua, A iknttei proVanon is contained In CI.HIM 19 cover the fees of medical pracUUonan who r.-nder emergency treatment to persons tnjure PAUL HAWKINS) MEXICO Cl IV. V Mexn.m livestock Industi tcriiHtioii.il meet tost lube vfctoi %  ver hoof and tnoutl Unitexl Stateg ope. shipments, it will mark for the fli that vaccines ha* Speak*r To Represenl ITdosAlCIVA. Keds Attack U.N. Positions Con-ii. .ini'.t kuUnuanM o all efl the western front while theli %  noM maji i Beds sent 300 mm again hill SO miles north of the heed ol iha traditional route thiontth tlie Uljongbu Corridor, GiKhth Aino hi-ips ware on Iha lltli ell ..cross the IN Qajna in I rspened it"liffi eenuli %  than 2.000 roinMls "f tmmunltlon Tlien ml i' bdilci Allied • I I bach. 100 LejaajM The attack cost (he lteds at least 100 i ,-isualtles. Five similar probes were thrown liiick with hoavi l;. United States Marines of the First Dnislun weie guard ol the western sector but i would nut permit an announcement as to when hi I votved in lo-darl Ochling. Patrols were rniiKing oil., noman's laial lagt nigtit and earl) to-day run into froup of Commuulsts as large as sixu West of Chorwon a United Nationi patrol aiubii l.i-d l:.-i killed five in ,i twenty minute light. Fifth Airfor.e bghi.r Uimbcn %  truck again t Con line bunkers and ieur an port and supply. ind im.nth infi I I I n hen %  could | %  I bajalacad qul< mouth out %  i i Russian Air Force Is A Threat NEW YORK. May 27. I this I nl Ol the AnFo Thomas Finlciter said Tuesday'i writinp li that sV"i Russia "ill be able to Aviation Age Magazir.' •jling and long range atomic ca;. posiibl> %  that even under %  I-.' jigain't the Hussians He said by 1954 the Red Air I II probably outnumber Of the North Treaty Organization by "al-out three to two" in the tactical field while lonji range bombers capable of atomic bombs v;l!l /Yarn // Threatens Mussed Attack On U.N. Forces PANMUNJOM. May 27. Tho Communists thieatened to unleash their 1.000.00Uman army in North Korea against the Ki.'li'h Army of the United Nations in retaliation for the RXhUed "nut of Red prisoners on Kojc Island. North Korean G" Nam II, senior Red deU-Katr delivcro-i 't' ]., %  i il.n ol renewed lull-stale bloody warfare In Korea since the truce negotiations began last July. He told iha i % %  ma s se s of North Knieans and Boy Did Lc-fiaont* With Hulle, Iir beg LONDON. May 2T. A 13 year old boy who did no* ..nut to get his friend In trouble *al stoically througti morning version at school yesterday a no then staggered home to tell his mother he hud l*en sho. The bullet had been fired accidentally from an old German pLitol brought to school by OJH of Edward Wilson's classmitet. The desk cover hurriedly slammcl dowm avrr the pistol, caused it to ftr. The st-rtled teacher c|ic in Abdication %  A %  1 %  i %  %  %  %  : %  %  ilt n % %  I %  %  ... %  • %  %  i p %  %  I %  I %  %  %  %  %  %  cllnad, %  %  %  %  %  %  I %  %  %  %  i i r //.IK/. I. Crmcel Special Flight* If* Whitsuntide %  %  %  %  l I on tho %  %  UA oil f the I M K. N. R. %  the Barbadi \ ml Bar%  %  %  HI early date has not yet I ."-d from B Mil Of the 1 %  ..ill he %  %  .i %  1U I %  reverse* s/UI alter 'hat ill '.. %  .. tour of the %  I .1. Oil Strike Upe Air Charges %  sfttau In. %  ad the ... %  Uon at the Lrlke. The in%  DOW only I weeklv pen Brtt%  %  %  ncaaMr %  ii.t m to be i their %  Ill A t' ill dweide li id be %  m h <• the i • increase 'They're everything I look for Cum %  Ri front of the IM-sTI fence IIni i onwi ii %  %  % % %  The waning brought %  eials. Chief United N raan Brer. Oaneral v. u Nuck..ld< threat. Majoi I K H.ii 11 v said it was "propagsridn". Nam's threat came as Uw All troops on the m lOT ^ possible (!down i Seoul, i low i ii K 'i Ihat 237 Hfd PTUm recently in camps-!:': %  Archer Nam' 1 do 'les— %  They said thay ajovid i iulv In" M/hUs %  %  tfnii I Don army overrun North K threatemxl th '.; Icr— f.P. iMiss D. Wood 10—6 Trinidad Lead in Lawn TennU %  "Hut seldom fniJ, riecfd In •U, Maarlar, I ...p^w ggaj II. Hill what rsarll} do look fur in a eigarelle?'* I I rV/' ''"'"" — which i • ( \ I A/ I 1 "n/v ciine from foaVi ** %  /; 1/ / I "it ii oither special CtlH tohaao Iti.ii. nl course, prr/ett MiHtothiiess — which me tint %  in comfortable throat," • ) ,//' tmWti D V"M kmiir, thu ilit \Uimt,, fdlir l'f> n jn-t iibont iniaaj>reeeej ' i*%i* smoke thai I nriiu." • %  >#\li Smoke lo your throat's content du MAURIER THE EXCLUSIVE FILTER TIP CIGARETTE St.04 lor SO MSOt IN INOIAMD SOU DISTKII i .1 IUVSts CO



PAGE 1

PAGE EIGHT RAKBATHT* ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY. MAT M. 1M? CLASSIFIED ADS p,,,>Lir w !" roi .M.UN S...\ TKLCntONC ISO* DIED MH, Field* Her funeral took x Church Mm IMM Archibald Mil. iHti Ran i 'PUtmt name l-.d'grandM ft U NUUll .Mrirltl Ti.c n m. Gap. Martiod.lau aaaieia JB P IH tO-0' Weeibur. tm-t. r •< %  are ...k#J l.> .attend Own and lr> Mrrrltt 'deuaiMleia' Eleaha. Small ._ her late residence Somol Gap, Wrat bt r. He-d at SO |. in t.-dar lot the VMltoj Cetnetery Friend. i% %  >M to atteead Mi Mn Ir.nlse Hall THANKS ln The family of the laic Brute Thomas bra through (himedium In morn thanks to all those kir d frtervdJ who Mnl Mn of ror.delenee. or In an* war eapte—Ml i.iti pain, in their recent bercevsmenl. IT ft M In %  IH< VIIOVVI • HRlBT ( HI kill lalKI rUI'SUATIIIN %  ^ lllll.l IWTHAHCK EXAMINATION. lft_ Applications IOC entry to Ihe School U MI he ,..-.!• .j, September 1.T __ lot... Ihe arturol on MondaysFridait, • .*> a m. and IN p m Applicant, nul be beta..,:, | •'I I year, and II year*. 6 monltV l.t of KrptMfibcr. Iftft) The entrance r* mm nation will be bald at Id* School on Fndev. IJlh Jimr, IBM. at *.M a m Theie will be no accommodation al the School for Parents oi Guardians on that day. Application form, mu.l ba UM lli.>uii.i-i!r.:. mn ]..i. i Uian ripiai SSUl May. IBM II 9 M-4n nuar CHI BUM I.IKI.h till MH I I..-. -4 I raaadallaa atrkelarahle. Thr re will ba oria 0* im-:r vaiaiKlai lot Foundation Scholar* at the Chriel Church Girli* Foundation School In An ataaerii nation will ba hold a| E "" Malona. at Harris..-i College, ami n he irliminl to him toateUv-r wttti a I* nr Baptiuik.il CVrUAcdftt not liter I 3 0* p.in on Friday 30th May, IBU Candidate, moat ball' Thr Children of pailahoner* CbrftM Cl.ureh who ara In a* aliened circumstances >1> Bar t ween tha aaa ol |0 and It Inclusive on tha day of t illation, i a 13th June. IKS] DEM MAUONK, Hecieiao •Trcaiuici. i...\.r..t,!*•">' Ch Ch GUIC foundation Schtxi IM.** < %  t OH KALE NOTrCK I (Hr I Sl.l. betv.ee. lha eg-e o. ._ _..„ „ lwl „ In narbadoa ara roo,..e,i,d to call at ti AroawlCBn Conauk.ta Iran J,. 1M, hn SalacUva ffWiviaa nV[iiratia. indaa tl^ Cnivaraal Military Trimi-i AUTOMOTIVE CAR .*! %  %  aiiai-ifji CAB. Morn. I 1MT modal MM nulaa in fod ordar ApplJ B. Olll. Waurafoid St Michael J ft M -*. %  : % %  '. :•* %  modal. 1 nr tyraa. n**a ..pholalcT). low mile.Ir Oa/nur dnvrn l.ica fta-7J J St Hill. TWaadMd* Road Pi.l 4MX1 H ft In All mala cn.iar,. of the ITnltad Slaw, Wftf> attain tha aga ol II July S !• %  *. a..11 l CARFord PnftKt Uta Ifttaf modal I.I :.ni laodition good Uilaafa uadaa "c-i"" *" —'-... r ssnr 1(40 rord Prafa-t T.#a mile, nt (ondlUon II aw.to Ifiotia nnlnCS KIM Miria I hp 4 door .odel Moult Olfoid 13*00 rnlla-. iwnpr dinar, and in excellent condi i on pM Moral Oar Mia Ltd Talrpntw<' *0* 11 ft U--4n .•iOTICE PAtUftMl oi -i mum Mil h vnotrt ',; oar .1 Ejihlblllon tenable .1 Q,,-,will ba raralvrd b ftha ..i.der-.Bi r-l „-. IJ I p m on Thursday 20th Mav. |*u rSsessx JT'si.s^iv.'sr^c;;' and muat not ba laai than • yaan i.or ntora than ll nan Ol ae on tha Ino Saptarr.Ue. Itftff. tn ba pro % ad by a boptlim-i certlfl,ale wh|ek %  I %  poay the jppllCBUon Form, of app.lcMftat. can ba oblali.ad ai lha Parochial .'HOT CAR In excaUOfit condltlcai .-,.' diivan May ba acan al [. F.i 1 *.rr.ey. Garaga CaU ••. St ft w-dn ELECTRICAL FRKllDAIRE. -Waallnshduaa in lak .orklni ordar Ulal 0* Tampro Ckrc rwal !*: %  •* 3r I'VL IO\UIO Model WG Eacall. i-ondlUon Vary Itttla uaad Praeticall^ M* Pho— IM m 9 fin REJ-RlornATtHtfall | Ht Q.l.g. RadTftfarator f I I. i % %  % %  • %  % % %  %  CHU-'KS New Hun .unhirat. Plymout truck. While Giant. Dial 4JSB %  tiit-Bi MISCELLANEOUS fllaoa. Chi Watartoloura. Early book.. Map*. Auto rapha ate. at Uonliura. AotUjuo Shop • .ijoinliiK Royal Yacbt Club I (w i I r. I'.FNIlitWDOO MIXTURI %  *!>• il lorn, which btindi a dod to hi. boat Suitable for doda Of Oil II broadPricaa faV. and II 00 Knight'. Ltd. US M Jn iiii..'.i; i ,M I .....ll. I II Hoabuck SI Dl Ml,, (XltEAlA I'tni, Flake. Mnaddad Whaal, All Bran. Oat PUVa. Ir. Tina and Lara Taptocu W M Potd, Jft Hoabuck •ft Dial **- •*-* %  ROVS lOI'NDATION -( HOOI. Faaadallea <•< n. received b> lha Clerk of tha Vaatry up to 11 noon oa Wedneaday. SaHh May Itfta Candldataa muat ba tha daugMan ... pOlidhlonan in atraitanad cUruua.tai.cei and muat not be. leaf, than t not moie IhAn II >rara of age on the 2nd Sep. loraber ItU, to ba proved by a Baptism* CaMIFaTBI Ai.mt i I i i in. BANK ACT. B_ a the tredltan balffni apaataUy llaaa .. loan ol *inoo under lha provtaaona of the above Ait agairiat tha aald Planlaliono In reapact of ihe Agruultuial • IBM to 1053 No money has been borrowed under lha Agricultural Aida Act, IM* or t above Ad l OF it FFIIII JO) Parochial Ttaaa.rrr Office a be cloaed M from Mai Wlh to Juna > both days inclualve Signed a 8 OORllLN. Pariichlal Trearurer. St jvt, : ar^L ESTATE BUNGAUVK Stonewall Baaiga,. known a* Banyan Berh. Brightan. Bl-k Rock. Sar.1 Michael. ,th M.IM aq.^.a at of land I Tha -tar.--. .id for .'Cir-petllinn at .me. gtreat. Bat Trida. 0th June al I "WII.TBHIMK PUAMTATlOhl'' dwaJlmghouae WHITE HAVEN all In Ml Philip trh .bout m acre Mad made .ip a* follow. 108 a. • grata. Ti bgni | B1I.TMORT. run Village St J.mei a aa Three Biilr n pt.il. Dining and Urawing roomBlactrkclty. running water ir. each room Oarage, and aaivanl • room DMI 01MIT ft J tana December mcluatv. bull, I r.. i bacaa. Togrlhe. aharea In Three Houaea ii.'" ks ..ill-" With I 70 lory Limited Thone Mr 2aX Tha up to public i roparty compatition for bidder beyond tha Bparaaaed value ..t 1 i m on, Friday tha Mh day of June 1W.J A our Offica For lurtraer gairtlcular< md condttton. ol aal. appay to lha under Mgned < AHRlNGToN UALV. Lien Street U ft U 13i THIS ATTRACJIV! IIOMI badroom ior iwo hedrooroa and dan RUNOAI/1W ..I IbMaO and concrete con atructi'm Combined forty feet livinal %  oom and gallery. lull> cupboar'W cadar lined double bedroom %  loaata AlU— tivrl> laid out gaide. tree* and ample room lot vegrtablaa Oar.ige witb braaysawa) to I i. lha l-.-a.ri. I. e-o.it. .> fkaBgaMaJll Hlaaaad -IIS... eaa. icarh al aaaJn read al Wartkiu. i.lie, ..... il.aoa Pb. a**: AUCTION UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER BY MbSaTVMI %  rt 11 wtD pall o> TI. Had Uth 'It chattel llmia S m the text, bK-ate.1 al corner Of Ughlfoota OvatJ L_iiBad Chapni-oStreet Spot can be rented Term. c.iWi Sate al 1 p m. VINCENT GIIIFF1TH. I • OaUoB BrftSgetown Ijiile 00 PftMMie au yg i ftm—jj, 'V -Bait OH or M4I i Hill, I'nlurnlahod R atanrtl Phone in •>! • f n PT.AT FULLY FUBJfualDaaO. In Gnu II ,-e Balmoral Gap rlaatlnra Dial IT*. 11 ft s CLJBfSBAPayne* Bay rnrnlahed ... -ilumlthod. gallary. drawing and dlalng tooma s badroawna twlth lunnmg water in It. kitchen, toilet and De-h ilnuaat Al Clapham, oppoatu tha V St Michael Phone IMI ft ft! -Jr. A.> tUH XCfSMK .\TN FASHION BOOKS UwaBfl To help with your asta-ina pi now offer thr lateat French FaahL Book, ilyle. for Mid Rred Street TAKE NOTICE DINACRIN l WlNTHJUlp FBimi'CUl DTC.. a %  x.taon mao.red and ealatlna aapgar .a*. of the aute of DaMaaaara, led BtahH ol America Hi — trade or buun---. addica. la I4B0 %  oMOgy. Maw York. New Torb United Btatea or Amarka. haa applied lor the eBjtraUaw of a trade mark m p-.t A of Begietai m reaaact at matdltfeiBI ">d phanuaceularal praparellawa*. and a-lli be anutbrd to regular the ami ifter one month from the Jain da> ol 4... IMI .nleea •ante peraon Uiall in the Ita. ntlmr glva natlre in duptarwtV to M il my oaVe ol oatpoMUon of .n rear. • traitor. The tiade mark can be (awn ... appllraUaai at ma ofkaaa. Dated tbli ISth da of May ISM H TTtl llnfctS Regtatf.. c< Ttada Mark. K> i It—in SHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. -tit IM. FBOM i am, tUTTlCA igth Mar ISBt % %  a NaCarroat, Mtn May itat •J a BOMAIRE. 1Mb Juna. ISM M a •nUlPOR. I7th June. ISM TAKE NOTICE BI8MAG Thai INTEBNATIONA1. CrlEMBTAI COMPAMY irMTTTD a BrtUOh Coeopan> Manufa.lining Chetniatl whoea Uade t Dualnru addiaaa i. The Factory Brayayaigrra fat Dnminara. Antgiia. Vontaarrat. Nevit and P Kltu. taaBI foe M.V -C*. accept Canto and Dominica, AulM>a. Nan* and at Kim urday Tth Juno. IMI BW4. 1CBOJMI OWNtBS.Hiwitnov tDfC-l %  ".Han — teir o. tatl HARRISON LINE OOTWAftD PmOM THE rJTfflTVD KINQDOH ...ken IN-ntal Plale can be r paired Ba wuv balance yaui budgi I Of living ii high remember •tltch III t %  .. %  -..; Dental Lab L'ppr, Reed Rtreal M ft B* Ii 17 ft M Bn UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER on Thuraday JOth by order ol the Mlaaaa ShUitone we will all tliali fair. tuture at LaurLaton" Strathcliile which Include. Ckl"Moti Dm11 K Table Screwi. Couch. Orn-nient Table, China I..U-. P.M(M ill iii Mahogany. Black Marbi. Top TabM. Picture.. Curbuna, Ola.. •nd China. Bra... S.licr and I'lalcd Ware. Fork-, faopnl Cutlery etc., San saiee Oloaa, larse Old China flowl and Old China Tea Sct.kc. Oak Chair, and Heofcar.. Single lion and Painted Woaaan Baditaada with spnnand IfgllreaaoB, Dreaalng fable., aood Mirrore.1 Pie.-. LadyDeak, Folding Screen all in Mahodany. M.T. Waih%  Und, Chamber Ware. Mlrrora. Book., Uraan Pre. Planter. Drab. Lnrdcr.. Kitchen Table., Lawn Mown PflllMII Pot.. 1'irfection 3-Burnei OH Stove and other I Ir ma. I POLeM Sale 11 JO Tenni Caah HKANKllt. TR<>TMAN d. CO, AaMlftMMrera. Mft.93 in TAKE NOTICE CENTURY \i %  i .....i .. DeOtei .1 AIJ'REIi BIRD A SONS. I.IV i rrMD. %  • mmp-n mgantied under II" tawa of 1 Hrllalu M iriifacturaJ • %  rtd MenlaaiiU. whoac trade at baanne., iddraaw H DeMm.hite Wirb.. Btnnihgbain U. tnalaeM ha. appbed for the ragjetra tlon of a trade mark Mt Part "A ol teglalrr in teapect ol baking pawde%  nd all lubatancaw uaed aa food ot a. linll-iiti III food, and Will be entitle I reglrter the name altar otw moni'. 'lorn the day of May IMI unla-.. o mark Can ba earn on applicatl. ..I my office Dated thl. Ilth da. of M. SS •MERCHANTS-S. "COLUMBIA STAR" SS. %  T1UHESMAN" S.S. "SELECTOR" Newport Ltverpool Liverpool London A M/bi^vugJi Livevpoul &i Glasgow 3th Mv Tth May Sth May 17th May 18th May 20th May 2Tth May 1st JUflf HOMCWAmD rOft THE I'NlTfTj RLNODOM Vraart SS. "GRELROSA S.S. "HERDSMANKMfurther iBfarrnatlan apply t* Wm CaSBRh* IB BarhatdnH Ijverpool 15th May London 22nd May DA COSTA ft CO.. LTD.—Aaaata la. ol May l*W H W1UJAMS. ReglaH., ,.l Trade Malk. TAKE NOTICE NOTICE 'I or sr. i-.-i r., Al-I'I.R'ATIONS for nnf li, Vc.trv abhlblllmi tenable at Ihe Con.bermer. School will ba received by the undeialgriad up to 1 p.m on Thuradaj. Mth May IMI Candidates mu.l be lha aom ol ParlihaOnera in •tralteii.it < niianiat... .,,-.. ..,.,. mu.t not lit leoa Ihnn MH year* nor mora than ll'i yeara of ageon the 111 of Kevmrabrr IBM lo be proved bv a baptlan-al iirtlhcala which muil accom. pany tha appllcaUon lorrna of application can be .blamed at lha Perochl-l Treawurer Off-co A T KINO. Clark. 81. Plillip'a Veatri NOTICE pARiaa OP ai. I.I IT Til %  IV.rec-,,.1 IJffile -> I.il. -,.. ". luaed on Tliuraaay net ir,iTrth nil nd will be re-opened .1 HARROWS on haturda.y. tu lit tn.t Othca houra Tuaadata and Thuradaya irorn 10 a m lo 3 p m and Halurdny* n S a m. to la noon OBWALD L DTtANF. Par. hi... SI l.UC> M a W--J UNDER THE SILVER HAMHER In Wadnvaday fill June b> ordei Tha Exocutoi. to HitBaUle ol UM UU b i*u Mill aril tin Furnlli at "Whitet, iv. W Phil p whack at*a>n.. % % %  : % %  Mahog SprinBB and Deep Sleep rlau He-da; 1, ...ari*. Coucbe* Pieaalng Table.. Iron Bad. lead, Scraana, Cham l>. 1 W-.e a-a-vtiolu. Oil laclilga-iator. 1 lluinrr Oil Stole, (oil Stovo, LardOl., . Lie11.1l. A Tableo, Btap Ladder C-nlaa Cot, uardau llench. Booka Llneu and many otkar llama of inlaid Sale 11 30 o'clock mNUI, TBOTMAN %  CO. .. ir,. NOTICE the g.1.1ai I'll SIMM HM.M1.II 1 <-t an S.ibartW now lo ihe nail. Telegraph England'a leading Dally Newepaper now "i mna In Rarbadoe be Air only a law daya after publication In London CoMat: Ian Gala, eo AdvocSU C.. Ltd l...rl Rapraaaatatlva. Tel 111! IT.f BS-t I i. rWNeBJ rnWTT Grapes Large A eand I AHIIIVI:I Anatber Ihlpatral mt 1' POPULAR i.t.T booked Iiicee ol no Mgbar. I'lllSOX Al. The I .t.l,. GIFTS For HrdrlliK--. Annlvrrmarira lUrthdays. t in I.I. .utirs. et. DIAMOND RINGS GOLD A SI1A 1 1: JEWELLERY s your Iriii-H.-t. . Y. De LIMA A CO.. LTD. 30 BROAD ST. 4 al MA.IVK GARnENS fbj warned agatnat %  craait to am peraon or parraoia laoeiei in my tiama aa I do no' myaell rraponiibte for anyone conti acting any debt 01 debta In any name iinlea. bv a written order algned by me OBWAIJ) ROCK. Pie Comer, St l.u.. IT ftS-an Tl.e public ate hereby warned again.! c.iing credit lo mj wife I'RSIIJ A MROWNE 'nea Spencri > aa i do not bold ivi.e'l leapomtble hi her ni anyone alar 1 unt. acting *ny debt or debt* in mv ileaa b> a nitllrn order algned Ft ASM TOBI KMGH1 NOTICK IS HERKBV GI\ r EN thai nil ..Hint havlna any debt or IMP upon r ..fTectiiia: the Eatala til Charlra TorA.i.u.Iua Km*' 1 ...t. ..I '! 1(11 in thr paUi.h ol S.1I11I I'lulip in H1.1 -land, -no eked In Ihla aaland on Jim ISOS are hereb> • % %  Ihrtr clalma. duly StI ir.ieai iu 10a irar mdai-iml Thaya^lhullaadlay, Pubii. n laiand ot Barbadoa quiHtted Admini-lrat. 1 %  1 the RhUte ol CharU-a Toning!.AuguMii. Knight draeaaed. Pub h Hullding. on or belore Ihe llal dav ..1 .July IBM altei wln.t. I (hall 1 Idlttrtbule the aaaeti ol the ..id calaie .-n.nng Ihe partlr. entitled thereto liavli a ( irgnrd lo the debt* and claim* onl> .1 winch I ahull itien have had notkhf 1 that 1 ahall nol be liable loi .net. % %  tii.tnbuted lo any peraon of whose deli or claim I ahall not have had nonce .1 the time tl luch dbtrtbutlon. AND nil peraoni indebted lo I'm %  aid e.lalr ate lequeaie.t to aetUe the.i •irounli without delay Italed thl* 17lh da> ol MaIBBJ TrMOTHV TlltrOPHfl-I'S Ihe aCalalr ol OIABLJDS TDMtCMOTON AUPUSTXIl KNIUIIT deceaaad. M 5 ftS-an MANAQEH A capable ma MftSlI IMsjai t.i ,% .-. nl .... I .perlen.e-1 nmnM, quartet 1 provided trail Mr. Rryan. No ) To at ft a— in RADIO KLECTIUCIAN loi our Fir. 1 kal Dapailmeni. Apply in peraon Wit egattv iH'doa. Ud It I S3—I ( n WanUd D ...all. I. "it tee lady aaalatant lo lake rharate ( Informatioo IHoe.ni Saawell Airport. A knowlrdle p| typing md Sp.ml.h il... 11 1 .11111.01 Barbedo, 1 1 AUCTTOMESW of Middle Street oilers for sale from his exttensive list: — A three bedroom stone bunaialow on in* sea. below Oistin. And HARBAREES HOUSE with 2*4 Acres of land. It Is within orn? mile from Bridgetown. If you are interested In properties, why nol .verlnok his list, or dial 2645 28.5.52—Sn I.OVF fb KIIMI LOST MISBTNO Irom Car near Hoc kin. uo Club. Lady* navy-blue handbag cam lair n. Omega watch and wedding ring Ol •cut!men!al value An paraon givinn i iiiioimatioti leading lo recovery will be weU lewarded Call Brooke, % %  eredbc | Beach Club, between A and Turn HWEEPMTAK K TK'KKl Hci le. P > I Finder plea Hotheraal Turning. owerad 1 Thou .. riael He.. g| fM hO'e as.ft.M-i,. SHORT STORIES. ARTICTaTt, VFR8K POt Ihe ('11.1.1,1,8. Mn A.tepted material will be paid after publVcallon Send Ml Kins. New Era I'reaa, rTharor.. avMjJka. Pains in Back. Nervous, Rheumatic! Wrung f %  '• ai i I. i>verork md IraViaaal fOaaaoft. pul a Btrain on ihKldne.. and Kt ine. and Hindder Iroublee are the true eau.e <>( lvc-Acldit.. tirtio.it Up N'lgM v Ht-rnln. Par...... Leg P.iflC Norvouinaea. Pli.lne... Swollen Ankle*. Rricumatl-ni. Puff. Kiell.!and •^e!lri. .-.,.... %  PRff^^'A """'/'/RET TRADr taSl MABR I &iuJ£i$Ui IZITI 'LAX: *ixa. ^J Th-t JDNKnI'lNGS OCM VULCANrl r\NIisTICKS FARRIKSAKTIEBOLAO. .. joint .lock i.imp.iv organlied undo Ilia law* of Sweden. Malih Manula(l>irei a. a-boa*. trade or bu.ineaa addn .. If. 1* V-alia. SnorgaUu. Jonkoplng, swadn KM -pplied tor the .eajiatralton of a trade rr.ra m Part "A" ol Nealater In reepec! miilh from the irTJaBS *Ve of eppoal Jatraay, United State ., A. en.MJIIi. lartorera. whoac trade 01 buiincai ..ddreaa :. CM Filth Avrm... %  i VI State of NeYork V HA hat applied for the registration of a trnde mark In Part "A' 1 of R.-sUUr In reaped Of -,unking tobac.o and clgarrtlea. and will be entitled lo reglaaar the aarne th i,..u. the Mth day ol May ISM. unless earn* peaaon shall in "i" meantime glva notice In duplicate t:> ma at mv omoa of opposition ti aueh .•Ki.trauon The trade mark can ba SeaJP application at mj.' oOsra Dated Ihl* Ilth day of May IBM It WnUAJalB, llegi.t,.,, ol Ttade Marks MS il—In Canadian National Ste ams hips -Ol Ml III M sn Hall. sail. galls Arrlars sail* MenllMl H.llt.a Baeeeaa BTaTas B'aaa 1AJ>V RODNEY ia v.. 1> Mi.. ft Mn v 1 June 1 Jane -ANADIAN CHAUXNUEIl SO May 1 June II Juna |l June 1 ADY NEUBON • JUM ia June 14 June U June M June CANADIAN CRUlSfUt V June IS June a July 3 July CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR June SJuty 11 July %  July 11 July I ADY ROD NTT 11 July It July : %  July M July NOBTTfBOrND Aitlaea galb -Uttraa Aertvea Aerlaaa' Bdoa B'daa BL Jaftut Baataa Nsllfu M nil. a CDN CRUISER ,. M Mat 1 ANADIAN at May ft Juna s Juna 11 June CONSTRUCTOR ) June 11 June IADY RODNEY is June 1 ANADIAN '" IT June ~ IT June 11 Juna 1 July CIIAL1XNGEK a June ?l June IB July 11 July i-\DY NJELSON SJuly ilv IS Jury aa July i 1'N CRUHOOt M July It July n July I Aug CONaiTRUCTOH H July n July 9 Aus. %  Aug 10 Aug LADY BODffBY .. T Aag. a A.ig Auaj. N Aug 1) Aug TAKE NOTICE { FOB further particular* apply to— GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.-AgsaU. .avalier I. m TV .(.nucatlo.! .. Dated !hb lUt da) of May IBS] H WIU-1AMS llceutier Of Trade Mark. M ft :-} -.ti, ASTHMA MUCUS Loosened first Dav :'... ruin JOIIT .le.,. day >a ii|hi .u. 4 t trying Mrs. EXVo I".. r.,e, medi.tne .. no,*, •in.ke. Injection or sgarnv. lui .,rka threuah tba Mood, Ibu. .-robin, lhv hmg* ... I bronrl ,r • ,>.. Tb. n, rt deer atari, helping nature imiir.ll. il.lyj.... | HelpMosen ail trmove thick .ti.inilnx mu.oa I r\, a >, promolesi freer bre.-ilhini atljaou-irle,. fipMob oau sag C l( G ll TRANSATLANTIQUE ;. CUUIBIS from He.abs*n>le>a to GBa4eloBB, Mil Hail % %  !. Rarbadoa. Trinidad, La Guaira, Cajnggfto A '-iilm TI...! B J REYNOLDS riaBACCO CO-WANY a corporation urgaiined gud •• %  istlng imder Ihe law. of the Stale -rt K Jersey United Stale, of America. Tobacco Manufaclurer.. srhOM irSdt %  biialneaa address la Math and Fourth etreeu. Winrlotr-Salem North Caiollna USA baa applied for the rrguiratltm of a trade mark In Part 'A" of Regtctat m rrapect of tobacco and tobacco produ.U. clgaretlea cigar*. amoklng t .|.i'c. snuff. .,,...-., arllrMt*. Ugarette paper matche.. cigarette cases. .I,.I ggj pipe. imokins tobacco, and will be "enlitlrd to ragtsiar Ihe ,.w after one month from lha Mth day of Mai. ISSf dnMaa .cane peraon shall In Ihe niewntlrraa live hollce In duplicate lo live at m iifflc* of nppoaltlon of inch reg's'r.tln The irada nwb can be seen •Iher reason. Claims must be made to the French War Damage authorities direct %  md should be in th* French language. H.M. Government can accept •io responslbllilv for the actual filing and prosecution of claims. 24.5 52—2n •"DE GRASS*' "COLOMBIE" *"DE GRASSE" 19th May, 1952 1st June, 1952 29th June, 1952 •Sailiing direct to Southampton 29th May, 1953 Ilth June, lMl 9th July. IMI Flir PANS. mat B* 1 VS Are Yours in Order? If not — They Are ubtaiitable at — THE WiXTmAi. tMl'Ullll M Corner Bread u,ti Tudor Strsjefjg yaaar kidney, clean vndlM. -III.IM.. V! %  ':; %  ; PAIR OF Gl-AHSBH ..Cyito3i'H:?tl !e'*-tra-Ve > -,e,r,e M T11W GUEST HOUSE IIASTINOS BARBADOS ;I Under new managt-nu-n: o Daily and longteim rates quoted on "equest a B ormaxient guests welcome. Dinner and Cocktail parties arranged. J. B. Bl'CKLAND. Proprietor. <.-f^f>tVt.•>e^,<.VlV• %  J ,V'.'-^*r'-'1, MM! HKVT V.I .able bu.tnesa pramlaes on •bora thg POM OnVe vrilh back entrance hill St.ee' Fronlaae contain* tw > door, and larse snow window Ideally suitable (or any business, especially a Urug Store. In close proiimlt. \i 1 parkma places and the It.,. Slandr Akkt eool and -, upilalr* c.iei the proBUsee eferred to above These office. oti" business srembes w | re-.fed srprrslelv ,nav be de.irod Applv lo Ltd. Riekrtt SKrcl BUJJ S. P. C. K. BOOK DEPARTMENT C r. ii iiiiiisiiv A vn.. I.TII. A shorl list of new titlennd rrplacemrnls from a large shipment of Books, etc., |ust received :— TEDDER : Roderick Owen MY INDIA : Jim Cotbett ADVENTURES IN TWO WORLDS : Cronin VENT! HE TO THE INTERIOR : V.n der Pt CHILDREN OF KAYWANA : MittelhoLcc LIEUTENANT HORNBLOWEK: C S Folder I'HOENIX RISING Mara-tarlta Siren LONDON PARTICULAR Chrisliunm. Ilriind THE TROUBLE AT NUMBER SEVEN Ii. .1 Bullell BARMY IN WONDERLAND !>. O Wodehou... HEADINGS IN ST. JOHN'S GOSPEL William Temple THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO ST. MARK : _ Vlrcenl Taylor THE BOOK Or UNVEILING M, R. Newbolt TIME TO REMEMBER : Lloyd Douglas CARDS r,.r all occasions especially Birthday Card, luit rasa ..^i • and PELICAN BOOKS. PAN BOOKS, GUILD l!!.',' !" ; .' v "abla in great quantity: BASII.DON BOND WRITING PAPER. AIR MAIL ENVELOPES, etc. REAL ESTATE Property & Land FOR SALE HOUSE RENTALS • JOIIX M. Ill AIMtN & CO. Real Estate Agenls. Auctioneers eV Building Surveyors Phone 4940 PlaVJiUtioos BuUtalBi FATBM AND MOTHERS t'l FASK NOTE : At ih,request of many parents and teachers we have made a careful 'election of books and pamphlets on sex instruction for Muing people These may be inspected at this branch. DO NOT FAlt TO INSPECT Ol'R BOOK BARGAIN SECTION Telephone **'.', HUH: A HOPPER BICYCLE a THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY ITU. While Park Road St. Michael OHlee : Merchandise: 4MB 4128 Wi.rk.hop : 4MB JA



PAGE 1

c mDNBUM] MAY 28. 152 BARBADOS ADVOCATE Common Pleas Suit Continues More Evidence Will Be Heard Today MOST of the evidence was being led for both the Plaintiffs and the defendant yesterday in the Court of Common Picas suit of Clement Gill. Joseph Dtakes. Arthur Broomes and Le Roy Branker against Lambert Martindale who are disputing the ownership of the Turf Club Spring Meeting ticket F—9374 of 1MB which won £500. Yesterday was the second day of the hearing of this case and the Chief Judge Sir Allan Cullymore who is presiding adjourned the case until today when the remainder of evidence will be taken and counsel will address the special jury which has been empanelled. Porter's Case Adjourned OBITUARY Mr. G.A. Brallwailr. J.P. If Mi rest%  Mi Ithwalto, J P \;t in PJV "•• '" %  > %  Charlie iitrnn^wn a porter of Chapman landing ilguri.In the community wiir, Jl Michael, i, charged by To .oung and old I, ... F pUcf wlth ">e unlawful qu.iiilai.ee ho M known as possession of three ba^s of ni.i.jif Cnuy" and he maintain was adjourned yeatrr.i., urbko woo turn Worship Mr E A. M;ieoJ. Police ">e alTr.lion 0( man) |< Matfstrate ... Diatri | A u m Juno l Counsel in the case U •!"*, K -„ W H rr "w foi H while Sgt Kmn ..i atbtd to Uw Afler In* early years ia*M on hi* own and iel up an establishment in Hottmck StrM. Ire was alw.y* The parties in the suit are all Police and charged with the from Bragg* Hill and both side* larceny of the ticket, are claiming they bought the He was never prevent in ticket from [leifield Taitt a ticket Brankcr's shop when Gill bought seller. Taitt said that he sold any ticket from Taitt, he said. tfctkttf from the particular book to Nor had he ever asked GUI for a both parties, but he does not share in any of his tickets. timcrnber who got the winning also said that he had never bough ticket. any ticket from Taitt at Branker'.. denied, too, his ever house and asking HOUSEWIVES complain tli.it eggan in short *oppl;. fbe larger •gg In the picture i a hem truing *ingU banded effort to wive the problem. This egit that weighs Just over four ounces was laved by a sis months' old LegDorn hen owned by Mr*. Enid MDllngton of Fifth Avenue, Hart's Oap. Of the plaintiff*, the Ucket was sho P* %  dually bought bv Gill, they are om lo Qm alleging, and the other three who him l aUow him to were present each contributed sixpence. "" %  gave evidence to Bfftsva ih.it Martindale had known the number of the ticket which he had bought and on hearing It had his ticket. Referring to the allegation that On the first dav of hearing Gill £ useU \. kwD a ^V," and Hi***" 13-UT" .K=. or uW nt well enough for all purposes, he said he used to sell ice and snowball but any writing which was involved In this connection was done by Marg| House Pay Tribute To Late Christopher Braithwaite. Ceiitr-.i in .M %  ~"" w ..*" -'" Hoi buck street, He was always e Bridgetown Hi..thrrhond in. chargo n i i i thai the .,ripi. Kin-h told the eoun vesier. ,., to itu St MlcJ day that ho a the gMeadaitt IMS and undo, I loading the trree bags irf in-nurr UlU Dl O'Noals and with th. on to a t UCA an I -,, |. Mpporl of lha n cua and a-ke.1 the oaxandani to weeltlj ha stood lot I %  OompjDJ hi" i Um Cantml 'he House 1 of Assembly an ts Hoaj ItiU c that Welch i Impj il .ii. St .Ing everyday. Here it was V%  tlmoot %  a v.itiv. u Hook but i II arttn hli now Dasnoci itit I bad bagiin 11"-ehusing am ini vu initrangtffi n %  kotn eV Mr. C. I I the "Bar;nid Mr. O A. 1 |lr.tHN. .iv ol UM nemocratir League rept faiths. The LeagtM won Ami it will ba racoUoetad record its profound sympathy at the prati-it! ot tne iate c !" '^^^ '^JJ: ho have lived a generation after Christopher Augustus Braithwaite member of the House of •* ..X^^ *ft I j *" '^^.""llo^riw Ammbly from 1924 to 1940 and that a copy of this resolu, wo-d.nh.sc.veS Before being ^^"^TS^^LS* tion be sent to his family. l*?t n to J l *?. Ho l ,u,] " *• %  ePn living contentedly un pioneer I Hi .*111%-i iila ken to Uwr Hosplial he was ceen In Harltab > Dr W H JohnBoni 1 ~ ^ Ver.ma Jackman (17) ... %  ho was "*."J""l.tin"7 t : h,ia,h*r Verona Jackman (17) of liintcn A. %  - %  t.OiUMl— fmmtv, St. Gr... living %  eglnii thought contentedly under of "the good days". In the M< in the Vesuuia.te. taken to the General Hoapiul after try he lhunen and written the names. Opposition. Mr. W. A. Crawford. Mr. F. K,. ot ^J*** 1 L !" r*" n baby was found in a 54-fogt --. Evidence Broufht When he went home ..JteV meetMr^V. B. Vaughan and Mr. the motion for the Rrso lutlot w „., 0[ MllJ „ u ^ rr|(ii|((>( 1( llMli;i| ,, ;(|l „, „ hl ,|, the distii>ie gatnerao now diaci i %  the war brounht tti unpredlctabl the now Lib! il full*' M ..,.^"",. !" '.-r~-."'^.;'." n u _r. ii,„.U.„..and hi. < %  : Vl\l ticket. the tickets thc^winning ticket WM Sanhwaita wi '" .-very sense of Churchwarden on thi The plalntltTs are represented bv about the third which had been , nc word us f ar a democratic ions. and acted in such -._,._. w /oC urk nirrT ,„ Mr. W. W. Reece. Q.C.. instructed looked at. repn-sent-lion in this Island was y only a week ago during; the M/'JftA HENRIETTA by Hutchlnson & Hanilcld SolidHe said that when he was arco £ cc| nru a pioneer. All of them absence Trom the island "" %  BR NGS MIXED CARGO tors. Martindale Is represented rested. he_ had made a statement co J^ rn S n( J P h u advaM Into lha V House of A-sembly 28 years ago, Evidence for Martindale had tag? Walker7 he had |OM bonw E. D. Mottley. nil <>t wfaotn Ud l"ine.l ^W*"^" to I* making good prugreM.' been that Blanker and Gill had immediately and found the others *poke In gl-wuiu Usrma of Mr the IIMIIUIV of Mr. lira.hwHit ,, u j||( i ()) hJl J>lckinjl| In convention with people said of his home in the sitting room. Eraithwaite's cntributlon to the e reierrco "' L ^ !" **u, nrf >a^ the mother of the child. thai the> had not had the winning The tickets were placed over his public life of the island 'n the HOW •' 1 ^" 1 ' The buby died some inlnutei ticket. He had also brought reputed wife's bedroom door. Moving the Resolution .f Svin•" •• Vestrymjii. und levaiirti ma. U (te>r it was udrnittHl to i %  evidence to prove his buying the When they had itarted looking at „,,*-. Mr, Adams said that Mr. he had Neiveu in the cap... n> Hospital. such a capae%  tatl :: BBt by Mr. D H. L. Ward instructed to Sergt. Elcock. by Messrs. Hayr.es & Grlfllth. He * ld hc hn Solicitors. lhe f nrailh %  troBfai dose of radical socialism. Mr ninth*..He lost his seal in the House ot Assembly In lu but the faith of his older supporters, the land owning anil business leeuon kept bint in Un until his denth HenInrtawi Hun Gale the present Churcharden. The Schooner Marea Hen lattl lyonc ^ successful in bearing the Mr. Goddard said "He was a (43 ,0,^, M n M i nto c .. , ,. x .,,,.,„,. wtT1 imbers of his ticketsjior f^J "J^re* and democracy 1 public spirited man. not only yt „ vrdmy mQ n.ing from St. Lucia and his worth recognised A Umbert Martindale. rockblaster d| d. he know the numbers hlnueir """ rba £ 03 K owod much to him In politics, but in the fle.d of under CBpt A j^,^ and bro )l{h (hf#„„,,., ChUKhwardan "" r oHeale and their colleagues *port "> winch he was %  .ways a ln 77 bunches „f fresh fruit, five pariah. In March this ,f 10 veirt or so ago who blazed lder. He was .. paal president bags of cocoanuts and 632 bags of was appointed Senior Guardian "he^th anS gJJi! rtalns? opposof the Bi.rb.dos Athletic Associrharcoa| 'P'" !" "? UcM Churchwarden Uion maao it possible for the ftlon. well _as^ ..prominent Snc iB ^^ til h( schnn„e r ol lha Pariah %  Bid he had tickets on the Spring ,nd Jj e ,low MaattDg; 1949. Margarette Watts, a young woman who lived at htm and to whom he had given the tickets to keep, told him that one of the tickets had won a consolation horse. Fanny Adams. He had bought all hit tickets from llellleld Taitt. a ticket selli that he was : prised when Walker told him he had heard he had the winning of ticket. His going to Jones to check to itton. sisair* j one5 ond ,,e Ls^rp^s^. S, ^gLttajrr-^i any cause which rcpr.sinUM by per' Next witness was the ticket sonjl other than those who until seller Bellleld Taitt who is by that day. either by accident of PJ— He could not i-cmember where trade „ painter He said that on hir(h or WO alth, were the rulers thought was right and w book „ r -hi. rnlony Car Catches Fire when he bought the ticket neewnber 24. 1M8. he sold 1 11 question. He had tiought all o{ tickeu in Series F—9570 to at various places and times. 9570. He sold Osw.iUi Miiyns <>i Strong lerswiality On the laat *ay o* lh# rgces of Castle Oraat onat Carrie Jordan "Mr. dr-iuiwaiie was a tiuin ol this particular maaliug. he was of the same district, at Brankcr's exceptionally strong person..my near home when he saw Prince Shop. Branker two, Clement Gill Mr. Adams sjici, "ana of necessity Walker ilxing his car. Walker two. Drakes one and on leaving spoke to him and told him he had there he saw Martindale and sold heard from the boys of the dlshim the last ticket. He said the trict that he had the ticket which fact that it was Christmas ev won Fanny Adams and he told helped him to remember to whom him he had not looked at his he sold these tickets. He did not tickets up to then Kn^w who had ot lhe winn "" On going home he told Margar&* %  £•*• ..__ %  „ o„o Wait ta* at th. U CKS Wh,U ^'^-'^Z „ : had bought known to lay down the cudgelCii-tMile politic %  he t.iok an interest In games of all kinds .nd ,fj i,-ti-%  and wie tin' foundei .mi' only President nf lb-' Kmpire lull The upholstery and re.r tyres He was also I'M .f motor cr M-2642 were burnt Athh-l v %  %  • %  ;• %  %  ; when the c. r cught Jlre along ^f^lfSMiSA nnancial hold on Uw lOd cluck with the newspaper he ,, had brought home. Wutts told him llc ^ 1 1 ^''V" her findings and gave him the ticket. Identification He remembered that when he brought home this ticket in question he had told her to write hes name, another relative's and his he had clashes Borne of his friends, and even with his enemies". Mr. Adams said he could truely say from the bottom of his heart lo.t Mr. Urailhwaitc and himself had a clash, and it had never altered his respect for him. Mr. Adams recalled that Mr. Braithwalta was one of the foundrtOfTOHlTl Lone Service Belle Gully Road, St. Michael, at 'J^S '"' Mr. W. A Crawford said he abort ll. p m mi Monday. It }?**." "' regarde on 'k She had ncr .t" P *" CI fact that ho had also given so p.C. Griffith, one ol their outted that Ihey should hold him n had ^^Jhor'^^"^ """W **•" of ,erv,c Vc5_ ;andin Barbadian ^". '" then, when hor b / ,he ^ n ^ ^ tryman to the parochial life of at present representing the colony took a pen from him and wrote Counlxy ^ m the Windward Isla,.LCork Cup lhe names in bdt.no thmedfgj^ Mi gj, tM |, aM , Tournament now taking place in oborated Martindale s eMdenc ^ of Uwm wou|d hAVP s Lucla> known him. only ... child Cork Cup I-inoK kiuw hit Ulher. but he waa Col. James said that he Is hoping sure thai ever>on* of them to return home to see the finals remember, perof these games. St. Lucia Has Started A Yacht Club — 25 Members ST. MJCIA has just started a yacht club with 0 membcrsJvp of 25 which is increasing daily, Col. Eric .lames, liie culuny's Chief of Polic now here for a short holiday told the Advocate yesterday. Ilsaid that they have a small Committee ineludinn Mr. Frank Barnard as Commodore. Mr. Bell, Secretary and himself as Vice Commodore. They have already ret-eiyi-d a,!vice and assistance from the Barbados and Trinidad Yacht Clubs and have decided to adopt the tornado class as their standard boat. Ilefcmng lo the Police Force he unrest were a verj N,,r wai Mr nr.ithwjtitr's i" teresls contlned to pohlirs nndthat , „ m(W iMnt U the Barbadians did extremely !IKI)II(| tour of du1> m st Cue NOTICE Wi ho ,,!,(. : in h.ii %  %  k ing on liir.dn 27th May Wrdnmdav, ZSlh May TliumUr, 2Mlh May. Our Dispensing Departii'ut will, howavor, (%  >i>*-ri i>r Prescriptions only, Bruce Wralhrrkr.d Ltd 27..' I 1.ilunliH d well. He heard nothing more of it until the following morning when he saw Bethell who informed him ^s To "Martindale's asking her to he could not pay him the recheck hc tfefcafj W ith the newsmainder of the money as other !" pe r ader the lasl day of the people were claiming lhe ownerraces ship of the ticket. Cross-exan Later he arrested by the lined she %  On puge 7. would haps 1 noiv than any other l^**VWVU*#*..',V**.v^^ ,-,',*,-,',-,*,*-*,',','^*-'-*^*'.***'*'*'*''*''''''''''' v ''v ;: s I CARPETS I ENCHANTING PATTERNS • EXCELLENT QUALITY He came out a year .go on a threevcr contract at the expiroUon .if which he will probably r.-'um U Kr ,;i..n| \ A 10., i/ni. PACE FIVE "nd Martini %  Todurrd by Martini A Torino IS 5/($12.00) 111 1 0111 PRICE TO \m iv o\i v $7.20ea. TM> bargain obtainable only from HARRISON'S Dial 2352 Broad Street



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PAf.F ix T louse InsuraiK BARBADOS ADvOCATT WEDNESDAY MAY j. is.',.' Pass 21 KILLED IN Kill < OLLISIOIS House Pav Tribute 0 |"r"tii I'ic 1 i %  lured, Clame 1 !" makei %  I tilled. %  it.t I ft n of thh clause would nfTeet very much tiio %  mall cur owner who happened TO be involved In B collision. Then' as where the clause did not eow the entire, liability, he nid. Ad m bU opinion -i created %  lt ol hardship. Mr. O. H. Adam* intoMr. Talma thai the sum involved depended en wbom the vaUde ""lit .ruck. If the ear had murk n man ol tome meat.: Ad he -nod for £5,000the tnaxjrI Company might h TOKYO. May 77 I'tilted state* Na\y head# rises Pee* i laid 24 South Korean liarDadtan who served UU were killed and 21 inu Juac and e U. Mr. UrathHirad l"t Wednesday whan m' .iia in. isjkmisc Aipi ParbMoa o—t an**** i Spun. • %  EknpW. GIMM, iu Korean waters, he two hipB were steamim: :\> HI i*l ion in Uudarkn •n the >imiei was given % %  jrse. The Apriek i NOIKI; Whan your BACK ACHES... r'or all ir hi if nhw* ( |o i ifront of the Barker which reUncharged efficient!* .i.ainea but nol in time through the year*. avoid the collision which ocHe said that it was largely due irred at 930 p.m. to his activities in the local govI II.M al C. Turner Joy theu eroment system of Barbados that ,'onimandor of Naval Forces In those bodies began* to pay attenFar Cast expressed his uon to the poor and no. ..oarl-felt sympathy 'v th e Re,, lir m idat". %  iblle of Korea Wavy Mr. Crawford —* r !li mthwnite . : %  I,. ppeai tnough this i going t majw .i loi i>f mom I I were gome* to i*.raada, I ment shot I felt thai certain 'lno> pwnan frar* goine In iQcre.Mtbeiifares. A I linn Mr. K li. Mapp (LI said Hi ha too tliyught Mi T.i 1 mil ban rair.I a KIKRI polnl in I 11, much. It m notapanj would have to pay moro and then; reeovar it from the car owner. ii. |fl that if (or ii man of sku m an accident and he Ml pendent.-: i %  I of, i did iiu' fjM why tha IO:ITI siit.ul I :> %  i. e than tba nun *h<> *i worki'itf for *8u a month. He xakl that Government should mnk %  limn : the Mm which t> %  insurance ainpany could elalin from tho car owner illed tha* Mr. of the foundera and the moving spirit of the old Democratic League which lid so much to blaze the trail for political progress m the colony. He was also one of the moving spirits in the St. IssChaat'i IliothiAN FRANC IS* ii May 2T i-rhond which did such splendid finiaalkinr Union ol LhaPacutc *oc!al service to the colon rL turned then |UL> work mi-eltnaliv vears ago. and in that H into .. full fleUged ^tru(e sohere—he aim rendered s most fsunst Uit P^>iUc Coast Shipping -Ignlflcant rontribution Sailor* 9 Union Strike In U.S. No HVpresentation day to back demands for wage ,iaJ overtime at sea 'larry LundU>r>g, head of uu rbo .niiiomiced the strife w forj recalM -t i.ignt -aid mwnbert. voted for Lappcni'd that when Mr liraiUi3.30i) iu 07 waito came to the House of As* ip sli.ps manned Oly as a member, the massvi i, tinunion at all United States '.hipeople were without repro^orts. but its effects were fait tematlon of any sort in the legi the Pacific coast Ships mLalurc and said that largely by .>f Ua House adjourn in order %  nd half acres „f m-i hj m embers mlRht pay their last '<; %  %  "" (Mp e*ts to the pawing of Mr. I.I. i-iurred atLascches PlantaRr^uhwnit,. I on. St. Jamas, at about 7.15 p.m., HralUlwnl • u Monday. They are the property Mr Adams said that Jiiy mem< l P. G. Seales of Goodland, Christ bars who desired to attend the nurch, and were insured. funeral were at liberty to do so. Another lire at Enterprise, but duo to procure of Guvern( hriat Church, burnt 50 holes of monl business, he could iu>t ad•eCOBd crop latoona, property of journ the House until nexi week. larflald Holder of Uie same He waa quite prepered lu adjourn ddress. The ratoona wore not for ftva minuter as a further mark iiKured, o| respect. GOVERNMENT NOTICES HOMi ilF .SKNIUk ill M. Ill NOBIC MVAMMBNI or MHIII Al. SERVKtArmy Gliders Abolished MOpg are to %  rooche i belween Iha w. %  the J l DO I i %  II %  carry n$ bat 1 mltod ipacos and lm| i .it the uie ui paratroops. Tramln': of wilder pilots baa %  ed. 11 Drown FORMOSA. Argi nuna. May 2 pre ii'"-u i Tuesday when %  lauoofa 35 p'ssengvrj. capsized in th Parana Rive. Twenty-four pa sfngei were saved by the Maritime Prefecture launch searchiiu lbs i LV0I III tha I .i ly moiiuti; The launch WSJ tarrying pirBMgVn to ihe steamer Cludad df Corrienles anchored in mldStresm due t" lOW watei in llu port here The launch was apparently causjht In %  %  .vhirlpool. tfuayan political vXllei hound rot Buenos Aires. Applications are invited for the pensionable post of Senior Health Nurse, Department of Medical Services. Salary wUl be on the scale of 31,200 X 72 31.440 per annum. In addiUon. a temporary non-pensionable cost of living allowance will be payable In accordance with approved rates. Ciiiforin is provided. Th* appointment will be on two yean.' probation and subject to Hie solveteu applicant being passed us medically III for employment in tho Public ieivico. The successful applicant will be posted to the Health Centre, Spcighlstown, in the first instance where furnished quarters are provided and will be subject to transfer to any Public Health area in tho Colony. ...._ Applicants must be registered nurses and midwives and hold Ul* C rtislcata of the Royal Sanitary Institute for Health Visitors and Scho J Nurses. unlacants -liould present in writing a full curriculum vitac to iK.-.te afe. euucatlonal quaUncatlons and experience. ivppucatioid shouid be addressed to the Colonial Secretary. Public Itutiuiugs, Bridgetown to reach his office not later than 31st May. INK, 24.5.52.—lln. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Vacsusioa in the Elementary Teaching Service Applications era Invited from teachers (women) with at least 10 years' teaching experience for the Headships of the following schools: — Eagle Hall Junior School—St. Michael St. Patrick's Girls' School—Christ Church. The minimum professional qualification required is the Certificate A of the Department or exemption therefrom. Salary will be in accordance with the Government Scale for Head Teachers in Grade I Elementary Schools. Candidates who have already submitted application forms in reject of previous vacancies (now tilled) may apply by letter, accompanied by a recent tesumonlal. All other candidates should mske application on the appropriate form which may bo obtained from the Department of Education. All applications must be enclosed in envelopes marked "Appointmenu Board" in the top left hand corner uid must reach the Department of Education by Saturday, 31st May, 1952. Candidates are warned that canvassing may lead to their du'jua nitration. 10th May. 1952. 9.2.52—7r I kety fresh all day... I use UU BUOY TOILET SOAP .Stay licsh all da; loaf—ju%t use LifclH vns*S. [uidec] psyou fresh now, and stay freth al) the i TOR PERSONAL FRISHNESS ALWAYS lime to relax—made perfect by your enjoyment of i.ivouiltiradio programmes oroutht to you by private line direct from our studios, with the B.B.C. and New York. No interference o* tuning' WITH relax REDIFFUSI0N FOH ll I II II IISIIMM. HEAR IT AT TRAFALGAR STREET. J DURABILITY and ECONOMY combined in the new G.E.C. ELECTRIC REFRIGERATOR CITY GARAGE TRADING CO., LTD. 1 VICTORIA STREET aJ.



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\ I CDN'KSDAT. MAY 2*. 1952 RIRRADOS ADVlH \Tl PACI IIIKII 'our Hong Long Police ret Medals tour George Meoals arc among artls to member* of the Hong; IE and Federation of MalPolice Force announced in > -Inspector Jame* Hidden and lective Constable Chu Fook I Colonial Police Medal fur li-i'-i> it awarded to Police Utable Chan Slk Wah. All arv nibvis i,l the lion* Kon^ Polteo n September, IttO. a police ty visited a hillside hut In the s* Territories where an armed ttf was in hiding. As the police %  cached. the gang opened Ure. ing one constable Under lire, Iden went to the help of the ft constable, and later placed %  elf in front of the Divisional s-rintendent when the latter I fired on from %  concealed well C ards away. ii Fook. single-luuidod. ileil %  cornered bandit who d point-blank at htm and then d to hurl a hand grenade. i dci.vtivo attacked, wounded. disarmed the bandit. C au aik Wah had a oullet! vest badly damaged by a let flred at close range, but led to cover the Divisional •rintendent throughout the l The citation concludes. I imperturbable demeanour constant *mile under Are wen* example in the highest tradinf valour and devotion to *orgc Medals are also J-ded t<< Police Kemjii Tan I Slew, aged 19. a National iceman, and t special cone Won Armon bin Wan laf. 24 both of tin Federation Malaya Police Force. '.HI Aim.in m .1 member of S lice Jungle Squad of nine rming %  routine patrol on an U' m Sungel Siput, Perak. on t try IS when the petrol was shed by about 2.1 bandits. Iof the patrol were killed ght and two others seriously %  Hied by th t initial burst of i The three unwounded memOf me patrol fought off the sgement. after three of them i been killed, two by Wan kn. ft November 23. 1951. on enftnent took place between |e and bandits in the Reugam t (>\ in itlJ ion ('nil ii*r hrine manufactured m btfaoa." Iood.ni l>|iiM> Service Labour Welfare House Pass Temporary Fund Collects $2m. Bill For Puisne judge flit." Uu I a_aa^VI_. I n.H In The House Yesterday vi%  ... Ha Mar. law UM Cinirrii"! I.I thr I II .-!(,.. %  %  i-rxr 1" %  HcilMiuriibli Nl/um s.iid f ll always rather follow the ions of my forefathers than the Indian Ocean". • he came to Bombay, where weather is torrid and sticky. Osman All Khan, despite his fmoniou&ness, refuses to eat ping that has not been presly sampled by his official tasters. He brought therea round dozen of them with K cover, the Nizam has never water from any source f than his favourite tank— Mir A am tank— in HyderojCity. He therefore had no lative but to charter %  plane to Bombay—and £300 on it—to carry the DM grtsa ,. p KM inn Annual Hrpxit i>I thr !-u;iii •n*nl .il Scientr And Aarirultur* ("r Ihr .tvir lftn 'I foil Ofllcr AdvuncHt d pa>"n-ni ol ". v Maw to • % %  > M'Kh. IM1 Thr r>ill.-v %  %  %  KrSfl RMoiuMnn lo plKcr Ihr run* ul *' -**" M UM %  %  !• %  •mor-ln i. IMS— tt. "'Il I E — * •tWn IB. UlB SussdpmaaMri bltrnafM, I.--M. '., L Mr. F. L. WAJ.COTT. (L) in IntraduotBg a Resolution in the House of Assembly yeslerrlay evonlog i> .ipprnve th< Sugar Industry (Rehabilitation. Price Stabilisation antl labour Welfare) Order 1952. on which money will be raised on ihis year's crop, disclosed that the Labour \V Ifare Pund collected $2.2l0.rHri of which $1,013,271 w added m l!i:. alCAft. The Resolulion was passed. The schedule to the Order %  states that there shall be ralseo (al on aU sugar manufactured In this Island during the year one thousand nine hundred and Arty two a levy at the rate of thirteen dollars and twenty cents per ton; (b) on all fancy molasses manufactured in this Island nurinr the year one thousand nine hundred and fifty-two a levy at the rate of thirteen dollars and twenty cents per three hundred and thirty wine gallons. 3. All moneys received by the Sugar Production and Export Control Board by way of the levy raised under Article 2 of this Order on all sugar and fancy molasses manufactured during the year one thousand nine hundred and fifty two shall be paid by the said Board to the Sugar Industry Capital Rehabilitation Reserve Board, the Sugar Industry Price Stabilisation Reserve Board and the Govarnor-1 n-Exacuttvc Committee In the following proportions:— (a) to the Sugar Industry Capital Rehabilitation Reserve Board at the rate of four dollars and eighty cents per ton in respect of sugar and at the rate of four dollars and eighty tents per three hundred and thirty wine gallons In respect of fancy molasses; (bl lo the Sugar Industry Price Stabilization Reserve Board at the rate of six dollars per ton In respect of sugar, and at the rate of six doUars per three hundred and thirty wine gallons in respect of fancy molasses; (c) to the Governor-in-Ex ecu live Committee at the rate of two dollars and forty cents per ton In respect of sugar, and at the rate of two dollars an 1 forty cents per three hundrcn and thirty wine gallons In respect of fancy molasses. In moving .he passing of the Resolution Mt. Walcott gave figures showing the position of the respective funds. These dielose>i that the Rehabilitation Reserve Fund collected *3.300.000 betweer 1B4T and 1931. and of that M*a $3,100,000 was spent. The Pric Stabilization Pund stands al $3,952,000. while the Labour Wei fare Fund realised *2,210,645 of which amount $1,013,271 was collected In 1991. Of this $800,000 allocated froi the Labour Welfare Fund to Pla\ ing Fields. $147,525 had bee spent to the 81st March last On the Housing Loan, thfl amount realised was $980,000, and the amount advanced was $874 917, Of which $98,160 has beetrepaid. HI PUnl*tion to unall i>ul. i .in<>idiirr .iih wtllnix 12 01 is (JiMiiiKi* Commit IM A Pi. •1 ilSVl -12 %  vculivp (Vtmiiiittrr lAmnid-ill' Acl. !M Rracrfullon I" NlbarkM thr r< IKIIHIM itum Col'iiiUI U*V*luf> I ana I ,ill Ini ich <>1hr m uprllns tinSM . | ..', Ill* Plna PlaoUlHHi -nd UUIrlcl ASTlrulTul-l SIDIIOII* Thr HOUMiw.-rt m Bill lo make proMiiom lor thr protection or TliUd I'irui'iisuli*1 rlrka .irltlng "' ' ,h '•• "'"i"l"i -lelfiM for t )nHMM inrKli-n" *>a 1MUTM• Hufar liid try (ItohabiiiiiiiMW. Pr' wi-*-i /.urn, iii.il 1-SWJT Wrllx. Oidrt. l3 ii"i' 0 IUM UI Irr thr orovuion. ul KCliotll 3 %  Mi il. ..i tha Rufki %  %  -.lion and Labo-ir WrIUrri Act 19*7 il4T--i>' Th-> llouw i,.c*pt*d th i mH THE HOUM "1 Assembly yfsiti.lay paWCfl B I*' 11 ' matte further provision in respect of the appointment ot • Puisne JudRo. In ihe objects and reasons of the Hill, it Is Mintsd QUl that tht 1 Chid Judge -mil Crown Law Officer [Additional .lutl^i'i Act, 1951, was tn provide foi the temporary appoint ment ol a puisne jud H lh< Chief Jud with the large outataridina; volume "1 arork In the Superior Courts. This need siill exista and the prese n t hill therefor seeks to extend the operation of is Acl from JtUM ^ ;i) 1951 when it will expire to March ;il 1953 In addition, the opportunity h* thought tlu Bill was.ow \\\uh.Ls been taken to pnwkla Uun the was long ovardt* pukoie jodg* shah h,ivthi-sama iii-i.i.rtr., hould i oiiaUflcatkaU as the Chief Judgere^ersanlsad. lie was pi Mr. Ii. II. Adam* vli>> un thu tha itndai n ancs wimV UV use had given a f<" s .tgo that the matter \<: iHinidi-ratlon. charfB lha Bill *aid that it .i temporary one in which the Chief Judge had asked that tinappointment should continue beaauaa lie still needed ignlstance. Tui-v had (0 Btaka the appointr,.ji_i-i ,. rnenl temporary because there He hoped Ihnl the Judu i..l A. was a Select Sonwdttaa which %  ">"" %  """ '" ^.j-m....1 n was considering the change under ^jdar would '^^"J^^-" the Judicial Act, but owlof lo his prehens.ve to make UW "E !" ?' as regularly as they would have •"> Court nf Appeal -hould be liked. They were however going ahead with the matter now unti 1 thr time came when they had I i appoint this tr-mporary ladge. tt'iulcd llr said Hint there w,is provialoti nuda in the Act that the person appointed should have the necessary qua I ill eat ion* to nuke him suitable for the post of Chief Judge from the point nf viSW <>i years. The person appointed should bo as qualified as the Chici Judge. He therefore moved that the Bill lie read a second turn foi •! %  -• beneAl r tha lUrabla member who hud lul is' S *, h; woul'l y 'hnt hl In L Uon WM not in order. Tli urn. had (MLnltely GOCna whr there wi nead f'>i tha appoint ment uf a Puisne Judge. Mr &f B, S. Lewis (LI said that waatn lha Bill drst eaaw i<> ttv Ibnise. he enquired about build,ng a new court MI th.it BOtto fudges could sit simultaneously he felt that faellltate matters. Mr. M. C. Coa (LI seconded. Mr. K. a Harp (D said that tu would like to ask the leuder uf tho House ir the Government was s;iti*Jk-d tii;it Uie alms and object.* of BOS maasurS were really being achieved. As far .is he could understniui. when the Puisne Judge was sitting, ihe Chief Judge was away and they were really not dealing with the large outuolug to appoint some one lo the ftandlns volume Of work whuh job, it seemed as if they were was set out in the Obfect and tblowing some aspersions at the In the present Bill h. aald thai .tub-clause two had stuled thai the Putsna Judge should have Ui %  ma qvaUfkastoni H 'he ciiiri .liidiie. If this had l>een inserted in tba tlrst Bill it would have been ui: right, but If they wen aKUffld< in* the Bill now that they AMENDMENTS ACCEPTED The House of Aaaainbh. day aSORDl H I 'iments ol i i luncfl to the Bill pertaining to the Consular Con\ • IMt. KeBsutib of the Bill. He hoped his information w;ts wrong and if so. he would api Ihe Government inwnbar of the House would tell him %  O, l*eople whose business brought them day by day lo the law courts i .. %  told him that and he hoprn it was wrong, because the Chief Judge of the Island was getting on in years and If then' wns a lot of work to be done and he nvedeii help he hoped he was getting II %  it the work was not U-ing done, lhay would contimi'to Bat .i lull of that -on acaatn year after year and he did no; think they would get anywhere w %  I...-, rate. l.on Overdue Mr. ('. B. Talma (L) said that person holding Uie offlei That was how il looked to him Some %  night feel Unit tin. provision '. ve been in the panrgUMgit Bill ,. was itii-n. stvan It < I ic.iding and p line d In ComtnlUee through all it< stage*.' VA Dtrflur I hum MONTREAU May 27. i' United states aouar w... .r ntt iptoftlif l*r BACKACH LUMBAGO SCIATICA JOINT PAINS RHEUMATIC PAINS OUR GUARANTEE De Witts Pill, are made %  <*&-% uticUr hygieni' ronditioni aad the ingredients all conform to rigid i HandArda of punt?.. DE WITT $ PILLS for Kidney and Bladder Troubles WATCHES ttaaat, MTfeCL or t IIROMI1M MIMIPU for ladles or aents FI'LLY CirARANTFim 1ft A 17 Jewels A u tradei-fiil new rangn wu BaaSW *t Dutstandina prices Today il your Jewellers Y. lit LIMA A ro.. i i n 10 niti IAD ST aad at M \KI\i; GARDENS SHOI'I'INf (IMBI iiTOS.CA 4711" Eau de rolopne comes from Cologne on Rhine; it is now again obtainable in the original quality, made I Uogj •-. ihe famn.ii and secret fmmula tmce 1*92. 7**& TH: DIFFERENCE! YOU CAN TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR RENTAL SERVICE OF CUTLERY, GLASSWARE AND EARTHENWARE • WE ARE STOCKED WITH A FINE ASSORTMENT OF THE ABOVE LINES THE CORNER STORE



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r PACE FOCI: BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDM'sim M\V 2. 1M2 BARBAWKfA ADVfJCATE r>i>i*4 • ta J.< I SI Pti*.U- Wednesday. May 2X. 1952 Is II Too Easy To lt< i onii British? r.iM. i AII i lit THE report of Iho Colonial Development Corporation for 1951. as summarised in the Advocate of May 21, contains a very gloomy forecast for the future of the small West i Indian islands. The Dominica Grouped Undertaking, according to the report, shows little chance of ever showing a profit to the Corporation. The pessimism of this statement is important because time and again the West Indies are blamed for failure to show initii alive. "If only the people would combine together': "if only they would invest more capital", are frequent criticisms made by the newcomers to the Caribbean. Critics often mean well but very often critics are persons with no experence of conducting enterprises in any other country. Not infrequently their presence in these territories is due to their inability to succeed in bigger countries. But Lord Reith is a successful person and Lord Reith is saying something quite different, so far as Dominica is concerned. And what he says will not encourage others to try where the Colonial Development Corporation has failed. The Grouped undertaking in Dominica included citrus, banana and coconut plantations, a citrus packing station and a hydroelectric scheme. Great hopes were built up when this undertaking was launched; now the chance of its ever showing a profit to the Corporation is Temote. The history of the Colonial Development Corporation linked as it is in the public mind with the enormous Overseas Food Corporation groundnut fiasco docs not encourage confidence. In the West Indies its activities are best known perhaps for the rebuilding of Castries but even this work has been halted for lack of funds. Prospects for British Guiana consolidated Goldfields sxp said to be good and long-term prospects foY British Guiana Timbers are fair. In.Trinidad there is cautious optimism in the expression that the Corporation's cement development" ought to be a sound irivcetfrleriV' In British Honduras the stock-farm has been abandoned and the Fort George Hotel in Belize will show no profit to the Corporation. If this list of enterprises in the Carib bean warrants the view that many of the brighter spots of the Corporation's work are in the Caribbean area then the outlook for the Corporation can only be described as black. The reasons for the Corporation's failures are in fact given welcome publicity by Lord Keith, The Corporation has suffered in the past 'from inaccurate estimating and incompetence, from rising costs and shortages of materials, and always over the majority of the enterprises there are the perils of the tropics, vagaries of wind and flood and drought of ravage and'disease." There is a great difference between this penitent cry of inea maxima culpa and the shrill hysteria of the British Press when the Colonial Development Corporation was horn. Then the cry was "develop the colonial garden for the good of the colonial peoples and of course for the benefit of the residents of the United Kingdom." The Overseas Food Corporation and the Colonial Development Corporation were born because of political pressure from politicians who knew little of the colonies they were to develop. They came into being at a period when finding "jobs for the boys" was a major political pre-occupation in the United Kingdom. Jobs were found for the boys: the Press of Great Britain supported the politicians in playing to the gallery. Millions nf pounds were squandered. Even in 1951 the squandering was still going on. "Losses have to be written off, £4,500,000 of them at the end of 1951 or rather since there is literally no writing off, that sum has to be carried like a millstone round the neck." Concurrently with all this money going down the drain West Indian territories are in great need of money to finance deep water harbours, and airports and to improve agriculture and communications. Perhaps none of these schemes would show a profit to the Corporation but proper communications would at least give the West Indies a reasonable chance to promote their own schemes which will succeed. The Corporation's cie.it failure t.i achieve success in the Dornuuea Grouped Undertaking will act instsad like a wet blanket on schemes for development in other islands. It would be tragic (or the West Indies if a Government Corporation which was created to bench' Colonial peoples should act as a deterrt;.' i private investors in the West Ind-es. This Oath of AUefisnee— '/ swear by Almighty God. [hoi fmrh/til and b>-ar true alleviate:-. Jf.r Mmjeity. Qumi %  the Second, h,r Rein, and Succct$ors, according lo Iss*.' has been abased by strangers with British passports What is the remedy? DOES it surprise you to know that 60 Russians, who bought it I fourpenny form and tilled it up have become British this year? It cost each of them .i iiitli more th;i*i that before becoming one of u-'. but not enough to dlcourajte any determined PBSHsV 1 be Briton. The Government promise, of art independent inquiry into the cure-by-kind new methods of BnsadDMOr prompts a wider I question: "Are the British, beI sides being the most civilised people the wurld has ever known, also too soft-hearted toe their own good?" In particular: "Is it too easy to beeo rn s Missal Look at the figures. In the fliM qu.iilir of the year more than 800 aliens were granted !is of naturalisation. Sin.r the sod Of the war in Kurope more than 58.000 have %  oath of allegiance to lbs i'row ii. and have been lost among the mass of Britons. Most of them, so far as anyone knows, have settled down among us to lead useful, honest lives. WRONG 'L'V BUT, now and then, a "wrong •un" is given the blessing of British passport and all th rights and privileges which we take for granted. Their discovery easts doubt upon the usefulness of the fourpenny form and the security check il involves. Example; A DUU h bora diamond broker has hud his British citizenship taken away from him by the Home Secretary. This man was tailed for IK month* fr • miiKitllnK wlUiin 1 day. of taking the oath Sj| jllrUarr to Britain. When he appe.red l*fOre the Deprivation of Citizens-hip Committee he was described as "one of the big shots of the smuggling trade." A Customs Investigator said this man had been undei By GEORGE SCOTT constant suspicion since the end of May 1948-two year, before he became Br,ti>h. THKfcr: Uw Home Offlcewhich has the final say on all "i Want to be llntish" applications tfiree questions:— ONE: Is it the practice of the Home Office to give the benefit of the doubt to an applicant fo. naturalisation against the unispi.ions of Scotland Yard and the Customs authorTWO: Is it the practice of the Home Office to give the benefit of the doubt in cases where files have been destroyed by the Gestapo and it is therefore impossible to check on the past of I. refugee applying for British < itixcnship? THREE: How many applications for naturalisation have been turned down since the H %  I Last night a Home Office official gave the same reply to ouch of the questions: "We cannot answer that." NO NATIONALITY THIS official reluctance to tell us about our new neighbours does not stop US from building up a picture of the process of ligfotnlnsj British. Before a man (or woman) is granted British cituenshkp his background Is scrutinised by Special Branch men of Scotland Yard or provincial police forces, and by M.I.5. But how can anyone check on the past of a man who, before naturalisation. was of "no 'nationality?" That term may well hide the horrors of war which turned human beings into despair-sick refugees. Britain has given them sanctuary. But it could also provide u convenient way for unpalhetie, undesirable foreigners to curtain unscrupulous and unsavoury paiti WHAT ( III t K %  SOMF. such men have certainly been given sanctuary in our proper eagernc| to succour genuine refugees from Bed Shirt. Black Shirt, and Brown Shirt persecution. But what sort of security ChOCk is it that let.* through to citizenship our smuggler ana men like atom scientist Bruno Pontacorvo. Fuchs, Carl Strauss, and Anton la R*idl—who peddled information •bout Czech emigreJli Britain to ihe Czech secret %  Well, here is the n-utine foi all would-be 11 ton* F.rst. thev must live in Uus country for -t least 11 months immediately before applying rug. i. '.iralisation They must hava spent four of the previous seven years either In Britain, in British territory., or in Crown Tvirr Then, Ilk* those CO Russians they pay their fourpence — for the four-page, white foolscap itm. called A 1. at the Stationery Office In London's Kingsway. The form puses 11 questions. •all simple. The applicant signs a statement about his own character, already printed for him. which reads: "I am of good character and have suffii-iem knowledge language. 1 solvent." Four Briton.' hi the English •m financially muHt sponsor Next, the foreigner advertise* his application for naturalise' %  lion in two local papers, pays j 2s. 6d. as tjie fee for witnessing his declaration, and sends off his form, with 12, to the Home Office. £20 IN ALL THE applicant then waits while lb* police check his statements. In London this may take, up to six months; In the provinces up to three months. If these Inquiries leave him with a clean record he will be naturalised, after paving another [ £18. making t20 in all, to the \ Home Office. Occasionally — and here the Broadmoor analogy is complete —Britain pay an incalculable price for kecj"?ig her pride In sanctuary. What is the alternative 1 is the Home Office to refuse naturalisation every time the police or CUM urns are "not quite sure" about a man, or have "suspicions" of him they cannot prove? Or is that mocking the principle of I U which a man U wholly innocent until ho II proved wholly guilty? The price of "indisputable •afety" Is a -octet police forte. The risky virtues of tolermcc and liberty that go with a British passport are worth better custodians than that. And better safeguards— LC S. \MEMICAN COLUMN: A Man Not A Bit Like Taf t WASHINGTON VEJtY level headed indeed II 47-year-old Senator Wayne Morse, who cocoes from the Far Western State of Oregon, who oncw taught argumentation" at the Universities of Wisconsin and Minnesota, mid Is a typo of Republican very different, say, from Senator Taft. Morse is one of the Liberal group in the Republican Party and nothing at ad like an Isolationist. N-w out he comes to warn "reactionary elements" in his party against "trying to throw the party's weight behind the unreasonable demands of t h e steel companies for u pi ice inMany people are saying that Truman, by siding with the *tecl workers, has clinched the union vote for the Democrats at the Presidential Election. Probably with this In mind. Morse tells his colleagues: "You may well alienate the independent voters if they get into the haul' of Identifying the Bcpubllcans with (he big business viewpoint in the steel dispute." DONT LOOK now. General Elsenhower, but the '•"nft supporters are up to a rather naughty trick. They are circui .... n M. MacCOLL lating copies of a petition which calls on you to answer 21 searching questions on political Sample: "Will you clean house In the State Department. starting with Dean Acheson? TUB peculiar night life of Washington Include* some pitfalls. I hear the sad story tf an out-of-town visitor who, feeling the need of further irrigation after the official closing time of 2 ajn.. wound up In a notorious night haunt. A bottle of alleged champagne was followed by a bill for £28. Turning to protest, the visitor thought better of it as he observed three large gents with disarranged noser* and ears rignt behind him. What's more, the three ehummily Joined his table and all called for drinks—addling £ 10 to the bill. Yes. It's springtime In the nation's capital. THE big stride forward in the economic lot of America's Negroes in the past decade h.ts been striking. A* I strolled about the streets to-day I noticed that Cadillac after Cadillac had block faces Inside It. "MANY clergymen are lakin; flying lessons," said an official at the big Belling Field Air Force base near Washington "They make excellent pilots, 1 because they have good moral. J mental, and physical require%  ment*. They arc rarely bothered | with the emotional disturbances fouad in some applicants for licences." HERE in Washington the temperature Is up In the mtdeighties, the girls are sporting their thinnest summer frocks. | the air-conditioners are murmuring slumberouMy in all the offices, and you can altno the chestnut leaves unfold. AND in Philadelphia Dr. I. S Ravdin. of the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, attacks the "ghost surgeon." "Ghost surgery" Is a growinn practice among unscruputoitmedicos whereby, unknown to the patient, who Is already under an anaesthetic, a strange Surgeon Is called in to condu. t an unnecessary operation, get!* his fee, and leave* again. HEADLINE: "Meal Day litres Thousand.* into Traffic Jam-." THE HI MAN TOUCH: Top notice in Washington shop window: "We make ordinary shoes toeless for you In 20 minutes." The Two Immigration Bills (From the "New York Herald Tribune") OBJECTIONS to the McCarran-Walter immigration bill come from so many quarters and go .so deeply to fundamental questions of national policy that the Senate can do no less than to hear out all criticism fairly. To hear it in prolonged debate on upward of 200 amendments which opponents threaten to offer is the hard way of doing it. The orderly method, and the fairest, is to recommit it to the Judiciary Committee for new hearings, at which the substitute measure offered by Sen. Herbert H. Lehman, D., N.Y., would be considered together With the McCarranWalter bill. The Senate's duty to weigh, justly, every major criticism against this measure is compelling. Only once in a generation docs the opportunity arise to shape a new immigration policy which will affect the lives of perhaps millions of persons in the future. That the task should fall in the present abnormal period of world tension and unrest is unfortunate; it makes all the heavier the responsibility on Congress to draft Ihe soundest possible legislation. The McCarran-.Walter bill has good and bad points, both in its general aims and in its multitude of particular sections. It makes a genuine effort to codify the bewildering miscellany of laws, proclamations, executive orders, regulations and treaty clauses amassed during the last thirty years and longer. It ends, in principle at least, the immigration ban against Orientals, which has been an international sore point for three decades. At the same time, it retains the old quota system based on the national origins of the country's population in 1920; a system deliberately designed to favour the countries of Western and Northern Europe over those of Central and Eastern Europe. It avoids the opportunity to temper this unequal policy by providing for utilization of the unused quotas of favoured countries for less-favoured nations (such as Greece and Latvia) whose quotas have been mortgaged beyond the year 2000. As to particular provisions of the bill, its opponents fairly riddle it with criticism; some of it, undoubtedly, unfair. But the charge that the bill's provisions for immigration of foreign colonials in this hemisphere is discriminatory against the coloured peoples in the Caribbean area does deserve dose examination. And the Senate's best thought should be applied in weighing new provisions which would place the naturalized citizen in jeopardy of deportation for actions he may have taken far in his past life, or might take in the future. Even if the justification is to give a broad control over outright subversives and criminals who gain citizenship, does this accord with fundamental American principles of equality in citizenship? This newspaper doesn't believe so. Opponents of the McCarran-Walter bill have asked searching questions on matters of basic national policy, and the answers require from the Senate an exercise of highest statesmanship. Our I lead era Say: l'< I 'III I ill II HI Xtltf* | To The Editor. The AdYorOIr— SIB. — I h a v e not been favourably Impressed by the content of the current series of articles entitled "Education Notes." Firstly because, from the tone of these "Notes" it. seems that the writer makes tfaMS* .Mivriso comments with "niitlice aforethought" and not as one, who had given great 00) tion to the matter, who had devoted much time lo the study of tinmsthods, scope nnd trends of Education in the modern world. Secondly because, as the writer vi'iy likely knows, the tJlrector and his Education staff are precluded by virtue ol their StStUI as Civil Bel t .lit.-. From freely defending the policy of government against lho>e who are front t<> make mischievous remarks on such policy. It is taken for granted that the community at large has confidence in Hie capacity of the head of the administration to discharge h I s duties with efficiency. It is also taken for granted that the community has contldtnes la the ability of its representatives In the House of Assembly to look after its (the community's) interests. Now the policy of Uuestton which at present obtains In this Island Is the policy of the Government—i.e. it has the approval both of the head of the administration and of the i cpresentatlves of the jH-oplc. Consequently the author f any adverse comment aimed al the present policy must avtosnaueaUy display a lack of COOfldsSKS in the gu\ eminent and tlie administrative chief. I. however. Incline to the view that the author of "Education Notts -utters not from any such l.uk ol oonAdWOOt but rather from ignorance of the subject upon whi I tends to speak with authority. I am sure that the "Notes" do not impress persons who have a knowledge of the worldwide progress in Education based on the principles which guide our Education officers in the formulating of a local policy. The "Notes" may, however, succeed In confusing those who for some reason or other might not have any knowledge of the prerequisites of such progress. To the author I would suggest UM following remedial treatment (lo to the public library. There yi u will find a good collection of books on the History of Education and the various methods of Education developed and practised over the years up to the present day. You will discover how these methods duveloped and what difficulties (and they are multitudinous) they seek to overcome. In addition you will find works on Educational Psychology which is playing an increasingly important role in modem education. When you would have studied but a few of these works you will begin to understand that the problem of Education in a changing world is vast and insuperable and that its solution, sven in regard to our local requirements, is not by any means within the limitations of your own presumably narrow perspective and even more diminutive store of knowledge of the subject. Yours faithfully, AMATEUR. Elvclricily Supplivn To The Editor. The Advocate— SIR.^Judglng by the following letter which appeared In the Timct of May tth the same difficulties which now beset the Barbados Electric Co., arc being experienced In England. 1 lord Brabazon. as always, Is frank and forthright In his state%  .'I his long experience In connection with electricity .supply entitles him to speak with authority A! the same time, it ought to be stated that the British Electricity Authority does not. a% he suggests, regard as abhorrent competition with coal or gas. On the contrary, it has proclaimed the principle that consumers should have frtcHom of choice in the use of the fuel and appliance most suited to their needs. Lord Brahazon says that electricity is both "dear and dellclent*\ Desmess must be considered wits regard to the prices of other cossmodities. With electrical plant costing three times as much as before the war, and With the cost of fuel, labour, and materials all very high. It ess hardly be expected that electricity prices can escape the consequences of such Increases. A* was stated in the 1951-52 anmial report of tSe Brit^h Electric"it> Authority, the average price fot electricity .void to domestic, commercial, and small power cohmimers was some 8 3 per cent below the pre-war price. This was only possible because cf ithe increased consumption < t electricity Prices have rkSW %  ttBMVrhSt since then, but the general comparison still holds good. If ..ver-all consumption is to be seriously curtailed Jhd the piai.i i ot usid !o its existing capaci'y, a substantial increase in the srlce of electricity will be un.i void able. In regard to deficiency of supply, this. too. is a relative matter Domestic consumers are consuming at least two-and-ahalf times the amount of electricity ihe> did before the war. and the general output is more than double. While electricity is not an abundant as we should like, the industry has n "***• to be ashamed of its achievements. With the general tenor of Lord Prabazon's letter most peoplr in the electricity supply industry v-:ll be in agreement" I think it will be read with interest by the Chamber of Commerce as it was written by Lord Citrine. Yours. JOHN CITIZEN. Commonwealth Trade Day THE West Indies are well represented at the British Industries Fair where Commonwealth Trade Day was celebrated last week. The day was marked by visits to the Commonwealth section of the Fair at Earl's Court, London, by Mr. Oliver Lyttelton. Secretary of State for the Colonies, Lord Salisbury. Secretary of State for Commonwealth Relations, and Mr. Peter Thorneycroft, President of the Board of Trade. The British West Indies occupied an impressive proportion of the section. They displayed their sugar, fruits, rum, cocoa, honey, the world-famous Sea Island cotton, and the attractive products of handcrafts such as basketwork and wood-carving, weaving, and embroidery. The Jamaican stand included an exhibit by the bauxite industry, the first time that this newly-developed industry had been staged by Jamaica as an individual exhibit. A feature of the Trinidad and Tobago stand was its magnificent display of anthurium lilies, which is now almost a tradition. As well as the famous Trinidad asphalt and other well-known products on this stand, two of the island's new industries were represented by displays of bottled lager beer and stapled boxes. On a neighbouring stand the attractions of Barbados as a tourist centre were displayed. These West Indian exhibits stood among the displays of the Commonwealth countries, of Nigeria, the Gold Coast, and Sierra Leone, of Hong Kong and Malaya, Malta and Cyprus—displays that gave an impresM\ i idea of the magnitude of the Commonwealth's production especially of raw materials. Representatives in bright national costumes lent added colour to some of the Mandt tn a broadcast on the eve of Commonwealth Trade Day, the President of the Board of Trade reminded listeners that the Commonwealth countries did one-third of ail the world's trade in 1951. I PLASTIC PROPELLING PENCILS LONG LEAD, SCRIPTO PENCILS, BREAK PROOF 18c. *aeh Mtnl4in t\S.A. ADVOCATE STATIONERY PAINT-UP The beet way you know howwith top quality branded PAINTS, ENAMELS, VARNISHES that guarantee long run economy! And that goes for Jobs ashore and afloat! C. S. PITCHER & Co. WHY NOT CONSERVE VALUABLE FOODT ID STERNE'S DEEP FIIEEZE PltlCE SI2.1.00 — AVAILABLE FROM STOCK — tOSWA y CO.. IIU. tlec. Mrpl. Cricket Balls Bats The game of games with equipment from our magnificent and low priced selection. Indian Cricket Balls from $2.02 and Knglish makes by Wisden, Lillywhite, etc. By Gunn & Moore, (.radidife, Denis Compton among others. Wickets r 0 5i,e and BraM Fer: i ruled and Shod .... @ *U.M Pads A. Gloves A wide range of sizes and Prices Da Costa & Co., Lid. %  gn****HW**SMVSSStVSS.VSSSSSSSS.V.WSS*IVSSSS$ TO-NIGHT after the News Mr. GEORGE HUNTE tells the Story o( J&R BAKERIES over Rediffusion at 8.03 &f Listen to this Broadcast brought to you by the Makers of the Famous J & R ENRICHED BREAD ''/.v,v.',v//,w//,wv.



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o \mv i\ k %  J Ml l>M D\Y. II \Y 2". 1' WHERE PARATROOPERS NOW GUARD RED PRISONERS BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE SEVf N 1 \ •ail AS DEIIAN1 HO WA. PRISONHS ,h,„tcnccl „,„ oulbrrrti o. Ko| l.t.nd. .n American .l.borr* l-rce n moved In lo bnlilcr the tightened luard over In. rebel CnimunUU In the picture ibDve, Red I'oWi .re •nown uiins iplked-tlpped tent pole, tor r.epon ar Ihe, detlai.llj h.ujli up on bayonet drill in a lot further tioiible. Shortli b,l„„ arrival ot the XI. S M7th Airborne Inlnnlr, Retimenl. Brl E Oen lla.dsn Ko|i commander Mid: • T lieyll soon leain who li I. ,i,onal Soundpliolol B -tr.. j. i Indians— Essex St. Lucia Score Match Drawn il'mm OH On CVfBfMlMHl LONDON, M "'"•; a h with "I adi.nv;,. Ill,,,,, Uukiv. A powferful " [ %  :. ikar and Minjrkar wh„ put Sffi Essex did match drawn. Glamorgan 361 ami i Somantt lira nut II (,. DtarMd N diniriilt .met 2l r,„ I. Slriihensin 114 SLfLEyj Ken, „,„c h KM and 330 %  %  ^ % %  L h V"' k ''' "~ %  KurMllo Millo" I %  -,-. ml&m for tl.i/rr /'/ the match, Essex who Is being com the England team, hurl the third . I % % %  ... fr Ihe Test In Ihe county UN I honours went to %  L H fl rrlon rJ?f*& ?Sf I. to 'die LeJcesu-. So V, '" .""•'; *** Han* Jackson who took four I 30. and Walsh, four ft W. NWl|" ' & '*" "'.! ounl ol eri In Middlesex being dismissed '*["^ lionilas And l hip/Htrays Heal ll.C. And Police 478—9 Against Dominica ST. LUCIA, Bay 27. The second match In the Windward Islands' Cork Cup Cricket pened on Monday, Si. raw Dominica. St. Lucia battfid all day today to amass the huge tola! of 478 urns toe 9 wickets, Griffith raka|ng (IK century by two runs. St. Lucia's overnight score of 178 for one wait increased by -ix runs when the second wicket MI DatervWi K oing out in the second Qrffjr for 83, and the thin) wldDM f.il at 197. Angler being caught at 64. Lunchtime score was 264 for 3. Griffith 36, Drysdak*41. On resumption. Drysd.il,. h „t "ut without adding to his total Ir-atim.. score was 364 for 4 Cose or piny 478 for 8. %  % %  %  11-', ,-.'. %  83. Auguer 64. Drysdale 41. Phillips 39, including 4 sixes and 2 fours in 19 minutes, Joseph 29 19, Dr Clarke (Capt.) 2. Elhrk not out 17. Sthclinc not •>ut 39. Fall of wickets 1—57. 2—184 3—197. 4—27S. 5—319. 0—387* 7—399. 8—414, 9—463. The weather was fine and the crowd was the largest are* to 'he games. S> from pair 3 A Colonial Pol inMedal Gallantry is awarded to L/Cpl. Pilus bin Slnong, aged 23. of tho %  %  li of Malaya Police Force for his part in the engagement in tin Reiig.1111 .,,,,, ,.< .Inhnre ml Xovrnilxr 23. PUug shot and killed a bandit %  entry, and led n charge Into 'he bandit camp, throw-in* a grenade wtiicti proMbU kiiu-a another bandit. For bravery during the Fiji hut i.eanc last J a n u ,. i >. l.omn.i I>..kui,iv<*:i. 3l>. ., •.nd metcorologu.il -MM, int. H Yasawa-1-Raia. Km. is aw.tided •he Mrili.l, Eiiipiie M. da] During the storm, DakunlVOM extracatl d .mil repaired a transmitting set from a wrecked hut id his exposed hill mete..' station, iiftalh.l || in the OM .emnintng house wher,. the rest >l ihf vuKaaai bad I.I. %  %  ..mi was able to resume reporting lo the Important central ereatTtCf i (lice at Nadi, rivals .,11 through The '" %  ,' %  %  1 H goal scorers were '.wo goals, Kogers, two lag 107 nut „ui to t-rlng g" %  %  *' ftatchtr, one goal. victory by seven wickets. ihe other match. Police was 7- by u,, Whipporays % %  di Whip] irayi bad i I"'" "' Ihe gume. the six games, followed I Meree u/ag Mi. A. Clarke. S n 4 games and Yoi In 4. York; hue li... i I i it brsi mnlngi i i nek i. S. African ISxiion Secretary F^reed .OWN, South Africa. May 27. ni workers union secrcBmil Sachs whose mat runs. Yorkshire 385 fo 'f widespead rioting was rleaaad In STUO bail Tuesday 6 for 79. condition tn.,: be .ittcnds no i. i hire beat Notts b Innings and n was his second appearance MS for 9 dcclai Bupranv Court In two dayi 195. Poole || not out, Hilton I |*S of violating the sup87. Ait by Banpahlre b • i^ht twiOS defying the Government wicket*. S :i.r ;i;iin-t public speaking and Shackletoii 5 for 70, H its order to give) up his union 300 and 93 for 2. with the shire by 169 runs. Worce torshlrfl return to work of striking mem274 an.! Q urnunt Winkers 210 and 151. HitchI i U i when be was cock J3, Perks 4 for 37. Leicester beat Middlesex by speech, || 0 was released on ball. seven v.i %  another speech 216. Bdrich 1 u tested.— I.F. Common Pleas • From Page 3 had put the ticket in her pocket bag. About 26 tickets were in the bag and about 18 had ihe names written On them. She -aid that iken bat a burly long time lo go through the tickets mi the last night of the races as ahe went through all. thai M.niiiidale leit the house with the newspaper and the ticket. She saw when he relumed later that night with the newspaper and the ticket. It had taken her about three to lour hours to find the winning ticket. Wh.n she WTOta the names on the Ucket her aunt, grandmother, her brother and Martindale were present. She denied writing the names only on the last night of the races. Harold Trot man, a cabinet maker of Braggs Hill, said that 00 March 12. 1949. between 9 and 12 he was at Ilranker's shop reading a new -paper when someone came in and began talking about the winning ticket mil lirankcr said be did not have h* Another Taltt, Stanley Taitt of Horte Hill gave evidence of his having heard Gill say he did not have the winning ticket. The case continues today. WHAT'S ON TODAY Court i of API'.CAI and Petty Debt—10 in. Court of Common Pleas—10.30 a.m. Basket Ball. Second Division at Harrison Collage, DU trtct A and Modern HIRII School at (too p.m. PreaanUUon of Medals at Dl* trlct A 5 00 p m. •Twelfth Night" at Parry-Colendge School—5.00 p.m. Recipes Readers of the Bitbado"Advocate" are asked to send la recipes lor paolieatlon. These recipes will be publish ed over a period of oue month after which time a poll will bt held and contrlbntors will be asked to decide the best recipe of the month The win nor will be awarded %  prise Each entry most be accom panted by the following coupon. TO: THE WOMEN'S EDITOR ADVOCATE. NAME: ADDRESS: RECIPE NAME: I'M AM .\TK XIJW M.OSIM. HATE WIN $40.00 Here Is a simple Cross Word punlr which ran help JOD to Wan $40.00 for only one shilling. Al the same time you will be dot ni: your hit to help send Barbados' sole Olympic hope to Helsinki nexi July. Enter now and lr> yoar skill Kiri.l > 1 Thr first corrrtt solution opened by the Editor will win the prlir. 2. In the event of there belnc ro correct solution the one t iiiriiiilns the least errors which is opened first by the Editor u.ll ni the prise. HORIZONTAL 1—Performs. 9—Lucky i 10-Whs WJI Msitd f, temple la Jerusalem? 14—Clock face. IS—Papal veil. II H—Hear. 18—i),M,lom of lime. > nc piece. 12—Printer's measure. M— In what sea weie Pharaoh's chariots and host drowned? ~Rittcr SS— Dry. as wine. 17—Careulvo touch. -Predatory birds p— Preclude^ |3—Skids to the side. -Eccentric wheel-part. -Forays %  gjabwaj has the si bit. H— B -I : motional lanL£la?kbird. \; .., • t-fore. SB-S&k. 7l-What peoples had dwelt in Ar prior to the land being given to tho children of Lot? 73—Musician's baton. 75-Spikenard. 7ft—Country roads. T7—Curved molding. VtJtTICAL 1-Jc.ish month. Qu M 3 Symbol for tantalum. 4— Cunning. 5—Flics aloft. r,-Wanders from truth. 7-l)uct %  —Street railway (abbr> 9-A border city la the land of Judah What place were Joshus'l %  \2— inner lining of the iris. t.-nli.-'l soason. l—Ijmpieyt. %  %  trust 36—IJesctS'iants o! stie:n. I letter 3—Tiny. 30—Split pulse. 31-College cheer. -Of the moon. %  38—Who is the reputed author of .he Psalms? 37—Dubious. 39—Tibetan gaielle. 40—Bronze money. 43-Who owned the field In which Abraham was buried Entrance fee of one shilling (1/-) must be enclosed with each solution along with name and address on the coupon printed below. Any entrr which b not accompanied by the entrance fee i'l be irniii'di.iifl> destroyed. All entrants for this competition agree to abide by the derision of Ihe Editor of the Barbados Advocate. The rompelillon will be closed on Friday, 30th May. at 4 p.m. All rnvrlopc* must be clearly marked CRUSH WORD IT//I K COMPETITION and addressed to thEditor, the Barbados Advocate. 34 Broad Street. The name of the winner will be published In the Sanday Advocate of in 51—Shoshonean Indian. 63-Knob. 53—Observed. 05— In addition 55—Spirit of the air. Tranagraaeteei 56—Asparagus 67—How many mites did tl 57—To what were the breastulates of the 1 u beredt M—Stupor. 00—Cllmax. 02—Serf. waiting for— REVLON! Lipstick — all shades Nail Polish —frosted and plain REVLON! Cuticle Remover Velvet Remover Call or telephone early for yours HM. HN.AKTY (B'DOS) LTD. TAKt HOME A BO Till TODAY* Si < rO 2 < o 2 NQ1A3H M01A3U NOlAStJ Special Cash Offer for this Week t.Al.VAMSrii COBaVGATBD SIIKKTS 21 0MH v li f... 7 ft, K ft, l,.., K KM, $I.M'. $7.M |l.r Shrrl rt fiauiir x X fl.. 9 fl„ 10 ft ln u S.V6H: HLMg $7.00 prr Shpol oALVruassD saws can IS inn. wide x (I II. long ill (12.82 each GALVANISED \.\ll.s |7e, pat lb. uriiiiniiiiu ROOTING:— in H..IN :i li. v i.l.\ H ft. hmg ut siii.iiu pM it..ll BARBADOS HARDWARE CO. LTD. No. Ill SMUII SI. IMIUIHS: llllli, 2109, 3534 SEMTfcX uiotfi6 Q/ JJisfiNefwti f W.MfttL 47-llXpen. H rorrld. 49— Ocean. i:\vitu: PRMKKns TO I:\H\IM ron FMNLANB FUtm F.ntrit led or deliveredI t o t he "Ad vorale ^ tHl nn ^v" "r^^ Y'^JT. ^^S t Sf T



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r IO* TEN BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY. MAY 2. 1932 This Could be Greatest Year for British and Empire Athletes' f — !" '.:%'.'>'''>'•' %  ''''" %  •'•'•* %  '''''*'**•'''*' Today Is Derby Day By most popular sportt 111 with nn astounding >S event the Derby Stakes which ; proportion i.'ianec in the 5,000 metre*. ,,*" "* run "" at Epsom on Bui d-.nl forget that the Comw *dnesdav Fnrty top-flight thor"iwcilth can produce a few ""Knbredi will rontest the one find I "good-uns" when It come* to a ha ""tie mat which will be %  „ !" „ inp "chest In the history of the ..IJI I *o optimistic? V,-^ -^ McFj|r N will be worth £20,587 to %  c (Quarter and half mile) who the winner compared with r 1B..W. in the 1948 Game. ;.: lh ' previous record set m Iltd who baa a victor ffi Th *"d famous race ".ovA.thur Wlnt U. his credit, which takes its name from the "l5^l52*r2Sft l '-'" %  " *""* *"l ^hEa.lIUerb VW afl.,t„.n 1 :'"J J D-M s %  %  won the Epsom in 1"80 and except foe ikcc Indoor Games two ""'ak* during two world wa rule event in 9 mins. 15.7 sec*hen ten "substitute'' ran ends, and Jack Carroll who has r V n at Newmarket, the el. I n 400 metres In 48. sees, to hu a '*ay* been run over the horse, name. 'hoe shaped track. f\U tr.lia's miler Oon McMillan is unolhcr 1 would not rule put %  >f the reckoning Back % %  BUI with the British have big John Savingsgets nearer lo worlil .lass time ho putts the shot and nir.v well go close In hi* Record Entries For Intercolonial Sports THREE DAY MEET OPENS SATURDAY due I C mpetit eoaehtng %  %  : ."k. The glass track would theni< slow hi* BUKk Farnum assures me that he %  ride to give the public the opportunity of teeing him Against the champ* from other colonies before he leaves. Locals in Training; The local athletes are in serious daining and HuntO expect* to reonds --, „ .... -. and Saturday. Mav 31, continues on Monday, June 2 and end* Blenman of the local constabulary on Thursday, June 5 have been m training for the Police %  --..-... %  Sports and should be in good The Association have doubv in*imuon rtace Illim flir Ine spim! .... m de an nll-out effort to in,-." There will be a special invita\ r \ x ** ? on distances Hil| and „, some life into the Meet since | ti on 60 yards dash in which it is Uoy 3 wlU baU,e ,n Uie M0 I"***! (By O. S. COPPIN) A i nord number of two hundred and sixtv-two entries have been accepted by the Amateur Athletic Association M I'.nrbados for th,> forthcoming three-day Intercolonial turn i Time better\hn bo Cycle and Athletic Meet which opens at Kensington on '<-r the 440 yards. Archei I hat anking %  • united lop :yclisls and athletes xpected that I*wis. Archer. onp milp and thtf ">"• ** uneei. The track Is regarded as a true teit of speed and stamina foi three-year-old colts each of whom will carry 126 pound*. The start is at the bottom of hill the Urn take part in thi Kiuht Step Thii direction individual Blenman and Innlss will be seen '., In this event. ISovellie. Turning to the cycling events Novcllie* ol this meeting are there seem* to have been a wealth 'be parade of the athletes on the D ,t..,, L. .Kri-h. "t talent attracted in the three i:rjt day which should be well tee ffaW . ini <"lMe. hi the "A" class there worth seeing and the fact that nfrformancpl i M wl ^ •"• Berbice Wheel champ ">e prizes for most of the event* Idifo> the nr*t"fouV"furlns ra7ti*uU, : n\cr.t ,xc.pt -b. %  % %  11' **** LK,dp whn "1 tno le **~ *>" ^ presented immed.^ely horses have a study climb, made In competition ogarrS the in^clhlon form in B.G. today. *"£ flnbhof the evenly drop until the fa,nn-pirscntatives from From Trtn'dad .comen the This is based on the model of bend at Tottenham ,,,i u r Utrritoria -mit have iu Olympic hope David Malthieu I he Olympics and is the method Corner is reached. It is from this i^. mad( lini i,, r ^.nrt,,!,:. ?h-.t whllp ,h close of the make their tlnal effort over fairlv Tht lot a i stars spearheaded by lt day** programme. l-IrdV Siri, '1"„ 20 Thc A"*'ciation bavi broken B mm Olympic hope, yards which U lightly uphill m w Kloun(| ,„ hr l ni( 1 r;iCPmPni Ken Farnum. L. Carmlchacl. D. During the first 50 years the <' d a > 'here Is worldwide interest the Grenada Don' Secondarv holder of the local live mile record ','i £!i\"'. ^ "•ire* — anxi espocially in countries running School Athletic star to take pert in the "A" and Intermediate the JOU foi Kood measure. sweepstakes on the result, the most |„ the School evenU. classes. R. Sottaur and the newly famous of which Is the Irish Hos1 see also that he has been promoted Darcy Yarde will all pitnl Sweep, tht winner of which entered for the 880 yards, thebe tbere to slvc battle to the High Jump and the I^ong Jump Intercolonial invitees. Farnuin's Farewell I understand however that Interest nit; Kecord lid be accused of false *U^_ _c/ , ha ul I"! 11 modesty if I did not include m>%  If in the list ot poiblc-< r are Inclined to think %  'ial 1951 saw me at my peak. Hut although 31 lr.. comparatlvel;vi^akUig. n ripe old age for 0 %  printer, I am out to prove then AN IRISH LINEN SUIT ONLY $36.00 EA Ideal for the Tropics P. C S. MAFFEI & Co.. Ltd Top Scorers In tailoring Prince Wm. Henry Street If I get just one of them though, I -hall st.11 i.c well fattened, for it is 27 vean since Britain last took an Olympic sprint Hi Our girl* too have never been in an Olympics With kUCh % % %  :. derful chance* ot kuecese. A ;>letc)y lit June r'milda could the 100 metres. And. de*e the rk itnilitellon of thinmparable Pinny Hlanker*len, winner of four gold medalthe 1948 Games. I look to eila Lcrwill. holder of ihc fM-reeond, lo win the high nets £50.000 In addition, the famous event u 0pen events. draws nearly half a million spectators most nl whom go to see the colourful surroundings apart from the running of the race. Facing QKtens' the grand Stand on n hill :h the race is run tl: und inB 0,l< '" "' public %  n interestU Windward Islands Inter-School touinanieiit 111 mill around gaily decorated Gl "f> won the '*" %  ""d Long Jump crowning fried tlsh ntnlls, icecream barrows his performance with the creditand shcciting galleries while fur*hle achievement of winning the ther afield an amusement fair High Jump ul 5 feet 11* Inches. complete with roundabouts proThis is several inches higher than vides a riot of colour in contrast what our local boys have been with the grctn turf of the winding returning ft-r the past U-.\ j racetrack Farnum will be seen only in the short distances, 1 mile, mile and iwo mile because the grass track is slower than the road on which m is spending most of his eriously for Helwill have ta rid* SUITINGS FOR "^i* time training nki where h MfM d meet la BAIXKV mtC'KS THE TAPEflnit iisain. Will lie do too at M.lslnkl? belie ,v In No Derby scene would be complete without It* fypsles WBOM brightly painted caravans have now been forced to camp well •way from the track. Bui Ihil will not prevent them from mingfrom 20 year old n„ K wlt h ,-rowds to tip cert" winMajone Jackson. I nfrs nr n(T ,. r )o tc |j vour fortune. The grandstand will be packed ^" lige 6. June Fouldl I In addition to this Gittens ran tflCOnd In the 100 yards and 120 yards to H. Bain, his fellow Grenadian whom, I un he beat over the same distance at their school sports K'i i i.i Also fi io mu.ii greater keeni Bhlrtej Strickland (80 metres oVthk'stands athlete* thinwelves. The idea 1 hurdles) Ray Weinburg who has th.ie will be f W i n g her n-under and M COUld bent many ale sprintei.N Australia teiere are On the athletic side too. fans will be afforded the opportunity seeing George I-ewis. veteran •ntatlves of many pa'"" ^'"l Oeg*J Lewis, vani Dukes and En'rls arid *&** champion of Trinidad. with rep Uons, with high-ranking officials and owners occupyinK the most exclusive part This year however. < 1 BM In him a: member of the by his showing running Just f. i the ake Of runa lime for the 120 hurdles of 14 Rav&l Famli'v nn-set nmg is on the way out. There iccunds, and John Treloar. Olymu ,ni| m mournine for the 1st. IS too. ,i far more HriOUS anpic wml-tlnalM lour year. ago. Km* r,cor-W P lo the often boring husiwho may unset all my plan* fn ,cor c ,,r lies* of preparation and %  givater the 100 metre-. IneUnatlon to tight. in eventi Un re u n to much of the "aftel >"u Claude" attitude. AMI % %  ha n ulted In better Umi i and tlgures all round. Add U) Ihl %  reflected in all written in the United the formerly disparaged British and ConunonweeJUi n'hleles. and the feel that the land of the Airnighty l>llar does not io far appeal to have thrown up the usual running. rho %  loaough be has been running for ears now still has plenty %  I mu vidnced in the recent the Court Intenialloiial Sports Meeting of the A.AA, of Trinidad when he beat the American invitees WEATHER REPORT YEflTERDAY Rainfall from Codringtoo: .01 ToUl Rainfall for month to date: 2.06 ins. HiKhost Temperature: 86.6 *F Lowest Temperature: 72 fi F Wind Velocity: 9 miles per hour Barometer: (9 a m ) 29.979, (3 p.m.) 29.910 TO-DAY Sunrise: B 40 am Sunset: 8 18 p.m. Moon: New. May S3 Lighting: i"i p m High Tide: &.33 a.m., 7.03 p.m. Low Tide: 12 19 p.m. SUMMER!! 2X" KHAKI DRILL 28" WH1TK DRILL 28" WHITK LINKS DRILL 28" IRISH LINEN u *l.5:l, $1.58. $1.69 Vil. $1.31, $1.66. $1.69 Yd. $2.38. $2.95 Yd. $3.15. $4.49 Yd. .VI" IRISH LINEN CRASH $4.33 Yd. 54" Jl'TE CRASH $3.66 Yd. Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10, II, 12 & 13 Broad Street l^ienomenon, and you will that the. .i sanguine ptttUeUon Hut fr mi generalities to particularities. From whom, on thii fide of the Atlantic ind In DW Commonweallli, do I expeetl Orework* at He] Firt. I think I would pull Arthur Wint the great Jumatcai runner, ar.ti rapteill Of ihei: in this year, who muni hivi a wondi %  %  the 40* metres .if retaining the title Ju so lini %  d from un-Tj der Hi. no e of Herb M.-K.-nleyrt in 1S48 Arthur is Iraininj foi both the'J S(>0 and tin i > vents.: L'ut 1 fed hit best chance will be In the i And the •: no doubt.iii< his own detcr-j itlon tt add pnother gold J ti the one hi already^ owns. Id T len theK It Itourr HannlSterS (1.500 ea -oldg foi i i Oxford mllor, currently H i' the half-imlr _^ .1 IW.UK (if in-tf I over the*] 1 %  havej ful chance of Cable And Vi 'intern Def k al Curllon Cable and Wireless defeated Carlton in a cricket match played at Boarded Hall on Saturday. May 24. Carlton batting first scored 82 all out. E. W. Marshall top scored with 24 not out and F. B. Edghlll scored 23. They came to(.ether i n an cishth wicket partnerfhlp when Carlton had lost seven wickets for 10 urns and avid their team from complete collapse B. Croney. H. H. King and K. L, Hranker toi>k 3 wiekets each for 2. 7, and 23 runs respectively. Cable and Wireless replied with 93, C Scale lop scored with 32 while N. T. Clarke scored 16. For Carlton Geoie Edghill took four wickets for 13 runs, while F Edghill and K Warren bagged three each for IS and 17 runs respectively. ever event she chooses l,> enter. My personal opinion is that she stands moat chance in the long lump. Quite an impressive list Isn't it. And It is by no means eomplete — Bill Nnnkeville. I.en Eyre and Kiiropejwi L'fio rnetrva champion Brian Shenton are ,m!y three I have not dwelt upon I llul thos*. I hnv.' mctmnnr.t will make Hip l^-.l in ihc wuvli* go all out. And althouKh tho chU-f challeiiKP is likely lo cwm r from the l'nile.1 Slates. I feel liter-.-sportsman of thp WaakOhrl ln "' ""til"-m HI. .peed "lienfoj.u... olrmple hop. eard. Unless nnuooa holds nn 1 him clock Hut 4 1111.1 11 unnperlrdly strong hand, Brilsccood rnil.-s at th Now TmUJBB Neither must I forget Yvette am and tlM Co ..1th are ,|; n .nil. Williams versatile New Zenlunitoing to pick up qullc a few ago; II h b) ^< lor der who should do well In whattricks at Helsinki In July. away with Ihc title. They'll Do It Every Time "Fry THE POOR TELEPHONE OPERAOR. FT?HSTAHC£.A u>is-oisiAncc CALLED MILL C5IVE STRCT INSTRUCTIONS . THUS By Jimim ll.nlo THEN 1VHEN SAID R4RTy is MOTIRED AS PER INSTRLKTnONS'"OUR &4L IN THE MIDDt-E 6ETS THIS A tense incident in the Trinidad Barbados Tornado tournament — generous in victory — the Barbadian skipper hurls a life saver to a gallant but gasping victim of a Tornado turnover. Asa reminder why don't you attend the grand Tornado Dance at the Crane on Saturday 31st May and remember, say "Gimme a Carib" and absolutely no one will give you $100.22 — try it.



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II\KH.\I><>ADVOCATE til UM ID V> M 11 UH Cahih C a ^ n/ 9 y I deK, FHAMPTOrf. A*ri er u • %  %  U on • sj \ntigua oil Monti I A. Film Board Chief M l TOM V1L1.ANEUVA Ptes. i Ltoatu n( TniJdad and Manager of HeK bllc Pictures, returned to Trim i on Monday evenlnK by !i W I A. after paring a short .IMI (icr*. He was •laying I the H.i.iincj Hotel. Off To Trinidad I E WOtO tof Trinidad on Mon• : In* by B.W.I A : ernroenl IULI. She baa gene U MTi daughter Joan ill. On Annual Viiit L \i; for Canada via Trimdad on Monday by D.W.I.A was Mr. J C Kreindler Hanoi Messrs. G. W ., and Co., Ltd and the Modern Dress Shonpc He up mi hti annual business visit and is expected to be %  On Business L EAVING for Trinidad on Monday by U W.I.A on n business visit wa* Mr. Wilfred Alston of "tjindicape". St. The. i-xuectR to be awsy for about ten Intransit T NTBANSIT from Haiti via Antigua by B W.I A on Monday evening was Mr. A. Nori.-sklent of tho ExecutiveCouncil -if the Caribliean Tourist Association which mfrlinK hr had just attended After a brief stop at Soawcll. Mr. HuglK-s left for Trinidad on Ids wav Ul QtfJkstta He said th.it the headquarters of the Tourist Association have been moved from Trinidad to Anttgua '""' '' ,. ( .|.,ii,l to move them to [M CW y, i: tupst-nees warrant 11 Mr. Louts I-aw has been appointed Ex., itive Wrectoi of the A*ociatinn. Back From Antigua M R. ALGIE SYMMONDS. OH of the mambers ••< tinEmplre Sports Team which played a series of names in Antigua, arrivcd here on Monday by B.W.I.A. after what he ricMTibed %  a pleasant -lav in the island The Manatfer. Mr. J. E. T Branckei itnd other members of •hi:..tm have gone on to St Kltts when they will spend a ?hort time before returning home. Bett Place • M B. CUSTAV PABST. Jnr. of Waslu[:i"ii. I) C arrived on Monday by B.W.I. A. via %  u i month's holiday which ha at the Ocaan Vtw Hotel .Mr Pabst who is paying tin. second visit tn the island said that it is I hi btal place he knows He cam* here four years ago to upend one day ana eventually .: tv-onc. En-Route To U.K. M R. C. I, SONGHURST. Advertising Manugcr of tho British Amariean Tobecco Company in London, England, left on %  gonday • ranuu by B w i A %  Trinidad and Jamaica on his He was here on %  buainasi visit and was stovlag at tinOcean View Hotel. ANITA S|0*K No M **. efft'. Miss Bjork refuses 11LONDE Swedish film %  settees Anita Bjork. who kUpeared In the Swedish film >I Strlndbers's Miss Julie, hndeclined an offer to %  tar In a Rank film tn Bnglaa i The offer was iu Sfjeeet in The Long M n MilK ShiIn under %  if mak-.< Mm :n Stockholm for n An rnpeaj Home From Korea | T. WILLIAM I JON ''urn I: fun try p w5h£?\ to *** L' u Iath Mr i vYll*!? i" £25!" Sm of Church %  nt staying with Mr. W. A. • ford at PesrwQi, Mrnnr i %  Church. r r l U Jonea who ftp „ n otW moml-J ,' '"' rom Camj. R !" .u! y ; B covered some IT.OfH i miiea lo gel henjj. I t|| and Port Arthur Leaving Barbados ten. yean '" "• J 01 ""' the i's -. MVMI dsjrtng World War n a, * !" pe with the Tturd Amy, %  General P M the ra aw ti o u oi I live yean at Boston rom the rnfutn School at Pun iwnninn in Georgia and later went t Uie F.. i ., Th ,_ d Infantr. Uwuiun. On his return to the U.S.A. ; %  J "' ; -signed to '.'TMiany. M VUitinf The Island HS J R A UHANCH. wife f. !" !" 'f 0 1 An "'i un Monday • veiling by H.W t.A on n vl.Il ' '1 L"" 1 1 "P" ' %  J'lnl ui THE TUBBY HUBBY A DIET -based on the proposition that round husbands still deserve a square rneai . By Bernard Wickstted &£ b". st" A'" St Anns Fort, Garrison. On Long Leave VfH AND MRS U K J? 1 !" ?*%  daugsv %  iigua for „ Rhort boltdai %  lying i-.. ih. i he United Kingdom ri., renee Mr Thomas who is with Barclays Uank m Antigua, is now < Grenada Wedding Spent A Month L EAVING lor Trinidad on Mi day by B W.I.A intransit for British Gulan-i were Mr and Mrs. Leon Wlllems and then Gerald They had spent a month's holiday staying at their seiu-tde resident!.' "Rosamund". ... Worthing Their other son P< twho had come over with them, ha: f<-r f... returned to school at the Idge. are itarinj at the Si I, Mr WiUems is a Director of Hotel. Willems Timber .,.! Trading Co.. Ltd M With Barclays Bank A FTER spending three Hratte' h.diday In Barbados, Mr i) .1. Brown l.'ii ..n Moi K la% \f ,SS MAHKI. MrNKII.1V i. B. W.I.A. for TrinliT , II D. lania, '. l ''" ,,: 1 ssBipsg qi i ;. large %  '• % %  ! % %  i ..nd Barba''<"*'' at frisvo. and mm dor, returned betM on Monday wishers of the bride wilneaeed eveiiitu: an. ., Vl sit ban '< %  union which on business tuupled with pleasure. "V "he Revd. Adam Th( paolad by Mrs The bride, strildng a charroin| Of Urn u. Th wn guests of pfctura in an aha I i Fmar of Maxwell, sihixr finUn. wag A*. ii U .. n oncto Mr Caorga M.N-I.IIV.. After Ihrde Months while Mr. Frank B A FTER .pending llieie monlh.-' ' Uw gTOOOl (umi British Ouiai holiday here, Miss Agatha uru d us heatmaii. Sesl> and Miss Cynthia Sealy reThere were no bridesmaids, but! '.i.-rned to Trinidad on Momlay by the bilde's sister, ShaUa, U.W.I A. Thay were staying al^iulaiue a* the vo with Dr. and Mra W. L Woodoxehanged. I"# o' w '"vllle", Black Rock. HoneyinoonJiig at Quarantine nay had come over to be present Station. Mr. I'ennycook leaves this at the birth or Mrs. Woodlnga u.k-ond fur B.G to be loincd Spent The Week-End Mis* Sheila McNeill* left the M R. O. H JOHNSON of if laud m-route to Wnles wfttarg h. Johnson's Stalionery who • oe ' mw "t the famil. ,,f was in Trinidad for the week end. ""nee. u Welsh Fu returned home on Monday mornhers during las hi*; bv B W.I A disturbances. VSfELL. They have Y !" started me off on the Tubb> Hubby diet. They put me on n at ftraajrfMt stEM M kao day ..ad ..iurward.> tried to tail BM 1 luoltefl grig. The wltolc Otuig >* a trick i an ar\ala becaus.' thei or. .uti**i They gu*e OK *nn'i v.'ry aittiTnit IIUJU the. oreaaiast I get any oilier day whin Thai .'ii trying %  4tt mi de • %  %  %  toast iiithii vouil lei lob '>n thinims and i-ni tnou-*.kU %  : ouunds vase. >m it -i. Aiail aga-n Lunon passed off i lullv I bad ii in the city T i M paper ilido'l .heat unless vou c-u osJl ing w bave ihia,(f i A bar TlMTuoOy Hubby O-ei was deviasd by a mceM differs tot them. It Isn't easy to dcilno your own skin, but you should watch it carefuUy to work out your own particular sun intake —or is it "cxtaki".' Under the first layer of scaly lop skin known as epidermis, we sU have a true skin which contains the blood vessels, nerves, tat oells and other pigments which are the decisive factors on which we determine our ability lo tan. If the pigments are evenly distributed you will tan evenly. The girls who possess skins of medium colour anil thickness, must take their sunbathing mnrr cautiously. Those of you with more delicate skin* have to guard HKulnst over-exposure and take sunning very, very carefully. The Ihin, sensitive skin thai bums so easily should be sun-liathed under a sunshade, which does not make it so brown, but yet doesn't get red and uncomfortable, eithei Daily Lubrication Be careful lo IbUow lbs genera] rule, five mlnutai each side to i-egin with, with outstretched arms so that the sun gets to the undersides, increasing the dose with each time. You can, of lourse, sunbathe three or four ilmos II day—and eventually Jug) lay in the sun all ><„> Bui II you want to get ieall> brown the need for oiling and creaming l>eisists the whole time. The more the oiling the browner the Kin and the ml ,U*' ,n> the skin getting dry and shrivelled, if yon have tun; sunning don't LO straight in and wash the race ayllh toap and water, don't taki i bath hews* i inky you ".>• teal i reasD %  fat s, sad wail until you have lultg cooled <>ll 101 ) OUT balli Lai down those houldet straps (row the word n ehan you intend to suntan. Even Ovi minutes in the sun will U ihclr mark. nd they just staj there for u long lime regulating their colour •vlth the rest of ihi bodl, and don't, alas, catch ip i to neod mure oil than any other part of the body US a good ill UV i %  %  )> iflar youi bath, it gives yew skin thai i oath, .itii v usM irance, Last Hints Your legs have to look good whan they are so lengthily exoosed to all and sundry, so anv fugi has to be illmlfia'ed. Shaving bm't wise. It hardens he hairs and makes tht-m grow coarse. You can use the removers that are ( % %  penned for the under sms llajns you'd prefer them Thev are certainly ra tags lo u s 9 %  %  show signs of reapr repeat the treatment. A last warning-do wear dark ylasses in the nin'l gjars Tbaj II make you feel more comfortable, and they will prevent wnnkies %  JVUSM use ayaa, Take them nff whilo vou sunharhe. h-, S|l means, but only for ; %  while U prevent getting white 'clown hke" circles. And how .mr/iit,vi the sun glasses are' They i a great deal to your Mnnmertime beauty. Listening /fours t, P in Tlir Nrw. 4 10 p.m. Thr n ac V,.II..I-. | ..) 1 M. Ml %  1 lntrlutlc. SO p ii Sroltuh Mu TI,. %  va q i w in a m % %  ,,p