Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
9

———

_—





ESTABLISHED 1895





Foreign Ministers



Arrive In Bonn
Expected To Sign
Treaty Manday

BONN, May 23.

The three ‘Western Foreign Ministers, Mr. Eden, Mr.
Acheson and M. Schuman have arrived in Bonn for final
talks with the Federal German Chancellor, Dr. Konrad
Adenauer on the agreement ending Western occupation of
Germany, The treaty expected to be signed Monday, in-
cludes the contractual agreements made between the West-
ern High Commissioners and Dr. Adenauer.

United States Secretary of State

Dean Acheson landed at Bonn
Airport this afternoon in President
Truman's plane from Washington. |
Acheson told reporters at the’
airfield that the Contractual
Treaty system which also covers
West Germany’s share in Euro-
pean Defence should be a “great
contribution to the security and
peace of the world.” |

In this weekend conferences
with Chancellor Adenauer and
Britain's and French Foreign
Ministers he hoped to do “some
real constructive work.”

“Meanwhile West German parli-
ament to-day rejected the motion’
by the social democratic opposition
to discuss the Allied German
treaties ending the occupation
before Chancelior Konrad Aden-‘
auer signs them.

The social democrat motion was
defeated by a show of hands after
a noisy debate in an atmosphere
heavily charged after last night’s
bitter exchange between the con-!
valescent opposition leader Kurt
Schumacher and Dr. Adenauer.

Jack Fox writes from London:

Britain has never felt itself part
of Europe and to-day still fiercely
independent, Britain is staying
aloof from the grand design to
weld all western Europe into one
bloc,



ADMIRAL NELSON’S
HOUSE BURNT

{From Our Own Correspondent)
Kingston, Jamaica, May 23.
An historic landmark in
West Indian history was de-
stroyed by fire yesterday as
flames gutted the house where
Admiral Nelson lived at Port
Royal when he commanded at
Port Charles in the 1780's.

The world famed Nelson’s
quarterdeck, the wooden gal-
lery of the fort where he paced
while looking to sea for the
French or Spanish fleet was
saved by military and civilian
firefighting action.

Port Royal Roman Catholic
school was housed in the fam-
ous building. The adjacent
building in which the Roman ~
Catholic Church was housed
was also destroyed.



Civil Disturbances
Cost Grenada
$82,665

(From Our Own Correspondent)

Very soon Western Allies will GRENADA. May 23.

sign what amounts to a_ peace
treaty with Western Germany.
Then France, Italy, Belgium, Hol-
land and tiny Luxembourg will
initial the history making docu-
ment to put their troops in the

sei emia cers

nm army.
British Foreign Secretary An-

thony Eden will sign Bonn peace
contract giving back Sovereignty
to her late enemies. Eden will do
so as he himself has said not
without misgivings after bitter
experience of two world wars in a
quarter century.

Legislature has voted $82,665 in
connection with last year’s civil
disturbances and its aftermath,
including the bringing of the
Welch Fusiliers from Jamaica
poder from Trinidad and St.
Lucia. Ksiy

A large part of this sum was
actually spent last year but is
yet unapproved. The remainder
meets the BWI Airways bill.

The Committee also agreed to
the principle that Grenada should
take advantage of the possibility
afforded by the Trinidad and To-
bago school for blind children
and to provide funds to maintain
the two Grenada children already
there.

The Committee agreed that
the DDT spraying of Carriacou
homes which took place, during
the malarial epidemic last year
should be repeated at the colony’s
expense early in the present
rainy season in the hope of avoid-
ing a similar outbreak this year,
It is expected’ that the insect
control scheme to be launched
shortly by UNICEF and W.H.O.
will take care of this in the
future.

Considering information relat-
ing to the cost of a police radio
system the Committee decided to
defer decision of the installation
iin connection with next year's
estimates.

U.N. Planes Score Biggest
Raid Over North Korea

SEOUL, May 23.

SWARMS of United Nations fighter bombers struck
Communist war factories near the North Korean capital
of Pyong Yang to-day in the climax of a two-day attack
that probably was the biggest air assault of the Korean
War.

United States and Australian war planes flying day
and night after the opening blow at dawn on Thursday
smashed at least 305 buildings and damaged 151 others
including factories manufacturing hand grenades and other
weapo

i

—UP.

U.S. Dollar Up

MONTREAL, May 23

The United States dollar Thurs-
day closed at a discount of 1 9/16
per cent, in terms of Canadian
funds, up 1/16 from Wednesday’s
close, that it took $0.98 7/16
Canadian to buy $1 American, The
pound sterling was $2.75 %4, down
% from Wednesday.

The Canadian dollar was down
1/16 of a cent at a premium of
1 19/32 per cent in terms of
United States funds in closing
foreign exchange dealings on
Thursday. The pound sterling was
down % of a cent at $2.79 a

—(CP).





ns,

Fifth Airforce planes flew 900 sorties and were be-
lieved to have topped in both sorties and the destruction
of the war’s biggest previous raid on May 8th assault on
the ancient walled town of Suan. In that raid 180 buildings
were destroyed and two square miles of supplies laid waste

but the total sorties were not announced.
Almost every type of fighter ————————-———-—-

bomber in the Allied arsenal flew han. ee
Interior Ministry

yesterday, last night and to-day

in an attack that ranged from nine ue F
Blame U.S. Catholics

BUENOS AIRES, May 23.

to_fifteen miles east of Pyong Yang
toward the Yellow Sea port of

Chinnampo. Key factories includ-
ing a hand ‘grenade plant and
powerhouse were levelled. A Fifth} Government blamed “Catholics
Airforce spokesman said the raid} directed from the United States”
was a “healthy blow” at North|for the recent riots protesting

Korean war industry.

Shuttle attacks with pilots going
back for second and third missions
as fast as they could reload bombs
and ammunition, were not broken
off until heavy rain clouds ob-
secured the still smoking target
area.

Communist MIG 15’s which dur-
ing the Suan raid came as far
south as Pyong Yang were not
sighted by United States sabre jets
flying protective patrols for fighter
bombers.

At least four huge secondary ex- |
were seen to-day as pilots |

plosions
dropped hundreds of tons of bombs
and thousands of gallons of Na-
palm into the factory area. United
States F.84 thunder jets and F.80
shooting star jets of the Austra-
lian Meteor jets, F.51 Mustangs,
Marine Corsairs, and Navy Sky-
raiders streaked through smoke to~
day to blast any buildings still
standing. United States B.26 in-
vaders kept the attack going night-
long.—U.P.

“immoral” movies in which 11 per-
sons were injured.

There were riote in Buenos Aires
and Cordoba this week at the
openings of the Argentine film
“Atomic Barbara” which features
five scantily clad Cuban dancers.

The Interior Ministry last night
in a communique linked the riots

with the recent Catholic action
campaigns against immodesty at
beaches. The communique charged
that North American missionaries
are promoting the drive.
Interior Minister Borlenghi said
five persons arrested in Buenos
| Aires riots have been released but
Maximo Guillermo Mantel is being
| held for trial.
| Police found a notebook at Man-
| tel’s home in which the following
‘was written about July 4: “Inde-
| pendence Day of the United States.
Most glorious day of all. Our big
sister.”
| Boflenghi said

this proved

\‘ these incidents are directed from| cultural development corporation

abroad.--U.P,

Committee To
_ Inquire Into
Trade Dispute

GEORGETOWN, B.G., May, 22.
Governor Sir Charles Woolley
has appointed a three man com-
mittee to enquire into the cause
of the trade dispute between the
Shipping Association of George-
town (representing the principal
shipping agents) and the British
Guiana Labour Union which re-

-Sulted in the stoppage of work by
| dockers in March last, and to make

such recommendations as the

{committee may deem necessary.
fis chairman of the committee

The Finance Committee of

is the comptroller of customs, J, W.
Gregory, and members are the
Honourable G. A. Cyril Farnum,
O.B.E., and Mr. W. V. Jeune, Vice-
President of the Post Office Work-
ers’ Union and member of the
executive of the Federation of
Unions of Government employ-
ees,

The request for a committee was |’

made by the union after a dead-
lock had been reached on the
question by the association whether
the dockers strike had been called
by and was supported by union
or whether men simply refused
the work which it was offering.
Then representatives of the ship-

SATURDAY

SS





--~

“Hy RRICANE~



MAY 24, 1952



RETURNS

on

MR. IAN GALE (right) and Mr, “Corkie’ Roberts relax on the deck of “Hurricane” after their return
you Uhis areusta is lashed down to the deck of the Motor Vessel “Cacique Del Caribe” which

arrived

Grenada via St. Vincent and St. Lucia.

Mr Gale and Mr. Roberts sailed “Hurricane” to Grenada via St. Vincent and the Grenadines.





Riot Busters |
Mass In Paris. |

PARIS, May 28
Troops are massed in barraéks)

ping agents and of the union met/yinging Paris in support of 15,000

the Colonial Secretary and dis-
cussed the situation, but it was
not possible to reach an* agree-
ment.—(C.P.)

Red China
Would Attack
Via Siam

WILLIAM De BARZELARE
SAIGON, May 23.
Informed sources said if Red
China ever launches a full-scale
offensive against Indo-China, the
mn strike probably will come
Tv d (Siam), The
be ithield, said that ‘Thailand's
w: a ailan
gallant but small and poorly
equipped army would be easy
victims of a Chinese force of say
2,000. And once Siam was “lib-
erated” there would be a clear
road through Cambodia into the
heart of France's rich “Associated
States.”
The source said: ‘“‘Mind you}
we have no indication at present



By

that the Chinese communists are|§

riot busting police as “H. Hour’
neared for: mass demonstrations
ordered by Communists against
General Matthew B. Ridmway,
new NATO Supreme Commander.

Between 20,000 and 25,000
soldiers including veterans of the
war against Communist rebels in}
Indo-China, were ordered to bar-
ragks at army posts surrounding
the city as French Reds stepped
up their blasts against “General
Plague.”

A spokesman for the Paris Police
Prefecture said troops have been
assembled “just in case” Commu-
nist rioters get out of control of
the city’s crack 15,000-strong anti+
riot squads,

He said however, the author!-

squads. were adequate to a
with any trouble that might de-
velop when party members hit
the streets this afternoon to de-

monstrate in some 20 key spots
against Ridgway’s arrival next
Tuesday.

Convoys loaded with troops

rumbled along the broad highways
jJeading to Paris and dark blue
trucks of tough CRS (Republican

Security Companies) rolledy



Two Home A fler

Record Voyage

MR. IAN GALE, Acting Editor of the Barbados Advo-
cate, and Mr. “Corkie” Roberts, Clerk of the Attorney
General’s Office, returned to the island yesterday morning
by the Motor Vessel “Cacique Del Caribe” from Grenada
via St. Vineent and St. Lucia.

On Sunday afternoon, May 11, Mr. Gale sailed the 15-
foot “D” Class yacht, Hurricane, out of Carlisle Bay and
set-a course for St, Vincent. Mr. Roberts accompanied
him as crew.

‘Daily Mirror’

They arrived in St. Vincent ap-
proximately 23 hours later, Hur-
| ricane has therefore established







Apologises
To Churchill

LONDON, May 23.

: The —_ pro-Labo

vy atror “pibieny Mabhaieed
to Prime Minister Churchill Satur-
day for the election day picture

and statements at which he took
offence. He in turn dropped the
libel suit against the paper.

The Mirror last October 25th
printed a picture of a pistol on its
front page and asked “Whose fin-
ger do you want on the trigger.”
The Mirror’s apology read: ‘The
Statements and pictures referred
to never intended to suggest that

i

planning to invade Indo-China. |through the city streets radioing. Mr. Churchill did not dislike war

But if they did we believe that|
is the way they probably would
do it. Such a strike would be
combined with an_ offensive
against the bulk of 155,000 French
and Vietnam troops at present
concentrated on the main fighting
front around Hanoi 700 miles to
the north of Saigon.

General Raoul Salan, French
Commander in the Hanoi area
said recently he could hold off
such an attack in his sector “for
a month at least’’ with the force
now at his disposal. But the
northern prong of a Chinese of-
fensive would prevent the French
from diverting troops to meet a
back door attack.

The source said “Thailand is!
in no position to stem a Chinese}
attack, According to intelligence}
reports Siamese Communists al-
ready are setting up a complete
underground network to wage
sabotage and guerrilla warfare
in the event of a Chinese ‘lib-
eration’,

He said the Siamese army was
a “group of gallant men who do
not have the necessary military
means to make a .lone stand}
against a Chinese invasion. “But
the source pointed out it would
be a long 600 mile haul for a
Chinese invading force to reach





Cambodia through Siam, At that}
point the French probably could |
muster a force strong enough to
delay the attack until help came
from the outside world.

—U.P.













“Since we are to
co-operate on Europe:
defence, onsieur Le
Général, doubtless you
will now reveal the secrct
of the British arz-2ur-
plated stomach which can
resist the catering offen-
sive the most terrible!"

London Bzpress Service.





£500,000 LOAN

KINGSTON, May 23.
The Sugar Price Stabilization
Fund has offered to lend Govern-
ment £500,000 to be used in
financing the newly formed agri-|

—C.P,

to headquarters whatever Com-
munist movement they sighted,
—UP.



Peron Twists
_ Lion’s Tail

—DAILY MAIL

LONDON, May 23
The Daily Mail said that Argen-
tine President Juan Peron ‘was
playing the “old game of twisting
the lion’s tail’ over Argentine’s
claims to the Antarctic territory.

The newspaper’s editorial page
columnist “Tanfield” quoted Peron
as saying that Angentina would
no longer discuss their claims to
the territory but would defend
them after decorating members of
an Argentine Antarctic expedition,
The paper continued: “The meet-
ing which Peron attended how-
ever, was little shory of material
on Argentine heroism in the An-
tarctic. So they showed the British
film “Seott of the Antarctic’.”

—UP.

Empire Youth
Service Sunday

At 4.30 p.m. tomorrow the Em-
pire Youth Service will he held at
Government House grounds, It
is expected that approximately
2,000 young people, drawn from
the Cadets, Scouts and Guides,
Church Lads and Girls Brigades,
Sunday Schools, Police Boys!
Clubs and other youth organisa-
tions will be attending the service.

His Excellency the Governor
will deliver the Empire Day
Message and Rev. K. E, Towers
vil) deliver an address, Others
taking | part in the service
will be: Archdeacon Hutchinson,
Dean Hazelwood, Rev E. E. New
and Major Walter Morris of the
Salvation Army.





and the possibility of war, as much
as the defendants do themselves.”

—U.P,



An Appreciation
BY A VISITOR

The Committee of the Barbados
Branch of the League of Empire
showed commendable wisdom in
their selection of the project
scheme for the Junior Compe-
tilion for Empire Week 1952. As
a visitor to Barbados I should like

the high standard of the Exhibi-
tion now on display at Comber-
mere School,

The project illustrates a model
of the development of a two-acre
plot
what more appropriate choice
could have been made in order
to stimulate the interest of chil-
dren and parents in the direc-
tion of a progressive policy of
land settlement?

The ingenuity revealed by many
of the competitors shows the
educational value of the
Scheme. Some of the
created did give one the impres-
sion that the imagination was
atlowed to run riot-—-one for ex-
ample provided a» paddock of
thoroughbreds; another two giants
reclining against a house many
times too small—but these were
exciting displays in
mathematical
childish fancy.

I found the posters equally ex-
citing — Alexandra School and
Combermere particularly delight-
ful. I hope the Essays will be
published as the report of the
examiner discloses that they
reached a high level of literary
merit and originality. I under4
stand that the young lady who
gained third prize by her essay
on the Scout and Guide Movement
was commended for her sane and
pleasing exposition of values
which are apt to be overlooked in
modern society. Will the men of

you to record my admiration “na

spite of

inaccuracies and

of ground at Seawell; :

Project; forwarded to the Prime Minister
South Africa, the Secretary of

,a record for being the smallest

yacht, sailing under the auspices
of the Royal Barbados Yacht Club
to make the Barbados to St. Vin-
cent “ip.

Mr. Gale made this record even
more difficult for the skipper who

ane
dines and
“None The Worse”
On board the Cacique Del

Caribe yesterday they both look-
ed none the worse from their
exciting trip. Hurricane also look-
ed in good shape and will most
likely be ready for the Twelfth
Regatta today.

After leaving Barbados, Hurri-

cane encountered choppy seas
until 25 miles out. The sea be-
tame calmer and she had a
smooth run to St. Vincent

Mr, Gale and Mr, Roberts spent
a couple of days in St, Vincent
where they met the yacht Wan-
derer with its crew of two Aus-
tralian yachtsmen,

After leaving St. Vincent they
sailed to Bequia where they spent
two nights. They stayed a few
nights at Mustique Canouan and
Carriacou before setting sail for
Grenada.

They encountered some rough
seas and land winds on their way
through the Grenadines but Hur-
ricane reached Grenada _ ship-



B.G. Trade Union
Council Protests
Against Malanism

}EORGETOWN, B.G., May 23
The British Guiana Trade Union
Council last night passed a resolu-
tion protesting against Malanism.
Resolution copies which are to be

State for the Colonies, and the
Human Rights Commission, of the
United Nations, states “whereas
treatment meted out to non-
European in the Union of South
Africa has been regarded by
workers including Europeans all
over the world as being most op-
pressive, and whereas the Union's
government continues with its
campaign of terror and has order-
ed workers’ militant leaders in the
trade union movement to resign
their posts, and their political
leaders to be unseated, and
whereas movements of the said
leaders have been restrigted and
freedom of speech and assembly
has been denied them, be it re-
jfolved that this council represent-

ing all workers of British Guiana!

protest most vehemently
hese outrages directed
jown trodden coloured workers

in South Africa, and be it further

against

against |





Jea Lifts Ban On
Canadian Fish

Imports Cut, However

OTTAWA, May 23.
Jamaica has lifted its temporary ban on Canadian can-
ned fish and placed imports under a quota which will result
in a deep cut in exports from Canada this year Trade offi-
cials disclosed on Friday- E
The result will be that Canadian exporters will be
granted import licences only for about $174.000 worth of
canned fish this year compared with more than $500,000 in
1951, The move on part of the colony is to conserve dollars
wherever possible.

All British coloni@és in that ~— As =
area are taking a second look at :
dollar imports to consider where
savings can Be made. The canned
fish cut may thit Canada’s East
Coast. Last year maritime ex-
porters were allowed to ship
canned fish into Jamaica almost
freely under open general license,
but officials said Jamaica found
she was spending a lot more
dollars on this product than she]
anticipated,

A short while



Â¥
Farnum For
1
linland Fund
Donations for the fund to
defray the expenses of Ken
Farnum to the Olympic Games
are accepted at Barclay’s

Bank, the Royal Bank of Can-

ito. she” hatte al ada and the office of the Ad-



imports temporarily for about a Yosaie
month and then opened the doors Goal i $2,880.00
again—placing canned fish under Amt. Prev. Ack. ,.. $1,096 47
Canada—B.W.1I. Trade Liberali- Parry-Coleridge arse
zation Plan. Under this scheme School 14.00
Canada will be allowed to ship Mr. & Mrs Denton :
canned fish up to 30 per cent. of Sayers : 5.00
Jamaica's imports from Canada Advocat orts 5
in the basic period 1946—48. | ‘Club. SS 8.24
OP. wleck ¥: miele :
ZOAl od eeveess $1,123.71







Ex-C.1LD. Chief

J’ca To Serve | (Cuts Inv U.S.
Six Months ae te

_@ an e
(From Our Own Correspondent | Foreign Aid
re es| § Affermead

Wooding was complimented by}
the Resident Magistrate of the}

Kingston Court todas on his hand- | WASHINGTON, May 23.

| T nn
ling of the conspiracy case in-/, The House of Representatives
volving Jamaica’s former Minis- | 2 . roll call vote of 221 to 187 to-
ter of Education Joseph Malcolm | 22y affirmed the tentative $615,-

300,000 cut in European “defence
support” aid in the Foreign Aid
Bill,

and Henry Wellington, former
Chief of the CID, Wellingt@m who
retired as the Island's top detec- |
tive last year was found guilty of |
trying to pervert the ends of
justice by the Magistrate and was
sentenced to 12 months on four
counts concurrently,

Wooding made an impassioned
plea on behalf of Wellington as a
result of which the judge reduced
the imprisonment term to six

the Mig an jer see ng the trial,



The House then formally reaf-
firmed by a roll call vote of 192
to 165 its decision to cut $11,200,000
from defence support and techni-
eal aid for Asia and the Far East
in the Mutual Security Bill.

It had voted this cut tentatively
earlier to-day.

The House Democrat
admitted that they hai
chanoe of stopping the determined
Republican economy bloc from
dealing roughly with $6,900,000,-
000 foreign aid programme.
—UP.

Malcolm!

he Crown had not proved
conspiracy between him and Well-
ington on eight counts.

The charges are connected with
the farm workers ticket fraud
from which Maleolm was _ previ-
ously sentenced to 12 months’ jm-
prisonment and is now serving 7 , Og ’ . >
that sentence. Wellington endeav- VEW TYPE CARGO SH
oured to obstruct police collecting | LAUNCHED FOR

evidence against Malcolm. Well- ) TTE TRADE
ington has given notice of appeal | BAUXITE _ a
A 8 ;

Royalty Fly A new type of cargo ship for







carrying bauxite from Jamaica to
| U.S. ports, which can load and

In Comet yunload its 12,500 ton cargo in

| nine hours against the two days

LONDON, May 23. | it would take a nermal ship, was

The Queen Mother Elizabeth,|!a@unched on May 13 at Barrow,

and Princess Margaret are going | Lancashire,

for a ride today in one of Bri- be

tain’s Comet jet airliners, the The President of the U.S, Com-

fastest commercial plane in the} pany, Reynolds Jamaica Mines,

world. They drove from Bucking-| Said at the launching that Jamai-
ham Palace this morning for the, ca will soon supply more alumin-

De Haviland airfield to go aboard | ium than any country in
the plane,

ore

—U.P. Europe.—B.U.P.



Barbados please note?

Let me conclude by stating thaf,
the League of Empire Exhibition
shows that Barbados has a good
future before her. I hope to be
back in time for next year’s
Exhibition which is worth much
more than the modest fee charged.

Bread Shortage

Tornadoes, Hail
Lash Mid-West U.S.

CHICAGO, May 23,
Communications were disrupt-
ed, buildings damaged, and at
least twelve persons were injured |
after a series of tornadoes and
severe hail storms struck mnorth-
eastern Kansas and western Mis-













resolved that the British Guiana
Government be urged strongly to
cease all trade with South Africa
so long as its government persists
in its fascist tyranny,—CP).



Move and more.
people are saying —



Thieves Take Gold
Worth $100,000



* ° .
souri last night. Heavy raims and In British Guiana VALDOR, Quebec, May 23. |
hail were reported throughout Police Friday intensified their e
eastern Kansas and western Mis-| GEORGETOWN, B.G., May 23 search for the perpetrators of a
souri area. A shortage, said due to the delay} $100,000 gold brick theft from East ‘
. in importations as well as non-]Malartic mines.
Kansas _and Missouri torms arrival of ships to schedule has The announcement of the break}

were the first of several thunder-|)i+ British Guiana. Several baker-|in and theft came yesterday from
storms which pit the ae i ies have already had to go tem-|T. V. Netherey, East Malartic Man- }
Soe han Suseen + : aa porarily out of operation and in]|ager who said an acetelyne forch
tine: of activity brot gusty consequence buyers have been|had been used to cut through two
surface winds, severe turbulence}Storming the city’s two meee es doors and relea e the locks
and hail to part of Kar Okla-| factories i to all appearances!to the Company’s vault in which

Missouri and Arkansa tk vill be a breadle weekend’ four gold bricks were stored await-

—.P.‘for most of the people.—CP), {ing shipment.—-(CP),





PAGE TWO f



yer

Mrs
the

rnoon

esas aft:
rurner

wife of Colonial

Secretar) iil open the Girls’
Industrial Union Annual Fete at
Queen’s Park at 3 o'clock The
Police Band under Captain C. E
Raison will be in attendance anc
the Mobile Cinema will show films

the Queen's House Theatre up-

stairs at 6.45 o'clock. There will be
the usual attractions highlighted
by the Fancy Dress Parade at 4.15
o'clock. Two prizes will be given
to adults for the first two lucky
numbers.

Carib Calli

For One Week

AYING a business visit to the
island is Mr. A. Bento, pro-
prietor of Harpers Ltd., Druggists
of Antigua. He arrived on Thurs-
day night by B.W.LA. for one
week and is staying at the Hotel
Royal.

U.K. Visitors Leave
ETURNING to England earlier
in the week by the S.S. De

Grasse were Mr. P. C. Faunthorpe
and Miss Mary Cutler who were
holidaying in Barbados as guests
at the Windsor Hotel,

Mr. Faunthorpe was here for
three weeks, while Miss Cutler
spent a fortnight.

Spent Two Weeks

R. ENRIQUE LUNA DIAZ of

Barinas, Venezuela, returns
home today by B.W.LA., after
spending two weeks’ holiday as a
guest at the Hotel Royal. Before
coming here he was in Trinidad
where he remained for one week.
His wife who had travelled out to
Port-of-Spain with him, returned
to Venezuela while he came over
here.

Mr. Diaz is Warehouse Manager

of Socony Vacuum Oil Company
in Venezuela,

Canadian Holidaying Here
ISS BEVERLEY BANDRICK
of Montreal, Canada, arrived

here on Thursday by T.C.A. from

Trinidad for e week’s holiday and

ts staying at the Hotel Royal.

Miss Bandrick who is a member
of the Office Staff of Standard

Brands Inc.. will stop at Bermuda

before returning to Montreal.

Since leaving Canada, she has

visited Curacao and Venezuela

Paid Short Visit

EAVING for Trinidad on

‘ Thursday where they will
spend a few days before returning
home, were Mr. and Mrs. Carlos
Russian of Caracas, Venezuela,
who were here for a short holiday
staying at the Hotel Royal.

Mr. Russian is employed
the Government in Venezuela.

with



MR. AND MRS. CYRIL GILL

On Honeymoon
R. AND MRS. MICHAEL
WILLIAMS of Trinidad, who
were married there recently are
in Barbados spending their honey-
moon, They arrived here during
the week by B.W.LA, and are
staying at the Hotel Royal.

Michael is a son of Mr. Williams
of the Louis J. Williams Market-
ing Company.

Leaving Today

FTER spending three weeks’

holiday staying at the Hotel
Royal, Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Ehren-
reich will be returning to Trinidad
this evening by B.W.LA. They
will be accompanied by their little
daughter Catherine.

Mr. Ehrenreich is Plantation
Manager of the U.S. Naval Station
n Trinidad. He said that they
all had a lovely holiday anq re-
gretted having to leave so soon

Visited “Advocate”
IX young guides from St. Mar-
garet’s Girls’ School accom-~
panied by Miss Payne and Misd@
Mayers troom leaders, visited the
“Advocate” yesterday afternoon.
They were shown around the
various departments by Mr
Michael Hope of the Job Printery.
The youngsters showed great in-
terest in the many things around
them.



Quiet Wedding

HURSDAY
scene of a
wedding at

morning was the
quiet but pretty
the James Street
Methodist Church when Rev.
Frank Lawrence solemnised the
marriage between Miss Pauline
Inniss, daughter of Mr. E. D.
“Cossie” Inniss of ‘“Neta-ville”,
Upper Collymore Rock, and Mr.
Cyril Gill, son of the late Thaddeus
Gill and Mrs. Gill of “Haldon
Court,” Prospect, St. James

The bride who was given in
marriage by her father looked
charming in an Elizabethan lace
bodice with a nylon skirt. Her
head-dress was a petal juliet cap
studded with pearls. Her finger-
tip veil was kept in place by two
white roses. Her bouquet was
Queen Anne's lace, anthurium
lilies and pink radiants

The bridesmaids were the
Misses Joyce Ramdin and Peggy
Inniss, sister of the bride. They

looked charming in silk anglaise
and nylon and they carried posies
of pink radiants matching forget-
me-nots, blue violets and Queen
Anne’s lace.

The reception was held at the
bride’s father’s home and the
honeymoon is being spent at
Powell Spring Hotel, Bathsheba.



Silver Threads Among

Today there are three types of gain high lights to her hair —
grey-haired women the elderly bronze, amber and titian. Though
type whose hair is grey through when she does start to grey, col«
the passage of years, the younger our rinses will make her hair
woman with prematurely grey look much prettier,
‘hair, and the woman who chooses Silver hair, whether it be
tc have her hair tinted grey to be natural or adopted must have the
in high fashion. Maybe it is be- right make-up to complement it
cause so many young women have The younger woman with pre-
become prematurely grey for4maturely grey hair, must take
fome reason or other during andgeare that she selects make-up
since the war, and the result be-"which does not contain much
ing so completely charming that blue, such as deep fuchsia or deep
a new fashion has been born. red, She should choose, instead,

This silvery blonde shade is one vlear reds, pinks, coral and rose
that is certain to appeal to the reds, Orange tones on cheeks
ulonde who bewails the darken- and lips add drabness and sallow-
ing of her hair, yet hates the ness to the nonotone colour of
brassy shades of gold so often grey.
produced by bleaching. There is
also the advantage of being able
to make these new shades merely
tansient, They can be changed .
with each shampooing. It saves Should not go in for make-up
all that bother of bleaching and ‘!*shions”. Her cosmetics should
dyeing. You CAN give your hair Le in shades which approximate
: colour rinse at home, though to Nature’s own and applied with
I always think it wise to have “ elicate hand. Naturally she
the first rinse by your own hair- Wnts to keep her skin looking as
dresser, ™ ‘ight and fair as possible. Foun-
dation and powder should be only
light enough to tone or ‘warm’
up the skin colour if the skin

Colour rinses are only tints, 1eeds brightening up. Otherwise,
and though light hair takes them a colour should be selected that
admirably, the brunette can onlybiends harmoniously with the

.

Blend With Skin

The older grey-haired woman

Use Colour Rinse



The Gold

natural skin tone, Light shades
of rouge are too bright and too
obvious on older faces. The med-
tum clear red shades are close to
blood tones and give the most
natural appearance. Lipstick, har-
inonising With the rouge should be
in the clear red tones too.

Soft But Clear

In youth every feature is nat-
urally well defined. To retain
that youthful appearance, then,
the brows should suggest a soft,
but clearly defined gentle arching
brow. The mouth should be
shaped with a brush or the lip-
stick itself but blotted to a muted
tone,

Blend over the cheek rouge
with a powdered puff, and when
powdering the face, if there are
any wrinkles, spread these apart
with the fingers of one hand, and
pat powder into them with the
puff. After this, brush all excess
powder away with a complexion
brush,

If you want to be extra sophis-
tucated, and decide to adopt one
o1 the new silver shades of hair
tint, you must be doubly careful
about your make-up. Blue rinsed
hair looks best with a pink and
white complexion.



BY THE

HE men who ransack the torts half filled with morcose, 4
wine-dark seas for. whales Dranestone insulator encased in

to replenish owr grotesque lard- hemp, and two brushwood thongs
ers are killing the beasts by elec- with reversible tarbols. The sage
trocution. lit a magnetic candle, touched
And the learned chemists who the fulcrum, and there was a
tell us what we are eating say soft explosion. When asked for
that this method of killing whales an explanation, the Doctor said,
makes their flesh more tender and “That was the bamp, It is now

also lowers the jprice. isolated.” There were no com-
But if a dish of whale becomes ments.

the fashion the price will go up, A,

not down, Chefs have only to In passing

announce that the Timbale de

Baleine is cooked int red wine and “ IS usual alibi was that he

served with Sauce Mirobolante was not interested.” That is

for this dainty to supersede tin- a good example of the meahani-
ned Rhodesian turkey at banquets. cal repetition of certain words
By that time the quacks, the for which there is a craze at the
Marchands @Orvietax, the push- moment, “Alibi” is used as though
ers of Ferltmpinpin, will have jt meant an “excuse.” The lovely
discovered forty kinds of benefi- word “glamour” has been utterly
cent chemicals in wihale-snout debased and rolled in the mud,
pie. and critics are beginning to ap-
ply the idiotic word “escapism”

Strabismus demonsttrates to any pook, play, or film which

is not a putrescent’ heap of lust,
Y recent report of the isola- murder, and obscenity. The com-
tion of the bamp_ by Dr. bination of this cruze with the

Strabismus (Whom God Preserve) dialect of the Jargoneers Brigade
of Utrecht was receivedi by sei- of the Civil Service cugh' to end
entists with pained incredulity. by producing a wonderful kind of
Yesterday the sage was at home English,

to a deputation at Wagefling Par-

va. He showed them what look- Look out for the ‘guide’

ed like a copper fulcrvan, a jar i Se Tet da

of frozen wool, a twistedi coil of TVE-SHILLING day ” non ne

steam-heated rhubarb, ‘three re- ham Place was somewhat
.





AY e cece By BEACHCOMBER

marred last Saturday by an ec-|

centric guide who charged an
extra half-crown to show the
spot on which the fourth Earl

kicked Cromwell on the shin; an
extra shilling for a peep at the
Scoffing Stone in the minstrels’
gallery; and an extra three shil-

lings to let le sit in the chair
of Matilda of Flanders. “None of
this is in the printed booklet,”

objected a sightseer. “Tt will all
be in the next edition,” replied
the guide, with that confident leer
which belongs only to Captain
Foulenough, At the end of the
day the takings had vanished—
as also the guide.

Precautionary nose-pulling

HE woman who “pulled a
man's nose in public” should
said that she was testing his
bona fides, Bogus foreign aristo-
erats in liners nearly always have
false nd&es, to give them a Haps-
burg touch, and the wise young
lady is she who, the moment the
Prince begins to talk about his
schloss near Vienna, tweaks the
Hapsburg facade, to make sure,
She will lose a few hours of
pleasant flirtation, but will keep
her self-respect. It is what the
Germans call profit and schloss

have



LADIES’ “EVER-REST” SHOES

@ WITH BUILT IN ARCH SUPPORTS

BLACK AND TAN COURT — BLACK AND TAN LACE @...... $10.92

NEW LINE MEN’S SHOES — SUEDES AND LEATHERS $8.33 TO $13.66

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS



42%

DIAL

YOUR SHOE STORES



DIAL 4606



BARBADOS AD

On Business

V3": BERTIE KING,
ib tative of the Central Agency |
Liriited, was a passenger by!
B.\/.LA. on Monday for Antigua.
Mr. King is on a business visit to!



Antigua and St. Kitts on behalf!
of his firm

BUTTERFLIES

Vel Aviv: Israel coastal roads4

are covered with a fine blanket

of ‘snow-flakes’. They are dvinge

white butterflies which have ap-

peared in phenomenal numbeg®)
this year. |
EXHIBIT A ;

Nicosia: A hen, produced if |
court here as Exhibit A in a theft |
ease, laid an egg on the judge's

VOCATE



—It Was a Gift From All the Toys—

By MAX TRELL

,WHEN Knarf and Hanid, the
Shadows, were sure that Mr. Punch
was fast asleep, they gathered |
everyone else around them and then |
Banid said: “Tomorrow is his birth- |
day.” }

“Oh!” exclaimed everyone — |
everyone except Teddy the Stuffed |
Bear who asked: “Whose birth-
day?”

“Oh!” said Teddy, which is what
he should have said in the first
place.

“I think,” said General Tin the

iP
“Mr. Puneh’s,” answered Knart. |

desk during the proceedings. Dis- | tin soldier, “that we should give
turbed by the hen’s cackling in | Mr. Puneh a beautiful 6.”

the court, the judge ordered its “That’s what | think, too,” said
removal, | Gloria, the doll with the golden
| curls, “I think we should buy him a
_ beautiful pair of gloves, a beautiful



| £007.15 pom

Listening Hours

|
SATURDAY, MAY 24, ine
ces 197M 20.58 |

4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. ‘The |
Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. Empire Day, |
£.00 p.m. Composers of the Week, 5.15
p.m Music for Dancing, 6.00 p.m. |
Scottish Magazine, 6.15 p.m. Frankie
Howerd Goes East, 6.45 p.m. Sports |
Round-up and Programme Parade, 7.00
p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m. Home News
from Britain.
7.15—10.0 pom

7.15 p.m. Behind the News, 7.45 p.m,
Sports Review, 8.15 p.m, Radio New!

2.9% p.m. King George VI, 9.30 pi.

B.B.C. Scottish Orchestra, 10.00 p
The News, 10.10 p.m. News Talk, 10.15

. 25.59M 91. 32M
nf

p.m. Music Magazine, 10.30 p.m. Variety
Fanfare,





GAIETY

The Garden—St. James
To-day 4.30 & 8.30 pm
“PASS TO ROMANCE”

Martha O'DRISCOLL &








“MAN-EATER of KUMAON”
* SABU dell COREY g
oo 5 T s
- MIDNITE TONITE %
4 “COWBOY CAVALIER” x
Ysimmy WAKELY & x
x eB SON ¥
Pe ‘SILVER RAIDERS" Whip WILSOD S$
2 > SON & MON. 890 pm |
g MAT. SUN 430 pm RQ)
x “SWORD n the DESERT x
, ene ANDREWS & %
. “GAL WHO TOOK THE WEST’ € olor”

%,
Syvonne DeCARLO Scott BRADY \
FES SSS OOSCSESOSSSSOO*

1

|

}



FOR

TO.MOBRROW 5% &
uate

t








i
kA

=< -e

SCREEN PLAY BY



oe "ee ete i ARR

hat, a beautiful pair of slippers,
and a beautiful new pipe.”

Beautiful Pipes

“Two beautiful pipes,” added
Teddy. “Then he can smoke one
and hold one.”

No one paid any attention to this.

Hanid said: “What Mr. Punch
likes best of all isn’t gloves, or a
hat, or slippers or a pipe, Besides,
he’s got all of those things. What
he likes best of all for a birthday

resent is something that you can’t

Cay—something that you can al-
ways keep—and something that
no one else in the world can give
him but us.”

Everyone wanted to know what
this thing could be. When Hanid
saw that no one could guess, she
finally said: “For Mr. Punch’s
birthday present I think we should
give him a poem.”

“Very good idea,” said General
Tin; “very good indeed. But not an
easy present to give.”

being kissed.”



sug: Mr. Punch might
Sie thoes pipes.

Mr. Punch we love you dearly
Daily, weekly, monthly, yearly,

We always know it very clearly
Mr. Punch we love you dearly.

Tedily

Mr. Punch we wish you fan days
Teseeiers, Fridays, Saturdays,
jundays,
Thursdays, Wednesdays, Tues-
days, Mondays,
Mr, ch we wish you fun days.

Then, when it was all dene, Han-

ic wrote the poem out on a fresh

iece of paper and ped it under
. Punch’s door so that he would
be sure to see it the first thing in
the morning.

Birthday Kiss
“And of course,” said Gloria,

“we'll all give him a kiss, too. No-
body can have a birthday without

“Tt’s a wonderful poem and I’m

1 ”

“It’s much easier to get gloves | Sure Mr. Punch will like it,” Teddy
and those other things,” said Gloria, | the Stuffed Bear said after the lights
shaking her curls. “It’s hard to| Were out and everyone was about
write a birthday poem.” to go to sleep. “But I think he would

“That’s what makes it such a

like two pipes, too. Next year I’m

good present,” said Knarf. | going to give him two pipes for his

So they all thought and thought,
and scribbled and scribbled, and

birthday, maybe three of them.”

“Three of them, Teddy! What

changed and changed, and crossed | can he do with three pipes ?” Knarf

out and erased and wrote in new
words until at last the poem was);
finished. This is it:

j =
i
EMPIRE

TO-BAY — 4.45 & 8.30
and Continuing mr
oderick CRAWFORD udy
sili in (HOLLIDAY
“BORN YESTERDAY”

— EXTRA
PEHATKOVSKY'S
- NUTCRACKER SUITE
LS,





-day 1.30 To-nite Mid-nite
Williara Boyd in John =
\) HOPPY'S a ie
HOLIDAY" —
and MYSTERIOUS

(TRY & OFT ME DESPERADO
Action Doubl Tim Holt

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY —- 445 & 8.15—1st Inst.
Sun. & Mon. 445 & 8,15—Final Inst.

“DON DARE DEVIL RIDES AGAIN”
with Roy BANCROFT—Ken CURTIS

Te-day — 1.20



Mid-nite; Tonite

INDIAN
‘TERRITORY KING OF

) and JUNGL LAND

CRIME DR



GAMBLE Whole Seria





NEVER A DULE MOVIE

TODAY 5% & 8.30 p.m.
MONDAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.

8.30 pane.

6 6 wows BIG-AS-TEXAS TRCHNICOLOR MUSIC4 ly

music BY

STORY BY LYRICS BY
DOROTHY KINGSLEY * S6QRHiy’kinestey HARRY WARREN + DOROTHY FIELDS » CHA
‘



~

Always keep Limacol Toilet Lotion

in your

Always keep Limacol Toilet Lotion

at your

THEN YOU'LL ALWAYS BE COOL
BECAUSE

LIMACOL |

TOILET LOTION

IS

“The freshness of a breeze in a bottle”





AN M-G-â„¢ PICTURE

home

office

demanded.

‘in each hand,” said Teddy.

ROODAL THE







“One to smoke, and one to hold

So Ss

RE

A



TO-DAY TO TUES.
Universal Double - - -
Yvonne DeCARLO in

HOTEL SAHARA &

SARABAND with Stewart GRANGER}

in Technicolor



MIDNITE TONITE
Whole Serial - - -

“SUPERMAN”

ROYAL

To-day & Tomorrow 4,30 & 8.15
Universal Double

Brian Donlevy — Howard Duff
in

SHAKE DOWN &
AIR CADET



Starring
Stephen McNALLY — Gail RUSSELL
—

Mon, & Tues, 4.30 & 8.15
John WAYNE ox Laraine DAY/

“TYCOON”



and
“THE MYSTERIOUS DESPERADO”

DIRECTED BY

RLES WALTERS- JACK CUMMINGS























\
}Don BARRY &
i} LASH LA RUE. ‘

SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1952

cence tian cane tenement

vrwen-, Mr. Punch’s Birthday Poem





Watch ‘DISPRIN dissolve—
quickly—completely



Because * Disprin * enters the stomach
in a rrue solution, with no insoluble
acid particles, it is more rapidly absorbed

SS

by the system-
thus relieving pain without delay. The best way to take
‘Disprin’ is in water, though its soothing, pain-relieving
effect will be the same whichever way you take it, Because
of its advantages over ordinary aspirin, * Disprin’ is
widely used in hospitals throughout Great Britain.

‘DISPRIN to relieve pain

When you need aspirin better take a ‘DISPRIN’

tents: T. S, GARRAWAY & CO., Bridgetown 3





TRY THE

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

For BEST BROOKS.

DIAL 2310

To-day 445 & 8.30 p.m.
& Continuimg Daily

“PAINTING the CLOUDS
Wits SUNSHINE
(Technicolor)

Dennis

TODAY 4 45 & 8.20 p m
& Continuing Daily

DRUMS IN THE
DEEP SOUTH

(Super Cinegplor)

James CRAIG —
Barbara PAYTON
Guy M

TO-DAY'S Special
1.30 p.m.
| Triple Attraction

TODAY & TOMORROW
4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

ON MOONLIGHT

(Technicolor)

Doris DAY &
Gordon MacRAE

Virginia
MAYO —
$-Z
SAKALL

—=—=———————======
Today Special 9.30 & 1.30

“RED DESERT" “LAW of ‘the

Tim HOUT &

ns
“FRONTIER REVENGE eee
George OBRIEN

————SSS

MEDNITE TO-NITE
“BLACK EAGLE”
William B&SHOP &

Fuzzy “ST.

MIDNITE TO-NITE
“SWORD in the DESERT”
EWS &

TIMBERLAND

Richard ARLEN -
Andy DEVINB



TO-DAY 445 & 8.30

and Continuing Daily 445 & 830



oe 6 2s ss Oca ed & crete «
“ff ; oa é
* r %
> *
. 4 ¥
* " «
. Wem
bd
8 a
al % Sf
“} B+! a
2 Ke
« Ad
4 ye
ond \ fy
x “4 *
Ls
~ Sram Fay by Albert Mancboimar» Produced ty. SYLVAN SIMON —2 x

Le Directed ty GEORGE CUKOR + Based ov tho Stage Play by GARSON KANIN

ae

SPECIAL SHOWS TO-DAY
1.30 P.M.—BY TEENAGERS’ REQUEST

eTHE STRIP”

(Mickey ROONEY — Louis ARMSTRONG)
MIDNITE — TO-NITE * MIDNITE

LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE

AND

“NANCY GOES TO RIO”

(Jane POWELL -—- Carmen MIRANDA)

AND

“DEVIL’S DOORWAY”

(Robert TAYLOR — Paula RAYMOND)

CONTESTANTS TO-NITE

LUCILLE CRAIG ...
GLORIA BENTHAM
EDDIE HALL

CHESTON HOLDER
FRANK CORBIN .

CARL BEST ‘
ORVIL GRANDERSON ...

“I only have eyes for you”
.s,...... “Sentimental Me”
“The loveliest nite of the year”
; “Because of You”

“I only have eyes for you”
oat “Prisoner of Love”
cs os ae . “Roses”
EE

A GRAND SHOW IN ANY COUNTRY

Pit: 18¢. House: 36c. Bal. 48ce. Box: 60c.





Today Spectal 1.30 p.m.



SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1952



SUGAR NEWS:

[Imperial Preference On
Commonwealth Sugar

LONDON.

THE IMPERIAL PREFERENCE on Empire sugar,
which was given a life of four years under the Finance
Act of 1948, has become permanent as a result of a clause
gered by the House of Commons in this year’s Finance

The difference is that under earlier arrangements, Pre-
ference was put into operation for a limited period. Now
the Preferences stand until Parliament revokes or changes
them. Sir Arthur Salter, speaking for the Government,
pointed out that Parliament could change them whenever
it desired, but he said it was essential that they should
continue throughout the life of the Commonwealth Sugar
Agreement.

Opposition spokesmen supported the clause because
they_were in favour of the Commonwealth Sugar Agree-
ment and because they regarded Preferences as an integral
part of the Agreement.

But Mr. Arthur Bottomley, a cause black marketeers are too
ocialist anq former Secretary wafy to be caught by trapping.
or Overseas Trade, suggested —B.U.P.
nat it would have been better
> have consulted Commonwealth
roducers first.

“If we are to build up these
references, whether it be
agar or anything else,



SUGAR EXPERTS FOR
EL SALVADOR
is El Salvador is to ree@ive the
the best es + — an oe
‘fay to do it i ieee .§ {agreement approved by
Eiacnat - ste gag its Foreign Minister with the
e declared. “The West Indies, I United | Nations Food afd Agri-
gow from experience, would far culture Organisation,
ither have a guaranteed market Under the agreement, the U.N.
w sugar for a long time to come, cgescy 38 tO send 4 aeivade: suec
ad we for some years have been SU84* Manufacturing technologist
ying to buy our sugar at lower to conduct a complete survey,
ces than the real price.” > and one economist to analyse the
economic structure of its sugar
industry.
The existing



sugar processing

SRITISH SUGAR AID FOR

plants in the country, methods oi
AUSTRALIA processing and equipment will be
BRISBANE, eXamined by the technologist. He

Britain has granted £561,000 Will recommend any desirable
the Australian sugar industry, Changes with a view to the ex-
is the Australian sugar indus- Pansion of local sugar cane pro-
y's share of a surplus accu- 4uction, :

wlated by the Ministry of Food Two fellowships for people
6m transactions in sugar over a MOMinated by the El Salvador
tiod of years within the Brit- Government will also be estab-
4 Commonwealth. lished by the U.K. Food and Agri-
Mr, H. Collins, Queensland Culture Organisation.

inister for Agriculture, an-
funced the grant in Brisbane
td said that most of the sum
duld go to Queensland, whose
Zar crop last year was worth
tout £22,000,000. The British
overnment, he said, had ex-
essed the hope that the money
duld be used to improve the
ar industry. A special pay-

—B.U.P.

NEW CUBAN SUGAR
AGENCY TO SELL
1952 SUGAR

HAVANA, Cuba.
The Cuban Government has set
up a single selling agency to sell
the special quota of the 1952
sugar crop on the World market.



ent of 15s. id, a ton will Th ;

, ! w .
| paid to producers on raw made tat tnemnbors a oe
Bar of a requisite standard

Cuban National Sugar Institute,
representing mil] owners and
planters. A Government delegate
appointed by the President will
be its chairman.

The Cabinet alse set up a
Commission to recommend meas-
ures to regulate the supply of

meee in the 1951 season, he
“The Queensland Government
irmly Spypnetaiee this action
‘thé United Kingdom,” added
t, Collins, “and regards it as
excellent example of the good
jl existing between the United

‘sugar for world markets this
ngdom and the British Com- year and next. It will seek to
onwealth sugar exporters. press for q new word sugar

—B.UP. agreement to replace the London

pact of 1937.—B.U.P.





BLACK MARKET IN

SUGAR RATES OF EXCHANGE
DURBAN. MAY 23, 1852
The South African Government Bellin, NEW YORK bes
appealed to members of the 72.67 pr, Cheques on =e
lic to give information of any Bankers 70.9% pr
als in black market sugar. Sight or demand -
i : rafts 10.7% pr
ere is q serious shortage of 72.6% pr. Cable is
@ar in South Africa, although 71.1% pr. Currency 69.4% pr
8 position should ease soon ‘''"''''* Coupons 68.7% pr

fen the new cane crop is cut, CANADA

‘When the sugar shortage de-

loped towards the ena (ineluding Newfoundland)

of last

ar,” said Mr, Eric Louw, Min- 75.3% pr. Cheques on

ér of Economic Affairs, “TI “en aan Pe

Ye the order that price in- “"""*’ a ant Drafta, 73.8% pr

Sectors should pay special at- 7.8% pr. Cable fetter:
i 3.8% pr. urrency .1% pr

ition to sugar and a number of 1.8% pr. Coupons 71.4% pr

P were sent to Natal. They ‘tiie above Rates are subject to change
not have much success be- without notice.

Beh?

- BOXED BRAIN OPENS —



BARBADOS



“Awad there, Virginia, is the Coronation Stone of Britain with a
mystic mscription—er—MADE IN JAPAN...”

ADVOCATE



New Digest Of
Colonial Statistics





The fourth section of the
Digest shows tables of the
ary products from the

new
prim





Stage Career For
Cherry Huggins





PAGE THREE



SEA AND AIR

q












oD
Is 1 q LONDON
Suet Rap Sey Seated
liss herr Huggin daughter }
Sir Joh Hu former j
tA ANDON 7 TRAFFI
N The first issue of a new Colo. aoe Ry te “ae
al Office publication which sets E is 13. saad 4 ~ pleting hes
ut in ae act a pasy-to- * ee ad 2
aaa is + ee "ag Mp" course at the Royal Academic '-—-—————— —s
the Colonial e rade and ite of of Dramatic Art, in London, In is
he olonial territories for quick iw a will be looking for In Carlisle Bay
eference by the business man or */)'*> . . ae
oficial appeared on May 14 i : SS. R Mv. 1
PP ~ Training itself is a full-time ; Anita. Sch. DOrtec, Sct
It is the “Digest of Colonial job, which leaves her no time for ” Ss Sots Philip Davidsor
Statistics,” planned as a com/ the parties she love: Although star. sch. Hariet Whitakee, S
panion volume to the “Monthly she a debutante this season, ; Sch. Laicille Smith, Sct
Digest of Statistics” published by she will not join othey debutantes %.. Seh. Marion Belle W
H.M. Stationery Office for the in the round of almost nightly DEPARTURE
Central Statistical Office, and it curties. Instead, she will ratior lotor Vessel Caribbee
will be published every other /erself to one party a week whil
month, she finishes her arduous training Sites Wanda eee og ae
: ‘ Motor Vessel Calcique ‘aribée froi
Among the 50 tables and {or the stage. Lucia and 3.8" Sapho 4.380 a0
appendices the first issue contains Miss Huggins, gay and viva- » St. Laiciay
are details of the value of total ¢jous, wants to act in ight comedy.
imports and exports of Colonial Already she is a glohe-trotter,
a from 1936 to 1951 and for her father’s career has taken OLD-WORLD
oe the oe by months for him to many parts ot the world
he Years 1949 to 1951, Born in Panang, she has lived in ATMOSPHERE
n Tables 3 to 14 these figures }rinidad, Washington and Jamaica.
are broken down to show the She went to school at Roedean and Venice: Venetiar toecrats are
origin of imports and destination was at a finishing school in New seeking to ban the ile of Coca-
< sae for the C olonies aS @yyork before taking up her train- Cola on the Grand Canal Gon-
whole and for the West Indies ing aS an actress, dolas to preserve the canal’s old-
and others of the larger Terri. —B.U.P. world atmasphere
tories individually. : a :



Colonies, |

HEALTHY APPETITES
and STRONG BODIES

and it is interesting to note mH
Table 19 the steady increase in}
Trinidad’s production of crude
petroleum which has risen from
of 148,000 tons in 1936 to wpaictied,
" tons in 195
"t i I
e Figures ndustrial production
" 2 in Section VI also show an in
BBs crease in West Indies’ products
Ay sucl is Soap, Margarine, manu-
f i facturdd tobacco, cigarettes and
matches
[' i An appendix at the end of the
‘By Digest gives the areas and popu-
7. a lation of each Colony with a
ok table at the end showing their
Express § 4 Reyer by races at the last
Ba 9 —B.ULY.

FLIERS’ PARACHUTES

THE ROYAL AIR FORCE is giving its aircrews a small
barometric box which will automatically open their para-
chutes for them and release them from their ejector seats
if they have to abandon their aircraft miles above the earth.

Up to t
to do this for himself and at a
time when he is being blown clear
of an aircraft travelling at perhaps
600 miles an hour. As he fall
away from the aircraft in his ejec-
tor seat, a small drogue is re-
leased from the seat to slow it
down, otherwise neither pilot nox
parachute could stand the strain
when the chute suddenly opened,
The airman then has to free him-
self from the seat and fall for a
short time before it is safe for him
to open his parachute. To do this
he must have his wits about him
all the time. At great heights
there is not enough oxygen in the
air to keep a man conscious for
more than a few seconds, and in
his hurry to leave his aircraft, ha
may not have time to switch or
his emergency oxygen supply.

The new barometric box will do
the flier’s thinking for him. If he
bales out high up, the box takes
over, releases him from his seat
and opens his parachute for him
when he reaches 13,000 feet. If he
is ejected below 13,000 feet, the
box automatically delays the
opening for a few seconds so that
he gets clear of the aircraft and
slows down,

The box does not stop the air-
man pulling his ripeord himself if
he wants to: but it does it for him
if he is in trouble.

The box, made by the Irving
Chute Company, contains a sensi-
tive barometric bellows which
measures air pressure. It is about
the size of a packet of 20 cigar-

e present a flier has had ettes

and weighs 1%
Air Force ground crews are fitting}
it to their squadron aircraft and
equipment themselves,

It is made in three versions, The
first automatically releases the
airman from the safety harness
which connects him to his ejector
seat. The second automatically
opens his parachute; and the third
is designed for crews using an
ordinary static seat which remains
in the aircraft.

The device has been live-tested
in a number of high altitude jumps
in Britain and Australia. In one
of these tests, the parachutist was
falling at 125 miles-an-hour at the
fastest point of his fall. It has
also been tried out thousands of
times on the ground—in pressure
eabins at an equivalent atmos-
pheric altitude of 50,000 feet and
at temperatures down to minus
50 degrees C.

Technically, the box is a baro-
metric bellows, connected to a
time-delay, which prevents tha
operation of the firing mechanism
above the pre-determined altitude
to which it is set. Below that alti-
tude, the pressure on the bellows
releases a compressed spring
which gives a sixty pound pull on
the ripeord.

MAIL NOTICE

Mails for St, Lucia, St, John, N.B.,
Montreal by the M.V. Can, Cruiser will

Ibs. Royal



|
|
|

be closed at the General Post Office as
under:
Farce! Mail and Registered Mail at |

9 a.m., Mail at 10

the 26th

Ordinary
May 1952

a.m. on |



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I of it and destroy the germ—then ask for Famel Syrup.
Why? Because Famel Syrup does so much more than
ordinary cough mixtures. It contains soluble lactocreosote
which is carried by the bloodstream to the throat and lungs
and breathing passages, where it destroys the germs which

Once the germs are destroyed then it’s goodbye to the cough
Meanwhile, the soothing balsams in Famel Syrup
are easing the irritated membranes and the tonic minerals
are keeping up your strength and powers of resistance
Famel Syrup is a recognised medical product used for coughs,
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FAMEL SYRUP

Obtatnable in two sizer—fram ali chemists oF stores

Trade enquiries to :-—
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|

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ROAD TO THE MOON



NO MATCH FOR THEM

Washington: Just when every- Rome: A _ football match be-
one. thought that Crosby, Hope tween Fatties and Skinnies took
and Lamour must surely be run- place at Savigliano, near Turin,
ming out of places they take the All the fatties weighed more |
road to, they announce the title than 15 st. each while the skin-|
af their next “Road to the nies weighed under 7 st, each. }
Moon”; a mad scientist gets them But the skinnies j

out-manoeuvred |

there by mistake. the fatties and 1

won




tl

i
i

\

———
——
ee
——=—==





"

a

’

ro PLEASE NOTE

WIN $40.00

Here is a simple Cross Word puzzle which can help you to
win $40.00 for only one shilling. At the same time you will
be doing your bit to help send Barbados’ sole Olympic hope to
Helsinki next July. Enter now and try your skill.
RULES
1. The first correct solution opened by the Editor will win
the prize.
2. In the event of there being no correct solution the one
containing the least errors which is opened first by the
Editor will win the prize.

66—Meager.
HORIZONTAL caper aor.
1 Pastors 1 at peoples had dwelt in Ar

prior to the land being given

5—Lucky number, to the children of Lot?

10—Whoe was ejected from the

temple in Jerusalem? 73M ician's aiid

face ard,

Glock veil. tee roads
leave. T1—Curved molding.
ear, j

6—Divisions of time. VERTICAL





piece, 1—Jewish month.
Printer’s measure. uote.
In what sea were Pharaoh's ymbol for tantalum.
} chariots and host drowned’ 4—Cunning.
5—Flies aloft,
tter vetch. 6—Wanders from truth.
ry, as wine. 7—Duct.
'—Caressive touch. 8—Street railway (abbr.)
tory birds. 9—A border city in the land of
> «cludes. Judah
to the side. 10—Snoop. é
tric wheel-part. 11—At what place were Joshua's
‘orays. . men defeated? ”
ibway. 12—Inner lining of the iris.

t t was slain b 13—Penitential season.
mare r 19—-Lampreys.
1—Exclamation. 2i—Card game.

-Insect. 24~—Mistrust.
43--Eternity. 26—Descendants of shern.
#4--Golf mound. 21—Greek letter.

a pee Bimaminighind, 29—Tiny

20—Split pulse.
g f, ces. 31—College cheer.
ipped.
60—What are believers warned

£2—Begin.
23—Of the moon.
pot to lie against?
2—-Goddess of dawn.





34—Satisfied.
36—Who is the reputed autho: of



3. Entranee fee of one shilling (1/-) must be enclosed with

8

51
53
55

56

57-

58
60
62

BUILD —




{The Complete
VITAMIN and MINERAL FOOD SUPPLEMENT
Pleasant tasting — Economical,

Available at all leading Drug Stores























CLOSING DATE

each solution along with name and address on the coupon
printed below.

Any entry which is not accompanied by the entrance fee
will be immediately destroyed,
All entrants for this competition agree to abide by the
decision of the Editor of the Barbados Advocate.
The competition will be closed on Friday, 30th May, at
4 p.m,
All envelopes must be clearly marked CROSS WORD
PUZZLE COMPETITION and addressed to the Editor, the
Barbados Advocate, 34 Broad Street.
The name of the winner will be published in the Sunday
Advocate of June 1.
Shoshonean Indian. 63—-Knob.
—Observed, 65—In addition
Spirit of the air 66—-Transgression
-Asparagus, 67—How many mites did oor
To what were the breast widow throw into tl a
plates of the locusts com sury?
pared? 10—Which of Judah’s so: vas
ahisinor, slain by the Lord?
—Climax. 72—Mother.
—Serf, 14-—Symbol for silver.






° the Psalms? 4
a4 37— Dubious.
Equipment. 29—Tibetan gazelle.
--Fr 40—Bronze money. ‘ . 4
Worthless bit. 43—Who owned the field in which err ht
-measure. Abraham was buried’ ;
— y horns has ths K
oe ge peee! CE Lae Lt
@—Proposed international lan- 47—Pig-pen. A
48—Torrid. 3-3
49—Ocean
NS i cp Ae sale di sia CENTRE ae ees v.08 6% Severe miveicun enécater pA in ch ved ackeRsabieokb RNa Rimae Smee Ne Tee ‘is )}

ENTIRE

| o5— Black bird.
| | PROCEEDS



TO FARN UM

vocate Stationery” or Advertising Office





SSS











~~ ———

MY recent report of tihe isola-
tion



PAGE TWO
+ Nght y
C C:

oa afternoon Mrs. R N
rurner, wife of the Colonial
Secretary li open the Girls’
Industrial Union Annual Fete at
Queen’s Park at 3 o'clock. The
Police Band under Captain C. E.
Raison will be in attendance and
the Mobile Cinema will show films
the Queen's House Theatre up-

stairs at 6.45 o'clock, There will be
the usual attractions highlighted
by the Fancy Dress Parade at 4.15
o'clock, wo prizes will be given
to adults for the first two lucky
numbers
For One Week
AYING a business visit to the
island is Mr. A. Bento, pro-

prietor of Harpers Ltd., Druggists
of Antigua. He arrived on Thurs-
day night by B.W.LA, for one
week and is staying at the Hotel
Royal.

U.K. Visitors Leave

oe to England earlier
in the week by the S.S. De

Grasse were Mr. P. C. Faunthorpe
and Miss Mary Cutler who were
holidaying in Barbados as guests
at the Windsor Hotel.

Mr. Faunthorpe was here for
three weeks, while Miss Cutler
spent a fortnight.

Spent Two Weeks

R. ENRIQUE LUNA DIAZ of

Barinas, Venezuela, returns
home today by B.W.LA., after
spending two weeks’ holiday as a
guest at the Hotel Royal. Before
coming here he was in Trinidad

On Honeymoon
R. AND MRS. MICHAEL
WILLIAMS of Trinidad, who
were married there recently are

i Ee in Barbados spending their honey-
where he remained for one week. j,00n, They arrived here during

His wife who had travelled out to , 5 a

Port-of-Spain with him, returned Garnet a Be tet nin

to Venezuela while he came over ~ “Wichael is a son of Mr. Williams

here, of the Louis J. Williams Market-
Mr. Diaz is Warehouse Manager ing Company.

of Socony Vacuum Oil Company Leaving Today

in Venezuela, FTER ii th ks’

spending three weeks

Canadian Holidaying Here holiday staying at the Hotel

ISS BEVERLEY BANDRICK Royal, Mr, and Mrs. E, E, Ehren-

of Montreal, Canada, arrived Teich will be returning to Trinidad

here on Thursday by T.C.A. from this evening by B.W.LA. They

Trinidad for a week’s holiday and Will be accompanied by their little
4s staying at the Hotel Royal. daughter Catherine, — ;

Miss Bandrick who is a member _ Mr. Ehrenreich is Plantation

of the Office Staff of Standard Manager of the U.S, Naval Station

Brands Ine., will stop at Bermuda /” Trinidad. He said that they

before returning to Montreal, @ll had a lovely holiday and re~
Since leaving Canada, she has &tetted having to leave so soon

visited Curacao and Venezuela Visited ‘‘Advocate”’

Paid Sk rt Visit IX young guides from St. Mar-

b ve garet’s Girls’ School accom-
EAVING for Trinidad on panied by Miss Payne and Misa
‘ Thursday where they will

Mayers troon leaders, visited the
spend a few days before returning “Advocate” yesterday afternoon.
home, were Mr, and Mrs. Carlos They were shown around the
Russian of Caracas, Venezuela, various de partments by Mr

‘who were here for a short holiday Michael Hope of the Job Printery.

staying at the Hotel Royal. The youngsters showed great in-
Mr. Russian is employed with terest in the many things around
the Government in Venezuela. them.







dt
.

MR. AND MRS. CYRIL GILL

Quiet Wedding

HHURSDAY morning was the

scene of a quiet but pretty
wedding at the James Street
Methodist Church when Rev.
Frank Lawrence solemnised the
marriage between Miss Pauline
Inniss, daughter of Mr. E. D.
“Cossie” Inniss of “Neta-ville’”’,
Upper Collymore Rock, and Mr.
Cyril Gill, son of the late Thaddeus
Gill and Mrs. Gill of “Haldon
Court,” Prospect, St. James.

The bride who was given in
marriage by her father looked
charming in an Elizabethan lace
bodice with a nylon skirt. Her
head-dress was a petal juliet cap
studded with pearls. Her finger-
tip veil was kept in place by two
white roses. Her bouquet was
Queen Anne’s lace, anthurium
lilies and pink radiants

The bridesmaids were the
Misses Joyce Ramdin and Peggy
Inniss, sister of the bride. They
looked charming in silk anglaise
and nylon and they carried posies
of pink radiants matching forget-
me-nots, blue violets and Queen
Anne’s lace.

The reception was held at the
bride’s father’s home and the
honeymoon is being spent at
Powell Spring Hotel, Bathsheba.



Silver Threads Among

Today there are three types of gain high lights to her hair —
Srey-haired women —. the elderly bronze, amber and titian. Though
type whose hair is grey through when she does start to grey, col
the Passage of years, the younger our rinses will make her hair
woman with prematurely grey look much prettier,
‘hair, and the woman who chooses Silver hair, whether it be
te have her hair tinted grey to be natural or adopted must have the
in high fashion, Maybe it is be- right make-up to complement it
cause so many young women have The younger woman with pre-
become prematurely grey forgimaturely grey hair, must take
fome reason or other during andgcare that she selects make-up
since the war, and the result be-"which does not contain much
ing so completely charming that blue, such as deep fuchsia or deep
a new fashion has been born. red, She should choose, instead,
_ This silvery blonde shade is one vlear reds, pinks, coral and rose
that is certain to appeal to the reds, Orange tones on cheeks
tionde who bewails the darken- and lips add drabness and sallow-
ing of her hair, yet hates the mess to the nonotone colour of
brassy shades of gold so often grey.
produced by bleaching. There is
also the advantage of being able
to make these new shades merely ,
transient. They can be changed The older grey-haired woman
with each shampooing, It saves Should not go in for make-up
all that bother of bleaching and ‘fashions”, Her cosmetics should

Blend With Skin

dyeing. You CAN give your hair be in shades which approximate
: colour rinse at home, to Nature’s own and applied with
I always think it wise to have % delicate hand. Naturally she

the first rinse by your own hair- Wnts to keep her skin looking as
dresser, sught and fair as possible. Foun-
dation and powder should be only
light enough to tone or ‘warm’
up the skin colour if the skin

Colour rinses are only tints, 1eeds brightening up. Otherwise,
and though light hair takes them a colour should be selected that
admirably, the brunette can onlybiends harmoniously with the

.

Use Colour Rinse



The Gold

natural skin tone. Light shades
of rouge are too bright and too
obvious on older faces. The med-
ium clear red shades are close to
blood tones and give the most
netural appearance. Lipstick, har-
inonising with the rouge should be
in the clear red tones too.

Soft But Clear

In youth every feature is nat-
urally well defined. To retain
that youthful appearance, then,
the brows should suggest a soft,
but clearly defined gentle arching
brow. The mouth should be
shaped with a brush or the lip-
stick itself but blotted to a muted
tone,

Blend over the cheek rouge
with a powdered puff, and when
powdering the face, if there are
any wrinkles, spread these apart
with the fingers of one hand, and
pat powder into them with the
puff. After this, brush all excess
powder away with a complexion
brush,

If you want to be extra sophis-
ucated, and decide to adopt one
o1 the new silver shades of hair
tint, you must be doubly careful
about your make-up. Blue rinsed
hair looks best with a pink and
white complexion.



BY THE

HE men who ransack the torts half filled with morcose, :
wine-dark seas for. whales Dranestone insulator encased in
to replenish our grotesque lard- hemp, and two brushwood thongs
ers are killing the beasts by elec- with reversible tarbols, The sage
trocution. lit a magnetic candle, touched
And the learned chemists whe the fulcrum, and there was a
tell us what we are eating say soft explosion. When asked for
that this method of killing whales an explanation, the Doctor said,
makes their flesh more tender and “That was the bamp. It is now
also lowers the price. isolated.” There were no com-
But if a dish of whale becomes ments,
the fashion the price will go up,
not down, Chefs have only to
announce that th® Timbale de
Baleine is cooked ini red wine and
served with Sauce Mirobolante was not interested.” That is
for this dainty to supersede tin- a good example of the meohani-
ned Rhodesian turkey at banquets. cal repetition of certain words
By that time the ‘quacks, the for which there is a craze at the
Marchands d@’Orvieta®, the push moment. “Alibi” is used as though

In passing
' IS usual alibi was that he

ers of Perltmpinpin,. will have jt meant an “excuse.” The lovely
discovered forty kinds of benefi- word “glamour” has been utterly
cent chemicals in whale-snout debased and rolled in the mud,
pie. and critics are beginning to ap-
> ° ly the idiotic word “escapism”
Strabismus demonstrates i any book, play, or film hich
is not a putrescent heap of lust,

murder, and obscenity. The com-

of the bamp_ by Dr. bination of this crize with the
Strabismus (Whom God Preserve) dialect of the Jargoneers Brigade
of Utrecht was received§ by sci- of the Civil Service ough’ ‘o end
entists with pained incredulity. by producing a wonderful kind of
Yesterday the sage was at home English.
to a deputation at Wagefing Par-
va. He showed them what look-
ed like a copper fuleruan, a jar
of frozen wool, a twisted coil of
steam-heated rhubarb, ‘three re-

Look out for the ‘guide’

IVE-SHILLING day ait SnaMfe-
ham Place was somewhat





AY eeeee 8y BEACHCOMBER

marred last Saturday by an ec-

centric guide who charged an
extra half-crown to show the
spot on which the fourth Earl

kicked Cromwell on the shin; an
extra shilling for a peep at the
Scoffing Stone in the minstrels’
gallery; and an extra three shil-

lings ‘to let le sit in the chair
of Matilda of Flanders. “None of
this is in the printed booklet,”

objected a sightseer. “Tt will all
be in the next edition,” replied
the guide, with that confident leer
which belongs only to Captain
Foulenough, At the end of the
day the takings had vanished—
as also the guide.

Precautionary nose-pulling

‘HE woman who “pulled a
man’s nose in public” should
have said that she was testing his
bona fides, Bogus foreign aristo-
crats in, liners nearly always have
false nd’es, to give them a Haps-
burg touch, and the wise young
lady is she who, the moment the
Prince begins to talk about his
schloss near Vienna, tweaks the
Hapsburg facade, to make sure,
She will lose a few hours of
pleasant flirtation, but will keep
her self-respect. It is what the
Germans call profit and schloss



LADIES’ “EVER-REST” SHOES

@ WITH BUILT IN ARCH SUPPORTS

BA IN

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NEW LINE MEN’S SHOES — SUEDES AND LEATHERS $8.33 TO $13.60

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DIAL 4606



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

.
On Business

4. tative of the Central Agency
Liriited, was a passenger by |
B.\/.LA. on Monday for Antigua. |

By MAX TRELL
Mr. King is on a business visit to|



ag . oe ,WHEN Knarf and Hanid, the

> os St. Ritts on beuale Shadows, were sure that Mr. Punch
oe ; was fast asleep, they gathered |

BUTTERFLIES | everyone else around them and then

Hanid said: “Tomorrow is his birth-
Fel Aviv: Israel coastal roads day.”

are covered with a fine blanket |

y-
“Oh!” exclaimed everyone —
of ‘snow-flakes’, They are dying

white butterflies which have ap-~ Bear who asked: “Whose birth-

peared in phenomenal num day?”

this year. .| “Mr. Puneh’s,” answered Knarf.
EXHIBIT A “Oh!” said Teddy, which is what

Nicosia: A hen, produced if | he should have said in the first

court here as Exhibit A in a theft | place.
case, laid an egg on the judge’s | “I think,” said General Tin the
desk during the proceedings. Dis- tin soldier, “that we should give





turbed by the hen’s cackling in | Mr. Puneh a beautiful present.”

the court, the judge ordered its | “That’s what I think, too,” said

removal, | Gloria, the doll with the golden
* e a a

Listening Hours ta, » beavtitat “pair of, slippers,

SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1962 and 6 ben a eee

4007.15 pom .. 19 76M 25 5M Beautiful

“4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. he o beautiful pipes,” added

Daily Service, Vin p tas Bnpire Day. Teddy. “Then he can smoke one

A ee a Ae de LO

Seuttish Magazine, 6 15 p.m. Prankie | No one paid any attention to this.

Howerd Goes East, 6.45 p.m. Sports
Round-up and Programme Parade, 7,00

Hanid said: “What Mr. Punch
likes best of all isn’t gloves, or a

Soe iene en ee ee hat, or slippers or a pipe, Besides,
7.15—10.00 pim 25. 59M. a1 .oama he’s got all of those things. What

7.145 p.m. Behind the News, 7.45 p.m, he likes best of all for a birthday

Sports Review, 8.15 p.m, Radio New! me is something that you can’t
0 pm. King George vt, 9-3 pg | buy—something that you can =
C. Scottish Orchestra Pp. somethin,
. ways keep—and ge th
es oa enaeiet no one else in the world can give
}

him but us.”

The News, 10.10 p.m

p.m. Music Magazine, 10.30 p.m. Variety
Fantare.

she

guess,
The Garden—St. James Mr. Punch’s

To-day 4.40 & 8.30 p m.
. “PASS TO ROMANCE”
Martha O'DRISCOLL &
“MAN-EATER of KUMAON”
SABU Wendell COREY

° MIDNITE TONITE
“COWBOY CAVALIER”
Jimmy WAKELY &
SILVER RAIDERS" Whip WELSON
“SCN. & MON. #30 pm write a birthday poem.”
J a m “ » Z
‘Ghana x tke wenemx’ That’s what makes it such a
Dana ANDREWS & | good present,” said Knarf.
‘GAL WHO TOOK THE WEST” Color % So they all thought and thought,
Yvonne DeCARLO Seott BRADY S| and scribbled and scribbled, and
LA FRVPSSS * | changed and changed, and crossed
out and erased and wrote in new
words until at last the poem was
| finished. This is it:

finally said:
give him a poem.”

Tin; “very good indeed. But not an
easy present to give.”

and those other things,” said Gloria,
| shaking her curls.

OOS

4















To-night

TO-DAY — 445 & 8.30
and Continuing Daily
WFORD



“BORN YESTERDAY”
EXTRA

VEHAIKOVSKY'S

NUTCRACKER SUITE
—————_—$ TTT
‘To-day 1.30 To-nite Mid-nite




William Boyd in John wage
Ys HOPPY'S “ *”
and MYSTERIOUS
RY & GET ME DESPERADO
Action Double Tim Holt
OLYMPIC
TO-DAY — 4.45 & 8.15—ist Inst,
Sun. & Mon. 4.45 & 8,15—Final Inst.



“DON DARE DEVIL RIDES AGAIN”
with Roy BANCROFT—Ken CURTIS
(a

‘To-day — 1.90
IN)



Mid-nite; Tonite

KING OF
JUNGLE LAND








Oe
o's
«4? we
wt

TOMORROW 5% & 8.30 p.m.

ts, *d* °
Nh

SCREEN PLAY BY STORY BY musie BY’ Lynics BY
DOROTHY KINGSLEY * Sonotiy niNestey “HARRY WARREN « DOROTHY FIELDS + CH







ay

Always keep Limacol Toilet Lotion
in your home

°

Always keep lLimacol Toilet Lotion
at your office

THEN YOU'LL ALWAYS BE COOL
BECAUSE

LIMACOL

TOILET LOTION
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“The freshness of a breeze in a bottle”



Le SOC Stokes & Bynoe Ltd. —

Mm susie nine, nepresee-| Mr. Punch’s Birthday Poem

—It Was a Gift From All the Toys—

everyone except Teddy the Stuffed |

“« dog body can
Very good idea,” said General ine kissed.






Whole Serial

FOR NEVER A DULL MOVIE

TODAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.
MONDAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.

SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1952
AD



x

i



T ted Mr. Punch ht
ody. one ea mig

r. Punch we love you dearly
ly, weekly, monthly, yearly,

We always know it very clearly

Mr. Punch we love you dearly.

Mr. Punch we wish you fan days

Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays,
Sundays,

Thursdays, Wednesdays, Tues-
days, Mondays,

Mr. ch we wish you fun days.

Then, when it was all dqne, Han-

+ |i wrote the poem out on a fresh

ed it under

jiece of and
ths di t he would

ir. Punch’s door so

it the first thing in
Everyone wanted to know what | be sure to see
this thing could be. When Hanid | the morning.

Birthday Kiss

birthday present I think we should | ,, “And of course,” said Gloria,

we'll all give him a kiss, too. No-
ve a birthday without
n”

“Tt’s a wonderful poem and I’m

“It’s much easier to get gloves | Sure Mr. Punch will like it,” Teddy

the Stuffed Bear said after the lights

“It’s hard to| Were out and everyone was about

to go to sleep. “But I think he would
like two pipes, too. Next year I’m
| going to give him two pipes for his
birthday, maybe three of them.”

“Three of them, Teddy! What
can he do with three pipes ?” Knarf
demanded.

“One to smoke, and one to hold
said Teddy.

‘in each hand,”





Universal Double - - -
Yvonne DeCARLO in

HOTEL SAHARA &
SARABAND with Stewart GRANGE!
in Technicolor

MIDNITE TONITE
Whole Serial - - -
“SUPERMAN”

ROYAL

To-day & Tomorrow 4.30 & 8.15

Universal Double

Brian Donlevy — Howard Duff
in







SHAKE DOWN &
AIR CADET

Starring
Stephen McNALLY — Gail RUSSELL;
———

Mon, & Tues. 4.30 & 8.15
John WAYNE — Laraine DAY/
in

“TYCOON”

and
“HE MYSTERIOUS DESPER.






DIRECTED BY

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ARLES WALTERS - JACK CUMMINGS



po” }

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“PAINTING the CLOUDS
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(Technicolor) DEEP SOUTH
\ nee wee cz (Super Cinegplor) (Technicolar)
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Dana ANDREWS &

——=——$—————
| MIDNITE TO-NITE
"Al. WHO TOOK

} Dena An in the DESERT"





EMPIRE THEATRE

TO-DAY 445 & 830
d Continuing Daily 445 & 830
ARIE 6 6) 5! 6 le! eo! 6 oFere

rs

+f



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Sa
cd
J
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my!
ok
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% Hire a
ba exe , a
. : Rak 7 v a3
ba ‘Semeen Play by Abort Mancheimer = Produced by 5. SYLVAN SIMON bite] *
Directed ty GEORGE CUKOR + Based oo the Stags Play by GARSON KANIN ay ae

eer

SPECIAL SHOWS TO-DAY
1.30 P.M.—BY TEENAGERS’ REQUEST

eTHE STRIP”

(Mickey ROONEY — Louis ARMSTRONG)
MIDNITE — TO-NITE = MIDNITE

LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE

AND

“NANCY GOES TO RIO”

(Jane POWELL — Carmen MIRANDA)

AND

“DEVIL'S DOORWAY”

(Robert TAYLOR —- Paula RAYMOND)

CONTESTANTS TO-NITE

LUCILLE CRAIG .
GLORIA BENTHAM
EDDIE HALL .....
CHESTON HOLDER . nin bh
FRANK CORBIN . “I only have eyes for you”
CARL BEST oe ot, A ois “Prisoner of Love”
ORVIL GRANDERSON . ; down . “Roses”
— EEE ae
A GRAND SHOW IN ANY COUNTRY

“I only have eyes for you”
......s... “Sentimental Me”
“The loveliest nite of the year”
j . “Because of You”

Pit: 18c. House: 36c. Bal. 48e. Box: 60c.





=





SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1952



SUGAR NEWS:

Imperial Preference On
Commonwealth Sugar

LONDON.

THE IMPERIAL PREFERENCE on Empire sugar,

which was given a life of

four years under the Finance

Act of 1948, has become permanent as a result of a clause
passed by the House of Commons in this year’s Finance

Bill.

The difference is that under earlier arrangements, Pre-
ference was put into operation for a limited period. Now

the Preferences stand until

Parliament revokes or changes

them. Sir Arthur Salter, speaking for the Government,
pointed out that Parliament could change them whenever
it desired, but he said it was essential that they should
continue throughout the life of the Commonwealth Sugar

Agreement.
oe Opposition spokesmen

ment and because they
part of the Agreement.
But Mr. Arthur Bottomley, a
Socialist ang former Secretary
for Overseas Trade, suggested
that it would have ‘been better
to have consulted Commonwealth
producers first.

“If we are to build up these
preferences, whether it be in
Sugar or anything else, the best
way to do it is by long-term
agreement and bulk buying,”
he declared. “The West Indies, I
know from experience, would far
rather have a guaranteed market
for sugar for a long time to come,
and we for some years have been
trying to buy our sugar at lower
prices than the real price.” r



BRITISH SUGAR AID FOR
AUSTRALIA

BRISBANE.

Britain‘ has granted £561,000
to the Australian sugar industry.
It is the Australian sugar indus-
try’s share of a surplus accu-
n.ulated by the Ministry of Food
from transactions in sugar over a
period of years within the Brit-
ish Commonwealth,

Mr, H. Collins, Queensland
Minister for Agriculture, an-
mounced the grant in Brisbane
and said that most of the sum
would go to Queensland, whose
Sugar crop last year was worth
about £22,000,000. The British
Government, he said, had ex-
pressed the hope that the money
would be used to improve the
sugar industry. A special pay-
ment of 15s. ld. a ton will
be paid to producers on raw
sugar of a requisite standard
produced in the 1951 season, he
said.

“The Queensland Government
warmly appreciates this action
by thé United Kingdom,” added
Mr, Collins, “and regards it as
an excellent example of the good
will existing between the United
Kingdom and the British Com-
monwealth sugar exporters.”

—B.U.P.



BLACK MARKET IN
SUGAR

DURBAN.
The South African Government
has appealed to members of the
public to give information of any
deals in black market sugar.
There is qa serious shortage of
sugar in South Africa, although
the position should ease soon

when the new cane crop is cut,
“When the sugar shortage de-
veloped towards the end of last
year,” said Mr. Eric Louw, Min-
ister of Economic Affairs, “I
gave the order that price in-
spectors should pay special at-
tention to sugar and a number of
them were sent to Natal. They
did not have much success be-

supported the clause because

ey_were in favour of the Commonwealth Sugar Agree-
regarded Preferences as an integral

cause black marketeers are too
wary to be caught by trapping.
—B.U.P.

SUGAR EXPERTS FOR
EL SALVADOR

El Salvador is to receive the
services of two sugar experts
under an agreement approved by
its Foreign Minister with the
United Nations Food anq@ Agri-
culture Organisation,

Under the agreement, the U.N.
agency is to send El Salvador one
sugar manufacturing technologist
to conduct a complete survey,
and one economist to analyse the
economic structure of its sugar
industry.

The existing sugar processing
plants in the country, methods oi
processing and equipment will be
examined by the technologist. He
will recommend any desirable
changes with a view to the ex-
pansion of local sugar cane pro-
duction,

Two fellowships for people
nominated by the El Salvador
Government will also be estab-
lished by the U.K, Food and Agri-
culture Organisation.



—B.U.P.

NEW CUBAN SUGAR
AGENCY TO SELL
1952 SUGAR
HAVANA, Cuba.
The Cuban Government has set
ap a single selling agency to sell
the special quota of the 1952
Sugar crop on the World market.
The new agency is a committee
made up of members of the
Cuban National Sugar Institute,
representing mil] owners and
planters. A Government delegate
appointed by the President will
be its chairman.
The Cabinet alse set up a
Commission to recommend meas-
ures to regulate the supply of



‘sugar for world markets this
year and next. It will seek to
press for q new word sugar

agreement to replace the London
pact of 1937.—B.U.P.

RATES OF EXCHANGE



MAY 23, 1952
NEW YORK
Selling Buying
72.6% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 70.9% pr
Sight or demand
Drafts 10.7% pr
72.6% pr. Cable ‘ .
71.1% pr. Currency 69.4% pr
Was ss Coupons 68.7% pr.
CANADA
(including Newfoundland)
75.3% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 73.6% pr
Demand Drafts 73.45% pr
Dakss Sight Drafts 73.3% pr
75.3% pr. Cable wdheesss
13.8% pr. Currency 72.1% pr.
err eee Coupons 71.4% pr

The above Rates are subject to change
without notice.

Bub

BOXED BRAIN OPENS.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





“Awd there, Virginia, is the Coronation Stone of Britain with a
mystic mscriftion—er—MADE IN JAPAN...”



New Digest Of

Colonial Statisties

Digest shows tables of the prim-





ary products from the Colonies,

and it is interesting to note fh

Table 19 the steady increase in

Trinidad's production of crude
petroleum which has risen from |

of 148,000 tons in 19386 to 241,000
“- tons in 1951 |
an

a Figures of industrial produetion

° De in Section VI aiso show an in

ee crease in West Indies’ products

4 \ i such as soap, margarine, manu-

Bk facturadd tobacco, cigarettes and

? matches

. An appendix at the end of the

' Digest gives the areas and popu.

lation of each Colony with a!

table at the end showing their

London Express Service ae by races at the last

i 2 —B.ULP.

FLIERS’ PARACHUTES

ROAD TO THE MOON



NO MATCH FOR THEM

Washington: Just when every- Rome; A _ football match be-

one. thought that Crosby, Hope tween Fatties and Skinnies took

THE ROYAL AIR FORCE is giving its aircrews a small and Lamour must surely be run- place at Savigliano, near Turin,
barometric box which will automatically open their para- Ding out of places they take the All = fatties Songion more!
chutes for them and release them from their ejector seats eee to yor ee ane he we Bick cai i e-ghe cakaa |
if they have to abandon their aircraft miles above the earth. Yoon". . tne scientist gets them But the skinnies out-manoeuvred
Up to the present a flier has had ettes, and weighs 1% Ibs. Royal there by mistake the fatties and won 2—1
to do this for himself and at a Air Force ground crews are fitting} Ta eat :

time when he is being blown clear
of an aircraft travelling at perhaps
600 miles an hour. As he fall:
away from the aircraft in his ejec-
tor seat, a small drogue is re-
leased from the seat to slow it
down, otherwise neither pilot nor
parachute could stand the strain
when the chute suddenly opened.
The airman then has to free him-
self from the seat and fall for a
short time before it is safe for him
to open his parachute. To do this
he must have his wits about him
all the time. At great heights
there is not enough oxygen in the
air to keep a man conscious for
more than a few seconds, and in
his hurry to leave his aircraft, he
may not have time to switch or
his emergency oxygen supply.

The new barometric box will do
the flier’s thinking for him. If he
bales out high up, the box takes
over, releases him from his seat
and —— his parachute for him
when he reaches 13,000 feet. If he
is ejected below 13,000 feet, the
box automatically delays the
opening for a few seconds so that
he gets clear of the aircraft and
slows down,

The box does not stop the air-
man pulling his ripcord himself if
he wants to: but it does it for him
if he is in trouble.

The box, made by the Irving
Chute Company, contains a sensi-
tive barometric bellows which
measures air pressure. It is about
the size of a packet of 20 cigar-

it to their squadron aircraft
equipment themselves,

It is made in three versions, The
first automatically releases the
airman from the safety harness
which connects him to his ejector
seat. The second automatically
opens his parachute; and the third
is designed for crews using an
ordinary static seat which remains
in the aircraft.

The device has been live-tested |
in 4a number of high altitude jumps
in Britain and Australia. In one
of these tests, the parachutist was
falling at 125 miles-an-hour at the
fastest point of his fall. It has
also been tried out thousands of
times on the ground—in pressure
cabins at an equivalent atmos-
pheric altitude of 50,000 feet and);
at temperatures down to minus
50 degrees C,

Technically, the box is a baro-
metric bellows, connected to a
time-delay, which prevents tha
operation of the firing mechanism
above the pre-determined altitude
to which it is set. Below that alti-
tude, the pressure on the bellows
releases a compressed spring
which gives a sixty pound pull on

|

and

the ripeord.

MAIL NOTICE

Mails for St. Lucia, St. John, N.B.,
Montreal by the M.V. Can, Cruiser will
be closed at the General Post Office as
under: |

Parcel Mail and Registered Mail at
9 a.m., Ordinary Mail at 10 a.m. on|
the 26th May 1952







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of it and destroy the germ—then ask for Famel Syrup.
Why? Because Famel Syrup does so much more than
ordinary cough mixtures. It contains soluble lactocreosote
which is carried by the bloodstream to the throat and lungs |
and breathing passages, where it destroys the germs which

Once the germs ate destroyed then it’s goodbye to the cough
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Famel Syrup is a recognised medical product used for coughs,
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} NOTE

WIN $40.00

Here is a simple Cross Word puzzle which can help you to
win $40.00 for only one shilling. At the same time you will
be doing your bit to help send Barbados’ sole Olympic hope to
Helsinki next July. Enter now and try your skill.

RULES
1. The first correct solution opened by the Editor will win
the prize.
2. In the event of there being no correct solution the one

containing the least errors which is opened first by the
Editor will win the prize.

aa

68—Therefore.

HORIZONTAL 69—Sign.

1—Performs. 71—What peoples had dwelt in Ar

prior to the land being given

S—Lucky number. to the children of Lot?

10—Whe was ejected from the

temple in Jerusalem? 7e—M clan's hentia.
: ard.
sank sags 7 oun) roads.
leave : 71—Curved molding.
ear. y
visions of time. _ VERTICAL
piece, 1—Jewish month.
Printer’s measure. uote.
n what sea were Pharaoh's ymbol for tantalum.
and host drowned? 4—Cunning.
5—Flies aloft.
Wanders from truth.
Duct.
8—Street railway (abbr.)
ay pester city in the land of
u
, 10—Snoop. ,
~part. 11—At what place were Joshua's

men defeated?
12—Inner lining of the iris.
13—Penitential season.



19-—-Lampreys.
- Bi-C ate game.
| <4+---Mistrust.
Hleraity. 26—-Descendants of sher.
“ if mound. sy area letter.
umm ird. 29-—Tiny.
per ing 20—-S iit pulse.
ices. 31—College cheer.

82—Begin.

23—Of the moon.

34—Satisfied.

26—Who is the reputed authe
the Psalms?

37—Dubious.

39—Tibetan gazelle.

40—Bronze eoey: ;

43—Who owned the field in which

ipped.
50 What “are believers warned
ot to lie against?

‘ oddess of down.
i iecee .
—_

ot

rthless bit.
t etanibures Abraham was buried
i—How many horns has the a
dragon? uw. 45—Watchful.
@4—Proposed international lan- 47—Pig-pen.
age. 48—Torrid.
66-~Blackbird. 49—Ocean





Stage Career For

a before taking up her train- Cola on
|
\

NEW



PAGE THREE

SEA AND AIR





Cherry Huggins













Issued Nae
Miss Cher Huggins, daughter \
LONDON « Sir Jobn Hu gins form ar TRAFFIC |
‘ The first issue of a new Colo. Governor of Jamalpa, eee ee
al Office publication which sets P®T™S for a stage career _
eut in a compact. and easy-to- '* now 18 and completing _ ¥ omnes
read form the trade and life of oe ee ne C1 ———— — — —_-—
the Colonial territories for quick *’ ,~?3™™ a? rm ae i
he’ Colonial "territories. an or duly, oe will be ‘looking for in Carlisle any
officiat enuineet on ge job. 5.8. Rogenes, M.V ;
Hclat appeared on May 14. Training itself is a full-time ; Anita Bo port se Franklyn
It is the “Digest of Colonial job, which leaves her no time for ©. %.. Seh. Philip Davidson, Sc Flor
Statistics,” planneq as a com- the parties she loves Although St . gee nhs Whitake, M1 oumnans
panion volume to the “Monthly she a debutante this season, Sch. Lacil ith, ScF Brterprise
Digest of Statistics’ published by she will not join other debutantes %. Seh. Marion Belle Wolf
Hi.M. Stationery Office for the the round of almost nightly DEPARTURE
Central Statistical Office, and it curties. Instead, she will ration Motor Vewel Caribbee.
will be published every other herself to one party a week while
month, she finishes her arduous training itedi ain tie De i
Among the 50 tables and jor the stage. St. ase ia an ss go ve} ‘nn
appendices the first issue contains Miss’ Huggins, gay and viva- n St. Laiciag
are details of the value of total cious, wants fo act in light comedy.
imports and exports of Colonial Already she is a globe-trotter,
territories from 1936 to 1951 and ys,» her father’s career has taken OLD-WORLD
yin Soe Sgures by months for jim to many parts ot the world
the years 1949 to 1951. : Born in Panang, she has lived in ATMOSPHERE
In Tables 3 to 14 these figures yrinidad, Washington and Jamaica
are broken down to show the She went to school at Roedean and Venice: Vene ! crats are
origin of imports and destination was at a finishing school in New seeking ban tr tle of Coca-
exports for the Colonies as’ a the Grand Canal Gon-
and others Of the larger Teme [in a an actress, ane
an, « arg - J . here
tories individually a —B.U.P. world atmasphers
The fourth section of the new

e




BUILD —

HEALTHY APPETITES
and STRONG BODIES

am





jThe Complete
VITAMIN and MINERAL FOOD SUPPLEMENT
Pleasant tasting ~ Economical,



Available at all leading Drug Stores



DATE
Entranee fee of one shilling (1/-) must be enclosed with

each solution along with name and address on the coupon
printed below.

~

3.

4. Any entry which is not accompanied by the entrance fee
will be immediately destroyed,

5. All entrants for this competition agree to abide by the
decision of the Editor of the Barbados Advocate.

6. The competition will be closed on Friday, 30th May, at
4 p.m.

7 All envelopes must be clearly marked CROSS WORD
PUZZLE COMPETITION and addressed to the Editor, the
Barbados Advocate, 34 Broad Street.

& The name of the winner will be published in the Sunday
Advocate of June 1.

51—Shoshonean Indian. 63—Knob.

65—In addition

66—Transgression

67—How many mites did t
widow throw into th
sury?

70—Which of Judah's so:
slain by the Lord?

72—Mother,.

14—Symbol for silver.

53—Observed.
55—Spirit of the
56— Asparagus.
57—To what were the breast
plates of the locusts com

ared?
88—Btupor p
60—Climax.
62—Serf.

air
oor












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Stationery” or Advertising Office

SS












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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS- ADVOCATE



ed ADVOCATE

Rice ee as es Pe

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown









1952

ee

POCKET THEATRE

THE legitimate theatre in Barbados
owes much to the British Council and tae
members of the Pocket Theatre for the
excellent performances of Pygmalion and
Twelfth Night.

Saturday, May 24,





The achievements of the Bridgetown
Players (now the Barbados Players) and
of the short lived Barbados .Dramatic
Club are not to be despised since their
productions provided Barbados with the-
atrical erftertainment, not otherwise ob-
tainable locally.

But the Pocket Theatre actors have so
far selected their plays from dramatists
whose works have obtained a secure place
in English Literature as works of art.

Even Shakespeare and the excellence of
Pygmalion is independent of Shaw’s repu-
tation as a dramatist of outstanding abil-
ity. The words ‘legitimate theatre’ which
are used in North America to describe
drama as distinct from other theatrical
performances aptly describe the work
which the Pocket Theatre Movement is
doing in Barbados.

The Pocket Theatre is a handmaid of the
arts and if the British Council only had
this achievement ‘to its credit it would
have justified those who first established a
headquarters here. The British Little
Theatre Movement for which the Pocket
Theatre may claim to be descended has
spread through many parts of the British
Empire and helps to keep alive an art in
which the British have produced so many
great names since William Shakespeare.

But the British Council have taken two
steps since Pygmalion which deserve
especial notice from the community. The
provision of a Pocket Theatre has been
followed with the provision for Twelfth
Night of Costumes suitable for Shakes-
pearean plays. If clothes make the man,
and Shakespearean clothes go far to make
the play, the generous gift of clothes alone
would have been notable; But the Pocket
Theatre and the Council have gone even
further. They have taken the Pocket The-
atre to the people. By going on tour in
St. Peter, St. John and St. Philip, they
have taken the little theatre movement to
the country.

Whether their intention was deliberate
or whether it was the unconscious gesture
of a team of public spirited individuals is
of no more than passing interest.

What is significant about this action is
the pioneering effort of interest of the
country dwellers in the theatre. If the
Pocket Theatre movement were to catch
on in the country, more than half of the
monotony and drabness which is respon-
sible for the drift from the villages to the
city would be banished forever.

So long as-_there chn be found individuals
as keen on the theatre movement as the
Risley Tuckers, Grossmiths, and Hewitt-
Myrings the Pocket Theatre will not die,
but will constantly impart new life into
that movement.



ROAD RULES

EVERY user of the road in Barbados is
supplied by the Commissioner of Police
with a booklet containing what are de-
scribed as Six Cardinal Rules for Safe
Driving.

The rules are; Always keep your eyes
open and your wits alert: Always drive as
you would wish others to drive: Always
keep yourself. and your vehicle in safe
driving order: Always anticipate danger:
Learn, give and obey the recognised traffic
signals: and obey the law in letter and
spirit. :

These Six Cardinal Rules are amplified
by a series of instructions which if faith-
fully observed by drivers of vehicles would
keep death off the roads of Barbados and
reduce accidents to, an infinitesimal num-
ber. It is the duty of every driver of a
vehicle to learn and obey these rules.
Every-day drivers in Barbados take corn-
ers on the wrong side: cut in or cut things
too fine and overtake at corners, bends and
cross roads. Traffic signals are carelessly
given. The result is death, injuries to
persons and vehicles. Let every motorist
learn and obey the Six Cardinal Rules.



A Little Nonsense

Following an unwritten “code of honour”
the shepherds of Sardinia refuse to collabor-
ate with the police. The grim code of the
Sardinian shepherds is based on two funda-
mental rules — first you must avenge your-
self any wrongs done to you or to your fam-
ily, killing the offender or a member of his
family. Secondly you must never ask the
police to: help you: all those collaborate or
even talk to the police are informers and
must be eliminated.

tage

perhaps because he lost both his
father and mother while ‘he was
still a lad. But that was to be
no serious handicap to a man of
his native intelligence and abili-
ty. Shortly after he took his
place in the Assembly, he begqh
to make his mark and ten years
later was unanimously elected

|

Gur Common Heritage—5

Sir John Gay Alleyne

Patriotic Fervour

_ Perhaps the outstanding figure
in Barbados during the eigh-
teenth century was Sir Jehn
Gay Alleyne. Born in Barbados
in 1724, he lived into the nine-
teenth century and died at the
age of seventy-seven. He was
created a Baronet of Great
Britain by King George III in
1769 and for an almost unbroken
period of forty years—there was
a single break of one annual
session—he occupied a seat in
the House of Assembly. During
that time he played a_ distin-
guished part in the island’s pub-
lic life. He was Speaker of the
Assembly for thirty years—
being re-elected regularly every
year except during the session
when he was absent from the
island—and thus set up a record
that was to be held for more
than a century and a quarter
until it was broken by the late
Sir Frederick Clarke.

Two years after he entered
the House, Alleyne gave evidence
of his patriotic fervour on an
occasion that aroused strong feel-
ings in Barbados. A British fleet,
with a sizeable contingent from
Barbados, had set out to capture
Martinique, When they reached
the French island, the troops
were landed but shortly after-
wards were re-embarked “at the
very moment when the principal
inhabitants were employed in
arranging a plan for the surren-
der of the island.” An attack was
then made on the other French
island, Guadeloupe, but, during
the seige, the British commodore,
hearing of the arrival of a
French fleet, withdrew this ships
to Dominica. Such inglorious
conduct was too much for the
Barbadians and the English com-
modore was burnt in effigy, “his
person treated with indignity and
his name held in absolute detes-
tation.” An incident like this was
certain to cause ill-feeling be-
tween the Barbadians and the
officers of the English Navy and
one of the former brought out
a pamphlet severely attacking
the character of the islanders.
An opportunity such as this was
not to be missed by Alleyne. He
wrote a spirited reply to the
pamphlet and so effective was
this defence of the honour of the
island that he was publicly
thanked by the House of Assem-
bly.

The Reformer

Alleyne never had the advan-
of a University education

to the Speakership. The days of
bitter struggle between
House and the Governor seemed
to be largely over, It was no
longer necessary for Alleyne
to play the role of Samuel
Farmer and risk imprisonment
and ruin by incurring the wrath
of the King’s representative, Nc
longer were the House and
Council so opposed to each other
that they could not come to-
gether when vital issues were
at stake. On one occasion, for
instance, when Alleyne was in-
sulted by a naval officer, both
Chambers adopted a resolution
declaring that ‘an affront to the
person of any member of the
Legislature

for any matter,

cause or act, arising from .. «'

his public service, is an affront
to the legislative body.’ That
may be taken as a measure both
of Alleyne’s standing among his
fellows and of the new spirit
prevailing among both branches
of the Legislature.

Alleyne’s great work for Bar-
bados lay in the House of
Assembly. To equip himself for
the task he had in mind, he
acquired a thorough knowledge
of the procedure of the House
of Commons, Then he set him-
self to the business of improy-
ing the procedure of the House
of Assembly, He insisted that
measures passed by the House
presented to the
council with appropriate digni-
ty and ceremony and that
money bills sanctioned by the
Upper Chamber should be pre-
sented to the Governor by the
Speaker of the Assembly. Since
the Assembly no longer con-
sumee its energy in fierce Lat-
tles with the Governor and the
Council, it could turn to setting

should be





its house ‘n order and Alleyne
watched with a jealous care
over the strici observance of
the new rules of procedure. For
all this Alleyne will long Le
remembered by those who cher-
ish the idea of parliamentary
government. But perhaps his
chief claim to our grateful mem-
ory is that he was the first
Speaker to request for members
of the House the famous three
privileges—freedom from arrest,
freedom of speech and freedom
of access at all times to the
King’s representative.

One of the charges brought
against Alleyne in more recent
times is that he opposed the prc-
posal to raise a West Indies regi-
ment from the slave population.
England at the time was facing
as great a threat from Napoleon
as she had ever faced from
Louis XIV, As in the time of the
French King, the Mother Coun-
try was concerned to ‘halt the
advance of French influence and



SIR JOHN GAY

arms not only in the continent
of Europe but in the Caribbean
area, In view of the high mor-
tality among the white soldiers
in the area, England decided to
supply her army in the West
Indies with men who could bet-
ter stand the rigours of a tropi-
cal climate. But the plan to raise
five regiments of black soldiers
was strenuously resisted both in
Barbados and in other colonies of
the West Indies. The influence
of the French Revolution had
already spread from France to
the other countries of Europe.
The ideas of “Liberty, Equality
and Faternity” had reached the
French possessions in the Carib-
bean and the slaves in San
Domingo took the opportunity
to rise against their masters, In
the upheaval that followed hun-
dreds of plantations were ruined
and thousands of whites were
killed. Small wonder that the
planters in the British West
Indies felt they were sitting on a
volcano, In the circumstances it
was perhaps natural for men like
Alleyne to believe that the plan
to raise five regiments from the
slave population, so far as it
was likely to affect Barbados,
would prove “rather the means
of its destruction than its
defence,”
A Balanced Outlook

But Alleyne did not allow
fear to disturb the balance of
his outlook. During the seven-
ties of the eighteentf® century
the sugar industry passed
through one of its most trying
periods, suffering from disease
and drought; and Alleyne’s
speeches in the Assemtbly re-
flected his anxiety over the eco+
nomic condition of the island.
But he did not sree those un-
fortunates whose fabour played
a great part either in bringing
Barbados to prosperity or help-
ing it through a period of gloom.
For the poor and distressed he
always had a word and, while
he regarded slavery as lawful
and necessary, he felt that the



Our Readers Say:

Import Licenses

To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—The readers of this
paper who are not aware of
what is taking place in Bar-!
bados, may find the following
information interesting. On the
13th March this year, the Control
Authorities refused to allow any
further orders to be placed with
Europe (our main source of food
supplies, potatoes, onions, etc.),
and until to-day (19th May)
have prohibited all business with
countries generally referred to
as soft currency areas, This has
meant that the public in general
are going to suffer a 1 of,
revenue, because ships will be
coming with no cargo, They!
will also be suffering the loss of
a meal, because there will, be
nothing in the shops for them to
eat when they are hungry. -It
is interesting to note that the
approximate importation from
these countries for 1951 was
£900,000. The Control Authori-
ties now propose to reduce this
figure to approximately £200,000.
This is going to mean small
profits if any by the retailers of
food stuffs and hardware. It is
also going to mean small profits
for the commission merchants

and

agents, and in some cases,
drastic measures, such as, Tre-
duction in staff would be indi-
cated. In turn this will have
the effect of reducing collectable
income tax and also a loss of
duty. The Government will have
much less money to spend, and

therefore, many of the schemes
which they are so ambitiously
carrying out to-day will be
endangered by the latest follies
of our Control Authorities. Let
us consider what is being done
by the other West Indian
Islands, In Trinidad and Jamaica
various items such as, decorated
glassware, holy pictures, rosar-
ies and other items which are
not essential ‘to existence are
placed on the prohibited list,
but such things as food, agri-
cultural impliments and the
necessities of life, are allowed
in any quantities which the
importer may consider a necessity
for the benefit of the colofy.
Why do we have to deviate from
the good example set by our
sister colonies and go to the
extreme of cutting our imports
from approximately £900,000 in
1951 to £200,000 for the last half
of 1952 or an equivalent \of
£400,000 for the year, which is a
cut of more than 50%. Any
elementary school boy can see
that our Control Board has been
too drastic, and it is time for
the people of Barbados to protest
against their action, This action
when examined closely is not
only a hardship on the people,
but a menace to the very ex-
istence and way of life, and if
our present Government realiy
has tne interest of the people at
heart and is genuinely deter-
mined to make this island a
better place to live in, then it is
time that they speak quite



Hy F. A. Hoyos

system left an immense debt on
men like himself to clear the
obligation of human nature.” In-
deed, for a man who lived in

feeling and seldom missed an
ppportunity to emphasise in the
House of Assembly that there
were classes of society other
than his own which were enti-
tled “the equal protection of wise
and equitable laws.” No partial
regard for the interests of the
landowner, he argued, should
ever influence the deliberations
‘of the Assembly; and, on one
occasion when the House passed
a Bill, shortly after the disas-
trous hurricane of 178Q, to sus-
pend legal proceedings for debt
against landowners, he spoke

with great eloquence against it
and “moved an additional clause
excluding himself by name from
any benefit to be derived from
the operation of the law.”

Some may be tempted to dwelt
on Alleyne’s faults.

He was

ALLEYNE

irascible and quite unusually
vain and these infirmities grew
as he advanced in age. Others
will draw our notice to his lack
of enthusiasm for Codrington’s
plan to bring Christianity to the
Negroes ona Indians ae Re West
Indies. ad humane
Oe g TORN Slaves, he relt
that Codrington’s scheme for
their conversion was too ambi-
tious. To him it was far more
practical to give boys a good
secondary education. Like other
Barbadians of his time, Alleyne
was indifferent to the idea of a
centre for missionary work and
preferred to see Codrington Col-
lege develop as a secular school.
Yet it should always be remem-
bered to his eredit that it was
mainly due to his efforts that the
grammar school was _ revived
after the hurricane of 1780.
Without his hagh-spirited and
energetic exertions, it is doubt-
ful if the Lodge School, which
was to develop into one of the
leading schools in the West In-
dies, would have survived the
difficulties of a dark and critical
period. Nor was«this all he did
for education. For he used the
money he earned as the island’s
‘Treasurer to found the sehgolk
which is n known as _ the
Alleyne Schoo.

Sir John Gay Alleyne’s contri-
bution to the common stock of
policy and counsel cannot be
questioned. He enhanced the
prestige of the House of Assem-

ly and began the great reforms
that were needed to make it a
more efficient instrument of gov-
ernment. Ata time of great peril
he brought sanity and good sense
to the deliberations of the As-
sembly. And his work in the
cause of education was to pro-
duce permanent and fruitful
results. “Though no sculptured
marble speaks his country’s grat-
itude,” wrote, the historian,
Poyer, when Alleyne ‘was still
alive, “his virtues have em-
balmed his mory. and — will
transmit it to°the admiration of
succeeding generations.”



plainly and oppose such drastic
restrictions being placed on the
importation of goods into this
island, Let us face this new
menace of starvation and .priva-
tion with determination and
defeat it before it can, get a

serious hold on us.
Yours truly,
HUNGRY.

Load-Shedding

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Once again I see in
your paper suggestions for load
shedding suggested to the Elec-
tric Company,

Surely in ‘a democracy one
considers the greatest good to
the greatest number. Why
should all who buy electricity
be made miserable and dis-
gruntled? I believe the number
is 23,000, to please temporarily
the 5,000 or so who want elec-
tricity in their new houses? I
say temporarily advisedly, as
the new instatlers would soon be
crying out as loud as anyone
else when they couldn’t cook
on their electric stove for some
periods, fridge cuts, meat spoil-
ing in deep freeze ‘etc.

IT am the owner of a house at
Silver Sands built in 1938 and



Electricity applied for that same
year was never received. I still
say load shedding will make

Director!

eighteenth century Barbados, al
was singularly free from :









|
every single consumer irritated |
and miserable, ‘getting up

tions etc.
Don't do it Mr.
HOUSEWIFE.

peti-/on her doorstep.
jcope with the situation.

| NOBODY'S |

DIARY

Monday—Everybody in Bridgetown has been
talking about the Ladies. Will they go or
will they stay? Do we want them or don’t
we want them? I even overheard one
street hawker saying to the male member
of a party of two “That is a sweet lady

you’ve got Mr A—— let me sell her a

pineapple.”

Another street vendor pushed his cart
past the House of Assembly today. On it
in large letters was written “LADY BE
GOOD”. As I saluted Nelson I shed a
tear. Nobody saw me.

P.S. What good news about the foun-
tain! Won’t Miss Manning be pleased!
Tuesday—While I’m in this feminine mood I

must tell you the story of a woman
scorned. Was she furious! I saw the drama
through the cracked windscreen of my
doorless two-seater. There she was near
to the roadway a woman scorned and
armed with a stick. f wonder where she
learnt to swing it like that! From Cyrano
no doubt! But she wasn’t beating one
man or fifteen men. The recipient of her
blows was a much younger girl whose
face showed as much refinement as sur-
prise. I hope the woman cops are taking
up fencing. They might need it, if this
kind of thing spreads.

Wednesday—My friend’s four-year-old boy
(did I mention he was born on a leap
day) continues to view Heaven from a
utilitarian world. When it rained the
other day he told his better parent.
“Isn’t God useful mummy! His has a big
watering pot and is helping daddy with
the vegetables.”

Thursday—Remember how long it took them
to cut the grass at the Alice Playing
Field? It seems that the Y.M.C.A., are
having similar playing field headaches.
Their playing field, (I think it’s theirs)
is one of the bushiest fields near Green-
fields and is far more suitable for cow-
boys and Indians than for ball games. I
wonder if the people at the Y., ever go
down Brighton way. If they do they will
notice what seems to me one of the best
kept playing fields in Barbados. It was
laid down by a private company and is
maintained by a private company. I’m
sure that if the Y., were to ask them for
a few tips on how to keep the grass from
growing they would oblige. In my young
days I used to spend most of my Satur-
days cutting and rolling grass. But I
would hate to suggest that the members
of the Y., could do what I used to do
(with help of course).

People are so touchy nowadays. Look at
the scouts,

Friday—Yve spent all day wondering what is

the best way to frighten people from

picking my water coconuts. Shall I put an

obeah bottle up the tree? Shall I fit a

bulb and switch it on during the act?

Shall I hire a ventriloquist and frighten
the life out of the picker? Shall I pick
the coconuts and leave a note saying:
help yourself: don’t mind me.

Why do people pick other people’s
coconuts, mangoes, avocadoes, bananas or
whatever they can get their hands on.

Do they think they are doing the
grower a good turn? Or do they just steal
for the fun of it? suf

Perhaps police night patrols in unex-
pected places would help. It seems such
a waste of energy planting fruit bearing
trees for others to eat. Might as well do
a spot of night plucking myself, what.
Anyhow the field is open for the adult
educationalists,

Pluck only what is yours to pluck.
Them’s good sentiments.

Saturday—The House of Assembly which has
a library of sorts and which holds the
purse strings might consider purchasing
Ivan Payne's painting of the Public

. Buildings. ‘

In this picture there are enough taxis
outside the Colonial Secretary’s office to
justify the expense.

If ever the taxis are banished, they
could be painted or better still they could
remain as a reminder of the power of the
automobile in politics. Something like
that.



Mystery Murder

ROME, May 14.

Eighteen peovle of the Sardinian village of
Orgosolo have been living under the threat
of death since April 1950, when 35 names
of Mgrs, yo appeared chalked on a church
wall,

The list was accompanied by a statement
that they had been sentenced to death by
an unnamed tribunal. Since then, the sev-
enteen other people on the list have all been
murdered.

The latest victim was a shepherd who was
found dead near his flock riddled with bullets
only three days ago.

The killings are believed to be the result
of a large-scale vendetta carried on by the
followers of the notorious bandit leader Gio-
vanni Battista Liandru.

The Government put a ransom of £1,000
on the bandit’s head and he was arrested
after having been betrayed by his wife. A
few days after the arrest the wife was killed
The police were unable to

—E.N.S.

















SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1952





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PEPE OPES OOS

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PLASTIC
PROPELLING PENCILS

LONG LEAD, SCRIPTO PENCILS,

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48e. each

Made in U.S. A.
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and all

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HARDWARE

EARTHENWARE
ALUMINUMWARE
ENAMELWARE

WHY NOT sdeaciacomal “4 VALUABLE FOOD?
















STERNE’S DEEP FREEZE





Semel
— AVAILABLE FROM STOCK —

Da COSTA @ CO., LID.

And Kitchen equipment of
almost every kind, including
Oil Stoves and Ovens.

Much of our stock is of
recent arrival and the
full range invites your
looking and choosing—
it already warrants sat-
isfaction!

HARDWARE DEPARTMENT,

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Pears

Peaches

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Grapes

Prunes

Gooseberries

Apple Juice

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Butterscotch Pudding
Caramel Pudding



MEAT DEPT.
Turkeys
Chickens

Ducks
Rabbits
ONLY 2

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SHOPPING DAYS

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-

FOR SANDWICHES
Butter Bread
Sandwich Bread
Butter Concentrate
Pate de Fois Gras
Cheese Biscuits
Carr’s Crackers
Carr’s Sweet Biscuits
Hams in Tins
Cheese in Tins
Chili Sauce

KEEP COOL

with a Gin and
Schweppes Tonic

or
A Gold Braid Rum
3-yr.-old
with Canada Dry Sodas
and Ginger Ales





SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1952



Kirst Co-Operative Society
Registered Under New Act

St. Barnabas Co-Op. Society
Has Membership Of Sixty

FOR THE FIRST TIME in the history of Barbados, a
co-operative society was registered under the recently
enacted Co-operative Society’s Act when the Certificate of
Registration of the St. Barnabas Co-operative Marketing
Society Limited was presented to its President (Mr. Ran-
dolph Worrell) by the Registrar of Co-operative Societies
(Mr. C, C. Skeete) at a function which took place at St.
Barnabas Boys’ School on Thursday night.

This society which was established four months ago,
has a membership of 60 with funds amounting to $115.

_The main purpose of the so-
ciety like that of all Co-operative
Societies, is the promotion of
thrift, self-help and mutual help
among its members. The so¢iety
has as its main objects, market-
ing as a co-operative basis of
Sugar cane and such other pro-

duce of its members as it may
from time to time see fit to
handle,

Its area of operation is the St.
Barnabas district and its mem-
bers consist of peasants of the
area,

A large and appreciative audi-
ence of members and friends of
the society witnessed the pres-
entation of the certificate of reg-
istration,

Certificate Presented

Chairman of the Meeting was
Rev. O. C. Haynes, Vicar of St.
Barnabas, After the Secretary had
read his report,. the Registrar
gave an address and then pre-
sented the certificate to the So-
ciety. Mr. Clive A. E. Beckles,
Co-operative Officer, made some
general remarks on co-operation
and a vote of thanks was moved
by Mr. Wilfred Maynard, the
Treasurer, which was seconded
by Mr. K. D. Inniss and support-
ed by Mr. G. Callender.

The President in introducing
the Chairman said® that the So-
ciety was greatly indebted to him
for allowing them the use of the
school room for their meetings.
In doing so, he was promoting
the good and welfare of a society
which it was hoped would prove
a credit to the community in
general and its members in par-
ticular, ;

The Chairman in opening ‘the
function said that it was rather
surprising that the co-operative
movement which had _ been es-
tablished in England over 100
years ago should only now begin
to be developed in Barbados.
However, now that a start had
been made, he hoped the move-
ment would become well estab-
lished here and move _ from
strength to strength. .

Objects of Society

He said he noted that among
the objects of the society was
mentioned the promotion of self-
help and mutual help os its
members and added at they
should all aim at the harmonious
combination of helping them-
selves and at the same time help-
ing others. ‘

He regretted that he had not?
taken as keen an interest in the
St. Barnabas Society as he might
have, but promised to watch its
development and take a keener
interest in its activities in the
future. :

The Registrar opened his address
by congratulating the Society on
the strides it had made during the
relatively short period of four
months that it had been in exis~
tence. He said he had listened
with interest to the report of the
Secretary and had noted that one
of the points made was that meet-
ings had not always been well
attended. He pointed out that the
Society could be a means of social,
moral and economic benefit to
members, teaching them. self-re-
liance and self-help and raising
their standard of living. It was
essential, however, the Registrar
continued, that members should
be regular in attendance at meet-
ings so as to study together co-
operative principles and practice
and advance their own economic
welfare.

Leading Position

He said: “I wish to congratulate
your Society on being one of the
firat Societies to be registered
under the Co-operative Societies
Act of Barbados. The registered
number of your Society is actu-
ally Number One. I hope this will
inspire you to maintain a leading
position among the Co-operative
Societies in this Island.

The Co-operative Officer, Mr.
Beckles, will have discussed vari-
ous aspects af co-operation with
you from time to time. But per-
hzps it would not be inappropri-
ate if I took this opportunity of
referring again to one or two
points.

First of all it is essential that
your Society should be laid on

a sound financial basis and

should have adequate member-

ship, if the objects of the Society
are to be achieved. But there is

a point of even greater impor-

tance, it is that your Society

should consist of a body of loyal

members, adhering strictly
co-operative principles, and
regular and punctual in attend-
ance at general meetings. There
must also be loyalty of the So-
ciety’s officers in the keeping of
accounts and records and in car-
rying out all the duties assigned
to them; there must be loyalty
of the members in supporting
the officers you have yourselves
appointed under the democratic
constitution of your Society; and
there must be loyalty of all,
officers and members, to the
principles of co-oreration and
to the provisions of the Co-
operative Societies Act and of
the Rules and By-Laws of the
Society.
A Body Corporate

I would also like to take this
opportunity of reminding you
that through registration your
Society now becomes a body cor-
porate, that is your Society is rec-
ognised by law as having legal
existence. Corporate existence
will of course cease if registration
is cancelled, Registration gives tha
Society power to hold real and
personal Property in the name
under which it is registered. and
also protects individual members
from legal proceedings in respect
of an obligation of the Society. It
Registrar’s duty to have accounts
of registered Societies examined
from time to time and audited at
least once a year. The fulfilment
of this duty ensures that confi-
dence may be placed in the
Society. not only by the members
but also by the general public.

I now have much pleasure in
presenting to your President, on
your behalf, the Certificate of Reg-
apes ot he St. Barnabas Co-

rativ, i i
imiea arketing Society
Officer’s Remarks

Mr. Beckles said: “This should
be a most happy occasion for you
members of the St. Barnabas Co-
operative Marketing Society. You
should be happy in your know-
ledge of the fact that you have
been able to organise your So-
ciety, adopt your by-laws, build
up a reasonably good member-
sate and share capital and con-
orm requirements
of they operate Societies Act,
as a result of which you -naw have
the distinction of being the first
co-operative society to be -
istered under the Act. Just as I
shared, and continue to share, your
growing pains with you, I now
share in your joy at this achieve-
ment,

I think you realise that credita-
ble as all 'this is, worthy as eee
achievement is of congratulation
it marks merely the beginning of
what we all hope will be a virile
co-operative society: a society
which will be managed by the
members for the members along
truly co-operative lines, bringing
blessings in the way of social,
moral and economic improve-
ments, not only to its members
but to the entire community and
to future generations. You the
present, as well as prospective
members, should regard the build-
ing up of such a virile society as
your special responsibility and a
sacred duty.

to

Opposition

In attempting to discharge this
duty you will come up against
opposition from several sources,
There will, for example, be those
pessimists who maintain that Co-
cperation cannot succeed in Bar-
bados because of the individualism
and suspicion of the people. It
will be up to you to prove your-
selves good co-operators and by
adopting as your guiding princi-
ple “Unity is Strength” show the
strong individualists among you
that far more can be achieved by
co-operative effort than by selfish
individualism. The best means of
winning over those who are sus-
picious is by straightforward deal-
ing. Make sure that all books and
records of your Society are care-
fully and accurately kept, and
these together with your Bank
book, should be open to inspec-
tion by members at all reasonable
times. Let there always be frank
and open discussion at your meet-
ings of all difficulties, problems
and seeming irregularities as they
eccur. Members should always
observe the democratic principle
of majority rule and accept the
decision of the majority with cood

SSS SSE <







SPECIAL

BUYS
FOR

RAYON

PIN STRIPED SUITING







SS



eee



ALL WOOL ENGLISH.FANCY WORSTED
in Grey, Fawn and Brown at $17.00 per Yard
ALL WOOL GREY WORSTED |
At $8.30; $8.40 and $9.73 per Yard
GABARDINE SUITING
in Brown, Grey, Fawn, Slate and Cream
at $3.54 and $4.30 per Yard



grace, even when it
to your own opinion.
Team Spirit

Your co-operative society may
aptly be compared to a football,
or cricket, team, The success of
your society like that of the foot-
ball team depends primarily on
good team spirit. The aim of the
team must be the same, playing
the game and winning the match.
This can best be done when the
team as a whole, from the centre-
forward back to the goal-keeper
pulls his weight on the side. Then,
too, the fundamental principles
of the game those principles which
the experts have proved to be
match-winning factors—must be
scrupulously observed. At the
same time, every member of the
side must avoid foul play and any
action which experience has
shown to be detrimental to the
team and likely to rob the game
of the right spirit.

If your society is to succeed,
and it is up to you to see that it
does, it must develop that team-
spirit and observe those principles

is contrary

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PAGE FIVE



of the same district

Without prejudging him, the Chief Justice said, from
the evidence which came before the Court, he was satisfied
that Babb knew about the will and seemed to have had it
and he intended passing on the evidence to the Police who
might bring a case for the destroying of the will or per-

of these were admitted as new
members at our last meeting as
a result of a special membership
drive effected by Mr. Yard our
Peasant Instructor, and the Co-
operative Officer assisted by mem-

jury, or both,
be:s of the Society.

Mr. Yard has used his valuable In evidence yesterday, Babb
years of experience in agriculture denied any knowledge of any
as an instrument in bringing Will.

these peasants together and it is _ Sylvester Ifill, son of Leopold
because he is so well known claiming that his f ther

amongst them that they will trust Made a wil the contents of which
his words and him also. he communicated to him and it

Will Said To Be Burnt: C.J.
Will Pass On Evidence

THE CHIEF JUSTICE Sir Allan Collymore yesterday
decided to pass on to the police certain evidence in con-
nection with the alleged burning of the will of the late
Leopold Ifill of Sutherland, St. Lucy

Motorist
Fined 157-

by Brandford Babb





Our most worthy and suitable Was afterwards handed to Nabb Their Honours Mr. J. W. B.
Co-operative Officer has never Who had since refused to have Chenery and Mr, A. J. H. Hans-
refrained from expounding every it proven. chell Judges of the Assistant
question put to him. He brought 7 Sylvester is alleging that Babb Court of Appeal, — yesterday
to our light many historical facts refused to produce the will when ordered Fred Waterman to pay
tcuching co-operation which filled he filed to canvass the funeral “ fine of 15/- for refusing to move
many a member with enthusiasm, of Leopold for a certain under- his motor car while using a
in so much that one member said taker whose agent he was. portend ee eee oo
that he wished such light were Mrestens atRences had! sea vut prejudice another case brought
brought to them 20 years ago. that the “will wa peed. at ‘the ee hime with me cee ie win IN
as 8 a y using a car for hire
There is not one member who has office of Mr, Nichols, rolicitor, without having a Tosvice for that COOL G &

not great interest in the Society. se Sct

; when Babb and one Luther Scan-
hs tM ig POT indeed very poet, tlebury were tnere and Scantle-
BHG< So sCRHAUG. Shr in as much bury himself had given evidence
money as we would like, but the to thet effect.
Co-operative Officer has told us Yesterday ‘Mr, Nichols tod the

14

Forde prosecuted



for the



purpose.
The fine of 15 /- is to be paid in REFRESHING
days or 14 days’ imprison-|
ment with hard Jabour. Sgt.

Police







which have proved during the to “deny ourselves to reach the ; a rast este receive
” court that sometime last year from information received |

100 years that the co-operative goal” and we shall do so. some parties, ‘Ifll, Scantlebury Cpl. McClean attached to the

movement has been in existence to anuther : ”h as said Traffic Branch at Central Station

be the best, in fact, the only Funds and another men whe was sai ihe ob he Fel 9
foundation for its success. There The Funds of the Society '° be Babb, but whom he could told the court that on February 9

may be a tendency on the part of amount to $87.86; $22.00 being Rot remember well had come to Jie was on Sam ao — ae
some members to act contrary to entrance fees and $65.86 share his office with a certain will. mans and =e hie ayes ORE he
one or another of these principles. capital. He mentioned, too, that the will sata in the . ower a ireen, Er
It should be remembered, however, The entrance fee to the Society was not quite jn order, sean ant : — in t ie car, ye ew
that they have been tested for is 50 cents and the value of a Doris Broomejof St. Lucy gave roe aot the Meter dit :3 a me
over S Seahaey. ee am many a share $1.00, Each member under- evidence af Babb's ie to Papa te. SSKEG The GerenGUny wo _ Mr

rent lands and have been prove! “ “jf ‘ll three weeks after Ifll’s *%,, 5 ast
to be sound and right. It wil be Tone ep § eee a Ny \ “ The defendant refused ~ ag ' LET THE
your duty then to adhere strictly “ The objects of the Society are } the car. He then erty =
to these principles which form the yery wide and include— Babb told tle court that he Matter to the Traffic Branch H D EN
basis of the Co-operative move- i Raisin the standérd of knew nothing @f the will and shel a hiasieatnidelae C IL R
ment, ' : 5 also denied ever going to Mr. .

The Principles

Very briefly, these principles are
as follows: —

1. Membership in a co-opera-
tive society is voluntary.
Members meet on a basis of
equality, involving the de-
mocratie principles of one
man, one vote.

Surplus is distributed in
proportion to business done
with the society and not in
proportion to capital invest-
ed.

There is no restriction on
membership.

Members join to promote
their own economic interests
and advantage, not those of
« non-members.

Business should be done for
cash,

A proportion of the earnings
to be set aside for educa-
tional purposes.

Neutrality in religion and
polities.

Labour shall be fairly treat-
ed, \ a
10. Co-operative societies shall
. co-operate with one an-

2.

other.

‘Your society, like most co-oper-
attve nvarketing or producers’ so-
cieties, aims at performing a num-
ber of inter-related functions for
its members. In all you. business
let service to your members, rather
than mere profit making be your
main purpose. If at the same time
you are guided by the tried and
proved principles of Co-operation,
there can be little doubt that the
St. Barnabas Co-operative Mark-
eting Society also will stand the
test of time and measure up to
what the Registrar hoped it would
be—a model to all other co-opera-
tive societies in Barbados.

Secretary's Report

In presenting the Report, the
Secretary Mr. P, N, Pilgrim said:

“There was an inaugural meet-
ing held on the 31st January, this
year, attended by peasants of the
St, Barnabas district. Mr. Beckles,
the Co-operative Officer outlined
to the meeting the purpose and
aims of a Co-operative Society and
of the proposed Marketing Co-op-
erative Society. After a general
discussion, a resolution was unani-
mously passed to the effect that a
co-operative society be formed in
the district, especially for the pur-
pose of marketing canes on a co-
operative basis,

Election of officers took place on
the 7th of February, and resulted
in the following officers being
elected for the ensuing year:
President R. Worrell; Secretary:
P.N, Pilgrim; Treasurer: W. May-
nard: Trustees: Jas. A. Maxwell
and §. Ifill. '

Several meetings were held to
discuss in detail model by-laws
prepared by the Co-operative Offi-
cer. These by-laws were finally
adopted, and application made for
registration of the society under
the Co-operative Societies Act. |

The total number of meetings
held was 16. Attendance at meet-
ings has not always been satisfac- |
tory. This has been attributed |
mainly to members being engaged '
in the reaping of the cane crop.)
Two meetings were abortive for
want of a quorum. |

Attendance

The average attendance at)
meetings was 12. The membership |
of the Society has risen from 28
in number on the 15th of this
month to 45 at present, Seventeen |

’ j



in Blue, Brown and Grey at $3.44 per Yard

HARRISON'S



Dial 2664
Broad Street





its activities to the marketing of

fact that the society was started
after the present cane crop began,
we have found the factories to
which our canes haye been sent 4% it oD
very co-operative. We are very Hill, St. Philip,
hopeful that as a result of

in qualifying for

agriculture in the ot, Nichols the solicitor.



2. Co-operative marketing o
vee ¥ He added that Scantlebury had
ane wanah” She THe approached me in Ser last
4 4. year and told’ him that if he went
" ae somes aa to the court and give a tale about
4. The provision of loans to the will as he knew the late
"members: : Ifill, he, Seantlebury, would give
5. Bulk purchasing of seeds bim $50.
and fertilizers, and —
6. The provision of such other

services as members may
find necessary from time to
time,

etters Of
Administration

Mr, Justice,G. L. Taylor yes-
jig members’ canes, Despite the terday granted the petition of
the Public Trustee of the island
for Letters of Administration to
the estate of Charles Torrington
Augustus Knight, late of Blades.

So far the society has confined

this The petition of Alexander
Co-operation we have succeeded Theophilus Mason of Hill View,
the additional St. Philip, for Letters of Admin-
price to be paid to Peasant Co- istration to the estate with will

cperative Societies under the annexed of his father Alexander
terms of the Domestic Sugar Mason was also granted. This
Agreement, will was proved on June 11, 1943.

Our aim is to work together to The petition of Louise Mar-
achieve our goal, which is, to quille Hinkson for Letters of Ad-
improve the standard of living of ministration to the estate of her
every single member of our father Alexander Mason, de-
society. Registration = ~ ae ceased, was also granted.
is one step in this direction, We
ceeadiiniet the shall be presented Mr. D. H. L. Ward instructed
our registration certificate this by Hutchinson & Banfield, ap-
evening. We are extremely proud Peared for the petitioner.
of this, and take this opportunity The other petition for Letters
of saying thanks beforehand. of Administration which was|)

7 granted was that of Frank Inniss |}
of Cave Hill, St. Michael, to the |)
estate with will annexed and de
bonis non cf Martha Matilida
King, late of Baxters Road.

LORD WILLOUGHBY
COMES OFF DOCK Mr. E. W. Barrow instructed by
Mr, E. D. Rogers, solicitor, ap-

The Lord Willoughby—a new p ‘
tug brought to the island from Peay forthe pettiener.
Southampton, and the No. 1 Water
Barge came off the dock yester-
aay morning after they were
given a general inspection. The
Lord Willoughby will be given a
trial run sometime next week. admitted to probate:— ,
The motor vessel Blue Star went Wiliam Albert Worrell, St}
on dock yesterday afternoon, She Michael; Beata Irene Hinkson, St{
vill be undergoing a general in- T'nomas; James Forde, St. Philip}
spection. Thomas Albert Clarke, St. An4
drew; William Eustace Nurse, St,
: ey | a rite Moore, St. Michael;
: ihe’ vonne vide, St. Michael;
Cacique De Caribe Calls Christina Walker, St, Michael;
The 162-ton Cacique Del Caribe Joseph Thorne, St. Michael;
arrived in Carlisle Bay yesterday James Blackman, St. James,
morning from St. Lucia but before Leanora Bayley, St. Joseph,
she could come into the Careenage __Im the Court for Divorce and
she was held up for some hours. Matrimonial Causes decree ab-
Thu Cacique Del Caribe under solute was pronounced in the suit
Capt. H, Wallace brought in 200 of C, G. Kirton, petitioner, and
packages of fresh fruit, six bags C. B. Kirton, respondent,
of peas, two casks of pumpkins Decree nisi was prenounced in
ind 12 bunches of fresh fruit, the suit of G. N, Jervis, petition-
She is consigned to the Schooner er, and L. R, Jervis, respondent.











Wills Admitted

The wills of the following wer



Owners’ Association, The Steam- In the suit of V. C. Cox
ship Sapho (4,380 tons) also petitioner, and A. Cox re-
urived in Carlisle Bay yesterday gpondent, decree nisi was also
morning from St. Lucia. pronounced. : ;







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PAGE SIX



Jamaican Preacher
Attacks Dr. Malan
In St. Paul’s Cathedral

Fight Costs |
2 Women 46’-

In the Assistant Court of Appeal

















LONDON. yesterday Their Honours Mr.
The Rev. Dr. Marcus James, a J. W. B. Chenery and Mr. A. J. H.
29-year-old Jamaican, beeame Hansehell fined Ilene Clarke of

the first negro to preach in St.
Paul's Cathedral when last Sun-
day evening (May 11) he gave a
sermon on “The Christian
approach to the racial problem, ’
Dr. James, a descendant of a

n Slave, is the first ne; to
hold: an Oxford degree of Dover and 3/- costs in seven days or 14
of Philosophy. days’ for assaulting and beating
He told the white and coloured [ene Clarke.
congregation: “It is sheer hypocs BY imposmg these fines Théir
rigy to be intervening in Korea Honours confirmed the decision of
with tanks, planes, men and
bombs, while closing our eyes
to events in South Africa,
Where the principles for which,
the United Nations are avowedly
fighting, are being trampled on
with increasing ruthlessness day
by day.”
Speaking by inference of Dr.
alan, the South African Prime
inister, Dr. James continusd, bbons who examined
“By his'‘words and actions he has Hinds said that she came to him
proven himself in the eyes of mang" December 21 — the next cay
to the successor of Adolph}j-!ter the fight — and said thar
ler, as the world’s high priestde%€ Was beaten. She was bitten
racial hate, intolerance and {eM a finger. :
Oppression, anq yet, considers) Addressing the court Mr, Malone
himself by some perverted sense,@5@id that the eviuence of Clarke
of logic, a minister of the Chris-Mould not be aceepted by me
tian Gospel of Love. court and submitted that it Was
-larke who first started the
“This man, this sinister man is@ nd brutally bit the other womau
propagating his vile and unscien-4on her finger. If the court ac-
tifle dociiine of the ‘master race & epted the evidence of Hinds then
one of tO very monstrosities i),

it oere was no case against her, |
Opposition-to which so many in

Endeavour, St. James 25/- and
3/+ costs to be paid in seven days
er One month's imprisonment with
hard labour for inflicting bodily

Dalketha Hinds and or-
dered Dalketha Hinds also of En-
deavour, St. James to pay 15/-

were Mr.
J. S. B. Dear for Ciarke and Mr.
Denis Malone for Hinds.

The cases were brought as a
result of a fight which Ciarke ana
Hinds had on December 20, lu
the fight Hinds was bitten on tne
linger by Clarke.

Dr. i

laid doi their lives in the Which Told The Truth

second orld war. Mr. Dear submiited that the
In th Africo, Christians&-ase was one in which the judges
are findiig themselve® in directPuad to look carefully and sce

Opposition= to the state. Fellow
Christiam&abroad must give their
full sufZipt to them in the re-
Sistance =*5 tyranny,”

which one of the women was tell-
ing the truth, In the course oi
-he [ght both of them fell to the
5 =to Dr. James|*ground and looking at the evi-
said. = 2» * @ dence in the case it was cleat thai
Too Many Christian voicesâ„¢:4inds assaulted his client,

which heve been loudest in their#) Then it would only be a question
denunciation of Communism .f what fines should be paid. ‘In:
have bet silent on this question® ;act that a person went to a docjor
of raciakedolatory which threat-‘and was under his supervision tot
ens to pllihge an entire continentizsometime was nothing surprising
into bloodshed. and ‘did not mean that the injury
poet an was serious,



—B.U.P.
“I am aoe - the in-
fe ° juries that Hinds received were
Many Ch ildren trivial and there is no reason why
Clarke should have to pay more

ont than the other woman. The

Altend Exhibition ecision should be reversed ana

School-ehildren from all parts the fine should be reduced,” Mr.
of the island have been visiting Dear said. 2
Combermere School during tha _ Before confirming the decision
week. The Empire week Exhi-. Their Honours said that it was

bition is now in progress in the Clear that Hinds first started the]-

School Hall. fight and in their view the Mag-
Many parents and other visitors ‘strate was right in fining both
were among the large crowd that ®d regarding the injury as a
went to Combermere yesterday, Serious one.
Yesterday was the first day on
which the Exhibition was opened
to the public as wet! as schools.
During thé evening the Police

8 Acres Canes Burnt
Band, conducted by Captain C. E.

Raison, by kind permission of Canes were burnt when a fire
Colonel R. T, Mitcheliu, Commis- occurred at Grazettes Plantation,
sioner of Police, gave a Concert St. Michael on Thursday, They
of appropriate music, The ma- are the property of the Barbados
jority of the visitors crowded Co-operative Bank Ltd, and were
around the Band. insured,

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Creation of a Post of Executive Officer to a
Secondary Industries Board

The Government of Antigua is considering the creation of a post
of Executive Oflicer to a Secondary Industries Board which is shortly
to be established. The duties of the Executive Officer will include
supervision of a Cotton Ginnery, a cornmeal factory, an arrowroot
mill did’ 4 cannery. In addition the Officer will be required to advise
the Board on the technical aspects of any further secondary industries
Which may be introduced in the Presidency,

These industries will be on a small scale and it is not expected
that the Executive Officer should be an expert in all of them. He
should be a practical man with a knowledge of electricity and machin-
ery, With ability to control and train staff, and with sufficient know-
ledge of simple accounting. to be able to take managerial charge in
the initial stages of any industry which may be established, He should
be willing to turn his hand to anything and to have a pioneering
spirit.

The appointment would be for three years, with provision for
six months leave at the end of that period. It would not be pension-
able. It would carry a salary of not more than £900 per annm, and
a transport allowance.

It is anticipated that the post will be created by the middle of

__ 1952; and, if it is finally decided to make this appointment, the selected
st @andidate will be required to assume duty in July, 1952,.

in In the meantime, persons desirous of being considered for the
aS post (if created) are invited to submit applications to the Administra-
3@ tor of Antigua stating age, education, and a full record of past experi-

*fence and present employment. ‘Testimonials need not be forwarded
rd at this stage.

* | Administrator’s Office,







ie St. John’s,

; s Antigua. 11.4.52—3n.
. i

4 WAR DAMAGE TO BRITISH PROPERTY IN FRANCE

Ne Announcements in the Board of Trade Journal on February ist,
, + 1947 and June 7th, 1947, gave cdotails of arrangements between H.M.

Government and the French Government relating to compensation in
respect of war damage to British property in France, and notified the
final date for the regisiretion of claims as December Bist, 1947.

An extension 6f the final date for the submission of claims to July
7th, 1952, has now been granted under Article 87 of Law No. 52—5 of
January 3rd, 1952, to those British subjects, Corporations and Associa-
tions whose elaims were, or would have been, rejected because they
were submitted after December 3ist, 1947,

Tt should, however, be noted that this law does not permit the re-
consideration of claims which have been finally rejected for any
other reason.

Claims must be made to the French War Damage authorities direct
and should be in the French language. HLM. Government can accept
no responsibility for the actual filing and prosecution of claims.

24.5,52.—2n.

_——$—
VAUANT POST OF SENIOR HEALTH NURSE, DEPARTMENT
: OF MEDICAL SERVICES

Applications are invited for the pensionable post of Senior Health
Nursé, Department of Medical Services.

Salary will be on the scale of $1,200 x 72 -~ $1,440 per annum.
In addition, a temporary non-pensionable cost of living allowance
will be payable in accordance with approved rates.

Uniform is provided.

The appoiniment will be on two years’ probation and subjeet to
the selected appiicant being passed as medically fit for employment
in the Public Service.

The successful applicant will be posted to the Health Centre,
Speightstown, in the first instance where furnished quarters are pro-
vided and will be subject to transfer to any Public Health area in the
Colony. ose adh

Applicants must be registered nurses and midwives and hold the
Certificate of the Royal Sanitary Institute for Health Visitors and
School Nurses.

Applicants should present in writing a full curriculum vitae to
inelude age, educational qualifications and experience.

‘Applications should be addressed to the Colonial Secretary, Pub-
lie Buildings, Bridgetown to reach his office not later than 31st May,
1962.

24.6,52.02h.

T*

_

St. Michael.









THE

PEASANTS’



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

NOTICE





LOAN BANK

ACT, 1936

To the Creditors holding Liens against the Peasant Holdings

Dated this 24th day of May, 1952.



Names
|



Arthur, Thomas ..
Brathwaite. Ernest
Bridgeman, Alfred
Callender, Aleatha
Challenor, Susan
Chapman, Eunice
Clarke, Constanza rt
Cox, Arthur W. .. . 9
Est. Criehlow, Frederick Dec.
per Goodridge, Preston re
Drakes, Darnley & Helena
Dunnah, Charies A, .. "
Ellis, David N, per Bilis, Mary
Gittens, Rhoda .. “6 oy
Griffith, Wendel

Hackett, Henry N. y
Holloway, Dezmora B. ..
Hoyte, John R. ..

Johnson, Inez et alia

Jordan, Benjamin

Kennedy, Maud H.

King, Josiah
Lashley, William ..

Marshall, Edith ..

Maynard, Stella ..

Medford, . Lavinia

Moseley, Keturah

Niles, Eglon oo 2 us
Est. Norris, George Dec. per
Norris, Mary As os
Phillips, Alphonza A.
Rawlins, Charles H.

|

Sealy, Itvine G, .. os oe
Skeete, William C.
Smith, Lilian xe se ae
Stuart, Dorothy & Eudora
Stuart, James y's ss ge
Thompson, J hus & Horatio
Walcott, Julia T. oa ““
Wallace, Seibert .. ‘ ea
Weekes.

Weegee, Clifford T. per
Wiltshire, Drusilla

St. James,
Baird, Leslie
Best, Arthur Blackman, James per Agard,

Alva _,, is ae +
Burnett, Lionel ., ys oe
Crick, James M, ny 6h
Est, Doughlin, Joseph N, Dec.
per Doughlin, Blmin

Drakes, Samuel .. ie
Estwick, Benjamin R, . .

. Farley, Minthy A. “3 ai
Fletcher, Albertha per Skeete,

Me en o* be as
Pittense, Albertha per Skeete,

See et ate i

on Walter M.

Finds, Alfred per Hinds,
arlotta oe

Husbands, Clarence At ee
ohnson, Matthew mM ov

Jordan, Samuel per Jordan
Miller, | et alin. h
and Licorish, #,

Wr a

Est Thillips, Norman Dec,’ pet
illips, Albertine & Eustace .,

Sandiford, Ivan & St, Clair .,

Springer, Walter & Kathleen ..

Thomas, Sarah .. a: ve

Skeete, Dauphiness a4 a>

St.. Peter.
Bend, James
Bend, Nathaniel

; a eee
Rock, Matta ~—_ a 46

wyn, .
Skeete, Simeon

Austin, Kenneth M.
Austin, Lionel A.

Babb, Adolphus .. ee
Babb, Elvira & Ronald ..
Bellamy, Mortimer G. ..
Boyce, William B. G. ..
Brome, Adinah .. os
Broome, Carlisle S. '
Brome, Charles .. va
Brome, Edgeton .. ‘ 5
Brome, Haldane H. 45 ée
Chandler, Frederick William
Collymore, Sydney td
Collymore, William H, ..
Collymore, William H. ..
Colthrust, James A,

Corb:

Cumberbatch, Williarn C.
Forde, Felix O, .. .
Gibbons, Charles . s6 ¥
Goodridge, Henry & Maud
Grant, Grant, Ruth .. be
Grea

oe
“e
oe
at

oe

* oe
Elson. i+
Gritith.” Adolphus

Howell, Evelyn C.
McGeary, Seon I, .

Leslie, Mildred & Theresa
Moore, Frederick .. ‘
Roach, Gibeon A,
Skeete, Edmund ..
Skeete, Garfield .. vs
Skeete, Oliver Dec
Skinner, Joseph A.
Slocombe, Norman
Springer, Christopher
Yearwood, Cyril ..
Yearwood, Darnley es

St. Andrew.
Alleyne, Philip
Alleyne, Stanley oe .
Est. Belgrave, Fred A. Dec., per
Belsrave, Joseph & Rose
Benjamin, Adrianna
Best, Edwin A. .. oe
Campbell, Theophilus ..
Carrington,

Clarke, Charles M.
Cumberbatch, Cl
Doughlin, Jonathan.
Foster, Harold .,
Foster, Joseph E.
Foster, Nathaniel
Francis, Albert William
Goodridge, Theophilus ..
Hunte, Archibald o
Hurst, Franklyn DeC, ..
Tfll, Aaron vs +
Jordan, Leslie i =
Kellman, Elijah MeD. ..
Keilman, Ethel ..
Leacock, Elizabeth
Moore, Fitz 3
Murtay, Joseph .. +4
Marshall, Cecil H. vs “6
Medford, Richard F... ee
Moaze, William H. wt as
Mortis, Joseph N. : i
Payne, Lowise ue es ee
Roach, Leon DaCosta oi
Roachford, Ezra .. 38 ee
Roachford, Rosalie and Adolphus
Sandiford, William :
Springer, Joseph N

oe
*
“*
oe -
-
o*
oe.
oe

oe
ey
”
“e
oe or
oe
*
oe
oe
ad
oe

oe.
ee
ay
oe.

-
“
*

Welch, Egerton St, Cc. |. .

Worrell, James E. 4 4%

Yearwood, Evelyn H. .. v7
St. Lucey.

Armstrong, Olga . . a oe

wel >



KE NOTICE that the peasant owners mentioned in the First Column of the Table
hereto annexed are about to obtain under the provisions of the above Act the —
of money respectively set out in the Second Column of the Table opposite the names 0?
such peasant owners by way of loan against the

asant holdings respectively, mention-
ed and described in the Third Column of that Ta

1 site such names.
Ble OPP OSI OA. HAYNES,

Manager, Peasants’ Loan Bank.
APPLICATIONS FOR LOANS. PEASANTS’ LOAN BANK. 22 MAY
en rrr"rvlerhnswOéOlrOwmr— oer

AMOUNT
granted Loeality
% ¢.
144.00 Cave Hill
250.00 ” ”
126.00 claggat. dali
36.00 rs we
54.00 Codrington: Hill
30.00 Rouen Village
54.00 Haggatt Hal
35.00 ” »
100.00 Clevedale
60.00 mock Dundo
15.00 claggatt Hali
100.00 Jacksons
90 00 Haggatt Hall
36.00 downersal Purning
25.00 Nr, Codrington Hil!
35.00 Whitehall
30.00 Rural Cot
360.00 Nr, Buxton School
50.00 Bush Hall
100.00 Whitehall
72.00 Salters
36.00 daggatt Hall
90.00 mane Hill
72.00 B ae
100.00 Whiteha
144.00 Haggatt . Hall
2000 » ”
54.00 a ;
40.00 St. Stephen’s Hill
150.00 Salters
36.00 Mt, Friendship
144.00 3ush Hall
40.00 faggatt Hall
50.00 Jac
60.00 {j|Bush Hall
150.00 Flint Hall
36.00 Friendship
20.00 Jackmans
100.00 Haggatt Hall
25.0 des,
~*~ } Garden
740.00 | Weston
54.00 Rock Dundo
98.00 Carlton
240.00 Weston
: Orange Hill
37.80 Fitts Village
50.00 Porters
174.00 Orange Hill
36.00 Weston
Mt. Standfasi
36.00
45.00 | Setlton ais
36.00 Yr. The Risk
126.00 Mt. Standfasi
»
oe'f Holders’s Hill
Carlton
19-0 Weston
B33 ”
Mt. Standfast
a Carlton
100.00 | Prospect
| nm
33-00 Mt. Standfast
‘y
> 72.00 Ashton Hall
72.00 Ashton Hall
72,00 Ashton Hall
20,00 Mile & Qr;
36.00 The Whim
30.00 The Whim
140.00 Ashton Hall}
65.00 Ashton Hall
70.00 Ashton Hall
100,00 The Whim
75.00 Ashton Hall
54.00 Archers
150.00 Josey Hill
50.00 Pie Corner
36.00 Crab Hill
120.00 Crab Hill
80.00 Alexandria
25.00 Chance Hall
90.00 Chance Hall
72.00 Josey Hill
25.00 Crab Hill
72.00 Nr, Spring Garden
72.00 Harrisons
100.00 Checker Hall
116.00 Pie Corner
200.00 Northumberland
144.00 Wellfiela
1 Chance Hall
Chance Hall
‘ Harrisons

eessssessessssse

sisesusssees®

BEE
2

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eccoc

wouw
QLD

Se
sss

Seeeeeese ey

— —
a
co

5

SasShsssesessuksasseuszesees eg:
Sesssssssssessssssessssssesescces ss

aeusasee

Half Moon Fort
Nr, Retreat & Wakeham
Petersys

Crab Hill
Salmonds

Pie Corner

Nr, Lowland
Checker Hall
Babbs

Sea View
Checker Halil
Nr. Lowland
Checker Hail
Checker Hall
Durham & Dooley
Checker Hall
Crab Hill
araveyard
Checker Hall
Northumberland

Belleplaine
St. Simons

.
St. Simons
Rock Hall
Rock Hall
Belleplaine
Cane Garden
Mount All
Walkers
Walkers
Mount All
ue wae Whitehill
Rock Hall

Belleplaine
Cane Garden
Belleplaine
Hillaby
Mount All
Mount All
Chalky Mount
Mount All

Rock Hall
ane Garden
alkers
plaine
by

" ”
ee ee



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——



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P.














NAMES 'Amount granted

aa cellieeial
St Andrew—(Continued) . & _
Stephenson, Charles B. .. be
Thompson, Oscar ; 180.00
Thompson, Oscar 36.00
Vaughan, Benjamin 350.00
Worrell, Seibert. 36.00

orre i a

Yearwood, Joseph N. 75.00

St.. Joseph.
Alleyne, Alma B. 0.0
Brewster, Clement 20. 00
Bryan, Bonny Eyre 36.00
Forde, Joseph N. .. 54 “00
Headley, Easton A. 50. 00
Holder, Aubrey N. 80.00
Horton, Edna L. C. Soe
Mayers, James N. 5508
Taitt, Caspar
St. John.

Alleyne, Lilian C, mee
Barnett, Evelyn E. 25.00
Belgrave, Edith .. 36.00
Blades, Dorcas .. ie 36.00
Browne, Edmund Lisle .. 36.00
Browne, Hermione 154.00
Clarke, Egbert D. 7200
Codrington, Edith 8 .* Sad
Est, Codrington, Egerton Dec.|| m=. « 36.00
per Codrington, Eunice .. we .
Downes, Joseph per Downes, 30.00

Dalton .. es es Be 100/00
Forde, Elson W. .. i e °
a net, Emmanuel Dec, per 50.00

reen, Kate .. os es .
Est. Green, Fitzherbert Dec. per 36.00
. Green, Grace... olf % 5°80
Haynes, Henry W. ibs ee 100.00
Shepherd, Fitz G.L._ .. is .
Shorey, Sarah and Codrington 25.00

John i. “* 2é ee :
Thorne. Clement per Codring- 144.00

ton, E. .. ak % a 144.00
Walrond, St, Clair 50.00
Walrond, Agnes .. ;

St. Philip. .

Alleyne, Bruce E. and Evans O. At
Alleyne, Melvin W ; ve 30. 00
Batson, Lavinia .. 80.00
Bayne, Robert F. . - 60. 00
Beckles, Joseph J. ‘¢ a8 00
Brathwaite, Carol W. .. 20.00
Brathwaite, Chesterfield 40:00
Brathwaite, Edric a o* .
Est. Brathwaite, Julian Dec. per

Brathwaite, Theophilus and én 00

Ethnia .. eg 44 ’ sree
Callender, Eva E. e os
Clarke, James N. .. e ath oats
Codrington, Millicent A. is ‘
Daniel, Fitzherbert ‘is Gi ee
Deane, Dorothy et alia i a
Edgehill, Edward B. .. é 3a
Ellis, George A. s 12500
Forde, Clarence C. v6 vs :
Gooding, Ethel oe . aS
Gooding, Ethel ‘s r as
Greenidge, Eva W. ine es
Greenidge, Lionel E. ve 00
Greenidge, Matilda ee 60.00
Harewood, Walter L. in 40.00
Holder, Warwick : 72.00
Hunte, Donald DaC. ye 100,00
Hunte, James A. a4 70.00
Hutchinson, Leon oe oe 100.00
Jones, William C, DaC, s 100.00
Jones, Ethelbert L. na ‘ 36.00.
Jones, Julian L, ee ee 36.00
Est. Kirton, Emma Dee, per

Pilgrim, Elliott + 54.00
Lord, Lillian B, 6 ‘ 160.00
Lord, Louise... a 50.00
Marshall, Beresford G. fs 36.00
Marshall, Beresford G. ° 36.00
Mason, James .. i *. 150.00
McCarthy, Arthur B. .. . 60.00
Newton, Ernestine A. . 60.00
Payne, Monington D. . 70.00
Roach, Winifred oe ° 125.00
Sargeant, Drusilla “ ‘ 36.00
Sealy, omas R. o 36.00
Stuart, Joseph .. ee a 72.00
Walcott, John E. is 600.00
Wiltshire, Harman A. 576.00
Ward, Louis ; 140.00
Est, Wynfield, Athalia Dec. pet

Bushell, Dodson “ a; 50.00

Christ Church
Adams, Theodore «9 . 80.00
Barrett, Fitzherbert va 200.00
Barrow, Charles R. 200.00
Batson, John H, na oe 70.00
Best, Amanda J. per Morris,

Francis 6 an “ 36.00
Bispham, Miriam 100.00
Bullen, Lucille I. 100.00
Carter, Ernest P. A. 90.00
Clarke, Samuel is mr 60.00
Drayton, Joseph ae Vs 72.00
Edwards, Cecil J. Vy ‘ 36.00
Eversley, James N. 54.00
Evelyn, Julian St. C. .. ‘ 216.00
Flatts, Lottie M. os 40.00
Gittens, Reuben oe 20.00
Goodridge, Christina is 20.00
Graham, Samuel it 8 36.00
Grannum, C. Hugh G. .. wt 480.00
Greene, Lewin C. ‘5b 4 75.00
Ifill, Simeon B, ve 35.00
Jones, Dudley K. oe 36.00
Kinch, Hezekiah sa 20.00
King, Enid ve 126.00
King, J. Adelbert vs 54.00
Kirton, Clara B. ie vi 100.00
Knight, Fitz Clarence .. Ks 30.00
Layne, G. Kathleen ; a 72.00
Layne, May E. ve oe 82.00
Legall, Alexander : pa 72.00
Lovell, A. we es 94.00
Maloney, Egbert W. ‘ aa 288.00
Nurse, Benjamin .. is 50.00
Nurse, Samuel A, oe or 200.00
Pitt, Louisa +s es a 36.00
Powlett, Robert J. £5 ss 50.00
Rose, Leitha per Rose, Jonathan 50.00
Ryan, Charles A, .. ie bu 30.00
Small, Gaston S. .. fs 180.00
Taylor, Marie .. ee ~ 20.00
Walcott, Edward .. 4 . 240.00
Weekes, Ernest W. i : 100.00
Walcott, Felix .. oe oe 75.00
Wiltshire, St. Clair ‘ “é 64.00
Taylor, George H. és “ 150.00

St. George.
Belle, George F. A. & Deuel_ .. 40.00
Birkett, Joseph A, “a oe 100.00
Corbin, Cecil A. .. os es 30.00
Gittens, Allan... o o 72.00
Harding, James E, a es 42.00
Holmes, Irene... ae at 36.00
Inniss, Charles B. & Violet 25.00
Miller, Benjamin . . oe 72.00
Sargeant, Arthur .. ce es 84.00
Scott, Charles C. .. a6 ee 36.00
Selman, Cecilia F. oi a io
Trotman, George E. .. 36.
St. Thomas. e''

Banfield, Martha .. ee . 100.00
Bispham, Aberdeen H. .. ee 50.00
Brathwaite, James A, ‘ os 60.00
Bruce, Wilhelmina es pe 70.00
Christie, Ernest .. or ~ 50.00
Clinton, Joseph N. oe as 100.00
Collins, Cyril M, .. és oe 60.00
Cox, Estelle os a) we 180.00
Dorunt, Prince A. 7 ee 36.00
Durant Allan F. per Durant,

Mabel .. i a ‘a 75.00
Earle, Beryl & Grimes, Cynthia 36.00
Edey, Elijiah ae ee o 50.00
Forde, Cornelius .. eo os 120.00
Gibbs, Rosa ee * a 86.00
Gibson, Clarence McD. .. 20.00
Jemmott, Ethelbert MeL. 75.00
Jordan, Mary R. .. bk pa 72.00
Lavine, Joseph .. 6. oa, 40.00
Luke, Lilian E. M. atts 50.00
Odle, Kenrick R. .. 50.00
Payne, Rose oe a 27.00
Prescod, Croydon F. B. .. 36.00
Reece, Adina = ys 36.00
Seale, James A. McD. .. 288.00
Watson, Stephen McD. .. ae 30.00
Est. Wiikinson, Edward E. Dec. |

per Wilkinson, Florence E. | 36.00

26,424.00

SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1952

Locality , a RB FP
|
————
| dl |
j j 2 00
| St. Simons ae
Rock Hall 2 00
Walkers 2 00
Belleplaine 0 0
” 2
Lakes
Mount All ..%
4.
Sugar Hill
St. Sylvans 1 2 00
Sugar Hill ;
Venture 2 1 8
Cleaver’s Hill 3 20
” »
Braggs Hill ae
” ” P
enture 2
— a bourne & Ch. Grove ie ee
sealy Hall a
Venture 03
Sealy Hall 2:
Spooners 2 0 B
Stewart’s Hill 1 0 02
Cliff Cot 2. 0
'
1
Carters 2
Sealy Hall 1 2 12
Massiah Street 2
Sealy Hall : $8
Carters 1 03
Nr, Glenbourhie os 3
Sealy Hall | 1 2 #37
Stewart's Hill 2 0 18
Nr, Bath & Welches 24°82
Sealy Hall 3 00
|
Nr. Apple Hall $2.
Eastbourne 2 0 3
Merricks 4 $ 3
Diamond Valley 1 ”
Six Roads 1 3 1
Nr. Bay & Bequest 2 00
Diamond Valley 2 3
Eastbourne 2
Kirtons j 1 29
Diamond Valley 0 00
oo a 2” 35°
uy
Kirtons 1 0 00
Bayfield 2 ee
Industry Hall ... 37.
Spring Farm s }.
Kirtons 2 2 0
East Point i 2
Pitchers 1 0 00
Airy Hill oe a
Diamond Valley 1 0 00
Pounders 2; 0
Eastbourne p ee ee
Nr. Hopeland 1 O 00
East Point 7 #O 04
Merricks 1 0 00
Kirtons a. 6.
Merricks is. 8
Diamond Valley 2 00
Eastbourne 2 04
Diamond Valley 3 00
Kirtons 4°0 28
Pounders 1 2 oh
Nr. Stone Hall 2
Nr. Bequest 2 00
East Point 6 0 00
Marchfield 1 0 0
Marley Vale 1 1 @
Nr. Palmers 1 1 00
Little Hope 2 0 00
Eastbourne 1 3 o9
Piet 1
Marchfiela 10 0 00
Nr. Palmers 8 0 00
East Point 2 2 oO
Diamond Valley 3 28
Vauxhall i 04
Maxwell 3 3 00
Pilgrim & i @
Clapham 3 32
Rnterprise | - ; b+
Chancery Lane
Fair View & Lead Vale 2 2 06
Kendal Hill 1 2 oO
Charnocks 2 2 o2
Clapham 2 1 = 10
Bartletts 2 03
Wilcox 3 il
Enterprise 8 0 08
Pegwell 2 oo
Hopewell 3 00
Lodge Road 2 00,
Bartletts 1 39
Pilgrim 2 1 OB
L
Nre’ Warners 1 Oo 00
Clapham 8 O21
Below Rock 3s 37
Enterprise £058 ae
Nr. Goodland 3 00
Chancery Lane & Hopewell 8. ae
ileox 2 3 34
Charnocks 1 0 04
Nr. Ryecroft 1 O 26
Sayes Court . 1 0 038
Enterprise 1 #1 #12
Chancery Lane 4 0 0
Charnocks ; Qo #17
Bournes 10 3 00
Bournes 2 8
Maxwell Hill ; 1 9
Ventnor g 24
Maxwell Hill 1 10
Nr. Ealing Grove 3 2 29
Gall Hill 1 09
Charnocks § : 22
Edey’s Village 3
Sargeant’s Village 2 3
Sargeant’s Village 3 00
Chancery Lane 22 i
Rock Hall 3 #19
Walker's Valley 2 04
Workman’s 8 27
| Haggatt Hall ; 2.0 7
| Greens : 26
Walker’s Valley 01
| Dash Valley 1 2 00
| Rock Hall 1 0 0
Sweet Bottom 1 8 32
| Ellerton 03
| Cole Hole | 1 0 00
Middleton 1 39
|
|
Rock Hall 1 2 382
Jacksons 1 0 00
Welchman Hall sa
Shop Hill & —Grand View i 00
Christie’s Village 3 11
Welchman Hall 4 2 26
Rock Hall . 3 22
Welchman Hall ~ 2 2 o9
‘Grand View 2 00
Welchman Hall 1 0 09
Rock Hall 2 oo
Spring Farm x i. 00
Welchman Hall 1:2: eh
Welchman Hall oe =.
Kew Land . 1 38
Welchman Hall 1 0 10
in Hall 2
elehman Hall . 8. =
Bridgeteld 5 3
e) Jacksons 7. ae
Rock Hall 1 20
Rock Hall 2 14
Rock Hall | 2 00
Welchman Hall ; 4 0 21
Welchman Hall 3 18
cael
Welchman Hall 2 00

@ On page 7.



SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1952
.



From page 6.

(a a en



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF APPLI CATIONS. PEASANTS’ LOAN BANK

ee
















AMES

Beraid

tus os as
manor & Elizabeth..

ph G.

Bnaries PB. and
moy ..
E.

Charles H. Dec per |
Sward ve on

Samuel
mH, Donald N. 4
kinson, Prince Dec per
, Rosetta & Earl
pJoseph B.








James A C4 4
Vernon O, & Williams,
a dy wy
James



APPLICATIONS








































Amount ~. k
sranted A. . P.
ae Locality
—
} $.: | Bus
60.00 Jacksons } oe a
144.00 | » } i 3 3
|
72.00 Orange Hill Se ee
60.00 Nr. Appleby "2° @
te
~~ 48.00 Ashton Hall 2/31
; |
225.00 |Harrisons & Checker Hall a 46.
50.00 Nr. Wakenham 2 °3s
30.00 Josey Hill 2i--s
94.00 Rock Hall ee ee
i]
36.00 Six Roads e438
50.00 | Kirtons 1 0 00
40.00 |Nr. Bequest & Long Bay | 3 00
4) }
40.00 | Eastbourne 2 31
36.00 Marchfield 2 00
36.00 , | Dash Valley s 2 00
54.00 | Arthur Seat 3 06
Lip
36.00 Grand View 2 05
40.00 |Shop Hill 2 19
1,062.00 }





: ‘ : | Amount Amount
NAMES ' Locality Ac RP. Granted Previously
Granted
4 ucy $. c. $. ¢
Â¥ perbatch, William Harrisons 3 30 166.00 50.00
3 =
St. Andrew
m Franklyn DeC. Walkers 1 0 00 250.00 72.00
| Roachford, Ezra . Walkers 1 0 v0 280.00 72.00
Thompson, Oscar Rock Hall $ 387 200.00 | 72.00
ae
St. Philip
Clarke, McDonald .. | Marchfield 1: #80 680.00 —
5 Crawford, Samuel ; .. | Kirtons 1.8: 300.00 50.00
- ' Wiltshire, Halam A, tw .. | Nr, Palmers 8 0 00 2,400.00 576.00
“Christ Church rs
2 Graham, Samuel .. | Bartletts 2 05 52.00 36.00
ard, Deleina Maxwell Hill 2 10 140.00 ie
i George
#Inniss, DeLacey Dash Valley 2 00 50.00 36.00
PNeblett, Alfred Dash Valley 1 2 00 200.00 a
4,718.00
APPLICATIONS FOR LOANS. PEASANTS’ LOAN BANK. “C”
Industry Hall | 8 2 26 1,200.00 —_
rist Church |
unum, C. Hugh G. Maxwell 9 0 Ov 570.00 -—




: APPLICATIONS FOR LOANS. PEASANTS’
































































|





1,770.00





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

_ Instructions
On Import
_ Licences

Instructions regarding the issue
of licences for imports from non-}
| sterling sources other than the
| United States of America and
Canada were issued to local im-
porters by the Control Office this
week,

According to those instructions, |
licences submitted to cover out-
standing orders on which goods
| have arrived in the colony should
be endorsed Outstanding Order.
Goods arrived invoices should be
presented so that the goods may
be written off when the licences
are issued, and goods on such
licences must be paid for by the
30th of June, 1952,

Licences submitted to cover
gcods ordered prior to the 13th
March but for which goods have
not arrived should be marked

Outstanding Order and the value
of such licences will be charged
to the Quota for “Outstanding
Orders” and marked not to arrive
before the second half of 1952.

Licences submitted to cover
new orders being placed should
also be endorsed “New Order’ and
the value will be charged to the
Quota for the second half of 1952.
Licences for outstanding orders
arriving in the second half of
1952 which exceed 50% of the
total value of outstanding orders
as returned to the Control Office
will be charged to the Quota for
half of 1952.

Licences to cover outstanding
orders not to arrive before the
second half of 1952 and licences
for new orders must be accom-
panied by copies of orders and
both orders and licences must have
the statement “The value of this
order or licence must under no
circumstance be exceeded.

It was also pointed out that as
from the 21st of May it would be
necessary to have all licences
issued written off at the Control
Office before presentation to the
Post Office or Customs for goods
to be duty paid.

Iran Violated
Soviet Treaty

—RUSSIA

TEHERAN, May 23

High Iranian government offic-
ials denied Soviet charges that
Iran has handed over control of
its army to the United States and
is violating the 1921 Soviet-Iranian
Treaty by accepting United States
military aid.

The charges were contained in
a note handed to the Iranian Am-
bassador in Moscow by Soviet
Foreign Minister Andrei Vyshin-
sky yesterday. The text of the
note was broadcast by Radio Mos-



the second













9:
LOAN BANK. “D” cow and published. in the Soviet
a Government’s newspaper Izves-
a ce ae a a tia to-day.
St. Michael The Soviet reference to the 1921
Birkett, Theodore Jacksons .. tos 200.00 _ Treaty caused some concern here.
4 Gittens, Rhoda Haggatt Hall 1 1 05 240.00 90.00 |The Treaty gave the Soviet Union
Griffith, Wendall Nr. Hothersal 2 00 100.00 36.00 -/the right to move troops into Iran
Headley, Alonza F. .. | Deacons Road } 3 30 300.00 os if foreign forces hostile to Russia
Jordan, Benjamin rd .. | Bank Hall 0 34 150.00 50.00 {entered Iranian territory.
| Kennedy, Maude H. White Hall 2 0 08 200.00 100.00 However an Iran government
© Lashley, William . os .. | Haggatt Hall 2 03 120.00 36.00 | spokesman said the Treaty stipu-
â„¢ Moseley, Keturah . | Haggatt Hall 2 0 06 200.00 144.00 /lated primarily that Iran would
7 Murray, Joseph & S. .. ’. | Green Hill 3 02 100.00 — |not support Czarist aggressive
© Smith, Lilian eng .. | Haggatt Hall | 1 0 04 100,00 40.00 /aims against the then new Soviet
Walcott, Julian T. ss "| | Friendship | 2 02 15.00 36.00 | Republic or permit its territory to
© Wallace, Seibert . 3 :, | Jackmans | 3 30 100.00 20.00 | be used for Czarist attacks on the
| Wiltshire, Druscilla \; Haggatt Hall 2 OL 15.00 25.00 | Republic. He denied that Iran’s
aie : tary advisers at this time contra- | $
Rear gg edie . | Garden 8 2 19 240.00 260.00 | vened the Treaty. Moreover, he|
F Bishop, Aubrey |. 2... | Westmoreland 2 10 80.00 — |said United States military ‘ad-|%
senate Lionet *" | Gariton | 1 4-12 150.00 95.00 | visers stationed in Iran comprised | %
Est Doughlin i Dec ner Dough- .Jonly a small corps and had no %
Elin, Eimin . s Orange Hill 2 13 30.00 36.00 |authority over the army or gen- |
ae Anse stus |. £ 2, Orange Hill 1 3 08 55.00 72.00 |darmerie. He said they serve only |
Barle: ann aa” Orange Hill 21 31 300.00 174.00 | in an advisory capacity. $
es ee int ny A. ws ttl eestor Oo 32 150.00 72.00 He also denied the Soviet charge |
ANTES WO yl nn 2 00 120.00 — |that Iran by accepting U.S. aid, | %
as ckham, Fitz Gerald ., “% ea Vie was co-operating with the United y
= ' States government in the imple-
ar eter sa : 2 21 60.00 | 36.00 |mentation of aggressive plans
a ris, Lilian —_.. ns ++ |The Whim 1 2 33 175.00 100.00 | against the Soviet Union,
Prrell, James E. ++ ++ |The Whim B “|| Russia seized upon last month’s | ¢
ae | . resumption of United States mil-
eeucy ; _. | itary aid to Iran as an excuse to
ant, Frederick .. Salmonds : : * go od 60.00 |ring charges of aggressive aims
ant, GEcres Crab Hill 1 0 22 150.00 80.00 |and Treaty violations against Iran,
Evelyn C, Sweet Field 2 25 50.00 50.00 —UP.
s, Leroy ¥ Nr. Wakenham 2 1 16 100.60 oe
iohnson, Ada L. .. i o a r és .
Mpkeete, Oliver DeC, Durham & Dooley 8 : = 400.00 Te Inter-Club Debate
earwood, Darnley Northumberland ; =O nip tition
' ‘ ' r| 10 ie
? -
.
Doughlin, Jonathan .. | Walkers 1 0 06 ie 72.00 The Second Round fixtures of x
Foster, Nathaniel -. |Rock Hall 1 0 00 ae 60.00 |the Inter-Club Debate competition .
Hunte, Archibald .+ |Belleplaine 1 0 10 100. 72.00 |sponsored by the Central Council | $
> Moore, Fitz ce oe «+ |Mount All | 1 3 00 100.00 80.00 {at the Old Scholars’ Association x
Roach, Leon DaC. .. |Cane Garden | 1 0 20 = 80.00 were completed last Thursday | %
Toney, Joseph Belleplaine | 1 0 00 120. —~ night, i ey %
at . P e motion “Tha e Fe a-|¢
St. Joseph sf ; tion of the British Caribbean] $
Alleyne, Alma B. Sugar Hill | 2 eae 100.00 40.00 | Territories is an urgent necessity” %
Brewster, Clement “a ee | 2 tb ooh be pode was ee aes peeuee x
Forde, Joseph N, .. s -. |Sugar Hi ’ - VU || proposers a ynch’s Secondary
: : School; St. John’s Cultural Club %
st. John also defeated St. James’ Brother-| »
Est. Codrington, F. si | hood, >
Dec. per Codrington E -. | Cliff Cot 2 00 40.00 36.00 In the other two instances, the |%
Shepherd, Fitz G. ee ++ |Nr. Glenburnie ; 1 3 03 150.00 126.00 ropemein ensued wy St. Augie
ne an ifton Hall, was defeat-
St. Philip : i ed by St. Martin’s and St. Jude’s %
Alleyne, John Wim, Merricks 1 0 04 100,00 — | respectively. >
Bannister, Allan & L. Eastbourne 2 00 100,00 bee! o of the debates took place
Brathwaite, Carol W. Nr. Bayleys & Bequest | 2 : = | es =e on Wednesday night os Ne ag es
Brathwaite, Edric .. | Eastbourne 2 | 40.00 ,! . two on Thursday night. e
Edgehill, Edward -B. - | Industry Hall oe ee 75.00 30.00 judges during the week were Mrs.
Forde, Clarence C. Kirtons 2 2 00 100.00 125.00 |Scott, Mr. Broome, Mr. Simmonds,
Holder, Warrick .. Nr. Hopeland 1 0 00 80.00 72.40 |Miss E. Bourne, Mr. C. Springer,
Hunte, James A. Merricks 1 0 00 715.00 | 70.00 jand Mr. Sainsbury; Mrs. C.
Jones, Ethelbert E. ‘* Diamond Valley 2 00 100.00 86.00 | Springer, Mr. Cameron Tudor, and
Jones, William DaC. .. Merricks 1 2 28 200.00 100.00 | Mr, E. C, Theobalds; Miss E. Mill-
Marshall, Donald N. . | Nr. Bequest 3 00 60.00 40.00 |ington, Mr. Aubrey Douglas-Smith
Mason, James -. es -. | Eastpoint 6 0 00 150.00 150.00 |and Mr. Douglas.
Proverbs, Cecilia et or ae a 2 20 40.00 Tr
Est. Wynfield, A, ec. per | = y be
Bushell, Dodson Diamond Valley 3 28 50.00 50.00 Western Union And >
oa 3 sal rf } ' : %
Christ Church ; | Ag ¢
f Clarke, oe oe po sg 1 : bo | 22 } se A.F.L. rée
Jones, Dudley . + Clapham ) 7 ‘ M : %
Legall, Alexander, ,- +» |Sayers Court 1 0 03 40:00 Mt ay cates Ow ale
Mayers, George D, “ +» |Nr. St. Patricks 2 0 .39 240.) == negotiators of the 5-19
Taylor, Marie «+ |Gall Hill 1 09 20.00 20.00 |tern Union Telegraph Company | %
BYIGF ss a dy rf e : and AFL Commercial Telegraph-
st, George he ers bee reached an “agreement
= . ‘ in in¢iple’” on a new contract
Corbin, Cecil A, .. a ++ | Workmans | 3 37 100.00 30.00 ad deowe toward a settlement of | $
Gittens, Allan” .. + ++ |Haggatt Hall 1 0 07 200.00 72-00 line seyen-week wirtice. ‘s
ee ae oe pe Greens 2 26 150.00 42.00 Federal mediator F Marvin| %
ea : " Sconyers said at 5.30 a.m. EST}
. Osford - +> |Haggatt, Hall 10 05 | 100.00 — that the final signing of the new|%
5 t, Arthur ' | Sweet Bottom 1 0 32 | 300.00 84.00 pact “could come ‘at any time”. 1%
mn, Rupert R., | Rock Hall 1 38 ly 80.00 | — |Negotiators have been in con-|%
| | \ |tinuous session since early last x
. Thomas | | | night. %
Bailey, Samuel J. |Kew Land 3 1 09 | 100,00 _ Sconyers said “There haven't|}
, Martha ** |Rock Hall 1 2 22 | 190.00 | 100.00 | been any snags but it is a pretty | @
Prince A - ; |Grand View 2 00 } 100,00 | 36.00 |complicated picture on wages and | %
Vernon Williams, ¥ Besa = 2 05 | 50.00 | 36.00 |hours. The language is pretty 1%
, May . - |Rock Hall 2 2 | 50.00 | — jtough to write.” The manage-|%
Cr 4 Lithes ” ee eae 100.00 | 36.00 |ment and union attorneys were | ”
| : eee neneees "5 |\going over the proposed new)¢*
| 8,689.00 ! contract item by item in the|%
fashionable Wardman Park Hotel |%
Gr Total $42,663.00 ; —U.P.



l asked
let
position”
accepted.

Delegate

date for

—_—

Talks Recessed
For Three Days

PANMUNJOM, May 23

United Nations truce delegations
three-day recess to
our
angrily

for a
Communists
and

“consider
the Reds
the

Despite break,

Major General William K. Har-
rison Set a firm “no nonsense” tone
in his first full day as Senior
He proposed the recess
after listening to another Commu-
nist propaganda blast. ‘ ; r
North Korean General Na 1 fight leading and jabbing with 9 ou ,

angrily slammed his pencil oe the straightest left he has yet 24 HL wie At School
table when Harrison proposed the Shown.
recess. Nam refused to suggest o

next meeting but ; é rdi
agreed when Harrison asked for the Italian only just managed to home, according to a
May 27,—U.P.

the

SPORTS
QUIZ

By SPORTS EDITOR

The Barbados Advocate
will award a book on sport
to the first person who sends
the correct answers to the
following questions,

1. CRICKET

What is the name of the
Barbados cricketer who, in
an Intercolonial fixture
with Trinidad, injured his
knee and was compelled by
the umpire to stand and
roll the ball underhand
down the pitch.

2. FOOTBALL

A team kicks off and by
clever combined play man-
ages to score without an
opponent playing the ball.
Should the referee award a
goal?

3. RACING

Name the Barbados own-
ed horse that won the
Trinidad Turf Club Cup at
the Christmas meeting 1927.
4. BOXING

From whom did Joe
Louis first win the world
heavyweight boxing cham-
pionship?

5. TABLE TENNIS

What is meant by the

term “Let” in table tennis?

NOTE: All entries for
“Sports Quiz” should be
addressed “Sports Quiz”,

c/o Advocate Sports Editor,
and must reach this office
by 12 noon on Saturday,
May 31. The correct
answers and the name of
the winner will be publish-
ed in the Sunday Advocate
of June 1,

Each entry must be
accompanied by A COUPON
as Set out below.

SPORTS

QUIZ





DRINK REAL BEER - HEINEKEN’S

9999999999999999009 290% —PLIOUO PTE
retention of United States mili- |% PSVV9OSS —POLSREPEESSSEOO SPSL LLLP PLP LPS

retiring
Senior Allied Delegate Vice-Ad- 2
miral G. Turner Joy. expressed *“ored
confidence that the talks eventu-
ally woyld bring
jand honcurable armistice.”

“an equitable





Em






St . . e
id y and right te.his jaw for a cou
Trin ad Night of eight aid he had no soone
: got to his feet’ that Pompey
At Albert Hall crowded in.on him and finished
him off with a heavy right.
Boxing Match In the chief supporting bout of
ve evening Ansell Adams, who
LONDON like Pompey comes from Trinidad,
It was Trinidad night in the Kocked out Jean Serres of Lux-

embourg in the third round. Like

boxing match in the Albert Hall, ;
fellow countryman, Adams

London, on May 13 when Yolande 5's

Pompey and Ansell Adams both put his opponent down twice be-
convincing victories. in fore the final knockout—a heavy

meir bouts. right to:the ribs.
Out of four “mixed bouts in

In three rounds Yolande Pom- the programme between coloured
pey, “Trinidad Tornado”, knocked und whité boxers only one white
out cruiserweight Guiliano. Pans boxer won.
cani of Italy in the most one
sided fight of the evening, It was
the main fight of the contest.

Pompey hardly exerted him-
self at all and he started the

—B.U.P.

Children Spend



In the second round he 3
dropped Pancani for a count of Toronto: Toronto children sit
nine with a vicious left hook and 28 hours a week watching TV at
report of
get to his feet in time. the City’s wemen teachers, The

In the third and last round children spend only 24 hours at
Pancani went down from a left school.





{A clear fresh skin is thé
foundation of beauty
Care for yours as I do,”",
says Ann Todd, “use Lux
\Woilet Soap regularly?”









Shiels



&
Care for yo

foundation of beauty!

MALTS 757-1459-00

epihetiatgiets





FOR THE OFFICE
AND
THE SCHOOL

ADVOCATE STATIONERY |

666Gb OOOS
PAPC PPAR AEE PPO PPPPPELLESP PP VPP SSS LOD

TABLE PENCIL SHARPENERS

LARGE OFFICE PENCIL SHARPENERS

STAPLING MACHINES
PERFORATORS
SPONGE BOWLS
STAMP DAMPERS
ROLLER BLOTTERS

WIRE STAPLES—Box of 5,000 for $1.32
CELLULOID CHEMISTRY STENCILS—

For School Children

BROAD STREET AND GHREYSTONE

4,4,4,4%4

ur skin as Ann Todd, lovely star of the J. Arthur Rank
Organisation, does—-use Lux Toilet Soap regularly. A daily faciat
with Lux Toilet Soap will give you a clear fresh skin — the
Cover your face generously with its rich,
+ creamy lather, and work it in thoroughly. Rinse first with warm,
» then with cold water, and pat gently dry. Your skin will take on ,
a new loveliness — the loveliness of the stars!

LUX 5
TOILET SOAP ae

The fragrant white soap of the film stars



PAGE SEVEN



4 Foreign Ministers.
i To Meet li Bonn



BONN, Germany, May+23.

The Big Three Foreign Minis-
ters come to Bonn on Friday to
offer West Germany the key place
in free Europe’s defences against
the menace of Soviet agression in
the first Foreign Ministers Con-
ference on German soil since
World War II

Diplomatic leaders of Britain,
United States, France and West
Germany are slated to sign a
peace contract binding 48,000,009
Germans west of the iron curtain
te the Atlantic community, politi-
cally and militarily,

Once signed tne Peace Pact
faces high hurdles of ratification
by four nations’ parliaments with
the major trouble expected in the
Bonn Assembly. Across the iron
curtain in East Germany commun-
ist leaders are warning of civil
war and making implied threats
to blockade Red surrounded Ber-
lin,—(CP),





ot

- ~
4 LEVER propuct

ess
PPP PPPOE APPS S

$

+

4 $6,666 656656606068
PPLE LPL LLL ELL PLL PAN



PAGE FICAT



CLASSIFIED ADS. Prmue Nonies

TELEPHONE 2508

| FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

heelter Car in good order—
per gallon. For further in-
Dial 4100 or 8133, 23.5.52.—%n.

IN MEMORIAM



























































BULBUMA; |
Yousuf M. Bulb t ‘ tex
fe ¢ 4
Tf i € i ‘ 1x ie
Hi € | t

Ever

childre’







CAR-—ford Prefect late 1950 model.
General condition good,



in















































16,000. Apply Withnall, Fi
Phone 3409 8.5.52—t.f.n.
F | CAR-—One 1936 Standard Car 16 h.p. in
| sood condition with 5 good tyres. Apply
- }to Mr. V. Gibson Prior Park Plantation,
~ St. James. Dial 2030 =
HOUSES | fain thon
BILTMORE—Fittz Village, St, James,| “cap reat tase Monae
On sen. Three Bedrooms, Dining and | ),,0 4% Ope IU Ford re oe ahe
Drawing rooms, Electricity, running water {9179 oy 9817 24.5.52—2n
in each room. Garage and servant's room. | © See oan .
Dial-0155 17.5.52—t£-n. | “CAR.One Vauxhall Car 25 hp. with
oe 7y 9s senda 5 4 tyres In excellent condition. Dial
BUNGALOW,—Maxweli's Coast, Christ | > go0e %) 2
Church, fully furnished house with four 4514, Grifitia, Roekiey. mee a
bedrooms. Good sea bathing. To an ap-
proved tenant for the month of June ELECTRICAL
Apply Mrs. J. H. Wilkinson, Phone 2404 -
24.5,52—3n.| BATTERIES Ediswan Batteries. 6
a rs Volt, 11, 13 and 15 plates; 12 Volt, 9,
FLAT & HOUSE—Fully furnished, St.]11 and 13 plates, Get our prices first.
Lawrence on-Sea Phone 3508 Dial 3878 and 4710, Da, Costa & Co. Ltd.
20.3.52—t.f.1 Electrical Dept. 16.5.52—én.
GLASSES-—For Dances and othe! ELECTRIC MOTORS—‘% h.p. 110/220
social funetions. Cheap rate per dozen. | volts, Single Phase. Dial 3878 or 4710.
3rd floor 53, Swan Strect 4 5.5%-\' | DA. COSTA & CO. LTD., Electrical
eee Dept. 16.5.52+6n.
WANTED EDISWAN BATTERY CHARGERS
‘ Will charge up to 18 six-volt Batteries
or thelr equivalent ot 6 Amps. Fort use
on 110 Volt Single Phase cireuit. Dial
HELP 2878 or 4710. DA, COBTA & CO. LTD.,
a oaenenscile becndanstnnpine-s Electrical Dept. 16.5.52—6n
HOUSE MAID ‘ nn tL
reliable references App!y Gard FRIGIDAIRE,—Westinghouse in good
House”, St. George on. 5,52—3n | working order Dial 4086, Elec-
_— trical 24.5.52—2n





RADIO-ELECTRICIAN for our Elec Te nel














trical Department. Apply in person. Wrr FLOOR POLISHERS, Used in conjum
arty (B'dos) Lid 22.5.02—t.f.1 tion with Johnson's Floor polishes will
keep your Floors looking new. Dial
MISCELLANEOUS 3878 or 4710, 16,5.52—6n.
———
” ee tc ae, GARRARD RECORD CHANGERS—
STAMPS. 100 lots. Barbados aii}, Speed. A few left Call‘early and
other WT. colonies. Cash, Sra floor 55.1 avoid disappointment P.C. S. Maffei
Swan St 5 Bin} ee Co. Tid 215.52-—-5n

“TM Vv. RADI >GRAMS ~ New Me

] _ ; ‘Tv . ; ‘
will speed Chen@ers and Record Cab-
ANNOL Ne IMEN s inet ol 2e78 or 4718, DA. COSTA &
Co, LTD, Kiectrical Dept.



: 16.5.52-6n.
ATTENTION LADIES ie
have fust revefved





We Fashic













































a RADIO,One 5 Tube Phillips in good
hooks for mid-summer, with over 250) woreing order, Apply Mrs, Mabel May-
Freneh stvies In each names like these pard, Mothersal Turning Octovia Ville,”
mean the latest tn Fashions, hurry anrdiey agenaei 24 in.
get your copies now as a

at RANDAL y + Thr
se VACUUM CLEANERS.-Three sizes to
Reed and Tutor Stroets select from, Keeps thaccessible corners
246.52 20 | clean, Dial 8878 OF 4710, DA, COSTA
“1& CO, LTD, Flectriesi Dept. agin
4 * 16,55 nm,
PERSONAL
ene iat dlaonenenetinllniashitaanssan MISCELLANEOUS
The public are hereby warned against, —————————-——~ a ve
giving credit to my wife, Winifred Oreta AGA-REX COMPOUND for Constipa-
Smith (née Wilkinson) as I do not hold] tion, a palatable creamy Emulsion of
myself responsible for her or anvore|liquid Paraffe. Price 3/- bot. Knight's
else contracting any debt or debts in my] Ltd 20.5.52—3n
name unless by a written order signed SS
by me BAROMETERS, Thermometers, and
(Sed.) FRED ALBERT SMITH Hygrometers, These instruments are
St. Paul Ave., Bay Land German made and only perfectly ad-
St. Michael, Barbados. | justed movements are used. K. R.
24.5.52--2n. | Hunte & Co., Ltd., Lower Broad St
—— ——— 22.5.52—3n
The. public are hereby warned against ihe ctilttinninnt utieatineeniieatinds. tabdintnatiingg he
giving cfedit to my wile, lanthe Gibbes DECCA RECORDS: Clearances, Three
inée Pierre) as I do not hold myself] for $2.00 The Trovellers Club, Brad-
responsible for her or anyone else con-} shaw Building, St, Michael's Row.
tracting any debt or debts in my name 22.56.52. fn,
unless by a written order signed by me ait til
(Sed.) LESLIE GIBBES, HOUSEHOLD EQUIPMENT of oll
Westbury Road, description. Owen T. Alider, 118 Roebuck
St. Michael. | Street. Dial 3299, 10.5.52-—t.f.n.
24.5,62-—2n.
me le nearer TRONERS—Oprim Industrial Lroners. A
The public are hereby warned against] complete Woner for Home or Laundry.
giving credit to my wife, Florence Dray-] pial 3878 or 4710. DA. COSTA & CO,
ton (née Sargeant) as Lo not hold my-| LTp., Electrical Dept.
self responsible for her or anyone else 16,5,52—6n.
contracting any debt or debits in my etl eats
name unless by a written order signed NEW STOCK OF BOOTS’ MINERAL
by me. .
(Sad) DOUGLAS DRAYTON, SAUTE shthos Weninerhena Limitady solic
Near Crane, ing Agents for Messrs, Boots i
Pt Whe Nottingham 20.5,52—5n
PIANO—BENTLEY In excellent con-
a these throbbing pains in dition Phone 8435 24.5.52—4n
seeds sae elpsmmthatieliniaheteanierigsteatcusniaisitittadetne
Subscribe now to the Datly Telegraph
Apply England's leading Daily Newspaper now
arriving in Barbados by Air only a few
days after publication in London. Con-
tact: San Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltd.
Local Representative, Tel, 3118.
| 17,4.52—t.f.n.
.
ed OST & FOUND
—_
LOST
You don’t rub in “Sloan's” you dab it

on the affected part gently“ Sloan's
does the rest! Good for (——
aches and pains and stiff RAY
joints too! =

LOOK FOR THE
PICTURE OF DR. SLOAN

BICYCLE—New Brand Humber, M—
5, missing from Four Square Garage,
Philip, on Tuesday, 20th, Finder re-

St
warded on returning to Prince ok Dia-
|






mond Valley, St, Philip, 245, a

Public Official Sale

(The Provost Marshal's Act 1901
(1004-6) 8 30).
On Friday the 6th day of June, 1952













at the hour of 2 o'clock In the afternoon
will be sold at my office to the highest
bidder for any sum not under the ap-
praised value all that certain piece of
land containing by admeasurement 2
Roods 41/10 Perches situate at London
Road, Brittons Hill in the
Michael,

10-DaY'S NEWS FLASH



parish of St.
butting and bounding on lands
now or late of Mrs, E. Clarke, now or
late of Josephine Me Clean, now or late
of William Davis and on London Road

ns ‘s ~ or however else the same may abut and
CELLOPHANE PAPER bound, together with the messuage or
" Dwelling House, Buildings, &c., apprais-

Has Arrived ed as follows:
To The whole property to Five Thousand







JOHNSON'S Plorende King for and towerds sailstee-
WE ARE “SEL LING OUT NB a5¢ Deposit to be paid on day
OUR STOCK OF eens T. T. HEADLEY,
WINDOW GLASS Tae a ona Marshal

A Bargain tor Builders 22nl May, 1952



24.5.52—n,

JOHNSON’S HARDWARE

FOR RENT

Valuable business premises on
Rickett Street above the Post
Office with back entrance on Mar-
hill Street. Frontage contains two
entrance doors and large show
window. Ideally suitable for any
class of business, especially a
Drug Store. In close proximity t>














SPANISH
LESSONS

Quick and Practical Course












with Specis 3 parking places and the ‘Bus
F ial Attention to Stands Also cool and spacious
Correct Pronunciation. offices upstairs over the premises
> ile referred to above. These offices
Pupils accepted singly or anc business premises will be
in groups. rented separately or together as

may be desired. Apply to:—



Mrs. PARMERTON
Tel. 8134

EVELYN, ROACH & Co., Ltd,
Rickett Street
24,5.52—t fn

ORIENTAL
PALACE

HEADQUARTERS FOR







YOUR HOME IS
YOUR EMPIRE

FURNISH




















LIKE A QUEEN SOUVENIKS
TOP VALUES—in Bureau re INDIA, CHINA &
counter-sunk, bowfront and fia CEYLON
tops. with 1 to 7 drawers wit
pedestals, or Cabiiole and othe

Smart | egs,

THANI'S

h Pound or othe:









Brilliant sin r Triple Mirrer

—Bedsteads, Wardrobes ests of >
Drawers, Mar t er her Pr. Wm. By. St. Dias si66
Washstand Night






TABLES,—Several size

hapes








woods, finishes, for Pini an‘ ¢.

eee uses eae ~ f Ching Bendix A { .
phe! « 2 der i

Liquor cases $5.50 up ann I u omatie

Ice Boxes, Enamelled Ware Drair







ers $3.00,



Washing Machines.

DRAWING ROOM FURNITURE





















~in Morri Canec othe —
styles
These Machmes are entirely
PIANOS.— Tvpewri Pra automatic, simply toad with
Trunk Clocks $3.12 ur clothes, set to Wash. 45 minutes
jater remove th lothes which
have been washed, rinsed three
times and damp dried
So simple, So [labour saving,
Get one from DA COSTA & CO
LTD Elect. Dept
SPRY STREET. DIAL 4069 16.5.52—6n



above
obtain a loan of £4,000 under the pre-































AIDS ACT. 105.

To the creditors holding gpectalty liens

against Maynards Plantation St. Peter
TAKE NOTICE that I, owner of the
named plantation. am about to



















The above property will be set up for

sale by Public Competition at our Office,
James Street, on Friday Gth Jane, at 2
p.m

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,

!
Solicitors. |

22.5.52-—8n

very desirable. Situ-



LAND,—' Acre,

ated at Shop Hill, Grandview, Main Rd.

St, Thomas. Apply Gilbert Millar, Fitts
Village, St. James, 24.5,52—1n.
. Umited number of OR-

in THE

Za. per share, Fret of stamp duty”

. per e. e stamp du

CARRINGTON & ALY
13,5.52—12n



SHOPS—Three shops situated at Eagle

Hall corner, Purchaser to remove same
within ten days from date of sale. Apply
e General Traders Ltd

23.5.52—-3n
THIS ATTRACTIVE HOME
An extremely well built, modern three





“WILTSHIRE PLANTATION” — and
dwellinghouse “WHITE HAVEN” situate

in St. Philip with about 202 acres of
land made up as follows: 102 acyes
arable, 7 acres tenantry, 22 acres in

sour grass, 71 acres in roads and woods
ete., also 4 fan mills, 1 motor truck, 1
bull, 2 cows, 1 horse, 2 donkeys and 1
donkey-cart. Together also with 1,870
shares in Three Houses Factory Limited
Inspection by appointment. Phone Mr
A. T. Skeete, “Bentley” 2535. The
above property will be set up to public
competition for sale to the highest
bidder beyond the appraised value at 2
p.m. on Friday the 6th day of June 1852
at our Office. For further particulars
and conditions of sale apply to the under-

signed.
CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Lucas Street
23.5. 82—13n

High Blood Pressure
Kills Men & Women

Twice a3 many women as men 5. -
fer from High Blood Pressure, which
is a roy ecerods disease that starts
about the time of Change of Life and
is the real cause of much heart troub!y
and later on of paralytic strokes. Com-
mon symptoms of High Blood Pray-
gure are: Nervousness, headaches i{
top and back of head and above eyer,

ressure in head, dizziness, shoit

reath, pains in heart, palpitation,
poor sleep, loss of tnemory and energy,
easily excited, fear and worry. If you
suffer any of these symptoms, don (
delay treatment a single day, because
your life may be in danger. Noxco
(formerly known as Hynox), a new
m very, reduces Hi Blood
Pressure with the first Seen takes a
a load off the heart, and makes
i eel years younger in a few days,

et Noxco from your chemist today.
ft is to make you fee! fr
ead or





DO NOT BE FOOLED BY

FASHION

For the next week
10% on all Dry Gooc's
do not have to spend

This is just to mee
Competitors to know
cheap or even cheape
may .

A. E. TAYLOR LTD.

The Real Price Cutters in Barbados

Ne ee RN Seer





A.

BARBADOS
CATIONAL |



EDI





CHRIST CHURCH



ADVOCATE



OFFICIAL NOTICE

IN THE, COURT OF CHANCERY

BARBADOS



BO .N i
"iene aoe, scnool | IN PURSUANCE of the Chancery Act, 1906, I do hereby give notice to all
Sudee WH SS aus ee tships ’ pereane having or aplstming any estate, right or interest or any lien or in-
aoe r more vacancies|cumbrance in or affecting the property hereinafter mentioned ‘the property ef |
for Foundation Scholars at the Christ| the defendant)) to bring before me an account of their claims with their sinceete |

Church Bove’































ch
18.5.52—4n

OHRIST CHURCH GIRLS’ FOUND ATION



























CANADIAN SERVICE
SOUTHBOUND



SCHOOL SAILS FROM
ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1952 z Montreal Arrives Barbados
Applications for entry to the School in} 6/8 “ALCOA PILGRIM” May 5th May 1lith
tember, 1952, must be made on the| S/S ‘“TINDRA” May 16th May 26th
cial form which can be obtained at /s “TISTA” .. May 30th June 9th
the School on Mondays—Fridays between | 8/8 “ALCOA POINTER” June 13th June 23rd

9.30 a.m. and 3.00 p.m

Applicants must be between the ages
of 8 years and 11 years, 6 months on the 8
Ist of September, 1952.

The entrance examination will be held

BARBADOS | at the School on Friday, 13th June, 1952,

at 9.30 a.m. There will be no accom-
modation at the School for Parents or
Guardians on that day.

Application forms must be returned to
the Headmistress not later than Friday,
30th May, 1952,

11.5.52—Gn. .

Revitalise Your

KIDNEYS









sons. Get Cystex from any Chemist on

Guararntet to put you right
Act Now! In 24 hour

weil in

and be
one week,

ee Cystex> Che Guar:

antee
“or Kidneys, Preumetivm, Bladder tects you.

PPPOE SSPSS PISO,
The well-known Sports:
Mr. CLÂ¥YTON EASTMOND
(known as “Kilroy'’)

the pleasure

or money
you will




hack
feet better



throw off acids and poisons, now creep.
ing to joints and muscles..In 24 hours
complete




requests of your













NORTHBOUND

‘s “ALCOA POINTER” Due Barbados May 17th for St. Lawrence River Ports

een a are

ROBERT THOM LTD..Y{ NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
Apply:— DA COSTA & CO., LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE

HARRISON LINE



ee

bedroom (or two and den)
BUNGALOW of stone and concrete con- ‘And You'll Feel Young—Look Young OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
struction. ee ae ibe Nothing ages man or woman more
m Bilchen. Floor to ceiling). 'y We Pia enaien son cueiar tre Vessel From Leaves Due

teda: n closets N » & ing, Iteh “ . ‘wpor
Attractively laid out garden with fruit Pass Boa barven: Diaziness, Wheue S.S. “MERCHANT” bi t & 5th M a hare
trees and ample room for vegetables. m, Backache, Leg Pains, Circles ~s % Liverpool ay May
Gar: with breezeway to house and under Eyes, Swolfen Ankles, Loss of |S.S. “COLUMBIA STAR Liverpool 7th May 20th May
detached self-contained maid's quarters Appetite, Energy, etc., bec kid- 15.S, “TRIBESMAN” London &
The Property is coolly and delightfully neys which should filter blood il to M/br gh i 27t
situated within easy reach of main road « ” 7 t/ ‘ou 9th May 27th May
at Worthing, Offers over £4,000 Ph, 856, Pere ee iano aces stranethe 5S. “SELECTOR' Liverpool &

24.5.82—1n ehs kidneys and expels acids and poi- Glasgow 17th May 1st June



HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM

_ Vessel For Closes in Barbados
S.S. “GRELROSA” Liverpool 15th May
S.S. “HERDSMAN” London 22nd May

For further information apply to
DACOSTA & CO., LTD.—Agents



company at his 000 SOS 30 2556909 939 <5
%

DANCE ~ KITCHEN CUTLERY OF ALL DESCRIPTION

On SUNDAY NIGHT x
. 25TH MAY, 1952 2 SPOONS, KNIVES, FORKS, FISH TURNERS, ETC,

At UNITED SOCIAL CLUB,
Marehfield, St. Philip, Obtainable at...
(Kindly lent by the Management)
ADMISSION: $3 2/- i, Va
| Music oy. Mr. ©. B. Browne's THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
Â¥ rchestra
% REFRESHMENTS ON SALE Corner Broad and Tudor Streets
$%6+50456006066490446600) | V.oncosccessocneoneosonsncancnecooososoosesenets«
Beveovesereyereeyeorrrry SPSSSTSSSSSS S999 S9SS9 GOSS OGD SSOS FOP te
vig

. ° ole
'§ Removal Notice Make
| % ‘ 81% Saturday
3 We desire to inform our % .
{% customers that on the 29th, ¥ os
1% 30th & 3ist, we shall be ¥ Sahely
1% moving our offices and »
|@ stocks to our new premises, X Day Shirts
|% Lower Bay Street, former- ——
'% ly occupied by Ralph Beard, y We have just
| e and consequently will be :
1% closed to business, | Received
'é ——— +
a ores oe " : : LTD.
8 STOKES & BYNOE a New
6.656656, COS OPPO POOPIE

PARADES.

°

&. TAYLOR is givin
from one dollar up. You
$30.00,

»t Competition and allow
that we will sell just as
r than they, come what

Sd



— DIAL: $e2 4100 —
where
They are no Parking Problems
and where
Qualities are HIGH
and

Prices are LOW

5
PLLC LELLLPP PPL PPLTS



SHIPMENT
OF

DRESS and SPORTS
SHIRTS

By ELITE



SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS... ) $8.20
POLAR DRESS SHIRTS 2 ti » $5.20

“O” POPLIN DRESS SHIRTS ve ee $4.75 & 4.85

By RENOWN

MANHATTAN DRESS SHIRTS .... .f
EXCELSIOR a bs oi g by 7
HIGHTONE + »» Fe @ $3.69
GABARDINE SPORT SHIRTS vs @ 3 92

OTHER SPORT SHIRTS
By PREMIE

@ $6.60—7.36 & 4.41

FANCY SPORT SHIRTS ae $e & @ $3.25
BOYS’ FANCY SPORT SHIRTS .. =i ng @ $2.19
KOOL KEEMF SPORT SHIRTS ‘> $8.83
PLAIN SPUN SPORT SHIRTS ba @” $4.39
CHECK SPUN SPORT SHIRTS ue 8 $5.85

Also
NEW YORKER aa SHIRTS
4

@ $4.
So Remember

EE
AHELY & CO—
Hine O—19 Swan St. for

ATURDAY’S and all the year
round

Phone 4934





“The Land

of
taining 72,550 square feet more or
| situate near Westbury School in the par-
ish of Saint Michael
| Barbados
| hereto and more particularly shown and
| delineated on a plan of survey signed
| Pa ‘dinted 18th Toone
and ani

the office of the Colonial Engineer having
been decided on
the aperovel
| Legislature
L fesaiessteen of the Houses of the Legisia-

of Section 5 of the Land Acquisition
Act, 1949, that the said lands have been
acquired for the following public
poses:

| bury School.
72,550 sq. ft. situate to the south
of Westbury School in Westbury Road

the north on lands of the Westbury
| Schoot and of Dudley Weekes, on the y
%
%








visions of the above Act, inst Foundation School in| documents and vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday. be-
Sugar, Molasses and other enn A the peptone. =. : tween the hours of 12 noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration |
said plantation te be yoruin’ tex sees aaa nee will be held at the Office, Public Buildings, Bridgetown, before the 4th day of July 1952 in
No money has yet been borrowed} Jane bene “< am Sat 4th |} order that such ciaims may be reported and ranked according to the nature
against the said crops, aan e orms of applic tiog be | and priority thereof respectively, otherwise such persons will be precluded from
Dated this 93rd day of May 1962. obtained from the Seerétary, Mr 1). E. M.{the benefits of any decree and be deprived of all claims on or against the said
) = meee a at Harrison College, ond must} property
E ‘ ¢ returned to him together with,a Birth
. nek Page Sartibente not later than PLAINTIFF: HUGH OWEN SAINT CLAIR CUMBERBATCH
' m. on ay 30th May, 195 DEFENDANT: T D. SI -0., Li y
vt en” bien Ae ee aoe THE SUGAR INDUSTAY Candidates must be— e ny a: ee ”
AGRICULTURAL BANK ACT 148 er ao 2 te of parishoners of |PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate near Warners
Te the creditors holding specialty liens pinot sehen who aré in strait- in the parish of Christ Church and Island aforesaid formerly
agains eys Plantation, St. Peter (2) Between the apes, supposed to contain by estimation four acres or thereabouts but
KE NOTICE that }, the owner, of te pears eae of 10 and 12 found by recent survey to contain five acres and six perches Of |j.1¢ it is hereby
the above Plantation am bout to obtain maton hes ig A of the exam | thereabouts abutting and bounding on the North on lands of | 0
a loan of £2,200 under the provisions of ms . EM Wes ore Warners Plantation on the East on lands fo herly o¢ Alea Wateast
r a APN Ee, a J may
it cared ot Se Karta yon Sorter treasure Gece “ane tt "on iandt'st"Giseme" alt" an
to 1953. niet Soe ~~ ; — of T. Cox and on a road and Sn the += on the Public
No money has been borrowed under . ~~ ad or however else the same may abut an und
the Agricultural Aids Act, 1905, or the eae Rill filed: 29 Januamy 1952
above Act (as the case may be) in re- CHRIST CHURCH —— i Lae April, 1952 i. wILLiaMe
Dated aie te ay of M 1952 BOYS’ FOUNDATION SCHOOL Registrar-in-Chancery
ee GILL Samuel Kirton Scholarships 29 .4,52—3n
? : Owner ‘ poe aor ¥ one ore vacancies
or Samue irton Scholars it ive
22.5.52—3n Christ Church Bors’ Foundation "Sct ol
in September, 1952
THE SUGAR INDUSTRY AGRICUL- An aminat it ‘
; amina ill be heid at tre
TURAL BANK ACT 1943 @chool at 33 an. 2 :
To the creditots holding spectatty itens| Sane jos) pore ny a ptturday, 14h
e, 195 f application can be
against Bagatelle Plantation, St. | “aytnined from the Seer
u tary, Mr. b. E. M, —_— - — aa
Thomas. be
z / Malone, at Harrison College, and must MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW Nera te VO
ER NOTICE that we the owne's | oe returned to him together with a Birth ZEALAND LINE LIMITED. d
Tryhane of the above Plantation are ba pe eee Certificate not later than (M.A.N Z_ LINE) The a . oon an
about to obtain a joan of £8,000 under | 2, Pine must eee ae? Oe | com Bee pine Miny Stat Devonport | Passengers for St. Lucia, St
the provisions of the above Act against : lates must be ali from Pirie May 3ist, Devonport a St. + .
Ge: ad Biante, WA waapest cd the (1) Children attending an Element: June 5th, Melbourne June 14th, Sydney Vincent, Grenada, and Aruba.
Agricultural year 1952 to as School in the parish of Chr.st|June 24th, Brisbane July 5th, arriving at Sailing Wednesday 28th inst
No monéy has been borrowed under | (2) ee... * Barbados about August 6th. The M/V “MONEKA" will
the Agricultural Aids Aet, 1905, or the | Christ ch a parishioners 0! In addition to general cargo this vessel accept Cargo and passengers for
above Act in respect Of such year a murch who are in strait-|has ample space for chilled and hard Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Dated this 28nd day of May, 1952 ened circumstances, frozen cargo Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing
Cc. £ YHANE et al 4) Between the ages of and 12 ; Thursday, 29th inst.
; tAti eyvewd inclusive on the day of the exam Cargo accepted on through Bills of .
Per: R. E. King ren ti { June. 1982 Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to The M/V “CARIBBEE” will
it letras D. E. M. MALONE, ae Guiana, Leeward and Windward meant Saree gna Enseaneets for
ri Secretary-Treasurer slands minica, ntigua, ontserrat,
. Nevis 2 s § Sat-
stiesnanicdek ee toe x more vacant Ch, Ch, Boys Foundetion Bon | wor Survige Sertieniars Sopaye A Aaaoe Fe Fine se al
St. Michael's Vestry Exhibitions at | 10 5.§2-—4n FURNESS WITHY & CO., LTD., B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’
QUEEN'S COLLEGE will be received by - a tig TRINIDAD. ASSOCIATION (INC)
the Clerk of the Vestry up to 12 noon a eens CHURCH DA couen bb. Li. Consignee — Tele. No, 4047
on. Wednesday, 28th May 1952. GIRLS’ FOUNDATION SCHOOL ¥ & . LTD. r
Candidates must be the daughters of Foundation Schelarships BARBADOS, BW.)
parishioners in straitened circumstances | There will be one or more vacancies | —————————— —
and must not be less than 9 nor morej;for Foundation Scholars at the Christ
than 12 yeara of age on the 2nd Sep-*Church Girls’ Foundation School in e.
tember 1952, to be proved by a Baptismal! | September, 1952 aaenetntes
Certificate Which must accompany «th An Examination will be held at f! 0.
application School at 9.30 a.m. on Friday 1th \
tms of application will be issued and | June, 1952. Forms of application can be
received at the Vestry Clerk's Office | obtaimed from the Secretary, MroD. F.'M .
between the hours of 10 a.m. and| Malone, at Harrison Colle and must
12 hoon. be returned to him together with a Birth | ————-———————_—_———— Me
B. Cc. REDMAN, tor Baptismal Certificate not later than
Cierk, St. Michael's Vestry. {3 7 Pires on Friday 30th May, 1952 NEW YORK SERVICE.
ttn aire — — ~ a es must be
. | () The Children of parishoners of A STEAMER sails May 9th—arriv.s Barbados May 21s
PUBLIC SALES Christ Church who are in stratt- A STEAMEBN galls Mey S8U:-ait ven Betbadee tan ath
ned circumstances ipldosin 5
5 (2) Between the ages of 10 and 12 :
REAL ESTATE | inelusive on the day of the exom NEW ORLEANS SERVICE.
aueadunialais ination, i.e, 13th June, 19 % **
BUNGALOW Stonewall Bungaiow | D. E. M. MALONE, oe eee cee sails May 10th—arrives Barbados May 2th,
known as Banyan Beach, Brighton, Black Secretary-Treasurer, BTRAI sails May 24th—arrives Barbados June ith.
Rock, Saint Michael, with 11,100 square Governing Body
feet of land thereto. Ch, Girls! Foundation School, | “een ee a ees

re

—=>",
==

SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1952










FORM I

Acquisition Act,
1949

(Notice required by Section, 5)
THE acquisition, for public purposes,
the following pa of land ya

THE SALVATION ARMY

For the maintenance of its local
work, The Salvation Army will
observe its Annuel Tag-Day in
St. Michael and the joining Par-
ishes on Friday 6th June.
worded “To Help Others” will be
on sale

in the Island of

described in the Schedule








ARRIVED
Another Shipment of the

POPULAR

84180 GAS COOKERS

A few of these have nov yet
been booked,

Prices of next shipment will be

Why not call at yout Gas Show-
rooms, Bay Street TO-DAY anc
secure one of these cookers.

Sworn Surveyor,
1962 and filed in

y the Governor with
Houses of the
of the Island of Barbados by

of
declared in pursuance

pur-
for enlarging the playing ground

and otherwise for the use of the West-



THE SCHEDULE
A}l that certain parcel of land contain-

SOME SAY...
There are no Embalmers
in Barbados
OTHERS SAY...
Plumbing is not
Embalming
WE SAY...

Let's Bury Your
Dead !!

in the parish of St. Michael, bounding

south on the public
lands of Mr. Stanley
Jordan et

nth day of May 1952,
House in the Island of

east and By hem

drain on the west on

Hawkins and on lands of M.

al, and on the public road.
Dated this fourtee:

at Government

Barbados.

ALFRED SAVAGE,
Governor.
22.5.52—3n

Elecirical Installations
and Repairs.

Wiring Department carries
rece . of Wiring

SELF-HELP
ENTERPRISES LTD.

Undertakers and Funeral

a complete stock
Accessories and will undertake
the installation or repair of all
kinds of Wiring Jobs in Homes



Factories.

My Dial 3878 or 4710. Directors
Learn to remember numbers. Tweedside Road, St. Mic! 1
Practice on Ours. hae

DA, COSTA & oo, LTD., i.

Electrical Dept. PH /

16,5.52—6n. NE:
Day 3958 — Night 2939
e

* $1.00 Shares Available
% Last Year's Dividend 5%

POPSSPEOS SLOOP COGS
{

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
READING ROOM

You will enjoy the epic story of

“MARY BAKER EDDY AND
HER BOOKS”

999999

i

The Loyal Brothers
of the Star

By WILLIAM DANA ORCUTT

This book may be read, borrowed

or purchased at the Reading Room.
BOWEN & SONS. Broad Street



Open Tuesdays, Wednesda, al Proudly Presents
jaws 10 n. to 12 o'clock.
gee ke aie to 2 p.m. and 1952 BARBADOS
CARNIVAL,

; ALL ARE WELCOME.

aul copamreaneial At QUEEN’S PARK














SG SSSOOOP POP SOOSS ON
" THURSDAY, 6th and
§ Competition ! 1! SATURDAY, 7th JUNE
Here’s TEN SHILLINGS

A. COSTUME BANDS
B. STEEL

for you =

What are these five jum-
bled words?

*UREINS

ADVERTISING BANDS
D. HISTORICAL BANDS

In order to raise the standard of
Carnival in this island the Steer-
ing Committee would appreciate

*OYRU the co-operation of firms, ¢lubs
* UNRTIUR and individuals being as original
AS as possible.
* .
on Admission: Adults 1/6 Children 1/-

Bookings for Booths and
contact Mr. . Morris,

Lane. .
Closing date for above will be
closed on 3rd June, 1952.

Stands
First correct entry open- Sobers
ed gets the prize.

Closing date May 31, at
12 noon.
Mark your reply
petition and sen
NEW INDIA

ASSURANCE CO. LTD
12 High Street

Special Frise of 69040 awarded

best apprepriste Rhyme
Calypso Special Performances by
the Boodoos Brothers and Party.

SISSSOSSSSSSS FOS POSS SSA SPF SSOSS

- NEILSON’S” |

CHOCOLATE HARS
JUST ARRIVED {

Large Variety Of Flavours

Obtainable From All Dealers
Get Yours Today





THE NEW

CORDUROY



SHOE





The latest and
most modern in
Rubber Soled SHOES
suitable for Dress and
Sports Wear.

A real Bata Scoop!

Available in
BLACK - BROWN - WINE

ALI, SIZES

PRICED AT ONLY $3.35 PAIR.
SHOES

Remember ! cost less at

|





eee SSeS
aeaeaNeSRENSoNe aoe pee i ,
a











BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE NINE





BY CARL ANDERSON



NATIONAL EMPLOYERS MUTUAL

GENERAL INSURANCE ASSN. LTD.

Offer You Insurance Against
All Risks.

When you Insure with N.E.M. You become a Member—

Your Problems, Difficulties & Claims are ||




SURELY VOURE MISTAKEN, MRS.DE LAZLON.
YOUVE PUT 1T SOMEWHERE FOR SAFETY
AND FORGOTTEN...




THE DOOFS STILL LOCKED
-~ ON THE INSIDE!






= treated in’a spirit of Mutual Co-operation
may prem auey ~
Sewen case RisaT Why Not Enjoy the Difference ||

\\ THERE O
f ) DRESSINS TABLE.
Sr a DY
: 4
de - a







Full Particulars at Your Disposal—

From—A. §. BRYDEN & Sons (8'dos) Ltd.

AGENTS.





Ir PAYS YOU *0 DEAL HERE

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday fe Saturday only

———SS SN Caer cease rear ane
SPECIAL OFFERS are now avuilable at our Branches Tweedside,
Speighistown and Swan Street
tie ee er See ee Teele eneuenemmaenmatenl



H LORETTA IS
FINALLY FALLING ) |S
K FOR ME, POP
mi! f
Si






















Usually Now



Tins Orange Juice .... " $ 36 $ 32
Tins FANCY BISCUITS: T ‘ ‘ a
PUAwROR kins, 2.08 1.68 mu 4 ay q ANNED
Dress Circle .......... 2.05 1.68 VEGETABLES
Joy Bells ............ 2.12 1.68
l IT'S OVER...AS y RESULT: THERMAL Tins Imp: Oxford Sausages 69 64
erree ; Sis peed nD Tins Brussels Sprouts
E mS r UL * = “sy § . a ee rer ee er re
THE SUN'S, ZoRMID Dy © 565 % LIVE UNDER THOSE Tins HEINZ SOUPS: ‘ ok ita eRe es ais os de cae be
OUT AGAIN ! / Cie? (VE AIM (: Ga asa) A DEAD Vegetable ............ A a2 RE NORE DORON 6 eA gs hee i oieos 98
HOPELESSLY > . f i pane Celery CWROM) icici cesses 98
ON 4 eee a= Oxtail ....... 6. eee, 34 32 ee CONT. CORE). visi cma Knees keeseas 70

Tins Young Green Peas (large) ...... 82
Tins Young Green Peas (fine) ........ 66
re OR 0 8a cc cies bea Sapesaaay 27

Bottles Green Seal Rum .. 1,20 1.00

Bottles Carib Beer ........ .24 20



SEVEN DAYS, AND THE

, P j Beet imee. ~ iil , > |
— peice |D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street
@

THE COLONNADE GROCERIES
The Place Where Your Dottar Goes Further



AHA--WHEN IN FRANCE,
DOLIKEA FRENCHMAN! #
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THE BARBADOS MUTUAL
LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY

ot AT THE
BY GEORGE MC. MANUS 111TH YEARLY ORDINARY GENERAL MEETING
HELD ON FRIDAY, 25TH APRIL

The Directors Reported that

$2.233.039 NEW BUSINESS

issued in 1951 was a

RECORD

For the Society
Other Principal Features were :—
INCOME : From Premiums .... We ki ab $1,042,105.70
» Interest, Dividends ‘WY!

WN Rouen STuRe 7 aon TO LE and Rents ce $451,682.18
—_ es Less Income Tax 54,428.62 397,253.52
~ 3 7 aN Rape... sis socaperiaiiebipianens

IK im ‘| Alt "i mace ws CLAIMS: By Death 43 under 70 Policies assuring ... 131,083.00
~ \ { Waid. ae ae: 91,071.00

A ii By Maturity 236 Policies assuring is 361,004.00
ay Bonus = : 149,416.00

He

RATE OF INTEREST: Before Payment of Income Tax 4.53 per cent
After Payment of Income Tax 3.98 per cent

COMMISSION & EXPENSES OF MANAGEMENT :







Ratio to Premium Income ie 17.23 per cent
RE A SMART ONE, BOSS.
KEEP MOVIN: THEN NOBODY iL LIFE ASSURANCE FUND :
ma_EVER FIND US. Added as result of year's working ik $ 440,645.92
. The total Fund is now ue, Hie $10,391,159.16
INVESTMENT RESERVE FUND:
: Now Totals Sa i a, OF $ 623,915.06
Sj Sa C. K. BROWNE,
Bi —— Secretary.

pene at 8 Nes ee







PAGE TEN



By O. S.

THE 1952 FOOTBALL



COPPIN

SEASON ended on Saturday

when the Hon, the Colonial Secretary presented the trophies
to the winners of the various competitions.

The

1952

season has been a successful one from the

point of view of finance, the reward of industry’and. appli-
cation as far as the new champions Notre Dame are con-
cerned, and a personal sense of satisfaction for the B/A.F.A.
whe successfully undertook the administration of the games

at Kensington.
NO SMUGNESS

There can be no smugness
however over the fact that the
standard of football was a com-

paratively low one or that the
season has been a purely domestic
® devoid of a visit from a tour-
ing team or a visit out of the
island by a local team,

Let me deal first with the cons
before I deal with the pros. What
is the answer to the two questions
whieh the above observations
must ‘inevitably pose? In the
first place there seemed to be no
effort by clubs at ccnstructive and
Scientific football. The field at
Kensington had been widened
considerably and yet almost for
the entire first round of games
in the First Division, no team,
with the exception of Harrison
College convincingly indicated
that they were aware of this fact





by adapting their play to the
altered c dition They bundled
ir > centre of the field and the





win had a choice of bundling
in tt centre of the field with
them or be left on holiday if they



remained, as they should, on the
wings.
IMPROVEMENT
There was a marked improve-



ment, although not on as liberal
a seale as the crowd obvicusly de-
sired, after Graham Wilkes took
charge of a Sunday B.A.F.A
coaching school. In additicn to
this Mr. Wilkes also ran a column
in the Sunday Advocate entitled



G. WILKES

“Soccer Lessons”. ,

Credit is due Mr, Wilkes for this
example of public spiritedness and
lam convinced that he has shaped
his course more or less on a long
s In other words I exy-
Wilkes’ scheme to béar
ample fruit in due season in the
imme tiate future,

TOURS

With regard to a tour, it mgs:
be realised that however much the
BA.F.A, is convinced that thgre
can be no greater fillip at present
to local football than a tour out of
the island, that they are faced at
present with the question of join-
ing the*newly formed Caribbean
Football Federation, an ambitious
and expensive venture and taking
part in tournaments that include
playing the host to Jamaica,
‘Trinidad, British Guiana, Surinam,
Puerto Rico, Curacao and the like.

On the other hand there is the
alternative of engaging a non
member of this agsociation, say
Grenada, St. Vincent or even Mar-
tinique. The season took place at
a time when these questions had
to be deeided in the interests of
local football and there is every
indication of a satisfactory seft-
ling of the question,

‘This being so, there should be
a decision one way or the other



in this connection soon, conse-
quently a tour with an Interco-
lonial flavour is the natural
sequence,

IN FAVOUR

Having dealt with the cons let
us briefly deal with the pros, In
the first place the B#.A.F.A. has
earned the commendaifon of the
sporting public for having under-
taken the administration of foot-
ball at Kensington this season. Al-
though there has been no fault
found with the Pckweik Ciub wno
found with the Pickwick Club who
sociation for the past three years,
yet it has been justifiabiy felt that
the Association should in its own
interests shculder the responsibill-
ty since they plan ultimately pur-
chasing a ground and running foot-
ball there.

EXPERIENCE
Added to this is the considera-

They'll Do It Eve







WHEN T C.
THIS AFTE

You DIDN'T
WHY
THATS oy

Every Time




ME; BEFORE

tion that some €xperience must be
gathered by the B.AP.A.. if they
are to handle tours here or even
negotiate with some measure of
skill With other Associations for
reasonable terms and c@nditions
for tours cutside the island.

And now for a look around the
clubs:—

Cera



P, MANDEVILLE

NOTRE DAME

For sheer toil and steadfastness
of purpose Notre Dame deserves
the championship of the B.A.F.A.,
which they won with the cham-
pionship of the Second Division
thrown in for good measure.

From a comparatively mediocre
start they welded themselves by
constant and assiduous practice
into a team that played as a team
after the first two fixtures.

Paul Mandeville, the captain,
the Daniel brothers, left winger,
centre-half and inside forward
along with the experienced
McCollin at right wing formed a
good attacking force while the
defence with Browne and
Straughn as full-backs and Wil-
kinson in goal constituted a for-
midable defence.

It was unfortunate that Daniel,
the centre-half received an in-
jury during the season, which
put him out of the game and
especially the Knockout compe-
tition. Had he been there Notre
Dame might at least have been
one of the finalists in the Knock-
out competition.

EMPIRE

At one stage of the competition
it seemed as if Empire would be
the winners of the Senior Divi-
sion competition, They had a
spell of good football and made
an unbeatqgn run until Everton
came from the bottom.of the
table and defeated them upset-
ting all their calculations and a
defeat at the hands of Notre
Dame too did not assist their
chances.

Drayton was the brains of the
forward line and Taylor had a
good season. Valiant in the
defence was S, I. Smith, easily
one of the best individual players
this season, while Grant his part-
ner. at full-back worked like a

Trojan as is his wont. .
They reached the semi-finals in

the Knockout competition but a

replay saw them go into the field



W. A. DRAYTON

with only four of the old brigade,
the rest having left for Antigua
on tour and although the substi-
tutes were not disgraced, yet
they were “knocked out.”

Regivered U. 5. Potent Ofee = 6









GAY YOU LOVED
ING UPs*
r HU YOu

THANX AND A TIP
¢.OF THE HATLO HAT
Te

ROY BARNES,
5iO E.8 6ST,

NEW YORK
nM

aLep )| Now THEY'RE. MARRIED AND +
WELL, YOU KNOW THE REST !



G. GRANT.
SPARTAN
The Park team, who for the
past three seasons have carried
off both the First Division and
Knockout competitions had _ to

give up both cups this year. They
suffered chiefly from lack of
teamwork and a resultant loss of

cohesion in their play.
They showed spurts of good
football when they twice defeat-

ed Carlton and once held Notre
Dame to a keenly contested draw
but unfortunately these were too
few and far between.

Some individual players gave
good performances and showed
signs of promise. Young Gittens
would have found his way into
any colony team as a wing half.
Grant is very promising as an in-
side forward and Atkins in goal
was improving with every game
he played.

HARRISON COLLEGE

College were an enigma this
season. I saw them play their
first game and their positional
play was as near perfection as
possible. They were the only
team in the opening games to use
their wingers and use them with
the cross field pass, that used _to
be effective before.

They .then
went into the dol-
drums and play-
ec} some indiffer-
ent games. Smith
was brilliant in
,goal at the begin-

ining of the sea-

son but he soon
fell victim to the
seeming disease
of laissez faire.

The Tudor
brothers were
good individual-

ists but Paul is
too selfish. I was surprised when
Fernando Tudor was dropped in-
stead of Paul. and still more sur-
prised when he was not brought
back into the team in spite of
many weak changes in the school
team. However, they were clear
winners of the Inter-School com-
petition and for this they deserve
congratulations. I am expecting



Cc. SMITH

to see them do much better next
season,

i
ool
'
i
{




R. HAYNES

EVERTON

Everton’ had their worst season
since their promotion to the First
Division, ‘hey were without the
services of Blades, one of their
key players for most of their
matches. They too made several
changes in their line-up almost
every match and there was no
scope for building a team, Haynes
was consistently sound and was
without doubt their best player,

One game they reproduced
some flashes of their best days
when they got into their stride

and defeated Empire, then lead-
ers of the competition but they
did not repeat this effort. How-

ever, a win over College and a
late win over Spartan kept them
safely away: from relegation and
they have survived to open with

a clean slate next season. “
N CARLTON

A perfect example of anti-
climax is the fact that Carlton

have won the Knockout Cup and
in the B.A.F.A, competition have
finished bottom of the table and
so are in line for relegation.

_By Jimmy Hatlo |
















AW! KEEP you
MACKINAW ONS








vy)

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

952 Football Season In Review

Carlton at. first played their

quick short passing game but
they did not adapt it to the larger
ground with the result that they
bundled down. the middle and
themselves | negative their best
efforts.

Their football was entertaining
at times and I have seen them
lose by the proverbial hairs-
breath. It is a tribute to their
determination that they. di@ not
allow their position in the
B.A.F.A. cup to colour their play
in the Knockout competition un-
favourably. Their play in this
competition was as good as some
of the best performances of the
teams above them ih the B.A.F.A.
line-up.

“Brickie’ Lucas was ovtstand-
ing and both “Boogles” Williams
and Reynold Hutchinson
into good form towards the close
of the season.

Warren was deadly accurate at
right wing and a useful man in

goal, while Clairmonte was gen-
erally useful.



N. LUCAS

WINT FOR
OLYMPICS

LONDON.

Arthur Wint, the athletic
champion, has decided to fun in
this year’s Olympic Games in
Helsinki for his native Jamaica,
in spite of his long residence in
Britain. He will defend his 400-
metre tithe and will also try to
capture the 800-metre title.

“The double is possible because
after the 800-metre final there is
a day’s interval before the 400-
metre heats begin,” he explained
in London. “I am not aiming at
any g0od times—I shall warm up
gradually.”

Wint, a medical student at
London University, will not have
to wait to be chosen by Britain
to run in the Clympics, in view
of his decision to run for Jamaica,
He intends also to defend his
Amateur Athletic Association title
against a strong field that will
include Roger Bannister, Britain’s
mile champion, who, is now con-
centrating on the half-mile.

—B.U.P.

u. & W. Play Today

The following players will rep-
resent Cable & Wireless vs, Carl-
ton in a friendly cricket match at
tboaraed Halli on Saturday, May
24,

Play starts at 1 p.m.

N. T. Clarke (Capt.), B. M.
Matthews, R, B. McKenzie, R. M,
Croney, H. H. King, A. C. Cozier,
E. G. Skeete, C. C. Seale, C,
Alleyne, H. A. White and E, L.
Branker.









. e
The following players will rep-
|resent the “Hadleighs C.C.” vs. a
| Lodge School team at Lodge to-
day when play will start at 1.30
p.m.
; C. V. Rayside (Capt.), E. W.
Cave, C. E, Small, A. Mason, M.
| Brewster, O, Husbands, R. Wal-
cott, O. L. Estwick, J. Higginson,
| H. Cook, E. Gibson and L. Cum-
} mins,



HIDE-OUT

Brussels: For the past week,
lawyers in the Palais de Justice
at Furnes—-south-west of Os-

tend—-have been complaining to
the police that gowns anq robes
were being stolen from _ their
jcloakroom, The thefts continued
|despite repeated searches. Early
jone morning a watchman heard
| Snoring in one. of the rest rooms.
He found agpile of robes, and
under them 24-year-old Michel
Stevens, an absentee from the
Belgian Army. Declared Stevens:
“I didn't think anybody would
find me if I hid in the Palais de
stice,”



—_







ran ‘minutes and the



Indians Beat |

Oxford

‘From Our Own. Correspondent)
LONDON, May 23.
The Indian touring team to-
day won their first match of the
current tour when they beat
Oxford University at Oxtord by
nine wickets. Ghulam Ahmed
who took eight University
wickets in the first innings, again
bowled well to claim another






five for 66. The only stubborn
partnership, between Cowdrey
who batted 2% hours for 54,

and Dowding, who batted
Slightly longer for 69, his highest
score in First Class cricket, pre-
vented the innings defeat for the
University. .

Left to score 62 for victory the
tourists set about the task in
light-hearted manner, Umrigar
followed his first innings double
eentury by collecting 29 in ten
runs were hit
off in 25 minutes. *

A fine spell of bowling by
Denis Compton brought Middle-
sex their victory of the season
at the expense of Gloucester ai
Lord’s. This victory by 111 runs
enables Middlesex to retain their
place at the top of the champion-
ship table, Compton giving his
leftarm spinners plenty of air
troubled all the batsmen and
after lunch. claimed five of the
six wickets that fell, the Glouces-
ter score going from 148 for 3 to
203 all out,

Another fine
Géorge Tribe,

performance by
who claimed five
wickets for 80, enabled North-
ants to secure their second vic-
tory of the season, this time over

Sussex, by 118 runs.
Scoreboard:—
Indians beat Oxford Univer-

sity by nine wickets. Oxford 227
and 232, Indians 398 for 3 de-
clared, ang 62 for 1.

Combined Services beat Glam-
organ by 80 runs. Combined Ser-
vices 243 anq 165. Glamorgan
185 and 143.

Northants beat Sussex by 118

runs. Sussex 135 and 247, North-
ants 166 and 384 for 7% de-
clared.

Derby beat Worcester by ten
wickets. Derby 350 for 9 declared
and 14 for none. Worcester 151
and 210, (Gladwin 5 for 67).

Essex vs. Surrey. Match drawn.
Surrey 417 for 9 declared and
227 for 7 declared. Essex 323 and
251 for 7.

Kent vs. Somerset Match
drawn, Somerset 387 and 206 for
6 declared. Kent 374 and 102

Lancashire vs. Warwick. Match
drawn. Warwick 286 and 208
for 5 declared, Lancashire 289
for 9 declared and 79 for 1.

Middlesex beat Gloucester by
111 runs. Middlesex 138 and 345
(Edrich 73). Gloucester 169
and 203.



5 5
Argentines May
. 9
Drive BRM’s At

r .
Grand Prix

LONDON, May 23.

Argentine driving aces Juan
Manuel Fangio and Jose Froilan
Gonzales reportedly may drive
Britain's famed but unlucky
BRM racing car in the Albi
France Grand Prix on June 1.
Two BRM cars will leave Britain
shortly after several months of
intensive develdpment. Britdin’s
future as a contender in the
Grand Prix racing will largely
depend on the cars’ performance
The driver has not yet been nom-
inated but Britain's No. 1 driver
Stilling Moss will be taking part
in the sports car race in Monaco
and the Argentines are expected

to take wheel. Alfa Romeos
which have dominated postwar
formula one racing will not

French Talbots will give BRM’s
strong competition. —U.P.

Empi re 288 ;
Antigua 77-1

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ANTIGUA, May23,
At the close of the second day’s
play of the Empire - Antigua Test,
Antigua had made 77 runs for the
loss of one wicket in reply to
Empire’s Ist innings score of 288.
The wicket was perfect and the

Empire fielding keen.
Governor Blackburne

attended
the cricket after tea.

EMPIRE IST INNINGS

Hunte lbw b, Gonsalves 28
Robinson b, Gonsalves 53
Taylor b. Walcott 21
Alleyne c. Gore b. Anthonyson a4
De Peiza b. Walcott $2
Bynoe c. Camacho b. Anthonyson 13
Norville b. Gore 22
Amor, ¢. Camacho b. Walcott 24
Kine b. Walcott sure 0
Rudder c. Caines b. Anthonyson M4
Barker not out : 0

Extras . . we 16

Total



Beat James Street \

tneir
fixture against Jame
Scouts won
vesterday.

y

|
|

}

compete at Albi but Ferraris and |!











STOKES & BYNOE

sible for the scoring of Sea Scouts
were
Ciarke, J.

%

Grimes and J. Pilgrim scored 4,
3









SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1952



| Basketball 7

First Sea Scouts

First Sea
Second divisior

Barbados Scouts in
Basketball
Street Boys’
with 22 points to 9
Those who were chiefly respon-

A. Smith, G. Springer, N.
Carter and W. Cum-
erbatch who scored 10, 6, 4 and 2
espectively, while H. Bynoe, L.



and 1 for their team.



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Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.968

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Mr. PATRICK BYNOE
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invites you to

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on Sunday Night, May 25th, 1952
at “HILLSIDE SOCIAL CLUB
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Admission fof 2/-
Music

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Music by Mr. Percy Green's Ork
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Refreshments on Sale



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PAGE 1

SATURDAY, MAY U, 1M2 BARBADOS ADVOCATE FAliK THM1.I. tVCAt VSWBi Imperial Preference On Commonwealth Sugar LONDON THE IMPERIAL PREFERENCE on Empire sugar, which was given a life of four years under the Finance Act ui 1948, has become permanent as a result of a clausepased t>y the House of Commons in this year's Finance Bill. The difference is that under earlier arrangements. Preference was put into operation for a limited period. Now the Preferences stand until Parliament revokes or changes them. Sir Arthur Salter. speaking for the Government, pointed out that Parliament could change them whenever it desired, but he said it was essential that they should continue throughout the life of the Commonwealth Sugar Agreement. Opposition spokesmen supported the clause because they were in favour of the Commonwealth Sugar Agreement and because they regarded Preferences as an integral part of the Agreement. But Mr. Arthur liottomlcy, a cauae blacK marketeers are too oclahsl and former Secretary wary lo be c-ught by napping. ar Overseas Trade, suggested —fc.U.1*. sat it would have been better > have consulted Commonwealth roducers Aral. "If we arc to build up Iheae references, whether it be in jgar or anything else, the best %  ay to do It is by long-term trecment and bulk buying." declared, "The West Indies. I Sow from experience, would far |thcr hava guaranteed market %  sugar for a long time to come, SI GAR EXPERTS FOR EL SALVADOR hi Salvador u i ressna the services of two sugar expcit> under an agreement jpproveu bj its Foreign Minister with I h a United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation. Under the agreement, the U.N. agency is to send El Salvador oneId we for some year. hnveUen £*" J^ !"!" """* J Khn *S* >lng to buy our sugar at lower 'V" 1 ""' 1 *nP* %  urvey. ice than (he real nnre •• i,nd * economist to analyse the economic structure of its sugar industry. The existing sugar processing plants in the country, method01 processing and equipment will be examined by the technologist. He ll recommend any desirable IRITISH SUGAR AID FOR U'STKAI.IA BR1S1IANE. Britain has granted 11561,000 the Australian sugar industry, changes with a view to the exi< the Australian sugar indusP* 0 1 ** ' Iocs' nugar cane pru:. of a surplus accuauction, •laled by the Ministry of Food Two fellowships for people the Goronatto ~srMADE %  Slowc of ilrifuin .ih IK JAPAN ." UMKIOI bores* Sei pass tf KOAI TO Till Ml M IN m transact ions sugar over i mnated by the El Salvador eiod of years within the BritGovernment will also be cstab1 Commonwealth. llshed by the U.K.. Food and AgriMr. H Collins. Queensland cul,ur Organl-ailon Uwhiiiciiiii J Inisler for Agriculture, ansjneed the grant in Brisbane id said that most of the sum >ul A ruonbtl or h.uh altitude jumps in Brttatn and Australia. In one of these teals, the parachutist was falling nt 125 nuli's-an-hour at the fastest point Ol hi. fall. It has use been tried oul thousands ol Vmo Digest Of >loi>iuI Statistic* NDOM. The fli %  Out in a compact -ml eesy-to. fur quick ess man <. official appeared on Ua> 14 Oatau i .. com' -Monihlj ingesT of Stalnti. > puoliaess] bj omrc for MM Mitral sii.ti.tnal office, and it will be published e\. | IIHXllll. tlM 5H tables and appendices Uie ftnl i>' B value ol tot 11 I I territories from itttti to i5i and ninths for ., | • In T.ibl..3 lo 14 these Agura am to show the igm ut imports and i %  A and othei iaUy< %  %  and it i Interesting to not %  week whuV %  lage. Mis* HU r.nus. wanl^ to act in light .! gsosSs'troWai "*s taken UM world %  lived In %  SJia wenl iii BBStei was at a k bstoei taking up bet train%  — B.I r. SEA AND AIR TRAFFIC In Carlisle Bay "en nroi.n-woRui ATMOSPMKKK I -rats are %  %  Aorkl atui'. II.. run%  when the chute The airman then bai to trea blm self from the scut and fall for a short time before it is safe for him to open his parachute To do thlfl he must have his wits about him all the Ume. At great bstgtlts there is not enough oxygen n> lha air to keep a man eo Ps esO u i fn more than a few secund><. and his hurry to leave his aircraft, ha times on the ground—in pressura BLACK MAKKFT IN SUGAR RATES OF £XCIIA\C,F DURBAN, the South African Government „„ 1B { appealed to members of tin |jl lie to give information of any •Is in black market sugar. tre is a seriou* shortage of n a. pr gar in South Africa, although > %  >"• r* I position should eae soon an the new cane crop Is cut. %  When the sugar shortage de%  Oped towards the end of last tr '* said Mr. Eric Louw. Mln:n pr |r of Economic Affair*. '"I fe the order that price In|Ctor< should pay special atg jj P' F I-V to cugar and n number of n ,-t w i were ent to Natal. They T h.aov not have much success bewiihaui nm MAY u. I"V •lisht ..r i)i..nCablr %  aSfai N.r.n4i.si %  .. Q on Biinkn T) S t Drnnind Dt.lt1 *B SHbt Draflt 13 it, I Cbl* Cuiimv 71.1% ~ lupon* "I ' %  I fUtn .r* %  ublet t h switch pp'r The new buromctnc box wiU do Ihe tiler's thinking for blm. If h" bales out high up. the box takes over, releases him (ram hai seal and opens his parachute fur inn. when ne reaches 13,000 fn-t. If M hi ejected below 13,000 feet, tho box automatically delays tho Opining for a few seconds so that ho gets clear of the aircraft and %  lows down. The box does not slop the airtn man pulling his ripcord hinu>clf if he wants to. but It docs it for tun. if hfl is m trouble. The box, miuic i>y the Irving Chute Company, contains a sensitive barometric bellows which measures air pressure. It is about the size of a packet of 20 ciguicebtn St ;m i't|uivaL*nt atmoapherie aHCMde of tso.onn feet temparatures down to minu* .'>() degrees C. Technically, Ihe box i< „ lwn>lime-delay. u-hieh prevents the operaMor, of the Rrlng mechanism SbOVfl llirpre-iletermlnerl altitude to whtrh it i set Batow thai sIUiudi>. thi> preasurs mi tiic beUswi releases a lompresse-l spring which gives a sixty pound pull Mill" v.. R %  Si %  %  rrrBom i .. BJH %  MAIL NOTICE for St Lucia. SS John, N %  by Hi. M V Can I'nhwr will t -< omr. • Mail and HMIM*f4 M.ll M M.II •( !• m i %  \o M \lt II I OK TIIKM Resnr; A roMJ .11 mutch beMl Skmnlas took war Turin. ltd mare the ,-kin. .maivti-d %  WLD HEALTHY APPETITES and STRONG BODIES with NE0 CHEMICAL FOOD The Complete VITAMIN and MINERAL FOOD SUPPLEMENT [ iu^M^ Pleaionl tasting Economical Availabfo of ol' leading Drug Stores DRINK REAL BEER HEINEKEN'S 7eidie THE DIFFERENCE! GMtl ICM to hu\ . [Ml to run .,. it's 1h<> irurhi'x most <<-4ntru;^ does so much more than ordinary cough mirtuici. It contains soluble lactocrcoseic which is earned by the bloodstream to the throat and lungi and breathing pissag.es, where it destroys the germ? which cause the trouble. Once the germs arc destroyed then it's goodbye to the cough or cold Meanwhile, the toothing balssms in Farad Syrup are easing ihe irritated membranes and the tome mineral< ire keeping up your strength and power* of resistance Kamel Syrup it a recognised mc Jical product u>od for coughs, colds, influenza and bmnchisl troubles. It k widely recom mended bj Doctors. Hospitals sod Sanatoria. FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. n— 2385 Sole DUtribirtr Phone 4504 FAMEL SYRUP i "in-/i — %  Frank B. Armstrong Ltd BHIDGCTOWN WIN ^40.00 Here Is a simple Crow Word pussle which ran help >m U> win $40.00 fnr only one hhllllnu. At the same tlmr you will be dalns your till to help send Barbados' sole Olytnple hope In llflslnkl neal July Fnter %  •<* ..ml Iry jour skill %  tVLBfl I. The flrsl nirrr.1 solullon nprned by the >.IHor will n. the prtae. ? In the evenl of thi. I no rorreet solution the ene • on la In In t Un leaal errers which I* opened Orel by the Editor will win the prise. Lulrantf fee of ene shilling il/-> must be enclosed with %  Stall Milutlim aloiif vi 1th aajne and address on the >i|.. uti-.i. Mill be Hosed on rld*>. 30th May, at I pm All eitvrlopr* must be rlrarly marhfd I'KOSS WtiRll II BXLI I OMPKTITION and addre-j.ed l the Fdller. the Hni.-.l.. \.I>....1.it llrn.td Mrt-rt Mi i id. 48—Ocean VAiiith I'ltOIIIOS TO FAH.% tU **>lt MAX.IV/# WUNB Kntriss can be postesl or delivered to the "Ad vocale Stationery" or Advertising Office



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r\c.r ncfiT HARHMMVi \nvOTATF •.ATtTtlltT. MAT M HB CLASSIFIED ADS. ,,,m *" %  ** %  TCLCPHONt* ISO! I\ MKMOK1AM i on iiK.vr HOUSES i AW i" is. stinbid Car I* h p. h I-I %  r|. ',..„ „,|h S .1 I ...i..,„. Ma r..,w %  mi i\ On tan. Three l*droorr.. Plains Mid IHnir.1 igam* Elerti \ n plat** On our pnr*a Brat. Dial SbTi and 4110 Da. Coela a. Co. Ltd it#iri. wi % %  / % % % %  WXMIIl %  AIM %  I! ,UIO HI %  acmiciAN ment Afpty Mhllll WIUI'S \v\oi \I;MI;VI> All. MliiS I Mill ,.tV*d (Ml lor ml** •HieIn e I>I:HSO\ A!. The fMlM >'-All to (In in i, Within i HI I* AIIIIMT SMITH %  %  ->•< %  Wa> The inaalir *ivmf credit lo IMI Pirrr*i I rail bold in .-ripon >ibk< leu I I I tradlna anv debt b* *b in no i unlean b> a written order .aned I" I HI .. ion iii* Bai • %  It mttpor %  cantrort.nl anv debt nr debta li nam* unto** by a wrlllm order i Li*o %  FOR sill; AUTOMOTIVE %  M.r 'SI*n CAU-fWd Pnfad laM IMS a.-l waii..' ax-ad M llaifji i *.***. Apply WiBinall. Ford %  %  f • %  —t r.M. %  i M i wiln ordilion Dial 1 | SJ-fr RUECTUCAL '. iiin MQTOI §k ,un,... %¡ MM h r. I 110 uo D*al MM ar %  LTD, BleeAr....: 14 I.M-dn MMaVWI ItATTKHV CM AH • 111 . •Tin DA CONTA CO LT1> %  iHlilral D***. l*' rHiaiDAim. i 1-ilJsllUUI Uaad m coniun. flARItAKT) IlKultl. CHANGEIU. -peed A 1— lell Call railv atvd I -i.itment I" C S M.H MJ.BB-* %  %  md %  ma DA COSTA Ibaat Hi i IVHAMI'V Ol ..,...-* at k %  T 1p p V M i i l IEANKRS Tl.ru • rl-i I 'rum Ke*t* i ix. I < ., iin i ..Hi; Oci* MISC KlX AN EOim CfJafJlaVa;A nx CMPIVHI. a pa'"-* 1 1 llqnin P.ra*n Ptie* t Ud HIS ->n Md RAROMBTBRS T*anP*Hi^H*r. Tl*r*r inlnim'iil (iim.it mad* and ^nl* parfanu adnaHtd motaiiBili arr uaad K Ltd I*.rr Bra SI XS %  at at ia> T>e Tra>laaa Cluft. a %  '' a av i HOVMaiuLO BqUIPalXNT of all .IrM-ripllon 0f-T Allder. Ill Ro*Haf |M day ol Ma* llau T r r*mms OMMI lair ai-fiAK i<.at>niv 0 i I I I K \i BANK AIT. IMi la la. aradMar. haldMf .paHaltf llta> l( .ir,.i Ralallr>> plaalaltaa. ** %  P'lfl TAKK NOTTCB ihn! . in* ewn n* tha aBa-ra PlanlalWm am about to atn-.rar ia*I No mama) haa baon b u tra—r-1 m •ft nt % %  OA* INDl'bTBT AOBK I 1 ii MAI IUNK AIT laas %  IBlail PJaaalrllr ri.miil.i. II Tbaata*. TAKi: NOTICE tnal wr Ihr oi..i E Tryhanr, I B Tt-iianr and A A >haiva of Ihr ubova Plantation Baa rout to obtain a kaaai of CIJNQ undar -a provlaloni ol tha abova Act attalirt Ihr aald PUnUtlon. In mpacl ol the raaw in • lacs No man*! haa brrn boi' il" AaTlniHural Aidi All. I*>-'. i ^. %  ..-(-. i ( l)f*d Ul Bbd d**bf N.v lU c r mvii \sr. %  IVi I Kind lAtto i MICK I I .11 si, ...a.i... >^ Kill OI Mak-. br r.t.rnad to hun • %  • Rapt I w 3 ad p> n, on rn> at ill The ihildmi ltrt>.. tb. a>. %  lth J I I M %  INK Irtar Ibaal I HIM I Ml Hi M BOTH ml M.UHI\ „ .1 %  rr rrlunvd lo him lofrthrr with a Bn p h r RaptUmai OortUkaatd not lalar th >n an Friday. Mth May. 1MJ OFFICIAL NOTICE IN TWt lillT Ol ill IBM. I do he**, >i flalmin( any aatnlr. rUpil or -n-.tii m tba%  naanj *. brira or for* ma i HI:M II IV I and Anciititiaa Art. ay tin. nr b> •Ihr fioparlt ad I wllnai %  -nd t*arn thr hr>..., .,( 1] ,.n and ) o'clock U. the (JmVa. FAa>..r UiUHMrp. %  >lda W l>aii. badorr Ihr *ie> dareaaad on the Routh an land* wl Oraran* Hall f^ntocaan an .and. <* T Co> and on a load and on the Wrat M Road or hoev.r lw the aammay -b.il and bound Janviaair >* Atml. IcaH iHW reaab-ad I THE OMUSHUen for -in* P*r> inm yM aquaae I II •AH IIUbBI. avt-u I be NOTICE CATIONS lor one oi D K M MALiaKI I %  BaBI MB %  • %  %  SHIPPING NOTICES htt ratry up to II M... IBM be the dauaThti Candtddtr-. (,_r l .hl— i. %  nd BMBB I.H b* Ira* than • nor than IS year* ol aft • %  the and ternber tbW, U> be prbvnd *. .i Hot. hieh naurl artnmpar ." i %  i cm m ii I.IRI* Mil MIMHIN M HHOI raonaall-a Hrbalarablp. Thar* Wl>l be one Ol moil ih-.li ... I .^ivdatlon bch.ml i OI^MJCBBTEHla irhrdi.!ed M %  in, Malbourne Juna tth. bydnn Jure Mlh. nr.al.anJuly Hh. arrlnm at B4badoa about Auffuit Mb Ir. addition to tftnrral nrgo thli vtaaal htf amp** apace far chiliad and hard iroivn rarrio Carco arcacaard on Uirooch ta.lla bf Ladln-r Inr trnnahlpmrnl at Ttin-dad *>> RilUah OuUn* lervird and Wlndv.ird I.Unda lor further parlio"ar apply— MI WITBI CO. LTD., TMINIIIdD. aad DA IOMA A CO. LTD.. *BSi 2 -bet-wren Ihr harnn il | "aaiierulx IP) 1 A.. K.-.u,. I s.b.. I .' | I'lHlll BAIJBS \*.i-.r. al rtariM Coii.a*. i I he reliimed lo him ta#.-thr, I ... |: ., '• ;.ln „ „, „ r.iday Will H : Chi ii Cr.ireh who af In rtrallimaun. REAL ESTATE th. in III'M-'ALoU %  Mtali *>Runyari Bear ark. BalNt Michael, i fe-t ol una th.,.i T>-a ubove prpert\ will I il lie ClblipilWabll *' nr Olfl earn** Rtrrec. ••. I ndav "ith Jan.. pl YBAHWOOD KniKito'. a • u I e IMI. II K M %  \ %  etrrta. I Bbdl IKII I HI III I. II'I I Ml Ml I si 'i. ,1,1 KKTHANCl: FX,VMINATION ... il s.' LAND, S Acre vert detirable d al Shop Hill Uiandvar*. M.m _!. Titom*. Applt Ollbari Millar. VllUa*, Si Jama. H4 BMAldBb-V. limitad iii.ia-r Ol OBHigh Blood Pressure Kills Men & Women .. hra.lithc* -I aboia e> %  Ineaa, all •th. palna in heart, palpl'al: ,r alrrp. lo.. „l m.murt and anal,-...-.., eiotad. irar anil •„,,, |f >, aiiAar an. nl ti, rw •ymptaina. d> %  daUV lltalnirni a >ir.l.l>, I | >ow life ma> ba in dancrr. No. IIOIML.II> kn..-r aa ll|n,i.| A I % %  %  Mhli.ildii.oi.it.inluiMHifl, HI %  Pre**tra onh tha fliat do**, takr. heavy load off lha heart, and ml „ ,ou f**l itara > our,., m fan. dav. iel Noico lioni / ,i harnlai ludii. 11 la puaraataad *• aaaUM paca faal 11 form ".hid l ..• ol a year* und II -^rai". month* 1*4 of September ISM The rntranr..ainmalioi' -II. at IHe Stnflol on Frld.iv. inh JLI %  "* %  'at > M a in Ther* Will ba no atlba rnodattoii at Ihr School lor BbrenU ol ihal day. Appllcatiuii I..ITM n.uat I* l.i thaHnadmblrr.. n^i later than Friday Mth Mac ibU Vinrrnt, Orrnada. and Arub.-* "iilma Wedneidav Mth in-' TIHM V MiiNTK \ ar.ll M-*pt Carfn and paen*cr, lor Dominica, AntUrua, Montaafrat. ttaru and 81. Kitu Salhni Tn-ir—lav. Mlh mat Tire M v cABinncr % %  *n i accept Cana and rmainiii lo> i. AnilKiia. Montwrrat. Nevi< and St K,tf BaUllal BM ill-day. 1th June, 1Mb, BW.l. HtNnOMR OHMIl ".'.VeV,'//AV.VAW.V.'.'-', %  Airvavor and dated IHh January IBM and Bled in U,c .-dlVcr ol Ihe Colonial BnibvrM havmj hem di-rioed on ttv lha Oovaria( -ith the approv*! >•' both HOUB4B M "•* I—uUtui* n| the laland of Ba.b-d— by rrtolulion ol the Houar. ol Ihr Uatp>*paaa u .. irreb> dacUrrd u' punuance o. Srct.u ol the Land Aoqul.illon Act. 1MB. **t th* aa*rl land, have been .^olmd Mr Ihr tollo-..n p-blwpurpn-,: tar ^Wni '!JWW mvd ottnn-nl** for th* ua* 0* the wrrt•flB •aCHBDL'LI. All ihnt CACUUI parcrl Ol land i-.>ntin„-., 73MV at ft Mtuatb to thaaotlth o( 'wr.tbu.y School in W^llniri And hi i.e nat-Mh of t( Mirha'l, boundinc t \no rtorlf on Una-^"•"tS School and ol Duduv W*rlit*. on U>* dram on th* a Hawkina and al and an th* pumr* •"-• Datrd thf*urt**nlh day rf " at Oovemment Houa* in ah* lalai MMtaMV ARRIVKD POPULAR I4IM OA. rOOIllH SOMF. SAT . W Mc<^ Si*onuJup CoSnc. Mnirical liLsUllitian.s ami KfNin. Deparlineirt cam** •lock ol Wlrliuf AiJMMiillM b~l -' ndmtk. Ihr tnualkatl n or repan oi a,< kmcl. rl Wl nl Joba In Home* .. BabbTbM Dial WTI or 4110 lawn lo r*m*nAd* nr-mbrra DA COBTA 1 CO. LII.. K e, ntai D*p< MIBn %  HV TURK ... H I M-> rurt SERVKK. t Ma< Uth NafrT ORI.I Bjf| SERVHi; lain -arrive. RarbadcK..i ( \-\MI-vs KFRVK r .,1 .rill',I Ml < rnRl'0U Wlul are Olfse 1.I.-1 wordi? •VIIIN a •F E U N R T 1 •WHIT •av. Pir*I correct entrv opi. ed gU the prize. Cloling date Uay 31. 12 noon. Mark your reply "Competition and send it to NEW INDIA ASSURANCE CO. LTD 12 High Street .v.-.w.-.'.v.v.-,w-v.w.r.'.-,w/.v.-.v^v//.v.v.v,5 i it is ii IH III llll S NEILSOIVS CIMM'Ol vi i: I1AUS JCST i it it n in j I .ir, ;1 Variety Of Flavours (II.IJIM.IIIIIFrom All Dealrn. CS.I Your* T.Mlav rWMm DO NOT BE FOOLED BY FASHION PARADES For the next week \. B. TAYLOR iin*, m .ill Dry G I llai up V ilo not have lo spent. $30.00. Tlu-v i> tu.-i to n • Comptrtition iiiu. RUOW Competitor! t know that wn will nil chean or even Chttpor than they, come what A. E. TAYLOR LTD. TinItviil Pri..' C niterin I.iirniiil.f. —: DIAL: 41H0 :— Hh*rt> They urr no CirkinProMt-im anil \t lirri> QliBlili^s nrc HK.II .HHI Patt kn ..r, LOT DRESS and SPORTS SHIRTS n,i II a i M t 1-1 IMiiOITON SHIRTS POLAR DRESS SHIRTS • I I.I.N DUKSS SHIRTS It,, It I AOII A MANHATTAN DRESS SHIRTS F.X( KI-SJOR H1GHTONE flAUAHDINE SPORT SHIRTS %  irmn SPORT SHIRTS 11,1 I'll I Mil 'It FANCY SPOUT SHTRTS HOYS' FANCY SPORT SHIRTS KOOI. KKF.MV SPORT SHIRTS PI.MN SPl'N SPORT SHIRTS CHFCK SPUN SPORT SHIRTS AAa NRW YORKF.R FLASH SPORT SHIRTS • HI! 20 W 20 M.TS& 4 H* %  S.I .' > .. : 19 i ! B S um s %  So Remember |EE AHELY & CO -19 Swan St. for $ IHIRTS 'ATURDAYS and all the year round Phone 4934 S I i '-'-'-'•''''''•^'<-<-'>V'**r*e*.VV*e*^^ .Pre sen ting THE NEW CORDUROY SHOE The latest and most modern in Rubber Soled SHOES suitable for Dress and Sports Wear. A real Bala Stoop Available in BLACK BROWN WINE AM, SIZF.S PRICED AT ONLY $3.3.7 PAIR. ttememoer tNff[f



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Foreign Ministers Arrive In Bonn Expected To Sign |Committee To Inquire Into Trade Dispute %  I, nun t\i. in:11 IIVS Treaty Monday BONN. May ft The three -Western Foreign Ministers. Mr Eden. Mr Acheson and M. Schuman have arrived in Bonn for final talks with ihe Federal German Chancellor. Dr. Konrad Adenauer on the agreement ending Western occupation of i J many TlH ,realv Ptpeeted to be signed Monday, includes the contractual agreements made between the Western High Commissioners and Dr Adenauer. United States Secretary 0 f Slate Dean Acheson landed at Bonn Airport this afternoon in President Truman's plane from Washington, i Acheson told reporters at the airfield that the Contractual Treaty system which also covers West Germany's share in Europeon Defence should be a "great contribution to the security and pence of the world | In this weekend conference* with Chancellor Adenauer and Britain's and French Foreign Ministers he hoped to do "some real constructive work." aToanwhlle West German parliament to-diiy rejected the motion* by the social democratic opposition SO discuss the Allied (,.;m.,n treaties ending the occupation 1 before Chancellor Konrad Adenauer signs them. The social democrat motion was defeated by a show of hands after a noisy debate in an atmosphere heavily charged after last nighf* bitter exchange between the con! valescent opposition leader Kurt Schumacher and Dr. Adenauer. Jack Fox writes from London: Britain has never felt It eU | 1X1 of Europe and to-day still fiercely independent. Britain is staying aloof from the grand design to weld all western Europe into one bloc. Very soon Western Allies will sign what amounts to a peace treaty with Western Germany. Then France, Italy. Belgium. Holland and tiny Luxembourg will initial the history making document to put their troops in tho iiwW au*i'i v-tl-lii-T .-! i. i —all in one European army. British Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden will sign Bonn peace contnd giving back Sovereignly to her late enemies. Eden will do so as he himseir has said not without misgivings after bitter experience of two world wars In a quarter centurv. —U.P ADMIRAL NELSONS HOUSE BURNT Kingston. Jamaica, Hay S3. An historic landmark in Went Indian history was destroyed by fire yostsTday as flame* gutted the how where Admiral Nelson lived at Port Royal when be commanded at Fort Charles In the ITftOV The world tamed Nelson's quarterdeck, the wooden gallory of the fort where he paced while looking to *aa for the French or Spanish fleet wv aaved by military and dvlU.au flrenghUng action Port Royal Roman Catholic school was houaed in the fm onbuUdlng. Tha adjacent building In which the Roman Catholic Church was boosed was also destroyed. GEORGETOWN. B.G Ma>. 22. Governor Sir Charles Wool)*) ha appointed a threeman com-' mittee to enquire Into the ceVaN of the trade dispute betwevn the Shipoin* Association of George-, town (representing the principal shipping agents) and the Britlstl Guiana Labour Union which resulted in the -stoppage of work, by dockers in March last, and to m.ke such recommendations as the committee may deem necessary The chairman of the commJttaM IS the comptroller of customs. J W. Gregory, and members are the Honourable G. A. Cyril Farnuni. O.B.E, and Mr. W V fame, VuvPresident or the Post Office WorkUnion and member of the tmcutiva "f the Federation of Unions of Government cmployThe request for a committee was made by the union after a deadlock had been reached on the question by the association whether the dockers strike had ieen called by and was supported by union o> whether men simply refused the work which it was offering Then representatives of the shipping agents ami of tha union met the Colonial Secretary and discuiscd the situation, but it was not possible to reach an* agreement.— (C.P.) J'ca Lilts Ban On Canadian Fish imparts Cut, However OTTAWA, III Jamaica has lifted its temporary ban on Canadian canned fish and placed imports und R Mdl will result in a deep cut in txpoftJ trom Canada this year Trade officials disclosed on FridayThe result will be that Canadian exporters will be granted import licences onlj for about $174,000 canned fish tins jmi I ith more than $500,000 in 19M. The mine on serve dollars wherwvr poalrtMa Mi HiIIlaw eatOsdaa in irs taking a second look ..< 1 %  liar m potto COM N Last ) were %  %  llawad % % %  n.ih cu aa %  Hti ten Oai %  i %  i % %  11 Del Oanbe MR. TAN OALK (ngall and Mr 'Corkle" Roberta N vestarBUP. Hniiicana id laia*d down to the dack ol arrived fasai Oiciudi via St. Vincent and St Lucia Mr Oak and Mi. Roberts sailed Hurricane" to Orenada via St. Vincent and the Grenadine* I i eaagtatl rlsh into Jam;.. freely undti open geneta but oniiui. said Jan.. she was spending a lot n dollars on Ihls product than she BDUclpaH A short while ago aha i iHi Imperil tempo H i month and then again pin MM: caniw | nsh undci Canada B IF.I. lattan I'lan Undei T t> %  < anada di i"al* i i anaad Ash up t" M DM I ml ol Jamaica i inn-.*\-. m Caninla in the basic peri.nl 1948—48. —cr. Riot BiMtesm TWO Home After Ex-C.I.D.Chi.l tarn am For Finland Fund OonaUoim for the fund to dafray the expenses of Kan rarnum to the Olympic Oamea are accepted at Barclay's Bank. th*> Royal Bank of Canada and the office of the Advacate. Mass In Paris U.S. Dollar Up MONTREAL. May 23 The United States dollar Thursday closed at n discount of I 9 '16 pet cent, in terms of C a n a di a n funds, up 1/16 from Wednesday' close, that It took $0.98 7/1 Canadian to buy $1 American. The pound sterling was $2.75 V. down >' from WeCUM The Canadian dollar was down 1/16 of a cent at a premium of 1 19/32 per cent in terms United States funds In closing foreign exchange dealings Thursday. The pound sterling |H down irtom Our Own Cunnpondnit* GRENADA. May 23. The Finance Committee of the Legislature has voted $82,665 in connection with last year's rivll disturbances and its aftermath, including the bringing of tho Welch Fusilier* from Jamaica TJ gill— from Trinidad and S'. Lucia. A large part of this .•um was actually spent last year but la yet unapproved. The remainder meets the BW1 Airways bill. The Committee also agreed to the principle that Grenada should lake advantage of ihe possibility I v miTrinidad and Tobago school for blind children and to provide funds to maintain the two Grenada children already %  The Committee agreed that the DDT spraying of Carriaco'j homes which took place, during the malarial epidemic last year should be repeated at the colony's expense early In she present Red China Would Attack Via Si;iin PARIS Mi v 23 Troops are massed in berretfeJ ringing Paris In support of 1S.0OO riot busting police as "H. Hour' ncared for mass demonstration! orde r e d by CommunistMatthew I* Huiajway Stew NATO Supreme t'ommaneer Between 20,000 and 25.000 soldiers tncludini vetaran of the war against Cemnwnist rcsbeai in Inrio-Chin;i %  i oi :. red to barracks at army twists SUl l UUIIaassI the city as French Reds stepped up their blasts against (•'nci.i' Hague." A %  pokeanan for thePariB Police Prefecture said troopi have been assembled "just in case" I DM i "UTS get out of oootrot of thp city's crnek 15,000-Mrong ant'rm iquadg. H< H, WILLIAM Ue n\n/ll\i:i SAIGON. May 23. Informed ^ourees said If Red China ever launches a full-scale ofTenstve against lndo-Chuui. the fuin strike probably will r'nw tnrough Thailand (Sum). I'lw aouroa, who aaked that hiname be withheld, aald thai TliHl]aiid'> gallant but small and poorty equipped army would be easy vtctlm!< of a Chinese force of say 2.000. And once Slam was "liberated" there would be a clear road through Cumbodiu into t **%  heiirt of Fnince's rich "ASfociatecl States. Tho said: '"Mind >ou we have no indication at present 'truck* of lough CMS {RepiiMic that the Chinese communists arc IScciuity i i o lied S lanning to invade Indo-China. through the etqf ut If hhey did we lielieve that | to headquarters whatever Comi. the author'thn were eonRdMtt that P^'UeaWd squads were tide.|tiale trt o.liil i a |, with any trouble that mltif develop when party membe>rs hit 'i.. t bj this afternoon to ileOp i M key .ipirts ;igains! Hidgway's an f TW %  Oonvovs loaded wtth tmopn iiiiubli-l ilixiy the bro;id IIIKIIV-M-I I and dark bl Record Voyage MR. IAN GALE. Acting editor of Iht BariaiM Adv.. calc. and Mr "Corkir" Unbelts. Clprk of the Attorney General's Oflii-c. relurm-d l.t the i l.uul v.st.-i.tav mornini; l.v Ihl Motor Vessel "Cacique Del Caribe" imn'i lliriia.l.i > 111 SI ViiK.nl and St. Lucia. On Sunday afternoon. May II. Mr Gale sailed the K.f.il "D" Class yacht. Hurricane, out of Carlisle Bay anil set a course for SI. Vincent. Mr. Roberts %  ecomputed him as crew. They arrived In SI. Vim.m ..j. Daily wrrar* ApologtHVH To Churchill J'ea To Serve Six Months Is the way they probably would do it. Such a strike would In? combined with nn offensive against the bulk of 155,000 French and Vietnam troops at present concentrated on the main fighting —r .11. %  '"•' "n" .i"'i "i. -in."-in iiaiiiini, rainy season In the hope of a\oidf around Hanol T00 mile ,, ing a similar outbreak this yea'. It is expected that the Insect control scheme to be launched shortly by L'NICEF and W.H.O. wiU take care of thu in the future. Consid'ring information rela'ing to the coat of a police radio svstem the Committee decided to defer decision of the installation in connection wt* next years i stini.ilt-. U.N. Planes Score Biggest Raid Over North Korea SEOUL, May 23. SWARMS of United Nations fighter bombers struck Communist war factories near the North Korean capital of Pyong Yang to-day in the climax of a two-day attack that probably was the biggest air assault of the Korean United States and Australian war planes flying day and nijiht after the opening blow at dawn on Thursday smashed at least 305 bjuildings and damaged 151 others including factories manufacturing hand grenades and other weapons. Fifth Airforce planes flew 900 sorties and were believed to have topped in both sorties and the destruction of the war's biggest previous raid on May 8th assault on the ancient walled town of Suan. In that raid 130 buildingwere destroyed and two square miles of supplies laid waste but the total sorties were not announced. Almost every type of fighter • ~~~ lunist movement they • % % % %  %  —r.p. 1.ONI JON, May 22. Tim pio-Labum; nawspauer m*% V MtVrr puMICW >pn1ngli+d to Prime Minister Churchill Sjturday for tho election day picture mid statements at which he took nlfrnee Him Mini dropped the liliel suit against Ihe paper, TtM Minor List Oct. punt.'.I ii picture <>f a piMol on ils %  lid uked %  Whose nn(fo 'ii w;mt on the trigger." Th Mirrar'g BposW reed: "rii*statement', and pictures referred to never intended to suggest th.it ChutehUl did not dislike war gnd tiniKMsibillly of war, as much the defendants do themselves." —U.P. north of Saigon Onend Raoul Salan, rrcneh Commander in the Hanoi area said recently he could hold oft suoh an attack In his sector "for a month wt least" with the forcv iw at his disposal. But the northern prong of %  Chinese offensive would prevent the French from diverting troops to meet back door attack. The source said "Thailand la In no position to stem a Chinese %  tteck According to intelllircnre reports Siamese Communists already are setting up I complete underground network to wage sabotage and guerrilla warfare In the event of | Chinese "liberation*. He said ahe Siamese army was a "grouu of gallant men who di> not Ism the necessary military msaiM to make %  tone Mead against a Chinese invasion, "inn the source pointed out it would be a long 600 mile haul for u Chinese invading force to reach Cambodia through Siam. At that potad Iht French probably could I muster %  force strong enough to delay the attack until help came from the outside world. Peron Twist H Lion's Tail —imn MUI. UONDON, May 23 The IfcUl) Mail said that ArgunM I'II Idenl Juan l*eron waa playing the "old gMM '>f twisting the lion's tail" ovei hi claims to the Antarctic terrltoi The nc\> pa| i i" cdiloi i.M \.. i columnist ''Twfleld" quoted Pei %  as saying that Angcntin;i would no longer discuss their claim Ihe territ"H I .ii i would defend them lifter deeoniting men an Argentine Antai Ttnpapti eontlaued! "Tba meating which peron attan I ever, was little *hore; %  >' on Argentine heroism la IBM KB tarrlie. Si they showed II film %  Scott of BBV —t'P t/i Appreciation m Ooal %  j m .-i Ami Prav. Ack. .. $1.0W.7 Parry Colrrldga aeaool 14.00 Mi. a am. Drnton Sayerv a.oo Advocstr gporU Club a M TeUI (l.iaa.Ti Ixsmber in the Allied arsenal fie yesterday, last night and to-day in an attack that ranged from nine to fifteen miles east of Pyong Yang toward the Yellow Sea port of Chinnampo. Key factories including a hand grenade plant and powerhouse were ((.veiled A Fifth Airforce spokesman said the raid was a "healthy blow" at North Korean war Indu b Shuttle attacks with pilots going back for second and third missions as fast as they could reload bombs and ammunition, were not broken off until heavy rain clouds obscured the still smoking target J Communist MIG 15s which during the Suan raid came as far south as P>ong Yang were not sighted by United States sabre Jets living protective patrols for fighter 11 nsfian At least four huge secondary cs> Inttrior Ministry lUaiiit U.S.Catholics BUENOS AIRES. Maff 23. Government blamed "Catholics directed from Ihe United States" for the recent riots protesting "immoral" movies in which 11 persons were injured. There were riot* in Buenos Aires and Cordoba this week at the openings of tho Argentine film "Atomic Barbara" which features five scantily clad Cuban dancerv The Interior Ministry last night in a communique linked the riots with the recent Catholic action campaigns against immodesty at beaches The communique charged that North American missionaries are promoting the drive. Interior Minister Borlenghi said plosions were seen to-day as pilots i five persons arrested In Buenos dropped hundred* of tons of bombs | Aires riots have been released but and thousands of gallons of Na; Maximo Guillermo Mantel Is being palm into the factory area, "riited held for trial States F 84 thunder jets and F.SO I Police found a notebook at MaeahooUna star tetof the Austra-i lei's home In which the following lian Meteor lets, F 51 Mustangs,'was written about July 4: IndeMarine Corsair., and Navy sky-| per^ce Day of the United Stales, raiders streaked through smoke toMoat glorious day of all. Our big day to blast anv buildings still | sister. standing United States B 2 inBorlcnehl seid this proved voders kept the ottack going night-1 "these incidents are directed from long-t-P 'abroad—UP. -. %  ..'.Sine* we fal eo-operate on Europe defence, Montleur U central, doubtleu wou Kill now reveal the tecr.t Of the BritUh err.Jurplated itnmach tchlrh ra'i reiUt the catering oftenitre the mat terrible .' r a %d V '. tat.ii I'-' £500,000 LOAN KINGSTON. May 23. The Sugar Price Stabilization Fund has offered to lend Government flnam cultural development corporation, homa, Missouri and ArK-r Empire Yoicth Service Sunday At 4.30 p.m. tomorrow U 8 will he held at GovarnDMrrl House grounds. It expected that approximately a.ftoo young people, didwn sroi the Cadets. Scouts and Gutdas, Church Lads and Girl B Schools, Polka Boys' Clubs and other youth organ kxis will be attenduiK the fcervke. His Excellency the Governor will deliver trie Empire Day Missage and Rev. K. E. Toi v111 deliver an uddicss. Others taking part in the service will !-• %  Archdeacon Hutchln Dean HaMlwoodi Re E. E. New and Major Walter Morn-, of tic Army. TornuclWs, II.til Lush VlidW^t I'.S'. cmcAoo M.I. 23 Commii' % % %  disrupted, buildings damaged, and at after %  series of tornadoes ami rtna atrurk norlheastern Kanaa> i % % % %  iT'Mlghout eastern Kansas souri area. Kansas and Mis;uri storms Brat of several ihundei storms which hit tho rn id-west iceraTdlni jlirte ejf i gusty £500.000 to be used I:i surface win •i-ned agri-|and hail %  t r t 17S/7VW The Committee of the Harbadi i.l the Lcaguo of Empire ii. v< i! tha proji %  ebegM faff the Junior ComiM.— hllon fnr Hmpii,. W ek 1952. a visitor to Barbados 1 should llku you to record my admiration of the lugh standard of the Kxhilw on display ut Crunbcrhooi. The project illusliates a model l | tha divelopnicni ,,f u two-acr plot of around at Seawell; and what more appropriate choice could ham been made, in order to stimulate the interest of elnl.II.II BBd paientHI the direrlinn of a progresaive poUe} if land aattlanaantY The Ingenuity revealed by many of ihe compeutoi :ii value of the Project .IT betVM Some of the ininlcl .1 give one UM • % %  i %  • .on thai the Imagination WM %  ue for %  rnple provided a paddock breda; anolh*r two giants ttg aicainut a house %  mill but these exiiting dbtplays In spit mathematical Inaccuracies and (inldish fancy. I found the posters equally i.ting Alexandra School and CombcTmere particularly delightful. I hope the Essays will be published as the report of the examiner discloses that they leached a high level of literary merit and originality. I under* stand that the young lady who pjjpad third pnre by her essay nn the Scout and Quid* JJOVSPIMal i unr and! pleasing exposition of value v.'iiirh an apt to be oeerlookad in nodera oe at) Win U> al %  (,'iti MM Ittda by stating thai th.. I>euuc i>f Empire Exhibition shows that Barbados has a good fi.liin(--fore her I hop.to be baaa: IB time for next year's Exhibition wbi.h fal worth much iore than tho modest fee charged \nt*ne has therefore established %  0 d f-" iK-ing Ihe smallest racht, ailing under tlic auspice* f the Ih.yal Barbados Yocht Club make the BaiUidoa to St Vnint trli). Mi Gale 1.1-do this record even more diflli'iilt for the skipper wtw might try to break it. He *atl<-.i tliinictiri* thruugh Uw ONM. (UIIM and on to tlwswaira. "None Th rVarse" On board the Caciqa. 1 Del 'arthe yesterday thev I..tit |00*> d none the WOTM from th.ir lOMlnl trip l/Tirrlcane almi looki\ in giMKi shop* and will most lifcelv be ready for the Twelfth Regatta tixlay. Aftei leaving ll-.hail.K. Hum. countared choppy seas until H niili". ..ut The sea beaaoM %  %  Inaar ud staa had a % %  on I-. St. Vincont Mi. Gala ami Mr. Roberts spent couple ..f ,,.,. MI St Vincent %  mere Ihey roai toe turn area> ierer with Its crew of two Ausi rail an yaehtafhen After leaving St Vincent Ihey ailed I.. Hei|iilu where tin %  two night.1. They stayed a few nights st Mustiinin Canouan and Carrlncou iH-fore scttlm; -.nl for ii-enada Thev mount.fed i-mie mugh seaa and land winds on their way 'hrough the Grena.Mnci hut HurrUane reached firenada shlp*ape. KINGSTON. .IV.. Maj 13 Trtnidad iiarn.t.i u i. WiHxting was aosnpluni tho Resident Magistrate of tl ton I l.n,! nf tin 11 | volvmg Jamaica's foiiii< ter of Education Joseph ind Henri Weiiingio. h Chief of Ihe CH. Wellinglfln who retire,! .... log I 1 Ml lop dclCC • 1 | %  %  trying to jicrveit the lustice b> iii-UadJ Irate and was •antaneed to insonUi counts concurrently WotKliiut nude an in., pie i i-lialf of W. Ilu result of which the judge reduced the iniprisonmeiil liliti I" l> muuthi.. luolu't dunns the Mi'il I i>cLMU*e the Crown had mil proved nsplrary between him Ington on eight counts. The hargei an conni i led • Ith the farm workers lid I from whirii MalaaUn m 'ualy sentenced to 12 months' im:ri .nin.i'iit and is now servinK ii.it %  atanoa. Wenington endear urad tn olsitruct police colleeting %  vidi atainal laali aln Wi U ington has given notlee Royally FlyIn Comet LONDON M The Quean UoUtei swwabeth, ni I'nitress Itjuamral i fui a into today HI ana ol iini.i.i,' Com %  aara, the tn la] plane la th> world. They drove hretn But klni i' I'nl. itl ,. for Ihi lie Ifaviland %  IrReld t.. go aboard Cuts In U.S. Foreign Aid Affirmed w ^SBINOTON, May 23. '"" %  n f Representatives 11 vote .T •2\ to 137 toitlve Mis.. (OIIIMHI ul In Itaropeea "defenee reign Aid Mill. The Uou than formally reaf> (oil call vote of 192 to nit Sll.200.000 from defence support and technical aid for Asia and the Far East in the Mutual Security Bill. It hail voted this cut tentatively -day. .* LisuwiaasaaSB.hBSSajBjs thai ihey naVJ rrrrfc %  topping the determined Republican economv bloc from dealing roughly with $8.900.0011.%  pronanune. —U.P. Ihe ieen denied them, be it resolvad that this council representing all workers of British Guiana %  %  %  %  • baa llrected against I low n 'Hidden coloured in South Africa, and be it furthc esolvad thai the linti-h OtdaM Government be urged atrongly to use all trade with South Africa long as Its government persists its fascist tyranny.—<•. Itreml Shortage In British Guiana GEORGETOWN. B.G May 23 A shortage, sold due to the d"luy in importations o well as nonarrival of ship-. h Ouiana Several baker0 go temporarily out f operation and in coneequence buyer* have been Thievei Tuk** Gold Worth SHHMIIIII VA1.DOH. U i i-.ed the! eepatratora of i $100,000 gold brick tlu'ft from Bast Malartic mines. In and theft came yesterday from T. V. Ne'l ager who said so had been used tu cut through two st'>rming the tity'S two biscuit' teel doom and releate the locks ;-l*carances to the Company's vault In which this W1U weekend four gold brick.* were stored awoltfor most of the people— <*>. (ing shipment. -KT). Mote and more % people ate sayinq TRUMPETER





PAGE 1

SATIBD AY M \Y 24. U52 BARBADOS ADVOCATI PACE SEVEN SLPPLEMT 'NTAIIV i m • From page 6 M \PPIJ CATIONS IM \SANTS LOAN RANK h Amwni greeted Locality A R P. 1 M Mirhael £afcrl AuguSI Iwi HayBge, A D lnnlss. LiCon St. Assfnw Est. Baa', st. rails* Heckles, Crawfci Marshal! iii.naM N Krt. Will.: % %  I' ; 1 Wilkinso i Payne. J %  ; h B. st George Inniss, I %  v Si. Tbaas* Broome*. A Gibbs, V. t -i 0 AWilliams. Philll|M ]' Orandlso, Orange Hill Nr. Appleby Harrisons & Checker Hall Nr. Wakenham Jc,-y Hill Hock Hall Ha H. ...iKirton* Nr. Bequest & Long Bay Eastbourne Morchlield Dash Valley Arthur Seat I Grand View Shop Mill 20 31 06 n 3ft IS 18 00 00 00 M AITLK ATKINS FOR LOANS. PEASANTS' LOAN BANK. "B" M hnty Cwb Hurst Road Thorn i %  i S r -. Halam A. .lU'rh i' I I %  I Locality Harrison* Walkers %  Hock Hall Kirtuns Nr. Palmers :>., h Voiles Do* VeUej Amount Ofented 250 tin 280.OU 200 00 300.00 2.400.00 50.00 ?oii o.i Amount l'i<-nou-h Granted 8. c. 50.00 72 00 72 00 72 00 50 00 576 00 APPLICATIONS FOR LOANS. PEASANTS' LOAN BANK. "C" Philip ( 'rank C. . rUI ( hureh mm. C. Hugh 0. 1/ his'ij Hall I Maxwell 8 2 26 8 0 0J 1.200 00 570 00 i m N APPLICATION'S FOR LOANS. PEASANTS' LOAN BANK. "D" Kl Mirhael Theodore Ithodn .. F. Benjamin v. Maude II im | Moselcy. Kelurah [ Murray. Joseph AS... Julian T Solbert WOtaDIre, Dmscilla .. .1 Til. LkMMl l.lin. J. Dec. per Dough' F.lmln '.hnlhv A Alfred et alia .. I G. ild . Hai i Wo J %  r Pt I ... ) nt. ft* ret ell. liv.hn (". %  nl 1 %  my Johnson. Ada L. .. irwood. 1I | Andrew i Archibald Piti %  !.-l I |>l. AUeyne, Alma B 1 i'ph N. fft lataj Iringten, F Dae. per O drlngton E -Shepherd. PHI 0. [ M PUttp John Win i Allan .V I. irol w. > %  Edric Edward B. Forde. Clarence C. W.irrick Hunle. James A. Etbelbert L. Wilham DaC. .. Mi tall Donald N. .'* I %  Ola el aJJa %  meld. A. Dec. BushesX nodson k hrlst hiirch Samuel %  K Legall. Ah Geonce D. Taylor, Marie „.. (lenrce Cadi A .. Allan r Harding, Jame H Dec. i I Hunte. Oaford I Rargeant. Arthu „ Tlnmi .[Bailey, Samuel J. %  Banfield. Martha Haggatt Hall Ni. H..thersnl Deacons Road ii-.ii-. Hall White n-ii Ha watt Hall ilaggati Hall amen iiiii ll.iggatt Hall Friendship Jacfcmani llaggatt Hall %  ,.,:,.. 0 i Westmoreland 1 Carl ton Or.-itlite Hill I Orange Hill Orange Hill Wcslon Sea View The Whim The Whim 1 Salmonds Crab Hill BweM Field Nr. Wakenham Durham & Dooley Northumberland Walkers Rock Hall BeHeplalne Mount All Cane Garden Sugar Hill I liimborazo Sugar Hill Cliff Cot Nr. Glcriburnic KaM bourne Nl i;..>leys & Bequest h-. IbOURH Industry Hall Kirtons Nr. Hopeland Merricks Diamond Valley Merrickfl Nr. Bequest F-i>st point Diamond Valley Chamocks ( lapham Baytn Court Nr. St. Patricks Gall Hill Work man i Haggalt Hall Ureens Haggatt Hall Sweet Bottom Rock Hall %  Williams, P. Kew Land •lock Hall Oi mi Van Rock Hall 1 1 OS 200.0.) — 1 1 05 240.00 00.00 2 0(1 100.00 36.00 1 3 30 t 0 34 300.00 — 150.00 50.00 2 0 08 200.00 100.00 2 03 120.00 36 00 2 0 06 200.00 144.00 3 02 100.00 1 0 04 100.00 40.00 2 02 15.00 36.00 3 30 100 00 20 00 2 01 15.00 25.00 3 2 19 240 00 260 00 2 10 SO.00 1 1 12 150.00 95 00 2 13 30.00 36 00 1 S 08 55.00 72.00 2 1 31 300.00 174.00 1 0 12 150.00 72.00 2 00 %  | 120.00 2 21 60.00 36.00 1 2 33 175.00 100.00 1 1 39 100.oo 1 1 17 30.00 •0 00 1 0 22 150 00 80.00 2 25 .50.no 50.00 2 1 16 3 3 13 100.00 200 oo 260.00 2 20 24 00 V 36 00 1 0 Of, 175 00 72 00 1 0 00 150 60 60.00 1 0 10 100 00 72.00 I 3 00 100 00 80 no 1 0 20 120 00 80.00 1 0 00 120 00 1 1 !0 100 00 40 00 2 3 17 100.00 SO OO 36 00. £ 00 60 00 2 00 40 00 36.00 1 3 03 130.00 126.00 H 1 0 04 100.00 — 2 00 100 oo 2 2 00 130.00 100 (10 2 02 40.00 40 00 1 3 18 75.00 30.00 2 2 00 loo on 125.00 1 0 00 80.00 72. ;o 70 OO ] 0 00 75.(A) 2 00 100 00 MOO 1 2 28 200 00 100 on 3 00 60.00 40.00 6 0 00 150 00 150 00 2 20 40.00 — 3 28 50.00' 50.00 1 2 02 40 00 60 00 06 00 2 01 130.00 240 00 1 0 03 72 00 2 0 39 240. V 20.00 — 1 09 20 00 3 37 100.00 30.00 1 0 07 200.00 72 00 2 26 150.00 42.00 1 0 05 100.00 1 0 32 MO oo 84 OO J 38 00 00 3 1 09 100.00 1 2 22 100 00 100 00 2 00 100 00 26.00 2 05 50.00 M 00 1 2 20 50.00 2 .14 100 00 1 _——— Im":8.689 00 Instructions On Import Licences Instructions regardiin. I '••I licences for imports Irum nonoterling sources other thjn tne United States of America and Canada were Issued tn ; potters by the Contra) (MTHv this week According to those Instructions, licences submitted to cover outstanding orders on which goodl have arrived In the colony should be endorsed Outstanding Order. Goods arrived Invoices should be presented so that the goods may btwritten off when the licence* are issued, and goods on such licences must be paid for by the 30th of June, 1952. Licences submitted to cover ig..ods orden-.i prior to thp 13th [March but fur which gooda have \f Mtatendlofl ord Bg ictiirnixi to the Control CAOS will be etarged •. % %  tin* Quota for the second half of 1952. Licences to cover outstanding orders not lo aRtra before th second half of 1952 and Ueenci :nu-t be accompanied by copies of orders and both orders and liceim > nui-t l.avr the statement 'The VtlllO of thi* order or licence mu*t under "o circumstance be exceeded. It was also pointed out that U from tbO 21st of May It would be necessary to have all licences issued written off at the Control Office before presentation to the r -i >n.< %  i, ha .Uity paid, Iran Violated Soviet Treaty —tn /1 TEHEHAN. May 23 High Iranian anvenuMni oAo* L;.K denied Soviet chaiassf ttttl Irjii has handed i.ver control l it.s annv to 11..i is violatniK the 1MI Siirl-lranian Treaty by accepting United Stato military old. "Hie chm K' 1 ' a note handed lo the Iranian Ambassador in Moscow by Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Vvshmsky yesterday. The lest of the note was broadcast by Kadio Moscow and published In Ihe Soviet Government'* newspnper livrsUa to-day. The Soviet reference lo the 1921 Treaty caused some coin i The Treaty gave the Soviet Union the right to move troops into Iran if fofOign forces hostile to R entered li jiiitiin territory. M %  %  .' r an Iran government spokesman said the Treaty stipulated primarily that Iran woold not support C/arist aggressive alms against the then new Soviet Republic or permit its territory to be used for Czarist attacks on the Republic. He denied that Iran's retention of United Ketei military adviser.* at tin t m> inntiavened Ihe Treaty. Moreover, he said United Stales military advisers stationed In Iran comprised only a small corps and had no authority over Ihe army or gendarmerie. He said th"> %  In an advisory rapacity. He also denied the SOVH I .-haute that Iran by accepting (J B. aid was co-operating with the United States government in Ihe implementation of aggressive plans against the Bo*fc Russia seized upon la~i ntenth'l resumption of United States mtlitary aid to Iran as an excuse to bring charges of aggressive aim* and Treaty violations against Iran. — v.r. Talks Rtres8tHl for Throe Days i'A.NMCNJOM. % %  ] 23 true* delegations a three-day recess to asstder our lh Red* angrily accepted. Despite t h e break, retiring Allied Delegate Vice-Admiral C Turner Joy expreased ccnisdeae that the lelb ally would bring "an equitable and hcnAirable armi.>: If ijor Oeneral William K. Harna nonsense" tone Href full day as Senior %  ing lo anothci I 1 -taiida blast. North Korean Oeneral Nam II inmed his pencil on the table when rlafrlaon proposed the recess. Nam refused to suggest a date for the next meeting but ben Harrison asked for i p Inti*r-€3ub Debate Com petition The Second Round fixtuieg of the luter-Club Debate o • sponsored by Ihe Central Council uf the Old Scholars' Association were completed last Thursilav night. The molioti "Tliat Ihe Federation of the Ilritisri Caribbean Territories is an urgent necessity" was discussed. Mount Tabor, the proposers beat lunch's Secondary School; St. John's Cultural Club Q li. %  ( %  ated St. Jame^. 1 Brotnerhood. In the otlo it, pioptNUtion argut^l by St. Augustine and Clifton Hall, was defeated by St. Martin's and St. Jude's respectively. PW of |hj debates took place oniweclnesday night and the OUUT two on Thursday night. The Judges during Ihe week were Mrs. Scott, Mr. Broome. Mr Simmond* V ll<.ui i e. Mi C Spi it.i:i i. and Mr. Sainsbury; Mrs. C. Springer. Mr. Cameron Tudor, and Mr. E. C. Theobalds; MiI nigton, Mr. Aubn-y Douglas-Smi and Mr. Douglas, SPORTS QUIZ B> SPOBTB EDITOR Ihr Barbados Advacate w III ward a book on speM lo the Hral aerson who send* the ..inc. i aasiwera to the i.ill.mine Hucsinni. 1. CRICKET What l< the name sf the Barbados rrkkeler *.ho. In an intercolonial fixture with Trinidad. Injured his hner mil wa .niiiicll.il by the umpire to atand and roll the ball underhand down the pitch. £. l IN 11 n \i i A hsBRl kicks off aad by clever combined play nun agea lo score without an opponent plajlng the ball should the referee award a goal? 3. RACING Name the Barbados owned horse u,..i won the Trinidad Turf Club Cup at the Clirtatmas meeting I9S7. 4 BOXING t rl whom did Joe l -.<• % %  first win thr world 111' f i li hi li.iM":; i h.llll nlonkhlp? 5. TABLE TENNIH Whit far meant by the term Let' In Uble tennis? NOTE : All entries for -ii. .r Hull" should be .d.li. %  -, ,i "Sports wni/ r/o Advocate Sports Ultor. and must reach this office by U noon on Halurdav May 31 The correct anawrra and the name of the winner will be published in the Sunday Advocate of Jane I. Each entry must be accompanied by A COUPON aa Set out below. SfORTM CJI'IZ Nasne Trinidad \;ght At Albert Hall lioxing Match IsOMDOH It was Trinidad night m the boxing match in the Albert Hall. London, on May 11 when YoUnrt* Potnuey and Ansell Adams both •.-red convincing victories in lueir bouts. In thre.' rmiiiib Vol.inde Pompay, Trinidad Tornado", Irnoehad out cruiser weight OuUbUKl I'.i' urn of Italy in the most one Hided light of the evening. It was tlie main light of the contest. Pompey hardly exerted himself at all and he startt.i tha fight leading and jibbing with ;he slraightest lelt he has yet %  hoern. In the second rotsssf be dropped Pencenl tor a count of nine with a vicious left hook and OH li.il u only just managed to t t %  la Ida f.-.-t m tim. In the third and last round Panrani went down front n left I Foreign Ministers got to his feet that Pompe> i ~T*,^ ic ,s I II -. 1 I t *t ft III Komi rlgftt In tM : >-!3 rhree Foreigi %  knocked out J frsja Europe's defences ugainst his fellow countryman. Ad.nr>.; lhc wnace of Soviet acre t down twice 1>~ •*• ftr ^ Foreign Ministers Conlore the ttn-l knoekoul '" *<* >nee he ribs. W" Out isT four mixed lxit, in ino programme between eeleured I:,ul d States, France and West ind WnM boxen only one whito l;i !" -"V arc slated to ^ign a boner won peace contract binding a,fK)O B r r. tierman* west of the Iron curtain %  mmunlty, peliti. %  % %  iwi ine Peace Pact itincation air nations' parliament. i rpected in the ToroMo: ToieMo OaOdran % %  Bonn Assembly. Across the iron 28 hour> %  •!.."> %  einnmiinireordlng to report of 1st 1 i of %  rM did makiiii' Implied threats children 'pe<'d onlv '2* hours %  Hed surrounded Bar* schooL im iltilihrii S|M*lul 21Hmrs At School i Can for your skin as Ann Toilil, lovely -tat of Ihe J. Arthur Rank l irganiaalion. does—use I.ux Toili-l S.ap regularly. A daily facial with La Tetlrt Sp .ll v ^.>..u ,l.ar fresh -kin — iho l.iHii.lmioii of beauty! ( %  I MSJMIJO Western Union And A.F.L. Agr<*e WASHINGTON. May 23 Weary negotiators of the Western Union Telegraph Company and AFI. Commercial Telegraphers Unic> reached an "a g reement in principle"' on g n< %  md drooe toward a seltlement of the seven-week strike. mediator F Marvin I Sconyers sold at 5S0 am EST that the final signing of the new lid rnme at any time" Negotiators have lien in continuous session %  %  % %  night. %  %  compliraT. d vagos and 0 .:u;tK'' is pretty itough to write" The union attorneys were going ..-. eeed new 'contract item i (fashionable Wardman Park Motel -IT. TABLE PENCIL SHARPENERS LARGE OFFICE PENCIL SHARPENERS STAPLING MACHINES PERFORATORS SPONGE BOWLS STAMP DAMPERS ROLLER BLOTTERS WIRE STAPLES-Box of 5,000 for $1.32 CELLULOID CHEMISTRY STENCILSFor School Children i I ADVOCATE STATIONERY %  MIOAII Slllll I .\\1> CMBYtVIluMC ',v, ;',',;',',',;'.'.; •.^•.'.^•.• r %' r r f '.'sss*'s.%**'s t 'sss&**+**'. *** .'w^ '* '*"*** VIAV**V*. v*'. ',',--','^*-*-'*'***^'*'-*^-v. I



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PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY. MAY 24. MM Qojah Calling I en Mrs. R N I *j of the Colonial Annual Pel at Park JI X o'clock. The • | ta m C E. i ma w>U *uw ftlnui it the CI %  II be etven %  BOhswal loi 'he MM t*n lucky For One Wk RAYING %  I uimm visit lo thr %  i i* Mr. A. Benin, proHarpara Ltd.. Druggistof Anhguj. He arrived on Thurs day %  *•*< '" B.W.I A. Ni IHk rlnv;il U.K. Visitors Leave R i : %  I;;.IM. in BMI wet-K by the S S. De tirm** were Mi p fi PauntbcwM und Mis* Mary I ii in Barbados an guests at the Windsor Hotel. Mr. Fuunlnorpe was twia [Of inner weeh*. while Mi % %  pent a fortnight. Spent Two Weeks M il. ENRIQUE LUNA DIAZ 01 Barlna*. Venezuela, return* .:ay by B.W.IA.. attar -pending two weeks' holiday U3 ;i Kueat at the Hotel Royal. Before • oming here he was in Trinidad where he remained for one weak. Ills wife who had travelled out to Port-of-Spaln with him, returned to Venezuela while he came over here. Mr. Diaz |f Warehouse M an agar Of Socony Vacuum Oil C'ompanv i" Venezuela. Canadian Holidaying Here M ISS HEVKRLEY BAN1IHH K of Montreal, Canada, arrived here on Thursday by T.C.A. from Trinidad for I wetafi boOdaj ..ml la ataying at the Hotal Rfl*aJ indrtck who li a member of the Office staff of Standard Brands Inc. will top %  Dtnaudl before returning to MornVai I. Stare leaving Canada, ahe hat* vtsiU'.i Cuneao and Vaj %  Paid Short Visit I EAVINt; ( 0 i Trinidad on < Thursday whan' thi %  > %  v. .11 upend a few days before returiuiiK home, wcie Mi Russian of Cnrucas. Vwe* were here for a shon taottday i-tayliiK at th* Hotel Royal Mr. Russian is employed with the Government hi Venezuela. On Business M R. 11 EH TIE KING, I Ulivc of the Central AtfeiHv I i -i passenger lay ll.\ I A. DM* Britain. *K \NI MRS C'VRII. Cill.l. On Honey* M R AND MRS MICHAEL WILLIAMS of Trinidad, who -.•tv married there recently are in Barbados spending their honeymoon They arrived here during i im week by B-W.I A., and are staying at the Hotel Royal. Michael ia a son of Mr. Williamof the Louis J. Williams Marketing Company. Leaving Today A FTER tpendmit three weeks holiday Maying at th< Hotel Royal. Mr. and Mrv E. E. Ehrcnreich will be returning to Trinidad this evening by B.W.I A. They will be accompanied by then little dauahter Catherine Mr. Ehrenreirh i* Planlulioti Wgnafa ..f the US Naval Station HI Trinidad. He said ihat laVt) all had a lovely holiday an ( | regretted having to leave IQ soot. Vitit'd "AfhrocnU" S IX youn^ tuide* trottl *t Mai oaret'f Otrls* School accom: % %  % %  %  %  b% MiPayne und Mis* Mayers Ira > leaders, visited the %  Am... reatoriay afternoon Thrv were 'li"wn around the •renla by Mr Michael Hup.of Ins Job Printers The younni.iimned great Interest in the mens '^ing* around them. Quiet Wedding T HURSDAY morning was ttta scene of | (juiet but pretty wedding at the I Methodist Church when Rev. Frank Lawrence Milemniscd the marriage between Miss PauUne* Innlss, daughter of Mr. E. D. "Coaste" lnmss of "Neta-vllle". I'pper Collymtue Kovk. and Mr. Cyril Gill, son of thlnW Thaddeus fiill and Mrs (Ml „t "Haldon ( -juii." I'rospect. St. Junu-iv The bride w".. $m x \< % %  In niarnage by her f.lln i opkad charming in mi Ehit.ibeth.ii bodioa with %  nylon sktn n*r had-diewi wai i petal Itshal cap studded with pearl.-: Her linger* raa kepi in pUi arnita raaag. Bar bounjuai m IJueen Am %  %  %  i lilies sad pink radaarda. Ml*cs Joyce Haindin ami IV(u*v Innlss. sister of the bride. They liioked charmiiiM In -ilk .malaise ..ml nylon and they tarried posies of pink radiants matching forgetme-nots, blue violets and Queen Anne's lace. The reception was held at the bride's father's home and the honeymoon is being .spent at Pmvell Spring Hotel Bafbabebn, Silver Threads Among The Gold natural skm tone. Light shades :if rouge are too bright and too obvious on older faces The med.uni clear red shade* are close to olood tones and giv c the moat natural appearance. Lipstick, hari.ionliiua with the rouge should bo ii ihe clear red tones too. Today there -re three types of gain high lights to her hair — Huy-hairtil syonsan the elderly oronie, amber and tllian. Though type whose hair ts grey through when she does start to grey, colIhe passage of years, the younger our rinses will make her hair WOtnao with prematurely grey 1 .k much prettier. *•**. in. Vha woman what oSssaa— nuver htttr. whauiar II i. fc have her hair tinted grey to be latural or adopted mut have thin hich fashion. Maybe it la beright make-up to compleim-nt it cause MI many younr wumen have The younger woman with pre I an'ii.iiLirely grey for I maturely grey hair, inuat tako rome rnanan or other during andajcare that ahe selects make-up aince the war, and the result be-"which does not contain much Ing pQ completely charming that blue, such aa deep fuchsia or deep n new (aahJon bai bean bom. red. Sh should choose, instead, Tinsilvery blonde shade ia One • lear reds, pinks, coral and rose liiat is certain In appeal to the reds. Orange tones on cheeks Honda* who bewails the darkenand lips add drabneas and aallow•ng of her hair, yei hates the ncss lo the nonotone colour brassy shades of gold so often drey. produced by bleaching. There :>1MIho advantage ot being sole to make these new shades merely They ran be changed viiii taeh shampooing. It saves ill th.it bother of bleaching and dyeing. You CAN give your hair colour i HIMat home, though think It wise to have -sow own hatrfMaaar. UN Colour Rinse only fllmd With Skin The older grey-haired woman should not go in lor make-up %  lashions" Her eogmaUea should i i i n shades which approximate to Nature's own and applied wit'. a delicate hand. Naturally she wants to keep her skin looking as ItffAt and fair us )>osslble. Poun.-..li.. i, .md ixiwdei shinild In..nt-. %  i-in enough to tone or 'warm' up the skin caaOar if the skin %  eds btightemiiR up. Otherwisi Colour mis. ougfa light hair takes them a colour should be selected that .1 inin.ihiv. Ing brunette ran onlyb>nds harmoniously with the $*>H But Clenr In youth every feature is naturally well dertned. To retain thai youthful appearance, then, tin brows should suggest n soft. but clearly defined aentle arching a row. The mouth should be flhaped with a brush or the llpst.'rk Itself but blotted to a muted blend over the cheek rougo with a powdered puff, and when powdering the face, if there are any wrinkles, spread these apart with the fingers of one hand, and pat powder into them with tho puff. After this, brush all excess powder away with a complexion bnnfa. II you want to be e*lr sophisticated, and decide to adopt one oi the new silver shades of hair thit, you must be doubly careful %  bout your make-up. Blue rinsed hair looks best with a pink and white complexion. BY THE WAY 6V BEACHCOMBER T HE men who ransack the t..rls half filled with m wine-dark aeas for whales Dvancstone Inralator tn to replenish our *initesque lardhemp, and two brushw< t Iduutl the baMta by elecartin reversible Uu-boli trocutian. lit a magnetic candle, And tinle.mieil chemists who the fulcrum, and then tell us What Wl are eating say sTifl esplufcion Wh n .. %  .•-.I Brhind I %  !*>" % %  7 46 | m, nipm a.i.. Nwaas, KIM; Qr> VI. *• vW v it., is oo psY 1411 II The Oardea—SL Jaaaea I. 4. IM a IB p m -PASS TO SUSAM1 [Msrlhs ODHISCOL1. MA.s-r.Aris *r at MAUN "sAQV Wendell COtsKV MlliMH lOMil OH not i o.lin nj WAKia.Y a. hanged and chaaged, and crossed oat and erased and wrote in new wOTaB until at last the poem was finished. This is It: Watch 'DISPRIN' dissolvequickly— completely Trddj •aifeatad a%. Pnaeh ssighi lik* tares pis** Mr. Punch wo lot you dearly Dally, weekly, monthly, yearly, Wa always know it vary clearly Mr. Punch we lovo yoo dearly. Mr. Punch wa wish yoa fan days Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, Saodays. Thursdays. Wednesdays, Tuesdays, Mondays, Mr. Psiich wa wish yen fun days. Then, when It was ail dene. Ban I. wrote the poem out on a fresh C ioce of paper and slipped it under Ir. Punch's door so that ha would be sure to sea H the Bret thing in tho morning. asilhaay Klaa "And of course." said Gloria, "wall all give htm a kiss, too. No* body can have a birthday without being kissed." "It's a wonderful poem and I'm sura Mr. Punch will like it." Teddy the Stuffed Bear said after the lights wera out and averyona waa about to go to sleep. "But I think he would like two pipes, too. Next year I'm going to glv him two pipes for his birthday, maybe three of them." "Three of them. Teddy! What raa ha do with three pipes V Knarf demanded, "One to smoke, and one to hold in each hand," said Teddy. !' i • Divp.-m' enters the stomach in a irut 1 solution, with no insoluble ftdd pWllcteS, ii il MOW upiJIy ahsorbed by the lyBtan thus relieving pain wiihoui delay. Ihe best way lo lake %  Disprin' is in walcr, though its soothing, pain-reliiviiij; r4bcl will be UM MUM wliKhfarw waj you iako ii taguao of its advantages o\er ordinary aspirin. •Disprin* is widely used m hospitals throughout Greai Britain. DISPRIN to relieve pain When you need aspirin better take a 'DISPRIN' V .\I.HA*.Y CO % %  ..* rai TBE !!( l/li STATMOXERY For BUST HOOKS. .a.e .C I MM MUR A IO.B4I s a GLOBE % *fc nun MOVIE s.ie ^ L I of killing whales maltat their llet.h more tender and also lowers the price. BUI il ii dish <>f "hale becomes %  M fasaston the mice will go up. not down. Chefs have only to that th.? Timbale dc Bo lei ne i cooked in*, red wine and served with Sauce afirobolantr foi this dainty to skipensede tinned Khodesian turkey at banquets. fin n explnnutlon, the Doctor said, 'That was the bamp. It is DOW isolated." There were no comMfsN hi /ni**intt Ills i, „..l not interested" That is good example nf the meohanipatltlon th.chair of Matilda •< pullinu T HE woman who "pulled a man's nose hi public" should have said that she was testing his bowd fides. Bogus foreign aristocrat in liners nearly always have false noses, lo give them a Itapsburg touch, and the wise young lady is she wtio, the moment the Prince begins to talk about his scht'U* near Vienna, tweaks the} rfapeburg facade. to make sure. She will lose a few nOura of pleasant flirtation, but will kirj her self-respect. It i< what the CTermans cull prnflt anil LADIES' "EVER-REST" SHOES 3 WITH BUILT IN ARCH SUPPORTS BLACK ANDTAN COURT — BLACK AND TAN LACE '& S10.S2 Mm LINK. MUN'S SHOBfl — Sl'KOKS AND LKAITIKRS S8.33 TO 13.S T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS IHM 421 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4b0b ISMSHSOVI •. S> 8. ia r .~ >lM0 i W •• P • *""— >* BICAS-TEXAS TEcffi $** M0 CU, EMPIRE THEATRE &f TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 and Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 r r pf? B SPaM vim n n '• %  •" " r. im It nmciio t noogca n i OOOTHY KiNcsirr • agRmsA" w aam %  MMM* NBM • CMAW.ES WALTUS JACK CUBSINSS tmm-t-mtKvm v*£m Alwavs kerp Limacol Toilet Lotion in youi home Always keep Limacol Toilet Lotion at your office THEN YOU'LL ALWAYS BE COOL BECAUSE LIMACOL TOILET LOTION IS "The freshness of a breeze in a bottle" LU — Ar Z:-ss's?*vs. 1 4*v-0 oaianatknan pmmm YESTERDAY m ABMSTBONO, MIDNITt TO-MTE MIDNTTE LOt \t TALENT aJN PAllAsC ANn >AMt GOI% TO RIO" (Jane POWELL — Carmen MIRANDA | AND mill* nottRwti" (Robert TAYLOR Paula RAYMOND! CONTESTANTS TO-NITE I.UCILLF. CRA1C; GLORIA RENTHAM MIDIF. HALL CIIESTON HOLDER FRANK COR BIN CARL BEST ORVIL GRANDER90N I ir.ly have eyes for you" Sentimental Me" 'The loveliest rute of the year !" "Because of You" %  I only have eyes for you" %  'Pnwncr of Love*" .... •'Roses" A GRAND HHOU IN \N> (OINTRi Pit: lie. HeeaeT S6r Ral. *ae. Bex: •>.



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PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, MAY U. 1-1 Cahib Qallinq T it N of the Oiloeuw %  3 o'clock Th %  I n Ihr Cjueen'* House Th< lh usual attnctlMM highlighted %  be given to adutti KM Ma itr>i ivso iu.k> For One Week pAVING %  business visi! to the I i \li A. Bentn, prol Ltd.. Druggistof Antigua. He arrived on Thursday riiRht bv B.W.I.A. km mm week and \ slaving at UM Hotel 1 U.K. Visitors Leave R K'I flLNl.NC lo England earlier m ih t mk by the SS Da <% were Mi. P, C. Faunthorpe Benl Miss Mary Culler who werc IwMdiylM m Barbados as guests Windsor Hotel Mr. Faunthorpe was her* lor three weeks, while Minn Cutler spent %  fortnight. Spent Two Weeks V|li KNHiyUE LUNA DIAZ On Business M R. D Ell TIE KING. lie. tative of the Centra* Aarn. > Ln Had, was .. passenger b> H.V I A. on Monday for Antigua. Mr. King u on a business visit to I Aragua and St. Kltta on behalf.' .rm. BfTTr.KH.IKS „. n|r! Tel Aviv: Israel coal, reaflkd day." on: of 'snow-flake*'. They %  white butterflies which peared in phenomenal '(IIS VI'. II KXIIIB1T .1 Nleaaaa: A hen. produced kf court here Exhibit A in a theft caet, laid an egg on the judge's desk during the proceedings Disturbed by the han't cackling in the court, the Judge ordered It* removal. Mr. Punch's Birthday Poem — It Wag S Gitt From All tA* Toy•y MAX TRELL .WHEN Knarf and Hants, the Shadows. were sura that Mr. Punch was fast aaleap, they gathered everyone else around them and then Han id said: "Tomorrow is his birth. Listening Hours • a I IS MK ANI> MKS. i 1 KM OILI. Venezuela, return.'" 'oino today by B.W.1A, 'pending two weeks' holiday as .1 'he Hotel Royal. Before < nming here ho was in Trlnldar li/fK AND MRS. MICHAEL '..* i"l WILLIAMS of TTinulad. wtTe married there recently ,n Barbados spending their honeywedding at the Jam* Street moon. They arrived here during Methodist Church when Rev. lha week by B.W.I.A.. and are Frank Lawrence solemnised the staying at the Hotel Royal. marriage between Mis* Paulina Michael .s a an of Mr. Williams Inniss, daughter nf Mr. E. D. i>f the Louis J. Williams Market' Cnasie" Inniss of "Neia-ville". mg Company '*PV*r Colly more Rock, and Mr. L ravin* Trwlnv Cyr G '"* * n of *"*' lal Thaddeus A r*S Z2U!mSL .. %  g^nft-S JL r\ holiday staying at the Hotel M ISS HEVEHLEY HANDHICK KoyaL Mr. and Mrs E. E. Ehren'"" %  • "iid* who ** given ID of Montraa.1. Canada, arrived "^n *'l ** returning to Trinidsd marriage In hei rathe* leaked here on Thursday by TCA from xtxU evening by B.W.I A. They charming in an Elizabethan lace Trinidad for .: week** hottdav and will be accompanied tn then little bodies with .1 nylon *kirt. Her Is staying at th. i(.,i, .t-ughtar Catharine kaad-dreas was a petal julwi cap Miss Bandnck who 1* a member **r. Ehrenrelch is Planlatlon ' B | mployed \'l !U'/iH'l .lift School aceomInniss. sister t. Light shades bright and too The med'ktar red shades ol.-d tones and giv,. Uie moat •v.'urm rrpnenrRnre. Lipstick, harliionislng with the rouge sho 11 the clear red tones too. la Soft But Clear youth every feature '" si cntn p lfttal y charming that blue, such as deep fuchsia or deep "'ally wdl denned. To ., new fashion has been bom. red. She should choose, instead. """ youthful appearance. This silvery blonde shade la one < lear reds, pinks, coral and rose "'* brows should suggest a at is certain to appeal t<> the rads. Orange tones on cheeks but clearly denned gentle who bewails the darkenin id lips add drabnesa and sallo of her h.nr. yet hatos the brassy shsdes of gold so often produced by bleaching. There is IISO the advantage of being able 10 ni.ike these new shades merely They can be changed with each shampooing, ll saves all that bother of bleaching and dyeing. You CAN give your hair grey. lo the nonotone coloui >t brow. The mouth should be sliajwd with a brush n r the lipseek Itself but blotted to a muted Blend With Skin The older grey-haired should not go Her Blend over the cheek rougu with a powdered puff, and when I 'iwderlng the face, if there are make-up any wrinkles, spread these apart lies should with the lingers of one hand, and ... !" „ %  '" *hade* which approximate pat powder into them with the colour rinse at home, though "* : N lur#T8 own nd a PPlleiind-u -i.rt Pnnnuw PnvJ n> The N. hnm Britain via— iass an uas %  TASB TO SUIMANCB" Martha ODPISCOUL a SAS-IAriH al kl MAOM ,-i %  via KAtDsaa rt>iw U*KMT IV a "\ %  o ~ O KM -l\ 1MB-. # •NUIP *aartaat O asclaimad everyone — averyona except Teddy tha Stirffad Baar who asked: "Whose birthday?" Mr. Paawh'a." aaawared knarf. "OhT aaid Tsddy. which is what ha aheela kava said is tha first place. "I think.' said tiaasral Tin the tin soldier, 'that we sheuld give Mr. Punch a tiaauUful pra-eat.' "That's what I tkbik. teV said Glona, tha doll with tha golden curls. "1 thank w skauld buy him a iieautlful pair of gloves, a beautiful hat, a aaaaUfol pair of slipper*. ane 1 a beautiful saw pipe.** MSI ss tan Baaalifal Plswo Km The "Two beaatiful giaas," added i.*!" Do*. Teddy, "^^a he can smoke one n modua No on P* d any attention to this. Saea> Han id said: "What Mr. Punch Ilkas beat of all isn't gloves, or s I hat, or slippers or a pipe. Besides. m he's got all of thosethings. What ~* I ha likes best of all for a birthday ii|a-i 1 nraaant is something that you can't U M 1 ''uy—something that you can al%  waya keep—and something thst no ons else In tha world can give liisu but US." Kvaryona wanted to know what this tiling could be. Whan Hanld saw that ns one could guess, she finally said: "For Mr. Punch's birthday p tesent 1 think wa should civs him a pcem." "Very good idea," said Genersl Tin; "vary good n.ieed. But not an -a-y present to give." "It's much easier to get gloves and those other things," atid Gl Watch 'DISPRIN' dissolvequickly—completely Teddy saggastad Mr. Fui like Ukrea aiaes. Mr. Punch we love you dearly Dally, weekly, monthly, yearly, Wa always know tt vary clearly Mr. Punch we lova you dearly. Mr. Punch wa wish yoa fan day* Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays. Thursdays. Wednesdays, Tuesdays, Mondays. Mr. Punch wa wish yen fun days. Than, whan It was all dene, Hann wrota tha poem out on a fresh B iSca of paper and slipped it under lr. Punch's door so that ha would be sure to sea H tha first thing in the morning. Birthday Klaa "And of course," said Gloria, "wall all give him a kiss, too. Nobody esn have a birthday without being kissed." "It's a wonderful poem and I'm sure Mr. Puneh will Ilka it." Teddy tha Stuffed Baar said after thS lights baking her curls. "If. hard lo out and everyone was about rite a birthday poem." >" • to sleep. "Bui I think ha would •That's what makes It such a '"ka two pipes, too. Next year I 01 pad present," said Knarf. *£'" < !*• him two pipes for his So they all thought and thought. birthday, maybe three of them gg scribbled and scribbled, and 1 "Thraa of tham. Teddy! what hanged and changed, and crossed \^a ha do with three pipes? Knarf ul and erased *rd wrote in new .demsnded. lords until st Isst tha poem was "One to smoke, and one to hold mshed. This is it: in each band." said Teddy. Because 'Dispr'm enters Ihc stonuuh ^t in a true m/nitoiK with no invluhlc .icul pMtJCrtt, it U more i.ipi.lls jhsnvhed by ihe Qtsteoi ,hir. IVIICMIIJ; pjui wiihoui JcUiy. The best wa\ M Mate 'Disprin' is i" inrtw, though its sixuhing. pflisVffltteving cU'ecl will be the sumo whichever Wt) you Uke ii. Bcc.uise of its advantages over ordinary aspirin. Disprin i, widely used in honpiiaU ihroughoui Ureai Briiain. DISPRIN to relieve pain When you need aspirin betr-r cake a 'DISPRIN' a (IAKRASAV g ( r) THE \nVOCATE STATMONERY For BUST IIOItHS. BY THE WAY BEACHCOMBER 'TMiE t.. tepli *ho ransack U10 tortii If Oiled with morcose. marre-i last Saturday by an ss> 1 was for whales Dranestone insulator encased in ceniHe guide who charged an nlSti our grotesque lardhemp, and two bnij*iwi-l Irn.nifs extra half-crown ba show tin killing the bruits by elecwith reversible tarbol Ina SSg< S ,H „n which Ihe fourth Earl fc_ . t '" a inagnelle candle, touched kicked Cromwell on the shin: an the learned chemists who the fuienim. and then* was a extra shilling for a peep at the itlrur say anfl exploalon. When asked for Scoffing stone In thmlnatreU' sajsad <>r killing whales h r and "That was tha lamp. It is ii' als. 1 lowers the price. isolated There were no cm But if a dish of whale heroines I l •ho fodhion the mice will go up. not down. Chefs have only u *" nviss//i^r thst th.f Tim bale dc BnlH'ie is cooked iirt red wine and "LJlS usual alibi was that served with Sauee Miroholonir XI WM not inten^tnl for this dainty to stipenede tina good example of the ned Bhodesian turkejt gg banquets, eal ismaUUoB xplanuuon. the Do,-.nr said. gnUery; and an extra three shilthat Ume the quacks, the for which there Is 11 erase al the lings to let people sit in the chair .if Matilda of Flanders. "None of this is in the printed booklet." objected s sightseer. "II will all be in the next edition." replied Ihe guide, wlhh that confident leer which t*"long* tmlv lo Captain That is FOulanough. At the vru\ of the eoiianiday the takings had v.uwh.0Uo the guide. Prvrautionmry mtmf-pullin/r OTl Of / %  rli.,.piiipin 1 will have meant an "excuse The |i.vel discovered forts kinds of beneflword "glasgnur' ha sao utter|v cent chemicals in w*inle-snout dabaaed and rolled |r ihe mud. Pie and critic are begin *sfnr/)iriiif< ilvnntnl." • Is not B putreseen*. h M Y lecent report of tjhe isolsmurder, and obaeetnv Uon of the bamp by Dr. buiatmu of this ci % %  • %  ...... %  L Strablsmus (Whom God Prarre) dialect of the Jlffljonaera Brigade " 'Hich. and \he of Utrecht was received! by setof the Civil Servir. ugl etui l** l > *"• w 10 Thc noment the %  with pained in.u-edullty. by produeing 1, wo: • i(u> kind of "^n^e begins to talk about his Veaterday UM sage was at home English. sehloss near Vienna, tweaks IM %  .1 *Wag>llng Par. ... Hnp-hurg facade, m make snre\, He ihowed theni w tat lookluok nut /or tin-^uirlv she win low ., few hours of ru hke ,1 ixotwi fulcrum 1 In pteosant nlrtntion, but will keeg -7IVE-SHILUN'C. das u aVudwher Mf-reaag. T HE woman who "pulled man's nose in : .ublu should lilni which n v,> "e' 0 *** %  "he was testing his ..,., >f i ult t bona /Ides. Bogus foreign artstoThe com'-'' %  • '* In liners nearly always have fat, false noses, to give them a Haps -I %  ifl ci steam-heated rhubarb. 'Jireo re:!F' baa Pin. .ih.it Oermana call profit and schkws LADIES' "EVER-REST" SHOES 3 WITH BUILT IN ARCH SUPPORTS S DJ BLACK ANO TAN COURT — BLACK AND TAN LACE (8 MO.M Ni:\V LINK MEN'S SHOES — SUEDES AND LKATnERS S8.33 TO I13.M T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS HIM 2 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL *bOb


9

———

_—





ESTABLISHED 1895





Foreign Ministers



Arrive In Bonn
Expected To Sign
Treaty Manday

BONN, May 23.

The three ‘Western Foreign Ministers, Mr. Eden, Mr.
Acheson and M. Schuman have arrived in Bonn for final
talks with the Federal German Chancellor, Dr. Konrad
Adenauer on the agreement ending Western occupation of
Germany, The treaty expected to be signed Monday, in-
cludes the contractual agreements made between the West-
ern High Commissioners and Dr. Adenauer.

United States Secretary of State

Dean Acheson landed at Bonn
Airport this afternoon in President
Truman's plane from Washington. |
Acheson told reporters at the’
airfield that the Contractual
Treaty system which also covers
West Germany’s share in Euro-
pean Defence should be a “great
contribution to the security and
peace of the world.” |

In this weekend conferences
with Chancellor Adenauer and
Britain's and French Foreign
Ministers he hoped to do “some
real constructive work.”

“Meanwhile West German parli-
ament to-day rejected the motion’
by the social democratic opposition
to discuss the Allied German
treaties ending the occupation
before Chancelior Konrad Aden-‘
auer signs them.

The social democrat motion was
defeated by a show of hands after
a noisy debate in an atmosphere
heavily charged after last night’s
bitter exchange between the con-!
valescent opposition leader Kurt
Schumacher and Dr. Adenauer.

Jack Fox writes from London:

Britain has never felt itself part
of Europe and to-day still fiercely
independent, Britain is staying
aloof from the grand design to
weld all western Europe into one
bloc,



ADMIRAL NELSON’S
HOUSE BURNT

{From Our Own Correspondent)
Kingston, Jamaica, May 23.
An historic landmark in
West Indian history was de-
stroyed by fire yesterday as
flames gutted the house where
Admiral Nelson lived at Port
Royal when he commanded at
Port Charles in the 1780's.

The world famed Nelson’s
quarterdeck, the wooden gal-
lery of the fort where he paced
while looking to sea for the
French or Spanish fleet was
saved by military and civilian
firefighting action.

Port Royal Roman Catholic
school was housed in the fam-
ous building. The adjacent
building in which the Roman ~
Catholic Church was housed
was also destroyed.



Civil Disturbances
Cost Grenada
$82,665

(From Our Own Correspondent)

Very soon Western Allies will GRENADA. May 23.

sign what amounts to a_ peace
treaty with Western Germany.
Then France, Italy, Belgium, Hol-
land and tiny Luxembourg will
initial the history making docu-
ment to put their troops in the

sei emia cers

nm army.
British Foreign Secretary An-

thony Eden will sign Bonn peace
contract giving back Sovereignty
to her late enemies. Eden will do
so as he himself has said not
without misgivings after bitter
experience of two world wars in a
quarter century.

Legislature has voted $82,665 in
connection with last year’s civil
disturbances and its aftermath,
including the bringing of the
Welch Fusiliers from Jamaica
poder from Trinidad and St.
Lucia. Ksiy

A large part of this sum was
actually spent last year but is
yet unapproved. The remainder
meets the BWI Airways bill.

The Committee also agreed to
the principle that Grenada should
take advantage of the possibility
afforded by the Trinidad and To-
bago school for blind children
and to provide funds to maintain
the two Grenada children already
there.

The Committee agreed that
the DDT spraying of Carriacou
homes which took place, during
the malarial epidemic last year
should be repeated at the colony’s
expense early in the present
rainy season in the hope of avoid-
ing a similar outbreak this year,
It is expected’ that the insect
control scheme to be launched
shortly by UNICEF and W.H.O.
will take care of this in the
future.

Considering information relat-
ing to the cost of a police radio
system the Committee decided to
defer decision of the installation
iin connection with next year's
estimates.

U.N. Planes Score Biggest
Raid Over North Korea

SEOUL, May 23.

SWARMS of United Nations fighter bombers struck
Communist war factories near the North Korean capital
of Pyong Yang to-day in the climax of a two-day attack
that probably was the biggest air assault of the Korean
War.

United States and Australian war planes flying day
and night after the opening blow at dawn on Thursday
smashed at least 305 buildings and damaged 151 others
including factories manufacturing hand grenades and other
weapo

i

—UP.

U.S. Dollar Up

MONTREAL, May 23

The United States dollar Thurs-
day closed at a discount of 1 9/16
per cent, in terms of Canadian
funds, up 1/16 from Wednesday’s
close, that it took $0.98 7/16
Canadian to buy $1 American, The
pound sterling was $2.75 %4, down
% from Wednesday.

The Canadian dollar was down
1/16 of a cent at a premium of
1 19/32 per cent in terms of
United States funds in closing
foreign exchange dealings on
Thursday. The pound sterling was
down % of a cent at $2.79 a

—(CP).





ns,

Fifth Airforce planes flew 900 sorties and were be-
lieved to have topped in both sorties and the destruction
of the war’s biggest previous raid on May 8th assault on
the ancient walled town of Suan. In that raid 180 buildings
were destroyed and two square miles of supplies laid waste

but the total sorties were not announced.
Almost every type of fighter ————————-———-—-

bomber in the Allied arsenal flew han. ee
Interior Ministry

yesterday, last night and to-day

in an attack that ranged from nine ue F
Blame U.S. Catholics

BUENOS AIRES, May 23.

to_fifteen miles east of Pyong Yang
toward the Yellow Sea port of

Chinnampo. Key factories includ-
ing a hand ‘grenade plant and
powerhouse were levelled. A Fifth} Government blamed “Catholics
Airforce spokesman said the raid} directed from the United States”
was a “healthy blow” at North|for the recent riots protesting

Korean war industry.

Shuttle attacks with pilots going
back for second and third missions
as fast as they could reload bombs
and ammunition, were not broken
off until heavy rain clouds ob-
secured the still smoking target
area.

Communist MIG 15’s which dur-
ing the Suan raid came as far
south as Pyong Yang were not
sighted by United States sabre jets
flying protective patrols for fighter
bombers.

At least four huge secondary ex- |
were seen to-day as pilots |

plosions
dropped hundreds of tons of bombs
and thousands of gallons of Na-
palm into the factory area. United
States F.84 thunder jets and F.80
shooting star jets of the Austra-
lian Meteor jets, F.51 Mustangs,
Marine Corsairs, and Navy Sky-
raiders streaked through smoke to~
day to blast any buildings still
standing. United States B.26 in-
vaders kept the attack going night-
long.—U.P.

“immoral” movies in which 11 per-
sons were injured.

There were riote in Buenos Aires
and Cordoba this week at the
openings of the Argentine film
“Atomic Barbara” which features
five scantily clad Cuban dancers.

The Interior Ministry last night
in a communique linked the riots

with the recent Catholic action
campaigns against immodesty at
beaches. The communique charged
that North American missionaries
are promoting the drive.
Interior Minister Borlenghi said
five persons arrested in Buenos
| Aires riots have been released but
Maximo Guillermo Mantel is being
| held for trial.
| Police found a notebook at Man-
| tel’s home in which the following
‘was written about July 4: “Inde-
| pendence Day of the United States.
Most glorious day of all. Our big
sister.”
| Boflenghi said

this proved

\‘ these incidents are directed from| cultural development corporation

abroad.--U.P,

Committee To
_ Inquire Into
Trade Dispute

GEORGETOWN, B.G., May, 22.
Governor Sir Charles Woolley
has appointed a three man com-
mittee to enquire into the cause
of the trade dispute between the
Shipping Association of George-
town (representing the principal
shipping agents) and the British
Guiana Labour Union which re-

-Sulted in the stoppage of work by
| dockers in March last, and to make

such recommendations as the

{committee may deem necessary.
fis chairman of the committee

The Finance Committee of

is the comptroller of customs, J, W.
Gregory, and members are the
Honourable G. A. Cyril Farnum,
O.B.E., and Mr. W. V. Jeune, Vice-
President of the Post Office Work-
ers’ Union and member of the
executive of the Federation of
Unions of Government employ-
ees,

The request for a committee was |’

made by the union after a dead-
lock had been reached on the
question by the association whether
the dockers strike had been called
by and was supported by union
or whether men simply refused
the work which it was offering.
Then representatives of the ship-

SATURDAY

SS





--~

“Hy RRICANE~



MAY 24, 1952



RETURNS

on

MR. IAN GALE (right) and Mr, “Corkie’ Roberts relax on the deck of “Hurricane” after their return
you Uhis areusta is lashed down to the deck of the Motor Vessel “Cacique Del Caribe” which

arrived

Grenada via St. Vincent and St. Lucia.

Mr Gale and Mr. Roberts sailed “Hurricane” to Grenada via St. Vincent and the Grenadines.





Riot Busters |
Mass In Paris. |

PARIS, May 28
Troops are massed in barraéks)

ping agents and of the union met/yinging Paris in support of 15,000

the Colonial Secretary and dis-
cussed the situation, but it was
not possible to reach an* agree-
ment.—(C.P.)

Red China
Would Attack
Via Siam

WILLIAM De BARZELARE
SAIGON, May 23.
Informed sources said if Red
China ever launches a full-scale
offensive against Indo-China, the
mn strike probably will come
Tv d (Siam), The
be ithield, said that ‘Thailand's
w: a ailan
gallant but small and poorly
equipped army would be easy
victims of a Chinese force of say
2,000. And once Siam was “lib-
erated” there would be a clear
road through Cambodia into the
heart of France's rich “Associated
States.”
The source said: ‘“‘Mind you}
we have no indication at present



By

that the Chinese communists are|§

riot busting police as “H. Hour’
neared for: mass demonstrations
ordered by Communists against
General Matthew B. Ridmway,
new NATO Supreme Commander.

Between 20,000 and 25,000
soldiers including veterans of the
war against Communist rebels in}
Indo-China, were ordered to bar-
ragks at army posts surrounding
the city as French Reds stepped
up their blasts against “General
Plague.”

A spokesman for the Paris Police
Prefecture said troops have been
assembled “just in case” Commu-
nist rioters get out of control of
the city’s crack 15,000-strong anti+
riot squads,

He said however, the author!-

squads. were adequate to a
with any trouble that might de-
velop when party members hit
the streets this afternoon to de-

monstrate in some 20 key spots
against Ridgway’s arrival next
Tuesday.

Convoys loaded with troops

rumbled along the broad highways
jJeading to Paris and dark blue
trucks of tough CRS (Republican

Security Companies) rolledy



Two Home A fler

Record Voyage

MR. IAN GALE, Acting Editor of the Barbados Advo-
cate, and Mr. “Corkie” Roberts, Clerk of the Attorney
General’s Office, returned to the island yesterday morning
by the Motor Vessel “Cacique Del Caribe” from Grenada
via St. Vineent and St. Lucia.

On Sunday afternoon, May 11, Mr. Gale sailed the 15-
foot “D” Class yacht, Hurricane, out of Carlisle Bay and
set-a course for St, Vincent. Mr. Roberts accompanied
him as crew.

‘Daily Mirror’

They arrived in St. Vincent ap-
proximately 23 hours later, Hur-
| ricane has therefore established







Apologises
To Churchill

LONDON, May 23.

: The —_ pro-Labo

vy atror “pibieny Mabhaieed
to Prime Minister Churchill Satur-
day for the election day picture

and statements at which he took
offence. He in turn dropped the
libel suit against the paper.

The Mirror last October 25th
printed a picture of a pistol on its
front page and asked “Whose fin-
ger do you want on the trigger.”
The Mirror’s apology read: ‘The
Statements and pictures referred
to never intended to suggest that

i

planning to invade Indo-China. |through the city streets radioing. Mr. Churchill did not dislike war

But if they did we believe that|
is the way they probably would
do it. Such a strike would be
combined with an_ offensive
against the bulk of 155,000 French
and Vietnam troops at present
concentrated on the main fighting
front around Hanoi 700 miles to
the north of Saigon.

General Raoul Salan, French
Commander in the Hanoi area
said recently he could hold off
such an attack in his sector “for
a month at least’’ with the force
now at his disposal. But the
northern prong of a Chinese of-
fensive would prevent the French
from diverting troops to meet a
back door attack.

The source said “Thailand is!
in no position to stem a Chinese}
attack, According to intelligence}
reports Siamese Communists al-
ready are setting up a complete
underground network to wage
sabotage and guerrilla warfare
in the event of a Chinese ‘lib-
eration’,

He said the Siamese army was
a “group of gallant men who do
not have the necessary military
means to make a .lone stand}
against a Chinese invasion. “But
the source pointed out it would
be a long 600 mile haul for a
Chinese invading force to reach





Cambodia through Siam, At that}
point the French probably could |
muster a force strong enough to
delay the attack until help came
from the outside world.

—U.P.













“Since we are to
co-operate on Europe:
defence, onsieur Le
Général, doubtless you
will now reveal the secrct
of the British arz-2ur-
plated stomach which can
resist the catering offen-
sive the most terrible!"

London Bzpress Service.





£500,000 LOAN

KINGSTON, May 23.
The Sugar Price Stabilization
Fund has offered to lend Govern-
ment £500,000 to be used in
financing the newly formed agri-|

—C.P,

to headquarters whatever Com-
munist movement they sighted,
—UP.



Peron Twists
_ Lion’s Tail

—DAILY MAIL

LONDON, May 23
The Daily Mail said that Argen-
tine President Juan Peron ‘was
playing the “old game of twisting
the lion’s tail’ over Argentine’s
claims to the Antarctic territory.

The newspaper’s editorial page
columnist “Tanfield” quoted Peron
as saying that Angentina would
no longer discuss their claims to
the territory but would defend
them after decorating members of
an Argentine Antarctic expedition,
The paper continued: “The meet-
ing which Peron attended how-
ever, was little shory of material
on Argentine heroism in the An-
tarctic. So they showed the British
film “Seott of the Antarctic’.”

—UP.

Empire Youth
Service Sunday

At 4.30 p.m. tomorrow the Em-
pire Youth Service will he held at
Government House grounds, It
is expected that approximately
2,000 young people, drawn from
the Cadets, Scouts and Guides,
Church Lads and Girls Brigades,
Sunday Schools, Police Boys!
Clubs and other youth organisa-
tions will be attending the service.

His Excellency the Governor
will deliver the Empire Day
Message and Rev. K. E, Towers
vil) deliver an address, Others
taking | part in the service
will be: Archdeacon Hutchinson,
Dean Hazelwood, Rev E. E. New
and Major Walter Morris of the
Salvation Army.





and the possibility of war, as much
as the defendants do themselves.”

—U.P,



An Appreciation
BY A VISITOR

The Committee of the Barbados
Branch of the League of Empire
showed commendable wisdom in
their selection of the project
scheme for the Junior Compe-
tilion for Empire Week 1952. As
a visitor to Barbados I should like

the high standard of the Exhibi-
tion now on display at Comber-
mere School,

The project illustrates a model
of the development of a two-acre
plot
what more appropriate choice
could have been made in order
to stimulate the interest of chil-
dren and parents in the direc-
tion of a progressive policy of
land settlement?

The ingenuity revealed by many
of the competitors shows the
educational value of the
Scheme. Some of the
created did give one the impres-
sion that the imagination was
atlowed to run riot-—-one for ex-
ample provided a» paddock of
thoroughbreds; another two giants
reclining against a house many
times too small—but these were
exciting displays in
mathematical
childish fancy.

I found the posters equally ex-
citing — Alexandra School and
Combermere particularly delight-
ful. I hope the Essays will be
published as the report of the
examiner discloses that they
reached a high level of literary
merit and originality. I under4
stand that the young lady who
gained third prize by her essay
on the Scout and Guide Movement
was commended for her sane and
pleasing exposition of values
which are apt to be overlooked in
modern society. Will the men of

you to record my admiration “na

spite of

inaccuracies and

of ground at Seawell; :

Project; forwarded to the Prime Minister
South Africa, the Secretary of

,a record for being the smallest

yacht, sailing under the auspices
of the Royal Barbados Yacht Club
to make the Barbados to St. Vin-
cent “ip.

Mr. Gale made this record even
more difficult for the skipper who

ane
dines and
“None The Worse”
On board the Cacique Del

Caribe yesterday they both look-
ed none the worse from their
exciting trip. Hurricane also look-
ed in good shape and will most
likely be ready for the Twelfth
Regatta today.

After leaving Barbados, Hurri-

cane encountered choppy seas
until 25 miles out. The sea be-
tame calmer and she had a
smooth run to St. Vincent

Mr, Gale and Mr, Roberts spent
a couple of days in St, Vincent
where they met the yacht Wan-
derer with its crew of two Aus-
tralian yachtsmen,

After leaving St. Vincent they
sailed to Bequia where they spent
two nights. They stayed a few
nights at Mustique Canouan and
Carriacou before setting sail for
Grenada.

They encountered some rough
seas and land winds on their way
through the Grenadines but Hur-
ricane reached Grenada _ ship-



B.G. Trade Union
Council Protests
Against Malanism

}EORGETOWN, B.G., May 23
The British Guiana Trade Union
Council last night passed a resolu-
tion protesting against Malanism.
Resolution copies which are to be

State for the Colonies, and the
Human Rights Commission, of the
United Nations, states “whereas
treatment meted out to non-
European in the Union of South
Africa has been regarded by
workers including Europeans all
over the world as being most op-
pressive, and whereas the Union's
government continues with its
campaign of terror and has order-
ed workers’ militant leaders in the
trade union movement to resign
their posts, and their political
leaders to be unseated, and
whereas movements of the said
leaders have been restrigted and
freedom of speech and assembly
has been denied them, be it re-
jfolved that this council represent-

ing all workers of British Guiana!

protest most vehemently
hese outrages directed
jown trodden coloured workers

in South Africa, and be it further

against

against |





Jea Lifts Ban On
Canadian Fish

Imports Cut, However

OTTAWA, May 23.
Jamaica has lifted its temporary ban on Canadian can-
ned fish and placed imports under a quota which will result
in a deep cut in exports from Canada this year Trade offi-
cials disclosed on Friday- E
The result will be that Canadian exporters will be
granted import licences only for about $174.000 worth of
canned fish this year compared with more than $500,000 in
1951, The move on part of the colony is to conserve dollars
wherever possible.

All British coloni@és in that ~— As =
area are taking a second look at :
dollar imports to consider where
savings can Be made. The canned
fish cut may thit Canada’s East
Coast. Last year maritime ex-
porters were allowed to ship
canned fish into Jamaica almost
freely under open general license,
but officials said Jamaica found
she was spending a lot more
dollars on this product than she]
anticipated,

A short while



Â¥
Farnum For
1
linland Fund
Donations for the fund to
defray the expenses of Ken
Farnum to the Olympic Games
are accepted at Barclay’s

Bank, the Royal Bank of Can-

ito. she” hatte al ada and the office of the Ad-



imports temporarily for about a Yosaie
month and then opened the doors Goal i $2,880.00
again—placing canned fish under Amt. Prev. Ack. ,.. $1,096 47
Canada—B.W.1I. Trade Liberali- Parry-Coleridge arse
zation Plan. Under this scheme School 14.00
Canada will be allowed to ship Mr. & Mrs Denton :
canned fish up to 30 per cent. of Sayers : 5.00
Jamaica's imports from Canada Advocat orts 5
in the basic period 1946—48. | ‘Club. SS 8.24
OP. wleck ¥: miele :
ZOAl od eeveess $1,123.71







Ex-C.1LD. Chief

J’ca To Serve | (Cuts Inv U.S.
Six Months ae te

_@ an e
(From Our Own Correspondent | Foreign Aid
re es| § Affermead

Wooding was complimented by}
the Resident Magistrate of the}

Kingston Court todas on his hand- | WASHINGTON, May 23.

| T nn
ling of the conspiracy case in-/, The House of Representatives
volving Jamaica’s former Minis- | 2 . roll call vote of 221 to 187 to-
ter of Education Joseph Malcolm | 22y affirmed the tentative $615,-

300,000 cut in European “defence
support” aid in the Foreign Aid
Bill,

and Henry Wellington, former
Chief of the CID, Wellingt@m who
retired as the Island's top detec- |
tive last year was found guilty of |
trying to pervert the ends of
justice by the Magistrate and was
sentenced to 12 months on four
counts concurrently,

Wooding made an impassioned
plea on behalf of Wellington as a
result of which the judge reduced
the imprisonment term to six

the Mig an jer see ng the trial,



The House then formally reaf-
firmed by a roll call vote of 192
to 165 its decision to cut $11,200,000
from defence support and techni-
eal aid for Asia and the Far East
in the Mutual Security Bill.

It had voted this cut tentatively
earlier to-day.

The House Democrat
admitted that they hai
chanoe of stopping the determined
Republican economy bloc from
dealing roughly with $6,900,000,-
000 foreign aid programme.
—UP.

Malcolm!

he Crown had not proved
conspiracy between him and Well-
ington on eight counts.

The charges are connected with
the farm workers ticket fraud
from which Maleolm was _ previ-
ously sentenced to 12 months’ jm-
prisonment and is now serving 7 , Og ’ . >
that sentence. Wellington endeav- VEW TYPE CARGO SH
oured to obstruct police collecting | LAUNCHED FOR

evidence against Malcolm. Well- ) TTE TRADE
ington has given notice of appeal | BAUXITE _ a
A 8 ;

Royalty Fly A new type of cargo ship for







carrying bauxite from Jamaica to
| U.S. ports, which can load and

In Comet yunload its 12,500 ton cargo in

| nine hours against the two days

LONDON, May 23. | it would take a nermal ship, was

The Queen Mother Elizabeth,|!a@unched on May 13 at Barrow,

and Princess Margaret are going | Lancashire,

for a ride today in one of Bri- be

tain’s Comet jet airliners, the The President of the U.S, Com-

fastest commercial plane in the} pany, Reynolds Jamaica Mines,

world. They drove from Bucking-| Said at the launching that Jamai-
ham Palace this morning for the, ca will soon supply more alumin-

De Haviland airfield to go aboard | ium than any country in
the plane,

ore

—U.P. Europe.—B.U.P.



Barbados please note?

Let me conclude by stating thaf,
the League of Empire Exhibition
shows that Barbados has a good
future before her. I hope to be
back in time for next year’s
Exhibition which is worth much
more than the modest fee charged.

Bread Shortage

Tornadoes, Hail
Lash Mid-West U.S.

CHICAGO, May 23,
Communications were disrupt-
ed, buildings damaged, and at
least twelve persons were injured |
after a series of tornadoes and
severe hail storms struck mnorth-
eastern Kansas and western Mis-













resolved that the British Guiana
Government be urged strongly to
cease all trade with South Africa
so long as its government persists
in its fascist tyranny,—CP).



Move and more.
people are saying —



Thieves Take Gold
Worth $100,000



* ° .
souri last night. Heavy raims and In British Guiana VALDOR, Quebec, May 23. |
hail were reported throughout Police Friday intensified their e
eastern Kansas and western Mis-| GEORGETOWN, B.G., May 23 search for the perpetrators of a
souri area. A shortage, said due to the delay} $100,000 gold brick theft from East ‘
. in importations as well as non-]Malartic mines.
Kansas _and Missouri torms arrival of ships to schedule has The announcement of the break}

were the first of several thunder-|)i+ British Guiana. Several baker-|in and theft came yesterday from
storms which pit the ae i ies have already had to go tem-|T. V. Netherey, East Malartic Man- }
Soe han Suseen + : aa porarily out of operation and in]|ager who said an acetelyne forch
tine: of activity brot gusty consequence buyers have been|had been used to cut through two
surface winds, severe turbulence}Storming the city’s two meee es doors and relea e the locks
and hail to part of Kar Okla-| factories i to all appearances!to the Company’s vault in which

Missouri and Arkansa tk vill be a breadle weekend’ four gold bricks were stored await-

—.P.‘for most of the people.—CP), {ing shipment.—-(CP),


PAGE TWO f



yer

Mrs
the

rnoon

esas aft:
rurner

wife of Colonial

Secretar) iil open the Girls’
Industrial Union Annual Fete at
Queen’s Park at 3 o'clock The
Police Band under Captain C. E
Raison will be in attendance anc
the Mobile Cinema will show films

the Queen's House Theatre up-

stairs at 6.45 o'clock. There will be
the usual attractions highlighted
by the Fancy Dress Parade at 4.15
o'clock. Two prizes will be given
to adults for the first two lucky
numbers.

Carib Calli

For One Week

AYING a business visit to the
island is Mr. A. Bento, pro-
prietor of Harpers Ltd., Druggists
of Antigua. He arrived on Thurs-
day night by B.W.LA. for one
week and is staying at the Hotel
Royal.

U.K. Visitors Leave
ETURNING to England earlier
in the week by the S.S. De

Grasse were Mr. P. C. Faunthorpe
and Miss Mary Cutler who were
holidaying in Barbados as guests
at the Windsor Hotel,

Mr. Faunthorpe was here for
three weeks, while Miss Cutler
spent a fortnight.

Spent Two Weeks

R. ENRIQUE LUNA DIAZ of

Barinas, Venezuela, returns
home today by B.W.LA., after
spending two weeks’ holiday as a
guest at the Hotel Royal. Before
coming here he was in Trinidad
where he remained for one week.
His wife who had travelled out to
Port-of-Spain with him, returned
to Venezuela while he came over
here.

Mr. Diaz is Warehouse Manager

of Socony Vacuum Oil Company
in Venezuela,

Canadian Holidaying Here
ISS BEVERLEY BANDRICK
of Montreal, Canada, arrived

here on Thursday by T.C.A. from

Trinidad for e week’s holiday and

ts staying at the Hotel Royal.

Miss Bandrick who is a member
of the Office Staff of Standard

Brands Inc.. will stop at Bermuda

before returning to Montreal.

Since leaving Canada, she has

visited Curacao and Venezuela

Paid Short Visit

EAVING for Trinidad on

‘ Thursday where they will
spend a few days before returning
home, were Mr. and Mrs. Carlos
Russian of Caracas, Venezuela,
who were here for a short holiday
staying at the Hotel Royal.

Mr. Russian is employed
the Government in Venezuela.

with



MR. AND MRS. CYRIL GILL

On Honeymoon
R. AND MRS. MICHAEL
WILLIAMS of Trinidad, who
were married there recently are
in Barbados spending their honey-
moon, They arrived here during
the week by B.W.LA, and are
staying at the Hotel Royal.

Michael is a son of Mr. Williams
of the Louis J. Williams Market-
ing Company.

Leaving Today

FTER spending three weeks’

holiday staying at the Hotel
Royal, Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Ehren-
reich will be returning to Trinidad
this evening by B.W.LA. They
will be accompanied by their little
daughter Catherine.

Mr. Ehrenreich is Plantation
Manager of the U.S. Naval Station
n Trinidad. He said that they
all had a lovely holiday anq re-
gretted having to leave so soon

Visited “Advocate”
IX young guides from St. Mar-
garet’s Girls’ School accom-~
panied by Miss Payne and Misd@
Mayers troom leaders, visited the
“Advocate” yesterday afternoon.
They were shown around the
various departments by Mr
Michael Hope of the Job Printery.
The youngsters showed great in-
terest in the many things around
them.



Quiet Wedding

HURSDAY
scene of a
wedding at

morning was the
quiet but pretty
the James Street
Methodist Church when Rev.
Frank Lawrence solemnised the
marriage between Miss Pauline
Inniss, daughter of Mr. E. D.
“Cossie” Inniss of ‘“Neta-ville”,
Upper Collymore Rock, and Mr.
Cyril Gill, son of the late Thaddeus
Gill and Mrs. Gill of “Haldon
Court,” Prospect, St. James

The bride who was given in
marriage by her father looked
charming in an Elizabethan lace
bodice with a nylon skirt. Her
head-dress was a petal juliet cap
studded with pearls. Her finger-
tip veil was kept in place by two
white roses. Her bouquet was
Queen Anne's lace, anthurium
lilies and pink radiants

The bridesmaids were the
Misses Joyce Ramdin and Peggy
Inniss, sister of the bride. They

looked charming in silk anglaise
and nylon and they carried posies
of pink radiants matching forget-
me-nots, blue violets and Queen
Anne’s lace.

The reception was held at the
bride’s father’s home and the
honeymoon is being spent at
Powell Spring Hotel, Bathsheba.



Silver Threads Among

Today there are three types of gain high lights to her hair —
grey-haired women the elderly bronze, amber and titian. Though
type whose hair is grey through when she does start to grey, col«
the passage of years, the younger our rinses will make her hair
woman with prematurely grey look much prettier,
‘hair, and the woman who chooses Silver hair, whether it be
tc have her hair tinted grey to be natural or adopted must have the
in high fashion. Maybe it is be- right make-up to complement it
cause so many young women have The younger woman with pre-
become prematurely grey for4maturely grey hair, must take
fome reason or other during andgeare that she selects make-up
since the war, and the result be-"which does not contain much
ing so completely charming that blue, such as deep fuchsia or deep
a new fashion has been born. red, She should choose, instead,

This silvery blonde shade is one vlear reds, pinks, coral and rose
that is certain to appeal to the reds, Orange tones on cheeks
ulonde who bewails the darken- and lips add drabness and sallow-
ing of her hair, yet hates the ness to the nonotone colour of
brassy shades of gold so often grey.
produced by bleaching. There is
also the advantage of being able
to make these new shades merely
tansient, They can be changed .
with each shampooing. It saves Should not go in for make-up
all that bother of bleaching and ‘!*shions”. Her cosmetics should
dyeing. You CAN give your hair Le in shades which approximate
: colour rinse at home, though to Nature’s own and applied with
I always think it wise to have “ elicate hand. Naturally she
the first rinse by your own hair- Wnts to keep her skin looking as
dresser, ™ ‘ight and fair as possible. Foun-
dation and powder should be only
light enough to tone or ‘warm’
up the skin colour if the skin

Colour rinses are only tints, 1eeds brightening up. Otherwise,
and though light hair takes them a colour should be selected that
admirably, the brunette can onlybiends harmoniously with the

.

Blend With Skin

The older grey-haired woman

Use Colour Rinse



The Gold

natural skin tone, Light shades
of rouge are too bright and too
obvious on older faces. The med-
tum clear red shades are close to
blood tones and give the most
natural appearance. Lipstick, har-
inonising With the rouge should be
in the clear red tones too.

Soft But Clear

In youth every feature is nat-
urally well defined. To retain
that youthful appearance, then,
the brows should suggest a soft,
but clearly defined gentle arching
brow. The mouth should be
shaped with a brush or the lip-
stick itself but blotted to a muted
tone,

Blend over the cheek rouge
with a powdered puff, and when
powdering the face, if there are
any wrinkles, spread these apart
with the fingers of one hand, and
pat powder into them with the
puff. After this, brush all excess
powder away with a complexion
brush,

If you want to be extra sophis-
tucated, and decide to adopt one
o1 the new silver shades of hair
tint, you must be doubly careful
about your make-up. Blue rinsed
hair looks best with a pink and
white complexion.



BY THE

HE men who ransack the torts half filled with morcose, 4
wine-dark seas for. whales Dranestone insulator encased in

to replenish owr grotesque lard- hemp, and two brushwood thongs
ers are killing the beasts by elec- with reversible tarbols. The sage
trocution. lit a magnetic candle, touched
And the learned chemists who the fulcrum, and there was a
tell us what we are eating say soft explosion. When asked for
that this method of killing whales an explanation, the Doctor said,
makes their flesh more tender and “That was the bamp, It is now

also lowers the jprice. isolated.” There were no com-
But if a dish of whale becomes ments.

the fashion the price will go up, A,

not down, Chefs have only to In passing

announce that the Timbale de

Baleine is cooked int red wine and “ IS usual alibi was that he

served with Sauce Mirobolante was not interested.” That is

for this dainty to supersede tin- a good example of the meahani-
ned Rhodesian turkey at banquets. cal repetition of certain words
By that time the quacks, the for which there is a craze at the
Marchands @Orvietax, the push- moment, “Alibi” is used as though
ers of Ferltmpinpin, will have jt meant an “excuse.” The lovely
discovered forty kinds of benefi- word “glamour” has been utterly
cent chemicals in wihale-snout debased and rolled in the mud,
pie. and critics are beginning to ap-
ply the idiotic word “escapism”

Strabismus demonsttrates to any pook, play, or film which

is not a putrescent’ heap of lust,
Y recent report of the isola- murder, and obscenity. The com-
tion of the bamp_ by Dr. bination of this cruze with the

Strabismus (Whom God Preserve) dialect of the Jargoneers Brigade
of Utrecht was receivedi by sei- of the Civil Service cugh' to end
entists with pained incredulity. by producing a wonderful kind of
Yesterday the sage was at home English,

to a deputation at Wagefling Par-

va. He showed them what look- Look out for the ‘guide’

ed like a copper fulcrvan, a jar i Se Tet da

of frozen wool, a twistedi coil of TVE-SHILLING day ” non ne

steam-heated rhubarb, ‘three re- ham Place was somewhat
.





AY e cece By BEACHCOMBER

marred last Saturday by an ec-|

centric guide who charged an
extra half-crown to show the
spot on which the fourth Earl

kicked Cromwell on the shin; an
extra shilling for a peep at the
Scoffing Stone in the minstrels’
gallery; and an extra three shil-

lings to let le sit in the chair
of Matilda of Flanders. “None of
this is in the printed booklet,”

objected a sightseer. “Tt will all
be in the next edition,” replied
the guide, with that confident leer
which belongs only to Captain
Foulenough, At the end of the
day the takings had vanished—
as also the guide.

Precautionary nose-pulling

HE woman who “pulled a
man's nose in public” should
said that she was testing his
bona fides, Bogus foreign aristo-
erats in liners nearly always have
false nd&es, to give them a Haps-
burg touch, and the wise young
lady is she who, the moment the
Prince begins to talk about his
schloss near Vienna, tweaks the
Hapsburg facade, to make sure,
She will lose a few hours of
pleasant flirtation, but will keep
her self-respect. It is what the
Germans call profit and schloss

have



LADIES’ “EVER-REST” SHOES

@ WITH BUILT IN ARCH SUPPORTS

BLACK AND TAN COURT — BLACK AND TAN LACE @...... $10.92

NEW LINE MEN’S SHOES — SUEDES AND LEATHERS $8.33 TO $13.66

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS



42%

DIAL

YOUR SHOE STORES



DIAL 4606



BARBADOS AD

On Business

V3": BERTIE KING,
ib tative of the Central Agency |
Liriited, was a passenger by!
B.\/.LA. on Monday for Antigua.
Mr. King is on a business visit to!



Antigua and St. Kitts on behalf!
of his firm

BUTTERFLIES

Vel Aviv: Israel coastal roads4

are covered with a fine blanket

of ‘snow-flakes’. They are dvinge

white butterflies which have ap-

peared in phenomenal numbeg®)
this year. |
EXHIBIT A ;

Nicosia: A hen, produced if |
court here as Exhibit A in a theft |
ease, laid an egg on the judge's

VOCATE



—It Was a Gift From All the Toys—

By MAX TRELL

,WHEN Knarf and Hanid, the
Shadows, were sure that Mr. Punch
was fast asleep, they gathered |
everyone else around them and then |
Banid said: “Tomorrow is his birth- |
day.” }

“Oh!” exclaimed everyone — |
everyone except Teddy the Stuffed |
Bear who asked: “Whose birth-
day?”

“Oh!” said Teddy, which is what
he should have said in the first
place.

“I think,” said General Tin the

iP
“Mr. Puneh’s,” answered Knart. |

desk during the proceedings. Dis- | tin soldier, “that we should give
turbed by the hen’s cackling in | Mr. Puneh a beautiful 6.”

the court, the judge ordered its “That’s what | think, too,” said
removal, | Gloria, the doll with the golden
| curls, “I think we should buy him a
_ beautiful pair of gloves, a beautiful



| £007.15 pom

Listening Hours

|
SATURDAY, MAY 24, ine
ces 197M 20.58 |

4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. ‘The |
Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. Empire Day, |
£.00 p.m. Composers of the Week, 5.15
p.m Music for Dancing, 6.00 p.m. |
Scottish Magazine, 6.15 p.m. Frankie
Howerd Goes East, 6.45 p.m. Sports |
Round-up and Programme Parade, 7.00
p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m. Home News
from Britain.
7.15—10.0 pom

7.15 p.m. Behind the News, 7.45 p.m,
Sports Review, 8.15 p.m, Radio New!

2.9% p.m. King George VI, 9.30 pi.

B.B.C. Scottish Orchestra, 10.00 p
The News, 10.10 p.m. News Talk, 10.15

. 25.59M 91. 32M
nf

p.m. Music Magazine, 10.30 p.m. Variety
Fanfare,





GAIETY

The Garden—St. James
To-day 4.30 & 8.30 pm
“PASS TO ROMANCE”

Martha O'DRISCOLL &








“MAN-EATER of KUMAON”
* SABU dell COREY g
oo 5 T s
- MIDNITE TONITE %
4 “COWBOY CAVALIER” x
Ysimmy WAKELY & x
x eB SON ¥
Pe ‘SILVER RAIDERS" Whip WILSOD S$
2 > SON & MON. 890 pm |
g MAT. SUN 430 pm RQ)
x “SWORD n the DESERT x
, ene ANDREWS & %
. “GAL WHO TOOK THE WEST’ € olor”

%,
Syvonne DeCARLO Scott BRADY \
FES SSS OOSCSESOSSSSOO*

1

|

}



FOR

TO.MOBRROW 5% &
uate

t








i
kA

=< -e

SCREEN PLAY BY



oe "ee ete i ARR

hat, a beautiful pair of slippers,
and a beautiful new pipe.”

Beautiful Pipes

“Two beautiful pipes,” added
Teddy. “Then he can smoke one
and hold one.”

No one paid any attention to this.

Hanid said: “What Mr. Punch
likes best of all isn’t gloves, or a
hat, or slippers or a pipe, Besides,
he’s got all of those things. What
he likes best of all for a birthday

resent is something that you can’t

Cay—something that you can al-
ways keep—and something that
no one else in the world can give
him but us.”

Everyone wanted to know what
this thing could be. When Hanid
saw that no one could guess, she
finally said: “For Mr. Punch’s
birthday present I think we should
give him a poem.”

“Very good idea,” said General
Tin; “very good indeed. But not an
easy present to give.”

being kissed.”



sug: Mr. Punch might
Sie thoes pipes.

Mr. Punch we love you dearly
Daily, weekly, monthly, yearly,

We always know it very clearly
Mr. Punch we love you dearly.

Tedily

Mr. Punch we wish you fan days
Teseeiers, Fridays, Saturdays,
jundays,
Thursdays, Wednesdays, Tues-
days, Mondays,
Mr, ch we wish you fun days.

Then, when it was all dene, Han-

ic wrote the poem out on a fresh

iece of paper and ped it under
. Punch’s door so that he would
be sure to see it the first thing in
the morning.

Birthday Kiss
“And of course,” said Gloria,

“we'll all give him a kiss, too. No-
body can have a birthday without

“Tt’s a wonderful poem and I’m

1 ”

“It’s much easier to get gloves | Sure Mr. Punch will like it,” Teddy
and those other things,” said Gloria, | the Stuffed Bear said after the lights
shaking her curls. “It’s hard to| Were out and everyone was about
write a birthday poem.” to go to sleep. “But I think he would

“That’s what makes it such a

like two pipes, too. Next year I’m

good present,” said Knarf. | going to give him two pipes for his

So they all thought and thought,
and scribbled and scribbled, and

birthday, maybe three of them.”

“Three of them, Teddy! What

changed and changed, and crossed | can he do with three pipes ?” Knarf

out and erased and wrote in new
words until at last the poem was);
finished. This is it:

j =
i
EMPIRE

TO-BAY — 4.45 & 8.30
and Continuing mr
oderick CRAWFORD udy
sili in (HOLLIDAY
“BORN YESTERDAY”

— EXTRA
PEHATKOVSKY'S
- NUTCRACKER SUITE
LS,





-day 1.30 To-nite Mid-nite
Williara Boyd in John =
\) HOPPY'S a ie
HOLIDAY" —
and MYSTERIOUS

(TRY & OFT ME DESPERADO
Action Doubl Tim Holt

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY —- 445 & 8.15—1st Inst.
Sun. & Mon. 445 & 8,15—Final Inst.

“DON DARE DEVIL RIDES AGAIN”
with Roy BANCROFT—Ken CURTIS

Te-day — 1.20



Mid-nite; Tonite

INDIAN
‘TERRITORY KING OF

) and JUNGL LAND

CRIME DR



GAMBLE Whole Seria





NEVER A DULE MOVIE

TODAY 5% & 8.30 p.m.
MONDAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.

8.30 pane.

6 6 wows BIG-AS-TEXAS TRCHNICOLOR MUSIC4 ly

music BY

STORY BY LYRICS BY
DOROTHY KINGSLEY * S6QRHiy’kinestey HARRY WARREN + DOROTHY FIELDS » CHA
‘



~

Always keep Limacol Toilet Lotion

in your

Always keep Limacol Toilet Lotion

at your

THEN YOU'LL ALWAYS BE COOL
BECAUSE

LIMACOL |

TOILET LOTION

IS

“The freshness of a breeze in a bottle”





AN M-G-â„¢ PICTURE

home

office

demanded.

‘in each hand,” said Teddy.

ROODAL THE







“One to smoke, and one to hold

So Ss

RE

A



TO-DAY TO TUES.
Universal Double - - -
Yvonne DeCARLO in

HOTEL SAHARA &

SARABAND with Stewart GRANGER}

in Technicolor



MIDNITE TONITE
Whole Serial - - -

“SUPERMAN”

ROYAL

To-day & Tomorrow 4,30 & 8.15
Universal Double

Brian Donlevy — Howard Duff
in

SHAKE DOWN &
AIR CADET



Starring
Stephen McNALLY — Gail RUSSELL
—

Mon, & Tues, 4.30 & 8.15
John WAYNE ox Laraine DAY/

“TYCOON”



and
“THE MYSTERIOUS DESPERADO”

DIRECTED BY

RLES WALTERS- JACK CUMMINGS























\
}Don BARRY &
i} LASH LA RUE. ‘

SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1952

cence tian cane tenement

vrwen-, Mr. Punch’s Birthday Poem





Watch ‘DISPRIN dissolve—
quickly—completely



Because * Disprin * enters the stomach
in a rrue solution, with no insoluble
acid particles, it is more rapidly absorbed

SS

by the system-
thus relieving pain without delay. The best way to take
‘Disprin’ is in water, though its soothing, pain-relieving
effect will be the same whichever way you take it, Because
of its advantages over ordinary aspirin, * Disprin’ is
widely used in hospitals throughout Great Britain.

‘DISPRIN to relieve pain

When you need aspirin better take a ‘DISPRIN’

tents: T. S, GARRAWAY & CO., Bridgetown 3





TRY THE

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

For BEST BROOKS.

DIAL 2310

To-day 445 & 8.30 p.m.
& Continuimg Daily

“PAINTING the CLOUDS
Wits SUNSHINE
(Technicolor)

Dennis

TODAY 4 45 & 8.20 p m
& Continuing Daily

DRUMS IN THE
DEEP SOUTH

(Super Cinegplor)

James CRAIG —
Barbara PAYTON
Guy M

TO-DAY'S Special
1.30 p.m.
| Triple Attraction

TODAY & TOMORROW
4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

ON MOONLIGHT

(Technicolor)

Doris DAY &
Gordon MacRAE

Virginia
MAYO —
$-Z
SAKALL

—=—=———————======
Today Special 9.30 & 1.30

“RED DESERT" “LAW of ‘the

Tim HOUT &

ns
“FRONTIER REVENGE eee
George OBRIEN

————SSS

MEDNITE TO-NITE
“BLACK EAGLE”
William B&SHOP &

Fuzzy “ST.

MIDNITE TO-NITE
“SWORD in the DESERT”
EWS &

TIMBERLAND

Richard ARLEN -
Andy DEVINB



TO-DAY 445 & 8.30

and Continuing Daily 445 & 830



oe 6 2s ss Oca ed & crete «
“ff ; oa é
* r %
> *
. 4 ¥
* " «
. Wem
bd
8 a
al % Sf
“} B+! a
2 Ke
« Ad
4 ye
ond \ fy
x “4 *
Ls
~ Sram Fay by Albert Mancboimar» Produced ty. SYLVAN SIMON —2 x

Le Directed ty GEORGE CUKOR + Based ov tho Stage Play by GARSON KANIN

ae

SPECIAL SHOWS TO-DAY
1.30 P.M.—BY TEENAGERS’ REQUEST

eTHE STRIP”

(Mickey ROONEY — Louis ARMSTRONG)
MIDNITE — TO-NITE * MIDNITE

LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE

AND

“NANCY GOES TO RIO”

(Jane POWELL -—- Carmen MIRANDA)

AND

“DEVIL’S DOORWAY”

(Robert TAYLOR — Paula RAYMOND)

CONTESTANTS TO-NITE

LUCILLE CRAIG ...
GLORIA BENTHAM
EDDIE HALL

CHESTON HOLDER
FRANK CORBIN .

CARL BEST ‘
ORVIL GRANDERSON ...

“I only have eyes for you”
.s,...... “Sentimental Me”
“The loveliest nite of the year”
; “Because of You”

“I only have eyes for you”
oat “Prisoner of Love”
cs os ae . “Roses”
EE

A GRAND SHOW IN ANY COUNTRY

Pit: 18¢. House: 36c. Bal. 48ce. Box: 60c.





Today Spectal 1.30 p.m.
SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1952



SUGAR NEWS:

[Imperial Preference On
Commonwealth Sugar

LONDON.

THE IMPERIAL PREFERENCE on Empire sugar,
which was given a life of four years under the Finance
Act of 1948, has become permanent as a result of a clause
gered by the House of Commons in this year’s Finance

The difference is that under earlier arrangements, Pre-
ference was put into operation for a limited period. Now
the Preferences stand until Parliament revokes or changes
them. Sir Arthur Salter, speaking for the Government,
pointed out that Parliament could change them whenever
it desired, but he said it was essential that they should
continue throughout the life of the Commonwealth Sugar
Agreement.

Opposition spokesmen supported the clause because
they_were in favour of the Commonwealth Sugar Agree-
ment and because they regarded Preferences as an integral
part of the Agreement.

But Mr. Arthur Bottomley, a cause black marketeers are too
ocialist anq former Secretary wafy to be caught by trapping.
or Overseas Trade, suggested —B.U.P.
nat it would have been better
> have consulted Commonwealth
roducers first.

“If we are to build up these
references, whether it be
agar or anything else,



SUGAR EXPERTS FOR
EL SALVADOR
is El Salvador is to ree@ive the
the best es + — an oe
‘fay to do it i ieee .§ {agreement approved by
Eiacnat - ste gag its Foreign Minister with the
e declared. “The West Indies, I United | Nations Food afd Agri-
gow from experience, would far culture Organisation,
ither have a guaranteed market Under the agreement, the U.N.
w sugar for a long time to come, cgescy 38 tO send 4 aeivade: suec
ad we for some years have been SU84* Manufacturing technologist
ying to buy our sugar at lower to conduct a complete survey,
ces than the real price.” > and one economist to analyse the
economic structure of its sugar
industry.
The existing



sugar processing

SRITISH SUGAR AID FOR

plants in the country, methods oi
AUSTRALIA processing and equipment will be
BRISBANE, eXamined by the technologist. He

Britain has granted £561,000 Will recommend any desirable
the Australian sugar industry, Changes with a view to the ex-
is the Australian sugar indus- Pansion of local sugar cane pro-
y's share of a surplus accu- 4uction, :

wlated by the Ministry of Food Two fellowships for people
6m transactions in sugar over a MOMinated by the El Salvador
tiod of years within the Brit- Government will also be estab-
4 Commonwealth. lished by the U.K. Food and Agri-
Mr, H. Collins, Queensland Culture Organisation.

inister for Agriculture, an-
funced the grant in Brisbane
td said that most of the sum
duld go to Queensland, whose
Zar crop last year was worth
tout £22,000,000. The British
overnment, he said, had ex-
essed the hope that the money
duld be used to improve the
ar industry. A special pay-

—B.U.P.

NEW CUBAN SUGAR
AGENCY TO SELL
1952 SUGAR

HAVANA, Cuba.
The Cuban Government has set
up a single selling agency to sell
the special quota of the 1952
sugar crop on the World market.



ent of 15s. id, a ton will Th ;

, ! w .
| paid to producers on raw made tat tnemnbors a oe
Bar of a requisite standard

Cuban National Sugar Institute,
representing mil] owners and
planters. A Government delegate
appointed by the President will
be its chairman.

The Cabinet alse set up a
Commission to recommend meas-
ures to regulate the supply of

meee in the 1951 season, he
“The Queensland Government
irmly Spypnetaiee this action
‘thé United Kingdom,” added
t, Collins, “and regards it as
excellent example of the good
jl existing between the United

‘sugar for world markets this
ngdom and the British Com- year and next. It will seek to
onwealth sugar exporters. press for q new word sugar

—B.UP. agreement to replace the London

pact of 1937.—B.U.P.





BLACK MARKET IN

SUGAR RATES OF EXCHANGE
DURBAN. MAY 23, 1852
The South African Government Bellin, NEW YORK bes
appealed to members of the 72.67 pr, Cheques on =e
lic to give information of any Bankers 70.9% pr
als in black market sugar. Sight or demand -
i : rafts 10.7% pr
ere is q serious shortage of 72.6% pr. Cable is
@ar in South Africa, although 71.1% pr. Currency 69.4% pr
8 position should ease soon ‘''"''''* Coupons 68.7% pr

fen the new cane crop is cut, CANADA

‘When the sugar shortage de-

loped towards the ena (ineluding Newfoundland)

of last

ar,” said Mr, Eric Louw, Min- 75.3% pr. Cheques on

ér of Economic Affairs, “TI “en aan Pe

Ye the order that price in- “"""*’ a ant Drafta, 73.8% pr

Sectors should pay special at- 7.8% pr. Cable fetter:
i 3.8% pr. urrency .1% pr

ition to sugar and a number of 1.8% pr. Coupons 71.4% pr

P were sent to Natal. They ‘tiie above Rates are subject to change
not have much success be- without notice.

Beh?

- BOXED BRAIN OPENS —



BARBADOS



“Awad there, Virginia, is the Coronation Stone of Britain with a
mystic mscription—er—MADE IN JAPAN...”

ADVOCATE



New Digest Of
Colonial Statistics





The fourth section of the
Digest shows tables of the
ary products from the

new
prim





Stage Career For
Cherry Huggins





PAGE THREE



SEA AND AIR

q












oD
Is 1 q LONDON
Suet Rap Sey Seated
liss herr Huggin daughter }
Sir Joh Hu former j
tA ANDON 7 TRAFFI
N The first issue of a new Colo. aoe Ry te “ae
al Office publication which sets E is 13. saad 4 ~ pleting hes
ut in ae act a pasy-to- * ee ad 2
aaa is + ee "ag Mp" course at the Royal Academic '-—-—————— —s
the Colonial e rade and ite of of Dramatic Art, in London, In is
he olonial territories for quick iw a will be looking for In Carlisle Bay
eference by the business man or */)'*> . . ae
oficial appeared on May 14 i : SS. R Mv. 1
PP ~ Training itself is a full-time ; Anita. Sch. DOrtec, Sct
It is the “Digest of Colonial job, which leaves her no time for ” Ss Sots Philip Davidsor
Statistics,” planned as a com/ the parties she love: Although star. sch. Hariet Whitakee, S
panion volume to the “Monthly she a debutante this season, ; Sch. Laicille Smith, Sct
Digest of Statistics” published by she will not join othey debutantes %.. Seh. Marion Belle W
H.M. Stationery Office for the in the round of almost nightly DEPARTURE
Central Statistical Office, and it curties. Instead, she will ratior lotor Vessel Caribbee
will be published every other /erself to one party a week whil
month, she finishes her arduous training Sites Wanda eee og ae
: ‘ Motor Vessel Calcique ‘aribée froi
Among the 50 tables and {or the stage. Lucia and 3.8" Sapho 4.380 a0
appendices the first issue contains Miss Huggins, gay and viva- » St. Laiciay
are details of the value of total ¢jous, wants to act in ight comedy.
imports and exports of Colonial Already she is a glohe-trotter,
a from 1936 to 1951 and for her father’s career has taken OLD-WORLD
oe the oe by months for him to many parts ot the world
he Years 1949 to 1951, Born in Panang, she has lived in ATMOSPHERE
n Tables 3 to 14 these figures }rinidad, Washington and Jamaica.
are broken down to show the She went to school at Roedean and Venice: Venetiar toecrats are
origin of imports and destination was at a finishing school in New seeking to ban the ile of Coca-
< sae for the C olonies aS @yyork before taking up her train- Cola on the Grand Canal Gon-
whole and for the West Indies ing aS an actress, dolas to preserve the canal’s old-
and others of the larger Terri. —B.U.P. world atmasphere
tories individually. : a :



Colonies, |

HEALTHY APPETITES
and STRONG BODIES

and it is interesting to note mH
Table 19 the steady increase in}
Trinidad’s production of crude
petroleum which has risen from
of 148,000 tons in 1936 to wpaictied,
" tons in 195
"t i I
e Figures ndustrial production
" 2 in Section VI also show an in
BBs crease in West Indies’ products
Ay sucl is Soap, Margarine, manu-
f i facturdd tobacco, cigarettes and
matches
[' i An appendix at the end of the
‘By Digest gives the areas and popu-
7. a lation of each Colony with a
ok table at the end showing their
Express § 4 Reyer by races at the last
Ba 9 —B.ULY.

FLIERS’ PARACHUTES

THE ROYAL AIR FORCE is giving its aircrews a small
barometric box which will automatically open their para-
chutes for them and release them from their ejector seats
if they have to abandon their aircraft miles above the earth.

Up to t
to do this for himself and at a
time when he is being blown clear
of an aircraft travelling at perhaps
600 miles an hour. As he fall
away from the aircraft in his ejec-
tor seat, a small drogue is re-
leased from the seat to slow it
down, otherwise neither pilot nox
parachute could stand the strain
when the chute suddenly opened,
The airman then has to free him-
self from the seat and fall for a
short time before it is safe for him
to open his parachute. To do this
he must have his wits about him
all the time. At great heights
there is not enough oxygen in the
air to keep a man conscious for
more than a few seconds, and in
his hurry to leave his aircraft, ha
may not have time to switch or
his emergency oxygen supply.

The new barometric box will do
the flier’s thinking for him. If he
bales out high up, the box takes
over, releases him from his seat
and opens his parachute for him
when he reaches 13,000 feet. If he
is ejected below 13,000 feet, the
box automatically delays the
opening for a few seconds so that
he gets clear of the aircraft and
slows down,

The box does not stop the air-
man pulling his ripeord himself if
he wants to: but it does it for him
if he is in trouble.

The box, made by the Irving
Chute Company, contains a sensi-
tive barometric bellows which
measures air pressure. It is about
the size of a packet of 20 cigar-

e present a flier has had ettes

and weighs 1%
Air Force ground crews are fitting}
it to their squadron aircraft and
equipment themselves,

It is made in three versions, The
first automatically releases the
airman from the safety harness
which connects him to his ejector
seat. The second automatically
opens his parachute; and the third
is designed for crews using an
ordinary static seat which remains
in the aircraft.

The device has been live-tested
in a number of high altitude jumps
in Britain and Australia. In one
of these tests, the parachutist was
falling at 125 miles-an-hour at the
fastest point of his fall. It has
also been tried out thousands of
times on the ground—in pressure
eabins at an equivalent atmos-
pheric altitude of 50,000 feet and
at temperatures down to minus
50 degrees C.

Technically, the box is a baro-
metric bellows, connected to a
time-delay, which prevents tha
operation of the firing mechanism
above the pre-determined altitude
to which it is set. Below that alti-
tude, the pressure on the bellows
releases a compressed spring
which gives a sixty pound pull on
the ripeord.

MAIL NOTICE

Mails for St, Lucia, St, John, N.B.,
Montreal by the M.V. Can, Cruiser will

Ibs. Royal



|
|
|

be closed at the General Post Office as
under:
Farce! Mail and Registered Mail at |

9 a.m., Mail at 10

the 26th

Ordinary
May 1952

a.m. on |



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FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.

Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504

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cause the trouble.

or cold.





|

F you're really out to conquer a cough—to get to the root
I of it and destroy the germ—then ask for Famel Syrup.
Why? Because Famel Syrup does so much more than
ordinary cough mixtures. It contains soluble lactocreosote
which is carried by the bloodstream to the throat and lungs
and breathing passages, where it destroys the germs which

Once the germs are destroyed then it’s goodbye to the cough
Meanwhile, the soothing balsams in Famel Syrup
are easing the irritated membranes and the tonic minerals
are keeping up your strength and powers of resistance
Famel Syrup is a recognised medical product used for coughs,
colds, influenza and bronchial troubles. It is widely recom
mended by Doctors. Hospitals and Sanatoria.

FAMEL SYRUP

Obtatnable in two sizer—fram ali chemists oF stores

Trade enquiries to :-—
Frank B. Armstrong Ltd.
BRIDGETOWN.

|

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ROAD TO THE MOON



NO MATCH FOR THEM

Washington: Just when every- Rome: A _ football match be-
one. thought that Crosby, Hope tween Fatties and Skinnies took
and Lamour must surely be run- place at Savigliano, near Turin,
ming out of places they take the All the fatties weighed more |
road to, they announce the title than 15 st. each while the skin-|
af their next “Road to the nies weighed under 7 st, each. }
Moon”; a mad scientist gets them But the skinnies j

out-manoeuvred |

there by mistake. the fatties and 1

won




tl

i
i

\

———
——
ee
——=—==





"

a

’

ro PLEASE NOTE

WIN $40.00

Here is a simple Cross Word puzzle which can help you to
win $40.00 for only one shilling. At the same time you will
be doing your bit to help send Barbados’ sole Olympic hope to
Helsinki next July. Enter now and try your skill.
RULES
1. The first correct solution opened by the Editor will win
the prize.
2. In the event of there being no correct solution the one
containing the least errors which is opened first by the
Editor will win the prize.

66—Meager.
HORIZONTAL caper aor.
1 Pastors 1 at peoples had dwelt in Ar

prior to the land being given

5—Lucky number, to the children of Lot?

10—Whoe was ejected from the

temple in Jerusalem? 73M ician's aiid

face ard,

Glock veil. tee roads
leave. T1—Curved molding.
ear, j

6—Divisions of time. VERTICAL





piece, 1—Jewish month.
Printer’s measure. uote.
In what sea were Pharaoh's ymbol for tantalum.
} chariots and host drowned’ 4—Cunning.
5—Flies aloft,
tter vetch. 6—Wanders from truth.
ry, as wine. 7—Duct.
'—Caressive touch. 8—Street railway (abbr.)
tory birds. 9—A border city in the land of
> «cludes. Judah
to the side. 10—Snoop. é
tric wheel-part. 11—At what place were Joshua's
‘orays. . men defeated? ”
ibway. 12—Inner lining of the iris.

t t was slain b 13—Penitential season.
mare r 19—-Lampreys.
1—Exclamation. 2i—Card game.

-Insect. 24~—Mistrust.
43--Eternity. 26—Descendants of shern.
#4--Golf mound. 21—Greek letter.

a pee Bimaminighind, 29—Tiny

20—Split pulse.
g f, ces. 31—College cheer.
ipped.
60—What are believers warned

£2—Begin.
23—Of the moon.
pot to lie against?
2—-Goddess of dawn.





34—Satisfied.
36—Who is the reputed autho: of



3. Entranee fee of one shilling (1/-) must be enclosed with

8

51
53
55

56

57-

58
60
62

BUILD —




{The Complete
VITAMIN and MINERAL FOOD SUPPLEMENT
Pleasant tasting — Economical,

Available at all leading Drug Stores























CLOSING DATE

each solution along with name and address on the coupon
printed below.

Any entry which is not accompanied by the entrance fee
will be immediately destroyed,
All entrants for this competition agree to abide by the
decision of the Editor of the Barbados Advocate.
The competition will be closed on Friday, 30th May, at
4 p.m,
All envelopes must be clearly marked CROSS WORD
PUZZLE COMPETITION and addressed to the Editor, the
Barbados Advocate, 34 Broad Street.
The name of the winner will be published in the Sunday
Advocate of June 1.
Shoshonean Indian. 63—-Knob.
—Observed, 65—In addition
Spirit of the air 66—-Transgression
-Asparagus, 67—How many mites did oor
To what were the breast widow throw into tl a
plates of the locusts com sury?
pared? 10—Which of Judah’s so: vas
ahisinor, slain by the Lord?
—Climax. 72—Mother.
—Serf, 14-—Symbol for silver.






° the Psalms? 4
a4 37— Dubious.
Equipment. 29—Tibetan gazelle.
--Fr 40—Bronze money. ‘ . 4
Worthless bit. 43—Who owned the field in which err ht
-measure. Abraham was buried’ ;
— y horns has ths K
oe ge peee! CE Lae Lt
@—Proposed international lan- 47—Pig-pen. A
48—Torrid. 3-3
49—Ocean
NS i cp Ae sale di sia CENTRE ae ees v.08 6% Severe miveicun enécater pA in ch ved ackeRsabieokb RNa Rimae Smee Ne Tee ‘is )}

ENTIRE

| o5— Black bird.
| | PROCEEDS



TO FARN UM

vocate Stationery” or Advertising Office





SSS








~~ ———

MY recent report of tihe isola-
tion



PAGE TWO
+ Nght y
C C:

oa afternoon Mrs. R N
rurner, wife of the Colonial
Secretary li open the Girls’
Industrial Union Annual Fete at
Queen’s Park at 3 o'clock. The
Police Band under Captain C. E.
Raison will be in attendance and
the Mobile Cinema will show films
the Queen's House Theatre up-

stairs at 6.45 o'clock, There will be
the usual attractions highlighted
by the Fancy Dress Parade at 4.15
o'clock, wo prizes will be given
to adults for the first two lucky
numbers
For One Week
AYING a business visit to the
island is Mr. A. Bento, pro-

prietor of Harpers Ltd., Druggists
of Antigua. He arrived on Thurs-
day night by B.W.LA, for one
week and is staying at the Hotel
Royal.

U.K. Visitors Leave

oe to England earlier
in the week by the S.S. De

Grasse were Mr. P. C. Faunthorpe
and Miss Mary Cutler who were
holidaying in Barbados as guests
at the Windsor Hotel.

Mr. Faunthorpe was here for
three weeks, while Miss Cutler
spent a fortnight.

Spent Two Weeks

R. ENRIQUE LUNA DIAZ of

Barinas, Venezuela, returns
home today by B.W.LA., after
spending two weeks’ holiday as a
guest at the Hotel Royal. Before
coming here he was in Trinidad

On Honeymoon
R. AND MRS. MICHAEL
WILLIAMS of Trinidad, who
were married there recently are

i Ee in Barbados spending their honey-
where he remained for one week. j,00n, They arrived here during

His wife who had travelled out to , 5 a

Port-of-Spain with him, returned Garnet a Be tet nin

to Venezuela while he came over ~ “Wichael is a son of Mr. Williams

here, of the Louis J. Williams Market-
Mr. Diaz is Warehouse Manager ing Company.

of Socony Vacuum Oil Company Leaving Today

in Venezuela, FTER ii th ks’

spending three weeks

Canadian Holidaying Here holiday staying at the Hotel

ISS BEVERLEY BANDRICK Royal, Mr, and Mrs. E, E, Ehren-

of Montreal, Canada, arrived Teich will be returning to Trinidad

here on Thursday by T.C.A. from this evening by B.W.LA. They

Trinidad for a week’s holiday and Will be accompanied by their little
4s staying at the Hotel Royal. daughter Catherine, — ;

Miss Bandrick who is a member _ Mr. Ehrenreich is Plantation

of the Office Staff of Standard Manager of the U.S, Naval Station

Brands Ine., will stop at Bermuda /” Trinidad. He said that they

before returning to Montreal, @ll had a lovely holiday and re~
Since leaving Canada, she has &tetted having to leave so soon

visited Curacao and Venezuela Visited ‘‘Advocate”’

Paid Sk rt Visit IX young guides from St. Mar-

b ve garet’s Girls’ School accom-
EAVING for Trinidad on panied by Miss Payne and Misa
‘ Thursday where they will

Mayers troon leaders, visited the
spend a few days before returning “Advocate” yesterday afternoon.
home, were Mr, and Mrs. Carlos They were shown around the
Russian of Caracas, Venezuela, various de partments by Mr

‘who were here for a short holiday Michael Hope of the Job Printery.

staying at the Hotel Royal. The youngsters showed great in-
Mr. Russian is employed with terest in the many things around
the Government in Venezuela. them.







dt
.

MR. AND MRS. CYRIL GILL

Quiet Wedding

HHURSDAY morning was the

scene of a quiet but pretty
wedding at the James Street
Methodist Church when Rev.
Frank Lawrence solemnised the
marriage between Miss Pauline
Inniss, daughter of Mr. E. D.
“Cossie” Inniss of “Neta-ville’”’,
Upper Collymore Rock, and Mr.
Cyril Gill, son of the late Thaddeus
Gill and Mrs. Gill of “Haldon
Court,” Prospect, St. James.

The bride who was given in
marriage by her father looked
charming in an Elizabethan lace
bodice with a nylon skirt. Her
head-dress was a petal juliet cap
studded with pearls. Her finger-
tip veil was kept in place by two
white roses. Her bouquet was
Queen Anne’s lace, anthurium
lilies and pink radiants

The bridesmaids were the
Misses Joyce Ramdin and Peggy
Inniss, sister of the bride. They
looked charming in silk anglaise
and nylon and they carried posies
of pink radiants matching forget-
me-nots, blue violets and Queen
Anne’s lace.

The reception was held at the
bride’s father’s home and the
honeymoon is being spent at
Powell Spring Hotel, Bathsheba.



Silver Threads Among

Today there are three types of gain high lights to her hair —
Srey-haired women —. the elderly bronze, amber and titian. Though
type whose hair is grey through when she does start to grey, col
the Passage of years, the younger our rinses will make her hair
woman with prematurely grey look much prettier,
‘hair, and the woman who chooses Silver hair, whether it be
te have her hair tinted grey to be natural or adopted must have the
in high fashion, Maybe it is be- right make-up to complement it
cause so many young women have The younger woman with pre-
become prematurely grey forgimaturely grey hair, must take
fome reason or other during andgcare that she selects make-up
since the war, and the result be-"which does not contain much
ing so completely charming that blue, such as deep fuchsia or deep
a new fashion has been born. red, She should choose, instead,
_ This silvery blonde shade is one vlear reds, pinks, coral and rose
that is certain to appeal to the reds, Orange tones on cheeks
tionde who bewails the darken- and lips add drabness and sallow-
ing of her hair, yet hates the mess to the nonotone colour of
brassy shades of gold so often grey.
produced by bleaching. There is
also the advantage of being able
to make these new shades merely ,
transient. They can be changed The older grey-haired woman
with each shampooing, It saves Should not go in for make-up
all that bother of bleaching and ‘fashions”, Her cosmetics should

Blend With Skin

dyeing. You CAN give your hair be in shades which approximate
: colour rinse at home, to Nature’s own and applied with
I always think it wise to have % delicate hand. Naturally she

the first rinse by your own hair- Wnts to keep her skin looking as
dresser, sught and fair as possible. Foun-
dation and powder should be only
light enough to tone or ‘warm’
up the skin colour if the skin

Colour rinses are only tints, 1eeds brightening up. Otherwise,
and though light hair takes them a colour should be selected that
admirably, the brunette can onlybiends harmoniously with the

.

Use Colour Rinse



The Gold

natural skin tone. Light shades
of rouge are too bright and too
obvious on older faces. The med-
ium clear red shades are close to
blood tones and give the most
netural appearance. Lipstick, har-
inonising with the rouge should be
in the clear red tones too.

Soft But Clear

In youth every feature is nat-
urally well defined. To retain
that youthful appearance, then,
the brows should suggest a soft,
but clearly defined gentle arching
brow. The mouth should be
shaped with a brush or the lip-
stick itself but blotted to a muted
tone,

Blend over the cheek rouge
with a powdered puff, and when
powdering the face, if there are
any wrinkles, spread these apart
with the fingers of one hand, and
pat powder into them with the
puff. After this, brush all excess
powder away with a complexion
brush,

If you want to be extra sophis-
ucated, and decide to adopt one
o1 the new silver shades of hair
tint, you must be doubly careful
about your make-up. Blue rinsed
hair looks best with a pink and
white complexion.



BY THE

HE men who ransack the torts half filled with morcose, :
wine-dark seas for. whales Dranestone insulator encased in
to replenish our grotesque lard- hemp, and two brushwood thongs
ers are killing the beasts by elec- with reversible tarbols, The sage
trocution. lit a magnetic candle, touched
And the learned chemists whe the fulcrum, and there was a
tell us what we are eating say soft explosion. When asked for
that this method of killing whales an explanation, the Doctor said,
makes their flesh more tender and “That was the bamp. It is now
also lowers the price. isolated.” There were no com-
But if a dish of whale becomes ments,
the fashion the price will go up,
not down, Chefs have only to
announce that th® Timbale de
Baleine is cooked ini red wine and
served with Sauce Mirobolante was not interested.” That is
for this dainty to supersede tin- a good example of the meohani-
ned Rhodesian turkey at banquets. cal repetition of certain words
By that time the ‘quacks, the for which there is a craze at the
Marchands d@’Orvieta®, the push moment. “Alibi” is used as though

In passing
' IS usual alibi was that he

ers of Perltmpinpin,. will have jt meant an “excuse.” The lovely
discovered forty kinds of benefi- word “glamour” has been utterly
cent chemicals in whale-snout debased and rolled in the mud,
pie. and critics are beginning to ap-
> ° ly the idiotic word “escapism”
Strabismus demonstrates i any book, play, or film hich
is not a putrescent heap of lust,

murder, and obscenity. The com-

of the bamp_ by Dr. bination of this crize with the
Strabismus (Whom God Preserve) dialect of the Jargoneers Brigade
of Utrecht was received§ by sci- of the Civil Service ough’ ‘o end
entists with pained incredulity. by producing a wonderful kind of
Yesterday the sage was at home English.
to a deputation at Wagefing Par-
va. He showed them what look-
ed like a copper fuleruan, a jar
of frozen wool, a twisted coil of
steam-heated rhubarb, ‘three re-

Look out for the ‘guide’

IVE-SHILLING day ait SnaMfe-
ham Place was somewhat





AY eeeee 8y BEACHCOMBER

marred last Saturday by an ec-

centric guide who charged an
extra half-crown to show the
spot on which the fourth Earl

kicked Cromwell on the shin; an
extra shilling for a peep at the
Scoffing Stone in the minstrels’
gallery; and an extra three shil-

lings ‘to let le sit in the chair
of Matilda of Flanders. “None of
this is in the printed booklet,”

objected a sightseer. “Tt will all
be in the next edition,” replied
the guide, with that confident leer
which belongs only to Captain
Foulenough, At the end of the
day the takings had vanished—
as also the guide.

Precautionary nose-pulling

‘HE woman who “pulled a
man’s nose in public” should
have said that she was testing his
bona fides, Bogus foreign aristo-
crats in, liners nearly always have
false nd’es, to give them a Haps-
burg touch, and the wise young
lady is she who, the moment the
Prince begins to talk about his
schloss near Vienna, tweaks the
Hapsburg facade, to make sure,
She will lose a few hours of
pleasant flirtation, but will keep
her self-respect. It is what the
Germans call profit and schloss



LADIES’ “EVER-REST” SHOES

@ WITH BUILT IN ARCH SUPPORTS

BA IN

BLACK AND TAN COURT — BLACK AND TAN LACE @...... $10.92

NEW LINE MEN’S SHOES — SUEDES AND LEATHERS $8.33 TO $13.60

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS



DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4606



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

.
On Business

4. tative of the Central Agency
Liriited, was a passenger by |
B.\/.LA. on Monday for Antigua. |

By MAX TRELL
Mr. King is on a business visit to|



ag . oe ,WHEN Knarf and Hanid, the

> os St. Ritts on beuale Shadows, were sure that Mr. Punch
oe ; was fast asleep, they gathered |

BUTTERFLIES | everyone else around them and then

Hanid said: “Tomorrow is his birth-
Fel Aviv: Israel coastal roads day.”

are covered with a fine blanket |

y-
“Oh!” exclaimed everyone —
of ‘snow-flakes’, They are dying

white butterflies which have ap-~ Bear who asked: “Whose birth-

peared in phenomenal num day?”

this year. .| “Mr. Puneh’s,” answered Knarf.
EXHIBIT A “Oh!” said Teddy, which is what

Nicosia: A hen, produced if | he should have said in the first

court here as Exhibit A in a theft | place.
case, laid an egg on the judge’s | “I think,” said General Tin the
desk during the proceedings. Dis- tin soldier, “that we should give





turbed by the hen’s cackling in | Mr. Puneh a beautiful present.”

the court, the judge ordered its | “That’s what I think, too,” said

removal, | Gloria, the doll with the golden
* e a a

Listening Hours ta, » beavtitat “pair of, slippers,

SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1962 and 6 ben a eee

4007.15 pom .. 19 76M 25 5M Beautiful

“4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. he o beautiful pipes,” added

Daily Service, Vin p tas Bnpire Day. Teddy. “Then he can smoke one

A ee a Ae de LO

Seuttish Magazine, 6 15 p.m. Prankie | No one paid any attention to this.

Howerd Goes East, 6.45 p.m. Sports
Round-up and Programme Parade, 7,00

Hanid said: “What Mr. Punch
likes best of all isn’t gloves, or a

Soe iene en ee ee hat, or slippers or a pipe, Besides,
7.15—10.00 pim 25. 59M. a1 .oama he’s got all of those things. What

7.145 p.m. Behind the News, 7.45 p.m, he likes best of all for a birthday

Sports Review, 8.15 p.m, Radio New! me is something that you can’t
0 pm. King George vt, 9-3 pg | buy—something that you can =
C. Scottish Orchestra Pp. somethin,
. ways keep—and ge th
es oa enaeiet no one else in the world can give
}

him but us.”

The News, 10.10 p.m

p.m. Music Magazine, 10.30 p.m. Variety
Fantare.

she

guess,
The Garden—St. James Mr. Punch’s

To-day 4.40 & 8.30 p m.
. “PASS TO ROMANCE”
Martha O'DRISCOLL &
“MAN-EATER of KUMAON”
SABU Wendell COREY

° MIDNITE TONITE
“COWBOY CAVALIER”
Jimmy WAKELY &
SILVER RAIDERS" Whip WELSON
“SCN. & MON. #30 pm write a birthday poem.”
J a m “ » Z
‘Ghana x tke wenemx’ That’s what makes it such a
Dana ANDREWS & | good present,” said Knarf.
‘GAL WHO TOOK THE WEST” Color % So they all thought and thought,
Yvonne DeCARLO Seott BRADY S| and scribbled and scribbled, and
LA FRVPSSS * | changed and changed, and crossed
out and erased and wrote in new
words until at last the poem was
| finished. This is it:

finally said:
give him a poem.”

Tin; “very good indeed. But not an
easy present to give.”

and those other things,” said Gloria,
| shaking her curls.

OOS

4















To-night

TO-DAY — 445 & 8.30
and Continuing Daily
WFORD



“BORN YESTERDAY”
EXTRA

VEHAIKOVSKY'S

NUTCRACKER SUITE
—————_—$ TTT
‘To-day 1.30 To-nite Mid-nite




William Boyd in John wage
Ys HOPPY'S “ *”
and MYSTERIOUS
RY & GET ME DESPERADO
Action Double Tim Holt
OLYMPIC
TO-DAY — 4.45 & 8.15—ist Inst,
Sun. & Mon. 4.45 & 8,15—Final Inst.



“DON DARE DEVIL RIDES AGAIN”
with Roy BANCROFT—Ken CURTIS
(a

‘To-day — 1.90
IN)



Mid-nite; Tonite

KING OF
JUNGLE LAND








Oe
o's
«4? we
wt

TOMORROW 5% & 8.30 p.m.

ts, *d* °
Nh

SCREEN PLAY BY STORY BY musie BY’ Lynics BY
DOROTHY KINGSLEY * Sonotiy niNestey “HARRY WARREN « DOROTHY FIELDS + CH







ay

Always keep Limacol Toilet Lotion
in your home

°

Always keep lLimacol Toilet Lotion
at your office

THEN YOU'LL ALWAYS BE COOL
BECAUSE

LIMACOL

TOILET LOTION
IS :
“The freshness of a breeze in a bottle”



Le SOC Stokes & Bynoe Ltd. —

Mm susie nine, nepresee-| Mr. Punch’s Birthday Poem

—It Was a Gift From All the Toys—

everyone except Teddy the Stuffed |

“« dog body can
Very good idea,” said General ine kissed.






Whole Serial

FOR NEVER A DULL MOVIE

TODAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.
MONDAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.

SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1952
AD



x

i



T ted Mr. Punch ht
ody. one ea mig

r. Punch we love you dearly
ly, weekly, monthly, yearly,

We always know it very clearly

Mr. Punch we love you dearly.

Mr. Punch we wish you fan days

Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays,
Sundays,

Thursdays, Wednesdays, Tues-
days, Mondays,

Mr. ch we wish you fun days.

Then, when it was all dqne, Han-

+ |i wrote the poem out on a fresh

ed it under

jiece of and
ths di t he would

ir. Punch’s door so

it the first thing in
Everyone wanted to know what | be sure to see
this thing could be. When Hanid | the morning.

Birthday Kiss

birthday present I think we should | ,, “And of course,” said Gloria,

we'll all give him a kiss, too. No-
ve a birthday without
n”

“Tt’s a wonderful poem and I’m

“It’s much easier to get gloves | Sure Mr. Punch will like it,” Teddy

the Stuffed Bear said after the lights

“It’s hard to| Were out and everyone was about

to go to sleep. “But I think he would
like two pipes, too. Next year I’m
| going to give him two pipes for his
birthday, maybe three of them.”

“Three of them, Teddy! What
can he do with three pipes ?” Knarf
demanded.

“One to smoke, and one to hold
said Teddy.

‘in each hand,”





Universal Double - - -
Yvonne DeCARLO in

HOTEL SAHARA &
SARABAND with Stewart GRANGE!
in Technicolor

MIDNITE TONITE
Whole Serial - - -
“SUPERMAN”

ROYAL

To-day & Tomorrow 4.30 & 8.15

Universal Double

Brian Donlevy — Howard Duff
in







SHAKE DOWN &
AIR CADET

Starring
Stephen McNALLY — Gail RUSSELL;
———

Mon, & Tues. 4.30 & 8.15
John WAYNE — Laraine DAY/
in

“TYCOON”

and
“HE MYSTERIOUS DESPER.






DIRECTED BY

' PRODUCED BY
ARLES WALTERS - JACK CUMMINGS



po” }

i


















Ce
wan
Cm, rey





Watch ‘DISPRIN dissolve—
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Because ‘ Disprin * enters the stomach
in a true solution, with no insoluble —
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of its advantages over ordinary aspirin, * Disprin’ is
widely used in hospitals throughout Great Britain.

‘DISPRIN to relieve pain

When you need aspirin better take a ‘DISPRIN’

3



tyene: T. S, GARRAWAY & CO., Bridgetown





TRY THE

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

For BEST BROOKS.

THEATRES |



‘( “BRIDGETOW) BARBAREES OISTIN)
DIAL 2310 (DIAL 5170) (Dial 8404)
To-day 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. ||TODAY 4 45 & 8.30 PD » lipgpay a TOMORROW
& Continuing Daily & Con Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
“PAINTING the CLOUDS
wirw suvenme’|/ O[RUMS IN THE ton MOONLIGHT
(Technicolor) DEEP SOUTH
\ nee wee cz (Super Cinegplor) (Technicolar)
} Guy MADISON |} orden MechSE
‘Today Special 9.30 & 1.30 « - Teday Special 1.30 p.m.
) “RED DESERT” TO-DANS Spectal UY “LAW of ‘the |
Don BARRY & Triple Attrection BADLANDS’
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William BISHOP &
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Dana ANDREWS &

——=——$—————
| MIDNITE TO-NITE
"Al. WHO TOOK

} Dena An in the DESERT"





EMPIRE THEATRE

TO-DAY 445 & 830
d Continuing Daily 445 & 830
ARIE 6 6) 5! 6 le! eo! 6 oFere

rs

+f



en hay a
Sa
cd
J
®
Bs
d
4
*.
my!
ok
?
% Hire a
ba exe , a
. : Rak 7 v a3
ba ‘Semeen Play by Abort Mancheimer = Produced by 5. SYLVAN SIMON bite] *
Directed ty GEORGE CUKOR + Based oo the Stags Play by GARSON KANIN ay ae

eer

SPECIAL SHOWS TO-DAY
1.30 P.M.—BY TEENAGERS’ REQUEST

eTHE STRIP”

(Mickey ROONEY — Louis ARMSTRONG)
MIDNITE — TO-NITE = MIDNITE

LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE

AND

“NANCY GOES TO RIO”

(Jane POWELL — Carmen MIRANDA)

AND

“DEVIL'S DOORWAY”

(Robert TAYLOR —- Paula RAYMOND)

CONTESTANTS TO-NITE

LUCILLE CRAIG .
GLORIA BENTHAM
EDDIE HALL .....
CHESTON HOLDER . nin bh
FRANK CORBIN . “I only have eyes for you”
CARL BEST oe ot, A ois “Prisoner of Love”
ORVIL GRANDERSON . ; down . “Roses”
— EEE ae
A GRAND SHOW IN ANY COUNTRY

“I only have eyes for you”
......s... “Sentimental Me”
“The loveliest nite of the year”
j . “Because of You”

Pit: 18c. House: 36c. Bal. 48e. Box: 60c.





=


SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1952



SUGAR NEWS:

Imperial Preference On
Commonwealth Sugar

LONDON.

THE IMPERIAL PREFERENCE on Empire sugar,

which was given a life of

four years under the Finance

Act of 1948, has become permanent as a result of a clause
passed by the House of Commons in this year’s Finance

Bill.

The difference is that under earlier arrangements, Pre-
ference was put into operation for a limited period. Now

the Preferences stand until

Parliament revokes or changes

them. Sir Arthur Salter, speaking for the Government,
pointed out that Parliament could change them whenever
it desired, but he said it was essential that they should
continue throughout the life of the Commonwealth Sugar

Agreement.
oe Opposition spokesmen

ment and because they
part of the Agreement.
But Mr. Arthur Bottomley, a
Socialist ang former Secretary
for Overseas Trade, suggested
that it would have ‘been better
to have consulted Commonwealth
producers first.

“If we are to build up these
preferences, whether it be in
Sugar or anything else, the best
way to do it is by long-term
agreement and bulk buying,”
he declared. “The West Indies, I
know from experience, would far
rather have a guaranteed market
for sugar for a long time to come,
and we for some years have been
trying to buy our sugar at lower
prices than the real price.” r



BRITISH SUGAR AID FOR
AUSTRALIA

BRISBANE.

Britain‘ has granted £561,000
to the Australian sugar industry.
It is the Australian sugar indus-
try’s share of a surplus accu-
n.ulated by the Ministry of Food
from transactions in sugar over a
period of years within the Brit-
ish Commonwealth,

Mr, H. Collins, Queensland
Minister for Agriculture, an-
mounced the grant in Brisbane
and said that most of the sum
would go to Queensland, whose
Sugar crop last year was worth
about £22,000,000. The British
Government, he said, had ex-
pressed the hope that the money
would be used to improve the
sugar industry. A special pay-
ment of 15s. ld. a ton will
be paid to producers on raw
sugar of a requisite standard
produced in the 1951 season, he
said.

“The Queensland Government
warmly appreciates this action
by thé United Kingdom,” added
Mr, Collins, “and regards it as
an excellent example of the good
will existing between the United
Kingdom and the British Com-
monwealth sugar exporters.”

—B.U.P.



BLACK MARKET IN
SUGAR

DURBAN.
The South African Government
has appealed to members of the
public to give information of any
deals in black market sugar.
There is qa serious shortage of
sugar in South Africa, although
the position should ease soon

when the new cane crop is cut,
“When the sugar shortage de-
veloped towards the end of last
year,” said Mr. Eric Louw, Min-
ister of Economic Affairs, “I
gave the order that price in-
spectors should pay special at-
tention to sugar and a number of
them were sent to Natal. They
did not have much success be-

supported the clause because

ey_were in favour of the Commonwealth Sugar Agree-
regarded Preferences as an integral

cause black marketeers are too
wary to be caught by trapping.
—B.U.P.

SUGAR EXPERTS FOR
EL SALVADOR

El Salvador is to receive the
services of two sugar experts
under an agreement approved by
its Foreign Minister with the
United Nations Food anq@ Agri-
culture Organisation,

Under the agreement, the U.N.
agency is to send El Salvador one
sugar manufacturing technologist
to conduct a complete survey,
and one economist to analyse the
economic structure of its sugar
industry.

The existing sugar processing
plants in the country, methods oi
processing and equipment will be
examined by the technologist. He
will recommend any desirable
changes with a view to the ex-
pansion of local sugar cane pro-
duction,

Two fellowships for people
nominated by the El Salvador
Government will also be estab-
lished by the U.K, Food and Agri-
culture Organisation.



—B.U.P.

NEW CUBAN SUGAR
AGENCY TO SELL
1952 SUGAR
HAVANA, Cuba.
The Cuban Government has set
ap a single selling agency to sell
the special quota of the 1952
Sugar crop on the World market.
The new agency is a committee
made up of members of the
Cuban National Sugar Institute,
representing mil] owners and
planters. A Government delegate
appointed by the President will
be its chairman.
The Cabinet alse set up a
Commission to recommend meas-
ures to regulate the supply of



‘sugar for world markets this
year and next. It will seek to
press for q new word sugar

agreement to replace the London
pact of 1937.—B.U.P.

RATES OF EXCHANGE



MAY 23, 1952
NEW YORK
Selling Buying
72.6% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 70.9% pr
Sight or demand
Drafts 10.7% pr
72.6% pr. Cable ‘ .
71.1% pr. Currency 69.4% pr
Was ss Coupons 68.7% pr.
CANADA
(including Newfoundland)
75.3% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 73.6% pr
Demand Drafts 73.45% pr
Dakss Sight Drafts 73.3% pr
75.3% pr. Cable wdheesss
13.8% pr. Currency 72.1% pr.
err eee Coupons 71.4% pr

The above Rates are subject to change
without notice.

Bub

BOXED BRAIN OPENS.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





“Awd there, Virginia, is the Coronation Stone of Britain with a
mystic mscriftion—er—MADE IN JAPAN...”



New Digest Of

Colonial Statisties

Digest shows tables of the prim-





ary products from the Colonies,

and it is interesting to note fh

Table 19 the steady increase in

Trinidad's production of crude
petroleum which has risen from |

of 148,000 tons in 19386 to 241,000
“- tons in 1951 |
an

a Figures of industrial produetion

° De in Section VI aiso show an in

ee crease in West Indies’ products

4 \ i such as soap, margarine, manu-

Bk facturadd tobacco, cigarettes and

? matches

. An appendix at the end of the

' Digest gives the areas and popu.

lation of each Colony with a!

table at the end showing their

London Express Service ae by races at the last

i 2 —B.ULP.

FLIERS’ PARACHUTES

ROAD TO THE MOON



NO MATCH FOR THEM

Washington: Just when every- Rome; A _ football match be-

one. thought that Crosby, Hope tween Fatties and Skinnies took

THE ROYAL AIR FORCE is giving its aircrews a small and Lamour must surely be run- place at Savigliano, near Turin,
barometric box which will automatically open their para- Ding out of places they take the All = fatties Songion more!
chutes for them and release them from their ejector seats eee to yor ee ane he we Bick cai i e-ghe cakaa |
if they have to abandon their aircraft miles above the earth. Yoon". . tne scientist gets them But the skinnies out-manoeuvred
Up to the present a flier has had ettes, and weighs 1% Ibs. Royal there by mistake the fatties and won 2—1
to do this for himself and at a Air Force ground crews are fitting} Ta eat :

time when he is being blown clear
of an aircraft travelling at perhaps
600 miles an hour. As he fall:
away from the aircraft in his ejec-
tor seat, a small drogue is re-
leased from the seat to slow it
down, otherwise neither pilot nor
parachute could stand the strain
when the chute suddenly opened.
The airman then has to free him-
self from the seat and fall for a
short time before it is safe for him
to open his parachute. To do this
he must have his wits about him
all the time. At great heights
there is not enough oxygen in the
air to keep a man conscious for
more than a few seconds, and in
his hurry to leave his aircraft, he
may not have time to switch or
his emergency oxygen supply.

The new barometric box will do
the flier’s thinking for him. If he
bales out high up, the box takes
over, releases him from his seat
and —— his parachute for him
when he reaches 13,000 feet. If he
is ejected below 13,000 feet, the
box automatically delays the
opening for a few seconds so that
he gets clear of the aircraft and
slows down,

The box does not stop the air-
man pulling his ripcord himself if
he wants to: but it does it for him
if he is in trouble.

The box, made by the Irving
Chute Company, contains a sensi-
tive barometric bellows which
measures air pressure. It is about
the size of a packet of 20 cigar-

it to their squadron aircraft
equipment themselves,

It is made in three versions, The
first automatically releases the
airman from the safety harness
which connects him to his ejector
seat. The second automatically
opens his parachute; and the third
is designed for crews using an
ordinary static seat which remains
in the aircraft.

The device has been live-tested |
in 4a number of high altitude jumps
in Britain and Australia. In one
of these tests, the parachutist was
falling at 125 miles-an-hour at the
fastest point of his fall. It has
also been tried out thousands of
times on the ground—in pressure
cabins at an equivalent atmos-
pheric altitude of 50,000 feet and);
at temperatures down to minus
50 degrees C,

Technically, the box is a baro-
metric bellows, connected to a
time-delay, which prevents tha
operation of the firing mechanism
above the pre-determined altitude
to which it is set. Below that alti-
tude, the pressure on the bellows
releases a compressed spring
which gives a sixty pound pull on

|

and

the ripeord.

MAIL NOTICE

Mails for St. Lucia, St. John, N.B.,
Montreal by the M.V. Can, Cruiser will
be closed at the General Post Office as
under: |

Parcel Mail and Registered Mail at
9 a.m., Ordinary Mail at 10 a.m. on|
the 26th May 1952







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F you're really out to conquer a cough—to get to the root }

of it and destroy the germ—then ask for Famel Syrup.
Why? Because Famel Syrup does so much more than
ordinary cough mixtures. It contains soluble lactocreosote
which is carried by the bloodstream to the throat and lungs |
and breathing passages, where it destroys the germs which

Once the germs ate destroyed then it’s goodbye to the cough
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} NOTE

WIN $40.00

Here is a simple Cross Word puzzle which can help you to
win $40.00 for only one shilling. At the same time you will
be doing your bit to help send Barbados’ sole Olympic hope to
Helsinki next July. Enter now and try your skill.

RULES
1. The first correct solution opened by the Editor will win
the prize.
2. In the event of there being no correct solution the one

containing the least errors which is opened first by the
Editor will win the prize.

aa

68—Therefore.

HORIZONTAL 69—Sign.

1—Performs. 71—What peoples had dwelt in Ar

prior to the land being given

S—Lucky number. to the children of Lot?

10—Whe was ejected from the

temple in Jerusalem? 7e—M clan's hentia.
: ard.
sank sags 7 oun) roads.
leave : 71—Curved molding.
ear. y
visions of time. _ VERTICAL
piece, 1—Jewish month.
Printer’s measure. uote.
n what sea were Pharaoh's ymbol for tantalum.
and host drowned? 4—Cunning.
5—Flies aloft.
Wanders from truth.
Duct.
8—Street railway (abbr.)
ay pester city in the land of
u
, 10—Snoop. ,
~part. 11—At what place were Joshua's

men defeated?
12—Inner lining of the iris.
13—Penitential season.



19-—-Lampreys.
- Bi-C ate game.
| <4+---Mistrust.
Hleraity. 26—-Descendants of sher.
“ if mound. sy area letter.
umm ird. 29-—Tiny.
per ing 20—-S iit pulse.
ices. 31—College cheer.

82—Begin.

23—Of the moon.

34—Satisfied.

26—Who is the reputed authe
the Psalms?

37—Dubious.

39—Tibetan gazelle.

40—Bronze eoey: ;

43—Who owned the field in which

ipped.
50 What “are believers warned
ot to lie against?

‘ oddess of down.
i iecee .
—_

ot

rthless bit.
t etanibures Abraham was buried
i—How many horns has the a
dragon? uw. 45—Watchful.
@4—Proposed international lan- 47—Pig-pen.
age. 48—Torrid.
66-~Blackbird. 49—Ocean





Stage Career For

a before taking up her train- Cola on
|
\

NEW



PAGE THREE

SEA AND AIR





Cherry Huggins













Issued Nae
Miss Cher Huggins, daughter \
LONDON « Sir Jobn Hu gins form ar TRAFFIC |
‘ The first issue of a new Colo. Governor of Jamalpa, eee ee
al Office publication which sets P®T™S for a stage career _
eut in a compact. and easy-to- '* now 18 and completing _ ¥ omnes
read form the trade and life of oe ee ne C1 ———— — — —_-—
the Colonial territories for quick *’ ,~?3™™ a? rm ae i
he’ Colonial "territories. an or duly, oe will be ‘looking for in Carlisle any
officiat enuineet on ge job. 5.8. Rogenes, M.V ;
Hclat appeared on May 14. Training itself is a full-time ; Anita Bo port se Franklyn
It is the “Digest of Colonial job, which leaves her no time for ©. %.. Seh. Philip Davidson, Sc Flor
Statistics,” planneq as a com- the parties she loves Although St . gee nhs Whitake, M1 oumnans
panion volume to the “Monthly she a debutante this season, Sch. Lacil ith, ScF Brterprise
Digest of Statistics’ published by she will not join other debutantes %. Seh. Marion Belle Wolf
Hi.M. Stationery Office for the the round of almost nightly DEPARTURE
Central Statistical Office, and it curties. Instead, she will ration Motor Vewel Caribbee.
will be published every other herself to one party a week while
month, she finishes her arduous training itedi ain tie De i
Among the 50 tables and jor the stage. St. ase ia an ss go ve} ‘nn
appendices the first issue contains Miss’ Huggins, gay and viva- n St. Laiciag
are details of the value of total cious, wants fo act in light comedy.
imports and exports of Colonial Already she is a globe-trotter,
territories from 1936 to 1951 and ys,» her father’s career has taken OLD-WORLD
yin Soe Sgures by months for jim to many parts ot the world
the years 1949 to 1951. : Born in Panang, she has lived in ATMOSPHERE
In Tables 3 to 14 these figures yrinidad, Washington and Jamaica
are broken down to show the She went to school at Roedean and Venice: Vene ! crats are
origin of imports and destination was at a finishing school in New seeking ban tr tle of Coca-
exports for the Colonies as’ a the Grand Canal Gon-
and others Of the larger Teme [in a an actress, ane
an, « arg - J . here
tories individually a —B.U.P. world atmasphers
The fourth section of the new

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BUILD —

HEALTHY APPETITES
and STRONG BODIES

am





jThe Complete
VITAMIN and MINERAL FOOD SUPPLEMENT
Pleasant tasting ~ Economical,



Available at all leading Drug Stores



DATE
Entranee fee of one shilling (1/-) must be enclosed with

each solution along with name and address on the coupon
printed below.

~

3.

4. Any entry which is not accompanied by the entrance fee
will be immediately destroyed,

5. All entrants for this competition agree to abide by the
decision of the Editor of the Barbados Advocate.

6. The competition will be closed on Friday, 30th May, at
4 p.m.

7 All envelopes must be clearly marked CROSS WORD
PUZZLE COMPETITION and addressed to the Editor, the
Barbados Advocate, 34 Broad Street.

& The name of the winner will be published in the Sunday
Advocate of June 1.

51—Shoshonean Indian. 63—Knob.

65—In addition

66—Transgression

67—How many mites did t
widow throw into th
sury?

70—Which of Judah's so:
slain by the Lord?

72—Mother,.

14—Symbol for silver.

53—Observed.
55—Spirit of the
56— Asparagus.
57—To what were the breast
plates of the locusts com

ared?
88—Btupor p
60—Climax.
62—Serf.

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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS- ADVOCATE



ed ADVOCATE

Rice ee as es Pe

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown









1952

ee

POCKET THEATRE

THE legitimate theatre in Barbados
owes much to the British Council and tae
members of the Pocket Theatre for the
excellent performances of Pygmalion and
Twelfth Night.

Saturday, May 24,





The achievements of the Bridgetown
Players (now the Barbados Players) and
of the short lived Barbados .Dramatic
Club are not to be despised since their
productions provided Barbados with the-
atrical erftertainment, not otherwise ob-
tainable locally.

But the Pocket Theatre actors have so
far selected their plays from dramatists
whose works have obtained a secure place
in English Literature as works of art.

Even Shakespeare and the excellence of
Pygmalion is independent of Shaw’s repu-
tation as a dramatist of outstanding abil-
ity. The words ‘legitimate theatre’ which
are used in North America to describe
drama as distinct from other theatrical
performances aptly describe the work
which the Pocket Theatre Movement is
doing in Barbados.

The Pocket Theatre is a handmaid of the
arts and if the British Council only had
this achievement ‘to its credit it would
have justified those who first established a
headquarters here. The British Little
Theatre Movement for which the Pocket
Theatre may claim to be descended has
spread through many parts of the British
Empire and helps to keep alive an art in
which the British have produced so many
great names since William Shakespeare.

But the British Council have taken two
steps since Pygmalion which deserve
especial notice from the community. The
provision of a Pocket Theatre has been
followed with the provision for Twelfth
Night of Costumes suitable for Shakes-
pearean plays. If clothes make the man,
and Shakespearean clothes go far to make
the play, the generous gift of clothes alone
would have been notable; But the Pocket
Theatre and the Council have gone even
further. They have taken the Pocket The-
atre to the people. By going on tour in
St. Peter, St. John and St. Philip, they
have taken the little theatre movement to
the country.

Whether their intention was deliberate
or whether it was the unconscious gesture
of a team of public spirited individuals is
of no more than passing interest.

What is significant about this action is
the pioneering effort of interest of the
country dwellers in the theatre. If the
Pocket Theatre movement were to catch
on in the country, more than half of the
monotony and drabness which is respon-
sible for the drift from the villages to the
city would be banished forever.

So long as-_there chn be found individuals
as keen on the theatre movement as the
Risley Tuckers, Grossmiths, and Hewitt-
Myrings the Pocket Theatre will not die,
but will constantly impart new life into
that movement.



ROAD RULES

EVERY user of the road in Barbados is
supplied by the Commissioner of Police
with a booklet containing what are de-
scribed as Six Cardinal Rules for Safe
Driving.

The rules are; Always keep your eyes
open and your wits alert: Always drive as
you would wish others to drive: Always
keep yourself. and your vehicle in safe
driving order: Always anticipate danger:
Learn, give and obey the recognised traffic
signals: and obey the law in letter and
spirit. :

These Six Cardinal Rules are amplified
by a series of instructions which if faith-
fully observed by drivers of vehicles would
keep death off the roads of Barbados and
reduce accidents to, an infinitesimal num-
ber. It is the duty of every driver of a
vehicle to learn and obey these rules.
Every-day drivers in Barbados take corn-
ers on the wrong side: cut in or cut things
too fine and overtake at corners, bends and
cross roads. Traffic signals are carelessly
given. The result is death, injuries to
persons and vehicles. Let every motorist
learn and obey the Six Cardinal Rules.



A Little Nonsense

Following an unwritten “code of honour”
the shepherds of Sardinia refuse to collabor-
ate with the police. The grim code of the
Sardinian shepherds is based on two funda-
mental rules — first you must avenge your-
self any wrongs done to you or to your fam-
ily, killing the offender or a member of his
family. Secondly you must never ask the
police to: help you: all those collaborate or
even talk to the police are informers and
must be eliminated.

tage

perhaps because he lost both his
father and mother while ‘he was
still a lad. But that was to be
no serious handicap to a man of
his native intelligence and abili-
ty. Shortly after he took his
place in the Assembly, he begqh
to make his mark and ten years
later was unanimously elected

|

Gur Common Heritage—5

Sir John Gay Alleyne

Patriotic Fervour

_ Perhaps the outstanding figure
in Barbados during the eigh-
teenth century was Sir Jehn
Gay Alleyne. Born in Barbados
in 1724, he lived into the nine-
teenth century and died at the
age of seventy-seven. He was
created a Baronet of Great
Britain by King George III in
1769 and for an almost unbroken
period of forty years—there was
a single break of one annual
session—he occupied a seat in
the House of Assembly. During
that time he played a_ distin-
guished part in the island’s pub-
lic life. He was Speaker of the
Assembly for thirty years—
being re-elected regularly every
year except during the session
when he was absent from the
island—and thus set up a record
that was to be held for more
than a century and a quarter
until it was broken by the late
Sir Frederick Clarke.

Two years after he entered
the House, Alleyne gave evidence
of his patriotic fervour on an
occasion that aroused strong feel-
ings in Barbados. A British fleet,
with a sizeable contingent from
Barbados, had set out to capture
Martinique, When they reached
the French island, the troops
were landed but shortly after-
wards were re-embarked “at the
very moment when the principal
inhabitants were employed in
arranging a plan for the surren-
der of the island.” An attack was
then made on the other French
island, Guadeloupe, but, during
the seige, the British commodore,
hearing of the arrival of a
French fleet, withdrew this ships
to Dominica. Such inglorious
conduct was too much for the
Barbadians and the English com-
modore was burnt in effigy, “his
person treated with indignity and
his name held in absolute detes-
tation.” An incident like this was
certain to cause ill-feeling be-
tween the Barbadians and the
officers of the English Navy and
one of the former brought out
a pamphlet severely attacking
the character of the islanders.
An opportunity such as this was
not to be missed by Alleyne. He
wrote a spirited reply to the
pamphlet and so effective was
this defence of the honour of the
island that he was publicly
thanked by the House of Assem-
bly.

The Reformer

Alleyne never had the advan-
of a University education

to the Speakership. The days of
bitter struggle between
House and the Governor seemed
to be largely over, It was no
longer necessary for Alleyne
to play the role of Samuel
Farmer and risk imprisonment
and ruin by incurring the wrath
of the King’s representative, Nc
longer were the House and
Council so opposed to each other
that they could not come to-
gether when vital issues were
at stake. On one occasion, for
instance, when Alleyne was in-
sulted by a naval officer, both
Chambers adopted a resolution
declaring that ‘an affront to the
person of any member of the
Legislature

for any matter,

cause or act, arising from .. «'

his public service, is an affront
to the legislative body.’ That
may be taken as a measure both
of Alleyne’s standing among his
fellows and of the new spirit
prevailing among both branches
of the Legislature.

Alleyne’s great work for Bar-
bados lay in the House of
Assembly. To equip himself for
the task he had in mind, he
acquired a thorough knowledge
of the procedure of the House
of Commons, Then he set him-
self to the business of improy-
ing the procedure of the House
of Assembly, He insisted that
measures passed by the House
presented to the
council with appropriate digni-
ty and ceremony and that
money bills sanctioned by the
Upper Chamber should be pre-
sented to the Governor by the
Speaker of the Assembly. Since
the Assembly no longer con-
sumee its energy in fierce Lat-
tles with the Governor and the
Council, it could turn to setting

should be





its house ‘n order and Alleyne
watched with a jealous care
over the strici observance of
the new rules of procedure. For
all this Alleyne will long Le
remembered by those who cher-
ish the idea of parliamentary
government. But perhaps his
chief claim to our grateful mem-
ory is that he was the first
Speaker to request for members
of the House the famous three
privileges—freedom from arrest,
freedom of speech and freedom
of access at all times to the
King’s representative.

One of the charges brought
against Alleyne in more recent
times is that he opposed the prc-
posal to raise a West Indies regi-
ment from the slave population.
England at the time was facing
as great a threat from Napoleon
as she had ever faced from
Louis XIV, As in the time of the
French King, the Mother Coun-
try was concerned to ‘halt the
advance of French influence and



SIR JOHN GAY

arms not only in the continent
of Europe but in the Caribbean
area, In view of the high mor-
tality among the white soldiers
in the area, England decided to
supply her army in the West
Indies with men who could bet-
ter stand the rigours of a tropi-
cal climate. But the plan to raise
five regiments of black soldiers
was strenuously resisted both in
Barbados and in other colonies of
the West Indies. The influence
of the French Revolution had
already spread from France to
the other countries of Europe.
The ideas of “Liberty, Equality
and Faternity” had reached the
French possessions in the Carib-
bean and the slaves in San
Domingo took the opportunity
to rise against their masters, In
the upheaval that followed hun-
dreds of plantations were ruined
and thousands of whites were
killed. Small wonder that the
planters in the British West
Indies felt they were sitting on a
volcano, In the circumstances it
was perhaps natural for men like
Alleyne to believe that the plan
to raise five regiments from the
slave population, so far as it
was likely to affect Barbados,
would prove “rather the means
of its destruction than its
defence,”
A Balanced Outlook

But Alleyne did not allow
fear to disturb the balance of
his outlook. During the seven-
ties of the eighteentf® century
the sugar industry passed
through one of its most trying
periods, suffering from disease
and drought; and Alleyne’s
speeches in the Assemtbly re-
flected his anxiety over the eco+
nomic condition of the island.
But he did not sree those un-
fortunates whose fabour played
a great part either in bringing
Barbados to prosperity or help-
ing it through a period of gloom.
For the poor and distressed he
always had a word and, while
he regarded slavery as lawful
and necessary, he felt that the



Our Readers Say:

Import Licenses

To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—The readers of this
paper who are not aware of
what is taking place in Bar-!
bados, may find the following
information interesting. On the
13th March this year, the Control
Authorities refused to allow any
further orders to be placed with
Europe (our main source of food
supplies, potatoes, onions, etc.),
and until to-day (19th May)
have prohibited all business with
countries generally referred to
as soft currency areas, This has
meant that the public in general
are going to suffer a 1 of,
revenue, because ships will be
coming with no cargo, They!
will also be suffering the loss of
a meal, because there will, be
nothing in the shops for them to
eat when they are hungry. -It
is interesting to note that the
approximate importation from
these countries for 1951 was
£900,000. The Control Authori-
ties now propose to reduce this
figure to approximately £200,000.
This is going to mean small
profits if any by the retailers of
food stuffs and hardware. It is
also going to mean small profits
for the commission merchants

and

agents, and in some cases,
drastic measures, such as, Tre-
duction in staff would be indi-
cated. In turn this will have
the effect of reducing collectable
income tax and also a loss of
duty. The Government will have
much less money to spend, and

therefore, many of the schemes
which they are so ambitiously
carrying out to-day will be
endangered by the latest follies
of our Control Authorities. Let
us consider what is being done
by the other West Indian
Islands, In Trinidad and Jamaica
various items such as, decorated
glassware, holy pictures, rosar-
ies and other items which are
not essential ‘to existence are
placed on the prohibited list,
but such things as food, agri-
cultural impliments and the
necessities of life, are allowed
in any quantities which the
importer may consider a necessity
for the benefit of the colofy.
Why do we have to deviate from
the good example set by our
sister colonies and go to the
extreme of cutting our imports
from approximately £900,000 in
1951 to £200,000 for the last half
of 1952 or an equivalent \of
£400,000 for the year, which is a
cut of more than 50%. Any
elementary school boy can see
that our Control Board has been
too drastic, and it is time for
the people of Barbados to protest
against their action, This action
when examined closely is not
only a hardship on the people,
but a menace to the very ex-
istence and way of life, and if
our present Government realiy
has tne interest of the people at
heart and is genuinely deter-
mined to make this island a
better place to live in, then it is
time that they speak quite



Hy F. A. Hoyos

system left an immense debt on
men like himself to clear the
obligation of human nature.” In-
deed, for a man who lived in

feeling and seldom missed an
ppportunity to emphasise in the
House of Assembly that there
were classes of society other
than his own which were enti-
tled “the equal protection of wise
and equitable laws.” No partial
regard for the interests of the
landowner, he argued, should
ever influence the deliberations
‘of the Assembly; and, on one
occasion when the House passed
a Bill, shortly after the disas-
trous hurricane of 178Q, to sus-
pend legal proceedings for debt
against landowners, he spoke

with great eloquence against it
and “moved an additional clause
excluding himself by name from
any benefit to be derived from
the operation of the law.”

Some may be tempted to dwelt
on Alleyne’s faults.

He was

ALLEYNE

irascible and quite unusually
vain and these infirmities grew
as he advanced in age. Others
will draw our notice to his lack
of enthusiasm for Codrington’s
plan to bring Christianity to the
Negroes ona Indians ae Re West
Indies. ad humane
Oe g TORN Slaves, he relt
that Codrington’s scheme for
their conversion was too ambi-
tious. To him it was far more
practical to give boys a good
secondary education. Like other
Barbadians of his time, Alleyne
was indifferent to the idea of a
centre for missionary work and
preferred to see Codrington Col-
lege develop as a secular school.
Yet it should always be remem-
bered to his eredit that it was
mainly due to his efforts that the
grammar school was _ revived
after the hurricane of 1780.
Without his hagh-spirited and
energetic exertions, it is doubt-
ful if the Lodge School, which
was to develop into one of the
leading schools in the West In-
dies, would have survived the
difficulties of a dark and critical
period. Nor was«this all he did
for education. For he used the
money he earned as the island’s
‘Treasurer to found the sehgolk
which is n known as _ the
Alleyne Schoo.

Sir John Gay Alleyne’s contri-
bution to the common stock of
policy and counsel cannot be
questioned. He enhanced the
prestige of the House of Assem-

ly and began the great reforms
that were needed to make it a
more efficient instrument of gov-
ernment. Ata time of great peril
he brought sanity and good sense
to the deliberations of the As-
sembly. And his work in the
cause of education was to pro-
duce permanent and fruitful
results. “Though no sculptured
marble speaks his country’s grat-
itude,” wrote, the historian,
Poyer, when Alleyne ‘was still
alive, “his virtues have em-
balmed his mory. and — will
transmit it to°the admiration of
succeeding generations.”



plainly and oppose such drastic
restrictions being placed on the
importation of goods into this
island, Let us face this new
menace of starvation and .priva-
tion with determination and
defeat it before it can, get a

serious hold on us.
Yours truly,
HUNGRY.

Load-Shedding

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Once again I see in
your paper suggestions for load
shedding suggested to the Elec-
tric Company,

Surely in ‘a democracy one
considers the greatest good to
the greatest number. Why
should all who buy electricity
be made miserable and dis-
gruntled? I believe the number
is 23,000, to please temporarily
the 5,000 or so who want elec-
tricity in their new houses? I
say temporarily advisedly, as
the new instatlers would soon be
crying out as loud as anyone
else when they couldn’t cook
on their electric stove for some
periods, fridge cuts, meat spoil-
ing in deep freeze ‘etc.

IT am the owner of a house at
Silver Sands built in 1938 and



Electricity applied for that same
year was never received. I still
say load shedding will make

Director!

eighteenth century Barbados, al
was singularly free from :









|
every single consumer irritated |
and miserable, ‘getting up

tions etc.
Don't do it Mr.
HOUSEWIFE.

peti-/on her doorstep.
jcope with the situation.

| NOBODY'S |

DIARY

Monday—Everybody in Bridgetown has been
talking about the Ladies. Will they go or
will they stay? Do we want them or don’t
we want them? I even overheard one
street hawker saying to the male member
of a party of two “That is a sweet lady

you’ve got Mr A—— let me sell her a

pineapple.”

Another street vendor pushed his cart
past the House of Assembly today. On it
in large letters was written “LADY BE
GOOD”. As I saluted Nelson I shed a
tear. Nobody saw me.

P.S. What good news about the foun-
tain! Won’t Miss Manning be pleased!
Tuesday—While I’m in this feminine mood I

must tell you the story of a woman
scorned. Was she furious! I saw the drama
through the cracked windscreen of my
doorless two-seater. There she was near
to the roadway a woman scorned and
armed with a stick. f wonder where she
learnt to swing it like that! From Cyrano
no doubt! But she wasn’t beating one
man or fifteen men. The recipient of her
blows was a much younger girl whose
face showed as much refinement as sur-
prise. I hope the woman cops are taking
up fencing. They might need it, if this
kind of thing spreads.

Wednesday—My friend’s four-year-old boy
(did I mention he was born on a leap
day) continues to view Heaven from a
utilitarian world. When it rained the
other day he told his better parent.
“Isn’t God useful mummy! His has a big
watering pot and is helping daddy with
the vegetables.”

Thursday—Remember how long it took them
to cut the grass at the Alice Playing
Field? It seems that the Y.M.C.A., are
having similar playing field headaches.
Their playing field, (I think it’s theirs)
is one of the bushiest fields near Green-
fields and is far more suitable for cow-
boys and Indians than for ball games. I
wonder if the people at the Y., ever go
down Brighton way. If they do they will
notice what seems to me one of the best
kept playing fields in Barbados. It was
laid down by a private company and is
maintained by a private company. I’m
sure that if the Y., were to ask them for
a few tips on how to keep the grass from
growing they would oblige. In my young
days I used to spend most of my Satur-
days cutting and rolling grass. But I
would hate to suggest that the members
of the Y., could do what I used to do
(with help of course).

People are so touchy nowadays. Look at
the scouts,

Friday—Yve spent all day wondering what is

the best way to frighten people from

picking my water coconuts. Shall I put an

obeah bottle up the tree? Shall I fit a

bulb and switch it on during the act?

Shall I hire a ventriloquist and frighten
the life out of the picker? Shall I pick
the coconuts and leave a note saying:
help yourself: don’t mind me.

Why do people pick other people’s
coconuts, mangoes, avocadoes, bananas or
whatever they can get their hands on.

Do they think they are doing the
grower a good turn? Or do they just steal
for the fun of it? suf

Perhaps police night patrols in unex-
pected places would help. It seems such
a waste of energy planting fruit bearing
trees for others to eat. Might as well do
a spot of night plucking myself, what.
Anyhow the field is open for the adult
educationalists,

Pluck only what is yours to pluck.
Them’s good sentiments.

Saturday—The House of Assembly which has
a library of sorts and which holds the
purse strings might consider purchasing
Ivan Payne's painting of the Public

. Buildings. ‘

In this picture there are enough taxis
outside the Colonial Secretary’s office to
justify the expense.

If ever the taxis are banished, they
could be painted or better still they could
remain as a reminder of the power of the
automobile in politics. Something like
that.



Mystery Murder

ROME, May 14.

Eighteen peovle of the Sardinian village of
Orgosolo have been living under the threat
of death since April 1950, when 35 names
of Mgrs, yo appeared chalked on a church
wall,

The list was accompanied by a statement
that they had been sentenced to death by
an unnamed tribunal. Since then, the sev-
enteen other people on the list have all been
murdered.

The latest victim was a shepherd who was
found dead near his flock riddled with bullets
only three days ago.

The killings are believed to be the result
of a large-scale vendetta carried on by the
followers of the notorious bandit leader Gio-
vanni Battista Liandru.

The Government put a ransom of £1,000
on the bandit’s head and he was arrested
after having been betrayed by his wife. A
few days after the arrest the wife was killed
The police were unable to

—E.N.S.

















SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1952





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YOUR PICNIC

SHOPPING DAYS

GODDARDS New.

Elec. Dept.





-

FOR SANDWICHES
Butter Bread
Sandwich Bread
Butter Concentrate
Pate de Fois Gras
Cheese Biscuits
Carr’s Crackers
Carr’s Sweet Biscuits
Hams in Tins
Cheese in Tins
Chili Sauce

KEEP COOL

with a Gin and
Schweppes Tonic

or
A Gold Braid Rum
3-yr.-old
with Canada Dry Sodas
and Ginger Ales


SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1952



Kirst Co-Operative Society
Registered Under New Act

St. Barnabas Co-Op. Society
Has Membership Of Sixty

FOR THE FIRST TIME in the history of Barbados, a
co-operative society was registered under the recently
enacted Co-operative Society’s Act when the Certificate of
Registration of the St. Barnabas Co-operative Marketing
Society Limited was presented to its President (Mr. Ran-
dolph Worrell) by the Registrar of Co-operative Societies
(Mr. C, C. Skeete) at a function which took place at St.
Barnabas Boys’ School on Thursday night.

This society which was established four months ago,
has a membership of 60 with funds amounting to $115.

_The main purpose of the so-
ciety like that of all Co-operative
Societies, is the promotion of
thrift, self-help and mutual help
among its members. The so¢iety
has as its main objects, market-
ing as a co-operative basis of
Sugar cane and such other pro-

duce of its members as it may
from time to time see fit to
handle,

Its area of operation is the St.
Barnabas district and its mem-
bers consist of peasants of the
area,

A large and appreciative audi-
ence of members and friends of
the society witnessed the pres-
entation of the certificate of reg-
istration,

Certificate Presented

Chairman of the Meeting was
Rev. O. C. Haynes, Vicar of St.
Barnabas, After the Secretary had
read his report,. the Registrar
gave an address and then pre-
sented the certificate to the So-
ciety. Mr. Clive A. E. Beckles,
Co-operative Officer, made some
general remarks on co-operation
and a vote of thanks was moved
by Mr. Wilfred Maynard, the
Treasurer, which was seconded
by Mr. K. D. Inniss and support-
ed by Mr. G. Callender.

The President in introducing
the Chairman said® that the So-
ciety was greatly indebted to him
for allowing them the use of the
school room for their meetings.
In doing so, he was promoting
the good and welfare of a society
which it was hoped would prove
a credit to the community in
general and its members in par-
ticular, ;

The Chairman in opening ‘the
function said that it was rather
surprising that the co-operative
movement which had _ been es-
tablished in England over 100
years ago should only now begin
to be developed in Barbados.
However, now that a start had
been made, he hoped the move-
ment would become well estab-
lished here and move _ from
strength to strength. .

Objects of Society

He said he noted that among
the objects of the society was
mentioned the promotion of self-
help and mutual help os its
members and added at they
should all aim at the harmonious
combination of helping them-
selves and at the same time help-
ing others. ‘

He regretted that he had not?
taken as keen an interest in the
St. Barnabas Society as he might
have, but promised to watch its
development and take a keener
interest in its activities in the
future. :

The Registrar opened his address
by congratulating the Society on
the strides it had made during the
relatively short period of four
months that it had been in exis~
tence. He said he had listened
with interest to the report of the
Secretary and had noted that one
of the points made was that meet-
ings had not always been well
attended. He pointed out that the
Society could be a means of social,
moral and economic benefit to
members, teaching them. self-re-
liance and self-help and raising
their standard of living. It was
essential, however, the Registrar
continued, that members should
be regular in attendance at meet-
ings so as to study together co-
operative principles and practice
and advance their own economic
welfare.

Leading Position

He said: “I wish to congratulate
your Society on being one of the
firat Societies to be registered
under the Co-operative Societies
Act of Barbados. The registered
number of your Society is actu-
ally Number One. I hope this will
inspire you to maintain a leading
position among the Co-operative
Societies in this Island.

The Co-operative Officer, Mr.
Beckles, will have discussed vari-
ous aspects af co-operation with
you from time to time. But per-
hzps it would not be inappropri-
ate if I took this opportunity of
referring again to one or two
points.

First of all it is essential that
your Society should be laid on

a sound financial basis and

should have adequate member-

ship, if the objects of the Society
are to be achieved. But there is

a point of even greater impor-

tance, it is that your Society

should consist of a body of loyal

members, adhering strictly
co-operative principles, and
regular and punctual in attend-
ance at general meetings. There
must also be loyalty of the So-
ciety’s officers in the keeping of
accounts and records and in car-
rying out all the duties assigned
to them; there must be loyalty
of the members in supporting
the officers you have yourselves
appointed under the democratic
constitution of your Society; and
there must be loyalty of all,
officers and members, to the
principles of co-oreration and
to the provisions of the Co-
operative Societies Act and of
the Rules and By-Laws of the
Society.
A Body Corporate

I would also like to take this
opportunity of reminding you
that through registration your
Society now becomes a body cor-
porate, that is your Society is rec-
ognised by law as having legal
existence. Corporate existence
will of course cease if registration
is cancelled, Registration gives tha
Society power to hold real and
personal Property in the name
under which it is registered. and
also protects individual members
from legal proceedings in respect
of an obligation of the Society. It
Registrar’s duty to have accounts
of registered Societies examined
from time to time and audited at
least once a year. The fulfilment
of this duty ensures that confi-
dence may be placed in the
Society. not only by the members
but also by the general public.

I now have much pleasure in
presenting to your President, on
your behalf, the Certificate of Reg-
apes ot he St. Barnabas Co-

rativ, i i
imiea arketing Society
Officer’s Remarks

Mr. Beckles said: “This should
be a most happy occasion for you
members of the St. Barnabas Co-
operative Marketing Society. You
should be happy in your know-
ledge of the fact that you have
been able to organise your So-
ciety, adopt your by-laws, build
up a reasonably good member-
sate and share capital and con-
orm requirements
of they operate Societies Act,
as a result of which you -naw have
the distinction of being the first
co-operative society to be -
istered under the Act. Just as I
shared, and continue to share, your
growing pains with you, I now
share in your joy at this achieve-
ment,

I think you realise that credita-
ble as all 'this is, worthy as eee
achievement is of congratulation
it marks merely the beginning of
what we all hope will be a virile
co-operative society: a society
which will be managed by the
members for the members along
truly co-operative lines, bringing
blessings in the way of social,
moral and economic improve-
ments, not only to its members
but to the entire community and
to future generations. You the
present, as well as prospective
members, should regard the build-
ing up of such a virile society as
your special responsibility and a
sacred duty.

to

Opposition

In attempting to discharge this
duty you will come up against
opposition from several sources,
There will, for example, be those
pessimists who maintain that Co-
cperation cannot succeed in Bar-
bados because of the individualism
and suspicion of the people. It
will be up to you to prove your-
selves good co-operators and by
adopting as your guiding princi-
ple “Unity is Strength” show the
strong individualists among you
that far more can be achieved by
co-operative effort than by selfish
individualism. The best means of
winning over those who are sus-
picious is by straightforward deal-
ing. Make sure that all books and
records of your Society are care-
fully and accurately kept, and
these together with your Bank
book, should be open to inspec-
tion by members at all reasonable
times. Let there always be frank
and open discussion at your meet-
ings of all difficulties, problems
and seeming irregularities as they
eccur. Members should always
observe the democratic principle
of majority rule and accept the
decision of the majority with cood

SSS SSE <







SPECIAL

BUYS
FOR

RAYON

PIN STRIPED SUITING







SS



eee



ALL WOOL ENGLISH.FANCY WORSTED
in Grey, Fawn and Brown at $17.00 per Yard
ALL WOOL GREY WORSTED |
At $8.30; $8.40 and $9.73 per Yard
GABARDINE SUITING
in Brown, Grey, Fawn, Slate and Cream
at $3.54 and $4.30 per Yard



grace, even when it
to your own opinion.
Team Spirit

Your co-operative society may
aptly be compared to a football,
or cricket, team, The success of
your society like that of the foot-
ball team depends primarily on
good team spirit. The aim of the
team must be the same, playing
the game and winning the match.
This can best be done when the
team as a whole, from the centre-
forward back to the goal-keeper
pulls his weight on the side. Then,
too, the fundamental principles
of the game those principles which
the experts have proved to be
match-winning factors—must be
scrupulously observed. At the
same time, every member of the
side must avoid foul play and any
action which experience has
shown to be detrimental to the
team and likely to rob the game
of the right spirit.

If your society is to succeed,
and it is up to you to see that it
does, it must develop that team-
spirit and observe those principles

is contrary

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PAGE FIVE



of the same district

Without prejudging him, the Chief Justice said, from
the evidence which came before the Court, he was satisfied
that Babb knew about the will and seemed to have had it
and he intended passing on the evidence to the Police who
might bring a case for the destroying of the will or per-

of these were admitted as new
members at our last meeting as
a result of a special membership
drive effected by Mr. Yard our
Peasant Instructor, and the Co-
operative Officer assisted by mem-

jury, or both,
be:s of the Society.

Mr. Yard has used his valuable In evidence yesterday, Babb
years of experience in agriculture denied any knowledge of any
as an instrument in bringing Will.

these peasants together and it is _ Sylvester Ifill, son of Leopold
because he is so well known claiming that his f ther

amongst them that they will trust Made a wil the contents of which
his words and him also. he communicated to him and it

Will Said To Be Burnt: C.J.
Will Pass On Evidence

THE CHIEF JUSTICE Sir Allan Collymore yesterday
decided to pass on to the police certain evidence in con-
nection with the alleged burning of the will of the late
Leopold Ifill of Sutherland, St. Lucy

Motorist
Fined 157-

by Brandford Babb





Our most worthy and suitable Was afterwards handed to Nabb Their Honours Mr. J. W. B.
Co-operative Officer has never Who had since refused to have Chenery and Mr, A. J. H. Hans-
refrained from expounding every it proven. chell Judges of the Assistant
question put to him. He brought 7 Sylvester is alleging that Babb Court of Appeal, — yesterday
to our light many historical facts refused to produce the will when ordered Fred Waterman to pay
tcuching co-operation which filled he filed to canvass the funeral “ fine of 15/- for refusing to move
many a member with enthusiasm, of Leopold for a certain under- his motor car while using a
in so much that one member said taker whose agent he was. portend ee eee oo
that he wished such light were Mrestens atRences had! sea vut prejudice another case brought
brought to them 20 years ago. that the “will wa peed. at ‘the ee hime with me cee ie win IN
as 8 a y using a car for hire
There is not one member who has office of Mr, Nichols, rolicitor, without having a Tosvice for that COOL G &

not great interest in the Society. se Sct

; when Babb and one Luther Scan-
hs tM ig POT indeed very poet, tlebury were tnere and Scantle-
BHG< So sCRHAUG. Shr in as much bury himself had given evidence
money as we would like, but the to thet effect.
Co-operative Officer has told us Yesterday ‘Mr, Nichols tod the

14

Forde prosecuted



for the



purpose.
The fine of 15 /- is to be paid in REFRESHING
days or 14 days’ imprison-|
ment with hard Jabour. Sgt.

Police







which have proved during the to “deny ourselves to reach the ; a rast este receive
” court that sometime last year from information received |

100 years that the co-operative goal” and we shall do so. some parties, ‘Ifll, Scantlebury Cpl. McClean attached to the

movement has been in existence to anuther : ”h as said Traffic Branch at Central Station

be the best, in fact, the only Funds and another men whe was sai ihe ob he Fel 9
foundation for its success. There The Funds of the Society '° be Babb, but whom he could told the court that on February 9

may be a tendency on the part of amount to $87.86; $22.00 being Rot remember well had come to Jie was on Sam ao — ae
some members to act contrary to entrance fees and $65.86 share his office with a certain will. mans and =e hie ayes ORE he
one or another of these principles. capital. He mentioned, too, that the will sata in the . ower a ireen, Er
It should be remembered, however, The entrance fee to the Society was not quite jn order, sean ant : — in t ie car, ye ew
that they have been tested for is 50 cents and the value of a Doris Broomejof St. Lucy gave roe aot the Meter dit :3 a me
over S Seahaey. ee am many a share $1.00, Each member under- evidence af Babb's ie to Papa te. SSKEG The GerenGUny wo _ Mr

rent lands and have been prove! “ “jf ‘ll three weeks after Ifll’s *%,, 5 ast
to be sound and right. It wil be Tone ep § eee a Ny \ “ The defendant refused ~ ag ' LET THE
your duty then to adhere strictly “ The objects of the Society are } the car. He then erty =
to these principles which form the yery wide and include— Babb told tle court that he Matter to the Traffic Branch H D EN
basis of the Co-operative move- i Raisin the standérd of knew nothing @f the will and shel a hiasieatnidelae C IL R
ment, ' : 5 also denied ever going to Mr. .

The Principles

Very briefly, these principles are
as follows: —

1. Membership in a co-opera-
tive society is voluntary.
Members meet on a basis of
equality, involving the de-
mocratie principles of one
man, one vote.

Surplus is distributed in
proportion to business done
with the society and not in
proportion to capital invest-
ed.

There is no restriction on
membership.

Members join to promote
their own economic interests
and advantage, not those of
« non-members.

Business should be done for
cash,

A proportion of the earnings
to be set aside for educa-
tional purposes.

Neutrality in religion and
polities.

Labour shall be fairly treat-
ed, \ a
10. Co-operative societies shall
. co-operate with one an-

2.

other.

‘Your society, like most co-oper-
attve nvarketing or producers’ so-
cieties, aims at performing a num-
ber of inter-related functions for
its members. In all you. business
let service to your members, rather
than mere profit making be your
main purpose. If at the same time
you are guided by the tried and
proved principles of Co-operation,
there can be little doubt that the
St. Barnabas Co-operative Mark-
eting Society also will stand the
test of time and measure up to
what the Registrar hoped it would
be—a model to all other co-opera-
tive societies in Barbados.

Secretary's Report

In presenting the Report, the
Secretary Mr. P, N, Pilgrim said:

“There was an inaugural meet-
ing held on the 31st January, this
year, attended by peasants of the
St, Barnabas district. Mr. Beckles,
the Co-operative Officer outlined
to the meeting the purpose and
aims of a Co-operative Society and
of the proposed Marketing Co-op-
erative Society. After a general
discussion, a resolution was unani-
mously passed to the effect that a
co-operative society be formed in
the district, especially for the pur-
pose of marketing canes on a co-
operative basis,

Election of officers took place on
the 7th of February, and resulted
in the following officers being
elected for the ensuing year:
President R. Worrell; Secretary:
P.N, Pilgrim; Treasurer: W. May-
nard: Trustees: Jas. A. Maxwell
and §. Ifill. '

Several meetings were held to
discuss in detail model by-laws
prepared by the Co-operative Offi-
cer. These by-laws were finally
adopted, and application made for
registration of the society under
the Co-operative Societies Act. |

The total number of meetings
held was 16. Attendance at meet-
ings has not always been satisfac- |
tory. This has been attributed |
mainly to members being engaged '
in the reaping of the cane crop.)
Two meetings were abortive for
want of a quorum. |

Attendance

The average attendance at)
meetings was 12. The membership |
of the Society has risen from 28
in number on the 15th of this
month to 45 at present, Seventeen |

’ j



in Blue, Brown and Grey at $3.44 per Yard

HARRISON'S



Dial 2664
Broad Street





its activities to the marketing of

fact that the society was started
after the present cane crop began,
we have found the factories to
which our canes haye been sent 4% it oD
very co-operative. We are very Hill, St. Philip,
hopeful that as a result of

in qualifying for

agriculture in the ot, Nichols the solicitor.



2. Co-operative marketing o
vee ¥ He added that Scantlebury had
ane wanah” She THe approached me in Ser last
4 4. year and told’ him that if he went
" ae somes aa to the court and give a tale about
4. The provision of loans to the will as he knew the late
"members: : Ifill, he, Seantlebury, would give
5. Bulk purchasing of seeds bim $50.
and fertilizers, and —
6. The provision of such other

services as members may
find necessary from time to
time,

etters Of
Administration

Mr, Justice,G. L. Taylor yes-
jig members’ canes, Despite the terday granted the petition of
the Public Trustee of the island
for Letters of Administration to
the estate of Charles Torrington
Augustus Knight, late of Blades.

So far the society has confined

this The petition of Alexander
Co-operation we have succeeded Theophilus Mason of Hill View,
the additional St. Philip, for Letters of Admin-
price to be paid to Peasant Co- istration to the estate with will

cperative Societies under the annexed of his father Alexander
terms of the Domestic Sugar Mason was also granted. This
Agreement, will was proved on June 11, 1943.

Our aim is to work together to The petition of Louise Mar-
achieve our goal, which is, to quille Hinkson for Letters of Ad-
improve the standard of living of ministration to the estate of her
every single member of our father Alexander Mason, de-
society. Registration = ~ ae ceased, was also granted.
is one step in this direction, We
ceeadiiniet the shall be presented Mr. D. H. L. Ward instructed
our registration certificate this by Hutchinson & Banfield, ap-
evening. We are extremely proud Peared for the petitioner.
of this, and take this opportunity The other petition for Letters
of saying thanks beforehand. of Administration which was|)

7 granted was that of Frank Inniss |}
of Cave Hill, St. Michael, to the |)
estate with will annexed and de
bonis non cf Martha Matilida
King, late of Baxters Road.

LORD WILLOUGHBY
COMES OFF DOCK Mr. E. W. Barrow instructed by
Mr, E. D. Rogers, solicitor, ap-

The Lord Willoughby—a new p ‘
tug brought to the island from Peay forthe pettiener.
Southampton, and the No. 1 Water
Barge came off the dock yester-
aay morning after they were
given a general inspection. The
Lord Willoughby will be given a
trial run sometime next week. admitted to probate:— ,
The motor vessel Blue Star went Wiliam Albert Worrell, St}
on dock yesterday afternoon, She Michael; Beata Irene Hinkson, St{
vill be undergoing a general in- T'nomas; James Forde, St. Philip}
spection. Thomas Albert Clarke, St. An4
drew; William Eustace Nurse, St,
: ey | a rite Moore, St. Michael;
: ihe’ vonne vide, St. Michael;
Cacique De Caribe Calls Christina Walker, St, Michael;
The 162-ton Cacique Del Caribe Joseph Thorne, St. Michael;
arrived in Carlisle Bay yesterday James Blackman, St. James,
morning from St. Lucia but before Leanora Bayley, St. Joseph,
she could come into the Careenage __Im the Court for Divorce and
she was held up for some hours. Matrimonial Causes decree ab-
Thu Cacique Del Caribe under solute was pronounced in the suit
Capt. H, Wallace brought in 200 of C, G. Kirton, petitioner, and
packages of fresh fruit, six bags C. B. Kirton, respondent,
of peas, two casks of pumpkins Decree nisi was prenounced in
ind 12 bunches of fresh fruit, the suit of G. N, Jervis, petition-
She is consigned to the Schooner er, and L. R, Jervis, respondent.











Wills Admitted

The wills of the following wer



Owners’ Association, The Steam- In the suit of V. C. Cox
ship Sapho (4,380 tons) also petitioner, and A. Cox re-
urived in Carlisle Bay yesterday gpondent, decree nisi was also
morning from St. Lucia. pronounced. : ;







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PAGE SIX



Jamaican Preacher
Attacks Dr. Malan
In St. Paul’s Cathedral

Fight Costs |
2 Women 46’-

In the Assistant Court of Appeal

















LONDON. yesterday Their Honours Mr.
The Rev. Dr. Marcus James, a J. W. B. Chenery and Mr. A. J. H.
29-year-old Jamaican, beeame Hansehell fined Ilene Clarke of

the first negro to preach in St.
Paul's Cathedral when last Sun-
day evening (May 11) he gave a
sermon on “The Christian
approach to the racial problem, ’
Dr. James, a descendant of a

n Slave, is the first ne; to
hold: an Oxford degree of Dover and 3/- costs in seven days or 14
of Philosophy. days’ for assaulting and beating
He told the white and coloured [ene Clarke.
congregation: “It is sheer hypocs BY imposmg these fines Théir
rigy to be intervening in Korea Honours confirmed the decision of
with tanks, planes, men and
bombs, while closing our eyes
to events in South Africa,
Where the principles for which,
the United Nations are avowedly
fighting, are being trampled on
with increasing ruthlessness day
by day.”
Speaking by inference of Dr.
alan, the South African Prime
inister, Dr. James continusd, bbons who examined
“By his'‘words and actions he has Hinds said that she came to him
proven himself in the eyes of mang" December 21 — the next cay
to the successor of Adolph}j-!ter the fight — and said thar
ler, as the world’s high priestde%€ Was beaten. She was bitten
racial hate, intolerance and {eM a finger. :
Oppression, anq yet, considers) Addressing the court Mr, Malone
himself by some perverted sense,@5@id that the eviuence of Clarke
of logic, a minister of the Chris-Mould not be aceepted by me
tian Gospel of Love. court and submitted that it Was
-larke who first started the
“This man, this sinister man is@ nd brutally bit the other womau
propagating his vile and unscien-4on her finger. If the court ac-
tifle dociiine of the ‘master race & epted the evidence of Hinds then
one of tO very monstrosities i),

it oere was no case against her, |
Opposition-to which so many in

Endeavour, St. James 25/- and
3/+ costs to be paid in seven days
er One month's imprisonment with
hard labour for inflicting bodily

Dalketha Hinds and or-
dered Dalketha Hinds also of En-
deavour, St. James to pay 15/-

were Mr.
J. S. B. Dear for Ciarke and Mr.
Denis Malone for Hinds.

The cases were brought as a
result of a fight which Ciarke ana
Hinds had on December 20, lu
the fight Hinds was bitten on tne
linger by Clarke.

Dr. i

laid doi their lives in the Which Told The Truth

second orld war. Mr. Dear submiited that the
In th Africo, Christians&-ase was one in which the judges
are findiig themselve® in directPuad to look carefully and sce

Opposition= to the state. Fellow
Christiam&abroad must give their
full sufZipt to them in the re-
Sistance =*5 tyranny,”

which one of the women was tell-
ing the truth, In the course oi
-he [ght both of them fell to the
5 =to Dr. James|*ground and looking at the evi-
said. = 2» * @ dence in the case it was cleat thai
Too Many Christian voicesâ„¢:4inds assaulted his client,

which heve been loudest in their#) Then it would only be a question
denunciation of Communism .f what fines should be paid. ‘In:
have bet silent on this question® ;act that a person went to a docjor
of raciakedolatory which threat-‘and was under his supervision tot
ens to pllihge an entire continentizsometime was nothing surprising
into bloodshed. and ‘did not mean that the injury
poet an was serious,



—B.U.P.
“I am aoe - the in-
fe ° juries that Hinds received were
Many Ch ildren trivial and there is no reason why
Clarke should have to pay more

ont than the other woman. The

Altend Exhibition ecision should be reversed ana

School-ehildren from all parts the fine should be reduced,” Mr.
of the island have been visiting Dear said. 2
Combermere School during tha _ Before confirming the decision
week. The Empire week Exhi-. Their Honours said that it was

bition is now in progress in the Clear that Hinds first started the]-

School Hall. fight and in their view the Mag-
Many parents and other visitors ‘strate was right in fining both
were among the large crowd that ®d regarding the injury as a
went to Combermere yesterday, Serious one.
Yesterday was the first day on
which the Exhibition was opened
to the public as wet! as schools.
During thé evening the Police

8 Acres Canes Burnt
Band, conducted by Captain C. E.

Raison, by kind permission of Canes were burnt when a fire
Colonel R. T, Mitcheliu, Commis- occurred at Grazettes Plantation,
sioner of Police, gave a Concert St. Michael on Thursday, They
of appropriate music, The ma- are the property of the Barbados
jority of the visitors crowded Co-operative Bank Ltd, and were
around the Band. insured,

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Creation of a Post of Executive Officer to a
Secondary Industries Board

The Government of Antigua is considering the creation of a post
of Executive Oflicer to a Secondary Industries Board which is shortly
to be established. The duties of the Executive Officer will include
supervision of a Cotton Ginnery, a cornmeal factory, an arrowroot
mill did’ 4 cannery. In addition the Officer will be required to advise
the Board on the technical aspects of any further secondary industries
Which may be introduced in the Presidency,

These industries will be on a small scale and it is not expected
that the Executive Officer should be an expert in all of them. He
should be a practical man with a knowledge of electricity and machin-
ery, With ability to control and train staff, and with sufficient know-
ledge of simple accounting. to be able to take managerial charge in
the initial stages of any industry which may be established, He should
be willing to turn his hand to anything and to have a pioneering
spirit.

The appointment would be for three years, with provision for
six months leave at the end of that period. It would not be pension-
able. It would carry a salary of not more than £900 per annm, and
a transport allowance.

It is anticipated that the post will be created by the middle of

__ 1952; and, if it is finally decided to make this appointment, the selected
st @andidate will be required to assume duty in July, 1952,.

in In the meantime, persons desirous of being considered for the
aS post (if created) are invited to submit applications to the Administra-
3@ tor of Antigua stating age, education, and a full record of past experi-

*fence and present employment. ‘Testimonials need not be forwarded
rd at this stage.

* | Administrator’s Office,







ie St. John’s,

; s Antigua. 11.4.52—3n.
. i

4 WAR DAMAGE TO BRITISH PROPERTY IN FRANCE

Ne Announcements in the Board of Trade Journal on February ist,
, + 1947 and June 7th, 1947, gave cdotails of arrangements between H.M.

Government and the French Government relating to compensation in
respect of war damage to British property in France, and notified the
final date for the regisiretion of claims as December Bist, 1947.

An extension 6f the final date for the submission of claims to July
7th, 1952, has now been granted under Article 87 of Law No. 52—5 of
January 3rd, 1952, to those British subjects, Corporations and Associa-
tions whose elaims were, or would have been, rejected because they
were submitted after December 3ist, 1947,

Tt should, however, be noted that this law does not permit the re-
consideration of claims which have been finally rejected for any
other reason.

Claims must be made to the French War Damage authorities direct
and should be in the French language. HLM. Government can accept
no responsibility for the actual filing and prosecution of claims.

24.5,52.—2n.

_——$—
VAUANT POST OF SENIOR HEALTH NURSE, DEPARTMENT
: OF MEDICAL SERVICES

Applications are invited for the pensionable post of Senior Health
Nursé, Department of Medical Services.

Salary will be on the scale of $1,200 x 72 -~ $1,440 per annum.
In addition, a temporary non-pensionable cost of living allowance
will be payable in accordance with approved rates.

Uniform is provided.

The appoiniment will be on two years’ probation and subjeet to
the selected appiicant being passed as medically fit for employment
in the Public Service.

The successful applicant will be posted to the Health Centre,
Speightstown, in the first instance where furnished quarters are pro-
vided and will be subject to transfer to any Public Health area in the
Colony. ose adh

Applicants must be registered nurses and midwives and hold the
Certificate of the Royal Sanitary Institute for Health Visitors and
School Nurses.

Applicants should present in writing a full curriculum vitae to
inelude age, educational qualifications and experience.

‘Applications should be addressed to the Colonial Secretary, Pub-
lie Buildings, Bridgetown to reach his office not later than 31st May,
1962.

24.6,52.02h.

T*

_

St. Michael.









THE

PEASANTS’



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

NOTICE





LOAN BANK

ACT, 1936

To the Creditors holding Liens against the Peasant Holdings

Dated this 24th day of May, 1952.



Names
|



Arthur, Thomas ..
Brathwaite. Ernest
Bridgeman, Alfred
Callender, Aleatha
Challenor, Susan
Chapman, Eunice
Clarke, Constanza rt
Cox, Arthur W. .. . 9
Est. Criehlow, Frederick Dec.
per Goodridge, Preston re
Drakes, Darnley & Helena
Dunnah, Charies A, .. "
Ellis, David N, per Bilis, Mary
Gittens, Rhoda .. “6 oy
Griffith, Wendel

Hackett, Henry N. y
Holloway, Dezmora B. ..
Hoyte, John R. ..

Johnson, Inez et alia

Jordan, Benjamin

Kennedy, Maud H.

King, Josiah
Lashley, William ..

Marshall, Edith ..

Maynard, Stella ..

Medford, . Lavinia

Moseley, Keturah

Niles, Eglon oo 2 us
Est. Norris, George Dec. per
Norris, Mary As os
Phillips, Alphonza A.
Rawlins, Charles H.

|

Sealy, Itvine G, .. os oe
Skeete, William C.
Smith, Lilian xe se ae
Stuart, Dorothy & Eudora
Stuart, James y's ss ge
Thompson, J hus & Horatio
Walcott, Julia T. oa ““
Wallace, Seibert .. ‘ ea
Weekes.

Weegee, Clifford T. per
Wiltshire, Drusilla

St. James,
Baird, Leslie
Best, Arthur
Blackman, James per Agard,

Alva _,, is ae +
Burnett, Lionel ., ys oe
Crick, James M, ny 6h
Est, Doughlin, Joseph N, Dec.
per Doughlin, Blmin

Drakes, Samuel .. ie
Estwick, Benjamin R, . .

. Farley, Minthy A. “3 ai
Fletcher, Albertha per Skeete,

Me en o* be as
Pittense, Albertha per Skeete,

See et ate i

on Walter M.

Finds, Alfred per Hinds,
arlotta oe

Husbands, Clarence At ee
ohnson, Matthew mM ov

Jordan, Samuel per Jordan
Miller, | et alin. h
and Licorish, #,

Wr a

Est Thillips, Norman Dec,’ pet
illips, Albertine & Eustace .,

Sandiford, Ivan & St, Clair .,

Springer, Walter & Kathleen ..

Thomas, Sarah .. a: ve

Skeete, Dauphiness a4 a>

St.. Peter.
Bend, James
Bend, Nathaniel

; a eee
Rock, Matta ~—_ a 46

wyn, .
Skeete, Simeon

Austin, Kenneth M.
Austin, Lionel A.

Babb, Adolphus .. ee
Babb, Elvira & Ronald ..
Bellamy, Mortimer G. ..
Boyce, William B. G. ..
Brome, Adinah .. os
Broome, Carlisle S. '
Brome, Charles .. va
Brome, Edgeton .. ‘ 5
Brome, Haldane H. 45 ée
Chandler, Frederick William
Collymore, Sydney td
Collymore, William H, ..
Collymore, William H. ..
Colthrust, James A,

Corb:

Cumberbatch, Williarn C.
Forde, Felix O, .. .
Gibbons, Charles . s6 ¥
Goodridge, Henry & Maud
Grant, Grant, Ruth .. be
Grea

oe
“e
oe
at

oe

* oe
Elson. i+
Gritith.” Adolphus

Howell, Evelyn C.
McGeary, Seon I, .

Leslie, Mildred & Theresa
Moore, Frederick .. ‘
Roach, Gibeon A,
Skeete, Edmund ..
Skeete, Garfield .. vs
Skeete, Oliver Dec
Skinner, Joseph A.
Slocombe, Norman
Springer, Christopher
Yearwood, Cyril ..
Yearwood, Darnley es

St. Andrew.
Alleyne, Philip
Alleyne, Stanley oe .
Est. Belgrave, Fred A. Dec., per
Belsrave, Joseph & Rose
Benjamin, Adrianna
Best, Edwin A. .. oe
Campbell, Theophilus ..
Carrington,

Clarke, Charles M.
Cumberbatch, Cl
Doughlin, Jonathan.
Foster, Harold .,
Foster, Joseph E.
Foster, Nathaniel
Francis, Albert William
Goodridge, Theophilus ..
Hunte, Archibald o
Hurst, Franklyn DeC, ..
Tfll, Aaron vs +
Jordan, Leslie i =
Kellman, Elijah MeD. ..
Keilman, Ethel ..
Leacock, Elizabeth
Moore, Fitz 3
Murtay, Joseph .. +4
Marshall, Cecil H. vs “6
Medford, Richard F... ee
Moaze, William H. wt as
Mortis, Joseph N. : i
Payne, Lowise ue es ee
Roach, Leon DaCosta oi
Roachford, Ezra .. 38 ee
Roachford, Rosalie and Adolphus
Sandiford, William :
Springer, Joseph N

oe
*
“*
oe -
-
o*
oe.
oe

oe
ey
”
“e
oe or
oe
*
oe
oe
ad
oe

oe.
ee
ay
oe.

-
“
*

Welch, Egerton St, Cc. |. .

Worrell, James E. 4 4%

Yearwood, Evelyn H. .. v7
St. Lucey.

Armstrong, Olga . . a oe

wel >



KE NOTICE that the peasant owners mentioned in the First Column of the Table
hereto annexed are about to obtain under the provisions of the above Act the —
of money respectively set out in the Second Column of the Table opposite the names 0?
such peasant owners by way of loan against the

asant holdings respectively, mention-
ed and described in the Third Column of that Ta

1 site such names.
Ble OPP OSI OA. HAYNES,

Manager, Peasants’ Loan Bank.
APPLICATIONS FOR LOANS. PEASANTS’ LOAN BANK. 22 MAY
en rrr"rvlerhnswOéOlrOwmr— oer

AMOUNT
granted Loeality
% ¢.
144.00 Cave Hill
250.00 ” ”
126.00 claggat. dali
36.00 rs we
54.00 Codrington: Hill
30.00 Rouen Village
54.00 Haggatt Hal
35.00 ” »
100.00 Clevedale
60.00 mock Dundo
15.00 claggatt Hali
100.00 Jacksons
90 00 Haggatt Hall
36.00 downersal Purning
25.00 Nr, Codrington Hil!
35.00 Whitehall
30.00 Rural Cot
360.00 Nr, Buxton School
50.00 Bush Hall
100.00 Whitehall
72.00 Salters
36.00 daggatt Hall
90.00 mane Hill
72.00 B ae
100.00 Whiteha
144.00 Haggatt . Hall
2000 » ”
54.00 a ;
40.00 St. Stephen’s Hill
150.00 Salters
36.00 Mt, Friendship
144.00 3ush Hall
40.00 faggatt Hall
50.00 Jac
60.00 {j|Bush Hall
150.00 Flint Hall
36.00 Friendship
20.00 Jackmans
100.00 Haggatt Hall
25.0 des,
~*~ } Garden
740.00 | Weston
54.00 Rock Dundo
98.00 Carlton
240.00 Weston
: Orange Hill
37.80 Fitts Village
50.00 Porters
174.00 Orange Hill
36.00 Weston
Mt. Standfasi
36.00
45.00 | Setlton ais
36.00 Yr. The Risk
126.00 Mt. Standfasi
»
oe'f Holders’s Hill
Carlton
19-0 Weston
B33 ”
Mt. Standfast
a Carlton
100.00 | Prospect
| nm
33-00 Mt. Standfast
‘y
> 72.00 Ashton Hall
72.00 Ashton Hall
72,00 Ashton Hall
20,00 Mile & Qr;
36.00 The Whim
30.00 The Whim
140.00 Ashton Hall}
65.00 Ashton Hall
70.00 Ashton Hall
100,00 The Whim
75.00 Ashton Hall
54.00 Archers
150.00 Josey Hill
50.00 Pie Corner
36.00 Crab Hill
120.00 Crab Hill
80.00 Alexandria
25.00 Chance Hall
90.00 Chance Hall
72.00 Josey Hill
25.00 Crab Hill
72.00 Nr, Spring Garden
72.00 Harrisons
100.00 Checker Hall
116.00 Pie Corner
200.00 Northumberland
144.00 Wellfiela
1 Chance Hall
Chance Hall
‘ Harrisons

eessssessessssse

sisesusssees®

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2

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eccoc

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QLD

Se
sss

Seeeeeese ey

— —
a
co

5

SasShsssesessuksasseuszesees eg:
Sesssssssssessssssessssssesescces ss

aeusasee

Half Moon Fort
Nr, Retreat & Wakeham
Petersys

Crab Hill
Salmonds

Pie Corner

Nr, Lowland
Checker Hall
Babbs

Sea View
Checker Halil
Nr. Lowland
Checker Hail
Checker Hall
Durham & Dooley
Checker Hall
Crab Hill
araveyard
Checker Hall
Northumberland

Belleplaine
St. Simons

.
St. Simons
Rock Hall
Rock Hall
Belleplaine
Cane Garden
Mount All
Walkers
Walkers
Mount All
ue wae Whitehill
Rock Hall

Belleplaine
Cane Garden
Belleplaine
Hillaby
Mount All
Mount All
Chalky Mount
Mount All

Rock Hall
ane Garden
alkers
plaine
by

" ”
ee ee



j

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——



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P.














NAMES 'Amount granted

aa cellieeial
St Andrew—(Continued) . & _
Stephenson, Charles B. .. be
Thompson, Oscar ; 180.00
Thompson, Oscar 36.00
Vaughan, Benjamin 350.00
Worrell, Seibert. 36.00

orre i a

Yearwood, Joseph N. 75.00

St.. Joseph.
Alleyne, Alma B. 0.0
Brewster, Clement 20. 00
Bryan, Bonny Eyre 36.00
Forde, Joseph N. .. 54 “00
Headley, Easton A. 50. 00
Holder, Aubrey N. 80.00
Horton, Edna L. C. Soe
Mayers, James N. 5508
Taitt, Caspar
St. John.

Alleyne, Lilian C, mee
Barnett, Evelyn E. 25.00
Belgrave, Edith .. 36.00
Blades, Dorcas .. ie 36.00
Browne, Edmund Lisle .. 36.00
Browne, Hermione 154.00
Clarke, Egbert D. 7200
Codrington, Edith 8 .* Sad
Est, Codrington, Egerton Dec.|| m=. « 36.00
per Codrington, Eunice .. we .
Downes, Joseph per Downes, 30.00

Dalton .. es es Be 100/00
Forde, Elson W. .. i e °
a net, Emmanuel Dec, per 50.00

reen, Kate .. os es .
Est. Green, Fitzherbert Dec. per 36.00
. Green, Grace... olf % 5°80
Haynes, Henry W. ibs ee 100.00
Shepherd, Fitz G.L._ .. is .
Shorey, Sarah and Codrington 25.00

John i. “* 2é ee :
Thorne. Clement per Codring- 144.00

ton, E. .. ak % a 144.00
Walrond, St, Clair 50.00
Walrond, Agnes .. ;

St. Philip. .

Alleyne, Bruce E. and Evans O. At
Alleyne, Melvin W ; ve 30. 00
Batson, Lavinia .. 80.00
Bayne, Robert F. . - 60. 00
Beckles, Joseph J. ‘¢ a8 00
Brathwaite, Carol W. .. 20.00
Brathwaite, Chesterfield 40:00
Brathwaite, Edric a o* .
Est. Brathwaite, Julian Dec. per

Brathwaite, Theophilus and én 00

Ethnia .. eg 44 ’ sree
Callender, Eva E. e os
Clarke, James N. .. e ath oats
Codrington, Millicent A. is ‘
Daniel, Fitzherbert ‘is Gi ee
Deane, Dorothy et alia i a
Edgehill, Edward B. .. é 3a
Ellis, George A. s 12500
Forde, Clarence C. v6 vs :
Gooding, Ethel oe . aS
Gooding, Ethel ‘s r as
Greenidge, Eva W. ine es
Greenidge, Lionel E. ve 00
Greenidge, Matilda ee 60.00
Harewood, Walter L. in 40.00
Holder, Warwick : 72.00
Hunte, Donald DaC. ye 100,00
Hunte, James A. a4 70.00
Hutchinson, Leon oe oe 100.00
Jones, William C, DaC, s 100.00
Jones, Ethelbert L. na ‘ 36.00.
Jones, Julian L, ee ee 36.00
Est. Kirton, Emma Dee, per

Pilgrim, Elliott + 54.00
Lord, Lillian B, 6 ‘ 160.00
Lord, Louise... a 50.00
Marshall, Beresford G. fs 36.00
Marshall, Beresford G. ° 36.00
Mason, James .. i *. 150.00
McCarthy, Arthur B. .. . 60.00
Newton, Ernestine A. . 60.00
Payne, Monington D. . 70.00
Roach, Winifred oe ° 125.00
Sargeant, Drusilla “ ‘ 36.00
Sealy, omas R. o 36.00
Stuart, Joseph .. ee a 72.00
Walcott, John E. is 600.00
Wiltshire, Harman A. 576.00
Ward, Louis ; 140.00
Est, Wynfield, Athalia Dec. pet

Bushell, Dodson “ a; 50.00

Christ Church
Adams, Theodore «9 . 80.00
Barrett, Fitzherbert va 200.00
Barrow, Charles R. 200.00
Batson, John H, na oe 70.00
Best, Amanda J. per Morris,

Francis 6 an “ 36.00
Bispham, Miriam 100.00
Bullen, Lucille I. 100.00
Carter, Ernest P. A. 90.00
Clarke, Samuel is mr 60.00
Drayton, Joseph ae Vs 72.00
Edwards, Cecil J. Vy ‘ 36.00
Eversley, James N. 54.00
Evelyn, Julian St. C. .. ‘ 216.00
Flatts, Lottie M. os 40.00
Gittens, Reuben oe 20.00
Goodridge, Christina is 20.00
Graham, Samuel it 8 36.00
Grannum, C. Hugh G. .. wt 480.00
Greene, Lewin C. ‘5b 4 75.00
Ifill, Simeon B, ve 35.00
Jones, Dudley K. oe 36.00
Kinch, Hezekiah sa 20.00
King, Enid ve 126.00
King, J. Adelbert vs 54.00
Kirton, Clara B. ie vi 100.00
Knight, Fitz Clarence .. Ks 30.00
Layne, G. Kathleen ; a 72.00
Layne, May E. ve oe 82.00
Legall, Alexander : pa 72.00
Lovell, A. we es 94.00
Maloney, Egbert W. ‘ aa 288.00
Nurse, Benjamin .. is 50.00
Nurse, Samuel A, oe or 200.00
Pitt, Louisa +s es a 36.00
Powlett, Robert J. £5 ss 50.00
Rose, Leitha per Rose, Jonathan 50.00
Ryan, Charles A, .. ie bu 30.00
Small, Gaston S. .. fs 180.00
Taylor, Marie .. ee ~ 20.00
Walcott, Edward .. 4 . 240.00
Weekes, Ernest W. i : 100.00
Walcott, Felix .. oe oe 75.00
Wiltshire, St. Clair ‘ “é 64.00
Taylor, George H. és “ 150.00

St. George.
Belle, George F. A. & Deuel_ .. 40.00
Birkett, Joseph A, “a oe 100.00
Corbin, Cecil A. .. os es 30.00
Gittens, Allan... o o 72.00
Harding, James E, a es 42.00
Holmes, Irene... ae at 36.00
Inniss, Charles B. & Violet 25.00
Miller, Benjamin . . oe 72.00
Sargeant, Arthur .. ce es 84.00
Scott, Charles C. .. a6 ee 36.00
Selman, Cecilia F. oi a io
Trotman, George E. .. 36.
St. Thomas. e''

Banfield, Martha .. ee . 100.00
Bispham, Aberdeen H. .. ee 50.00
Brathwaite, James A, ‘ os 60.00
Bruce, Wilhelmina es pe 70.00
Christie, Ernest .. or ~ 50.00
Clinton, Joseph N. oe as 100.00
Collins, Cyril M, .. és oe 60.00
Cox, Estelle os a) we 180.00
Dorunt, Prince A. 7 ee 36.00
Durant Allan F. per Durant,

Mabel .. i a ‘a 75.00
Earle, Beryl & Grimes, Cynthia 36.00
Edey, Elijiah ae ee o 50.00
Forde, Cornelius .. eo os 120.00
Gibbs, Rosa ee * a 86.00
Gibson, Clarence McD. .. 20.00
Jemmott, Ethelbert MeL. 75.00
Jordan, Mary R. .. bk pa 72.00
Lavine, Joseph .. 6. oa, 40.00
Luke, Lilian E. M. atts 50.00
Odle, Kenrick R. .. 50.00
Payne, Rose oe a 27.00
Prescod, Croydon F. B. .. 36.00
Reece, Adina = ys 36.00
Seale, James A. McD. .. 288.00
Watson, Stephen McD. .. ae 30.00
Est. Wiikinson, Edward E. Dec. |

per Wilkinson, Florence E. | 36.00

26,424.00

SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1952

Locality , a RB FP
|
————
| dl |
j j 2 00
| St. Simons ae
Rock Hall 2 00
Walkers 2 00
Belleplaine 0 0
” 2
Lakes
Mount All ..%
4.
Sugar Hill
St. Sylvans 1 2 00
Sugar Hill ;
Venture 2 1 8
Cleaver’s Hill 3 20
” »
Braggs Hill ae
” ” P
enture 2
— a bourne & Ch. Grove ie ee
sealy Hall a
Venture 03
Sealy Hall 2:
Spooners 2 0 B
Stewart’s Hill 1 0 02
Cliff Cot 2. 0
'
1
Carters 2
Sealy Hall 1 2 12
Massiah Street 2
Sealy Hall : $8
Carters 1 03
Nr, Glenbourhie os 3
Sealy Hall | 1 2 #37
Stewart's Hill 2 0 18
Nr, Bath & Welches 24°82
Sealy Hall 3 00
|
Nr. Apple Hall $2.
Eastbourne 2 0 3
Merricks 4 $ 3
Diamond Valley 1 ”
Six Roads 1 3 1
Nr. Bay & Bequest 2 00
Diamond Valley 2 3
Eastbourne 2
Kirtons j 1 29
Diamond Valley 0 00
oo a 2” 35°
uy
Kirtons 1 0 00
Bayfield 2 ee
Industry Hall ... 37.
Spring Farm s }.
Kirtons 2 2 0
East Point i 2
Pitchers 1 0 00
Airy Hill oe a
Diamond Valley 1 0 00
Pounders 2; 0
Eastbourne p ee ee
Nr. Hopeland 1 O 00
East Point 7 #O 04
Merricks 1 0 00
Kirtons a. 6.
Merricks is. 8
Diamond Valley 2 00
Eastbourne 2 04
Diamond Valley 3 00
Kirtons 4°0 28
Pounders 1 2 oh
Nr. Stone Hall 2
Nr. Bequest 2 00
East Point 6 0 00
Marchfield 1 0 0
Marley Vale 1 1 @
Nr. Palmers 1 1 00
Little Hope 2 0 00
Eastbourne 1 3 o9
Piet 1
Marchfiela 10 0 00
Nr. Palmers 8 0 00
East Point 2 2 oO
Diamond Valley 3 28
Vauxhall i 04
Maxwell 3 3 00
Pilgrim & i @
Clapham 3 32
Rnterprise | - ; b+
Chancery Lane
Fair View & Lead Vale 2 2 06
Kendal Hill 1 2 oO
Charnocks 2 2 o2
Clapham 2 1 = 10
Bartletts 2 03
Wilcox 3 il
Enterprise 8 0 08
Pegwell 2 oo
Hopewell 3 00
Lodge Road 2 00,
Bartletts 1 39
Pilgrim 2 1 OB
L
Nre’ Warners 1 Oo 00
Clapham 8 O21
Below Rock 3s 37
Enterprise £058 ae
Nr. Goodland 3 00
Chancery Lane & Hopewell 8. ae
ileox 2 3 34
Charnocks 1 0 04
Nr. Ryecroft 1 O 26
Sayes Court . 1 0 038
Enterprise 1 #1 #12
Chancery Lane 4 0 0
Charnocks ; Qo #17
Bournes 10 3 00
Bournes 2 8
Maxwell Hill ; 1 9
Ventnor g 24
Maxwell Hill 1 10
Nr. Ealing Grove 3 2 29
Gall Hill 1 09
Charnocks § : 22
Edey’s Village 3
Sargeant’s Village 2 3
Sargeant’s Village 3 00
Chancery Lane 22 i
Rock Hall 3 #19
Walker's Valley 2 04
Workman’s 8 27
| Haggatt Hall ; 2.0 7
| Greens : 26
Walker’s Valley 01
| Dash Valley 1 2 00
| Rock Hall 1 0 0
Sweet Bottom 1 8 32
| Ellerton 03
| Cole Hole | 1 0 00
Middleton 1 39
|
|
Rock Hall 1 2 382
Jacksons 1 0 00
Welchman Hall sa
Shop Hill & —Grand View i 00
Christie’s Village 3 11
Welchman Hall 4 2 26
Rock Hall . 3 22
Welchman Hall ~ 2 2 o9
‘Grand View 2 00
Welchman Hall 1 0 09
Rock Hall 2 oo
Spring Farm x i. 00
Welchman Hall 1:2: eh
Welchman Hall oe =.
Kew Land . 1 38
Welchman Hall 1 0 10
in Hall 2
elehman Hall . 8. =
Bridgeteld 5 3
e) Jacksons 7. ae
Rock Hall 1 20
Rock Hall 2 14
Rock Hall | 2 00
Welchman Hall ; 4 0 21
Welchman Hall 3 18
cael
Welchman Hall 2 00

@ On page 7.
SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1952
.



From page 6.

(a a en



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF APPLI CATIONS. PEASANTS’ LOAN BANK

ee
















AMES

Beraid

tus os as
manor & Elizabeth..

ph G.

Bnaries PB. and
moy ..
E.

Charles H. Dec per |
Sward ve on

Samuel
mH, Donald N. 4
kinson, Prince Dec per
, Rosetta & Earl
pJoseph B.








James A C4 4
Vernon O, & Williams,
a dy wy
James



APPLICATIONS








































Amount ~. k
sranted A. . P.
ae Locality
—
} $.: | Bus
60.00 Jacksons } oe a
144.00 | » } i 3 3
|
72.00 Orange Hill Se ee
60.00 Nr. Appleby "2° @
te
~~ 48.00 Ashton Hall 2/31
; |
225.00 |Harrisons & Checker Hall a 46.
50.00 Nr. Wakenham 2 °3s
30.00 Josey Hill 2i--s
94.00 Rock Hall ee ee
i]
36.00 Six Roads e438
50.00 | Kirtons 1 0 00
40.00 |Nr. Bequest & Long Bay | 3 00
4) }
40.00 | Eastbourne 2 31
36.00 Marchfield 2 00
36.00 , | Dash Valley s 2 00
54.00 | Arthur Seat 3 06
Lip
36.00 Grand View 2 05
40.00 |Shop Hill 2 19
1,062.00 }





: ‘ : | Amount Amount
NAMES ' Locality Ac RP. Granted Previously
Granted
4 ucy $. c. $. ¢
Â¥ perbatch, William Harrisons 3 30 166.00 50.00
3 =
St. Andrew
m Franklyn DeC. Walkers 1 0 00 250.00 72.00
| Roachford, Ezra . Walkers 1 0 v0 280.00 72.00
Thompson, Oscar Rock Hall $ 387 200.00 | 72.00
ae
St. Philip
Clarke, McDonald .. | Marchfield 1: #80 680.00 —
5 Crawford, Samuel ; .. | Kirtons 1.8: 300.00 50.00
- ' Wiltshire, Halam A, tw .. | Nr, Palmers 8 0 00 2,400.00 576.00
“Christ Church rs
2 Graham, Samuel .. | Bartletts 2 05 52.00 36.00
ard, Deleina Maxwell Hill 2 10 140.00 ie
i George
#Inniss, DeLacey Dash Valley 2 00 50.00 36.00
PNeblett, Alfred Dash Valley 1 2 00 200.00 a
4,718.00
APPLICATIONS FOR LOANS. PEASANTS’ LOAN BANK. “C”
Industry Hall | 8 2 26 1,200.00 —_
rist Church |
unum, C. Hugh G. Maxwell 9 0 Ov 570.00 -—




: APPLICATIONS FOR LOANS. PEASANTS’
































































|





1,770.00





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

_ Instructions
On Import
_ Licences

Instructions regarding the issue
of licences for imports from non-}
| sterling sources other than the
| United States of America and
Canada were issued to local im-
porters by the Control Office this
week,

According to those instructions, |
licences submitted to cover out-
standing orders on which goods
| have arrived in the colony should
be endorsed Outstanding Order.
Goods arrived invoices should be
presented so that the goods may
be written off when the licences
are issued, and goods on such
licences must be paid for by the
30th of June, 1952,

Licences submitted to cover
gcods ordered prior to the 13th
March but for which goods have
not arrived should be marked

Outstanding Order and the value
of such licences will be charged
to the Quota for “Outstanding
Orders” and marked not to arrive
before the second half of 1952.

Licences submitted to cover
new orders being placed should
also be endorsed “New Order’ and
the value will be charged to the
Quota for the second half of 1952.
Licences for outstanding orders
arriving in the second half of
1952 which exceed 50% of the
total value of outstanding orders
as returned to the Control Office
will be charged to the Quota for
half of 1952.

Licences to cover outstanding
orders not to arrive before the
second half of 1952 and licences
for new orders must be accom-
panied by copies of orders and
both orders and licences must have
the statement “The value of this
order or licence must under no
circumstance be exceeded.

It was also pointed out that as
from the 21st of May it would be
necessary to have all licences
issued written off at the Control
Office before presentation to the
Post Office or Customs for goods
to be duty paid.

Iran Violated
Soviet Treaty

—RUSSIA

TEHERAN, May 23

High Iranian government offic-
ials denied Soviet charges that
Iran has handed over control of
its army to the United States and
is violating the 1921 Soviet-Iranian
Treaty by accepting United States
military aid.

The charges were contained in
a note handed to the Iranian Am-
bassador in Moscow by Soviet
Foreign Minister Andrei Vyshin-
sky yesterday. The text of the
note was broadcast by Radio Mos-



the second













9:
LOAN BANK. “D” cow and published. in the Soviet
a Government’s newspaper Izves-
a ce ae a a tia to-day.
St. Michael The Soviet reference to the 1921
Birkett, Theodore Jacksons .. tos 200.00 _ Treaty caused some concern here.
4 Gittens, Rhoda Haggatt Hall 1 1 05 240.00 90.00 |The Treaty gave the Soviet Union
Griffith, Wendall Nr. Hothersal 2 00 100.00 36.00 -/the right to move troops into Iran
Headley, Alonza F. .. | Deacons Road } 3 30 300.00 os if foreign forces hostile to Russia
Jordan, Benjamin rd .. | Bank Hall 0 34 150.00 50.00 {entered Iranian territory.
| Kennedy, Maude H. White Hall 2 0 08 200.00 100.00 However an Iran government
© Lashley, William . os .. | Haggatt Hall 2 03 120.00 36.00 | spokesman said the Treaty stipu-
â„¢ Moseley, Keturah . | Haggatt Hall 2 0 06 200.00 144.00 /lated primarily that Iran would
7 Murray, Joseph & S. .. ’. | Green Hill 3 02 100.00 — |not support Czarist aggressive
© Smith, Lilian eng .. | Haggatt Hall | 1 0 04 100,00 40.00 /aims against the then new Soviet
Walcott, Julian T. ss "| | Friendship | 2 02 15.00 36.00 | Republic or permit its territory to
© Wallace, Seibert . 3 :, | Jackmans | 3 30 100.00 20.00 | be used for Czarist attacks on the
| Wiltshire, Druscilla \; Haggatt Hall 2 OL 15.00 25.00 | Republic. He denied that Iran’s
aie : tary advisers at this time contra- | $
Rear gg edie . | Garden 8 2 19 240.00 260.00 | vened the Treaty. Moreover, he|
F Bishop, Aubrey |. 2... | Westmoreland 2 10 80.00 — |said United States military ‘ad-|%
senate Lionet *" | Gariton | 1 4-12 150.00 95.00 | visers stationed in Iran comprised | %
Est Doughlin i Dec ner Dough- .Jonly a small corps and had no %
Elin, Eimin . s Orange Hill 2 13 30.00 36.00 |authority over the army or gen- |
ae Anse stus |. £ 2, Orange Hill 1 3 08 55.00 72.00 |darmerie. He said they serve only |
Barle: ann aa” Orange Hill 21 31 300.00 174.00 | in an advisory capacity. $
es ee int ny A. ws ttl eestor Oo 32 150.00 72.00 He also denied the Soviet charge |
ANTES WO yl nn 2 00 120.00 — |that Iran by accepting U.S. aid, | %
as ckham, Fitz Gerald ., “% ea Vie was co-operating with the United y
= ' States government in the imple-
ar eter sa : 2 21 60.00 | 36.00 |mentation of aggressive plans
a ris, Lilian —_.. ns ++ |The Whim 1 2 33 175.00 100.00 | against the Soviet Union,
Prrell, James E. ++ ++ |The Whim B “|| Russia seized upon last month’s | ¢
ae | . resumption of United States mil-
eeucy ; _. | itary aid to Iran as an excuse to
ant, Frederick .. Salmonds : : * go od 60.00 |ring charges of aggressive aims
ant, GEcres Crab Hill 1 0 22 150.00 80.00 |and Treaty violations against Iran,
Evelyn C, Sweet Field 2 25 50.00 50.00 —UP.
s, Leroy ¥ Nr. Wakenham 2 1 16 100.60 oe
iohnson, Ada L. .. i o a r és .
Mpkeete, Oliver DeC, Durham & Dooley 8 : = 400.00 Te Inter-Club Debate
earwood, Darnley Northumberland ; =O nip tition
' ‘ ' r| 10 ie
? -
.
Doughlin, Jonathan .. | Walkers 1 0 06 ie 72.00 The Second Round fixtures of x
Foster, Nathaniel -. |Rock Hall 1 0 00 ae 60.00 |the Inter-Club Debate competition .
Hunte, Archibald .+ |Belleplaine 1 0 10 100. 72.00 |sponsored by the Central Council | $
> Moore, Fitz ce oe «+ |Mount All | 1 3 00 100.00 80.00 {at the Old Scholars’ Association x
Roach, Leon DaC. .. |Cane Garden | 1 0 20 = 80.00 were completed last Thursday | %
Toney, Joseph Belleplaine | 1 0 00 120. —~ night, i ey %
at . P e motion “Tha e Fe a-|¢
St. Joseph sf ; tion of the British Caribbean] $
Alleyne, Alma B. Sugar Hill | 2 eae 100.00 40.00 | Territories is an urgent necessity” %
Brewster, Clement “a ee | 2 tb ooh be pode was ee aes peeuee x
Forde, Joseph N, .. s -. |Sugar Hi ’ - VU || proposers a ynch’s Secondary
: : School; St. John’s Cultural Club %
st. John also defeated St. James’ Brother-| »
Est. Codrington, F. si | hood, >
Dec. per Codrington E -. | Cliff Cot 2 00 40.00 36.00 In the other two instances, the |%
Shepherd, Fitz G. ee ++ |Nr. Glenburnie ; 1 3 03 150.00 126.00 ropemein ensued wy St. Augie
ne an ifton Hall, was defeat-
St. Philip : i ed by St. Martin’s and St. Jude’s %
Alleyne, John Wim, Merricks 1 0 04 100,00 — | respectively. >
Bannister, Allan & L. Eastbourne 2 00 100,00 bee! o of the debates took place
Brathwaite, Carol W. Nr. Bayleys & Bequest | 2 : = | es =e on Wednesday night os Ne ag es
Brathwaite, Edric .. | Eastbourne 2 | 40.00 ,! . two on Thursday night. e
Edgehill, Edward -B. - | Industry Hall oe ee 75.00 30.00 judges during the week were Mrs.
Forde, Clarence C. Kirtons 2 2 00 100.00 125.00 |Scott, Mr. Broome, Mr. Simmonds,
Holder, Warrick .. Nr. Hopeland 1 0 00 80.00 72.40 |Miss E. Bourne, Mr. C. Springer,
Hunte, James A. Merricks 1 0 00 715.00 | 70.00 jand Mr. Sainsbury; Mrs. C.
Jones, Ethelbert E. ‘* Diamond Valley 2 00 100.00 86.00 | Springer, Mr. Cameron Tudor, and
Jones, William DaC. .. Merricks 1 2 28 200.00 100.00 | Mr, E. C, Theobalds; Miss E. Mill-
Marshall, Donald N. . | Nr. Bequest 3 00 60.00 40.00 |ington, Mr. Aubrey Douglas-Smith
Mason, James -. es -. | Eastpoint 6 0 00 150.00 150.00 |and Mr. Douglas.
Proverbs, Cecilia et or ae a 2 20 40.00 Tr
Est. Wynfield, A, ec. per | = y be
Bushell, Dodson Diamond Valley 3 28 50.00 50.00 Western Union And >
oa 3 sal rf } ' : %
Christ Church ; | Ag ¢
f Clarke, oe oe po sg 1 : bo | 22 } se A.F.L. rée
Jones, Dudley . + Clapham ) 7 ‘ M : %
Legall, Alexander, ,- +» |Sayers Court 1 0 03 40:00 Mt ay cates Ow ale
Mayers, George D, “ +» |Nr. St. Patricks 2 0 .39 240.) == negotiators of the 5-19
Taylor, Marie «+ |Gall Hill 1 09 20.00 20.00 |tern Union Telegraph Company | %
BYIGF ss a dy rf e : and AFL Commercial Telegraph-
st, George he ers bee reached an “agreement
= . ‘ in in¢iple’” on a new contract
Corbin, Cecil A, .. a ++ | Workmans | 3 37 100.00 30.00 ad deowe toward a settlement of | $
Gittens, Allan” .. + ++ |Haggatt Hall 1 0 07 200.00 72-00 line seyen-week wirtice. ‘s
ee ae oe pe Greens 2 26 150.00 42.00 Federal mediator F Marvin| %
ea : " Sconyers said at 5.30 a.m. EST}
. Osford - +> |Haggatt, Hall 10 05 | 100.00 — that the final signing of the new|%
5 t, Arthur ' | Sweet Bottom 1 0 32 | 300.00 84.00 pact “could come ‘at any time”. 1%
mn, Rupert R., | Rock Hall 1 38 ly 80.00 | — |Negotiators have been in con-|%
| | \ |tinuous session since early last x
. Thomas | | | night. %
Bailey, Samuel J. |Kew Land 3 1 09 | 100,00 _ Sconyers said “There haven't|}
, Martha ** |Rock Hall 1 2 22 | 190.00 | 100.00 | been any snags but it is a pretty | @
Prince A - ; |Grand View 2 00 } 100,00 | 36.00 |complicated picture on wages and | %
Vernon Williams, ¥ Besa = 2 05 | 50.00 | 36.00 |hours. The language is pretty 1%
, May . - |Rock Hall 2 2 | 50.00 | — jtough to write.” The manage-|%
Cr 4 Lithes ” ee eae 100.00 | 36.00 |ment and union attorneys were | ”
| : eee neneees "5 |\going over the proposed new)¢*
| 8,689.00 ! contract item by item in the|%
fashionable Wardman Park Hotel |%
Gr Total $42,663.00 ; —U.P.



l asked
let
position”
accepted.

Delegate

date for

—_—

Talks Recessed
For Three Days

PANMUNJOM, May 23

United Nations truce delegations
three-day recess to
our
angrily

for a
Communists
and

“consider
the Reds
the

Despite break,

Major General William K. Har-
rison Set a firm “no nonsense” tone
in his first full day as Senior
He proposed the recess
after listening to another Commu-
nist propaganda blast. ‘ ; r
North Korean General Na 1 fight leading and jabbing with 9 ou ,

angrily slammed his pencil oe the straightest left he has yet 24 HL wie At School
table when Harrison proposed the Shown.
recess. Nam refused to suggest o

next meeting but ; é rdi
agreed when Harrison asked for the Italian only just managed to home, according to a
May 27,—U.P.

the

SPORTS
QUIZ

By SPORTS EDITOR

The Barbados Advocate
will award a book on sport
to the first person who sends
the correct answers to the
following questions,

1. CRICKET

What is the name of the
Barbados cricketer who, in
an Intercolonial fixture
with Trinidad, injured his
knee and was compelled by
the umpire to stand and
roll the ball underhand
down the pitch.

2. FOOTBALL

A team kicks off and by
clever combined play man-
ages to score without an
opponent playing the ball.
Should the referee award a
goal?

3. RACING

Name the Barbados own-
ed horse that won the
Trinidad Turf Club Cup at
the Christmas meeting 1927.
4. BOXING

From whom did Joe
Louis first win the world
heavyweight boxing cham-
pionship?

5. TABLE TENNIS

What is meant by the

term “Let” in table tennis?

NOTE: All entries for
“Sports Quiz” should be
addressed “Sports Quiz”,

c/o Advocate Sports Editor,
and must reach this office
by 12 noon on Saturday,
May 31. The correct
answers and the name of
the winner will be publish-
ed in the Sunday Advocate
of June 1,

Each entry must be
accompanied by A COUPON
as Set out below.

SPORTS

QUIZ





DRINK REAL BEER - HEINEKEN’S

9999999999999999009 290% —PLIOUO PTE
retention of United States mili- |% PSVV9OSS —POLSREPEESSSEOO SPSL LLLP PLP LPS

retiring
Senior Allied Delegate Vice-Ad- 2
miral G. Turner Joy. expressed *“ored
confidence that the talks eventu-
ally woyld bring
jand honcurable armistice.”

“an equitable





Em






St . . e
id y and right te.his jaw for a cou
Trin ad Night of eight aid he had no soone
: got to his feet’ that Pompey
At Albert Hall crowded in.on him and finished
him off with a heavy right.
Boxing Match In the chief supporting bout of
ve evening Ansell Adams, who
LONDON like Pompey comes from Trinidad,
It was Trinidad night in the Kocked out Jean Serres of Lux-

embourg in the third round. Like

boxing match in the Albert Hall, ;
fellow countryman, Adams

London, on May 13 when Yolande 5's

Pompey and Ansell Adams both put his opponent down twice be-
convincing victories. in fore the final knockout—a heavy

meir bouts. right to:the ribs.
Out of four “mixed bouts in

In three rounds Yolande Pom- the programme between coloured
pey, “Trinidad Tornado”, knocked und whité boxers only one white
out cruiserweight Guiliano. Pans boxer won.
cani of Italy in the most one
sided fight of the evening, It was
the main fight of the contest.

Pompey hardly exerted him-
self at all and he started the

—B.U.P.

Children Spend



In the second round he 3
dropped Pancani for a count of Toronto: Toronto children sit
nine with a vicious left hook and 28 hours a week watching TV at
report of
get to his feet in time. the City’s wemen teachers, The

In the third and last round children spend only 24 hours at
Pancani went down from a left school.





{A clear fresh skin is thé
foundation of beauty
Care for yours as I do,”",
says Ann Todd, “use Lux
\Woilet Soap regularly?”









Shiels



&
Care for yo

foundation of beauty!

MALTS 757-1459-00

epihetiatgiets





FOR THE OFFICE
AND
THE SCHOOL

ADVOCATE STATIONERY |

666Gb OOOS
PAPC PPAR AEE PPO PPPPPELLESP PP VPP SSS LOD

TABLE PENCIL SHARPENERS

LARGE OFFICE PENCIL SHARPENERS

STAPLING MACHINES
PERFORATORS
SPONGE BOWLS
STAMP DAMPERS
ROLLER BLOTTERS

WIRE STAPLES—Box of 5,000 for $1.32
CELLULOID CHEMISTRY STENCILS—

For School Children

BROAD STREET AND GHREYSTONE

4,4,4,4%4

ur skin as Ann Todd, lovely star of the J. Arthur Rank
Organisation, does—-use Lux Toilet Soap regularly. A daily faciat
with Lux Toilet Soap will give you a clear fresh skin — the
Cover your face generously with its rich,
+ creamy lather, and work it in thoroughly. Rinse first with warm,
» then with cold water, and pat gently dry. Your skin will take on ,
a new loveliness — the loveliness of the stars!

LUX 5
TOILET SOAP ae

The fragrant white soap of the film stars



PAGE SEVEN



4 Foreign Ministers.
i To Meet li Bonn



BONN, Germany, May+23.

The Big Three Foreign Minis-
ters come to Bonn on Friday to
offer West Germany the key place
in free Europe’s defences against
the menace of Soviet agression in
the first Foreign Ministers Con-
ference on German soil since
World War II

Diplomatic leaders of Britain,
United States, France and West
Germany are slated to sign a
peace contract binding 48,000,009
Germans west of the iron curtain
te the Atlantic community, politi-
cally and militarily,

Once signed tne Peace Pact
faces high hurdles of ratification
by four nations’ parliaments with
the major trouble expected in the
Bonn Assembly. Across the iron
curtain in East Germany commun-
ist leaders are warning of civil
war and making implied threats
to blockade Red surrounded Ber-
lin,—(CP),





ot

- ~
4 LEVER propuct

ess
PPP PPPOE APPS S

$

+

4 $6,666 656656606068
PPLE LPL LLL ELL PLL PAN
PAGE FICAT



CLASSIFIED ADS. Prmue Nonies

TELEPHONE 2508

| FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

heelter Car in good order—
per gallon. For further in-
Dial 4100 or 8133, 23.5.52.—%n.

IN MEMORIAM



























































BULBUMA; |
Yousuf M. Bulb t ‘ tex
fe ¢ 4
Tf i € i ‘ 1x ie
Hi € | t

Ever

childre’







CAR-—ford Prefect late 1950 model.
General condition good,



in















































16,000. Apply Withnall, Fi
Phone 3409 8.5.52—t.f.n.
F | CAR-—One 1936 Standard Car 16 h.p. in
| sood condition with 5 good tyres. Apply
- }to Mr. V. Gibson Prior Park Plantation,
~ St. James. Dial 2030 =
HOUSES | fain thon
BILTMORE—Fittz Village, St, James,| “cap reat tase Monae
On sen. Three Bedrooms, Dining and | ),,0 4% Ope IU Ford re oe ahe
Drawing rooms, Electricity, running water {9179 oy 9817 24.5.52—2n
in each room. Garage and servant's room. | © See oan .
Dial-0155 17.5.52—t£-n. | “CAR.One Vauxhall Car 25 hp. with
oe 7y 9s senda 5 4 tyres In excellent condition. Dial
BUNGALOW,—Maxweli's Coast, Christ | > go0e %) 2
Church, fully furnished house with four 4514, Grifitia, Roekiey. mee a
bedrooms. Good sea bathing. To an ap-
proved tenant for the month of June ELECTRICAL
Apply Mrs. J. H. Wilkinson, Phone 2404 -
24.5,52—3n.| BATTERIES Ediswan Batteries. 6
a rs Volt, 11, 13 and 15 plates; 12 Volt, 9,
FLAT & HOUSE—Fully furnished, St.]11 and 13 plates, Get our prices first.
Lawrence on-Sea Phone 3508 Dial 3878 and 4710, Da, Costa & Co. Ltd.
20.3.52—t.f.1 Electrical Dept. 16.5.52—én.
GLASSES-—For Dances and othe! ELECTRIC MOTORS—‘% h.p. 110/220
social funetions. Cheap rate per dozen. | volts, Single Phase. Dial 3878 or 4710.
3rd floor 53, Swan Strect 4 5.5%-\' | DA. COSTA & CO. LTD., Electrical
eee Dept. 16.5.52+6n.
WANTED EDISWAN BATTERY CHARGERS
‘ Will charge up to 18 six-volt Batteries
or thelr equivalent ot 6 Amps. Fort use
on 110 Volt Single Phase cireuit. Dial
HELP 2878 or 4710. DA, COBTA & CO. LTD.,
a oaenenscile becndanstnnpine-s Electrical Dept. 16.5.52—6n
HOUSE MAID ‘ nn tL
reliable references App!y Gard FRIGIDAIRE,—Westinghouse in good
House”, St. George on. 5,52—3n | working order Dial 4086, Elec-
_— trical 24.5.52—2n





RADIO-ELECTRICIAN for our Elec Te nel














trical Department. Apply in person. Wrr FLOOR POLISHERS, Used in conjum
arty (B'dos) Lid 22.5.02—t.f.1 tion with Johnson's Floor polishes will
keep your Floors looking new. Dial
MISCELLANEOUS 3878 or 4710, 16,5.52—6n.
———
” ee tc ae, GARRARD RECORD CHANGERS—
STAMPS. 100 lots. Barbados aii}, Speed. A few left Call‘early and
other WT. colonies. Cash, Sra floor 55.1 avoid disappointment P.C. S. Maffei
Swan St 5 Bin} ee Co. Tid 215.52-—-5n

“TM Vv. RADI >GRAMS ~ New Me

] _ ; ‘Tv . ; ‘
will speed Chen@ers and Record Cab-
ANNOL Ne IMEN s inet ol 2e78 or 4718, DA. COSTA &
Co, LTD, Kiectrical Dept.



: 16.5.52-6n.
ATTENTION LADIES ie
have fust revefved





We Fashic













































a RADIO,One 5 Tube Phillips in good
hooks for mid-summer, with over 250) woreing order, Apply Mrs, Mabel May-
Freneh stvies In each names like these pard, Mothersal Turning Octovia Ville,”
mean the latest tn Fashions, hurry anrdiey agenaei 24 in.
get your copies now as a

at RANDAL y + Thr
se VACUUM CLEANERS.-Three sizes to
Reed and Tutor Stroets select from, Keeps thaccessible corners
246.52 20 | clean, Dial 8878 OF 4710, DA, COSTA
“1& CO, LTD, Flectriesi Dept. agin
4 * 16,55 nm,
PERSONAL
ene iat dlaonenenetinllniashitaanssan MISCELLANEOUS
The public are hereby warned against, —————————-——~ a ve
giving credit to my wife, Winifred Oreta AGA-REX COMPOUND for Constipa-
Smith (née Wilkinson) as I do not hold] tion, a palatable creamy Emulsion of
myself responsible for her or anvore|liquid Paraffe. Price 3/- bot. Knight's
else contracting any debt or debts in my] Ltd 20.5.52—3n
name unless by a written order signed SS
by me BAROMETERS, Thermometers, and
(Sed.) FRED ALBERT SMITH Hygrometers, These instruments are
St. Paul Ave., Bay Land German made and only perfectly ad-
St. Michael, Barbados. | justed movements are used. K. R.
24.5.52--2n. | Hunte & Co., Ltd., Lower Broad St
—— ——— 22.5.52—3n
The. public are hereby warned against ihe ctilttinninnt utieatineeniieatinds. tabdintnatiingg he
giving cfedit to my wile, lanthe Gibbes DECCA RECORDS: Clearances, Three
inée Pierre) as I do not hold myself] for $2.00 The Trovellers Club, Brad-
responsible for her or anyone else con-} shaw Building, St, Michael's Row.
tracting any debt or debts in my name 22.56.52. fn,
unless by a written order signed by me ait til
(Sed.) LESLIE GIBBES, HOUSEHOLD EQUIPMENT of oll
Westbury Road, description. Owen T. Alider, 118 Roebuck
St. Michael. | Street. Dial 3299, 10.5.52-—t.f.n.
24.5,62-—2n.
me le nearer TRONERS—Oprim Industrial Lroners. A
The public are hereby warned against] complete Woner for Home or Laundry.
giving credit to my wife, Florence Dray-] pial 3878 or 4710. DA. COSTA & CO,
ton (née Sargeant) as Lo not hold my-| LTp., Electrical Dept.
self responsible for her or anyone else 16,5,52—6n.
contracting any debt or debits in my etl eats
name unless by a written order signed NEW STOCK OF BOOTS’ MINERAL
by me. .
(Sad) DOUGLAS DRAYTON, SAUTE shthos Weninerhena Limitady solic
Near Crane, ing Agents for Messrs, Boots i
Pt Whe Nottingham 20.5,52—5n
PIANO—BENTLEY In excellent con-
a these throbbing pains in dition Phone 8435 24.5.52—4n
seeds sae elpsmmthatieliniaheteanierigsteatcusniaisitittadetne
Subscribe now to the Datly Telegraph
Apply England's leading Daily Newspaper now
arriving in Barbados by Air only a few
days after publication in London. Con-
tact: San Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltd.
Local Representative, Tel, 3118.
| 17,4.52—t.f.n.
.
ed OST & FOUND
—_
LOST
You don’t rub in “Sloan's” you dab it

on the affected part gently“ Sloan's
does the rest! Good for (——
aches and pains and stiff RAY
joints too! =

LOOK FOR THE
PICTURE OF DR. SLOAN

BICYCLE—New Brand Humber, M—
5, missing from Four Square Garage,
Philip, on Tuesday, 20th, Finder re-

St
warded on returning to Prince ok Dia-
|






mond Valley, St, Philip, 245, a

Public Official Sale

(The Provost Marshal's Act 1901
(1004-6) 8 30).
On Friday the 6th day of June, 1952













at the hour of 2 o'clock In the afternoon
will be sold at my office to the highest
bidder for any sum not under the ap-
praised value all that certain piece of
land containing by admeasurement 2
Roods 41/10 Perches situate at London
Road, Brittons Hill in the
Michael,

10-DaY'S NEWS FLASH



parish of St.
butting and bounding on lands
now or late of Mrs, E. Clarke, now or
late of Josephine Me Clean, now or late
of William Davis and on London Road

ns ‘s ~ or however else the same may abut and
CELLOPHANE PAPER bound, together with the messuage or
" Dwelling House, Buildings, &c., apprais-

Has Arrived ed as follows:
To The whole property to Five Thousand







JOHNSON'S Plorende King for and towerds sailstee-
WE ARE “SEL LING OUT NB a5¢ Deposit to be paid on day
OUR STOCK OF eens T. T. HEADLEY,
WINDOW GLASS Tae a ona Marshal

A Bargain tor Builders 22nl May, 1952



24.5.52—n,

JOHNSON’S HARDWARE

FOR RENT

Valuable business premises on
Rickett Street above the Post
Office with back entrance on Mar-
hill Street. Frontage contains two
entrance doors and large show
window. Ideally suitable for any
class of business, especially a
Drug Store. In close proximity t>














SPANISH
LESSONS

Quick and Practical Course












with Specis 3 parking places and the ‘Bus
F ial Attention to Stands Also cool and spacious
Correct Pronunciation. offices upstairs over the premises
> ile referred to above. These offices
Pupils accepted singly or anc business premises will be
in groups. rented separately or together as

may be desired. Apply to:—



Mrs. PARMERTON
Tel. 8134

EVELYN, ROACH & Co., Ltd,
Rickett Street
24,5.52—t fn

ORIENTAL
PALACE

HEADQUARTERS FOR







YOUR HOME IS
YOUR EMPIRE

FURNISH




















LIKE A QUEEN SOUVENIKS
TOP VALUES—in Bureau re INDIA, CHINA &
counter-sunk, bowfront and fia CEYLON
tops. with 1 to 7 drawers wit
pedestals, or Cabiiole and othe

Smart | egs,

THANI'S

h Pound or othe:









Brilliant sin r Triple Mirrer

—Bedsteads, Wardrobes ests of >
Drawers, Mar t er her Pr. Wm. By. St. Dias si66
Washstand Night






TABLES,—Several size

hapes








woods, finishes, for Pini an‘ ¢.

eee uses eae ~ f Ching Bendix A { .
phe! « 2 der i

Liquor cases $5.50 up ann I u omatie

Ice Boxes, Enamelled Ware Drair







ers $3.00,



Washing Machines.

DRAWING ROOM FURNITURE





















~in Morri Canec othe —
styles
These Machmes are entirely
PIANOS.— Tvpewri Pra automatic, simply toad with
Trunk Clocks $3.12 ur clothes, set to Wash. 45 minutes
jater remove th lothes which
have been washed, rinsed three
times and damp dried
So simple, So [labour saving,
Get one from DA COSTA & CO
LTD Elect. Dept
SPRY STREET. DIAL 4069 16.5.52—6n



above
obtain a loan of £4,000 under the pre-































AIDS ACT. 105.

To the creditors holding gpectalty liens

against Maynards Plantation St. Peter
TAKE NOTICE that I, owner of the
named plantation. am about to



















The above property will be set up for

sale by Public Competition at our Office,
James Street, on Friday Gth Jane, at 2
p.m

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,

!
Solicitors. |

22.5.52-—8n

very desirable. Situ-



LAND,—' Acre,

ated at Shop Hill, Grandview, Main Rd.

St, Thomas. Apply Gilbert Millar, Fitts
Village, St. James, 24.5,52—1n.
. Umited number of OR-

in THE

Za. per share, Fret of stamp duty”

. per e. e stamp du

CARRINGTON & ALY
13,5.52—12n



SHOPS—Three shops situated at Eagle

Hall corner, Purchaser to remove same
within ten days from date of sale. Apply
e General Traders Ltd

23.5.52—-3n
THIS ATTRACTIVE HOME
An extremely well built, modern three





“WILTSHIRE PLANTATION” — and
dwellinghouse “WHITE HAVEN” situate

in St. Philip with about 202 acres of
land made up as follows: 102 acyes
arable, 7 acres tenantry, 22 acres in

sour grass, 71 acres in roads and woods
ete., also 4 fan mills, 1 motor truck, 1
bull, 2 cows, 1 horse, 2 donkeys and 1
donkey-cart. Together also with 1,870
shares in Three Houses Factory Limited
Inspection by appointment. Phone Mr
A. T. Skeete, “Bentley” 2535. The
above property will be set up to public
competition for sale to the highest
bidder beyond the appraised value at 2
p.m. on Friday the 6th day of June 1852
at our Office. For further particulars
and conditions of sale apply to the under-

signed.
CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Lucas Street
23.5. 82—13n

High Blood Pressure
Kills Men & Women

Twice a3 many women as men 5. -
fer from High Blood Pressure, which
is a roy ecerods disease that starts
about the time of Change of Life and
is the real cause of much heart troub!y
and later on of paralytic strokes. Com-
mon symptoms of High Blood Pray-
gure are: Nervousness, headaches i{
top and back of head and above eyer,

ressure in head, dizziness, shoit

reath, pains in heart, palpitation,
poor sleep, loss of tnemory and energy,
easily excited, fear and worry. If you
suffer any of these symptoms, don (
delay treatment a single day, because
your life may be in danger. Noxco
(formerly known as Hynox), a new
m very, reduces Hi Blood
Pressure with the first Seen takes a
a load off the heart, and makes
i eel years younger in a few days,

et Noxco from your chemist today.
ft is to make you fee! fr
ead or





DO NOT BE FOOLED BY

FASHION

For the next week
10% on all Dry Gooc's
do not have to spend

This is just to mee
Competitors to know
cheap or even cheape
may .

A. E. TAYLOR LTD.

The Real Price Cutters in Barbados

Ne ee RN Seer





A.

BARBADOS
CATIONAL |



EDI





CHRIST CHURCH



ADVOCATE



OFFICIAL NOTICE

IN THE, COURT OF CHANCERY

BARBADOS



BO .N i
"iene aoe, scnool | IN PURSUANCE of the Chancery Act, 1906, I do hereby give notice to all
Sudee WH SS aus ee tships ’ pereane having or aplstming any estate, right or interest or any lien or in-
aoe r more vacancies|cumbrance in or affecting the property hereinafter mentioned ‘the property ef |
for Foundation Scholars at the Christ| the defendant)) to bring before me an account of their claims with their sinceete |

Church Bove’































ch
18.5.52—4n

OHRIST CHURCH GIRLS’ FOUND ATION



























CANADIAN SERVICE
SOUTHBOUND



SCHOOL SAILS FROM
ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1952 z Montreal Arrives Barbados
Applications for entry to the School in} 6/8 “ALCOA PILGRIM” May 5th May 1lith
tember, 1952, must be made on the| S/S ‘“TINDRA” May 16th May 26th
cial form which can be obtained at /s “TISTA” .. May 30th June 9th
the School on Mondays—Fridays between | 8/8 “ALCOA POINTER” June 13th June 23rd

9.30 a.m. and 3.00 p.m

Applicants must be between the ages
of 8 years and 11 years, 6 months on the 8
Ist of September, 1952.

The entrance examination will be held

BARBADOS | at the School on Friday, 13th June, 1952,

at 9.30 a.m. There will be no accom-
modation at the School for Parents or
Guardians on that day.

Application forms must be returned to
the Headmistress not later than Friday,
30th May, 1952,

11.5.52—Gn. .

Revitalise Your

KIDNEYS









sons. Get Cystex from any Chemist on

Guararntet to put you right
Act Now! In 24 hour

weil in

and be
one week,

ee Cystex> Che Guar:

antee
“or Kidneys, Preumetivm, Bladder tects you.

PPPOE SSPSS PISO,
The well-known Sports:
Mr. CLÂ¥YTON EASTMOND
(known as “Kilroy'’)

the pleasure

or money
you will




hack
feet better



throw off acids and poisons, now creep.
ing to joints and muscles..In 24 hours
complete




requests of your













NORTHBOUND

‘s “ALCOA POINTER” Due Barbados May 17th for St. Lawrence River Ports

een a are

ROBERT THOM LTD..Y{ NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
Apply:— DA COSTA & CO., LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE

HARRISON LINE



ee

bedroom (or two and den)
BUNGALOW of stone and concrete con- ‘And You'll Feel Young—Look Young OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
struction. ee ae ibe Nothing ages man or woman more
m Bilchen. Floor to ceiling). 'y We Pia enaien son cueiar tre Vessel From Leaves Due

teda: n closets N » & ing, Iteh “ . ‘wpor
Attractively laid out garden with fruit Pass Boa barven: Diaziness, Wheue S.S. “MERCHANT” bi t & 5th M a hare
trees and ample room for vegetables. m, Backache, Leg Pains, Circles ~s % Liverpool ay May
Gar: with breezeway to house and under Eyes, Swolfen Ankles, Loss of |S.S. “COLUMBIA STAR Liverpool 7th May 20th May
detached self-contained maid's quarters Appetite, Energy, etc., bec kid- 15.S, “TRIBESMAN” London &
The Property is coolly and delightfully neys which should filter blood il to M/br gh i 27t
situated within easy reach of main road « ” 7 t/ ‘ou 9th May 27th May
at Worthing, Offers over £4,000 Ph, 856, Pere ee iano aces stranethe 5S. “SELECTOR' Liverpool &

24.5.82—1n ehs kidneys and expels acids and poi- Glasgow 17th May 1st June



HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM

_ Vessel For Closes in Barbados
S.S. “GRELROSA” Liverpool 15th May
S.S. “HERDSMAN” London 22nd May

For further information apply to
DACOSTA & CO., LTD.—Agents



company at his 000 SOS 30 2556909 939 <5
%

DANCE ~ KITCHEN CUTLERY OF ALL DESCRIPTION

On SUNDAY NIGHT x
. 25TH MAY, 1952 2 SPOONS, KNIVES, FORKS, FISH TURNERS, ETC,

At UNITED SOCIAL CLUB,
Marehfield, St. Philip, Obtainable at...
(Kindly lent by the Management)
ADMISSION: $3 2/- i, Va
| Music oy. Mr. ©. B. Browne's THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
Â¥ rchestra
% REFRESHMENTS ON SALE Corner Broad and Tudor Streets
$%6+50456006066490446600) | V.oncosccessocneoneosonsncancnecooososoosesenets«
Beveovesereyereeyeorrrry SPSSSTSSSSSS S999 S9SS9 GOSS OGD SSOS FOP te
vig

. ° ole
'§ Removal Notice Make
| % ‘ 81% Saturday
3 We desire to inform our % .
{% customers that on the 29th, ¥ os
1% 30th & 3ist, we shall be ¥ Sahely
1% moving our offices and »
|@ stocks to our new premises, X Day Shirts
|% Lower Bay Street, former- ——
'% ly occupied by Ralph Beard, y We have just
| e and consequently will be :
1% closed to business, | Received
'é ——— +
a ores oe " : : LTD.
8 STOKES & BYNOE a New
6.656656, COS OPPO POOPIE

PARADES.

°

&. TAYLOR is givin
from one dollar up. You
$30.00,

»t Competition and allow
that we will sell just as
r than they, come what

Sd



— DIAL: $e2 4100 —
where
They are no Parking Problems
and where
Qualities are HIGH
and

Prices are LOW

5
PLLC LELLLPP PPL PPLTS



SHIPMENT
OF

DRESS and SPORTS
SHIRTS

By ELITE



SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS... ) $8.20
POLAR DRESS SHIRTS 2 ti » $5.20

“O” POPLIN DRESS SHIRTS ve ee $4.75 & 4.85

By RENOWN

MANHATTAN DRESS SHIRTS .... .f
EXCELSIOR a bs oi g by 7
HIGHTONE + »» Fe @ $3.69
GABARDINE SPORT SHIRTS vs @ 3 92

OTHER SPORT SHIRTS
By PREMIE

@ $6.60—7.36 & 4.41

FANCY SPORT SHIRTS ae $e & @ $3.25
BOYS’ FANCY SPORT SHIRTS .. =i ng @ $2.19
KOOL KEEMF SPORT SHIRTS ‘> $8.83
PLAIN SPUN SPORT SHIRTS ba @” $4.39
CHECK SPUN SPORT SHIRTS ue 8 $5.85

Also
NEW YORKER aa SHIRTS
4

@ $4.
So Remember

EE
AHELY & CO—
Hine O—19 Swan St. for

ATURDAY’S and all the year
round

Phone 4934





“The Land

of
taining 72,550 square feet more or
| situate near Westbury School in the par-
ish of Saint Michael
| Barbados
| hereto and more particularly shown and
| delineated on a plan of survey signed
| Pa ‘dinted 18th Toone
and ani

the office of the Colonial Engineer having
been decided on
the aperovel
| Legislature
L fesaiessteen of the Houses of the Legisia-

of Section 5 of the Land Acquisition
Act, 1949, that the said lands have been
acquired for the following public
poses:

| bury School.
72,550 sq. ft. situate to the south
of Westbury School in Westbury Road

the north on lands of the Westbury
| Schoot and of Dudley Weekes, on the y
%
%








visions of the above Act, inst Foundation School in| documents and vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday. be-
Sugar, Molasses and other enn A the peptone. =. : tween the hours of 12 noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration |
said plantation te be yoruin’ tex sees aaa nee will be held at the Office, Public Buildings, Bridgetown, before the 4th day of July 1952 in
No money has yet been borrowed} Jane bene “< am Sat 4th |} order that such ciaims may be reported and ranked according to the nature
against the said crops, aan e orms of applic tiog be | and priority thereof respectively, otherwise such persons will be precluded from
Dated this 93rd day of May 1962. obtained from the Seerétary, Mr 1). E. M.{the benefits of any decree and be deprived of all claims on or against the said
) = meee a at Harrison College, ond must} property
E ‘ ¢ returned to him together with,a Birth
. nek Page Sartibente not later than PLAINTIFF: HUGH OWEN SAINT CLAIR CUMBERBATCH
' m. on ay 30th May, 195 DEFENDANT: T D. SI -0., Li y
vt en” bien Ae ee aoe THE SUGAR INDUSTAY Candidates must be— e ny a: ee ”
AGRICULTURAL BANK ACT 148 er ao 2 te of parishoners of |PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate near Warners
Te the creditors holding specialty liens pinot sehen who aré in strait- in the parish of Christ Church and Island aforesaid formerly
agains eys Plantation, St. Peter (2) Between the apes, supposed to contain by estimation four acres or thereabouts but
KE NOTICE that }, the owner, of te pears eae of 10 and 12 found by recent survey to contain five acres and six perches Of |j.1¢ it is hereby
the above Plantation am bout to obtain maton hes ig A of the exam | thereabouts abutting and bounding on the North on lands of | 0
a loan of £2,200 under the provisions of ms . EM Wes ore Warners Plantation on the East on lands fo herly o¢ Alea Wateast
r a APN Ee, a J may
it cared ot Se Karta yon Sorter treasure Gece “ane tt "on iandt'st"Giseme" alt" an
to 1953. niet Soe ~~ ; — of T. Cox and on a road and Sn the += on the Public
No money has been borrowed under . ~~ ad or however else the same may abut an und
the Agricultural Aids Act, 1905, or the eae Rill filed: 29 Januamy 1952
above Act (as the case may be) in re- CHRIST CHURCH —— i Lae April, 1952 i. wILLiaMe
Dated aie te ay of M 1952 BOYS’ FOUNDATION SCHOOL Registrar-in-Chancery
ee GILL Samuel Kirton Scholarships 29 .4,52—3n
? : Owner ‘ poe aor ¥ one ore vacancies
or Samue irton Scholars it ive
22.5.52—3n Christ Church Bors’ Foundation "Sct ol
in September, 1952
THE SUGAR INDUSTRY AGRICUL- An aminat it ‘
; amina ill be heid at tre
TURAL BANK ACT 1943 @chool at 33 an. 2 :
To the creditots holding spectatty itens| Sane jos) pore ny a ptturday, 14h
e, 195 f application can be
against Bagatelle Plantation, St. | “aytnined from the Seer
u tary, Mr. b. E. M, —_— - — aa
Thomas. be
z / Malone, at Harrison College, and must MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW Nera te VO
ER NOTICE that we the owne's | oe returned to him together with a Birth ZEALAND LINE LIMITED. d
Tryhane of the above Plantation are ba pe eee Certificate not later than (M.A.N Z_ LINE) The a . oon an
about to obtain a joan of £8,000 under | 2, Pine must eee ae? Oe | com Bee pine Miny Stat Devonport | Passengers for St. Lucia, St
the provisions of the above Act against : lates must be ali from Pirie May 3ist, Devonport a St. + .
Ge: ad Biante, WA waapest cd the (1) Children attending an Element: June 5th, Melbourne June 14th, Sydney Vincent, Grenada, and Aruba.
Agricultural year 1952 to as School in the parish of Chr.st|June 24th, Brisbane July 5th, arriving at Sailing Wednesday 28th inst
No monéy has been borrowed under | (2) ee... * Barbados about August 6th. The M/V “MONEKA" will
the Agricultural Aids Aet, 1905, or the | Christ ch a parishioners 0! In addition to general cargo this vessel accept Cargo and passengers for
above Act in respect Of such year a murch who are in strait-|has ample space for chilled and hard Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Dated this 28nd day of May, 1952 ened circumstances, frozen cargo Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing
Cc. £ YHANE et al 4) Between the ages of and 12 ; Thursday, 29th inst.
; tAti eyvewd inclusive on the day of the exam Cargo accepted on through Bills of .
Per: R. E. King ren ti { June. 1982 Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to The M/V “CARIBBEE” will
it letras D. E. M. MALONE, ae Guiana, Leeward and Windward meant Saree gna Enseaneets for
ri Secretary-Treasurer slands minica, ntigua, ontserrat,
. Nevis 2 s § Sat-
stiesnanicdek ee toe x more vacant Ch, Ch, Boys Foundetion Bon | wor Survige Sertieniars Sopaye A Aaaoe Fe Fine se al
St. Michael's Vestry Exhibitions at | 10 5.§2-—4n FURNESS WITHY & CO., LTD., B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’
QUEEN'S COLLEGE will be received by - a tig TRINIDAD. ASSOCIATION (INC)
the Clerk of the Vestry up to 12 noon a eens CHURCH DA couen bb. Li. Consignee — Tele. No, 4047
on. Wednesday, 28th May 1952. GIRLS’ FOUNDATION SCHOOL ¥ & . LTD. r
Candidates must be the daughters of Foundation Schelarships BARBADOS, BW.)
parishioners in straitened circumstances | There will be one or more vacancies | —————————— —
and must not be less than 9 nor morej;for Foundation Scholars at the Christ
than 12 yeara of age on the 2nd Sep-*Church Girls’ Foundation School in e.
tember 1952, to be proved by a Baptismal! | September, 1952 aaenetntes
Certificate Which must accompany «th An Examination will be held at f! 0.
application School at 9.30 a.m. on Friday 1th \
tms of application will be issued and | June, 1952. Forms of application can be
received at the Vestry Clerk's Office | obtaimed from the Secretary, MroD. F.'M .
between the hours of 10 a.m. and| Malone, at Harrison Colle and must
12 hoon. be returned to him together with a Birth | ————-———————_—_———— Me
B. Cc. REDMAN, tor Baptismal Certificate not later than
Cierk, St. Michael's Vestry. {3 7 Pires on Friday 30th May, 1952 NEW YORK SERVICE.
ttn aire — — ~ a es must be
. | () The Children of parishoners of A STEAMER sails May 9th—arriv.s Barbados May 21s
PUBLIC SALES Christ Church who are in stratt- A STEAMEBN galls Mey S8U:-ait ven Betbadee tan ath
ned circumstances ipldosin 5
5 (2) Between the ages of 10 and 12 :
REAL ESTATE | inelusive on the day of the exom NEW ORLEANS SERVICE.
aueadunialais ination, i.e, 13th June, 19 % **
BUNGALOW Stonewall Bungaiow | D. E. M. MALONE, oe eee cee sails May 10th—arrives Barbados May 2th,
known as Banyan Beach, Brighton, Black Secretary-Treasurer, BTRAI sails May 24th—arrives Barbados June ith.
Rock, Saint Michael, with 11,100 square Governing Body
feet of land thereto. Ch, Girls! Foundation School, | “een ee a ees

re

—=>",
==

SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1952










FORM I

Acquisition Act,
1949

(Notice required by Section, 5)
THE acquisition, for public purposes,
the following pa of land ya

THE SALVATION ARMY

For the maintenance of its local
work, The Salvation Army will
observe its Annuel Tag-Day in
St. Michael and the joining Par-
ishes on Friday 6th June.
worded “To Help Others” will be
on sale

in the Island of

described in the Schedule








ARRIVED
Another Shipment of the

POPULAR

84180 GAS COOKERS

A few of these have nov yet
been booked,

Prices of next shipment will be

Why not call at yout Gas Show-
rooms, Bay Street TO-DAY anc
secure one of these cookers.

Sworn Surveyor,
1962 and filed in

y the Governor with
Houses of the
of the Island of Barbados by

of
declared in pursuance

pur-
for enlarging the playing ground

and otherwise for the use of the West-



THE SCHEDULE
A}l that certain parcel of land contain-

SOME SAY...
There are no Embalmers
in Barbados
OTHERS SAY...
Plumbing is not
Embalming
WE SAY...

Let's Bury Your
Dead !!

in the parish of St. Michael, bounding

south on the public
lands of Mr. Stanley
Jordan et

nth day of May 1952,
House in the Island of

east and By hem

drain on the west on

Hawkins and on lands of M.

al, and on the public road.
Dated this fourtee:

at Government

Barbados.

ALFRED SAVAGE,
Governor.
22.5.52—3n

Elecirical Installations
and Repairs.

Wiring Department carries
rece . of Wiring

SELF-HELP
ENTERPRISES LTD.

Undertakers and Funeral

a complete stock
Accessories and will undertake
the installation or repair of all
kinds of Wiring Jobs in Homes



Factories.

My Dial 3878 or 4710. Directors
Learn to remember numbers. Tweedside Road, St. Mic! 1
Practice on Ours. hae

DA, COSTA & oo, LTD., i.

Electrical Dept. PH /

16,5.52—6n. NE:
Day 3958 — Night 2939
e

* $1.00 Shares Available
% Last Year's Dividend 5%

POPSSPEOS SLOOP COGS
{

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
READING ROOM

You will enjoy the epic story of

“MARY BAKER EDDY AND
HER BOOKS”

999999

i

The Loyal Brothers
of the Star

By WILLIAM DANA ORCUTT

This book may be read, borrowed

or purchased at the Reading Room.
BOWEN & SONS. Broad Street



Open Tuesdays, Wednesda, al Proudly Presents
jaws 10 n. to 12 o'clock.
gee ke aie to 2 p.m. and 1952 BARBADOS
CARNIVAL,

; ALL ARE WELCOME.

aul copamreaneial At QUEEN’S PARK














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§ Competition ! 1! SATURDAY, 7th JUNE
Here’s TEN SHILLINGS

A. COSTUME BANDS
B. STEEL

for you =

What are these five jum-
bled words?

*UREINS

ADVERTISING BANDS
D. HISTORICAL BANDS

In order to raise the standard of
Carnival in this island the Steer-
ing Committee would appreciate

*OYRU the co-operation of firms, ¢lubs
* UNRTIUR and individuals being as original
AS as possible.
* .
on Admission: Adults 1/6 Children 1/-

Bookings for Booths and
contact Mr. . Morris,

Lane. .
Closing date for above will be
closed on 3rd June, 1952.

Stands
First correct entry open- Sobers
ed gets the prize.

Closing date May 31, at
12 noon.
Mark your reply
petition and sen
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BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE NINE





BY CARL ANDERSON



NATIONAL EMPLOYERS MUTUAL

GENERAL INSURANCE ASSN. LTD.

Offer You Insurance Against
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When you Insure with N.E.M. You become a Member—

Your Problems, Difficulties & Claims are ||




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THE BARBADOS MUTUAL
LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY

ot AT THE
BY GEORGE MC. MANUS 111TH YEARLY ORDINARY GENERAL MEETING
HELD ON FRIDAY, 25TH APRIL

The Directors Reported that

$2.233.039 NEW BUSINESS

issued in 1951 was a

RECORD

For the Society
Other Principal Features were :—
INCOME : From Premiums .... We ki ab $1,042,105.70
» Interest, Dividends ‘WY!

WN Rouen STuRe 7 aon TO LE and Rents ce $451,682.18
—_ es Less Income Tax 54,428.62 397,253.52
~ 3 7 aN Rape... sis socaperiaiiebipianens

IK im ‘| Alt "i mace ws CLAIMS: By Death 43 under 70 Policies assuring ... 131,083.00
~ \ { Waid. ae ae: 91,071.00

A ii By Maturity 236 Policies assuring is 361,004.00
ay Bonus = : 149,416.00

He

RATE OF INTEREST: Before Payment of Income Tax 4.53 per cent
After Payment of Income Tax 3.98 per cent

COMMISSION & EXPENSES OF MANAGEMENT :







Ratio to Premium Income ie 17.23 per cent
RE A SMART ONE, BOSS.
KEEP MOVIN: THEN NOBODY iL LIFE ASSURANCE FUND :
ma_EVER FIND US. Added as result of year's working ik $ 440,645.92
. The total Fund is now ue, Hie $10,391,159.16
INVESTMENT RESERVE FUND:
: Now Totals Sa i a, OF $ 623,915.06
Sj Sa C. K. BROWNE,
Bi —— Secretary.

pene at 8 Nes ee




PAGE TEN



By O. S.

THE 1952 FOOTBALL



COPPIN

SEASON ended on Saturday

when the Hon, the Colonial Secretary presented the trophies
to the winners of the various competitions.

The

1952

season has been a successful one from the

point of view of finance, the reward of industry’and. appli-
cation as far as the new champions Notre Dame are con-
cerned, and a personal sense of satisfaction for the B/A.F.A.
whe successfully undertook the administration of the games

at Kensington.
NO SMUGNESS

There can be no smugness
however over the fact that the
standard of football was a com-

paratively low one or that the
season has been a purely domestic
® devoid of a visit from a tour-
ing team or a visit out of the
island by a local team,

Let me deal first with the cons
before I deal with the pros. What
is the answer to the two questions
whieh the above observations
must ‘inevitably pose? In the
first place there seemed to be no
effort by clubs at ccnstructive and
Scientific football. The field at
Kensington had been widened
considerably and yet almost for
the entire first round of games
in the First Division, no team,
with the exception of Harrison
College convincingly indicated
that they were aware of this fact





by adapting their play to the
altered c dition They bundled
ir > centre of the field and the





win had a choice of bundling
in tt centre of the field with
them or be left on holiday if they



remained, as they should, on the
wings.
IMPROVEMENT
There was a marked improve-



ment, although not on as liberal
a seale as the crowd obvicusly de-
sired, after Graham Wilkes took
charge of a Sunday B.A.F.A
coaching school. In additicn to
this Mr. Wilkes also ran a column
in the Sunday Advocate entitled



G. WILKES

“Soccer Lessons”. ,

Credit is due Mr, Wilkes for this
example of public spiritedness and
lam convinced that he has shaped
his course more or less on a long
s In other words I exy-
Wilkes’ scheme to béar
ample fruit in due season in the
imme tiate future,

TOURS

With regard to a tour, it mgs:
be realised that however much the
BA.F.A, is convinced that thgre
can be no greater fillip at present
to local football than a tour out of
the island, that they are faced at
present with the question of join-
ing the*newly formed Caribbean
Football Federation, an ambitious
and expensive venture and taking
part in tournaments that include
playing the host to Jamaica,
‘Trinidad, British Guiana, Surinam,
Puerto Rico, Curacao and the like.

On the other hand there is the
alternative of engaging a non
member of this agsociation, say
Grenada, St. Vincent or even Mar-
tinique. The season took place at
a time when these questions had
to be deeided in the interests of
local football and there is every
indication of a satisfactory seft-
ling of the question,

‘This being so, there should be
a decision one way or the other



in this connection soon, conse-
quently a tour with an Interco-
lonial flavour is the natural
sequence,

IN FAVOUR

Having dealt with the cons let
us briefly deal with the pros, In
the first place the B#.A.F.A. has
earned the commendaifon of the
sporting public for having under-
taken the administration of foot-
ball at Kensington this season. Al-
though there has been no fault
found with the Pckweik Ciub wno
found with the Pickwick Club who
sociation for the past three years,
yet it has been justifiabiy felt that
the Association should in its own
interests shculder the responsibill-
ty since they plan ultimately pur-
chasing a ground and running foot-
ball there.

EXPERIENCE
Added to this is the considera-

They'll Do It Eve







WHEN T C.
THIS AFTE

You DIDN'T
WHY
THATS oy

Every Time




ME; BEFORE

tion that some €xperience must be
gathered by the B.AP.A.. if they
are to handle tours here or even
negotiate with some measure of
skill With other Associations for
reasonable terms and c@nditions
for tours cutside the island.

And now for a look around the
clubs:—

Cera



P, MANDEVILLE

NOTRE DAME

For sheer toil and steadfastness
of purpose Notre Dame deserves
the championship of the B.A.F.A.,
which they won with the cham-
pionship of the Second Division
thrown in for good measure.

From a comparatively mediocre
start they welded themselves by
constant and assiduous practice
into a team that played as a team
after the first two fixtures.

Paul Mandeville, the captain,
the Daniel brothers, left winger,
centre-half and inside forward
along with the experienced
McCollin at right wing formed a
good attacking force while the
defence with Browne and
Straughn as full-backs and Wil-
kinson in goal constituted a for-
midable defence.

It was unfortunate that Daniel,
the centre-half received an in-
jury during the season, which
put him out of the game and
especially the Knockout compe-
tition. Had he been there Notre
Dame might at least have been
one of the finalists in the Knock-
out competition.

EMPIRE

At one stage of the competition
it seemed as if Empire would be
the winners of the Senior Divi-
sion competition, They had a
spell of good football and made
an unbeatqgn run until Everton
came from the bottom.of the
table and defeated them upset-
ting all their calculations and a
defeat at the hands of Notre
Dame too did not assist their
chances.

Drayton was the brains of the
forward line and Taylor had a
good season. Valiant in the
defence was S, I. Smith, easily
one of the best individual players
this season, while Grant his part-
ner. at full-back worked like a

Trojan as is his wont. .
They reached the semi-finals in

the Knockout competition but a

replay saw them go into the field



W. A. DRAYTON

with only four of the old brigade,
the rest having left for Antigua
on tour and although the substi-
tutes were not disgraced, yet
they were “knocked out.”

Regivered U. 5. Potent Ofee = 6









GAY YOU LOVED
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r HU YOu

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WELL, YOU KNOW THE REST !



G. GRANT.
SPARTAN
The Park team, who for the
past three seasons have carried
off both the First Division and
Knockout competitions had _ to

give up both cups this year. They
suffered chiefly from lack of
teamwork and a resultant loss of

cohesion in their play.
They showed spurts of good
football when they twice defeat-

ed Carlton and once held Notre
Dame to a keenly contested draw
but unfortunately these were too
few and far between.

Some individual players gave
good performances and showed
signs of promise. Young Gittens
would have found his way into
any colony team as a wing half.
Grant is very promising as an in-
side forward and Atkins in goal
was improving with every game
he played.

HARRISON COLLEGE

College were an enigma this
season. I saw them play their
first game and their positional
play was as near perfection as
possible. They were the only
team in the opening games to use
their wingers and use them with
the cross field pass, that used _to
be effective before.

They .then
went into the dol-
drums and play-
ec} some indiffer-
ent games. Smith
was brilliant in
,goal at the begin-

ining of the sea-

son but he soon
fell victim to the
seeming disease
of laissez faire.

The Tudor
brothers were
good individual-

ists but Paul is
too selfish. I was surprised when
Fernando Tudor was dropped in-
stead of Paul. and still more sur-
prised when he was not brought
back into the team in spite of
many weak changes in the school
team. However, they were clear
winners of the Inter-School com-
petition and for this they deserve
congratulations. I am expecting



Cc. SMITH

to see them do much better next
season,

i
ool
'
i
{




R. HAYNES

EVERTON

Everton’ had their worst season
since their promotion to the First
Division, ‘hey were without the
services of Blades, one of their
key players for most of their
matches. They too made several
changes in their line-up almost
every match and there was no
scope for building a team, Haynes
was consistently sound and was
without doubt their best player,

One game they reproduced
some flashes of their best days
when they got into their stride

and defeated Empire, then lead-
ers of the competition but they
did not repeat this effort. How-

ever, a win over College and a
late win over Spartan kept them
safely away: from relegation and
they have survived to open with

a clean slate next season. “
N CARLTON

A perfect example of anti-
climax is the fact that Carlton

have won the Knockout Cup and
in the B.A.F.A, competition have
finished bottom of the table and
so are in line for relegation.

_By Jimmy Hatlo |
















AW! KEEP you
MACKINAW ONS








vy)

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

952 Football Season In Review

Carlton at. first played their

quick short passing game but
they did not adapt it to the larger
ground with the result that they
bundled down. the middle and
themselves | negative their best
efforts.

Their football was entertaining
at times and I have seen them
lose by the proverbial hairs-
breath. It is a tribute to their
determination that they. di@ not
allow their position in the
B.A.F.A. cup to colour their play
in the Knockout competition un-
favourably. Their play in this
competition was as good as some
of the best performances of the
teams above them ih the B.A.F.A.
line-up.

“Brickie’ Lucas was ovtstand-
ing and both “Boogles” Williams
and Reynold Hutchinson
into good form towards the close
of the season.

Warren was deadly accurate at
right wing and a useful man in

goal, while Clairmonte was gen-
erally useful.



N. LUCAS

WINT FOR
OLYMPICS

LONDON.

Arthur Wint, the athletic
champion, has decided to fun in
this year’s Olympic Games in
Helsinki for his native Jamaica,
in spite of his long residence in
Britain. He will defend his 400-
metre tithe and will also try to
capture the 800-metre title.

“The double is possible because
after the 800-metre final there is
a day’s interval before the 400-
metre heats begin,” he explained
in London. “I am not aiming at
any g0od times—I shall warm up
gradually.”

Wint, a medical student at
London University, will not have
to wait to be chosen by Britain
to run in the Clympics, in view
of his decision to run for Jamaica,
He intends also to defend his
Amateur Athletic Association title
against a strong field that will
include Roger Bannister, Britain’s
mile champion, who, is now con-
centrating on the half-mile.

—B.U.P.

u. & W. Play Today

The following players will rep-
resent Cable & Wireless vs, Carl-
ton in a friendly cricket match at
tboaraed Halli on Saturday, May
24,

Play starts at 1 p.m.

N. T. Clarke (Capt.), B. M.
Matthews, R, B. McKenzie, R. M,
Croney, H. H. King, A. C. Cozier,
E. G. Skeete, C. C. Seale, C,
Alleyne, H. A. White and E, L.
Branker.









. e
The following players will rep-
|resent the “Hadleighs C.C.” vs. a
| Lodge School team at Lodge to-
day when play will start at 1.30
p.m.
; C. V. Rayside (Capt.), E. W.
Cave, C. E, Small, A. Mason, M.
| Brewster, O, Husbands, R. Wal-
cott, O. L. Estwick, J. Higginson,
| H. Cook, E. Gibson and L. Cum-
} mins,



HIDE-OUT

Brussels: For the past week,
lawyers in the Palais de Justice
at Furnes—-south-west of Os-

tend—-have been complaining to
the police that gowns anq robes
were being stolen from _ their
jcloakroom, The thefts continued
|despite repeated searches. Early
jone morning a watchman heard
| Snoring in one. of the rest rooms.
He found agpile of robes, and
under them 24-year-old Michel
Stevens, an absentee from the
Belgian Army. Declared Stevens:
“I didn't think anybody would
find me if I hid in the Palais de
stice,”



—_







ran ‘minutes and the



Indians Beat |

Oxford

‘From Our Own. Correspondent)
LONDON, May 23.
The Indian touring team to-
day won their first match of the
current tour when they beat
Oxford University at Oxtord by
nine wickets. Ghulam Ahmed
who took eight University
wickets in the first innings, again
bowled well to claim another






five for 66. The only stubborn
partnership, between Cowdrey
who batted 2% hours for 54,

and Dowding, who batted
Slightly longer for 69, his highest
score in First Class cricket, pre-
vented the innings defeat for the
University. .

Left to score 62 for victory the
tourists set about the task in
light-hearted manner, Umrigar
followed his first innings double
eentury by collecting 29 in ten
runs were hit
off in 25 minutes. *

A fine spell of bowling by
Denis Compton brought Middle-
sex their victory of the season
at the expense of Gloucester ai
Lord’s. This victory by 111 runs
enables Middlesex to retain their
place at the top of the champion-
ship table, Compton giving his
leftarm spinners plenty of air
troubled all the batsmen and
after lunch. claimed five of the
six wickets that fell, the Glouces-
ter score going from 148 for 3 to
203 all out,

Another fine
Géorge Tribe,

performance by
who claimed five
wickets for 80, enabled North-
ants to secure their second vic-
tory of the season, this time over

Sussex, by 118 runs.
Scoreboard:—
Indians beat Oxford Univer-

sity by nine wickets. Oxford 227
and 232, Indians 398 for 3 de-
clared, ang 62 for 1.

Combined Services beat Glam-
organ by 80 runs. Combined Ser-
vices 243 anq 165. Glamorgan
185 and 143.

Northants beat Sussex by 118

runs. Sussex 135 and 247, North-
ants 166 and 384 for 7% de-
clared.

Derby beat Worcester by ten
wickets. Derby 350 for 9 declared
and 14 for none. Worcester 151
and 210, (Gladwin 5 for 67).

Essex vs. Surrey. Match drawn.
Surrey 417 for 9 declared and
227 for 7 declared. Essex 323 and
251 for 7.

Kent vs. Somerset Match
drawn, Somerset 387 and 206 for
6 declared. Kent 374 and 102

Lancashire vs. Warwick. Match
drawn. Warwick 286 and 208
for 5 declared, Lancashire 289
for 9 declared and 79 for 1.

Middlesex beat Gloucester by
111 runs. Middlesex 138 and 345
(Edrich 73). Gloucester 169
and 203.



5 5
Argentines May
. 9
Drive BRM’s At

r .
Grand Prix

LONDON, May 23.

Argentine driving aces Juan
Manuel Fangio and Jose Froilan
Gonzales reportedly may drive
Britain's famed but unlucky
BRM racing car in the Albi
France Grand Prix on June 1.
Two BRM cars will leave Britain
shortly after several months of
intensive develdpment. Britdin’s
future as a contender in the
Grand Prix racing will largely
depend on the cars’ performance
The driver has not yet been nom-
inated but Britain's No. 1 driver
Stilling Moss will be taking part
in the sports car race in Monaco
and the Argentines are expected

to take wheel. Alfa Romeos
which have dominated postwar
formula one racing will not

French Talbots will give BRM’s
strong competition. —U.P.

Empi re 288 ;
Antigua 77-1

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ANTIGUA, May23,
At the close of the second day’s
play of the Empire - Antigua Test,
Antigua had made 77 runs for the
loss of one wicket in reply to
Empire’s Ist innings score of 288.
The wicket was perfect and the

Empire fielding keen.
Governor Blackburne

attended
the cricket after tea.

EMPIRE IST INNINGS

Hunte lbw b, Gonsalves 28
Robinson b, Gonsalves 53
Taylor b. Walcott 21
Alleyne c. Gore b. Anthonyson a4
De Peiza b. Walcott $2
Bynoe c. Camacho b. Anthonyson 13
Norville b. Gore 22
Amor, ¢. Camacho b. Walcott 24
Kine b. Walcott sure 0
Rudder c. Caines b. Anthonyson M4
Barker not out : 0

Extras . . we 16

Total



Beat James Street \

tneir
fixture against Jame
Scouts won
vesterday.

y

|
|

}

compete at Albi but Ferraris and |!











STOKES & BYNOE

sible for the scoring of Sea Scouts
were
Ciarke, J.

%

Grimes and J. Pilgrim scored 4,
3









SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1952



| Basketball 7

First Sea Scouts

First Sea
Second divisior

Barbados Scouts in
Basketball
Street Boys’
with 22 points to 9
Those who were chiefly respon-

A. Smith, G. Springer, N.
Carter and W. Cum-
erbatch who scored 10, 6, 4 and 2
espectively, while H. Bynoe, L.



and 1 for their team.



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Highest Temperature: 86.5 °F
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Wind Velocity 8 miles per hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.968

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Mr. PATRICK BYNOE
(Harewood) P.C, No. 1.
invites you to

A GRAND DANCE

on Sunday Night, May 25th, 1952
at “HILLSIDE SOCIAL CLUB
{kindly lent by the Management)
SEALY HALL, ST. JOHN
Admission fof 2/-
Music

oS SSSOS9SSSSSSSOSF

by Mr. Percy Green's
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DANCE

at the —

Children's Goodwill League (Shed)
Constitution Road t

TO-NIGHT
(Bank-Holiday)
Music by Mr. Percy Green's Ork
Admission _- 2/-
Refreshments on Sale



o

Messrs

Phone 4267.

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the supreme toast
HEIDSEICK & CO's.

DRY
MONOPOLE
~ CHAMPAGNE

THE



CHAMPAGNE

Dry Monopole
Mecaoiahe




\

CHAMPAGNE YOUR GUESTS
WILL PREFER



LTD.—Agents

OEE EEE EEE EEE EE EE OE EEE




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SATURDAY, MAY 24, l*S2 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE 11IH1 l SI I, Iff \EWS: Imperial Preference On Commonwealth Sugar LONDON. THE IMPERIAL PREFERENCE on Empire sugar. which was fivwi %  lift of four years under the Finance Act of 1948, has become permanent as a result of a clause passed by the House ol Commons in this year's Finance BUI. The difference is that under earlier arrangements. Preference was put into operation for a limited period. No* the Preference* stand until Parliament revokes or changes them. Sir Arthur Salter. speaking for the Government, pointed out that Parliament could change them whenever it desired, but he said it was essential that they should continue throughout the life of the Commonwealth Sugar Agreement. Opposition spokesmen supported the clause because they were in favour of the Commonwealth Sugar Agreement and because they regarded Preferences as an inteffr... pan of the Agreement. But Mr. Arthur Bottomiey, %  cauee black marketeer* are too i and former Secretary wary to be caught DJ frapaoag. Soci for Overseas Trade suggested that it would have been better to have consulted Commonwealth i rodu i n last "If we are to build up these preference*, whether it be In sugar or anything else, the beat way to do it Is by long-term agreement and bulk buying," he declared. "The Went Indies. I SUGAR EXPERTS FOK EL SALVADOR El Salvador is to receive Uic services of two ugar eStaerU under an agreement approve*! by its Foreign Minister with t 0 %  United Nations Food and Amitasw tram mw saaahiV Hfeg-I*^?l n .. „„ ruaranUM market ln<1 Ul aajsamvm. la* U.N and wc for some years have been trying to buy Our Sugar at lower price* than the real price." BRITISH SUGAR AID FOR AUSTRALIA BRISBANE. Britain has granted £561,000 ugar manufacturing technologist 10 conduct a complete survey, ;ind one economist to analyse the economic structure of its sugar industry. The existing sugar processing plants in the country, md processing and equipment will be examined by the technologist. Ha III recommend sny desirable to the Australian sugar industry, changes with a view to the exit is the Australian sugar indusPension of local sugar cane protry's share of a surplus atcuduclion. n.ulated by the Ministry of Food Two fellowships for people from transactions in sugar over a nominated by the El Salvador period of years within the BritGovernment will also be estabish Commonwealth. lished by the U.K. Food and AgriMr. H. Collins, Queensland culture Organisation BOXED FLIERS* BRAIN OPENS PARACHUTES \ MSM ''i %  I"" was at ii %  ol in New I of* taking up ling as an actress. —BI r SEA AND AIR TRAFFIC In Carlisle Bay I V CwnaeB n aap M •( %  D*l I'. 'I laic* ana R R Bapfm Ustaa IrMlWORIJ, ATMOSI'lllRK Venire crtta. are l %  %  world i i(o\r> TO niE MOON WLD HEALTHY APPETITES and STRONG BODIES Min iste r for Agriculture, announced Ihe grant in Brisbane and said that most of the sum would £o to Queensland, whose sugar crop last >ear was worth about £22.000.000. The British Government, he said, had expr^d the hope ,„.. ,ho mon„ !" ^-" J !" would be u-ed In imnnw. IK. u r %  "' lenina .. —B.I.P. NEW CUBAN SUGAH AGENCY TO SELL 152 SIT.AR HAVANA. Cuba Cuban Government has se %  a IhoUghl Hi;.i Croil THE SOYAL AIR FORCE b giving Its sircrsws a small i4l*nioui muai barometric lx\ which wilt BUtMnafleaUy open thru para chutca lor thim and release Ihem irom'lheii ajsctoi Mall E"" ;1 tliuv havito abandon then aircraft miles abova tbe earth. „„,.' %  ', 22 ,ieni'.i",-, Upioilie p,. .. haded „ %  ?„£. %  to do this (or himaeir n-oul.l be u-e.1 In improve th. Tf„""• %  -. •Ular induitry A ipeelal parmant of 15>. Id. a ton will lo sane He 1992 ugar crop on the World market, o producers on raw !" d n W "*"* " m, u tugar of produced in the'lBSl season, he said %  r up of members of the *. k ?"J. .l'-: l !" '"S Cuban Nationa, Su.r Institute. representing mill owner* and •••Ph.. — %  --^ „..„, _,, planters. A Government delegate Government ;ippo | nIcd by thf Prr lHc n w)ll be ita chairman. The Cabinet nlsn -*t up a Commission to recommend measwarmly appreciates thLi bv the Unlfed Kingdom. Mr. Collinr. "and regards nrtloi added year and next It will seek to Kingdom and ihe British Commonwealth sugar exporters." —aMT.F. press for n new word jiRreement to replace the Lor pact of 1M7.—B.V.F. Hjna Sfhen i,. is batng blown olaar .. iron ... of .in ..iiri.if: ttjvi n. i itperhai Dguipntcm irkmselve 000 miles an hour. As he tUD ion... The away front the aircraft In Ml ejai Qrm %  UtOCnallcally leleases the tor seat, a small drogue is n airman mm ttu leased from Ihe seal to slow ii which connects lom to h down. ouerwiM oelaaer pilot nor wat. Ttu%  eeond sutonuUcsvilj parachute could stand the strain open-, ins p..i ..ehute. .md the third when the chute suddenly opened, is design*.i using an The airman then has lo frag him i which remains *eir from ihe scut and fall for H in the aircraft. short time before u is safe for him The device baa bean 1H to open his paruchute. To Ho 1hl in u number of hlRh altitude jumpa he must have his wits about him it. Britain and Australia In one all Ihe unie At great height* of these tests, Ihe parachutist was there is not enough oxygen in Ux fulling at i2. r > mil— an hour al the air to keep a man conscious for fastest point Of hi fall. Ii h.i more than a few seconds, and In also been tried nit thousands of his hurry lo leave hi* aircraft, ha times on the ground—in pressure BLACK MAKKRT IN SUGAR RATES OF WtCBANGE "Mil, DURBAN. The South African Government has appealed to members of the R will il<> the Hicr's thinking, (or him. If he bales out high up, the box takes over, releases him from hu seat and opens his parachute for hkn> when he reaches 13.000 1 is ejetled below 13,000 feet, thu box automatically delays the opening for a (aw seconds so that ho gets clear of the aircraft and slows down. The box does not stop Ihe airman pulling his npcord himself if lie wants to but It does it for him if he is in trouble. The box, matie by the Irvinic Chute Company, contain* ,. sensitive barometric bellows which it is about fa packet of 20 cigarcabins .it an equivalent" %  tmil Mlude of M>,0Tto feet and %  t temperatures down to mlnu* in degrees C. Technically, the box is u baro: %  Iluv t'Olinei '. %  '.'. tinie-delay, which prevents the Men of Hie firing ni-hanii above toe preHlttcraimed altitudo to *jfet II is •> I 11' low th-t altitude, the pressure on the bsUoW releases .1 rompresse>l sprn,..' which gives a *ixty pound pull the rtpeor-l MAIL NOTICE NO M Vl< ll l (Ut THRM RenH-. A football nMtae. ks> 1 an t • M| Skinnlos took tear Turin. • bad more than 15 Li MS Bstln%  %  . with NE0-CHEMICAL FOOD Jhc Complete VITAMIN and MINERAL FOOD SUPPLEMENT Pleasant lasting-Economical Available al all leading Drug Scores 1, at Jotin. H B 1 ... < .la< will *i pi oeit* %  DRINK REAL BEER -HEINEKEN'S *7 T ^AMEL c i&cnuam lei I F you're really out to conquer a cough—to gel to the root of it and destroy ihe germ -then ask for Fatnel Syrup Why? Because Faroe! B)fe.fl does so much more than ordinary cough miuurcv It lontains soluble lactocrcosote which is carried by thu bloodstream to the throat and lungs and breathing; passages, where it destroys the germwhich cause the trouble. Once the germs jre destroyed tlwn it's goodbye to the cough or cold. Meanwhile, the soothing balsams in Famcl Syrup are easing the irritated membranes and the tonic mineral' art keeping up your strength and powers of resistance Famcl Syrup is a recognised mc-lical product u.od for coughs. colds, intlu.-n/a and bronchial troubles. It is widely recom ;ndcd b) Doctors. Hospitals sod Sanatoria FAMEL SYRUP Frank B. Armstrong Ltd. BRIDGETOWN I'll AM \Oli: M.%% riOM-Vi. liVIK WIN ^40.00 Here la a simple <:roas Word pusale whUli can help mu lo win MO.OO for only one shllliue Al the same time sou will be doing your bit to help send lUrbados' Bole Olympic hope In Helsinki n.i July Inter imw and try your skill RVLKf I The Brat rorrerl solution opened by Ihe Idltor will win the prise 1 In the event of Uiere brlna no rurreel solution the one eontalnlni Ihe least errors which Is opened tlret by she editor will win Ihe prise shilling. Meagsr i>8— Therefore (W-Slgn ?I— What i J r %  1 .1 I.Y rcentrlc %  *' —I %  „•-' Potni hibway -What giant was ill DavldT I I—aCailariiall'iri I Insect. Flenilty e*--Oolf mound 4g--Topai hummingbird tO—What are t>ell'-vsrs Wgroed not to lie sesinstT 92—Goddess of down. 6Shabby. 14 l*ei;.-.' gg— IViUlprnent |7--rroet k Wbrthlesa bit •0— Land-meaiire. gl— How many lioroi has the %  4 P roposed international lang_EaAbird. f mold i g VUITICAI. 1—Jewish month. 1-Uuote J—Symbol for tantalum. 4—Cunning. ft-rlies aloft. t Wanders from truthDuel. g—Street railway (abbr I •—A oi.rder citv u> the lai.d Jodah 1| iessa II—Ai what pla( ttu 1 nimdl fci§SSK 13" Knob ..". If ...M.tMl: Wft—Transgression. S7—How many mites did t widow Ihrow into tl 70Whkh of Judah's s 0 slam by the l-ord* 72—MoUier 74 STml>ol for sUvsr. Addn #;s##fi 1'iiin I:I-:IS TO FAH.X VIM TOII TIXTA.XD FT.XO Enlrlaa can br pmtod or drlivrrrd lo thf "Ad vocatc Slalioncry" or Advarll.lng OBIta > IK.Sll



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PAGi IWE HVRBADOS ADNOCATF SATIRDAV MAV 24. 152 BARBADfB^A ADVOCATE Saturday. Mv 24. I52 I'll! hi I Till Vlltl TIIK legitimate theatre in Barbados owes much to the British Council anti *.iie members of the Pocket Theatre for the it performances of Pygmalion and Twelfth Night The achievement* of the Bridgetown Players (now the Barbados Players) and of the short lived Barbados Dramatic Club are not to be despised since their productions provided Barbados with theatrical erttentainment not otherwise obtainable locally. But the Pocket Theatre actors have so far selected their plays from dramatists whose works have obtained a secure place in English Literature as works of art. Even Shakespeare and the excellence of lion fl independent of Shaw's reputation as a dramatist of outstanding ability. The words 'legitimate theatre' which anused in North America to describe drama as distinct from other theatrical performances aptly describe the work which the Pocket Theatre Movement is doing in Barbados. The Pocket Theatre is a handmaid of the arts and if the British Council only had this achievement to its credit it would have justified those who first established a headquarters here. The British Little TlHMtre Movement for which the Pocket Theatre may claim to be descended has spread through many parts of the British Kmpire and helps to keep alive an art in which the British have produced so many great names since William Shakespeare. But the British Council have taken two steps since Pygmalion which deserve especial notice from the community. The provision of a Pocket Theatre has been followed with the provision for Twelfth Night of Costumes suitable for Shakespearean plays. If clothes make the man, and Shakespearean clothes go far to make the play, the generous nift of clothes alone would have been notable; But the Pocket Theatre and the Council have gone even further. They have taken the Pocket Theatre to the people. By going on tour in St. Peter. St. John and St. Philip, they hve laker. \ta* UvsW ths*tre movement to the country. Whether their intention was deliberate or whether it was the unconscious gesture of a team of public spirited individuals is of no more than passing interest. What is significant about this action is the pioneering effort of interest of the country dwellers in the theatre. If the Pocket Theatre movement were to catch on in the country, more than half of the monotony and drabness which is responsible fgr the drift from the villages to the city would be banished forever. So long as there can be found individuals as keen on the theatre movement as the Risley Tuckers, (.lossmiths. and HewitlMyrings the Pocket Theatre will not die. but will constantly impart new life into that movement. 4lr I *• in mo II Hi ri.m _." H> F. A. Wmymm IIOAII III I IS EVERY user of the road in Barbados is supplied by the Commissioner of Police with a booklet containing what are described as Six Cardinal Rules for Safe Driving. The rules are: Always ktep your eyes open and your wiLs alert: Always drive as you would wish others to drive: Always keep yourself and your vehicle in safe driving order: Always anticipate danger: Learn, give and obey the recognised traffic signals: and obey the law in letter and spirit. These Six Cardinal Rules are amplified by a series of instructions which if faithfully observed by drivers of vehicles would keep death off the roads of Barbados and reduce accidents to an infinitesimal numbtr. It is the duty of every driver of a vehicle to learn and obey these rules. Every-da> drivers in Barbados lake corners on the wrong side: cut in or cut things too tine and overtake at corners, bends and cross roads. Traffic signals are carelessly gfvm The result is death, injuries bo persons and vehicles. Let every motorist learn and obey the Six Cardinal Rules. Sir John liaj Alleyne I'.iii ioii Fervour Perhaps the outstanding figure in Barbados during the ••ightccnlh century WM Sir John i;..> AllajIM ti.jrn in B..i6-do* III 1724, lie iivi'd into lite rilnrtfi'iiih i %  !.,xl at the age of si-vi %  ;.. -*->i-n. fie waa created a Baronet of Great Britain by King George III in 1769 and for an almost unbroken period of forty years—there was a single break of one annual session—he occupied a seat In the House of Assembly. During that time he played a distinguished part l n the island's public life Me WM Speaker of the Assembly for thirty years— being re-elected regularly rvery year except during the aa—ton when he was absent from the Island—and thus set up a record that was to be held for mate than a century and a quarter until It WM brown by the late Sir Frederick Clarke. Two yWn after he entered the House, Alley ne gave evidence of his patriotic fervour on an occasion that aroused strong feelings ln Barbados. A British fleet, with a sizeable contingent from Barbados, had set out to capture Ifarttnlqu*. When they reached tinKtiT.ch Island, the traps. were landed but shortly aftarwards were rc-emlxirked "at the very moment when the principal Inhabitants were emplnyi'l bl arranging a plan tot the surren% %  island An attack was then made on the other French Island. Guadeloupe, but, during the selge. the British commodore, hearing of the arrival of a French fleet, withdrew his ships to Dominica. Such inglorious conduct was too much for the Barbadians and the English commodore was burnt In effigy, "his person treated willi indignity and his name held In ahnluti tattoo." An incident like this was certain to cause ill-feeling between the BaiLadian* and the Of the English Navy and on* of the Conner brought out a pamphlet MWfgJr attacking the character ..f the Islanders. An opportunity such as this was not to be missed by Alleyo.lly II..House should be presented to tho council with appropriate dignity and ceremony and that money bills sanctioned by the Upper Chamber should be presented to the Governor by the Speaker of the Assembly. Since the Assembly no lunaer consumer 1 Us inert) In nerct lattle* with 'i><; nrernaf ..11*1 no Council, It could luin to settinu its Ttoui* .n < %  d.'i and AM>yin* with i I'll'-us rare over the gMn '•Usvrvjnee of I|H BM ruh %  dvre, For ..it tinAlleyne *ill loon 1 %  ri-iiii-inl1 'v Ii 1 thernh the idea of par): %  government. But i-erhaps his chief claim U> our grateful memory Is that he WM the first Speaker to request for membra nt Hi.House the (MM %  privileges—freedom fiom arrest, freedom of speech and freedom of access at all times to the King's representative. One of the charges brought against Alleyne in more recent times la that he opposed the preposal to raise a West Indies regiment from the slave population. England at the time was facing as great a threat from Napoleon ai she had ever faced from Louis XrV. As in the time of the French King, the Mother Country was concerned to halt the advance of French influence and svstem left tn .mmense debt cm mm like himself to clear the obligation of huinan nature indeed, for %  ro-n ho lived in eighteenth .•"' 1 -rbedos, he wn singular!* free front UtwJ feeling and ssldom missed an i.ppoitunity to emphasise in the House of Assen 1 bl.. thai there were classes of Mettty other than his own which were entitled "the ci|uai protMtton "f WtM and equitable laws" No partial regard for the interests of tho landowner, he argued, should ever influence '•<' deliberations of the Assembly, and. on one occasion when :1KH"use passed I Bill, shortly after the disastrous hurricane of 1780, to suspend legal proceedings for debt against landowners, he spoke with great eloquence against and "moved an additional clause excluding himself by name from > tit to be den,the operation of the law." Some may be templed to dwi on Alleyne's faultsHe w SIR JOHN GAY AI.I.EYNE arms not only in the continent of Europe but in the Caribbean area. In view of the high mortality among the white soldiers in the area. England decided to supply her army In the West huiies wirh men who could bettar stand ths> rigours of a tropical climate. But the plan lo raise five regiments of black soldiers was strenuously resisted both In Barbados and in other colonies of the West Indies. The influence of the French Revolution had already spread from France to the other countries of Europe. The IdM of "Liberty. F-quality and Faternity" had reached the. French possessions in the Caribbean and the slaves in San Domingo took the opportunity lo rise against their masters. In the upheaval that followed hundreds of plantations were ruined and thousonds of whites were killed. Small wonder that the planters in the British West Indies fell they were sitting on a volcano. In the circumstance* it was perhaps natural for men like Alleyne to believe that the plan to raiae live regiments from Ihc slave imputation, so far as it was likely to affect Barbados, would prove "rather the means of its destruction than its defence." A Balanced Outlook But Alleyne did not allow fear to disturb the balance of his outlook. During the seventies of the eighteenth* century the sugar industry passed through one of its most trying period*, suffering from diseaso and drought; and Alley ne's speeches in the Assembly reflected his anxiety over the economic condition of the island. But he did not forget those unfortunates whose labour played a great part either In bringing Barbados to prosperity or helping It through n period of gloom. For the poor and distressed ho always had a word and. while he regarded slavery as lawful and necessary, he felt that the Irascible and quite unusually vain and these infirmities grew as he advanced in age. Others will draw our notice to his lack of enthusiasm for Codrington' B lan to bring Christianity to thi cgroes and Indians in the West Indies. Though he had humane feelings fr^TH*'slaves, he felt that Codnngton's scheme for their conversion was too ambitious. To him it was far more practical to give boys a good secondary education. Like other Barbadians of his time, Alleyne was Indifferent to the idea of a centre for missionary work and i ireferred to see Codrington Cnl. lop .is a secular school. Yet It should always InranssfnbtMd tO his credit that it was mainly due to his efforts that thu grammar school was revived after the hurricane of 1780. Withoul his Mgh-splrited and energetic exertions, It Is doubtful If the L-dge School, which w-(..i to develop into one of the leading schools in the West Indies, would have survived tho difficulties of a dark and critical period. Nor was-this all he did for education. For he used the money he earned as the island's Treasurer to found the tehool which is now known as tni Alleyne School. Sir John Gay Alley ne's contribution to the common stock of policy and counsel cannot be questioned. He enhanced the prestige of the House of Assembly and began Ihe great reforms that were needed to make It more efficient instrument of government. At a time of great peril he brought sanity'and good sense to the deliberations of the Assembly. And his work In the cause of education was to produce permanent and fruitful results. "Though no sculptured marble speaks his country's gratitude," wrolo the historian, Poyer. when Alleyne was still alive, "his virtues have embalmed his memory and will transmit It tothe admiration of succeeding geueratlons." OH %  • Reader* Say; A I. Wile Niins.iisc Following an unwritten "code of honour*' the shepherds of Sardinia refuse to collaborate with the police. The ^Hm co de of the Sardinian shepherds is based on two fundamental rules — iirst you must avenge yourself any wrongs done to you or to your family, killini: the offender or a member of his family. Secondly you must never ask the police to help you: all those collaborate or even talk to the police are informers and must be eliminated. Import l.ivvnni'H o The Editor, The Adrecoie, SIR,—The readers of this paper who are not awtgl C4 what Is taking place in Bar-* bados, may find the following information Interesting. On the 13th March this year, the Control Authorities refused to allow any further orders to be placed with Europe (our main source of food supplies, potatoes, onions, etc.). and until to-day (19th May) have prohibited all business with COUntriW generally referred to %  a wft i iirresxj %  • This has meant that the public In general are going to suffer a loss ot revenue, because ships will be coming wiUi no caw Thc\. will also be suffering; the loss of a men), because there will be nothing in the shops for them to eat when they are hungry. Ii ; taWreating ID note uiat tho approximate Importation from these countries for 1951 was 1900.000. The Control Authoripropose to reduce this £200.000. This Is goini> profits if any Py UM rel.nlcrs of food stuffs and hardware), it Is also K "ing to mean small profits sion merchants and agents, and in some eases, drastic measures, such as. ren staff would be indicated. In turn this will have lUactable income tax and also a loss of duty. The Government will have much less money to spend, and therefore, many of the schemes which they are so ambitiously carrying out to-day will bo endangered by the lutest follies of our Control Authorities. Let us consider what is being done by the other West Indian Islands. In Trinidad and Jamaica various items such as, decorated glassware, holy pictures, rosaries nnd other itms which are not essential to existence ero placed on the prohibited list, but such tilings as food, agricultural impllments and the necessities of life, are allowed in any quantities which the importer may consider a necessity fo r the benefit of the colony. Why do we have to deviate from the good example set by our *ister colonies and go to the extreme of cutting our importa from approximate^ £900.000 In 1951 to f.200,000 for the last half of 1952 or an equivalent „of £400,000 for the year, which ts n cut of more than SOft. Any elementary school boy can see that our Control Hoard has been too drastic, and it is time for the people of Barbados to Bcotatt aflamst their action This action Whan examined closely is not only a hardship on the people, but a menace to the very exuid way of life, and if our present Government really has tne interest of the people at id is genuinely determined to make this island a better place to live In. then it Is time that they speak quite plainly and tppose such drastic restrictions being placed on the importation of goods into this island. Let us face this now menace of starvation and,privation with determination and defeat it before It can. get a serious hold on us. Yours truly. HUNGRY. Load-Shedding To The Edilor, Tlie AJHIOmtt i SIR,—Once again I In jour (taper suggestions, for load shedding sUgitested to the Electric Cump.ni} Surely in A democracy i considers the greatest good to the gioatcst number. Whyshould all who buy I SO made miserable and disgruntled? I betleve the number Is 23.000. to please temporarily the 5,000 or so who want elecIrletta IB their new houses? say temporarily advisedly, the new installers would soon crying out as loud as anyone eousBoVl coo* mi thatr •fflctrw stove for s< periods, fridge cuts, meat spoiling in deop freeze etc. I am the owner of a house Silver Sands built in 1938 and Electricity applied for that sa year was nev> r received. 1 still say loud shedding will make nsdsj i onsumer irritated arable, getting up petition, ate Don't do it Mr Dm HOUSEWIFE. NOBODY'S DIARY Monday -Everybody in Bridgetown has been talking about the Ladies Will they go or will they stay* Do we want them or don't we want them'* I even overheard one street hawker saying to the male member of a party of two "That is a sweet lady you've got Mr A let me sell her a pineapple." Another sfti't vendor pushed his cart past the House of Assembly today. On it in large letters was written "LADY BE GOOD". As I saluted Nelson 1 shed a tear. Nobody saw me. P S. What good news about the fountain! Won't Miss Manning be pleased! Tuesday While I'm in this feminine mood I must tell you the story of a woman scorned. Was she furious! I saw the drama through the cracked windscreen of my doorless two-sealer. There she was near to the roadway a woman scorned and armed with a stick, t wonder where she learnt to swing it like that' From Cyrano no doubt! But she wasn't beating ono man or fifteen men. The recipient of her blows was a much younger girl whoso face showed as much refinement as surprise. I hope the woman cops are taking up fencing. They might need it, if ttta kind of thing spreads. Wednesday—My friend's four-year-old buy (did I mention he was born on a leap day) continues to view Heaven from J utilitarian world. When it rained th other day he told his better parent. "Isn't God useful mummy! His has a bin watering pot and is helping daddy with the vegetables." Thursday—Remember how long it took them to cut the grass at the Alice Playing Field? It seems that the Y.M.C.A.. are having similar playing field headaches. Their playing field, (I think it's theirs) is one of the bushiest fields near Greenfields and is far more suitable for cowboys and Indians than for ball games. I wonder if the people at the Y., ever go down Brighton way. If they do they will notice what seems to me one of the best ki pi playing fields in Barbados. It was laid down by a private company and is maintained by a private company. I'm sure that if the Y., were to ask them for a few tips on how to keep the grass from growing they would oblige. In my young days I used to spend most of my Saturdays cutting and rolling grass. But 1 would hate to suggest that the members of the Y., could do what 1 used to do (with help of course). People are so touchy nowadays. Look at the scouts. Friday—I've spent all day wondering what is the best way to frighten people from picking my water coconuts. Shall I put an obeah bottle up the tree? Shall I fit a bulb and switch it on during the act? Shall I hire a ventriloquist and frighten the life out of the picker? Shall I pick the coconuts and leave a note saying: help yourself: don't mind me. Why do people pick other people's coconuts, mangoes, avocadoes, bananas or whatever they can get their hands on. Do they think they are doing the grower a good turn? Or do they just steal for the fun of it? Perhaps police night patrols in unexpected places would help. It seems such a waste of energy planting fruit bearing trees for others to eat. Might as well do a spot of night plucking myself, what. Anyhow the field is open for Ihe adult educationalists. Pluck only what is yours to pluck. Them's good sentiments. Saturday—The House of Assembly which has a library of sorts and which holds the purse strings might consider purchasing Ivan Payne's painting of the PublicBuildings. In this picture there are enough taxis outside the Colonial Secretary's office to justify the expense. If ever the taxis are banished, they could be painted or better still they could remain as a reminder of the power of the automobile in politics. Something like that. PLASTIC PROPELLING PENCILS LONG LEAD, SCRIPTO PENCILS, BREAK PROOF 4c. each ADVOCATE STATIO.XKIIY C. S. PITCHER & Co. WHY NOT CONSERVE VALUABLE FOOD? In STEHXK'S MBV nUXZB P1I1CE Sli.-i.OO — AVAILABLE FROM STOCK — II.. COS 1 4 fit III.. LID. I In. Drpt. i iiiiii iiii iliiii' i '"" PANS And Kitchen equipment of almnst every kind, including Oil Stoves and Ovens. Much of our stock Is of recent arrival and the full range Invites your looking and choosing— it already warrants satisfaction! HARDWARE DEPARTMENT Da Costa & Co., Ltd. I Il llll l '"' I' mi ii ii ii; I mi i iim" OROEH EAHM.Y far Myftfery Murder ROME. May 14. eighteen people of the Sardinian village of Orgosolu have been living under the threat Of death since April 1950. when 35 names of villagers appeared chalked on a church wall. The list was accompanied bv a statement that they had been sentenced to death by an unnamed tribunal. Since then, the seventeen other people on the list have all been murdered. The latest victim was a shepherd who was found dead near his flock riddled with bullets onlv three days ago. The killings are believed to be the result of a large-scale vendetta carried on by the followers of the notorious bandit leader Giovanni Battista Liandru. The Government put a ransom of £1.000 on the bandit's head and he was arrested %  ftef Living been betrayed by his wife. A %  fter the arrest the wife was killed on her doorstep. The police were unable to cope with the situation. —E.N.S. 1 YOUR PICNIC KASV TO SF.RVF Frsrs Peacbrft ApHcsU Grapes Fruats (imnrbfrrir* Apple Jui.r Grape Juke Hiillr-r, i.l< li Puddlllg Caramel Pudding MEAT DF.PT. FOR SANDWICHES Butter Bread S.IIIIIW nil lire 1.1 Butter Conrentrate Pate de Fats Grss Chrete Bbwults Carr'a Crackers Csrr'H Sweet Bfceuils Hams In Tins Cheese In Tins Chill Sauce KEEP COOL with a Gin and S. hwf ppeft Tonic A Gold Braid Rum S->r.-old with Canada Dry Sodas and Ginger Ales S Turkey* £ Chickens C Ducks A Rabbit* OXLY '2 aWaWPJQVG t* &f Phone <.nilAltllS Vow.



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PAGE TEN BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY. MAY 24. H52 1952 Football Season In Review Indians Ural Oxford tfy o g ncer.':ed. and a personal sense of satisfaction for the B.A FA Wfj successfully undertook the administration of tr qarmat Kensington NO SMUGNESS Uon that rome luinm must bo Mnujoivsi. withered by the b.AJVA. If ihcy l I that the ore to handle tours here or even ootball was a comneajotlate with wine measure nf %  ;.< kfll i*itii (ther Associations for %  %  • out of the uland b> a local team. •. • %  I deal with the pros Wh.it -to ihe two quest which thp if. Ui %  d in be no %  i tern i ooo rt d e rabl] and %  %  .-.it of Kami* team, with ;•<• convincingly indicated thai •' • %  i iof 1 to .tie I Held and Ota %  %  In OH thuji %  .( (hey rent" i n the wing %  IMPROVKMI.VT There area . mark d Improve* a seal Qraham Wllkes took chargeof a Sunday R.AF.A i utlf school. It K ikes also ran a column ai the Send i entiuen it tours i utside the island" And now for a look around the clubs; — IMANDFVlLLi: G. C.BANT. SPARTAN The Park team, who lor the past three Masons have carried off both the First lli\ Knockout competitions had to give up both cups this year. They suffered chiefly from teamwork and a resultant loss of cohesion in their play. They showed spurts of good football when they twtci ed Csrlton and once held Notre Dame to a keenly contested draw but unfortunately these few and far between. Some individual pi.. %  good performances mid showed "iKiiv of pi Y inj (iittens would have found hi.any colony team as a wing half. C-.nt i< verv promising as an mglde forward and Atkins in goal Was improving with every game he pl.iVeil HARRISON COLLEGE College were an enigma this season. I sew them play their first game and their i play was .1naai pet \< eUon possible. They were the only LONDON. Carlton at tlr>l played their The Indian touring team 1 quick short passing game but day won their ilr-t match of t - of Uie best ticrformanee*. • 4 aha I-^ft U) BCCen W teams above them .h the B.A.F.A tourtstt set about the ta-k "'"''"i' light-hearted manner. Umri J'E J MC £* was *>Jh,tandfollowed his erst innings doub'e ing and both "Booglra" Williams century by collecting 29 .11 ten rSl.St'T !" ""'^'"""i n "minutes and the runs were ^^ ood _/ orm towards the close off in 25 mm A fine spell of bowling by ." !"J Denis Compton brought Middlesex their victory of the season of the Warren was deadly act right wing and a useful man tn goal, while Clairmontc w* generally useful. the cross field pass, that used jo before. They then of purpose Notre Dame deserves the championship of the B.A FA.. Li _! %  -? which they won with the chamOT pionshlp of the Seci.ni thrown in for good maasure. From a comparatively mediocre .tart they welded themselves by constant and assiduous practice into a team that played as a team alter the first two flxturas. Paul Miindevillc. the captain. D kel brothers, left winger, centre-half and inside forward along with the experienced f*_ McColhn at right wing formed a food iitlacking force while the defence with Browne and BtreOghn as full-backs and Wilkinson in goal constituted a forc ^ SMITH too selfish I s M was unfortunate that Dan.cl. ^.JJiVdo /'•;/ Sea Scouts lU>al James Street Barbados First Sea Scouts In OOd dlvUMr Kasketball fbrturc si %  -i-et ft; Scouts won with 22 points U Those wt. ,. response for the scoring •u-\\ rdness and specially he Knockout compem weak chanfea ni lho Bohool any good UmesI shall warm up lltlon. Had he been there Notre (ean > Howevcr lhtv were c)ear tradu ally." DsmwmtaM at least J Jf n winners of the Inter-School comWint, a medical student at te oMhe^finalists in the Knocsp^,,,,,,,, mnd for hl lht v deaarv* London University, will not have congratulations. I am expecting to wait to be chosen by Britain to see them do much better next t„ run '" (he Olympics, in at the expense of Qtow Lord's Thla victory iiy ill run^ enables Middlesex to retain tneii place at the top of the clumpn *hlp table. Compton giving his leftarm spinners plent> troubled all the batsmen and after lunch claimed five of the h:x wickets that fell, the Gloucesajosiui iron :4B for 3 to 203 all out. Another fine performance by George Tribe, who cU.inu.1 tiv< wickets for 80, enabled Northants to secure their second victory of the season, this time over Sussex, by 118 1 Scoreboard:— Indians beat Oxford University by nine wickets. Oxford 22'. and 232. Indians 398 for 3 deetared, .mti 62 for 1. Combined Service* beat Quunorgan by 80 run-. Combined Services 243 and 165. Glamorgan 185 and 143. Northants beat Sussex by 118 runs. Sussex 135 and 247. Northsnta 168 a n d 334 for 7 declared. Derby beat Worcester by ten wickets. Derby 350 for 9 declared and 14 Un none. Wei and 210. (Gladwln 5 for 67) Essex n Surrey. Hatch drawn. Surrey 417 for 9 declared nnd 227 for 7 declared. E-. -. 3 ln 251 for 7. 1,1 Kent vs. Somerset M a 11 h :a _; drawn Somerset 387 and 6 declared. Kent 374 and 102 Lancashire va W ar w i c k Mattfe rlrawn. Warwick 288 nn.l 208 for 5 declared I.incashi.e 28P for 9 declared and 79 for I %  gjfldgaaea be .'. Olo a ill runs. Middlesex 138 gad Ufl (Ed rich 73*. Glcucegter 1!1 nnd 203. ,-ompetltii EMPIRE At one stage of the competition is :!< %?&£?$& nmpetitlon. They had %  term baals Hi %  '<> %  i words 1 e.... to t,: ir ample frull In due season In the IJata future. .-pell of gool football and made an unbeatin run until Everton came from the bottom of the table and defeated them upsetting all their calculations and a defeat at the hands of Notre Dame too did not assist their chancel TOWS With regard I ur, it m/ r much ft .' th.i en be no greater fillip at present Dravton was the brains of !h to local football than a tour out of forward line and Taylor had 1 (he island, th.it Utey are faced at goo d season. Valiant in th n of joindefence was S. 1. Smith, casil. "'X U* been ,„„. 0 f the best individual player 1 %  %  II la season while Grant I taking „. 1at full-back worked Ilk" part m tournaments that Include Trojan as is his wont. lo Jamaica. Thpy reached the seim-llnals Tiiuiuad. llrillsh Guiana. Surinam, ne Knockout sompetitlon but I w them an into the n "n the other hand ther? Is the aiteniatiN,' of angaglng a non mtnibcr of this association, say Qrenada, St. Vloearrl or even Martinique Thr aaa a on took place at a tune tvhen the to be drcide l p they plan ultl 1 %  : l^ill there EXPEBIENCE Added to this i, th. i of hb decision U> run for Jamaica, Ha Intends also to defend Ins Amateur Athletic Association UUa against a strong field that will include Hoger Uantustcr KtteUVa mile champion, who is now ri centretlni on the half-mile. —tVl'.P. Argentines May Drive BRM 9 8 At Grand Prix WEATHF^ REPORT YESTERDAY Rjlnfall from Codrington: .12 in. Total rainfall for month to date: 1 89 IDS. Highest Temperature: 86 5 *F Lowest Temperature: 72 6 *F Wind Velocity a miles per hoar Barometer <9 a.m.) 29.968 (3 p.m ) 29 889 TO-DAY Sunrise: fi 38 a.m. Sunset 6 17 p.m. Moon: New. May 23 Lighting: 7 0O p.m. High Tide: 2 M a.m. 4 24 pi Low Tide: 10.02 a > ui |. n WHAT'S ON TODAY Aanual BcouterConference. Scout Headquarters Beckles Road 9 a.m. Yachting. Carlisle Bay—2.30 O I U Fete. Quean's Psrk— 3 p.m. N" 1. Nanbrr Onr ,N. 1. H-. Mr It I mi h IU Mil ii4i-.... ( ,ii r.c. N*. i, A GRAND DANCE • %  *ua*a> Nlrhl. May ItUi IBM •l HII.I.MUt S04IAI. CUB by "luUi ,. •/. Mgtl. i,. Mr P#rr, |||||-| OcrhHlra rutnue MaqovTi ON sai,g BVa ^tl' ll sund ami ihr I. WE CAN FIT YOU with a SUIT that Uattera your build — a Suit you can chooee horn a wide range ol popular tabrlcs —a suit that haa all the details ol modern atyUnq that you insist on I WE WILL WELCOME the . opportunity ol proving this to you in our . TAILORING DEPARTMENT oh the Flrat Floor ol CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street DANCE Irval (••• %  •in %  '* % % %  •gktaa i '..!.. gate • •-NH.HI L..&W. Play Today The follow iixg pia>crs ni Ui.ble & Y* irclcsa .111 ,s. Carli LONDON. May 23 Argentina driving new Jiuin Manuel Fanglo and Jose Froih.ii (•onzalo!* reporteei forn.ancc The driver has not \ct been nominated but Brttaln'a No i drtvei Stilling Moss will I-tal in the sjx.rts car race in Monaco and the Argentine, anexpected to Like wheel. Alfa Romcos which have dominated postwar formula one racing will not .inpele at Albi but F, %  Phone 4267 for GALVANISED CORRUGATED SHEETS 26 (..ur:.and 28 < .:• %  EVERITK C'OKRUCIATED SHEETS EVERITE TRAFFORD TILES STANDARD IIARDBOARD The Board of I. Uses INSULATING WALLBOARD WALLBOARD MOULDINGS WOOD MOULDINGS, corner & fll ALUMINIUM MOULDINGS Phone 4267. WILKINSON & BAYNES CO., LTD. e-ee*" Play starth at I p.m. N. r. Clarke iCapt.), B. M. Ilatthevtt, R ii McKeruue, H. M. (Jroncy, ll. 11. King, A. C Cozier. t Ci. Skcete, C. C. S4-ale, C. 11. A. White and E. L. lUiitiKer. sUTNl pji bay playeri i M inn.t of their na tahea Thej loo rnada aaveseJ I'liaiigeb in then lnu--up almost every mutch and then scope for building a team liaynes atai ion-, b %  and was without doubt Ihelr bast player. One game th. Mime flushei. or their bi whin they got into thru strids and defeated Empire, thou lead. ers of the cornnetltlon bill they did not re p a a l this effo I I |8 and a late win over Spartan kept them safely away fron . they have survived to on leei CABLTON A iteifeet example of anticlimax is the fact that Carlton 1 having left for AfKlgUa hava won Hi.. Knockout Cup and ..ii tour and although the suhstiin Ihe B.A FA. coniiH'titlon have tutt-s were not disgi.n-ed rel mushed bottom of the table and they were "knocked out "• so are In line for relegation \ Rayakla (Capt.), E. w. 1,1'tDTAv 1 Cave. C. E. Small, A. Mason, M. I.W.KHM o Husbanda, RWal•£? ^L7'!i.' l, ? a to L %  *w*ck. J. Hlgajlnaon, their promotion to the First H Cook. E. Gibson and I. Cumion. Ihcy were without UM mm-, en of Bladea. one of then _.^^^^^___ ,.,,,„,..„ ,,._„ ...„i -,... compete at Albi but Ferraris and '* , Z~?; "strong competition. -f.P. bi-tio.ii team at Laodge to%  J_ Empire 28(t; Antigua 77—1 Lxxlge i .ill start at 130 W. A. DRAVTON A ltd only four of the old brfgada Fri>m Our Own Corrr*pund>nti ANTICUA. UaySt At 1he clc*e ct the second day's play of the Empire Antigua Test. Antigua had made 7? runs for the past Week, loss of one wicket in reply to de Justice Empire's 1st innings score of 288. of OBThe wicket was perfect and the Empire Melding kecr. iHiackiHirne attended Ticket after tea. i M rii I-I DratttiQi Ibw b. CMIUIIK M HIDK-OLT n>u\>els: For thi I twyen In the Pali at furnes^—southtend—have been complaining to the iMillcc that gown* and robes were bebl| %  ) :.eir the ( cloaloranai Tht thefl contjaued despite repeated aaerehea. Lfarry K V.'.',i,l' one niornnn; ., watchman heard T-yU>i b Waicd ntortruj in one of the rest room*. r|*CJ He found %  . pile of robes, and | M-yeer-old Mnhel Narvtua b <-.<, ir • I the £g" ,,' tt "*|'^ u Belgian Army. Declared Stevens; ru.a... find me if I Kid in the 1'alan de c "* r Tot.1 I %  ) b Anlhoci}! itho b Walcutl WORLD'S MOST COPIED TRACTOR trilh a rhuicti ot thrw t'lii/int's — unify •V.l'Mf. I />•/v/rii/ and .\On' Oil utesEL This wonderful machine is now also available with FULL-TRACKS You'll be (ruly amazed lo see this smalllooking unit performing jobs, both in the Held nnd on the road, that are beyond wheel Tractors of twice ita Horsepower. This Tractor is indeed the friend of both the small and large Plantation owners alike and Ihe price is well within your reach. He shall /• pi<-us,;l to. arrange a ilvmonMlration at your rvquvut ItOIII III TIIOM LIMITED COURTESY GARAGE DIAL 4616 I They'll Do It Every Time _By Jimmy Hatlo ROSOtA-* CAMSD MEK pjUFe TiMES [XMRATA CUP' BiOCA" oi -rue pv*>J=y 1/ blew -THEY'RE MARKED AHD-WEIX,>O0 KNOW "THE REST .' youwoRMlN OUT^lLNieWT. 1 WHY nOerT >CHJ HAve-rue CALL UP SO I WOOU3>?T woRy? V AW! Keep YOUK MACKINAW ONX WAS WOKKJNt, LATZl DIDN'T H.4VE TIME! ml* t "LADIES AND GENTLEMEN THE BRIDE AND GROOM" The supreme moment of a wonderful occasion and the supreme toast Hi II >M U K & CO'l. DRY M0N0P0LE CHAMPAGNE THK CHAMPAGNE YOCR GUESTS WILL PREFER STOKES a BYN0E LTD -**je



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BARBADOS \DV(l( \ 1 I PACE NINF. NATIONAL EMPLOYERS MUTUAL GENERAL INSURANCE ASSN. LTD. Offer You Insurance Against All Risks. When you Insure with N.E.M. You become a Member— Your Problems. Difficulties & Claims are treated in-a spirit of Mutual Co-operation Why Not Enjoy the Difference Full Particulars at Your Disposal— From -A. S. BRYDEN & Sons (B<>.. TITTllUfcll l our Uru I ,11.,11. irln-s Twrrdiilr. Hill N*;III Sli-i-i-i' Tins Oranne Juice Tins I"AM Y HlstT'ns IMayhox Brass circle Joy 11. %  11 • Tins Imp: Oxford iMMfM Tins HMN'Z SOUPS: Vegetable Oxtail Bottles r.reen Seal Kum Bottles Csrie Beer 31. 2.08 Ml 2.12 69 .34 M 1.20 .21 N.IH S .:i2 ins 1.(8 IBS 111 :.a :i2 l.tHI 2tl 111 1411 CANNES VEGETABLES Tins Brussels Sprouts S .44 Tills Cauliflower .70 'fins Hi...ill Hejins .M I %  > %  t iii'iv (wkon) .98 Tim Celen (cut) .70 Tills Vaaag Green Peas V 1 A HE . H O < E II I E I Thv #*/•• II # %  <•- %  Your Oullur #•>• I mil,ftTHE BARBADOS MUTUAL LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY Wf AT THE I11TH YEARLY ORDINARY GENERAL MEETING HELD ON FRIDAY, I8TH APRIL Th. Directors fleported that S2.2:.:,.o:,> ,\i:w HISIMSS issued in 1951 wen a neon For Ihe Society Olher Principal Features were :— INCOME : From Premiums .... Sl.042,105.70 interest. Dividends 'flAP*-*" and Rents S4S1.682.18 Less Income Tax 54.428.62 397.253.52 CLAIMS: By Death 43 under 70 MWM assuring 131.083.00 Bonus s .. 91,071.00 By Maturity 236 Policies assuring 161.004.00 Bonus 149.416.00 RATE OF INTEREST : Belore Payment of Income Tax 4.53 per cent Alter Payment ol Income Tax 3.38 per cent COMMISSION 4 EXPENSES OF MANAGEMENT: Ratio lo Premium Income .... 17.23 per cent LIFE ASSURANCE FUND : Added as result ol year's working The total Fund is now S 440.645.92 $10,391,159.16 INVESTMENT RESERVE FUND: Now Totals $ 623.915.06 C. K. BROWNE. Secretary.



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PACE SIX Jamaican IWI.rr pfg^ {fat* Dr. Mala,, 2 Wamen 46 ,. BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATL'tDAV, MAY 14.1M2 NOTICE In St. Pauls Cathedral LONDON. In the Auuunt Court of Appeal Sw.^.ll'i.'' ,' i" 0 "" m %  J"*** !" "'. M. Jam*. 25,.nd 2" 1 "-aUwdral "bass l.il dun'ttma Is b* Paul in mm div. '" %  n ChtMlaa ftard labour for 53SEJ lidVls negro ila NAMES Amount granted %  %  %  < B i tin of dared DaUeUia Hu,da also of Envongrrjfaii a, II la near hypos'. By imyusaia. tim, n „„ r^eii o or inlrrvrning In Korao Honour, confirmed ma incision ul "'•""'" !" n ""• %  "JJL W <""IP %  *,. S. H. Nurs*. Th. i„ „;^ '""''" 0ur •" "*"" %  • commmed on IX*. !" l" ~uth Africa. ""r 10. Cowual war* Mr Has Uiillcd Naliona are avowMlv " Malon* tor llina> L ar* being lr.rr.plad oil 1n *aaaa war,broughi flU *&""** 'ui">*sttvats dav raauli M a tujhl wmen (.Mrkc n day %  Hindu Had on Dronum 20 u, 3 Speaking bj inrrirw of Dr '"• "hl Hlnda was billed on Ul tllan. the South Alncan Prime "" %  >/ Clarke. mi.ter D r Jamen ciumu %  "> to which so BMD1 hi %  their hv* ,„ II., second wprld war ln 3?"' * ourl be accepted by so. .1 submitted that it wa kral started tile lignt. ilb. "ii.ir woDia,, loajsr, if ti„ court acI Ci lli'ius then : ner. ens to plunge into bloodshed Many Children Which Told The Truth Mr. Dear submitted that th, .'ie in which the judge; id to look carefully arM s.< ', ^rrirrtr. r,^r.rs. to "i: ron i* l( ,v % %  L "•'" u >" '• M it wa.i clear .. ha T.w"l,n. Cnmmun.ii, ^.f wtmt t.nn should b* p-,u in '" ^,S '. f '"-* J,Kl *• %  u,K r " wpervialon i, onure HnOMntOMnMUnM waa noUiliut aurpriiiun, %  Ttii '""' l d nul me -" 1 • nnl %  %  injur> B.I'. i. ooietod was serious. %  "I am submitting that the inr.uiic.'. that Hiuds received were i .\ i.ii .HI 11 UHM U no IWBM Iti %  A /!-. I t?' f "i %  • Clarke should have to pay more -WftP/M/ I'/XnibitlOn money than the other woman. The (lecLsum should be revt-rs<. of appM | Th IT tM propei-ty ur Ihe BaibadoS -<>pe:ative Bank Ltd. and ware '. the Band. Insured. GOVERNMENT NOTICES < ,tion ,if o Tool of Executiv* Officer to a Secondary Indus trie* Board The Govrrmncnl of Antigua Is considering the creation ol a pott of Executive Ulltcer to a Secondary Industries Board which it tbortl> lo be established. The duties of the Executive Officer will Includ* supervision of a Cotton Ginnery, a commeal factory, an arrowroot mill aricTi cannery. In addition the Officer will be required to advise the Board on the technical aspects of any further secondary Industrie* which may bo introduced in the Presidency. These Industries will be on *, small scale and It is not expected that the Executive Ortlcer should be an expert in all of them. a practical man wi.h a Knowledge of electricity and machind c Journal on February is'. if 4 aml J,in '' 7,, %  'M7, |an (< lili of arrangements between HM Govertii;,..:,rranch G ni-n-nt relating to compensation In "*f'^ "' i -'"> %  in France, and notified the Qnal d.iv .. >inis us IJecembar tlst, 1847 An x %  : ,.| : Ml 0 .,... f0l m. ub mlsalon of claims to Jul> ah. 1B-.2 hi rww 1 NRI ,J intod nndar AKicle S7 of Law No 52—5 of J l,uat %  %  %  ets. Corporttlona tnd Astoelalions Whose elaims were, off would have been, rejected because the* were tubmlttad after December .list, 147. It should, however, be ttotM hat this Itw does not permit the reconsideration of claims which have bean finally rejected for anv < it her reason. qtainu mual be mad* h) the I Dah War Damage authorities direct and should be In tha i MM Government can accept no ratp"nsi!'ili*\ for ihe tclua) tling and prosccullon of claims. 14.5 52.—In VACANT FOR M MMOh HI \Llll Nl RRK. DEPARTMENT OrMEDf. \I. SHRVHKS Al '' "" %  '" %  l "'" l 'i "'pensionable posl of Seni.T Health Nurse. Daparlnnl of Medic a 6 Of $1,200 x 32 $1,440 per nnnum. rn oeklluon, a uvmporar) nontatttoBabla COM of living allowance wfll be i-ayable in nccord."icc i;h approved rates. I'M' i.n fa rr.>viried. 'l>c spool!, m nl will he on two years' probation and subject to ;i>e Mbctad ..ppne.-int balng poaaad M medically m for amplovmem HI the Public Service. Tl "' pUotart *,ll be posted trt ihe Health Centre Speightsimvi, In the llrst instan-e whore furnished quarters are provided and will be subject to tin r,r lo any Public Health area in the Colony. ApDlieantr mn-t I .• ieiristere & Horatio W.IIM.U, Julia f. WtUaea, Seiiiett .. Weskas. ClilTord T. per Wneke-: R Wiltshire, Drusilla st Jsaaea. Ruird. LesUe .. ,, Best. Arthur B l a c k m ail, James per Agard. Alvo .. la.rn. it. Lionel Click. Jaapag M. Est, Doughlln, Joseph N. Dee per Doughlin. Blmin Drakes. Samuel Estwick, Benjamin R. 1 Farley, Minthy A Fletcher, Alberthn per Ske-t* St c Fletcher. AJbortha per Skeotff St C ,. ... Greaves. UiUicefit Hall. Kglonton Walter M Hinds. Alfred per Hinds, Carlolla ., ,, Husbands. Clarence Johr.snn. Matthew Jordan, Samuel per Jordan IW MULsr, AUrrd .t alto . .Wilert Alfi'.-d nnd IJcoriSh, F. tst. Hhillips. .Votinan Dae i.ei Phillip'. Albertine ft Eustace Saiidlford, Ivan ft St. Clair Sprlngfr. Walter ft Kathleen Thomas. Sarah Skeete. Dauphlness si Fatar. Bend. James Bend, Nathaniel .. ., Edwards. Flu (•tikes. Albartha Harris. Lilian A Rock. Martha Jane Sober*, Selwyn A. Skeete. Simeon Welch. Egerton St. C. Worrell. Jamet X. Yeaiwood. Evelyn 1L Kl Lacy. Armstrong, Olga Austin, Kenneth M. Austin. Lionel A. Itabb, Adolphua . Babb. Blvira ft Ronald I'' -II.iiny. Mo: tuner O. . Boyce, William B. O. Brome. Adlnah .. llro-ime, Ctilisla S. Brome, Charlas Brome, Edgeton , Brome, Haldane H. Chandler. Frederick William Collymotc, Sydney Collymnre. WiUlam H. Cnllymore. William H. Colthrust Jamet A, Co.bin, Laatar Cumberbatch, William C Forde. K,. ... O. .. Gibbons, Charlas Goodridge. Henry ft Maude Grant. Oeorg* Orant, Ruth Greaveo, Elson Griffith. Adolphua Howtjfl, Evalyn C. Mc.eary, Seon I. Ix-slie. Mildred ft Theresa More. Frederick .. Roaoh, Gii'eon A. Bkattft, Edmund .. at*, Garfleld . Bkeata, Oliver DeC Skinner, Joseph A. ., aUocotnb*, Norman SpMnger. i : 'oplier Yrjiuood. Cyril .. ,, Vviiwd, Darnlay M Andrew Alleyne. Philip .. Allcyne, Stanley Est. Belgrave, Fred A. Dec. per <-. Jotapli ft Rosa ., I-enjiunin, Adrianna ,, __ Best. Edwin A Campbell. TheopbilUf ,, .. '• %  i % %  iiiBton. PriscUla ,, Claika. Chnrles M. .. Cumbvt^atCta, Cleophas ., rvvighlin. Jonathan ,. ,, Foster, Harold ., .. Foster. Joseph B. .. ., Fn'tp Nathaniel ,, „ Francis, Albert William Goodridge. Theophilus ,. ,. 11 ante. Archibald Hurst. Franklyn DeC .. Hill. Aaron Jordan. I^slw Kellman. Elijah MeD. ,. Kt'ilman. Ethel Lcacoek. Kliiabeth Moore. Fltz ,, Murray, Joseph Mai shall. Cecil H. Medford. Richard F Moaie. William H Moms. Joseph N. Payne. Louise Roach. Leon DaCosta Roachford. Ezra Roachford. Rosalie and Adolphus Sandiford. William Springer Joseph N LOANS. PEASANTS' LOAN BANK AMOUNT granted Locality > a. 144 00 Cave Hill S::;; .luaguu Hall M II %  MOO Codnngton Hill 30 00 Jtouen Villaxe 54 00 llaggatt Hali 36 00 100 00 Clevedale 60 00 .tocR Dundo 19.00 %  iaggatt Hali 100. oo Jacksons •0,00 Haggau Hall 16 II" •io,nersal Turning 29 00 Nr. Codrlirn Hill 35 00 Wnitehall 30.00 Rural Co. 360.00 Nr. Buxton -,..... 50.00 flush HaU 100 00 Whitehall 72.00 Sailers 36 00 '...ggatl Hall 90 00 72 00 100.00 Lodge Hill Mush Hall Whitehall 144.00 ilsggstt Hall 20 UO .. 54 00 40 00 St. sskefifcon's Hill 150.00 Salters 36 00 >lt. Friendsh'p 144 00 iush Hall 40 00 (aggatt Hail 50.00 J.I1 KIII.IIK iBush Hall 60.00 IM.OO Flint Hail S6 00 friendship 20 00 Jackmanc ion mi Hajgatt H. n 19.00 %  260 40 Garden 40.00 Wetton 54.00 Rock Dundo M5 Oil Cftrtton 240 00 West on 36 OO Orange Hill 72.00 Fltts Village 50 00 Pur:ei 174.00 Orange Hill MOO Wetton 36 (10 Ml. S:. i; ,dr. 45 00 36 00 Carlton Nr. Tha H. 126 00 Mt Standfast 36 00 '.00 00 Holders',"!' ;; 100.00 Carlton 72.00 Weatan 45 00 •• 36 on Mt. StaiadXast 30 00 Carlton 100 00 Prospect 50 00 Weston 36 00 Mt Standfast *" n.oo Ashton HaU 72.00 Ashton HaU 71.00 Ashton Hall 20.00 Mile ft c. 36.00 The Whim 90.00 The Whin 140.00 Ashton Hull •5.00 Ashton H ; dl 70.00 Aehton Hall 100.00 The Whim 75.00 Ashton 11.ii, 54.00 Archers 150.00 Josey Hill 90.00 F'I Cine: 36 00 Cub Hill 120 00 Crab Hill 80 00 Alexandria 23.00 Chance Hall 90.00 Chance Hall 72.00 Josey Hill 25.00 Crab Hill 72.00 Nr. Spring Garden 71.00 Harrison^. 100.00 Checker Hall 111.00 Pie Corner 200.00 Northumberland 144.00 Well Held 120.00 Chance Hall 90 on Chance Hall 90.00 Harrisons MOO Half Moon Fort •o.oo Nr. Retreat ft Wakeham •0.00 Petersys M.00 Crab Hill 29 00 Salmonds 60.00 Pie Corner 60 Oil Ni. Lowland 80.00 Checker Hnll 135 00 Babbs •0 00 Sea View 216.00 Checker Hall 200.00 Nr. Low la i ,: 120.00 Checker H ill 72.00 Checker Hall 250 00 Durham & D-.lev 30.00 Checke, f{..11 54.00 Crab Hi. 36.00 94.00 iraveyard Checker H.ll MOO Northumberland 20.00 Bellcplairu•2.00 St. Simom •0.00 St. Simon> 36 00 Rock Hall M 00 Rock Hall 106.00 Belleplaine BO no Cane Garden 72 00 Mount All 72 00 Walkers 72 00 Walkers 126 00 Mount AU 190.00 'litlaby ft Whltehlli Rock HaU 60 00 %  I. 00' Hlllaby 40.00 Relleplain.144.00 .'elleplainc 71 00 Walkers 130 00 Mount All M 00 Mslleplaine 60 00 Cane Oftrdrn 150.00 i.-ilepl.ii 66.00 Hlllaby to 00 Mount All 50 00 Mount AU •0 00 Chalky Mount 229 00 Mount All 4W 00 50 00 Rock Hail IN.M %  0.00 72 on Slrf*' u:*! m .. io A. R. P 2 0 00 7 1 03 1 1 39 > 07 1 02 2 20 1 01 1 01 4 0 24 1 V M 1 01 1 1 00 1 1 05 1 1 00 14 1 0 O.I 2 00 1 1 "I 1 • M 1 0 M 1 0 12 1 "i 1 1 M 1 0 ft 1 i 16 I 0 M 1 0 04 3 Of. 1 00 1 2 00 1 11 1 1 13 1 1 I 0 0 1 0 2 i 04 oo 16 00 02 H oo 12 M ll 00 20 01 00 I 27 1 15 0 30 0 00 3 02 2 1 1 1 I 0 4 2 1 .! 1 0 I 1 2 1 2 1 2 02 00 24 04 16 It 07 20 11 00 1 • H 4 • %  1 1 ? 3 1 1 it k Andrew-lCentlnuedt Siephenson, Charles B Tri..u.|f.,i.. OssatJ Thi.niL*..n. Oacar Vaugaian. Benjamin Worrell. Clarice . Worrell. Subert Yearwood. Joseph N M J-es>h Alleyne. Alma B. Brewster. Clement Bryan, Bonny Eyra Forde. Joseph N. .. Hcadley, Easton A. Holder. Aubrey N. Hotton, Edna L C. Mayers. James N. Taltt. Caspar Alleyne. Lilian C. Barnctt. Evelyn E. Belgrave, Edith Blades. Dorcas Browne. Edmund Lisle %  row ne. llermione Clarke. Egbert D. ... Codrington. Edith Est. Codrington. Egerton Dec. per Codrington, Eunice .. Downes. Joseph per Downes. Dalton Forde. Elson W Est, Green, Emmanuel Dec. per Green. Kate Eat. Oraen, Fiuherberl Dec. per Green. Grace .. llaynes. Henry W. Shepherd. Fit* G. L. Shorey. Sarah and Codrlngtor John Thorne. Clement per Codrington. E. Wrtlrond. St Clalr Walrond. Agnes st. Philip. Allevne, Bruce E. and Evans O. ,\;i.vne, Melvln W Batson. Lavlnla Bayne. Robert F Bcckles, Joseph J. Brathwalte. Carol W Bralhwalte. Chesterfield Brathwalte, Edrlc Est Brathwailc^ Julian Dec. pei Brathwalte, Theophilus and Ethnia Callender, Eva E. Clarke, James N Codrington, Milllcent A. Daniel, Fltiherbert Deane, Dorothy et alia Edgehlll. Edward B. . Ellis. George A. Forde. Clarence C. Gooding. Ethel Goodlng. Ethel Gretmdge. Eva W. Giernidgc, Lionel E. Greenldge. Matilda Harewood, Walter L Holder. Warwick Hunte, Donald DaC. .. Hunte, James A, Hutchinson, Loon .. Jones, William C. DaC. Jones, Ethelbcrt L. Jones. Julian L. ... RrL Kirton, Emma Dec. per Pilgrim, Elliott Lord. Lillian B. ... Lord, Louisa Marshall. Beresford G. Marshall. Beresford O. Mason, Jamet McCarthy, Arthur B. .. Newton. Ernestine A. Payne, Monington D. Roach. Winifred Sargeant, Drusiila Mealy. Thomas H. Stuart. Joseph Walcott, John E. Wiltshire. Harman A. Ward, Louis U Est. Wynllsld, Athalia Dec. per Bushell. Dodson Christ i i. HI. h Adams, Theodore Barrett, Fitzherbert Barrow, Charles R. Bauon, John H. Best. Amanda J. per Morris. Francis Bispham. Miriam Bullen, Lucille I. Carter, Ernest P. A Clarke, Samuel Drayton, Joteph Edwards. Cecil J. Eversley. James N. Evelyn. Julian St. C. .. Flatts. Lottie M. Gittens, Reuben Goodridge. Christina Graham, Samuel Grannum, C. Hugh O. Greene. Lewln C. Mil, Simeon B. ... Jones, Dudley K. Kinch. Heiekiah King, Enid King. J. Adelbert Kirton, Clara B. Knight, FiU Clarence Layne. G. Kathleen Layne, May E. Legal). Alexander I ..well. Milton A Maloney, Egbert W. Nurse, Benjamin Nurse, Samuel A. Ptlt, Louisa Powictt. Robert J. Rose, Leitha per Rose. Jonathai Ryan. Charles A Small. Gaston S. . Taylor, Marie Walcott. Edward .. Weekes, Ernest W Walcott. Felix Wiltshire, St Clalr Taylor. George H. S|. George. Belle. George F. A. & Deuel Birkett. Joseph A Corbin. Cecil A Gittens, Allan Harding. James E. .. Holmes. Irene .. IniiiSH, Charles E. •* Violet Miller, Benjamin Sargeant. Arthur .. Scott. Chariot C. Salman, Cecilia T. Trotman. George E 'I. Thasnaa. n-indeld. Martha Bispham. Aberdeen R Br.ithwaite. James A Pnica. Wllhelmlna ChrtsUe, Ernest .. .. (.:• Ti>n .i.,-.#.ph N. Collina, CrrUM Cox. Estelle .. ., .. Oorunt. I'rince A. Durant Allan F. per Duraslt, Mabel F,..rle Baryl A Grimes. Cvnthia Edey. Elijiah Fnrne Corneliuf .. Gihlte. Rosa OlbtSMV Ct.irencP McD Jemmott. Ethelbcrt McL Jordan. Mary R I. Joseph .. ,, Luke. Lilian E. M. Odlc. Kenrick R. Payne. Rose Prescod. Croydon F. B. .. Reece, Adlno Seale. James A. McD. %  %  tl, Stephen MeD. E*^ Wllkutaon, idartrd E. Dec per Wilkinson. Florence E $ c. M.IM 72 0U HW.U0 *.U0 M.W 79.00 40.UO 00.00 20.00 36.00 H.OO 50.00 60.00 la uU SO.00 108.00 11*.oo 26.00 36.00 M. 00 36.00 1&4.00 72.00 36.00 30.00 100.00 36.00 26.00 100.00 29.00 144 00 144 00 50.00 00.00 144.00 30.00 60.00 60.00 100.00 40.00 40.00 525.00 216.00 90.00 200.00 72 00 60.00 do.oo BO.00 125.00 72.00 50.00 40.00 50.00 60.00 40.00 72 00 100.00 70.00 100.00 100.00 36.0036 00 54.00 160.00 50.00 36.00 38.00 150.00 60.00 60.00 70.00 125.00 38.00 16.00 72.00 600.00 576.00 140.00 SO.00 80 00 200.00 200.00 70.00 36 00 100.00 100.00 woo 60 00 72 00 36 00 54.00 216.00 40.00 20.00 20.00 36.00 480.00 78.00 35 00 36.00 20.00 126.00 54.00 100 00 30.00 72.00 82.00 72.00 94.00 288 00 50.00 200 00 36 00 50 00 50.00 30 OO 180 00 20.00 240.00 100 00 75.00 54.00 190 00 40 00 100.00 30.00 72.00 42 no 36.no 29.00 72.00 84.00 36.00 72.00 36 00 100 DO 50 00 60.00 70 00 50 00 100.00 60.00 180.00 36 00 75.00 36.00 50.00 120.00 86 no 20.00 75.00 72.00 4'i M 50.00 50 00 27 OO 36.00 86 00 288 00 30 00 36 00 St. Simon* Rock Hall WsflBtri Betleplaine Mount All Sugar Hill ChimborasMi St. Sylvans Sugar Hill Vanture CTcaver's HU1 Braggt HUi Venture aineraourne It Cn. Grove aealy HaU venture .11'..... Hall Spooners sii-warfs Hill Clifl Col Jarters Scaly Hall Masslah Street Sealy HaU Cartert Nr. Ulenbournie Sealy Hall Stewart's HIU Nr. Bath 4t Welches Sealy Hall Nr. Apple Hall Kast bourne Mar ricks Diamond Valley Six Roads Nr. Uayley, Bequest Diamond Valley Eastbourne Kirtons Diamond Valley Stroud Land Supers Kirtons Bayflald Industry Hall Spring Farm Kirtons East Point Pitchers Airy Hdl Diamond Valley Pounders Eastbourne Nr. Hopeland East Point Merricks Kirtons Merricks Diamond Valley Eastbourne Diamond Valley Kirtont Pounders Nr. Stone Hall Nr. Bequest East Point March!) eld Marley Vale Nr. Palmers Little Hope Etabtbuurne Baylteid E.i-ll.i'Ui i.i-' Marchtleld Nr. Palmers East Point Diamond Valley Vauxhall MaxweU Pilgrim Clapham Enterprise Chancery Lane Fair View Lead Vale Kendal Hill Charnoeks Clapham Bartletts Wllcox Enteipric Pegwell Hopewell Lodge Road Bartletts Maxwell Pilgrim Nr. Warners Clapham Below Rock Enierprisc Nr. Goodland Chancery Lane & Hopewell Wllcox Charnoeks Nr. Ryecroft Sayes Court Enterprise Chancery Lane Charnoeks Bournes Bournaa Maxwell Hill Ventnor Maxwell Hill Nr. Eating Grove Gall Hill Charnoeks Edey's Village Sargennt's Village Sargeant's Village Chancery Lane Rock Hall •Talker-, Valley Workman's ILikgatt Hall Greens Walk***! Valley I %  %  '. ValleRock Mall Sweet Bottom EUtrton Cole Hole Middle, on Rock Hall Jackson* Welchman Hall Shop Hill & —Grand View Christie's Vlllnge Welchman HaU Rock Hall Welchman Hall Orand View Welchman Hall Rock Hall Spring Farm Welchman HaU Welchman Hall Kew Land Welchman Hall Wjjchman Hall WeTchman Hall Spring Farm Bridge (1 eld it Jacktons Rock Hall Rock Hall Rock Rail Welchman HaU Welchman Hall Welchman HaU • Ot. Mta 1 3 04 J I 00 4 1 M S 32 1 0 S 00



PAGE 1

SATURDAY. MAY 24. 1S2 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAC.E FTVK First Co-Operative Society Registered Under New Act Will Said To Be Will Pass On Burnt: C.J. Kvidence St. Barnabas Co-Op. Society ; %  ;; Has Membership Of Sixty MB when "l i* contrary of these were admitted • %  new own opinion. member* jt our last meeting a*> Team Spirit %  result of %  special membership Your co-operative foctety may oiive effected by Mr. Yard our aptly be compared to %  football, P**nt Instructor and the CoFOR THE FIRST TIME in ihe history of Barbados, a r cricket, team. The success of f^'J* *£*; V"** 6 b > mrm o-opera.iye society was registered under the recently f$^m^jgfr* ^VUS STSti hi. v.i.abte enacted Co-operative Society s Act when the Certificate of goo d team split The aim of the y r *' experience in agriculture d*' 110 1 Registration of the St. Barnabas Co-operative Marketing team mat be the same, playing a* an instrument in bringing wl Society Limited was presented to its President (Mr, Ran f""P and winning the match. Jhew peasants together and It Is THE CHIEF JUSTICE Sir All*] decided to pass on to the police certain avsttafsCa In connection with the alttcnvd bun ii I ol tha l*ta I Sail i Butharlai I Luc^ bj BrwvUord Babb of inc nnu dlttriet Without prejudgim: him, tht Chltl Juatka Mid trow tinnidenca w hich i um before the Court, he wu lattsficd thai Babb km w about the will and seemed .• have had ;t tnded ptnliu] on the evidence to the Police who might bring, a case for the destroying of the will or perjury. DRINK & ENJOY TRINIDAD. ^SGE .CRAPtfHjJi %  any rmoartadgji s>;.. it %  • itiii. lan M ^^Fa^Yi'aaiaKsS 1 '!* !" ^^S£ !" tAiMra • i (Mr. c. C. Skecte) at a function which look place at St. rorss-anl back to the goal-kwper bis words and him also. he communicated to him Balnabas Boys'School on Thursday night, itulls his weight on the side Then. Our most worthy and suUabie was afterv irdi b ncM This society which was established four months ago. loo, the fundamental principle. Co-operative officer hsi never >> has a mcnibershin nf 6ft with funria amnnntini* In .! 1". * the game those principle* which refrained from expounding every It fcroven expe.U have proved to be Question put to him He brought %  Jvlvesier Is allecu* thai Babb Motorist Fined 15'Their Murmurs Mr .1 W h %  ad Mr A J II it u •iitcll Judge* of tin AuUtmil App4-.1I. f The main purpose of the society like that of all Co-operative Societies, is the pra thrift, Mlf-hrlp and mutual help DMrobart. The society has as Its main objects, marketing as a co-operative basis of sugar cane and such other produce of its members as it may from time to time see fit to Its area of operation i* the St. Barnabas district and its members consist of peasants of Uic area. A large and appreciative audience of members and friends of ill.i .1 the incantation or the certificate of ragis.ral.on. Certificate Presented Chairman of the Meeiing memoir*, adhering atrlrUy to matchA inning factors—must be < our lutfit i historical fsrta rafWd to product the will whan ""<'"-< %  m to pay tun 11 |fj for ii-iiis.ni Ua raotoi cm wtttlo u-mu %  ii i kdng an ad •fill uut prejudl %  %  Kstnst him by lha fobs* i if him ittAOut having ucenca IW thai co-operative principle*, a n d scrupulously observed. At the touching corporation which tilled he f llad t.. cmvass the funeral rrgular and punctual in attend* same turneven momlwr af the many a member with enthususni. Of -'"I i rot %  certain nndcrance at general meetings. Then side must avoid foul play and any ' x> much that one mcmbei said takvi whose agent he %  %  must also be loyally of the So.iction which experience has that he wished such light ware previcua CVIOCIUC hsd been clrti's officer. In the keep in e af shown to h*' detrimental to the brought to theni 20 years agv. (h (hv wU | ^,. rtf4(1 „, lhc accounts and records and In eart Pa m nd likely to rob the |imo There Is not one member who has o( M ,. ^icnota >i" >>" %  vlth< ul r.vui out ..11 the duties aaalgned 0 f tni ri£ ht spiril. not great interest m the Society „^, Babb atl(i „ 1U Lutha H m them; there must be loyalty rr your society is to succeed. We are poor, indeed very poor. (UAHry wcrc inric -nd ScantlcTn,tin,-of Ii .i %  S.y Mbr ln su PPrt |n and it is up to you to see that it and so cannot throw In as much b himself had given evidence tie i>nieer you ha\e >ourseles doci n mU(ll develop that teammoney as we would like, but the ,*_,. cr *-,., %  Mllallt gs aahr th a_iata^ ak .,.,,„ ,„.,, ,..i.,ih.*e principles Co-operaUve Offlcer has told us Yttlrrd-y Mr N cho li to d the the", mist be I .,m i'^i wh,ch navc provwl durlnB lhe •"*!. ourse vo * rMCn ,h '' court ihat gorMtime lui yaw .ram Information received. ilicer, and meSnerl to ihe ,0 >
%  3* pirtlcs. IfllL Sc.tl l..uy Cpl McCleai. all* P.lneip.e, of cour ,ratlon and ££&*? ^^"W^tt r.. n A. " UHOm n.r, v.hr a, ntd ^c Hrnnch LprbonN ft bjgtj lahota Fouli prosecuted fot tha Pouet to the provisions of the CooperaUve Saclelles Act and of Socle";"'" "* By L "' f ^ -• A Body Corporate fwh' I would also like to taki has been in existence to be the beat, in fact, the only foundation for its success. There The Funds Funds of the Society will to be H.ibb. but whom he < . tendency on the part of amount to 87.8; 122.00 beuii " B^Jf h ^, !" nembers to act contrary to entrance fees and S19.M ihare %  omc ;. *' "„ ,i ,!, of thew pnnciples. cooltal He mentioned, too. that th. Id be remembered, however. The entrance fee lo the Society • "ol jjuile In order. "IN |ht lh..> tiu horn tested fi.i „ f.n ,,.„!, a i"l ""' value ,.l a D>''" Blonnienf St l.ue, y.n: 5* v ?' C, .-" .'!f*'e ". r >. J opportunity of reminrtlnit you IV ,, 0 century and in many dlfshare $1.00. Each member underevidence of Balis threat 10 bum sirs 'i^sr&s ss^sfussr^ 1 ^ t^^ss^'ssmssii ?z£ ubKr "" a m,nlmum *?""" > general remarks on co-operation ii cancelled. Registration gives th courl that on Fi ,„ ID was on duty in the ..,., rjraea and aaa th.motor car M1431 in the Lower Green. Tht .irfciiilaii! was in the car. and %  aging, no bi ckni cat asked the defendant to move 1f The dafandant rafuead to move COOLING & REFRESHING / TIN standard of also denied ever BOIIIK HI •nd and a vote of thanks was moved Society power to hold real Ii. MI WI.1I.-I M.iynard. the personal property In the name Treasurer, which was seconded under which it is registered and by Mr. K. D. Innlss nnd supportalso protects individual member ed by Mr. O. Callender. from legal proceedings in resisecl The nooMtnl In inlroducina „r a n obllfatiot, of the Society It lhe I'hauinoii soicf thaiI the SoRefutrar'a duty to have accounts l,pd to him of registered Societies examined for allowing them the use of the f rom llrne la |imo and au(tlIcd Jlt school room for their meeting*, least once a year. The fulfilment In doing so, he was premotlnr of this duty ensures that eimflUa pod and ... If ol %  sottm dsooa mavi b$ pltsM h -i,. whiel, il was hoped would prove Society, not only by the members a credit to the community In but also by the general oublir MI.II.I1 and Its members in peri now haV( much pl^,,,, |u tlcular. Pfsenting to your Pr. The Chairman in opening the ,our behalf, the Certiorate of baas. function said thai it was rather i, lra „ on of lhc st.lErnataV Cosurprising that lhe eo-uperatlve operative Marketing Soclelv movement which had been esLimited." •• %  " tablished in England over 100 orfiri.r'. "HiaSS? Mr. SS^Jr^S should mi be a most happy occasion for you ... members of the St. ftarnabas Co,_._boperaUve Marketing Socictv. You lished here and move Irom should be happy In your knowstrength to strength. '-^e of the net that you have Objects of Society !JJ ""fj 0 organise your SoHe said he noted that among c'cty. adopt your by-laws, build objOcU of the society was P a njasonably good membcr" . • %  — -a —1#Sim nnd ihar. ^apllal and mn2. agrleulture In the district; m ,„ „„,.„„, Co-operauve marketing of h Se.ntlebury had members canes and oMci oppr „ ocnespilc the "W granted the petition ol lbe4l own economic interests fart thal the ^ciety was lUrted • %  "i"'* Trustee of the island and advantage, not those of after the prosen t cane crop began, w I'tlers of AdmirnMiation 10 non-members. w Y. ave found the factories to " e-tate of Charies T rnngtoii Business should I* done for which wr can „ h ve ^g, ,„,,. Augustus Knight. 1.1* o( Bladai cash. vr( y co-operative We are very "'"• s n Cs-V-opcrative societies shall Ag'eement. co-operate with one anOur nlm Is to work to-got he i other :t his father Al< also granted That will was proved on June 11. 1913 Th^ l* 1 "' n purpose. If at the some tlrne f |hl flnd ake thU opp(>r t U nlty .The other pet.I 1 are guided by the tried and „„,„„ ^,1,, beforehand. nine time helpistered unde: Ihn-gi-etied that he had no. shared, and continue to B hare vour taken as keen an interest in _ihe growing pains with you, I now St. Barnabas Society as hemmM hare in your Joy ot this %  cWaveA lev.Hitler Mason Mr. D a 1Ward Instr !utise tliat hart, but promised >o watch its menL development nnd take u keener , hmk Ihtareat In %  attittai at the b|o M a|| (hi! future. m, .M-I.. mK The Registrar opened his address 4 mark merelv thi by congratulatinR the Society _on ^ ^ JJ ^^^ 'proved principles of Co-operation. ^,, 1O there can be little doubt that Iho St. Barnabos Co-operative Marketing Society also will stand the is, worthy as jour of congratulation. ,„,-„, u the strides it had made during the itand measure up to beginning or whol lhc R e g | !lr a r hoped it would model to all other co-operaviiile relatively short period of four S2h !" "" •• ?*—--- %  e """ live societies In Barbados monlhs that it had been In exls" ill be managed by the said tie had listened members for the members alone Secretary s Report v 1II1 interest to the report of lhe !" 'y co-operative lines, bringing i n presentins the Report, the 17 and had noted that one blessings in the way of social. Secretary Mr. P N. Pilgrim said: of the points made was that meetmoral and economic Improve"There was an Inaugural meetings had not always been well metres, not only to Its members ing held on the 31st January, this attended. He pointed out that the but to the entile community and year, attended by peassnts of the Society could be a mCBns of social, to future generations. You the St. Barnabas district. Mr. Berkles. moral' and economic benefit lo present, as well as prospective the Co-operative Officer outlined members, teaching them self-remembers, should regard the buildto the meeting the purpose and llanre and self-help and raising lng up of such a vinie society as alms of a Co-operative s... lety and %  f their standard Ol living. It was your special responsibility and a ' ,hc prop-ised Marketing <-"-op... • %  ii..-;-.-.... — ~rv>H (iulv —oinrn tun-id v After .1 Cl'IUT.il of saying thanks beforehand. LORD WILLOUGHBY COMES OFF DOCK The Lord Wllloughby—a new tug brought to the island from .Southampton, und the No I Wataf [large came oft the uock yesterday morning after they wero givao i garsaral mspi'ction. Tho Lord v\ ill...... I.I, will be given a Miiil run sometime next week. The motor vessel Blue Star went on dock yesterday aft' II be undergoing for Letters Administration whi.-h w. nanled was Unit of Fr..nk Inni: of Cave Mill. St Mifhiiel. t,. tf (".tate with will innaiad gnd de hoiila nan • I M n'tha M;illl King, late of Baxter) Road. Mr | W Barrow iiistni, tr.i bv Mr. E. D. Rogers, solicitor, appeared for the petitioner. Wills Admitliil SJiliril however, the" Registrar sacred duty. erative Society. After a genera continued thai members should Opposition discussion, a resolution was un.nIbe regulsr in attend,.nee a, meet„, a....mptKiT,„ Xharge this c 7 OD LUfvT^?C.V 1^ formed'in The wills of the f %  •!! > %  lmitli to probate:— Wil.lam Albert Worrell, Sll She Michael; Benta Irene Hinkson. Sll general inThomas, James forde. St. PVUUpj Thomas Albert Clarke. St. An4 drew; William Eustace NUIMBi Michael; Ev Moore, St. Michael. Cacique Dei Caribe' Calls Vvo !" 'SL£& £nm !" c !" nomlc ^r^iSTmSSSb^i jsj.su basi-s. ketlng canes on Elec-tioi welfare l^-ssimists who maintain that CoLcidini; l-osition ptrsstloo cannot succeed in Barthe 7th nf February, and He said: "I svlsh to congratulate b, do becusc ol lh individualism it. the following offlcci your Society on being ishe of tnj ond u p i clo „ „, lhe peopip, ,, e i cc ted for the ensuing year Jirat Societies to be rogisterea wU | b> „, President It. Worrell: Secretary: under the Co-operative boc'c^" selves good co-overators arid by P. N. Pilgrim; Treasurer: W MayAct of Barbados. The J'f "^ udopting a. your guiding princnnd: Trustee,: J... A Maswell gWSWS Lt'ron^inoiv.dSis^ !" Z "SSoSf-—np were held to Inspire you to maintain leadinj h ^^^ SSSLi'S %  "•* '" d "-"" modrl ^-"S? ous aspects of co-operation with P !" "" L-V^ ^t deS '. >"* C^aparaUw SoeleU you from time to time. But per'"" aXe * al "" books ami Thp lola , iuml r „f meetings hzps it would not be Inapproprijeeonta of your Society are carehf ., (1 wafi 6 AtUndancc at meeti.te if I took this opportunity of 'ully and accurately kept, and | nir has not always been satlsfacreferring again to one or two !" * together with your Hank t„ rv Thi.ha* l-een attributed points. .T 0 '. should ,>e P* n to ln*pecmainly to memlwrs being engaged First of all It Is essential that llnn oy members at all reas.nable in the reaping of the cane crop vour Sciet* should be laid on limes. Let there always be frank Two meetings were abortive for a sound tinam lal basis and And open discussion at your meetwant of a quorum ohould have adequate membertngs of all difficulties, problems Attendance ship. If the objects of the Society and seeming irregularities as they The average attendance at axr to be achieved. But there Is iccur. Members should always meeting* was 12. The membership a point of even irealer Imporobserve t'-.e democratic principle of the Society has risen from 28 tance. K Is thai your Society of majority rule and accept the in number on the 15th of this should consist of s body of (oral decision of the majority with '•ood month to 45 at present. Seventeen Christina Walker, SI. Mlchattj The 162-ton Cacique Del Caribe J<-Ph Thome, St. Michael, coarrived in Carlisle Bay yesterday James Blackmail. St. James. morning from St. Lucia but before Leanora Bayley, St. Joseph. of officers took place on ^ ne could (.omc. into the Careenage in the Court for Divorce and iuiwi! he waB hfl d up for somc hours. Matrimonial Causes decree abbeing j^ Cacique Del Caribe under wlJte was pronounced In the dull Capt H. Wallatv brotighl ln 200 of C. G. KirUm. peiitn.iu-i. ind [uckages of fresh fruit, six bags G B. Kir ton. respondent. %  if peas, two casks of pumpkins decree nisi was pfCsSOUBOad Lfl end 12 bunches of fiesh fruit. the suit of Q, N. Jervn, patltlonShe is consigned to the Schooner rr. and L. R. Jervis. respondent. Owners' Associotlon, The SteamIn the suit of V. t* %  .. shin Sapho f4.380 tons) also petitioner, and A. Cox re. nved in Carlisle Bay yesterday tpondent. decree nisi was also morning Irom St. Lut IB. pronoun,-."I FOR CaTflf AND OTHt* LIVtSTOCK KIKMt l.<\ Contains I Calcium. Iliospl, cttun i" Phoaphorui rath OOffiai Cohalti Manganese. ii~iiiif. Iran, fasodlum Chktr> IM RHMITS MINDII MIMKM SALTS FOR 1 ATTLK umtain h,il.ir% %  ... %  • ,' .i ciuin. phosphoius. nipini. inl.i.lt. iron, I'KIIT.'. n l an adequate proportion if common ialt The only pi ticul way of atarUflng 'hit the cattle are receiving .-<•auau oiinaraU, U b) wad > I thrm dirtly with I'lS l nil' in MKKCTtONII <>n I'Hl Co*-* In milk Add 3 lh of IliHits Min-lif Mineral Salts to aai 0l < in., tuti .it*--. %  il fot in %  IK production. give individual eoafi per day for those giving up lo 3 gallons, plug If I each gallon ovat three. Ir> COM* OIvi Salb dally, Hullark* and I ..I Mmk Aii.l J II-. Of Miu.lif tach carl of concentrates fed. AJtafTt* alivcly. give 2 oz. with Iba II day. (.,.(hi Milk and lrv t.oalo Give one te poonful of i Uli dlf M .,i Balti daily with ratt %  win St..II Give :: !.. I • 'I Miiulif Mineral Salts daily with rations, raagafcsga Give Otsf >•/ Boots Mlmlif Mineral Salts daily with rations. fssHI As soon M fouls are weaned, feed | to I table spoonful Booh. Mind.f Mineral Salts daily iiccordini; I "2 Ib for 36 Cents" HUE WEATHERHEAD HI. -Mill, \, r i,l. fr minis IIKI i, co." LET THE CHILDREN JOIN THE 1/mMIN NAVITOI. iMAII COMPOUND (A Squihb I'rodurll ni HIKlh Liver Oil Irradiated rrsoslerol. ferrouo lulpha'e. HI. ,.|l .> n IhUmlnr lodrochlorlde and nlirinamlde. In a vrUcie -* -r* llllll \ A IJST M 1,1 H OIH IIS ARROW SHIRTS. Collars attached, Coat style in white. Tan. Biae. Grey sues 141 lo 10 ins at $ 7.21 earh STRIPED ARROW SHIRTS eolUra attached Mixes 14J to 16 ins. at $7.86 each ARROW UNDER PANTS with snap fasteners and elastic Inserts at side sizes 32 to 42 ins. . Ui $2.37 per pair BREWSTER SPORTS SHIRTS short sleeves in self colours, shades in White, Blue. Tan. Grey 'a $4.10 each AERTEX CELLULAR SPORTS SHIRTS, Collar attached, short sleeves size 38 to 44 White 11 $.1J each MEN'S INTERLOCK SPORTS SHIRTS STELLA BRAND. Collar attached short sleeves, atta* M lo 38 I3.M 40 to 42 Ins $3.99 earh CHILDREN'S INTERLOCK SI'IIRT SHIRTS. Crew Neck, S in shades of White and Sky sizes 18 to 24 ins $1.43. 26 to 32 ins $1.62 each B.V.D. WHITE I'NDEH PANTS witl. snap fasteners and elastic side m. sorts, sizes 30 lo 44 lng j SI.63 per pair CAVE SHEPHERD & Co. Ltd. 10, II. 12 I 13 Broad Street -*Si ll lll.XA IMM. mow EQUAL IN FOOD AND ENERGY AT %  III. V1VI.M. I> OST. .'Nil .,1 IT'ltl'. 1 .'.'. i!l Is equal II. f.....l anorg) '." 3 Pouods ot Ki.sl. Meat . I TAKK YOUR DOC A BAG TO-DAY W \ POOD HSU. REALLY GO C II. JASON; JONES & CO., LTD. 'si yam. 5srWi^v B ^ T,vv