Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


|







ESTABLISHED 1895



Public Utilities Bill Blamed
For Inadequate Electric Supp
Chamber Of Commerce
Urge Co. Directors To Act

Captain W. A. Brown, Chairman of the Board of Direc-
tors in London of the Barbados Electric Supply Corporation
told members of the Council of the Chamber of Commerce
yesterday that the Company “has every intention of con-
tinuing to expand the capacity of the Power Station so as
to meet the rapidly growing demand. However, any major
expansion depended on the success of negotiations between
the Company and the Barbados Government regarding the
removal of some undesirable features of the Public Utilities
Bill which would increase the difficulties of raising money
by public subscription in England. :

Captain Brown is accompanied
on this visit to Barbados by Mr.
A. W. R. Lovering, a Director and
Secretary of the Company, for the
purpose of conducting those nego-
tiations. After he had outlined
briefly the position of the Com-
pany, members of the Council em-
phasized some of the major prob-
lems affecting Barbados due to the
present condition, and urged the
Directors to do everything in their
power to try and alleviate the
present serious position,

Addressing the Council after re-
ceiving a warm welcome by Mr.
G, H. King, President of the;
Chamber, Captain Brown in a pre-
pared speech said: .

The Directors much regret the
inconvenience suffered by the in-
habitants of Barbados owing to the
irregularities which have occur-
red in the electricity supply dur-
ing recent years.

The original cause of the
trouble was the refusal of the
U.K. Government during the
War and immediately after-
wards to allow the Company to
purchase additional Plant. But
unfortunately when circum-
stances did permit the acqui-
sition of more Generating Sets
failure of the engines installed
in the Power Station has pre-
vented the benefit of the in-
creased output being fully felt.
The Manufacturers of the Sets

have had representatives here for
some time, who haye been doing
their best to put matters right, and ;
I have no doubt that all difficul-|
ties will shortly be overcome
The Company has every inten-
tion of oa to Serine. the
capacity of the Power Station so
as. Seinadet the rapidly growing
r , demand. The first stage will be
have been doing is the very op-!an addition to the exisiting Diesel |
posite of socialism,” he said; “we] Plant. We believe that, on our re- |
have been getting means of pro_|turn to England, we shall be able
duction back into the hands of in-|to complete arrangements for the
dividual private enterprisers ” purchase and erection of a set of
The: President spoke at an out- @ On page 5

be ae! beeper ead at cee

Monument honouring agricul- .
Reds Lift
oad Blockade

tural Department employees for
BERLIN, May 15.



Capt. W. A. BROWNE

Farm Programme

Not Socialistic

TRUMAN

WASHINGTON, May 15.

Truman rejected as “plain ho-
kum” charges that the democratic
farm programme is socialistic In
a speech reminiscent of his 1948
campaign oratory, he struck at
“Mossi * who oppose his farm
policies -~n the ds that the

hat we



















t
t

\t

t













outstanding service. Truman said

that the federal farm programmes

developed during 20 years of de-

mocratic administrations “enabled

the farmers of America to build!

the strong agricultural economy

we know to_day. “In this way we} The Russians with chess

demonstrated that by, positive ac-| tactics halted one United States

tion We can use powers of our gOVv-| military police patrol on the Ber !

ernment to make our resourcés;jin-West German highway bu!

and our freedoms work for every-| allowed the British and the se-

body’s benefit. “In these twenty!cond United States patrol through. |

years we brought about real re-|At the same time the Russians | ,
t

a

¢





Western Peace Contract and three
days of hysteria could result in an

through the Chesapeake and Dela-

members are missing. Five of the

' gulfed the westbound Hayes soon
| after the collision with the steam-
| ship Barbara Lykes shortly after

smoke rolled lazily over the Dela-

16, 1952 -



FPRIT aY, MAY
!
ly

|

Beginning on oar
fascinating story of old
house which became the
cipal home of Our Ro
ily and the setting for some of
the most brilliant and «ost
‘ar a ae “sg in our his-
tory as yy Marguerite
Peacock. Book your copy of
Sunday’s Advocate NOW.

CONGREGS



‘







he 658.000 men taking part in



Peace Pact
May Rouse
Communists



Finland Fund

ae Donations for the to
By PHIL NEWSOM. ASK; S FOR Perum. te tae Cheat Soups
The si og of nw it thei i conted. Bt, the Royal Bank of
e signing of the West German WW bay? se,
Peace Contract. by the Big Theos IN , Canada, Marclay’s, Bank, obs
Foreign Ministers may touch off || the office of the Advocate.
three big days for Communists | “The Farnum for Finland
at the present U.S., France and | ene ee 8) a
ritain are scheduled to sign ; ‘ 1 iy cere’ Le
papers restoring virtual sovereign- An vt ’ ae * “Tao | Sompetition and win $25.00 at
ty to West Germany on May 24 | 4 ing j i vostiag |] the Same time helping the
On May 25, General Matthew B iemanding immediate Jnvestige- fund.
Ridgway is scheduled to arrive in} UO"S Of the Koje Island com Goal... ...... 2... $8,880.00
Paris to take over as European munist war prison camp inc. -1} Amt. Prev. Agk... «, mse
Supreme Commander. and on May jent. The lawmakers are indic-} Ch. Ch. Boys’ Schoo) 8,00
26, European Defence Community { 12"t about the whole affair. They i DOOGRER ib 6 cavities sss 1.00
Treaty is to be signed. Coinci-] vant to know how Brig. General|{ St,, Matthias Liter,
dentally, important Italian local] Francis T. Doda could fave let} uray & Sports Club 5.00
elections also come on May 25.] Simself be captuged by Commun Olympia Club 10.00
Any one of the four events nerm-] st priscners and “how Brig. Gen- Professor aud Mrs.
ally ous at the signe for Com-]| 2ral Charles F. Colson, His gue- 0.'N. Weekes. 5.00
munist outbreaks. Coming con-}2essor as camp Commandel & poaac
secutively as they do they create] >ould have made a concession for | § -BaA96

® situation of potential Avnamite.
_In Italy and France demonstra-
tions will be dealt with by police
and handled as strictly internal
matters. Prospects are excellent
for a few cracked heads, but prob-
ably no international incidents
The real danger spot is Germany
and the core of trouble is the city
of Berlin, There East Berliners are
being urged by Russians into mas-
sive demonstrations against the

Dodd's release.



“Representative Miké@, 2,ansfeld
said he would introduce it resolu-

} ‘
tion today asking the hgure to as- Defence Plan
sign the armed serVicés @6mmit- |
tee to look into the incident. He} ;

| Can Avert

said “they don’t need a Brig.
PARIS, May 15,

General in charge of thet camp.
What they ought to have is a

Lord Ismay, Secretary-General
of the North Atlantic Treaty Or.

marine top sergeant,” He ac-
cused Dodd of ‘outrageous care-|

ganization, said to-day that if the!
West can carry out its defenca

lessness” in exposing hienself to}
rapture by the prisoners

Representative W. Sterling Cole
said he would ask Chairman Carl

internal incident.—U.P.



F : P 2 h A Vinson of the armed services plans in the next “two or three
our eris s committee to have that gi@up in-| years” without, war, danger point }
i "S vestigate the affair. Cole is a/ Will be passed, Ismay told a lunch- |
Shi Ss Collide member of the committee, Sen- ©9N session of 117 editors attend, |
p ate Republican leader Styles img the first general assembly of

the International Press Institute
that goals adopted by N.A.T.O.,
‘were “bare minimum.”

friends ask~

Bridges, said he would istroduce
a resolution today, requesting an
investigation by the Senate pre-|
paredness subcommittee. Bridges,
accused both Colson and ede

WILMINGTON, Delaware,
May 15.

Two collided halfway

ships Ismay

\oa how tong the , defence
a8} Build-up continue and what will

today unleashing a} ‘stupidity’ and saia Con
— = ne eats aoe 3 snotha investigate the “whole dis- happen when the West accumu-

sraceful affair.” He said the kid-| lated a great array of arms and.
napping of Dodd and the conces-|troops. “I have no idea of what!

anker’s 10-man crew leaped into sions made by Célaon Were

he 200-foot wide waterway and 7 \ made ; the time limit will be but it is my
paddled ashore, another was res-|'0 order for Communist propa~ hope as its my belief, that pro-j
‘cued from the water. ganda, vided we can by resolution, unity

and some self-sacrifice get over ;
, the next two or three years with-
out collision, the day will come}
when our energies will no longer |
concentrated on defence but
those other fields of common en-
deavour which can bring happi-
Ine s and prosperity to peoples of

However, the “Voice of Amer-
ica” said “hundreds” of prisoners
on.the island might have been |
killed if controversial} concessions | |
had not been made. “The Voice” | -
is trying desperately in a broad~ |
cast around the globe to counter

Flames visible for five miles en-

nidnight.
At daybreak a column of blatk



ware countryside from the still the Communist propaganda har-| the free world,” Ismay replied to
like, burning tanker, The 270-foot| Tage touched off by the incident the Tae querry.—-U.P,

Hayes was carrying 700,000 gal- Officials here were not surprise |

ons of high octane gasoline, when General Mark W. Clarke,;

Far East Commander, repudiated |

No one tried to put the fire ut} the concessions
ind firemen were unable to get
‘lose enough to battle the flames

18 mud banks and woods border

Talks On Vietnant

State Department officials said PARIS, May 15.

the “terms which the Red prison-

coe ee slowed inspection at Sata carry: ee canal. ers laid down for Dodd’s release Pl cals gongs Ear apts
. jing trucks on the in end o vere s e ith propagandat}. has been invited by the US
. Truman said “new deal” and|the 180-mile international high-| The crash occurred near Sum- ba ore aaate Gaon ae eae = b Fo
fair deal administrations had/ way and some 40 to 50 eae Teak Bridge, Delaware about 20)) 1. United States to: take vituatbon Me nen Meise
been opposed “every step of the) were backlogged this morning. miles south of Wilmington and tt literally. Military leaders ; I have petal ven an invitation
way” on their policies, but} The Russians suddenly lifted|halfway across the 19-mile canal }‘em »d previously that Clarke |1 the State, Department in
he felt farmers themselves needed| their week-long stoppage of U.S which connects the Delaware had hinte aL ‘h 7 romises Wi shington” Ts Yoarnen told
a little help in measuring their] military patrols yesterday follow-| River with upper Chesapeake Bay,}â„¢ight repudiate ua Mieke z - 1s. he..stepped dawn
own benefits “All this talk about|ing a meeting between Allied mili.| The captain of the 270-foot) which prisoners ‘won by newsmen & ppe

socialism is just “plain hokum,”
he said, pointing out that in 1932
less than 50 per cent. of American
farms were owned by people who
operated them compared with 75
per cent. owner operation to_day.

“There are 250,000 more farm-
ers who own their own farms to-
day than in 1932. That does not
sound like socialism to me. It
sounds like real free enterprise.

—U-P.

Ist TV Crook

LONDON, May 15.
The first crook to be trapped |
by television in Britain has been
arrested and jailed because he!
appeared on the show speaking
with the wrong accent,
Twenty-two year-old Colin
Groundwater said he | wi a
“frogman” underwater suledge
worker—from the Orkney Islands
off Seotland during an interview
on the “What’s My Line” Tv
show about unusual occupations.
But Bank Manager Alexander
Dowie who was watching tefe-
vision that night wondered why
Groundwater did not have an
Orkney accent. He remembered
that some bad cheques showed
up at his bank with Ground-
water’s name on them. Dowie
called police and told them his!
story.
Yesterday Groundwater was!
sentenced ‘to 15 months’ impris-}
onment after he pleaded guilty,

to mening stare teed 150 WORKERS FOR U.S.

JAMAICA TAKES
IN NEW YORK

Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, May, 15.
While the American oil strike

con*inues B.O.A.C’s once weekly

at Russian military headquarters

in Potsdam.—U.P. I



|
|
\



H.M. THE QUEEN

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, May 15.
Three hundred odd loeal appli-
eants for U.S, jobs selected from |
cver 2,000 will be presented to
1ecruiting officials expected this
week end for the final pick in a|
| quota of 150.





(From

| ATOM SUB BY 1954?

direct London—Jamaica service’ WASHINGTON, May 18,

t G40 take in. New The navy said today the keel
will be rerouted to take in of the Nautilus the first atom
York. This will mean an addi-|;wereq submarine will be laid

tional three or four hours to nor-/-come time in June. The keel lay-

mal flying time ing will take place in Connecti-
A B.O.A.C. spokesman aid\eut, The Navy declined.any other
today that the first flight on the/information at this time. It said
new route would be on Monday.|in the past however that it
The service will revert to nor-}expect to launch the Nautilus in
mal when the strike finishes 1954 —U.P.

tary liaison officers and Russians | tanker and one of those saved said
that his vessel was struck on the
side by the Barbara Lykes.—(CP)







mail” from Colson who conducted ]from the. plane that brought him
negotiations for Dodd's ar Jhere from Saigon ot



Eisenhower Lunches With Queen

LONDON.

General Eisenhower aud
his wife lunched privately at
Buckingham Palace witb
Queen Elizabeth II and the
Duke of Edinburgh as the
General said goodbye to Lon-
don again for the second
time in seven years,

The General and _ wife
swept past the gate of the
Pal at 12.30 p.m, as 4
crowd of 200 onlookers
waved and two guardsmen
in brilliant scarlet tunics and
bearskin helmets gave a crisp
salute.

It was the beginning of 2
busy two days for the Eisen-
howers in a city that. truly
likes him going back to Wr
days when he led the in-
vasion of Europe and won
a tumultous hero’s welcome
after V.-E. Day.

The Eisenhowers were
first received at the Palace
by the Queen Mother, Eliza-

Oil Men Will Go Back

WASHINGTON May 15.

LIJIGH government officials who asked not to be named,

predicted that most of the 90,000 striking oil workers | ‘ ,
will be back on the job “within the next 48 hours.” They aueee ae in = a st
expected the agreement to be signed quickiy at the 15 cents | Exchange Snanies Weanesacy,
per hour ceiling imposed by the Federal Wage Stabilization | The pound sterling was down 1/8
Board yesterday. | of a cent at $2.80 9/16, In Montreal

The co-ordinating committee of 22 CIO, AFL. and inde- | the United States dollar closed
pendent unions involved “reluctantly approved the settle- eee a : ce e .taca8
ment” on the basis of the Board’s ceiling. The unions had |r. S anoleiiged- tiie Dueminy's
demanded an 18 cent hourly boost lose, That is it took $0.98 19/32

However, B. J. Schafer, Vice President of CIO, oil (eanaeies) to eae, $1 ee)
workers, said that since the “companies haye insisted on | fhe pound sterling was at $2.76
plant by plant bargaining, which is cumbersome it may Le Tee” down 1/16 from Tuesday's
quite a while before all striking groups are back at work.”

—UP.

beth, widow of the late King
who became close and in-
formal friends of the Gen-
eral during the war. Ther
they lunched in a small reom
at the Palace wit: only
Elizabeth and Philip presert.
Later this afternoon they
were to be received by the
84-year-old Queen Mar~ at
Marlborough House,

This evening Prime Minis-
ter Winston Churchill and
Mrs. Churchill will entertain
Eisenhower at No. 10 Down-
ing Street at a banquet to be
attended by the top Govern-
ment and military figures of
Britain.

After driving to the Pal-
ace the great wrouyht iron
gates of Wellington Arch at
Hyde Park corner were
swung open for the shining
Rolls-Royce in which the
Eisenhowers rode. The gate
usually is not opened except
for royalty —U.P.

te



Gen. EISENHOWER



“*

Canadian $ Down

NEW YORK, May 15.

The Canadian dollar was down
1/32 of a cent at a premium of



—CP)

4 Se ~ de



PICKETS FORM HUMAN CHAIN AT STR

HOLDING HANDS, a group of pickets form a human chain at the main'ge cof
in Gary, Ind. They were standing by to prevent cars and truck

Farnum Yor |\|*Prisoners Of War.

PRICE: FIVE. CENTS

Butler
Outlines

UK Crisis

MINERS DEMAND
WAGE INCREASES

LONDON, May 15

Chancellor of the Exchequer
R. A, Butler called in 50 top in-
lustrialists and Union leaders
to-day to help fight Britain's
economic. crisis just a few hours
ifter coal miners added the!x
Olce to. these Ballifa frre wage

| increases.



UCK STEEL PLANT

ai




the 0. S. Steet Co

pat plant
tering the strikebound area, Most
m CIO President Philip Murray

trom e@
the stee} walkout are awaiting orders [



Butler outlined the economic
jcrists to an emergency meeting of
jthe national joint advisory coun-
; cil in the Commons and he was
expected to

Do Not Negotiate”

SAYS NEW CHIEF

call for both wage

| and profit restraints. But just a

KOJE ISLAND, KOREA, May 15. io 7. before the meeting

Brigadier General Haydon L Boatner, new commander , >)” tam Uawther President
ste oie t vie : 7 , i doe “~ the National Union of Mine
0 nite ations dje island prison camps taid down @&) workers said negotiators would

tough policy and said that Communist captives might as; begin the immediate preparation

well stop making demands because “prisoners of war do not °f the claim for
wage increases for

“substantial”
700,000 miner

; »

_ negotiate,” Boatner who took over the | in nationalized coal mines.
turbulent camps aftey Brigadier- z

e e General Charles Colson was tired | Almost every major sector of

Britain May by General Mark Clark said the) b@bour is now. demanding wage

situation, is still “inflammabie,” | \bereases on the . grounds that

He said he is going to make some Butler's budget has brought up

ose Jet changes | prices. Three railroad unions lest

Clark supreme United Nations, Week demanded 4 ten per cent
Commander said that Colson ex-| '"¢Tease for 450,000 members,

ceeded his authority in granting |

Race ToU.S.

The miners’ claim was

embarrassing “concessions” to} on by , decided

. pe < fl yY a meeting of the Union's

By ROBERT JACKSON Communists for, the release of ‘national executive and ative
LONDON, May 15, |@rig-General Francis T, Dodd) commented on this

\ ; fn . ‘ afternoon’:
Britain may lose to the United ifter Dodd's capture by prisoners eeting with Butler “Tt's the





















States. the headstart in jet air-| Boatner former frontline Com- Chancellor's ) alk » has
liner travel she thas gained . pander, who fought, at “Heart-’ talked ro com ‘arenas “phe
her fabulous Comet because! 2reak Ridge” said that the 79,200 ae:
military demands are such that] isoners on Koje will be treated The Treasury bulletin for the
she is ‘urning out only one] strict accordance with the ‘dustry published to-day mean-
Comet per = month aviation] ieneva convention but will cet, while warned that higher labour
experts admitted, o favours osts will send up export prices
British Overseas Airways i time when Britain is tr z
Corporation now has only four He said “prisoners of war do increase her exports ass a
Comets for ithe. South African] \ot negotiate. They are getting’ atter of economic life and death
run. whigh it inaugurated last;!’anmunjom (the site of truce —UP.
week—the fifst commercial jet] alks) and this place mixed up.
2" ha a — i (here is no negotiating about the
le avilanc Aircraft Com-] teneva convention, It is all right 2
pany now has in, the production}‘here in print.” He said in the Prisoners Used

stages an improved Comet with
sufficiently greater range than it
can be put on the most lucrative

) ist prisoners have received “more
han is required by the Geneva
nvention,.” He said “They have

Kor ‘Experiments’:

of airline routes—the North Hen exter rivileges which they Y * y
Atlantic Run, That plane will Te Nan ania tate GT teeth Communists Sa
Ay, Sauk: Yaste to Mew steak lal usurped, Prisoners still would Ly

et “everything possible” in the

little over

a six hours. But the P. 5
alveraft industry bottleneck here ay of fair treatment under the Coduhunae Bake Ae: 8
May uch. that "the longer a snvention ap they have in the ba Uni ; Sorry
Comet Will not be able to stat vate ‘olonel Wi arte ty priemen it
the Atlantle run for approxim-| Lieut. Colone Ider Military} ¢¢,). “experiments” with atomic
ately two years. Police officer who narrowly €S-Tiombs atid erm wartare
British aviation men fear that] “ped seizure with Dodd said the]; Nj immediately illed the
competitive U.S. airlines shaken] isoners are still making verbalf jarge “ridiculous”. It was the
by the threat the Comet poses on] ind written demands, He said] j;st ‘time such a charge has
luxury services will apply such] their chief demand is for the rightfocen made at the Korean truce
pressure that they will get af o organize an Association off \ujks here, and Vice Admiral C
United States jet airliner into} orisoners to inspect the compounds{ Turner Joy, senior allied dele-
service before BOA, hasfon the island. This is one of the] (ate, promptly denied it
sufficient Comets to grab North} ‘concessions’ made to gain Dodd's
Atlantic supremacy, lease but which was invalidated The charge was contained ir
—UP. hen Clark made repudiation off) list of “criminal acts” sub-
the deal —U.P. nitted by North Korean General



Nam Il. It virtually matched the

BRATHWAITE ACTING



’ - wording included in the agree-
Gendarmes Arrest HWARDEN ment communists @btained for
N Li iali t Le d | CHURC vt - release of Brig. General
Natioual suder | At an emergency meeting yes-[ Francis T, Dodd, former Koje
8 rday, the St. Michael Vestry Island prison camp commander,
» ; ow if | , anted their Churchwarden,f who was captured and held for
PARIS, May 15 , ,
Si tiaras ciatat ae attiion. V. C, Gale, leave of absence three days. This supported the
The French Police said that M
Algerian Nationalist leader Hadj,|!'0â„¢ yesterday until the end offstatement by General Mark
p asta after nesterday’s blondy | tis month, “The Vestry theal Clark Supreme Unived Nations
arres oc atten ease ee 200CY | appointed Mr. Christie Brathwaite} Commander that the Dodd inci-
rioting at Orleansville Algeria)ine genior Guardian, to act a8fdent was intended by Reds to
was flown to Paris and imme-|Churchwarden until Hon. V. C.] “manufacture propaganda’”’,
diately shipped to an undisclosed|Gaje is ready to resume his —U.P.
residence in Western France, duties.
Hadj, Leader of the anti-
French ‘“‘Movement for the Tri- . fob :
umph of Democratic Liberties’| BEA l Y AND PROTECTION

was seized at Orleansville south-
east of Algiers after his followers
and police clashed during
inti-French demonstration
Police said three Arab dernon-
trators were killed and a large
iumber injured. Four policemen
vere injured by flying stones
lub
Police said that Hadj haq re |
ently been banned from the Oran
Jepartment bordering Tunisia for!
nti-French speeches in the vi-,
‘inity of this turbulent area. He
ill not be allowed to leave the
|
'
|

an

and

lepartment of his new enforced
esidence.—U P.



Strikers’ Canes
Won’t Be Ground

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, May 15
Twelve and a half acres o
anes were destroyed by fire las!
Monday night at Calivigny Estat
belonging to the Grenada sugar
‘adctory where ‘workers are
ttrike since March 27 protesting
ythe employment of an overseer o1
the ground that he is not a mem-
ber of the M.M.W.U. The fire was
he biggest yet of several, since
the crop began, |
Insisting on its right to employ,
the staff of its choosing the fac-
tory has stood firm refusing to
grind the cahes of a large num-,



0

... WITH BERGERTEX

With Bergertex, chere’s new beauty and protection for walls of

onerete, plaster, brick or stone. Waterproof and weather resisting

Bergertex cannot crack or peel off, for in drying it hecomes an integra

part of the wall on which it is painved Its crisp, matt finish sti



ber of tenants on the estate un- fresh and smart almost indefinite
less its own are cut, | < :

A prolonged dry spell is sitins | Vergertex is available in mars
ing the canes of the tenants who delicate célours fot use inside
also are not earning any wages.' ;

Other large grinders also refuse! outside
the tenants’ canes
MADE BY

MEETING ON WEST
GERMANY

BONN, May

Chancellor
and Allied High
Commissioners today held what
may be their last meeting in|
eight months of hard negotiation |
to replace occupation by virtual}
sovereignty for West Germany.

BERGER PAINTS

15
West German Kon-

rad Adenauer





ON SALE
AT ALL HARDWARE STORES

Allied officials said they exam-'
ined drafting alterations in the;
treaty syst to end occupati
reaty system to end occunstom-| GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents



PAGE TWO



Carib Caling








IN Vv. ¢ GALE, M.L H Managing Director of thé
Advocate Co, Lid. left yester
day for a w or busine
trip to Canada -

He i expected to” return to
Zarbados on Monday, During hi
absence M, (€ A, Brathwaite
JP. will act as Churchwarder ;

Cocktail Party a
R. G. H. ADAMS, C.MG., P
M M.C.P. held a_ Cocktail P
Party at his residence “Tyrol
Cot”, Spooners Hill yesterday
evening in honour of the student:
attending the Trade Union
Course

Spent Twe Weeks

“
_#

t



salad

Bermuda an hour
scheduled time due to tall winds
travelling about 90 miles an hour

Canadians Here On
Holiday

RRIVING

yesterday

morning

by T.C.A, for two weeks’ holl-
juy were Mr, and Mrs, W, Finn
ind their two sons Ricky = ar
Terry who are staying at No,

Bungalow, Coral Sand:

Mr. Finnie is Instrument Plyir
Instructor employed by T.CLA, ¥
that they had a

rip coming down and

They had lote of rain im Mar

ute

very good
reached
earlier than the

5

Ma
le

treal and the Spring had been very
They aleo had a tremendous
arnount of anow during the winter | eaould use beth hands to ho.
which took long to melt and they

ut

R. J. H, BUCKLAND who did not get rid of it until abo
has business interests inter the middle of April =a ne
J ? pc 4 n De
ests in Upton, Ontario, returnec Hon, ¥. ©, GALE, MAL ;, thelr last oor gore ¢ a’ tees
to Canada yesterday morning b> and when he_ le on
T.C.A, after spending two week perature was about af

here on business combined with

Directors Mest

This is Mr, Finnte’s first visit

to

pleasure staying at the Sea View H°* " A. CURB, C.B2 the letand, but the ee =
: « ‘ » i ( on t

Guest House of which he is the ML.C., left for Trinidad wife and the yore one re

proprietor Monday by BWA ne to enjoy Ue ‘

} He joined other Directors o athtag
With T.L.L, , , British West Indian Airways next Venezuelans
M* AND MRS HAROL day for Jamaica where they are MONG the recent arrivals to
Id ane ae i ne Py , holding a meeting of the com the colony from Veneruela
children were arrivals yesterday pany, \ sy hy and Mire. C. i
morning — by BW.LA from | ‘Tinis meeting was arranged to cheer ioe tee children and
HecealWooao ontee Me My. Bécommodate Mr. HO. B. Wood Mrs : Paith Khan and her two
Haskell who is a son Of Mr, HN jing who had legal business in are. ai eer tenn “quer
Haskell, retired Headmaster of jasyajon and another director ° i a . aoe OE tae ene
Harrisom College and Mr Ha who could not leave Jamaica = Sea ax guests at the Rockley
kell, ee employed with T, | Normally the meeting would ee cs
at Potit-a-Pierre have been held in Trinidad Reach Clu

Leaving Teday
R G. W JENNINGS
Jarnaica who came out her
about two weeks ago on business
expects to return home to-day
by B.W.LA, He will be accom
panied by this wife who joined
him a week ago for a holiday
staying at Roeckley Beach Club

Spent a Week
AT spending a week's
holiday staying at the Hotel
Royal, Mr. A. Carbajal of Vene
zuela, returned home yesterday

morning by B.W.LA. via Trini-
dad,

Paid Routine Visit
D" JOHN ADLER, Presiden

of the Independent Explora-
tion Co., Lid. of Texas, U.S.A,
left for San Juan yesterday
morning by B.W.LA, on his way
back to the U.S.A,

Dr, Adler who was here on a
short visit staying at the Hotel
Royal, came out on a routine

visit in connection with the work
hig company is doing for
Barbados Gulf Oil Company



the Hom H. A, CUKE,

Business and Pieasure
R. AND MRS, M, BR, LAM
British Guiana whe

been in Barbados for

weeks, expect to remain for

ot

have
several
an

other two or three staying at Ber-

wyn Guest House, Hastings
Mr. Lam who spent a month

in

Trinklad before coming here said
that his visit here is one of busi-

ness coupled with pleasure
Principal of M. R tam. Manuf

He is

ace

turers’ Commission, Life and Fire

Insurance Agent
Comptroller of Custom
N Barbados for a
is Mr, Louis Spence, ©
of Customs, Trinidad
yesterday morning
B.W.LA. and s staying at
Ocean View Hotel

Back te St. Vincent

troher
arrived

short visit

Comp-
He

the

R JUSTICE MANNING and
MRS. MANNING of St
Vineent, returned home yester-
day afternoon by B.G. Airways
after spending a holiday in Bar-

Ocean View Hotel

GB. E., M.L.C, baces, ‘They were staying at the

What Makes Hair Thrive

You would, if you had
choice in the matter, pick the
sort of ancestors, To a
long line of well-thatched
tors is highly important, as heredi-
ty is thought to be the
factor in determining whether or
not he will be bald in early life. tr

rightis

you is important be-

anyvessential for general

ances found
meat,
decisive cereals, peas, beans, and peanuts, give it,

vitality also
thought to be important for the

in liver,
wheat

kidneys,
germ, whole-grain

You can see that the best hair

eatment is the internal one that
You, as a woman, need have little makeg

worry about .
Ye ry + i point. Heredity Ubeval

good blood and supplies it

is beneficial, too.



\Â¥ to the sealo. But ont mente,
side treatment

clinging, see a skin doctor.
The growth and character

depend largely on the care

For example, dry hair,
by internal factors, over-y

of

man, a colour and life of the dair, It is your hair depend mainly on what
lean happens inside your body. Looks

you

caused

aro

cessing or too frequent perma-

feelg harsh, looks strawy,

or unsuitable shampoo
and

a it determings what colour to bring about good results ‘aster. dull, and is stubborn to arrange.
= ae ee ea hair will be Dally scalp massage is excel- But you can make it behave, A
or curly er it will be straight lent to encourage circulation, This conditioning cream, used after a

: is not difficult or complicated; shampoo, will make it feel silkier,

You can't change your ancestry, ry
but you can do a great deal to p
have healthy hair, You can make 4)
the most of what you have, You
can Help to keep it well nourished,

y inch,

‘ust move the scalp firmly inch
with the pads of the
nyers

Stimulating tonies may be help-

look smoothier, and stay in p

better, Of course, the effec

temporary, but it is good,
Too oily hair won't look d

lace
t is

ank

‘ ful, but use them as an aid to and greasy if you have regular
alive, and growing, You can take massage, Don't depend on the permanents, shampoo every five or
expert care of it, in order to bring tonic alone to do the job, six days, ,
ot all its colour, shen, and Keep your scalp free from Baby-fine hair is a nuisance. If

Five ipeide hatin - J dandruff, Ordinarily, this can be you have this problem, you need
ae elle * lush a } ~ a the done by thorough brushing regu- an expert cut and a style that re-
Soon "on 7 te »y the larly and washing the hair as soon quires no pins, Have your hair
hatucat roche Sor Wanted one as oe roe Gey ee If trimmed regularly; get 2 good
when: it goee out of kilter end Med does not solve the problem, permanent as soon as it becomes

your -hair becomes stringy, dry,
and lifeless, or when it thing
alarmingly, do you wonder what
has happened. What causes form-
erly healthy hair to act this way?
Broadly spenking, it is because the
nourishment it receives hag heen
diminished in quality or quanti-
ty,

A poor diet, lacking in the ele-
ments that make for maximum
health, slowly starves the hair,
An illness, even a brief one, may
cause the hair to fall out, An
operation, pregnancy, nerves,
overwork any intense mental or
physical strain or shock will take
its toll,

These effects do not show im-
mediately—often not until months
later and it takes an even 1onger
time for the hair to recover, Haic
forms slowly, especially under un-
favourable conditions, And if the
cells are starved, the follicle
simply closes shop and ceases to
produce,

What can you do to keep your
hair healthy? And if it should lose
its vigor, what can you do to
restore it? Keep yourself in the
best possible shape physically, The
hair ig so sensitive to any alter-
nation in the blood gupply that
sometimes the first notice you
have of a rundown condition is
u charge in your hair,

Watch Your Health

Make a habit of a well-balanced
meal, When you are having
troublé with your hair, you often
ask what vitamins will help it.
Actually, the proper balance of
food every day is much more im«
portant than any single vitamin,
But be eure you are getting sulll-
cient “Vitamin A, abundant in
carrotg, apricots, peaches, and
other yellow vegetables and fruits,
wreen . vegetables, milk, butter,
cheese, eggs, Vitamin B-complex,



NICE

SELECTION

y rubbing in a special tonie or

antiseptic lotion once or twice be-
tween shampoos, If the dandruff is
stubborn and becomes greasy and

limp, The timing and judgement

of test curls must be just ri

Clear away that
bidding fog!

Tee inexperienced player usually takes his partner’s protec-
tive bids at their face value, but the expert often tends to

Ku Lo the other extrem

Examples from imternational
matches frequentiy show a
player passing instead of making
the obvous overcall when the
Ndding is Opened cn his right
ye), when he has the luck to bear
iS pariner reopen, he continues
{0 pass or to g.ve Min mum
responses For sume reason the
rov@etive bd is assumed to have
Neon) made gn the mere amet) of
in oil-rag



who prote
‘ives dang
» best of mes 0 it
0 1 responder to help
wy the fog that envely
vdding In the fo lowin
oxample of mudedied ii
North he'd this hand
ABS Y KV65%
KR 763
Had South opened ihe +
With One Spade. Nort!
lemporice with th one
foree Two Diamond.
ink tO Jump to game on Lye
round if South's Spad
rebiddable But a very diff
tuation arose when
dealer ot game al ‘ wd
With One Noe Trump. Norch and
Rast passed, and South reopened
With Two Spades.



yp cal
nicing.



dading

would

round
end
next

are

ol



Lost control

North promptiy bid Three
Diamonds and was not amused
‘es Sea himself left in this con-

LUNCH BAGS in all Colours ..

SHOPPING BAGS

WHITE HANDBAGS Latest Styles



tract South’s hand was this
®KQ1096,9 9863. O08
SAB S
In Three Diamonds, North jost
control and went two down
whereas Four Spades was un
beatabh
South
Diamonds
that it
a better

tha Phre
what $A
was nRGY oO 0
pari-score «contra
than Two Spades 5
Prospects being neg igeble ‘
the One No-lrump oid by We
Having already gone our on a
Umb. South was disposed
drop the bidding as early a
Possible before the opponen
Started doubling

There was vo case
beating @bout the bush

Assumed
meant



here to
south



intervention Was made with thy
knowledge that Bast and We
in spite of the former alend
might Well hod the balance o
strength Under the ru
Two and Three. his ba

KIX Pees winners baied o
ood

Ki five-card or longer sult ‘I
orth, band is almos sur
provide four additional winne
in a Spade contract

North, in faet miended to ba
Four Spades on the next row
over @ny a&anticipated reply to
Three Diamonds Bul the go
Was in Aight from the star ind
the only effect of his delayed
action tactics was to put Af
unfalr strain on bis partner



London Brpress Ser



ght;

for you, there's very little margin
between fuzz and no wave at all,





—
ee
Nite MREE SRS $3.80
with Zipp Fasteners .......,....... $4.76, $5.29, $6.15
PRIN £ hao va nu ane areas $3.99 to $9.99

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4606

spoon

H

and



Intertude, &
8.00 p.m

pm
10.15 p.m
pom



» BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Children Etiquette

nee:

1, At what age should a child
be taught table manners?
When he is able to sit at
the table with the family

Ans,

2. How

should a

Ansa, A baby should be taught to
put a spoon into its mouth peinted

\e end foremost,
vat 3. What are the five points a

baby must be drilled in?

Ans. A, To take small mouth

fuls; B. To eat very slowly; C. To
41L nothing; D. To keep ite mouth
nut while chewing; EB. And not ta
smear ite face with food

4. How should a child hold a

mug, @ @lase or a cup?

Ana, Until its hands are strong
under good control, a ehild

mug or a glase

5. When should a child be al

1 lowed to come to the diningsroom
for Sunday dinner’



baby use a







4 When it can eat without
i : ything or smearing its
liy ind = drink
grease “moons
without making any
noise.

before visitors

6. Should a child be corrected

°





Ans. It is wise not to correct
since too |much nagging in the
‘presence of strangers iessens a
child's incenuve lo g00a behaviour
pefore them

to the

7. Should a child be sent back

nursery for committing any
kind of table offehee or blunder?
“Ans. Yes, To send him back
immediately after the act occurs

would be a simple but an effective
punishment,

8. When

should a child -be

taught to use a fork, a knife, and

‘ poor’

Ans, When tt is old enough to
hold them; with constant practice
a
them properly



ehild naturally learns to use



’

ie

Rupert and the. Toy Scout—25












Arriving a stocking tree
Rupert finds’ ¢ several ot his
trends have got there fire: and
are busily discussing plans Alpy
and Rex have climbed into the
branches and are choo ve
positions Now that you here
you may as well hang all our

B.B.C. Radio.
Programme












FRIDAY, MAY 16 ise
1-715 pom, TSteM KM
4% pm The News 4
Daily Service, 4.15 » ive Mt
and Dave Kaye, 4.3 p.m. Bedtime With
Braden, 3.8 p.m Composer rr
Week Pa Listeners
Navy
Revels



ai-up and Prog
The News, 7!







e Curta
News, 10.10 pow News
The

the Third Programme

The

From

Many women are subject to weak,
aching back. Often the kidneys are
to blame, for your kidneys, along
with thé liver, must filter out im-
puritias from the bloodstream.

So if you feel tired, worn-out, head-
achy—with the nagging pain of on
aching back—look to both your kid-
neys and liver. That's why Cana-
diana have been relying on Dr.
Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills for over
half a century.

Give your system a_ chance to
work properly. ‘Try Dr. Chase’a
Kidney-Liver Pills today. The name
“Dr, Chase’ is your assurance. 3

Dr. Chase's

MIDNEY-LIVER PILL’



EMPIRE

OPENING TO-DAY, 2.30 and 8.30.

and Continuing Daily, 4.45
and 8.30

SHE HAD
EVERYTHING You
COULD GIVE A

WOMAN TO
TORMENT
A MAN!

News

Debate Continue »

< £46 < Aes
POSSESS SSE SOLO LLP LLL



stockings,"
brought pl

«

gre
“ You hav

T



Vv




re al



A

says Bill, “I've
ty of string and some
you leave room for
While they are work-

“Why, yeu
laughs Rupert
brought a stocking.
*s a pillow case 1"*

A

ns Mind
rybaxdy."*
Podgy runs up
dy th A





i
|

’
|

without making | Malone, retireq Chief Justice of
on its mug, or eat| the Windwards and Leeward: one
unnecessary | of her counsel for the Windwards,

|

‘VSLZSESCSSIO0CO8000000000000000066000060500000",

We sell the best of everything and recommend

FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1952

MALONE, Q.C.

=| GONQUER PAIN
SCIENTIFICALLY

H. M. the Queen has been
four well-praven medicines, |.t.. Phenacatin,

pleased to appoint Sir Clem2nt|

it was announced here,



medicines, scientifically balanced, work synergistically—that

they relieve pain fast, restore your sense of well-being !

RE Serenity Coons! Cow Cosessone and dentists
in Great Britain alone use it in their surgeries ! Fevers,

colds, headaches, toothache, rheumatism, neuraigia—this wonderful

few specific brings you amazingly quick relief from all of them !

costs little. You can buy it
ANACIN] two-tablet envelopes—
enough to bring quick relief from a
bout of pain. Or In handy 20-tablet
boxes. Or in S0-tablet botties—keep
one of these in your house.

ARM YOURSELF

CROSSWORD ©















































































Across
1 and 4. in no domain is it seen
i ‘aitiahty hetore nguyesnti oy AGAINST PAIN .
‘oun n ese en mn .
10 Often follows 12 in dressing. (3) ‘ ’ 70
? Chote os sere ponies severe 13} e GET ANACIN oA Y!
4 hat shows inc em A
14 Some mirth brovides him, (4) *AMAGIN’ 'e cold ln Great Britain and Seuth Africa voder the name ‘ ANADIN
15. Inflammation of the nose. (8) a
16. Inner casing, (6) = —— ~~
i t by the atart of 26 (3)
20, Almost a bull, (5)
23. The third and the inst call. (4)
24. Container of the military
La pe-etook % (4)
#9 ttain, (5)
and 27. See 9 Down. \ aired teenie ae nea tinted lee
Down \ BRIDGETO POWN BARBAREES OISTIN
4. What a fabulous ‘ot. (7) S178) (Dial 8404)
3. Follows some Yecreae® (4) Under the Patronage of [/TODAY: 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. || ro:
DAY & TOMORROW
4. See 1 Across. Col. R. T. Michelin & Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m
. Whone iattie vase you save? (4) “TODAY (3 Shows!” |] Sat MATURE Il-swoup IN THe
‘ nose a 3: 4 )
8 Modern trading centre in an / & 830 pm cea neae stp Dana AND DESEET”
0° piace, t AS na is
0 = aos ote 1 Acros, | nn : wg LAS VEGAS STORY
——ailernative . , a, &
11. Indisposed to severity. (8) THE BLUE LAMP hatte Boe sae eee THE WEST"
18 Such tears are never shed. (5) Jack WARNER—also : tarr Yvonne De CARLO
i. po sailors use 4 ad gravy ? (4) “SALUTE TO DUKE RAIDERS OF
22. See 9 Down, ELLINGTON” AHA Tete weet 1.20 Pm
24. The end of &Y (3) SAT. “Speciat 030a1.90|] TOMAHAWK CREEK]) Triple Attraction =
Baiation ot Pararden Oussle.— Aaseaa: BLACK EAGLE oe LAND"
‘ aseball; % ; 9 ; . .
wy Geptury: a Charm: "8: Uris: 8. William Bishop & FORT SAVAGE }] Rigid ARLEN &
baile; Bi, u >; 2 H
AS. dan: 26. Grit. Down: 1 Biscuit: DESERT VIGILANTE RAIDERS Tex WILLIAMS &
b Garett Soe neg ni dee Charles Starrett __ Coming Re-Rel Et
} 4 ’ ane ages one MIDNITE SPECIAL Sat; wae. MIDNIT ‘
Pe SUR Be ee Charles Starrett (Double) Errol FLYNN in naar

COWBOY CAVALIER
Jimmy WAKELY

and
SILVER RAIDERS
Whip WILSON

DODGE CITY

Anne SHERIDAN
Olivia De HAVILLAND

SOUTH OF DEATH VALLEY
IRENEGADES OF THE SAGE








GERM MOTOR OILS
at LOBE
HIGH CLASS LUBRICATIONS.

CENTRAL

Gasolene Service Statien

J--cvc.
SO



in
“ANOTHER MAN'S POISON"
a ee
)
)
)

rr —————

il
ARRIVED ,

Another Shipment of the

POPULAR

S4180 GAS COOKERS

A few of these have nov
booked

Prices of next shipment will be
higher

yet

bec

Why not call at your Gas Show- !
rooms, Bay Street TO-DAY anc
secure one of these cookers.

EMPIRE
au 4

To-day at 2.30 & 8.30 and continuing
dally 445 & 8.30
Bette DAVIS—Gary MERRILL



ee
Sat.. Miid-nite

To-morrow
t 30



at Gene Autny
Rod Cameron in
in Indian Territory
“River Lady” and
and Warner Baxter
Jungle Captain” .in
with Crime
Otto Kruger Dr, Gamble
OLYMPIC
To-day t¢ Mon. 4.30 & 8.15

R.K.O's Tripple Attraction
(1) JUNGLE HEADHUNTERS
(2) ROREINSON—TURPIN
2ND FIGHT

THE JUDGE STEPS oUuT

“™



pat. at 1.30 Sat.. Mid-nite

Duncan Renaldo

Super Thrills



in Super Action
) The Daring 4
Caballero ns

and Super Man

Urubu A Whole Serial

®

46+
CCCP BOOS

“a
s

Â¥






FOUNDRY LTD.



POSPOS9OEPIOS SOLES CODSS SOE SSOP

; GENTLEMEN |

HERE'S NEWS
FOR YOU!!



TODAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. Opening Io-morrow

Trafalgar Street. (Last Shows) 5.00 & 8.30 p.m. & Continuing





— on an
5999S9999S9956999950009", | re venture
GA ET Y | that most men

The Garden—St. James feared to face!



TODAY & TOMORROW 830 p.m,

“NEVER TRUST A GAMBLER”
Dane CLARKE & Ng
“LAST of the BUCCANEERS”
Paul HENREID

MIDNITE 8AT. 17
“LAW of the BADLANDS”
Tim Holt—Richard Martin

“PRAIRIE LAW”

George O'BRIEN










presents i
an |

" SSSSSSSSSSSSSS5656SS560" exciting \|
new idea |
ROXY in
To-day only 445 & 8.15 musical

J. ARTHUR RANE PRESENTS” !

“RED SHOES" oe

Opening To-morrow 4.45 & 815
and continuing Daily

Ann SHEREIDAN—John LUND ;
in

Starring
ROBERT

| TAYLOR:

vith HOPE EMERSON
JOHN McINTIRE

“STEEL TOWN” ~™
Color by Technicolor








DENISE

DARCEL

staining

2
MICKEY ROONEY « SALLY FORREST
Svaks VIC DAMONE + MONICA LEWIS
WILLIAM DEMAREST = JAMES CRAIC
YAY BROWN + LOUIS ARMSTRONG ‘tea® Story by Frank Capra

frataring MONT CARL OTLISAT WIRES, Directed by

Produced by
(eu | WILLIAM A. WELLMAN - DORE SCHARY

$e Wt pereee AN M-G-M PICTURE

Sat. Mid-nite Special
ABBOTT & COSTELLO in
“HERE COMES THE COEDS”
and “CAPTIVE WILD WOMAN”

ROYAL

To-day only’4.30 & 8.16
“THE FLYING SERPEANT”
and
“I ACCUSE MY PARENTS” ohare



Sereen Play by CHARLES SCHNEE



GRAND MIDNITE DOUBLE TO-MORROW

“PIN UP GIRL”
Betty Grable; Martha Raye; Charlie Spavik Orchestra.
- and -
“DAISY KENYON”

Joan Crawford; Dana Andrews and Henry Fonda.
Ln

GLOBE announces the resumption of - - -
“LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE” (
AUDITION SUNDAY, 18TH 9.30

POLICE SPORTS



To-morrow & Sunday 4.30 & 8.15

in

“TRY AND GET ME”
and

“SUN SETS AT DAWN”

Stafring:
Philip SHAWN —Sally PARR





Shortly)
A.M.

$5666>>



°

KENSINGTON OVAL

°





x,
; x
&
% Gentlemen friends, Customers and the male seec- ° MAY 22nd. 3 p.m.
$ tion of the general public:—
%
$ We acknowledge with thanks your several hints
x ey : i : :
s} recently addressed to us, suggesting that we give the ne «
RS Ladies only a monopoly of attention for Bargains ete., Admission : ADULTS 36c
% through the medium of our Sales, Parades and quite
recently our “Annual Exhibitions of Dress Materials. % CHILDREN 18c.
» >
% We take this opportunity to assure you that you are
‘ace fe * fever forgotten by us. When we appeal to the Ladies,
} We have in mind that in their capacity as housewives,
BETTE DAVIS % sweethearts, girl-friendg ete., ete., they shop for the
4 4 %s husbands, Sweethearts, Boy-friends, etc., and all mem-
VATy } bers of the household,, meaning that the gentlemen RIDE A eeece
GARY MERRILL, % goncerned shop by proxy.
5 ss .
FMIW MS % But now weare launching a special Parade for Gen- x
’ Wik (lemen in things of special interest to Men with the
& direct intention of interesting all Males who prefer or
% whose positions do not afford them to shop by proxy.
° “
Detailed particulars in connection with this Gen- | ;
i Yemen's Parade which will last for one week, starting %
i om Saturday, i7th May, will be announced later. 3 /
%
x i
: So, Gentlemen, tune your ears for the Bugle Call. x ‘e
°
\% x
fan surrng ANTMOMY STEEL se sense + hoe tes hone (as < >
pr ter her Paps Reet Ly ew Seren Wi tant || ss ry ‘ x , DRY LT.
Sases= | |N.E. WELSON & Co. {| THE BARBADOS FOUN
i % : White Park Road.
EXTR A Ig The Shopping Centre for Gentlemen of Distinction. g a Michael
SHORT, ss
NORMA, MIDSUMMER NIGUT’S § 31, SWAN ST. itt DIAL 3676. 3 b Office : 4326 Workshop : 4546
DREAM. S $)3 Merchandise: 4528 ” 4650
Paramount British News Reel. | .0140700s0.ce0oeeseocoseooseeesooeoooeosooosoooon | + SOSSOSSSESSE
i «



fa



FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1952



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Barbados Chamber Of Commerce |
Report Of The Council

For The Year 1951

Meetings

The following meetings were
held during the year:

The annual general meéting, two
quarterly general meetings, two
special general meetings, twelve
monthly meetings of the Council,

and three special meetings of the
Council.

Membership
The membership at the end of
1950 was 147. Duri 1951 nine
new members were Sn four
members resigned and one died.
The total number of members at

a end of 1951, therefore, was

Finance

The credit balance at the be-
ginning of 1951 was $2,439.99. Sub-
scriptions from members during
the year amounted to $5,414.80.
Receipts from other sources were
$180.98. The expenditure for the
year was $6,074.37, leaving a
credit balance of $1,961.40 at the
end of 1951. r

The Commercial Journal

The credit balance of the Com-
mercial Journal account at the
beginning of the year was $2,092.-
49. The receipts from subscriptions
and advertisements were $1,134.02.
The expenses in connection with
the publication of the journal
amounted to $830.57, leaving a
credit balance at ‘the end of the
year of $2,395.94.

Since the appointment of Mr.
Ian Gale as Editor of the Com-
mercial Journal the issues have
been appearing more regularly, A
new and more colourful coyer,
which will make the journal more

attractive, was produced during peig

the year. The number of journals
printed monthly has recently been
increased from 150 to 300.

Visitors
The Council were pleased to
welcome the following visitors to
meetings of the Chamber during
the year: Mr. A, R. Starck, U.K.
Trade Commissioner in Trinidad;
Mr. C, D. Thomas, President of

. the Clerks Union; Sir John Saint,

prior to attending the Common-
wealth Supply Conference in the
U.K, as an adviser; Mr, F. A.
Bishop, Controller of Supplies; Mr,
Cc. J. Burgess, Executive Secre-
tary (Economics) of the Caribbean
Commission; and Mr, Bernard
Braine, M.P., Secretary of the
West Indies Committee to the
Conservative Party.

The Chamber’s Dinner

During the year it was decided
at a quarterly general meeting
that the practice of holding an
annual dinner should ‘be discon-
tinued on account of the poor’ at-
tendance in, recent) years, It was
also
would be
if sufficient”
desire for it.

Obituary

The Council ,ecord with: regret
the death of the foll ‘during
the year:

Mr. Hilton H. Edwards, who
died on 21st January. In his early
years he worked with the firm of
W. L. Johnson & Co. He later en-
tered into partnership with Mr.
W. H. Roach and formed the firm
of Evelyn, Roach & Co, He served
for a number of years as a mem-~-
ber of the Highways and Sanitary
Commissioners of St. Michael. In
the field of sport he was principal-
ly interested in ‘horse racing and
was for many years the Official

;

Starter of the Barbados Turf Club. su,

Mr. D, L. Johnson, head of the

our of the

agreed that this function corpo

first worked with Messrs. W. L.
Johnson & Co., where his father
had been a partner. At the out-
break of the 1914 war he enlist-
ed and served as a Lieutenant in
the British West Indian Regiment.
On his return to the Island he
started his own firm as schooner
agents. He was interested in paro_
chial affairs, becoming a Vestry-
man and serving at one time as
Churehwarden. He was a keen
ae pina being a member of the

anderers Cricket Club and for
many years was a Judge at meet-
ings of the Barbados Turf Club.

a Conferences

e following are some of the
principal conferencés which were
held during the year, of interest
to the commercial community:

The First”Meeting of the Re-
gional Economic Committee was
held in Barbados ‘in May, under
the chairmanship of Professor
C. G, Beasley, Mr. G. H,. Adams
was the local representative, with
Hon. H. A. Cuke, Hon. K. R.
Hunte, Sir John Saint, Mr. D. G.
Leacock and Mr. G. J, Bryan as
advisers,

The Twelfth Meeting of the
Caribbean Commission was also
held in Barbados during May.
The conference was opened by His
Excellency the Governor and was
under the chairmanship of Sir
George Seel, Co-Chairman of the
U.K. section of the Commission.
This Chamber gave a_ cocktail
party at the Marine Hotel in hon-
rs and staff of
the Commission, Chamber mem-
bers and local officials also be-

ing invited.

conference of Supply Officers

‘the British Caribbean was
here during the month of
April, with Professor C. G. Beas-
ley as Chairman. Mr, F. A. Bishop
was the local delegate.

The Rice Marketing Board of
British Guiana arranged a con-
ference which was held in Trini-
dad in March for representatives
of those colonies in the Caribbean
who were supplied with rice by
British Guiana, to meet members
of the Board and negotiate new
prices for rice. The local delegates
were Sir John Saint and Mr. F.
A. Bishop, with Mr, S, H. Kinch,
a member of this Chamber, as an
adviser,

The Seventeenth Congress of the
Federation of Chambers of Com-
merce of the British Empire was
held in Loydon in June. Mr. R. M.
Cave was in London during this
month and he represented this
Chamber at the congress.

from

Incorporated Chambers of

Commerce of the British
Caribbean
Arrangements are being made
for the Ninth Congress of the In-
rated Chambers to be held
$5 British Guiana in October, 1952.
e Council

: a com-
mittee to select suitable subjects
which this Chamber will present
for consideration at the congress.

Control of Advertising Signs

The Council appointed a com-
mittee during the year to make re-
commendations for a scheme of
voluntary restriction by firms in
the display of advertising signs.
This committee, working with the
co-operation of the leading local
firms who do a large amount of
advertising by means of advertis-
ing signs, and the Civic Circle, re-
commended that advertising signs
outside of the city limits should be
restricted to a size of twelve square
feet. The Committee drew up a
list of built-up areas where they
advertising signs could

be displayed and recommended

firm of D. L. Johnson & Co. He that outside of these districts ad-



Here is a simple Cross Word
win $25.00 for only one
be doing your bit to help send

puzzle which can help you to
. At the same time you will
‘bados’ sole Olympic hope to

Helsinki next July. Enter now

try your
NOTE NEW DATE OF GLOSING OF ENTRIES IN CLAUSE

1.
the prize.

2

RULES
The first correct solution opened by the Editor will win
In the event of there being no correct solution the one

containing the least errors which is opened first by the

HORIZONTAL

1—Who was the father of Elia-
saph?

5—Elevate

10— What is the fourth book of the
New Testament?

14—Prophetie scene
battle at the end

16—Oil: comb. form.

17—Fish net.

18—Lairs.

19—Titles of address. .

20—Loathers.

22—One of the places where the
Lord prophesied great pain

23—Residence.
24—Imitate.

26—Great operatic tenor.
28—One of David's sons

33—The turmeric.

34—Depart.

36—Tropical rodents.

37—Propagate.

39—Jewel.

40—Used scraping tool.

41—Who was filled with the Holy
Ghost?

42—Ruin

43—Peculiar.

44— Hagarder.

45—Days in the week.

46—Prefix: two.

47—Patrivtic society ‘abbr.)

48—Langhid

50—By What river did Ezekiel see
visions of God?

53—Auditory organ.

54—Blast

55—Masculine nickname.

57—Who washed his hands in
token that he had no responsi-
bility in the conviction of
Jesus?

62—Crippled

63—Fertile earth.

65—Tint.

ot the at
of the world

66—A son of Judah
67—Necessary elements.

tured slab.
71—Location.
VERTICAL

s—Note road.

+ i “gf the scale.
7—March date.
8—Pertaining to sound.

g—' d
10— is the sixth book of the
ld Testament?

11—Medies.
ib Qoe eo Asia turned away from
al

13—Olfactory o
is—Twenty “of these are worth a
shekel

7—Primary color.

28—Upper garment of Jewish
priest

29—"Church of the ——

(0— Frosted.

1—Mournful.
remee adependent union.

89—Donated.
41—In what story form did Jesus
speak?



vertising signs should only be
placed at the country shops. ese
recommendations were circulated
to all firms likely to advertise by
means of signs or hoardings along
the highways. The Council are
pleased to record the co-operation
of the majority of firms in this
matter.

Vigilance Committees

On the suggestion of the Presi-
dent the Council recommended to
the principal sections of_ business
that they should appoint Vigilance
Committees for the purpose of ad-
vising him, and to bring to his at-
tention matters affecting their
trade which they felt should be
dealt with by the Chamber. As a
result of this recommendation.
Vigilance Committees were ap-
pointed for the following sections:

Lumber and Hardware, Dry
Goods, and Druggists.

The Grocery Trade felt that
their interests were being ade-
quately looked after by the Pro-
vision Merchants Association and
for this reason there was no need
for a Vigilance Committee of
Grocers.

The Council look forward to
active work by each of these com-
mittees in the interests of their
particular sections of trade and in-
vite members to make use of them
by putting before them matters
which they feel require the atten-
tion of the Chamber.

British Industries Fair

During the year the Council or-
ganised a stand in the West Indies
section of the British Industries
Fair. This was the first occasion
that Barbados was represented at
one of these Fairs which are an
annual event. This effort was
made possible by the financial sup-
port which the Coungil received
from the Publicity Committee, the
rum distilleries and the majority of
the local rum exporters, the Bar-
bados Canning Co. and the Barba-
dos Cotton Factory Ltd.

Exhibits of local produce and
handicrafts, as well as advertising
matter for attracting tourists to
the island were on display. The
stand was prepared and arranged
by the West India Committee, and
from reports received, their work
was very attractive.

The Council wish to record their
thanks and appreciation to Major
William Lambert, the West India
Committee’s representative in
oe of the West Indies section
and to Mr. E. A. Bishop and Mr.
C. S. Husbands, who were in at-
tendance at the Barbados stand,
for their work in making the local
display a success. :

Shipping

During the year 965 Merchants
Vessels with a total nett tonnage
of 1,793,001 tons arrived at the port
as compared with 1,024 vessels of
1,645,678 tons in 1950. In addition
to the above. 36 vessels of other
types visited the port. These were
comprised of 14 yachts, 1 Spanish
motor vessel, 1 Royal Fleet Aux-
iliary, 1 Royal Army Service Corps
Vessel, 3 British, 10 American and
2 Canadian Warships and 4 train-
ing ships.

10 vessels whose gross tonnage
amounted to 63,583 tons entered
the Careenage as against 581 ves-
sels of 70,522 tons gross in 1950;
of these 141 were steam and motor
vessels, the remainder being sail-
ing vessels.

The s.s. Mauretania made two
calls and the s.s, Nieuw Amster-
dam made one call here during the
year on special winter cruises
They brought between them a
total of 2,082 tourists to this island.

The total number of passengers
arriving in the Colony by sea dur-
ing 1951, exclusive of intransit
passengers and tourists, was 5,380.
The number who left the Colony
by sea was 4,939, as compared with
5,238 arriving and 4,396 leaving
by sea in 1950. ‘=

“
The following table gives the

class. nationality, number and nett | shi

@ (on April 3,

Class of
Vessel

Steam
and

Motor

Nationality
British
American
Argentine
Colombian
Dutch
French
German
Norwegian
Honduran
Panamanian
Venezuelan

British
Dutch

Tankers

British
French

Sailing
Vessels

Total Merchant Shipping

No of
Vessel

Nett
Tonnage
1,012,464

2572

810
132,773

1,746,665



158
64
5:
a8

4
a

13

2

5
ul

362

3

19,752
1,793,001

The following table shows the number of steam and motor ves-
sels which arrived at the port of Bridgetown during the years 1946-51:
Year

1946
ioe
18s
1960
1951

Air

No of Steam &
Motor Vessels
271
441
441

yw
602
600

Traffic

The number ot commercial aircraft arriving at Seawell Airport

during 1951 was 1.267, as compared with 1,297 in 1950.

operated by the following airlines;
British West Indian Airways:

British Guiana Airways:

Trans-Canada Airlines 120

Linea Aeropostal Venezolana 32
Commercial non-schedule

airlines 100

In addition to the above, 16

military and private aircraft

landed at the Airport, carrying @
total of 44 passengers.

The number of passengers ar-
riving by air during the year was
15,411 and the number departing
by air was 16,048, as compared
with 13,506 arriving and 13,363
departing during the previous
year, There were 2,591 intransit
passengers by air during 1951.

A new scheduled airline—Linea

Aeropostal Venezolana — com~
EXPORT TRADE FIGURES

861 flights,
sé

These were

carrying 24,977
1.082

passengers

3.094

104

3,649
menced operations through Bar-
Bados from ports in Venezuela

during the month of August.

Implementation of the recom-
mendations of the Seawell Air-
Committee appointed by His
cellency the Governor was
commenced during the year. The
recommendations are designed to
bring Seawell into line with the
larger airports in the area, as
well as to accommodate the in-
creasing numbers of passenger:
using the airport.

Susar Z
1949 1950 1951 1949 1950 1951
0.009 1 0 $0182 019,591 3 40.202 4 300 276
ark Cry 116,699 121,554 = 139, 3,019,591 3,540.2 399,270
pee es 2,587 2,295 3.052 | 40,098 60,722 84,73
Muscovado 1,550 1,250 1,000 31,000 37,760 32,720
White Crystals §,773 6.644 8,958 183,213 229,956 319,338
126,609 131,743 «188,762 3,273,902 3,868,100 4,836,074
Molasses :
1949 1950 â„¢ 1951 1949 1950 1952
Sisis Se05.83 Sas 439 eid 939 oa 116 1 240, 455
e Asse: 143,813 5,805,830 6,346, 939 028,116 1,249,458
Chale werent 3 247,099 r 195,159 104,886 36,550 23,934 20,64)
Vacuum Pan 1,753,014 2,894,311 2,911,202 32,869 24,119 110,186
6,143,026 8,835,900 8,762,527 682,358 1,076,169 1,380,290
Rum (inecludiyse ships’ stores) “ saa
1949 1950 1951 1949 1950 51
gallons uallons gallons £ £ &
647,748 902,296 1,352,178 255,242 294,988 410,932

The values of staple crops exported during the

as follows:

years 1947-51 are

Sugar Molasses as

£1,870,255 £1,147,279 £943,705

ie 1 air ana 1,052,170 376,639

1949 3,278,902 682,358 255,242

1950 3,868,100 1,076,169 294,988

1951 4,836,074 1,380,290 410,932
The 1951 figures for the following percentage and values tables

of imports and exports are not
of a member of the staff of the
culated to members as soon as they

Percentage Table of Exports of knees Panteee

obtainable on account of the illness

et é
Enstons ee They will be cir-

able.

& Manufactures of the Colony,

are ava’

1947 1948 1948 1950
on : ’
United Kingdem He He » q #2
Canada 52 q 2
Other parts of the British Empire %4 21.0 a 77
USA. ° 3 7 : 0 4
Other Foreign countries 7 3
Percentage Table of Imports for the Years 1947-50 Tae cai cai ia
39.3 B.C
Urited Kingzdom so =e 21 + :
Canada A
Other parts of the British Empire Seta 166 Z ae as
U.S.A. “e et . e
Other foreign countries ote vo shh)-0 56 nT 69 wa
vara, f RRS BAG DERM Ter 5 Imports Exports Total Trade
1947 ‘ £ 7,124,930 £3,715,107 £ 10,840,037
1948 6,346, 3,048,165 9,304,395
1949 7,072,628 4,688,536 11,761,164
8,067,944 5,758,975 13,826,919

1950
Charcoal and Firewood

e On page 5
nl

LARCENY CASE

ADJOURNED

The case in which John Good-
ing of Bay Land, St. Michael, is
charged by the Police with the’
larceny of two bottles of brandy,
the property of D, V. Scott & Co.,
was yesterday ad-
journed until May 23 by His Wor,
Mr. G. B. Griffith, Acting

tonnage of vessels arriving at the }Police Magistrate of District “A.”

port during 1951:

Editor will win the prize.

3. Entrance fee of one shilling
each solution along with name and address on the coupon
— aoe

ny en which is not accompanied by the entrance fee

will be immediately destroyed.

5. All entrants for this competition agree to abide by the
decision of the Editor of the Barbados Advocate.

6, The competition will be closed on Friday, May 16th at
: ‘ae and not on Thursday, May 15, as previously adver-

7. All envelopes must be clearly marked CROSS WORD
PUZZLE COMPETITION

‘ Barbados Advocate, 34 Brodd Street.

Advocate of May 18.

42--Babytonian god
44—Gentle blow.
45—Severe.
47—Calm.
49—Plant juice.

51—Who was hanged on the gal-
lows he had erected for Mor-
decai?

§2—Perch















| Zr |
Ya || | |
eB
ae

—————L—LLLL<&<&€_h@BM— SSS

The name of the winner will be published in the Sunday

VAL IT
a
Tro Aye
PTT TT Peary
YM eT PT TY
al 7/7
PrT TT wer Be
VET Ae
sl 7 al
/
TEE! | CZ
7

ry eae
he A ok el
i

ENTIRE PROCEEDS TO FARNUM FOR FINLAND FUND
Entries can be posted or delivered to the “Advocate Stationery” or Advertising Office

nv
.



(1/-) must be enclosed with

addressed to the Editor, the

4—Wild plum.
56—Foundation.
58—Timothy’s grandmother

Sox agio-tndian weight.
o-Ini e!
Re. rly.
64—Honey

*8—Symbo! for neon.

PARP
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© SEA AND AIR §
© TRAFFIC 3

DEPARTURES By B.W.LA.
ON THURSDAY
Por Antigua;
J. Powell, H. Shuffle,
Daniel, K. Ablack
DEPARTURES By B.W.LA
ON WEDNESDAY
Tor Puerte Rico:
Mrs. Elizabeth Japp, Mr. James Culling-
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R. Coates, 1 Smart, A. Carbajal, L
Mestier, D. Hadeed, A. Harkness

ARRIVALS—By BWIA

ON WEDNESDAY

A. Hadeed, R. Urton, C. Urton, 8. Urton
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M. Rahal, I Ramirez, D. Blackett, C
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PHILLIPS

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In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

and Wireless (West Indies)
Limited, advise that they can now com,
nunicate with the following ships
through their Barbados coast station
5.5. Manistee, s.s. Grelrosa, 8.8: Davila,
5.8. Fort Napier Fort Townshend,
Tankland, 8.5 ‘aranaki, s.s. Mara
non, 8.8% Weneeslao, 5.8. Pampas, s.s
Peetfie Unity ss Aleoa Clipper s.8
Degrasse, $.* Fort Smith, ss Rosairo,
Somerset S. Rosa, s.s. Will-
omstad, #.s. Aida Lauro, 8.8, N
Chaco, Fletero, s.s. Lady ?
Washington, s.8. City of Liverpool, s.s
Lorde Canning, 8.8. Hidleford, s.s. Alcoa
funner, s.s. Mont Agel, 8.8. Oberon,
Sundale, ss Adolfo, s.8. She
Ciudad de Caracas; s.8. Del Mundo,
Canadian Cruiser; 8.8. Toas; 5.8
Lake Traverse; s.s, Astronomer; s.s. Mel-
ine; 6.8. 8. Cirilo; #.8. Sunwalt; .s.6
Austanger; 8.5. Donald H. Holland; 5.6
Geirulv, s.s. Francisco R. Hart; 8.8
Mormaciand; ss. Daytona,
Pilgrim, s.s. Casablanca, s s
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MAIL NOTICES

Mails for the United Kingdom and
France by the SS. De Grasse will be
eosed at the General Post Office as])
under

<

Parcel Mail at 3 p.m. to-day
May Registered Mall at 830 a.m. and])
Ordinary Mail «ot 9 pm. on the 17th
May, 1952 r '

Mails for St. Vineent, Grenada, Trint.
lad, and British Guiana by the M.V
Chnadian Cruiser will be closed at the
General Post Office as under

Parcel Mail and Registered Mail at
2 p.m Ordinary Mail at 2.30 pom
to-day, 16th May, 1952

Mails for Madeira, United Kingdom
Antwerp and Amsterdam by the M.S
Oranjestad will be closed at the General
Post Office as under

Parcel Mail at 12 noon, Registered Mall
at 2 p.m. and Ordinary Mail at 2.30 p.m

on the 19th May 1952

RATES OF EXCHANGE

NEW YORK
Cheques on Bankers 10 3/10%
Sight or Demand
Drafts 70 1/10%
i Cable
10 5/10% Curreng 68 8/10%
" Coupons 6B 1/10%
>» 0) Yer Silver 20%
CANADA
â„¢ 5/10% Cheques on Bankers 72 6/10%
Demand Dratts 72.65%
Sight Drafts 72 6/10%
745/10% Cable j= = — cssensane
78% Curreney 71 3/10%
Coupons 70 6/10%
SO Silver V% "

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PAGE FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE



FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1952 *











———$.

Friday, May 16, 1952



LESS TRAVEL

THE British West Indian Airways Com-
pany is a subsidiary of the British Over-
seas Airways Corporation, which provides
air service to many parts of the world, One
important branch of BOAC’s activities is
the promotion. of dollar-earning flights
between North America and the Bahamas.
Throughout North America the inhabi-
tants of Canadian and American cities are
invited by the British Overseas Airways
Corporation to enjoy holidays in British
Bahamas. There is mention too of other
British West Indian territories and refer-
ence is made to the possibility of travelling
by British West Indian Airways to most
of the territories in the West Indies and
British Guiana. But the pressure of
BOAC’s publicity in Canada and the
United States is directed to encourage
North Americans to holiday in the
Bahamas. Barbados, which is the most
British of the Atlantic possessions of Her
Majesty relies on a Canadian Airlines Com-
pany, Trans-Canada Airlines, to publicise
its attractions to Canadians: while Pan-
American Airways, whtch provide service
to Trinidad also attempts to persuade
Americans of the merits of Barbados as a
tourist resort. So far as BOAC is con-
cerned only Jamaica, the Bahamas and
Bermuda in the North Caribbean and
Atlantic are considered worthy of. direct
connection with the United Kingdog.

The rest of the British Southern Carib-
bean is from their point of view apparent-
ly well served by Trans-Canada, K.L.M.
and Pan-American Airways.

The Corporation’s efforts have therefore
been directed to make BWIA a shuttle ser-
vice within the Caribbean and its policy
has been to emphasise the middle rather
than the extreme letters which form the
abbreviation BWIA.

This policy has not gone unchallenged
in the area and the failure of BOAC to
provide direct air communication with the
United Kingdom from Barbados and
Trinidad has often been the subject of
adverse comment by visitors to these
isla Son! United Kingdom, Within
ae 0 aaa the aN, sub-
sidiary BWIA has given (and until the
recent startling announcement this week
was giving) satisfactory service through-
out the area. The Company has built up a
reputation for air safety which is the

greatest asset any airline company can
possess.

But the announcement this week has
come as a shattering blow to the region.

The United Kingdom’s indifference to
the lack of British passenger vessels in the
British Caribbean has become proverbial.
That indifference has sometimes been
adroitly exploited by travelling salesmen
of the United Kingdom government, who
have attempted to justify Great Britain’s
disregard of inadequate passenger ship-
ping service in the region by claiming that
British West Indian Airways provided
adequate inter-territorial communications.

This claim has always been regarded as
preposterous by anyone wanting to visit
territories like Montserrat, Dominica, St.
Vincent, British Guiana or British Hon-
duras. But it is typical of the attitude of
mind of a country which, although it is
fully aware that federation of the British
Caribbean territories cannot be achieved
without first providing adequate sea and
air communications continues to woo West
Indian Governments into taking this step
in the dark.

No West Indian can admire Great
Britain’s neglect of communications in the
British Caribbean, It is a neglect for which
that country ought to be ashamed and for
which it certainly merits West Indian
reproach.

And now straight from the blue with
no attempt to explain to the public and no
notification as to the nature and extent of
the cuts imposed by BOAC on, say, the
service between New York and Nassau or
elsewhere, Barbados is told that its weekly
services are to be reduced from seven to
four,

4
BOAC and British West Indian Airways
cannot be held responsipiie for a strike in
the American refineries which manufac-
ture aviation spirits, and West Indians
would be only too willing to suffer any in-
convenience resulting from the drastic
curtailment announced this week if other
territories served by BOAC have been re-
quired to make corresponding sacrifices.

A much more comprehensive statement
is awaited from the Corporation’s agents
in the West Indies.

Eee

Ring ———— eee ee —o



Cotton (4)

The Purehase Tax
Controversy

Lancashire’s present troubles
are, to some extent, a result of
its own short-sightedness. Like
the boy in Aesop’s fable, it made
the mistake of crying “Wolf”
once too often.

There are many people in the
cotton industry who, even now,
are inclined to lay the blame for
the present recession at the door
of Dr. Dalton, who advised con-
sumers at the end of 1950 to stop
buying textiles until prices came
down, No doubt this had its ef-
fect on sales, However, the buy-
ers’ strike which brought about
the present trade recession did
not develop into a reaily serious
situation until several months
later.

Lancashire’s first reaction to
the falling off in sales was to
seek protection from the Gov-
ernment. At ‘first, it spoke with
many voices, but recently its
campaign has been more co-
ordinated. Its clarion call now
is: “Abolish the purchase tax on
cotton goods.”

It is significant, however that

one rarely hears the word
“slump” mentioned in Lanca-
shire today. One prominent

member of the cotton trade told
me, quite emphatically, “This is
not a slump. It is a very serious
trade recession.” To the man-in-
the-street this may seem to be a
case of hair-splitting, but to
members of the cotton industry
the distinction is one of great
importance.

The word “slump” was ap-
plied to the situation in the cot-
ton industry long before the
fact justified it. Newspapers
began to talk about a “serious
depression” in Lancashire,
Leading members of the indus-
try made speeches referring to
huge stocks of unsound materi_
als. Deputations were sent to
Whitehall to demand ail sorts
of Government action to allevi-
ate the situation.

The effect of all this was to
confirm the consumer in his
view that cotton prices were
about to fall. Purchases that had
been postponed until prices were
brought more into line with the
new level of demand were put
off indefinitely. Manufacturers
were calling for the abolition of
the Utility scheme (which al-
lowed certain classes of textile
goods to be sold free of pur-
chase tax) and consumers de-
cided, therefore, to wait until
after the Budget before re-
stocking their wardrobes and
linén cupboards

The Budget did, in fact, abol-
ish the Utility scheme—but only
to substitute it with an even
more complicated system of
purchase tax. Consumers who
had previously bought best-
quality Utility textiles now
found they had to pay tax on the
same class of goods,

Again the cotton industry pro-
tested, But this time, instead of
demanding a modification of
purchase tax, it called for its
total abolition, Clice again, con-
sumers were left in doubt as to
the future level of cotton prices;
and by this time they were so
confused that they stopped
buying altogether.

Meanwhile, stocks are contin-
uing to accumulate, and the sit-
uation has rapidly assumed
“slump” proportions, The indus-
try is in a dilemma. Its cries of
“Wolf” have caused a slight re-
cession to develop into a serious
buyers’ strike, and it is now
too late to turn the tide of pub-
lic indignation against high
prices.

THE LANDED GENTRY.



By RONALD BOXALL

Members of the cotton trade
find themselves in an unenvi-
able position. On the one hand,
they dare not repeat the mis-
take of drawing public atten-
tion to their difficulties for fear
that it might further delay the
resumption of buying. But, on
the other hand, they feel very
strongly on the question of pur-
chase tax. The surest way of ex-
erting pressure in the Govern-
ment to remove the impediment
‘to sales, would be to rally pub-
lic opinion to their side, but this
would only strengthen the con-
viction that prices have yet to
touch rockbottom.

Not unnaturally, therefore,
the industry has divided into
two rival camps, There is no
difference of opinion over the
need to remoVe purchase tax on
Lancashire’s products. Members
of the industry, almost to a
man, are convinced that it
should go. The difference arises
over the best means of per-
suading the Government to fall
in with their request.

One school of thought, head-
ed by the powerful United Tex-
tile Factory Workers’ Associa-
tion, takes the view that the
best way to achieve this aim is
to make the public aware of the
industry’s plight. Mass meetings
are therefore being held all
over Lancashire to press. the
industry’s case for the removal
of the hated tax.

ARTIE’S HEADLINE

LLL

ono0ooa0 O\
GLASS MiN/ATURES
/Ale MY OWN WORK



Another section of the indus-
‘try, however, believes that this
is the wrong way to go about it.
Apart from increasing uncer-
tainty as to the future trend of
prices, they say, mass meetings
are apt to be used to put across
sectional views. They drive
home this point by pointing. the
number of Socialist M.P.’s who
are appearing on these plat-
forms.

But whichever method is
chosen to influence Government
policy on purchase tax, the case
for relief is a strong one. The
industry points out that three-
quarters of all its output is sold
on the home market, Now that
sales have fallen practically to
zero, .every possible means
should be taken to give .;consum-
ers the necessary inducément to
buy. The removal of purchase
tax, they argue, would do this
by causing an automatic reduc-
tion in the price of better-
quality textile goods of the sért
which the average consumer
has shown himself most ready
to buy.

The Government's answer to
this is that the removal of pur-
chase tax would not solve the

a

industry’s problérfis because the
buyers’ strike affects all types of
textiles, including those which
are now tax-free.

It also argues, with some jus-
tification that any concession to
the cotton industry would inevi-
tably lead to demands for simi-
lar treatment by other consumer
goods industries, which are also

beginning to experience a
‘stiffening of consumer resist-
ance,

The Government’s argument
that the removal of purchase
tax on textiles would mean a
loss of between £80 and £100
million in revenue is less valid.
The industry points out, for
instance, that this estimate is
based on sales at last year’s
high level, With sales at their
present level the amount actual-
ly flowing into the Exchequer
from this source must be at a
much lower annual rate,

One of the worst aspects of
the present system of taxation
has been its effect on the quality
of Lancashire’s .products. Manu-
facturers, with an eye to sales
in the shops, ha¥e devoted more
and more of their production to
‘those textiles which escape tax-
ation, and this has _ sornetimes
resulted in a lamentable debase-
ment of quality.

Lancashire industrialists re-
sent the “tax on craft,” which
they say is tending to destroy
the industry’s traditional pride
in its products, Even if the
Government insists on retaining
the purchase tax, they hope it
will at least consider a modifica-
tion of the system to allow a
wider range of#textiles to be
sold tax-free.

This does not exhaust the pur-
chase tax controversy, for one
6f the industry’s strongest argu-
ments is that the incidence of
this tax on better-quality tex-
tiles hampers the drive for new
export markets.

The home market, besides be-
jing the chief outlet for Lan-
cashire’s output,*is also a valu-
able “testing ground” for new
lines which manufacturers wish
‘to develop for export markets.
By testing the “saleability” of a
new cloth or a new pattern

“(peration Bootstrap”

| How Puerto Rico Achieved
| Industrial Prosperity
LONDON,

Puerto Rico’s economic problem has been
much the same as in other islands in the
Caribbean. Its limited natural resources,
chiefly dependent upon sugar production,









—





PLASTIC

PROPELLING PENCILS

LONG LEAD,

BREAK PROOF 48e. each
Made in U.S. A.



could not support its population of 2,200,000. ||

The story of “Operation Bootstrap,” the
scheme which has brought some measure of
industrial prosperity to the island over the
years, is told in the current issue of “Colonial
Development,” the quarterly magazine of
the C.D.C., just published in London.

“If Puerto Rico can find an answer which,
with due modification, can be applied to
low-income societies, it will have made 3
major contribution to one of the fundamental
problems of the world to-day—the relation
of food supply to population,” says the
article.

As far back as 1940, it was evident that
the answer to Puerto Rico’s economic prob-
lem lay in _ industrialisation. “Operation
Bootstrap” was started in 1941. Government
help was given to the encouragement of new
industries in the island, Young Puerto
Ricans were sent to study industrial tech-
niques in the United States.

The Governor, Sr. Luis Monoz Marin,

“The economic goal of Puerto Rico is to in-
crease production as effectively as possible
so that the greater number of Puerto Ricans
there are each year will have fewer days of
unemployment, a higher standard of living,
and depend less and less each day on aid and
privileges which are not the result of their
own productive activities.”

A Government corporation was formed to
buy land and to work out new patterns for
its cultivation. After experimenting unsuc-
cessfully with farmers’ co-operatives, this
corporation decided on three major policies.

1. Sugar lands were bought from big
estates and converted into “proportional
profit farms.” These were owned by the peo-
ple of Puerto Rico and managed in an up-to-
date manner. Workers continued to work at
their regulaf wages and at the end of the



ithe home market they claim to
be able to judge whether it will
prove successful in overseas
markets,

The home market is also an
outlet for goods which, though
made for export, have, for one
reasow or another, been left on
merchants’ hands. Purchase tax
on these better-quality goods, it
is argued, deprives the industry
of the use of the home market
ba a testing sound for, new

xtiles and an , et of las
resort for frustrated exports.

But whatever the Govern-
ment’s intentions on the future
of purchase tax may be, the in-
dustry wants a definite statement
on the matter—one way or the
other. Nothing is worse for
trade than the present uncer-
tainty about prices. Even a blunt
“no” would be better than the
present vacillation.

Meanwhile, the industry is stil!
putting a large part of its re-
duced output to stock—and this
is rapidly absorbing working
capital. What it dreads more
than anything else is a liquida-
tion of stocks at “slaughter
prices.” Even now, many cotton
goods can be bought in the shops
at less than their replacement
cost. Any tendency for this to
develop into the establishment of
a price level that the industry
could not maintain would pro-
long the crisis and threaten
many firms with bankruptcy.





LOWER THE DRAWBRIDGE



BURKE'S LANDED GENTRY
—the official and exclusive caste
list of the land-owning classes
~—has had to lower its sights.

Landed gentry are now so
searce that the publishers have
had to forage around to find
enough names (with land) to fill
their latest edition, the first
since 1939 which is due out this
spring.

The result of the foraging is
that film stars and novelists
have broken in.

More than half the 5,000
landed gentry mentioned in the
11-16, 2,800-page tome are
landless gentry, The editor,
L. G. Pine, admitted the change

yesterday in a lecture to the
Society of Genealogists in
London.

The landless ones get in on
the strength of their old family
pedigrees, or because they have
rendered public service.

And the properties of those
who. are landed are _ much
smaller than they were. Burke’s
has met with gentry more than
halfway.

Fifty years ago the minimum
land requirements for inclusion
in the directory was 2,000 acres,
Now it is 300 acres.

‘Cadets’

AMONG the landless newcom~
ers are novelists Graham Green
and S. P. B. Mais. They are
included as ‘“cadets’—a_ title
given because they are not the
heads of their families.

Film, star sisters Olivia de
Havilland and Joan Fontaine
are cadets of the de Havilland
family, of which air pioneer Sir
Geoffrey de Havilland is head.

Steven Hardie, first chairman
of the nationalised Iron and
Steel Corporation, can only trace
his ancestry back for’ three
generations. But as “Hardie of
Ballathie” he rates a Burke

mention because he owns 2,000
acres in Perthshire.

The B.B.C. brothers Freddid
and Harman Grisewood——-Har-~
man controls the Third Pro-
gramme — are also newcomers
who can claim long pedigrees.

So can Sir Ambrose Heal, tha
furniture magnate; and publisher
Sir Stanley Unwin. So, can

And the actors, the
authors, and the
steel man file in...

an

ANOS

CY



by James Leasor

Evelyn Waugh—who would in
any case qualify because he
owns land in Gloucester.

Two Counts

BURKE’S wanted to include
details of Sir Hartley Shawcross
and family “on account of his
distinguished public service.”
and, said @ member of the firm,
“we got quite a good pedigree
out of him.” He can prove hé
is of yeoman stock that goes
back to 1743. So Sir Hartley
fis in.

Sir Laurence Olivier is there
because he owns property—

Notley Abbey, Bucks—and he
can, incidentally, trace his
ancestry back to the 15th cen-
tury. Author-explorer Peter
Fleming is in asthe head of a
new family—and also because
he owns enough property.

Since 1949, Pine and six
helpers have sending out
requests for i ation to the
4,000 families that qualified for
mention ‘in the 1939 edition.
Pine estimates that at least half
of the entries bear the Ichabod
phrase “late of.”

Some families haye sold their
stately homes; others have en-
dowed the National ‘Trust with
them and retain only a small
flat in their great houses.

This is the case with Lord
Sackville’s home. at Knole, in
Kent. > 7

The Duke of Wellingto:
handed over No, 1, Cio
Apsley House—t@ the State.

ieee ; famili are bashful;
Y decline t
= a e to 'e details, reply

, person to whom the
original postcard was addressed
married beneath her. Sorry,

but we can’t help in any way.”

Others, incl star “alla
became wealthy the war, are
so eager to ‘é their way into
Burke's Lan . Gentry that
they bombar f° office with
letters, finally up to Lon-

don in person to gtate their case.
One man it £3,000 to

prove he had a- igree.
Maybe this actounts for the

immense interest’ in this new
edition of Burke’s Landed Gen-
try. More thar 4,000 copies
have been orderec| in advance
of publication—at eight guineas
a copy. Copies bought after





































year profits were shared between manage-
ment and workers.

2. Land was bought for new villages,
where squatters might have a little cottage
and garden of their own. By last September,
some 25,000 families had been resettled in
200 of these villages.

3. Land was also bought from ‘the big
estates to be divided into family-sized farms,
which were sold to individual farmers on
reasonable terms.

“This three-point programme has worked
well,” says the article. “It has eased some of
the tension in the agricultural problem and
has improved the status of farm labourers.”

The Puerto Rican Industrial Development
Company was organised in 1942 with a capi-
tal of $500,000, later increased to $22,000,000.
Its purpose was to promote manufacturing
on the island and conduct research into
natural resources, marketing methods and
export possibilities, It has acquired a cement
works and has built factories to manufacture
clay products, glass, paperboard and shoes.
All five industries, badly needed on the
island, were operated as nationalised busi-
nesses.

After the war, a new policy was started—
building factories for lease or sale to private
enterprise. New enterprises started in this
way include a large hotel in San Juan and
a big textile mill. The nationalisation period
has now ended with the sale of all five Gov-
ernment factories to private industry.

By last July, Puerto Rico had established
121 factories by such methods and had given
indirect assistance, principally in the form
of tax exemption, to 41 more. At capacity
operation, thes@ (factories are expected ‘to

year, most. of which will be exported to the
U.S. mainland.—B.U.P.

Atom Picture

By JOSEPH L. MYLER

WASHINGTON, May 15.
THE Atomic Energy Commission is
releasing next Tuesday a motion picture
showing in flaming colour what a full size
atomic bomb does to buildings. It is beautiful
but not pretty.

The film was made last spring at Eniwetok
Pacific island proving ground where A.E.C.
tests its most powerful atomic weapons, It
has been exhibited to preview audiences of



stated the aim of the scheme as follows:||

produce some $100,000,000 worth of goods a!



newsmen here and at Las Vegas, New
Mexico, The picture.is called “Greenhouse”
which was the name of the last test pro-
gramme at Eniwetok.

At least one of the atomic bombs exploded
last spring was “several times more power-
ful” than any the United States has set off
elsewhere.

The carefully edited Eniwetok film makes
it clear why an efficient civil defence pro-
gramme is advisable in time of possible
atomic war.
civil defence officials here both the film and
still secret data obtained.in operation Green-
house leaves much to-be desired,

The movie filmed in colour shows several
predawn atomic explosions. All are from
high steel towers. Several shots show atomic
blasts hitting and smashing specially built
target buildings. Banks of automatic cam-|

publication cost the buyer nine/eras operating in the orange—yellow light

guineas.

So if the mew landed gentry
have no land it seems they still}
know how to buy when the!
market is right.—L.E.S.

of the atomic fireball held buildings in fecus

|long enough for observers to see them pitch

sideways.

—U.P.

But from the stand-point of};



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FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1952



GUADELOUPE HAS GOOD 20s Chamber Of

Commerce Report

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

TOURIST FACILITIES







3,588 tohs of charcoal and Pres

From Page 3

a

DRINK

PAGE FIVE

ei AL “ from the following sources: ee ne Satine: CLAYT ON’S
; 2G Sask. tees
Agricultural Officer Roads Undergoing. <. a:
Here On Holiday Improvement 1 sw nde ner wo poe

Mr. Walther Hewitt who is the head of the Agricul-

tural Exténsion Service in S
spend the greater part of his

He arrived here from Guadeloupe on Monday where
he has been the Commissioner from Surinar-. in the Nether-
lands Section attending the Fourteenth Meeting of the

Caribbean Commission, He is

Yachtsmen Call
Here From N.Z.

nue : m nets after attending the wo ia Taverne 1949 3.36
urin, ourteent i sso r + 7 jecember 3.51
pr gt e last four months of ro th Meeting of the Carib-| BETTY GRIFFITH FOR Saueaee i6hp 08
muy. New Behind M A at office, he was also appointed bean Commission, said that Li , - : eink
R aon o M ay Bake sailed Minister of Health, so that he has Guadeloupe hid a new modern air BRAR}Y TRAINING March se vs
“wy ae hilont u pa te Dertinl had two extended departments terminal building which was April 17
the yac Hante tf into Carisie under his full responsibility. rushed to completion earlier this | ,M/ss Betty Griffith, Senior Library As- May oar
Bay on Saturday. From here they month to accommodate the dele- | the pupa Chea to the Aduit Section of syne »s
will sail to Cristobal. The new political status in gates who were attending the woes, Library, has been granted "a July 3.37
The New Zealanders purchased gyrinam provides. the Minis- meeting a {Council award, supplemented August 10,01
th: yacht at Southampton Eng- = s &. ¥ an allocation from the Government September 7.24
ey : pion, ; ters with anun- The meeting, he said, was merely | 2t#iting Seheme, for training at the October 13.52
land. On April 4 they steamed out divided respon- a routine one and rather shorter | east", Caribbean” Regional Litany in Movember 11.26
of Southam ton for Madeira and sibility for their than usuai, It started on Tuesday Seen Ree rg the Examination’ for December 4 Pr
the Canary Jslands before crossing departments. May 6, and finished on Saturday. of Great Britain. ¢ Library Ageagiation January, 1951 3.58
the Atlantic for Barbados. The Go 50th Anniv ' * ~
‘ oe x was eS rahe 9 ac hape et . ~~ ag or ag l . In 1950 she undertook a short! course 90,12
ubmarine aser a May 9 was the > nien's

somewhat the M.V. Caribbee
which trades between the West In-



Mr. Max A. Eg

urinam, is now in Barbados to
two months’ vacation.

skirts of the city
airport.

He said that the Govern
deal of money to improve
portant to tourism.

Mr. Egloff who spent a few days

and about
staying at Sandy Beach Hotel.

Mr. Hewitt has been Minister
of Agriculture, Animal Husban-
dry and Fisheries in Surinam
from June 1949 until April 1951.

the Government

sary of the eruption of Mt. Pelee
f and the repre-

and the destruction of St. Pierre,

loff, Information Offi ribbe
Commission, told the Advocate shortly be me oeone

Trinidad on Wednesday night by BW.1,
could offer outstanding accommodatio
Grand Hotel which is situate

before returning to
A., that Guadeloupe
1 tion to tourists in the
d in Point-a-Pierre on the out-
three minutes’ drive from the

ment was also spending a good

the roads which were very im-



of training in Trinidad Prior to the suc~
cessful completion of the Entrance Ex-
amination of the Library Association

' : ae wenn crop was 43,020 acres as against per cwt., which under the Suga:
dian islands. sentative o f the largest. city. There was a ded om tb tote ot Sone ee 41,241 acres in 1950, These figures Industry (Rehabilitation, Price
It carries a crew of 11 and is H.M. the Queen. Special Commemoration Service }absence Miss Naney Went will act as include 8,000 acres for land under Stabilisation and Labour Wel- siiliaal ae Bd s
luxuriously equipped. a * sot < oe atten and = Soeuemaion sent a mes- |SeMor Library Assistant. peasants’ cane (estimated). are). Act, Ame, will be deposited a as ————
feet long and powered by twin 2 i sage of sympathy to the people Of * aceeeceeeceseeneeee The equivalent of 69,240 to the special reserve funds,
h.p. on Marine diesel engines Speen he 4 in- Martinique through the Prefect, » puncheons of Fancy Molasses In December the U.K. Ministry VALOR COOKER STOVES
which give it a tep speed of 14 vio a e and the He said that he was glad to re- building programme which was in Was produced during the 1951 of Food reached an agreement
knots and cruising speed of 11 ie — was turn to Barbados. He was here operation. He was really aston- crop season. The latest estimate with the Commonwealth Sugai Sh
knots. an Me witha? once before and that was in March ished to see what was going on Of the 1952 crop production of Producers as to the method of ort Burners

When crossing the Atlantic its ‘ o w
skipper hoisted two square sails Mr. W. HEWITT That is why he
on a 50-foot mast. The crossing has no responsibility in matters of
took 13 days with one engine Government and cannot tau any
working. The average speed Was decision without the approval of
ning knots. the proper Minister, who bears

The New Zealanders hope to the responsibility towards the ieee

1944 at the time when they had
the first West Indian Conference.
He was then Information Officer
on the staff of the Governor of
Puerto Rico.

“IT have always had pleasant
memories of my previous visit and

and thought that the work should
have fine results for Barbados.
Mr, Egloff who joined the Carib-
bean Commission in August las?
year as Information Officer, held a
similar post from 1942-47 on the
staff of the Governor of Puerto

for the Island for the fifteen-
month pericd November, 1949 to
January, 1951 is given below. The
total rainfall for the season was
well above average. The month of
November, 1949, was compara-
tively dry, but the rainfall during
December, 1949 and January,
1950 was sufficient for the estab-
lishment of the young crop.
Sebrfiary, March and April, 1950
were comparatively dry, good

Rainfall for the period Novomber 1949 to January 1951

The area harvested for the 1951

sugar and fancy molasses shows
that a crop equivalent to 170,000
tons is expected,

The > ritish Government,
through the Ministry of Food,
has purchased the entire export-

frequent ang heavy showers fel
during the remaining months ot
the year, The rainfall for Janu
ary and the early months f :951
particularly February, was heav)
and the ratoons continued to de-
velop until late in the crop seasor

The heavy rains during these
months, not only hindered th
harvesting of the crop, but re
tarded the ripening of the cans
so that the juice quality was poor

inches

of £38.10.0 per ton

includes 2/!

fixing the price to be paid eaci
year for that portion of th
Commonwealth production whicl
the U.K. has guaranteed to bw
at a remunerative price,
The production figures fo
1948 to 195







2 Burner Model @ $56.14
3 Burner Model @ $71.87

Also

WHITE PORVELAIN ENAMEL SINKS
With Double Drainboard @ $65.64









able output of sugar during the sugar for the years complete with waste and overflow

visit Panama via the Gallapagos jslative Council. A decision takergg am delighted to find that Barba-

Rico. Prior to that, he was with





——————————————— |












1952 crop season. The cif. price are as follows: — sein
Islands. They are also expecting by the Cabinet-Council on an in-%y203 is as pleasant as I remember the Federal Government in Wash- 1948 1949 1980 1981 Established f. HERBERT, Ltd. Incorporated
to call at Tahiti. ternal affair of the country canno: git.” ; . ington for eight years during which a pinta . 1860 10 & 11 Roebuck Street 1928
ae this reason be rejected by the ey paid a on on oi ee Het was with the Farm Secur- V.P. Sugar 56.408 134.808 sa3.908

overnor. L im ‘he Fisheries ficer, on ednes- ity dministration and the U.S. Muscovado S$ 1,262 1,991 1,276 === Se a = = —— ee

Servant Discharged 7 Aday and was impressed by his ship Housing Authority. orancy Molabeee 20/468 16,072 15°201 OLCPC ODED DEEL LTPP LELSL SLE LAAT A
: The new status was the will of ;_ a oan
His Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith, Queen Wilhelmina who gave the 7 ea Total 78,226 152,731 158,183 187,64



Ss

fa asa Lastieal . Salting ters %
Avting Potion Magistrate of Dis; colonies their ‘autonomy prior to e ele e e *Equated at the rate of 330 wine gallons per ton of sugar % y aarre Farm Fresh
trict “A”, yesterday discharged her abdication and with the ap- ; Food Crops livestock unit to every 20 acre: |
20-year-old domestic servant proval of the representatives of ] 1es ] Emergenc lati for the of land. ) %
Hida ciate ot, Cuspgen ae Mtarlante People, inh eorgmey, incerta, Cotton : TT

i i a a a n e confer- ; ; sory

Village, th aaselice charged her pg with cencestntattves ‘trea : @ from page 1 ly, industrially and otherwise, and provisions and vegetables ,con- The area of cotton cultivates | 8 U ER
Pigg seny of jewellery Surinam and the Netherlands suitable size and we hope this may had even killed the incentive for tinue to be enforced. by plantations during the 1950-5" | $
with the 0 Sai a property Antilles about five years ago The be installed by about the end of starting new industries. During the 1951—52 crop year, season was 16 acres, which ¥
en Aleeindte of My Legislative Council consists of 21 ae Thereafter, Ww shall en- It was urged that some solution the total area required to be yielded 9561 1b, of seed cotton | % (Not the ordinary Tinned Butter)
Lord’s Hill, St, Michael. emat elected members and is the only wren have a agrreP sige Fp to the problem might be arrived planted in holdings of 10 acres with a crop average per acre o! |

The prosecution alleged

the offence was committed some the last word in all. Government







Co,

On receipt of the information, Weekés of Christ Church whom

Parliament in Surinam. It has

for some time—for the erection of
a steam station with units of con-

and, while that fact may be of

at between the Company and the
Government, so that the machin-
ery could be ordered and expan-

: would do such small things as they



and over waa 21 per cent. and in 597.56 lb, of seed cotton. Peasant
holdings of 2 to 10 acres 20 per planted 170 acres of cotton yield



a Revenue Equalisation Fund,

leaving an estimated balance on remaining in steamers’ ware-







I NOT ONLY















: i hose friend- little comfort to Barbados business | could to alleviate the position, 1g a ipod of $6,903,219, houses. Night landings at Seawell
Moder te wre: Re “sonnldaet wtp te oie wPhe: ima evidences peorls, we = as -— ee anak The Apps pide, a General q Airport, mt
objections ‘an i iti ar, FAL, LOO WARE: SO SHORE TF St »}current. and re-introduc ‘oad ‘eabh
these objections and any other of the hospitable qualjties of Bar as a consequence, they will con-! shedding, was put forward, and The following were some of rine ir é bi ba ae
ee ee 8 Ps q i i irec i the principal matters which 1e Council take this opyx Cy] , I
3 . tinue to be patient. the Directors promised to discuss . ? nate Yip iene dea Geers”
he Se In conclusion I wish to assure |the matter with the local Man- received the attention of thé unity o expressing oe app
as you that the Directors of the Com- | ager. ‘There is no real difficulty in Coupell Gung 0 Yet’ 1 the help which the Press. hu sess
0 y ar st anxious to satisfy | obtaining meters, Mr. Lovering $s to . e 8
il’ 4 nt Ca 7 le EN ea » jnhabit- He ¥ U.K. by Trans-Canada Airlines. accorded to the Chamber during ‘
Suhail Sailed I a rlis Bay Oe Sand a8 aa Ho informed the Chamber. Delay in the delivery of mails the course of the year mr TO-DAY \
everything i wer to at-
Sir Geoffrey Knox, K.C.M.G., First Secretary. He became everything in their po

sailed the ketch Suhail into Car-
lisle Bay on Monday. The 31-ton
Suhail arrived from Tobago. It
has a crew of three.

tain this object. .
Not “Happy” |
Members of the Council took the ,
opportunity to emphasize the diffi- |

Counsellor of the Embassy in 1931.

Sir Geoffrey served as Chair-
man of the Saar Governing Com-
mission from 1932 to 1935 and be-

|
|

; ; -ulties ich. were being experi-

Sir Geoffrey Was created came Envoy Extraordinary and culties which: k
C.M., in 1929 and K.C.M.G. in Minister Plenipotentiary to Hun- enced because of ie a aes ’
1935, During the First World War gary in.1935. He held this office of electricity, ane

he served in the European theatre
and was honoured with Chevalier
of Order of Redeemer. Greece.
He was born on March 11, 1884,
and was Student Interpreter, Lev-
ant, when only twenty-two years
old. In 1920 he was made Second
Secretary and three years later,



JONES

SEWING

MACHINES

of satisfactory service.

ed discussion
See ns told the Directors that
they were not happy that the out-
look for the future was at all sat_
isfactory.

It was emphasized that the pres-
ent lack of electricity was serious- |
ly affecting the island economical- |

for four years. :

In 1939 Sir Geoffrey was made
British Ambassador to Brazil and
served in that capacity until 1941.

The, Suhail, which is anchored
off the Royal Barbados Yacht Club,
is in the island for an indefinite

period.



Oh@rc . GPa tele reren’ .vegee! ))



Broad St. — Local Agents

which ensued |





DESIGNS FOR EVERY TASTE

ALSO

KHAKI SHIRTS Premier Brand fused collar
attached, long sleeves coat style, nice shade,
good quality; will wash well. Sizes 144 to 164
ins. $4.86.

STRIPED UNDERPANTS Also white with snap
fastener and elastic sides. Sizes 30 to 42 ins.
$1.27, $1.59, $1.65.

COTTON UNDER BRIEFS (Jockey Pants) Elas-
tic waist $1.56, $1.02.

IDOL NYLON ANKLETS With

clocks at side.
Size 10 to 11 in. @ $1.71 per pair.

IDOL SELF COLOUR ART SILK (H/F HOSE)
Sizes 10 to 114 ins. Shades of Black, Grey,

10, 1, 12 & 13 Broad Street



SSS EE



SPECIAL

Soda Fountain







SS

o

\
KARDOMAH TEA—per '4-Ib pkts








COCKADE FINE RUM



NG SHOPPER

YOU'LL BUY THESE

Knights Phoenix

Originally This Week
39 5

Cordovan, @ $1.41 per pair | OK, COPFEE-—per 75-10 Dit, 78 mM

| CANADIAN SARDINES—per tin 20 18

HAND MODEL—complete with wood cover COTTON SLACK SOCKS (Anklets) with elastic CANADIAN SARDINES—per doz. 2.40 1,92

ab , . Tops in shades of White, Light Grey, Fawn, CRAWFORD'S CREAM CRACKERS

seen ; Dark Brown Camel @ 73c. per pair —per tin 1.64 1.20
CASH PRICE $99.16 ‘ ‘LAS SIG 3 Ww Benes eee 1} ARMOURS BEEF & HAM PASTE—per jar . 29
“JONES” MACHINES will do every descrip- M SS FLASHY DESIGN TIES With Roses, Scenes, | , VEAL & HAM PASTE—ver jar “38
Credit, Terms Arranged aa Be Pictures of Women Etc, @ $2.12, $2.16 each. CHICKEN & HAM PASTE—per jar 33
tion of sewing and they make a perfect lock- . e Ke: LION BLACK PEPPER—1-o0z. tin 34
Bois ; , 7 | LION WHITE PEPPER—1-0z. tin .49
stitch on all materials, thick or thin. te Y@\ Es 5 EINZ SANDWICH SPREAD—per jar 51
ifeti K L aL ave ¢ er 0 % APIE PEANUT BUTTER : 61

Buy a “JONES”—it will give you a lifetime | x Ke +e ° )
*













STANSFELD,



SCOTT & CO. LTD.



; ; ane 9 rn i i y verful, : . cent. . ing 48.664 Ib. of seed cotton o
told, the count a t the yeeerpetd ee eee siderably larger capacity. This, sion started as soon as_ possible 286.2 lb. per acre, The total are’ % ' ‘
told the oo a ae lace as a Retired however, presents difficulties of after agreement was reached on The keeping of livestock by under cotton cultivation was 18° 1% CosT LESS
used to work _ mene aeian thes two kinds. First, the raising of the Public Utilities Bill, plantations was maintained at acres, as compared with 386 acre: | §
domestic servan' had passed she additional capital and second the Captain Brown pointed out that the same level as before, viz. one jn the previous year, x
month of vat re tay When he retired as a Minis- restriction of the output of all it was very difficult to order the ‘ y AND
missed the jewellery. h w the ter, Mr, Hewitt took up his old plant for commercial purposes ow- machinery, and for sometime they "*™f*" The enintadt ‘Cer the years 1945-K1 Is‘ an follows: x
Os ORD SCC ee ee nich function again as Head of the ing to the prior demands upon in- have been held up because the 1948” 1949 1980. rial $
cereien Wa on t she Agricultural Extension Ser- dustry arising from the rearma- Public Utilities Bill was “hanging —— ee - % Go FURTHE
resembled the one tha A ay ment drive. over their heads”. In the Highlands 75 91 ins 64 56 ins 86 81 ins 99 72 inn x um
reported | missing to ae ce, ‘J The Public Utilities Bill, Pressed for a. statement -as to inthe Eowiteks 64.93 Ins, 58.22 ins, 74.55 Inu 82.06 ine % s
Before. decharging goer Ores sn said that his work dealt whieh has seoeey Sep. cabtest of — oe eee een Castain Whole Island 60.81 ins. 60.89 ins. ~—-79.67 ins, 90.24 ins x BUT
‘ wide discussi , our a A a I Tax Statistics for the ¥ 42- %
as produced by the rorecear Somteeaa Pee ca” os ciate view, some features which Brown said he hoped it would be kpc ra oh Rae Meee in is £ x
was not enoug ke a ~ J ey and through his ac- would increase the difficulties possible in a matter of months From To 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 19491950195 % TASTE
aah nosed se the person who tivities, Surinam had altered of raising money by public rather than years, ee 210 -6 -/6 -/6 9 9 9 6 6 6 $
defenaa oi E fs i ‘ 101 200 «1/- Is : 4 ‘
took way the jewellery. from a rice-importing country oe yp Renn oy eae Loans Difficult 201 4002 yw 6 os ast 2 ’ ’ g RETTER
It was not proved that me to a rice-exporting one and the nan a cieek sitaiiht Asked whether they had ever 401 600 8/- 3/- 3/- 3/8 3/8 3/3 3 3 3 : % 7 ” $s
brooch which Alexandre saw the — export of citrus to Holland was ” ‘ taal ot itt a to ‘tied to raise the necessary Capital 801 Sar oe We Os ae BA nae ee f
Garena sre: ae recone also rather important now, Oe eeeupee ~ labertore “ae, am in the West Indies, Captain 1,001 1750 ¢/6 6/6 1/- 13 13 Va 168 Ye we YS ?
was the brooch whic e iv - Brown said they had often talked 1.751 2,000 6/6 6/6 #7/- T/3 3 1/1 i he x “3
ed stolen and was her property. In the line of sport, he is not isting rights and contracts. Fat satan Paay at here, but 2,001 2500 8/- 8/- 86 89 89 8 ° 3 Be 6 Ot R B B ‘
unknown in his country. The | The principal object of my visit were told that it would be very — jo01 Soe 10 1. 108 WW i. ne he ws al i 3 Ee art
DIED SUDDENLY large sports grounds of the Suri- tO Barbados has been to impress difficult to do so. Over 5,000 12/- 12/- 12/6 13/6 13/6 13/6 13/9 15/- 15/- 1 ¢
Joseph Headley of Codrington nam Football Association had a kune oF a bes ar ae ‘al Replying to » sugeestion thas phe 1942 1942 1044 has 1006 1947 1948 = 1949 5 by x BUTTER
Hill, St. Michael, died suddenly peen laid out under his supervis- Paar a aera leah i eh Company should try to arrange ; 7 949 «1950 x
at his home at about 11.30 a.m. fon and for fifteen years, he has q me ne Ss. es atures ant with some of the sugar factories tax on Companies oe 5 08 6/8 68 68 1/6 76 % CONCENTRATE
‘on Wednesday. The body was peen President of the Basketball he Bill ; negotia eae ares ill which had extra units to tap their, Tax on Life Assur- 28 23s ¢
removed to Hinds & Core Rineral Aevctation. tn the ast sears ne Brorcading {am surethat You will Surent into the Compaye Wine, sana AAO a es B83, 3a fae os LR
Parlour has won two first and two second ther on this subject Captain Brown pointed out tha 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1951 v The ARISTOCRAT
at ae en ee ee Pere uk cole CS er ee ee $ of BUTTERS
District “A”, gave pe ssion for ipo. wi gated, but it was foun 1 ie RS & £ “£ £ ‘ % e wat
the body tobe taken to Burton’s "°° ! , i. ,Derer Teele Babee untis prectiedble tor contain reatihe. 264,779 296,928 382,519 524,178 524,737 608,523, 671,350 630,138 709,061 984.8 3 WOR
Rngal” Bavlour where On pent ote. fewit said that hie mame yA sninca an anus Re was iconed tet he nial aye land's Financial Postion sriviog by Trans-Canada av-|¥ WORTH TRYING!
. is is! ec ances-~ he Authorities, can do ver. a : ta » lines, The Holidays with Pa "
formed DY Pr vied to mete 12% ‘but he is really Dutch, He much. Recent enquiries in Eng- £0",,malon exparaion wast he Government's estimates for Bill. Customs Union, Inadequsu |} Oblanable from all Grocertes.
Causes. is locking forward to a pleasan’ land revealed that the British money lenders were not prepared 1952—53 it is found that the commercial representation on \h | (ee¢nesssunauonsseossousesoosssootoseonenene.t-,
ectiewteinmnatenion, stay in Barbados and expects his Government was itself accepting 4, advance any money until they surplus on 31st March, 1952, was Legislative Council. The Repor — eee
OBJECTIONS TO RATES Wife to join him on Thursday deliveries of 2 years and over for Wore satisfied that their position $5,361,599. The capital budget of the Price Control Committee
The Vestry clerk informed the next. comparable requirements. It is was secure deficit is shown as $680,723 and The wages paid to Clerks, In-
. ' therefote to be feared that some ~“ ‘ . the current budget surplus is crease in steamship freight ra es
Vestry that he had _ received om friends in Surinam who time must inevitably elapse before Pressed further, Captain Brown . e yeitty Technical and Vocatignal.[rain-
i : f Fr estimated to be $1,344, 687. Fifty t
objections oo the ay | Mosist have visited the island, he has we can hope to overtake many de- told the Chamber that Barbadians per cent, of the budget surplus, ing. Labour conditions in th
Messrs. Yonkers Bus Cn NEON arg many pleasant recommenda- mands for industrial power. These would have to accept the shortage $672,343, ig to be transferred to Port. The imposition by the Cus
Bus Co, ans, the erogtemive Bus tions about the family of C. N. conditions are almost world wide for sometime, but the Company toms authorities of fines on good "

|
|







=





PAGE SIX’







CLASSIFIED ADS.



TELEPHONE 2508
> . 2
DIED FOR SALE
}
} —_—— em
MARBRIS—On May 15, 199° maior % “
s, D.S.O His funeral wt s
@ place at 3 p.m. today at the} AUTOMOTIVE
Cemetary, Greaves End, — $$ ——— - ~
eek erie nels are asked to attend BEDFORD 12 ewt. DELIVERY VAN
Squacron Leader Snow | New, for immediate delivery. Dial 4616.
: inte Garage 10.5.52-—0n
SREENIDGE—On the loth BEDFORD TRUCK— 206” wheelbase
ORE bell Philip Rowe Gr i j comple te with Cab and Platform New,
manager of Carrington Factory, St r immediate delivery—Courtesy Gar-
Philip. His funeral will leave his late | age Dial 4616 10.5.52—6n
x lence, Valiey Hill, Christ Churen ab RL aaloon, . eee
this aftern the West- CAR—One (1) Jaguar 1% Litre Saloon,
: moses eon oe 7 good condition. Mileage iow, per-
Winifred Greenidge, Geofirey ‘ance excellent. An expensive Cat
Greenidge. 16.5.52 bargain price. Phone 4949, Chelsea
ge (1950) Ltd. 16.5.52—Sn.
R—One (1) 1948 Standard, 8 h.p.







\pply Courtesy Garage.



PUBLIC SALES



REAL ESTATE

RS
A DOUGLAS FIR PURLIN and prin-
ciple close boarded and shingled roof,
covering a pen 140 ft. x 60 ft., two spans
30 et each containing 20 trusses and
at 20,0¢ fect of lumber







W. A. Year Hanson
St. Gee ne 4022

11.5.52—8n

—<—$ $$ — cee
At our Office, No. 17 High Street, on
Sriday the 16th May at 2 pw Wyn-
holme,” 8th Avenue, Belleville, with
land attached containing 9,715 square
feet. The house contins Drawing and

Dining Rooms, 3 Bedrooms, Kitcheo and
usual offices, inspection on application to
Mrs. Gibbons at the house on tuesdays
and Fridays between 4 p.m. and 6 p.m,
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
Solicitors
25,.4.52—8n
40 SHARES in e Central Foundry
Limited Apply to:—
Messrs. COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,












BARBADOS ADVOCATE





PUBLIC NOTICES

eae



= Se RAL. AIDS ACT, 1956)
‘° creditors ho!
against Cove Punptation Bel nner -
TAKE NOTICE that we the owners of |
the above named plantation, are about
to obtain a loan of £2,500 under the
provisions of the above Act, against the
Sugar, Molasses and other crops of the
said plantation to be reaped in 1952—53.
No money has Yet been borrowed
egainst the said crops.
Dated this l4th day of May, 1952 i
GERTRUDE ELIZABETH THOMPSON |









BOYCE,
and
JAMES F. W. BOYCE,
Owners. |
14,5.52—3n |
NOTICE

Tenders are invited for painting the
steel structure (3 coats) and roof, out-
side and inside (2 coats each), of the
Kensington stand. It may be necessary
to scale all or part of steel structure
before applying paint.



FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1952

SHIPPING NOTICES

SOOO SOPOO
STEAMSHIP CO.

















Now in effect

TCA Mee: 60-DAY

EXCURSIONS

Lowest fares ever offered for air travel














The M/V “MONEKA” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and §8t. Kitts. Sailing
Saturday 17th inst.

The M/V “CLARA” will accept
Cargo and Passengers for Trini-
dad and Nassau. Sailing Friday

TO CANADA AILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO i6th inst
a A. BRITISH GUIANA The M/V “CARTBBEE’. will
* ‘ .S. COTTICA, june aceept Ca and P: fo!
Regular flights by North Star" Skyliners SAILING TO P. AND Dorin e astiaus, Meena ‘.
BRITIS: Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing
ONLY $445.60 (B.W.1.) M.S. STENTOR i7th May 1952 Monday 26th inst. ‘

M.S.
SAILING TQ TRINIDAD AND
CURACAO

M.S. HERA 2nd June 1952.
S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD
Agents

from BRIDGETOWN to TORONTO

or MONTREAL and Return! B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS’

ASSOCIATION (INC.),














Por complete information, see

your Travel Agent or 5
GARDNIER AUSTIN & CO. LTD.
Lower Broagé St. Phone 4704 a

TRANS-CANADA Air Lines




























































Elggtric light, Large Yard enciosed, Also
Land to make garden. Fruit ri bearing
Approved tennant. Apply witnin. Phon
18.5.58-—2n

4925, 0.5.88
_ PERSONAL





Phe public are hereby warned

giving credit to my wife, :
SISE MURRELL (nee MASC( )
1 not hold mayself responsible ic

her or anyone else contracting any debt
ordebts in my name unless by a written

order signed by me.
. CLEMENT MURRELL,

Blades Hill,
St, Philip.
15.5.52-—2n






LOST—& FOUND



<—_LOST
ediniepre nena itn endian
KEYS — Bunch of keys between Ne!-
son St., Bay St. and Bay Land. Finder
please return to St. Aubyn Callender,
Orehards C/o Daniel's Bakery, Roebuck
Street. ¥
Reward offered.
eile 16,5.52—2n.





Public Official Sale

(The Provost Mar 1904
‘ (1904-4) #8 20)
Qn Friday the 16th day of May 1952
at the hour of 2 o'clock in the afternoon



al's Act

a ised value

IL that certain piece of \Land con-
taining by admeasurement 6,136 sq, ft
situate at Kensington Tenantry in the
Parish of St. Michael butting and
bounding on three sides on lands now or:
late of Kensington Tenantry and. on the
Private roadway known as Bighth
Avenue, or however else the same abut





Pick

Electrical Dept.



Electrical Dept.























nS
TRUCK—One (1) 3-ton Austin Truck.

Segly D.V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd, White

Road.
24.4.52-t f n.










BATTERIES - 5 Batteries. 6
and 15 plates; 12 Volt, 9,
ates. Get our prices first
4710. Da. Costa & Co. Ltd.

16.5.52—6n







SLECTRIC MOTORS—‘% h.p. 110/220

volts, Single Phase. Dial 3878 or 47Â¥.

DA.
Dept.

FLOOR POLISHERS. Used in conjun
tion with Johnson's Floor polishes will
cep your Floors looking new Dial
3878 or 4710, 16.5,.52—6n

COSTA & CO. LTD., Electrica)
16.5.52—6n.





sn siberian gindeiitietpaseeaimrneassalomneiate
FRIDGE—Westinghouse Fridge 3% c.f
Excellent condition. Ring Mr. Hughes
4412, after 5 p.m, 2064
13,5,.52-—Sn

HOOVER VACCUUM CLEANERS
Cylindrical type, complete with
attachments, only $75.00; Mechanical car-
pet sweepers, only $17.88. K, R. Hunte

& Co., Ltd, Phone 5136.
14,5.52—3n.

all

—————
FLM.V. RADIOGRAMS — New Models

with 3 speed Changers and Record Cab-
net, Dial 3878 or 4710, DA, COSTA &

16.5.52—n,

Co. LTD., Electrical Dept.



ae
IRONERS—Oprim Industrial Ironers. A

complete kroner for Home or Laundry.
Dial 3878 or 4710, DA. COSTA & CO.
sold at my office tagthe highest | UTD., Electrical Dept.

* 16.5.52—6n,

EDISWAN BATTERY CHARGERS

Will charge up to 18 six-volt Batteries
or their equivalent at 6 Amps. For use
on 110 Volt Single Phase eireuit. Dial
2878 or 4710. DA. COSTA & CO. LTD.,
16.5.52—6n.

aaa ee Ee
VACUUM CLEANERS--Three sizes to







and bound, appraised as follows:— select from. Keeps inaccessible corners
© whole area of land to SIX HUN-| clean. Dial 9878 or 4710, DA. COSTA
tm AND TWENTY-ONE DOLLARS] & CO. LTD., Electrical Dept.
AND FORTY-THREE CENTS ($621.43) 16,5.52—6n
Ae tor from James Christopher Gra-
vette for and towards satisfaction, &c
N.B.—-25% Deposit te be paid on day MECHANICAL
shase
oo ould vy. T. HEADLEY, EEL STRAKES: Reduce Tractor
Provost Marshal. i-spin considerably. In_ stock for
Pyovost Marshal's Office, -Harris Mod. 744D for other
0th April, 1952. etors on application—Courteay Gar-
+s 2.5.52—3n Dial 4616. 10.5.52—6n
. ean
——_-—_-_— MISCELLANEOUS

Sion Pyorrhea
in 24 Hours



Longe

Teeth and










« mean that you have
orrhe Trench Mouth or bad
ich sooner or Inter will

teeth fall out and may

‘ism and Heart Trou-

? r with the

. Hiops bleed-

1.24 hours, ends sore

tiehtens teeth. Iron clad

« Amosan must make your
heowal ‘4 save your teeth or
Weney back return of empty

sckag Amosan from your

/ ; chomist today
3 Pe (se: The .
AMeosan ane Booey?
Pes @yorrhea— Trench Mouth







Bendix Automatic
Washing Machines.

ee /
These Machines are entirely

automatic, simply ioad wit

clothes, set.to wash 5 m

later remove the ciott



have ‘been= washed, rinsed ree
times end damp dried
So simple, So labour saving.
Get one from DA COSTA & CO |
LTD Elect. Dept, |
165.526, |





ORIENTAL
PALACE

HEADQUARTERS FOR
SOUVENIKS

| FROM INDIA, CHINA &
CEYLON

THANI'S

Pr. Wm. Hy. St Diu: p4e {

7







Â¥

COLLINS’ LID.
LO0COS0SSOSOSOOOOOSEOU

%





POOP SSOOOT OG
5 s <
FOR SALE
ONE “FRIGIDAIRE” Electric
Neep Freeze. {
ONE “WESTINGHOUSE” Electr
fee making machine, capacity 500
Ibs. per day
One 5 gal. gos h coffee per-
colator complete with heating
unit.
One gas heated st steel @
hot water urn. 2
x

OT
AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT—Mas-

ey Harris and other equipment includ-
ng Grass Rakes, Grass Loaders, Fertil-
‘yr Distributors, Bagasse Spreadgrs,
iso suitable for applying Filter-Press
Ashes and Pen Manure, and other
Courtesy Garage

10.5.52—6n




Types Implements
Dial 4616.

ocean



COUNTER SCALES ~- Jacob Pattern
Counter Scales with brass scoop anc
weights Government stamped $34.31
each

G. W. Hutchinson & Co, Ltd.
Dial 4222
16.5.52—3n.

FISHING BOAT named Endeavour
No. S 148. Practically new, can be seen
at Mount Stanfast Bay. Apply to IRA



















SOBERS. Garden St. James
16. 5. 52—2n.
“GARDEN “HOSE: ™%” Garden Hose

and Fittings. City Garage Co., Victoria
Street. 1,.5.62—t.f.n

GALVANIZED NAILg—All sizes up
to 3 inch at 42c. per lb, G. W. HUTCH-
(NSON & Go Ltd. Dial 4222

‘16.5.52—3n

——$—$—_[_—
Gibson V Class Speedboat—built and
mported 1948, Length 18 ft, Beam 5 ft
) ins. Draught 12 feet. Seating eapacity
six to seven people. Steel hull material
nd construction comply with Lioyd’s
md Board of Trade requirement
Powered with Ford Watermotor 10/3%
> H.P. Speed ten knots. Price $800.00

Apply REGINALD aimee 7
§.52--t.f.n






sl aero an
HURRICANE LANTERNS -
rome should have one, Only $1.97 e9
> W. HUTCHINSON & Co Lid. Di
4242 16.8.52-—3n
$$$
HOUSEHOLD EQUIPMENT ot all
scription. Owen T. Allder, 118 Roebuck
1. Dial 3299 10.5.52—t.f.n
if you cannot take plain Cod Liver
we suggest you take "Rexall's Cod
Liver OF Emulsion’, a _ palatable
reparation containing 507% of Vitamin
Tested Cod Liver Oil.
KNIGHT'S LTD.
14.5.52—3n,



Str



time to give yourself @



Now is the

glorious suntan by applying “Sun

Tone” regularly when at the beach
Price 3/- bot.

KNIGHT'S LTD.

14.5.52—3n.







FURNISH

NOW IT’S EASY
The Money Saving Way



Popular Bureaus, Bedsteads,
Beds, Cradles, Wardrobes, Wash
stands $8.00 up, Coil and Fiat
Springs -— TABLES for Dir

Kitchen and Fancy use, Larders,
Waggons, ‘Tea Trollays, Side-
boards—Kitchen, China and Bed-
room Cabinets, Liquor Cases
$5.50 up DRAWING ROOM
FURNITURE, Rush Furniture fo
Little and Big—PIANOS, Pram,

Ice Boxes,
Nice

Typewriter, and other
Things—ALL AT MONEY

L.S. WILSON

SPRY STREET DIAL 4069



So





















































ery repair work desirable Applicant
must have knowledge of scale drawing
end experience in the direction of



“UNDER THE SILVER

f 5 abour.

HAMMER Copies of recent testimonials must be
By recommendations of Lioyds Agents} submitted with application by 3ist May

we will sell on FRIDAY 16th at H.|1952, For particulars relating to salary

Ltd conditions, apply to: The

and other
Manager, The Barbados Foundry Limi-
ted, P.O. Box 91,

Bridgetown, Barbados.

——_———

An Assistant FOREMAN capable of
supervising our Machine Shop Depart-
ment. Applicant must have knowledge
in making sketches and reading blue
prints.

Copies of recent testimonials must be
submitted with application by Sist May
1952, For particulars relating to salary
tnd’ other conditions, apply to: ‘The
Monager, The Barbados Foundry Limited,
P.O. Box 91, White Park Road, Bridge-
town, Barbados. 14.5.52—in.

ie wciicsiiiectenenaibenieeseliabnainabiee

BOOK-KEEPER for our, Office. Must
have knowledge of Book-keeping, other-
no use applying. For particulars

Jason Jones & Co. Warehouse,
Hincks Street:—
20 BAGS DARK CRYSTAL SUGAR.
Sale 12.30 d’clock Terms cash
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers.

15.5.52—2n.





FOR SALE
MISCELLANEOUS

PRIMUS LANTERNS—Burns
00 candle power, fitted with H
Duroterm Glass Chimneys a
Hardware & Bicycle Accessorie















an ri Stre: wise
pee eee 19.5,52—2n. | Dial K. Re HUNTE, 8137, any morning
RECORDS—Clearing our stock of MGM | Pefore 980 a-m- 16.9.98—4n-
Records. Three for Two Dollars, your —
choice. A. BARNES & CO., LTD LOSPPPPOSOOSSLOSOSS GOSS:
9.4.52—t.f.n x

LT
Subscribe now to the Datly Telegraph
England's leading Daily Newspaper now
arriving in Barbados by Air only a few
days after publication in London. Con-
tact: jan Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltd.
Local Representative, Tel, 3118
17.4.52—t.f.n. |

VAT—One (1) 8,000 gallon Oak vat —|¢
apply D. V, Scott & Co., Ltd., White! ¢

VEGETABLES

CABBAGE... 30c. per tb %





Park Road, 1.5521... |% CARROTS... 24c. per tb $
ones pave st fresh supply of ‘“Brags's x
harcoa! its"? C . TS Ac,
Rosen Lsbeeaetoae sense ie % BEE sons 2 per th
nee, Acidity ete, Price 6+ tin. ‘3 : t
KNIGHT'S LTD.
teiecks. |@ At No. 11, Swan Stree
———— eee Ub 45:68 EGOSSSOOSSS OOS

5S SSOSOPOFSDPVSPLOD:







}
mm rwo TAT }
TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH | Electrical Installations
What The Boys Have ‘
Been Waiting For } and Repairs.
Has Arrived:— ' Our Wiring Department carries
AMERICAN car 8) | 4 Sale lft “ona
PISTOLS AND CAPS tha. installation or repair of all
Closing Out Sale of re Joke in Homes

ALL ENAMEL PAINTS Dial 3878 or 4710.

Learn to remember numbers.

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY Practice on Ours.
and De ered Sage
HARDWARE 16.5.52—6n



64055959960 SSOOOCOG8OES

Barbados Fancy Molasses Production
and Export Acts 1987 and 19939.





Under the above Acts, the Fancy Molasses Control and Marketing
Board has allocated the following amounts of fancy molasses to be
manufactured for the purpose of export by the plantations named.
These allocations are subject to approval by the Governor-in-Execu-
tive Committee at the expiration of seven days from the date of this
publication: —











| Name of Plantation Wine Gallons
ae eine ed wh Oe Aas NORA NOLS $02 O60 9 9 CMR OE 303,708
MAK e Chace ke Rel eee UNDE gvirt ee oo8 617,241
Colleton (St. John) 315,490
DU ocdcth peas ches ase esonnhescs 440,837
GODS) Fai sca sealers 423,159
WRT ees ace sk swage 388,846
Kendal 405,725
DROP ais Gb 65 6b 0408 NENA ROR LORE SOS 158,867
NWN Cc Se CRC Cage eas hese Bada tage eee ee> 441,441
MOONGOUS: diecondsdae> tent hee es nkegesiepee ube t gets 175,831
EAE, aie eve ie ho oes ee pbem eens oaahaes 3,671,145

15.5.52—3n.



INVESTMENTS

In exchange for - - -

$7.000 COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA
5° Bonds, 1952/55,

ah em

‘mn I hi ee

I will deliver - - -

£2,650 BARBADOS GOVERNMENT

342 DEBS, 1961/



OP
£3,400 BRITISH 312% WAR LOAN,
1952 or after.
'

Above figures ean be varied up or down: all
subject to market changes. Other attractive
trades available for those not requiring trustee
investments.

e



A.M. WEBB

STOCKBROKER.

Dial 4796 ese Hours 9—3
ss 33 Broed St. (Upstairs Phoenix Pharmacy).
- Seer ee ee





















15.5.52—3n 17, High Street, Tenders must reach the wu ed
$$ eauamnaner es at C. FP. Harrison & Co’s Office not
CAR—Prefect Ford, 1948 modei: good ers 5.5260 than May 19th.
Furnished. From 15th May) T} condition, five BoOd tyTeS, BOOK UWP 9 aeemnmenememennmmnmnt The Association does not bind itself
or 8589 | holstery. owns. driven. Selling —— SHARES—.. limited number of OR-/|to rons re lowest ox eet tender. 2 s e
——__—— = e. $850.00 pply to Leslie Smith,| DINARY iE BARBADOS t ARBADOS CRICKET t l t
PARAWAY-— St. Phiiip, ttens Road, Govt. Hill. SHIPFING WRADI co. LID at ASSOCIATION. lan a 1ona eams 1 Ss
rooms. Fully furnished 15.5.52—2n.] £2. per share. Free mp duty W. F. HOYOS,
Watermill supply. Dout ————_———[—$_————— eee CARRINGTON & SEALY Hon. Secty.
servant rooms. From CAR—Austin, A. 70 Hampshire, © 43.5.52-——12r 11.5.62—4n
4476. cellent condition, Dial 2594. CB. | un mn — SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Sails Arrives Sails Pe ee ra eee a a a.
uart i6'5.52~3n. | GplON KO? — MAXWELL coast | NOTICE Montreal Halifax Boston B’dos —_B’dos 1EQLE
“HORSE Hilt House, Josept | - The above property will be offered ! CANADIAN CRUISER .. 2 Apr. 2 May — 17 May 17 May
$60.00 per month, electricity, telephor CAR—Vauxhall 18 b.p. Saloon 1951, in| for sale at 2 p.m. on Friday, 16th May,/ APPLICATIONS for one or more CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 9May 12 May = 21 May 23 May
and water insts Apply: Mrs. Georg cally first class condition. Newly Spray-] 1952, at the office of the undersigned.’ vacant St. Michael's Vestry Exhibitions LADY RODNEY .. oa .. 19 May 22 May 24 May 2 June 3 June
Hutson, Dial 96245. inted. Dial 4616 Courtesy Garage. | | Viewing Sunday, May ith to Thurs. at Harrison College will be received ee aes CHALLENGER _ 39 May § Zune a 22 June £2 toss Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
3.5.52 a May so — a, , y NELSON .. i ba une ni
Se Sg a a oy ny suly 1s Soe further enanene Nip dcw R te P Lge Allg ‘Stay, | CANADIAN CRUISER 4 oe eo ee eye suly Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica
KELDARE ford > CAR—One (1) Austin A.40 Car, lat€| lars apply 1952 CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 30 June 8 July = 12 July 13 Jule
Micghael. Near ait Club, From is 951 model, Telephone 4821. D. V COTTLi: CATFORD & CO., Candidates must be the sons of LADY RODNEY .. a .. MdJuly July 16 July 25 July 26 July
June to oe Demet: Well-furnishe cott & Co., Ltd. 8.5.52-—t.f.n., High Street. parishioners in straitened circumstances
Buhgalow; Verandahs reception rooms, ) ————____——-—- 11.5.52—5n.|and must not be less than 9 nor more From Sou Arrives Barbados
2 Gouble bedrooms (basins), servants DODGE TRUCK—Complete with new] —— _____ "| than 15 years of age on the 30th June, NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives Ayrives “COLOMBIE” 8th Ma 1952 21st Ma: 1952
room, gas cooker, Garage, Warden. Reus stform and good tyres, Courtesy AUCTION 1952, to be proved by a Baptismal P B'dos Bidos St. John Boston Halifax Montreal pe: wo y> sere ease y,
onétie rent. Tele. 46031 after eleven rage Dial 4616 Certifeate which must accompany the DE GRASSE” .... 4th June, 1952 .... 16th June, 1952
w'clock. 16,8.52—31 MORRES OXFORD—1952 Model, like ——--—- ~- xpplication,. oo 24 May 29 May 5 June - 8 June 11 June el
mileage under 3,000, Dial 4616 > r f lication be obtained | © LAN m calling
NEWHAVEN — Crane Co 4 bed ga 19.5,52—8n, Ac ten tha Voley CET “Office. CONSTRUCTOR 3June June 15 June = 18 June® 21 June _ at -Byatgionee
rooms. Fuliy furnished, lighting Plo ciara heen ae ; EET, on FRIDAY E. C. REDMAN, LADY RODNEY 15 June 17 June > gi June 28June 1 July
Watermill supply, Double Garage, three (1) M Coupe 1 perfect | 16th p.m. one 1951 AUSTEN A-« Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry CANADIAN SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE
servant rooms. For May apd from Oc Apply Newcastle Plantation, St |SEDAN CAR damaged in accident 10.5.52—7n CHALLENGER. 23 June 28 June 5 July 18 July 8 July 11 July
tober ist Phone 4876. , 30 +-£.0, | FRRMB CARH. cencincrnsnsinstitnaninemnmnseseausctnamamnasonas| Te DELS 6 July a July 19 July 22 July From Barbados. Arrives Southampton
10.4.52—t.f.5 c Pps ie semana BR. ARCHER McKE! ere 14 duly 19 July ae suly SM suly “1 Aug *“DE GRASSE” 19th 1952 29th 1952
i cline erence naeentntmenetoe MASSEY-HARRIS S— book; ‘ I NITED c eee May, asso snee May,
TRINITY. COTTAGE-—Fully furnished, requirements of these Popular Trac-} 4n WA Ace ee. a hae Me an $58 wie $3 Rar: “COLOMBIE” .... Ist June, 1952 .... 18th June, 1952 ¢
three bedrooms, complete with tele-| ‘ors Now. (Wheel and half-Track). Dial) ~~ oO — ee "a ; . ae me i" *“DE GRASSE” 29th June, 1952 9th July. 1952 ¥
phone and refrigerator, situated 41 | 4616, Courtesy Garage, 7 eae | cher ieee aan — og! Model _ one , ae ee '* %
3 a Pi ts 0 2—G6r Sitroen ol, damaged in ac
Derrieks Bay, St, James, Fhope anne. ou, oo Pe eo tnaucted Be ae ty P For further particulars, apply to— *Sailing direct to Southampton
PICI P—One Ford Pick-up in good Company to offer both these vehicle: HEL’ ‘
‘THE SNUGGERY’—Near Bra working order with Five good tires.| ele by AUCTION at the COuH —— rN ahs GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD.—Agents. 59596 66:66:66 OS SC6CSS SCC CO8P
Beach, newly painted; comprisini ‘| Apply to B. A. BELGRAVE, Hindsbury| GARAGE on Friday 1th of & a Aes 2 ksho! ‘anc. | S2SMSIREaie cs tae wremtniano nici an
Bedrooms, Dinning and Drawing Room] Rd. St Michael 16. 5, 52—in,}| 2.30 p.m, Auctioneers: John M la pa le © supervising a wor ae Be.
en@losed; Gallery, Toilet and Bath, & Co 18.5 52—4n. | Foundry, Experience in Sugar Machin-

THE DEMERARA
UTUAL LIFE



hy



OVER $2,000,000
DURING 1951.

- RECORD ADDITION OF $571,646
TO ASSURANCE FUND.

ACTUARY RECOMMENDS BONUS OF TWO PER CENT

ASSURANCE SOCIETY

©

Reports :— | Na

i,
Miri,

NEW ISSUE







AS A RESULT of the transactions for the year ended
December 31 last, the Demerara Mutual Life Assurance

Society, Limited, has established another record by the
| addition of the very large sum of $571,646 to the Assurance

Fund which now stands at $6,681,714. The average yield
on the Assurance Fund for the year was very satisfactory,
| ane Society was holding its own in the competitive

This was stated by Mr..Percy C. Wight, O.B.E., Chair-
man, at the 60th annual general meeting of members yes-
terday at the Demerara Life Building.

Addressing the meeting Mr. Wight said :
Gentlemen,

It gives me much pleasure to present to you the Sixtieth
|Annual Report of the Directors on the transactions of the
Society for the year 1951. Before dealing with the main
features of the Report, however, I regretfully have to refer
to the passing of Mr. John Ignatius deAguiar, C.B.E. on the
27th January last. Mr. deAguiar had been a member of this
Board for 26 years and by his death not only has the Society
lost avery capable Director but the community as a whole
has suffered a great loss.

As you will see from the Report Mr. A. E. Gonsalves
has been elected to fill the vacant seat at the Board.

HOLDING OWN IN COMPETHIYS FIELD

Now reverting to the report whic customary has
‘been reproduced in the local Press you will observe that the
New Issue for the year was $2,023,842 with an annual pre-

mium income of $116,857. This is the largest total but one
in the history of the Society and shows that the Society is

holding its own in the competitive field.

Claims by death during the year
assuring $112,242 including bonus YGaitions which is much
less than the previous year when the total was $142,058 in-
volving 73 policies. The maturing of 153 Endowments result-
ed in the sum of $260,216 being paid out. These bring the
total claims paid by the Society since its inception to
$8,858,279.

The Ratio of Expenses of Management (including com-
mission account) to Premium Receipts is 17.5% as against
17% in 1950.

The average yield on the Assurance Fund for the year
| worked out at 4.58% and the average for the Quinquennium
was 4.75% which is very satisfactory after taking into
|account the low yields obtaining on gilt-edged securities
jat the present time.

totalled 52 policies







As a result of the transactions for the year, the Society
has established another record by the addition of the very
large sum of $571,646 to the Assurance Fund which now
stands at $6,681,714.

2% BONUS RECOMMENDED ;

The Report by our Actuary on the Twelfth Quinquen-
nial Valuation has just arrived. Mr. Pelham recommends
that we should increase our reserves by two hundred and
sixty thousand doljars and in addition thereto declared a
Reversionary Bonus of two per cent per annum upon the
Sums Assured and the existing Bonus Additions on policies
entitled to participate. I am sure that you will agree with
Mr. Pelham when he states that the Valuation results are
eminently satisfactory. In accordance with the Society’s
regulations an Extraordinary General Meeting will be con-
vened as early as possible to adopt our Actuary’s Report.

Before I close my address I would like to place on re-
cord my thanks to the Directors for their co-operation and
the Staff for their loyal service.

With these remarks, Gentlemen, I formally move the
adoption of the Report and after it has been seconded I shal!
be pineeerl to answer any questions Members may care to
ask.”
ms Mr. C. C. de Freitas seconded and the report was adopt-

THOSE ‘PRESENT ,
Other Directors present were: the Hons. G. H. Smellie

and E. F. McDavid, C.MG.. C.B.B. and Messrs. Percy W.

King, O.B.E., R. K. Steele, F, A. Seaford, C. L. de Freitas
and A. E. Gonsalves, with Mr. E. C. Innis Secretary and
H. Cannon, assistant secretary.

Policyholders in attendance were: Messrs. A. S, Out-
ridge, R. L. King, A. E. Chester, S. N. Abdool, R. A. Callen-
der, B. M. Gonsalves, F. S. Gomes, N. Wight, H. S, Perreira
J. A. Campbell, C. P. Wight, C. C. de Freitas and J. E. Bren:
nan, ; aa

Messrs. C. L. de Freitas, P. W. King, and A. E. Gonsalves.
retiring Directors were re-elected on a motion by Mr. C. C
de Freitas, seconded by Mr. A. E, Chester.

Remuneration of the Directors was fixed at $4,000 fo
the ensuing year : $1,000 for the Chairman and $3,000, to b
divided among the other Directors; while the remuneratio':
of the Auditors was fixed at $1,440.

Donations to Charity were approved at $2,500 for th»
year 1952.

MR. WIGHT RE-ELECTED CHAIRMAN

At a special meeting held afterwards Mr. Percy C

Wight was unanimously re-elected Chairman.

Sa cea ae



FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1952



a ee

HENRY

4 MEAN, MY DEAR LADY
VOURE AS PHONEY AS
THAT UEWELLERY VOU
THREW OVERBOARD

NOW, MAS. DE LAZLON,
WHAT PRECISELY 5S









LAURETTA USED
TO THINK I WAS

GOT IN




—LIKE A CHARM, ff
caP'N! WHEN
THAT GAS .
COOLED THE PILE

(OHHH... MY
HEAD... HEY!
THE COOL













CAREFUL, DALE!
DON'T TOUCH

THE SUIT-- IT’S
SOAKED WITH
RADIATION /

FLASH? DARLING...
PLEASE! OPEN
YOUR EYES...









UP LIKE A CORK
IN A RAIN BARREL /

WE'RE OUT IN
FREE SPACE










Get us!



JOHNNY HAZARD

w |F THERE IS ANYONE
PRESENT WHO CAN SHOW
WHY THIS MAN AND THIS
WOMAN SHALL NOT BE








ZE MONTAIGNE CHAPEL
EES ON ZE NEXT BLOCK,

A BLOCK IS AS
GOOD AS A MILE
RIGHT NOW...



THIS NEW COOK WE HIRED
YESTERDAY IS EVIDENTLY
NOT AN EARLY RISER /T'M
STARVING //--I'D LIKE SOME
BREAKFAST’

4 . MINERVA - WHAT
SHE MUST HAVE OVERSLEPT’ }4— =
I THINK T'LL GIVE HER A



NO...ALL THE CABBIE
COULD TELL ME WAS THAT }
SHE WAS ATTRACTIVE

AND WELL DRESSED...

\ a~e——( THAT'S NOT
Y= MUCH TO










TM MAKING
PROGRESS, HONEY...
I KNOW THAT RICKY
LAABERT’S KILLER



WATCH THAT TRUCK.
IF IT MOVES AWAY, SEE

THEN WE BOTH
THE SAME
BIOCHEMISTRY








AGAIN! OLD MAN
JUPITER COULON'T











HAVING FOR BREAKFAST
THIS MORNING ?



BY CARL

THE OLO INSURANCE
A RACKET, EX ?..

ye NOW SHE ONLY

{ CONSIDERS ME AS
A DOLLAR AND TEN
CENTS’ WORTH OF

SALT, NITROGEN, IRON

CLASS THIS TERM 4 ” CALCIUM, HYDROGEN

SCAne POTASSIUM
GY”



BY DAN _ BARRY

EXPEDITIONS ONE AND
TWO WEREN'T AS
LUCKY AS OURS! WE
COULDN'T LAND BUT
WE GOT OUR RECORDS
<.. AND WE'VE SUR-
VIVED TO TAKE THEM
BACK TO PALOMAR |

ee

AND, DARLING,
WE GOT A
PERFECT RECORD
OF JUPITER'S
SURFACE FROM
THE RADIO
ROBOT!




MAYBE, FLASH! ~
WE'RE NOT OUT OF
» DANGER YET...

a aa
WEE DORRIE/ GET

AWAY FROM THAT HUSSY

THIS INSTANT /






we LET HM
SPEAK

I |
i








DON'T WORRY ABOUT
MY BREAKFAST - MR.
JIGGS/ GO AHEAD
WITH YOUR? OWN = TLL
GET MINE LATER /

ARE YOU



IT'S A START...HONEY, I'D LIKE YOU
TO DO ME AFAVOR... GO DOWN TO |
THE “DAILY SPHERE”...CHECK THEIR /
FILES FOR CLIPPINGS ON RICKY _/
LAMBERT...LIST EVERY GIRL y——~" _/
WHOSE NAME WAS LINKED

WITH LAMBERT'S IN THE 4

PAST TWO YEARS /





ANDERSON



BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN













We never
let go!

Vigilance over the high quality of
“Black & White” is never relaxed. Blended in
SY the special “ Black & White ” way this truly

outstanding Scotch is in a class all its own.

‘BLACK: WHITE’

SCOTCH WHISKY

By Appointment Scotch Whisky Distillers

to H.M, King George Vi James Buchanan & Co. Led,



JAMES BUCHANAN & CO. LTD., GLASGOW, SCOTLAND











= Sk ee
SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Hranches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street









Usually Now Usually Now

ONIONS—2-lb. CA ; 48 -. 36 PKGS. WEETABIX ry 30 27
BOTTLES GRAPE JUICE ‘ 67 62 PKGS, JELLO PUDDINGS e 23 20
TINS GRAPES ey ‘5 +i 34 30 BOTTLES CARIB BEER ca 24 20




e
THE COLONNADE

GROCERIES







LET HIM HAVE
JUDGEMENT

®y BRUCK HAMILTON

of Barbados. :

tion; he believes that justice is with the seales and the sword, or

Whether the reader believes in Paul Reform or in retribu-
that between them is margin for error, Bruce Hamilton here
presents with drama, vision, and a power that does not seek to
persuade, a case for every reader to answer,

This is a murder stary with a differenee—the accused is a
High Court Judge. From his seat on the Bench he is brought
to stand in the dock and answer for a crime which he had every
reason to commit, Here is a range of lively and candid charae-
ters: Art 'Turvey, the old countryman with his small cunning
and his taste for seandal; the furyman who dabbled in psycho-
logy; Teal, the stranger who came from Buffalo to spring a trap
in the Norfolk marshes; Willoughby, the nonentity who was
accused of murder, and Sir Francis Brittian who paid the penalty.

The book culminates in a trial in which the case against the
accused mercilessly advances, fact by fact, towards his indict-
ment and sentence, There follows a surprise development and
a wry, unexpected ending.

Bruce Hamilton is a writer with a brisk and simple style,
humour, and a veal but not laboured sympathy,

ON SALE AT - - -

ADVOCATE
STATIONERY






9 , 7 o [
For Your Enjoyment
Tins Sun Pat SALTED PEANUTS
Tins Sun Pat SALTED CASHEW NUTS
Tins Sun Pat SALTED ALMONDS
Bots. Escoffier MANGO CHUTNEY
Crosse & Blackwell's MANGO

For Your Cake Mixing

BRIDAL ICING SUGAR (Plain)

BRIDAL ICING SUGAR (Flavoured)
in 116 pkgs.

GROUND ALMOND PASTE COMP. CHUTNEY
per Ib ar ee Crosse & Blackwell’s COCKTAIL
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PAGE EIGHT

Carlton



D feat

Empire 2—0

Carlton defeated Empire two

replay for the Knock Out at

nil in their semi-final
Kensington yesterday evening,

when these teams met on the first occasion the match was

drawn two all,
The Carlton goals wer
their inside left, and Pepy I

WATER POLO:



Snappers, H.C.
Win Water

Polo Games

Snappers
Sword Fish
'—2 and

a +2

completely outplayed
and defeated them
Harrison College scored
win over Whipporays
when the first two Division
“A” Water Polo matches for the
season were played at the Aquatic
Club yesterday evening.

Snappers displayed much skill
and guile in outpositioning thei
opponents, combined well and for
the first match of the season were

very fit and were swimming pow-
erfully. College won through
their ceaseless attacks on Whip-
porays whom they somewhat

muddled and through their alert-
ness in dodging the Whipporas
players to receive passes.

For Snappers, Delbert Ban-
nister who has as powerful a
back arm thrust as ever and Ma
colm Browne who is swift an
unerring, each scored two, «Ken
neth Ince, Billy and Frank Man-
ning each scored one.

Sword Fish Portillo
Nestor and Herbert,
for their team,

For College in

brothers,
each scored

the College

Whipporays match, Charles Eve-
jyn, G. Jordan, S. Grannum and
R. Feldman scoreg one each and

for Whipporays H. Weatherhead
and R, Redman scored

It would scarcely be fair to
single out any of the Snapper
players for special mention, Each
player pulled his weight. But it
was interesting noticing how Ken-
neth Ince,could quickly scan the
water, sum up the position and
pass the ball to advantage. The
Snappers players were leaping
waist high out of the water when
about to make an attempt at the
nets and this always added force
to the try.



Sword Fish put up but
show at combination and
completely routed.

Outstanding in the College team
were G. Jordan and C. Evelyn.
Jordan is really the backbone of
his side and plays one well
skilled in the game,

4 poor
were

as



Of the goalkeepers, College’s
Chabrol was about the best. He
Was executing some good timing
and saved many, possible goals.

In ‘the Snappers-Sword Fish
match, Sword Fish’s Albert
Weatherhead seemed to get dis-
gusted after so many goals wer
coming in on him, especially as
the ball was coming with such
force and he was not getting

much help from his team fellows

The teams were:

Snappers—T. Clarke, G. Mc

Clean (Capt.) ,B. Manning, F
Manning, D. Bannister, K. Lnce,
M. Browne.

Sword Fish—A Weatherhead,
G. Foster, Gerald Jordan, A

Jones, N. Portillo, H
Dick Reece.
Harrison College — J. Chabrol,
R. Feldman, C. Evelyn, Jordan, A,
Taylor, K. Armstrong and S.
Grannum,
Whipporays—C.
Yearwood, H, Weatherhead, A.

Portillo and

Hunte (Capt.) B. Ward, R. Red-
man and Hazel
The referee was Archie Clarke.



WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY

Rainfall
nil.
Total Rainfall for Month to

date: 62 in.
Highest Temperature: 88.5 °F.
Lowest Temperature: 74.0°F.
Wind Velocity: 11 miles per
hour.
Barometer (9 a.m.)
(3 p.m.) 29.940.

from Codrington;

30.005;

TO-DAY
Sunrise; 5.39 a.m,
Sunset: 6.16 p.m.

Moon Full: May 9,
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

High Tide: 9.20 a.m. 10.44
p.m.

Low. Tide: 3.26 a.m., 4.06
p.m,



| They'l Do Tt Bvew

(CO KNOW THIS CHARACTER ws HE
{/PUSHES HIMSELF INTO A CRO’

BUS WITH THE HAPPY

oy



Greenidge, T. «

e scored by Boogles Williams
{utchinson at centre forward

Carlton took the touch off while

Empire defended the northern
nal. Carlton were first to attack.
Pepy” Hutchinson. Carlton centre

forward, missed an opportunity to

open the score for his team. Rey-
nold Hutchinson, left winger, ran
down the wing and_ centred.
Pepy” was unmarked, but took a
hot which went wide of the right
pright. “Brickie” Lucas, Carlton
iside right, took a shot from out-
ide the aréa. This was also wide

f the goal
A tew minutes later Douglas, the

Umpire left winger took a long
hot which was well outside the
ight upright, Carlton were award-
da free kick from just outside

he goal area, No scoring resulted.
Hope, on the right wing for Em-








ire, took a beautiful shot from
he wing. The ball went only a
»w yards wide of the crossbar.

Carlton got another free kick
rom a few feet outside the goal
area. On this occasion goalie
Archer fouled the ball. Lucas took
he kick but the ball went wide
of the goal

First Goal
“Boogles” Williams, Carlton in-
ide left, scored the first goal for
his team frorn a free kick. The

hot was taken from just outside

he goal area. The ball struck

valie Archer and entered the left

nner of the net At half time
core was Carlton one, Em-

ire nil 4

Empire were first off the mark in

ihe second half. They were award-
ed a free kick and Maynard, their
left half, took a well placed shot.
Carlton’s custodian, King, ran out
of goal and saved.

Shortly afterwards Carlton al-
most increased their lead. Lucas
took a hard shot from close range
but the ball struck goalie Archer
ind rebounded into play.

The second goal for Carlton
came soon after. The Black Rock
forwards bore down on their op-
ponents, “Pepy” Hutchinson who
had now changed positions with
Reynold Hutchinson, received a
short pass and ran through. He

eat goalie Archer with a_ hard
shot The game ended with the
score Carlton two, Empire nil.

The teams are as follows; —

Empire: Archer, Jordan, Grant.
Maynard, Smith, Haynes, Hope,
Hutchinson, Bynoe. Parris, Doug-
las.

Carlton: King, Kennedy, Porter
Warren, Clairmonte, Cox, Wil-
liams, G. Hutchinson, Marshall,

Lueas. R. Hutchinson,
Referee: Mr. O. Graham.

First Girls’







Is there a Derby winner

among them ?

perhaps in 1953

THs week came news which has been
eagerly awaited by British racegoers

The Queen, with the Queen

four hours in a tiny village five hundred
feet up on the Wiltshire Downs. Its name
Beckhampton. The Queen was visiting fiv«
of her horses trained by Mr.
She had lunch and tea there and watched the

horses galloped.

There has been no announcement yet of the
Queen's intentions about racing this season. It is
expected that when Court mourning
14 aliogeth
Under the name and in the colour

her horses—she has
of Norfolk, To-day, at Newbur

name of the Duke of Norfolk. ‘|
Boy

_Next season it 1s thought that

under the famous Royal colours
and gold,” first adopted by King
ut her visit to Beckhampton
indicating that she fully intend
enthusiastic interest in the
breeding and racing of horses

The five horses at 3eck-
hampton are not technically
owned by her. They were leased
to King George VI from the
National Stud, For a number of
years selected yearlings have
been leased in this way. Never-
theless, they are always regarded
as Royal horses, Gordon Richards
the stable jockey, rides them.

The arrangement started when
Fred Darling trained at Beck-
hampton. When Noel Murless
went over there in 1947 he took
over the Royal racing interests.

Out-of-Doors Man

At 42, Noel Murless has one
of the largest strings in the coun-
try; he trains 60 horses.

He is tall and lean, with a
tanned, craggy face: the face of
the eternal out-of-doors man.

He sat in his garden wearing a



jacket with leather patches at
the elbows, screwing up his
eyes at the sun, He gazed ab-
sently at his two terriers chasing

over the lawn and discussed the
Queen’s horses.

He said: “The Queen's horses
get no preferential treatment;
they are fed and exercised just
like any other of the 60 in the
string.

“At the moment there are five
of them, They are all fillies.

“One is a_ three-year-old:
Ardent, The others are two-year-
olds: Black Bee, Snow Princess,
High Service and Infernal Ma-
chine.

“None of them has raced yet.”

What are their chances when
they do get on to a racecourse?

Said Murless: “It is really too
early to say, and so I cannot
give a sound opinion. But |

Inter-School





Sports To Be Held Today

WHEN the first Girls’ Inter School Sports ever to be
held in Barbados comes off today at Kensington, the winning
school of Alexandra, Alleyne, Foundation, Queen’s College
ind St. Miechael’s Girls’ will be taking away the Lady

Savage Challenge Cup.

Lady Savage has lead the way in supplying Challenge

Cups for these new sports,
Cups needed—the four Class
14—16 and over 16.

The sports meeting starts at 1.30
p.m. There will be 17 events and
the sports will be confined to flat
races and high jumping. The long-
est distance wil) be a 220 yards
for 14---16 girls and over 16.

Unlike boys’ sports, there will
be no throwing of the cricket ball,
long jump, (St. Michael’s Girls’ is
the only school with a sand pit),
jumping the hurdles. nor the long-
distances like the 440 and 880;

yards



The sports nevertheless are ex_
pected to be very interesting es-
pecially as competition is very

keen and each school so far has
been trying to keep it as a state

secret what times their athletes
ere making for the various dis-
tances or how high their jump-
rs are jumping.
Team Spirit
A games mistress of one of these
chools observed yesterday that

the development of good sports
\anship, team spirit and physical
ness is necessary in the educa-
both boys and girls,

It is therefore hoped that the
eneral public will give to the
Girl Inter “School Sports the

me enthusiastic support which

Boy Sports receive, i
As this is the first sports meet-
, of the kind, no fund yet exists

oO Support it. Subseriptions to-
wards the purchase of Cups are
bus welcome and will be grate_
fully received on behalf of the
Sports’ Committee by the Head
‘Yeachers of these schools.
The following are the events:—
I. High Jump Class IIT.
Il. 100 Yards Class IIT,

y Time










WOED
CRY:

THANX ANO A TIP
\OF THE HATLO
HAT "OD
LYN CALEY,
4904 N.AUSTIN,
CHICAGO 3O,

Semi-Finals Tonight |

= _ By Jimmy Harlo

but there are still four more
Cups, under 10, 10-—12, 12—14,

III. 100 Yards Class II.
IV. 60 Yards Class IV.
V. 80 Yards Class III.

VI. High Jump Class I.
VII. 150 Yards Class II.
Yitl. 80 Yards Class IV,

IX. 120 Yards Class III.

X. 150 Yards Class I.



XI. High Jump Class II
Tea Interval

XII. 100 Yards Class IV.

XIII. 150 Yards Class III,

XIV. 220 Yards Class 1.

XV. 220 Yards Class II.

XVI. Junior's Relay.
XVII. Senior's Relay.
Table

Tennis

The
Inter-Club Knock Out Table
Tennis games will be played at
the Y.M.C.A, Naval Hall from
7.30 o'clock tonight. Barna wil
meet Adelphi while Queen’s Col-
lege plays Y.W.P.C,

In the opening games Adelphi
defeated Lenville and Y.W.P.C
beat Y.W.C.A. Tonight's game
shoulq be extremely interesting
Both Adelphi and Y.W.P.C., have
strong teams, while Queen's Col-
lege and Barna tied with 36 points

each in the Inter-Club League
Competition. Y,W.P.C. gave a
good display against Y.W.C.A

last Friday night.

The winners will meet in the
finals for the Knock Out Cup on
Friday night next.




me of the Queen
horses is entered for the Rayne

he horse is Choi

semi-finals of the Ladies |

_—

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Well—

Mother, spen'

Noel Murless



ends on May 31
‘twill be run
of the Duke

Stakes, in the

he will race
‘purple, scarlet
Edward VIL

can be taken as
to continue her

by

JOHN WATERMAN







don’t at present think there i
anything exceptional amon
them. I don’t suppose there i
any classic material.’

The Queen’s Opinion

And what did the Queen her-
self think of them when sh:
went there on Monday? “Well,’
said their trainer, “I’m afraid ]
just can’t say.”

The horses actually owned by
the Queen—apart from he
jumpers, who are with Captain
Peter Cazalet at Tonbridge—are

trained by Captain Cecil Boyd-
Rochfort at Freemason’s Lodge,
Newmarket.

From the outside the house
looks like a country parsonage
Sixty-four-year-old Captain
Boyd-Rochfort is a tall, bulky
Irishman with an impeccab)
charming manner. He has

trained here since 1923, has won
£800,000 in stake money for his
owners.

As he sits in a green arm-
chair in his study surrounded
by portraits of winners, on his

desk a table lamp decorated with
coloured cameos of jockeys and

owners, his appearance is not
that of the racing trainer, It is
that of a prosperous, senior
Oxford don.
His Erudition
His talk is perhaps a little
donnish: but only in so fay as it

displays immense erudition—
about racehorses and breeding
“Of course,” he said, passing
a hand over his thinning grey
hair, “I have no knowledge of
the Queen’s intentions about her

horses. [ have no authority
whatsoever to make any. state-
ment about her intentions,

“But,” he said, reaching for a
book the size of a ledge, and
running a finger down its pages,
“there are, let me see, nine of
her horses here

“All or them were bred at the!
Sandringham Stud, There's!
Windsor Forest, Choirboy, Stream
of Light, all three-year-olds|
whom we hope will win races. |
But until we know what the
Queen intends to do I cannot
really give any idea of prospects,

“T don’t think that there are
any of really outstanding class.”

Perhaps Captain Boyd-Roch-
fort, besides being guarded, was
being unduly self-effacing, Cer-
tainly if the horses in his care
do as well for the Queen as
those he trained for King George
he will have no reason to be dis-
satisfied.

He trained more than 60
winners for the late King, includ-
ing Hypericum, the 1000 Guineas
winner, and Above Board, the
winner of the Cesarewitch, Al-
though King George’s first years







2

PRESERVE

MANNING

RET _ cctmrinmnansey pepeermnatinhes—enintinaagsaeeaes







QUALITY ’
PAINTS ©

BUILDINGS
g

& CO..

WHAT’S ON TODAY ||



FRIDAY,

MAY 16, 1952



NOEL MURLESS AND WIFE

The Queen visited them this week.

in racing involved him ipa loss |
of something like £20,000, he)
eventually made this gz and |
one season won more than £8,000)
in stakes. |
One horse of the Queenh’s Cap- |
tain Boyd-Rochfort singled out: |
this was Aureole, a two-year-old |
chesnut colt. “He is really beau-
tifully bred,” he said, “by Hy-
perion out of Angelola.” |
Earlier this year, when Captain
3oyd-Rochfort was in New|
York, he spoke of Aureole as “a}
good-looking yearling” that mighi|
do well in the 1953 Derby. |
His breeding certainly suggests
that if he does not acthally win
a Derby he could well sire a)
Derby winner when put to stud. |
|



Not since Edward VII won
with Minoru in 1909 has the
reigning monarch bred and own-
ed the Derby winner. _ Captain
Boyd-Rochfort was at Epsom at
the time, “It was a scene I shal!
never forget,” he said.

Glory Recaptured

When the colt won the crowd
surged round Edward VII cheer-
ing wildly, They then broke into}
God Save the King. }
If Aureole—or any of his pro- |
geny—should win the Derby
these wild scenes might be re-!
peated, It would be a deserved |
triumph for both Royal owner
and Royal trainer. And the race |
ing public would know that the}
glory of Edward VII's racing}
days had been recaptured. |
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED

L, E. 8.



Court of Ordinary — 11.00
a.m.

Basket Ball
7.30 p.m,

Mobile Cinema, Mt. Stand-
fast Plantation Yard, St.
James, 7.30 p.m.

“Twelfth Night” at the Brit-
ish Council, 8.15 p.m.

Secondary Girls’ Inter School

at Ken-

at Y.M.P.C.,



Sports Meeting
ton, 1.30 p.m.







CLUB
NOTICE TO MEMBERS

Members are hereby noti-
fied that the Oval will be
open for practice as from
Monday, 19th May.

J. P, PETERKIN,
Hon. Secretary.

12.5.52—2n.

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Full Text

PAGE 1

ESTABLISHED lgK Krtl >N MAY 18. 1*J PRICE. FIVE CfcSli Public Utilities Bill Blamec For Inadequate Electric Supply Chamber Of Commerce Urge Co. Directors To Act PICKETS FORM HUMAN CHAIN AT STRUCK STEEl PLANT Captain W. A. Brown. Chairman of the Board of Directors, in London of the Barbados Electric Supply Corporation told members of the Council of the Chamber of Commerce yesterday that the Company "has every intention of continuing to expand the capacity of the Power Station to as to meet the rapidly growing demand However, any major expansion depended on the success of negotiations betw een the Company and the Barbados Government regarding the removal of some undesirable features of the Public Utilities Bill which would increase the difficulties of raising money by public subscription in England. Captain Brown is accompanied on this visit to Burbudos bv Mr A W R levering. %  Inrectdr and of UM Company, for the I conducting those negotiaBooS, After he had outlined briefly the position of the Company, members of the Council emphasised some ol the major problems affecting Barbados due to the Sresent condition, and urged the ireeturs to do everything in their power to try and alleviate the rloua position. Addressm* the Council after recemng a warm welcome by Mr. G. H. King, President of the Chamber, Captain Brown in a pre. ired .. The Directors much regret the In anvenitocs suffered by the habitants of Barbadu dies which Peace Pact May Rouse Communists By mil. M UMI\| Cant. W. A. BROWM Farm Programme Not Socialistic NEW YORK. M*. 15 Th. signing of the Weil tferm... Peace Contract by the Big Three Foreign Ministers may touch off three big days for Communists Up to the present U.S. France and Britain an scheduled to i papert restoring virtual sovereignty to Weal Germanv on May 24 On May 2S. General Matthew B. Ridgway is scheduled to arrive In Paris to take over as European Supreme Commander, and on Ma* 26 Furopean Defence Communlt* Treaty is lo be signed. Colncldcntally, Important Italian local elecUord also mme on May 2b Any one of Ihf foui event*, nviiii• u> would IKUM signal loi Communist outbreaks Coming i *ecutivel> as the* do they ireau MiuaUon of i-iuntlal tvw*miie In Italy and France demonstrating to the tiom will bo dealt with by poll \i occurand handled as strictly internal ed In the electricity supply dur(matters. Prospects are excellent tii! recent years. (for a few -racked heads, but probTfce original caw of tfc*: B bly no international incidents trouble wis the refuel of the The real danger spot Is Germany IK Governmrnl during the and the core of trouble is the cit> of Berlin. There East Bet liners are being urged by Russians Into meivr demonstrations against the Western Peace Contract and three days of hysteria could result In an intornr.l incident—I*.P. ifterItut War and Immediate! • 1 llllll. ill. iv tin i Ulllpii purehaiic addlllonal Plain, unfortunately when circumstances did permit the arqul•lUon of morr Geo*rtlns *et failure of the engine* instilled In the Power Htatkin has prevented the benefit of the Increased output being fully fell. The Manufacturers of the Sets ive had representatives here for me time, who have been doing their best to put matters right, and, I have no doubt that all difficulties will shortly be overcome The Company has every Intenonlinulng to expand the aa *> meet the ._. w demand The first stage will li an addition to the existing Diesel Plant. We believe that, on our return to England, we shall be nolle complete n-rangements for th purchase and erection of a set <.f gg On page 5 Reds Lilt Road Blockade TRLMw WASHINGTON, May 15. Truman rejected as "plain hokum" charges that the democratic fjrm programme is socialistic In a speech reminiscent of his 1948 i-ampaign oratory, he struck at Mosaibacks" who oppose his [arm policies -n th-*; <•' Plo*.n. On !h o,l niKii F f. nape* four erew member* are missing Five of the Milker's 10-man crew leaped Into the 200-foot wide waterway and paddled ashore, another was res1 ued from the water. Flame.'visible for five miles engulfed UM westbound Hayci sown after tho collision with Ihe steamship Hnrhn-n Lylces ihortlj after midnight At daybreak a column of black took.' rolled lastly over the Delaware countryside from the still burning lanker. The |?0-|oot Hayes was carrying "00.000 gallons of high oclune gasoline No one tried to put tno fire out and flrcmeu were unable lo get close enough lo battle the llames as mud banks and woods border the canal. The crash occurred near Summit Bridge, Delaware about 20 miles south of Wilmington and halfway across Ihe IS-mllc canal which connects the Delaware River with upper Chesapeake Bay. The captain of the 270-foot tanker and one of those saved said that his vessel was struck on the side by the Barbara Lyfcei.—CP> SMguwlai eu Sunday-T*. fascinating story of tea aU noose which bcun* use prla cipal aom of Our Royal 1 *ai ily and the setting for see of the mo-t brlUiant and -ist Momentom aesnas u oi misu-ry aa tout by Msrgu.rtW Peacock. Bask jour eseof Sunday's Ad v or at* HOW llOl.HNO HANDS. | sioup of pi. Hi '• I I lnd The) were stand np l>v i 'Q0ientkingi>art in the rnysWgs. i aw at tint i M %  t '.'!' %  I'reBldanl ThlUp Murray Butler Outlines UK Crisis MINERS DEMAND WAGE INCREASES ii CiONGREii* ASKS FOR INQUIRE WASHINGTON l,i> Angry Congiet-MiieV' ai %  i lemanding immetli ti |nvitig.. Uona of the Koje I.n | munist war prison earn, lent. The lawmsl ri >ant aboul ih> wrhoU am *ant to k'nift how !1MK i Fran. r DIKUI eould five Ir I liinsclf lie cnplufjOd bv t' 1 idTlov liilfc '"ii t'ormi av< sign the armec .ee lo look into the incidVnt He tnd "they don't need | Hrig 'Jeneral in charge of th What they oug rine ttx< sergeant* He ac' led Dodd of "outrages*! n exposing hhnat I U plure by ihf iirisoner* Fa mum For Finland Fund Doaatlon(or taa fund te defray th* eapeusss af KM r*rnun to the Olympic fsaMS •a Hskdakl oast July are ae%  uftl at the Boyal Bank of Cauada, %  arclay'a Bank, and the ofBco of the AdsocatsThe I'aiiiuui far rtnlsad .'ompatitlon <*M pags 3) elesas 'oday at 4 p.m Bnsr thi %  <'.< i.'i ...e Norih ADaiitlc Treotj Or. Represcjil.i:iM\V StSrlln| Lois gani/aiion, said to-day that If the id he srould ;.^K Chsfrrnaa Carl wsl ran i-arry out Ils defence inson of the c next "iwo or three! ommlttee to have that pdep myear.' withoul war, dsnge, point '; %  '"> no *' h") ihproduct.on told a lunch-. J ?r_"'"'.V^11 Comet with Britain May Lose Jot RaceTolJeS. R% ROBERT JACKSON U'NtXiN M... I UrSiun may IOMto the United SUlss the headatarl lUier travel she dtas gamed with )St fabulous I nilit,n> dnnaml. are Mpfa that Ini timing out only one Comet per month rlnsh 0\-eiit'.i Airways 'itrcorathm now haa ml\ foul Comets f. n rne Souls Afri run ..liioh il triangulated laai eek-the ilrvt commercial let hrtea In history and Atra ifl vi'. tiauie aftalr. Cole is a w" 1 l* l>a**ed. Is may inembei ol the coaunlttee lea%  csswn i in rditora attend. %  IS HryublK.ni Ic-dn styles ''•' ln ^'* l Keneral assembly of ilridges, said he would ii.ttoduce ,n,> 'tdernalton.il Press Instltut__ thai goals adopted by NATO. were "bore minimum lolution ludsy. iUgolion by Ihe Senate prsparedneks subcomnutte Bridges Umay said many tikends ask^uMtl butn CliK>n .na %  Va ml „ h.^* ln B v.ll( UM d4ivlupmay' ana saio *A(*gross i, u ,i(t U p i-onUmia and *h. tarhod off by thr here were not surflgle ; n general Marti W OVkt Fur East Commander. reyudlaU'd the eoncessdona. Stale Department ojs the lerms which the Bed prisoners laid down for Dodd's releaso .ere so loaded with propaganda linkthat there was no reason for the United State* 'o take then literally. Military leaders ad hinted previously Ih light repudiate the pronib'^ vbieh prisoners won by "btock%  nail" from C1M>II who ooneaiev a %  gotiations for Dodd'i rMssse and some sclf-san Iflea k'" thfl next iwo or three years out collision, the day will When our energies wdl 00 lonBB ntraled "u eafaoce bin those other fields of common enWevotaT which can bring hnppipro peritf to peoples f • ihi NmSy replied to last nuerrv —|t.lutnctsMsy gientnrang*iha. can be put on the meat lucrative Ol airline unites the Nurth AlUBBU Hun That plane will lU from Ixmdon to New York in i Intl.ovat M" hours. Hut the .ii.-L.ii lodustn bouteneck b.n f-e ableto'sta^ 'he Alluntfc run for npproxlnt %  •tel| tw Ilritlsh .w.ii.. r. %  ir.S alrllnas shaken by the threat the Comet poses on ,..ii' ervkei "Ml am pressure lhal tlu-v will gi>t i. — I'tided Stales jet uirliner into 1,n (service before B.O.AC bSJ east .ufllcient Comets to grab North nprcmiu v -v.r. IVBI th-II bulanl amp itti ieneial Chai \< %  Col %  ". ma Oensral Mari .•'inereasf< %  ige im.re.iMi.„ 700.000 miner* HI nation.iii/. i ooal nine \] |H i-vei ector ol di I I' He said he i-. SJ<'.)<• ""'lers budgei has brought Up toes, Three railroad unset k .l-MMIld.U ., ten i'sskl th.it Colson es,nh %  %  %  -i, ( _, %  aeeuUvf and onunsnted on th' •nemoon-. Corniminhrta Bdf-Genera I Itei Dodd Boaitnei f 11 under wh. for the relaaar of BVaneU r Dodd i i imci trontlfne CoinHeartTalks On \ ii-iimnf I'MtlS, May li .liin l.Itniio..., Miiiistci He i 9 pnt Oensral in IiKlo-Chlna said :he OS. v.-t tall "ii the nam Iiavi receive) an .i.viiaiion Btete Depaitmeiil in Le Touniau UA>\ men a* he stepped down 'he plane thai brounht him by ihe WasMngla Eisenhower Lunches With Queen 1 si TV Crook IX)NDON. May 15. The first crook to be trapped by television In Britain has been' arrested and Jailed because h< appeared on the show speaking with Uie wrong accant. Twenty-two year-old Colin Ordunrtwater said he was a I '*rniCrnan" underwater salvage I weenr—fnrni the Orkney Islands off Scotland during an Intarvlew | on the "What's My IJne" Tv show about unusual occupations. Bui Bank Manager Alexander. Doarle who was watching terethat night wondered why Oroundwater did not have an Orkney accent He remembered' that some bad cheques showed up et *us bank with Gr-iudwater's name on them. Dowie called police and told them his •tory Yesterday Oroundwater was entenced "to IS months' tmprlsJ onment after >e pleaded guilty to obUlning u U.27S car with 150 WORKERS FOR U.S worthless cheque* II.M THE QI'ERN LONDON. i.rn.i.i Uaenhawer swt hb> wife lunched prlvatel> at Buckingham Halace wlib Queen Uisabeth II and the Duke of i .iiiilmn.h aa Uni ii'iin 11 said goodbye to I."' %  %  don again for the aeesoJ mi. In seven years. The General and wife swept paat the fate ef the Palace al 1C.M p.m. aa s crowd of SSe •alesher* waved and tw* gMsrdssnen In brilliant scarlet tunics snd bearskin helmets save s araP sslate. It si* the bealnnlni of i bu^ two dayi fee the Klsenhowrni in a city that trail llkrhim Holm back to KM days when he led the uv vsalon of fcsrope and wsn a inmulUiUs hero'* welrame after V -E. Day The Elsenhower* MM in-, rrrelved at the Pslsre b> the Queen Mother. BBBsV belli, widow of thr Ui. Pins who became rloe and if> formal frlrnd* of the Qaa eral durtni the w.r. Th-r •hry lunched In a MSBl roam at the IMUce Milt unl Elisabeth and Philip pre<'i't 1.4l<-1 this ill. 'I-..Ihr* were to be received b> thr K I ..-..I "Id On"., Mae at Marlboroticn House. i til. evening Prtmf Mlnliler Winston ChurrhUI and Mrs. Churchill will entertain I ... %  nho wet at N. 10 llnv. n m Street al a banquet to be attended bv the Lip 'iivern n,-nt and military liRurts af Britain. After driving to Ibe Palais Ihe great wraacht iron fates of Wellington Arch at llde Part esioer were swung seen fee
ncrs an* still making verbal nd written demands. He said ••ii chief ch'iaand Ifoi Ihe light i urgani/e an Assoclatli i Him to in |i'i t thr corn] ' I. to H'lui DotW'i l< %  imt v.hud wa Invalidated hen Clark made repudiation oi ., .1.,! — IMP, (.endarnrs's Arrtsl Naliiiidi-I Ltiudrr I'AIUS, May IO The French Police said that Algerian Nationalist leaeV H irreatad after yeatarday' luting at Orleunsvllli Algeria SOWB to Purls and nnnnliately shlpj)ed l> an un I In Western I i U Iladj. Leader ol the aotlFrench ''Movement for the Tri Unph of IJeniocraJii U vas seised at OriSBBSVitk -..si of Algiers aftei nil follow. iiid police clashed dsfl nti-French dSaBSSssI PoUea said three Aral %  %  %  kill.. i Dd a lurae .umber injured. Four policemen lull I'olin.tin lii.it lladj had fell banned] from the Orai "'partment bordering Tunisia rot iili-French speeches In the Vtimty of this turbulent area. He ill not be allowed In leave the 'epartment of his new eCsforetd dence.—P P. tRATHWAITF. ACTINCl CHURCHWARDEN \t i nergenu tneeUng yse.day. ihe St. Michael Vestry mted their Churchwarden, '! .II v C Gale, laatra of absenct %  i montti The Vestry Ihej Mr. i inf.!].Bnthvrani S I < ill.iMll.il iiui.hwai.leti UttU) HOD V C Dale i leads to resume hlf duties. i ting with rtuth-i i hnnceUor'r )"*> io talk, lie >, .* 100 -nuch alrejHv %  The Treaaury bulletin fui the industx) publishi i rned that higher labour will wnri i lime when Bril utcresaa her anBepk in4 death —|.*.P Prison/em Um& for 'HlkpertmmW: Communists Say %  -; % %  ..!'. l'.\NMi:\JOM truce espeaimeiitH afiri grii immediately rut-, pious" lime sun, %  eats al Ih M UsU^_ -. %  calU-d th I cnarge (ui %  jlks hero, and Vne Admiral UI in i Jo.. siuiitr .ilii, ile, promptly denied it I'll.. I l.„ %  lint of "erlmlnal acti iitted by North Korean General %  m 11 It vlrtualU r'14'.i %  i '•txiiiifi mcludul .,. (Hit.lined for Irelease of Brig I i'.i l Dodd. fotmer Ku|o Istand pi-hum camp eonunander, -. i aplured and hi days. This suppoi' d.itpment by (leneral Mm. L'Uik Supreme llniud Nations Cmnmaruler that UM Dodd Incident was intended by Reds tv loanufBcture propaganda". —U.P. 4 IS' 1) I 1 HO T F.CTION Strikers* Canes Won'/ Be Ground Oen. ElMEMIOHIK — v.r. JAMAICA. TAKES IN NEw YORK i FrSTiOvr Own Co rrp on Si t • LONDON. May. 19. While the American oil strike ron'inues B.O.A.C*s once areeklj rlireet London—Jamslca service will be rerouted lo take in NewYork. This will mean Jr additional three or four hours to normal flying time A B.OA.C. spokeM: loday that the first flight on the new route would be on Monnay Tm? service will rev.: mal when the strike finishes. GRENADA Hay 16. Three bund > it Kid local appll-, contt for U S jobs selected from sag ItBw "•• presented to tecrulling efftciall expected thlv i ieafc end for the Anal pick In S nuota of 190. ATOM SUB BY 1954? WASHINGTON. May 19. The navy said today the keel of the Nautilus the first atom powered submarine will be laid In Xun> Th" keel lay' 'mnecti. it Tin ".'... declined informal]"! t It said in the past however thst It expect to launch the .Vsutilu In — v.r. Oil Men Will Go Back WASHINGTON UKiH government officials who asked not to be namcf, Canadian $ Ihtwn The Cc NEW YORK. May IB dollai predicted that most of the 90,000 strikii I r| \'&<* a c m .' -ill be back on 'he fOb "within the next 4K houis They ^£ 2 ?J n £| n, il J n ^ t a cent at 12.80 /!. In Monlr.al i h. Un N-d States dollar closed Wednesday at a discount of 1.13 32 per cent In terms of Csnadian funds unchanged from Tuesday's low. That U 't took MBS IB'J2 (Canadian) to buy |1 (American i GRENADA, MB] Twelve and a half ane* were destrnyed b] I Monday night at CfAlVtsB %  lonamg lo the Grenada sugar .iictory where warker. ur.itrike since March 27 protesting; 'he employment of an oversea on 'he around that he is not a Diem* -r .f Oka M.M.W.U The Hr^


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I'KIDW. MAY It. 1SS2 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACK SI VI.N HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... BY ALAN STRANKS ft GEORGE DAVIES RLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS *£t BOKKISf <• %  \? BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS TH New axx we HHHJ WeTEROCi' a? EVOBNTLV NC F Aft : ,-v,; ... ; v : M STARVING ?-IP LKE SCME BI7BAKBWT' LOCK' AT THE TIME 0"E MUgT HE OVEOSLEPT'I I THINK 1 IU. G*VE r*S A j |> ;, •. %  MWI tour AW BWfcAKPAST MB. JeMtV OQAM -'<' .WTH >QJJR CWVN %  IU. 6f T MUfe" LAIBH/ ••:• tipI RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND We never let go! Vigilance over the high quality of "Black & While" is never relaxed. Blended in the special Black & White way this truly outstanding Scotch is in a class all its own. BLACK&WHITE SCOTCH WHISKY Ohe Secret ii in the Bltttttina (AMES BUCHANAN ft CO. LTD.. GLASGOW. SCOTLAND IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers lo all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only M'M I .VI. Ol I IKS iir. iin ,,, ...l.il.l. ..< our Id -am Ins I \>< ilsi.l. S|i< iylilsl.m ii mid Snail Nlri<-< Usually Now ONIONS— 2-lb. BOTTLES GRAPE JUICE TINS GRAPES Usually Now 4H :ic 07 62 :w :io PKa8 WEETA1IIX .. .. .'10 27 PK.OS, JKLLO PUDDINGS .. 23 20 BOTTLES CAH1B BEER 24 20 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street I HE I O I \ \ A D E I. IMM I II I I S LET HIM HAVE 11 IH. i: >l Ii !\ I .> mini II\>III io\ of Barbados. limi; Inbelieves thai justice la with the Malm and the sword, or CVuether the reader believei in Paul Befon • In retributhal between them imargin (or error, Bruce Hamilton bare preaenta with drama, vision, and a power that doei not seek to persuade, • oasa tor ever; reader to answer. This is a murder star) with o difference the accused is u IBgh Court Judge, ft i iiseat on the Bench he la brought lo stand in tindock and anawer for a crime which be had ever) reason i 1 it. Ben Is a range of livelj and candid characters %  Ari Turvey, the *l 1 countryman with Iiis small cunning • %  • i> %  l bis taste tor scandal; the turyman who dabbled In psycholog) ; Teal, the stranger i ame from Buffalo i" spring a trap in the Norfolk marshes; Wtuoughby, the nonentitj who was aocused of murder, and Sir ftancis Brittlan who paid the penalty. The book aulminatei in a trial In which the case against the accused raereilaaalj advancea, Cad by tact, towards Ins Indiotniciii and sentence. There follows a lurprise development and % %  i wry, nrpectad ending, Bruce Bamilton la %  writer with u brisk and simple style, liuii'iiiir, and a real lui not htboured Bympatby. O.V SALE AT ADVOCATE SIVIIOMJ.V l-'or tofff* #"*• tli.viiitf BRIDAL ICING -SUGAR (Plain) BRIDAL ICING SUGAR (Flavour! IJ in lib pkfis. GROUND ALMOND PASTE COMP. BANQUET CASTOR SUGAR In Is M'11 III.!! Tins of JACOB CREAM CRACKERS la :: at $1.50 l''ur lofir #/!/ iiifnl Tins Sun I'.il SA1 Til) PEANUTS lin I'll SALTED CASHEW NUTS sin. Pal SALTED ALMONDS %  MANGO i III TNEY „ Crowe ABUK I WGO CHUTNEY .. Ci, ....., %  AIlk-irk well's COCKTAIL i INIONS .. ApM PEANUT BUTTER Applaford'i CIDER VINEGAR %  swell TAKQAOOM VINEGAR REAM POWDER ., APPLE SAI CE .n Hl'l ami Vt KRAFT ICE CRI VI MIX 4 oz. and 12 "f tins I IPTON'S FRENCH COFFEE \l 111M ARTHUR & (II.. I id. IUI ll'.IIUrivllS—llillli Slrrt-t



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I-AGI. TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE 'WHAT. MAT It. I Ml gahih Calling Children Etiquette H nagnig OAUI %  4a\ tot wee* 'm trip to Canada. I Mum l> Barbados on Monday Dunnf hi JP wll art a* Ckw CcckUJ Party M il G H AXMMfl, CMC MCI' btafl pan/ %  a*s "**" w Co*", Spoonen Hill yeateidej IVI-IHIH; i' link M"„,.. J Ml ( Director* MfM H c\ II v i i Kt I'BI MI i,d t,.i i ru i w\ i \ %  ..I III-.IL V\. Ml.. .I' 1 ng ,.t u tin rould ii' %  Ttd.y Mil ban ..Ho i.l. %  III t Will l~ i... n hald MI rrimrlad Sper.l Twi' We--ka ll itii Kl.\M> ohi %  %  n1 II.. M turn*. i i | .ifit-t ap—idlO| %  %  %  wh* ii ii. iu propel With T.L.L. M M AND MIIS HAItull IIASKFI.I. and ihn thiMten wen.iinvih morning by II W.I.A trim M a loll l \i, i' %  rottrod rlMdmaJM %  I Mi 11 -I Potpt-a-J'.errw I—ling M l a w %  i by 11 w i A II. 1 him a week aao '< %  hbtldaj stayina; at II'. kl-v Beach Club Spent a WrrU A FTER apamdlng %  ,.,.,k li .h. n it.i, .M.I,. an I lhan ihr .Int. I., tall wind* travelling about H 01 raltl In MonBprln| had hewn very : ,t, i he) also baa %  tremeevdous ii ml ol anon during the winiei hlcll took kMI feO mrtl •> %  Ihcy •t it until *i—ii II i. II.ol \prt1 11 %  • h %  % %  atom IhO trio I' F M i initial Hist vlail lo ; : %  %  .. ..I f,.| Ml EB>) ...,• oil ilad la i aroathtl ami sen VrnaruaUnt MONO Uw ".>"' %  rfivali lo /\ lha i nlonj from Vbaeauoli ha ( holiday wan Mi ted M I I two children "".I ,, u Kl jpd hen low ,r *'*' ta thry air apemtln* ai wests •' Ihr *valr. I'luh Buiinesi and Pieaaur.M R \\p MM M t; I aM ol MM *h. havr toon In Mini, Mport Id ramaln rw an a* rtaying t Bc wvn Ouoal Hcaaw, HaoUnaji who aponl a monla In Tltithlad btton lhat hi v noaa iwuplr.l with plrMUir Itr .,( M K lam. M.nmf* t and F\re An ul Comptroller of Cuttoont I N Barbadoa Uv a U %  %  W !'. at Backti St. Vii.cent n s; n %  M ufmw MRS MANMNC of St Vtncont. nrtumrvl hoa day aftrrtirtwi !•> Hi. .ui m %  uoon into It 3 Wh.it | ib* iMint udnui AM A. To lahr in... ful i; H. To i II nolhlng, It i ut whiir chawing, t: And not lo %  maar Ha faro with food 4 RM a^dUl tmia. a BIBM OI UM • -titu Until ilti.iiiilR ... | lid undi i When iwuld uai I %  I ignl lo mi* oi a laa> %  A'ton II ran • %  at wuhoui aarlna lip*, an i' (raaar "n Mf, Of e-l without nuking -ny unn*-?4 v,ar> Bjoan, 8 Should ;• child to coiTrcUMl before vlnllora? Am It i* wtio not lo correct i ii i.iKKiog In the "I •irjoger* inifiu a I0M 1-CllBVIOUI arforo 'i %  I the nurai M rommltUitf any < l(lu^le^•• tn. v. To Had him back i ihr act occur* %  %  dimple but an effective . m. I Wtu l (nrii i %  %  ... ,,.,,. KM tuada) dlnnor* ini.i to .it 111. III! | kould -i • luici I-l rork, %  knife, and Ait* When h |, old OROtlffl 10 bold IIMII, with %  tnl.i i %  lo uae MALONE, Q.C. GRENADA. May 15 H. M th*. Queen haa b an pleaaed lo appoint Sir Clan, -nt Malonc. retired Chief Justice of, in*Windwarda and Leeward 1 one I of tor coon-rl for the Windwarda. it WII announced here CONQUER PAIN SCIENTIFICALLY SMfiS?, Rupert and the Toy Scout25 Arnvng %j iK tv Rnrn tad*, thai ami %  %  pouter,. %  N* ihn y*u rt tor* HI uu. it i*1 hang tit oaf %  1 '. %  _,_ dutnaln la it aavn olially Oclois nunibtti, it, %  > rinitii) In mr*r r I ten follow* 13 ... lolot D( tiaid catiU-a t in mtowa included trirm 7 131 r.ltn. 14) .u QfU iv i|,<. II Whi. niniimfiil.. 14) I'i in nrMalnp. H> d cenUra toiera. (0> ,',r i, t *l I Ii ororldaa i ion o( the n > atari of 3A a .v. !• lunar 11 llpa( lit II. fa, AftfNMt • bun mi i* Toe Hiiro ami Um I oat call. (4, J* f^oniainar ol Uia military rollnil-aluch T |4) AtUir, <•) W Down. I IMB g. What a fabuiou* dog got. (II .1 Puiluwa vimt arfirtm. <4I I He l Acroaa %  Torn lUt (4i a Weird. IBI 1 Wtioaa ta the %  <• you nit I4I n Hndarn iradtng ctrotra lo an •' J2 anil -M 31 ACIOM. B.C. --akicrnaiKci IUb3. |. 3 4. 4| lmliap.-Wt U> a#*rltr. Ill Sucli lt*ara .IK never ahed. let H fft E _^"* l l r f *'"* >* %  .....,-. alha (lawt. Ill BAG Radio IVograiiiinr I aaiaiiaaatfMiMMat tuiiui* arjaa.: HA^IMTI. ( i4ll 'i ti-a 11. Ouil. I l01-j. J* I'n.nr, I', 1,1. |H • ll* J. iSioan. it* urn 34 Craditad> Wdm: in Otll ! %  % %  1 pjlaaull: v.' .'.;,. %  ;,• .,;: %  • I H**.I ll Hidar. IB Ham 4 U4; i faw t B a MOJaT J ia*t aai. %  •f^anacarjn. Caaouto, A*arloaacrlk Acta aad QaJtNlrM. Taaea faor KMnuncailr aalaacad. -o#* tyna n Matall ; l hat b why taaw nOawo pain teat, restore your aanea ol ali-6etc I [-aNACfaf? ** • %  *"> *f asabaaWbl 0>v liJOOeoaaciaad daaua u ii-SiiV bt Great OrttalB akme aaa H at lMr sargarkBi I rwsjr*, OBMB, haiatodaaa, tga^ l aa ab *, mwmawm. naorsigiB—thfc won4era*l t arlaaj yea uaaiJnfly Quick relief from all of then I InNaCiW <- 'h^ Toe eaa be, it L2 -Z/e two^aWet — % %  losas •nougri to bring quick rallef from %  bout of BBIB. Or In handy iO-u: • %  Or In S0-ua ', j wjad >,,^, „„ „„. S !" ,.„ u ool M win i. i ;„ „i ",,,'" ^ %  "'" '"•" ""' K '" aaaaatm *o ilr. nuM V,,i. .,, „ ,,,„„„. J. l.<-lm !" i Is Uu. I.ilrrn.1 me th.l oy Intrrmil (aclon, ovor-orowuily'u..,.,, ,..,.,.„. ','.',"' '""'"'* """! lll '"l "'"' •uoullo. It co.^n. oc loo maurnt 1....... ilTh„ ,'" t;";;,:,;"',",'." i %  "* —*• <^ •'-" %  %  ?•"•-"• ..rrurly .u-alahl i..„, ,„ ,. „,. ,„„ .,. l „|„ l „ ,.„„„ 1>od .„„. .. %  in p..I .t.„i...:> ...i ,.... .< %  L. .. ..._. ..ii i..it rot. ,.„, ,i„ „ ,„,, %  hclthy hair. You rai %  a ,n timi.ull ... i ..,ii|.ll,olr,l, -li.iii,|., will mahc ll f.H'l Mlk ; ;' i inov. II. aalp anal) ln<* look i ihi.-r. .....i -t.. } ... ,.i.,..r.o !." v ""''• "'"' "" '' %  "'' f "" l "'' r Ol courw. 111. oltort Is thriniisi ..i wi',',',1 v,,,"i„.,!."v ,'." n ""'"" l am pora j r, but u i< ood ". S.|,„,,I:.I„„ I, ,,,,„. T,. hair 1 '1 k dank KK "''• '"' ",-" """' ""I '" "•! *<• % %  '"! .' you have regular ', £?S?S : ;~ r .^-.Sir. '"' '""' K ~" '"" %  %  "! %  • "• """I Baby-nnr hair I. nulaanc II Up ovrry oil,-, „art „r lhc •'""'•""• '-'"I'"><• !" '> b. you have Ihls problem, you nord ...i. I„.l. i. .7, I ''"'"' l,v "'"O.i.ah hru-hhij rogu.... oxpen cut a.ul a stillthat iv%  '.."M, Y„ ,.k ' !• l-l !" n,,^ qulr.-, oo „!„.. Have your hoi I,„ ,„„„, I,,,' I',', "V 1 '"' 'T"";' "SfSfc, " l un 1 rriuUrly; n ood Mt doaa nnl ...Iv lha ,....,.1.,,,. ,„ iu.,i,ci,t „• soon OS It becomes . ...I I..in,en limp. The timing* nod JuclnriMi-nt ntlaaptlc li.tli>ri one Mica lx-. aj tost curls man he just riahl • %  I' I' 'I' %  '. '.IT i I i ,i.u, Mn-ie vei, hill,. n;ii,:n %  111M..111 and becomes greusy iimi iH-twcen fu/r. nod no wmra ..t .11 ~. ,...-.>. ,,„ S...MI..I ,1111V 11,,, ,1... „ n _. ," •" %  "' *<"' "Id 1V -....hlngm i.rliL. '\ """7. .*'-*• -mUatpUc lotion ii.ui i itnd lifeless, or wh.-,. R tim, atiuiidnKly, il„ v„„ w,,inl.-, wh.i has hnpitennl Wlml rauses (omilifollhy hair to act this way? Iltoadly aitonklng, it la because tha iioiirlahmeiit It -Hc-a hi •iiuitiil' h quality 01 .|u..nt, A ppOr ilul. I.i'l.lin; In II |s> 1 I % %  %  th.it in,ihr Im iiiiixlniiiii. IIIMIHI. l|owt> nlaricB iho hah An iiin. avan -. i.mr om maj %  h.< f.,1 1 An i.perlitloii. plfgiiiuny. tin v,-.. overwork any Int.-nvmental or physical strain or shock will inkit.i mn These elTnU tlo not I....ImMiedlately often not until -nutths Inter and It takes mi even longei I HI, f.. ( tln> hnlr lo recovrr II.,.. formi slowly. OhperlaU) ii-i.l, r uu %  ible coniflUorsl And ir tha cells are aturvetl. u,.tblllcll in ply closet shop and ceases to produco What cn you do to keer | hair healthy? And If it nhould |OM Ml vigor, whol can y,,u do 10 ical.iio it h..|. ..11 1 II in the bgat M in ir ihapo phyali illy, The hair Ii "o sensitive to any lltOI nation to the blood Rupply that MMoetrmeH llw Hm| notlcw you have of n ninilown coiiilltlon Is U rhnnae In your hair U ..it Ii Your lleiilth Makf n htil.lt .if 1. w.|l-t..il.ni... 91 | A •• H | I Dtamontli %  %  %  : i %  D:amona* rsi-m; ehj %  hi ling %  "I I AltvH KJ.il || ; K i n i n oi i. %  %  %  %  .i verv d ffrreni West ,. %  N %  •rd and HOm: Loil conliol Norn Tli'ii 1 ' idi and %  i i • •>.. i.tiaaclt lf| i. %  .1 %  i %  %  %  •..? lib r rjciorr lhc a i i %  lllCIS BO* IIO IBM llSlf Ini Mating UKIHI mi %  %  . i ... %  v-iiii.xim' thai ts>' ,iu.i We % %  i %  • m.ghi wrll no n I, Mndci IK T*o and Ttitrr' in %  a i %  %  k.-xi rtvi i '.ml i. ilnMM n %  Nniili in | I II ihr or %  I. wam *.gut rr ol a Tir-*,,. i„ mil B. unfair -train on lm M V\r veil thr le^t of rveryUiInc and rerommrnd Clta.ll MOTOR OILH — for — llliai CLAM l.t'BRICATTONS. ivrnAr loiMim LTIK ...olmr -,-t.hr sullen Trafalgar Streel %  T MUJBOIIB • 4.1 a s is a.aa. THE BLUE LAMP %  - WARNKR aU'i lH It TO m hi KIUN4.TOIS r KaaB OTA U BLAXK EAGLE William Bun-op a DESERT VIGILANTE Ci.a,l SUnall SOUTH OF DEATH VALLEy JtH-ENCGADES OF THE SAGE HARBARECS (DIAL SIM) it AY - S, SWpi LAS VLGAS STOR Y %  T -H-rlal I Ml I RAIDERS OF OlHTlN iKta.1 ate.) rooAT a TOMoaaowi t-U A I xi ;, ,SWOBD IN XBK i'i-ii Oana ANDREWS OAL WHO TOOK TUB m.i %  D CAhXo TOMAHAWK CREEKllrnU'Ati"' IIIN a* -HEN o( Ik* itMlil, FORT SAVAGE RAIDERS Eirol n,YNN u. DODGE CITY Anne 8HEMIDA.V 1.1 OBI IOU11 ' •>.!•, (Last Shows) ll pm •oaifl Aad Dvr IS ,rt.,.1 %  tal 130 V" Wotki "tajtoaV SIS i m From Tvr liitt. itW ,. m liB lp V > m T. Nea. la i IB 11 p m TtW DBMBW Canluiui l-rom Uw Thin* Opeiitni Its.naeerreaaa 5.00 fit 8.30 p.m. ot Continuing <$" H,Tgd 20 > — omen on in advenUtf •fl^^JHfc^ hal %  *! ibn Many womao ana %  utnVrt at buif tock. Often tin* kiunrya anj lit hiams, fur y,ir klihwyil iig Wllh lha livsr, nittat filler .nt n u IHiriiMW from lha hltHiUlrram Snlf youffTltir.'.! SO W oad.bsaaV arhy wtih lha nagging pa in of aw aching tack look In Nirt v..,ir kidneys and Hear. That's why t'snadiana have twit rrlvuia ,.n lit. ITiaar'a Kiditrv User I'ill* fur o* hall a i.i.ii.it Oivsi your a>slero a chanoa lo work pwSBOrla ^ '!, a llf. ('(„ •TS2 Dr. Chase's KIDNEY-LIVER PILL 1 I >ll>llll Oil MN(! TO-IIAV, 2.30 and 11 and Conllnulnc lUlly, 4.45 and 8.30 <*"' %  w ^t %  eomoN Hew EaMTf* %  !' llo Kni|.r .•*.[ kUd-nilr tlrnr Airlr.f Indian 1 -t.llar, and Wamfr BaiUr l rlaaa tt i..,.,11OI.VrlPH %  > M Haa. 4.SS 4 1,11 aoni>aos-ii ariN NB iii.iir THB ii nui HTIPS ore 1 N Sat.. Mld-nllc 1 -T ..;.( %  Stipae Thrill* *uprr Action Sara III d iBBvr Maa A Whale a*ru! "at. HIS-nlU n,„ Aniicryrr A CIMTD. IIIHI .um. mi i iBi i'APTIVB WILD IHIVAI. > i i ist. starrANT • I ACCUSE MT PARENTS -rmv AWO OIT MI THE STRIP ft.;; w DSHONE saaaics urns llllll OtMIIISI IINIS cuit ttl BB3-.-N • LOUIS IIMSIIOHC " WESTWARD THE WOMEN EUrnaj ROHRRT nPVlSP TAYLORDARCEL .... HOPE EMERSON JOHN MclSTIRE v,.,. n.,.. riHRI.KS Sf H,SEE i.......i • Pit**,*,, muiM A. VBJJUII DUKE nun ^•'•' %  %  %  %  %  '•' %  '•'•'•' %  '•'•'•'••••'•'s.w-'Stvsss.vssssssssssssrs. %  HE HAD IVCBYTHINO V9U COULB SIVI A WOMAN TO TORMENT (•TaaR MAN! t-aaj.. GENTLEMEN HERE'S NEWS FOR YOU!! \IIM-: SELEcrrox LVM II BAGS la allCalaan Mll0 Milll'l-INIi IIAt.s wllh Zlpp Faatancra $4.7,, $5M| M „ WIIITI: HANDBAGa I,.I,M style, KM ,„ „ is T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606 DOUCUt UIMANKI ^ OANm M AMOIt ... BETH3 DAMS (iTOERRIIl HMLYN Cspntli-mcn friends. Customers and the male secii ol the general public:— .cktiowlcliip with thanks your several hints > addressed to us, suggesting that we give the only a monopoly of attention for Bargains etc., %  trough the medium of our Sales, Parades and quite t-. %  utl> our Annual Exhibitions of Dress Materials." A. t.,k, tins npptirlunity to assure you that you are nevt 1 forgOttM) by us. When we appeal lo the Ladies, IHIVO 11 mind that in their capacity as housewives, ;* ,u '' "friends* etc., etc.. they shop for the j III 1 and*, SwteuSVairts, Ilm-friends. etc., and all mem.; *ri of ihe iMHisehold., iTM-tiuing that the t(entlemen J. tjoiieorned shop by proxy, 1 Bill now ,. 1 .ire launching a special Parade for GenI Ihlngg of special interest lo Men with the *; "" intt ntion ol interesting all Males who prefer or I *'' %  p nil do not afford them to shop by proxy. \ t particulars In connection with this Gen1 which will last for one week, starting 1 May. will be mmiHincrd latet. S'i. i;ontl..inrn. tune your ears for the Bu.de Call. l.liaSD WlBfSIIL DHBLL IO-NORROTT "PIN l*P GIRL" Belly Grable; Martha Raye; Charlie Spavik Orchestra. and "DAISY KESYON" Joan Crawford; Dana Andrews and Henry Fonda. • J (mi announces Uic resumption of "LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE" (Shortly) AUDITION SI'NDAV, I8TH at 9.30 A.M. EXTRA MKIKT. NOKMX MIIISI MMI t ; MC.HI DREAM. Paramoanl BrilWi News Reel. N.B. WIISOVAIi, 11.. Ibaaaiat P aa to lor GmiLmni oi IMaSaattta. U, SWAN ST DIAL MTI. ','.V,V,VAV,M POLICE SPORTS KENSINGTON OVAL &f MAY 22nd. 3 p.m. Admission: ADULTS — 36c CHILDREN 18c. HIDE A HOPPER BICYCLE 'a THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. Whit. Park Road. SI. Michael Office: 432S Workshop : 4S4f Merchandise: 4S28 .. 4150



PAGE 1

PAGE EIGI11 BARBADOS ADVOCATE l-RIDAV. MAY 16. 1052 Carl ton Defeat Empire 2—0 Carltoi, mpir< twonil in their semi-tin ul replay (or the KIMK k Out at K \ Mlbkf,, when these teams mat on the ftW occasion tho match was drawn two all. TinCarHoA goaji wan cored 03 Bo< [lot William*, their inafdt V %  ard took Ihe touch r.ff while the northern to attack. %  Cai ItOfl rrntriforward, misled ,.n oppm I nold Hutchinsoii, left aruafar, ran Own UM "inii .Hiii centred. unmarked, but look a not whl*! 'he ught Ktirkie" Lucai. Cmitt-ii train out %  t the goal Inutoa latci DouulaTHE QUEEN'S HORSES The World's Cl—fall SKIN OINTMENT UATKK I'llIII: Snappers, H.C. Win Water Polo Games ' % %  Is outplay.— ii rilh .11 HI ix-feated Hi. : "LA "5* %  1 4— 2 win OW arban Uw first two A watt season were played at UM Club yes.terd.iy evening;, snapper,-; displayed much skill %  %  opponents, coml>i:.< 1 very fit %  ) arfully. on U r ... muddled and through ttK %  player* to receive i>;m*ei FT B1 I %  back arm U eolm Browne f/bo \l swift ,1. hoi "huh wai wen outside the iht upiight. Carlton were awardd a free kick from lust outside no goal area. No scoring resulted. Uw right wing lor EmI beautiful shot from he wing. The ball went only n >'w yards wide of the crossbar. Carlton got another Uram ;i few feet outside the goal On thin occasion goalie ided the bull I-.i M kick but tln> ball went wide %  Is there a Derby winner among them? Wellperhaps m 7953 THIS week came news which has beet eagerly awaited by British racegoer The Queen, with the Queen Mother, apen* four hours In a tiny Tillage five hundn rat t up on the Wiltshire Downs It* n inn 1; 1 kh.impton. The Queen araa visiting IIv of her horses trained by Mr Noel Murlos She liad lunch and Ua thenand wj-chro >j DOnaj RaJluped. There ban been no announ pmeni ret al U wuwn.In 1 en:loco aoou-. r m* II.season. It g rspcctrd Uiac wlien Cour: mouin w. rnd' on May 3' ier horses—h B hu i -: %  •" • I*rui "<>•*" ">naniKiid 11 ul NortolR. TO-daj.at % % %  i .(.mem is eniered for ih. i BjuM <>r the miKr of Norfolk i I .• I % %  Cho Bo) Next scvuon H | thoUBhl i hi w.li r. %  undar the famous Royal colour-putpic. ararlr .mo: gold." first adopted bv Kiny Rdwnrd VII But her visit to Oorkhampio i tun betaken a> inaVaung Uiat she fully intend to tonttnue he' enthusiastic interest in Uibrecdini and raclri* of horses ned the first goa %  ra boraai al Back hanujMoB ara ni technically • i . to King George Vl from the %  Stud, Pot .. nutnbei of years salectcd ycarlim been leased in this way. Nevcr%  ai Royal b 11 D Richard the stable Jockey, ride-. The arrangement started when FYed Darling trained al Becknampteo. Whm Koat %  r there in \W, In ,..J. tba Koy.il racing Intc Oul-nf-lHHtr*. Man At 42. Koal M of tinHirgaal rtruuai In tba eoun> try: ba trains 60 horses. lie it. II .in.i bain, with a tanned, craggy lace: tn l oot-Of-dnOffl man. Me sat 11 jacket will the elbow %  up his eyes at the sun. He gazed ab%  -1 • i >at his two %  nver the Uwn and ditCU baraaa. He said: The Quean's horse ;.-! no (ill-fen | Utfq -ire fed and i u was interesting noticing bow Kanhad BOW cbatUBsd positions with Ugaj mj othar <>l tba 60 in tin nelh ln.e could quickly scan the RtynoM HuUhlnson. nig. water, sum up the |illon and fbort pan and ran through. He .. At Ihe mimH n i UWBTC pasg the ball to adv..iu..ge Kb Axchei with a nard ul ilt -u B m_ Snappers players were leapti "' Th r a*arae ei>ded with tne .0np s three->-ear.old wsist high ..ut Ws: Black Bee. Snow r liatt any this always added force ^'"P"'" r < h ''' „"„-L u !" High Service and Infernal Mnto the trv Maynard, Smith, ttaynes. Hope. • ' ,nr st. .,,,,„„ Bvnoc p an i,. DougPj* Sword Ki-h pul up but poor las. 7am Buk Soothing, Healing, Antiseptic Keep a bux nlnn.hanil\ neth Jm. ning eaeb a brad ana. swi.ni Pfab POrtUlo i H tor their team. For CoUaga in tba i Whipporays mate] I Urlai fcw iyn. G. Jordan, B Orannum ami eacb an I for Waipporayi n W ..nd K. Bh | It would scarcely I %  single out any of tba pu .ir' ; ton, Bai %  player pulled his wci; I for IJetbi: %  laaan from a free kick The % %  Just outside i :he left A 1 i all tuns one, I'ni. ball They were awardIttck and Maynard. Their left half, took a well placed shot. Carlfc i istodian, King, ran out of goal and saved. .ilton al• aatd tix-ir i. .ui. Lucas look a hard shot from elo i %  II %  truck goalb n bounded into play. and goal for Carlton . aiter. The Bis bora down on their opponan ta "Ptpy" iiutcbinson who Carlton. King. Ketincid] Warren, Clairmonte. Cox. Williams, G. Hulchinsuiw Marshall. Lucas. R. Hutchinson. Referee; Mr O Graham. show at combination, and were completely routed. Outstanding In ihe College leant were G. Jordan and (' Bbratyi Jordan is really the back his side and playi as "no well Skilled in the game. Of "die goaJJuwpers, ColK Chabral sraa about tbe best. He was cxcculinR some and saved many possible aoaii.. in Ahe ?lt>iPT>*r"-Wwi <\ Ti->< natch. Sword Fish's Albert WeatherhtMii gat disgusted after SO many goal coming in on him. ,, the h 11 was coming with such tarca and he was not ^ much help from Ml b %  siapaeM— y Clarke, G. Mc l l iii (Copt.) ii. Manning, r Manning, ii. Baniuatar, K M. Browne Sword nab A W< aUiarbaad, (: Ho ar, Qarali Jo Jones. N. PortiUo, H I'ortillo and Illek Reece. llurUton Collese — J. Chnbrol. H. Feldman. C.Evelyn. JoMai ,. S Uichael'l 1 .yl;r. h Aral brong fmd CJrannum. nor the longWhkppora\. C OreenidgC .., 440 and 880 %  '•' %  %  A. \..rds. lUmte (Capt 1 Q Wat I fhi "None of them hH raced yet." What ara their obani • ihey do get on to a racecou S Id IfUl leal It 1really to. early to say, and so I canno; gtva .. .''mini 1 pinion Bui First Girls' Inter-School Sports To Be Held Today WHEN tinUral Girl*' Inter School Sports ever b> held in rnae off today at Kensington, tha winning .1 rUaxandra, Allayna, loujidatton, Quean'i College Michaels (in Is will be takinR away the Lady %  Cup. Lady Savage has lend the way in supplying Challenge for tbagg new sports, but there arc still (our more Cups needed—the four Class Cups, under 10. 10—12. 12—14, :i d ova* it; 1'-. .it i.io will he conllned to flat blgfa jumping. The long1 wfia be a 220 vards war ie %  %  t>e no throwing of the criekei Kill, nd pit). 1 an and n otal 'cree • Archi, WEATHER REPORT UsIIKDAV Kainfall from ( iKlnnRtno: nil. loi.il tUinUII Tor Month (u date: 41 in. Illghsat Tiiasawilais HS.5 K. l.nwi -t 1 p ii 11 > %  .mi. 74.0 r'. mral v.i., in 11 atBi, ll( liniir Barametrr til .i.m > BMMl (3 p.m > U "" TO-HAY ;.:.'.• in Suusel: <>.lii i>.i Hean Fall Ha] 9. LiL'hlimi: 7.00 p.m. tilth Tide: N.JO am. 10.44 p.m. Low. Tide: 3.M a.m.. 4.00 p.m eating csts very %  chotil so far has i stnto 1' time-i their athletes rot tba various distances or how high their Jumpinnptng, ill ra f VI. VII. VIII k ix X. XI. XII. XIII XIV. XV. XVi XVII 100 Yards Class II. 60 Yards Class IV 80 Yards Class 111 High .lump Class I. 150 Yards Class II. 80 Yards Class IV. 120 Yards Class III 150 Yards Class I. High Jump Class II Tea Intan J 100 Yards Class IV. 150 Yards Class III 220 Yards Class 1. 220 Yards Class II. .luinoi's itclay. Senior's Hela> r,ihti> Tvnnin JOHN WATERMAN %  them. I c %  .Mi. claaelc m. • 1 The Qaaaua Opinion And ai :.rn h.rself think of tfiem .. on MondayT "Well.' tralnei rra sny." ''"'• h" owned bj tba Oman %  perl from taei who iro wttb Peter Cazalet at Tonbi I %  ithfort Lodg-. iket. From the OUQridU Ufa houft' look* hfce ii Sixt;, -foui-year-old C Boyd-Rochforl bi .1 tall, buikv wlUt an uni %  rnanaer nee 1923. luas won £8(10.0011 in stake money for his owner 1 green armchair in his study tu by portrait* of winners, on his desk a table lamp decorated with floure d amen of ieirig guai being unduly self-effacing. Certainly If the horses In his care do aa well for the Queen a-, those he trained for King George be will bai c no • be fU 1 %  iManed He trained more than eo inners for the bite King, inrludhTyperlcum, the moo Guineas %  nine., ind Abova B • tcb. Although King George's iirst years 1 1 icing involved hint ill a to* Udng like 120,000. he eventually made this good, ana one season won more than M.OOO t..k. One borat <>r the Queen's Cap-, : on Buyd-Hochfort singled out this was Aureole, a two-year-olo ehesnut colt. "He is really beautifully inert.' he said, "by Hyperion out of Angelola.*' Earner this year, when Captain Boyd-Rnchfort was in New York, he spoke of Am 1 good-looking yearling*" that might : in the 11153 DSfrb) His bi-eeding certainly suggests that If he does not actaally wbi a Derby he could well sire a Derby winner when put to stud UK4 Edward Vll wot. with Minoru in 1909 has the reigning monarch bred and owned the Derby winner. Captnii ichfort was at Epsom at lbs timw. "It was a scene I shal never forget," he said. Glory Reciiptureal When the colt won the crow SUTged round Edward Vll cheer nit wildly They then broke into ive the King. If Aureole—or any of hi' progeny—should win the Derby. these wild seanae might be re; it would be a rieservee triumph for bo'fli Royal ownerf il trainer. And the rac, mr publle would know that the. dor) of Edward VII's racing, ^tured. : %  < oi-YRti.lU Rr.SESV(D L. I. S. STOMACH upsets When the stonisch is upset as a result ol hyperacidity, a dose of l>r Witt's Antacid Powdri will disperte the pain and distress ngSt away. Flaiulrncp, hmrttMf n and indiifcMion air toinr of the symptom* Ihat Uu* excess of acid in the stomach can bring d initsUam. De Witts Antacid Powdri 10011 nentralises the aod and at the sasM tune other ingiedicnU in the wellbslancrd foimuta soothe and protrct thr delicate stomach fining. Get a supply right away. ANTACID POWDER (VeatrsasH Add wthet >lofi*(ri // ^£1 J^ nfytitfoty 1 IS COMFORT A\l> STYl.t: l\ lilt "JEW H0LLANDIA SHOES 1 til SHOPS FOR LAIHES arc new offered in mam smart designs m White. \n-Huck. Black I'.itcnt. Red Calf. 1 ant all and Multi-C.-lour Mesh with low and medium Wedge Heels. Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10. 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street b • o. U iswai toehon.1 4 •H:..ntrded Csrr, few 4 r 0 r-'omet •1*1 De WITT'S 4 P • Emty t ANTACID 4 r a c.ti.w. rd TABIFTS J [ft*AA 1 s..-. ;* faUMi 3 r '1 j Ai^'-^J This shipment—coolly tropical and refreshing its a hrecje—In keeping with our newly received Tropical Worsteds and Tropical Gabardines, ul prices that axe highly competitive WHAT'S ON TODAY Court of Ordinary — 11.00 Basket Ball at Y.M.P.C.. 7.30 a.m. M..r.ilr Cinema. Ml. Standfast Plantation Yard. SI. James. 7.30 i> in. Twelfth Mght" at Ihe British Caaaau. 8 15 p.m. Secondary tiirls* Inter School NiNirU Meetlmi at Krnton, 1.30 p.m. MORS Cough Relief! Bach soothing and aelkiaai VleksCough Pio r :n c %  dry, urluted throat nwmbtai-.t *''' %  U fuB rnl"" 1 PICKWKk (KICKET HUB NOTICi: TO MKMHI.KS Members are hereby nolilied thai the Oval will be open for practice as from Monday, lUth May. J. P PETERKIN, Hon. Secretary. BETTE R CdugSi Relief! Xbv'i* >*ai mftlicawd — aasuMwsi"' 11 1 ""I Br rfw,iiolVI*iV.pRu''. Trnm Spirit ... if one ol the* • 11 i-1 inal!' 1111 i•;111 The mill limit of the IjftdlU luUT-Club Knock Out TjbU i*servol >,-.l.m.j !!,.. %  ,,.„„,, „„,., „,„ , %  %  Y..M.C.A. rUVl Mull Iron, 7.30 o'clock Ul(hl. Ba !" -.! ;;;'-r Adcph, while Q„c.,,-, cm 11 UierMara Ii..,.-,! thai th."** "*" "• WJ ,..• to ihu i„ „„, op oiu,„ 6 .,„„, x „ %  led Uenrtlk ..mi vui'i rnthusliutlc nuyori which ,„..„ Y w c A T „ luc |„S Laim ^. n.i should oe CXIrcmoU ml' „. HI..." ""U 1 Adcluhl raw Y.W.P.C. have %  "*"' K.I.. ~ Pnl. (lrnt ape kind) no liind ,., ...I-,!,,,!,..,! lO''""' ''""" %  ** l '""" '"' %  inn. h. se of fin.. % %  •• %  "d Uarna nwl with 36 point %  nd will be pate l,h "' lh e Inter-Club Leatu. il> received on behalf of the < "iiipcl.tion. Y.W.P.C. an n tue by the Head 9 '*" TRY QUALITY PAINTS PRESERVE BUILDINGS a MAXXIXd. A CO Pitch Pine. Fir. Deal, Spruce In Various Size* Surinam Plywood I t , < I, 8 2Xc. & 30c. sq. II. Canadian Plvwood 3x8, 3 X G. 4 x 8, "Oi40c. IVallboard 's" 4 x 6. 4 x 8, 4 X 10. 4 x 12 @ 18Xic. iq ll. Ilardboard '" 4x8 18c.. 4x6. 4 x 10. 4 x 12, Hi. Flal Everilc (4 x 8) S7..1II per sheet Cement LTD. as*. 1*11 Hill All C. II. Rice If* Co. in u in M. or ni.i'iiiiixi.y We can supply I'ltt It I* I.Ml in Ihe following ,h,; 1 x 4 3x4 4x6 1 x B 3x6 4x8 2x4 3x8 4 xlO 2x6 3 xlO 4 xl2 2x8 3 xl2 DOUGLAS FIR 2x4. 2x8, 1x8 aidin| STANDARD IIARDBOARD SHEETS TEMPERED IIARDBOARD SHEETS J" WALLBOARD SHEETS PLYWOOD Phone 4267. Lumber Dept. WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. Y'*WWV/V>V/#WeV////AV/.V// 1 .-.','.V*.V. J— I AN I IRISH | LINEN 1 SUIT | ONLY $36.00 EA Ideal for Ihe Tropics • P. C. S. MAFFEI & Co.. Ltd. Top Scorers in taiiorinr I'rinre Wm. Henry Street


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VRimV. MAY 16. 15J BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE ITVE GUADELOUPE HAS GOOD B'das Chamber Of T OURI ST FACILITIES Commerce Report Agricultural Officer Roads Undergoing Here On Holiday Improvement 1.3SS to*, ol and January. The heavy rains dm. ^ ^ cuj ana about three nunutw. drive from the lo am sufficient for the estabmonths, not only hmrtaard II Id th t ii, o lishmenl of the yoiiiin my, wod • mm tkt juice quality wa ''' <. told th Ail i tf il! tfaorUj hgftwi MtumhHttj • %  % %  rnliiM re. Iha M*M cnuld f?T" ^SSS!? ni h W' BW.KA.. that Guadeloupe "£ "l? v !•* Thc could offer outstanding accommodation to lout,sis in thVNvcmber IkHt. was pt.Uti vrtdM I status Ii the Minn. trl with an undivided responMbilily t. %  %  %  departments The Governor the Head of Two New Zealanders. Mr. A. M will sail to Cristobal. Thc The New Zealanders purchased urina thc yacht ft Southampton, England. On April 4 they steamed out of Southumi Ion for Madeira and the Canao Islands before crossing thc Atlantit for Barbados. rhlbuite II was originally %  Submarine Chaser and resembles somewhat the MV. Cartbbcc which trades between the West Indian Islands. It carries a crew of II and is luxuriously equipped. It Is 121 feet long and powered by twin 225 h.p. Gray Marine diescl cnglr which give it a top speed knots] and cruising speed knots. When crossing the Atlantic its Mr skipper hoisted two square sails on a 50-foot mast. The crossing has •.I. Ihr Pub I Bnli.I, by n .II.MU !" tnm (>>• -Hrnsi Braame. In Irauilng *\ Mr. Hewitt has been Minister dcjl ' money to impi-n,the fOgsdl which of Agriculture. Animal Husbanportant to tourism. dry and Fisheries in Surinam Mr. Egloft* who spent a few dftvs from June 1M9 until April 1951. m Barbados, .ifter attending the During the last four months of Fourteenth Meeting of the Carlbthat office, he was also appointed hean Commission, said tnat Minister of Health, so that he hss Guadeloupe, h td .. Q#W n i terminal b u il di n g wfctoH arUsc tins month to aeeommodatt UM dele* galas who were attend meeting : routm i I liii'shcd mi Saturday .Oih Anniversary Mav 9 v..ithe Fiftieth Anniv.i the Government ,n. ,.( p, eruption of Ml Pi lies and the repreand the deMi-uctum .1 sPierre SW5",* thc largest City. There was A HM theth.. noraUon Service As representsfln d the Commission sent a mesmpathy to the people n! Martinique through the Prefect. He said that he was turn to Barbados. He was here operat. nparalivrK dry, Infill f iKpM I *.u..r*fc<. !•( %  I Queen he Is inviolable and the usual term was that "he could •am ommra nat niih-un nuiimv Brlly (iiiftm KM Aduil S>,i ain M Lniy, has %  *• %  %  r.. ll i asr Afll mm Junv July AuB'iM r,.t.. rrl„id-rt Ir^bw lo II A*.*ihip oi in, of Ormi HnUiii %  luailruUrin fo. idwrtooS %  .hod i SO II Misirr .„ once before ond that was In March Th„t ? hf 1 !; ,944 '' ,h ,l "" "ben thev had That is why he fho flntl Wcfcl ndUl|1 ,. otl ,, | .cw.,i ,-, wl ,,,i,u w 0( th. a*ti,. ( , t. The area harvested for the 1991 <'f €38.10.0 per ton include. 2 m^a,m^ t tti J ^'^ A "*,""^ cr P w" 41,020 acnes as against per cwt which undsj tit. St., 4-d .r. in. int. oi M.,w'a 'd—inr'hrr *'24 a,rM *n '* so These figures Industi> (Rehabilitation. I'm SIMMK* MM Nancy Wn| .ii at M include 8,000 acre* for land under Stabilisation and labour Wel•> Ubnrr AanuM peasants' cane (estimated). gf) Act. 1947. \vill !%  ^^^__ The eijiiivalcnt of 89.240 t' the special reearve fuml* puncheons of Fancy Molasses In Dcceinher tini'K Mi glid tor"building programme which w. is \i\ %  produced during the 1951 of Food reached an agreeinei He was reailv u ston> erop season. The latest estimate with the Conunonwealtn Sugl .... I -* il m et _^_Mil II .vl Dn^lnura na • Ished to see what was going on ' ,n 18S ^ cro P production of I*roduceni as to UM* m ethod and thought that the work should lu "* r • nd fHIU 'v niolas?ies shows fixing the price to be paid have fine results for Barbados. that • erop equivalent lo 170,000 year for that i -J responslbllltv m matters of H • %  ,n, n Information Offcer Mr. Egloff who joined the Ca.ihtons la expected. Common wealth production i took 13 days with one engine Government and cannot take any "*' !lw ,,aff ol tnt Governor of bean Commission In August but Thc working The average speed was decision without the approval of Puerto Rico. ^ year as Inform ttion Officer, held a througl nine knots the proper Minister, who bear* The New Zealanders hope to the responsibility towards the Leg-l visit Panama via the Oallapsgos lslative Council. A decision udtet I are also expecting by the Cabinet-Council on an ln-j Islands. The: to call at Tahiti. ternal affair of the countr> t anno I for this reason be rejected bj tin 1 Governor. alaVk Servant Dis-rliargi-d ^ The new status was the will of His Worship Mr. C. B. Griffith. Queen WUhelmlna who gave the Acting Police Magistrate of Dtscolonies their 'autonomy prior to tricl "A" yesterdav discharged her abdication and with thc ap20-ycar-old domestic servant proval of the representatives ,f Hilda Clarke of Carrington the Netherlands people in Thc Village Si. Michael, in the case Hague after a round table conferin which the Police charged her enee with representatives from with tl'e larceny of jewellery Surinam and the Netherlands vilued at $89 and Hw property Antilles about five years ago. The ,.:i Alexandre of My Legislative Council consists of 21 lord's Hill, St. Michael. elected members and is the only 'The pi<.iu"on alleged that Parliament in Surinam. It has thn offence was committed some the last word In all Government time in January 152. Alexandre affairs and it is very powerful told the eourt that thc defendant used to work t her place Ml domestic servant and after the> month of January had passed she it -..i the ii-wellcry. On one occasion she saw trie defendant with a brooch which resembled thc one that she reported missing to the Police Before dWhargtnf Clarke. Mr. Griffith laid that the evidence as produced by the prosecution K .t enough, > convict i.nd did not prOee ftnt the defendant was the person who look way thc jewellery Ii was not proved that the brooch which Alexandre saw the defendant wearing on that day was the brooch which she reported stolen and was her property. British Government, the U.K. has guaranteed to bti the Ministry of Food, ul a remunerative price I have always had pleasan'. similar post from 1942-47 on the has purchased the entire exportThe pioduction tlgurcs f<> I Tiemone* of my previous Wait and staff of thc Governor of Puetto shle output of sugar during the Bufgr for the yoars 1948 tu 1 >• am dvliKhtvd to Bnd that BarnaRico. Prior to that, he was with 1**2 crop season The cJ.f price are as follows: — dos Is as pleasant as I remember the Federal Government in Washit" Ington for eight years during which He paid a call on Mr. Wiles, lime he was with thc Farni Secu'hc Fuheriaa Officer, on WednesIty Administration and the UJi. day tmd SffU Impnossed bv his gup Housing Authority. % % %  M ISU H.4SS i* Public Utilities Bill •I'.nii \1..UHTowl •E 4 tiai i.ns ISJSl ; %  n I ••!!.• %  151.131 IM.1U ISI.S*S KOLA TOMC H<-tired I I C'r restriction of the output of all It plain Brown pointed out that the san very difficult to order the I level before, viz. <>ne | n the prevli ler. Mr. Hewitt took up his old plant foi rommt i.u.l purposes owmachinery, and for sometime they Head of U" xtenslon Serfunction aaaui Axrlcullural vice. Be said that hla work drH wfth the extension or the rice cultivation as welt u citrus cultlvattan and throuah his sctlvtUea. i Surinam had altered from a rice-lmporlini counlr> to a rlee-exporUns; one and the export of cltnis to Holland trgg also rather Important now Ing to the prior demands upon inhave been held up because the dustry arising from the rcarmaPublic Utilities Bill was "hanging inent drive. over their heads". The Public rtillllr* BUI. Pressed for a statement * to which hu been the subject of how soon Something could be do In the line of sport, he is not nnn uiirxnCMI V unknown in his country. The DILU iUUUtNLT i arge sporls erounds of the SuriJosenh Hesdley of Codrington nam Football Association had Hill. St. Michael, died suddenly b Mn i B i d out under his supervlsat his home at about 1130 a.m. i on anrf or fifteen years, he has Wednesday The body was been p res ident of the Basketball ilrtidkHcuaslon eontains. In our view. 'um. featurei which would Increase the dlfllculllea of r.'.i.iiii-. money by public -ni !" ruiti..M In Knsland. This Is rapeelslty important a the lndon money market it. at present, extremely sensitive to attrmpta to interfere with cxbttinf rich Is and eontr"rta. Thi principal object of my visit has i-ccn to Impress these facts on the Authorities in the hope €if M undes rather than j matters, Captain hoped It would he matter of months HMI !• 1M %  IWI-81 In lh* l Hal IM Loans Difficult Asked whether they had ever tried to raise the necessary Capital in the West Indies. Captain Brown said they had often talked about raising money out here, but were told that it would be very dlftV Ull to do so Replying to a suggestion that the inng the removal Company should try to arrange ble features from w | t h some of the sugar factories T the Bill As negotiations are still wnkh hit( i ,. xtra unils 0 tap their, T. Zni^fm^UT^TimmTl A ^r n u ? o S n de t,L Tast B re k ar t s b h e ^^K.Z^^^^ S^ *' frtZ'ti Sfi Parlour K,. *..„ .•„ Act ,M two vond not w'sh.me to say anything furcaptain Brown pointed out thaI'.irlour has won two first and two second Mr. E. A. McLeod. Coroner of p r i 2 es in bridge drive in Param District "A", gave permission for g^^Q the body to be taken to Burton's Ihcr on this sublect. MM t.tet ' %  %  SB -SB IB 9 %  t a I .(•! • n II || || II I 17 Jl-U 3.000 10/IU %  10 1 11 || || II > 17 >v..| 5.SS0 it/17 1) II 111 11 S 1) S 11 %  H ISO l.tJ llt IM) ISM IW7 IMS IMO .. 1 %  i '.I'nii'i i/t, a II %  a as i a LUt A—utm at s> i U • M % %  1 )1. 11* it. 3 111 > lu %  -'•n* T %  mi !'..< %  I).ii.. ( .1).. „4 ( % %  IK. mill leaj ISU 1 M* IMA IMS IMI ISU IMS IH Funeral' Parlour where a post HHirrcm examination was performed by Dr. J. A. Browne. Death wa* nltnbiited to natural Delay World-Wide Mr. .lew,,, said that his name J^P£ i \&J^ U 'ZS t is bnghsh because of hi< ancestm y thQ Authorities, can do very tors, out he is really Dutch. He murh Reeent enquiries in Engis locking forward I" a pleasant Ijim revealed that the British stay fn Barbados and expects his Government was ilself accepting wife to Join him on Thursday deliveries of 2 years and over for next. comparable requirements It Is therefore to l>e feartd that some From friends in Surinam who time must Inevitably elapse before have visited the Island, he has we can hope to overtake many deaM.rnt MHI 61* US SS4.T17 this possibility had bcci Invest 1 gated, but It was found to be In practicable for certain n isons. It was disclosed that the Initial —, . ., _,, %  — ... amount which would be .equ.red The IsUnd s rmanc.al Position for major expansion Was In the From the memorandum on tinvlclnitv of 1300.000. but that the Government s estirn.temoney lenders were not prepare with I 1 .* Bill. Customs Union !• conimen lal nt p raa tn taUon to advance any money unid'tniy surplus on 31st Murch. iga2, wai I f} 1 '*' ,l v ,'' ''"•>'<"' Th.K% %  %  < were satisfied that their position I&.MI.SM. The capital iH.ug.-t V.' ' %  • "'"" """ % %  ' was secure deficit Is shown as $080,723 ami Tnc *"• l'd to Clerks In the current budget surplus is erease in steamship freight I.I <• Pressed lurther, Captain Brown c tUnaled to be $1,344, 087. Fifty Technical and vocasiojngj P> Co. On receipt of the information. fche Vestry decided to meet on he meets often and whose frltndMondav at 11 a.m. to consider ship is one of the many evidences these objections and any other of the hospitable qualities .J Barthcy m.iv receive. badians. tions about thc family ... W ,„L-. „# r*hri*< church whom and, while that fact may be of little comfort lo Barbados btl people, we feel sure that they are far too wise to Ignore it and that, as a consequence they will continue to be patient. In conclusion I wish to assure yotl 'hat the Directors of the Company are most anxious to satisfy the requirements of the inhabitnnti of the Island and will M everything in their power lo atUdn Ihli object. Not "Happy Members of the Council took the SffnB indbeopportunity to amohgslte the dimSuhail' Sailed Into Carlisle Ray told the Chamber that Barbadians p. r cnl ^ Uie budget surplus, i"*" Lsb.jr coruUUooa -accept the shortage $(,72,3*3. U to be Uuiufcnvd to I*orl. in. in | IKTI l>> the < but thc Company a Revenue Ettualisation Fund, tons authorities ..r fines on go would do such small things as they leaving an estimn could to alleviate the position. 31n March l52 The Idea of giving sppHcants current, and re-lntroduclng load shedding, was put forward, and the Directors promised to mB<-uss the matter with the local Manager. There Is no real difficulty In obtaining meters, Mr. Lovering informed the Chamber. m The Inlng In of $5,353.2111. houses Night landings at Bt General Airpo. following were aorne of she F^es^ principal matu>rs wlu.t, The Council Like ti ved the attention of Iha Uinjty of expressing th Council during the yaw cialion f-.r the co-in* ratiwi The carrying of malls lo the help which the I'M U.K. by Trans-Canada Airline, accorded U 11.1.v in the dehv.iy "f until-'hi> (mm' I Sir Geoffrey Knox. K.CM.O, First Secrelary. He became sailed the ketch Suholl Into CarCounsellor of the Embassy iii 1831. lisle Bay on Monday. The 31-ton Sir Geoffrey served as Chair,*Juhail arrived from Tobago. It man of the Saar Oovernlng C has a crew of three mission from Sir Geoffrey was created CMC in 1929 and K.C.M.G came Envoy KnTaardlna.y and cult.es which ^xn^r^^ ... Minister Plenir-M-ntlary U> Hun"ced because of t ^Present lack 135. During the First World War „ry in 1MB. He l.ld this office jJg^jJJgJSf ^ ch VnsSed he served In the European thealro for four years. 2Sl2lL-i t .1 the Director* that and was honoured with Chevalier fn 1939 Sir Geoffrey was made members toId th. l> [~ !" J JJ" of Order of Redeemer. Greece British Ambassador to Braril and tl.ey *"r ""J, !" "" He was born on March 11, 1884. served in that capacity until 1941 look fo. the fut and was Student Interpreter, LevThe, Suhail, which it anchored isfactory ant. when only twenty-two years off the Royal Barbados Yacht Club, It was old. In 1920 he was made Second is In the Island for an Indefinite cnt lark Secretary and three years later, period. aptaa I affecting tht • was at all i Aged that the pre mwtF _.- |M,14 3 Burner Model # IJ187 Also WIUTK POJUfKLAIM ENAMEL SINKS With Douhlc Dralnboard 9 $05.64 complete with waste and overflow T HERBERT. Ltd. Incorporated 1921 10 A 11 Roebuck Street I | 1 am I tu* tit I i tsh BUTTER fNoll/ o.rf,no., T,„nd Joiw) I NOT ONLY COST isjgaj AND . i i ii mi ii BUT T.i.vrK mm J BUnER ^ CONCENTRATi: nw lUusToatAT / HI inns WORTH TRYING! 4lhljli.il.tr from all tirocrrlrs. PINEAPPLE CREAMS TO-DAYS SPKIAl ul Knights Phoenix Soda Fountain m SHOPPER rot •LI. Ill Y THESE KWil.oMtll TEA—per '.-lb k( O.K. COITIB—gi '..-rt, plda, < tNADIAN BABOIffEB—gr tin i WAIHW SARDINES—per doa. f II \ttl(lKI)'s < 111 \M ( K V( KIKS —per tin llrir.in.ill* This Week -M . .70 ,M ?0 .It Z.V 1.93 1.61 EJ .V MAM I'ASTE—per Jar VEAL AHA' 1 lar CHICKEN ti HAM I'ASTE—per jar I.oz tin U< IN WHITE PEPPEB l-ox tin •.NDWICH si-HEAD— per Jar Al'lK I'KANUT BUTTER '


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KHIbAY, MAT !, 1M1 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THBKE Barbados Chamber Of Commerce Report Of The Council For The Year 1951 vertising signs should only be placed at the .-uuntry shops. These reconi mend.it i-iiit. were circulated to all Arms likely to advertise by means of signs or boardings alonp the highways The Council arc pleased to record the co-operation of the majority of firms In this mutter America" Ar**"UiL* C '"%  m S:J2 To thuHV ir/io '335 1(44 Vigilance CMMHMM On the lucgMtlnn of the PTeai.m I 1 The number oi comma during 1851 win I 267. %  operated by tinfollowing airlines: Mnli-ti Wr.t Indian Al'i>' "SI aiht' BnU>H Guiana Airway* '• Tout-Canada Anliwi ISO ISM menial Hon-aefa-tlulr %  irUno l it Seawell Airport Meetings first worked with Mr an. W. L Johnson A Co., wheiv his lather The following meetings, were had been a partner. At the outheld during toe year: break of the IBM war he enliatThe annual general meeting, two ed and served aa a Lieutenant in utterly^general meetings, two the British West Indian Regiment, dent*the Cornell NConuiMnM to monthly meeting-, of the Council, started his own lirm as schooner (hat thev ihuuld appoint Vigilance rZTZ, and three special maexlnasj of the agents. He was interested in paro_ Committees for the purpose of adTud aurchani aaippm•* mo ,^T !" Counc cbM • %  *. ^-coming a Vest !" vising him. and to bring to his at, The loUowtug table shews the number a *"*' !" !" tSJg: „ .. man and serving at one time as tonlion matter, affecting their • which arrived at the port oi Bridgetown during the years 11*46-51. Membership Churchwarden. He was a keen trade which thev felt should be The membership at the end of sportsman, being a member of the, dealt with by the Chamber Ai a MOIIM_VM*>II 1950 was 147. During 1931 nine Wanderers cricket Club and for result of this recommendation new members were elected, four mB nv veors was a Judge >t meetVigilance Committees were apmembert resigned and one died j n gs of the Barbados Turf Club, pointed for th following sections The total number of members at Lumber and Hardware. Dry the end of 1951, therefore, v-as Conferences Goods, and Druggists 151. The following are some of the The Grocerv Trade felt that principal conference*! which were their interests were U'lng adeI iii.im.• held during the year, of interest quately looked utter by the FroThe credit balance at the beto the commercial community: vision Merchants Association and limning of 1951 was S2,43999. SubThe First Meeting of the Refor thi> reason there was no nee,t wriptloru from members, during gWflll i Economic Committee was *? v >' Committee of the yea, amounted to $5,41440. held in Barbados in May. under Cr 5£ er *;. s .,„ M „ lrt „i, nru ,„ d .„ year was lo.uiiJi. leaving a ^^j tn( iocai representative, with *,--i( rL ,i a .,. r ti, ,? tT.M 1 !" ""*" "* 2" H A a e "" K B5SaS?fr5ii5."woTta and ut 1931. Hume. Sir John Saint, Mr. D. O. -,. „ ... %  Loacock and Mr G. J Bryan as The Commercial Journal adviaerJ The credit balance of the ComTho Twelfth Meeting of Ihc memo! Journal account at the c „,i,bean CommliMon wa.. ab.i i&Sl^UZS?^?!' "I* *?•?**" hdd ln Barbados durlna Ma> 49. The receipts from lubKTtptlons Thl conference was opened by His and advertisements wore 11.134.0Z. Excellency tbe Governor and was 1 he experaea in connection wllh umler u, e chlurrnanrtl p „, gi Ihe publication of the journal coo,,,, s^, Co-Chalrman of Uv amounted to $830.57. leaving a VK .action of the O SEA AND AIR TRAMI DII-ASTI IIn* HSI OrJ in tasgtss. Pwll. H Mn. MM In Kllubrkb Japp. U> J-mr. f u iin>. • ..rtfc. Mr* H.... Culhna* ">i Culiinc'lUl. klr JaUn tv,<> Vi< NaUlMF IS>w.. Hr Joaapt. Adlr. Mr KOOMI n.>ugu< Uta. i-^... j^rtff. I-. IHitlaarf M lOrlolY. I' Dvirsait. J HtM.h V. Ixal) i %  A H.-.i.-v. a. Clan. -i— t•*""• A Csrhajal. I. ,! I:IV .1 i i. i . I I %  rfl I vUrtun. 8 I'rto. I lOu.iii.i U ii In addition tX&S&EZ "Hillary and tm-ough U'Veneiui !%  lo the above, 16 .ueneed opcratioi private aircraft Hedos from port Landed at • Aiipwt. carrying J .luring the month of August fcffSS S^jr^^. •^••JSjS-fe .. imiaemcma.,, th. recon tlrn of the Chamber uam \SV\IW\.. To ttwyoaai who, from lime I (Q rclu-sc p.un. Dafpril %  If "'l' Ktsc.iuli Ju-iniM hi I for years lo pun—ill aspirin In Uipnn i CM IttVC bftH ubkl wbkfc is not ."iK Me, tH U0 pej tf fsbi f Aspirin is acid (atci.ls.iliolk' HW) .uul insoluble in w.itci DifJ i' on ihe other ha I laic loluhon tlui i> (ki lea K ... ij. ii is ih>t libel) to irn.jtc ihc itoataofti Mil ii disaoiva c.MiiplcicK. H ki more rapidi) ihtoi wd and is iiu-Tcioio qaUrni to fjM rttte. Vow doewt knms how imporl.tnl (hi-vOilun,:s.irc. In all OMM licn vou would noiiiulU UBl rVfrcr lakB . 'De^fhV. Brilish lnriastriesFair he Council orw 'j.h I3.&0C During the yea The number of patseugcrs at -^nd^'nonj, u f Ui riving by an during the year WM Coaunittce ippointed bj HH 15,411 and the number atp*"" 1 -. tVceltencv the Governor wa >'> *J~ l9 *^JHSn ^mmenre.1 during 'he yea,. Th. ing and >W* tecommendationi. are designed W , %  , .Tedit balanee at Ihe end year of $2,395.94. lrf ,he This Chamber section of the British Industrie.. Tar There were 2.591 intranv ^. C ?^J , !2!?_ 1. fZL Fair This was the first occasion ^n^n bv ,„ hc I'ul.licitv Commit) bers and local officials also berur n lUaaUarles nnd the majority of i new .scheduled a upofttal Venezolai been appearing new and more regularly. A ltl ginvited, i-alourful cover. the local rum exporters, the Bar%  Msjaaai A conference of Supply Officers (jados Canning Co. and the B.irba^f/9" * ihlch will make the Journal more Irom ^ British Caribbean was dos Cotton Factory Ltd hl c attractive, wne produced during Hf{d hcre durlng th0 montn ^ Exhibits of local produce and the year. The number of journals ^pni with Professor C G Be-ashandicrafts, as well as advertising printed inoirthly has recently been .„ chainnan Mr r A Bishop matter for attracting tourists to increased from 150 to 300 wa hl .__... .leleBa-e the Island were on dlnplav. Th. Thi. HI.-. Marketine Board rf * n < was prepared and arranged }uir y Vraitort svSl oSam airarurad a COSb > ,hP West India rommlttee. and oaatse Council were oleased to !" L a P.^^..^ !" -??^^ 0 ." from report, n^relvred. their work •*" The Council were pleased wafc o ma the following visitor ferencc which was held in Trinii.-..-.it.v.im.1 w rffc .i-. u b .•.attraetive dad in March for representaUve; w ver > aro*ri\c meetirms of the L hamber dilrtng of |hOMJ ^0,,!,^. ln lhe Caribbean Th Council wish to record their the year Mr. A. R. Starck, UJX. who were supp i(ed with rice by thanks and appreciation to Majo Trade Cc-mm ssioner in Trmidad, BriUsn Guiana, to meet members William Lambert, the West Indi; Mr £J* ,T oma ^ "Vr *" V of the Board and negotiate new Committees representative the Clerks Union; Sir John Saint. ^ for flce Th(> 1(K fll delega Cri charge of the West I prior to attending the CommonP^ ^ John ^^ and Mr waaltll Supply < onference in the A Bihh ^^ Mr s H Klnrhi Z7T "^"l „••...„' a member of this Chamber, as an Bishop. Controller of Supplies; Mr. _,..-,,,.. C. J Burgew, Exutlve SecreThe Seventeenth Congreea of th 0 tary t^^ ic * J '^ Ca 1 r l i e m a ': Federation of Chambers of Comcommission and Mr. BnuD ^ Brlt | lh Empire was Bralne. M.P., Secretary of the u, V cten In June Mr. B M West Indies Committee to the g^ 1 "^**"find'oTduring this 0 V ConservaUve Party. mon(h ^j he repres^iiled this '. The Chamber', Dinner c !" *** at lhc oon ~ of 1 ,1 1 I fa I Indies section and To Mr. E A. Bishop and Mr C. S. Husbands, who w<< tendance at the Barbados stand, for their work in making the local display a success Shipping During the year 965 Merchants Vessels with a total nett tonnage 1.793.001 tons arrived at the port as compared with 1.024 vessels of 1.845.678 tons In 1950. ln addition to the above. 36 vessels of other types visited the port Theae were comprised of 14 vachts. 1 Spanish VUHiptlSCa "I n vni'Ua. 1 jpoinon ,,,„_, fuii-urn tiilriw motor vessel. 1 Royal Fleet Aux•>„,„.,, iabi> • %  t>ii> "•* "" illary. 1 Royal Army Service Corp: During the year it was OaeMed i ncorporate d Chambers Inat" thTSc.^Tno.d'mT'an Commerce „( Ute British annual dinner should be disconCaribbean tinned on account of the poor at^ !" ^ n e J *J ,r ^ ,n !" le Vessel. 3 British. 10 American arid t, i.,i ,ie IU recent years. It w.i for the Ninth Congress of the Int CftnBdjDin Warships and 4 trainalso agreed that this function corporated Chambers to be held lng shlp6 (1 ^ A wyuhl i-iev*.'ud in the future m BriUsh Guiana in October. IU52. gjo vessels whose gross tonnaae i*r .-i il sufficient *nehbers exj>rMd a The Council has appointed a comBin „tuited to 63.583 ton* entered *' % % %  •' '"•"" desire for It. mlttee to select suitable subjects Inf Careenage as agalnnt 581 ves,,,; which this Chamber will present se \ s „f TO.522 tons gross In 1950: iv-w Obituary for consideration at the congress, of these 141 were steam and motor The Council record urith regret vessels, lhe remainder being sailthe death of the following during Control of Advertising Sign* ing vessels the Near Th Council appointed a comThe ss. Mauritania made two Mr Hilton H Edwards who mlttee during the year to make recalls and the s.s. Nlcuw Anuter.na.,i \4i*4 innnnrv In his earlv commendations for a scheme of dam made one call here during the !5L 1 ^ JSA wh the ftrmol voluntary restriction by Arms in year on special winter cruise, !" r T-Jll !" rH.i.tt-9n. lh display of advertising signs. They brought between them a W. L. Johnson • to no iaurr tri Tmj comm ltctwor iunj vrilh the total of 2,082 tourists to this island. tgnd Into parti.crshlp_with Mr. co _< >I>B| aUon of th e leading local The totol number of passenger^ eh and f OIn >eo^ine nrm flrmi wh() do a laf|(e amount 0 f arr i v lng in the Colony by sea duradvertlsing by meansof^advertising 1951, exclusive of Intransil *e, repassengers and tourists, was 5,380. signs Thi W H. Roc— of Evelyn. Roach It Co. He served for a number of years as a .item, 9 and lne Clvlc Circl ber of the Highways and San tary commenued that advertisin" Cornmissioners of St. Michael. In ou t,ide of the city limits should be by the field of sport he was principalrestricted to a size of twelve square 5.238 arriving and 4.396 leaving tho property ol D V. Scott ft co.. w interested in horse racing and tM & The Committee drew up a by sea In lfWO. 1 *" on April 3. was yesterday adwas for many years the Official n Bt 0 f built-up areas where thev The following table gives theijcurned until May 23 by His W>i. Starts of theBarbados Turf Club, suggested advertising signs could class, nationality, number and neti I ship Mr. G. B. Griffith. Acting Mr D L. Johnson, head of the be displayed and recommended tonnage of vessels arriving at theN'ollcc Magistrate of District firm of D l* Johnson 4r Co. He that outside of these districts adport during 1931: I .1-. WIN $25.00 Here is a simple Crose Ward possle which can help yoa to win $25.0* for only one shilling. At the same tuna yon wUl be doing your bit to help send Barbados' aole Olympic hope to HeKlnkl next July Enter new and try your skill. NOTE NEW DATE OF CLOSINO OF ENTRIES IN ClaAUSE RULES I The first correct solution opened ay (he Editor wfU win the prhte. I In the event of there being no eorreet solution the one containing the leant errors which Is opened Brat by the HUKl/O.NTAL 1 —Who was the father of Eliasaph? 5— Elevate 10-Wnal is lhe fourth book of the New Testament? 1-*. H'oohetlc scene ol th* great battle at Uie end of the world 10-<1] combform. 17-Eish net u—Laum. 19 Titles of address. 2 uLoathers 22—One of the places where the Lord prophesied great pain 23—Residence. 24Imitate. 26—<-reat operatic tenor. 28—One of Davids sons 33—The turmeric 34— Depart. 6—Troiilcal rodent. 7-Props gate. 89-Jewel 40— Used iap.og toot 41-WhO was Oiled with the Holy filKSSl* 4-T Hum uliar Haaarder. 45—Pays in the week. 46— Prefix two 4?-Patriotic society 'abbr > Langtml 50— By what rivt-i did fbekiel SM v'siOBS et Ood53 —Auditory organ 51Rfast 5>—Masculine nicaname 57-Who washed his Hands ir token that rip na-t no responsibility in the conviction oi -Crippled r'ertile eartft. 06— A son of Judah 67—Necessary elements 69—Serf 70—Sculptured slab. 71-Location. YEKTICAI. 1-Wlup. 2—Extent. 3—Give forth. 4—Country road. 5—Note in the seals. a— Annex. 7— March dale. H—Pertaining to sound. 9— Trapper 10—What Is the Sixth book of the Old Testament" 11—Medaea. 12—One In Asia turned awsy from Paul 13—Olfactory organ. 15— Twenty of these are worth a shekel 21-Watering place. 25— Live coal B -Primary color. Upper garment of Jewish priest 29-Church of the 20—Frosted. 31— Mournful. 3: Russian independent union 85Portents. 88Weird. 29 -Donated. 41—In what story form did Jcsu* •prak? %  14-GentIe blow 45-Severe. 41-Calm. 49-Plnt juice. 51 -Who was hanged on the tallows he had erected for Mordecai? 52— Perch mber who left 'the Colony changed by th,Polka 4,939, as compared wllh larceny of two bottles of brand Editor will win the prise. Entrance fee of one shilling ll/-) uM be enclosed with earh solution along uilh name and address on the coupon printed below. Any entry which Is not accompanied by the entrance fee will be Immediately deatroyed. All fiitr.ni, for this competition agTee to abide by the decision of the Editor of the Barbadas Adroeata. The competition will be closed on Friday. May 16th at 4 p.m.. and net on Thursday. May 15. as previously advertised. All rnvrloprs must be clearly marked CROSS WORD PUZZLE COMPETITION .ad addressed to the Editor, the Burbado* Advocate. 34 Broaa Street The name of the winner will be published In the Sudsy Advoeale of May IS. ,l—Wild plum %  •i— Foundation. 56—Timothy's ''jUOPKfJKt^'fWrv: rlarwy.Easy-tonash! •0—Anglo Indian wsight 61Formerly 64—Honey M—Symbo' EX I IRE PROCEEDS TO FAH.Vl.M EOR EEVEA.XO FUJVB Entries can a* poate or delivered to the "Ad locale Stationery" or Advertiaiai Oflce NOW PACKID IM EViRY BOX OF 4£f%<# ALL-BRAN k a ^^ lif^lr (if riillr it: I %  ftifl oniou m LuartTnl of Kcllfivtr Oat yours today while tho supply lasts! YOURS! Accept this 4-in I measuring spoon" package of delicious K< llofg*a ALL-BRAN: lack of r ilk i'i tho nut. enjoy a bowlful of Kellogg's inv. And drink plenty of water. 1 > %  natural laxative food? % %  'Oi -it v *.i' HAN da|a>] moeauring apooi. nur growr quick! Offer pr'g ut Katlle Creek, Mich. MOMIN! All spoon u apoon and teaspoon 0 quarter-teaspoon on ot' %  poons. Wa s hes, t Offer made to acou;< and crispier Kellogg a / and measuring spoon t Light! Tender' It." i;nnuring sizes in one! TabVs1 one sTde! H .if x side. Handier than 4 separate quickly. Acidproof? ,t you with tho a*cet-r-• %  I, BBAN of today! Use AM UKAM make muffins everybody loves. 11 ALL-BRAN >-••





PAGE 1

PAGE SIX' BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, MAV 16, 1M CLASSIFIED ADS. TCLEPHONf HOB DIED roil SAUB "*£ %  AUTOMOTIVE BEDFORD II Ot DIUVIhV Ttf for imadaftie *Unp Dial aftis % %  (I ML 1.1 i on UNI %  %  Mf (i.(-d %  W Appl, to Uri .to-* CAB-VluiUU ia ev a*ieea, i*i. t J Brat UN Condition X.a.I* Spre) .tnled Dial *M Courteay £ %  £'£ , MMhu'l Juae to MM %  i a*.... ,,.*... %  St IM HI H NAILS REAL ESTATE A 1•nra > .. (t.i %  < the l*th M neinu," > lai.B attached co.il*.. i lae) The houae eontlna Drewtna ead Dlnina Roeraa. %  B^TOMM. Kitefte* M ,-.: %  :; v." i. (mu r*Tnmn ft co.. 11. IU* •-. %  >i m.itMinus ma Auurt IIHAI AIDS ACT. last To ihe ln>t Ui. kuar. H>ltNH and Mk-i crepe of ih* • MM In IftU M neon borrowed mofw-r ( imnrt ! %  eeid cropa ii. I.-I ih.. i4in %  Ml H4>. 1*61 ..JITRCD* BUZABCTII TlltMlipSON •9RB JAMD r W BOTCE. I* %  -Ir nber of O*. i ..vi BADM CAIllll.NOToN NOTICE Trntm art Invited (or pa Inline: W ii.il .tincture 13 coaia and roof, ool*de and )M(dk> I* MU eeafe). of the Ke.nin.rlon d*nd. Il may bo MCNHII %  1 erale nil or part of tieei aVucnn t>.lo.e appbln* palnl Tinil-n mint reaih tha unairWa n ed neon 4 Co". OfSee not lelei ., %  May Itui Tho Association doee nM bind itBoll I accept Ihe toe/eat or any t ender TMT. HAK11AOOS CIUCKBT i \Tlox w r HOYOS. Sect* lift at—en %  •...til COAST Nmw fi BrfeKf rW 60-DAY EXCURSIONS lowtit farm* •* &f orrWd for o*> froveW TO CANADA Regular ftiohti by "Morlh Slof SkylirWft ONLY I445.4W (B I rrvr%  mixirrowN ••> TVT" M iNTRCAI. and %  atutn* r n,i r l.l[..m.ll.K ' im.Mii VI-TIS A III i" % % % %  ^a^Llvrl-fHlaVil i..-,, Mr..a -. rk... tn* l^llBXlCilXalf JiSHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. %  AILING rmoM COTTICA. I* HEHA. IMk I US NIWTOft jr -MIU.I. M S OBA-SJiatTAD. Kh Mv MIIINn TO TBINIHAD rABAM ASU RUTUM til'IANA >. %  COTTICA, Bad Juna latt. %  A1L1XI IO ralAMtBIBO A^fD natTMH OU1 AH A MS *Ta*T*J ITUt Ma* IBM M t NBtTDB IJtn Juiir IBS^ -MUX. IO TBIVIDAD AHB) ( IRAC-AO M 5 HEHA IM Juno lS? B F ail'BBON. BOH CO. LTD >yv-d-v dad and 1 Win inat Thr U V "CBJ ,. BB4 cat** 1 1 IW""Antiau. IBM Canadian National Steamships I NOTICE m, i Paaaa Bl b i atoaa n iba**n. aaraBi %  OMI %  • %  JJM-lB U*IOM *o laPW* at*i p'vTvn'r^i^'ith May".) APPUCATKJNa ro S, ,l, SflW o( thT^iadaBad 'v<-ni SI Mlrfujar* Vratey %  Hhib.t.on. Viowina Bunday !* %  H0> W Thun..t ylarnton Cotlrd* will ba r#car*i au U\" *& %  • pm. Vatawt by thr Clark of tho Va-try — t U • pai luiuiof aartwulaaoa xiav-*18i2SJ BE*"" NSTI'C-nill I ADY KODNEY CANADIAN CHAUJLNviEK LADY NELSON i \NADIA.'. ourisaa .-ANAlilAN COrlBTraUCTUJt LADY KODNXY Ball* Moslrt.i %  -• A I ft. till.III.. May II May IB Mn> 1 Junta Juno W///V// 13 Ji.nr I July II 111. aa July M Juno a July 13 Jul> M July ..I %  Ir...i>.i.l. A Fruit ii *a Iwnn. I • %  : i'i:iis>\i alao NflUKbr onaor atam^l b; 1 b. n.ld at my offtc* tu.Ui hiahott %  .iaa. <-i • mo w^N uiwUi \*< -PV'id valua All tl-at crrt-ln pjoco o* land en uiniia b.adaaraauramral B.iaa -q li •iiu.ir at Krniln^inn Tanantrv In th. J'arl.h ol St Wl.luicl jSMttB g an l.tlf • I Krnalniton Tcn.nliy an4 " U>i ...dway knows aa nii i %  hoiaavrr alia tha aaroa abu .ind bound. am>ii>l-*d ai MaPWai Thf h c jrinl land to BIX HUN 1 AMD FOHTY-THBE* CENTS •ani *3 ABh"H pinahllEllB Uaad I I MH I' THE SllAl.K IIAMMKK .1 on FRIDAY Wk at I Jaaon Jona. A Co. Ltd Warabouar. %  M BACiS DARK CRYSTAL SLOAh Mala 12 30 HnBRAMkEK. TRUTMA.N a. CO, Anrtlonrrra. MJJH dB WANTED HELP %  nt WORKS ENtilNEER ,: ., woiMhnp and MIBIMPOI v CON CJVJ1SEH l \NAD1AN COHBrrTtUCTOm I.ADY 1-nllNEY CANADIAN CHAI'.JLNOBR IJ*IY NELSON isaat CANADIAN C"G"TRANSATLANTIQUE SBiujBCl from Soulhsinploo to OoadeloiiP-. %  Urtuilque. Pditsullal. Trtnldhd. Ls Gosln, Cnrscat* Jjt Jsi 23 Juno M Juno July l* July ia July -. fT June \ July IB July a July aa July a Juky 11 July IB July 33 Juiv aa July i Am LADY Frs-BB Saulkaamptaai -COLOMBIE" 8th May. IMS •DE CKASSE" . 4th June. IMS ATTIT-S FUrbaJaa Slat May. 152 . lffth June. IMS •Not calling at Guadeloupe SAIIXNU FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE From B*tb*da. Arrtvt, IftooUiB-ajUn -DE GRASSE" .... lth May, 1M2 ttth May. 1952 11th June, 1952 9th July. 1952 "COLOMBIE" .. •"DE GltASSE" 1st June, 1952 .. 29th June. 1952 Fur further particular* apply toGARDINER AUSTIN 'Sailing direct to Southampton & CO., LTD.—Agents. Suar Machin .-\ repair WPrtt deuiabW Appucanl ,,,,4 !" kinwladga of arak* drawtnB and tapartanea m tha diraotion of "'coidaa of recant taatunoitUM muU ba c.ii>" Llled Vi Ith anplKitliMi bv ll'I May UrniCr aaSkva-a ralaUn* to aaLm *•*•, 'KS--%  S? OB ftl. W inidaaiown. rou SaftLE MIKCEI.L \M.Ol'S rnrDr.r-Wr.ilnai*ou P .c-Uant rondiuoa ltin H13. aflat %  p. S0B4 id( ii MtKlVCn VACCUUM CIXANERS C'lmdrKal typa. complete with t..chmanta. only 1/7500; MeehaiRai ci 1 .wo-por*. only UfJB. K I ftTtS co Ltd Fhona SUB ^^ II M V KADIOORAM* New Modrli • uh 3 upoed Chana*" and Hrtoid i an* .w* Dial 3B1 or *710. DA COSTA s> Co LTD. Elactnral D*p< ...„_. IIUIMKI 0|iiH'i Induatilal tronrra A ...nwlato Wonar for Home or tdWndri >UI 3BIB or 10. DACOBTTA A IO LTD.. Bacincal Dapt ^ ^ W -T Si:p Pyorrhea in 24 Hours ED1SWAN HATTEHY (TIAIUiEH-S %  h-rae up to IB l-i-oll Bjiilean • equlvalrnl al %  Amp* For ui ,• Phaao circml Pi. 4TI0 DA COSTA A CO LTTI %  I Dapt uais-a. VACHCM Cl.EANMlaV-Thra lact from Knapa inari-ca-ib Has. Dial BBTB or 4110 D* i CO LTD, Clactrlcal Dai otfea ., .i Ttidw Stra> % %  RaXOHDN Claanna our atock of MOM Re.oi.la Tbroa Im Two Dollara. your choara A. BAMNBB A CO.. LTD ft 4.BB--1 f Si.bacrlbe now lo Ihe Ball Telairaab O a land a Iradina Dally Newipaper nv %  irivini in tlarbadui by Air only a laa daya attar publication In London Con tact: kan Oaia, c o Advocate Co.. Lid Local naproaenlallve, Tel SUB 11. aa-t la Awl.tant FOHEMAN capabl. vitma our Machine Shop DapartADu.icnt mini havo knawiad. %  nt tfatiBionlala muat ba applicJlloii by BUI Ma rulara iclallnd to aalwy dltlona. apply to: Thr I nulled :A For parueuian 1 ataer ea mn i s t , Bi.rb-.lu. Fo-irdi il Boa 91. MThito Park R-" ..i at MDOK KPatfER loi v~. !" — — VA' apply i BaftBd qi i •ft ajsktaa Oak M A Co Ltd Wluta 1 II.M H i v Bjaaaa] I a V .aoi.. aurl.ti.. %  -,• A. i""e.h aupply of "Brsara %  i :. ^ | %  %  %  ";". riaaa %  MECHANICAL It-liia NEWS 1LAMI IMul The BOJB Have >;. i II n .mi.. For Uas Arrived:— AMERICAN CAP 1M3IOL..S ANI> CAl'M FRESH VEGETABLES CABBAGE 30c. per lb CARROTS 24c. per lb BtKTS 24c. per lb AI No. 11. Swan Slreel THE DEMERARA MUTUAL LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY LTD. An .,!• Mod T4D 4i application—Cdurtee-pan i *!(* io >.aa—n MISCELLANEOUS xci'irt'iTCIIAL BWJ1PM1 rv llarrla and other aajulprm „* O.-aa Bake.. OraLo->1 i ulor. Il.-aaa Bi.rcadya i.for anprylnd Fiiter-iT.-.Mud, Aahca and Pan Manure, an %  %  Dui 4*1B io a i with tha b. PB blea-l. na %  %  ..i.li It.n clad r %  ).. nrlar Aa*oan'' : I.M..II. Hemlix Aulumalic Vnnliiiu Maihmfs. have *BM-araaaad, .m*** ihrar tjimp dneo >lrBo labwu aavkKi. Iron. DA COSTA A CO LTD fuse. Deal STALKS J--0*. PU- .lr. wlUi braaa enoop anc ,,XI. Onvemmant .laniped BM.1l I Urn %  tui Sale of ALL ENAMEL PAINTS JUIINMIN S MAl'ltlNERa and BLftBOWAW <,'.• :',',•>',*.'.:•'''' %  '*•' %  I I niriral Installations and Repairs. Our Wlr.n Dapartinant carriea a complete stock of Wirintf Accraaorlea and UI under Uka the installation or repair of all kind, nf Wiring Jobs In Horr.ee or ractoriea Dial ina or 4T10 Learn to remember number* Jtecice on Oura. DA COSTA ft CO LTD Remrlc.il Drill 1BS.U ft-. Reports:— OVER $2,000,000 NEW ISSUE DURING 1951. Barbados Fancy Molasses Production and Export Acts 1937 and 1939. <; w ii,,1.1,111 .i, A Co. U 1 Irajh at afc. per lb"0 *. .NBON A OO Ltd Dial 43E7 ORIENTAL PALACE HXADQ''AHTE1*S FOR ftfil'VENIRS FROM INDIA. CHINA i i 1 1 UN THAWS *, V, -. '. -.-. %'. '.'.% W/.V-V/A i on SAIJ: fiihmn V Claaa fpeedboal -built and mportad IBM Lenath IB II B> in> Drauahl It feet Seat l(1( | Bpard o* Trade requlremett ,,-rrr.l wilh Ford Walermolr io %  n .. | Maj i t. i rtas • % % %  Apply RJWDtALD niDCH.-^ \ NX L^hTTEJWS. —_a%ari 'I ".Tl ", w MirrcTiiHsoH A Co ,t-i* "J Under the above Acts, ttie Fumy Molaa*ea Control and MarketinK Board has allocated Ihe following amounts ol fancy moUsaes to bo anulaclured for the purpoae of e-tport by the plantaUona namud Theas allocaUons are subject lo approval by the Governor-ln-Execunve Coinmltlse at the expuation of seven days from the date of this publication:— — „ A'atn ot PlonWIion VV* Gal^* 1 CUB J0S.70S Colleton iSl. John) ?!rlS SSST.:: ::; .. : £ ::::::: £:! isaui 441,441 175.M1 RECORD ADDITION OF $571,646 TO ASSURANCE FUND. ACTUARY RECOMMENDS BONUS OF TWO PER CENT ASA RESULT ol the transactions for the year Kendal Newton . Spencers .3.871,145 aaj aue-ae-! >ou lake "Reaaira i.fll Oil EmulaloB". a pala'^B,. .r.i,-.n aafraaaaM SB* ol Viuaoa cited Cod liver Baf. me to glee youraelf a l> apply ln( when al the b FURNISH NOW IT'S EASY TIlR aajapM laWaaal W il* Sli.li.I. %  TARI* I Di Kllchen and Fano i *'.(*..!,., Tea T Boards—tUtehen. Cnina and D> room Cabinet*, laquor Ca D1LAWINO BlKM >*h Furniture for Llllle and BIB • PIANOS. Pram Ice Bolfi, Tvpewrller and alhel Mr. Thlnr ALL AT MOrfEV L.S.WILSON INVESTMENTS In exchan|?* for .Tumi COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA :,'. II... f the Auditors was fixed at $1,440. Donations to Charitv were approved at $2,500 for th year 1952. MR. WIGHT RE-ELECTED CHAIRMAN At a special meeting held afterwards Mr. Percy C Wight was unanimously re-elected Chairman. —~^aaamBBBBBBaaaaaaaaaieB**BBa>BaBi^Baw* a rr*--''




|







ESTABLISHED 1895



Public Utilities Bill Blamed
For Inadequate Electric Supp
Chamber Of Commerce
Urge Co. Directors To Act

Captain W. A. Brown, Chairman of the Board of Direc-
tors in London of the Barbados Electric Supply Corporation
told members of the Council of the Chamber of Commerce
yesterday that the Company “has every intention of con-
tinuing to expand the capacity of the Power Station so as
to meet the rapidly growing demand. However, any major
expansion depended on the success of negotiations between
the Company and the Barbados Government regarding the
removal of some undesirable features of the Public Utilities
Bill which would increase the difficulties of raising money
by public subscription in England. :

Captain Brown is accompanied
on this visit to Barbados by Mr.
A. W. R. Lovering, a Director and
Secretary of the Company, for the
purpose of conducting those nego-
tiations. After he had outlined
briefly the position of the Com-
pany, members of the Council em-
phasized some of the major prob-
lems affecting Barbados due to the
present condition, and urged the
Directors to do everything in their
power to try and alleviate the
present serious position,

Addressing the Council after re-
ceiving a warm welcome by Mr.
G, H. King, President of the;
Chamber, Captain Brown in a pre-
pared speech said: .

The Directors much regret the
inconvenience suffered by the in-
habitants of Barbados owing to the
irregularities which have occur-
red in the electricity supply dur-
ing recent years.

The original cause of the
trouble was the refusal of the
U.K. Government during the
War and immediately after-
wards to allow the Company to
purchase additional Plant. But
unfortunately when circum-
stances did permit the acqui-
sition of more Generating Sets
failure of the engines installed
in the Power Station has pre-
vented the benefit of the in-
creased output being fully felt.
The Manufacturers of the Sets

have had representatives here for
some time, who haye been doing
their best to put matters right, and ;
I have no doubt that all difficul-|
ties will shortly be overcome
The Company has every inten-
tion of oa to Serine. the
capacity of the Power Station so
as. Seinadet the rapidly growing
r , demand. The first stage will be
have been doing is the very op-!an addition to the exisiting Diesel |
posite of socialism,” he said; “we] Plant. We believe that, on our re- |
have been getting means of pro_|turn to England, we shall be able
duction back into the hands of in-|to complete arrangements for the
dividual private enterprisers ” purchase and erection of a set of
The: President spoke at an out- @ On page 5

be ae! beeper ead at cee

Monument honouring agricul- .
Reds Lift
oad Blockade

tural Department employees for
BERLIN, May 15.



Capt. W. A. BROWNE

Farm Programme

Not Socialistic

TRUMAN

WASHINGTON, May 15.

Truman rejected as “plain ho-
kum” charges that the democratic
farm programme is socialistic In
a speech reminiscent of his 1948
campaign oratory, he struck at
“Mossi * who oppose his farm
policies -~n the ds that the

hat we



















t
t

\t

t













outstanding service. Truman said

that the federal farm programmes

developed during 20 years of de-

mocratic administrations “enabled

the farmers of America to build!

the strong agricultural economy

we know to_day. “In this way we} The Russians with chess

demonstrated that by, positive ac-| tactics halted one United States

tion We can use powers of our gOVv-| military police patrol on the Ber !

ernment to make our resourcés;jin-West German highway bu!

and our freedoms work for every-| allowed the British and the se-

body’s benefit. “In these twenty!cond United States patrol through. |

years we brought about real re-|At the same time the Russians | ,
t

a

¢





Western Peace Contract and three
days of hysteria could result in an

through the Chesapeake and Dela-

members are missing. Five of the

' gulfed the westbound Hayes soon
| after the collision with the steam-
| ship Barbara Lykes shortly after

smoke rolled lazily over the Dela-

16, 1952 -



FPRIT aY, MAY
!
ly

|

Beginning on oar
fascinating story of old
house which became the
cipal home of Our Ro
ily and the setting for some of
the most brilliant and «ost
‘ar a ae “sg in our his-
tory as yy Marguerite
Peacock. Book your copy of
Sunday’s Advocate NOW.

CONGREGS



‘







he 658.000 men taking part in



Peace Pact
May Rouse
Communists



Finland Fund

ae Donations for the to
By PHIL NEWSOM. ASK; S FOR Perum. te tae Cheat Soups
The si og of nw it thei i conted. Bt, the Royal Bank of
e signing of the West German WW bay? se,
Peace Contract. by the Big Theos IN , Canada, Marclay’s, Bank, obs
Foreign Ministers may touch off || the office of the Advocate.
three big days for Communists | “The Farnum for Finland
at the present U.S., France and | ene ee 8) a
ritain are scheduled to sign ; ‘ 1 iy cere’ Le
papers restoring virtual sovereign- An vt ’ ae * “Tao | Sompetition and win $25.00 at
ty to West Germany on May 24 | 4 ing j i vostiag |] the Same time helping the
On May 25, General Matthew B iemanding immediate Jnvestige- fund.
Ridgway is scheduled to arrive in} UO"S Of the Koje Island com Goal... ...... 2... $8,880.00
Paris to take over as European munist war prison camp inc. -1} Amt. Prev. Agk... «, mse
Supreme Commander. and on May jent. The lawmakers are indic-} Ch. Ch. Boys’ Schoo) 8,00
26, European Defence Community { 12"t about the whole affair. They i DOOGRER ib 6 cavities sss 1.00
Treaty is to be signed. Coinci-] vant to know how Brig. General|{ St,, Matthias Liter,
dentally, important Italian local] Francis T. Doda could fave let} uray & Sports Club 5.00
elections also come on May 25.] Simself be captuged by Commun Olympia Club 10.00
Any one of the four events nerm-] st priscners and “how Brig. Gen- Professor aud Mrs.
ally ous at the signe for Com-]| 2ral Charles F. Colson, His gue- 0.'N. Weekes. 5.00
munist outbreaks. Coming con-}2essor as camp Commandel & poaac
secutively as they do they create] >ould have made a concession for | § -BaA96

® situation of potential Avnamite.
_In Italy and France demonstra-
tions will be dealt with by police
and handled as strictly internal
matters. Prospects are excellent
for a few cracked heads, but prob-
ably no international incidents
The real danger spot is Germany
and the core of trouble is the city
of Berlin, There East Berliners are
being urged by Russians into mas-
sive demonstrations against the

Dodd's release.



“Representative Miké@, 2,ansfeld
said he would introduce it resolu-

} ‘
tion today asking the hgure to as- Defence Plan
sign the armed serVicés @6mmit- |
tee to look into the incident. He} ;

| Can Avert

said “they don’t need a Brig.
PARIS, May 15,

General in charge of thet camp.
What they ought to have is a

Lord Ismay, Secretary-General
of the North Atlantic Treaty Or.

marine top sergeant,” He ac-
cused Dodd of ‘outrageous care-|

ganization, said to-day that if the!
West can carry out its defenca

lessness” in exposing hienself to}
rapture by the prisoners

Representative W. Sterling Cole
said he would ask Chairman Carl

internal incident.—U.P.



F : P 2 h A Vinson of the armed services plans in the next “two or three
our eris s committee to have that gi@up in-| years” without, war, danger point }
i "S vestigate the affair. Cole is a/ Will be passed, Ismay told a lunch- |
Shi Ss Collide member of the committee, Sen- ©9N session of 117 editors attend, |
p ate Republican leader Styles img the first general assembly of

the International Press Institute
that goals adopted by N.A.T.O.,
‘were “bare minimum.”

friends ask~

Bridges, said he would istroduce
a resolution today, requesting an
investigation by the Senate pre-|
paredness subcommittee. Bridges,
accused both Colson and ede

WILMINGTON, Delaware,
May 15.

Two collided halfway

ships Ismay

\oa how tong the , defence
a8} Build-up continue and what will

today unleashing a} ‘stupidity’ and saia Con
— = ne eats aoe 3 snotha investigate the “whole dis- happen when the West accumu-

sraceful affair.” He said the kid-| lated a great array of arms and.
napping of Dodd and the conces-|troops. “I have no idea of what!

anker’s 10-man crew leaped into sions made by Célaon Were

he 200-foot wide waterway and 7 \ made ; the time limit will be but it is my
paddled ashore, another was res-|'0 order for Communist propa~ hope as its my belief, that pro-j
‘cued from the water. ganda, vided we can by resolution, unity

and some self-sacrifice get over ;
, the next two or three years with-
out collision, the day will come}
when our energies will no longer |
concentrated on defence but
those other fields of common en-
deavour which can bring happi-
Ine s and prosperity to peoples of

However, the “Voice of Amer-
ica” said “hundreds” of prisoners
on.the island might have been |
killed if controversial} concessions | |
had not been made. “The Voice” | -
is trying desperately in a broad~ |
cast around the globe to counter

Flames visible for five miles en-

nidnight.
At daybreak a column of blatk



ware countryside from the still the Communist propaganda har-| the free world,” Ismay replied to
like, burning tanker, The 270-foot| Tage touched off by the incident the Tae querry.—-U.P,

Hayes was carrying 700,000 gal- Officials here were not surprise |

ons of high octane gasoline, when General Mark W. Clarke,;

Far East Commander, repudiated |

No one tried to put the fire ut} the concessions
ind firemen were unable to get
‘lose enough to battle the flames

18 mud banks and woods border

Talks On Vietnant

State Department officials said PARIS, May 15.

the “terms which the Red prison-

coe ee slowed inspection at Sata carry: ee canal. ers laid down for Dodd’s release Pl cals gongs Ear apts
. jing trucks on the in end o vere s e ith propagandat}. has been invited by the US
. Truman said “new deal” and|the 180-mile international high-| The crash occurred near Sum- ba ore aaate Gaon ae eae = b Fo
fair deal administrations had/ way and some 40 to 50 eae Teak Bridge, Delaware about 20)) 1. United States to: take vituatbon Me nen Meise
been opposed “every step of the) were backlogged this morning. miles south of Wilmington and tt literally. Military leaders ; I have petal ven an invitation
way” on their policies, but} The Russians suddenly lifted|halfway across the 19-mile canal }‘em »d previously that Clarke |1 the State, Department in
he felt farmers themselves needed| their week-long stoppage of U.S which connects the Delaware had hinte aL ‘h 7 romises Wi shington” Ts Yoarnen told
a little help in measuring their] military patrols yesterday follow-| River with upper Chesapeake Bay,}â„¢ight repudiate ua Mieke z - 1s. he..stepped dawn
own benefits “All this talk about|ing a meeting between Allied mili.| The captain of the 270-foot) which prisoners ‘won by newsmen & ppe

socialism is just “plain hokum,”
he said, pointing out that in 1932
less than 50 per cent. of American
farms were owned by people who
operated them compared with 75
per cent. owner operation to_day.

“There are 250,000 more farm-
ers who own their own farms to-
day than in 1932. That does not
sound like socialism to me. It
sounds like real free enterprise.

—U-P.

Ist TV Crook

LONDON, May 15.
The first crook to be trapped |
by television in Britain has been
arrested and jailed because he!
appeared on the show speaking
with the wrong accent,
Twenty-two year-old Colin
Groundwater said he | wi a
“frogman” underwater suledge
worker—from the Orkney Islands
off Seotland during an interview
on the “What’s My Line” Tv
show about unusual occupations.
But Bank Manager Alexander
Dowie who was watching tefe-
vision that night wondered why
Groundwater did not have an
Orkney accent. He remembered
that some bad cheques showed
up at his bank with Ground-
water’s name on them. Dowie
called police and told them his!
story.
Yesterday Groundwater was!
sentenced ‘to 15 months’ impris-}
onment after he pleaded guilty,

to mening stare teed 150 WORKERS FOR U.S.

JAMAICA TAKES
IN NEW YORK

Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, May, 15.
While the American oil strike

con*inues B.O.A.C’s once weekly

at Russian military headquarters

in Potsdam.—U.P. I



|
|
\



H.M. THE QUEEN

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, May 15.
Three hundred odd loeal appli-
eants for U.S, jobs selected from |
cver 2,000 will be presented to
1ecruiting officials expected this
week end for the final pick in a|
| quota of 150.





(From

| ATOM SUB BY 1954?

direct London—Jamaica service’ WASHINGTON, May 18,

t G40 take in. New The navy said today the keel
will be rerouted to take in of the Nautilus the first atom
York. This will mean an addi-|;wereq submarine will be laid

tional three or four hours to nor-/-come time in June. The keel lay-

mal flying time ing will take place in Connecti-
A B.O.A.C. spokesman aid\eut, The Navy declined.any other
today that the first flight on the/information at this time. It said
new route would be on Monday.|in the past however that it
The service will revert to nor-}expect to launch the Nautilus in
mal when the strike finishes 1954 —U.P.

tary liaison officers and Russians | tanker and one of those saved said
that his vessel was struck on the
side by the Barbara Lykes.—(CP)







mail” from Colson who conducted ]from the. plane that brought him
negotiations for Dodd's ar Jhere from Saigon ot



Eisenhower Lunches With Queen

LONDON.

General Eisenhower aud
his wife lunched privately at
Buckingham Palace witb
Queen Elizabeth II and the
Duke of Edinburgh as the
General said goodbye to Lon-
don again for the second
time in seven years,

The General and _ wife
swept past the gate of the
Pal at 12.30 p.m, as 4
crowd of 200 onlookers
waved and two guardsmen
in brilliant scarlet tunics and
bearskin helmets gave a crisp
salute.

It was the beginning of 2
busy two days for the Eisen-
howers in a city that. truly
likes him going back to Wr
days when he led the in-
vasion of Europe and won
a tumultous hero’s welcome
after V.-E. Day.

The Eisenhowers were
first received at the Palace
by the Queen Mother, Eliza-

Oil Men Will Go Back

WASHINGTON May 15.

LIJIGH government officials who asked not to be named,

predicted that most of the 90,000 striking oil workers | ‘ ,
will be back on the job “within the next 48 hours.” They aueee ae in = a st
expected the agreement to be signed quickiy at the 15 cents | Exchange Snanies Weanesacy,
per hour ceiling imposed by the Federal Wage Stabilization | The pound sterling was down 1/8
Board yesterday. | of a cent at $2.80 9/16, In Montreal

The co-ordinating committee of 22 CIO, AFL. and inde- | the United States dollar closed
pendent unions involved “reluctantly approved the settle- eee a : ce e .taca8
ment” on the basis of the Board’s ceiling. The unions had |r. S anoleiiged- tiie Dueminy's
demanded an 18 cent hourly boost lose, That is it took $0.98 19/32

However, B. J. Schafer, Vice President of CIO, oil (eanaeies) to eae, $1 ee)
workers, said that since the “companies haye insisted on | fhe pound sterling was at $2.76
plant by plant bargaining, which is cumbersome it may Le Tee” down 1/16 from Tuesday's
quite a while before all striking groups are back at work.”

—UP.

beth, widow of the late King
who became close and in-
formal friends of the Gen-
eral during the war. Ther
they lunched in a small reom
at the Palace wit: only
Elizabeth and Philip presert.
Later this afternoon they
were to be received by the
84-year-old Queen Mar~ at
Marlborough House,

This evening Prime Minis-
ter Winston Churchill and
Mrs. Churchill will entertain
Eisenhower at No. 10 Down-
ing Street at a banquet to be
attended by the top Govern-
ment and military figures of
Britain.

After driving to the Pal-
ace the great wrouyht iron
gates of Wellington Arch at
Hyde Park corner were
swung open for the shining
Rolls-Royce in which the
Eisenhowers rode. The gate
usually is not opened except
for royalty —U.P.

te



Gen. EISENHOWER



“*

Canadian $ Down

NEW YORK, May 15.

The Canadian dollar was down
1/32 of a cent at a premium of



—CP)

4 Se ~ de



PICKETS FORM HUMAN CHAIN AT STR

HOLDING HANDS, a group of pickets form a human chain at the main'ge cof
in Gary, Ind. They were standing by to prevent cars and truck

Farnum Yor |\|*Prisoners Of War.

PRICE: FIVE. CENTS

Butler
Outlines

UK Crisis

MINERS DEMAND
WAGE INCREASES

LONDON, May 15

Chancellor of the Exchequer
R. A, Butler called in 50 top in-
lustrialists and Union leaders
to-day to help fight Britain's
economic. crisis just a few hours
ifter coal miners added the!x
Olce to. these Ballifa frre wage

| increases.



UCK STEEL PLANT

ai




the 0. S. Steet Co

pat plant
tering the strikebound area, Most
m CIO President Philip Murray

trom e@
the stee} walkout are awaiting orders [



Butler outlined the economic
jcrists to an emergency meeting of
jthe national joint advisory coun-
; cil in the Commons and he was
expected to

Do Not Negotiate”

SAYS NEW CHIEF

call for both wage

| and profit restraints. But just a

KOJE ISLAND, KOREA, May 15. io 7. before the meeting

Brigadier General Haydon L Boatner, new commander , >)” tam Uawther President
ste oie t vie : 7 , i doe “~ the National Union of Mine
0 nite ations dje island prison camps taid down @&) workers said negotiators would

tough policy and said that Communist captives might as; begin the immediate preparation

well stop making demands because “prisoners of war do not °f the claim for
wage increases for

“substantial”
700,000 miner

; »

_ negotiate,” Boatner who took over the | in nationalized coal mines.
turbulent camps aftey Brigadier- z

e e General Charles Colson was tired | Almost every major sector of

Britain May by General Mark Clark said the) b@bour is now. demanding wage

situation, is still “inflammabie,” | \bereases on the . grounds that

He said he is going to make some Butler's budget has brought up

ose Jet changes | prices. Three railroad unions lest

Clark supreme United Nations, Week demanded 4 ten per cent
Commander said that Colson ex-| '"¢Tease for 450,000 members,

ceeded his authority in granting |

Race ToU.S.

The miners’ claim was

embarrassing “concessions” to} on by , decided

. pe < fl yY a meeting of the Union's

By ROBERT JACKSON Communists for, the release of ‘national executive and ative
LONDON, May 15, |@rig-General Francis T, Dodd) commented on this

\ ; fn . ‘ afternoon’:
Britain may lose to the United ifter Dodd's capture by prisoners eeting with Butler “Tt's the





















States. the headstart in jet air-| Boatner former frontline Com- Chancellor's ) alk » has
liner travel she thas gained . pander, who fought, at “Heart-’ talked ro com ‘arenas “phe
her fabulous Comet because! 2reak Ridge” said that the 79,200 ae:
military demands are such that] isoners on Koje will be treated The Treasury bulletin for the
she is ‘urning out only one] strict accordance with the ‘dustry published to-day mean-
Comet per = month aviation] ieneva convention but will cet, while warned that higher labour
experts admitted, o favours osts will send up export prices
British Overseas Airways i time when Britain is tr z
Corporation now has only four He said “prisoners of war do increase her exports ass a
Comets for ithe. South African] \ot negotiate. They are getting’ atter of economic life and death
run. whigh it inaugurated last;!’anmunjom (the site of truce —UP.
week—the fifst commercial jet] alks) and this place mixed up.
2" ha a — i (here is no negotiating about the
le avilanc Aircraft Com-] teneva convention, It is all right 2
pany now has in, the production}‘here in print.” He said in the Prisoners Used

stages an improved Comet with
sufficiently greater range than it
can be put on the most lucrative

) ist prisoners have received “more
han is required by the Geneva
nvention,.” He said “They have

Kor ‘Experiments’:

of airline routes—the North Hen exter rivileges which they Y * y
Atlantic Run, That plane will Te Nan ania tate GT teeth Communists Sa
Ay, Sauk: Yaste to Mew steak lal usurped, Prisoners still would Ly

et “everything possible” in the

little over

a six hours. But the P. 5
alveraft industry bottleneck here ay of fair treatment under the Coduhunae Bake Ae: 8
May uch. that "the longer a snvention ap they have in the ba Uni ; Sorry
Comet Will not be able to stat vate ‘olonel Wi arte ty priemen it
the Atlantle run for approxim-| Lieut. Colone Ider Military} ¢¢,). “experiments” with atomic
ately two years. Police officer who narrowly €S-Tiombs atid erm wartare
British aviation men fear that] “ped seizure with Dodd said the]; Nj immediately illed the
competitive U.S. airlines shaken] isoners are still making verbalf jarge “ridiculous”. It was the
by the threat the Comet poses on] ind written demands, He said] j;st ‘time such a charge has
luxury services will apply such] their chief demand is for the rightfocen made at the Korean truce
pressure that they will get af o organize an Association off \ujks here, and Vice Admiral C
United States jet airliner into} orisoners to inspect the compounds{ Turner Joy, senior allied dele-
service before BOA, hasfon the island. This is one of the] (ate, promptly denied it
sufficient Comets to grab North} ‘concessions’ made to gain Dodd's
Atlantic supremacy, lease but which was invalidated The charge was contained ir
—UP. hen Clark made repudiation off) list of “criminal acts” sub-
the deal —U.P. nitted by North Korean General



Nam Il. It virtually matched the

BRATHWAITE ACTING



’ - wording included in the agree-
Gendarmes Arrest HWARDEN ment communists @btained for
N Li iali t Le d | CHURC vt - release of Brig. General
Natioual suder | At an emergency meeting yes-[ Francis T, Dodd, former Koje
8 rday, the St. Michael Vestry Island prison camp commander,
» ; ow if | , anted their Churchwarden,f who was captured and held for
PARIS, May 15 , ,
Si tiaras ciatat ae attiion. V. C, Gale, leave of absence three days. This supported the
The French Police said that M
Algerian Nationalist leader Hadj,|!'0â„¢ yesterday until the end offstatement by General Mark
p asta after nesterday’s blondy | tis month, “The Vestry theal Clark Supreme Unived Nations
arres oc atten ease ee 200CY | appointed Mr. Christie Brathwaite} Commander that the Dodd inci-
rioting at Orleansville Algeria)ine genior Guardian, to act a8fdent was intended by Reds to
was flown to Paris and imme-|Churchwarden until Hon. V. C.] “manufacture propaganda’”’,
diately shipped to an undisclosed|Gaje is ready to resume his —U.P.
residence in Western France, duties.
Hadj, Leader of the anti-
French ‘“‘Movement for the Tri- . fob :
umph of Democratic Liberties’| BEA l Y AND PROTECTION

was seized at Orleansville south-
east of Algiers after his followers
and police clashed during
inti-French demonstration
Police said three Arab dernon-
trators were killed and a large
iumber injured. Four policemen
vere injured by flying stones
lub
Police said that Hadj haq re |
ently been banned from the Oran
Jepartment bordering Tunisia for!
nti-French speeches in the vi-,
‘inity of this turbulent area. He
ill not be allowed to leave the
|
'
|

an

and

lepartment of his new enforced
esidence.—U P.



Strikers’ Canes
Won’t Be Ground

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, May 15
Twelve and a half acres o
anes were destroyed by fire las!
Monday night at Calivigny Estat
belonging to the Grenada sugar
‘adctory where ‘workers are
ttrike since March 27 protesting
ythe employment of an overseer o1
the ground that he is not a mem-
ber of the M.M.W.U. The fire was
he biggest yet of several, since
the crop began, |
Insisting on its right to employ,
the staff of its choosing the fac-
tory has stood firm refusing to
grind the cahes of a large num-,



0

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With Bergertex, chere’s new beauty and protection for walls of

onerete, plaster, brick or stone. Waterproof and weather resisting

Bergertex cannot crack or peel off, for in drying it hecomes an integra

part of the wall on which it is painved Its crisp, matt finish sti



ber of tenants on the estate un- fresh and smart almost indefinite
less its own are cut, | < :

A prolonged dry spell is sitins | Vergertex is available in mars
ing the canes of the tenants who delicate célours fot use inside
also are not earning any wages.' ;

Other large grinders also refuse! outside
the tenants’ canes
MADE BY

MEETING ON WEST
GERMANY

BONN, May

Chancellor
and Allied High
Commissioners today held what
may be their last meeting in|
eight months of hard negotiation |
to replace occupation by virtual}
sovereignty for West Germany.

BERGER PAINTS

15
West German Kon-

rad Adenauer





ON SALE
AT ALL HARDWARE STORES

Allied officials said they exam-'
ined drafting alterations in the;
treaty syst to end occupati
reaty system to end occunstom-| GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents
PAGE TWO



Carib Caling








IN Vv. ¢ GALE, M.L H Managing Director of thé
Advocate Co, Lid. left yester
day for a w or busine
trip to Canada -

He i expected to” return to
Zarbados on Monday, During hi
absence M, (€ A, Brathwaite
JP. will act as Churchwarder ;

Cocktail Party a
R. G. H. ADAMS, C.MG., P
M M.C.P. held a_ Cocktail P
Party at his residence “Tyrol
Cot”, Spooners Hill yesterday
evening in honour of the student:
attending the Trade Union
Course

Spent Twe Weeks

“
_#

t



salad

Bermuda an hour
scheduled time due to tall winds
travelling about 90 miles an hour

Canadians Here On
Holiday

RRIVING

yesterday

morning

by T.C.A, for two weeks’ holl-
juy were Mr, and Mrs, W, Finn
ind their two sons Ricky = ar
Terry who are staying at No,

Bungalow, Coral Sand:

Mr. Finnie is Instrument Plyir
Instructor employed by T.CLA, ¥
that they had a

rip coming down and

They had lote of rain im Mar

ute

very good
reached
earlier than the

5

Ma
le

treal and the Spring had been very
They aleo had a tremendous
arnount of anow during the winter | eaould use beth hands to ho.
which took long to melt and they

ut

R. J. H, BUCKLAND who did not get rid of it until abo
has business interests inter the middle of April =a ne
J ? pc 4 n De
ests in Upton, Ontario, returnec Hon, ¥. ©, GALE, MAL ;, thelr last oor gore ¢ a’ tees
to Canada yesterday morning b> and when he_ le on
T.C.A, after spending two week perature was about af

here on business combined with

Directors Mest

This is Mr, Finnte’s first visit

to

pleasure staying at the Sea View H°* " A. CURB, C.B2 the letand, but the ee =
: « ‘ » i ( on t

Guest House of which he is the ML.C., left for Trinidad wife and the yore one re

proprietor Monday by BWA ne to enjoy Ue ‘

} He joined other Directors o athtag
With T.L.L, , , British West Indian Airways next Venezuelans
M* AND MRS HAROL day for Jamaica where they are MONG the recent arrivals to
Id ane ae i ne Py , holding a meeting of the com the colony from Veneruela
children were arrivals yesterday pany, \ sy hy and Mire. C. i
morning — by BW.LA from | ‘Tinis meeting was arranged to cheer ioe tee children and
HecealWooao ontee Me My. Bécommodate Mr. HO. B. Wood Mrs : Paith Khan and her two
Haskell who is a son Of Mr, HN jing who had legal business in are. ai eer tenn “quer
Haskell, retired Headmaster of jasyajon and another director ° i a . aoe OE tae ene
Harrisom College and Mr Ha who could not leave Jamaica = Sea ax guests at the Rockley
kell, ee employed with T, | Normally the meeting would ee cs
at Potit-a-Pierre have been held in Trinidad Reach Clu

Leaving Teday
R G. W JENNINGS
Jarnaica who came out her
about two weeks ago on business
expects to return home to-day
by B.W.LA, He will be accom
panied by this wife who joined
him a week ago for a holiday
staying at Roeckley Beach Club

Spent a Week
AT spending a week's
holiday staying at the Hotel
Royal, Mr. A. Carbajal of Vene
zuela, returned home yesterday

morning by B.W.LA. via Trini-
dad,

Paid Routine Visit
D" JOHN ADLER, Presiden

of the Independent Explora-
tion Co., Lid. of Texas, U.S.A,
left for San Juan yesterday
morning by B.W.LA, on his way
back to the U.S.A,

Dr, Adler who was here on a
short visit staying at the Hotel
Royal, came out on a routine

visit in connection with the work
hig company is doing for
Barbados Gulf Oil Company



the Hom H. A, CUKE,

Business and Pieasure
R. AND MRS, M, BR, LAM
British Guiana whe

been in Barbados for

weeks, expect to remain for

ot

have
several
an

other two or three staying at Ber-

wyn Guest House, Hastings
Mr. Lam who spent a month

in

Trinklad before coming here said
that his visit here is one of busi-

ness coupled with pleasure
Principal of M. R tam. Manuf

He is

ace

turers’ Commission, Life and Fire

Insurance Agent
Comptroller of Custom
N Barbados for a
is Mr, Louis Spence, ©
of Customs, Trinidad
yesterday morning
B.W.LA. and s staying at
Ocean View Hotel

Back te St. Vincent

troher
arrived

short visit

Comp-
He

the

R JUSTICE MANNING and
MRS. MANNING of St
Vineent, returned home yester-
day afternoon by B.G. Airways
after spending a holiday in Bar-

Ocean View Hotel

GB. E., M.L.C, baces, ‘They were staying at the

What Makes Hair Thrive

You would, if you had
choice in the matter, pick the
sort of ancestors, To a
long line of well-thatched
tors is highly important, as heredi-
ty is thought to be the
factor in determining whether or
not he will be bald in early life. tr

rightis

you is important be-

anyvessential for general

ances found
meat,
decisive cereals, peas, beans, and peanuts, give it,

vitality also
thought to be important for the

in liver,
wheat

kidneys,
germ, whole-grain

You can see that the best hair

eatment is the internal one that
You, as a woman, need have little makeg

worry about .
Ye ry + i point. Heredity Ubeval

good blood and supplies it

is beneficial, too.



\Â¥ to the sealo. But ont mente,
side treatment

clinging, see a skin doctor.
The growth and character

depend largely on the care

For example, dry hair,
by internal factors, over-y

of

man, a colour and life of the dair, It is your hair depend mainly on what
lean happens inside your body. Looks

you

caused

aro

cessing or too frequent perma-

feelg harsh, looks strawy,

or unsuitable shampoo
and

a it determings what colour to bring about good results ‘aster. dull, and is stubborn to arrange.
= ae ee ea hair will be Dally scalp massage is excel- But you can make it behave, A
or curly er it will be straight lent to encourage circulation, This conditioning cream, used after a

: is not difficult or complicated; shampoo, will make it feel silkier,

You can't change your ancestry, ry
but you can do a great deal to p
have healthy hair, You can make 4)
the most of what you have, You
can Help to keep it well nourished,

y inch,

‘ust move the scalp firmly inch
with the pads of the
nyers

Stimulating tonies may be help-

look smoothier, and stay in p

better, Of course, the effec

temporary, but it is good,
Too oily hair won't look d

lace
t is

ank

‘ ful, but use them as an aid to and greasy if you have regular
alive, and growing, You can take massage, Don't depend on the permanents, shampoo every five or
expert care of it, in order to bring tonic alone to do the job, six days, ,
ot all its colour, shen, and Keep your scalp free from Baby-fine hair is a nuisance. If

Five ipeide hatin - J dandruff, Ordinarily, this can be you have this problem, you need
ae elle * lush a } ~ a the done by thorough brushing regu- an expert cut and a style that re-
Soon "on 7 te »y the larly and washing the hair as soon quires no pins, Have your hair
hatucat roche Sor Wanted one as oe roe Gey ee If trimmed regularly; get 2 good
when: it goee out of kilter end Med does not solve the problem, permanent as soon as it becomes

your -hair becomes stringy, dry,
and lifeless, or when it thing
alarmingly, do you wonder what
has happened. What causes form-
erly healthy hair to act this way?
Broadly spenking, it is because the
nourishment it receives hag heen
diminished in quality or quanti-
ty,

A poor diet, lacking in the ele-
ments that make for maximum
health, slowly starves the hair,
An illness, even a brief one, may
cause the hair to fall out, An
operation, pregnancy, nerves,
overwork any intense mental or
physical strain or shock will take
its toll,

These effects do not show im-
mediately—often not until months
later and it takes an even 1onger
time for the hair to recover, Haic
forms slowly, especially under un-
favourable conditions, And if the
cells are starved, the follicle
simply closes shop and ceases to
produce,

What can you do to keep your
hair healthy? And if it should lose
its vigor, what can you do to
restore it? Keep yourself in the
best possible shape physically, The
hair ig so sensitive to any alter-
nation in the blood gupply that
sometimes the first notice you
have of a rundown condition is
u charge in your hair,

Watch Your Health

Make a habit of a well-balanced
meal, When you are having
troublé with your hair, you often
ask what vitamins will help it.
Actually, the proper balance of
food every day is much more im«
portant than any single vitamin,
But be eure you are getting sulll-
cient “Vitamin A, abundant in
carrotg, apricots, peaches, and
other yellow vegetables and fruits,
wreen . vegetables, milk, butter,
cheese, eggs, Vitamin B-complex,



NICE

SELECTION

y rubbing in a special tonie or

antiseptic lotion once or twice be-
tween shampoos, If the dandruff is
stubborn and becomes greasy and

limp, The timing and judgement

of test curls must be just ri

Clear away that
bidding fog!

Tee inexperienced player usually takes his partner’s protec-
tive bids at their face value, but the expert often tends to

Ku Lo the other extrem

Examples from imternational
matches frequentiy show a
player passing instead of making
the obvous overcall when the
Ndding is Opened cn his right
ye), when he has the luck to bear
iS pariner reopen, he continues
{0 pass or to g.ve Min mum
responses For sume reason the
rov@etive bd is assumed to have
Neon) made gn the mere amet) of
in oil-rag



who prote
‘ives dang
» best of mes 0 it
0 1 responder to help
wy the fog that envely
vdding In the fo lowin
oxample of mudedied ii
North he'd this hand
ABS Y KV65%
KR 763
Had South opened ihe +
With One Spade. Nort!
lemporice with th one
foree Two Diamond.
ink tO Jump to game on Lye
round if South's Spad
rebiddable But a very diff
tuation arose when
dealer ot game al ‘ wd
With One Noe Trump. Norch and
Rast passed, and South reopened
With Two Spades.



yp cal
nicing.



dading

would

round
end
next

are

ol



Lost control

North promptiy bid Three
Diamonds and was not amused
‘es Sea himself left in this con-

LUNCH BAGS in all Colours ..

SHOPPING BAGS

WHITE HANDBAGS Latest Styles



tract South’s hand was this
®KQ1096,9 9863. O08
SAB S
In Three Diamonds, North jost
control and went two down
whereas Four Spades was un
beatabh
South
Diamonds
that it
a better

tha Phre
what $A
was nRGY oO 0
pari-score «contra
than Two Spades 5
Prospects being neg igeble ‘
the One No-lrump oid by We
Having already gone our on a
Umb. South was disposed
drop the bidding as early a
Possible before the opponen
Started doubling

There was vo case
beating @bout the bush

Assumed
meant



here to
south



intervention Was made with thy
knowledge that Bast and We
in spite of the former alend
might Well hod the balance o
strength Under the ru
Two and Three. his ba

KIX Pees winners baied o
ood

Ki five-card or longer sult ‘I
orth, band is almos sur
provide four additional winne
in a Spade contract

North, in faet miended to ba
Four Spades on the next row
over @ny a&anticipated reply to
Three Diamonds Bul the go
Was in Aight from the star ind
the only effect of his delayed
action tactics was to put Af
unfalr strain on bis partner



London Brpress Ser



ght;

for you, there's very little margin
between fuzz and no wave at all,





—
ee
Nite MREE SRS $3.80
with Zipp Fasteners .......,....... $4.76, $5.29, $6.15
PRIN £ hao va nu ane areas $3.99 to $9.99

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4606

spoon

H

and



Intertude, &
8.00 p.m

pm
10.15 p.m
pom



» BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Children Etiquette

nee:

1, At what age should a child
be taught table manners?
When he is able to sit at
the table with the family

Ans,

2. How

should a

Ansa, A baby should be taught to
put a spoon into its mouth peinted

\e end foremost,
vat 3. What are the five points a

baby must be drilled in?

Ans. A, To take small mouth

fuls; B. To eat very slowly; C. To
41L nothing; D. To keep ite mouth
nut while chewing; EB. And not ta
smear ite face with food

4. How should a child hold a

mug, @ @lase or a cup?

Ana, Until its hands are strong
under good control, a ehild

mug or a glase

5. When should a child be al

1 lowed to come to the diningsroom
for Sunday dinner’



baby use a







4 When it can eat without
i : ything or smearing its
liy ind = drink
grease “moons
without making any
noise.

before visitors

6. Should a child be corrected

°





Ans. It is wise not to correct
since too |much nagging in the
‘presence of strangers iessens a
child's incenuve lo g00a behaviour
pefore them

to the

7. Should a child be sent back

nursery for committing any
kind of table offehee or blunder?
“Ans. Yes, To send him back
immediately after the act occurs

would be a simple but an effective
punishment,

8. When

should a child -be

taught to use a fork, a knife, and

‘ poor’

Ans, When tt is old enough to
hold them; with constant practice
a
them properly



ehild naturally learns to use



’

ie

Rupert and the. Toy Scout—25












Arriving a stocking tree
Rupert finds’ ¢ several ot his
trends have got there fire: and
are busily discussing plans Alpy
and Rex have climbed into the
branches and are choo ve
positions Now that you here
you may as well hang all our

B.B.C. Radio.
Programme












FRIDAY, MAY 16 ise
1-715 pom, TSteM KM
4% pm The News 4
Daily Service, 4.15 » ive Mt
and Dave Kaye, 4.3 p.m. Bedtime With
Braden, 3.8 p.m Composer rr
Week Pa Listeners
Navy
Revels



ai-up and Prog
The News, 7!







e Curta
News, 10.10 pow News
The

the Third Programme

The

From

Many women are subject to weak,
aching back. Often the kidneys are
to blame, for your kidneys, along
with thé liver, must filter out im-
puritias from the bloodstream.

So if you feel tired, worn-out, head-
achy—with the nagging pain of on
aching back—look to both your kid-
neys and liver. That's why Cana-
diana have been relying on Dr.
Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills for over
half a century.

Give your system a_ chance to
work properly. ‘Try Dr. Chase’a
Kidney-Liver Pills today. The name
“Dr, Chase’ is your assurance. 3

Dr. Chase's

MIDNEY-LIVER PILL’



EMPIRE

OPENING TO-DAY, 2.30 and 8.30.

and Continuing Daily, 4.45
and 8.30

SHE HAD
EVERYTHING You
COULD GIVE A

WOMAN TO
TORMENT
A MAN!

News

Debate Continue »

< £46 < Aes
POSSESS SSE SOLO LLP LLL



stockings,"
brought pl

«

gre
“ You hav

T



Vv




re al



A

says Bill, “I've
ty of string and some
you leave room for
While they are work-

“Why, yeu
laughs Rupert
brought a stocking.
*s a pillow case 1"*

A

ns Mind
rybaxdy."*
Podgy runs up
dy th A





i
|

’
|

without making | Malone, retireq Chief Justice of
on its mug, or eat| the Windwards and Leeward: one
unnecessary | of her counsel for the Windwards,

|

‘VSLZSESCSSIO0CO8000000000000000066000060500000",

We sell the best of everything and recommend

FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1952

MALONE, Q.C.

=| GONQUER PAIN
SCIENTIFICALLY

H. M. the Queen has been
four well-praven medicines, |.t.. Phenacatin,

pleased to appoint Sir Clem2nt|

it was announced here,



medicines, scientifically balanced, work synergistically—that

they relieve pain fast, restore your sense of well-being !

RE Serenity Coons! Cow Cosessone and dentists
in Great Britain alone use it in their surgeries ! Fevers,

colds, headaches, toothache, rheumatism, neuraigia—this wonderful

few specific brings you amazingly quick relief from all of them !

costs little. You can buy it
ANACIN] two-tablet envelopes—
enough to bring quick relief from a
bout of pain. Or In handy 20-tablet
boxes. Or in S0-tablet botties—keep
one of these in your house.

ARM YOURSELF

CROSSWORD ©















































































Across
1 and 4. in no domain is it seen
i ‘aitiahty hetore nguyesnti oy AGAINST PAIN .
‘oun n ese en mn .
10 Often follows 12 in dressing. (3) ‘ ’ 70
? Chote os sere ponies severe 13} e GET ANACIN oA Y!
4 hat shows inc em A
14 Some mirth brovides him, (4) *AMAGIN’ 'e cold ln Great Britain and Seuth Africa voder the name ‘ ANADIN
15. Inflammation of the nose. (8) a
16. Inner casing, (6) = —— ~~
i t by the atart of 26 (3)
20, Almost a bull, (5)
23. The third and the inst call. (4)
24. Container of the military
La pe-etook % (4)
#9 ttain, (5)
and 27. See 9 Down. \ aired teenie ae nea tinted lee
Down \ BRIDGETO POWN BARBAREES OISTIN
4. What a fabulous ‘ot. (7) S178) (Dial 8404)
3. Follows some Yecreae® (4) Under the Patronage of [/TODAY: 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. || ro:
DAY & TOMORROW
4. See 1 Across. Col. R. T. Michelin & Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m
. Whone iattie vase you save? (4) “TODAY (3 Shows!” |] Sat MATURE Il-swoup IN THe
‘ nose a 3: 4 )
8 Modern trading centre in an / & 830 pm cea neae stp Dana AND DESEET”
0° piace, t AS na is
0 = aos ote 1 Acros, | nn : wg LAS VEGAS STORY
——ailernative . , a, &
11. Indisposed to severity. (8) THE BLUE LAMP hatte Boe sae eee THE WEST"
18 Such tears are never shed. (5) Jack WARNER—also : tarr Yvonne De CARLO
i. po sailors use 4 ad gravy ? (4) “SALUTE TO DUKE RAIDERS OF
22. See 9 Down, ELLINGTON” AHA Tete weet 1.20 Pm
24. The end of &Y (3) SAT. “Speciat 030a1.90|] TOMAHAWK CREEK]) Triple Attraction =
Baiation ot Pararden Oussle.— Aaseaa: BLACK EAGLE oe LAND"
‘ aseball; % ; 9 ; . .
wy Geptury: a Charm: "8: Uris: 8. William Bishop & FORT SAVAGE }] Rigid ARLEN &
baile; Bi, u >; 2 H
AS. dan: 26. Grit. Down: 1 Biscuit: DESERT VIGILANTE RAIDERS Tex WILLIAMS &
b Garett Soe neg ni dee Charles Starrett __ Coming Re-Rel Et
} 4 ’ ane ages one MIDNITE SPECIAL Sat; wae. MIDNIT ‘
Pe SUR Be ee Charles Starrett (Double) Errol FLYNN in naar

COWBOY CAVALIER
Jimmy WAKELY

and
SILVER RAIDERS
Whip WILSON

DODGE CITY

Anne SHERIDAN
Olivia De HAVILLAND

SOUTH OF DEATH VALLEY
IRENEGADES OF THE SAGE








GERM MOTOR OILS
at LOBE
HIGH CLASS LUBRICATIONS.

CENTRAL

Gasolene Service Statien

J--cvc.
SO



in
“ANOTHER MAN'S POISON"
a ee
)
)
)

rr —————

il
ARRIVED ,

Another Shipment of the

POPULAR

S4180 GAS COOKERS

A few of these have nov
booked

Prices of next shipment will be
higher

yet

bec

Why not call at your Gas Show- !
rooms, Bay Street TO-DAY anc
secure one of these cookers.

EMPIRE
au 4

To-day at 2.30 & 8.30 and continuing
dally 445 & 8.30
Bette DAVIS—Gary MERRILL



ee
Sat.. Miid-nite

To-morrow
t 30



at Gene Autny
Rod Cameron in
in Indian Territory
“River Lady” and
and Warner Baxter
Jungle Captain” .in
with Crime
Otto Kruger Dr, Gamble
OLYMPIC
To-day t¢ Mon. 4.30 & 8.15

R.K.O's Tripple Attraction
(1) JUNGLE HEADHUNTERS
(2) ROREINSON—TURPIN
2ND FIGHT

THE JUDGE STEPS oUuT

“™



pat. at 1.30 Sat.. Mid-nite

Duncan Renaldo

Super Thrills



in Super Action
) The Daring 4
Caballero ns

and Super Man

Urubu A Whole Serial

®

46+
CCCP BOOS

“a
s

Â¥






FOUNDRY LTD.



POSPOS9OEPIOS SOLES CODSS SOE SSOP

; GENTLEMEN |

HERE'S NEWS
FOR YOU!!



TODAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. Opening Io-morrow

Trafalgar Street. (Last Shows) 5.00 & 8.30 p.m. & Continuing





— on an
5999S9999S9956999950009", | re venture
GA ET Y | that most men

The Garden—St. James feared to face!



TODAY & TOMORROW 830 p.m,

“NEVER TRUST A GAMBLER”
Dane CLARKE & Ng
“LAST of the BUCCANEERS”
Paul HENREID

MIDNITE 8AT. 17
“LAW of the BADLANDS”
Tim Holt—Richard Martin

“PRAIRIE LAW”

George O'BRIEN










presents i
an |

" SSSSSSSSSSSSSS5656SS560" exciting \|
new idea |
ROXY in
To-day only 445 & 8.15 musical

J. ARTHUR RANE PRESENTS” !

“RED SHOES" oe

Opening To-morrow 4.45 & 815
and continuing Daily

Ann SHEREIDAN—John LUND ;
in

Starring
ROBERT

| TAYLOR:

vith HOPE EMERSON
JOHN McINTIRE

“STEEL TOWN” ~™
Color by Technicolor








DENISE

DARCEL

staining

2
MICKEY ROONEY « SALLY FORREST
Svaks VIC DAMONE + MONICA LEWIS
WILLIAM DEMAREST = JAMES CRAIC
YAY BROWN + LOUIS ARMSTRONG ‘tea® Story by Frank Capra

frataring MONT CARL OTLISAT WIRES, Directed by

Produced by
(eu | WILLIAM A. WELLMAN - DORE SCHARY

$e Wt pereee AN M-G-M PICTURE

Sat. Mid-nite Special
ABBOTT & COSTELLO in
“HERE COMES THE COEDS”
and “CAPTIVE WILD WOMAN”

ROYAL

To-day only’4.30 & 8.16
“THE FLYING SERPEANT”
and
“I ACCUSE MY PARENTS” ohare



Sereen Play by CHARLES SCHNEE



GRAND MIDNITE DOUBLE TO-MORROW

“PIN UP GIRL”
Betty Grable; Martha Raye; Charlie Spavik Orchestra.
- and -
“DAISY KENYON”

Joan Crawford; Dana Andrews and Henry Fonda.
Ln

GLOBE announces the resumption of - - -
“LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE” (
AUDITION SUNDAY, 18TH 9.30

POLICE SPORTS



To-morrow & Sunday 4.30 & 8.15

in

“TRY AND GET ME”
and

“SUN SETS AT DAWN”

Stafring:
Philip SHAWN —Sally PARR





Shortly)
A.M.

$5666>>



°

KENSINGTON OVAL

°





x,
; x
&
% Gentlemen friends, Customers and the male seec- ° MAY 22nd. 3 p.m.
$ tion of the general public:—
%
$ We acknowledge with thanks your several hints
x ey : i : :
s} recently addressed to us, suggesting that we give the ne «
RS Ladies only a monopoly of attention for Bargains ete., Admission : ADULTS 36c
% through the medium of our Sales, Parades and quite
recently our “Annual Exhibitions of Dress Materials. % CHILDREN 18c.
» >
% We take this opportunity to assure you that you are
‘ace fe * fever forgotten by us. When we appeal to the Ladies,
} We have in mind that in their capacity as housewives,
BETTE DAVIS % sweethearts, girl-friendg ete., ete., they shop for the
4 4 %s husbands, Sweethearts, Boy-friends, etc., and all mem-
VATy } bers of the household,, meaning that the gentlemen RIDE A eeece
GARY MERRILL, % goncerned shop by proxy.
5 ss .
FMIW MS % But now weare launching a special Parade for Gen- x
’ Wik (lemen in things of special interest to Men with the
& direct intention of interesting all Males who prefer or
% whose positions do not afford them to shop by proxy.
° “
Detailed particulars in connection with this Gen- | ;
i Yemen's Parade which will last for one week, starting %
i om Saturday, i7th May, will be announced later. 3 /
%
x i
: So, Gentlemen, tune your ears for the Bugle Call. x ‘e
°
\% x
fan surrng ANTMOMY STEEL se sense + hoe tes hone (as < >
pr ter her Paps Reet Ly ew Seren Wi tant || ss ry ‘ x , DRY LT.
Sases= | |N.E. WELSON & Co. {| THE BARBADOS FOUN
i % : White Park Road.
EXTR A Ig The Shopping Centre for Gentlemen of Distinction. g a Michael
SHORT, ss
NORMA, MIDSUMMER NIGUT’S § 31, SWAN ST. itt DIAL 3676. 3 b Office : 4326 Workshop : 4546
DREAM. S $)3 Merchandise: 4528 ” 4650
Paramount British News Reel. | .0140700s0.ce0oeeseocoseooseeesooeoooeosooosoooon | + SOSSOSSSESSE
i «



fa
FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1952



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Barbados Chamber Of Commerce |
Report Of The Council

For The Year 1951

Meetings

The following meetings were
held during the year:

The annual general meéting, two
quarterly general meetings, two
special general meetings, twelve
monthly meetings of the Council,

and three special meetings of the
Council.

Membership
The membership at the end of
1950 was 147. Duri 1951 nine
new members were Sn four
members resigned and one died.
The total number of members at

a end of 1951, therefore, was

Finance

The credit balance at the be-
ginning of 1951 was $2,439.99. Sub-
scriptions from members during
the year amounted to $5,414.80.
Receipts from other sources were
$180.98. The expenditure for the
year was $6,074.37, leaving a
credit balance of $1,961.40 at the
end of 1951. r

The Commercial Journal

The credit balance of the Com-
mercial Journal account at the
beginning of the year was $2,092.-
49. The receipts from subscriptions
and advertisements were $1,134.02.
The expenses in connection with
the publication of the journal
amounted to $830.57, leaving a
credit balance at ‘the end of the
year of $2,395.94.

Since the appointment of Mr.
Ian Gale as Editor of the Com-
mercial Journal the issues have
been appearing more regularly, A
new and more colourful coyer,
which will make the journal more

attractive, was produced during peig

the year. The number of journals
printed monthly has recently been
increased from 150 to 300.

Visitors
The Council were pleased to
welcome the following visitors to
meetings of the Chamber during
the year: Mr. A, R. Starck, U.K.
Trade Commissioner in Trinidad;
Mr. C, D. Thomas, President of

. the Clerks Union; Sir John Saint,

prior to attending the Common-
wealth Supply Conference in the
U.K, as an adviser; Mr, F. A.
Bishop, Controller of Supplies; Mr,
Cc. J. Burgess, Executive Secre-
tary (Economics) of the Caribbean
Commission; and Mr, Bernard
Braine, M.P., Secretary of the
West Indies Committee to the
Conservative Party.

The Chamber’s Dinner

During the year it was decided
at a quarterly general meeting
that the practice of holding an
annual dinner should ‘be discon-
tinued on account of the poor’ at-
tendance in, recent) years, It was
also
would be
if sufficient”
desire for it.

Obituary

The Council ,ecord with: regret
the death of the foll ‘during
the year:

Mr. Hilton H. Edwards, who
died on 21st January. In his early
years he worked with the firm of
W. L. Johnson & Co. He later en-
tered into partnership with Mr.
W. H. Roach and formed the firm
of Evelyn, Roach & Co, He served
for a number of years as a mem-~-
ber of the Highways and Sanitary
Commissioners of St. Michael. In
the field of sport he was principal-
ly interested in ‘horse racing and
was for many years the Official

;

Starter of the Barbados Turf Club. su,

Mr. D, L. Johnson, head of the

our of the

agreed that this function corpo

first worked with Messrs. W. L.
Johnson & Co., where his father
had been a partner. At the out-
break of the 1914 war he enlist-
ed and served as a Lieutenant in
the British West Indian Regiment.
On his return to the Island he
started his own firm as schooner
agents. He was interested in paro_
chial affairs, becoming a Vestry-
man and serving at one time as
Churehwarden. He was a keen
ae pina being a member of the

anderers Cricket Club and for
many years was a Judge at meet-
ings of the Barbados Turf Club.

a Conferences

e following are some of the
principal conferencés which were
held during the year, of interest
to the commercial community:

The First”Meeting of the Re-
gional Economic Committee was
held in Barbados ‘in May, under
the chairmanship of Professor
C. G, Beasley, Mr. G. H,. Adams
was the local representative, with
Hon. H. A. Cuke, Hon. K. R.
Hunte, Sir John Saint, Mr. D. G.
Leacock and Mr. G. J, Bryan as
advisers,

The Twelfth Meeting of the
Caribbean Commission was also
held in Barbados during May.
The conference was opened by His
Excellency the Governor and was
under the chairmanship of Sir
George Seel, Co-Chairman of the
U.K. section of the Commission.
This Chamber gave a_ cocktail
party at the Marine Hotel in hon-
rs and staff of
the Commission, Chamber mem-
bers and local officials also be-

ing invited.

conference of Supply Officers

‘the British Caribbean was
here during the month of
April, with Professor C. G. Beas-
ley as Chairman. Mr, F. A. Bishop
was the local delegate.

The Rice Marketing Board of
British Guiana arranged a con-
ference which was held in Trini-
dad in March for representatives
of those colonies in the Caribbean
who were supplied with rice by
British Guiana, to meet members
of the Board and negotiate new
prices for rice. The local delegates
were Sir John Saint and Mr. F.
A. Bishop, with Mr, S, H. Kinch,
a member of this Chamber, as an
adviser,

The Seventeenth Congress of the
Federation of Chambers of Com-
merce of the British Empire was
held in Loydon in June. Mr. R. M.
Cave was in London during this
month and he represented this
Chamber at the congress.

from

Incorporated Chambers of

Commerce of the British
Caribbean
Arrangements are being made
for the Ninth Congress of the In-
rated Chambers to be held
$5 British Guiana in October, 1952.
e Council

: a com-
mittee to select suitable subjects
which this Chamber will present
for consideration at the congress.

Control of Advertising Signs

The Council appointed a com-
mittee during the year to make re-
commendations for a scheme of
voluntary restriction by firms in
the display of advertising signs.
This committee, working with the
co-operation of the leading local
firms who do a large amount of
advertising by means of advertis-
ing signs, and the Civic Circle, re-
commended that advertising signs
outside of the city limits should be
restricted to a size of twelve square
feet. The Committee drew up a
list of built-up areas where they
advertising signs could

be displayed and recommended

firm of D. L. Johnson & Co. He that outside of these districts ad-



Here is a simple Cross Word
win $25.00 for only one
be doing your bit to help send

puzzle which can help you to
. At the same time you will
‘bados’ sole Olympic hope to

Helsinki next July. Enter now

try your
NOTE NEW DATE OF GLOSING OF ENTRIES IN CLAUSE

1.
the prize.

2

RULES
The first correct solution opened by the Editor will win
In the event of there being no correct solution the one

containing the least errors which is opened first by the

HORIZONTAL

1—Who was the father of Elia-
saph?

5—Elevate

10— What is the fourth book of the
New Testament?

14—Prophetie scene
battle at the end

16—Oil: comb. form.

17—Fish net.

18—Lairs.

19—Titles of address. .

20—Loathers.

22—One of the places where the
Lord prophesied great pain

23—Residence.
24—Imitate.

26—Great operatic tenor.
28—One of David's sons

33—The turmeric.

34—Depart.

36—Tropical rodents.

37—Propagate.

39—Jewel.

40—Used scraping tool.

41—Who was filled with the Holy
Ghost?

42—Ruin

43—Peculiar.

44— Hagarder.

45—Days in the week.

46—Prefix: two.

47—Patrivtic society ‘abbr.)

48—Langhid

50—By What river did Ezekiel see
visions of God?

53—Auditory organ.

54—Blast

55—Masculine nickname.

57—Who washed his hands in
token that he had no responsi-
bility in the conviction of
Jesus?

62—Crippled

63—Fertile earth.

65—Tint.

ot the at
of the world

66—A son of Judah
67—Necessary elements.

tured slab.
71—Location.
VERTICAL

s—Note road.

+ i “gf the scale.
7—March date.
8—Pertaining to sound.

g—' d
10— is the sixth book of the
ld Testament?

11—Medies.
ib Qoe eo Asia turned away from
al

13—Olfactory o
is—Twenty “of these are worth a
shekel

7—Primary color.

28—Upper garment of Jewish
priest

29—"Church of the ——

(0— Frosted.

1—Mournful.
remee adependent union.

89—Donated.
41—In what story form did Jesus
speak?



vertising signs should only be
placed at the country shops. ese
recommendations were circulated
to all firms likely to advertise by
means of signs or hoardings along
the highways. The Council are
pleased to record the co-operation
of the majority of firms in this
matter.

Vigilance Committees

On the suggestion of the Presi-
dent the Council recommended to
the principal sections of_ business
that they should appoint Vigilance
Committees for the purpose of ad-
vising him, and to bring to his at-
tention matters affecting their
trade which they felt should be
dealt with by the Chamber. As a
result of this recommendation.
Vigilance Committees were ap-
pointed for the following sections:

Lumber and Hardware, Dry
Goods, and Druggists.

The Grocery Trade felt that
their interests were being ade-
quately looked after by the Pro-
vision Merchants Association and
for this reason there was no need
for a Vigilance Committee of
Grocers.

The Council look forward to
active work by each of these com-
mittees in the interests of their
particular sections of trade and in-
vite members to make use of them
by putting before them matters
which they feel require the atten-
tion of the Chamber.

British Industries Fair

During the year the Council or-
ganised a stand in the West Indies
section of the British Industries
Fair. This was the first occasion
that Barbados was represented at
one of these Fairs which are an
annual event. This effort was
made possible by the financial sup-
port which the Coungil received
from the Publicity Committee, the
rum distilleries and the majority of
the local rum exporters, the Bar-
bados Canning Co. and the Barba-
dos Cotton Factory Ltd.

Exhibits of local produce and
handicrafts, as well as advertising
matter for attracting tourists to
the island were on display. The
stand was prepared and arranged
by the West India Committee, and
from reports received, their work
was very attractive.

The Council wish to record their
thanks and appreciation to Major
William Lambert, the West India
Committee’s representative in
oe of the West Indies section
and to Mr. E. A. Bishop and Mr.
C. S. Husbands, who were in at-
tendance at the Barbados stand,
for their work in making the local
display a success. :

Shipping

During the year 965 Merchants
Vessels with a total nett tonnage
of 1,793,001 tons arrived at the port
as compared with 1,024 vessels of
1,645,678 tons in 1950. In addition
to the above. 36 vessels of other
types visited the port. These were
comprised of 14 yachts, 1 Spanish
motor vessel, 1 Royal Fleet Aux-
iliary, 1 Royal Army Service Corps
Vessel, 3 British, 10 American and
2 Canadian Warships and 4 train-
ing ships.

10 vessels whose gross tonnage
amounted to 63,583 tons entered
the Careenage as against 581 ves-
sels of 70,522 tons gross in 1950;
of these 141 were steam and motor
vessels, the remainder being sail-
ing vessels.

The s.s. Mauretania made two
calls and the s.s, Nieuw Amster-
dam made one call here during the
year on special winter cruises
They brought between them a
total of 2,082 tourists to this island.

The total number of passengers
arriving in the Colony by sea dur-
ing 1951, exclusive of intransit
passengers and tourists, was 5,380.
The number who left the Colony
by sea was 4,939, as compared with
5,238 arriving and 4,396 leaving
by sea in 1950. ‘=

“
The following table gives the

class. nationality, number and nett | shi

@ (on April 3,

Class of
Vessel

Steam
and

Motor

Nationality
British
American
Argentine
Colombian
Dutch
French
German
Norwegian
Honduran
Panamanian
Venezuelan

British
Dutch

Tankers

British
French

Sailing
Vessels

Total Merchant Shipping

No of
Vessel

Nett
Tonnage
1,012,464

2572

810
132,773

1,746,665



158
64
5:
a8

4
a

13

2

5
ul

362

3

19,752
1,793,001

The following table shows the number of steam and motor ves-
sels which arrived at the port of Bridgetown during the years 1946-51:
Year

1946
ioe
18s
1960
1951

Air

No of Steam &
Motor Vessels
271
441
441

yw
602
600

Traffic

The number ot commercial aircraft arriving at Seawell Airport

during 1951 was 1.267, as compared with 1,297 in 1950.

operated by the following airlines;
British West Indian Airways:

British Guiana Airways:

Trans-Canada Airlines 120

Linea Aeropostal Venezolana 32
Commercial non-schedule

airlines 100

In addition to the above, 16

military and private aircraft

landed at the Airport, carrying @
total of 44 passengers.

The number of passengers ar-
riving by air during the year was
15,411 and the number departing
by air was 16,048, as compared
with 13,506 arriving and 13,363
departing during the previous
year, There were 2,591 intransit
passengers by air during 1951.

A new scheduled airline—Linea

Aeropostal Venezolana — com~
EXPORT TRADE FIGURES

861 flights,
sé

These were

carrying 24,977
1.082

passengers

3.094

104

3,649
menced operations through Bar-
Bados from ports in Venezuela

during the month of August.

Implementation of the recom-
mendations of the Seawell Air-
Committee appointed by His
cellency the Governor was
commenced during the year. The
recommendations are designed to
bring Seawell into line with the
larger airports in the area, as
well as to accommodate the in-
creasing numbers of passenger:
using the airport.

Susar Z
1949 1950 1951 1949 1950 1951
0.009 1 0 $0182 019,591 3 40.202 4 300 276
ark Cry 116,699 121,554 = 139, 3,019,591 3,540.2 399,270
pee es 2,587 2,295 3.052 | 40,098 60,722 84,73
Muscovado 1,550 1,250 1,000 31,000 37,760 32,720
White Crystals §,773 6.644 8,958 183,213 229,956 319,338
126,609 131,743 «188,762 3,273,902 3,868,100 4,836,074
Molasses :
1949 1950 â„¢ 1951 1949 1950 1952
Sisis Se05.83 Sas 439 eid 939 oa 116 1 240, 455
e Asse: 143,813 5,805,830 6,346, 939 028,116 1,249,458
Chale werent 3 247,099 r 195,159 104,886 36,550 23,934 20,64)
Vacuum Pan 1,753,014 2,894,311 2,911,202 32,869 24,119 110,186
6,143,026 8,835,900 8,762,527 682,358 1,076,169 1,380,290
Rum (inecludiyse ships’ stores) “ saa
1949 1950 1951 1949 1950 51
gallons uallons gallons £ £ &
647,748 902,296 1,352,178 255,242 294,988 410,932

The values of staple crops exported during the

as follows:

years 1947-51 are

Sugar Molasses as

£1,870,255 £1,147,279 £943,705

ie 1 air ana 1,052,170 376,639

1949 3,278,902 682,358 255,242

1950 3,868,100 1,076,169 294,988

1951 4,836,074 1,380,290 410,932
The 1951 figures for the following percentage and values tables

of imports and exports are not
of a member of the staff of the
culated to members as soon as they

Percentage Table of Exports of knees Panteee

obtainable on account of the illness

et é
Enstons ee They will be cir-

able.

& Manufactures of the Colony,

are ava’

1947 1948 1948 1950
on : ’
United Kingdem He He » q #2
Canada 52 q 2
Other parts of the British Empire %4 21.0 a 77
USA. ° 3 7 : 0 4
Other Foreign countries 7 3
Percentage Table of Imports for the Years 1947-50 Tae cai cai ia
39.3 B.C
Urited Kingzdom so =e 21 + :
Canada A
Other parts of the British Empire Seta 166 Z ae as
U.S.A. “e et . e
Other foreign countries ote vo shh)-0 56 nT 69 wa
vara, f RRS BAG DERM Ter 5 Imports Exports Total Trade
1947 ‘ £ 7,124,930 £3,715,107 £ 10,840,037
1948 6,346, 3,048,165 9,304,395
1949 7,072,628 4,688,536 11,761,164
8,067,944 5,758,975 13,826,919

1950
Charcoal and Firewood

e On page 5
nl

LARCENY CASE

ADJOURNED

The case in which John Good-
ing of Bay Land, St. Michael, is
charged by the Police with the’
larceny of two bottles of brandy,
the property of D, V. Scott & Co.,
was yesterday ad-
journed until May 23 by His Wor,
Mr. G. B. Griffith, Acting

tonnage of vessels arriving at the }Police Magistrate of District “A.”

port during 1951:

Editor will win the prize.

3. Entrance fee of one shilling
each solution along with name and address on the coupon
— aoe

ny en which is not accompanied by the entrance fee

will be immediately destroyed.

5. All entrants for this competition agree to abide by the
decision of the Editor of the Barbados Advocate.

6, The competition will be closed on Friday, May 16th at
: ‘ae and not on Thursday, May 15, as previously adver-

7. All envelopes must be clearly marked CROSS WORD
PUZZLE COMPETITION

‘ Barbados Advocate, 34 Brodd Street.

Advocate of May 18.

42--Babytonian god
44—Gentle blow.
45—Severe.
47—Calm.
49—Plant juice.

51—Who was hanged on the gal-
lows he had erected for Mor-
decai?

§2—Perch















| Zr |
Ya || | |
eB
ae

—————L—LLLL<&<&€_h@BM— SSS

The name of the winner will be published in the Sunday

VAL IT
a
Tro Aye
PTT TT Peary
YM eT PT TY
al 7/7
PrT TT wer Be
VET Ae
sl 7 al
/
TEE! | CZ
7

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i

ENTIRE PROCEEDS TO FARNUM FOR FINLAND FUND
Entries can be posted or delivered to the “Advocate Stationery” or Advertising Office

nv
.



(1/-) must be enclosed with

addressed to the Editor, the

4—Wild plum.
56—Foundation.
58—Timothy’s grandmother

Sox agio-tndian weight.
o-Ini e!
Re. rly.
64—Honey

*8—Symbo! for neon.

PARP
ee




U,

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Offer made to a

WSSSSSSSTOSS

SOSSOGIOSOSE,

© SEA AND AIR §
© TRAFFIC 3

DEPARTURES By B.W.LA.
ON THURSDAY
Por Antigua;
J. Powell, H. Shuffle,
Daniel, K. Ablack
DEPARTURES By B.W.LA
ON WEDNESDAY
Tor Puerte Rico:
Mrs. Elizabeth Japp, Mr. James Culling-
worth, Mrs. Hollis Cullingworth, Miss
Ann Cullingworth, Master John Culling-

M. Shuffle, M

worth, Mr. John Boyce, Mrs Natalie
Pope,, Mr. Joseph Adler, Mr. Robert
Douglas, Miss Laurine Jeffers

Fer Trinidad:

M Exlof, B Carrigton, © Arthur
Donegan, J. Roach, E. Sealy, L. Forde,
A. Hadeed, R. Urton, C. Urton, S, Urtan,
R. Coates, 1 Smart, A. Carbajal, L
Mestier, D. Hadeed, A. Harkness

ARRIVALS—By BWIA

ON WEDNESDAY

A. Hadeed, R. Urton, C. Urton, 8. Urton
From Trinidad
M. Rahal, I Ramirez, D. Blackett, C
Hinkson, C. Ray, D. Ward, N. Hender
son. G. Morvay, A. Morvay, J. Morvay
D. Berteau, D. Wilkie, H. Hobson
PHILLIPS

10/10 pom 1

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

and Wireless (West Indies)
Limited, advise that they can now com,
nunicate with the following ships
through their Barbados coast station
5.5. Manistee, s.s. Grelrosa, 8.8: Davila,
5.8. Fort Napier Fort Townshend,
Tankland, 8.5 ‘aranaki, s.s. Mara
non, 8.8% Weneeslao, 5.8. Pampas, s.s
Peetfie Unity ss Aleoa Clipper s.8
Degrasse, $.* Fort Smith, ss Rosairo,
Somerset S. Rosa, s.s. Will-
omstad, #.s. Aida Lauro, 8.8, N
Chaco, Fletero, s.s. Lady ?
Washington, s.8. City of Liverpool, s.s
Lorde Canning, 8.8. Hidleford, s.s. Alcoa
funner, s.s. Mont Agel, 8.8. Oberon,
Sundale, ss Adolfo, s.8. She
Ciudad de Caracas; s.8. Del Mundo,
Canadian Cruiser; 8.8. Toas; 5.8
Lake Traverse; s.s, Astronomer; s.s. Mel-
ine; 6.8. 8. Cirilo; #.8. Sunwalt; .s.6
Austanger; 8.5. Donald H. Holland; 5.6
Geirulv, s.s. Francisco R. Hart; 8.8
Mormaciand; ss. Daytona,
Pilgrim, s.s. Casablanca, s s
ning? #8. Olivebank, 58
nond; #.8 Dolores; s.s

Cable







5.8





dan

5.8. Aleoa
Lord Can
Esso
Alcoa Partner,

MAIL NOTICES

Mails for the United Kingdom and
France by the SS. De Grasse will be
eosed at the General Post Office as])
under

<

Parcel Mail at 3 p.m. to-day
May Registered Mall at 830 a.m. and])
Ordinary Mail «ot 9 pm. on the 17th
May, 1952 r '

Mails for St. Vineent, Grenada, Trint.
lad, and British Guiana by the M.V
Chnadian Cruiser will be closed at the
General Post Office as under

Parcel Mail and Registered Mail at
2 p.m Ordinary Mail at 2.30 pom
to-day, 16th May, 1952

Mails for Madeira, United Kingdom
Antwerp and Amsterdam by the M.S
Oranjestad will be closed at the General
Post Office as under

Parcel Mail at 12 noon, Registered Mall
at 2 p.m. and Ordinary Mail at 2.30 p.m

on the 19th May 1952

RATES OF EXCHANGE

NEW YORK
Cheques on Bankers 10 3/10%
Sight or Demand
Drafts 70 1/10%
i Cable
10 5/10% Curreng 68 8/10%
" Coupons 6B 1/10%
>» 0) Yer Silver 20%
CANADA
â„¢ 5/10% Cheques on Bankers 72 6/10%
Demand Dratts 72.65%
Sight Drafts 72 6/10%
745/10% Cable j= = — cssensane
78% Curreney 71 3/10%
Coupons 70 6/10%
SO Silver V% "

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16th






PAGE THREE

Te those wko

take ASPIRIN ...

To everyone who, from time to time,

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PAGE FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE



FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1952 *











———$.

Friday, May 16, 1952



LESS TRAVEL

THE British West Indian Airways Com-
pany is a subsidiary of the British Over-
seas Airways Corporation, which provides
air service to many parts of the world, One
important branch of BOAC’s activities is
the promotion. of dollar-earning flights
between North America and the Bahamas.
Throughout North America the inhabi-
tants of Canadian and American cities are
invited by the British Overseas Airways
Corporation to enjoy holidays in British
Bahamas. There is mention too of other
British West Indian territories and refer-
ence is made to the possibility of travelling
by British West Indian Airways to most
of the territories in the West Indies and
British Guiana. But the pressure of
BOAC’s publicity in Canada and the
United States is directed to encourage
North Americans to holiday in the
Bahamas. Barbados, which is the most
British of the Atlantic possessions of Her
Majesty relies on a Canadian Airlines Com-
pany, Trans-Canada Airlines, to publicise
its attractions to Canadians: while Pan-
American Airways, whtch provide service
to Trinidad also attempts to persuade
Americans of the merits of Barbados as a
tourist resort. So far as BOAC is con-
cerned only Jamaica, the Bahamas and
Bermuda in the North Caribbean and
Atlantic are considered worthy of. direct
connection with the United Kingdog.

The rest of the British Southern Carib-
bean is from their point of view apparent-
ly well served by Trans-Canada, K.L.M.
and Pan-American Airways.

The Corporation’s efforts have therefore
been directed to make BWIA a shuttle ser-
vice within the Caribbean and its policy
has been to emphasise the middle rather
than the extreme letters which form the
abbreviation BWIA.

This policy has not gone unchallenged
in the area and the failure of BOAC to
provide direct air communication with the
United Kingdom from Barbados and
Trinidad has often been the subject of
adverse comment by visitors to these
isla Son! United Kingdom, Within
ae 0 aaa the aN, sub-
sidiary BWIA has given (and until the
recent startling announcement this week
was giving) satisfactory service through-
out the area. The Company has built up a
reputation for air safety which is the

greatest asset any airline company can
possess.

But the announcement this week has
come as a shattering blow to the region.

The United Kingdom’s indifference to
the lack of British passenger vessels in the
British Caribbean has become proverbial.
That indifference has sometimes been
adroitly exploited by travelling salesmen
of the United Kingdom government, who
have attempted to justify Great Britain’s
disregard of inadequate passenger ship-
ping service in the region by claiming that
British West Indian Airways provided
adequate inter-territorial communications.

This claim has always been regarded as
preposterous by anyone wanting to visit
territories like Montserrat, Dominica, St.
Vincent, British Guiana or British Hon-
duras. But it is typical of the attitude of
mind of a country which, although it is
fully aware that federation of the British
Caribbean territories cannot be achieved
without first providing adequate sea and
air communications continues to woo West
Indian Governments into taking this step
in the dark.

No West Indian can admire Great
Britain’s neglect of communications in the
British Caribbean, It is a neglect for which
that country ought to be ashamed and for
which it certainly merits West Indian
reproach.

And now straight from the blue with
no attempt to explain to the public and no
notification as to the nature and extent of
the cuts imposed by BOAC on, say, the
service between New York and Nassau or
elsewhere, Barbados is told that its weekly
services are to be reduced from seven to
four,

4
BOAC and British West Indian Airways
cannot be held responsipiie for a strike in
the American refineries which manufac-
ture aviation spirits, and West Indians
would be only too willing to suffer any in-
convenience resulting from the drastic
curtailment announced this week if other
territories served by BOAC have been re-
quired to make corresponding sacrifices.

A much more comprehensive statement
is awaited from the Corporation’s agents
in the West Indies.

Eee

Ring ———— eee ee —o



Cotton (4)

The Purehase Tax
Controversy

Lancashire’s present troubles
are, to some extent, a result of
its own short-sightedness. Like
the boy in Aesop’s fable, it made
the mistake of crying “Wolf”
once too often.

There are many people in the
cotton industry who, even now,
are inclined to lay the blame for
the present recession at the door
of Dr. Dalton, who advised con-
sumers at the end of 1950 to stop
buying textiles until prices came
down, No doubt this had its ef-
fect on sales, However, the buy-
ers’ strike which brought about
the present trade recession did
not develop into a reaily serious
situation until several months
later.

Lancashire’s first reaction to
the falling off in sales was to
seek protection from the Gov-
ernment. At ‘first, it spoke with
many voices, but recently its
campaign has been more co-
ordinated. Its clarion call now
is: “Abolish the purchase tax on
cotton goods.”

It is significant, however that

one rarely hears the word
“slump” mentioned in Lanca-
shire today. One prominent

member of the cotton trade told
me, quite emphatically, “This is
not a slump. It is a very serious
trade recession.” To the man-in-
the-street this may seem to be a
case of hair-splitting, but to
members of the cotton industry
the distinction is one of great
importance.

The word “slump” was ap-
plied to the situation in the cot-
ton industry long before the
fact justified it. Newspapers
began to talk about a “serious
depression” in Lancashire,
Leading members of the indus-
try made speeches referring to
huge stocks of unsound materi_
als. Deputations were sent to
Whitehall to demand ail sorts
of Government action to allevi-
ate the situation.

The effect of all this was to
confirm the consumer in his
view that cotton prices were
about to fall. Purchases that had
been postponed until prices were
brought more into line with the
new level of demand were put
off indefinitely. Manufacturers
were calling for the abolition of
the Utility scheme (which al-
lowed certain classes of textile
goods to be sold free of pur-
chase tax) and consumers de-
cided, therefore, to wait until
after the Budget before re-
stocking their wardrobes and
linén cupboards

The Budget did, in fact, abol-
ish the Utility scheme—but only
to substitute it with an even
more complicated system of
purchase tax. Consumers who
had previously bought best-
quality Utility textiles now
found they had to pay tax on the
same class of goods,

Again the cotton industry pro-
tested, But this time, instead of
demanding a modification of
purchase tax, it called for its
total abolition, Clice again, con-
sumers were left in doubt as to
the future level of cotton prices;
and by this time they were so
confused that they stopped
buying altogether.

Meanwhile, stocks are contin-
uing to accumulate, and the sit-
uation has rapidly assumed
“slump” proportions, The indus-
try is in a dilemma. Its cries of
“Wolf” have caused a slight re-
cession to develop into a serious
buyers’ strike, and it is now
too late to turn the tide of pub-
lic indignation against high
prices.

THE LANDED GENTRY.



By RONALD BOXALL

Members of the cotton trade
find themselves in an unenvi-
able position. On the one hand,
they dare not repeat the mis-
take of drawing public atten-
tion to their difficulties for fear
that it might further delay the
resumption of buying. But, on
the other hand, they feel very
strongly on the question of pur-
chase tax. The surest way of ex-
erting pressure in the Govern-
ment to remove the impediment
‘to sales, would be to rally pub-
lic opinion to their side, but this
would only strengthen the con-
viction that prices have yet to
touch rockbottom.

Not unnaturally, therefore,
the industry has divided into
two rival camps, There is no
difference of opinion over the
need to remoVe purchase tax on
Lancashire’s products. Members
of the industry, almost to a
man, are convinced that it
should go. The difference arises
over the best means of per-
suading the Government to fall
in with their request.

One school of thought, head-
ed by the powerful United Tex-
tile Factory Workers’ Associa-
tion, takes the view that the
best way to achieve this aim is
to make the public aware of the
industry’s plight. Mass meetings
are therefore being held all
over Lancashire to press. the
industry’s case for the removal
of the hated tax.

ARTIE’S HEADLINE

LLL

ono0ooa0 O\
GLASS MiN/ATURES
/Ale MY OWN WORK



Another section of the indus-
‘try, however, believes that this
is the wrong way to go about it.
Apart from increasing uncer-
tainty as to the future trend of
prices, they say, mass meetings
are apt to be used to put across
sectional views. They drive
home this point by pointing. the
number of Socialist M.P.’s who
are appearing on these plat-
forms.

But whichever method is
chosen to influence Government
policy on purchase tax, the case
for relief is a strong one. The
industry points out that three-
quarters of all its output is sold
on the home market, Now that
sales have fallen practically to
zero, .every possible means
should be taken to give .;consum-
ers the necessary inducément to
buy. The removal of purchase
tax, they argue, would do this
by causing an automatic reduc-
tion in the price of better-
quality textile goods of the sért
which the average consumer
has shown himself most ready
to buy.

The Government's answer to
this is that the removal of pur-
chase tax would not solve the

a

industry’s problérfis because the
buyers’ strike affects all types of
textiles, including those which
are now tax-free.

It also argues, with some jus-
tification that any concession to
the cotton industry would inevi-
tably lead to demands for simi-
lar treatment by other consumer
goods industries, which are also

beginning to experience a
‘stiffening of consumer resist-
ance,

The Government’s argument
that the removal of purchase
tax on textiles would mean a
loss of between £80 and £100
million in revenue is less valid.
The industry points out, for
instance, that this estimate is
based on sales at last year’s
high level, With sales at their
present level the amount actual-
ly flowing into the Exchequer
from this source must be at a
much lower annual rate,

One of the worst aspects of
the present system of taxation
has been its effect on the quality
of Lancashire’s .products. Manu-
facturers, with an eye to sales
in the shops, ha¥e devoted more
and more of their production to
‘those textiles which escape tax-
ation, and this has _ sornetimes
resulted in a lamentable debase-
ment of quality.

Lancashire industrialists re-
sent the “tax on craft,” which
they say is tending to destroy
the industry’s traditional pride
in its products, Even if the
Government insists on retaining
the purchase tax, they hope it
will at least consider a modifica-
tion of the system to allow a
wider range of#textiles to be
sold tax-free.

This does not exhaust the pur-
chase tax controversy, for one
6f the industry’s strongest argu-
ments is that the incidence of
this tax on better-quality tex-
tiles hampers the drive for new
export markets.

The home market, besides be-
jing the chief outlet for Lan-
cashire’s output,*is also a valu-
able “testing ground” for new
lines which manufacturers wish
‘to develop for export markets.
By testing the “saleability” of a
new cloth or a new pattern

“(peration Bootstrap”

| How Puerto Rico Achieved
| Industrial Prosperity
LONDON,

Puerto Rico’s economic problem has been
much the same as in other islands in the
Caribbean. Its limited natural resources,
chiefly dependent upon sugar production,









—





PLASTIC

PROPELLING PENCILS

LONG LEAD,

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could not support its population of 2,200,000. ||

The story of “Operation Bootstrap,” the
scheme which has brought some measure of
industrial prosperity to the island over the
years, is told in the current issue of “Colonial
Development,” the quarterly magazine of
the C.D.C., just published in London.

“If Puerto Rico can find an answer which,
with due modification, can be applied to
low-income societies, it will have made 3
major contribution to one of the fundamental
problems of the world to-day—the relation
of food supply to population,” says the
article.

As far back as 1940, it was evident that
the answer to Puerto Rico’s economic prob-
lem lay in _ industrialisation. “Operation
Bootstrap” was started in 1941. Government
help was given to the encouragement of new
industries in the island, Young Puerto
Ricans were sent to study industrial tech-
niques in the United States.

The Governor, Sr. Luis Monoz Marin,

“The economic goal of Puerto Rico is to in-
crease production as effectively as possible
so that the greater number of Puerto Ricans
there are each year will have fewer days of
unemployment, a higher standard of living,
and depend less and less each day on aid and
privileges which are not the result of their
own productive activities.”

A Government corporation was formed to
buy land and to work out new patterns for
its cultivation. After experimenting unsuc-
cessfully with farmers’ co-operatives, this
corporation decided on three major policies.

1. Sugar lands were bought from big
estates and converted into “proportional
profit farms.” These were owned by the peo-
ple of Puerto Rico and managed in an up-to-
date manner. Workers continued to work at
their regulaf wages and at the end of the



ithe home market they claim to
be able to judge whether it will
prove successful in overseas
markets,

The home market is also an
outlet for goods which, though
made for export, have, for one
reasow or another, been left on
merchants’ hands. Purchase tax
on these better-quality goods, it
is argued, deprives the industry
of the use of the home market
ba a testing sound for, new

xtiles and an , et of las
resort for frustrated exports.

But whatever the Govern-
ment’s intentions on the future
of purchase tax may be, the in-
dustry wants a definite statement
on the matter—one way or the
other. Nothing is worse for
trade than the present uncer-
tainty about prices. Even a blunt
“no” would be better than the
present vacillation.

Meanwhile, the industry is stil!
putting a large part of its re-
duced output to stock—and this
is rapidly absorbing working
capital. What it dreads more
than anything else is a liquida-
tion of stocks at “slaughter
prices.” Even now, many cotton
goods can be bought in the shops
at less than their replacement
cost. Any tendency for this to
develop into the establishment of
a price level that the industry
could not maintain would pro-
long the crisis and threaten
many firms with bankruptcy.





LOWER THE DRAWBRIDGE



BURKE'S LANDED GENTRY
—the official and exclusive caste
list of the land-owning classes
~—has had to lower its sights.

Landed gentry are now so
searce that the publishers have
had to forage around to find
enough names (with land) to fill
their latest edition, the first
since 1939 which is due out this
spring.

The result of the foraging is
that film stars and novelists
have broken in.

More than half the 5,000
landed gentry mentioned in the
11-16, 2,800-page tome are
landless gentry, The editor,
L. G. Pine, admitted the change

yesterday in a lecture to the
Society of Genealogists in
London.

The landless ones get in on
the strength of their old family
pedigrees, or because they have
rendered public service.

And the properties of those
who. are landed are _ much
smaller than they were. Burke’s
has met with gentry more than
halfway.

Fifty years ago the minimum
land requirements for inclusion
in the directory was 2,000 acres,
Now it is 300 acres.

‘Cadets’

AMONG the landless newcom~
ers are novelists Graham Green
and S. P. B. Mais. They are
included as ‘“cadets’—a_ title
given because they are not the
heads of their families.

Film, star sisters Olivia de
Havilland and Joan Fontaine
are cadets of the de Havilland
family, of which air pioneer Sir
Geoffrey de Havilland is head.

Steven Hardie, first chairman
of the nationalised Iron and
Steel Corporation, can only trace
his ancestry back for’ three
generations. But as “Hardie of
Ballathie” he rates a Burke

mention because he owns 2,000
acres in Perthshire.

The B.B.C. brothers Freddid
and Harman Grisewood——-Har-~
man controls the Third Pro-
gramme — are also newcomers
who can claim long pedigrees.

So can Sir Ambrose Heal, tha
furniture magnate; and publisher
Sir Stanley Unwin. So, can

And the actors, the
authors, and the
steel man file in...

an

ANOS

CY



by James Leasor

Evelyn Waugh—who would in
any case qualify because he
owns land in Gloucester.

Two Counts

BURKE’S wanted to include
details of Sir Hartley Shawcross
and family “on account of his
distinguished public service.”
and, said @ member of the firm,
“we got quite a good pedigree
out of him.” He can prove hé
is of yeoman stock that goes
back to 1743. So Sir Hartley
fis in.

Sir Laurence Olivier is there
because he owns property—

Notley Abbey, Bucks—and he
can, incidentally, trace his
ancestry back to the 15th cen-
tury. Author-explorer Peter
Fleming is in asthe head of a
new family—and also because
he owns enough property.

Since 1949, Pine and six
helpers have sending out
requests for i ation to the
4,000 families that qualified for
mention ‘in the 1939 edition.
Pine estimates that at least half
of the entries bear the Ichabod
phrase “late of.”

Some families haye sold their
stately homes; others have en-
dowed the National ‘Trust with
them and retain only a small
flat in their great houses.

This is the case with Lord
Sackville’s home. at Knole, in
Kent. > 7

The Duke of Wellingto:
handed over No, 1, Cio
Apsley House—t@ the State.

ieee ; famili are bashful;
Y decline t
= a e to 'e details, reply

, person to whom the
original postcard was addressed
married beneath her. Sorry,

but we can’t help in any way.”

Others, incl star “alla
became wealthy the war, are
so eager to ‘é their way into
Burke's Lan . Gentry that
they bombar f° office with
letters, finally up to Lon-

don in person to gtate their case.
One man it £3,000 to

prove he had a- igree.
Maybe this actounts for the

immense interest’ in this new
edition of Burke’s Landed Gen-
try. More thar 4,000 copies
have been orderec| in advance
of publication—at eight guineas
a copy. Copies bought after





































year profits were shared between manage-
ment and workers.

2. Land was bought for new villages,
where squatters might have a little cottage
and garden of their own. By last September,
some 25,000 families had been resettled in
200 of these villages.

3. Land was also bought from ‘the big
estates to be divided into family-sized farms,
which were sold to individual farmers on
reasonable terms.

“This three-point programme has worked
well,” says the article. “It has eased some of
the tension in the agricultural problem and
has improved the status of farm labourers.”

The Puerto Rican Industrial Development
Company was organised in 1942 with a capi-
tal of $500,000, later increased to $22,000,000.
Its purpose was to promote manufacturing
on the island and conduct research into
natural resources, marketing methods and
export possibilities, It has acquired a cement
works and has built factories to manufacture
clay products, glass, paperboard and shoes.
All five industries, badly needed on the
island, were operated as nationalised busi-
nesses.

After the war, a new policy was started—
building factories for lease or sale to private
enterprise. New enterprises started in this
way include a large hotel in San Juan and
a big textile mill. The nationalisation period
has now ended with the sale of all five Gov-
ernment factories to private industry.

By last July, Puerto Rico had established
121 factories by such methods and had given
indirect assistance, principally in the form
of tax exemption, to 41 more. At capacity
operation, thes@ (factories are expected ‘to

year, most. of which will be exported to the
U.S. mainland.—B.U.P.

Atom Picture

By JOSEPH L. MYLER

WASHINGTON, May 15.
THE Atomic Energy Commission is
releasing next Tuesday a motion picture
showing in flaming colour what a full size
atomic bomb does to buildings. It is beautiful
but not pretty.

The film was made last spring at Eniwetok
Pacific island proving ground where A.E.C.
tests its most powerful atomic weapons, It
has been exhibited to preview audiences of



stated the aim of the scheme as follows:||

produce some $100,000,000 worth of goods a!



newsmen here and at Las Vegas, New
Mexico, The picture.is called “Greenhouse”
which was the name of the last test pro-
gramme at Eniwetok.

At least one of the atomic bombs exploded
last spring was “several times more power-
ful” than any the United States has set off
elsewhere.

The carefully edited Eniwetok film makes
it clear why an efficient civil defence pro-
gramme is advisable in time of possible
atomic war.
civil defence officials here both the film and
still secret data obtained.in operation Green-
house leaves much to-be desired,

The movie filmed in colour shows several
predawn atomic explosions. All are from
high steel towers. Several shots show atomic
blasts hitting and smashing specially built
target buildings. Banks of automatic cam-|

publication cost the buyer nine/eras operating in the orange—yellow light

guineas.

So if the mew landed gentry
have no land it seems they still}
know how to buy when the!
market is right.—L.E.S.

of the atomic fireball held buildings in fecus

|long enough for observers to see them pitch

sideways.

—U.P.

But from the stand-point of};



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|
FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1952



GUADELOUPE HAS GOOD 20s Chamber Of

Commerce Report

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

TOURIST FACILITIES







3,588 tohs of charcoal and Pres

From Page 3

a

DRINK

PAGE FIVE

ei AL “ from the following sources: ee ne Satine: CLAYT ON’S
; 2G Sask. tees
Agricultural Officer Roads Undergoing. <. a:
Here On Holiday Improvement 1 sw nde ner wo poe

Mr. Walther Hewitt who is the head of the Agricul-

tural Exténsion Service in S
spend the greater part of his

He arrived here from Guadeloupe on Monday where
he has been the Commissioner from Surinar-. in the Nether-
lands Section attending the Fourteenth Meeting of the

Caribbean Commission, He is

Yachtsmen Call
Here From N.Z.

nue : m nets after attending the wo ia Taverne 1949 3.36
urin, ourteent i sso r + 7 jecember 3.51
pr gt e last four months of ro th Meeting of the Carib-| BETTY GRIFFITH FOR Saueaee i6hp 08
muy. New Behind M A at office, he was also appointed bean Commission, said that Li , - : eink
R aon o M ay Bake sailed Minister of Health, so that he has Guadeloupe hid a new modern air BRAR}Y TRAINING March se vs
“wy ae hilont u pa te Dertinl had two extended departments terminal building which was April 17
the yac Hante tf into Carisie under his full responsibility. rushed to completion earlier this | ,M/ss Betty Griffith, Senior Library As- May oar
Bay on Saturday. From here they month to accommodate the dele- | the pupa Chea to the Aduit Section of syne »s
will sail to Cristobal. The new political status in gates who were attending the woes, Library, has been granted "a July 3.37
The New Zealanders purchased gyrinam provides. the Minis- meeting a {Council award, supplemented August 10,01
th: yacht at Southampton Eng- = s &. ¥ an allocation from the Government September 7.24
ey : pion, ; ters with anun- The meeting, he said, was merely | 2t#iting Seheme, for training at the October 13.52
land. On April 4 they steamed out divided respon- a routine one and rather shorter | east", Caribbean” Regional Litany in Movember 11.26
of Southam ton for Madeira and sibility for their than usuai, It started on Tuesday Seen Ree rg the Examination’ for December 4 Pr
the Canary Jslands before crossing departments. May 6, and finished on Saturday. of Great Britain. ¢ Library Ageagiation January, 1951 3.58
the Atlantic for Barbados. The Go 50th Anniv ' * ~
‘ oe x was eS rahe 9 ac hape et . ~~ ag or ag l . In 1950 she undertook a short! course 90,12
ubmarine aser a May 9 was the > nien's

somewhat the M.V. Caribbee
which trades between the West In-



Mr. Max A. Eg

urinam, is now in Barbados to
two months’ vacation.

skirts of the city
airport.

He said that the Govern
deal of money to improve
portant to tourism.

Mr. Egloff who spent a few days

and about
staying at Sandy Beach Hotel.

Mr. Hewitt has been Minister
of Agriculture, Animal Husban-
dry and Fisheries in Surinam
from June 1949 until April 1951.

the Government

sary of the eruption of Mt. Pelee
f and the repre-

and the destruction of St. Pierre,

loff, Information Offi ribbe
Commission, told the Advocate shortly be me oeone

Trinidad on Wednesday night by BW.1,
could offer outstanding accommodatio
Grand Hotel which is situate

before returning to
A., that Guadeloupe
1 tion to tourists in the
d in Point-a-Pierre on the out-
three minutes’ drive from the

ment was also spending a good

the roads which were very im-



of training in Trinidad Prior to the suc~
cessful completion of the Entrance Ex-
amination of the Library Association

' : ae wenn crop was 43,020 acres as against per cwt., which under the Suga:
dian islands. sentative o f the largest. city. There was a ded om tb tote ot Sone ee 41,241 acres in 1950, These figures Industry (Rehabilitation, Price
It carries a crew of 11 and is H.M. the Queen. Special Commemoration Service }absence Miss Naney Went will act as include 8,000 acres for land under Stabilisation and Labour Wel- siiliaal ae Bd s
luxuriously equipped. a * sot < oe atten and = Soeuemaion sent a mes- |SeMor Library Assistant. peasants’ cane (estimated). are). Act, Ame, will be deposited a as ————
feet long and powered by twin 2 i sage of sympathy to the people Of * aceeeceeeceseeneeee The equivalent of 69,240 to the special reserve funds,
h.p. on Marine diesel engines Speen he 4 in- Martinique through the Prefect, » puncheons of Fancy Molasses In December the U.K. Ministry VALOR COOKER STOVES
which give it a tep speed of 14 vio a e and the He said that he was glad to re- building programme which was in Was produced during the 1951 of Food reached an agreement
knots and cruising speed of 11 ie — was turn to Barbados. He was here operation. He was really aston- crop season. The latest estimate with the Commonwealth Sugai Sh
knots. an Me witha? once before and that was in March ished to see what was going on Of the 1952 crop production of Producers as to the method of ort Burners

When crossing the Atlantic its ‘ o w
skipper hoisted two square sails Mr. W. HEWITT That is why he
on a 50-foot mast. The crossing has no responsibility in matters of
took 13 days with one engine Government and cannot tau any
working. The average speed Was decision without the approval of
ning knots. the proper Minister, who bears

The New Zealanders hope to the responsibility towards the ieee

1944 at the time when they had
the first West Indian Conference.
He was then Information Officer
on the staff of the Governor of
Puerto Rico.

“IT have always had pleasant
memories of my previous visit and

and thought that the work should
have fine results for Barbados.
Mr, Egloff who joined the Carib-
bean Commission in August las?
year as Information Officer, held a
similar post from 1942-47 on the
staff of the Governor of Puerto

for the Island for the fifteen-
month pericd November, 1949 to
January, 1951 is given below. The
total rainfall for the season was
well above average. The month of
November, 1949, was compara-
tively dry, but the rainfall during
December, 1949 and January,
1950 was sufficient for the estab-
lishment of the young crop.
Sebrfiary, March and April, 1950
were comparatively dry, good

Rainfall for the period Novomber 1949 to January 1951

The area harvested for the 1951

sugar and fancy molasses shows
that a crop equivalent to 170,000
tons is expected,

The > ritish Government,
through the Ministry of Food,
has purchased the entire export-

frequent ang heavy showers fel
during the remaining months ot
the year, The rainfall for Janu
ary and the early months f :951
particularly February, was heav)
and the ratoons continued to de-
velop until late in the crop seasor

The heavy rains during these
months, not only hindered th
harvesting of the crop, but re
tarded the ripening of the cans
so that the juice quality was poor

inches

of £38.10.0 per ton

includes 2/!

fixing the price to be paid eaci
year for that portion of th
Commonwealth production whicl
the U.K. has guaranteed to bw
at a remunerative price,
The production figures fo
1948 to 195







2 Burner Model @ $56.14
3 Burner Model @ $71.87

Also

WHITE PORVELAIN ENAMEL SINKS
With Double Drainboard @ $65.64









able output of sugar during the sugar for the years complete with waste and overflow

visit Panama via the Gallapagos jslative Council. A decision takergg am delighted to find that Barba-

Rico. Prior to that, he was with





——————————————— |












1952 crop season. The cif. price are as follows: — sein
Islands. They are also expecting by the Cabinet-Council on an in-%y203 is as pleasant as I remember the Federal Government in Wash- 1948 1949 1980 1981 Established f. HERBERT, Ltd. Incorporated
to call at Tahiti. ternal affair of the country canno: git.” ; . ington for eight years during which a pinta . 1860 10 & 11 Roebuck Street 1928
ae this reason be rejected by the ey paid a on on oi ee Het was with the Farm Secur- V.P. Sugar 56.408 134.808 sa3.908

overnor. L im ‘he Fisheries ficer, on ednes- ity dministration and the U.S. Muscovado S$ 1,262 1,991 1,276 === Se a = = —— ee

Servant Discharged 7 Aday and was impressed by his ship Housing Authority. orancy Molabeee 20/468 16,072 15°201 OLCPC ODED DEEL LTPP LELSL SLE LAAT A
: The new status was the will of ;_ a oan
His Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith, Queen Wilhelmina who gave the 7 ea Total 78,226 152,731 158,183 187,64



Ss

fa asa Lastieal . Salting ters %
Avting Potion Magistrate of Dis; colonies their ‘autonomy prior to e ele e e *Equated at the rate of 330 wine gallons per ton of sugar % y aarre Farm Fresh
trict “A”, yesterday discharged her abdication and with the ap- ; Food Crops livestock unit to every 20 acre: |
20-year-old domestic servant proval of the representatives of ] 1es ] Emergenc lati for the of land. ) %
Hida ciate ot, Cuspgen ae Mtarlante People, inh eorgmey, incerta, Cotton : TT

i i a a a n e confer- ; ; sory

Village, th aaselice charged her pg with cencestntattves ‘trea : @ from page 1 ly, industrially and otherwise, and provisions and vegetables ,con- The area of cotton cultivates | 8 U ER
Pigg seny of jewellery Surinam and the Netherlands suitable size and we hope this may had even killed the incentive for tinue to be enforced. by plantations during the 1950-5" | $
with the 0 Sai a property Antilles about five years ago The be installed by about the end of starting new industries. During the 1951—52 crop year, season was 16 acres, which ¥
en Aleeindte of My Legislative Council consists of 21 ae Thereafter, Ww shall en- It was urged that some solution the total area required to be yielded 9561 1b, of seed cotton | % (Not the ordinary Tinned Butter)
Lord’s Hill, St, Michael. emat elected members and is the only wren have a agrreP sige Fp to the problem might be arrived planted in holdings of 10 acres with a crop average per acre o! |

The prosecution alleged

the offence was committed some the last word in all. Government







Co,

On receipt of the information, Weekés of Christ Church whom

Parliament in Surinam. It has

for some time—for the erection of
a steam station with units of con-

and, while that fact may be of

at between the Company and the
Government, so that the machin-
ery could be ordered and expan-

: would do such small things as they



and over waa 21 per cent. and in 597.56 lb, of seed cotton. Peasant
holdings of 2 to 10 acres 20 per planted 170 acres of cotton yield



a Revenue Equalisation Fund,

leaving an estimated balance on remaining in steamers’ ware-







I NOT ONLY















: i hose friend- little comfort to Barbados business | could to alleviate the position, 1g a ipod of $6,903,219, houses. Night landings at Seawell
Moder te wre: Re “sonnldaet wtp te oie wPhe: ima evidences peorls, we = as -— ee anak The Apps pide, a General q Airport, mt
objections ‘an i iti ar, FAL, LOO WARE: SO SHORE TF St »}current. and re-introduc ‘oad ‘eabh
these objections and any other of the hospitable qualjties of Bar as a consequence, they will con-! shedding, was put forward, and The following were some of rine ir é bi ba ae
ee ee 8 Ps q i i irec i the principal matters which 1e Council take this opyx Cy] , I
3 . tinue to be patient. the Directors promised to discuss . ? nate Yip iene dea Geers”
he Se In conclusion I wish to assure |the matter with the local Man- received the attention of thé unity o expressing oe app
as you that the Directors of the Com- | ager. ‘There is no real difficulty in Coupell Gung 0 Yet’ 1 the help which the Press. hu sess
0 y ar st anxious to satisfy | obtaining meters, Mr. Lovering $s to . e 8
il’ 4 nt Ca 7 le EN ea » jnhabit- He ¥ U.K. by Trans-Canada Airlines. accorded to the Chamber during ‘
Suhail Sailed I a rlis Bay Oe Sand a8 aa Ho informed the Chamber. Delay in the delivery of mails the course of the year mr TO-DAY \
everything i wer to at-
Sir Geoffrey Knox, K.C.M.G., First Secretary. He became everything in their po

sailed the ketch Suhail into Car-
lisle Bay on Monday. The 31-ton
Suhail arrived from Tobago. It
has a crew of three.

tain this object. .
Not “Happy” |
Members of the Council took the ,
opportunity to emphasize the diffi- |

Counsellor of the Embassy in 1931.

Sir Geoffrey served as Chair-
man of the Saar Governing Com-
mission from 1932 to 1935 and be-

|
|

; ; -ulties ich. were being experi-

Sir Geoffrey Was created came Envoy Extraordinary and culties which: k
C.M., in 1929 and K.C.M.G. in Minister Plenipotentiary to Hun- enced because of ie a aes ’
1935, During the First World War gary in.1935. He held this office of electricity, ane

he served in the European theatre
and was honoured with Chevalier
of Order of Redeemer. Greece.
He was born on March 11, 1884,
and was Student Interpreter, Lev-
ant, when only twenty-two years
old. In 1920 he was made Second
Secretary and three years later,



JONES

SEWING

MACHINES

of satisfactory service.

ed discussion
See ns told the Directors that
they were not happy that the out-
look for the future was at all sat_
isfactory.

It was emphasized that the pres-
ent lack of electricity was serious- |
ly affecting the island economical- |

for four years. :

In 1939 Sir Geoffrey was made
British Ambassador to Brazil and
served in that capacity until 1941.

The, Suhail, which is anchored
off the Royal Barbados Yacht Club,
is in the island for an indefinite

period.



Oh@rc . GPa tele reren’ .vegee! ))



Broad St. — Local Agents

which ensued |





DESIGNS FOR EVERY TASTE

ALSO

KHAKI SHIRTS Premier Brand fused collar
attached, long sleeves coat style, nice shade,
good quality; will wash well. Sizes 144 to 164
ins. $4.86.

STRIPED UNDERPANTS Also white with snap
fastener and elastic sides. Sizes 30 to 42 ins.
$1.27, $1.59, $1.65.

COTTON UNDER BRIEFS (Jockey Pants) Elas-
tic waist $1.56, $1.02.

IDOL NYLON ANKLETS With

clocks at side.
Size 10 to 11 in. @ $1.71 per pair.

IDOL SELF COLOUR ART SILK (H/F HOSE)
Sizes 10 to 114 ins. Shades of Black, Grey,

10, 1, 12 & 13 Broad Street



SSS EE



SPECIAL

Soda Fountain







SS

o

\
KARDOMAH TEA—per '4-Ib pkts








COCKADE FINE RUM



NG SHOPPER

YOU'LL BUY THESE

Knights Phoenix

Originally This Week
39 5

Cordovan, @ $1.41 per pair | OK, COPFEE-—per 75-10 Dit, 78 mM

| CANADIAN SARDINES—per tin 20 18

HAND MODEL—complete with wood cover COTTON SLACK SOCKS (Anklets) with elastic CANADIAN SARDINES—per doz. 2.40 1,92

ab , . Tops in shades of White, Light Grey, Fawn, CRAWFORD'S CREAM CRACKERS

seen ; Dark Brown Camel @ 73c. per pair —per tin 1.64 1.20
CASH PRICE $99.16 ‘ ‘LAS SIG 3 Ww Benes eee 1} ARMOURS BEEF & HAM PASTE—per jar . 29
“JONES” MACHINES will do every descrip- M SS FLASHY DESIGN TIES With Roses, Scenes, | , VEAL & HAM PASTE—ver jar “38
Credit, Terms Arranged aa Be Pictures of Women Etc, @ $2.12, $2.16 each. CHICKEN & HAM PASTE—per jar 33
tion of sewing and they make a perfect lock- . e Ke: LION BLACK PEPPER—1-o0z. tin 34
Bois ; , 7 | LION WHITE PEPPER—1-0z. tin .49
stitch on all materials, thick or thin. te Y@\ Es 5 EINZ SANDWICH SPREAD—per jar 51
ifeti K L aL ave ¢ er 0 % APIE PEANUT BUTTER : 61

Buy a “JONES”—it will give you a lifetime | x Ke +e ° )
*













STANSFELD,



SCOTT & CO. LTD.



; ; ane 9 rn i i y verful, : . cent. . ing 48.664 Ib. of seed cotton o
told, the count a t the yeeerpetd ee eee siderably larger capacity. This, sion started as soon as_ possible 286.2 lb. per acre, The total are’ % ' ‘
told the oo a ae lace as a Retired however, presents difficulties of after agreement was reached on The keeping of livestock by under cotton cultivation was 18° 1% CosT LESS
used to work _ mene aeian thes two kinds. First, the raising of the Public Utilities Bill, plantations was maintained at acres, as compared with 386 acre: | §
domestic servan' had passed she additional capital and second the Captain Brown pointed out that the same level as before, viz. one jn the previous year, x
month of vat re tay When he retired as a Minis- restriction of the output of all it was very difficult to order the ‘ y AND
missed the jewellery. h w the ter, Mr, Hewitt took up his old plant for commercial purposes ow- machinery, and for sometime they "*™f*" The enintadt ‘Cer the years 1945-K1 Is‘ an follows: x
Os ORD SCC ee ee nich function again as Head of the ing to the prior demands upon in- have been held up because the 1948” 1949 1980. rial $
cereien Wa on t she Agricultural Extension Ser- dustry arising from the rearma- Public Utilities Bill was “hanging —— ee - % Go FURTHE
resembled the one tha A ay ment drive. over their heads”. In the Highlands 75 91 ins 64 56 ins 86 81 ins 99 72 inn x um
reported | missing to ae ce, ‘J The Public Utilities Bill, Pressed for a. statement -as to inthe Eowiteks 64.93 Ins, 58.22 ins, 74.55 Inu 82.06 ine % s
Before. decharging goer Ores sn said that his work dealt whieh has seoeey Sep. cabtest of — oe eee een Castain Whole Island 60.81 ins. 60.89 ins. ~—-79.67 ins, 90.24 ins x BUT
‘ wide discussi , our a A a I Tax Statistics for the ¥ 42- %
as produced by the rorecear Somteeaa Pee ca” os ciate view, some features which Brown said he hoped it would be kpc ra oh Rae Meee in is £ x
was not enoug ke a ~ J ey and through his ac- would increase the difficulties possible in a matter of months From To 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 19491950195 % TASTE
aah nosed se the person who tivities, Surinam had altered of raising money by public rather than years, ee 210 -6 -/6 -/6 9 9 9 6 6 6 $
defenaa oi E fs i ‘ 101 200 «1/- Is : 4 ‘
took way the jewellery. from a rice-importing country oe yp Renn oy eae Loans Difficult 201 4002 yw 6 os ast 2 ’ ’ g RETTER
It was not proved that me to a rice-exporting one and the nan a cieek sitaiiht Asked whether they had ever 401 600 8/- 3/- 3/- 3/8 3/8 3/3 3 3 3 : % 7 ” $s
brooch which Alexandre saw the — export of citrus to Holland was ” ‘ taal ot itt a to ‘tied to raise the necessary Capital 801 Sar oe We Os ae BA nae ee f
Garena sre: ae recone also rather important now, Oe eeeupee ~ labertore “ae, am in the West Indies, Captain 1,001 1750 ¢/6 6/6 1/- 13 13 Va 168 Ye we YS ?
was the brooch whic e iv - Brown said they had often talked 1.751 2,000 6/6 6/6 #7/- T/3 3 1/1 i he x “3
ed stolen and was her property. In the line of sport, he is not isting rights and contracts. Fat satan Paay at here, but 2,001 2500 8/- 8/- 86 89 89 8 ° 3 Be 6 Ot R B B ‘
unknown in his country. The | The principal object of my visit were told that it would be very — jo01 Soe 10 1. 108 WW i. ne he ws al i 3 Ee art
DIED SUDDENLY large sports grounds of the Suri- tO Barbados has been to impress difficult to do so. Over 5,000 12/- 12/- 12/6 13/6 13/6 13/6 13/9 15/- 15/- 1 ¢
Joseph Headley of Codrington nam Football Association had a kune oF a bes ar ae ‘al Replying to » sugeestion thas phe 1942 1942 1044 has 1006 1947 1948 = 1949 5 by x BUTTER
Hill, St. Michael, died suddenly peen laid out under his supervis- Paar a aera leah i eh Company should try to arrange ; 7 949 «1950 x
at his home at about 11.30 a.m. fon and for fifteen years, he has q me ne Ss. es atures ant with some of the sugar factories tax on Companies oe 5 08 6/8 68 68 1/6 76 % CONCENTRATE
‘on Wednesday. The body was peen President of the Basketball he Bill ; negotia eae ares ill which had extra units to tap their, Tax on Life Assur- 28 23s ¢
removed to Hinds & Core Rineral Aevctation. tn the ast sears ne Brorcading {am surethat You will Surent into the Compaye Wine, sana AAO a es B83, 3a fae os LR
Parlour has won two first and two second ther on this subject Captain Brown pointed out tha 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1951 v The ARISTOCRAT
at ae en ee ee Pere uk cole CS er ee ee $ of BUTTERS
District “A”, gave pe ssion for ipo. wi gated, but it was foun 1 ie RS & £ “£ £ ‘ % e wat
the body tobe taken to Burton’s "°° ! , i. ,Derer Teele Babee untis prectiedble tor contain reatihe. 264,779 296,928 382,519 524,178 524,737 608,523, 671,350 630,138 709,061 984.8 3 WOR
Rngal” Bavlour where On pent ote. fewit said that hie mame yA sninca an anus Re was iconed tet he nial aye land's Financial Postion sriviog by Trans-Canada av-|¥ WORTH TRYING!
. is is! ec ances-~ he Authorities, can do ver. a : ta » lines, The Holidays with Pa "
formed DY Pr vied to mete 12% ‘but he is really Dutch, He much. Recent enquiries in Eng- £0",,malon exparaion wast he Government's estimates for Bill. Customs Union, Inadequsu |} Oblanable from all Grocertes.
Causes. is locking forward to a pleasan’ land revealed that the British money lenders were not prepared 1952—53 it is found that the commercial representation on \h | (ee¢nesssunauonsseossousesoosssootoseonenene.t-,
ectiewteinmnatenion, stay in Barbados and expects his Government was itself accepting 4, advance any money until they surplus on 31st March, 1952, was Legislative Council. The Repor — eee
OBJECTIONS TO RATES Wife to join him on Thursday deliveries of 2 years and over for Wore satisfied that their position $5,361,599. The capital budget of the Price Control Committee
The Vestry clerk informed the next. comparable requirements. It is was secure deficit is shown as $680,723 and The wages paid to Clerks, In-
. ' therefote to be feared that some ~“ ‘ . the current budget surplus is crease in steamship freight ra es
Vestry that he had _ received om friends in Surinam who time must inevitably elapse before Pressed further, Captain Brown . e yeitty Technical and Vocatignal.[rain-
i : f Fr estimated to be $1,344, 687. Fifty t
objections oo the ay | Mosist have visited the island, he has we can hope to overtake many de- told the Chamber that Barbadians per cent, of the budget surplus, ing. Labour conditions in th
Messrs. Yonkers Bus Cn NEON arg many pleasant recommenda- mands for industrial power. These would have to accept the shortage $672,343, ig to be transferred to Port. The imposition by the Cus
Bus Co, ans, the erogtemive Bus tions about the family of C. N. conditions are almost world wide for sometime, but the Company toms authorities of fines on good "

|
|




=





PAGE SIX’







CLASSIFIED ADS.



TELEPHONE 2508
> . 2
DIED FOR SALE
}
} —_—— em
MARBRIS—On May 15, 199° maior % “
s, D.S.O His funeral wt s
@ place at 3 p.m. today at the} AUTOMOTIVE
Cemetary, Greaves End, — $$ ——— - ~
eek erie nels are asked to attend BEDFORD 12 ewt. DELIVERY VAN
Squacron Leader Snow | New, for immediate delivery. Dial 4616.
: inte Garage 10.5.52-—0n
SREENIDGE—On the loth BEDFORD TRUCK— 206” wheelbase
ORE bell Philip Rowe Gr i j comple te with Cab and Platform New,
manager of Carrington Factory, St r immediate delivery—Courtesy Gar-
Philip. His funeral will leave his late | age Dial 4616 10.5.52—6n
x lence, Valiey Hill, Christ Churen ab RL aaloon, . eee
this aftern the West- CAR—One (1) Jaguar 1% Litre Saloon,
: moses eon oe 7 good condition. Mileage iow, per-
Winifred Greenidge, Geofirey ‘ance excellent. An expensive Cat
Greenidge. 16.5.52 bargain price. Phone 4949, Chelsea
ge (1950) Ltd. 16.5.52—Sn.
R—One (1) 1948 Standard, 8 h.p.







\pply Courtesy Garage.



PUBLIC SALES



REAL ESTATE

RS
A DOUGLAS FIR PURLIN and prin-
ciple close boarded and shingled roof,
covering a pen 140 ft. x 60 ft., two spans
30 et each containing 20 trusses and
at 20,0¢ fect of lumber







W. A. Year Hanson
St. Gee ne 4022

11.5.52—8n

—<—$ $$ — cee
At our Office, No. 17 High Street, on
Sriday the 16th May at 2 pw Wyn-
holme,” 8th Avenue, Belleville, with
land attached containing 9,715 square
feet. The house contins Drawing and

Dining Rooms, 3 Bedrooms, Kitcheo and
usual offices, inspection on application to
Mrs. Gibbons at the house on tuesdays
and Fridays between 4 p.m. and 6 p.m,
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
Solicitors
25,.4.52—8n
40 SHARES in e Central Foundry
Limited Apply to:—
Messrs. COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,












BARBADOS ADVOCATE





PUBLIC NOTICES

eae



= Se RAL. AIDS ACT, 1956)
‘° creditors ho!
against Cove Punptation Bel nner -
TAKE NOTICE that we the owners of |
the above named plantation, are about
to obtain a loan of £2,500 under the
provisions of the above Act, against the
Sugar, Molasses and other crops of the
said plantation to be reaped in 1952—53.
No money has Yet been borrowed
egainst the said crops.
Dated this l4th day of May, 1952 i
GERTRUDE ELIZABETH THOMPSON |









BOYCE,
and
JAMES F. W. BOYCE,
Owners. |
14,5.52—3n |
NOTICE

Tenders are invited for painting the
steel structure (3 coats) and roof, out-
side and inside (2 coats each), of the
Kensington stand. It may be necessary
to scale all or part of steel structure
before applying paint.



FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1952

SHIPPING NOTICES

SOOO SOPOO
STEAMSHIP CO.

















Now in effect

TCA Mee: 60-DAY

EXCURSIONS

Lowest fares ever offered for air travel














The M/V “MONEKA” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and §8t. Kitts. Sailing
Saturday 17th inst.

The M/V “CLARA” will accept
Cargo and Passengers for Trini-
dad and Nassau. Sailing Friday

TO CANADA AILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO i6th inst
a A. BRITISH GUIANA The M/V “CARTBBEE’. will
* ‘ .S. COTTICA, june aceept Ca and P: fo!
Regular flights by North Star" Skyliners SAILING TO P. AND Dorin e astiaus, Meena ‘.
BRITIS: Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing
ONLY $445.60 (B.W.1.) M.S. STENTOR i7th May 1952 Monday 26th inst. ‘

M.S.
SAILING TQ TRINIDAD AND
CURACAO

M.S. HERA 2nd June 1952.
S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD
Agents

from BRIDGETOWN to TORONTO

or MONTREAL and Return! B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS’

ASSOCIATION (INC.),














Por complete information, see

your Travel Agent or 5
GARDNIER AUSTIN & CO. LTD.
Lower Broagé St. Phone 4704 a

TRANS-CANADA Air Lines




























































Elggtric light, Large Yard enciosed, Also
Land to make garden. Fruit ri bearing
Approved tennant. Apply witnin. Phon
18.5.58-—2n

4925, 0.5.88
_ PERSONAL





Phe public are hereby warned

giving credit to my wife, :
SISE MURRELL (nee MASC( )
1 not hold mayself responsible ic

her or anyone else contracting any debt
ordebts in my name unless by a written

order signed by me.
. CLEMENT MURRELL,

Blades Hill,
St, Philip.
15.5.52-—2n






LOST—& FOUND



<—_LOST
ediniepre nena itn endian
KEYS — Bunch of keys between Ne!-
son St., Bay St. and Bay Land. Finder
please return to St. Aubyn Callender,
Orehards C/o Daniel's Bakery, Roebuck
Street. ¥
Reward offered.
eile 16,5.52—2n.





Public Official Sale

(The Provost Mar 1904
‘ (1904-4) #8 20)
Qn Friday the 16th day of May 1952
at the hour of 2 o'clock in the afternoon



al's Act

a ised value

IL that certain piece of \Land con-
taining by admeasurement 6,136 sq, ft
situate at Kensington Tenantry in the
Parish of St. Michael butting and
bounding on three sides on lands now or:
late of Kensington Tenantry and. on the
Private roadway known as Bighth
Avenue, or however else the same abut





Pick

Electrical Dept.



Electrical Dept.























nS
TRUCK—One (1) 3-ton Austin Truck.

Segly D.V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd, White

Road.
24.4.52-t f n.










BATTERIES - 5 Batteries. 6
and 15 plates; 12 Volt, 9,
ates. Get our prices first
4710. Da. Costa & Co. Ltd.

16.5.52—6n







SLECTRIC MOTORS—‘% h.p. 110/220

volts, Single Phase. Dial 3878 or 47Â¥.

DA.
Dept.

FLOOR POLISHERS. Used in conjun
tion with Johnson's Floor polishes will
cep your Floors looking new Dial
3878 or 4710, 16.5,.52—6n

COSTA & CO. LTD., Electrica)
16.5.52—6n.





sn siberian gindeiitietpaseeaimrneassalomneiate
FRIDGE—Westinghouse Fridge 3% c.f
Excellent condition. Ring Mr. Hughes
4412, after 5 p.m, 2064
13,5,.52-—Sn

HOOVER VACCUUM CLEANERS
Cylindrical type, complete with
attachments, only $75.00; Mechanical car-
pet sweepers, only $17.88. K, R. Hunte

& Co., Ltd, Phone 5136.
14,5.52—3n.

all

—————
FLM.V. RADIOGRAMS — New Models

with 3 speed Changers and Record Cab-
net, Dial 3878 or 4710, DA, COSTA &

16.5.52—n,

Co. LTD., Electrical Dept.



ae
IRONERS—Oprim Industrial Ironers. A

complete kroner for Home or Laundry.
Dial 3878 or 4710, DA. COSTA & CO.
sold at my office tagthe highest | UTD., Electrical Dept.

* 16.5.52—6n,

EDISWAN BATTERY CHARGERS

Will charge up to 18 six-volt Batteries
or their equivalent at 6 Amps. For use
on 110 Volt Single Phase eireuit. Dial
2878 or 4710. DA. COSTA & CO. LTD.,
16.5.52—6n.

aaa ee Ee
VACUUM CLEANERS--Three sizes to







and bound, appraised as follows:— select from. Keeps inaccessible corners
© whole area of land to SIX HUN-| clean. Dial 9878 or 4710, DA. COSTA
tm AND TWENTY-ONE DOLLARS] & CO. LTD., Electrical Dept.
AND FORTY-THREE CENTS ($621.43) 16,5.52—6n
Ae tor from James Christopher Gra-
vette for and towards satisfaction, &c
N.B.—-25% Deposit te be paid on day MECHANICAL
shase
oo ould vy. T. HEADLEY, EEL STRAKES: Reduce Tractor
Provost Marshal. i-spin considerably. In_ stock for
Pyovost Marshal's Office, -Harris Mod. 744D for other
0th April, 1952. etors on application—Courteay Gar-
+s 2.5.52—3n Dial 4616. 10.5.52—6n
. ean
——_-—_-_— MISCELLANEOUS

Sion Pyorrhea
in 24 Hours



Longe

Teeth and










« mean that you have
orrhe Trench Mouth or bad
ich sooner or Inter will

teeth fall out and may

‘ism and Heart Trou-

? r with the

. Hiops bleed-

1.24 hours, ends sore

tiehtens teeth. Iron clad

« Amosan must make your
heowal ‘4 save your teeth or
Weney back return of empty

sckag Amosan from your

/ ; chomist today
3 Pe (se: The .
AMeosan ane Booey?
Pes @yorrhea— Trench Mouth







Bendix Automatic
Washing Machines.

ee /
These Machines are entirely

automatic, simply ioad wit

clothes, set.to wash 5 m

later remove the ciott



have ‘been= washed, rinsed ree
times end damp dried
So simple, So labour saving.
Get one from DA COSTA & CO |
LTD Elect. Dept, |
165.526, |





ORIENTAL
PALACE

HEADQUARTERS FOR
SOUVENIKS

| FROM INDIA, CHINA &
CEYLON

THANI'S

Pr. Wm. Hy. St Diu: p4e {

7







Â¥

COLLINS’ LID.
LO0COS0SSOSOSOOOOOSEOU

%





POOP SSOOOT OG
5 s <
FOR SALE
ONE “FRIGIDAIRE” Electric
Neep Freeze. {
ONE “WESTINGHOUSE” Electr
fee making machine, capacity 500
Ibs. per day
One 5 gal. gos h coffee per-
colator complete with heating
unit.
One gas heated st steel @
hot water urn. 2
x

OT
AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT—Mas-

ey Harris and other equipment includ-
ng Grass Rakes, Grass Loaders, Fertil-
‘yr Distributors, Bagasse Spreadgrs,
iso suitable for applying Filter-Press
Ashes and Pen Manure, and other
Courtesy Garage

10.5.52—6n




Types Implements
Dial 4616.

ocean



COUNTER SCALES ~- Jacob Pattern
Counter Scales with brass scoop anc
weights Government stamped $34.31
each

G. W. Hutchinson & Co, Ltd.
Dial 4222
16.5.52—3n.

FISHING BOAT named Endeavour
No. S 148. Practically new, can be seen
at Mount Stanfast Bay. Apply to IRA



















SOBERS. Garden St. James
16. 5. 52—2n.
“GARDEN “HOSE: ™%” Garden Hose

and Fittings. City Garage Co., Victoria
Street. 1,.5.62—t.f.n

GALVANIZED NAILg—All sizes up
to 3 inch at 42c. per lb, G. W. HUTCH-
(NSON & Go Ltd. Dial 4222

‘16.5.52—3n

——$—$—_[_—
Gibson V Class Speedboat—built and
mported 1948, Length 18 ft, Beam 5 ft
) ins. Draught 12 feet. Seating eapacity
six to seven people. Steel hull material
nd construction comply with Lioyd’s
md Board of Trade requirement
Powered with Ford Watermotor 10/3%
> H.P. Speed ten knots. Price $800.00

Apply REGINALD aimee 7
§.52--t.f.n






sl aero an
HURRICANE LANTERNS -
rome should have one, Only $1.97 e9
> W. HUTCHINSON & Co Lid. Di
4242 16.8.52-—3n
$$$
HOUSEHOLD EQUIPMENT ot all
scription. Owen T. Allder, 118 Roebuck
1. Dial 3299 10.5.52—t.f.n
if you cannot take plain Cod Liver
we suggest you take "Rexall's Cod
Liver OF Emulsion’, a _ palatable
reparation containing 507% of Vitamin
Tested Cod Liver Oil.
KNIGHT'S LTD.
14.5.52—3n,



Str



time to give yourself @



Now is the

glorious suntan by applying “Sun

Tone” regularly when at the beach
Price 3/- bot.

KNIGHT'S LTD.

14.5.52—3n.







FURNISH

NOW IT’S EASY
The Money Saving Way



Popular Bureaus, Bedsteads,
Beds, Cradles, Wardrobes, Wash
stands $8.00 up, Coil and Fiat
Springs -— TABLES for Dir

Kitchen and Fancy use, Larders,
Waggons, ‘Tea Trollays, Side-
boards—Kitchen, China and Bed-
room Cabinets, Liquor Cases
$5.50 up DRAWING ROOM
FURNITURE, Rush Furniture fo
Little and Big—PIANOS, Pram,

Ice Boxes,
Nice

Typewriter, and other
Things—ALL AT MONEY

L.S. WILSON

SPRY STREET DIAL 4069



So





















































ery repair work desirable Applicant
must have knowledge of scale drawing
end experience in the direction of



“UNDER THE SILVER

f 5 abour.

HAMMER Copies of recent testimonials must be
By recommendations of Lioyds Agents} submitted with application by 3ist May

we will sell on FRIDAY 16th at H.|1952, For particulars relating to salary

Ltd conditions, apply to: The

and other
Manager, The Barbados Foundry Limi-
ted, P.O. Box 91,

Bridgetown, Barbados.

——_———

An Assistant FOREMAN capable of
supervising our Machine Shop Depart-
ment. Applicant must have knowledge
in making sketches and reading blue
prints.

Copies of recent testimonials must be
submitted with application by Sist May
1952, For particulars relating to salary
tnd’ other conditions, apply to: ‘The
Monager, The Barbados Foundry Limited,
P.O. Box 91, White Park Road, Bridge-
town, Barbados. 14.5.52—in.

ie wciicsiiiectenenaibenieeseliabnainabiee

BOOK-KEEPER for our, Office. Must
have knowledge of Book-keeping, other-
no use applying. For particulars

Jason Jones & Co. Warehouse,
Hincks Street:—
20 BAGS DARK CRYSTAL SUGAR.
Sale 12.30 d’clock Terms cash
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers.

15.5.52—2n.





FOR SALE
MISCELLANEOUS

PRIMUS LANTERNS—Burns
00 candle power, fitted with H
Duroterm Glass Chimneys a
Hardware & Bicycle Accessorie















an ri Stre: wise
pee eee 19.5,52—2n. | Dial K. Re HUNTE, 8137, any morning
RECORDS—Clearing our stock of MGM | Pefore 980 a-m- 16.9.98—4n-
Records. Three for Two Dollars, your —
choice. A. BARNES & CO., LTD LOSPPPPOSOOSSLOSOSS GOSS:
9.4.52—t.f.n x

LT
Subscribe now to the Datly Telegraph
England's leading Daily Newspaper now
arriving in Barbados by Air only a few
days after publication in London. Con-
tact: jan Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltd.
Local Representative, Tel, 3118
17.4.52—t.f.n. |

VAT—One (1) 8,000 gallon Oak vat —|¢
apply D. V, Scott & Co., Ltd., White! ¢

VEGETABLES

CABBAGE... 30c. per tb %





Park Road, 1.5521... |% CARROTS... 24c. per tb $
ones pave st fresh supply of ‘“Brags's x
harcoa! its"? C . TS Ac,
Rosen Lsbeeaetoae sense ie % BEE sons 2 per th
nee, Acidity ete, Price 6+ tin. ‘3 : t
KNIGHT'S LTD.
teiecks. |@ At No. 11, Swan Stree
———— eee Ub 45:68 EGOSSSOOSSS OOS

5S SSOSOPOFSDPVSPLOD:







}
mm rwo TAT }
TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH | Electrical Installations
What The Boys Have ‘
Been Waiting For } and Repairs.
Has Arrived:— ' Our Wiring Department carries
AMERICAN car 8) | 4 Sale lft “ona
PISTOLS AND CAPS tha. installation or repair of all
Closing Out Sale of re Joke in Homes

ALL ENAMEL PAINTS Dial 3878 or 4710.

Learn to remember numbers.

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY Practice on Ours.
and De ered Sage
HARDWARE 16.5.52—6n



64055959960 SSOOOCOG8OES

Barbados Fancy Molasses Production
and Export Acts 1987 and 19939.





Under the above Acts, the Fancy Molasses Control and Marketing
Board has allocated the following amounts of fancy molasses to be
manufactured for the purpose of export by the plantations named.
These allocations are subject to approval by the Governor-in-Execu-
tive Committee at the expiration of seven days from the date of this
publication: —











| Name of Plantation Wine Gallons
ae eine ed wh Oe Aas NORA NOLS $02 O60 9 9 CMR OE 303,708
MAK e Chace ke Rel eee UNDE gvirt ee oo8 617,241
Colleton (St. John) 315,490
DU ocdcth peas ches ase esonnhescs 440,837
GODS) Fai sca sealers 423,159
WRT ees ace sk swage 388,846
Kendal 405,725
DROP ais Gb 65 6b 0408 NENA ROR LORE SOS 158,867
NWN Cc Se CRC Cage eas hese Bada tage eee ee> 441,441
MOONGOUS: diecondsdae> tent hee es nkegesiepee ube t gets 175,831
EAE, aie eve ie ho oes ee pbem eens oaahaes 3,671,145

15.5.52—3n.



INVESTMENTS

In exchange for - - -

$7.000 COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA
5° Bonds, 1952/55,

ah em

‘mn I hi ee

I will deliver - - -

£2,650 BARBADOS GOVERNMENT

342 DEBS, 1961/



OP
£3,400 BRITISH 312% WAR LOAN,
1952 or after.
'

Above figures ean be varied up or down: all
subject to market changes. Other attractive
trades available for those not requiring trustee
investments.

e



A.M. WEBB

STOCKBROKER.

Dial 4796 ese Hours 9—3
ss 33 Broed St. (Upstairs Phoenix Pharmacy).
- Seer ee ee





















15.5.52—3n 17, High Street, Tenders must reach the wu ed
$$ eauamnaner es at C. FP. Harrison & Co’s Office not
CAR—Prefect Ford, 1948 modei: good ers 5.5260 than May 19th.
Furnished. From 15th May) T} condition, five BoOd tyTeS, BOOK UWP 9 aeemnmenememennmmnmnt The Association does not bind itself
or 8589 | holstery. owns. driven. Selling —— SHARES—.. limited number of OR-/|to rons re lowest ox eet tender. 2 s e
——__—— = e. $850.00 pply to Leslie Smith,| DINARY iE BARBADOS t ARBADOS CRICKET t l t
PARAWAY-— St. Phiiip, ttens Road, Govt. Hill. SHIPFING WRADI co. LID at ASSOCIATION. lan a 1ona eams 1 Ss
rooms. Fully furnished 15.5.52—2n.] £2. per share. Free mp duty W. F. HOYOS,
Watermill supply. Dout ————_———[—$_————— eee CARRINGTON & SEALY Hon. Secty.
servant rooms. From CAR—Austin, A. 70 Hampshire, © 43.5.52-——12r 11.5.62—4n
4476. cellent condition, Dial 2594. CB. | un mn — SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Sails Arrives Sails Pe ee ra eee a a a.
uart i6'5.52~3n. | GplON KO? — MAXWELL coast | NOTICE Montreal Halifax Boston B’dos —_B’dos 1EQLE
“HORSE Hilt House, Josept | - The above property will be offered ! CANADIAN CRUISER .. 2 Apr. 2 May — 17 May 17 May
$60.00 per month, electricity, telephor CAR—Vauxhall 18 b.p. Saloon 1951, in| for sale at 2 p.m. on Friday, 16th May,/ APPLICATIONS for one or more CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 9May 12 May = 21 May 23 May
and water insts Apply: Mrs. Georg cally first class condition. Newly Spray-] 1952, at the office of the undersigned.’ vacant St. Michael's Vestry Exhibitions LADY RODNEY .. oa .. 19 May 22 May 24 May 2 June 3 June
Hutson, Dial 96245. inted. Dial 4616 Courtesy Garage. | | Viewing Sunday, May ith to Thurs. at Harrison College will be received ee aes CHALLENGER _ 39 May § Zune a 22 June £2 toss Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
3.5.52 a May so — a, , y NELSON .. i ba une ni
Se Sg a a oy ny suly 1s Soe further enanene Nip dcw R te P Lge Allg ‘Stay, | CANADIAN CRUISER 4 oe eo ee eye suly Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica
KELDARE ford > CAR—One (1) Austin A.40 Car, lat€| lars apply 1952 CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 30 June 8 July = 12 July 13 Jule
Micghael. Near ait Club, From is 951 model, Telephone 4821. D. V COTTLi: CATFORD & CO., Candidates must be the sons of LADY RODNEY .. a .. MdJuly July 16 July 25 July 26 July
June to oe Demet: Well-furnishe cott & Co., Ltd. 8.5.52-—t.f.n., High Street. parishioners in straitened circumstances
Buhgalow; Verandahs reception rooms, ) ————____——-—- 11.5.52—5n.|and must not be less than 9 nor more From Sou Arrives Barbados
2 Gouble bedrooms (basins), servants DODGE TRUCK—Complete with new] —— _____ "| than 15 years of age on the 30th June, NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives Ayrives “COLOMBIE” 8th Ma 1952 21st Ma: 1952
room, gas cooker, Garage, Warden. Reus stform and good tyres, Courtesy AUCTION 1952, to be proved by a Baptismal P B'dos Bidos St. John Boston Halifax Montreal pe: wo y> sere ease y,
onétie rent. Tele. 46031 after eleven rage Dial 4616 Certifeate which must accompany the DE GRASSE” .... 4th June, 1952 .... 16th June, 1952
w'clock. 16,8.52—31 MORRES OXFORD—1952 Model, like ——--—- ~- xpplication,. oo 24 May 29 May 5 June - 8 June 11 June el
mileage under 3,000, Dial 4616 > r f lication be obtained | © LAN m calling
NEWHAVEN — Crane Co 4 bed ga 19.5,52—8n, Ac ten tha Voley CET “Office. CONSTRUCTOR 3June June 15 June = 18 June® 21 June _ at -Byatgionee
rooms. Fuliy furnished, lighting Plo ciara heen ae ; EET, on FRIDAY E. C. REDMAN, LADY RODNEY 15 June 17 June > gi June 28June 1 July
Watermill supply, Double Garage, three (1) M Coupe 1 perfect | 16th p.m. one 1951 AUSTEN A-« Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry CANADIAN SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE
servant rooms. For May apd from Oc Apply Newcastle Plantation, St |SEDAN CAR damaged in accident 10.5.52—7n CHALLENGER. 23 June 28 June 5 July 18 July 8 July 11 July
tober ist Phone 4876. , 30 +-£.0, | FRRMB CARH. cencincrnsnsinstitnaninemnmnseseausctnamamnasonas| Te DELS 6 July a July 19 July 22 July From Barbados. Arrives Southampton
10.4.52—t.f.5 c Pps ie semana BR. ARCHER McKE! ere 14 duly 19 July ae suly SM suly “1 Aug *“DE GRASSE” 19th 1952 29th 1952
i cline erence naeentntmenetoe MASSEY-HARRIS S— book; ‘ I NITED c eee May, asso snee May,
TRINITY. COTTAGE-—Fully furnished, requirements of these Popular Trac-} 4n WA Ace ee. a hae Me an $58 wie $3 Rar: “COLOMBIE” .... Ist June, 1952 .... 18th June, 1952 ¢
three bedrooms, complete with tele-| ‘ors Now. (Wheel and half-Track). Dial) ~~ oO — ee "a ; . ae me i" *“DE GRASSE” 29th June, 1952 9th July. 1952 ¥
phone and refrigerator, situated 41 | 4616, Courtesy Garage, 7 eae | cher ieee aan — og! Model _ one , ae ee '* %
3 a Pi ts 0 2—G6r Sitroen ol, damaged in ac
Derrieks Bay, St, James, Fhope anne. ou, oo Pe eo tnaucted Be ae ty P For further particulars, apply to— *Sailing direct to Southampton
PICI P—One Ford Pick-up in good Company to offer both these vehicle: HEL’ ‘
‘THE SNUGGERY’—Near Bra working order with Five good tires.| ele by AUCTION at the COuH —— rN ahs GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD.—Agents. 59596 66:66:66 OS SC6CSS SCC CO8P
Beach, newly painted; comprisini ‘| Apply to B. A. BELGRAVE, Hindsbury| GARAGE on Friday 1th of & a Aes 2 ksho! ‘anc. | S2SMSIREaie cs tae wremtniano nici an
Bedrooms, Dinning and Drawing Room] Rd. St Michael 16. 5, 52—in,}| 2.30 p.m, Auctioneers: John M la pa le © supervising a wor ae Be.
en@losed; Gallery, Toilet and Bath, & Co 18.5 52—4n. | Foundry, Experience in Sugar Machin-

THE DEMERARA
UTUAL LIFE



hy



OVER $2,000,000
DURING 1951.

- RECORD ADDITION OF $571,646
TO ASSURANCE FUND.

ACTUARY RECOMMENDS BONUS OF TWO PER CENT

ASSURANCE SOCIETY

©

Reports :— | Na

i,
Miri,

NEW ISSUE







AS A RESULT of the transactions for the year ended
December 31 last, the Demerara Mutual Life Assurance

Society, Limited, has established another record by the
| addition of the very large sum of $571,646 to the Assurance

Fund which now stands at $6,681,714. The average yield
on the Assurance Fund for the year was very satisfactory,
| ane Society was holding its own in the competitive

This was stated by Mr..Percy C. Wight, O.B.E., Chair-
man, at the 60th annual general meeting of members yes-
terday at the Demerara Life Building.

Addressing the meeting Mr. Wight said :
Gentlemen,

It gives me much pleasure to present to you the Sixtieth
|Annual Report of the Directors on the transactions of the
Society for the year 1951. Before dealing with the main
features of the Report, however, I regretfully have to refer
to the passing of Mr. John Ignatius deAguiar, C.B.E. on the
27th January last. Mr. deAguiar had been a member of this
Board for 26 years and by his death not only has the Society
lost avery capable Director but the community as a whole
has suffered a great loss.

As you will see from the Report Mr. A. E. Gonsalves
has been elected to fill the vacant seat at the Board.

HOLDING OWN IN COMPETHIYS FIELD

Now reverting to the report whic customary has
‘been reproduced in the local Press you will observe that the
New Issue for the year was $2,023,842 with an annual pre-

mium income of $116,857. This is the largest total but one
in the history of the Society and shows that the Society is

holding its own in the competitive field.

Claims by death during the year
assuring $112,242 including bonus YGaitions which is much
less than the previous year when the total was $142,058 in-
volving 73 policies. The maturing of 153 Endowments result-
ed in the sum of $260,216 being paid out. These bring the
total claims paid by the Society since its inception to
$8,858,279.

The Ratio of Expenses of Management (including com-
mission account) to Premium Receipts is 17.5% as against
17% in 1950.

The average yield on the Assurance Fund for the year
| worked out at 4.58% and the average for the Quinquennium
was 4.75% which is very satisfactory after taking into
|account the low yields obtaining on gilt-edged securities
jat the present time.

totalled 52 policies







As a result of the transactions for the year, the Society
has established another record by the addition of the very
large sum of $571,646 to the Assurance Fund which now
stands at $6,681,714.

2% BONUS RECOMMENDED ;

The Report by our Actuary on the Twelfth Quinquen-
nial Valuation has just arrived. Mr. Pelham recommends
that we should increase our reserves by two hundred and
sixty thousand doljars and in addition thereto declared a
Reversionary Bonus of two per cent per annum upon the
Sums Assured and the existing Bonus Additions on policies
entitled to participate. I am sure that you will agree with
Mr. Pelham when he states that the Valuation results are
eminently satisfactory. In accordance with the Society’s
regulations an Extraordinary General Meeting will be con-
vened as early as possible to adopt our Actuary’s Report.

Before I close my address I would like to place on re-
cord my thanks to the Directors for their co-operation and
the Staff for their loyal service.

With these remarks, Gentlemen, I formally move the
adoption of the Report and after it has been seconded I shal!
be pineeerl to answer any questions Members may care to
ask.”
ms Mr. C. C. de Freitas seconded and the report was adopt-

THOSE ‘PRESENT ,
Other Directors present were: the Hons. G. H. Smellie

and E. F. McDavid, C.MG.. C.B.B. and Messrs. Percy W.

King, O.B.E., R. K. Steele, F, A. Seaford, C. L. de Freitas
and A. E. Gonsalves, with Mr. E. C. Innis Secretary and
H. Cannon, assistant secretary.

Policyholders in attendance were: Messrs. A. S, Out-
ridge, R. L. King, A. E. Chester, S. N. Abdool, R. A. Callen-
der, B. M. Gonsalves, F. S. Gomes, N. Wight, H. S, Perreira
J. A. Campbell, C. P. Wight, C. C. de Freitas and J. E. Bren:
nan, ; aa

Messrs. C. L. de Freitas, P. W. King, and A. E. Gonsalves.
retiring Directors were re-elected on a motion by Mr. C. C
de Freitas, seconded by Mr. A. E, Chester.

Remuneration of the Directors was fixed at $4,000 fo
the ensuing year : $1,000 for the Chairman and $3,000, to b
divided among the other Directors; while the remuneratio':
of the Auditors was fixed at $1,440.

Donations to Charity were approved at $2,500 for th»
year 1952.

MR. WIGHT RE-ELECTED CHAIRMAN

At a special meeting held afterwards Mr. Percy C

Wight was unanimously re-elected Chairman.

Sa cea ae
FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1952



a ee

HENRY

4 MEAN, MY DEAR LADY
VOURE AS PHONEY AS
THAT UEWELLERY VOU
THREW OVERBOARD

NOW, MAS. DE LAZLON,
WHAT PRECISELY 5S









LAURETTA USED
TO THINK I WAS

GOT IN




—LIKE A CHARM, ff
caP'N! WHEN
THAT GAS .
COOLED THE PILE

(OHHH... MY
HEAD... HEY!
THE COOL













CAREFUL, DALE!
DON'T TOUCH

THE SUIT-- IT’S
SOAKED WITH
RADIATION /

FLASH? DARLING...
PLEASE! OPEN
YOUR EYES...









UP LIKE A CORK
IN A RAIN BARREL /

WE'RE OUT IN
FREE SPACE










Get us!



JOHNNY HAZARD

w |F THERE IS ANYONE
PRESENT WHO CAN SHOW
WHY THIS MAN AND THIS
WOMAN SHALL NOT BE








ZE MONTAIGNE CHAPEL
EES ON ZE NEXT BLOCK,

A BLOCK IS AS
GOOD AS A MILE
RIGHT NOW...



THIS NEW COOK WE HIRED
YESTERDAY IS EVIDENTLY
NOT AN EARLY RISER /T'M
STARVING //--I'D LIKE SOME
BREAKFAST’

4 . MINERVA - WHAT
SHE MUST HAVE OVERSLEPT’ }4— =
I THINK T'LL GIVE HER A



NO...ALL THE CABBIE
COULD TELL ME WAS THAT }
SHE WAS ATTRACTIVE

AND WELL DRESSED...

\ a~e——( THAT'S NOT
Y= MUCH TO










TM MAKING
PROGRESS, HONEY...
I KNOW THAT RICKY
LAABERT’S KILLER



WATCH THAT TRUCK.
IF IT MOVES AWAY, SEE

THEN WE BOTH
THE SAME
BIOCHEMISTRY








AGAIN! OLD MAN
JUPITER COULON'T











HAVING FOR BREAKFAST
THIS MORNING ?



BY CARL

THE OLO INSURANCE
A RACKET, EX ?..

ye NOW SHE ONLY

{ CONSIDERS ME AS
A DOLLAR AND TEN
CENTS’ WORTH OF

SALT, NITROGEN, IRON

CLASS THIS TERM 4 ” CALCIUM, HYDROGEN

SCAne POTASSIUM
GY”



BY DAN _ BARRY

EXPEDITIONS ONE AND
TWO WEREN'T AS
LUCKY AS OURS! WE
COULDN'T LAND BUT
WE GOT OUR RECORDS
<.. AND WE'VE SUR-
VIVED TO TAKE THEM
BACK TO PALOMAR |

ee

AND, DARLING,
WE GOT A
PERFECT RECORD
OF JUPITER'S
SURFACE FROM
THE RADIO
ROBOT!




MAYBE, FLASH! ~
WE'RE NOT OUT OF
» DANGER YET...

a aa
WEE DORRIE/ GET

AWAY FROM THAT HUSSY

THIS INSTANT /






we LET HM
SPEAK

I |
i








DON'T WORRY ABOUT
MY BREAKFAST - MR.
JIGGS/ GO AHEAD
WITH YOUR? OWN = TLL
GET MINE LATER /

ARE YOU



IT'S A START...HONEY, I'D LIKE YOU
TO DO ME AFAVOR... GO DOWN TO |
THE “DAILY SPHERE”...CHECK THEIR /
FILES FOR CLIPPINGS ON RICKY _/
LAMBERT...LIST EVERY GIRL y——~" _/
WHOSE NAME WAS LINKED

WITH LAMBERT'S IN THE 4

PAST TWO YEARS /





ANDERSON



BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN













We never
let go!

Vigilance over the high quality of
“Black & White” is never relaxed. Blended in
SY the special “ Black & White ” way this truly

outstanding Scotch is in a class all its own.

‘BLACK: WHITE’

SCOTCH WHISKY

By Appointment Scotch Whisky Distillers

to H.M, King George Vi James Buchanan & Co. Led,



JAMES BUCHANAN & CO. LTD., GLASGOW, SCOTLAND











= Sk ee
SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Hranches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street









Usually Now Usually Now

ONIONS—2-lb. CA ; 48 -. 36 PKGS. WEETABIX ry 30 27
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e
THE COLONNADE

GROCERIES







LET HIM HAVE
JUDGEMENT

®y BRUCK HAMILTON

of Barbados. :

tion; he believes that justice is with the seales and the sword, or

Whether the reader believes in Paul Reform or in retribu-
that between them is margin for error, Bruce Hamilton here
presents with drama, vision, and a power that does not seek to
persuade, a case for every reader to answer,

This is a murder stary with a differenee—the accused is a
High Court Judge. From his seat on the Bench he is brought
to stand in the dock and answer for a crime which he had every
reason to commit, Here is a range of lively and candid charae-
ters: Art 'Turvey, the old countryman with his small cunning
and his taste for seandal; the furyman who dabbled in psycho-
logy; Teal, the stranger who came from Buffalo to spring a trap
in the Norfolk marshes; Willoughby, the nonentity who was
accused of murder, and Sir Francis Brittian who paid the penalty.

The book culminates in a trial in which the case against the
accused mercilessly advances, fact by fact, towards his indict-
ment and sentence, There follows a surprise development and
a wry, unexpected ending.

Bruce Hamilton is a writer with a brisk and simple style,
humour, and a veal but not laboured sympathy,

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anf




PAGE EIGHT

Carlton



D feat

Empire 2—0

Carlton defeated Empire two

replay for the Knock Out at

nil in their semi-final
Kensington yesterday evening,

when these teams met on the first occasion the match was

drawn two all,
The Carlton goals wer
their inside left, and Pepy I

WATER POLO:



Snappers, H.C.
Win Water

Polo Games

Snappers
Sword Fish
'—2 and

a +2

completely outplayed
and defeated them
Harrison College scored
win over Whipporays
when the first two Division
“A” Water Polo matches for the
season were played at the Aquatic
Club yesterday evening.

Snappers displayed much skill
and guile in outpositioning thei
opponents, combined well and for
the first match of the season were

very fit and were swimming pow-
erfully. College won through
their ceaseless attacks on Whip-
porays whom they somewhat

muddled and through their alert-
ness in dodging the Whipporas
players to receive passes.

For Snappers, Delbert Ban-
nister who has as powerful a
back arm thrust as ever and Ma
colm Browne who is swift an
unerring, each scored two, «Ken
neth Ince, Billy and Frank Man-
ning each scored one.

Sword Fish Portillo
Nestor and Herbert,
for their team,

For College in

brothers,
each scored

the College

Whipporays match, Charles Eve-
jyn, G. Jordan, S. Grannum and
R. Feldman scoreg one each and

for Whipporays H. Weatherhead
and R, Redman scored

It would scarcely be fair to
single out any of the Snapper
players for special mention, Each
player pulled his weight. But it
was interesting noticing how Ken-
neth Ince,could quickly scan the
water, sum up the position and
pass the ball to advantage. The
Snappers players were leaping
waist high out of the water when
about to make an attempt at the
nets and this always added force
to the try.



Sword Fish put up but
show at combination and
completely routed.

Outstanding in the College team
were G. Jordan and C. Evelyn.
Jordan is really the backbone of
his side and plays one well
skilled in the game,

4 poor
were

as



Of the goalkeepers, College’s
Chabrol was about the best. He
Was executing some good timing
and saved many, possible goals.

In ‘the Snappers-Sword Fish
match, Sword Fish’s Albert
Weatherhead seemed to get dis-
gusted after so many goals wer
coming in on him, especially as
the ball was coming with such
force and he was not getting

much help from his team fellows

The teams were:

Snappers—T. Clarke, G. Mc

Clean (Capt.) ,B. Manning, F
Manning, D. Bannister, K. Lnce,
M. Browne.

Sword Fish—A Weatherhead,
G. Foster, Gerald Jordan, A

Jones, N. Portillo, H
Dick Reece.
Harrison College — J. Chabrol,
R. Feldman, C. Evelyn, Jordan, A,
Taylor, K. Armstrong and S.
Grannum,
Whipporays—C.
Yearwood, H, Weatherhead, A.

Portillo and

Hunte (Capt.) B. Ward, R. Red-
man and Hazel
The referee was Archie Clarke.



WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY

Rainfall
nil.
Total Rainfall for Month to

date: 62 in.
Highest Temperature: 88.5 °F.
Lowest Temperature: 74.0°F.
Wind Velocity: 11 miles per
hour.
Barometer (9 a.m.)
(3 p.m.) 29.940.

from Codrington;

30.005;

TO-DAY
Sunrise; 5.39 a.m,
Sunset: 6.16 p.m.

Moon Full: May 9,
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

High Tide: 9.20 a.m. 10.44
p.m.

Low. Tide: 3.26 a.m., 4.06
p.m,



| They'l Do Tt Bvew

(CO KNOW THIS CHARACTER ws HE
{/PUSHES HIMSELF INTO A CRO’

BUS WITH THE HAPPY

oy



Greenidge, T. «

e scored by Boogles Williams
{utchinson at centre forward

Carlton took the touch off while

Empire defended the northern
nal. Carlton were first to attack.
Pepy” Hutchinson. Carlton centre

forward, missed an opportunity to

open the score for his team. Rey-
nold Hutchinson, left winger, ran
down the wing and_ centred.
Pepy” was unmarked, but took a
hot which went wide of the right
pright. “Brickie” Lucas, Carlton
iside right, took a shot from out-
ide the aréa. This was also wide

f the goal
A tew minutes later Douglas, the

Umpire left winger took a long
hot which was well outside the
ight upright, Carlton were award-
da free kick from just outside

he goal area, No scoring resulted.
Hope, on the right wing for Em-








ire, took a beautiful shot from
he wing. The ball went only a
»w yards wide of the crossbar.

Carlton got another free kick
rom a few feet outside the goal
area. On this occasion goalie
Archer fouled the ball. Lucas took
he kick but the ball went wide
of the goal

First Goal
“Boogles” Williams, Carlton in-
ide left, scored the first goal for
his team frorn a free kick. The

hot was taken from just outside

he goal area. The ball struck

valie Archer and entered the left

nner of the net At half time
core was Carlton one, Em-

ire nil 4

Empire were first off the mark in

ihe second half. They were award-
ed a free kick and Maynard, their
left half, took a well placed shot.
Carlton’s custodian, King, ran out
of goal and saved.

Shortly afterwards Carlton al-
most increased their lead. Lucas
took a hard shot from close range
but the ball struck goalie Archer
ind rebounded into play.

The second goal for Carlton
came soon after. The Black Rock
forwards bore down on their op-
ponents, “Pepy” Hutchinson who
had now changed positions with
Reynold Hutchinson, received a
short pass and ran through. He

eat goalie Archer with a_ hard
shot The game ended with the
score Carlton two, Empire nil.

The teams are as follows; —

Empire: Archer, Jordan, Grant.
Maynard, Smith, Haynes, Hope,
Hutchinson, Bynoe. Parris, Doug-
las.

Carlton: King, Kennedy, Porter
Warren, Clairmonte, Cox, Wil-
liams, G. Hutchinson, Marshall,

Lueas. R. Hutchinson,
Referee: Mr. O. Graham.

First Girls’







Is there a Derby winner

among them ?

perhaps in 1953

THs week came news which has been
eagerly awaited by British racegoers

The Queen, with the Queen

four hours in a tiny village five hundred
feet up on the Wiltshire Downs. Its name
Beckhampton. The Queen was visiting fiv«
of her horses trained by Mr.
She had lunch and tea there and watched the

horses galloped.

There has been no announcement yet of the
Queen's intentions about racing this season. It is
expected that when Court mourning
14 aliogeth
Under the name and in the colour

her horses—she has
of Norfolk, To-day, at Newbur

name of the Duke of Norfolk. ‘|
Boy

_Next season it 1s thought that

under the famous Royal colours
and gold,” first adopted by King
ut her visit to Beckhampton
indicating that she fully intend
enthusiastic interest in the
breeding and racing of horses

The five horses at 3eck-
hampton are not technically
owned by her. They were leased
to King George VI from the
National Stud, For a number of
years selected yearlings have
been leased in this way. Never-
theless, they are always regarded
as Royal horses, Gordon Richards
the stable jockey, rides them.

The arrangement started when
Fred Darling trained at Beck-
hampton. When Noel Murless
went over there in 1947 he took
over the Royal racing interests.

Out-of-Doors Man

At 42, Noel Murless has one
of the largest strings in the coun-
try; he trains 60 horses.

He is tall and lean, with a
tanned, craggy face: the face of
the eternal out-of-doors man.

He sat in his garden wearing a



jacket with leather patches at
the elbows, screwing up his
eyes at the sun, He gazed ab-
sently at his two terriers chasing

over the lawn and discussed the
Queen’s horses.

He said: “The Queen's horses
get no preferential treatment;
they are fed and exercised just
like any other of the 60 in the
string.

“At the moment there are five
of them, They are all fillies.

“One is a_ three-year-old:
Ardent, The others are two-year-
olds: Black Bee, Snow Princess,
High Service and Infernal Ma-
chine.

“None of them has raced yet.”

What are their chances when
they do get on to a racecourse?

Said Murless: “It is really too
early to say, and so I cannot
give a sound opinion. But |

Inter-School





Sports To Be Held Today

WHEN the first Girls’ Inter School Sports ever to be
held in Barbados comes off today at Kensington, the winning
school of Alexandra, Alleyne, Foundation, Queen’s College
ind St. Miechael’s Girls’ will be taking away the Lady

Savage Challenge Cup.

Lady Savage has lead the way in supplying Challenge

Cups for these new sports,
Cups needed—the four Class
14—16 and over 16.

The sports meeting starts at 1.30
p.m. There will be 17 events and
the sports will be confined to flat
races and high jumping. The long-
est distance wil) be a 220 yards
for 14---16 girls and over 16.

Unlike boys’ sports, there will
be no throwing of the cricket ball,
long jump, (St. Michael’s Girls’ is
the only school with a sand pit),
jumping the hurdles. nor the long-
distances like the 440 and 880;

yards



The sports nevertheless are ex_
pected to be very interesting es-
pecially as competition is very

keen and each school so far has
been trying to keep it as a state

secret what times their athletes
ere making for the various dis-
tances or how high their jump-
rs are jumping.
Team Spirit
A games mistress of one of these
chools observed yesterday that

the development of good sports
\anship, team spirit and physical
ness is necessary in the educa-
both boys and girls,

It is therefore hoped that the
eneral public will give to the
Girl Inter “School Sports the

me enthusiastic support which

Boy Sports receive, i
As this is the first sports meet-
, of the kind, no fund yet exists

oO Support it. Subseriptions to-
wards the purchase of Cups are
bus welcome and will be grate_
fully received on behalf of the
Sports’ Committee by the Head
‘Yeachers of these schools.
The following are the events:—
I. High Jump Class IIT.
Il. 100 Yards Class IIT,

y Time










WOED
CRY:

THANX ANO A TIP
\OF THE HATLO
HAT "OD
LYN CALEY,
4904 N.AUSTIN,
CHICAGO 3O,

Semi-Finals Tonight |

= _ By Jimmy Harlo

but there are still four more
Cups, under 10, 10-—12, 12—14,

III. 100 Yards Class II.
IV. 60 Yards Class IV.
V. 80 Yards Class III.

VI. High Jump Class I.
VII. 150 Yards Class II.
Yitl. 80 Yards Class IV,

IX. 120 Yards Class III.

X. 150 Yards Class I.



XI. High Jump Class II
Tea Interval

XII. 100 Yards Class IV.

XIII. 150 Yards Class III,

XIV. 220 Yards Class 1.

XV. 220 Yards Class II.

XVI. Junior's Relay.
XVII. Senior's Relay.
Table

Tennis

The
Inter-Club Knock Out Table
Tennis games will be played at
the Y.M.C.A, Naval Hall from
7.30 o'clock tonight. Barna wil
meet Adelphi while Queen’s Col-
lege plays Y.W.P.C,

In the opening games Adelphi
defeated Lenville and Y.W.P.C
beat Y.W.C.A. Tonight's game
shoulq be extremely interesting
Both Adelphi and Y.W.P.C., have
strong teams, while Queen's Col-
lege and Barna tied with 36 points

each in the Inter-Club League
Competition. Y,W.P.C. gave a
good display against Y.W.C.A

last Friday night.

The winners will meet in the
finals for the Knock Out Cup on
Friday night next.




me of the Queen
horses is entered for the Rayne

he horse is Choi

semi-finals of the Ladies |

_—

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Well—

Mother, spen'

Noel Murless



ends on May 31
‘twill be run
of the Duke

Stakes, in the

he will race
‘purple, scarlet
Edward VIL

can be taken as
to continue her

by

JOHN WATERMAN







don’t at present think there i
anything exceptional amon
them. I don’t suppose there i
any classic material.’

The Queen’s Opinion

And what did the Queen her-
self think of them when sh:
went there on Monday? “Well,’
said their trainer, “I’m afraid ]
just can’t say.”

The horses actually owned by
the Queen—apart from he
jumpers, who are with Captain
Peter Cazalet at Tonbridge—are

trained by Captain Cecil Boyd-
Rochfort at Freemason’s Lodge,
Newmarket.

From the outside the house
looks like a country parsonage
Sixty-four-year-old Captain
Boyd-Rochfort is a tall, bulky
Irishman with an impeccab)
charming manner. He has

trained here since 1923, has won
£800,000 in stake money for his
owners.

As he sits in a green arm-
chair in his study surrounded
by portraits of winners, on his

desk a table lamp decorated with
coloured cameos of jockeys and

owners, his appearance is not
that of the racing trainer, It is
that of a prosperous, senior
Oxford don.
His Erudition
His talk is perhaps a little
donnish: but only in so fay as it

displays immense erudition—
about racehorses and breeding
“Of course,” he said, passing
a hand over his thinning grey
hair, “I have no knowledge of
the Queen’s intentions about her

horses. [ have no authority
whatsoever to make any. state-
ment about her intentions,

“But,” he said, reaching for a
book the size of a ledge, and
running a finger down its pages,
“there are, let me see, nine of
her horses here

“All or them were bred at the!
Sandringham Stud, There's!
Windsor Forest, Choirboy, Stream
of Light, all three-year-olds|
whom we hope will win races. |
But until we know what the
Queen intends to do I cannot
really give any idea of prospects,

“T don’t think that there are
any of really outstanding class.”

Perhaps Captain Boyd-Roch-
fort, besides being guarded, was
being unduly self-effacing, Cer-
tainly if the horses in his care
do as well for the Queen as
those he trained for King George
he will have no reason to be dis-
satisfied.

He trained more than 60
winners for the late King, includ-
ing Hypericum, the 1000 Guineas
winner, and Above Board, the
winner of the Cesarewitch, Al-
though King George’s first years







2

PRESERVE

MANNING

RET _ cctmrinmnansey pepeermnatinhes—enintinaagsaeeaes







QUALITY ’
PAINTS ©

BUILDINGS
g

& CO..

WHAT’S ON TODAY ||



FRIDAY,

MAY 16, 1952



NOEL MURLESS AND WIFE

The Queen visited them this week.

in racing involved him ipa loss |
of something like £20,000, he)
eventually made this gz and |
one season won more than £8,000)
in stakes. |
One horse of the Queenh’s Cap- |
tain Boyd-Rochfort singled out: |
this was Aureole, a two-year-old |
chesnut colt. “He is really beau-
tifully bred,” he said, “by Hy-
perion out of Angelola.” |
Earlier this year, when Captain
3oyd-Rochfort was in New|
York, he spoke of Aureole as “a}
good-looking yearling” that mighi|
do well in the 1953 Derby. |
His breeding certainly suggests
that if he does not acthally win
a Derby he could well sire a)
Derby winner when put to stud. |
|



Not since Edward VII won
with Minoru in 1909 has the
reigning monarch bred and own-
ed the Derby winner. _ Captain
Boyd-Rochfort was at Epsom at
the time, “It was a scene I shal!
never forget,” he said.

Glory Recaptured

When the colt won the crowd
surged round Edward VII cheer-
ing wildly, They then broke into}
God Save the King. }
If Aureole—or any of his pro- |
geny—should win the Derby
these wild scenes might be re-!
peated, It would be a deserved |
triumph for both Royal owner
and Royal trainer. And the race |
ing public would know that the}
glory of Edward VII's racing}
days had been recaptured. |
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED

L, E. 8.



Court of Ordinary — 11.00
a.m.

Basket Ball
7.30 p.m,

Mobile Cinema, Mt. Stand-
fast Plantation Yard, St.
James, 7.30 p.m.

“Twelfth Night” at the Brit-
ish Council, 8.15 p.m.

Secondary Girls’ Inter School

at Ken-

at Y.M.P.C.,



Sports Meeting
ton, 1.30 p.m.







CLUB
NOTICE TO MEMBERS

Members are hereby noti-
fied that the Oval will be
open for practice as from
Monday, 19th May.

J. P, PETERKIN,
Hon. Secretary.

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PAGE 1

PAGE F01T. BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. MAT 16. 145! WiJ 0 S .-^M E Krid.y. May 16. 1932 • ..I I..I. (I| LESS TRAVEL THE British West Indian Airways Company is a subsidiary of Ihe British Overseas Airways Corporation, which provides air service to many parts of the world. One important branch of BOAC's activities is the promotion of dollar-earning flights between North America and the Bahamas. Throughout North America the inhabitants of Canadian and American cities are invited by the British Overseas Airways Corporation to enjoy holidays in British Bahamas. There is mention too of other British West Indian territories and reference is made to the possibility of travelling by British West Indian Airways to most of the territories in the West Indies and British Guiana. Bui the pressure of BOAC's publicity in Canada and the United States is directed to encourage North Americans to holiday in the Bahamas. Barbados, which is the most British of the Atlantic possessions of Her Majesty relies on a Canadian Airlines Company. Trans-Canada Airlines, to publicise its attractions to Canadians ; while PanAmerican Airways, which provide service to Trinidad also attempts to persuade Americans of the merits of Barbados as a tourist resort. So far as BOAC is concerned only Jamaica, the Bahamas and Bermuda in the North Caribbean and Atlantic are considered worthy of direct connection with the United Kingdom. The rest of the British Southern Caribbean is from their point of view apparently well served by Trans-Canada, K 1. M and Pan-American Airways. The Corporation's efforts have therefore been directed to make BWIA a shuttle service within the Caribbean and its policy has been to emphasise the middle rather than the extreme letters which form the abbreviation BWIA. This policy has not gone unchallenged in the area and the failure of BOAC to provide direct air communication with the United Kingdom from Barbados and Trinidad has often been the subject of adverse comment by visitors to these islands liom the United Kingdom. Within it* limits, however, the Company's subsidiary BWIrt has given (and until the recent startling announcement this week was giving) satisfactory service throughout the area. The Company lias built up a reputation for air safety which is the greatest asset any airline company can possess. But the announcement this week has come as a shattering blow to the region. The United Kingdom's indifference to the lack of British passenger vessels in the British Caribbean has become proverbial. That indifference has sometimes been adroitly exploited by travelling salesmen of the United Kingdom government, who have attempted to justify Great Britain's disregard of inadequate passenger shipping service in the region by claiming that British West Indian Airways provided adequate inter-territorial communications. This claim has always been regarded as preposterous by anyone wanting to visit territories like Montserrat, Dominica. St. Vincent, British Guiana or British Honduras. But it is typical of the attitude of mind of u country which, although it is fully aware that federation of the British Caribbean territories cannot be achieved without first providing adequate sea and air communications continues to woo West Indian Governments into taking this step in the dark. No West Indian can admire Great Britain's neglect of communications in the British Caribbean. It is a neglect for which that country ought to be ashamed and for which it certainly merits West Indian reproach. And now straight from the blue with no attempt to explain to the public and no notification as to the nature and extent of the cuts imposed by BOAC on, say. ttM service between New York and Nassau or elsewhere, Barbados is told that its weekly services are to be reduced from seven to four. BOAC and British West Indian Airways cautiul be held respunsibiie fur a strike in the American relincnes which manufacture aviation spirits, and West Indians would be only too willing to suffer any inconvenience resulting from the drastic curtailment announced this week if other territories served by BOAC have been required to make corresponding sacrilices. A much more comprehensive statement is awaited from the Corporation's agents in the West Indies. The Purchase Tax Controversy Lancashire's prawnt troubles are, to some extent, a result of its own short-sightedness. Like the boy in Aesop's fable, it mad* the mistake of crying Wolf" once too often. I&sstO are many people In the cotton industry who. even now. : .I'd to lay the blame for the present recession at the door of Dr. Oalton, who advised consumers at the end of 1950 to stop buying textiles unUI prices came down. No doubt this had its effect on sales. However, the buyers' strike which brought about the preent trade recession did not develop into a really serious situation until several months later. Lancashire's first reaction to the falling off In sales was to seek protection from the Government. At first, it spoke with many voices, but recently ttl campaign has been more co%  tail now is; "Abolish the purchase tax on cotton mods." It is significant, how.irr th..i one rarely hears the word "Mump" mentioned in I-ancashlre today. One prominent member of the cotton trade told me. iimte emphatically. "This Is not a slump It Is a very serious trade recession." To the man-lnthe-"treet this may seem to be a case of hair-splitting, but to members of the cotton Industry the dlstlnctloi Is one of great Importance. The word "slump" was applied to the situation In the cotton Industry long before the fact justified it. Newpapcrs began to talk nbout a "serious daprfenlou" in Lancashire. Leading members of the industry made speeches raftering to huge stock* of unsound materi. Bis. Deputations were Kent to Whitehall to demand all sorts of Government action to alleviate the situation. The effect of all this was to confirm the consumer HI his view that cotton prices were %  bout to f..ll. Purchases that had been postponed until prices were brought more into line with the new level of ilrmam! were put riff indefinitely. Manufacturers were calling for the abolition of the Utility scheme (whi.h .1lowed certain classes of textile goods to be sold free of purchase tax) and consumers deelded, therefore, to wait until after the Budget before restocking their wardrobes and linen cupboards The Budget did. in fact, abolish the Utility scheme—but on|y to substitute it with un even more complicated system of puicii>B* lax. Consumoca who had previously bought bestquality Utility textiles now found they had to pay tax on the same class of goods. AJMHI the eOttOfl industry protested. But this time, instead of demanding a modillcalion of purchase tax, it called for its total abolition. Oiicc again, consumers were left In doubt as to the future level of cotton prices; and by this time they were so confused that they stoppod buying altogether. Meanwhile, stocks are continuing to accumulate and the situation has rapidly assumed "slump'* proportions. The industry Is in w dilemmaIts cries of "wolf have caused a slight recession to develop Into a serious buyers' strike, and It Is now too late to turn the tide of public indignation agulnst high prices. *5 By RONALD BOXALL Member-; of the cotton trade Dud themselves in an unenviable position. On the one hand, they dare not repeat the mistake of drawing public attention to their difficulties for fear that it might further delay the resumption of buying. But. on the other hand, they feel very strongly on the question of purchase tax The surest way of exerting pressure in the Government to remove the impediment to sales, would be to rally pubtie opinion to their side, but this would only strengthen the conviction that prices have yet to touch rockbottom. Not unnaturally, therefore, the industry has divided into two rival camps. There ll BO difference of opinion over the need to remove purchase tax on 1-tncashirCs products. Members of the industry, almost to a man, are convinced that It should go. The difference arises over the best means cf persuading the Government to fall in with their request. One school of thought, headed by the powerful United Textile Factory Workers' Association, takes the view that the best way to achieve this aim Is to make the public aware of the industry's plight. Mass meetings are therefore being held all over Lancashire to press the indu-trv's Bag* for the removal of the hated tax. ARTIE'S HEADLINE Au *r **v *< Another section of the industry, however, believes that this is the wrong way to go •bout it. Apart from increasing uncertainty as to the future trend of prices, they say. mass meetings are apt to be used to put across sectional views. They drive home this point by poln\in* th number of Socialist M.P.'s who are appearing on these platforms. But whichever method i* chosen to influence Government policy on purchase tax, the case for relief is %  strong one. The industry points out that threequarters of all its output Is sold on the home market. Now that sales have fallen practically to zero, .every possible means should be taken to give consumers the necessary inducement to buy. The removal of purchase tax. they argue, would do this by causing an automatic reduction In the price of betterquality textile goods of the sort which the average consumer has shown himself most ready to buy. The Government's answer to this Is that the removal of purchase tax would not solve the industry's piobsarAs because the buyers' strike affects all types of textiles, including those which are now tax-free. It also argues, with some justification that any concession to Ihr cotton industry would inevitably lead to demands for similar brOBtBMBl By other consumer goods industries, which are also beginning to experience a stiffening of consumer resistThe Government's argument that the removal of purchase lax on textiles would mean a loss of between £B0 and £100 million in revenue is less valid. The industry points cut, for Instance, that this estimate is based on sales at last year's high level. With sales at their present level the amount actually flowing into the Exchequer from this source must be .it %  much lower annunl rate. One of the worst aspects of Ihe present syalatn of taxation in the shops, have devoted more and more of their production to those textiles which escape taxation, and thlf has sometimes resulted in a lamentable debasement of quality Lancashire industrialists resent the "lax on craft," which they say Is tending to destroy the Industry's traditional pride in Its products. Even if the Government insists on retaining the purchase tax, they hope It will at least consider a modification of the system to allow a wider range of textiles to be sold tax-free. This does not exhaust the purchase tax controversy, for one of Ihe Industry's strongest arguments is that the incidence of this tax on better-quality textiles hampers the drive for new export markets The home market, besides being the chief outlet for Lancashire's output.'Is also a valuable "testing ground"' for new lines which manufacturers wish to develop for export markets. By testing the "salenbillty" of a new cloth or a new pattern the home market thev claim to be able to judge whether It wi'l prove sunoisful in overseas markets. The home market Is also an outlet for goods which, though made for export have, for reasoa? or another, been left on merchants' hands. Purchase fax on these better-quality goods, it is argued, deprives the industr. of the Use of the home market as a testing ground for new textile* .,„i M i *>utlet of last resort for frustrated exports. But whatever the Government's intentions on the future of purchase tax may be. the industry wants a definite statement 01) the matter one way or the other. Nothing Is worse for trade than the present uncertiinty about prices. Even a blunt "no" would be better than the present vacillation. Meanwhile, the industry Is stil! putting a large part of Its reduced output to stock—and this Is rapidly absorbing working capital. What it dreads more than anything else is a liquidation of stocks at "slaughter prices." Even now, many cotton goods can be bought in the shops at less than their replacemeii, cost. Any tendency for this to develop into the establishment of a price level that the Industry could nut maintain would pro-, long the crisis and threaten ntay firms with bankruptcy. THE LANDED GENTRY LOWER THE DRAWBRIDGE Bl'IlKJ-TS LANDED GENTRY —the official and exclusive caste list of the land-owning classes —has had to lower its sights. Landed gentry are now so scarce that the publishers have had to forage around to find enough names (with land) to fill their latest edition, the first since 19.19 which is due out this spring. The rosult of the foraging is thai t\lm stars and novelists hava broken In, More than half the 5.000 landed gentry mentioned In tho 11-Th. 2.B00-page tome are landless gentry. The editor. 1. G. Pine, admitted the change yesterday In a lecture to the fcmtOtj of Genealogists In London. The landless ones get in on mill of their old family l 'i!.:n"i i"' iu.se lhe> have public service. And the properties of those who are landed are much smaller than they were. Burke's has met with (gentry more than halfway. Fifty years ago the minimum land requirements for inclusion in the directory was 2 000 acres. Now II li NO acres. 'Cadets' .ndiess newconiers are novelists Graham Green i S P 11 Mais. They aro included as "cadets"—a title given bOOstUOt they are not the heads of their families. Film, star sisters Olivia d 1 lav Miami and Joan Fontaine %  is of the de HaviUand family, of which air pioneer Sir l ivilland Is head. %  of the nationaliFcd Iron and BtOOl Corporation, nan only trace for threeE ierations. But as "Hardie of llathie" he rates a Burke mention because he owns 2,000 .n tvs in FVrthstnrr The B.B.C. brothers Freddio and Barman Grisewood—Harman controls Ihe Third Programme — arc also newcomers who can claim long pedigrees. So can Sir Ambrose Heal, tha furniture magnate; and publisher Sir Stanley Unwln So can And thm actors, fhe authors, and thm • fee/ man film In ... "Operation Bootstrap" How Puerto Rioo Achieved Industrial Prosperity LONDON, Puerto Rico's economic problem has been much the same as in other Islands in the Caribbean. Its limited natural resources, chiefly dependent upon sugar production, could not support its population of 2,200,000 The story of "Operation Bootstrap," the scheme which has brought some measure of industrial prosperity to the .sland over the years, is told in the current issue of "Colonial Development," the quarterly magazine of the C.D.C., just published in London. "If Puerto Rico can tind an answer which, with due modilication, can be applied to low-income societies, it will have made 3 major contribution to one of the fundamental problems of the world to-day—the relation of food supply to population," says the article. As far back as 1940. it was evident that the answer to Puerto Rico's economic problem Jay in industrialisation. "Operation has been it! effect nn tiiequlJVty j Bootstrap" was started in 1941. Governmcn*. of Lancashire's products. Manuhelp wan given to the encouragement of new '"' Industries in the island. Youns l'mrt, Ricans were sent to study industrial techniques in the United States. The Governor. Sr. Luis Monoz Marin stated the aim of the scheme as follows: "The economic goal of Puerto Rico is to increase production as effectively as posaibl .* so that the greater number of Puerto Ricans there are each year will have fewer days of unemployment, a higher standard of living. and depend less and less each day on aid and privileges which are not the result of their own productive activities," A Government corporation was formed to buy land and to work out new patterns for its cultivation. After experimenting unsuccessfully with farmers' co-operatives, this corporation decided on three major policies. 1. Sugar lands were bought from big estates and converted into "proportional profit farms." These were owned by the people of Puerto Rico and managed in an up-todate manner. Workers continued to work at their regulaf wages and at the end of the year profits were shared between management and workers. 2. Land was bought for new villages, where squatters might have a little cottage a^d garden of their own. By last September, some 25,000 families had been resettled in 200 of these villages. 3. Land was also bought from the big estates to be divided into family-sized farms, which were sold to individual farmers on reasonable terms. "This three-point programme has worked well." says the article. "It has eased some of the tension in the agricultural problem and has improved the status of farm labourers." The Puerto Rican Industrial Development Company was organised in 1942 with a capital of $500,000, later increased to $22,000,000 Its purpose was to promote manufacturing on the island and conduct research into natural resources, marketing methods and export possibilities. It has acquired a cement works and has built factories to manufacture clay products, glass, paperboard and shoes. All five industries, badly needed on the island, were operated as nationalised businesses. After the war, a new policy was started— building factories for lease or sate to private enterprise. New enterprises started in this way include a large hotel in San Juan and a big textile mill. The nationalisation perit>d has now ended with the sale of all five Government factories to private industry. By last July, Puerto Rico had established 121 factories by such methods and had given indirect assistance, principally in the form of tax exemption, to 41 more. At capacity operation. thes4Y (factories ape expected to produce some $100,000,000 worth of goods a vear. most of which will be exported to the U.S. mainland.—B.U.P. Notloy Abbey. Bucks—and ha> can, incidentally. trace bis ancestry bark to the 19th century. Author-explorer Peter Fleming u in