Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


—_—



ESTABLISHED 1895



“Lady Boats” To Be Considered

A TWO-MAN COMMITTEE comprised of Mr i
Leacock Jnr., President, and Mr. G. H. King. Vice dpaientl
of the Chamber of Commerce, was yesterday appointed to!
draft a Resolution to be sent to the Government urging |
that they approach other West Indian Governments with

a view to taking up the mat
of the C.N.S. Passenger Servi

level with the Canadian Government.

This decision was taken by the
Council of the local Chamber of
Commerce after they had met and
discussed the matter with Capta
R. A. Clarke, General Manager
the Canadian National Steamships
and President of the Snaipping
Federation of Canada, at a special
meeting held in the Bovell &
Skeete Building.



After welcoming Captain Clarke .

and expressing the reciation
of the Council for meena been
given the opportunity to discuss
the matter with him, the President
of the Chamber told Captain

the proposed withdrawal with
grave concern in view of the im-
portance of such a service to the
West Indies. As regards the
question of the subsidy now puid
by the West Indian Government:
the President told Captain Clarke
that that had been raised in the
Regional Economic Committee.

Report Delayed

Addressing the Council, Captain
Clarke explained that the Presi-
dent of the C.N.S. Company had at
the request of Mr. Albert Gomes
and another member of the R.E.C.
when they were last in Canada
to hold off his report until th
R.E.C. had met in November @&
December, but they in Canags
heard nothing until the middle «
the following August when Mk,
Rex Sfolimeyer asked if they could
forward copies of the Annual Re~-
port for the past three years, The
reports were furnished, but still
they heard nothing from R.E.C, un-
til the 10th September, after he
had written to Mr. King, Managing
Director of Messrs. Gardiner
Austin, local Agents of the C.N.S.
Line enquiring whether the Con- |
ference had been held.

@aptain Clarke said there had
been a statement to the effect
that he had not given the in-
formation which they wanted,
but he would assure the Coun-j
cil that the information thev
were uhable to give them could
have been obtained from the
Canadian or local Governments,
He repeated that the Canadian

Government had notified the
Colonial Office towards the latter
part of March of the proposed
withdrawal of the Lady Boats and
in the meantime the Renvort was
tabled in the Canadian House of|
Commons.

No Direct Approach

In spite of that, there had been
no direct approach to the Canadian
Government as to what might be
done to renew the service, al-
though it was made known to the
West Indies delegates to the Con-
ference in 1949 that the vess¢ \s }
were “towards the end of the}
rope”, and it was proposed to)
build new ships, and that they;
should have some assurance that/

On page 16

NEWSPRINT











HITS MEXIC

Mexico City newspapers began reducing their line up] )ey> ‘Abbot

in an attempt to alleviate



Clarke that the Chamber 4
|

C.C. Council
Approve
Youngman

The Council of the Chamber of
; Commerce yesterday decided to
; write to the Government of Bar-
bados intimating their intention
!to support the nomination of Mr.
R. W. Youngman whose name has
In an effort to boost the been forwarded for the position
Farnum for Finland Fund, of West Indies Trade (Com-
which has not been getting missicner in the United Kingdom.
e §
be hetitennee bas ee _The Council arrived at its de-
a oi word | Oo see cision after considering a Reso-
Toss mpetition || lution from the Jamaica Chamber

(09 page 5). ;of Commerce asking the local

Donations may be sent t Oo
Whe Revel Bank oe Gene bong Chamber to support Mr, Young-



ter of the proposed withdrawal
ce to these parts at Government
t

Farnum For
Vinland Fund

Barclay’s Bank and the || '°"

— of the ere In making the motion that the

Tee mers as: $ Taree Chamber write Government’ con-

oat i i, an cerning their view, Mr. A.S.

shnte .00 Eryden said that he considered
M 2.00 | Mr. Youngman a_ suitable man
mies nani for the office. Copies of the Reso-



of Colonial Development & Wel-
j fare who will make the appoint-
ment on the advice of the

EB 3 ur |
Gen. Dodd Samer of he ineorporte
Re leas 2 rs 0 ommerce,
SEOUL, May 10. Jewel Sales

en aren ees of war Ti °e
on Koje Island released Brig. Gen. In Bri ain
. eo ‘yye .
Dwindling

Francis Dodd after holding him
LONDON, May 10.

hostage for four days according
to an announcement by General
James A. Van Fleet, Eighth Army
commander. ;
Dodd was reported unharme ; ;
and in good shape when Soceae h vit treme 8 anes ee ee «
and will be flown to Eighth Army bay . wal ey canno' 3 ord a
headquarters at Seoul to-morrow itr lose Sante levees a:
morning.—U. e
&—U.P. company Garrards which has sold
gems to the Royal Family for 200
years, has decided to get out of
business while the going is good
and is selling its shop in fashion~
able Mayfair to the big jewel con-
cern, the Goldsmiths and Silver<

$768.36 | tution will be sent to. the Head
'







Red. Close Road To

Allies In Berlin
smiths Company.
Shareholders

: BERLIN, May 10. wilt be asked. to
Soviets barred allied military approve the sale of the business
police vehicles from using the founded 231 years ago yen. rrr
international highway from Ber- girl from a wealthy home
lin to the west in a tactic remin- endowed with a filled jewel case
isecent of the Soviet land blockade before she was eighteen.

of Berlin.
{ The Goldsmith's company will
An allied spokesman said pay £20.000 for the name of Gar-
armed Soviet guards barred rards and its patterns. It will also
military police safety patrols buy some-of the stock of jewels
from leaving Berlin on routine and preciots stones.

daily trips to the west and back. Garrards’ Chairman, Herbert

He said United States and British Sulman tells shareholders “trade) tor of the scheme, and a member |
jeeps are being halted at Soviet’s may not for sometime be so good; of the Committee, has approached |

check-point (at Babelsberg) just as in the past” with a 100 per cent,
outsida Berlin and are refused purchase (sales) tax levied on
passage to the west. jewels profits have fallen fast.

U.S. and British police patrols, UP,

each tnake an average of thres

trips daily to the west and back New Abbot Elected

to aid allied motorists in distress.
VATICAN CITY, May 10.

They are known officially as
courtesy patrols. UP | The General Chapter of Canons
es Regular of

SHORTAGE
O’S DAILIES



formerly visitor for Hispano-
American province as new Abbot
General,
Urquia of
but a citizen
until now a resident of
Argentina. Fifteen
from Argentina, England,



of Argentine was

MEXICO CITY, May 10.

took part in the election of the
: General to replace.
the acute newsprint shortage} Abbot General Louis Smith of

which may curtail publication by next week. Novedades} Britain who will now return to

Excelsior and Noticias were
trimmed formats to seven col
number of pages. Newspaper
that several shipments of

weekend,

There was no immediate ex-
planation for the shortage. Dis-j
tribution of newsprint in Mexico}
is controlled by a Government;

agency. George Wilshe, Represent- |

ative for several Canadian manu-
facturers said that 900 tons of
paper were scheduled to arrive
sometime next week by train.

Stocks here were expected to be
balanced again within 20 days.
Wilshe said the current world de-
mand for newsprint has caused a
deficit this year. Demand is for
9,506,000 tons while production
has been estimated at only
8,500,000 tons. Several news-
papers including El Universal! said
htheir supplies were sufficient only
until next Monday.—U.P.



British Troops
Must Leave Svez

—KING FAROUK
CAIRO, May 10

The Independent Weekly news-}

aper Akhbar El Yom said_that
Premier Negueb El Hilaly Pasa
has drafted a note rejecting the

latest British proposals for se'- |
tling the Anglo-Egyptian als-;
pute. |
It said the note will be for-|
warded to Ambassador Amt

Pasha in London who will be
instructed to deliver it to Foreign
Secretary Anthony Eden. It said









a copy of the note would be

handed to British Ambassacot

Sir Ralph Stevenson in ¢ C

Monday Iso King Farouk tol

the Ur S‘ate Ambasvadot

Jefferson T

audience

would acceft 1

complete evacuator of

troops from the ¢ Zone

the upitv «t the Nile Vail
—UP

among the large dailies whichis country.
umns while E] Nacional cut the} “Capitular’ from Poland could

s banked their hopes on reports [not attend because the Polish Gov-
paper would arrive over the ®™ment refused him a a

FROM €.¢.

TALKS

|
a




|

|
|

|
j

SIR GEORGE SEEL, Comptroller for Development and Welfare and

Mr. G. H. Adams as they alighted from B.W.1.A’'s aircraft which

brought them from Gaudeloupe yesterday afternoon where they attend-
| ed the Fourteenth Meeting of the Caribbean Commission,



Lateran yesterday|neth Mason, Charles Morris, Clevie | States
elected Father Fernando Urquia! Gittens,



Spanish extraction }

Salta|ly to give assistance are: Johnson | fence. Built up from almost noth- {sult
“Capitulars”|& ‘Redman,

Bel-| Modeyn
gium, France, Holland and Italy| DeLima,





MseY 11, 1952

BARBA



C.C. C’tee To Send|Resolution

Proposed Withdrawal Of

U.S.., France, U.K.

ERDAS SEMI-FINALS

DRAYTON, playing at inside rigut }r Hmpire, leaps high in the air for a head-in, but King, the Carlton
goalie, with arms outstretched, pundea clear. The match ended in a two-all draw.

-—-(See page 4)

“ —<-; aii
Norway Wil Guard | French Admit
‘Toni. Plane Crossed
N.A.T.O. North Flank ,,.. Corridor

OSLO, May 10, |
PLANS have adyanced to make Norway a bastion of BERLIN, May 10

N.A.T.O’s northern flank, Admiral Sir Patrick Brind,} A ¥ neh spokesman nid. to-
Commander-in-Chief of N.A.T.O. Northern Region, the! {Sig hurry her reply to. last
Norwegian military chiefs and Norway's new Minister of |night’s Russian protest that a
Defence Nils Langhelle could all point to the fact that it | French military plane h id sees
had now been established by (Storting Parliament) that |e Fe toad Wa ee
the defence of the north could be concentrated.on the|iviny. or :

mountain fortresses of Northern and Southern Norway. French officials admitted this
Thes@ plans now being carried {morning that a French military
framework. of|,courier plane did swerve out of

Ts F out within the : 0
l Talen 340,000,000 kroner ($500,000,000) |} the air cor ridor on Thursday as
" Theee Year Defence Programme jalleged in the Russian protest,







The spokesman stid tonight no} ing to Japan,

Braadaact 'imténded to block two of the tra-|
& agg a, RNR RUNS PNR AER er

Pli tht ntic Ocean. fare still waiting fora Soviet rep

> S anned [m to life only after a long series | Soviet jet fighter attack on a civil
of internal Norwegian divergencies | plane.”

A group of local artistes have and there still are many Norwegian The French civil plane was shot
formed a Committee and are| military experts who point to weak | up by Soviet fighters on April 29.
hoping to arrange a half nour apots of the programme although | Seviet authorities alleged that
Local. Talent Broadcast over! most of ther: agree that the pros-| was @utside the agreed air cor-
Rediffusion once every weck. | pects for efficient defence of the) yidor at the time of the incident
{NATO northern flank have im-j}and had disobeyed orders to land

Mr. Kenneth Mason, the ofigina-| proved during the last few months, | Western allied officials denied this
|" 1 th tern commandants
and three western co Y dr §

Former Norwegian Navy Chief,| joy. have sent twr protest notes
many City firms with a view to| Admiral E, C, Danielson resigned | ,, the matter to General Vaesily
their sponsoring the programme. ; hen he failed to convince Minig-| Gyyjloyv, Soviet Control Commis-
The money contributed by these|ter of Defence Jens Hague that] >. Chief.—U.P.

amplifier and microphone, wire) *

firms will help pay the expenses |the Norwegian Navy was neglected |
Tri Talk
‘ ‘
rrieste Talks
recorder, an audition room, etc. | Norwegian 3,000 mile coast line

of arranging the programme— | in favour of the Army. Norwegian |
| without the support of heavy units | VPs V av S| ro
3ritain and the United} ay € X avs
«
|

|
}
|
|



musie to scsompany ‘vocalists, an and will not be able to defend the |

costal forces still are very limited |
The Committee is: Messrs, Ken-| from

LONDON, May 10.

Oo. 8. Coppin, Winston ° |
Hackett and George Spencer. The) Air Defence | Yugoslav Ambassador to Brit-
first meeting will. beheld on Mon- | lai Dr. Jose Brilej said in an in-

NATO !terview that his government and

leaders have chosen first to elim-!{he Yugoslav people
The firms so far who are like~| inate another weak point—air de- “deeply disappointed’ at the re-
of the London Conference on
which he said would only
of a direct
Yugoslavia

day night at 7 o'clock. Instead Norwegian and

Advocate,| ing immediately after the war the | Trieste

Alfonsa, Norwegian Airforce is still limited } prejudice the chance:
Thani|1p some 50 British Vampire planes, |agreement between

20 World War II Spitfires and 19 | and Italy.

United States Thunderjets H> said “that Yugosiav Govern-

Barbados
Cress. Shoppe,
N. E, Wilson,
Brothers and Cave Shepherd.

|



i | But military airports costing |}ment and public opinion were
ein | $20,000,000 are being built "18 (disturbed and protested about the
inorthern and southern Norway |, onde ecnference with gooc
Commission within the NATO programme. One saa eae is confirmed by a com-
: | of them is at Bardufoss near the jmunique issued at the conclusion

Was |Aretic Circle and so-called! or the conference.’

Meeting



i‘’fromve Defence Line” of Nor- Brilej saw Foreign Secretary

oR 3 ti 99 One Sie Os ey eae and ke Anthony Eden at the Foreign
u in tablished by le Germans Curing) omee goon after an “understand<

O e j World War II this air base near] jn petween the British, United

. . jo Rugso-Norwelgian frontier 1S | States ind Italian Governments

Sir George Secl, K.C.M.G.,\ at present being built for thun-| >, ryieste had been signed. Eden
Comptroller for Development and) der jets 4 handed Brilej the text of the
Welfare, returned from Guade-| Other air bases in southern Nor-' \,derstanding and it is under-
loupe yesterday afternoon after way link fortifications of the Oslo~ et-od Brilej repeated to Eden the
attending the Fourteenth Meet- | Kristiansand-Stavanger triangle | viusoslay Government’s view that

ing of tha Caribbean Commission ¢/0,000,000 appropriation together | 4),
of which he is British Co-Chair- with equipment and planes ex-~
Ac ing him were Mr. G wanes tay ee a gg Seer on ot ice treaty and warned him of
ccompan yin, m r. G.' intended to supply afr yases W tha aa vee t Yi .
H. Adams, CMG. M.C.P,, Com- planes within the next year i pe re vo of the Yugo
missioner, Mr. D. A. Percival,’ At the same time it has been peo} P.
Assistant sate oo to decided to move the main naval ;
er and rr. mM ‘ be . rwegian Navy from ’
the Comptroller a base of the. Norwegian Navy from Child Burnt
y >
To Beath
A CHILD was burnt

conference was contrary to
the provisions of the Italian





Roe of the Secretariat of the De- Ojo Fjord to Bergen in Westerr

velapment and Welfare Organ- Norway near the open ocean anc

Embassy in Washington who wae when a fire occured at a boarded
the other Commissioner attending and hingled

ization, ‘naval base of northern Norwa
Mr. J. Kenneth Thompson, jrom Tromve to Harstad.—U.P

the Meeting, “has gone on to On Murder Chorge {completely destroyed at

Washington, ‘Street, St, John,

Colonial Attache at the British
TE JEWTON of Thyme on Ath ries
Sir George said that the sae: EUNICE NEWTON of . Thyme) ye-te:day, The house wa



j : Bottom, Christ Church, has been}. pworence The brie the!
na pe We teik Conmiioe a ae charged by the Police with | iid is } a ; er |

ing with a variety of business in- murdering her husband George

eluding the rdport of the Indus-'Newton of the same address on| Pas re

trial Development Conference May |. | Trieste Quies

which was held at Puerto Rico in! Gao. Newt a 94-year-old! vr peo

February last; the Fisheries Con- ide las admitted. to" thel TRIESTE.





» New Anglo-American con-

aly in the Allied
>» Free Territory
quietly in the

held in Trinidad last
lmonth and preparations for thé
Fifth West Indian Conference
which is to be held in Jamaica in

ference spit al on May 1 at lan

and died on the

General He
about 11 pm
Jnight of May 2









ee. hich lasted f ee ee kh mtver ot the “man-in-the
The meeting which lasted from Be A Ss y of ‘ nan-in-the
Tuesday May 6 until yesterday Fire Al Buttels sires reaction indicated that
morning when there’ was a priv- . ( wity of Triestine re zard
ate session, was presided over by Fight anc ‘5 pg) the agreemen a ¢ { thing
Baron Beauverger, French Am-| eee ae top ripe ¢ —U P.
bassador to Cuba. | econd and third ¢ sop ipe ca coeneeivntinasteneneiinceipsssiaomans

The meeting was rather of »|4nd 101 holes of trash ge wre .
routine nature Sir George said| When a fire oceurt I alice! Th wey.

lamd added that the real work of} Plantation, St. George
the Commission is done in the|The canes are the
technical conferences which
oa ae 4 F . t it immons the Po
He said that it is proposed t The ‘fire exterde » anown ‘ vhe



of LONDON, May 10



| i € f ;
jhold a conference on production | “eld i b ree q F ele
uses of local timber in Trinidad} 4n acre of ro e ;
prope I er i i I

jand another conference on _ ths

promotion of trade during 1953 Man





_” S =+ , . ~ - " ee °
Trade srOwmMs se mer ~~ electoral conditions
| The Western reply is under-

The programme has, however,|to our note, protesting against the | States,

it

would be

to death} K
house which was | K

Massiah | K

at about mid-day
occupied

Bulkeley Ltd., and-were insured \ gramophone devir« hich

PRICE, SIX CENTS

To Govt.

Complete Reply

To Russian Note

LONDON, May 10.

British, French and United States officials today com-
pleted the draft of the Western reply to the Seviet note on
the settlement with Germany according to a usually reliabie
source. The draft on which officials worked for more than
five hours to-day will be sent to three capitals for fina.
approval before it is sent to Moscow early next week.

There will not be another meeting of officials unless
their Governments want any alteration in the drafting or
presentation. Meetings today were mainly concerned with
the details of the note since U.S. Government had approved
its general terms.

The Western note replies to one
(from the Soviet Government of
{April 10 rejecting the earlier
| Western proposal that the United
, Nations Commission for Germany

J ap—Chinese

By VICTOR KENDRICK |stood to press for Soviet accept-
lance of the United Nations’ Com-
TOKYO, May 10. {mission but says the three powers
Japan is doing business withtare prepared to consider any pro-
Communist China still, the “land] posal from the Soviet Union for
of 400,000,000 customers” with] a neutral commission to study the
the United States as an unwitting} question of elections.
third partner Materials sent When the formation and func.
from the United States to Japan}itions of, the Commission have
are winding up behind the iron] been defined the three powers will
curtain and products from Red] pe prepared to hold a meeting of
China are going to the United! four high Commissioners in Ger-
States labelled ‘processer| in} many The Western note is also
Japan.” Informed sources here] expected to ask the Soviet Union
ind in Hong Kong said this trade} for jts definite views on setting
vot only is active but growin tatus of all German Gov-
ernment pending a peace treaty.
The Soviet Union has proposed
that such a Government should
be established and Western powers
want to know more about its
powers and position. —U.P.

up a

The, Japanese Government offi
dally frowns on it but that policy
nay be changed soon, Nippon
Times said Government is be-
ieved to be contemplating a plan
for limited trade with Commun-
ist China and the Soviet Union,’






Despite the official disapprova
by Japanese and United State
oceupation authorities, trade ha

1 Vietnantese To Join
ene Avg. ;

been going on for more than | Fr h : ae

year, Most is via Hong K " Communist Rebels

ind the nearby Portuguese colo
ny of Macao. But some shipments

10 directly to Red China, SAIGON, May 10.

Informed sources said all the
The correspondent was told by | Vietnamese mobile column com-
businessmen in Hong Kong that] posed of several infantry battal-
Chinese coal and bristles are go-|ions will soon join the French
Coal remains in}expeditionary corps in the war
cases of bristles] with Communist rebels. T

Daphtihabece sent to the|Japan but 600 Of \ is 4 an inte
etek, 2 tia... apan” re-\said the column Ww ‘ a. I
tery haere on to. the United yAPmenet “TPMT cas

joined by artiller "
sion units ¢quipped with most
; iern United States material,
Informed sources said in an- ie y t so instructors ¢
other direction that Japanes The Vietnamese instructors are
made textiles machinery and too} going through thorough Ane
are entering Red China via Macao |!" modern warfare. The mobile
group will be attached to the Viet-
Raw cotton for textiles made}namese chief of staff as part of
in Japan came from the United] 65,000 strong national army



States Mobile groups have _ hitherto
. been attached to the French
Flour from the United States{ command. Informed sources said

|has also been passing to Rec} Vietnamese army soon will take

China through 1 Macao, Wit! fover the Tonking sector held

Japan once again a sovereign| until now by French and colonial

jnation interest in restoring pre 0S.

|war trade with China has surged

—UP.



Many businessmen here believe
the steady flow of Chinese raw
materials would go far to bolster
shaky Japanese industries. Cheap-
er raw materials too would hel; LONDON, May 10.
to narrow the spread betweer Dr. Leopold . Figle, Austria's
prices and wages which is one of | Chancellor, left London by air to-
the chief ¢auses of current labour} night for Washington on a fort-
unrest in Japan, night’s visit at the invitation of the
United States Government.—U.P.

nn

Jha choice of those who
necognise Quality, and

| of those who employ

| Economy...

A rare combination realised in

| K. W. V.

“THE LABEL WITH THE KEY”

Wines, Brandies and Liqueurs

K.W.V. PAARL TAWNY

K.W.V. Coronation Wine

K.W.V. Old Brown Sherry

K. W.V. Amontillado Sherry

K. W.V. Old Oloroso Sherry

| K.W.V. Sweet Vermouth.

.W.V. Dry Vermouth ’
.W.V. VAN DER HUM LIQUEU
.W.V. Superior “Key’’ Brandy

\USTRIAN CHANCELLOR
INVITED TO U.S.



—UP.









i ~

The

Pillars
of
Health

and



Happiness







~



PAGE TWO



GIRLS INTER SCHOOL
ATHLETIC SPORTS

To be Held at

KENSINGTON

On

FRIDAY, 16TH MAY, 1952

AT 1.30 P.M.

e
Admission : Kensington Pavilion 1/6

Children $d.

George Challener 94.

—————_
















(Technicolor)
David NIVEN
Vern ELLEN

THE GROOM





CESAR ROMERO Bing Crosby Jane
ee T° mar Alexis Smith
TUES. & WED
(By Request)
WOMEN 445 p.m Orrin canto
MEN 830 pm

MON & DAD |) onsen cry

Segregated Audience — —====
Age Limit 12 Years and |] Thurs cial | 30 p m

over! Tim HUT Doubie !

“Rio Grande Patrol” @
‘Arizona Ranger”

ROODAL



THURS
BLUE LAMP

Coming

THE







BRIDGETOWN cEs~
(DIAL 23810) DARBARESs
Today & Tomorrow (WTAL Bi70)
445 & 8.30 pm ~ Today & Tomorrow
HAPPY Go 445 &830 PM
LOVELY HERE COMES

———___

THEATRES

OISTIN
(DIAL #44)
Today & Tomorrow
445 & 830 p.m.

“KAZAN”

Stephen Dunne &

RETURN OF
MONTE. CRISTO

Loui Hayward

TUES & WED
445 & 830 p.m.
DAVID HARDING
COUNTER SPy
Willard Parker &
BULLDOG
DRUMMOND
STRIKES
Ron

BACK
Randell

iMPIRE ROXY



TO-DAY — 445 & 8.20 To-day to
and continuing Daily Ri do W
John DEREK—Lee J. COBB “eardo Mo

ir
MARK OF

Short: FOOLISH BUNNY

Paramount British News Reel with Tex

OLYMPIC R

To-day to Men, —
zuccoO
in

THE FLYING SERPEANT
\

THE FAMILY SECRET
EXTRA

4.30 & 8.15

Last @
Ralph LEWIS

George

2-Reel Short

Tues. ~ 445 @& 3.15
ntalban, Syd Charisse
THE RENEGADE

EXTR
SWEET SERENADE
Beneke & His Ore

OVAL

Shows Today 430 & 8.15

HARLEM GLOBE TROTTERS



aha and
ACCUSE MY PARENTS HOLIDAY IN HAVANA
with . with
Mary BETH, HUGHES & Others :
.e i. 2 Mary Hatcher
Bua Aber Nee Gonstio Mon. & Tues. = 4.90 & 6%
es IND!**! TERRITORY
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Confidence Ir The General

SAN ANTONIO, Texas, May 9.
Mrs, Margaret Dodd said Fri-
day she is confident that her hus-

the right things.”

Houston

















SUNDADVOCATE

SUNDAY,

——
I

RRIVING from Trinidad yes-
. terday morning by B.W.I.A.,
Miss Marien Daniel from the

She was interviewed at Fort Sam/"ist Committee’s Office of the




” n S ? late to-day, She bados Publicity Committee in
cae Brigadier General Francis poised and smiling She said Ww York.
Jodd and those trying to rescue have the utmost confidence he wiht the Airport to meet her
him from Communists in the Koje do rather well —that he will @re Miss Joan Kysh and Mr.
Island prison camp “will do just absolutely the right things.” prey Boyce, Secretary and
norary Treasurer respectively
LOPES SESE SF ETRE LIST) the Barbados Publicity Com-
* y Ltee
. % ° siete
* 4 A 2 & § 3 : AHRIVED Miss Daniel who will be in om
S Gard. ¥ Anoth Sh jos for about five days stayin
* Shi t of th
|% Mke Garden—8t. James dines ia the Hotel Royal, has come out
is ane & MON 8 a bm r POPULAR learn all she can about a
Ng TAnoany, $22 hm 54180 GAS COOKERS ios in order to tell the people
| TARZAN 'S PERILS 7 <= ih wheal dls*
| Lex BARKEP, & A few of these have not yet |New York about wh $
IR WOMAN ON PIER 1% s been booked sing tourism on her return.
i&= pocert BYAN_Larsine DAY | a of nent shipment will be While here she hopes to tour
3 TUES. & WED. 8.39 Wha! hoe cou’ island and visit the various
|



secure one of these cookers.



pow |
WHITE TOWER (Colors }
and
MIRACLE OF THE BELLS

your Gas Show.
rooms, Bay Street TO-DAY and




‘els






Student Returns
HRISTOPHER SMITH a stu-
dent. of the Lodge School,



jnith of Basseterre Sugar Fac-

turned from St, Kitts yester-
hy afternoon by B.W.1LA. after
‘ending the Easter holidays with
Bs parents Mr, and Mrs. Charles
























At your grocer’s in convenient size packages
also in improved filter tea balls

}
REFRESHING ::

United
Sa actSnanaten iy








on

oi
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a wonderful twosome,
You'll both be in the best
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And you can have it, too,
if you shop soon.

\ANTZEN

sIMITED,

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ie.

rea

take this opportunity w
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from Lashiay'’s Limited in Prince
William Henry Street to Johnson‘s
Building between the Modern Dress
Shoppe and Jolreon’s Stationery oan
Broad Street

«. BALDINI & CO.



BRIDE!

Entree Dishes, Cocktail Shakers, Bread Boards and Knives,
Table Lamps with and without Shades, Glassware, Clocks,
and numerous other items in Bone, China and Porcelain.

A WONDERFUL SELECTION

LOUIS L. BAYLEY

AQUATIC GIFT SHOP
"Phone 3909

"Phone 4897
Sole Representatives for . . .
RULES ‘WAPRGS OG i. 6 ciisisicuvitdilinttianen
ROYAL CROWN DERBY CRINA CO,
CROWN STAFFORD CHINA CO. .

youre yourself

| Eemalich

pry.

Christopher is a nephew of Mrs,
i, C. Shepherd of St. Thomas Rec-
sory,

Housing Experts
EAVING for Antigua on Thurs-

day by B.W.L.A. were Mr.
Jonald R, Hanson and Mr. Hec-
or Garcia two experts on “aided
* housing from the U.S.A.
came out to Barbados to
confer with Mr. W. M. Wood-
heuse Building Development
Adviser to the Comptroller
for Development and Welfare.

Mr. Hanson and Mr, Garcia who
spent about a week here staying
at the Marine Hotel, are making
fa preliminary tour of the whole
Caribbean region,
They have been
the Caribbean Commission pnde:
“Point Four’ scheme of the
States Government and
will be available for the next two
years to the Caribbean territories
lto advise on aided self-help”
|housing schemes—schemes under
| which prospective occupiers builc
| their own houses with government
help in the form of materials anc
jexpert advice.

| From Plaisance
‘ I, JOSEPH DrSOUZA of
} 'M. Plaisance,

aceredited to

East Coast,
Demerara, arrived in the island on
| | friday by the Lady Nelson to spend
rr month's holiday. He is an em-
‘ployee of the Harbours and
| Transports Department in B.G.,
and is on six months long leave. \
He expects to spend some of
jhis holiday in Trinidad. Mr
| DeSouza was last in Barbados in
11948. He is the guest of Mr.
'D. I. R, Fernandes of Wellington
Street, City.







" Health Facts" Series

_ [D0 YoU KNOW
it 9

| ~why you get headaches when
| your systeom’s out+of- ,
| order? Gases given off by
| fermenting food, . 5
ey tyre ee ea ty
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general lassitude.
It's simple to keep your
system free of clogging
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\ Remember—

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Miss MARION DANIEL

B.G. Health Visitor



All Well in Illyria!

UMOURS reaching the outside
R world from behind the brown
curtain say that all is going well
in Illyria —- that is, the stage of
the Pocket Theatre where rehear-
sals of Twelfth Night are now in
their final week. Though two
duels are at one point in progress
tricted space, there heve been no
at the same time in this very res-
casualties so far. No one has be-
come bored with his part—which
suggests that ,those who feel that
Shakespeare was quite a writer
are probably correct, for rehears-
as have been going on for weeks;
and it is being once more proved
that glowing costumes and good
lighting will compensate for acres
of painted scenery. This show is
being given on every night of the
week starting on Monday 19th,
with the exception of Wednesday,
which is being reserved for a
special performance, though it may
be possible to release a few seats
for the general public on that night
too. It looks as if anyone who

the

MONG the pasbénchin ‘arriv- wanted a seat had better apply to
A ; v

ing on Friday morning by the
Lady Nelson from British Guiana
Sancho,
Georgetown.
Sancho who is on thrée months’
guest
Angela Bart of River Road.

was Mrs,
Visitor of

Eva

holiday, is the

Merchant in Vénezuela

BETHENCOURT
in Vene-
zuela, arrived here yesterday via
Trinidad by B.\V.LA., for about
hohday.
accompanied by his

R. CARLOS
Jnr.; a

two weeks’

family and they
Sam Lord's Castle.

On Business
ERE on a fifteen-day business
visit is Mr, Jacob Kiperman,
Partner of Kiperman Bros, Phila-

Health
Mas

Mrs

merchant

are staying

British Council at Wakefield

House in person or by letter pretty

quickly. It is years since a Shake-

spearian play hes been seen in

; Barbados apart from school per-
formances: it may be years more

* before anyone is prepared to de-
vote as much time and hard work
to putting on another one.

Methodist Minister

R*’. FRANK LAWRENCE of
the James Street—Speights-

was town Circuit returned from Trini-
wife and dad

at B.W.LA.

yesterday morning by
after paying a visit to
his son Mr. Alan Lawrence of
the Control Board.

Returning to U.S.A.
FTER spending 36 years in

the U.S.A. Miss Albertha

delphia Hat Manufacturers of San Taylor, sister of Mrs. M. Gooding

fernando. He came in yesterday of
morning by B.W.1A.,

dad and
Royal.

Visited Théir Daughter
MRS. WALTER
CORBIN of Worthing,
turned on Thursday by B.W.LA.,
from Trinidad where they were
son-in-law and daultter, Me and the Gold Coast who spent part of retired floor
Mrs. Burke of “Vistabella, South his holiday in Trinidad with his p,

R. AND

spending

Trinidad.
Mr.

a holiday

Corbin is a

Norham’s Read, paid a short
returning shortly and begs to ex-
tend her sincere thanks to all her
friends and family who made her
stay a véry pleasant one.

re- Comptroller cf Customs

M® HUGH LUCIE-SMITH,
Comptroller of Customs of

relatives, arrived here on Thurs-
of day by B.W.I.A. to spend the re-

MAY li, 1952

anrib Calling —



Mr. J. A. W. GRIFFITH
Awarded Scholarship

NOTIFICATION has been
received from the Secretary
of State that Mr. J. A. W. Griffith,
an engineering apprentice in the
Federal Engineers’ Department,
Leeward Islands, has been award
ed, under the Empire Training
Scheme, a scholarship for a
diploma course in Civil Engineer+
ing, leading to exemption from
Parts A and B of the A.M.LC.B.
Mr. Griffith, a Barbadian, was
educated at Harrison College and
the Antigua Grammar School, He
is the son of Mr. G, B. Griffith
Acting .Police Magistrate of
District ‘A’ and Mrs. Griffith of
Holligan Road,

Civil Service Delegate

RRIVING from Trinidad yes
terday morning by B.W.1.A.

was Mr. A. E. Lewis one of the
Barbados delegates who attended
the Fifth Conference of the Fed«

from Trini- visit to the island. She will be eration of Civil Service Associa«
is staying at the Hotel

tion in Grenada,
At the conclusion of the Con-
ference Mr. Lewis went over to

Trinidad to have a look at their
hospitals.

For Medicai Aid
I N Barbsdos for medical treat«
ment is Mr. A. Villanueva,
walker of Messrs,
Hope Ross and Sons, Trinidad.
He arrived yesterday morning by
B.W.I.A. accompanied by his

Messrs, Martin Doorly and Co., â„¢ainder with his mother Lady daughter Mrs, R. Oakley who will

Ltd.

Enrolment and Talk

} N MONDAY night at 4 o'clock,
Miss Margaret Hart, Advisory
Secretary to the Y.W.C.A., in the
West Indies, will tell members of
| the Local Y.W.C.A,, of some of
meeting
| takes place at the Y Headquarters,

There will also D*® COLIN TUDOR, son of Mr.

| her

experiences,

| Pinfold Street.
| be an enrolment.

Intransit

MoM“ JUS-
23 C Zz
JACKSON,
Chief Justice
of the Wind-
ward and
Leeward
Islands, pass-
ed through
here yesterday
afternoon by
B.W.1.A. from
Antigua on his
way to Gren-
ada to preside
over the Su-
preme Court

in Grenada, Mr.



Justice Jackson

Lucie-Smith.

On Short Visit

M® SEYMOUR WILLIAMS,
Secretary of H, F. Wildy
and Co., Ltd. St. Kitts, arrived
on Friday by B.W.I.A. on a short
visit.

Medico Returns

be remaining for a week,

Mrs. Oakley is an accountant of
Messrs A. S. Bryden and Sons
(Trinidad) Ltd.

Congratulations

CONGRATULATIONS to Edwin

Rogers who will be twenty-
one tomorrow. The occasion was
marked by a gay party which was
held at his brother's residence Mr.
Winston Rogers, Deacons Road.
me happy years of weight-

g!

and Mrs. J. O. Tudor of liftin

“Edithville”

by B.W.LA. He went over
see Dr. A. A. Peat, Director
Medical Services.

First For Girls

PRECEDENT will be created

when the first Inter-Schools
Sports for girls wil] be held at
Kensington Oval on May 16th at
1.30 p.m. Queen’s College, St.
Michael’s Girls’, Foundation Girls’,
Alexandra, and the Alleyne Girls
will be represented.
The results of these Schools at
ir annual sports have proved
interesting and events should be
keenly contested.

Pine Road returned
- from Trinidad yesterday morning

to ‘YY ZSTZRDAY afternoon Lady
of

Girl Guides Fair

Collymore opened the Annual
Girl Guides’ Fair which was held
at the Drill Hall. The fair was
well attended and lasted from
3—8 p.m.

There were the usual amusé=
ments for children such as the
Wheel of Fortune, and the Lucky

ips. There was also the Cake
Stall, Trefoil Guild, the House.
hold Stall, Gifts, Books, Sweets,
Coca Colas. Snack and Milk Bars,
Teas, Ices, and many other stalls.

There was also. a raffle of 2
Raleigh bicycles and the Police
Band under the supervision of
Capt. Raison rendered a pro-
gramme of appropriate atrs,



tion in particular,

Caribbean Barbados Hotels, Clubs
of B.O.A.C., Houses
meeting of tion,

sociation on

which are in the Associa-

On this same list should be
noted that they would all pay the
normal commission to these agents
for no matter what length of stay,
The latter has been a point which,

eing in doubt, had lost Barbados
Agent business before, and now

to the practical and energetic dis- Mr, Alexand .
cussion, which had just taken th peel beithen’ Mad tinky

place, was to him a very important
step forward, The Association had
made a very good start, and, if
the pace were maintained, exch
its members
would soon begin to feel the bene-

and everyone of

fit of their efforts,

He welcomeu sn particular the
proposed affiliation with the Am-
erican Society of Travel
He pointed out that AST.

most

the travel

important organisation
business,
enormous membership all over the

at if the Association does be-
come linked with ASTA, it must
not be sparihg with advertising
and promotion material, Agents
did not always have time to write
for infofmation and material, and
even B.O.A.C., who have offices,
for example, all over the U.S.A.,
could never get enough. It was
up to the Association to keep them

Agents. supplied. Barbados has everything
‘A is the tourists could desire, but they had

in got to be tuld about it
on

He drew the attention of the

world, and to be in regular con= meeting to the International Con-

tact with their members would vention of ASTA to
—} be of tremendous value, Not only Miami, Florida

would it put Barbados hotel men
in touch with them, but right in

front of their
distribute a

be held in
in October this
year, In previous years this con
vention had been held in Mexico

eyes, ASTA would City, Washington, D.C, and Paris.
information the As- This year was expected to be the

sociation sent them to all of their biggest gathering of travel people
members, and he ane at that ever known, and ali eyes would

on becoming an
the Hotel Associatio
ward tv them a list of



in’ should fe:

r, be on the Caribbean, While Bar-

t= bados could not afford to send a
all the delegation with a lavish expense

, and Guest sheet,

—the Agents t



B.O.A.C. Sales Manager
Addresses Hotel Men

Mr. John Alexander,
area Sales Manager
addressed a general
the Barbados Hotel As
Wednesday May 7th, 1952.

He said that he had first visited
Barbados five years ago and on
each subsequent visit he had noted
with pleasure the progress that
had been made in general, but in :
the tourist facilities and organisa- a tt had been cleared up—at

That he had east as far as the member hotels
how been able to sit down with aioli be inten
the Hotel Association, and listen 52°U e informed.

at the very least the As-
sociation should make it their busi-
ness to see that a hotelman was
sent to represent them and to
tell Barbados,

This was an opportunity which
should not be missed at all costs,
for it would be a long time be-
fore it would recur, The B.O.AC.,
Sales Manager then asked whether
Barbados Hotels were really

king advantage of having a
direct air connection with Puerto
Rico which was now the main
focal air point of North and South
America. He pointed out that
hotels there averaged 90 per cent
occupancy during the summer
months, and advised the Asso<
ciation to give some thought to
encouraging some of these tourists
to make side-trips to Barbados,
The tourist should be made to un
derstand that he could stay in
Barbados for two weeks for less
than it would cost him for a week
in other Caribbean islands,

Mr. Alexander concluded by re«
.marking that when he first went
to Jamaica, tourism was then their
third biggest export. At the
present time, it is their second,
end very soon it will be number
one. He saw no reason why,
through the concerted action of the
Barbados Hotel Associa’ and
the Barbados Publicity Committee,
as much, if not more progress,
should not be made in the de-
velopment of the Barbados Tourist
Industry.



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SUNDAY, MAY ll,

1952



At The Cinema

SUMMER FARE

Speaking persdnally I find that the sudden upward
trend of the thermometer that we have been experiencing
the last few days calls for entertainment in a light vein and
I am happy to report that the three new films I have seen
are all in this category, even though one of them is a mur-
der story. The two Plazas are offering “HAPPY GO LOVE-
LY” (Bridgetown), which lives up to its title and “HERE
COMES THE GROOM” (Barbarees), with Bing Crosby,
while the Globe is showing “THE STRIP” with Mickey

Rooney.

Let's begin with “Happy Go
Lovely”, Day?d Niven, Vera-Ellen
and Caesar Romero are the prin-
cipals in this refreshing, light-as-
a-feather musical. Proceeding at a
say, bouncing pace, this comedy-
ofserrors concerns an, American
theatrical troup who are having a
rough time financially to get their
musical show on for the Edinburgh
Festival. Late for rehearsal one
morning, one of the chorus’ girls
thumbs a ride to the theatre in
what turns out to be the car of a



VERA ELLEN

‘onger interested in any proposi-
tion concerning marriage with him
and has become engaged to her
wealthy socialite boss, so our re-
porter hatches a plot to lure her
back to him. This entails, among
other things, his living—complete
with children — on the flance’s
palatial estate; converting a distant
cousin of the groom-to-be from a
drab, sedate blue-blood into a
glamour girl and havimg her take
the bride’s place at the wedding
rehearsal. When the bride discov-
ers that her stand-in is in love
with the groom, an all-in lady
wrestling scene ensues and it is not
until Bing pulls the last ace out of
the pack that he gets a mother for
the two kids.

Bing plays with his usual care-
free, good-natured, easy manner
and his scenes in the orphanage at
the opening of the film are most
appealing. A highlight of this part
of the film is the aria “Caro Nome”
sung by sixteen year old Anna
Maria Alberghetti who has an ex-
quisitely clear, pure and flexible
soprano. Bing’s own numbers, in-
cluding a song and dance routine
with Jane Wyman are catchy and
attractive and in one of them he
gets together with Louis Arm-
strong and other well-known stars.
Jane Wyman is pert and peppery
as the bride wavering between two
grooms and Franchot Tone and
Alexis Smith bring plenty of
laughter to their roles of Bos-
tonian aristocrats. All in all, a
good-natured film with eod-
natured people providing the fun
and Bing Crosby fathering “the

* herd” with easy grace and charm.

Scottish millionaire and before you
can say Jack Robinson, rumour
hath it that she is engaged to him
and the money troubles are over.
From then on, the fun starts, with
the producer trying to knuckle in
on the millions, the dancer being
raised to stardom as a result of the
rumoured betrothal and the baf-
fled millionaire fast falling in love
with the chorus girl, who thinks
he is a newspaperman. An hilari-
ous climax reveals the “reporter”
is, in reality the millionaire, and
with the help of the police, every-
thing ends Happy Go Lovely.

Punctuating the story are pleas-
ant musical interludes and some
delightful numbers by Vera-Ellen
including a short modernistic bal-
let. Her dancing is, as always, a
treat to watch, and it seems to get
better and better. David Niven is
in fine form as the weathly Scot
and his well-known flair for
ironic comedy is given gull rain,
while Caesar Romero contributes
his share of comedy as the hard-
beset, fast-talking producer, Diana
Hart, a neweomer to audiences this
side of the Atlantic, is as cute as
she can be and I should say, would
bear watching. I forgot to mention
that this pleasant, enjoyable musi-
cal is, of course, in technicolor.

“HERE COMES THE
GROOM”

This film starts out as a gentle,
sensitive Bing Crosby type of com~
edy, with touches of warmth and
pathos by director Frank Capra.
Then, all of a sudden, it explodes
into bosterous slapstick and farce
with Bing, Jane Wyman, Franchot
Tone and Alexis Smith in the thick
of it.

The story concerns a Boston
newspaperman, played by Bing,
who arrives in the U.S. from
France with two French orphans,
only to be told that unless he can
find a mother for them within five
days, he will have to give ther
up. Calling on his ex-fiancée, he
finds that she is definitely no

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“THE STRIP”

The title of “THE STRIP” com-
mencing Tuesday at the Globe
may be misleading but don’t run
away with the idea that it has to
do with burleque or any associated
activties. It is a straight murder
mystery with Mickey Rooney as
the central figure. For once, the
plot is uncomplicated and believ-
able and follows a straight path to
its solution. The location of the
story is the Strip, a section cf
Hollwood famous for its night-
clubs, restaurants and film agenc-
ies and the plot concerns a drum-
mer in a night club who is sus-
pected of murder by the police
when his former boss, a racketeer,
and a dancer with whom he is in
love, are found murdered. During
the unfolding of the story, there
re plenty of opportunities for
some good entertainment numbers
including some dancing by Sally
Forrest, whose sole aim is to get
into pictures and who doesn’t mind
how she achieves it; and some hot
jam sessions with such famous jazz
musicians as Louis Armstrong and
Jack Teagarden as well as other
well-known members of Mr. Arm-
strong’s band. In these sessions,
Mickey Rooney gives a fine dis-
play of his dexterity with the drum
sticks and I can assure he is good!
There are alo solo numbers by
Vic Damone and Monica Lewis and
some admirable executions. on the
trumpet and trombone by Louis
Armstrong and Jack Teagarden,

From the dramatic angle, Mickey
Rooney acquits himself creditably
in-the first serious role I have seen
him in and it is good to see him
doing an adult role instead of the
perennial adolescent. He combines
youthfulness and maturity, with
the underlying sincerity that is
always present in his acting. Sup-
porting him are William Demerest
and a little newcomer, Kay Brown,
who sings a catchy tune called “A
Kiss To Build A Dream On”, Sally
Forrest, as the entertainer, shows
‘that she can dance, as well as act.







KOO

“ASHTON” ie



For Amateurs

Last week's article described
how to build a rock garden. This
week we will deal with how to
plant it up.

When all the rocks are safely
amranged and in place, the
pockets, and spaces in between
must be filled with mould in
which to plant the plants. Make
up a good mixture of black
mould, manure and charcoal, and
if possible some leaf mould, Fill
the spaces, banking it high, for
there will be considerable sink-
age after a few days watering.
Water the rock garden and let
the whole thing settle for at least
a week, in the meantime refilling
any parts that need it. After
this, the rock garden should be
in a fit state to be planted up.

Choice of Plants
There is a wide choice of
plants that can be used in plant-
ing up a rock garden, and the
choice need by no means be con-

fined to low ilin, lants alone.
Naturally feptlin Ris wach ks

Hollyhocks, would be most unsuit-
able for a rock garden, but such
plants as Coreopsis for example
lend themselves extremely well.

Consideration must be given to
the position of the rock garden,
when choasing what plants to
use, for it would be no good put-
ting in plants that like sun in a
shady position or vice versa. In
selecting the plants, try to get as
great a variety of colour as pos-
sible, and this colour will be far
more effective if arranged in
large groups rather than in small
bits here and there. Therefore,
if planting Sweet Alyssum do not
put one plant here and another
close by there, but plant a group
of plants close together so that
when flowering they will form
a big drift of snowy white,

And now for the plants

* * *

Verbena is an excellent rock
garden plant. Verbena can be had
in a great variety of lovely
colours, which look very effective
when mixed together in groups,
or when planted in a group of
one colour, This plant can be had
in deep purple and various
shades of mauve, in red and
varying shades of pink, in white
and in many variations of all
of these colours.

* * *

SWEET ALYSSUM: is another
rock garden plant which flowers in
snowy white. Hermatmetum or
little yellow daisy will make a
lovely splash of golden yellow,
there is also Coreopsis Nasturtium,
Phlox, Candytuft, low growing
Begonias Aseratum and _ single
Balsam, all these are suitable, and
of many colous.,

Of the coloured leaves we have
the variegated Coleus. Then there
are ferns to add green to the
general picture.

From this list it will be seen
that there is a choice of plants
that like the sun, and also plants
that like thé shade. Choose your
plants wisely, and plant them in
suitable positions to. get the best
results,

Once the rock garden is
planted up, it can be left for long
weeks with very little attention,
and it will be years before it will
be found necessary to actually re-
build the whole thing.

But before this, about once a
year it is just as well to remould
the rock garden in parts, as mould
does get washed away by rain and
constant watering, and sometimes,
in spite of the utmost care in
building, rocks may get loosened,
and, may need securing again.
These, and perhaps other little
attentions may be needed, but, on
the whole, a rock garden is not a
demanding part of the garden and
entails less labour in upkeep than
do garden beds.

Bourn-vita

Jams and Marmalades

(For the first time in 11b. glass jars}













eee

SUNDAY

ee

Gardening Hints Farm And Garde

ADVOCATE



it

SEASONAL NOTES
By AGRICOLA

AT this time of the year

a certain amount of- re-organisation i
transition from the cool weather types of vegetables to}
warm season types, Preparktions for the establishment
which sueceed

of those kinds
should be well under way,

of their season.

the vegetable garden calls for

in the hot, rainy

spinach plants will figure largely in new plantings.



Prominent —
Personality

NAIROBI, April, 30th,

The name of the Rhodesian
Prime Minister Sir Godfrey Hug-
gins is high on the
nent political personalities in East
and Central Africa who signed the
“Declaration of Principles” on
which they will work to achieve
the future federation of Southern
and Northrn Rhodesia, Nyasatand,




Kenya, Uganda and Tangenyika.
The plan was revealed by 4
speaker at a public meeting in



Dar-es-Salaam. He also said that
Roy Welensky leader of the
ed members of Northern Rhode~
sia’s Legislative Council and sev-
eral other European members of
the Kenya and Tanganyika legis-

latures are among the signatories. as

The speaker, T. W. Tyrrell, who
is a leading figure in the Tangan-
yika European Settlers Political
Council, said America also recog-
nised the importance of such a
great African coalition. American
business men, he added, had indi-
cateq their willingness to provide
£300,000,000 annually for several
years to assist the developme
of such a federated group



Tyrrell describea 1t as big-
gest thing in colonial history”
saying it would,mean new life for
UNO Trust: Territory in Tangan

yika.
He expressed his belief that th
principles set out by Sir Godfrey

and his associates would be ac-
cepted by all races in the six ter-
ritories,

Another speaker said it should
lead to a satisfactory solution of
“the problem of the African con-
tinent.”

The conference, which Sir God-
frey Huggins, Welensky and cther
leaders and white settlers in East
and Central Africa will attend in
a personal capacity is being held
in Salisbury, Rhodesia, this sum-
emer.





= \ Ff
joy

Ac antaus

“Oh Humphrey
dreadjul after a tate
silting, Mother — shout
ing, ‘Hear, hear!’. andj
‘Shame!’ in his sleen. }
and getting wp to uote |
every time the ‘phone

;
ema oss

‘GILT EDGE”

Tool Sets
Consisting
im Lge

Rake — Hoe
Scoop — Fork

To Help Grow
a Garden
Like This!






COTTON FA

4 Att
Roe PSEC - at



ist ‘of promis s}

elect- A

-

66,5666604 .
rrr rr err PSF LES -

Root vegetables such as beet
and carrot will continue to give

satisfactory returns. . But above
all, remember that during the
warmer months appetites arc
likely to beeame jaded and salad

meals are favoured in preference
to heavier menus in which starchy
fox predominate. It is import-
ant, therefore, to plan for a regu-
lar supply of leafy greens by suc-
ve plantings at suitable inter-
Vals Lettuce ig not usually in




not easy to come by.

example, is

b
De fa
they are quite the equal of char
ag @ spinach,
ing to import tinned spinach wher
it ean be so easily grown from suct
variety of native plants!

On the farm, preparation
the planting of yams and othe

ground provisions and cereals such
Indian corn and Guinea corn

will be in full swing. And let] Drug Store for Kruschen.
your plantings this yeo> of pigeon
peas and hardy be, rd bona-
vists be much mo al than

last year, won't you member
there was a Shortage of
and we #imply cannot afford t
be without them especially wher
meat supplies continue to be in
adequate.

ance of pulse is as old as civill
sation itself. In this connection

if you have your bibles handy, turn

to the first chapter of the Book

of Daniel and refresh your mem-

ories,

Windbreaks

Windbreak boraers around the
garden will need some attention
Where pigeon peas have beer

used and are a year old, the top

third of the old plants should be
pruned off. Showery weather wil

assist them to put on an abundant
new growth and the yields of peas

will be as good( if not better, tha:
the first year.

areas they
infested with white blight and i
is better to dig them up and re
plant
to try other types of windbreaks
Guinea corn will prove useful ir
some areas and the seed grail

which it produces makes excellent

scrateh feed for poultry. The
adeno. 8 JuF-jug

jent,
searcity last year.

A good
especially in the
as it is
count of, its rapid growth, Ir
ome parts of the West Indies i
is used ag a shade for young cocoe

and coffee. It is fairly common in

this island, drops its foliage in the
dry season and bears lilac coloure:
flowers in great profusion,

make excellent mwyulching
rial for the garden beds.
freshly cut,
mell of clover hay. There is
roup but retains its foliage wher
trained as a hedge

is very useful in waste places

not only for its ornamental value
Gliricidia can je

but as firewood.
easily established from seed o
hardwood cuttings, For
tings in

double rows about

“inches apart each way,

“GILT EDGE”
6-Piece Sets Only

$11.88

BABBADOS CO-OP

CTORY LTD.

ae

It is a period of|

months
Vegetables such as tomatoes,
eabbages, cauliflowers and onions will be reaching the end|

Legumes (peas and beans), shallots, and
green leafy vegetables such as lettuce, chard and other

t supply but green spinach is
Chard, for
an excellent green
cue if precautions are taken to
in wet sackimg or

wr the ves
' te Cae its freshness can

erved for a reasonable time
throw away your beet.tops,

Just fancy our havyv-

for

t pulses

It is well to recall that
recognition of the dietary import-

Some keep them
for a third crop but in the drier
are liable to become

Some gardeners may like

‘of which there was ‘also a

permanent windbreak,
higher rainfall
areas, is Gliricidia or ‘quick-stick’
sometimes called, on ac-

It is
ceusily trained into a neat and at-
tractive hedge and the prunings
mate-
When
there is a fragrant
a

trong resemblance to the Cassia

As a tree, it

hedge
| purposes, plant the seed or cut

18

OPO CROOOY:





AT 31, HE FELT LIKE
‘OLD MAN

ave




Then
found the remedy to restore
YOUTHFUL VIGOUR

This young man was bei
prematurely ance b kidney |
trouble. He tells in his } |
how Kruschen gave him back !
health after weeks of pain :-~< @

“Tt suffered for weeks from |
kidme; trouble and felt like an
old man although I am only }
If I stooped to do anything #%
was agony to straighten
again. Several people ad
me to try Kruschen Salts as th
bad found them wonderful,
tried them and found they spre
me relief from pain, and I felt |
better in every way. I shall ki
on with the datly dose because |
can pow do my day's work

of “| any the worse for 3h

s VO.

Uniess the kidneys function
properly. certain acid wastes,
nstead of bette expelled, are
allowed to pollute the blood
stream and produce troublesome
complaints—backache, rheuma-
tism and excessive fatigue,
\} Kruschen is one of the finest
)} diuretics or kidney aperients,
The small daily dose keeps the
kidneys and other internal organs
working smoothly and macapety,
so that the blood stream is
purified aad vigorous health
restored @ °

Ask your nearest Chemist op




































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PAGE FOUR

CONQUER

PAIN





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3 soudiy chanted—"We want Six” and they did get six. But there is a
i ‘imit to indulgence and when they shouted “We want Ten” The Lodge
rt ooys held on and said “no.” The game finished at six-iove in favour
; of College.
ail On thursday the B.F.F.A, defeated Police in a Knockout fixture.
} ;| These boys too played at Kensington for the first time. They were

* | precise and workmanlike in their movements when they had once got
Be? the lay of the land. It was obvious too that they were more than
@ }a match for Police. Spartan will have their hands full of them on
ai ; : : ies

i Monday in the second semi-tinal.

Ay INDIAN TEAM IN UNITED KINGDOM eae.
yee N VIEW of the forthcoming visit of an Indian team to the West
x Indies later this year and early next year. West Indian cricket
bet circles are more than ordinarily concerned with the progress of the
ve; | Indian team that is at present touring England.
7 So far they have only played two official fixtures, one agairist



«

*



EMPIRE AND CARLTON DRAW Carlton, Empire Draw Game
Williams ]

Eyes Of W.I. On Indian-U.K. Tour

By O. S. COPPIN

tition in the First and Second Division last week,
there was a natural inclination of interest towards the
final competition for the 1952 season.

What has been most controversial and indeed enter-
taining even to the extent of the burlesque has been
the first semi-final game played between Empire and
‘ Carlton at Kensington yesterday afternoon.

The concert, for such state of development it reached in some of
its stages, ended in a two-all draw. It however reflected no credit
vn either team fer science, planning, or any superiority in technique.

HERE were flashes of each of these conditions during the game.

for were not two well known First Division teams playing? But
certainly one cannot condone deliberate and persistent fouling. fla-
grant breaches of the laws of the game and a general indication of
bad tempers so abundantly exhibited by the players on both sides.

Tne referee would have been justified in sending off half the
pleyers on both teams. It is so easy for a game of football to degen-
evate in a nonsensical “free-for-all” so that is desirable that even
if a referee errs on the lenient side, experienced players should assist
to the extent that they avoid all indications of bad manners, bad sports-
manship and out and out boorishness,

“THERE was no justification for the display yesterday afternoon by

the Empire and Carlton teams and certainly I cannot exonerate
eferea Gittens from the charge that he could easily have sent off
ive or six of the worse behaved,

There has been a growing disregard for law and _ order this
eason. Even if we assume for the sake of argument that in some
cemote instances the refereeing has been inexpert yet this is not a
icence for players to abuse reterees and openly flout their authority.

A school team has walked off the field en bloc and to my mind
there can be no extenuation for such an act. The disciplinary
machinery of the B.A.F.A. must now make unequivocable decisions
in the interests of Civilisation and decency. There are too many
players still despoiling the chances of future Barbados football that
should be put on sidelines FOR EVER and others could be sus-
pended say for five or ten years to discourage the other ruffians,

CHECK YOUNGER ONES TOO
C*OME of the younger and less civilised brigade could be dissuaded
at once from making Association football their recreation and
a suspension of say fifteen years would fix that,

There is no room in organised sport for the hooligan regardless
of his pigmentation and the time has come when they should be de-
prived of the opportunity of playing with civilised people.

On Monday Harrison College were knocked otit by Spartan who
scored the only goal of the match. The College team missed many
opportunities and it was certainly their own fault that they did not
establish some sort of a tangible superiority early in the game when
they had things more or less their own way.

In the second half however Spartan rallied and in the circum-
stances I must certainly disagree with a large number of spectators
who trom a jaundiced view vociferously booed Spartan on their win.

Spartan outplayed College in the second half, ang the school team
who tailed to press home an early advantage in the first half, have
only themselves to blame that they lost the initiative in the match and
a more experienced team made the most of the situation,

COLLEGE WIN KEY GAME

N Wednesday Harrison College in a key game with Lodge swamp-

ed the St. John visitors by six goals to love. This was a peculiar
game, The Lodge School, who were obviously labouring under the
nandicap of playing at Kensington for the first time, soon got into
their stride and certainly their defeat of six goals to love is no true
indication of the respective standards of play up to the half time
interval, Lodge School kicked out two certainties from well within
che penalty area and when they kicked a penalty up towards the moon
as well this did not assist their chances.

Harrison Coliege, after resumption were quicker on the ball and
surer in their attack, Success followed success and there was a corre-
sponding rise in thrust and morale and so when the College had put
tnemseives in the lead by three goals to love, there was no doubt tnat
a bigger score was in store. The schoolboy hailers of College then










Worcestershire which was drawn and the other they have lost to
Surrey.

> I am more or less concerned with the composition of the team,

sincé it is safe to predict that the 95% of the members who are at
present on tour of England will be in the line-up against the West
indies.
". S. HAZARE, one of the
world’s greatest all rounders
is captain and he needs no intro-
duction to West Indian cricket
circles,
The West Indies who have made
a successful tour of India within
the past few years will recall at
once present members of the team
like H. R, Adhikari, for example,
D. G. Phadkar, of bounders fame,
P. R. Umrigar, C. T. Sarwate,
Ghulam Ahmed and D. K. Gaek-

wad.
MANKAD OUT

1E fact that the team will be

without the services of Vinoo
Mankad is a serious blow to its
entire structure, Mankaqd is en-
gaged with Haslingden in the
Lancashire League and some
schools of thought expressed the
opinion that he would . still be
available in the Tests,

Recent news from _ England
however point to the fact that
skipper Hazare has not planned
on including Mankad in his Test
team.

Three of the team, Hazare, himself, Shinde and Sarware toured
England in 1946 and Divecha is a former Oxford Blue, The average
age of the team is 26 and it does appear that thé team is made up of
good all round players, at least on reputation, rather than specialists
in any one department,



Vv. S. HAZARE



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FTHE Open Knock-out competition has been the
; focus of all attention in senior football circles
sast week. Notre Dame having sealed off the compe-*

- Started.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

CARLTON: Lucas /,
EMPIRE: Harper 2



. ~ 2
— 2

A LARGE CROWD of football fans went to Kensing-
ton Oval yesterday afternoon and saw Carlton and Empire
play to a two-all draw in their football knockout fixture.
Much foul play marked both halves of the game and Referee
Gittens had'to use the whistle frequently. .

Carlton was the first to score
and then Empire equalised. At half
time, Empire had two goals in on
Carlton, Then in the second half
Carlton kicked in their second
goal. For Empire centre-forward
Harper scored both goals while
“Brickie” Lucas, inside right, and
Cc. B. Williams, inside left kicked
in one each for Carlton.

The game started with the Blues,
defending the goal at the south-
ern end of the pitch. From the
kick off both sides tried to assert
themselves, The Carlton forwards
10oved down on the Empire de-
fence but Grant kicked the ball
outside and Referee Gittens sig-
nalled for a corner kick. Lucas
kicked the ball from the corner
into the goal to put Carlton one
up on Empire. Everyone was
amazed to see a goal scored from
this corner kick, but the Empire
players were not perturbed, Soon
after the first goal was scored
Hutchinson on the left wing nearly
kicked the second goal in on Em-
pire from the wing.

Empire Score

Symmonds at inside left also
tried to open the scoring for Em-
pire, but his kick went wide. Then
a faultless forward movement by
Empire brought the equaliser as
Harper on receiving a short pass
from Drayton made no mistake in
kicking the ball into the Carlton
goal beyond the reach of King.
Score: one-all. With the equaliser
in, the game again became fast
and it was Empire who was doing
the greater part of the pressing.

Then when it was about one

minute before the end of the fj-st
half, Harper, always on the aiert,
kicked in the second goal, beating
the Carlton custodian, King com-

pletely. The first half ended with
the score at’ 2—1 in Empire's
favour.

On the resumption Empire con-
tinued to pile on the pressure on
their rival, but Carlton was slso
trying to equalise. Players on
both sides employed all the dirty
tactics to get on top and the fans
did not care for this exhibition.

Corner Kick

Lucas at inside right tried to
score the equaliser, but he too was
kicking wide of the goal. Then
when the half was 15 minutes
Vid, Referaa Gittane sigmallod far
a corner kick on Empire. This was
kicked by Warren across the Em-
pire goal and Williams who was
standing in the middle of the
Empire area unmarked, kicked the
ball directly at Robinson, but it
had passed the goal line.

Robinson tried to cuff the ball
out for a corner, but Referee
Gittens signalled for a goal, With
the score two all, players on both
sides made renewed ecorts but
the game ended with the score at
two-all.

The teams were:

Empire ;—Robinson, Bynoe,
Grant, Rudder, Alleyne, Smith,
Maynard, Symmonds, Harper,
Drayton and Norville.

Carlton:—King, Porter, Ken-
nedy, Cox, Clairmonte, Marshall,

Warren, Lucas, G. Hutchinson, C.
Williams and C. Hutchinson.

The referee was Mr. S. O’'C.
Gittens.



Moyra Blair Scores Victory

(By Our Yachting Correspondent)

MOYRA BLAIR scored a convincing victory in the B
Class when the Tenth R.B.Y.C. was sailed in Carlisle Bay

yesterday evening. Sailing

conditions very much suited

this large boat and from the start it was clear that she would

end up among the first three.

about.

The Eleventh Regatta will be
sailed on Saturday, May 17 and
the Twelfth on May 24 (Bank-
Holiday). The race for the
Frontenac Cup, which will be two
rounds, will be sailed on June 5
(Bank-Holiday) and the present-
ation of trophies is fixed for a
later date.

Eight boats raced in the B Class,
Wizard and Okapi did not start,
At the end of the first round,
Ranger, the first boat to start, was
still in the lead. However, Moyra
Blair soon overtook both Ranger
‘and Hi Ho as she pulled away

F ‘lirt and Rascal.
drop Mentagned Completed the

second round 51 seconds ahead of
Ranger which was now second.
Flirt was third, 30 seconds later.
Hi Ho. which was 45 seconds be-
hind Flirt, had a lead of only 8
seconds on Rascal.

Mischief Overtaken

Gipsy overtook Mischief and
was 9Y seconds ahead. Moyra
Blair sailea steadily and kept. the
lead. When she received the gun
she was two minutes and six
seconds ahead of Flirt, second.
Rascal was third, 16 seconds be-
hind Flirt and Ranger finished 25
Seconds later, Fantasy beat Hi
Ho by four seconds and Gipsy
finished a minute and 33 seconds
ahead of Mischief,

» In the C Class seven boats
Madness dropped out of
the race before completing the
first round. Rogue was leading
at the end of the first round, witn
Miss Behave second and Gannet
third.

Rogue went on to win the race,
finishing over a minute and a half
ahead of Gannet, second. Miss
Behave finished third and Scamp
fourth,

Honour in the Intermediate
Class went to Gnat. Clytie drop-
ped out of the race shortly after

The race was again north

Seabird had finished among the
first three in the Ninth Regatta
‘when it should have “been Rain-
bird. Perhaps Seabird was in-
spired by this efror. She won
yesterday’s race.

Seven boats started in the D
Class, At the end of the first
round Seabird was still a good
way ahead of the nearest boat,
Sinbad. Rainbow was third with
Hurricane closely behind her.

Seabird kept her lead and went
on to beat Sinbad, second by 57

seconds. Hurricane was third, a
minute and 24 seconds behind
Rainbow.

As usual, Vamboose carried off
honours in the Tornado Class. She
scored another ‘easy _ victory.
Vamoose quickly got away from



the other four boats.. She led
throughout the race. Comet was
second and Edril third. Thunder

dropped out of the race before
completing the second round.
The results were as follows:—

B Olass:—1. Moyra Blair. 2.
Ranger. 3. Flirt.
C Class:—1. Rogue. 2. Gannet.

3. Miss Behave.

Intermediate Class:—1l. Gnat;

2. Reen. 3. Mohawk.
D Class:—1. Seabird. 2. Sin-
bad. 3, Hurricane,

Tornado Class:—1. Vamoose. 2.
Comet. 3. Edril.



CHENERY WINS
MEN’S SINGLES

V. H. CHENERY defeated L. A.



Harrison 6—0, 7—5 to win tne
finals of the M Singles at
Summerhayes Tennis Club yes-
terday evening.

Chenery won the toss. and
elected to serve. He won these
games on a stretch before Harri-



son could get into his stride,
In the second set Harrison





AN UNFAIR RULE
By BOOKIE

THERE are several incidents in racing which
occasionally excite world opinion. Most frequent,
and those which attract the mos: attention, are, un-
fortunately those concerning the “warning” off of
owners or trainers. Jockeys are suspended so often
that very seldom is any particular attention paid to
these cases. There are other instances concerning
jockeys such as the famous fight in the Kentucky
Derby of 1933 which will always live in the history of the turf, F

Of course it was not the first fight Lebeoen jockey$ in a race but
perhaps one of the few which ever took place in a well known classic
between the riders of the first and second horses. Another instance of
an ordinary everyday occurrence in racing being made into a world
wide headline was the disqualification of Craganour in the Derby of
1913. That the fact that a Derby winner had never been disqualified
(at least not immediately after the race) made Craganour perhaps
more famous than if he had simply won the event without protest.

Like the above the incident which I am now about to relate and
comment on may have taken place in racés all over the world for
many years. But I have never seen nor heard of the likes of it in a
well known classic. As will be seen later on, the very fact that it did
happen in a classic will make a vast difference in the future careers
of two horses.

I must begin by saying that although the incident is now nearly a
year old it was through the columns of thet excellent magazine “The
British Racehorse” that I learnt of it. With due acknowledgements
cuentas to the Spring Supplement of this periodical let us get on with
the story.





ee scene is the Chantilly race course in France and the Prix du
Jockey Club (The French Derby) is about to be run. The favour-
ite is M, Jean Stern’s colt Sicambre. Also in the race is another colt
owned by M. Stern, this being Free Man who had only recently won
the French Guineas in the most brilliant style, absolutel running the
opposition off its legs over a mile. Unfortunately for Free Man his
stable consider him only a good miler and a much inferior horse to
Sicambre over a mile and a half.

In fact Free Man is only allowed to take the field because it is
felt that the great Sicambre will need more than one pace maker
which he already has, and the stable now have three competitors in
the race, Free Man is not even given the benefit of a recognised
jockey. A young apprentice is given the ride on him. and one
might rightly assume the reason. An experienced recognised jockey
might want to ride his own race. An apprentice will do what he
is told, or else!

Before going any further a condition in French racing must be
explained. In my opinion, the real culprit in the whole affair, It
is this: in France representatives of the same stable are “coupled”
in the betting, the stable being allowed to win with the horse of its
choice. Under the English rule, and as we do it out here, all horses
are independent in the betting and must run on their merits irrespec-
tive of ownership. Now for the race, and here let Prince V. Wiazem-
ski take over with his account as it appeared in the British Racehorse.

“A young apprentice J. Massard (since first jockey to the Vol-
table) was appointed to ride Free Man. He dashed off with
him: as soon as the tapes were up, letting him stride along with his
fast and powerful speed, but without riding him into the ground.

“At half distance Free Man had a ten lengths clear lead, which
he still kept when the field turned into the straight. Paul Blanc
on the favourite was riding Sicambre with all his strength, but, ap-
proaching the final furlong Free Man was looking a certain winner!
Shouts of ‘stop him, stop him’ . . ‘were heard from the stands, and
finally Massard, obeying and pulling hard on his mount, let P. Blanc
and Sicambre pass to win by a length, himself an easy second in
front of the fast finishing Lavarede, with Pharsale fourth and Mat
de Cocagne fifth.” {he italics are mine.)

Let Prince V. Wiazemski add his final note. “A lot of ink and
print.” he writes, “were spent on this Derby result. To_impartial
onlookers it seemed that belonging to different stables Free Man
should have won easily, but M. Jean Stern and his trainer were
steadfast in affirming that Sicambre is far the better of the two.”





ELL I am several thousand miles from France and nearly a

year has passed since the above took place. I am not in a posi-
tion to argue of the merits of Free Man and Sicambre. I presume
their owner and trainer must know best. But from the above it is
clear that Free Man should have won, and wold have won the French
Derby under different ownership. And having won the Derby, Free
Man would not only have been one of the few who had the double
distinction of being winner of both Guineas and Derby, but he would
be able to command a sire’s fee far in excess of what he now obvi-
ously will, solely because of this. Breeders would probably flock
to him and he might become a champion sire of the future,

Now, simply because his owner and trainer believed him to be
inferior, Free Man will never have another chance to prove that
he was not. Nor would his @wner and trainer be the first so closely
connected with a horse who have proved to be wrong about them.
On occasion good six furlong horses are known to get away with a
mile. But seldom does one hear of good milers getting away with
a race of a mile and a half, especially in good company. And, accord-
ing to all reports, Sicambre was supposed to be a champion.

~ Perhaps, one may opine, Sicambre’s jockey was too complacent
and he was caught napping at the finish. Subsequent events do not
support this. A fortnight later Paul Blane was taking no chances
with Sicambre in the Grand Prix de Paris and coming into the home
stretch he was leading by several lengths and being given his head.
Yet at the finish he was all out and only a neck in front of the

4 avareae, : .
ana as I said before, was the betting rule. This no doubt
was made with the object of avoiding the situation ,where a_ stable
would enter two horses and mislead the public by winning with the
inferior harse in order to get better returns in the betting. On paper
it sounds good enough. For instance if Free Man had won it oe
have made no difference to the “pay-out”. But if in pease. *
allows the stable to regulate the result from the stands, then to a
true horsemen, a rule like this has no place*in the laws of racing.



Leicestershire 161,
India 68—2

LEICESTER, May 10.



Argentinan Tour

EDINBURGH, May 10.
Chairman of Hibernian Football
Club, Harry Swan, gave another
official denial that a contract has

been signed for the Scottish team
to tour Argentina. He saiq “no-
thing definite has yet been decided
regarding the club's proposed visit
to Argentina, Players and officials
of the club are at present on a
playing tour of the continent and
nothing will be done concerning
the decision on the Argentine pro-

The Indian touring cricket team
were 93 runs behind Leicestershire
at the end of the first day’s play
in their three-day match here.

After dismissing the county for
161 in their first innings, the tour-
ists had made 68 for the loss of
two wickets in reply at the close.
At lunch Leicestershire had lost

completing the first round when
she appeared to be sailing very
well. At the end of the first round
Reen was in the lead. Clytie,
second, was 12 seconds ahead of
Gnat. ' »|

Gnat soon went into the lead. service and should have won the
She beat Reen by a minute®Sand™set, but he lost his service and
12 seconds. Mohawk was third from then onwards Chenery was
and Coronetta fourth. on top. Chenery went on to win

In my last article I stated that 7—5. le iil

BEDE DE Dee Be

changed his game and by using
the chop shot and advancing to the
net, worried Chenery considerably.
Harrison led 5—2 in the second
set.

At this stage Harrison had the




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posal until they return.”

This is the second official denial
of the report that a contract has
been signed and issued by club
officials in four days. On Wed-
nesday club manager Hugh Shaw
denied the morning newspaper re-
port saying a contract has been
signed and giving what were
alleged to be details of the deal.

UP.

6 wickets for 49 but Gerald Smith-
son (55) helped first by wicket-
keeper Jack Firth (19) and then
by Australian Jack Walsh (37)
brought about a splendid recov-
ery.

Sadhu Shinde, a leg break
bewler, was the most suecessful
bowler for the {indians taking 3
wickets for 37 ruhs.—U.P,

DUNLO
FORT
CAR TYRES





service

SMOOTHER DRIVING



DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., LTD.

(ECKSTEIN BROS.)







SUNDAY, MAY li, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE

TABLE TENNES + between Renee Gloumesu ‘| LC. Wins Again | MAY 11 — NO. 223



















SSS Eugene Daniel. Miss Danial Was
ne match for her opponent whe J
Â¥Y. MP. C. KNOCK OUT 7, W. C. A, smashed at will. Miss Glouna aul Aft Basketball 9

won 2117, 21—15 and 21-—19.| se al I he Topic ,

IN INTERESTING it was not necessary for the Gna By CALVIN ALLEYNE
singles set between Ann oad PP Re , ; |

MA TCH and Weldina Pilgrim to be “a RESH from their victory over f

played. This would have been an Pickwick in the first match of the oO



By P. A. ¥V. fo each other’s movements and Basket Ball season, Harrison Col-

= , st eae interesting set. 1 aaa t
Y.W.P.C. created a sensation by knocking out ¥.W.C.A., played much potter, ¥WCS "The first match of the night) lose hare = S- Tan: | ‘
when the o: matches of the Dadi ter- ook. "S Se Bene +. —er- was between Adelphi and B@n-} yen School t n Friday nigt ] ; t W k
pening. es Inter-Club Kn From early in the second game ville. Only two Lenville players when they “Ganeaiad the he 5 | as ee

Out competition were played at the Y.M.C.A. Naval Hall on Miss Hoad and Miss Gloumeau iymed up, Marion BatteW:! From the way the College boys |
Friday night..Many people expected that the ¥Y.W.C.A., took the lead. Miss Hoad placed iipper and Gloria Ramsay. The} s.6 playing ,one can predict with
team, after their excellent performance against Queen’s thie Wis eet a es on first set should have bee Mb rair certainty that they will be in |
College in the Inter-Club, competition a few weeks ago, pair to do an extra bit of rune a Caer Ee pon | te last reckoning. ;
would have reached the semi-finals in the Knock-Out. ning atound. Miss Hoad was the ji. w s “Mbagat this put Adelgh rhe two other teams witch play |
However, the Beckles Road to them. Therefore in the semi- more aggressive bul Miss Glou- (Spe lead ’ od SaaS. 8S ee
ton road, With full strength. finals next Friday night Barna meau’s backhand cut shots wor- ? oe PO arin ation itedaad | AOE Sateen Last season Y.M.P.C
formerly Adelphi " Ted” h 5 ey | Canpington tor d the edge, but from the game

» meets phi and Queen’s Col- ri er opponents considerably. 34; B; \ Miss Barrow }

teiean'ts their ranks after a lege will play Y.W.PC. The Beckles Road pair took this Gaighted the crowd with occa-| “cS?ay night when Carlton beat
lang absence. Ann was in good The sensational set of tha gaine to bring Hanows even. ©), a. fae em 22—Z21, it seems that there

‘ ; pa p sional flicks but Miss Carrington a . 4 J oa |
it would “oe which as night was the doubles in the They won the following two tae ala ms in't : lead, She won eee see Se
































































thou the new spectacles which y W.P.C.—Y.W.C.A. match. Ann gwnes to claim the set Seg at at and Mead them, One thing at any rate about
= for the first = in a Hoad and Renee Gloumeau rep- When the doubles set started ~ —~" ~~ eee t o teams bs that, they are |
competition, were great resented YW.P.C. They met and the score was one each. In the \, thn vies Betty Carring- Se er ge ee eee |
assistance. She smashed from defeated Weldina Pilgrim and first set Joyce Jones defeated ,, r aD i ‘Phy lis Chandier beat Col od ‘s win over Pickwick was |

angles and her flicks especi: Ce s aye for Jea wphrey to . > a ay od
were excellent. Sase Se who played = far m count far ¥.W.C.A. open the 4; wm Barrow ane Gloria Ram- t at all surprising. Nor for that |
favoured the 5 sa > Say. The Lenyille pair placed itter was their win over Mod- |
team but - still it patieseble thet 3 Tu In the second set Patsy Hum- e bali well but the Adelphi ) High School: but the latter Se
Oe ee ee ane. Te ae er honours even by sttack was too much for fhém. | jtch was interesting as the spec- | Lou! ul Lou! tell me th
|






Y.W.C.A. should thave givon a girls must ice servi fez 3 This s ste
oa a practice serving tha defeating Bynoe. This set :
, i 5 > Was 1 a + Soi +9, ‘ ors were seeing a somewhat un- nie of Wilkes’ bo
better performance. Even skipper pall to the right half of the'table was not spectacular as both play- Friday night's matches should | '0™" WETe Maule & Soern High Joe’ “twas last Wednesday evening

























Joyce Jones, who met ean if the games are to be continued ers were defensive. However, be very interesting. It is antici- ; e College toyed with toys
Humphrey in the first set, did without numerous interruptions. Miss Humphrey got on a few pated that Queen's College and hoo wiio ae just come up : :
In the first game the Beckles good forehand push shets which Barna, who tied for the Inter- the Sacons 5 Tes Pg, tae ‘ ihockainea err
Road double pair did not get into baffled Miss Bynoe Club Cup with 36 points each, New M.H.S. Team To beat the Harrisonians
their stride. In the latter stages The set which brought will be he finalists. in the Most of the sort Son eee et But not one goal they gained
after having the first set heed this game they got accustomed Y.W.P.C ___ Victory was singles Knoc k-Out Competition, “cage vaay have fott on a oe Tuy thought that Ts ddy Grimt .
PEP LPD DILL DLRLLLLLLAPLAALDPAP APL ALAA ALPLLAALLLPLL LPP LD PPPLDLD. PLPLLLPLPLELPLLLLLPALPLPAA =~} We present team is comparatively Ba just a Teddy bear 9
Editor will win the prize. i ; a aencel ‘ te ie FE gen! cr ae“ ' 4.
3. Entrance fee of one shilling (1/-) must be enclosed with Yet as the game progressed, ea
each solution along with name and address on the coupon everybody was thinking that it ' to she nets thase goals went
printed below. would not be a run over for Col- | ,."7" (ne eae heel aoe cS
4 any nity which is not accompanied by the entrance fee } lege, The een n we ee _ Would destroy a Wibix C A D B U R y’ S
Here is a simple Cross Word puzzle which can help you to will be immediately destroyed, ) fit as the College boys and did | ee [ |
win $25.00 for only one shilling. At the same time ‘om will 5. All entrants for this competition agree to abide by the \ t give them breathing space or OE et Se j
be doing your bit to help send Barbados’ sole Olympic hope to decision of the Editor of the Barbados Advocate. {);@ chance to take a_ comfortable | paul dribbled! Yes he dribble | DAIRY MILK CHOCOLATE
Helsinki next July. Enter now and try your skill. 6. The competition will be closed on Thursday, May 15th at {{ shot at the nets. And on the other | Then Paul “out-dribbled" Paul i
” 4 p.m i hand, they were getting away well | ‘ . : .
RULES 7. All envelopes must be clearly marked CROSS WORD {) with the ball and making attempts | {3° gence nied ie s ee
1. The first correct solution opened by the Editor will win PUZZLE COMPETITION and addressed to the Editor, the {)_ «i the College nets |And Smith the goalie’s broth
the prize. Barbados Advocate, 34 Broad Street. ) But here was the trouble—at-| Upset the Lodge Boys’ plot
2. In the event of there being no correct solution the one 8. The name of the winner will be published in the Sunday | tempts! The Modern boys lack |... love is bad prothn ee
containing the least errors which is opened first by the Advocate of May 18. practice at scoring, are inaccur- | ‘Ss’. (hy pau cne



ate, and this is their chief set back. | no wonder why Lodge hailers
66—A son of Judah od Wild plhun

1 Babylonian Otherwise College would not have | Walked out without a fus,
gitinantal, CNecéksdry elements. R le blow é—Foundation. : is ; beaten them by so wide a margin wading sited: ated ees outhful
1—Who was the father of Blia- Sere 17 g 8—Timothy's grandmoth | Their way about it was not like | When fighting or a nan

70—Sculptured slab.











e Gib- | Au of
saph? bed 19 . i Nan oot College's Gibson’s way, say. of these first class matches
{ 5—Elevate m ries 5 banged on the gal 60— Anglo Indian weight son is swift, piercing and has =) Worth vying on, Sig ee
, ame tie is the South book of the 1—Whip \ shad erected for Mc Formerly leap and a twirl of the finger | "Twill bring out all the mettle g : hw
Testament? ae decai? '4— Honey which seldom fails to get the ball | “dy which strong boys are made
2—Extent ng hogs are made
u—P Prophetic seene of the great 3—Give forth. §2—Pereh 18—Symbo! for neon * into the nets. Gibson is the best /-rwin also place each player
\ at the end of the world 4—Country road, € of a fair lot and his speed makes | Into his rightful grade la d S’ For tifie ar Nf
o 5—Note in the scale. iii ene parr inemes “E577 - im difficult to intercept. Sebi y Pee es | :
Fish Aa oem $—Anbex : ey? gt yj ee ZA vA In the first quarter, Modern put | "WOW" nest to ick ana ‘head 4 New Discc
18—Lairs. eee date. P La cis up a good showing and kept Col-; put Coliege knows the secret y cover y
Titles dhcplinnos: So peceenine to sound. is | TY a | lege in check to ‘the mere lead | They all eat Enriched Bread Do you feel old before your
oathers, 10— Ss th book of the ! 8—6. But after this they FEW | ene forward A die St) rook sive way BOR tb o keer up th .
Une or the places where the erase oe : the combination which had been The Wiole team frank say eos of ey t . ve - Wemen
Lora prophesied great pain 4) Medlies so helpful to them in the first | To play outstanding football, feat or have an inferiority compies? Des i
a 12—One in Asia turned away from ZG quarter to the wind. In this way | Eat J&R Bread gac b aay, | reat a Bh Eater ompR ourous
23—Residence. Paul Uy | 1 ocigt mn at : 4 Men
24— Imitate. saci iede Green | they were routed and College’s | on Thursday the Policemen ee he ee ay ;





26—-Great operatic tenor. 15 sien 1i eo : WY WZ }experience began to show up tO| Were thrashed three goals to one | gland
28—One of David's sons eT shekel” PE ts eye UU, + re yy | idvantage against this dropping | hE ener wae waar = Stimulated, you ean not hap
4¢ 21—Watering place. ’ of! of Modern’s way of playing | Pe eee Saad
ane sunperie- 25—Live coal og 3 parr 35 j}and their evident lack of confi-|'The B.F.F.A. combined wortugaetalige Your Gidnds
+ hs 27—Primary color. or heel And each man marked his man giana artign’ a pasion Wah ah seats’ Shy je
Tropical rodents. 28—Upper garment of Jewish so 7 r — A | a That was the way Policemen } srlecled a Bit as ;
a Eropagate priest Relegation Basy defeat began | i
W— Jewe : Churel the , set { Shak " 14
40—Used scraping tool. vid hurch of the | se nnt . on ee whe weee | Yearwood at right wing cut in j
41—Who was filled with the Holy 20-- Frosted |. | of thei _ a s ft Jair eh a And: land one in the nets |
Ghost? 31 --Mournful seemed ider, I see them holding their | roo hot for Police goalie

42—Ruin a9 wn in a fair way, but the only | Both tired and soaking wet



Russian independent unior


























43— Peculiar 98 Fortents. }rueful thing is that with this}, joys: me BFA }
$4—Hiazarder 36-— Weird relegation business, it may be a@| Can kill any team stone dead FOR rs Jt ee te BAe 2 onrae
fo— Days in the week. 39—Donatea ttle too late i Those boys like all the small clubs : > keen aur woe ,
ae . two. shat story form J , 2 el Pa & RB Enrichee reac aliziny © joys an
a hye aaa ae a tory form did Jesus } In the other match on Friday Fat J & I ¥ ch in 4 | realizing the em fd Bicasi
48—Languid. = lnieht, Pickwick had everything | one tast word boys remember : 1%,
She-BY Senet Hee did Ezekiel see hil their own way against For- ; Don't left Ka0d things undone Z Doctor Prois ses Vi-Tobks |
visions of God . 2 oral Jain now with Joe abe nysielun, fh66 { , ;
$3— Auditory organ. NAMO weer ne yed eee sinc pesanees | ae apt beat oR... ah wh Ang, hel ihe, Tapio, Png \ tara unin tee an Soest
os niin ckname. tady player, for Pickwick, Mrs. |Help with the Crossword euasia \ glands € could Keep ¢ "¢ nied
5 Mae die aOR EAT catalan an Jean Mc Kenzie and for Fortress |,.0° ,elr in )oun gum v8 venta tauveer ene ia toate Lenaet Ui uunand Br ie eae as
token that he had nv rebponsi- Addvess ............ 0c ees eeeeee Miss Beryl Walton, The combin= | je1p rarnum Fund to-day { on my years of experion mt e) enee i of
a in the conviction of ition of Mrs. Me Kenzie’s skill b nee "10 kr one
6a—Crippled Ruka bas ae 40h 4 ee alee es Hicks eel race eat Recunacy sponsored by Kiarantee BEC Vi-Tabs Ue
63— Forte earth. . saree “Oe g y pied th an
ERG Fe ey ne) Siena’ Lake Saws Fhe entitle e Ret $9 A271 feating their opponents. eye | J&R BAKERIES gle xh
ih ’ . ~ “ cored 14 and Miss Mc Kenzie 10. iH “
ENTIRE PROCEEDS TO FARNUM FOR FINLAND FU. This week, H.C.0.B. will meet | k . A vairout a vere
Entries can be posted or delivered to the “Ad vocate Stationery” or Advertising Office ariton, eae - P prob ck, | makers © 24- Hour Results urn
rortress, rates = | use Vi-Tabs Y ’ ‘ °
| scion 4 wall be ‘ d Get Teds from
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PAGE SIX











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Sewing
Circle

| By PENNY NOLAN

If you wish to make a bathing
| suit using last week’s bra founda-
tion for the top, the panty foun-
dation described this week will
be suitable for the underpants.
Add a circular or semi-circular
short skirt and you have a pretty
and comfortable bath suit.

The panty draft can be made
from the top part of your basic
skirt draft. If you haven't drafted
basic skirt you may draft a hip
sectian for the panty draft as
follows: Measure your waist and
divide the measure by four. Add
one inch for dart to the result.
From the top left hand corner of
the paper measure down three-
fourths of an inch and make
point A. From A measure to-
ward the right in a slight curve
the quarter waist measure plus
the dart allowance to touch the
top of the paper making point\B.
Locate the dart three inches from
A on the curved line.

From A measure down the lgit





hand edge of the paper six and a
quarter inches and make poiut.C.
Square a line from C measuring
one-fourth your hip measure to
make point D. Connect D to B.
Place point of dart three and one
half inches from C on C D line
Cut this hip foundation out and
pin in the dart, Trace Trace on a
larger sheet of paper. Continue
the C D line down eight inches
more to make point E. Continue
the A C line down eight and one
half inches to make point F, Con-
nect F to E with a slight curve.
From F measure up toward C
three and one half inches and
make point G. Mark one and one
half inches on one leg of yur
square and place that mark on G
| with the square pointing toward
the left and the other leg on F,
make H at the square corner, Con-
tinue G H line four and one half
inches to make I. From I square
down a line one and one half
inches to make J. Connect J to

F with a slight curve. From G
measure up one and one half
inches and make K. Connect H

to K with a slight curve to round
off the corner, Pe

Add seams all around.

The same pattern is used for
both the front and back, Cut the
centre front and centre back
seams on the bias. You may make
two ecpies of the foundation and
putting them together at the side
seams cut panties without side
seams having only the centre front

and centre back and_ crotch
seams to sew,
For briefs shorten the side

seams but rarely does the .crotch
need shortening.

You may run elastic though
a casing in the bottom of the legs






SUNDAY

Vhat’s Cooking
In The Kitcherz

Have you ever tried making
éclairs? [his is an easy recipe
and it dows make a change.
FRENCH PARTY FOR EVCLAIRS

AND CREAM BUNS.
Flour 2 oz.

1 gill cold water or
1 oz, butter
2 Egg yolks.
Pinch of salt.

milk

Put the butter. the water andj

salt into a small saucepan. When
it boils sift in flour. Always
blirring keep the saucepan on
the fire until the mixture will

come off the sides of the sauce-
pan, Remove saucepan from fire,
then add the egg yolks one at a
time and the egg whites. Beat
each time you add the yolks and
the whites. Let the mixture cool.
If you want to make cream buns,
shape the mixture into balls and
bake in moderate oven for about
1 hour. When baked let the buns
cool then slit the side and fill
with whipped cream flavoured
with vanilla. If you want to make
eclairs instead of water put milk
in the pastry. When the mixture
is cool force it out of a forcing
bag or icing syringe on to a but-
tered greaseproof paper in 6 inch
long fingers. Bake for 30 minutes
then let them cool. When cold
make a slit on each side and fill
with whipped cream (sweetened)
or chocolate cream. Ice with cof-
fee or chocolate icing.

Another recipe for cream cara-
mel, It is very easy and it is such
a nice sweet to offer any of your
friends on these very hot nights.

CREAM CARAMEL
l cup sugar
} cup water
3 Eggs
2 cups of milk
1 teaspoonful Vanilla
essence,
This recipe is for 3 or 4 people.
Burn 4 cup of sugar with half
cup water. By burning I do not
mean to burn itt as much as if
you were making colouring. As
soon as the sugar has become a
nice golden colour pour in a bit
at a time into the tins or moulds
you want to use for the cream car-
amel. Tip it very quickly until it
covers the bottom and the sides
of the tins. Pour the 2 cups of
milk into a saucepan, add the
sugar (4 cup) and let it get
warm; mind it does not boil.
Beat the eggs and stir the milk
and sugar into them, Mix well
by beating the mixture again and
pour into the tins or moulds.
Place the tins into pyrex dishes
filled with water and let them

bake in a moderate oven until
the cream caramel looks firm.
Let the tins get cold, then puv

into frigidaire and let it get real-
ly cold. Turn into dish before
serving,

If you like you can sprinkle
the cream caramel with minced
roasted almonds or nuts,

c °
Recipes
Readers of the Barbados
Advocate are asked to send in
recipes for publication. These

recipes will ba published over a
od of one month after which

ime a poll will be held and con

tributors will be asked to decide
the best recipe of the month.
The winner will be awarded a
prize, Each entry must be accom-
anied by the following coupon.
'O: THE WOMEN’S EDITOR,
ADVOCATE.

NAME:

ADDRESS:

RECIPE NAME:

or shin them with several rows

of elastic thread. In using elastic
thread wind it loosely on the bob-

bin. It wears better if used
double, Use a loose tension and
be sure to tie off the ends
securely.

AND YOU CANT
G2 WRONG!

The regular use of
Lanalol Hair Food
will, by its action on
the roots and scalp,
nourish every hair
gland and encourage
richer growth. It
provides nourishment
to the scalp and hair
roots and corrects
such troubles as

DANDRUFF
PARTIAL BALDNESS
THIN & FALLING HAIR

ADVOCATE





SUNDAY, MAY 11, 1952

iil oan A Curse On




















PASSPORT TO BEAUTY

By DOROTHY BARKLEY

Do you ever feel you want ex-
pert advice on your own personal
beauty problems but don't know

how to set about it? It is all very
well, you think, for those in town

with money—to visit one of the
famous beauty salons in Bond
Street or its parellel in any capi-
tal. But how can those not in
town get the personal advice and
treatment they want?

Now, through the Beauty Club
of Great

Britain,’ many women
are receiving the kind of per-
sonal advice they want and with-
out leaving their own homes—for
a guinea a year. Fer the exchange
of questions and answers between

the club’s beauty exvert and the
members is carried on by post.

Any weman, from the age of
seventeen to seventy can, without
spending a great deal of money,
look attractive; for attractive
women fre made, not born, This
is the belief of the founder of tha
club, Mrs. Phyllis Digby Morton,
wife of the London dress designer,
and herself an authority on
beauty. And it is proving a
stimulating thought to women in-
tent on improving their appear-
ance, Already in the few months
ince it¢ founding, the club mene
bership has passed the five-
hundred mark.

What do members learn through
the club? On joining, they fill in
a personal “record card” and
send this with a photograph to
Mrs. Morton.

Mrs. Morton then sends back
a report and analysis of their
beauty problems, together with a
“prescription” advising correc-
steps to be taken, As an indepen-

dent adviser, she is in a position
to give unbiased views on the
right choice of preparaticns and

treatment, and does not suggest
cosmetics merely because the
» wame”’ is well-known.

Mrs. Morton has already
arranged many postal beauty
courses, Every aspect is given
attention—skin care and make-
up, hair care and styling, figure
problems, and poise and dress
sense, (two aspects of beauty too
often neglected). Effective hcme
treatments are suggested, and all
postal courses are worked out to
meet the individual needs from
the personal beauty club record.

The membership card is becom-
ing a passport to charm. For
London beauty specialists are
offering concessions to members.
A hairstylist and a+salon have

=
s
=





‘BAHAMA

in gay ¢

both announced a 10% reduction
to members. And the advantage
of even a single salon treatment
is that the correct method learned
there from expert fingers can be
remembered always.

Already planned are once-a-
week evening meetings at the
London centre. Members’ will
receive advice from a woman
chiropodist on the prevention or
cure of ‘housewives’ feet”; from
a corsetier, on why this corset
does that to the figure; and from
a tailor, on “lines” suitable for
different figure types.

Mrs. Morton is hoping to start
local branches up and down the
ccuntry and to employ travelling
lecturers who will talk on topical
subjects,

And all this for a very reasona-
ble annual subscription.

The Club is still in its infancy.
But it has already received
enquiries from abroad. For it is
a universal fact that stimulation
of self-interest—through a* club
such as this—is the vital first step

towards improving looks and
appearance,
Remember that, while some

women are born attractive, others
ean also acquire attractiveness.

The Eyes Have It

Not spectacles, not glasses—
but “eyewear”; for that is the
new terminology. Opticians have
now turned a _ professional eye
towards the problems of women
—there are eleven million of
them in Great Britain—who wear
“spectacles”. And they set out to
prove in a display at a fashiona-
ble Mayfair restaurant that ‘“‘spec-

INTELLIGENCE TEST

TWELVE
RODS

By T. 0. HARE

|
5
"TWELVE metal rods of the i
same length can be fitted
together to form (as in the
diagram) a hexagon and its
diagonals. Each rod is to be
coloured red, white or green.
and they are to be so fitted
together that each of the six %
triangles which the hexagon §
comprises ts to have one red 5
side, one green one, and one §&
white one, :
How many hexagons can be &
constructed in this way which i
are distinguishable from one &
another ? $

‘ scncsesneescescnssenscacssscussccnesnenserd!

p2enennzeuserenescocsaseseusesarsonus

Vividly gay,

audaciously

tacles” can be an asset to beauty,
not a liability.

Here are a few of their tips for
“spectacles” without tears. Eye-
wear must be keyed in colour to
eyes, to make-up, to hair, to
hats. So it can be any colour, any
shape and is often “jewel’-
studded. (see illustrations.) Eye
make-up must be dramatic, with
more-than-usual mascara and
eye-shadow. “Forelocks” should
be tinted to tone in with the
“spectacles.” And diamante studs
on “spectacles” must be repeated
on your dress.

There is eyewear for every
oceasion, for office, for sport, for
glamcur. But a problem arises
now, If, as a spectacle wearer,
you are limited to one pair,
would you choose a pair for office,
for sport or for glamour,

Wedding
Etiquette

The names of divorced parents
should not appear together on an
invitation, but it is perfectly
permissible for a bride to be



given in marriage by _ her
divorced father if she so desire,
even though her mother, with

whom she lives, has married
again,
The nvitations should be

issued by the mother only, but
the reception cards should be in
the name of the mother and her
second husband, since he will
act as host for the reception.
The bride’s father (under these
circumstances) retires by a_ side
aisle to a rear pew, after giving
her in marriage at the altar.

If the bride is not close to her
own father however, she may be
given in marriage by ther step-
father or by an uncle, Invita-
tions or announcements may be
sent in both the mother’s and
stepfather’s name if the step-
father is to sponsor the bride
through her entire wedding.

The invitations may even read
“Request the honour to your
presence at the marriage of their
daughter,” if the bride’s own
father is out of the picture. If
the bride+to-be lives with her
father, he should sponsor her
maryjage. The mother may or
may Trot attend the wedding.



Our Daily
Bread

By NEVILLE SCHULER,
O.D., D.Se.

Heart disease remains the
greatest killer in every civilized
country. In every civilized coun-
try because enough emphasis has
never been placed upon the alarm-
ing increase in heart disease co-
incident with the discarding by
the millers, some thirty years ago,
of Vitamin E in processing flour.
Housewives have mistakenly ac-
cepted the idea that flour must be
white to attain purity. The insane
thought has taken hold that bread
must be white, and rice must also
be white, in order to reach per-
fection and wholesomeness in diet.

Surely this point is proven by
the fact that in undeveloped
countries throughout the world,
where the native population eats
whole grain only, the incidence of
heart disease is infinitesimal. Thus
in the so-called civilized countries
every man, woman and child is
to some extent deficient in Vita-
min E, Ag this vital factor is
grasped .by doctors and their
parents, more and more individu-
als realise its importance, and
until this fraction is put back into
our daily bread we must resort tc
isolated Vitamin E (alpha toco-
pherol) in combatting by a natural
method the widespread hold that
cardio-vascular-renal diseases ex-
ercise on its a of the lily-
white-for-purity Yad,

A recent visit to Canada served
to impress in an indelible manner
what one saw and heard. Dr.
Evan Shute, of The Shute Founda-
tion for Medical Research, again
produced unassailable evidence
pertraying numerous patients dur-
ing the course of treatment. On
the other hand, Dr. Shute and his
associates were given a first hand
account of the phenominal success
of Vitamin E in Great Britain
where every month it is more
widely prescribed under the Na-
tional Health Service.

In the U.S.A. there are scores
of brands of Vitamin E, manufac-
tured from the same type of con-
centrates as used in England, for
instance, Most of them, however,
consist of mixed tocopherols, and
since it is the alpha factor alone
that counts in fixing the high
dosage so essential for the success-
ful treatment of cardio-vascular-
renal diseases, it follows that the
vast majority of patients submit-
ted to these brands containing an
inadequacy of the alpha factor
rarely respond. Herein lies the
reason for some practitioners hav-
ing recourse to the statement “I
have not met with much success
etc. etc.” It can therefore be
taken for granted that the Vitamin
E position in America will con-
tinue to be confused until Wash-
ington sees fit to follow Canada’s
example by introducing a regula-
tion whereby every brand of ©
must be labelled in terms of in-
ternational units.

Vitamin E, the anti-sterility
vitamin, was originally prescribed
in obstetrical cases alone, but in
massive doses it has been found
successful in the treatment of
heart, kidneys, diabetes, Buerger’s
disease, all grouped under the

head of cardio-vascular-renal
diseases in modern practice.

The daily application of this, Hair
Food results unfailingly in a really
beautiful glossy head of hair.

LANALOL No.1! With oil (Yellow
Label) for dry scalp.

LANALOL No. 2 Without oil (Green {
Label) for hair that is naturally oily —
astringent and sols

LANALOL CREA (Blue Label). A

lossy hair ones,
LANALOL SOLIDIFIED (Bakelite
box). An ideal fixative.

LANALOL SOAP SHAMPOO (Red
Label). A liquid soap de luxe. |

plies the important food essentials needed for
babies to grow strong and healthy. And KLIM is
teadily digested—another important feature.

» Above all, KLIM is dependable. It’s not surprid-
ing that so many Mothers prefer it!

1. KLIMis pure, safe milk



2. KLIM keeps without refrigeration



Tt . e
Lanal

3. KLIM quality is always uniform Local Distributors:



the fashionable woman wears

4. KLIMis excellent for growing child a ee ee
% s excelle r growing c ren ES 10 THE ROOT Foop \ Made by C. & J. Clark Ltd, (Wholesale on'y) Street, Sumerset, England ( YS E R ~
(Barhaden) TAA... of % tae Taooau LOCAL AGENTS: ALEC RUSSELL & CO., BARBADOS “ \ atest qekings
B. O. Box 27.

5. KLIM adds nourishment to cooked dishes

a ~

—

Just received







PI aa







KLIM 1S RECOMMENDED FOR INFANT FEEDING!
i)

7. KLIM is safe in the specially-packed tin

At the sound of the fire alarm, your first though............ !

Where Is The Fire ?

Is it your house, furniture, stock, going up in smoke?

Are You Covered ?

If not this will be a total loss to you. Be prudent!



GLADIOLUS and DAHLIA
“BULBS ”

STOMACH
PAINS

DUE TO INDIGESTION

8. KLIM is produced under strictest control

ay water,



Also .
The new





10 HORMONE VITAMIN........








Spo Sas etter n ete SOLUTION TABLETS...... ‘Act now!’ Insure your house, FURNITURE and
. of MACLEAN BRAND ST i \ :
add KLIM, stir STOMACH POWDER! This For Plants. ..... OCK without delay. Tomorrow, even now you
+ scientifically balanced formula Each Tablet makes 2 Gallons of Solution .................. may be too late.
and you have pure, safe milk uickly relieves Stomach Pains,

These wonderful Tablets bring out the best results from your
garden.

latulence, Heartburn, Nausea
or Acidity due to Indigestion.

L. M. B. MEYERS & CO, LTD.,
P.O. Box 171, Bridgetown.

Ring, call or consult............

NEW INDIA ASSURANCE C0, LTD.

Agents: Haynes and Griffith, High St.—4173






Obtainable at:—

BOOKER’S (B’dos) DRUG STORES LTD.
BROAD STREET and HASTINGS (Alpha Pharmacy)

pure

KLIMâ„¢: MILK

FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER

Copr. 1950
Borden Co.
Internat’! Copr.
Heserved

























SUNDAY, MAY li, 1952



SUULLDOARUERORSORT HUH) 11 ODOR REY

vente neon

















SUNDAY ADVOCATE

DE MILLE DISSOLVES





COMPANY















PAGE SEVEN















m + + ” es i
NOT QUITTING MANNING'S CORNER STORE MODERN DRESS SHOPPE£| ~
= jhave a new and unique service 2nd value beyon« compare— |
2S Frem NEWELL ROGERS. fm all civilised countries. Marting around May 15. It's a yes, it's here again > fantasti
Deen : N wisecrack either. The}? Rental Service of good qué DOLLAR SALE bargains
Cecil B —, vous ey. ph his luxurious baths SRocnty ¢ LASSES ame gl aver shelf oom
lect! B. de ille, who made a 2... » tile bathroom a “must” in Tg = or your next Wed- Spun Hat ies 2 for $i ellow
fortune cut of screening beautiful 2” a. ecicag -home, even during} {7% Reception or Party, Any- Dusters 4 for $1. Travelling Face
tax colleciors that they are no} > ;, jactiver to your instructions and igs 2 for $1. Rubber Swim Hat
= fener one moke @ tirtena ae ee ae ee eee = 8 remarkably low rate 2 for $1. Several hundred Wal-
ES . Bapal yherever & phone call t ir . . $ lets « 7 AC Ever seen any-
: Cc Oo N WAY ons of SHR. =e ‘ecil B. de turned, Egyptian bathing beauties} will solve yest pee un ly thing like aoe you haven't! S
= He has dissolved Cecil. » < climbed in and out of the Nile. and surely. A good idea is t¢ Jump through that doorway first
IN ANY LIST of London's Mille Productions it is ~ He tackled Bible stories when] reserve your requirements “now thing Monday and you’ll see lot
10 es scpal corporation. Members Of -atigion. was a strict Hollywood|for this most useful service will 21d lots more ;
most intelligent stage his family “were the directors. 556 if you are old enough, you|be in great demand ° . *
actresses, American - born Its chief asset was his contract The T Command P L R
= . . ae emember “The Ten - De GRASSE is “France Afloat”
ee te = __ meh Peseta movie prodacer Rs It set boxeMee reeO] an ORrewtaL, STONE. of Ne overt Mette an, erent
: : 7 : . the ‘twenties, : 2 of every evening an occasion, every
place. To-night’s first night said: “Corporate income taxes. '" Surti United have received ; ssi ing |
y . : a a ee nee hs 4 é he “ . ed an all passing moment unfolding magic
mings hast MISS CUMMINGS Jimmy Jewel, Simone qunere uses taxes, franchise ieee He followed this with “The a Cargo of Tortoiseshel] and of dreams in a world of talands |
hada theatre Doilphen, Ben Warriss in ; and : her taxes didn’t le&V® King of Kings”—still being shown |>“"dlewood Boxes and wooden and ultra-marine and sapphire.
ae for 6 i em Suara revue, Soe nt he acai = in churches. More recently there’ Sans ietveadh oe tien ie €x- And old gold. This beautiful |
BENN LEVY, t, opens j nem s , _ has been his modernised “Sign $e icg j Y craftsmanship is ship of the French Line is mak-~}
vere LEAVES FE TQ ne) (Re eee gatos HOD: of ie Cross” anc “Bamaon and gee eat gh mags of the fll~ ‘ng! regular “trelve of our ene : elilah” s elvet Bags on .c “ili won re
major drama- : 7 ? isn’t he the man who started the Deileh’ 7 " and Bracelets of Ivory, Gthicken - ie npiying com sox pe aes ;
tists. Among The Happy Time, has belied its place back in 1913 because it q To him the secret of a successful] ingerbowls and Agaghatiios han to book with R. M. Jones |
bis services to title at the box-office. (I liked rained too much in Flagstaff, film W 90 simple. “Love: boy (burning scent sticks) and Kash- - wos Bae a 4 ee |
Ea best ane it; not enough other playgoers Arizona? Siiain ties — hero versus }mir Wool Carpets bring the {id not the least of the pleasures
writing or pro- did.) He stopped at Flagstaff, at the “ain. Everything else is just}exotic East into the Island of {oon 4 h er yt
ducing—some- Gums Sisto bow vestare, falied “ nmings.” Barbados—present it to you! you'll find is the low cost. |
iiss’ Gureatee Ly Lee Ciemeks diese yo gale To the rescue — though not half a barn for a studio and saad Finished with Hollywood? Said + m
re mm ings . ° + until April 3—comes rival man- “The §s, en he - de Mille: “I’ve no intention of . ; 3 {
umstance and flourish. = 2 - ‘ 2 Squaw Man for 15,245 ; HOUSEHOLD STORE WHERE
But the iast play Return to = me s tan ager, Sub - Tenant HENRY qollars (£6,444). ing myself from a business] ~, GEDDES GRANT LTD. are THERE'S NEARLY EVER r= |
Tyassi, faiied undeservedly, I k he was fi an SHEREK. He will reopen the Today 69 pictures later, 1 vhich I've allotted 50 years of J ne distributors of B-H PAINTS ‘THING YOU COULD THINK OF, I
, ate » + Edgar Wallace whodunit, in- Ss; jJames’s with another Ameri- has jyet made « Re ae ale life.” (He practically founded | This : nae : ee ae stocked with dreamed I went
thougat. This week Mr. Levy stead acting Sha . r has just made “The Greatest Shbv . This Brandram-Henderson pro- very m« n and stockec
is rehearsing his new comedy of kespeare. And can play CLIFFORD ODETS'S on Earth” for 4.000 000 dollar the movie industry in 1912 with Jauct literally covers the whole bigh quality not too pricely pro- ‘
Cupid and Psyche: his wif sas I would need to be a mind- winter Journey. (£1,428,000). In betwen. tts pic- Jess Ly Lasky, a variety agent, }iield of Enamels, Varnishes ana cucts. That’s what you want isn’t} to a formal in
, yenhe: wue re reader to answer my opening ere © simuk-6 riube . ee de ce : . end Samuel Goldwyn, a glove[Paints. You know that it , it? Well here it is at K. R
mains at home, still jobless This is the drama about a rui- tures have grossed nearly 600,000- it pays to
Instead, the’ wo sab star is question: Wolfit, if and when he {o-seeq stage star and his de- 600 dollars (£214,285.700)-——more *“2es™#n)- seep things painted only if you HUNTE & CO. LTD. on Lower * ’
PEGGY CUMMINGS Teo chooses, can be the soul of tact. yoted wife. MICHAEL RED- than any three other directors What next, then oe man? ,. [ase top quality materials Look Broad St. In all things Electric, WhttUul li OsTNS
the sane aeellion onal differ- 3 GRAVE. GOOGIE WITHERS combined. He developed more Helen of Troy, that’s what’s}at a B-H Shade Card, It’s got in Garden Furniture and Office
and Sar 8, ta the Excitement ? Intense and New York actor - producer stars than any other producer. next, And Hollywood is betting }everything you could ask for or Furniture, in Clocks and Watches o/® .
ae ee a Sore A » SAM WANAMAKER have bee . Sree 7 aes “er. that in de Mille’s super-colossal | }ope for to lighten and brighten and Jewellery, too, K. R. HUNTE .
SAM W ER have been His trad king
husband wants to see Constance It has cost £60,000, are ; : . race Is making super moja, war Helen will have a{2 room, passageway or house. & CO. LTD. have presented a new Maide: Ss -
Cummings --acting again: Ben caearing @xeiting the provinces with it. colessals. His trade-mark is a san wer ‘ atin thane tie a ’ . Daan eres } Maidenette Strapless bra
» Be Oe ee ee, ee Pee the, Tepneeanios | ge long as London joins in the beautiful girl or girls bathtubs, SUper-colossal bath. Leading Hardware Stores have it store with new stock and it's for
Levy the playwright refuses t9 TOM ARNOLD and EMILE excitement, the Oliviers should Said de Mille: ‘ ie airestact ind so, most certainly should you. you to walk right in and look and

compromise artistically by in-

Pacific Profits

LITTLER — watching fhe tired

ways to earn a living,”

said the

unpractised speaker at a Critics’

—L.E.S.






14

Kvpress Service.



admire and if you feel like it— Ifa big oceasion is on vour atk

reset a. aed 5 aa > able ake sir srican bathtub scenes which were 1u-
venting a part for her which the company of 100 file out of the P© able tw take their American 1% ee Were inne - wy!
play doesn’t require, —— tee door this morning. holiday next month without ential in changing washing habits [NTELLIGENCE TEST SULUTION C. S. PITCHER & CO. are soll buy! 6 é * endar, this dream of a bre-lg
j is j : ; rrying. coapramenae Ainmae -- , ‘ : S. , he » are sell- nad > Mtoe
' He is quite right, of course— They were off for a few hours wrryns Circle lunch — where far too cysie onder 12.84.58 "tnen ing in daily ‘increased demand COLE'S GARAGE AND HILL- designed for you! Maidendtfe
but ag ss We are not rest before curtain-rise. ee many werds were spoken We Ca Ne as he newest of new fertilizers— MANS so I dropped in to tell Strapless is the most fashion-
s ~ rc Scec 7, “ee . l ane pc 2 an 4 rn a. it’ J oy ’ 7 . . Ae > 1 s sor-
Seen wie Liteame sel gates Muar vce 2 same be dem Met Hewes the ets” trom 30 vin? S86 SASER: [10s LIQUINURE, 9 blghly con Dorian Ta decided and twas st- | able party-goor ever! Wonder
. ; : um rt; t x a ment entralec anc ully yalanced ry, when he unveiled before m
j Miss Cummings can safely be models over the audience.” con- iL , A= Covent Garden, simost sulping (b) 13. 8 (say) red. 2, 4. 6, (say) Liquid Manure for general use unbelieving eyes that gem of ail ful under bare- shouldered
3 lef’ h I hope Dame NINETTE with nervousness at first, who bite. three arrangements; oe ; : 7 :
e eft at home for another season. fided the Designers. DE VALOIS has heard how 24- ra (¢) 1 and @ red. 2 and 6 white in the Garden. And it wont harm convertibles the new HILLMAN evening clothes or covktail
\ If this star’s husband oanmot “Five hundred costumes, one ir RERYL, GREY suoia by ae = oe, to her sub- 4 and 5 green and similarly 1 and foliage. Full strength for trees MINX in quartz blue and red up- Greases, Maidenette” Strapirs
; think up a suitable part for her, and a half million spangles,” 2 oe aia Sadler’s Wells credit ant _ emerged the orator- and 4 fan be tinomenis °F | and shrubs; medium for yvegeta- jolstery. Slickly chromed and aeoeere ee ¢ apiess,
' won’t some rival dramatist come chimed in the Wardrobe Mis- Dp aoe th " ~ he — The Valois training (d) 4 3. 5 {say) red. 2 (say) bles and border plants and weak }jack-hooded I looked and 1 gives excellent firure contrel,
to the rescue? tress. the ~~ . by far the ‘ee Ora Tiethate, te Wee wh “er and window drooled. It's the most beautiful; Dainty insets make it extra f
« Miss Grey was RLD 3 " 4 % OXES So ere you are— of them all, | verily believe. And bade, | Be he :
‘Of course, there are easier youngest, and certainly the most RESERVED ante shore can, be 13 dlstinawlet- 1 IQUINURE from Pitcher’s” Dh. this to the engine that covered | sine: featherdight bo p

472 and watch youf garden grow 19.500 miles early this year in 21 ports your curves lrom beiow.

. ‘. Producer ROBER'’ NESBITT, , . : ns
Cupid and Psyche is being — 6th em . a 5 eben + then, by jings. doys — from London to Capetown. In white or black in \ our Laver
presented in London by hate to try any of them,” he * * What’s the betting you’re going ite fabrics
OSCAR HAMMERSTEIN an@ gaged a eats | tee to buy? 5 Genuine Maid
RICHARD ROGERS—with some lunch and sleep after 40 hours | ADVOCATE STATIONERY a . ° e ree ee oF

of the sterling they have earned,

nearly non-stop in the theatre.



yome and a home from home for

BARBADOS FOOD PRODUCTS of America,



are still earning, at Drury Lane. t Books. In Broad Street and in their : ; :
That is a useful way to spend And, after all the preparation . Village Shop in Balmoral Gap it’s *'°, "@pidly inereasing sales of There is a Watden Kam
their South Pacific pocket- and the cost, what will the .| Books galore! The Phaidon Edition ‘eir hygenically grease proot a hebieadnes ta ans
i money. If the play is a success Customers say in a few hours’ (i! f French Impressionists in full wrapped Home Cured Bacon and | SL ae ry type od |
; and goes to Broadway, Messrs. ‘time, when Excitement—the 4th 5 olour—Gardening, Travel, Fic- Hams. You must really see the 00.4, 8, bar. one
i H. and R. will send the dollar Latin Quarter Revue — makes ~ tion and Children's SBaples. — “ns ee arden a Stes th
j : : “e Statione: ; Gener: ardware § af
i profits back to England I callthat its premiere bow? They will gpRIOUS LOVER writes, “My me, but 1 do not know if he is much in love. Yet if I ever talk bchentie "Carter pine, —. 4918). Prices are best = sown’



even more useful,

In the cast with the g-less
Miss Cummins: HUGH SIN-
CLAIR, RONALD WARD and
ALEXANDER KNOX,

It is only just that Canadian-
born Mr. Knox should be in-
cluded, He was given a thor-
oughly obnoxious role in Mr.

merely say if they

show is funny enough.

Awkward
right.

the two funniest men
business—JIMMY JEWEL
BEN WARRISS — have been 4,

customers,
first-night audiences;

these

and

think the hoy friend went to America ten
months ago, and has not written
F me since Xmas, although I have
but quite written to him several times. I
That is why, this time, have heard that he believes I’m
in the girting with other fellows—which
is not true.

Should I write again

wait until he returns next

brought in to go with the one June?”
and a half million spangles, And ¢

serious. Please help me.”

It does seem to me, my dear,
that you do not know your own
mind as yet. Obviously the jeal-
ous boyfriend wants to have lots
of fun and variety himself and
will not, allow you the same.
Really, I advise you not to be too
serious with anyone of them just
yet. You are quite young and

with another fellow, he gets
jealous and says he will leave me.
When [| explain he gives me an- |,
other chance, Must 1 let
continue? Please tell we what to
do. f
My dear, when two people are
in love and going steady for as
long a8 you too have been, little
pett jealousies do rear their

so

this} packing now and there’s no doubt,

just look at these: Streaky Bacon
$1.15; Back Bacon $1.20; Shoulder
Hams $1.10; Leg /1.30, No parking

problem here either, Barbados

Food Products are deserving a Is YOUR

very high recommendation indeed. WARN j N GI
s

VPVOPPPELPL LEE PPOF FEES

Just Arrived

ind Diaries. And this dream of
1 Pen—the PARKER '§l. A huge
1ew shipment of Books is un-
you'll

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SFOS OO
$





Levy’s last play; set goed it so to help out the Nudes. Do write to him, my dear, and have plenty of time to look around ugly heads, Have a heart to heart pure,
loyally and well that au aie make it clear that you are not you and make your own decis- talk with this boy of yours, Ex- APEX HAIR PREPARATIONS fresh wing to every nerve and
—the few who came—cordially To the Rescue carrying on a flirtation while he is ions in due course. plain that even though you love JOHNSON’S BABY OIL muscle, blood stream is heavy with
loathed him. When Return To Sir LAURENCE OLIVIER @W@Â¥. Perhaps this is the reason , him truly you. must have a cer- KLP.| RAZOR BLADES waste and acids. Then you feel rotten.
Tyassi flopped, Mr. Knox for his silence, .However, my To EE, (St. Michael.) you will toim amount of life of your own. PLAS c ss. Half a gutury’s experiance: and
promptly returned to America, 7A acts on aed as a dear, do not cheapen yourseif by have to be most tactful indeed 18 §o long as you are not being un- OLEARSPE tissues for keeping lens of bee Pills cui is prove
roe audiences have loved him a St tect mat throwing yourself at him. Re- wile renee a ze could “sues faithful to him, I see no reason vasa Vance tae 2 8 oe pm
ears. ’ is ike, r ather a ¥& etween our us- , % excess acids
my is pining a Weet End theatre— ™enper that men don't like, or 2 why you should not have good YOUR DRUG STORE. blood is clear—your backache disappears

Dept. of Tact

Show - Question of the
week: What did DONALD

WOLFIT, possibly our finest
King Lear think of those Old

pretend they don’t
women who chase them.

the one Sir GEORGE ALEXAN- payer?
DER used to run. But while the
dollars accumulate, Olivier’s St. CLS. writes, “My boyfriend is
Jame’s Theatre is closed this 4 jealous man and makes a big
month—which must be an €X- noise if — go out with any other
pensive shock for the absent im- poy Yet he goes out with other

band and yourself, Example, my
dear, is the best method of get-
ting results, Get him to read to
you aloud sometimes. Become in-
terested in grammar etc. yourself
and if he sees you reading and
concentrating on it, it may well

friends around and about. Again,
my dear, these long engagements
are not good for either of you.
Aren’t you thinking of getting
married soon? It would be very
go00d for both of you, you know,
if you are really and truly in love.

THE

Phone; 4441 or 2041
SISOS AOE

fet
et

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Vic notices? presario. . girls and seems to think I should arouse his interest. iil vinkinecwonpbigiaibiays iddminaiiasciial
i It was just before Lear went It had a bad Christmas je pleased about it. Another boy- ROSALYN G. writes, “I and Jf you too need advice write
into rehearsal that Mr. Wolfit— season, now the American play friend of mine in Curacao writes my boyfriend are going steady ‘0 Mrs. Clarke, c/o the Editor,

with his wife, ROSALIND IDEN he sent over to hold the fort, tg me regularly and says he lovesfor 17 months and we are very





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PAGE FIGHT

BARBADOS eM ADVOCATE

Caw rt ee es SS



<== wee

Sunday, May 11, 1952

HELP YOURSELF

SELF-HELP housing in the Caribbean
is now Officially recognised by most gov-
ernments in the area as the only practical
method of building large numbers of rural
houses,

In Puerto Rico experiments in aided
self-help have been so successful that
houses, 272 square feet in area, containing
one living room, two bedrooms, porch and
kitchen are today being constructed for
the equivalent of $550 B.W.I.

In Barbados on the other hand chattel
houses 18 x 9 feet are estimated to cost
$600 each to build.

The recent visit to Barbados of two
Americans loaned to the Caribbean Com-
mission under the Point 4 Technical Aid
Programme provides this island with an
opportunity for self-examination.

Is Barbados doing as much as it can to
encourage self-aided housing? Is it pre-
pared to learn anything from the experi-
ence of Puerto Rico or even from Antigua
and Jamaica where local governments are
actively encouraging self-aid housing?

The visit of Mr. Lashley of the Barbados
Housing Board to Antigua, Puerto Rico
and Jamaica at the expense of the Gov-
ernment of Barbados would suggest that
Barbados is in fact very eager to learn
from first hand about neighbouring terri-
tories’ experience.

But the visit of Mr. Lashley to Antigua,
Puerto Rico and Jamaica and the visit of
the two American self-help housing
experts to Barbados will make little im-
pression on Barbados’ housing problem or
needs unless there is widespread recogni-
tion and understanding of what those
problems are.

There is a tendency for Barbadians to
regard housing with a mixture of com-
placency and fatalism. “What can be done
is being done, and nobody could do much
more” could, not unfairly, be quoted as
typical of the mentality of those who are
responsible for housing programmes in the
island.

The justification for this smugness and
fatalism cannot easily be discovered. In
recent years housing has been engaging
the attention of the government of Barba-
dos. In 1948, thirty-eight houses were
built at the Pine Housing Estate.

In 1950 forty houses were added to that
estate and in 1951 a totalof 54 houses were
completed at the Pine and Bay Estates and
50 houses were being constructed at the
Bay Estate. Over a four-year period less
than 200 houses were built by the Govern-
ment and the costs of those houses were
between four and five and six times the
cost of houses being built by aided self-
help methods in Puerto Rico.

In addition to building new houses the
Government of Barbados during this
period and beginning in 1946 removed 68
houses from slum areas to Belfield Hous-
ing Estate: 14 to the Pine Estate: and 351
to the Bay Estate.

Besides the building of new houses and
removal of houses from slum and con-
demned areas the Government Peasants’
Loan Bank has issued loans to between
three and four thousand peasants for re-
pairs to houses.

In a small island like Barbados the gov-
ernment’s attitude to housing based on
this record of achievement could not be
described as indifferent, especially when
it is remembered that other agencies exist
to help housebuilders other than govern-
ment agencies,

But there is too great a tendency for
housing authorities to regard house build-
ing in Barbados as something with regard
to which Barbados must provide its own
formula, irrespective of building costs and
irrespective of the experience of other ter-
ritories in the area.

Too often is the argument heard in Bar-
bados that the people of this island are
rugged individualists and will not do this
or that. The way to deal with rugged
individualists is to strike their names off





the waiting list for government houses. It .

is quite wrong to build limited numbers of
houses for a very tiny percentage of the
island’s population and to allow this small
number to dictate housing policy.

If government money is to be spent on
providing cheap rented homes for some
people the government, not the people,
must decide how best that money is to be
spent. How can houses ever be built at
reasonable prices if costs have to include
provision of walls and roads on a scale
which eclipses or competes with housing
estates built by private enterprises.

In an island which will not within thirty
years be able to provide proper accommo-
dation for all its people what justification
ean there be for lavishing money on non-
essentials on the restricted number of
houses built for those who are privileged
to enjoy the special amenities of the Bay
or Pine Estates.

On the Pine Estate itself might not

more be done by the Housing Board to
encourage the production of more food
by making tenancy of government heuses
there dependent on the cultivation of
garden allotments? But while room for

improvement undoubtedly exists in the
urban housing schemes run by the govern-
ment the building of rural houses seems
hardly to have been touched.

In this field the Point 4 grant of some
$68,000 U.S. to the Caribbean Commission
should prove advantageous to Barbados.
If this island applies for help to start a
rural self aided housing scheme, the
experts attached to the Caribbean Com-
mission for this purpose can loan films
and provide information which will help
the government to launch its campaign.

Irrespective of what Mr. Lashley has
learnt on his visit the housing needs of
the rural community must be met, Funds
for this purpose can be obtained from the
Peasants’ Loan Bank, which now only
assists with repairs of existing houses. But
only propaganda, concerted opinion and
the willingness to build self-aided houses
will make this method of home-providing
popular. It is shirking the question to
talk of rugged individualists. The people
of this island are quite capable of under-
standing facts, if facts are presented in
the way that they can understand. The
facts show that there is not enough money
in the exchequer to build everyone a house
costing between 2,000 and 2,300 dollars. In
Puerto Rico on the other hand houses
which in Barbados have cost these sums
and more to build are being constructed
for $550 by self-aided methods. Since
labour costs form between 40 and 60 per
cent. of the costs of house building in the
island the reason for the cheapness of the
Puerto Rican house is apparent.

The task of the government is to edu-
cate the people to help themselves, not to
accuse the people of being rugged individ-
ualists or otherwise. Let the government
embark on schemes for rural self-help
housing and the people will show them
how willing they are to avail themselves
of the opportunity to help themselves to a
home. If the people of Antigua, Jamaica

and Puerto Rico can build their own

houses, why not our people? Give them a
lead and they will probably build for less
than the Puerto Ricans,

EDUCATION

MR. FLECKER, Headmaster of Christ
Hospital, came to the West Indies to
lecture on education at the invitation of
the British ‘Council. Last week an article
reproduced in the Advocate proves Mr.
Flecker to be an accurate observer and
recorder of the West Indian educational
system.

Mr. Flecker’s views are, of course, not
novel, They are views which have been
consistently held over a long period of
IRTOTRER a body of educa’ and well-
nformed persons in the West Indies. Un-
fortunately the body of well-informed
opinion has never enjoyed popularity with
the majority of West Indian peoples to
whom education has Fourseantee an escape
from the servitude of hewing wood and
drawing water to the world of leisure and
good-breeding which Professor Joad so
erroneously prophesied as the goal to
which the world was progressing.

The facts about education are that there
is no end to the process of being educated
and in countries like the United Kingdom
the possession of a University degree is
no guarantee of employment. Even in the
West Indies and in Barbados the holders
of Univergity degrees are turning towards
commerce and other professions as being
more rewarding than the pursuit of aca-
demic honours to be gained in schools and
universities.

While this evolutionary process is
silently taking place among the more
highly educated the worship of the school
certificate has never perhaps been greater
among the majority to whom the posses-
sion of the school certificate in former
years represented the distinction between
the man-in-the-street and the educated
person. This result was foreseen by the
minority of well educated and public
spirited persons whose warnings fell on
deaf ears and whose observations are now
being vindicated by the Headmaster of
Christ Hospital.

At present in the West Indies, notes Mr.
Flecker, the schools “too often concentrate
on the mere acquisition of a corpus of ex-
aminable knowledge and. that travesty of
education will lead nowhere.”

Unfortunately he is not quite correct in this
observation. The worship, idolatry would not
be too strqang a word, of this travesty of educa-
tion has led to the tragic situation whereby the

schools of this island continue to turn out in
ever increasing numbers pupils wto are taught
earn



hardly anything that will assist them to

a living in this region, but who have been taught
just enough to make them aspire to the limited
number of government professional and com-
mercial jobs which form the substance of the
dreams of all white collar workers.

Any suggestion that the type of education is
unwise or even unkind to the children on whom
it is inflicted by ambitious parents and com-
placent governments is regarded as proof of the
reactionary disposition of the critic. No doubt
Mr. Flecker too will be labelled as a reactionary.

There is little evidence for supposing that those
responsible for educational policy in Barbados
are really aware of the great unbalance which
exists in an educational machine so little geared
to the highly technical and competite world in
which we live.

The possibility of a technical school being
included in the expenditure which the govern-
ment intends to make in implementation of its
five-year programme should lull no one into a
sense of something vital having been achieved.
One technical school will be an advance on no
technical schools: but the whole educational sys-
tem of the island needs reorienting to the needs
of the community, Agriculture, handcrafts, car-
pentry, domestic science, health habits ought to
be the major subjects of school curricula every-
where in Barbados.

The change-over has got to be gradual and
the prejudices of the people can only be removed
by patient propaganda and explanation, but a
start must be made,

Mr. Flecker’s article, coming as it does from
a Headmaster of a famous English public school,
ought to carry more weight with those respon-
sible for educational policy than the splendid
efforts which have been made by the minority
who have long been crying beware. If only a
halt is called to the present certificate-worship-
ping system, the first Step forward will have
been taken.

te

SUNDAY

















come families, the project provides 2,610

The entire development is located



LOCAL

“To require the Central Execu-
tive to assume direct responsibility
for the day-to-day decisions on
numberless points of local policy
is to ask too much. of it”, i
dictum of Sir John Maude needs
careful scrutiny by everyone and
ought to be foremost in the minds
of anyone who reads the Bill to
establish a system of local govern-
ment based on Sir John’s recom-
mendations.

The Bill provides for three local
government areas in Barbados, the
city of Bridgetown, the Northern,

| District and the Southern District,

The City of Bridgetown is to com-
prise three wards; the City Ward,
the St. Michael Ward and the Car-
\lisle Ward.

cipal City and the _ inhabitants
thereof a corporate City bearing
the corporate name of “The Mayor,
Aldermen and citizens of the City
of Bridgetown”,

The Mayor is to be elected an-
nually by the City Council from
among the Aldermen or Council-

lors.

The City Council may pay to the
Mayor. such remuneration as they
think reasonable, The Mayor may
appoint an alderman or council-
lor to be deputy Mayor. There
are to be nine Aldermen (or if an
Alderman is elected Mayor eight)
elected by the City Council from
among the Councillors or persons
qualified to be Councillors of the
City, Aldermen are to hold office
for six years and are to ele: .
in groups of four or .
third year, except for the first :
tion of aldermen. '

Eighteen councillors are to be
elected, six from each ward of the
City. The City of Bridgetown for
purposes of local govern nt will
therefore, under the provisions of
the Bill under reference, be ad-
ministered by one Mayor, eight or
nine aldermen and eighteen coun-
cillors (unless one Councillor is
elected Mayor when there will be
17 Councillors). There will be
either 27 or 28 persons on the City

ouncil. on
- The two District Councils will
each consist of the Chairman,
Aldermen and Councillors.

The District Councils will each
appoint a Vice-Chairman. Each
council will include five or six
aldermen depending on whether
the Chairman is elected from any
six Aldermen or Councillors. The
six parishes of the Northern Disr
trict, St, Lucy, St. Peter, St.
Andrew, St. Joseph, St, Thomas
and St. James will each elect
three district councillors, :

The Northern District _ will
therefore be administered by a
Chairman, five or six aldermen
and seventeen ar eighteen coun-
cillors. Total persons will be 24
or 25. :

The Southern District consisting
of St. George, St. Philip, St. John
and of St, Michael and
Christ Church will elect twenty
five councillars, five from each
parish, Local government of the
Southern District will therefore
be administered by a Chairmany
five or six aldermen and 24 or 25
councillors. It will_be observed
that the Southern District is to
be the largest of the two rural
units of local government, unless
some amendment is made to the
Bill as it presently stands.

Sir John Maude in his report
criticised financial relations be~-
tween the vestries and parochial
boards and said that these
tet of” govern ent. granite
ee — sense of
responsibility.

The new Bill makes pravision



for every council .
finance committee from among its
members for regulating and con-
trolling the finance of the City or
District, ‘This finance committee
is to be responsible for estimat-
ing all expenditure which exceeds
in the case of the District $250
and in the case of the City $500











to appoint a”



ADVOCATE

AN AERIAL VIEW of the vast Luis Llorens Tor res housing project—largest launched by the San
Juan municipal housing authority, and to be finished the end of this year. Involving oindhivatien costs of
$12,000,000, the project covers a hundred acre tract on the outskirts of San Juan. Designed for low in-

artments divided into 140 buildings two and three stories high.
im ts of a huge coconut plantation, adjacent to residential areas
as small, private houses that have been developed within the past two years.
units now under construction in Puerto Rico exceed on a population or area basis the number of such
units being built in any of the States. Puerto Rico, with 2,400,000 inhabitants, has 9,000 units under
construction as compared with 8,537 for New York and 12,345 for Texas.—(I.N.P.)

GOVERNMENT)
BY NAME |

By GEORGE HUNTE

Every Council is required to
appoint a clerk of the Council
and treasurer, The Councils
will fix the rate of remuneration
of these officers but the Governor
will have power of dismissal or
the Council may dismiss with the
consent of the Governor.

The Governor may nominate
medical officers and sanitary in-
spectors and can dictate terms as
to salary, duties and otherwise of
these officials.

The Council will have author-
ity to employ and pay all other
staff. Provisions as to pensions
are to be the responsibility of the
Governor-in-Executive | Commit-

Bridgetown is to become a muni- tee.

A Council may purchase land
compulsorily in order to provide
halls, offices or buildings.

Councils shall be the rating
authorities for their respective
areas. In addition to the general
rate Council may make and levy
a special rate, The Council
shall have power to reduce or
remit the payment of any general
rate but there are checks on its
authority to levy the special rate.

Chattel houses occupied by
owners the annual value of which
does not exceed fifty dollars are
to be exempt from rates.

Trade Tax shall be levied and
collected by the Council but
assessments of Trade Tax are to
be made by the Commissioner of
Income . Tax... Assessable income

for trade tax purposes up to
$1,000 shall be exempt from
trade tax,

Consent of the Governor-in-
Executive Committee is necessary
before iand can be acquired by
agreeement or purchased. com-
pulsorily, Annual budgets of Coun-
cils must be submitted before,the
beginning of a financial year to
the Governor-in-Executive Com,--
mittee for approval. The Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee
cannot increase the amount to be
expended but can make other
modifications,

Grants to Councils can be made
by the Governor-in-Executive
Committee subject to conditions,
Sanction of the Governor-in-
Executive Committee is required
before money can be borrowed by
Councils either for long term or
short term spending.

The accounts of every Council
of every committee appointed by
a Council and every joint-com-
mittee shall be subject to Audit
by the Auditor General. Sir John
Maude who recommended that the
auditor of the Councils should be
a whole time government officer
made it clear that within the limits
of the present Vestry system the
auditors had done their work care-
fully and well.

All accounts which are subject
to audit shall be made up yearly,
but the Bill leaves. the date of
auditing unfixed, Accounts. shall
“be audited as soon as may be
thereafter.”

When the accounts have been
audited ope month after their
receipt by the Council, committee
or joint-committee, the Council
shall cause the accounts as certi-
fied by the Auditor General to be
published in the Official Gazette.

The Auditor “General cannot

disallow expenses which have been
sanctioned by the Governor-in-
e Committee.
: e. Governor-in-Executive
‘ommittee shall make regulations
r compensation of officers or
servants of a Vestry who suffer
loss of employment or dimunition
of emoluments attributed to the
coming into force of the Act.

The Governor-in-Executive
Committee may make regulations
providing for the payments by the
Councils to the Diocesan Synod of
Barbados and to such other religi-
ous bodies as may be specified of





OUR READERS SAY:

Birth Control

To the Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—

We who are interested in con-
trolling the size of families must
thank “Medicus” for his sound
logic expressed in your columns.

On one point I must disagree
for he says he sees “no reason
that religion should enter into it”
(birth control).

Of course, different persons
have very differing ideas as to
what constitutes religion. To

those who feel _ reli; to be hi

mainly concerned with worship of
Diety or life hereafter, the con-
nection between religion and
birth control would not be
obvious, But to those who take
christianity as a way of living our
daily lives—and of enriching
theirs through following our way
\slowly—then every part of our
jlives is linked to religion
Family Planning (made possi-
ble by the ability to control the

number of children) is, to my

way of Shines a very great

assistance in allowing young men

and women to lead stable, satis-
and progressive lives,

Nothing is so good for young
le as they emerge from
olescence as to marry and es-
tablish a home. Home with its
-affection,, and understanding—
with some ohne who ¢ares, and is
anxious to thelp. becomes the
haven and the centre of interest.
A young man with a wife and
ome becomes a respected mem-
ber of the community. He has
something to work for—the best
ih him is called out. These are
the conditions, the atmosphere in
which spiritual aspirations flour-
ish. These are the church goers,
these are the ones who from their
foundations of stability and self-
respect are enabled to turn their
thoughts to things of the spirit-—
mercy, justice, helpfulness and so
on,

SUNDAY, MAY 11, 1952

PLASTIC
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annual grants in respect of ex-
penditure incurred by them for the
repair or maintenance of Churches
and other places of worship and
for the salaries of officers of such
churches and places of worship.
The Governor-in-Executive
Committee may exercise the func-
tions and powers of a Council
until the first meeting of such
Council, If any difficulty arises
in connection with the establish-
ment of the Councils or the pre-
paration of the first register of
local government electors or the
preparation of the first valuation
list for rating hereditaments, the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
may make such order for remov-
ing the difficulty and any such
order may modify the provisions
of the Act, up to one year's date
from the Act coming into opera-
tion. Any local government elector
(that is any adult who has reached
the age of twenty-one and who is
registered as a voter) can inspect
and make notes from a Council
proceedings on payment of a fee
not exceeding 25 ce The
accounts of a Council and treasure;
of the Council shall be open to
the inspection of any member of
the Council, Every Council and
every committee and joint-com-
mittee shall make to the Governor-
in-Executive Committee such re-
ports and returns and give him
such information with respect to
their functions as he may require
or as may be required by eithe:
House of the Legislature. The
Governor-in-Executive Committee
may cause a local enquiry to be
held in any case where he deems
it advisable, concerning the exer-
cise of any powers or any duties
conferred on Councils by the Act
The Governor-in-Executive Com-
mittee will also have the power to
enforce exercise of power by a
Council by transferring to himseli
specified functions of the Council
Each Council can make bye-
laws and can impose penalties not
exceeding $50. These bye-law:
have however to be approved by
the Governor-in-Executive Com-

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mittee. elie | ; interior
Sir John Maude in his report

anticipated critics who would say :

that the power of the new Coun- decoration

cils are so hedged about with
Government controls that the sys-
tem is one of local government in
name rather than in substance,

I must confess after reading the
new Bill to be one of these critics
But I think that this criticism is
of far less importance than the
one which follows from Sir John’s
own admission that to entrust the
whole administration of loca
government to the central govern-
ment would be to impose on it ar
intolerable burden, I am not one
of those who think that govern-
ment by Governor-in-Executive
Committee is the best or even e
democratic form of government
But the Bill under reference no!
only adds to the responsibility of
the Governor-in-Executive Com-
mittee but gives him greater
power, If there was no party gov-
ernment in Barbados there woulé
of course be no difficulty since the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
would be acting upon the advice
of the Executive Committee, Bu’
since the Bushe experiment there
has been a_ tendency for the
Leader of the House of Assembly
to assume the role of Prime
Minister and to play a role in the
Executive Committee which is «
new conception of local govern-
ment, So much thereforé depend
on the answer to the question whc
is the Governor-in-Executive
Committee?

But whoever it is, his powe?
over the local government will be
immense if the new Bill is passec
by the Legislature.

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O-DAY

Is

Ens







_And not only are the man ané
woman blessed by marriage anc
a home and the children grow uf
in the moral wholesome atmos-
phere which ‘is the basic deter-
rent of waywardness,

i

This: year let’s make Mother’s
Day the first of 365 days of
love and affection for Mother.
Let’s give her a whole year
of affection. She deserves
the best of everything.



But this advantageous state o
affairs is closed to thousands o!
young men and women for the
simple reason that they cannot
cope with the financial strain o
a large family What man witl
a wage that is little more thar
enough to care for himself woulc
decide in all reasonableness tc
obligate himself to support eigh
or ten people?

If birth-control were” freel: rth ute ail WMothors
used the marriage rate woulk a J to
treble, illegitimacy would drop

prom

9. N. Goddanrds E Sons Ltd.

Leading Grocery & Blenders of 83-year-old Gold Braid Rum.

and delinquency would decrease.
So birth control is essential fo:
moral living. The average youn:

person does not. prefer to be
promiscious, he is forced into it
by financial. pressure, Birth] '

control promotes well-living.
M. M.S.



SUNDAY, MAY 11,

“SIRPE, SIRPE MONSIEUR.....

(By HAIKA DE POEL)

A little Arab shoeshine boy,
woke me up. I had been sleep-
ing on a bench in one of Algiers
parks,

Monsieur est American? Ou
monsieur Allez?” he asked. The
little native from Northern, Africa
was a nice person, He started
talking and gave me a lot of in-
formation about the Sahara and
how to cross a desert with “peu
de Francs” and how to be friends
with the people in the Sahara,

Shining my shoes, he told me
that the Sahara was a very dan-
gerous spot and that life there
was very hard. His uncle tried
once to travel through the Sahara
but he did not get through....

Oh Yes Sir much too hot in the
Sahara..you die....”

The little Arab shoe shiner was
not the first fellow whom I asked
about the world’s biggest desert
and he told the same thing every-
body told me. Lots of people of
Algiers and Tunis only go to El
Golea and then they turn back,
because they are afraid of the
sand storms and the thirst....

However I wanted to go through
that desert and I wanted to see
how the people lived in the sand.

Two days later I was sitting in
a train with lots of Arabs going

over the Atlas mountains. We
passed a great many villages and
the train. climber over the

rocky Atlas mountains. The for-
ests were very thick and many
animals were among the trees.
We passed Blida and Media—two
little Arab villages where only
two Frenchmen lived amongst
the natives. Then the train went
down the Atlas Mountains. The
heat from the big sand-sea was
within a few hours travelling and
the train went through the grape
fields where hundreds of boys and
women were picking grapes. Soon
we left them behind. The only
thing we saw, was sand and
some trees. Then the train stop-
ped. DJELFA, was written on
the wall of the white station. It
was a little Arab place and called
the end of the world. This was
the last outpost of civilisation. In
front of me was the Sahara: The
burning sun and _ 2,500,000 sq.

1952



ee ee

SUNDAY ADVOCATE





RAILWAY STATION in Leopoldville (Capital Belgian Congo). In
this part of Africa there are many pioneers working hard to develop

the country.
miles of sand,...3,000 miles of
sandy tracks where nobody could
give you a lift or invite you to
have a drink....

All the Arabs were = curious
where I had come from and
where I was going, “Nigeria?

Monsieur beaucoup de soif.. Ah
c’est ‘si loin....”

Donkeys And Camels

And it was a long way. It took
me four months to.come through
that sea of sand. Four months of
travelling without any accommo-
dation or any good food. Four
months of travelling on the back
of donkeys and camels. Four
months without sleeping in a
proper bed. And four months of
thirst and hunger.

The first 200 miles I travelled
on the back of an old donkey.
The Arabs were not unfriendly
but life was very hard. Then,
when we reached El Golea the
donkeys were left behind and
the trip was continued with the
Camels. We had a caravan of
30 camels. The animals did not



BAYAKA NATIVES masquerade dancing. This is to keep the Evil

Spirits away from the village



PANS

Pan Books continue to cater to
many readers.

Mrs. Belloc Lowndes’ “I too
have lived in Arcadia” is auto-
biographical. In he quiet conver-
sational style the author of The
Lodger tells of the remarkable
parents to whom Hilaire Belloc
and herself were born although
a doctor had pronounced their
father incapable of having child-
ren. Life in France and England
durnig the autihor’s early child-
hood is depicted without sensa-
tionalism but with a clear vivid-
ness of detail that leaves behind
an impression centred around one

family. Mrs, Belloc Lowndes’
mother knew many of the in-
teresting historical and literary

figures of the time and they enter
the pages of I too lived in Arcadia
unobstrusively and as if calling
at one of the famliy’s tomes,
West Indian readers will be in-
terested to know that the Bellocs
at one time owned proverty in
Martinique and San Domingo and
that Martinique was once known
as Bourbon, I have never before
heard of Martinique by any
other name.

* * *
TI first read Sheppey at what is

now Powell Spring Hotel where

{







walk quickly—not
2—3 miles an hour.

During the days the heat was
enormous, So hot that we boiled
our tea in the burning = sand.
Once, for 15 days we did not see
half an inch of shadow. Not a
leaf,a tree or anything. Just
sand and the sky......

The nights were cold. So cold
that many times the water was
frozen Everybody dug beds in
the sand and covered themselves
with it. That was the blanket.

more than

One morning, when we were near

Tamanrasset somebody did not
wake up. He buried himself the
night before, because the scor-
pions slept with him in the sand
and gave him the final injection.
The food was bad. Everyday we
had meals, but the meals were all
the same. Dried camel meat and
lour porridge. The water was
not sufficient and rations had to
be cut down. Once we did not
wash ourselves for 18 days. The
big men from the Sahara, the
Touaregs were very nice for me.
When they had something to eat,
they always used to give me some
too. They were friends in this
land of misery.

And then cama the day that the
trees of Central Africa were in
front of us. The first banana I
had was better than a cheque of
1,000 dollars. And the first river
bath was*a thrilling experience
after four months of burning sand
and hot wind.

Tha missionaries were very
kind. Théy saw that I had lost
20 pounds weight in the Sahara
and I was their guest for several
days. Then I started the trip
through Central Africa, and after
visiting West Africa I went back
to the belt of the Sahara—
TCHAD.

Tchad Colony

The TCHAD colony is one of

‘he most interesting parts of
French Africa. It is the richest
part of Central Africa, A great

variety of animals can be hunted
in the Tchad colony especially
around Lake Tchad, where lots of
Tubbu and Hausa tribes have

settled down. It is a nice and
clean part of Africa. No mos-
quitoes or Tse-Tse flies trouble
you there, The climate is good am
the meals of fresh game are
cellent. If you want to have fis
in Tchad, all you have to do is
get a light in your canoe and ou

ing the evening all the fish w

jump in.

The Tchad Colony was discov-
ered by the English by Denham
and Clipperton in 1800. The first
Frenchman who came to the
Tehad was in 1897, He made
peace with the Hausa’s but was
killed by the warriors a few
months later.

Even today, in the Tchad colony
there are still a lot of natives who
have never seen a white man be-
fore. The people live far away
in the bush, frequently so far
from the little town Fort Lamy

that nobody has visited them.
Fort Lamy is a sand city. In the
sandy streets are a few motor

vehicles. Mostly lorries. Every-
where camels and donkeys lie jn

front of the houses. At. night
everybody collects in the cen«
trum. There Hausa musicians

play their instruments, made {rem
calabashes and horns, and in the
cool breeze the people enjoy the
spiritual dances, The chiefs sit
on their famous Arab horses,
proud like a girl who’s wearing a
new dress. And while everybody
is dancing the lions can be heard
roaring not far away.

Big Lips

The track went down south. 1
travellad as a chief for some
Syrians down to Fort Archam-
ault. The jungle was very thick.
We saw all sorts of animals and
many types of natives I never had
seen or heard of in my life. Es-
pecially the Sara women with
their big lips. Exactly 9 months
after I had left Northern Africa,
I reached the Congo river. There
I got a “piroque’ (canoe) and
went down the Congo river.
After twenty days I had reached
Leopoldville and was taken
straight from the canoe into the
hospital with 40 degrees fever—
Malaria.

The heat

was__insupportable,

and when I left the Belgian




4




’ . ”
ONE of the Bambara girls in the

Moyen Congo. Like all the natives,
she has a happy disposition.








BAKONYO CHIEF and sous-chief talking in Batale. Ornaments are
teeth from jaguars and hippos.

Congo again I had a chance to
visit Angola, the Portuguese Col-
ony. Very few strangers
allowed into this Colony, but I
got a special permit from the
Governor and I was flown by
special planés to different parts
of the jungle. From that moment
—I was just 20 years—I became
an explorer and was well known
in the whole of Angola. I gave
radio talks and wrote in many
newspapers and was the guest of
the government. Eventually I
was flown back to the
Congo,

There I did the same and was

island Mozambique.

°° JO

By then I wanted to have fresh

ave air again and waited for two day:

on an airfield before getting a
“life’ on a plane. Eight hours
later I stepped again on Sout!

African ground,
to enjoy life.

I remember that for the
two weeks I was afraid when
walked along the busy streets

Johannesburg
to the sky-scrapers I

and to talk
native friends. But
got again accustomed

with
last I

my

Then I started i.

first |

j

ol

When I looked up
got scared
Belgian I wanted to go back to the silence

of the jungle again

at

to

lucky since the people liked me ‘ha new world and expelling all

and helped me in everything.

che jungle air from my lungs, [|

Then for 18 months I lived in Yrevelled in the fresh South Afri-

the jungle, sometimes without any
more accommodation than just
a dirty hut, lent by the chief of
one of the wild tribes in Central
Africa. I got as far as Rhodesia
and was given a “iift” from the
border to South Africa. We
travelled for 6 days right through
the bush and savannahs of North-

ern and Southern Rhodesia,
For 2 years I did not see a
decent town. For two years I

did not see an autobus and for 2
years I did not see—the worst of
all—a nice and pretty girl, Sure
a Princess wanted to marry me,
but I was glad to escape, Some-
times it is nice to be a Prince,
— not always....I remembered
nat.

South Africa was a Paradise for
me. I could recover from the
jungle experiences and write my
books, The newspapers in South
Africa were glad to have some of
my articles and I was glad to have
some money. Then just after a
month in South Africa I went
again on the road. Hiteh-hiking
down to Lourenzo Marques, the
eastern Portuguese Colony, There
the Government did everything
they could do for me. I got first
class train tickets and free flights,
I travelled through the jungle

torest for another 40
dita en I reachéd Nyasaland
and went up to Tanganyika and



I often stayed as a young boy.
That was some 17 years ago but
it still weaves its spell after so
long a period. Sheppey and The
Letter and The Breadwinner are
included in a great Pan volume.
Somerset Maugham’s reputation
as a dramatist of distinction is so
firmly based that any attempt to
underline it would be wasted
labour. But young readers com-
ing to Maugham for the first time
will find these three plays typi-
cal of the essential Maugham
The Breadwinner is particularly
suitable for the adolescents who
are convinced in every age that
they can set the world to rights
if only they can keep the old
fogies in their place.

* * *

Dirty Eddie by Ludwig Bemel-
mans is a satire, It takes the
mike out of life in Hollywood.
Dirty Eddie by the way is a pig.
If you are one of the love-sick
swains or are still collecting
photos ,of Hollywood stars then
Dirty Eddie is not the book for
you. But if you. want to peep
behind the scenes and get a
glimpse of the Hollywood the
movie magazines never tell you
anything about why Dirty Eddie
is just the cup of tea.

In







If you buy Magnificent Obses-
sion thinking it is anything like
The Robe because it is by Lloyd
Douglas you are going to be dis-
appointed. The story has been
filmed, and as a story it has all
the ingredients which Lionel
Barrymore mixed so successfully
in the films where he played the

hospital doctor. The hero has
everything and on top of this he
gets religion. The religion is
never clearly defined but the
hero goes from _ strength to
strength. The theme is_ that

even a rich man can get a kick

out of life by doing good to his

neighbour. There are lots of

worse themes and this one is

handled with the skill of an ac-

complished writer,
*

* *

Pan has reprinted Ernest Hem-
ingway’s Fiesta, This is the un-
usual story of a man for whom
love was hopeless, Only Heming-
way could have written it
Hemingway is the journalist whose
books record the emptiness of
life of Americans and others who
went on living in Europe after
the excitement and thrill of war
had spent its force in 1918. No
one can imitate Hemingway’s
style and it is fully formed in
Fiesta, There is of course a bull
fight,



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JOHN WHITE

|

FOR EVERYONE

Whiteoak Heritage
by Mazo de la Roche ure two of
the twelve books which form
the Whiteoak Novels. In tihese
novels you meet all the Whiteoaks
from Adeline Court, the old
grandmother who is so fond of
her food to the youngest of the
Whiteoaks and you get very in-
terested in everything that goes
on at Jalna their wonderful man-
sion in Canada, In Whiteoak
Heritage Renny comes back from
the war 1939-45 and finds _ that
his uncles have mismanaged his

estate, and he starts to ee
everything in order. In Ja
one of his step brothers gets

married to the illegitimate child
of one of Renny’s best friends,
the other stepbrother also gets
married to an American girl. She
comes to live at Jalna and soon
falls in love with the lord of the
manor (Renny). Everything
goes well at the end,

* * n

The Lady Vanishes by Ethel
Lina White is a Thriller that you
can’t just down, An_ English
governess vanishes on the Express
to Trieste and an_ English girl
who has met her by chance on
the train tries to find her. But
unforiunately everybody on the

eases]



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Kenya and came down by the
coast and went to the famous
and Jalna train thinks she is quite mad

The tension grows stronger and
stronger as the train gets nearer |

to Trieste, The story has been |

most successfully filmed,
* * *

Bargain Basement. by Ceci

Roberts ig a Romantic Novel of
a big Department Store. Lady
Elizabeth Belton decides to earn
her living in a Big Department
Store. She enjoys her experiences
there and she falls in love with
a young man in the Bargain Base-
ment. When her mother knows
she tries ‘to stop their romance
but Bargain Basement is one of
those novels with happy endings

Eigat Tales of tioffman trans-
later by J, M. Cohen is a new
Pan Book. Like Edgar Allan
Poe, Hoffman wrote many creepy
stories. This Book includes the
Sandman, The Lost Relection and
six others. Some of these tales
were filmed recently in a Ballet
Film called The Tales of Hoffman
The musie for the opera of the
Tales of Hoffman was composed
by Offenbach,

Pan Books are sold
Advocate Stationery,

the

H.

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|



can air.

SARA WOMAN, This tribe lives
near Chad. Thirty years ago the

men from other



tribes came to
steal the women, so the women de-
cided to make themselves ugly.

They cut their upper and lower

lips. In the cut the
of stone or wood.

put a piece
fter a woek

they pulled their lips and put in
a big stone. Eventually they lokk-

ed like this. )

Sa a aa a a a aaa
%
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bY Merchandise to

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* Bruce Weatherhea
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EDUCATION NOTES Cl { U R CH SERVICES SPEIGHTSTO WN ROUND-UP

Perpetuating Error sr. Towa cttunem moe! Sea Ener oach ing

PAGE TEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, MAY lI, 1952





I > a.m 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m, Com-
{ t Puc : i 11 pany Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting

i } : , t nd Sermo! s nd Preacher: Ma & Mrs. W. Morris,
Last week I criticised the ap- Education. And there is a very peintment of a mathematical sound reason for this statement. ST. MARY’S CHURCH BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL

sncsamemahingeeatananinictimnth

can help you to success
















} | o,°
iali ‘ © The attendance roll at these 4th Sunday After Easter 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m. Com a * ood m thr h al t tuiti
to the eet Gl taaparterste ot ioe a me average about _730 am. Matins 800 am, Low pany meer 7 ry a" Meeting People living along certain parts of Heyw' Ss and Six- 0 rson pos on
- ste aa iam . , Mass. 900 am Solemn Mass & Sermon, Preacher: Major at w sae + ae F
the Elementary School. Within a 26,000; out of _ these s7 hs eer 2 20 6 m ‘Sunday "School / 0 pm WELLINGTON STREET mens are closely watching the encroachment the sea is mak- Tone OF MEN in important positions were once students of
few days my comment was jus- Vo ° a muene ie pa i 458 bm. Raetian oo tae va ain oo ing on the land in that area. ~ 7 ; The Bennett College. They owe their success to Personal Postal
tified by events. a aaa cdonetianae 48 Preacher: Sr. Major T. Gibbs. Recently, the sea at spring-tide—but not breaking— ‘Tuition — The Bennett College way. You have the same chance to
Mr. Jarvis hes, ponapted . Peel remaining 20,000 might get in METHODIST 11 a.m, Hollies Meeting: 3 p.m: Com- © “washed over the road and under people’s houses depositing qualify for a fine carcer, higher pay and social standing.
=o ae ee pt Senior the elementary school is ALL and JAMES: STREET pany Meeting: 7 p-m- Salvation Meeting“ Jheaps of sand. At one time, the road was well covered with Bios af deses cneiens Wik tad to peur ebventenedt
hewi 1 » education 11 a.m. Rev. K. E. Towers, B.A., B D e $ ; as . oad . icles
Maths from in piace joo in ever get. If it does not fi aot ee ae eae at oe CORNER | s céin- water and sand and was impassable by vehicles. - Se ee i tani
of Mr. Gra who has )'°Y i » Furley 11 a.m. Bolinges my: TD Mesting People who had to make use of Auditing . Shorthand Licensee
pe Phe a equip — oe ee ee = BETHEL: 11 a.m. Rev. Innes, Seere- pany Meeting: Tee: Seivation Zeworth, t8@ roed had to wade through the Book-keeping English Subjects Mathematics
ired, . Community en educ . tary, B.F.B.S. 7 pm. Rev. E. Taylor ‘eacher: ‘ . * bes ‘ - — Commercial Arith General ‘i
"Whether - Mr. Jarvis realised (2 now’ it will have failed. “DALKEITH: [1)s im. Mr. G. Brew- 1). | pong Resting: 3.p.m, Cole pall day, the water had Costing. a aa Pattee Sublet
that he would be partially wasted Society is not to be judged by ster. 7 pm. Mo. 7 Blackma0- | mare pany Meeting; 7 p.m ° Salvation Meeting. ann oO t the sand still made it Economics Journalism Short Story Writing
ld be oom j 1 f the _ BELMONT: | 9 a.m : : Lieut: i. ; cult for vehicles to use the ’ i
and that there cou no r its irilliant scholars from ley: 7 p.m. Mr. A. Curwen Preacher a Fond s zs , i : :
for his spécial -gifts and intellec- university. There are too few of ‘SouTH DISTRICT: 11 a.m. Mr. ©... , EE OeT ntag: es an. debe “Her Rig Weg. ne on Poriceiinrs | Foripeoring Drawings Sanitation |
tual qualifications, I am not them. It must not be judged by Jones. 7 pm. Mr i Maver’. wy, pany Meeting; 7 p.m_ Salvation Meeting. Gyo, ae nd oe Aircraft Maintenance Machine Design Steam Engineering
aware, but_at least one bighly the humble men and women who ,,PROVIDENCE: wr. D. Griffith Preacher: Captain: L. Moore. e road in this area, Only Swiding Mechanical Engineering Surveying
i ie ved for perform the various services and “yay ao am. Rev. E. Taylor, NEW TESTAMENT CHURCB OF GoD When waves were breaking heavily . pentry Motor Engineering Telecommunications
qualified teaeher will be sa F s an VAUXHALL f RIVER ROAD did water g e or Seamutry Plumbing Television
better use ifthe profession, who do the jobs which Y geocereg 7 p.m. Miss aR a ate 10 a.m. Sunday School. 11 am. Ser- a ane —. 20 sa a en enc Eivd Ree-necriog Power Statios Engineering Wireless Tetegraphy
i ; ace i safety ' ent .s at something ngi Pres 1 Work ks M
But a on oer ee : eee Sar” everybody ei 9.90 az. Mr. ¢ Ee. 7pm. Rev. x, 2, pm Diyine oe. ner should be done about it at ones. Draughtsinanshe Guancity Surveying Workshop Practice
er advertisem va 7 oe K ‘owers, . mers Minister Charge . . x am juctrical Enginoering Radi A i
apes ts mt See te applicants for «that ey. the paajority of (WHITE HALL tm 1 am Eee i a om. jn PB pea Meg 2 Boa waters J oiterin Stucericel Ensincering Radio, Engineering eaitiis binds
o. these can y get an elemen- 930 am Mr. Di 3 pm. Mother's Day Ss spots. Zs “ 3
© post stating that preference ‘ Mr. G. Perkins vine Service * . ; 0 SD GD ome or eee ee eee een ee eS ee CERTIFICATE
> : tery education and that is not Celebrations. 7.15 p m. Divine Service ; f
will be given to one with qualifi- goad enough to fit them for their 9.99 amo ne MEMORIAL cra Rev. MB. Prettijohn, Minister in A large crowd attended the TO TNE BEWWETT COLLEGE, DEPY. 156, SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND. GENERAL
cations in Mathematics and for place in society then all our ment), 7 p.m. Mr_G_Bascombe Charge. nexetent Mobile Cinema show at the District 43; Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith y Peo send me free vour prospectus on: CERTIFICATE OF
Science. The Director of Educa- tion should be called upon © me add: “They are declining 89am. Mr W. oe ” ine Service; 7.15 p.m. Divine Service: night. Most of them were from Fo ag A ies Me hello -. pa a
a high- " Mrs. 5 . Rev. R. H. Walkes. Min: Charge. Mile and Quarter and Ashton Ten- y sen ef Pa
show what particular use a bith now.” BANK HALL aha ny! COX ROAD antr: Q year-old George Spencer a labour- 1 ADDRES “4 SEND TODAY
ly qualified a. zt Fundamentals BD am Rev.) % ey Bes Ae * 43 a.m, Divine Service, 3 pm. Sunday Fite funeral of the late King and &r of Chapman's Lane, St, Michael ] | for a free prospectus on
i r ) 0 , , 7 pase. ‘i ft. “m, Divi tee. Rev. a ate z " dhe ae, ot. , AGI der 21)... 8 4° he ‘
pe work, ot the “Flementary ue Ge ce “ging. the SPRIGHTSTOWN ve MC A. Nurse. Miniter in Charge. a film on eugenics were among the ‘0 one month's imprisonment with) =f —,., : sities Meee
’ the purpose oO 1 ll am. MF . ™m. ” HILL > 4 ee ae Fete i ¥ t om LETT b .
Schools, Tt may be that _ the iaele basic education and Husbands SELAH 1 am Divine Service Rey. J. B. = pene ® at ee on Sens os Nee ste we ein eae come 11.5.52 Ek Pa coupon and post it
Serer, Sake, 3, pete exit: by that I mean a general somnaee 930 am. Mr. G H Marville. winter ( ) in oer 7.15 pm Whe Department of Highways Black Rock
> Suen é am~ cion on whieh they can build. a BETHESDA e . Pastor Charge. eps ; :
i i & j 9 and Transpo r e ; LL AY,
ipe the ate dung The fundamentals are reading 930 am. Mr. D. Scott BAPTIST oa at Goteae ee et The offence was committed on age
fecvedtn to the curriculum of the ‘ nd writing and to calculate sim- MORAVIAN THE St. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST ()6 corner of Church Street, Queen May 9 about 11.45 p.m.
Blementtary School pe sremetien, WE panies ROPBUCK STREET —i1 a.m, Momng | it a.m. Maiormon, Preacher st von Street and Orange Street. Before sentencing Spencer M*| [Qf ang- n
Others Available eittts - aro wareane ; Events. service, Fnev. James Survices, Rev J. B. Gront, L.Th., Min- At this spot, the road was so Griffith told him that honest peo-
There are other people avail- event them from getting any â„¢ ing tog BATES wea. Fri. Training DArrow that two big vehicles could ple cannot walk the road at might
ott revent ther tting an; RACE HULL — 11 am, Morning 4.30 p.m, Mon. ° ‘ § not pass each other without one for fear of people like him and
able ond qualified to an re job because of tihe bad spelling service, Preacher: Mr. F. G. Downes; for Youths, this, will be conducted b ane. A sete eens by it was the duty of the Police
post of Inspector of Schools, and ~nd worse English. ‘followed by Holy Communion); 7 p.m. Rev. L. Bruce-Clarke (Assis " , x p the an ? Vy ft
it is the duty of the Governor or "Tt i oausile aint to see gvening Service, Preacher: Mr. ©. and Mrs, Olga Browne the Church wall. The widening of to arrest any suspicious person j
. . . may oe 5 s - ——————$———— nt an Sot a a att ana ; sasame' 1 ; : 4 a)
the newly created Civil Service young men dividing their wages hy 11 a.m. Morning Service; oe ae wit a aia ease like him loitering, ae
Commission to see to it that by putting the money in lots on preacher; Mr. W. St. Hill; 7 p.m CHRISTIAN SCIENCE rame congestion there. at tea Ys h
ij “ . ‘ce: Preacher: w * * * Emerson Howard—keeper of the
specialists are not wasted in the ground (‘one for me, one Evening Service; Preacher: Mr First Church of Christ, Setentist, Em ceep t 0 AND
offices which do not need nor for you, one for he”) : " Swire le Bridgetown, Upper Bay Street Eleven fines totalling $37.20 criminal records at District “A’’—
exercise their intellectual quali- ite 3 , MONTGOMERY re nites SUNDAYS 31 8 m8. wa 8 P2. which WeTe imposed by Police Magistrate told the court that the defendant
fications when others can fill the Misfortunes MOP HILL—7 p.m. Evening Service; Neciudes ‘Testimonies of Chris- Mr. S. H. Nurse on offenders tried had four previous convictions for
places, Preacher: Mx Francis Dee tian Seience naling. t District “E” Police Courts on larceny and two under the Q
It might serve as a_ useful The child of today seems to ,,DUNSCOMBE—7 p.m. Evening © : Sunday, May it, 19% Monday and Wednesday this week, Vagrancy Act. On the last con- 5;
owen, meat the difi- be extremely unfortunate. In the P'*°h* Ns Pe St Subject of eee eer pee AND “Benjamin White of Round-the- viction he was sentenced to one i :
culty “which schools and

ALLEN : p 7 : :
the elementary school the addition of ———_____»______~_ Golden Text: 1 Corinthians 15: 22. | As Town, Speightstown, was ordered month’s imprisonment with hara

teaching profession experienced 2 Latin, Spanish and Maths. pre- : in Adam all die, even so in Christ shali to pay two fines of $6.00 each for jabour and deemed a rogue and HE , 0 HING
few years avo when there was ° vent him from paying enough _I do not object to changes. 211 be made alive. incluaea in Pesisting a police constable and vagabond,
general exodus of specialists attention to simple reading, Nature herself surviyes on the The following Citations axe, itu

ding the Lesson-Sermon: The Bible: Grace for assaulting a police constable.

inelu Messrs. Sweet (Sci- writing and arithmetic. The process of changes, but let us [Mj ‘peace be multiplied unto you He was given seven days to pay Sgt. Howard attached to the
ence) and Isaacs and Burton parent being ambitious demands revise the educational system tO through the Enowialee te ou ot each fine. Failing to pay either, he Blatk Hock Police’ Gintion said
(Classics) from Harrison Col- a secondary education, Here the keep step not only with modern Bunce and. Health with + so me Will undergo one month's impris- that he saw the defendant on the
lese and Mr. Hodson (Science) masters find that the foundation trends but. also with local Criptures, by Mary Baker . énment. No fine for the two days premises of Greenidge and when
on ow School, Barbados is so weak that there is little on demands as do not Daler an Ae mortals Ree Se eens pent excepped are : ad he asked him what he was doing
ha go as far as Harvard which to build. Then for- tem whic as served us : they give up the ; e other fines were for dan- : i ! ‘
Universtty for one and even to junate, at a time no thy Bay ree the altar of modern theories. true existence apart from God. Page 283 gerous driving, not keeping to the the defendant could not give a

. atisfactory explanation. Spencer
accept others who’ had bogus most help, is faced with super- left side of the road, exceeding the satisfactory Pp ion penc



CURES AS SWIFTLY ,

AS
CANADA'S LARGEST

See orn

a







qualifications. annuation, He leaves school half es — Si T speed limit, breaking of the Shop Sid he was waiting on a bus. SELLING COUGH
: ’ : sch there seems to be & ¢ n Temporar Closing Act, indecent language, s : mS
Raison d'etre tucated and with fouse, Is Tun’ our educational system OF 4 SPOOF By. Co, Tdad. crying exces welght of N65 0% age, St Michael was yeuorday AND COLD REMEDY
Z pride in his work or respect for 0? a " i . : c = a lorry and wounding. fined 25/- in 21 days or one
My feasiii.cfor raising these - teachers must come together if aiaincet ee aaa 60/ A ys
ictal is that parents a iaa it anybody? the 26,000 children are to be PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 9. YUGOSLAVIA DEFEAT month’s imprisonment with hard J
difficult nowadays to pay fees This specialising and stream- provided with an education ade- Hon. Mitra Sinanan, Deputy FINLAND IN DAVIS CUP labour for using indecent lan-
and keep children at Second>ry ‘nx the Elementary Schools is all quate to their needs and accord- Speaker, was elected this after /F’ guage on Marhill Street, St.
Schools for them to get an edu- nonsense unless and until there ing to the demands which society noon a temporary member of the HELSINKI, May 10 Michael on May 9. ft
cation and this also costs the is compulsory attendance. They Will make on them. _., Executive Council in place of Hon. yugoslavia defeated Finland by |, Mulli hi eta
Government a large sum, there- ara begotten unwanted and roam Next week I shall deal ,with Ajodhas Singh, Minister of Works four matches to one in the Davis Cpl. Mullins who broug e

fora only the best will do. There the streets 0? the folly of teaching Latin, and Communications who is ill. Cup European Zone in a_ first case said that he spoke, to the de-

must be no tinkering with edu- lle are Tae tron eae Spanish and Mathematics in Sinanan topped the secret ballot yound match here to-day and qual- fendant who was abusing in the

eation and especially Elementary them. Elementary Schools, with 16 votes. The post of Deputy ified to play at home to Britain in street. The defendant still con-
J. E. B. Speaker will be filled next wr the second round.—WU.P. tinued to misbehave.

A i A TAI a cer erg |

MIXTURE



>

4



PROUDLY PRESENTING







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cent,

SUNDAY, MAY 11,



The Lives Of Harry Lime

1952

"THE hyacinth is a flower, a rum swizzle is a drink, and
the Panama Canal—let’s face it—is a ditch.

The story begins with a drink and ends with the

flower. There are also a couple of very cute babes involved

in the proceedings.

So hold on tight, my children.
Your Uncle Harry’s taking you
for a nice ride on his magic
carpet. We're off to the Canal
Zone.

When I arrived there at the
start of this story I decided to
lay up for a night in Cristobal.
I found an air-cooled hotel and
took a shower. Then off to Pto-
maine Joe’s bar for one of those
rum swizzles,



When a cauliflower-eared “jug”
joined up to fight tor Uncle Sam he
didn’t imagine that his war job
would be picking flowers! Life
was dull until Harry Lime came
along, then the two men found
themselves up against it in a jungle
spy plot. H's another Harry Lime
adventure that will thrill you, and
its title is: “‘The Hyacinth Patrol”.



The next mniute a burst of
stars exploded in front of my
eyes and my jaw seemed to
become detached from my
skull. It was some time before
I heard a voice like a rusty file
telling me: “Oh, gee, mister, I
never meant to slug you. I was
aiming at my pal here. You all
right?”

A khaki-clad giant with a
brokén nose and two cauliflowec
ears was bending over me
anxiously. Picking me up, he
went on: “The least I can do is
buy you a drink. They say one
of Joe’s ‘zombies’ kills or cures
you. C’mon .. let’s grab a seat.
Hey, Joe! A rum swizzle fer me
friend here, ang tap out another
beer for me.”

“Comin’ up, Tiger,” the bar-
man called and the soldier con-
tinued: “Now we can chin in
peace. Me... I’m Tiger Dolan.
Most promisin’ middleweight in
the fight game. I was all set for
a try at the championship when

Uncle Samm called’ th’
decision. .. . What d’ya say your
tag was?”

“Harry Lime . .. You know,
Tiger, canta better do something
about that red hair of yours. It
gets you into too much trouble.”

JUNGLE GIRL
A Slow Smile

He grinned sheepishly. “I get
it.” Then, frowning, “I used to
keep fightin’ for the ring, Harry,
but since Nugent shoved me
to th’ Hyacinth Patrol—”

“Who shoved you into what?”

“The Hyacinth Patrol ... an’
Nugent is th’ louse sittin’ over
at that corner table with my gal
Lola.”

It was like looking into the
face of the jungle itself, looking
at Lola, She was lush, magnifi-
Her eyes were insolent
her mouth voluptuously curving
and cruel, her hair the dark red
of ageing blood. She met my
gaze, . . slowly smiled.

Tiger said bitterly, “I was
doing all right with Lola till
‘Nugent moved in. That guy’s

ed me up since boot camp,
Harry. Thinks he’s a_ boxer.

Learned to throw his fists in
military school, I guess.

“I beat the tar outa him in a
camp bout an’ he’s hated me
ever since. I almost busted with
joy when they transferred me
to Panama. Looked like I was
gonna make one of th’ gun
crews, Then Lieutenant Nugent
was transferred here—to my
outfit—an’ he details me to th’
Hyacinth Patrol.

“It’s a stinkin’ flower detail—
clearin’ water hyacinths outa th’
channels so’s they won't foul
up ships or breed malarial mos-
quitoes. I joined up to fight,
not to pick posies. An’ nobody
knows it better’n Nugent.”

I smiled at Lola. She re-
turned the courtesy with inter-
est. Lieutenant Nugent caught
our pleasant interchange. He
scowled and called the barman.

We couldn’t hear what he said.
but we found out without delay,
for Joe came across to us, and
without. preliminary said: “I

must ask you to leave. You're
disturbing the peace. The
lieutenant—"

Tiger’s face went scarlet. He
kicked his chair back.
Swinging his big fists, he

moved forward. But so did Joe
and his bouncers. In no time at
all, Tiger and I were outside,
sitting in the gutter among a
crowd of grinning Panamanians.

Three hours and eight bars
later I was ready to call it a
night. By now, Tiger and I
were buddies, and we'd arranged
to meet on the morrow—being
Sunday. Looking forward to a
peaceful shower and slumber I
let myself into my room,
switched on the light and elec-
tric fan—ang then I got a sur-
prise. Lola was lounging across
my bed, smiling like a cat that’s
been at the cream pitcher.

She said: “It isn’t very nice to
keep a lady waiting, Mr. Lime.
I came to apologise about you
being thrown out of Joe’s. It
wasn’t my fault, but Ross gets so

jealous — especially when you
were with Tiger.”
“Let it go,” I said. “You’re

danger with a capital D, Lola.”

She stood up lazily. Then,
smiling: “Want to see me to-
morrow.”

“Where?”

“At my place, 23,
Darkish . About eight?
waiting, Harry.”

ANGER
I Am Accused

Her hand was on the door
latch when the door was pushed
violently open, and the new
visitor was Tiger Dolan. He sized
up the situation quickly—and
wrongly.

“Harry, what's she doin’ here?”
he asked, angrily.

Lola slipped past him without
replying. I said: “We'll take
that up in due time, sergeant.
Come on in. “I don’t intend to
get thrown out of this place!
Now, what’s your problem?”

Tiger scowled. “I dunno as I
want to tell you now. = Th’
minute I turn my back you're
after my girl.”

“Wrong! She came after me.
But Louie the Louse was ahead
‘of me. Don't forget that.”

His moon-face brightened.
“Yeah! Nugent! That's why I
come here, Harry. I just heard
somethin’ about him. Somethin’
I never believed even he’d be low
enough to do, You gotta listen,

Villano.
I'll be

Harry. This is important. I
think Nuigent’s workin’ for th’
enemy!

“I’m not kiddin’,” he went on
earnestly. “A friend of mine
just came in from the swamps
to tell me. Rita lives near the
old French channel... An’ she’s
seen our spit-an- polish lieuten-
ant goin’ to ol’ Gibber’s cabin !
How d’ya like that?”

“Not too well. Tell me all

about it to-morrow, Tiger.”

“Tomorrow’s too late. That's
why I'm tellin’ you now. I want
you to go out with me first thing
in th’ mornin’ to Rita’s shack.
She’ll tell you th’ whole story.”

“I’ve never been partial to
swamps. They’re damp, dismal
places with all sorts of nasty
poisonous things flying, and
dithering about. This particular
one was no exception as, in the
dingy hours of dawn, Tiger
laboriously rowed us through
something that was half mud
half glue — except for those
cursed water hyacinths.

“Why must people live in such
places—unless they’re related to
alligators?” I moaned,

“No rent,” Tiger pointed out.
“Squatters, you know. Throw
any kind of shack up. There’s
Rita now! Just aroun’ this next
bend, Harry, an’ we’ll be there.”

RITA
Glowing Eyes

It was Rita. And, as Lola had
been all jungle, this small dark
Panamanian girl with glowing
black eyes and fawn-like grace
was whatever loveliness that a
dawn in this swampland could

there



the shack that sheltered her.
was bare, spotlessly clean . . .
and forlorn. In a milk bottle on
the wooden table, hyacinths
bloomed.

“IT live here with my father,”
she said. “My mother is dead.
My father works on the canal.
Before I met ‘Tiger, I might never
have noticed an officer like
Lieutenant Nugent—or should I
say, I would not have noticed
anything strange about his visits
to Gibber.”

“Does he have to row there?”

“No. Gibber’s cabin is land-
locked. You can walk there in
half an hour, I first see the
Lieutenant when I am looking
for watercresses. Next time, I
hide and watch because I know
Tiger does not like him.”

SUSPICION
Killer’s Leok

The story rang true to me.
Certainly, Nugent’s visits to an
obscure swamp half-wit were
highly suspicious, I went to 23,
Villano that evening for my
rendezvous with Lola and to ask
a few questions. But as I stepped
up ‘on the porch I happened to
glance through the bamboo
screening. I saw Nugent was
already having a furious
row with Lola.

“You're going up the old
French channel again— to see
your pal Gibber,’ she was say-
ing. “But you’re not only seeing
Gibber, are you? You're just as
interested in that Rita giri—”

Nugent hit her across the
mouth hard. “One word from
you about my visits to Gibber,”
he gritted, “and ’u—

There was murder in Nugent’s
face as he bent menacingly over
her crouched form.

I somehow sensed a deal in the
making, but before going after
the business I picked up my au-
tomatic at my hotel. Then I
started for the Erench channel.
I had got directions on how to
reach Gibber’s cabin, but I made
the mistake of using Rita’s cabin
as a landmark. I thought I saw
her flitting in the shadows as I

passed near the place, and then
a familiar voice sounded. It was
Tiger, He said plaintively: “You
goin’ to Gibber’s without me?
I wouldn’t miss out on bein’ in
at th’kill for anything. a

“T come, too,” Rita said,

“No, Rita,” I told her; “You
stay here and keep the swamp
fires burning.”

“An’ if we don’t come back
in two hours,” Tiger added,
“you know what to do, Baby,”

SILENT TREK
We Face a Gun

We made the trek to Gibber’s
in silence. The shack looked like
something a lunatic would have
loved. Broken down. Garlanded
with moss. We peered at it from
the edge of the clearing in which
it stood, while the swamp made

hungry, sucking noises in the

distance.

-Suddenly, a _ high, cracked

voice cackled? “Lookin’ fer

swamp spirits, folks?”
“Gibber!” I exclaimed. Then

placatingly: “We're friends,

eome to talk to you,”

Then another voice broke in,
“All right, Gibber, You can
bring ‘em in now.”

“Nugent!” Tiger gasped.

Holding an’ army automatic,
Nugent stepped from behind the
bushes,

“You don’t know who you're
tied up with, Dolan, Lime has
more crimes to his credit than
I’ll ever have.”

I bowed. “But they all pale
beside your hidden profession
Nugent. You’re in a position to
serve your adopted country very
well.”

“IT think so,” he agreed.

“Then you should know I
might prove useful to you,” I
suggested.

Poor Tiger stared at me un-
believingly, Then he _ yelled:
“Let me at that guy!”

Nugent’s gun came up fast
“Don’t make a move, Dolan!
he warned, “Got their guns,‘
Gibber? Very well. Bring them
inside the shack.”

hold. She led us up a path that | We went forward over rot-
oozed under my feet and into ‘ting wood into the cabin. A



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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

|

|

match scraped and the gleam of |
a lone candle lit the place dim-
ly. But there was light enough
to see the contemptuous look
Tiger gave me.

Ignoring him, I said: “Tiger
gave me the lead, lieutenant. 1
intended coming here alone to-

night to make a proposition for
our mutual benefit. I overheard

your little scene with Lola. I
thought you might come here
after that.”

Nugent shook his head with
a thin smile,

“I don’t need you, Lime
would be dangerous. You
Dolan will be liquidated
night.”

Still smiling, he pressed a
concealed button, A section of
‘the wall rolled back. “But know-
‘ing as much as you do, I thought
you’d be interested in this.”

“A secret room!” Tiger gasp-
ed. “Behind that phoney wall!”

“Complete with telegraphic

You
and
to-

caemaetiiieta> eeamaiagitedeleciencrettemetanpncceetibah canals ania enieenigtipne

equipment and operator,” I said,

“All very cloak and dagger.”
“All very efficient, Lime,”

said Nugent, “At the moment,

the operator is sending a mes-
sage to our carrier, miles out at
sea, alerting the robot planes to
bomb the Gatun dam,”

Trying to sound cool, T asked:
“Just what are your plans for
us, lieutenant?”

He laughed, “Dolan is on the
Hyacinth Patrol, so I thought
I'd drop you both into the chan-

nel so that you could observe
their root formation at close
range.”

WARNING

And a Rescue

I listened to the chattering of
the telegraph key as it talked
to the enemy carrier, Then sud-
denly it stopped, A high steady



whine came from the radio re-
ceiver.

The operator tensed, his fin-
ger frozen on the transmitting
key. Nugent snapped: “The au-
tomatic warning signal! Some-
one’s coming, Close the wall!

Douse the light!”
But a louder hall drowned his

words, “Ahoy! Ahoy. . .! You
in there. Sergeant Dolan?”
Tiger roared back; “The Hya-

cinth Patrol. . .
get us, buddied!”

The Hyacinth Patrol gathered
more than blossoms that night.

-Come in and

Nugent and the other enemy
agents were rounded up, the
whole Canal Zone alerted for

attack, the enemy carrier found
and destroyed, And all because
little Rita went for aid the mo-
ment we started for Gibber’s
cabin,

DEPARTURE

But Not Alone
I didn’t see Tiger Dolan for

a few days. When I did, back{ %

in Ptomaine Joe’s’bar, he was
apologetic.

“Forget iit,” I said lightly.
“After all, how were you to

know I was playing for time?”

‘you up plenty,

“Yes,” I grinned,
barrassing. As a rule, they aren’t
quite so cordial,”

He chuckled, Then he said
eagerly: “They’re creattin’ a Hy-
acinth Patrol of the air, to
guard the canal. An’ I made
the gun crew on one of ’em, Ail
because of you, Harry. I—I
never, had a friend like you.”

He went on in a rush:
will you be best man at
weddin’? Rita wants you, too

A little wildly I said: “Er—
sorry, old man, but I’m taking
the next ship out—”

Tiger’s request was much too
sentimental for me, And yet—
as my ship made its way
through the locks I
hear the strains of Lohengrin.
A formation of low-flying planes
bearing gigantic hyacinths paint-
ed on their sides buzzed our
ship. It was Tiger Dolan’s last
salute.. I raised my hand.

Sort of sad—me, all alone ‘on
the boat going mournfully off
ino the sunset? But the fact is,

our

I was’n’t levelling with you.
Not entirely.
The fact is, I wasn't alone.

The lady’s name, you may re-
member, was—Lola.






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PAGE TWELVE

THE

By JOHN PRIDI x A ri de if
Vv. I i letter that

In 166: Lo ‘ ( expect ome favour



Thom














cil .received a i fre one as she had acce ove 12,000
Fex I er uch disaffected rsons, render-
nbui t ng them useful instead of a men-
ace to the Commonwéalth 4)
Thi figure 1 ppt
. . ather high, but it must be remer
rhe g af f the royalis
Scettish were ot transported person
in’ Gemaica j Barbad for the it emigrants who had fled from
honour Of their ¢ » Cromwell
frie the k ri : ic In 1667, the Militia of Barbados
st nd idle beggar was weak, and the dangers from
id vasion by the Fren« and rebel-
‘ an oun lion from the newly imported
€ ; es f Africa were great
: i Gove ent complained that
oT e ery t were being
t to! bados, and it made
A festions to increase this traffic
They "bh petitioned “that wee may
ed ome ol ive a free trade and a supply
in ale ol m Kingdom of Scotland of
of he peace, anc Scotch servants with whom being
were af aid that ipplyed from Kingdom of Scot-
t with opposition | nd of Scotch servants with whom
1 direct authoriby

\eing supplyed in good numbers







il bhi petition experience heretofore hath

1 a warran en had) will render both Comod-

j granted, ‘provydin and Security to the planters.”

that ye bring the de persor }) In 1682 Barbados passed the

Before ‘the Lord Justice Clerk, to t of a series of acts encouraging

whom it is hereby recommendit t © importation of white servants.
try and take notice of the | 0



any captain brought good serv-
3 and could not sell them with-

be t] 1 re f t












0 ! ‘ as by days, he might turn them
the : c to the Treasurer of the Island,
appr ndi Me t un } ; authorised to pay £12 10
countrey m be disburthe ch for them, These were then to
them.” (1) pportioned among the planters

On the 7th of December in the cording to the information
same } oy Lor f H ived from the Colonels of the
Majesties P { neil, t litia, and the planters were to
their con ha pay £13 each for them. When this
severall prison law was renewed in 1688, the
buith of Edinburgh who of thei! prices were changed to £10 0. 0
gune accord are desyrous to b@ and g10. 10. 0 respectively. This
sent to Barbados d .

nere-OF8 may have been brought about by

give warrand and comrnand to the

; a . eing an increased supply,

magistrates of Edinburgh to sett it in 1696, after the wars of
; al ~ * ‘ 7 » r ‘

at liberty all prisoners for erymes William IIT it is found that not

who of their oune frie will are only was the treasurer directed

content to goe t® Barbadoes; and

to pay £18.0.0 for each white serv-
ordaines ther to be delyvered to unt~ but the servant himself was
George Hutcheson, merehand in guaranteed a wage of twenty-five
Edinburgh, in order to their trans- shillings per year during his term
portation. (2) f service. This has also carefully

Governor Searle, referring to the defines the food and clothing to

Trish and Scotch servant in Bar- which each servant was entitled
bados, wrote in 1655 pointing ‘uring his term and each succes-
the danger of having so many dis ive act offered more liberal in-
hffected persons on this small qucements

island, particularly those of in:- After the restoration of the
portance. Other writers confirm monarchy all those who con-

this by attributing the royalist out- fessed to

their
breaks which occurred here to the the

rebellion and

participation in
refused to take

influence of thése exiles rath ; 1 oath of allegiance were ordered
than of the oldér inhabitants. (3) to be shipped to ‘the Barbadoes



The Judge Asks, «Who Is The Boss?”

; by GEURGE MALCOLM

A majority may decide to over-
THOMSON .

rule the interests, wishes, even
‘ s ‘ the conscience of < inority. **/
@HE PROBLEM OR POWER. By jower to the wathune: way wt
, J * power to the workers, may be
; Lord Radcliffe. Secker and War- equally with the Fuhrer Prinzip,
arg Rae ro pages. 1 shortcut to slavery.
5 to the discourse of On a a = .
. majority may decide that
eminent judge is one of the: iy }s more importan to be well-
Yarest pleasures in life provided

t , fed than free whic ve
One is not standing in the dock. gither the Rss Suan oat ae
When the judge is also a highly imptations of power, or demo-

cultivated man, and when, more-
over, he is talking about one of
the most important problems in ¢- ralt

Â¥ ; of the elfare State.
life, then we may settle joyfully Welfare State
in our chairs and compose our-
selves to listen.

eracy will degenerate into a queue
of toothless medicants at the door

Again, it is usually assumed in
this country that power corrupts,
absolute power corrupts abso-
lutely. Lord Radcliffe will have
none of this. His luminous
survey of political thought,
question his starting-point for a eek from Plato: to Matthew
thee of human thought and expes rnold, takes on an eloquence
rience on the supreme problem of (OU hed with something like
gévernment—Who i the boss, indignation. in a chapter devoted
why: above all, within what lim- to the British rule in India,

“What really prevents men who
have authority from abusing it?”
Lord Radcliffe asks himself on the
opening page, and mak th








ifs and restrained by what sanc- , It 18 am aside. It is not an
tibns? ; irrelevance, It opens with two

It may be thought that, in a & a BaGeHety's most pungent
democracy (a type of society “°OPCeS:

“The British have formed the
habit of praising their institu-
tions, which are sometimes
inept, and of ignoring the
character of their race, which
is often superb. in the end, they
will be in danger of losing their
character and being left with

which Radcliffe suspects. may be
passing away) the problem doe
net arise, Nothing eould be
fgrther from the truth. Repre-
s@ntative democracy. does not
sdlve the problem, of power; it
simply poses it in a new context.







Censider South Africa at this their institutions : a result disas-
moment. trous indeed,”
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PEOPLE OF BARBADOS :

epart—these unfortunate
not all shipped to
to all the American



jarbados, |

Jantation

To encourage the merchants to

brin indentured servant )
Barbado: 1 Jocal Law was passe

in 1670 whereby merchants could
ecove; In court any mone ow i
them for servant The English

Government were constantly in-
structing the Colonial Governors
to take measures for preventing
cruelty to the white servants from
1670 onwards, These instructions
seem to have been taken as just
routine matters and little done
ibout the heavy load of the white
ervant. In the seventies of the
next century, Eddis wrote from
Maryland that the servants
‘groaned beneath a worst than
Egyptian bondage.” (6)



Governor Atkins, stated in 1676
that three blacks would not only
do more work, but also do it more
cheaply, than one white man; as
the negro slaves answered many
colonial requirements even better
than did white servants. Slaves
were held to perpetual instead of
temporary servitude, they were
usually cheaper to feed and
clothe, and replaced themselves to
some extent by natural breeding.
These slaves accustomed to a hot
climate endured the tropical heat
of the West Indian plantation
colonies much better than white
men. (7) But for all this the colon-
ist were always glad to obtain the
services of competent craftsmen.
This is recorded in a letter of one
Christopher Jeaffreson, a planter
in St. Kitts, who wrote to his
agent in England in 1681, that—
“for a taylor, a cooper, a carpen-
ter, a joyner, a mason, a smith—
which are the trades nose necessary
here, — I would allow to such an
one, when a good workman, a
thousand pounds of sugar wages,
for each yeare that he should
serve me, with what must be
paid for theire passages, tools
and instruments.” (8)

Ligon recorded that in the
1640’s the servants rarely had
meat “unless an Oxe dyed,’’ and
that the planters themselves ate
it only twice a week. By the
latter half of the seventeenth
century most of the West Indian
colonies passed acts prescribing
the amount of food and clothing
to be allowed servants. This was
done mainly to encourage the
migration of indentured servants.
In 1672, Jamaica provided that

The Middle Class

The record of the British at
work in India is for Lord Radcliffe
“a classic example of how men
really respond to the stimulus of
great authority. me uses it to
demolish the notion that power
necessarily rots the mora] fibres
of those who enjoy it—and to
‘ecall to their fellow-countrymen
the names of men who should
never be forgotten—Malcolm, El-
phinstone, the Lawrences, Nichol-
son, Metcalfe, etc.

A band off men chosen arbi-
trarily, anq mainly from the
British middle class, who went
into voluntary exile in a strange
country, were offered danger,
immense responsibility—and a
decent competence,

They found the “glow of work
and duty around us in the Punjab
such as I have never felt before
or since.” They died young.
“Grief has made him.” (Lawrence)
“grey and worn, but it became
him like the stars of a battle.”

But, since it is plain that power
has often been abused, where are
we to find the means of protect-
ing ourselves against a tyrant?

Evil Men

_In making sure that he is the

right kind of tyrant, said Plato













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alt wee
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ee +,4,4
PPOPPSIOESD ’ PP SOF GOES |

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ree ana nhait pout

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women and children were tion was draining the soil ‘ a due to the accumulation >
being kidnapped by people 1 essential plant foods. it means that your
authority and sent to the We ies for sale. The following | Yet today, agricultural
- recorded by Frof. Robert ina pecome more
Phillips proves this —* "In k juctive than ever, for
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To ye Aged and Beloved,
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There be naw at sea a
Welcome,’

the necessity for return- ,
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gen and other elements



ship

called hich has op |

































ba rd 100 or more of the Heretic taken. up by the plant in the snpteen of inpatities.
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with W. Penn, who is the chiesg) 'S growth. Nitrogen is a colo ss, inert gas that forms four- @ De Witt's Pills have widely used

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The General Court has accord: |/>f it are available over every square mile of the earth’s sur- letters sen' 10 us by who longed for LUMBAGO

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Master Malachi Ouscott, of the Lee al vehi: 1h efnanes saad : e : > | s JOINT PAINS
brig ‘Porpoise,’ to waylay thy ot ier elem¢ nts before plant n absorb jt in the form of a4 e, ur trouble? Go to RHEUMATIC
said ‘Welcome’ slyly as near the} fertilizers. PAINS
Cape of Cod as may me, apd mak, |

‘Every day, the great synthe
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ammonia factories of I.C.L
gen from the air into a range |
to make British farming the
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captive the said Penn and hi
ungodly crew, so that the Lorg
may be glorified and not Mockes
on the soil of this New Countr}
with the heathen worship of these

OUR GUARANTEE



ree Much pr om be mad} uses nitrogen to make explosives and plastics, \
f selling the whole lot to bat : x r ‘
badoes where slaves fetch goon] ¢5!ns, paints and leather-cloth. LC.I’s nylon and ic | \

prices in rum and sugar, and we] Other synthetic textile fibres contain nitregen. So,

















Brit. Museum;
Company Records III.
313, 493-4, 505,

6. Letters from America, p 70.

7 ‘Colonial Period of Ameri-
can History, by C. M.
Andrews, 1934, I. 124; 125
White Servitude in Virginia |
by J. C. Ballagh, p.21.

8. ‘A Young Squire of the!
Seventeenth Century, by #/
C. Jefferson, 1. 257. |

9. Barbados C.O. 30/5, pp 19—|
20, 1685,

10, ‘American Government and
its Problems, by Prof. R.
Phillips.

Virginia
115,

YOUR SHOES THIS

MORNING 2? ———
| WOW A WORD ABOUT
| YWAT LOVELY NUGGET

,

|
shall mt only do the Lord great too, do many of the drugs which LC.I. contributes | y
service by punishing the wicked ' 7 ie =
but we shall make great good foi to modern medicine. 3
his ministers and people Trade Mark of Imperial ¢ ©.1 Industries Ltd.. London, England 1 k »
Yours in the bowels of Christ, | ” r y yl r r - 7
(10) idne der jroubies
COTTON MATHER.” aes oat Yas ; im for Kidney an *
errr rrr er re A PSS COS PPLE LALA PPA A EE ! , . -
1 Registery Privy Councij of bee tn 3 4 yee oe |
Scotland, 3rd ser., Il, 101. ‘ A |
2. hid. IT. 111. WAY NAY) WIA)
3. Thurloe, LV, 39; Egerton
MSS 2395 £625 I: GooP MORNING:
4. Additional MSS, 11411, f. 9. | T
5. Sloane MSS 2442, ff. 18-20 |! DID YOU NUGGE
|

Z

In obedience to Gods law, say
Luise yivetetsetcy , luo whi |
iyranhy was, however, @ Matbics |

ot induference, suhce “¢vil rulere |
can do the good man no harm.

The United Slates sougul
safety im an elaborate, structure
of Checks ~ and “oat ‘ane
British have left the whole thing
to chance, as if a special Provi-
aence watched over our trecdoim,

And where, at the emd of the
voyage, after ail the serious ana
witty conversation which has
hidden much learning and more
thought — where does Lord Rad-
fright) that the ultimate safe-
cliffe bring his ship to port?

Provocative
The wise people are constantly



Frank B. Armstrong & Co., Ltd.—Agents.









making, and re-making, an MILLIONS OF FAMILIES agree with scientific findings that ? THE ¢ ave WAY
aristocracy. ‘ ; 4 oan
The Evening Standard Book COMPLETE

HOME DENTAL CARE

sensitive nerves of our world. It
affords us the pleasure of hear-
ing a provocative, distinguished
talker—and, perhaps, the further
pleasure of dissenting from him.

It is inexcusable that Lord
Radcliffe’s publishers have, 9m
the jacket, mis-spelt his school

ind mis-dateq his birth.

Alweys brush your teeth
—L.E.S,

right after eating with .

COLGATE DENTAL CREAM

a

of the Month is acutely topical,
with a precise touch on the most

‘iat MOR iin

‘PERFECT ENJOYMENT

OF MOTORING

THESE



Bee ee per yard $1.44
ashdsapeodes che jfar per yard 1.68 ?
Bes ie, ake per yard 1.95 ||
Blue ........ per yard 1.95 |
Batl weve from 48

© ON BEDSPREADS

MOTOR GASOLINE

I

SHELL X-100 MOTOR OIL

‘PHONE 2702



THE PERFECT PAIR
L









ee a a a a a eT EE — ee eo



SUNDAY, MAY ll, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN f
a A LT TT Sree + eee nate ee nee RE RR RE Sas enmeeneemnnenecnee eee

.

7

BRINGS A SMILETO» ~ ®
EVERYONE'S FACE *

Just serve delicious Royal Puddings to ~
your family and friends—and then wateh |
the smiles of satisfaction. You'll smile, |
too—for Royal Puddings are so
too,

] —
HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON | THE PRINCESS WHO

WOULDN'T SMILE.










a

are









In a far-off land lived a Princess who
never smileg. Clowns and jugglers came
from all over, but not one could bring
out even the tiniest smile.

>» ZZ) y
F" ~~.
Ke
. =



Close by lived at
day the son ha
will make the
“Royal Pudding!”



e






DAVIES

By Appointment
Cin Distillers

to the Late
King George VI

ually
Grcom fa aratl













'D LOVE SOME FISH
IN CURRY SAUCE WITH
RICE,AND SALAD WITH
e* 2 ( ROQUEFORT DRESSING, AND

3 APPLE PIE AND COFFEE




DAGWOOD --'VE BEEN MARRIED
TO YOU LONG ENOUGH TO
KNOW YOU WOULDN'T
LIKE THAT





“TCO YOU WANT 4!'
ME TO THINK UP
SOMETHING ] =

FLASHi GORDON

ae tee Ex N Wee 7 _ ae «100, THE TEMPERATURE | [IT MIGHT WORK!















boiaii THERE'S ONLY BUT THE \) " EI ee OF THE SHIP IS HIGH Wwe —, DO IT By —————————————
‘ : ML = (i | FROM RUBBING AGAINST | | OPENING THE ’ :
ONE WAY WE'LL EVER REFRIGERATION Se AN = a P — r
GET OUT OF HERE’ <7 cous ARE AT | (ge oN ee TE AS MOLECULES. | | EMERGENCY RepAie SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only
/ a 23 ITSELF IS COOLS IF THAT MEANS CRAWLING - I A Se
a THE ATOMIC PILE a “ c _ 14. na ‘ ome
‘ SOMEHOW! pq aS ayes: coe ah WORE eS. hl eeeon cases SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Branches Tweedside,
THE PILE... AND BROILING MEAT Speightstown and Swan Street
; OF ee Seen ra Usually Now Usually Now
: Tins BERRI TOMATO JUICE .. 33 20 Tins scene, camaas gas
wie * oe 6 ws .
2 Tins IMP VIENNA
F.F. SAUSAGES Ve 93 84 Tins HAMS (2-Ib.) se ee 3.89 3.50
Tins ANCHOR POW. MILK 25 2.35 2.15 Tins FRYS COCOA (4) oo =o 46
JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS "1
eitiarhiaas sai D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street





















EVERYTHING ALL RIGHT
Now / RETURNING TO
LE BOURGET FIELD’
LEAD THE WAY /

BACK HOME NOW,

a
WEE LAURIE /

THE COLONNADE GROCERIES

NOW 70 PUT LIFE Re
|BACK INTO THAT ENGINE (jl
THAT DR, ANTON RIGGED

GOOD, M@. HAZARD /
NOW THERE IS A CERTAIN
MISS WISP WHO WON'T BE






y, we Ss
ae )

er es
hed
Pan

oe re a 1
i Se, ese :




Nu

I TOLD HER IF SHE
BROKE ANYTHING
ELSE I'D TAKE IT
OUT OF HER SALARY”









GOLLY = WHAT WAS THAT
NOISE DOWNSTAIRS Pl! IT

NDED. LIKE SOME
SOONG PALLING?



TLL DOWN
AND SEE
WHAT IT WAG













4,
4
FZ
SS
SS. sy.
. s“ . a
RQ




KIRBY WE WANT YOU TO HELP










US GET JOE SEVEN OUTTA THAT NIGHT...IT LASTED TILL ° . 1 V : ' ie We ‘ i /
STIR! HE HAD NOTHIN’ MORNIN‘. SEVEN DIDN‘T i { Fi ia
TO DO WITH THAT i Mee”

LAMBERT KILLIN’







a a, gos 5
\ \ \\ \ \\: AY tt \\ \\ ‘5 ‘
VARS \
| =—

SHELL-LEASEHOLDS DISTRIBUTING CO LIMITED
PETROLEUM MARKETING Cf (WEST INDIES) LTD

BRETTON HALL, 16 VICTORIA AVENUE, PORT OF SPAIN

SOUNDS LIKE,
GOING ON. WE'D
BETTER LOOK
INTO IT?












ore
7) a ik ad \
we (t

DISTRIBUTORS —

| DA COSTA & CO., LTD.
JAMES A. LYNCH & CO., LTD.

ks enh



RR AN RG TEI SE A A









i

Seca eS 2. See see



_.



PAGE FOURTEEN
\ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR RENT

CLASSIFIED ADS.

BOARDING AND




















































LODGING at Ras- | ~~~ s
In-Urbe Guest House, Crumpten S8t, APARTMENT—An for rent
TELEPHONE 2508 City. Centrally located opposite Harri-| Apply: F. Jordan, Gittens Road, Govern
son College. Apply in person. Telephone | ment Hill 11.5.52—In
DIED 4 4324 ae ‘ - Shetetintmiee
MISS CLARISSA BECCLES, BUNGALOW — Navy
WEREES — Op Moy 00h, 1088, ot her FOR SALE . 115.52—2n. | furnished. Al con pentenune ae
residence, jamond rs a eoesmean vo erences — iliams
— "Phe funeral will eve the ne —— 1 DRESSMAKING undertaken, satistac- a ee
q . tion guaranteed, work promptly done “EYAREVILLE”, Eagie Hall Road.
above residence at 4.00 p.m. this AUTOMOTIVF Mr. Mendes. Denroy, St. Lawrence, | Drawing and Dining rooms, 3 pi
ee wk entip’ and quan _—_. ] Hours 1 to 6 p.m. daily oF by mppoint. |ete. | Bungalow af Welches : St.
Holy Trinity Church, St. Philip. BEDFORD 12 ewt. DELIVERY VAN:| "en! ree tk Cel cccia borcunte’ sotnn ae
Caroline Rice (daughter), Tony ; New, for immediate delivery ris: DARCY A. SCOTT. .
and Ashton Rice terand-children). | Courtesy Garage 0.5, 52—tn Middle Street -
11.8.52—In. LOST & FOUND ("se See aves.
e - BEDFORD TRUCK- 206” wheelbase ns ae
complete with Cab and Piletform New, -

THANKS for immediate delivery—Courtesy Gar- Fn ge Bedford Avenue, 8t.
erent age. Dial 4616. 10.5.52—6n LOST ichael. 2 mins, Yacht Club. From lst
EVERSLEY — The undersigned grate- | 2. ‘ me | oe June to 3ist December, well~

fully acknowledge with deepest] CAR: One Vauxhall 25 h.p, with 6 | pockET NOTE BOOK—Containing |{Urnished bungalow—verandah, drawing,

tion and return
all who attended the funeral,
wreaths, letters, cards or
other way expressed
renderi

dining,
(basins),
cooker,

4631.

study, 2
servants’ room, garage.
garden, Reasonable rent, 1,

11,5.62—1n,

tof good Tyres in excelient condition. Dia:
sent

in any
sympathy by
ing assistance on the death of

Race Tickets, Cane Tickets, also envelope
with Receipts and Bills for C. D. Jordan
teward offered on returning same tc
Advocate Advertising Dept

4514. A Bargain 10.5,52—2r





CAR—One il) V-8 Ford Car, 6 H.¥











E.102 in good running order No reason 6.5.52—2r |. er IEP Gane ener eo eee
Sarah Helena Eversiey, able offer refused. Mile & Quarter, St Otte 2) aaa |BUNGALOW—Modern furnished Bunga-
woite aio Fairwether, | Feter 11.5, 52—1n 2 tollets a bathe soe hot andeead
3 é bh " mas , running and cold
11.5.52—In./ CAR: One Nash Coupe in good work PUBLIC NOTICES vant; All modern’ conveniences. Dial
GHLEL? We tinterely thank all those whe ing order $300 nearest offer Phon ? ’ 6.5.53—t.f.n
; We sincerely thank all those who'| gi95 9.5.52—2n _|l- salle sane ces dee
sent wreaths cards or otherwise ex- . e 3 ROOM—On the seas
pressed their sympathy to us, in our CAR: Ane 1948 Ford Super Delux CENTRAL CRICKET CLUB for rent. Phone 8401. bes
recent bereavement, due to the death of :



The grounds will be open for practice

































~ : ~ . Bor May and from Oc
CAR—Morris Oxford. Perfect condi P. |S. W. SCOTT, tober Ist Phone 4476. "















DRAY¥TON—In loving memory ot my] tion; mileage 2,370. Telephone. 249 Parogniat oe Pole 10.4.52—t.f.n,
dear beloved friend, who departed. this 23.4.52—t.f.n oe .
life on 9th May, 1951. alana



MASSEY-HARRIS TRACTORS— bool
your requirements of there Popular Trac
(Wheel and half-Track)
Courtesy Garage.

“Gone but not forgotten”

Till memory fades and life departs

You'll live forever in my heart
Ever to be remembered by Edna L. Ward.

NOTiCE

invited

of June. Tel. 8372.
tors Now. Dia Tenders are for painting the
461

our dear Father and Husband Charles | £4 condition $1,600.00, Phone 8125 § \s5 from Monday 12th May. 11.6,08—t.2,n.
Oneal Gill. 9.5.59—a E. D. FITZPATRICK, FARAWAY—St. Philip coast,
Mrs. Sadie Gill (Wife), Anice Jones, CARS_1947 Vauxhall 14-6 Gioia. Hony. ants
Teemes Oe. 11-5-82—18 } excellent condition. Price — $1,500.0¢ B: | Watermill supply. Double Car Port,
Humber Hawk Saloon, one owner an . servant rooms. From May ist. Phone
IN MEMORIAM almost like new. Ideal for taxi service NOTICE 476 10.4.52-—t.f.n
Cole & Co., Ltd. 10.5,52—3n. Tenders are invited for the removal _
BECKLES—In loving memory of my) ————————— | [rom the Wharf to our premises 155] HOUSE — 11 Graeme Hall Terrace
dear beloved husband Samuel Beckles, CAR—One (1) Austin A.40 Car, late} Roebuck St. of 75 pieces of Green-|Modern furnished house. All services
who was shet by his cousin on the 10th | 1951 model. Telephone 4821. D. V. [heart asstd. lengths and sizes, Por fur-~ John M. Bladon & Co. Phone 4640
May, 1951. Scott & Co,, Ltd. 8.5.52—t.t.n.,}ther information apply the Secretary—| Plantations Buliding 11.5.52—In
Died but not forgotten, nnn F Knights Ltd. 33 Broad St. Se gage paper
I do not need a special day CAR—(1) M,G. Coupe in_ perfect 11.5,52—-8n MODERN STORE AND OFFICES—One
To bring you to my mind order, Apply Newcastle Plantation, St as Store and two Offices at No. 22
The days I do not think of you, John. 30.4.52—t.f.n NOTICE Anim Street. Apply to C, L. Nicholls,
Are very hard to find ——— PARISH OF ST PRILIP °o. 18 Swan Street. 8.5.52—n
Ever to be remembered by his wife and CAR—One 1951 Hillman Car in perfect Fr - S 18th to the wee Mz (both
children Una Beckles (wife), Doris, | condition. Done 4,000 miles, Phone J. Bf, ‘rom test isth 4 hs ‘Ome “ ie Pieds
Wilbert, Edna, Arlene, Sybil, Keith, | Emtage 5/42 or after hours 5105 bial ee re a ere ee awa Yaa lighting Plant,
Eleanor, Clyde, Hilda (sister-in-law) 7.5.52—5n oe reasurer = W oe. oe
, 11.8.52—1n se i eae saturdays only from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.



a steel structure (3 coats) and roof, out-
11.5.52—in. 10.5.52—6n side and inside (2 coats each), of the fully furnished, including telephone and
———$—$—$<<$<— << | EE | Kensington stand, It may be necessary | tefrigerator, for June, October onwards,
GREENE: In offectionate memory of my] ONE FORDSON UTILITY VAN—Car-}{, scale all or part of steel structure | for further information—Dial 2250.
dear beloved wife Miriam Greene who]ries 7 passengers or 1% tons carge| pefore applying paint ra &
ae this life on May 9, 1951. 22 ‘miles per gal. Apply: McDonalc Tenders must reach the undersigned ee
in our hearts lie a picture Sealy. Dial 3322. 120 Roebuck Street} at C.F. Harrison & Co's Office not later| TRINITY COTTAGE—fully furnished,
More precious than silver or gold 9.5.52—8n. | inan May 19th. three bedrooms, complete with tele-
The picture of my dear wife

pho:

The Association does not bind itself sesird

to accept the lowest or any tender
THE BARBADOS CRICKET

and refrigerator,

situated at
Bay, St. James,

Phone 2959.
27.4.52—t.f.n.

ee
TRUCK—One (1) 3-ton Austin Truck

Apply D.V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd, White
Ever to be remembered by her husband | park Road.

Whose memory would never grow
old.










ASSOCIATION. LE
Albert, Florenza, Tasos, neem 24.4.59-t fn W. F. HOYOS, VRRA“Oy BAiniahe cde Vike
(daughters), Samuel, No yer ts Hon. Secty. —Good position Navy Gardens. July ta
Giayton (grandchildren) 11-8.82—-1 ELECTRICAL 11.5.62—4n, | Dee. inclus.”" Linen and. Silver if
Clayton (grandchildren) 11.5. -In gt. nee a Padi a ios,
tc teetttitee~mereieinensieneatiptaentitar | mvemeremmranirateerninn tsetse > essar 2389 morn:

KING—in loving memory of our beloved| FRIGIDAIRE—Deep Freeze, in perfect NOTICE 11.5,.52—1n.






mother and grandmother “Minnie” |cendition, Capacity 4 cubic ft, Ideal for

5 A
who departed this life on May, 10th | two people. Phone 95—247 if interested. PARISH OF ST. THOMAS

enna
WINDSLOW, Cattle Wash, Ba‘
APPPLICATIONS {gr one or more thsheba,

For the months of June, October,






















1. 11.5.52—1n | vestry Exhjbitions tenable at the St.|ember and December. Apply to iy
God saw the road was getting rough Michael's Girls’ School of the annual|W. T. Gooding, Stronghope, St. Thomas,
ane inilia.. too. bard. to slip LIVESTOCK value of £5 will be received by the | Ring 3502. Poomas.
hat anikoicea aude Ta iihe undersigned up 7 — PN aoe” :
L fi 52 RID ae Applicants mus' e ec ren of
11.5. an. hae eget gage aon rire viee parishioners in straitened circumstances, PURLIC SALES
ROGERS — In loving memory of L.| Schooled for polo, well mannered not less than 8 years of age or more

than 12 years on September 2nd 1952.
A Baptismal Certificate must “be
forwarded with the Application Form,
which may be obtained from Parochial

$380.00 can be seen Balantyne plantation

William Rogers. Christ Church. 27.4.52—t.f.n

Today brings back sad memories
One a loved one went to rest
And who think of him today














AUCTION

COW—One Geurnsey Cow 28 pints














first calf. Apply: F. King, opposite] Uffice By inst 5
Are those who loved him best. F. F. PILGRIM, y instructions received from
Claudine (mother), Gwendoline (sis- | Neils Gap, St. Michael. $6, (adi Parochial ‘Treasurer, Director of Department of Highwars &
ter), Roy (son), Enid (friend). 5.6 St. Thomas, | Transport I will set up for Sale by public
_11..62=10- | SIAMESE KITTENS—Phone 3121 10. 5-0 en | Piatra nt ee
§ . dasaian le inning a p.m
ROGERS—In loving memory of William 11.5.52—2n items—(96) Shovels,
















































vingston Rogers who departed this ® iti s | § ‘44) Sheeting Forks,

lite on Mays 11th. 1901. POULTRY ublic Official Sale | irc. *sss\* sive
One year has passed since that sad | _. aa axes, (480) Bass Brooms, (37) Wheel

day, POULTRY — Pure Bred Leghorns.| (The Provost Marshal's Act 1904 eee (22) Small Rakes, (19) Paint

When one we loved was called away,| piymouth Rocks and White Giant (1904-6) # 30) sans rushes and several other items.
The blow was hard, the shock severe, | (jockerels from imported stock $3.00| On Friday the 1th day of May is DARCY A. SCOTT,
We little knew death was so near each. Ellesmere, St. George. at the hour of 2 o'clock in the afternoon pee vt. Auctioneer, Dist.
But only we who have lost can tell 10.5.52—2n. | will be sold at my office to the highest | 10.5.52—an
The pain of parting without farewell. bidder for any sum not under the

E to be by Mrs. Claudine appraised value By instructions of the Insurance





ts (mother), Gwendolyn Rogers
isister), Roy (son), Enid Nurse and James

MECHANICAL
ds), Ena and Octavia
oreee 11,5,.52—1n. i
Sa et Oahner
ically new and in free class condi-

ovil memory of our dear | pri
or ae Dial i; 8.5,52—4n

All that certain piece of Land con-
taining by admeasurement 6,136 =: ae
ituate at Kensington Tenantry e
ay
on sides on

late of Kensingron Tenantry and_ on the
Private roadway known as Eighth
Avenue, or however else Ps same abut
and bound, appraised as foliows;—

The whole area of land to SIX HUN-
DRED AND TWENTY-ONE DOLLARS
\ND FORTY-THREE CENTS ($621.43)
Attached from James Christopher Gra-
ette for and towards satisfaction, &c.
N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on day

pany I will sell at the General Motor
Bus Coy., NELSON STREET, on FRIDAY
ion at 2 Pas ao 4 AUSTIN A-40

a :
aan mage in accident

. ARCHER McKENZIE,
Auctl













: In
ther, Walter Small who died on May | tion.
we vies you now our hearts are CYCLE—Raleigh Gents Sports Cycle.
r Four speed, Dyno Hub lighting set, prop

As time goes by we miss you more-— stand. Good condition. Price $75.00

Your loving smile your sweet face,| Apply: N. Gibbs “Croydon” Hastings

No one can fill your vacant place [Phone 3492 11.5.52—1n
Ever to be reme by his loving
Lawrence, Wilbert (Sons),




















UNDER ‘THE DIAMOND
HAMMER

By instructions received I will sell at
the house called “Ormondville”, situate
t Bush Hall on Wednesday next 14th











MACHINES—Adding Machines, Type °




Children—
Daughter), Ruth Smail (Wife). writers, machines, Bargain | > purchase. beginning at 12.30 p.m. a collection of | be made
Ime ; $ ti—in| In second hand machines: standar: ? 2 HEADLEY. 1 household furniture’ ineluding— Mahog:
Und lypewriter | $70.00, Origine i oa Marshal. | Cabinets, Dining room Chairs, Rush bot-
SKEETE--In loving memory of our dear} Odhner Calculator $120.00, Provost Marshal's ice, tom Chairs, Carpet, Chest of Drawers,
mother Edna Skeete who fell asleep on | Adding Machine $220.00 Bradshaw &* 30th April, 1952. 2.5,62—n | Mahog. Mirror, Carpet and
May, lth 1951. Compary . 11.6,52—1n nGe other ee Terms Cash.
We miss you now our hearts are sore RCY A. SCOTT,

As time goes by we miss you more
Your loving smile, your gentle face
No one can fill your vacant place.

ree Me Be ughrerl: Cermmic ang Vernon

iter), mmie an

Skeete eae se 11,5.52—1n.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEATH OF MR. TOM GITTENS

Information has been received
from H.M. Consul, Hav of the
death in Cuba on 16th April, 1952

RALEIGH 4-speed Bicycle
ENGINE. Apply Marshall & Edward
Garage, Roebuck Street. 27.4,52—t.f.1

—$—$—————————

WHEEL STRAKES: Reduce Tractoi
Wheel-spin considerably. In stock fo
Massey-Harris Mod, 744D— for othe
Tractors on application—Courtesy Gar-
ane. Dial 4616. 10.5.52—6i

——— as

SALES

wit! Auctioneer.

10.5.52—3n

UNDER THE DIAMOND
HAMMER



PUBLIC



REAL ESTATE

eS
DOUGLAS FIR PURLIN and prin-

(he close boarded and shingled roof,
covering a pen 140 ft, x 60 ft., two spans 5
0 feet each containing 20 trusses “Crane View", situate at the Crane, St.
approximately 20,000 feet of lumber. Philip. This’ property which occupies
11.5,.52—8n. |a most beautiful’ position, near” the

———- |Crane Hotel, and which is continually










1 will set up for Sale by pute com-
petition at my Office, Middle Street on
Thursday 15th p.m. that
desirab: all property known as



instant at 2


























11,5.52—1n.




Sas sitialiiesitiesiensaiciaeaiolie

of Tom Gittens, a native of Barba~ : At our Office, No. 17 High Street, on| fanned by refreshing breezes from the

dos. iphs etc, at Gorringes Antique Sho) | Sriday the 16th May at 2 p.m. “Wyn-| Crane Coast, consists of spacious ver-
Royal Yacht Club.

colotning andah on two sides, drawing and din-
: ing rooms, 3 bedrooms and spare room
lavatory and bath, kitchen, garage and
sun porch, together with an acre of land.
For inspection call at house below for
key, or apply to—
D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Real Estate Agent & Auctioneer.
Dial 2645 7

UNDER THE SILVER

jolme,” 8th Avenue, Belleville, with
and attached containing 9,715 square
‘eet. The house contins Drawing and
Dining Rooms, 3 Bedrooms, Kitchen and
usual offices, Inspection on application to
virs, Gibbons at the house on Suse
and Fridays between 4 p.m. an p.
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
Solicitors.
25.4.52—8n















AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT—Mas
sey Harris and other equipment includ
ing Grass Rakes, Grass Loaders, Fertt!
izer Distributors, Bagasse Spreadqrs
also suitable for plying Filter-Pres
Mud, Ashes an@ Pen Manure, and othe
Types Implements. Courtesy Garage
Dial 4616, 10.5.52—6r

*
Ieeane,, pe, NON S.
ALL PERSO o ha
yet submitted their income tax
feturns for year of assessment
1952 (year of income 1951) are
asked to do so without delay.
N. D. OSBORNE,
















ee
HOUSE: One new attractive board and






























: BULBS—Purple Ground Orehid Bulbs x 11 x 8, shed 20 x 6,

Commissioner of Fhone 3121. 11.5.52—-1n | (tinsle house 2) tows and doors. Put| ON TUESDAY 13th by order of the
Income Tax and "Sieawtaeiiin aati ee ee ogether with blots and screws. Executors to the Estate of The Late
Death Duties (Ag.)| BUSINESS REQUIREMENTS — Doc | Qiconable offer refused, _ Apply Archdeacon Shankland we will sell his

52—2n ment safes, cabinets, presses, desks, fan: | zneriock Field, Foul Bay St. Philip. Furniture at “Uplands” 3rd Avenue
4.5.52—2n. typewriters, adding machines, and othe |~ 11.5.52—1n, Belleville, which includes




office and business requirements. K. P



Good Extension Dining Table, (closes






Hunte & Co., Ltd. Lower Broad Street ote ifully situated, Graeme|in a Round) Sideboard, Morris Chahs
Din Saas 9.5.82—3n chi Rerclae mits < waver, gas and]and- Cushions, Ornament Tables, Book
nf ctricity Two lots 22,000 feet. Edghill.|Case (glass doors) Arm and Upright

BED SHEETS—AIl qualities and sizes | p 36" 9.5,52—4n. | Chairs, Mir,—Hatstand, Double End,

Phone 8367.



j Selling out veny fast, Cheapest in town -— Settee all in Mahogany: Barometer





























Candlesticks
Singer's

carrying case, $150.00, Fruit Knives &c. Brass

llth to Thurs-
Four (4)

























ing Sunday, May

daylight developing tanks May 15th, 430 —

6 p.m. Vacant| Vases &c., Cutlery, Electric

THANIS


































ay ¥ Mir,—Presses, Bureaus
tach ne om SS mam. to 616, 9.00] posiension, July Ist, For further particu: |g scand. Vono Spring all in Aiahogsny:
One (1) Thermometer § Stirri: Rod OTT: & co, Deep Sleep — Dunlopillo attresses:
Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Dial 3466 $2.50. es ee - Ta Oe Single Iron Bedstead, Trunks and Suit
Frank Watkins, Blue Waters, Rockley 11.5.52—5n.| Cases; 3-Burner Oil Stove, Larders, Hot
Phone 8412. 9.5.52—3n Plate, weet. ae eer tee
q f Lawn Mower, otons in Cemr vts,
ae SRO NYT. TABLETS—To FOR SALE ae ae we many ean vor
Messrs OSCAR FORDE, ROBERT eliminate bad breath and body odours — e . o’cloc’ ¥
MIT’ NURSE Knight's Lid. 11,6.52—8n, | ~~" BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,
SMiimown as Tennents) = MISCELLANEOUS Rustloneots
remind ‘you of their GARDEN HOSE: %” Garden Hose 9.5.52—2n
and Fittings. City Garage Co., Victoria} SPORT SHIRTS—Dozens of qualities,} wenn en
Excursion & Picnic Street. 1.5.52—t.f.1] suitable for all taste and _ pockets,

mole ——$$—$___— children and grown ups. Exclusive
AWAIAN DESIGN PRINT SPUN:

Absolutely new in the market. Suitable
for skirts and shirts, Only $1.20 per

yard. Thani Brothers 11,5,52—2n

HOUSEHOLD EQUIPMENT of ali
desvription. Owen T, Allder, 118 Roebuck
Street, Dial 3299. 10,5,52—t.f.n,

Local Representative, Tel, 3118.
LADIES WARM CLOTHING, (used) r 17.4,52—t.f.n.
ineluding coats, skirts, suits etc. Suitable —_—

for travelling. Appointment by phone VAT—One (1) “8,000 gallon Oak Vat —
9112 Mrs. Noel Roach, Speightstown. | D. V, Scott & Co., Ltd., White

Thani Brothers.

designs and materials. 18,

Getting Up Nights
Makes Men Old

Getting up aights, burning sensa-
tion of organs, whitish discharge,
dull ache at base of spine, groin
and leg pains, nervousness, weak-
ness and loss of ur are
caused by a disease of the Prostate
Gland (a most important sex gland

on SAT. 24th May, (Empire Day)
to WILTSHIRE’S BAY, St. Philip
Excursion 5/- Dance %/-
Music by C, B, Browne's Ork
Buses and Lorties leave Trafalgar
Square, Codrington and Station
Hill at 8.40, via Turning
Between $2 and $10 for best
Marico and Rumba Dancer
BAR PRIZE, EXCURSION PRIZE



Subscribe now to the Datly Telegraph
England's leading Daily Newspaper now
arriving in Barbados by Air only a few
days after publication in London, Con-
tact: Ian Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltd.

















7.5.52—3n. | park Road 1.5, 52—t.{.n. in men), To overcome troubles

a — ae: 24 oars ae sulky senues

MOSDA CIGARETTE ROLLERS—Rolls WATCHES—Just received 17 jewel vigour an e je new
large or small cigarettes, No skill] Rolled Gold Automatic Waterproof Wrist setentifie discovery. called Rogena.

needed, save money by

buying one at
Knight's Ltd

Watches with the latest ‘“ROTOMATIC”
winding system, also instock Wrist
Watches from $9.25 up. Obtainable at
A. L. Waithe, Jeweller, Cor. James and
Tele. 3253

No matter how long you have suf-

seer eral is guaranteed to set

you invigorate your Pros-

tate Gland and make you feel 10 to

20 years vounger or money back,
9.5.52—3n Rogens from your chemist

dias thini dalla — fuarantee protects you.

YACHT—International Tornado Yacht eo

tht Sart ee and come | WoenwaRT CRICKET

auxiliary marine engine and complete
CLUB

4/6 each.

REALTORS °
LIMITED |

151—152 Roebuck Street

OFFERS YOU

11.5.52—gn

MOSQUITO NETS-—Ready
superior quality double
$¢.99. Limited quantity

made and
$7.51, medium,
Thani Brothers

11.5.52—2n

Coleridge Streets



PLASTICS An unlimited quantity.
Table Covers 36 x 36 $1.41, 54 x S54 $2.48,
up to 54 x 84 $4.03,
Raincoats $2.97. Ail
Kirpalani, Swan Street,



$),450.00 Enquires Yacht

equipment 4.5.52—2n.

Aprons $1.08 up, | Club
imported Visit

11,5.52—In



built
Telephone

Cabin Cruiser,
Oriel Gill

YACHT—30 ft
1950. Price $1,700
91-14 or Rediffusion





“PRIMUS STOVES—Do not accept in-









ane only available spot of %|ferior substitutes which give poor 6.5.52—2n NOTICE TO MEMBERS
on Rockley ar service, The name Primus is guarantee : ;
proximately 5000 ae of superior quality. Every home should Members are hereby noti-
looki: : tk Sq. 7% y | have one New repair service gives fied that the grounds will
overlooking the beach ¢$| you a brand new steve for the cost of 1 Cl Ha UE: thecnmectice on
boundeqd by a _ natural the repairs to your old stove. Bring Car ton wb = P H. =
@wimming pool and two $11), "e"brand new’ outit, Bradshaw & Practice Nets will be open to Meera y
blic_ roads. : 1 members from May 19th 1952 !
Company 11.5 ln N. C. THORNTON,
legantly suited for erec- ——$_$_[__ $$ T E. W. MARSHALL, Secretary.
tion of ultra modern RECORDS—Clearing our stock of MGM Hony. Secretary gucaa”
Bungalow. Records. Three for Two Dollars, your 11.5.52—2n | 9. o2—on.
| choice, A, BARNES & CO., LTD





9.4,52—t.f.n





4 4


















Thani Brothers 11,5.62—2n PROPERTIES — For results, whether|Antique Carved Cabinet and Upright
ALACE ee ave be ON aetishig t pecparcien Consult: | Chairs, uphols: Chairs, Electrola, very
CAUSTIC RENCILS—Safe and efficieni| seoj) Jemmott. 48, Tudor Street. Phone} nice Divan (Couch or Bed), good!
ARTERS FOR im running warts, 1/3 each. Knight’ | isg3 11.5,.52—1n rere, oo ae Oe ee

HEADQ . 11.5,52—3n —— -— }an airs; erandal 5
SOUVENIRS oo ve SPION KOP — MAXWELL COAST |Ciock, Violin, Typewriter, Desk Chair,
| CAMERA—One (1) Rolleicord Camer: The above property will be offered | Bookshelves and Books, Glass and China,
FROM INDIA, CHINA & | with F.3.5 Zenar coated Lense, syn-|¢oy sale at 2 p.m, on Friday, 16th May,| Dinner and Tea Services; Plated Ware
CEYLON chronised for flash, complete wit) at the office of the undersigned, |in Tea Service, Spoons, Forks, Fish and



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

—-

WANTED



HELP

_———$—$——_________ }

3 DOMESTIC HELP and a Yard Boy

Apply: Mandalay, Enterprise Rd. Christ



—_———
CHRIST CHURCH GIRLS’ FOUNDATION
SCHOOL

September,

EDUCATIONAL

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1962

Applications for entry to the School in
1952, must be made on the
official form which can be obtained at
the School on Mondays—Fridays between

9.30 a.m. and 3.00 p.m.

Applicants must be between the ages
ef 8 years and 11 years, 6 months on the

Ist of September, 1952.

double bedrooms | 4.
at 9.30

The entrance examination will be held
it the School on Friday, 13th June, 1952,
e will be no aceom-

11.5.52—in

modation at the School for Parents cr
Guardians on that day.

Application forms must be returned to

the Headmistress not later than Friday,

30th May,

ALEXANDRA SCHOOL —BARBADOS

A Graduate—preferably in Mathematics
—to teach up to
Education—Ordinary
2 bed. or in oer. 1952. arn

ool is a y secondary school with
rooms. Fully furnished. Lighting Plant.| 150 girls on the roll and is aided by
two} Government funds
Salary:




4 bed-/tion on
ee Getided by —
Garage, three| ®n_allowance ‘ar Serv

7 is pensionable under the

Pension Act. No contributions
are payable but the minimum qualifying

e post
Teacher's

by $120 to
for a ree
Certificate.

to $1,776 and then by $72 to
for a recognised
or Certificate

)

A Cost of Living Allowance is now
payable at prevailing rates.
the Salary Scale would be
experience including

11.5.52—Gn

level—standard

First or Second Cla
Degrees:

For

$1,584 r°

7% plus $216
Te

For Graduates: $1,416 risin,

16 per annum
acher's

($480= £ 100).

ice.

period is ten years. Service at Ale

Ly
SI4ON KOP—Maxwell Coast, furnis! School is counted as qualifying under the
Avaliable last two weeks, May, meet English Teacher’s Superannuation Act |
9.5.52—2n Passage expenses to Barbados not ex-
a ceeding £200 will
SEA GAZE-on-the-sea, Maxwells Coast | @PPTopriate

be paid, aga
vouchers. A_ term's
ve is granted every five

i Certificate of

The posi-







“

ss








by $72 to $2,304 and then
¢ annum
‘eacher’s loma or

by $60
plus

st

long
years on
request, but up to the present no passage

money {s available for leave, although

this
Applications together with three recent

testimonials, the names of two Referees,

is now under consideration

should be sent by airmail to:

Speightstown, Barbados,
arrive not later than




The Truth in
Your Horoscope








useful pi
has built up
enviable reputa-
tion?
the} curacy of
predictions and
Dracti-



urposes
an
The = ac-
his

the sound

Tuesday the} cal advice con-

Love

Lotteries,
have astounded
educated people
the world over.
George Mackey

of New York be- - ad
Heveg that Tabore must possess some sort

of
To
Sion
(Mr.

joneer .
11.6.52—4n. | birth

second-sigh:

what the
‘ould you like







































































it.
or eee
you your full name:

Mrs. or Miss), address and date of
all clearly written by yourself. No

money wanted for Astrological Work,

Postage etc.,




but send 1/-

in British

Postal Order for stationery, testimonials





TARORE,




















and other interesting literature.
be amazed at the remarkable accuracy
of his statements about you and
. Write now as this offer may not
PUNDIT
213-D), Upper Forjett
Street, Bombay 26, India, Postage to India

POY,



again,
» (Dept.

Address:

REALTORS LIMITED

REAL ESTATE
AGENTS

FOR SALE



SWEET FIELD

Love}y Stone House, comprising
upstairs three bedrooms, large
living room, dining room, 2 toilets
and baths, one with Tub bath
and hot and cold water, gallery
Downstairs; 3 spare rooms, kitchen
and shower room, Standin® on
approximately 2‘) Acres of land
about 100 yards from Gibbs Beach
Inspection by appointment only.

NEW BUNGALOWS

Comprising three bedrooms, din-
ing and living room, kitchen, toilet
and large tiled bath. Standing on
approximately 11,000 square fe««
of land. Situate at Blue Waters,
and approximately 250 yards from
the famous Rockley Beach. This
Bungalow has never been lived in.
Very reasonable price

_ Rocklay New Road: on approx-
imately 19,000 square feet of land.
Magnificent view of Golf Course

‘ee bedrooms, drawing and
dining room, Kitchen. Downstairs:
Garage, servant room with bath
and toilet, and enough room for
Jaundry or workshop

At Ventnor Building Estate
Three bedrooms, drawing and
dining room, modern kitchen,

toilet and bath. Ali built in cup-
boards. Very close to Golf Course,
The last availabig spot at this
very popular residential area

CHURCHILL
Maxwells Coast Road. Three
bedrooms with running water,

combination drawing and dining
room, modern kitchen, toilet and
bath. Good residential area,
Excellent sea bathing. A sound
investment at the very low reserve
price,

Partly stone and lath and
Plaster comprising three bedrooms,
dining and living room, toilet and
Lath, and a large gallery. The
out buildings comprise servants
room and garage. Standing on
approximately 10,000 square feet
ef land. This house is veny close
to the famous Rockley Beach.
Price £3,200

Very attractively designed com-
prising three bedrooms with toilets
and baths attached, dining and
living rooms, kitchen, verandah to
the west and a nice patio to the
east. Standing on approximately
% acre of land situate at Graeme
Hall Terrace P

Good sized two bedroom bunga-
low with small spare room,
dining and drawing rooms, and
closed gallery. Government water,
electric {ight installed. Situate at
Codrington Hill, St. Michael.

CHATTEL HOUSE "

One roof chattel house 16 x 9

with shed-roof 16 x 9 and kitchen

8 x 6, all attached, with out-

offices, and partially enclosed with

wooden palings. On rented land
at ist Avenue, Bush Hall.

REALTORS Limited

REAL ESTATE AGENTS
AUCTIONEERS
VALUERS
151/152 Roebuck Street,

Rridgetown.
Phone 4900





You will

your

SSSS9SS5O6SS54






























3

















=
ARE YOU INTERESTED IN MAKING



SUNDAY, MAY



SHIPPING

ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO.

NOTICES







fi St, Lucia, Gre
SAILING FROM. -EUROPE or Bt, Ls rad
$.S. COTTICA, 16th May 1952 ada and Aruba. Passengers only
MS F ~ - 4 ' for St. Vincent. | Safling Today
HERA, 16th May 152 Wednesda 7
M.S. NESTOR 30th 1952. . 7
SAILING TO EUROPE .

M.S. ORANJESTAD,.20th May...1962
SAILING TO TRINIDAD, RARAMARIBO
AND BRITISH GUIANA

$8.8. COTTICA, 2nd June 1962.
SAILING TO PARAMARIBO AND
BRITISH GUIANA
STENTOR ith May 1052
v ‘OR 13th June 1962

TO TRINIDAD AND
CURACAO

for Dom-
Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
. Kitts. Sailing Friday 16th





inst.
B.W.1, SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASB8OCIA

M.¢ HERA 2nd June 1952. ‘TION (ENC)
Consignee Tele, 4047

8. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.
Agents ¥

Canadian National Steamships

©









SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Sails Ayrives
s Montreal Halifax Boston B'dos Bdos
CANADIAN CRUISER .. 29 Apr 2 May _ 11 May 13 May
CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 9 May 12 May 21May 23 May
LADY RODNEY.... - ..» 19 May 23 May 24 May 2June 3 June
CANADIAN CHALLENGER 30 May 2 June — ll June 12 June
LADY NELSON .. . °.. @June 12 June 14June 2June 4 June
CANADIAN CRUISER .. 20 June 23 June. — 3 poy 3 July
CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 30 June 3 July _ 2 13 July
LADY RODNEY il July i4Jduly 16 July July 2% July
.
NORTHBOUND Artives Sails Arrives Avrives Ajtives Arrives
Pdos Bdes St. John Boston Halifax Montreal
LADY NELSON .. &May 12 May a 22 May 2May 2 May
CDN. CRUISER 2% May ©§ 29 May 5 June — 8June 11 June
Canons RUCTOR J 15 J 18 June 21 June
Tv sv 8 June 5 June -_
LADY RODNEY .. 15 June 17 June - 27 June 2%June 1 July
CANADIAN x
CHALLENGER .. 23 June 26 June 5 July 18July 8July 2 July
LADY NELSON 6 July &@July WJuly 2 July
Ga, CRUBER +. (14 July. 18 July % July WJuly 1 Aug
N :
CONSTRUCTOR 24 July 2 July 5 Aug. 8 Aug. 10 Aug.
LADY RODNEY TAwE. 9 Aug. 19 Aug. 20 Aug. 23 Aug.
For further particulars, apply to-

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD.—Agents.



MADAM HELENE
BEAUTY SALON















ShampooPress Curls—Finger Dr. CHAS. O.¥. LOWE, Chiro-
Wave—Marcel Apex Poro or practor, Bay Street. Phone 4648.
Madam Walker Systems, Swan
Street. 11,5.52—2n,






Removal Notice

MR. CECIL JEMMOTT
wishes to inform his Cus-
tomers that he has removed
from KNIGHT’S Building,
Broad Street, to more com-
modious premises at 48,
Tudor Street, formerly. oc-
cupied by WARD'S DRUG
STORE. He is carrying on
his same business of REAL
ESTATE & COMMISSION
AGENT, as well as dealer
and seller of Pianes, Toilet
Requisites, and all matters
affecting Household requite-

















LIMITED

OFFERS YOU
ONLY
THE BEST IN

PROPERTIES

Real Etate Agents




























ments. - . Auctioneers
Telephone No. 4563 is un-- Valuers.
changed.
MMOTT 151/152 Roebuck St.
ee Telephone 4900

“ 48, Tudor-St-. >. -






nd”
GALV. NISED SHEETS
* AN

EXPANDING METAL
To. CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner Broad & Tudor Streets
+, COLMONOGOOGOO0060S6266655

” Se










SM ALCOSS





_ © ¢ MORE MONEY?
IF SO ENROLL NOW FOR ONE OF
FHESE COURSES

Architectural Draughtsmanship
Building and Design Course

A.MS.E., (Civil, Elee., and
Mec.)

Automobile Repairman’s Course

Electrical Installation and Wir-
ing Course

General Electrical Engineering
Course

General Certificate of Educa-
tion

General Agricultural Course
Insurance Practice
Salesraanship
Petroleum Technology Course
School Certificate Course
Special Book-keeping and
Accountancy

Forestry ‘
Radio Servicing Mainterrance

and Repair Course

F Private Secretaryship

_ Write for full particulars if course is not mentioned

Write to the: “

CARIBBEAN EDUCATIONAL POST COUPON TO P.O. BOX
INSTITUTE, T
P.O. BOX 307, P.O.8.
Agents for :
BRITISH INSTITUTE
ENG. TECH. &
TUTORIAL

307, P.O.8.,
Please send me Free Book.
Name Aree eereseee eeteetoeres
Address
Subject or Career

OF
BRITISH
INSTITUTE,
LONDON Ase -:.
THERE IS NO TOMORROW—POST TO-DAY ! |

of Interest









RUMCO—

THE WORLD'S. BEST RUM:



Guaranteed 5 Years Old, stored
in Wood. This Brand is blended, bottled and sold only by
US. As the word “Rumco” is registered any person infring-
ing on this Trade Mark will be strictly
We also sell all-the-othey, Well-known Brands of Liquor

and Liqueurs such asi. ~ +

GORDONS GIN. i
SEVERAL MAKES OF WHISKY.

FINDLATERS. AND S_ BRANDY.
LOUIS REEDER AND DRY MONOPOLE
: CHAMPAGNE.

We even stock - - -
HENNESSYS 40 YEAR OLD BRANDY.

Rumeo is not only soft and mellow, but goes down with
that. smooth, rich taste when drunk by itself with no after
effects. * "1 : 7

It is superb for Cocktails, Plan Punches and other
mixed drinks and it is preferred by those ‘naking Cakes.

It is no use talking or even writing about it. Taste it.
Try a bottle right away and be convinced.

If is sold ih Nips, Pints and Quart Bottles by:—

‘<
: A. E. TAYLOR LTD.
+
COLERIDGE STREET. i

Where they, afe no Parking Problems. 4
Â¥ And where
¢ Qualities are HIGH,
8 And
% Prices are LOW. |
% '
3 PLEASE DIAL: 4100.







* Owner

* access’ to



11, 1952




THANKSGIVING SERVICE 2
%,
oe R
Â¥
The “Livesey Comet” Lodge No g
3312 “Lily of Bridgetown” House
hold of Ruth No. 6655 and The
Evening Star Lodge No. 76 F
Of The Grand United Order af
’ Odd Fellows
Will be holding their annual
Thanksgiving Service at their
Lodge Rooms, Bay Street on Sun-
day llth May, 1952 beginning at
3.00 p.m, Kindred Lodges an
friends are asked to attend. A &
M Hymn Books








11.5. 52—I1n

St. David's Church
Annual Bazaar

At THE NEW PAVILION %
SARGEANT’S VILLAGE
-on «
eee 17TH MAY
‘0 opened by
Mrs. ROBERT CHALLENOR

At 3 p.m.

Police Band in Attendance
By the kind permission of
Col. Michelin.
MANY ATTRACTIONS

— i/-
Pavilion on "Bus Route from
Town and other sections of
Christ Church. (Route 16). %

REMOVAL NOTICE

JOYCE
HUTCHINSON

EXPERT HEMSTITCHING

Button & Buckle Covering
Button Holes
Modern & Fashionable
Dress Decorations

Begs to inform her many
customers that her office is
removed frorh Ist floor Col-
lins Ltd., to Knights’ Phoenix
Pharmacy (lst floor). En-
trance from Prince William
Henry St.
9.5.52.—2n.
















A.F.S., F.V.A.

COMPREHENSIVE _LIST-
INGS ALWAYS AVAIL-
ABLE.



FOR SALE
STONE BUNGALOW, Main Rd.
Worthing—Twelve montis. old:

construction carefully supervised.
Living room, gallery, 3 bedrooms
with washbasins, separate tajlet
and bathroom, kitchen, detached
servants’ quarters and garage.
Excellent bathing close at hand

leaving Island. Nearest
£4,500.

r Y MILL", Rendezvous
Hill, Ch. Ch. — Modern built
bungalow, 3 bedrooms, lounge,
kite’ . @arage, servants’ quar-
ters, walled and standing on 8,000
sq. ft. land. In good area with
unobstructed view. Any reasonable
offer accepted.

MODERN RESIDENCE, Maxwell
Coast—Very well built stone
house near coast with spacious
drawing room having French
windows leading on to wide
roofed verandahs. Dining room,
breakfast room, fitted kitchen, 4
double ms, 2-car garage,
servants’ quarters and private
access to good beach. This
Property includes a detached and
teadily saleable building plot.

“ARCHWAY HOUSE”, Navy
Cardens—A modern, compact and
well built stone property in a
popular and central residential
quarter. The house is assured of
adequate privacy by flowering
shrubs and shade trees. There is
a good sized living room and
dining room, 3 airy bedrooms,
separate toilet and bathroom with
Uled shower. The garage is
integral with the main building
and has a door giving direct
the house. A wide
L-shaped front verandah, which
is not overlooked, is a pleasant:
and dominant feature. Good
servant’s quarters are provided
and the grounds of 14,250 sq. ft.
are completely fenced and private.
Very reasonably priced at above



figure as owner is leaving the
Island.

“MALTA”, St. Peter—A modern

stone built house of extremely

lid. and extensively

added attrac-

contains 2



there ib usually a cooling breeze)
there is a wide and spacious cov-
verandah with outlook sea-
wards, a large bathroom, drawing
room, 2 bathrooms one with hot
water instalied, 3 bedrooms (1
with own bath and toilet) butler’s
pantry and modern kitchen
Approx: % acre of land well laid
out and irrigated from own water

ily, also Mains water and light.
Right of way to beach and good
bathing opposite house.

COVE SPRING HOUSE, St.
James — A 2 storey house on
with good grounds and in-
teresting posstbilities. There iv
excellent bathing from a secluded
and private sandy cove.

“WYNDOVER", St. Peter—A
oe one storey stone residence

i

garage. Grounds

4% acres with productive
orchard, flower and vegetable
gardens, driveway and large park-
ing space for cars. “‘Wyndover”
is well elevated on the ridge,
always benefits from a breeze and
commands perfect views of the
coastline.



RENTALS

Several furnished and unfurn-
ished houses for rent.

e
John b4. Bladen
& Ce.

Phone 4640
Plantations Building











SUNDAY, MAY ll, 1952





GOVERNMENT NOTICES

VACANT POST OF CAPTAIN OF THE
RESEARCH BOAT “INVESTIGATOR”

Applications are invited for the vacant post of Captain of the
Fisheries Research Boat, “Investigator”.

2. The salary attached to the post is at the rate of $1,200 per
afinum plus temporary cost of living allowance of $144 per annum.

3. Post is temporary and non-pensionable. Appointment will be
made subject to medical fitness and will be terminable by one month’s
notice on either side.

4. The holder of the post will be in charge of the Research Boat
and will be responsible to the Fishery Officer for its general manage-
ment and operation.

5. Applicants should have a working knowledge of Navigation
up to inter-island standard. ’ r

6. Applications stating age, qualifications and experience should
be addressed to the Director of Agriculture, Department of Science and
Agriculture, Queen’s Park, and should be submitted not later than
Saturday, 17th May, 1952.

11.5.52—2n,



‘

Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-
ment) Order, 1952, No. 13 which will be published in the Official
Gazette of Monday, 12th May, 1962. '

2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling
prices of “Biscuits—Local” are as follows:—

ARTICLE

WHOLESALE PRICE] RETAIL PRICE
(not more than)

(not more than)



Biscuits—Local:

(a) Sunrise $3.28 per ctn of 3 for Ic.
24 lbs.
(b) Special Eclipse $3.40 per ctn of 5 for 2c.
24 Ibs.
10th May, 1952. 11,5,52—I1n,



Vacant Post of Radiographer, General Hospital, Barbados.

Applications are invited for appointment of the non-pensionable
post of Radiographer, General Hospital, Barbados. ee

The salary attached to the post is at the rate of $1,560 x 72—1,920
(B.W.1.) per annum, plus a temporary cost of living allowance. A
ration allowance of $240 per annum is payable and free uniforms are
provided, Return passages not exceeding $1,440 each way are payable.
Quarters are not provided, If the selactee is a contributor to the
Federated Superannuation Scheme for Nurses, the employer's share
of the contribution will be paid.

The appointment will be on agreement for a period of 3 years in
the first instance and will be subject to renewal.

The holder of the post will be required to assist the Radiologist

dates, with the dual qualifications of Diagnostics and Therapy.

Applications should be addressed to the Colonial Secretary, Public
Buildings, Bridgetown, to reach him not later than the 10th of June,
1952.

11.5,52—2n,



PART ONE ORDERS

LIRUT.-COL, J, at OBR. BD, top
THE B ‘ i c F.ke

Issue No. 19 9 May @.



1. PARADE — TRAINING
All ranks will parade at Regt HQ at 1700 hours on Thursday 16th May, 1962.
All Companies will carry out drill with a view to rehearsing for the Queen's
Birth Day Parade.
BAND — PRACTICES
Band Practices will be held on Mon, 12, Wed. 14 & Thurs 15 May $2
SIGNALS — COURSE
All N.C.Os of the Signal Platoon a the signal NC.Os course on

rs

Mon. 12 — Wed. 14 May 52, at 1700

ANNUAL CAMP

The Annual Camp will be held at Walker's, St. from Friday 13 to
Sunday 22 June &. All ranks who are able to attend and have not yet
handed in their names should inform the R.S.M, as soon as possible

4. REGIMENTAL—SPORTS MEETING
Para. 3 of Part I Orders dated 11 Apr.
Sports will be held on Saturday 7 June 52,
Jater.

is cancelled. The Regimental!
ther details will be announced

1 ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING
1%, MAY 52

Orderly Officer

Orderly Serjeant

Lieut. S. G. Lashley
400, Sit. Reid, N. E.

Lieut. P. L. C. Peterkin
381, Sjt. Robinson, V. N.

Next for duty
Orderly Officer
Orderly Serjeant

M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major,
S.O.L.F. & Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment

PART I ORDERS
THE BARBADOS REGIMENT SERIAL NO. 16



1 LEAVE— "aa
319, THe Granted 2 weeks S/Lenve from 23
Apr.6 May 52

Granted 2 weeks S/Leave from 1-—

Knight, E. E., HQ. Coy
468, Li/Cpi. May, G., “A” Cae
15 May 5!
. STRENGTH DECREASE—RESIGNATIONS
400, Pte A ’
481, Pte

Crane, D

d The marginally named are permitted
Chandler, E '

to resign from the Regiment, wef.
Â¥ May 52.
M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Baise,
S.O.L.F. & tant,

The Barbados Regiment.



VY

( STOP PAIN ‘*



The famous threefold action of PHENSIC tablets RELIEVES
PAIN, SOOTHES NERVES, COUNTERACTS DEPRESSION.
No matter how intense the
how depressed you feel, P v
comfort, quickly and safely. Remember this — PH
neither harm the heart nor upset
substitutes. Keep a supply of PHENSIC tablets by you!

in, no matter how weary your nerves,
NSIC tablets will bring you relief and
SIC tablets
the stomach. Don’t accept

Phensic

‘ TWO TABLETS BRING QUICK RELIEF
FROM RHEUMATIC PAINS LUMBAGO, NERVE PAINS,
HEADACHES, NEURALGIA, INFLUENZA, COLDS & CHILLS








Short Burners
2 Burner Model @ 14
3 Burner Model @ $71.87

Also

WHITE PORVELAIN ENAMEL
With Double Drainboard @ $65.64
complete with waste and overflow

T. HERBERT, Ltd.
10 & 11 Roebuck Street

Established Incorporated





College, but all other f must t.
in the Diagnostic and Therapy services of the X-Ray Department " SUP ee ae Cones Neng mmuat he) ma
General Hospital, Candidates should hold the certificate of Member- 4, Attention is drawn to the fact that residence in the Milner
ship of the Society of Radiographers, preference being given to candi- | Hostel at the College is compulsory.



EXPORT OF LIVESTOCK

Consideration will. be given to the issuing of export licences for a |
limited number of the following livestock for breeding purposes: —-
(a) Heifers and Bulls between the ages of 6—12 months }

(b) Pigs. |

2. Applications for licences which should be submitted in writing

to the Director of Agriculture will be considered strictly in rotation
and the livestock selected for export must be approved by the Depart- |
ment of Agriculture as being suitable for breeding purposes. 4 }
11.5. 52—2n. |



JOHN R. BOVELL SCHOLARSHIP

Applications are invited for one “John R. Bovell Scholarship”
which will be of the value of $1,236 per annum for three years ten-
able at the Imperial College of Tropical Agriculture. Applications to
be addressed to the Director of Agriculture, will be received at the
< nn of Science and Agriculture up to the 17th of

YY, *

2. Applications will be considered from a candidate who —
(a) is between 18 and 21 years of age on the Ist of May,



1 ;

(b) has reached advanced standard in at least one science
subject together with at least ordinary standard in a
second science subject;

(c) is a native of Barbados, the son of a native or of parents
who have been domiciled in the Island for ten years
prior to the date of application;

(d) submits evidence of good character and general ‘fitness
to profit by a course of study at the Imperial College.

3. A candidate may be required to submit a medical certificate
testifying to his physical fitness.

4. Attention is drawn to the fact that residence in the Milner
Hostel at. the College is compulsory and the allowances have been
increased to enable the John R. Bovell Scholarship holders to com-
ply with this regulation. eases

5. The successful applicant will be required to begin ‘his studies
at the Imperial, College ae 1952. If no applicant possess-
ing the requ qualifications is forthcoming, the award of the
scholarship. will be postponed until next year. abe
E 9.5,52—2n.

»
wt

FREE TUITION SCHOLARSHIP

Applications for one free tuition scholarship tenable at the Im-
perial College of Tropical Agriculture will be received by the Direc-
tor of Agriculture up to the 17th of May, 1952.

2. Candidates should be not less than 17 years of age on the
ist of September, 1952, and have obtained a General Certificate of
me in at least five subjects, two of which should be Science

jubjects.

3. This stholarship entitles the holder to free tuition at the



Sai te er

9.5,52—2n.



ISLAND SCHOLARSHIPS, 1952

An examination for election to the above Scholarships will be
held at Harrison College on the 13th and 14th June, 1952.

Applications must be sent to the Director of Education, The Gar-
rison, St. Michael, not later than the 23rd May, 1952.

Candidates must be

(a) under twenty years of age on the 3ist of May, 1952,

(b) natives or sons of natives of Barbados, or of persons who
are domiciled in the Island and have been resident in the
Island for at least ten years.

Candidates must also provide Birth Certificates and Certificate
of their general character and conduct covering at least three years
immediately preceding their candidature.

Department of Education,

ith May, 1952.

(ee ees eee
Che Amateur Athletic Association
of Rarbados

— presents —

INTER-COLONIAL CYCLE AND ATHLETIC
SPORTS

Under the distinguished patronage of H.E. the Governor
Str ALFRED SAVAGE, K.C.M,C.

at KENSINGTON OVAL

—on —

SAT., 318T MAY, MON., 2ND JUNE, THURS., 5TH JUNE
Events commence at 1.00 p.m.

Intercolonial rivalry on the highest level - - -
Cyclists and Athletes from Trinidad, B.G. and Grenada competing
— PROGRAMME —

1st 8
Parade of A eee

thietes
1 Mile Cycle All Classes
440 Yds, Flat Men
100 Yds. Flat

2nd Day
1 Mile Cycle Roadster Fixed
r Mile Cycle Roadster 3
ie} % Mile Cycle All Classes speed
Boys under 16 100 yds. Flat Elementary 280 yds. Flat—Men
100 yds. Flat Girls under 16 Boys
100 yds. Flat Girls over 16 100 yds.
100 yds. Flat Boys over 46 Girls
High Jump—Men 100 yds. Flat Men
1 Mile Cycle Roadster Free- 3 Mile Cycle All Classes
whee ‘ole Vault
1 Mile Cycle Boys under 16 880 yds, Relay—Men
440 yds. Relay Boys Schools Long Jump—Men
1 Mile Flat—Men
9 Mile Cycle—open

150 yds, Flat Girls under 16
Flat Elementary 220 yds, Flat Boys under 16
220 yds. Flat Girls over 16

2 Mile Cycle All Classes
440 yds. Relay—-Men

5 Mile Cycle All Classes
Putting the Shot

440 yds. Flat—Boys over 163 Mile Flat-—Men

880 yds. Flat—Men

Devil take the Hindmost
15 Mile Cycle—open

52. EVENTS OF KEEN COMPETITION.
Entries must reach the Assistant Secretary, c/o Carrington & Sealy,

Lucas Street by 4.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 14th May. No entries will be |

accepted after that date.

By kind permission of the Commissioner of Police a Pool will be
run on the results of the Cycle Events in aid of the Farnum for Finland
Fund. Watch the Advocate for detai’s.

— PRICES OF ADMISSION —
KENSINGTON STAND — $1.00 per day SEASON TICKET — $2.16
GEO, CHALLENOR ” -72 per day SEASON TICKET — $1.60
UNCOVERED STAND -— .36 per day GROUNDS — 18

Season Tickets obtainable from The Advocate Stationery
and Carrington & Sealy.








POLICE SPORTS

°

KENSINGTON OVAL

°

MAY 22nd. —

°

- Admission : ADULTS ~
CHILDREN —

36c"
18c.

1
3 p.m.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



220 yds. Flat Boys over 16 | |!



BADE SY THE BOMES OF BUCKFAST ABBEY










RHEUMATIC REMEDY

PAGE FIFTEEN



Mayonaise—-Bots.

Mangoe Chutney Sanuce—Bots.
Horse Radis Sance

Tomato Sauce

Rose’s Lime Juice

Cc. T. Onions

Ox Tongues—2-lb. Tins
Brisket Beef—4-lb.

Oxo Cubes

Lactogen

Cashew Nuts

Cashew Nuts

UAllit Biscuits

Asparagus

Ourrie Powder

Assorted Biscuits Bourn Vita

GOLDEN ARROW RUM.
PERKINS & CO... LTD.

Roebuck Street os

Wf you feel worn out, depressed, of
generally run down a glass or two a day of
Buckfast Tonic Wine will quickly restore lost
energy and tone up the whole nervous system.
Giving new vitality It fortifies you against fever
and exhaustion and remember, Buckfast Tonic
Wine Is especially valuable after il/ness.

Chicken Haddies Tins
Tomato Juice

Lamb Tongue

Goose berries

Pears

Peaches

Cherries

Hams~— (Cooked)

Bacon (Sliced)--Ib.
Mansion Polish — Tins
White Pepper in
Black Pepper

Cocktail Biscuits




TONIC WINE,
2 SSS





anata meee

__
PPA LALLA SLLSPS FLED

RIDE A ....

HOPPER
BICYCLE

THE BARBADOS , FOUNDRY LTD.

White Park Road.
St. Michael

4326
4528







i

ALL WHO

SUFFER FROM
RHEUMATISM

TAKE

SCE

LLLDSPPLESSSSF ISSA SS

SIMPLY

(BRAITHWAITE

Office:

Workshop : 4546
Merchandise :

” 4650

STOKES & BYNOE LTD.—AGENTS®

NEW TIMES! NEW FASHIONS! NEW SHIRTS!

RELIANCE

THE SHIRT BARBADOS LOVES

You'll Find Relief with the First Bottle.

“9s,










ee

——_—_

Sn ipeaeat nai

o

Driven by Mr. G. Hinchliffe and Mr,
J. Bulan, a Hillman Minx Saloon reached
Cape Town from Pali Mali, London, in 21 days,
19 hours and 45 minutes, This magnifi-
cent performance, achieved in the face of
extremely heavy floods and bad road
conditions, cut no jess than 2 days, S hours
and 5 minutes off the previous fastest
time — made by a much bigger car.

HILLMAN MINX

You get so much more out of the MINX



COLE & CO., LTD.
DISTRIBUTORS.

CRAFTSMAN BUILT. BY ROOTES &







se i) ee

f ;



)

1&.

An AaMo se Oso Sree

eT EROS

oa ©



PAG E SIXTEEN





C.C. C’tee To dend Resolution $







%” POLLS SSPE FFP OFF

: SEA AND AIR

OGCCSS eo1sc0e. .

@ from rage il As egards passenger _ traffic,
they would receive a fair share of Captain Clarke pointed out that
business. whereas before the war, between 7 1
Replying to number of ques- 10 and 15 West Indians travelled TRAFFIC
tions from members of the Coun- north each trip, today there was i
cil, Captain Clarke said he could only between 1 and 3 making each >
not say what arrangements were trip, and what was more, they %-GGGG0*-¢ ALAC

being made by the Canadian Gov-




ernment, but in the mea ne thes
would continue the freight servic
with the same regularity

He said that the volume f
passenger traffic is below what it
used to be, and the subsidy con-

tributed by the West Indian Gov-
ernments is only about 58% of
what it was before the devaluation

o > ) ernm
of the pound sterling. He disclosed to curtail their participation in the From Triniasa—

thet a survey made last year for

were not getting whet they

ARRIVALS BY BW.LA

con~ ON FRIDAY



idered a ieasonable portion Of from Trinidad

+ eels >) . E Szunyogh, B. Chin, E F
1 ig 20 a € ) -war é
freight. Going back to pe i, Montell, Ho Hulks, K Abia
days, Captain Clarke said that je R ‘Laidier, A Shields



the West Indies used to get their
cargo coming in from January to

DEPARTURES BY B.W.LA
ON FRIDAY
Por Brien Guiana:

Decemter, and C.NS., did not © ‘4; Seabee hate” MM. -Chabrol,. Mr
largély pa-ticipate in the imports P Tavehs Mr. S Leelum, Mr C
at that time. Since the war, Gov- Stephenson. Mr. B. Jardine

ARRIVALS BY B.W.ILA

had forced them ON THURSDAY

ent controls

f Abaaroa, D. Allette, W. Clark, E
expanding the company and with fou shipment Parris, E. Parchment. 3° Wicknamn’ i
1 view to taking a look into the Hargreaves, H. Lucie-Smith, C. Gollop,
future, they ‘found that on .the Trade Agreement enue’ - ees a Dempsey
1 ur 2 jouter, Makhou Nahous, D
estimated cost of three new vessels Dear .

hased on the 1949 figure the opera- The question was raised between penanee y

yased on th 949 figur Pp f the C arding RTURES BY B.W.LA,

tion of these vessels on this run members 0 e Council reg ON THURSDAY

Yould incur a deficit of over the possibility of opening negotia~ For Antigus

$800,000 (Canadian), whereas thc
present contribution of the Eastern
Caribbean amounted
$75,000 “nd $80,000.

they felt that the entire deficit was

should be borne by

Indian Governments, but

fever it was.
Capital Cost
It would cost in the region of
five or six million dollars, for the
capital cost of*one vessel, and the

new vessels would be slightly more

economical to run from the point
of view of fuel.

Captsin Clarke said that Barba-
des was at present the-worst port,
and it was costing the Company
$10,000 a voyage.

Asked concerning the question
of increased rates, the C.NS.,
official said that since the war the
rates had only gone up 110 per
cent ‘whereas operational costs had
risen by 175 per cent. In reply to
a. further question, he said that a
smaller vessel carrying 50 or 60
Passengers would cost about the
same in salaries as one carrying
110 or 120 passengers, because the
heads of the departments would
have to be paid in accordance with
their salary scales.









ALL YOURS, M’BOY :-+-DESK
ai STUDY LAMP:ENCYCLOPEDIA~
â„¢, THIS IS YOUR DENA PLACE
{ WHERE YOU CAN DO YOUR
LESSONS AND CONCENTRATE”







tions

it was sideration,
felt that the colonies should con- would be
tribute about 4 of the deficit, what- October.

| They'll Do Do It Every Time



Pop wever i NEVER HAD A PLACE TO STUDY
WHEN HE WAS A KID, SO HE SHOT THE
WORKS ON A STUDY ROOM FOR JUNIOR

Hawkins, Mr

for a new Canada-West Mr T R_ Williams,

Mr. J Turner, Master C Pole, M
Indies Trade Agreement, since it j1, pole. Me Hi Pogsot, Mr. D Han-
to between was felt that the two matters were son, Mr. H. Garcia, Mr” A, Frampton,
Not thet tied up one with the other, but it M's |J. | Maguire, Master M Maguire,
oe
pointed out that the Ume wy Cariston Inniss, Miss Madeline
the West element had to be taken into con- Sobers, Mr. Graham MacFarlane, Mr

service Henry ‘Sealy,
next

because the Mr. Harold Lowe
' ARRIVALS
discontinued ‘ON WEDRESUNY LA,
from Trinidad:

Captain Clarke suggested that 3. Pipoli, 1. Burke, H

Fraser, G
Lambert, N. Wolfe, W

Anthony, C

Harewood,
Corbin, Mr.
Smith, Mr. C. Davis
Oscar Smith, Mrs. E Smith, Mr
M. Melendez, Mrs. A. Melendez, Mr
Maillard,



the sooner some protest or SUBCS- He Meillac M Wittems, 1. Sens. ‘Db
tion was made to the Canadian Morrison, T Guiterrez, R Lynch, G,.
Government as to whether there Bayne. B.' Bane, Be Meuley. i Auten,
was anything they could do to way. T. Wall, R. Lenonard, C Sucre
prolong the service, the better it G. Sucre. ?
would be, and in reply to a ques- OU tate LA,
tion said that as a temporary for trinidad: -
measure the present Lady Boats Rev. F. Lawrence, Mr. S
could be carried on for a time as a Thtne ae ee Mr J
a “stop gap.’ Mr

Following the discussion, Mr.
A. S. Bryden moved that a two- &
man committee comprised of Hae
President and the Vice-President «s 9
be appointed to draft a Resolution LADY NELSON SAILS
urging Government to take the MONDAY
matter up with other West Indian The Lady Nelson, which arrived
Governments with a view toon Friday from Georgetown,
entering negotiations with the Trinidad, Grenada and St. Vin-
Car edian Government to see what cent will be sailing at 9.00 pm. on
could be done in the matter, Monday for Bermuda, Boston,

The member Chambers of the Halifax and Montreal via the Bri-

Incorporated Chambers of Com- tish Northern islands,
merce will be informed of the
action taken by the local Chamber. sengers and cargo.
Cn RL iy

ba

- By fi Jimmy | Hatlo |i]

Hepiniared US Patent OMe












Avo WHERE DOES JUNIOR DO ALL HIS
STUDYING # WHY, ON HIS STOMACH IN |
THE LIVING ROOM, OF CouRSsE!

JZ me DON'T you " OH, SURE“IT’S

OKAY I JUST WANT \”


















EE We LIKE THE NICE
DEN WE FIXED TO SEE THE END
UP FOR YOU? OF THIS PROGRAM



WHAT'S THE CAPITAL



HOUSEHOLD DEPARTMENT






The Nelson will be taking pas- (eee om





































































SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, MAY Til, 1952
B B C R = (SaaS SS FSS) | = a5;
ob Pele adio i tT SUPPLIES SOW AVAILABLE )) 9
P ) ARTIST AND STUDENTS OIL COLOURS
rogramme ZINC WHITE, FLAKE WHITE AND TIFANIUM—iarge size tt}
emit din ARTIST SABLE AND BRISTLE BRUSHES, Flat & Round
007 QoNDsY. . ee oan PURIFIED LINSEED OIL, POPPY OIL AND TURPENTINE
of met Ps ALETTES, PALETTE KNIVES & DIPPERS
$00 pm The News “30pm Inter CHARCOAL, FIZATIVE AND SPRAYERS,
tude. 4.15 p m_ For the Common Good. | s — also — |
7 2 : wo Hour ae vari ] SCHOLASTIC WATER COLOURS
ety Bandbox 615 pm English Maga- POWDER AND POSTER COLOURS
zine 6 45 Programme Parade and DRAWING AND SKETCH BLOCKS :
Interlude 70 p m The Rvs w 7.10 }) e : ‘
Pie ame News rom eT aap in white & assorted
OT i}
715 pm. Caribbean Voices 45 pt {i ROBERTS & Co. - Dial 3301 | Colours
Sunday fervice @15 pm Radio News- blew At) yt
reel] 8.30 pm_ Ivor Moretan & vere |
Kaye. 8645 pm _ Interlude 55 C= ieee) il ies si ee 3
Fe hea Ow | with MADERIA
10 10 p m. News talk 015 pm n=
jon Forum 10 45 r The Bible in} + :
fatal eile ES ALDING or REPAIRING ? EMBRCIDERY
MONDAY, MAY 12, 1952 | ® e
4.00—7.15 19 76M 25 We can supply
ceeerperenenenen eee CICS
400 p.m The News. 410 pm oe | D> ¥ SUN SUITS -
Daily Service 415 p.m. From the Thi Ti ’ ; : ‘ .
Programme 5 00. pm. Jumes Verity PATCH PINE in tie following sizes
$15 pm Souvenirs of Music 6 00 p.m. BIBS and
Welsh Misceliany 615 pm. Take it
from here 645 p.m_ Sports reunmeee:| 1x3 3 xe3 4x4
Progra me Parade, 7 00 hi
News 710 pm. Home News from 1x4 3x4 4x6 BABY PILLOW
Britain | 1x6 3x6 4x8
7 15—10 30 25 53M 31 32M 2x4 3x8 4 x10
7.15 1 Lady he S
Wk atts Ve, Satan ets 2x6 3x10 4x12 | CASES
Radio Newsreel 3.20 B, m Afvigan Sur- 2x8 3 x12 |
vey 845 pn terlude 5
Prot the eNitorials 9.00 p.m Room. to ||} DOUGLAS FIR
ad eer ie 2x 4, 2x 8, 1x 8 siding
Talk 1015 pm B.LF. Report. 10 3¢

p.m. Tip Top Tunes

WEATHER REPORT }|
YESTERDAY

Rainfall from Codrington: nil

Total Rainfall for month to

PLYWOOD

Phone 4267.





date: .21 in.
Temperature: 71 °F. |
Wind Velocity: 11 miles per |
hour. |
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.977
(11 a.m.) 29.970 |
TO-DAY |
Sunrise: 5.40 a.m. | eS
Sunset: 6.16 p.m. %
Moon: Full, May 9 ,
Lighting: 7.00 p.m %
High Tide: 4.20 a.m, 5.41 pm. || $
Low Tide: 11.12 a.m. 11.02 1%
p.m ss
1%
g



- FREE YOURSELF 1)




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with

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ROOT Le 7 i ES

@ Banish headache, backache, biliousness
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@ Dr. Morse's Pills contain six active
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@ Gentle, offective 9-hour action will not
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@ Special TONIC ingredient helps restore
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Worms threaten old and young alike. Be
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LADIES‘ HANDBAGS



STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS
' TEMPERED HARDBOARD SHEETS
4” WALLBOARD SHEETS

WILKINSON & HAYNES C0, LTD.

ONLY $36.00 EA.

Ideal for the Tropics

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a —OPOSOPSS OE SSOOS SE FESSOS SOY









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oe



=

—————————eaEeEaIESeaI=aeaeew ee



This shipment—coolly tropical and re-
freshing as a breezec—in keeping with ovr
newly reeeived Tropical Worsteds and
Tropical Gabardines,
at prices that are
highly competitive

ae
v.

C. B. Rice & Co.





TO MAKE ROOM FOR A NEW SHIPMENT OF MERCHANDISE
WE ARE OFFERING ALL OUR WHITE GOODS
AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES

THE UNDERMENTIONED ARTICLES IS PROOF OF THE
WONDERFUL OPPORTUNITY OF LIGHTENING
YOUR BUDGET

adap at ae wets

RYN eS
THIS 1S WHITE SALE

REALLY RINGS THE BELL FOR

__GREATER VALUES — BETTER PRICES

weue au

"READ ALL ABOUT IT —
- DATE WITH

PPK Ten Snore:

OR em ee eB A me

TWICE — THEN HAVE A DOUBLE
FOGARTY’S THIS WEEK

ype eg

DRESS GOODS DEPARTMENT

GENTS’ HATS



e
36” K, W. B. Spun ...... ‘ NOW § .85 per yd.
; 36” Royal Spun ...... VRS ie 96 ” Gents’ White Drill Hats—each .......... $ 1.44
White Sensation Spun ..... * 1.00 » :
36” White Shantunge ....... i 2.00 ss ” » Peak Caps—each .......4... 1.48
” —Sunelaine , 110 4 ‘
4 inert . ” » Straw Hats—each .......... 4.00
36” y» Linen .... seers ” 1.68 ”
BO ym ant daeeeeee » Men by og Mele ath! ) wiaeuacns 8.00
36” » Art Silk Shantung ”» 1.00 ”
er °
GENTS’ DEPARTMENT
e '
'
Gents’ White Shirts—Shamrock—each $ 3.50 GENTS’ WHITE MATERIALS
» Elite White Shirts—each .......--- 5.00
. » Trubenised Shirts—each 6.25 &
» White Metropole Shirts—each ..... 5.00 are :
Premier L/S White Sport Shirts—each 5.80 28” Seaport White Drill—per yd. ...... $ 1.40
» S/S White Sport Shirts—each is 5.40 28” Portress White Drill—per yd. ........ 91
» L/S White Southsea Shirts—each .. 3.96 sav White Shaskikin “apet yd. 006... ve
» S/S White: Southsea Shirts—each .. 3.60
e = 54” ¥ pe ME FOE iio 8 8 4.32
» S/S Tweka Sports Shirts—each .... 4.25 kar tai i.
»» L/S Tweka Sports Shirts—each .... 4.75 se ROPUM——-Per FG. ose esses se ees 3.00
White Cotton Kerchiefs 18 x 18—each 28 56” » Tropical—per yd. ............. 4.00
» Woollen H. Hose & or pair 84 56” » Cricketing Flannel—per yd. 5.00
» Jockey Shorts—per pair .......... 84
28” » Linen — yd.
» Underpants—per pair 1.85 Liner per yds... eis iw ane 3.60
» Pegasus Shorts—per pair .......... 96 28” Moygashel Linen—per yd. .... 5.00
» Silk Scarves—each ................ 1.32 56” ' Doaskinccper ‘a: e108 & $11.87

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+98 Only he geal x 90— + aan 25 bed oe watlebeeraall Bedspreads
emmed each @ ..... : $ 5. x eee ure ot yes 8.50 |
hite Haz ags Ba Ss oak .
250 Only Cotton Sheeis—70 x 90 ‘Hem- 25 Only White Beneenom Bedspreads Pr eene nee. Bee —
stitched each @ ..........00 5.0055 6.00 80 x 100—each ............... 9.00 | » Plastic Linen Handbags—each 4.00
Cotton Sheets 80 x 100 Hemmed each @ 7.20 600 White Kitchen Towels 18 x Sdccoath 72 7
| ” » Drawstring Handbags—each 1.44
160 Only Linen Sheets 72 x 108 Hem- 600 White Glass Towels 23 x 32—each 90 |
stitched each @ ........... 6605s 11.00 Mosquito Netting 90” wide—per yd. 1,20 » Silk Gloves—per pair $1.08 & 1.92
Se ee ae 90 x 108 Hem- \aias Readymade Mosquito Nets—Single—each 12.80 » Woollen Pullovers—each .......... 5.00
Corona Cotton Sheeting 90” ead diete ot 2.75 Readymade Mosquito Nets—Double—each 18.00 Large Assortment of ‘White Handkerchiefs
36” Linen Sheetin be ve 2.56 White Duchess Sets in Indian Lace—each 6.00 | OO As baeeu Ma iuee ees t 12ce. — 35c.
SW Giued shacktep ie ck soy | Tea Cloth Sets (1 Cloth and 6 Serviettes) PENG POP YE ere r sss 45 x 45—per set ............. TJ
90" Linen Sheeting—per yd. 5.75 Tea Cloth Sets (1 Cloth and 6 Serviettes)
100 only Linen Pillow Cases 28 x scsi 2.75 50 x 50—per set 0.6... eee ees 8.00 | LADIES’ WHITE SHOES
240 Special Damask Table one 54 x 54— Lace Curtain Nets—per yd. 37e. — 83e. se
each 4.00 600 Huck-a-back Guest Towels 20 x 32— e 1%
120~—Cf, bs ‘A 54 x teaceeck 5.00 each Dice aera : c 1.08
120 - > » 54 x 70—each 6.00 Cotton Panketenaash b aceite ace 5.75 Nace Court with Mudguard, Med.
600 , Napkins 18 x 18—each 59 4-Ib, 5-Ib. G-Ib, FID. | pike Heels—per pair ......... $10.25
5 Pieces Cotton Damask Tabling 54” Hammocks | Nu-Buck Sandals — Swing ee, Cuban
Wide—per yd, aot Meier eters ont, | 1.50 $9.50 $12.00 $15.00 $17.50 | Heel—per pair ; ‘ i 11,00
» White Fancy—Spike Heels—per pair 6.50
ER Arcola Fancy Court—close heei, open toe
MANCHESTER DEPARTMENT _ 1ES' WHITE UNDERWEAR PO PONE! Wins MR Res veda vs ga sess 16.00
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| Hol s is—W — 5
e Ladies’ Art Slik Paitite—per par . s 124 ollang Sandals—Wedge Heels—per pair 8.50
L : s : Es 2, SCOTS ET TT SE a
86” Kurupung Cotton—per yd. ... $ ‘ Diy gp ers 8 re . 2.17 SILK DEPARTMENT
ow) 9 n—per yd. : .30 » Nylon Slips—each ua 7.75
Pees Butter Mages 7 | ,. Nylon Panties—per pair $2.64 & 2,90
| » Rayon Vests—each 1.00 e
ORCI TS A TNR » Cotton Vests—cach Tse. & 1.42
} » O. 8. Vests—each 96
LADIES’ HATS | Cotton Panties—per pair .80 48” White Brocaded Silk NOW §$2.16 per yd. |
e | Children’s Art Silk Panties—each 66 » Bemberg Silk ,.. rae 7 as
Children’s Cotton Panties—each 40 | Georgett 1.50
Ladies’ Nylon Nightdresses—each 11.00 | » Georgette . ” A »
+ 5 1 Hats—eac $ 4.00 Ladies’ Rayon Nightdresses, open top—cach 3.97 Heavy White Crepe 1.50 iy
White Straws Hats—each | Ladies’ Rayon Nightdresses—each 8.00 hite chess Crepe
5.00 White Duchess Crepe 1.70 oo
i se ie Ladies’ 2-piece Bath Snuits—Lastex—each 13.00 ; cas
4.80 Satin Lastex each 12.00 Smooth Finish Crepe ” 1.32 ie
” ” ” ” :
Crinoline Straw—cach 4.32 Ladies’ White Silk Blouses—Embroidered ie Corded Crepe 1.32 ”
o —each 9. > obi 916
Cringline Flops—each #85 Ladies’ White Silk Blouses—Lace Trimmed Sharkskin . ” 2.16
Children’s Straw—each $2.00 & $2.50 —each 8.00 ' 36” White Gloria Satin ... 74

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%  101 I SIM1VV AllldlAII SlINDAV, M\V 11. 1S52 i. 1 f--—i Sunday. May 11, 1952 iii.i.r iuisi:ii SELF-IIKU' bousing in Ihc Caribbean is now official 1 by most governments in the area as the only practical method of building large numbers of rural houses. In Puerto Rico experiments in aided self-help have been so successful that houses. 272 square feet in area, containing ofM living room, two bedrooms, porch and kitchen are today being constructed for the equivalent of $550 B.W.I. In Barbados on the other hand chattel houses 18 x 9 feet are estimated to cost $600 each to build. The recent visit to Barbados of two Americans loaned to the Caribbean Commission under the Point 4 Technical Aid Programme provides this island with an opportunity fur self-examination. Is Barbados doing as much as it can to encourage self-aided housing Is it prepared to learn anything from the experience of Puerto Rico or even from Antigua and Jamaica where local governments are actively encouraging self-aid housing? The visit of Mr. Lashley of the Barbados Housing Board to Antigua. Puerto Rico and Jamaica at the expense of the Government of Barbados would suggest that Barbados is in fact very eager to learn from first hand about neighbouring territories' experience. But the visit of Mr. Lashley to Antigua. Puerto Rico and Jamaica and the visit of the two American self-help housim: experts to Barbados will make little impression on Barbados' housing problem or needs unless there is widespread recognition and understanding of what those problems are. There is a tendency for Barbadians to regard housing with a mixture of complacency and fatalism. "What can be done is being done, and nobody could do much more" could, not unfairly, be quoted as typical of the mentality of those who are responsible for housing programmes in the island. The justification for this smugness and fatalism cannot easily be discovered. In recent years housing has been engaging the attention of the government of Barbados. In 1948. thirty-eight houses were built at the Pine Housing Estate. In 1950 forty houses were added to that MUU and in lft&l a loUal of 54 housea were completed at the Pine and Bay Estates and 50 houses were being constructed at the Bay Estate. Over a four-year period less than 200 houses were built by the Government and the costs of those houses were between four and five and six times the cost of houses being built by aided selfhelp methods in Puerto Rico. In addition to building new houses the Government of Barbados during this period and beginning in 1946 removed 68 houses from slum areas to Bellleld Housing Estate: 14 to the Pine Estate: and 351 to the Bay Estate. Besides the building of new houses and removal of houses from slum and condemned areas the Government Peasants' Loan Bank has issued loans to between three and four thousand peasants for rep.ms to houses. In a small island like Barbados the government's attitude to housing based on this record of achievement could not be described as indifferent, especially when it is remembered that other agencies exist to help housebuilders other than government agencies. But there is too great a tendency for housing authorities to regard house building in Barbados as something with regard to which Barbados mdst provide its own formula, irrespective of building costs and irrespective of the experience of other territories in the area. Too often is the argument heard in Barbados that the people of this island are rugged individualists and will not do this or that. The way to deal with rugged individualists is to strike their names off the waiting list for government houses. It is quite wrong to build limited numbers of houses for a very liny percentage of the island's population and to allow this small number to dictate housing policy. If government money is to be spent on providing cheap rented homes for some people the government, not the people, must decide how best that money is to be spent. How can houses ever be built at reasonable prices if costs have to include provision of walls and roads on a scale which eclipses or competes with housing estates built by private enterprises. In an island which will not within thirty years be able to provide proper accommodation for all its people what justification can there be for lavishing money on nonessentials on the restricted number of houses built for those who are privileged to enjoy the special amenities of the Bay or Pine Estates. On the Pine Estate itself might not more be done by the Housing Board to encourage the production of more food by making tenancy of government houses there dependent on the cultivation of garden allotments ? But while room for improvement undoubtedly exists h llM urban housing schemes run by the government the building of rural houses seems hardly to have been touched. In this field the Point 4 grant of some $68,000 D S to the Caribbean Commission should prove advantageous to Barbados. If thii island applies for help to start a rural self aided housing scheme, the experts attached to the Caribbean Comfor this purpose can loan films and provide information which will help the government to launch its campaign. Irrespective of what Mr. Lashley has learnt on his visit the housing needs of the rural community must be met. Funds for this purpose can be obtained from the Peasants' Loan Bank, which now only assists with repairs of existing houses. But only propaganda, concerted opinion and the willingness to build self-aided houses will make this method of home-providing popular. It is shirking the question to talk of rugged individualists. The people of this island are quite capable of understanding facts, if facts are presented in the way that they can understand. The facts show that there is not enough money In the exchequer to build everyone a house costing between 2.000 and 2.300 dollars. In Puerto Rico on the other hand houses which in Barbados have cost these sums and mure to build are being constructed for $550 by self-aided methods. Since labour costs form between 40 and 60 per cent, of the costs of house building in the island the reason for the cheapness of the Puerto Rican house is apparent. The task of the government is to edueata the people to help themselves, not to accuse the people of being rugged individualists or otherwise. Let the government embark on schemes for rural self-help housing and the people will show them how willing they are to avail themselves of the opportunity to help themselves to a home. If the people of Antigua, Jamaica and Puerto Rico can build their own houses, why not our people? Give them a lead and they will probably build for less than the Puerto Ricans. PLASTIC PROPELLING PENCILS LONG LEAD, SCRIPTO PENCILS, BREAK PROOF 18c. each • ADVOCATE STATIONERY AN AERIAL VIEW of th Tart LoU Lloren* Tor ret hoimlng piajf.i l.r.M UmicLed by the San Juan municipal housing authority, and to be flnlnhad U* end of thin year. Involring coiutrncUOD com of S12.000.000, U projoct covers a bondrtd scrs but on aha OUI-KIMor San Juan. Designed for low income famiuoa, tho project provides 2,010 apartment* divided Into llu bulldlnci two and tin-torn* lush. The enure development it located In remnants of a huge coconut plantation, adjacent to residential areas a.*mall. private hoaaaa that have boon developed within the put two year*. Low income dwelling imtta now under construction in Puerto Rico exceed on a population or area baai* the number of anch unit* being built In any of the State-. Puerto Rico, with 2.400,000 inhabitants, has '.'.(mo unit* under conatrucUou a* compared with H,S37 for Hew York and tsVNo for Tessa.— (I.N.P.) IIH< VIIOV MR. FLECKER, Headmaster of Christ Hospital, came to the West Indies to lecture on education at the invitation of the British Council. Last week an article reproduced in the Advocate proves Mr. t _, Flecker to be an accurate observer and lor to be deputy Mayor There mm Q LOCAL <;OVLIll%MENT BY NAME "To require the Central ExecuBy GEORGE Hl'NTF. annual grant* in respect of live to assume direct responsibility penditure incurred by them Bog Oat for the day-to-day decision! on Every Council is required to repair or maintenance of Churns I numberless points uf local policy appoint clerk of the Council and other place* of worship and I is to ask too much of It". This and treasurer. The Councils for the salaries of officers of such dictum of 3lr John Maude needs will fix tne rate of lemuneration churches and places of worship, .careful scrutiny by everyone and of these officers but the .Governor The Governur-in-Executive [ought to be foremost In the minds will have power of dismissal or commi"" D 13 ntr t tha funcof anyone who read? the Bill to the Council maydismiss with the tkms and ,„„,„ o( a council establish a system of local governconsent of the Governor. ,„ ^ nrrt meolmg of sucn ment based on Sir John's wornThe governor maj'"^^ Council. If any difficulty arise. mendaUons. medical officers and sanitary In. „,„„„.,.=_,, ',, h rt „ 1 The Bill provide i for three local spectors and can dictate term, as £ ^''^Vh^r !" !" tu W !" t government areas In Barbados, the to salary, duties and oiherwisc of *>* " J: oun f l r th ? >"*-itv of Bridgetown, the Northern these officials. paraUon of the first register t [District and the Southern District. The Council will have authorl*""" 1 government elector* or tnt The City of Bridgetown is to comity to employ and pay all other preparation of th e nisi valuation 'prise three wards; the City Ward, start Provisions as to pensions list for rating hereditaments, the tinSt Michael Ward and the Carare to be the responsibility of Mic Governor-tn-Executive Committee lisle Ward. Govi'rnor-in-EsecuUve Commitmay make such order for reinovHridgetown Is to become a munitee. ing the difficulty and any such clpal City and the Inhabitants A Council may purchase land order may modify the provision.*. thereof a corporate City bearing eornpulsortly in order to provide of UM Act. up to one year's date the corporate name of "The Mayor, halls, offices or buildings. from the Act coming into operaAldermen and cltiiens of the City Councils shall be the rating Itm Any local govarnmenl of Bridgetown". authorities for their respective (that Is any adult who has reacned The Mayor ,* to be elected anareas. In addition tothe general lhc ^ ur v *• "',*'* '' * %  *. u iirp"* up U. <*. „ may t^ required by etthei third year, except for the first elee$i,ooo ^hall bo exempt from n ouso 0 f t h 0 Legislature. The tion of aldermen, trade tax. Govein..r-in-Exeeuiive Committe, Eighteen councillors are to be consent of the Governor-inmay cauae a local cnqu iry to be elected, six from each ward of trie Executive Committee la necessary held in nny —-, where he deem* City. The City of B^*^*" '"{ be i^L"' nd can • ^1"j*< by lt aovl sable, concerning the arimrpnsc?. of local government wui agrecemont or purchased com, f '„,..,,-, or -duties therefore, under the provisions of pu U. rlly. Ai.nu..l budgets ol Coun^iX'clJbvVId the Hill under reference, be adotH muK lsubmitted bcfore,lho ^S^liSJS^mSmolS, ministered by one Mayor, eight or beginning of a financial year to !" G 0 ^"' 0 ^'' !" Si SwtaMc, nine aldermen and eighteen courtthe Govern.* -in-Executive Commi ) Xoc wlU ^ nav 5 X !" !" ?1 rilfcM (unless one Councillor Is miitee for approval. The Om ,. .ckof |K>wcr k l etaCd Mavor when there will be emor-in-Exc; utive Committee Council by transferring t., himatJl 17 Councillors). There will be cannot increase the amount to bo specified functions of the Council tither 27 or 28 persons on the City expended but can make other Each Council can make byeCouncil, modifications. laws and can Impose penalties not The two District Councils will Grants U> Councils can b* made exceeding $50. These bye-law: each consist of the Chairman, by the Governor-in-Executive have however to bo approved b> Aldermen and Councillors. Committee subject to conditions, the Govenior-ln-Execuiive ComThe District Councils will each Sanction of the Governor-inrniltce. appoint a Vice-Chairman. Each Executive Committee is required .ncil will include nv '.„*. s i5 before money can be borrowed by that rhe power of the new Counhort term spending. c( a are ^ hedged about ,m-t, S tot. ,?' J^SkJ?; a Council and cW Joint-corn"" Andrew. SI. Joseph Sljtog ml ,„,. ,„.,„ bo „„,„., ,„ Aud| lh Jre?ore N '£ h adn,ln.SS^ by'!! au,h.„r OC lb. CouncU. .nou.d bo r'r, ,~. m Bv or six ldormtn a whole time government oAni SS ^venteen ?£ ^eighteen ,ounn>.d. it clear that within the limits elllors. Total perlons will bo 24 ot the pre! 4? y The DisSt. Sir John Maude in his report nidcrm'en''dependTng" on whether Cornells" either" tor "torTgterrr; or T,Y[l"^ i!~"" "'"" "'""" '' the Chairman la elected trom any h „ r u-rm .nendine. Aldermen or Councillors. I must confess after reading the iew lull 10 be one of the e erlttca Hut I think that this criticism ii of far less importance than lh< ? which follows from Sir John n gdinJaslOII that to entrust thi whole administration of loca !ully and well. m ent would be to Impose on It al AU ^f C ^ n n S ^ mC H 0 ^,liK intolerable burden. I am not one . a H dlt *i" f^ a v J^^l of those who think that govtrai ment by Governor-ln-Executlv Committee is the best or even ; rtsmnniltlll fom of gvernment Hut the Hill under reference no' been only adds to the responsibility o: their .-Ing in this region, but who have been taught Just enough to make them aspire to the limited number of government professional and commercial Jobs which form the substance of the dreams of all while collar workers. Any suggestion that the type of education Is unwise or even unkind to the children on whom it Is Inflicted by ambitious parents and complacent governments is regarded as proof of the reactionary disposition of the critic. No doubt Mr. Flecker too will be labelled as a reactionary. There is little evidence for supposing that those responsible for educational policy in Barbados are really aware of the great unbalance which exists in an educational machine so little geared to the highly technical and competite world in which we live. it Vestry system thi or 25. auditors had done their work ca.everninont lo lh< cmtral ^ The Southern District consisting t\My and well, of St George. St Philip. St. John and parts of St. Michael and ,„ ___ Christ Church will elect twenty bu t the Bill leaves the date of five councillors, five from ech auc jiting unfixed. Accounts shall parish Local government of ne ..^ au( i[ted as soon as may be Southern District will H !" **** thereafter." be ^mimrtT^ by %  C hairman. ^^ ^ ^^^ ^ 'lumr'uiors It will be observed audited ope month after their the C,..vemor-in-Executivc Com •h.t the Southern District Is to receipt by the Council, committee mittee but gives him greatei be the largest of the two rural or lolnt-commlttee. the Council power. If there was no party govunits of local government, unless shall cause the accounU as cerlleminent in Barbados there trOuV %  wna amendment is made to the fled by the Auditor General to be of course be no difflailty since th< Bill as it presently stands. published In the Official tla/.-tt.Governor-ln-BxocuUv Committct Sir John Maude in his report The Auditor General cannot would be acting upon the Bdvio .criticised financial relations bedisallow expenses which have been of the Executive Committee. Bu Itween the vestries mid parochial sanctioned by the Govotnor-lnaince the Bu^he experiment then iboards and aakl that Uieac r gU--d> xecutlv Committee. has been a tendency for the itions and the unsatisfactory ,y**^.'Pn %  Governor-in-Executive Leader of the House of Assembl; tem of government it'^wa _TmCommittee shall make regulations to assume the role of Prim< compensation of officers or Minister and to play a role In th> nts of a Vestry who sutler bOBUUvt Committee which i* 1 f emplo>-ment or dlmunitlon new conception of local governlit them to earn pair the Vestries sense of financial to ^inonslblllt}' The new Bill makes provision ^ SLZSZISSXS frSn ;S5S 1 ^ ' !" t mM, '' t "'"'buted to the mpn( So nlllch therefore depend meXrV far regulating and concomin* Into force of the Act. M the answer to the question wh. tn.lline the finance of the City Or p The „. Governor-in-Executive ls ,ho Governor-in-Executiv. District 'This finance committee CommlteaO mi.y make regulations Commitlee? U to be responsible for estimalpnjviding for the payments by the But whoever It f*. his powcing all expenditure which exceed* Councils' to the Diocesan Synod of ovor t he local government will b. in the case of the District S25o Barbados and to such other relifiii mrn en5e if the new Bill Is passe* and in the case of the City $S00 ous bodies as may be specified of by the Legislature. Ol II READERS SAY: Tlie possibility of a technical school being included in the expenditure which the government intends to make In implementation of its live-year programme should lull no one into a sense of something vital having been achieved. One technical school will be an advance on no technical schools: but the whole educational system of the island needs reorienting to the needs of the community. Agriculture, handcrafts, carE entry, domestic science, health habit* ought to %  the major subjects of school curricula everywhere in Barbados. Thy change-over has got to be gradual and the prejudices of the people can only be removed by patient propaganda and explanation, but a start must be made. Mr. Flecker's article, coming as it does from a Headmaster of a famous English public school, ought to carry more weight with those responsible for educational policy than the splendid efforts which have been made by the minority who have long been crying beware. If only a halt Is called to the present cert idea te-worshipAnd not only are the man an< llirl/i CMOW number of children) Is. to my woman blessed by marriage an< wav of thinking, a very great a home and the children grow Uf a -.distance in allowing voting men In the moral wholesome atmos and women to lead stable, satisphere which Is the basic deterrent of waywardness. To the Editor, The Advocate, ,SIR,— thank "Medlcus" for his sound Nothing Is so good for young But this advantageous -date o I logic expressed in your columns, people SO they emerge from affairs is closed to thousands or On one point I must disagree adolescence a* to marry and esyoung moi and women fof thI for he says he sees "no i*asj ublish a home. Home with its simple reason that they cttnno'. that religion should enter into it affection. and understanding cope with the financial strain o (birth control). with some one who *area, and s a large family What man will Of course, different persons anxi-ms to *elp. become Little more ttiai haw very differing icktus as U> haven and the centre of interest, rnoufll to care for himself woul* what constitutes religion. To A young man with a wife nu'i decide in all rtUsoiutblencsb i< those who foal religion to be home becomes a respected memobligate hlmsolf to suppoit wk$)t mainly concerned with worship of bar of the community. He has or ten people? Diety or life hereafter, the consomething to work for—the best If birth-control were freel nocUon between religion anel in him is called out These are used the marriage rale srouli birth control would not be the conditions, the atmosphere In treble. Illegitimacy would drop obvious. But to those who take which spiritual a.pirations flourand delinquency would decrease. Christianity as a way of living.Kir tab. These are the church goers. So birth control Is assenl dailv lives—and of ssuiohlng t-tes* are the one* who (: d llvlnf. The averaga then* through foUowiitg our way foundations of stability and selfperson does not prefer to br slowly—then every part of our respect are enabled to turn their promiscious. he is forced into It mne *Vntm* ihe"flnTt*"?b^n* forward !" Tit" ha^i 'lives ls linked to religion thoughts'to things of Uw spirit— by financial pressure. Birth h££ uSSP' forward UI nave j^.^ p, anilll u, (made poaaimercy, Justice, helpfulness and so control promotes well-living. occ-i sssBsaa 'ble by the ability to control the on U M S LIQUINURE A HiKhly Coneentraled Liquid Manure C. S. PITCHER & Co. Ph. 4472 In everyday life, accidents happen when least expected, whether on land, on sea, or in the air. If you have a family dependent on you, you cannot afford to travel unprotected. Allow us to issue you with A PERSONAL ACCIDENT INSURANCE POLICY that will take care of all eventualities. For information and advice, consult the Agents:— DA COSTA & CO. LTD. L AGO MATT WASIIAEIB Flat Oil Paint rVguteed 3B& Tr-otfe Mark Ask our agents for particulars. (l%tfrrwr/fr>/*frf< v^//>//> Cjtywrfj S&t DA COSTA & CO., LTD. COMMISSION DEPARTMENT. TO-DAY is M0 ( THER'G This year let's make Mother's Day the first of 365 days of love and affection for Mother. Let's give her a whole year of affection. She deserves the best of everything. a jAiiuh to an vnoUwn 3fiom Leadlnr Grorerr Blenders of 3-year-sM G*l*l BcaU Baas.



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SUNDAY, MAY 11. 1952 SUND V\ ADVOCATE i".nr NINE "SIRPE, SIRPE MONSIEUR •9 (By IIAIKA DK POrX) A little Arab shoeshine boy woke me up. I lad been sleeping on a bench in one of A! glen %  k... Monsieur el American? Ou monsieur AUmV he asdted. The %  %  %  Erom Northern Africa was a nice person. He started talking and gave me a lot of information about the Sahara and how to cross a d*srt with "peu de Francs" and how to be fXiandl with the people in the Sahara. Whin i n g my shoes, tie told me that the Sahara waa a very dangaroua spot and that Ufa fcfesfa was veiy hard. His uncle triad once to travel through tlio Sahara but he iid nu'net through Oi Yes Sir much too hot in the Sahara .you die Thfe little Arab shoe shiner was not the first fellow whom I asked about the world's biggest desert and ho told .'he same thing everybody told me. lx>ts of people of Algiers and Tunis only go to El Golca and then they turn back. because they aro afraid of the sand storms and the thirst However I wanted to go through get and I wanted to see how the people lived In the sand. Two days later 1 was sitting i train with lot, „f Arab* goin/ ?"* Atliii: rpnml^Ml .'.. ill* VI and peace killed 1 Belgian Congo). irkmg bard to develop RAILWAY STATION in Loupoldville this part of Africa tbere aro many plo; the country. miles of sand 3.000 miles of walk quickly—not non than sandy tracks where nobody could 2—3 miles an hour. give you a lift or invite you to During the days the heat wM over the Atlas mountains "~Wc h *i? fc rfrm k "V enormous. So hot that we boiled p--l a groat mjgvfiS*, and ^tV^ haST" 1 J^~ Vrt ^l ? *1 "?. i 1 bumm MIKL the train climber over the w fc ere '. "*** como Ir ^I! a ,"'l nr *r r ,5 dav5 w dld nm "" rJky At! mounSins. Tne for! *S3JL J"! -•** ! %  ! Inch of shadow. settled down It Is a nice clean part of Africa. No quitoes or Tse-Tse flies you tin re. The climate is good %  Is of fresh game aro ;i vou warn in have In Ti-'utd. all you have to do irct a light .n your i-utoe and during the evening all the B>h Jump In. The Tchad Co* i Mtsmafl) and Clipptxton In 1800. The Unit Frenchman who eattW to the Tcliad was In IH-<7. He mad<> nth the Hausa'a but m by the warriors a few month" later. i l %  day, lo the Tchad colony there are still a lo: of naU< have never seen a white, man before. The people live far away In the buah, frequently so far from fh? little town Port Uirny th.t nobody hut. visited than Fort Umy is a sand -itv. In the traata ara a few motor I Uirii's. Everywhere camels and donkeys lia in front of the houses. At nucht every body collects in the centrum. There Hausa mu-s^isns play their inrtrumeiib. nuidw (rasn and horna. and ED LM % %  I brassaa she people enjov the spiritual dances. The chiefs sit on 'hoir famous Arab hor-es. proud like a girl who's waaRguj •MHIX WHITE v... %  ->"*^a*.-.*, BAKONYO CHIEF and sons chief talking in Bstsle. Ornaments sro teeth tiom Js.fi.ara and nlppei Congo uKain 1 had a chance t vi -it Angela Lh* Po ogueae Col\\y then 1 wanted to have fresh otty. Very few strangers iv air again and waltl giiowcri Into thai Colony, but I on an ah-flatd before pt.t n v|*-ril ptnrttl from the -life" on a plane HgM noun Oo*rnor and I was llown by later I Mopped ... special planes to dulercnt parts African ground. Then I %  fine Jungle Prom that moment t„ ,.„, m life. STOCKED BY ulng not far a new dress. And while everybody r !" MW .iri^er 1 '. TJ^i -*ZgJS?3k K^SE I remember thai • Whole of Angola I gave tWQ week* I Wax ad. .id w*nii I talks and wrote in many walked gtotLaj the buy streets of ,f Johannesburg When I l<*ed ii]i r %  ipgi gad i flown Congo. back to the from .vheie I .v.tKouiK. N',:'". hall ... cat, "were vary thick and many B ? on Ieur 1 ^""^'P o> *>' %  Ah ) m t $ ,,,,. or anything. animals were among the trees. c CBl 'V" 1 . sand and the sky We passed Blida and Media—two Donkeys And Camels The nights ware cold. So cold little Arab villages where onlv And it was a long way. It took that many times the water was Bis Lips two Frenchmen lived amongst ">e four months to come through msslii Everybody dug bens in The track ""'>t down south. the natives. Then the train went "hat sea of sand. Four months of the sand and covered themselves travelled as a chief for w> down the Atlas Mountains. The travelling without any accommoi' '>• That was t.ie blanket. Syrians down to Fort Arrhamheat from the big sand-sea was dation or any good food. Four One morning, when we were near baull. The jungle was very fuck within a few hours travelling and months of traveUing on tho back Tamanrasset somebody did not Wc saw all sorts of animals and the train went through Vie grape of donkeys and camels. Four wake up. He buried him/elf the many types of natives I never had fields where hundreds of bovs and months without sleeping in a night before, because the scorseen or heard of in mv Ufe. Es women were picking grapes. Soon proper bed. And four months of piona slept with him in the sand penally the Sara women with we left them behind. The only thirst and hunger. j* 1 ?' 1 ? av "' n,rn *"'" rt tL al '"lotion, their big lips. Exactly 9 months .. jrr thing wc saw. was sand and The ilrst 200 milos I travelled The food was bad. Everyday we after I had left Northern Africa. '"• J u te. sometimes without any can air. some trees. Then the train stopon the back of an old donkey, had meols. but t^e meals were all j reached the Congo river. There '"ore accommodation than just ped. DJELFA. waa written on The Arabs were not unfriendly the same pnd camel meat and i fol a -pirogue" (canoe) and a Qir, i .? u1, 'T? 1 JIT thp !" f or the wall of the white station. It but life was very hard. Then. Rour porridge. The water was went down the Congo river /f M 1 Xl \* tt ; iUi ,rib ,n D P pntral WS a little Arab place and called when we reached El Golea the not sufficient and rations had to After twenty dnvs 1 had reached Afr *ca. I got as far as Rhodesia the end of tine world This wns donkeys were left behind and bo cut down. Once we did not Leopoldville and was taken B d Wils lv n a "'f' from }**" the last outpost of civilisation. In the trip wns continued with the wash ourselves for 18 days. The straigh ^ from llu> M mt (he bonier to South Africa. We front of me was the Sahara: The Camels. We had a caravan of big men from the Sahara, the h-wpit.il with 40 degrees fever— !" v Ucd for 8 days right _through *%lf* T'bll^t^ mill tiil'sfl the gueit i Belgian I %  of the jungle and to talk again I With my native friends. | There I did the same and wai U R* a am aceu* 5" luck)since the people bked mo •''<' • ,M ' l n oa !" l dld not wv u left the IlelgUn dfnnt )own Tof W(( ymn did not see an autobus and for 2 years I did not see—the worst of id! a Diet and pretty girl. Sure a Princess wanted to marry me, but I wai glad to escape. Sometimes it is nlcu lo be a Prince, but not ulways . I remembered that. Sctith Africa was a Paradise for i %  OUjd r "T from the t i:le experiences ami write mv The newspapers In South Aft tea were glad to have some of I and I was glad to have some money. Then )u>t adKai month in South Africa 1 iNpl again on the Rgtd Ilitch-hlkmg down to I^ourenzo Marques, the oasluni Portuguese Colony. Than ::..Qovornmant did ovsi %  U i tliey could do for mo I got first class ttain tukeU and free flights. I travelled through the |iui|(le illyt. Then I reached N and went up to Tangan.uk.i and Kenya and camo down by the toast and went to the famous C F. HARRISON & Co., (B'dos) Ltd. and at present on display in their show window. Well soon have that better with ONE of the Bambara girls In tha Moycn Congo. Like all the natives. she lias a happy disposition. PANS FOR EVERYONE SARA WOMAN. TliU tribe lives I near Chad. Thirty year* ago the men from other tribes cane to %  teal the women, so the women de I tided w maka taemtelvee ugly They cut their upper tad ktWSI Up-, tu th tut hy vul pier* of "tone ot Wol ATter %  we** they pulled their lip* and put In a big itone. Eventually they lokk •d like this. yvV/MW/W//,V,W,WV %  tcry ship brlnii New S Pan nooks continue to cater to I often stayed as a young bm. If you buy Mflflniflccnf ObiesU'hiteoafc Hcntnuc aid Jalno train thinks she is quite mud many laartsji That was some 17 years ago but alo* thinking it is anything like by Mazo de la Roche .re two of The tension grows stronger and Mrs Helloc Lowndes' "I too It still weaves its spell after so Die Bobe becousc It Is by Lloyd the twelve books wnlch form stronger as the train gets nearei have lived in Arcadia" is sutolong s period. Shcppcy and Tfc Douglas you are going to be dlsthe Whiteoak Novels In thes.to Trieste. The story has been biographical In he quiet tonverLerter and The Breadwinner are appointed. The story ias been novels you meet all the Whiteoaks moat iiiccessfully filmed national style the author of The Included in a great Pan volume, filmed, and as a story it has all from Adeline Court, the old Lodm-T tells of the remarkable Somerset Maugham's reputation the ingredients which Lionel grandmo'her who so fond of parents lo whom Hiluire Belioc as a dramatist of distinction • mixed ro successfully her food to the youngcM or the nnd herself wcixborn although flrmlv based that any attempt lo in the films where he played the Whiteoaks and you get very inor,j(un Ban'mcui by Cadi a doctor hiUl pronounced their underline it would lie wasted hospital doctor. The hero has tarasted in everything that goes Roberta is a Romantic Novel ol father me iinlile of hiving childlabour But young readers comcverj'lhing and on top of this he on at Jalua fthefr wonderful mann big Department Store. l.ad> % % %  i. V ni.e ,md England ing to Matlg^WIB §0T ttM flrat tlRW flats religion Tl.. Canada In IVhileoaJ rn/., %  % %  !, llelion dcnle toiar,, durnig the author's carlv childwill find these three plays typinever clearly defined but the }lrrUaye Renny comes bock from her living In a Rig Department hood is depicted ivilhout sensatal of the essential Mauaham hero goes from strength to the war 1930-45 and finds that Store. She enjoy, her experience* tionalisrn but with a clear vividThe Brcodu'iri'icr is particularly strength. The ttMBM is that Jus uncles luive mismanaged his there and she falls in Ion trsth ness of detj.il that leaves Ijehlnd suitable for tho adolescents wh< even^a .'Lehman can Jfl)^ a kick estate^ and ho _starts to put a young man In the Bargain Baseli an Impression centred around i are convimed in every age that out of Un by doing good to his everything neighbour. The worsttl handled with the farinlv. MrHelloc l^owndc-.' they can set the world to rights mother knew many of the tnIf only thev ran keep the old Ling historical and literary fogies in their olace. figures of the time and they enter a • • the pages of / too Bred in Arcadia unobstruslvely and as if calling D | r ,,, Eddie by Ludwig Berne), at one of the family's homes. maiu j; „ mti „ litk „ thl West Indian readers will be inmi ^ oul ot lfe in Hollywood terested to know that the Bellocs Dtr1 f^^ b thc wnv a a pia at one time owned nroverty in If c of Xhe i ovc -slck tv-us-v. nn H arp ^ coUectlnj( .-m I..KW aw. photos of Hollywood stars thei, Dirty Eddie Is not the bonk fo: BSbJV Exmr KS"' %  glimpse of the Hollywood order. -nog I it. V mrnt. When her mother kn Iota of one of his step brothers gets she tries to Hop their roma— this one is married to toe illegitimate child but Bargain Basement < kill of an acof one of Renny's best friends, those novels with happy andlnc the other stepbrother also gets • married to an American girl. She ^0't Tnle t of ;,'offr Pan has reprinted Ernest Hemcomes to live at Jalnn and soon l*er by J. M. Cohen tngway's Fiesta. Thl:, Is the unfalls In love with the lord of the Pan Book. Like Edgar Allan usual story of a man for whom manor (Rennv). Everything Pc>e. Hotfrnan wrone many creepy Jove was hopeless. Only Heminggoes well at the end. could have written Martinique and San Domingo and that Martinique was once known as Bourbon. I have never befor heard of Martinique by any other name. I :: \ read Snsppty at what is now Powell Spring Hotel where movie magazines never anything about why D< is just the cup of tea. tell y. fv Eddie Iran LUpa K'i:*:ii ..' %  I-' many state This Book includes 1> Sartdman. The Lost Relection and six others. Some of these were filmed recently in • BaDei life of Americans and others who The Lady Vanithr, hy Eth-I nim called The Tlsi H % %  t ( ,i fter I-tti^ White is a Thriller that you The music for the opera of the II of war Cant just down. An English Tales of Hoffman was OBtnflOjgJ t. had spent it* force In 1918. No governess vanishes on the Express by OITenbauh. can imitate Hemingway's " Trii-ste and an English girl Hemingway is the lournalist whose the emptiness of rtyle and It %  '• %  .'.:. There i fight. fully Of I rned in 'ho has met her by chance a bull l 1 "' t !" tt-is-sa to llnd her But unforUinately everybody on the Pan Advocal Books are sold at .Vfafionrrp. (hi I Brute Weathcrhead Ltd. mm AKiut \i > Film l*arka XX 520— No V lia V lit! K IM KODAK Hlfniiii U S A Pc i Card BUM V 127 V 130 — V 610 — V 820 XX ISO lit REX nm SKWKA1I QLOVn MACK IKHilni. • \\ : I.M't; MALTRVOI. IN 12 OZ BOTTLtt MACHAIX) ClOAfifl rROM JAMAICA tli-inen fU i .. Muchado—Gems. Lomlrcs — 1801 Pan sssai JIT. BRUCE WEATIIERIIEAD IJmili'il JOHN WHITE FOOTWEAR FULLY GUARANTEED GENTS' PRIMK CUT WILLOW CALK i:uo(.l P s Iw SI2.32 pair OBNIV Sl'KDE BROGUES In Brown. Navy and Blark ril 81I.K.1 pair GENTS' WILLOW OXFORDS From $8.32 lo SI2.S2 pair GENTS' BOX CALF OXFOROS From $8.32 In SI2.52 m erne I.X Ol It M.XE.X IU IT LINEN SHEETING 9fl in., wide 17.18 yard 72 ins. wide $5.11 yard UNEN SHEETS M x 108 (it S24.2II earh 'I IW -a si H K: each JOHN WHITE means made just right 3mm Tht'm on IHapluy ami U-u Earlu tram HARRISON'S "on* U.S. LINEN PILLOW (ASKS 18 x 28 •.; S:l.77 earh 18 X 28 './ J2.2I earh U.S. LIMN AMIKICAN BAG TOP 21 x 33 LACE TABLE CLOTHS 60 x M MaM .... 66 x 86 $3.31 racli I0.M rail, I W) earh 'K TIIK BIST l'It>M-KIFT!ON SBRVH'B KNIGHTS DRUG STORES r ',',',*.+,*.:•.',•*',',: *,--'. DELIGHT YOUR PARTY WITH THESE: LABBB FRANCOIS LIQUEUR* in Miulstiire BOIUM 60C. esCk. MAKAKQUIN KUMMRI.. OKANOI! PRANDY. CHERRY BRANDY. L'RBMF, DE MENTHE. PEACH BRANDY. Al'RICOT BRANDY. COINTREAU in Mliiistiire BolUan Mc. DOM BI.KUliICTlNi: • lie. (TIERRV IIEERINU in Mil. loBotllas 78e. MARTELI. BRANDY in ML ttlst 4C. 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PAGE 1

SUNDAY, MAY II, 19J2 Sl'NDAY ADVOCATE PAGE F.I.F.VF.N f The Lives Of Harry Lime 'T'HE hyacinth Is a flower, a rum swiizlc U a drink, and the Panama Canal—let's face it—is a ditch. The story begins with a drink and ends with the flower. There are also a couple of very cute babes involved in the proceedings. So hold on tight, my children. Your Uncle Harry's taking you for a nice ride on his magic carpet. We're off to the Canal Zone. When I arrived there at the •tart of this story I decided to lay up for a night tn Cristobal. I found an air-cooled hotel and took a shower. Then off to Ptomaine Joe's bar for one of those ium swizzles. Whan %  cauliflower-earnl *-|usT Joined up to fl*ii lor Unrla Sam he didn't i"i*inr that tin war Job would ba picking or Life wu dull until Harrv Urn* cam* BJ>I>*. than thr CM mm lound thrmarlvn up • %  alnal it In a |unajlr •PV plot H anoUtrr Harry Um# adontuir that will thrill >ou. and Us Utle U: -The Hyacinth Patrol". The next mniute a burst of stars exploded in front of my eyes and my Jaw seemed to become detached from my skull. It was some time before I heard a voice like a rusty file telling me: "Oh. gee. mister. I never meant to slug you. I was aiming at my pal here. You all right?" A khakl-clad giant with a broken nose and two cauliflowe.* ears was bending over vai anxiously. Picking me up. to went on: "The least I can do is buy you a drink. They say one of Joe's 'zombies' kills or cures you. C'mon . let's grab a seat. Hey. Joe! A rum swizzle fer me friend here, and tap out another beer for me." "Comin' up. Tiger." the barman called and the soldier continued: "Now we can chin in peace. Me . I'm Tiger Dolan. Most promisin' middleweight in the fight game. I was all set for a try At the championship when Uncle Sammy csTlled th' decision. . What d'ya say your tag was?" "Harry Lime . You know. Tiger, you'd better do something about that red hair of yours. It gets you Into too much trouble.' JUNGLE GIRL A Slow Smile He grinned sheepishly. "I get it." Then, frowning, "I used to keep fight in' for the ring, Harry, but since Nugent shoved me to th* Hyacinth Patrol—" "Who shoved you Into whaiT" "The Hyacinth Patrol ... an' Nugent Is th' louse slttin' over at that corner table with my gal Lola." It was like looking into the face of the Jungle itself, looking at Lola. She was lush, magnificent. Her eyes were Insolent her mouth voluptuously curving and cruel, her hair the dark red of ageing blood. She met my gaze. . slowly smiled. Tiger said bitterly, "I was doing all right with Lola till Nugent moved in. That guy's fouled me up since boot camp. Harry. Thinks he's a boxer. Learned to throw his fists in military school, I guess. "I beat the tar outa him In a camp bout an' he's hated me ever since. I almost busted with Joy when they transferred me to Panama. Looked like I was gonna make one of th' gun i lews. Then Lieutenant Nugent was transferred here—to my outfit—an' he details me to th' Hyacinth Patrol. "U's a stlnkin' flower detail— clearin* water hyacinths outa th' channels so's they won't foul up ships or breed malarial mosquitoes. I Joined up to right, not to pick posies. An' nobody knows tt better'n Nugent." I smiled at Lola. She returned the courtesy with interest. Lieutenant Nugent caught our pleasant interchange. He scowled and called the barman. We couldn't hear what he said. but we found out without delay, for Joe came across to us. and without preliminary said: "I must ask you to leave. You're disturbing the peace. The lieutenant—" Tiger's face went scarlet. He kicked his chair back. Swinging his big flats, he moved forward. But so did Joe and his bouncers. In no time at all. Tiger and I were outside. sitting in the gutter among a crowd of grinning Panamanians. Three hours and eight ban* later I was ready to call it a night. By now. Tiger and I were buddies, and we'd arranged to meet on the morrow—being Sunday. Looking forward to a peaceful shower and slumber 1 let myself into my room, switched on the light and electric fan—and then I got a surprise. Lola was lounging across my bed, smiling like a cat that'*. been at the cream pitcher. She said: "It isn't very nice to keep a ludy waiting, Mr. Lime. I came to apologise about you being thrown out of Joe's. It wasn't my fault, but Ross gets so Jealous — especially when you were with Tiger." "Let it go," I said. "You're danger with a capital D. Lola." She stood up lazily. Then. amlling: "Want to see me tomorrow." "Where?" "At my place, 23, Villano. Darkish . About eight? I'll be waiting. Harry." ANGER I Am Accused Her hand was on the door latch when the door was pushed violently open, and the new visitor was Tiger Dolan. He sized up the situation quickly—and wrongly. "Harry, what's she doln' here?" he asked, angrily. Lola slipped past him without replying. I said: "We'll taka thai up m due time, sergeant. Come on in. "I don't Intend to get thrown out of this place NOW. what's your problem?" Tiger scowled. "I dunno as 1 want to tell you now. Th" minute I turn my back you're after my girl." "Wrong! She came after me. But Louie the Louse was ahead %  of me. Don't forget that." H i s moon-face brightened. "Yeah! Nugent! That 1 why I come here, Harry. I just heard somothin' about him. Somcthln' I never believed even he'd be low enough to do. You goltu listen. Harry. This Is important. 1 think Nuuent's workm' for th' enemy! "I'm not klddln'," he went on earnestly. "A friend of mine Just came in from the swamps to tell me. Rita lives near the old French channel . An' she*!i BI^II our splt-anpolish lieutenant goin' to ol" Gibber's cabin How d'ya like that?" "Not too well. Tell me all about It to-morrow. Tiger." "Tomorrow's too late. That's why I'm tellin' you now. I want you to go out with me first thing In th' mornln' to Rita's shack. She'll tell you th' whole story." "I've never been partial to swamps. They're damp, dismal places with nil sorts of nasty poisonous things flying, and dithering about. This particular one was no exception as. In the dingy hours of dawn. Tiger laboriously rowed us through something that was half mud half glue — except for those cursed water hyacinths. "Why must people live in such places;—•unless they're related to alligators?" I moaned. "No rent." Tiger pointed out. "Squatters, you know. Throw any kind of shack up. There's Rita now! Just aroun' this next bend, Harry, an we'll be there." RITA Glowing; Eyes It was Rita. And. as Lola had been all jungle, this small dark Panamanian pnl with glowing black eyes and fnwn-likc grace w.i.i u:i.il