Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Z



ESTABLISHED 1895 -



“SATURDAY





PAY 90,3082







PRICK: FIVE?



LENS



“LADY BOATS” OPERATE AT GREAT LOSS —

Last Year Was Deadline
For Decision On Boats

‘THE announcement early in April of the Cana-———-—- — -

dian Government's decision to withdraw the U K Ital :
“Lady Nelson” and the “Lady Rodney” from the perenne )
West Indian Service should have come as no sur-|

Ne
prise to the officials and people of the British West. Sign P act

a and re oe Capt. R. A. Clarke Gen. T “

eral Manager of the Canadian National Steamships'

and President of the Shipping Federation of Canada’ On rieste
told members of the Press at a conference at

LONDON, May 9




" i in?. 14: Britain, United States and Italy

Messrs. Bed Austin s building yesterday signed “memorandum of under-

. iding”” covering ‘Italian partici-

Capt. Clarke who arrived here yesterday morning by | Peon aoe ee o
the Lady Nelson from Trinidad said that his visit to the Piste’ zone “

West Indies had ngthing to do with the announced with-
drawal of the “Lady Boats”, but was just another routine
visit in connection with their operations in the area.
Capt. Clarke said: — :

The agreement concluding a
Series of diseussions which began
on April 3, is authoritatively un-
derstood to have left the petbohel.












































b bility r zonal administrati in

During the past two or three mg Roe Rape wee | pierecd
years it has been made known, Allied commanders would at the
both officially and unofficially, that Same time retain all powers of
last year was the deadline when

government

something would have to be done It understood that





Italy will
about the con! or other- be given the post of political
wise of the passehger service. advisor. This office would have

As early as 1938 the Canadian milar powers as the British and
Government realized that the the United States political advis-
service, as called for, could not be ors in the zone

maintained at such a terrific loss |
under the terms of the Canada-
West Indies Treaty; therefore,
notice of cancellation was served
on the Colonies at that time.

Tt was also believed an Italian
iB; would be given the post of direc-
m@ tor of administration who would
deal with lowal government prob-













lems and financial and economic

Cancellation Notice eee et eSarpon ae eee

the “more n r sritain,

vend eet ae means ae | Minister Julius Holmes for the

‘ans dat ta So aly | United States and Valian, Ambas-
= Teas ens aaa ipse. y sador Malio Brosio for Italy

6a int Spas was oe An official communique will

o between governmen( be issued at 0030 hours to-

concerned whereby the steamship
service would be maintained to
the extent that war conditions
would allow, subject to the right
of either party, to terminate

agreement by the giving of six

The Conference held in Barba-
- 1949 was attended by dele-
from all the Colonies, also

7; morrow.—U.P,

| U.K., Franee, U.S,
cart.x.a.crarxe | Despatch Urgent

MYT r
| ete sie nates | Notes Ta Moscow
° .
the Camadian Deputy Minister of Sir John Saint | WASHINGTON, May 9
myself, and our Freight T, E b G Britain, France and the United
ere Pro re la jStates tonight sent an urgent
Speraly tinister.| o e nad freminder to the Kremlin of their
Nv proposal for a short state treaty
Sugar Industry it Austria, In notes hande@*over
(From Our Own Correspondent hea the Soviet Gover nment by their
RENADA, May 9, three Ambassadors in Moscow to-
Sir John Saint, a retired Barba-|!)2ht. Western powers ask f
dos Director of Aguiculture has |'°OlY “at the fipst-opportunity”
been appointed Special Commis-|!"° "te they sent last Mareh.
sioner to undertake investigation| -p; earlier
tol; : : | le earlier note set out the
The terms of reference include e |0 2%, Dronosed eluht article
7 a {treaty for Austria to be signed by
thes of the at panison ang lfour powers to replace the present
ie prospects of the Grenada | 5; article draft treaty on which
Sugar Industry and advise 4OV~| nevotiations are deadlocked,
—U-P.

ernment on future policy with
U.S. Oil Strike |

WS! particular reference to the con-|
tinuation or otherwise of sub-
7 .
Felt In Mexico
MEXICO CITY, May 9.

Sidisation pursued as a result of |
the Skeete report of 1948, and’
encouragement of cane cultivation

Senator Antonio Bermudez, Di-

rector of the Mexican Government

perated oil company Petroleos

by peasants. |
Sir John arrives in Grenada |
on May 21,
|Mexicoanos said that motorists in
Northern Mexico will soon feel a
desperate” gasoline shortage
caused by the United States oil
| strike.







’

by the I
the heavy



passenger vesséls or the building
of new ones, they were told that
this could only be done by in-
creasing the contributions made by
the Colonies—this

most unfavourably received.

Wartime Restrictions

From early in 1942 until the
end of the war, due to wartime
restrictions we, allied rr of
shipping, regular scheduled
service was interrupted. We are
prohibited from calling at some
of the more exposed ports and our
operations to some of the other
“Treaty” ports were restricted.
Nevertheless, Canada provided the
shi directly and/or indirec'
to tain the bread-line
practically all the Colonies and, in





















Lady Huggins For
Dunbarton Polls

(From Our Own Correspondent?

LONDON, May 9.



He said there is “little hope” of




























f







The Auster Antocrat plane for the Barbados Light Aeroplane Club arrived in the island during the week
Tt is in @ case and not yet assembled.
After being assembled, the plano will resemble this Anster Autocrat.



by the 8.8. “Crofter”’

the excellent visibility of this type ’ plane.

Surrey Beat| Auster Autoerat °°

India

LONDON, May 9,
suffered

‘he Indian cricketers

the first defeat of their tour today

when beaten’ by Surrey by 141
uns at the Oval here.

Left to get 260 to win on a
rain affected pitch the Indians
oon showed their inexperience
nder such conditions

+
t

wickets fell for the addition of 63
uns

Spin bowler Jim Laker was
Surrey's most successful bowler
with four wickets f 55.

The Indians 158 ay
Ms /

Half of the
lunch and

side

the

was out for
remaining

Final scores: Surre¥

108





Gomes, Hannays ‘Tio

45

five

19 and 188,

Arrives From U.K.:

(By Our Flying Correspondent)
THE Auster Autocrat of the Barbados Light Aeroplan
Club arrived in the island during the week by the S.S

Crofter from England. The

wea. PLANE -

“Six Nations Sign
~W. Europe Mutual
Detence Treaty

PARIS,

a

May




Represent es of six Bur. pean nations to-day inital
i the draft treaty for settiig up a European Defenee
mmounity If the draft i ified and German peace
contracts go through, German vill have she right, to raise
id and sea forces for the jirst time simee the Third Reich
surrendered in 1945
Upon ratification six nations a

France. West Germany, Italy, Bel-
Holland and Luxembourg—

t's

‘Tunis’, Egyp





wil pool their land, sea and air

force under a single General} e

| Start West Germany will thus be Ch afis T Ik
jinked with Wester Defence ! 4 1e Ss a
Organisation without an independ-|

ent German Army and German | CATRO, May 9
G Staff Britai: vill be j alah Ben Youssef, Secretary
a tated with the European De-!of He Tunisian Neo Destour Na-
| fer Community providing for \T alist Party conferred with
| me arocal military aid in case any] Es vptian Premier El Hilal

or of the member nations o1 1 projected request t the
attacked \{ ted Nutions General A

|} Heads of delegations putting|te discuss the Franco-Tun
thelr initials to the 122 clause ute

}document and its five nnexes of n Youssef also conferred vitt
jthe draft treaty were Herve|H: fez Afifi, chief of the Royal
Alphand, French Representative | ( inet. Foreign Minister Abdel
}on the North Atlantic Couneil:|K

™ ‘ : G a : alek Hassouni and Abdel Kha-
This picture gives an idea of | L2eodor Blank, German Chance lel’ Hassouna, Arab League Secre-

jlor’s Defence Adviser; Ivan Mat-| ta» Adel Laidman Azzam and
jteo Lombardo, Italian Member of] Bx -pt's Bemanen, United Nations
|Partiament; Andrei De Staercke,] De (orate Mahmoud Fawzi Bey,
an Representative on the Youssef described as “false
Atlantic Council Pjarda] release” the transfer of members
\Van Starkenborgh, Duteh Repre-] of Tunisia’s former Chenik Cabi-
‘sentative on the North Atlantic ne. from internment on the island
;Couneil and Nickola Hommel,} ar Jerha to house arrest in Tunis





resentative of the Organisation ~ULP.
Suropean Economics
Initialling of the draft treaty ‘
| by these experts comes 15 month: 4? "
iF er they started their negotia- ; idgway Leaves
jtiens on February 15, 1951 ? 7 4
| During this time various Com- far East Monday
> arrival of

this plane will] |mittees of expérts have been in

; ; > ? ee ahha : Sih flihin te p Ny ‘ically continuous session and TOKYO, May 9,
Ory iously disappoint those critics who claimed that th fh Steering Committee has met} Ceoneral Ridgway back te a
B.L.A.C. would be just one of those clubs which got no- over 100 times, There have been| farewell visit to Korea prepared
where. A least the Club has got off to a good start, fiur meetings of Foreign Ministers to turn over his commands to

- _ ape [he arrival of the Autoerat | t ttle maior problems some of | G¢ ral Mark W. Clark and leave
Wis not heralded and unassem-| which are still left outstanding and | fo, his new assignment in Burove
Carne Re d bled in its case it provided no | wii) mean further meeting of the Ridgway said he will relinquish
y a 7 y great attraction. for Barbadian Foreign Ministers in the near [pig post as Commander of. United
But, as ane Hoes by it may if ‘ UP Nations and United States Forces
Yo 2f0ve to be an invaluable asset to =U. 1 a : «
To Assume P wie P } in the Far East “in a matter of

Command

ATHENS, May 9,

ing

Some Barbadians are however ii 7 am However headquarters
F t 2 ihowever officials had ple for al
dequainted. with the foatures of | LIke On Farewell trat xs of ohana en
the Autoerat.. In September last these have been cancelled an
an Auster from the Trinidad Fly

Lope e and
Club visited the island t| /our Of Norway will remain in

Ridgway re
5s



by : , : “ommand until his departure. He
Admiral Robert Carney Com-j|Was piloted by Philip Habib and] x ; 7 ~
1 sortie of Allied Forces " in R. A. C. “Jimmy” Alston acted as! } is ae Mey :: “eH eae ea ee
> a So x o ; , navigator, ‘eneral Eisenhower arrived at y nr a nm.
Kepresent Nn dad ie ‘t A neritae Wet pots i eet ornebu airfield near Oslo at 6.55 He is scheduled to leave Tokyo
° Wad itetenaaan’ Py 2a Demonstrations em. GMT from Copenhagen to]Monday for the United States and
it Ts Ik " fediterranean told a questioner ; tl to Pi ace G rf
“ederation ks here today that he would take L .,_ {Start his farewell visit to Norway.|then to Paris to replace General
tn at . Many Barbadians crowded Sea~|{mmediately after arrival Eisen.|Bisenhower a Supreme "Come
Pilin Dus Gwe Céewediinden over Regional Command of Greek} yj) ty witness a demonstiration |} cae a iri 7 ir ro t NATO mander of North Atlantic Treaty
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 9. and Turkish Land and Naval] of stunt flying when the T.L.A.C No ther” Rok Gommnanter Organization, (NATO) forces, j
The Legislature after three Forces His reply to a direct Auster was here, After the de-~| 4 imira! Sir Pattrick Brinds' —U.P.
hour debate to-day, elected the|Guestion was: “Admiral Carney monstration many members of hear os san at Voksenkollen in
Hon'bles Albert Gomes and L. C.| himself without intermediaries. the B.L.A.C. and other flying en- a Sar ‘Onl . ; ;
Hannays as the colony’s delegate ‘ thusiasts were taken up for}*!? po mes et 6 DEAD ABOARD
to the Federation talks in London}, ©@!?ey arrived here on Monday flights. Perhaps some may. have reneral Eisenhower said _ last I
es és Ss rec é — i nl to inspeet Greek army installations giudged ‘Trinidad for its advance- 4! t he would be in the U.S.A R O SANTA CRUZ
"Both rab eaented the colony at}/#24 airtields in Greece and Crete.| ment and keeping in line wilh}! June Ist. Concerning the pos- BUENOS AIRES, May 9
tha kehthen ee Conference on|H¢ has also discussed Mediterran=|! modern times, But now that the [®ibility of his nomination as Re-| The Argentine State merchant
Federat n in 1948 and on the|°&! defence with Greek Defence] B.L,A. has its Auster every {Pi vllecan presidential candidate|fleeter “Rio Santa Cruz” was to-
“ederation i wee 1? Chie art . ~wardless 0; olo ‘T did not ask for it but iffday adrift weathering a storm off
Standing Close Association Com Barbadian, regardless of colour : ‘tire \ f , gas o
mittee on West Indies. Federation.| Greece and Turkey have made|lor creed, can have th experience | they want me Tam ready to oblige|Patagonian coast with six dead
Before the election the Council; |! clear since they joined the/jof flying, if he so desires them. and a. number injured on board
. ied the Government resolus| Atlantic Pact last February that : He said he did not intend tolfollowing a boiler explosion on
paternuets (etree . ' Ithey were t “apared t | {t will again make it quite clear|“make any swing of the entire Wednesday, Efforts to board the
tion which asked the Council tojth¢y were not prepared to put), ' : - tt : ‘ b iahes a i bial ita. e
appoint two or more of its mem-|their armics unde; the Pact’s|'!@t the BLA.C. is not for the|country giving several speeches |vessel failed yesterday after tow

bers to be chosen by the Govern-|Southern Land Commander Italian







idle rich” as Mr, O, T. .Alider,

—UP.

aid addresses every, day.’—U.P. ropes broke twice.

























N ee : ae ‘astiglioni, | member of the House, suggested
addition, provided direct financia}}| Lady Huggins, wife of the) : a et ad by line s or-in-Council to be the colony’s}General Maurizio De Castiglioni, hans the House of Amenity was a SS =
- former Governor of Jamaica was | Shipping emergency gasoline sup- delegates, and that they be em- 2) ae Bo ea conned a Bill t6 amen the
istance during the war years ' s iar f us ‘ scentl ering
ass ce ,|today formally adopted as a Con-jplies to the border States of powered to make all such de-| Yugoslavia which has recently Customs Tori” Act a a!
when many of the een - servative candidate for the Scot-| Chihuahua, Lower California, Son-|Gicions for and on behalf of the| been co-operating more closely Fr Saat ae thats ta ind CLEAN WHOL ESOME
$e peng ress cts to|tish constituency of Dunbarton| °ta,and Sinaloa which import most | .ojony which in theit opinion were} With Greece and Turkey is also], mislead the public and many ; -
able to export their = s a West. f their gasoline from the United! ji ciy to lead to an agreement on! believed to have said that such a wathia’ whh geretinuly naan
provide funds Fa eae The seat is at_ present held by | States. a. sound and workable federa)|Command might hamper relations have been keen on joining the ‘
the necessities 0 y aaarane ce Mr. eee He said that Mexican production | sc!ieme in suffic ient detail . =: tween the three countries, jClu », would have discarded the }
In some quarters reference has|Wi0 ns WN Poa: yO 1951,| “hile sufficient for most of the|able a start to be made ayatep sa Observers here belleve that both nee because of the feeling that i
been made to the employment pro-}OVer Mr. BP. W, N. Fraser in 19! ‘| nation could not be increased im-| process of drafting the necessar; 'Greeks and Turks wanted an th "y were not rated in the Class }}!
vided for Canadians by the opera- Prior to her adoption for Dun-| mediately to take care of an im - | constitutional instrument oe +|American Land Commander for Idle Righ ‘
tir f the Canada-West Indies|parton, Lady Huggins had been) pending shortage along the border The effect of the amendmen lero the hanitintion. thut ; ae
oe of the Canadian ? - . aa , —U.P. adopted by the Council was Pee Bee On ele Mee ee ie Promoting Flying {
fleet, this came out on the short ist 20r Several COfl- lelect the delegates itself and sti, i would be easier to get financial \\
tax-payers pockets, Po Gena eg nee Sotipabam. julate that their decisions must be sistance and equipment fror | vould advise these people to}{l
National Steamships as been er early childhood was spent! , * pe \ gener s 4 tie United States without red jense any such misleading state~ |;
under no obligation to employ West#in Dunbarton which is the county | Reas Again Demand sae Fa Pacers bes Pe te 2 “| Gaee: end ase monts from their minds and join 4)
Indians as members of ships crews; town and she has many friends in} ‘ $2 : tion Committee | --U.P. |th: Club. It is aiming at promot- i
nevertheless, we have employed a/the District || teturm Of Prisoners | ir ir John and Lady Huggins anc : : / Ww months ago an article |)
ae A ee tates tanec house in the constituency for TOKYO. May, 9 ; id >a O | F ii 2 por — Asa an ae
Fie te Reiman SME, commune tae ian! Ridgway Orders Force) er.tinche
With the high rates of wages aN Hi nll ¥ nat SES Obie again demanded the return of all | } asgued pee enwaatesh DG) AO e ie \
pro gins will spend one week there in = . Pret ~ hat perhaps in a few vears tihe ?
vailing recently, this has been of reve , rth Korean and Chinese pris-!7\7y ; oe Stn take i
tremendous value to the Colonies|®V¢ry month rs at a ten-minute session at | i oO eca ature. en. oO eg a 4B Nha ney. eer ti
times the value con’ £ ; Netions spokesman said after- se ire : | Vounitird > essincihily hould 1i
made by the respective Colonies. i “t nm Hurt {wards he did not think Noth | le SAN, Eocee, ning 9, | tear this in mind. Who knows? i
q , | Korean General Nam Il chief! General Ridgway gave the army orders to use force if shortly there may be a dernar {
A’ Tourist ae saa a Fighting Blaze communist delegate had had time) »ecessary to free Brig, Generel Francis T. Dodd from the | pitots and. navigato
The typ Of Rerview % BUENOS AIRES, May 9. |‘? 8¢t new instructions. | hands of 6,000 North Korean Communists. The order came| !arbados will have '
“« ” ships rea laced the , May . le tly mentioned {
the “Lady’ ps Afi hich b h der |, Neither side directly me ntioned | re a oT de ape an hath Doritantae made ifler. i
West Indies and Brit Guiana te which was brought under eizure of. Brigadier: General the oulgoin nited Nations Supreme Commander mad The WEA CO, will chive (
. stand-! control after raging three hours)‘ °°! Pre leh eat | has to Pusan with Cenerals Mark W. Clark. his}. )%* BLA Berve |
in the map from a tourists stan on a four-storey building occupied |": T. Dodd by communist prison- | flyin » Pusan with nerals Mark W, Clark, his|,, useful purpose Pot
point, the people of all the Colonies by Philco Arvientisa « Soobany (£? on Koje Island. But General | ecessor and James A, Van Fleet, Eighth Army Comman-|theie may be another war. 1 {
bene end of the last cen-|here caused damages estimated at | Nem sp’ke of the “heroic resis-| der Dodd was re ported “all right” in a bulletin from Koje|Brrbadians who voluntary
ince "

millions of pesos and injury to 11 | ‘*aice of the Communist prisoners. |
tury, when regular passenger ser-







Pi

of
he

y

i ba fi ['welve communist jet fighters
Vice commenced between Canada oe according to the authori | today” swopt dows ‘dedaedlie “Gn
and the Colonies, it was 4{' Ten fire companies were called |cizht American shooting stars}
nized that such a service out to-battle the blaze in a build- | #ttecking raily 30 miles south |s@
not be operated at a profit. The ing lotated in the machine manu-|°f the Yalu River. One of the
Canadian Government paid sub-| facturing district near South Dock.| communist fighters was reported
sidies to various Steamship Lines] Four firemen were seriously An-| damaged. The air force did not
to maintain this Service until] jured and hospitalized and seven tell how the slow shooting stars
1927 when, under the terms of|others overcome by smoke were|came out of the battle. Allied
the Canada-West Indies Trade] given first aid treatment. lair losses, if any, are announced

@ On Page 5 —UP. | kly.—_U.P.





—
/

WEST EUROPEAN ARMY IS VITAL

By EDWARD M. y hower and his SHAPE team too, The State Department has
\ . 9, have put all their eggs in the | “no alternative” in reserve either
The betting co iow is|European Army basket. If they, The idea that West Germany

will no European |fail to hatch dn a multi-national
omy ane the ‘shockiane fact is\defence force capable of stopping



would be eager to rearm by itself
—with United States support—has











there takers among {the Russians the United States—jnot yet been greeted with ans
rk officials of the nations most|and Eisenhower—may be caught warmth in Germany itself. And
oncerned. | empty-handed the whole Western alliance—the
os ‘ North Atlantic Treaty Organization
If this pessimistic approach is| Eisenhower at his last question |—would fall apart it the United
borne out in fact then it not only |and answer press conference States sought u h
may have dire consequences for | January emphazised that policy, The United Stat il
Western Europe but it may have |‘no alternative” to the proj: holds on to this idea officialls
a tremendous effect on coming j|creating «a single arn the | however as the level to put pres-
U.S. Presidential Elections. Not |manpower and resource of |sure on the French because there
only the United States State|Germany, France, Belgium, Italy jis 1 ternative solution on hand
Department but General Eisen-!the Netherlands and Luxembour =P.





prison camp at 6 p.m

(2 a.n
The report said his status wi
We are glad he is still alive’ -

i an Eighth Army spokesman a

in, port on the southern tip «
Korea separated. by a narrow





water
pe We
yh and unhurt.”

Terms Unreasonable

from Koje. We



A United Press dispatch from
kyo said that the Korean Eigh

ider General Ja



comm
Van Fleet w









$8 tonight directi









Le

f
of

rip|
just,
can get him out of there;



i plan possibly involving a for
to rescue United States Comman
dam brigadier General Franci
Dodd from North Korean Co
munist prisoners who capt
im three days ago riot-torn
Koje Island
After a flying visit to Koje
day Van Fleet aid Commu t
terms for Dodd releas re
unreasonable angi annot be
granted’ He suld not revea
the tern but i he id not be-
D eizet for

D ss A fF
te e to-day he

la and optimistic about
fate

@ On Page 5

}

{ ST) where he is being held
“unchanged,” i

Labour Ahead |
At Borough Polls |





|
lihold a pilot license Some w
I even commissioned to the {tp
lranic of Flying Officer ‘or Flight
Li the start lhe
i licence through

A.F. wouk

if they

the R.A.F. on
quickly promoted

RC

Lieutenant fron
this

Light

get

Barbado Aeroplane Cli

The Hangar






LONDON, May 9 f
fhe labour Party continued | here are membet wiho re
i trong showing in sritish | 4, ig all they ean for the bene
Municipal Elections early to-day of the Club, Many of these mem-
by eapturing 20 Borough Coun=|bev: have sacrificed weekends at i
cil x of thetn in the hard hit home to go to Seawell where they i
|Midland textile belt @rected the hangat These mem y)
Most of the Council which | j,, wre doing the pade ork i
retaines their Conservative or|, ers will bene )
list majorities in nearly | {
vere whittled down by be ere ! id iver })
esse Polling vas | serie lectures o Theory of} ;
ever reported low YF light The first wa ven | 5
4 3.357 contested seats in 372\the British Council, "Wakefield’'} }
boroughs Labour gained 656 andiand was illustrated by a vary in-| » * 7"
lost 16 Conservatives lost 472 te resting film show entitle Why | ; y : }
aot ster ba io etek to coe kh ee EVERY GRAIN EDIBLE (
viderecd the most important contest he entrance fee ying |) nt : . }
Mth industrial Manchester the|mnual’ suseriotion thease} NO BICKING REQUIRED. = }
{ er tive jority dropped to) flying embe , $10 year - . ))
dustrial Port of Bristol. and|it is expected that Phitty Heo PRICE 60c. Package i
ndustria ‘or o ; > an 7: 4 xpected that nilip } (
reduced the Conservative majority jof the Trinidad Light Aeropla t GEDDES GRANT 4
in Leeds from 28 to 12 }Club will come over to take it on
; —U.P. ‘a few trial runs. Vee








PAGE TW





a
ADY ARUNDELL, wife of His

Excellency the Governor of

the Windward Islands, arrived
ere yesterday morning by the
Lady Nelson from Grenada in-

transit for Dominica.

Establishing New Office
R. O. D. BRISBANE, Manag-
ing Director of O. D. Brisbane

and Sons, Merchants of St, Vin-
cent, arrived here yesterday
morning by the Lady Nelson

intransit for St. Kitts and Anti-
gua. He was accompanied by his
son Charles who will be Manager
of the new office they are going
to establish in St. Kitts,

Chiropractcr Returns

R, C. O. Y. LOWE, Chiroprac-

tor of Bay Street, returned
from St. Vincent yesterday morn-
ing by the Lady Nelson after
spendiig about two weeks, He
was actompanied by his wife and
daughter.

Réturning to U.S.A.
R.. ED LEAHY left for An-
tigua yesterday on the M.V.
Caribbee aiter spending a month
at the-St. Lawrence Hotel.
He is returning to New York
City after a sixteen months’ tour
of Eurepe anc the Caribbean.

For Five Weeks

or about five weeks’
w holid:y here igs Mrs. Olive
Mohammed of British Guiana.
She artived yesterday morning by
the Lady Nelson and is staying
with Mrs. Arthur Cadogan of
Hastings.

Spent Twe Months

RS; JOYCE MaGUIRE, daugh-

ter of Mr. B, A, T. Williams,
retired. Comptroller of Customs
and Mrs, Williams of “Henley,”
Fontabelle, returned to Antigua

en Thursday by B.W.I.A. after
spending two months’ holiday with
her parents. She was accompanied
by her little son Michael.

From Bermuda

Puisne Judge

R, JUSTICE A. R. COOLS-

LARTIGUE, Puisne Judge
of the Leeward and Windward
Islands, arrived here from his
headquarters in St. Vincent yes-
terday morning by the Lady Nel-
son aftér presiding over the Court
of Appeal. He will be here until
Monday staying at the Hastings
Hotel before leaving for Antigua
to preside over thie Court of Crimi-
nal Sessions.

Building Surveyor

R. A. C. FRANKLIN, Build-

ing Surveyor of the Housing
Authority in Antigua, arrived here
yesterday morning from Trinidad
by the Lady Nelson after spending
two months’ holiday. He is now
on his way back to Antigua.

On Six Months’ Leave
PENDING part of his six

months’ leave in Barbados is
E. D. Small, Chief Clerk of
Treasury in British Guiana.
arrived yesterday morning by
the Lady Nelson accompanied by
his wife and is staying at “Leaton-
on-Sea,” The Stream.

Cable & Wireless Dance
NVITEES are reminded of the
dance to be held to-night at
the Paradise Beach Club, by the
Cable & Wireless Sport’s Club.
The Dance Committee are
all in their power to make the
evening a success.
Spent a Week
R GRAHAM MAC FARLANE
left the island by British
West Indian Airways on Thursday

Mr,
the
He

on his way home to Rochester, I
New York.

Mr. Mac Farlane has_ been
staying for a week at the St.

Lawrence Hotel.
Intransit
NTRANSIT on the Lady Nelson
yesterday morning from St.
Vincent was Mr. George Alexan-
der Grant, Superintendent of

doing

Back to U.S.A.

ISS MADELINE SOBERS,

of the U.S.A, who was holi-
daying here for about ten days,
left for Trinidad on Wednesday by
B.W.LA. on her way back home.
She was staying at the Ocean
View Hotel.

Retired Headteacher

RS. W. H, JACOBS, retired

headteacher of Grenada, ar-
rived yesterday morning by the
Lady Nelson for a holiday and is
staying with her son-in-law and

daughter, Rev. and Mrs, K. O.
Grannum of St. Simon’s, St.
Andrew.

Also arriving by the Nelson

from Grenada yesterday morning
for a holiday was Miss Phyllis
Seon, Civil Servant attached to
H. M. Custems. She will spend
about two months here staying
with Miss Louise Grell of The
Stream.

After 38 Years

ISS ROSITA HEADLEY who

has been living in the U.S.A.

for thirty-eight years returns

home to-day. Miss Headley has

been spending a holiday in the

Colony and during her stay here

she was the guest of Mrs. Martha
Levine, St. Peter.

Farewell Dinner

M® SULEMAN PATEL gave a

farewell dinner rty at his
residence “Crishna,”’ Lands End,
on Thursday night in honour of
Mr. and Mrs, D. A. Thani of
Brighton, Black Rock who will be
leaving later in the month for

Mr, Thani who first came out to
Barbados in 1937, is paying his
second visit back home. His first
was in 1946. He expects to be
away for about a year.

Among those present were Mr.
and Mrs. A. I, Patel, Mr. A, M.
Patel, Mr. S. Mater, Miss Elaine
Taylor, Mr. Colin Morris, Mr.

PENDING six weeks’ holiday in Public Works who is going up to Keith Chandler, Mr, and Mrs. N. A.
Barbados are Mr, and Mrs. the U.S.A. to take a six months’ Thani, Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Thani,

H. §. Halsall of Bermuda,
arrived yesterday morning by the
Lady Nelson and are staying
the Marine Hotel.

and Maintenance, He will be at-





Each would-be beauty must first

learn a_ secret—one that every
established beauty has discover-
ed long ago Call it the “habit
of beauty.” It is to practise each
infinitesimal chore religiously
each day until it becomes as

much. part of your life as brush-
ing your teeth. You'd never keep
them white and undecayed by
carefully cleaning them for one
week, then forgetting t hem
for another, would you? Like-
wise your hair won't snine unless
you brush it every day, not in fits
and starts. It’s just that princi-
ple that’ underlies the whole plan
of beauty,

You'll have to be honest and
repeat each chore diligently.
Some chores, like the daily bath
and make-up are fun; some, like
removing the same make-up, are
tedious, It’s encouraging to
know that soon you'll reach the
stage where you repeat them as
unconsciously as you eat with a
knife and fork,

YOUR FACE
Its Care
Probably you have just discov-
ered the bewildering array of
creams, lotions and astringents,
all aiming to guard your com-
plexion, But for young skin there

is only one sure fire prescription
—wash it Wash it, wash it and
wash it again, even for luck.
Try different soaps until you find
one compatible with your skin.
Oily skins respond best to soaps
with a spirit base; dry, sensitive
skins have to take it easy with
mild baby soaps. A medicated
soap, prescribed by a doctor, is
recommended for problem skins,

If you have a tendency toward
enlarged pores which clog easily,
try steaming hot towels followed
by soap cleansing, then cold,

cold water and perhaps an _ as-
tringent. It’s the slower safer
more permanent way to clear

your skin of blackheads.

Never, never pinch or squeeze
blackheads and pimples, or you'll
ve sorry. If a machine breaks
down, an engineer doesn’t bash
it in a burst of rage. He tries to
find where the trouble _ started.
It’s the same with’ your skin. Diet,
on your hair is refiected by the
maltreatment, exercise, sleep,

serenity (in that order) are things
to check. Acne finds a cosy home
where pimples and blackheads
have been mauled by fingers. If
it develops, see your doctor,

A crop of pimples could mean
your bloodstream is clogged with

impurities. To clear it, Grand-
ma’s sulphur recipe has never
been beaten....one teaspoonful

of sulphur mixed-with three tea-
spoonsful of treacle or syrup.
Take it every morning before
breakfast until the spots clear.

Besides soap and water you can
use a light cleans*ng cream be-
fore washing again. But beware
of rich nourishing creams. Young
skins don’t need them and may
turn temperamental if overloaded.
A softening lotion for dry skins

before makeup, a drying night
lotion (the calomine type) for
slightly troubled skins before

bed, is all the skin care parapher-
nalia you nedd, But a final warn-
ing—never go to bed with your
makeup on.

Its Trimming

The ideal look for a young
girl’s make-up is just as fresh
and natural as it can be. There
should be a_ shine just about
everywhere, her hair, her eyes,
her teeth, anywhere but her nose.
All you'll need is a very light
powder base and a powder that
matches your skin. The fresh
look of this simple makeup is just
a matter of checking and renew-
ing. Wash it off a couple of times
a day and begin again.

Soft pastels, the pretty
and corals, are the young girl’s
own lipstick colours. For fun,
buy a flock of different coloured
inexpensive lipsticks and experi-
ment until you know the shades
that suit you and can apply them
surely. Vaseline is the only eye
cosmetic you need. Smooth it on
your lids and eyebrows to make

pinks

them shine and pluck just the
few stray hairs that fizz the
natural line of your brows, no
more,
Your Figure
Let's face it....everything from

the size of your waistline to shine
food you eat. Double helpings of
sweets, malted milks, fried foods,
and pastries not only put on

They course in Highway Construction Mr, and Mrs. M. Karnani, Mr. and

Mrs, M. Maneck, Mr. K. Bhagvan-

at tached to the U.S. Bureau of Pub- das, Mr. Joe Thani and Mr. M.
lic Roads in Washington.

Santo,

Beauty Hints For The Young

inches but bring out a crop of
spots, Fortunately there is a
group of foods (meat, eggs, fresh
fruit, vegetables and milk) which,
if included in a balanced diet, not
only keeps you slim but healthy
with a clear skin too.

It is true that you'll only re-
duce your weight or keep it its
own sweet self, by watching your
diet. But the other step on the
road to a perfect figure is exer-
cise. Try to keep up at least one
sport that you played at school.
One that takes you into the fresh
air and sunshine, and get a little
exercise @ach day.



Mother Of The Year

NEW YORK,

Chilean First Lady Senora Rosa
Markmann De _ Gonzalzes was
awarded the title of “Mother of
the World” to-day, and in an ac-
ceptauce speech called on women
to do their part to preserve civili-
zation. The award was presented
at Hotel Waldorf at a luncheon
attended by 600 sons from all
parts of the world by the “Ameri-

can Mothers Committee” of the
Gold Rule Foundation.
At the same time China-born

Miss Chin was awarded the title
of “American Mother of the Year.”
Senora Gonzalzes said mothers
have a “great and beautiful task
in this convulsed world that
threatens spiritual security dan-
gerously.”"—U.P.

B.B.C. Radio
Programme

SATURDAY, MAY
400 —7.15 pm



10, 1952
9.7% & OS M



4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The
Daily Service; 4.15 p.m. BBC Scottish
Orchestra, 5 p.m Racing, 5.15 p.m.
Musie for Dancing, 6 p.m. Scottish Mag-
azine, 6.15 p.m. Frankie Howard goes
East, 6.45 p.m. Sports Rgynd-Up and
Programme Parade, 7 p.m. The News.
7.10 p.m. Home News from Britain
7.15—10.9% pm S822 M



7.15 p.m, Behind the News, 7.45 p.m
Sports Review, 8.15 p.m. Radio Newsree!
8.20 p.m. Radio Theatre, 10 p.m. The
News, 10.10 p.m. News Talk, 10.15 p.m
Music Magazine, 10.30 p.m. Variety Fan-
fare

en nenennnnag PLPLPELPVOPPSCLELLL LES ren
2 *
. 4 r ‘ $
LOOK OUT FOR x
* %
$ 3
<§ SUNDAY’S . :
S d a ADVOCATE
8

8

x and win

x %
rs

s

25.0
. e S
S §
& > Re
$ AT THE SAME TIME YOU.CAN HELP THE 3
8

&

s y iy §
% FARNUM FOR FINLAND FUND. %
‘;

%,

%

VOLPE LELLL PEL PPP LPLPLLPPVP®LLLLBVLCELP?PPRLEPL PLES 3





GLOVERS MEN SHOES

EXCELLENT QUALITY

BLACK & TAN from $10.19 to $10.78

MEN FIELD BOOTS..._....___.. $11.96



T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL~ 4606

ADOS ADVOC

AX TRELL }

KNARF, the shadow, met Blackie
Beetle pushing a wheelbarrow load-
ed with trunks, valises, dishes,
clothes and furniture. Blackie |
stopped to mop his forehead with a
handkerchief.

“Hello, Blackie,’ said Knarf, |
“Where are you going with all that |
stuff?” .

“p ing.”

afm shoving *

“I don’t like my old place any |
nrore—the one under the gray rock
near the stump of the apple tree. It’s
too damp and the ants keep walking |
in without being invited. I’m moving
under a white rock near the garden
wall. Blinky Mole used to live there.
Drop in and see me when you have
time. It’s a beautiful place.”

Blackie Beetle lifted the handle of
’ wheelbarrow again and pushed
off.

Dragging a Cart

A few minutes later Knarf met |
Blinky Mole, dragging a cart filled
with all his household goods, “Hello
Blinky,” said Knarf. “You're moy-
ing, aren’t you?”

“Oh, yes,” answered Blinky,
pushing his dark glasses over his |
eyes to keep out the sun. “My old |
place—the one near the garden
wall-~is awful. The dogs and the}
squirrels keep digging in it. Jum |
kept awake half the night.”

“Blackie Beetle thinks it’s beau- |
| tiful!”

“It may be beautiful for a beetle.
It’s awful for a mole. I’m moving |
down to the edge of the marsh, un- |
der the ferns and toadstools, Come
and see me. It’s as pretty as a pie-
ture.”

Hardly had Blinky Mole gone |
than Willy Toad came hopping by. |
He was carrying a heavy knapsack
over his shoulder.

“Moving,” said Willy to Knarf. |
‘Um moving!”

“Why, Willy, I’m surprised!
hought y

varsh!”

“I did,” retorted Willy. “It used
» be lovely. But a mole is moving

That’s the end of my ferns and
adstools. He'll burrow right un- |

r them. I don’t like living in a/
ace where someone is digging, |

d gnawing and burrowing un-|

rneath. I’m moving over to the

grove. Come around and see





I}
ou liked it down at the!

Beetle Was Moving

o Longer Liked His House Under a Rock—

ATE

ayo —
| ees ra

ym;

VY

WY























“I'm moving,” Blackie told

me as soon as you can.” Then Willy
hopped off,

Not many minutes afterwards
Knarf saw a whole flock of may-
flies and blue-bottles buzzing
across the field. Each of them was
carrying a tiny basket filled with
clothes and groceries. “\ nrov=
ing,” they explained to Knarf, “An
awful toad has just moved into our
pine grove! We won’t have a mo-
ment’s peace or safety with a toad
in our neighborhood.’

“Where are you moving to2”
Knarf asked,

Old Apple Tree

“To the stump of the old apple
tree. It’s a nice quiet place. I’m sure
we won't be disturbed.”

Knarf watched them fly off.
“Well,” he said to himself, ‘that’s
Blackie Beetle’s old place. I’m sure
they'll like it. No one is living there
at all now.”

But Knarf was wrong.

Glive the Snail came along!
slowly, leaning on his cane and

}earrying some things wrapped up

in a piece of brown paper. He
stopped to talk to Knarf. “I just
found a nice parking place for my
house,” he said, “Just beside a gray
rock near the stump of the old
apple tree. But then a whole flock
of mayflies and blue bottles came
alor 30 I’ve got to move again.
Well, I’m used to moving, But I bet
no one else is doing any moving—
no one but me!” And he wondered
at the surprised look in Knarf’s
face,







Girl Guides

Fair T

Today the Girl Guides are hold-
ing their annual Fair at the Drill!
Hall from 3 — 8 p.m.

In 1946 the Guides decided
in order to have their own He
quarters they would have to w
for the money, and in July of











year they held t Fair

Each year since they use

this effort to raise money an
-

they are hoping that today
will be even more su
last year’s.

Due to Court Mourning, Lad
Savage, the President of the Geel
Guides Association, is unat
attend. Lady Savage has
taken such an interest in the





of the Organisation and the Guides +



are disappointed that she
be present today. Lady

c

Colly



rk on sal

Hold Annual

oday

very kindly consented
) the Fair at 3.30 p.m.
mbers of the Local As-







iat have again undertaken

e Cake Stall and the Trefoil
] (Old Guides) are running
Plz The Commission-
Guiders, Guides and

ni re ge of ail the

r St The Household, Gifts,

cs, Sweets, Coca Colas, Snack
Milk Bars, Teas, Ices, Wheel
Fortune and the Dips. The
Band, through the kind per-
nission of the Commissioncr of
Pol will be in attendance.
Tick for the 2 Raleigh bicycles,
ic re being raffled, will be
it the Fair. It is hoped

public

supp

noor

will generously
rt to the Guides

ive their



Rupert and the



Rupert feads his tne
Robin Down side of Nutwood

hey begin to descend



“* Have vou though: of

fo}
a

IO’



and so
mouse.
to our cottages

idea,
little



ome
bring our stockings

we
1g them here
yk, this old dead tree is
we need. We know
passing here in any

together.






Knarf.! %




Remember.

THE GIRL GUIDES’ PAIR

HALL



AT THE DRILL

TO-DAY

From 3 to 8 p.m








Under the Distinguished Patron-
age of His Excellency the Gov-

ernor and Lady Savage








ADMISSION; Adults I/-
Children & Nurses 6d
Scouts & Guides in Uniforms 6d

GAINEY

The Garden—St. James
LAST SHOWING TODAY
Women 4.45 Men 8 80
Age Limit 12 years and Over
MOM & DAD

Segregated Audience Only





Midnite Special TONITE
Triple Attrattion—
MEN. OF THE TIMBERLAND |
,. Richard Arlen—Andy Devine
SIX GUN MUSIC (Tex Williams)
& LES BROW
$6566S0C00
TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30
And CONTINUING Daily










ad

UNFOLDING WITH





















_-~ ON DEREK LE CO
JOY LANRANE es

PRODUCTION « Produced 2y ROBERT LORD - Directed by HENAY LEVIN

COLONY
CLUB

The weekly Club
Dinner Dances
will recommence

on SATURDAY, JUNE 7th.

DINNER JACKETS
or

LOUNGE SUITS
Dinner & Dancing $4.00

YOUR COOK'S
DAY OFF??

Why not phone for a table
and have lunch or dinner
any day

Phone 0107



To-night








Be like lovely Loretta Young — never neglert_vour daily Active-
lather facial with fragrant Lux Toilet Soap, No girl should take
chances with daintiness, the mostimportant charm of all. A Lux

Toilet Soap beauty bath makes y
and clea!
Toilet Soap! Remember, Lux
be lovelier tonight!

LUX

TOILET

The fragrant white soap of the film stars y

4 LEVER propuct

You'll love the clinging flower-like perfume of Lux

ou sure—leaves your skin fragrant

girls are lovelier! You, too, can

SOAP

“ You'll love the delicate
perfume Lux Toilet Soap has,”
says glamorous
Loretta Young.









K-LTS 790-1499-00

SATURDAY, MAY 10, 1952





PROGRESS ©
AGAINST PAIN

Research chemists inmanycountries have long been trying
to overcome the two obstinate defects of ordinary aspirin.
Now, in ‘Disprin’, they have succeeded. Aspirin is acid
(acetylsalicylic acid), and it is almost insoluble in water.
Consequently aspirin enters the stomach in the form of
undissolved acid particles which are liable’ to produce
gastric irritation, resulting in heartburn or dyspepsia.
‘Disprin’ on the other hand provides a substantially
neutral, palatable solution which is not likely to irritate the
stomach lining. Being freely soluble, ‘Disprin’ is quickly
absorbed and brings relief without discomfort or delay.

Because of these advantages ‘ Disprin’ has found

favour with doctors in Great





Britain and is now widely used
in hospitals there.

In all
would normally take asy ‘rin—
better take a ‘Disprin’. 5

eases when you

“DISPRIN’ to relieve pain
Far less acid
Completely soluble
Quicker to relieve
Non-irritant
Palatable

Also in neat, flat, 8-tablet
pack for pocket or handbag

™ Made by the manufacturers of ‘DETTOL’

Agents: T, S. GARRAWAY & CO., Bridgetown



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Send You~ Orders for— ‘
GALVANISED SHEETS
AND
EXPANDING METAL
To CENTRAL EMPORIUM
Corner Broad & Tudor Streets
“BRIDGETOWN || BARBAKEES™|| _OISTIN—
(DIAL 2310) Cra an; (DIAL 8404)

Last 2 Shows TODAY
4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

Today to' Monday

445 & 8.30 p.m. To-day & Continuing

HAPPY Go| *"**""â„¢ NEVER TRUST
meveny = |{HERE COMES ||... 4 GAMBLER
David NIVEN THE GROOM || LAST oF THE
CBSAR WOMEnE SEN |] Bing crosby, Jane BUCCANEERS

Wyman, Alexis Smith Paul Henried









TODAY 6.30 & 1.30
SILVER RAIDERS

Whip WILSON &

COWBOY CAVALIER
Jimmy WAKELY



foday's Special 1 30 p m
“Raiders of Tomahawk
Creek” &
“Fort Savage Raiders”
Charles Starrett Double

Today's Special 1.30 p m
Triple Attraction !

“RAIDERS of the
DESERT’

Richard ARLEN &





Midnite Special To-nite

2 New Thrillers! Midnite To-nite

RED DESERT ‘CHEYENNE COWBOY |] “LAW of the
Den Barry & ILLIAMS & P
FRONTIER REVENGE |] 7 °* eens Gler || TH, HOLT &

Lash La _Rue— ex BENEKE & Gler “PRAIRIE LAW”

Fuzzy St. John George O'BRIEN

ROODAL
EMPIRE

To-day 4 45 & 8 30 and Continuing
Dally

John DEREK—Lee J. COBB in
THE FAMILY SECRET
EXTRA
Short: FOOLISH BUNNY
Paramount British News Reel
Vigilantes Return

Jon Hall |

OLYMPIC

Today to Monday 4 30 & 8.16
George ZUCCO—Ralph LEWIS in—
THE FLYING SERPEANT &
I ACCUSE MY PARENTS
Starring:
Mary Beth HUGHES :& Others

MILLER & Orchestrz
THEATRES
ROXY

To-day to Tues 4 45 & 8.15
Ricardo Montalban—Syd Charisse













— in -
MARK OF THE RENEGADE
EXTRA:
2 Reel Shorts: SWEET SERENADE
with Tex BENEKE and his Ork
To-day 1.30 p.m.



Tonite Midnite
Whole Seriel

SUPERMAN
Action. Thrills

TONTITE MIDNITE SPECIAL
PIRATE TREASURE
with Richard TALMADGE

ROYAL

To-day & To-morrow 420 & & 15
HARLEM GLOBE TROTTERS
with Thomas GOMEZ &

HOLIDAY IN HAVANA
with Desi ARNEZ & Others

Mon. & Tues. 4 30 & 8 15

“INDIAN TERRITORY”
and
Warngr BAXTER in
“ORIME DR GAMBLE”

Michigan Kid &







Special Tonite

MIDNITE
Rod Cameron .in |} whole Serial—

The Lady Objects Jack Armstrong
& Drums of, with John Harte

Joe Brown
The Congo Action! Action!

.* GLOBE

AN UNBEATABLE COMBINATION “t
The CONTROVERSIAL FILN4

To-day 3 Shows 1.30, 5.00 & 83.30 p.m.
TO-MORROW 2 SHOWS 5 & 8.30 P.M.

“David,
Slayer of
Goliath,
Give Us
The
Adulteress,
Bathsheba!”

Today 1 30 p.m



Wed & Thurs. 4.90 & 8 15
JACK ARMSTRONG












a)
ge
>












starring

Produced by DARRYL F.



Pe + Directed by HENRY KING * "5 te PHILIP DUNNE

vrerwvrywyyyyvyreyyve




MS

—=





—



TO-NITE MID-NITE TO-NITE

PRINCE OF FOXES (Tyrone POWER)
* and
DANGEROUS MILLIONS (Kent TAYLOR)

PIT: 10c. HOUSE: 20c. BAL.: 30c. BOX: 40c.











SATURDAY, MAY 10,

The Government Industria

1952

Girls’ Reformatory

THE Girls’ section of the Government Industrial School

is really a Reformatory School.

In years past detention at

the school was merely punitive for children who har’
committed trivial offences or perhaps no offences at all.
Some were even carried there merely for wandering about

the street.

Barbados has travelled far and
fast since these days and now
there are Probation Officers whose
duty is, not only to look after
children accused of criminal of-
fences, but to save others from the
reaches of the law. These officers
place ‘with foster~parents child-
ren who are by reason of uncom-
fortable homes or bad habits, on
the down grade.

The small number of ten girls
now detained at the School is an
indication of the enlightening ap-
proach to Juvenile Delinquency.
Ten girls in a population of over
200,000 in a Reformatory School
might not be an exact indication
of the moral standards of girls in
the community, but it is an indi-
cation that people are less willing
to make criminals out of young-
sters by having them sent to a
school of detention for some triv-
ial offence in their early years.

The Girls’ School (Summervale)
was founded in 1912 with a roll
of 28. Both the Boys’ and Girls’
Schools were situated on the sites
of contiguous sugar estates and
the arable dcreage (186 acres)
continued to be administered by
the staff of the Boys’ School until
May, 1947, when the plantations
(Dodds and Summervale) ceased
to be the responsibility of the
Superintendent and Staff of the
Schools

It is note worthy that a Com-
mission set up in 1877 made a
clear distinction between a Re-
formatory and ah _ Industrial
School and were of the opinion
that “a Reformatory is needed for
children actually convicted of
crime, and more especially of re-
peated crime whereas the Indus-
trial School is designed for idlers
and vagabonds who have not as
yet been actually convicted,” They
further maintained that “A Re-
formatory must always carry with
it more or less the gaol stigma and
must necessarily in its discipline
approximate closely to a gaol.”
Thus the Reformatory Act, by
which the School was created in
1883, gave way to the Reforma-
tory and Industrial Schools Act of
1890. It seems fairly certain that
the Act of 1890 envisaged the com-
mittal to the Schools of children
“beyond control and in need of
care or protection.”

The Government Industrial



School is administere
intendent, Major O.

*&, Walnot,

assisted by a Matron, a School-

mistress, a Nurse
overseers. About 75 per cent. of
the children are admitted as a re-
sult of cases of petty larceny. The
minimum sentence is three. years
and the maximum five years,
There is a uniform of blue for all

the girls.
School
The girls have elementary les-
sons—geography, hygiene, English,

and 2 female



arithmetic, history,—and the cur-
riculum includes biology. In the
evenings there are opportunities
for gardening, domestic , work,
laundry, plain sewing, fancy work,
housewifery and West Indian
Handwerk.

Each = is ih charge of two or
three beds. Mrs. Dove the Matron
who spent over twenty years
in the Gold Coast, West Africa,
brought back with her a variety
of plants. She has taught the
girls not to depend on lettuce, car-
rots and cabbage but they also
cultivate the Amaranthus, wild
lettuce, and yellow egg plant
which seed @asily.

Outside Tours
The girls also make educational
tours to districts making special
note of plant life, the Museum,
British Council and other places of
interest. Once a year there is a
big picnic and occasionally _ pic-
tures are shown. by the Mobile
Reon. There is also a Fireworks
play on November 5th and at
nee time gifts are distribut-
ed.
Games
The aim of the School is to give
the girls as much freedom as pos-
sible. Occasionally they are taken
for sea-baths. The spacious school
with its surroundings of trees and
gardens affords the girls much
space for play. Outdoor games in-
clude cricket and football which
are very popular among the girls.



Indoor games include table tennis,
and chess, and they even dance
to records. Plans are being made
to start Basket ball and a new
playing field.

The girls aim at attractiveness
is clearly seen especially on en-
tering the recreation room. Here
they have pictures of film stars
and the Royal Family, there is
even an attempt from one keen
artist—a drawing of Esther Wil-
liams. There is also a Libr: and
in the afternoons after work the








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BARBADOS ADVOCATE



girls relax with books and m:
zines.



Normal

In other words the sole aim is
to make them feel as much like
other people as possible and they
are even give pocket money, The
diet scale is a liberal and balanc-
ed one and there is noticeable
improvement in weight and height
after some months in residence
All the girls are examined periodi-
cally by the Medical Officer and
by the visiting Dentist. Every
Wednesday at inspection cod-
liver-oil is administered. The
sleeping room is a spacious one
and the girls sleep separately in
cots.

The discipline is maintained by
a system of rewards privileges
and admonishments. In case of
iliness a girl may visit her home
under escort,

After Care

The real merit of a child’s train-
ing is indicated by the way she
responds to life when she goes out
into the world away from the



y



supervision of the school Con-
structive work on leaving the
School will help to steer the child
clear of mischief and the records
show that only a comparatively
small percentage of the pupils
discharged from the school subse-
quently lapse again into crime.
The Superintendent and Probation
Officers place the girls in suitable
jobs. Most of the girls seem quite
set on becoming shop-assistants.

1 School

‘Peer’s Son
Sails—A
Test Of Love’

As Anthony Blyth, son and heir
of Lord Blyth, set sail from

The solution of all problems of Galway last night on a 6,000-mile

conduct is the power of religion.

There is public worship at the
Parish Church regularly on the
Ist and 8rd Sundays

month. There
for religious instruction and con-
School one may notice that this
firmation classes.

structive training but one may
call it a home where one big fam-
ily enjoys the healthful, happy

recreation and the enjoyment of to wat

those things that are so often lack-
ing in the overcrowded house to-
day.

Top: The girls will soon be
taught basket-ball. Mean-
while Football and Cricket
are popular outdoor games.

Left: The girls learn how
to make baskets and hats
from local straws. These
W.I. handcrafts will be
helpful to the pupils when
they leave the school.

|
|



Below: Each girl has a plot
of land for the cultivation
of flowers and vegetables.
There is keen competition
among them.





LONDON, May 9,

Economic and financial pro-
blems dominated discussions today
between Dr. Leopold Figl, Austrian
Chancellor and Richard Butler
Britain’s Financial Chief. These
talks concluded the official part of
the Austrian statesman’s four-day
visit to Britain.

The two men were understood
to have centered their discussions
on three main points:

Japanese Have No

WASHINGTON, May 9.

Secretary of State Dean Ache-
son has decided that “the Japan-
@€se have no claims whatsoever in
Korea.” This was disclosed Friday
by Korean Ambassador Y. C.
Yang who said he received this
communication from the American
official after protesting Japanese
demands for the return of property
they formerly held in Japan.

‘\MEL has conquered tens of

For

thous ‘nus

of coughs.
recommended

|
|
‘
1

by Dectors, Nurses, Hospitals

Sanatori v¢verywhere. The

n? Simply this. It con-

fis soluble actocreosote —

d in the Famel labor-

-and this ingredient

tor

your bloodstream and

the trouble at its roof.

nelis so effective




LP AMEL

bie im two

Trade enquiries to i=

Frank B. Armstrong Ltd.
BRIDGETOWN.

sizes — from all chemists or stores,

Britain Discusses Economic |
Problems With Austria |

1. Settlement of Austria’s pre-|
war external debts,

2. Future wool credit which
British commercial interests ex-
tended to Austria shortly after the
last. war,

3. Cost of British occupation
troops in Austria. They are also
believed to have had a general talk
on the trend of trade between the
two countries.

—U-P.



Claims In Korea

Korean officials said Japan was
demanding as the price of signing
the peace treaty with Korea that
the latter agree to return former
Japanese property and also in-
demnity owners for losses suffered
as a result of the Korean war.

Japanese officials said “our posi-

tion has been misunderstood.”
—UP.

and why it acts so quickly and so
From the first dose
Farnel cases the inflamed bron-
hial passages and builds up
your powers of resistance while

thoroughly,

it is destroying the germs which
have caused the cough or cold.
Th: moment you suspect "flu, or
catch a cough or cold, take
Famel Syrup and you will have
started on the road to recovery,
Always keep a bottle in the house.

SYRUP

of each}girl clerk in Coventry
are also classes] !east i

On a visit to thefother y«
is not merely a school for con-§45-foot

adverture trip to the Canary
Tslands, the West Indies, Honolulu,
and Vancouver, an 18-year-old
said: “At
will be a true test of our
love.”

Anthony, who is 20, and five
ung men went off in the
ketch Aisling—Gaelic for

Poet’s Dream—on a voyage that
may last a year
Lord Blyth was on the quayside
the Aisling leave

Anthony,

{
in a black beret, high- {

necked jersey. and flannels worked |

all day yesterday loading supplies
and finishing the fitting out of the
boat. He said before sailing

“T spent two and a half years in
Coventry on a studentship in
engineering. | had stomach trouble

and came home two months ago.
A few hours before the Aisling
ailed, Anthony rang up Miss

Nancy Dean, the fiancee he is leav-
ng behind in Coventry.
Chestnut-haired Nancy talked
of the test of their love, added:—
“It will be a terribly long wait.
{ tirst knew about the trip on
*ebruary 25. We both felt rather
sad, but it had to be faced.”
Lord Blyth, who lives
Galway, said
of the engagement.”

————

RATES OF EXCHANGE
MAY 9th 1952
NEW YORK

near

72 1/10" Cheques on
Bankers 70 3/10%
Sight or Demand
Drafts 70 1/10%
72 1/106 Cable
To 6/10" Currency 68 8/10 %
Coulpons 68 1/10%
50% Silver 20%
CANADA
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Bankers 72 9/10%
Demand Drafts 72.15%
Sight Drafts 72 6/10%
747/10% Cable
732/10 Currency Tr 4/10%
Coupons 70 7/10%
50 Silver 20%



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PAGE FOUR 4



BARBADOS ta

SSS Yes Pore

Saturday, May 10, 1952



KOREAN DILEMMA

THE Korean Truce Talks have been going
on for nearly a year and there is still no
armistice. Observant listeners to radio bul-
letins will have noted the many occasions
on which meetings between Communist and

United Nations delegates at Panmunjom
ended after one minute, half a minute, one
and a half minutes etc.

Meanwhile hostilities continue and the
Communists lose no opportunity to accuse
the United Nations of prolonging the fight-
ing, using germ warfare and brutalising
prisoners. The facts are so different. The
United Nations are particularly anxious to
see the end of the fighting in Korea. Only
the highest motive of honour and the
noblest sense of international responsibil-
ity keep United Nations troops in an area
from which they would only be too willing
to return to their homeland.

This truth is strikingly illustrated by the
most recent developments in the Korea
truce talks.

The Communist delegates at Panmunjom

are insisting that the United Nations should

» return more than 62,000 North Koreans and
Chinese prisoners of war before an armis-
tice can be signed.

On the face of it nothing seems more log-
ical or more easy of fulfilment than this re-
quest. One of the articles of the Geneva con-
vention guarantees a prisoner of war rights
of repatriation. Refusal to return prisoners

\DVOGATE

SS



of war might well seem to be a high-

handed action not in keeping with the arti-
cle of the Geneva convention. But the
United Nations have made a census of pris-

oners of war in their hands and more than
62,000 have declared their unwillingness to
be repatriated. Prisoners of war cannot be
forcibly repatriated at the point of a

bayonet: they must desire to return.

General Ridgway’s offer of an armistice
to the Communists includes the proposal
that imemdiately an armistice is concluded
opportunity should be given for an interna-
tional commission to examine the reluct-

ant prisoners of war again.

The Times of London this week com-
menting on the delay of the armistice in
Korea suggests that the United Nations
might make the concession of allowing such

an examination of reluctant prisoners 0

f

war to be carried on before the signing of
an armistice. No doubt such a concession
could be made and no doubt it will be made
if by making it there is any real chance of
promoting the armistice which is so ardent-

ly desired by the United Nations.

But the facts are that the United Nations
have already carried out such a census and
have discovered that no less than 62,000 or
more than half the total number of prison-
ers of war in their hands do not want to be
repatriated. Commonsense makes it plain
that so large a quantity of prisoners are a
liability to the United Nations. Expediency
would suggest that they should all be sent
back whether or not they wanted repatri-

ation.

But the forcible repatriation of prisoners
of war many of whom would kill them-
selves before arrival at their destination
would in the words of Mr. Anthony Eden
be repugnant to the sense of values of the

civilised world.

Surrender in time of war is regarded as

treason in China and the prisoners of war

in United Nations camps hear Chinese
broadcasts about mass purges and execu-
tions in China. So far from being guilty of

y

the wild charges brought against them by

the:Communists, the United Nations Forces
in Korea are actuated by the highest moral

principles. It is unthinkable that men, even

prisoners-of-war, should be driven across

the lines at the point of a bayonet.

There is another side to the picture.
Refusal to send back Communist prisoners
of war might lead to reprisals against
United Nations prisoners of war in Allied
hands. The Communists can also take act.on

against
refuse repatriation,

the families of prisoners who

In this event greater butchery might re-
sult than from the forcible repatriatian of
prisoners. And if hostilities in Korea should
extend to a larger theatre of war might the
Communists not persuade British prisoners
of war by some of the modern techniques of

“confessions” not to seek repatriation?

The’ refusal of the United Nations to com-
pel prisoners of war to return to what seems
certain death in their countries of origin is
based on the highest humanitarian princi-
ples. The action reflects the great value
which the United Nations place in indivi-
dual freedom, but the dilemma remains in
Korea. Nothing is settled by this praise-

worthy action.
talks is not yet in sight.

And the end of the truce

. the Dutch reached England,

Our Common Heritage=2

Cavaliers and Roundheads
THE career of Francis Lord
Willoughby takes us back to an

almost forgotten episode in the
great civil war between King
Charles I and the Roundheads, At
the outbreak of that war, few

people in England seemed to know
or care anything about Barbados.
The island enjoyed happy rela-
tions with the Dutch merchant-
men who plied their trade in these
parts and, when the civil war be-
gan, our trade with the Dutch
continued without interference.

Before long, however, reports of
the island’s prosperous trade with
The
Royalists were the first to recog-
nise the importance of Barbados
not only as a trading centre but as
a strategic outpost in the New
World. They seemed to guess, as
Cromwell afterwards clearly real-
ised, that the West Indian colonies
were destined to play no small
part in British trade and war
during the following hundred arm
fifty years,

After Charles I was executed in
1649, Barbados, along with the
American Colonies, remained loyal
to the Royalist cause. Indeed the
island lost no time, after the
King’s execution, in proclaiming
his son King as Charles II. This
convinced the Royalists that the
time had come to take action and
it was unanimously decided by
the advisers of Prince Charles that
Francis Willoughby was just the
man to further the King’s cause
in Barbados and the Caribbee
Islands. The plan was that, if.
fortune went completely against
the Royalists in England, the
ground should be prepared for a
Cavalier stronghold in West In-
dian ard American colonies.

Francis Willoughby had at first
been on the side of the Round-
heads. Later he joined the Roy-
alists and served as Vice-Admiral
under Prince Rupert whose spirit
and genius were then threatening
to do for the Royalist navy what
it had done for the Royalist army
at the outset of the civil war.
When all seemed gone at home,
Willoughby resolved to try his
fortune overseas and to attempt
the salvation of the King’s cause
in the New World.

The Struggle for Liberty

Shortly after his arrival in Bar-
bados, Willoughby (was encour-
aged by its strong Royalist spirit
to fortify the island, raising a
substantial force for its defence
and sending out ships to enforce
the King’s authority in the other
Caribbee Isiands. The Common-
wealth, which was alive to the
importanve of the Caribbean,
thereupon denounced the Barba~
dians as traitors to the republican
cause and, by passing the Naviga-
tion Act of 1651, forbade the island
to continue its profitable trade
with the Dutch. The Navigation
Act, which was designed to strike
a crippling blow at the Dutch car-
rying trade, also threatened much
damage to Barbados. Stung by
this measure, the Barbadians, with
Willoughby as their spokesman,
made the striking claim that a
parliament, in which they were
not represented, had no right to
make laws for them or restrict
their commerce. With a sturdy
colonial spirit, which was to be
typical of Barbados in the years
to come, the islanders proclaimed
that they would rather “choose a
noble death than forsake ould
liberties and privileges.”

Such being the attitude of the
Barbadians, who were encouraged
in their defiance of the English
Parliament by Prince Rupert's ex-
ploits at sea, the Commonwealth
decided to send out an impressive
squadron, with two thousand sol-
diers on board, under the command
of Sir George Ayscue, to reduce
the island to submission. But the
Barbadians were not to be intimi-
dated by this attempt to bring
them to heel, Led by Willoughby,
they made a spirited resistance and
it was two months before Ayscue
could effect a landing. Eventual-
ly, when the battle of Worcester
had finally extinguished the Roy-
alist cause in England in 1651,
Willoughby was induced to come

to terms with Ayscue. By the
Articles of Agreement, which
were drawn up_ between Lord

Willoughby and Sir George Ays-
cue, it was laid down that the
Government of the island should
consist of “a Governor to be ap-
pointed from England, the Coun-
cil to be chosen by him and the
Assembly to be selected by the



Our Readers
Nobody’s Diary Plus
To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—I can add a bit more to ,

your Nobody’s Diary for May 3
re the dirty beaches of the island.

It is a disgrace to the people
along the Hastings beach to see
the dirty state of the beach.
Thousands of old tins, bits of
broken g.ass, coconut limbs and
trimmed trees lie all along the
beach, The high tides had cleaned
up everything a few weeks ago,
but the old condition is here
again. In a highly respectable
district with the Hotels and Tour-
ists walking the beaches, and for
our own sakes, I am appealing to
the persons who live on the sea-
side to make an earnest effort to
keep the beaches clean, It may be
easy fer those whose houses over-
Jap the sea along the Hastings
road, those below the Hotels to
dump their tins and refuse in the
sea, but it certainly shows lack

of respect for others ang for
order and tidiness in general.
It may take a little more
effort to see that the refuse
fis put at the roadside for the
Scavengers on mornings but it

will be worth it. It often happens
that the refuse does not gather on
the beach of the one who dumps
it in the sea, but very often wash-
es up On some cone else’s beach,
Several afternoons I have passed
along the Hastings Hotel and
there were old papers and refuse
littered over the road making the
road very untidy. The scavengers’
cart passes on mornings and
everyone should see and put
their bins out so that they can be
emptied instead of having to be
allowed to remain all day,

The Sin'‘tary inspectors could
bring to mind not to dump any-
thing on the beach and every oc-
cupier of a house on the seaside
should be made to keep his por-



*

Fréucis Lord Willoughby

freeholders.” Thus was the Bar-
badian Parliament, established by
Henry Hawley, confirmed ‘by
Ayscue as the representative of
the Engssou «4 acstatnenc. more-
over, the assurance was given that
Englishmen living in the colonies
ought to enjoy all the rights of
Englishmen livin; in England,
and it Was recognised that no taxes
should be made on the Barbadians
without their consent in a General
Assembly,

When it is remembered that the
same sentiments were expressed
by the American colonists during
their revolt from England more
than a hundred years later, Wil-
loughby and the Barbadians will
be regarded as pioneers in the
struggle for colonial freedom. In-
deed, it has been claimed that the
terms won from Sir George
Ayscue were later taken note of
by the American colonists and
that the Articles of Agreement
drawn up in Barbados in 1652
were to give shape to the Ameri-
can Declaration of Independence
in 1776. ;

The Autocrat

Although Barbados received
such favourable terms, Willough-
by himself was not treated fairly
and ordered to leave the island
contrary to the Articles of Agree-
ment. But when the Common-
wealth came to an end and Charles
II ascended the throne, Willough-
by was again sent out to Barbados,
His restoration as Governor did
not proceed smoothly. He had
originally leased Barbados from
its owner, the Earl of Carlisle, on
the understanding that half of the



SIR GEORGE AYSCUE and LORD WILLOUGHBY of Parham.

island’s profits would come to him
and the other half go to the pay-
ment of Carlisle’s debts. At his re-
storation, some eight years of his
lease still remained but the Bar-
badians resented the idea that they
would have to depend on the noble
lord’s goodwill for the enjoyment
of the estates they had now come
to regard as their own. Eventual-
ly, the Legislature of Barbados,
urged on by Willoughby, decided
to impose on the inhabitants a duty
of four and a half per cent on all
their produce in return for the
concession whereby the planters
were recognised as owners of their
estates, But there was stout oppo-
sition at first and Willoughby im-
prisoned the Speaker of the House
of Assembly, Samuel Farmer, for
leading the agitation against the
measure.

Willoughby cannot be com-
mended for his treatment of
Samue]| Farmer, though he was
upheld in this and other arbitrary
acts by King Charles II and _ his
minister, Clarendon. The four
and a half per cent duty was to
prove a heavy burden on the
planters for many years and Far-
mer typified the sort of Barba-
dian who was to play a leading
part in the long struggle between
the Governor and the Assembly
for the control of the purse strings.
Yet it is not difficult to under-
stand why the man, who agreed
to surrender his lease of the island,
should insist on another source
of revenue to maintain the dignity
and honour of the King’s represen-
tative, Nor should it be thought
that Willoughby eared nothing for
the economic position of the
island. He realised the hardships
which the Navigation Act would
bring to Barbadian commerce and
by his own constant advocacy of
the island’s cause he brought it a

Say;

tion of beach clean. Let us have

i cleaner island by all of us doing

our bit to bring it about,
Thanking you,

SLEANLINESS.
Self Control
Is Birth Control
To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,“1 read with interest Jean
MacKenzie’s letter concerning tirth
control in the Sunday Advocate,
and would, like to add a few
remarks on the subject.

Birth Control is undoubtedte
the lesser of two evils, the greater
evil being the appalling conditions
resulting from overpopulation, yet
the root of the problem goes far
deeper than that.

I subscribe to the view that the
sexual functions were given to
mankind by the Creator for the
purpose of the propagation of the
species and not for the unlicensed
gratification of sex lust. Such an
ideal is alas! only too far removed
from most of us. Such an ideal
is made far harder to reach by
many practices which are preva-
lent to-day.

Take the theatres for instance.
With glaring billboards showing
semi-nude women with only a few
inches of clothing on their bodies,
even the wayfarer on the street
besides the theatre-goers are pre-
sented with views which are not
conducive to morality.

The reading, particularly by the
young, of sentimental trash which
only too often makes them too
sex-conscious. Youth must be
taught that man is more than a
physical organism, therefore the
remedy of the social ill he has
created must be more than physi-
cal.

The Youth must be taught that
man is here not primarily for self-
indulgence, but for service and
helpfulness to the race, therefore
the principles of self-control. pur-
ity and consideration for the wel-
fare of others should take prece-



BARBADOS

|

large measure of relief from the
Strict enforcement of that law.
The Colonial Pioneer |
When Charles II declared war |
against Holland, the Dutch sent}
the illustrious Admiral de Ruyter |
to attack the, West Indian colonies.

After several triumphs off the
coast of Afriga, he came to Barba-
dos with a formidable armament. |

But, although he did much dam-
age to the ships in the harbour,
he was unable to land, Willough-
by’s defence against him being
even more effective than against |
Sir George Ayscue. Thus did Wil-
loughby win a notable victory
against the man who was later to |
bring shame and indignation to
the Mother Country when he}
sailed up the Thames and des-
troyed English ships in the Med-|
way. 5 |

Willoughby’s 'ife ended in the
way he; would perhaps have
chosen. Ags»Captain General and
Governor-in-chief of all the)
Caribbee Islands, he could not
confine his attention to Barbados
alone. In May 1666 he set out,
with a considerable expedition, to
punish the French and the Dutch
for the damage they had done in
other West Indian islands. Unfor- |
tunately, after capturing St. Lucia,
his fleet was. ovemaken by a hur-
ricane and he perisheli with the
majority of his men. Thus ended
the career of a man who, it has
been said, did more than any one)
to extend the British Empire in}
the Caribbean area. |

Willoughby deserves a place in|
West Indian history not so much
as a Governor but as a colonial

pioneer, He did not possess the
patience and the tact necessary for
a successful administrator. His
attempt 40 follow the example of
Charles I and govern the country
without parliament earned him
the censure of those who support-
ed Samuel Farmer and the Bar-
badian Petition of Rights. Ardent
and impulsive, like other pioneers
who set out to build up England's}
empire overseas, he could also be}
high-handed and arrogant, when
other methods might have suc-

ADVOCATE

| Wednesday—Everybody who has been to



MAY 10, 1952

SATURDAY,

NOBODY'S —
DIARY

Monday—Maude it seems is going to lead
nobody up the garden. Mr. A - - now in
Guadeloupe (a place with a deep water
harbour) parlaying francais with the
double—Charlie (CC) boys told the
House then breaking up for a vacation||
to study the Maude Bill while he was
away in Geneva, The House could hardly
do that because it hadn’t come off the
Press much before Mr. A - - - left Swit-
zerland. But this week while Mr. A - -
is in France (Guadeloupe being a de-
partment of France) everybody’s read-
ing Maude or at least the local govern-
ment bill based on Maude. Normally not
more than five dozen bills are printed
for the edification of the 60 or less peo-
ple who go through the motions of read-
ing them. But what with vestrymen and
others clamouring for the Bill the gov-
ernment has run off some 300 copies.

Even Nobody is reading it while the
wound in his heel keeps him off the
beach,















PLASTIC
PROPELLING PENCILS

LONG LEAD, SCRIPTO PENCILS,
BREAK PROOF 4Be. each

e
ADVOCATE STATIONERY





~ LIQUINURE |

A Highly Concentrated Liquid Manure

CS. PITCHER & Co.

Ph. 4472

Tuesday—I was so thrilled to hear Mr.
Tucker’s talk about “The Turkey”. I
look forward daily to read that Mr. B—
is going to thrill us with a talk on
“Grease.”



WHY NOT CONSERVE VALUABLE FOOD?
in
London knows that policemen are won- STERNE’'S DEEP FREEZE
derful. As Professor Joad would say it
all depends upon what you mean by
wonderful. The Policeman at Seawell
who has nothing better to do than to
make me drive my wheels right up to
the studs instead of being content that
I was behind the studs was certainly
wonderful. But I cannot believe the ex-
planation given by a friend of long
standing that the reason why the police-
man on duty outside the entrance to the
Police Station wears a spike on his hat
is to protect him against parachutists.
That is too wonderful to be true.

PRICE
$425.00



NGS ee

Thursday—It suddenly struck me to-day. If
Mr. M — who stays with Mr. A — finds
it difficult to find the Big Four, who can
ever find them? The only time you can

_ AVAILABLE FROM STOCK —

Da COSTA & CO., LID. Elec. Dept.













be certain where Mr. A — is, is when
he’s out of the island, This week he is
in Guadeloupe. Mr. W — is more ac- "

cessible because of his car. You can’t
miss it. Still the idea of one office with

This man is completing a deal’on Golden Grade
one of the four always accessible is



ceeded in winning the support of
those he hat'to govern,

Francis Willoughby has been
compared with such adventurous
spirits as Sir Walter Raleigh and
Sir Humphrey Gilbert. Certainly,
he had bold ideas for extending
the King’s power overseas to off-
set the victories of the English
Parliament at home. Perhaps, as
Strafford thought of doing in Ire-
land a few ‘years before, he may
have hoped to raise an army in
America to reduce the King’s re-
bellious subjects in England. Dur-
ing the period immediately fol-
lowing the Restoration of King

Charles II, thousands of Barba-|-

dians emigrated to Carolina, Vir-
ginia, Surinam, Jamaica, St. Lucia
and ather West Indian islands.
This colonisation was part of Wil-
loughby’s programme to extend
and strengthen British influencé in
the New World. The West Indies
were thus prepared to meet the
great efforts that France was later
to make to gain supremacy in the
Caribbean. “By his energy and
leadership Willoughby established
Barbados as the centre of British
influence inthe West Indies, in-
fusing the islanders with the spirit
that warded off the sustained at-
tacks that were made on the
islands during the seventeenth
and eighteenth centuries,

:



dence over mere personal grati-
fication. ,

They must be taught a sense of
responsibility, that every act, how-
ever apparently trivial, has an
effect on their fellow beings and
even on the Universe as a whole.
To emphasize, I quote the words
of Rudyard Kipling, “Whoso im-
pingeth, ever so.lightly, on the
life of a fellow mortal, the touch
of his personality, like the Nipples
of a stone cast into'a pond, widens
and widens in ni
through the aeons, till not even
the far off gods. themselves can
tell where action ceases.”

With anticipatory thanks for

space, '
OBED FRANKLIN,
Howell's X Rd,
St. Michael.

Birth Control |

To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—re Birth Control—the gb-
verse side of the picture.

Your correspondent “Medicus”
scored a bulls- eye when he said
that the matter has nothing to de
with religion,

Until recently the Church coun-
tenanced the practice among mar-
ried persons. .

Promiscuity with a wanton dis-
regard of the possibility of pro-
creation and/or Venereal Disease
Jas nothing arguable to commend
it but is cheerfully paid for by
Government,

‘Medicus* cotild have gone further
and reminded us of a letter writ-
ten to the British Medical Journal |
of October 14¢h, 1944, in which— |
discussing the question of human
artificial insemination—the writer
said: “The Chureh, having for
years condemned lust without pro- |
creation, may find difficulty in
pronovncing upon the quéstion of |}
procreation without lust.”

Fanaticism in this matter is by
no means helpful

I therefore appreciated greatly |
the sound letter of the Reverend
F. Godson.

NEMO.

© ending circles |

'months in New York as a money spinner.

—a safe bet to yield high returns in long-wearing
-\ smooth-fitting
comfortable apparel.

A
GOLDEN
GRADE
SUIT

Hand Tailored

worth chewing on, perhaps.
and





A man I know who works less than a
lot of other people tells me a story of
his son at prayers. It seems that the
son has a crush on work and sweeps out
gutters and runs messages with all the
alacrity of the “V.P.’s” Bob-a-jobbers.
Anyhow the idea of work has gone home
to his little brain. So much so that doing
his duty as a God-fearing citizen the
other night his little lips addressed “Our
Father Who Works in Heaven.”

Friday—The Bob-a-jobbers remind me of the
other little boy who calls the Scouts
Cowboys. “Daddy the cowboys outside.”
This set me thinking of the Lodge school-
boys who call each other Cubbos. Could

Cubbos be a corruption of Cowboys? by
Alas not. Etymologically speaking Cub- SUMRIE .
bo is a corruption of Corbeau, and so of England

many Lodge Boys come {from French
speaking islands where they call what
we call Crows Corbeaux. So you can’t be
too careful can you when you want to
fit something into the preconceived pat-
tern you’ve already decided upon, can
you. se git

Saturday—Red letter day for the Empire (if
you’re not ashamed of the word. I’m
not). To-day in 1893 Queen Victoria
opened the Imperial Institute. I hope
that sends shivers down your spine.

(P.S. Two Pelicans just flew over the
island.)

OLIVIER'S FLOP

By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS

LONDON.
SIR Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh di:
not do so well on Broadway with their tw:
productions of Cleopatra plays. In London a:
their own theatre they were the rage of the
town all last summer playing Shakespeare’:

and sold by:

Da Costa
& Co. Ltd.









REMEMBER MOTHER ON
MOTHER'S DAY
SUNDAY, MAY 11TH
WITH A BOX OF
CHOCOLATES



—

Anthony and Cleopatra one night and George Specials Boxes of Chocolates
Bernard _Shaw’s Caesar and Cleopatra the Prepared Mustard .25 per Sizes 1 Ib. to 3 Ibs.
next night. » 7 axt Bottle -| Carr's Biscuits
night On the golden strand of Broadw SFE edness 8 as gg 4 Asst. in Tins & Pkes.

nothing went so well. The big erities putlM} ngacoroni .39 por pkg. ee ee
their fangs in both plays and by the time the Chase & Sanborne Coffee oy hoy Crackers $1.20
theatres ivi i : $1.90 per tin fr Gn

atres closed the Oliv iers were play ing witl Empire Coffee $1.20 per 1 tb, Carr’s 7 Biscuits .36 per
some empty seats in the house. They did not pkg. v2 Pkg.

Churchman’s Cigarettes
Embassy Cigarettes

Dressed Tripe .32 per Ib.

bring home many dollars, but gave yet an-
g : ae Dressed Rabbits .42 per Ib.

other proof what goes in London doesn’t
necessarily work in Manhattan. But then it
sometimes works the other way and the
QOliviers can remind themselves that a play at
their own theatre—““The Mad Women of
Chaillot” ran two weeks in London and flop-
ped only to cross the Atlantic and run six





Shop at GODDARDS

Refresh at GODDARDS

Lunch at GODDARDS

Ask for a GODDARD 3 Year Old RUM |























SATURDAY, MAY 10, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE

Hotel Proprietors Told What _ Foreign Bible Society U.S. Industry | “Lady Boats” | 0 trotting sins tm

° . 4 your muscles at once! Apply
{ ° pe Fight Against Communism Can Supply _,,......2 rer! tees Untaont Wi
ay * te tine Oradniged to }: teal your
merican ourists Expect DURING an address to members of the Barbados Defence Needs | one rate ae De ger er and Ws 1
MR. JOHN ALEXANDER, HOA C's Sales Manage Auxiliary of the British and Foreign Bible Society and Pun eae alee eee ate SEW eved!

treement National




















the public in general at the Empire Theatre yesterday eve- by ARTHUR J. OLSEN — for ship. sey jee,
for the Caribbean Area with headquariers in Jamaica has ys i ; Seonh ta x Boa ae |
, an \ L r 1as ning, Rev. James Inniss, Secretary of the British West : ; Fewer Pz ge
just left for Trinidad where -he will have discussions with Ww ng Commander Indian Centre of the Society, made a strong appeal for aid niin Gene a Btn wees You don’t rub in “Sloan's” you dab it
* : a, s os e @d Dtaces’ oi T.ilet +} . enze: a ‘ :
aes before returning to Jamaica. He was accompan- Smith Arrives by way of funds to help in the work of the Society in cia.s said the American Industry al a the Demet ay tretas oe
i y his wife and two children who were staying at the spreading the doctrine of the Bible. is fully cupable of producing g00a5| ing the past ¢ uple of years, this
Ocean View Hotel. On ‘De Grasse’ Rev. Inniss told of their fight against Communism and ‘to fulfil the United States’ de-| combined with the necessity of! aches and pains and stiff |
. et f om Mr.. Alexander attended at the how the Society were “smuggling in” Bibles in Russia and Suiniat a diated’ taco ene keeping | nger fares down to!) joints too!
invitation o 0 iati i i i : i i i me riendly né S. ‘Y| meet competitio from othe
wan MER a 4 ag me ge their meeting which _WwiNnG COMMANDER Denis China where it has became a forbidden book. noted the defense buildup is only] forms of tees ore Look FoR THE
eld at the Hotel Royal on Wednesday night and was Smith, O.B.E., Aeronautical En- | This is Rev. Inniss’ fifth visi & tartial mbbiiieation with. less PICTURE OF DR. SLOAN
very interested to hear their plans. | ery and Senior Executive of the to Barbados. In his introductory oan Pe phenomenal increase in operation |
At the meeting he gave a short

paki. olland Aireraft Company, Ham. remarks, Dean Hazlewood the Will A dm itt d than 15 per cent. cf the nation’s} cost was responsible fr the |

talk telling hotel proprietors what ble, Southampton, ariteek care chairman, referred to Rev. In- 1 Ss 1 e steel mau tor example, dive t.c) deficits of the two “Lady” ships
the American tourists wanted Vi | this week on board the S.S. De niss as being an energetic and from normal civilian uses to mili- exceeding the total CNS. deficit |
and expected to find in their 10 ence ©. Grasse on a_ two-month holiday indefatigable secretary, — To Probat tary production. jof $466,000.00 Canadian in 1951. |
hotels and advised them on how visit. This is his first visit, and The Barbados Auxiliary is e An estimated 2,000,000 ton: ;
to attract the traffic from places Di 2 d he is staying’ with his.cousin Mr, made up of various denomina- less than two per cent. of (he Phe controis exercised by somes
like San Juan, the U.S.A nd ismiusse Neville Howell, Manager of Bulke- tions and has a Committee to In the Court of Ordinary annual production — lost during] Of the Colonies in the bulk pur- shila lige
then tain ley. ; help the work of the Society yesterday, His Lordship the Chief Steel industry stoppages in the} Chase of flour has resulted in the |
, His Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod Wing Commander Smith ts a _ Last year the Barbados Auxii- Justice ‘Sir Allan Collymore last two weeks will not serioi Canadian National Steamships 2
Commenting on the recent Police Magistrate of District “A” Soma yee Sader ot aay pn A gage ne: ye | 9 een wills of the following ar ie ee ie serene wey so datan Fee MaMgne sg on deel | i ne $ ust
successful first flight of the yesterday discharged Ainsley Wor- sistant Court of Appeal of this Hon ‘Secretary Mr.) Vi. SE aes ea Oe ic experts. ‘They said inc} medity but, it is 4 tifying to |
B.O.A.Cs Comet jet liner from rell of Sea View, St. James in the island. His uncle rt Sevan Tehy deacdnks ae Wien ve Maud Stansby McKinstry, st. economic experts. They said the | Medi ut. it is gratifying . to } ds

. . aa : 4 ’ - va sland, s : ‘ S s ing less a eae Ea! ori . aiap) 8 sel iiie se) st ; note that in 1951 the importers
London to South Africa and its case in which the Police charged Smith, Manager of the Barbados than that which the’ Society con- Sh Sette Teeate bee ee snighh sectonche cntens ial unite jin all the Colonies have IN en | lean ul ci

return, Mr, Alexander said he him with robbi i Electric , Corpora i ; ter . ; ¥.
had, flayn.éna two-hour flight in bing Cecil Batson of Supply Corporation. tributed to Barbados. He and Henry Thomas Bend, St. States’ steel production now ex-|US # greater measure of support | Your body cleans out excess Acids

i
From all chemists and stares





said






































3 by usi iolenc i . ._ An Honours Graduz at > ig rere as aoe sea : end poisonous wastes in your blood
the Comet last November while ae ane eerace oe ae, University, M nigh of Oxford nbn Sears were hoping Michael, Henry DaCosta Bascom, pected to amount to about 110, | 8% we look forward to the con- thru's million tiny delicate Kidney
i Mr, F. Smith nts mith served in to send £200 this year. ; tinuance of their increasing con- tubes or Silters, If Poisons in the Kid-
in England and the lack of vibra~ ) ioe mith appeared on be- the Royal Air Force during the Prayers St, .Georgs, 000,000 tons this year, but at Uiclaacnce in the reliable freight neys or Bladder make your suffer
tion and almost noiseless flight at @/£ of Worrell while Sgt. King jast war and was twice mentioned The meeting’ waa opened by , 2” the Court of Chancery His Same time it was pointed out thi | orvice, including refrigeration,| git?s.Up,N! Jtiar kaven Daceaaees
4,000 feet was an experience prosecuted for the Police. — The jn Despatches and later awarded prayers by Rev. F. C. Pember- Lordship the Vice-Chancellor the United States can switch ov’! which the CNS. have eran | Paine. Circiee Under See Saeeree
which could only be described as Prosecution called on one witness the Military O.B.E. He wag also ton. The Lesson was read by ‘ceived the Registiar's Reports to a sterner mobilization pro-| and will continue to provide. | _—_RASSAKEE, don't rely on ordinagy medhe
equivalent to sitting in one’s Cecil Batson and then Mr, Smith for sometime with the Bomber Major Welter Morris and this 0 ,the annual accounting of gramme at any time ; | with the doctor's prescription
lounge chair at home “in the S¥bmitted to the court that on the Command where he was on the was followed by the Honorary Eustace Maxwell Shilstone Esq., As a measure of what could |! Therefore, while it is not pos- Cystex starts working in three
stratosphere” with a visibility of €Vidence that Batson gave identi- Staff of the Commander-in-Chief, Secretary's report and financjal Selicitor and Receiver re the done in emergency it wes recail*!) sible to thank them all person- Ta Raye ee icine yea aaa ae
over 150 miles on either side. fication was not proved and it Air Chief Marshal Sir Arthur statement which was adopted, BASCOM TRUST FUND for the that more than twice as much ©'lally, I take this opportunity, money back 1s guaranteed Ask YOUR

. would be unsafe to accept that (“Bomber”) Harris. Thanks were accorded Mr, Years ended August 1949 and the the gross product of the nation/ through the medium of the press chemist for Cystex. (Slashes) (im
Stratocruiser Services evidence, There was also no cor- , ; ._ V. B. St. John and the Com- August, 1950. went into war production during | to extend to all our clients our} @@ stex antee
“BO roboration. On ~eee the Air Force in mittee for their service to the Reports of the Sale and Costs World War II. than is now divert-|}:eartiest appreciation for their ne brctrtepeer HG i,
B.O.A.C., is always endeav- Batson told the court that on 1946, ing Commander Smith Society. in the suit of P. N. H. Johnson vs ed to defence buildup. loyal support. = ;
ouring to improve its equipment April 23 about 7 p.m. he went to joined a ee. eee Com~- The following were elected for Dorcas Williams of Dwellinghouse Responsible officials said th>!)
and anette from the United Pine Hill in his motor car and ae itant' th oa Chi oP an Was the ensuing year :—Mr, V. B. St, AVEDON and one rood land at present defense production trou- |) eee
ae om and the U.S.A. to the while there for some time a man He. ms had uni ai po ee ibitity John, Secretary, Mr. J, G. Pile, Upper Collymore Rock, St. Michael bles - exemplified by the dis
artbbean and has recently in- eame up to the car and opened the in the design of the Canberra the Dreasurer and the Committee sold to Marie Josephine Prescott closure of General Lawton C
troduced _ stratacruiser — service door and said “Money or your first Britiely Jet . Bombs which comprise Messrs. H. Ward, G. for £1,230, Collins that some ammunition '
ccemine” to tte eo ae” established a world record fight Murray, D. Chase, O. A. Pilgrim. The Acting Pulsne Judge His rationed in Korea — stem fron|
amaica’ e sa and a “4 c : = ‘ > ills of the S.P.C.K., and 7 j ’ ie ihin eid ae a t
ie hoped that in the tetuee fur He told the man that ne had no sermes the Atlante ‘earlier this A, Clu sores dar. Teuea.G. Laavics three frincipal couses. None ct ane PS

ther extensions of these luxury money on him and another person - : ‘ After a short introduction b: . after as kinide dl: Mtaton' \§

aire aft can be. made to the who was in the cat with him gave pritma,smih, has, been very im the Dean, Rev. Inniss, delivered decree “absolute. in. the ult of Gigisy to preluse wer materi

E2stern Caribbean which is the man 12 cents, After receiving Gos which he said he very much 300 uae we eee M. R. Osbourne, petitioner and The first is the limited character | a new medicated
growing increasingly important this money the :nan pushed the wantec to know, and he thinks the j9 999 copies —— were distributed ©°,D: L Osbourne, respondent. of the defense buildup.

for B Rey tourist and commer- knife in his left side and put his climate wonderful. He plans to by the Society in the West Indi Decree absolute was also pro- Defence authorities are deliker
cial traffic. hand in his pocket and took out return home by the De Grasse y ie wes €S nounced in the suit of R. BE. Phipps, ately



i st yez i holding down all-out pi
_ Mr, Alexander will be attend- $3, when she returns to Barbados to- /@8t year than in the previous ..itioner, M. R Fhipps, responde duction. of some weapons ‘nn!
ng the Nati Cc t f years. pe ‘ pon
ing the National Convention o: He then got oué of the cay and wards the end of June. But the fact there was that ine Mt and Shan Brooks, co- ~“ninment to save money to avoil Oo soa
the Ame ican Society of Travel both of them began to fight but crease, i respondent. Mast he” wroduntioy er ats
Agents in Miami in October and , he said, did not mean P ' 1 in items th;

in the scuffle the man got away. that they were getting on fine, Decree nisi was pronounced in m-y become obsolescent befor?)

he is certain Barbados could get Before he got out of the car the There was m the suit of M. R: i .
; 7 R d ead oO ’ uch more to be e suit of M. Ramsay, petitioner they are needed on the battlefield. |
a ot, publicity py endang 4 man told him to, undress and he “Y© h Supt. Of Msfe was much more 10 be dane aii, MacD. “Hamsay, re= 1% 8 NNT ONS UP. | WITH DISTINCT ADVANTAGES
added ee refused to do so. , , ie faid, were fortunate in being al- SPOD ent. ees a
and also issuing an invitation to r ways i .
these agents to come down to To the court, Batson said that Grenada Prisons ays under the British tutelake, His Lordship also pronounced

t f for in this way their stande { decree nisi in the suit of E. K. R DGW A
Barbados to see what the lovely the voice of the man that attucked (From Our Own Correspondent) education had Deteme nn he McConney petitioner, ‘and J. A. I < Y
island has to offer. him that night was that of the GRENADA May 9. many other places. There was MeConney, respondent,

yy Tp Ly, y
) | @ leaves the coat healt!
il a defendant but he could not recog- _ Mr. W. A. Redhead, Acting much illiteracy in the West Indies In the suit of B, H. E. Howell, ORDERS I ORCE | aah ‘ ‘ ae 7
On Wednesday, his family and nise the man that night for he was Superintendent of prisons conse- @nd the Society had to tackle petitioner and C. L. Howell, re- ee ee
he spent a very pleasant day at wearin ask quent on the promotion of Mr. E. that proble 8 wel a , . ; @ From Page 1
the Colony Club, St, James, g a mask. CG. ‘King to a similar poet in Brite the Bible eansevines he teen oa ecree nisi was Koje Island prison camp au- | @ destroys fleas, lice and ticks
making the eine = Capt. ish Honduras is now confirmed in jous languages. ne OE Siprent, sndiinabud he Enceities se aes gree in wiles |
Hodges who was previously as- k i his, post. BBtv MM ee Of the many tents in the compouna | : hc ie a
sociated with B.O.A.C, as Cater- Motorist Fined _ Redhead, a young officer serving Special Appeal Ee Ee ene appear- the North Korean Officers were | @ guards against mange
ing Manager. It is just such ; in various depariments since Remarking that the population or the petitioner, holding General Dodd, 6,000 pris-
attractive places as the Colony £3 For S in 1926, attended a nine months of the West Indies was about enere het mi in a compound where | @ protects the hands
Club which will bring tourists to ; speed social welfare course in Jamaica 15,000,000, he said that thd 17 School Girls ee — vane
Barbados to enjoy the aan His Worship Mr. C. L. Walwyn in 1946, oer mare oe poe which : akin Wideeus anes eee
of the beautiful beaches and we i ; arate ‘tia 1 . was hamper rough lack of s,s hud ithorised: the use 106 to
appointed accommodation = Slee HA" pocneeh bas Michael Freak Tur key er wd ‘nie aes oe ene 4 Injured In Accident seetes -Camaat ee A gal
t eri- . ey could make good sak tortna hed: nate
aad Ode: SER = Spence cf Bush Hall, St. Michael, rs, William Thornhill of Sar- headway. That was why,” he ATLANTA, May 9. Ws. ae d - i eee? Gonfers |
£3 to be paid in 14 days or in geant’s Village, Christ Church, Said, he was making a special A train ploughed into a school ence Held O “Wad: ta Korea, i
default one month’s imprisonment prought a turkey with three legs appeal to the people to assist the bus to-day injuring 17 of 35 e n wednesday | are RS
with hard labour for driving the into the Advocate yesterday morn- Society. school girl passengers some seri- . It was learned from Korea tha'| medicated $04
Maas Charged With motor car M—2768 on Pine Road ing. 2 He recalled that when he wag ously. The bus was carried 75 the kidnapping was known on | aca gk eine
: at 45 miles an hour on Februar; rhe turkey, which is 5 days old, im England last year, the Bishop feet down the track. Wednesday but was officially de~|
Havi Weapcn 22. Spence pleaded guilty to the was hatched with eight others, of Hanover, Germany, came to | People rushed from nearby sp ore See : eee be a \ Ane ees ii ‘ : es
ig : ipo charge of exceeding the speed The other features of the chicken England asking to be provided houses and found bleeding girls. 1s surprised and overwhelmed | pleasant ° non-irritant « invigorating « insecticidal
limit are quite normal and it shows with 80,000 copies of the Bible A policeman said “many were un- While he was conferring with «|
CASE DISMISSED The Speed limit on that road is every possibility of being raised + 120,000 people who were See tilered Baildee aes = Cee ane aes ee on
i , to full size, about to be confirmed, but they the injured chiJdren along the prison gates. Another United Na~
A>case brought: by the ‘Police = weiitiic Cie ake = could spare only 20,000 copies. Y ids of the railway track. tions officer Lieut, Colonel Wilbur | IMPERIAL CHEMICAL (PHARMACEUTICALS) LTD.
against 28-year-old St. George end t 1 h Communism, ‘he said, was in- . The accident was just outside Robert Raven fought his way clear | MANCHESTER ENGLAND
; fi : endorsement, Cpl: Jones attached CONDUCTOR FINED 20/- imica! te the ‘gospel of J In Atlanta City. Later the injured of the Communists and escaped. A subsidiary company of Imperial Chem i ,
Leonards of Belle Land, St, Mich to the Traffic Branch at Central ~ Arnold Riley of Venture, St. Bulgaria and flungary Ceechab- were put into ambtQances and The imprisoned General was} . Mend Sacha tchpe Thiele
ee a ‘ahhiin Watnen Feprua oe oe (10.25 pe John was yesterday ordered to pay lavikia, their work of the society taken to the hospital. A specta~ keeping in touch with the south SOLE AGENTS AND DISTRIBUTORS
8 a ruary abou .25 p.m. he











" 3 ) ‘ f 20/- and 1/- costs in 21 had been closed down. tor was the last to be helped from by field telephone. Army cooks A. §, BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS) LTD.

with intent to commit a felony was was on duty on the Pine Road ee a pte rb ieapeischvesind Finland has always been a the scene, She fell from an em- were to-day sending in his food P.0, BOX 405, BRIDGETOWN ’ * Ph.
dismissed without prejudice by anq saw the motor car M—2768 by His Worship Mr, G. B. Griffith strong Protestant country and bankment while watching, and and he was reported to be still} 235
His Worship Mr, E, A. McLeod, approaching him and it appeared Acting Police Magistrate of Dis. W@S one of their strong centres broke both ankles. unharmed and well. Camp au i lh ia



Police Magistrate of District “A” i : ‘1 padi —U.P. thorities complied with the de- |) =e.--—~-~~~--—~---_____.
yeareney. F Fe aeeeenR, trict “A”, for overloading the ot ere Cote es han -~ mand by prisoners for 1,000 sheets )})~ tT s.

The case for the prosecution was A check cf its speed vas made motor bus — G—50 on My Lord’s prohibited the cxinting ae t the GRANTS TO GRENADA °t paper—a request earlier refus-
that on May 1 about 7.30 p.m. the and that showed that it was trav- Mill, St. Michael, about 7.10 Pm. Bible, The Society tee “aaa FOR INSECT CONTROL ed. The demand was sent out in
defend=nt ang Oliver Warner of elling at 45 miles per hour. Police on March 19. great work in Russia, « message from General Dodd who





~ but the Hicauielal “sae
Jones Land, St. Michael, had a Constable 466 Lashley said that he _ Cpl. Cyrus attached to the Traf- work there was closed down. But (From Our Own Corresponient) also asked for a “hospital repre- VACATION
row in which the defendant took stopped the car and the defendant fic Branch at Central Station said they were sending Bibles to Rus- GRENADA, May 9. Sentative. iia aaid
a knife and attempted to wound was the drive. that there were 62 passengers in via’ from "Finleka aN” Wa, Grants of SHOR UMTCER. .,HidKNsy's mesiage to-day sai
Warner, Spence said that he never knew the bus which is licensed to carry secret, he said, but it was done and $19,000 by W.H.O, both in whatever force may be necessary

Warner said that the defendant that he was driving at 45 miles 31. The defendant was the con- in a way which has not yet be

cE . en. Ss. le t mien fcerene ‘s release
abused him telling him that he per hour and that he was in a ductor and he said that he had discovered, U.S. currency have been made tO tg secure General Dodd's releas

Grenada for a two-year pro- and for establishment and main

BARGAINS



i 7 he bus because another St Barri trae naan tes tic “o)
was an annoyance. The defend- speed trap until he was told so by loaded t trong Barrier gramme of insect control particu- tenance of unchallenged contro!
ant took up a knife and rushed 4 person sitting in his car, Waa veep commtensnad a oft noald et the Protestagt larly of the malarial mosquito.
3 , . bagi : urch was a stronger barrier tc ; NLLC.E.F. i J » * » Py
at him with it. He was not cut siline Soca’ iehernmieen caedived, “tae ip, Pepriee ip | She Deputy Chist of U.N.LC.E Will Not Be Harmed Drastic Reductions in Thermos



doctrine than the Catholic jn the area who had his office in ‘The Eigt fig OO aiid
0 f » Eighth Army Commande:
Church. The Protestant churches Guatemala visits the island be- expressed his confidence that Gen-

} : ih
St Peter Tio Get 12 Arrested For LABOURER REMANDED were better able to withstand it. tween May and June to discuss eral Dodd would not be harmed, |

In the Far East there was a



Picnic Sets



j e e ‘ accounting and supply procedures But he said foree would be used |

Ne B 9 Club May Day Riots wy ote Stichnel, ae pont pie sre ta tue si ee ore with the Senior Medical Officer, 4 pean Leni e neeerery 7” Original Price Now
: , - 7. SS ee sa so Ts att co-0 Te ‘ "

Wepre MEXICO, May 9, ‘emanded without bail until to- who were there were languishing to distribute half a million as petting “up the telephone to the |) Attache Case for 4 people .. ‘ $30.00 $16.00
The Police have managed to get | Twelve Communists are held in any yown popees se Saree nee B prison, It was only where the against the 3,000,000 of Das Kap- unknown tent where the General ” et ee i ‘bs $26.00 $12.00
a building at Indian Ground, St, jail awaiting trial on charges of Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith at Dis- ae Flag was flying that the jtal, the Marxist doctrine which was held and freely permitted him Valise See ac ; $20.00 $13.00
Peter, where it is expected ‘they inciting May Day riot involving ‘ict A” charged by the Police Bible Society was acting unim- they are building up.” _ to communicate with camp officials, | Canveai Bind: Casa the 4 1 20.00 0
will open a Boys’ Club. Many extreme rightwing militarists With breaking and entering the paged. f He said that the work in India —U.P. as ‘pp ase for 2 people aia $20. $13.0:
boys between the ages of 8 and 18 “gold shirts’ in which two persons house of Miriam Walker and steal- t ey had withdrawn their staff had fallen off badly since India | Basket Case for 2 people .. re $20.00 $13.00

are already enrolling. were killed and more than fifty ing a pair of shoes and kitchen Bible China to Hong Kong and gained her independence. RATOONS BURNT

Before the Club is opened, the injured. The twelve which in- utensils from the same dwelling ibles ‘were carried there by “We are trying hard.” he said,

building will be equipped. A cluded Carlos Sanchez of Farm- house. aes means, ss “but we are not doing nearly A quantity of ratoons and fod-
Police told the Advocate that, ers and Workers, affiliated with The charge states that the | ~9me years ago,” he said, “we enough, and I have given you an der was burnt when a fire occur-
apart from games, the Club will the Leftists Popular Party, were offence was committed on April eal. distribute about four of insight of the position of the! rai at Sedge Pond. St, Andrew, on
offer tuition in carpentry, tailor- held from more than 40 persons 11, Sgt. Murre’l is prosecuting but Red million Bibles in China; work today as it really is and it Thursday. The ratoons and fodde:
ing shoemaking and handicraft. U.P. on behalf of the Police. ut last year we were only abld is for you to help,” he said. are the property of peasants.

©
KNIGHTS LTD.







JOHN WHITE BHMARAeReeeee B

FOCTWEAR i R i ¢ il
SUPPLIES

GENTS’ PRIME CUT
IN STOCK













WILLOW CALF BROGUES
@ $12.52 pair
GENTS’ SUEDE BROGUES

In Brown, Navy and Black
@ $11.85 pair

GENTS’ WILLOW OXFORDS
From $8.32 to $12.52 pair

GENTS’ BOX CALF
OXFORDS

From $8.32 to $12.52

JOHN WHITE

means made just right



#@ POULTRY

â„¢ CHOW
me 2DAIRY CHOW
tm OMOLENE
wi DOG CHOW
ta RABBIT

m CHECKERS

‘MPIGEON
a CHOW

GOAT CHOW



HANDBAGS

for Morning
Afternoon and
Evening Wear





i

A wide range

CAVE SHEPHERD 6 C0, LID. Fg H. JASON JONES & ~Jse

'
|
10, 11, 12 & 13. BROAD STREET | | AGENTS

| = reese eeeee
<<




See Them on Display and Buy Early from

HARRISON'S BROAD ST.

ees eee R Bees
Sua easeBBBB8 hw & O



&















——————_— 7 —SSS











PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE


















































. a a"
Cc LA S S I F I E D AD S ee SHIPPING NOTICES |
“ IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY
BARBADOS
_____TELEPHONE 2508 IN PURSUANCE Chancery Act, 1906, I do hereby give notice to all] ———_._ __ tani eee eens
7 “ Pike persons having or ¢ ar estate, right or interest or any lien or tn- MONTRE. j 3 Oo : q oe
DIED - » PUmbrante in or uffecting the property hereinafter mentioned (the prepbrty .of | SrALAnD aes aes a , LLLSCSSOOSS SPSS FOSS, |
BRATHWAITE: Yesterday at the Gen- FOR SALE the defendaht)) to bring before me an account of their claims with their witnesses, “ANZ. LINED DS whe MV. CACIQUE DEL
era] Hospital, Mrs. Ophelia Brath-| documents and ¥ to be examined ty me on any Tuesday or_Friday be- SS, “TEKOA” 1s scheduled to gail CARIBE will accept Cargo and |
waite (wife of Mr. James F. Brath- Reet ‘aie tween the hour oon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration | ¢ro;, Adelaide February 15th Melbourne for St. Lucia, Gren- }
waite, Official Reporter of the House Office, Pub B Bridgetown, before the 4th day of J 1962 in March 2rd, Sydn March 10th, Bris- ada and Aruba. Passengers only i
' 5 ey .
of Assembly) Her funeral leaves - order that such ¢ may be reported and ranked according to na bane March 22nd arriving at Trinidad for St. Vincent. Sailing Today
her late residence Quas Road AUTOMOTIVF and priority thereof respectively, othe se such persons will be precluded from | about April 22nd and Barbados about ednesday 7th inst.
Carringten’s Village, St. Michael at} _ _ Pe ele 5 oe the benefits of decree and be deprived of all claims on or against the said! ania gsth. The M.V. CARIBBEZ will accept
4.30 o'eleek this afternoon for the} (aR—~One (1) Austin A.40 Car, late] Property | Tm addition to general cargo this ves- Cargo and Passengers for Dom-
Pilgrim Mpliness Church, Carrington’s| 95; model. Telephone 4821. D. V Oe zl 3 TCH {sel has araple space for chilled and hard iniea, Antigua, Montsérrat, Nevis
eee ane yas for the ae Seott & Co., Ltd 8.5.52—t.f.n., PLAINTIFF HUGH OWEN SAINT TAs CUMBERSAT frozen cargo. tas St. Kitts. Sailing Friday
ury ameter y friends are aske . z DEFENDANT T. D. SEALY CO., LIMITED ‘ Cargo accepted on through Bills of instant |
to pees F. Brathwaite (fusband CAR—Morris Oxford. Perfect condi- 1 of land situate nesr Warners er = spenepaent at Trinidad to Gan =v. E idainmnad wn eneset |
AMES .. rathwaite (Husband) 1 ” 9 ak sleph: 2949 PROPERTY ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate 8} Brit uiana, eward ‘and wa |
10.8,08 2. case ton; millenge 2.500. Selepnens ish of Christ Church and Island aforesaid formerly | tanga inica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
23.4.52—t.f.n in the parish o s , . ‘ si! cn
a mae “ait SS rr 7 fee genre ee — acaee eae or| Fort turtner particulars apply — — inte. Sailing Bridey
CAR—(1) M,G Coupe in perfect oun bce su. 3 rth m lands of ‘RNESS WIT’ : ¥ q
CURWEN: We the undersigned, desire|order. Apply Newcastle Plantation, St thereabouts abutting and bounding on one bog of Allen Walcott rote HY & CO., LTD., B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS
h tl ed e John ‘30.4. 52—t.f£.n Warners Plantation on the East on lands formerly - . ASSOCIATION (INC)
throug! a my a og orten the . aw cae but now of E. Best, M, H. H. Sullivan and the estate of J. E oe ané ©o: nee Tele, 4047
be Z TP oenereise : a 2 000 deceased on the South on lands of Graeme Hall Plantation DACOSTA & CO. LTD., masts:
funeral, paths an otherwise CAR-—One (1) 1951 Hillman 1%, he Public
WERE. re = i road, and on the West on the
condoled with-as in the death of the| miles. Perfect condition, going cheap. jands of Te Cox aie the same may abut and bound. BARBADOS. #.W.L
late Susan “Amelia Curwen. Prodgers, Little Hamilton, St. Lawrence] . , toad or ho ver else a
A. B. : (Brother), Mrs. Her-] Gap 8.5.52—n, | Pill filed: 29 Januany 1952 hence adit laimidintenin sili aii a tals den:
mene Holder a Family 10.5.52-—1n | —————$__________—__ | Date April, 1952 HH. WILLIAMS,

1948 Standard 8 Saloon in good

CAR, Registrar-in-Chancery










































































































































BRATHW. f" We the undersigned beg | rinning order, tyres good. Phone 405) 29.4.52—3n . ~~
Prato ae eu om a s\ HARRISON LINE
to ail-those~kind friends who sent Siccuptiiateinniadsmainis neonate
wreaths, letters of Condolence or ir CAR—One 1951 Hillman Car in perfect j
way €Xfféssed their sympathy ir dition. Done 4,000 miles. Phone J. H. PUBLIC NOTICES WANTED
u ae pect ecencnt = bod the ] emtage 5/42 or after hours 5105. ‘ es
dea a Edna trice rathwaite 7.5.62—6n ————$—$—
The 3 @nd Clarke Families. | ———__--- imie—enenines-al ee aaa ee aoe eee
ot Minsion , Brittons Hill CARS—1947 Vauxhall 14-6 Saloon in] UY¥NCH’S SECONDARY SCHOOL MISCELLANEOUS OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
excellent condition Price $1,500.00 ‘
os ao ro Applications are invited for the post PURCHASE
7 ber Hawk Saloon, one owner and ; WANTED TO
FOR 2 RENT | lr oat ile eae deal ee aaait service of senior Assistant Teacher qualified to Gramaphones, Victrolas, Pickups. Apply: Vessel From Leaves Due
Cole & Co., Ltd 10.5.52—an, }teach English and Mathematics up tO! Owen T. Allder, 118 Roebuck Street,| qo «uveRCHANT” Newport & Barbados
“EYAREVILLE”, Eagle Hall Road. | - | pece, Certificate standard. Apply | in| pial 3299. 6.5.62—2n | 5-S. Liv 5th May 18th May
and Dining rooms, 3 bedrooms ONE FORDSON UTILITY VAN-—Car- eee tating experience and qualifi-} a S.S. “COLUMBIA STAR” Li erpool 1th Ma: 20th M
ete. low at Welches Road, St. 7 passengers or 1% tons cargo |°#tons, A. MeD. FORDE a ‘ iverpool y ay
‘wihg and Dining rooms, miles per gal. Apply: McDonald 5 1 (Oran |S-S. “TRIBESMAN” London 10th May 28th May
acts’ roonis, garage &« aly. Dial 3322. 120 Roebuck Street om a CANADIAN COLYU i S.S. “SELECTOR” Gl &
Y¥ A. SCOTT . 9.5.52—8n. 3.5.52—2n. ey pj grated
“Dial 2645 ° Liverpool 17th May ist June
10,.5.52—2n CAR—Ford Prefect late 1950 model, NOTICE 9 ot brain erly idee gone:
von, Ph Tg ge Gemeral condition good ene ee Keer ee CURE
ARAWAY-—St. ilip coast, 3 bed- | 16,000 Apply: Withnall, Pon! ie, TIONS or one or more
fooms. Fully furnished. Lighting Plant. | ione 2409 8.5.52—t.f.n. vacant St. Michael's Vestry Exhibitions HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
temmili supp! € Port a et Harrison Colleg ‘ill ¥ ceived ~~ o
Soon eee bet Shae ak Erte CAR sail 25 h.p. with 6] by the Clark Of ths Vestry up to ‘2 to solve a 1& i Vessel For Closes in Barbados
4478. Ot + lle: conditio: Dial} moon on Friday, the 23rd da of May, 7 dears . .
ala lagi ences sigs mind i a. E panama wy Oo eae : Ps 3 ' “GRELROSA” Liverpool 10th May
FLAT AND HOUSE—Fully furnished. | ———___——— | Candidates must be the sons of ap HERDSMAN” London 19th Ma
St. Lawrence on Sea. Avaliable. April BEDFORD TRUCK 206” wheelbase | parishioners in straitened circumstances robles y
on. Phone 2803. We invite inspectio mplete with Cab and Platform New, | and must not be less thar r more LURES
mpe D. a .
for next Winter. 29.3.52-—t.f.n ir immediate delivery—Courtesy Gar-|than 15 years « or 20th Juhe. For further information apply to
aia iat atlas at stein in ae ge. Dial 4616 10.5. 52—6n. be ni ; by a e-em T es
MODERN STORE AND OFFICIES—One | - | which must accompany he TD.
modern Store and two oprces at No. 2° 3EDFORD 12 cwt. DELIVERY VAN: | @pplication | Atom scient DA COSTA & CO., L = Agents
even, Strest Apply to I Nicholls x for immediate delivery ny 4630 ce te ee Cena eet Canada’s Chalk R
‘fo, 18 Swan Street 8.6,52—4in. | Courtesy Garage S4a—n } y= Cc. REDMAN, search station are
NEWHAVEN — Crane Const, 4 bed ASSEY-HARRIS TRACTORS— book Clerk, St. Michael's Vest {| to use a £100,090 el
rooms. Fully furnis?ed, lighting Plant requirements of these Popular Trac- 10.5 e- brain” now on its . e
Watermill supply, Double Garage, three ws Now. (Wheel and pipes ie le agar RBG aie ae ERIE, rrens seam. + May and from Oc_| #16. Courtesy Garage 10.8.88=-8n NOTICE | = England ,
: Er a inaipeotwacaesiaita PARISH OF ST THOMAS j e robot brain will
: f hte vie TNUCK—One (1) 3-ton Austin Truck.) .,APPPLICATIONS for one or more, mathematical problems ee Inc.
PLYMOUMK, “Crane Coast—June and | Abr'y D.V. SCOTT & Co. Lid, White! Very dione col of the annual | “uglear physics. engine
July. Phone 2953. 4.5.52—t.f,n, | Park Road. aise a value of £5 will be received by the) ®nd astronomy, 100 time ba icliaciie
ROOSEVELT’ “Maxwell Coast. Fully | — a | undersigned ‘up to 20th May, 1902 OO i a NEW YORK SERVICE
a at Applicants must be = children machine is also likely
furnished. A’vailable 16th May. Phone ELECTRICAL parishioners in straitened circumstances,| be used in Canada’s de
‘ 5. 52—in oH
2224 10,5. 52—2 PEER RR catachtietal trea ee Bo EE A 8 rs of age oF fort te Teas 2 ote A STEAMER sails 18th Aprtil-- arrives Barbados 29th April, 1952.
TRINITY GoeeAGie_wully toraissed ONE COOLERATOR at Ruby Plan-| than 12 years on September 2nd 1992 nied solve av. A STEAMER sails 9th May— arrives Barbados 20th May, 1952.
7 ti , St Philip 10.5.52—2n 4 aptismal Certific must 2e a ae Ee ee a ae ae STS
three bedrooms, complete with — tele- m forwarded with the A ‘ r
5 orwi » Application Form, | ‘or the past 23 vears C NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
pa i Teper cater. ae a R ‘DIO ‘One (1) Mullard 8-Tube Radio which may be obtained from Parochial Ik dians have been produ
: mes: 91.4.69—t.t.n. | “2 ¢xcellent condition... 'F i rf FF: PITGRIM s per cent more than tn oe: A STEAMER sailed 10th April—arrives Barbados 26th April, 1952.
—PERSONAL a cf Parochial Treasurer preceding year, and h A STEAMER sails 24th April—arrives Barbados 10th May, 1952.
gg ET Ee RR a eT gs te ; 7 : sabia — —— LTT
I FR¢DGE—Westinghouse Fridge 3% c.f. 6t. Thomas doubled gross nation! p a
ERSONAL Exce lent condition. Ring Mr i Hughes 10.5.52—3n. | tion, according to Gifbert J : CANADIAN SERVICE
4112, after pm» 264. 52—4n. aaa eee " os ‘ ‘
The public are hereby warned against : CENTRAL CRICKET CLUB Son, Toronto economist, in r S6UrAROUND
giving crédit to anyone in my name @ | GARRARD 3-SPEED AUTOMATIC! ‘The grounds will be open for practice] SPecth here
1 do not hold mi self responstPle y name | -SANGERS—Just | received a limited| as from Monday igth May. ((anaga’s living | ¢osts. Name of Ship Sails from Arrived
unless by a writen, order signed by me Pa aoe early. P. C Rt ae E. D,’ FITZPATRICK, rising for years, have s é i Barbados
LL « Co. Ltd. 5.5.52—6n Hony. Secretary 1 a . > the bez ’ 8S. “ALCOA PILGRIM Montreal April 30th May 10th
" = Con ae hacl — 10.5.52—2n going down since the beginnin 8.8. “TINDRA ‘ Montreal May 16th May 26th
Black Rock, St. Michael. LIVESTOCK ; of this year. , S.8. “TISTA” Montreal May 20th June Sth
SSS onnetereenemeemennenntnentastsesiet NOTICE As a result, it is estima S.S. “EVROS” Montreal June 13th June 23rd
- ie , ye ¢ at ?
‘ COW—One Geurnsey Cow 28 pints PARISH OF 8” -HILIP Canadians will have a ‘ 5 :
ai rie att: ABBiy: OR. Kings: oppositek: Cihigia’ Gar teak ee cae an meth | this year totalling more tho: , NORTHBOUND Due Barbados
PP n the 12th to the 3ist May s.s EVROS May 14th
D AN Cc E Neils Gap, St, Michael days inclusive). The Office of the Paro-| £50 million. on P = ret ~ rt ar N#., and
10.5.52—2n.|chial Treasurer will be opened on The decline in living ¢ : wrence River Ports
sgt ——_—— Saturdays only from 9 a.m, to 11 a.m ‘ ‘ - .
in aid of MARE: One Bay Mare suitable for So WwW RCOFE, works out at an avers These vessels have limited passenger aceommodation
CABLE & WIRELESS ding or driving. Can be seen at Aysh- Parochial Treasurer, nearly 6s. a week for a

ord Plant. H earning £20. Renpeeeqeipiaaiete

Hutson Inniss



SPORTS CLUB

TOoNIGE
AT

. 10.5.52—2n London Express

ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE

























































% 1 3 7 y 7 a: a 7 — - _— 6
POULTRY ‘'ANNOUNCEME! Hiah Blood Pressure RB ip Apply DA COSTA & CO., LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE
PARADISE BEACH CLUB }}|—citiy — one importca Hampsnive Bae an b00d rressure
vr. Curwen’s «k, won 2nd e at last exhibition, . . rina s ‘
_" 3 aie ee o the Ist prize pullet and 3 otber] yrr Mende Dene Pee oe Kilis iM OPO EFSOSSOSOSSS
rchestra }] cts, "Appive "Brie Benny, ‘Bridge Gap,| MT) Mendes. | Denros, st. Lawrence nh
Dancing 9 — 3 a.m. ‘ack Rock, St. Michael. a ast eS ee. ora eT ees Twice as Many Women as men suf-
ADMISSION — $1.00 }} 7.5.52—2n. |" - fer from High Blood Pressure, which | $
|| pouumRe = pare Beg Laahon SALES | ingut'the time ot Change of tieand |
a) d y — Pure re eghorns, , ‘ yet , a e eof C @ 0} fe an
SS. iymouth Rocks and White Giani! PU Lai SALES is the real cause of much heart trouble | 3%
°° eee res \ Cockerels from imported stock $3,004 and later on of paralytic strokes. Com-
3 ch, Etiesmere, St. George, mon sy ol ood Pres-
2 x 1 ! | au Shey N Tua ee head hi t
0.5.62--2n, | re : Ne ,» headaches %
BOY ) REAL ESTATE ton and back of head and above eyes,
() for S § MECHANICAL } shee Jreso ace in head, digziness, short
iE , LAND Beautifull Graeme | breath, pains in heart, palpitation,
+ Hall Terrace, cee poor sleep, loss of memory and energy,
In stock. % CALCULAPOR- One original Odhner elonininitey. Two Toa oe 000 feet oe gmt. onaly: anne eho nae AED Mabe
. practically new and in first class condi- | p 4 5.5% y suffer any 0 hese symptoms, don’t
Orders accepted... . % tion. Dial 4689. a 5. 62-—4n — eich Sas Cinta ewioe Meg treatment « aingle day. because
@ oe your life may be in danger. Noxco
SHORTS FOR BOYS. %| WHEEL STRAKES: Reduce Tractor AUCTION (formerly known as Hynox), a new
Materi $] Wheel-spin considerably. In_ stock for | _ medical discovery, reduces High Blood
aterial (Ours or Yours) | Massey-Harris Mod. 744D— for other By inst ions reteived from Mr Pressure with the first dose, takes a
S| Practors on application—Courteay Gar- | Joseph Howard, Carter's Village, St. John. | heavy load off the heart, and makes
Prices Reasonable. Rj ace. Dial 4616. 10.5.52-6n | A Board and Shingled House | Shedroof| You feel years younger In a few days.
aaaevey Prot % attached, will be sold at Public Auction ret meaese freee Fame nee today. We am much pleasure in announcing that we have been
y . on Thursday, 15th May. feel al inted en for T Ind Assuran Co., Ltd.
Press Club Building crane a clietaeat hhetoneu eee eee (Incorporated in India 1919) with an authorised capiial of
53 Swan St. Dial 4718, %| AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT—Mas- A Rn Rue he with branches in Bangkok, Cairo, Singapore
% arria and other equipment includ- 7 —2n.}} y, ‘okyo, Rangoon, Nairobi and Karachi, and enci in the
. . : Grass Rakes, Grass Loaders, Fertil- | ~— i "ng
“eG O9SS% oF Bes . . arrears rennnnnen
PSSVOSSSOBOSLOSOSS | | Distributors, Bagasse Spreadq's, \ hy instructions ~yeceived from the ARRIVED United Kingdom, France, Germany, Holland, British Guiana,
o suitable for applying Filter-Press PDirector of Department of Highwavs & Jamaica, Trinidad, Dutch Guiana among other places.

Mud, Ashes and Pen Manure, and other | Transport I will set up for Sale by public Another Shipment of the

We are in a position to advise you on insurance prob-














1 1 yroes Implements Courtesy Garage,fauction at their Yard.on Tuesday the ems, rin, FIR
WINDWARD CRICKET vial 4616 10.5.52—6n! 1Sth beginning at 2 p.m. the following POPULAR i risks). e, E, (against property, furniture, stock with
SUSIN ean ———— | items ) Shovels, (100 Buckets $4180 GAS COOKERS . MA
CLUB BUSINESS REQUIREMENTS — Docv | .41) Sheeting Forks’ (28) Agricultural MARINE, CARS AND OTHER VEHICLES
ment safes, cabinets, presses, desks, fans | Forks, 39) Steel Brooms, (25) Pick A tew of these have not yet including THIRD PARTY RISKS. R
pewriters, adding machines, and othe | a (480) Bass Brooms, (37) Wheel been booked.
NOTICE TO MEMBERS fice and business requirements. K. ® | Barrows, (22) Smail Rakes, (19) Paint Prices of next shipment will be All Claims Promptly settled.
unte & Co., Lid. Lower Broad Street, | Brussss' and several_other items higher. - ‘
: ial 5136. 5.53! , HAYNE
Members are hereby noti- Thi eeinsiiasiiabncage ecu ane RE A. BCOTE, |, Why not call at your Gas Show- S and GRIFFITH
) a Govt. Auctioneer, Dist. “A rooms, Bay Street TO-DAY and
CAR TYRES REMOULDED-—Sizes 500— ;

fied that the grounds will 10.5.52—8n

High Street

Phone 4173.

secure one of these cookers.



































be open for practice on Gathers ae age 8... Oona
Tuesday 13th May. ‘Trafalgar Store, Trafalgar Street. Dial UNDER THE DIAMOND |! 86 POCO CCCP EOP OEE
N. C. THORNTON a ae eee HAMMER
4 By instructions received I will sell at

Secretary.
9,5,52—3n,

the house called “Ofmondville’, situat
at Bash Hali on Wednesday next I4th
begirning at 12.30 p.m. a collection of
housthold furniture including Mahog

mattress and drop side, one baby’s wash-
stand one Baby's High Chair. Telephone

5080 or 2351. J. A. Lewis







8.5.52—3n









| CRADLE — One Baby's Cradle with
th

on (1) Thermometer Stirring Rod, LOST & FOUND

Frank Watkins, Blue Waters, Rockley

Cebinets, Dining room Chairs, Rush bot-
Shairs, Cz B thes drawers,
AMERA—One (1) Rolicicord Camera | Munog. Bedstend, “Mirror, Carget ane
‘ F 3.5 Zenar coated Lense, §yn- | other items of interest Terms Cash
ronised for flash, cvicplete with DARCY A. SCOTT.
‘ carrying case, $150.00, Auctioneer : ' ‘ ‘
Four (4) daylight developing twnks. | 49 5 52—3n
PALACE adjustable from 35 m,m. to 61L, $6.60} 000" iit has it. a
ecch |

oO ING,

HEADQUARTERS FOR









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Se cn =





| Monday— 10.00 a.m.—12 Noon

Tuesday— 4.30 p.m—6.00 p.m. ..
Wednesday—4.30 p.m.—6.00 p.m. ..
Thursday—4.30 p.m.—6.00 p.m.

Friday — 4.30 pm—6.00 p.m. ..

attend 75% of their classes.

SATURDAY, MAY 10, 1952

GOVERNMENT NOTICES





HOUSECRAFT CENTRE, BAY STREET

The following programme of Day and Evening Classes will open

jat the Housecraft Centre, Bay Street, from Monday, 19th May to
| Friday, ist August, 1952.

Cake and Pastry Making.
Simple Cutting and Sewing.
Sweets and Preserves.

Simple Dress Cutting & Sewing
Assorted Dishes.

Smocking.

Cake and Pastry Making
Elementary Pattern Drafting.
Caribbean Cookery.

Simple Dressmaking.
Elementary Cake Icing.
Advanced Dressmaking.
Butlering.

Advanced Handicrafts.
Registration for all classes will take place at the Housecraft Centre,

2.00 p.m.—4.00 p.m.

4.30 pm.—6.00 p.m.

Bay Street, between 10.00 a.m. and 12 noon, and between 2.00 p.m.
and 5.00 p.m. on Wednesday, 14th and Thursday, 15th May, 1952.

Fees for all classes must be paid in advance for the term, at the

time of registering.

5/- for each course in Sewing, Pattern Drafting, Smocking and

Handicrafts.

15/- for each course in Cake & Pastry Making, Cake Icing, Assorted

Dishes, Caribbean Cookery, Butlering, Preserves and Sweets Making.

2/- will be refunded at the end of the term to all students. who
7.5.52.—2n.



THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951

The Governor-in-Executive Cdmmittee, pursuant to section 3 (2)

(a) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951, hereby
causes this notice to be published of his intention to make the Order
set out below declaring the manufacture of wax and wax products to
be a pioneer industry and wax and wax products from sugar cane
to be pioneer products of that industry.

2. Any person who objects to the making of the Order set out

below is hereby invited to give notice in writing of his objection and
of the grounds on which he relies in support thereof to the Clerk
to the Executive Committee on or before the 2ist day of May one
thousand nine hundred and fifty-two so that due consideration may
be given to any objections received pursuant to this notice.



ORDER

THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951
The Pioneer Industry (WAX and WAX PRODUCTS) Order, 1952

The Governor-in-Executive Committee, in exercise of the powers

conferred on him by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Encour-
agement) Act, 1951, hereby makes the following Order :—

1. This Order may be cited as the Pioneer Industry
(Wax and Wax Products) Order, 1952.

2. The manufacture of wax and wax products is hereby
declared to be a pioneer industry and the following articles are
hereby declared to be pioneer products of that industry :—

Wax and wax products from sugar cane.

Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this
day of one thousand nine
hundred and fifty-two.
By Command,
Clerk, Executive Committee.
29.4.52—3n.

THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951

The Governor-in-Executive Committee, pursuant to section

3(2)(a) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951, hereby
causes this notice to be published of his intention to make the Order
set out below declaring the spinning and knitting of cotton yarn
and the manufacture of garments therefrom to be a pioneer industry
and the spinning and knitting of cotton yarn from West Indian
cotton and the manufacture of garments therefrom to be pioneer
products of that industry.

2. Any person who objects to the making of the Order set out

.| below is hereby invited to give notice in writing of his~objection and
% of the grounds on which he relies in support thereof to the Clerk
,|to the Executive Committee on or before the 21st day of May one
%| thousand nine hundred and fifty-two so that due consideration may
be given to any objections received pursuant to this notice.



ORDER
THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951

The Pioneer Industry (SPINNING AND KNITTING OF COTTON
YARN AND THE MANUFACTURE OF GARMENTS) Order, 1952

The Governor-in-Executive Committee, in exercise of the powers

conferred on ‘1im by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Encour-
agement) Act, 1951, hereby makes the following Order :—

1, This Order may be cited as the Pioneer Industry
(Spinning and Knitting of Cotton Yarn and the Manufacture of
Garments) Order, 1952.

2. The spinning and knitting of cotton yarn ang the manu-
facture of garments therefrom is hereby declared to be a pioneer
industry and the following articles are hereby declared to be
pioneer products of that industry :—

The spinning and knitting of cotton yarn from West Indian

cotton and the manufacture of garments therefrom.

Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this
day of one thousand nine
hundred and fifty-two.
By Command,
Clerk, Executive Committee.
29.4.52—3n.



THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951
The Governor-in-Executive Committee, pursuant to section

3(2)(a) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951, hereby
causes this notice to be published of his intention to make the Order
set out below declaring the manufacture of sugar confectionery and
nut food products to be a pioneer industry and boiled confectionery,
lollipops, mints and icing sugar, and every variety of nut food
products to be pioneer products of that industry.

2. Any person who objects to the making of the Order set out

jar yd is hereby invited to give notice in writing of his objection and
of the
to the
thousand nine hundred and fifty-two so that due consideration may
be given to any objections received pursuant to this notice.

guns on which he relies in support thereof to the Clerk
xxecutive Committee on or before the 2lst day of May one



ORDER
THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951

The Pioneer Industry (SUGAR CONFECTIONERY AND NUT FOOD

PRODUCTS) Order, 1952
The Governor-in-Executive Committee, in exercise of the powers

conferred on him by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Encour-
agement) Act, 1951, hereby makes the following Order :—

1. This Order may be cited as the Pioneer Industry
(Sugar Confectionery and Nut food products) Order, 1952.

. The manufacture of sugar confectionery and nut food
products is hereby declared to be a pioneer industry and the
following articles are hereby declared to be pioneer products of:
that industry :—

boiled confectionery, lollipops, mints and icing sugar, and
every variety of nut food products.
Made by the ,Governor-in-Executive Committee this
day of one thousand nine
hundred and fifty-two
By Command,
Clerk, Executive Committee.
29.4.52—3n,

THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951
The Governor-in-Executive Committee, pursuant to section



4%(2)(a) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951, hereby
causes this notice to be published of his intention to make the Order
set out below declaring the manufacture of ham, bacon and meat-
curing to be a pioneer industry and ham, bacon and other food
products produced from meat of locally-reared pigs to be pioneer
products of that industry,

2. Any person who objects to the making of the Order set out

below is hereby invited to give notice in writing of his objection and
of the grounds on whith he relies in seugest

to the Executive Committee on or before the
thousand nine hundred and fifty-two so that due consideration may
be given to any objections received pursuant to this notice.

thereof to the Clerk
2ist day of May one



ORDER
THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951
The Pioneer Industry (HAM, gs AND MEAT-CURING)

Order, 1f '
The Governor-in-Executive Committee, in exercise of the

conferred on him by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Encour-
agement) Act, 1951, hereby makes the following Order :—

1, This Order may be cited as the Pioneer Industry
(Ham, Bacon and Meat-curing) Order, 1952.

2. The manufacture of ham, baion and meat-curing is
hereby declared to be a pioneer industry and the following
— are hereby declared to be ‘pioneer products of that
industry :—

Ham, bacon and: other food produwets produced from meat of

locally-reared pigs.

Made by the Governor-inm-Executive
day of
hundred and fifty-two.
By Command,
Clerk, Executive Committee.
f 29.4.52—3n.

Committee this
one thousand nine





SATURDAY, MAY 10, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN
cae sensei es a nents a eh ES eNRERRReTRRNRLe Sena







HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON |




Quick! —put a few drops

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vicxs VA-TRO-NOL

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@ No deodorant cream is so harm-
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@ No deodorant cream is gentler
















FIMAD ANY SENSE, 1D GO |
STRAIGHT TO FLINT AND

TELL HIM SEVERN'S AFTER
THAT JEWELLERY..

A REMINDER





000











to even sensitive skin, and it is so
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QDO-RO-NO

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DAISY. 1 WANT YOU TO
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Pe —— ~ —- +
















































FLASIi GORDON oo _CBY_DAN BARRY SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only
a z Pa eee PR CNP — ——eeeSe———— EE ——————————— z ia
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/ WE’V i 4 . ‘ ‘
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NOTICE

ALL PERSONS WHO ORDERED

The Pictorial Record of |
KING GEORGE Vi.

through the Advocate Stationery are specially advised to
Call for their Copies TO-DAY. Failing to call, these copies
will no longer be reserved but will be on sale to the public
from SATURDAY, MAY 10TH.

The Price of the Book is... .

$2.72
ADVOCATE
e STATIONERY




WE DION’T WANNA DO IT, BUB..
BUT YOU WUZ STUBBORN’ <=

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PAGE EIGHT













—— — me

The Indian Touring Team i





BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, MAY 10, 195









WEIGHTLIFTING AND
BODYBUILDING

Sports Window

iy EDWIN

TODAY I will t 1 Ly
reade he ya < the
histor of Weightlift Many
people t
themselv«
origin of this ex: here
also r

weigh
few years ago



Bob Hoffman, the wor
ing Physical Instruc
lifting, states in
Health” maga
ago, porn
sands of
countries,
practised with rounded , sticks
thrust through stones, mill stone
like in appearance, in which hole
had been drilled. For. thousands oi
years this progressive principie of
training has been known. Teach
the body to carry a little more, to
overcome a little more resistance
each training day, and in time it
will become strong enough to
perform physical work which
seems startling to the untrained.
Milo proved this principle thou-
sands of years ago by carrying a
calf from the time it was a few
weeks old until it becan
powerful bull. In the proce
the animal grev in ize
weight, Milo ¥ in sh
unti] he bec :
man in the world, t inné
the Olympic Games in restl










golan









for a period oO i 1 ve
years.”

Three hundred year
leading phy traine
England said, “train with welg
and your weapon.” More than two
thousand years ago the Grecks
and Romans worked on the vver-

load principle, training their men
with leaden shoes and with
weights to make them strong
enough to fight a long time

Almost a century ago, there is

on record that certain outstanaing

strong men trained reguiariy with

weights and not too different;
from how we do toda Befor«
and after the Civil War, ambitiou
youths in America were settir

records in the various ,accepted
methods of weightlifting, Fo

example, Bill Curtis, who late
became known as Father Bil
Curtis, set records in 1868 which

have never yet been broken. In ¢



the middle weight class, weighin
not more than 168 lbs., at the time,
Curtis. seta record of Curling
two 100-lb., dumbelis,



Great emphasis was placed upon
training with very heavy weights
in those days. Back, hip, harness
hand and thigh lifting, and the

men who excelled in these were
those who were good at jumping,
rowing and other sports popular
then. These weightliftin’ pioneer



had already learnt what has
proven to be so true today, That
any man can improve himseli
physically, at his chosen sport
through weight training

We are writing of a long time
ago, even the elosing decades of

the last century is a long time.
In the seventies and ¢ ghties there
were many strong men wou, sh-
out the world setting re ords, The
best known of these ave Jefferson

who set records in what is still
called the Jefferson Lift trad-
die iift and Carl Abs, the big
German who was the _ first _to
ut 330 pounds over his head.
hen there are the men 50 well

known today who first came to 9

fame in the eighties and nineties
in America. Sandow, Saxon anc
Cyr. believed by many to have
been the strongest men who ever

lived, Hackenschmidt still re-
nowned as the greatest wre ter
of all time, and hundreds more

These men set fabulou records
with the weights and mae phy
jgues compare favourably with
Se best ie in the Mr, America
contest, Bobby Pandow and
Eugene Sandow being tht most
famous of these.

It is reasonable to believe that
these men knew something, in
fact a, great deal, about physica
training to have developed such
strength and well developed bod-
jes that they are still famous
today. While they did not have
the advantage of the same type
of adjustable weights we have
today, these men of the closing
decades of the last century and
the opening years of this century
knew much about physical train-
ing, In 1902 Alan Calvert offered
the first adjustable Barbells

As the greatest honour went
to the man who put the most
weight overhead, any styl
continental typas of lifting
practised most. The be
the side press and the continent
press with one hand anc he
various forms of pressing and
jerking with two hand Later
and very long ago too, many othe:
weightlifting feats ‘were popular,
but the Snatches and Cleans, the











ROGERS



EDWIN ROGERS

ctised in the closing years of
ie last century.
As we come down the ages, the
ords set up and broken by the
ugmen, we can contemplate
how popular weightlifting has
Viost countries have
thtlifting contests run along
ciation lines.
than ever as we look
zh the records of Weight-
and Body building with
ve feel as Confucius, the
inese Philosopher said,
© truly nothing new un-









; have been known
such a long time, that there
i iothing new about them,



Summerhayes
Tennis
Tournament

The Men’s Doubles Finals game
Hetween Dr. A. S. Cato and Col.
Duke vs, D. A. Wiles and E£, R.
Aikinson was played yesterday
fternoon but was unfinished, the
wre being in favour of Wiles and
\tkinson 3—6, 9—7, 8—6.



It is hoped that the match will
replayed on Wednesday next
when the trophies for the Doubles
nd Singles Championships will be
presented.

Today's Fixture

Men’s Singles Final
L. A. Harrison vs. V, H. Chen-
ery.



In addition to the Singles Cup
the winner of this match will re-
ceive a Max Ply racquet very
bindly presented by Messrs, Wil-
liam Fogarty (B’dos) Ltd.



Basketball



H.C., PICKWICK DEFEAT
M.H.S., FORTRESS

Harrison College defeated Mod-
ern High School 43—19, and
Pickwick defeated Fortress 40—
21 in their basketball fixtures
played at Y.M.P.C. last night,

For MNarrison College Gibson
had the highest score with 18

goals. Daniel scored 10

Archer scored 12 times for
Modern High School,

Davis 14, and Mrs, McKenzie
10, helped Pickwick on to their
viclory. Roecheford scored 8 goals
for Fortress,

The matches which were to
have been played tonight at
Y.M.P.C, have been postponed.

Practice Match

A practice match of the Barba-
dos Friendly Football Association
will be played at Shell on Sun-
cay, May 11th. Following are the

teams!—



‘A” team—White Shirts.

Goal: R. Pinder, Backs: D.
Haydes. R. Denny; Half-backs: E.
MeCollin, D. Norville, C, Phillips,
Forwards: H. Maughan, R. Harris,
H. Clarke, R. Thorne, C. Year-
wood,

‘B” team:Coloured Shirts,

Goal: A. Dummett; Backs: C.
Barker, G. Alleyne; Half-backs:
C. Maitland, D. Forde, S. Black-
man; Forwards: E. Linton, C.

nes, D. Olton, R. Haynes, V.

sun,” All the exercises

LONDON.

This sumumer the fifth Indian
touring team will be playing in
England. In the past, such per-
sonalities as the immortal Ranjit-
inhji and his nephew ‘Duleep’
enthralled the English spectator
with their majestic batting. More
recently, on their last tour in 1946
the Nawab of Pataudi, Merchant
and Mankad continued the tradi-
tion and brought great delight t
all who watched them,

This year, who knows? Will the
tour unearth another ‘Ranji’ or
Mankad? Cricket is a notoriously
unpredictable game. For ex-
umple, before the West Indies
toured England two years ago,
the names Valentine and Rama-
chin were unknown in the cricket
world; at the end of the tour,
however, these two young West
Indian bowlers had _ established
themselves in the forefront of
world cricketers.

To English crowds, most of the
tourists are unknown. Exception:

re Hazare, this year’s captain,
Sarwate and Shinde who came
with Pataudi’s side in 1946,
Divecha who played for Oxford
University in 1950 and 1951, and
Umrigar and Ramchand who have
both played League cricket

On their first day’s practice at
Lords, they had a taste of the
weather they may experience
this summer. There was a keen

wind, and many of them wort
two sweaters

I chatted with Hazare, whose
slightly greying hair gives him a
decidedly distinguished appear-

ince. He told me that the side
would endeavour to provide the
spectators with attractive cricket.

I asked him whether they would

miss Mankad, who will be play-
ing in Lancashire League cricket,
and who would replace hin He
replied that any player with the
ibility of Mankad, one of the
greatest slow left arm bowlers
in the world and also a good bat,
is bound to be missed, and_ would
be diffieult to replace. Bul he
added that Ghulam Ahmed, right
hand off-breaks, and Shinde, leg-
breaks and googlies, both spis the
bail well. And that Mankad
would not be called upon.

Despite the cold weather, both
Shinde and Ghulam Ahmed ‘were
spinning the ball viciously in the
nets, and they may give the Eng-
lish batsmen a _ great deal of

‘ouble.

Tisthre would say little of his
own chances, but it is on his
shoulders that the role of chief
run-getter may fall. For although
Merchant, who was the most pro-
lific scorer on the 1946 tour, and
is in Britain for a medical check-~-
up, has announced if fit, he will
offer his services, there 1s only an
outside chance of him playing
This means that of the batsmen
only Hazare and Umrigar have ex-
perience of English conditions.

In the nets Hazare displayed
that calm efficiency which inspires
confidence in others, and it was
obvious that whatever other Ope.
partments India may be lacking
in this season, it will not be

santainey
; “His final remark will he echoed
by all ericket lovers, “We pisy
hetter with the sun on 9Ur backs,
and we are looking forward to a
fine summer.” fies

ere are brief sketches of the
aottteal plavers: HAZARE, Vilny
<-muel (Baroda) (Captain). Born
1915, Has scored more centuries
then any Indian cricketer with the



"County Cricket

LONDON, May 9.

At Lords Middlesex beat Derby-
shire by nine wickets. Derbyshire
215, Rhodes 60, and secondly 90.

oss five for 15.
ee Middlesex 234, Denis Compton
85, Rhodes four for 46 and sec-
ondly 72 for one.

‘At Oxford, the Oxford Univer-
sity and Yorkshire match was
drawn, Yorkshire 409 for eight
declared. Hutton 65, Wilson 154,
Halliday not out 126. Oxford Uni-
versity 131. :
ae ‘Birmingham, the Warwick-
shire-Hampshire match was aban~-
doned because of rain. Warwick-
shire 189 for eight declared. Hamp-
shire did not bat. ‘

At Cambridge, the Cambridge
University - Essex match was
drawn, Essex 242. Dodds 50, and
secondly 197 for five declared.
Dodds 56, Gibb 62, Horsfall not
out 56. Cambridge University 208,
Sheppard 113 and secondly 220 for
seven, Sheppard 64, May not out

4.
ag —UP.



Sands Beats Bourke

MELBOURNE, May 9.

Dave Sands retained his British
Empire and Australian Middle-
weight boxing titles by knocking
out Al Bourke, Champion of Vic-
toria in the fifth round here to-
night.

It was Sands’ first defence of
the title since he won it in Sep-
tember 1949 by beating Dick Tur-
pin of Britain in the first round.

By a Cricket Correspondent

exception of Ranjitsinhji and
Duleepsinhji Shares with Gul
Mohammed the world record
highest partnership, 577 for 4th
wicket v Baroda (he was then
playing for Maharashtra) at Poona
in 1939-40. Also holds the
monopoly record, 309 out of 389
Hindus (Bombay) the same

ear is a medium pace swing
and off-break bowler Toured
England im 1946 scoring 244 not
out against Yorkshire and 193 no
out against Middlesex Has play-
ed Lancashire League cricket i
which in 1950;he became one of
the few cricketers to complete the
‘double’ of 1,000 runs and 190
wickets. *'
ADHIKARI, Hemu Ramchandra
(Services XI) (vice-captain) Born
1919. A brilliant cover fielder
and attractive right hand batsman
Played in all five Tests against the
West Indies and three against the
MCC. Highest score 233 not out
inst Rajasthan in 1951-52
SHOWDHURY, Nirode Ranjan
(Bengal). Born 1923. Opening
howler with no reputition as
batsman. Has played in one Test
against the West Indies and one
against the MCC.

DIVECHA. Ramesh Vithaidao
(Bombay). Born 1927. No strange:
to England. Twice appeared for
Oxford against Cambridge in 1999
and 1951, and for Gentlemen
Players in 1951. Can bowl meéd-
ium-pace or off-spinners, Is a
useful batsman in a crisis. Has







not yet hit a century in first-class

cricket but appeared in two Tests
against the MCC last season, Will

probably open the bowling in

Tests this summer

GAEKWAD, Dattajerae Krish-

narao (Baroda) Zorn 1928. A



right-hand batsman who was 12th
man in three Tests against the
MCC. Made three centuries in
the 1950-51 Ranji tournament
Good fielder in the covers.
FAEKWAD, Hiraial Ghasulal
(Holkar). Born 1923, Has heavy
responsibility for he has been
brought in as replacement for



Mankad. Is slightly quicker than

most left-arm bowlers and can
also swing the new ball. In heavy

atmosphere may open attack. Also

bats left-handed,

GHULAM AHMED (Hydera~

bad). Born 1922. An. off-spin-

ner who really believes in spinning
the ball. Played in three Tests

against the West Indies and two
against the MCC. Against Holkar
in, 1950 set up world record by
bowling 555 balls in an innings,
beating the existing record of 5
by Valentine for the West Indie:
against England in the Third Test
at Nottingham in 1950. Claimed
nine wickets in the innings against
Madras at Secunderabad 1947-48.
GOPINATH, Coimbatareo Dor-
aikannu (Madras) 3orn 1930. A
forcing right-hand bat who is ex-
ceptionally strong on the off-side
feat fielder and catcher in the
deep. Played in three Tests against
the MCC. ‘sn
MANJREKAR, Vijay Laxman
(Bombay). Born 1931. The
youngest player in the side. Asa
boy scored two double centuries
in school cricket. Has also scored
‘wo double centuries in Ranji
trophy matches. Quick on his fect

tnd a fine stroke player. Played |

in two Tests against the MCC and
was twelfth man.in the Final Test

AS
MANTRI, Madhay (Bombay), g

Born 1922. Wicket-keeper bats-
man who holds Indian record of
nine victims (4 ct. 5 st.) in an
innings. Opened in one Tese
against the MCC when he showed
much promise, Will rival Sen for
a vlace in the Test team
PHADKAR, Dattaray (Bombay),
3 rn 1925. A fine all rounder
who is expected to be one of the
Stors of the side. Has played
League cricket and so is well ac-
ovainted with English climate. Can

A. OBGSY*

- SUNDAY’S ADVOCATE
‘ and win
$25.00
@
: AT THE SAME TIME YOU CAN HELP . THE
‘ FARNUM FOR FINLAND FUND. ;





WORLD'S MOST

against fast bowling.
for Bombay
Maharashtra at Bombay

West Indies an

100 wickets

RAMCHAND, Gopinath

selection but an attractive cricket-

As a batsman once scored 230

not out in 200 minutes for
“against Maharashtra.

1 fast-medium bowler who gets a

lot of pace off the pitch.

ROY Pankaj
Barring accidents is certain
to be India’s opening batsman. His
izgregate of 387 runs in the five
Tests against the MCC last season

dekut in 1947 and celebrated by
coring a century—one of the few
batsmen to have
defensively
attacks the

SA RAWATE, Chandrashekhr

bowler who can also bat.
Surrey on the



stand of 249 which is
England. Has toured Austr



the West Indies.

9 for 61 against Mysore in 1945-46,

wicket-keeper position. Has tour-
ed Australia and ‘kept in all five
Test against the West Indies. Also

Scored 132 for Bengal against Hol-
kar in 1943, his second first-class

COMPANY

and googly
right-hand bat.
«members of the present t
toured England in 1946.
in first Test on that

One of the thre





siderably and appeared in one Tes
gainst the West Indies and thr
against the MCC.





Phadkar, probably the best known
member of the side. Is nicknamed
in Lancashire
cricket for two years.

fielder in any position. Also bowls
Played in one
Test against the West Indies and
il! five against the MCC, He made
in the last game

medium pace.

Maharashtra in 1951-52.

a aca cic tie i.

’
PCCP OO FR.



» reminded of a

Grand Dance

which will be given by
NORMAN LASHLEY



MARCHFIBLD SOCIAL

on MONDAY NIGHT
12th’ May, 1952
ADMISSION; ¢

Mr. Percy Green
*
»
66 SCVOOCSSES

«, ~
PRPOPOSO PPP OPP OED

LOOK

LPL PPPPF PFS OO

OPIED TRACTS

EMPIRE and Carlton meet
at Kensington this afternoon
in the first semi-final game of
the Knock-out Competition.

Empire were runners-up to
Notre Dame in the Senior
Competition this season and
also gained the honour of be-
ing the only team to defeat
the champions this season.

Carlton on the other hand
have been improving with
every game and the match this
afternoon should be interest-
ing.





WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY
Rainfall from Codrington;
-O1 in,
Total rainfall for month to
date .21 in,
Highest Temperature:
87.5 °F.
Lowest Temperature:
74.0 °F.
Wind Velocity 9 miles per
hour
Barometer’ (9 a.m.) 30.004
(3 p.m.) 29.927
TO-DAY
Sunrise; 5.40 a.m.
Sunset: 6.16 p.m.
Moon: Full, May 9.
Lighting 7.00 p.m.
High Tide: 3.36 a.m., 4.45
p.m.
Low Tide; 10.26 a.m., 10.20
p.m,





WHAT’S ON TODAY

Meeting of Chamber of Com-

merce at 10.00 a.m.

Police Band at Girl Guides

Fair, Garrison 3.00 p.m.

Football at Kensington 5.00

p.m.



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COST ACCOUNTING.

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From ‘Miscellany".

by Mary Baker Eddy
This book



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ALL, ARE WELCOME





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THE BARBADOS AQUATIC

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Local and visiting members only)
Saturday, 31st May
at 9 p.m.

Music by
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Admission to Ballroom
$1.00

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ESTABLISHED 1895 -



“SATURDAY





PAY 90,3082







PRICK: FIVE?



LENS



“LADY BOATS” OPERATE AT GREAT LOSS —

Last Year Was Deadline
For Decision On Boats

‘THE announcement early in April of the Cana-———-—- — -

dian Government's decision to withdraw the U K Ital :
“Lady Nelson” and the “Lady Rodney” from the perenne )
West Indian Service should have come as no sur-|

Ne
prise to the officials and people of the British West. Sign P act

a and re oe Capt. R. A. Clarke Gen. T “

eral Manager of the Canadian National Steamships'

and President of the Shipping Federation of Canada’ On rieste
told members of the Press at a conference at

LONDON, May 9




" i in?. 14: Britain, United States and Italy

Messrs. Bed Austin s building yesterday signed “memorandum of under-

. iding”” covering ‘Italian partici-

Capt. Clarke who arrived here yesterday morning by | Peon aoe ee o
the Lady Nelson from Trinidad said that his visit to the Piste’ zone “

West Indies had ngthing to do with the announced with-
drawal of the “Lady Boats”, but was just another routine
visit in connection with their operations in the area.
Capt. Clarke said: — :

The agreement concluding a
Series of diseussions which began
on April 3, is authoritatively un-
derstood to have left the petbohel.












































b bility r zonal administrati in

During the past two or three mg Roe Rape wee | pierecd
years it has been made known, Allied commanders would at the
both officially and unofficially, that Same time retain all powers of
last year was the deadline when

government

something would have to be done It understood that





Italy will
about the con! or other- be given the post of political
wise of the passehger service. advisor. This office would have

As early as 1938 the Canadian milar powers as the British and
Government realized that the the United States political advis-
service, as called for, could not be ors in the zone

maintained at such a terrific loss |
under the terms of the Canada-
West Indies Treaty; therefore,
notice of cancellation was served
on the Colonies at that time.

Tt was also believed an Italian
iB; would be given the post of direc-
m@ tor of administration who would
deal with lowal government prob-













lems and financial and economic

Cancellation Notice eee et eSarpon ae eee

the “more n r sritain,

vend eet ae means ae | Minister Julius Holmes for the

‘ans dat ta So aly | United States and Valian, Ambas-
= Teas ens aaa ipse. y sador Malio Brosio for Italy

6a int Spas was oe An official communique will

o between governmen( be issued at 0030 hours to-

concerned whereby the steamship
service would be maintained to
the extent that war conditions
would allow, subject to the right
of either party, to terminate

agreement by the giving of six

The Conference held in Barba-
- 1949 was attended by dele-
from all the Colonies, also

7; morrow.—U.P,

| U.K., Franee, U.S,
cart.x.a.crarxe | Despatch Urgent

MYT r
| ete sie nates | Notes Ta Moscow
° .
the Camadian Deputy Minister of Sir John Saint | WASHINGTON, May 9
myself, and our Freight T, E b G Britain, France and the United
ere Pro re la jStates tonight sent an urgent
Speraly tinister.| o e nad freminder to the Kremlin of their
Nv proposal for a short state treaty
Sugar Industry it Austria, In notes hande@*over
(From Our Own Correspondent hea the Soviet Gover nment by their
RENADA, May 9, three Ambassadors in Moscow to-
Sir John Saint, a retired Barba-|!)2ht. Western powers ask f
dos Director of Aguiculture has |'°OlY “at the fipst-opportunity”
been appointed Special Commis-|!"° "te they sent last Mareh.
sioner to undertake investigation| -p; earlier
tol; : : | le earlier note set out the
The terms of reference include e |0 2%, Dronosed eluht article
7 a {treaty for Austria to be signed by
thes of the at panison ang lfour powers to replace the present
ie prospects of the Grenada | 5; article draft treaty on which
Sugar Industry and advise 4OV~| nevotiations are deadlocked,
—U-P.

ernment on future policy with
U.S. Oil Strike |

WS! particular reference to the con-|
tinuation or otherwise of sub-
7 .
Felt In Mexico
MEXICO CITY, May 9.

Sidisation pursued as a result of |
the Skeete report of 1948, and’
encouragement of cane cultivation

Senator Antonio Bermudez, Di-

rector of the Mexican Government

perated oil company Petroleos

by peasants. |
Sir John arrives in Grenada |
on May 21,
|Mexicoanos said that motorists in
Northern Mexico will soon feel a
desperate” gasoline shortage
caused by the United States oil
| strike.







’

by the I
the heavy



passenger vesséls or the building
of new ones, they were told that
this could only be done by in-
creasing the contributions made by
the Colonies—this

most unfavourably received.

Wartime Restrictions

From early in 1942 until the
end of the war, due to wartime
restrictions we, allied rr of
shipping, regular scheduled
service was interrupted. We are
prohibited from calling at some
of the more exposed ports and our
operations to some of the other
“Treaty” ports were restricted.
Nevertheless, Canada provided the
shi directly and/or indirec'
to tain the bread-line
practically all the Colonies and, in





















Lady Huggins For
Dunbarton Polls

(From Our Own Correspondent?

LONDON, May 9.



He said there is “little hope” of




























f







The Auster Antocrat plane for the Barbados Light Aeroplane Club arrived in the island during the week
Tt is in @ case and not yet assembled.
After being assembled, the plano will resemble this Anster Autocrat.



by the 8.8. “Crofter”’

the excellent visibility of this type ’ plane.

Surrey Beat| Auster Autoerat °°

India

LONDON, May 9,
suffered

‘he Indian cricketers

the first defeat of their tour today

when beaten’ by Surrey by 141
uns at the Oval here.

Left to get 260 to win on a
rain affected pitch the Indians
oon showed their inexperience
nder such conditions

+
t

wickets fell for the addition of 63
uns

Spin bowler Jim Laker was
Surrey's most successful bowler
with four wickets f 55.

The Indians 158 ay
Ms /

Half of the
lunch and

side

the

was out for
remaining

Final scores: Surre¥

108





Gomes, Hannays ‘Tio

45

five

19 and 188,

Arrives From U.K.:

(By Our Flying Correspondent)
THE Auster Autocrat of the Barbados Light Aeroplan
Club arrived in the island during the week by the S.S

Crofter from England. The

wea. PLANE -

“Six Nations Sign
~W. Europe Mutual
Detence Treaty

PARIS,

a

May




Represent es of six Bur. pean nations to-day inital
i the draft treaty for settiig up a European Defenee
mmounity If the draft i ified and German peace
contracts go through, German vill have she right, to raise
id and sea forces for the jirst time simee the Third Reich
surrendered in 1945
Upon ratification six nations a

France. West Germany, Italy, Bel-
Holland and Luxembourg—

t's

‘Tunis’, Egyp





wil pool their land, sea and air

force under a single General} e

| Start West Germany will thus be Ch afis T Ik
jinked with Wester Defence ! 4 1e Ss a
Organisation without an independ-|

ent German Army and German | CATRO, May 9
G Staff Britai: vill be j alah Ben Youssef, Secretary
a tated with the European De-!of He Tunisian Neo Destour Na-
| fer Community providing for \T alist Party conferred with
| me arocal military aid in case any] Es vptian Premier El Hilal

or of the member nations o1 1 projected request t the
attacked \{ ted Nutions General A

|} Heads of delegations putting|te discuss the Franco-Tun
thelr initials to the 122 clause ute

}document and its five nnexes of n Youssef also conferred vitt
jthe draft treaty were Herve|H: fez Afifi, chief of the Royal
Alphand, French Representative | ( inet. Foreign Minister Abdel
}on the North Atlantic Couneil:|K

™ ‘ : G a : alek Hassouni and Abdel Kha-
This picture gives an idea of | L2eodor Blank, German Chance lel’ Hassouna, Arab League Secre-

jlor’s Defence Adviser; Ivan Mat-| ta» Adel Laidman Azzam and
jteo Lombardo, Italian Member of] Bx -pt's Bemanen, United Nations
|Partiament; Andrei De Staercke,] De (orate Mahmoud Fawzi Bey,
an Representative on the Youssef described as “false
Atlantic Council Pjarda] release” the transfer of members
\Van Starkenborgh, Duteh Repre-] of Tunisia’s former Chenik Cabi-
‘sentative on the North Atlantic ne. from internment on the island
;Couneil and Nickola Hommel,} ar Jerha to house arrest in Tunis





resentative of the Organisation ~ULP.
Suropean Economics
Initialling of the draft treaty ‘
| by these experts comes 15 month: 4? "
iF er they started their negotia- ; idgway Leaves
jtiens on February 15, 1951 ? 7 4
| During this time various Com- far East Monday
> arrival of

this plane will] |mittees of expérts have been in

; ; > ? ee ahha : Sih flihin te p Ny ‘ically continuous session and TOKYO, May 9,
Ory iously disappoint those critics who claimed that th fh Steering Committee has met} Ceoneral Ridgway back te a
B.L.A.C. would be just one of those clubs which got no- over 100 times, There have been| farewell visit to Korea prepared
where. A least the Club has got off to a good start, fiur meetings of Foreign Ministers to turn over his commands to

- _ ape [he arrival of the Autoerat | t ttle maior problems some of | G¢ ral Mark W. Clark and leave
Wis not heralded and unassem-| which are still left outstanding and | fo, his new assignment in Burove
Carne Re d bled in its case it provided no | wii) mean further meeting of the Ridgway said he will relinquish
y a 7 y great attraction. for Barbadian Foreign Ministers in the near [pig post as Commander of. United
But, as ane Hoes by it may if ‘ UP Nations and United States Forces
Yo 2f0ve to be an invaluable asset to =U. 1 a : «
To Assume P wie P } in the Far East “in a matter of

Command

ATHENS, May 9,

ing

Some Barbadians are however ii 7 am However headquarters
F t 2 ihowever officials had ple for al
dequainted. with the foatures of | LIke On Farewell trat xs of ohana en
the Autoerat.. In September last these have been cancelled an
an Auster from the Trinidad Fly

Lope e and
Club visited the island t| /our Of Norway will remain in

Ridgway re
5s



by : , : “ommand until his departure. He
Admiral Robert Carney Com-j|Was piloted by Philip Habib and] x ; 7 ~
1 sortie of Allied Forces " in R. A. C. “Jimmy” Alston acted as! } is ae Mey :: “eH eae ea ee
> a So x o ; , navigator, ‘eneral Eisenhower arrived at y nr a nm.
Kepresent Nn dad ie ‘t A neritae Wet pots i eet ornebu airfield near Oslo at 6.55 He is scheduled to leave Tokyo
° Wad itetenaaan’ Py 2a Demonstrations em. GMT from Copenhagen to]Monday for the United States and
it Ts Ik " fediterranean told a questioner ; tl to Pi ace G rf
“ederation ks here today that he would take L .,_ {Start his farewell visit to Norway.|then to Paris to replace General
tn at . Many Barbadians crowded Sea~|{mmediately after arrival Eisen.|Bisenhower a Supreme "Come
Pilin Dus Gwe Céewediinden over Regional Command of Greek} yj) ty witness a demonstiration |} cae a iri 7 ir ro t NATO mander of North Atlantic Treaty
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 9. and Turkish Land and Naval] of stunt flying when the T.L.A.C No ther” Rok Gommnanter Organization, (NATO) forces, j
The Legislature after three Forces His reply to a direct Auster was here, After the de-~| 4 imira! Sir Pattrick Brinds' —U.P.
hour debate to-day, elected the|Guestion was: “Admiral Carney monstration many members of hear os san at Voksenkollen in
Hon'bles Albert Gomes and L. C.| himself without intermediaries. the B.L.A.C. and other flying en- a Sar ‘Onl . ; ;
Hannays as the colony’s delegate ‘ thusiasts were taken up for}*!? po mes et 6 DEAD ABOARD
to the Federation talks in London}, ©@!?ey arrived here on Monday flights. Perhaps some may. have reneral Eisenhower said _ last I
es és Ss rec é — i nl to inspeet Greek army installations giudged ‘Trinidad for its advance- 4! t he would be in the U.S.A R O SANTA CRUZ
"Both rab eaented the colony at}/#24 airtields in Greece and Crete.| ment and keeping in line wilh}! June Ist. Concerning the pos- BUENOS AIRES, May 9
tha kehthen ee Conference on|H¢ has also discussed Mediterran=|! modern times, But now that the [®ibility of his nomination as Re-| The Argentine State merchant
Federat n in 1948 and on the|°&! defence with Greek Defence] B.L,A. has its Auster every {Pi vllecan presidential candidate|fleeter “Rio Santa Cruz” was to-
“ederation i wee 1? Chie art . ~wardless 0; olo ‘T did not ask for it but iffday adrift weathering a storm off
Standing Close Association Com Barbadian, regardless of colour : ‘tire \ f , gas o
mittee on West Indies. Federation.| Greece and Turkey have made|lor creed, can have th experience | they want me Tam ready to oblige|Patagonian coast with six dead
Before the election the Council; |! clear since they joined the/jof flying, if he so desires them. and a. number injured on board
. ied the Government resolus| Atlantic Pact last February that : He said he did not intend tolfollowing a boiler explosion on
paternuets (etree . ' Ithey were t “apared t | {t will again make it quite clear|“make any swing of the entire Wednesday, Efforts to board the
tion which asked the Council tojth¢y were not prepared to put), ' : - tt : ‘ b iahes a i bial ita. e
appoint two or more of its mem-|their armics unde; the Pact’s|'!@t the BLA.C. is not for the|country giving several speeches |vessel failed yesterday after tow

bers to be chosen by the Govern-|Southern Land Commander Italian







idle rich” as Mr, O, T. .Alider,

—UP.

aid addresses every, day.’—U.P. ropes broke twice.

























N ee : ae ‘astiglioni, | member of the House, suggested
addition, provided direct financia}}| Lady Huggins, wife of the) : a et ad by line s or-in-Council to be the colony’s}General Maurizio De Castiglioni, hans the House of Amenity was a SS =
- former Governor of Jamaica was | Shipping emergency gasoline sup- delegates, and that they be em- 2) ae Bo ea conned a Bill t6 amen the
istance during the war years ' s iar f us ‘ scentl ering
ass ce ,|today formally adopted as a Con-jplies to the border States of powered to make all such de-| Yugoslavia which has recently Customs Tori” Act a a!
when many of the een - servative candidate for the Scot-| Chihuahua, Lower California, Son-|Gicions for and on behalf of the| been co-operating more closely Fr Saat ae thats ta ind CLEAN WHOL ESOME
$e peng ress cts to|tish constituency of Dunbarton| °ta,and Sinaloa which import most | .ojony which in theit opinion were} With Greece and Turkey is also], mislead the public and many ; -
able to export their = s a West. f their gasoline from the United! ji ciy to lead to an agreement on! believed to have said that such a wathia’ whh geretinuly naan
provide funds Fa eae The seat is at_ present held by | States. a. sound and workable federa)|Command might hamper relations have been keen on joining the ‘
the necessities 0 y aaarane ce Mr. eee He said that Mexican production | sc!ieme in suffic ient detail . =: tween the three countries, jClu », would have discarded the }
In some quarters reference has|Wi0 ns WN Poa: yO 1951,| “hile sufficient for most of the|able a start to be made ayatep sa Observers here belleve that both nee because of the feeling that i
been made to the employment pro-}OVer Mr. BP. W, N. Fraser in 19! ‘| nation could not be increased im-| process of drafting the necessar; 'Greeks and Turks wanted an th "y were not rated in the Class }}!
vided for Canadians by the opera- Prior to her adoption for Dun-| mediately to take care of an im - | constitutional instrument oe +|American Land Commander for Idle Righ ‘
tir f the Canada-West Indies|parton, Lady Huggins had been) pending shortage along the border The effect of the amendmen lero the hanitintion. thut ; ae
oe of the Canadian ? - . aa , —U.P. adopted by the Council was Pee Bee On ele Mee ee ie Promoting Flying {
fleet, this came out on the short ist 20r Several COfl- lelect the delegates itself and sti, i would be easier to get financial \\
tax-payers pockets, Po Gena eg nee Sotipabam. julate that their decisions must be sistance and equipment fror | vould advise these people to}{l
National Steamships as been er early childhood was spent! , * pe \ gener s 4 tie United States without red jense any such misleading state~ |;
under no obligation to employ West#in Dunbarton which is the county | Reas Again Demand sae Fa Pacers bes Pe te 2 “| Gaee: end ase monts from their minds and join 4)
Indians as members of ships crews; town and she has many friends in} ‘ $2 : tion Committee | --U.P. |th: Club. It is aiming at promot- i
nevertheless, we have employed a/the District || teturm Of Prisoners | ir ir John and Lady Huggins anc : : / Ww months ago an article |)
ae A ee tates tanec house in the constituency for TOKYO. May, 9 ; id >a O | F ii 2 por — Asa an ae
Fie te Reiman SME, commune tae ian! Ridgway Orders Force) er.tinche
With the high rates of wages aN Hi nll ¥ nat SES Obie again demanded the return of all | } asgued pee enwaatesh DG) AO e ie \
pro gins will spend one week there in = . Pret ~ hat perhaps in a few vears tihe ?
vailing recently, this has been of reve , rth Korean and Chinese pris-!7\7y ; oe Stn take i
tremendous value to the Colonies|®V¢ry month rs at a ten-minute session at | i oO eca ature. en. oO eg a 4B Nha ney. eer ti
times the value con’ £ ; Netions spokesman said after- se ire : | Vounitird > essincihily hould 1i
made by the respective Colonies. i “t nm Hurt {wards he did not think Noth | le SAN, Eocee, ning 9, | tear this in mind. Who knows? i
q , | Korean General Nam Il chief! General Ridgway gave the army orders to use force if shortly there may be a dernar {
A’ Tourist ae saa a Fighting Blaze communist delegate had had time) »ecessary to free Brig, Generel Francis T. Dodd from the | pitots and. navigato
The typ Of Rerview % BUENOS AIRES, May 9. |‘? 8¢t new instructions. | hands of 6,000 North Korean Communists. The order came| !arbados will have '
“« ” ships rea laced the , May . le tly mentioned {
the “Lady’ ps Afi hich b h der |, Neither side directly me ntioned | re a oT de ape an hath Doritantae made ifler. i
West Indies and Brit Guiana te which was brought under eizure of. Brigadier: General the oulgoin nited Nations Supreme Commander mad The WEA CO, will chive (
. stand-! control after raging three hours)‘ °°! Pre leh eat | has to Pusan with Cenerals Mark W. Clark. his}. )%* BLA Berve |
in the map from a tourists stan on a four-storey building occupied |": T. Dodd by communist prison- | flyin » Pusan with nerals Mark W, Clark, his|,, useful purpose Pot
point, the people of all the Colonies by Philco Arvientisa « Soobany (£? on Koje Island. But General | ecessor and James A, Van Fleet, Eighth Army Comman-|theie may be another war. 1 {
bene end of the last cen-|here caused damages estimated at | Nem sp’ke of the “heroic resis-| der Dodd was re ported “all right” in a bulletin from Koje|Brrbadians who voluntary
ince "

millions of pesos and injury to 11 | ‘*aice of the Communist prisoners. |
tury, when regular passenger ser-







Pi

of
he

y

i ba fi ['welve communist jet fighters
Vice commenced between Canada oe according to the authori | today” swopt dows ‘dedaedlie “Gn
and the Colonies, it was 4{' Ten fire companies were called |cizht American shooting stars}
nized that such a service out to-battle the blaze in a build- | #ttecking raily 30 miles south |s@
not be operated at a profit. The ing lotated in the machine manu-|°f the Yalu River. One of the
Canadian Government paid sub-| facturing district near South Dock.| communist fighters was reported
sidies to various Steamship Lines] Four firemen were seriously An-| damaged. The air force did not
to maintain this Service until] jured and hospitalized and seven tell how the slow shooting stars
1927 when, under the terms of|others overcome by smoke were|came out of the battle. Allied
the Canada-West Indies Trade] given first aid treatment. lair losses, if any, are announced

@ On Page 5 —UP. | kly.—_U.P.





—
/

WEST EUROPEAN ARMY IS VITAL

By EDWARD M. y hower and his SHAPE team too, The State Department has
\ . 9, have put all their eggs in the | “no alternative” in reserve either
The betting co iow is|European Army basket. If they, The idea that West Germany

will no European |fail to hatch dn a multi-national
omy ane the ‘shockiane fact is\defence force capable of stopping



would be eager to rearm by itself
—with United States support—has











there takers among {the Russians the United States—jnot yet been greeted with ans
rk officials of the nations most|and Eisenhower—may be caught warmth in Germany itself. And
oncerned. | empty-handed the whole Western alliance—the
os ‘ North Atlantic Treaty Organization
If this pessimistic approach is| Eisenhower at his last question |—would fall apart it the United
borne out in fact then it not only |and answer press conference States sought u h
may have dire consequences for | January emphazised that policy, The United Stat il
Western Europe but it may have |‘no alternative” to the proj: holds on to this idea officialls
a tremendous effect on coming j|creating «a single arn the | however as the level to put pres-
U.S. Presidential Elections. Not |manpower and resource of |sure on the French because there
only the United States State|Germany, France, Belgium, Italy jis 1 ternative solution on hand
Department but General Eisen-!the Netherlands and Luxembour =P.





prison camp at 6 p.m

(2 a.n
The report said his status wi
We are glad he is still alive’ -

i an Eighth Army spokesman a

in, port on the southern tip «
Korea separated. by a narrow





water
pe We
yh and unhurt.”

Terms Unreasonable

from Koje. We



A United Press dispatch from
kyo said that the Korean Eigh

ider General Ja



comm
Van Fleet w









$8 tonight directi









Le

f
of

rip|
just,
can get him out of there;



i plan possibly involving a for
to rescue United States Comman
dam brigadier General Franci
Dodd from North Korean Co
munist prisoners who capt
im three days ago riot-torn
Koje Island
After a flying visit to Koje
day Van Fleet aid Commu t
terms for Dodd releas re
unreasonable angi annot be
granted’ He suld not revea
the tern but i he id not be-
D eizet for

D ss A fF
te e to-day he

la and optimistic about
fate

@ On Page 5

}

{ ST) where he is being held
“unchanged,” i

Labour Ahead |
At Borough Polls |





|
lihold a pilot license Some w
I even commissioned to the {tp
lranic of Flying Officer ‘or Flight
Li the start lhe
i licence through

A.F. wouk

if they

the R.A.F. on
quickly promoted

RC

Lieutenant fron
this

Light

get

Barbado Aeroplane Cli

The Hangar






LONDON, May 9 f
fhe labour Party continued | here are membet wiho re
i trong showing in sritish | 4, ig all they ean for the bene
Municipal Elections early to-day of the Club, Many of these mem-
by eapturing 20 Borough Coun=|bev: have sacrificed weekends at i
cil x of thetn in the hard hit home to go to Seawell where they i
|Midland textile belt @rected the hangat These mem y)
Most of the Council which | j,, wre doing the pade ork i
retaines their Conservative or|, ers will bene )
list majorities in nearly | {
vere whittled down by be ere ! id iver })
esse Polling vas | serie lectures o Theory of} ;
ever reported low YF light The first wa ven | 5
4 3.357 contested seats in 372\the British Council, "Wakefield’'} }
boroughs Labour gained 656 andiand was illustrated by a vary in-| » * 7"
lost 16 Conservatives lost 472 te resting film show entitle Why | ; y : }
aot ster ba io etek to coe kh ee EVERY GRAIN EDIBLE (
viderecd the most important contest he entrance fee ying |) nt : . }
Mth industrial Manchester the|mnual’ suseriotion thease} NO BICKING REQUIRED. = }
{ er tive jority dropped to) flying embe , $10 year - . ))
dustrial Port of Bristol. and|it is expected that Phitty Heo PRICE 60c. Package i
ndustria ‘or o ; > an 7: 4 xpected that nilip } (
reduced the Conservative majority jof the Trinidad Light Aeropla t GEDDES GRANT 4
in Leeds from 28 to 12 }Club will come over to take it on
; —U.P. ‘a few trial runs. Vee





PAGE TW





a
ADY ARUNDELL, wife of His

Excellency the Governor of

the Windward Islands, arrived
ere yesterday morning by the
Lady Nelson from Grenada in-

transit for Dominica.

Establishing New Office
R. O. D. BRISBANE, Manag-
ing Director of O. D. Brisbane

and Sons, Merchants of St, Vin-
cent, arrived here yesterday
morning by the Lady Nelson

intransit for St. Kitts and Anti-
gua. He was accompanied by his
son Charles who will be Manager
of the new office they are going
to establish in St. Kitts,

Chiropractcr Returns

R, C. O. Y. LOWE, Chiroprac-

tor of Bay Street, returned
from St. Vincent yesterday morn-
ing by the Lady Nelson after
spendiig about two weeks, He
was actompanied by his wife and
daughter.

Réturning to U.S.A.
R.. ED LEAHY left for An-
tigua yesterday on the M.V.
Caribbee aiter spending a month
at the-St. Lawrence Hotel.
He is returning to New York
City after a sixteen months’ tour
of Eurepe anc the Caribbean.

For Five Weeks

or about five weeks’
w holid:y here igs Mrs. Olive
Mohammed of British Guiana.
She artived yesterday morning by
the Lady Nelson and is staying
with Mrs. Arthur Cadogan of
Hastings.

Spent Twe Months

RS; JOYCE MaGUIRE, daugh-

ter of Mr. B, A, T. Williams,
retired. Comptroller of Customs
and Mrs, Williams of “Henley,”
Fontabelle, returned to Antigua

en Thursday by B.W.I.A. after
spending two months’ holiday with
her parents. She was accompanied
by her little son Michael.

From Bermuda

Puisne Judge

R, JUSTICE A. R. COOLS-

LARTIGUE, Puisne Judge
of the Leeward and Windward
Islands, arrived here from his
headquarters in St. Vincent yes-
terday morning by the Lady Nel-
son aftér presiding over the Court
of Appeal. He will be here until
Monday staying at the Hastings
Hotel before leaving for Antigua
to preside over thie Court of Crimi-
nal Sessions.

Building Surveyor

R. A. C. FRANKLIN, Build-

ing Surveyor of the Housing
Authority in Antigua, arrived here
yesterday morning from Trinidad
by the Lady Nelson after spending
two months’ holiday. He is now
on his way back to Antigua.

On Six Months’ Leave
PENDING part of his six

months’ leave in Barbados is
E. D. Small, Chief Clerk of
Treasury in British Guiana.
arrived yesterday morning by
the Lady Nelson accompanied by
his wife and is staying at “Leaton-
on-Sea,” The Stream.

Cable & Wireless Dance
NVITEES are reminded of the
dance to be held to-night at
the Paradise Beach Club, by the
Cable & Wireless Sport’s Club.
The Dance Committee are
all in their power to make the
evening a success.
Spent a Week
R GRAHAM MAC FARLANE
left the island by British
West Indian Airways on Thursday

Mr,
the
He

on his way home to Rochester, I
New York.

Mr. Mac Farlane has_ been
staying for a week at the St.

Lawrence Hotel.
Intransit
NTRANSIT on the Lady Nelson
yesterday morning from St.
Vincent was Mr. George Alexan-
der Grant, Superintendent of

doing

Back to U.S.A.

ISS MADELINE SOBERS,

of the U.S.A, who was holi-
daying here for about ten days,
left for Trinidad on Wednesday by
B.W.LA. on her way back home.
She was staying at the Ocean
View Hotel.

Retired Headteacher

RS. W. H, JACOBS, retired

headteacher of Grenada, ar-
rived yesterday morning by the
Lady Nelson for a holiday and is
staying with her son-in-law and

daughter, Rev. and Mrs, K. O.
Grannum of St. Simon’s, St.
Andrew.

Also arriving by the Nelson

from Grenada yesterday morning
for a holiday was Miss Phyllis
Seon, Civil Servant attached to
H. M. Custems. She will spend
about two months here staying
with Miss Louise Grell of The
Stream.

After 38 Years

ISS ROSITA HEADLEY who

has been living in the U.S.A.

for thirty-eight years returns

home to-day. Miss Headley has

been spending a holiday in the

Colony and during her stay here

she was the guest of Mrs. Martha
Levine, St. Peter.

Farewell Dinner

M® SULEMAN PATEL gave a

farewell dinner rty at his
residence “Crishna,”’ Lands End,
on Thursday night in honour of
Mr. and Mrs, D. A. Thani of
Brighton, Black Rock who will be
leaving later in the month for

Mr, Thani who first came out to
Barbados in 1937, is paying his
second visit back home. His first
was in 1946. He expects to be
away for about a year.

Among those present were Mr.
and Mrs. A. I, Patel, Mr. A, M.
Patel, Mr. S. Mater, Miss Elaine
Taylor, Mr. Colin Morris, Mr.

PENDING six weeks’ holiday in Public Works who is going up to Keith Chandler, Mr, and Mrs. N. A.
Barbados are Mr, and Mrs. the U.S.A. to take a six months’ Thani, Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Thani,

H. §. Halsall of Bermuda,
arrived yesterday morning by the
Lady Nelson and are staying
the Marine Hotel.

and Maintenance, He will be at-





Each would-be beauty must first

learn a_ secret—one that every
established beauty has discover-
ed long ago Call it the “habit
of beauty.” It is to practise each
infinitesimal chore religiously
each day until it becomes as

much. part of your life as brush-
ing your teeth. You'd never keep
them white and undecayed by
carefully cleaning them for one
week, then forgetting t hem
for another, would you? Like-
wise your hair won't snine unless
you brush it every day, not in fits
and starts. It’s just that princi-
ple that’ underlies the whole plan
of beauty,

You'll have to be honest and
repeat each chore diligently.
Some chores, like the daily bath
and make-up are fun; some, like
removing the same make-up, are
tedious, It’s encouraging to
know that soon you'll reach the
stage where you repeat them as
unconsciously as you eat with a
knife and fork,

YOUR FACE
Its Care
Probably you have just discov-
ered the bewildering array of
creams, lotions and astringents,
all aiming to guard your com-
plexion, But for young skin there

is only one sure fire prescription
—wash it Wash it, wash it and
wash it again, even for luck.
Try different soaps until you find
one compatible with your skin.
Oily skins respond best to soaps
with a spirit base; dry, sensitive
skins have to take it easy with
mild baby soaps. A medicated
soap, prescribed by a doctor, is
recommended for problem skins,

If you have a tendency toward
enlarged pores which clog easily,
try steaming hot towels followed
by soap cleansing, then cold,

cold water and perhaps an _ as-
tringent. It’s the slower safer
more permanent way to clear

your skin of blackheads.

Never, never pinch or squeeze
blackheads and pimples, or you'll
ve sorry. If a machine breaks
down, an engineer doesn’t bash
it in a burst of rage. He tries to
find where the trouble _ started.
It’s the same with’ your skin. Diet,
on your hair is refiected by the
maltreatment, exercise, sleep,

serenity (in that order) are things
to check. Acne finds a cosy home
where pimples and blackheads
have been mauled by fingers. If
it develops, see your doctor,

A crop of pimples could mean
your bloodstream is clogged with

impurities. To clear it, Grand-
ma’s sulphur recipe has never
been beaten....one teaspoonful

of sulphur mixed-with three tea-
spoonsful of treacle or syrup.
Take it every morning before
breakfast until the spots clear.

Besides soap and water you can
use a light cleans*ng cream be-
fore washing again. But beware
of rich nourishing creams. Young
skins don’t need them and may
turn temperamental if overloaded.
A softening lotion for dry skins

before makeup, a drying night
lotion (the calomine type) for
slightly troubled skins before

bed, is all the skin care parapher-
nalia you nedd, But a final warn-
ing—never go to bed with your
makeup on.

Its Trimming

The ideal look for a young
girl’s make-up is just as fresh
and natural as it can be. There
should be a_ shine just about
everywhere, her hair, her eyes,
her teeth, anywhere but her nose.
All you'll need is a very light
powder base and a powder that
matches your skin. The fresh
look of this simple makeup is just
a matter of checking and renew-
ing. Wash it off a couple of times
a day and begin again.

Soft pastels, the pretty
and corals, are the young girl’s
own lipstick colours. For fun,
buy a flock of different coloured
inexpensive lipsticks and experi-
ment until you know the shades
that suit you and can apply them
surely. Vaseline is the only eye
cosmetic you need. Smooth it on
your lids and eyebrows to make

pinks

them shine and pluck just the
few stray hairs that fizz the
natural line of your brows, no
more,
Your Figure
Let's face it....everything from

the size of your waistline to shine
food you eat. Double helpings of
sweets, malted milks, fried foods,
and pastries not only put on

They course in Highway Construction Mr, and Mrs. M. Karnani, Mr. and

Mrs, M. Maneck, Mr. K. Bhagvan-

at tached to the U.S. Bureau of Pub- das, Mr. Joe Thani and Mr. M.
lic Roads in Washington.

Santo,

Beauty Hints For The Young

inches but bring out a crop of
spots, Fortunately there is a
group of foods (meat, eggs, fresh
fruit, vegetables and milk) which,
if included in a balanced diet, not
only keeps you slim but healthy
with a clear skin too.

It is true that you'll only re-
duce your weight or keep it its
own sweet self, by watching your
diet. But the other step on the
road to a perfect figure is exer-
cise. Try to keep up at least one
sport that you played at school.
One that takes you into the fresh
air and sunshine, and get a little
exercise @ach day.



Mother Of The Year

NEW YORK,

Chilean First Lady Senora Rosa
Markmann De _ Gonzalzes was
awarded the title of “Mother of
the World” to-day, and in an ac-
ceptauce speech called on women
to do their part to preserve civili-
zation. The award was presented
at Hotel Waldorf at a luncheon
attended by 600 sons from all
parts of the world by the “Ameri-

can Mothers Committee” of the
Gold Rule Foundation.
At the same time China-born

Miss Chin was awarded the title
of “American Mother of the Year.”
Senora Gonzalzes said mothers
have a “great and beautiful task
in this convulsed world that
threatens spiritual security dan-
gerously.”"—U.P.

B.B.C. Radio
Programme

SATURDAY, MAY
400 —7.15 pm



10, 1952
9.7% & OS M



4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The
Daily Service; 4.15 p.m. BBC Scottish
Orchestra, 5 p.m Racing, 5.15 p.m.
Musie for Dancing, 6 p.m. Scottish Mag-
azine, 6.15 p.m. Frankie Howard goes
East, 6.45 p.m. Sports Rgynd-Up and
Programme Parade, 7 p.m. The News.
7.10 p.m. Home News from Britain
7.15—10.9% pm S822 M



7.15 p.m, Behind the News, 7.45 p.m
Sports Review, 8.15 p.m. Radio Newsree!
8.20 p.m. Radio Theatre, 10 p.m. The
News, 10.10 p.m. News Talk, 10.15 p.m
Music Magazine, 10.30 p.m. Variety Fan-
fare

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2 *
. 4 r ‘ $
LOOK OUT FOR x
* %
$ 3
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8

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25.0
. e S
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& > Re
$ AT THE SAME TIME YOU.CAN HELP THE 3
8

&

s y iy §
% FARNUM FOR FINLAND FUND. %
‘;

%,

%

VOLPE LELLL PEL PPP LPLPLLPPVP®LLLLBVLCELP?PPRLEPL PLES 3





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ADOS ADVOC

AX TRELL }

KNARF, the shadow, met Blackie
Beetle pushing a wheelbarrow load-
ed with trunks, valises, dishes,
clothes and furniture. Blackie |
stopped to mop his forehead with a
handkerchief.

“Hello, Blackie,’ said Knarf, |
“Where are you going with all that |
stuff?” .

“p ing.”

afm shoving *

“I don’t like my old place any |
nrore—the one under the gray rock
near the stump of the apple tree. It’s
too damp and the ants keep walking |
in without being invited. I’m moving
under a white rock near the garden
wall. Blinky Mole used to live there.
Drop in and see me when you have
time. It’s a beautiful place.”

Blackie Beetle lifted the handle of
’ wheelbarrow again and pushed
off.

Dragging a Cart

A few minutes later Knarf met |
Blinky Mole, dragging a cart filled
with all his household goods, “Hello
Blinky,” said Knarf. “You're moy-
ing, aren’t you?”

“Oh, yes,” answered Blinky,
pushing his dark glasses over his |
eyes to keep out the sun. “My old |
place—the one near the garden
wall-~is awful. The dogs and the}
squirrels keep digging in it. Jum |
kept awake half the night.”

“Blackie Beetle thinks it’s beau- |
| tiful!”

“It may be beautiful for a beetle.
It’s awful for a mole. I’m moving |
down to the edge of the marsh, un- |
der the ferns and toadstools, Come
and see me. It’s as pretty as a pie-
ture.”

Hardly had Blinky Mole gone |
than Willy Toad came hopping by. |
He was carrying a heavy knapsack
over his shoulder.

“Moving,” said Willy to Knarf. |
‘Um moving!”

“Why, Willy, I’m surprised!
hought y

varsh!”

“I did,” retorted Willy. “It used
» be lovely. But a mole is moving

That’s the end of my ferns and
adstools. He'll burrow right un- |

r them. I don’t like living in a/
ace where someone is digging, |

d gnawing and burrowing un-|

rneath. I’m moving over to the

grove. Come around and see





I}
ou liked it down at the!

Beetle Was Moving

o Longer Liked His House Under a Rock—

ATE

ayo —
| ees ra

ym;

VY

WY























“I'm moving,” Blackie told

me as soon as you can.” Then Willy
hopped off,

Not many minutes afterwards
Knarf saw a whole flock of may-
flies and blue-bottles buzzing
across the field. Each of them was
carrying a tiny basket filled with
clothes and groceries. “\ nrov=
ing,” they explained to Knarf, “An
awful toad has just moved into our
pine grove! We won’t have a mo-
ment’s peace or safety with a toad
in our neighborhood.’

“Where are you moving to2”
Knarf asked,

Old Apple Tree

“To the stump of the old apple
tree. It’s a nice quiet place. I’m sure
we won't be disturbed.”

Knarf watched them fly off.
“Well,” he said to himself, ‘that’s
Blackie Beetle’s old place. I’m sure
they'll like it. No one is living there
at all now.”

But Knarf was wrong.

Glive the Snail came along!
slowly, leaning on his cane and

}earrying some things wrapped up

in a piece of brown paper. He
stopped to talk to Knarf. “I just
found a nice parking place for my
house,” he said, “Just beside a gray
rock near the stump of the old
apple tree. But then a whole flock
of mayflies and blue bottles came
alor 30 I’ve got to move again.
Well, I’m used to moving, But I bet
no one else is doing any moving—
no one but me!” And he wondered
at the surprised look in Knarf’s
face,







Girl Guides

Fair T

Today the Girl Guides are hold-
ing their annual Fair at the Drill!
Hall from 3 — 8 p.m.

In 1946 the Guides decided
in order to have their own He
quarters they would have to w
for the money, and in July of











year they held t Fair

Each year since they use

this effort to raise money an
-

they are hoping that today
will be even more su
last year’s.

Due to Court Mourning, Lad
Savage, the President of the Geel
Guides Association, is unat
attend. Lady Savage has
taken such an interest in the





of the Organisation and the Guides +



are disappointed that she
be present today. Lady

c

Colly



rk on sal

Hold Annual

oday

very kindly consented
) the Fair at 3.30 p.m.
mbers of the Local As-







iat have again undertaken

e Cake Stall and the Trefoil
] (Old Guides) are running
Plz The Commission-
Guiders, Guides and

ni re ge of ail the

r St The Household, Gifts,

cs, Sweets, Coca Colas, Snack
Milk Bars, Teas, Ices, Wheel
Fortune and the Dips. The
Band, through the kind per-
nission of the Commissioncr of
Pol will be in attendance.
Tick for the 2 Raleigh bicycles,
ic re being raffled, will be
it the Fair. It is hoped

public

supp

noor

will generously
rt to the Guides

ive their



Rupert and the



Rupert feads his tne
Robin Down side of Nutwood

hey begin to descend



“* Have vou though: of

fo}
a

IO’



and so
mouse.
to our cottages

idea,
little



ome
bring our stockings

we
1g them here
yk, this old dead tree is
we need. We know
passing here in any

together.






Knarf.! %




Remember.

THE GIRL GUIDES’ PAIR

HALL



AT THE DRILL

TO-DAY

From 3 to 8 p.m








Under the Distinguished Patron-
age of His Excellency the Gov-

ernor and Lady Savage








ADMISSION; Adults I/-
Children & Nurses 6d
Scouts & Guides in Uniforms 6d

GAINEY

The Garden—St. James
LAST SHOWING TODAY
Women 4.45 Men 8 80
Age Limit 12 years and Over
MOM & DAD

Segregated Audience Only





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JOY LANRANE es

PRODUCTION « Produced 2y ROBERT LORD - Directed by HENAY LEVIN

COLONY
CLUB

The weekly Club
Dinner Dances
will recommence

on SATURDAY, JUNE 7th.

DINNER JACKETS
or

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Dinner & Dancing $4.00

YOUR COOK'S
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and have lunch or dinner
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SATURDAY, MAY 10, 1952





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SATURDAY, MAY 10,

The Government Industria

1952

Girls’ Reformatory

THE Girls’ section of the Government Industrial School

is really a Reformatory School.

In years past detention at

the school was merely punitive for children who har’
committed trivial offences or perhaps no offences at all.
Some were even carried there merely for wandering about

the street.

Barbados has travelled far and
fast since these days and now
there are Probation Officers whose
duty is, not only to look after
children accused of criminal of-
fences, but to save others from the
reaches of the law. These officers
place ‘with foster~parents child-
ren who are by reason of uncom-
fortable homes or bad habits, on
the down grade.

The small number of ten girls
now detained at the School is an
indication of the enlightening ap-
proach to Juvenile Delinquency.
Ten girls in a population of over
200,000 in a Reformatory School
might not be an exact indication
of the moral standards of girls in
the community, but it is an indi-
cation that people are less willing
to make criminals out of young-
sters by having them sent to a
school of detention for some triv-
ial offence in their early years.

The Girls’ School (Summervale)
was founded in 1912 with a roll
of 28. Both the Boys’ and Girls’
Schools were situated on the sites
of contiguous sugar estates and
the arable dcreage (186 acres)
continued to be administered by
the staff of the Boys’ School until
May, 1947, when the plantations
(Dodds and Summervale) ceased
to be the responsibility of the
Superintendent and Staff of the
Schools

It is note worthy that a Com-
mission set up in 1877 made a
clear distinction between a Re-
formatory and ah _ Industrial
School and were of the opinion
that “a Reformatory is needed for
children actually convicted of
crime, and more especially of re-
peated crime whereas the Indus-
trial School is designed for idlers
and vagabonds who have not as
yet been actually convicted,” They
further maintained that “A Re-
formatory must always carry with
it more or less the gaol stigma and
must necessarily in its discipline
approximate closely to a gaol.”
Thus the Reformatory Act, by
which the School was created in
1883, gave way to the Reforma-
tory and Industrial Schools Act of
1890. It seems fairly certain that
the Act of 1890 envisaged the com-
mittal to the Schools of children
“beyond control and in need of
care or protection.”

The Government Industrial



School is administere
intendent, Major O.

*&, Walnot,

assisted by a Matron, a School-

mistress, a Nurse
overseers. About 75 per cent. of
the children are admitted as a re-
sult of cases of petty larceny. The
minimum sentence is three. years
and the maximum five years,
There is a uniform of blue for all

the girls.
School
The girls have elementary les-
sons—geography, hygiene, English,

and 2 female



arithmetic, history,—and the cur-
riculum includes biology. In the
evenings there are opportunities
for gardening, domestic , work,
laundry, plain sewing, fancy work,
housewifery and West Indian
Handwerk.

Each = is ih charge of two or
three beds. Mrs. Dove the Matron
who spent over twenty years
in the Gold Coast, West Africa,
brought back with her a variety
of plants. She has taught the
girls not to depend on lettuce, car-
rots and cabbage but they also
cultivate the Amaranthus, wild
lettuce, and yellow egg plant
which seed @asily.

Outside Tours
The girls also make educational
tours to districts making special
note of plant life, the Museum,
British Council and other places of
interest. Once a year there is a
big picnic and occasionally _ pic-
tures are shown. by the Mobile
Reon. There is also a Fireworks
play on November 5th and at
nee time gifts are distribut-
ed.
Games
The aim of the School is to give
the girls as much freedom as pos-
sible. Occasionally they are taken
for sea-baths. The spacious school
with its surroundings of trees and
gardens affords the girls much
space for play. Outdoor games in-
clude cricket and football which
are very popular among the girls.



Indoor games include table tennis,
and chess, and they even dance
to records. Plans are being made
to start Basket ball and a new
playing field.

The girls aim at attractiveness
is clearly seen especially on en-
tering the recreation room. Here
they have pictures of film stars
and the Royal Family, there is
even an attempt from one keen
artist—a drawing of Esther Wil-
liams. There is also a Libr: and
in the afternoons after work the








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BARBADOS ADVOCATE



girls relax with books and m:
zines.



Normal

In other words the sole aim is
to make them feel as much like
other people as possible and they
are even give pocket money, The
diet scale is a liberal and balanc-
ed one and there is noticeable
improvement in weight and height
after some months in residence
All the girls are examined periodi-
cally by the Medical Officer and
by the visiting Dentist. Every
Wednesday at inspection cod-
liver-oil is administered. The
sleeping room is a spacious one
and the girls sleep separately in
cots.

The discipline is maintained by
a system of rewards privileges
and admonishments. In case of
iliness a girl may visit her home
under escort,

After Care

The real merit of a child’s train-
ing is indicated by the way she
responds to life when she goes out
into the world away from the



y



supervision of the school Con-
structive work on leaving the
School will help to steer the child
clear of mischief and the records
show that only a comparatively
small percentage of the pupils
discharged from the school subse-
quently lapse again into crime.
The Superintendent and Probation
Officers place the girls in suitable
jobs. Most of the girls seem quite
set on becoming shop-assistants.

1 School

‘Peer’s Son
Sails—A
Test Of Love’

As Anthony Blyth, son and heir
of Lord Blyth, set sail from

The solution of all problems of Galway last night on a 6,000-mile

conduct is the power of religion.

There is public worship at the
Parish Church regularly on the
Ist and 8rd Sundays

month. There
for religious instruction and con-
School one may notice that this
firmation classes.

structive training but one may
call it a home where one big fam-
ily enjoys the healthful, happy

recreation and the enjoyment of to wat

those things that are so often lack-
ing in the overcrowded house to-
day.

Top: The girls will soon be
taught basket-ball. Mean-
while Football and Cricket
are popular outdoor games.

Left: The girls learn how
to make baskets and hats
from local straws. These
W.I. handcrafts will be
helpful to the pupils when
they leave the school.

|
|



Below: Each girl has a plot
of land for the cultivation
of flowers and vegetables.
There is keen competition
among them.





LONDON, May 9,

Economic and financial pro-
blems dominated discussions today
between Dr. Leopold Figl, Austrian
Chancellor and Richard Butler
Britain’s Financial Chief. These
talks concluded the official part of
the Austrian statesman’s four-day
visit to Britain.

The two men were understood
to have centered their discussions
on three main points:

Japanese Have No

WASHINGTON, May 9.

Secretary of State Dean Ache-
son has decided that “the Japan-
@€se have no claims whatsoever in
Korea.” This was disclosed Friday
by Korean Ambassador Y. C.
Yang who said he received this
communication from the American
official after protesting Japanese
demands for the return of property
they formerly held in Japan.

‘\MEL has conquered tens of

For

thous ‘nus

of coughs.
recommended

|
|
‘
1

by Dectors, Nurses, Hospitals

Sanatori v¢verywhere. The

n? Simply this. It con-

fis soluble actocreosote —

d in the Famel labor-

-and this ingredient

tor

your bloodstream and

the trouble at its roof.

nelis so effective




LP AMEL

bie im two

Trade enquiries to i=

Frank B. Armstrong Ltd.
BRIDGETOWN.

sizes — from all chemists or stores,

Britain Discusses Economic |
Problems With Austria |

1. Settlement of Austria’s pre-|
war external debts,

2. Future wool credit which
British commercial interests ex-
tended to Austria shortly after the
last. war,

3. Cost of British occupation
troops in Austria. They are also
believed to have had a general talk
on the trend of trade between the
two countries.

—U-P.



Claims In Korea

Korean officials said Japan was
demanding as the price of signing
the peace treaty with Korea that
the latter agree to return former
Japanese property and also in-
demnity owners for losses suffered
as a result of the Korean war.

Japanese officials said “our posi-

tion has been misunderstood.”
—UP.

and why it acts so quickly and so
From the first dose
Farnel cases the inflamed bron-
hial passages and builds up
your powers of resistance while

thoroughly,

it is destroying the germs which
have caused the cough or cold.
Th: moment you suspect "flu, or
catch a cough or cold, take
Famel Syrup and you will have
started on the road to recovery,
Always keep a bottle in the house.

SYRUP

of each}girl clerk in Coventry
are also classes] !east i

On a visit to thefother y«
is not merely a school for con-§45-foot

adverture trip to the Canary
Tslands, the West Indies, Honolulu,
and Vancouver, an 18-year-old
said: “At
will be a true test of our
love.”

Anthony, who is 20, and five
ung men went off in the
ketch Aisling—Gaelic for

Poet’s Dream—on a voyage that
may last a year
Lord Blyth was on the quayside
the Aisling leave

Anthony,

{
in a black beret, high- {

necked jersey. and flannels worked |

all day yesterday loading supplies
and finishing the fitting out of the
boat. He said before sailing

“T spent two and a half years in
Coventry on a studentship in
engineering. | had stomach trouble

and came home two months ago.
A few hours before the Aisling
ailed, Anthony rang up Miss

Nancy Dean, the fiancee he is leav-
ng behind in Coventry.
Chestnut-haired Nancy talked
of the test of their love, added:—
“It will be a terribly long wait.
{ tirst knew about the trip on
*ebruary 25. We both felt rather
sad, but it had to be faced.”
Lord Blyth, who lives
Galway, said
of the engagement.”

————

RATES OF EXCHANGE
MAY 9th 1952
NEW YORK

near

72 1/10" Cheques on
Bankers 70 3/10%
Sight or Demand
Drafts 70 1/10%
72 1/106 Cable
To 6/10" Currency 68 8/10 %
Coulpons 68 1/10%
50% Silver 20%
CANADA
747/10 Cheques on
Bankers 72 9/10%
Demand Drafts 72.15%
Sight Drafts 72 6/10%
747/10% Cable
732/10 Currency Tr 4/10%
Coupons 70 7/10%
50 Silver 20%



In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd. advise
that they can now communicate with the
following ships through their Barbados
Coast Station

8.8. Cavina, Melanie, Bonaire, Bianca,

Mica, Samana, Fort Townshend, Buccan-
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Bittencourt, Oremar, Cristallina, S. Cat-
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Paneer, Tank Baron, ‘Tetela, Scholar,
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PAGE FOUR 4



BARBADOS ta

SSS Yes Pore

Saturday, May 10, 1952



KOREAN DILEMMA

THE Korean Truce Talks have been going
on for nearly a year and there is still no
armistice. Observant listeners to radio bul-
letins will have noted the many occasions
on which meetings between Communist and

United Nations delegates at Panmunjom
ended after one minute, half a minute, one
and a half minutes etc.

Meanwhile hostilities continue and the
Communists lose no opportunity to accuse
the United Nations of prolonging the fight-
ing, using germ warfare and brutalising
prisoners. The facts are so different. The
United Nations are particularly anxious to
see the end of the fighting in Korea. Only
the highest motive of honour and the
noblest sense of international responsibil-
ity keep United Nations troops in an area
from which they would only be too willing
to return to their homeland.

This truth is strikingly illustrated by the
most recent developments in the Korea
truce talks.

The Communist delegates at Panmunjom

are insisting that the United Nations should

» return more than 62,000 North Koreans and
Chinese prisoners of war before an armis-
tice can be signed.

On the face of it nothing seems more log-
ical or more easy of fulfilment than this re-
quest. One of the articles of the Geneva con-
vention guarantees a prisoner of war rights
of repatriation. Refusal to return prisoners

\DVOGATE

SS



of war might well seem to be a high-

handed action not in keeping with the arti-
cle of the Geneva convention. But the
United Nations have made a census of pris-

oners of war in their hands and more than
62,000 have declared their unwillingness to
be repatriated. Prisoners of war cannot be
forcibly repatriated at the point of a

bayonet: they must desire to return.

General Ridgway’s offer of an armistice
to the Communists includes the proposal
that imemdiately an armistice is concluded
opportunity should be given for an interna-
tional commission to examine the reluct-

ant prisoners of war again.

The Times of London this week com-
menting on the delay of the armistice in
Korea suggests that the United Nations
might make the concession of allowing such

an examination of reluctant prisoners 0

f

war to be carried on before the signing of
an armistice. No doubt such a concession
could be made and no doubt it will be made
if by making it there is any real chance of
promoting the armistice which is so ardent-

ly desired by the United Nations.

But the facts are that the United Nations
have already carried out such a census and
have discovered that no less than 62,000 or
more than half the total number of prison-
ers of war in their hands do not want to be
repatriated. Commonsense makes it plain
that so large a quantity of prisoners are a
liability to the United Nations. Expediency
would suggest that they should all be sent
back whether or not they wanted repatri-

ation.

But the forcible repatriation of prisoners
of war many of whom would kill them-
selves before arrival at their destination
would in the words of Mr. Anthony Eden
be repugnant to the sense of values of the

civilised world.

Surrender in time of war is regarded as

treason in China and the prisoners of war

in United Nations camps hear Chinese
broadcasts about mass purges and execu-
tions in China. So far from being guilty of

y

the wild charges brought against them by

the:Communists, the United Nations Forces
in Korea are actuated by the highest moral

principles. It is unthinkable that men, even

prisoners-of-war, should be driven across

the lines at the point of a bayonet.

There is another side to the picture.
Refusal to send back Communist prisoners
of war might lead to reprisals against
United Nations prisoners of war in Allied
hands. The Communists can also take act.on

against
refuse repatriation,

the families of prisoners who

In this event greater butchery might re-
sult than from the forcible repatriatian of
prisoners. And if hostilities in Korea should
extend to a larger theatre of war might the
Communists not persuade British prisoners
of war by some of the modern techniques of

“confessions” not to seek repatriation?

The’ refusal of the United Nations to com-
pel prisoners of war to return to what seems
certain death in their countries of origin is
based on the highest humanitarian princi-
ples. The action reflects the great value
which the United Nations place in indivi-
dual freedom, but the dilemma remains in
Korea. Nothing is settled by this praise-

worthy action.
talks is not yet in sight.

And the end of the truce

. the Dutch reached England,

Our Common Heritage=2

Cavaliers and Roundheads
THE career of Francis Lord
Willoughby takes us back to an

almost forgotten episode in the
great civil war between King
Charles I and the Roundheads, At
the outbreak of that war, few

people in England seemed to know
or care anything about Barbados.
The island enjoyed happy rela-
tions with the Dutch merchant-
men who plied their trade in these
parts and, when the civil war be-
gan, our trade with the Dutch
continued without interference.

Before long, however, reports of
the island’s prosperous trade with
The
Royalists were the first to recog-
nise the importance of Barbados
not only as a trading centre but as
a strategic outpost in the New
World. They seemed to guess, as
Cromwell afterwards clearly real-
ised, that the West Indian colonies
were destined to play no small
part in British trade and war
during the following hundred arm
fifty years,

After Charles I was executed in
1649, Barbados, along with the
American Colonies, remained loyal
to the Royalist cause. Indeed the
island lost no time, after the
King’s execution, in proclaiming
his son King as Charles II. This
convinced the Royalists that the
time had come to take action and
it was unanimously decided by
the advisers of Prince Charles that
Francis Willoughby was just the
man to further the King’s cause
in Barbados and the Caribbee
Islands. The plan was that, if.
fortune went completely against
the Royalists in England, the
ground should be prepared for a
Cavalier stronghold in West In-
dian ard American colonies.

Francis Willoughby had at first
been on the side of the Round-
heads. Later he joined the Roy-
alists and served as Vice-Admiral
under Prince Rupert whose spirit
and genius were then threatening
to do for the Royalist navy what
it had done for the Royalist army
at the outset of the civil war.
When all seemed gone at home,
Willoughby resolved to try his
fortune overseas and to attempt
the salvation of the King’s cause
in the New World.

The Struggle for Liberty

Shortly after his arrival in Bar-
bados, Willoughby (was encour-
aged by its strong Royalist spirit
to fortify the island, raising a
substantial force for its defence
and sending out ships to enforce
the King’s authority in the other
Caribbee Isiands. The Common-
wealth, which was alive to the
importanve of the Caribbean,
thereupon denounced the Barba~
dians as traitors to the republican
cause and, by passing the Naviga-
tion Act of 1651, forbade the island
to continue its profitable trade
with the Dutch. The Navigation
Act, which was designed to strike
a crippling blow at the Dutch car-
rying trade, also threatened much
damage to Barbados. Stung by
this measure, the Barbadians, with
Willoughby as their spokesman,
made the striking claim that a
parliament, in which they were
not represented, had no right to
make laws for them or restrict
their commerce. With a sturdy
colonial spirit, which was to be
typical of Barbados in the years
to come, the islanders proclaimed
that they would rather “choose a
noble death than forsake ould
liberties and privileges.”

Such being the attitude of the
Barbadians, who were encouraged
in their defiance of the English
Parliament by Prince Rupert's ex-
ploits at sea, the Commonwealth
decided to send out an impressive
squadron, with two thousand sol-
diers on board, under the command
of Sir George Ayscue, to reduce
the island to submission. But the
Barbadians were not to be intimi-
dated by this attempt to bring
them to heel, Led by Willoughby,
they made a spirited resistance and
it was two months before Ayscue
could effect a landing. Eventual-
ly, when the battle of Worcester
had finally extinguished the Roy-
alist cause in England in 1651,
Willoughby was induced to come

to terms with Ayscue. By the
Articles of Agreement, which
were drawn up_ between Lord

Willoughby and Sir George Ays-
cue, it was laid down that the
Government of the island should
consist of “a Governor to be ap-
pointed from England, the Coun-
cil to be chosen by him and the
Assembly to be selected by the



Our Readers
Nobody’s Diary Plus
To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—I can add a bit more to ,

your Nobody’s Diary for May 3
re the dirty beaches of the island.

It is a disgrace to the people
along the Hastings beach to see
the dirty state of the beach.
Thousands of old tins, bits of
broken g.ass, coconut limbs and
trimmed trees lie all along the
beach, The high tides had cleaned
up everything a few weeks ago,
but the old condition is here
again. In a highly respectable
district with the Hotels and Tour-
ists walking the beaches, and for
our own sakes, I am appealing to
the persons who live on the sea-
side to make an earnest effort to
keep the beaches clean, It may be
easy fer those whose houses over-
Jap the sea along the Hastings
road, those below the Hotels to
dump their tins and refuse in the
sea, but it certainly shows lack

of respect for others ang for
order and tidiness in general.
It may take a little more
effort to see that the refuse
fis put at the roadside for the
Scavengers on mornings but it

will be worth it. It often happens
that the refuse does not gather on
the beach of the one who dumps
it in the sea, but very often wash-
es up On some cone else’s beach,
Several afternoons I have passed
along the Hastings Hotel and
there were old papers and refuse
littered over the road making the
road very untidy. The scavengers’
cart passes on mornings and
everyone should see and put
their bins out so that they can be
emptied instead of having to be
allowed to remain all day,

The Sin'‘tary inspectors could
bring to mind not to dump any-
thing on the beach and every oc-
cupier of a house on the seaside
should be made to keep his por-



*

Fréucis Lord Willoughby

freeholders.” Thus was the Bar-
badian Parliament, established by
Henry Hawley, confirmed ‘by
Ayscue as the representative of
the Engssou «4 acstatnenc. more-
over, the assurance was given that
Englishmen living in the colonies
ought to enjoy all the rights of
Englishmen livin; in England,
and it Was recognised that no taxes
should be made on the Barbadians
without their consent in a General
Assembly,

When it is remembered that the
same sentiments were expressed
by the American colonists during
their revolt from England more
than a hundred years later, Wil-
loughby and the Barbadians will
be regarded as pioneers in the
struggle for colonial freedom. In-
deed, it has been claimed that the
terms won from Sir George
Ayscue were later taken note of
by the American colonists and
that the Articles of Agreement
drawn up in Barbados in 1652
were to give shape to the Ameri-
can Declaration of Independence
in 1776. ;

The Autocrat

Although Barbados received
such favourable terms, Willough-
by himself was not treated fairly
and ordered to leave the island
contrary to the Articles of Agree-
ment. But when the Common-
wealth came to an end and Charles
II ascended the throne, Willough-
by was again sent out to Barbados,
His restoration as Governor did
not proceed smoothly. He had
originally leased Barbados from
its owner, the Earl of Carlisle, on
the understanding that half of the



SIR GEORGE AYSCUE and LORD WILLOUGHBY of Parham.

island’s profits would come to him
and the other half go to the pay-
ment of Carlisle’s debts. At his re-
storation, some eight years of his
lease still remained but the Bar-
badians resented the idea that they
would have to depend on the noble
lord’s goodwill for the enjoyment
of the estates they had now come
to regard as their own. Eventual-
ly, the Legislature of Barbados,
urged on by Willoughby, decided
to impose on the inhabitants a duty
of four and a half per cent on all
their produce in return for the
concession whereby the planters
were recognised as owners of their
estates, But there was stout oppo-
sition at first and Willoughby im-
prisoned the Speaker of the House
of Assembly, Samuel Farmer, for
leading the agitation against the
measure.

Willoughby cannot be com-
mended for his treatment of
Samue]| Farmer, though he was
upheld in this and other arbitrary
acts by King Charles II and _ his
minister, Clarendon. The four
and a half per cent duty was to
prove a heavy burden on the
planters for many years and Far-
mer typified the sort of Barba-
dian who was to play a leading
part in the long struggle between
the Governor and the Assembly
for the control of the purse strings.
Yet it is not difficult to under-
stand why the man, who agreed
to surrender his lease of the island,
should insist on another source
of revenue to maintain the dignity
and honour of the King’s represen-
tative, Nor should it be thought
that Willoughby eared nothing for
the economic position of the
island. He realised the hardships
which the Navigation Act would
bring to Barbadian commerce and
by his own constant advocacy of
the island’s cause he brought it a

Say;

tion of beach clean. Let us have

i cleaner island by all of us doing

our bit to bring it about,
Thanking you,

SLEANLINESS.
Self Control
Is Birth Control
To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,“1 read with interest Jean
MacKenzie’s letter concerning tirth
control in the Sunday Advocate,
and would, like to add a few
remarks on the subject.

Birth Control is undoubtedte
the lesser of two evils, the greater
evil being the appalling conditions
resulting from overpopulation, yet
the root of the problem goes far
deeper than that.

I subscribe to the view that the
sexual functions were given to
mankind by the Creator for the
purpose of the propagation of the
species and not for the unlicensed
gratification of sex lust. Such an
ideal is alas! only too far removed
from most of us. Such an ideal
is made far harder to reach by
many practices which are preva-
lent to-day.

Take the theatres for instance.
With glaring billboards showing
semi-nude women with only a few
inches of clothing on their bodies,
even the wayfarer on the street
besides the theatre-goers are pre-
sented with views which are not
conducive to morality.

The reading, particularly by the
young, of sentimental trash which
only too often makes them too
sex-conscious. Youth must be
taught that man is more than a
physical organism, therefore the
remedy of the social ill he has
created must be more than physi-
cal.

The Youth must be taught that
man is here not primarily for self-
indulgence, but for service and
helpfulness to the race, therefore
the principles of self-control. pur-
ity and consideration for the wel-
fare of others should take prece-



BARBADOS

|

large measure of relief from the
Strict enforcement of that law.
The Colonial Pioneer |
When Charles II declared war |
against Holland, the Dutch sent}
the illustrious Admiral de Ruyter |
to attack the, West Indian colonies.

After several triumphs off the
coast of Afriga, he came to Barba-
dos with a formidable armament. |

But, although he did much dam-
age to the ships in the harbour,
he was unable to land, Willough-
by’s defence against him being
even more effective than against |
Sir George Ayscue. Thus did Wil-
loughby win a notable victory
against the man who was later to |
bring shame and indignation to
the Mother Country when he}
sailed up the Thames and des-
troyed English ships in the Med-|
way. 5 |

Willoughby’s 'ife ended in the
way he; would perhaps have
chosen. Ags»Captain General and
Governor-in-chief of all the)
Caribbee Islands, he could not
confine his attention to Barbados
alone. In May 1666 he set out,
with a considerable expedition, to
punish the French and the Dutch
for the damage they had done in
other West Indian islands. Unfor- |
tunately, after capturing St. Lucia,
his fleet was. ovemaken by a hur-
ricane and he perisheli with the
majority of his men. Thus ended
the career of a man who, it has
been said, did more than any one)
to extend the British Empire in}
the Caribbean area. |

Willoughby deserves a place in|
West Indian history not so much
as a Governor but as a colonial

pioneer, He did not possess the
patience and the tact necessary for
a successful administrator. His
attempt 40 follow the example of
Charles I and govern the country
without parliament earned him
the censure of those who support-
ed Samuel Farmer and the Bar-
badian Petition of Rights. Ardent
and impulsive, like other pioneers
who set out to build up England's}
empire overseas, he could also be}
high-handed and arrogant, when
other methods might have suc-

ADVOCATE

| Wednesday—Everybody who has been to



MAY 10, 1952

SATURDAY,

NOBODY'S —
DIARY

Monday—Maude it seems is going to lead
nobody up the garden. Mr. A - - now in
Guadeloupe (a place with a deep water
harbour) parlaying francais with the
double—Charlie (CC) boys told the
House then breaking up for a vacation||
to study the Maude Bill while he was
away in Geneva, The House could hardly
do that because it hadn’t come off the
Press much before Mr. A - - - left Swit-
zerland. But this week while Mr. A - -
is in France (Guadeloupe being a de-
partment of France) everybody’s read-
ing Maude or at least the local govern-
ment bill based on Maude. Normally not
more than five dozen bills are printed
for the edification of the 60 or less peo-
ple who go through the motions of read-
ing them. But what with vestrymen and
others clamouring for the Bill the gov-
ernment has run off some 300 copies.

Even Nobody is reading it while the
wound in his heel keeps him off the
beach,















PLASTIC
PROPELLING PENCILS

LONG LEAD, SCRIPTO PENCILS,
BREAK PROOF 4Be. each

e
ADVOCATE STATIONERY





~ LIQUINURE |

A Highly Concentrated Liquid Manure

CS. PITCHER & Co.

Ph. 4472

Tuesday—I was so thrilled to hear Mr.
Tucker’s talk about “The Turkey”. I
look forward daily to read that Mr. B—
is going to thrill us with a talk on
“Grease.”



WHY NOT CONSERVE VALUABLE FOOD?
in
London knows that policemen are won- STERNE’'S DEEP FREEZE
derful. As Professor Joad would say it
all depends upon what you mean by
wonderful. The Policeman at Seawell
who has nothing better to do than to
make me drive my wheels right up to
the studs instead of being content that
I was behind the studs was certainly
wonderful. But I cannot believe the ex-
planation given by a friend of long
standing that the reason why the police-
man on duty outside the entrance to the
Police Station wears a spike on his hat
is to protect him against parachutists.
That is too wonderful to be true.

PRICE
$425.00



NGS ee

Thursday—It suddenly struck me to-day. If
Mr. M — who stays with Mr. A — finds
it difficult to find the Big Four, who can
ever find them? The only time you can

_ AVAILABLE FROM STOCK —

Da COSTA & CO., LID. Elec. Dept.













be certain where Mr. A — is, is when
he’s out of the island, This week he is
in Guadeloupe. Mr. W — is more ac- "

cessible because of his car. You can’t
miss it. Still the idea of one office with

This man is completing a deal’on Golden Grade
one of the four always accessible is



ceeded in winning the support of
those he hat'to govern,

Francis Willoughby has been
compared with such adventurous
spirits as Sir Walter Raleigh and
Sir Humphrey Gilbert. Certainly,
he had bold ideas for extending
the King’s power overseas to off-
set the victories of the English
Parliament at home. Perhaps, as
Strafford thought of doing in Ire-
land a few ‘years before, he may
have hoped to raise an army in
America to reduce the King’s re-
bellious subjects in England. Dur-
ing the period immediately fol-
lowing the Restoration of King

Charles II, thousands of Barba-|-

dians emigrated to Carolina, Vir-
ginia, Surinam, Jamaica, St. Lucia
and ather West Indian islands.
This colonisation was part of Wil-
loughby’s programme to extend
and strengthen British influencé in
the New World. The West Indies
were thus prepared to meet the
great efforts that France was later
to make to gain supremacy in the
Caribbean. “By his energy and
leadership Willoughby established
Barbados as the centre of British
influence inthe West Indies, in-
fusing the islanders with the spirit
that warded off the sustained at-
tacks that were made on the
islands during the seventeenth
and eighteenth centuries,

:



dence over mere personal grati-
fication. ,

They must be taught a sense of
responsibility, that every act, how-
ever apparently trivial, has an
effect on their fellow beings and
even on the Universe as a whole.
To emphasize, I quote the words
of Rudyard Kipling, “Whoso im-
pingeth, ever so.lightly, on the
life of a fellow mortal, the touch
of his personality, like the Nipples
of a stone cast into'a pond, widens
and widens in ni
through the aeons, till not even
the far off gods. themselves can
tell where action ceases.”

With anticipatory thanks for

space, '
OBED FRANKLIN,
Howell's X Rd,
St. Michael.

Birth Control |

To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—re Birth Control—the gb-
verse side of the picture.

Your correspondent “Medicus”
scored a bulls- eye when he said
that the matter has nothing to de
with religion,

Until recently the Church coun-
tenanced the practice among mar-
ried persons. .

Promiscuity with a wanton dis-
regard of the possibility of pro-
creation and/or Venereal Disease
Jas nothing arguable to commend
it but is cheerfully paid for by
Government,

‘Medicus* cotild have gone further
and reminded us of a letter writ-
ten to the British Medical Journal |
of October 14¢h, 1944, in which— |
discussing the question of human
artificial insemination—the writer
said: “The Chureh, having for
years condemned lust without pro- |
creation, may find difficulty in
pronovncing upon the quéstion of |}
procreation without lust.”

Fanaticism in this matter is by
no means helpful

I therefore appreciated greatly |
the sound letter of the Reverend
F. Godson.

NEMO.

© ending circles |

'months in New York as a money spinner.

—a safe bet to yield high returns in long-wearing
-\ smooth-fitting
comfortable apparel.

A
GOLDEN
GRADE
SUIT

Hand Tailored

worth chewing on, perhaps.
and





A man I know who works less than a
lot of other people tells me a story of
his son at prayers. It seems that the
son has a crush on work and sweeps out
gutters and runs messages with all the
alacrity of the “V.P.’s” Bob-a-jobbers.
Anyhow the idea of work has gone home
to his little brain. So much so that doing
his duty as a God-fearing citizen the
other night his little lips addressed “Our
Father Who Works in Heaven.”

Friday—The Bob-a-jobbers remind me of the
other little boy who calls the Scouts
Cowboys. “Daddy the cowboys outside.”
This set me thinking of the Lodge school-
boys who call each other Cubbos. Could

Cubbos be a corruption of Cowboys? by
Alas not. Etymologically speaking Cub- SUMRIE .
bo is a corruption of Corbeau, and so of England

many Lodge Boys come {from French
speaking islands where they call what
we call Crows Corbeaux. So you can’t be
too careful can you when you want to
fit something into the preconceived pat-
tern you’ve already decided upon, can
you. se git

Saturday—Red letter day for the Empire (if
you’re not ashamed of the word. I’m
not). To-day in 1893 Queen Victoria
opened the Imperial Institute. I hope
that sends shivers down your spine.

(P.S. Two Pelicans just flew over the
island.)

OLIVIER'S FLOP

By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS

LONDON.
SIR Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh di:
not do so well on Broadway with their tw:
productions of Cleopatra plays. In London a:
their own theatre they were the rage of the
town all last summer playing Shakespeare’:

and sold by:

Da Costa
& Co. Ltd.









REMEMBER MOTHER ON
MOTHER'S DAY
SUNDAY, MAY 11TH
WITH A BOX OF
CHOCOLATES



—

Anthony and Cleopatra one night and George Specials Boxes of Chocolates
Bernard _Shaw’s Caesar and Cleopatra the Prepared Mustard .25 per Sizes 1 Ib. to 3 Ibs.
next night. » 7 axt Bottle -| Carr's Biscuits
night On the golden strand of Broadw SFE edness 8 as gg 4 Asst. in Tins & Pkes.

nothing went so well. The big erities putlM} ngacoroni .39 por pkg. ee ee
their fangs in both plays and by the time the Chase & Sanborne Coffee oy hoy Crackers $1.20
theatres ivi i : $1.90 per tin fr Gn

atres closed the Oliv iers were play ing witl Empire Coffee $1.20 per 1 tb, Carr’s 7 Biscuits .36 per
some empty seats in the house. They did not pkg. v2 Pkg.

Churchman’s Cigarettes
Embassy Cigarettes

Dressed Tripe .32 per Ib.

bring home many dollars, but gave yet an-
g : ae Dressed Rabbits .42 per Ib.

other proof what goes in London doesn’t
necessarily work in Manhattan. But then it
sometimes works the other way and the
QOliviers can remind themselves that a play at
their own theatre—““The Mad Women of
Chaillot” ran two weeks in London and flop-
ped only to cross the Atlantic and run six





Shop at GODDARDS

Refresh at GODDARDS

Lunch at GODDARDS

Ask for a GODDARD 3 Year Old RUM |




















SATURDAY, MAY 10, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE

Hotel Proprietors Told What _ Foreign Bible Society U.S. Industry | “Lady Boats” | 0 trotting sins tm

° . 4 your muscles at once! Apply
{ ° pe Fight Against Communism Can Supply _,,......2 rer! tees Untaont Wi
ay * te tine Oradniged to }: teal your
merican ourists Expect DURING an address to members of the Barbados Defence Needs | one rate ae De ger er and Ws 1
MR. JOHN ALEXANDER, HOA C's Sales Manage Auxiliary of the British and Foreign Bible Society and Pun eae alee eee ate SEW eved!

treement National




















the public in general at the Empire Theatre yesterday eve- by ARTHUR J. OLSEN — for ship. sey jee,
for the Caribbean Area with headquariers in Jamaica has ys i ; Seonh ta x Boa ae |
, an \ L r 1as ning, Rev. James Inniss, Secretary of the British West : ; Fewer Pz ge
just left for Trinidad where -he will have discussions with Ww ng Commander Indian Centre of the Society, made a strong appeal for aid niin Gene a Btn wees You don’t rub in “Sloan's” you dab it
* : a, s os e @d Dtaces’ oi T.ilet +} . enze: a ‘ :
aes before returning to Jamaica. He was accompan- Smith Arrives by way of funds to help in the work of the Society in cia.s said the American Industry al a the Demet ay tretas oe
i y his wife and two children who were staying at the spreading the doctrine of the Bible. is fully cupable of producing g00a5| ing the past ¢ uple of years, this
Ocean View Hotel. On ‘De Grasse’ Rev. Inniss told of their fight against Communism and ‘to fulfil the United States’ de-| combined with the necessity of! aches and pains and stiff |
. et f om Mr.. Alexander attended at the how the Society were “smuggling in” Bibles in Russia and Suiniat a diated’ taco ene keeping | nger fares down to!) joints too!
invitation o 0 iati i i i : i i i me riendly né S. ‘Y| meet competitio from othe
wan MER a 4 ag me ge their meeting which _WwiNnG COMMANDER Denis China where it has became a forbidden book. noted the defense buildup is only] forms of tees ore Look FoR THE
eld at the Hotel Royal on Wednesday night and was Smith, O.B.E., Aeronautical En- | This is Rev. Inniss’ fifth visi & tartial mbbiiieation with. less PICTURE OF DR. SLOAN
very interested to hear their plans. | ery and Senior Executive of the to Barbados. In his introductory oan Pe phenomenal increase in operation |
At the meeting he gave a short

paki. olland Aireraft Company, Ham. remarks, Dean Hazlewood the Will A dm itt d than 15 per cent. cf the nation’s} cost was responsible fr the |

talk telling hotel proprietors what ble, Southampton, ariteek care chairman, referred to Rev. In- 1 Ss 1 e steel mau tor example, dive t.c) deficits of the two “Lady” ships
the American tourists wanted Vi | this week on board the S.S. De niss as being an energetic and from normal civilian uses to mili- exceeding the total CNS. deficit |
and expected to find in their 10 ence ©. Grasse on a_ two-month holiday indefatigable secretary, — To Probat tary production. jof $466,000.00 Canadian in 1951. |
hotels and advised them on how visit. This is his first visit, and The Barbados Auxiliary is e An estimated 2,000,000 ton: ;
to attract the traffic from places Di 2 d he is staying’ with his.cousin Mr, made up of various denomina- less than two per cent. of (he Phe controis exercised by somes
like San Juan, the U.S.A nd ismiusse Neville Howell, Manager of Bulke- tions and has a Committee to In the Court of Ordinary annual production — lost during] Of the Colonies in the bulk pur- shila lige
then tain ley. ; help the work of the Society yesterday, His Lordship the Chief Steel industry stoppages in the} Chase of flour has resulted in the |
, His Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod Wing Commander Smith ts a _ Last year the Barbados Auxii- Justice ‘Sir Allan Collymore last two weeks will not serioi Canadian National Steamships 2
Commenting on the recent Police Magistrate of District “A” Soma yee Sader ot aay pn A gage ne: ye | 9 een wills of the following ar ie ee ie serene wey so datan Fee MaMgne sg on deel | i ne $ ust
successful first flight of the yesterday discharged Ainsley Wor- sistant Court of Appeal of this Hon ‘Secretary Mr.) Vi. SE aes ea Oe ic experts. ‘They said inc} medity but, it is 4 tifying to |
B.O.A.Cs Comet jet liner from rell of Sea View, St. James in the island. His uncle rt Sevan Tehy deacdnks ae Wien ve Maud Stansby McKinstry, st. economic experts. They said the | Medi ut. it is gratifying . to } ds

. . aa : 4 ’ - va sland, s : ‘ S s ing less a eae Ea! ori . aiap) 8 sel iiie se) st ; note that in 1951 the importers
London to South Africa and its case in which the Police charged Smith, Manager of the Barbados than that which the’ Society con- Sh Sette Teeate bee ee snighh sectonche cntens ial unite jin all the Colonies have IN en | lean ul ci

return, Mr, Alexander said he him with robbi i Electric , Corpora i ; ter . ; ¥.
had, flayn.éna two-hour flight in bing Cecil Batson of Supply Corporation. tributed to Barbados. He and Henry Thomas Bend, St. States’ steel production now ex-|US # greater measure of support | Your body cleans out excess Acids

i
From all chemists and stares





said






































3 by usi iolenc i . ._ An Honours Graduz at > ig rere as aoe sea : end poisonous wastes in your blood
the Comet last November while ae ane eerace oe ae, University, M nigh of Oxford nbn Sears were hoping Michael, Henry DaCosta Bascom, pected to amount to about 110, | 8% we look forward to the con- thru's million tiny delicate Kidney
i Mr, F. Smith nts mith served in to send £200 this year. ; tinuance of their increasing con- tubes or Silters, If Poisons in the Kid-
in England and the lack of vibra~ ) ioe mith appeared on be- the Royal Air Force during the Prayers St, .Georgs, 000,000 tons this year, but at Uiclaacnce in the reliable freight neys or Bladder make your suffer
tion and almost noiseless flight at @/£ of Worrell while Sgt. King jast war and was twice mentioned The meeting’ waa opened by , 2” the Court of Chancery His Same time it was pointed out thi | orvice, including refrigeration,| git?s.Up,N! Jtiar kaven Daceaaees
4,000 feet was an experience prosecuted for the Police. — The jn Despatches and later awarded prayers by Rev. F. C. Pember- Lordship the Vice-Chancellor the United States can switch ov’! which the CNS. have eran | Paine. Circiee Under See Saeeree
which could only be described as Prosecution called on one witness the Military O.B.E. He wag also ton. The Lesson was read by ‘ceived the Registiar's Reports to a sterner mobilization pro-| and will continue to provide. | _—_RASSAKEE, don't rely on ordinagy medhe
equivalent to sitting in one’s Cecil Batson and then Mr, Smith for sometime with the Bomber Major Welter Morris and this 0 ,the annual accounting of gramme at any time ; | with the doctor's prescription
lounge chair at home “in the S¥bmitted to the court that on the Command where he was on the was followed by the Honorary Eustace Maxwell Shilstone Esq., As a measure of what could |! Therefore, while it is not pos- Cystex starts working in three
stratosphere” with a visibility of €Vidence that Batson gave identi- Staff of the Commander-in-Chief, Secretary's report and financjal Selicitor and Receiver re the done in emergency it wes recail*!) sible to thank them all person- Ta Raye ee icine yea aaa ae
over 150 miles on either side. fication was not proved and it Air Chief Marshal Sir Arthur statement which was adopted, BASCOM TRUST FUND for the that more than twice as much ©'lally, I take this opportunity, money back 1s guaranteed Ask YOUR

. would be unsafe to accept that (“Bomber”) Harris. Thanks were accorded Mr, Years ended August 1949 and the the gross product of the nation/ through the medium of the press chemist for Cystex. (Slashes) (im
Stratocruiser Services evidence, There was also no cor- , ; ._ V. B. St. John and the Com- August, 1950. went into war production during | to extend to all our clients our} @@ stex antee
“BO roboration. On ~eee the Air Force in mittee for their service to the Reports of the Sale and Costs World War II. than is now divert-|}:eartiest appreciation for their ne brctrtepeer HG i,
B.O.A.C., is always endeav- Batson told the court that on 1946, ing Commander Smith Society. in the suit of P. N. H. Johnson vs ed to defence buildup. loyal support. = ;
ouring to improve its equipment April 23 about 7 p.m. he went to joined a ee. eee Com~- The following were elected for Dorcas Williams of Dwellinghouse Responsible officials said th>!)
and anette from the United Pine Hill in his motor car and ae itant' th oa Chi oP an Was the ensuing year :—Mr, V. B. St, AVEDON and one rood land at present defense production trou- |) eee
ae om and the U.S.A. to the while there for some time a man He. ms had uni ai po ee ibitity John, Secretary, Mr. J, G. Pile, Upper Collymore Rock, St. Michael bles - exemplified by the dis
artbbean and has recently in- eame up to the car and opened the in the design of the Canberra the Dreasurer and the Committee sold to Marie Josephine Prescott closure of General Lawton C
troduced _ stratacruiser — service door and said “Money or your first Britiely Jet . Bombs which comprise Messrs. H. Ward, G. for £1,230, Collins that some ammunition '
ccemine” to tte eo ae” established a world record fight Murray, D. Chase, O. A. Pilgrim. The Acting Pulsne Judge His rationed in Korea — stem fron|
amaica’ e sa and a “4 c : = ‘ > ills of the S.P.C.K., and 7 j ’ ie ihin eid ae a t
ie hoped that in the tetuee fur He told the man that ne had no sermes the Atlante ‘earlier this A, Clu sores dar. Teuea.G. Laavics three frincipal couses. None ct ane PS

ther extensions of these luxury money on him and another person - : ‘ After a short introduction b: . after as kinide dl: Mtaton' \§

aire aft can be. made to the who was in the cat with him gave pritma,smih, has, been very im the Dean, Rev. Inniss, delivered decree “absolute. in. the ult of Gigisy to preluse wer materi

E2stern Caribbean which is the man 12 cents, After receiving Gos which he said he very much 300 uae we eee M. R. Osbourne, petitioner and The first is the limited character | a new medicated
growing increasingly important this money the :nan pushed the wantec to know, and he thinks the j9 999 copies —— were distributed ©°,D: L Osbourne, respondent. of the defense buildup.

for B Rey tourist and commer- knife in his left side and put his climate wonderful. He plans to by the Society in the West Indi Decree absolute was also pro- Defence authorities are deliker
cial traffic. hand in his pocket and took out return home by the De Grasse y ie wes €S nounced in the suit of R. BE. Phipps, ately



i st yez i holding down all-out pi
_ Mr, Alexander will be attend- $3, when she returns to Barbados to- /@8t year than in the previous ..itioner, M. R Fhipps, responde duction. of some weapons ‘nn!
ng the Nati Cc t f years. pe ‘ pon
ing the National Convention o: He then got oué of the cay and wards the end of June. But the fact there was that ine Mt and Shan Brooks, co- ~“ninment to save money to avoil Oo soa
the Ame ican Society of Travel both of them began to fight but crease, i respondent. Mast he” wroduntioy er ats
Agents in Miami in October and , he said, did not mean P ' 1 in items th;

in the scuffle the man got away. that they were getting on fine, Decree nisi was pronounced in m-y become obsolescent befor?)

he is certain Barbados could get Before he got out of the car the There was m the suit of M. R: i .
; 7 R d ead oO ’ uch more to be e suit of M. Ramsay, petitioner they are needed on the battlefield. |
a ot, publicity py endang 4 man told him to, undress and he “Y© h Supt. Of Msfe was much more 10 be dane aii, MacD. “Hamsay, re= 1% 8 NNT ONS UP. | WITH DISTINCT ADVANTAGES
added ee refused to do so. , , ie faid, were fortunate in being al- SPOD ent. ees a
and also issuing an invitation to r ways i .
these agents to come down to To the court, Batson said that Grenada Prisons ays under the British tutelake, His Lordship also pronounced

t f for in this way their stande { decree nisi in the suit of E. K. R DGW A
Barbados to see what the lovely the voice of the man that attucked (From Our Own Correspondent) education had Deteme nn he McConney petitioner, ‘and J. A. I < Y
island has to offer. him that night was that of the GRENADA May 9. many other places. There was MeConney, respondent,

yy Tp Ly, y
) | @ leaves the coat healt!
il a defendant but he could not recog- _ Mr. W. A. Redhead, Acting much illiteracy in the West Indies In the suit of B, H. E. Howell, ORDERS I ORCE | aah ‘ ‘ ae 7
On Wednesday, his family and nise the man that night for he was Superintendent of prisons conse- @nd the Society had to tackle petitioner and C. L. Howell, re- ee ee
he spent a very pleasant day at wearin ask quent on the promotion of Mr. E. that proble 8 wel a , . ; @ From Page 1
the Colony Club, St, James, g a mask. CG. ‘King to a similar poet in Brite the Bible eansevines he teen oa ecree nisi was Koje Island prison camp au- | @ destroys fleas, lice and ticks
making the eine = Capt. ish Honduras is now confirmed in jous languages. ne OE Siprent, sndiinabud he Enceities se aes gree in wiles |
Hodges who was previously as- k i his, post. BBtv MM ee Of the many tents in the compouna | : hc ie a
sociated with B.O.A.C, as Cater- Motorist Fined _ Redhead, a young officer serving Special Appeal Ee Ee ene appear- the North Korean Officers were | @ guards against mange
ing Manager. It is just such ; in various depariments since Remarking that the population or the petitioner, holding General Dodd, 6,000 pris-
attractive places as the Colony £3 For S in 1926, attended a nine months of the West Indies was about enere het mi in a compound where | @ protects the hands
Club which will bring tourists to ; speed social welfare course in Jamaica 15,000,000, he said that thd 17 School Girls ee — vane
Barbados to enjoy the aan His Worship Mr. C. L. Walwyn in 1946, oer mare oe poe which : akin Wideeus anes eee
of the beautiful beaches and we i ; arate ‘tia 1 . was hamper rough lack of s,s hud ithorised: the use 106 to
appointed accommodation = Slee HA" pocneeh bas Michael Freak Tur key er wd ‘nie aes oe ene 4 Injured In Accident seetes -Camaat ee A gal
t eri- . ey could make good sak tortna hed: nate
aad Ode: SER = Spence cf Bush Hall, St. Michael, rs, William Thornhill of Sar- headway. That was why,” he ATLANTA, May 9. Ws. ae d - i eee? Gonfers |
£3 to be paid in 14 days or in geant’s Village, Christ Church, Said, he was making a special A train ploughed into a school ence Held O “Wad: ta Korea, i
default one month’s imprisonment prought a turkey with three legs appeal to the people to assist the bus to-day injuring 17 of 35 e n wednesday | are RS
with hard labour for driving the into the Advocate yesterday morn- Society. school girl passengers some seri- . It was learned from Korea tha'| medicated $04
Maas Charged With motor car M—2768 on Pine Road ing. 2 He recalled that when he wag ously. The bus was carried 75 the kidnapping was known on | aca gk eine
: at 45 miles an hour on Februar; rhe turkey, which is 5 days old, im England last year, the Bishop feet down the track. Wednesday but was officially de~|
Havi Weapcn 22. Spence pleaded guilty to the was hatched with eight others, of Hanover, Germany, came to | People rushed from nearby sp ore See : eee be a \ Ane ees ii ‘ : es
ig : ipo charge of exceeding the speed The other features of the chicken England asking to be provided houses and found bleeding girls. 1s surprised and overwhelmed | pleasant ° non-irritant « invigorating « insecticidal
limit are quite normal and it shows with 80,000 copies of the Bible A policeman said “many were un- While he was conferring with «|
CASE DISMISSED The Speed limit on that road is every possibility of being raised + 120,000 people who were See tilered Baildee aes = Cee ane aes ee on
i , to full size, about to be confirmed, but they the injured chiJdren along the prison gates. Another United Na~
A>case brought: by the ‘Police = weiitiic Cie ake = could spare only 20,000 copies. Y ids of the railway track. tions officer Lieut, Colonel Wilbur | IMPERIAL CHEMICAL (PHARMACEUTICALS) LTD.
against 28-year-old St. George end t 1 h Communism, ‘he said, was in- . The accident was just outside Robert Raven fought his way clear | MANCHESTER ENGLAND
; fi : endorsement, Cpl: Jones attached CONDUCTOR FINED 20/- imica! te the ‘gospel of J In Atlanta City. Later the injured of the Communists and escaped. A subsidiary company of Imperial Chem i ,
Leonards of Belle Land, St, Mich to the Traffic Branch at Central ~ Arnold Riley of Venture, St. Bulgaria and flungary Ceechab- were put into ambtQances and The imprisoned General was} . Mend Sacha tchpe Thiele
ee a ‘ahhiin Watnen Feprua oe oe (10.25 pe John was yesterday ordered to pay lavikia, their work of the society taken to the hospital. A specta~ keeping in touch with the south SOLE AGENTS AND DISTRIBUTORS
8 a ruary abou .25 p.m. he











" 3 ) ‘ f 20/- and 1/- costs in 21 had been closed down. tor was the last to be helped from by field telephone. Army cooks A. §, BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS) LTD.

with intent to commit a felony was was on duty on the Pine Road ee a pte rb ieapeischvesind Finland has always been a the scene, She fell from an em- were to-day sending in his food P.0, BOX 405, BRIDGETOWN ’ * Ph.
dismissed without prejudice by anq saw the motor car M—2768 by His Worship Mr, G. B. Griffith strong Protestant country and bankment while watching, and and he was reported to be still} 235
His Worship Mr, E, A. McLeod, approaching him and it appeared Acting Police Magistrate of Dis. W@S one of their strong centres broke both ankles. unharmed and well. Camp au i lh ia



Police Magistrate of District “A” i : ‘1 padi —U.P. thorities complied with the de- |) =e.--—~-~~~--—~---_____.
yeareney. F Fe aeeeenR, trict “A”, for overloading the ot ere Cote es han -~ mand by prisoners for 1,000 sheets )})~ tT s.

The case for the prosecution was A check cf its speed vas made motor bus — G—50 on My Lord’s prohibited the cxinting ae t the GRANTS TO GRENADA °t paper—a request earlier refus-
that on May 1 about 7.30 p.m. the and that showed that it was trav- Mill, St. Michael, about 7.10 Pm. Bible, The Society tee “aaa FOR INSECT CONTROL ed. The demand was sent out in
defend=nt ang Oliver Warner of elling at 45 miles per hour. Police on March 19. great work in Russia, « message from General Dodd who





~ but the Hicauielal “sae
Jones Land, St. Michael, had a Constable 466 Lashley said that he _ Cpl. Cyrus attached to the Traf- work there was closed down. But (From Our Own Corresponient) also asked for a “hospital repre- VACATION
row in which the defendant took stopped the car and the defendant fic Branch at Central Station said they were sending Bibles to Rus- GRENADA, May 9. Sentative. iia aaid
a knife and attempted to wound was the drive. that there were 62 passengers in via’ from "Finleka aN” Wa, Grants of SHOR UMTCER. .,HidKNsy's mesiage to-day sai
Warner, Spence said that he never knew the bus which is licensed to carry secret, he said, but it was done and $19,000 by W.H.O, both in whatever force may be necessary

Warner said that the defendant that he was driving at 45 miles 31. The defendant was the con- in a way which has not yet be

cE . en. Ss. le t mien fcerene ‘s release
abused him telling him that he per hour and that he was in a ductor and he said that he had discovered, U.S. currency have been made tO tg secure General Dodd's releas

Grenada for a two-year pro- and for establishment and main

BARGAINS



i 7 he bus because another St Barri trae naan tes tic “o)
was an annoyance. The defend- speed trap until he was told so by loaded t trong Barrier gramme of insect control particu- tenance of unchallenged contro!
ant took up a knife and rushed 4 person sitting in his car, Waa veep commtensnad a oft noald et the Protestagt larly of the malarial mosquito.
3 , . bagi : urch was a stronger barrier tc ; NLLC.E.F. i J » * » Py
at him with it. He was not cut siline Soca’ iehernmieen caedived, “tae ip, Pepriee ip | She Deputy Chist of U.N.LC.E Will Not Be Harmed Drastic Reductions in Thermos



doctrine than the Catholic jn the area who had his office in ‘The Eigt fig OO aiid
0 f » Eighth Army Commande:
Church. The Protestant churches Guatemala visits the island be- expressed his confidence that Gen-

} : ih
St Peter Tio Get 12 Arrested For LABOURER REMANDED were better able to withstand it. tween May and June to discuss eral Dodd would not be harmed, |

In the Far East there was a



Picnic Sets



j e e ‘ accounting and supply procedures But he said foree would be used |

Ne B 9 Club May Day Riots wy ote Stichnel, ae pont pie sre ta tue si ee ore with the Senior Medical Officer, 4 pean Leni e neeerery 7” Original Price Now
: , - 7. SS ee sa so Ts att co-0 Te ‘ "

Wepre MEXICO, May 9, ‘emanded without bail until to- who were there were languishing to distribute half a million as petting “up the telephone to the |) Attache Case for 4 people .. ‘ $30.00 $16.00
The Police have managed to get | Twelve Communists are held in any yown popees se Saree nee B prison, It was only where the against the 3,000,000 of Das Kap- unknown tent where the General ” et ee i ‘bs $26.00 $12.00
a building at Indian Ground, St, jail awaiting trial on charges of Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith at Dis- ae Flag was flying that the jtal, the Marxist doctrine which was held and freely permitted him Valise See ac ; $20.00 $13.00
Peter, where it is expected ‘they inciting May Day riot involving ‘ict A” charged by the Police Bible Society was acting unim- they are building up.” _ to communicate with camp officials, | Canveai Bind: Casa the 4 1 20.00 0
will open a Boys’ Club. Many extreme rightwing militarists With breaking and entering the paged. f He said that the work in India —U.P. as ‘pp ase for 2 people aia $20. $13.0:
boys between the ages of 8 and 18 “gold shirts’ in which two persons house of Miriam Walker and steal- t ey had withdrawn their staff had fallen off badly since India | Basket Case for 2 people .. re $20.00 $13.00

are already enrolling. were killed and more than fifty ing a pair of shoes and kitchen Bible China to Hong Kong and gained her independence. RATOONS BURNT

Before the Club is opened, the injured. The twelve which in- utensils from the same dwelling ibles ‘were carried there by “We are trying hard.” he said,

building will be equipped. A cluded Carlos Sanchez of Farm- house. aes means, ss “but we are not doing nearly A quantity of ratoons and fod-
Police told the Advocate that, ers and Workers, affiliated with The charge states that the | ~9me years ago,” he said, “we enough, and I have given you an der was burnt when a fire occur-
apart from games, the Club will the Leftists Popular Party, were offence was committed on April eal. distribute about four of insight of the position of the! rai at Sedge Pond. St, Andrew, on
offer tuition in carpentry, tailor- held from more than 40 persons 11, Sgt. Murre’l is prosecuting but Red million Bibles in China; work today as it really is and it Thursday. The ratoons and fodde:
ing shoemaking and handicraft. U.P. on behalf of the Police. ut last year we were only abld is for you to help,” he said. are the property of peasants.

©
KNIGHTS LTD.







JOHN WHITE BHMARAeReeeee B

FOCTWEAR i R i ¢ il
SUPPLIES

GENTS’ PRIME CUT
IN STOCK













WILLOW CALF BROGUES
@ $12.52 pair
GENTS’ SUEDE BROGUES

In Brown, Navy and Black
@ $11.85 pair

GENTS’ WILLOW OXFORDS
From $8.32 to $12.52 pair

GENTS’ BOX CALF
OXFORDS

From $8.32 to $12.52

JOHN WHITE

means made just right



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CAVE SHEPHERD 6 C0, LID. Fg H. JASON JONES & ~Jse

'
|
10, 11, 12 & 13. BROAD STREET | | AGENTS

| = reese eeeee
<<




See Them on Display and Buy Early from

HARRISON'S BROAD ST.

ees eee R Bees
Sua easeBBBB8 hw & O



&















——————_— 7 —SSS








PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE


















































. a a"
Cc LA S S I F I E D AD S ee SHIPPING NOTICES |
“ IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY
BARBADOS
_____TELEPHONE 2508 IN PURSUANCE Chancery Act, 1906, I do hereby give notice to all] ———_._ __ tani eee eens
7 “ Pike persons having or ¢ ar estate, right or interest or any lien or tn- MONTRE. j 3 Oo : q oe
DIED - » PUmbrante in or uffecting the property hereinafter mentioned (the prepbrty .of | SrALAnD aes aes a , LLLSCSSOOSS SPSS FOSS, |
BRATHWAITE: Yesterday at the Gen- FOR SALE the defendaht)) to bring before me an account of their claims with their witnesses, “ANZ. LINED DS whe MV. CACIQUE DEL
era] Hospital, Mrs. Ophelia Brath-| documents and ¥ to be examined ty me on any Tuesday or_Friday be- SS, “TEKOA” 1s scheduled to gail CARIBE will accept Cargo and |
waite (wife of Mr. James F. Brath- Reet ‘aie tween the hour oon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration | ¢ro;, Adelaide February 15th Melbourne for St. Lucia, Gren- }
waite, Official Reporter of the House Office, Pub B Bridgetown, before the 4th day of J 1962 in March 2rd, Sydn March 10th, Bris- ada and Aruba. Passengers only i
' 5 ey .
of Assembly) Her funeral leaves - order that such ¢ may be reported and ranked according to na bane March 22nd arriving at Trinidad for St. Vincent. Sailing Today
her late residence Quas Road AUTOMOTIVF and priority thereof respectively, othe se such persons will be precluded from | about April 22nd and Barbados about ednesday 7th inst.
Carringten’s Village, St. Michael at} _ _ Pe ele 5 oe the benefits of decree and be deprived of all claims on or against the said! ania gsth. The M.V. CARIBBEZ will accept
4.30 o'eleek this afternoon for the} (aR—~One (1) Austin A.40 Car, late] Property | Tm addition to general cargo this ves- Cargo and Passengers for Dom-
Pilgrim Mpliness Church, Carrington’s| 95; model. Telephone 4821. D. V Oe zl 3 TCH {sel has araple space for chilled and hard iniea, Antigua, Montsérrat, Nevis
eee ane yas for the ae Seott & Co., Ltd 8.5.52—t.f.n., PLAINTIFF HUGH OWEN SAINT TAs CUMBERSAT frozen cargo. tas St. Kitts. Sailing Friday
ury ameter y friends are aske . z DEFENDANT T. D. SEALY CO., LIMITED ‘ Cargo accepted on through Bills of instant |
to pees F. Brathwaite (fusband CAR—Morris Oxford. Perfect condi- 1 of land situate nesr Warners er = spenepaent at Trinidad to Gan =v. E idainmnad wn eneset |
AMES .. rathwaite (Husband) 1 ” 9 ak sleph: 2949 PROPERTY ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate 8} Brit uiana, eward ‘and wa |
10.8,08 2. case ton; millenge 2.500. Selepnens ish of Christ Church and Island aforesaid formerly | tanga inica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
23.4.52—t.f.n in the parish o s , . ‘ si! cn
a mae “ait SS rr 7 fee genre ee — acaee eae or| Fort turtner particulars apply — — inte. Sailing Bridey
CAR—(1) M,G Coupe in perfect oun bce su. 3 rth m lands of ‘RNESS WIT’ : ¥ q
CURWEN: We the undersigned, desire|order. Apply Newcastle Plantation, St thereabouts abutting and bounding on one bog of Allen Walcott rote HY & CO., LTD., B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS
h tl ed e John ‘30.4. 52—t.f£.n Warners Plantation on the East on lands formerly - . ASSOCIATION (INC)
throug! a my a og orten the . aw cae but now of E. Best, M, H. H. Sullivan and the estate of J. E oe ané ©o: nee Tele, 4047
be Z TP oenereise : a 2 000 deceased on the South on lands of Graeme Hall Plantation DACOSTA & CO. LTD., masts:
funeral, paths an otherwise CAR-—One (1) 1951 Hillman 1%, he Public
WERE. re = i road, and on the West on the
condoled with-as in the death of the| miles. Perfect condition, going cheap. jands of Te Cox aie the same may abut and bound. BARBADOS. #.W.L
late Susan “Amelia Curwen. Prodgers, Little Hamilton, St. Lawrence] . , toad or ho ver else a
A. B. : (Brother), Mrs. Her-] Gap 8.5.52—n, | Pill filed: 29 Januany 1952 hence adit laimidintenin sili aii a tals den:
mene Holder a Family 10.5.52-—1n | —————$__________—__ | Date April, 1952 HH. WILLIAMS,

1948 Standard 8 Saloon in good

CAR, Registrar-in-Chancery










































































































































BRATHW. f" We the undersigned beg | rinning order, tyres good. Phone 405) 29.4.52—3n . ~~
Prato ae eu om a s\ HARRISON LINE
to ail-those~kind friends who sent Siccuptiiateinniadsmainis neonate
wreaths, letters of Condolence or ir CAR—One 1951 Hillman Car in perfect j
way €Xfféssed their sympathy ir dition. Done 4,000 miles. Phone J. H. PUBLIC NOTICES WANTED
u ae pect ecencnt = bod the ] emtage 5/42 or after hours 5105. ‘ es
dea a Edna trice rathwaite 7.5.62—6n ————$—$—
The 3 @nd Clarke Families. | ———__--- imie—enenines-al ee aaa ee aoe eee
ot Minsion , Brittons Hill CARS—1947 Vauxhall 14-6 Saloon in] UY¥NCH’S SECONDARY SCHOOL MISCELLANEOUS OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
excellent condition Price $1,500.00 ‘
os ao ro Applications are invited for the post PURCHASE
7 ber Hawk Saloon, one owner and ; WANTED TO
FOR 2 RENT | lr oat ile eae deal ee aaait service of senior Assistant Teacher qualified to Gramaphones, Victrolas, Pickups. Apply: Vessel From Leaves Due
Cole & Co., Ltd 10.5.52—an, }teach English and Mathematics up tO! Owen T. Allder, 118 Roebuck Street,| qo «uveRCHANT” Newport & Barbados
“EYAREVILLE”, Eagle Hall Road. | - | pece, Certificate standard. Apply | in| pial 3299. 6.5.62—2n | 5-S. Liv 5th May 18th May
and Dining rooms, 3 bedrooms ONE FORDSON UTILITY VAN-—Car- eee tating experience and qualifi-} a S.S. “COLUMBIA STAR” Li erpool 1th Ma: 20th M
ete. low at Welches Road, St. 7 passengers or 1% tons cargo |°#tons, A. MeD. FORDE a ‘ iverpool y ay
‘wihg and Dining rooms, miles per gal. Apply: McDonald 5 1 (Oran |S-S. “TRIBESMAN” London 10th May 28th May
acts’ roonis, garage &« aly. Dial 3322. 120 Roebuck Street om a CANADIAN COLYU i S.S. “SELECTOR” Gl &
Y¥ A. SCOTT . 9.5.52—8n. 3.5.52—2n. ey pj grated
“Dial 2645 ° Liverpool 17th May ist June
10,.5.52—2n CAR—Ford Prefect late 1950 model, NOTICE 9 ot brain erly idee gone:
von, Ph Tg ge Gemeral condition good ene ee Keer ee CURE
ARAWAY-—St. ilip coast, 3 bed- | 16,000 Apply: Withnall, Pon! ie, TIONS or one or more
fooms. Fully furnished. Lighting Plant. | ione 2409 8.5.52—t.f.n. vacant St. Michael's Vestry Exhibitions HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
temmili supp! € Port a et Harrison Colleg ‘ill ¥ ceived ~~ o
Soon eee bet Shae ak Erte CAR sail 25 h.p. with 6] by the Clark Of ths Vestry up to ‘2 to solve a 1& i Vessel For Closes in Barbados
4478. Ot + lle: conditio: Dial} moon on Friday, the 23rd da of May, 7 dears . .
ala lagi ences sigs mind i a. E panama wy Oo eae : Ps 3 ' “GRELROSA” Liverpool 10th May
FLAT AND HOUSE—Fully furnished. | ———___——— | Candidates must be the sons of ap HERDSMAN” London 19th Ma
St. Lawrence on Sea. Avaliable. April BEDFORD TRUCK 206” wheelbase | parishioners in straitened circumstances robles y
on. Phone 2803. We invite inspectio mplete with Cab and Platform New, | and must not be less thar r more LURES
mpe D. a .
for next Winter. 29.3.52-—t.f.n ir immediate delivery—Courtesy Gar-|than 15 years « or 20th Juhe. For further information apply to
aia iat atlas at stein in ae ge. Dial 4616 10.5. 52—6n. be ni ; by a e-em T es
MODERN STORE AND OFFICIES—One | - | which must accompany he TD.
modern Store and two oprces at No. 2° 3EDFORD 12 cwt. DELIVERY VAN: | @pplication | Atom scient DA COSTA & CO., L = Agents
even, Strest Apply to I Nicholls x for immediate delivery ny 4630 ce te ee Cena eet Canada’s Chalk R
‘fo, 18 Swan Street 8.6,52—4in. | Courtesy Garage S4a—n } y= Cc. REDMAN, search station are
NEWHAVEN — Crane Const, 4 bed ASSEY-HARRIS TRACTORS— book Clerk, St. Michael's Vest {| to use a £100,090 el
rooms. Fully furnis?ed, lighting Plant requirements of these Popular Trac- 10.5 e- brain” now on its . e
Watermill supply, Double Garage, three ws Now. (Wheel and pipes ie le agar RBG aie ae ERIE, rrens seam. + May and from Oc_| #16. Courtesy Garage 10.8.88=-8n NOTICE | = England ,
: Er a inaipeotwacaesiaita PARISH OF ST THOMAS j e robot brain will
: f hte vie TNUCK—One (1) 3-ton Austin Truck.) .,APPPLICATIONS for one or more, mathematical problems ee Inc.
PLYMOUMK, “Crane Coast—June and | Abr'y D.V. SCOTT & Co. Lid, White! Very dione col of the annual | “uglear physics. engine
July. Phone 2953. 4.5.52—t.f,n, | Park Road. aise a value of £5 will be received by the) ®nd astronomy, 100 time ba icliaciie
ROOSEVELT’ “Maxwell Coast. Fully | — a | undersigned ‘up to 20th May, 1902 OO i a NEW YORK SERVICE
a at Applicants must be = children machine is also likely
furnished. A’vailable 16th May. Phone ELECTRICAL parishioners in straitened circumstances,| be used in Canada’s de
‘ 5. 52—in oH
2224 10,5. 52—2 PEER RR catachtietal trea ee Bo EE A 8 rs of age oF fort te Teas 2 ote A STEAMER sails 18th Aprtil-- arrives Barbados 29th April, 1952.
TRINITY GoeeAGie_wully toraissed ONE COOLERATOR at Ruby Plan-| than 12 years on September 2nd 1992 nied solve av. A STEAMER sails 9th May— arrives Barbados 20th May, 1952.
7 ti , St Philip 10.5.52—2n 4 aptismal Certific must 2e a ae Ee ee a ae ae STS
three bedrooms, complete with — tele- m forwarded with the A ‘ r
5 orwi » Application Form, | ‘or the past 23 vears C NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
pa i Teper cater. ae a R ‘DIO ‘One (1) Mullard 8-Tube Radio which may be obtained from Parochial Ik dians have been produ
: mes: 91.4.69—t.t.n. | “2 ¢xcellent condition... 'F i rf FF: PITGRIM s per cent more than tn oe: A STEAMER sailed 10th April—arrives Barbados 26th April, 1952.
—PERSONAL a cf Parochial Treasurer preceding year, and h A STEAMER sails 24th April—arrives Barbados 10th May, 1952.
gg ET Ee RR a eT gs te ; 7 : sabia — —— LTT
I FR¢DGE—Westinghouse Fridge 3% c.f. 6t. Thomas doubled gross nation! p a
ERSONAL Exce lent condition. Ring Mr i Hughes 10.5.52—3n. | tion, according to Gifbert J : CANADIAN SERVICE
4112, after pm» 264. 52—4n. aaa eee " os ‘ ‘
The public are hereby warned against : CENTRAL CRICKET CLUB Son, Toronto economist, in r S6UrAROUND
giving crédit to anyone in my name @ | GARRARD 3-SPEED AUTOMATIC! ‘The grounds will be open for practice] SPecth here
1 do not hold mi self responstPle y name | -SANGERS—Just | received a limited| as from Monday igth May. ((anaga’s living | ¢osts. Name of Ship Sails from Arrived
unless by a writen, order signed by me Pa aoe early. P. C Rt ae E. D,’ FITZPATRICK, rising for years, have s é i Barbados
LL « Co. Ltd. 5.5.52—6n Hony. Secretary 1 a . > the bez ’ 8S. “ALCOA PILGRIM Montreal April 30th May 10th
" = Con ae hacl — 10.5.52—2n going down since the beginnin 8.8. “TINDRA ‘ Montreal May 16th May 26th
Black Rock, St. Michael. LIVESTOCK ; of this year. , S.8. “TISTA” Montreal May 20th June Sth
SSS onnetereenemeemennenntnentastsesiet NOTICE As a result, it is estima S.S. “EVROS” Montreal June 13th June 23rd
- ie , ye ¢ at ?
‘ COW—One Geurnsey Cow 28 pints PARISH OF 8” -HILIP Canadians will have a ‘ 5 :
ai rie att: ABBiy: OR. Kings: oppositek: Cihigia’ Gar teak ee cae an meth | this year totalling more tho: , NORTHBOUND Due Barbados
PP n the 12th to the 3ist May s.s EVROS May 14th
D AN Cc E Neils Gap, St, Michael days inclusive). The Office of the Paro-| £50 million. on P = ret ~ rt ar N#., and
10.5.52—2n.|chial Treasurer will be opened on The decline in living ¢ : wrence River Ports
sgt ——_—— Saturdays only from 9 a.m, to 11 a.m ‘ ‘ - .
in aid of MARE: One Bay Mare suitable for So WwW RCOFE, works out at an avers These vessels have limited passenger aceommodation
CABLE & WIRELESS ding or driving. Can be seen at Aysh- Parochial Treasurer, nearly 6s. a week for a

ord Plant. H earning £20. Renpeeeqeipiaaiete

Hutson Inniss



SPORTS CLUB

TOoNIGE
AT

. 10.5.52—2n London Express

ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE

























































% 1 3 7 y 7 a: a 7 — - _— 6
POULTRY ‘'ANNOUNCEME! Hiah Blood Pressure RB ip Apply DA COSTA & CO., LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE
PARADISE BEACH CLUB }}|—citiy — one importca Hampsnive Bae an b00d rressure
vr. Curwen’s «k, won 2nd e at last exhibition, . . rina s ‘
_" 3 aie ee o the Ist prize pullet and 3 otber] yrr Mende Dene Pee oe Kilis iM OPO EFSOSSOSOSSS
rchestra }] cts, "Appive "Brie Benny, ‘Bridge Gap,| MT) Mendes. | Denros, st. Lawrence nh
Dancing 9 — 3 a.m. ‘ack Rock, St. Michael. a ast eS ee. ora eT ees Twice as Many Women as men suf-
ADMISSION — $1.00 }} 7.5.52—2n. |" - fer from High Blood Pressure, which | $
|| pouumRe = pare Beg Laahon SALES | ingut'the time ot Change of tieand |
a) d y — Pure re eghorns, , ‘ yet , a e eof C @ 0} fe an
SS. iymouth Rocks and White Giani! PU Lai SALES is the real cause of much heart trouble | 3%
°° eee res \ Cockerels from imported stock $3,004 and later on of paralytic strokes. Com-
3 ch, Etiesmere, St. George, mon sy ol ood Pres-
2 x 1 ! | au Shey N Tua ee head hi t
0.5.62--2n, | re : Ne ,» headaches %
BOY ) REAL ESTATE ton and back of head and above eyes,
() for S § MECHANICAL } shee Jreso ace in head, digziness, short
iE , LAND Beautifull Graeme | breath, pains in heart, palpitation,
+ Hall Terrace, cee poor sleep, loss of memory and energy,
In stock. % CALCULAPOR- One original Odhner elonininitey. Two Toa oe 000 feet oe gmt. onaly: anne eho nae AED Mabe
. practically new and in first class condi- | p 4 5.5% y suffer any 0 hese symptoms, don’t
Orders accepted... . % tion. Dial 4689. a 5. 62-—4n — eich Sas Cinta ewioe Meg treatment « aingle day. because
@ oe your life may be in danger. Noxco
SHORTS FOR BOYS. %| WHEEL STRAKES: Reduce Tractor AUCTION (formerly known as Hynox), a new
Materi $] Wheel-spin considerably. In_ stock for | _ medical discovery, reduces High Blood
aterial (Ours or Yours) | Massey-Harris Mod. 744D— for other By inst ions reteived from Mr Pressure with the first dose, takes a
S| Practors on application—Courteay Gar- | Joseph Howard, Carter's Village, St. John. | heavy load off the heart, and makes
Prices Reasonable. Rj ace. Dial 4616. 10.5.52-6n | A Board and Shingled House | Shedroof| You feel years younger In a few days.
aaaevey Prot % attached, will be sold at Public Auction ret meaese freee Fame nee today. We am much pleasure in announcing that we have been
y . on Thursday, 15th May. feel al inted en for T Ind Assuran Co., Ltd.
Press Club Building crane a clietaeat hhetoneu eee eee (Incorporated in India 1919) with an authorised capiial of
53 Swan St. Dial 4718, %| AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT—Mas- A Rn Rue he with branches in Bangkok, Cairo, Singapore
% arria and other equipment includ- 7 —2n.}} y, ‘okyo, Rangoon, Nairobi and Karachi, and enci in the
. . : Grass Rakes, Grass Loaders, Fertil- | ~— i "ng
“eG O9SS% oF Bes . . arrears rennnnnen
PSSVOSSSOBOSLOSOSS | | Distributors, Bagasse Spreadq's, \ hy instructions ~yeceived from the ARRIVED United Kingdom, France, Germany, Holland, British Guiana,
o suitable for applying Filter-Press PDirector of Department of Highwavs & Jamaica, Trinidad, Dutch Guiana among other places.

Mud, Ashes and Pen Manure, and other | Transport I will set up for Sale by public Another Shipment of the

We are in a position to advise you on insurance prob-














1 1 yroes Implements Courtesy Garage,fauction at their Yard.on Tuesday the ems, rin, FIR
WINDWARD CRICKET vial 4616 10.5.52—6n! 1Sth beginning at 2 p.m. the following POPULAR i risks). e, E, (against property, furniture, stock with
SUSIN ean ———— | items ) Shovels, (100 Buckets $4180 GAS COOKERS . MA
CLUB BUSINESS REQUIREMENTS — Docv | .41) Sheeting Forks’ (28) Agricultural MARINE, CARS AND OTHER VEHICLES
ment safes, cabinets, presses, desks, fans | Forks, 39) Steel Brooms, (25) Pick A tew of these have not yet including THIRD PARTY RISKS. R
pewriters, adding machines, and othe | a (480) Bass Brooms, (37) Wheel been booked.
NOTICE TO MEMBERS fice and business requirements. K. ® | Barrows, (22) Smail Rakes, (19) Paint Prices of next shipment will be All Claims Promptly settled.
unte & Co., Lid. Lower Broad Street, | Brussss' and several_other items higher. - ‘
: ial 5136. 5.53! , HAYNE
Members are hereby noti- Thi eeinsiiasiiabncage ecu ane RE A. BCOTE, |, Why not call at your Gas Show- S and GRIFFITH
) a Govt. Auctioneer, Dist. “A rooms, Bay Street TO-DAY and
CAR TYRES REMOULDED-—Sizes 500— ;

fied that the grounds will 10.5.52—8n

High Street

Phone 4173.

secure one of these cookers.



































be open for practice on Gathers ae age 8... Oona
Tuesday 13th May. ‘Trafalgar Store, Trafalgar Street. Dial UNDER THE DIAMOND |! 86 POCO CCCP EOP OEE
N. C. THORNTON a ae eee HAMMER
4 By instructions received I will sell at

Secretary.
9,5,52—3n,

the house called “Ofmondville’, situat
at Bash Hali on Wednesday next I4th
begirning at 12.30 p.m. a collection of
housthold furniture including Mahog

mattress and drop side, one baby’s wash-
stand one Baby's High Chair. Telephone

5080 or 2351. J. A. Lewis







8.5.52—3n









| CRADLE — One Baby's Cradle with
th

on (1) Thermometer Stirring Rod, LOST & FOUND

Frank Watkins, Blue Waters, Rockley

Cebinets, Dining room Chairs, Rush bot-
Shairs, Cz B thes drawers,
AMERA—One (1) Rolicicord Camera | Munog. Bedstend, “Mirror, Carget ane
‘ F 3.5 Zenar coated Lense, §yn- | other items of interest Terms Cash
ronised for flash, cvicplete with DARCY A. SCOTT.
‘ carrying case, $150.00, Auctioneer : ' ‘ ‘
Four (4) daylight developing twnks. | 49 5 52—3n
PALACE adjustable from 35 m,m. to 61L, $6.60} 000" iit has it. a
ecch |

oO ING,

HEADQUARTERS FOR









SOUVENIKS Phone 8412, 9.6.58-a0. 2 \
FROM INDIA, CHINA & DEXIE CUPS- -For Ice Cream or Water, LOST \ y/
CEYLON iso for Dentists. Special prices for piesa tater ot i
large quantities. Knight's Ltd. ET NOTE BOOK Yontaining
: - - 9.5,.52—2n Race Tickets, Cane Tickets, also envelope eee oh eer ras



with Receipts and Bills for C. D. Jordan
Reward offered on returning same to
Advocate Advertising Dept.

THANI'S

rr. Wm. Hy. St. Diai 3466

FLOWERED SEERSUCKER—far your
or Bedspread, lovely designs
Quality too $1.06 yard at
, 52 Swan Street

7.5.52-——2n



et














10.5.52—1n | SWEEPSTAKE TICKET — Series W.
POSTS heseaue iol _______... | 484. Finder please return same to
ARDEN HOSE: Carden Hose | Dudley Jones. Shaban, St Sonn. ‘
© Wwe PLAGE id Fittings, City Garage Co., Victoria my, 03—to
TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH B)oe sce he et i en
{nit The Boys Have. (OUSEHOLD EQUIPMENT of all FOR SALE
e Boys Have ceceription, Owen T. Allder, 118 Roebuck | ———-——-—_----——---—_-—
Been Waiting For treet, Dial 3299 10.5.52-t.f.n MISCELLANEOUS





ween ces ake “The ORDS—Clearing our stock of MGM

“VAT—One (1) 6,000 gallon Oak Vat —







Necords. Three for Two Dollars, your | y .

. SAPS ole , apply D. V. Scott & Co., Ltd., White

PISTOLS AND CAPS choice. A. BARNES & CO , UTD. be. [Bark Road 1.5, 52—t.f.n
Closing Out Sale of —aeionesvoinra> WATCHES—Just received 17_ jewel

ALL ENAMEL PAINTS Subscribe now to the Dally Telegraph | Rolled Gold Automatic Waterproof Wrist

ive tk Benue te Newspaper now | Watches with the latest “ROTOMATIC"
5 VERY ernece sg r only @ fe winding system, also in stoc ris
— days’ after publication jn London, Con- | Watches from $9.25 up. Obtainable at
and techy ae Gale, c/o Advocate Co,, Ltd. }A, L. Waithe, Jeweller. Cor. James and
HA ¥ .ocal Representative, Tel. 3118 soleridae 8 OW ireie. 3253
RDWARE $ e ark book an. Coleridge Streets ele ah Can wl
248 | BOILING STOVE















At the sound of the fire alarm, your first though......

Where Is The Fire ?

FURNISH

NOW IT’S EASY

The Money Saving Way Is it your house, furniture, stock, going up in smoke?








|
|
Popular Bureaus, Bedsteads, + . ©
Sette gl cd tna ees | Are You Covered ?
Spray TAB ES for Dis ng
en and Fancy use, Larder a z
Waggons, fon Protas, site. |I}}§ If not this will be a total loss to you. Be prudent!
SE et ann Rae Bes ‘Act now!’ Insure your house, FURNITURE and
$5.50 up — DRAW ROOM 1 STOCK without delay. Tomorrow, even now you ;
FURNITURE, Rush Furniture fo se We ¥60 lat ;
S, yrewriter, am other .
Nice Things-ALL AT MONI | Ring, call or consult............ “ssenen gee wai
: a TWO-8
9 NEW INDIA ASSURANCE €0.,° LTD |
0. 1D." “THE FAMILY FALKS — FOR HAPPY HOMES’)
E. S. WILSON | se ; : { ss
Bree STREET. DIAL 4009 | Agents: Haynes and Griffith, High St.—4178 )

——

\ STOKES & BYNOE LTD. — AGENTS





Se cn =





| Monday— 10.00 a.m.—12 Noon

Tuesday— 4.30 p.m—6.00 p.m. ..
Wednesday—4.30 p.m.—6.00 p.m. ..
Thursday—4.30 p.m.—6.00 p.m.

Friday — 4.30 pm—6.00 p.m. ..

attend 75% of their classes.

SATURDAY, MAY 10, 1952

GOVERNMENT NOTICES





HOUSECRAFT CENTRE, BAY STREET

The following programme of Day and Evening Classes will open

jat the Housecraft Centre, Bay Street, from Monday, 19th May to
| Friday, ist August, 1952.

Cake and Pastry Making.
Simple Cutting and Sewing.
Sweets and Preserves.

Simple Dress Cutting & Sewing
Assorted Dishes.

Smocking.

Cake and Pastry Making
Elementary Pattern Drafting.
Caribbean Cookery.

Simple Dressmaking.
Elementary Cake Icing.
Advanced Dressmaking.
Butlering.

Advanced Handicrafts.
Registration for all classes will take place at the Housecraft Centre,

2.00 p.m.—4.00 p.m.

4.30 pm.—6.00 p.m.

Bay Street, between 10.00 a.m. and 12 noon, and between 2.00 p.m.
and 5.00 p.m. on Wednesday, 14th and Thursday, 15th May, 1952.

Fees for all classes must be paid in advance for the term, at the

time of registering.

5/- for each course in Sewing, Pattern Drafting, Smocking and

Handicrafts.

15/- for each course in Cake & Pastry Making, Cake Icing, Assorted

Dishes, Caribbean Cookery, Butlering, Preserves and Sweets Making.

2/- will be refunded at the end of the term to all students. who
7.5.52.—2n.



THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951

The Governor-in-Executive Cdmmittee, pursuant to section 3 (2)

(a) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951, hereby
causes this notice to be published of his intention to make the Order
set out below declaring the manufacture of wax and wax products to
be a pioneer industry and wax and wax products from sugar cane
to be pioneer products of that industry.

2. Any person who objects to the making of the Order set out

below is hereby invited to give notice in writing of his objection and
of the grounds on which he relies in support thereof to the Clerk
to the Executive Committee on or before the 2ist day of May one
thousand nine hundred and fifty-two so that due consideration may
be given to any objections received pursuant to this notice.



ORDER

THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951
The Pioneer Industry (WAX and WAX PRODUCTS) Order, 1952

The Governor-in-Executive Committee, in exercise of the powers

conferred on him by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Encour-
agement) Act, 1951, hereby makes the following Order :—

1. This Order may be cited as the Pioneer Industry
(Wax and Wax Products) Order, 1952.

2. The manufacture of wax and wax products is hereby
declared to be a pioneer industry and the following articles are
hereby declared to be pioneer products of that industry :—

Wax and wax products from sugar cane.

Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this
day of one thousand nine
hundred and fifty-two.
By Command,
Clerk, Executive Committee.
29.4.52—3n.

THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951

The Governor-in-Executive Committee, pursuant to section

3(2)(a) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951, hereby
causes this notice to be published of his intention to make the Order
set out below declaring the spinning and knitting of cotton yarn
and the manufacture of garments therefrom to be a pioneer industry
and the spinning and knitting of cotton yarn from West Indian
cotton and the manufacture of garments therefrom to be pioneer
products of that industry.

2. Any person who objects to the making of the Order set out

.| below is hereby invited to give notice in writing of his~objection and
% of the grounds on which he relies in support thereof to the Clerk
,|to the Executive Committee on or before the 21st day of May one
%| thousand nine hundred and fifty-two so that due consideration may
be given to any objections received pursuant to this notice.



ORDER
THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951

The Pioneer Industry (SPINNING AND KNITTING OF COTTON
YARN AND THE MANUFACTURE OF GARMENTS) Order, 1952

The Governor-in-Executive Committee, in exercise of the powers

conferred on ‘1im by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Encour-
agement) Act, 1951, hereby makes the following Order :—

1, This Order may be cited as the Pioneer Industry
(Spinning and Knitting of Cotton Yarn and the Manufacture of
Garments) Order, 1952.

2. The spinning and knitting of cotton yarn ang the manu-
facture of garments therefrom is hereby declared to be a pioneer
industry and the following articles are hereby declared to be
pioneer products of that industry :—

The spinning and knitting of cotton yarn from West Indian

cotton and the manufacture of garments therefrom.

Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this
day of one thousand nine
hundred and fifty-two.
By Command,
Clerk, Executive Committee.
29.4.52—3n.



THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951
The Governor-in-Executive Committee, pursuant to section

3(2)(a) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951, hereby
causes this notice to be published of his intention to make the Order
set out below declaring the manufacture of sugar confectionery and
nut food products to be a pioneer industry and boiled confectionery,
lollipops, mints and icing sugar, and every variety of nut food
products to be pioneer products of that industry.

2. Any person who objects to the making of the Order set out

jar yd is hereby invited to give notice in writing of his objection and
of the
to the
thousand nine hundred and fifty-two so that due consideration may
be given to any objections received pursuant to this notice.

guns on which he relies in support thereof to the Clerk
xxecutive Committee on or before the 2lst day of May one



ORDER
THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951

The Pioneer Industry (SUGAR CONFECTIONERY AND NUT FOOD

PRODUCTS) Order, 1952
The Governor-in-Executive Committee, in exercise of the powers

conferred on him by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Encour-
agement) Act, 1951, hereby makes the following Order :—

1. This Order may be cited as the Pioneer Industry
(Sugar Confectionery and Nut food products) Order, 1952.

. The manufacture of sugar confectionery and nut food
products is hereby declared to be a pioneer industry and the
following articles are hereby declared to be pioneer products of:
that industry :—

boiled confectionery, lollipops, mints and icing sugar, and
every variety of nut food products.
Made by the ,Governor-in-Executive Committee this
day of one thousand nine
hundred and fifty-two
By Command,
Clerk, Executive Committee.
29.4.52—3n,

THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951
The Governor-in-Executive Committee, pursuant to section



4%(2)(a) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951, hereby
causes this notice to be published of his intention to make the Order
set out below declaring the manufacture of ham, bacon and meat-
curing to be a pioneer industry and ham, bacon and other food
products produced from meat of locally-reared pigs to be pioneer
products of that industry,

2. Any person who objects to the making of the Order set out

below is hereby invited to give notice in writing of his objection and
of the grounds on whith he relies in seugest

to the Executive Committee on or before the
thousand nine hundred and fifty-two so that due consideration may
be given to any objections received pursuant to this notice.

thereof to the Clerk
2ist day of May one



ORDER
THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951
The Pioneer Industry (HAM, gs AND MEAT-CURING)

Order, 1f '
The Governor-in-Executive Committee, in exercise of the

conferred on him by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Encour-
agement) Act, 1951, hereby makes the following Order :—

1, This Order may be cited as the Pioneer Industry
(Ham, Bacon and Meat-curing) Order, 1952.

2. The manufacture of ham, baion and meat-curing is
hereby declared to be a pioneer industry and the following
— are hereby declared to be ‘pioneer products of that
industry :—

Ham, bacon and: other food produwets produced from meat of

locally-reared pigs.

Made by the Governor-inm-Executive
day of
hundred and fifty-two.
By Command,
Clerk, Executive Committee.
f 29.4.52—3n.

Committee this
one thousand nine


SATURDAY, MAY 10, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN
cae sensei es a nents a eh ES eNRERRReTRRNRLe Sena







HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON |




Quick! —put a few drops

of Vicks Va-tro-nol up
each nostril. Irritation is
soothed, your nose“‘opens



up” and .you breathe
freely again! Va-tro-nol

often helps prevent bad
colds ind 4 flu.

vicxs VA-TRO-NOL

NOSE DROPS

“BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES p K K kK
\ ne ele teene| | Nin saan ee
9 > ; , wy | -
° se
| If you knew her secret ~
| you, too, could be more :
charming, lovely, attractive

On, LAUR! — THE PAST IS
CATCHING UP WITH VOU!
... and the secret of her attractiveness
is Odo-Ro-No. Don’t let offending
underarm odour spoil your natural
freshness.
@ Odo-Ro-No safely stops perspi- ,,
ration and odour fora full 24 hours. mn
@ Odo-Ro-No stays creamy lon

i
|
| —never gets gritty even in open
@ No deodorant cream is so harm-
less to fabrics as Odo-Ro-No.
@ No deodorant cream is gentler
















FIMAD ANY SENSE, 1D GO |
STRAIGHT TO FLINT AND

TELL HIM SEVERN'S AFTER
THAT JEWELLERY..

A REMINDER





000











to even sensitive skin, and it is so
easy to use.

QDO-RO-NO

gi CREAM

DAISY. 1 WANT YOU TO
SET A GOOD EXAMPLE FOR
THE PUPS AND TAKE THIS
TONIC LIKE YOURE

fj. ENJOYING IT
4G}

1 TT CANT CATCH THE
| C pups To Give THEM
oe m{ THEIR SPRING TONIC
AL? —wie os

sl wr TARY




TO - DAY.

{ ei The
ee) deodorant
ae ~—s without
Re . gs a doubt





) IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

Pe —— ~ —- +
















































FLASIi GORDON oo _CBY_DAN BARRY SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only
a z Pa eee PR CNP — ——eeeSe———— EE ——————————— z ia
. IT'S THE ATOMIC PILE f Bae Wee oe eae SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Branches Tweedside,
/ WE’V i 4 . ‘ ‘
Wits THE ROARING ATOMIC PILE WIDE OPEN, FLASH'S TAXED IT TOO: HARD / DRAIN OR ‘THE PILE NOW, THIS SHIP! Speightstown and Swan Street
{ Gear? put FRICTION ie tans a chee SHE'S DRAINING MOST WILL BURN ITSELF OuT!) WILL DROP

fees OF HER POWER AS Usually Now Usually Now ?
7 WHAT'S THE MaTTER! x 4}
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PAGE EIGHT













—— — me

The Indian Touring Team i





BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, MAY 10, 195









WEIGHTLIFTING AND
BODYBUILDING

Sports Window

iy EDWIN

TODAY I will t 1 Ly
reade he ya < the
histor of Weightlift Many
people t
themselv«
origin of this ex: here
also r

weigh
few years ago



Bob Hoffman, the wor
ing Physical Instruc
lifting, states in
Health” maga
ago, porn
sands of
countries,
practised with rounded , sticks
thrust through stones, mill stone
like in appearance, in which hole
had been drilled. For. thousands oi
years this progressive principie of
training has been known. Teach
the body to carry a little more, to
overcome a little more resistance
each training day, and in time it
will become strong enough to
perform physical work which
seems startling to the untrained.
Milo proved this principle thou-
sands of years ago by carrying a
calf from the time it was a few
weeks old until it becan
powerful bull. In the proce
the animal grev in ize
weight, Milo ¥ in sh
unti] he bec :
man in the world, t inné
the Olympic Games in restl










golan









for a period oO i 1 ve
years.”

Three hundred year
leading phy traine
England said, “train with welg
and your weapon.” More than two
thousand years ago the Grecks
and Romans worked on the vver-

load principle, training their men
with leaden shoes and with
weights to make them strong
enough to fight a long time

Almost a century ago, there is

on record that certain outstanaing

strong men trained reguiariy with

weights and not too different;
from how we do toda Befor«
and after the Civil War, ambitiou
youths in America were settir

records in the various ,accepted
methods of weightlifting, Fo

example, Bill Curtis, who late
became known as Father Bil
Curtis, set records in 1868 which

have never yet been broken. In ¢



the middle weight class, weighin
not more than 168 lbs., at the time,
Curtis. seta record of Curling
two 100-lb., dumbelis,



Great emphasis was placed upon
training with very heavy weights
in those days. Back, hip, harness
hand and thigh lifting, and the

men who excelled in these were
those who were good at jumping,
rowing and other sports popular
then. These weightliftin’ pioneer



had already learnt what has
proven to be so true today, That
any man can improve himseli
physically, at his chosen sport
through weight training

We are writing of a long time
ago, even the elosing decades of

the last century is a long time.
In the seventies and ¢ ghties there
were many strong men wou, sh-
out the world setting re ords, The
best known of these ave Jefferson

who set records in what is still
called the Jefferson Lift trad-
die iift and Carl Abs, the big
German who was the _ first _to
ut 330 pounds over his head.
hen there are the men 50 well

known today who first came to 9

fame in the eighties and nineties
in America. Sandow, Saxon anc
Cyr. believed by many to have
been the strongest men who ever

lived, Hackenschmidt still re-
nowned as the greatest wre ter
of all time, and hundreds more

These men set fabulou records
with the weights and mae phy
jgues compare favourably with
Se best ie in the Mr, America
contest, Bobby Pandow and
Eugene Sandow being tht most
famous of these.

It is reasonable to believe that
these men knew something, in
fact a, great deal, about physica
training to have developed such
strength and well developed bod-
jes that they are still famous
today. While they did not have
the advantage of the same type
of adjustable weights we have
today, these men of the closing
decades of the last century and
the opening years of this century
knew much about physical train-
ing, In 1902 Alan Calvert offered
the first adjustable Barbells

As the greatest honour went
to the man who put the most
weight overhead, any styl
continental typas of lifting
practised most. The be
the side press and the continent
press with one hand anc he
various forms of pressing and
jerking with two hand Later
and very long ago too, many othe:
weightlifting feats ‘were popular,
but the Snatches and Cleans, the











ROGERS



EDWIN ROGERS

ctised in the closing years of
ie last century.
As we come down the ages, the
ords set up and broken by the
ugmen, we can contemplate
how popular weightlifting has
Viost countries have
thtlifting contests run along
ciation lines.
than ever as we look
zh the records of Weight-
and Body building with
ve feel as Confucius, the
inese Philosopher said,
© truly nothing new un-









; have been known
such a long time, that there
i iothing new about them,



Summerhayes
Tennis
Tournament

The Men’s Doubles Finals game
Hetween Dr. A. S. Cato and Col.
Duke vs, D. A. Wiles and E£, R.
Aikinson was played yesterday
fternoon but was unfinished, the
wre being in favour of Wiles and
\tkinson 3—6, 9—7, 8—6.



It is hoped that the match will
replayed on Wednesday next
when the trophies for the Doubles
nd Singles Championships will be
presented.

Today's Fixture

Men’s Singles Final
L. A. Harrison vs. V, H. Chen-
ery.



In addition to the Singles Cup
the winner of this match will re-
ceive a Max Ply racquet very
bindly presented by Messrs, Wil-
liam Fogarty (B’dos) Ltd.



Basketball



H.C., PICKWICK DEFEAT
M.H.S., FORTRESS

Harrison College defeated Mod-
ern High School 43—19, and
Pickwick defeated Fortress 40—
21 in their basketball fixtures
played at Y.M.P.C. last night,

For MNarrison College Gibson
had the highest score with 18

goals. Daniel scored 10

Archer scored 12 times for
Modern High School,

Davis 14, and Mrs, McKenzie
10, helped Pickwick on to their
viclory. Roecheford scored 8 goals
for Fortress,

The matches which were to
have been played tonight at
Y.M.P.C, have been postponed.

Practice Match

A practice match of the Barba-
dos Friendly Football Association
will be played at Shell on Sun-
cay, May 11th. Following are the

teams!—



‘A” team—White Shirts.

Goal: R. Pinder, Backs: D.
Haydes. R. Denny; Half-backs: E.
MeCollin, D. Norville, C, Phillips,
Forwards: H. Maughan, R. Harris,
H. Clarke, R. Thorne, C. Year-
wood,

‘B” team:Coloured Shirts,

Goal: A. Dummett; Backs: C.
Barker, G. Alleyne; Half-backs:
C. Maitland, D. Forde, S. Black-
man; Forwards: E. Linton, C.

nes, D. Olton, R. Haynes, V.

sun,” All the exercises

LONDON.

This sumumer the fifth Indian
touring team will be playing in
England. In the past, such per-
sonalities as the immortal Ranjit-
inhji and his nephew ‘Duleep’
enthralled the English spectator
with their majestic batting. More
recently, on their last tour in 1946
the Nawab of Pataudi, Merchant
and Mankad continued the tradi-
tion and brought great delight t
all who watched them,

This year, who knows? Will the
tour unearth another ‘Ranji’ or
Mankad? Cricket is a notoriously
unpredictable game. For ex-
umple, before the West Indies
toured England two years ago,
the names Valentine and Rama-
chin were unknown in the cricket
world; at the end of the tour,
however, these two young West
Indian bowlers had _ established
themselves in the forefront of
world cricketers.

To English crowds, most of the
tourists are unknown. Exception:

re Hazare, this year’s captain,
Sarwate and Shinde who came
with Pataudi’s side in 1946,
Divecha who played for Oxford
University in 1950 and 1951, and
Umrigar and Ramchand who have
both played League cricket

On their first day’s practice at
Lords, they had a taste of the
weather they may experience
this summer. There was a keen

wind, and many of them wort
two sweaters

I chatted with Hazare, whose
slightly greying hair gives him a
decidedly distinguished appear-

ince. He told me that the side
would endeavour to provide the
spectators with attractive cricket.

I asked him whether they would

miss Mankad, who will be play-
ing in Lancashire League cricket,
and who would replace hin He
replied that any player with the
ibility of Mankad, one of the
greatest slow left arm bowlers
in the world and also a good bat,
is bound to be missed, and_ would
be diffieult to replace. Bul he
added that Ghulam Ahmed, right
hand off-breaks, and Shinde, leg-
breaks and googlies, both spis the
bail well. And that Mankad
would not be called upon.

Despite the cold weather, both
Shinde and Ghulam Ahmed ‘were
spinning the ball viciously in the
nets, and they may give the Eng-
lish batsmen a _ great deal of

‘ouble.

Tisthre would say little of his
own chances, but it is on his
shoulders that the role of chief
run-getter may fall. For although
Merchant, who was the most pro-
lific scorer on the 1946 tour, and
is in Britain for a medical check-~-
up, has announced if fit, he will
offer his services, there 1s only an
outside chance of him playing
This means that of the batsmen
only Hazare and Umrigar have ex-
perience of English conditions.

In the nets Hazare displayed
that calm efficiency which inspires
confidence in others, and it was
obvious that whatever other Ope.
partments India may be lacking
in this season, it will not be

santainey
; “His final remark will he echoed
by all ericket lovers, “We pisy
hetter with the sun on 9Ur backs,
and we are looking forward to a
fine summer.” fies

ere are brief sketches of the
aottteal plavers: HAZARE, Vilny
<-muel (Baroda) (Captain). Born
1915, Has scored more centuries
then any Indian cricketer with the



"County Cricket

LONDON, May 9.

At Lords Middlesex beat Derby-
shire by nine wickets. Derbyshire
215, Rhodes 60, and secondly 90.

oss five for 15.
ee Middlesex 234, Denis Compton
85, Rhodes four for 46 and sec-
ondly 72 for one.

‘At Oxford, the Oxford Univer-
sity and Yorkshire match was
drawn, Yorkshire 409 for eight
declared. Hutton 65, Wilson 154,
Halliday not out 126. Oxford Uni-
versity 131. :
ae ‘Birmingham, the Warwick-
shire-Hampshire match was aban~-
doned because of rain. Warwick-
shire 189 for eight declared. Hamp-
shire did not bat. ‘

At Cambridge, the Cambridge
University - Essex match was
drawn, Essex 242. Dodds 50, and
secondly 197 for five declared.
Dodds 56, Gibb 62, Horsfall not
out 56. Cambridge University 208,
Sheppard 113 and secondly 220 for
seven, Sheppard 64, May not out

4.
ag —UP.



Sands Beats Bourke

MELBOURNE, May 9.

Dave Sands retained his British
Empire and Australian Middle-
weight boxing titles by knocking
out Al Bourke, Champion of Vic-
toria in the fifth round here to-
night.

It was Sands’ first defence of
the title since he won it in Sep-
tember 1949 by beating Dick Tur-
pin of Britain in the first round.

By a Cricket Correspondent

exception of Ranjitsinhji and
Duleepsinhji Shares with Gul
Mohammed the world record
highest partnership, 577 for 4th
wicket v Baroda (he was then
playing for Maharashtra) at Poona
in 1939-40. Also holds the
monopoly record, 309 out of 389
Hindus (Bombay) the same

ear is a medium pace swing
and off-break bowler Toured
England im 1946 scoring 244 not
out against Yorkshire and 193 no
out against Middlesex Has play-
ed Lancashire League cricket i
which in 1950;he became one of
the few cricketers to complete the
‘double’ of 1,000 runs and 190
wickets. *'
ADHIKARI, Hemu Ramchandra
(Services XI) (vice-captain) Born
1919. A brilliant cover fielder
and attractive right hand batsman
Played in all five Tests against the
West Indies and three against the
MCC. Highest score 233 not out
inst Rajasthan in 1951-52
SHOWDHURY, Nirode Ranjan
(Bengal). Born 1923. Opening
howler with no reputition as
batsman. Has played in one Test
against the West Indies and one
against the MCC.

DIVECHA. Ramesh Vithaidao
(Bombay). Born 1927. No strange:
to England. Twice appeared for
Oxford against Cambridge in 1999
and 1951, and for Gentlemen
Players in 1951. Can bowl meéd-
ium-pace or off-spinners, Is a
useful batsman in a crisis. Has







not yet hit a century in first-class

cricket but appeared in two Tests
against the MCC last season, Will

probably open the bowling in

Tests this summer

GAEKWAD, Dattajerae Krish-

narao (Baroda) Zorn 1928. A



right-hand batsman who was 12th
man in three Tests against the
MCC. Made three centuries in
the 1950-51 Ranji tournament
Good fielder in the covers.
FAEKWAD, Hiraial Ghasulal
(Holkar). Born 1923, Has heavy
responsibility for he has been
brought in as replacement for



Mankad. Is slightly quicker than

most left-arm bowlers and can
also swing the new ball. In heavy

atmosphere may open attack. Also

bats left-handed,

GHULAM AHMED (Hydera~

bad). Born 1922. An. off-spin-

ner who really believes in spinning
the ball. Played in three Tests

against the West Indies and two
against the MCC. Against Holkar
in, 1950 set up world record by
bowling 555 balls in an innings,
beating the existing record of 5
by Valentine for the West Indie:
against England in the Third Test
at Nottingham in 1950. Claimed
nine wickets in the innings against
Madras at Secunderabad 1947-48.
GOPINATH, Coimbatareo Dor-
aikannu (Madras) 3orn 1930. A
forcing right-hand bat who is ex-
ceptionally strong on the off-side
feat fielder and catcher in the
deep. Played in three Tests against
the MCC. ‘sn
MANJREKAR, Vijay Laxman
(Bombay). Born 1931. The
youngest player in the side. Asa
boy scored two double centuries
in school cricket. Has also scored
‘wo double centuries in Ranji
trophy matches. Quick on his fect

tnd a fine stroke player. Played |

in two Tests against the MCC and
was twelfth man.in the Final Test

AS
MANTRI, Madhay (Bombay), g

Born 1922. Wicket-keeper bats-
man who holds Indian record of
nine victims (4 ct. 5 st.) in an
innings. Opened in one Tese
against the MCC when he showed
much promise, Will rival Sen for
a vlace in the Test team
PHADKAR, Dattaray (Bombay),
3 rn 1925. A fine all rounder
who is expected to be one of the
Stors of the side. Has played
League cricket and so is well ac-
ovainted with English climate. Can

A. OBGSY*

- SUNDAY’S ADVOCATE
‘ and win
$25.00
@
: AT THE SAME TIME YOU CAN HELP . THE
‘ FARNUM FOR FINLAND FUND. ;





WORLD'S MOST

against fast bowling.
for Bombay
Maharashtra at Bombay

West Indies an

100 wickets

RAMCHAND, Gopinath

selection but an attractive cricket-

As a batsman once scored 230

not out in 200 minutes for
“against Maharashtra.

1 fast-medium bowler who gets a

lot of pace off the pitch.

ROY Pankaj
Barring accidents is certain
to be India’s opening batsman. His
izgregate of 387 runs in the five
Tests against the MCC last season

dekut in 1947 and celebrated by
coring a century—one of the few
batsmen to have
defensively
attacks the

SA RAWATE, Chandrashekhr

bowler who can also bat.
Surrey on the



stand of 249 which is
England. Has toured Austr



the West Indies.

9 for 61 against Mysore in 1945-46,

wicket-keeper position. Has tour-
ed Australia and ‘kept in all five
Test against the West Indies. Also

Scored 132 for Bengal against Hol-
kar in 1943, his second first-class

COMPANY

and googly
right-hand bat.
«members of the present t
toured England in 1946.
in first Test on that

One of the thre





siderably and appeared in one Tes
gainst the West Indies and thr
against the MCC.





Phadkar, probably the best known
member of the side. Is nicknamed
in Lancashire
cricket for two years.

fielder in any position. Also bowls
Played in one
Test against the West Indies and
il! five against the MCC, He made
in the last game

medium pace.

Maharashtra in 1951-52.

a aca cic tie i.

’
PCCP OO FR.



» reminded of a

Grand Dance

which will be given by
NORMAN LASHLEY



MARCHFIBLD SOCIAL

on MONDAY NIGHT
12th’ May, 1952
ADMISSION; ¢

Mr. Percy Green
*
»
66 SCVOOCSSES

«, ~
PRPOPOSO PPP OPP OED

LOOK

LPL PPPPF PFS OO

OPIED TRACTS

EMPIRE and Carlton meet
at Kensington this afternoon
in the first semi-final game of
the Knock-out Competition.

Empire were runners-up to
Notre Dame in the Senior
Competition this season and
also gained the honour of be-
ing the only team to defeat
the champions this season.

Carlton on the other hand
have been improving with
every game and the match this
afternoon should be interest-
ing.





WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY
Rainfall from Codrington;
-O1 in,
Total rainfall for month to
date .21 in,
Highest Temperature:
87.5 °F.
Lowest Temperature:
74.0 °F.
Wind Velocity 9 miles per
hour
Barometer’ (9 a.m.) 30.004
(3 p.m.) 29.927
TO-DAY
Sunrise; 5.40 a.m.
Sunset: 6.16 p.m.
Moon: Full, May 9.
Lighting 7.00 p.m.
High Tide: 3.36 a.m., 4.45
p.m.
Low Tide; 10.26 a.m., 10.20
p.m,





WHAT’S ON TODAY

Meeting of Chamber of Com-

merce at 10.00 a.m.

Police Band at Girl Guides

Fair, Garrison 3.00 p.m.

Football at Kensington 5.00

p.m.



ACCOUNTANCY,
COST ACCOUNTING.

BOOK-KEEPING

An “Intensive Method” Course

of Diploma as Associate

Commer





READING ROOM

“The right way wins the right
of way, even the way of Truth
and Love whereby all our depts
are paid, mankind blessed, and

God glorified”

From ‘Miscellany".

by Mary Baker Eddy
This book



Saturdays 10 a.m. to 12 o*clock
ALL, ARE WELCOME





Barn Dance

at
THE BARBADOS AQUATIC

CLUB
Local and visiting members only)
Saturday, 31st May
at 9 p.m.

Music by
“CARIBBEAN
TROUBADOURS”
Admission to Ballroom
$1.00

10.5. 52-—4n.





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14>cli> and President of the Shipping Federation of Canada *-' 11 • %  OTU told members of the Press at a conference at LO* Messrs. Gardiner Austin's building yesterday afternoon ' m ..r i,n* U.K.. Hah Sign Pad capt. Clarke who arrived here vesterdav moriuiiR b\ the Lady Nelson from Trinidad said thai his visi* to the Tl West Indies had nythintf lo do with the annoui drawal of the "Lady Boats", but was just another routine visit in connection with their operations in the area. Capt Clark* said: Sir John Saint To Probe Grenada Sugar Industry GRENADA, May it. During the part two or three years It has been nude known, both officially and unofficially that last year was .the deadline when something would have to be done about the continuance or otherwise of the passenger service. As early as 1998 the Canadian Government realized that the service, as called for. could not be maintained at such a terrific loss under the terms of the CanadaWest Indies Treaty; therefore, notice of cancellation was served on the Colonies at that time. Cancellation Notice However, ta 1939 the War intervened and the Notice of cancellation was allowed to lapse. Early in 1940 sn arrangement was entered into between the governmenU concerned whereby the steamship service would be maintained to the extent that war conditions would allow, subject to the right of either party, to terminate the agreement by the giving ol six months notice. The Conference held in Bars*dee 1949 waa attended !>> de|egatea from ail the t'otonie*. also the Canadian Deputy MlnisU-r of Traaapert. myself, and our Freight Traffic Manager. Ftgum were ta bled by the l>nuu Minister, %  bowing the heavy financial burden wbioh the Canadian Govern mean baa borne from the inception of the passenger se rvi ce saatll the outbreak of war amounting to over SlS.aeet** e Canadian When delegate* from the Colonic* asked that the passenger carrylng capacity be In cre ased to pre-war level by adding additional passenger vessels or the building of new ones, they were told that this could only be done by increasing the contributions made by the Colonies—this suggestion was most unfavourably received Wartime Restrictions From early i n 1942 until the end of the war, due to wartime restriction'; and allied control of shipping, the regular scheduled service was Interrupted. We are prohibited from calling at some of the more exposed ports and our operations to some of the other •Treaty" ports were restricted. Nevertheless. Canada provided the shipping directly and/or indirectly to maintain the bread-line to practically all the Colonies and, in addition, provided direct financial assistance during the war years, when many of the Colonies, due to shipping restrictions, were unable to export their products to provide funds for the purchase of the necessities of life In some quarters reference has been made to the employment provided for Canadians by the operations of the Canada-West Indies fleet, this came out of the Canadian tax-payers pockets. The Csnsdlan National Steamships has been under no obligation lo employ West Indiana* members of ships crews; town and she h. nevertheless, wc have employed althe D.stri la ) ge number of local seamen from Sir John .mil Lady Kuggta all the cotonlos both m the pre-war ]" ,u *' ' J*" constltuenithorthtUveb un. I i \ %  tame turn retain all j too ** %  aivei i political advisor. B. B | /one n am atas baUaved n n lUaa Itsntoiftratton who would deal with 1d Special Ci sioner to undertake imcsligaUon int<> the Grenada sugar industry. The tetms of reference include survey of the p:-e eni the prospects of the On Sugar Industry and advise Government on future policy with ; port leu la i reference to the continuation ur otherwise of sul>-' aidisati in pursued as a result of! the Skeete report of 1948, and encouragement of cane en by peasants Sir John arrlvei In Orenadu Bfl ftfu 21. %  note they sonl Phe earlier note set out the le*t of the proposed cl, i sty i r Auatrli to (* %  i [four powc die present li'ai Ions are deadlocked. i r Ladv Huggins I :MDituhaii:ni Foils LONDON. May 9. Lady Huggins. wife of the former Governor of Jamaica wns today formally adopted servative candidate for the Scottish constituency of Dunharton West. The seat Is at present held by Socialist M.P Mr. rhw. Steele who obtained a majontv of 2.50V over Mr P. W. N. Fraser in 1931. Prior adoption for DunU.S. Oil Strike felt In Mexico MEXICO CITY, May 9. ludez, Ditorof the Mexican Oovernmeni perated oil company Petrolco^ Northern Mexico will goon feel %  gasoline shortage •stised by the United States oil •trike. %  here u. "little hope" of .ipping emergency gasoline supIll."; to the border States of chihuahua. Lower California. Son;.i and gl n aloa which import most their pa^nlin^ from the United Mates. He said that Mexican production nta 'iimrtent for most of the nation could not be increased immediately to take aagaj ,,( u in barton, Lad> Huapfil *>'I %  %  erasing shortage along" the border on the short list for several con-1 —I'.F. slituencies including Nottingham Her early cUldhooi in Duitbaitoj. amich I the count) any fi %  PAR] %  I and %  %  %  % %  BUM U n..tinliItaly, Bel, 1 Hand .owl Luxi n %  %  u.i. | thus b. ... Tunis*. Egypt Chiefs Talk H The Aiutei A'.t erai ''V the 88 "Crofter Aftri being 4SMM %  %  !.. %  .' . plnr for thr JWas-L.. lag hi A It IN ID ut ug not yt %  pisi will re^mhlo tl | f Uan typf i plane uplaus ClnL arrived in the Islaud duiiiig the week tsasMaa i Anstei Antoent ThU plctors glwe. sn idr>n of Surrey Bvut Indiu U >NDON, nutTerosjl I %  .. %  .oJay %  i bo %  ;•'.. b> 141; %  •< M9 to sri IUI -rte-.te.! pttah Ih. %  %  %  %  .1 • ol b.iwler witli foui al sei.res Sui n yVlU ,nni 1BH 158 ..:g4 10fe. Ansler Autocrat rrives rrom Fi l.K. 1K> Our Flying <'rrep.uidenl( THE Auater Autocrat M mntu %  %  :t!i Korean and Chh> t'anmunjtim today. A United rds he did not think Nt.it/. .re.m General Nam II chief conanuiusi mi %  Vrithr. side ( iirccti> mentioned B i i %  But Gars %  Goim, IlamiavUrj Rtipreaenl TJad M Fedenrtion Talke PI The Legislatui%  ml L ' delegate %  %  %  Both repieseiikil lln %  .. \ nittee on West ] i Before the a to e tioB tb< i ion which asked the Council -o appoint two or mm. of Itl rnems to be e hoaan b) tttt %  delegates, and n powered to make all CtslOM for and on behnlf .f Uh colony which in thenopta M %  Is to %  able a stai %  > %  with tii' 'Halting Uie iiecessar; • niihtilutional nibt The effe't ol th. gmtih l ine n %  1 lac n t of Uh -' Closer A M ATHENS, Maj V, %  I Forces hi tint Hrid a quaationar i loal hi woul i take .. ( '..mm.ind "f Oreak Hah l-ind ami Naval Ills reply to „ direct ras "Admiral Carney Mmself wttnoul intennedlaries. ' i Mimdav j bietallauon i i. %  ( .. ni (trail Mi dltarratvVK litt I %  %  . %  1 I l nke> have made '.men the Pact la -t February that it ,rl. % %  .. %  ... un., Italian General Maurh-in r>e r'astigiioni. loatsVia which ha* i BBtty aa-oparaUnf more closely with Gtaeca and Turkey is also • i' vi d lo have tald that wuOb %  %  %  %  o latrlaa B l %  '' : %  • U m Lai nmiiMasi tr niption that tO geT lln. MI(al and •••i>ii|Mnent fnm. t %  rjntta i stav i witho %  •.*"? and -i p an IIM il %  1 U %  i retiprocal caw %  123 .lau-. %  n Alphanil. I nn the H Cound I tianeel i Dafai %  Ivan Ma: 'i i Lombardo, Italiai Mi I .HI Rcpreventalh e th< Darda v. -h.,i,. nboral %  KonuiiiM I. 1 %  I'1*51. : I > n Committee has met i 100 1 ttle %  '. M f Sttrnf || iibfidl u ^. .,iihoe\M tl Autocrat li< s*>,.irmher t^' IP tutfei ,it Flv' led by Philip H R, \ (' Jl"im Deinoiislrulioiis 1 hadlins a %  Ij.tlHHl Uint flying wtsffl UM T.I. A C here Aftur the debei • %  B.L.AC and oUwi f % %  %  %  l lakJ 1 I keep;.. | UM iui has ibI. regard leas ol %  IllHldl. %  n .ill %  Hfl I 1 'I HI'' %  1 nghterj. .. %  %  < %  did not shooting stars of the battle Ailieo r r;.-unce-l I P. Ki(Ig\\a\ Orders Force ToRecaptureGeai.Dodd lay 9. (iai %  l( .sdd froni the' haul % %  %  ime iprtme •t. Eighth Ann; Conunan Dodd latin from Koje 'i | .. unchanHed UH allvo i aUghUi Army ip o ka as n an at . I ..11* Mil Vlit-ao Vl H rro.h-l. FollH aaun it qulta iiear IIW uw BL.A.C. la not fm th Ha II.II,f the .• %  'ri the House of Assembly nj .. Dill to am^nri the Tariff Acl. %  Uon -urh u u i' t i ipte viio previous!) might %  %  .I Cl i rcaugh' concernad. eiisptj 1 laaialad. If this pessimistic approach is Eisenho borne out In fact then it not only an may have dire consequences for Jai Western Europe but it njsy have ,. ,,r.. a tremendous effect on coining i-eating a sing!. U.S. Prosidontlal Elections. Not manpower and raaouro only the United States State Germany. France. Belgi a Department but General Eisen-' the Netherlands and Luxembour'; The £i*t,Depertmen? has The idea that West I ...uld be eaKtv | -with United States support—ha%  rm'i: In Germany itself And %  Western alliance—the North Atlantic T • -would fall apart if i 1 Hates still ihl however | put pre.%  ura on the French D^cause there 41 on hand -IP. LONDON M fho labour Part lU strong shouir.:: In B III h lions early to-day 10 Borough Coun%  plan possibly involving a : United SUb i %  %  %  %  %  pu %  %  i. A < win tar %  rl aarpi 'ashai *ai i I the R.A.I t fi i i of hying Omei %  r %  The Hangar %  %  day Van Fleet sold terms f'.i and r iTk-laU I v Commit nisi %  :ind optimistic about %  Oa r.se r, . i I '. %  %  ni %  %  rwaa-i %  %  i 65B andiaiut wn lllu "II lost 472 ', %  %  • no li ndustr —rvBtive major] %  U 12 /Club will mow• — V.r. ';, few trial laka untry giving several speeches %. ab]y w |l rvmain In until his departure. He hold ,i loini Press confsferance Sflth Clark tomonow aftenHwn. '" leave Tokyo Monday fi. r 'i„ United St Part i spines Oe. i I NOfftfl Allan%  i Uon, (NATO* forces —I'P 6 DEAD ABOARD RIO SANTA CRUZ BUENOS A HIES, alar il %  I Kin .Sunr/i i.'n ,.. atliciing j rtorm nil rwagjonan coast sntfa M< daad anil a number miured on ixiard following a boUat i xplosion on ffi EfTortv to in...r

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SATURDAY. MAY 10. 1M BARBADOS ADVOCATE The Government Industrial School Girls' Reformatory THE Girls' section of the Government Industrial School is really a Reformatory School. In years past detention at ihe school was merely punitive for children who h*^ committed trivial offences or 'perhaps no offences at all. SonuHTsod IbflM merely for wandering about the street. Barbados has travelled far and arithmetic, history,—and the curfut since these days and now rlculum include* biology. In aha there are Probation Officer* whose evenings there are opportunities duty Is. not only to look after 'or gardening, domestic work. children accused of criminal oflaundry. Plain sowing, fancy work, fences, but to save others from the housewifery and West Indian reaches of the law. These officer* Handwork. place with fostei-parents childEach girl is ih charge of two or ren who are by reason of uneomthree beds Mrs. Dove the Matron fortable homes or bad habits, on who spent over twenty years the down grade. the GoW Coast. West Africa. The small number of ten girls brought back with her a variety now detained at the School Is an o( plants. She has taught the indication of the enlightening apwrls not to depend on lettuce, carproach to JuveiJlo Delinquency, r** snd cabbnge but they also Ten girls in a population of over cultivate the Arraranthus. wild : % %  K.'f.Minntorji Sdhoal I'-'in.%  BM wile* an plan! might nut be an exact indication which seed easily, of the meral standards of gtrfc In rw the community, but it Is an indiinilSteJe Tours egtion thai |H'plc are less willing The guls also make educational to make criminal* out of young,ourK < districts making special narlM them sent to a note of plant life, the Museum. school o( detention for some trivpriush Council and other places of lal offence in their early years. nler ** t 1 nce a >* r wre is H Dig picnic and occasionally pic* Tlu bills'School (Summervsle) *" %  ** are shown by the Mobile was founded in 1912 with a roil y, nem> There Is also a Fireworks of 28 Hoth the HOTS' nnrl Olrb "Isplay on November 5th and at Schools were situated on the sites nristmas time gift, are dlslrilmtestates and cd v with books and I SfJ lines 111 .. a to make Jassn feel as sssndh tta* other people *s pcsaible and they are even otiey. The dtet scale is %  liberal and balanced there is a improvenienl In weight and height altar some months in residence All the cirls are examined periodical!) bj Mincer and Sine visiting DsnUst. Every edncsday at Inspection codllver-oil Is administered. The slevptng room I• spaeiou' BBJS snd the girls sleep scparatel. m cots. The dl 'i ^allied by and admonishments In case of Bi n *Si a girl may vinl h*r home under d After tare The real merit of n child's training is induutid by the way she respond? to life when she goes out Into the world AWDM from the \*r\.-. • -he vhonl Connor* mi leaving th.. fecassag u. help 1o steer th.i-ruM esrsa _g i .schuf and th. record' dasssT th* oedt • in i' discharged from the school tubse%  natendent and Probation Officers place the girls in suitable jobs Most of the girls reem quite set on becoming shnp-assistants. The solution of all problem* of conduct is Ihe pow*f .if religion public worship at the Pailsh Church regularly on the lt and !lrd Sundsys of each tht rs are also classsi It us Instruction s.-h-ii OJH n ij nonce that lofe Las* On %  visit t<. the is not merely a aefcool for ( %  iruotiv* training hut call it a home when ISM h|g family enjoys th. healthful, happy recreaticiti ami the iiiioymcnl of those things that are so often larking In the overcrowded I i.ntijruous sn arable acreag the arable acreage (186 acres) continued to be administered by the staff of the Boys' School until May. 1947, when the plantations (Dock!, and Summervale) ceased for sea-baths. The spacious school to be the responsibility of the with Its surroundings of trees Superintendent and Staff of the gardens affords the girl Game* The aim of the School is to give the girls as much freedom as posible Occasionally they arc talc School It Is note worthy that a Commission set up in 1877 made a clear distinction between a Reformatory and an Industrial School and were of the opinion that "a Reformatory Is needed for children actually convicted of crime, and more especially of repeated crime whereas the Industrial School is designed for Idlers and vagabonds who have not as C bci • i.iil;. ..nvietcd They her maintained that "A Reformatory must always cany with It more or less the gaol stigma and must necessarily in its discipline approximate closely to a gaol." Thus the Reformatory Act, by which Ihe School was created in 1883. gave way to the Reformatory and Industrial Schools Act of 1890 It seems fairly certain that the Act of 1890 envisaged the committal to (he Schools of children "beyond control and in need of care or protection The Government Industrial 1 for play. Outdoor games Inlude cricket and football which re very popular among the girls. Peer's Son Sails—'A Tesl Of Love' \s Jirithon> Dlyih. IBB and heir Urd Birth, Qeisaaj last night %  t> ooo-mii. 1 %  Jtveajfettre trip 1 '•lands, the West Indies. Honolulu, and V mcouver, an IS-yoar-old v 1! be .1 Hue :. M V and live MB wesM t'fT in the \i % %  Q Poet's Dream—mi a VOjn .... fth W*g on lithe Alsling !• Aw %  lawk beret, mgiiK woiked all dav y.vrterday loading siravUes irgj the rmtrtg %  Ing %  wo if.i ,i half years In %  nl itup in ,. f\ trouble and ctinu\ %  fjeal Vii. -my rane dp Mi | ii. h.iiit in Covaarti) I Nancy talked ..i ;h.i (..>' added: — %  It will be l terribly long wall. ( first knew about the i|> OK %  Ybruais %  Wt iH.lh felt rather sad, but U had to be faced." Laird Myth, who Hei G ihra) %  %  %  rpiIEIR good] lrmk tell von tlies're hsH right. You know, too. when vno |gok at the price tag, that yoo ran't grt luier \ alue. 1 tin -1 rated is a Full brogue llxior.l. Ii.-l to every pair is Ihe ,|..lin \Miite Guarantee S fcfa sW ihe -igu which mean• Jwl rigAf V Look for it iu leaning lorci:i Harbatlos. Tp: The tnlMill MMMI be imuht lu-ki t-ii.ili. Mean* while I IH. id.ill iind Cricket are popular iiuldmir sanies. 1 eft: The girl\ learn ksjp] to nuke bankets and haLt trom local \lrawv lhesW.I. handcrafto will he helpful to Ihe pupils when they leave the school. Rclow: I .u li girl has a plot nf land for Ihe cultivation ol flowers and vegetables. %  "here is keen competition imontt them. Britain Discusses Economic Problems With Austria HATES <' t:\<:nw<-t SHRii < Mai Coupon %  I \S VMS rtankvr. 7S '1S-1 W ,nk. DrntKiMl Dull" ,*•''' nnS In Touch With Barbados Coastal Station Iliiuugli I heir .:. i M II.. | in,, LONDON, May 9. Economic god blems dominated discussions today between Dr. l.oo|>old Kigl, Austrian QuoceUor and Richard Butler Britain'^ Plnnnelal fhlef Thew talks concluded the official part of the Austrian MatainUnVl fnur-day visit to Britain The two men were understood to have centered theh discussions on three main points: 1. Settlement of Austria's preII external debts. 2. Future wool credit which Rntlsh cominerriid interests ox%  aaastrta anortSg I i la*t war. 3. Co^t .it British occupation Austria, They are also believed to have had a gener.il talk ur. the trend of trade between the two eoun' i' —U.P. Bkai Vrrsnior. BBytta, StarroMs. II mtMatt. Cape I i I.II. *,i-ioy. AlctM ts.li.lrr gpurt. W..1IOI.. !*!, Or ar, TUM. l*d) Nelson. I1TM>-. K nini>o.i n.rm-., c>i.-n atna. Mil'' .1 fon %  official after protesting Japanese demands for the return of property they formerly held in Japan. Korean official laid i j demanding as tin treaty with Korea that the latter agree to leturn foimei Japanese property and nlao indemnity owner* for losses suffered an a result of the Korean war. Japanese officials said "our positlOO bag been misunderstood.*' —v.r. B *v* ^"vJ -i l RW ; f Foifffli9hHwerklyfrommeCrtbb^m t> Choice of Constellation or OC-4 k Sleeper service on Southern route available t Stopovers en route arranged at no egtra cost k Unmatched KIM service On all routea . excellent meals, delicious drinks and famous KLM service. %  ^ COUGHS I i ni*ucrcj tL-iivoi %  ^ ihodnjl 11 OOnJba, Tor %  bj !)<>• : %  h ; .. ID sflfgah re. The It con^ Kreesetc — aiJicnt ihe trouble at its nwf %  jfid why it BLU SO quickly and so the roughly. From the first dose i | cv the inflamed brontu 1 pusagn and builds up snag powers ol resistance while it is destroying the germs which hr. I caused the cough or cold. Th: moment >ou suspect 'flu,or catch a tough or cold, take l-'amel S>iup and you will have II ihe road lo recovery Always keep a bottle in the bouse. r A. HYRUP m ir J itzti — from ail chtmuti at iWras. Trade en-itantt to :— Frank B Armstrong Ltd. ERiDGETOWN. • H, | Bulmtn, %  O Ops Town Irom Pill Mill. <. r >. IVta-Jri *r0Ai. i_> COLE & CO.. LTD. DISTRIBUTORS RAFTSMAN BUILT BtfROQTES GROUP



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ADOS At>VO( \TI S \TI RI AV MAY IOIW! L ADV AJtUNDELL, wif of His I I rnar Ol adwant Islands, irnvn lug b> th* N'IMHI from Grenada intransit for Dominica. Lstablishing New Oiiic: M R •• D BRISBANE. Managro i> itu % %  MI .( svttv cent, ai yratardv morning by i| Lady Nalaan Intrant! I B K.'* and Antigua. He waa accompanied by hi 0 uiil be Manage. or the new office they are going gbUsn in St. Kill*. Chiropractor Returns D H C 0, Y I/)WE, ChiropracI lJny StMtt, returned from ( day morning by the Idkis NVlana afti-j about two an i. i:ipanied by hiRsUtrning to U.S.A. M il ED LEAHY left for Antigua w-ticrday on tb.M V. MTHC Hold. Ho Is rMUrnlni to New York City aflr .1 -ixu-in months' torn of. Eurape ant' the Caribbean. S Fcr Five Week* PENDING about five weeks* Mis. Olive I %  fdav morning by in-' l-asty Nelson and Is slaving lira Arthur Cadogan of Hast in §8. Spent Twc Months M RS. JOYCE M:.(ii'iHK. daughter „f Mr. II A. T Williams, relircd Comptroller of Customs and Mrs. Williams of "Henley," Fontabelle. returned to Antigua in Thursday by B.W.I.A. after •pending two months' holiday with Dta, She was accompanied by hCT little son Michael. From Bermuda S PENDING MX weeks' holiday in idea are Mr. and Mrs. 1!. S H*l*all of Bermuda They iv morning by the |.id N>lbQu| (WQ monlha ^ 1 •• ith Miss Loul-e Grell of The Beetle Was Moving Longer Liked His House Under a Roclc— AX TRBLI. Mr. E D. Small. Chief Clerk of the Treasury in British Guiana. He arrived yesterday morning by the lady Nelaan accompanied by his wife and is staying at "Leatonim-Sei" The Stream. Stream. After 38 Years WISS ROSITA HEADLEY who hns been living m the LVS.A for thirty-eight years returns fa Hi* At Wir*l>ii Danre home to-day. Miss Headley has .£v ? !" W,r *',t L T a 7 C ,f ( >een spending a holiday in the WNUTEaS arc reminded ol the Colofty and dufing hn s(fly ^ a dance to be ""M ">-nignt at ahe was the guest of Mrs. Martha the Paradise Beach Club, by the i^, V i ne Rt prter Cable At Wireless Sport's Club. The Dance committe arc doing Farewell Dinner all m then pa**** 10 make thr n SULEMAN PA TEL gave a avonlnga success. IVI fartwcl dlnm r ^^ at m Spent a W -ck residence "Cnshna," Lands End. M R GRAHAM MAC FARLANE on Thursday night in honour of left the island by British Mr. and Mrs. D. A. Than! ">'>. Black Rock who will be %  ray home to Rochester, !?"* toter m "* monln for New York. Mr. Mac Farlanc has been staying for %  week i th st Lawrence Hotel. Intransit f NTRANSIT on the Lady Nelson KN ARrTThe shadow, met Blacki. Beetle pushing a whaelbarrow load. ed with trunks, valises, dishe*. clothes and furnitura. Blackie stopped to mop his forehead with a handkerchief. "Hell*. Blacki*,said Knarf. "Where are you going with all that .-tuff?" "I'm moving." "Oh?" > "I don't like my old place am more—the one under the gray roc V near the stump of the apple tree. If.. too damp and the ants keep walking in without being invited. I'm moving under a white rock near the garden wall. Blinky Mole used to live there. Drop In and see me when you have time. It's a beautiful place." Blackie Beetle lifted the handle of the wheelbarrow again and pushed t > the India. Mr. Thani who first came out to Barbados In 1037. is paying his second visit back home. His flr-t was In 1MB. He expects to tit away for about a year. Among thoae present were Mr yesterday morning from St. a nd Mrs. A. I. Patel, Mr. A M Vincent was Mr. George Alexanp^xeh Mr. S. Mater. Miss Elaine der Grant. Superintendent of Taylor. Mr. Colin Morris. Mr Public Works who is going up to Keith Chandler. Mr and Mrs N. A the USA. to take a six months' Th nn i. Mr. and Mrs. R. A Thanl, course in Highway Construction Mr. and Mrs. M. Karnani, Mr. and and Maintenance. He will be atMrs. M. Ma neck Mr. K Bhagvanlached to the U.S. Bureau of Pubdas, Mr Jre Thani and Mr. M lie Roads in Washington. Santo Beauty Hints For The Young Raon would-be beauty must first serenity (in that order) are things 1 set-rot—one that every to check. Acne finds a cosy home established beauty has discoverwhere pimples and blackheads ed long ago Call it 'eie •habit have been mauled by fingers. If of l>eaut.v.~ It is to practise each it develops, see your doctor. "!,lE ri 5 '^ 0 L„i 0, T J %  W*" 1 A crop of pimples could mean each day until it becomes as your bloodstream Is clogged with i .ur life as brushimpU r.ties. To clear itTGrand111R your h-eth You'd never keep ma s Bulphur ^p,. h „ nevor them white and undecayed by been beaten .. onV teaspoonful tare-fully clea ning t hem for one of sulphur mixectwlln threaleo" ^ • %  spoonsful of treacle Ol nor, would you-LikeTakc „ CVPry mo rning before r hair wont thine unless breakfast until the spots clear. you i>ni h it even day. DO) m ftta end atarta, It's lust anal principle that underlies the wl > %  .. 1, Besides soap and wntcx you can use a light elean^.*ng cream before washing again. But beware Ich nourishing creams. Young inches but bring out a crop of spots. Fortunately there is n group of foods (meat. eggs, fresh fruit, vegetables and milk) which. if included In a balanced diet, not only kteps you slim but health;, with a clear skin too. It is true that you'll only reduce your weight or keep it Its own sweet self, by watching yout diet. But the other step on the road to a perfect figure is exercise. Try to keep up at least one sport that you played at school. One that takea you Into the fresh air and sunshine, ane get a little exercise each day. choJ? h diugU£ ffJ?^ Z£3T, n ? rr Mother Of ThtWar I the daily l*th '." n ir"^ !" ?^ -1 -" *"****** %  P ,,m M ,H '" dolly luith and DMke-up are fun; some, like Ihe same make-up, are It's ititMiiraging to know lhal MMHI you'll reach the stage wheie you lepeat them OS .softening lotion for dry skins before makeup, a drying night lotion (the calomlne tvpe) for slightly troubled skins before bed. is all the skin care parapher~c* s ;^."^. !^i^^, .-^s 9 Ing—ne\'ei makeup v go to bed with Its I riminin,; young frenh There about I fork. YOUR FACE Its Care The ideal look for a Probably you have just discovgirl's make-up is Just as orcd the bewildering array at and natural as It can be creams, lotlona and astringents, should be a shine just all aiming 10 guard your comeverywhere, her hair, her eyes. But for young skin there her teeth, anywhere but her noae. one sure fire prescription All you'll need is a very light v...sh it, wash it and powder base and a powder that %  'V'-ii for luck, matches your skin T.*ie fresh rrj aUJer ent Haps until yuu And b-.k of this simple makeup is lust paUDW with your skin, j matter of checking ami renewOily rAins respond l>ett to soaps ,ng. W.h it off u couple i* times wiih 11 spirit base; dry. acnalUve a dav and begin again skltw have to lake it easy wUh Soft pastel., the pretty pinki koby soaps. A medicated Map, prescribed by a doctor, Is tided for problem skins. NEW YORK. Chilean First Lady Senora Rosa Markmann De Gonzalzes was awarded the title of "Mother of th' World" to-day, and in sn accept.,,,,speech called on women to do their part to preserve civilization. The award was presented at Hotel Waldorf at a luncheon attended by 000 persons from all parts of the world by the "American Mothers Committee" of the Gold Rule Foundation. At the same time China-born Miss Chin was awarded the title of "American Mother of the Year Senora Gonzalzes said mothers have a "great and beautiful task ir. this convulsed world that threatens spiritual security dangerously ."—IT .P. Girl Guides Hold Annual Fair Today Today the Girl Guides are bol kimHy consented ing their annual Fair at tho Drill to open the Fair at 3.30 p.m. Ha.I from S — 8 pm. The numbers of the Local AsIn 1948 the Guides decided that social* n have again undertaken order to have their own HeadU> B U Dd the Trefoil quarters they irould haw Ouldee) are running for the monev. and 'n July of th ..missionyear they held their first Fa %  .ides and Each year since they have use. Brownies are In charge of %  > the this efTort to raise money Household .Gifts. they are hoping that today 7 f 5f ( oll,s !" et [ WUI be even more last year's '"' -"•'' n '' D| P' Thc Police Band, through the kind perDue to Court Mourm I the Commlsatonfr of S vage. the President of Ihe OBat PsJIcSi will be In atlendanca Guides Association, is maM %  bicycles attend. Lady Savage ha* always %  hJch jre being raffled, will be taken such an interest in -;ir rft 00 : si Ihg Fair. It of the Organisation and the ('. %  ,:> public will generously are disappointed that shr r innot ; lee their suppcrt to the Guides be present today. Lady C noon. If you have a tendency toward Is. are the young girl's lipstick colours. For fun, buy a (lock of different coloured Ive lipsticks and experiment until you know the shade* asru*t*WS*H*5y^ B.B.C. Radio Programme ,-oiH M,r m Be M-.i'. H.' Hi s :• p m Radi Km IS M P l MUBk MA|.IIW fnr nd thr N> 1 S p II p m *Ud> S<—.1 Thin. p m The N.w. Talk, IS IS \> m tap M vanats rax V,V.V,V/,V/'-V,V,',V,*,V,',V,',v,v,-;,v, LOOK oir ton SiWOA VS A D VOCA TB and win $25.00 AT THE SAME TIME YOU CAN HELP THE f.ift.vf .# ran wBajum FV.XD. off. Dragging a Cart A few minutes later Knarf uct Blinky Mole, dragging a cart fille.: with all his household goods. "Hall^ Blinky," said Knarf. "You're moving, aren't you?" "Oh. yes," answered Blinky. pushing his dark glasses over his eyas to keep out the sun. "My old place—the One near tho garden wall—is awful. The dogs and th. squirrels keep digging In it. kept awake half the night." "Blackie Beetle thinks it's beaut if ill!" "It may be beautiful for a beetle. It's awful for a mole. I'm moving down to the edge of the marsh, under the ferns and toadstools. Come and seo mo. It's as pretty as a pietore." Hardly had Blinky Mole gone (han Willy Toad came hopping by. Trying a heavy knapsack liver his shoulder. "Moving." said Willy to Knarf. I'm moving!" arsh!" %  I did." retorted Willy. %  ing," Blackie told Knarf. XI C All I 1 fl'il !• The Garden—St. J a aa e a W $ .,..;.. %  ; %  .-,' % %  %  ::' %  : -:". ^. %  \ > * llm.t 11 .. • %  o... BU \ MOI> "'" — *; uinnM Aadi— oslr me as soon as you can." Then Willy hupped off. Not many minutes afterwards Knarf saw a whole flock of mayflies and blue-bottles bussing across the field. Each of ihcm waa carrying a tiny basket f" d with clothes and groceries. "H nawuig." they explained to Knarf. "An awful toad has just moved into our pine grove! Wo won't have a moment'" paaos or safety with a toad Ul our neighborhood* i(i you moving to?" Knarf asked. Old Apple Tree "To the stump of the old apple tree. It's a nico quiet place. I'm sure we *. n't he disturbed." Knarf watched them fly off. -Well," he said to himself, "that's Blackie Beetle's old place. I'm sure they'll |0M it. No one is living there at all now." But Knarf was uiong. Gllvo the Snail came along slowly, leaning on his cana and carrying some things wrapped up .in a piece of brown paper. Ha Why. Wily m surprised! I jumped to talk ta Knarf. "I just —ght you liked it down at thc t ^ llu[ a moe parking place for my be tali "Just beside a gray It used I rock near tho stump of tho old be lovely. But a mole is aWftag anplo tree. But then a whole flock That's the end of my fern* and of mayflies and blue bottles came idstools. He'll burrow right ^: along. BO I'vo got to move again. 1 them. I don't like living in a Well. I'm used to moving. But I bet -re where someone is dig,; r-g. no one else Is doing any movingLi gnawing and burrowing u n-1 no one but me!" And ha wondered meath. I'm moving over to the at tho surprised look h> Knarf'a grove. Coma around and see I face. 1 :> % %  • % %  %  : TO-DAY . A And CONTINUING Dally UNF01-D4WJ WTTH mVSNKl-—. Rupert and the ID it—22 ltap*ri kud> hi> k r Robin Down t-4, oN ih* iv. or hot Iron W,t)*. I'v, tof I • t Con* *nd he oib Th K 10 hm -Wf-.' %  Rucen. Hivt voti ihaW "VM. I. M h-.na our i:ockii|t jnd hing thaSB ht iocrdwr. And kxA. ihit old ,1,.>.i |ta m 1 we need. W< kno i here in *n v COLONY CLUB The weekly Club Dinner Dances will reeommenee on SATURDAY. JUNE 7th. DINNER JACKETS or LOUNGE SUITS Dinner & Dancing S4.00 YOUR COOK'S DAY OFF?? Why not phone for a table and have lonrh or dinner any day riuMsiU'SS AGAINST PAIN Research cncmM* m in.nn cour.ir.^ ha\c long been tr>ing lo overcome thc two obstinate defects of ordinary aspirin. Now, in 'Disprin". they have succeeded. Aspirin is acid (acctylsalicylic acid), and it is almost insoluble in water. Consequently aspirin enters the stomach in thc form of undissolvcd acid particles which arc liable* to produce gastric irritation, resulting in heartburn or dyspepsia. •Disprin* on the other hand pRrridH I <' %  staniially neutral, palatable solution which is not likely to irritate the stomach lining. Being freely ^lublc, "Di-pritr ta quickly absorbed and brings relief without di-comfort pi I Because of these advantages Disprin has found favour wilh doctors in Grcal Britain and is now uuidy used in hospitals there. In all cases wfaaa you would normally ta^better take a 'Disprin'. 'DISPRIN' to re'ieve pom Far less acid Completely soluble Quicker to relieve Non-irritant Palatable ^/„. /„ n eai, fai, 8-tablet pack for pocket or handbag "Made by the manufacturers o/'OITTOk* Aiwmi T. S. GARRA* \V A ( O. BiiJfri-*^ oOio>e>oe>o*i'-'-*-' S*>nd Vow Orders for — GALVAXiSlCD sill I is AND /V/MV/HWMICI.U. To I IM IIAI I MI-OIIII M Corner Broad & Tudor Streets PLAafA THEATRES IliMPV .)> %  •VELV iTeeHnieolori David NIVSN — Vern U. I XN CUAh aso niHiur Dn II.11 ( 4 Ay ni'iMiiit m\i\i BARBARAS"— (0IAI. SIM) T-sr a OaassBwlM is a s is r M HERE COMES THE GROOM %  Ins Croaliv. Jane Wiman. Ahntla ai>ut>Trtpte Allrsclioti 1 "BAIDKBH al II.' uissar Richard ARI.EN A 0BBIIRM losnoi TVt WUJ1AMS a as* OISTIN lUIAL SIM! Ian Shawi TODAS NEVER TRUST A GAMBLER DBSM osarin a LAST OF THE BUCCANEERS ii" •( IK* IIAOLANDS" 1m MULT a "V" LAW" Jeorav o'HRIEN HOOKA E TMEA I IIF.S I SII'IHI ItJuhiL PLHKK I-o,. J CODD in TRIE i run stcaST EXTRA Hbarl: lOOLlKN BtNNT 1 ina <)i,mi 1 Wm aaai 1 I.i tan ssswa HI To-dn 1 SO p m 1 Tonne Mldmle HlrklraKid W holt. aMSM Jon Hall A.t. %  Thrill. V.WiW.WWrf^'.'.W^^ GLOVERS MEiX SHOES vxaBuusm. 01 AI.ITV BLACK & TAN from $10.19 to $10.78 MEN FIELD BOOTS $11.96 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606 OI.1MPH raday la M..<.•! %  > I a S I II ir 7.UCCO-HJlph LF.WKI In 111 II us.. -iiiiM a AIX'l |g X Mary Beth HUGHS* Oil -i Tedsr IS %  I Rod Cameron In \ Thr 1 .J. ri'.;r. !• Draa at fcHDNITE \1' ..I.gaatS I.. %  M .--I .... with John llai now Rlcaido MonUlbsn—Syd Chariwe MARK Or THE RIMnADI EXTRAI { R**l Shall.: SKFCT HFRDN'AII* with Tex BJENEXE and hi* Oi IIOVAE T.-rf.. ,,. „„,„„ „ 0 A ,, l ,f ^f:' B a,A> ** Taorrsaa %  iin Thomaa GOMEZ a MOIIDAV IM HAVANA wUh Dm ARNEZ ft Olhers fa. a T... sa INDIAN TIILRITOKY M >v •#> GLOBE s> V AN UNBEATABLE COMBINATION ^ %  l COSIIIO>I laSIVI IIIV. lost... J Magava* I.KO. %.•• U •.!• |.aas. i II %  vini;j;u\\ 2 SHOWS 5 A 830 P.M. B> likr lovrly Lorrlla Voiina -• %  %  an -!aily Aasjag. lather fai ial with frigrant LttX Toittl 9 ap. Na vrl -hould ukr ahasieas wila dasvtsaess, (] '.mi rhann of all. A Lux ToilrtSo^n baaat] fOW -Unfrsgranl SSJSI CSMMI V-ulll"" • -:!,.(•• %  rtiimeof Lux Toilet Soapt Kemfmber, Lux girl arc knelteri Yuu, loo, can be lovelier tonight! LUX TOILET SOAP V7i' fragrant whitt nap oj the film stars a Lt l i H raoouci



PAGE 1

SATURDAY. MAY lu 1M2 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVK Hotel Proprietors Told What American Tourists Expect MR. JOHN ALEXANDER, BOA.C's Sales Manager for the Caribbean Area with headquarters in Jamaica has just left for Trinidad where he will have discussions with B.W.I.A. before returning to Jamaica. He was accompanied by his wife and two children who were staying at the Ocean Y"?w Hotel. While in Barbados. Mr. Alexander attended at the invitation of the Hotel Association, their meeting which was held at the Hotel Royal on Wednesday night and was verv interested to hear their plans. At the imfting he gave a rhort talk telling hotel proprietor* what the American tourists wanted and expected to find in their hotels and advised them on how to attract the traffic from places like San Juan, ihe USA, Canada and Venezuela. Violence Case Dismissed His Worship Mr. E. A. McLood. recent Police Magistrate of District "A" if the yesterday discharged Ainsley Worfr from rell of Sea View. St. jamc in the and its case in which the Police Chargl I md he him with robbing Cecil Batson of using violence on April 23 Commenting on the successful first flight B.O.A.C* Comet Jet UP Londoq In South Africa return, Mr. Alexander i had flown on a two-hour flight in $a L the Comet last November while _, in EiujUnd and the lack of vibra. r f* Smi,h PP** rc d bclion and almost noiseless flight at "* u of Worrell while Sgt. King 4000 feet was an experience Pud 'or the Police. XlM which could only be described as Pf"*uiion called on otic witness equivalent to sitting in one's Le C" Batson and then Mr. Smith lounge chair at home in the submitted to th e court that on the stratosphere" with a visibility of evidence that Batson gave idcntiover 150 miles on either side. neat ion was not proved and it would be unsafe to accept that Stratocruiser Services evidence. There was also no corroboration. "B.OAC.. Is always endeavBu tson told the court thai on ""a"*** J mp T"" e .J** uI pm n A P rit 2S bout 7 p.m. he went to KL^* f r K m IT'S*. V" 1 I? Plne H,n ,n h ""** r and rl & nd J lt l e USA -. 1 lhe "hflt there for some time a man Caribbean and has recently inMme up lo y,. car aild lllP iroduced siraiacruiser service Hour and aid "Monov nr vour from both these countries to JjJ?" y 0r your Jamaica" he said and added: "It i; hoped that in the future, furHe told the man that he had no iher extensions of these luxury money on him and another person airc aft can be made ti the who was in the car with him g-ve E stern Caribbean which is the man 12 cents. After receiving Blowing increasingly important this money the man pushed the f..ii i A c's tourist -nd commerknife In his left side and put his cial traffic." hand in his pocket and took out Mr. Alexander will be attendS3. tag the National Convention of He then got out of the car and me Ame ican Society of Travel both of them began to light but Agents in Miami in October and m the scuffle the man got away, he is certain Barbadoi cou d get Before he got out of (he ear the a lot of publicity by sending a „„„ lo | d hlm to undrCBS Bnd he representative to the Convention refused to do so and also issuing an invitation to these agents to c me down to To the court, Batson *oid that Barbados to sec what the lovely the voice of the man that attacked island has to offer. him that night was that of the ,„ . , „ defendant but he could not recogOn Wednesday, his family and nuto Ihe mim that nJ8n[ for ^ „ he spent a very pleasant day at wearlng a malk the Colony Club, St. James, making the acquaintance of Capl. %  Hodges who was previously associated with B.O.A.C. as Catering Manager. It is Just such attractive places as the Colony Club which will bring tourists to Barbados to enjoy the facilities of the beautiful beaches and well appointed accommodation prices reasonable to the Amorts can and other visitors. ^ing Commander Smith Arrires On 'DeGrasse* WING COMMANDER Denis Smith. OBI. AeronsuUcal Engineer and Senior Executive of the Folland Aircraft Company, Humbit. Southampton, arrived here this week on board the S S De Oaajc „n a two-month holiday visit This is his first visit, and he is staying with his cousin Mr m U Kowsjll, Manager of Bulkeley. Wing Commander Smith !s a son of the late Mr. Justice Stanley Smith, a former Judge of the Assistant Court of Appeal of this island His uncle Is Mr. Veinon Smith, Hanaaar Of thr Barbados Electric B i .tion. An Honours Graduate of Oxford i Mr. Smith served in the Royal Air Force during the Ins*, war and was twice mentioned in Despatches and later awarded. ;v OB E. He ml also for sometime with the Bomber Command where he was on the Staff of the Commander-In-Chief, Air Chief Marshal Sir Arthur ("Bomber") Harris. On leaving the Air Force In 194i>. Wing Commander Smith Joined the English Electric Company. Aircraft Division and was assistant to the Chief Engineer He alga had major responsibility hjn of the Canberra, the first British Jet Bomber which established a world record fllf.ht across the Atlantic earlier this year Mr Smith has been very impressed on his first visit to Barbados which he said he very much wanted to know, and he thinks the climate wonderful. He plans to return home by the De Gnuse when she returns to Barbados toward* the end of June Foreign Bible Society U.S. Indus. r\ Fight Against Communism Can Sii|>|>l\ DURING to members uf the Barbad.-s D'foiH*t k INYtMiS Auxiliary of the British and Foreign Bible htx-iety and the public in general at the Empire Theatre yesteni.. ninn. Rev James Inniss. Secretarv <>f the" Brttstfa Indian Centre of the Society, made a strong appeal foe aid by way of funds to hsslp m the wrrk of Uw S-niety 111 spreading the doctrine of the Bible. Rev. Inniss told of their tiht against Communism and huw the Society were "smuKKling in" Bibles in Russia and China where it has become a forbidden book. InmsV fifth visit %  %  b> ART1II K J OI.NIN cia.s saul is fully capsule <> %  to fultll the In U i' jnd aid con aw. Tney noted the defense build.i. partial gtoMUl than IS pi ilpul for example, dl from norniJl civilian uses to miltary production. An aawnotod 2.000.0 fl \tf. %  In the Court of Ordinary annual production — lot) yesterday. His Lordship the Chief ,lcrl i''u*try immsjgi Sir Allan Colly more la lwo weeks will not Wills Admitted To Probate lo Barbados. In his introductory remarks. Dean Hazlewood chairman, referred to Rev niss a* bring an energetic indefatigable secretary. The Barbados Auxiliary i* made up of various tions and has a Committee to help the work of the Society Last year the Barbados Au*njustice contributed £75 to llie a dmilled the wills of the'toiinwlng affect dtfense production which the t„ iptooati f !" 1W2 aecordtng t.> Q s* %  Miud Stunby McKm^try. St economic experts. They said tl lanes Alberta v-*.i. "•"' and prolongod Masl %  a amount Hon. Secretary Mr John described as than thi.i which th.B ka Irtbutad t<. Barbados. He „ that the Auxili.irv were hopln to send £200 this year. Prayers Th,meeting wa opened 1> i„„..h?,. J.prayers by Hev r '"' ton. The Lesson WSJ read t> "" u ' *• %  Major Welter Morris and tins .is fallowed by the Honoi .>> report and nnani(al statement which wss adopted I\fotorist Fined £3 for Speeding His Worship Mr. C. L. Walwy '! Acting Police Magistrate of Distt-lpt "A" "HIH'lii PlMU Mm Charged Wiih lla\ inii WjBflpfln <: tst: MSMissEO A" yesterday fined Michael cf Bush Hall. St. Michael, £3 to be paid in 14 days oi in dfault one month's imprisonment with hard labour for driving the motor car M—2788 on Pine Road at 43 miles an hour on Februar.. 22. Spencc pleaded guilty to the charge of exceeding the speed limit. The speed limit on that road is 30 miles per hour. Spence Is also A case brought by the Police to submit his driver's licence for tigainst 28-year-old St. Gerge endorsement, Cpl. Jones attached Leonards of Belle Land^ St. Mich,„ lhe Traffic Branch at Central ael. charging him with being station told the Court that on firmed with an offensive weapon February 22 about 10.25 p.m. he with intent to commit a felony was was on ,j uty on me Pine Road dismissed without prejudice by and gaw t h e motor car M—2768 His Worship Mr. E. A. McLcod. approaching him and it appeared Police Magistrate of District "A" t 0 be speeding, yesterday. The case for the prosecution was A check cf its speed /as n ade that on May 1 about 7.30 p.m. the and that showed that it was travdefend-nt and Oliver Warner of elling at 45 miles per hour. Police Jones Land. St. Michael, had a Constable 466 Lashley said that he row In which the defendant took stopped the car and the defendant a knife and attempted to wound was the driver. Warner. Spence said that he never knew Warner said that the defendant that he wi driving at 45 miles abused him te'llng him that he per hour and that he was in n was nn annoyance. The defend*peed trap until he was told so by ant took up a knife and rushed person sitting in his car. at him with it. He was not cut. __^^___ 12 Arrested For May Day Riots MF.XICO. May 9. Twelve Communists are held < %  • lull awaiting trial on charges of inciting May Dav riot involving extreme rightwing militarists "gold shirts* in which two persons were killed and more than fifty Injured. The twelve which included Carlos Sanchez of Farmers and Workers, affiliated with the Leftists Popular Parly, were held from more than 40 person* U.P. Redhead Supt. Of Grenada Prisons iFiain Our Own Cor respondent %  (iKF.NADA M.i'. 9. Mr W. A Itcdhead. Acting Supei in ten dent of prisons consequtnl on '.tv> promotion of Mr. E. C. King to a similar post m British Honduras is now confirmed in bii pott Redhead, a young officer serving in various departments since 1926. attended a nine month; social welfare course in Jamaica In 1946. Freak Turkey Mrs William Thornhill of Sargeant's Village. Christ Church. brought a turkey with three legs Into the Advocate yesterday morning. itii' turkey, which Is T. d 1 '" *e suit of durtry to produce war B it 2M ri een. m^l mj£^ M R O st ^Hin'. petlUoner and The nrt is the limited IMOOfTeuDW we^2 distributed T D L 1 "U" P">~ Dtfenede-Ill %  %  %  r u.an in.the M J r IS ""n^ hi th.iuit of R. t Phipps. ateb nil | yea „ H iw.ilioner, M. R Phtpps. ies|K>ndaHieHnn ipon Rut the fact there, was that inent trui Sha Brooks. coImt he said, did not maeii respondent. lurllnti in d--m Decree nisi was pronounced in m v b> the suit of M Ramsay, petitioner tll o y are — — msiMi that they were getting on fine. There was much more to be dot MacD. Ra ilBjay, i %  • i. %  i Mdtd on !* %  b ill -ri' R1DGWA Y ORUFRS FORCi I From Paae 1 uid in Koje th-.i it 17 School Girls camp .' %  i not know lo touts in i npoi Korean omcers were holding Oanoral ihnid I D otin vntrs in a compound whan he is beinn hold MDOVO. a Commander Gars Hidttway eaili i %  i •' i-i at • i "tier a I Dodd and a plan was formed at n nilit.t%  %  in I'uv.!'^ South Korc.i Held On WediifNlny is learned from K" i St. Peter Ta Gef New Boys* Club The Police have managed to get a building at Indian Ground, St. Pr;cr, where it is expected they will open a Boys' Club. Many boys between the ages of 8 and 18 are already enrolling. Before the Club is opened, the building will be equipped. A Police told the i4doeare that. apart from games, the Club will offer tuition in carpentry, tailoring shoemaking and handicraft. CONDUCTOR FINED 20,Arnold Rilcy of Venture. St. John was yesterday ordered to pay a fine uf 2l)t and 1. St. Michael, was yesterday remanded without bail until today when he appeared before His Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith at District A" charged by the PQUM with brraklng and entering the house of Miriam Walker and stealing a pair of shoes and kitchen utensils from the samp dwelling house. The charge stales that the offt uce was committed on April 11. Sgt. Murrel Is prosecuting on bf half of the Police. onli tin-le Society was acting unimUiey are building up." P*"^ 1 lie said that the work in Iudi.. They hat" withdrawn their staff had fallen off badly since India from China to Hong Konr and gained her independence. Bibles were carried there by "We are trying hard." he said. various means. .. but we are not doing Marl) some years BKO." he said, "we enough, and I have given ray used to distribute about four of insight of Oie posftlon of thi no live million Bibles in China: work today as it really is and H ear we were only a bid is for you to help." he said Will Not lie Hnrmcd The Eighth Army t expiesstd hi. .. : in; 11' %  lift not be harm' Hut lie saul foice WOUld lie U lo release him If IMCS sal'l prisoners had i > setting UD tin ti lophono lo tl unknown wnl a horo tiiOtnei 1st doelrine which was held and freelv inm.lt'i .i In to communicate with camp official I hut last JOHN WHITE FOOTWEAR FULLY GUAR*NTE£D GENTS' I'HIMl: CUT WILLOW CALF BROC.CEK (u *12.S2 pair CENTS' Sl'EDE BROGUES In Brown. Navy and Blark $11.85 pair GENTS' WILLOW OXFORDS From SK.32 to $12.32 pair GENTS' BOX CALF OXFORDS From .:-' lo $12.52 JOHN WHITE means made just right S<.. Tht'tn nn Miipliipi ami Huy I M-II/ tram HARRISON'S B* %  RATOONS BURNT A quantity of ratoons and l... der was burnl when a Bra occu nil at KedKe Pond St. Andu iii.' ratoon are the proparty o' peasants. LM\ f Boats* 1 O) rrm Pare I %  %  l i-ssels built es%  i tins service. 1 \\. i I'.i-ven^crs ha declined dur%  %  %  nssH eornpetiUon fn %  In %  %  exceeding th P tol of $4B.ooo.oo Canadian in issi. I CHI thou Utrobbint palm hi soar iisaclaa it once 1 apah; thMR't Llnisssnt lifMlj-^ tec) your flour has resulted in the i •:.am!iip Ihe transp rtstlon of Ui iuyiBi n i %  i la that In IM p ill UM Colowsss nat. %  fldanco In the rellabli which irta CHS I and Will v ntniii. .. ribta to Uianli UMRI all %  11) i porUmlty, through the medium < %  ( I I" all oui I %  i loyal support. Voa SOo'i rub in "Sloao's "jo J d;h H OB iht affsvieJ p.if t senlly—" Wossfs '* Son nMrcti' Good ... •Mi and puss sad aflf WEMB! JUUtU IOO LOOK MM IMS > ji nrruw o as UOMI -j,*" •ajrsf^c.., • Kidneys Must (lean Out Adds vour body dau on m*e—t At-td; olra ) %  > your blttOS thru S i ... *tM-T %  |'oi. Uln ih*KI4> .M.. n^k.-,ouriufffrfm p N |hlt. N.r.nu>HM, l- ArMnc Jdt, A> "tiiy. or Barnlni I(.B. doo i '... %  i. offliimi mdlN.n4tmni 1*M .J h 1-ulMtl* tihih..k> lor* WMcrteUw € %  •!• %  C,i.m .i.iii*v>lli| in IhtMhSwrS. %  nun rn>v .r.inly MlMsUtyu b •ixdr U>* m*dMUt* *ou *—a • ..Cyst. ••HiSUt>.iH,.aMli The people of b'Arbodos" he *"d J> said, were fortunate in being al*P*>ndent. ways under the British tutelage. His lordship aura pronounced for In thi. way their standard of decree nisi In the suit of K. K. education had become better tln McCotlM) petitioner, and J. A. many other places. There *as McConnev. respondent, much illiteracy In th* West Indies In the suit of S. H. E. lluwell. i.nd the Society had to tackle petitioner and C. U Howell, rethut problem JIS w,ll as gettlrtg pondent. decree nisi was the B'ble transcribed In the varpronounced. IOUS languages. Mr Ei Wi Barrow, instructed by of ui,"m.,'. Nneeial tniiMl flaynes ft GrilBlh t* lUltors a|>i>eart | l( N..i th of the West Indies was about 15,000.000. he said that the Society's rate of progress, which was hampered through lack ofr__ Jt ftl -i _. funds, it would take many year, InjIITCfl III "<*l*It|il before thai they could make good headway. That was why, he ATIJVNTA. May said, he was making a special A train ploughed into a school appcul to the people lo assist the bus to-day Injuring 17 of 35 Society. school girl passenger* some serl,. He recalled that when he was ou*\y. The bus was carried 75 '.V fcl Know,, in England las! year, the Bishop tcct down the track. Wednesdny but was nfllciiiUy dof Hanover, Germany, came lo People rushed from nearby %  "• "' Hie tnm tiener.d I). I Bnaland asking to be provided houses and found bleeding girls. *f* sur|irlsci and ovsrwhstme witli 8Q.000 copleo of the BlUs A policeman said "many were unwhile he was ronfarting for 120.000 people who were conscious", llesriie workers hud COrnmunlat Ic.idi r at one of th about to be confirmed, but the\ the injured children along the 1'fiM.n g.i!-' iled N.i could sp-'ire only 20.000 copies, "hies of the railway Iraek. BOni OfBcsi Uoul Colonel Will.n Communism, he said, was iflTh r accident was just outside Robert VII rmiglit his w;iy d. ,t imical b. the gtwpel of Jesus. In Atlanta City. Ulcr the Injured 'f Ihe Commun.Ms and i-,.ip.il Bulgaria and Hungary Oerhos. were put into ambulances ami The Imprlionad uonaral wni lavikia their work of the societ? taken to the hospital A ipeetuKpjni In touch with UN had been closed down lor was the last to be helped from bj Held telephone An Finland has always been the scene. She fell from an em" atrong Protestant country and bankment while watching, and and he was reported to lie was one of their strom; centres broke both anklr> for spreading the gospel. —U.r. A>S m ^r^Sfl'Si GRANTS TO G.IENADA ss? JS srtLsr?& F OR I NSECT CONTROL work ihere was closed down. But irr, <>. o... i Key were sending Bibles t,i, Rug(iUKNAHA. \Uy !• na from Finland. Il was no Grants of $27,000 by U.N.1.C.EK. secret, he said, bul it was done an d $l.000 by WHO. both in li"ltrS| Wh,Ch hM 0l yCt b, e US currenc y hBVf b€ n m ,,e '" to secure (. release c-' . _, (iicn.ida for a two-year pro;m(1 for ^.hiuhmenl .MM-II : Barrier gramme of insect control partlcutonuM* "( unchallanfjod control He said Ihal Ihe Protestant | ar ly if the malarial nuwqulto. was a stronger barrier lo The Deputy Chief of UN.ICE F NOW... a new medicated dog soap WITH OISTIUCT AOViMTABCS %  I I .uid licki • PHRh IftSSM n'.ingc pfOfjKU |hf II.IIKI* TET'MdSOl' m.JLtli.1 tn\ r.r in, pleasant • non-irritant • invigorating • insccticidal icl IMPERIAL CHEMICAL (PHARMACEUTICALS) LTD. %  U! ""' i.cn-n 11 /-J-.i ( j(j-Ufn/ •OI I VIMS \Mi IHMHI.l | ^s% VACATION BARGAINS ifi /is.'V itfilit rti **>n in i lu-iiuns i*irr$ir StHJt it. Mi 1. lu t i fur 4 people Valise .. ., 2 ClWM Zlpp OfSM for i people H.itkel OOH for 3 people v IIMIU I . 'ii nn -'M nn 510.00 Now SI 6.04 $13.00 SI3 00 SI 3.00 SI3M KNIGHTS LTD. Q**"i: Chi %  c IIASUU4C.S for Morning Afternoon and Evening Wear • A wide range now available CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.! 10. II, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET r'llKSII SUPPLIES IV SIIHh %  a PURIN*! r.i POULTRY "l CHOW „ a DAIRY CHOW B"OMOLENE "DOG CHOW %  „ RABBIT %  sj CHECKERS %  PIGE0M %  CHOW *"G0AT CHOW r* II. JASON J0NF.S A CO. LTD. L, AGENTS 5 ^ w a i



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PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, MAY M. IMS CLASSIFIED ADS. TILf-HONE JS08 MBD BATBW \i< etaj HooplMl MM. Ophelia Rt.lhoalt* olf' of Mr j.mra r BrothWBIt*. OftV al I %  A u BMBly Hrr fu*i*r*l loavr* her .-lr Villa**. M In PU*n* Rolli • - '• Cairlaajtol Villa**, and IN>r<-* fcn In* ** burr CMN Frionda are %  iM hi MM I •MM/ |r"m (Kiub*nd> I I X ion BALE AfTOMOnVK THANKS Cl'IOtN We IM underatgnod. MHn through thla nNlum lo ..pre** U-uU 1* Kit tboae lta .IMMM lUArTal. Mftt ST-etb* 000 ollWf mao**a -rtM IP th* *-'•>> •* .air *rnen MnWia l'ur>m A B CtfriB lP.roTh.-r Mr. 1 nrnr Hwu. and 1 IS StIUlll>ITt Wr th* underaigned l. UII. li ihu, nunl i l.rn Wank. to all NM *•"i n MM water* << i^iu-.n. .XI t, mti (... death of Sdna Baotr..* BreUi.ait. Thd BrathwaB* and Clarh* F-mlllM of MUa.on Gap. Br.ttom Hill FOR HF..VT "rvAJsnux" ra*w H.U IM awing and l>'i %  %  PrS.V-w at Welch'* Fend. St MM— DWWM and Turning NHM .'AK .On* il> AwM IBM notrl T*lepho Scott Co.. Lid CAR -'II M rrd.r Apply J ] M up* in prefect i ftmmmm m VIU II" CAR--On* (II INI HIIBnon ITAdO nl*a Perfect condition, going rh. Hamilton, it. Lawn CAIt-On* 1M1 llilln.*.. CM In I nr .!** mUM. PhOOl II.IBI* )'U or altar Noun %  !•* %  i.haii -• Saloon H Price l.* 40 am FattmtoN irrti.irv l Bgfeaj pa %  Apply. McDonald 190 Roebuck Str.et IIH-ln OFFICIAL NOTICE IN TUB lOlIT or (-NANCVBT llAltflADOa IN FVMSVAMCE of lb* Ch-"C*" Act, l"> mo t'f rtfM CiiniN-.W If. n ..Barling UT l-oprrty brWniWfr MflltlMMd IK* dele-.tmt I* bring *'m* %  ••"" ' *"•*' "" !" ** -T^ITTr" ...y Tii***— ..r Friday bc*• % % % % % %  %  •• * * 5ir u r liridgetoon. before the U< day of JoJ* I*". In thai nch claim* may b* reported ana rwtko* % % % %  *' • ~*h p*.aonwill be pea th* beneftU of any deer** and a* dopnv*d of all alalm. on o aftml P'opcrt) OltV*. *n> It** or I .thr pi<*fty lul, 1MB lo MM natt SHIPPING NOTICES GOVERNMENT NOTICES .„.Al* At BT /• M ISli I ISI IM A N E. UMI IIKi %  u •ehoCuMd to aall '. r*b*uar T 14th Mrlbourn* Mai oh Jtd. &rdnr Manth la*. Bnabano March Und arrlvina al TilnMad i iQMBr*1 all TMAT loilalu BUM QT ••/*•' O^ laoA altual* noaf Watn fa! uJ^-hiTS' t-in bv *lDJt* four found by raont HIIW l contain Hv th*r*ab.iuU abuititif and boundintf r X* Cox and 0—•"< ' ,• J"2L? "" '^ it,, .ant* ma obut ***" KIM and atx prrcho* at !" th* North on Uada M land* loimarly of AlWn WaKott ,,., %  •MM forgo acc*ptod on throudh Billa < i.. i*u for uanahlpmanl at Trinidad I RrKHp Qhllano. L**ward an.l Wlndwai lalandA F'p*n*i* -nrt qiiaiidA M*t roitDC. Haaaaaaan I Jit t a FABAWAV M Phlhp i %  **• 1 t>*footna FiilW furntahrd l.llhtbMI plant m,a*wnlli .jp*.y Douhu Car Port t*. aarooni roami Pm, Mai l.t Phon. ** . KB— t.ln FI.AT AND iroUME-rtiNy" furntabarf •L Lawrence on H*a Anllabl* Ar" on rhenc •* ttv nut* ln**rti"' •ar neat Wmtn. .l U—t f n MO'X vt tmni nun mri %  %  in mod r.tor* and too Off,, r. at No 7: Bw Aupl' t„ (• |. Mldwoba Ko. IB Sv. Bft SI—ftn mtWHAVBrf — Cra a* CBMR. 4 bai rootoa Piih) furriaf r-t Hahl i Watorn.tll oupply. If lu bl* OMBMB, thid PhilMMii for Bt lAir-ta Or*o-1:1 Cargo and Paaaonaori lor Doo>lr.*ta, An>rt>. Mant— n ot, ana and Bt KitW Hailing Friday Mh hMMBM Th* M.V MONEXA will accept Cargo and PoojiogNf for DoaaI'KI. Antigua. M jooMo m MawM MaM U'rel and hatf-TTaaa> Uorag* 10 II NOTICK APPLICATSONH lor on* or moi vacant at Mnha.li V*lat HarrUon College will b by the ( noon on Friday. Ihr Bird d. IBM Candidate* mual be Uie aw. i a'd muit '-.ut b* leu than B nor more %  i of ay* on the sath June. Its. lo ha proved BS Baptl-r-1 C*ctlncote v Forma of application can be Bbla in aB Iron th* Vc-tr. Clerk offlc* I i U I \M Clerk. St Michael*. Va.l %  i '•% %  on* Hi 1-ton Auelln True*. \p| y n V SCOTT at Co Lid. Whll* ( Road ELBCTKICAL NOTICE PABISM OF BT TNOMAB APFPI li Al IOMB *M t |h* Bt Mlehaol'i Girl.' Seh'xil "I the annual value of Si -III I-* i.clvrtl by tha ..ndemuned up to Buth Mat. 1*41 .lUlli.il of parnhloiiCM CANADIAN it.i.' Robot I)!" to soh.e a1 problems TOi^ Atom scientist* It Canada* Clia % R search itaUoii ars % %  xprr 10 use a C100 10 "brain nov. M the Unlvirsity of T fntll l.M':' IT) : The robot brittn gJl mathematical protlM nuclear pta*alc "nKinc r nnd aatronomy ino Urn', cast as a man The marhme ;* ai"> in 1 used In Can ; : a solve a %  • SS. "COLUMIilA STAR"* SS. "TRIBESMAN'* ELECTOR" Fram Newport At Liverpotri Liverpool In don Glasgow & Uverpool :,Mi lias 7th May 10th May Ihie H.,rlM.li18th MQ> %  Mh M t] 28th Mu> 17th May 1st June B.SO p-ai.—8.00 pjn. rueaday— 4.t0 p.m—8.00 p.m. .. Cake and Pastry Making Elementary Pattern Drafting VV.dneaday—4.30p.m.—0.00 p.m. .. Caribbean Cookery. Simple Dressmaking. Thursday—4 30 pm-B.W p.m. Elementary Cake Icing Advanced Dressmaking. Friday — 4.30 p.m.—6.00 p.m. .. Butlerinfl. Advanced Handicrafts. Registration for all classes will take place at the Housecraft Centre, 1 Bay Street, between 10.00 a.m. and 12 noon, and between 2.00 p.m | and 5.00 p.m on Wednesday, 14th and Thursday, 15th May. 1952. Fees for all classes must be paid in adcance for the torm, at the lime of registering. 5/for each course In Sewing. Pattern Drafting, Smocking and Handicrafts. 13/for each course In Cake k Pastry Making, Cake Icing. AaaorUii Dishes, Caribbean Cookery, Butlcring, Preserves and Sweets Making t/will be refunded at the end of the term h. all students win ttend 75% of their clasae*. 7.3.52.—2n. Hum U MH FOR TIIF rNITTD K1VODOM Veaael S S, GHELJtOSA" SS. "HERDSMAN'For Uverpool Li...lull (-'•sea In %  BI.IIII KHh May 19th May for further lnformstl*n applv t DA COSTA A CO.. LTD.—AtnU ^Aicoo.St^^C"NEW YORK SF.KVIC E THE PIONEER INDl/ATRIEft (ENCOI RAOEMENT) ACT. 1M1 Tho Governor-ln-Eaiecutlve Cornmittce, pursuant lo serttan t <2) fa) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951. hereby %  luses this notice to be published of his Intention to make the Order s .t out below declaring the manufacture of wax and wax products to 1* a pioneer industry and wax and wax products from sugar cane t be pioneer products of that industry. 2. Any person who objects to the making of the Order set out below is hereby Invited to give notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds on which he relies in support thctcof to the Clerk t" the Executive Committee on or before the 21st day of May one thousand nine hundred und fifty-two so that due consideration may higiven to any objections received pursuant to this notice. ORDER THE PIONEER IN'DI'ATRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT. 1831 The Pioneer Industry (WAX and WAX PRODUCTS) Order. 1932 The Governor-In-Executive Committee, in exercise of the powers (..inferred on him by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Art, 1951, hereby makes the following Order :— 1. This Order may be cited as the Pioneer Industry (Wax and Wax Products) Order. 1932. 2. The manufacture of wax and wax products Is hereby declored to be a pioneer Industry and the following articles are hereby declared to be pioneer products of that Industry :— Wax and wax products from sugar cane. Made by the Governor-In-Executive Committee this day of one thousand nm %  hundred and fifty-two. By Command, Clerk, Executive Committee. 29.4.32—3 n THE PIONEER IMM-ii'.n(ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1931 The Governor-in-Exetutiv.' Committee, pursuant to section 3<2>(a) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951, hereby ciuses this notice lo bt published of his intention to moke the Ordei set out below declaring the spinning and knitting of cotton yarn and the manufacture of garments therefrom to be a pioneer industry and the spinning and knitting of cotton yarn from West Indian ..itton and the manufacture of garments therefrom to be pioneer p.oducts of that industry. 2. Any pen^m who objects to the making of the Order set out below is hereby Invited to give notice in writing of his-objection and jl the grounds on which he relies in support thereof to the Cleric to the Executive Committee on or before the 21at day of May one thousand nine hundred and llfty-two so that due consideration may be given to any objections received pursuant to this notice. (i R n K R THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (EN( OIRAOFMENT) ACT. IS1 I he Pioneer lndumtry (SPINNING AND KNITTING OF COTTON VARN AND THE MAM'FACTCKE Orf. \RMFNTS) Order. 195? The Governor-1n-ExecutiVe Committn In akstfvtM of the powers conferred on "nm by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouiaitement) Act. 1951, hereby makes the following Order :— 1. This Order may be cited as the Pioneer Industry (Spinning and Knitting of Cotton Yarn and the Manufacture of Garments) Order, 1952. 2. The spinning and knitting of cotton yarn and the manufacture of garments therefrom is hereby declared to be a pioneer industry and the following articles are hereby declared to be pioneer products of that Industry :— The spinning and knitting of cotton yarn from West Indian cotton and the manufacture of garments therefrom. Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this day of one thousand nine hundred and fifty-two. By Command. Clerk, Executive Committee. 29.4.53—Sn. THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT. 1931 The Govcmor-in-Executivc Committee, pursuant to section 3(2)(a) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Act. 1951, hereby causes this notice to be published of his intention to make the Order set out below declaring the manufacture of sugar confectionery and nut food products to be a pioneer industry and boiled confectionery, lollipops, mints and Icing sugar, and every variety of nut food products to be pioneer products of that industry. 2. Any person who objects to the making of the Order set out below Is hereby invited to give notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds on which he relies in support thereof to the Clerk to T 1 v Executive Committee on or before the 21st day of May one thousand nine hundred and fifty-two so that due consideration may be given to any objections received pursuant to this notice. ORDER THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT. 1951 the Pioneer Industry (SUGAR CONFECTIONERY AND NUT FOOD PRODUCTS) Order. 1952 The Governor-in-Executive Committee, in exercise of the powers (conferred on him by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Act. 1951. hereby makes the following Order:— 1. This Order may be cited as the Pioneer Industry (Sugar Confectionery and Nut food products j Order, 1933. 2. The manufacture of sugar confectionery and nut food products is hereby declared to be a pioneer Industry and the following articles are hereby declared to be pioneer products of. that Industry :— boiled confectionery, lollipops, mints and Icing sugar, and every variety of nut food products. Mad" the Oovemor-in-Executive Committee this iv f one thousand nine hundred an.i Itfty-two By Command, Clerk, Executive Committee. 29.4.53—3n. THE PIONEER INDUSTRITS (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT. 1931 The Guvemor-ln-FTecuttcp < ommittee, pursuant to section :t'21(a) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951, hereby causes this notice tf. be published nf his intention to make the Order *et out below decla.ing the manufacture of ham. bacon and meatcuring to be a pioneer industry and ham, bacon and other food products produced from meat of locally-reared pigs to be pioneer products of that industry. 2. Any person who objects to the making of the Order set out below is hereby invited to give notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds on which he relies in support thereof to the Clerk 10 the Executive Committee on or before the 31st day of May on* •housand nine hundred and fifty-two so that due consideration may lie given to any objections received pursuant to this notice. THE FAMILY FALKS FOR HAPPY HOMES" STOKES & BVNOE LTD. AGEHTSORDER THE PIONEFIt INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT. 1931 The Pioneer Induelry (HAM. BACON AND MEAT-CURING) Order, ltft The Govern or-in-Executive Committee, m xercie of the powers conferred on him by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Eneourngi mi>nt> Act. 1951. hereby makes the following Order :— 1, This Order may be cited as the Pioneer Industry (Ham, Bacon and Meat-curing) Order. 1932. 2. The manufacture of ham, bncon and meat-curing is hereby declared to be a pioneer Industry and the following articles arc hereby declared lo be jrioneer products of that industry :— Ham, bacon and other food products produced from meat of lornlly-rrare'i Made by the Govern or-in,—Executive Committee this day of one thousand nine hundred and vBy Command, Clejrk, Executive Committee. 29.4.52—3n



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SATURDAY MAY 10. 152 BARBADOS ADVOCATE r \C.E SF.VEM HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNCJOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS A REMINDER BUY PEEK FBEM BISCUITS TO-DAY. 'Wo? QufcJt'r<>< a few drop* %  f Vkt V..ir.vi->l up tachno.it il Imtaiion i* nothad, voue not*' 'or*m Up" and you bieathe freely again 1 Va-uo-nn. olten help* pmmtt bad coUt and fh> V.CKSVA-TRO-NOL NOSl MOPS If you knew her secret you, too, could be more charming, lovely, attractive •nj (he watt of hrt MI i active new II Odo-Ro-No. Doo'i Ut orfrn.ting tin.lfiim inJouf I pod youl ruiufal frriiineu. • CMo-Ro-No yfily nop* pertpiraiion %  nd odour for a dill 2* hour*. • Odu-Ko-N'o lUyi creamy longer -never gelt gritty even in open iar. • No deodorant cream it v> haraiIe*t i.) i.l'im at Odo-Ro-No. • No deodorant creun it gcntlar ut even ""mi. skin, and RUM raty 10 ute. ODO-RO-1,0 ^mt* CREAM Til* daodorant without ,. .loubl *T.# IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only M'l .1 l.\l. Ol I IIIS arr u<> uviiilultltut •• % % %  lliamlns I n rrdoidr, S|><-iuliisio % %  mill SHIIII Siri'4'1 Tin* KI.IM—(5 lb.) Tin* MEAT LUNCH .. Pkg. MIXED NUTS .. Usually Now Usually Now 6.14 5.84 Tin* MELON & ODtSHI JAM .46 .38 .45 .40 Tin. TOMATOES :lli .34 1.10 M Bottle TENNENTS BEER „ 26 .23 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street THE < <> I. O \ \ A II I I. II II II II I I S IAMM Ol'T I OH St \n 1 V& 1 DVOCA TE and win $25.00 AT THE SAME TIME YOU CAN HELP THE FAMNtJM I'Oil VINLAND ll\ '/'' %  '•'''''''''•'''''•''•+''''' r '.'S,','.'.'.',','^^^ I AV//W IMPORTANT NOTICE ALL PERSONS WHO ORDERED The Pictorial Record of KING GEORGE VI IhrouKh Ihe Advocate Stationery are specially uiUUed to Call lor their Copln TO-DAY. Failing In call. these copies will no longer be reserved but will be on sale to the public from SATURDAY. MAY 10TII. The MM of the Book is . . 92.72 ADVOCATE STATIONERY V****'SS&&*&****&****^JV*&***S. 1 yy V s^ssSSSSSS**&SS*''-"'''"' !M ''



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PAGE EIGHT BABBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY. MAY It. INI WEIGHTUFTTNG AND uojmn DJMNG IS. UBVIN IIIM.I.IIS The Indian Touring Team .. %  UONI rti IncUaii touring i. Kiiflamd. In the put. such perJ! Ranjit%  'Duleep' thr English spectatorwith ihcn n,..|'*stn battlDi Mor %  im IM6 ;. ..1 Pal ilidl brouAi go .! -iciiKht t-II who watchetl them. This year, who knows? Will the Ih another 'Ran)!' 01 I ( •Nrr.iM.mli-iil Ill*w\RI. I Kl 1919. A brilliant rover Hold*. %  %  'i i HH • i IN nol out .-,ff-int Kalasthan in IBM-52 *M(II\M" -h (Bom%  boul M %  tired 230 .'i 200 minuU-* for BomI %  t Maharashtra He I i lam-medium bowler a llI lik- %  w^ ^# r. %  ,.i.^reii i." had Iiliouaands 01 W >. div.-,tght hand betsnw. ROY Pankai (Bengali. Born %  %*• '" A T „ r.nliihcrotU moil or Hairing art-tdml. is certain own. Teach ^Tp r-• I ...urist. are unknown Fxcrution West Indies and Ihrre against th,' :<' be India's opening batsman. His .,• more, in aBBT %  re H.jjire lhi. veer's raotnln MCC lligheal %  • %  • -gate of S87 runs In the five II. more resistance I I the MCC lilt season each training day, and , .... ... imt rHOHIHIIHV NIK an Indian record Made his will be. me %  ...,. h 1„ % %  „ lv( h ., wn0 _,.,,.„, ,,.., ,,„,,, B I'.-'" 111 in 1M7 and celebrated by t''mwmtt^nmm university in fsl end I FUmcfcwd h i U>W MOW IK.II, pUycl League crirK-t * •and> of year, ago I... On their bat dejr. practice I "* %  th ehnw!. calf Icom the lime B wl %  losing years of !.nrds. they had a Uune „I Uu|>i\|cin i %  ,. h-nta straight drive, and weeks old until ii l LflllaVy. weather they may experience H, ,, ,, ..„ powerlol bull lu the % %  Vi we come down the ages, the this summer. There was %  keen England Twice appeared to' S \ halt \ i i %  .trashekhr %  up and broken by the wind, and many of them ... irl i 9i H I onhtiiplalc• | ;,,,,, i with lla'ar. Kl .,, bowl ,. leg-break ana goody man In II %  %  U) greying hall give, i .. ii Icll, distinguished JPpeer,,.. r „i babjman in a I may on the I Ml i %  *f •**• not yet hit eenturj nrst-cuan wfl look would endeavour to provide the and you Od replace hin I I Sport* Window • Oarlteu meet *t KTIflTHtyn tBli fcfteriioon bl u.a Drat saaU-aaa] gasae of tat Knock-oat OeMBtrtiuon Empire were raaaent-ap to Kotre Due in the Senior Con.p-t.Uon tbla H eJOP uMl BUO (Bined the M mi of beinc tne only toaa. to dofeet la •kMBtooi UUB neBKOu. C-MIUMI on the other baud hove boon Unprovlng wit* •rerr gaBM and the matfb UUs *ft*rnoon •honld bo intorootlOi.li p. ... I! "'" I wilh lovvdon *hoet* and i CIKIU,;' Almost a century mio, Italia with rant!) %  %  record* U. Mhodj I .. | became known us r %  Uh i CurUi bowlc* MCC nlurics i.i %  IN Born HHttW-61 RtnJI tournamenv lfr26. Ma for the Su m merhayes Tennis Tournament u \. s. Cato Dftkm vs. D. A. Wib's and C. R. A'.ktnoon was played nut was iinnniln-'l. 11.-%  w,'. uad ereatesl ato* ,, t „„,,„ ST, ,..„lal %  A '"" *** .iddtll I .',mc "J %  ", %  ,,.,""", '''",. h as I.reak, ,.d V&l~.< \ quicker than K ball w.'ll And that AHUM no. -• called upon OUM not w ^7 ';'X, iK.th most left-orn %  >>r cold v-tMiner, •>• %  _„ %  „_ lh „„ w u .n %  „ v .i.krfp and fihulam Ahnv. %  """ h(l w ",, tn 1943. i 1 iitli %  r^t-rl;i %  swina inenew urn. m i-itvj s|||\lll • .,^i they ...... t:.y. 'the F.ngI •' left-handed <1M ) googly Imwler and ..men a mat deal "< '-HI LA.M AUMs.ll (Hydert,. rir.il md b One ol Ihe th ,hl„ '" U ""'" '"-• %  Snare would MJ little ol I illy bellevi in spinn -•" chonoM but !• o„ ,ha'i the role of chief Maine! Ihe W.M In %  anil two did nol ..-at i .. e...—•• %  _— %  .. .iiiaieiui ih— vis-'/-%  —.1—.a ee-.i— a.___ •!•__ i>u Improvod con %  r-niii, in i.iviiur oi wnesand shoulders that the roi<"' •""' "*?T 1T. '' """" i,n lw l:'" ""*"" %  •" %  • ,1.9-7.8-6. rua-Heltcr may fall. For althouph ;'*ir UtoMCC Alntt Holkai Since hen h ^^ iflklt* alt l a***i4unL who WM the most pron I9.1i> •d thai the match will w. lm Britain roc medli ' %  MCC. i n the trophlei [Of ttU Double; uo has lonahlni will be %  I I %  %  in theae wen I rowing ai Ih n ro vcntol*so i true_ !l mSTXTZ S"*l "<*<* Tndiiy's Fixture Mc-ns Singles Klnal H I'll, n. be Singles Cup ,. ..iiiiounied if I", he rill U) ValenOne f.„ the West l.i.l, ffer hi. -.ryi.'. • 'He Third Test outride chance of him pUylnl nl Nlt...Ehnm in IU50. CUlmed i ,„ lhat of the helemen nine wickets In Ihe innings %  Iln.ril.cr hay. ex ,,,,'• d 1947- „f Fneli.l. cond ...il'1-.WM .,., rc0 Dar .,. ,|„. net Hats I Horn 1930. A ncy which in'pireforcing rifht-h...... i.i who is ex%  ,.n-;id. ...,„.... 'hat whatever other dellnlliant fielder and catcher in th. I an>n. nhyal alia 1 l | chosen si.. %  ill A I I laid. Wc are v. Hta flnal well H.C., PICKWICK DEFEAT M.H.S., FORTRESS Harrison I ted HodHiiCh Srhool 43—19. and ago. even i OUI II"' >' ',' ,. t.l'.l ,........! I'...:.,.. 4.1 (, lv ,.,„ k.tball Dkiung n.liht Cyr beli' i Couege Gibson bc.n th. with m lived. I' %  "I 10 of all lime, ond 1 9. hool. • %  icket lovers. .ill, the -un fin. IfCC 1 \N 'I.I I, \l: irk will he eeh.^.l (Bomhai | I. We pi %  "" a".' V .yard to 1-1 XII. a. i ltJI. T h i th" side. As I Here ." ., cVtitu^c, I .., „. .kk.l.r with the County Cricket LONDON, May 9. Al Lord* Middlesex tteat I>erby hlrc by nine wicket' Df^"" 2ir.. Rhodes M. and *eeondly Moss five for 15. Middlesex 234. Denis Compton nr Rhodes four for 46 nnd %  •LeafiM tinI" 0pr4>V i %  %  Euscne Sando*being iru' famous Ol %  ilv 72 for one. Oxford, the Oxford UniverYorkshlre match w >tingest player toy scored two m school cricket. lu a also scored .n liunii Ouieli mi Ins Jr,t inid U flm %  I.i I Ifth man in Ihe F i MANTRI. M ,,ii'.,, | Bomb j I, Born 1922 Wlcket-keep. i B .II Mtao holds Indian n %  "' I' %  "I'' -l %  T ', I, ,„ ;l|1 1 >i %  %  i! in one Teal no nvieh promiKo. Will n. olaca m Iba Tr • PIIADKAK Dattaray iltombav) nm 1925. A AM .,II roundel %  U tarn t* one of Hto Of Ihr lidl HH i.i. .M.I ofcarl and m Ii wi n aei MBK.AR Ratanji (Otijerot) I %  -"I'knutned % % %  a l l %  i kefctt for two years. Ls a strong d a good B3 poaHion. Also bowls I In one Watt 1 %  )' live againii Ui ISO not out in thr la*t fune at %  i •ra in 1951-52. At DavU 14, ..nd Mrs. Mi K.n/i.Viitk-blre 409 for eiRht %  E&JSBXSB& i %  It h HMM man kna t.n .. : %  %  tniiiinK to haw '^ ; atn-iuitb ;,M """ la* that |haj till lainmi.today WhiiiUiej did not hwe the advant IK< -I flat adjusii.i'i'today, those men "' decade* of thi I the opening years of tin knew mui ins In 1902 Alan 1 j • ui.' a rbelli %  I which ,,-ity 131. At BMrmtnho .Inre-Hampahlre i the Warwick%  tch was abanwhich wore to *hire-nam|a.mn-...-" "-J" V. played tonight ;.t ^'^-^^.htdeHnred lla^ 'i .Kwtponed i hire 1> for eight deeln •.hire did not bat. At Cambridge, the Cambridge University Eex match B Forde. S. Blackthe title since he won it in ScpfcelghUiftl M i.u. mm; Frmrords E. Unton. C irmber 1949 by beating Dick Turbut th. Bne II ouoi>. R, Haynet. V. pin f Britain In the find round popular quick .in> "t ii-ii' %  !..., X'.V. They 11 Do It Every Time J*y_Ji inuny II.ulo int..I with English rllw ,:'.-.::',.. ,',:','*'s.;' e *sss Grand Dance HI i WEATHER REPORT YESTEKDAV KaialeUI ir.-m (udrinKU.ii: .01 lu. i .ri.ii rainfall for month l #** :i\ In, lllgbcot Teni|>eraHire: 87.5 F. I.IIHI-M TemperaUin-: 7i* F. t\Uui Velocity mile* per hour %  L.n.ni.-U-r' t9 a.m., -JO.IMU (3 p.at.) 29.927 TO-DAY %  Minns.5.40 J.m Suoart: S.16 p.m. Moon: Pail. May I. l-ijehlinc 7.00 p.m. Hilh Tide: 3.M a.m.. 4.43 LeOVf Tide1?6 a.m.. I0.M WHAT'S ON TODAY Ml ll.i.nllll llll-Mil (milIIK i<! Coo ii., F.N.iUSH CnurMii -,,r Ovel*ea*~ .ludrnU. For nUEK S.'HSIAS BTUDENTS I/1NDON n'NTANrV. 11. Dvifce JaM-'. London S.W 1 E il.r. even thr -.v ol Truth r paid, mankind bleeaed. and | WP.II.IH) '. i i ill book may be read, borrowed I piintuaed %  ( Ihr Readlns Moom I ( I ( < 2 up. faasaan w4.*ax. rnk J ease IO a a. t: P M4 I fj %  aanraari '• ' •• ofeasel •* A MX ARg WBfoMi; %  MR. PiOBMAM i v> II l i al ih,. MAKCilFlaX.li SOCIAL CLAJB N : ., MIINDAl Mi.II I , ijui May. 195: ADMISSION. 2 . Music b> •; Mr. 1-rrt v tirern mN .-'--. '-'-'---*,*,*,',',-,Barn Dance IHE KAKHADOS .Mil AIIC CLUB -jturday' SlMMar al 9 a.m. Music by CARIBBEAN TKOI'nADOt'RK" VUmissiou lo Hallruom $1.00 r',v*'-'--*'-*-'->'*'-''''*'*-*''-'''*';C IAMK mr von 8CNDA Y*S ADVOCA TE s !• and win AT THF. SAME TIME YOU CAN HELP THI". S i \nxi\i nut n\i.\\n ff r v. WORLD'S MOST COPIED MOR i-iit/ims — tisiiif/ eV.%#/*g*. 1 *i/>t>ii%inif €Mf mmd MOW lHi:sB-:r This \\ underfill ni.i.-liitie is now also .ivnilable with I ll.l. TKAtKK You'll ,. | r „|y .nn.i/.d to sitIbis small' % %  "kmMill pcrformiiij; j„hs. both bj (lufield >nd mi the mad. Ih.it are In > ond u lm I rr:ntors of twice its BM M'pewer. This Tractor is indeed llie friend of l.otli Ihfl sinull anil Inrifr Pl:n lataOB tnrmn alike and Ihe prifi M well erifhEn vnir re:ich. II *shtiH §*Ifti %#•#/ it* tn rtiiiifiav llf'lfu*tl-4lli!!/ %  Ii t/IK-st IIW1II III THW.>I I I'llllll IOIRTESY U Alt At. %  • DIAL 11,1.. ZormtL l Ills HOW 11 xi n I \I.I-: IMLMKSiWHITK NHH 31" fl gl.e.. sir. A tar. BLl'E %  liI H I 1 He. BEIGE onl, 31ft Me. KHAKI SHIRTING 27" 0 He. KHAKI SHIRTING H~ ? Hr STRIPE Jle W-l". 14 r STRIPE Me Mr. '•. — ALSO — PLAIN JERSEY 4" wide al 1.1 err .....1 ...n.,1,1, lor night wear. Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10, 11. 12 & 13 Broad Street NOW1 Dental Science Reveali HOOf THAT MIMHINO IEIIH HIOHT ArTH IATUM IS THI SAM, IFHCTIVE WAY TO HELP STOP TOOTH DECAY with Colgate Dental Cream GIA.iT . He. LARGE. See. MED. .. 24r. In OHO ttupvi'b 'fr..... here is everj thing you waul •••nSe^aOaya^Hai A car lti.il keep* aimJ ot .lie i,ucue in lown tra-l < in ihe ODJD rood, i car that lap* the mile* in safety anj comron. Sealins for live in comfort. 70 horse power sixcylindcr cnijine thai runs a> smooth as Wlk. SiedUn column near nhifl. Torsion-bat imlcpenoent from wheel xispen.ion and chassis raalnant lo luit. Tver, featur that appeal* 'O car pioud ownon will be found > i niaMerpiece Morris. > SEE IT AT I OHT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. i hour 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504 IIV' ran aupply Iron* xlorkm l RITTAI.I. STEEL SLIDING FOLDING DOORS THE IDEAL DOOR FOR VERANDAHS The Whole Door slides and fold, lo one side. .S'.tpjilird in lU'o Sire. . 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PAOl roea II KII 1HIS U>WK Air. Mil KIM\ \l\\ I" MM UAKBMX)S gjaj, AlAUuAl 1 ur Ion....,,., HeH.ag>-2 I rails*is I. oi t. — Saturday. May III. 1,52 KOICI \\ 1)11 I >l>l I THE Korean Truce Talks have been going on for nearly a year and there is still no armistice. Observant listeners to radio bulletins will have noted the many occasions on which meetings between Communist and United Nations delegates at Panmunjom ended after one minute, half a minute, one and a half minutes etc. Meanwhile hostilities continue and the Communists lose no opportunity to accuse the United Nations of prolonging the fighting", using i;erm warfare and brutalising prisoners. The facts are so different. The United Nations are particularly anxious t<> see the end of the fighting in Korea. Only the highest motive of honour and the noblest sense of international responsibility keep United Nations troops in an area from which they would only be loo willing to return to their homeland. This truth is strikingly illustrated by the most recent developments in the Korea truce talks. The Communist delegates at Panmunjom are insisting that the United Nations should return more than 62,000 North Koreans and Chinese prisoners of war before an armistice can be signed. On the face of it nothing seems more logical or more easy of fulfilment than this request. One of the articles of the Geneva convention guarantees a prisoner of war rights Of repatriation. Refusal to return prisoners of war might well seem to be a highhanded action not in keeping with the article of the Geneva convention. But the United Nations have made a census of prisoners of war in their hands and more than 62.000 have declared their unwillingness to be repatriated. Prisoners of war cannot be forcibly repatriated at the point of a bayonet: they must desire to return. General Ridgway's offer of an armistice to the Communists includes the proposal that imemdiately an armistice is concluded opportunity should be given for an international commission to examine the reluctant prisoners of war again. The Time* of London this week commenting on the delay of the armistice in Korea suggests that the United Nations might make the concession of allowing Midi an examination of reluctant prisoners Of war to be carried on before the signing of an armistice. No doubt such a concession could be made and no doubt it will be made if by making it there is any real chance of promoting the armistice which is so ardently desired by the United Nations. But the facts are that the United Nations have already carried out such a census and have discovered that no less than 62.000 or more than half the total number of prisoners of war in their hands do not want to be repatriated. Commonsense makes it plain that so large a quantity of prisoners are a liability to the United Nations. Expediency would suggest that they should all be sent back whether or nut they wanted repatriation. But the forcible repatriation of prisoners of war many of whom would kill themselves before arrival at their destination would in the words of Mr. Anthony Eden be repugnant to the sense of values of the civilised world. Surrender in time of war is regarded as treason in China and the prisoners of VU in United Nations camps hear Chinese broadcasts about mass purges and executions in China. So far from being guilty of the wild charges brought against them by the Communists, the United Nations Forces in Korea are actuated by the highest moral principles. It is unthinkable that men, even pnsoners-of-war, should be driven across the lines at the point of a bayonet. There is another side to the picture. Refusal to send back Communist prisoners of war might lead to reprisals against United Nations prisoners of war in Allied hands. The Communists can also lake act .on against the families of prisoners who refuse repatriation. In this event greater butchery might result than boa the forcible repatriation of prisoners. And if hostilities in Korea should extend to a larger theatre of war might the Communists not persuade British prisoners Of war by some of the modern techniques of "confessions" not to seek repatriation? The refusal of the United Nations to compel prisoners of war to return to what seems certain death in their countries of origin is based on the highest humanitarian principles. The action reflects the great value which the United Nations place in individual freedom, but the dilemma remains in Korea. Nothing is settled by this praiseworthy action. And the end of the truce talks is not yet in sight. Cavalier* and Roundheads Barlargo rneasii ,,n lne THI career of Francis Lord [* %  'it. established by strict enforce) J % %  %  %  %  of that ^ w Willoughby lakeus back lo an Henry Haul'., confirmed by The Colonial pioneer almost forgotten episode in the Ayseue %  -.utive of Whtn fh arll II %  • ir, "d *er great civil war bctwe. ti King "P Eng..*.. ..,„..,*:.( anre„„,, Charles I and the Roundheads. At oV". 'be assurance was given thai the ilhilrMi Huvler the outbreak of that wjr. few Englishmen Uvfelfl in the colon people in England seemed to know ought lo enjoy all the rights of After seven '"* 'be or care anything about Barbados. Englishmen livm in England, coast of Afilc e i anu> to Barba]'.v-l happy rela*nd it was recognised that no taxes do* with %  mament lions With the Dutch merchantshould Inmade on the Barbadians But, although he did much dammen who piled their trade in the*e without their cmiKnt in a (General agw to thr • >ilpin the harbour. parts and, whan the civil war beAssembly. h waB un bltf tn lBnfl \ Willoughgan. our trade with the Dutch When it is remembered that the hy's defence ag-'in*! him being Interference, same scntli ... > hAli against 1 Before long, however. report* of D> 'he Amen<-jn colonistduring Sir George Avsrue Thin did WilIha ist.ind's prosperous trade with 'heir revolt from England more loughby win a notable \ the Dutch reached England. The than a hundred years later, Wil. gainst the man who was later to Royalists were the first to reeogloughby and the Barbadians will bring shame and Indignation to nise the importance of Barbados be regarded as pioneers in the the Mother Country when he not only a* a trading centre but as struggle for colonial freedom. Insailed up the Thames and desa strategic outpost In the New deed, it has Ixen claimed that the troyed English ships in the MedWorld. They seemed to guess, as terms won from Sir George wa y, Cromwell afterward! clearly realAyseue were later taken note of ised, that the West Indian colonies by the American colonists and Willoughhv 'ife ended in the were destined to play no small 'hat the Articles of Agreement way he would pirhapa have part in British trade and war drawn up in Barbados in 1652 chosen. Aa Ciptam General and during the following hundred arai were to give .-hape lo the AmcriGovernor-in-chief of all the fifty years. <* Declaration of Indcpcndcnce Caribboe Islands, bo could not After Charles I was executed In In 1778 confine his attention In Barbados, 1649. Barbados, along with the alone. In May 1666 he set out.' American Colonies, remained loyal The Autocrat w ,ih a considerable expedition, to to the Royalist cause. Indeed the Although Barbados received punish the 1 the Dutch Island lost BO time, after the such favourable terms, Wllloughf or the damage thev had done in ; King's execution, in proclaiming by himself wanot treated fairly other West Indian islands. Unl %  King as Charles II. This and ordered to leave the island tunately, after capturing St. Lucia. mnvlnced the Royalists that the contrary to the ArUcles of Agreehis fleet'was overtaken by a hurtirne had come to take action and ment. But when 'he Commonticane and he pemheo with the: it was unanimously decided l>y wealth came to an end and Charles majority of his men. Thus ended [ the advisers of Prince Charles that II ascended the throne. Wllloughthe career of a m. boys told the House then breaking up for a vacation to study the Maude Bill while he was away in Geneva. The House could hardly do that because it hadn't come off the Press much before Mr. A left Switzerland. But this week while Mr. A -i is in France (Guadeloupe being a de-1 partment of France) everybody's reading Maude or at least the local government bill based on Maude. Normally not more than live dozen bills are printed for the edification of the 60 or less (Wt> pie who go through the motions of reading them. But what with vestrymen and others clamouring for the Bill the government has run off some 300 copies. Even Nobody is reading it while the wound in his heel keeps him off the beach. PLASTIC PROPELLING PENCILS LONG LEAD, SCRIPTO PENCILS, BREAK PROOF I8r. each • \lYO< A11 STATION EHY iu^vii-vi aan .JIP", T.I.IVI.,.1we mill Hi • %  i w< !" %  • .. %  / l>y was again sent out to Barbados, been said, did more than any one Tiiaav I wa* *n thrilled Ills restoration at Governor did t„ extend the British Kmpire In ,up "y—' was so thrilled -.> ~..-ul rirnriUh. If— fc^.l • %  f 111 Tiipbnr'c titlr iKr.nl "Til SIR OEOROE AY8CUE and LORD WILLOUGHBY of Far ham. this measure, the Barbadians, with Willoughby ai their spokesman, made the striking claim that parliament, tn which they were not represented, had l badians resented the Idea that they without parliament earned him ild have to depend on the noble the censure of those who supportlord's goodwill for the enjoyment ed Samuel Farmer and the Barof the estates they had now come hadlan Petition of Right* Ardent to regard as ihcfr own. Eventualand impulsive, like olhri | tn legislature of Barbados, who set out to build up England's rged on by Willoughby, decided empire overseas, he could also be ..„ right tn lo impose on the inhabitants a duty ln^h-liamled ;nid arrogant, when ...aWe laws for them or restrict ' Iour uid %  balf i cr cent on Ml other methods might have sucthclr commerce With n sturdv their produce in return for the ceeded in winning the support of colonial -pirn which was to be concession whereby the planters thone he hair to govern, typical of Barbados in the years were riwgnised a* owners of their Francis Wlll.iughbv has been to come, the islanders proclaimed * ta \ "Jut there was stout oppocompared with such adventurous that they would rather -choose a •' at Am and Willoughby imsp in ts u Sir waller Raleigh and noble death than lorsake ould prisoned the Speaker of the House Sir Humphrey Gilbert. Certainly liberties and privileges." %  Al """ l > !" }"" !" &*>ftt bag had I M Ideal foi Mending Such being the attitude of the loading the agitation against the the Kings power overseas to offBarbadians, who were encouraged measure. K i the victories of the English in their defiance of the English Willoughby cannot be comParliament at home Parhapt, Parliament by Prince Rupert's exmended for his treatment of Strafford thought of doing in Lrs> ploits at sea. the Commonwealth SamuH Farmer, though he was land a few years before, he ma\ padded to Mod out an impressive upheld in this and other arbitrary have hoped to raise an army in squadron, with two thousand solacts by King Charles II and his America to reduce the King's redlern on board, under the command minister. Clarendon. The four bellious subjects in England. Durof Sir George Ayseue, to reduce and a half per cent duty was to ing the period Immediately folthe Island to submission. But the prove a heavy burden on the lowing the Restoration of King Barbadians were not to be intimiplanters for many years and FarCharles II, thousands of Barbadatcd by this attempt to bring mer typified the sort of Barbadians emigrated to Carolina, Vlrthem to heel Lad by Willnuuhby. dian who was to play a leading ginla. Surinam. Jamaica, St. Lucia they made a spirited resistance and part In the long struggle between andj cither We-t Indian islands. it was two months before Ayseue the Governor and the Assembly This colonisation was part of Wilcould effect a landing. Eventualfor the control of the purse strings, loughby's programme lo extend |y, when the battle of Worcester Yet it is not difficult to underand streiifithen British influence in had llnally extinguished the Roystand why the man, who agreed the New World. The West Indies ..list cause in England In 1851, to surrender his lease of the island, ware thus prepared to meet the Willoughby was induced to come .should Insist on another source hrjt afforts that France was later to terms with Ayseue. By the of revenue lo maintain the dignity to make to gain supremacy In the Articles of Agreement, which and honour of the King'n rciiresenCaribbean, By his energy and wan drawn up between I*ird tative. Nor should it be thought leadership Willoughhv Wtabllihfd Willoughby and Sir George Aysthat Willoughby cared nothing for Barbados a* the centre of British cue, It was laid down that the '.he economic position of the influence In the Wot [n# Government of the island should island He realised the hardships fusing tinislanders with the spirit consist of "a Governor to be apwhich the Navigation Act would that warded off the sustained ntpolnted from England, the Counbring to Barbadian commerce and tacks that were made on the cil to be chosen by him and the by his own constant advocacy of islands during the seventeenth Assembly to bo selected by the the island's cause he brought it a and eighteenth centuries. Our Header* WMJMVS Diary /*/" To The Editor, The Adcocafr, Say; I tion of beach clean. I,et us have dence over mere personal gratii cleaner island by all of u-i doing flraUon. out to hear Mr. Tucker's talk about "The Turkey". I look forward daily to read that Mr. B— is going to thrill us with a talk "Grease." Wednesday—Everybody who has been to London knows that policemen are wonderful. As Professor Joad would say it all depends upon what you mean by wonderful. The Policeman at Seaweli who has nothing better to do than to make me drive my wheels right up to the studs instead of being content that I was behind the studs was certainly wonderful. But I cannot believe the explanation given by a friend of long standing that the reason why the policeman on duty outside the entrance to the Police Station wears a spike on his hat is to protect him against parachutists. That is too wonderful to be true. Thursday—It suddenly struck me to-day. If Mr. M — who stays with Mr. A — findi it difficult to find the Big Four, who can ever find them? The only time you can be certain where Mr. A — is. is when he's out of the island. This week he i in Guadeloupe. Mr. W — IS more accessible because of his car. You can't miss it. Still the idea of one office with one of the four always accessible is worth chewing on, perhaps. A man I know who works less than a lot of other people tells me a Htory of his son at prayers. It seems that the son has a crush on work and sweeps out gutters and runs messages with all the alacrity of the "V.P.'s" Bob-a-jobbers Anyhow the idea of work has gone home to his little brain. So much so that doing his duty as a God-fearing citizen the other night his little lips addressed "Our Father Who Works in Heaven." Friday—The Bob-a-jobbers remind me of the other little boy who calls the Scouts Cowboys. "Daddy the cowboys outside This set me thinking of the Lodge schoolboys who call each other Cubbos. Could Cubbos be a corruption of Cowboys? Alas not. Etymologically speaking Cubbo is a corruption of Corbeau, and so many bodge Boys come from French speaking islands where they call what we call Crows Corbeaux. So you can't b. too careful can you when you want to fit something into the preconceived pattern you've already decided upon, can |our bit to bring n about. Thanking you. CLEANLINESS Si'// Ciirilrii/ h Bir/h Control To The Editor, The Advocate. They must be taught a sense of responsibility, that every act. however apparently trivial, has an effect on their fellow beings and even on the Universe as ;i whole To emphasise, I quota the words of Rudyard Kipling. "Whoso lmpingeth. ever so tightly, on the life of a fellow mortal, the touch Of his personality, like the ripples .. ',' ,"';"' Wl,h ll,lcrwl J<, ;"> of a stone cast into %  pood, widens M..,-Kei!(i.S letter concerning t ,i|li gad widi u> m never ending circle* control m the Sunday Advocate, throuith the aeons, till not even and would, like to add a few the far off *ods themselves can rematrts on the subject. tell where ai 'ion ceases." Birth Control is undoubted** With .nticipatory thanks for •he lesser of two evils, the greater space. £?' of on > '** ffl '' removed red bu Iseye when he said Mere) m T .' \" 5 ', Su cn an ldcaI th, 1 ""tier has nothing to do ..< ... l made (ar harder to reach by will, rellgioi little men maMV practices which are prcvaUntil recci tly the Church coun. ffort to see that the refuse ,,.,„ tl ,_ n lenenced the oracucsTSnong Is put at the roadside for the Take the theatres for instance. rMp Scax-engers on mornings but it With glaring billboards showing Promi Hi u ,th a wanton ditwill bd worth it. It often happens semi-nude women with only a few regard ot the possibility of proth.it the refuse does not gather on Inches of clothing on their bodies, creation and or Venereal Disease the beach of the one who dumps Wen the wayfarer on the street ha* nothing .reliable to commend besides the theatre-goers are preIt but K chi-rfully paid for by sentcd with views which are nol Clnvern'm>nt. conducive to morality. 'Medicus' eeald have gone further The reading, particularly by the and reminded Us of a leth young, of sentimental trash which ten to the British Medical Journal only too often makes them too of (Vs.her Hth. 1944, in which— V^rniVHv"^,/^vpn* a orV' *-"*yl>us. Youth must be discussing the question of human %  .,! very untidy, me scavengers t^ght that man Is more than a artificial insemination-the writer cart passes on mornings and phvBicn i organism, therefore the said: The Church, having for everyone should see and put remedy of the sixiai ill he bag yean condem i and tidiness iay take it in the sea, but very often washes up on some ene else's bench. Sever. i! ..fternoons I have pas'ed along the Hastings Hotel and there were old papers and refuse littered over the road making the you. Saturday—Red letter day for the Empire (if you're not ashamed of the word. I'm not). To-day in 1893 Queen Victoria opened the Imperial Institute. I hope that sends shivers down your spine. (P.S. Twn Pelicans jual flew over the island.) OLIVIER'S FLOP By DAVID TEMPLK RDBHRTS LONDON. SIR Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh di not do so well on Broadway with their tw< productions of Cleopatra plays. In London a. their own theatre, (has • t&Mi Mge of tht town all last summer playing Shakespeare' Anthony and Cleopatra one nipht and Geort-t Bernard Shaw's Caesar and Cleopatra thnext night. On the golden strand of Broadwav nothing went so well. The bi^ critics p\:' their fangs in both plays and by the time th* irfoa o d theOHvicrs ware playing will some empty seats in the house. They did n<' bring home many dollars, but gave yet an other proof what goes in London doesn': necessarily work in Manhattan. But then i' other way and tl their bins out so that they can be created must be more than pbysti Bod !" duncultj ID I aotnaUfaaa works the emptied Instead of having to be cal. t i 10 question of i Olivion: ran remind ihnmsplvM th-il •. nlnv -.1 allowed to remain all day. The Youth must be taught that procreation without lust." WVWTa OH itnnnil in. m* l\is that pias B1 man Is here not primarily for selfFanaticism in this matter is bv their own theatre—""The Mad Women of ^.riiKrrp':: 1 ssssx ^r.zt^sz n v ..„ iaM „„„;. <->•"'"•'• %  * %  >-n !" • *?• thing on the beach and every octb> I 'elf-control purthe sound letter of the Reverend ped onlv to cross the Atlantic and run six pf a hou*> on the seaside Uy and consideration,for_ the we.F. Godson. months "in New York as I money spinner. tSk LIQUINURE A Highly Concentrated Liquid Manure C. S. PITCHER & Co. Ph. 4472 WHY NOT CONSEHVF, VALUABLE FOOD? in VIIIIMS III II' I HI I /I IHHI; — \\ \ I iTITT I FROM STOCK — De. -. Bepl. This man Ls romplelintf u deal on Golden Grade —u safe bet to yield high returns in long-wearing; smooth-fitting and comfortable apparel. GOLDEN GRADE SUIT Da Costa & Co., Ltd. KLMKMBIIK MOTIIF.R ON MQTHER'S DAY Sl'NDAY, MAY UTII WITH A nOX OF CHOCOLATES Specials Trepsred Mustard £a per Battle Galnnr** stasil .it per btlr. Macoroni .3 p>i-r i>k. (Tuv A Sanborae Coflee Si '"I prr lln Fmplri( ^f!ce M !0 per 1 lb. pk,. Ures^ed Trine .3). per lb. l>rerd Itibblb, . per lb. Boxes of Chocolate* Slice 1 lb. U> 3 lbs. Carra BttrulU Asst. I n Tl— rhgm. Carr's Cream Crackers 1.3t per da Carr's Rweet Bl-rulU .36 per 'i kg. Churrhmin s Clsaretles Kmh (icarettea S!i|i at 4.0IIII \r.HS llefre*h .< I.lllin 1ICIS Lunrli al .OIIII \IIIIS Ask fra MMMftAIIII 3 Vmr Oltl III M should be made to keep his porfare of others should take preceKEMO.