Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text






ESTABLISHED 1895





Demands For His
Release Ignored

TOKYO, May 8,
_ Communist prisoners on Koje Island were reported to-
— oe ae eens tb seed Nations Camp Com-
nera. ‘ Bs ee i 7 t
holding Liner hieane Report said they were
t was authoritatively | ists
took General Dodd captive Fy ee oh eet geemeneen
Koje, is the island where two bloody riots involving
Seen prisoners of war occurred in February and
An official statement is expected within a few hours.
Koje island is Southwest of Pusan main port ‘is South
Korea. On Febru: 18, 1,500.prisoners attacked their
Seetaans — oo — = eee wire flairs
fe 's were a 1 i .
ale Pjur ; n prisoners and 23
COMMUNIQUE

_. An Eighth Army communique issued to-day from Koje
island said: “Brigadier General Francis Dodd, United Na-
tions Commanding General of prisoner of war camp Num.
ber One on Koje Island was forcibly seized by Communist |
prisoners of war and is being held in camp against his will.
A demand for his release unharmed has been ignored
by Communists. “General Dodd with another officer was
conferring with Communist leaders at the gate to one of |
the compounds at about 15.15 hours local time May 7. With- |
po hg . — ao seized and forced into an
osure © P ners. The seco:
mode his 'y _ ~ nd officer escaped and
“General _



of Tallahassee, Florida was overpow-
ered and held munists. A note has been meatvad
in General Dodd's handwriting stating that he is unharmed.
Efforts are made to effect the release of General
Dodd, There are no other details available at this time.”
_ Until full details were available it was believed here
that fear for General Dodd’s safety had prevented troops
from effecting his rescue. It could not be ascertained im-

mediately what Communist pri i
io is ak Wee ee prisoners demanded in return

SURREY 219°:
AND 151 FOR 8:
INDIA} 158 Threaten Peace

LONDON, May 8, WASHINGTON, M
Surrey with two second innings| President Truman on’ a ct.
wickets to fall led the Indianjenth anniversary of Victory in
touring cricket team today by 212
runs at the close of play after a
keen struggle on the second day
of their match here.

The Indians were,outeim their



Attitude Of U.S.
Cougress Might





















Farnum For
Finland Fund

THE Fund to defray the ex
penses of ace cyclist Ken Far-
hum to the Olympic Games in
Helsinki next July still urgent*
ly needs your support.

Donations are accepted at
Barelay’s Bank, the Royal
Bank of Canada, and the Office
of the “Advocate.”

Goal . $2,880.00
Amt. Prev. Ack $ 757.68
Treasury Staff .... 7.68



Total
Conservatives Plan
to Denationalize

Trucking Industry

e LONDON, May 8,
Britain’s Conservative Govern-
ment announced plans to de-
nationalize the trucking industry
and to aid nationalized railways
in competing with it. In their
Paper the government promised











riety esa dhbbioaiee

| W. Germany
Rises From
War Ruins



By JOSEPH W. GRIGG
BERLIN, May 8.
years
1,000
to final

Seven
Hitler
crashed

ago
year

smoking
secmed
hop.
As V. &.
the

Day
Free

Bells peale
World Nas

througtrout

Field Marshal Wilhelm Keg
later to die on the scaffold
Nuremberg signed the Wert”

macht’s total surrender here
Berlin 48 hours after the earlic
ceremony at a little red schof
house at Theims., |
Berlin was dead, Germany wr*}

dead. Its big cities were boml

shattereq rubble heaps. Its it
dustries were smashed. It we}
without a Government. It
1



armed forces no longer existec
Never in history had a _ natio:}
suffered such overwhelming tot

defeat.



FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1952

Communist Prisoners Seize U.N. Genera

{
Thursdu
5 Nazi Reich
doom amid the
; ruins of a Berlin th
devastated beyond al
of rising aguin









Cheaper
Newsprint
From Bagasse

U.K. EXPERIMENTS
ARE SUCCESSFUL

WATER BARGE

LONDON.

Newsprint has been made
from bagasse in successful exe,
periments in the United King-
dom. Prices are no higher
than those of newsprint made
by traditional methods and it
is expected that bulk produc-
tion by existing mills coutdy
yuickly bring prices down.

This is the report made by Mr.
W. T. Curtis-Willson, owner @ a
Brighton newspaper, who |!
backed the experiments. He has
sent all information available to
the United Nations Education: |
Scientific and Cultural Organis>-
ion, which has set up a commit~
tee to investigate the problem

Mr. Curtis-Willson suggested a
‘thain of pulp mills in the sugar-
‘rowing countries round the
vorld. But he pointed cut that
»pposition of newsprint manufac-
urers would have to be broken
jown









incl

THIS WATER BARGE, which will be towed by the “Lord Willonghby”,
“Crofter” yesterday afternoon.
capacity of 93 tons.

Water Barge |. Europe Sign Pact Today:
Towed Into |(¢
Careenage

The water

the 5.8.
Tt has @

was unloaded from
It was towed into the Careenage by the “Lord Combermere”.

rmany A Sovereign State

PARIS, May 8,
A Quai D’Orsay spokesman said the 50-year pact will
morrow at 6.00 p.m. the French Foreign Office officially

Samples
“We obtained samp es from the
iritish West Indies of bagasse in
i very highly compressed form

will
work in eonjunction with the tug

barge, which



that trucking would revert to A Great Change | Lord Willoughby to supply ships announced. ind we asked a mill in this coun-
private hands but it would com | Today, just seven years lab in Carlisle Bay with water, was _A Quai Dorsay spokesman said the 50-year pact wil) ] ty to experiment with ti t,”
pensate the loss by levying a tax|something has happened that n>| ‘CNS /Mto The Careenage yesten- be initialled by the heads of delegations of member nations] ‘4 Mr. Curtis- Willson w
4 oe ar yee. The ‘*~ one who like this corresponden:|poryerc, » Lord Com-| in the Foreign Office buildine, He said no special ceremony | rave mes a very good news-
v d reimburse gove 4 se Onan 1 2” aealiin 2 : ' : ta Sven mee. ‘ad ; +6 pr yhich is s , it is
about £4,000,000 Foor fon: ate ee eran acess itesea Weta og The barge has a capacity for ir a for the signing of the treaty designed to pool Coie ar ete. from tradi-
few years and experts predict“d|ple. Western Germany, aided b hecoribemnart nets int to ae aa ee a meocetetercs Erande, Wesern Germany, Italy, jtional sources — that has a much
it would take about five years at!her former enemies the Unite: |of water : te elgium, Holland and Luxembourg stronger fibre, and from the
this rate to pay the cost of turning | States, Britain and France, is ov Lord ‘Willoughby will either! laboratory tests is in every way
the industry over to privatd|/the verge of becoming near sev- the barge behind or at the ° Infarmed sources believe thatja fine substitute for newsprint
ownership. : ereign power again. side—as the weather allows— Suan Raided he protracted negotiations on a |from traditional sources.

ai oe ail oa i Its citiés are rising fast frov mat n they go into operation. x : ce aba a ben z SEH “But on the samples that we
mus ecentralizec o allow . Inited ) They will replace the Ida which yman army naa oeen power worked we found that the colour
them to compete with truck: Se Pt eer Eee rn iS*now 59 years old and which I rom Dawn pees Me, DY the recent visit te | was bad, that it was brownish,
et or oat gece! and there] ijqustries are booming far beyon ; Was condemned 11 years ago “ as - Goneral Ei pa oe ye {ana that the bagasse pulp as sup-
Ww c » preat a , re nance rene Risen rer and s * fines ‘ fon
anise One. are ee former levels, German exporters! The barge is painted in the Until Dusk is talk with Federal Chancello eee on Bp iS coemines

It said the British transport are grabbing great portions of th: | same colour as the Willoughby | Dr. Konrad Adenauer. ca Th a is d Ss to th te ot
commiimten would be given greater world’s markets out of the hand: |and has tha same sturdy appear- po , * + e se eae is a
trend i. wetting fares hd of her former victors. jance, It was lowered from thé]. TOKYO, May 8 Obstacles [Utes these sugar Cane roms. ars
reece in Ving ares S.S. Crofter by a heavy lift der-|United Nations planes includin; jburnt to remove all the leaf
freight charges in order to keep} The Western Allies once pledg-|rick aft 1 : jets today made their biggest raic Fisenhower reportedly urged |#towth before they are milled
up with competition. Changes in}eq t, block German rearmameni} Jt was noticeable that the of the Korean war attacking th¢ denauer to help remove any| “These, however, are problems
Sie See ahr ae for all time are negotiating with | barge was a bit longer than the huge Communist supply centri bstacles preventing final agree-| which offered very little, if any,
inet iin tkcent Wow ws the Bonn Government to raise 12 | Lord Willoughby. The barge i outh of Pyongyang from dawn te ent In its present form the|difficulty of solution. We found

road and “will encourage efficiency
in both.”

Official statistics given out late
last year said the Government had
taken over 3,727 trucking firms









German divisions of 300,000 mer



{61 feet long while the Willoughby

dusk, Target for today’s raid wa caty contains several important|that we could, by use of chemi-

to join the West’s defence agains has an overall length of 60 feet Suan, 35 miles south of Pongyan nditians where no agreement}cals, produce a paper as white as
Communism. Even Berlin, sti! oF bteienh a 5 uld be reachedso far driven snow; and the removal of
divided and isolated 100 mile he Fiarbour aster went out All Force Headquarter eae a aie a the dirt was of course merely
behind the Iron Curtain is ¢limb- to the Crofter to watch the un-}announced it was left covere: e of the biggest hurdles was

loading of both tug and barge, with billowing flames and smoke vercome yesterday when it was problem for the cane growers





first innings for 158 in reply to
Surrey’s 219 and by close Surrey
were 151 for eight in their second
knock,

England bowlers Jim Laker and
Alex Bedser took six for 64 and
three for 42 respectively in the
Indian’s first innings and six
wickets fell today for the addition
of 92 to the overnight score.

A whirlwind 41 by Whittaker
and a sound neat 57 by Constable
bolstered Surrey’s second innings
score,



Truman, Negotiating
Copper -Aigreementt
With Chile

WASHINGTON, May 8,
President Truman told newsmen
that the matter of the copper
agreement between Chile and U.S,
was a subject of negotiation be-
tween him and the (President of
Chile, He said he hoped the

matter could be brought to a
successful conclusion but he could

‘not comment at this time.

The President was commenting
at a weekly news conference in
response to a question about the
action of Chile within the past
week in abrogating the agree-
ment to sell copper to the United
States.

A.reporter asked the President
to explain what the United States’
attitude was toward the action of
Chile. The President replied it
otiation be- \



was a matter of n

tween himself and the President |

of Chile.

When asked if he had been in|

contact with the Chilean President
Truman replied that he had not
yet.
anything more about it now. He
did = ue Salusaes be
ho matter would awe
peggy icn sh conclusion.—U,P.



New Luxury-Liner
Gets First Trials

DUNKIRQUE, France, May 8,
A New Pride of France’s
Transatlantic fleet slipped out -f
rt for her first sea trials.

ndre is scheduled to make her'] the

maiden voyage from Le Havre to
New York crossing on ls
This is a major in 1d!
the French Merchant Fleet
which two-thirds ‘was destroy
ed during the war.

20,500 tens Flandre
cutee wvmtapaiins tor WS

fitst class pass , 274 in cabin
claSs and 56 berth tourist class in
four-bunk cabins.

Today’s trial will merely =
performance tests will come later.
At 574 feet long the hull is about
half the
size of Liberte and Isle De France.
Flandre is the largest ship launch-| las
ed in France since the war and
fourth largest; He
merchantman sailing under tri-
colour. She matches the speed and

UP.

the ship’s sea legs. Speed

the size of De Grasse and

will be the

luxury of her larger mates.

\ Ridgway, leaves on

d > ; i ac its feet again. ce ‘ | . |fource

Europe to-day said the attitude with 43,731 vehicles and 4,994|'"8 Bans Ch its ; nnounced that the ticklish ques- ;

the United States Congress Siohat trailers. tee ee eee ar “Rh Two Communist jets were rve- \!0n of Germany's financial con~ Price of Pulp

8) ding for National Defe anhé _U.P. venue reduced o y= ’ * ported to have destroyed and { ribution to the army had been “ - ; lien

Mutual’ Defence aan’ Snacatan ii smoking ruin in 1945, is lined Ike Continues third ahmagad et tea Hew ottled, liegt eee we peer

chances for future world peace, oe ba @ On Page 5 ¥ south from Manchuria apparently In Bonn W ' : ata = . ”
i Te ‘ Pe ial Eye 2 i ) In Bonn West German Chancel-|saving; indeed, possibly news-

Bie eld a Weds cdnlerence:there U.S. Strike Causes silat er ewell Tow to intercept the raiders, {hen Konrad Aden juer and the print made from bagasse at pres
would be no Third World: War it \ it ike t 7 : i . i. The Allied Communique saia| ose. High Commissioner met, ont might eost virtually the sam>
Americas somes oie tet | Petrol Cut In U.K. | Ne Move Towards COPENHAGEN, May 8) fai? of demolition ail high ax, today on the seventh anniversary |as newsprint does today, or may-

on an even keel and the Mutual
Security Programme of aid to free

countries were carried through to |

a successful conclusion, He said
he was disturbed by the crises in
steel, oil and copper in this coun-
try and certain attitudes in Con-
s toward the National Defence
ogramme and Mutual Security
Appropriation.

Reviewing his administration
for the past seven years, Truman
said his goal and every effort ha
been to keep the entire free
world from coming under Com-~
munist control, So far he saic
this effort had been successful 1!
that it had prevented the Third
World War, but said conditions to-
day were very grave. na

LONDON, May 8.
British Government today

The

‘cut deliveries of high octane
aviation spirit to civil aireraft
operators by 30 per cent. because

oi the refineries in
the U.S.

Restrictions applying
excess of 80 octane

strike in oil

to fuel in

are the same



as those imposed in the United
States itself. The order comes
into effect on Monday.

During 28 succeeding days oper-
j ators of civil aireraft may not
| acquire more than 65 per cent. of
}the amount of aviation spirit
juris » April. ‘As April, has 30
days effective reduction in 28
| days period will be 30 per cent.
‘ of recent supplies. —U.P.







General Mark Clark
Arrives In Korea

U.N. fighter bombers we

SEOUL, May 8,
lcomed General Mark W. Clark

to Korea to-day by launching a devastating attack on the

Communist supply city of

Suan, only 35 miles from the

Capital of North Korea, Swarming flights of Fifth Airforce

and Marine fighter-bomber
noon to become the biggest

Communist MIG 15 jet fighters were shot down.

The attack recalled a recor:
bombing of the city of Sinuiju in
North Korea a year ago in which
312 planes gave that supply hu)
a dawn to dusk blasting

Clark flew to the Korean battl«
front with General Ridgway whom
he will succeed as Supreme United
Nations Commander of Koree.
Monday to

take over the supreme Allied

He added he could not say|Command in Europe from Gen-

eral Eisenhower.
Increased Action

In addition to the increased
action in the air, Clark found
“heavier than normal”
all across the 155-mile Korean
battle front.

Suan area is 35 miles southeast

of Pyongyang, and the Fifth Air-

force has been waiting the right

combination of circumstances to

attack.

United States sabre
up a screenin
er bombers

jets set
hat swooped
The intensity of the attack forcec

Communist MIGs to fly south ©
‘Pyongyang where Allied

fighting

for low flying figh«-
in on
target with heavy bomb loads. |

jets

s were well on their way by
single air blow at Suan. Two



1)

¢

GENERAL MARK CLARK

shot down two and damaged one.

Red jets rarely venture as far) ~~

south of the North Korean capital
Fifth Airferces pilots

50-calibre machinegun fire
their strategic tanvets.—U.P.



WASHINGTON, May’ 8.

Senator Everett Dirksen, Llin
ois campaign manager for Senato
Robert Taft
would not rule out General Doug
MacArthur as a
Republican Presidential
pointed to MacArthur’
national popularity, and the num
ber of written votes for the Gen
eral in the Republican Primary

claimed
by noon 85 supply buildings des- |
troyed and 40 damaged as they

trained high explosive bombs andl For GG ra nd Prix

into

MacArthur In The Running

said Thursday he

possible |
nominee

—U-P,



22 Motor Entries










on {ist party set the

General Lisenhower arrived

Naz "4 é ) ¥ .
plosives tore Communist supplies zi capitulation. to put the!/be a pound or two per ton more







. . nines “C ” - are ee 0 ay ae
Settlement Of ere ee at Ube pans ti0$8 to sheds, Thousands of gallons nising. foughes to a “I do not, personally, pay
gee te yen ‘ GMT hours) after his take off napalm (jellied petrol) were! West Germany a sovereign mem- much regard to that, because
Sirike At U.C.W J. from Paris, spread over the target turning |per of the Free World, — we are dealing with small pulp
piles of supplies into billowing ‘ mills, whereas if once this
(From Our Own Correspondent He is on a farewell visit of|fiames and smoke.” On Friday the Ruropean Army| material is recognised and used
KINGSTON, J’ca, May 8. Scandinavian members of the —U.p, | act under which West Germany| that is the important thine
The workers strike at U.C.W.1.|NATO before he leaves for the ill be re-armed in co-operation —by the existing paper mills,
continues to-day with no move United States to join the Presi- ,with her enemies of only seven] then the cost would come tum-
Laade yet towards settlement. This [dential Election race, Eisenhower + ee ears ago is to be initialled in bling down.”
morning the Gleaner made 4M! accompanied by his wife was Solution Of Paris. Z 5
editorial appealed for an early] greeted by Danish Defence Minis- Pad o- . That pact and in fact every sant oar ce evallabl =
ttle > rest of the! arc etersen Som- ‘ : ‘ ‘ é ac very | amo of bagasse available he
eee Sonic Bp a a : ae od eae a fee Tunisian Dispute agreement which is making the said. Estimates vary between
to the educational future of the | forees Admiral E. J. C. Quivest- . Se uel of this severed | 4,000,000 tons and 14,000,000 tons
West Indies, and carried pictures}gaard, Ole Bjoern Kraft, For- Appears Likely am povereiien were madeja year. But it has been
on the front page showing stu-| eign Minister, Admiral Trick rime eee “ Soviet found that it takes three tons -
dents performing domestic duties) Brind Commandr-in-Chief of TUNIS, May 8 dats a A : rs We e the west bagasse to produce one ton of pulp
nm the institution, Allied forces of Northern‘ Reliable sources said that four ao . a by aoe menace but seven|It is therefore possible to pro-
| Oné pieture shows Christopher] Europe, Missus Eugneie Anderson) of the ten members of the Franco- | } cede a {th » Tee ae a BR0e at least 1,000,000 Vong of
Osborne of Trinidad, Al Walwyn} United States Ambassador to! Tunisian Reform Commission have | ; Dente x = wes and of] newsprint every year which

iof St. Kitts, Sandy Luck and Bud

@ On Page 5

Denmark and other high Danish) been decided upon and that others











|Lee of British Guiana pealing| military and civil officials—U.P. will be announced shortly.
,potatoes in the kitchen for the

{mid-day ‘meal, while another Slag nd ol "

{showed Eric Munroe and Murray e yO) out details ofa
|Mooyoung of Jamaica operating Reds Aiccuse U.N. Home Rule and Administration

! Reform promised by the French
P ° ir last March when the Bey was
i
Of Delaying Truce linduced to drop his anti-French
idvisers. Seven member of the

B: PANMUNJOM, May 8, | Commission will be Tunisian and

The Communists again “catego-\ three French.
rically rejected the United Nation | Resident
final propasal” on prisoner eX-|Hauteclocque and Tunisian Pre
change and accused the Allies of|mier Salah Eldine Baccouche | |(
holding up the Korean truce by ‘agreed that the Commission would
refusing to negotiate, Red General meet as soon as the political at-} })
Nam I] used 17 minutes of today's! mosphere was sufficiently cleared |
18-minute “open” session in 4/in this troubled protectorate where |

\the telephone switchboard.

On the campus of the Univers-
jity, undergraduates are busy
[preparing the cricket ground for
\the Senior Cup match on Satur-
ae

General Jean De



Commission a
greater

Truman Is 68

|
|
WASHINGTON, May 8.

President Truman is 68 years|pitte. tirade against the United riots have claimed upwards of on
old today and looking forward tO|Nations stand on the prisoners | hundred lives since last January
retirement next January as Presi- issue |
dent of the United States to being 4 The release from house arres
a sort of vocal national “con- The other minute went to Vice-|of former Premier Mohamm

Chenik was interpreted as an i

jscience” to campaign for ‘his ‘fair | Admiral C. Turner Joy who calm- ;

jdeal” programme as long as he}\y suggested that a recess in the dieation that the talks are alm¢
leommands the ‘virtue of reading Walks be called until the Reds ready to begin ous there 4
and listening. Truman plans t¢|:ome up with something, hew to many signs that extreme rationa

ists have not given up oppositio
to any deal with the French sho
of complete independence

continue his fight for whaf he

1]
|
i
| thinks is right.
1

Both sides appeared to be hope-

lessiy deadlocked but the Com-
munists kept the talks going by
asking for another
to-morrow

He envisions
grammes
Presidency.

The President admittedly relish-
es the idea of speaking out as
private citizen,

Although many of his critic:
have detected no particular inhi-
i bitions in Truman speeches, he
anticipates greater freedom of ¢x-
| pression after he leaves offices

—U.P.

extensive pro-

after he leaves tht : Terrorists exploded two born
meeting in Tunis last night causing consic
erable damage but no casualties

—U-P. —USP.





Grenada C.C., Tourist Board Discuss
‘Lady Boats’ Removal With Capt. Clarke

} . (From Our Own Correspondent)

Reds Plan GRENADA, May 8,
| ° me il A joint meeting of the Chamber of Commerce and the
\Anti-Ridgway Riots)\ Tourist Board-with Capt. Earle Hughes of the former pre-) {{
| PARIS, May 8 siding, availed themselves of the opportunity of an intran-
a powerful French Cammun- sit north-bound call of Capt. R. A. Clarke, General Manage:
line for Europe’s





'S ai ti.

of the C.N.S. aboard the Lady Nelson to discuss the matter
of the Canadian Government's intention to withdraw the



with demands for mass prote o ace - \
\“in all forms” against the arrival Lady” liners during October coming.

tof General Ridgway as Suprem Members at the brief meeting ; large sums i eget 2

European Commander, on May jaddres ed Capt, Clarke who was, disturbed by 4 oe E

25 re lon one of his routine visits in|effects of the intended withdrawal NESCAFE is full strength, full flavoured Coffee

Grenada Government be



| Paris Police Authorities pr ymypt-}connection with the operations Blee the

,
t
|
ante t est Seed } {
|
,

}

/

)
annually are now
the serious adverse
















| BERNE, May 8, ‘nounced that they would mo-jthe line in the area and the meet-|urged to make every pot sible Plus Carbohydrates added solely to protect the flavour {
Twenty t automobile racing} jilize their whole special riot corp ended with the passage of aleffort to assist in the securing of ; {
stars/from seven countries enter- of 15.000 helmeted mobile guards | Resolution moved by Mr. Norris|the continuance of the service — it’s — ))
ed the Grand Prix of Switzerland! and to bidalte “be 6 ad President of the Tourist|that the Governor of the Wind tn
â„¢ . . ugh specially trained anti~- | Hughe resident o ve nuris a 1 rovern ie \ { sAgY p : )
-| here y y 31, Le Son o Sn demonstration squads supported! Board, seconded by R. O Williams| vards be requested to ask the i EASY TO PREPARE §\\
pion Argentine Huan Fangio, the rs . . smash any Com-{of the Chamber of Commerce sro-| Governments of St. Vincent, St p J regeeiess
field includes three Italians, four by some police to mash any m-) e 2 n pe , ‘ a | OV m is ee of j i} Iv’s ECONOMICAL—NO WASTE i}
-iF ; nim all munist riots or demonstrations posing that wherea both bodies} Lucia and Jomi | $) ii)
rrenchmen and six British. Two The Cormmunist order for anti-!are fully appreciative of the valu~| imilar action } . i
Germa Argentines and one Rideway 7 -oteste followed ‘cnet Gait atti rendered by the »)) i
s | Swiss. on Siamese and three! FGg ey eet by the Reds to call|C.N.S., for many years in their] The Resolution also proposed }) \ NESTLES QUALITY PRODUCT {
vite ss. lgtreet demonstration It was maintenance of regular supplies of} th copies be warded = t¢ \
: +1)f anc » move-!| opposit odie oO island (tt .
-| y,i the race Party’s newspaper, L’Humanite. ment of passenge ith particu-| requesting co-operation wiih the ti) se
—U-P. : —UP. lar reference to tourists spending-- same IEEE
\ —







PAGE TWO



Carib

Senior

G. S. Bridgeman,
t Architect of
Watkins and

Oe Kami
A Adm
P: s of London and

t Indies, returned to Trini-
dad last night by B.W.LA.,, after
spending about ten days staying at
the Windsor Hotel.

Col. Bridgeman came over to
Barbados in connection with
3arclays Bank to arrange for the





conversion of the building they
had taken as temporary premises
during the period of the recon-

struction of the Bank.

On Holiday
RS. ELMA NAPIER, authoress
and former member of the
Legislative Council in Dominica
arrived here on Wednesday on a
short visit to the island and is
staying at the Ocean View Hotel.

On Special Visit

E. A ve K, FRAMPTON,

Agricultural Adviser to the
Comptroller for Development and
Welfare, left yesterday morning by
B.W.LA., on a special visit to St.
Kitts; Nevis and Montserrat, He
expects to be away for about two
weeks.

Music Exhibition
Ne has been received that
4 Miss Nellie Bailey, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs, J, E. Bailey of
South District, St. George has been
awarded an exhibition at the
Royal College of Music.

Miss Bailey left Trinidad where
she-held the post of Music Officer
in December to take up studies at
the College.

Spent Two Weeks
tz. J. D. RAMKESOON

of St. Magaret’s Vicarage,
Port-of-Spain, returned to Trini-
dad by B.W.1.A. on Tuesday after
spending two weeks’ holiday. He
was staying at “Leaton-on-Sea”
The S‘iream.

On Business
HERE on a short business visit
£ is Mr. Neville Wolfe, Secre-
tary of the Faulkner Trading Co..
Ltd;, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad
He -arrived on Wednesday night
by B.W.LA. and is staying at the
Ocean View Hotel,

Back to the U.K.
BAVING for Canada _yester-
day morning by T.C.A. in-
transit for Scotland were Mr, and
Mrs, nan Duthie who were
down-here for several weeks stay-
ing at Old Trees, St. James and
he Ocean View Hotel. Accom-
panying them was Mrs. N. Suth-
erland, Mrs, Duthie’s daughter.
Brought Son to Schcol
PENDING a short holiday in
S Barbados staying at the
Hotel Reyal is Mr, Asot Michael

Mor

prominent merchant of Antigua.
He arrived here earlier in the
week by B.W.1LA. with his son
Patrick #%ihom he has_ brought

back to school at the Lodge,

Back From Trinidad
f[®: WOODLEY ANTHONY

of Maresol Beach _ returned
om ‘Trinidad on Wednesday
night by B.W.1.A,. after paying a
short visit,

BY

HE alert Hungarian demo-
crats seem to have discov-
ered a particularly vile plot, re-
actionary in its deviationism.
The Hungarian newspapers re-
cently concentrated their rage
againsi a firm of hatters. The
firm was accused of selling a cap
with a deviationist label inside
it This label showed “an Eng-
lish gentleman wearing a_ golf
cap, with the arrogant grin char-





acteristic of exploiting capital-
ism,”

The next thing is to find out
whether this subtle propaganda

is the work of Hungarian aristo-
crats, or a triumph of English ex-
porters. Perhaps the caps are
dropped by night, from planes,
in lonely places, and gathered up
by English commercial travellers
disguised as Hungarian peasants.
At any ratte, one can imagine the
farmer of the Kisafold or the
gipsy of the sandy Nyirseg hiding
the cap in a cupboard when the
secret police arrive.





ee ee





Here is a letter that ap-
peared in the Parents’
Magazine, signed by Mrs.
S. S., Fort Worth, Texas.

Thanks to the Wolf at the
Door!

“In reply to your request
for the renewal of my sub-
scription, I wish to inform
you that the present condi-
rtion of my bank account
makes it almost impossible.
My shattered financial con-
dition is due to federal laws,
state laws, county
brothers-in-law,
law and outlaws.

laws,
sisters-in-

Through these laws I am
compelled to pay a business
tax, amusement tax, head
tax, school tax, gas tax, light
tax, water tax, sales tax,
liquor tax, income tax, food
tax, furniture tax and excise
tax. I am required to get
a business license, car license,
operator’s license — not to
mention a dog license,

I am also required to con-
tribute to every society and
organization which the
genius of man is capable of
bringing to life; to woman’s
relief, the unemployed relier
fand to every hospital and
charitable institution in the
city, including the Salvation
Army, Community Chest,
Red Cross, Purple Cross,
Double Cross, Boy Scouts,
Girl Seouts, Club Scouts,
Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A, as
well as Boys’ Ranch and
Boys Town.

“WOLF AT
THE DOOR
}

For my own safety I am
vequired to carry health 1m-
surance, life insurance, fire
insurance, property insur-
ance, liability insurance,
earthquake jnsurance, torna-
do insurance, unemployment
compensation and old-age
insurance.

My business is so govern-
ed that it is no easy matter
to find out who owns it. I
am inspected, expected, sus-
pected, disrespected, reject-
ed, dejected, examined, re-
examined, informed, re-
quired summoned, fined,
commanded and compelled,
until I provide an inex-
haustible supply of money
for every known need, desire
or hope of the human race.
Simply because I refuse to
donate to something or other,
I am boycotted, talked about,
lied about, held up, held
down and robbed,

I can tell you honestly
that except for a miracle
that happened I could not
enclose this check. The
wolf that comes to many
doors nowadays just had
pups in my kitchen. I sold
them and here is the money.



Ideological cap

OUNTER-MEASURES will
probably include an order to

all Hungarian collective hatters
to sow into their caps a label
showing a member of a _ labour

camp, wearing his golf cap with
the happy smile characteristic of

a People’s Democracy, If this
fails there will be a _ purge of
leading hatters. But simple
workers, gazing at the gentle-
man’s golf cap and the super-
cilious grin, will still murmur

“We never knew it was like that
in tha capitalist countries, Fancy
being free to wear any label you
like inside your golf cap! Heigho!
Wellady!”

In passing

HILDREN'S'~ minds having
been completely rotted with
films and radio, we now come to

the coup-de-grace: education
(sic) by television. What is really



alling

Spent Five Weeks

M* AND MRS. L. MARTIN
and family returned
Trinidad

to|boy just for the sake of
on Wednesday by the| cut.’

BARBADOS ADVOC

rem

Be Popular

WHEN a girl goes on a
a good and lasting impressic

ATE
@

first
yn.

date, she wants to create
Here are a few ideas that

should give you a sure start.

(1) Never accept a date from a
‘going
You must like him even if

Dutch S.S. Bonaire after spend-|it is only just as a friend, for

ing five weeks staying at Cacra-jafter all,

bank Hotel.

Mr, Martin is Director and
Secretary of Alstan’s Ltd., Port-
of-Spain.

Hor:symoon Couple Leave

ETURNING to Trinidad last

night by B.W.LA. were Mr.

and Mrs. Cecil Milne who were

spending their honeymoon at the
Crane and Royal Hotels.

Mr. Milne is Service Manager

you have to endure his
company for guite a while on yogr
date,

(2) Try your utmost not to Be
late. Men hate to be kept wait-
ing, and since they always expect
girls to be late then they are
pleasantly surprised when you are
not. Yet, if he is late, don’t glare
at him, accept his apology calmly.

(3).Be modest about your fig-

of the Caterpillar Department of|UTé, especially if it is a good one.
Neal and Massy Engineering Com-| Dress carefully and be completely

pany, His wife is the former Miss | feminine.

Pat Hope Ross.

Petroléum Engineer
Paying thdir first visit to the

-Good posture is im-
portant for without it your beauty
and gracefulness are marred.

(4) .Don’t try to impress him by

island are Mr. and Mrs, Thhomas|being coy and shy, yet on the

Wall of Colombia.

They arrived|other hand, don’t be possessive
on Wednesday via Trinidad by|/and eggressive.,

Be’ natural, gay

B.W.LA. for two weeks’ holiday|and don’t get flustered, Pay com-
and are staying at the Marine/pliments but don’t overdo it by

Hotel.

Mr. Wall is Petroleum Engineer
with the Colombian Petroleum
Company in Cucuta.

. ‘
Canadians End Holiday

R. AND MRS, L. S. WEBB

of New Brunswick, who were
holidaying here for the past two
weeks returned to Canada yes-
terday marning by T.C.A. They
were staying at the Ocean View
Hotel.

To Assist Mounted Police
TAFF SGT. C. W. ANDERSON
of the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police arrived here yes-
terday morning from Ottawa by
T.C.A. for the purpose of assist-
ing the Barbados Mounted Police
in their training.

He will be here for six weeks
staying at the Marine Hotel.

Staff Sgt. Anderson who was a
policemen for twenty-four_ years,
spent twelve years in Ottawa,
seven in the training depot
Regina, Saskatchewan and_ the
remaining five doing Police work
in the Province of Manitoba.

Atténded Course in U.K.
R. VINCENT KING, a Civil
Servant of the Secretariat in

St. Vincent, returned home yes-
terday by BG, Airways after
spending a few days here staying
at “Leaton-on-Sea”, The Stream.

Mr. King. who spent eigh:
months in the U.K. attending a
coursd in Administration arrived
here on Tuesday by the SS.
De Grasse.

———4

TODAY’S GEM

The Kiss of the sun for par-
don

The song of the birds for
mirth

One is nearer God's heart in
a garden

Then anywhere
Earth,







else on



‘THE WAY ...... . 8) Beachcomber

wanted is a Mechancial Educator,
a combination of film, radio, and
television. No master or mistress
would be needed, A _ trained
mechanic would be able to take
classes of thousands, and in time
the children would learn to work
the machine themselves, thus
finding another outlet for the
worship of gadgets,

Abyssinian windfall

OAST Abyssinian Beef and
Yorkshire Pudding will look

odd on a menu when the supplies
begin to arrive. But the Grand
Maitre Chef de Haute Cuisine in
many a gilded gargote can be
relied on to call it Quenelles de
Pre-Sale. “What do you recom-

mend to drink with it?” “Un-
doubtedly, sir, this Chateau
Medoc of 1950, It is a sound

Burgundy, sir, matured in the
cask. A full wine, sir, and cheap
at 28s. 6d. the bottle. Shall I ice
it, sir, or do you prefer it hot?”

Importance Of Development Man Aid The Soil
Of Colonies

LIVERPOOL.

The importance of economic de-
velopment in the Colonial Empire
to help Britain through her pres-
ent economic crisis was stressed
by. Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, the Colo-
nial Secretary, who was guest of
henour at the annual luncheon of
the Liverpool Chamber of Com-
merce, It is, he said, “one of the
keys to our prison.”

Foreign capital, as well as Brit-
ish, must be attracted to Colonial
investmynt if the vast natural re-
sources available are to be devel-
oped or expanded and brought to
the world’s markets, he said, It
is.a fruitful field for imagination
and energy.

“Colonial exports of bauxite rose
from 170,000 tons in 1936 to
1,698,000 tons in 1950,” he said.
“Petroleum oil exports rose from
2,404,000 tons to 8,028,000 tons.
Timber rose from 13,000,000 to
30,000,000 cubic feet. This means
rising standards of life in the
Colonies and the hope of curing



world shortages of primary raw
materials.

“T am afraid ‘it is useless to
deny that our surpluses will be
insufficient to push this develop-
ment along as quickly as it should
be and that we must have capi-
tal from creditor countries and
from overseas to assist. We must
try and do this so that we retain
our fair share of any enterprise
which foreign capital may help to
encourage and to foster,

“As far as one can see, and it
is dangegous to be too dogmatic
the primary producer—and of
course I am thinking particularly
uf the first of all primary proauc-
ers, namely food—will, so to
speak, be calling, the tune for
many years to come. We can,
through Colonial development
greatly increase our strength as
primary producers and with it
bring an economy which is so
largely a manufacturing one into
amore healthy and diversified

balance.”
—B.U.P.

NEW SHIPMENT

WHITE & COLOURED TOWELS FROM 58c. TO $2.56

The world’s population, now
about 2,350,000,000 is increasing
at the rate of 60,000 a day. The
world’s food supplies are in-
adequate even for the existing
numbers. By misuse of the land,
millions of acres have ceased to
be productive.

What can be done to feed thesa
extra people? And how can it be
done so that the fertility of the
soil is safeguarded for future gen-
erations? How can we claim new
acres from the unproductive areas
of the world — the scrub, the
swamps, the desert, and the
frozen lands of the north? How
van we reclaim acres which have
been lost through neglect cr bad
farming? What are the effects of
new methods of agriculture on
health?

These are some of the questions
asked and answered — as far as
they can be — in the series of
B.B.C. Transcriptions — entitled
“Man and the Soil.” The series
will be relayed at 8.00 p.m, every
Friday from May 9th. It will be
heard over Radio Trinidad on the
following trequencies 31m—9625k;
yr hg 3325k; 920m — 790k, and

aS TT

being too gushy.

(5) Go easy on his pocketbook,
whether rich or poor. Can’t have
him think you are a ‘gold-digger.’
Intelligence, character and ambi-
tion add up to much more th:
stuffed wallet, }



No more
windscreen
wipers!

[ BF IsH scientists have
| discovered how to keep
| car windscreens and shop
| windows free from snow, ice
| and mist. ies te

| The secret cover! them
(with a film of pure p+

It is not an expensive

gold is onl. tir of 8
'The only # quarter of :
at} millionth of an Inch ick, ‘and i3|

‘transparent.
National Physteal “Labeecy

sica’ aborato ab
Teddington. Middlesex. |

London Express Service ,

—

Willy Was Selling Um

—They Were the Kind
By MAX TRELL

“Umbrellas! Umbrellas for sale!”

Knarf and Hanid, the shadows

, with the turned-about names, looked

at each other. The sun was shining

brightly, Why should anyone be

| wanting to sell umbrellas? Besides,

| the voice came from the foot of the

| hill, where the marsh began. Who

could be selling umbrellas in the

marsh? They hurried down the hill
to see.

By and by, as Knarf and Hanid
reached the edge of the marsh they
recognized Willy Toad’s voice.
“Umbrellas!” he was calling out.
And sometimes he said: “Umber-
ellas!”

They soon found Willy, squatting
on the root of a willow tree, A stick
with a sign on it read: “Umbrellas
For Sale”.

An Umbrella

“Hello Knarf! Hello Hanid!” he
said when he noticed them. “Want
to buy an umbrella? I’m selling very
good umbrellas. You'll! need them
for the rain.”

“But, Willy,” said Hanid;
isn’t even raining.”

“And it doesn’t even look like
rain, Willy,” said Knarf. “The sun
is shining. There isn’t a cloud in the
sky.”

“Ha, don’t be fooled by appear-
ances,” said Willy with a laugh, “It
doesn’t look like rain, But it’s go-
ing to rain just the same.”

“Where, Willy?” said Hanid.

“Right here, sooner or later. It |

always rains sooner or later. So
you'd better be prepared and buy an
umbrella for when it does. I’ve got
all sizes to sell,”

Knarf, who was looking all over
the ground and had walked twice
around the willow tree, now said:
“But Willy, where are the umbrel-
jas? I don’t see any.”

“Neither do I,” added
“Where do you keep them?”

Willy answered: “In a very safe
place. Under the ground.”

Willy nodded. “Right under the
#round—right under
standing this minute2

“I never heard of such a thing!
Why do you have to keep them un-
der the ground?”

“It’s tha best
them,”

Hanid.

place to store

“it
|

where I'm |

(6) Give him your attention,
let him know you are having a
good time. Don’t flirt with other

men on your date, it’s bad man-
mers. If you are not sincerely
interested in his conversation,
don’t show it, pretend to enjoy it.

A’ simple greeting is enough
should you meet someone you
know,

(7) Never let on that you are
bored. If anything excites you,
mention it, don’t pretend you've
seen better. That is being snob-
bish and real men abhor female
snobs.

(8) So you are a college gradu-
ate! Well, he didn’t bring you
out to learn what you got your
diploma for. He is pleased to
htar about your merits, but don’t
go into detail. Don’t try to im-
press him, be yourself and modest.
Otherwise, it would seem that you
are not sure of yourself. Charm
is precious.



(9) After you have come home}

and thanked him for giving you;

such q wonderful time (whether
he did or not) you can then decide
whether you would like to go
out with him again. If you
wouldn’t never say it in as much
words,

B.B.C. Radio
Programme

FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1952
4.00—7.15 p.m 19 76M, 26.53M



4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily
Service, 4.15 p.m. Ivor Moreton and

Dave Kaye, 4.30 p.m. Bedtime with
Braden, 5 p.m. Cricket, 5.05 p.m. In-
terlude, 5.15 p.m Listeners’ Choice,
6 p.m. Merchant Naw? Programme, 6.15
p.m. Record Revels, 6.45 p.m. Sports
Round-up and Programme Parade, 7 ran.
The News, 7.10 p.m. Home News from
Britain

7.15—10.20 p.m 2 53M, 31 32M



7.15 p.m. West Indian Diary, 7.45 p.m.
Song and Dance, 8.15 p.m. Radio News-
reel, 8.30 p.m. World Affairs, 8.45 p.m.
Interlude, 8.55 p.m. From the Editorials,
Â¥ p.m. Ring up the Curtain, 10 p.m
The News, 10.10 p.m. News Talk, 10.15
p.m. The Debate Continues, 10.30 p.m.
From the Third Programme



brellas 4

That Grew in the Rain—



| “Umbrellas for sale,” called Willy.

Knarf said eagerly: “Let’s see
the umbrellas, Willy.” But Willy
| wouldn’t let him. “It’s no use dig-
ging them up now, Knarf. When the
| rain comes, they’ll come up by them-
selves, They're wonderful umbrel-
las. None others like them in the
| world.”

“You—you’re sure they'll come
|up when it rains?” Knarf said.

| “Oh yes, oh yes indeed!” Willy
| replied.

Knarf and Hanid both bought an
|umbrella from Willy, even though
| they couldn't see what they were
| buying.
| Rained During Night
It rained during the night. And
the next morning it was still rain-
ing. Knarf and Hanid ran down to
,the edge of the marsh as fast as
| they could. “I bet he hasn’t any
umbrellas at all,” Knarf said. “How
can you keep umbrellas under the
ground? And how can they come up
when it rains?”

When they reached the willow
tree they were astonished. For
standing straight up with their
handles in the ground were a dozen
or more beautiful umbrellas, some
emall, some large, and some just
coming up!

Willy himself was sitting under
the largest one of them.

“They're mushrooms!” cried Ha-
nid.

“Umbrellas,” said Willy. “I told
you Id have them when the rain
came.”







aS 6

At Podgy’s words Rupert smiles.
“So that’s why you wouldn’:
speak when I passed you just
now," he murmurs. “Yes, |
suppose so,’" says Podgy. “| caw
those tracks and then I lost them,
and I was trying to think eh.

POSS SSSS 9S SSS 9S OSS 9999 OF 99995509"

LOOK

SUNDA



made them and where they ica,

and | was so puzzled that | didn’:






notice you or anything else!"

* Well, now you know al! about

it,”” says Rupert. ** So let us go and

tell the othevs.” He and W
rela .

run back to the f
tice thar P

POPP PPPEP AO OPD

Y*s



|

_Two Elizabeths

(THERE is a striking simi-
larity between _ the
signatures of the two Eliza-
beths, the Queen and the
Queen Mother.

This is shown in the two
autographs I reproduce here.

But there are differences of
detail. The Queen Mother’s
signature is moré precise than
her daughter’s, as in the
junction of the “b” and “e.”
In crossing the “t” the Queen
Mother's stroke always finds
the letter; the Queen’s in-
variably comes above the
letter.

There is an element of
greater boldness in the
Queen’s autograph. Hand-
writing experts would point to
it in the curving flourish of
the initial “E” and the tail
of the “z.”

=

E Iyabell

THE QUEEN'S
This autograph is bolder—

Zlahste R

THE QUEEN MOTHER'S
—and this is more precise.
London Krnress Service





- A low dance?
round. (8)
. His 9 ts ignored. (5)

Well, you ge

. Clever bird that can. (4)
+ Time to reach three figures?

What they dia to Una on Join-
ing the Marines. (5)

1
7
¢. Taken from wide areas, (4)
2

When in the eye, 26 does. (4)
Transport medium. (5)

in the sou» on the contrary.
- Not a bright ort of clue. (3)
Paid to the incited red. (8)
. Chair from the Andes, (5)

See 15 Across. (4)

Down
Home-made colour. (7)
Includes the raven duet.
Aligns, by Morse? (6)
Out of all failures. (3)
A bit thin surely, (4)
Races into troubles (5)

This standine is above
average (3)

After the nignt before. (3)

{t ran laughing. (5)

A musica plant, (4

Drier on horseback

17's guide (4)
{t's » topper (3)
Must be a plece of dirt,
Only halt credit. (3)

Solution of vesterdav’s nuzzle.—Across:
1. Buildings: & Liner; 11. Manage: 12.
Candy 15, Ease. 14 z: 17 Dew: 21,
fentiIce 25 Snow’ 24 Rival: 25 Keen:
26. Stall: 27 Seas Down: 1, Block/a
2. [nane & Lend: 4, Drav’ 5. in rent
eo

. : orse: van:
ells. 19. Asks: 20 Hoe, 22 Call

(9)

(5)

ee sat te
CSHIMSHCSC Bavewwr

3

(4)

v
2

i Oy
5:



See Us for the

BEST BOOKS
Advocate Stationery



A Good Night's
REST
Is So Important

Do you sink peacefully on your
pillow and float away on clouds
of restful sleep?

r do you lie down with
staring eyes . . . to have the
worries of the day come back
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And that’s the time when Dr.
Chase's Nerve Food can do so
much to help you. For this
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Bi, iron and other needed
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your vitality and tone up your
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Canadians by the thousands
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eat better, feel better after taking
Dr. Chase’s Nerve Food. So
don’t let your nerves rob you of
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SSSS9SSSSSSSS99S99909O",
GAIETY

The Garden—St. James
WODAY & TOMORROW
Women 4.45 Men 8 30
Age Limit 12 years and Over
MOM & DAD
Segregated Audience Only



Midnite Special SAT.
Triple Attraction—
MEN OF THE TIMBERLAND |
Richard Arlen—Andy Devine
SIX GUN MUSIC (Tex Williams

OUT FOR
ADVOCATE




|

}

|
|













FRIDAY,



PLAZA THEATRES |

BRIDGETOWN || BARBAREES
DIAL 23160
TO-DAY a ‘Shews) (DIAL 5178)

To-day -& Continuing
444830 PM

2 30 — 4.45 & 8.30 p.m
& Continuing to Monday
445 & 8.38 p.m

HAPPY GO || HERE COMES
LOVELY = || THE GROOM
Davia MVE Bing Crosby, Jane,
Vera ELLEN I]wyman, Alexis Smit

ROMERO :





SAT Special 9.36 @ 1.30
SILVER RAIDERS

Whip WEHLSON &

COWBOY CAVALIER

SAT Special 130 pm
friple Attraction !

MAY 9, 1952



eo



Soe

OISTIN
(DIAL 8404)
TODAY & TOMORROW
4.45 & 8.30 p.m

NEVER TRUST
A GAMBLER

Dane Clarke &
LAST OF THE
BUCCANEERS

Paul Henried

Special 1.30 p.m.
“Raiders of Tomahawk
Creek” &

SAT

“RAIDERS of the “Fert Savage Raiders”
Jimmy WAKELY DESERT’ |] Charies Starrett Doubie

Midnite Special SAT.
2 New Thrillers!

RED DESERT
Don Barry &

Richard ARLEN &
CHEYENNE COWBOY
yILLIAM
FRONTIER REVENGE oe oe Se
eo va me ex BENEKE & Gler

Fuzzy St. John|IMILLER & Orchestra



MAIUDNILE SAT.
‘LAW of the
BADLANDS"
Tim HOLT &
“PRAUUE LAW”
George O'BRIEN &



ee =









EMPIRE

Opening TODAY 230 & 8 40
and Continuing Dally 445 & 8 30
John DEREK—Lee J. COBB

THE FAMILY SECRET
EXTRA
Short: FOOLISH BUNNY
Lastest Newsreel

SAT. MIDNITE
Whole Serial—

SUPERMAN







& HO







SAT,
Jon Hall Double

1.30 p.m.





MARK



OLYMPIC

Today to Monday 4% & 8.15

George ZUCCO—Ralph LEWIS in—
THE FLYING SERPEANT! &
I ACCUSE MY PARENTS












Starring: -
Mary. Beth HUGHES & Others CAPTAIN BOYCOTT
Starring: Stewart GRANGER
SAT, 1.30 p.m Special SAT & BOYS IN BROWN
MIDNITE






Rod Cameron in Whole Serial~

Jack Armstrong
with John Harte
Joe Brown
Action! Action!

The Lady Objects
& Drums of,
The Co



EMPIR

OPENING TO-DAY 2,30
and Continuing Daily 4,4

of nognot



i eroeeece °



ROXY

TODAY (Only) 4.30 & 8.15
HAKLEM GLOBE

Sn
TOMORROW to TUES. 4.45 & 8.15
Ricardo Montalban—Syd Charisse

2 Reel Shorts:



Michigan Kid & Action! Aétion? with Tex BENEKE and his Ork
Vigilantes Return|]| Thrills, Suspense SAT. MIDNITE SPECIAL
PIRATE TREASURE

with Richard TALMADGE

ROYAL

TODAY (only) 4.30 & 8.15

SAT. & SUN. 4.30 & 8.15

HARLEM GLOBE TROTTERS
with Thomas GOMEZ &

HOLIDAY IN HAVANA
with Desi ARNEZ & Others

sees ee eee COLUMBIA PICTURES pres

- SECRET

COCO Ce ee oo eeerres

wine MOHN DEREK - LEE J.
TODV LAWRANGE Sr mawee-ouas sworn sommes,






LKOTIBKS ©

LIDAY IN HAVANA







— in —

OF THE RENEGADE
EXTRA:
SWEET SERENADE
















E

& 8.30
5 & 8,30








Opening To-day 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

and Continuing DAILY

PLAZ
BING teeming BEST

oo” Li
TOP, STA

r
1
i
!
'

C



HERE COMES |
THE GROOM

with ROBERT KEITH and introducing ANNA MARMA ALBERGHETTI
Produced and Directed by FRANK CAPRA : Associate Producer-IRVING ASHER

Somenplay by VIRGINIA VAN UPR, LIAM O'BRIEN and MYLES CONNOLLY

‘Story ty ROBERT RUSKIN ard LIAM O'BRIEN. A PARAMOUNT PICTURE

—————





po GLOBE

FOR FOP PRODUCTS

CONTINUES TO-DAY 5.00






BARBAREES
(Diat 5170)

ING JANE

ROSBY: WYMAN

ALEXIS

SMTA

FRANCHOT

TONE

JAMES

- BARTON:





%
& 8.30 p.m.

TOMORROW 1.30, 5 & 8.30 P.M.

SUNDAY 5 and 8,30

THE FGLs4 OF THE




Fiery as their love!

Mighty as Goliath!

P.M.

CENTURY




BaTHsHEBA

TECHNICOLOR











WIRD NORD... ok. te cen ‘tiemieus See and win
COTTON BLANKETS—WHITE, PINK, GREEN, BLUE, FAWN %
50 x. 70” ..... . $3.30 “> »D OO | == ‘oil
85 3 157 6.) $3.70 $ - | MIDNITE DOUBLE TOMORROW NITE
Monte ees : % ; ae
6X 86" ...... $4.89 ; AT THE SAME TIME YOU CAN HELP THE : PRINCE OF FOXES
VANS & WHITFIELDS | eee
; y 7 ime ie a via } an
T. R. E x FARNE Ma FoR FINLAND FU ND. x DANGEROUS MILLIONS (Kent Taylor)
DIAL 4220 YOU R SH O E STO RES DIAL 4606 Soseoosoosssoess SSOCOS GOODE 9S B CBOSS OS S8SSB SOOO 555565558













MAY 9,

FRIDAY, 1952









‘TAKING A CHANCE’ IN PUERTO RICO

R SIXTY DOLLARS and the right slip of paper you can win $300,000 in
Puerto Rico and not pay a cent in taxes to the government. You can do
this by purchasing thé top ticket in a lottery run by the island's government.
A board of judges chosen by the chief of the bureau of lottery supervises the
weekly drawings. Civic, commercial and industrial leaders serve on the
board. To guard the public, agents selling lottery tickets are bonded. The
drawings are ety checked and operate completely by machines—huge

ae 7:

2 To,

Outside headquarters, spectators see winning aumbers and prizes on board.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



covered cages which spill out the winning colored ball kets
weekly drawings cost 25 cents apiece, but to win the $300, 000 purse in Dee
cember, you must buy a $60 ticket. If you hold the 25-cent tickets, you can
win in proportion to the purse. The lottery is run in ‘the public interest with
approximately 25 per cent going to charities and some needy cities. In 1951,
about 70 per cent of the $28,600,000 went for prizes and $3,432,000 was
handed out in commissions to more than 800 agents selling lottery tickets.

the

as



Racks of winning autho balls are lashed pa the coutiéliet and checked.



Australia Faces
£740m Trade Loss

(By PETER DUFFIELD)
AELBOURNE,
THEY took the sign “SCOTCH WHISK Y—ALL
BRANDS—£1. 12s, 3d. PER BOTTLE, AVAILABLE

HERE” from the back of the bar of Melbourne's Royal
Automobile Club last night—and said: “Sorry, sir, but that

was last week.”

At the little ice cream-delicatessen-tobacconist around
the corner you asked for your usual three packets of Eng-

lish cigarettes.

They gave you the look reserved for black

market hoarders—and one reluctant packet of 20.

You went into the world’s sec-
ond largest department store
(which unaccountably exists in
Melbourne) and asked for an
English lounge suit. The place
looked like the pitch for a des-
peration fire sale — you had so
much competition,

And that’s how it was in Aus-
tralia to-day—with goods marked
“Made in Britain’ moving fast
into the hahds of buyers or sliding
softly under that same old counter.

Like a child echoing the sounds

of its parents, Australia—almost
for the first time—to-day mouth-

ed a famous post-war Anglo-Saxon
word—austerity,

It used the word roughly for
the same reasons as its mother
country: its overseas trade bal-
ances were shot to pieces,

But Australia differed from
3ritain in one major respect. Un-
like Britain, she fed herself—she
had merely overspent her pocket
money.

The story of Australia’s decline,
but by no means fall, has, as usual,
a sharp background in ‘the wool
story.

In 1948-49 that
commodity netted

spectacular
Australia a

cheque for £287 million. In 1950-
51 the wool cheque was £636
million, but this year wool slid

to an estimated cheque of about
£300 million.

Meantime, with a currency ad-
mittedly inflated but free to
spend, Australians of all clases
have gone in for a gigantic buy-
ing spree,

Last year Australia turned in a
trading balance of £84 million.
This year, on Prime Minister
Menzies’s figures, the Common-
wealth was heading for a £740
million loss.

What are the prospects for
Australia in her newly recognised
financial plight? Immediately —
due to the 80 per cent. import cut
by Menzies’s Government — they
are these:

Her major task will be to in-
crease wheat production—an old
Australian vital export recently
gone into disrepair.

Her second task: to live on
imports that she now holds in

hand.
Meatless Days?

The building trade alrea@y
foresees pig cuts in hospital and
factory construction because of
their dependence on imported
cement and timber.

Farmers are saying that res-
trictions on importing vital fen-
cing wire and wire netting will



3 YOULL FEEL RELIEF WITH THE FIRST BOTTLE

e

POOWOOLOOOSOOOOCOCOOE



slow down food production.
;Meatless and butterless days for
Australians are being suggested
by some branches of the Chamber
of Commerce.

Blackest of all prophecies comes
from an Australian economist
who forecasts that by the end of
next year the Commonwealth
will have to import bread unless
wheat production goes up.

(Australia’s best crop: 220 mil-
lion bushels of wheat 1948-49;
best exports same year, 131 mil-
tion bushels.)

Even the sausage men have
stepped in, bemoaning the fact
that German and garlic sausages
will go straight off the market.

But the true picture of Aus-
tralia’s new austerity is that it is
relatively unreal, laughable and
fantastic—a faint shadow of the
word as it is used and known in
Britain. As the finance editor of
one leading Australian paper put
it to me: “It is like going from a
standard of living that is very
soft to a standard of living that
is fairly soft.”

Backing this view are the facts
that up and down the immense
Australian coastline, werehouses,
bondhouses and wharves are
stacked with the goods Australia
has been over-buying from
abroad. Sydney men have tele-
phoned Melbourne men in des-
peration: “Can you get us bond
space for 3,000 cubic feet?
Otherwise we shall have to return
our stocks to England.”

Stocks? Plenty

There are, by admission of the
buyers themselves, millions and
millions of cigarettes—“enough to
last four whole months without
importing a single cigarette at
Australia’s present smoking rate.”
Timber enough for a whole year
of private house building at
present construction rates, say
timber men (this estimate ex-
cludes hospital and factory buiid-
ing). Clothing stocks so great
that the recent textile recession
and unemployment in Australian-
made garments will be made good.

It is true that many Australian
businessmen believe that the new
import controls will mean a black
market, racketeering, selling of
gradually diminishing goods \n-
der the counter. Most people hope
and expect the controls will not
last long.

But generaliy, Australian sec-
ondary industry has taken a new
lease of life and shares (with the
notable exception of some British

DONT LET

CHAIN YOU

It's easy to free yourself of troublesome

Rheumatic Pains. Simply get a bottle of

BRAITWAITE’S
RHEUMATIC REMEDY



SPSS SOD SPPEPEPOT SISO. : » . *
§ in Experiment In Understanding

% '
SEAAND AIR "The Doctor. La











wyer And



‘Canada Shares

Missiles







With U.S.

Guidec

U.K.









OTTAW A, rhe i“ en » staff t
da i iilding \ rtie; esearet velopment
} ice missile, Dr, O M Solandt lishment in Quebec
j 1} ector of Defence Res | Sol d iid “There is
Board, has disclosed trong possibility that not onl
Canada’s top scientist adcde t omic but biological and chemicé
\¥ as an ri to air missik @ weapons ill be used ir noth«
} variety iaunched from the tr war, and Canada is preparing t
| against attacking bombers md meet ch ittack ind
part of secret defence preparations nace etalia '
; against possible ne t ne eat obstacle in t
; weapons pre e fk ry eventua
} the < of agrec to
The missile is being developed ta ncdardisation among the Wester

#t the Canadian armament re

earch and.development establish-

}ment at Valcartier near Quebec

| Also being perfected are new types

! espirators
clothing to guard Soldiers anc
civilians against atomic radiatior
and chemical attack
j He gave no details
i suided missile which
secret lists,
| Dr. Solandt said
,are employed full time on guidec
| research at Valcartie

ana protect

of the new
is on the toy

missile

Tests are being carried out reguler-
will be
$30,000,000

ly there and next
transferred to a new
(£10.000,000) rocket range ir
‘western Canada 100 miles

fs th of the Alberta-Saskatchewar

year

border town of Lloydminster.

The research findings are
hared with
United States,

Britain

“anada has been in the guided
hal!

missile field only one and a
years Before that Canadii
scientists were sent to British anc
United States guided missile ex
perimental stations to tud
progress there



Never tell
children
‘It won't hurt’

ever teH a child “It won’t

hurt” when looking for
an aidmment,
When children find it ts









untrue their faith in their
parents or doctor is shaken,
T 1 says a leading children’s sur-
: P e t Gi HF . Vi ea Mr. Harold Dodd, of the
h ~ | Princess Louise Hospital for
al ries ] V e elr 1e W Ss Children, writing in the
GOB SO6St $999900" Medical World
Sch. Heniy D. Wallace, Sch. Maria (By JAMES LEASOR) vill be baat en gag
Henrietta, Sch, Mandalay I, $.S. Lad ONE of irs 5 as : »Wwspe - reporter years | + C Gee, or Bee in, By
i ah, tetet ie ceae INE of my first jobs as a newspaper reporter years| patient—irrespective of age
Sch. Lydia Adina S., Sch. Gordinia W ago— ina provincial city—was to see a caller, a young man| unpredictable, it depends on
fA. Grote, he wee in his early twenties. their sensitiveness,” he says
t ‘ofte ane anibbee A . ;
Sch ROSARSRRIVALS He produced from his raincoat pocket a yellowed same Dodd says wee a
Sch SARENE, Capt. L. Olivicrre néwéspaver oe - Pot ar al . doctor examines a chitd he
ny's TRADER. 3t a2 Capt. C. V tke Gutta camabte de: secatan Sp0 faembamasige ose should tell it What-it-45 all
Ss / OR, 3,692 tons, Capt ’ about, the g rt, anc
ee Tiare oar It showed a child wearing a If I don’t tell him and the gir! that one site aaah ie
I A BROW 288 tons, Cap 4 . nm » ! . or
w k, tran Trididad ” " tasselled hat. He w held tightly [ods out somehow, no explanati brave Doctors should’ bulld
Mv. DAERWOOD, 94 tons, Capt, in a woman’s arms. Round about Will help him. ,.. up friendships with their
s ells, from Grenada stood old - fashioned - looking child patients, he urges, and
Yacht LEANDER, 43 tons (owned b : , nites ae in than hey
ens 5 RA as et ma (owned MY policemen, Well, the experts say— gives these rules for dealing
: with children
* Can you help me trace this?” THE DOCTOR ; If 1 were tt Give them friendship and
he asked. “It says here it was Chap I'd tell Peter frankly. H¢ rentleness, take interest in
MAIL NOTICES taken by a photographer of this took the picture in the hope of er ta and toys, and giv
aper.” having good news for him, but em je same courtesy
MAILS for St. Vincent, St. Lucia, Gren. P®PE™ , T esty 4 ‘xpi \ ‘
fa eavatetn ck tered bythe tk . pacers The photograph, he said, be- #nyway, it’s not so bad, The honesty and explanations that

will be closed at the General Post Office

mother
as under:

longed to a
Peter,

red haired friend, was not guilty, He’q nott










Parcel Mail: at 3 pim. on the 9th who believed that he was Ing to worry about. te a a
May. Registered Mail at a.m. Ordin. the kiddy, But . WHO was : . dai OCB BOOB OOOO EOL LLP LPP PPPOE APA SY PCO POPS PROSE
12 Mail at 9 a.m. on the 0th Mav the woman and WHY wert THE LAWYER : | agree. Peter g 8
952
Are toy Dominica, Antic Mont. there policemen around? must know, S50 must his girl.) % - x
serrat, Nevis and St. Kitts by the M'V rien she chh decide Whether she) & i OOK OUT FOR %
CARISEED will be Closed at the Gen- will go on with the marriage or] 4 / &
eral Post Office as under sah eli ate : res 4
Parcel Mail at 12 noon; Registered Mail Peter had found the picture Ans Oh ‘er rate Nae ee g x
at 2. p.m. Ordinary” Mail at 2.80 p.n years age sk€d away : he Might fine us photograph and 7
cn the 9th May 1952 Map, SuORed | AWey AE TAE ee a few inquiries On dts Own Ix . + 7, e@y y Y “mY
MAILS for Trinidad by the back of a drawer. He had asked Me re Ww ! x / : d My %
HENRY D. WALLACE will be his mother: Is that me? and she “°coun i$ A 4 A a rh 3
at the General Post Office as ur 5 5 Les 7” “ ‘ »
poe peared Dont. OF nag une P= had | said quickly: Of courst Or if by accident hw wife heard, J : %
ét 2,30 p.m ybetistered Mail at 2 not.” And she had tried to take would she believe that he had and win
on the 9th May 1952 the picture away. nown nothing about this case 4
Now Peter wanted to marry the THE sain: ee »
” 7 . Ta THE PRIEST: If | were Peter +
RATES OF EXCHANGE daughter of a strict Scots family. ; thea Td Hurn the plaptoe fe >,
ihe girl’s father was unenthus friend, then [’'d burn the photo- % eDe
s ie e mwas rap That ood cet 3 y ,
WEDNESDAY, MAY 8,--1952 mastic about Peter as a son-in-law STBPO ) What | sd waite tik, >
NEW FORK his temper was as fiery as hi ome of raking out old ashes like
71 9/10% Cheques on 55 eared 7 Oe this? i Be! ,
Bankers 70 2/107, hair—and Peter had suddenly rv AT THE SAME TIME YOU CAN HELP THE
Sight ot Desand , membered this old photograp All this happened long, longs
rafts 70° ; f
71 9/10% ‘Cable eee ane was unaccountably worried ayo. Everyone else connected with
70 4/106 Currency y it. he case is dead Peter bears a . ter », ” r r x
; Coupons : VEEN FOR FINLAND FUND
we SHY Basa nal So this friend who shared a flat]"*~ Dame FPARNU: ror . vere E
15% Cheques on with Peter had brought the picture Let the past look after its@M,1@ 04 44 sesneesiow eee OOOO OOOO 4 (ROOF Spb pA gb b gbghgbghatgt gt ety
pose bankers 73 2/10% —without Peter’s knowledge and let the dead bury the dead. PPP LLLLELEL LLL PPE PLL ven
Sight Drafts. - we poe, along to the office. | Peter looks forward to the future. {
1B % Cable Could I help? I spent a dusty| By taking my way out, his friend
3 5/10% Currency 71 7/1@% half hour with old files. jcan help him go forward to enjoy fe
50% coupons De But when I found the story it|it ¥ Joe Wy
did not make happy reading. Well, if you were Peter's friend rt
p

Peter was the baby. —what would you do?—L.E.S.

ear firms) took a jump upwards
after falling for months.
Business View

I am in the habit of foregather-

His mother had just appeared
in court on a charge of murder
The husband, a drunk, had
attacked her, and she hit in self-

FOR ALL YOUR FRIENDS
YOUR DISTINGUISHED

SOS

ing nightly with six or seven qefence, He had fallen: heavily|$ GUESTS AND YOURSELF
businessmen at one of Melbourne’s anq knocked his head on the floor
bars in the post-work last drink There is Nothing Better on
period of 5 to 6 p.m. Most of the The charge was reduced to

the Market than







POS

OEP SAPP PPOP SOS

,-} are extended to adult













plants.

HOW IS IT USED?
Liquinure is only used

tion and applied to growin

ing them with food and dr

time. No wonder they th:

ive

500 scientists

clue

being
and the

Powers
“Canada has a vital interest 1
ndardisation, We would like t
ee the United States and Britai
- using identical weapons. Our force
‘ then would be spared the recur
) rent dilemma presented by rival
weapons, and Wwe could use our
industrial resources to greater
idvantage in support, not only of
ur services, but those of ou

allies,”





NorthStar”
TOA

Famous”
and traditional

all the way

For full informason
see your
Travel Agent or —

TRANS - CA.






Transcontinental









without difficulty, and in the hands of the

in great dilu- experienced
@ plants, provid- urpassed for
ink at the same

ive on it, 1 to 8



Now in effect

7CA 60-DAY EXCURSIONS

Lowest fares*
for air travel to

CANADA

Skyvliners
service
regular flights to
Toronto and Montreal with di-

rect connections to all Canada,

GARDINER AUSTIN & Co, Ltd,
McGREGOR St
Phone 4518

~Tnternational «1 . Trans a VW.



gardener Liquinure is
implicity

PAGE THREE

WANTED

OLD GOLD
AND SILVER
JEWELRY

OR IN PIECES IN
SCRAP FORM

The very highest
market prices paid

at your Jewellers...

Y. De LIMA
& €O.. LTD.

20 BROAD ST.
Phone : 4644
















ever offered



oe



a
(j

un-
and effectiveness.

:
%
8
men are chief accountants, chief manslaughter, and finally the jury %
salesmen, managers or directors returned that canny Scots verdict; %
of secondary industries tyres, Not Proven. $
cheese, plastics, biscuits. She went free, changed het x
As the most recent arrival yame and Peter’s then mar- %
from England I am regarded aS yjeq again - °
an expert on British public . x um
opinion I arrived promptly for i &
our rendezvous last night. And Back again in the front of ty
not one of that little group did [ told my caller the news. 1% Blended and Bottled by
jot come up to me and ask me ‘Now,” he said, “what shall I) @¢
anxiously and commiseratingly tell Peter? For a start he doesn't 1 f » GAT ,
how Britain was going to rid@ eyen know I’ve got the photo-| STUART & SAMPSON
this latest obstacle that had, 80 graph. If I tell him the truth| LD
regrettably, been put in her post- straight out and he passes it on— % (1938) .
war way
ze as he may feel bound to—to
went corrmars mang, Hs fanonoy tothe, then the =f eaveceeces TRY THE NEW LIQUID MANURE
Tee riage is off. PSS LLL LVS
PLLOLE SO ow Meret PLEA ALSELLOS [ IQUINURE
pi ‘ ig WHAT 18 IT? WHAT DOES IT DO?
RUEUMA TisM RIDE A oa e's Liquinure is a Liquiti Plant Food of
eet ona acer which contains Liquid Manure made from Liquinure
a @ essential plant nutrients, major . . ite » bal soi =
and:-minor (trace elements), in’ correct brings the fertility of the ball of soil @
proportion. When diluted with 320 to closing the main roots to any desired
2,500 volumes of water, according to type level. You can make any plant in any
and purpose, it makes the ideal liquid soil grow fast or as steadily as you like.
manure, greatly relished by all growing A novice can obtain first. class results
|
|
{

BICYCLE

) SOS

2
gi
Take It Regularly ! $i THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

%

e|% White Park Road.

% g St. Michael

3 : Office : 4326 Workshop : 4546

& 1% Merchandise: 4528 a 4650
oooow 00S00005506015091900 01 9066000. 90500844000"

STOKES & BYNOE LTD, AGENTSseeeee0eece0eso0567

teaspoonsful (% to 2 tat
the fluid are put into 2
| in a can, according to di

{ label,
NOW AVA
FLOWER A

$S56664:6605555SS SV SS COTSSEESSOESS FSGS OSOSSESS



rallons of water,

ND VEGETABLE



ECONOMY
A 16 oz
Manure.

‘FOR

lespoonsful) of

rections on the : Pt

ILA BLE

THE CORNER

bottle makes 128

GARDENS

STORE

eee



gallons Liquid

AT



|
|





PAGE FOUR

eet

BARBADOS i ADVOCATE



”” Friday, May 9, 1952

FANCY MOLASSES

IT IS much easier to see what has
happened in the molasses industry than to
understand why it has happened.

Barbados having produced the equivalent
of 64,000 puncheons of molasses in 1950-51
is going to produce about half that quantity
this year. And despite the fact that only
ten syrup factories were producing
molasses this year as compared with twelve
syrup factories and a number of sugar fac-
tories last year, the production of syrup
or fancy molasses has already ceased. Two
separate subjects arise for comment.

The first concerns the future of the syrup
factories: the second the future of the fancy
molasses industry.

The tendency in Barbados is for the sugar
industry to become more centralised. Dur-
ing the last eleven years eight dark crystal
sugar factories and 57 syrup factories have
gone out of production.

The closing down this year of two syrup
factories and the restricted period of pro-
duction of the remaining ten may be tem-
porary phenomena or symptomatic of fur-
ther centralising tendencies.

The merits of centralization in Barbados
eannot be decided without extensive re-
search and investigation but it is undeni-
able that centralisation tends towards effi-
ciency and increased output of production
in the sugar industry.



But unless the market for fancy molasses
is in fact decreasing and will continue to
decrease considerably it seems reasonable
to suppose that the maintenance of syrup
factories exclusively occupied in the manu-
facture of fancy molasses is justified. Is the
market in fact decreasing or is the unusual
depression which is being experienced this
year temporary? How far is it a real slump
or how far is it due to overproduction last
year?

It can be very little consolation to the
manufacturer of fancy molasses to reflect
that whereas this year he has been com-
pelled by the advice of the Fancy Molasses
Control and Marketing Board to close down
his factory before the end of April, last
year the production of fancy molasses was
assisted by the output from several dark
erystal sugar factories.

No one could blame the owner of the
syrup factory for asking whether this year’s
slump is in anyway connected with last
year’s overproduction. The result for him
and his employees has been painful enough.
Not only has he been compelled to close
his factory earlier this year and to dismiss
his employees earlier but he is left with
canes standing in his fields which have now
to be sold for producing sugar and which
cannot be sold until the sugar factories are
ready to receive them. A contraction in the
output of fancy molasses will not only affect
all the workers in syrup factories: it will
cause unemployment in cooperages in
Bridgetown and will decrease the number
of part-time employees engaged in hand-
ling molasses.

Observers will note that the fears ex-
pressed at the time when bulk shipment of
fancy molasses was peremptorily stopped
by a decree of the government are now
being realised for another reason.

Unemployment in the molasses industry
is resulting not from bulk shipment but
from a decrease by almost half in this year’s
exports to Canada.

But why is there a decrease in demand?

Can it have anything to do with the delay
in fixing the price for molasses? Legislation
to fix the price was only passed through the
House this week and still has to be ap-
proved by the Legislative Council.

Why must there be such a delay in fixing
the price for molasses so that a factory is
compelled to close down to avoid over-
production before even the priee for its
product is fixed? Is this a business-like way
of dealing with the island’s greatest dollar
earning industry after sugar?

Would there have been a greater demand
for fancy molasses from Canada if the price
of molasses was not equated with that of
sugar? Does this method of price-fixing, ex-
cellent as it may be when demand for sugar
and molasses is great, not militate against
the molasses industry when there is no
such demand? At a time when the price of
refined sugar in Canada is falling by 25
cents per 100 Ibs., are Canadian importers
likely to risk overstocking of molasses? Is
it wise always to equate the price of sugar
with that of molasses? The answer to all
these questions will help to clear up some
of the doubts that are being expressed as to
the wisdom of a policy which has resulted
in so drastic a fluctuation of the fancy
molasses market. The future of bulk ship-
ment, fear of infiltration of bulk-shipped
sugar into Canada from the United States, a
possible fall in the price of sugar are no
doubt factors to be considered in relation to
those answers. But can any industry oper-
ate under the best conditions if it is com-
pelled to shut down before the price of its
product is made known’

Whatever action is taken to inject new
life into the fancy molasses industry an
earlier fixing of the price seems essential.

|
|



A business-man _ KEEPING UP W



BARBADOS ADVOCA

goes to Moscow |

I SAW NO
SMART
WOMEN

srossseecencensccccsncccseccncces By HARRY SCOTT STOKES Pere ta a ee

i who went to Moscow for the economic corferenee which } *
lasted from Aprd 3 to April 10.

rakeenlliieigitin’

Fosencsusescussncccsseusueceeacuss scassesss

By HARKY SCOTT STUKES

It was as a business man first and
last that I went to tne seven-
day economie conterence

in Moscow. My brief-case was
packed with otters. And | sold the
Russians 50,000 wooilea sneep-

skins at £1 each, enough to keep
my factory working for five
weeks, The bargaining was hard,
but the price was right.

From the start I stuck to my
guns and spoke straight business
ianguage. So did Kaplin, head of
Moscow’s buying and selling or-
ganisation. And Andrianko, head
of the Russian trade mission in
London.

The Russians were well inform-
ed. They knew the value of every
related article in my trade, They
knew every producing centre in
England, Europe and America.

Once Kaplin and Andrianko
suggested prices had dropped 25
per cent. since my arrival. I said
I had taken that drop into ac-
count. iad

Negotiations lasted four days.
Then we settled the deal.

When I was away from negoti-
ating I wasted no time at the
“working groups” where so much
propaganda ballyhoo was hurled
about. I rubbernecked my way
through Moscow,

No smart women strolled the
boulevards. There was nothing
chic about them, whatever their

standing in life.
No smart dresses or fur coats.

No hair do’s, Just roughly made
sheepskin coats and second-rate
footwear. i} inal

THE FACTORY

And The House
I SAW where some of those

shoes were made. It was the
“Paris Commune.” Moscow’s
jargest shoe factory employing
7,000 workers.

By British standards it was
pitifully equipped. I employ 45

women to every 55 men. There
the ratio was above 75 women
te 25 men, *
Where were the men? In the
army, many of them—those who
weren’t killed in the war.
Shabbily dressed women,
bulging from _ tattered
worked eight-hour shifts.
They said: “Everything here
is perfect.” I replied: ‘What
about cleaning the windows and
repairing the floors?”
A laugh greeted this. “But
it doesn’t need an expert to tell
us that,” they said.

feet
shoes

“No, but you don’t do it.” I
pointed out.
It was hopeless to get beyond

that Soviet stubbornness and as-
sumption that because it was
Russian and Stalin-inspired it was
the best.

If that is an example of work-
ing conditions, how then do they
live?

One building I saw was a block

THE SLUMS
I SAW
WERE BAD





HARRY SCOTT STOKES

is Mayor of Glastonbury,
Somerset town with a popula-
tion of 5,000. '

HE

HE is managing director of a
business with 700 employees.

HE is a Quaker, aged 55; a former
subaltern with a World War 1
M.C.; and a World War II vcom-
pany commander in the Duke of
Wellington’s Regiment.

HE is a one-time Liberal, now
non-political, but a member of
the local Tory club.

HE is a Winchester Scnool-boy,
“who in those happier, pros-
perous, lazy days befor¢ 1914
sought a classical education and
an intellectual life.”

ERASED
of 100 flats. There was a store on
the ground floor. But I was not
allowed to see any d elling in
occupation,

However, four miles from the
Kremlin and 400 yards off the
magnificent Gorki-street I saw
some slums—about as mean as
anything I have ever seen out-
side the white riverside slums of
Tennessee.

There were little wooden houses
built in the middle of last century.
Snow beat in through the ill-
fitting doors,

THE THEATRE
—angry Chinese

ONCE on my travels | lost my
temper. I was taken to “Red Pop-
py,” a ballet of China’s history
since 1927 and her “exploitation
by the British and American im-
perialists.”

Then the finale—salvation by
the Russians! The Chinese were
even angrier than I was: “They

THE CHAPEL

I VISITED |
WAS FULL

dian't do anything to save us from
the Japanese who were our real
enemies. The thing is simply
false,” they said.

And I told my Russian conduc-
tors: “It is shamefully jingo and
anti-British. I happen to be Brit-
ish. It is an insult to a guest.”

They looked surprised,
there was no apology. I
back to the magnificent
placed at our disposal,

After that I went about on my
own—to performances of “Madam
Butterfly” and “La Traviata.”
There was nothing altered in
these productions, though
“Madam Butterfly” could © lend
itself to exeellent propaganda!

THE CHAPEL
—all is not lost

JUST once I was moved to a
feeling that all is ndt lost in the
Godless society that Stalin has
created.

We went to a “Baptist” chapel.
Every inch was packed with 1,200
worshippers. There was an up-
surge of welcome ang love.

The service went on for two
and a half hours. We were given
a Bible printed in 1926. No Bi-
bles had-been printed since then,
they.said.-It was a tcuching gift.
For Bibles: cannot be bought.

Net even “the negation of
God. on -earth erected into a
system of>government”—to quote
Mr. Gladstone—can prevail
against this spirit of religious fer-

vour,
THE. PANIC
—and the way out

UNHEALTHY, imprisonment of
individual opinion is strangling
Russian political development.

Make: no mistake about it.
Russia is a Police State. Jt is spy-
ridden. Men and women spy on
their own people and _ strangers
alike,

Even our interpreters worked
for the intelligence service. I
know. My mail was read.

But they are ina panic. I
reached that conelusicn after
days of talks and visits.

And they have the same fear
France had after 1918—the fear
of another attack from Germany.
A remote fear no doubt.

How can a business man’s con-
science be reconciled with all
this? I say that free exchange}
of trade will do more to cut out
the jamming stations and the hid-
den micrephones than all the
pious resolutions of the intellect-
ual pacifist.

I came back from Moscow with
a full order book, Of that I am
proud and pleased. It will keep
my people in work. It will give
a poor nation something towards
her low standard of life.

Maybe more of it will help kill
that panic and fear which grip the
Communist leaders.

Dy —L.E.S.

but
went
hotel



Our Readers

The Right Approach to
Birth Control
To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Kindly grant me a little
‘space in your newspaper to state a
few facts in connection with this
question of Birth Control, which
has been so widely discussed of
late; some of your correspondents
have put forward some sound
views, as to why Birth Control
should be practised, others not so
sound.

Barbados today has a popula-
tion of roughly 220,000 souls and
of this number a large portion are
idle most of the time, It is known
that there is not sufficient employ-
ment to absorb the greater portion
of the working classes. What is to
be done then? The world that we
are living in today is no dream
world, and hard conditions call for
practical measures. Mankind has
free will, but also has reason and
common sense and if he does not
apply those at times, well then he
would deserve whatever stew he
found himself in.

Birth Control or Family Plan-
ning must be practised in Barba-
dos, if disaster is to be avoided in
the near future. It is the only way
of keeping the population down to

-a level where it can be decently
fed and clothed — emigration
would help a great deal, but it is
not on an operational basis at
present,

As regards the self control part
cf this question, I don’t believe
that the average man or woman
ever practiced it in any form, and
I think the individual would find
it a little beyond his or her power
of control. If tested on this very
vexed question of the moment, it
would be asking a little toc much
at this stage.

There is a way whereby one can
so furify and raise ones nature to
a level of Cosmic consciousness
where the question of sex ceases
to exist as a human element, this
is the hard way, and will raise the
question of Self Control again
which I wish to avoid at this final
stage of my letter,

WELL WISHER.
Birth Coniroi

To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—For sometime now I have
been reading with a great deal
of interest series of letters for and
against birth control, But the only
writer to approach this subject
with any intelligent appreciation
and understanding in my opinion
is Mr. Beckles.

The advocates for self-control,
and whom I suspect are advocates
purely through religious princi-
ples, fail to realize that the la-
bouring classes in this Island, or
anywhere else for that matter, can

Say:

never hope to reach that high
spiritual and mental level so con-
ducive to “Self Control. Perhaps
these advocates, who are neither
practical, nor realists in the true
sense of the word, and who have
already reached this much to be
desired goal, might be persuaded
to instruct the poor misguided
masses in the first few lessons of
this all too absorbing subject; and
then in years to come this class
of people in the Island would en-
joy the unique reputation as
Jeaders of the Self Control Doc-
trine,

Self contro] is definitely not the
sclution to the over population
problem, We have only to take a
quick glance at the population
of this Island to appreciate the
fact why it is not so, The middle
and upper classes who through
the years have been and still are
practising either birth control or
to a lesser extent self control, are
very much in the minority, the
lower classes (to whom the word
majority can hardly be termed
appropriate) have been practising
something, but it can hardly be
calleq birth or self control. Some
through ignorance, look askance
on birth contrél, others probably
have never heard of it, and the
whole can never aspire®to such
a lofty practice as “Self Control”

To save this Is'and from hun-
ger, poverty, unemployment, and
all those unhappy relations of
over population, let us advocate
birth control for the masses, and
Jeave self control for those higher
ppiritual beings in our midst be-
fere we have an even more terri-
ble control in the shape of “Na-
ture Control,” a Nature whose
balance when thrown out makes
no hesitation in re-adjusting it re-
gardless of the consequences.

If an epidemic or pestilence
were to hit this Island, birth con-
trol, self control or any other
form of control would not help
us, and each and everyone of us
know this only too well.

Yours faithfully,

NEMESIS.
Electricity
To the Editor, The Advocate,
IR, — I refer to your re-

cent interview with Capt. W. A.
Brown,of the Barbados Electricity
Supply Corporation published on
the 2nd inst. The express pur-
pose of the Chairman’s visit to the
Island is to get certain clauses in
the Public Utilities Bill adjusted,
provided of course that the Party
in power conforms to these. If
there is any discord in effecting
these changes, are we to assume
that there will be no immediate
improvement in the supply situa-
tion? A clarification of this point
is worthwhile asking for.



The Chairman has made no sug-
gestions ‘for the immediate im-
provement of the domestic supply
situation, such as rationing and
the temporary withdrawal of cur-
rent for advertising purposes dur-
ing the peak, hours, this being in
his opinion of secondary. impor-
tance, and needless’ to say’ there
is widespread discontent about
this, The Corporation is com-
pelled by law to supply current
for domestic uses, under the Or-
dinance, and their 10 unit agree-
ment is a breach of their interest
in the essential requirements of
the inhabitants of the Colony.

Thanking you for space,

Yours-faithfully,
*FAIRPLAY”.

A’ Nuisance

To the Editor, the Advocate,

SIR,—I shall be grateful if you
will publish the following in
“Our Readers Say.”

The problem of catching a bus
is at all times a difficult one and
it ir-being greatly aggravated. by
the number of school children
who accentuate the congestion by
taking an éarly bus in the morn-
ings and a late bus in the even-
ings, instead of that provided for
them.

sind

Along "my bus ~*oute—Black
Rock/Paynes Bay etc.—and prac-
tically every route there are
school buses provided for school
children, and yet, these buses
are at times half empty, while
passenger buses are packed with
children on their way to and
from school,

Everyone knows that the bus
problem has gradually been
getting worse, for even at normal
times it is difficult’ to secure a
seat in a bus and the school
children are doing nothing to
alleviate the rush.

Can’t school children be made
to catch the school bus? And if
enough buses are not provided
for this purpose, can’t that
remedied? Surely another bus
can be provided along crowded
routes for these children! Teach-
ers and parents can co-operate
to see that the children are made

provided for

to catch the
them and ieve the cram,

Apart from, discomfort and| have
inconvenience; afforded to work-

la day from people who wish to spend a night

ing people, it is appalling to see
the children rushing for or hop- |
ping on to moving buses. One!
wonders how it is that they avoid |
injury. It childrén were made
to catch their .buses these cir-)
cumstances would not exist.

I have written.this letter in the
hopethat those*responsible will
do something about it and help
to change a state of affairs that
has developed into a nuisance.

A WORKER,

















TE

THE DUTCHMAN

(By R. M. MacCOLL)
WASHINGTON.

YOU may sometimes get the impression
that Congressmen are a bunch of rampag-|
ing chaps who ride roughshod over poor
quivering characters called to testify before
one of those teeming investigating commit-
tees.

Well, in point of fact, the Congressmen
often feel as frustrated as a refrigerator
salesman in northern Greenland.

One. of the biggest frustration-causers
they have ever encountered is a retiring
figure with a gravel voice named Henry
“The Dutchman” Grunewald.

Again and again has the Dutchman’s name
cropped up in the tangled skein of inquiry
into corruption which the law-makers have







tried to unravel.
This 59-year-old Grunewald has appeared
befgre the Congressmen four separate



times, No use. All he has told them has been
his name and age. Address? But no. Occu-
pation? Come now.

Connections with various business men in
Washington? I say, you chaps. Did you call
so-and-so on the telephone on such-and-
such-a-date? What makes you think I know
how to use a telephone?

wrath and, by a vote of 332 to nothing, in-
dicted “The Dutchman” for contempt.

In Decaturville, Tennessee, they find a
pair of trousers which belonged to a man
killed by a tornado 50 miles away last
month, The wind had blown them all that
way—with a wallet containing £142 in the
pocket.

victory. yet in a State popularity poll.
Eisenhower puts up his feeblest showing.

the returns counted this is the position :—

ers—l1 per cent.

over a command for a mass parachute drop
in big war games which have been going on
near Fort Hood, in Texas. Two ’chutists
were killed and nearly 200 badly hurt be-
cause the drop took place in bad conditions.
But a general and a colonel who ordered the

Finally Congress arose tonight in its 1

Senator Taft wins his most resounding
And

The State is Illinois, heart of the Isolation-
ist Mid-West. And with three-quarters of

Taft (Mr. Republican), 73 per cent.; Mr.
Harold Stassen, 13 per cent.; General Eisen-
hower—whose name was written in by vot-

There is anger—and a determination to
investigate—in many parts of the nation



LONG LEAD,



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exercise say they are “wholly satisfied.”

A cinema in Washington took a_ poll
among its regular patrons on whether they
liked or disapproved of pop-corn. By 95 to 1
they said they loathed the sight, smell and
taste of the stuff. ° :

Encouraged by this, the management not
only threw away its pop-corn selling
machines, but started a new policy of reviv-
ing “intelligent” films of the old days.

Results—massive business, while all other
cinemas are complaining of pint-sized au-
diences.

Talking of pop-corn, that is one of Ameri-
ca’s allegedly edible products which always
gives me nausea, Others I place in this class
include salt water taffy (which tastes like
cotton waste soaked in brine), Philadelphia
serapple (pure fatty degeneration of some-
thing or other), hominy grits (a sort of poor
man’s rice), and corn pone (the worst bread
you.ever tasted).

The human touch: Investigating Congress-
men wax sarcastic over the high rate of ill-
ness among witnesses in the income-tax
inquiry. No fewer than 15 men
whose presence is requested are suddenly
laid up with ailments ranging from low

scandal

blood pressure to high.

RESTLESS GHOST



A TUDOR well in the garden of Abbas
Hall, Great Cornard, Suffolk—Britain’s most

haunted house—is to be excavated in an
attempt to lay the ghost which is said by
villagers to haunt the 14th century building.

The digging is to be undertaken by
American GIs stationed on Lakenheath air-
field near by.

The owner of the hall, Mr. Cecil Wells, ¢
Sudbury Solicitor, has given his consent,

The well, 40ft. deep, was filled with rub-
ble many years ago.

MIDNIGHT SEANCE

Now a London medium who held a mid-
night seance in the house has reported re-
ceiving a spirit message to the effect that
the ghost is connected with human remains
which will be found at the bottom of the
well.

Mr, Wells told me to-day: “I gladly gave
my consent for the excavations. I am not a

be believer in hauntings, but the house has

now attracted such notoriety, that nothing
would please me more than for the ‘ghost’
to be laid.
SIX LETTERS A DAY
“Since Abbas Hall came into the news ]
been getting an average of six letters

there.”
One of the psychical research workers
who has been active at Abbas Hall told me:

|\“We believe that bones will be found st the

bottom of the well.

“If they are, they will be buried in conse-
crated ground—and the Abbas ghost will
find peace at last.”—L.ES,

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FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1952



GREAT CHANGES IN U.K. IN SOCIAL.

British Trade Unions
Severely Tested

LECTURING to

an appreciative



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



ing the income of the sections of
the community other than the
wage-earners (e.g) by reducing
profit margins). In so far as the
second method offers any relief—
and today it offers very little—it

audience at the is not a method which can be ap-

British Council headquarters yesterday evening, on “Brit- plied by collective bargaining, but
ish Trade Unions To-day,” Mr. J. D. M. Bell said that great Only by fiscal or other Govern-

changes had taken place in Britain since the war in the

social and economic policy.

ment means. Increased produc-
tion remains the key,

Those changes together with This situation demands

some

the difficult international economic position of the country, kind of wage policy, as otherwise

provided a severe test for the British Trade Unions which the
the responsibilities imposed by their own ‘great strength

had made it necessary that

One
cumstances they had shown a hi

social responsibility.

Mr. Bell is Lecturer at Glasgow
University in Modern Economic
History and Research Lecturer in
Industrial Relations.

He said:

Strength

The Trade Unions are in Britain
today immensely powerful organ-
isations. Their membership in re-
cent years, estimated at over 9
millions, is higher than ever be-
fore, and, while it is true that it
represents just under half of the
total employed population, that
apparently low general proportion
is largely accounted for by the
existence of considerable groups
of workers among whom organisa-
tion is but little advance —
clerks, distributive workers some
sections of unskilled workers,
many groups of women workers,
ete. Amongst all male workers
the population is probably as high
as two-thirds and in many major
industries (e.g, mining, railways,
cotton textiles, boots and shoes
among craftsmen in printing,
building, engineering and _ ship-
building, among civil servants and
teachers) it is often much higher
than that. Moreover, about 15—16
million workers are estimated to
be covered by one or other wage
agreements or awards in the
negotiations of which the Trade
Unions are parties,

The total membership is not
only larger than before; it is
more representative of the
working population as a
whole. In 1913 more than
half of all the country’s trad?
Unionist were coal-miners,
cotton operatives, building
workers or workers in metal.
Today these four groups ac-
count for little over one-third,
the decline in their relative
importance being due to the
spread of organisation else-
where, especially among non-
manual workers, women and
workers of lower degrees of
skill,

Through amalgamation, federa-
tion, and other forms of joint
action their strength is also more
concentrated than before. The
six largest unions today account
for just about half of the affiliated
membership of the Trade Union
Congress. he 17 largest form
two-thirds of all the Trade Unions
in Britain. In engineering and
shipbuilding, the largest complex
of industries in the country, a con-
siderable measure of joint action
is obtained through the Confeder-
ation of shipbuilding and Engineer-
ing Unions, which since 1946, has
included all the important organ-
isations, in the trades. Finally,
the strength and prestige of the
T.U.C. has perhaps never been
greater than during these post-
war years.

The Labour Party

This powerful movement has
moreover been operating in large-
ly favourable political, economic,
and social circumstances, Politi-
cally, the Labour Party, with its
close links with the Unions has
been in office for most of the post
war period. Today it is in op-
position by a small margin of
seats, but I venture to suggest that
since the war there has been not
a sweeping or revolutionary but a
marked and permament swing to
the left in British political opinion,
which means that at least Labour
will enjoy periodic terms of office
in the future and also that the
policies of the Conservatives will
have to be conditioned (as they
already show some signs of being)
to the changed circumstances,

Both major parties, again, are
committed to economic policies
based on the maintenance of full
employment (or at least a high
and stable level of employment)
although opinions differ as to
which side can offer the more
effective guarantees of that main-
tenance. A high level of employ-
ment undoubtedly favours the
unions. Finally, there is wide-
spread recognition in Britain to-
day of the Social importance of
Trade Unions. It is almost un-
thinkable that there should be
any kind of advisory committee,
commission of inquiry or joint
executive board dealing with any
major questions of social policy
with the Trade Unions being
Biven, in practice, representation
upon it.

Great Changes

The great changes in social and
economic policies which have
taken place in Britain since the
war, the. difficult international
economic position of the country,
and the responsibilities imposed

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competitive pressures of
sectional collective bargaining will

. push the economy into inflation.
Should face. In the cir- getween 1948 and 1950 a

ghly developed sense of temporary answer was found in
wage-restraint. That, in my view,
is an essential part of any etffiec-
tive wage policy under full em-
ployment. But it can only be ap-
plied if the Government is at the
same time maintaining a reason-

by their own great strength, pro-
vide a severe test for the British
Trade Unions. My own view is
that, in face of this test, they have
shown a highly developed sense

‘ evel ably stable level of prices and
of social responsibility. They satisfactory social justice by action
could, in Britain’s post war against profits.

economic crisis, have misused the

power which they possess to Wage—Restraint

wreck the country’s prospects of Wage-restraint, however, can
recovery; so far from doing so, mever be the whole’ answer. To
they have exhibited a degree of freeze wages means to freeze
testraint which must have wage-structure, and that. is un-
astounded many of their critics. thinkable. Moreover, trade unions
On the other hand, the process of derive the bulk of their dynamic

hdapting their methods and from the wage-struggle, What
practices to the needs of the new js needed is some form of wage
situation — which has certainly policy, co-ordinated through the

been going on—has not in some T.U.C_ whereby the unions. will
directions, I would suggest, been themselves decide how the in-
going on quickly enough. creased wages which rising pro-

The primary functions of Trade duction make possible should be
Unions has always been, and still shared out.

is, the maintenance and improve- Are the trade unions yet
ment of the wages, hours and ready for this? Ultimately that
conditions of work of their mem-~ means, is the ordinary rank and
bers. To that end they have fle member ready for it?
used primarily the method or Hardly yet, given an imaginative
collective bargaining with em- ead from Government the ex-

ployers. That method had _ in- erience of 1948-50 suggests that
volved them in two “battles.” yuh could be a

(1) to secure satisfactory collec- The answer is always — out-
tive bargaining machinery put, and more output, alone it
(2) to use that machinery to ad- would not be enough, but it

vantage. ae would make every other aspect
The first battle, it is possible to of the problem so much more
Say, is as ggod as won. In every capable of solution.

major industry collective bargain-
ing machinery exists, usually Control Of Industry
On a national basis. Where that The Trade Unions have done
machinery is not wholly satisfac- much since the war to assist the
tory it has been supplemented by drive for greater output. A
State—backed wage fixing author- maximum effort however depends
ities:on a tripartite basis, which on the degree of sympathy they
act as schools of collectivé bar- have with the purposes and
gaining.” At every turn, the state- policies which industry seeks to
has aided, encouraged and serve. The best way to elicit that
augmented the voluntary system. sympathy is to associate the work-
Trade Dispute ers with the foundations of those
That negotiations are usually purposes and policies, which is
national, brings the danger of the precisely what the more enlighten-
national trade dispute. That is ed of modern managers seek to
a danger which unions and em- accomplish through the machinery
ployers have been so reluctant to of joint consultation,
face, that the official strike would Joint Consultation has been wel-
seem to be almost obsolescent as comed by the Trade Unions as
an industrial weapon. This poses providing an intelligent and prac-
two problems: tical answer to their forty-year-
(a) resentment finds expression old demand for democracy in in-
in the unofficial strike, which is, dustry. From crude and vague
in the strictest sense, irresponsible, Philosophies of workers’ control
and which, if widely enough they have come to accept consul-
practised, would discredit the tation as the best means of ex-
established system of industrial pressing the workers participa-
eerenions. The answer to it lies tion in management,
mainly in the internal organisa- .
tion of the wehand. 2 Industrial Democracy
and (b) an alternative way of | Already through advisory com-
finding an answer in the event of mittees on Government industriai
a breakdown in negotiations must and manpower policies, Develop-
be found. From 1940 to 1951 that ment Councils in private industry
answer was provided by com- 2nd national consultative councils
pulsory arbitration, but that could in nationalised industry, the trade
scarcely in a democratic com- unions can make their contribu-
munity, be permanent. Today tion at the “top-level’. But indus-
the Industrial Disputes Order trial democracy _ is essentially
(Order 1376) of 1951, by offering something which touches the in-
the means to a final settlement dividual worker, which must
without, however, denying the primarily have its roots in the
right to strike in the last resort, workshop, What is needed is not
seems to offer a workable solution, merely a system of committees,
‘Nevertheless, it must be remem- Valuable as they are, but a con-
bered that the first responsibility tinuous effort to enlist “the per-
of a Trade Union is to protect the Sonal initiative of each in the col-
wages and conditions of its mem- lective action of the group.
bers: the pursuit by the state of | This development carried far
policies which threaten these must enough and with goodwill can
make industrial peace harder to make the purely advisory con-
maintain. sultative aoe oe zee
» Secon Parliaments of industry; wi
ese chon eeu etiine management as their executive

i ide: agents, But once again it is a de-
nike nee Wiens velopment which has its full

y le.
1) the Unions’ interest is not chance of success only in a stab e,
just a the level of money wages, fully employed ed acetal ae
but on the quantity of goods and industrial peace and social justice
services that these wages will like prevail.
command, hence they are concern-
ed with the effect of Government
economic planning upon the level
of prices.

and (2) the unions interest
not just in the hourly (or piece)
rate of wages, but in the annual
level of earnings, i.e. in the op-
portunities for full-time work and
in-the question of full employ-
ment,

This widening of the objective
introduces complications. In con-
opens a mass SRD
when overnment set about A oi ee
policies of deficit budgeting, public Unions refuse to take any risks
investment subsidies to consumers Whatever. Any social decision .
etc., in an effort to promote re- a matter of balancing one set o
covery Trade Union pressure on ®isks against the other.
wages is unlikely to cause an in-
flationary spiral in prices or
seriously to impede the extension
of employment.

Full Employment

But, with full employment cir-
cumstances are very different.
Real inflation becomes a threat, qemands a fundamental unity of
asthe increased claim on the purpose between the State and the
available quantities of goods and voluntary associations, and the
services which rises in wages will on the side of the latter to
represents cannot be met by meet their responsibilities, This
further expansions of employment. challenge faces the trade unions
Increases can only be met by in- more than it does any other kind
creased production or by lower- of organisation.

SSS

NEWSPRINT SPORT SHIRTS

The Very Latest Craze
In Blue, Brown, Green, Wine and Black
@ $2.70 each

Conclusion

Given the prosperity and the
achievement of enlighted and
js social policies the trade unions
, are sufficiently responsible to
adopt their practices and methods
to the situation. This attitude in-
volves them in some degree of
risk by dismantling some of their
traditional defences and restric-
tions they are banking on_the
continuance of such policies, They
may not continue. But their
failure is certain if the trade

Personally, I hold an essential
feature of a democratic society to
be the existence of voluntary
hssociations, assisting in the
formation and execution of major
policies, and not leaving every
thing to the State. Such an idea







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DIAL 2664

{
(





a



| CAVE



LIGHT FLASHING

OFF COUVA

THE Harbour Master has
received a cable from the
Acting Harbour
Trinidad which states: A
light flashing every second,
visible eight miles, is «x--
hibited at a height of 20 feet
from a white steel structure
with a red horizontal strip,
red lantern on a pile beacon
in a position approximately
latitude 10 degrees 23 min-
utes 54 seconds North, long-
tude 61 degrees, 31 min-
utes, 42 seconds West, on
the S.W. extremity of Couva
Shoal. The red buoy in the
vicinity has been removed
and is to be expunged from
the British Chart No. 483.

Vessels bound to southern
ports are requested to report
on their arrival the distance
light is raiseq and their
height of eye.

|
|



HARBOUR NEWS:
: 99
“Kosarene

Here From
B. Guiana

The Schooner Rosarene under
Capt. L. Ollivierre arrived irom
Demerara yesterday laden with
70 tons of firewood, 300 bags of
charcoal, 660 bags of rice, 500
bran and 60 polish. Besides other
cargo, the Rosarene had 80 bun-
dles of shingles on board, but
these shingles were not for
Barbades, .

* * *

Wharf hands were busy un-
loading the M.V. Caribbee yester-
day of her 98 bags of dried copra,
three crates of fresh fruit, cab-
bages, empty barrels, Ju-c bottles
and other cargo,

The 100 ton Caribbee came
from Dominica with skipper
Basil Gumbs on Wednesday.

The M.V. Daerwood came in
yesterday evening frem Grenada,
having the yacht Leander, 48
tonnage, in tow. The Daerwood
left Barbados last Sunday.

ARTIE'S HEADLINE

“2. And if ie will help
in the slump I'll have u
reel of cotton.”



“Nelsoii” Due Today

The Lady Nelson will be ar-
riving to-day from Georgetown,
Trinidad, Grenada and St. Vin~«
cent. From Barbados she will be
sailing north for Bermuda, Bos-
ton, Halifax and Montreal via the
British Northern Islands.

At about mid-day the Canadian
Challenger arrives from = Trini-
dad. She will be sailing north,
direct to St. Johns, New Bruns-
wick,



Cyclist Injured

Shortly after 2.15 p.m. yester-
day Everton Boyce, a labourer of
Haggatt Hall, St. Michael, sus-
tained injuries to his face and
hands after he fell from his bi-
cycle which he was riding along
Government Hill, St. Michael.

He was treated at the General
Hospital and discharged. The
front wheel of the bicycle was
damaged.

_Mrs. A. M Arias who left for
Canada by the Lady dney last month
was a resident of Pine Hill, St, Michdel,
it was not Mrs. A. M. Arthur of York-
shire, Christ Chureh as was previousiy
reported in this newspaper.





* or







Rises Again

@ From rage |
again with luxury stores and res-
taurants and its coloured neon
Gaus at night Pivai Mose of

«Broadway and London’s Picadilly

Circus,

Even in Communist controlled
East Berlin slow recovery is be-
ginning — much siower tan Uiat
an the city’s western sectors. But
destruction and devastation are
still there.

Empty Spaces

Vast empty spaces mark the
places where once stood Hitler’s
Chancellory, the Nazi Foreign
Utnce, Joseph Goebbels’ Propa-
ganda Ministry, the United States,
British and French Embassies, his-
toric Kranzler’s Cafe and the
City’s most fashionable hotels —
the Adlon, Bristol and Eden.

It still will be many years be-
fore the scars of Berlin's air bom-
bardment by the Western Allies
and the ten days’ seige by! the
Red Army disappear altogetner,

The final act of capitulation
was signed at the Russian head-
quarters at Karlshorst an East
Berlin suburb that came through
the war relatively unscathed.
After hours of last minute nego-
tiations with the Western Allies
the Russian Commander in Chief
Marshal Grigori Zhukov sum-
mened the German delegates
shortly before midnight to the
hall in the former Wehrmacht
technical school building. The
U.S. was represented by General
Carl Spaatz, Brftain by Air Chief
Marsha] Sir Arthur Tedder and
France by General Jean De Lat-
tre De Tassigny.

Keitel, who was haughty and
self possessed, his face slightly
flushed slammed his Marshal's
baton on the table and sat down
staring arrdgantly ahead. He
was accompanied by Admiral
Friebeurg who committed sui-
cide a few weeks later and
General ‘Paul Stumpf, Com-
mander in Chief of the Luft-
waffe, ’

Tedder, Deputy to General
Eisenhower, Western Allied Su-
preme Commander rose and asked
coldly in English. “I ask you,
have you read this document of
unconditional surrender? Are you
prepared to sign it?”

“We Are Ready”

Keitel answered in

a rasping
voice in German: “Yes we are
ready.” At a sign from Zhukov,

Keitel picked up his cap and Mar-
shal's baton and slowly and care-
fully inserted a monocle in his
right eye. Then he walked over
to the table in front of the Allied
leaders and signed in a scrawling
hand the single word “Keitel.”

It was just 12.15 a.m. on May

9, 1945. Ags he returned to his
place Keitel began loudly de-
manding another 24 hours to

notify forces under his command.

Zhukov ignored the request and
the Germans were escorted from
the room later to be taken to an
Allied Prison camp.

On their way they drove for
fhe last time through a Berlin
that was a hideous nightmare, a
Jabyrinth of total destruction,

From Curfuelstendamm in the
West to Frankfurter Alley in East
Berlin now renamed Stalin Alley
the City was nothing but an eerie
echoing waste of ruins and bomb
craters and burned out skeletons
of buildings. Whole areas were
blocked off by enormous bomb

craters or piles of debris, Bar-
ricades for street fighting still |
barred some streets.

Wrecked streetcars leaned |
drunkenly against the sides of
buildings. Here and there were
wreckeq 88 mm. anti-aircraft

guns and the carcases of shot up
Tiger tanks, Smoke till curled
up and hung over the citv. To
‘all appearances Berlin had ab-
porbed these blows for al’ time.
—U-P.

REMANDED |
Lamount Griffith of Britton’s
Hill, St. Michael was yesterday
remanded with bail until May 14
by His Worship Mr. C. L. Wal-
wyn, Acting Police Magistrate of ,
District “A,” on a charge of at-|
tempting to set fire to the dwell-
ing house of Beryl Dowrich. The
charge states that the offence was
committed cn February 20.

Mr. F. Smith is appearing on
behalf of Griffith, while Sgt. King
is prosecuting for the Police from |
information receiyed, Three wit-
nesses gave evidence for the pros- |
ecution yesterday.





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Afternoon and
Evening Wear

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now available



11, 12 & 13





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|
|

BROAD STREET









—————
eee

HANDBAGS



ECONOMIC POLICY

West Germany Carpenter Charged

With Slealitig
Bottle Of Perfunie

A 29-year-old
ston Waldron, alias
Mayers Land, St. Michael, wa
yesterday charged by the Police
before His Worship Mr. G. &
Griffith, Acting Police Magistrate
of District ‘A”, with the larceny
of a bottle of perfume, the prop-
erty of Bookers Drug Store, on
February 16.

The case was adjourned unti
to-day, Mr. E, W. Barrow is ap-
pearing on behalf of Waldron,
while Sgt. Murrell is prosecuting
for the Police. George Bradshaw
a clerk of Bookers Drug Store
told the court that on Februar)
16 while he was standing behind
the counter he saw the defendant
put his hand in an open glass
ease in which were bottles of per-
fume and lotion. He saw the de
fendant with a bottle in his hand
but the defendant ran away

When the defendant ran out o
the store he chased him, but
failed to catch up with him, He
went back and reported the mat-
ter to the Manager of the Store.

To the court Bradshaw
that he had seen the
since that day,

2000-year-old
beats are ‘out

of pickle’

carpenter Win-

“Dauber” of

saic
defendan

‘[‘wo ancient craft, about
2000 years old, which
nave been “in pickle” for
four years at the National
Maritime Museum, Green-
wich, have now been taken
out to dry
The vessels were discovered

in the mud of the River Humber
n 1937, and 10 years later were

removed by road to. the
nuseum
They were put into a tank

Niled with glycerine, where they
remained until a short time
ago.
On show

The “ pickling’
sary to save the
going to dust

Parts of. the vessels are miss

was
wood

neces-
from

ing, but the remnants will be
assembled soon and the boats
will be put on show at the
museum

They are believed to repre
sent the first stage in plank
built boats. Before this boats
were made from hollowing

varts of tree trunks



Sore Mouth

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leeding Gums, Sore Mouth and
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|







heaper Newsprint

@ From Pege 1
ould increase world supplies by
11 per cent.

Sugar Cane

Sugar ca ; botanically in the
same family as bamboo, which
ows in a tropical belt all round
>» world. There is, therefore, arf
ilimited supply of raw material,
he said. But there are two prob-

lems facing the newspaper world
he added, which are:

“1. The competition from
mills requiring to make other
pay ind we have already
found a resistance by our friends
in the West Indic who are
more interested in producing
bagasse pulp for the manufac-
ture of higher-grade papers than
newsprint; and

“2. The fact that, although
bamboo exists in such enormous
quantities, there are no pulp
mills to deal with it,

‘The cost of putting up paper
mills to-day is staggering. The

American Government have grant-

‘a to a concern in the Louisiana
ugar-growing country, facilities
to put up a new paper mill at

cost of over £17,000,000, That
nill is to produce bagasse news-
rrint.”

Details
Mr. Curtis-Willson said he had
ent all the details he had
umassed to UNESCO because they
ould do more with it than he

‘ould. He added. “What we want
© do is to interest the sugar grow-
ers in the West Indies, in Mauri-

tius, in the Indonesian countries,
in Ceylon and India, until you
have gota chain of pulp mills
“ound the world,

“These pulp mills need not be
paper-producing, because to pro-
duce the pulp you do not need

the highly-skilled labour that has
to go into a newsprint mill. You
can, in each of these countries,
find an abundance of comparative-
y cheap and unskilled labour to
preduce the pulp. ;

“Therefore, the time seems ripe
for every country to press forward
for experimentation in these new
sources of supply. We have done
what we can in this country; we
have proved out a point that we
can make paper. We have got the
know-how; but what we have not
got, and, I am afraid we shall not



get,

PAGE FIVE





is the support of the paper
makers ‘ ~

New Raw Materials

That, I think, is a job which
newspapermen. in. every
country have got to break down;
the opposition, not necessarily
violent opposition, but the inertia
the refusal to move, the refusal
to do anything with these new raw
materials, by the paper manufac-
turers.

“Let us agree that they are
producing at the moment the
capacity of their mills. It is no
use to us in England talking to
our mills and saying that they
should use bagasse because they
are working to the full extent on
the traditional raw material that
is already coming into this coun-
try and we cannot produce the
new pulp at present at a competi-
tive price which would encourage
them to use bagasse instead of
pulp from Scandinavia and else-
where.

‘That is only for to-day. I want
to emphasise as strongly as I can
that the world is marching to-
wards a newsprint famine unless
these new untraditional sources of

upply are tapped”

we



—B.U.P,

What’s In A Name?
TURIN, May 8.

Ten years ago Francesco bel-
Joni was sentenced to seven years
in jail for having called his dog
“Benito” and as a result of that
he was not able to get married.
His flancee’s father then a fervent
fascist called off the marriage and
denounced Francesco to authori-
ties on charges of having insulted
the late dictator by using his name
for a dog. :

Released from jail in 1945
Francesco not able to marry be-
cause his fiancee’s father said he
would not have his daughter mar+
ry a man with a Police record.
Belleni appealed against sentenee
and the Appeal Court ‘of Turin
yesterday annulled sentence’ four
years of which Francesco had
served,

He will 1..arry on Sunday,





ANIAMTED

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INE RUM







PAGE SIX BARBADOS. ADVOCATE FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1952


























































































































* — soldi
1 ene LL CC LL
PUBLIC NOTICES! PUBLIC S GOVERNMENT NOTIC
sal ; oS ee RNDME ES SHIPPING NOTICES
- |
}
fuk GARBADOS MUTUAL LIFF JOHN R. BOVELL SCHOLARSHIP | —- - ~ - 7 _
TELEPHONE 2508 aSeURAT ° . |\——_—— ———
i ccnticariciieensnecitennitinemein VE i SSURANCE SOCIETY REAL EST
1 notif the policyholders ATE Applications Sears . “ . }
ons are invited for one “John R. Bovell Scholarship” Ot
‘ . s eee ta cane gna 2 | een eee 5 . . ship’ oe
DIED FOR SALE - a ates - LAND Pemitifully situated, Graeme) Which will be of the value of $1,236 per annum for three years ten- ROYAL NETHERLANDS \e os POSTROOOOOOOS
Mt ; e | Hal ‘errace, with Water, ae and}able at the Imperial College of Tropical Agriculture. Applications to | The M.V CACIQUE DEL %
: =| city 0 lo . s : . tc ; >
: pone eS - — | oF cons roposed ati is | Cleetricity. Two lots 22,000 feet. Edghill.| be addressed to the Director of Agriculture, will be received at the | STEAMSHIP CO. i See ih accent Cargo snd %
CALLENDER—On M T ‘i oun a i t t 9.5.52—4n. | SAILING FROM EUROPE Passengers for St. Lucia, Gren- %
Callender ge 7 ‘ ks, | AUTOMOTIVF | While it ; lenthoe on seme . oe of papentasent of Science and Agriculture up to the 17th of| 4.5. HERA, 14th May 1982 am we onan. Passengers only S
Ciwist Chureh. His funeral leaves | —————— —— ——_—_—_-_—— | subsequent occ t eek election, I ay. P ie eg . . ‘or incen Sailing Today
his late residence at 4.30 t | CAR—One (1) 1951 Hillman 17,000|am not prepared to do so on this AUCTION z ae are Wednesday 7th inst 3
Bien tor St. Bartholomew church, | miles.” Petes. condition, “going chem’; |°"tmacr the. circumstances, 1 have| ~9uaryaem am 2. Applications will be considered from a candidate who— | M5 NESTOR 94h May ime... (B carco snd Pamcnwers Yor Lon §
Budine Nurse, May Eastmond | Gar twee | uted the Society to withdraw my| UNDER THE DIAMOND Of eet Ee te oe the Ist of May,|â„¢* OSATUING TO EUROPE and St) Kits. Sailing Friday 3
tehildren) Cuthbert : —_—$—<—————— rr | LE rer those f the candidates Oe SAILIN: © TRINI | PARAMARI s § ing iday
Israe! and Cyril ‘grandchildrer CAR—One (1) Austin A.40 Car, late | proposed I " HAMMER Be pe uA BO Sh_ instant .
9.5.52 nodel. Telephon« LINDSAY E. R. GILL. | Aiton at may for Sele Se eee anes (b) has reached advanced standard in at least one science| $.S. COTTICA, 2nd June 195 PR my. potas, will accept
AS é “oO } idgetow < ‘ + of s me ‘ . -' ssen, s for Dom-
& Co, Md ; 4.5.saan.| Thieday 15th pall at. a et subject together with at least ordinary standard in a| SAâ„¢ING_ TO rare AND inica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
IN MEMORIAM CAR—Morris Oxford. Perfect condi- | ———~ - - | eee Ee al ek iat second science subject; | M.S. STENTOR 17th May 1952 aad St, Kilts, faitag Friday 16th
“ aad tion; mileage 2,370. Telephone 249 | THE BARBADOS MUTUAL LIFE jprjip, = camel eee ao ’ x | M.S. NESTOR 13th June 1952 ins ¥
« oor Bieaittn abranees socuas A | reie., "toe, proc grenegsertae (c) is.a native of Barbados, the son of a native or of parents| —SANANG “£0, TERIDAD Axo ons soca Commer.
ee ee ane ion © 3 7 s a = 8 ¢ . 4 5 « *
; 5 as 3 SAR) MG. Coupe in perfect} With reference to the Ballot advertised Crane Hotel, and which is continually who have been domiciled in the Island for ten years} ws HERA 2nd June 1952 Consternce Tele. 00 )
LOWE: Charles Clement Lowe who fell ; fanned ty refreshing b t hi te os ne
ddiki Bias © ao order. Apply Neweastle Plantation, St. | to take place at the Society's Office., Grane Coast. coeatate ee ar ae prior to the date of application; SP MUSSON, SON & CO, LTD
: ; les John 30.4.52—t.f.n. | Beckwith Place, Bridgetown, on 9th) 21° , - Agents POCO OOMIOC FOC
In the home of the blessed - : : . , andah on t ides, d@ 4 din- : ; ar
tee dear ove at rest, aca i ee ae ana May, 196%, for the _ election of _inree i ceiens, beset re ee ae (ad) submits evidence of good character and general ‘fitness
Whe of husbands and fathers Apply D.V. SCOTT & Co, Ltd White| persons nominated, having notified his lavatory and bath, ieftehen, garage and to profit by a course of study at the Imperial College.
mongst the best . I; , ‘ : are — ; sun porch, together with an acre of land. . .
o8 S91 Park Road. intention not to accept nomination nor . ; e
eee EG ENN Teention to tee nem en 59" or mmpeetio, eal at house Selow for] 3. A candidate may be required to submit a medical certificate Canadian National Steamships
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FOR RENT CAR—One 1951 Hiliman Car in perfect take place 4 ge eal Real Estate Agent & Auctioneer
ing condition. Done 4,000 ‘miles. hone 5. Fi ¢) 8. Beets) | | a ae ionesr4,| 4. Attention is drawn to the fact that residence in the Milner) ,,.
« ee de untage 6142 or after ‘hours OMMP. |. -s,| Beckwith Place, i — | Hostel ¥ the cea is eennioney and the allowances have been SOUTHBOUND wits Sails Sails Arrives s
BEN-O-NI, Fitts Village st. |——_—_———— — —_——.. | Bridgetown ~ increased to enable the John R. Bovell Scholarship holders to com- Montreal Halifax = Boston Bidos Bidos
James, 2 bediooms. Dresstag Room. W ¢ CAR: One Nash Coupe in good work- 4.5.52—3n UNDER THE SILVER ply with this regulation, CANADIAN CRUISER | . 20 Apr. 2 May ps 11 May 13 May
Garage and Servants room. Dial 2628. /ing order $300 nearest offer Phone " eateries HAMMER - CANADIAN CON! iCTOR 9 May 12 May — 21 May 23 May
2.6,52—q:. | 8125 9.5.52-2n| THE BARBADOS MUTUAL LIFE Th i . i ¥ . ‘ . | LADY RODNEY .. + 19 May 22 May 24 May 2 June 3 June
ee eee. ¥ deeniiehabibelt poniatenniegeniaaaae ASSURANCE SOCIETY ON TUESDAY 13th by order of the 5. e successful applicant will be required to begin his studies | CANADIAN CHALLENGER’ 30 May 2 June ae ll June 12 June
BUNGALOW — Navy Gerdens, full CAR: Ane if8 Ford Super Deluxe, Election of Directors Executors to the Estate of The Late |at the Imperial College in September, 1952. If no applicant possess- ee eae co tio? . @June 12June M4 June 23June 2% June
SO ce cen hohe iL. jgood colldition $1,000.60, . Puone Sim, |. Mr. lL. ©. R. Gill. one o€ the petages Archdeacon Shankland we will sell his|ing the requisite qualifications is fortheoming, the award of the | CANADIAN Caulaam Bune 7 yuw 2 Jul Fog. $ July
Williams 7.5.52—Sn @.5.82--an | 2ominated to serve as a Director at the urniture at “Uplands” 3rd Avenue, holarshi rill be t a til t | CAN, CONSTRUCTOR 30 June 3 Juyw = 12 Jusy 9 48 Jub
Annual General Meeting of the above Belleville, which ineludes scholarship wt postponed until next year. 98522 | LADY RODNEY .. : 1 July 14July 16 July 9 2 Julyy July
5.52—2n. | & ;







——$_—$_—_
CAR- Standa ~ |mentioned Society held on 25th April,|Good Extension Dining Table, (closes
ie undaré_ 8. 3eloon ia go 1952, having given notice that it is not]in @ Round) Sideboard, Morris Chalrs





FARAWAY-—St. Philip coast, 3 bed-











rooms. i LP ead > “
Caletais sxesar mockia Gor Mant, two SERIE OR: ES ‘SO rn a his intention to accept nomination nor end Cushions, Ornament Tables, Book - =
quiet scoms. Irom. May ist. Phone |. ———— . i stand tor election on is cotacion,, is ae leas some) Bem and Upright FREE TUITION SCHOLARSHIP NORTHBOUND aire oie Pee Arrives tees Arrives
476 10.4.52—+ f+ VAN—Fordson Van in perfect order, | piTP0¥ sepiates we. a — - ring Sosa > ame ir. —Hia » Double End, Laby NeLAON Bides Pa St. John Boston alifax Montreal
19,000 miles. Royal Store No. 12, High Te Rt gre ee noe tod meena hee Cabin aoa Veena Applications for one free tuition scholarship tenable at the Im-| CDN. CRUISER ‘. May oo May wet 5 June 3 ene a 3u
> : a - e 3 ML an ssts v ce Cab’ righ: i . A . : .* May 2 3 _ e e
a ee eas oe nee 7.5.52—Sa-\P ir’ Gave are reelected for the Chairs, uphols: Chairs, Electrola, perial College of Tropical Agriculture will be received by the Direc- | CANADIAN 7
Sean Bice, Apply to CL. Nicholis.) ONE FORDSOM UTWITY VAN—Canes | ¢nsulig year jnice Divan (Couch or Bed), tor of Agriculture up to the 17th of May, 1952. CONSTRUCTOR 3June 8June | — 16 June 18 June 41 June
No. 18 Swan Street 8.5.52—€ nd Passengers or 14 tons cargo. 22 miles G. B. EVELYN, er Carpets, Extension Qak Tabies ee 15 June 17 June 27 June = 28 June 1 July
, Sws . .6.52—-6 r I = pag 0 Chairme pa a ; , 3
ver gation of RPly MeDonald Sealy. | pookwith Place oe ee ats | Vereen CORE Waker 2, Candidates should be not less than 17 years of age on the CHALLENGER .. 23 June 28 June 5July 8Juby 11 July
NEWHAVEN = Crane Coast. 4 bed amt 12D RAO TONE ot din Bridgetown Bookshelves and Books, Glass and China, | 1st of September, 1952, and have obtained a General Certificate of | LADY NELSON : 6July 4 July 18 July 9 July 22 Jul
RRPRAVEN crane Guat tnt «2 sa. | Bishan ‘Rs Bercy utsa, Ware |Edueation in at least five subjects, two of which should be Selence|ERNaSiqg sn WN tt wih per ths
Watermill supply, Double Garage, three ELECTRICAL Seem Fruit Knives &c, Brass Candlesticks ubjects. GOMERRUCTOR * 4 guly Jy os 5 Aug. 8 eae 10 aus
LAD IDNEY .. 7 Aug. 9 ug. ug. 20 Aug 23 Aug



Vases &c., Cutlery, Electric Singer's

servant rooms. For May and from Oc_ :
tober te ” 3. This scholarship entitles the holder to free tuition at the































it Phone 4476. RADLO-_One (1) Mullard 5-Tube Ravio P b ie { i \ | Sewing Machine, Mir.—Presses, Bureau;
10.4.52—t.f n. Jin excelient condition. ‘Whone 3944 u lic 0 ficial Sa e Pedstead Vono Spring ail in Mahogany: | College, but all other fees must be met.
? aia 7 Deep Sleep — Dunlopilio _ Mattresses; .
PLYMOU!H, Crane Coz nd inilbeemniiina pinnae eemmpeate . (The Provost Marshal's Act 1904 (1904-6) |] Single Ivon Bedstead, Trunks and Suit’ ; . —— * * * For further particulars, apply to—
faa toe es ; ar Te ae sc on ay ie Sings uuries G0 tare, Lavaers, tet 4. Attention is drawn to the fact that residence in the Milner
condition. Ring Mr. Hughe On Friday the day at} Plate, Kitehen Tables, Large Flasks, Hostel at the College is compulsory. GARDINER AUSTIN & co,, LTD.—Agents.
5 p.m. 2064 7.5.52—4n. | the hour of 2 o'clock i Lawn Mower, Crotons in Cemment Pots, 9.5.52—2n.
SIHION KOP—Maxweill Coast, furnished aaa ———— —_———- will be sold at nm office to the highest | Large Paims and many other items LUE
Available last two weeks, May, mont ARRARD 3-SPE AUTOMATIC | bidder for any sum not under the ap- Sale 11.30 o'clock Terms Cash
of June. Tel. gg72 9'5.52-2n | “MANGERS——Just received a limited | praised value BRANKER, TROTMAN & C0, OFFICIAL NOTICE SOOSOOlF
Pei _—-- juantity “all early. P. C All that certain piece of Land con- Auctioneers.
TRINITY COTTAGE—Fully furnished | & Co., Ltd : taining by estimation 12 acres 1 Rood 9.5.52—2n.
22 Perches situate at the Crarte in the BARBADOS. eT eT

three bedrooms, complete with tele-
phone and _ refrigerator, situated at
Derricks Bay, St. James, Phone 2959
27.4.52—t.f.n





LR
Philip butting and bound-

Parish of St
MECHANICAL ing on lands now or late of the Estate

neers fof Sit G. L. Pile, deceased, on lands
CALCULATOR—One original Odhner|now or late of Mrs, M. Hanschell, on rut ust

practically new and in first class condi the sea, on ljand now or late of one

tior Dial 4689 8.5,.52—4n. | Simpson and on the Public Road lead- e
ing to the Crane Beach together with Basis Of

IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY
,

IN PURSUANCE of the Chancery Act, 1906, I do hereby give notice to oll
persons having or claiming any estate, right or interest or any lien or incumbrance
in or affecting the property hereinafter mentioned (the property of the defend-
ants) to bring before me an account of their claims with their witnesses,
documents and vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday



PERSO



















































ec SOON a A z MISCELLANEOUS the | ee pte Bt yi i between ie hours of 12 noon ae 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration
The pidlic are hereby warned + | : ” ae a Office, ic Buildings, Bridgetown before the 12th day of June 1952 in cee aan
pate, Public are hereby warmed se:in:t | “TUSINESS REQUIREMENTS — Doc |'Hpe” note property with lighting Understanding: |" watson ciaima®iay ‘be "reported 'on and ranked. according to the ature 1EQ@LE
i LLIPS + ; I ent Ss sts, presses, desks, fans : eee 3 r thereof resp fs ore
Teter; tases. wheat naa selatbie toe her : Jain machines, and’ othe PMOUSAND. "Pot aH SNDRED TROL BIRMINGHAM, M the benefits of any ere Tl ee a oo en ts
oF ayone-¥lse contracting any debt or | %ce and business requirements. K. % |LARS ($ 4 id Attached from John RM » May 8. sroperty.
deb& in fia) name unless by a written | Hunte & Co. Ltd. Lower Broad Sint | pumnival for and towards satisfaction Understanding among people his ea : Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
ordar signed by me. sip q| Dial 5198 9.5.52—3m. | ac must be based on truth “and I am : DAY BERNERT MURPHY ant” SS er re Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica
> ake = I 3 25 ic Si 4 be pale ym Gay i i ua. var
tlre i (A CRADLE — One Baby's Cradle with neeaeene Deposit to be paid on d sure this can be achieved” Ar- sheets aie ed acting executors w 0; yare %
§.5.52-2n. | mattress and drop side, one baby's wash- ‘ Ty. T. HEADLEY, gentine Ambassador Carlos A. g
mand ong Babys Wik; Ghat. elephsne , ceavolomt Rha, [Hogan said today during a tuneh-| PPFENDANTS: mLNene,, WAIT, AURIS, CURSE te bet sro eatiauite nines Biter
cared parcels by 35 : otha Provost Marshal's Office, = : . . § ., acting herein by D'Arcy Augustus ‘0 nm ives 0s
The re hereby warned against 6.5.52—-Sn @ith April, 1952 eon at which he was a guest at their constituted Attorney on record in this Island. *“DE GRA Pi i
giving Sanyone in my same nt 26.4.52-an]the British Industries Fair at i SSE 24th April, 1952... ... 6th May, 1952
Bee ae ncil ioseal! responsible for an? | CAR TYRES REMOULDED—Sizes 500 ; PROPERTY: ALL THAT CERTAEN piece or parcel of land situate at Eagle COLOMBIE” .... 8th May, 1952... .. 2ist May, 1952
; sa 45 21.5! Ch i Birmingham, ; BP: e one -
debt or debts contracted in my name] 16, $23.53) 460-17, fat G2. | Clmie na Anaeeoende 1 ' Hall Road in the Parish of Saint Michael and Island aforesaid DE GRASSE” ... 4th June, 1952... .. 16th June, 1952 %
unless Qk sCousitten onder signed by me aw sky asd map ine “= at an 4 a. 4 ne Si r cou . not un- containing by admeasurement Nine and three-fifths perches ot ‘
uanees ALAA, CONNELI rafalgar § ore afalgar Stree Y ; erstan owever “why news thereabouts—Abutting and bounding on two sides o; lands of * i ‘
Black Rock, St. 3543 8.3 an Commonwealth circulated round the world by Albertha Payne on lands now or late of cote Mrs ‘Thomas dia Not calling at Guadeloupe
: c cae ta on Eagle Hall Road aforesaid or however else the same is abutting
Press and other agencies is often and bounding Together with the messuage or dwellinghouse SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE
x

thereon called “Eyare Village’ and all and singular other the
buildings and erections on the said’ parcel of land erected and
built standing and being

Bill filed: 25 March 1952.

Date; 10 April 1952. 11.4.52—4n



From Barbados. Arrives Southampton

*“DE GRASSE” .... 19th May, 1952 .... ... 29th May, 1952
“COLOMBIE” Ist June, 1952... ... 13th June, 1952
*“DE GRASSE” .... 29th June, 1952... .. 9th July 1952’

*Sailing direct to Southampton

FOR SALE Rees eee

10-DAY'S NEWS Flas ?|) ORIENTAL
THIS ATTRACTIVE HOME “pen Walting For PALACE

Been Waiting For
HEADQUARTERS FOR

CAMERA—One (1) Rolleicord Camera
ES a eee voecalinte | we Day Al misunderstood, often ill inten-

chronised for , flash, complete with " :
carrying ease, $150.00 tioned and in the best cases com-

Four (4) daylight developing tant . arse ski i iectivity,”
datistable com om m to 616 36.50 Industries Fair Wccnanna uae’ ener’ the

ome (1) Thermometer Stirring Rod, LONDON. | Argentine nation was doing “what
Frank Watkins, Blue Waters, Rockley May 14 will be celebrated as|We have done and what we are
Phone #412 9.6 Commonwealth ‘Trade Day at|aiming at Hogan said “in a few
—— dechnaaminnmseeeentes —J|this year’s British Industries Fair day” the first six-year period of
eae Roane me ee ee in London. Special arrangements Peron’s Constitutional Govern-
large quantities, Knight's Ltd are being made to focus attention|ment will en@ and the second
9.5.52—2n.] on that day on the importance of period 1952—1954 for which he
trade to the Commonwealth, and|had been freely and almost unani-
in particular on the Common- mously elec by the se of

wealth section of the Fair. my country will start.—










































GARDEN HOSE: Garden Hose
and Fittings, City Garage Co., Victoria
Street 1,6,52—t.f.n







HERBS—Make-u-well Herbs is Nature's
cure for constipation, Rheumatism, mm-
digestion, Kidney and Bladder Diseases

Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, the Colon-| -——
ial Secretary, will on that y

' Has Arrived:—
visit the Commonwealth section, Cuts Endanger

AMERICAN CAP






and Sluggish Liver, Price 2/- | box

KNIGHT'S LTD 7.5.52—3.| which this year consists of ne An extremely well built, modern three bedroom (or two PISTOLS AND CAPS SOUVENIKS
i TING, tamed) | Stands taken by Commonwealth #3 , ie ek a io
LOS AR etre Lio, Suitable | Governments. A big West Indian European Defence bedrooms and den) BUNGALOW of stone and concrete con Ang sine, Out Sale of on a Le

including coats, skirts, suits ete. Suitable
for travelling Appointment by phone
9112 Mrs, Noel Roach, Speightstown

struction. Combined forty feet living-room and gallery, fully

display will be among them,
WASHINGTON, May & cupboarded Canadian styled kitchen. Floor to ceiling cedar JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

THANI'S





7.5.52—3n : ; *
= Mr. Lyttelton wili be accom-| General Dwight D, Eisenhower ‘ ;
“Silane world’s Gnest motor gi!| panied on his visit by Mr. Peter| Atlantic Pact Supreme Comman- lined double bedroom closets. Attractively laid out garden and ie
| vagtiol, at all leading Garages and Service | Thorneycroft, President of the, der warned Congress today that with fruit trees and ample room for vegetables. r HARDWARE Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Diai 5406
| Stations, Your vehicle deserves the best | Board of Trade, and the Mar-\ further cuts in the new aid to . Gerege with
: a oard oO rade, anc e are E i > :
lever Found daar ae quess” of Salisbury, Secretary of| Allies Programme might endanger breezeway to house and detached self-contained maid’s $OOSSOSOOO IIT,
ee | State for Commonwealth Rela-}the whole European defence quarters. The Property is coolly and delightfully situated Send Y Ord fi
end Your ers for—

tions. Mr, Thorneycroft will also} buildup. within easy reach of main road at Worthing. Ph. 8562,

$
x

broadcast a talk in Britain on . ‘i ; st
His, warning was, contained in|} A Nee. LV GALVANISED SHEETS |

PEEK FREANS' CHEESLETS—We have
Peek Freans’ Cheeslets in stock, origt nat
price 7/-, now reduced to $1.12 ow
is your chance to get a_ bargain.
KNIGHT'S LTD R 7.5.52—3n,
—————————

RECORDS—Clearing our stock of MGM
Records. Three for Two Dollars, yout
choice. A, BARNES & CO,, LTD.

9.4.52—t.f.n

“The Importance of Trade to the telter.-td - Ghairtin a th
wealth.” —B.U.P. 8 n e
eesincemeai id Senate Foreign Relations Com- AND

mittee Senator Tom Connally EXPA NDING METAL
a a .

(Democratic) who had asked the

antaic J ’s i > sible :
Jamaican Sugar — | Genera’s ca. ib! To CENTRAL EMPORIUM
Man Tours Britain The Committee had earlier re- = Corner Broad & Tudor Streets







|
| a oom ————

Subscribe now to the Dally Tele



ingle padi Daily Newspaper now , ) i
aaa etn Bartados by Air only a f duced President Truman's $7,900, 3
SSO6hOOESS

POMEL O30 >





arriving in Barbados by Air only a few
days after publication in London, Con 5
tact: kan Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltd
| Local Representative, Tel, 3118

j 17.4,.52—t.f.n

000,000 aid request by $1,000,-|

LONDON ; i
= . 000,000 before submitting the
Mr. Max Sharp, Secretary of Aidawe 4 i )- LADIES FULL FASHIONED NYLON
the Sugar Industrial Welfare Military and Economie Aid| Pro





































F | cicenenasstealbloocin pipaleceneriineny ; . aa ; “| gramme to the Senate. —U.P. '
+++ with ingredients of Vicks VapoRub TOOTH PABTEOSlerilia Tooth Paste} Board of Jamaica, has begun a THERS DAY om Sunday Ma ll
— ha and refreshes, special value 1/-} tour of Britain under the aus- ill SE dicate 7 gs eee Yo xy: P
FANG | Ne LTD 7.9-52—in | pices of the British Council. He] In Touch With Barbados
WATCHES—Just received 17 jewe! wath aE the weer ore Cc
| Rolled Gold Automatic Waterproof Wrist |ers in fac ories, mines and rura ¢ ¢
= —, | Watches with the latest “ROTOMATIC" | areas oastal Station s Gauge a come a poe. sat @ $1.96 per pair
winding system, also in stock Wrist |° o uni’ dui Wkediond YWiaacradlaay: tga Gauge enier eam also, jac! ae ge.32 ‘
Vatche $9.25 Ybtainable « : able A ‘
WINDWARD CRICKET 1 eee ine, er or Satan sina At the end of May, Mr. Sharp | advise that they can now communicate @ St. Pr
; Hi dleridge Streets. Tele. 3253 , {Will spend several days in Liver- | Barbados Roeres ie Sees Wels These Hose are the best that Money can buy. They are not
».5.52—1 “yg 2 , on
CLUB cei a. TS SRE Ol poo), $0. gee Weleare: AEP Sem eres | #8: Secrets Pane oct. only Stylish but are the very latest fully fashioned.
: VAT—One (1) 5,000 gallon Oak Vat —| for sugar workers ‘there, His adian Challenger, Olimpia, Pedro, Moun- .
val - 8 apply D, V. Scott & Co., Ltd,, White) programme will also cover the —_ ee ae ape ae ee New Stock just arrived are subject the same as all our other
NOTICE TO MEMBERS Park Road 1.6,59-t.M. | toiching of arts, crafts and drs - | Fort Townshend, Imperial. Torotito’ goods to our usual 5% Discount. :
Wry. atic art, ¥ : s and adult Gadila, Beaufighter, De Grasse, Bianca, ‘
Mombers are hereby noti- Peat Rey recs on eit Kastor, Baltore, Alcoa Pointer, David KHAKI DRILL — we have this as low as 90 cents per yard.
fied that the grounds will eae eae BOUCR ORE ae ade! f saith Pease eerie eh Trader, Varsal, See Us before Buying elsewhere.
be open for practice ot HELP also see housing plans for rural | Rangitoto, erent a med Comayamua,
Tuesday 13th May. J and industrial communities. drag pak eae eer eatin vice Remember there is not a Store in Barbados that can undersell
ipeees : AN ANNOUNCER—Rediffusion require Mr. Sharp served for eight) tow>, Alcoa Pegasus, Ocean Monarch, Us, We Buy in large quantities and We Pay Cash in London
N. C. THORNTON, 1 Announcer, Script Writer, male pre-|years as an officer in the R.A.F. Auriga, Alcoa Cavalier, Path Finder thereby saving a large Discount.
command of * 7 at oY aces > « yy | British Empress Assimia, Cleveland,
during the war and became senior | qn. 4
a . F ,; Sunrell, Drina, 5 Paula, Esso Koben-
| R.A.F Welfare Officer in the! }avn, Vergmor, Lake Winnipeg and S.S
Caribbean from 1946 to 1948.—- S.Vbaldo e





VALOR COOKER STOVES

Apply before 10 in the morning or after
in the evening, to Mrs. Scaife La

We have a

A. E. TAYLOR LTD.



Garoupe, Cave Hill 9.5,52—-In



GS





























|
Secretary ;ferred, good diction and
saosin. ||| auelah, ements. sooty Tete
OPTS OTTT MVS, | for sail modern oudence, 2 sais.
Holiday Enteric 3) ———————————
x oi: ae ae z : Where very often you obtain goods of a better grade than LARGE VARIETY
g -% ARRIVED i}) pace: Aare . most other Stores so Dial 4100.
=m $ Anether Shipmatit “of tho 3 Burner Model @ $71.87 OF
aiean POPULAR | = where |
” << 4 8 VAS ERS } liti HIGH }
$ ee ee on WHITE PORVELAIN ENAMEL SINKS ote
{ 3 been booked : . } With Double Drainboard @ $65.64 7 and
i Prices of next shipment will be complete with waste and overflow
7 Be us x $ higher Prices are LOW.
: Sa a Why not call at your Gas Show Established . HE : atec :
N : x A een aC Aa ea Siar 2: HRRORERT, Gad weecrporated Furthermore there are no Parking Problems.
y B] |} secure one’ ot “these cookers \ 1860 10 & 1! Roebuck Street 1926
“MIXED VEGETABLES in x rn || A SS MN SUITABLE
tins % SA SS = ae ) x LPP ELLE LLL A PPLE PEPE EE PPP LPL PS
SLIC MOV OTIOR '
SLICED HAM Si} REMOVAL NOTICE PUBLIC MEETING | ik ae FOR
LAMB TONGUES in tins ¥ x LOOK OUT FE re
x ——— Under the Auspices of the x
CORNED MUTTON in tins % R nae h d " ‘ @ ¥ ° 2
7 ‘ »
Dwi Gia 8 _ JOYCE ritih and Foreign |S SOT NDAY’S ADVOCATE PRESENTS
», in . ry at. , , °
VEAL LOAF in tins % HUTCHINSON Bible Society x
. ici es a a - . .
LUNCHEON BEEF in tins }$(}) ©XPERT HEMSTITCHING At EMPIRE THEATRE | % and win e
¥ Button & Buckle C ring x atin “ a .
Add-Ove Fopeler : Dutton Holes This Evening at 5 p.m. | i Sen e FAR ee * $
oe ¥ Modern & Fashionable a rae =e > 2 j
FIVE ‘STAR RUM x aie Decarations e Speaker hacas aoe: \% $25 OO 3 SURPRISE YOUR MOM W iTH
e % c : : co ys 3 < ‘
SS Pusioiaten Wek tear dient | Representatives from the : ° g A PAIR FROM De a
% % removed : f porn Ist floor Col- | Angtican, Methodist and % — ¥ © * SAD BWV devise
$ INCE & co. 3 | a Lid., to Knights’ Phoeni» een out 5 aan 1) x Al THE SAME TIME YOU CAN HELP THE : RES
& = 5 *harmacy (ist floor) En- . 1a < ( ~
3 LTD. % oe a Prince William (A Cordial Invitation } * %
Henry St. Extended to all Sections of ff) > bi a “ “ y y TY .
S: , gee ieek we, : as } tended to all Sections 1B FARNUM FOR FINLAND FUND. x]
* is
POLL LOCOROCO OVOP \ SS & 3 |





ft Oe 66° Se; b .
PIV9VOOOVVO GOSS OOS OBO POPP SOLE PEE DOSS GODS SOO PI PP PDOSS SPI SPI SSP IPSS

-
~
mt nn ali Ek ee es



we









FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN

oe









HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON

* Famous
for flavour!









‘ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES”

mgs:
BY



LYING ABOUT WHAT ?..
OW, FORGET IT, FLINT...
VOU'RE ON LEAVE ..
WHERE HAVE 1 SEEN
LAURI LOVAT
BEFORE >..



MEARO LAUR) THREATEN
TO KILL HIM IF WE
WERE LYING..+





WHERE
HAVE 1 SEEN
LAVA LOVAT

ROSE ;
TEA is good tea

ROW eT 7 IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE
(THE OTHER FOOT MARRIED MAN
J em ee pe



a NOW LIFT THE
LIFT YOUR ef. ( OTHER FOOT
FOOT, DEAR



COULD HAVE A
DREAM LIKE THAT ———— SESE = —————————EE
See ee SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only
TC SS ==







RAN









SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Branches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street



Usually Now Usually Now
Tins KLIM—(5 Ib.) oy 6.14 5.84 Tins MELON & GINGER JAM 46 38
Tins MEAT LUNCH .. as 45 40 Tins TOMATOES “ = 36 34
Pkgs. MIXED NUTS .. ee 1.10 96 Bottles TENNENTS BEER .. 26 23



FLASIi GORDON




















ALL CONTROL SURFACES FULL \&
VERTICAL! FEED THE ATOMIC
PILE WIDE OPEN/ LET'S
A HAVE EVERYTHING <<

. SHE'S GOT! J

KENT, THROW ALL YOUR REFRIGERATION
UNITS ON MAXIMUM / WE'LL HAVE
TO RISK THE FRICTION HEAT...OR
IT'S SURE DEATH DOWN IN |
THAT WHIRLPOOL OF GASES! &





















WE'VE GOT TO GO
EASY! SKIN TEMP'S
STILL RISING! THE
FRICTION |S
MURDEROUS!

FLASH... WE'VE
/ GOT TO BUST OUT
OF HERE! JUPITER'S
\. GRAVITY IS SUCKING
Be US DOWN /

D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

THE COLONNADE GROCERIES

IMPORTANT
NOTICE





















YOU GUYS'D BETTER—
HEY.’ LOOK OUT THERE
BEHIND YOU /

WELLERASH/

3 ALL PERSONS WHO ORDERED

S The Pictorial Record of
KING GEORGE VI.

through the Advocate Stationery are specially advised to
Call for their Copies TO-DAY. Failing to call, these copies
will no longer be reserved but will be on sale to the public
from SATURDAY, MAY 10TH,

I'M SORRY -DADDy -

THE GIRLS FROM MY

CANASTA CLUB ARE
MEETING HERE

WELL=YOL CAN'T WORK
HERE IN THE KITCHEN /
THE COOKS’ AND
CHAMBERMAIDS' CLUB
IS MEETING HERE
TONIGHT /

The Price of the Book is ....

$2.72

ADVOCATE
STATIONERY

63676. OOOFOO6bO66664
ng nae 4, 4, “7, AAA 000 0% COLES CCE VOCCCLCLLL LLL LLLLVLLPLPLLLPDLPBDLLPLDPAPBLL PPLE
4, 466% 25.
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FOR ANYTHING... MY SISTER. ;

sss WHO ARE
a j?




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Gouda Cheese per Ib.

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Dairy Maid Cheese in 12 oz.
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Swifts Cheese in 12-02. tins



WE GOT ACOZY SETUP. Y
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| SUPPOSE THE CURRENT PRICES
OF LEGAL LIQUOR HAVE MADE BOOT-
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Delicacy in 12 oz. tins
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A ' é



PAGE EIGHT

B.F.F.A. Beat 70-Year-Old WHY PLAY CRICKET?
Police 3—1 Controversy surrey’s Jack Parker Balances the
oy ity Revived

HALIFAX, NS.,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE 1952

MAY 9,

nn i



FRIDAY,


















Tenth Regatta
THE



Tenth Regatta of the

R.B.Y.C. will be sailed in Carlisle

and Bay. on Saturday, May 10 at 2.30
p.m. The Handicap times are ar
follows:—

Rewards
Hazards (nol Forgetting the Corns)

JOHN FREDERICK PARKER, a sprightly 14% stone,

Parker the family man has Class No. Yach$









tba < ternational sporting con- sprang out of the taxi, landed on legs that will be 39 years sighed little as 12-hour Seve B 10 Wizata 220 Red
Oval y¢ ; .t troversy, all but forgotten for 70 old on the 23rd of this month, and made his first move Se Ee aa eA GP the eee cement
half Cee Tr ears, was in the throes i oe towards the new cricket season—his 22nd and last with paternal pleasure of watching his D 8 Peter Pa 231 Yellow
{ t 1 rt ‘ pa . > © , g »s . ants £ ‘ * r : oe Se = —— ontenenernenepeeeciees —
ober ggg : boday ae neaencants 0! paitided Surrey at Kennington Oval. daughters grow up 4 Hi Ho 232 Red
sage ret ee ‘ ; ha meomny (Cre ee ve oe 7 a , His first move? At the There are also physical ame
tp if a ™ . eek a prize their fa’hers risk of knocking the debits to record. Parke: D 12 Rainbow 233 Yellow
gts. FE purned. . romance out of cricket, I tells with a reminiscent ~~ ii Fantasy .
< Memories of heroic battles be- have to report that Jack grin of the jaw he broke B 6 Pure r
€ tween oarsmen of Canada and Parker, idol of 10,000 in a car smash at Yeovil r | Morra Bieir 2% Red og
. other nations were evoked ameng Cockneys, was on his way in 1935—and of the £150 6B 8 Rascal nN ‘o>
_ old-timers as the dust of seven to g chiropodist. that he, Eddie Watts, » 9 Okapi . : ae
» defendirx the decades was shaken from the Cricket has a thousand Laurie Fishlock and the a THIS NEW FINE RANGE
ihe southern i of the records of a race between the minstrels singing its late Stan Squires had to Pp = 9 Olive Blossom 225 Yellow
wr ad : ‘ nee-far ‘ax isher "s aises — e isi > : “if acate the D 10 Van Therndyke y, y
Police went on the defen- once-famous Halifax Fishermen's praises eulogising the contribute to placate i Bie } DE. ous
a about two minutes after Crew and a Thames foursome gentlemanly leg glide car owner. Spe —_ INCLL ‘8:
if had s t Tavlor from London, England rhapsodising over swift He recalls the five 5



Rainbird 238 Red



rd re first lot runs that snatched a fa-







































‘ operations that followed pD 7 Sinbad WHITE POPLIN 31” @ as $1.04, 97c. & 88e.
‘ 7 t-s} ri he ; alli \ : :
for Police h PO A tae ee SS ee ae ee ee, ee the poisoning of he tani BS Mimhiet —||] BLUE & BEIGE 31” @ ....................5., a ese ee
marked and } the ball i lalifax Fishermen’: heirs. memories of a ca a finger on his rig nen? 2S aa weds “
the font : Sh after the prize was more than $1,000. made history and head- by the red dye of a cricket See Ln + De Pak vase re oc 8 oun eas eos whee ne ... 78e.
B.F.F.A. players made a good for- Seventy years ago the Nova lines, But = of a ball on a wet day; the B 1. Gipsy 242 Rea KHAKI SHIRTING 27” @ 95c.
ward movement but both Police Scotian oarsmen spurned the songsters, so far as unequal struggle agains! 3k ia KHAKI SHIRTING 32” @ 88c.
Pack intercepted ind = cleare money and returned to their know, has touched upon long and painful bouts of ae Ss a Bkipoy. a as es :
their area. homes, indignant over what they the prosaic subject of muscular rheumatism; the ] eae WARE nhs ee hee Se RES $1.10, $1.04 & 96c.
considered unfair tactics dyring COTâ„¢S ee two broken fingers and [I ft Reen 244 Red Se wa ies Cbs 8 5 donee techies eee ae 0c, & 78c.
Equaliser match against the Thames crew ‘ A otone a ane Guece a ; ee ot — ALSO —
Police at this stage st 1 to | t Phi . ig ¢ fet, says Jac arker, suffered i e se of 12 Dawn 245 Yellow
concentrating on defen pla at Philadelphia, Pa, after a lifetime among duty in the slips. ~e sacl ia es te PLAIN JERSEY 48” wide at $1.19 per yard suitable
ing and ‘just before the end The $1,000 amount was second the runs and wickets, no “Tt has been a little K Tornadoes 246 #86Red for night wear.
this half, McColin on receiving prize in the race. Members of the cricket professional can trying at times,” is the Se RMT Tae RPE Oo itt
long pass equalised for B.F.F.A. }alifax crew, however, with a afford to neglect his un- woemer verdict on, ia my is Clytie 247 Yellow
The score was then one all variety of triumphs to their eredit, derpinning. Without reg- occupational hazards. A ~
> « 3 £ Sea . . , 1 Miss Ber
half time, agreed that second place wasn’t ular road-work — in his His gamble ¢ \Um Madwesss > Slee? aaa :
On the resumption both teams goog enough and decided to fore- CaS€ across Hayes Com- Sut that jis not the 9 Polly ave é er 0
fought hard but the B.F.F.A. © oe ras mon, Kent—and_ at least whole story. a PR es e
ylayers had the edg he » U ey Bern he a+ one pre-season visit to the “When I began,” he na ow
ry ils and a ime I f ‘ = * i ng ats ee eee chiropodist, the men who says, “we had to gamble I 4 Coronetta = 2.49 Yello
‘ t i hie ring a . ‘ = , z _ —- — ——__-———_—_——_——
combinir vell Then abot ic e580, They were hurt “ve. us our cricket would with’ our future. To-day Cc ii Magwin 250 Red 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street
three t } blow money of $2,500. They wet never stay the five a young professional cat NTE NP ae lh
~ off Jone even more by a decision of the months’ course from May Family man: Jack Parker, Mrs, Parker, Susan start at £400 a year C 2 Scamp 251 Yellow
gate > ; PE ee
the second goal race officials, who relegated them to September. and Christine. playing for the second “aa neous a
With t COT to the runner-up spot when they Sper week plus £1 per day match XI. If he makes the first team, C 10 Gannet 252 Red ada masses =)
playe1 yw mack felt in their hearts that they had Now their bats, lightly oiled allt oney for “club and ground,” he can double that sum, and even ——————_—____ a ay | ==
vo get more *. il won. oe are ee oF ec yher jwere supplemented by winter ad- rake in another £500 a x eaten, (ee ee ae ee th May,
minute after the sec - ' Nova 2 ~ a son flannels are laundered, the ventures as a ship’s writer and as Winter coaching. Test players can — ~
kicked in, Yearwood at right The Nova Scotions had been jeyiy spiked, their ‘feet made , .

a roadmaker and dockworker in earn up to £2,000 a year.” Sdeheidligs quieter liancdiciaiped
workable. To-morrow Parker and Australia

referee ruled they had fouled the pj, fellow-professionals all over
int econd-finishing Londoners. ,, the country get down *o the job sng] went willingly,” he says. look back on his over-all batting
B.F.P.A The judges reversed the final of loosening limbs and flexing fin- «7 gaye up the chance of a first- average of 61 in 25 innings against

result and gave first money to the gers at the nets. wool firm in tceuring sides; his 255 against New



the first across the finish-line, but the

well in
lead when he cut in from the
wing and kicked the ball in the

wing put B.F.F.A We can supply from stocka

After 21 years in the game
“But cricket got me in the end, Parker has no regrets. He can
left corner of the nets.

had three goals on Police
3



WHEN THE p

NGER’ FIRE

CRITTALL STEEL SLIDING FOLDING DOORS



class job witha

The game ended 3—1 English crew. Then—war Sydney to come back to Surrey.” Zealand his six for 28 against Uy THE IDEAL DOOR FOR VERANDAHS
The teams were: — The decision stood, despite Why do they do it? What is ‘That decision has brought re- Derby; his acrobatic acceptance of The Whole Door slides and folds to one side.
Police: Haynes, Thompson, official protests and a resolution there in cricket for the man who ward.

Parker admits to a modest more than 300 catches; the fact |
adopted by the committee gov- makes it his career? affluence and pleasing prospect that he has never been dropped |
erning the regatta, stating that its It was to get answers to these of security for Kathleen, the wife since Surrey gave him his county |
members felt “unanimously” that quéstions that I went to see Jack he married 12 years ago, and their cap in 1936. |
the honors of the international Parker. I found him in Surrey’s qaughters Susan (eight) and
four-oared professional race be- freshly painted dressing-room at Christine (four and a half).

we » Halifax e . The Oval *
longed to the Halifax entry. BT te bala can the Colney His own house

Marshall, Warner, Griffith, Trot-
man, Banfield, Cadogan, Taylor,
Franklyn and Dodson.

B.F.F.A. : Pinder; Hayde
Denny, Phillips, Norville, Harris,
Linton, Jones, McColin, Thorne
and Yearwood

Supplied in two Sizes...
With 4 leaves — 6 2” wide X 7 2” high
With 6 leaves — 9 3” wide x 7 2” high

He has shaken hands with the
King. He plays cricket because he

likes it. | CRITTALL FRENCH DOORS



i : " E E > * or * gr
The referee was Mr, O. Graham. The inrident brought heated grounds as the most proficient Their detached si ebomked WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED UNGUENTINE 3’ 9’ wide X 7 9” high
ae . ‘ controversy for several months player who never attained the ul- house in Beadon Road, Bromléy, By GEORGE WHITING 4
‘ Ww but eventually it was forgotten. timate glory of a —_ - wt is their own recently acquired —L.E.S. | QUICK CRI s L WIN ws
Greriada wo It lay dormant until Halifax England we ‘. - . ao * property. The tax-free £5,000 i re tiger anal oa cosikt ake
County Councillor William Smith (He was packing his bag to play wid

A MODERN ANTISEPTIC
TUBES or JARS

he collected from his benefit match

then he against Middlesex last season is

safely invested by Surrey, and the

principal guaranteed.
Winter coaching,

oO ‘ inst India in 1939: VERY NERVOUS
pee » { " decided recently that the spurned %8@
Re enter Cork Cup prize ‘should be accepted at long wert off to spend six years as a

* * hysi¢al training instructor in the
Cricket Series last. » 183s Royal Air Force. )

without Ventilators.

An honest “Very nervous” was}

| THE MODERN WINDOW FOR THE MODERN HOME
Miss BIDDY- BURGUM’S reply |

including a

























; —
manithiia & my n s career really began when - 7 8 -.. | When asked how she felt about
(From Our Own Correspondent) a a eee ™ ~ ween he was a boy at Battersea Central eS heloed the Parear Sheen’ playing in her first hockey inter- ai inti: dkg*<
ST. GEORGE'S, May 5. * nlite bates sae he snd. had School 24 years ago. They pick- Now nearing the evening of a ational for England against = : int

G ja is to re-enter Wind- “““""* r i e im to lead Sou Ondon wooc EE est tanh ie ~ | Scotland a embley, \

to i * cm the contract’ mateh, d hi to lead South Lond swashbuckling cricket career—he Scotland at Wembl WV
ward ae cricket in the Cork = a prt for the schools at the Oval. has hit more than 100 eixes.for : ou pay no more WILKINSON & HAYNES is 4
Cup series, els Sativa Rey 1 £3 a week Surrey since the war — Parker

During the recent Inter-Schools heirs of the oldtime Nova oo ee coe Seek aitaty. taueiit attr for the
Tournament, Mr. Victor Archer, crew, the county councillor saic g



All-round promise as batsman, French and Spanish, and _ will
bowler, and even wicket-keeper soon be preparing for new con-

nF ————_——_——= —=--

Headmaster of ti? Dominica the wrangle over first place had
Grammar School, acted on behalf long ago been closed, but that he attracted the attention of Ernie quests as a solid business man.
of the Dominica Sports Associa- had lodged a claim on the group's Fayes, the Surrey coach, and at Present plan is a partnership
tion in assuring Grenada that his pehalf for the second-place prize. 18 Parker quit his modest job in with his father-in-law in Batter-
island was prepared to bury alto- The money has rested in @ g shipping office for a job as a sea—making protective clothing

gether the hatchet over the inci- pittsburg, Pa., bank ever since cricketer. Summer wages of £3 for industrial workers,
dent which brought the 1947 tour i). gay of the race.

2 on abrupe | con Sue ae" Smith anticipated that the
Pxeninion = arene - a ““Bamount would substantially ex-
ween ‘ oe aceon had been the © ed $1,000 now, because of ac-
seaeeon by a former Secretary cumulated interest over the past
of the D.S.A. of a letter of June 70 years.
1949 in which Grenada made an
amende honourable, but this, dis-
covered only a matter of weeks
ago, absolutely satisfles Dominica
and they were ready and willing
to forget the incident and wel-
come Grenada back to the series
as of yore

Grenada’s reaction has been fa-
vourable, though it Is unlikely
that a team can be sent to the

SPORTS
QUIZ

The Barbados Advowate
will award a book on sport
to the first person who sends
the correct answers to the
following questions.

1, CRICKET.

Name auy player who rep-
resented Barbados, Trinidad
or British Guiana in the pre-
war Triangular Cricket
Tournaments who made
“spectacles” in any one of
the games in these series.
2. FOOTBALL.

Can a player carry the ball
in his hands over the goal-
line, under the cross-bar and
between the two goalposts
and yet score a goal?

GREATER
EXPERIENCE











/
This shipment—coolly tropical and re-
freshing as a breeze—in keeping with ovr
newly received Tropical Worsteds and
Tropical Gabardines,
at prices that-are
highly competitive

|

It May Be Trainer Thrale’s |
Best Year For Winners |







RICHARD BAERLEIN of

Through the years Peter Thrale has proved one of the |
greatest yearling judges in Britain. Most of the horses in his
stable have been bought by him for his patrons at no great
price. He buys all kinds of horses with all kinds of pedi-
grees, but the great asset is that they nearly all pay their
way.

Sports Window

LAST year’s First Divi-
sion Cup winners—Harrison
College—-will meet the Sec-
ond Division Cup winners

- that’s one reason why
this airline has been
“first choice” of interna-

.§



who have been promoted to
the First Division—Modern
High School—at Basket Ball
to-night at the Y.M.P.C. The
match is expected to be ex-
citing, especially as thefe
will be school rivalry and
boys from the two schools
will be present to encourage
the players,

In the other match, For-
tress will meet Pickwick.
In the Second Division

Peter Thrale is paid his greatest

1952 series in St. Lucia this month compliment by

If one goes, it will not be a fully
representative combination
—<—<—$—— es

Empire Lightweight
Title

see he is in the bidding and then
join in themselves jn the hopc
of outlasting him.

Two of the greatest
spinners of last s
witch winner, Three Cheers
Le Sage, who won five races j
succession — were both bought :
yearlings in 1949 by Thrale fo
modest figures,





LONDON
McGovern, the ar itisl
boxing champion,

Tommy
lightweight

to fight Cliff Anderson of Britt Foundation will play St. Three Cheers cost 500 guin-
Guiana in a final eliminator fr | S.C.L.B, at the Garrison, eds, and Le Sage 1100 guiness
the Empire lightweight title at | 1.8.8.—Boys’ Club at Dis- while this year’s classic ca
Porthoawl on June 11 or 18. trict A and J.S.B.S.—Spar- didate, Khor-Mousa cost only
—B.U.P. tan at Harrison College. 1050 guineas. In view of the



rr

WEATHER REPORT



owners are only too keen
enlist his aid.

For the coming season there



WHAT'S ON TODAY



YESTERDAY a record number in the stable, and
Court of Ordinary 11 a.m this promises to be Thrale’s
Rainfall from Codrington: Lower Courts and Court of greatest year. There are ‘4

of which 30 are two-year-

Work Held Up
At present the two-year-olds
are more backward than usual
and the heavy rains of the past

Nil. Appeal 10 a.m,
Total rainfall for month to Annual Meeting, Bible So-

Sarat sk Be ; ciety, Empire Theatre 5,00
Highest Temperature: 88.0 °F p.m.

Lowest Temperature: 73.5 °F Rehearsal of “Twelfth
Wind Velocity: 9 miles per Night” at British Council



tas Seid pnak app oh ieee ieandat
































































t fore the ability of these two-
some sale ring
competitors who wait until they

money -
ason——Cesare- pick of the older horses. He has
and done exceptionally

results it is not surprising that last season.

















3. RACING

What is the minimum
weight that can be imposed
as Top weight in a Barba-
dos Turf Club Handicap
Race ?
4. WATER-POLO

Can a goal-keeper stand
on the bottom for the pur-
pose of defending his goal ?
5. TABLE TENNIS

What are the measure-
ments of a Table Tennis bat,
according to the Laws of
the Game ?

NOTE: All
“Sports Quiz”
addressed

year-olds can be assessed, What
is important is that they were
all bought at reasonable figures,
despite their illustrious breed-|j
ing
Three Cheers is naturally the
well, but no
three-year-old Cesarewitch wit
ner has gone ¢n in recent vea
to become a great four-year-old
Even Better \
The Cesarewitch seems to tell
its inevitable tale, but only the
racecourse can prove this, for in
his box Three Cheers looks an
even bigger force than he was





entries for
should be
“Sports Quiz”,
c/o Advocate Sports Editor,
and must reach this office
by 12 noon on Saturday,
May 10, The correci



Khor-Mousa heads the three-
year-olds and has already
proved aapable of acting in
heavy going when winning over
the Ascot mile.

He is one of the few two-year-
olds of last season who can be
depended upon to y the Derby
listance. If the gcing is heavy,
he will be there with a chance.

Sir Phoenix also proved capable
of staying qa mile in heavy going

the winner will be publish-
ed im the Sunday Advocate
of May 11.

Each entry must be
accompanied by A COUPON
as Set ont below.



SPORTS QUIZ



tional travelers for nearly
© quarter of a century.

| NEW YORK

Non-stop service. by the luxurious
“E) Presidente” or via San Juan by
popular, money-saving “E) Turista.

Regular service by giant double
decked “Strato” Clippers*—world’s
fastest airliners —to Paris, Rome
Enjoy stopovers in England, Ire
land. PAA Clippers also fly to India
and the Orient.

Venezuela

Frequent flights to all main cities
by swift Convair-type Clippers.



You can now “fly PAA” almost any-
where —in fact, to 83 countries
and colonies on six continents.









|
answers and the name of







































i \ —SOSCSSOOS SS SFOS OPS POP SOOT
our. 5 p.m. week have further held up their as a two-year-old and this colt}]|] Name ........cececceueee r reservations, see your * ee x
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 30.016, Basket Ball—2nd Div. at work. will also pay his way. | Travel Agere ao < BA ‘ “y Mtns x
(3 p.m.) 29.928. Garrison, Modern High There are some well-bred ones Maxey Rock was the best two=]|] .. 02. co.cc cece eveueges . % {| \ “= -
TO-DAY School and Harrison Col- among them, including two colts year-old plater of last seasop. It ‘Ss | ¥%
Sunrise: 5.40 a.m. lege 5 p.m. Ist Div. at by Persian Gulf, named The will be some time before he is}|]} Address ...............0: n - e st
Sunset: 6.16 p.m. Y.M.P.C. 7.30 p.m. Cydaris and Sassanian Monarch, visked in selling plates again, at ’ WORLD'S * x
| Moon: Full, May 9. Police Band at Hastings | and Marston Magna, a son of was intended to send him toLin=]]f ............. Roe eo te Se $
an Tp Dee ee a Da ~ ead Precipitation, coln in a_ handicap but Pre | Be * * R
{ e: 2.58 a.m., 3.52 p.m. ounc ims 8. Par a ies ar . may now have to be revise DPE ED en oo 6405 bebe cab ashe eee | > x
| Low Tide: 9.45 a.m., 9.42 p.m. oe ' ase ae ner, Chumossaire, the waterlogged state of the i| PAN AMERICAN * :
\ ; *) gallops, | %
' nee eteneet a ————'_Pst twill be a few weeks be —L.£.S. Hort AimHAYs $ AN %
rn . rT ‘ aR . 2 ial Sete epeeetnemre sees roe eee ’ .
| Theyll Do It Every a Bea By Jimmy Hatlo | Da Costa & Co, tid. x %
Sass ii = ret rer x PAR | Broad Street — igetown % S
~ aaa 7 ey 4 Ph 212
ae ae Sas ZG), Owes 16 A | A Y HIS IS AD SE BEA CH CLU | one 2122 (After arn ge i peachy § RI
» AT UPS Ne wai GAN Seatty Z SONG WRITER»+GIVE HIM THAN NOT HAVING] | e z
( PLay “JADDAROO"- SoS AND ie

7) OYA KNOW, IT? ake set ie aekine HIM GO_OUT IN THE: te wre x, “nil } | NOTICE TO MEMBERS : x
7 \T GOES “SYA-DA~ eet TUNES pie? JH BACKYARD AND DEEDLE- A | ‘ x
he eee THEM! TUNES NOBODY A \ LE“DEEDLE-LE-OUM™ Under Rule 94 the Club will be CLOSED to Members ADVERTISING PAYS BEST |% %
DE-DIDDLLE-UM=YA~ Caesieac onc). Niveau WHEN HE'S NOT on Saturday, 10th May, 1952, from & p.m. x %
TA-TA-TE~ DUM» ees Rees arnt VOCAL KIBITZING, HE'S until 7 a.m. Sunday, llth Mey ||| Sse as $ x
2 GOT IT? 7 A NOOmt meee” SHOWING GEORGE HOW preter eee oeeatr ee —S rg ed ialagicthie tae x
AFRAID I D TO MAKE FANCY | OPO SSD IV SS SSO SOO LIS SS PEDO SEEPS EEL PE PPLP IPP PLLPLEDEL LEEDS OO | %
KNOW THA « CONCOC IN 1s eR 3
HOW ABR % THE KITCHEN 1% - rg ‘ RIS %
rae a : K LOOK OUT FOR |8 :
THAT'S A NICE < its YTS .
AUMBE} A 18 %
. SUNDAYS ADVOCATE \ ONY $36.00 EA
. "te d Lt iy hes £ % $
* VES e :
. * *
g and win % x \
: $y Ideal for the Tropics ¥
* % % “ &
* —_ ‘ ys e: ¥
% De By] x
~ a :
=a : 3}; PLCS. MAFFEI :
x = ab ‘ ; a ; : 3 se . B 2 a x xy
THERE'S ONE OF THESE| * Al THE SAME TIME YOL CAN HELP THE eT. & Co. Ltd. X
HUMMERS AT EVERY ; yt x
Ss. PIANO PLAYER'S ELBOW) |: Setaal se a Top Scorers in tailoring %
ME by THAW AND A TIP OF . FARNUM FOR FINLAND FUND. Sa IRS Prince Wm. Henry Street x
LO T * . ‘
AN - MARIE BREIOT, : Shs a




CINCINNATI , OHIO

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I'AGL TWO BARBADOS MA U( VII I Klh o MAI I, 1*52 Cahib galling C l S BrtdKfman. Senior itlve Arehiteel of W A U .tldiw and :. ndon itud returned '" IWniI B.D itKMit ten days staying *t H .'..'1. %  BStatoa tn connertitin with Batrtayi Bank to arrange for the %  f the building ihejr %  %  period of the recon^ ruction of the Bank On Holiday \*T*S EXNfA NAl'lEK. authoress XT* and former member uf the : < M in Dominica %  short visit 1') the bland and i* .. II ul On Special Visit M R AUYK. FHAMPTON. llural Adviser lo the Comptroller for Development and .in.) limn tf 1. 'A' I A %  -ji-cial visit to St. levis and Montserral. He %  lie uway for about two peafe Music Exhibition N EWS h;i* l-oen received thai 0 BaUi %  daughter %  1 Mrs. J. F : :<• has been n at the 4 MUM. % %  1 • %  he held the DOM of Music Officer Lbar lo i.ikv up studies at %  i :icge. Spent Two W?>ks C .1 D. HAMKESOON 4 Si. Magarot's Vicarage. [pain, relumed to TriniB W l A on Tuesday afte.: two vn tha* holiday. He vas Maying at "Loaton-on-Sco" On Buiir.ess H n a short business visit NVvllle Wolfe. SecreI ,'kntr Trndinit Co.. ; '-Si.,11, Trinidad •-.I -n Wednesday nlsht : I. stoyinit al the \ law Hotel Back to the U.K. L EAVING for Canada Of by TC.A inland were Mr. and IM'hie wild wile *reks staySi Jan H nd ... Ho'.el AKIIN. SuthDulhle'l daughter. Brought Son to Schcot S PENDING %  %  hort hoUday m Barbudo; : laying &1 'be %  merchant of Antigua %  . i (HI • earlier m the l.v B.W.I.A with his son ..-n ho has brought to %  : %  Mil at the I.' Back From Trinidad It WOODLEY ANTHONY >re*ct| Iteach returned Trinidad on Wednesday B.W.1 V after paying a vlatt. WOLF AT THE DOOR Here is a letter that appeared In the Parent;' Magazine, signed by Mrs. S. S. Tort Worth. Texas. Th.nks to the Wolf ul DM Door' "In reply to your request for the renewal of my subscription, I with to inform >ou that the present condition Of my bank account makes it almost impossible. My shattered financial condition is due to federal law, state laws, county laws, brothers-in-law, slaters-In law and outlaws. Through these laws I am compelled to pay a business tax, amusement tax. head tax. school tax, gas tax, light tax. water tax. siles tax. liquor tax. income tax, food tax. furniture tax and excise (ax. I am required to get a business license, car Lb I operator's license — not to mention a dog license. I am also required to contribute to every society and organisation which the Hemus of man is capable of bringing t.i life; to woman's irlief the unemployed rebel end to every hospital *wd charitable Institution in ire city, including the Salvation Army, Community Chart. Red Cross, Purple Cross. Double Cross, Boy Scouts. Girl Scouts. Club geouta, Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A. as well as Boys' Ranch and Boys Town. For my own safety 1 am Required to carry health insurance, life insurance, fire insurance, property insurance, liability Insurance, earthquake insurance, tornado insurance, unemployment compensation and old-age insurance. My business la so governed that It is no easy matter to Bad out who owns it. I um inspected, expected, suspected, disrespected, re)ected. dejected, examined, reex. imined. informed. required summoned, fined, commanded and compelled, until I provide an inexbiiuslible supply of money for every known need, desire or hope of the human rao Simply because I refuse !< %  donate to something or other. I am boycotted, talked about, lied about, held up. held down and robbed. I can tell you honestly that except for a miracle that happened I could not this check. The wolf that comes to many doors nowadiys Just had pups In my kitchen. I sold them and here is the money. Sp-nl Five Weeks M R AND MRS L. MARTIN and famllv returned to Trinidad on Wednesday by tha Dutch SS. Bonaire after .'pending five weeks staying al Cacrabank HoUfl. Mr Martin la Director and Secretary of Alston's Ltd.. Portof-Spain. Hor jymoor. Couple Leave R ETURNING to Trinidad last night by B.W.I A. we and Mis. Cecil Milne who wore spending their honeymoon at the Crane and Royal Hotels. Mr. Milne is Service Manager of the Caterpillar Department of Neal and Massy Engineering Comf arlga is the former Mls jt Hope Ross. Petroleum Engineer Paying ihqir Rrtt visit to the udand are Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Wall of Colombia. They arrived on Wednesday via Trinidad by B.W.I.A. for two weeks' holiday and are staying at the Marine Hotel. Mr. Wall Is Petroleum Engineer with the Columbian Petroleum Company In Cucuta. Canadians End Holiday M R. AND MRS. I. S. WEBB of New Brunswick, who were holidaying here for the past two weeks returned to Canada yesterday morning by TC.AThey were staying al the Ocean View Hotel. To Assist Mounted Police S TAFF SGT. C. W. ANDERSON of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police arrived here yea terday morning from Ottawa by T.C.A. for the purpose of assisting the Barbados Mounted Polic in their training. He will be here for six weeks staying at the Marine Hotel Stiff Sg>. Anderson who was a policeman for twenty-four years, spent twelve years in Ottawa, seven in the training depot a1 Regina, Saskatchewan and the remaining live doing Police work in the Province of Manitoba. Attended Course in U.K. M R. VINCENT KING, a Civil Servant of the Secretariat in St. Vincent, returned home yesterday by B.G. Airways after •pending a few days here staying %  t "Leaton-on-Sca". The Stream. I Mr. King who spent eigh. I months in HM UK. attending a u.iiiMi iii Administration arrived here on Tuesday by the SS.j J?. r;rajje. / Me Popular! WHEN %  girl goes wants lo create • good and lasting Imprskj lM! a few ideas that should give you a BUN •tart (1) Never accept a daw from a ,> Give him your ..* boy just fur the sake of going let him know you are having a out. You must like him even if good time. Don't flirt with other It Is only just as a friend, for men on your date, it's bad manafter all, you have lo endure his nets. If you an* not sincerely company for quite a while on yew interested in his conversation. date. don I nd to rn)oy it. (21 Try your utmost not to fee A simple greeting is enough late Men hete to be kept wail*hould you meet someone you ing. and since they always s*psct koaw girls to be late then they are (7) Never let on that you are pleasantly surprised when you are bored. If anything excites you, not. Yet, If he is late, don't glare mention it. donl pretend you've t him, accept his apology dimly. Min better. That la being snob_ blsh and real men abhor female i3).B9 modest about your figsnobs, ure. especially if It is a good one. (8| So cu are a college graduDress careru.ly and be completely „-*.• u/el. he didn't bring you feminine. .Good posture is im„ u t to leirn what you got vour portant for without 11 your beauty diploma for. He is pleased lo and gracefulness are marred. bfcar about your merits, but don"t and eggressive. Be natunnTgay J" !" *' re your ,r ChMm and don't get flustered. Pay com( ,r ** lwu pliments but don't overdo It by (9) After you have come home being too gushy. and thanked him for giving you (5J Go easy on hit pockelbook. such ,, wonderful time (whether whether rich or poor. Can't have he did or not) you can then decide him think you are a 'gold-digger.' whether you would like to go Intelligence, character and amblut with him again. If you add up to much more than %  wouldn't nrvrr aay it in as much TH: i Two Elisabeths ERE u a sinking similarity between the signatures or the two Elisabeths, the Queen and the Queen Mother. This Is shown in the two autographs 1 reproduce bere. But there are difference* of detail. The Queen Mothers signature is more precise than her daughter's, as In the S uction of the "b" aod "e." crossing the -1 the Queen Mothers stroke always Onds the letter: the Queen's Invariably comes above the letter. There is an element of E ater boldness In the een's autograph. Handwriting experts would point to It in the curving flourish of the initial "E" and the tall of the "a" J2u& ^ THC QUEENS This •atogfaph „ M ew— stuffed wallet. -....-!... No more windscreen B.B.C. Radio Programme wipers! t B RITISH scientists have discovered how to keep oar windscreens and shop windows free from snow, ice and mist. The jecret lies tn covering them with a nun of pure gold. '* not an expensive proc*. SSiJS? W only a quarter of a millionth of an inch thick, ana u transparent. The discovery w u made at the. National I'hv.vcai Laboratory al Teddjngton Middlesex. .London Express Service 4pm Th* Nrn. in p in The Dully %  ii P m Ivor Morrtin nd K %  30 p m BvSUfn* wlUt Bradvn. 1 p m CrkkM, 8 SB p m Intrrlud*. B 19 p n> LWtocwn* Choice, S p m Mri.h-.nl Nt.w. Profummr. S IB %  i Rev-vls. IB pm Sport* Hminrtup mil Programmp Pandv. T | I 10 p m llomr N> I I MS—IBM p.a U, MM, SI SEM II P in Weal Indian DUrY, 7 *• P gong and Dnnc*. fl 11 p m Kodio Niwt.. .1 i :KI (, m Woiid Aif,!! !" ISpn Ir.tvrlude. B U p m rrom Un> Editorial! p m Ping up UMT CurUUn. 10 p m IB M |. m Kr. Talh. IB I p n. Th* nrhaliCoMlnue. 10 30 p n TODAYS GEM The Kiss of the sun for pardon The song of the birds for mirth One Is nearer God's heart in a garden Then anywhere else on Earth. BY THE WAY T MK alert Hungarian democrats BSMO i" bava discovered a particularly v 11 %  pMi rein Its devlati lit' Hungarian newspapers reniontiatrd their rage ngalns', a firm of hatters. The % %  .. -\ of relllng n cap with a devlationlst label inside %  hah gentleman wearing a gou* cop. with thd arrognnt grin char' i < Kplotung capiutl*.<> find out wnauaSf Uua atibtif propaganda OCk "I Hungarian arlatoeraU. or a triurnph of English exl^rtors I'erbap* the caps arc dropped by night, from plane*. v places, .mil gathcrid up 1 h comrnenUu Uavtuai %  %  i > '*. one can nnagiiK a thf i lluKlsafold or the the sandy Nylrsag hiding In a cupboard when the polled arrive. Iili-nlitftit'iil rap C OUNTER-MEASURES will probably Include an order to all Hungarian collective hatters tn sow into their caps a label blowing a member of a labour camp, wearing his golf cap with the happy smile characteristic of u People's Democracy. If this fails there will be u purge of leading hatters. But simple workars, gazing at the gentleman's golf cap and the supercilious grin, will still murmur "We never knew it was like that in iht) capitalist countries. Fancy l>eing free t.. wem an> lii->l you like inside vour U"lf cap! Heigh"'. n III /nf-til:C HILDREN'S minds having been cumpletel>' rotted with lllms and radio, we now come to the coup-de-gmcei education (ic> by televisi.Ki. What li. really By Beachcomber wanted is a Mechancial Educator. a combination of film, radio, and television. No master or mistress would be needed. A trained mechanic would be abla lo taki claisas of thousands, and in tinn the children would learn to work the machine themselves, thus finding another outlet for the worship of gadgets. Abynainian wimlfnll R OAST Abyssinian Beef and Yorkshire Pudding will loot odd on a menu when the supplle, begin to arrtvo. Hut the Gram. Maltre Chef do Haute Cuisine in many a gilded oaruote ran relied on to call K Quenelles de Prc-Sale. "What do you recommend to drink with it?" "Undoubtedly, sir, this Chateau Medoc of 1950. It la a sound Burgundy, sir, matured in the cask A full wine, sir. and chca at 28s 6d. the bottle,^ Shall 1 ic %  lr r d you prefer It hof" Importance Of Development M*" Ad Thv Soil Of Colonies LIVERPOOL The importance of economic development In the Colonial Empire to iieip Britain through bar pratvet Lyttalton, the Coio%  honour at the annual luncheon of tin Liverpool Chamber of ComH is. he said, "one of the keys to our prlron." cai>ltal, aa well as British, must be attracted lo Colonial ,n1 if the vast natural resources ;i %  to Dt devel%  xp.mdrd and brought to l'i markets, he said. It Ltful held for Imagination rgy. Dial exports of bauxile rose From 1 TO.000 ions in 1936 to 1.698,000 tons In 19S0." he said. im oil exports rose from 2.404,000 tons to 8.028.000 Ions. Timbc* rose from 13,000.000 to :(0OWOOO ruble feet. This means ruin? standards of life In the Colonies and the hope of curing world shortages of primary raw materials. "1 am afrnul 'it Is useless to deny that our surpluses will be basufflcJenl to push this development along as quickly as it should be and that we must have capital from creditor countries and from overseas to assist. We must try and do this so that we retain our fair ahare of anv ctitei priiw which foreign capital may help to encourage and to foster. "As fatas one can aee, and It Is dangegpus to be loo dogmatic the primary product r am! of course I am thinking particularly bl the first of all primary pruoucil-.. TI.in.iU food—Will, SO tO speak, be calling, the tune for many years to come. We can. through Colonial development greatly Increase our strength as primary producers and with it bring an economy which Is ao largely a manufacturing one into a more healthy and illiai ilgad. balance." —B.C.P. The world's population, now about 2. 350.000.000 Is Increasing at the rate of 60,000 a day. The world's food supplies are Inadequate even for the existing numbers. By misuse of the land, millions i acres have ceased to be productive. What can be done to feed theso extra people? And how can it be done so that the fertility of the soil is safeguarded for future gencralions? How can we claim new acres from the unproductive areas of the wot Id — the scrub, the nwamps. the desert, and the frozen lancls of the north? How can we reclaim acres which have oeen lost through neglect r bad farming' What are the effects of new methods of agriculture health? These aie some of the quest asked and answered — as fai they can be — i n the series of B.B.C. Transcriptionentitled "Man and the Soil." The ae..._ will be relayed al 8.00 p.m. every Friday from May 9th. It will heard over Radio Trinidad on the following trequencies 31m—9625k; 90m — 3325k; 920m — 790k, and 1295k. XEW SHMPMENT WHITE & ( iil.ni in |, TOWELS FROM Mc. TO $2.5 WASH CLOTHS jg, COTTON BLANKETS—WHITE. PINK. GREEN. BLUE, FAWN SO X '0" $3.30 S5 X 75" $3.70 60 X W $4 J3 M X 86" $4.89 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606 "I mbrellan for lied Willy. Willy Was Selling Umbrellas —They Were the Kind That Grew in the Rain — By MAX i 1:1 i I "Umbrellas! Umbrellas for sale!" | Knarf and Hanid, the shadows with the turned-about names, looked at each other. The sun was shining brightly. Why should anyone be wanting to sell umbrellas? Besides, the voice came from the foot of the bill, where the marsh began. Who could be selling umbrellas in the marsh? They hurried down the hill to see. By and by. as Knarf and Hanid reached the edge of the mat .di they recognised Willy Toad' • "Umbrellas!" he was calling out. And sometimes he said: "Umberellas!" They soon found Willy, squatting on the root of a willow tree. A stick with a sign on it read: "Umbrellas For Sale". An Umbrella "Hello Knarf! Hello Hanid!" he said when he noticed them. "Want to buy an umbrella? I'm selling very good umbrellas. You'll need them for the rain." "But. Willy," said Hanid; "it Isn't even raining." "And it doesn't even look like rain. Willy," said Knarf. "The sun is shining. There isn't a cloud in the sky." "Ha. don't be fooled by appearances." said Willy with a laugh. "It doesn't look like rain. But it's going to rain just the same." "Where. Willy?" said Hanid. "Bight here, sooner or later. It always raina sooner or later. So you'd betler I* prepared and buy an umbrella for when tt does. I've got all sises to sell." Knsrf. who was looking nil over the ground and had walked twiaa around the willow free, now said: "Bui Willy, where are the umbrellas? I don't see any." 'Neither do I." added Hanid. "Where do you keep them?" Willy answered: "In a very safe place. Under the ground." Willy nodded. "Right under Iht ground—right under where I'm standing this minute^' -I never heard .,f meh a thing" ttny ilo you have to keei> • der the ground?" "It's the best place to itOTS i hem." Jlfcg. THI QUEIN MOTHER S —aad >hti ,1 -=i f piMhM. CROSSWORD • i %  I ; i • T 1 _]' 3 f I 1 1" 1 ,u %  1 %  % %  •'4 kl round i Ita v is ignored. 1S1 vi T !" from wide r*M. (4| It. Clever bird that can. I4> It. rune to reach Uires HgurM > 1 lo'.nooatrarr. 'ftNot a or:ni _ort of erne. i4 Paid to til* incited r*d. *„ t>, Morse? (Si .nit or al, tsllurea. (S| mm ureiy. 14) • ubtea IS) troubir* nd i n Knarf said eagerly: "Lets sea tlM umbrellas. Willy." But Willy wouldn't let him. "It's no use digging them up now. Knarf. When the rain comes, they'll come up by themelve. They're wundrrful umbrellas. None others like ihem in tho world." -you—you're sure theyll come up when it rains?" Knarf said. %  '"li yea, "h yes indeed!'' Willy replied. Knarf and Hnnid both bought an umbrella from Willy, even though they couldn't see what th.-y wan bajruag. Rained During Night It rained dur.ng the night. And the next miming it was still raining. Knarf and Hanid ran down to the edge of the marsh as fast as UkH could. "I bet he hasn't any %  imhrellas at all." Knarf said. "How can you keep umbrellas under the ground! And how can they come up when it ralnaf* When they reached Ihe willow rrce they wen astonished. For -landing straight up with their handles in the ground were a down Or taoTC beautiful umbrellas, BOOM -mall, some large, and some just coming up! Willy himself was sluing under I one of them. "They're mushrooms!" cried Ha aid. lias," said Willy. "I told ffesj I'd have them when the rain Rico, into t rut* t %  vrge Alter the mgnt before "" tauvnim Bianl **1 I? Ir!r. „ n BMlpBMkf (5) 17. snilde ((1 IB ' vmoer lit KSU v"s;.v %  ,T-a;„-..","T.: 1*iSt H l 1 ,**" *f t.tllnrtt.1,1*1: Ku."* 13:r %  See Us for the BEST BOOKS Advocate Stationery ^aperf and the Toy Scout—15 Al Podgy' words Rupert smilr "So Ifwt'i why you wouldn* •paik when I pitied you H now." he marmurs. Y*i. %  uppose so." uyi Podgy. "I •,. (ho^ tricks and then I lost ihr.n Ukl I wu iry.tig IO rfhQh nude ihOBl *nd avtll and I was >o p*U netioi you or sayth t i >. Well, now >OU know ." lays Bjp*rt. "Sole, si Bthees." H. .-• run bttk HI WIUUBM LBS BBOW.N S It A NO A Good Night's REST Is So Important Do you ink peacefully on your pillow and float away on cluudiof resirul aleep? Or do you Ue down with BfargU eyes ... to have the wornrw of the day come baa and taunt you? Many men and women whose nerve*~nn> fmvt-d by .iimiiv ur m run-dowr condition —find this to be tnAnd that's the time when l)r Chases Nerve Food can do so much to help you. For this reliable tonic contains Vitamin Bi. iron and other needed mmernla which help build up your vitality and tone up your whole system-no youVe in better condition to get your normal needed rest. Canadian* by the thousand'' have pmtd in over half a century of use. that you mt belter mt better, fret better after taking Dr. Chase'* Nervo Food. H don't let your nertes rob you of proper rnt> i;*t Dr. Chase's Nerve Food in the largo "economy riBS*, The name "Dr. Chaao' is your aasurance. ii CAIEIY The Oardea—St. James roiiAv a TONOiiow PI A/A llll 1IKIS nim.i HI s • DIAL HI.) iiuTi ce IIIHII iT^Knknl.l CMAR hOMMU %  4 1 -*.n.i ** | > SlLt IS a Mill c Brass w;i.si>\ A (OWMOl \\ ii II Jimmy WAKEI.V MlesSM -i.-. i.l SAT a New ThnUm' so oisiar II \i:i: \I:I i l DIAL SIM I T> % %  > a I • ntm %  i %  • HERE COMES THE GROOM SAT ID pm Jon H-ll Double Ml, 'Mini M.I S VliUuUT a*lam KAT MI: WMBS S*nalaUPSatMAjJ l%  s 4l.%MI>lt TaAs to M.*4.. I %  1 | || Oootgv zucco luuiih u;ww tn-. IM. IULM, MSI. VM I ACXTSB SfT FtStMi SUnini laiy BWUi IIUGHrK Othcn SAT *1 fld Cameron In t* Il4| Objr.lt Dram, -f rt< >U. SpwUI SAT MI UNITE rhl* Senal U'k Arm.lr.ns ..th Jobn Mirtf \. II. II: Ailkin' NEVER TRUST A GAMBLER Hn* i .IB Si LAST OF THE BUCCANEERS i TUKS 4 *S A S IB S>S CnariBM MABK OF TUB IIMI.AD1 gXTPA : B-.l *h.Fl. -Ur -I KIN All! iin Tr IlENEXB and his Orlj %  AT MIDMTH BP1 rtSATS TRIANII Hill. Ri-hj/.l TA1.M.V IIOYAL BAT & SUN 4 30 St B IB %  lAKIIw l.loitl TKOrtEBB < OOBIKZ HOLIDAY IN HAVANA wiUi lut.i ARNEZ 0, OUMfS E \i l> I || I OPENING TO-DAY 2.30 & 8.30 and Continuing Daily 4,45 & 8.30 ^L FAMILY w*\ SECRET \ l .J0HNDEREKLEEJ.1 MIAWRANCE %  BBBtD (SW BuKM t IBSn IM OfM'M in ft I,,-.,!<,,, #. g.J A H.:tO p.m. and Continuing DAILY pi Al A iiiiuiiiiii* %  *-/mar_rm (ui .IIU> ^sw^fiKT low WVMANI | ?\ SMHH| Topsmns f* AMD | rVKrW _y HERE COMES THE GROOM TONti BARTOll tL. * >*GLOBE X% %  OR I OP PIIODIICI% > COSIISUIB lO-Dil %  .. y II. IO P .M. TOMORROW 1.30. 5 & 8.30 PJU. SINDAY 5 and II 30 P.M. Ill I II v Ol IHE CISIUII1 JtaW Mid nil* Wpcci.l Trlpl. AIlrlion HBN Or TNI TIMRS.AN I' %  LI An... A ... N Ml >K MAHtti OtT FOR SUXDA 1 %  • 8 and win ADVOCATE $21.00 AT THE SAME TIME YOU CAN HELP THE i:\H\l\l t-Ott Ff.Vf.l.VO Ft WD. ? Mighty as Goliath! Fiery as their love! DAVID ANO BATHSHEBA TECHNICOLOR GREGORY PtCK ?MJ gATWAM < MIBNIII UOIIIII I IOWOIIKOW Mil pmsii Ol IO\l% Tjrone I'ower. Winds llendrlx and II 1M.I IMMIS Kill %  io>* (Kent Taylor)



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I PAfil. -I\ BARBADOS ADVOCATK FBHIAY. MAY . 1 CLASSIFIED ADS. I'l III M MMMIN rtLffHONt :$• \l"Mil Ckrut Church. I OK KALE AUTOMonvr HH funeral leav. UMT %  4 ay l*"Wi4 CAR-Or. bedeoonii On lig Room S MM. Dial 1 nproAi %  fumMhcd All i WlUtoani Navy Ci %  %  Mwa* %  ; haaM i. PAtAVAV'll PhUtp toaat. > b-d room* ruuy larhUM. Liahiir.1 Plant. WateamV.1 *•!(. Doul.1* Cat Port, two servant ro.i** Prom Mat lit Phor a 441* It I II CAM *Jn* ill Auatti Trlepti-.n, I ltd \ I Ml D V %  a aa-t i n %  C'ouu* in aar arc I J a* 4 tt-i.ir.!IN ".TOHr. AM' CM I mMn. sumana *o Offices at No I irStr -t Apei* to C I NEWHAVBM Crane Can*. 4 I%  rniti Pul* f irniahM. uahtine PI,, WaBarmiil mpi-u Double Oarage, IM •ftM room. For Mar ."J tram Oc, labor Ul phor* MTi H> 4 aa—t I n IIItriN KOI %  H Jan. T.l Wtt "TfUNlTY rOTTAC*: ~r*ul?> furnl.h. I three Iwtaooan*. rorriplrte with Irl' phone and rrrncrator. Utuated a1 Darrkh> Bay. It. Jam*rti-n* S IMIISOVAI • %  i.inr %  d I %  do H.1 hold pa| TUP I > % %  in and*b' narn* luyleia bv a •.Hit HAROLD HIH MIS % %  %  a sa~3 perfect otd--i No U Kifh i aa-iii | ,;..!.... 1 c eircumiUncr. Socl*t those of too randidatet 4 ft -an un I'llll.H WALKS RKAL ESTATE rmnitinaiv aitaa* .11 Terrar*. with *Mi na an ~>o lot* ae* i„t Eaton, i AUCTION INI %  • Ml II M \.i RAMI aot II v .I.H... a4 MM %  parson • norolni %  tend lor N-I that ti %  ah* plar* n UNDEK TI1K OlAMOMt HAMMER I wtll %  ! up rw ai* by puf^c "xn i-tiiwn -I m* Or. Maadla htat at. I Ui in.tanl at 1 |> m iba" .Kftrihl. m.>ll [irofMrtr hrMMm a. i .-' *>\u..u at tho Cran*. %  %  i. anaaifti -ii*ti %  ..•>> j i.t l-ulilui vaaatwii. aaw ta •'tan* Hotd. -rd which conunullr>i.nrd tortliMKHI braaaaa fraaa w i t.nr Coaat. eenitota of aaMlatai awao4ah on too . %  [Mia. a baataaoaaa anal apara loam. lavatory and haih. ailtban. Baraaj* and ta#>thrt with aa am a4 UaMt. ill at hfltaaa ba a — fta* 4 5 1 i in I> ABKV A. SCOTT. UMI Eatata Aaot A Au rt t— aaa. ui.i ataa T.nmGOVERNMENT NOTICES lollV R BOVKI.I. SCHOLARSHIP SHIPPING NOTICES ,| B r&*y~ !" K"i ROYAL NETHERLANDS %  t ions are invitd lor one "John R whu i will • at 'he value of 1,236 per mnun ttto) Imperibl Colk-aje ol Tioptcal Agi n-ulturc. Applacalona 1o STEAMSHIP CO. be -• laaa Ma> .Z M w HrjlA ,„ h M „ 1WU I AMUcatront will be considered from a candidate who— u ^ B o5SjrJ^ [ (a) is between l* and 21 yearn of age on the lt af May.," "MMSQW 1982 j -II is., m miNin* lb) haw reached advanced on of a native or of parent* who have been domiciled in the Island for ten yavisj prior to the date ->f application. (d) submits evidence of good character and general tttnea tn profit by a course of ttudy at the Imperial College 3 A candidate may be required to submit a medical certificate | testifying to his physical fitness. 4. Attention is drawn to ihe fact that residence in the Milner, Hostel at the College is compulsory and the allowances have been %  OPS rtiAMARini) tNIl fiaill-rl I.I I" \ s %  c'lrrncA. -i Ju" i"sa -MIIM. lO M1AKM(III MI as a aTPstarroH IT* uaj> isas M ^ NUtTOIt IStn June l*3 \ll 1.1. i" (BIMIItO IMl Tba M I t-AJtmr. anil aacae* %  • . i kn(fii loc Bt L.—ia. Unnand Aauba raataaijara onl> amaadai tth inat Bll -i I • c-pl i lor L-.IIMaaaaarral. Navta •ailms rragav Canadian National Steamships -..I IHI'.lH Mi I \IH K THE SILVER HAMMER oh nuDAY lau. by oro*. ol HM l>(>cn A.n. i I'pmpv mtieased to enable the John F Bovell Scholarship bolder* to com-, CAMAWAK CRUISER MI ti A i. urt \--i it \M i sot im II**Ua> .1 Daraaiawa 1. t. R Oill. 0.1a of ** P*a lnat*d to I..Ia* a littrrtor at.la* Ai.nual GaiMTal Meatini ol th* April. ItOl. ha-. I. %  %  n m -mm nomination taar land lor aiK-ium o th ..ceaalon. U %  t rn ifiioni Chalr. ,.,n avttaa all Hi Maoa ,**. -4 Aauwto Carvoa C-4bt ^nd Uprlatt fax flw Chain, upbol. Chauti tl.ct.oia vets intre Divan iCewak o Bad. BD. 4 P i IUIH. Carprta. atotenaloH OM Tbfcla* -n< ch.iri. Vanndah CiuMra. %  ss trt i li.ock. Vhilln. Tnewrllaa. Daak Chair. Doohahlv*i and Boo*.. Ulaaa and On.. DfnaMr and TBa brvtroa, hurt W.MiDoubla Cod. ELECTRIC Al. T-,InaxiM l-h-m* aa44 i.i.a %  I r>ida >Vr| MECHANICAL MISCELLANEOUS rVaXYN. ,ih this regulation. „ The succesaful .ipplx JIII will be required to begin hu studu at the Imperial College In September, 1952. If no applicant possessing the requisite quaUflcations Is forthcoming, the award of the 9 5.52—2n Uig the requisit scholarship will he postponed until next • CANADIAN roNajTTtUmiH l-ADY RODSKY CANADIAN l)IAI.LXNGF.B LADY MTajaDN i ANAIHAN CHUISKK CANADIAN CttN-.TPlH-rOI'. |4\DY HODKaTY M-nlir.l a* Apt • Stay EREE TUITION SCHOLARSH1I' IHIlOl Mi %  I'lihln Official Sale Th* rra* Var^al'A.l laal iiaal-m On rilda. the SUi a* ..( May ISM al ina i plr of Land i i fttimaium 13 acroa I I I Philip buattng and ho"."*% %  %  uf Wir (; I* 1*11" "" %  " •• laipl' now or t-'. %  "h*ll. 01 Knivoa __ ___ %  Etoctrlc ains*t %  aaochln* Mir -I T iaa n Kuiaam. ,....o *!..> %  all in Yl.bot-n D*ai Sl**p — DunlopllHi %1alli*M> tinarie Iron gi da ta a a. Trunk, and An.' C.*. .i-Bu/n*r Oil •%•. land**.. H't Plata KilcB*n Tabtoa. Larrsc FU-k L-n MOM*'. CrMona In C*mra*il Pnt Ijirta Palma and many other "'" c 11 W oeioca Teniia Ca" nsAxan. TBOIRAN A I O AtlU.n..i. s a Sg—tn m p -I %  Ihe C>n.H.h Ins-i In* naau... M -uat BBr hoto prafasrt) wl %  rtirtiltal l-< aad lo3rd* i--d a CILAD1.E On* Bibjl Cradla itatlmn and ilrop aMt* on* baby'i wmBland on* Baby. Hish Chair Talrph-n* %  aw or gui i A l*u -attofa i.. i .in ilrhl IIP* %  !•" %  I ii %  *"* a T T Iir-ADIXY. n ue, S*rvtr*a PUi*d W"r aeea-M. rorba, riah anc all.** Candl*at>i Applications for one free Motion scholarship tenable at tne 1mperi.il College of Tropical Agriculture will, be rece.ved by the Dire. <*££* ^.H lor f Agriculture up to the 17th of May, 1952. lja>v -OIINIEY . L CANADIAN !. Candidates thould be not leas than 17 years of age on the CHAU-WUKH 1st of September. 1952. and have obtained a General Certificate of I.ADY Education In at Itail five subjects, t Subjects. i of which should be Sclent3. This scholarship entitles the holder to free tuition at thCollege, hut all other fees must be met. 4. Attention is drawn to the fact thai residence in the Milner Hostel at the College is compulsory. .-.*• %  9.5.S2—2n. OFFICIAL NOTICE nAiinAnns IN THS OP ctiAvrrT ComtnonwoaUh Day At Industrie* Fair i I 'NDON bntd u 11. i)i I induMrlr'ui i Bpeclal .ii mi tli.it U.iy On lr* imp tg-fKaa t.i the O mpwnwi ., iha e. .niiiu.niiih set UON < %  [ ii" 1 nu Mr. tllivt r l.\ %  Mellon. UW CoUm,y Will "11 Ih.'t v Mi section consists of 17 Commonwealth Q] in;imons them. I.Wi it.,.. panied on his visit by Mr. Peter TaWfagycroft Pregldgiil of the Board ol Tiiide, and the Marivie of Salisbury. Sect %  tate for Commonwealth Bcln%  rul ^1*" broadcast a talk In Britain on "The Importance of Trade In UH Commonvcalth —B.I'.P. Truth Must Be Bash Of Understanding IHKM1NGHAM, May B. i iiiUing .unoiig peopli l atd DO truui "and 1 am sure this can be achieved" ArKcnttno Ambassador Carlos A. Hogan said today during a lunchi-on .it which hi was a guest gl tin Uritish Industrie* Fair .it Birmingham. The Ambassador could not un* iendand however 'why newirnil.iled round aBO world l>y Press and other agenci-** i" Often %  si uod, often III Inteniiifil jnd in the best cases enmrjletndj Licking in objectivity." Explaining briefly what Hie nation was doing "what have done and what we are aJnuBI ii" llogau suid in a few te) itai nnl -ix-y.;^ i*rlod of ron*titutional Oovern. ment will end and the aajeond period 1952—1954 for which he had been freely and almost unnn mi.u-.lv elected mv rounlry will IN fnTIRUAtfCa: of Ih* Chancery Act. 18a*. I do horatoy Siva notice to .1 raona h-rr1na or clalmins any r.iat* rlaht o liitar.*! or anv ll*n or inrarn Man. n, %  iilactlns th* property h*.*maft*r mrntlo-wd (Ui* p*-o*-artv of In* defati.t ,U to brim ba*or ma an account of thvlr etobtra artlh their wltriMac-. .,i,d voucher! to b* earn!nod by me on anv Ttiradar or rtd : i.*an iho houra of 11 noon and 3 o'clorH in th* alt-rrnoon al the K*Btri %  Public llulldlnga. .ldgcton bHor* IM 11th .-. ihjt atarh clnima may be reported on and ranBrd acr"".in . d prioritv tharoof i-*-rp-.-tl n May May S Jim* II Jim* II June JVaW aa Jun* St Jon* 1 Jmv 12 J.al11 1 July | Vtteaa Arrl.. •aaMlnl tJ May IT M.< fBBM ii J II Jun* y July M July i Alia* t July as Jul -B July I Au GARDINER AUSTIN & CO.. LTD.—Afents. .v/////////--,--v-y/-v/,v/-v/////////v'. IBS3 .Balnal 1 by the people ol 11 start— r.l\ DAISY HKRJlF.ltT MUIIPMY and JAMTJt ORANT ATKn-t pt-.K. the c-uallnad actlnii exreutora of the will of fcvar* Murphy doC'd DKrgNDANT" MlIJJCEJfT WAITIIB and AtTRXIJA CT.ARKE both nt He* York. U R A actln-j herein by D-Arcy Auft-uatuo aV gsaar conaUtutcd Attorney on record In thla 1*1 and Bil-ICnTY AU. THAT rTRTAaN MaM or parcel ol land iltuale lint! Road In the Pariah of Saint Mlch-el and bland .fore-Mid ronUlnlnii bv admeuupeme.it Nine and Iheee-tlflh. perch*of UbereabouU Abiitlinu and bounding on lao Mdea On land* 'I Albertha Payne on i.nili now or l-le of on* Mm Tion b(to Hall Hood i.iomaid or howevei el-e Ih..am* I* abutto.S .II -d bounaUnt ToSelher 1th !! %  loe-fcHiaa* or dwvlllnarnouae ihmaon called "Byar* VHIaff*and all and -inert-lar other tbo bulldlnaa and eroetiona on Ih* autd parcel of land erect*d aid b.nlt -dandlns* and brine HI i.iatll H Uaich ISM a* ID Aonl IBM 4 11-4.. Jair.airiui &a$KK .Man Tours lirituin I 1. IN DON Mr. Hal Sh.irp. s.>rotary of hnin ti .il WeHrtrtHoard of Jamaica, has begun a tour of Britain under the auspices of the British Council. He will study the we.frtre of workin factories, mines and rural areas. Cuts Endanger European Defence WASHINGTON. May 8. General Dwlght D. Eisenhowe'All.mtlc Pact Supreme Commander wnrnf d C< ngress today that lurlliir cuts In the new aid to Alllc-t Programme might endange. the whole European defencbuildup His warning was contained In letter to Chairman Of UV_ S'-ILI1I> Foicign Relations Com-. tagfl >. ntor Tom Connally 4Democratie> who h in asked the Qangral'a opinion an poaslblErf the cuts. The Committee had earlier re.,i I'I evident Truman's $7,900. 000.000 aid request by al.00" 000.000 : -*fore submiltiiiK 111 Military and Economic Aid Programme io the Senate. —U.PI OH SALE THIS AnRACTIVE HOME An extremely well built, modern three bedroom (or two l*drooms and den) BUNGALOW or stone and concrete construction. Combined forty feet living-room and gallery, fully cupboarded Canadian styled kitchen, floor to celling cedar lined double bedroom closets. Attractively laid out garden with fruit trees and ample room for vegetables. Garage with breezeway to hr>u*c and detached self-contained maid'.: quarters. The Property I* coolly and dellghtfalty situated within easy reach of mini road al Worthing. Ph. H5?. STEWART. 2.5.51—4m. C"G U TRANSATLANTIQUE Sailings from Southampton to GsuuSelotipe. Martlnkuse, l'..rDados, Trinidad, La Gualra. Curacao ft Jamaica From Houuaamptoo •"DE GRASSE"....24th April. 1952 ..tt.HiMBIE" .... Bth May. 1952 .... *"DE GRASSE" .. 4th June. 1952 .... Arrives Barbados 8th May, 1952 .... 21st May. 1952 .. I6th June, 1952 "Not calling at Guadeloupe 8A1UNG FROM BARBAIK>S TO EUROPE From Barbados. Arrlvee SoulhajnpUn %  -I)E GRASSE" .... 19th May. 1952 2lb May. 1952 "COLOMBIE" .... 1st June, 1952 ., 29th June. 1952 "DE GKASSE" "Sailing direct to Southampton rVV/iV/.V//AV,V/-V*W///. 1 12th June, 195^ 9th July. 1952 TO-D AiS NEWS HASH What The Be>B Hav* Been Waiting For lias Arrived:— AMERICAN CAP PISTOLS AND CAPS Closing Out Sale of ALL ENAMEL PAINTS JOHNSON'S STATIONERY and HARDWARE ORIENTAL PALACE IIEADQI'AHTEHS FOR SOITENIBS FROM INDIA. CHINA t CRTLON THANIS At the end ol M.iy Mr. stnni. will -pet. "' Liveipool. to see wilfare arrangement ir sugar workers theie. Hi* L.p'.imme will ul*.. %  I %  routh cluhj | In Touch With Barbados Coastal Station iWeat Indie%  l T ( .hlpa throush aha* -; %  Uon:lowrto Poeeldoi OltrfTrta P*d-o %  Savn. IMS Cllppop. Lord Oladi Uiarl UnperUl Toronto H ii. i i lend. see housing plans for rural ) P.ndlloto AUanUr Ranser. I frn" 1 '!*" Sharii served for i '''' i,*'. i years a" an officer in J '' %  >during the war and hot D Welfnre Orn. I t „. Verf/mor, 1-ahi Canbheun from 1948 to 1948— i vi-aido i er. Palh Fintll take rt. I %  %  %  the PtJ I LOOK orr FOR SiiW.l VS A U VOCA TE and win ikm sm %  •* S2.L00 AT THE SAME TIME YOU CAN HELP THE. I fIffYf If EOH Ff.Vf..l.V *••#".*. We have a LARGE VARIETY OF SHOES SUITABLE FOR PRESENTS SURPRISE YOUR MOM A PAIR FROM . WITH



PAGE 1

FRiriW. MAV 9. 152 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE PtVB GREAT CHANGES IN U.K. IN SOCIAL ECONOMIC POLICY Cheaper Newsprint British Trade Unions Severely Tested ttt| the income of lhe sections of the community other than the wage-earners (eel ntf reducing profit margins). In so dr u the second method i rr-ri'otfct.-. %  and l d a y OfTOTI %  LLCTLRING to an appreciative audience at the ,* not j method which can be apBritish Council headquarters yesterday evening, on "BritP'ie* 13 coUacthr* bargaining, but \m Trade Unions To-day," Mr. J. D. M\ Bel) said that tfreat onlv fc > Jjnal or " (; changes had taken place in Britain since the war in the !??* i" 1 !? "* HL_"I! TS > "' produc sociaf and economic policy. Those changes together with TJ, !" "nation d^andthe difficult international economic position of the country, kind of wage policy, as otherwise provided a severe test for th,British Trade Unions which the competitive pressures of the responsibilities imposed by their own great strength mc *£ m }* •"•*•'*• b f f Mn *d 'rt* 1 had made it necessary that they should face. In the cir'^^ 'ST" 3 Jd TOM" 0 "; cumstances they had shown a highly developed sense of t.mporary answer H found in social responsibility. wage-restraint. That, in my view. Mr Ml is I-ectuier at Glasgow by their own great strength, prouyl n ^^^YJT^W^J'U University In Modern Economic vide a severe test for the Dntish uirA-menl ft i %  uilv bfSHistory and Research Lecturer in Trade Union, My own view I. KST? h cS^n 'IMSC Industrial Relations. that. In face "'U' ' hlr critic thinkable. Moreover. Ma u total employed popu ation. hat On the other hand, the process of dl „,ve the bulk of their dvnaml. apparently low general proportion hdaptlng their method, and from ,he wage-struggle Whai iilSE? J^Si, SL.w JL !" >"•"''"* '" ""L •"** of " ew ' needed I. some form'of wage —tence of considerable group, situation which has eertiinly policy, co-ordinated through ihe horn org.nisabeen going on—has not in some T.U.C. whereby the unions will *2. !" directions, 1 would suggest, been themselves decide how the Ingomg on quickly enough. creased waq. v. ln.ii n.inf proThe primary functions of Trade duction make possible should be "id still shared out. LIGHT FLASHING OFF COUVA THE il-.rh,. U r Master ha* received a cable from the Acting Harbour Master af Trinidad which stalea. A light flashing evert second visible eight mile-., la eft. hiblted at a height of to feet from a while sleel structure with a red borltooUl strip, red lantern on a pile beacon In a position approximately latitude 10 degrees X3 nun utea M seconds North, long. .:ude til degrees. 31 minute*. 41 second. West, on the Mf. estremlly of Couva Shoal. The red buo In the vicinity ban been removed and la to be expunged from the British than No. iVe as el s bound to xoulhem ports srr requested to report on their anivsl the distance light Is raised "'<1 their height of e>e. a> From %  age 1 again with luxury Hurts and r*a— iWimHi and its cwkiureO neon Hani's al iiigni ItVai U.utH* l 1 broadway and London's Pteadu*> Circus. Meat Germany Hi sea Again Carpenter Charged \\ ah StaKitg Botile CM PtBtbme r.l %  ston Waidmn. alias •Dauber" ol Mayan i Even m Commurust controlliru u f ,„, H werun slow recovery is ber.r.mih. At; ginning — much slower an Uucity's western sectors acs .ruction and devastation -till there. I minx Spare?. Vast empty spa of District -A". Witt But of ,i bOttti arc crly of Hookers I>iii{ s Kebru.i> 16. The case was adjourned ilnti' [,,, to-dhj .Mi I w Burrow is aponcc slood Hitlers PJ*P 0haU pun Chancellory. umc*, Ji'ph Ooebbels' Propaganda MinUtry. the t'niKd State*. ,\' !" £ n BHttsn and French tmbavs.es. haft,• wn ,i hi?!., tone Kramler's Cafe and Uie h „ „,„, t ,J h. ". lily's moot fashionaolihotel* lh Adlon, Brspsal and rk..n of workers among t.on is but tittle ad 1 clerks, distributive worker: sections of unskilled workers. many groups of women workers. Unions has always been, ate. Amongst all male workers i,. the maintenance and improvcthc population is probably as high mem of the wages, hour* and as two-thirds and in many major conditions of work of their toemlnduslr.es %  _ %  ready for this? Ultimately that means, ti UM orilm;iry rank and hl number ready for it? Hktfdl] •! %  vjsjB an imaginative lead from Government the II MlMit K Waf9l "Kosarene" Here From B. < iuiana Waldroti the Nan Foreign J* 1 *! B fc, IIU "5 H l8 prosecuting for the Pbl %  icrk < i Booken i>i.. t -eourl %  the counter he saw the d • LBd ID .in OBH case in which w-rc hottles ol paj It still will be m.ny yean 1*fun:, and fore the scars of Berlin's -ir bomrtndanl wttt . botUa In I hardmeiil 09 UM VV.stin, AUsM bttl tfa A and the ten days' seigc by the When UK Bed Army disappear altogcinei. the store h. cbanad him. bill The Anal act of capitulation f-ilcl to catOb Up with I was signed at the Kussian headwanl DMk and n quarters at Karlshon.t an East u '' '" ""' M" a t r Ol the Store. Berlin suburb that came through In Wl *' 1 *' T 1 B th.war relatively unscathed. !" ~Jf l fc "fT.f!-* 0 After hours of last minute ncgo* From r if I get. is the support of the paper .ipphes bv makers. ( l* r "'"' %•• Raw Materials Suear i ne> %  %  papermen in mtrv have got to breaK j iropical belt all round the opposition, not necessarily r violent opposition, but the Inertia of raw material, 'he refusal to move, the refusal he said. But it.. rob,u ,1 anything with those new raw .cms fa. itariau, by the paper manufarhe added, which are: turer. i • Eton from %  >• us agree that it niic.ng at the mom.; I their mills. 1 :>* ill In England talking to ,„. our mills and saying th.t %  ng should use bagasse becaus. bagasse rnanufacarc un, l*'"J( to the full extent on i nal raw material that %  otning into Una coun"J Th.f.ut that, althouafi '' % • ,lul *• cannot produce the in such enormoti P'esent at a compeouuld encourage • i, t to use bagasse instead of p from Scandinavia and el*e. i riiat li only for to-day. I want %  d to a concern in the l.nil.l,ina to emphasise as strongly as I can -..rid is marching lor > put i.i Inl famine unless coal Ol £17,0 "traditional sources of \ihat'alnAi\amef Mil..'ii..t dai li.itiotis with the Wi-M.tn Alh.'.s Uic Russian Commander in Chief Marshal GadgOrl Zliukov sumincned the German delegates fthortly before midnight to the The schooner Raaajana under hall in the former Wchrmacht pt. L. Olliviene arrived .n>ni technical school building The yestcrdny laden with V S was roprwentcd bs < f flrawood. SOO bags of Car i SpaaU. Brflain by Air Chief J 00 Marshal Sir Arthur Tedder Tiir, 1 %  :harcoal, MO bags of not lajoi ing be ngreements or awards In the The first battle. U Js possible to negotiations of which the Trade My gg gnpd as won. In evcrv Unions are parties. The total membership Is not onlv larger than before; It Is more repreaenUUve of the working population aa a whole. In I'M.: more than half of all the country's trad? I'nlonlftt were coal-miners, rotton operative*, building workrro or workers In mrlal. Today these four groups account for little over one-thlrd. the decline In their relative importance In in due to the spread of organisation elsewhere, especlall> among nonmanual workers, women and worker, of lowrr degrees of skill. Through amalgamation, federation, and other forms of Joint action their strength is also more ntrated than before. Th* unions today account perience of 1948-50 suggests that bran and 60 polish Besides other £_* hv r !" 7,i i-.n n i much could be tat. cargo, the RoVarcne had 80 bunf "}£ £ Siv Keuel. W „ ,,l,hU ,,., •elf aoaestwd. hit race slUhUy rtiuhed %  lammed hut Marshal's baton on the table and sat dow n staring immmil, ahead. He waa aeoompaaled by Admiral Frlebeurg who committed suicide a iv* weeka later and ..n.r..i pa U | Stumpf. Commander In Chief of the I mi waffe. Tedder. Deputy lo Oanaral Eisenhower. Western Allied Si.Conlrol Of Industry The Trad* UMODa Have doni %  the war to assist th< greater output. Wharf hands were busy unloading the M.V. Caribbee yesterday of her 08 bags of dried copra, three crates of fresh fruit, cabbages, empty barrels. Ju-c bottles and other cargo. The 100 ton Caiibbee came from Domini.n with skipper Basil Ouinbc on Wed... The M.V. llaerwood yesterdav evening fr.m Grenada. Vi*me Commander rose and asked having the yo.ht I iMini.-r. I r cldty in English. I aa] lonnafja, In low. The Daerwoou nave you read this document .if left Barbados last Sundn. ARTIE'S HEADLINE The answer put. and more output, alone it these shingles would not be enough, but It Itaih.nl s. would make every other aspect • of the problem so much more cipable of solution, industry collective bargalnmacliinery exists, usually on a national basis. Where that machinery is not wholly satlsfacmuch 9 Cory It has been supplemented bf tin States—backed wage fixing authormaximum effort however depend: itles on a tripartite basis, which pn the degree of sympathy they act as schools of collective barhave with Out purposes and gaining." At every turn, the statepolicies which industry seeks to has aided, encouraged and serve. The best way lo elicit that augmented the voluntary system, sympathy is to associate the workTi.ulr Ili-puii' ers with the foundations of those That negotiations are usually purposes and policies, which is national, brings the danger of the precisely what the more cnlightennallonal trade dispute. That is cd of modem m msgers seek to n danger whuh unions and emaccomplish through the machinery ployers have been so reluctant to of joint consultation. face, that the official strike would Joint Consultation has been welBeem to be almost oosolescent as corned by the Trade UmOM H an Industrial weapon. This poses providing an intelligent and practwo problems: tlcal answer to their forty-yearfa) resentment finds expression old demand for democracy In Inthe unofficial strike, which is. dustry. From crude and vague the strictest sense. Irresponsible, philosophies of workers' control id which. If widely enough ih^Y have com e to accept consulfor Just about hilf of the affiliated practised, would discredit the lotion as the best means of cxmembershtp of the Trade Unior established system of industrial pressing the workers partJclpaCongress. The 17 largest form relations. The answer to It lies tion in management, two-thirds of all the Trade Union? mainly In the internal organisa. .. —_. in Britain. in engineering and tion of the unions. Industrial Democracy shipbuilding, the largest complex and (b) an alternative way of Already through advisory comof Industries in the country', a confinding an answer In the went of mittccs on Government industrial siderable measure of joint action a breakdown In negotiations must •>"" manpower policies. Deveiopi* obtained through the Omfcdcrbe found. Prom 1840 to 1051 that ment Councils in private industry alionof shipbuilding and Engineeranswer was provided by comnd national consultative councUt ing Unions, which since 1948, has pulsory arbitration, but that could In mtlonallsed industry, the trade included all the importjnt organscarcely in a democratic comunions can make their cntnbuisations. in the trades. Finally, munity, be permanent. Today tion at the "top-level. But industhe sticngth and prestige of the *he Industrial Disputes Order trial democracy is essentially T.U.C. has perhaps never been (Order 1378) of 1951, by offering something which touches the Ingreater than during tliesc postthe means to a final settlement dividual worker, which must war years, without, however, denvlng the primarily have Its roots m the right to strike in the last resort, workshop. What is needed is not The Labour Party ems to offer a workable solution mciely ;. system of committees. fc ,j\i, v | c ^.-" I*. -„ Tiwliiv -li „1 This powerful movement h^ Nevertheless, it must be mnomvaluable as they are. but ., %  \l \> Ml III...' I •IMllI) ; % % %  ; < moreover been operating in largebered that the first responsibility tinuous tflort to enlist -the perly favourable political, economic. Ol a Trade Union is to protect the "" %  initntive of each In the colLady Neusm and social circumstances Politiwages and conditions of its memiec ^f e action of e.illy. thl-il-itii Party, with its bers: the pursuit by the state of This iU&: Ami if II Ntffl h. r .tump llf hm. un.unditiona] surrender? A prepared to sign it'" "We Are Ready" K. it' I answered In a rapping voice In German: "Yrs we IN ready." At a sign from Zhukov, Keiiel picked up his dp and Mar%  yhal's baton and slowly and carefully Inserted a monocle In his right eye. Then he walked over to the table In front cf the Allied leaders and signed In a scrawling hand the "Ingle word "Keitel *' It waa Just lg.II am. on \l.,v 9. 1945. As he returned 1 to his place Keitel begin lotKttj demanding anothtu24 hours to notify forces under his command. /.link v Ignored the request and the Germans were escorted from the room later to be taken to an Allied Prison camp. On their way they drovg lot Ihe last time through a Berlin thai was a hideous nightmare, a labyrinth of total destruction. From Curfuel'tcndamm in tinWest to Frankfurter All. H.-i in Mr* ii'ii.irnetl Stalin Alley the City was nothing but an eerie cclming waste of ruins and bomb t aki'l'ti'iiof buildings. Whole areas w 2000-year-old boats are tint of pickle' T*o aoctani craft, about 1 nOQ vears old. which iave pern "in pickle" for RMIf I Ifl at tinNational Maritime Museum, Oreen'..w BOfJ been taken i ,t to dry The veuM'ls *ere dtscovert'rt .n the in ii) ..I the Itiv.r Ihimbcr n 1937 and 10 years later were -. 'moved by road to th nuseum They wan put into a tank •Iiled with glyeerliM ithars lii] "i in.imeil until u short time ago On show The %  piikimg was necea%  vary 10 >.. %  Ihe aTOOd FTOCD going to (lust Parts of the veasela are miss ing. but the remnanta will be lattniDng i KM ID I UlV LaMti HI be im( on show at the museum They are belii'.'i to repra sent the nr%i aUffe in plunk tin 1 IT i>>itBefore < BHJISJ IT-, idi Irani hoiiowtnr. .%  o| tree irunks ill Is lo ni.-tm lv *'e tapped" DftaJb ab CurtU-VI %  ent all the details ha hi l OM attd %  UWI I niilil do m. in Uk Ii in Ceylon and India, u hava fo. ound !' %  —B.L'.P. T.L ri-'ltlN, May 8. ,.-1.en years jail for having called his dog m" and as a result of that i .l|)"mills he waa not able to get manMC. rid His daiicee'l fathei then a fervent lad ->(T the marriage and .MI-'! -i ii'ii.ii int. beeauae t<> proci-nounced Francesco to authorlduca the pulp you it" %  .. „n charge* of having insulted [y-lkUlod laboUJ that has the late dictator by using his name !• BO lnli> ,. MWiprlnt Dull Y.m f„ r a ^og. eountritt, Releascl from lall m 1M5 ndanal liveyr^n^^o n ot able to marry belabour lo cauBe hls nancee's fathar said he wnuld not have his daughter mar*-lth Police record. %  ,,-n .i ,-.!,.:• rrimantatlon in these new Bellcnl appealed against •*"*• .. 1C and the Appeal Court of Turto what we can in this cou sterday annulled sentence lotir h vi' provvd oul %  point thai wo yoan or which Francesco had arvfd i Ht Will i nrry "ii Sunday. %  i not —P.p. Sore Mouth IOOM Bloody Tooth % %  • M 1. ami Loosa Tth in 1 %  •yotrl %  *->n.o Iia.l iliiv>-i IhBl i r ln.r .mi—. >.Mir i ii and limy uii. .-..-•> li'.n IIIKIII on.l ll.-nrt TrmiW'. ADIPII pa cum MMdlag inrtn>t ,i.> •n I* •• %  re Itixuili ..-. I HI thai .|li l-in .In.I ,. Aniomk/iiu.i malio ><>ur maun. %  it. S-. Bnss pexy i My pai (.•*.will be arblocked tiff by enormous lomb of the group" nvinjt to-day from Georgetown, craters or piles <*f debus lln development carried fai Trinidad, Grenada and St. Vinrlcades fo r street fighting still .lose links with' the" Unions 'ha* poUcies which"threaten these must enough and with goodwill can cant From Barbadoa she.will I* barred some "treelJ. been in office for most of the post make industrial peace harder to make the purely advisory con^L^J"*S^-*Wr cked •treelc.r. ^tioT, r 't ifSptfAA'B n "*Tt* Second Battle iSSSiSSTTt^^ ^vS^S^S^L ^Zll\en^ts?A WhTabouTtre^ndbatUe !" F^ ^ ffff?^ C^n^ "'\ IveY ^ronf^S since the war there has been not Here the conception has widened 1 "*;' nLs ?ut "* "f" 1 "" J g e j :"„ "h7 w II I* saiUna nmih ., sweeping or revolutionary but a in two wavs: volopmenl which has its full dan. ish,ew nil* filing I marked and permament swing to (1, ihe Unions' mt-e— is ,„, chance of succew only In a stable, direct to St. Johns. Ne the left in British political opinion. Just which means that at least Labour but on the quantity of goods and will Bu)oy periodic terms of office services that these wages will in the future and also that the command, hence they are concernpolicies of the Conservatives will ed with the effect of Government have to be conditioned I is they economic planning upon the level ilrcady show some signs of being) of pri Ill'III' like prevail. Cyciiat Injured Conclusion Given the prosperity and the Shortly after 2.1a p.m. yetterachievem. nt Of enUghtad and day Everton lioyec. a labourer of social policies the tr.de unions J la M" u Hal • St. Michael. %  are auiliciently responsible to '6">d injuries to his face and adopt their practices and methods hands after he fell from his bito the situation. This attitu-le inJ/fll oh he was riding along ieerec of Government Hill. St. Michael. He was treated at the General and discharged. Tin Ic.n ed he dninkeiily against the sides of buildings. Here and there were wreeke,, M mm. anti-aircraft tnins and the carcases of shot up Tiger tanks. Smnke 'till curl"d up and hunit over the ellv. Tn all appe trances Berlin had absorbed these blows for al' time. —I I* volvcs them nsk l>> ili-.iiiniithiig some of the,. ,, traditional defences and reslrlcV !" 1 .'... tions they I ..-.i-:'!,: ttv But their M, A to the changed circumstances. and (2) the unions interest Is Bottl major parties, again, are not Just in the hourly (or piece) committed to economic policies rate of wages, but in the unnu.ii based on the maintenance of full level of earnings, i.e. in the opemployment lor at leant a high port unities for full-lime work and and itible level of employment) In the question of full employalthough opinions differ as to ment. which side can offer the more This widening of the objective -—. -ei,-,. ""< effective guarantees of that mainintroduces complications. In eoncontinuance of such poiiues. *ney tenance. A high level of employditions of miss unemployment. JW "<> continue. ment undoubtedly favours the when Government act about failure Is certain ir .v unions. Finally, there Is widepolicies of deficit budgeting, publi. Unions refuse to take an spread recognition in Britain toinvestment subsidies to consumers whatever. Any social dec day of the Social importance of etc.. In an effort to promote reTrade Unions. It is almost uncovery Trade Union pressure on thinkable that there should be wages is unlikely to cause an inany kind of advisory committee, fiationary spiral in prices or commission of inquiry or Joint seriously to impede the extension executive board dealing with any of employment, major question* or social policy Full Employment with the Trade Unions being But, with full employment cirHiven in practice, representation cumstances are very different. UP 0 •*> Real inflation becomes a threat. from wheel of the bicycle damaged. their Mr. A M Arthur h D U(i |I ,de i-iiiuxla by ti,|a r \, H !„, „ llrisks matter of balancing one set of risks against the other. Personally. I held an essential r a democrtic society to be the axlstai ) voluntary associations, assisting in the formation and execution Of major policies, and not leaving every thing to the State. Such an idea demands a fundament i) unity thP purpose between the Stale and th. am voluntary associations. di.-.it Chances B the Increased The great changes In soclil and available quantities of good economic policies which have services which rises in wage W) ij ,„, ln( „;,), 0 f me latter t taken place in Britain since the represents cannot be met by m(W .. lh ^, r responsibilities. This war. the difficult International further expansions of employment. f ^u -n -f„,es the trade unions economic position of the country Increases can only be met by inm (r ,. | nilll „ doss any olhcr kinil and the responsibilities imposed creased production or by lower„f organisation. r Hill SM Ml. r.t.1, U ^thur of Vurt... *,.. atavi i-1 npaper REMANDED I-amount Griffith of Brltton's Hill. St. Michael war yesterdav ramandad with bail until Mav 14 bv His Worship Mr. C. L Waluvn. Aiimg Police Magistrate of D trid A %  • i.n .. charaa ..r attemptlng to set fire to the dwelling house of Beryl Down.li. The charge states thai the offence was committed .. I I l211 BBOAO ST and at MAKIM: IIAKIH NHIIOPPIMi I'KNTRi: ANIAMTED OPINIONS SJI. Mr. I.rn Kins | VIII MM KK-I.ION IT ni.lNCi THE KHEETKST TEATToffee The Perfection of Confo. tion MADE IN U.K WALTERS PALM TOFrci iiu PALM WORKS LONDON W 3 MEN'S NYLON SOCKS The Famous "Idol" Brand In Grey, Brown. Blue and Black (cl $1.63 pair VIYELLA Anklets & Hall Hose In Blue. Grey. Brown and Maroon ft 91.79 .Hid $2.12 pair MEN'S ART SILK SOCKS In Plain and Fancy Designs From 44c. fo $1.16 pair NEWSPRINT SPORT SHIRTS The Very Latest Crate In Blue, Brown. Green. Wine and Black . %  mi S13A0 .nt\.iN /Ipp Cave for 2 pcopl'SZ0.00 113.00 Riskrl OtM 'r 2 people 1211.08 S13.0O ; 11 res MAX AN STE \K U : 1 per T


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KIDAY. MAY S. iH2 BAKItADO* ADVOIATK r \i .1 MiRhh TAKING A CHANCE' IN PUERTO RICO P )R SIXTY DOLLARS and the right slip of paper you can win SJ00.0OO in Puerto Rico and not pay a cent in taxes lo the government. You can do this by purchasing the lop ticket in a lottery run by the inland's government. A board of judges chosen by the chief of the bureau of lottery supervises the weekly drawings. Civic, commercial and industrial leaders serve on thi* board. To guard the public, agents selling lottery tickets are bonded TIM drawings are clooelv checked and operate completely by machines—huge coveted cages which -piU out the winning colon .1 1. the weekly drawings coat *J5 centapiece, but to win the $ wo. too MM in December, you must buy a $00 Octet 11 you I i win in proportion to Ihe puna. The lotaar* i i in in U* | I wtfh approximately 25 pe. cent ittag. In 1951, about 70 per cent of the $28,600,000 went tag 4.12.000 was handed out in oomrni-'-ion* to more than 800 agents Ml r.g lottery tickets. Canada Shares Guided Missiles \\ itli U.S.. U.K. OUTI %  I - u V I>\ Made In Britain" moving fast wlll eat product i>u goe up. in h-^i-t t ft nai fta* oete | %  ,,.. of buyer*i or sliding (,4u*tra.iVf best crop: 220 mUiC !" i M-II >I J „ m ,„ 1h r st %  f!l.v under that same old counter ton (,uhels of u-hear 1948-48: - Hwurrni M>II < t .. Like a child echoing the sounds best exports seme year, 131 mil;jr *•" %  < rents, Australia—almost (ion bushels) MAILS U r-r Ike (Irsl time—to-day mouthBven the sausage men have ast eat. Mwi ed a famous post-war Anglo-Saxon 'tepped In, bemoaning ihe fiu-t < >nimi i. ...„,! iust>ril\ that German and garlic s.u It used the word roughly for will go straight off tin market. u < i i. m the same reasons as its mother But the irue picture of Ausits overseas trade baltralia's new austerity is that it is once* were shot to pieces, relatively unreal, laughable and But Australia differed from fantastic—a faint shadow i t the ,n one major respect. Unword as it Is used and known in like Britain, she fed herself—she Britain. As the finance editor of had merely overspent har pocket one leading Australian i>ai*r put It to me: "It is like koin* from a The story of Australia's decline, standard of living that is very hut by no means falL has, as usual, totl to a sUn dard of living that is fairly soft." Backing this view are the tacts that up and down inc Australian coastline, wereh<-uses, The Doctor.Lawyer Am I 7 V Priest Give Their Views (By JAMES I.KASOK) ONV "f ni\ tir.st inht as B newspaper reporter year* in a provincial — till, IMHKIK i ii 1 were n -.ii i inkly. H< photographer oi Lhkl '" "" P*Ctur< in Ihe hope • %  %  ,1 kgj. in.yway, it*n not so b.n i I.II nci. mother was not %  II ... %  %  paper." The photo ma ph. ho longed to a rod hatred Never tell children It won't hurt' Weref tef a .ihikl It */oni *' hurt' Mn %  m. for in ttauivnt When rhlldr.n nnd It bj Untniff Ihetr lajlh in their parent! or doctor || . aM that It may htll that the child should biii.up iriend h p .v ih th< i lulil |i:itn-nlIi' ii'i these ru with children. i them frlendahlp sad %  intefesl md to i %  I md II .us that ,r.' enu nd'Hl \<* Now in afreet 7CA 60-DAY EXCURSI0 Lowest loro* ovnr offered for air travel to CANADA Wnlnlea. Ann .1 -I K I be rlowil • Ml .11 Pared M.i.1 .1 12 %  1 I p m Ordinal.. U*ll *1 JVIII n Ihe Hh Mv 1PM MAIIS l.-t TTinKlMl hv lltr Srti IIFNHV H MALI AI -III XM ClOMd %  I Ihe OMiaial PotX OfRcr M ll I SO p in RrlfCiM Mm' M DM Ml M q IM oho believed that „r was mg Ih. kiddy nut . WHO ....... .,• ,-, rtTI i \HW.K i agre. Pw %  "'"*' ! %  gni %  %  thai !" %  Mill no on with U ftiTh'S OF EXCHANGE sharp background in the wo"l story. In HttK- that specUcub lommodiiy netted Austral WggMgajnytY MAY 8 I NIH Tona w ; chnpir* i ianam Daavaaa haqys for CT mflltoo. In 1M bondhouses and wharves in JJ cheque MM bill this ve.ti wool slid lo an estimated cheque of about £3on million. Meantime, with a currency admittcdlv inflated but free i Beta utacked wiih the goods AtHtraUl has been over-buying from abroad. Sydney men have telephoned Melbourne men in desperation: Can you get us bond for 3.000 cubic feel ? Peter had (Quad ttko picture, years ago. hlok*d Baj .il IQ> back "' .' tii.'M'i it. | his mother: Is that me? and -hi i quickly Ol OOUTM ii'it." And she Ii the picture away. Now l' % %  marry tin daughter of a str r„gtrfi • %  %  .I-.IU.ll)....' I'mpgff wa as llery MM hi : . in. nberi d thai old P %  md wai iinanwouatabl by It. spend, Australian* of all claises otherwise we shall have to retu have gone in for a gigantic buyour rtocks ^ BngUnd." %  "" %£££ ing spree. MM tnvsr Last yeor Australia turned in a Stock* 9 Plenty trading balance f £84 million. Thero QTi bv admlssi o n of I " This year on Prime Minister bU ycrs themselves, millions aid car firms) look Menriess figures the Commonmlliions of clKar ette*--enough lo after falling for wealth was heading for a {740 Mt four w h 0 | P months with ut million loss. importing a single cigarette at What are the prospects for Australia's present smoking rale" Australia in her newly recognised Timber enough 'or a wh-l, rtiutnclal Plight? Immediately of pr|v-le house building at ,,. to the 80 per rent import cut prescn| animaton rates, say JSJ",,, 1 toTp.! f'SX ADA 1'hrq *-• ..I. HW.C :i 7 HI %  Sight Drll. ft I l s> %  with IVler had brought %  ,.., —withooi i nsrledgo along to the office. Could I help? 1 spent a dnat) half hour with old tile*. But when 1 found the Iton II iti>c hit in self.ng nightly wiih ix or seven ( i e f eoc *. He had fallen heavil in/'" a .i '"usinessmen at one of Melbourne's „ nd imocked his head on k la.'' ihav ^' % % %  : % %  • *" %  —• %  —.—— %  •-—, .— i porio i m. M %  of the The charge wai n "! %  —' %  %  .„,. _,„. ,_ ,„ ,„ elude hoiiiiUl and factory bui d,,i„ mC n. n,„. UU1 ScoU vcrd.c %  er major fk w II to to in,„,, C i wh | n , wis s „ ,„„, ,m,M. wheat producllon-an __old hul ,„,.„„„, cxlllr „,, v r ihJm ., %  iiliotograph and rnuKi.1 ', %  q thai ii-bad utoavn iin'iitot .ii-ioi ih tin-. riti>i [| i %  .,. Petei ptaoto* %  fie hi" AII Mn> happened long. ,( nr fa Li %  u.. i .I'M Mielf. d bury the dead, rorwsrd la Ira %  .n In ip bin |D forward lo enjoy I (0101* FOH Australian vital exprt recently none Into disrepair. Hfr -..rood task: to live on imports that she now holds In hand. Meatless Day*? The building trade alree*;foresees nig cut, in hospital and mployment in Australianmade garments will be made good. It la true that many Austral n t'lisiitestmei, believe that the n m import coiiUrole will wMB market, racketeering, selling of gradually diminishing %<** Ithe coanter. Most people i Itkta -i l.ictory construction because of und expect the controls Mill I %  heir dependence on Imported lost long. ement and timber. But generally, Auau-alian lecFarmers are saying that resondary industry has taken a new Fictions n importing vital fenlease of life and share* (with the ing winand wire netting will notable exception of some Dr.tiii Mi, A* the most ruent arrival name ami pati from ErmL.nd I am regarded as rl( (1 d g yin an expen On British (..•. .I. i \ : tved pnassssUy tot our randOKVOUg last night. And Back ..gain in the from ..ll %  IhM httle STOUP did [ wild my callor Uu i in* and ask itaiixlou-'i' %  % % %  bsll C lea?? 1 how Britain was going lo ride Vi n know !**• "' '" %  this latest obstacle that had. so fn .ph. if | tell him the truth regrettably, been pul in her poetsu -aight out and he passes It war way. ^ Hf mnv f t el bound UJ —to aroau cosYfaaan-asaantn (l aancee"* fathsi then the It Well. If vu were I'eU-r'n fH'd -what would you do"-I. I rOg, MI VIIIH ngsWM VOI II lllsllS'.l l-IH i> mm K SAMPSON (1938) LTD. S/V/M r m S ADVOCATE and win S2...0U A I nil SAMK TIME M)U CAN HELP THE i trtvi.if roil fiviivn ei.vo. -.-'.----'-*,*,*,-. %  -' % %  >"?'* %  '* '^^^^^.• r %* t ^^,^^^^^ ^^^^*y^ftf*^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^* t ^^^^^^^''^^A FOR BIGGER '.--o','. -, v*y////, v* -**->o**wHOPPER I0OMT LET HllhlMllISM I #/##*# J\ Cn.UX YOI! Its eosy to Iron yoursell ol troublesome Rheumatic Pains. Simply get a bottle ol BRAITWAITE'S RHEUMATIC REMEDY Talc. II Rjulorl r I S YOI7TJL FEEL RELIEF mm THE FIII.ST HIIITLE I .'.'.-,•.'.-.'.*-'.--'-'',-.*.'.',-.^00*'.. BICYCLE THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. Wl Park Hoacl Sf. Mirharl Officr: 4326 M,T, liaiiili-. : 452H Workshop : I.VIIi 4S0 B.-,V.V,V.-,'.-.V.'.' CROPS TRY THE NEW LIQUID MANURE LIQUINURE Kimd of %  ...'In. Ii nutrient nl i), in rorrei t WHAT IB IT? Uqulnurc la a Iaiqui iTK.rrr,.".-: i oncrnt r .,'. l< in all the easentl.il plan) and in, lenv Uoa Whi-ii diluted with MQ la z..wo folumaa t w..i. and purpose, it asstlo ; liquid manure, greatly rs41abed i ill growing plants. HOW IH IT U8EI>' Uquinurn la only used in gicat dilu%  -i applied to gn provlding them with food and drluK al itnaanaS I .o H I tii R teaspoonsful (" to 2 'ableapoonsful ' lbs fluid are put 1m BfMarJL in a can. according t" dlr--lions on the -A I.I 1*1. WHAT IM>E IT DOT Uquld Manure made from Uqulnurc fertility of thf bnll of soli en* losing the main roots to any desired You aagt tngka ago; plant i n any %  Oil gniw fast or as steadily as you llkt. oMala iirst class result* without difficulty, and in the hands of the '. Mar Uqutattn %  :i>,i nl f II..; %  tiveness. UONOMV A |l M 1-8 cations Liquid \OH .XV.Ml.MILE FOH FLOWIt AMI YEliETXHLE U\HIIE\S AT THE (OIIXEII STORE



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PACii im i: HVKIIVIMIADVOCATE I'KIUAY. MAV . IKS wAposj^Am. tnat i weal to tne •evenday rcunum it cuiil> IWN in Moscow. My brief-case ws peeked wile oners, Aim i sold ui HUUIIIW su.uuo wooilru sneepsKins at £ 1 each, enougn to %  * p my factory working lor llv* week*. The bargaining was hard, but the price was right. From ihe start I stuck lo my gum and spoke straight business language. So did Kaplin, head of Moscow's buying and selling organisation. And Andrianko. head of the Kutsum traUv mission in London. The Russians were well informed. They knew the value of every related article In SW trade. They knew e%'cry producing centre in England. Europe and America. Once Kaplin and Andrianko suggested prices had dropped -i per cent, since my arrival. I said I hail taken that drop into account. -, Negotiation'' lasted (our days. Then we settled the deal. When 1 was away from negotiating 1 wasted no time at the "working groups" where so much propaganda ballyhoo was hurled about. I rubbernecked my way through Moscow. No smart women strolled the boulevards. There WSS nothing, chic about them, whatever their standing in life No smart dresses or fur coat*. NO h.ni 'I"'*. Just roughly made sheepskin coals and second-rate footwear. THE FACTORY And The House I SAW where some or those shoes were made. It was the I'.n i COBUBAUM Moscow's largest shoe factory employing 7,000 workers. THE DUTCHMAN (By K. M. MacCOLL) WASHINGTON. YOU may sometimes get the impression that Congressmen are a bunch of rampaging ehaps who ride roughshod over poor quivering characters called to testify before one of those teeming investigating committees. Well, in point of fact, the Congressmen often feel as frustrated as a refrigerator' salesman in northern Greenland. One of the biggest frustration-causers they have ever encountered is a retiring figure with a gravel voice named Henry "The Dutchman" Grunewald. Again and again has the Dutchman's name cropped up in the tangled skein of inquiry into corruption which the law-makers have tried to unravel. This 59-year-old Grunewald has appeared befujre the Congressmen four separate own—to performances of "Madam times. No use. All he has told them has been Butterfly" and "La ^Traviau/' his name and age. Address? But no. Occu-' patlon? Come now. < Connections with various business men in] PLASTIC PROPELLING PENCILS LONG LEAD, SCRIPTO PENCILS, BREAK PROOF 18c. end. • ADVOCATE SI VIIOM IIV oiuii i uo anything to **vc us from the Japanese who were uui real i ill miss The thing u simply raise." Ihey said. And 1 lold my Russian conductor^ It is " could lend Itself it eyirlh-nt propaganda! Mi Glad Mom — can prevail si this spitii of religious ferTHE CHAPIX —all is not lost JUST once 1 was moved to a feeling that all is nM lost in tinGodless society that Stalin has cr ee l ed. We went lo a "Baptist" chapel. Every inch was picked with 1,200 worshippers. There was an upsurge of welcome and love. The service went on for two and a half hours. We were given a Bible printed in 1926. No Bibles bud been printed since then. HARRY SCOTT STOKtS """V ** ,d ' w %  touching gltt. ., ^M #-i, < >in K. Fur Bib.es cannot be bought. UK Is Mayor of '' % %  "J"?>. Nul „ vpr] ... h negaUon of Somerset own with a pe-aie^ ^ ^^ ^^gj )n(o a m'V rnZcin. dlrert*r l *+* <* vernment l. II. iii's. with 190 rmplo>ee*. Hi: K a (fujler aged 55: a former .ubaltern wM. a World War 1 "' pVTr M.C.: and a World War II SMB.TIIK PANIC pany commander in Ihe I lube ol —nnd the wny out Wellingtons Keitlment. UNHEALTHY, imprnonm HE to a one-time Liberal, now individual opinion is strungnm. rum-political, but a member of Huasian polltiial clevelopmem. the local Tor* club. Make no mistake about HE to a Winchester Heheol-boy. Russia is a Police Stale. It is spy"wlio In those happier, pre*ridden. Men and women spy on prrous, laiy days befor* 1914 then own people and strangers By British standards il was sought a classical education and alike. pitifully equipped. I employ 45 n tnielleclual life." Even our interpreters worked women to every 55 nun. Then* %  for the intelligence service. I the ratio was above 75 women of 100 flats. There was a store on g n ow. My mall was read. 10 25 men. the ground floor. But I was not But they ate in %  | Where were the men.' In Ihe allowed lo see any d elling in reached that conclusion after army, many of them—those who occui days of talks and visits. weren't killed in the war. However, four miles from the And they have the same fear Shabbily drewd women, feet Kremlin and 400 yards off the Franca had after 1918the fear bulging from tattered shoes maun lucent Gorki-street I saw ot „ n other attack from Germany, worked eight-hour shifts. some slums—about as mean as A remote fear no doubt. They said: "Everything here anything I have ever seen outHow can a buaine*J man's conIs perfect." I replied: "What *lde the while riverside slums of sc icnce be reconciled with all about cleaning the windows and Tennessee. this' I say that free exchange repairing the floors"' There were little wooden houses of lrade W(ll a „ moro IO cut uul A laugh greeted this. "But built in the middle of last century. thc jamming stations and the hidIt doesn't need an expert to tell Snow beat In through thc illden mtcrcphonea than all the us thai," they said. lining doors. pious resolutions ot the intellect"No. but you don'! do it." 1 THE THEATRE ual pncillst. pointed out. -—angry Chines* 1 came back from Moscow with It was hopeless to get beyond ONCE on my travels | lost my a full order book. Of that I am that Soviet stubbornness and astemper, I was taken lo "Red Popproud and pleased. It will keep sumption that because it was py," a ballet of China's history my i>eople in work. It will Hu-sian and Slalin-lnsplred it was since 1927 and her "exploitation a poor nation something towards the best. by the British and American imher low standard of life If that is an example of workperialists." Maybe moro of ii will help kill ing conditions, now then do they Then ihe finale—salvatior by that panic nnd fear which grip the live* th 0 Russian"! The Chinese were Communi-l leaders. One building I saw was a block even angrier than I w: "They • —L.I Our Header* Say; fM Riftht Ifipnmrh In Birth Control To rhe Editor, The Advocate— SIR.—Kindly grant me u little never hope to reach that high The Chairman has made no sugspiritunl and mental level so congestions for the immediate duelve to Self Central. I'erhnps provement of the domestic supply Ihese advocates, who are neither situation, such as rationing and %  practical, nor realists in the true ihe temporary withdrawal of space In your newspaper to slate a sense of thc word and who have renl Ior advertising purposes durfew facto in connection with this already mahadl mil much to be lnB ,nc pci k no1 "*. lh' s being in question of Birth Control, which ^..-i*-,* -^,,1 ,„ Ltf hi ha nar.iari#fi ,m >I*oIon of secondary imporhas been so widely discussed of f„ m ? lr u ?,' '** r E,' QC d ,ancc and nci ^* ln *'there ate; some of vour correnDondenL"'^"" %  P"'r niiiguiden „ w dw ,pread discontent about have put forward some sound SfTf, ,h f SS W i?*" 0 5 [ ,h '" The Corporation to comviews, as to why Bhth cJntVol *ta aU IlKi .Uorbing subjec-t; and ^i,^ by law to IuppIv curren t %  houia be practised, others not so the "\ y f" t o ^""f ln cl " $* domestic uses, under the Orpound o f people in the Island would endinance. and their 10 unit agreeBarbados today has a popotoJ oy the .unique reputation as ment is a breach of their in-.. r< tion of roughly 220,000 souls of this number :i large portion m.idle most of ih. time It )a known Soir t nll l > 8 definitely not the that there is not sufficient employeclution to Ihe over population ment to nbsorb the greater portion l r,,l > ,on . We have only lo take a of the working classes. What to to € vllclt Blance Hi the population be done then.' Thc world that we r lni ''land to appreciate the S living in *.oday is no dream 'a*' 1 why it i* not So. The middlo fn ? ... world, and hard conditions call for an d upper classes who through practical measures. Mankind has lno years have been and still arc hrea will, but also has reason and practising either birth control or coalmen sense and if he does not to a lesser extent self control, are apply those ;it Hmes. well then he very much in the ininorily. the \ raUM deserve whatever slew he lower classes (to whom the wid JJj"|" leaders of the Self Control Docin the essential requirements the inhabitants of the Colony. Thanking yot| for space. Yours faithfully, "FAIRPLAY". .1 VSJJMIM*) (he Adrocafe. SIR. I shall be grateful if you will publish Ihe -follow Our Readers Say." Thc problem of catching a bus nl all tune* a difficult one and being git-utly aggravated b> found himself in. majority can hardly be termed the number of'achool children Mirth Control or Family Planappropriate) huve been practlsMi who accentuate the congestion l>v nlng must be practised in Burbasomething, but it can hardly be taking an early bilk in thc dOB, if aiSSSIer IB lo be avoided in called birth or self control. Some mg* and a late bus in the evenLnS near future. It is the only way through ignorance, look askance ings. instead of that provided lor Of keeping Ihe population down to on birth contrSJ, others probably th a level where it can be decently have never heard of 11, nnd ihe Alr fed and clothed emigration whole can never aspire to such n .Jk PavnTs l l2^2? would help a great deal, but it is „ lofty practice as "Self Control" SgKHgfL ^Mt^S^^t not on an operational basis at To save this Wand from hun{Snot buses .. vMuUtaes.* !" PCt at K r-r. D0erty. unemployment, and chilX.i and' v { hSi taSs. \ i the self control part all Ihosc unhappy relal.ons of SilltUmeV half amoto whue ll '. ,1 q,,Ml,on uc kVd with that th,average man or woman birth control for the masses, and children on their way to and ever practiced it in any form, and ftsevs elf control for Ihose higher from school. I think the lndiviilu.il would find rpintual beings in our midst belt a Little beyond his or her power fere we have an even more terriEveryone knows that the bus of control. If tested on this very ble control in the shape of "Naproblem ha Washington? 1 say, you chaps. Did you call %  0 sflsleX) on the telephone on such-andsuch-a-date? What makes you think I know how to use a telephone? Finally Congress arose tonight in its wrath and, by a vote of 332 to nothing, indicted "The Dutchman" for contempt. In Decaturville. Tennessee, they find a pair of trousers which belonged to a man killed by a tornado 50 miles away last month. Thc wind had blown them all that way—with a wallet containing £142 in the pocket. Senator Tail wins his most resounding | victory yet in a State popularity poll. And Eisenhower puU> up his feeblest showing. The State is Illinois, heart of the Isolationist Mid-West. And with three-quarters ul the returns counted this is the position :— Taft (Mr. Republican). 73 per cent; Mr. Harold Stassen, 13 per cent.; General Eisenhower—whose name was written in by voters—11 per cent. There is anger—and a determination tc investigate—in many parts of the nation over a command for a mass parachute drop in big war games which have been going on near Fort Hood, in Texas. Two 'chutists were killed and nearly 200 badly hurt because the drop took place in bad conditions. But a general and a colonel who ordered the exercise say they are "wholly satistied." A cinema in Washington took a poll among its regular patrons on whether they liked or disapproved of pop-corn. By 95 to 1 they said they loathed the sight, smell and taste of the stuff. Encouraged by this, the management not only threw away its pop-corn selling machines, but started a new policy of reviving "intelligent" films of the old days. Results—massive business, while all other cinemas are complaining of pint-sized audiences. Talking of pop-corn, that is one of America's allegedly edible products which alway: gives me nausea. Others I place in this class include salt water taffy (which tastes lik cotton waste soaked in brine). Philadelphii scrapple (pure fatty degeneration of something or other), hominy grits (a sort of poor man's rice), and corn pone (the worst bread you ever tasted). The human touch: Investigating Congressmen wax sarcastic over the high rate of illness among witnesses in the income-tax scandal inquiry. No fewer than 15 men whose presence is requested are sudden laid up with ailments ranging from low blood pressure to high. RESTLESS GHOST A TUDOR well in the garden of Abbas Hall, Great Cornard. Suffolk—Britain's most haunted house—is to be excavated in ar attempt to lay the ghost which is said l>\ villagers tu haunt tho 14th century building The digging is lo be undertaken b> American GIs stationed on l*akenheath airfield near by. The owner of the hall, Mr. Cecil Wells. : Sudbury solicitor, has given his consent. The well. 40ft. deep, was filled with rub ble many years ago, MIDNIGHT SEANCK Now a London medium who held a midnight seance in the liousihits reported regrad h ually ,he berij Ce,vin 1 a MpirU mesM K e ,u ,he efTecl thal xed question of the moment, it lure Control," a Nature "whose B" ln 8 worse, for even at normal the ghost is connected with human remain would be asking a little too much balance when thrown oul make. Um f* jj ,s ;'"'ull to secure a which w|U be t mu a the bottom „f tne ;•' "" '"e no hesitation in re-adjusting Ii re*" ,n '•" %  "d ihe school There is a way whereby one can gsrdless of the consequences. S'JSj," .h^ ?"" n0lhln, t0 so furify and raise ones nnlure to If an epidemic or pestilence !rwT J,v, ,_ %  ,_ a level of Cosmic consciousness were to hit this Mat* birth con^SchThe^^^ where the qwettoa of sex eeegee I'd, self control or anv other ZjESr K2L iZ?lT~£!&Jl Utffih.H' hum -r'r* n i 1 lh '* '"" <* control wou.d not help f !" %  mis^rp.i?^ can't P thJ W S is the hard wav and will raise the us, and each and everyone of us remedied question of Self Control again know this only too another bus which I wish to avoid at this final stage of my letter. WFI.L WISHER Hirih Cmminl To The Editor, The Adrocat SIR.—For sometime now I have rent intcrv lv en reading wttr .if interest tertee of i against birth control. But Ihe only Yours faithfully. NEMESIS. I'liwlricity To rhe Editor. The Advocate, sin. i refer ... with Cap! w A. A P rt ,r,irn * d '~; a great deal Brown of Ihe Barbados Electricity inconvenience* afforded t, letters for and Supply Corporation published on '''* I'^P'e. .1 .* gppallmi 2nd Inst. The express purthe children n,.h!qg frMr. Wells told me to-day: "I gladly gavt my consent for the excavations. I am not a believer in hauntings, but thc house has now attracted such notoriety, that nothing can be providedi along crowded [would please me more than for the 'ghost' routes tor thesi children I Teach, %  era and parci.U can co-operate to be laid. to see that the children are made lo catch the buses provided for them and Una;/eTieve the cram. have been getting an average of six letters I ,i day from people who wish to spend a night hop.it|u : fort and workSIX LKTTERS A DAY "Since Abbas Hall came into the news I ::;;:'„:;: :ss ; : sa^t s ftS?* >B ' t l ^ *• psyc, cal re,warch worke ", ,1. V,,1 Z „' v .mtmZ ""• p blic l '" 11 "" Bl '"Uustcd. tolOT. 11 ch.Mrcn we,,, mad. who lias boon active at Abbas Hall told me: S^ipST' '" "" ETSS %  •JSHL'tf &.* %  %  SAXtirZ SE ""We U-Hovo that bone, in be found ,. 0.1 puieiy through religious prtnci, hn tnrrr ,. |U (M „„ i mrr ,e pe ace *' lasl — %  *"*. 9m\ LIQUINURE A Highly Concentrated Liquid Manure C S. PITCHER & Co. Ph. 4472 WHY NOT CONSERVE VALUABLE FOOD? in siiiiMs milntii/i run i 9I2.S.OO — w Ml Mil l FROM STOCK — * I OSI i y CO.. I III. % %  •Ue-gel. Thin man is completing a deal on Golden Grade —a safe bet to yield hiyh returns in lonit-vvcaring -S smooth-fltting and comfortable apparel. GOLDEN SUIT Hand Tailored by /• SUMRIE of England nnd sold by: Da Costa U Co., Ltd. ill Ml MIU K MOTIIIR ON MOTHER'S DAY St'NDAV. MAV IITII wrrii A BOX OF CHOCOLATES Special* 1'i.Mirr.l Mustard .25 prr lUttle Gulnneu Stout .32 per bile. Maeoronl .39 per pkc Chase A. Simborne Coffee \l •>•' & SI00 ir 'in I'iiipir.' Cofee SI iO per I lb. phi lir, --.,1 Tripe .32 per lb. Orrwd HibbiU .42 per lb. Boxrs of Chocolates Slics 1 lb. lo 3 lbs. Carr's Bbu-ult* Asat. Ir. Tin* APats. Carr 1 <"ream Craehers SI.20 per tin C'arr'n Swret BL-.rulu .36 per Ii eag. f'hurchmin'o flxarrltes Rmbaasy Clc are ties S!i..|. l (.OIlAIUIS n.fr.sh


PAGE 1

PAGE EIGHT B.F.F.A. Beat Police 3—1 RAKRAUOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. MAY %  UU KM r ur-oid WHY PLAY CRICKET? Controversy Surrey's Jack Parker fto Inner* the Rewards ami Keyiv ed lluzanh (mil r'orgrlling th,Corn*} imih Rrguitu TKI Tvi.ti. Kegatta of the will be salted in Carlisle Saturday, May 10 al 2.30 t>m. The Handicap limn are a* MOOVH! -POB IIA1 nil sporting cofiI.IV as descendants of a proud %  %  %  imed. Uliiriilaj %  I barok battles u% %  %  oarsmen of Canada and JOHN KKKUKKICK PAHKEH. a fpnhtly 14^ stone. Par ten the family man ha* sprang nut of !i %  I i on legs that will be 30 years stabed Uttl. a* 12-hour day* old on UW *M of this month, and made his ilrat move !" robbed'hlrn of the towards the new cricket season—his 22nd and last with patenuii pleasure of watching hiSurrey at Kcnnington Oval. I lera grow up. His first move? Al th %  decodes wai shaken from the thousand tha iiu't of knoddai lha romance 1 have to n peel mat Jack Parker. Idol of 10,000 an 00 his way %  not. %  a %  l sjVW "^1 rthout two minute* after 1 %  %  IWll Into %  It F.K.A. 1 food foi1 %  ace between, the minstrels singing 1 Fishermen 1 1 and a Thamaa fou 1 Ixmdon. England 's praises — eulogising the • gentlemanly leg glide Th.%  re ih.ni si 000. Seventy years ago I oarsman ipanad th and returned homes. Ind tic* dynr I the Thames ere nielphia Pa. gentlemanK rhapsodising over awin . ., Ittna ip d headlines. But DOfM Of there songsters, so far as I •d upon hat they ,f Ptosaic subject of cans A lifetime Yet, says Jack Parker. A lifeline among The tl.OOO amount was second ihr runs and wickets, no IIKTS of the cricket professional can ..1. with afl his unf inuinphs U. their crcdii derpinning. Without reg.greed that second place wasn't ular 'fggVg^ "colS..... Kent—and at least go the award. They hurt that la bring bach lop • so more by a decision of the id goal again "*•. w, "> relegated them %  ; spol when thrv : that thy had to get mon ivon. Uon. had bMD wiipuj v.v. 528; , > had louled the n | B f c i[ ow -professionals all over nd Mckad Ihis ball hi sacond-Cl n is hln sj Lxmdoncrs. the country get down Hi Ben %  %  lull '. agreed xnni KOIIQ |n^ *ii ^ %  a~ -cough led to fore< %  *** %  ?" % %  "W* I"'"* 11 n th* -.ward combining well 11 Sou. .ason visit to the chiropodist, the men who give us our cricket would %  .iv the five months' course from May to September. 1 -1 iif?PT" week plus £1 per day match x 'iheir bats, lightly oiled aU8j^ onev for .. clUD ann srou „, winter, are ready for runs Their wcr# 1U ppieinenicd by winter adrafc flannels are laundered, ihelr boots vr ,. Iuref „ newly spiked, their bMt m:ide roadmakei kable To-morrow Parker and Australia. debits to record. Parkei %  .. .isays, "we had to gnmllr with our future To-di>y £400 a ye tr If he makes lha 'irst team that sum, and even In m %  • ship's writer and as winter coaching Test players C;IP and dockworker In <'*" %  "P o £2.000 a year." After zi yean In 1 la. Ms *"*' set al tlM %  Word t ss VU"* I> PM.r PS* Hi SU 3 M D n BkSkMSM s a> fagss* 11 n n i' DIM MorJ RUIr Rfttc.l i. T 1 M a*d 11 i" gsssMN Ol IV* BhHKIfTt Vm Taaniiki s ss YIW>w 0 D 7 DhMes SinbM 1 ss IUd H I MtMtilel HurrtrMw t 41 Yelln* n Gipv s w Red 1 %  Sklp> S 48 YaOr>* 1 t"v-.l-r %  ase S 44 Has 1 • 11 Pawa 1 %  vritow K s as Baa 1 is %  %  s et Yllo Mih RM'iia *iurdsy. lIUi Um>. THIS 19KW FI.XK gfilifW IXCI.II0ES!— will I i POPI.lv 31" BLi'K A BKIOE 11" *e nru.F. onir Ji" e KHAKI HH1KTINO 17" .11 M.I SIIIKTING 11" I STRIP* 119 sTTuri: w • Si.04. *?r. A nv. ifc. We. 11.10, 11.M A 'M.., 1 Ilr. — ALSO — PLAIN I. RH " ldr .1 1.1 w Wl wlUMr lur Rllht WMI. Cave Shepherd & Co., Lid. 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street the "But cricket got ma m the end. lie left "corner of the LV B r F had Miri 1 1 The teams were: — Police: Hayn.es, Thompson. Marshall, Warner, Griffith. Trotman. Banfleld. Cadognn, Taylor. Franklyi. gBdl D B.F.F.A. Pindar; Hayd< Denny. PhiUliM Linton, Jottaa, McColin. Thorne .: wood. The leferee was Mr. O. Graham. The tttdfas reversed Ihc final ^f loosening limbs and flexing f D i gjm Hist money to the gers at the nets. tJig.nh craw. Then—war vtood. despite w j, y do they do it? What %  tests and a raaolution than lha man %  adopted bv the committee govmakes it his career 1 lha regatta, stating Ibal itIt was to get answers to these of %  eeuritv for Kathleen. th> thai waa t l om that I went to see Jack he married 12 years ago, snd the, r C.rkei I found him in Surreys daughters Susan (eight! See be9ftUf [minted dressins-room at Christine (four and a half). Lcket got nic in the end, Psrker has no .. and I went willingly." he says, look back on his over-all batUnj %  hanct: of a Al I *>l in 23 Innings ogalnu N It kg) GreiSftda To „ County CounciUor William Smith '?_* %  .?* Iti-trntt-r Cdrk Tain ****?**& S^ggj 3K? oil S ipid six y e.n urize should he aeeepted at kp| n lcal lrjllmilI lllS trurtor in the l " Royal Air rorce., "I gave up the class lob with a wool firm In touring sides; his 2*5 agin Sydney to come back to Surrey." island his six lor 28 again-t iThat decision has brought reDerby: his acrobatic n.-. • %  %  DO ward, Parker atlmits to a mode [ more than 300 ratehes: the fact prospecl art he has never been dropp-c -ince Surrey Rave htm his count> ego in 1*36 He has shaken hands with the King. He nUv ertckal %  likes It. WOHID rnpYsiciir an i By GEORGE WHITING His uwn Parker is known on the Count> The incident brought heated grounds as the most proficient Th ,.„ j^acbed glx-roomed conlroveray lor several months player who never attained tnr uihouse ,„ Bendon Road. Bromley, %  itually it was forgotten. " f 0 ^ of a crt a P r ~ n Is their own recently acquired dormant until Halifa* Kngland cap in n Tekt match^ pruvfn Tht> lax rree C5>wff (He .was packing his bag to pln> hc colle cted from his benefit India in 1MB; then he ag ninM Middlesex last prize should he accepted at Z£ZX 22JEAJ5L2E!***1 •*& ,n VM,td b > Sur l'A/?l \KNYOtS last. Smith's Halifax Cricket Series ; fathc (From i • ST Ql Grenada Is tc re-enter Windward [si it! the Cork Cup aeries. During the recent [nier-Sehool. TournaT" '"' %  ' l "" ler "f f. Oramm.! B d, bUl that he of the Dominica Sports Assoclahad lodged claim on the group' th r late Wairen raj one of the :i and had thi i ontravan I tl m < ul As oflti i nan lor lha lUma Nova Srntlftn principal guar.n, Winler couching, including An honest Miss ninnv flHGE*"FIRE TOUCHES YOU/ UN6UF.NTINE QUICK A MODERN ANT TUBES fo. ciraar rea ly began when -^STtrtTtotLi Wevt iodie'' mhm k ed how he Wl about %  wns i boy St BsttersJe Central ^7" oed'tic > -k oa -rail P" > ln '" *" t? *$> inXri School 24 years ago Thev picked him to lead South Lomlr gtMli .,t t( 1( Oval. £3 a week Hearing the evening of swashbuckling cricket i has hit more than 10U Surrey since the war — Parkei has read widely, taught himself All-round promise as batsman. French and Spanish, and will bowler, ami even wlckct-keeptT POOH !• ptVparUU lor new conBttractad the att. ntion of Ernie quests as a solid business man. Hayes, the Surrey coach, and at Present plan %  asri od Scotland W tion In assuring Grenada that his behalf for tt>"* seeoctd-piaea praa>. \% p ;iI ker (|uit his modest )ob in with his father-in-law in BatterIsland was prepared to bury alto>jhe money has rested in a a shlppinc office for a Job as H sea—making protective clothing .. % %  I the ion|. (t ink rett Unoa cricketer. Summer wages of £'J for industrial workers. dent which brought the IM1 lour t||i| iV to an abrupt close durtng tlvi Grenada final Quaan'i Parsi i%  suppression by I tr Of June IM9 in made an this, dis. Dominica ind willing to forget the ki %  unlikely ent to the its month if ., HI %  Uon Empire Lightweight rule LOW 0 %  to light Cliff A Qul tha ft&i i 1|IU I'orthoawl on J the Smith anticipated that limount would subsiantlally -I "IKI DOW, beguM "' geumulated Intswaal 0"*t* 'he pW Sparto Window LAST year's First Ivl%  -i"ii the First Division—Mod mi High School—at Basket Ball to-night at the Y.MI'C. The match la expected to be exciting, eapeelally an there will be school rivalry and boys (mm the two school* will he present to encouraer the players. In the other match, t tr. %  will meet Pickwick. In the Second IHrfatlon Foundation will play St. 8C.LB. at the Garrison. L.S.S.—Boys' Club at District A and J.SJI.S.—Spartan at Harrison College. It May Be Trainer Thrale's Best Year For Winners UCHABD BAIKMIN ThruuKh the yens Pt Thrali Il pr I Krratesl yvarlinf; judges In 11 %  iiam U< it i i ihihoio c ycrirlliuts in IMS bi i TIIIM aOO gun !. . while mis year's ejj dfdate, Khor-Mouss coat < r.l 1050 guineas. In view of the results it is not surprising tl f.ire the ability o| '!,. be aaataaad. what is impo I ihey w all bought at reasotuill. I l hrrr (ben u ally the pick of thl He 1' .'1' well but in IX.II Heller to tell its inevitable talc, but only th< rncecourse can prove this, for In his box Three I n n blggor lorea man ba was WEATHER REPORT YFSTERDAV Rainfall from (odriusloii: Nil. Total rainfall for month t date: .20 In*. Highest Temperature: HN.U I Lawest Temperature: 73..S Y Wind Velocity "J mileBOf hour. Barometer; (9 a.m.) 30.01G (S n.m ) 29.92*. TO-DAV Saarlse: 9.40 a.m. Snnael: 6.16 p.m. Moon: Full. May 9 Lighting: 7.00 p.m. High Tide: 2.58 a.m 3.52 p m Uew Tide: 9.45 ajn 9 4* p.m WHATS ON TODAY Court of Ordinary 11 a.sn. Lower Courts and Court nt Appeal 19 a.m. Annual Meeting. Bible Society. Empire Theatre 5.90 p.m. Rehearsal of "Twelfth Night" nt British Ctounrll 5 p.m. Basket Ball— 2nd Die. at Harrison. Modern High School and Harrison Colleg* 5 p.m. 1st IHv al Y.M.P.C. 7.30 p.m. Police Band at Ilaatlngx Racks H.ee p.m RrttWh Council Films 8.15 owners are only too keen Etts aid. i %  lna seaaon tht* %  a record number in the Iftga promises to be Thr.h greatest > e a r There old Khnr-Mousa he.ul tht ye it-olds | n il I as alread j tng when wtl D the Ascot mile. ii one of the few two-yearblab M an two-yea olds of last season who k* depended upon to stay lln Work llelrl Up Al present the tWO-yi I 1 hO will be there n-e man aes.kwstiU than ui i an I tile heavy ram of the M ttctk have further held up Iheir work. There are aotna well-bred ones ammig them, mcluo'inj' two OOltl ii I'ei % % %  ..?! Cnlf. named The Cydaris and Saaaanlsn Manarrh. and Marslon Magna, a .-on of I'ren | illation, Tw, of the hllici aie b> tht St Le>ger winner, Chamoasalre, but it will be a few weeks besr Plseagda I us a twoi R i.ay his way. Mam sea yoar-old i later of %  %  bel re in ii i %  o Lincoln in • handle,))but plans may now have %  lO the w.i:erlogged state M tin gallops —L.K.SBarbados Advocate mrd J i % %  to the tint persuu who sends the correct answers to the fwlluwmg >ii.' -I" I CRICKtT. Name aa> player who reprctnilcd Iturbados. 1'rinidad or Brttlalt Uuun.1 In thr prewar Triangular Cricket Tournaments w h o made "spectacles" In my one of Hi. mies In these serif*. %  i. FOOTBALL. Oil a player rar> Ihr ball in his hands over the goalline, under thr cross-bar ami between the two goalposts and set score a goal? 3. RACING What is thr minimum weight Hut cin be imposed aa Tap weight In a Barbados Turf Club Handicap Rare? 4. WATER-I'OLO Can a goal-keeper stand an the bottom for the purpose of defending his goal ? 3. TABLI II >1VI hat are the measurement* of a Table Tennis bat. according I* the l-*ws of Ihe Came ? NUTF. : All entries for "Sports yuit" should be addressed "Sports Quls". c/o Advocate Sporta Fditer, and must reaeh this ofti> %  by 12 noon on Saturday. May 10. The correct answers and the name of the winner will be published In* the Sunday Advocate Of May 11. nil rntry must be accompanied by A COUPON H Set out below. SPORTS Ql'IZ ll'tf* rdM supply /rom Htnehm CRITTALL STEEL SLIDING FOLDING DOORS THE IDEAL DOOR FOR VERANDAHS The Whole Door slides and folds to one side. Supplied in two Sizes ... ,__ With 4 leave. — •' t" wWe %  V *" MB With 6 learea — 9' 3" wta> X V V high CRITTALL FRENCH DOORS V 9" wMe x V V high CRITTALL STEEL WINDOWS Various widths and hetghta with or without Ventilators. THE MODERN WINDOW FOR THE MODERN HOME You pay no inoro for the GREATER EXPERIENCE PARADISE BEACH CLUB NOTICE TO MEMBERS Under Rule 34 Ihe Club will be CLOSED to Members on Saturday. 10th May, 1952, from 8 pjn. until 7 a.m. Sunday, I lth Mcy "/'AA — that's one reason why this airline has been "first choice" o* inlama* llonal travelers for nearly e> quarter of a century. MEW YORK b i tbi In in i Ian lij pogiulnr, iiKHiev-ov lna *TI Turi.t.. EUROPE %  I doable decked "Sirato" Clippers"-wild irhaen -to Pari. Rom %  I iii !' I %  I \ \\t lippeii alto H> lolndttod th* Orieat Venezuela 1 ftf** t.i nil Mli cRRt by *ill Cocvair-type Clippers. You can now "fly FAA" sin where — in Ijct, to SI %  and colonies on M* continent'. rcarrrafit'int, are yovr Trntrl Agrnf or WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. €. B. Ricefc Co. PAN AMERICAN tl-iffi/l AUtMAYS Da C :-.J 4 t• Lid Sr*d iff I ~ Sndo"0I -*-. 1131 (AfSf b^.r.l. ho„. 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ESTABLISHED 1895





Demands For His
Release Ignored

TOKYO, May 8,
_ Communist prisoners on Koje Island were reported to-
— oe ae eens tb seed Nations Camp Com-
nera. ‘ Bs ee i 7 t
holding Liner hieane Report said they were
t was authoritatively | ists
took General Dodd captive Fy ee oh eet geemeneen
Koje, is the island where two bloody riots involving
Seen prisoners of war occurred in February and
An official statement is expected within a few hours.
Koje island is Southwest of Pusan main port ‘is South
Korea. On Febru: 18, 1,500.prisoners attacked their
Seetaans — oo — = eee wire flairs
fe 's were a 1 i .
ale Pjur ; n prisoners and 23
COMMUNIQUE

_. An Eighth Army communique issued to-day from Koje
island said: “Brigadier General Francis Dodd, United Na-
tions Commanding General of prisoner of war camp Num.
ber One on Koje Island was forcibly seized by Communist |
prisoners of war and is being held in camp against his will.
A demand for his release unharmed has been ignored
by Communists. “General Dodd with another officer was
conferring with Communist leaders at the gate to one of |
the compounds at about 15.15 hours local time May 7. With- |
po hg . — ao seized and forced into an
osure © P ners. The seco:
mode his 'y _ ~ nd officer escaped and
“General _



of Tallahassee, Florida was overpow-
ered and held munists. A note has been meatvad
in General Dodd's handwriting stating that he is unharmed.
Efforts are made to effect the release of General
Dodd, There are no other details available at this time.”
_ Until full details were available it was believed here
that fear for General Dodd’s safety had prevented troops
from effecting his rescue. It could not be ascertained im-

mediately what Communist pri i
io is ak Wee ee prisoners demanded in return

SURREY 219°:
AND 151 FOR 8:
INDIA} 158 Threaten Peace

LONDON, May 8, WASHINGTON, M
Surrey with two second innings| President Truman on’ a ct.
wickets to fall led the Indianjenth anniversary of Victory in
touring cricket team today by 212
runs at the close of play after a
keen struggle on the second day
of their match here.

The Indians were,outeim their



Attitude Of U.S.
Cougress Might





















Farnum For
Finland Fund

THE Fund to defray the ex
penses of ace cyclist Ken Far-
hum to the Olympic Games in
Helsinki next July still urgent*
ly needs your support.

Donations are accepted at
Barelay’s Bank, the Royal
Bank of Canada, and the Office
of the “Advocate.”

Goal . $2,880.00
Amt. Prev. Ack $ 757.68
Treasury Staff .... 7.68



Total
Conservatives Plan
to Denationalize

Trucking Industry

e LONDON, May 8,
Britain’s Conservative Govern-
ment announced plans to de-
nationalize the trucking industry
and to aid nationalized railways
in competing with it. In their
Paper the government promised











riety esa dhbbioaiee

| W. Germany
Rises From
War Ruins



By JOSEPH W. GRIGG
BERLIN, May 8.
years
1,000
to final

Seven
Hitler
crashed

ago
year

smoking
secmed
hop.
As V. &.
the

Day
Free

Bells peale
World Nas

througtrout

Field Marshal Wilhelm Keg
later to die on the scaffold
Nuremberg signed the Wert”

macht’s total surrender here
Berlin 48 hours after the earlic
ceremony at a little red schof
house at Theims., |
Berlin was dead, Germany wr*}

dead. Its big cities were boml

shattereq rubble heaps. Its it
dustries were smashed. It we}
without a Government. It
1



armed forces no longer existec
Never in history had a _ natio:}
suffered such overwhelming tot

defeat.



FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1952

Communist Prisoners Seize U.N. Genera

{
Thursdu
5 Nazi Reich
doom amid the
; ruins of a Berlin th
devastated beyond al
of rising aguin









Cheaper
Newsprint
From Bagasse

U.K. EXPERIMENTS
ARE SUCCESSFUL

WATER BARGE

LONDON.

Newsprint has been made
from bagasse in successful exe,
periments in the United King-
dom. Prices are no higher
than those of newsprint made
by traditional methods and it
is expected that bulk produc-
tion by existing mills coutdy
yuickly bring prices down.

This is the report made by Mr.
W. T. Curtis-Willson, owner @ a
Brighton newspaper, who |!
backed the experiments. He has
sent all information available to
the United Nations Education: |
Scientific and Cultural Organis>-
ion, which has set up a commit~
tee to investigate the problem

Mr. Curtis-Willson suggested a
‘thain of pulp mills in the sugar-
‘rowing countries round the
vorld. But he pointed cut that
»pposition of newsprint manufac-
urers would have to be broken
jown









incl

THIS WATER BARGE, which will be towed by the “Lord Willonghby”,
“Crofter” yesterday afternoon.
capacity of 93 tons.

Water Barge |. Europe Sign Pact Today:
Towed Into |(¢
Careenage

The water

the 5.8.
Tt has @

was unloaded from
It was towed into the Careenage by the “Lord Combermere”.

rmany A Sovereign State

PARIS, May 8,
A Quai D’Orsay spokesman said the 50-year pact will
morrow at 6.00 p.m. the French Foreign Office officially

Samples
“We obtained samp es from the
iritish West Indies of bagasse in
i very highly compressed form

will
work in eonjunction with the tug

barge, which



that trucking would revert to A Great Change | Lord Willoughby to supply ships announced. ind we asked a mill in this coun-
private hands but it would com | Today, just seven years lab in Carlisle Bay with water, was _A Quai Dorsay spokesman said the 50-year pact wil) ] ty to experiment with ti t,”
pensate the loss by levying a tax|something has happened that n>| ‘CNS /Mto The Careenage yesten- be initialled by the heads of delegations of member nations] ‘4 Mr. Curtis- Willson w
4 oe ar yee. The ‘*~ one who like this corresponden:|poryerc, » Lord Com-| in the Foreign Office buildine, He said no special ceremony | rave mes a very good news-
v d reimburse gove 4 se Onan 1 2” aealiin 2 : ' : ta Sven mee. ‘ad ; +6 pr yhich is s , it is
about £4,000,000 Foor fon: ate ee eran acess itesea Weta og The barge has a capacity for ir a for the signing of the treaty designed to pool Coie ar ete. from tradi-
few years and experts predict“d|ple. Western Germany, aided b hecoribemnart nets int to ae aa ee a meocetetercs Erande, Wesern Germany, Italy, jtional sources — that has a much
it would take about five years at!her former enemies the Unite: |of water : te elgium, Holland and Luxembourg stronger fibre, and from the
this rate to pay the cost of turning | States, Britain and France, is ov Lord ‘Willoughby will either! laboratory tests is in every way
the industry over to privatd|/the verge of becoming near sev- the barge behind or at the ° Infarmed sources believe thatja fine substitute for newsprint
ownership. : ereign power again. side—as the weather allows— Suan Raided he protracted negotiations on a |from traditional sources.

ai oe ail oa i Its citiés are rising fast frov mat n they go into operation. x : ce aba a ben z SEH “But on the samples that we
mus ecentralizec o allow . Inited ) They will replace the Ida which yman army naa oeen power worked we found that the colour
them to compete with truck: Se Pt eer Eee rn iS*now 59 years old and which I rom Dawn pees Me, DY the recent visit te | was bad, that it was brownish,
et or oat gece! and there] ijqustries are booming far beyon ; Was condemned 11 years ago “ as - Goneral Ei pa oe ye {ana that the bagasse pulp as sup-
Ww c » preat a , re nance rene Risen rer and s * fines ‘ fon
anise One. are ee former levels, German exporters! The barge is painted in the Until Dusk is talk with Federal Chancello eee on Bp iS coemines

It said the British transport are grabbing great portions of th: | same colour as the Willoughby | Dr. Konrad Adenauer. ca Th a is d Ss to th te ot
commiimten would be given greater world’s markets out of the hand: |and has tha same sturdy appear- po , * + e se eae is a
trend i. wetting fares hd of her former victors. jance, It was lowered from thé]. TOKYO, May 8 Obstacles [Utes these sugar Cane roms. ars
reece in Ving ares S.S. Crofter by a heavy lift der-|United Nations planes includin; jburnt to remove all the leaf
freight charges in order to keep} The Western Allies once pledg-|rick aft 1 : jets today made their biggest raic Fisenhower reportedly urged |#towth before they are milled
up with competition. Changes in}eq t, block German rearmameni} Jt was noticeable that the of the Korean war attacking th¢ denauer to help remove any| “These, however, are problems
Sie See ahr ae for all time are negotiating with | barge was a bit longer than the huge Communist supply centri bstacles preventing final agree-| which offered very little, if any,
inet iin tkcent Wow ws the Bonn Government to raise 12 | Lord Willoughby. The barge i outh of Pyongyang from dawn te ent In its present form the|difficulty of solution. We found

road and “will encourage efficiency
in both.”

Official statistics given out late
last year said the Government had
taken over 3,727 trucking firms









German divisions of 300,000 mer



{61 feet long while the Willoughby

dusk, Target for today’s raid wa caty contains several important|that we could, by use of chemi-

to join the West’s defence agains has an overall length of 60 feet Suan, 35 miles south of Pongyan nditians where no agreement}cals, produce a paper as white as
Communism. Even Berlin, sti! oF bteienh a 5 uld be reachedso far driven snow; and the removal of
divided and isolated 100 mile he Fiarbour aster went out All Force Headquarter eae a aie a the dirt was of course merely
behind the Iron Curtain is ¢limb- to the Crofter to watch the un-}announced it was left covere: e of the biggest hurdles was

loading of both tug and barge, with billowing flames and smoke vercome yesterday when it was problem for the cane growers





first innings for 158 in reply to
Surrey’s 219 and by close Surrey
were 151 for eight in their second
knock,

England bowlers Jim Laker and
Alex Bedser took six for 64 and
three for 42 respectively in the
Indian’s first innings and six
wickets fell today for the addition
of 92 to the overnight score.

A whirlwind 41 by Whittaker
and a sound neat 57 by Constable
bolstered Surrey’s second innings
score,



Truman, Negotiating
Copper -Aigreementt
With Chile

WASHINGTON, May 8,
President Truman told newsmen
that the matter of the copper
agreement between Chile and U.S,
was a subject of negotiation be-
tween him and the (President of
Chile, He said he hoped the

matter could be brought to a
successful conclusion but he could

‘not comment at this time.

The President was commenting
at a weekly news conference in
response to a question about the
action of Chile within the past
week in abrogating the agree-
ment to sell copper to the United
States.

A.reporter asked the President
to explain what the United States’
attitude was toward the action of
Chile. The President replied it
otiation be- \



was a matter of n

tween himself and the President |

of Chile.

When asked if he had been in|

contact with the Chilean President
Truman replied that he had not
yet.
anything more about it now. He
did = ue Salusaes be
ho matter would awe
peggy icn sh conclusion.—U,P.



New Luxury-Liner
Gets First Trials

DUNKIRQUE, France, May 8,
A New Pride of France’s
Transatlantic fleet slipped out -f
rt for her first sea trials.

ndre is scheduled to make her'] the

maiden voyage from Le Havre to
New York crossing on ls
This is a major in 1d!
the French Merchant Fleet
which two-thirds ‘was destroy
ed during the war.

20,500 tens Flandre
cutee wvmtapaiins tor WS

fitst class pass , 274 in cabin
claSs and 56 berth tourist class in
four-bunk cabins.

Today’s trial will merely =
performance tests will come later.
At 574 feet long the hull is about
half the
size of Liberte and Isle De France.
Flandre is the largest ship launch-| las
ed in France since the war and
fourth largest; He
merchantman sailing under tri-
colour. She matches the speed and

UP.

the ship’s sea legs. Speed

the size of De Grasse and

will be the

luxury of her larger mates.

\ Ridgway, leaves on

d > ; i ac its feet again. ce ‘ | . |fource

Europe to-day said the attitude with 43,731 vehicles and 4,994|'"8 Bans Ch its ; nnounced that the ticklish ques- ;

the United States Congress Siohat trailers. tee ee eee ar “Rh Two Communist jets were rve- \!0n of Germany's financial con~ Price of Pulp

8) ding for National Defe anhé _U.P. venue reduced o y= ’ * ported to have destroyed and { ribution to the army had been “ - ; lien

Mutual’ Defence aan’ Snacatan ii smoking ruin in 1945, is lined Ike Continues third ahmagad et tea Hew ottled, liegt eee we peer

chances for future world peace, oe ba @ On Page 5 ¥ south from Manchuria apparently In Bonn W ' : ata = . ”
i Te ‘ Pe ial Eye 2 i ) In Bonn West German Chancel-|saving; indeed, possibly news-

Bie eld a Weds cdnlerence:there U.S. Strike Causes silat er ewell Tow to intercept the raiders, {hen Konrad Aden juer and the print made from bagasse at pres
would be no Third World: War it \ it ike t 7 : i . i. The Allied Communique saia| ose. High Commissioner met, ont might eost virtually the sam>
Americas somes oie tet | Petrol Cut In U.K. | Ne Move Towards COPENHAGEN, May 8) fai? of demolition ail high ax, today on the seventh anniversary |as newsprint does today, or may-

on an even keel and the Mutual
Security Programme of aid to free

countries were carried through to |

a successful conclusion, He said
he was disturbed by the crises in
steel, oil and copper in this coun-
try and certain attitudes in Con-
s toward the National Defence
ogramme and Mutual Security
Appropriation.

Reviewing his administration
for the past seven years, Truman
said his goal and every effort ha
been to keep the entire free
world from coming under Com-~
munist control, So far he saic
this effort had been successful 1!
that it had prevented the Third
World War, but said conditions to-
day were very grave. na

LONDON, May 8.
British Government today

The

‘cut deliveries of high octane
aviation spirit to civil aireraft
operators by 30 per cent. because

oi the refineries in
the U.S.

Restrictions applying
excess of 80 octane

strike in oil

to fuel in

are the same



as those imposed in the United
States itself. The order comes
into effect on Monday.

During 28 succeeding days oper-
j ators of civil aireraft may not
| acquire more than 65 per cent. of
}the amount of aviation spirit
juris » April. ‘As April, has 30
days effective reduction in 28
| days period will be 30 per cent.
‘ of recent supplies. —U.P.







General Mark Clark
Arrives In Korea

U.N. fighter bombers we

SEOUL, May 8,
lcomed General Mark W. Clark

to Korea to-day by launching a devastating attack on the

Communist supply city of

Suan, only 35 miles from the

Capital of North Korea, Swarming flights of Fifth Airforce

and Marine fighter-bomber
noon to become the biggest

Communist MIG 15 jet fighters were shot down.

The attack recalled a recor:
bombing of the city of Sinuiju in
North Korea a year ago in which
312 planes gave that supply hu)
a dawn to dusk blasting

Clark flew to the Korean battl«
front with General Ridgway whom
he will succeed as Supreme United
Nations Commander of Koree.
Monday to

take over the supreme Allied

He added he could not say|Command in Europe from Gen-

eral Eisenhower.
Increased Action

In addition to the increased
action in the air, Clark found
“heavier than normal”
all across the 155-mile Korean
battle front.

Suan area is 35 miles southeast

of Pyongyang, and the Fifth Air-

force has been waiting the right

combination of circumstances to

attack.

United States sabre
up a screenin
er bombers

jets set
hat swooped
The intensity of the attack forcec

Communist MIGs to fly south ©
‘Pyongyang where Allied

fighting

for low flying figh«-
in on
target with heavy bomb loads. |

jets

s were well on their way by
single air blow at Suan. Two



1)

¢

GENERAL MARK CLARK

shot down two and damaged one.

Red jets rarely venture as far) ~~

south of the North Korean capital
Fifth Airferces pilots

50-calibre machinegun fire
their strategic tanvets.—U.P.



WASHINGTON, May’ 8.

Senator Everett Dirksen, Llin
ois campaign manager for Senato
Robert Taft
would not rule out General Doug
MacArthur as a
Republican Presidential
pointed to MacArthur’
national popularity, and the num
ber of written votes for the Gen
eral in the Republican Primary

claimed
by noon 85 supply buildings des- |
troyed and 40 damaged as they

trained high explosive bombs andl For GG ra nd Prix

into

MacArthur In The Running

said Thursday he

possible |
nominee

—U-P,



22 Motor Entries










on {ist party set the

General Lisenhower arrived

Naz "4 é ) ¥ .
plosives tore Communist supplies zi capitulation. to put the!/be a pound or two per ton more







. . nines “C ” - are ee 0 ay ae
Settlement Of ere ee at Ube pans ti0$8 to sheds, Thousands of gallons nising. foughes to a “I do not, personally, pay
gee te yen ‘ GMT hours) after his take off napalm (jellied petrol) were! West Germany a sovereign mem- much regard to that, because
Sirike At U.C.W J. from Paris, spread over the target turning |per of the Free World, — we are dealing with small pulp
piles of supplies into billowing ‘ mills, whereas if once this
(From Our Own Correspondent He is on a farewell visit of|fiames and smoke.” On Friday the Ruropean Army| material is recognised and used
KINGSTON, J’ca, May 8. Scandinavian members of the —U.p, | act under which West Germany| that is the important thine
The workers strike at U.C.W.1.|NATO before he leaves for the ill be re-armed in co-operation —by the existing paper mills,
continues to-day with no move United States to join the Presi- ,with her enemies of only seven] then the cost would come tum-
Laade yet towards settlement. This [dential Election race, Eisenhower + ee ears ago is to be initialled in bling down.”
morning the Gleaner made 4M! accompanied by his wife was Solution Of Paris. Z 5
editorial appealed for an early] greeted by Danish Defence Minis- Pad o- . That pact and in fact every sant oar ce evallabl =
ttle > rest of the! arc etersen Som- ‘ : ‘ ‘ é ac very | amo of bagasse available he
eee Sonic Bp a a : ae od eae a fee Tunisian Dispute agreement which is making the said. Estimates vary between
to the educational future of the | forees Admiral E. J. C. Quivest- . Se uel of this severed | 4,000,000 tons and 14,000,000 tons
West Indies, and carried pictures}gaard, Ole Bjoern Kraft, For- Appears Likely am povereiien were madeja year. But it has been
on the front page showing stu-| eign Minister, Admiral Trick rime eee “ Soviet found that it takes three tons -
dents performing domestic duties) Brind Commandr-in-Chief of TUNIS, May 8 dats a A : rs We e the west bagasse to produce one ton of pulp
nm the institution, Allied forces of Northern‘ Reliable sources said that four ao . a by aoe menace but seven|It is therefore possible to pro-
| Oné pieture shows Christopher] Europe, Missus Eugneie Anderson) of the ten members of the Franco- | } cede a {th » Tee ae a BR0e at least 1,000,000 Vong of
Osborne of Trinidad, Al Walwyn} United States Ambassador to! Tunisian Reform Commission have | ; Dente x = wes and of] newsprint every year which

iof St. Kitts, Sandy Luck and Bud

@ On Page 5

Denmark and other high Danish) been decided upon and that others











|Lee of British Guiana pealing| military and civil officials—U.P. will be announced shortly.
,potatoes in the kitchen for the

{mid-day ‘meal, while another Slag nd ol "

{showed Eric Munroe and Murray e yO) out details ofa
|Mooyoung of Jamaica operating Reds Aiccuse U.N. Home Rule and Administration

! Reform promised by the French
P ° ir last March when the Bey was
i
Of Delaying Truce linduced to drop his anti-French
idvisers. Seven member of the

B: PANMUNJOM, May 8, | Commission will be Tunisian and

The Communists again “catego-\ three French.
rically rejected the United Nation | Resident
final propasal” on prisoner eX-|Hauteclocque and Tunisian Pre
change and accused the Allies of|mier Salah Eldine Baccouche | |(
holding up the Korean truce by ‘agreed that the Commission would
refusing to negotiate, Red General meet as soon as the political at-} })
Nam I] used 17 minutes of today's! mosphere was sufficiently cleared |
18-minute “open” session in 4/in this troubled protectorate where |

\the telephone switchboard.

On the campus of the Univers-
jity, undergraduates are busy
[preparing the cricket ground for
\the Senior Cup match on Satur-
ae

General Jean De



Commission a
greater

Truman Is 68

|
|
WASHINGTON, May 8.

President Truman is 68 years|pitte. tirade against the United riots have claimed upwards of on
old today and looking forward tO|Nations stand on the prisoners | hundred lives since last January
retirement next January as Presi- issue |
dent of the United States to being 4 The release from house arres
a sort of vocal national “con- The other minute went to Vice-|of former Premier Mohamm

Chenik was interpreted as an i

jscience” to campaign for ‘his ‘fair | Admiral C. Turner Joy who calm- ;

jdeal” programme as long as he}\y suggested that a recess in the dieation that the talks are alm¢
leommands the ‘virtue of reading Walks be called until the Reds ready to begin ous there 4
and listening. Truman plans t¢|:ome up with something, hew to many signs that extreme rationa

ists have not given up oppositio
to any deal with the French sho
of complete independence

continue his fight for whaf he

1]
|
i
| thinks is right.
1

Both sides appeared to be hope-

lessiy deadlocked but the Com-
munists kept the talks going by
asking for another
to-morrow

He envisions
grammes
Presidency.

The President admittedly relish-
es the idea of speaking out as
private citizen,

Although many of his critic:
have detected no particular inhi-
i bitions in Truman speeches, he
anticipates greater freedom of ¢x-
| pression after he leaves offices

—U.P.

extensive pro-

after he leaves tht : Terrorists exploded two born
meeting in Tunis last night causing consic
erable damage but no casualties

—U-P. —USP.





Grenada C.C., Tourist Board Discuss
‘Lady Boats’ Removal With Capt. Clarke

} . (From Our Own Correspondent)

Reds Plan GRENADA, May 8,
| ° me il A joint meeting of the Chamber of Commerce and the
\Anti-Ridgway Riots)\ Tourist Board-with Capt. Earle Hughes of the former pre-) {{
| PARIS, May 8 siding, availed themselves of the opportunity of an intran-
a powerful French Cammun- sit north-bound call of Capt. R. A. Clarke, General Manage:
line for Europe’s





'S ai ti.

of the C.N.S. aboard the Lady Nelson to discuss the matter
of the Canadian Government's intention to withdraw the



with demands for mass prote o ace - \
\“in all forms” against the arrival Lady” liners during October coming.

tof General Ridgway as Suprem Members at the brief meeting ; large sums i eget 2

European Commander, on May jaddres ed Capt, Clarke who was, disturbed by 4 oe E

25 re lon one of his routine visits in|effects of the intended withdrawal NESCAFE is full strength, full flavoured Coffee

Grenada Government be



| Paris Police Authorities pr ymypt-}connection with the operations Blee the

,
t
|
ante t est Seed } {
|
,

}

/

)
annually are now
the serious adverse
















| BERNE, May 8, ‘nounced that they would mo-jthe line in the area and the meet-|urged to make every pot sible Plus Carbohydrates added solely to protect the flavour {
Twenty t automobile racing} jilize their whole special riot corp ended with the passage of aleffort to assist in the securing of ; {
stars/from seven countries enter- of 15.000 helmeted mobile guards | Resolution moved by Mr. Norris|the continuance of the service — it’s — ))
ed the Grand Prix of Switzerland! and to bidalte “be 6 ad President of the Tourist|that the Governor of the Wind tn
â„¢ . . ugh specially trained anti~- | Hughe resident o ve nuris a 1 rovern ie \ { sAgY p : )
-| here y y 31, Le Son o Sn demonstration squads supported! Board, seconded by R. O Williams| vards be requested to ask the i EASY TO PREPARE §\\
pion Argentine Huan Fangio, the rs . . smash any Com-{of the Chamber of Commerce sro-| Governments of St. Vincent, St p J regeeiess
field includes three Italians, four by some police to mash any m-) e 2 n pe , ‘ a | OV m is ee of j i} Iv’s ECONOMICAL—NO WASTE i}
-iF ; nim all munist riots or demonstrations posing that wherea both bodies} Lucia and Jomi | $) ii)
rrenchmen and six British. Two The Cormmunist order for anti-!are fully appreciative of the valu~| imilar action } . i
Germa Argentines and one Rideway 7 -oteste followed ‘cnet Gait atti rendered by the »)) i
s | Swiss. on Siamese and three! FGg ey eet by the Reds to call|C.N.S., for many years in their] The Resolution also proposed }) \ NESTLES QUALITY PRODUCT {
vite ss. lgtreet demonstration It was maintenance of regular supplies of} th copies be warded = t¢ \
: +1)f anc » move-!| opposit odie oO island (tt .
-|
y,i the race Party’s newspaper, L’Humanite. ment of passenge ith particu-| requesting co-operation wiih the ti) se
—U-P. : —UP. lar reference to tourists spending-- same IEEE
\ —




PAGE TWO



Carib

Senior

G. S. Bridgeman,
t Architect of
Watkins and

Oe Kami
A Adm
P: s of London and

t Indies, returned to Trini-
dad last night by B.W.LA.,, after
spending about ten days staying at
the Windsor Hotel.

Col. Bridgeman came over to
Barbados in connection with
3arclays Bank to arrange for the





conversion of the building they
had taken as temporary premises
during the period of the recon-

struction of the Bank.

On Holiday
RS. ELMA NAPIER, authoress
and former member of the
Legislative Council in Dominica
arrived here on Wednesday on a
short visit to the island and is
staying at the Ocean View Hotel.

On Special Visit

E. A ve K, FRAMPTON,

Agricultural Adviser to the
Comptroller for Development and
Welfare, left yesterday morning by
B.W.LA., on a special visit to St.
Kitts; Nevis and Montserrat, He
expects to be away for about two
weeks.

Music Exhibition
Ne has been received that
4 Miss Nellie Bailey, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs, J, E. Bailey of
South District, St. George has been
awarded an exhibition at the
Royal College of Music.

Miss Bailey left Trinidad where
she-held the post of Music Officer
in December to take up studies at
the College.

Spent Two Weeks
tz. J. D. RAMKESOON

of St. Magaret’s Vicarage,
Port-of-Spain, returned to Trini-
dad by B.W.1.A. on Tuesday after
spending two weeks’ holiday. He
was staying at “Leaton-on-Sea”
The S‘iream.

On Business
HERE on a short business visit
£ is Mr. Neville Wolfe, Secre-
tary of the Faulkner Trading Co..
Ltd;, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad
He -arrived on Wednesday night
by B.W.LA. and is staying at the
Ocean View Hotel,

Back to the U.K.
BAVING for Canada _yester-
day morning by T.C.A. in-
transit for Scotland were Mr, and
Mrs, nan Duthie who were
down-here for several weeks stay-
ing at Old Trees, St. James and
he Ocean View Hotel. Accom-
panying them was Mrs. N. Suth-
erland, Mrs, Duthie’s daughter.
Brought Son to Schcol
PENDING a short holiday in
S Barbados staying at the
Hotel Reyal is Mr, Asot Michael

Mor

prominent merchant of Antigua.
He arrived here earlier in the
week by B.W.1LA. with his son
Patrick #%ihom he has_ brought

back to school at the Lodge,

Back From Trinidad
f[®: WOODLEY ANTHONY

of Maresol Beach _ returned
om ‘Trinidad on Wednesday
night by B.W.1.A,. after paying a
short visit,

BY

HE alert Hungarian demo-
crats seem to have discov-
ered a particularly vile plot, re-
actionary in its deviationism.
The Hungarian newspapers re-
cently concentrated their rage
againsi a firm of hatters. The
firm was accused of selling a cap
with a deviationist label inside
it This label showed “an Eng-
lish gentleman wearing a_ golf
cap, with the arrogant grin char-





acteristic of exploiting capital-
ism,”

The next thing is to find out
whether this subtle propaganda

is the work of Hungarian aristo-
crats, or a triumph of English ex-
porters. Perhaps the caps are
dropped by night, from planes,
in lonely places, and gathered up
by English commercial travellers
disguised as Hungarian peasants.
At any ratte, one can imagine the
farmer of the Kisafold or the
gipsy of the sandy Nyirseg hiding
the cap in a cupboard when the
secret police arrive.





ee ee





Here is a letter that ap-
peared in the Parents’
Magazine, signed by Mrs.
S. S., Fort Worth, Texas.

Thanks to the Wolf at the
Door!

“In reply to your request
for the renewal of my sub-
scription, I wish to inform
you that the present condi-
rtion of my bank account
makes it almost impossible.
My shattered financial con-
dition is due to federal laws,
state laws, county
brothers-in-law,
law and outlaws.

laws,
sisters-in-

Through these laws I am
compelled to pay a business
tax, amusement tax, head
tax, school tax, gas tax, light
tax, water tax, sales tax,
liquor tax, income tax, food
tax, furniture tax and excise
tax. I am required to get
a business license, car license,
operator’s license — not to
mention a dog license,

I am also required to con-
tribute to every society and
organization which the
genius of man is capable of
bringing to life; to woman’s
relief, the unemployed relier
fand to every hospital and
charitable institution in the
city, including the Salvation
Army, Community Chest,
Red Cross, Purple Cross,
Double Cross, Boy Scouts,
Girl Seouts, Club Scouts,
Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A, as
well as Boys’ Ranch and
Boys Town.

“WOLF AT
THE DOOR
}

For my own safety I am
vequired to carry health 1m-
surance, life insurance, fire
insurance, property insur-
ance, liability insurance,
earthquake jnsurance, torna-
do insurance, unemployment
compensation and old-age
insurance.

My business is so govern-
ed that it is no easy matter
to find out who owns it. I
am inspected, expected, sus-
pected, disrespected, reject-
ed, dejected, examined, re-
examined, informed, re-
quired summoned, fined,
commanded and compelled,
until I provide an inex-
haustible supply of money
for every known need, desire
or hope of the human race.
Simply because I refuse to
donate to something or other,
I am boycotted, talked about,
lied about, held up, held
down and robbed,

I can tell you honestly
that except for a miracle
that happened I could not
enclose this check. The
wolf that comes to many
doors nowadays just had
pups in my kitchen. I sold
them and here is the money.



Ideological cap

OUNTER-MEASURES will
probably include an order to

all Hungarian collective hatters
to sow into their caps a label
showing a member of a _ labour

camp, wearing his golf cap with
the happy smile characteristic of

a People’s Democracy, If this
fails there will be a _ purge of
leading hatters. But simple
workers, gazing at the gentle-
man’s golf cap and the super-
cilious grin, will still murmur

“We never knew it was like that
in tha capitalist countries, Fancy
being free to wear any label you
like inside your golf cap! Heigho!
Wellady!”

In passing

HILDREN'S'~ minds having
been completely rotted with
films and radio, we now come to

the coup-de-grace: education
(sic) by television. What is really



alling

Spent Five Weeks

M* AND MRS. L. MARTIN
and family returned
Trinidad

to|boy just for the sake of
on Wednesday by the| cut.’

BARBADOS ADVOC

rem

Be Popular

WHEN a girl goes on a
a good and lasting impressic

ATE
@

first
yn.

date, she wants to create
Here are a few ideas that

should give you a sure start.

(1) Never accept a date from a
‘going
You must like him even if

Dutch S.S. Bonaire after spend-|it is only just as a friend, for

ing five weeks staying at Cacra-jafter all,

bank Hotel.

Mr, Martin is Director and
Secretary of Alstan’s Ltd., Port-
of-Spain.

Hor:symoon Couple Leave

ETURNING to Trinidad last

night by B.W.LA. were Mr.

and Mrs. Cecil Milne who were

spending their honeymoon at the
Crane and Royal Hotels.

Mr. Milne is Service Manager

you have to endure his
company for guite a while on yogr
date,

(2) Try your utmost not to Be
late. Men hate to be kept wait-
ing, and since they always expect
girls to be late then they are
pleasantly surprised when you are
not. Yet, if he is late, don’t glare
at him, accept his apology calmly.

(3).Be modest about your fig-

of the Caterpillar Department of|UTé, especially if it is a good one.
Neal and Massy Engineering Com-| Dress carefully and be completely

pany, His wife is the former Miss | feminine.

Pat Hope Ross.

Petroléum Engineer
Paying thdir first visit to the

-Good posture is im-
portant for without it your beauty
and gracefulness are marred.

(4) .Don’t try to impress him by

island are Mr. and Mrs, Thhomas|being coy and shy, yet on the

Wall of Colombia.

They arrived|other hand, don’t be possessive
on Wednesday via Trinidad by|/and eggressive.,

Be’ natural, gay

B.W.LA. for two weeks’ holiday|and don’t get flustered, Pay com-
and are staying at the Marine/pliments but don’t overdo it by

Hotel.

Mr. Wall is Petroleum Engineer
with the Colombian Petroleum
Company in Cucuta.

. ‘
Canadians End Holiday

R. AND MRS, L. S. WEBB

of New Brunswick, who were
holidaying here for the past two
weeks returned to Canada yes-
terday marning by T.C.A. They
were staying at the Ocean View
Hotel.

To Assist Mounted Police
TAFF SGT. C. W. ANDERSON
of the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police arrived here yes-
terday morning from Ottawa by
T.C.A. for the purpose of assist-
ing the Barbados Mounted Police
in their training.

He will be here for six weeks
staying at the Marine Hotel.

Staff Sgt. Anderson who was a
policemen for twenty-four_ years,
spent twelve years in Ottawa,
seven in the training depot
Regina, Saskatchewan and_ the
remaining five doing Police work
in the Province of Manitoba.

Atténded Course in U.K.
R. VINCENT KING, a Civil
Servant of the Secretariat in

St. Vincent, returned home yes-
terday by BG, Airways after
spending a few days here staying
at “Leaton-on-Sea”, The Stream.

Mr. King. who spent eigh:
months in the U.K. attending a
coursd in Administration arrived
here on Tuesday by the SS.
De Grasse.

———4

TODAY’S GEM

The Kiss of the sun for par-
don

The song of the birds for
mirth

One is nearer God's heart in
a garden

Then anywhere
Earth,







else on



‘THE WAY ...... . 8) Beachcomber

wanted is a Mechancial Educator,
a combination of film, radio, and
television. No master or mistress
would be needed, A _ trained
mechanic would be able to take
classes of thousands, and in time
the children would learn to work
the machine themselves, thus
finding another outlet for the
worship of gadgets,

Abyssinian windfall

OAST Abyssinian Beef and
Yorkshire Pudding will look

odd on a menu when the supplies
begin to arrive. But the Grand
Maitre Chef de Haute Cuisine in
many a gilded gargote can be
relied on to call it Quenelles de
Pre-Sale. “What do you recom-

mend to drink with it?” “Un-
doubtedly, sir, this Chateau
Medoc of 1950, It is a sound

Burgundy, sir, matured in the
cask. A full wine, sir, and cheap
at 28s. 6d. the bottle. Shall I ice
it, sir, or do you prefer it hot?”

Importance Of Development Man Aid The Soil
Of Colonies

LIVERPOOL.

The importance of economic de-
velopment in the Colonial Empire
to help Britain through her pres-
ent economic crisis was stressed
by. Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, the Colo-
nial Secretary, who was guest of
henour at the annual luncheon of
the Liverpool Chamber of Com-
merce, It is, he said, “one of the
keys to our prison.”

Foreign capital, as well as Brit-
ish, must be attracted to Colonial
investmynt if the vast natural re-
sources available are to be devel-
oped or expanded and brought to
the world’s markets, he said, It
is.a fruitful field for imagination
and energy.

“Colonial exports of bauxite rose
from 170,000 tons in 1936 to
1,698,000 tons in 1950,” he said.
“Petroleum oil exports rose from
2,404,000 tons to 8,028,000 tons.
Timber rose from 13,000,000 to
30,000,000 cubic feet. This means
rising standards of life in the
Colonies and the hope of curing



world shortages of primary raw
materials.

“T am afraid ‘it is useless to
deny that our surpluses will be
insufficient to push this develop-
ment along as quickly as it should
be and that we must have capi-
tal from creditor countries and
from overseas to assist. We must
try and do this so that we retain
our fair share of any enterprise
which foreign capital may help to
encourage and to foster,

“As far as one can see, and it
is dangegous to be too dogmatic
the primary producer—and of
course I am thinking particularly
uf the first of all primary proauc-
ers, namely food—will, so to
speak, be calling, the tune for
many years to come. We can,
through Colonial development
greatly increase our strength as
primary producers and with it
bring an economy which is so
largely a manufacturing one into
amore healthy and diversified

balance.”
—B.U.P.

NEW SHIPMENT

WHITE & COLOURED TOWELS FROM 58c. TO $2.56

The world’s population, now
about 2,350,000,000 is increasing
at the rate of 60,000 a day. The
world’s food supplies are in-
adequate even for the existing
numbers. By misuse of the land,
millions of acres have ceased to
be productive.

What can be done to feed thesa
extra people? And how can it be
done so that the fertility of the
soil is safeguarded for future gen-
erations? How can we claim new
acres from the unproductive areas
of the world — the scrub, the
swamps, the desert, and the
frozen lands of the north? How
van we reclaim acres which have
been lost through neglect cr bad
farming? What are the effects of
new methods of agriculture on
health?

These are some of the questions
asked and answered — as far as
they can be — in the series of
B.B.C. Transcriptions — entitled
“Man and the Soil.” The series
will be relayed at 8.00 p.m, every
Friday from May 9th. It will be
heard over Radio Trinidad on the
following trequencies 31m—9625k;
yr hg 3325k; 920m — 790k, and

aS TT

being too gushy.

(5) Go easy on his pocketbook,
whether rich or poor. Can’t have
him think you are a ‘gold-digger.’
Intelligence, character and ambi-
tion add up to much more th:
stuffed wallet, }



No more
windscreen
wipers!

[ BF IsH scientists have
| discovered how to keep
| car windscreens and shop
| windows free from snow, ice
| and mist. ies te

| The secret cover! them
(with a film of pure p+

It is not an expensive

gold is onl. tir of 8
'The only # quarter of :
at} millionth of an Inch ick, ‘and i3|

‘transparent.
National Physteal “Labeecy

sica’ aborato ab
Teddington. Middlesex. |

London Express Service ,

—

Willy Was Selling Um

—They Were the Kind
By MAX TRELL

“Umbrellas! Umbrellas for sale!”

Knarf and Hanid, the shadows

, with the turned-about names, looked

at each other. The sun was shining

brightly, Why should anyone be

| wanting to sell umbrellas? Besides,

| the voice came from the foot of the

| hill, where the marsh began. Who

could be selling umbrellas in the

marsh? They hurried down the hill
to see.

By and by, as Knarf and Hanid
reached the edge of the marsh they
recognized Willy Toad’s voice.
“Umbrellas!” he was calling out.
And sometimes he said: “Umber-
ellas!”

They soon found Willy, squatting
on the root of a willow tree, A stick
with a sign on it read: “Umbrellas
For Sale”.

An Umbrella

“Hello Knarf! Hello Hanid!” he
said when he noticed them. “Want
to buy an umbrella? I’m selling very
good umbrellas. You'll! need them
for the rain.”

“But, Willy,” said Hanid;
isn’t even raining.”

“And it doesn’t even look like
rain, Willy,” said Knarf. “The sun
is shining. There isn’t a cloud in the
sky.”

“Ha, don’t be fooled by appear-
ances,” said Willy with a laugh, “It
doesn’t look like rain, But it’s go-
ing to rain just the same.”

“Where, Willy?” said Hanid.

“Right here, sooner or later. It |

always rains sooner or later. So
you'd better be prepared and buy an
umbrella for when it does. I’ve got
all sizes to sell,”

Knarf, who was looking all over
the ground and had walked twice
around the willow tree, now said:
“But Willy, where are the umbrel-
jas? I don’t see any.”

“Neither do I,” added
“Where do you keep them?”

Willy answered: “In a very safe
place. Under the ground.”

Willy nodded. “Right under the
#round—right under
standing this minute2

“I never heard of such a thing!
Why do you have to keep them un-
der the ground?”

“It’s tha best
them,”

Hanid.

place to store

“it
|

where I'm |

(6) Give him your attention,
let him know you are having a
good time. Don’t flirt with other

men on your date, it’s bad man-
mers. If you are not sincerely
interested in his conversation,
don’t show it, pretend to enjoy it.

A’ simple greeting is enough
should you meet someone you
know,

(7) Never let on that you are
bored. If anything excites you,
mention it, don’t pretend you've
seen better. That is being snob-
bish and real men abhor female
snobs.

(8) So you are a college gradu-
ate! Well, he didn’t bring you
out to learn what you got your
diploma for. He is pleased to
htar about your merits, but don’t
go into detail. Don’t try to im-
press him, be yourself and modest.
Otherwise, it would seem that you
are not sure of yourself. Charm
is precious.



(9) After you have come home}

and thanked him for giving you;

such q wonderful time (whether
he did or not) you can then decide
whether you would like to go
out with him again. If you
wouldn’t never say it in as much
words,

B.B.C. Radio
Programme

FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1952
4.00—7.15 p.m 19 76M, 26.53M



4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily
Service, 4.15 p.m. Ivor Moreton and

Dave Kaye, 4.30 p.m. Bedtime with
Braden, 5 p.m. Cricket, 5.05 p.m. In-
terlude, 5.15 p.m Listeners’ Choice,
6 p.m. Merchant Naw? Programme, 6.15
p.m. Record Revels, 6.45 p.m. Sports
Round-up and Programme Parade, 7 ran.
The News, 7.10 p.m. Home News from
Britain

7.15—10.20 p.m 2 53M, 31 32M



7.15 p.m. West Indian Diary, 7.45 p.m.
Song and Dance, 8.15 p.m. Radio News-
reel, 8.30 p.m. World Affairs, 8.45 p.m.
Interlude, 8.55 p.m. From the Editorials,
Â¥ p.m. Ring up the Curtain, 10 p.m
The News, 10.10 p.m. News Talk, 10.15
p.m. The Debate Continues, 10.30 p.m.
From the Third Programme



brellas 4

That Grew in the Rain—



| “Umbrellas for sale,” called Willy.

Knarf said eagerly: “Let’s see
the umbrellas, Willy.” But Willy
| wouldn’t let him. “It’s no use dig-
ging them up now, Knarf. When the
| rain comes, they’ll come up by them-
selves, They're wonderful umbrel-
las. None others like them in the
| world.”

“You—you’re sure they'll come
|up when it rains?” Knarf said.

| “Oh yes, oh yes indeed!” Willy
| replied.

Knarf and Hanid both bought an
|umbrella from Willy, even though
| they couldn't see what they were
| buying.
| Rained During Night
It rained during the night. And
the next morning it was still rain-
ing. Knarf and Hanid ran down to
,the edge of the marsh as fast as
| they could. “I bet he hasn’t any
umbrellas at all,” Knarf said. “How
can you keep umbrellas under the
ground? And how can they come up
when it rains?”

When they reached the willow
tree they were astonished. For
standing straight up with their
handles in the ground were a dozen
or more beautiful umbrellas, some
emall, some large, and some just
coming up!

Willy himself was sitting under
the largest one of them.

“They're mushrooms!” cried Ha-
nid.

“Umbrellas,” said Willy. “I told
you Id have them when the rain
came.”







aS 6

At Podgy’s words Rupert smiles.
“So that’s why you wouldn’:
speak when I passed you just
now," he murmurs. “Yes, |
suppose so,’" says Podgy. “| caw
those tracks and then I lost them,
and I was trying to think eh.

POSS SSSS 9S SSS 9S OSS 9999 OF 99995509"

LOOK

SUNDA



made them and where they ica,

and | was so puzzled that | didn’:






notice you or anything else!"

* Well, now you know al! about

it,”” says Rupert. ** So let us go and

tell the othevs.” He and W
rela .

run back to the f
tice thar P

POPP PPPEP AO OPD

Y*s



|

_Two Elizabeths

(THERE is a striking simi-
larity between _ the
signatures of the two Eliza-
beths, the Queen and the
Queen Mother.

This is shown in the two
autographs I reproduce here.

But there are differences of
detail. The Queen Mother’s
signature is moré precise than
her daughter’s, as in the
junction of the “b” and “e.”
In crossing the “t” the Queen
Mother's stroke always finds
the letter; the Queen’s in-
variably comes above the
letter.

There is an element of
greater boldness in the
Queen’s autograph. Hand-
writing experts would point to
it in the curving flourish of
the initial “E” and the tail
of the “z.”

=

E Iyabell

THE QUEEN'S
This autograph is bolder—

Zlahste R

THE QUEEN MOTHER'S
—and this is more precise.
London Krnress Service





- A low dance?
round. (8)
. His 9 ts ignored. (5)

Well, you ge

. Clever bird that can. (4)
+ Time to reach three figures?

What they dia to Una on Join-
ing the Marines. (5)

1
7
¢. Taken from wide areas, (4)
2

When in the eye, 26 does. (4)
Transport medium. (5)

in the sou» on the contrary.
- Not a bright ort of clue. (3)
Paid to the incited red. (8)
. Chair from the Andes, (5)

See 15 Across. (4)

Down
Home-made colour. (7)
Includes the raven duet.
Aligns, by Morse? (6)
Out of all failures. (3)
A bit thin surely, (4)
Races into troubles (5)

This standine is above
average (3)

After the nignt before. (3)

{t ran laughing. (5)

A musica plant, (4

Drier on horseback

17's guide (4)
{t's » topper (3)
Must be a plece of dirt,
Only halt credit. (3)

Solution of vesterdav’s nuzzle.—Across:
1. Buildings: & Liner; 11. Manage: 12.
Candy 15, Ease. 14 z: 17 Dew: 21,
fentiIce 25 Snow’ 24 Rival: 25 Keen:
26. Stall: 27 Seas Down: 1, Block/a
2. [nane & Lend: 4, Drav’ 5. in rent
eo

. : orse: van:
ells. 19. Asks: 20 Hoe, 22 Call

(9)

(5)

ee sat te
CSHIMSHCSC Bavewwr

3

(4)

v
2

i Oy
5:



See Us for the

BEST BOOKS
Advocate Stationery



A Good Night's
REST
Is So Important

Do you sink peacefully on your
pillow and float away on clouds
of restful sleep?

r do you lie down with
staring eyes . . . to have the
worries of the day come back
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women whose nerves are frayed
by anxiety—or a run-down
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And that’s the time when Dr.
Chase's Nerve Food can do so
much to help you. For this
reliable tonic contains Vitamin
Bi, iron and other needed
minerals which help build up
your vitality and tone up your
whole system—so you're in
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Canadians by the thousands
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eat better, feel better after taking
Dr. Chase’s Nerve Food. So
don’t let your nerves rob you of
groper rest! Get Dr, Chase's

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The Garden—St. James
WODAY & TOMORROW
Women 4.45 Men 8 30
Age Limit 12 years and Over
MOM & DAD
Segregated Audience Only



Midnite Special SAT.
Triple Attraction—
MEN OF THE TIMBERLAND |
Richard Arlen—Andy Devine
SIX GUN MUSIC (Tex Williams

OUT FOR
ADVOCATE




|

}

|
|













FRIDAY,



PLAZA THEATRES |

BRIDGETOWN || BARBAREES
DIAL 23160
TO-DAY a ‘Shews) (DIAL 5178)

To-day -& Continuing
444830 PM

2 30 — 4.45 & 8.30 p.m
& Continuing to Monday
445 & 8.38 p.m

HAPPY GO || HERE COMES
LOVELY = || THE GROOM
Davia MVE Bing Crosby, Jane,
Vera ELLEN I]wyman, Alexis Smit

ROMERO :





SAT Special 9.36 @ 1.30
SILVER RAIDERS

Whip WEHLSON &

COWBOY CAVALIER

SAT Special 130 pm
friple Attraction !

MAY 9, 1952



eo



Soe

OISTIN
(DIAL 8404)
TODAY & TOMORROW
4.45 & 8.30 p.m

NEVER TRUST
A GAMBLER

Dane Clarke &
LAST OF THE
BUCCANEERS

Paul Henried

Special 1.30 p.m.
“Raiders of Tomahawk
Creek” &

SAT

“RAIDERS of the “Fert Savage Raiders”
Jimmy WAKELY DESERT’ |] Charies Starrett Doubie

Midnite Special SAT.
2 New Thrillers!

RED DESERT
Don Barry &

Richard ARLEN &
CHEYENNE COWBOY
yILLIAM
FRONTIER REVENGE oe oe Se
eo va me ex BENEKE & Gler

Fuzzy St. John|IMILLER & Orchestra



MAIUDNILE SAT.
‘LAW of the
BADLANDS"
Tim HOLT &
“PRAUUE LAW”
George O'BRIEN &



ee =









EMPIRE

Opening TODAY 230 & 8 40
and Continuing Dally 445 & 8 30
John DEREK—Lee J. COBB

THE FAMILY SECRET
EXTRA
Short: FOOLISH BUNNY
Lastest Newsreel

SAT. MIDNITE
Whole Serial—

SUPERMAN







& HO







SAT,
Jon Hall Double

1.30 p.m.





MARK



OLYMPIC

Today to Monday 4% & 8.15

George ZUCCO—Ralph LEWIS in—
THE FLYING SERPEANT! &
I ACCUSE MY PARENTS












Starring: -
Mary. Beth HUGHES & Others CAPTAIN BOYCOTT
Starring: Stewart GRANGER
SAT, 1.30 p.m Special SAT & BOYS IN BROWN
MIDNITE






Rod Cameron in Whole Serial~

Jack Armstrong
with John Harte
Joe Brown
Action! Action!

The Lady Objects
& Drums of,
The Co



EMPIR

OPENING TO-DAY 2,30
and Continuing Daily 4,4

of nognot



i eroeeece °



ROXY

TODAY (Only) 4.30 & 8.15
HAKLEM GLOBE

Sn
TOMORROW to TUES. 4.45 & 8.15
Ricardo Montalban—Syd Charisse

2 Reel Shorts:



Michigan Kid & Action! Aétion? with Tex BENEKE and his Ork
Vigilantes Return|]| Thrills, Suspense SAT. MIDNITE SPECIAL
PIRATE TREASURE

with Richard TALMADGE

ROYAL

TODAY (only) 4.30 & 8.15

SAT. & SUN. 4.30 & 8.15

HARLEM GLOBE TROTTERS
with Thomas GOMEZ &

HOLIDAY IN HAVANA
with Desi ARNEZ & Others

sees ee eee COLUMBIA PICTURES pres

- SECRET

COCO Ce ee oo eeerres

wine MOHN DEREK - LEE J.
TODV LAWRANGE Sr mawee-ouas sworn sommes,






LKOTIBKS ©

LIDAY IN HAVANA







— in —

OF THE RENEGADE
EXTRA:
SWEET SERENADE
















E

& 8.30
5 & 8,30








Opening To-day 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

and Continuing DAILY

PLAZ
BING teeming BEST

oo” Li
TOP, STA

r
1
i
!
'

C



HERE COMES |
THE GROOM

with ROBERT KEITH and introducing ANNA MARMA ALBERGHETTI
Produced and Directed by FRANK CAPRA : Associate Producer-IRVING ASHER

Somenplay by VIRGINIA VAN UPR, LIAM O'BRIEN and MYLES CONNOLLY

‘Story ty ROBERT RUSKIN ard LIAM O'BRIEN. A PARAMOUNT PICTURE

—————





po GLOBE

FOR FOP PRODUCTS

CONTINUES TO-DAY 5.00






BARBAREES
(Diat 5170)

ING JANE

ROSBY: WYMAN

ALEXIS

SMTA

FRANCHOT

TONE

JAMES

- BARTON:





%
& 8.30 p.m.

TOMORROW 1.30, 5 & 8.30 P.M.

SUNDAY 5 and 8,30

THE FGLs4 OF THE




Fiery as their love!

Mighty as Goliath!

P.M.

CENTURY




BaTHsHEBA

TECHNICOLOR











WIRD NORD... ok. te cen ‘tiemieus See and win
COTTON BLANKETS—WHITE, PINK, GREEN, BLUE, FAWN %
50 x. 70” ..... . $3.30 “> »D OO | == ‘oil
85 3 157 6.) $3.70 $ - | MIDNITE DOUBLE TOMORROW NITE
Monte ees : % ; ae
6X 86" ...... $4.89 ; AT THE SAME TIME YOU CAN HELP THE : PRINCE OF FOXES
VANS & WHITFIELDS | eee
; y 7 ime ie a via } an
T. R. E x FARNE Ma FoR FINLAND FU ND. x DANGEROUS MILLIONS (Kent Taylor)
DIAL 4220 YOU R SH O E STO RES DIAL 4606 Soseoosoosssoess SSOCOS GOODE 9S B CBOSS OS S8SSB SOOO 555565558










MAY 9,

FRIDAY, 1952









‘TAKING A CHANCE’ IN PUERTO RICO

R SIXTY DOLLARS and the right slip of paper you can win $300,000 in
Puerto Rico and not pay a cent in taxes to the government. You can do
this by purchasing thé top ticket in a lottery run by the island's government.
A board of judges chosen by the chief of the bureau of lottery supervises the
weekly drawings. Civic, commercial and industrial leaders serve on the
board. To guard the public, agents selling lottery tickets are bonded. The
drawings are ety checked and operate completely by machines—huge

ae 7:

2 To,

Outside headquarters, spectators see winning aumbers and prizes on board.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



covered cages which spill out the winning colored ball kets
weekly drawings cost 25 cents apiece, but to win the $300, 000 purse in Dee
cember, you must buy a $60 ticket. If you hold the 25-cent tickets, you can
win in proportion to the purse. The lottery is run in ‘the public interest with
approximately 25 per cent going to charities and some needy cities. In 1951,
about 70 per cent of the $28,600,000 went for prizes and $3,432,000 was
handed out in commissions to more than 800 agents selling lottery tickets.

the

as



Racks of winning autho balls are lashed pa the coutiéliet and checked.



Australia Faces
£740m Trade Loss

(By PETER DUFFIELD)
AELBOURNE,
THEY took the sign “SCOTCH WHISK Y—ALL
BRANDS—£1. 12s, 3d. PER BOTTLE, AVAILABLE

HERE” from the back of the bar of Melbourne's Royal
Automobile Club last night—and said: “Sorry, sir, but that

was last week.”

At the little ice cream-delicatessen-tobacconist around
the corner you asked for your usual three packets of Eng-

lish cigarettes.

They gave you the look reserved for black

market hoarders—and one reluctant packet of 20.

You went into the world’s sec-
ond largest department store
(which unaccountably exists in
Melbourne) and asked for an
English lounge suit. The place
looked like the pitch for a des-
peration fire sale — you had so
much competition,

And that’s how it was in Aus-
tralia to-day—with goods marked
“Made in Britain’ moving fast
into the hahds of buyers or sliding
softly under that same old counter.

Like a child echoing the sounds

of its parents, Australia—almost
for the first time—to-day mouth-

ed a famous post-war Anglo-Saxon
word—austerity,

It used the word roughly for
the same reasons as its mother
country: its overseas trade bal-
ances were shot to pieces,

But Australia differed from
3ritain in one major respect. Un-
like Britain, she fed herself—she
had merely overspent her pocket
money.

The story of Australia’s decline,
but by no means fall, has, as usual,
a sharp background in ‘the wool
story.

In 1948-49 that
commodity netted

spectacular
Australia a

cheque for £287 million. In 1950-
51 the wool cheque was £636
million, but this year wool slid

to an estimated cheque of about
£300 million.

Meantime, with a currency ad-
mittedly inflated but free to
spend, Australians of all clases
have gone in for a gigantic buy-
ing spree,

Last year Australia turned in a
trading balance of £84 million.
This year, on Prime Minister
Menzies’s figures, the Common-
wealth was heading for a £740
million loss.

What are the prospects for
Australia in her newly recognised
financial plight? Immediately —
due to the 80 per cent. import cut
by Menzies’s Government — they
are these:

Her major task will be to in-
crease wheat production—an old
Australian vital export recently
gone into disrepair.

Her second task: to live on
imports that she now holds in

hand.
Meatless Days?

The building trade alrea@y
foresees pig cuts in hospital and
factory construction because of
their dependence on imported
cement and timber.

Farmers are saying that res-
trictions on importing vital fen-
cing wire and wire netting will



3 YOULL FEEL RELIEF WITH THE FIRST BOTTLE

e

POOWOOLOOOSOOOOCOCOOE



slow down food production.
;Meatless and butterless days for
Australians are being suggested
by some branches of the Chamber
of Commerce.

Blackest of all prophecies comes
from an Australian economist
who forecasts that by the end of
next year the Commonwealth
will have to import bread unless
wheat production goes up.

(Australia’s best crop: 220 mil-
lion bushels of wheat 1948-49;
best exports same year, 131 mil-
tion bushels.)

Even the sausage men have
stepped in, bemoaning the fact
that German and garlic sausages
will go straight off the market.

But the true picture of Aus-
tralia’s new austerity is that it is
relatively unreal, laughable and
fantastic—a faint shadow of the
word as it is used and known in
Britain. As the finance editor of
one leading Australian paper put
it to me: “It is like going from a
standard of living that is very
soft to a standard of living that
is fairly soft.”

Backing this view are the facts
that up and down the immense
Australian coastline, werehouses,
bondhouses and wharves are
stacked with the goods Australia
has been over-buying from
abroad. Sydney men have tele-
phoned Melbourne men in des-
peration: “Can you get us bond
space for 3,000 cubic feet?
Otherwise we shall have to return
our stocks to England.”

Stocks? Plenty

There are, by admission of the
buyers themselves, millions and
millions of cigarettes—“enough to
last four whole months without
importing a single cigarette at
Australia’s present smoking rate.”
Timber enough for a whole year
of private house building at
present construction rates, say
timber men (this estimate ex-
cludes hospital and factory buiid-
ing). Clothing stocks so great
that the recent textile recession
and unemployment in Australian-
made garments will be made good.

It is true that many Australian
businessmen believe that the new
import controls will mean a black
market, racketeering, selling of
gradually diminishing goods \n-
der the counter. Most people hope
and expect the controls will not
last long.

But generaliy, Australian sec-
ondary industry has taken a new
lease of life and shares (with the
notable exception of some British

DONT LET

CHAIN YOU

It's easy to free yourself of troublesome

Rheumatic Pains. Simply get a bottle of

BRAITWAITE’S
RHEUMATIC REMEDY



SPSS SOD SPPEPEPOT SISO. : » . *
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SEAAND AIR "The Doctor. La











wyer And



‘Canada Shares

Missiles







With U.S.

Guidec

U.K.









OTTAW A, rhe i“ en » staff t
da i iilding \ rtie; esearet velopment
} ice missile, Dr, O M Solandt lishment in Quebec
j 1} ector of Defence Res | Sol d iid “There is
Board, has disclosed trong possibility that not onl
Canada’s top scientist adcde t omic but biological and chemicé
\¥ as an ri to air missik @ weapons ill be used ir noth«
} variety iaunched from the tr war, and Canada is preparing t
| against attacking bombers md meet ch ittack ind
part of secret defence preparations nace etalia '
; against possible ne t ne eat obstacle in t
; weapons pre e fk ry eventua
} the < of agrec to
The missile is being developed ta ncdardisation among the Wester

#t the Canadian armament re

earch and.development establish-

}ment at Valcartier near Quebec

| Also being perfected are new types

! espirators
clothing to guard Soldiers anc
civilians against atomic radiatior
and chemical attack
j He gave no details
i suided missile which
secret lists,
| Dr. Solandt said
,are employed full time on guidec
| research at Valcartie

ana protect

of the new
is on the toy

missile

Tests are being carried out reguler-
will be
$30,000,000

ly there and next
transferred to a new
(£10.000,000) rocket range ir
‘western Canada 100 miles

fs th of the Alberta-Saskatchewar

year

border town of Lloydminster.

The research findings are
hared with
United States,

Britain

“anada has been in the guided
hal!

missile field only one and a
years Before that Canadii
scientists were sent to British anc
United States guided missile ex
perimental stations to tud
progress there



Never tell
children
‘It won't hurt’

ever teH a child “It won’t

hurt” when looking for
an aidmment,
When children find it ts









untrue their faith in their
parents or doctor is shaken,
T 1 says a leading children’s sur-
: P e t Gi HF . Vi ea Mr. Harold Dodd, of the
h ~ | Princess Louise Hospital for
al ries ] V e elr 1e W Ss Children, writing in the
GOB SO6St $999900" Medical World
Sch. Heniy D. Wallace, Sch. Maria (By JAMES LEASOR) vill be baat en gag
Henrietta, Sch, Mandalay I, $.S. Lad ONE of irs 5 as : »Wwspe - reporter years | + C Gee, or Bee in, By
i ah, tetet ie ceae INE of my first jobs as a newspaper reporter years| patient—irrespective of age
Sch. Lydia Adina S., Sch. Gordinia W ago— ina provincial city—was to see a caller, a young man| unpredictable, it depends on
fA. Grote, he wee in his early twenties. their sensitiveness,” he says
t ‘ofte ane anibbee A . ;
Sch ROSARSRRIVALS He produced from his raincoat pocket a yellowed same Dodd says wee a
Sch SARENE, Capt. L. Olivicrre néwéspaver oe - Pot ar al . doctor examines a chitd he
ny's TRADER. 3t a2 Capt. C. V tke Gutta camabte de: secatan Sp0 faembamasige ose should tell it What-it-45 all
Ss / OR, 3,692 tons, Capt ’ about, the g rt, anc
ee Tiare oar It showed a child wearing a If I don’t tell him and the gir! that one site aaah ie
I A BROW 288 tons, Cap 4 . nm » ! . or
w k, tran Trididad ” " tasselled hat. He w held tightly [ods out somehow, no explanati brave Doctors should’ bulld
Mv. DAERWOOD, 94 tons, Capt, in a woman’s arms. Round about Will help him. ,.. up friendships with their
s ells, from Grenada stood old - fashioned - looking child patients, he urges, and
Yacht LEANDER, 43 tons (owned b : , nites ae in than hey
ens 5 RA as et ma (owned MY policemen, Well, the experts say— gives these rules for dealing
: with children
* Can you help me trace this?” THE DOCTOR ; If 1 were tt Give them friendship and
he asked. “It says here it was Chap I'd tell Peter frankly. H¢ rentleness, take interest in
MAIL NOTICES taken by a photographer of this took the picture in the hope of er ta and toys, and giv
aper.” having good news for him, but em je same courtesy
MAILS for St. Vincent, St. Lucia, Gren. P®PE™ , T esty 4 ‘xpi \ ‘
fa eavatetn ck tered bythe tk . pacers The photograph, he said, be- #nyway, it’s not so bad, The honesty and explanations that

will be closed at the General Post Office

mother
as under:

longed to a
Peter,

red haired friend, was not guilty, He’q nott










Parcel Mail: at 3 pim. on the 9th who believed that he was Ing to worry about. te a a
May. Registered Mail at a.m. Ordin. the kiddy, But . WHO was : . dai OCB BOOB OOOO EOL LLP LPP PPPOE APA SY PCO POPS PROSE
12 Mail at 9 a.m. on the 0th Mav the woman and WHY wert THE LAWYER : | agree. Peter g 8
952
Are toy Dominica, Antic Mont. there policemen around? must know, S50 must his girl.) % - x
serrat, Nevis and St. Kitts by the M'V rien she chh decide Whether she) & i OOK OUT FOR %
CARISEED will be Closed at the Gen- will go on with the marriage or] 4 / &
eral Post Office as under sah eli ate : res 4
Parcel Mail at 12 noon; Registered Mail Peter had found the picture Ans Oh ‘er rate Nae ee g x
at 2. p.m. Ordinary” Mail at 2.80 p.n years age sk€d away : he Might fine us photograph and 7
cn the 9th May 1952 Map, SuORed | AWey AE TAE ee a few inquiries On dts Own Ix . + 7, e@y y Y “mY
MAILS for Trinidad by the back of a drawer. He had asked Me re Ww ! x / : d My %
HENRY D. WALLACE will be his mother: Is that me? and she “°coun i$ A 4 A a rh 3
at the General Post Office as ur 5 5 Les 7” “ ‘ »
poe peared Dont. OF nag une P= had | said quickly: Of courst Or if by accident hw wife heard, J : %
ét 2,30 p.m ybetistered Mail at 2 not.” And she had tried to take would she believe that he had and win
on the 9th May 1952 the picture away. nown nothing about this case 4
Now Peter wanted to marry the THE sain: ee »
” 7 . Ta THE PRIEST: If | were Peter +
RATES OF EXCHANGE daughter of a strict Scots family. ; thea Td Hurn the plaptoe fe >,
ihe girl’s father was unenthus friend, then [’'d burn the photo- % eDe
s ie e mwas rap That ood cet 3 y ,
WEDNESDAY, MAY 8,--1952 mastic about Peter as a son-in-law STBPO ) What | sd waite tik, >
NEW FORK his temper was as fiery as hi ome of raking out old ashes like
71 9/10% Cheques on 55 eared 7 Oe this? i Be! ,
Bankers 70 2/107, hair—and Peter had suddenly rv AT THE SAME TIME YOU CAN HELP THE
Sight ot Desand , membered this old photograp All this happened long, longs
rafts 70° ; f
71 9/10% ‘Cable eee ane was unaccountably worried ayo. Everyone else connected with
70 4/106 Currency y it. he case is dead Peter bears a . ter », ” r r x
; Coupons : VEEN FOR FINLAND FUND
we SHY Basa nal So this friend who shared a flat]"*~ Dame FPARNU: ror . vere E
15% Cheques on with Peter had brought the picture Let the past look after its@M,1@ 04 44 sesneesiow eee OOOO OOOO 4 (ROOF Spb pA gb b gbghgbghatgt gt ety
pose bankers 73 2/10% —without Peter’s knowledge and let the dead bury the dead. PPP LLLLELEL LLL PPE PLL ven
Sight Drafts. - we poe, along to the office. | Peter looks forward to the future. {
1B % Cable Could I help? I spent a dusty| By taking my way out, his friend
3 5/10% Currency 71 7/1@% half hour with old files. jcan help him go forward to enjoy fe
50% coupons De But when I found the story it|it ¥ Joe Wy
did not make happy reading. Well, if you were Peter's friend rt
p

Peter was the baby. —what would you do?—L.E.S.

ear firms) took a jump upwards
after falling for months.
Business View

I am in the habit of foregather-

His mother had just appeared
in court on a charge of murder
The husband, a drunk, had
attacked her, and she hit in self-

FOR ALL YOUR FRIENDS
YOUR DISTINGUISHED

SOS

ing nightly with six or seven qefence, He had fallen: heavily|$ GUESTS AND YOURSELF
businessmen at one of Melbourne’s anq knocked his head on the floor
bars in the post-work last drink There is Nothing Better on
period of 5 to 6 p.m. Most of the The charge was reduced to

the Market than







POS

OEP SAPP PPOP SOS

,-} are extended to adult













plants.

HOW IS IT USED?
Liquinure is only used

tion and applied to growin

ing them with food and dr

time. No wonder they th:

ive

500 scientists

clue

being
and the

Powers
“Canada has a vital interest 1
ndardisation, We would like t
ee the United States and Britai
- using identical weapons. Our force
‘ then would be spared the recur
) rent dilemma presented by rival
weapons, and Wwe could use our
industrial resources to greater
idvantage in support, not only of
ur services, but those of ou

allies,”





NorthStar”
TOA

Famous”
and traditional

all the way

For full informason
see your
Travel Agent or —

TRANS - CA.






Transcontinental









without difficulty, and in the hands of the

in great dilu- experienced
@ plants, provid- urpassed for
ink at the same

ive on it, 1 to 8



Now in effect

7CA 60-DAY EXCURSIONS

Lowest fares*
for air travel to

CANADA

Skyvliners
service
regular flights to
Toronto and Montreal with di-

rect connections to all Canada,

GARDINER AUSTIN & Co, Ltd,
McGREGOR St
Phone 4518

~Tnternational «1 . Trans a VW.



gardener Liquinure is
implicity

PAGE THREE

WANTED

OLD GOLD
AND SILVER
JEWELRY

OR IN PIECES IN
SCRAP FORM

The very highest
market prices paid

at your Jewellers...

Y. De LIMA
& €O.. LTD.

20 BROAD ST.
Phone : 4644
















ever offered



oe



a
(j

un-
and effectiveness.

:
%
8
men are chief accountants, chief manslaughter, and finally the jury %
salesmen, managers or directors returned that canny Scots verdict; %
of secondary industries tyres, Not Proven. $
cheese, plastics, biscuits. She went free, changed het x
As the most recent arrival yame and Peter’s then mar- %
from England I am regarded aS yjeq again - °
an expert on British public . x um
opinion I arrived promptly for i &
our rendezvous last night. And Back again in the front of ty
not one of that little group did [ told my caller the news. 1% Blended and Bottled by
jot come up to me and ask me ‘Now,” he said, “what shall I) @¢
anxiously and commiseratingly tell Peter? For a start he doesn't 1 f » GAT ,
how Britain was going to rid@ eyen know I’ve got the photo-| STUART & SAMPSON
this latest obstacle that had, 80 graph. If I tell him the truth| LD
regrettably, been put in her post- straight out and he passes it on— % (1938) .
war way
ze as he may feel bound to—to
went corrmars mang, Hs fanonoy tothe, then the =f eaveceeces TRY THE NEW LIQUID MANURE
Tee riage is off. PSS LLL LVS
PLLOLE SO ow Meret PLEA ALSELLOS [ IQUINURE
pi ‘ ig WHAT 18 IT? WHAT DOES IT DO?
RUEUMA TisM RIDE A oa e's Liquinure is a Liquiti Plant Food of
eet ona acer which contains Liquid Manure made from Liquinure
a @ essential plant nutrients, major . . ite » bal soi =
and:-minor (trace elements), in’ correct brings the fertility of the ball of soil @
proportion. When diluted with 320 to closing the main roots to any desired
2,500 volumes of water, according to type level. You can make any plant in any
and purpose, it makes the ideal liquid soil grow fast or as steadily as you like.
manure, greatly relished by all growing A novice can obtain first. class results
|
|
{

BICYCLE

) SOS

2
gi
Take It Regularly ! $i THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

%

e|% White Park Road.

% g St. Michael

3 : Office : 4326 Workshop : 4546

& 1% Merchandise: 4528 a 4650
oooow 00S00005506015091900 01 9066000. 90500844000"

STOKES & BYNOE LTD, AGENTSseeeee0eece0eso0567

teaspoonsful (% to 2 tat
the fluid are put into 2
| in a can, according to di

{ label,
NOW AVA
FLOWER A

$S56664:6605555SS SV SS COTSSEESSOESS FSGS OSOSSESS



rallons of water,

ND VEGETABLE



ECONOMY
A 16 oz
Manure.

‘FOR

lespoonsful) of

rections on the : Pt

ILA BLE

THE CORNER

bottle makes 128

GARDENS

STORE

eee



gallons Liquid

AT



|
|


PAGE FOUR

eet

BARBADOS i ADVOCATE



”” Friday, May 9, 1952

FANCY MOLASSES

IT IS much easier to see what has
happened in the molasses industry than to
understand why it has happened.

Barbados having produced the equivalent
of 64,000 puncheons of molasses in 1950-51
is going to produce about half that quantity
this year. And despite the fact that only
ten syrup factories were producing
molasses this year as compared with twelve
syrup factories and a number of sugar fac-
tories last year, the production of syrup
or fancy molasses has already ceased. Two
separate subjects arise for comment.

The first concerns the future of the syrup
factories: the second the future of the fancy
molasses industry.

The tendency in Barbados is for the sugar
industry to become more centralised. Dur-
ing the last eleven years eight dark crystal
sugar factories and 57 syrup factories have
gone out of production.

The closing down this year of two syrup
factories and the restricted period of pro-
duction of the remaining ten may be tem-
porary phenomena or symptomatic of fur-
ther centralising tendencies.

The merits of centralization in Barbados
eannot be decided without extensive re-
search and investigation but it is undeni-
able that centralisation tends towards effi-
ciency and increased output of production
in the sugar industry.



But unless the market for fancy molasses
is in fact decreasing and will continue to
decrease considerably it seems reasonable
to suppose that the maintenance of syrup
factories exclusively occupied in the manu-
facture of fancy molasses is justified. Is the
market in fact decreasing or is the unusual
depression which is being experienced this
year temporary? How far is it a real slump
or how far is it due to overproduction last
year?

It can be very little consolation to the
manufacturer of fancy molasses to reflect
that whereas this year he has been com-
pelled by the advice of the Fancy Molasses
Control and Marketing Board to close down
his factory before the end of April, last
year the production of fancy molasses was
assisted by the output from several dark
erystal sugar factories.

No one could blame the owner of the
syrup factory for asking whether this year’s
slump is in anyway connected with last
year’s overproduction. The result for him
and his employees has been painful enough.
Not only has he been compelled to close
his factory earlier this year and to dismiss
his employees earlier but he is left with
canes standing in his fields which have now
to be sold for producing sugar and which
cannot be sold until the sugar factories are
ready to receive them. A contraction in the
output of fancy molasses will not only affect
all the workers in syrup factories: it will
cause unemployment in cooperages in
Bridgetown and will decrease the number
of part-time employees engaged in hand-
ling molasses.

Observers will note that the fears ex-
pressed at the time when bulk shipment of
fancy molasses was peremptorily stopped
by a decree of the government are now
being realised for another reason.

Unemployment in the molasses industry
is resulting not from bulk shipment but
from a decrease by almost half in this year’s
exports to Canada.

But why is there a decrease in demand?

Can it have anything to do with the delay
in fixing the price for molasses? Legislation
to fix the price was only passed through the
House this week and still has to be ap-
proved by the Legislative Council.

Why must there be such a delay in fixing
the price for molasses so that a factory is
compelled to close down to avoid over-
production before even the priee for its
product is fixed? Is this a business-like way
of dealing with the island’s greatest dollar
earning industry after sugar?

Would there have been a greater demand
for fancy molasses from Canada if the price
of molasses was not equated with that of
sugar? Does this method of price-fixing, ex-
cellent as it may be when demand for sugar
and molasses is great, not militate against
the molasses industry when there is no
such demand? At a time when the price of
refined sugar in Canada is falling by 25
cents per 100 Ibs., are Canadian importers
likely to risk overstocking of molasses? Is
it wise always to equate the price of sugar
with that of molasses? The answer to all
these questions will help to clear up some
of the doubts that are being expressed as to
the wisdom of a policy which has resulted
in so drastic a fluctuation of the fancy
molasses market. The future of bulk ship-
ment, fear of infiltration of bulk-shipped
sugar into Canada from the United States, a
possible fall in the price of sugar are no
doubt factors to be considered in relation to
those answers. But can any industry oper-
ate under the best conditions if it is com-
pelled to shut down before the price of its
product is made known’

Whatever action is taken to inject new
life into the fancy molasses industry an
earlier fixing of the price seems essential.

|
|



A business-man _ KEEPING UP W



BARBADOS ADVOCA

goes to Moscow |

I SAW NO
SMART
WOMEN

srossseecencensccccsncccseccncces By HARRY SCOTT STOKES Pere ta a ee

i who went to Moscow for the economic corferenee which } *
lasted from Aprd 3 to April 10.

rakeenlliieigitin’

Fosencsusescussncccsseusueceeacuss scassesss

By HARKY SCOTT STUKES

It was as a business man first and
last that I went to tne seven-
day economie conterence

in Moscow. My brief-case was
packed with otters. And | sold the
Russians 50,000 wooilea sneep-

skins at £1 each, enough to keep
my factory working for five
weeks, The bargaining was hard,
but the price was right.

From the start I stuck to my
guns and spoke straight business
ianguage. So did Kaplin, head of
Moscow’s buying and selling or-
ganisation. And Andrianko, head
of the Russian trade mission in
London.

The Russians were well inform-
ed. They knew the value of every
related article in my trade, They
knew every producing centre in
England, Europe and America.

Once Kaplin and Andrianko
suggested prices had dropped 25
per cent. since my arrival. I said
I had taken that drop into ac-
count. iad

Negotiations lasted four days.
Then we settled the deal.

When I was away from negoti-
ating I wasted no time at the
“working groups” where so much
propaganda ballyhoo was hurled
about. I rubbernecked my way
through Moscow,

No smart women strolled the
boulevards. There was nothing
chic about them, whatever their

standing in life.
No smart dresses or fur coats.

No hair do’s, Just roughly made
sheepskin coats and second-rate
footwear. i} inal

THE FACTORY

And The House
I SAW where some of those

shoes were made. It was the
“Paris Commune.” Moscow’s
jargest shoe factory employing
7,000 workers.

By British standards it was
pitifully equipped. I employ 45

women to every 55 men. There
the ratio was above 75 women
te 25 men, *
Where were the men? In the
army, many of them—those who
weren’t killed in the war.
Shabbily dressed women,
bulging from _ tattered
worked eight-hour shifts.
They said: “Everything here
is perfect.” I replied: ‘What
about cleaning the windows and
repairing the floors?”
A laugh greeted this. “But
it doesn’t need an expert to tell
us that,” they said.

feet
shoes

“No, but you don’t do it.” I
pointed out.
It was hopeless to get beyond

that Soviet stubbornness and as-
sumption that because it was
Russian and Stalin-inspired it was
the best.

If that is an example of work-
ing conditions, how then do they
live?

One building I saw was a block

THE SLUMS
I SAW
WERE BAD





HARRY SCOTT STOKES

is Mayor of Glastonbury,
Somerset town with a popula-
tion of 5,000. '

HE

HE is managing director of a
business with 700 employees.

HE is a Quaker, aged 55; a former
subaltern with a World War 1
M.C.; and a World War II vcom-
pany commander in the Duke of
Wellington’s Regiment.

HE is a one-time Liberal, now
non-political, but a member of
the local Tory club.

HE is a Winchester Scnool-boy,
“who in those happier, pros-
perous, lazy days befor¢ 1914
sought a classical education and
an intellectual life.”

ERASED
of 100 flats. There was a store on
the ground floor. But I was not
allowed to see any d elling in
occupation,

However, four miles from the
Kremlin and 400 yards off the
magnificent Gorki-street I saw
some slums—about as mean as
anything I have ever seen out-
side the white riverside slums of
Tennessee.

There were little wooden houses
built in the middle of last century.
Snow beat in through the ill-
fitting doors,

THE THEATRE
—angry Chinese

ONCE on my travels | lost my
temper. I was taken to “Red Pop-
py,” a ballet of China’s history
since 1927 and her “exploitation
by the British and American im-
perialists.”

Then the finale—salvation by
the Russians! The Chinese were
even angrier than I was: “They

THE CHAPEL

I VISITED |
WAS FULL

dian't do anything to save us from
the Japanese who were our real
enemies. The thing is simply
false,” they said.

And I told my Russian conduc-
tors: “It is shamefully jingo and
anti-British. I happen to be Brit-
ish. It is an insult to a guest.”

They looked surprised,
there was no apology. I
back to the magnificent
placed at our disposal,

After that I went about on my
own—to performances of “Madam
Butterfly” and “La Traviata.”
There was nothing altered in
these productions, though
“Madam Butterfly” could © lend
itself to exeellent propaganda!

THE CHAPEL
—all is not lost

JUST once I was moved to a
feeling that all is ndt lost in the
Godless society that Stalin has
created.

We went to a “Baptist” chapel.
Every inch was packed with 1,200
worshippers. There was an up-
surge of welcome ang love.

The service went on for two
and a half hours. We were given
a Bible printed in 1926. No Bi-
bles had-been printed since then,
they.said.-It was a tcuching gift.
For Bibles: cannot be bought.

Net even “the negation of
God. on -earth erected into a
system of>government”—to quote
Mr. Gladstone—can prevail
against this spirit of religious fer-

vour,
THE. PANIC
—and the way out

UNHEALTHY, imprisonment of
individual opinion is strangling
Russian political development.

Make: no mistake about it.
Russia is a Police State. Jt is spy-
ridden. Men and women spy on
their own people and _ strangers
alike,

Even our interpreters worked
for the intelligence service. I
know. My mail was read.

But they are ina panic. I
reached that conelusicn after
days of talks and visits.

And they have the same fear
France had after 1918—the fear
of another attack from Germany.
A remote fear no doubt.

How can a business man’s con-
science be reconciled with all
this? I say that free exchange}
of trade will do more to cut out
the jamming stations and the hid-
den micrephones than all the
pious resolutions of the intellect-
ual pacifist.

I came back from Moscow with
a full order book, Of that I am
proud and pleased. It will keep
my people in work. It will give
a poor nation something towards
her low standard of life.

Maybe more of it will help kill
that panic and fear which grip the
Communist leaders.

Dy —L.E.S.

but
went
hotel



Our Readers

The Right Approach to
Birth Control
To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Kindly grant me a little
‘space in your newspaper to state a
few facts in connection with this
question of Birth Control, which
has been so widely discussed of
late; some of your correspondents
have put forward some sound
views, as to why Birth Control
should be practised, others not so
sound.

Barbados today has a popula-
tion of roughly 220,000 souls and
of this number a large portion are
idle most of the time, It is known
that there is not sufficient employ-
ment to absorb the greater portion
of the working classes. What is to
be done then? The world that we
are living in today is no dream
world, and hard conditions call for
practical measures. Mankind has
free will, but also has reason and
common sense and if he does not
apply those at times, well then he
would deserve whatever stew he
found himself in.

Birth Control or Family Plan-
ning must be practised in Barba-
dos, if disaster is to be avoided in
the near future. It is the only way
of keeping the population down to

-a level where it can be decently
fed and clothed — emigration
would help a great deal, but it is
not on an operational basis at
present,

As regards the self control part
cf this question, I don’t believe
that the average man or woman
ever practiced it in any form, and
I think the individual would find
it a little beyond his or her power
of control. If tested on this very
vexed question of the moment, it
would be asking a little toc much
at this stage.

There is a way whereby one can
so furify and raise ones nature to
a level of Cosmic consciousness
where the question of sex ceases
to exist as a human element, this
is the hard way, and will raise the
question of Self Control again
which I wish to avoid at this final
stage of my letter,

WELL WISHER.
Birth Coniroi

To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—For sometime now I have
been reading with a great deal
of interest series of letters for and
against birth control, But the only
writer to approach this subject
with any intelligent appreciation
and understanding in my opinion
is Mr. Beckles.

The advocates for self-control,
and whom I suspect are advocates
purely through religious princi-
ples, fail to realize that the la-
bouring classes in this Island, or
anywhere else for that matter, can

Say:

never hope to reach that high
spiritual and mental level so con-
ducive to “Self Control. Perhaps
these advocates, who are neither
practical, nor realists in the true
sense of the word, and who have
already reached this much to be
desired goal, might be persuaded
to instruct the poor misguided
masses in the first few lessons of
this all too absorbing subject; and
then in years to come this class
of people in the Island would en-
joy the unique reputation as
Jeaders of the Self Control Doc-
trine,

Self contro] is definitely not the
sclution to the over population
problem, We have only to take a
quick glance at the population
of this Island to appreciate the
fact why it is not so, The middle
and upper classes who through
the years have been and still are
practising either birth control or
to a lesser extent self control, are
very much in the minority, the
lower classes (to whom the word
majority can hardly be termed
appropriate) have been practising
something, but it can hardly be
calleq birth or self control. Some
through ignorance, look askance
on birth contrél, others probably
have never heard of it, and the
whole can never aspire®to such
a lofty practice as “Self Control”

To save this Is'and from hun-
ger, poverty, unemployment, and
all those unhappy relations of
over population, let us advocate
birth control for the masses, and
Jeave self control for those higher
ppiritual beings in our midst be-
fere we have an even more terri-
ble control in the shape of “Na-
ture Control,” a Nature whose
balance when thrown out makes
no hesitation in re-adjusting it re-
gardless of the consequences.

If an epidemic or pestilence
were to hit this Island, birth con-
trol, self control or any other
form of control would not help
us, and each and everyone of us
know this only too well.

Yours faithfully,

NEMESIS.
Electricity
To the Editor, The Advocate,
IR, — I refer to your re-

cent interview with Capt. W. A.
Brown,of the Barbados Electricity
Supply Corporation published on
the 2nd inst. The express pur-
pose of the Chairman’s visit to the
Island is to get certain clauses in
the Public Utilities Bill adjusted,
provided of course that the Party
in power conforms to these. If
there is any discord in effecting
these changes, are we to assume
that there will be no immediate
improvement in the supply situa-
tion? A clarification of this point
is worthwhile asking for.



The Chairman has made no sug-
gestions ‘for the immediate im-
provement of the domestic supply
situation, such as rationing and
the temporary withdrawal of cur-
rent for advertising purposes dur-
ing the peak, hours, this being in
his opinion of secondary. impor-
tance, and needless’ to say’ there
is widespread discontent about
this, The Corporation is com-
pelled by law to supply current
for domestic uses, under the Or-
dinance, and their 10 unit agree-
ment is a breach of their interest
in the essential requirements of
the inhabitants of the Colony.

Thanking you for space,

Yours-faithfully,
*FAIRPLAY”.

A’ Nuisance

To the Editor, the Advocate,

SIR,—I shall be grateful if you
will publish the following in
“Our Readers Say.”

The problem of catching a bus
is at all times a difficult one and
it ir-being greatly aggravated. by
the number of school children
who accentuate the congestion by
taking an éarly bus in the morn-
ings and a late bus in the even-
ings, instead of that provided for
them.

sind

Along "my bus ~*oute—Black
Rock/Paynes Bay etc.—and prac-
tically every route there are
school buses provided for school
children, and yet, these buses
are at times half empty, while
passenger buses are packed with
children on their way to and
from school,

Everyone knows that the bus
problem has gradually been
getting worse, for even at normal
times it is difficult’ to secure a
seat in a bus and the school
children are doing nothing to
alleviate the rush.

Can’t school children be made
to catch the school bus? And if
enough buses are not provided
for this purpose, can’t that
remedied? Surely another bus
can be provided along crowded
routes for these children! Teach-
ers and parents can co-operate
to see that the children are made

provided for

to catch the
them and ieve the cram,

Apart from, discomfort and| have
inconvenience; afforded to work-

la day from people who wish to spend a night

ing people, it is appalling to see
the children rushing for or hop- |
ping on to moving buses. One!
wonders how it is that they avoid |
injury. It childrén were made
to catch their .buses these cir-)
cumstances would not exist.

I have written.this letter in the
hopethat those*responsible will
do something about it and help
to change a state of affairs that
has developed into a nuisance.

A WORKER,

















TE

THE DUTCHMAN

(By R. M. MacCOLL)
WASHINGTON.

YOU may sometimes get the impression
that Congressmen are a bunch of rampag-|
ing chaps who ride roughshod over poor
quivering characters called to testify before
one of those teeming investigating commit-
tees.

Well, in point of fact, the Congressmen
often feel as frustrated as a refrigerator
salesman in northern Greenland.

One. of the biggest frustration-causers
they have ever encountered is a retiring
figure with a gravel voice named Henry
“The Dutchman” Grunewald.

Again and again has the Dutchman’s name
cropped up in the tangled skein of inquiry
into corruption which the law-makers have







tried to unravel.
This 59-year-old Grunewald has appeared
befgre the Congressmen four separate



times, No use. All he has told them has been
his name and age. Address? But no. Occu-
pation? Come now.

Connections with various business men in
Washington? I say, you chaps. Did you call
so-and-so on the telephone on such-and-
such-a-date? What makes you think I know
how to use a telephone?

wrath and, by a vote of 332 to nothing, in-
dicted “The Dutchman” for contempt.

In Decaturville, Tennessee, they find a
pair of trousers which belonged to a man
killed by a tornado 50 miles away last
month, The wind had blown them all that
way—with a wallet containing £142 in the
pocket.

victory. yet in a State popularity poll.
Eisenhower puts up his feeblest showing.

the returns counted this is the position :—

ers—l1 per cent.

over a command for a mass parachute drop
in big war games which have been going on
near Fort Hood, in Texas. Two ’chutists
were killed and nearly 200 badly hurt be-
cause the drop took place in bad conditions.
But a general and a colonel who ordered the

Finally Congress arose tonight in its 1

Senator Taft wins his most resounding
And

The State is Illinois, heart of the Isolation-
ist Mid-West. And with three-quarters of

Taft (Mr. Republican), 73 per cent.; Mr.
Harold Stassen, 13 per cent.; General Eisen-
hower—whose name was written in by vot-

There is anger—and a determination to
investigate—in many parts of the nation



LONG LEAD,



FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1

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exercise say they are “wholly satisfied.”

A cinema in Washington took a_ poll
among its regular patrons on whether they
liked or disapproved of pop-corn. By 95 to 1
they said they loathed the sight, smell and
taste of the stuff. ° :

Encouraged by this, the management not
only threw away its pop-corn selling
machines, but started a new policy of reviv-
ing “intelligent” films of the old days.

Results—massive business, while all other
cinemas are complaining of pint-sized au-
diences.

Talking of pop-corn, that is one of Ameri-
ca’s allegedly edible products which always
gives me nausea, Others I place in this class
include salt water taffy (which tastes like
cotton waste soaked in brine), Philadelphia
serapple (pure fatty degeneration of some-
thing or other), hominy grits (a sort of poor
man’s rice), and corn pone (the worst bread
you.ever tasted).

The human touch: Investigating Congress-
men wax sarcastic over the high rate of ill-
ness among witnesses in the income-tax
inquiry. No fewer than 15 men
whose presence is requested are suddenly
laid up with ailments ranging from low

scandal

blood pressure to high.

RESTLESS GHOST



A TUDOR well in the garden of Abbas
Hall, Great Cornard, Suffolk—Britain’s most

haunted house—is to be excavated in an
attempt to lay the ghost which is said by
villagers to haunt the 14th century building.

The digging is to be undertaken by
American GIs stationed on Lakenheath air-
field near by.

The owner of the hall, Mr. Cecil Wells, ¢
Sudbury Solicitor, has given his consent,

The well, 40ft. deep, was filled with rub-
ble many years ago.

MIDNIGHT SEANCE

Now a London medium who held a mid-
night seance in the house has reported re-
ceiving a spirit message to the effect that
the ghost is connected with human remains
which will be found at the bottom of the
well.

Mr, Wells told me to-day: “I gladly gave
my consent for the excavations. I am not a

be believer in hauntings, but the house has

now attracted such notoriety, that nothing
would please me more than for the ‘ghost’
to be laid.
SIX LETTERS A DAY
“Since Abbas Hall came into the news ]
been getting an average of six letters

there.”
One of the psychical research workers
who has been active at Abbas Hall told me:

|\“We believe that bones will be found st the

bottom of the well.

“If they are, they will be buried in conse-
crated ground—and the Abbas ghost will
find peace at last.”—L.ES,

WHY NOT CONSERVE VALUABLE FOOD?

ght









in

STERNE’S DEEP FREEZE





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This man is completing a deal en Golden Grade

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smooth-fitting and

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A
GOLDEN
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SUIT

Hand Tailored

4 by
‘a SUMRIE
of England




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" REMEMBER MOTHER ON
on MOTHER’S DAY
SUNDAY, MAY 11TH
WITH A BOX OF
CHOCOLATES



Boxes of Chocolates
Sizes 1 Ib. to 3 Ibs,

Carr’s Cream Crackers $1.20
per tin

Carr’s Sweet Biscuits .36 per
%% pkg.

Churchman’s Cigarettes

Embassy Cigarettes



Shop at GODDARDS

Refresh at GODBARDS

Lunch at GODDARDS

Ask fora GODDARD 3 Year Old RUM



AED DPLL LPL FLL PLR ELLEELELLLPLLELLA


FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1952



GREAT CHANGES IN U.K. IN SOCIAL.

British Trade Unions
Severely Tested

LECTURING to

an appreciative



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



ing the income of the sections of
the community other than the
wage-earners (e.g) by reducing
profit margins). In so far as the
second method offers any relief—
and today it offers very little—it

audience at the is not a method which can be ap-

British Council headquarters yesterday evening, on “Brit- plied by collective bargaining, but
ish Trade Unions To-day,” Mr. J. D. M. Bell said that great Only by fiscal or other Govern-

changes had taken place in Britain since the war in the

social and economic policy.

ment means. Increased produc-
tion remains the key,

Those changes together with This situation demands

some

the difficult international economic position of the country, kind of wage policy, as otherwise

provided a severe test for the British Trade Unions which the
the responsibilities imposed by their own ‘great strength

had made it necessary that

One
cumstances they had shown a hi

social responsibility.

Mr. Bell is Lecturer at Glasgow
University in Modern Economic
History and Research Lecturer in
Industrial Relations.

He said:

Strength

The Trade Unions are in Britain
today immensely powerful organ-
isations. Their membership in re-
cent years, estimated at over 9
millions, is higher than ever be-
fore, and, while it is true that it
represents just under half of the
total employed population, that
apparently low general proportion
is largely accounted for by the
existence of considerable groups
of workers among whom organisa-
tion is but little advance —
clerks, distributive workers some
sections of unskilled workers,
many groups of women workers,
ete. Amongst all male workers
the population is probably as high
as two-thirds and in many major
industries (e.g, mining, railways,
cotton textiles, boots and shoes
among craftsmen in printing,
building, engineering and _ ship-
building, among civil servants and
teachers) it is often much higher
than that. Moreover, about 15—16
million workers are estimated to
be covered by one or other wage
agreements or awards in the
negotiations of which the Trade
Unions are parties,

The total membership is not
only larger than before; it is
more representative of the
working population as a
whole. In 1913 more than
half of all the country’s trad?
Unionist were coal-miners,
cotton operatives, building
workers or workers in metal.
Today these four groups ac-
count for little over one-third,
the decline in their relative
importance being due to the
spread of organisation else-
where, especially among non-
manual workers, women and
workers of lower degrees of
skill,

Through amalgamation, federa-
tion, and other forms of joint
action their strength is also more
concentrated than before. The
six largest unions today account
for just about half of the affiliated
membership of the Trade Union
Congress. he 17 largest form
two-thirds of all the Trade Unions
in Britain. In engineering and
shipbuilding, the largest complex
of industries in the country, a con-
siderable measure of joint action
is obtained through the Confeder-
ation of shipbuilding and Engineer-
ing Unions, which since 1946, has
included all the important organ-
isations, in the trades. Finally,
the strength and prestige of the
T.U.C. has perhaps never been
greater than during these post-
war years.

The Labour Party

This powerful movement has
moreover been operating in large-
ly favourable political, economic,
and social circumstances, Politi-
cally, the Labour Party, with its
close links with the Unions has
been in office for most of the post
war period. Today it is in op-
position by a small margin of
seats, but I venture to suggest that
since the war there has been not
a sweeping or revolutionary but a
marked and permament swing to
the left in British political opinion,
which means that at least Labour
will enjoy periodic terms of office
in the future and also that the
policies of the Conservatives will
have to be conditioned (as they
already show some signs of being)
to the changed circumstances,

Both major parties, again, are
committed to economic policies
based on the maintenance of full
employment (or at least a high
and stable level of employment)
although opinions differ as to
which side can offer the more
effective guarantees of that main-
tenance. A high level of employ-
ment undoubtedly favours the
unions. Finally, there is wide-
spread recognition in Britain to-
day of the Social importance of
Trade Unions. It is almost un-
thinkable that there should be
any kind of advisory committee,
commission of inquiry or joint
executive board dealing with any
major questions of social policy
with the Trade Unions being
Biven, in practice, representation
upon it.

Great Changes

The great changes in social and
economic policies which have
taken place in Britain since the
war, the. difficult international
economic position of the country,
and the responsibilities imposed

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competitive pressures of
sectional collective bargaining will

. push the economy into inflation.
Should face. In the cir- getween 1948 and 1950 a

ghly developed sense of temporary answer was found in
wage-restraint. That, in my view,
is an essential part of any etffiec-
tive wage policy under full em-
ployment. But it can only be ap-
plied if the Government is at the
same time maintaining a reason-

by their own great strength, pro-
vide a severe test for the British
Trade Unions. My own view is
that, in face of this test, they have
shown a highly developed sense

‘ evel ably stable level of prices and
of social responsibility. They satisfactory social justice by action
could, in Britain’s post war against profits.

economic crisis, have misused the

power which they possess to Wage—Restraint

wreck the country’s prospects of Wage-restraint, however, can
recovery; so far from doing so, mever be the whole’ answer. To
they have exhibited a degree of freeze wages means to freeze
testraint which must have wage-structure, and that. is un-
astounded many of their critics. thinkable. Moreover, trade unions
On the other hand, the process of derive the bulk of their dynamic

hdapting their methods and from the wage-struggle, What
practices to the needs of the new js needed is some form of wage
situation — which has certainly policy, co-ordinated through the

been going on—has not in some T.U.C_ whereby the unions. will
directions, I would suggest, been themselves decide how the in-
going on quickly enough. creased wages which rising pro-

The primary functions of Trade duction make possible should be
Unions has always been, and still shared out.

is, the maintenance and improve- Are the trade unions yet
ment of the wages, hours and ready for this? Ultimately that
conditions of work of their mem-~ means, is the ordinary rank and
bers. To that end they have fle member ready for it?
used primarily the method or Hardly yet, given an imaginative
collective bargaining with em- ead from Government the ex-

ployers. That method had _ in- erience of 1948-50 suggests that
volved them in two “battles.” yuh could be a

(1) to secure satisfactory collec- The answer is always — out-
tive bargaining machinery put, and more output, alone it
(2) to use that machinery to ad- would not be enough, but it

vantage. ae would make every other aspect
The first battle, it is possible to of the problem so much more
Say, is as ggod as won. In every capable of solution.

major industry collective bargain-
ing machinery exists, usually Control Of Industry
On a national basis. Where that The Trade Unions have done
machinery is not wholly satisfac- much since the war to assist the
tory it has been supplemented by drive for greater output. A
State—backed wage fixing author- maximum effort however depends
ities:on a tripartite basis, which on the degree of sympathy they
act as schools of collectivé bar- have with the purposes and
gaining.” At every turn, the state- policies which industry seeks to
has aided, encouraged and serve. The best way to elicit that
augmented the voluntary system. sympathy is to associate the work-
Trade Dispute ers with the foundations of those
That negotiations are usually purposes and policies, which is
national, brings the danger of the precisely what the more enlighten-
national trade dispute. That is ed of modern managers seek to
a danger which unions and em- accomplish through the machinery
ployers have been so reluctant to of joint consultation,
face, that the official strike would Joint Consultation has been wel-
seem to be almost obsolescent as comed by the Trade Unions as
an industrial weapon. This poses providing an intelligent and prac-
two problems: tical answer to their forty-year-
(a) resentment finds expression old demand for democracy in in-
in the unofficial strike, which is, dustry. From crude and vague
in the strictest sense, irresponsible, Philosophies of workers’ control
and which, if widely enough they have come to accept consul-
practised, would discredit the tation as the best means of ex-
established system of industrial pressing the workers participa-
eerenions. The answer to it lies tion in management,
mainly in the internal organisa- .
tion of the wehand. 2 Industrial Democracy
and (b) an alternative way of | Already through advisory com-
finding an answer in the event of mittees on Government industriai
a breakdown in negotiations must and manpower policies, Develop-
be found. From 1940 to 1951 that ment Councils in private industry
answer was provided by com- 2nd national consultative councils
pulsory arbitration, but that could in nationalised industry, the trade
scarcely in a democratic com- unions can make their contribu-
munity, be permanent. Today tion at the “top-level’. But indus-
the Industrial Disputes Order trial democracy _ is essentially
(Order 1376) of 1951, by offering something which touches the in-
the means to a final settlement dividual worker, which must
without, however, denying the primarily have its roots in the
right to strike in the last resort, workshop, What is needed is not
seems to offer a workable solution, merely a system of committees,
‘Nevertheless, it must be remem- Valuable as they are, but a con-
bered that the first responsibility tinuous effort to enlist “the per-
of a Trade Union is to protect the Sonal initiative of each in the col-
wages and conditions of its mem- lective action of the group.
bers: the pursuit by the state of | This development carried far
policies which threaten these must enough and with goodwill can
make industrial peace harder to make the purely advisory con-
maintain. sultative aoe oe zee
» Secon Parliaments of industry; wi
ese chon eeu etiine management as their executive

i ide: agents, But once again it is a de-
nike nee Wiens velopment which has its full

y le.
1) the Unions’ interest is not chance of success only in a stab e,
just a the level of money wages, fully employed ed acetal ae
but on the quantity of goods and industrial peace and social justice
services that these wages will like prevail.
command, hence they are concern-
ed with the effect of Government
economic planning upon the level
of prices.

and (2) the unions interest
not just in the hourly (or piece)
rate of wages, but in the annual
level of earnings, i.e. in the op-
portunities for full-time work and
in-the question of full employ-
ment,

This widening of the objective
introduces complications. In con-
opens a mass SRD
when overnment set about A oi ee
policies of deficit budgeting, public Unions refuse to take any risks
investment subsidies to consumers Whatever. Any social decision .
etc., in an effort to promote re- a matter of balancing one set o
covery Trade Union pressure on ®isks against the other.
wages is unlikely to cause an in-
flationary spiral in prices or
seriously to impede the extension
of employment.

Full Employment

But, with full employment cir-
cumstances are very different.
Real inflation becomes a threat, qemands a fundamental unity of
asthe increased claim on the purpose between the State and the
available quantities of goods and voluntary associations, and the
services which rises in wages will on the side of the latter to
represents cannot be met by meet their responsibilities, This
further expansions of employment. challenge faces the trade unions
Increases can only be met by in- more than it does any other kind
creased production or by lower- of organisation.

SSS

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Conclusion

Given the prosperity and the
achievement of enlighted and
js social policies the trade unions
, are sufficiently responsible to
adopt their practices and methods
to the situation. This attitude in-
volves them in some degree of
risk by dismantling some of their
traditional defences and restric-
tions they are banking on_the
continuance of such policies, They
may not continue. But their
failure is certain if the trade

Personally, I hold an essential
feature of a democratic society to
be the existence of voluntary
hssociations, assisting in the
formation and execution of major
policies, and not leaving every
thing to the State. Such an idea







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DIAL 2664

{
(





a



| CAVE



LIGHT FLASHING

OFF COUVA

THE Harbour Master has
received a cable from the
Acting Harbour
Trinidad which states: A
light flashing every second,
visible eight miles, is «x--
hibited at a height of 20 feet
from a white steel structure
with a red horizontal strip,
red lantern on a pile beacon
in a position approximately
latitude 10 degrees 23 min-
utes 54 seconds North, long-
tude 61 degrees, 31 min-
utes, 42 seconds West, on
the S.W. extremity of Couva
Shoal. The red buoy in the
vicinity has been removed
and is to be expunged from
the British Chart No. 483.

Vessels bound to southern
ports are requested to report
on their arrival the distance
light is raiseq and their
height of eye.

|
|



HARBOUR NEWS:
: 99
“Kosarene

Here From
B. Guiana

The Schooner Rosarene under
Capt. L. Ollivierre arrived irom
Demerara yesterday laden with
70 tons of firewood, 300 bags of
charcoal, 660 bags of rice, 500
bran and 60 polish. Besides other
cargo, the Rosarene had 80 bun-
dles of shingles on board, but
these shingles were not for
Barbades, .

* * *

Wharf hands were busy un-
loading the M.V. Caribbee yester-
day of her 98 bags of dried copra,
three crates of fresh fruit, cab-
bages, empty barrels, Ju-c bottles
and other cargo,

The 100 ton Caribbee came
from Dominica with skipper
Basil Gumbs on Wednesday.

The M.V. Daerwood came in
yesterday evening frem Grenada,
having the yacht Leander, 48
tonnage, in tow. The Daerwood
left Barbados last Sunday.

ARTIE'S HEADLINE

“2. And if ie will help
in the slump I'll have u
reel of cotton.”



“Nelsoii” Due Today

The Lady Nelson will be ar-
riving to-day from Georgetown,
Trinidad, Grenada and St. Vin~«
cent. From Barbados she will be
sailing north for Bermuda, Bos-
ton, Halifax and Montreal via the
British Northern Islands.

At about mid-day the Canadian
Challenger arrives from = Trini-
dad. She will be sailing north,
direct to St. Johns, New Bruns-
wick,



Cyclist Injured

Shortly after 2.15 p.m. yester-
day Everton Boyce, a labourer of
Haggatt Hall, St. Michael, sus-
tained injuries to his face and
hands after he fell from his bi-
cycle which he was riding along
Government Hill, St. Michael.

He was treated at the General
Hospital and discharged. The
front wheel of the bicycle was
damaged.

_Mrs. A. M Arias who left for
Canada by the Lady dney last month
was a resident of Pine Hill, St, Michdel,
it was not Mrs. A. M. Arthur of York-
shire, Christ Chureh as was previousiy
reported in this newspaper.





* or







Rises Again

@ From rage |
again with luxury stores and res-
taurants and its coloured neon
Gaus at night Pivai Mose of

«Broadway and London’s Picadilly

Circus,

Even in Communist controlled
East Berlin slow recovery is be-
ginning — much siower tan Uiat
an the city’s western sectors. But
destruction and devastation are
still there.

Empty Spaces

Vast empty spaces mark the
places where once stood Hitler’s
Chancellory, the Nazi Foreign
Utnce, Joseph Goebbels’ Propa-
ganda Ministry, the United States,
British and French Embassies, his-
toric Kranzler’s Cafe and the
City’s most fashionable hotels —
the Adlon, Bristol and Eden.

It still will be many years be-
fore the scars of Berlin's air bom-
bardment by the Western Allies
and the ten days’ seige by! the
Red Army disappear altogetner,

The final act of capitulation
was signed at the Russian head-
quarters at Karlshorst an East
Berlin suburb that came through
the war relatively unscathed.
After hours of last minute nego-
tiations with the Western Allies
the Russian Commander in Chief
Marshal Grigori Zhukov sum-
mened the German delegates
shortly before midnight to the
hall in the former Wehrmacht
technical school building. The
U.S. was represented by General
Carl Spaatz, Brftain by Air Chief
Marsha] Sir Arthur Tedder and
France by General Jean De Lat-
tre De Tassigny.

Keitel, who was haughty and
self possessed, his face slightly
flushed slammed his Marshal's
baton on the table and sat down
staring arrdgantly ahead. He
was accompanied by Admiral
Friebeurg who committed sui-
cide a few weeks later and
General ‘Paul Stumpf, Com-
mander in Chief of the Luft-
waffe, ’

Tedder, Deputy to General
Eisenhower, Western Allied Su-
preme Commander rose and asked
coldly in English. “I ask you,
have you read this document of
unconditional surrender? Are you
prepared to sign it?”

“We Are Ready”

Keitel answered in

a rasping
voice in German: “Yes we are
ready.” At a sign from Zhukov,

Keitel picked up his cap and Mar-
shal's baton and slowly and care-
fully inserted a monocle in his
right eye. Then he walked over
to the table in front of the Allied
leaders and signed in a scrawling
hand the single word “Keitel.”

It was just 12.15 a.m. on May

9, 1945. Ags he returned to his
place Keitel began loudly de-
manding another 24 hours to

notify forces under his command.

Zhukov ignored the request and
the Germans were escorted from
the room later to be taken to an
Allied Prison camp.

On their way they drove for
fhe last time through a Berlin
that was a hideous nightmare, a
Jabyrinth of total destruction,

From Curfuelstendamm in the
West to Frankfurter Alley in East
Berlin now renamed Stalin Alley
the City was nothing but an eerie
echoing waste of ruins and bomb
craters and burned out skeletons
of buildings. Whole areas were
blocked off by enormous bomb

craters or piles of debris, Bar-
ricades for street fighting still |
barred some streets.

Wrecked streetcars leaned |
drunkenly against the sides of
buildings. Here and there were
wreckeq 88 mm. anti-aircraft

guns and the carcases of shot up
Tiger tanks, Smoke till curled
up and hung over the citv. To
‘all appearances Berlin had ab-
porbed these blows for al’ time.
—U-P.

REMANDED |
Lamount Griffith of Britton’s
Hill, St. Michael was yesterday
remanded with bail until May 14
by His Worship Mr. C. L. Wal-
wyn, Acting Police Magistrate of ,
District “A,” on a charge of at-|
tempting to set fire to the dwell-
ing house of Beryl Dowrich. The
charge states that the offence was
committed cn February 20.

Mr. F. Smith is appearing on
behalf of Griffith, while Sgt. King
is prosecuting for the Police from |
information receiyed, Three wit-
nesses gave evidence for the pros- |
ecution yesterday.





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HANDBAGS



ECONOMIC POLICY

West Germany Carpenter Charged

With Slealitig
Bottle Of Perfunie

A 29-year-old
ston Waldron, alias
Mayers Land, St. Michael, wa
yesterday charged by the Police
before His Worship Mr. G. &
Griffith, Acting Police Magistrate
of District ‘A”, with the larceny
of a bottle of perfume, the prop-
erty of Bookers Drug Store, on
February 16.

The case was adjourned unti
to-day, Mr. E, W. Barrow is ap-
pearing on behalf of Waldron,
while Sgt. Murrell is prosecuting
for the Police. George Bradshaw
a clerk of Bookers Drug Store
told the court that on Februar)
16 while he was standing behind
the counter he saw the defendant
put his hand in an open glass
ease in which were bottles of per-
fume and lotion. He saw the de
fendant with a bottle in his hand
but the defendant ran away

When the defendant ran out o
the store he chased him, but
failed to catch up with him, He
went back and reported the mat-
ter to the Manager of the Store.

To the court Bradshaw
that he had seen the
since that day,

2000-year-old
beats are ‘out

of pickle’

carpenter Win-

“Dauber” of

saic
defendan

‘[‘wo ancient craft, about
2000 years old, which
nave been “in pickle” for
four years at the National
Maritime Museum, Green-
wich, have now been taken
out to dry
The vessels were discovered

in the mud of the River Humber
n 1937, and 10 years later were

removed by road to. the
nuseum
They were put into a tank

Niled with glycerine, where they
remained until a short time
ago.
On show

The “ pickling’
sary to save the
going to dust

Parts of. the vessels are miss

was
wood

neces-
from

ing, but the remnants will be
assembled soon and the boats
will be put on show at the
museum

They are believed to repre
sent the first stage in plank
built boats. Before this boats
were made from hollowing

varts of tree trunks



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|







heaper Newsprint

@ From Pege 1
ould increase world supplies by
11 per cent.

Sugar Cane

Sugar ca ; botanically in the
same family as bamboo, which
ows in a tropical belt all round
>» world. There is, therefore, arf
ilimited supply of raw material,
he said. But there are two prob-

lems facing the newspaper world
he added, which are:

“1. The competition from
mills requiring to make other
pay ind we have already
found a resistance by our friends
in the West Indic who are
more interested in producing
bagasse pulp for the manufac-
ture of higher-grade papers than
newsprint; and

“2. The fact that, although
bamboo exists in such enormous
quantities, there are no pulp
mills to deal with it,

‘The cost of putting up paper
mills to-day is staggering. The

American Government have grant-

‘a to a concern in the Louisiana
ugar-growing country, facilities
to put up a new paper mill at

cost of over £17,000,000, That
nill is to produce bagasse news-
rrint.”

Details
Mr. Curtis-Willson said he had
ent all the details he had
umassed to UNESCO because they
ould do more with it than he

‘ould. He added. “What we want
© do is to interest the sugar grow-
ers in the West Indies, in Mauri-

tius, in the Indonesian countries,
in Ceylon and India, until you
have gota chain of pulp mills
“ound the world,

“These pulp mills need not be
paper-producing, because to pro-
duce the pulp you do not need

the highly-skilled labour that has
to go into a newsprint mill. You
can, in each of these countries,
find an abundance of comparative-
y cheap and unskilled labour to
preduce the pulp. ;

“Therefore, the time seems ripe
for every country to press forward
for experimentation in these new
sources of supply. We have done
what we can in this country; we
have proved out a point that we
can make paper. We have got the
know-how; but what we have not
got, and, I am afraid we shall not



get,

PAGE FIVE





is the support of the paper
makers ‘ ~

New Raw Materials

That, I think, is a job which
newspapermen. in. every
country have got to break down;
the opposition, not necessarily
violent opposition, but the inertia
the refusal to move, the refusal
to do anything with these new raw
materials, by the paper manufac-
turers.

“Let us agree that they are
producing at the moment the
capacity of their mills. It is no
use to us in England talking to
our mills and saying that they
should use bagasse because they
are working to the full extent on
the traditional raw material that
is already coming into this coun-
try and we cannot produce the
new pulp at present at a competi-
tive price which would encourage
them to use bagasse instead of
pulp from Scandinavia and else-
where.

‘That is only for to-day. I want
to emphasise as strongly as I can
that the world is marching to-
wards a newsprint famine unless
these new untraditional sources of

upply are tapped”

we



—B.U.P,

What’s In A Name?
TURIN, May 8.

Ten years ago Francesco bel-
Joni was sentenced to seven years
in jail for having called his dog
“Benito” and as a result of that
he was not able to get married.
His flancee’s father then a fervent
fascist called off the marriage and
denounced Francesco to authori-
ties on charges of having insulted
the late dictator by using his name
for a dog. :

Released from jail in 1945
Francesco not able to marry be-
cause his fiancee’s father said he
would not have his daughter mar+
ry a man with a Police record.
Belleni appealed against sentenee
and the Appeal Court ‘of Turin
yesterday annulled sentence’ four
years of which Francesco had
served,

He will 1..arry on Sunday,





ANIAMTED

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INE RUM




PAGE SIX BARBADOS. ADVOCATE FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1952


























































































































* — soldi
1 ene LL CC LL
PUBLIC NOTICES! PUBLIC S GOVERNMENT NOTIC
sal ; oS ee RNDME ES SHIPPING NOTICES
- |
}
fuk GARBADOS MUTUAL LIFF JOHN R. BOVELL SCHOLARSHIP | —- - ~ - 7 _
TELEPHONE 2508 aSeURAT ° . |\——_—— ———
i ccnticariciieensnecitennitinemein VE i SSURANCE SOCIETY REAL EST
1 notif the policyholders ATE Applications Sears . “ . }
ons are invited for one “John R. Bovell Scholarship” Ot
‘ . s eee ta cane gna 2 | een eee 5 . . ship’ oe
DIED FOR SALE - a ates - LAND Pemitifully situated, Graeme) Which will be of the value of $1,236 per annum for three years ten- ROYAL NETHERLANDS \e os POSTROOOOOOOS
Mt ; e | Hal ‘errace, with Water, ae and}able at the Imperial College of Tropical Agriculture. Applications to | The M.V CACIQUE DEL %
: =| city 0 lo . s : . tc ; >
: pone eS - — | oF cons roposed ati is | Cleetricity. Two lots 22,000 feet. Edghill.| be addressed to the Director of Agriculture, will be received at the | STEAMSHIP CO. i See ih accent Cargo snd %
CALLENDER—On M T ‘i oun a i t t 9.5.52—4n. | SAILING FROM EUROPE Passengers for St. Lucia, Gren- %
Callender ge 7 ‘ ks, | AUTOMOTIVF | While it ; lenthoe on seme . oe of papentasent of Science and Agriculture up to the 17th of| 4.5. HERA, 14th May 1982 am we onan. Passengers only S
Ciwist Chureh. His funeral leaves | —————— —— ——_—_—_-_—— | subsequent occ t eek election, I ay. P ie eg . . ‘or incen Sailing Today
his late residence at 4.30 t | CAR—One (1) 1951 Hillman 17,000|am not prepared to do so on this AUCTION z ae are Wednesday 7th inst 3
Bien tor St. Bartholomew church, | miles.” Petes. condition, “going chem’; |°"tmacr the. circumstances, 1 have| ~9uaryaem am 2. Applications will be considered from a candidate who— | M5 NESTOR 94h May ime... (B carco snd Pamcnwers Yor Lon §
Budine Nurse, May Eastmond | Gar twee | uted the Society to withdraw my| UNDER THE DIAMOND Of eet Ee te oe the Ist of May,|â„¢* OSATUING TO EUROPE and St) Kits. Sailing Friday 3
tehildren) Cuthbert : —_—$—<—————— rr | LE rer those f the candidates Oe SAILIN: © TRINI | PARAMARI s § ing iday
Israe! and Cyril ‘grandchildrer CAR—One (1) Austin A.40 Car, late | proposed I " HAMMER Be pe uA BO Sh_ instant .
9.5.52 nodel. Telephon« LINDSAY E. R. GILL. | Aiton at may for Sele Se eee anes (b) has reached advanced standard in at least one science| $.S. COTTICA, 2nd June 195 PR my. potas, will accept
AS é “oO } idgetow < ‘ + of s me ‘ . -' ssen, s for Dom-
& Co, Md ; 4.5.saan.| Thieday 15th pall at. a et subject together with at least ordinary standard in a| SAâ„¢ING_ TO rare AND inica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
IN MEMORIAM CAR—Morris Oxford. Perfect condi- | ———~ - - | eee Ee al ek iat second science subject; | M.S. STENTOR 17th May 1952 aad St, Kilts, faitag Friday 16th
“ aad tion; mileage 2,370. Telephone 249 | THE BARBADOS MUTUAL LIFE jprjip, = camel eee ao ’ x | M.S. NESTOR 13th June 1952 ins ¥
« oor Bieaittn abranees socuas A | reie., "toe, proc grenegsertae (c) is.a native of Barbados, the son of a native or of parents| —SANANG “£0, TERIDAD Axo ons soca Commer.
ee ee ane ion © 3 7 s a = 8 ¢ . 4 5 « *
; 5 as 3 SAR) MG. Coupe in perfect} With reference to the Ballot advertised Crane Hotel, and which is continually who have been domiciled in the Island for ten years} ws HERA 2nd June 1952 Consternce Tele. 00 )
LOWE: Charles Clement Lowe who fell ; fanned ty refreshing b t hi te os ne
ddiki Bias © ao order. Apply Neweastle Plantation, St. | to take place at the Society's Office., Grane Coast. coeatate ee ar ae prior to the date of application; SP MUSSON, SON & CO, LTD
: ; les John 30.4.52—t.f.n. | Beckwith Place, Bridgetown, on 9th) 21° , - Agents POCO OOMIOC FOC
In the home of the blessed - : : . , andah on t ides, d@ 4 din- : ; ar
tee dear ove at rest, aca i ee ae ana May, 196%, for the _ election of _inree i ceiens, beset re ee ae (ad) submits evidence of good character and general ‘fitness
Whe of husbands and fathers Apply D.V. SCOTT & Co, Ltd White| persons nominated, having notified his lavatory and bath, ieftehen, garage and to profit by a course of study at the Imperial College.
mongst the best . I; , ‘ : are — ; sun porch, together with an acre of land. . .
o8 S91 Park Road. intention not to accept nomination nor . ; e
eee EG ENN Teention to tee nem en 59" or mmpeetio, eal at house Selow for] 3. A candidate may be required to submit a medical certificate Canadian National Steamships
a9 Se ee ee ed __. | notified that the Ballot will not now | ey, OF oro acy A. SCOT testifying to his physical fitness. *
FOR RENT CAR—One 1951 Hiliman Car in perfect take place 4 ge eal Real Estate Agent & Auctioneer
ing condition. Done 4,000 ‘miles. hone 5. Fi ¢) 8. Beets) | | a ae ionesr4,| 4. Attention is drawn to the fact that residence in the Milner) ,,.
« ee de untage 6142 or after ‘hours OMMP. |. -s,| Beckwith Place, i — | Hostel ¥ the cea is eennioney and the allowances have been SOUTHBOUND wits Sails Sails Arrives s
BEN-O-NI, Fitts Village st. |——_—_———— — —_——.. | Bridgetown ~ increased to enable the John R. Bovell Scholarship holders to com- Montreal Halifax = Boston Bidos Bidos
James, 2 bediooms. Dresstag Room. W ¢ CAR: One Nash Coupe in good work- 4.5.52—3n UNDER THE SILVER ply with this regulation, CANADIAN CRUISER | . 20 Apr. 2 May ps 11 May 13 May
Garage and Servants room. Dial 2628. /ing order $300 nearest offer Phone " eateries HAMMER - CANADIAN CON! iCTOR 9 May 12 May — 21 May 23 May
2.6,52—q:. | 8125 9.5.52-2n| THE BARBADOS MUTUAL LIFE Th i . i ¥ . ‘ . | LADY RODNEY .. + 19 May 22 May 24 May 2 June 3 June
ee eee. ¥ deeniiehabibelt poniatenniegeniaaaae ASSURANCE SOCIETY ON TUESDAY 13th by order of the 5. e successful applicant will be required to begin his studies | CANADIAN CHALLENGER’ 30 May 2 June ae ll June 12 June
BUNGALOW — Navy Gerdens, full CAR: Ane if8 Ford Super Deluxe, Election of Directors Executors to the Estate of The Late |at the Imperial College in September, 1952. If no applicant possess- ee eae co tio? . @June 12June M4 June 23June 2% June
SO ce cen hohe iL. jgood colldition $1,000.60, . Puone Sim, |. Mr. lL. ©. R. Gill. one o€ the petages Archdeacon Shankland we will sell his|ing the requisite qualifications is fortheoming, the award of the | CANADIAN Caulaam Bune 7 yuw 2 Jul Fog. $ July
Williams 7.5.52—Sn @.5.82--an | 2ominated to serve as a Director at the urniture at “Uplands” 3rd Avenue, holarshi rill be t a til t | CAN, CONSTRUCTOR 30 June 3 Juyw = 12 Jusy 9 48 Jub
Annual General Meeting of the above Belleville, which ineludes scholarship wt postponed until next year. 98522 | LADY RODNEY .. : 1 July 14July 16 July 9 2 Julyy July
5.52—2n. | & ;







——$_—$_—_
CAR- Standa ~ |mentioned Society held on 25th April,|Good Extension Dining Table, (closes
ie undaré_ 8. 3eloon ia go 1952, having given notice that it is not]in @ Round) Sideboard, Morris Chalrs





FARAWAY-—St. Philip coast, 3 bed-











rooms. i LP ead > “
Caletais sxesar mockia Gor Mant, two SERIE OR: ES ‘SO rn a his intention to accept nomination nor end Cushions, Ornament Tables, Book - =
quiet scoms. Irom. May ist. Phone |. ———— . i stand tor election on is cotacion,, is ae leas some) Bem and Upright FREE TUITION SCHOLARSHIP NORTHBOUND aire oie Pee Arrives tees Arrives
476 10.4.52—+ f+ VAN—Fordson Van in perfect order, | piTP0¥ sepiates we. a — - ring Sosa > ame ir. —Hia » Double End, Laby NeLAON Bides Pa St. John Boston alifax Montreal
19,000 miles. Royal Store No. 12, High Te Rt gre ee noe tod meena hee Cabin aoa Veena Applications for one free tuition scholarship tenable at the Im-| CDN. CRUISER ‘. May oo May wet 5 June 3 ene a 3u
> : a - e 3 ML an ssts v ce Cab’ righ: i . A . : .* May 2 3 _ e e
a ee eas oe nee 7.5.52—Sa-\P ir’ Gave are reelected for the Chairs, uphols: Chairs, Electrola, perial College of Tropical Agriculture will be received by the Direc- | CANADIAN 7
Sean Bice, Apply to CL. Nicholis.) ONE FORDSOM UTWITY VAN—Canes | ¢nsulig year jnice Divan (Couch or Bed), tor of Agriculture up to the 17th of May, 1952. CONSTRUCTOR 3June 8June | — 16 June 18 June 41 June
No. 18 Swan Street 8.5.52—€ nd Passengers or 14 tons cargo. 22 miles G. B. EVELYN, er Carpets, Extension Qak Tabies ee 15 June 17 June 27 June = 28 June 1 July
, Sws . .6.52—-6 r I = pag 0 Chairme pa a ; , 3
ver gation of RPly MeDonald Sealy. | pookwith Place oe ee ats | Vereen CORE Waker 2, Candidates should be not less than 17 years of age on the CHALLENGER .. 23 June 28 June 5July 8Juby 11 July
NEWHAVEN = Crane Coast. 4 bed amt 12D RAO TONE ot din Bridgetown Bookshelves and Books, Glass and China, | 1st of September, 1952, and have obtained a General Certificate of | LADY NELSON : 6July 4 July 18 July 9 July 22 Jul
RRPRAVEN crane Guat tnt «2 sa. | Bishan ‘Rs Bercy utsa, Ware |Edueation in at least five subjects, two of which should be Selence|ERNaSiqg sn WN tt wih per ths
Watermill supply, Double Garage, three ELECTRICAL Seem Fruit Knives &c, Brass Candlesticks ubjects. GOMERRUCTOR * 4 guly Jy os 5 Aug. 8 eae 10 aus
LAD IDNEY .. 7 Aug. 9 ug. ug. 20 Aug 23 Aug



Vases &c., Cutlery, Electric Singer's

servant rooms. For May and from Oc_ :
tober te ” 3. This scholarship entitles the holder to free tuition at the































it Phone 4476. RADLO-_One (1) Mullard 5-Tube Ravio P b ie { i \ | Sewing Machine, Mir.—Presses, Bureau;
10.4.52—t.f n. Jin excelient condition. ‘Whone 3944 u lic 0 ficial Sa e Pedstead Vono Spring ail in Mahogany: | College, but all other fees must be met.
? aia 7 Deep Sleep — Dunlopilio _ Mattresses; .
PLYMOU!H, Crane Coz nd inilbeemniiina pinnae eemmpeate . (The Provost Marshal's Act 1904 (1904-6) |] Single Ivon Bedstead, Trunks and Suit’ ; . —— * * * For further particulars, apply to—
faa toe es ; ar Te ae sc on ay ie Sings uuries G0 tare, Lavaers, tet 4. Attention is drawn to the fact that residence in the Milner
condition. Ring Mr. Hughe On Friday the day at} Plate, Kitehen Tables, Large Flasks, Hostel at the College is compulsory. GARDINER AUSTIN & co,, LTD.—Agents.
5 p.m. 2064 7.5.52—4n. | the hour of 2 o'clock i Lawn Mower, Crotons in Cemment Pots, 9.5.52—2n.
SIHION KOP—Maxweill Coast, furnished aaa ———— —_———- will be sold at nm office to the highest | Large Paims and many other items LUE
Available last two weeks, May, mont ARRARD 3-SPE AUTOMATIC | bidder for any sum not under the ap- Sale 11.30 o'clock Terms Cash
of June. Tel. gg72 9'5.52-2n | “MANGERS——Just received a limited | praised value BRANKER, TROTMAN & C0, OFFICIAL NOTICE SOOSOOlF
Pei _—-- juantity “all early. P. C All that certain piece of Land con- Auctioneers.
TRINITY COTTAGE—Fully furnished | & Co., Ltd : taining by estimation 12 acres 1 Rood 9.5.52—2n.
22 Perches situate at the Crarte in the BARBADOS. eT eT

three bedrooms, complete with tele-
phone and _ refrigerator, situated at
Derricks Bay, St. James, Phone 2959
27.4.52—t.f.n





LR
Philip butting and bound-

Parish of St
MECHANICAL ing on lands now or late of the Estate

neers fof Sit G. L. Pile, deceased, on lands
CALCULATOR—One original Odhner|now or late of Mrs, M. Hanschell, on rut ust

practically new and in first class condi the sea, on ljand now or late of one

tior Dial 4689 8.5,.52—4n. | Simpson and on the Public Road lead- e
ing to the Crane Beach together with Basis Of

IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY
,

IN PURSUANCE of the Chancery Act, 1906, I do hereby give notice to oll
persons having or claiming any estate, right or interest or any lien or incumbrance
in or affecting the property hereinafter mentioned (the property of the defend-
ants) to bring before me an account of their claims with their witnesses,
documents and vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday



PERSO



















































ec SOON a A z MISCELLANEOUS the | ee pte Bt yi i between ie hours of 12 noon ae 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration
The pidlic are hereby warned + | : ” ae a Office, ic Buildings, Bridgetown before the 12th day of June 1952 in cee aan
pate, Public are hereby warmed se:in:t | “TUSINESS REQUIREMENTS — Doc |'Hpe” note property with lighting Understanding: |" watson ciaima®iay ‘be "reported 'on and ranked. according to the ature 1EQ@LE
i LLIPS + ; I ent Ss sts, presses, desks, fans : eee 3 r thereof resp fs ore
Teter; tases. wheat naa selatbie toe her : Jain machines, and’ othe PMOUSAND. "Pot aH SNDRED TROL BIRMINGHAM, M the benefits of any ere Tl ee a oo en ts
oF ayone-¥lse contracting any debt or | %ce and business requirements. K. % |LARS ($ 4 id Attached from John RM » May 8. sroperty.
deb& in fia) name unless by a written | Hunte & Co. Ltd. Lower Broad Sint | pumnival for and towards satisfaction Understanding among people his ea : Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
ordar signed by me. sip q| Dial 5198 9.5.52—3m. | ac must be based on truth “and I am : DAY BERNERT MURPHY ant” SS er re Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica
> ake = I 3 25 ic Si 4 be pale ym Gay i i ua. var
tlre i (A CRADLE — One Baby's Cradle with neeaeene Deposit to be paid on d sure this can be achieved” Ar- sheets aie ed acting executors w 0; yare %
§.5.52-2n. | mattress and drop side, one baby's wash- ‘ Ty. T. HEADLEY, gentine Ambassador Carlos A. g
mand ong Babys Wik; Ghat. elephsne , ceavolomt Rha, [Hogan said today during a tuneh-| PPFENDANTS: mLNene,, WAIT, AURIS, CURSE te bet sro eatiauite nines Biter
cared parcels by 35 : otha Provost Marshal's Office, = : . . § ., acting herein by D'Arcy Augustus ‘0 nm ives 0s
The re hereby warned against 6.5.52—-Sn @ith April, 1952 eon at which he was a guest at their constituted Attorney on record in this Island. *“DE GRA Pi i
giving Sanyone in my same nt 26.4.52-an]the British Industries Fair at i SSE 24th April, 1952... ... 6th May, 1952
Bee ae ncil ioseal! responsible for an? | CAR TYRES REMOULDED—Sizes 500 ; PROPERTY: ALL THAT CERTAEN piece or parcel of land situate at Eagle COLOMBIE” .... 8th May, 1952... .. 2ist May, 1952
; sa 45 21.5! Ch i Birmingham, ; BP: e one -
debt or debts contracted in my name] 16, $23.53) 460-17, fat G2. | Clmie na Anaeeoende 1 ' Hall Road in the Parish of Saint Michael and Island aforesaid DE GRASSE” ... 4th June, 1952... .. 16th June, 1952 %
unless Qk sCousitten onder signed by me aw sky asd map ine “= at an 4 a. 4 ne Si r cou . not un- containing by admeasurement Nine and three-fifths perches ot ‘
uanees ALAA, CONNELI rafalgar § ore afalgar Stree Y ; erstan owever “why news thereabouts—Abutting and bounding on two sides o; lands of * i ‘
Black Rock, St. 3543 8.3 an Commonwealth circulated round the world by Albertha Payne on lands now or late of cote Mrs ‘Thomas dia Not calling at Guadeloupe
: c cae ta on Eagle Hall Road aforesaid or however else the same is abutting
Press and other agencies is often and bounding Together with the messuage or dwellinghouse SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE
x

thereon called “Eyare Village’ and all and singular other the
buildings and erections on the said’ parcel of land erected and
built standing and being

Bill filed: 25 March 1952.

Date; 10 April 1952. 11.4.52—4n



From Barbados. Arrives Southampton

*“DE GRASSE” .... 19th May, 1952 .... ... 29th May, 1952
“COLOMBIE” Ist June, 1952... ... 13th June, 1952
*“DE GRASSE” .... 29th June, 1952... .. 9th July 1952’

*Sailing direct to Southampton

FOR SALE Rees eee

10-DAY'S NEWS Flas ?|) ORIENTAL
THIS ATTRACTIVE HOME “pen Walting For PALACE

Been Waiting For
HEADQUARTERS FOR

CAMERA—One (1) Rolleicord Camera
ES a eee voecalinte | we Day Al misunderstood, often ill inten-

chronised for , flash, complete with " :
carrying ease, $150.00 tioned and in the best cases com-

Four (4) daylight developing tant . arse ski i iectivity,”
datistable com om m to 616 36.50 Industries Fair Wccnanna uae’ ener’ the

ome (1) Thermometer Stirring Rod, LONDON. | Argentine nation was doing “what
Frank Watkins, Blue Waters, Rockley May 14 will be celebrated as|We have done and what we are
Phone #412 9.6 Commonwealth ‘Trade Day at|aiming at Hogan said “in a few
—— dechnaaminnmseeeentes —J|this year’s British Industries Fair day” the first six-year period of
eae Roane me ee ee in London. Special arrangements Peron’s Constitutional Govern-
large quantities, Knight's Ltd are being made to focus attention|ment will en@ and the second
9.5.52—2n.] on that day on the importance of period 1952—1954 for which he
trade to the Commonwealth, and|had been freely and almost unani-
in particular on the Common- mously elec by the se of

wealth section of the Fair. my country will start.—










































GARDEN HOSE: Garden Hose
and Fittings, City Garage Co., Victoria
Street 1,6,52—t.f.n







HERBS—Make-u-well Herbs is Nature's
cure for constipation, Rheumatism, mm-
digestion, Kidney and Bladder Diseases

Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, the Colon-| -——
ial Secretary, will on that y

' Has Arrived:—
visit the Commonwealth section, Cuts Endanger

AMERICAN CAP






and Sluggish Liver, Price 2/- | box

KNIGHT'S LTD 7.5.52—3.| which this year consists of ne An extremely well built, modern three bedroom (or two PISTOLS AND CAPS SOUVENIKS
i TING, tamed) | Stands taken by Commonwealth #3 , ie ek a io
LOS AR etre Lio, Suitable | Governments. A big West Indian European Defence bedrooms and den) BUNGALOW of stone and concrete con Ang sine, Out Sale of on a Le

including coats, skirts, suits ete. Suitable
for travelling Appointment by phone
9112 Mrs, Noel Roach, Speightstown

struction. Combined forty feet living-room and gallery, fully

display will be among them,
WASHINGTON, May & cupboarded Canadian styled kitchen. Floor to ceiling cedar JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

THANI'S





7.5.52—3n : ; *
= Mr. Lyttelton wili be accom-| General Dwight D, Eisenhower ‘ ;
“Silane world’s Gnest motor gi!| panied on his visit by Mr. Peter| Atlantic Pact Supreme Comman- lined double bedroom closets. Attractively laid out garden and ie
| vagtiol, at all leading Garages and Service | Thorneycroft, President of the, der warned Congress today that with fruit trees and ample room for vegetables. r HARDWARE Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Diai 5406
| Stations, Your vehicle deserves the best | Board of Trade, and the Mar-\ further cuts in the new aid to . Gerege with
: a oard oO rade, anc e are E i > :
lever Found daar ae quess” of Salisbury, Secretary of| Allies Programme might endanger breezeway to house and detached self-contained maid’s $OOSSOSOOO IIT,
ee | State for Commonwealth Rela-}the whole European defence quarters. The Property is coolly and delightfully situated Send Y Ord fi
end Your ers for—

tions. Mr, Thorneycroft will also} buildup. within easy reach of main road at Worthing. Ph. 8562,

$
x

broadcast a talk in Britain on . ‘i ; st
His, warning was, contained in|} A Nee. LV GALVANISED SHEETS |

PEEK FREANS' CHEESLETS—We have
Peek Freans’ Cheeslets in stock, origt nat
price 7/-, now reduced to $1.12 ow
is your chance to get a_ bargain.
KNIGHT'S LTD R 7.5.52—3n,
—————————

RECORDS—Clearing our stock of MGM
Records. Three for Two Dollars, yout
choice. A, BARNES & CO,, LTD.

9.4.52—t.f.n

“The Importance of Trade to the telter.-td - Ghairtin a th
wealth.” —B.U.P. 8 n e
eesincemeai id Senate Foreign Relations Com- AND

mittee Senator Tom Connally EXPA NDING METAL
a a .

(Democratic) who had asked the

antaic J ’s i > sible :
Jamaican Sugar — | Genera’s ca. ib! To CENTRAL EMPORIUM
Man Tours Britain The Committee had earlier re- = Corner Broad & Tudor Streets







|
| a oom ————

Subscribe now to the Dally Tele



ingle padi Daily Newspaper now , ) i
aaa etn Bartados by Air only a f duced President Truman's $7,900, 3
SSO6hOOESS

POMEL O30 >





arriving in Barbados by Air only a few
days after publication in London, Con 5
tact: kan Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltd
| Local Representative, Tel, 3118

j 17.4,.52—t.f.n

000,000 aid request by $1,000,-|

LONDON ; i
= . 000,000 before submitting the
Mr. Max Sharp, Secretary of Aidawe 4 i )- LADIES FULL FASHIONED NYLON
the Sugar Industrial Welfare Military and Economie Aid| Pro





































F | cicenenasstealbloocin pipaleceneriineny ; . aa ; “| gramme to the Senate. —U.P. '
+++ with ingredients of Vicks VapoRub TOOTH PABTEOSlerilia Tooth Paste} Board of Jamaica, has begun a THERS DAY om Sunday Ma ll
— ha and refreshes, special value 1/-} tour of Britain under the aus- ill SE dicate 7 gs eee Yo xy: P
FANG | Ne LTD 7.9-52—in | pices of the British Council. He] In Touch With Barbados
WATCHES—Just received 17 jewe! wath aE the weer ore Cc
| Rolled Gold Automatic Waterproof Wrist |ers in fac ories, mines and rura ¢ ¢
= —, | Watches with the latest “ROTOMATIC" | areas oastal Station s Gauge a come a poe. sat @ $1.96 per pair
winding system, also in stock Wrist |° o uni’ dui Wkediond YWiaacradlaay: tga Gauge enier eam also, jac! ae ge.32 ‘
Vatche $9.25 Ybtainable « : able A ‘
WINDWARD CRICKET 1 eee ine, er or Satan sina At the end of May, Mr. Sharp | advise that they can now communicate @ St. Pr
; Hi dleridge Streets. Tele. 3253 , {Will spend several days in Liver- | Barbados Roeres ie Sees Wels These Hose are the best that Money can buy. They are not
».5.52—1 “yg 2 , on
CLUB cei a. TS SRE Ol poo), $0. gee Weleare: AEP Sem eres | #8: Secrets Pane oct. only Stylish but are the very latest fully fashioned.
: VAT—One (1) 5,000 gallon Oak Vat —| for sugar workers ‘there, His adian Challenger, Olimpia, Pedro, Moun- .
val - 8 apply D, V. Scott & Co., Ltd,, White) programme will also cover the —_ ee ae ape ae ee New Stock just arrived are subject the same as all our other
NOTICE TO MEMBERS Park Road 1.6,59-t.M. | toiching of arts, crafts and drs - | Fort Townshend, Imperial. Torotito’ goods to our usual 5% Discount. :
Wry. atic art, ¥ : s and adult Gadila, Beaufighter, De Grasse, Bianca, ‘
Mombers are hereby noti- Peat Rey recs on eit Kastor, Baltore, Alcoa Pointer, David KHAKI DRILL — we have this as low as 90 cents per yard.
fied that the grounds will eae eae BOUCR ORE ae ade! f saith Pease eerie eh Trader, Varsal, See Us before Buying elsewhere.
be open for practice ot HELP also see housing plans for rural | Rangitoto, erent a med Comayamua,
Tuesday 13th May. J and industrial communities. drag pak eae eer eatin vice Remember there is not a Store in Barbados that can undersell
ipeees : AN ANNOUNCER—Rediffusion require Mr. Sharp served for eight) tow>, Alcoa Pegasus, Ocean Monarch, Us, We Buy in large quantities and We Pay Cash in London
N. C. THORNTON, 1 Announcer, Script Writer, male pre-|years as an officer in the R.A.F. Auriga, Alcoa Cavalier, Path Finder thereby saving a large Discount.
command of * 7 at oY aces > « yy | British Empress Assimia, Cleveland,
during the war and became senior | qn. 4
a . F ,; Sunrell, Drina, 5 Paula, Esso Koben-
| R.A.F Welfare Officer in the! }avn, Vergmor, Lake Winnipeg and S.S
Caribbean from 1946 to 1948.—- S.Vbaldo e





VALOR COOKER STOVES

Apply before 10 in the morning or after
in the evening, to Mrs. Scaife La

We have a

A. E. TAYLOR LTD.



Garoupe, Cave Hill 9.5,52—-In



GS





























|
Secretary ;ferred, good diction and
saosin. ||| auelah, ements. sooty Tete
OPTS OTTT MVS, | for sail modern oudence, 2 sais.
Holiday Enteric 3) ———————————
x oi: ae ae z : Where very often you obtain goods of a better grade than LARGE VARIETY
g -% ARRIVED i}) pace: Aare . most other Stores so Dial 4100.
=m $ Anether Shipmatit “of tho 3 Burner Model @ $71.87 OF
aiean POPULAR | = where |
” << 4 8 VAS ERS } liti HIGH }
$ ee ee on WHITE PORVELAIN ENAMEL SINKS ote
{ 3 been booked : . } With Double Drainboard @ $65.64 7 and
i Prices of next shipment will be complete with waste and overflow
7 Be us x $ higher Prices are LOW.
: Sa a Why not call at your Gas Show Established . HE : atec :
N : x A een aC Aa ea Siar 2: HRRORERT, Gad weecrporated Furthermore there are no Parking Problems.
y B] |} secure one’ ot “these cookers \ 1860 10 & 1! Roebuck Street 1926
“MIXED VEGETABLES in x rn || A SS MN SUITABLE
tins % SA SS = ae ) x LPP ELLE LLL A PPLE PEPE EE PPP LPL PS
SLIC MOV OTIOR '
SLICED HAM Si} REMOVAL NOTICE PUBLIC MEETING | ik ae FOR
LAMB TONGUES in tins ¥ x LOOK OUT FE re
x ——— Under the Auspices of the x
CORNED MUTTON in tins % R nae h d " ‘ @ ¥ ° 2
7 ‘ »
Dwi Gia 8 _ JOYCE ritih and Foreign |S SOT NDAY’S ADVOCATE PRESENTS
», in . ry at. , , °
VEAL LOAF in tins % HUTCHINSON Bible Society x
. ici es a a - . .
LUNCHEON BEEF in tins }$(}) ©XPERT HEMSTITCHING At EMPIRE THEATRE | % and win e
¥ Button & Buckle C ring x atin “ a .
Add-Ove Fopeler : Dutton Holes This Evening at 5 p.m. | i Sen e FAR ee * $
oe ¥ Modern & Fashionable a rae =e > 2 j
FIVE ‘STAR RUM x aie Decarations e Speaker hacas aoe: \% $25 OO 3 SURPRISE YOUR MOM W iTH
e % c : : co ys 3 < ‘
SS Pusioiaten Wek tear dient | Representatives from the : ° g A PAIR FROM De a
% % removed : f porn Ist floor Col- | Angtican, Methodist and % — ¥ © * SAD BWV devise
$ INCE & co. 3 | a Lid., to Knights’ Phoeni» een out 5 aan 1) x Al THE SAME TIME YOU CAN HELP THE : RES
& = 5 *harmacy (ist floor) En- . 1a < ( ~
3 LTD. % oe a Prince William (A Cordial Invitation } * %
Henry St. Extended to all Sections of ff) > bi a “ “ y y TY .
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~
mt nn ali Ek ee es



we






FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN

oe









HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON

* Famous
for flavour!









‘ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES”

mgs:
BY



LYING ABOUT WHAT ?..
OW, FORGET IT, FLINT...
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WHERE HAVE 1 SEEN
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BEFORE >..



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THE COLONNADE GROCERIES

IMPORTANT
NOTICE





















YOU GUYS'D BETTER—
HEY.’ LOOK OUT THERE
BEHIND YOU /

WELLERASH/

3 ALL PERSONS WHO ORDERED

S The Pictorial Record of
KING GEORGE VI.

through the Advocate Stationery are specially advised to
Call for their Copies TO-DAY. Failing to call, these copies
will no longer be reserved but will be on sale to the public
from SATURDAY, MAY 10TH,

I'M SORRY -DADDy -

THE GIRLS FROM MY

CANASTA CLUB ARE
MEETING HERE

WELL=YOL CAN'T WORK
HERE IN THE KITCHEN /
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IS MEETING HERE
TONIGHT /

The Price of the Book is ....

$2.72

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A ' é
PAGE EIGHT

B.F.F.A. Beat 70-Year-Old WHY PLAY CRICKET?
Police 3—1 Controversy surrey’s Jack Parker Balances the
oy ity Revived

HALIFAX, NS.,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE 1952

MAY 9,

nn i



FRIDAY,


















Tenth Regatta
THE



Tenth Regatta of the

R.B.Y.C. will be sailed in Carlisle

and Bay. on Saturday, May 10 at 2.30
p.m. The Handicap times are ar
follows:—

Rewards
Hazards (nol Forgetting the Corns)

JOHN FREDERICK PARKER, a sprightly 14% stone,

Parker the family man has Class No. Yach$









tba < ternational sporting con- sprang out of the taxi, landed on legs that will be 39 years sighed little as 12-hour Seve B 10 Wizata 220 Red
Oval y¢ ; .t troversy, all but forgotten for 70 old on the 23rd of this month, and made his first move Se Ee aa eA GP the eee cement
half Cee Tr ears, was in the throes i oe towards the new cricket season—his 22nd and last with paternal pleasure of watching his D 8 Peter Pa 231 Yellow
{ t 1 rt ‘ pa . > © , g »s . ants £ ‘ * r : oe Se = —— ontenenernenepeeeciees —
ober ggg : boday ae neaencants 0! paitided Surrey at Kennington Oval. daughters grow up 4 Hi Ho 232 Red
sage ret ee ‘ ; ha meomny (Cre ee ve oe 7 a , His first move? At the There are also physical ame
tp if a ™ . eek a prize their fa’hers risk of knocking the debits to record. Parke: D 12 Rainbow 233 Yellow
gts. FE purned. . romance out of cricket, I tells with a reminiscent ~~ ii Fantasy .
< Memories of heroic battles be- have to report that Jack grin of the jaw he broke B 6 Pure r
€ tween oarsmen of Canada and Parker, idol of 10,000 in a car smash at Yeovil r | Morra Bieir 2% Red og
. other nations were evoked ameng Cockneys, was on his way in 1935—and of the £150 6B 8 Rascal nN ‘o>
_ old-timers as the dust of seven to g chiropodist. that he, Eddie Watts, » 9 Okapi . : ae
» defendirx the decades was shaken from the Cricket has a thousand Laurie Fishlock and the a THIS NEW FINE RANGE
ihe southern i of the records of a race between the minstrels singing its late Stan Squires had to Pp = 9 Olive Blossom 225 Yellow
wr ad : ‘ nee-far ‘ax isher "s aises — e isi > : “if acate the D 10 Van Therndyke y, y
Police went on the defen- once-famous Halifax Fishermen's praises eulogising the contribute to placate i Bie } DE. ous
a about two minutes after Crew and a Thames foursome gentlemanly leg glide car owner. Spe —_ INCLL ‘8:
if had s t Tavlor from London, England rhapsodising over swift He recalls the five 5



Rainbird 238 Red



rd re first lot runs that snatched a fa-







































‘ operations that followed pD 7 Sinbad WHITE POPLIN 31” @ as $1.04, 97c. & 88e.
‘ 7 t-s} ri he ; alli \ : :
for Police h PO A tae ee SS ee ae ee ee, ee the poisoning of he tani BS Mimhiet —||] BLUE & BEIGE 31” @ ....................5., a ese ee
marked and } the ball i lalifax Fishermen’: heirs. memories of a ca a finger on his rig nen? 2S aa weds “
the font : Sh after the prize was more than $1,000. made history and head- by the red dye of a cricket See Ln + De Pak vase re oc 8 oun eas eos whee ne ... 78e.
B.F.F.A. players made a good for- Seventy years ago the Nova lines, But = of a ball on a wet day; the B 1. Gipsy 242 Rea KHAKI SHIRTING 27” @ 95c.
ward movement but both Police Scotian oarsmen spurned the songsters, so far as unequal struggle agains! 3k ia KHAKI SHIRTING 32” @ 88c.
Pack intercepted ind = cleare money and returned to their know, has touched upon long and painful bouts of ae Ss a Bkipoy. a as es :
their area. homes, indignant over what they the prosaic subject of muscular rheumatism; the ] eae WARE nhs ee hee Se RES $1.10, $1.04 & 96c.
considered unfair tactics dyring COTâ„¢S ee two broken fingers and [I ft Reen 244 Red Se wa ies Cbs 8 5 donee techies eee ae 0c, & 78c.
Equaliser match against the Thames crew ‘ A otone a ane Guece a ; ee ot — ALSO —
Police at this stage st 1 to | t Phi . ig ¢ fet, says Jac arker, suffered i e se of 12 Dawn 245 Yellow
concentrating on defen pla at Philadelphia, Pa, after a lifetime among duty in the slips. ~e sacl ia es te PLAIN JERSEY 48” wide at $1.19 per yard suitable
ing and ‘just before the end The $1,000 amount was second the runs and wickets, no “Tt has been a little K Tornadoes 246 #86Red for night wear.
this half, McColin on receiving prize in the race. Members of the cricket professional can trying at times,” is the Se RMT Tae RPE Oo itt
long pass equalised for B.F.F.A. }alifax crew, however, with a afford to neglect his un- woemer verdict on, ia my is Clytie 247 Yellow
The score was then one all variety of triumphs to their eredit, derpinning. Without reg- occupational hazards. A ~
> « 3 £ Sea . . , 1 Miss Ber
half time, agreed that second place wasn’t ular road-work — in his His gamble ¢ \Um Madwesss > Slee? aaa :
On the resumption both teams goog enough and decided to fore- CaS€ across Hayes Com- Sut that jis not the 9 Polly ave é er 0
fought hard but the B.F.F.A. © oe ras mon, Kent—and_ at least whole story. a PR es e
ylayers had the edg he » U ey Bern he a+ one pre-season visit to the “When I began,” he na ow
ry ils and a ime I f ‘ = * i ng ats ee eee chiropodist, the men who says, “we had to gamble I 4 Coronetta = 2.49 Yello
‘ t i hie ring a . ‘ = , z _ —- — ——__-———_—_——_——
combinir vell Then abot ic e580, They were hurt “ve. us our cricket would with’ our future. To-day Cc ii Magwin 250 Red 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street
three t } blow money of $2,500. They wet never stay the five a young professional cat NTE NP ae lh
~ off Jone even more by a decision of the months’ course from May Family man: Jack Parker, Mrs, Parker, Susan start at £400 a year C 2 Scamp 251 Yellow
gate > ; PE ee
the second goal race officials, who relegated them to September. and Christine. playing for the second “aa neous a
With t COT to the runner-up spot when they Sper week plus £1 per day match XI. If he makes the first team, C 10 Gannet 252 Red ada masses =)
playe1 yw mack felt in their hearts that they had Now their bats, lightly oiled allt oney for “club and ground,” he can double that sum, and even ——————_—____ a ay | ==
vo get more *. il won. oe are ee oF ec yher jwere supplemented by winter ad- rake in another £500 a x eaten, (ee ee ae ee th May,
minute after the sec - ' Nova 2 ~ a son flannels are laundered, the ventures as a ship’s writer and as Winter coaching. Test players can — ~
kicked in, Yearwood at right The Nova Scotions had been jeyiy spiked, their ‘feet made , .

a roadmaker and dockworker in earn up to £2,000 a year.” Sdeheidligs quieter liancdiciaiped
workable. To-morrow Parker and Australia

referee ruled they had fouled the pj, fellow-professionals all over
int econd-finishing Londoners. ,, the country get down *o the job sng] went willingly,” he says. look back on his over-all batting
B.F.P.A The judges reversed the final of loosening limbs and flexing fin- «7 gaye up the chance of a first- average of 61 in 25 innings against

result and gave first money to the gers at the nets. wool firm in tceuring sides; his 255 against New



the first across the finish-line, but the

well in
lead when he cut in from the
wing and kicked the ball in the

wing put B.F.F.A We can supply from stocka

After 21 years in the game
“But cricket got me in the end, Parker has no regrets. He can
left corner of the nets.

had three goals on Police
3



WHEN THE p

NGER’ FIRE

CRITTALL STEEL SLIDING FOLDING DOORS



class job witha

The game ended 3—1 English crew. Then—war Sydney to come back to Surrey.” Zealand his six for 28 against Uy THE IDEAL DOOR FOR VERANDAHS
The teams were: — The decision stood, despite Why do they do it? What is ‘That decision has brought re- Derby; his acrobatic acceptance of The Whole Door slides and folds to one side.
Police: Haynes, Thompson, official protests and a resolution there in cricket for the man who ward.

Parker admits to a modest more than 300 catches; the fact |
adopted by the committee gov- makes it his career? affluence and pleasing prospect that he has never been dropped |
erning the regatta, stating that its It was to get answers to these of security for Kathleen, the wife since Surrey gave him his county |
members felt “unanimously” that quéstions that I went to see Jack he married 12 years ago, and their cap in 1936. |
the honors of the international Parker. I found him in Surrey’s qaughters Susan (eight) and
four-oared professional race be- freshly painted dressing-room at Christine (four and a half).

we » Halifax e . The Oval *
longed to the Halifax entry. BT te bala can the Colney His own house

Marshall, Warner, Griffith, Trot-
man, Banfield, Cadogan, Taylor,
Franklyn and Dodson.

B.F.F.A. : Pinder; Hayde
Denny, Phillips, Norville, Harris,
Linton, Jones, McColin, Thorne
and Yearwood

Supplied in two Sizes...
With 4 leaves — 6 2” wide X 7 2” high
With 6 leaves — 9 3” wide x 7 2” high

He has shaken hands with the
King. He plays cricket because he

likes it. | CRITTALL FRENCH DOORS



i : " E E > * or * gr
The referee was Mr, O. Graham. The inrident brought heated grounds as the most proficient Their detached si ebomked WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED UNGUENTINE 3’ 9’ wide X 7 9” high
ae . ‘ controversy for several months player who never attained the ul- house in Beadon Road, Bromléy, By GEORGE WHITING 4
‘ Ww but eventually it was forgotten. timate glory of a —_ - wt is their own recently acquired —L.E.S. | QUICK CRI s L WIN ws
Greriada wo It lay dormant until Halifax England we ‘. - . ao * property. The tax-free £5,000 i re tiger anal oa cosikt ake
County Councillor William Smith (He was packing his bag to play wid

A MODERN ANTISEPTIC
TUBES or JARS

he collected from his benefit match

then he against Middlesex last season is

safely invested by Surrey, and the

principal guaranteed.
Winter coaching,

oO ‘ inst India in 1939: VERY NERVOUS
pee » { " decided recently that the spurned %8@
Re enter Cork Cup prize ‘should be accepted at long wert off to spend six years as a

* * hysi¢al training instructor in the
Cricket Series last. » 183s Royal Air Force. )

without Ventilators.

An honest “Very nervous” was}

| THE MODERN WINDOW FOR THE MODERN HOME
Miss BIDDY- BURGUM’S reply |

including a

























; —
manithiia & my n s career really began when - 7 8 -.. | When asked how she felt about
(From Our Own Correspondent) a a eee ™ ~ ween he was a boy at Battersea Central eS heloed the Parear Sheen’ playing in her first hockey inter- ai inti: dkg*<
ST. GEORGE'S, May 5. * nlite bates sae he snd. had School 24 years ago. They pick- Now nearing the evening of a ational for England against = : int

G ja is to re-enter Wind- “““""* r i e im to lead Sou Ondon wooc EE est tanh ie ~ | Scotland a embley, \

to i * cm the contract’ mateh, d hi to lead South Lond swashbuckling cricket career—he Scotland at Wembl WV
ward ae cricket in the Cork = a prt for the schools at the Oval. has hit more than 100 eixes.for : ou pay no more WILKINSON & HAYNES is 4
Cup series, els Sativa Rey 1 £3 a week Surrey since the war — Parker

During the recent Inter-Schools heirs of the oldtime Nova oo ee coe Seek aitaty. taueiit attr for the
Tournament, Mr. Victor Archer, crew, the county councillor saic g



All-round promise as batsman, French and Spanish, and _ will
bowler, and even wicket-keeper soon be preparing for new con-

nF ————_——_——= —=--

Headmaster of ti? Dominica the wrangle over first place had
Grammar School, acted on behalf long ago been closed, but that he attracted the attention of Ernie quests as a solid business man.
of the Dominica Sports Associa- had lodged a claim on the group's Fayes, the Surrey coach, and at Present plan is a partnership
tion in assuring Grenada that his pehalf for the second-place prize. 18 Parker quit his modest job in with his father-in-law in Batter-
island was prepared to bury alto- The money has rested in @ g shipping office for a job as a sea—making protective clothing

gether the hatchet over the inci- pittsburg, Pa., bank ever since cricketer. Summer wages of £3 for industrial workers,
dent which brought the 1947 tour i). gay of the race.

2 on abrupe | con Sue ae" Smith anticipated that the
Pxeninion = arene - a ““Bamount would substantially ex-
ween ‘ oe aceon had been the © ed $1,000 now, because of ac-
seaeeon by a former Secretary cumulated interest over the past
of the D.S.A. of a letter of June 70 years.
1949 in which Grenada made an
amende honourable, but this, dis-
covered only a matter of weeks
ago, absolutely satisfles Dominica
and they were ready and willing
to forget the incident and wel-
come Grenada back to the series
as of yore

Grenada’s reaction has been fa-
vourable, though it Is unlikely
that a team can be sent to the

SPORTS
QUIZ

The Barbados Advowate
will award a book on sport
to the first person who sends
the correct answers to the
following questions.

1, CRICKET.

Name auy player who rep-
resented Barbados, Trinidad
or British Guiana in the pre-
war Triangular Cricket
Tournaments who made
“spectacles” in any one of
the games in these series.
2. FOOTBALL.

Can a player carry the ball
in his hands over the goal-
line, under the cross-bar and
between the two goalposts
and yet score a goal?

GREATER
EXPERIENCE











/
This shipment—coolly tropical and re-
freshing as a breeze—in keeping with ovr
newly received Tropical Worsteds and
Tropical Gabardines,
at prices that-are
highly competitive

|

It May Be Trainer Thrale’s |
Best Year For Winners |







RICHARD BAERLEIN of

Through the years Peter Thrale has proved one of the |
greatest yearling judges in Britain. Most of the horses in his
stable have been bought by him for his patrons at no great
price. He buys all kinds of horses with all kinds of pedi-
grees, but the great asset is that they nearly all pay their
way.

Sports Window

LAST year’s First Divi-
sion Cup winners—Harrison
College—-will meet the Sec-
ond Division Cup winners

- that’s one reason why
this airline has been
“first choice” of interna-

.§



who have been promoted to
the First Division—Modern
High School—at Basket Ball
to-night at the Y.M.P.C. The
match is expected to be ex-
citing, especially as thefe
will be school rivalry and
boys from the two schools
will be present to encourage
the players,

In the other match, For-
tress will meet Pickwick.
In the Second Division

Peter Thrale is paid his greatest

1952 series in St. Lucia this month compliment by

If one goes, it will not be a fully
representative combination
—<—<—$—— es

Empire Lightweight
Title

see he is in the bidding and then
join in themselves jn the hopc
of outlasting him.

Two of the greatest
spinners of last s
witch winner, Three Cheers
Le Sage, who won five races j
succession — were both bought :
yearlings in 1949 by Thrale fo
modest figures,





LONDON
McGovern, the ar itisl
boxing champion,

Tommy
lightweight

to fight Cliff Anderson of Britt Foundation will play St. Three Cheers cost 500 guin-
Guiana in a final eliminator fr | S.C.L.B, at the Garrison, eds, and Le Sage 1100 guiness
the Empire lightweight title at | 1.8.8.—Boys’ Club at Dis- while this year’s classic ca
Porthoawl on June 11 or 18. trict A and J.S.B.S.—Spar- didate, Khor-Mousa cost only
—B.U.P. tan at Harrison College. 1050 guineas. In view of the



rr

WEATHER REPORT



owners are only too keen
enlist his aid.

For the coming season there



WHAT'S ON TODAY



YESTERDAY a record number in the stable, and
Court of Ordinary 11 a.m this promises to be Thrale’s
Rainfall from Codrington: Lower Courts and Court of greatest year. There are ‘4

of which 30 are two-year-

Work Held Up
At present the two-year-olds
are more backward than usual
and the heavy rains of the past

Nil. Appeal 10 a.m,
Total rainfall for month to Annual Meeting, Bible So-

Sarat sk Be ; ciety, Empire Theatre 5,00
Highest Temperature: 88.0 °F p.m.

Lowest Temperature: 73.5 °F Rehearsal of “Twelfth
Wind Velocity: 9 miles per Night” at British Council



tas Seid pnak app oh ieee ieandat
































































t fore the ability of these two-
some sale ring
competitors who wait until they

money -
ason——Cesare- pick of the older horses. He has
and done exceptionally

results it is not surprising that last season.

















3. RACING

What is the minimum
weight that can be imposed
as Top weight in a Barba-
dos Turf Club Handicap
Race ?
4. WATER-POLO

Can a goal-keeper stand
on the bottom for the pur-
pose of defending his goal ?
5. TABLE TENNIS

What are the measure-
ments of a Table Tennis bat,
according to the Laws of
the Game ?

NOTE: All
“Sports Quiz”
addressed

year-olds can be assessed, What
is important is that they were
all bought at reasonable figures,
despite their illustrious breed-|j
ing
Three Cheers is naturally the
well, but no
three-year-old Cesarewitch wit
ner has gone ¢n in recent vea
to become a great four-year-old
Even Better \
The Cesarewitch seems to tell
its inevitable tale, but only the
racecourse can prove this, for in
his box Three Cheers looks an
even bigger force than he was





entries for
should be
“Sports Quiz”,
c/o Advocate Sports Editor,
and must reach this office
by 12 noon on Saturday,
May 10, The correci



Khor-Mousa heads the three-
year-olds and has already
proved aapable of acting in
heavy going when winning over
the Ascot mile.

He is one of the few two-year-
olds of last season who can be
depended upon to y the Derby
listance. If the gcing is heavy,
he will be there with a chance.

Sir Phoenix also proved capable
of staying qa mile in heavy going

the winner will be publish-
ed im the Sunday Advocate
of May 11.

Each entry must be
accompanied by A COUPON
as Set ont below.



SPORTS QUIZ



tional travelers for nearly
© quarter of a century.

| NEW YORK

Non-stop service. by the luxurious
“E) Presidente” or via San Juan by
popular, money-saving “E) Turista.

Regular service by giant double
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Enjoy stopovers in England, Ire
land. PAA Clippers also fly to India
and the Orient.

Venezuela

Frequent flights to all main cities
by swift Convair-type Clippers.



You can now “fly PAA” almost any-
where —in fact, to 83 countries
and colonies on six continents.









|
answers and the name of







































i \ —SOSCSSOOS SS SFOS OPS POP SOOT
our. 5 p.m. week have further held up their as a two-year-old and this colt}]|] Name ........cececceueee r reservations, see your * ee x
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 30.016, Basket Ball—2nd Div. at work. will also pay his way. | Travel Agere ao < BA ‘ “y Mtns x
(3 p.m.) 29.928. Garrison, Modern High There are some well-bred ones Maxey Rock was the best two=]|] .. 02. co.cc cece eveueges . % {| \ “= -
TO-DAY School and Harrison Col- among them, including two colts year-old plater of last seasop. It ‘Ss | ¥%
Sunrise: 5.40 a.m. lege 5 p.m. Ist Div. at by Persian Gulf, named The will be some time before he is}|]} Address ...............0: n - e st
Sunset: 6.16 p.m. Y.M.P.C. 7.30 p.m. Cydaris and Sassanian Monarch, visked in selling plates again, at ’ WORLD'S * x
| Moon: Full, May 9. Police Band at Hastings | and Marston Magna, a son of was intended to send him toLin=]]f ............. Roe eo te Se $
an Tp Dee ee a Da ~ ead Precipitation, coln in a_ handicap but Pre | Be * * R
{ e: 2.58 a.m., 3.52 p.m. ounc ims 8. Par a ies ar . may now have to be revise DPE ED en oo 6405 bebe cab ashe eee | > x
| Low Tide: 9.45 a.m., 9.42 p.m. oe ' ase ae ner, Chumossaire, the waterlogged state of the i| PAN AMERICAN * :
\ ; *) gallops, | %
' nee eteneet a ————'_Pst twill be a few weeks be —L.£.S. Hort AimHAYs $ AN %
rn . rT ‘ aR . 2 ial Sete epeeetnemre sees roe eee ’ .
| Theyll Do It Every a Bea By Jimmy Hatlo | Da Costa & Co, tid. x %
Sass ii = ret rer x PAR | Broad Street — igetown % S
~ aaa 7 ey 4 Ph 212
ae ae Sas ZG), Owes 16 A | A Y HIS IS AD SE BEA CH CLU | one 2122 (After arn ge i peachy § RI
» AT UPS Ne wai GAN Seatty Z SONG WRITER»+GIVE HIM THAN NOT HAVING] | e z
( PLay “JADDAROO"- SoS AND ie

7) OYA KNOW, IT? ake set ie aekine HIM GO_OUT IN THE: te wre x, “nil } | NOTICE TO MEMBERS : x
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PAGE 1

Communist Prisoners Seize U.N. General Demands For His Release Ignored TOKYO. May 8. Communist prisoners on Koje Island were reported tonight to have seized their United Nations Camp Commandant General Frank T. Dodd. A Report said thev vrere holding him as hostage. It was authoritatively learned here that Communist took General Dodd captive 48 hours ago. Koje, is the island where two bloody riots lM Communist prisoners of war occurred i'n February ond March. An official statement is expected within a few hours. Koje island Is Southwest of Pusan main port in South Korea. On February 16, 1,500 .prisoners attacked their American guards with st*el picks and barbed wire flairs Sixty-nine prisoners were killed and 14 prisoners and 2:f Americans injured. COMMUNIQUE An Eighth Army communique issued to-dav from Koje island said: "Brigadier General Francis Dodd, United Nations Commanding General of prisoner of war camp Num ber On* on Koje Island was forcibly seized bv Communist prisoners of war and is being held in camp against his will. A demand for his release unharmed nas been ignored by Communists. "General Dodd with another officer was conferring with Communist leaders at the gate to one of the compounds at about 15.15 hours local time May 7. Without warning the two officers were seized and forced into an enclosure by the prisoners. The second officer escaped and made his way to freedom. "0*neral Dodd. of Tallahassee. Florida was overpowered and held by Communists. A note has been received in General Dodd s handwriting stating that he is unharmed. "Efforts are being made to effect the release of General Dodd. There are no other details available at this time." Until full details were available It was believed here that fear for General Dodd'a safety had prevented troops from effecting his rescue. Tt could not be ascertained immediately what Communist prisoners demanded in return for his safe release—U.P. Far num For /inland Fund THE Fund to defray the ex pen*** or acs eyelirt Kan F cum to the Olysspu (lamas in -i uaxt July ktill urgent' ly needs youi mipport. Donation* are accepted at Barclay'! Bank, th* Royal Bank of Canada, and the Office, of ihe "Advocate." Ooai sa,aao on Ant. frtv Aik S 767.68 Treaauiy Staff 7 6* %  M ,: a PSS M SURREY 219 %  %  AND 151 FOR 8: INDIA 158 LONDON. May 8. Surrey with two second Innings wickol* to tall led the Indian touring cricket team today by 312 runs at the close of play after a keen struggle on the second day of their match here. The Indiana wwt ••*% am their first innings for IS8 In reply Surrey's 219 and by close Surrey were 151 for eight In their aecond Knock. England bowlers Jim Laker and Alex Bedser took six for 84 and three for 42 respectively In the Indian's first innings and six wickets fell today for the addition f 92 t„ the overnight score A whirlwind 41 by Whittnker and a sound neat 57 by Constable bolstered Surrey'* second Innings score. W. GermanyRises From War Ruins llv It)-.! I'll t\ ..Kit,I, %  years ago liiuisdj a year M lo final doom %  Ft** Worl, y WATER ir.\m.i; Attilude Of US Coiigivt*!* Might Threatni Peace WASHINGTON, May 8. President Truman on the seventh anniversary of Vi. I Europe tu-daj said the attitude In the United States CfJAgMSi %  pending for National Deft Mutual Defence might threaten chance* fur future world peace. He told a news confercm.then would be no Third Worhj War Ii American economy coulabe kepi on an even keel und the Mutual Security Programme of aid lo Bn • countries were carried through to a successful conclusion. He said he was disturbed by the crises ID steel, oil and copper In this country und certain attitude i %  res* toward the National Defer* < Programme and Mutual Security Appropriation Cons'r\ati\rs IMan To Donaliumili/.f Trucking liidiisir\ LONDON. May 8. llntaiti %  ( .r ,ii V .iivi .ovi-mmciit amMUOCtd plans lo denationalize the mi.king industry aid i.ati nalisad iejtesi*a In cOsSMOng with it. In their Caper the government promised that trucking %  pcnsalo the loss by levying a tax i gpvsrnaMnt by iilwut £4.000,000 yearly for ilrst few years and experts predict-ni it wouiu lain al i years at tins rats to paj the oosl of turning the industry ova* to private! vena Up The Paper gold the railroads must be decentralized to allow Me) with truck' arpl |ga and there srgju i. graal autonomy given it areas of the the BrtUah transport commuBion would t-o given greater freedom In setting fares and freight charges in order to keep up with competition. Changes in %  sine* January 1, 1948, will mean competition between both rail and road and "will encourage e ffi c i e n cy in both." Ofllcial BtatiNtics niven out late last year said the Govenuiiei.t had taken over 3,727 trucking firms with 43,731 vehicles aud 4.M4 trailers. t f sff, • % % %  ^ % %  ^ %  • %  IBBBSSBSBBSSSSSSSBSBI Nuremberg macl Eksrl eeremony %  %  i :in.in> M led Us bitf > | ifa (I I lUllllWI *fp' smashed. It w; without arsMd f arwa n i loogn Never In history had %  natl suffered such overwhelming tot .!.-f, M A Grml Chaitjrr Today, just m i someUiing has happened that oat waw like U> laUon would have believed poa ble. Western Germany %  %  States. Britain and Iran* %  • Its cities axe rising t| the ruins. Hacked by fjnum States Man-lull i itries are booming far oeyon. former lew I xporUr ire grabbing great portions of th' i nSm aim ot ilie hand of her former victors. ihidi will be tewed, by the • l.onl Willotuto I waa tewed Into the QaiSaaagJt BJ •a* usdeaded from the 8.S. i-urd Ooabersaare'*. ft h a Water Barge Tawed Into Careenage i %  I r barge, which will ai with the tug S •: I I % %  %  f{ .1I rd Con I %  ova) i"<> %  Cbmberaai of water. U'rllmiflhti/ will either i % %  behind "i ;>' the side—as the wcitlm attowi go into operation.. I replace ie Id i whul. wag eoruii-K narl n roan ago. The barge is i lour as tinWiiioiii/iibw nnd has thn sarM tun!\ LJM-..I wan lownrrd sYugfl tM SS Croft, r t>* .. he.vv lift dei It was noticeable that n.* •/as a bit longer than tihe hugo iK.ige I I riuiiaii \ t'jrut iatiil^ Copper 'Agreement With Chile WASHINGTON. May* 8, President Truman told newsmen that the matter of the. copper agreement between Chile and U.S. was a subject of negotiation between him and the President of Chile. He said he hoped the matter could be brought to a successful conclusion but he couk* not comment at this tune ntlng U.S. Strike Cmmm Petrol Cot In TT.K. i. WHOM, II %  ..lies of high octane %  th i's no Unltad %  uiysoper%  The Western Allies or, mam %  (Or ill time are negoti.itinn • the Bonn Government to raise 11 Lord WUta i German divisions of 300.00 c agah# Comnutnism. Even Berlin, sill divided and Isolated lOO mi e l>ehlnd th. k on Its feet -num. The Kurfuerstendnmni. lie -lin" Fifth Avenue rciiuei ,i to just smoking ruin in 194:. lur g> On Paare r. W r.uropo Sign Pad TodayJ German) A Sovereign Stair PARIS. May 8. A QiuH Dt >r-.,v UMSU tma %  Borrow at 6.00 p.m the Prvncti K..i. Acfall) announced. A Qti.ii Dofsoiy spokaai in said the W-yoii pad o/U l>e imtialti'it by the heuds ol lelcgations ol merabr natloiv In the r\ Tar^saV UuUeV, and cari.e* StfTasTorTn^btu iSccalafuH the • page show...* \ir Hove Towards Settlenu ml 01 S4rik.* Al GeCaWsL irikv al U.C.W.I The H Aent the i Ikf (A>iiliiiu ln> nrrived nt K.i'i. (10JO ike <.ll AII F i %  with billow i ,. HI I %  %  %  %  II. | NATO bel a farewell visit of mmuntal |ati i Dortod to bava dsMtrayad and •> third .1 U;I-.I whoa U m M.IIU burla i) %  The AlUad Commui I 1 tons of demolition and in i i i galloni T n|Hiim (ieihe.1 patrol) wore Ispresd vim < al lurnlng l|i| lie liltu of th 10 tl.. the ProsiU) y | (.i...... i i inwiia to the en. %  %  itthat It had prevented the Thimi World War. but said conditions ti me Universuildergradu.it. : .in SEOUL. Mav B, larsporlag tSo cm Kit pi U.N. fighter bombers welcomajd General Mark W, Clark tha Sccdor cup raatdi a to Korea to-day bv launching a devastating attack on the day. ( Communist supply city ot Suan, only 30 miles from the Capital of North Korea. Swarming flights of Fifth I 1'UIllUIl Is ()<> Til i General Mark Clark Arrives In Korea i i • •f the DaoJgti %  i %  \iliniral E. J C. Qulvest%  rn Ki..ft. ForMbuatei Admiral Trick iti'ii.i Commandr-ln^ Allied roress of North Kurope. Missus Bugneie Anderson United SUtao Ambassador W Tunisian Rafi Denmark and other high Danish military and civil officials— IM*. ,v 1 • % %  id amoke —U.P. Solution Of 1 tt n i.Hia n IHspu t< • Appear* Likely Red. AksottM U.N. Ul Deluyiiig I!rur::e TUNIS, May 8 irees said thnt (oui ,1 % % %  .ll I. rut Commlaslon have jpon ami ihut o 1 .in" need tb) I i i %  Hod i %  %  i.. 1 Obstacles 1 1 v urged l, un.nve an> % %  lit l nt | %  ..' lalru several i %  %  I., n m il.i Dt teiiched so far ,. it e .i 1 i % %  had i*en %  i 1 %  .. %  i %  ilatum lo i>ut tbe tract ii .1 u .ii ludn Mi t Gem i or of tha Vnt w..rui i h I-'I %  '.HI undai winch West Germany .II (-• ii •ormid in to ..ith her %  %  ii M on nltiaUed In %  ll.llf of < Ian Soviet 'nloo ui II ana west a but aevei %  and of I P Cheaper Nensprint from Bagasse /.A. EXPE/riH£M> AM SfCCESSFVi. LONDON Newsprint has bivn made from bagasse In sucewsful cJaasss, penments In the UnH Jom. Prices arc no hi. than those of newsprint made by traditional methiKls and it is expect" i production by existim; mills i luicklv bring prices down This is ihi nir' W. T run i W erOjTs 'Brighton in a i.icked ihe experlmenw. H. rnt aU info'inav. %  he United Nallnn;Bdut ion. which has set up a committee to uivc^Ugale ""• i Mr. Curtis-W! I lsnn suggestod a tebl of pulp null* in the sugnrTowing oounl vorld BUt BO pointed out thai ipposition i if irer otil,( hav.to bl brains* an %  Samples %  We obtained SBfl i nagk Vnsst It'' %  ..' .' "tinsse in i vir\ blgj) gad am .iskc,i .. mill In I u r t ,i Inl whu h is -iii'(-i> ii i la .. ne sprlni tlonal sources — the* has a much stronger Obro, w i from tho :lM)rntory tnts 1* In %  i fine subititutr for newsprint from traditional sources. Hut i>n the lOmBls %  offend aw fenmd that tha i as bad. thai it nu broorntsh, ni.t that the bagassa uulp as supi lied was dirty II itxiut iwi> poi cant M itir; and uh. The ash idm to hat these sugar cane rods alt burnt to remove mveth before they nr<* milled 'These, however, urc problems \hich iifTerdl vCffl ilncultv of solution. We found ihat we could, by u.c of chcnuVs produce . i iriven snow; and 'h,' P the dirt was of 00UTM D Masn *"r the %  ua an %  every g the this s rvorsd %  Price of Pulp 'Hut what we did litui %  %  f the puli inesint mi —vmg. indeed, possibly newnrttak snog* ftrom bag—..;.t i-r II might cost virtually Ihe soni %  newsprint dOM hsdaj 01 i .1 pound ui' '"i> pat '"ii rnori "I do not. ocrHOnJll*. P match .. .ii lo lhal. IM-< .use we are dealins with xmall pulo milk*, whereaif tflsM Mua material Is rereinlwd and •.<•* —tkt M the important thin' hy Ihe eslstlnc PSPT mill'. then the coat WOMM rumr lum hllns down." H is diflferoH b ..nioiint of bagnsse aval I %  t 'HI. It. 4.000.000 tons and U.OIMI i n year Dut it has been fi und thai It taki bagasse tii "t pu't' It \<. thenf'T. duee at least 1.000.000 tons or which g> tin rage & He added he could not aay Anything] more about It now. He .lid remark however, that he hnped the matter would be brought to .. *uccessful conclusion.— V,r. New LuxuryLiner Gets First Trials DUNKIRQUE. Trance. May 8. A Now Pride of Franco's Transatlantic Beet slipped out •*! port for hat first sea trials Flandre is scheduled to make he* maiden voyage from Le Havre to New" York cmetng on July %  ig 0 !" ^" 1 ? %  JEL 1 Tbi. Is a rr.alor step In rebufldlng Plt the French Msrcnant Fteet of which two-thirds was destroy ed during the war Displacing 30,600 ton-. Flandre rsnlatns accc-rnrnodatl,t %  idtiom in Truman speeches, I anticip.i'' aavn of •) prosslon after bg l'ANMUNJOM. May 8, Communist ad NaUoi -star on priaonai .-x aecuasd uio Allies ol q ha Korean truce •• refusing to negotiate. Red Oanaral ndnutaa .f today' IB-mini' % %  son in I .malnst the United ilot* have < irda of nidred lives since last /gssUBl troa house arre Tlie olher minute went Adnural C 'I'urner Joy rl %  faUa bo called until up haw i The mixed Commission wll work out detail Hume Hole und AdnU 'iiFrsnik i, wb> n Ua I b : ntl-Fn nlvisem Seven llieinlni o( tl.. Commission Wll] tTUB ihrea iR >.< %  ii' <" tn i..I .lean In rlautai locqut an i Tui inier Kal.ih Ddtna I agreed that Ihe Commi*iini won %  mosphcre was sufficiently clearee %  i %  it.le-l protectorate when %  ie boaait kapt tha talkti going by aking (or another I.L"'.N, _t.nil %  lieation that the talk* art i Irtgin Uut many Mans that extreme rational His have not given up opposite10 aov neal with the Fieneli she Terronstexploded two bom MI Tunl* l-st night cai.'n image but no • i 22 tfotor Fnlries For Grand Prix Today's trial will merely teat the ship's sea legs Speed and performance tea"* will com* later. At ST4 feet long the hull Is about Ihe size of De Grass* and half the *e of Uberte and Isle De France Flandre is the largest ship launched in France since the war and will be the fourth Urgsat merchantman sailing under tricolour. She matches the speed and lusurr of hsr larger mates. Isjral MacArlhur In Th:Running WASHINGTON. May 8. Senator Everett rirk.-oi* campitgn manager for Sen:.t''r Robert Taft said Thursday ho would not rule out Gen. Rods Plan Xnli'Ridgwuy Rifts PARIS. M The po %  %  : I 1 ist party %  BaaTopsfi .with demands tor nw m all forms" against U T .1 Ridgway ai European Commander, on A 25. 1 Par^ P th it the) • -. hole I,MII;III;I GaGa, Tourist BOstfd DisriisLtd) l(iuU a Removal WWi Gapt Ckrko (From tHir Own Correspondent) CJKKNAUA. May 8. A joint meeting of the Chamber of Commen | Tourisl Board with Capt. Barla Hughaa -f thasseiigeiv with partlcu^Ur reference to tourisrts spending— -ame i i wlthdi %  read lo possible ... %  I In I %  %  1 i %  %  r. also proposed %  %  %  % 



PAGE 1

FRIDAY. MAY 9. 1952 BARBADOS MIV..OATF. PACE SEVEN HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON I FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD I BY ALAN STRANKS a GEORGE DAVIES LAWS CA3AI &0*TVA£T£A **£ Of BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY Famous for flavour! RED ROSE TEA is good tea mm?**-''--'IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only SPI I I VI Ol I I Its art lion i>..il .1.1. H( our Ifi .i.. li. s I . • ilsiil.-. S|i.iuliis..> ii and Sn Slrre Uully Now Usually Now Tins KI.IM—(5 lb.) 8.14 S.M Tin* MELON • C.INCER JAM .46 M Tins MEAT LUNCH 45 .40 Tin. TOMATOES 36 .34 k S s. MIXED NUTS 1.10 .96 Hollies TENNENTS BEER .26 .23 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street T II E 4O I O \ \ A II i; . II ( I II I V /**-'*O^V**'*,V',^*,*,00'**'*^V*V'*'-**','*^^^^%^**V'-vv-.VO^'-0%0'*^^0^'.**'-'.',*S**SA*S,***'*W*SSS***'*VS*'***WSi'*'*, IMPORTANT NOTICE ALL PERSONS WHO ORDERED The Pictorial Record of KING GEORGE VI. through the Advocate Stationery are specially advised tu (nil for their Copies TO-DAY. Kailinu I., call. these copies will no longer he reserved but will be on sale lo Ihe public from SATURDAY. MAY KITH. I hMM of the II....I. |l . . $2.72 ADVOCATE STATIONERY : %  : %  *• STOCK UP Oil THESE CANNED FOODS flams in 4'j lb. tins Hums in 2'i lb. tin* Hrontc Roast Beef in I lb. tins Morey's Lunch Meul 8 oz and 12 uz. tins Wham—Delicious Ham Delicacy in 12 oz. tint Trim Pork and Beef Lunch Meal 12 oz. tin* Imperial Lamb Tongue in 12 oz. tins Kraft Kish Supreme tin* Mortons Cod Roe* in X oz. tins Morton'% Herrings in Tomato Sauce 7 oz. and II oz. tins Hots. Mango Chutney Hots. Demcrara C'assnreepe Hots. Clemens Pure Purplegrape Juico Illue ( bees*per Ih. (...n.i.i Cheesr per lb. Kenco Cheese in 12 oz. tins Dairy Maid Cheese in 12 M %  ins Swifts Cheese in 12 oz. tin* ALLEYNE ARTHUR & CO., LTD. voi ii I.IIOM-:II* llll.ll s %  III I I