Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

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Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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ie
' To

id
et

j lege, Weybridge, University Tutor-

Har biad0os



ESTABLISHED 1895







o Much Talk And
No Conerete Action

(From Our Own Correspondent)
C PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 7.

Captain R. A. Clarke, General Manager of Canadian
National Steamships, operators of the “Lady” boats to-da
blamed British West Indian Governments for the impend-
ing withdrawal of these vessels from the Canada-West
Indies service.

_There had been no definite signs that British West
Indian Governments wanted to maintain the passenger
service Captain Clarke declared.

He pointed out that there had been tal
meetings to discuss the matter,

held.
pr een Fu

k of holding
but no definite meeting was



There had been a series of post-
ponements and nothing concrete
had resulted he added Clarke who
is On a routine visit to the Carib-
bean Islands arrived this morning:
by the Lady Nelson which is ex-
pected to continue its voyage to
Montreal tanight. The last sailing

of the “Lady” boats from the West
Indies

J. Of T’daid

to Canada ill be i
November, be -
Hye R.E.C. Action

_IT IS announced by the Secre-
tary of State for the Colonies, Mr.
Oliver Lyttelton, that the Queen
f been pleased to approve the

ointment of Mr. J. L. M.
‘Perez, Attorney General, Trinidad
ind Tobago, to be Chief Justice of
that MY with effect from Aug-
Lee ;

Our correspondent in Jamaica
writes that the Honourable Donald
Sangster, Jamaica’s representative
of the Regional Economic Com-
mittee, commenting on the pro-
posed stoppage of the ‘Lady Boats’
on October 1, said R.E.C. action is
urgently necessary and Govern-
ment action is needed to settle a
commen policy.

Honourable Sangster pointed out
that Article 20 of the Canada-West
Indies Trade Treaty rovided
twelve months’ notice before ter-
mination and said whether this
applied to any part or just the
whole agreement had been deter-
mined. ‘The proposal to terminate
this service will, I hope, encourage
the West Indies to think seriously
about a Caribbean Shipping Ser-
vice which is so vital to the future
economy of this area. This service
need not be confined to the British
Caribbean; for I happen to know

ee

* Mr. Joseph Leon Mathieu Perez
vas born in Trinidad in 1896, and
as educated at St. George’s Col-

lal College, London and the Uni-
-Â¥ersity of London. He was called
o the Bar at the Middle Temple
in 1917 and after private practice
Trinidad, joined the Colonial
rvice there as Deputy Registrar
meral in 1927. He was appointed
sistant Magistrate in 1930 and
Cfown Counsel in 1934. He was
oted to be Chief Magistrate in
1936 and became Puisne Judge in
He was pointed to his
Fesent post of Attorney General
E195 ;







a Caribbean Shipping Service,”
he said.







NEW SINGAPORE
RESERVOIR TO
COST £5 MILLION

A new reservoir, three times

_ Huge Increase

_ In Malayan
Customs Revenue
Fi ubber was principally respon-
bie for an 85 per cent. increase

the yield from Malayan export
Gities in 1951, says an official

ort from Kuala Lumpur.







“The revenue collected by the
mstoms and Excise Department
he Federation of Malaya last
w from all sources amounted














the 1950
of $268,-

cent. over

an increase

he total amount collected in
ort duties was $352,679,620, an
ase of $197,759,981 over the
figure, while import duties
unted to $214,291,040, an in-
ase of $66,113,621.

“Malayan dollar = 2s. 4d.*

le’s Qopper To
t 333c. Per Lb

IAGO DE CHILE, May 7.
asury Minister German Pico
said a decree fixing the new
fige of copper will be signed to-

“and the new rate expected to
More than 33} United States
S per pound,





ile last week cancelled the
fl copper agreement with the
ed States under which 80 per
was sold at 274 United States’
$5 per pound leaving 20 per
nt. for sale on the free market.
aé@ Minister said there are no
of copper either accumu-
i or “frozen” in Chilean ports.
told newsmen categorically
Pnot a single ton of copper had
em produced since the outbreak
ot th: mining strike and all the
uction at Chile’s disposal does

aot exceed 1,500 tons.—U.P.
¢

Juin Is Marshal

PARIS, May 7.
eral Alphonse Juin, Inspec-
3 of French Armed
ses and Commander of Atlan-
‘Porces in Central Europe was
iéd a Marshal by the Cabinet.
Cabinet also promoted to
wank of Marshal —
sly — General Philippe
rc De MHauteclocque war-
ommander of the famed

“General of French Armed
until his death in an air

ash in 1947,
—UP.
















ngineer In

second African to be ap-
to the position of Execu-

A.M.1I.W.E., who had extensive
waining in Huddersfield, England.
Mr. Pratt, who was born in
Freetown in 1917, was educated at
the Prince of Wales School and
the Methodist Boys’ High School,
Freetown. He served five years’
ticeship in the Public
Department Technical
O01, Lagos, and from 1944 to
Baw as
id Technical College, York-




—— ee
a

bigger than any existing reservoir
on the Island, is to be constructed
in the Seleter Catchment area of
Singapore. ,
The capacity of the reservoir
will be of approximately 3,500
million gallons of water and the
treatment works will have a
capacity of 40 million gallons a
ay.

The estimated cost of the reser-
voir is about $45,000,000.

Communist truce neg
have agreed to withdraw
neutral truce ins
the ceasefire.

A pooled dispatch from
munjom quotin







ONLY TWO
ATTACKS

SAYS MICHELIN

Colonel R. T. Michelin,
Commissioner of Police, in
an interview with the “Ad-
vocate” yesterday said;
“There are a number of
completely untrue rumours
going around the island con-
cerning attacks on motorists
at night by armed persons.

“Do not believe all these
wild rumours which only
upset the population and are
the product of someone's
imag

‘ination.

“Only two true cases of
aitacks on motorists have
been reported to the Police
this year. These were made
on persons who had parked
their cars on lonely spots in
the Pine area at night. A
“Peeping Tom” had turned
up and demanded money.
Refusal to accede to his re-
quest had resulted in the
use of violence by him.

“The Police Information
Bureau (Tel. No, 08) will be
pleased to give anyone the
correct facts on any matter
at any time. Please verify
the facts before you pass on
an untrue rumour that does
harm.”

He ended; “You -_ —
jsured that swift an c-
tive Police action will always
lee taken to deal with all
true reports of attacks, etc.
on people of this island.”

C.S.A. Adopt
Holmes Report

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, May 7,
An official release on the C.S.A.



other territories which are willing | Federation Conference which end-
to participate in the promotion of |ed Monday reveals that the confer-

ence adopted the recommendation

;ot a select committee that the

Secretary of State be requested to
take action whereby unification of
public services in the area as re-
commended in the Holmes Report
Be coumiorns, for implementation
or to
Federation when consideration
should also be given by the
Secretary of State to setting up
our Regional Executive Authority
envisaged in the Holmes Report.

The C.S.A, Federation further
authorised itz Council to prepare
and submit to the Secretary of
State a scheme for implementation
of the unification of services.

The conterence accepted the
invitation of the British Honduras
delegate that its next beinnial
conference take place there.



N. Koreans Drop Russia As
Neutral Truce Inspector

TOKYO, May 7.

otiations were reported today to
their nomination of Russia as a
pector—one of the main issues blocking

the truce talks town of Pan-

United Nations sources said this con-

cession was made during secret talks between the chief
delegates on the new United Nations offer.

he dispatch said it was believed at Panmunjom that

the issue of the exchange of
only remaining major pr
United Nations “overall

Surrey 219:
India 64—4
The Indian ee

lost four wickets for 64 today,
after dismissing Surrey for 219.

A great spell by medium paced
bowler Ramchand in which
took five wickets for five runs
helped in the dismissal of the last
ee Surrey batsmen for only 20
uns.

Earlier Eric Bedser 40 and Dave
‘Fletcher 47 had put on 80 for the
first wicket and Laurie Fishlock
57 and Jack Parker 52 put on
108 runs for the fourth wicket.
Ramchand’s final figures were
five for 20.

The Surrey spinners Jim Laker
and Tony Lock took four wickets
in 20 minutes when the tourists
went in and the Indians finished
the day 155 runs behing with six
wickets in hand.—wU.P,







African As Executive

Sierra Leone

shire, England, where he obtained
the Higher National Diploma. In
1946, he was Prizeman for Me-

He was elected an Associate
Member of the Institute of Civil
Engineers in 1930, and an Associ-
ate Member of the Institute of
Water Engineers in 1951.

Mr. Pratt has had practical ex-
ong wong in various establishments
in the United Kingdom including
the Taf Fechan Water Supply
Board. He returned to Freetown
at the beginning of Aoril and has

.| chanical Engineering,

|
| appointment.

©) Panmunjom were

prisoners of war was now the

oblem barring acceptance of the
solution” for the truce.

Reports of the Communist con-
cession at Panmunjom came
through after General Ridgway
retiring United Nations Supreme
Commander had announced that
the latest Allied proposals were
the “limit to which the United
Nations can go.” An “overall
solution” he said was contingent
on acceptance as a whole. He
yd the Communists had rejected
he proposal. But it was not
immediately clear whether his
statement was prepared before or
after the latest developments at
known.

The United Nations he said had
ended the “news blackout” on the
truce talks and future sessions
would be public.

A despatch quoting United
Nations spokesman Brigadier
General illiam Nuckols said
that the Communists thad offered

London talks on} la’

THURSDAY,

C.N.S. General Manager Blames W.I
For Withdrawal Of Lady



U.S. Oil

U.S. 60,000,000 motoriat

that they return to work. —
Taft Polls
**‘Landslide’’

WASHINGTON, May 7,
Senator Estes Kefauver suffered
his first defeat in a Presidential
Primary losing to Senator Richard
B. Russel in the Florida Primary
as Senator Robert A. Taft claimed
all of Ohio’s 56 Republican dele-
gates in a “tremendous landslide
victory.”

Returns from 1,345 of Florida’s
1,683 precincts gave Russel 261,880
votes to 242,574 for Kefauver.
However, Kefauver apparently
prevented Russel from winning
the decisive victory which Russel’s
supporters said was needed to
win hnon-southern support at the
Democratic Convention,

The lead in the Florida contest
changed hands eight times duri







the night before Russel finally | ®s

pulled ahead for good,
Taft now has 401 delegates to

the Republican Convention which|]’

is two-thirds of the 604 needed for
nomination, Taft claims some
elected delegates who are not
publicly committed to any candi-
date. An unofficial count prior te
the Ohio Primary showed General
Eisenhower with 291 pledged or
publicly announced delega to
274 for Taft.

Harold E, Stassen had challenged
Taft for 47 of Ohio's 56 Republican
Convention Delegates but Stassen
appeared headed for another
Primary defeat. Taft had said he
might lose only one delegate al-
though he did not consider it a
“true contest” between himself
and Eisenhower who was not
entered in the Ohio Primary.
Write-in votes were not permitted.

Taft also beat Stassen in the
contest for Ohio's ten delegates at
rge. é
Retauver's “su claimed
a “sweeping victory” for him in
the Ohio Democratic Primary, A

Boat . Service

Strike Poses
Threat To Motorists

DENV
Si

plete exhaustion of gasoline supplies unless 90,000 striking |
oil workers accede to the Fedi















airlines announced they had cut

r
Weie others indicated they soon
would be forced to curtail services
pending the fuel shortage.

tary circles
Department ordered all of the arm-
ed forces to cut oil consumption in
the United States. U.S. Army
instructed all United States area
commanders to cut consumption of
petroleum products “to minimum
required
operations”.

least one-third in use of aviation
. f t ti

or c conservation”.
HS aioe. Ordered al fivipa
activities outside the Korean War
area to cut to the minimum, There





=AY 8, 1952

Govts.





Bit, COLORADO, May 7.
re threatened with com-

|

tal Government's request |

* spokesman
cf 22 gs

ey t oll

» the decision
we be made 4
\Vage Stabilization Board -
cay requested that the week old
strike @f oil workers be ended
“ingmediately” and summoned
Union and industry leaders to a
Leard meeting in Washington next
"Tuesday .

Chairman Nathan Feincinger
told representatives of Unions and
cfficials of 75 oil companies that
‘ney should continue collective
bargaining and be prepared to

iake a “full report” to the Board
on Tuesday on the status of the
tispute. -

The strike already has meant
he loss of more than 10,000,000
barrels of oil including 5,000,000
barrels of gasoline according to
ise national newspaper for the oil
industry “The Oil Daily”,

Tt has also caused a definite cut-
ck in military activities both In
@ United States and in Europe
well as the reduction of civil-

for the coalition |
CLO., AFL. and
unions in

, 10-Year Plan
For Aluminum
In Surinam

PARIS, May 6.

A $53,000,000 10-year‘programme
to produce aluminum in the
Netherland’s pint sized South
American colony of Dutch Guiana
was recommended Tuesday by the
International Bank for Reeon-
struction and Development,



LORD WILLOUGHBY, the new tug for the island,
Carlisle Bay after being unloaded from the 8.8. Crofter.

through
The water
barge, which was also brought by the “Orofter”, will be unloaded
to-day.

“Ida” To Be Replaced
By “Lord Willoughby”

MANY people gathered at the lower Wharf ye
day afternoon to watch the Lord Willoughby being teed

ashore by the Lord Combermere. The Lord Willoughby
will replace the Ida which continued to serve the colony

although condemned 11 years ago.
The Lord Willoughby, which was; thc 60-ton Jumbo, heavy lift der-



> pervices A report of a special bank : Jhites S ard (South-|rick of the Crofter.
Being felt mostly in the Mia Wee mission says there is no technical ceipten} bat sana in “ This Jumbo derrick is part of
®rid East. sqnege why reasonably cheap island at daybreak on board the|the Crofter’s equipment. The
Dwindling gas supplies forced me cuareinctste power cannot bels's. Crofter, At 1.00 p.m, she| water barge, which has its own
the trimming of bus services in eee ocally — to convert wos lowered into Carlisle Bay by pumping equipment for suppyling
Detroit and in Indianapolis and it a into aluminum for Dutch the ships , was left on the deck

Guiana, the world’s biggest source
of bauxite. The report urges the
Colonial Government to discuss
commercial aspects of such a
scheme with cauntries producing
‘luminum elsewhere and seek out-
side investments,

The mission predicted that ex-
ternal aid would probably give
the colony more than the required
$53,000,000. Much of Guiana's
bauxite is now being shipped to
Canada for manufacture because
of cheaper Canadian power sup-
ply.

Metal Dispute
Complicated

LONDON, May 7.

was reported that “no gas” signs
wilt be up by tomorrow. Seven

passenger and cargo services

The strike also moved into mili-
when the Defence-

to



support essential

The Navy ordered a cut of at

ine and the Marine Corps

ig no oil strike in California be-
cause most of the petroleum pro-
ducts used in Korea come from

First the United States—Bolivian

S § fauver’s eight : ;
spokesman said Ke ig tin dispute and now the United

delegate at large candidates were





lk

oi the Crofter. It will be lowered
this morning by another heavy
litt derrick in the aft,
Sturdy Appearance
Lord Willoughby is not as large
as either the Lord Combermere
or Ida, but has a very sturdy ap-
pesrance, Her hull is well out of
the water, It was noticeable that
when she was being tewed to the
Careenage by the Combermere,
«| She rolled more than the Comber-
me-ve did.

Reds Reject
Latest U.N.

Proposal

MUNSAN, Korea, May 7.
ne Korean Truce Talks san
o all time low today after the
mmunists rejected the Allies’? she has a design speed of 8%
iv, final and irrevocable pack-[ kn ts which was exceeded in her
An official Allied } trials when she attained 9.4 knots.

there is nothing} The Crofter also brought an-
other interesting bit of cargo.
was the Auster Autocrat
plane for t
eropla

that the plane will be unloaded
today.

S.S. Crofter has brought valu-
able cargo to the island, Barba-

[
te
©
el
proposal,
‘sman said
to discuss,

spo!
lef
Top negotiators of each. side
toll the other that the “next move
is up te you.” Agreement ap-
peared to be so remote that Unit-
ed Nations Command proposed an
indefinite recess for the Armistice
Talks, but full delegations will





\ ‘ Chiles , ro dos now has an Auster Autocrat
sswept in by an overwhelming! coastal refineries. Io ste. “eased emesis: meet again on Thursday at the! which, if allowed to do so by
nargen” Retauver tas Suen —UP. volved on both, ‘the Gling. andpR eas insistence Negotiators the B.L.A.C., could well carry
only eight of Tae eeearnen buying sides “produces a pemmipli- abruptly ended the secrecy which} 041 an airy rescue service in co-
at large. Former ator Robert cated situation which ‘seems to| had shrouded the talks since the operation with the Lord Will-
J. Bulkley, a favourite son ° e daunt press comment here. The| Allied Package Deal was presented oughby.
candidate” thus was assured of Fishin Boat Financial Times alone comments, }O% April 28 in Tokyo. oe mar \
the other eight. It sums up Chile’s experience with|th¢w B. Ridgway promptly a
—U-P. ° the “Free Market.” nounced a virtue’ Allied ultima- £200,000 FOR ST .LUCIA
: ‘ tum, It is a three-point package
Believed Lost Over most of lest year Chile} U.N. Command that they would ST. LUCIA, May 7.
° had no difficulty in securing} return 70,000 of 132,000 captured} y+ was announced Wednesday
New Atomic The fishing boat | Miss Pam prices around 50 cents per pound|Chinese and North Koreans !n|¢hat H.M, Government have ap-
which left Oistin beach at 5.45 p.m. |for copper which she was free to]exchange for 12,000 Allied rooms proved an additional | allocation
D 7 on Monday April 28th last and of}sell on the open market (com-|hejq by the Reds. This is thalto St, Lucia of £200,000 made up
Bomb Ex, losion ch there has been since no|pared with 27% cents veceived}on iy of the deadlock. Commu-fof £50,000 already approved and
P cunther official report has now|from sales to the United States). nist would be permitted to build}a further £150,000, '
LAS VEGAS, ws been given up as lost with its two-|Towards the end of the year how-| nc repair North Korean airfields.| This money will be mate avail:
. Nevada, May 7. Iinan crew—Fitzgerald Best of [ever premiums receded and sales) pa. would drop their nomina-Jable in the usual way as so ——
The detonation of an atomic]. . co swald King of | high prices becarne more diffi-| jo) ¢ Russia as a neutral nation|approved under C.D. and ;
: 7 sca! Vane Ville and Osw g , a ; ioe | tio
bomb 75 miles away at eee Oistins cult. Nevertheless the free priv to help police a truce.— funds,
flat brilliantly lighted up the ® a ; , : of copper even now * remains ees
pre-dawn sky here today. ‘ight wane Rene ee re ee around 35 cents per pound,
white light} Wiles said y y . Q
oe a Stoked’ buildings here and/the boat left Oistin, the owner} The question of Chile selling
surrounding mountains, there was; Charles Ifill made a ener be all her coneee 7 ya —
i sky in- Be. é t returned, but/market possibly including ron
a golden glow in the sky outlin-|the vessel had no : p aie Se
j ‘loud. ‘ ion that the skip-|Curtain countries has been rais-
6 Sere in Los Angeles 250 oor ae cose patie hocus pocns (ed but in view of the physical
i au i j i .|volurne involved and the present WORLD F
nae blink ties ay “to the on teen fehing in: Sasaae cautious temper of world metal
quic: a mn. i

markets need not be taken very
seriously. The real question is
whether Chile or the ‘U.S. is in a
better position to stand the strain
of « prolonged deadlock compara-

northeast. It lasted but a_frac-
tien of a second. No shock was
felt here and there was no sound
from ‘the blast, A small atomic
visible above the

Since then reports have been
received that parts of the debris
of the vessel were picked up, and
on this unconfirmed information,












cloud was i boat and crew are considered|y)" Rin he Ws —Bolivian ti
. is sared quickly. | the boa ble with the S.—Bolivian tin
desert It disappeare 1 ee ant. feos:
Metal bulletin reports that the



“Chilean government expects to
fin’ a ready outlet in Europe and
India for Chilean copper but has
no’ yet considered the sale of
me al to Iron Curtain countries.”
—U.P.

W. Powers Fear Japan’s

Tendency To Communists
By HAROLD GUARD

LONDON, May 7.

5 N from being

he Western Powers prevent Japan
\eaune tule the dominant Eurasian power which at present
consists of the Soviet Union Allied to Communist China?



S'rike At U.C.W.L
Enters Third Day

|

Since the Japanese Peace Treaty came into effect last From one nee reas!
April 28 questions have been discussed with some mie 1 eae
givings by far Eastern authorities here who are dubious} ),6 strike at the University
whether the politics and diplomacy of the West are suffi- Coll ge of the West indies emane

s 4 1¢@ NONn-academic junior ste com-
cient to bring success. ——— -|pleted its third day today with

The discussion was centred »~ under-graduates still doing domes-

a counter proposal on May 2.\around the Soviet Ambassador's MENT tic work. There was a slight dis-
This was sald to be a “package ees is Wee soe WAGE AGREE turbance between police and strike
deal” in which the Communists {

agreed to drop the nomination
of Russia if the United Nations
returned 123,000 Communist
prisoners. The United Nations
had offered 70,000 saying that the’
rest do not want to return to
Communist territory,

This despatch further said)
that no p 88 Was made after
May 2 and the issues had narrow-
ed to “only one, a fundamental
one’—the prisoner question,

In a_ statement at Panmunjom
teday United Nations Chief Dele-
gate Admiral C. Turner Joy said
that Communist nomination
Russia “was never the real issue.
It was an unofficial one created
by the Communists for bargain-
ing pu .’ The Communist
desire to rebuild their wrecked
airfields was ered the
crux of the problem.

This was why the United Na-
tions had offered to “accept the
Communist view on military air-
fields if they would accept the
fact that the United Nations
would not be a party to forced
repatriation of prisoners Admiral

—U.P.

a student at the Hud-| already assumed the duties of his! Joy said.

of | Saturday's






This was seen as Russia’s first KINGSTON, J’ca, May 7. |pickets at the University’s grounds

; s x but it was not

i f relentless} A w agreement has been|this morning, t was |
Rirnacr ic Meek ie security readanl haere cane farmers developed, The B.1.T.U., instructed
stern, attacking the United States}and the Bustamante Union in re-|a sectiofi of the staff attach-
tee-dapanees Defence Agree-|spect of the 1952 crop. Workersjed to the University College

get higher wages and other facil-|of the West Indies Hospital to re-

o draw Japan into an re~
Soars Seaman” with thefities, Two strikes are ge in} turn e eae nes z ceues
the soap and margarine factories.jwas obeyed, but the rest o! 1

pone See ree — stuff is still out

May Day Rioting

The first of the Soviet moves
were seen in the May Day rioting
which all authorities here agreed
showed clearly that Communists
in Japan are following the Soviet
directive. The editorial in last
London Times noted
the same misgivings and said the



Advisory C’tee On Library
Services In The Colonies



FROM

BURTON, ENGLAND

Worthington

BREWED AND BOTTLED
TO PERFECTION

|



NOW ON SALE AT

J. N. GODDARD & SONS Ltd.
BRIDGETOWN

|

|
|

May Day riots should teach the} ‘The Secretary of State for the Mr. F. C. Francis, M.A. F.S.A
yore oan ame ee Japanese {Colonies (Mr. Oliver Lyttelton) | (Keeper of Printed Book 1 brits I
id ¢ 3 announces that the Library As-|Museum); Mr. A. B. Mitchell
ie elec ta oe Eat Oar rola | sociation has established an ad | (Librarian, Colonial Office); Mr
stand why the American troops | V'S°TY committee with the task of | Charles Newell, M.A., F L A
are remaining in Japan after the considering and advising upon all) (City Librarian, Mar hester)
liberation of the country, The} â„¢atters affecting library services| Mr. R. Offer, B.A., Ph.D (Lib-
government could cut some of the} in Colonial territories. | Tary Adviser, Inter- niversity |
ground from the Communists if it! The chairman is Mr. L. R. Council an Higher Education in
explains more fully to the people| McColvin, C.B.E., F.L.A. (City the Colonies) ; Mr, E Sydney,
the part the United States is} Librarian, Westminster), and|M.C., F.L.A (Borough Librar-
playing in protecting their coun-| other members of the committee | ian, Leyton); and Mr. W. E. F.}
try while it is disarmed. are Miss F,. E. Cook, M.A. F.L.A.| Ward, C.M.G. (Deputy Educa
—U.P. (County Librarian, Lancashire); |tional Adviser, Colonia) Office

;
|
|
i



PAGE TWO



een te ae eee eearmeanay ~! Ae

Carib

MARGARET HART, Ad-

MS Secretary to the

Y.W.C.A. in the West Indies, who
at present ¢ a visit to the
island, il give a Talk to mem-
bers of the “Y” and their friends
Headquarters, Pinfold Street,

on Monday night next at 8 o'clock.
It is expected to see a large
number of members and friends
at this meeting. There will also

be an enrolment.

Miss Hart has been connected
to the “¥” organisation since 1934.
She has worked extensively in
Canada and Trinidad.



Perhaps the most interesting
part of her Talk will be when she
tells members and friends of her
experience at the Y.W.C.A. Lead-
ership Training Course at Geneva.

Midnight Snack
READ and molasses is the

favourite midnight snack of
Premier Smallwood. of New-
foundland, he told the House ex-
plaining had when he got a late cup of
tea for a_ visiting Industrialist.
Hiis tastes are these of the toiling
masses, he said, and he likes no-
thing better than bread and but-
ter and* molasses. “If you put
butter on, it makes the molasses
run offf, an Opposition member
objected. “Aha!” said the Prem-
ler, “it is obvious that the Hon-

rakle Member's acquaintance
with bread and molasses is mere
hes iy, You put the molasses
on first, let it soak in, and then
spread the butter on top—delici-



Back to Jamaica

Riera to Jamaica on
Tuesday by the s.S.
De Grasse was Miss E. Gideon:



She is the aunt of Dr. D. S. Gid-
eon, Medical Superintendent of the
Barbados General Hospital with
whom she was staying.

Congratulations
ONGRATULATIONS to Mr
and Mrs. Hassim Gafoor of



Couva, Trinidad, who celebrated
their first wedding anniversary on
May 4th. Mrs. Gafoor is the
former Erena, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. E. Lynch of Civilian Road,
Bush Mall, St. Michael,

Brains Trust

ITHIN the next few weeks,

at a date to be announced
later, listeners to Rediffusion will
be abla to hear a Brains Trust on
Trade Union and Industrial Prob-
lems. ‘The members of the Brains
Trust Will be Mr, F. C, Catchpole,
O.B.E.sAdviser on labour to Cola»

nial Bevelopment and Welfare,
Mr. Qs Lucie-Smith, Mr. F. C
Walcott and Mr. J. D. M, Bell,

Lecturér in Modern Economie His-

tory: and Research Lecturer in
Industadal Relations in the Uni-
versity®of Glasgow. Mr. Bell is

the Guest Lecturer dn the Carib-
bean Trade Union Course,

Thesscope of the Brains Trust
will be the general subject of in-
dustrid] relations, the everyday
contacts between employers and
employees, question of organisation
on both sides and the machinery
of negotiation, Questions are in-
vited from the public and should

be seat to the British Council,
“Wakefield”, White Park, and
marked ‘Broadcast’: names and

addresses need not be given.

Regular Winter Visitors



NM RS HELEN TOWNSEND
4 and Mrs. E. Lanvaster of
the U.S.A., left for Jamaica on
Tuesday by the S.S. De Grasse
intransit for the U.S.A. Both

ilar winter visitors to Barba-
dos, they had spent the entire

winter season here staying at the
Marine Hotel,



CROSSWORD



Across
i, Phey re proud of our Jim here.
w



& Phe oe A marginal interest ¥ (9)
ih Vou the oniid reaches it, con,
wive (6)
i4 Try sweet making and then
yuh wwe and why, (5)
id Ser yuU see a realy (@)
1* Hm » egendary 24 tor the honour
iret piace (is)
Wi ier tw be wed (3)
4.) VWeurd vure lo @ broken net. (4)
Ԥ NuWes the seaaon for ib (4)
va wee la (5) 28 Agog. (4)
UG. N&@e tor a theatrical pony. (5)
27, Qiep. deep waters, (4)
He Down
1. lich age would atop with
meen ag ade nmatr, (6)
4 wy (oO)
% Make the advance, (4)
* ViMhicle to ocunvey a yard, (4)
oO. Make itt nine Guy (eB)
6 Nathing goes for ner (6)
Y Awe, from the centre some put
tee sume take tt off, (4)
vw Je wey (7)
iv. ifs near “™)
1a Yaau got sumething in
gemera service. (5)
tO Where ogre® are found. (6)
37) #@eece tor 14 48)
i8 Wer Orson Knew thie part of
Baw (5, iv. Reguecn (a)
*0 Ifipement (3) 2. Hili4)
Soiifion of vesterauy s pusele Across
{ M@iparama, 8. Juulent Abated
u. supe 12 Dormy +4 Ante le
halter, 1h Bluae if One ¢ Resait
wi Nea thewn Lb Mou eé
LuAMrous & WeDt A AwenvOn
a 7 Ada veassea satin ,
eas is Pownterert 16 Bver 17
twandea





MISS ELSA HAGLUND
—Story on page

For a Month .

MONG the recent arrivals by

B.W.LA, from British Guiana

for a holiday were Mr. and Mrs.

J. Gonzales of Georgetown. They

were accompanied by their two

children as well as Mrs. Gonzales’

brother and Miss Mary Lopes,

daughter of Mr. Reggie Lopes,

Commission Agent of Georgetown,

Miss Lopes works in her father’s
office.

The party expects to be here for

a month staying at “Accra”, Rock-

ley.

Annual Fair

HE Girl Guides will be hold-

ing their annual fair at the
Drill Hall on Saturday 10th May
from 3—8 p.m. The proceeds
from this Fair will be divided to
defray the expenses of the 300
foot wall built at Pax Hill, The
Police Band by the kind permis-
sion of the Commissioner of
Police will render a suitable pro-
gramme of appropriate airs and
there will be amusements for the
kids. The usual attractions and
tickets for the raffle of 2 bicycles
will be on sale.

On Holiday

RS. MARY CUTLER from

England is now in Barbados
for a holiday. She arrived on
Tuesday by the De Grasse and is
staying at the Windsor Hotel.

Factory Inspéctor Leaves

R. G, I. QUINN, Senior Fac-
+ tory Inspector of Trinidad
returned home. last night by
B.W.I.A. after a short visit to

the island, While here he lectur-

ed to the Trade Union Students
attending the course at the
Y.M.C.A,

Mr. Quinn was staying at the
Hastings Hotel

U.K. Director
R. ALBERT LOVERING, one
of the Directors of the Bar-
bados Electric Supply Corporation,
arrived here from England on
Tuesday morning by the S.S.
De Grasse on a visit. He is stay-
ing at the Windsor Hotel,

On Honeymoon
R. AND MRS. CLAYTON
APPLETON of Trinidad are
now in Barbados to spend their
honeymoon, They were married
on Saturday at Susamachar
Church in San Fernando and arriv-

ed here the following day by
B.W.I.A.

Mrs. Appleton ,the former Miss
Eileen Lakhan, is the daughter of

Mr. and Mrs, Alexander Lakhan
of San Fernando, while her hus-
band is the son of Mrs. M. G.
Appleton and the late Mr. Claude
Appleton. They expect to be here
for two weeks staying at “Leaton-
on-Sea”, The Stream,

To Visit Their Daughter

R. AND MRS. MENDONZA
of British Guiana who were
holidaying here for the past three
weeks at “Accra”, Rockley, expect
to leave later in the week by
B.W.1.A. for Trinidad to spend
a further holiday with their
daughter before returning home.
Mr. Mendonza is Secretary of
Messrs. Booker Bros, in George-

town,
Wedding
QUIET wedding took place at
St. Matthias Church on
Thursday last when Mr. Clyde
Eastmond of Bank Hall was mar-
ried to Miss Clotelle Downie of
Quarry Road, Bank Hall
The bride who was given in
marriage by Mr, Dennis Jones,
wore a dress of silk peaque with
a flesh tone yoke, Her short veil
was kept in place by a headdress
of orange blossoms and she car-
ried a bouquet of Queen Anne's
lace and Anthurium lilies
The ceremony was conducted
by Rev. M. E. Griffiths and the
duties of bestman were performed
by the bridegroom's father

A reception was held at!
“Georgeville”, Bank Mall Hill. |
Married in B,G, |

i

R. AND MRS. G CHABROL |
who were married recently /
in British Guiana are now in Bar-!



bados on their honeymoon. They /
are staying with Mr. and Mrs
John Chabroal of “Floris Villa”,

i
Rockley |
Mr. John Chabrol is on the staff;
of Cable and Wireless Ltd |
British Guiana. At one time he
Was employed on the Barbados!
staff in 1945-46 working at the St./
Lawrence Branch.

Off to Trinidad
EAVING by the S.S. De Grasse
on Tuesday evening for
Trinidad -were General and Mrs,
George Vidmer,



n



Willy Had a Terrible Time

—He Found “Sound Language” Very Confusing—

By MA... TRELL

“IT’S no use,” Willy Toad was
saying in an unhappy voice to Knarf
and Hanid,,the shadows with the
turned-about names, “Every time |
go for a visit to town, something
happens.”

“What happened, Willy?” Knarf
and Hanid both asked.

Willy looked more unhappy than
ever as he replied: “1 can't begin
to tell you all the things that hap-
pened. Not good things, either. And
all because | don't understand
sound-language.”

“Sound-language {" said Hanid.

“It isn't English,” said Willy. “It
isn’t words. It’s just sounds. But
they all mean different things. And
you have to understand ali the dif-
ferent things they mean else you
find yourself in trouble.”

Needed Explanation

Knart and Hanid begged Willy to
explain exactly what he meant “be-
cause,” said Knarf, “we don't know
what you're talking about,”

“Well,” said Willy, “I dressed up
fn my best coat the green one with
the white stripes—and started hop-
| ping down the road to town. By and
| by | came to the railroad tracks |
| Was just about to cross over the
tracks when a bell started ringing.
It was just a regular, ordinary sort
of bell, and it didn’t even sound
very pretty, like » church bell for
instance. | looked around and was
surprised to see that a great many
people, and a wrent many, automo
biles all stopped at once at the edge
of the tracks and waited, listening



te the bell Now it seemed very
silly to me that all those neople
fo all these nutemobiles should

ind Watt and listen just be

«thet foolish old hell was ring

ine Sool started right across the
tracks snying to everybody: ‘You
can waste your time listening to a
bell I'm going!"
“My goodness!” gasped anid
‘Were vou hit by the"
Willy shook his head, “Hy the
reittond train’ No tt whirved by
he t henped out of the way just
in tine Alb at wot was the tail of
| my beautiful wreen eoat.”
Phat bell, Willy it meant stop
| look and tisten It meant that a
reilroad tratn was coming along the
; tracks. That's why all those people

and all those automobiles were wait
ng

“Yes,” said Willy. “But how was
{ to know. You. see, you have to
understand sound-language And









Willy Toad was all dressed
for town,

A policeman was standing in the
middle. As 1 stepped off the curb
he blew a whistle. And again all thr
people waited. But | didn’t see why
anybody should stand and wait just
because a policeman happened to
be blowing a whistle. Anybody can
blow a whistle. So | kept right on
walking.”

“My goodness!” Hanid gasped
again, “Were you hit by the—”
“By the automobiles’ No. By
hopping this way, and that way.
and by dodging, and running and
stopping short and darting forward
again, | finally reached the other
side. But | lost both sleeves and
all the buttons off my beautiful
coat,”

Blowing the Whistle

“That policeman wasn’t blowing
his whistle just in fun,” said Knart
“He meant for you ts stay just
where you were, and not to cross
the street!”

“Sound-lauguage,” said Willy,
“How was | to know what a whistle
meant? And there were other
sounds in town,” Willy went on.
“Sounds of horns; and sounds of
bells on streetcars; and crashing
sounds when cans of ashes were
dumped into trucks and dropped
back on the sidewalk; and sounds
of sirens when fire engines and
ambulances were coming, You had
to know what all of them meant 1
didn't know what they meant when
| went to town, But now | do. For.
tunately nothing hit me. But,” he
said sadly, “my beautiful new coat
is all in rags.”

Knarf and Hanid thought that as
long as Willy was still in one pivce



, then, when 1 finally got to town, |
started to go across the main street.

NEW SHIPMENT

WHITE & COLOURED TOWELS FROM 58c, TO $2.56

WASH CLOTHS

it really didn't matter how torn to
pieces his coat was.

SS SW

29¢.

COTTON BLANKETS—WHITE, PINK, GREEN, BLUE, FAWN

50 x 70" ..:... $3.30
55 X75" ...... $3.70
eo X 80” ...... $4.33
66 X 86” ...... $4.89

[TR EVANS & WHITFIELDS

BIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4606












































































































































































































me ; ’ #3
ee THURSDAY, MAY 8, 1952
BARBADOS ADVOCATE amon
350 Ai | , |
me Book | The STARS* *x°
a oo ~/he i
~Y
e bs " ry as Ba
The French-Canadian wif and YOU ~ A
fan wire i rr
; P
.
of a best-selling author
at's . AQUARIUS Good indications for the next few days. _
votes or t e mple life Jan. 21—Feb. 19 mantic interest successful for those born e~
tween 23 and 27 Jan. Money to eee in
sound investment. Sunday very lucky.
WHEN you read that e. Georges Simenon * . rte * )
is staying at a Wi End hotel with her PISCES Avoid spending unwisely during this period.
husband, who is one of world’s richest and Feb. 20—-Mar, 20 » Hold what you have and you pine ~~ tor
best-selling novelists, > you imagine some nee . — ae: Seat. wane
degree of lacquered sophistication. At least OREO) SIRDUONS 1 Z A :
’ ne “, , . ARIES Carry on as you have been doing and you will
sup) end ae Simence ete veins ” 2 ae a Mar. 21—Apr. 20 gain in business very shortly. Very Uae
F ‘ hat 3 ‘enchman,. (In fact, he i ” "
is Belgian, born 49 years ago in Liege.) a 1 time for a second son. News of we g
His French-Canadian wife, her hands thrust into — will bring woke * *
the pockets of her grey flannel skirt, her feet in i E a
flat-heeled brown country shoes planted purposefully TAURUS Mercury influences are very favourable an
gp the carpet has no nonsense about her whatever, Apr. 21—May 22 = should spur you on to fresh achievements and
psuick or o dat of teens artifice of a dash of possibly, a gain in finance. Purchase wisely
Genk “ta hee eT ent apart from her plain wedding and do not be too easily influenced, *
8 e-pear i
engagement ring. : b MADAME SIMENON GEMINI You will meet an elderly woman who will
She revealed her age without y May 23—June21 offer advice. Think carefully what course
being asked. She will be 3% Nothing but French is talked at : roid Tre later on
Sag lar ena ar Simettente EVELYN IRONS aie you should pursue to avoid regrets later i
spending the day in Paris. “They A little extravagance some- eae here
are Off to Prance and Belgium times steps in. tween novels *
this week-end: sail home. to S:menon has three weeks to a CANCER Attend to all urgent matters and essentials and
America on May 16 from his first wife whom he had Month free, and during that June 22—July 23 relax then. You are inclined to be a little
Madame ‘menon has an married in 1923. P time he and his wife like to take bit lazy, lately. Get a move on over the next
almost aggressive lack of affeetn- aioe aa a few days’ trip to a New York a ? You will not regret it
tion Her dark brown eyes fix aru taped gown the hotel. seeing the shows, meeting few days > ‘ ;
you with such a direct Jt a job ecame friends. : : i
1onest gaze that you feel a Simenon’s secreta she still in hie g2 All to do with study and brain work show
this at last is a woman yeh “ALS W — all eee aieee BUT HO CAFE uly 24—Aug. great promise during this pepe Value fous
positively no deception fi she no longer types his « , ts pies i ence and guard it. person who is
It is as if she wished to adver- Novels They were married the But ,We don't, g ty hectaea lot to be thankful for.
tise it t ut here, in con- day after his Reno divorce came we a ane. cn ae ree ha ee obe u 7
trast wi ubtletiés of the Wirough sua te mas ere VIRGO « Ith just now, Weather changes
psycho llers which are Now they live at Shadow Rock ho' ca shic! m ’ t d A 23—Sept. 23 Watch your hea ee TRY DW sis f' 1
er husban work, isthe Farm in Connecticut, an old S20WS ,, Which y husha’ ug. : bring on pains and aches. If you are carefu
sou! of sim self, ~ colonial-style clapboard “or : lebvated.. Detar you can avoid all unpleasantness. Very good
menon, she says. likes con- house with ‘ } 4 Simenon's celebra etec- . hers.
trast oy a velled all over two teers Fe. r 8 of land and tive een eae is usually period for expectant TAC # *
the world, and when he lived in ery to be found with a gla: LIBRA ‘ ; i
France liked to pop over to hand—an aperitif, or oo 24—Oct.23 Save what you have. | Reckless ee te
London from Paris to reiax 5—7 BOOKS A YEAR for the last se P ° bad, and especially so just now. Concentrate
between books (“He knows Simenor oon, i novelist has taken on your work. Watch for good news on
ell and enjoys every- ome oe from five ta liquor Saturday. Money gain due very soon.
including the a eee Madame Sim . = “* * *
rants.”) smoke a lot, but SCORPIO —- i
given up cigarettes altogeth Oct, 24—Nov.22 | Uranus and other planets in excellent position.
“because I used to ake more Be alert and take your chance when .
AD A JOB than was good for , Opportunity for suecess in work coming soon.
Like Maigre Fire rays influence personal affairs. .
Game s rst s c Ss 90g “* * *
. . eanes said i's” wife Ae eae 20 If you own livestock expect increased —_
: & wonderful A wise man counts before spending, oa a er,
Beware of outside influences in business.
he. bat -pipe- Colour red brings good luck. a
§ who gave me * 7 ‘
tl 5 pet is caranuee Pleasant possibilities for the energetic folks.
; he ‘ Dec. 21—Jan. 4 > :
” $s ’ a bevbhad Do not slack up just now as success hovers
: Pies over you. All rays excellent for those who
s c Ww try hard.
for 3 ut th na close-
cover 2 with one smal! onion will be in the
and k of celery, and. let THE next publication of the Stars And You
hem stew quietly in r own “Evening Advocate.’
Juice until the mussels are a
cooked. The onion and celery
may still be hard—but never
we don't want them—
them away I eat e
is and their liquid with
y of well-buttered bread
that it was easy to under- I
Mme. Simenon’s enthu- x ¥
answer to the questic IRE RO?
e like to ee EMP
best-selling writer?" Today Last 2 Shows 430 & 8.15
It's @ beautiful life." saia she. ee ea ot eee ce BOYS IN BROWN &
WORLD COE YRIGHI ) : CAPTAIN B CAPTAIN BOYCOTT
; Starring: Stewart GRANGER with Stewart GRANGER
"3 Opening TOMORROW 2.30 & 8.30 TOMORROW (only) 4.30 & 8.15
m ' . THE FAMILY SECRET HARLEM GLOBE TROTTERS
‘ & HOLIDAY IN HAVANA
B B C Radio General Juin Shr. 1.00 f WATOH THis
oD eLie | PROGRAMME STARTS P d seicniuaaiea fel eget TODAY 1.90pm. || SAT. Midnite
if Vigilantes Return “Sree
Programme | «MAY 15 nonwote Mone [Laupsrme snow J micnean mie 0 f] Pee, Beer
| KINGSTON, J’ca, May '7. PARIS, M 7 with Richard
a : . a Some 14,000 families are ex- » May |. Vigilantes Return Talmadge —
4 00—7 ieee we a as nsw Pected to benefit under the hur- General Alphonse Juin, In- OL WY MPIC
neat ast teane rehousing and rehabilita- Spector General of French armed ROW Al
4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The/ tion programme starting May 15. forces and Commander of Atlantic |} ropay (only) 4.30 & 8.15 4 4
Daily Service, 4.18 p.m. Rhythm is their | Aq'ual construction however is Pact ground forces in Central MICHIGAN KID & i
pre iste xn Toren Raterinae | not starting before October when Europe became Wednesday the VIGILANTES RETURN Picker bans: Srere 430 & 8.45
5.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice, 6 p.m.jit is expected that the fabrica- first living Marshal of France na POMORROW. 450 be 6.15 Sinkiee-| - dmmastiien
Welsh Diary, 6.15 p.m, Just Fancy,| tion plant being erected in west- since 1945. one : ain Mi
} Round-u and Pro-| _ : : THE FLYING SERPEANT & Richard’ TALMADGE
gramme Parade, ? pom. The News, 710/€rD Kingston will be in full pro- I ACCUSE MY PARENTS Soaked Neat
bin. bets News from Britain.” | duction Promotion of Juin 63-year-old —— ianiciieane? Sat. & Sun.
7.15—10 30 pm, 25.5% & 31 32 M Seven thousand one-room hous- veteran of French colonial service Today & Sat 1,30 WATCH THIS 4.130 & i 15 4.30 & 8.15
emnegeeeos s . > eractac in 9 one , . ~ i Stage o ucson
pret ratpeee ates % pm. img units will be erected in rural will further complicate the|{ eos cameron in SPACE FOR & Moke Bellove Harlem Globe
Music of the Regiments, 8.15 p.m. Radio| reas, 3,000 in Kingston and S.H.A.P.E. Command picture when mits tikes eeddiha Ballroom Trotters &
Newsreei, 8.30 p.m. Special Despateh,/ principal towns of the island. General Matthew B. Ridgway OL oie nee MIDNITE SHOW Starring: Holiday in
8.45 p.m. interlude, 8.55 p.m. From — cP) takes over next month —U.P. The Congo IT’S SPECIAL Frankie Laine Havana
the Editorials, 9 p.m. From the Third

Programme, 9.45 p.m. Accordion Music,
10 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. News
Talk, 10.15 p.m. Frontiers, 10,30 p.m
Oliver Twist.

W.L. Eggs For
British Museum

LONDON.
Nearly 3,000 West Indian and
South American birds’ eggs, col-
lected by Sir Charles Belcher,
have been presented to the Brit-
ish Museum in London. Sir
Charles, who is 75 and now living
in retirement in Kenya, was a
judge in the West Indies for six
years after 14 years in East Africa,
Bird-watching has been his life-
long hobby.—B.U.P.

, S9999S9959%





SOSSS SSP
GAIETY

The Garden—St. James
TODAY (only) 8.30 p.m
HER FIRST ROMANCE

Margaret O'BRIEN &

DEAD RECKONING
Humphrey BOGART











EAL ALLA AIELLO

FRE. & SAT
Women 4.45 - Men & 80
MOM & DAD
Segregated Audience ¥ |
Age Limit 12 years and Over ‘
COCSOECOEEOI CEES







Opening FRIDAY at 4.45 & 8.30
p.m. and Continuing Daily

It’s the biggest package
of entertainment ever!








0s ROBERT FEW ad wreticny ANNA AOA AL BERCAET

Behe aed Dotnd FRANK CAPA Avemnne Rene tv nit
cement ERA WN LIF Lua OTR ay MOLT COOL
ey oy NNT as RO ON A CN

PLAZ (DIAL 5170)







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ENCHANTING TO HEAR! |

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PLAZA THEATRES |

BRIDGETOWN BARBAREES OISTIN
(DIAL 2310) (DIAL 5170) (DIAL 8404)
TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m TODAY (Only) Today 4.45 & 8.30 p.m
Fri, 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. 4.30 & 8.30 pm RIDER FROM TUCSON
& Continuing Daily || “TARZAN’S PERIL” Tio Holt ; &
4.45 & 8.30 p.m Lex BARKER MAN’
“WOMAN on PIER 13” TERRITORY

HAPPY GO
LOVELY

Randolph SCOTT.
Gabby HAYES

FR

Robert RYAN

——
————
Today's Special 1.30 p m & SAT

i (Technicolor) Please Note— 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
vid NIVEN — . * ” NEVER TRUST
Vera ELLEN ||!ndian Film AAG A GAMBLER «&

CESAR ROMERO Non-Indians 36¢ Any-

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LAST OF THE
BUCCANEERS



Today’s Special 1.30 p m
“Raiders of Tomahawk
Creck” &



a
the mistletoe
which homes

work to do,"’ he says. “1 wish
we could find some way ot Se
him the trouble of going down all



——=
SAT Special 1.30 p.m.
“Raiders of Tomahawk

—
Friday 445 & 8.30 p.m.
& Continuing Daily





be calling those chimneys to fill our stock “Fort Savage Raiders” || “HERE COMES THE Creek” &
“T hope be ngs."" Yes, would be grand Charles Starrett Double ! GROOM"|| “Fort Savage Raiders”
As chy f we could,’ agrees B:ll. More ot Le «RT Fe Ea re Bing Crosby, Jane Charles Starrett Double

ells “hem ol their pals tin them as they walk eaten mates || Woman, Alexis ‘Suath MIDNITE SAT,

siowly

“LAW of the
BADLANDS"
“PRAIRIE LAW"

h The

|

ind silently over the slepe
Common

Whip WELSON &
COWBOY CAVALIER
Jimmy WAKELY

SAT Special 1.30 p m.
Trip'e Attraction !

&







ON ITS SECOND FLAMING WEEK

The Giant of Motion Pictures
TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 P.M. & CONTINUING







“David,
Slayer of
Goliath,
Give Us
The
Adulteress,
Bathsheba!”




It will make
your heart dance,
whistle and sing!






am
eT a

ie

VERA-ELLEN
CESAR ROMERO

starring
Produced by DARRYL F, ZANUCK + Directed ty HENRY KING * "5.0 % PHILIP DUNNE




-

ere rerereyvryyyyyverwrves











>

Special Shorts—SUPER MOUSE “HE DOOD IT”

GLOBE

RSTONE * Produced by MARCEL HELLMAN + Screenplay by VAL GUEST

TO-DAY 445 & 8.30 P.M.
B'TOWN FRIDAY & oat & ase
PM. & in
(DIAL 2310) 4.45 & 8.30 PM. r



il eee ae i ee





THURSDAY, MAY 8,



It would be hard to find a more
intractable problem than educa-
tion in the West Indies. The
limited resources of the islands
and territories cannot support the
educational structure which is es-
sential to the prosperity and con-
tentment of their large popula-
tions. The returns offered by
education are measured in genera-
tions and many social problems
clamour for immediate remedy.
Nowhere is a good education
cheap: in the case of the West
Indies their wide geographical
distribution and the high cost of
transportation impose an excep-
tionally expensive system. The
smallest island needs an educa-
tional structure complete to
university level. The boarding
schools are also subject to the
prevailing financial stringency.
They have to remember that over
and above school fees parents
from Other islands have to pay
six expensive air passages every
year.

The foundations are not secure.
Elementary education is not yet
universal. In some cases it is
imposed by a law which cannot
be enforced because there is no
room for the children in the
schools, In general, classes are
too large, 90 was the highest found
in an elementary school and 45
is common in the secondary
schools of one of the islands. The
buildings are quite inadequate. I
have seen nearly 1,000 children
packed elbow to elbow in a two-
storeyed shack with no division
whatever between the classes.
Some progress is being made in
the provision of school buildings,
but cencrete structures are very
costly and timber involves high
maintenance charge.

A realistic policy would spread
the erection of permanent build-
ings over q number of years and
be content in the meantime with
the cheapest temporary struc-
tures. The West Indian climate
invites such méasures, The cost
of buildings could probably be
reduced by standardization,
though the different natural re-
sources of the colonies impose an
obvious limitation. The matter is
urgent. The schools cannot ac-
commodate the existing child
population, and its rate of in-
crease is fantastic. The recent
disastrous hurricane in Jamaica
must have destroyed a _ large
number of schools, There is there-
fore a good opportunity fer a com-
prehensive rebuilding policy in
the island, which should be back-
ed by a generous grant from
British public funds. The home-
less and destitute must be our
first care; once their needs have
been met, there could be no more

valuable gift from Britain to
Jamaica than really adequate
schools.

Even more serious than the in-
adequecy of school buildings
throughout the West Indies is the
lack of trained teachers. In one
island, out of 829 teachers in the
elementary schools 368 have had
no sort of training and not even
a secondary education, and a fur-
ther 20 sueh teachers are at work

in the secondary schools, Plans
are being made to remedy this
shortage but, even if the money
can be found, it must be some
years before they can bear full
fruit.

The first need of the West Indies
is an all-out campaign against
illiterecy; bigger schools are want-

ed, staffed by qualified teachers.
Second in importance is a small
number of efficient technical
schools in the big towns. These

would give a quick return: it is
stated that if the machinery of
the Kingston Technical School had
been up to date, some useful sec-
ondary industries would have been
established in Jamaica. If the
existing structure has not sur-

Canadian Shorts

OTTAWA,
The Dominion Bureau of Statis-
ties, which keeps track of the
prices of almost everything, re-
ported the average price of tele-
phone poles in Canada as $6,77.

—B.U.P.

MONTREAL,

Canada’s water transportation
industry had 1,906 vessels in

operation in 1950. Of the total,
720 were freighters, 467 tow
barges and scows, and the rest
smaller craft.

—B.U.P.

QUEBEC CITY,
Mills in Quebec Province account
for more than 44 per cent of the
gross value of Canada’s total
textile production.
—B.U.P.
OTTAWA,
Nearly $79,000,000 worth
fertilizer is manufactured
Canada per year.

of
in

—B.U.P.

VANCOUVER, B.C.
British Columbia has only 68
of Canada’s 599 fish processing
plants, but, it accounts for nearly
50 percent of all the fish processed
in the country,
—B.U.P.



Every spoonful gives you~

energy and

fitness}









@ Men,

more and more

women, children—all
taking tasty ‘ Kepler * to-day

1952

West Indies Education

Limited Resources And An Urgent Need

By H. L. O. Flecker, Head Master
of Christ's Hospital. _.

vived the hurricane, it is to be
hoped that it will be properly re-
built and equipped. A beginning
has been made with technical
education in Georgetown, British
Guiana, and ip Trinidad, including
two interesting schools run by
the petroleum companies. But it
is useless to presert an elaborate
system of technical schools while
a number of children leave the
elementary schools unable to do
simple arithmetic. At present the
technical instructors have too
often themselves to lay the ele-
mentary foundation.

The best policy at the present
time would be to give handicraft
its rightful place in the secondary
schools. In many colonies there
is a deep-rooted prejudice against
any form of manual training.
Even where elementary school
gardens exist, a labourer is some-
times hired to do, the digging,
ostensibly because the work is too
hard for the children—actually
because it is beneath their dignity.
Given an honourable place in the
elite secondary schools, handi-
craft would spread _ through-
out the educational system, grad-
ually have a profound effect upon
the mental outlook of the popu-
lation and incline a proportion of
able pupils towards technology
rather than clerical occupations.

It is the lure of the “white
collar” job that vitiates much of
West Indian secondary education.
The door to most careers outside
agriculture is the possession of a
school certificate and it requires
unusual resolution to prevent the
examination from being the one
objective of the school course and
the sole criterion of success. The
parents are chiefly to blame, but
employers (and, not least, the
colonial governments) are not
guiltless. The examination boards
do what they can to counteract
the prevailing tendency. |Some
teachers, and most pupils, accept
examination fever as natural.
Until a more sane outlook pre-
vails there can be little progress,
and secondary education cannot
begin to meet the vital needs of
the colonies. For it is in these
schools that the hope of the
future lies. At present they too
pften congentrate on the mere
acquisition of a corpus of examin-
able knowledge, and that travesty
of education will ledd nowhere.
The West Indies need a real edu-
cation in moral and cultural
values, in citizenship and in lead-
ership, in a habit of mind and a
skill of brain and hand to match
modern conditions and problems.
This need is best realized in
Jamaica where a number of en-
lightened educationalists are mak-
ing a gallant assault on the prob-
lem. Elsewhere, too, there are
individual head masters and head
mistresses who refuse to bow the
knee, But in general the children
of the West Indies are sacrificed
to the Moloch of examinations.
Not only is the educational out-
look narrowed, but the curriculum
and teaching methods are warped.

The lack of. handicraft . has
already been mentioned. Even
where the need is appreciated and
local prejudice overcome, strange:

difficulties strangle its birth. In
one of the smaller islands a
scheme was launched to provide
a workshop in the secondary

school. The plan was greeted with
enthusiasm and the workshop was
transformed on paper into a full-
blown technical school; but the
cost of this was found prohibitive
and the whole venture was
dropped. This is probably not an
isolated instance.

The provision for science is not
much greater. There is a dearth
both of teachers and of labora-
tories. These last are an expen-
sive item, but there is no need
of the elaborate structures dear to







the minds of most architects,
administratays amd _ specialist
teachers. Useful biology can be

taught in an ordinary classroom
provided with a sink, and this is
happening in a Barbadian girls’
school. One of the islands has 11
secondary schools: of these, two
boys’ schools provide physics,
chemistry, and biology; one girls’
school offers general science. No
other science is taught in the
colony. The only secondary school
in a small island has no science
teacher or laboratory, and instruc-
tion in mathematics is given by
a pupil teacher who has ed
the higher certificate. Where
seience is available it is teo often
largely a matter of demonstration
and note-taking—not an educa-
tion but a preparation for the
school certificate.

The problem caused by a reck-
less increase in population has
been méntioned. The remedy lies
with education, especially the
education of girls. A study of the
modern period of Caribbean his-
tory would give teacher and
taught their chance in the natural

a

Peter Brander 87 m.
Decides To Seek
Fifth ABA Title

—Says Sportsman's Diary

The “yes he will; no he wen't”
speculation which has surrounded
PETER BRANDER'’S intentions
eoncerning this year’s Amateur
Boxing Association championships
is ended.

He has entered for the SW
London divisional championships
at Nine Elms Baths on Monday,
It was in the semi-finals of these

Will Sell

A new 87-miles-an-hour

engine capable of extremely
produced car,
70 miles an hour.

course of classroom discussion. a 4 % Dutch technicians who say they
Yet when Caribbean history is Championships last year that have seen the new model believe
studied the earlier period is often Brander lost his feather-weight ;- will be sold at about £600. and

preferred because it is regarded CTOWn to Ken Lawrence,
as the easier option for the school Professional. :
certificate. I have known for some time
No surveys seem to have been that Brander our No. 1 post-war jast night has an engine life of
made of the secondary school amateur, has had his eye on a 190,000 miles before it needs a
places required for those children fifth ABA title — and mayb yebore, and over a long test the
who have the ability to profit eventually a sixth to equal the pepair pill worked out at £50 for

now 4 will compete with British cars for
foreign currency.
The ‘flew Volkswagen, they said





p-h. Germ

From BASIL CARDEW

to drive straight into the heart of the world’s markets.
It is reported to be a five-seater saloon with a 1,500 c.c.

It is claimed to have a cruising speed of



~ @ATHER THAN WAIT
UNTIL WE CAN'T POSSIBLY

SEA AND AIR
TRAFFIC

“OCCOet
In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Henry D. Wallace, Sch.
nrietta, Seh. Mandalay I, $.S.
y, Sch. Everdene, Sch. Laudalpha,

Maria

ack

vdia Adina S., ch. Gardinia W., Sch.

enfindant, Sch. Frances W. Smith. —
ARRIVALS

1S. Crofter 5,777 tons under C

H. Diamond from London. Agents

sta & Co.

DEPARTURES
iV. Cacique Del Caribe for St. Lucia
enada and St. Vincent.

SEA WELL

ARRIVALS BY Be +A-
ON MONDAY
Prom Antigua:

ow

ae

ustry Will °

New ii J
on Car Not Affect C’dian

'

At £600

Sales

Te Michael, Lucy Willi
A Canadian Press release from “aiint Mabare © tele taki ‘not
Ottawa states that Canadian Michael, Patrick Michael, Geoffrey -
AMSTERDAM. Defen roduction officials said on 86°. John Jullion, David Baptiste.

From Martinique:
Ignatius Beaubrup
DEPARTURES BY 8.W.1LA.
ON MONDAY

Tuesday that the ibility of a
new aluminum jndustry growing
up in Dutch Guiana will not have |. eee
much effect on Canadian pro- "Nate tH. Pope, Viola Ford, Joha
duction or sales, They were com- Aiexander, Joan V. Alexander, Timothy
menting on the Paris dispatch in J a, Juliet Alexander, Sydney
which the International Bank for he Ev" 4,
reconstruction and development Lady E. Malone, Mr
recommended a $53,000,000 10- “ er 5 Ms. ‘Liceian- Cece
year programme to produce yyy" p. Morrison, Mrs. Mary Gaul, Mrs.
aluminum in the Netherlands L. Flower, Miss M. Carrol, Mr. Julius
South American colony of Dutch eS ras alee ann
Guiana, the world’s largest source J" "piRiner, Mrs. Lillian Poetner, Matt
of bauxite, Allan Poetner.

Officials said if this reeommenda- Aaa e eee ee TA.
tion was implemented it likely pgyom st.
wi!l mean that Holland would get

German People’s Car is about

high performance for a mass-

Clement Bourne;



“United States” May
Surpass “Queen
Mary's” Record Run

Lucia:
Jo I hell
BRITAIN will be faced with a Zohn Mute

Mr. Louis Maillard, Mr.

ns s at Mst. Laurie Barnard, Miss Pamela Mitch=
from such an education. There is record of Joe Steers in the 1890s. avery 60,000 miles. new contender for the Blue Riband on tomen ey a Conse ell, “Master Anthony Migehell.
CT Ss ac ge Ore earn for this © that the fn" Amacai Wabea tes ul the Canadian eles to Malang "ahaa, murs ran B
bo ee Cronts who have emo poeite hints of retirement pore (width) of the cylinder js i has been only a tiny proportion of Rust, D Rust, J Boyle, R Morton,

: ss x ‘ a ; fos saiicer ian aa aS ; / , ; Y ee
exerted by parents sae have ams Brander had had four bouts since greater than the stroke (length), @°"S ™t© Service this summer the total shipments.—C.P. Fodinen ones, Xo peel, Borin,
ee hy eee ate tenons — he went into training in sey The pistons travel more slowly The lUner, which has cost £25 —_—-— Goldie, D Deacon, G Colina, v Tecra,

canna om ¢ yo within , . j dn ten ; " wee S. Ro . ©. Rod . -
often gine to grigate athools which ne ¢ | Mesad them all, two within oe less than a long-stroke million and is the largest. built in WINS SCIENCE Car ie.“ Fisher. V Gravens
are little more than examination iw , # . = America, will start her maiden in. V_ Gravenstein, J. Gravenstein.
eeieanting instiicitions separing seteey eg en va the sairing Germen voyage to Britain on July 3. SCHOLARSHIP DECARTU RES BY B.W LA,
, ~thi of their ; ati ’ Volkswagen, which has a four- ‘ (From Our Own Correspondent) | , dusins
sriedis' a chase utes the om. the ABA international and form- oyjinder overhead valve engine, | She is due at Southampton on ST, GEORGES, "9," “Batacon, Miss L. Synder, Mis
nipotent school certificate, More- & Army representative from anq is exported at a price of un- JUly 8, a five-day crossing similar) Allan Kirton, former pupil of p. Fontenelle, Mr_E Elliott, Master Hi.
over, the attempts of broad- PPsom and Ewell. This will be Ger £500, is causing competitors ‘2 the schedule of the Queen| tho G.B.S.S. which he left in 1950, Watson, Mr. C. Douglas, Mr. Ignathus
minded educationists in the & Severe test for 24-year-old wuch concern in Continental Mary and Queen Elizabeth. has been awarded an open Science per ‘Trinidad:
hools to look beyond the exam- Brander and will give a form j.orkets ie : Scholarship to the University “Canon J. Ramkesoon, Mr. E_ Hopkin,
schools to loo! you ee - pointer to his chances in the s to maintain such a schedule College of the West Indies. Mr. J Dalgliesh, Mrs. Alice Dalgli
inations are countered by parents championships I was told that the Germans are jhere can be no doubt that the Now lerk in the Agricul- Miss’ J. Dalatlesh, Mr. J. Labree,
air Pm = h Sa ME 4 Brander’s decision will be wel- NOW turning out 120,000 of these cw liner is capable of at least T Daal when x Marbella re? see
still at schoo}, to be crammed by : ‘

cars a year. They are being made
at a vast Hitler-built factory near
Brunswick, in the British zone.

Beating Britain
120,000 annual

comed by all — except, perhaps

Opiaide teacher. his fellow feather-weights.

Teachers’ salaries range from
what is adequate to a starvation 7 *
wage. In one small island the £3,600 For Ray Smith
head mistress of the girls’ sec- | RAY SMITH’S benefit to date
ondary receives £500 p.a., and has realised £3,600, says the an-
her quarters, but not board. The Dual report of the Essex County
corresponding head master gets Cricket Club. Good by Essex
board in term time, a house and Standards, especially as the benefit
salary of £300 p.a, Neither post match suffered from rain. But if
is pensionable. The cost of living an all-rounder of Smith’s ability
is higher in the West Indies than played for Middlesex, Yorkshire
in England. Accommodation for ‘r Lancashire he would receive
assistant teachers is rarely pro- lots more.
vided and is expensive to secure. Essex have made a profit — an
In spite of these drawbacks some achievement when so many clubs
magnificent work is being done in bemoan a loss. They are £226 up
the schools both by West Indian on the year, compared with £2,267
and by British teachers. They need down on the previous year. kaa h
and they deserve every encourage- “This despite the fact that 21 POF ence the war,
ment. cut of 28 championship matches | It s known that their markets
were unfinished “on wickets just ®T@ Closed or restricted for cui-

This output is
British manufacturer. And the
Volkswagen is now selling in some
European countries, including
Switzerland, in such volume as to
exceed the total of all British car
sales in these countries,

Sales of the new model will add
to the difficulties of our own
manufacturers, whose industry has
borne a great part in the scram-
ble for foreign curreney and ex-

The economic condition of the



ar ar Pe ney reasons already in Canada,
territories, their emergent political * iene eee sheet : Australia, New Zealand, South
life, and the scarcity of well-paid I ne from sale of motor-cays 4frica and India.—L.E.S.
jobs inevitably issue in a cl im — fies

at most permanent educationa i
posts should be filled by West s ony £0 down. to Chelmsford U F
Know that her is SuiringeePs -Geed, news too, trom sussex Union Forms New
be gained from the lon, - 4s ae amen nr eee oe 5 y
thonel experience ah Sls ana £2,230 last season compared with Relations Board
of Britain. What is needed most @ £2,915 loss the previous year, ; 7 y
is the recruitme: Oo a (From Our Own Correspondent)
adininineation of siau, teat ae. " Boat F und Launched ST. GEORGE'S,
the training and outlook of the ,, Four times winners of tha . A Labour Relations Committee
British inspectorate. The second Princess Elizabeth cup at Henley is one of several Standing Com-
requirement is for a reinforce- Since the war, Bedford School has â„¢ittees provided for in the Con-
ment of British teachers. Neither â„¢ost of all to thank the late Mr, Stitution of a newly formed
of these requirements will easily N. 2: SYMONDS, who practically a Agricultural Union
be met because the salaries are not founded their boat club. His four mane merges the 50-year-old
often attractive, and passages S0nS gained between them two fa a Agricultural Association,
home are not always paid. Never- Cambridge blues and two trial age Abhocieltny Coconut Grow-
theless, the man who will go out ¢aps for rowing. One is now ;}*,, “hat ae i the ' strike-
from here in a spirit of humility coach to the school; another is Q2riaty e utural = Employers
to make his contribution will meet captain of Thames Rowing Club. “phe Union has been cre:
with a warm welcome and will Recently, Mrs. N. P. Symonds the light of th 4 4 Pi mi in
find that he has a field for the died leaving £1,000 to the school vigorous action On tie manors
exercise of his vocation which is boat club. In 1930 the school had planters therihit tas ; ‘i pert Si
wider and more plainly reward- 36 boats. By 1951 it had only 20 for now enterprise gh li . ed
ing than is often the case at home. and the new racing eight of 1950 policy. =e hee

—(From the Times Review) was the first boat it had been :

tural Department, he sat 4° Davies, Mr
for the Cambridge Higher School Mr R Dixon, Mr
Certificate in 1950 he gained full Elba Leon, Mr L

A. Rios, Mrs. E Rios,

30 knots, although I understand M_ Rodriguez, Mist

that, for purposes of classification Outram, Mrs Anne

}y the North Atlantic Shipping} ey sapti fr the London @utrai!. Master A. Outram, Miss H.
Conference, she has been put for- iy ~~ oa Quiram, Mr. De isle, Dear, ‘Mrs. f. Me

\

ard as a 29-knot ship,
The 81,000-ton Queen Mary has

SSCP SSOSSOD,

greater than that of any single held the Blue Riband for neatly 14

years,

Her fastest eastbound crossing
wes made in 4 days 2 hours and
37 minutes—an average speed of
31.72 knots. Her record west-
beund crossing was made in 3
days, 21 hours, 48 minutes. A
slight variation in route brought
the average speed down to 30.99
k ots.

{t is improbable that the United

States will attempt to break
rccords on her maiden voyage
when her machinery is still being

run in.—L.E.S,



MAIL NOTICES

Mails for S. Vincent, Martinique, §
Thomas, V1. New. York Py the 88.
FORT ‘TOWNSHEND will closed at
the General Post Office as under:—

Parcel Mail at 3 p.m. on the 9th May,

1952. Registered Mail at 8.30 a.m, and
O-dinary Mail at 9.30 am. on the 10th F
May, 1952.

Maile for Dominica by the Schooner

LAUDALPHA will be alosed at the Gen-
eial Post Office as under: —

Parcel Mail at 12 Noon, Registered Mail
at 2 p.m, and Ordinary Maj} at 2.30 p.m,
on the 8th May, 1952,

Mails for St. Lugia, Dominica, Mont-
verrat, Antigua, St. Kitts, Bermuda,
Halifax, Montreal by the W.M®. LADY
NELSON will be closed at the General
Post Office as under:—

Parcel Mall at 3 p.m. on the 9th May
1952. Registered Mail at 630 a.m. an
Ordinary Mail at 9.30 a.m on the 10th
May, 1962.





TEA & DINNER SETS

RATES OF EXCHANGE :
(or replacement pieces)

F * WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 1952
——$—__—. pcssible to buy for 20 years. Now Though formed ai few days EW ; *
Mrs. Symonds’s gift has inaugur- earlier. the new body must take 7) 0/10" Chatuke 3 ot Czechoslovakian
7 ated a new boat fund, a memor- up the challenge implicit in re- Bankers 170 2/10%
- WILL ia! to “NP.” marks by Hon, W. E. Julien in a Sight or Demratin 10% Glassware
i Two of the most distinguished debate at the last meeting of the 71 9/104 Cable 7
PICK T . old Bedfordian oarsmen hava /€gislature: “I have grown tired 70 4/10% Currency 68 7/105 Earthenware
signed an appeal to every old boy. Of hearing —agriculturists, es- sRupans oe
They are JAMES CROWDEN, pecially 5 en asking Gov- ” ve ‘
a £ i iver- &ramen nd a way to do CANADA y y,
A FORMER German minesweeper is to carry out ex- {ity boat club this year and JACK tings for them. “Grenada land: . BARBADOS CO-OP
ree a catching fish by electric shocks, using a new BERESFORD, medal winner at eared a.

me ienti a 4 Demand Drafts 73.38%
worked out by German scientists, five Olympic regattas. prising deh laty individunis en 8 Dra 2 ix COoTToO Vy FA CTORY
One of the objections to electrical fishing i Docker Editor the face of this earth.” oe ee ares)
ing in the past Governing and executive body ' * 10% Gurrenay me
has been the high mortality a Most ambitious venture of ' : u , as Coupons 71 3/10"
The new techniaie, it is clainy- mong young fish. Grays Athletic FC for years has of the Union is a Council of s Silver 20% LIMITED

ed, will allow young fish to
escape. Electrical impulses are
poe out as the trawl goes into
action,

By varying impulse frequencies
and tensions, only fish of a par-
ticular type or size will be
paralysed by the shock sent
through the water.

There will be experiments with
eod and herring.—L.E.S.



OTTAWA.
Canada’s 292 leather footwear
companies manufacture about
34,000 pairs of boots, shoes and

slippers a year. ave

gw

oe
) ZB



M4





@ Every spoonful of ‘Kepier’ gives you a rich
supply of vitamins A and D.

@ These vitamins are nature’s wonder
assuring health and freedom from iltnass

should start

4 BURROUGHS WELLCOME & CO. PRODUCT

Sele Agents for Bartados : Collins’ Ltd., 28 Broad Stregy



Management consisting of three
a ae o the Cocoa industry,
i i three o utmegs and four of
ready coming back,” said an (ther induntrion = with power to
official. . set up District Branches with a

The £500 was spent on their view to the protection and pro-
handbook, Fifty Years of Foot- motion of local interests as well

cost them £500. “But we think
it worth it and the money is al-

H.E. Takes Salute

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. GEORGE'S.

His Excellency Sir Robert ball. Editor is docker LES REY- as the following Standing Com-
Arundell took the Salute last NOLDS, who, besides being Press jittees: Labour Relations, Cocoa,
Friday afternoon of the “Passing secretary of the club, has been in Nutmegs, Sugar and Rum, Oils
Qut” Parade of the first Contin- turn air navigator, speedway and Fats, Livestock, Bananas and
gent of the Grenada Volunteer rider ana writer. Food Crops.

Constabulary. Ninety men staged Grays handbook is the best of First officers of the Union are:
a programme of exercises before its kind I have seen. Every result Hon. D, A. Henry (President),

a large gathering at Tanteen and of matches played by Grays for Dudley Ferguson
wore Suir complimented by His 50 years is mentioned. seat. Connel d teas :

xcellency on t de: unc ~~ Management;
“providing tha whdle” eoninun nity MISS ANNA NEAGLE, the film W. A_ Branch, P. G. Hosten, D, E
with an assurance against the actress, is the newly elected presi- Stevenson, Rex Renwick, Eric
penalties of disorder.” In over- dent of the Essex County Women’s Copland, Allan St. Bernard,
all command of the parade was Amateur AthlIctie Association. A Herbert Neckles, Ewen Chasteau,
Capt. H. M. Christopher, former case of from sound track to cinder Dr. J. R. Groome, George Kent,
S.C.F. Lieutenant. track.—L.E.S. Edward Kent and J. W. Vincent.

1 (Deputy Presi-
dent), Louis Strauss (Vice-Presi-





NOW! Dental Science Reveals

PROOF THAT BRUSHING TEETH RIGHT AFTER EATING
I$ THE SAFE; EFFECTIVE WAY TO

@ie

Maralyn is a fine bed-time drink
and helps you te sleep soundly.
And nothing could be nicer...
Maralyn is creamy milk deliciously
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A BOVRIL QUALITY PRODUCT







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In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (W.I.) Lid, advise
that they can now communicate with the
fol owing ships through their Barbagos
Cova Station:-


















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PAGE FOUR °-







—— ——

Thursday, May 8, 1952







CORONATION BA!

IF a selection had to be made in Barba-’
dos ef a group of individuals upon whom
the stamp of public approval was set un-
mistakably the Police Band would probably
top the list.



Capt. Raison and the Police Band are as
well known to residents of Pie Corner, and
of the villages round Thorpes, Belleplaine
or Silver Sands as they are to the more ex-
clusive company which frequents Hastings
Rocks or musical performances at Govern-
ment House.

At dances in aid of charities, perform-
ances of theatrical companies, school sports,
and on almost every occasion of rejoicing
or sorrowing by the community as a whole
or part the Police Band under Captain
Raison continue to give large audiences the
music they enjoy. The Police Band deserves
well of the community. Might the com-
munity not show its appreciation of the
Police Band by requesting the government
to send Captain Raison and the Police Band
to take part in the official pageantry in
London which will mark the coronation of
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in June
1953?

Barbados is a small though not quite the
smallest unit of the British Empire, but its
British ancestry goes back for more than
300 years. Bridgetown though a miniature
city was founded before Montreal. Barba-
dos has special links with Great Britain.
Paintings of two of the Harewoods hang
in the Legislative Council Chamber. As
early as the first quarter of the eighteenth
century the Lascelles family was estab-
lished in the island and one was a collector
of Customs. When this year His late Majesty
King George VI died, the Hon. Gerald Las-
celles owner of two Barbadian estates left
from here to attend His uncle’s funeral.

Many other links exist between Barba-
dos and the Mother Country. The term
“little England” was not coined by ignorant
men, but signified a real estate of affairs
illustrating the influence which England
has always had on the history of this island.

That influence has probably never been
greater than it is today and the Labour
movement in the West Indies owes most of
its inspiration to the ideas and ideology
originating from individual British socialists
like the late Sir Stafford Cripps, the late
Harold Stannard former Colonial Editor of
the Times and others.

Two Trade Union courses held in Barba-
dos in recent years (one of them still in
session) are under British auspices. Despite
the rapid changes which are still taking
place in every sphere of Barbadian life the
link with England remains strong and un-
bending. The unusual honour bestowed on
Mr. Adams in the New Year: the continued
choice by Barbadian scholars of the leading
English provincial Universities as centres
for higher learning may be quoted as ex-
amples in another field.

|
|
|



Towards the end of May 1902,
the S.S. Roddam arrived in the
roadstead off Bridgetown she had
come from Martinique via St.
Lucia, and was the only ship to
escape from St. Pierre, when that
city was destroyed by the eruption
of Mont Pelée on the 8th of May
just 50 years ago today. Captain
H. J. Kirkham, the harbour-mas-
ter wrote: — '

“The Roddam has just been
brought up from St. Lucia, and
if she had only been in the Mer-
sey on exhibition, the owners
could have buijt a new ship out
of the proceeds. I cannot des-
cribe her condition, as it beggars
description, and hundreds of
tons of lava have been thrown
overboard at St. Lucia. A gang
of fifty labourers have been at
work on her for ten days
to get the dust out, but it will
take a long time before she is
clear of it.”

Dust from this eruption had fall-
en on Barbados, and many were
the rumours of the destruction of
San Pierre, but the arrival of this
steamer brought the whole matter
before the public of Barbados.

Mont Pelée had been showing
signs of activity since August 1901,
this was the first sign of an erup-
tion since 1851. Towards the
middle of April 1902, the people
of San Pierre began to notice a
change coming over the mountain
that dominated their homes. The
smoke issuing from the crevices-in
the crater grew in volume until it
became big clouds. Both day and
night the peak of the volcano was
illuminated with vivid flashes of
lightning and low sullen growls
issued forth from the bowels of the
earth, which culminated in many
instances in crashes that startled
the natives. For three weeks these
conditions continued, then died
away. ' “4

Suddenly on Monday the 5th of
May, came the first touch of trag-
edy, when a great wave of boiling
lava gushed from the crater, pour-
ing through a V-shaped gap even-
tually reached the bed of the
Riviere Blanche, and flowing slow-
ly along this bed reached and en-
gulfed the Guerin sugar factory—
about two miles from San Pierre—
before it flowed into the sea.
impact of this molten rock drove
the sea back some fifty to sixty
yards before it was stopped. The
sea then swept in again over the
quays of the town. As soon as this
had subsided, investigation was
made and it was found that 150
people were missing from the fac-
tory and the works themselves
were embedded in molten rock and
mud leaving only the. top of the
chimney marking the place.

‘Deep Explosion

That night the display around
the top of the volcano was the
most vivid yet witnessed.
The population of San Pierre
was terrified for from the
direction of the volcano the
sounds of deep explosions
came to their ears. They were in
a panic, some rushed about the
streets of the city, others went to
the darkened Cathedral to pray,
while others clustered together in
the market place, finding comfort
in each others company. Their only
illumination was the lightning
from the top of the volcano, They
were oppressed with dread; some-
thing warned them that danger
was at hand. At dawn large par-
ties began leaving the town and
making their way to the capital of
the Island, Fort de France.

The Governor, M. Mouttet, real-
ising the effect that all these re-
fugees would have on Fort de
Frauce, sent soldiers out to stop
these panic stricken people, telling
them that it was all right, and that
the danger Was over so there was
nothing to fear. To set an example
to these citizens of San Pierre and
to try and restore order, the Gov-
ernor and his wife went to this
doomed city to see conditions at
first hand. That day was quiet,
and the Governor’s statements to-
gether with the quiescence of the
voleano had its effect on the people,
who grew calmer and went about

The

gigantic
those s
all




By JOHN PRIDEAUX

led to more panic, as all had i
Coat the ioe tind ponced Maa ange
would soon be restored to normal UP.

The * m’
le was caught
then

again. Not many people in the “De 2 '

city, slept that night. however, to- ood. ‘the des royed
wards mo: the city, ‘the y flung back-
quieter, and the people ward these terrific
hopes in their hearts, saw Ascen- J¢rks “to the full power of

her steam, did
alone was powerless to
snapped ehain
‘Roddam’ ee
was not well with her
though, for her rudder. was

Nasty Night

While the religious thronged the
en for the early morning
service, the steamer Roddam under ;

“. pe jammed hard over, and
Captain E. H. Freeman reached the Captain céuld not control her. as
port of San Pierre, He obeyed the che was beginning to run in cir-
waded 4s tes Genoa ahelien, cles towards ‘her destruction,
ieseaea arantine the being tossed) about by the wind
bani ee oe from port, and there anchored his ship. ith, the wheel. and suddenly he

The agent of the steamer, M. 4, ‘eae te teen aeeee
Joseph Plisson, boarded her and free again. The Cotsaio nine
greeted the Captain with Been @ ated by oné’ thought—to save his
nasty night, Captain.” To which p—drove her forward .
he replied, “Yes, but it seems to the blac r forward through
have cleared a bit now.” While from the tain we Fan = daa
this was going on, there was activ- and that pillar of, fire in the sky.
y about the decks of the Roddam, How he stgod the agony of ba
for she had brought twenty-three trolling this ship is one of the
stevedores from Grenada to work

the cargo and. were preparing to °PCS Of .saivege, for nig shenes'| Mr. H. S. Stokes, just returned from
could not tufn the spokes ~ tne | Russia with Lord Boyd-Orr says in the Daily

perform their allotted tasks, while “®™* S° badly burned
the officers and crew were making wheel
the steamer snug. Everyone was fo
occupied with their allotted tasks, w
and while this was ng on there
was the most appalling explosion
from the top of Mont Pelée. A
huge pillar of fire and smoke shot
for miles into the heavens; the sun
was obliterated and everything
was plunged into darkness deeper
than the deepest dark of night. An
awful rain of red-hot ashes and
stones poured from the black sky.
Rocks, so hot that they glowed in
the darkness, some eighteen inches
across were carried miles and be-
came a rain of death as all those
struck by these were killed in- ‘S-
stantly.. At the first gigantic ex- _Spirit stood by the
plosion a terrific wave of flame Wheel, steering this ship with his)
shot over the lip of the crater and @lbows. The first engineer was
swept towards San Pierre; also a burned to death in the holocaust:
river of White-hot lava and boil- It was the second. engineer. who
ing black mud belched forth and Was driving the engines to enable}
exterminated all life before it.. the ship to éseape. Of the crew!
Captain Freeman saw it coming Only twentysof them were below,
and knew that it meant death and £°me of thése badly injured.
destruction to everything it touch- These included the six of the
ed, realising that he must in- twenty-thret “stevedores who had
stantly or be destroyed, he acted SUrvived, Three of these, although
immediately. He gave the order badly injured worked like mad-
‘Fullspeed ahead’, shouted to the ™€n to stoke the furnaces,

with them,—ihe was
i to use his elbows to steer

_ Worked Hard

He triumphed over nis agony, |
and fled out at sea at full speed,
fleeing out of the very jaws of
the inferno, with the ‘volcano
lching fire behind him,
blackness in front of him to
mark his destination, while the |
red-hot ashesâ„¢poured and poured
down from the ‘darkened skies
to pile up on the decks and over
the bodies of the dead. Hour!
after hour’'this man with the|
indomitable

Second Engineer down through the Nine hours after the cata-
skylight and made his way to the Strophe the ‘Roddam’ steamed
chart-house through the blast of into Castries, St. Lucia, She was

hot air and burning ashes, and got Only the semblance of a steamer
there just as the force of the flam- her rigging and awning burned
ing inferno struck the ship. This 49d charred and hanging in
force was so great that the ship £Totesque fashion, figures lying
keeled over until her ports were @bout the deck that were bumed
under water and she was down to beyond recognition, ashes © cov-
the hand rail around the deck; ered everything six or eight
when it passed and gave her a inches deep, and in some places
chance to right herself. where they had been piled up by

the wind, they were feet deep.
Death Wind “Col

The people of Castries could
not believe their, eyes, for they

The Captain then ran out of the fad seen the ‘Roddam’ leave but
chart-house to be met by a hail of 4 few days before, and surely this

o London banker, who reported last Jan-

What the steam | recent economic conference in Moscow have
and let the| now returned. During the past few days we

i BARBADOS. ADVOCATE

The Destruction Of |
San Pierre

nanan a Tae
MR. SMITH (who went to Moscow |
himself — but as a private tourist)
reports on:

_ Two Views In The
vse ates Boyd—Orr Team

By JOHN SMITH

uary on his unconducted trip to Moscow
and Leningrad

THOSE Englishmen who travelled to the

















jhave been hearing, as no doubt we shall
| continue to hear for a week or so, their vari-
}ous opinions of the Soviet Union; and
once again we are faced with the most puz-
\zling of all the questions which that enig-
matic country poses—why it is that every
visitor to Russia, however honest and truth-
|ful he may be, brings back a different story.

What are we to believe?

Lord Boyd-Orr just returned from Russia
|with Mr. H, S. Stokes, says in the Sunday
Pictorial: “People in the streets were warmly
'clad and shod.”

| Express : * just roughly made sheepskin

| coats and second-rate footwear . . . shabbily
,dressed women, feet bulging from tattered
| shoes.”
| These are not matters of political opinion;
they are facts on which people who lack

and the eye of Communist faith ought to agree.

Many people will of course say that a few
days spent on a restricted visit to its capital
does not perhaps entitle a visitor, like
myself, to air his views on a sixth of the
world’s surface; but even when we turn to
intelligent, experienced men, with every
source of information at their command, we
are no better off.

WHAT THEY BELIEVE
The late British and the late American
Ambassadors both left Moscow at about the
same time; one of them was convinced that
the Russians support the regime, the other
that they are seething with discontent.
Most people just abandon the search for
truth, and merely believe those articles on
Russia which say what they are hoping to
hear, and whose authors share their politi-
cal views.
The author’s political views are, of course,
important. The chances are that somebody
who has thought and read a great deal about
Russia, and has looked forward to going
there for a long time, will, when he finally
visits the country, see what he is determined
to see rather than what is actually there.
If he is a fellow-traveller he will suffer—
or enjoy—an emotional détente on reaching

—



burning ashes. These were piled was not the’ same ship? So badly
up thick on the deck and burning (burndd, so’ terribly altered was
his feet, the very air seemed solid ee Freeman that the Agent
with them. “Members of his crew When he aboard spoke to him
were strewn about the deck in the Without recognizing who it was
most weird attitudes. The death he spoke with, Captain Freeman
wind had swept down and exter- was quickly removed to hospital,
minated them by burning before 4nd lived to return to England
they could realise what was to take where he was presented with
place so as to seek safety. , Lloyd’s Silver Medal for his
Captain Freeman endeavoured gallantry, for this alone had
to free the ship of her anchor, but saved his ship.
the chain was so hot that his hands | The ‘Roddam’ was the first to
were severely burnt so,he could bring the news of the disaster
not succeed. Back to the chart- that had befallen San Pierre and
house he crawled on hands and its thirty-six thousand inhabi-
knees under that hail of burning tants who had been destroyed by
fire, gasping and panting in the this voleanie — eruption. The
poisonous atmosphere; there to cables were broken by
signal “Full speed astern’, hoping earthquakes and slides, indeed
that he would be able to break the when the cable ship of the French
shackle by the force and leave the Cable Company, the Pouyer
anchor lying. The chain held, so Quertier went to repair
when the ship was at the end of cable to enable the rescuers to
the cable, he ordered full steam keep in touch with the world,
ahead and rushed back to be she found that the sea-bed where
brought to a sudden halt when she the cable lay had sunk from 300
reached the other extremity. He feet to 1,500 feet; so terrific was
did this several times without suc- the eruption, that the whole con-
cess. While occupied with this, he tour of the,sea-bed was altered.
saw the other ships around him Only one’inhabitant of San
capsize and sink, The West India Pierre, was found alive by the

the

the

the promised land at last.
~If he is a Fascist reactionary, or an Im-
perialist, or a lackey of Wall Street, as so
many of us still are, he will be as suspicious
of the Russians as they are of him.

But politics are not everything.

When we read an article about the Rus-
sians, no matter whether it lauds or slates
them, we should ask three questions about

the author.
FIRST VISIT?

First has he ever been abroad before — to
other foreign countries with which he can
compare Russia? Anybody going abroad for
the first time is bound to be enchanted by
sheer novelty.

Secondly; did he go to Russia as a mem-
ber of a delegation and—if the answer is
Yes, as it nearly always is—has he ever been |.
abroad as a member of a delegation before ?

It is against human nature to form a really
unfavourable opinion of a country where
one has been really well treated and enter-
tained; and nobody’s judgment, unless inocu-
lated by previous experience, is left unaf-
fected by the flattery of official hospitality.









_ THURSDAY, MAY 8, 1952



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UR





usiness in the ordinary way. and Panama cable-ship, the Grap- rescuers, this was a negro who 7 by
What th b fitting than for | Or rsnest day, Wednesday the pler never had a chance, and the had been condemned to death |... once went to the Argentine with a dele- ‘s
at then can be more fitting ay, y i Hl ,.|gation; we were taken everywhere, usuall SUMRIE

the island to be ted at Her 7th, all the quietness the day big American steamer, the Rorai- for murder and had been con-|® ’ ARE: Ty e, usually *

Pen s before vanished, for again explo- ma was ablaze from stem to stern. fined in a cell well below the|1N cars; everything was organised most “of England
Majesty’s coronation next year, not merely sions came to ee ears and & ae * ee oh den na us wo in va grown, as one smoothly for us; we met President Peron; 8

; e roun wn Ee nea hree Ys after the

by some member of the House of Assembly SE ont Cie venrne, The light- ley of the Riviere Blanche, eruption and destruction of- the hs ate colossal meals where almost as much and sold by:
and member of the Legislative Council, but | ning was again predominant, and which freed the ‘Roddam,’ for city by those digging amang the| time was consumed as food; everyone was

a light rain of gray powdery ash when this meached the shore it wreckage,

anSomrar asmvenaeeesanitedeannnin yo

by a colourful Police Band under the direc-
tion of that most popular Barbadian-by-
adoption Capt. Raison?

Some years ago the Band of the Police
Force of the Gold Coast visited London and
several other provincial cities, They played
in the parks, in halls, on piers and seaside
promenades and they received much atten-
tion from the national Press and the news-
reels. Certain difficulties were experienced
due to the restrictive practices of the Brit-
ish Musicians’ Union. The Band was not
allowed to earn money except on special
oceasions and even when they were allowed
to play at certain places by special indulg-
ence receipts for the performance were
returned to the regular British orchestras
by demands of their Union. But restrictive
practices of this kind little conducive as
they are to the promotion of goodwill and
understanding between the possessing
country and the country which is possessed
were irritants only. Sir Alan Burns’ excel-
lent idea of bringing the Gold Coast to
London in the ambassadorial persons of
their Police Band paid dividends. The
crowds of London and the Provincial cities
took the Gold Coast Police Band to their
hearts and their visit did more to educate
the British public about Colonies than any
other colonial visit to England except that
of the victorious West Indian Cricket team.

If Barbados pleads her ancient British
lineage and her especial connection with
British Royalty, perhaps Queen Elizabeth
II will graciously consent to the presence of
the Police Band from Barbados somewhere
along the triumphal Coronation route in

June next year!

went on all through the night. This



Our Readers

“Murder Will Out?”

To the Editor, the Advocate,

SIR,—I am wondering if the
leading article in your issue of
Sunday 27th ultimo is not a case of
“murder will out” or of your let-
ting the Trans-Canada cat out of
the Seawell Airport bag (or the.
Seawell cat ete. whichever you
prefer), Your Pan-American red-
herring dipped in the British Gov-
ernment’s barter sauce will surely
come in useful now that the cat
is out and about and may need
full rations.

I hope that the senior member
for St. George (Mr. Barrow) is
listening in. By 1954 Nobody's
Diary will no doubt record that
Trans-Canada Airlines insisted
that the Seawell Runway (cr
what’s left of it) be lengthened
and strengthened under their ex-
pert supervision and at the Brit-
ish Government expense, or they
would reluctantly, regretfully and
most sorrowfully be forced to
leave Barbados out of the itin-

erary of their new jet-propelled inane I have been reading your

exce
Another objection may be the noted the large number of letters
their 0n Birth ,Control.
at Sea- letters seem to go to the root: of

aircraft.

temporary quarantine of

passengers in a mud-hut

well from whence they ere sent the matter,

in all kinds of trepical weather
to regain their baggage from the
additional cow-shedq to the ter-
minal building.

both these contingencies?
who was it that persistently gave
him the “lie” direct?
With thanks for space,
Yours sincerely,
A. E. S. LEWIS
David And Bathsheba
To The Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,— While agreeing with
what F. G. says on this subject, I
would like, with your permission,



a cruel and constant war for the
1 survival of the fittest.
Who was it that warned us of of nature no longer exists and man

And has successfully practically sup-

and was eventually

hurled the sea back in one released. He was~ pardoned.

_



Say:

to say that he did not
enough with David's life,

David bitterly repented of those
heinous sins and it was he who
gave us most of those beautiful
Psalms, he died in God's favour,
not like his son Solomon; and do
you think God will look with
favour, because of that one great
sin of his, being made a spectacle
for the amusement of a crowd of
worldly people?

go far are patching up millions of human

beings of poor stock, who go on
breeding more poor stock, with the
result that rid population is to
my mind inefeasing at an alarm-
ing rate.

At the present rate, the popula-
tion of Barkados will be doubled
in 30 yearg if God's methods of
keeping the population down are
tampered with; He might just as
greatly resent vaccination, diph-
theria and typhoid inoculation as
He is alleged to resent birth con-
trol. If a working man is to have
five or six children how can he
bring them up? What is the dif-
ference between a prophylactic in-
jection against conception, and in-
oculation against diphtheria? Man
has completely upset nature’s
method of keeping the population
down, so he must now develop an
unnatural one, It is simply a mat-
TH. ter of common sense, and I see no

— why religion need come in
at all. ~

MEDICUS
No Réeinuneration

To The Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—As an Islatid’ Co ie I
would like to make-knoWn the fol-

lowing facts. .,We-ate under
to serve loyally and faithfully Her
¢ ou

It seems in these “last days”.
God's word written in His Holy
Bible, is wrested and changed up
for quite a different purpose from
what He intended it for—Our
Guide and help in time of need,
and the example set us by His
Be'oved Son,






Thanking you for space,
, FA

Birth Control

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—As a recent arrival in the

t paper regularly, and have
None of these
Let us assume that

God made the Ant-eater and its Majesty Quten | Elizabeth
prey, the lion and the zebra, the Pledge is the game as the Police.
tiger and the elephant. Nature is For our services we receive NO

remuneration, Like Invisible
Guardian Angéls, we serve. But,
we are human—flesh and blood
need sustenange. We have our
homes, wives’ and children. to
maintain. How are we to perform
the ‘miracle’? No assistance is ren-
dered us, as far as the question
of remuneration on casts is con-
~~~ned. Should a case run for
weeks c=2 then be thrown out, we |
get nothing—not even thanks. |
Thanking you for space,
Yours faithfully,
ISLAND CONSTABLE,

This law

pressed the epidemic diseases such
as typhoid, typhus, small-pox and
diphtheria; and also has largely
eliminated the tropical diseases,
He has therefore eliminated na-
ture’s method of keeping a bal-
anced population. We might quite
well argue that Dr. Jenner, the
discover of vaccination was the
cause of World Wars I and I.
Furthermore, we medical men

pleased to see us; we saw and were shown,
without effort on our part, things we had
never seen at home, although, did we but
know it, the same things, just as good,
existed there as well; and we had no spare
time to digest what we-had seen or to ex-
plore for ourselves.

EVENING OUT

Of course, we were vastly impressed and
grateful. '

In Moscow I saw exactly the same thing
happening—mystified Koreans ‘and Chinese
pinned down for the evening in the best
seats at the Bolshoi Theatre or dining 40
strong at the best hotel; tickets forthcoming
at onee where others had to queue; cars,
guides and interpreters for all.

_It would be churlish to be anything but
sincerely grateful to the Russians for their
kindness and trouble; but for most people
it would also be “impossible not to view
Russia through spectacles at least rose-col-
oured if not actually red,

Thirdly, does the author represent himself alone?

Practically nobody returns from Moscow who
did not go there in some official capacity, whether
as a diplomat—who, though obviously the best in-
formed, is bound to public silence—or as a trade
unionist. ’

_ Even newspaper correspondents in that
unfree air acquire a semi official status from their
eontact with and dependence on the embassies
quite apart from their other ties—when I was
there, four of the six foreign correspondents were
married to Russians.

All these sources of information are inevitably
tinged with official opinion of one col or) an-
other; and this excuses those returning visitors,
However brief their stay, who rush in where the
fficial angels are not allowed to tread.

Nevertheless, even after applying these three
tests to whatever we read, the fact remains that
we know less about Russia to-day than we did
about America in the time of Queen Elizabeth I.

Until the Iron Curtain rises (or clatters apart—
according to which way it turns out to be made),
Russia is bound to remain as fabulous and undis-
covered a land as medieval China, and we shall
be at the mercy of every modern Marco Polo who
brings back fellow-travellers’ tales.

We shall never know the truth about Russia
until a very great many ordinary humane, unpoliti-
cal people have made long and unconducted tours
of the country.

WORLD COYPRIGHT RESERVED
—L.E.S.






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THURSDAY, MAY &

9

1952



Vestry Want More Time
To Consider Maude Bill

AT the sogiest of the Select Committee appointed by

the House of
contains proposed changes

ssembly to consider the Maude Bill which

of the Vestry System, the St.

Lucy Vestry yesterday discussed the Bill, but after about
an hour and a half discussion few tangible views were

expressed.

Members said they had not had
sufficient time to peruse it and so
did not know the merits and de-
merits of the two systems and to
be able to compare and criticise
easily.

The views expressed are to be
passed on to the Select Committee
of the House.

Present were Rev. Pestaina,
Chairman and Messrs. J. E. T.
Brancker, F, A. Greaves, Church-
warden, C. H. Yearwood, C. DeC.
Howell, LeRoy Bourne, G. G. Har-
ris and D. E. Webster.

What Changes

Mr. J. E. T. Brancker opened
the discussion by observing that
the question was,—were they in
favour of remaining as they were?
If they were not, then, what type
of changes would they sanction?

“Frankly,” he said, “I can see
no justification for remaining as
we are. Improvements are long
overdue,”

The question arose as to which
system, the present or the pro-
posed would be more expensive
and Mr. F. A. Greaves, h-
warden, said that it was stated in
the Maude Report that the pro-
posed change would be more ex=
pensive,

Mr. Brancker pointed out that
there would not be so many par-
ochial treasurers.

After a pause in the discussion,
Mr. Webster observed that it was
a serious matter and he for one
did not like jumping over a cliff
as it were.

Mr. Brancker said that he was
prepared to listen carefully and
sympathetically then to the views
expressed, examine them and
bear them in mind when the mat-
ter came again before him as a
member of the House.

Too Much Of A Rush

Another impasse ensued and
then some members said that it
was all too much a rush. Mr.
F. A. Greaves said that the House
should publicise everything con-
cerning the proposed system.

Following repeated expressions
that there had not: had sufficient
time to go into the Bill and the
Select Committee had set too
early a date for them to consider
the Bill, Mr. Brancker suggested
that they might tell the Select
Committee as much. He added
that the Churchwarden might pass
on opinions on any general heads.

The Churchwarden then asked
what type of change, if any, they
would like.

The consensus of opinion was
that the present system should be
retained and there should be six
instead of eleven Vestries.

The present qualification which
entitles a parishioner to vote is
the owning of one rood of land or
the paying of £1 trade tax.
Opinion was that the qualification
for voting should not be changed
to one of adult suffrage, but
should be changed so that only
ratepayers should have a vote and
all of them should be entitled.
For, it was held, they were look-
ing after the ratepayers’ money.

Mr. Yearwood felt that unless
the Government assisted the sys-
tem by about $3,000,000, a hard-
ship would be created with the
change.

CF *

After the meeting the Vestry
visited Barrows House where it
has been decided to transfer the
parochial treasurer’s office be-
cause of complaints by ratepayers
as to the inaccessibility of the
present site of the office at Har-
tison Plantation.



Lecture On
Road Safety

AT the end of this month, Colo-
nel R. T. Michelin, Commissioner
of Police, will give his usual Lec-
ture to bus drivers and conductors
at one of the cinemas in Bridge-
town. i 7

This Lecture will be given in
co-operation with the launching
of a campaign by the Barbados
Automobile Association. The
President. and Secretary of that
Association will he associated with
the Commissioner of Police on
the platform.

After the Lecture a film on
“Road Safety” will be shown,

Persons will be admitted to the
Lecture on the production of a
current drivers’ and conductors’
licences,

It is expected that this Lecture
will be ‘arranged for Friday, May

30, a day*which it is hoped
be suitable for conductors and
drivers.

The Police have taken over the
supervision of car park attend-
ants. Shortly these attendants, as
well as Island Constables, will be
given a new type of uniform.





Motorist —
Acquitted

The case in which Henry
Trent of Goodland, St, Michael,
was charged by the Police with
driving the motor car M-1254 on
Deacon’s Road, St. Michael, in a
way dangerous to the public war
yesterday dismissed ,without pre-
judice by His Worship Mr. G. B.
Griffith, Acting Police Magistrate
of District “A”,

Mr. J. E. T. Brancker appeared
on behalf of Trent, while Sgt
Forde attached to the, Traffic
Branch at Central Station prose-
cuted for the Police. The charge
stated that the offence was com-
mitted on March 11.

George Jordan, island consta-
ble said that on March 11 some-
time during the night he heard a
crash and going into Deacons
Road saw a telephone pole knock-
ed down inthe street. A motor
car was about 20 feet from the
pole but the defendant who was
present never told him what
happened.

Harold Rock another witness
for the prosecution also said that
he heard a great noise while he
was going home in Deacons Road.
Cpl. McClean said that the de-
fendant told him that he was
driving on Deacons Road about
20 miles per hour and saw a man
dash across the rggd.. In trying
to avoid an accident the car
struck a telephone pole.

Rhodesia
To
Grow Sugar

SALISBURY, Southern Rhodesia

Experiments are going ahead in
the Zambesi for an ambitious
sugar plantation scheme. t is
hoped that eventually erfough
sugar will be produced to supply
the entire needs of both Southern
and Northern Rhodesia.

This plantation area is consider-
ably further north, nearer the
equator, than Africa’s existing
sugar-growing belt, in the coastal
districts of Natal and Zululand,
where sugar has been grown on
a commercial scale for more than
100 years.

Agriculturalists have always
felt, however, that Rhodesia
offered wide possibilities for a
variety of crops. Since tobacco
production on a commercial scale
began in Rhodesia some 40 years
ago, for instance, these crops have
become a valuable addition to the
world’s tobacco supply.

The first sugar-can seed in
Rhodesia has been planted in an
experimental plot on the hanks of
the Zambesi. near the Chirundu
Bridge. Rhodesia Sugar Re-
fineries is the firm conducting the
tests, but it is probably that an-
other company will be formed
later to organise the planting and
milling of cane in the area.

First Step

Wir. Stanley Cooke managing
director of the company, said that
the planting of this seed cane was
the first step in a scheme aimed
at meeting the sugar requirements
of both Rhodesia. He hoped that
20,000 tons of sugar a year could
be produced at first from the
Zambesi plantations, which would
be half the present consumption of
the two territories.

One difficulty that may face the
project, however, is the avail-
ability of cheap labour. This was
the problem encountered by the
early sugar planters in Natal and
which was overcome by the im-
portation of the indentured labour-
ers from India,

South African sugar produc-
tion has traditionally beei almost
entirely for domestic consumption
and it has never figured largely
as a South African export com-
modity. Expanding crops in the
past few seasons, however, have
given South Africa a sugar export
surplus.

Under the Commonwealth Sugar
Agreement, signed in London last
December, South Africa has “an
overall export quota of 200,009
tons a year and East Africa has
a quota: of 10,000 tons. It is
doubtful whether the South
African quota will be completely
taken up for the next few years et
fleast.

No provision is made under the
Agreement for new production in
other territories, such as Southern
Rhodesia, but it is unlikely, even
if the experiment succeeds, that
an export market will be sought
for Rhodesian sugar for many
years to come, especially since the
stated obiect of production is to
grow supplies for the Rhodesian
home morket. —B.U.P.







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“Dick” Reece
Here Again

STILL TAKES KEEN
INTEREST IN SPORT

Mr. H. W. W. “Dick” Reece
son of Mr. W W. Reece, Solicitor
General, who arrived here some
weeks ago from the United King-
dom with his family, is employed
with Kuwait Oil Company, but
still takes a keen interest in sport.

While in the West Indies, he
played water polo for Y.M.P.C.,
from 1938—42 and was captain
of Trinidad Leaseholds Ltd., from
1943—46. He also played for
Swordfish and Otters. London
Club in 1948 and = afterwards
captained the Kuwait Oil Com-
pany’s team from 1949—51.



MR. “DICK” REECE
While

in England, he _ learnt
rugby at Taunton School, the
leading West County rugby school
end in 1944, he was the only
B.W.I. selectee to represent Trini-
dad against British Guiana. The
other members of the team were
W. G. Show of T.L.L. (English) J.
Williams, UBOT (English) and
the remainder selected from the
Fleet Air Arm in Trinidad.
Goodwill Tour

In 1946 he represented. Trini-
dad in the first Goodwill Tour
after the war against British Gui-
ana. From 1943—51 he played
for Kuwait Oil Co,, Ltd., Ist XV
and in 1950—51 he represented
K.O.C. Ist seven teams in the
Persian Gulf Area in a seven a
side conypetition when K.O.C. won
both.

At football he represented T.L.L.
as goalkeeper from 1943—46 and
played for_Trinidad S.A.F.A. in
1944 and S.A.F. L. in 1945 and 46.

He was invited to practice by
the Trinidad A.F.A. in 1946 for
the B.G. tour, but was unable to
accept the invitation on account
of contractual leave taken in the
United Kingdom.

He also played quite a bit of
hockey and tennis.



Obituary

Dr. Jesse Grell
*
Dies li Barbados

Death unexpected and sudden
brougnt grief to the tamuly of
vr. vesse Grell, reured Dustrict
Medical Officer of ‘Trinidad.

Dr. Grell arrived yesterday
morning to spend a holiday with
his sister Miss Louise Grell at the
Stream. On arrival he was suffer-
ing from pneumonia, but it was
not expected that his end ‘was s0
near.

He was educated in Barbados
and later graduated in Medicine
from Edinburgh, He joined tne
Trinidad Medical Service and was
appointed to Siparia from whicn
post he retired recentiy.

He was married to Miss Solang>
Thaly of Martinique who pre-
deceased him and by whom he
had two children — a son and @
daughter. His son, who is the
well known Sports Master at
Queen’s Royal College in Trinidad.
is now in Denmark taking a re-
fresher course in Physica! Educa-
tion. ee

Dr. Grell was a man of gejia
temperament and was highly re-
spected. He was a member of the
B.M.A. and was a moving spirit
in the Medical Association in
Trinidad, He had, on his occa-
sional visits to Barbados over a
pericd of years, gathered a wide
circle of friends to whom his pa*s-
ing will be a source of deep re-
gret

His funeral took place at the
Westbury Cemetery yesterday
afternoon in the presence of «@
largve gathering.

To his sorrowine relatives deen-
est sympathy will be extended

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cE

Picture shows a pig and litter of 18 pigs which were born on Satur-
day night. This is believed to be a record. The sow is owned by
Mr. Giles of Laynes Road, Britton’s Hill.



Home Economics
Officer Commends
Vegetable Project

MISS ELSA.HAGLUND, Home Economies Officer of
the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United
Nations (F.A.0.), told the Advocate yesterday that during
her week's visit she had seen an interesting vegetable grow-
ing project and hoped it would be possible to extend stil!
further the production of food for home consumption.

20’- Fine For
Discharging
Firearm

His Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith,
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-
trict “A” yesterday convicted and
fined 42-year-oid Sydney Skinner
a Civil Servant of King Street,
St. Michael 20/- to be paid in 14
days or one month’s imprisonment
with hard labour for discharging
a firearm within 100 yards of a
public highway but dismissed on
its merits another charge of being
drunk while in the possession of
a loaded firearm,

Skinner appealed against Mr.
Griffith’s decision. Mr. E. W. Bar-
row appeared on behalf of Skin-
ner while Sgt. King attached to
the Central Police prosecuted
from information received for the
Police,

Dr. Cato told the court that he
examined Skinner and he ‘was
very talkative. He had been
drinking but he had not drunk so
much as to be incapable of know-
ing whet he was doing,

Addressing the court Mr. Bar-
row submitted that it was not
proved that the defendant dis-
charged the firearm, nor that if
he had discharged the firearm that
he did so intentionally. There
Was no expert to tel! the cout
whether the mechanism of the
gun was in good working order
or w’s defective. It was the dutv
of the prosecution to establish
that the man teok the gun in his
hand and discharged it, and that
he was 100 yards from the road.

Six Months For
Stealing $10

His Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod,
Police Magistrate of District “A”
yesterday sentenced Frank Drakes





a labourer of Cave Hill, St.
Michael to six months’ ° im-
prisonment with hard labour

for stealing $10 from Clairmonte
Eastmond.

The offence was committed on
April 12. Eastmond told the
court that on April 12 he saw
the defendant and after talking
with him the defendant told him
that he could get a pair of shoes
for him for $10. He gave the de-
fendant $10 and waited for him
to return.

The defendant did not return
and he notified the Police. Drakes
had three previous convictions for
stealing.



SALESMAN
DISCHARGED

Ashton Gibson, a salesman of
Kew Land, St. Michael, was dis-
charged by His Worship Mr. G.
B. Griffith, Acting Police Magis-
‘rate of District “A”, when he











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She hoped that the teaching of
Home Economics would be devel-
oped, but stressed the necessity
for having it closely related to
actual conditions in the homes of
the people.

Miss Haglund is making a tour
of the West Indies as a prelimin-
ary to the Conference on the
teaching of Home Economics and
Nutrition which is to be held
jointly by FAO and the Caribbean
Commission beginning June 30 in
Trinidad.

While in Barbados she has had
a very full programme. related
to these subjects. It included
visits to the Housecraft Centre,
some of the Secondary and ele-
mentary schools, the General Hos-
pital, the St. Michael's Almshouse,
the Nightingale "Home and_ the
Children’s Goodwill League: also
the Pine Livestock Station, Groves
Agricultural Station and Mr. Sam
Marshall’s “very enterprising”
vegetable growing project at
Eckstein’s Village.

Address to T.U. Students

On Tuesday Miss Haglund ad-
dressed the Trade Union student
at the Y.M.C.A, on Nutrition, She
thought they were a most prom-
ising group; very influential in the
communities from whence they
came, At the end of the talk, there
was a lively discussion which she
regarded as of great benefit to her;
and which she much enjoyed.

Miss Haglund had_ interviews
with His Excellency the Governor
and various heads of departments,
She also had consultations with
the Comptroller for Development
and Welfare and his Advisers,

The Education and Sacia!
Welfare Advisers wil attend a
Trinidad Conference to which
the territorial Governments
belonging to the~ Caribbean
Commission are invited te send
reprerentatives, The North
American Regional Office of
FAO in Weshington will also
send a representative,

Miss Haglund's headauarters
in the Caribbean are with the
Caribbean Commission in Trini-
dad. She will be leaving here
shortly for Grenada to continue
her tour of the are» which takes
her to Martinique, Puerto Rico.
Jamaica, Curacac and British
Guiana,

She wished that she could have
included many more territories in
her tour. but found it impossibl
due to the lack of time.

Miss Hawund who ws stavine
at the Marine Hotel. left for Trini-
dad last nieht by R WTA,

_—_——

appeared before him yesterday
charged by the Police with the
larceny of clothing valued at £11,
the property of Ernest Jones ot
Reid Street sometime between
December 18, 1951 and December
21, 1951.

Ernest Jones principal witness
in the case, told the court that
he desired that the matter be
dropped as he was suffering from
a lapse of memory. Sgt. Murrell
prosecuted for the Police from
information received.





Canadian To
Give Course In
Horsemanship

STAFF Sergeant Anderson,
Senior Equitation Instructor at
the Royal Canadian Mounted
Police Training Depot at Rock-
cliff, Ottawa, Canada, will be ar-
riving in the island today by
T.C.A.

He will be spending six weeks
here to instruct the local Moun.ed
Police in “Horsemanship and
Mounted Display Events.”

Staff Sergeant Anderson's vis‘
has been made possible througo
the kindness of Mr. Nicholson,
Commissioner of Police of in?
R.C.M.P.; by cooperation of T.C.A.
who brcught him to the island free
of charge and through the kina
ness of the proprietors of tnt
Marine Hotel who will put hiro
up without charge.

At the end of the Staff Sergean ‘s
visit, a Mounted Display will
given at District “A” Training
School where the public will i+
able to see the standard reached
and the benefit gained by the visit
of this experiericed instructor
horsemanship

Colonel R. T. Michelin, Commis-
sioner of Police, told the Advocat >:
“With the benefit of Staff Sergea's
Anderson’s experience, we ho»
that it will be possible for t u
Barbados Mounted Police to |
represented at the Coronation of
Queen Elizabeth next year.”





Leeward Is.
Council To
Be Deubled

During the -. debate on th
Leeward Islands (Aimendme
Act, No. 13rof 195), in the



eral Legislative Couneil on. ihe
19th November, . 195! variou

Suggestions were made These
Suggestions have now been con-
sidered by the Secretary of
State, who has reached 1e fol-
lowing decisions. The number
of the elected members on the
Federal Executive Council will

be increased from 3 to 6
ther consideration cannot be
given at this stage to the objec-
tion to the introduction of nomi-
nated members into the General
Legisiative Council or to the pro-
posal that the Governor should
only exercise his reserved powers
after consultation with the Exe-
ecutive Council. The new General
Legislative Council will be in-
vited to amend the Leeward
Islands Act, and additional legis-
lation will be introduced, to pro-
vide for the usual privileges and
immunities of members of the
Legislature, Similar legislative
action will be taken in the Presi-
dencies. The General Legislative
Council will be invited to amend
the Leeward Islands Act to pro-
vide that, if the representative
member who is the elected mem-
ber for Anguilla is unable to
take his seat on the General
Legislative Council, the unoficial
members of the St. Kitts-Nevis-
Anguilla Legislature may _ elect
an elected member from amongst
the remaining elected members
on the Presidential Legislature

Fur-

. » to be a temporary member of the
7 AMBRICGANS TO Gorcrat Vewssiative Cuneit.

LOOK FOR
TUNGSTEN

EDMONTON, Alta.
The unexplored Logan Mountain
range of the Northwest Territories
will be the target this summer fo;
seven American mountain climbers
seeking strategic deposits of tung-
sten and tin,

The party, including fuu
geologists, will be known as the

Yale-Logan expedition and_ is
sponsored by the Yale Mour-
taineering Club of New Haver
Conn,

The party will leave late tu
spring by plane for their br sv

camp at Watson Lake, 800 mile
from here on the edge of the juti-
ing Selwyn Range of which th
Logans are a chain,

Heavy scientific instruments and
equipment will be flown in from
Edmonton by Canadian Pacific
Airlines as well as food and othe:

supplies for the seven-week
assault of the chain,

The Logans are an unknown
quaniity except what physio-
eeaphie detail can be learned

from air photographs.

Dudley W. Bolyard, expedition
chairman, has spent several
months in detailed study of all!
available air photos of the chain
and he said bedrock formations)
strongly suggest of deposits of |
defense-precious tungsten, tin and]
other metals,

The party plans to climb every |
possible mountain in the range |
rather than concentrate on just one |
or two as do most expeditions on!
a pleasure-seeking vacation, The|
Logans, the highest in the N
American interior, contain many

high ranges crowned by rugmed
peaks as well as many Alpine
glaciers and icefields. }

—B.U.P |



Witnesses Tell |
Commission Of |
Misused Furds

(From Our Own Correspondent
ST, GEORGE'S. |
Several allegations of misuse of}
public funds have been made in|
the course of evidence given by |
witnesses before the Commission
of Inquiry now investigating ccr-|
tain features of the working of|
the Public Works Department
The Commission sat all last week}
and this week, in addition to hear-
ing more evidence, will visit cer-
tain country districts. Presiding
is Sir Clement Malone, assisted by

|
Mr. C. E. Newbold and Mr. J. W.|
Foster. Among witnesses last}
week was Hon. KE. M. Gairy



whose motion in the Legislature
led to the setting up of the Com
mission,

Se —

YARDLEY

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“PAGE FIVE

Compensation
Money To Be
Divided

In the Court of Original Juris~
diction yesterday His Honour Mr.
J. W..B. Chenery made an order
that $1,800 be divided equally
between Leotta Taitt wife of the
late Lloyd Taitt and-her daughter
fave been deducted when the
question as to the compensation
ior the death cf Lloyd Taitt a
lorry driver employed by Bulke-
ley Factory occupied the attention
of that court yesterday morning.

Compensation of $1,800 was
faid into the court by Bulkeley
Factory after Lloyd Taitt a lerry
driver of Haggatt Hall, St.
Michael died on tht spot when he
was involved in an accident on
My Lords Hill, St, Michael on t!
morning of March 25 while
was driving one of the trucka
belonging to Bulkeley Factory
and which was laden with bags of
Sugar at the time.

rhe Factory report showed that
the deceased was working for $22
a week before he met his death:
Leotta Taitt (45) of Haggatt Hall,
St. Michael. told the court that
she depended on the deceased
who used to live with her, She
was his lawful wife and they
only had one daughter who is
unmarried. :

An application from Viola
Drakes for part of the compensa-
tion was unsuccessful, “ Drakes
told the court that she was the
reputed wife of the deceaséd and
had three children from him.
Drakes is also a married woman.



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PAGE SIX



CLASSIFIED ADS. '-

_TELEPHONE

ee

IN MEMORIAM



LAWRENCE: In loving memor:
dear Mother, Edith Lawrence
on May &, 195%

We miss vou now our hes
As time goes bY we miss you more
Your loving sraile your gentle fa
No one can-fill your vacant pi ace.

Fver ‘to be remembered by her loving

Children—Laurinta, Leonard, Alma, Clif-

ford; (Grands) Mrs. Branch, Mrs. Good-

ridge 8.5.52



MARSHALL—In loving memory of our
dear son and brother, Lionel (Cocker)

Marshall, who died on 8th May, 1950

Memories are treasures no pne can
steal,

Death is a heartache nothing can
heal,

Some may forget him now he is

~ gone,

But we shall remember—no_ matter

how long





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Cl AR—A.40 3. 500 miles. Phon
6.5
CAR “Morris Oxford. Perfect condi-

ion; mileage 2,370. Telephone 2949

23.4.52—t.{.n





CAR—Ford Prefect late 1950 model
General condition good. Mileage under
16,000 Apply Withnall Fontabelie,
Phone 3409 8.5.52—t.fn

CAR-—-One 1) 1951 Hillman 17,000
niles. Perfect condition, going cheap
Frodgers, Little Hamilton, St. Lawrence
Cap 8.5.52—Gn.

CAR -One (1)



Austin A.40 Car, late



The Marshall Family 8.5.52—In 1351 model. Telephone ce D v
—_——. —— Scott & Co., Ltd 5.52—t f.n.,
FOR RENT CAR—(1) M.G Coupe in perfect

order Apply Newcastle Plantation, St

John 20.4.5 “t.f.n.

BEN-O-NI, Fitts Village, on sea, St.]~ ( ARS—One (1) Standard Vanguard
James, 2 bedrooms, Dressiig Room, WC. Jigds, and one (1) Hillman Minx 1980,
Garage and Servants room Dial 2628. both in excellent condition, No_reason-
2.5,52-—0u offer refused. Phone 4949, Chelgea







FARAWAY--St. Philip coast, 3 bed-
rooms, Fully furnished. Lighting Plant.
Watemnill supply. Double Car Port, two
servant rooms. From May Ist. Phone

10.4.52—t.f.n
aa

FLAT—New, very modern, seaside flat.
Completely furnished. Telephone, gas,
electricity. Facing sea. Excellent and
safe seabathing. Special Summer Rates.
Apply to “MARESOL"’

GAP. Phone 8496.
26.4 52—e.0.d.—t.f.n







FLAT AND HOUSE—Fully furnished,
St. Lawrence on Sea.
on, Phone 3503. We
for next Winter 29.3.59—t.f.n

MODERN FURNISHED FLAT
Silver and Linen. Good Sea -
For further particulars:
Lashley No. 6

With
bathing
Appiy to Alma
Coral Sands, Worthing

23.2.52—t.f{.n
“MODERN STORE AND OFFIC. ES -One
modem Store and two Office
Swan Street Apply
No. 18 Swan Street





ta; C.zT



NEWHAVEN — Crane Coast, 4 bed-
rooms. Fully furnished, lighting Plant,
Watermill supply, Double Garage, three
servant rooms, For May and from Oc_
tober Ist Phone 4476.

10.4,52—t.f.n





PLYMOUTH,
July.

SHA GAZE—on- the-sez
fully furnished, ingliding pope é
refrigerator, for #une, October onwards
for further infoymmtion—Dial 225

Crane Coast-

June and
Phone 2083

+ o:08—t.i,n









TRINITY COTTAGE—fully furnished,

ee bedroom mplete with tele-
and “refrigerator, situated at

Bay, St. James, Phone 2959,
27.4,52—+.f.n.





PERSONAL

i Whe Bebe ate hereby eres against
iving | cr to my wife, FELICIA
DOROTHY HUNTE (nee Lovell) as I do
not hold myself responsible for her or
anyone else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless’ by a written order
signed by me







JOSEPH NATHANIEL HUNTER,
Welchman Hall,
St. Thoma
7.5.52—2n
The public are hereby warned against
iving -credit, to miy wife, LILLIAN

GENE WHITE (nee Nowell) as I do
not hold myself responsible for her or
anyone” else contracting any debt or

debts in my name unless by a written
order signed by me

GEORGE WHITE





St. Elizabeth Village,
- Joseph
5 5.52-—2n
The publi¢vare hereby warned ogainst
giving credit to. my wife, ROSLIN
LAMO EDWARDS (nee Bovell) as |
do not«hold nayself responsible for her

or anyone tise contracting any debt or
debts fh nif hame unless by a written
order signed by me
RALPH ST. AUBRON McCONRICK
EDWARDS,
Boscobelle, St. Peter.
7.5.52—2n
a
The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, THELMA
ZANVIA PHILLIPS (nee Watson) as I
do not*hold myself responsible for, her
or anyone else contracting any debt or
debts in my name unless by a written
order signed by me

HAROLD PHILLIPS,








Boseobelle, St. Peter
8.5.52—2n
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Cameron Hinds, NOTICE
alwapleeper of Bank Hall XK Road
holder of Liquor License No. 894 of 1952,]) TE ASSOCIATED ROARD OF THE
granted to ElminaBishop in respect of ROYAL SCHOOLS OF MUSIC
” floor of “ storey wall building LONDON
Spooners Hit), #1. Michael, for per- Phe Board begs to notify the teachers
ticsion te use” sai@ Liquor License at}that the Written Exam takes pla
a board and shingle shop attached to|®oturday, S3lst May, at 9.45 at the
residence at Lower Bank X Road,| U line Convent, Collymore Rock. All
St. Michael forms and fees must be in tyr May 15th
Dated this 7th day of May, 1952 A. INNISS, H.L.R.,
To: E. A: McLEOD, Esq | Ashford, St. Thomas
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A". 8.5 In
Cc AMERON HINDS, We ee ee
Applicant

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be heid
at Police Court, Dist. “A” on Monday
the 19th day of May 1952, at 11 o'clock

am,
F. A. McLEOD.
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A’

2.5.52—-In

1\QUOR LICENSE NOTICE





The abplication of Permall Givinder
Shopkecper pf Brittons Hill, St. Michael
for permission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors












&c., at ground floor of a 2 storey wall
building at Brittons X Rd., St. Michael
Do ved 6th day of May 1952
To Ee A. MeLEOD, Esq
Poli¢e Mauistrate, Dist. “A”
me FRMALL GiVINDER,
Applicant
op eh. abit ee
t ¢ Court to be held
Pi Court, Dist A” on Monda
‘ih f 3 2, at il Oc Ce
FEF. Al McLEOD.
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
‘
1 if au OR LICENSE NOTIC!
tutterford Fost
« Black Rock, holder
Liq License No, 118% of 1962
nied "to Fdna Prathwaite in respect
ef bottom floor of # 2 storey wooden
timg at Baxters Road, St. Michge
permirsion to use tid Liquor License
é&c al B board and shingle shop attache



to resifence at Brighton, Black Ree)

Vaeho ol
lated this 6th day of May 1952
BE, A. McLEOD, Esq
Police “Magistrate, Dist. “A”
R, FOSTER,
Applicant
application will be consid-
Me Court to be
on Satur
at 11 o'¢

N.T This
ad at a Licen



le



at Police Court, Dis
the
am



Tith day May

A.

E

A
Magistrate, Dist



SSS

ror Best Results- ADVERTISE
SSS OSS8VS 959899 SO1GG9895,

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASK

What The Boy: Boys Have
Been Waiting For
Has Arrived:—
AMERICAN CAP
PISTOLS AND CAPS

- Closing Out Sale of
ALL ENAMEL PAINTS

STATIONERY







JOHNSON’S



\

















ST, LAWRENCE

Available Aprii
invite inspection

CESSES

wage (1950) Ltd 7. 562-
—
CAR—1951 Hillman 17,000 miles. Perfect
condition, going cheap. Box O.H. C/o
Advocate Co,, Lid 7.5.52—3n



TRUCK—One (1) 3-ton Austin Truck.
Apply D.V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd, White
Park Road,

244.524 1 n

VAN — Fordson
19,000 miles
Street Dial



Van in perfeet order,
Royal Store No. 12 High
4359 7.5.52—3n

ELECTRICAL
One (1) Mullard 5-Tube Radio

Phone 3944
7.5.52-—4n
We stinghou ise Fridge 34
condition. Ring Mr
5 p.m. 2064 7
GARRA RD 3-SPEED AUTOMATIC
HANGERS-Just received a _ limited
juantity. Call early, P. C. S. Maffei
& Co., Ltd 5.5.52—fn

MECHANICAL

4 CULATOR
pract cally new
tion. Dial 4689





RADIO-~

in exeelient condition






F TUDGE
Excellent
4412, after

4 of
Hughes
5.$2—4n







One original Odhner
and in first class condi-
8.5. 52-—4n

MISCELLANEOUS

CRADLE One Baby's Cradle with
“ttress and drop side, one baby's wash-
tand one Baby's High Chair, Telephone
680 or B51. J. A. Lewis



Jn



CLOTHES WRINGERS—For the home
lsundry, convenient and easy to operate
K. R

clothes wringers. Only $27,37.
Hunte & Co., Ltd. Lower Broad Street.
Dial 5136. 6.5.52—3n



'TTON PRINTS—New shipment of
adian Prints, lovely material, lovely
signs and reasonable price, come and

#et yours at Kirpalani, Swan ae
Bae.

CAR TYRES REMOULDED—Sizes “B00-
16, $23.53; 450-17, $21.52. Chamois
Leathers $2.75 Can be seen at the
Tri eae Store, Trafalgar Street. Dial
8.5.52—3n



GARDEN HOSE:

4” Garden Hose
wed Fittings, City Garage Co., Victoria
Street 1.5.52—t.f.n

Se

HERBS—Make-u-well Herbs is Nature's

cure for constipation, Rheumatism, im-
digestion, Kidney and Bladder Diseases
nd Sluggish Liver. Price 2/- box

KNIGHT'S LTD 7.5.52—3n

PEEK FREANS' CHEESLETS— We have
Peek Freans’ Cheeslets in stock, original

price 7/-, now reduced to $1.12. iow
is your chance to get a_ bargain.
KNIGHT'S LTD. 7.5.52—3n

————
NECORDS—Clearing our stock of MGM

Necords, Three for Two Dollars, your

chotee. A. BARNES & CO., LTD.

9. 4.52—t.f.n
Subscribe now to the Dally ‘Telegraph
ngland’s leading Daily Newspaper now

erriving in Barbados by Air only a few
favs after publication tn London. Con-



tict: Kan Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltd
local Representative, Tel. 3118.
17,4.52—t.f.n.



‘TOOTH PASTE—Sterilla Tooth “Paste
ci'eans and refreshes, special value 1/-

“VAT—One (1) 6,000 gallon Oak Vat —

poly D. V. Scott & Co., Ltd., White
Park Road. 1.8, OP =ti£.8

PUBLIC NOTICES











REMOVAL NOTICE

SMITH'S SHIPPING SERVICE
;2 sk their Clients to kindly note that their
OfMice is now located at Magazine Lane
| rocing the Public Librany.
6.5.52—-2n

Re Estate of
AROCHDEACON ALFRED SHANKLAND,
Deceased,

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim upon
r affecting the Estate of Archdeacon
Alfred Shankland, late of Third Avenue,
Belleville, in the parish of Saint Michael,
who died in this Island on the 30th day
! January 1952, are requested to send

particulars of their claims, duly
nttested, to the undersigned, the qualified
cutors of the Estate of the said
\lfred Shankland, (deceased), in care
{ Mesers, Cottle, Catford & Co., No. 17
wh Street, Bridgetown, on or before
ie Sth day of June 1952, after which
‘mte we ehall proceed to distribute the
ts of th nid Estate among the
te sreto, havir egard t
debt claims only of which we
I then have bad notice: And that we
i not be liable for acsets so distri-
ited to any person of whose debt or
claim we shall not have had notice at
the time of such distribution
And all persons indebted to the said
tate are requested to settle their ac-
yunts without delay,
Dated this 2nd day of April,
H, G, MURRAY
Cc. R. ARMSTRON
talified Executors of the Estate
of Alfred Shankland, dec'd,
3.4,52—4n.







it




1952,





Q







NOTICE

Applications for a vacant Bulkele:
Yrust Fund Exhibition tenable at any Ist
or 2nd grade school in the island will be

seceived by me up to 17th May.

Candidates must be sons of parents
straitened circumstances having a
ettlement in St. George, or liable ta

be rated there and must not be more
than 13 years of age. A baptismal cer-
fieate and a letter from the Head-
master of the school which app!" ant
sttends must accompany applicat
Forms of application must be obt,
from me, ,
D. H. A. JOHNSON,
Clerk, Vestry of St. George
| 4.5.52—4n
| Ne
|
| NOTICE
| I hereby
j that on the
mong my

inform
28th day of March,
sickness period only
ithorised Mr. J. C. Hutson tq collect
| bills and undertake
my behalf
This Natice
| suthority from
| mus: now
e between 6
2p.m., 6 p.m
' 4888.

all transactions

serves
April

to cancel all
30th 1952. All
be paid to me at my
a.m, to 8 a.m., 12 ngon

to 8 p.m. Telephone



J. N. T. CHATLANT,
Hindu Christian Proprietor,
eral Merchant Office and Residence,
Corner, Passage & Baxters Road.

6.5.52—2n

















| occasionally

the General Public |
1952, |

+1 M

WANTED





HELP
ANNOUNCER— Rediffusi¢ quire
Anne uncer, Script Writer, male pre
ferred, go0c ion and command of
English ¢ ape lette
Trat 8
bi LADY with experience
‘osmetic Departmer Collin 28
Broa Street 5.5. 52-—3n
—$_$<$$$<$—$<—$$—_
An Assistant WORKS ENGINEER,

capable of supervising a workshop and
Foundry Experience in Sugar Machin-
ery repair work desirable. Applicant
must have knowledge of scale drawing
and experience in the direction of labor

Copies of recent testimonials must be
submitted with application by 3ist May
1952 For particulars relating to salary
and other conditions, apply to: The
Manager, The Barbados Foundry, Lim-
ited P.O. Box $1, White Park Road,

Bridgetown, Ba Tn



An Assistant FOREMAN capable
supervising our Machine Shop Depart-
ment.
in making
prints

Copies of recent testimonials must be
submitted with application by 3ist May
1952. For particulars relating to salary
and other conditions, apply to: The Man-
ager, The Barbados Foundry Limited,
P.Q. Box 91, White Park Road, Bridge-
town, Barbadps, as 52—-7n

U.S., France, U.K.
Prepare New Note
On Austrian Treaty

LONDON, May #&

Britain, France and the US.
are preparing a new note to Russia
requesting a reply to their sug-
gestion for a new skeleton treaty
for Austria diplomatic quarters
here believed today.

A Foreign Office spokesman
here said: “three ppwers” are
considering what can be done to
expedite a reply to their note on
the Austrian state treaty whicb
was dispatched to Moscow at the
beginning of March.” The West-
ern note suggested that the
lengthy treaty which has been un-
der negotiation for some years by



sketches and reading biue





the four powers should be re-
placed by a new eight article
treaty.

Austrian Chancellor Dr. Leopold
Figl will discuss the question of
the new note to Moscow when he
begins his official four- day visit
to London tomorrow it is under-
stood, ,

He will have talks with Prime
Minister Winston Churchill and
with Anthony Eden, Foreign Sec-
retary before going on to Wash-
ington also on an official visi.



Seven Killed In
Train Accident

SYDNEY, Austialia, May 7.

At least seven persons — five
men and two women were
killed and hundreds injured when
two workmen’s electric trains col-
lided at Belala, a smail station
outside suburban Sydney.

The disaster occurred in a heavy
fog. One train travelling sight
speed crashed into the rear of
anothey standing at the station,
pushing it fifty yards along a traci
of telescoping steel and wooden
carriages.

The dead and injured were ex-
tracted from a tangled mass of
shattered steel, wood and glass.
Rescuers found scores of bleeding,
dazed and shocked men, women
and children Gogsering around
the wreckage.—U.P.

WHO'S WHO, 1952, is publ
to-day, and 1,002 new names take
up alphabetical station among all
the Somebodies,

As they have done since 1849
new Somebody will be privately
flicking through the pages, seek-
ing their own entries; and Not-
Yet-Ins will be disagreeing with a
selection which leaves them out,

Who makes the selection?

Nobody holds an official position
as selector. Who's Who is strictly
private enterprise, a commercial
reference book, and its prestige
rests on its own integrity.

The Just Men who decide
whether this name or that de-
serves a place confer in the inner
offices of a publishing firm in
Soho-square,

Their own names, even their
number, have never been pub-
lished. But they are constantly
haunted by the Would-Be-Some-
bodies,

They never reveal what rules,
if any, they have for selection-—
but sampling of the 40,000 names
in the 3,190 pages’ of Who’s Who,
1952, points to a general pattern.

The two big gateways are
clearly public office and the Lon-
don Gazette.

New Knights

inherit their entries
along with their titles; and the
drawbridge is lowered at once for
a new knight or dame: but Who’s
Who is not & social register, and
farnily connections are not enough.

In politics, a single success at
the ballot box will win a life-
long place, for once in you stay
there. ’

Dominion and foreign politi-
cians must climb much higher to
get a mention. Truman, Stalin,
Nehru, Acheson, Daladier and Taft
are there and Hitler was; but
Franco and Tito have never got
there. F

In the Services, rank, appoint-
ment, orders and medals seem to
add up on a secret points system.
A bemedalled brigadier may get
there before an undistinguished
major-general.

It is the same with the clergy.
Bishops are certainties, deans, and
archdeacnos stand a very good
chance, canons are rare—but some
of the longest entries concern
| parish parsons with gifted pens or
silver tongues.

IN the Civil Service List the
low-water mark wavers through
the under-secretaries and dips

among the assistant
to scoop in men with

PEERS

| sec retaries



)c. B.s after their names.
One of this year’s newcomers
on Page One, is twice married



Elsie Myrtle Abbot, an un-
at the Treasury since



der-secretary
1950.

[One of the mixed blessinys of
becomina a Somebody is that Mrs.
Abbot's friends will now all know

l\she is 44; career women rarely
| shirk the “date of birth” line in
the preliminary questionnaire.]





| Gallantry can earn a place in
Who's Who, but only when it is
recogniséd as being of the highest

ot} moe
Applicant must have knowledge

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

*3900,000-Ton Gap | In
Empire Sugar Supplies”

Lord Lyle Pleads For London
Sugar Market



LONDON.

| There is still a gap of some
500,000 tons between the total
beet and cane sugar supply of the
Commonwealth producers and
estimated unrationed sugar re-
quirements in the entire Com-
according to Lord
Lyle of Westbourne, president of
Tate & Lyle, Ltd, the sugar
refiners.

He estimated the requirements
as a whole at 3,500,000 tons of
sugar a year. If sugar were un-
rationed in Britain, U.K. con-
sumption alone would account for
2,500,000 tons a year and last
year’s Commonwealth exports
and British beet production came
within 100,000 tons of meeting
this figure, said Lord Lyle, ad-
dressing the annual general
meeting of the company.

“This year the gap will be
larger because of poor crops,
particularly in Australia,” he con-
tinued, “Even so, the gap is a
relatively small one and could
easily be bridged if we were the
only people being considered.
Tihe snag is that the rest of the
sterling area (composed mainly
of Dominions and Colonies) is
making ever-increasing demands
on the available supplies.

“The Ministry or Food for
many years past has undertaken
to supply the sterling area. If
the requirements of these coun-
tries continue to be filled with
Empire sugar before the re rer
ments of the United King
which now appears to be "the
policy—the gap will grow wider,
unless there is yet another cut in
‘he ration at home. :

“Dollars, therefore, are again
the crux of the affair, not only
here but in the importing Colo-
nies and Dominions. I hope that
some dollars can be found for
sugar, but dollars should not be
relied on for ever, and every
effort must be made to gain free-
dom from dependence on dollar
sugar.

“Devices may have to be found
to ensure that Empire countries
which answer the call for higher
production are not faced with the
prospect of having this trade
filehed from them by _ foreign
countries, if and when dollars are
cheap and plentiful. There should
be no difficulty in contriving such
devices, in view of the goal—
complete independence of dollar
sugar and the expansion of Em-
pire agriculture,





“Tf despite everything, dera-
tioning cannot be achieved at
home in the near future, some

steps should be taken to remove
some of the controls which at
presents prevent refiners from
fulfilling completely their true
functions.”

One such step, Lord Lyle sug-
gested, would be the re-opening
cof the London sugar market, to
relieve the Ministry of Food of
their task of buying refiners’
supplies of raw sugar for their
ve-export trade, For refiners to
buy their own sugar, he said, will
pr ee eee the way for the whole of

supplies of the United

What Turns A Nobody
Into A Somebody

By FRANK GOLDSWORTHY

ishedorden.

Private Bill Speakman’s
Korea V.C. came too late for this
issue, but he will be there with
other V.C.s from 1953 for as long
as he lives.

On the stage and screen a West
End hit or a Hollywood Oscar is
not enough; recognition goes to
men and women whom the years
have proved capable of holding
their places at the top of their
professions.

It is just as tough in radio.
Kenneth Adam, Controller of the
Light Programme, is one of this
year’s newcomers, joining Wilfred
Pickles, O.B.E, and “Arthur
Bowden Askey, theatrical artiste.”
But many long-loved names are
missing. I forecast J Ed-
wards, of “Take It From Here,”
will be in next year—as Edwards,
James, M.A., Rector of Aberdeen
University.

Television, it seems, has not yet
arrived. George Reginald Barnes,
its director, has 18 lines but there
is no sign of his departmental
chiefs. And the 37 es about
Terry Thomas refer to the distin-
guished headmaster of Leeds
Grammar School,

For sportsmen, whose top-of-the
tree careers are often short, the
ee is narrow, Gordon Richards,
Jack Hobbs (‘retired professional
cricketer”), and Walter Hammond
(company director) are there, and
of course, Sir Donald Bradman.

But Len Hutton and Denis
Compton, the long-reigning motor-
vycle ace Stanley Woods, his suc-
vessor Geoff Duke, racing driver
Stirling Moss, runner Sydney
Wooderson, and boxers Jack
Dempsey, Joe Louis, Randolph
Turpin, Bruce Woodcock tennis
players Fred Perry, Bunny Austin,
Tony Mottram, and Geoffrey Paish
footballers Stanley Matthews and
Stanle; fs are all missing
do iy. h rsdl he rdifemm ,.

AN Fair Bet

NEITHER wealth nor industrial
power will, of themselves, get a
man into Who's Who. ,

Certainly nobody can buy his
way in, For the Just Men, anxious
to kill persistent slander, devote
cone of the three paragraphs ik
their unsigned preface to

“It cannot be stated too emphatic-
ally that inclusion in Who’s Who
has never at any time been a
matter for payment or of obliga-
tion to purchase the volume.”

But it is still a fair bet that
some of the 1,002 wili feel flattered
cnough today to spend £5 on
Who's Who. 1952 —EE 3 ho's Who, 1952.—L.E.S.

i

Another Shipment of the

POPULAR

$4180 GAS COOKERS

A few of these have not yet
been booked
Prices of next shipment will be

higher
Why not call at your Gas Show-
rooms, Bay Street TO-DAY and

secure one of these cookers.



THURSDAY, MAY 1952

SHIPPING NOTICES

8,





iW. orld Beating Table
Tennis Japs Could
Be Better Still

MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW SOS SO0OFSPOOTOO POOPIE,
ZEALAND LINE LIMITED. ‘

CACIQUE DEL

SESS OOSS
The M.V
CARIBE will accept Cargo gnd
Passengers for St. Lucia, Gren-
ada and Aruba Passengers only
for St. Vincent Sailing Today
Wednesday 7th inst


















































By JOHNNY LEACH March 3rd, Sydney March 10th, Bris-
LONDON. .|eee, March Sind raving Trinidad
We have not seen the best of| April 7 _e The M.V. CARIBBEE will accept
the Japanese in intermational{ in addition to general cargo this ves-|% Cargo and Passengers for Dom-

sel has ample space for chilled and hard iniea,

frozen cargo.

Cargo accepted on through Bills of
Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to
British Guiana, Leeward and Windward
Islands,

For further particulars apply —
FURNESS WITHY & CO., LTD.,

TRINIDAD.

Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday
9th_ instant.

The M.V. MONEKA will accept
Cargo and Passengers for Dom-
inica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 16th
inst.

B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’

ASSOCIATION (INO)
4047

table tennis. That is the opinion
of Johnny Leach, former world
champion who played against
them in Calcutta this winter. The
Japanese carried off the men’s
Singles, men’s doubles, and
women’s doubles, and all their
players obtained winner’s medals.

Kingdom to be bought by traders
instead of by a Government de-
partment, and for London again
to take her rightful place as the
centre of the world sugar market. and Consignee Tele.
DACOSTA & CO., Sinpanae: Kinx

ee Alcoa, Steamahip Co

~~ NEW ¥ORK SERVICE

é pap sails 18th April—arrives Barbados 29th April,

The unusual feature of their



Lord success was that they used the
cotttdiingyh’ texatien in a on did-fashioned pen-holder grip,
year to £99,000,000. which had not been seen in inter-

national table tennis since 1929.
Johnny thinks that, well though
they played, the Japanese would
be even better if they adopted the
ordinary grip.

amounted

This huge total resulted from re-
fining nearly 2,000,000 tons of
sugar, of which one-third was
exported. The modest reward to
shareholders, he said, will be
£590,000 in’ dividends, after tax.

He criticised the continuation of
Government controls, which re-
quire refiners to offer sugar for
export to many countries only if
payment can be made partly in
dollars. Other foreign refiners,
he said, do not suffer from such
restrictions. The result is that
they get the orders and a higher



He explained that while the
suppleness of their wrists enabled
them to overcome most of the
drawbacks of the grip — such as
restricting stroke play — disad-
vantages were still evident.

1952.
sails 9th May—arrives Barbados 20th May,. 1952.

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
A STEAMER sailed 10th April—arrives Barbados 26th April, 1952.
A_STEAMER sails 24th April—arrives Barbados 10th Mey, i 1952.

~ aeRO

CANADIAN SERVICE





For this reason, he added, the
‘pen-holder’ is not likely to regain
world-wide popularity, despite

: sou ;
a because no dollars are} ing Japanese success, OUTHBOUND
5 oe Fn be siting Japan Name of Ship Sails from sAtaves

Lord Lyle also sfoke of the} shortly. There he will play|ss. “aLcoa PILGRIM" a
company’s efforts to improve the| against world champion Hirajih} 5S: “TINDRA slontzest Fa 16th ay
handling of raw sugar. Some| Satoh and hopes to avenge his} 2% “ZISTA’ Montreal May 30th June
450,000 tons of the company’s raw| Calcutta defeat. ea ae ae ee
supplies have been handled in With the exception of Japan NORTHBOUND Due Barbados
ulk, as against 110,000 tons in| and Vietnam, all the places were 8.S. “EVROS” May 14th for St. John, N-B., and

visited last year, and both men
are looking forward to meeting
old friends.

St. Lawrence River Ports

the previous year. In the cur-
These vessels have limited Passenger accommodation.

rent year, it is expected that bulk

cargoes will amount to 800,000
tons.

rere cece tet

ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
Apply:— DA COSTA & CO.,LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE

The Japanese visit is part of a
flying tour he is making with
Richard Bergman. They will
leave next month, and will play
in many parts of the globe, in-
cluding Pakistan, India, Singa-
pore, Vietnam, Hong Kong,
Burma, Australia, and Japan.

Other countries may yet be
added, for Johnny told me that
the game has such world-wide
popularity that he and Richard
have q standing invitation to visit
~ Fad every country in the

NYLON
STOCKINGS

Full Fashioned
New, Modern
Shades

“Ships carrying bulk sugar can
discharge in half the time it takes
to discharge bag sugar, adding
effectively to their earning capaci-
ty,” he explained.



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Corner Broad & Tudor Streets

“But there are only a limited
number of ships available whose
design suits them to this type of
cargo, Accordingly we have join-
ed with the United Molasses Com-
pany and the West Indies Sugar
Comprnhy to build a fleet of six
ships specially designed to carry
bulk sugar. These ships will each
carry 9, tons,



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The Tate & Lyle meeting was
followed immediately by the an-
nual eral meeting of its sub-
sidiary' company, Silvertown Ser-
vices, Ltd., which handles the
transport of sugar for the parent
firm. This company’s three ships,
together with two more vessels
which it chartered, have been en-
gaged in carrying bulk sugar from
Trinidad, Jamaica and San
Domingo to London,





Up to the end of last Septem-
ber, the company had delivered
65,000 tons to London with ut
incident or damage. These ships
will carry a total of 175,000 tons
of bulk sugar from the Caribbean
during the current season. The
company is now the largest ship-
per of bulk sugar to the United
Kingdom.

—B.U.P.

6.5.52.—8n.

> SSSSSDOOSSSSSOSSSSSSS9SS



51 and 60 guage
$2.05 per pair



Federal Grants
To Fairs Will
Be Increased

OTTAWA,
Federal grants to fairs and
exhibitions across the country will
be increased by $31,300 this year.
Finance Minister D, C, Abbott's
estimates to Parliament call for
grants totalling $645,700 in 1952-53,
compared with $614,400 last year.

Grants to class “A” and class
“B" fairs and provincial summer
fuivs will total $227,300, a decrease
of $23,000 over 1951-52, These are
the only grants which show a
drop for the coming year, Grants
to winter and spring fairs are the
same as they were in the previous
year. However, the estimates in-
clude a new grant of $10,000 for
the Newfoundland Exhibition
Association, St, John’s, Newfound-
land,

Tne estimates provide for $27,000
\o cover freight on live stock ship-
ments to the Royal Agricultural
Winter Fair in Toronto, The grant
last year was $23,000. The estimates
also includes a grant of $280,000
in aid of agricultural exhibition
associations for construction of
buildings and other projects. This
is an inerease of $40,000 over last

year
—B.U.P.

Geologists
Scarce

QUEBEC CITY,
Private firms are hiring so many
geologists to explore the wilds of
Quebee that the provincial govern-
ment can’t find enough men to do
its surveying.



The Refrigerator which ten
years ago caused the Bajan

|

Cook to exclaim :
“Hey! Hey! Looka Fia

mek ice!”

Just Opened
New Dresses
Hats — Bags

Specially Suitable
for
WEDDINGS

is here again .

in full force just in time to meet the
needs of those who cannot avail themselves of the
electricity supply in the near future.
These machines are for operation on kerosene oil,
natural gas or electricity, and are available in 41 cub.
ft. and 7 cub. ft. models.

BOOK YOURS NOW

ee SS

)







|
|






The Modern
Dress Shoppe

Broad Street

|
|
|

e.
THE EMTAGE ELEC. CO.

Plantations Building

A government official said the
mines department's big problem
this summer would not be where
to send geologists but “to find
cnough qualified men to form our
research and survey parties.”

He said private industry was
taking a heavy toll of men of the
type the government used to hire.

















Most of them are concentrated
in the Ungava region wher® one
frm is spending $500,000,000 on
mining development; in Abitibi,
Chibou ou and in the Gaspe

peninsula,
—B.U.P.

oa n i
M. y. DAERWOOD
will be arriving at Barbados {
on THURSDAY, May 8th |
and will be sailing on
SUNDAY, May 11th, for St.
Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada,
Aruba, accepting Passengers
and Freight.













THURSDAY,

HENRY

MAY 8,. 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Ai Rl OES EO REESE A MASE TNA UTE RP ORAS CORMAN SRC SEUNE A NAAN ARE, an in Sen NRE a

KIDNEY ACIDS ~
Rob yourRest... —

Many people never seem to a
night’s rest. They turn and ee
on ‘nerves’ —when it may be their kidneys.
Healthy kidneys filter poisons and excess
acids from the If they fail and
| impurities stay in the syst i
| rest often follows. If you don’t rest well

get and use Dodd’s Kidney Pills. Dodd's
help the kidneys so that you can rest
| better—and feel better. 136

| Dodds Kidney Pills



PAGE SEVEN







BY CARL ANDERSON

|
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this easy,
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Stand your dog in a shallow bath
containing a few inches of water, Wet iy
the dog thoroughly and sprinkle <





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leaves the coat in beautiful condition,
It also kills any fleas or other vermin
present.

COOPER

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ew «se



BY FRANK ROBBINS








SOMEBODY'D BETTER
TALK TO THE POLICE
IN THAT OTHER

NEVER MIND THE
POLICE .! YOU CAUSED TH
YOU SHALL FOLLOW CUR
LEADER DOWN / py



GROCERIES



THE COLONNADE





THE HOUSE
OF
COALPORT

By COMPTON MACKENZIE

THE
BROTHERHOOD
Near Brosely in Shropshire stands an eigh- OF FEAR

teenth-century gamekeeper’s cottage on the high By
ground above the southern dnd westerly banks
of the Severn. In the garden of this cottage can
still be found fragments of pottery—relics of the
origin of Coalport China,

ROBERT ARDREY
HELLO -MAGGIE#” JUST LISTEN
AND DON'T INTERRUPT ME# I'M
GOING TO A PIG'S-KNUCKLE
PARTY TO AND TLL BE

ET GOOD AND

MAGGIE WILL PROBABLY
KILL. ME WHEN I GET
HOME --BUT IT DID ME
GOOD TO DECLARE

Robert Ardrey author of The Brotherhood Of
MYSELF FOR ONCE /

Fear is wellknown to English audiences for his

7 remarkable and successful play Thunder Rock.
From that gamekeeper’s cottage, owned by In this book he takes as his setting a remote

Squire Edward Browne of Caughley Hall in 1750, island, inhabited by a few shepherds and their
to the Crescent Works at Stoke—on Trent, where families, lying off the coast of a totalitarian state.
Coalport China is made to-day, there is a story The life of this pastural community is shattered
of enterprise which it would be difficult to equal “by the arrival of Willy Bryo, a political ‘criminal’

in industry. from the mainland pursued by a member of the

{ ' secret police Konnr.
It is a history with probably more than its E

fair share of disaster and tragedy, but there is
also success resulting from intense hard work
and the taking of risks.



The story of the search for Willy Bryo by
Konnr and the reluctantly mobilised islanders
and the climax it reaches must be left to the
reader to discover. It is sufficient to say that
Ardrey is far too intelligent and sincere a writer

The reader may be surprised that the deli-
cate beauty of Coalport Ching could be the result

BUT, DUDE, I

CAN'T UNDERSTAND

DUDE! IM
SCARED!

THE FIRST THING |5 TO GET OUTTA

\/ I'LL MAKE THE ROUNDS AN



HERE... MY SISTER RUNS A ROOMIN’
HOUSE DOWNTOWN... SHE'LL TAKE
YOU IN AN’ KEEP HER MOUTH

IT/ I SHOT RICKY
LAMBERT,’ WHY DID JOE
SEVEN TELL THE /~

WHAT'LL

IT LOOKS CRATZY..
BUT SEVEN’S GOT \
ALL HIS MA@BLES...HE
HAD A REASON...AND }f
WHATEVER IT IS, BABY
(T AIN'T HEALTHY








ILL FIND OUT HOW ITS DONE
YOURE PROBABLY TRINKING THAT
OUT WHO THE SUPREME







KEEP MY EARS OPEN... MAYBE
T CAN FIND OUT WHAT'S
COOKIN’ WITH SEVEN /

(TS BEEN A SECRET FOR



of such a turbulent two hundred years, and what
emerges from Compton Mackenzie’s story is the
dominating influence of the craftsman who,
through all trials, maintained his skill which was
passed from one generation to the next.

In this book are faithful colour reproductions
of famous Coalport designs such as The Indiay
Tree and The Willow Pattern, and it will be
much sought after by collectors. To a utility-
minded generation the productions of china so
decorated will be an astonishment. At the time
of writing such china is “for export only,” and
can be bought in America, Canada, Australia,
New Zealand or almost anywhere outside Brit-
ain.

The name “Coalport” is literally a household
word the world over and the many who possess
Coalport and the many more who would like to,

to allow his novel to describe simply a clash be-
tween black and white. While Bryo developes
in the process of his experience and Konnr with-
draws ever more deeply into the rigidity of his
cast-iron training, the circumstances of their duel
bring about a curious intimacy between these
two men who hardly know each other as human
beings. The islanders, from Prosz, their leader,
to Dolora, his beautiful and courageous daughter,
live in a world enjoy pleasure and suffer fears,

that we can share and yet—like so much of the
world to-day—they are caught in a dilemma they
can neither understand nor escape.

In few novels is the tension of pursuit, the

poignancy of love or the violent impact of--ex-
ternal forces on the lives of individual men and
women so firmly or so movingly described.



YOULL BE THE ONE TO FINDOUT. 200 YEARS. | GUESS IT- will find in this book the tradition behind the
cree COMMANDER [Sse WE ALL HAVE THAT maduant (habs i daite
T INTO IDEA AT FIDCT produc ey so much admire.
THAT SAFE, SMYTHE. oe ss ‘
eo >
v ‘ mJ
ON SALE AT...
me g
~ 4 8
ADVOCATE ‘
z y
: 8
: STATIONERY 3
% ee £ A 4 3
% $
$
2 LOOSE SSOP SOP BOSS POO OOCOSS OOOO SOS GPP SPOS GEG GF EEL EDI OAS









_| PAGE EIGHT

4



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Harrison College Trounce Lodge 6—0

_ Inter-school Championship

Finals
HARRISON COLLEGE

“gy Tr

Begin

defeated Lodge six—nil in the

finals of the linter-School Championships at Kensington yes-

terday evening.

eddy Griffith scored two goals for College. F. Squires

Morris and Smith scored one each.

from one of the Lodge full

Lodge took the touch off with
a defending the s uthern
College were first to
attack. They were awarded a
free kick and nearly scored from
a melee in the Lodge goal area.

Shortly afterwards, College
right winger, received the ball
while he was unmarked. He took

a shot which went wide of the
Boal.

First Goal

When the game was about
seven minutes old Teddy Griffith,
College centre forward, opened
>the score for his team, From a
{kick out by goalie Smith, Griffith
+ received the ball and kicked well
“out of the reach of goalie Hutson.

‘utson.
| A few minutes later Lodge
‘were awarded a penalty kick.
Saoer Cheeseman took the shot
‘but kick the ball high over the
cross~bar.
. B, Smith, College inside left,
ishot the second goal for his team.
‘Goalkeeper Hutson attempted to
gather the ball after a long shot
taken by F. Squires. Smith, who
was .boring through, touched it
into the nets.
» PB, Tudor made an attempt to
Score the third goal for his team.
After dribbling his way into the
Lodge goal area, he took a shot
ewhich struck the left upright and
we ded into play.
{ The Lodge forwards organised
‘a beautiful forward movement
shortly before half time. Minors,
‘the Lodge right wing, sent in
la good shot from the wing.
|Brookes ran in from the left wing
‘and attempted to push in the ball
| but failed, Half time found the
_-sce@re College 2 Lodge nil.

Penalty

Shortly after the game _ re-
sur College got their third

They were awarded a
penalty arid F. Squires made no

e,

lege increased their lead
abéut ten minutes before the

blow off. Teddy Griffith received
fa short pass from B. Smith and
&hot into an nm goal,

A few minutes later College got
their fifth goal. Morris, their
left winger took a shot from close

. The ball went into the
after striking one of the
full backs. A few seconds

later Morris scored the sixth goal
after the Lodge full backs failed
to

lear.
artison College: C. Smith, D.
T ; J, Mayers, M, Simmons,
F. Squires, G. Squires, R. Morris,
B. Smith, E. Griffith, P. Tudor,

Medford.
Lodge: J. Hutson, H, Welch,
. n, C. Redman, F

Chi an, Alleyne, Minors,
Cramer, Hall, Brookes.
feree: Mr, ©. M, Robinson,

HAGAN DOSN'T PLA)

WALTER HAGEN, says a New
York writer, is completely retired
from golf. He does not even play
an occasional round. This great
showman of golf, now nearing 6,
winner of 11 national titles, is
credited with having won more
thah “A million dollars with his
mashie.



WEATHER REPORT
YESTERDAY
Rainfall from Codrington:

01 in.

Total Rainfall for month to
date .20 in,

Highest Temperature:
88.5 °F.

Lowest Temperature:

Wina Velocity 8 miles per
hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.017
(3 p.m.) 29.950
TO-DAY |
Sunrise; 5.40 a.m.
Suxset: 6.15 p.m.
Moon: First Quarter, May 2. |

7.00 p.m. {
Tide: 2.24 a.m., 3.05 |

p.m.
Low Tide: 9.06 a.m., 9.07
D.m,









WHAT'S ON TODAY

Police Courts 10.00 a.m.
Football at Kensington 5.00

p.m,
Mr. Bell lectures at British
Couneil at 5.00 p.m.
Police Band Concert at
enn. Park 7.45 p.m.
th Council Films at the
General Hospital 8.15 p.m.

The other goal came
backs,



Sports Window

The Barbados Friendly
Association tearn meet Police
in a knockout fixture at
Kensington Oval this after-
noon. The Police in their
first. fixture “knocked out”
Pickwick-Rovers while this
will be the first time that a
representative team of the
B.F.F.A. will be seen in As-
sociation football this season.



Russians Will Judge
Games Boxers
At’ Helsinki

By GEORGE WHITING
BRITISH boxers at the Hel-
sinki Olympics this summer are
likely to have their efforts
refereed and judged by at least
two Russians—and other “Iron
Curtain” officials. f
Behind this not unwelcome evi-
dence of the Soviet’s new “play
along” policy is the burly figure of
Mr. A. Zaplatka, of Poland.

It is he who has put forward
the names of the Russians—
plus Czechs, Hungarians, Ruma-
nians, and Poles—at a commit-
tee meeting of the Association
Internationale de Boxe Amateur
in London,

Some months ago, the Russians
indicated that they had Messrs.
A. V. Timoshin, V. G. Stepanov,
E. I. Ogurenkoff and V. P. Mik-
hailoff available as accomplished
and experienced international ref-
erees, The first two are now being
put forward for nomination at
Helsinki,

Seven times champion

Mikhailoff, 45-year-old star of
the party, has been refereeing
since 1934, when he gave up com-
petitive boxing after winning the
Soviet cruiser-weight champion-
ship seven years in succession.

Will the Russian idea of box-
ing rules conform to the pattern
laid down by _ international
usage? Yes—or else!

Messrs. Stepanov and Mikhail-
off, in common with all other new
and untried referees and judges
in Helsinki, will be asked to un-
dergo practical tests in specially
staged contests before being let
loose on unsuspecting Olympic
aspi. ants.

Never again, says the AIBA, will
they be held up to the ridicule
and opprobrium of 1948, when
early Olympic bouts were refereed
and judged on the principle of a
little trial and a lot of error, Only
a rigorous system of on-the-spot
sackings got them out of trouble.

Incidentally, Britain's only
Olympie referee in Helsinki will
be Stanley Royle, manager of a
boys’ club at Hillsborough, ‘Shef-
field.

A clue

What of Russia’s boxers? So far,
the Soviet’s international efforts
have been rigidly restricted to
“Tron Curtain” countries, with the
exception of odd matches against
Sweden and Finland,

Information, here, therefore, is

neither plentiful nor reliable
However, I came across a clue or
two this week in Co hagen,
where I had a long ta on the

subject with the Finnish profes-
sional light-weight, Elis Ask—one
of the few non-Soviet boxers with
personal acquaintance of Russian
rings these last few months,

Ask tells me that, for “tech-
nique” the Russians are non-start-
ers—but that every man they put
in the ring will be fit to fight for
a fortnight.

Unencumbered by amateur
definitions and the niceties of
“broken time,” their spartan
training methods are a guaran-
tee of absclute physical perfec-
tion and toughness,

Neither Elis Ask nor anybody
else outside Russia could talk
about individuals,

Nevertheless, it is worth noting
that a crack Soviet side performed
with much distinction in an “iron
curtain” international champion-
ship meeting in East Germany
recently,

if the winners there are picked
for Helsinki — look out for fly-
Weight Bulakow, bantam-weight
Stepanov, feather-weight Sokolov,
und heavy-weight Perow.
—L.E.S.





TOMMY FARR (left), Welsh Heavy Weight Champion and former Empire title holder, covers up as

Georgie Milan, Italian Champion,
attempting a come back with the
over ten rounds.

Mottram And Paish Still

Lead English

(By CHARLES STEPHEN)
LONDON.
England’s Davis Cup team this
year will wear a familiar look, in
fact the same look it has worn
‘every year since the war
The old firms Tony Mottram
and Geoffrey Paish have started

off the season in great form and |

in two weeks have proved they
are still Nos. 1 and 2 with the rest
nowhere,

In the final of the Shirley Park
Lawn ‘Tennis Tournament last
week the finalists were Mottram
and Paish with Mottram winning
in three straight sets. In the

—————————————

SPORTS
QUIZ

The Barbados Advovate
will award a book on ‘sport
to the first person who sends
the correct answers to the
following questions,


































1, CRICKET.
Name any player who rep-
resented os, Trinidad

or British Guiana in the pre-
war Triangular Cricket
Tournaments who made
“spectacles” in any one of

games in these series,

FOOTBALL.
Can a player carry the ball
in his hands over the goal-
line, under the cross-bar and
between the two goalposts
and yet score a goal?
8. RACING

What is the minimum
weight that can be imposed
as Top weight in a Barba-
dos Turf Club Handicap
Race ?
4. WATER-POLO

Can a goal-keeper stand
on the bottom for the pur-
pose of defending his goal ?
5. TABLE TENNIS

What are the measure-
ments of a Table Tennis bat,
according to the Laws of

the Game ?

NOTE: All entries for
“Sports Quiz” should be
addressed “Sports Quiz”,
c/o Advocate Sports Editor,
and must reach this office
by 12 noon on Saturday,
May 10, The correct
answers and the name of
the winner will be publish-
ed in the Sunday Advocate
of May 11.

Each entry must be
accompanied by A COUPON
as Set oat below.

SPORTS QUIZ

9

| DRIVING FRIEND
‘| HUSBAND TO
THE STATION»
SHE PASSES
FUNGUS» AND
WE DO MEAN
PAss !!



Simpson Bats
Well For
Nottingham

LONDON, May 6.

Reg Simpson, Nottingham, hit
a sparkling 78 against Kent in
English cricket on Tuesday but
his team’s bid for a whirlwind
victory ended in defeat, Notting-
ham needed 225 runs to win at
the rate of about a run a minute
and look like getting there until
reaching the half way mark
Then three wickets fell for one
run and blunted the Nottingham
bid, Simpson helped the Notting-
ham men to pass 100 runs in 75
minutes in two overs. He punish-
ed bey 1 break artist
Doug Wright for runs.

The results were: Worcester-
shire 101 for six vs, Indian tour-
ing team; match abandoned
owing to rain. M.C.C. 185 for
nine declared; Surrey four for
none; mateh abandoned owing to

rain. Oxford University 52 for
seven vs. Glouce: ire; match
abandoned owing to rain, York-

shire 237 for four declared; Som~
erset 91 for six; match abandoned
owing to rain. Camb Uni-
versity 168 for four lared;
Sussex 65 for two; match aban-
doned owing to rain. Kent 201
and 332: Nottinghamshire 309 and
191; Kent won by 33 runs.





Becker and William Knight, a
couple of young hopefuls, both
fell in the Surrey tournament to
Don Tregonning of Australia who
in turn was eliminated in two sets
by Paish with a loss of only four
games,

How much can we hope for
from Paish and Mottram this sum-
mer is anybody’s guess. Both
suffer from lack of competition in
this country. And it may be too
much to expect them in pre-Wim-
bledon knock-' to acquire that
extra edge which will be so neces-

attempts a right upper-cut during their fight at Cardiff. Farr, who is
object of regaining his British and Empire titles, beat Milan on points



are encouraging for they show
that Britain’s Ne. 1 who last year
eaused the biggest Wimbledon up-
set by beating Jaroslav. Drobny,
the former Czech star, is benefit-
ing from his winter tour abroad,

But in another respect the first
two weeks of the tennis season
have been far from successful.
Britain’s young players, who

Lawn Tennis

finals of the Surrey Hard Court
Lawn Tennis Championship this
week it was the same old story

with Mottram beating Paish 6—4 sooner or later must take over ary if they are to deal successfull
6—3. > from Mottram and Paish, have all {vith the Sarasin from Australia
In one respect these victories shewn indifferent form. Roger and America,







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THURSDAY,



MAY

1952

3,
4



REES ADDS A NEW
TITLE TO HIS RECORD
SHARES 1,500 DOLLARS

By JAMES GOODFELLOW
RYDER CUP player DAI REES has won a new title.

He is the first champion of Malaya.

When Rees, accom-

panied by match play champion HARRY WEETMAN,
stopped at Singapore on the way to Australia, 1,500 dollars

was put
ment in Ma

Three local professionals took
part, Tom Verity (Kuala Lum-
pur); Jack Hodgkinson (Island
club), and Douglas McEwan
(Royal Singapore club.)

Scores: Rees 72, Weetman 74,
Verity (who was declared native
e‘ampion) 77.

MAX FAULKNER, Open cham-
pi-n and Master Golfer, who will
be visiting U.S.A, in May after his
Australian trip, still hankers after
a match with BEN HOGAN,
United States Open champion and
Master Golfer. I have been asked
‘to renew the challenge on his be-
half.

Said Gus Faulkner, manager for
his son:

“Max feels that he would not
be doing justice to the title if they
do not play, as champions have
done in the past.

“Bo Jones met Arthur
Havers in a single in Atlanta and
Walter Hagen, when British Open
champion, played the holder of
the United States title.”

Faulkner had hopes that a
match might be fixed after the
last Ryder Cup contest at Pine-
hurst, but U.S.A. reports said that
Hogan was now confining his
Activities to a few tournaments a
vear and that he had no incentive
to accept a challenge.

No Pubricity

CURTIS CUP selectors move up
to Muirfield, East Lothian, at the
end of the month to see the prob-
ables in a “full programme of
stroke and match play golf” over
five days. F





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as prize money for the first professional tourna
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_ Yet at the recent L.G.U. meciing
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Challenge

FIRST part of the challenge

match between Sundridge Park

captain J. W. MACGREGOR, pair-
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HITCHCOCK will take place at
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Grim’s Dyke (Hatch End)

captain, RALPH ALLIN, tells
me that professional TOM
ODAMS has partnered him in
matches against “any-two” club
members since last May and
they have only lost four. They
have won for the past 24 con-
secutive weeks.

Mr. Allin introduced the
matches: “To play with as many
members as possible during his
captaincy and to give the profes-
sional a chance to play keen
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Full Text

PAGE 1

THURSDAY MAT 8. 1952 l!wtltAI>0s ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS 9OMC0OPVP DttTTEe W HLvfR AAlNp THE 10 TUE POLICE I POLICE .'MJO CAUSEP Tl' IN THAT OTHEe ,V V0U •**U FOLLOW CX<* PLANE / -^^T*BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS I'M QCma TO HE*?UAM0 PX55 "*MJC*LB PAB^-V TON 3"TiNO I" % or <30-3 TO MAE ANVEXCU?E5TOMA55;r A IXMQBMBy KIU_ V£ WUKN r (JUT M ".r... -when 4 may *• *• %  fcav.T. Il'.kf? a.t.-,. M>tf %  •• and „,.„ I .--. !,. th. UM4. II 0-, l| Mi -"••• %  w IU MM. (dUKM MM •*• him II n> *-1 rul nil C -l — DMW. KMW T FMW. DMU-. It* fcMWft M> lhal |S M l. at our Hi UIH I..-s l. ilsnlr. S|>< iyliislotin mill Siina Street U.unllj Now Tins RUM—(I lb.) Tin. MEAT LUNCH fen, MIXED NITS Usually Now Gil 5.84 .15 .41 1.10 M Tins MELON 4 ODKUtS JAM Tin. TOMATOES .. Hollies TENNENTS BEER Hi J8 .:i .34 .28 at D. VSCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street THE o i o \ .\ A ii i; (. ii o ( I ii i i: s ^'**'''''VVV>OV'*',VVVV^.V>'*V>V>VVVVV',V.V,--%v-. V,^^ I RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK RAY MOORt'S \0ufcE KCBABIV 1MNUlN6IMAr WJU BE TOE ONE TO FlNDOuT. AE All HAVE TOAT PE*.AJ'lKtj-: i: %  : THE HOUSE OF COALPORT By COMPTON MACKKNZIK Near Broody in Shropshire stands an eighteenth-century BUndaMMrl cottage on UM high ground above the southern and westerly hunks of the Severn. In the UidiD of this cottage can still be (ound fragments of pottery—relics of the origin of Coalport China. From that gamekeeper's cottage, owned by Squire Edward Browne ol Caughley Hall in 1750, lo the Crescent Works at Stoke---on Trent, where Coalport China is made to-day. there is a story "f enterprise which n would be difficult to equal In Industry. It is a history with probably more than its fair share of disaster and tragedy, but there is also success resulting from intense hard work and the taking of risks. The reader may be surprised that the delibcauty of Coalport China could be the result of such a turbulent two hundred years, and what emerges from Compton Mackenzie's story is the dominating influence of the craftsman who, through all trials, maintained his skill which wafc passed from one generation to the next. In this book are faithful colour reproductions of famous Coalport designs such aThe Indian Tree and The Willow Pattern, and it will bu much sought after by collectors. To u utilityminded generation the productions of china so decorated will be an astonishment. At the time of writing such china is "for export only," and can be bought in America, Canada, Australia, New Zealand or almost anywhere outside Britain. Thr name "Coalport" is literally a household word the world over and the many who possess Coalport and the many more who would like to, will And in this book the tradition behind the product they so much admire. THE BROTHERHOOD OF FEAR lly lilllll I; I iKIUtM Robert Ardrey author of The Brotherhood Of Fear is wellknown I" English audiences for his remarkable tnd lUCftssfui plsy Thunder Hock. In tins hook Insttlng • iemote island, inhabited by a few shtpherds and their families, lying off the coast ol B totahlanan state. The lib* of this pastoral community is shattered "by the arrival <>f Willy Bryo, a political 'criminal' nofU the mainland puTSUad bj .i ni'inber of the BOi ii-t pollcs Konnr. lory of the search for Willy Bryo by Konnr ami ihe raluctantly mobilised Islandsn and thiclimax it reaches must 1H I left to the reader to discover. U is suflicicnt to nay that Ardrey is far too intelligent and sincere a writer to allow his novel to describe simply a clash ben black and while. While Bryo developes in the process of his experience and Konnr withdraws ever mure deeply into the rigidity of his cast-iron training, the circumstances of their duel bring about a curious intimacy between these two men who hardly know each other as human beings. The kslnndei Ii n Pross, their leader, to Dolora hi biwutll us daughter, live in a world enjoy pleasure and suffer fears. that we can .hare and vet like BO much of the world to-dav they are caught In a dilenuna they can neitherUJldentand 1*01 escape. in f.-v. %  %  i tensli if pursuit, the poignancy of love <>r the Violent impact of external force* n n the lives of individual men and women so llrmly or so movingly described. O.X SALE AT ... ADVOCATE STATIONERY ; MMwy, •,'--, *-'.', '-'-'*'<.'-*-','. -.. -, %',',','.',; ; ',','.', V* V////WV/* V///' V*V'^>'*V,^*^'-*-<^^V^.V'*V'^*s.



PAGE 1

Till KsIMY, MAY 8, LK1 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THSEE West Indies Education Limited Resources And An Urgent Need ll wuuld be hard lo : I II. II. I,. O. nr*ker. Ue*4 Ma.wr < %  „• rntrartablc problem than rduca. ar rhrtat's llMsalal. MM niatralon >J %  .psviallst lion in the Wm Indies. The .... taachcrv Uae.ul biology can be limlled resource, ol the island. """<, '" r ruirrlcanr. il Is 10 be laluU „ ,„ „, ordinal, classroom and lerr.lnrirs cannol supuorl the f"*" 1 ,h :" '" ."* PVV* ff" provided llh a sink, and mis Is Mucat.on.il %  tructurc which ... o 'he elethe high. I .ertlllcalc Where, lionallv expensive system The mentarv foundation. .clciuc i. available il is too ultcn %  "' • %  ; I. !" .il nils-.largely ., mailer ol demonstration llonal structure complete to The belt policy al the present an d note-taking—not an educaunlvcr.it> level. The boardins Unas would be lo give handicraft t.on but a pieparatlon for the its riahtrul place in the MV.IImilitate schools. In many colonies there The prohh-m rau a deep-roolod prejudice against l e s increase in population haa ,• V/AWM4C SEA AND All. TRAFFIC In Carlisle Bay n Wallarr Set) II *: a u da l afca. I (..Mi,..., i ,T .. W '.I •-, tJH. Peter Hrander JJ7 in.D.h. German CW *** ***** l?"' Decides To Seek fifth AHA Titlf Will Sell At £600 \ol Affect C'dian Sale* ii.n..Tm.Caeaaua Orf Cailb* tM & SEA WELL 1K1.I. M l B-W.l ON MONDAY • a.....gal rhooU are also sub.cct lo the prevailing iinf.iK-i.il stringency. The> have lo remember lhal over and above school lees parents from • iher islands have to pay Bix expensive air passages every year. The Kiundulions are not secure Elementally i-iiutfition is not yet In some cases it Is imposed by H law which cannol be enfo.ced because there room (or th> children m the schools. In Kcncr.il, clHsea arv loo lame 90 WAS the hifhest found ^Ji^Si ^^ 1 '^ e ,'L Wt Up011 <"1if.cate ......_.i %  .... *ne mcnt.ii outlook t the popum 0 surv cys seem to navr been lotion and incline a proportion of niade -i the -,'ondrv school ..ble pupils towards teehnoloay Pia reuuircd for those duldr-ti an clerical occupations. who htVe ^ abllily to profit form <>( manual Even where elementary school Wl |j, ^ u s.rtens exist. %  labourer is someeducation or girl,. Asludy'of Ihtimes hired lo do the digging, modern period of Caribbean hisostenfihly becau).e the work Is Ion lory would give leach.-, and i,ard for tlir eliildren— %  duaUy taunht Iheir chance in the natural becaiue il u. beneath their dignity course of classroom discussion. — U1 honourable pace in the yet whet. Caribbean hi-tr,.-, 1$ >ec..iidary schools, handlstudied the earlier period il ofien ,K *iS uld .sp *T Dd through|V# r er re rt because tt i* regarded Nil Ine educalional system, gradM the easier option for Ihe school elite craft —Sa>* SporUmsn's lit.ir < The "yes he will; no he WCn't ulttion which has lui k PCTKK BKANntRfInb interning this years Amateui 'hampionshlps is ended. He has entered for the Stt London divisional championships at Nine Elms Baths DO Mond.,... It was in the •sanl-unab •>! these hamplonshlps last year that .in.,,ii. 1:1 Pre awi states I" f, i,,C|rod']eti.> leas,fPAi Canadian Hi ha*i >r,U i-il* said on •?•' Jl *" From BASH. I ARIiKVV AMSTERDAM m ;— >, A new 87-m.les-an-hour (.erman People's Car is aboul ^^Ej^^SZ^^L^^ u ""i-'-?^.". new atumlnum industrv growing DlPAlTtaaii lo drive ii ji^ht into the heart of the world s markets u|( in r>,it,h Quiana will not have Il is reported to be ,. B V g Wt ar saloon with ;i 1.500 c.C. Such effect on Canadian pro' entitle c.iliable "t extremetv hi^h peiformanee for a massUuctlun r sales. They were com. n ,. cUimM t, havf a cmtaiug sped o. ^S^TiSiSSSJXS& V.L.. IIV. iisliuelioii and development i-dy t. ia> tiu> — H sad i,., WIIIIMML Dor,, IUI.!,,,. AMI k SI Khar I 0*oa> KltDatW lapii'ir hi 70 mllai an hour Du;.t: lecht UN MONDAY l-.i-.i. Rtra lalu ii POM, v...u p..ni. Joha a.ii.l.1 Joan V Alriandrr. Tlit">Ur AtosaiMl.i J.hel Alo.anatrr a>dH*T Ml in an e l e men tary school and *.& common in ihe secondary schools ol one of the islands. Th buildings ,,re quite inadequate, have seen nearly 1,000 children Brander lost his leather-w crown U. Ken 1-iwrenee. n pTofessional. I have known loi some unic lhal Brander our No ) posl-wai amaieur. lias hud hi* eie on M lillh ALA title %  venlu.ill.v 1 UaW ..I" a tf dU a ,* ll ui itsou ud I nil-.d rtati's Hi! will cumpcic with !.itlu>h cars loi Mary's" Ki^ord R\tn There la record of Joe Steers in ihe 1890*. < n i reign nin-en. \ The lew, Volkswagen, they said Wst night has an engine life of %  V; 100.000 milrt before it needs • "i 1 "*.? 1 i^bore. and over a long lesl the lh to eqiialthe „.,„,,. ,„„ „,„ kr „ ,„„ „ ,. S( ,,„ v.. BOaWO miles. a p alhe mrcn i 1 ,' !." "^.1"" "' lhc "*£"* iron. jJeh an educaUoii. parked elbow lo'elbow In a twoffl^ffl.'^n^S*'" ftl ?. aenerall, an unbelievable istuurr Forn. Pointer storeyen shack with no dlvlsl-n ^Vo, to SogTcgrtrfSSS. %  ?, T f^ "" T^ !" Kh '" Da ,K """* "' """W" bo". 1 e nfl e, %  ~,^Z^.Ti^t b"olr;'foV K"ehuore„ avr Th a o^ S BLWL2S £*SL? £"•". ? " !" ; -' ->fc whatever beiwecn ihe classes. ...mc Some progress is being made in s ,. no .. Thosai hs woll into training .timber involve. h„h f^^Z^XZ, £ !" ^SSpT^SS S IS I'cTwoulc, .pjjy, L.%,^r eaftrbSe.^ ^TS^^ 'V^ ^ "-""' ^ E?Tg SSiS Ihe erection of permanent buildemployers (and. not least Ihe XllSzL? £52? .L^K. K,^!?. Army represenlallve from J^A i. January. iro within lhc distance. On Saturday at Horsham Brai nrandc inert by W fellow decision will be welill — except, perhaps' feather-weights. Ings over number ,f years and colonial govirnmenU, "a"rV JS Hff^'^^S^ rf* SRl be content m Ihe meanlime with Kuillless. The examination board. 'Sfo* *££&£* In thi the cheapest temporary strucdo whai they can to counteract JKU in l.k hel^irt thV. *xamSiT" Th ". W "' ,ndli ":. rlmiate jhe pnv.,llrlg tendency. Somo fnlTons'"^^^^^ i^parems Mas such measures. The cost teacher, and most pupils, accept who wnd („>,,. children, while of buildings could probably be examin.iUon fever as naturnl MlM ;i , l ., |lKl tu ^ l ramim ,| b> reduced by standardization, Until n more sane outlook pre(lU iidc teachers r though the different natural revails there can bo little progres-. Teacher** salaries range fi-mi ( t the colonies impose an nd secondary education cannol v ..i. a . .... 1 1 ,, 1 t,. i* ., -.larv-iini. obvious limitation. The matter is begin to meet the vital needs of wagc In „,„, \ niui i JJj,^ h( C3,ll Tor Ray Smith urgent. The sch* ols cannot acthe colonies. For it Is In theso head mi*ires* -t the itlrls' fsjc*** SMITH'S benefit t., date commod.-itc Ihe existing child "hools thai Ihe hope of the <,ndary roeivcs t500 j*.. and hu realised *-3,6GO, says the anpopulaiion. and its rate of In!" uro ,es Al Pf*ent the v too | :( r ( ," utir i rrii i,ut not board. The <"ial report of the Essex County crease is fantastic. The recent %  >" cn cvaeniralc on the mere .ejrrespondiiuf head master gels Cricket Club. Good by Essex disastrous hurricane in Jamaica acquisition of %  eorpusj.^ examinboard in term time a house and standards, especially as the benefit salary of £300 pa. Neither post match suffered from rain. is pensionable. The cost of living an all-rounder of Si Il higher in the West Indies than played for Middlesex The pistons travel more slowly and weniless than a long-*m>i.i enaine. A'COURT. v"k^,r whTch'ta* M Irs* ?^$Jte atys;;": pointer to his chances in the championships. lig I wat told that Ihe Germans ar.' turning out 120.000 ..f theae i They are being made i ,i vast Hitler-bkiilt fgctoi 'iniswiclt. in ihe British gone Beating Britain must have destroyed a large ,hIc knowledge, and lh. nun.!.of school;. The. e is Hie, c''' '. l 1 ll, " 1 wUJ 1,M : MrWWIl fore a g.xHl opportunity for a comT, > e Wo *^ ,ndles J 100 fl re *" luprehensmrebuilding policy in "Y" Ihe island, which slv uld be back*""J:r*' ed by a generous grant from n ibuc funds. The homeless and destitute must be our flrsi Car*; once their needs have This greater Brit. i. Volk ItCvMQ thai Ibgl ua] ouipui i if .ai\ %  Hi^ And tin moral and cultural citizenship and a habil of mind and a ; skill of brnin and hand In match noderii conditions and problem*. This need is best NufcCDtj in England. AcconunodaUon fur sM.t.mt leacfaari is niraly proi nii'd md i \|"iiiw to secure In spite of these drawbacks some Lancashii is more. Essex have made hievement when : Yorkahln >uld receive ST elen no sort of training i.,i i Dducation, and a further :'o • oeli lax ebers are at work Ln i oidary sciu>-i|s. Plan* are being made *' remedy this __ sboi mi. i ven U Ihe money ^mcuUlei suangie round, n mux ^ •onw ,„„. (lf „„. S1 „ a „ r faclu -ageii U now selling in some i,l,.li,v £ ur P !" counlrles. includlnu !• SwItrerlaiHl. in such volume a exceed the total of all British ales In these countries. Sale* of the new model will add to the rtimcultie* of our own manufacturers, whoso industry hiis borne a great part in Ihe scramble for foreign currency JH,I exports since the war. • %  It Is kimwii (hat iheir market s J,r '' lire closed or restricted for nil' "" ,l i m v re oM alreadv Hi Can id tr.lii. New Zealand. South '" liltlTAJN will ufaced uiih %  DtW oontciKici foi tln< Blue KiUm.i i. the Atlantic when the .'il.OOOtOfl Amenc.iii ItnM t^kUd Stsles I :1M* ssjiungi I Inliner which ha* cost 123 million and u lhc largest buill in America will start her maiden vo .ige to Briiitin mi July S. tshe is due al Southampton on .luli g. a live-u.iy cioshlng slmil.i '• Uie Kcheiiulc of the t)urn Mary and Quren r.lUsbelh. To maintain such a *t hertule in re can l>e no doubt that Ihe Uuci is capable of at Ica.l %  < Knots, a 11 hough 1 undei *i,un. "' I, foi (imposes of el is.ifli ittou lh* Nortli Atlnutlc Shipping iieiem-e she has been put fori ..i 29-knot ah,p The Bl.UOO-ton queen Mar> IIHH held the Blue Hlltand for itearly 14 >ears. munended %  g&3.000.000 10*•' T.I-M.J year programme lo produee MM ,. MorrEi. M aluminum In the Netherlands i. ...%  •• si— M Carnt, Soi.th Ameiicsm colony of Dutch •*' 1 '* n ***.. D *2^, I T??* C.nana. the world's largest sourc, of IMUXite. Allan IStatnar omcials said if Ihis reeonimendatloi: was implemented it likely wIM mean that Holiaml would gl he aluminum supplies from that i-i >.n. instead of from Canada. Bui the Canadian sale-, lo Holland hai Ixren only a tiny piop"i'tion of the total shipment* .A. ON Tl'ElDAV l.-.m HI l.l Mr loin, MsllUfd. Mr J.u r .' M. l^urtf llana.tl. Xi llmrli MltcK*\l Ms-lrr Anlhw. MklTriftl >..T.l.iaad J Alirr.>ii. A AlleiDfl. r-ilkrioB. U iy piopvii; —c.r. WINS SCIENCE SCHOLARSHIP o r.Muvn O'Connor V OaJ pvta. I. v Timn. A Kuan%  the previous year This despite the fact that 21 %  it of 28 championship inatchc vere unfinished "on wickets lust i little too good." Item la balaner sheet : Income from sale of motor-car. A '" 1 '" nd India.-!* %  .#, -£12S. I shall go down to Chelmsford fin the next sale I Good news too. from Sussex CCC. They made u prottt r fastest easlbound crossing made in 4 days 2 hours and mute., an iveiage speed nf 31 T£ knots. Her record Wags' und crossing was made in 3 i 21 hours. 41 minutes. A shvlit variation in route biought ti .iverage speed down to S0.r k tot* improbable Ihgl the fnllrd will allempt to break \M on her maiden voyage her machinery Is still be I. I s prom — an .._ many clubs inagniricenl work is being done In bemoan a loss. They are £226 up r~ ,. ,„,,, ,„u,u a. no „.„r. S^^^Sf^,^ 5 ttfSjBj*£3li ZSt ^ ""^ """ "26 Jamara than raallv adequato lem EUtwnl rei ,„,, lhr „. 1 .,„. ""%  %  "aSSS!" mar. -rru.u. Ulan the I.li "!". vldu l "• ,d mastrrs und bead The IM.IIUIIII. ...n.lnioii „l tlu,?."'" .,',. "'"" %  "So refuee in i %  .,,.,.„... ,,..„ „.,. u political tCiii'iut %  Wril ndi." the 5^% '," ."T"' 11 "" %  %  <"'"" %  ' %  > %  mid the acareity or well-paid [Srf tral ed ti'irho. Hi OM ','' '."i W .;"* '^"l " "f" 1 1 "'" !" Inevlubly Issue in a efcim Sland iijnj ,. %  ,.. thlv ,'"•" Mo,0<,h "1, !" mlnaUons. that most permanent edu.ulional h.l. JMI have had !*t "A *.tr •&**"* ""P""-' hould be lllled b. Wall %  m.1 not ew" ^ narrowed, but the curriculum Indians. Bui Ihe wiser people eai'lon -aad In.-"d Uaclniig method, are warped, know that there I. .1111 much to ,ZS''i '". c "' rianoieratt ha. IKgained from the long educa„ iiroady been mentioned. Even llonal experience and tradition. ta.*lll last season compared will %  %  ed I. appreciated anil of Britain. What is needed most J r^*' 5 '"*. tne previous yea I piejiidire overeome 'r n, t ^ the rceruilmeilt to eduiational a_.awii a ,,mn "' n "" < %  ""-. I.iilli le aJmlniiuallon or some men wiUi Boal r und Ijiunched SI nr.ORfir.S -' %  sland. ;. Ihe training and outlook or Ihe „ f '"" ''"'" winners ol tliu A laaooui lalaUons C.anmllle. iTTT. ..-heme was launched lo provide hi iti.li inspectorate. Tlie M.OII.1 lrl,ll s Kh-.il'th .up al Henley M W of leviraj Btandina ComTla,ilr i ,,ee,iol il,.. wi i„,l... .*!*_* "' ""' '" "'"idary •co.uirement Is tor a reinforce""re mc war. Brdlord School has "'H'ee. pmvidr.1 r... ,i u Con. 1. an ',-!?, amualii ;-'!• The plan wa. greeted wilh meml or Briti.h teachers. Neither "'•' o' " lo monk Ihe late Mr. ""ution of a newly tormed irae, JehSolfare w nt t"" 1 """ !" and Ihe work.hop ... of these i, u ir.-menU will esUly Vr. SVMOND8. who practically "renada Agricultural U„|.., b* nuVlmed linJhSrV '£!£' OT ! r £ P" ,P"? r •!''-" <"" %  %  " because the salaries .„ not founded their bat club. H„ four ^L, "!^S* ,."" ...,.; ~ •".,,'.', h, " n technical ichooli bul Ihe ..itei. altracttM and gaaggge. sons gained between lh .,,,'• %  •'• 'I. An Ilural \. ,,.„ rfKSl liliSlI "S .. •","• |K*lbllW home are not always paid. NeverCambridge blues and two trial ". mon ?."T^ 1 Coconu -l im, K ilJ'!'^* 1 ''! 1 aW" "a. theles,. lhc man who will go out ca| for rowing. One is now f !" /M P^S "1" '£" i" il "e .' oul'ek rewrn %  ,1 ILSIM h2ll£ "*> b ^ "'" %  '"> !<• I" a apull of humility eorh lo Ihe aenool; another %  • '"•' Agricultural ftn,.! italed thai if Ihe michmerv n ^t M Inatanoa. to make his eontrlbulion will mm captain or Thames Howmg club *"!', ,,, a ""* •*" afQia . lhso, M LS^jft-Sis ^rrT'^F^r ^^&X"& -.Mii"/::. J-iaSS sSSSS^^sz &&r "'" Union FomiH New R k la1ion.s Bnui* %  lh libiS. which luleft in lMi. w u £'M c Ii.. Incn i.w-1 U.i .in .im. Sim.,, ^' lilllJlt S^holarsliip to ihe University ran." J itarnl Collflgt Oi Ihe Wesl Indies. M. J I>alJIar, Now a clerk In ihe Agiiculg h lui.il Department, when he sat toi ihe Cambridge Higher S.-hool site .illeaie m IW0 he gained lull *" e\ 'rnption from the lawdon X". In •i-BSe K MM T V* H(-1IH-nr. riUirr. v urarai IravaaaSatit, J Oravrmtaai. \sri % % %  nr nwia. i'N TVEMUAV M. v.: .i al l" under: I'.nrl M-ll at ) p 1.1 mi Ihr til, May. IBJt llMlilrrtn an-l Otdlnaiy Mali al 1M pHI II i in. SID Ma. ISU Haili tor VI. I.Hia, Dont.ii.ta. Muni-.-nat. Anll|ua. St K|IU. SHnmuila. Il.hfan. Mnlrr.l l>r lh* RMS 1-AOT r.M.soN will u* cloxd al lh*Orratral OfHc* aa undac sag J?rtJ l Si bu ,' "?*"" U no "* rd ,n ,ha '" ottc '"'' "*' •"" home .md tin '•( the elaborate ^truetureii dear to —(From Ihe Times Review > - n Canadian Sftorts OTTAWA. The Dornlltka Bureau of Statistics, which keeps track or the l>i"' •' aUaBUlM eieryllilng. reported Ihe average price of telephone polos In Canad.. gg $6.77. —BX'.F. MONTREAL Canada's water transportation industry had 1.906 vessels in operation In 1950. Of Ihe total. 720 were freighter*. 47 tow barges and scows, and the reel ed. will smaller erafl escape. —B.U.I*. • s '' n, oul QUEBEC TITY. Bgtjgffg. Mill* in Quebec Province account for more than 44 per cent ..l the grofj value of Canada's total textile production. -B.f.P. OTTAWA Nearly $79,000,000 worth of fertilizer Ii manufnetured in Canada per year. —B.U.P. VANCOUVER. R.C Bniish Columbia has only 6B of Canada's 5W fllh processing TRAWLERMEN WILL PICK THEIR FISH ident oi Cambridge Unlverboat club this year, and JACK %  Olympic regattas A FORMER German minesweeper is to carry out ex, rn^'w t S in u^ alchir L g % h b > *ectric .hocks. usin K a new wHmmmD.^^ m*inod worked out by German gcientists. %  oivm-ie reaattai One of the objections to electrical Sghing in the pant bju been the high mortality among young Ash. The new technique, it is claim— allow young fish Electrical impulses %  w racing eight of I9!>u ul i was me find btuit il had been p< .isiul to buy for 20 years. Now ThtWigti (oilMd %  I, ^ iaH Mrs Symonds's gifl has inaugureartJe* the new bod) mug) take %  iied a new boat fund, a memorup the challenge nnjiluii m rail I to TfA" inaiicn by Hon. W K Jollen in a Two of the most distinguished debale at Ihe last meeting of thf Old Bedfordlan oarsmen have l-"'*Mature: %  ] have grown tired signed an appeal u, every old boy. "' l ) M 'i n < sgrhulturiaU, wThey are JAMEH CROWDEN, PfUv lanrtowners. asking CJovln landward A* IT/VA Or' KXCUANQk AKI1NKHDAV WAV I 1H NtW TUIK %  • Clvrqua* on BanKati ta t/ 1 Ml.l -il Ur.nai.rt Orafi* *•: %  Cabl* I iirno • %  7. eniii.i nt to find a way things for them, (.reniwla landowners have a mie-track mind and are about the most unentrrpri'Unki and lazy individuals on Mie fare of this earth." Govenatalg and executive bodv [>f the Union is a Council of Dajmarid IM.Ii. JJJJK D,.,,. < I' Couponi 71 i' 13 I/W* the trawl goes Into % %  eiion. By varying impulse frequenci*; and tensions, only fish of a particular type or site will be paralysed by Ihe shock tent ..trough the water. There will be experiments cod and herring.H.E. Takes Salut.ST GBoftr.CS FOOTWEAR r 1..I.1.I' plants, but. It accounts for nearly eompanie* 50 percent of all the (Vh processed 34.000 pairs of boots. In the country. flippers a ymr. —B.V.P. Dockar Editor Most ambitious venture of jkxv,xr: s 0 ^"HHS'sH CoMU1 SUUon Excellency Sir Robert ball Editor Is docker LU MZ Z MMng'"iSlndlnJ Com" lffZ?£m2ffZ2£> "* *• Arundcll took ihe Salute lasi NOLUS. who. besides being Press nutiees: labour fU-laliorw, Cocoa "i'•*•... ahin ihrmagh rrlday afternoon of the Passing secretary of the club, has been in Nutmegs. Sugar and Rum oil* iJ "tauow (Jut' Parade of the first Contlnturn air navigator, speedway m.d FaU. livestock it.m.na. and a a gwnaira wtr A'DTH' Constabulary Ninety men staged Grays handbook is the best of First officers of the Union are ;i programme of exercises ba**ore itkind I have seen. Every result IIMI D. A. Henry (president). n ;',""'SH'V ""Zl^ i" 1 *" ***'"4" ln .i Urge galherlng at Tantaen and ..f matches pUyed by Grays for Dudley Ferguson .Deputy PrealM .nr-oii". a* i-Ti^sE-. !" ere later complimented by His .'id years Is mentioned denti. laoui* Su-au* (Vlce-Presila.-i Mamwio MUM the sjraartneai and dentj Council of Managen.i nt %  n*na-nitoo Saiir pi aiding tha whole community MISS ANNA NEACI.*:. Ihe lilas w .\ lu.,. P ,-. ||.. ( ; ,, K % %  %  *' """"V footwear with an assurance again.t the .wlreaa. Is Ihe nel> rtfcleg prealSlevenaon. Rex Itenwkk. Erie M, utioa^r^oWn^Cajiad"n SVr Bernard. J" < %  >. %  kai.vBni.. gsaasM. TradrT. lt.rh.V" -.•Ith Kx OTTAWA 202 lealhe manufacture aboul penalties of disorda TEri shoes and ..11 cummand of the parade was Amateur Athlrlle Capt H M. Chri'topher. former case of from tound I —BIT S.C.F lieutenant. traek.— L.E^. deal nf Uie Ksaex Counly Womens Coplaixl. Allan •rialloa. A Heiu-it N* irk lo cinder Dr J. R. Groome. Edward Kent and fl,;,:.-e.in. 0 (.txirin. k'iiMornvardaMF. Eva I C.euige Kent. ,..,,,., Tachira. B.rr,i .1 W Vincent, in.. ,„d • % Hartdv.*-< TEA & DINNER SETS (or replacement pieces) Czechoslovakia!. Glassware Earthenware It1/tiltlPOS 4'O-OP 1'OTTO.X I 11 I OH* i.iMiiin w**wsw>^ iinii n.r r..n nnlu>. aaj Every spoonful gives you more And more energy and fitness! • £r r ipoonii.! ot • Kaptar (ios you %  rich lujpl* of -tumlns A and D. • Thaw v,i*n,n.i ara rtaturs'n wonder *orka< r aiiurinj haailh and fraadom from illrtaas • Man. woman. dtftgeM-al thould tun 'KEPLER.'. fOD UVlROli WITH MALI EXTRACT a IU.IOUCHS WEILCOMS g CO. PRODUCT ^ -^ ^a. KMav c*is..las. a ara amsr NOW I Dental Science Reveal* mOOf THAT MUSHaNO Tf ITH IKMI APTIR IATINO II THf SAFi, EFFiaiVi WAY TO HELP STOP TOOTH DECAY wHti Colgate Dental Cream i. n I .. Uc. Illlii: gr. MEI>. .. 21r. YOU'RE SURE TO LIKE Maralyn HOT COLD Maralya Is a 6IK bcd-iime drink sod hssge fou ta .Uep wuruU/. And omhaog could be nicer .. Maralyn la creamy milk dclitMuily Osround, and gfgkfegd with cnergtaog lugBr, nali and rcs< WML Q4MLITV PRODUCT NO NEED TO AIIU MILK OH SVCAR M.lt.ll.YX OFFERING A FEW MORE USEFUL ITEMS eSANDINCJ DISC CHITS 16, 24, 36, 50 e MASKING TAPE • RUBBING COMPOUND •SPONGK RUBBER • LOV COLD PLASTIC METAL • PISTON SEAL • KASENIT CASE HARDENING • RAWL PLUG DUROFIX • COPPER TUBING •*", A" W. A' • TYRE GAUGES (Car and Truck) • ENGLISH SOCKETS SKTS • ENGINEER HAMMERS • HACKSAW BLADES ECKSTEIN BROTHERS BAY ST. DIAL 4269



PAGE 1

PACI M\ BARBADOS ADVOCATE TinRSOAY MAY 8. 19S2 CLASSIFIED ADS. TELEPHONE 29M IN MRMOKIAM %  a itn. we mm u. no* our neana are m Aa It**M >oo muti Yeur mm *.. %  1 .1 t* immtotH Ity hrr Ink < •ere.. 'Or. rVae a • In „ ....... %  .-i m% m\ <* %  mr %  " and braUwr. Lionel iCeckt %  arahaii. amo HI PIMM **' %  > M .'I t I I OH SAI.K v* AMI :i "5 AUTUMUriVF win phor n Ill € a S3 in iAK-aaw.1. o.tord rlirl rood.io. n.Ueaa* 1.310 Trlepfts-na SMI ... ITrlrc' I.,. i %  %  Oilman 11M* n. ,oin i-hrap W. M Laaref>c( i AH Ow 'I nd*l ..tt A Co. A I Coup* 111 peilecl I .,:. j IMMBUM, M JS Wlr ill Standard Vanguard on* if IllUm-ni M.iifc IMO rrlUaed Phone **•. CtwUta Ml LM 1 I'M—in FLAT—Now. very modern, MIUU Bat. Completely turn lined Telephone. **> eleetrieit. Parlnc sea. brr-Utnt aiul •ale seabathin Special Sunune, Bow. *•* io UATttSoi. ST LAWmCCX EMV I ,.,, MM *S 4 Si—e o d -I 1 AW HUi-Ht -Fully rurnlih.i1 r. tat IN. Avallab.e Apri fuller >ll, i I n MuDCRN FVHNISIU-li PLAT wm. liner ami II biilhlr *or furthar particularA. i laihley No ft Coral Sand*. Worthing a -i f i MOIWESU. -THr \HD I MKU-UM %  reel Anl, i %  NEWflAVB*. Crane CtHL I mama Fully furnlahM, iightius Plant. Walarmlll aupply. Double Oaraee. ihir. Tor May and from (X r ..7 1*4 -J t lobet lal phen BB*1 MA. OAZaV-^n-Uia-aea. M i-urll. Coa.l fully furniahrrl. malmf* a i. idtipf, ivtoWr onvardi .fieri-N n, ;•'. %  I %  >,, TRINITY COTTAGE rull* fur pithed. w* rl M f Mi i i for fUrtlu-r i I'lllSOMI her. hv i Tl.i1...I BiV'lg rredit to niy DOROTHY IH'NTR 'nr nl hold m<-eir te*p-i atiroikt else ront^artmf d a|nin>t TO.IC1A lvellt aa I it 11for ner %  vi,i ,., %  MM my name iimita nv a vnttrn onj. 1 JCKEltl NATHANiri IIVNTI l*.H-f i' pfii 1. 1.. fivlna jtredlt in i. i n ,.[,,. rvncNE wiirre %  !-• N.^.U. ., i u not hold myielf loaportible for her a "'"* •'•• "'ontiacll K any debt a dvMa w tny name unleai by a -iii'e.i ordr Mdneo b} fiRORnr. wiiiTT M. Dliabetli Vlllaae. % %  %  s I cttaap Do" *' THUCK-Ona III 1-ton Auotln True* Am** D.V. ICOTr A Co Ltd. WfcUW n n-d - -i l I n peifeel ordri INo II High 7 ftftLADV im ... AMtalanl WOUI OaOMMBL %  I %  : i favndry. Expen.-. iy repair wark d'"-Mr Apfdftaanl n.uat haa knowledar ol m.r drewin and eiparlenct in Iha duaclMr of Iat*tf Copie* of lacanl taatm oala>> miiat be i %  ubmlfted -ith appllcal.oo by MM Ma' |._ j !" [*' u * I lo aalao'S00.000 ions between 00,000-Ton Gap In \yoridi].aiin S Tabi. r Viinis .l.i;iI .miId Empire Sugar Supplies^ Lord Lyle Pleads Fttr London Sugar Market I Ui aalai > to Tha | 1X>NLX)N KingUom tn be bouftit by traden HBP of MM irulcsd <.. I Van.-.-. U.K. I'rrjmrr NdW Note On Auntrian Treat) roduM* i ,ir.H!inutrd unnitiiwied aufar n--' .uiitmrnti in i enUrc Con.W.(HM).W Turnover otivfMjlJi jaordinc to Lorrj 1-ord Lyle reporlad that thai la ir of We-.tboiDne. ptvaldfiu of company's turnover tn tha past Tata & Lylt, Md.. the sugar year amounted to £M,000,000 rpflner*. This huge total resulted from reIIejtimnted tht* requirements fining nearly 2,000,000 tons of as a whole IA 3.500.000 tons of auger, of whteh one-third was lugar a your K *ugjr verc in i-xported. The modest reward to i.itiKird in Britain U K. conshareholdera, he said, will be urncJM akin, would iic.-ount IM i.lW.OO') tn dividends, after tax. 2.500.000 tuna a year and last n # cntu-ised the continuation of year's Commonweiillh I'Xjioin Govemnient controls which reand Bntiah beet production came q ulr r ,iiners to offer sugar for export to many countries only if yment can be made partly BLBCTBICAL ithin 100.000 tons of meeting this ngure. said Lord I.yle. adf^^^L enen "ollar.. Other foreign refiner-. '"'"Svi r'\^"Ti wiit be • •* %  *> "Ol auffer from such %  ecause .rf^poor crops restrictions. Th e rendt is that nucul.nly in AuftlraUa." he conln ? y at the orders and a higher tmued. "Even so. the gap is a P r £* because no dollars are sly small one and could "wl. ,.sily be bridged if we * %  "); %  l d Lvle also spoke of the LONDON, v %  he it-:;. a re prepm uig a new note lo Russia ng a reply to thcusugi ;-':mo m-kK "^-inciSuun, S-m.nd. "W" "• <*<" l ""^"< r M the available bUDUlics. %  thr i WeMlnfhouar Frldc I 1 kli Huahe. I | ^1 QAJUtARO %  II im I %  d .1 11 in i lad C a Mallei %  a a MECHANICAL MISCKIJ.ANEOUS n.vmj: One rubv. r MtrasS and drop aide, one b* gaaVi MUh C'.*lt • Bf 3M1 J A l**li %  i KiTlira WIIINOEIUI—Por thahonie m lr-, ronvanlenl and eaiv ( %  %  Ibaa arelnaaea Only SSI.ST K R %  MS *> c. Ltd Lowar llrood SLreet-i siaa a sian I VKTVTUtS REMOOXDCn HI.e, M %  B 13: M--lT, Sl 11 Chamol .ilhera M II Can be aaen at th l '.!* %  fttore TtatalBBr IMreel DUl i1i*>T >* Clarden I md rlilinaa City Oaraa* Co.. Victoria i > i %  HI miMaka-u -m Harba H N.tu.rhM Constipation. Rheunutlarn. • %  I madder Dlwaw n l.iv.r Prlca 9 boa MOIITI 1,TD T B Ml. i i : i I'll Praam Cheealel. in dock, aflpnal ; mm u S u asI sa si if Now ng what can be expedite a reply to their note on the Austrian state treaty which on the available supplies H,lk. against 110,000 tons beginning of March." The West e,n note uggi&lvd that the lengthy treaty which has been unThe Ministry or rood for the previous year. In the ny years past has undertaken rent year, It Is expected that bulk ,u i-upulv the sterling area. If cargoes will amount to 800 000 disp-ntchcd to Moscow al ihe n „ rpqun^ments of these countons. "' tries continue to be filled with Empire sugar before the requireShap* carryiug bulk sugar cai ments of the United Kingdom— discharge in half the time it takes i n for some years fiy whlc h mrw appears to be the to discharge bag ugar. adding Hie (our powers should M repolicy—4a* gap will grow wider, effectively to their earning capaeiplaccd by new eight arlleie ,,^1^ ihore is yet another cut In tv." he explained he ration .it home. Austrian Chancelloi D.*. Leopold IJ,,U.,I .. iherefm-e. are again But there are only a limited Figl will discuss the question of ln4 cnjx 0 f the affair, not only number of ships available whose .. note to Moscow when he here oyt ,„ the importing Colo visit njaaj a nd Dominion*. I hope that cargo Accordingly we have Join* to Luiidon tomorrow It is unders „me dollors can be found for stood, sugar, but dollars should not be lie will have talks with Prime relied on for ever, and every Minuter • "' l1 11 .i>d effort must be nuuie to gain freewitb Anthony Kdeu. Kieign Secdoni from dependence on dollar retury before going on to Waahsugi ..'mi alao i i an official %.r. ed with the United Molasses Company and the West Indies Sugar Cornprny to build o rteet of six ships 'penally designed to carry bulk sugar. These ships will each earr) ••MM tons. BtH.ll-T Slill By JOaVnfl l i M li LOkaoON. ibest ol Hie Japanese in inu t..tile tennii Th^t ,thr opinion .if Johnny Leach, %  rmer world champion who played against them in Calcutta uda winter. The Japanese carried off in,, men's singles, men's double-, and women's doubles, and all their players obtained winner's medals. The unusual feature of their %  uoeMg arts :1M' UI.'. I. i-H -ne ^Id-fashioned pen-holder grip. which had not been seen in international table tennis since 1029 Johnny thinks that, well though they played, the Japanese would i .'tter if they adopted 'he %  grip le explained that ulul, suppleness of their wrists enabled them to overcome most of the dgawtMeha; of the grip — such as restricting stroke play — disadvantages were still evident. Per this reason, he added, ir pen-holder' is not Mtcly to regain world-wide popularity, despite the Japanese success. Johnny will be visiting Japan shortly. There he will play against world champion Hirajih Satoh and hopes to avenge Calcutta defeat. With the exception of Japan nd Vietnam, all the places were isited last year, and both men ire looking forward to meeting iid friends. The Japanese visit is part of lying tour he Is making with Richard Bergman. They will eave next month, and will play ii many parts of the globe. luding Pakistan, India, Singapore, Vietnam. Hong Kong, Burma, Australia, and Japan. Other countries may yet be added, for Johnny told me that the game has such world-wide popularity that he and Richard have a standing invitation to visit practically every country in the world. HOVTB1AI.. •IllltUii. NgW 1BAXAND 1.1*1 LWITBDard The Tate it Lyle meeting Seven killixl in Train Accident The pi.liltp-ara Kerch. t. ." %  Maaaalla. St Petar : Ife, T1ICUMA IM M •'• not hold nnwll mpomlble foe her Haa cotilraclini: ... .. | order rifned by mc UAJIOI.D IW0JJP8. %  oai-obetle. V i.iqi'OK 1.1< i:\si: NOTH I: X H.....I %  %  at fta,nutui nie'aa>& ii— i % %  .. %  .i i. Hank X g Dated tin* tin dav nf Mnv. USt T r \ %  n >n. Feq r-in-e bnwbstraia. Dial >•*-. %  \\1l R %  .\ II T-.I L.i-i>i Ml -,H o. aoi enJ ..t %  I % %  %  I WOK LICENSE NOTICE i Frnm-Clearlnt an aloeh ol MOM R> orda TMae for Two uollari. loai i< e A BARNBM • CO.. LTD. laerlbe now lo Ihe Oally frleftaab nJ %  leading Dally Nrwapaper nab inr m narnadot by Air nlv a tea •fin public.I Ion In I ondrw Conis may have to be found i ensure that Empire countries SlchSfrom item toy i io ;lw cn W s,l.m !" ,. chwe Bnd v liUlul. There shuuli! ,r n P r "' !" ' '"' "" prenl difficulty in contriving such nrm. This company's three ships. SYUNKY, An 'j .Li.. M.'> > ri.vi.es, in view of the Konl— wnether with two more vessel* Al lea&t seven person, — live co n"h-le independence of dousr which it chartered, have been enmen, and two women — were niBBr and the expansion of Emmined in carrying bulk sugar from killed ...ui liuiidie.1 .njured when pu,agriculture. Trinidad. Jamaica an .1 San HMD, colII deep!* everylhing. detaf fc m |„,„ 1O London. luto-d "it UeUlU ll '"""" '*"""' W • cn ""' C<, hone in the near future, some Up u, u,e end ol tasl S.ptemTiiraii.li ""' 1 '" U M '"""' '' %  %  '"•• eompany had deUvered iiVli.e '.mil -nie of U control, which at 65.000 Ions to London wltlbut PU-aVnijfSS^i'aX^ *S^ o:,rC.h. "eurren\ ,h ^" lb ^e ..oping steel and wood.,, >; jWOJlSft. *gfg conipL^ eaTttuSa .St tracted trosn %  tangled mass >.f tneir task '>f buying refiners p.mga Hiuttered sWH-l, WI-HI BAd glass, supplies tf raw sugar lor their Rawsuers fouiul ftCOTM ->f blettlmg. ,,-vxpoit trade. For retlnera i.. women buy their own sugar, he *n d. will %  round mepare the way for the whole ol fog. One l i i-1 i itner I Repreaenlatlva. Tel ATOne Ml l.ftM saUoa, Oak Vat >ty D v seen . Co Ltd WMIC ik Road. I ^1 as—I I n i mil \oiiris NOTICE pi B.I It -.-ti mil. f\ ' %  %  g ground I %  . ISM i u*l ROD. Eaa 'lale. ntat "A"" rillMAII. GlVINDm. be halt M % %  I |l i \M NOTICl riaci No Rock, holdai I IM M latin reepect tl b.ttom Ifca-r of n I -loray woodan %  real Ihi. BU, day ol May IMS j A Md.E'.'O. Bad R rOSTXR. %  I I ..... r A %  %  : „,rH.Ml!r.nll> UHIIillS! rO-DAVS NLWS HASH WlUU Hie Wu. llavr Been nailing For Has ArriMd:— AMEliK \\ CAI* PISIOLS wii i \rClooing Out Sal ALL BNANEL PAINTS .(HIS-.ON s STATION! i:, and HARilWAKI I \--iir inn. i .. M .. ill HI nnvt.1. •< IIIIOI in MI -i. I nMlltv. I bVBfl IO l.lllV I I the Wrttl i %  unlay. Sill Mnv %  • * .it tl It.x-k REMOVAL NOTICE Mini -miHM -t i, v i. i Ihear Client, to kindly nota that I hi Ihe Public Ubrar. Ba B.lal. al %  ISKIHIIV \IIMIII SMAfKIXSn llrrraird -in V lf IIKItniV OlVr • I iVSna anj debt or <-loliil upon i nlTreUnj Ihe Ratalx ol Archdeatoi Mired Khiin.land. :.,|e n | Third A..n %  llivillt. in Ihe pariah of Saint Michael, v ba rtixl In thta liland 01. the Mtn d*. i January INI. are t-m ..-,.,I l nri partlrulara of turn claim., duh Hie iinderaldned. Ihe t|.i ,linl -if the Eatate i>f .ifred ShanMland. idcrenM.t I Me..r. Cotllo. Citlord DC nr before Q ol Jtinr IBM I JII piorrrd lu dlalrlbutc to* 'lotii th. I loan h>.* Hid Him." \i.it thai . .i ,(,. 'ed to any peraon ol ahmo debt 01 i %  :.. ... e ahall noi have had notice m • .th diatribut.on And all peraona Indebted to Ihe raid • He are requeued to settle -Hints WUfeowl i tinted Hit. md da' ol April. IHI II ; MlltHAi C It. ABMSTBONr, I Diecutora ol the Kat^lr —B.V.P. ted and child : buck' il III''". %  ir ckagi !'•*•supplies of the United What Turns A Nobody Into A Somebody For runner parUeulai DACOBTA a CO.. -,',-.-.-.',-.','The as v cAitqUa. DaX CAJIIDC will ^cm I riamarn far SM Locla. OSwa%  da and Aruba Paaaanaara only ant KallUM Today Kadoeaday Tlh inal The V V (-AJUBlwSG UI aceasii Carfo and Ha Mn | Mi lor DomRflMJa, AnUgua. MonUaarat. MavJa .•ml SI Kltto Sailing Prktss* Thc U V SIONEKA will -crept Carfo and Paaae>nawrs lor Dornina-. AnUduo. hluitaerial, Nevia and bt KltU Seilina Irid... IBUi InM iwi acaooMBa ONBSASSOCIATIOM |DC J'----,-,-, ',V',*.',',*,'-'-',--*-'-'-'-*--eV 9nc. NEW l-OatK SFKVK E NEW ORLXANA SEKTICB las lUibadaa loth Slav. ISSI CANADIAN -I i;vu I Montreal April JStl Montreal Ma, lap. Montreal Mn< sa-n Montreal June ISlh Due Barbados MaUth for s Si law Arrived Btartaaei %  * lath Ma> Mlh Theaa veaaaU hay* llmltad paaaangu accommodalloi KOBKET THOM LTD — NEW YORK aV GULF SRRVICE Applj:— DA COSTA A CO.. LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE %  m: all Hv f'Kl\A GOIMSWOKTHl WHO'S WHO. IMS, Is ^b.ishe.10^ ^-^^J^^S.s ... but he will be there with other V.C.I from 19S3 for as long s he lives. On the stage and screen a West F-nd hit or a Hollywood Oscar is enough; recognition goes to .md women whom the years nave proved r a liable of holding linn places at the top of their professions. It 1s just as tough In radio. Kenneth Adam, Controller of the id 1,002 i up alphabetical station the Somebodies. As they have djOtU Mine 1849 |W Somebody will be privately Rtckini througb '' own entries; and NolYel-Ins will IK' dlssjraalng With ;i %  i I. Hun whleli li U'lio makes the sefer4toit? Nobody holds .ui ofjiclal positin ns selector. Who's Who Is strictly enteTprlse, a commercial %  prertlge Uj" ^J" m f' ,!',„?" ftSI ' ...legr.l, ,' %  ',' r *',T? i %  I ,. offices of a publishing firm in Scho-square, W Their own names, even their number, have never been published. But they are constantly haunted by the would-Be-Somebodies. They never reveal what rules, if ..ii. they have for selectionbut sampling of the 40.000 names In the 3.1W pages of Who's Who. 1852, points to a genernl pattern. The two big gateways are 'ihlic office and the London Cuaetle. Neu Knightt I EBRS intierii then BBUruM ,I!.IIIR with their title*; and the IrawbrMn Is lowered at once for I new knight or dame: but Who's Who i< not a social register, ami iwuvdon* are not enough. In politics, a single success at the ballot box will win a lifelong place, for once in you stay WoodcrBon missing. I forecast Jimmy Edwards, of "Take It From Here," will be In next year—as Edwards. James. M.A.. Rector of Aberdeen University. Television. It seems, has not yet arrived. George Reginald Barnes, its director, has 18 Ones but there is no sign of his departmental chiefs. And the 37 lines about Terry Thomas refer to the distinguished headmaster of Leeds Grammar School. For sportsmen, whose top-of-the iirr careers are often short, the ate Is narrow. Gordon Richards Jack Ilnbbs ("retired professional rickcter"). and Walter Hammond i ompany director) arc there, and of course. Sir Donald Bradman Put Len Hutton and Deni>(ompton, the long-reigning motorcvele aee Stanlev Woods, his suc,-essor Geoff Duke, racing driver Stirling Moss, runner Sydney and boxers Jack hederal Grants To Fairs Will Be Increased OTTAWA. I.'der.ll grant* to fairs and •ir.ibiilons across the country will c increased by $31,300 this year tinance Minister D. C. Abbott's tnnutes to Parliament call foe i. its totalling IW3.700 in 1W52-53. im pared with $614,400 last ycir. Grants to class "A" and class It' fairs and provincial summer .UN will total (227,300. a decrease I S23.0OO over 1951-52. These are ne only iiiants which show a n.,i for the coming year. Grants Inter and spring fairs are the .ui.i' as they were in the previous e.i -. However, the estimates mlurfe a new grant of $10,000 for lie Newfoundland Exhibition L ••elation, St. John's, Newfoundie estimates provide for $27,000 >ver freight on live stock shipts to the Royal Agricultural %  er Fair in Toronto. The grant vear was $23,000. The estimates includes a grant of $280,000 aid of agricultural exhibition Miriations for construction tiding* and other projects. This an increase of $40,000 over last ,l-i B.l'.F. NOTICE M>phca1lon< for t Pond lrr.il.itl %  2nd srsde h w ,| vt-etved br rr.r up Candidntei mu.t straitened -im %  11* men I in raled there .Ii." ,it.l vacant nulheley trnable al any let i the Klanrl will ba i 17th M.. lite, h.ivins a table !.. iuat nol be more I year, ol as* A bapUatnal cerand a letter from Ihe I tradof Hie achool ah I muii aecompany appucat %  ol appUcatlon irurt be ob'. r> II A JOHNSQH. CWk. VeiUy of St. Oeorse 4 9W—tn I NOTICl.; %  ui .' r iin bun ng ....ci,-ii ,... i Ik* aervra —, April i 'llr mua, now he paid 1 .'•'.. r hrl.ftn Sam lo -jet.ipm lolp J N T „ Louis, Randolph and foreign poUtiTurpin. Bruce Woodcock teuiu* must climb much higher to ,,| avers prod Perry. Bunny Austin act a mention Truman, Stalin. r inv Mottram. and Geoffrey Paish Nehru. Acheson. Dnladler and Taft (.,,,. Da iiers Stanley Matthews and there and Hitler was; but ttBnlf .y Mortensen are all missinc Franco and Tito have never got there. In the Services, rank, appointn ent. orders and medals seem to add up on a secret pOlnta -""'r A l>emedalled brigadier may get there before an undistinguished ncral. it is ibi it clexfy Bishops are certalntirs. deans, and -irehdencno" aaU chanc v HI. h rsdl he rdlfcmm A Fair Bel NEITHER wealth nor industrial iwr will, of themselve*. get I BU into Who's Who. Certainly nobody can buy hh nv in. For the Just Men. anxious kill |ier*istent slajider. devote M of the three paragraphs i .. verv good their unsignd preface to sayingcanons are rare—but tome • |t cannot be stated too emphaticGeologists Scarce QUEBEC CITV. P-iv ate firms are hiring so many .lelngiats to explore the wilds of Qu< i*ec that the provincial governmtnt can't find enough men to do Iti surveying \ lovernment official said the %  tines department's big problem thii summer would not be where io send geologists but "to find nough qualified men to form our t-e.ireh and survey p•r^ief^.'• He said private industry was taking a heavy toll of men of the i. '.he government used to hire. i II r !" aj ,..-V//'///////.W/.V,V.'.'.'/ CIIATneral Merchant Office ..nd H. Corner. Paaaase tv Iiaxter. Kaad. a S ItIn longest entries concern parish pal '•" P* ns or INCivil Service List the low-inter it.'V. vets through and dip* occasionally amonr. the assistant to seooo In %  C.Bs after their names. ir mw.-nmer* U twice married Myrtle Abbot. ,tn un%  1950. P | M, S] •".of Mrs. Abbots friends krlll nOU oil know -l„. i. 44 Merer u-omen eareltf RhJrh [he dnt,of litrffi" line in %  v can earn I .'. % %  ... but on!) MIL' of the highest that inclusion In Who's Who has never at any time heen .i ,: payment or of obliga•IOII to purchase the volume But it Is "till a fair bet that some of the 1.002 will feel flattered enough toda* lo spend £5 on V. ,.,: %  Wu.i. W2. -L.E.S. \I(..IVI;I nathrr "hiaairnl al th POPULAR Why r Most of them are concentrated in '.he Ungava region where one l.rm is spending $500,000,000 M i:a.iing development; in Abitibt, hinougamou and in the Gaspe lemruula. ^^^ M.V. DAERWOOD wUI be arriving at Barbados on THL'RSDAY. Ma> SUi and will be aaiiiag on >l-NDAY. hUt UUt. for S*. I.ucaa, St Vincent. Grenada. Araba. aeeepltng Pssaemser^ "id Freight. NYLON STOCKINGS Full Fashioned New. Modern Shades 51 and 60 guage s52.0."i per pair .In si Opened New Dresses Hats Bags Specially Suitable for WEDDINGS The Modern Dress Shoppe Broad Street serve r em right! IRON BEDSTEADS WITH SPRINGS Recently received, do nol wait until the last moment BIV NOW M:\IIIAI K.MPOHIUM Corner Broad A Tudor Streets FLOORS SANDED Want tn yive your floors thai .... NEW LOOK Wc can do it by Ihe . NUFLOCR METHOD Call.. KVKI.YN KOACH & CO.. LTD. 3584 or 3585 6 5.52.—3n. ,'•'.::'.'*. ft oo c ooeoeeeeeeerM ELECTROLUX The Kr.ri;:er.ii..r which ten years ago caused the Bajan Cook to exclaim ( "Hey Hey Looka Fia mck ice!" f.v #i#*#• €§yuin . in full force just In time to meet that needs of those who cannot avail themselves of the electricity supply in the near future. These machines are for operation on kerosene oil, natural gas or electricity, and are available in A\'% cub. ft. and 7 cub. ft. models. BOOK YOURS WOW THI. EMTAtaE ELEC. CO. Plantations Building J&R ENRICHED BREAD serve together WITH SS ANCHOR MILK


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ESTABLISHED 1895 THURSDAY, f KV f \K2 PRICE FTVE e Chief Magistrate in ^HB and became Puisne Judge in .^gpl. He was af pointed to his r scnt post of Attornev General 1950. series of post|ponements and nothing concrete had resulted he added CUirke who a routine visit to the Caribbean Islands arrived this morning by the Lady NeLson which is expected to continue its voyage to Montreal tonight. The last" sailing; of the "Lady" boats from the West Indies in Canada will be In November. R.E.C. Action Our correapoodent in Jamaica writes that the Honourable Donald sangster. Jamaica', representative ir the Region,I Economic Committee, commenting on the proposed stoppage of the 'Lady Boat*' 'in October I. said R.E.C. action is urgently necessary and Government action is needed to settle a common policy Honourable Fangstcr pointed out that Article 20 of the Canada-Wast Indies Trade Treaty provided twain months' notice before tor-' mlnntion and said whether thLt ippUsd to any part or just the whole agreement had been deteri .* mined. "The proposal to terminate! BIM J this service will, I hope. He was ONLY TWO ATTACKS si.s netoun Colonel R. T. Michrllii. t oinnUM>loiirr vl police, in an interview wlUi the Advocate'' yesterday said: I In re are a number • %  romplcU-i) untrue rumaui • KOMI* arouitd the island couterming ilUtb on molertsw at night b> armed ptniu. "Do not believe all ihe* wild rumoui-k which only upaea the population and are III'* SCOdurt Of MHIirtHirimaainatloii. "Only two true caaea of attacks on motorists have even reported to the Police this yrir. These were made on pTsons Mho had parked tlu-ir Sjtn on lonely spots in the Fine area at night. A I'.. I""Tom" had turned up and demanded monrj. Kefuoal to accede to Inrequest had molted In the ii-< of violence by him. "Tlie Police Information Bureau tTel. No. 09) will be pleased to clvr anyone the correct facts on any matter at any time. Please verlf> the facto before you pans on .in untrue rumour that doe. harm." He ended; "You can be assured that swift and effective PeUer action will alway* be taken to deal with all true renorta of attacks, etc. on people of this Island." Huge Increase In Malayan Customs Revenue ^Mubber was principally rcsponBle for an 85 per cent' U to the yield from Malayan export du 1951. says an offlcial |Bort fr m Kuala Lumpur |^Br< 't venue collected by the Cssn .mil Excise Department %  hc Federation of Malaya last ~f from all sources amounted p>83.2J8.667*, which was more i cent, over the 1950 or an Increase ol $28.total amount collected in dutU ITM IMS.679.620, an te of $197,759,981 over the %  > figure, while import duties %  y&unted to S214.291.040. an inOra %  -. %  il SGB.II3.62] IValayun dollar = 2s. 4d.' ^-. raae the West Indie* to think seriously bout a Caribbean Shipping Ser'ice which Is to vital to the future economy of this area This service need not be confined to the British Caribbean, for I happen to know other territories which are willing to participate in the promotion o Caribbean Shipping Service." Chile's Copper To Cost 33 |c. Per Lb SANTIAGO DE CHILE. May 7. *Ae:. ury Minister German Pico Cana-aid a decree fixing the new prior of copper will be signrd todfljgr ; nd the new rate expected to bfgf oic than 33i United State-. StjW per pound. NEW SINGAPORE RESERVOIR TO COST £5 MILLION A new reservoir, three times bigger than any existing reservoir on the Island, is to be constructed in the Seleter Catchment area of Singapore. The rapacity of the reservoir will be of approximately 3.300 million gallons of water and the treatment works will have a capacity of 40 million gallons a day. The estimated cost of the rSaervoir is about $45,000,000 C.S.A. Adopt Holmes Report (frorti OMI Ou n Cor respond* II 11 GRENADA, May 7. An official release on the C.S.A. fl ii ration Conference winch endtd afondS) r.\...i thai the onf. re adopted the recommendation a select committee lhat the Se-retary of Stole be requested to tike action whereby unification of public sci vices at the area as recommended in the Holmes Report PC considered for implementation foi forthcoming London talks on Federation when consideration should nl*o be given by the Seretary of State to setting up Regional Executive Authority imaged in the Holmes Report lie C.S.A. Federation further authorised It? Council to prepare 1 submit to the Secretary of State a scheme for implementation of the unification of services. The conterence accepted the im itatlon of the British Honduras delegate that itnext iM-innial ferenco take place there. Taft Polls "Landslide" U.S. Oil Strike Poses Threat To Motorists „ . DENVBl.. COLORADO, May 7 U.S 60.000.000 motonlts re threatened with com! 1 mm exhaustion of gasoline supplies unless 90.000 strikin • oil workers accede tn the Fe.i-r.il Government's request that they return to work ^ ** spokesman for the coalition ..ung C.I.O. A.F.L. and %  in urteni ill uniom said in Mir de, .siou possibl. i • made to-day ,r The '.adt Stabilixallon Board yesteiH -ted that the weak old 'uka af oil workers be ended itely" and summoned %  n ->ii and industry leaders to a I said rnaeUBi in Washington next! 1 ui-tday Chairman Nathan reinclngei laid representatives of Unions and of 75 oi] companies Ihn' icv should continue collec' bargaining and be prepared iafta -., full report"* to the Board > n Tuesday on the 1atus of the iHPUte The -tilke already has awsjni B< I more than 10.000,0001 %  leirels of <>il including 5,000.000 gnwline according to [.per for the oil Industry "The Oil Daily". It ha* al.-o caused a definite cutt ek m military activities both in • United Slate-, and in Furopr well u the reduction of civil* l*n air servuv* The pinch ii ItairiK Ml mostly In the Mid-West kmi East. Ung gas supplies forced the ti-iiiiniing of bus services In rtotroit RDd in Indianapolis and It was reported thai "no gas" signs v.iB be up by tomorrow. Seven arhm mnounced they had cut (toafr passenger and cargo services while others Indicated they soon would be forced to curtail services t.mding the fuel shortage WASHINGTON. May 7. Senator E.t Kefauvvr suffered his first defeat in | Presulenlial rrimary losing to Senator Richard B. Hussel in Ihe Florid I 11 imarv as Senator Robert A Tafi claimed •Il of Ohio s 56 Republic.. u Ms. gfetes in a "tremendous landslide victory Returns from 1.345 of Florida's 1.M3 precincts gave Rugacj 281,880 votes to 2*2,574 for Kefuuvei. HoweVer. Kefauver apparently pnvfMltad Rusael from wim Ihe decisive victory which Russet's supporters said was needed win non-southern support al the OctiKK-utic Convention The lead in the Florida contest changed hands eight time during the night before Ruwl finally pulled ahead for good. Taft now has 401 daleflat Ihe Republican Convention which Is two-thirds of the 604 needed for nomination. Taft claims some elected delegates who are not publicly committed lo any candl\ An unofficial count prior to Ohio Primary showed General Eisenhower with 2DI pledged or publicly announced delegates 274 for Taft. Harold E. gtaawn had challenged Taft for 47 of Ohio's 5fi Republican Convention Delegates but Staasen appeared headed for another Primary defeat. Taft hud said he might lose only one delegate although ho did nut consider it a "true contest" between himself and Elsenhower who was not entered in the Ohio Primary. Write-in votes were not permitted./ oORD WILLOUOHBY. tbe nsw tug for the i-land. glide tarougb I I >ruie Bay after beins unloaded froi.i the BM. Croftor Th water lit t HI I'args. WBlch was also brought by u "Croftor". wUl be uiUod#d 10t e ar I Ian 535. 1 For Aluminum "Ida" To Be Replaced In Surinam ^ ^^ y m ^ MANY people gathered al Ihe lower Wharf yj ilav afternoon to watch the Lord Willoughby beinu U..jd BHsOfV by Ihe Lord Combermere. The Lord Willoughby will replace the ldii which cciitiiiued lo serve the colony J though coiufemnexl II years a go, '. Ooughby, which was built at Whites Shipyard (South..,! large. Kofnuver*s svi|>porters ctalmerl "sweeping victory" for hbn e Ohio Demoerallc Primary. A spnlsinarj said Kefauver's eight delegate at large eaniliiitu span 'itwept in b> ;m overwhelming nurgln." Kefauver had sought inly eight of Ohio's 16 delegates at large. Former Senator Robert Bulkley. '.i favourite son ndidatc" thus was assured of e ..the,eight. 1951 Unit. rent rent! :ent. rha v ilOCk .ated Ho %  iiat i seen p> if it trod MM • last week, cancelled the ^per jgreement with the i:teunder which 80 per P d at 271 United State.. %  f pound leaving 20 per •ale on the free market. Ustar said there are no copper cither accumu' frozen" in Chilean ports. Id newsmen categorically a single ton of copper hid Kluced since the outbreak lining strike and all the on at Chile'* disposal do^-s %  ed 1,500 tons.—t\P. N. Koreans Drop Kussia As Neutral Truce Inspector TOKYO. May 7. Communist truce negotiations were reported today to have agreed to withdraw their nomination of Russia as a neutral truce inspector—one ol the main issues blocking the ceasefire. A pooled dispatch from the truce talks town of Panmunjom quoting United Nations sources said this concession was made during secret talks between the chief delegates on the new United Nations offer. The dispatch said it was Iwlieved at Panmunjom that the issue of the exchange of prisoners of war was now the only remaining major problem barring acceptance of the United Nations "overall solution" for the truce. Rrports of the Commuiuit conPuntnunjom came Jtiin Is Harshal •>>rc^ ic IV ia.net The he i lumoi. lme C iecerai *r*a Fi or Cc •r-orcss rash %  PARIS, May 7. d Alprionsr Juln. Iiuipecirral of French Armed nd Commander of Allan's in Central Europe was Marshal by the Cabinet. abmet also promoted to k of Marshal — posty (^-neral Philippe l> Hauteclocque warmmander of the famed Armoured Division of ench Forces and Inspecteral of French Armed intll his death In an a 1M7 —U.T. Surrey 219: India 64 — 4 LONDON. May 7 The Indian touring cricket team lout four wickets for 64 toda>, after dismissing Surrey for 310. A great spell by medium pared l-owler Kamchand In which he took live wickets for five runs helped in the dismissal of the Its' six Surrey batsmen for only 30 Tuns. Earlior Eric BeO t in ,„..\ Dave Fletcher 47 had put on 80 for the first wicket and Laurie Flshlock S7 and Jack Parker 52 put 108 runs for the fourth wicket. Ramchand's final figures were five for 20. The Surrey spinner* Jim Laker and Tony Lock took four wickets in 20 minutes when the tourists went in and the Indians finished the day 155 runs behind w-lth six wickets In hand— U.f. The strike also moved inlo nullU.r> circles when the Defence Department ordered all of the armed forces lo cut oil consumption in the United States U.S Army nstructed all United Stales area %  n mandere to cut cunsumpUou |H tmlenni products "to minimi i paired to sup|H>rl essential , %  !.. tin,,. The Nnv> onlered .. cut of at 1'AIIIS A 853,000.000 10-year>i lo produes iliigalnMa in the Nctherlan.r* pml ibwd South American colony of Dutch Guiana was recommended TueMlay by Ihe ini. inaiioniii Bank fur Heconstructioii and Dvvelopinenl. A report of %  .in says than i ao te.i,,, l ban* i haap Taft also beat Stassen in ifie-third in UH conte-it for Ohio's ten delegate ,t %  nd ,h Marino Corps also t COIIHI vatlon" fljjllg activities outside the Korean War ;. #. line and the I I'-WAUSSV?"^'""""' nroored -.11 New Atomic Bomb Explosion cut to the minimum. There is no oil sink, in California because most of the petroleum products used In Korea come from ccastal refineries. — v.r. Fishing Bout Believed Loal The lulling boal Mlsa I'm !• 11 Ottnul beach at 5.45 p.m. on Monday April 2HUt lust and ol WBUCQ there ho been staai DO further ofHcial report has now been given up as lost with Us two%  nbu crew—Fitzgerald Best 01 Ville and Oswald King ol I .AS VEGAS. Nevada The detonation ( bomb 75 miles away — flat brilliantly lighted up Uie wuui pre-dawn sky r*re today. After The Fisheries Offl, the first flash of white liaht hich etched buildings henand inoundlng mountains. Uiere was gOadaa glow In the sky ouUinig clouds. Observers in Los Angeles 250 ules away reported seeing a tuck I'Unk In "• *v * ,nP It lasted but a frac•-., of a second. No shock was felt here and there was no aound ii the blast. A small atomic d was visible sbove the >rt It disappeared quickly. cri Mr. D. W Wil'-s said yesterday lhat since th< boat left Oi-lin. the owner | | i Mill made a report thM illvessel had nut returned, bul he was of opinion that the sklpp.-, had been playing heeaa paen* gil i had been fishing in Speightstown. Mnce then reports have been recived 'hat part, of the debris of the vessel ware picked up, and on this unconfirmed informant th< boat and crew are consider African A6 Executive Engineer In Sierra Leone 2-oirrteo >ve Ba >epartn African to be ap%  snire. England, where he obtained position of Executhe Higher National Diploma. In the Public Works 1146. he was Prtieman for Meerra Leone. Is Mr. | chnnlcal Engineering. ratt. A M.I C.E He was elected an Associate *ho had extensive %  Member of the Institute of Civil raining in II udders field. England, i Engineers In 1930, and an AssoctMr. Pi.iti. who was born in | ate Member of the Institute of Freetow. in 1917. was educated at' Water Engineers in 1051. he Pri School and. Mr Pratt has had practical exlodist Boys' High School. | perlence in various estahlishmenti ved five year'lln the United Kingdom Including Ihe Pubh. (the Taf Fecban Water Supply Sal Technical [Board. He returned to Freetown %  'r.,r\ 1044 to. at the beginning of Aoiil and hjs Hudalready assumed the dujles of his College. York-' appointment. A.M.I.W i h< MFreetov JRST School 194* v larafte through after General Ridgwi tng United Nations Suprer rnander had annmineed thai latest Allied proposals were "limit to which the United N.tion.s can go.'' An "overat •ulution" he said was eontingenl on acceptance as a whole. He t -irl the Communists had rejected he proposal But it was not Immediately clear whether his !-:..t-?ment was prepared before nPer the latest developmentr.inmunjnm were known The Untied Nations he said had end -d the "news blackout" en the tnu e talks and future session* would be public. A despatch quoting United Nations spokesman Dngadier Get oral William NuckoU said that the CommunisTs had rtftered a csinter proposal on May 2. This was said to be a "package dealin which the Communists agreed to drop the nomination of Russia If the United Nations returned 123.000 Communist prisoners. The United Nat nan rrfT.-ied 70.000 saying that the rest do not want to return Communist territory Thla despatch further said vifd no proareas was made after May 3 arid the issues had narrowed to "only one. a fundamental one'—the prisoner question. In a statement at Panmunjom li-l.iv United Nations Chief Delrgate Admiral C. Turner Joy said th.v. Communist nomination of Russia "was never the real Issue. It was an unofficial one created by the Communists for bargaining purpo s e s .'' The Communist des.re to rebuild their wrecked airfields was considered the crux of the problem This wss why the United Nation had offered lo "accept She Communist view on military earflBdflB if they would accept the fact that the United Nationwould not be a party to fon <-i repatriation of prisoner* Admiral Jo) .tin —U.F. I-.lrs>aa i ti ic oomm %  ann.it i>e ted LocaU) Foi iiui. n Guiana, the world** biggest source of bauxite. The report t Dlonla) Dovertuneni ii commercial as ( . -. Ith cQuntrlas produi lug luminuNi < 1 i l %  %  %  %  ion predicted I le-nal Mi.i wouiu pratwbls gli Ihe c(i|nn> more than the MMuire. 5>;t.lKM .oo M„ ,, .., ,;,,,.,, baus la Is nea batni I %  %  of cnaapl i Canadl MI powi pi-WAGE AGREEMENT W. Powers Fear Japan's Tendency To Communists Bv I IAIM >l I < %  I \Kl) I.ON!X>N. May 7. Can the Western Powers pre-ent Japan fr.m U-m* drawn into the dominant Eurasian power which at pr consists of the Soviet Union Allied to Communist China Since the Japanese Peace Treaty came into effecl last April 28 questions have >eeri discussed with some inisKivines by far Eastern authmlties here who are dubiOtJI whether the politics and diplomacy of the West arc sufficient to bring success. The discussion was centred around the Soviet Ambassador'! p.otest in Washington when the Far Eastern Commission ended This was seen as Russia's first public disclosure of relentless diplomacy to disrupt the security S stern, attacking the United Slates etes-Japanese Defence Agreement and to draw Japan into an exclusive association with the Soviet bloc. May II.. v Rintinu The ftrst of the Soviet movewere seen In the May Day rioUng which all suthoriUes here agreed showed clearly that Communists In Japan are following the Soviet directive The editorial in last Saturday's London Times noted the same misgivings and said the May Day riots should teach the Western Powers and the Japanese Government a lesson. It said "the government would be wise to see that people understand whv the American troop* are remaining In Japan after the liberation of the country. The government could cut some of the ; i ground from the Communists if il explains more fullv to the people the ptfl the United States Is playing la (.roteeting their country while It 1 di-armed. —U.F. Metal Dispute C,oiii|i.ir:.lr<. 1/JNixiN. Mm 1 First the I'oiti.i si its BoUvlao 'I' Nations Chilean Interests involvWlUl Aliinii %  ii.lcresl* involved on Ixith the •elliiiK and i' ,cli-(, •produces a cosnpUHiiion whii-h seems to daunt press eominent here The tlasnrlal Time* along MWIlliainfl It sums up Chllo's exparianca aith the "Free M.irket Ovi ma t oi ss i ti had no dlfflculi sjnd 0 %  %  i %  %  ... %  11 on lbs open manurl (eonv i.in--i with 27', earns reoalvad i salet to in I ... ever prsrnlurni rasodad at high prices beiame moTS dlffl...... %  ropper even now an i ,e B^BSStlOB Df 0bH tier copier on oaf market possibly including I Curtain countries ha* bt ed hut in view f MM ima invoke, i and U %  sui teinpei nf %  i ously. Tinreal quastlot wh.-ther ( s I. in i Bt of pi "longed deedhick i bit with the U.S—Bolivian tin imiaase." HatoJ bulletin reports that the %  c ilaan smatiunanl exiiects to In raSHU l,tl '' 1 ln Europe and It.' |S f-n C.nil.-.n COPP %  %  %  intrles," I r Ltd. ari ivod bn ">J %  % %  Ik BO i 'i" %  arts i v i ini p m .-he i. Bay i>\ Elede Reject Uteri L.N. Proposal I packAllied MUNSAN, KOMI. M:I> 7 i Koraan Truoa Talks sank ..II tune low tod.i; .fter the ... tut the All %  lisousa. i ( O-I.,IOI, oi .-.,. i, BSSS tol> ihe otaer th-t He nest ntovs >.. I OH n.ot,. tint Unifl i in loosed ii-i.'v rm the AimiHi It nil : %  .:. itions will again on Thursday ai I in< i .ton... Negotiators Bbruptly snded the laotaej which i, i | nrotiesM l llll t atsae the i ihMi wns praai aki I \or.i :;H in fakye ;en. Mailt EUdgWa* piomully wnI trtua 1 Allied ultini.iIt Is ,i three-point package U N Command thut they would II 70.0CS) of I32.00O caulured SI .i"l North Koreans n .line for 12.000 Aluad ttoooi l,v the Rasja, Tins Is ihq of the desdlnek. Commu•rOUld )HIH-I mltted to build epair North Korean airfields. Hid drop their nomlnatioi ..t Itussii, us it neut to help police a tn ,_oi Jumbo. heav\ lift deri-k ol the Crofter. This Jumbo derrick is i>*rt of t %  .. Crottar*! equipment. The wider barge, which has Its own pumping equipment for anppvltttg Uu ships was led on Hie .l-ck e, the Crofter. It will be lowere.1 mug by another heavy III' derrick In the aft. Sturdy Appearance i l Willoughby is not as large .is v-ither the Lord Combermere or Ida. bul has a very sturdy .ipHer null is well out of th< water, it was noticeable that srhen she was being tewed to toe i nags by the Combermere. she rolled more than the t'omberBM did. S iv has a doslgn speed of B k i k| which srag exceeded in her %  i R i n she attained 9.4 knot* The Crofter also brought anothur interesting bit of cargo. This was the Auator Autocrat plbiie for the Harbados Light Aet'-iptans rTOO 11 exnactal tii i the plane will be unloaded to.*. S.3 Crofter ha a brought valuable cargo to the island. Barbados now hns an Auster Autocrat win. h. If allowed to do so by UH ll I. AC. could well carry out -Ml Sir rescue service in coi p. itiotl with the Lord WIU£200.000 FOR ST .LUCIA SI I.Ut'lA. Mn 7 was announced Wedne*da> thiil II M Government have approved an .'iddltiomil uMiK'Hion to SI Lucia of £200.000 made up of £50.000 already approved and further £150.000. This money will be made available m the usual way a* **ieme pproved under CD. und W. funds. KINGSTON. J'ca A.ige ,.n< enieid ached between car i the Bustamante Ui if the 1052 crop May a.s been %  farmers Worker •el higher wages and other facilTwo strikes are now on In >p and margarine factories Strike At U.C.W.L I nters Third Day KINGSTON. Jl i %  May 7. .<• strike st the Unl unong . I*e ed its thlrtl day today with Ier-graduates still doing dotM o,k Theie snU .. BB| SUaM between police go %  r ornlng. but It was no %  Tb Ii I I U instructed ,i i Uotl of the staff aUach:in' Umvi i i'. M %  vTsal IiMh,-. HospiUl to reti,n to :(i. i .-I. DU the rest of the D I) i 'ill ou' WORLD FAMOUS ALES FROM BURTON. ENGLAND Advisory C'tee On Library Services In The Colonies The Secretary of State for the i Mr F. C. Francis. M A Colonies (Mr Ollvf l^rttettofO [(Keepei ol Prim .M.riounccs that the Library As-* Museum); Mr. A. II. Mitchell nas established an ad(Ubi in, I %  ommltlee with the task of, Charles Newell. M A iiig and advising upon all %  (City Libi effecting library services Mr. R Oder. I1A PI i Colonial territories. • rary Adviser. Ii The chairman is Mr L. R. Council on Higher Idui %.cColvm. CB.E.. FLA t< ,' librarian, Westminster), and, M ( F I. A i: '.•her members of the committee ian. Leyton); and Mr. W. E. F are Miss F. E. Cook, M.A. F.L A. Ward, CM G (Deputy 'County Librarian. Lancaihlre); Itional Adviser. Col AND ^orthini§lon BREWED AND BOTTLED TO PERFECTION NOW ON SALE AT J.N.G0DDARD& SONS Ltd. BRIDGETOWN i



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PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE THL'KKDAV MAI %  1S52 Harrison College Trounce Lodge 6 — 0 Intel-school <:iiaui|Mon-hi| Finals Begin HARRISON COLLEGE defeated Lodge six—nil in the finals of the Inter-School Championships at Kensimu terday evening. Teddy Griffith scored two k'oals for College. F. Squire? Morn* and Smith scored one each The other goal camo from one of the Lodge full backs. Lodtre look the touch off with Collegedefending the i^-ulhem goal. College H*OT tin* %  << attack. They *TW awanhM a /roe kick and nearly jcored from a melee in Ihc Lodge goal area Shortly nfterwardf. Collegi* right winger, received the ball while he was unmarked. He took a ahot which went wide of the Coal First Goal Whan the game was about seven minutes old Teddy Griffith. College centre forward, opened the score for his team. Prom a kick out by goalie Smllh. Griffith .received the ball and kicked well out of the reach of goalie Hutson. Hutson A few minutes later Lodge %  were awarded a penalty kick Skipper Chit—num took th but kick the boil high over th. cross-fam. B. Smith. College inside left ahot the second goal for his team. Goalkeeper Hutson attempted ti Bather the ball after a long shot taken by F. Squire*. Smith, who was boring Wirough. touched it Into the nets. P. Tudor made an attempt ti score the third goal for hi* leanAfter dribbling hi.* way into 'he Lodge goal area, he took a sho*. Sports Window The Barbados Friendly Association team meet Police In a knockout lixlure at Kensington Oval this afternoon. The Police in their nrst fixture 'knocked out" k-Bovan while thi* Will be the first time that I representative te.im of the H.F.FA. will be seen In Association football tim reason. .which struck the left upright and m &f ebounded into play. The Lodge forwards organisi-t a beautiful forward movement shortly before half time Minors, the Lodge right wing, sent in a good ahot from the wing Brook** ran In from the left wing 'and attempted t" push In the ball but failed. Half time found the fa-Ore College 2 Lodge nil. Penalty Shortly after the game reeuined College g..l their third goal. Thev were awarded penalty nnd F. Squires made n> muftaki HussiajTsWill Judge Gauu*t> ttoxers Ait Helsinki By GEORGE WHITING BRITISH boxer* at the Helsinki Olympics this summer air likely to have their efforts icfereed and judged by ot leatt two Russians and other "Iron Curtain" officials. Ilehlnd this not unwelcome evidence of the Soviet's new "play along" policy is the burly figure of Simpson Bats Well For Nottingham LONDON, May . Reg Simpson, Nottingham, hit a sparkling 76 against Kent in English cricket on Tuesday but his team's bid for a whirlwind victory ended m defeat Nottingdarn needed 225 runs to win at the rate of about a run a minute ..ad look like getting there until reaching the half way mark Then three wickets fell for one ran and blunted the Nottingham bid. Simpson helped the NottJngnam men to paaa 100 runs In 73 minutes in two overs. He puntshi < England's lee break artist Doug Wright for 85 runs. The results were: Worcestershire 101 for ux vs. Indian tourmi; team, match abandoned >wing to rain. M.C C. 185 for nine declared, Surrey four for aone; match abandoned owing to rain. Oxford University 52 for e even vs Gloucestershire; match .iiandoned owing to rain. Yorkshire 237 for four declared; Samuset 91 for six; match abandoned owing to rain. Cambridge University 186 for four declared: Sussex 85 for two; mutch "ban-loned owing to rain. Kent 201 nd 332: Nottinghamshire 309 and 191; Kent won by 33 runs. C.F. REES ADDS A NEW TITLE TO HIS RECORD SHARES I,.KM) DOLLARS By JAMES GOODFELLOW RYDER CUP player DAI REES has won a new title He is the flrst champion of Malaya. When Ree*. accompanied by match play champion HARRY WhhTMW stopped at Singapore on the way to All* I was put up as prize money fur th<-in v. I ment in Malaya, and the contest was held ut tinbland club Tnr Sr local pro'espionals toot This forerunner shoulu I part. Tom Verity (Kualu Lumwav of arousing i pur); Jack Hodgklnson (Island contest again** me U.S.A and In Vaw.. l^-. !" *^ w McEwan "> ctmnc** of „ur women Man i Royal SirypipoTe club.) securing their first wm ui Uua Scores: Rees 72. Weetman 74, international event. \eniy (who_ was declared native But np. The view has uMnvs .. 'rom the Ladies Golf Union haoui ,'TSi^ Tn Quartan that they would praft n and Master Golfer, who will nut to be watched o: io have Prtt. • viwUng U.S.A. in May after his publicity. Australian trip, still hankers ifter Yet at the recent L.Q l! a match with BEN HOGAN. in London MISS MARY ilnl u> United bra tee Open champion an.' WORTH, chairman, complained of Master Golfer. I have been asked the poor Bttgfadanecg enew the challenge on his bematches against France and" „ Belgium, which abowsx) a big F.ulkner, manager for financial loss. Whew the blame • Challenge FIRST part of the challenge match between Sumltidne Park captain J. W. MACOREGoi: *r.K,.r £M *"" ''x-Open champion AL .Itishljpen PBrh !" pl m """ champum:" ilayed thehot.cY^.f ISrSuxS* ?. W. W A L L V the United S3m title." {'"3SPS5 w V. J* k f. * TOMMY FARE (left). WeUb Heavy We if at Champion -nd former Eaiplre UUe holder co*ei Ottorgla Milan. Italian Champion, nttenpts a right upper cut during their tight at Cardiff. Fan .itUmpUng s come bsck with the object of regaining hi* Biiti-h and Empire titles, bast Milan ovsr fan rounds. A. Zaplatka. of Poland. It is he who has put forward the names of the Russiansplus Czechs, Hungarians. Rumanians, and Poles—at a committee meeting of the Association Internationale de Hoxe Amateur in London. Mottram And Paish Still Lead English Lawn Tennis liccker and William Knight. couple of young hopefuls, both fell in the Surrey tournament to Den Tragonnlng of Australia who in turn was eliminated In two set* by Paish with g loss of only %  iB* CHARLES STEPHEN) LONDON England*! Davta Cup team thi % %  i will wear a familiar look, [i %  iBM look It has wnr QoUeg* Increased llv-ir lead P u > ***"<* ,or nomination at obout ten minutes before the "'" u !" „ ... -^ %  — blow off Teddy Griffith received Seven times champion a short pass from B. Smith ami MikhailotT. 45-yenr-old star of ahot into an open goal. the party, has been refereelng A few minutes Inter College got since 11)34, when he gave up comtheir firth goal. Mbrrls, their p< tltlve boxing after winning the left wingor took %¡ shot Trom close Soviet cruiser-weight championrange. The ball went Into the ship seven years in nii-usnim goal after striking one of the Will the Russian idea of boxLodge full backs A few seconds later Morris scored the sixth goal after the l^odg" full l>arks failed Some months ago. the Russians indicated that they had Messrs. \ V Tlntoahln, V. ' E I Ogurenkoff and V. P Mikla hailotr available as accomplished i-v.-., year MIK.UM V.I and experienced international refThe old tlrmn Tm Mottnni BB, The first two are now being and Geoffrey Palh have aaart I of! the iiagcai HI paal (rm ud In two week* have proved they .ire still No*. I and 2 with the rest nmvhcre. In the final of the Shu I. | Parl Lawn T'nnii TouruamCnl lail mk the %  llottram and Pal-h with Mottram winmm' in three straight sets. In the anencouraging lor thej gt that Britain's No. 1 who Last y oau td the biggest Wimbl.doi. upgames. sat by beating Jaroslav. Drobny, How much can we hop* tht former Cscch star, Is bench;frwn Paish and Mottram this bu from his winter tour abroad. "* *. %  nybody-a Weas < (Hit in another ruspect the flrsi irrrr from lM ^ J fomp**' 1 1 " finals of the Surrey Hard Couit ^ ta h E %  this country And it may be too Lawn Tennis Championship thui Eve TeS far fro!^uccessfuT. !? VT 1 th T ^T^fSS fi H was the !" old rtor, Britain's young player. who '^Sr^^X^^TJSat Aith Mottram lieating Paish fi 4 SOOfMg or later muM take OV.T n v if thev are to deal successfully —3. frtm Mottram and Paish. have all rtlIO wc invasion from Australia [n ona respecl these victories siiewn indifferent form. Roger an ,t America. to i clear. HarrL. % % %  Collepe: C. Smith. D. mg rules conform to the pattern laid down by international usage? Yes—or else! Messrs Stepanov and MikhallTrotman. J Mnvr-r*. M. Simmon.. ,T >" common with all other new F. Squires "fi. S<,uin^. R. Mnrrt*. ai-l untrle.1 referees and judges P SmlWi. E. firimth. P Tudor. In Helsinki, will be asked to unMrdford, dergo practical teats in apeclall) Welch staged COfttaatl before being Lodpr Huts. H. Rfdtnon. C. Redninn, F. Cheeseman. Alley ne, Minors, Ooddani. Cramer, Hall. Brooke* Referee: Mr. O M. Robinson. unsuspecting Ulympic IIAVA\ Dosflrr r/.i) WALTER HAOEN. says a New York writer, is completely retired from golf. He d<*< no) i an occasional round. This great •bowman of golf, now nearlng HO. winner of II natlonil titles, itcredited with having won mor.Ihan a million dollnn; with his mashie loose ,n | ha held up to the ridicule and opprobrium of 1948, when early Olvmplc bouts were refereed and juduerl on the principle of n little trial and a lot of error. Onl> n rigorous system of on-the-spot sacktngH got them out of trouble. Incidentally. Britain's only efenr In Helsinki will Rovle, manager of a at HillslMirough. ShefOlympl be Slanle: boys' 1 1' 1 Held. A clue WEATHER REPORT YKSTEJU>A% Rainfall from CodrUiuton: .•1 as. Tetal Rainfall for month to date M In. Hkfhr-at Trmp.-i.ua r %  at.5 -F. Lowest Trmneratore: n-a *F. WuU Vstoclty g snUea per ggaar Barometer <9 j.m i 3*K (S p.m.i 29.fl.S0 TO-DAY Sunrise: 3.40 a.m. Kugaetr 8.13 p.m. Mean: First Quarter. May > %  Lighting T.M v %  High Tide? Z.H a.m. 3.U Law Tide: 9.M a-m.. .tT o.m. WHAT'S ON TODAY FaUee Coarta 10.00 a.m. Football at Kenslniton 5.00 pjn. Mr. Bell lectures at British Coutie(1 at 5.00 p.m. roll.*Band Concert at Qveen'a Park 7.45 p.m. British Council Films at the General tlaapltal B.IS p.m. What ..I Russia's IH.X.-I. So l;ir the Soviet's Internntlonal aflortl have been rigidly rciirlt-tud to "Iron Curtain'' countrie. with the exception of odd matches against Sweden and Finland. Information, here, therefore. Is neither plentiful DOT reliable However, I came pcroas a clue or I two this week In Copenhagen, i where 1 had | long talk on the I subject with the Finnish prolesBtOOal light-weight. Ells Ask 4HM of the few non-Soviet boxers with < personal acquaintance or Russian rings these last few months. Ask tells me thai, for "techntqua" the Russians are non-startrif but that every man they put in the ring will be ftl to light for ii fortnight. Unencumbered by amateur •Icnnlttoni and the niceties of %  Kikvu lime," their spart.ni '.raining methods are a guarunee of absclute physical perfec•ion and tnughnea. Neither Ells Ask nor anybody i utside Russia could talk about individual!. Nevertheless, it is worth nolinj; tl.rtl a crack Soviet side performed with much distinction in an "Iron < j lain" international championship meeting in East Germany i" eiitlv. If the winners ihere are picked f.i Helsinki — look out for flyw eight llulakow, bantam-weight Stepanov, feather-weight Sokolov. i.-id heavy-weight Perow. I.r s SPORTS QUIZ The Barbados Advuealr wlH award a book on hport to the lust person who aends the correct answers to the lollowiug question*. 1. CRICK ET. Name aaj playrr who represented it-i ii'l'" Trinidad sr British (lulaua la the prewar Triangular Vrlektl luiiin Jin.iiis who made "spectacles" In any one of the games In these series. ;•. muni \i i Can player carry the ball In his h.niils over the goalline, under the cross-bar and between the two goalposts mid *et wore a goal? 3. RACING What Is the minimum weight th.n csn hr Imposed ;.s Top weight In a Barbados Turf Club Handicap Race? 4. WATER-POLO Can a goml-keeper stand on the bottom for the purpone of drfendlng higoal T :>. I M'.l I TF.NNIR What are the measurements of a Table Tennis bat. according to Ihc Lasrs sf the t • %  mi7 NOTE: AU eatrirs far "Sporta Qula" should be addressed "Sports tl ui/ . ti Advocate Sports Editor, and m u-t reseh this office by It noon on Saturday. May 10. The entree! answers and the name of the winner will be published In the Sunday Advocate uf May 11. Each entry must be accompanied by A COUPON as Set oat below. SPORTS QUIZ They 11 Do It Every Time %  MM R0T1LL/I ALL MtHKEG UP, SHE'LL BO MLES OUT OF HER \M*YTO SRECT AH ACQlMlMX4NC£" KMOOieNE A-IDFUN8US-IOW Nee TO seE woWE WERE H THE LOUM3E.-8UT I IMS SURE IT 4S WOPOT-NEXT U3RNMO, CWVtNS FRiStiO UJSBAHO TO THE STAT\ISHE BOSSES PUMaUS-/WD VVEDOME/^ PksslT sr A FRESH ARRIVAL OF SMILES Here she comes with her cargo of Health and Happiness—Cow & Gate, the most famous of all Infants' Foods. And what a relief! For there Is everything that Baby needs in a tin of Cow & Gate to build firm flesh, strong bones, sound teeth, and to give that cheerful smile of abounding health and vitality. Yes! Welcome once again Cow & Gate. COW & GATE MILK FOOD TL, wiU t~ wkal JOM rant llum to L on (' o6 1 Qat>" J. B. LESLIE & CO., LTD — AjeBU. COPIED TRACTOR II ilh m rhttirt' ot Ihri-i' I'llf/IDI'.V 1imitoh>nt<. — -alma I npurisina UltSKL Wit ••"•! VH TUl u-ondertul m.ichine is now also nvailabl* wilh FULL-TRACKS Vou'll l>c truly amased to see Ibis smallloukiui; mill uorlorming jobs, both in the liold OIHI <t be doing justice to the title If they do not play, an champions have done In the past. "Bobby Jones Havers In a single In Atlanta and Walter Haifcn Faulkner had hopes that match might be fixed after the last Ryder Cup contest at Pinehurst but U.S.A. reports said that Hogan was now confining his activities to a few tournaments ,. venr and that he had no incentive to accept a challenge. No Publicity CURTIS CUP selectors move up |0 Muirfleld. East Lothian, mi the matches: "To play end of the month to see the probmembers us possible ables in a "full programme of captaincy and to giv.th. profons'roke and match play golf" over Monal a chance to play keen live days. matfftas M I break from coaching". Langlcy Park a week to-'morrou. Grlm's Dyke (Hatch End, captain. RALPH ALLIN. tcU* ma thai profcssioi'al TOM ODAM8 has partnered him in matches against "any-two" cluo members since last May and ihey have only lost row have won for the past 24 con%  acuUva weeks. Mr. Allin introduced the m.un (luriiiR hi: CAVE SHEPUEKD & CO., LTD. SOLE DISTRIBUTORS VALOR STOVES &f 3 BURNER (Black & While) $74.40 :l BURNER (Green) $63.88 2 BURNER (Green) ( $54.43 SINGLE OVENS n.K DOUBLE OVENS j3. 8 i GENERAL HARDWARE sujgug RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office) PHONE 49IB • •'•• run MUpplfg from sf##/.aw CRlTTALL STEEL SLIDING FOLDING DOORS THE IDEAL DOOR FOR VERANDAHS The Whole Dooe slides and folds to one side. Supplied ill ttCO Sl.-i-s With 4 leaves — ' V wldr With 0 leaves — ft' 3" wide CRlTTALL FRENCH DOORS J* •*' illa V •" high CRITTAIJ. BnORL WINDOWS Vartaas wMths snd helchU with sr without Ventilator*. '.' 2" high V Z" high THE MODERN WINDOW FOR THE MODERN HOMl WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD.



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* THITISDW M\V S, 15J BARBADOS ADVOCATK PAGE FIVE Vestry Want More Time To Consider Maude Bill HI oni y AT the request o( the Select Committee appointed by the House of Assembly to consider the Maude Bill which contains proposed changes of the Vestry System, the St Lucy Vestry yesterday discussed the Bill, but after about an hour and a half discussion few tangible views were expressed. Members said they had not had sufficient lime to peruse it and so did not know the merits and demerits of the two systems and ti be able to compare and criticise easily. The views expressed are to be passed on to the Select Committee of the House. Ttucase In Present were Rev. PcsUUna. Trvnt of Goodland, Chairman and Messrs. J. E. T. was charged by the Poll" Brancker. F. A. Greaves, ChurchMotorist Acquitted "Dick" Reece Here Again STIU. T.iKF.S BR l\ rOUST I* STOUT Mr. H. W W "Dick" Recce son of Mr. W W Reece. Solicitor huh Henry General, who arrived here tome Michael, week* ago from Ihe United Kiisa-Hn don win. ins tamllr, n tnploMd ivlng the molor car M-12M >*i w ,th Kuwait Oil Company, but warden, C. H. Yearwood. C. DeC. Deacon's Road. Si. Michael, in .t ,1,11 taken a keen Interssli in u..rt. Howell, LaRoy Bourne. G C. liarway dangerous to the public a .w Indies he and D. E. Webster. yesterday dismissed without preplayed water pyl'i (or YJLP-C r ;.v>.'' v u w £r! h "', Mr G n '"'"' ""— "t" 1 %  Orimui. Act !" Police Hwitrali „( Ti inidad Leaseholds !.' "£3$.J Btancker appea.rc,, jS&jgj, £, "&J. Club in 1948 and afterward* captained the Kuwait Oil Con Canadian To LeetMttl Is. Compensation Give Course In Council To Money To Be Horsemanship Bo. Douhlvtl Divided i>_ STAFF Sergeant ... on lntruclor %  ^..,,,. the Roval Canadian Mounte.1 Act i %  "T;:' tning Df| ,t "* 1 Legislatl** 4a, *.n be ai iih No What ( I...H... the discussion by observing that on behalf of Trent, while Sgt the question was.—were they in Forde uttached t. the Trunk favour of remaining as they were? Branch at Central Station proseII they were not. then, what type cuted foi the Police. The charge of changes would they sanction? stated that ihe offence was com"Frankly," be said, "I can see milled on March 11. no justification for remaining as George Jordan, island conslawe are. Improvements are long ble said that on March 11 someoverdue." time during the night he heard a The question arose as to which crash and going into Deacons system, the present or the proRoad saw a telephone pole knockposed would be more expensive ed down HI the xtroet. A motoi and Mr. F. A. Greaves. Churchcar was about 20 feet from the warden, said that it was stated in pole but i-*ie defendant who was the Maude Report that the propresent never told him what posed change would be more exhappened. pensive. Harold Rock another witness for the prosecution also said that Mr. Brancker pointed out that he heard a great noise while he there would not be so many parwas going home in Deacons Road ochial treasurers. Cpl. McClean said that the deAfter a pause in the discussion, fendant told him that he was Mr. Webster observed that it was driving on Deacons Road about a serious matter and he for one 20 miles per hour and saw a man did not like Jumping over a cliff dash across the ryad. In Drying puny Mgfl 'ri>m 1948—51. road, .(•cider it i it were. to avoid an accident the Mr. Brancker said that he was struck a telephone pole. prepared to listen carefully and sympathetically then to the views expressed, examine them and bear them in mind when the matter came again before him as a member of the Hou*e. Too Much Of A Rush Rhodesia Hopes To Grow Sugar picture "how* a pig and litt'i of IK pig* which ware born on Saturday night This u believed is b a record. The tow owned by Mr. OllM of Layne* Road. Brmon't HiU. Home Economics Officer Commends Vegetable Project ,i.rr. Ottawa, Oanasga, irtli bt tlvmf HI the island lodav by TC.V He will be spending here to instruct the local Moun.cu Police in "Horsemanship ami Mounted Display Events." Staff Sergeant Anderson's v-> I made pos*il>i< the Mndgssss. of Mi Nichols 1:. Ct.n.mis*H'iu'r i>r IVIire of > the Vtll of this •xperteneed In in>T -enianship I her xt year." Colonel K. T Miehelm. Commi -.i.-n. i tkf lollce. told the Artvocal "wuh the benefit of s-. ifl MISS F.Li A IIAGLUND, Home Economics Officer >i ftlf'T wlV'u" the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United liarbndos Mounie.1 ivii,v in Nations (FAO), told the Advocate yesterday that during represented at the < her tvtri visit she had seen an lntercstim* vegetable path ****" mm inti project and hoped it would be possible U> extend stil 1 further the production of food for home consumption. She hoped that the ie.-idling of Home Economics would be developed, but stressed the necessity for having It closely related to actual condition* in the homes oi the people. Miss Haglund is making a tour of the West Indies as %  preliminary to the Conference on the teaching of Home Economic! and Nutrition which ito be In the Court of Original Jurls, %  rdaj His Honour Mr. I, ,. Chanerjr made an order Sth N<1.BOO be dividari equally een Leotta Tarn wife of the have now i. i.'>v,i 1 .utt and her daughter Hit (29) after the cost*. ro|">ve been deducted when the lowing (.evasions The number ^omnun < %  to the compensation of the elected the death < f Lloyd Taitt a C in. I trill lorry driver employed by BulkeI Bt occupied the all ir consideration > • that court yesterday rcrwnlng ,„;;'V',. ,;;"' "^r llaggatt Hall. St. aael died on tht spot when he niKatlon > %  :> the Exe,v involved m an accident on .iin.v C Oenanl >' Lords Hill. St. Michael on 'he legislative Council A ill lxinmorning of March 25 while hw amernl the leewanl wsa driving one of the trucka WassBs Act belonging to Bulkeley ( %  lation will which wai laden with bags I \ .,ulot UM usual prtvllagsM ind nigar M th I ImmunlUoa of imrnben ( Ihe The Factory report showed thai H'ceased wan woiking for $22 action will 1-' t-iken in lite 1'iest. we#ll (,,,, rhe General LegialaUve. i..,.,., T llU J4Sl ol Haggatt H..11. Council will W In : Mtetiael told the court that the Lac I prolhc d#D wi M | e< | on the deceased ide that, if .the reureamtaUvc who upw( ^ hv „ wllh her sh Uwtui wife and they 20 Fine For Discharging Firearm %  n-rmoer M I -l memA,,,,,,!!:. ,. '.•;-•' %  %  •"• ,,,,. h, d on a, ulhl r who a JSSSi"S k, Kin. wiSi ( %  lrn< v "* KSSta U^OaturJ %  •>" '."P!" MM '"• .k, thai .he wa> ihe .,II DM PriiSdafHlal U ,r,. ,,i iiic Jmaipd ind a msrtitw • v.1 TI, > i. .. i .. ,""> !" rabm at the had three i-inurm fi;>m nan. \ II,UII .. V>* Ml. I. %  • %  CunelL Drake* Is also a married woman. LOCK POB TUNO'IKN Worship Mr. G. B. Gnm:>i, KDMl >M'i iN All. The unexploreil Logan '.' nil 1 1 iiuWor ih wni Ttrrltorinj heid w111 he 'he target this unoiMT t' Artiim Pohce' Ua.Utr.te ofnt." olnll > b >' FAO M "" Caribbean "•'•'" American mountain I .n^A^erd^SScSsI^. Con,m,*; lm be.lrann, June 30 ,n - r.le.le depcl,, „, ,un s •Dl< K H.FCF nnM -J''-d Sydnev Starrer T '!"'"''• . ., """ •" 0 ""• DIIK *..ECE C|vl Smm o( ^ suw wh ,|, i„ Barbados she has ha. T „ c meludlm, England, he learnl St. Michael 20/to be paid In 11 J *S full prolramiiumale. geolojisl,, will ba Sown a. II t 'Mill's n ST' a T u """' School. Ihe days or one month's Imprisonment IO 'new ""biecls II lnelude.1 v .,,,.., ,.>,,„,!,,,. £$iY£P'" d row „pp..ared on beh.lf'e." SkinMarshall's "very ,„..r, „" tog „l wh SJ"'a dnir *em to eonsld !" mulXnhe'rT'uh^ea]. goodwill Tour „.r while Sgt. K„„ attach^ „ v.getab'e growing pro.ect .1 U the Bill. Mr. Brancker suggested This plantation area is considerIn 146 he i.pre.ent,,l Trinl[he CenUnl Police proseculej Evkslein s v "'"that they might tell the Select ably further north, nearer the " '" 'he Irs! Goodwill Tour from information received for the Addrc lo T.l Students Committee as much. He addl equator, than Afric,', Vxlstlng %  "" the war against 111 itish CulPollee On Tujaday Ml.; Haglund ad^!! !"!" "i RJSC. "VJ lhat the Churchwarden micht pass sugar-growing belt, in thcoast;.! % %  %  i^otn 184* -51 M playwi llr. Calo told the court that be dressed the Trade Union MMmil on opinions on any general heads, districts of Natal and Zululnnd ,or Kuwail Oil Co., Ltd.. 1st XV examined Skinner and he was at the Y.M.C.A. 011 Nutrition. She The Churchwarden then asked where sugar has been grown on and in 19*0—*1 he represented very talkative. He had been thought they were a most promwhnt type of change, if any, they a commercial scale for more than K.O.C. 1st seven teams In tho drinking but he had not drunk s> ising group; very influential En ttM would like. 100 years. Persian Gulf Area in a seven a much as to be incapable of knowcommunitus from wh< nee UV v The consensus of opinion was Agriculturalists h ive always s,tie competition when K.O.C. won n g wh't he was doing came. At the end of the talk there lhat the present system should be r-lhowever, that Rhodesia hot ( h -. ,. „. _. Addressing the court' Mr. Barwas a livflv discussion which ih< ide possibilities for a Ai^r said bedrock format! %  In good workina order and Welfare and his Advisers. sliinly s l( g i-*.t of I l.ll III i chain id ,i\ > p lentuV liutiin • Edmbntotl by Canadian Paclil. Alrilnaa aa eii aa food and othei fUppilM for the MVOn WOOh null "f tht chain. i should be retained and there should be six offered ... instead of eleven Vestries. variety of crops. Since tobacco as goalkeeper from 1B43—46 and ,. ... .. production on a commercial scale P^ved for Trinidad S.A.FA. in The present qualification which ,.,.,_._,„ n Rhw i rsla ftmp 4 ., ,,.,,. mil n,i s A K I. ,„ !he B.C. tour, but was unable to Opinion was that the quallAeallon ^„ flrs „,,,,;„._,.,,. ^^ n accept the invitation on account for voting should not be changed Rnodeilla hQS h^n pUnted in an r,f contractual leave taken in the The I-ogans a quan It] aaju\lc Mall can ,M photograph." an unknot hut phys Mkwn pediUon USE A RIPPINGILLES BLUE FLAME STOVE whether gun if adult suffrage, but ^ xnPrt mental plot on the hanks of United Kingdom, should be changed so that only nr aimb,,^ Mar lh( (-hiiumhi He also played .IUILratepayers should have a vote and B ,| dw Rhodesia Sugar Hehockey and tennis. all of them should be entitled. fineriM ,, the flrm conducing the For. it was held they were looklests> bu( ,, s probnblv th ,„ .„. ing after the ratepayers rnnty. Athpr ^0*.,,. wlu i)0 fnlin e•> Medicine for him for S10. He gave the dewhich was overcome by the imfrom Edinburgh, He joined tt* port dion of toe indentured labourTrin dad Medical Service and wn suenr oroduc"PP' n,M to Slparia from whlci r\fEzS Pt he retired recent.y 1 anno*. ^_„.^j .. \*t. AT the end of this month, Coloens from Ind; eel R. T. Michclin. Commissioner South African of Police, will give his usual Lee..on has trad:t'on ture to bus drivers and conductors entlrelv for domestic consumption id one of the cinemas In Bridgeand it has never figured largel> town. as a South African export comThis Lecture will bo given in modify. Expanding crops in thi co-operation with the launching pant few seasons, however, hav of a campaign by the Barbados given South Africa a sugar export Automobile Association. The surplus. President and Secretary of that Under the Commonvealth Sugar Association will be associatsd with Agreement, signed in London I. the Commi.s..ioniT "f Police on December. South Africa has the platform. overall export quota of 200.0. (I After the Lecture a film "Road Safety" will be shown. doubtful whether the Sold Persons will be admitted to the Afriein quota will be completcl No provbiion is marie under the •'•>"' vl,lu t0 Ba rl^^ Twid %  xpected that this Lecture A8 eC ment fo, new production in P?"f* < ?*"" %  ^"7' J1 *'* will be arranged for Fnd.iy, May e sought HU funeral tK-k place at the The Police have taken over the f or Rhodesian sugar for many West bury Cemetery yesterd-.y supervision o*, ear park attendyears to come, especiallv since the n fiernoon in the presence o. ants. Shortly these attendants, aa < n ted obieet of production i to | ir np %  rath^ing. well as Iilr-nd Constables, will be (row supplies for the Rhodesian To n ,, gon I dee-i iriveii a new type of uniform. home m>rket. —B.t'.P. C st svmpBthv will he ext'-nd-"* He was married to Miss Solang • Ti dy of Martinique who predeeeased him and by whom h had two children — a son and < %  daughter. His sen. who is thriven known Sports Master a*. Royal College In Trinidal is now in Denmark taking a refre-hcr course In Physlca' Education. Dr. Grrll was a man of gem. tons a year and F.a .t Africa hatemperament and was highly reauota of 10.000 tons, jl is 8pcctP d. He WtU I member of lh" llM.A. and was a moving spinf the Mcdi'id Association belonging to Ihe Carilheii Commission are invited te send rapn anl itfvw Ttt% N.-HH AiTieiaan Regional Omnof rAO In W'shuiRton will also send a representative, H Itasdunds hssKstru irtt In the Cnnhb'an lire with the Caribbean Commission in Trinidad. She will be lenving here shortly for Orenida to continue lie* tour of the area arhlch tike her tn Martinique. PlMTte R* .lamalea, Curacse and Tti flulana. Shwlshe.1 that shcould hav Eastmond told the inr i„Hed mnv more te r „torleIn *&*„£* l *J8X h*r lour bot found It Imposslbl to the lick of time. M Hna'iin-1 who w s •• %  ie Mirtne Mo-el I' ft for Trlnifendant $10 and walled for htm r| '"" nl h h " ,,P v 'o return. ^—^——. —__^__.........._ The defend-nt did not return appeared before him yesterday .nd he tif>tiiif4i ihe PWlM Dfakaa ,„.„ K ..i i.. tha rnnl with lh. ,.,had three previous convictions for | Br ceny of clothing value,! at £11. the The party plans to 1 lin possible mountain in ut two ai do % %  • -1 tdJtloni lUon. lh-1 i. %  1-1 in the North American llO 0MHJ hiith LH.. 1 peaks as well gg nan) Alpins ' ** R1 FOR EASY & CLEAN CO OKING o A. .S. BIEYI>EN & aSONS (it iS) LID. AGENTS. W IfMSSSM Toll Commission Of Hisum'd I'uiuls dealing. SALESMAN DISCHARGED Ashton Gibson, a salesr KOw Land. St Michael, w charged by His Worship B Orifllth, Acting Joli %  <.21. 1951. Ernest Jones principal witness in the case, told the court thai of he desired that the matt M V9dropped us he was sufTerlnt; fron> *• %  a lapse of memory. Sgt. Murrell whose motion In the I Muglsprosf-cuted for the Police fro-o led to tha setttngi up Ol "' bo informal.mi received. mission. 0ti-*!m-tiim\ in //n-nnns 1'iVfiif Sftn r 4 people r for 2 people :! people OrfttfMl Prlre 30.M tUM MM! i S30.00 Now 116.00 tlZ.M .1 t mi • 11 M I1S.00 KNIGHTS LTD. YARDLEY FOR ALL THAT'S LOVELY AND BEAUTIFUL PERFUMES with lhat LIPSTICKS lilStinl I ol y u Favour4a I'ra^ranff sh 1 Here's The Range We Oifer— Perfumes, Lavender Water. Soap, • f Lipsticks, Ladies' & Gents' Gift Sets. Creams, Powders. CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street



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P M.I TWO BARBADOS \1IWM. Ill Cahib Catling M .RET HAFT. Adlo the 11.dies, who %  M i ttelr frirnda i' r if* %  next Ht a o'clock. i to see %  large %  f m.-mbcrs M Tf.cnwill alto Hart ha* been connected -allon since 1934. %  rel* in -'id Tm.H.ni Ihe most intcri'ilinj; part of her Tnlk will be when nhn u \l members and friends of her %  t the Y.W.C.A. Leadening Course at Oneva. Midi:ifhl Snack B it LAD and molasses Is tho favourite midnight snack of Small wood of Ncwh,told the House exwhat ho Ban hgot a lale cup of U [Of .i \.>iling Industrialist the lotting i -..id and he likes noi i better than bread and butmolasses. If you put on. it make* the nwlstiei run off7" n Opposition member "Aha!" sold the PremObtriOUS that the HonUarabafl acquaintance v th bread and molasses Is mere Voii put tho molasses let it soak In. nmt then %  > %  <• butter on top—deliciBack to Jamaica R BNINQ to Jamaica on Tuaaday to the s s. i • unit of lii D. S. Gld%  %  • I Superlnti intent of the %  "bum she was slaying. Congratulation* C ONOftAll 'LATIONS to Mr. Who celebrated I wedding %  naii i Mnv 4th || the roi mer Ei ena. daughter of Mr. and i oi Civilian Road. M Michael. Brains Truit \\7'THIN the next few weeks, * a] %  10 be announced %  % %  to Rediflusion will in.ii a Braim Trust on [ il II %  d Industrial Prob1 %  I! be Mr. F. C. Catchpot* << It E£A !i.\'lopment and WHf.iri\ Mr. It Lucia-Smith, Mi F Watcoi and Mr J D M II,U. i n Economic HiaRfHcarch Lecturer In 1 i he Uni' CI..I..W Mr. Rll Is 1 i • Lecturor dp the Caribbean Ti 9UTM. MISS EL8A HAGM'ND M pao* 5. For a Month A MON(; the recent arrivals bv II W.I A. from hiili-b (lui.ni. for a holiday wen Mr mil Mrs J QtOaBale* il (tenrgetnwn The> were nccompanlcd by their two children as well as Mrs. Gonznlc*' broth* and Miss Mary Lopes. daughter of Mr. Reggie Ipcs, Commission Alien! of Georgetown Misa Lopes works In her father's office The party expects to be here f^r a month staying at "Accra". flock ivyAnnual Fair T lu; Qlrl Quata tvtll t i aeon here staying at the Marina I CROSSWORD i ,ji i 'I'M 1 T-B s, IT n r ri — 1 U.IU. Ill* .'!< 1 H .,. %  nil I Willy Had a Terrible Time — He Found"Sound Language" Very Contusing — Hy .MA... IRK1.I. "IT'S no use." Willy Toad was saying in an unhappy voice to Knarf and llanid. the shadows with the turned about names. "Every time I go for a visit to town, something happens." "Whit happened. Willy?" Knarf and llanid hotk asked. Willy looked mere unhappy than ever aa he replied: "I can't begin! to tell you all the things that hap-1 pened Not good tilings, either. And all because I don't understand i •ound-lani. ii'•;:•*-" .ingnairer" said llanid. "It isn't English." said Willy "It isn't words. It's just sounds. Hut they all mean different things And ynu have to understand al! th different thinsa they mean else you find yoursrlf m tumid*.' Needed Kiplannlion Knnrf and llanid begged Willy to Oiplain exactly what he meant "hecause." .aid Knarf. "w. don't know •hat you ri tulklm about."Wll." said Willy. "I dressed up Sr my hest rOBl Ihe gtcrt One with the while strlpea and started hop I lug down the road to town Hy and T I came to Ih* railroad tracks I was lust ahout to er%s aval 'he tracks when a bell started ringing It was |usl a rcgiilai.oiritnary *,rt of hell, and il didn't even MHind reri pretty iifct church belt loi i %  I looked around and wa* sin |n iieil to see that a ereal many people, and a eienl man, guteaH biles nil Mapped m once t I hi %  dm %  tracks and araited. lisientng b its* aetl Hrm H iteaisii n V •in II ait i. it aaaa tui n II .' SB L 1 ** i*' %  * l*0t im • diMirriti u.ih). (ii IH 1*1. aeas eaten •*, *' INHffJ i dUrn a BiaiM atop eitn ^ wa— UM Mtl . Mi i veil, e % %  ,-iuiv.i (.:,( ,\i \f>.. it nina uu (, %  %  • ii n*i IDI -*> < ... ii on MI <>/ < i IBM m HI MM ares an louao i ii i.-i > %  • till* ptC ill lUUi J lll'Mi • %  %  1 • %  %  IIM | tfffl m "' rl i"ii nld hell *n nnii n • sn i started n B hi net.... ihi %  %  teoi rbadyi Vou rnvi lima) listening to a bill I IV || aaoaf gasned llanid "•V v || bj Hie v ' shook iu head "III the II -i ira i ., Na ii %  nd lisi >d hy 1 Del "* %  me tail of green real Willy it aaaanl .top en It meant mat %  i i I'M arai rnmlnii ni. %  . the tni rhatl why all thn>e ninpli 0 II loo aiitaastoUta ahwa *aii mi: in! Willy "Hut hi w eras I .< knoo Tea aaa, roa hara to unleisland sound InnitunRr And tl srhaa i rimdiv am IO loan I started In go serOSa Ihe main .treat W illy Toad was all dressed for town. A policeman was standing In the middle. As I stepped off the curb li< blew a whistle. And again all thi people wniied. Hut I didn't see why "ivlvi.iv should stand and wilt lust because a policeman happened to be blowing a whi.tle. Anybody can blow a uhlstli. So I kept right on wnlking.*' "My goodness!" llanid gasped again. "Wire you hit by the—" "By the automobiles T No Hy hopping this way. and that way ami by dodajaaji and running end stOMlna %  hen and darting forward again, I finally reached the other %  ide Hut I lost both sleetea and all Ihe bulions oft my beautiful in,,..,,,the Whistle "That policeman wasn't blowing hi whistle lust In fun." said K .rf "He meant foi you t* atay lust aheri you were, and not to cross tliest.eell" "Sound language," said Willy 'How an I to know what a whistle meant? And there ware ether sounde In town." Willy went on. "Sounds ol horr.s; and sounds of bells on street ears: and crashing sounds when cans uf ashes were dOBiasjd into trucka and dropped bark on Ihe sidewalk; and sounds of sirens when fire engines and iimbulaneea were coming You had to know what all of them meani I didnt know what they meant iv'.-n I want to town But now I rtn I r. iimetely nolhing hit me. But." ha said sadly, "my beautiful new coal Is all In rags/ Knsrf and llanid thought that i long as Willy was still in on pleefl it raaJly didn't matter how lorn io nieces his coal was. Mme. (lo s . k ) SIMENON The French-Canadian wife a of a best-selling author votes for the Simple life %1/HJ-N you rend tfulaAe. is staying at a WSWE: if flV w 'orges S.menon 'End hotel with her world's richest and you imagine som husband, who is one of best-selling novelists. • you imagine somi degree of lacquered sophistication At leM I did ... ^ of hpr grey nanne, ^i r her (, m OCr ,.• SSLm '.," !" <'y* I"I lTl5uS ^-"-""•'ir'tfW.'SS.!T *" "" %  "• ***" engagemeni t.r.i •he rcvea.to tier age a.UiauOe ni assed Slie wil! be 32 DO U *'H nd lh Sunenooa are •PMduif Uieday m PariiTT^ m ' France and It. UlS aeeaendsail home ill .. 16 Madame Simenon haa at aimof: a*.rf.vu* lack of nrleciii e.ar -surh a d.rec'i lac that vou fri > %  .. po*i:icly no d-, i %  .-• d idit w,slied to ader• in i !n..... Till It-iDAV M V\ I 1SS1 byEVELYN IRONS >* %  n\ e' \itk. is .1 likes conirasi it J and t London from Paris io relax betaeen books i It. London a.-ll and enj.u i 't me raawaraa %  nrw w.ie whom he had :i 1923 Pcnvse lurned down the lob and became %  s secretary ; abe MIJ i all tug bus iir-sa liliers. %  %  : notca Tliey were mm i day alter na Reno divorce came Now tliey |e a: Shadow H.>ck Farm in Connecticut, an old colons: upboard -ousc a.-.ii acrea gf land and WQ trout streams S-7 SOOKS • VEa %  loasa vear Bui %  aaaa ... a %  T ^:^tlt C< Kn and I •• .n .... % %  Band a. tlr>. ^ arranard ;!ie tive.ng \ •Net c .-.f Da 0 %  I a v MADAMt UMINON So*ling but French .s :a;ked at home. I :> exiravagar.ee sontet.mea steps ;n. Between nove' S menon haa three weeks to a moniii tree, and dur.ng that %  .miha and ii i wire i M ' '< <' % % %  a (ew davs trip io a m hotel, aeeing tike allows. n.e;.n.i friend* •T H um ~Bul we dim BO in •Misty.* 1 added M %  i: %  ag si i Just to see one ol UM i shows whicu my h enjoys." Simenon's celebrated Detec.. i-.sxvior Ma.aret is usually lo be found with a flaw U) liu ha-.s—an aperuif. or rjm But for Hie las) sersn reara the .;... %  iKillO.-. M id une s an %  %  • • > %  w ran up i igan : in w i %  ..I : ITr, %  U* M n Know %  i h %  1 sadder. < re sed : teee'sbesava \nd feri -a.e Thev e*\-r..r.B T :.: an cYBier.oo wa. taae a %  i %  .: %  and household %  ate afternoon. %  aorta .q %  %  rado. I Ul pips* %  % %  i be hard—but never I are doni want Uflen— Uaam aaav I . mussels and tlirir l.iud BIM B '.T.V o( well-buttcrrd bread %  ;ut it waaeas>:o underMine simemma entliu%  .;.qu, to aa -he a is o. a best-sellmu writer T" •* Tl *G %  Mllllll.., III." B.B.C. Radio Programme P > l: 4 ie art Tl | BUSSr H —. 4 4S p in 8por*wi| Rr

m Special l>mp;tlcn. rlude. S IS pi" from Edllarisls. p m Fimn live Third Pmsram'rr. IU pn Accoedlon Music, > ThRWWB, 1 1" P " New. ii IS p m rromiPT*. 10 JS p m Twin. JAMAICA HOUSING PROG.IAMME STARTS MAY 15 KINGSTON. JYa. May 7. .Some 14.000 fnmiUcs bdSsail aasdM Ihe huri nosiauai .imi rafaabiuta* Mily 15 %  -'. >ni 1^ s .' beford ix-tolwr when i! b rxixK-ted that tlufidinmaraetdd in west* ern Kingston will he in full BTOductlori St tr^ouaand 0D*-roorri housing unit.< lad In rvral 1,000 111 Kingston and psiswlpsd towns of the —] ap : m The Garden—St. James TUHAV 'M S XI |> n, HIR tlKMT WOMAN! 1 Mailai-I OIIK1EN ni*ii nriHOMM. ,. IIIKIVIil UM.' as .1".' ht *'|i. i *id•e (ould &W wr -ly o lm 'hr rrculil* o' /inR down 4I1 %  1 ataeM 10 NI. .>„. tl vk "% %  "V*,. 11 would be ijnd D M." I*re. B tl MBM ., .the) -.Ik nil ewi ihe kpr Opening FRIDAY at 4 45 & *.:". p.m. and < %  .nimn.ii 11 uU iSEW SMI*\II;\T warn coLoaaaD rovnaa FROM S*C. TO $:.S WASH CLOTHS JJ,. COTTON BLANKETS— WHITK. PINK. (1KKKN. BLUE. FAWN 50 \ 70" .. $3.30 SS .. 75" ... *3.70 * x o... ... $1.33 M X 86" ... .. $4.89 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS 6lAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606 GahSer found everyone and Snate the PcyFMg It't ihe biQgeii pochoga of *nl*i!iiiniti cmsfwm TONE BARTON HERE COMES THE GROOM EASY TO TAKE'. LOVELY TO LOOK AT! EiXIHAXTLXG TO HEAR! ?, It will malt* *^x> your heart dance. AQUARIUS Good indications for the next few days RoJaa. 21—rb. 19 mantle Interest successful for those born between 23 and 27 Jan. Money to be made in aound Investment. Sunday very lucky. nscEd Feb. 20— Mac,. 9 ABIES Mar. 21—Apr 20 TAURUd Apr. 21—May 22 GEMINI May 23—June 21 CANCER Jane 22—July 23 LEO July 24— Aug. 22 VHtOO Aug. 23—Sept 23 LIBRA Sept. 24—Oct. 23 SAOITTARrOB NOT. 23—Dec. 20 CAPRICORN Dec. 21—Jan. 20 Avoid spending unwisely during this period. Hold what you have and you will not lose. Moon's aspect klrongly stresses need for tact. Control emotions if success should be yours. Carry on as you have been doing and you will gain in buajassd very -horiiv. Veryprofitable lime for a second son. News of wedding to come will bring Joy. Mercury influences are very favourable and should spur you on to fresh achievements and possibly, a gain in finance Purchase wisely and do not be too easily influenced. • • • • You wdll meet on elderly woman who will offer advice. Think carefully what course you should jrureuc to avoid regrets later on. Days all beneficial for Romance. Attend to all urgent mutter* and essentials and rein tban You are inclined to be a little bit lazy, lately. Get ;i movt osi over the next few days You will not regret it. All to do with studv and brain work show great promise duiliiK l*ua iri Stars And You wtll be In tho "Evening Advocate." EMPIBE Tata? > I IS a SH Sin CAPTAIN BOTCOTT Starnn*: St wan CRANCUt 'MI.Hl.lKI.I Vl(llant K'lu Jon Hall WATCH TIMS SPACB FOR MIDNITE SHOW OIYMI'H TODAY -on]vi 4 JJ & B 1!* UHHK.4.N Kin a \ L.ll \\ II > 111 II IIS WATCH THIS SPACE FOB MinsnT. snow ITS KPEC.A1. HOW TOMrlHMoW Ian i 30 Si S II IIAKIIM (,|.nhl TaOTTFBN '1 I* II 11 \S FODAY IKpm. 'irhifan HIS a ItttYAI. on a a is 4 30 a< a IJ a Mafc* IWILvc %  assess dak* ll.lli..m Starring ll.ll.lnt In PLAZA I III il IMS BKiiMifrrtm'N iDIAL ISIS) TODAY IUS l • a C •Btlaalaa Uall) •.is t ia > %  mi'i'\ co CtSAH iOMtiKK ToSay -,,r. I>I | ao p „, 'BalSara ,.i I.M.,1, ,„k (*•*•• %  a "Part •....,. R>M.r>" la.n,, HaereM BeakJal ir s,„i Ml VI K Whip WI1J BAKBAKKKS IDIAL SIM) TODAT lOnln 4 as a s p m "TAR/*N S I'IRIl 1*1 HAHKF.1I 'WOMAN on PII.K 1 AAG mini li.il. Ml11(1 nanoM II i i.i II", Randolph SCOTT (..1,1,. rv 4 4i a. i p m. NEVI.II IK A i, V-llii IK i IAST or i nil cieah" a Raldar.fCtl I)..,,!.\ i %  I Ul A #A BARB/ IDIAL 5I70) DAVID NIUEN UERA ELLEN CESAR ROMERO 1 iOVEtV ^ TCS>UAII//l/tiV TECHNICOLOK PL-1/4 B ON ITS SECOND FLAMING WEEK The Giant of Motion Pictures TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 P.M. & CONTINUING "David. ^Slayer of Goliath. ;Give Us The Adulteress. Bathshcba!"! |>AVIS>*"RATHSHEBA l""*^ --1, l"^TECHNICOLOR CREGORTFfCK SUSAN |ATWMD '•• >. DAMTL r ./XailfS %  D-.. J 4UMtSBTHINfi' *-%£. •>** o*a—t (DIAL 2310) %  I % Vl CUl'I TO-IIAV 4.15 at 8.30 P M FRIDAY LSS, 4.45 A S-i I'M ConUnulng Ilallv, 4 45 A S IS P.M. Special Shorts—SUPER MOUSE "HE DOOD IT'" G I OKI:



















ie
' To

id
et

j lege, Weybridge, University Tutor-

Har biad0os



ESTABLISHED 1895







o Much Talk And
No Conerete Action

(From Our Own Correspondent)
C PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 7.

Captain R. A. Clarke, General Manager of Canadian
National Steamships, operators of the “Lady” boats to-da
blamed British West Indian Governments for the impend-
ing withdrawal of these vessels from the Canada-West
Indies service.

_There had been no definite signs that British West
Indian Governments wanted to maintain the passenger
service Captain Clarke declared.

He pointed out that there had been tal
meetings to discuss the matter,

held.
pr een Fu

k of holding
but no definite meeting was



There had been a series of post-
ponements and nothing concrete
had resulted he added Clarke who
is On a routine visit to the Carib-
bean Islands arrived this morning:
by the Lady Nelson which is ex-
pected to continue its voyage to
Montreal tanight. The last sailing

of the “Lady” boats from the West
Indies

J. Of T’daid

to Canada ill be i
November, be -
Hye R.E.C. Action

_IT IS announced by the Secre-
tary of State for the Colonies, Mr.
Oliver Lyttelton, that the Queen
f been pleased to approve the

ointment of Mr. J. L. M.
‘Perez, Attorney General, Trinidad
ind Tobago, to be Chief Justice of
that MY with effect from Aug-
Lee ;

Our correspondent in Jamaica
writes that the Honourable Donald
Sangster, Jamaica’s representative
of the Regional Economic Com-
mittee, commenting on the pro-
posed stoppage of the ‘Lady Boats’
on October 1, said R.E.C. action is
urgently necessary and Govern-
ment action is needed to settle a
commen policy.

Honourable Sangster pointed out
that Article 20 of the Canada-West
Indies Trade Treaty rovided
twelve months’ notice before ter-
mination and said whether this
applied to any part or just the
whole agreement had been deter-
mined. ‘The proposal to terminate
this service will, I hope, encourage
the West Indies to think seriously
about a Caribbean Shipping Ser-
vice which is so vital to the future
economy of this area. This service
need not be confined to the British
Caribbean; for I happen to know

ee

* Mr. Joseph Leon Mathieu Perez
vas born in Trinidad in 1896, and
as educated at St. George’s Col-

lal College, London and the Uni-
-Â¥ersity of London. He was called
o the Bar at the Middle Temple
in 1917 and after private practice
Trinidad, joined the Colonial
rvice there as Deputy Registrar
meral in 1927. He was appointed
sistant Magistrate in 1930 and
Cfown Counsel in 1934. He was
oted to be Chief Magistrate in
1936 and became Puisne Judge in
He was pointed to his
Fesent post of Attorney General
E195 ;







a Caribbean Shipping Service,”
he said.







NEW SINGAPORE
RESERVOIR TO
COST £5 MILLION

A new reservoir, three times

_ Huge Increase

_ In Malayan
Customs Revenue
Fi ubber was principally respon-
bie for an 85 per cent. increase

the yield from Malayan export
Gities in 1951, says an official

ort from Kuala Lumpur.







“The revenue collected by the
mstoms and Excise Department
he Federation of Malaya last
w from all sources amounted














the 1950
of $268,-

cent. over

an increase

he total amount collected in
ort duties was $352,679,620, an
ase of $197,759,981 over the
figure, while import duties
unted to $214,291,040, an in-
ase of $66,113,621.

“Malayan dollar = 2s. 4d.*

le’s Qopper To
t 333c. Per Lb

IAGO DE CHILE, May 7.
asury Minister German Pico
said a decree fixing the new
fige of copper will be signed to-

“and the new rate expected to
More than 33} United States
S per pound,





ile last week cancelled the
fl copper agreement with the
ed States under which 80 per
was sold at 274 United States’
$5 per pound leaving 20 per
nt. for sale on the free market.
aé@ Minister said there are no
of copper either accumu-
i or “frozen” in Chilean ports.
told newsmen categorically
Pnot a single ton of copper had
em produced since the outbreak
ot th: mining strike and all the
uction at Chile’s disposal does

aot exceed 1,500 tons.—U.P.
¢

Juin Is Marshal

PARIS, May 7.
eral Alphonse Juin, Inspec-
3 of French Armed
ses and Commander of Atlan-
‘Porces in Central Europe was
iéd a Marshal by the Cabinet.
Cabinet also promoted to
wank of Marshal —
sly — General Philippe
rc De MHauteclocque war-
ommander of the famed

“General of French Armed
until his death in an air

ash in 1947,
—UP.
















ngineer In

second African to be ap-
to the position of Execu-

A.M.1I.W.E., who had extensive
waining in Huddersfield, England.
Mr. Pratt, who was born in
Freetown in 1917, was educated at
the Prince of Wales School and
the Methodist Boys’ High School,
Freetown. He served five years’
ticeship in the Public
Department Technical
O01, Lagos, and from 1944 to
Baw as
id Technical College, York-




—— ee
a

bigger than any existing reservoir
on the Island, is to be constructed
in the Seleter Catchment area of
Singapore. ,
The capacity of the reservoir
will be of approximately 3,500
million gallons of water and the
treatment works will have a
capacity of 40 million gallons a
ay.

The estimated cost of the reser-
voir is about $45,000,000.

Communist truce neg
have agreed to withdraw
neutral truce ins
the ceasefire.

A pooled dispatch from
munjom quotin







ONLY TWO
ATTACKS

SAYS MICHELIN

Colonel R. T. Michelin,
Commissioner of Police, in
an interview with the “Ad-
vocate” yesterday said;
“There are a number of
completely untrue rumours
going around the island con-
cerning attacks on motorists
at night by armed persons.

“Do not believe all these
wild rumours which only
upset the population and are
the product of someone's
imag

‘ination.

“Only two true cases of
aitacks on motorists have
been reported to the Police
this year. These were made
on persons who had parked
their cars on lonely spots in
the Pine area at night. A
“Peeping Tom” had turned
up and demanded money.
Refusal to accede to his re-
quest had resulted in the
use of violence by him.

“The Police Information
Bureau (Tel. No, 08) will be
pleased to give anyone the
correct facts on any matter
at any time. Please verify
the facts before you pass on
an untrue rumour that does
harm.”

He ended; “You -_ —
jsured that swift an c-
tive Police action will always
lee taken to deal with all
true reports of attacks, etc.
on people of this island.”

C.S.A. Adopt
Holmes Report

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, May 7,
An official release on the C.S.A.



other territories which are willing | Federation Conference which end-
to participate in the promotion of |ed Monday reveals that the confer-

ence adopted the recommendation

;ot a select committee that the

Secretary of State be requested to
take action whereby unification of
public services in the area as re-
commended in the Holmes Report
Be coumiorns, for implementation
or to
Federation when consideration
should also be given by the
Secretary of State to setting up
our Regional Executive Authority
envisaged in the Holmes Report.

The C.S.A, Federation further
authorised itz Council to prepare
and submit to the Secretary of
State a scheme for implementation
of the unification of services.

The conterence accepted the
invitation of the British Honduras
delegate that its next beinnial
conference take place there.



N. Koreans Drop Russia As
Neutral Truce Inspector

TOKYO, May 7.

otiations were reported today to
their nomination of Russia as a
pector—one of the main issues blocking

the truce talks town of Pan-

United Nations sources said this con-

cession was made during secret talks between the chief
delegates on the new United Nations offer.

he dispatch said it was believed at Panmunjom that

the issue of the exchange of
only remaining major pr
United Nations “overall

Surrey 219:
India 64—4
The Indian ee

lost four wickets for 64 today,
after dismissing Surrey for 219.

A great spell by medium paced
bowler Ramchand in which
took five wickets for five runs
helped in the dismissal of the last
ee Surrey batsmen for only 20
uns.

Earlier Eric Bedser 40 and Dave
‘Fletcher 47 had put on 80 for the
first wicket and Laurie Fishlock
57 and Jack Parker 52 put on
108 runs for the fourth wicket.
Ramchand’s final figures were
five for 20.

The Surrey spinners Jim Laker
and Tony Lock took four wickets
in 20 minutes when the tourists
went in and the Indians finished
the day 155 runs behing with six
wickets in hand.—wU.P,







African As Executive

Sierra Leone

shire, England, where he obtained
the Higher National Diploma. In
1946, he was Prizeman for Me-

He was elected an Associate
Member of the Institute of Civil
Engineers in 1930, and an Associ-
ate Member of the Institute of
Water Engineers in 1951.

Mr. Pratt has had practical ex-
ong wong in various establishments
in the United Kingdom including
the Taf Fechan Water Supply
Board. He returned to Freetown
at the beginning of Aoril and has

.| chanical Engineering,

|
| appointment.

©) Panmunjom were

prisoners of war was now the

oblem barring acceptance of the
solution” for the truce.

Reports of the Communist con-
cession at Panmunjom came
through after General Ridgway
retiring United Nations Supreme
Commander had announced that
the latest Allied proposals were
the “limit to which the United
Nations can go.” An “overall
solution” he said was contingent
on acceptance as a whole. He
yd the Communists had rejected
he proposal. But it was not
immediately clear whether his
statement was prepared before or
after the latest developments at
known.

The United Nations he said had
ended the “news blackout” on the
truce talks and future sessions
would be public.

A despatch quoting United
Nations spokesman Brigadier
General illiam Nuckols said
that the Communists thad offered

London talks on} la’

THURSDAY,

C.N.S. General Manager Blames W.I
For Withdrawal Of Lady



U.S. Oil

U.S. 60,000,000 motoriat

that they return to work. —
Taft Polls
**‘Landslide’’

WASHINGTON, May 7,
Senator Estes Kefauver suffered
his first defeat in a Presidential
Primary losing to Senator Richard
B. Russel in the Florida Primary
as Senator Robert A. Taft claimed
all of Ohio’s 56 Republican dele-
gates in a “tremendous landslide
victory.”

Returns from 1,345 of Florida’s
1,683 precincts gave Russel 261,880
votes to 242,574 for Kefauver.
However, Kefauver apparently
prevented Russel from winning
the decisive victory which Russel’s
supporters said was needed to
win hnon-southern support at the
Democratic Convention,

The lead in the Florida contest
changed hands eight times duri







the night before Russel finally | ®s

pulled ahead for good,
Taft now has 401 delegates to

the Republican Convention which|]’

is two-thirds of the 604 needed for
nomination, Taft claims some
elected delegates who are not
publicly committed to any candi-
date. An unofficial count prior te
the Ohio Primary showed General
Eisenhower with 291 pledged or
publicly announced delega to
274 for Taft.

Harold E, Stassen had challenged
Taft for 47 of Ohio's 56 Republican
Convention Delegates but Stassen
appeared headed for another
Primary defeat. Taft had said he
might lose only one delegate al-
though he did not consider it a
“true contest” between himself
and Eisenhower who was not
entered in the Ohio Primary.
Write-in votes were not permitted.

Taft also beat Stassen in the
contest for Ohio's ten delegates at
rge. é
Retauver's “su claimed
a “sweeping victory” for him in
the Ohio Democratic Primary, A

Boat . Service

Strike Poses
Threat To Motorists

DENV
Si

plete exhaustion of gasoline supplies unless 90,000 striking |
oil workers accede to the Fedi















airlines announced they had cut

r
Weie others indicated they soon
would be forced to curtail services
pending the fuel shortage.

tary circles
Department ordered all of the arm-
ed forces to cut oil consumption in
the United States. U.S. Army
instructed all United States area
commanders to cut consumption of
petroleum products “to minimum
required
operations”.

least one-third in use of aviation
. f t ti

or c conservation”.
HS aioe. Ordered al fivipa
activities outside the Korean War
area to cut to the minimum, There





=AY 8, 1952

Govts.





Bit, COLORADO, May 7.
re threatened with com-

|

tal Government's request |

* spokesman
cf 22 gs

ey t oll

» the decision
we be made 4
\Vage Stabilization Board -
cay requested that the week old
strike @f oil workers be ended
“ingmediately” and summoned
Union and industry leaders to a
Leard meeting in Washington next
"Tuesday .

Chairman Nathan Feincinger
told representatives of Unions and
cfficials of 75 oil companies that
‘ney should continue collective
bargaining and be prepared to

iake a “full report” to the Board
on Tuesday on the status of the
tispute. -

The strike already has meant
he loss of more than 10,000,000
barrels of oil including 5,000,000
barrels of gasoline according to
ise national newspaper for the oil
industry “The Oil Daily”,

Tt has also caused a definite cut-
ck in military activities both In
@ United States and in Europe
well as the reduction of civil-

for the coalition |
CLO., AFL. and
unions in

, 10-Year Plan
For Aluminum
In Surinam

PARIS, May 6.

A $53,000,000 10-year‘programme
to produce aluminum in the
Netherland’s pint sized South
American colony of Dutch Guiana
was recommended Tuesday by the
International Bank for Reeon-
struction and Development,



LORD WILLOUGHBY, the new tug for the island,
Carlisle Bay after being unloaded from the 8.8. Crofter.

through
The water
barge, which was also brought by the “Orofter”, will be unloaded
to-day.

“Ida” To Be Replaced
By “Lord Willoughby”

MANY people gathered at the lower Wharf ye
day afternoon to watch the Lord Willoughby being teed

ashore by the Lord Combermere. The Lord Willoughby
will replace the Ida which continued to serve the colony

although condemned 11 years ago.
The Lord Willoughby, which was; thc 60-ton Jumbo, heavy lift der-



> pervices A report of a special bank : Jhites S ard (South-|rick of the Crofter.
Being felt mostly in the Mia Wee mission says there is no technical ceipten} bat sana in “ This Jumbo derrick is part of
®rid East. sqnege why reasonably cheap island at daybreak on board the|the Crofter’s equipment. The
Dwindling gas supplies forced me cuareinctste power cannot bels's. Crofter, At 1.00 p.m, she| water barge, which has its own
the trimming of bus services in eee ocally — to convert wos lowered into Carlisle Bay by pumping equipment for suppyling
Detroit and in Indianapolis and it a into aluminum for Dutch the ships , was left on the deck

Guiana, the world’s biggest source
of bauxite. The report urges the
Colonial Government to discuss
commercial aspects of such a
scheme with cauntries producing
‘luminum elsewhere and seek out-
side investments,

The mission predicted that ex-
ternal aid would probably give
the colony more than the required
$53,000,000. Much of Guiana's
bauxite is now being shipped to
Canada for manufacture because
of cheaper Canadian power sup-
ply.

Metal Dispute
Complicated

LONDON, May 7.

was reported that “no gas” signs
wilt be up by tomorrow. Seven

passenger and cargo services

The strike also moved into mili-
when the Defence-

to



support essential

The Navy ordered a cut of at

ine and the Marine Corps

ig no oil strike in California be-
cause most of the petroleum pro-
ducts used in Korea come from

First the United States—Bolivian

S § fauver’s eight : ;
spokesman said Ke ig tin dispute and now the United

delegate at large candidates were





lk

oi the Crofter. It will be lowered
this morning by another heavy
litt derrick in the aft,
Sturdy Appearance
Lord Willoughby is not as large
as either the Lord Combermere
or Ida, but has a very sturdy ap-
pesrance, Her hull is well out of
the water, It was noticeable that
when she was being tewed to the
Careenage by the Combermere,
«| She rolled more than the Comber-
me-ve did.

Reds Reject
Latest U.N.

Proposal

MUNSAN, Korea, May 7.
ne Korean Truce Talks san
o all time low today after the
mmunists rejected the Allies’? she has a design speed of 8%
iv, final and irrevocable pack-[ kn ts which was exceeded in her
An official Allied } trials when she attained 9.4 knots.

there is nothing} The Crofter also brought an-
other interesting bit of cargo.
was the Auster Autocrat
plane for t
eropla

that the plane will be unloaded
today.

S.S. Crofter has brought valu-
able cargo to the island, Barba-

[
te
©
el
proposal,
‘sman said
to discuss,

spo!
lef
Top negotiators of each. side
toll the other that the “next move
is up te you.” Agreement ap-
peared to be so remote that Unit-
ed Nations Command proposed an
indefinite recess for the Armistice
Talks, but full delegations will





\ ‘ Chiles , ro dos now has an Auster Autocrat
sswept in by an overwhelming! coastal refineries. Io ste. “eased emesis: meet again on Thursday at the! which, if allowed to do so by
nargen” Retauver tas Suen —UP. volved on both, ‘the Gling. andpR eas insistence Negotiators the B.L.A.C., could well carry
only eight of Tae eeearnen buying sides “produces a pemmipli- abruptly ended the secrecy which} 041 an airy rescue service in co-
at large. Former ator Robert cated situation which ‘seems to| had shrouded the talks since the operation with the Lord Will-
J. Bulkley, a favourite son ° e daunt press comment here. The| Allied Package Deal was presented oughby.
candidate” thus was assured of Fishin Boat Financial Times alone comments, }O% April 28 in Tokyo. oe mar \
the other eight. It sums up Chile’s experience with|th¢w B. Ridgway promptly a
—U-P. ° the “Free Market.” nounced a virtue’ Allied ultima- £200,000 FOR ST .LUCIA
: ‘ tum, It is a three-point package
Believed Lost Over most of lest year Chile} U.N. Command that they would ST. LUCIA, May 7.
° had no difficulty in securing} return 70,000 of 132,000 captured} y+ was announced Wednesday
New Atomic The fishing boat | Miss Pam prices around 50 cents per pound|Chinese and North Koreans !n|¢hat H.M, Government have ap-
which left Oistin beach at 5.45 p.m. |for copper which she was free to]exchange for 12,000 Allied rooms proved an additional | allocation
D 7 on Monday April 28th last and of}sell on the open market (com-|hejq by the Reds. This is thalto St, Lucia of £200,000 made up
Bomb Ex, losion ch there has been since no|pared with 27% cents veceived}on iy of the deadlock. Commu-fof £50,000 already approved and
P cunther official report has now|from sales to the United States). nist would be permitted to build}a further £150,000, '
LAS VEGAS, ws been given up as lost with its two-|Towards the end of the year how-| nc repair North Korean airfields.| This money will be mate avail:
. Nevada, May 7. Iinan crew—Fitzgerald Best of [ever premiums receded and sales) pa. would drop their nomina-Jable in the usual way as so ——
The detonation of an atomic]. . co swald King of | high prices becarne more diffi-| jo) ¢ Russia as a neutral nation|approved under C.D. and ;
: 7 sca! Vane Ville and Osw g , a ; ioe | tio
bomb 75 miles away at eee Oistins cult. Nevertheless the free priv to help police a truce.— funds,
flat brilliantly lighted up the ® a ; , : of copper even now * remains ees
pre-dawn sky here today. ‘ight wane Rene ee re ee around 35 cents per pound,
white light} Wiles said y y . Q
oe a Stoked’ buildings here and/the boat left Oistin, the owner} The question of Chile selling
surrounding mountains, there was; Charles Ifill made a ener be all her coneee 7 ya —
i sky in- Be. é t returned, but/market possibly including ron
a golden glow in the sky outlin-|the vessel had no : p aie Se
j ‘loud. ‘ ion that the skip-|Curtain countries has been rais-
6 Sere in Los Angeles 250 oor ae cose patie hocus pocns (ed but in view of the physical
i au i j i .|volurne involved and the present WORLD F
nae blink ties ay “to the on teen fehing in: Sasaae cautious temper of world metal
quic: a mn. i

markets need not be taken very
seriously. The real question is
whether Chile or the ‘U.S. is in a
better position to stand the strain
of « prolonged deadlock compara-

northeast. It lasted but a_frac-
tien of a second. No shock was
felt here and there was no sound
from ‘the blast, A small atomic
visible above the

Since then reports have been
received that parts of the debris
of the vessel were picked up, and
on this unconfirmed information,












cloud was i boat and crew are considered|y)" Rin he Ws —Bolivian ti
. is sared quickly. | the boa ble with the S.—Bolivian tin
desert It disappeare 1 ee ant. feos:
Metal bulletin reports that the



“Chilean government expects to
fin’ a ready outlet in Europe and
India for Chilean copper but has
no’ yet considered the sale of
me al to Iron Curtain countries.”
—U.P.

W. Powers Fear Japan’s

Tendency To Communists
By HAROLD GUARD

LONDON, May 7.

5 N from being

he Western Powers prevent Japan
\eaune tule the dominant Eurasian power which at present
consists of the Soviet Union Allied to Communist China?



S'rike At U.C.W.L
Enters Third Day

|

Since the Japanese Peace Treaty came into effect last From one nee reas!
April 28 questions have been discussed with some mie 1 eae
givings by far Eastern authorities here who are dubious} ),6 strike at the University
whether the politics and diplomacy of the West are suffi- Coll ge of the West indies emane

s 4 1¢@ NONn-academic junior ste com-
cient to bring success. ——— -|pleted its third day today with

The discussion was centred »~ under-graduates still doing domes-

a counter proposal on May 2.\around the Soviet Ambassador's MENT tic work. There was a slight dis-
This was sald to be a “package ees is Wee soe WAGE AGREE turbance between police and strike
deal” in which the Communists {

agreed to drop the nomination
of Russia if the United Nations
returned 123,000 Communist
prisoners. The United Nations
had offered 70,000 saying that the’
rest do not want to return to
Communist territory,

This despatch further said)
that no p 88 Was made after
May 2 and the issues had narrow-
ed to “only one, a fundamental
one’—the prisoner question,

In a_ statement at Panmunjom
teday United Nations Chief Dele-
gate Admiral C. Turner Joy said
that Communist nomination
Russia “was never the real issue.
It was an unofficial one created
by the Communists for bargain-
ing pu .’ The Communist
desire to rebuild their wrecked
airfields was ered the
crux of the problem.

This was why the United Na-
tions had offered to “accept the
Communist view on military air-
fields if they would accept the
fact that the United Nations
would not be a party to forced
repatriation of prisoners Admiral

—U.P.

a student at the Hud-| already assumed the duties of his! Joy said.

of | Saturday's






This was seen as Russia’s first KINGSTON, J’ca, May 7. |pickets at the University’s grounds

; s x but it was not

i f relentless} A w agreement has been|this morning, t was |
Rirnacr ic Meek ie security readanl haere cane farmers developed, The B.1.T.U., instructed
stern, attacking the United States}and the Bustamante Union in re-|a sectiofi of the staff attach-
tee-dapanees Defence Agree-|spect of the 1952 crop. Workersjed to the University College

get higher wages and other facil-|of the West Indies Hospital to re-

o draw Japan into an re~
Soars Seaman” with thefities, Two strikes are ge in} turn e eae nes z ceues
the soap and margarine factories.jwas obeyed, but the rest o! 1

pone See ree — stuff is still out

May Day Rioting

The first of the Soviet moves
were seen in the May Day rioting
which all authorities here agreed
showed clearly that Communists
in Japan are following the Soviet
directive. The editorial in last
London Times noted
the same misgivings and said the



Advisory C’tee On Library
Services In The Colonies



FROM

BURTON, ENGLAND

Worthington

BREWED AND BOTTLED
TO PERFECTION

|



NOW ON SALE AT

J. N. GODDARD & SONS Ltd.
BRIDGETOWN

|

|
|

May Day riots should teach the} ‘The Secretary of State for the Mr. F. C. Francis, M.A. F.S.A
yore oan ame ee Japanese {Colonies (Mr. Oliver Lyttelton) | (Keeper of Printed Book 1 brits I
id ¢ 3 announces that the Library As-|Museum); Mr. A. B. Mitchell
ie elec ta oe Eat Oar rola | sociation has established an ad | (Librarian, Colonial Office); Mr
stand why the American troops | V'S°TY committee with the task of | Charles Newell, M.A., F L A
are remaining in Japan after the considering and advising upon all) (City Librarian, Mar hester)
liberation of the country, The} â„¢atters affecting library services| Mr. R. Offer, B.A., Ph.D (Lib-
government could cut some of the} in Colonial territories. | Tary Adviser, Inter- niversity |
ground from the Communists if it! The chairman is Mr. L. R. Council an Higher Education in
explains more fully to the people| McColvin, C.B.E., F.L.A. (City the Colonies) ; Mr, E Sydney,
the part the United States is} Librarian, Westminster), and|M.C., F.L.A (Borough Librar-
playing in protecting their coun-| other members of the committee | ian, Leyton); and Mr. W. E. F.}
try while it is disarmed. are Miss F,. E. Cook, M.A. F.L.A.| Ward, C.M.G. (Deputy Educa
—U.P. (County Librarian, Lancashire); |tional Adviser, Colonia) Office

;
|
|
i
PAGE TWO



een te ae eee eearmeanay ~! Ae

Carib

MARGARET HART, Ad-

MS Secretary to the

Y.W.C.A. in the West Indies, who
at present ¢ a visit to the
island, il give a Talk to mem-
bers of the “Y” and their friends
Headquarters, Pinfold Street,

on Monday night next at 8 o'clock.
It is expected to see a large
number of members and friends
at this meeting. There will also

be an enrolment.

Miss Hart has been connected
to the “¥” organisation since 1934.
She has worked extensively in
Canada and Trinidad.



Perhaps the most interesting
part of her Talk will be when she
tells members and friends of her
experience at the Y.W.C.A. Lead-
ership Training Course at Geneva.

Midnight Snack
READ and molasses is the

favourite midnight snack of
Premier Smallwood. of New-
foundland, he told the House ex-
plaining had when he got a late cup of
tea for a_ visiting Industrialist.
Hiis tastes are these of the toiling
masses, he said, and he likes no-
thing better than bread and but-
ter and* molasses. “If you put
butter on, it makes the molasses
run offf, an Opposition member
objected. “Aha!” said the Prem-
ler, “it is obvious that the Hon-

rakle Member's acquaintance
with bread and molasses is mere
hes iy, You put the molasses
on first, let it soak in, and then
spread the butter on top—delici-



Back to Jamaica

Riera to Jamaica on
Tuesday by the s.S.
De Grasse was Miss E. Gideon:



She is the aunt of Dr. D. S. Gid-
eon, Medical Superintendent of the
Barbados General Hospital with
whom she was staying.

Congratulations
ONGRATULATIONS to Mr
and Mrs. Hassim Gafoor of



Couva, Trinidad, who celebrated
their first wedding anniversary on
May 4th. Mrs. Gafoor is the
former Erena, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. E. Lynch of Civilian Road,
Bush Mall, St. Michael,

Brains Trust

ITHIN the next few weeks,

at a date to be announced
later, listeners to Rediffusion will
be abla to hear a Brains Trust on
Trade Union and Industrial Prob-
lems. ‘The members of the Brains
Trust Will be Mr, F. C, Catchpole,
O.B.E.sAdviser on labour to Cola»

nial Bevelopment and Welfare,
Mr. Qs Lucie-Smith, Mr. F. C
Walcott and Mr. J. D. M, Bell,

Lecturér in Modern Economie His-

tory: and Research Lecturer in
Industadal Relations in the Uni-
versity®of Glasgow. Mr. Bell is

the Guest Lecturer dn the Carib-
bean Trade Union Course,

Thesscope of the Brains Trust
will be the general subject of in-
dustrid] relations, the everyday
contacts between employers and
employees, question of organisation
on both sides and the machinery
of negotiation, Questions are in-
vited from the public and should

be seat to the British Council,
“Wakefield”, White Park, and
marked ‘Broadcast’: names and

addresses need not be given.

Regular Winter Visitors



NM RS HELEN TOWNSEND
4 and Mrs. E. Lanvaster of
the U.S.A., left for Jamaica on
Tuesday by the S.S. De Grasse
intransit for the U.S.A. Both

ilar winter visitors to Barba-
dos, they had spent the entire

winter season here staying at the
Marine Hotel,



CROSSWORD



Across
i, Phey re proud of our Jim here.
w



& Phe oe A marginal interest ¥ (9)
ih Vou the oniid reaches it, con,
wive (6)
i4 Try sweet making and then
yuh wwe and why, (5)
id Ser yuU see a realy (@)
1* Hm » egendary 24 tor the honour
iret piace (is)
Wi ier tw be wed (3)
4.) VWeurd vure lo @ broken net. (4)
Ԥ NuWes the seaaon for ib (4)
va wee la (5) 28 Agog. (4)
UG. N&@e tor a theatrical pony. (5)
27, Qiep. deep waters, (4)
He Down
1. lich age would atop with
meen ag ade nmatr, (6)
4 wy (oO)
% Make the advance, (4)
* ViMhicle to ocunvey a yard, (4)
oO. Make itt nine Guy (eB)
6 Nathing goes for ner (6)
Y Awe, from the centre some put
tee sume take tt off, (4)
vw Je wey (7)
iv. ifs near “™)
1a Yaau got sumething in
gemera service. (5)
tO Where ogre® are found. (6)
37) #@eece tor 14 48)
i8 Wer Orson Knew thie part of
Baw (5, iv. Reguecn (a)
*0 Ifipement (3) 2. Hili4)
Soiifion of vesterauy s pusele Across
{ M@iparama, 8. Juulent Abated
u. supe 12 Dormy +4 Ante le
halter, 1h Bluae if One ¢ Resait
wi Nea thewn Lb Mou eé
LuAMrous & WeDt A AwenvOn
a 7 Ada veassea satin ,
eas is Pownterert 16 Bver 17
twandea





MISS ELSA HAGLUND
—Story on page

For a Month .

MONG the recent arrivals by

B.W.LA, from British Guiana

for a holiday were Mr. and Mrs.

J. Gonzales of Georgetown. They

were accompanied by their two

children as well as Mrs. Gonzales’

brother and Miss Mary Lopes,

daughter of Mr. Reggie Lopes,

Commission Agent of Georgetown,

Miss Lopes works in her father’s
office.

The party expects to be here for

a month staying at “Accra”, Rock-

ley.

Annual Fair

HE Girl Guides will be hold-

ing their annual fair at the
Drill Hall on Saturday 10th May
from 3—8 p.m. The proceeds
from this Fair will be divided to
defray the expenses of the 300
foot wall built at Pax Hill, The
Police Band by the kind permis-
sion of the Commissioner of
Police will render a suitable pro-
gramme of appropriate airs and
there will be amusements for the
kids. The usual attractions and
tickets for the raffle of 2 bicycles
will be on sale.

On Holiday

RS. MARY CUTLER from

England is now in Barbados
for a holiday. She arrived on
Tuesday by the De Grasse and is
staying at the Windsor Hotel.

Factory Inspéctor Leaves

R. G, I. QUINN, Senior Fac-
+ tory Inspector of Trinidad
returned home. last night by
B.W.I.A. after a short visit to

the island, While here he lectur-

ed to the Trade Union Students
attending the course at the
Y.M.C.A,

Mr. Quinn was staying at the
Hastings Hotel

U.K. Director
R. ALBERT LOVERING, one
of the Directors of the Bar-
bados Electric Supply Corporation,
arrived here from England on
Tuesday morning by the S.S.
De Grasse on a visit. He is stay-
ing at the Windsor Hotel,

On Honeymoon
R. AND MRS. CLAYTON
APPLETON of Trinidad are
now in Barbados to spend their
honeymoon, They were married
on Saturday at Susamachar
Church in San Fernando and arriv-

ed here the following day by
B.W.I.A.

Mrs. Appleton ,the former Miss
Eileen Lakhan, is the daughter of

Mr. and Mrs, Alexander Lakhan
of San Fernando, while her hus-
band is the son of Mrs. M. G.
Appleton and the late Mr. Claude
Appleton. They expect to be here
for two weeks staying at “Leaton-
on-Sea”, The Stream,

To Visit Their Daughter

R. AND MRS. MENDONZA
of British Guiana who were
holidaying here for the past three
weeks at “Accra”, Rockley, expect
to leave later in the week by
B.W.1.A. for Trinidad to spend
a further holiday with their
daughter before returning home.
Mr. Mendonza is Secretary of
Messrs. Booker Bros, in George-

town,
Wedding
QUIET wedding took place at
St. Matthias Church on
Thursday last when Mr. Clyde
Eastmond of Bank Hall was mar-
ried to Miss Clotelle Downie of
Quarry Road, Bank Hall
The bride who was given in
marriage by Mr, Dennis Jones,
wore a dress of silk peaque with
a flesh tone yoke, Her short veil
was kept in place by a headdress
of orange blossoms and she car-
ried a bouquet of Queen Anne's
lace and Anthurium lilies
The ceremony was conducted
by Rev. M. E. Griffiths and the
duties of bestman were performed
by the bridegroom's father

A reception was held at!
“Georgeville”, Bank Mall Hill. |
Married in B,G, |

i

R. AND MRS. G CHABROL |
who were married recently /
in British Guiana are now in Bar-!



bados on their honeymoon. They /
are staying with Mr. and Mrs
John Chabroal of “Floris Villa”,

i
Rockley |
Mr. John Chabrol is on the staff;
of Cable and Wireless Ltd |
British Guiana. At one time he
Was employed on the Barbados!
staff in 1945-46 working at the St./
Lawrence Branch.

Off to Trinidad
EAVING by the S.S. De Grasse
on Tuesday evening for
Trinidad -were General and Mrs,
George Vidmer,



n



Willy Had a Terrible Time

—He Found “Sound Language” Very Confusing—

By MA... TRELL

“IT’S no use,” Willy Toad was
saying in an unhappy voice to Knarf
and Hanid,,the shadows with the
turned-about names, “Every time |
go for a visit to town, something
happens.”

“What happened, Willy?” Knarf
and Hanid both asked.

Willy looked more unhappy than
ever as he replied: “1 can't begin
to tell you all the things that hap-
pened. Not good things, either. And
all because | don't understand
sound-language.”

“Sound-language {" said Hanid.

“It isn't English,” said Willy. “It
isn’t words. It’s just sounds. But
they all mean different things. And
you have to understand ali the dif-
ferent things they mean else you
find yourself in trouble.”

Needed Explanation

Knart and Hanid begged Willy to
explain exactly what he meant “be-
cause,” said Knarf, “we don't know
what you're talking about,”

“Well,” said Willy, “I dressed up
fn my best coat the green one with
the white stripes—and started hop-
| ping down the road to town. By and
| by | came to the railroad tracks |
| Was just about to cross over the
tracks when a bell started ringing.
It was just a regular, ordinary sort
of bell, and it didn’t even sound
very pretty, like » church bell for
instance. | looked around and was
surprised to see that a great many
people, and a wrent many, automo
biles all stopped at once at the edge
of the tracks and waited, listening



te the bell Now it seemed very
silly to me that all those neople
fo all these nutemobiles should

ind Watt and listen just be

«thet foolish old hell was ring

ine Sool started right across the
tracks snying to everybody: ‘You
can waste your time listening to a
bell I'm going!"
“My goodness!” gasped anid
‘Were vou hit by the"
Willy shook his head, “Hy the
reittond train’ No tt whirved by
he t henped out of the way just
in tine Alb at wot was the tail of
| my beautiful wreen eoat.”
Phat bell, Willy it meant stop
| look and tisten It meant that a
reilroad tratn was coming along the
; tracks. That's why all those people

and all those automobiles were wait
ng

“Yes,” said Willy. “But how was
{ to know. You. see, you have to
understand sound-language And









Willy Toad was all dressed
for town,

A policeman was standing in the
middle. As 1 stepped off the curb
he blew a whistle. And again all thr
people waited. But | didn’t see why
anybody should stand and wait just
because a policeman happened to
be blowing a whistle. Anybody can
blow a whistle. So | kept right on
walking.”

“My goodness!” Hanid gasped
again, “Were you hit by the—”
“By the automobiles’ No. By
hopping this way, and that way.
and by dodging, and running and
stopping short and darting forward
again, | finally reached the other
side. But | lost both sleeves and
all the buttons off my beautiful
coat,”

Blowing the Whistle

“That policeman wasn’t blowing
his whistle just in fun,” said Knart
“He meant for you ts stay just
where you were, and not to cross
the street!”

“Sound-lauguage,” said Willy,
“How was | to know what a whistle
meant? And there were other
sounds in town,” Willy went on.
“Sounds of horns; and sounds of
bells on streetcars; and crashing
sounds when cans of ashes were
dumped into trucks and dropped
back on the sidewalk; and sounds
of sirens when fire engines and
ambulances were coming, You had
to know what all of them meant 1
didn't know what they meant when
| went to town, But now | do. For.
tunately nothing hit me. But,” he
said sadly, “my beautiful new coat
is all in rags.”

Knarf and Hanid thought that as
long as Willy was still in one pivce



, then, when 1 finally got to town, |
started to go across the main street.

NEW SHIPMENT

WHITE & COLOURED TOWELS FROM 58c, TO $2.56

WASH CLOTHS

it really didn't matter how torn to
pieces his coat was.

SS SW

29¢.

COTTON BLANKETS—WHITE, PINK, GREEN, BLUE, FAWN

50 x 70" ..:... $3.30
55 X75" ...... $3.70
eo X 80” ...... $4.33
66 X 86” ...... $4.89

[TR EVANS & WHITFIELDS

BIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE STORES

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me ; ’ #3
ee THURSDAY, MAY 8, 1952
BARBADOS ADVOCATE amon
350 Ai | , |
me Book | The STARS* *x°
a oo ~/he i
~Y
e bs " ry as Ba
The French-Canadian wif and YOU ~ A
fan wire i rr
; P
.
of a best-selling author
at's . AQUARIUS Good indications for the next few days. _
votes or t e mple life Jan. 21—Feb. 19 mantic interest successful for those born e~
tween 23 and 27 Jan. Money to eee in
sound investment. Sunday very lucky.
WHEN you read that e. Georges Simenon * . rte * )
is staying at a Wi End hotel with her PISCES Avoid spending unwisely during this period.
husband, who is one of world’s richest and Feb. 20—-Mar, 20 » Hold what you have and you pine ~~ tor
best-selling novelists, > you imagine some nee . — ae: Seat. wane
degree of lacquered sophistication. At least OREO) SIRDUONS 1 Z A :
’ ne “, , . ARIES Carry on as you have been doing and you will
sup) end ae Simence ete veins ” 2 ae a Mar. 21—Apr. 20 gain in business very shortly. Very Uae
F ‘ hat 3 ‘enchman,. (In fact, he i ” "
is Belgian, born 49 years ago in Liege.) a 1 time for a second son. News of we g
His French-Canadian wife, her hands thrust into — will bring woke * *
the pockets of her grey flannel skirt, her feet in i E a
flat-heeled brown country shoes planted purposefully TAURUS Mercury influences are very favourable an
gp the carpet has no nonsense about her whatever, Apr. 21—May 22 = should spur you on to fresh achievements and
psuick or o dat of teens artifice of a dash of possibly, a gain in finance. Purchase wisely
Genk “ta hee eT ent apart from her plain wedding and do not be too easily influenced, *
8 e-pear i
engagement ring. : b MADAME SIMENON GEMINI You will meet an elderly woman who will
She revealed her age without y May 23—June21 offer advice. Think carefully what course
being asked. She will be 3% Nothing but French is talked at : roid Tre later on
Sag lar ena ar Simettente EVELYN IRONS aie you should pursue to avoid regrets later i
spending the day in Paris. “They A little extravagance some- eae here
are Off to Prance and Belgium times steps in. tween novels *
this week-end: sail home. to S:menon has three weeks to a CANCER Attend to all urgent matters and essentials and
America on May 16 from his first wife whom he had Month free, and during that June 22—July 23 relax then. You are inclined to be a little
Madame ‘menon has an married in 1923. P time he and his wife like to take bit lazy, lately. Get a move on over the next
almost aggressive lack of affeetn- aioe aa a few days’ trip to a New York a ? You will not regret it
tion Her dark brown eyes fix aru taped gown the hotel. seeing the shows, meeting few days > ‘ ;
you with such a direct Jt a job ecame friends. : : i
1onest gaze that you feel a Simenon’s secreta she still in hie g2 All to do with study and brain work show
this at last is a woman yeh “ALS W — all eee aieee BUT HO CAFE uly 24—Aug. great promise during this pepe Value fous
positively no deception fi she no longer types his « , ts pies i ence and guard it. person who is
It is as if she wished to adver- Novels They were married the But ,We don't, g ty hectaea lot to be thankful for.
tise it t ut here, in con- day after his Reno divorce came we a ane. cn ae ree ha ee obe u 7
trast wi ubtletiés of the Wirough sua te mas ere VIRGO « Ith just now, Weather changes
psycho llers which are Now they live at Shadow Rock ho' ca shic! m ’ t d A 23—Sept. 23 Watch your hea ee TRY DW sis f' 1
er husban work, isthe Farm in Connecticut, an old S20WS ,, Which y husha’ ug. : bring on pains and aches. If you are carefu
sou! of sim self, ~ colonial-style clapboard “or : lebvated.. Detar you can avoid all unpleasantness. Very good
menon, she says. likes con- house with ‘ } 4 Simenon's celebra etec- . hers.
trast oy a velled all over two teers Fe. r 8 of land and tive een eae is usually period for expectant TAC # *
the world, and when he lived in ery to be found with a gla: LIBRA ‘ ; i
France liked to pop over to hand—an aperitif, or oo 24—Oct.23 Save what you have. | Reckless ee te
London from Paris to reiax 5—7 BOOKS A YEAR for the last se P ° bad, and especially so just now. Concentrate
between books (“He knows Simenor oon, i novelist has taken on your work. Watch for good news on
ell and enjoys every- ome oe from five ta liquor Saturday. Money gain due very soon.
including the a eee Madame Sim . = “* * *
rants.”) smoke a lot, but SCORPIO —- i
given up cigarettes altogeth Oct, 24—Nov.22 | Uranus and other planets in excellent position.
“because I used to ake more Be alert and take your chance when .
AD A JOB than was good for , Opportunity for suecess in work coming soon.
Like Maigre Fire rays influence personal affairs. .
Game s rst s c Ss 90g “* * *
. . eanes said i's” wife Ae eae 20 If you own livestock expect increased —_
: & wonderful A wise man counts before spending, oa a er,
Beware of outside influences in business.
he. bat -pipe- Colour red brings good luck. a
§ who gave me * 7 ‘
tl 5 pet is caranuee Pleasant possibilities for the energetic folks.
; he ‘ Dec. 21—Jan. 4 > :
” $s ’ a bevbhad Do not slack up just now as success hovers
: Pies over you. All rays excellent for those who
s c Ww try hard.
for 3 ut th na close-
cover 2 with one smal! onion will be in the
and k of celery, and. let THE next publication of the Stars And You
hem stew quietly in r own “Evening Advocate.’
Juice until the mussels are a
cooked. The onion and celery
may still be hard—but never
we don't want them—
them away I eat e
is and their liquid with
y of well-buttered bread
that it was easy to under- I
Mme. Simenon’s enthu- x ¥
answer to the questic IRE RO?
e like to ee EMP
best-selling writer?" Today Last 2 Shows 430 & 8.15
It's @ beautiful life." saia she. ee ea ot eee ce BOYS IN BROWN &
WORLD COE YRIGHI ) : CAPTAIN B CAPTAIN BOYCOTT
; Starring: Stewart GRANGER with Stewart GRANGER
"3 Opening TOMORROW 2.30 & 8.30 TOMORROW (only) 4.30 & 8.15
m ' . THE FAMILY SECRET HARLEM GLOBE TROTTERS
‘ & HOLIDAY IN HAVANA
B B C Radio General Juin Shr. 1.00 f WATOH THis
oD eLie | PROGRAMME STARTS P d seicniuaaiea fel eget TODAY 1.90pm. || SAT. Midnite
if Vigilantes Return “Sree
Programme | «MAY 15 nonwote Mone [Laupsrme snow J micnean mie 0 f] Pee, Beer
| KINGSTON, J’ca, May '7. PARIS, M 7 with Richard
a : . a Some 14,000 families are ex- » May |. Vigilantes Return Talmadge —
4 00—7 ieee we a as nsw Pected to benefit under the hur- General Alphonse Juin, In- OL WY MPIC
neat ast teane rehousing and rehabilita- Spector General of French armed ROW Al
4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The/ tion programme starting May 15. forces and Commander of Atlantic |} ropay (only) 4.30 & 8.15 4 4
Daily Service, 4.18 p.m. Rhythm is their | Aq'ual construction however is Pact ground forces in Central MICHIGAN KID & i
pre iste xn Toren Raterinae | not starting before October when Europe became Wednesday the VIGILANTES RETURN Picker bans: Srere 430 & 8.45
5.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice, 6 p.m.jit is expected that the fabrica- first living Marshal of France na POMORROW. 450 be 6.15 Sinkiee-| - dmmastiien
Welsh Diary, 6.15 p.m, Just Fancy,| tion plant being erected in west- since 1945. one : ain Mi
} Round-u and Pro-| _ : : THE FLYING SERPEANT & Richard’ TALMADGE
gramme Parade, ? pom. The News, 710/€rD Kingston will be in full pro- I ACCUSE MY PARENTS Soaked Neat
bin. bets News from Britain.” | duction Promotion of Juin 63-year-old —— ianiciieane? Sat. & Sun.
7.15—10 30 pm, 25.5% & 31 32 M Seven thousand one-room hous- veteran of French colonial service Today & Sat 1,30 WATCH THIS 4.130 & i 15 4.30 & 8.15
emnegeeeos s . > eractac in 9 one , . ~ i Stage o ucson
pret ratpeee ates % pm. img units will be erected in rural will further complicate the|{ eos cameron in SPACE FOR & Moke Bellove Harlem Globe
Music of the Regiments, 8.15 p.m. Radio| reas, 3,000 in Kingston and S.H.A.P.E. Command picture when mits tikes eeddiha Ballroom Trotters &
Newsreei, 8.30 p.m. Special Despateh,/ principal towns of the island. General Matthew B. Ridgway OL oie nee MIDNITE SHOW Starring: Holiday in
8.45 p.m. interlude, 8.55 p.m. From — cP) takes over next month —U.P. The Congo IT’S SPECIAL Frankie Laine Havana
the Editorials, 9 p.m. From the Third

Programme, 9.45 p.m. Accordion Music,
10 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. News
Talk, 10.15 p.m. Frontiers, 10,30 p.m
Oliver Twist.

W.L. Eggs For
British Museum

LONDON.
Nearly 3,000 West Indian and
South American birds’ eggs, col-
lected by Sir Charles Belcher,
have been presented to the Brit-
ish Museum in London. Sir
Charles, who is 75 and now living
in retirement in Kenya, was a
judge in the West Indies for six
years after 14 years in East Africa,
Bird-watching has been his life-
long hobby.—B.U.P.

, S9999S9959%





SOSSS SSP
GAIETY

The Garden—St. James
TODAY (only) 8.30 p.m
HER FIRST ROMANCE

Margaret O'BRIEN &

DEAD RECKONING
Humphrey BOGART











EAL ALLA AIELLO

FRE. & SAT
Women 4.45 - Men & 80
MOM & DAD
Segregated Audience ¥ |
Age Limit 12 years and Over ‘
COCSOECOEEOI CEES







Opening FRIDAY at 4.45 & 8.30
p.m. and Continuing Daily

It’s the biggest package
of entertainment ever!








0s ROBERT FEW ad wreticny ANNA AOA AL BERCAET

Behe aed Dotnd FRANK CAPA Avemnne Rene tv nit
cement ERA WN LIF Lua OTR ay MOLT COOL
ey oy NNT as RO ON A CN

PLAZ (DIAL 5170)







EASY TO TAKE!
LOVELY TO LOOK AT!

ENCHANTING TO HEAR! |

of,

BARBAREES PLAZ

sroup 1s excited

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—
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PLAZA THEATRES |

BRIDGETOWN BARBAREES OISTIN
(DIAL 2310) (DIAL 5170) (DIAL 8404)
TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m TODAY (Only) Today 4.45 & 8.30 p.m
Fri, 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. 4.30 & 8.30 pm RIDER FROM TUCSON
& Continuing Daily || “TARZAN’S PERIL” Tio Holt ; &
4.45 & 8.30 p.m Lex BARKER MAN’
“WOMAN on PIER 13” TERRITORY

HAPPY GO
LOVELY

Randolph SCOTT.
Gabby HAYES

FR

Robert RYAN

——
————
Today's Special 1.30 p m & SAT

i (Technicolor) Please Note— 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
vid NIVEN — . * ” NEVER TRUST
Vera ELLEN ||!ndian Film AAG A GAMBLER «&

CESAR ROMERO Non-Indians 36¢ Any-

where

LAST OF THE
BUCCANEERS



Today’s Special 1.30 p m
“Raiders of Tomahawk
Creck” &



a
the mistletoe
which homes

work to do,"’ he says. “1 wish
we could find some way ot Se
him the trouble of going down all



——=
SAT Special 1.30 p.m.
“Raiders of Tomahawk

—
Friday 445 & 8.30 p.m.
& Continuing Daily





be calling those chimneys to fill our stock “Fort Savage Raiders” || “HERE COMES THE Creek” &
“T hope be ngs."" Yes, would be grand Charles Starrett Double ! GROOM"|| “Fort Savage Raiders”
As chy f we could,’ agrees B:ll. More ot Le «RT Fe Ea re Bing Crosby, Jane Charles Starrett Double

ells “hem ol their pals tin them as they walk eaten mates || Woman, Alexis ‘Suath MIDNITE SAT,

siowly

“LAW of the
BADLANDS"
“PRAIRIE LAW"

h The

|

ind silently over the slepe
Common

Whip WELSON &
COWBOY CAVALIER
Jimmy WAKELY

SAT Special 1.30 p m.
Trip'e Attraction !

&







ON ITS SECOND FLAMING WEEK

The Giant of Motion Pictures
TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 P.M. & CONTINUING







“David,
Slayer of
Goliath,
Give Us
The
Adulteress,
Bathsheba!”




It will make
your heart dance,
whistle and sing!






am
eT a

ie

VERA-ELLEN
CESAR ROMERO

starring
Produced by DARRYL F, ZANUCK + Directed ty HENRY KING * "5.0 % PHILIP DUNNE




-

ere rerereyvryyyyyverwrves











>

Special Shorts—SUPER MOUSE “HE DOOD IT”

GLOBE

RSTONE * Produced by MARCEL HELLMAN + Screenplay by VAL GUEST

TO-DAY 445 & 8.30 P.M.
B'TOWN FRIDAY & oat & ase
PM. & in
(DIAL 2310) 4.45 & 8.30 PM. r



il eee ae i ee


THURSDAY, MAY 8,



It would be hard to find a more
intractable problem than educa-
tion in the West Indies. The
limited resources of the islands
and territories cannot support the
educational structure which is es-
sential to the prosperity and con-
tentment of their large popula-
tions. The returns offered by
education are measured in genera-
tions and many social problems
clamour for immediate remedy.
Nowhere is a good education
cheap: in the case of the West
Indies their wide geographical
distribution and the high cost of
transportation impose an excep-
tionally expensive system. The
smallest island needs an educa-
tional structure complete to
university level. The boarding
schools are also subject to the
prevailing financial stringency.
They have to remember that over
and above school fees parents
from Other islands have to pay
six expensive air passages every
year.

The foundations are not secure.
Elementary education is not yet
universal. In some cases it is
imposed by a law which cannot
be enforced because there is no
room for the children in the
schools, In general, classes are
too large, 90 was the highest found
in an elementary school and 45
is common in the secondary
schools of one of the islands. The
buildings are quite inadequate. I
have seen nearly 1,000 children
packed elbow to elbow in a two-
storeyed shack with no division
whatever between the classes.
Some progress is being made in
the provision of school buildings,
but cencrete structures are very
costly and timber involves high
maintenance charge.

A realistic policy would spread
the erection of permanent build-
ings over q number of years and
be content in the meantime with
the cheapest temporary struc-
tures. The West Indian climate
invites such méasures, The cost
of buildings could probably be
reduced by standardization,
though the different natural re-
sources of the colonies impose an
obvious limitation. The matter is
urgent. The schools cannot ac-
commodate the existing child
population, and its rate of in-
crease is fantastic. The recent
disastrous hurricane in Jamaica
must have destroyed a _ large
number of schools, There is there-
fore a good opportunity fer a com-
prehensive rebuilding policy in
the island, which should be back-
ed by a generous grant from
British public funds. The home-
less and destitute must be our
first care; once their needs have
been met, there could be no more

valuable gift from Britain to
Jamaica than really adequate
schools.

Even more serious than the in-
adequecy of school buildings
throughout the West Indies is the
lack of trained teachers. In one
island, out of 829 teachers in the
elementary schools 368 have had
no sort of training and not even
a secondary education, and a fur-
ther 20 sueh teachers are at work

in the secondary schools, Plans
are being made to remedy this
shortage but, even if the money
can be found, it must be some
years before they can bear full
fruit.

The first need of the West Indies
is an all-out campaign against
illiterecy; bigger schools are want-

ed, staffed by qualified teachers.
Second in importance is a small
number of efficient technical
schools in the big towns. These

would give a quick return: it is
stated that if the machinery of
the Kingston Technical School had
been up to date, some useful sec-
ondary industries would have been
established in Jamaica. If the
existing structure has not sur-

Canadian Shorts

OTTAWA,
The Dominion Bureau of Statis-
ties, which keeps track of the
prices of almost everything, re-
ported the average price of tele-
phone poles in Canada as $6,77.

—B.U.P.

MONTREAL,

Canada’s water transportation
industry had 1,906 vessels in

operation in 1950. Of the total,
720 were freighters, 467 tow
barges and scows, and the rest
smaller craft.

—B.U.P.

QUEBEC CITY,
Mills in Quebec Province account
for more than 44 per cent of the
gross value of Canada’s total
textile production.
—B.U.P.
OTTAWA,
Nearly $79,000,000 worth
fertilizer is manufactured
Canada per year.

of
in

—B.U.P.

VANCOUVER, B.C.
British Columbia has only 68
of Canada’s 599 fish processing
plants, but, it accounts for nearly
50 percent of all the fish processed
in the country,
—B.U.P.



Every spoonful gives you~

energy and

fitness}









@ Men,

more and more

women, children—all
taking tasty ‘ Kepler * to-day

1952

West Indies Education

Limited Resources And An Urgent Need

By H. L. O. Flecker, Head Master
of Christ's Hospital. _.

vived the hurricane, it is to be
hoped that it will be properly re-
built and equipped. A beginning
has been made with technical
education in Georgetown, British
Guiana, and ip Trinidad, including
two interesting schools run by
the petroleum companies. But it
is useless to presert an elaborate
system of technical schools while
a number of children leave the
elementary schools unable to do
simple arithmetic. At present the
technical instructors have too
often themselves to lay the ele-
mentary foundation.

The best policy at the present
time would be to give handicraft
its rightful place in the secondary
schools. In many colonies there
is a deep-rooted prejudice against
any form of manual training.
Even where elementary school
gardens exist, a labourer is some-
times hired to do, the digging,
ostensibly because the work is too
hard for the children—actually
because it is beneath their dignity.
Given an honourable place in the
elite secondary schools, handi-
craft would spread _ through-
out the educational system, grad-
ually have a profound effect upon
the mental outlook of the popu-
lation and incline a proportion of
able pupils towards technology
rather than clerical occupations.

It is the lure of the “white
collar” job that vitiates much of
West Indian secondary education.
The door to most careers outside
agriculture is the possession of a
school certificate and it requires
unusual resolution to prevent the
examination from being the one
objective of the school course and
the sole criterion of success. The
parents are chiefly to blame, but
employers (and, not least, the
colonial governments) are not
guiltless. The examination boards
do what they can to counteract
the prevailing tendency. |Some
teachers, and most pupils, accept
examination fever as natural.
Until a more sane outlook pre-
vails there can be little progress,
and secondary education cannot
begin to meet the vital needs of
the colonies. For it is in these
schools that the hope of the
future lies. At present they too
pften congentrate on the mere
acquisition of a corpus of examin-
able knowledge, and that travesty
of education will ledd nowhere.
The West Indies need a real edu-
cation in moral and cultural
values, in citizenship and in lead-
ership, in a habit of mind and a
skill of brain and hand to match
modern conditions and problems.
This need is best realized in
Jamaica where a number of en-
lightened educationalists are mak-
ing a gallant assault on the prob-
lem. Elsewhere, too, there are
individual head masters and head
mistresses who refuse to bow the
knee, But in general the children
of the West Indies are sacrificed
to the Moloch of examinations.
Not only is the educational out-
look narrowed, but the curriculum
and teaching methods are warped.

The lack of. handicraft . has
already been mentioned. Even
where the need is appreciated and
local prejudice overcome, strange:

difficulties strangle its birth. In
one of the smaller islands a
scheme was launched to provide
a workshop in the secondary

school. The plan was greeted with
enthusiasm and the workshop was
transformed on paper into a full-
blown technical school; but the
cost of this was found prohibitive
and the whole venture was
dropped. This is probably not an
isolated instance.

The provision for science is not
much greater. There is a dearth
both of teachers and of labora-
tories. These last are an expen-
sive item, but there is no need
of the elaborate structures dear to







the minds of most architects,
administratays amd _ specialist
teachers. Useful biology can be

taught in an ordinary classroom
provided with a sink, and this is
happening in a Barbadian girls’
school. One of the islands has 11
secondary schools: of these, two
boys’ schools provide physics,
chemistry, and biology; one girls’
school offers general science. No
other science is taught in the
colony. The only secondary school
in a small island has no science
teacher or laboratory, and instruc-
tion in mathematics is given by
a pupil teacher who has ed
the higher certificate. Where
seience is available it is teo often
largely a matter of demonstration
and note-taking—not an educa-
tion but a preparation for the
school certificate.

The problem caused by a reck-
less increase in population has
been méntioned. The remedy lies
with education, especially the
education of girls. A study of the
modern period of Caribbean his-
tory would give teacher and
taught their chance in the natural

a

Peter Brander 87 m.
Decides To Seek
Fifth ABA Title

—Says Sportsman's Diary

The “yes he will; no he wen't”
speculation which has surrounded
PETER BRANDER'’S intentions
eoncerning this year’s Amateur
Boxing Association championships
is ended.

He has entered for the SW
London divisional championships
at Nine Elms Baths on Monday,
It was in the semi-finals of these

Will Sell

A new 87-miles-an-hour

engine capable of extremely
produced car,
70 miles an hour.

course of classroom discussion. a 4 % Dutch technicians who say they
Yet when Caribbean history is Championships last year that have seen the new model believe
studied the earlier period is often Brander lost his feather-weight ;- will be sold at about £600. and

preferred because it is regarded CTOWn to Ken Lawrence,
as the easier option for the school Professional. :
certificate. I have known for some time
No surveys seem to have been that Brander our No. 1 post-war jast night has an engine life of
made of the secondary school amateur, has had his eye on a 190,000 miles before it needs a
places required for those children fifth ABA title — and mayb yebore, and over a long test the
who have the ability to profit eventually a sixth to equal the pepair pill worked out at £50 for

now 4 will compete with British cars for
foreign currency.
The ‘flew Volkswagen, they said





p-h. Germ

From BASIL CARDEW

to drive straight into the heart of the world’s markets.
It is reported to be a five-seater saloon with a 1,500 c.c.

It is claimed to have a cruising speed of



~ @ATHER THAN WAIT
UNTIL WE CAN'T POSSIBLY

SEA AND AIR
TRAFFIC

“OCCOet
In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Henry D. Wallace, Sch.
nrietta, Seh. Mandalay I, $.S.
y, Sch. Everdene, Sch. Laudalpha,

Maria

ack

vdia Adina S., ch. Gardinia W., Sch.

enfindant, Sch. Frances W. Smith. —
ARRIVALS

1S. Crofter 5,777 tons under C

H. Diamond from London. Agents

sta & Co.

DEPARTURES
iV. Cacique Del Caribe for St. Lucia
enada and St. Vincent.

SEA WELL

ARRIVALS BY Be +A-
ON MONDAY
Prom Antigua:

ow

ae

ustry Will °

New ii J
on Car Not Affect C’dian

'

At £600

Sales

Te Michael, Lucy Willi
A Canadian Press release from “aiint Mabare © tele taki ‘not
Ottawa states that Canadian Michael, Patrick Michael, Geoffrey -
AMSTERDAM. Defen roduction officials said on 86°. John Jullion, David Baptiste.

From Martinique:
Ignatius Beaubrup
DEPARTURES BY 8.W.1LA.
ON MONDAY

Tuesday that the ibility of a
new aluminum jndustry growing
up in Dutch Guiana will not have |. eee
much effect on Canadian pro- "Nate tH. Pope, Viola Ford, Joha
duction or sales, They were com- Aiexander, Joan V. Alexander, Timothy
menting on the Paris dispatch in J a, Juliet Alexander, Sydney
which the International Bank for he Ev" 4,
reconstruction and development Lady E. Malone, Mr
recommended a $53,000,000 10- “ er 5 Ms. ‘Liceian- Cece
year programme to produce yyy" p. Morrison, Mrs. Mary Gaul, Mrs.
aluminum in the Netherlands L. Flower, Miss M. Carrol, Mr. Julius
South American colony of Dutch eS ras alee ann
Guiana, the world’s largest source J" "piRiner, Mrs. Lillian Poetner, Matt
of bauxite, Allan Poetner.

Officials said if this reeommenda- Aaa e eee ee TA.
tion was implemented it likely pgyom st.
wi!l mean that Holland would get

German People’s Car is about

high performance for a mass-

Clement Bourne;



“United States” May
Surpass “Queen
Mary's” Record Run

Lucia:
Jo I hell
BRITAIN will be faced with a Zohn Mute

Mr. Louis Maillard, Mr.

ns s at Mst. Laurie Barnard, Miss Pamela Mitch=
from such an education. There is record of Joe Steers in the 1890s. avery 60,000 miles. new contender for the Blue Riband on tomen ey a Conse ell, “Master Anthony Migehell.
CT Ss ac ge Ore earn for this © that the fn" Amacai Wabea tes ul the Canadian eles to Malang "ahaa, murs ran B
bo ee Cronts who have emo poeite hints of retirement pore (width) of the cylinder js i has been only a tiny proportion of Rust, D Rust, J Boyle, R Morton,

: ss x ‘ a ; fos saiicer ian aa aS ; / , ; Y ee
exerted by parents sae have ams Brander had had four bouts since greater than the stroke (length), @°"S ™t© Service this summer the total shipments.—C.P. Fodinen ones, Xo peel, Borin,
ee hy eee ate tenons — he went into training in sey The pistons travel more slowly The lUner, which has cost £25 —_—-— Goldie, D Deacon, G Colina, v Tecra,

canna om ¢ yo within , . j dn ten ; " wee S. Ro . ©. Rod . -
often gine to grigate athools which ne ¢ | Mesad them all, two within oe less than a long-stroke million and is the largest. built in WINS SCIENCE Car ie.“ Fisher. V Gravens
are little more than examination iw , # . = America, will start her maiden in. V_ Gravenstein, J. Gravenstein.
eeieanting instiicitions separing seteey eg en va the sairing Germen voyage to Britain on July 3. SCHOLARSHIP DECARTU RES BY B.W LA,
, ~thi of their ; ati ’ Volkswagen, which has a four- ‘ (From Our Own Correspondent) | , dusins
sriedis' a chase utes the om. the ABA international and form- oyjinder overhead valve engine, | She is due at Southampton on ST, GEORGES, "9," “Batacon, Miss L. Synder, Mis
nipotent school certificate, More- & Army representative from anq is exported at a price of un- JUly 8, a five-day crossing similar) Allan Kirton, former pupil of p. Fontenelle, Mr_E Elliott, Master Hi.
over, the attempts of broad- PPsom and Ewell. This will be Ger £500, is causing competitors ‘2 the schedule of the Queen| tho G.B.S.S. which he left in 1950, Watson, Mr. C. Douglas, Mr. Ignathus
minded educationists in the & Severe test for 24-year-old wuch concern in Continental Mary and Queen Elizabeth. has been awarded an open Science per ‘Trinidad:
hools to look beyond the exam- Brander and will give a form j.orkets ie : Scholarship to the University “Canon J. Ramkesoon, Mr. E_ Hopkin,
schools to loo! you ee - pointer to his chances in the s to maintain such a schedule College of the West Indies. Mr. J Dalgliesh, Mrs. Alice Dalgli
inations are countered by parents championships I was told that the Germans are jhere can be no doubt that the Now lerk in the Agricul- Miss’ J. Dalatlesh, Mr. J. Labree,
air Pm = h Sa ME 4 Brander’s decision will be wel- NOW turning out 120,000 of these cw liner is capable of at least T Daal when x Marbella re? see
still at schoo}, to be crammed by : ‘

cars a year. They are being made
at a vast Hitler-built factory near
Brunswick, in the British zone.

Beating Britain
120,000 annual

comed by all — except, perhaps

Opiaide teacher. his fellow feather-weights.

Teachers’ salaries range from
what is adequate to a starvation 7 *
wage. In one small island the £3,600 For Ray Smith
head mistress of the girls’ sec- | RAY SMITH’S benefit to date
ondary receives £500 p.a., and has realised £3,600, says the an-
her quarters, but not board. The Dual report of the Essex County
corresponding head master gets Cricket Club. Good by Essex
board in term time, a house and Standards, especially as the benefit
salary of £300 p.a, Neither post match suffered from rain. But if
is pensionable. The cost of living an all-rounder of Smith’s ability
is higher in the West Indies than played for Middlesex, Yorkshire
in England. Accommodation for ‘r Lancashire he would receive
assistant teachers is rarely pro- lots more.
vided and is expensive to secure. Essex have made a profit — an
In spite of these drawbacks some achievement when so many clubs
magnificent work is being done in bemoan a loss. They are £226 up
the schools both by West Indian on the year, compared with £2,267
and by British teachers. They need down on the previous year. kaa h
and they deserve every encourage- “This despite the fact that 21 POF ence the war,
ment. cut of 28 championship matches | It s known that their markets
were unfinished “on wickets just ®T@ Closed or restricted for cui-

This output is
British manufacturer. And the
Volkswagen is now selling in some
European countries, including
Switzerland, in such volume as to
exceed the total of all British car
sales in these countries,

Sales of the new model will add
to the difficulties of our own
manufacturers, whose industry has
borne a great part in the scram-
ble for foreign curreney and ex-

The economic condition of the



ar ar Pe ney reasons already in Canada,
territories, their emergent political * iene eee sheet : Australia, New Zealand, South
life, and the scarcity of well-paid I ne from sale of motor-cays 4frica and India.—L.E.S.
jobs inevitably issue in a cl im — fies

at most permanent educationa i
posts should be filled by West s ony £0 down. to Chelmsford U F
Know that her is SuiringeePs -Geed, news too, trom sussex Union Forms New
be gained from the lon, - 4s ae amen nr eee oe 5 y
thonel experience ah Sls ana £2,230 last season compared with Relations Board
of Britain. What is needed most @ £2,915 loss the previous year, ; 7 y
is the recruitme: Oo a (From Our Own Correspondent)
adininineation of siau, teat ae. " Boat F und Launched ST. GEORGE'S,
the training and outlook of the ,, Four times winners of tha . A Labour Relations Committee
British inspectorate. The second Princess Elizabeth cup at Henley is one of several Standing Com-
requirement is for a reinforce- Since the war, Bedford School has â„¢ittees provided for in the Con-
ment of British teachers. Neither â„¢ost of all to thank the late Mr, Stitution of a newly formed
of these requirements will easily N. 2: SYMONDS, who practically a Agricultural Union
be met because the salaries are not founded their boat club. His four mane merges the 50-year-old
often attractive, and passages S0nS gained between them two fa a Agricultural Association,
home are not always paid. Never- Cambridge blues and two trial age Abhocieltny Coconut Grow-
theless, the man who will go out ¢aps for rowing. One is now ;}*,, “hat ae i the ' strike-
from here in a spirit of humility coach to the school; another is Q2riaty e utural = Employers
to make his contribution will meet captain of Thames Rowing Club. “phe Union has been cre:
with a warm welcome and will Recently, Mrs. N. P. Symonds the light of th 4 4 Pi mi in
find that he has a field for the died leaving £1,000 to the school vigorous action On tie manors
exercise of his vocation which is boat club. In 1930 the school had planters therihit tas ; ‘i pert Si
wider and more plainly reward- 36 boats. By 1951 it had only 20 for now enterprise gh li . ed
ing than is often the case at home. and the new racing eight of 1950 policy. =e hee

—(From the Times Review) was the first boat it had been :

tural Department, he sat 4° Davies, Mr
for the Cambridge Higher School Mr R Dixon, Mr
Certificate in 1950 he gained full Elba Leon, Mr L

A. Rios, Mrs. E Rios,

30 knots, although I understand M_ Rodriguez, Mist

that, for purposes of classification Outram, Mrs Anne

}y the North Atlantic Shipping} ey sapti fr the London @utrai!. Master A. Outram, Miss H.
Conference, she has been put for- iy ~~ oa Quiram, Mr. De isle, Dear, ‘Mrs. f. Me

\

ard as a 29-knot ship,
The 81,000-ton Queen Mary has

SSCP SSOSSOD,

greater than that of any single held the Blue Riband for neatly 14

years,

Her fastest eastbound crossing
wes made in 4 days 2 hours and
37 minutes—an average speed of
31.72 knots. Her record west-
beund crossing was made in 3
days, 21 hours, 48 minutes. A
slight variation in route brought
the average speed down to 30.99
k ots.

{t is improbable that the United

States will attempt to break
rccords on her maiden voyage
when her machinery is still being

run in.—L.E.S,



MAIL NOTICES

Mails for S. Vincent, Martinique, §
Thomas, V1. New. York Py the 88.
FORT ‘TOWNSHEND will closed at
the General Post Office as under:—

Parcel Mail at 3 p.m. on the 9th May,

1952. Registered Mail at 8.30 a.m, and
O-dinary Mail at 9.30 am. on the 10th F
May, 1952.

Maile for Dominica by the Schooner

LAUDALPHA will be alosed at the Gen-
eial Post Office as under: —

Parcel Mail at 12 Noon, Registered Mail
at 2 p.m, and Ordinary Maj} at 2.30 p.m,
on the 8th May, 1952,

Mails for St. Lugia, Dominica, Mont-
verrat, Antigua, St. Kitts, Bermuda,
Halifax, Montreal by the W.M®. LADY
NELSON will be closed at the General
Post Office as under:—

Parcel Mall at 3 p.m. on the 9th May
1952. Registered Mail at 630 a.m. an
Ordinary Mail at 9.30 a.m on the 10th
May, 1962.





TEA & DINNER SETS

RATES OF EXCHANGE :
(or replacement pieces)

F * WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 1952
——$—__—. pcssible to buy for 20 years. Now Though formed ai few days EW ; *
Mrs. Symonds’s gift has inaugur- earlier. the new body must take 7) 0/10" Chatuke 3 ot Czechoslovakian
7 ated a new boat fund, a memor- up the challenge implicit in re- Bankers 170 2/10%
- WILL ia! to “NP.” marks by Hon, W. E. Julien in a Sight or Demratin 10% Glassware
i Two of the most distinguished debate at the last meeting of the 71 9/104 Cable 7
PICK T . old Bedfordian oarsmen hava /€gislature: “I have grown tired 70 4/10% Currency 68 7/105 Earthenware
signed an appeal to every old boy. Of hearing —agriculturists, es- sRupans oe
They are JAMES CROWDEN, pecially 5 en asking Gov- ” ve ‘
a £ i iver- &ramen nd a way to do CANADA y y,
A FORMER German minesweeper is to carry out ex- {ity boat club this year and JACK tings for them. “Grenada land: . BARBADOS CO-OP
ree a catching fish by electric shocks, using a new BERESFORD, medal winner at eared a.

me ienti a 4 Demand Drafts 73.38%
worked out by German scientists, five Olympic regattas. prising deh laty individunis en 8 Dra 2 ix COoTToO Vy FA CTORY
One of the objections to electrical fishing i Docker Editor the face of this earth.” oe ee ares)
ing in the past Governing and executive body ' * 10% Gurrenay me
has been the high mortality a Most ambitious venture of ' : u , as Coupons 71 3/10"
The new techniaie, it is clainy- mong young fish. Grays Athletic FC for years has of the Union is a Council of s Silver 20% LIMITED

ed, will allow young fish to
escape. Electrical impulses are
poe out as the trawl goes into
action,

By varying impulse frequencies
and tensions, only fish of a par-
ticular type or size will be
paralysed by the shock sent
through the water.

There will be experiments with
eod and herring.—L.E.S.



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Management consisting of three
a ae o the Cocoa industry,
i i three o utmegs and four of
ready coming back,” said an (ther induntrion = with power to
official. . set up District Branches with a

The £500 was spent on their view to the protection and pro-
handbook, Fifty Years of Foot- motion of local interests as well

cost them £500. “But we think
it worth it and the money is al-

H.E. Takes Salute

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. GEORGE'S.

His Excellency Sir Robert ball. Editor is docker LES REY- as the following Standing Com-
Arundell took the Salute last NOLDS, who, besides being Press jittees: Labour Relations, Cocoa,
Friday afternoon of the “Passing secretary of the club, has been in Nutmegs, Sugar and Rum, Oils
Qut” Parade of the first Contin- turn air navigator, speedway and Fats, Livestock, Bananas and
gent of the Grenada Volunteer rider ana writer. Food Crops.

Constabulary. Ninety men staged Grays handbook is the best of First officers of the Union are:
a programme of exercises before its kind I have seen. Every result Hon. D, A. Henry (President),

a large gathering at Tanteen and of matches played by Grays for Dudley Ferguson
wore Suir complimented by His 50 years is mentioned. seat. Connel d teas :

xcellency on t de: unc ~~ Management;
“providing tha whdle” eoninun nity MISS ANNA NEAGLE, the film W. A_ Branch, P. G. Hosten, D, E
with an assurance against the actress, is the newly elected presi- Stevenson, Rex Renwick, Eric
penalties of disorder.” In over- dent of the Essex County Women’s Copland, Allan St. Bernard,
all command of the parade was Amateur AthlIctie Association. A Herbert Neckles, Ewen Chasteau,
Capt. H. M. Christopher, former case of from sound track to cinder Dr. J. R. Groome, George Kent,
S.C.F. Lieutenant. track.—L.E.S. Edward Kent and J. W. Vincent.

1 (Deputy Presi-
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PAGE FOUR °-







—— ——

Thursday, May 8, 1952







CORONATION BA!

IF a selection had to be made in Barba-’
dos ef a group of individuals upon whom
the stamp of public approval was set un-
mistakably the Police Band would probably
top the list.



Capt. Raison and the Police Band are as
well known to residents of Pie Corner, and
of the villages round Thorpes, Belleplaine
or Silver Sands as they are to the more ex-
clusive company which frequents Hastings
Rocks or musical performances at Govern-
ment House.

At dances in aid of charities, perform-
ances of theatrical companies, school sports,
and on almost every occasion of rejoicing
or sorrowing by the community as a whole
or part the Police Band under Captain
Raison continue to give large audiences the
music they enjoy. The Police Band deserves
well of the community. Might the com-
munity not show its appreciation of the
Police Band by requesting the government
to send Captain Raison and the Police Band
to take part in the official pageantry in
London which will mark the coronation of
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in June
1953?

Barbados is a small though not quite the
smallest unit of the British Empire, but its
British ancestry goes back for more than
300 years. Bridgetown though a miniature
city was founded before Montreal. Barba-
dos has special links with Great Britain.
Paintings of two of the Harewoods hang
in the Legislative Council Chamber. As
early as the first quarter of the eighteenth
century the Lascelles family was estab-
lished in the island and one was a collector
of Customs. When this year His late Majesty
King George VI died, the Hon. Gerald Las-
celles owner of two Barbadian estates left
from here to attend His uncle’s funeral.

Many other links exist between Barba-
dos and the Mother Country. The term
“little England” was not coined by ignorant
men, but signified a real estate of affairs
illustrating the influence which England
has always had on the history of this island.

That influence has probably never been
greater than it is today and the Labour
movement in the West Indies owes most of
its inspiration to the ideas and ideology
originating from individual British socialists
like the late Sir Stafford Cripps, the late
Harold Stannard former Colonial Editor of
the Times and others.

Two Trade Union courses held in Barba-
dos in recent years (one of them still in
session) are under British auspices. Despite
the rapid changes which are still taking
place in every sphere of Barbadian life the
link with England remains strong and un-
bending. The unusual honour bestowed on
Mr. Adams in the New Year: the continued
choice by Barbadian scholars of the leading
English provincial Universities as centres
for higher learning may be quoted as ex-
amples in another field.

|
|
|



Towards the end of May 1902,
the S.S. Roddam arrived in the
roadstead off Bridgetown she had
come from Martinique via St.
Lucia, and was the only ship to
escape from St. Pierre, when that
city was destroyed by the eruption
of Mont Pelée on the 8th of May
just 50 years ago today. Captain
H. J. Kirkham, the harbour-mas-
ter wrote: — '

“The Roddam has just been
brought up from St. Lucia, and
if she had only been in the Mer-
sey on exhibition, the owners
could have buijt a new ship out
of the proceeds. I cannot des-
cribe her condition, as it beggars
description, and hundreds of
tons of lava have been thrown
overboard at St. Lucia. A gang
of fifty labourers have been at
work on her for ten days
to get the dust out, but it will
take a long time before she is
clear of it.”

Dust from this eruption had fall-
en on Barbados, and many were
the rumours of the destruction of
San Pierre, but the arrival of this
steamer brought the whole matter
before the public of Barbados.

Mont Pelée had been showing
signs of activity since August 1901,
this was the first sign of an erup-
tion since 1851. Towards the
middle of April 1902, the people
of San Pierre began to notice a
change coming over the mountain
that dominated their homes. The
smoke issuing from the crevices-in
the crater grew in volume until it
became big clouds. Both day and
night the peak of the volcano was
illuminated with vivid flashes of
lightning and low sullen growls
issued forth from the bowels of the
earth, which culminated in many
instances in crashes that startled
the natives. For three weeks these
conditions continued, then died
away. ' “4

Suddenly on Monday the 5th of
May, came the first touch of trag-
edy, when a great wave of boiling
lava gushed from the crater, pour-
ing through a V-shaped gap even-
tually reached the bed of the
Riviere Blanche, and flowing slow-
ly along this bed reached and en-
gulfed the Guerin sugar factory—
about two miles from San Pierre—
before it flowed into the sea.
impact of this molten rock drove
the sea back some fifty to sixty
yards before it was stopped. The
sea then swept in again over the
quays of the town. As soon as this
had subsided, investigation was
made and it was found that 150
people were missing from the fac-
tory and the works themselves
were embedded in molten rock and
mud leaving only the. top of the
chimney marking the place.

‘Deep Explosion

That night the display around
the top of the volcano was the
most vivid yet witnessed.
The population of San Pierre
was terrified for from the
direction of the volcano the
sounds of deep explosions
came to their ears. They were in
a panic, some rushed about the
streets of the city, others went to
the darkened Cathedral to pray,
while others clustered together in
the market place, finding comfort
in each others company. Their only
illumination was the lightning
from the top of the volcano, They
were oppressed with dread; some-
thing warned them that danger
was at hand. At dawn large par-
ties began leaving the town and
making their way to the capital of
the Island, Fort de France.

The Governor, M. Mouttet, real-
ising the effect that all these re-
fugees would have on Fort de
Frauce, sent soldiers out to stop
these panic stricken people, telling
them that it was all right, and that
the danger Was over so there was
nothing to fear. To set an example
to these citizens of San Pierre and
to try and restore order, the Gov-
ernor and his wife went to this
doomed city to see conditions at
first hand. That day was quiet,
and the Governor’s statements to-
gether with the quiescence of the
voleano had its effect on the people,
who grew calmer and went about

The

gigantic
those s
all




By JOHN PRIDEAUX

led to more panic, as all had i
Coat the ioe tind ponced Maa ange
would soon be restored to normal UP.

The * m’
le was caught
then

again. Not many people in the “De 2 '

city, slept that night. however, to- ood. ‘the des royed
wards mo: the city, ‘the y flung back-
quieter, and the people ward these terrific
hopes in their hearts, saw Ascen- J¢rks “to the full power of

her steam, did
alone was powerless to
snapped ehain
‘Roddam’ ee
was not well with her
though, for her rudder. was

Nasty Night

While the religious thronged the
en for the early morning
service, the steamer Roddam under ;

“. pe jammed hard over, and
Captain E. H. Freeman reached the Captain céuld not control her. as
port of San Pierre, He obeyed the che was beginning to run in cir-
waded 4s tes Genoa ahelien, cles towards ‘her destruction,
ieseaea arantine the being tossed) about by the wind
bani ee oe from port, and there anchored his ship. ith, the wheel. and suddenly he

The agent of the steamer, M. 4, ‘eae te teen aeeee
Joseph Plisson, boarded her and free again. The Cotsaio nine
greeted the Captain with Been @ ated by oné’ thought—to save his
nasty night, Captain.” To which p—drove her forward .
he replied, “Yes, but it seems to the blac r forward through
have cleared a bit now.” While from the tain we Fan = daa
this was going on, there was activ- and that pillar of, fire in the sky.
y about the decks of the Roddam, How he stgod the agony of ba
for she had brought twenty-three trolling this ship is one of the
stevedores from Grenada to work

the cargo and. were preparing to °PCS Of .saivege, for nig shenes'| Mr. H. S. Stokes, just returned from
could not tufn the spokes ~ tne | Russia with Lord Boyd-Orr says in the Daily

perform their allotted tasks, while “®™* S° badly burned
the officers and crew were making wheel
the steamer snug. Everyone was fo
occupied with their allotted tasks, w
and while this was ng on there
was the most appalling explosion
from the top of Mont Pelée. A
huge pillar of fire and smoke shot
for miles into the heavens; the sun
was obliterated and everything
was plunged into darkness deeper
than the deepest dark of night. An
awful rain of red-hot ashes and
stones poured from the black sky.
Rocks, so hot that they glowed in
the darkness, some eighteen inches
across were carried miles and be-
came a rain of death as all those
struck by these were killed in- ‘S-
stantly.. At the first gigantic ex- _Spirit stood by the
plosion a terrific wave of flame Wheel, steering this ship with his)
shot over the lip of the crater and @lbows. The first engineer was
swept towards San Pierre; also a burned to death in the holocaust:
river of White-hot lava and boil- It was the second. engineer. who
ing black mud belched forth and Was driving the engines to enable}
exterminated all life before it.. the ship to éseape. Of the crew!
Captain Freeman saw it coming Only twentysof them were below,
and knew that it meant death and £°me of thése badly injured.
destruction to everything it touch- These included the six of the
ed, realising that he must in- twenty-thret “stevedores who had
stantly or be destroyed, he acted SUrvived, Three of these, although
immediately. He gave the order badly injured worked like mad-
‘Fullspeed ahead’, shouted to the ™€n to stoke the furnaces,

with them,—ihe was
i to use his elbows to steer

_ Worked Hard

He triumphed over nis agony, |
and fled out at sea at full speed,
fleeing out of the very jaws of
the inferno, with the ‘volcano
lching fire behind him,
blackness in front of him to
mark his destination, while the |
red-hot ashesâ„¢poured and poured
down from the ‘darkened skies
to pile up on the decks and over
the bodies of the dead. Hour!
after hour’'this man with the|
indomitable

Second Engineer down through the Nine hours after the cata-
skylight and made his way to the Strophe the ‘Roddam’ steamed
chart-house through the blast of into Castries, St. Lucia, She was

hot air and burning ashes, and got Only the semblance of a steamer
there just as the force of the flam- her rigging and awning burned
ing inferno struck the ship. This 49d charred and hanging in
force was so great that the ship £Totesque fashion, figures lying
keeled over until her ports were @bout the deck that were bumed
under water and she was down to beyond recognition, ashes © cov-
the hand rail around the deck; ered everything six or eight
when it passed and gave her a inches deep, and in some places
chance to right herself. where they had been piled up by

the wind, they were feet deep.
Death Wind “Col

The people of Castries could
not believe their, eyes, for they

The Captain then ran out of the fad seen the ‘Roddam’ leave but
chart-house to be met by a hail of 4 few days before, and surely this

o London banker, who reported last Jan-

What the steam | recent economic conference in Moscow have
and let the| now returned. During the past few days we

i BARBADOS. ADVOCATE

The Destruction Of |
San Pierre

nanan a Tae
MR. SMITH (who went to Moscow |
himself — but as a private tourist)
reports on:

_ Two Views In The
vse ates Boyd—Orr Team

By JOHN SMITH

uary on his unconducted trip to Moscow
and Leningrad

THOSE Englishmen who travelled to the

















jhave been hearing, as no doubt we shall
| continue to hear for a week or so, their vari-
}ous opinions of the Soviet Union; and
once again we are faced with the most puz-
\zling of all the questions which that enig-
matic country poses—why it is that every
visitor to Russia, however honest and truth-
|ful he may be, brings back a different story.

What are we to believe?

Lord Boyd-Orr just returned from Russia
|with Mr. H, S. Stokes, says in the Sunday
Pictorial: “People in the streets were warmly
'clad and shod.”

| Express : * just roughly made sheepskin

| coats and second-rate footwear . . . shabbily
,dressed women, feet bulging from tattered
| shoes.”
| These are not matters of political opinion;
they are facts on which people who lack

and the eye of Communist faith ought to agree.

Many people will of course say that a few
days spent on a restricted visit to its capital
does not perhaps entitle a visitor, like
myself, to air his views on a sixth of the
world’s surface; but even when we turn to
intelligent, experienced men, with every
source of information at their command, we
are no better off.

WHAT THEY BELIEVE
The late British and the late American
Ambassadors both left Moscow at about the
same time; one of them was convinced that
the Russians support the regime, the other
that they are seething with discontent.
Most people just abandon the search for
truth, and merely believe those articles on
Russia which say what they are hoping to
hear, and whose authors share their politi-
cal views.
The author’s political views are, of course,
important. The chances are that somebody
who has thought and read a great deal about
Russia, and has looked forward to going
there for a long time, will, when he finally
visits the country, see what he is determined
to see rather than what is actually there.
If he is a fellow-traveller he will suffer—
or enjoy—an emotional détente on reaching

—



burning ashes. These were piled was not the’ same ship? So badly
up thick on the deck and burning (burndd, so’ terribly altered was
his feet, the very air seemed solid ee Freeman that the Agent
with them. “Members of his crew When he aboard spoke to him
were strewn about the deck in the Without recognizing who it was
most weird attitudes. The death he spoke with, Captain Freeman
wind had swept down and exter- was quickly removed to hospital,
minated them by burning before 4nd lived to return to England
they could realise what was to take where he was presented with
place so as to seek safety. , Lloyd’s Silver Medal for his
Captain Freeman endeavoured gallantry, for this alone had
to free the ship of her anchor, but saved his ship.
the chain was so hot that his hands | The ‘Roddam’ was the first to
were severely burnt so,he could bring the news of the disaster
not succeed. Back to the chart- that had befallen San Pierre and
house he crawled on hands and its thirty-six thousand inhabi-
knees under that hail of burning tants who had been destroyed by
fire, gasping and panting in the this voleanie — eruption. The
poisonous atmosphere; there to cables were broken by
signal “Full speed astern’, hoping earthquakes and slides, indeed
that he would be able to break the when the cable ship of the French
shackle by the force and leave the Cable Company, the Pouyer
anchor lying. The chain held, so Quertier went to repair
when the ship was at the end of cable to enable the rescuers to
the cable, he ordered full steam keep in touch with the world,
ahead and rushed back to be she found that the sea-bed where
brought to a sudden halt when she the cable lay had sunk from 300
reached the other extremity. He feet to 1,500 feet; so terrific was
did this several times without suc- the eruption, that the whole con-
cess. While occupied with this, he tour of the,sea-bed was altered.
saw the other ships around him Only one’inhabitant of San
capsize and sink, The West India Pierre, was found alive by the

the

the

the promised land at last.
~If he is a Fascist reactionary, or an Im-
perialist, or a lackey of Wall Street, as so
many of us still are, he will be as suspicious
of the Russians as they are of him.

But politics are not everything.

When we read an article about the Rus-
sians, no matter whether it lauds or slates
them, we should ask three questions about

the author.
FIRST VISIT?

First has he ever been abroad before — to
other foreign countries with which he can
compare Russia? Anybody going abroad for
the first time is bound to be enchanted by
sheer novelty.

Secondly; did he go to Russia as a mem-
ber of a delegation and—if the answer is
Yes, as it nearly always is—has he ever been |.
abroad as a member of a delegation before ?

It is against human nature to form a really
unfavourable opinion of a country where
one has been really well treated and enter-
tained; and nobody’s judgment, unless inocu-
lated by previous experience, is left unaf-
fected by the flattery of official hospitality.









_ THURSDAY, MAY 8, 1952



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usiness in the ordinary way. and Panama cable-ship, the Grap- rescuers, this was a negro who 7 by
What th b fitting than for | Or rsnest day, Wednesday the pler never had a chance, and the had been condemned to death |... once went to the Argentine with a dele- ‘s
at then can be more fitting ay, y i Hl ,.|gation; we were taken everywhere, usuall SUMRIE

the island to be ted at Her 7th, all the quietness the day big American steamer, the Rorai- for murder and had been con-|® ’ ARE: Ty e, usually *

Pen s before vanished, for again explo- ma was ablaze from stem to stern. fined in a cell well below the|1N cars; everything was organised most “of England
Majesty’s coronation next year, not merely sions came to ee ears and & ae * ee oh den na us wo in va grown, as one smoothly for us; we met President Peron; 8

; e roun wn Ee nea hree Ys after the

by some member of the House of Assembly SE ont Cie venrne, The light- ley of the Riviere Blanche, eruption and destruction of- the hs ate colossal meals where almost as much and sold by:
and member of the Legislative Council, but | ning was again predominant, and which freed the ‘Roddam,’ for city by those digging amang the| time was consumed as food; everyone was

a light rain of gray powdery ash when this meached the shore it wreckage,

anSomrar asmvenaeeesanitedeannnin yo

by a colourful Police Band under the direc-
tion of that most popular Barbadian-by-
adoption Capt. Raison?

Some years ago the Band of the Police
Force of the Gold Coast visited London and
several other provincial cities, They played
in the parks, in halls, on piers and seaside
promenades and they received much atten-
tion from the national Press and the news-
reels. Certain difficulties were experienced
due to the restrictive practices of the Brit-
ish Musicians’ Union. The Band was not
allowed to earn money except on special
oceasions and even when they were allowed
to play at certain places by special indulg-
ence receipts for the performance were
returned to the regular British orchestras
by demands of their Union. But restrictive
practices of this kind little conducive as
they are to the promotion of goodwill and
understanding between the possessing
country and the country which is possessed
were irritants only. Sir Alan Burns’ excel-
lent idea of bringing the Gold Coast to
London in the ambassadorial persons of
their Police Band paid dividends. The
crowds of London and the Provincial cities
took the Gold Coast Police Band to their
hearts and their visit did more to educate
the British public about Colonies than any
other colonial visit to England except that
of the victorious West Indian Cricket team.

If Barbados pleads her ancient British
lineage and her especial connection with
British Royalty, perhaps Queen Elizabeth
II will graciously consent to the presence of
the Police Band from Barbados somewhere
along the triumphal Coronation route in

June next year!

went on all through the night. This



Our Readers

“Murder Will Out?”

To the Editor, the Advocate,

SIR,—I am wondering if the
leading article in your issue of
Sunday 27th ultimo is not a case of
“murder will out” or of your let-
ting the Trans-Canada cat out of
the Seawell Airport bag (or the.
Seawell cat ete. whichever you
prefer), Your Pan-American red-
herring dipped in the British Gov-
ernment’s barter sauce will surely
come in useful now that the cat
is out and about and may need
full rations.

I hope that the senior member
for St. George (Mr. Barrow) is
listening in. By 1954 Nobody's
Diary will no doubt record that
Trans-Canada Airlines insisted
that the Seawell Runway (cr
what’s left of it) be lengthened
and strengthened under their ex-
pert supervision and at the Brit-
ish Government expense, or they
would reluctantly, regretfully and
most sorrowfully be forced to
leave Barbados out of the itin-

erary of their new jet-propelled inane I have been reading your

exce
Another objection may be the noted the large number of letters
their 0n Birth ,Control.
at Sea- letters seem to go to the root: of

aircraft.

temporary quarantine of

passengers in a mud-hut

well from whence they ere sent the matter,

in all kinds of trepical weather
to regain their baggage from the
additional cow-shedq to the ter-
minal building.

both these contingencies?
who was it that persistently gave
him the “lie” direct?
With thanks for space,
Yours sincerely,
A. E. S. LEWIS
David And Bathsheba
To The Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,— While agreeing with
what F. G. says on this subject, I
would like, with your permission,



a cruel and constant war for the
1 survival of the fittest.
Who was it that warned us of of nature no longer exists and man

And has successfully practically sup-

and was eventually

hurled the sea back in one released. He was~ pardoned.

_



Say:

to say that he did not
enough with David's life,

David bitterly repented of those
heinous sins and it was he who
gave us most of those beautiful
Psalms, he died in God's favour,
not like his son Solomon; and do
you think God will look with
favour, because of that one great
sin of his, being made a spectacle
for the amusement of a crowd of
worldly people?

go far are patching up millions of human

beings of poor stock, who go on
breeding more poor stock, with the
result that rid population is to
my mind inefeasing at an alarm-
ing rate.

At the present rate, the popula-
tion of Barkados will be doubled
in 30 yearg if God's methods of
keeping the population down are
tampered with; He might just as
greatly resent vaccination, diph-
theria and typhoid inoculation as
He is alleged to resent birth con-
trol. If a working man is to have
five or six children how can he
bring them up? What is the dif-
ference between a prophylactic in-
jection against conception, and in-
oculation against diphtheria? Man
has completely upset nature’s
method of keeping the population
down, so he must now develop an
unnatural one, It is simply a mat-
TH. ter of common sense, and I see no

— why religion need come in
at all. ~

MEDICUS
No Réeinuneration

To The Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—As an Islatid’ Co ie I
would like to make-knoWn the fol-

lowing facts. .,We-ate under
to serve loyally and faithfully Her
¢ ou

It seems in these “last days”.
God's word written in His Holy
Bible, is wrested and changed up
for quite a different purpose from
what He intended it for—Our
Guide and help in time of need,
and the example set us by His
Be'oved Son,






Thanking you for space,
, FA

Birth Control

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—As a recent arrival in the

t paper regularly, and have
None of these
Let us assume that

God made the Ant-eater and its Majesty Quten | Elizabeth
prey, the lion and the zebra, the Pledge is the game as the Police.
tiger and the elephant. Nature is For our services we receive NO

remuneration, Like Invisible
Guardian Angéls, we serve. But,
we are human—flesh and blood
need sustenange. We have our
homes, wives’ and children. to
maintain. How are we to perform
the ‘miracle’? No assistance is ren-
dered us, as far as the question
of remuneration on casts is con-
~~~ned. Should a case run for
weeks c=2 then be thrown out, we |
get nothing—not even thanks. |
Thanking you for space,
Yours faithfully,
ISLAND CONSTABLE,

This law

pressed the epidemic diseases such
as typhoid, typhus, small-pox and
diphtheria; and also has largely
eliminated the tropical diseases,
He has therefore eliminated na-
ture’s method of keeping a bal-
anced population. We might quite
well argue that Dr. Jenner, the
discover of vaccination was the
cause of World Wars I and I.
Furthermore, we medical men

pleased to see us; we saw and were shown,
without effort on our part, things we had
never seen at home, although, did we but
know it, the same things, just as good,
existed there as well; and we had no spare
time to digest what we-had seen or to ex-
plore for ourselves.

EVENING OUT

Of course, we were vastly impressed and
grateful. '

In Moscow I saw exactly the same thing
happening—mystified Koreans ‘and Chinese
pinned down for the evening in the best
seats at the Bolshoi Theatre or dining 40
strong at the best hotel; tickets forthcoming
at onee where others had to queue; cars,
guides and interpreters for all.

_It would be churlish to be anything but
sincerely grateful to the Russians for their
kindness and trouble; but for most people
it would also be “impossible not to view
Russia through spectacles at least rose-col-
oured if not actually red,

Thirdly, does the author represent himself alone?

Practically nobody returns from Moscow who
did not go there in some official capacity, whether
as a diplomat—who, though obviously the best in-
formed, is bound to public silence—or as a trade
unionist. ’

_ Even newspaper correspondents in that
unfree air acquire a semi official status from their
eontact with and dependence on the embassies
quite apart from their other ties—when I was
there, four of the six foreign correspondents were
married to Russians.

All these sources of information are inevitably
tinged with official opinion of one col or) an-
other; and this excuses those returning visitors,
However brief their stay, who rush in where the
fficial angels are not allowed to tread.

Nevertheless, even after applying these three
tests to whatever we read, the fact remains that
we know less about Russia to-day than we did
about America in the time of Queen Elizabeth I.

Until the Iron Curtain rises (or clatters apart—
according to which way it turns out to be made),
Russia is bound to remain as fabulous and undis-
covered a land as medieval China, and we shall
be at the mercy of every modern Marco Polo who
brings back fellow-travellers’ tales.

We shall never know the truth about Russia
until a very great many ordinary humane, unpoliti-
cal people have made long and unconducted tours
of the country.

WORLD COYPRIGHT RESERVED
—L.E.S.






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a Fresh Vegetables
Peaches English Garden Peas
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THURSDAY, MAY &

9

1952



Vestry Want More Time
To Consider Maude Bill

AT the sogiest of the Select Committee appointed by

the House of
contains proposed changes

ssembly to consider the Maude Bill which

of the Vestry System, the St.

Lucy Vestry yesterday discussed the Bill, but after about
an hour and a half discussion few tangible views were

expressed.

Members said they had not had
sufficient time to peruse it and so
did not know the merits and de-
merits of the two systems and to
be able to compare and criticise
easily.

The views expressed are to be
passed on to the Select Committee
of the House.

Present were Rev. Pestaina,
Chairman and Messrs. J. E. T.
Brancker, F, A. Greaves, Church-
warden, C. H. Yearwood, C. DeC.
Howell, LeRoy Bourne, G. G. Har-
ris and D. E. Webster.

What Changes

Mr. J. E. T. Brancker opened
the discussion by observing that
the question was,—were they in
favour of remaining as they were?
If they were not, then, what type
of changes would they sanction?

“Frankly,” he said, “I can see
no justification for remaining as
we are. Improvements are long
overdue,”

The question arose as to which
system, the present or the pro-
posed would be more expensive
and Mr. F. A. Greaves, h-
warden, said that it was stated in
the Maude Report that the pro-
posed change would be more ex=
pensive,

Mr. Brancker pointed out that
there would not be so many par-
ochial treasurers.

After a pause in the discussion,
Mr. Webster observed that it was
a serious matter and he for one
did not like jumping over a cliff
as it were.

Mr. Brancker said that he was
prepared to listen carefully and
sympathetically then to the views
expressed, examine them and
bear them in mind when the mat-
ter came again before him as a
member of the House.

Too Much Of A Rush

Another impasse ensued and
then some members said that it
was all too much a rush. Mr.
F. A. Greaves said that the House
should publicise everything con-
cerning the proposed system.

Following repeated expressions
that there had not: had sufficient
time to go into the Bill and the
Select Committee had set too
early a date for them to consider
the Bill, Mr. Brancker suggested
that they might tell the Select
Committee as much. He added
that the Churchwarden might pass
on opinions on any general heads.

The Churchwarden then asked
what type of change, if any, they
would like.

The consensus of opinion was
that the present system should be
retained and there should be six
instead of eleven Vestries.

The present qualification which
entitles a parishioner to vote is
the owning of one rood of land or
the paying of £1 trade tax.
Opinion was that the qualification
for voting should not be changed
to one of adult suffrage, but
should be changed so that only
ratepayers should have a vote and
all of them should be entitled.
For, it was held, they were look-
ing after the ratepayers’ money.

Mr. Yearwood felt that unless
the Government assisted the sys-
tem by about $3,000,000, a hard-
ship would be created with the
change.

CF *

After the meeting the Vestry
visited Barrows House where it
has been decided to transfer the
parochial treasurer’s office be-
cause of complaints by ratepayers
as to the inaccessibility of the
present site of the office at Har-
tison Plantation.



Lecture On
Road Safety

AT the end of this month, Colo-
nel R. T. Michelin, Commissioner
of Police, will give his usual Lec-
ture to bus drivers and conductors
at one of the cinemas in Bridge-
town. i 7

This Lecture will be given in
co-operation with the launching
of a campaign by the Barbados
Automobile Association. The
President. and Secretary of that
Association will he associated with
the Commissioner of Police on
the platform.

After the Lecture a film on
“Road Safety” will be shown,

Persons will be admitted to the
Lecture on the production of a
current drivers’ and conductors’
licences,

It is expected that this Lecture
will be ‘arranged for Friday, May

30, a day*which it is hoped
be suitable for conductors and
drivers.

The Police have taken over the
supervision of car park attend-
ants. Shortly these attendants, as
well as Island Constables, will be
given a new type of uniform.





Motorist —
Acquitted

The case in which Henry
Trent of Goodland, St, Michael,
was charged by the Police with
driving the motor car M-1254 on
Deacon’s Road, St. Michael, in a
way dangerous to the public war
yesterday dismissed ,without pre-
judice by His Worship Mr. G. B.
Griffith, Acting Police Magistrate
of District “A”,

Mr. J. E. T. Brancker appeared
on behalf of Trent, while Sgt
Forde attached to the, Traffic
Branch at Central Station prose-
cuted for the Police. The charge
stated that the offence was com-
mitted on March 11.

George Jordan, island consta-
ble said that on March 11 some-
time during the night he heard a
crash and going into Deacons
Road saw a telephone pole knock-
ed down inthe street. A motor
car was about 20 feet from the
pole but the defendant who was
present never told him what
happened.

Harold Rock another witness
for the prosecution also said that
he heard a great noise while he
was going home in Deacons Road.
Cpl. McClean said that the de-
fendant told him that he was
driving on Deacons Road about
20 miles per hour and saw a man
dash across the rggd.. In trying
to avoid an accident the car
struck a telephone pole.

Rhodesia
To
Grow Sugar

SALISBURY, Southern Rhodesia

Experiments are going ahead in
the Zambesi for an ambitious
sugar plantation scheme. t is
hoped that eventually erfough
sugar will be produced to supply
the entire needs of both Southern
and Northern Rhodesia.

This plantation area is consider-
ably further north, nearer the
equator, than Africa’s existing
sugar-growing belt, in the coastal
districts of Natal and Zululand,
where sugar has been grown on
a commercial scale for more than
100 years.

Agriculturalists have always
felt, however, that Rhodesia
offered wide possibilities for a
variety of crops. Since tobacco
production on a commercial scale
began in Rhodesia some 40 years
ago, for instance, these crops have
become a valuable addition to the
world’s tobacco supply.

The first sugar-can seed in
Rhodesia has been planted in an
experimental plot on the hanks of
the Zambesi. near the Chirundu
Bridge. Rhodesia Sugar Re-
fineries is the firm conducting the
tests, but it is probably that an-
other company will be formed
later to organise the planting and
milling of cane in the area.

First Step

Wir. Stanley Cooke managing
director of the company, said that
the planting of this seed cane was
the first step in a scheme aimed
at meeting the sugar requirements
of both Rhodesia. He hoped that
20,000 tons of sugar a year could
be produced at first from the
Zambesi plantations, which would
be half the present consumption of
the two territories.

One difficulty that may face the
project, however, is the avail-
ability of cheap labour. This was
the problem encountered by the
early sugar planters in Natal and
which was overcome by the im-
portation of the indentured labour-
ers from India,

South African sugar produc-
tion has traditionally beei almost
entirely for domestic consumption
and it has never figured largely
as a South African export com-
modity. Expanding crops in the
past few seasons, however, have
given South Africa a sugar export
surplus.

Under the Commonwealth Sugar
Agreement, signed in London last
December, South Africa has “an
overall export quota of 200,009
tons a year and East Africa has
a quota: of 10,000 tons. It is
doubtful whether the South
African quota will be completely
taken up for the next few years et
fleast.

No provision is made under the
Agreement for new production in
other territories, such as Southern
Rhodesia, but it is unlikely, even
if the experiment succeeds, that
an export market will be sought
for Rhodesian sugar for many
years to come, especially since the
stated obiect of production is to
grow supplies for the Rhodesian
home morket. —B.U.P.







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“Dick” Reece
Here Again

STILL TAKES KEEN
INTEREST IN SPORT

Mr. H. W. W. “Dick” Reece
son of Mr. W W. Reece, Solicitor
General, who arrived here some
weeks ago from the United King-
dom with his family, is employed
with Kuwait Oil Company, but
still takes a keen interest in sport.

While in the West Indies, he
played water polo for Y.M.P.C.,
from 1938—42 and was captain
of Trinidad Leaseholds Ltd., from
1943—46. He also played for
Swordfish and Otters. London
Club in 1948 and = afterwards
captained the Kuwait Oil Com-
pany’s team from 1949—51.



MR. “DICK” REECE
While

in England, he _ learnt
rugby at Taunton School, the
leading West County rugby school
end in 1944, he was the only
B.W.I. selectee to represent Trini-
dad against British Guiana. The
other members of the team were
W. G. Show of T.L.L. (English) J.
Williams, UBOT (English) and
the remainder selected from the
Fleet Air Arm in Trinidad.
Goodwill Tour

In 1946 he represented. Trini-
dad in the first Goodwill Tour
after the war against British Gui-
ana. From 1943—51 he played
for Kuwait Oil Co,, Ltd., Ist XV
and in 1950—51 he represented
K.O.C. Ist seven teams in the
Persian Gulf Area in a seven a
side conypetition when K.O.C. won
both.

At football he represented T.L.L.
as goalkeeper from 1943—46 and
played for_Trinidad S.A.F.A. in
1944 and S.A.F. L. in 1945 and 46.

He was invited to practice by
the Trinidad A.F.A. in 1946 for
the B.G. tour, but was unable to
accept the invitation on account
of contractual leave taken in the
United Kingdom.

He also played quite a bit of
hockey and tennis.



Obituary

Dr. Jesse Grell
*
Dies li Barbados

Death unexpected and sudden
brougnt grief to the tamuly of
vr. vesse Grell, reured Dustrict
Medical Officer of ‘Trinidad.

Dr. Grell arrived yesterday
morning to spend a holiday with
his sister Miss Louise Grell at the
Stream. On arrival he was suffer-
ing from pneumonia, but it was
not expected that his end ‘was s0
near.

He was educated in Barbados
and later graduated in Medicine
from Edinburgh, He joined tne
Trinidad Medical Service and was
appointed to Siparia from whicn
post he retired recentiy.

He was married to Miss Solang>
Thaly of Martinique who pre-
deceased him and by whom he
had two children — a son and @
daughter. His son, who is the
well known Sports Master at
Queen’s Royal College in Trinidad.
is now in Denmark taking a re-
fresher course in Physica! Educa-
tion. ee

Dr. Grell was a man of gejia
temperament and was highly re-
spected. He was a member of the
B.M.A. and was a moving spirit
in the Medical Association in
Trinidad, He had, on his occa-
sional visits to Barbados over a
pericd of years, gathered a wide
circle of friends to whom his pa*s-
ing will be a source of deep re-
gret

His funeral took place at the
Westbury Cemetery yesterday
afternoon in the presence of «@
largve gathering.

To his sorrowine relatives deen-
est sympathy will be extended

INT SPORT SHIRTS

SHIRTS (White only)

with Coloured Pipings and



DIAL 2664



BARBADOS. ADVOCATE





cE

Picture shows a pig and litter of 18 pigs which were born on Satur-
day night. This is believed to be a record. The sow is owned by
Mr. Giles of Laynes Road, Britton’s Hill.



Home Economics
Officer Commends
Vegetable Project

MISS ELSA.HAGLUND, Home Economies Officer of
the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United
Nations (F.A.0.), told the Advocate yesterday that during
her week's visit she had seen an interesting vegetable grow-
ing project and hoped it would be possible to extend stil!
further the production of food for home consumption.

20’- Fine For
Discharging
Firearm

His Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith,
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-
trict “A” yesterday convicted and
fined 42-year-oid Sydney Skinner
a Civil Servant of King Street,
St. Michael 20/- to be paid in 14
days or one month’s imprisonment
with hard labour for discharging
a firearm within 100 yards of a
public highway but dismissed on
its merits another charge of being
drunk while in the possession of
a loaded firearm,

Skinner appealed against Mr.
Griffith’s decision. Mr. E. W. Bar-
row appeared on behalf of Skin-
ner while Sgt. King attached to
the Central Police prosecuted
from information received for the
Police,

Dr. Cato told the court that he
examined Skinner and he ‘was
very talkative. He had been
drinking but he had not drunk so
much as to be incapable of know-
ing whet he was doing,

Addressing the court Mr. Bar-
row submitted that it was not
proved that the defendant dis-
charged the firearm, nor that if
he had discharged the firearm that
he did so intentionally. There
Was no expert to tel! the cout
whether the mechanism of the
gun was in good working order
or w’s defective. It was the dutv
of the prosecution to establish
that the man teok the gun in his
hand and discharged it, and that
he was 100 yards from the road.

Six Months For
Stealing $10

His Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod,
Police Magistrate of District “A”
yesterday sentenced Frank Drakes





a labourer of Cave Hill, St.
Michael to six months’ ° im-
prisonment with hard labour

for stealing $10 from Clairmonte
Eastmond.

The offence was committed on
April 12. Eastmond told the
court that on April 12 he saw
the defendant and after talking
with him the defendant told him
that he could get a pair of shoes
for him for $10. He gave the de-
fendant $10 and waited for him
to return.

The defendant did not return
and he notified the Police. Drakes
had three previous convictions for
stealing.



SALESMAN
DISCHARGED

Ashton Gibson, a salesman of
Kew Land, St. Michael, was dis-
charged by His Worship Mr. G.
B. Griffith, Acting Police Magis-
‘rate of District “A”, when he











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She hoped that the teaching of
Home Economics would be devel-
oped, but stressed the necessity
for having it closely related to
actual conditions in the homes of
the people.

Miss Haglund is making a tour
of the West Indies as a prelimin-
ary to the Conference on the
teaching of Home Economics and
Nutrition which is to be held
jointly by FAO and the Caribbean
Commission beginning June 30 in
Trinidad.

While in Barbados she has had
a very full programme. related
to these subjects. It included
visits to the Housecraft Centre,
some of the Secondary and ele-
mentary schools, the General Hos-
pital, the St. Michael's Almshouse,
the Nightingale "Home and_ the
Children’s Goodwill League: also
the Pine Livestock Station, Groves
Agricultural Station and Mr. Sam
Marshall’s “very enterprising”
vegetable growing project at
Eckstein’s Village.

Address to T.U. Students

On Tuesday Miss Haglund ad-
dressed the Trade Union student
at the Y.M.C.A, on Nutrition, She
thought they were a most prom-
ising group; very influential in the
communities from whence they
came, At the end of the talk, there
was a lively discussion which she
regarded as of great benefit to her;
and which she much enjoyed.

Miss Haglund had_ interviews
with His Excellency the Governor
and various heads of departments,
She also had consultations with
the Comptroller for Development
and Welfare and his Advisers,

The Education and Sacia!
Welfare Advisers wil attend a
Trinidad Conference to which
the territorial Governments
belonging to the~ Caribbean
Commission are invited te send
reprerentatives, The North
American Regional Office of
FAO in Weshington will also
send a representative,

Miss Haglund's headauarters
in the Caribbean are with the
Caribbean Commission in Trini-
dad. She will be leaving here
shortly for Grenada to continue
her tour of the are» which takes
her to Martinique, Puerto Rico.
Jamaica, Curacac and British
Guiana,

She wished that she could have
included many more territories in
her tour. but found it impossibl
due to the lack of time.

Miss Hawund who ws stavine
at the Marine Hotel. left for Trini-
dad last nieht by R WTA,

_—_——

appeared before him yesterday
charged by the Police with the
larceny of clothing valued at £11,
the property of Ernest Jones ot
Reid Street sometime between
December 18, 1951 and December
21, 1951.

Ernest Jones principal witness
in the case, told the court that
he desired that the matter be
dropped as he was suffering from
a lapse of memory. Sgt. Murrell
prosecuted for the Police from
information received.





Canadian To
Give Course In
Horsemanship

STAFF Sergeant Anderson,
Senior Equitation Instructor at
the Royal Canadian Mounted
Police Training Depot at Rock-
cliff, Ottawa, Canada, will be ar-
riving in the island today by
T.C.A.

He will be spending six weeks
here to instruct the local Moun.ed
Police in “Horsemanship and
Mounted Display Events.”

Staff Sergeant Anderson's vis‘
has been made possible througo
the kindness of Mr. Nicholson,
Commissioner of Police of in?
R.C.M.P.; by cooperation of T.C.A.
who brcught him to the island free
of charge and through the kina
ness of the proprietors of tnt
Marine Hotel who will put hiro
up without charge.

At the end of the Staff Sergean ‘s
visit, a Mounted Display will
given at District “A” Training
School where the public will i+
able to see the standard reached
and the benefit gained by the visit
of this experiericed instructor
horsemanship

Colonel R. T. Michelin, Commis-
sioner of Police, told the Advocat >:
“With the benefit of Staff Sergea's
Anderson’s experience, we ho»
that it will be possible for t u
Barbados Mounted Police to |
represented at the Coronation of
Queen Elizabeth next year.”





Leeward Is.
Council To
Be Deubled

During the -. debate on th
Leeward Islands (Aimendme
Act, No. 13rof 195), in the



eral Legislative Couneil on. ihe
19th November, . 195! variou

Suggestions were made These
Suggestions have now been con-
sidered by the Secretary of
State, who has reached 1e fol-
lowing decisions. The number
of the elected members on the
Federal Executive Council will

be increased from 3 to 6
ther consideration cannot be
given at this stage to the objec-
tion to the introduction of nomi-
nated members into the General
Legisiative Council or to the pro-
posal that the Governor should
only exercise his reserved powers
after consultation with the Exe-
ecutive Council. The new General
Legislative Council will be in-
vited to amend the Leeward
Islands Act, and additional legis-
lation will be introduced, to pro-
vide for the usual privileges and
immunities of members of the
Legislature, Similar legislative
action will be taken in the Presi-
dencies. The General Legislative
Council will be invited to amend
the Leeward Islands Act to pro-
vide that, if the representative
member who is the elected mem-
ber for Anguilla is unable to
take his seat on the General
Legislative Council, the unoficial
members of the St. Kitts-Nevis-
Anguilla Legislature may _ elect
an elected member from amongst
the remaining elected members
on the Presidential Legislature

Fur-

. » to be a temporary member of the
7 AMBRICGANS TO Gorcrat Vewssiative Cuneit.

LOOK FOR
TUNGSTEN

EDMONTON, Alta.
The unexplored Logan Mountain
range of the Northwest Territories
will be the target this summer fo;
seven American mountain climbers
seeking strategic deposits of tung-
sten and tin,

The party, including fuu
geologists, will be known as the

Yale-Logan expedition and_ is
sponsored by the Yale Mour-
taineering Club of New Haver
Conn,

The party will leave late tu
spring by plane for their br sv

camp at Watson Lake, 800 mile
from here on the edge of the juti-
ing Selwyn Range of which th
Logans are a chain,

Heavy scientific instruments and
equipment will be flown in from
Edmonton by Canadian Pacific
Airlines as well as food and othe:

supplies for the seven-week
assault of the chain,

The Logans are an unknown
quaniity except what physio-
eeaphie detail can be learned

from air photographs.

Dudley W. Bolyard, expedition
chairman, has spent several
months in detailed study of all!
available air photos of the chain
and he said bedrock formations)
strongly suggest of deposits of |
defense-precious tungsten, tin and]
other metals,

The party plans to climb every |
possible mountain in the range |
rather than concentrate on just one |
or two as do most expeditions on!
a pleasure-seeking vacation, The|
Logans, the highest in the N
American interior, contain many

high ranges crowned by rugmed
peaks as well as many Alpine
glaciers and icefields. }

—B.U.P |



Witnesses Tell |
Commission Of |
Misused Furds

(From Our Own Correspondent
ST, GEORGE'S. |
Several allegations of misuse of}
public funds have been made in|
the course of evidence given by |
witnesses before the Commission
of Inquiry now investigating ccr-|
tain features of the working of|
the Public Works Department
The Commission sat all last week}
and this week, in addition to hear-
ing more evidence, will visit cer-
tain country districts. Presiding
is Sir Clement Malone, assisted by

|
Mr. C. E. Newbold and Mr. J. W.|
Foster. Among witnesses last}
week was Hon. KE. M. Gairy



whose motion in the Legislature
led to the setting up of the Com
mission,

Se —

YARDLEY

FOR ALL THAT'S LOVELY

AND BEAUTIFUL












Here’s The Range We Offer—

Perfumes,

Lavender Waiter,
Soap,

Lipsticks,

Ladies’ & Gents’ Gift
Creams,

Powders.

—~--

orth |



“PAGE FIVE

Compensation
Money To Be
Divided

In the Court of Original Juris~
diction yesterday His Honour Mr.
J. W..B. Chenery made an order
that $1,800 be divided equally
between Leotta Taitt wife of the
late Lloyd Taitt and-her daughter
fave been deducted when the
question as to the compensation
ior the death cf Lloyd Taitt a
lorry driver employed by Bulke-
ley Factory occupied the attention
of that court yesterday morning.

Compensation of $1,800 was
faid into the court by Bulkeley
Factory after Lloyd Taitt a lerry
driver of Haggatt Hall, St.
Michael died on tht spot when he
was involved in an accident on
My Lords Hill, St, Michael on t!
morning of March 25 while
was driving one of the trucka
belonging to Bulkeley Factory
and which was laden with bags of
Sugar at the time.

rhe Factory report showed that
the deceased was working for $22
a week before he met his death:
Leotta Taitt (45) of Haggatt Hall,
St. Michael. told the court that
she depended on the deceased
who used to live with her, She
was his lawful wife and they
only had one daughter who is
unmarried. :

An application from Viola
Drakes for part of the compensa-
tion was unsuccessful, “ Drakes
told the court that she was the
reputed wife of the deceaséd and
had three children from him.
Drakes is also a married woman.



USE A

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BLUE - FLAME
STOVE



FOR EASY

& CLEAN

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AGENTS.









VACATION
BARGAINS



Drastic Reductions in Thermos

P



Attache Case for 4 people ..
Valise 2 ”

Canvas Zipp Case for 2 people
Basket Case for 2 people ..

” ”

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Sets

Original Price Now
$30.00 $16.00
$26.00 $12.00
$20.00 $13.00
$20.00 $13.00
$20.00 $13.00

4

KNIGHTS LTD.







Sets,



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO,

10, 11,12 & 18 Broad Street







LTD.






PAGE SIX



CLASSIFIED ADS. '-

_TELEPHONE

ee

IN MEMORIAM



LAWRENCE: In loving memor:
dear Mother, Edith Lawrence
on May &, 195%

We miss vou now our hes
As time goes bY we miss you more
Your loving sraile your gentle fa
No one can-fill your vacant pi ace.

Fver ‘to be remembered by her loving

Children—Laurinta, Leonard, Alma, Clif-

ford; (Grands) Mrs. Branch, Mrs. Good-

ridge 8.5.52



MARSHALL—In loving memory of our
dear son and brother, Lionel (Cocker)

Marshall, who died on 8th May, 1950

Memories are treasures no pne can
steal,

Death is a heartache nothing can
heal,

Some may forget him now he is

~ gone,

But we shall remember—no_ matter

how long





In



_2508 —

FOR SALE









=

AUTOMOTIVE
Cl AR—A.40 3. 500 miles. Phon
6.5
CAR “Morris Oxford. Perfect condi-

ion; mileage 2,370. Telephone 2949

23.4.52—t.{.n





CAR—Ford Prefect late 1950 model
General condition good. Mileage under
16,000 Apply Withnall Fontabelie,
Phone 3409 8.5.52—t.fn

CAR-—-One 1) 1951 Hillman 17,000
niles. Perfect condition, going cheap
Frodgers, Little Hamilton, St. Lawrence
Cap 8.5.52—Gn.

CAR -One (1)



Austin A.40 Car, late



The Marshall Family 8.5.52—In 1351 model. Telephone ce D v
—_——. —— Scott & Co., Ltd 5.52—t f.n.,
FOR RENT CAR—(1) M.G Coupe in perfect

order Apply Newcastle Plantation, St

John 20.4.5 “t.f.n.

BEN-O-NI, Fitts Village, on sea, St.]~ ( ARS—One (1) Standard Vanguard
James, 2 bedrooms, Dressiig Room, WC. Jigds, and one (1) Hillman Minx 1980,
Garage and Servants room Dial 2628. both in excellent condition, No_reason-
2.5,52-—0u offer refused. Phone 4949, Chelgea







FARAWAY--St. Philip coast, 3 bed-
rooms, Fully furnished. Lighting Plant.
Watemnill supply. Double Car Port, two
servant rooms. From May Ist. Phone

10.4.52—t.f.n
aa

FLAT—New, very modern, seaside flat.
Completely furnished. Telephone, gas,
electricity. Facing sea. Excellent and
safe seabathing. Special Summer Rates.
Apply to “MARESOL"’

GAP. Phone 8496.
26.4 52—e.0.d.—t.f.n







FLAT AND HOUSE—Fully furnished,
St. Lawrence on Sea.
on, Phone 3503. We
for next Winter 29.3.59—t.f.n

MODERN FURNISHED FLAT
Silver and Linen. Good Sea -
For further particulars:
Lashley No. 6

With
bathing
Appiy to Alma
Coral Sands, Worthing

23.2.52—t.f{.n
“MODERN STORE AND OFFIC. ES -One
modem Store and two Office
Swan Street Apply
No. 18 Swan Street





ta; C.zT



NEWHAVEN — Crane Coast, 4 bed-
rooms. Fully furnished, lighting Plant,
Watermill supply, Double Garage, three
servant rooms, For May and from Oc_
tober Ist Phone 4476.

10.4,52—t.f.n





PLYMOUTH,
July.

SHA GAZE—on- the-sez
fully furnished, ingliding pope é
refrigerator, for #une, October onwards
for further infoymmtion—Dial 225

Crane Coast-

June and
Phone 2083

+ o:08—t.i,n









TRINITY COTTAGE—fully furnished,

ee bedroom mplete with tele-
and “refrigerator, situated at

Bay, St. James, Phone 2959,
27.4,52—+.f.n.





PERSONAL

i Whe Bebe ate hereby eres against
iving | cr to my wife, FELICIA
DOROTHY HUNTE (nee Lovell) as I do
not hold myself responsible for her or
anyone else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless’ by a written order
signed by me







JOSEPH NATHANIEL HUNTER,
Welchman Hall,
St. Thoma
7.5.52—2n
The public are hereby warned against
iving -credit, to miy wife, LILLIAN

GENE WHITE (nee Nowell) as I do
not hold myself responsible for her or
anyone” else contracting any debt or

debts in my name unless by a written
order signed by me

GEORGE WHITE





St. Elizabeth Village,
- Joseph
5 5.52-—2n
The publi¢vare hereby warned ogainst
giving credit to. my wife, ROSLIN
LAMO EDWARDS (nee Bovell) as |
do not«hold nayself responsible for her

or anyone tise contracting any debt or
debts fh nif hame unless by a written
order signed by me
RALPH ST. AUBRON McCONRICK
EDWARDS,
Boscobelle, St. Peter.
7.5.52—2n
a
The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, THELMA
ZANVIA PHILLIPS (nee Watson) as I
do not*hold myself responsible for, her
or anyone else contracting any debt or
debts in my name unless by a written
order signed by me

HAROLD PHILLIPS,








Boseobelle, St. Peter
8.5.52—2n
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Cameron Hinds, NOTICE
alwapleeper of Bank Hall XK Road
holder of Liquor License No. 894 of 1952,]) TE ASSOCIATED ROARD OF THE
granted to ElminaBishop in respect of ROYAL SCHOOLS OF MUSIC
” floor of “ storey wall building LONDON
Spooners Hit), #1. Michael, for per- Phe Board begs to notify the teachers
ticsion te use” sai@ Liquor License at}that the Written Exam takes pla
a board and shingle shop attached to|®oturday, S3lst May, at 9.45 at the
residence at Lower Bank X Road,| U line Convent, Collymore Rock. All
St. Michael forms and fees must be in tyr May 15th
Dated this 7th day of May, 1952 A. INNISS, H.L.R.,
To: E. A: McLEOD, Esq | Ashford, St. Thomas
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A". 8.5 In
Cc AMERON HINDS, We ee ee
Applicant

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be heid
at Police Court, Dist. “A” on Monday
the 19th day of May 1952, at 11 o'clock

am,
F. A. McLEOD.
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A’

2.5.52—-In

1\QUOR LICENSE NOTICE





The abplication of Permall Givinder
Shopkecper pf Brittons Hill, St. Michael
for permission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors












&c., at ground floor of a 2 storey wall
building at Brittons X Rd., St. Michael
Do ved 6th day of May 1952
To Ee A. MeLEOD, Esq
Poli¢e Mauistrate, Dist. “A”
me FRMALL GiVINDER,
Applicant
op eh. abit ee
t ¢ Court to be held
Pi Court, Dist A” on Monda
‘ih f 3 2, at il Oc Ce
FEF. Al McLEOD.
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
‘
1 if au OR LICENSE NOTIC!
tutterford Fost
« Black Rock, holder
Liq License No, 118% of 1962
nied "to Fdna Prathwaite in respect
ef bottom floor of # 2 storey wooden
timg at Baxters Road, St. Michge
permirsion to use tid Liquor License
é&c al B board and shingle shop attache



to resifence at Brighton, Black Ree)

Vaeho ol
lated this 6th day of May 1952
BE, A. McLEOD, Esq
Police “Magistrate, Dist. “A”
R, FOSTER,
Applicant
application will be consid-
Me Court to be
on Satur
at 11 o'¢

N.T This
ad at a Licen



le



at Police Court, Dis
the
am



Tith day May

A.

E

A
Magistrate, Dist



SSS

ror Best Results- ADVERTISE
SSS OSS8VS 959899 SO1GG9895,

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASK

What The Boy: Boys Have
Been Waiting For
Has Arrived:—
AMERICAN CAP
PISTOLS AND CAPS

- Closing Out Sale of
ALL ENAMEL PAINTS

STATIONERY







JOHNSON’S



\

















ST, LAWRENCE

Available Aprii
invite inspection

CESSES

wage (1950) Ltd 7. 562-
—
CAR—1951 Hillman 17,000 miles. Perfect
condition, going cheap. Box O.H. C/o
Advocate Co,, Lid 7.5.52—3n



TRUCK—One (1) 3-ton Austin Truck.
Apply D.V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd, White
Park Road,

244.524 1 n

VAN — Fordson
19,000 miles
Street Dial



Van in perfeet order,
Royal Store No. 12 High
4359 7.5.52—3n

ELECTRICAL
One (1) Mullard 5-Tube Radio

Phone 3944
7.5.52-—4n
We stinghou ise Fridge 34
condition. Ring Mr
5 p.m. 2064 7
GARRA RD 3-SPEED AUTOMATIC
HANGERS-Just received a _ limited
juantity. Call early, P. C. S. Maffei
& Co., Ltd 5.5.52—fn

MECHANICAL

4 CULATOR
pract cally new
tion. Dial 4689





RADIO-~

in exeelient condition






F TUDGE
Excellent
4412, after

4 of
Hughes
5.$2—4n







One original Odhner
and in first class condi-
8.5. 52-—4n

MISCELLANEOUS

CRADLE One Baby's Cradle with
“ttress and drop side, one baby's wash-
tand one Baby's High Chair, Telephone
680 or B51. J. A. Lewis



Jn



CLOTHES WRINGERS—For the home
lsundry, convenient and easy to operate
K. R

clothes wringers. Only $27,37.
Hunte & Co., Ltd. Lower Broad Street.
Dial 5136. 6.5.52—3n



'TTON PRINTS—New shipment of
adian Prints, lovely material, lovely
signs and reasonable price, come and

#et yours at Kirpalani, Swan ae
Bae.

CAR TYRES REMOULDED—Sizes “B00-
16, $23.53; 450-17, $21.52. Chamois
Leathers $2.75 Can be seen at the
Tri eae Store, Trafalgar Street. Dial
8.5.52—3n



GARDEN HOSE:

4” Garden Hose
wed Fittings, City Garage Co., Victoria
Street 1.5.52—t.f.n

Se

HERBS—Make-u-well Herbs is Nature's

cure for constipation, Rheumatism, im-
digestion, Kidney and Bladder Diseases
nd Sluggish Liver. Price 2/- box

KNIGHT'S LTD 7.5.52—3n

PEEK FREANS' CHEESLETS— We have
Peek Freans’ Cheeslets in stock, original

price 7/-, now reduced to $1.12. iow
is your chance to get a_ bargain.
KNIGHT'S LTD. 7.5.52—3n

————
NECORDS—Clearing our stock of MGM

Necords, Three for Two Dollars, your

chotee. A. BARNES & CO., LTD.

9. 4.52—t.f.n
Subscribe now to the Dally ‘Telegraph
ngland’s leading Daily Newspaper now

erriving in Barbados by Air only a few
favs after publication tn London. Con-



tict: Kan Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltd
local Representative, Tel. 3118.
17,4.52—t.f.n.



‘TOOTH PASTE—Sterilla Tooth “Paste
ci'eans and refreshes, special value 1/-

“VAT—One (1) 6,000 gallon Oak Vat —

poly D. V. Scott & Co., Ltd., White
Park Road. 1.8, OP =ti£.8

PUBLIC NOTICES











REMOVAL NOTICE

SMITH'S SHIPPING SERVICE
;2 sk their Clients to kindly note that their
OfMice is now located at Magazine Lane
| rocing the Public Librany.
6.5.52—-2n

Re Estate of
AROCHDEACON ALFRED SHANKLAND,
Deceased,

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim upon
r affecting the Estate of Archdeacon
Alfred Shankland, late of Third Avenue,
Belleville, in the parish of Saint Michael,
who died in this Island on the 30th day
! January 1952, are requested to send

particulars of their claims, duly
nttested, to the undersigned, the qualified
cutors of the Estate of the said
\lfred Shankland, (deceased), in care
{ Mesers, Cottle, Catford & Co., No. 17
wh Street, Bridgetown, on or before
ie Sth day of June 1952, after which
‘mte we ehall proceed to distribute the
ts of th nid Estate among the
te sreto, havir egard t
debt claims only of which we
I then have bad notice: And that we
i not be liable for acsets so distri-
ited to any person of whose debt or
claim we shall not have had notice at
the time of such distribution
And all persons indebted to the said
tate are requested to settle their ac-
yunts without delay,
Dated this 2nd day of April,
H, G, MURRAY
Cc. R. ARMSTRON
talified Executors of the Estate
of Alfred Shankland, dec'd,
3.4,52—4n.







it




1952,





Q







NOTICE

Applications for a vacant Bulkele:
Yrust Fund Exhibition tenable at any Ist
or 2nd grade school in the island will be

seceived by me up to 17th May.

Candidates must be sons of parents
straitened circumstances having a
ettlement in St. George, or liable ta

be rated there and must not be more
than 13 years of age. A baptismal cer-
fieate and a letter from the Head-
master of the school which app!" ant
sttends must accompany applicat
Forms of application must be obt,
from me, ,
D. H. A. JOHNSON,
Clerk, Vestry of St. George
| 4.5.52—4n
| Ne
|
| NOTICE
| I hereby
j that on the
mong my

inform
28th day of March,
sickness period only
ithorised Mr. J. C. Hutson tq collect
| bills and undertake
my behalf
This Natice
| suthority from
| mus: now
e between 6
2p.m., 6 p.m
' 4888.

all transactions

serves
April

to cancel all
30th 1952. All
be paid to me at my
a.m, to 8 a.m., 12 ngon

to 8 p.m. Telephone



J. N. T. CHATLANT,
Hindu Christian Proprietor,
eral Merchant Office and Residence,
Corner, Passage & Baxters Road.

6.5.52—2n

















| occasionally

the General Public |
1952, |

+1 M

WANTED





HELP
ANNOUNCER— Rediffusi¢ quire
Anne uncer, Script Writer, male pre
ferred, go0c ion and command of
English ¢ ape lette
Trat 8
bi LADY with experience
‘osmetic Departmer Collin 28
Broa Street 5.5. 52-—3n
—$_$<$$$<$—$<—$$—_
An Assistant WORKS ENGINEER,

capable of supervising a workshop and
Foundry Experience in Sugar Machin-
ery repair work desirable. Applicant
must have knowledge of scale drawing
and experience in the direction of labor

Copies of recent testimonials must be
submitted with application by 3ist May
1952 For particulars relating to salary
and other conditions, apply to: The
Manager, The Barbados Foundry, Lim-
ited P.O. Box $1, White Park Road,

Bridgetown, Ba Tn



An Assistant FOREMAN capable
supervising our Machine Shop Depart-
ment.
in making
prints

Copies of recent testimonials must be
submitted with application by 3ist May
1952. For particulars relating to salary
and other conditions, apply to: The Man-
ager, The Barbados Foundry Limited,
P.Q. Box 91, White Park Road, Bridge-
town, Barbadps, as 52—-7n

U.S., France, U.K.
Prepare New Note
On Austrian Treaty

LONDON, May #&

Britain, France and the US.
are preparing a new note to Russia
requesting a reply to their sug-
gestion for a new skeleton treaty
for Austria diplomatic quarters
here believed today.

A Foreign Office spokesman
here said: “three ppwers” are
considering what can be done to
expedite a reply to their note on
the Austrian state treaty whicb
was dispatched to Moscow at the
beginning of March.” The West-
ern note suggested that the
lengthy treaty which has been un-
der negotiation for some years by



sketches and reading biue





the four powers should be re-
placed by a new eight article
treaty.

Austrian Chancellor Dr. Leopold
Figl will discuss the question of
the new note to Moscow when he
begins his official four- day visit
to London tomorrow it is under-
stood, ,

He will have talks with Prime
Minister Winston Churchill and
with Anthony Eden, Foreign Sec-
retary before going on to Wash-
ington also on an official visi.



Seven Killed In
Train Accident

SYDNEY, Austialia, May 7.

At least seven persons — five
men and two women were
killed and hundreds injured when
two workmen’s electric trains col-
lided at Belala, a smail station
outside suburban Sydney.

The disaster occurred in a heavy
fog. One train travelling sight
speed crashed into the rear of
anothey standing at the station,
pushing it fifty yards along a traci
of telescoping steel and wooden
carriages.

The dead and injured were ex-
tracted from a tangled mass of
shattered steel, wood and glass.
Rescuers found scores of bleeding,
dazed and shocked men, women
and children Gogsering around
the wreckage.—U.P.

WHO'S WHO, 1952, is publ
to-day, and 1,002 new names take
up alphabetical station among all
the Somebodies,

As they have done since 1849
new Somebody will be privately
flicking through the pages, seek-
ing their own entries; and Not-
Yet-Ins will be disagreeing with a
selection which leaves them out,

Who makes the selection?

Nobody holds an official position
as selector. Who's Who is strictly
private enterprise, a commercial
reference book, and its prestige
rests on its own integrity.

The Just Men who decide
whether this name or that de-
serves a place confer in the inner
offices of a publishing firm in
Soho-square,

Their own names, even their
number, have never been pub-
lished. But they are constantly
haunted by the Would-Be-Some-
bodies,

They never reveal what rules,
if any, they have for selection-—
but sampling of the 40,000 names
in the 3,190 pages’ of Who’s Who,
1952, points to a general pattern.

The two big gateways are
clearly public office and the Lon-
don Gazette.

New Knights

inherit their entries
along with their titles; and the
drawbridge is lowered at once for
a new knight or dame: but Who’s
Who is not & social register, and
farnily connections are not enough.

In politics, a single success at
the ballot box will win a life-
long place, for once in you stay
there. ’

Dominion and foreign politi-
cians must climb much higher to
get a mention. Truman, Stalin,
Nehru, Acheson, Daladier and Taft
are there and Hitler was; but
Franco and Tito have never got
there. F

In the Services, rank, appoint-
ment, orders and medals seem to
add up on a secret points system.
A bemedalled brigadier may get
there before an undistinguished
major-general.

It is the same with the clergy.
Bishops are certainties, deans, and
archdeacnos stand a very good
chance, canons are rare—but some
of the longest entries concern
| parish parsons with gifted pens or
silver tongues.

IN the Civil Service List the
low-water mark wavers through
the under-secretaries and dips

among the assistant
to scoop in men with

PEERS

| sec retaries



)c. B.s after their names.
One of this year’s newcomers
on Page One, is twice married



Elsie Myrtle Abbot, an un-
at the Treasury since



der-secretary
1950.

[One of the mixed blessinys of
becomina a Somebody is that Mrs.
Abbot's friends will now all know

l\she is 44; career women rarely
| shirk the “date of birth” line in
the preliminary questionnaire.]





| Gallantry can earn a place in
Who's Who, but only when it is
recogniséd as being of the highest

ot} moe
Applicant must have knowledge

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

*3900,000-Ton Gap | In
Empire Sugar Supplies”

Lord Lyle Pleads For London
Sugar Market



LONDON.

| There is still a gap of some
500,000 tons between the total
beet and cane sugar supply of the
Commonwealth producers and
estimated unrationed sugar re-
quirements in the entire Com-
according to Lord
Lyle of Westbourne, president of
Tate & Lyle, Ltd, the sugar
refiners.

He estimated the requirements
as a whole at 3,500,000 tons of
sugar a year. If sugar were un-
rationed in Britain, U.K. con-
sumption alone would account for
2,500,000 tons a year and last
year’s Commonwealth exports
and British beet production came
within 100,000 tons of meeting
this figure, said Lord Lyle, ad-
dressing the annual general
meeting of the company.

“This year the gap will be
larger because of poor crops,
particularly in Australia,” he con-
tinued, “Even so, the gap is a
relatively small one and could
easily be bridged if we were the
only people being considered.
Tihe snag is that the rest of the
sterling area (composed mainly
of Dominions and Colonies) is
making ever-increasing demands
on the available supplies.

“The Ministry or Food for
many years past has undertaken
to supply the sterling area. If
the requirements of these coun-
tries continue to be filled with
Empire sugar before the re rer
ments of the United King
which now appears to be "the
policy—the gap will grow wider,
unless there is yet another cut in
‘he ration at home. :

“Dollars, therefore, are again
the crux of the affair, not only
here but in the importing Colo-
nies and Dominions. I hope that
some dollars can be found for
sugar, but dollars should not be
relied on for ever, and every
effort must be made to gain free-
dom from dependence on dollar
sugar.

“Devices may have to be found
to ensure that Empire countries
which answer the call for higher
production are not faced with the
prospect of having this trade
filehed from them by _ foreign
countries, if and when dollars are
cheap and plentiful. There should
be no difficulty in contriving such
devices, in view of the goal—
complete independence of dollar
sugar and the expansion of Em-
pire agriculture,





“Tf despite everything, dera-
tioning cannot be achieved at
home in the near future, some

steps should be taken to remove
some of the controls which at
presents prevent refiners from
fulfilling completely their true
functions.”

One such step, Lord Lyle sug-
gested, would be the re-opening
cof the London sugar market, to
relieve the Ministry of Food of
their task of buying refiners’
supplies of raw sugar for their
ve-export trade, For refiners to
buy their own sugar, he said, will
pr ee eee the way for the whole of

supplies of the United

What Turns A Nobody
Into A Somebody

By FRANK GOLDSWORTHY

ishedorden.

Private Bill Speakman’s
Korea V.C. came too late for this
issue, but he will be there with
other V.C.s from 1953 for as long
as he lives.

On the stage and screen a West
End hit or a Hollywood Oscar is
not enough; recognition goes to
men and women whom the years
have proved capable of holding
their places at the top of their
professions.

It is just as tough in radio.
Kenneth Adam, Controller of the
Light Programme, is one of this
year’s newcomers, joining Wilfred
Pickles, O.B.E, and “Arthur
Bowden Askey, theatrical artiste.”
But many long-loved names are
missing. I forecast J Ed-
wards, of “Take It From Here,”
will be in next year—as Edwards,
James, M.A., Rector of Aberdeen
University.

Television, it seems, has not yet
arrived. George Reginald Barnes,
its director, has 18 lines but there
is no sign of his departmental
chiefs. And the 37 es about
Terry Thomas refer to the distin-
guished headmaster of Leeds
Grammar School,

For sportsmen, whose top-of-the
tree careers are often short, the
ee is narrow, Gordon Richards,
Jack Hobbs (‘retired professional
cricketer”), and Walter Hammond
(company director) are there, and
of course, Sir Donald Bradman.

But Len Hutton and Denis
Compton, the long-reigning motor-
vycle ace Stanley Woods, his suc-
vessor Geoff Duke, racing driver
Stirling Moss, runner Sydney
Wooderson, and boxers Jack
Dempsey, Joe Louis, Randolph
Turpin, Bruce Woodcock tennis
players Fred Perry, Bunny Austin,
Tony Mottram, and Geoffrey Paish
footballers Stanley Matthews and
Stanle; fs are all missing
do iy. h rsdl he rdifemm ,.

AN Fair Bet

NEITHER wealth nor industrial
power will, of themselves, get a
man into Who's Who. ,

Certainly nobody can buy his
way in, For the Just Men, anxious
to kill persistent slander, devote
cone of the three paragraphs ik
their unsigned preface to

“It cannot be stated too emphatic-
ally that inclusion in Who’s Who
has never at any time been a
matter for payment or of obliga-
tion to purchase the volume.”

But it is still a fair bet that
some of the 1,002 wili feel flattered
cnough today to spend £5 on
Who's Who. 1952 —EE 3 ho's Who, 1952.—L.E.S.

i

Another Shipment of the

POPULAR

$4180 GAS COOKERS

A few of these have not yet
been booked
Prices of next shipment will be

higher
Why not call at your Gas Show-
rooms, Bay Street TO-DAY and

secure one of these cookers.



THURSDAY, MAY 1952

SHIPPING NOTICES

8,





iW. orld Beating Table
Tennis Japs Could
Be Better Still

MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW SOS SO0OFSPOOTOO POOPIE,
ZEALAND LINE LIMITED. ‘

CACIQUE DEL

SESS OOSS
The M.V
CARIBE will accept Cargo gnd
Passengers for St. Lucia, Gren-
ada and Aruba Passengers only
for St. Vincent Sailing Today
Wednesday 7th inst


















































By JOHNNY LEACH March 3rd, Sydney March 10th, Bris-
LONDON. .|eee, March Sind raving Trinidad
We have not seen the best of| April 7 _e The M.V. CARIBBEE will accept
the Japanese in intermational{ in addition to general cargo this ves-|% Cargo and Passengers for Dom-

sel has ample space for chilled and hard iniea,

frozen cargo.

Cargo accepted on through Bills of
Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to
British Guiana, Leeward and Windward
Islands,

For further particulars apply —
FURNESS WITHY & CO., LTD.,

TRINIDAD.

Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday
9th_ instant.

The M.V. MONEKA will accept
Cargo and Passengers for Dom-
inica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 16th
inst.

B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’

ASSOCIATION (INO)
4047

table tennis. That is the opinion
of Johnny Leach, former world
champion who played against
them in Calcutta this winter. The
Japanese carried off the men’s
Singles, men’s doubles, and
women’s doubles, and all their
players obtained winner’s medals.

Kingdom to be bought by traders
instead of by a Government de-
partment, and for London again
to take her rightful place as the
centre of the world sugar market. and Consignee Tele.
DACOSTA & CO., Sinpanae: Kinx

ee Alcoa, Steamahip Co

~~ NEW ¥ORK SERVICE

é pap sails 18th April—arrives Barbados 29th April,

The unusual feature of their



Lord success was that they used the
cotttdiingyh’ texatien in a on did-fashioned pen-holder grip,
year to £99,000,000. which had not been seen in inter-

national table tennis since 1929.
Johnny thinks that, well though
they played, the Japanese would
be even better if they adopted the
ordinary grip.

amounted

This huge total resulted from re-
fining nearly 2,000,000 tons of
sugar, of which one-third was
exported. The modest reward to
shareholders, he said, will be
£590,000 in’ dividends, after tax.

He criticised the continuation of
Government controls, which re-
quire refiners to offer sugar for
export to many countries only if
payment can be made partly in
dollars. Other foreign refiners,
he said, do not suffer from such
restrictions. The result is that
they get the orders and a higher



He explained that while the
suppleness of their wrists enabled
them to overcome most of the
drawbacks of the grip — such as
restricting stroke play — disad-
vantages were still evident.

1952.
sails 9th May—arrives Barbados 20th May,. 1952.

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
A STEAMER sailed 10th April—arrives Barbados 26th April, 1952.
A_STEAMER sails 24th April—arrives Barbados 10th Mey, i 1952.

~ aeRO

CANADIAN SERVICE





For this reason, he added, the
‘pen-holder’ is not likely to regain
world-wide popularity, despite

: sou ;
a because no dollars are} ing Japanese success, OUTHBOUND
5 oe Fn be siting Japan Name of Ship Sails from sAtaves

Lord Lyle also sfoke of the} shortly. There he will play|ss. “aLcoa PILGRIM" a
company’s efforts to improve the| against world champion Hirajih} 5S: “TINDRA slontzest Fa 16th ay
handling of raw sugar. Some| Satoh and hopes to avenge his} 2% “ZISTA’ Montreal May 30th June
450,000 tons of the company’s raw| Calcutta defeat. ea ae ae ee
supplies have been handled in With the exception of Japan NORTHBOUND Due Barbados
ulk, as against 110,000 tons in| and Vietnam, all the places were 8.S. “EVROS” May 14th for St. John, N-B., and

visited last year, and both men
are looking forward to meeting
old friends.

St. Lawrence River Ports

the previous year. In the cur-
These vessels have limited Passenger accommodation.

rent year, it is expected that bulk

cargoes will amount to 800,000
tons.

rere cece tet

ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
Apply:— DA COSTA & CO.,LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE

The Japanese visit is part of a
flying tour he is making with
Richard Bergman. They will
leave next month, and will play
in many parts of the globe, in-
cluding Pakistan, India, Singa-
pore, Vietnam, Hong Kong,
Burma, Australia, and Japan.

Other countries may yet be
added, for Johnny told me that
the game has such world-wide
popularity that he and Richard
have q standing invitation to visit
~ Fad every country in the

NYLON
STOCKINGS

Full Fashioned
New, Modern
Shades

“Ships carrying bulk sugar can
discharge in half the time it takes
to discharge bag sugar, adding
effectively to their earning capaci-
ty,” he explained.



IRON BEDSTEADS with SPRINGS

Recently received, do not wait until the last moment
BUY NOW

CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner Broad & Tudor Streets

“But there are only a limited
number of ships available whose
design suits them to this type of
cargo, Accordingly we have join-
ed with the United Molasses Com-
pany and the West Indies Sugar
Comprnhy to build a fleet of six
ships specially designed to carry
bulk sugar. These ships will each
carry 9, tons,



o

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NU-FLOCR METHOD

Call... EVELYN ROACH & CO., LTD.
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The Tate & Lyle meeting was
followed immediately by the an-
nual eral meeting of its sub-
sidiary' company, Silvertown Ser-
vices, Ltd., which handles the
transport of sugar for the parent
firm. This company’s three ships,
together with two more vessels
which it chartered, have been en-
gaged in carrying bulk sugar from
Trinidad, Jamaica and San
Domingo to London,





Up to the end of last Septem-
ber, the company had delivered
65,000 tons to London with ut
incident or damage. These ships
will carry a total of 175,000 tons
of bulk sugar from the Caribbean
during the current season. The
company is now the largest ship-
per of bulk sugar to the United
Kingdom.

—B.U.P.

6.5.52.—8n.

> SSSSSDOOSSSSSOSSSSSSS9SS



51 and 60 guage
$2.05 per pair



Federal Grants
To Fairs Will
Be Increased

OTTAWA,
Federal grants to fairs and
exhibitions across the country will
be increased by $31,300 this year.
Finance Minister D, C, Abbott's
estimates to Parliament call for
grants totalling $645,700 in 1952-53,
compared with $614,400 last year.

Grants to class “A” and class
“B" fairs and provincial summer
fuivs will total $227,300, a decrease
of $23,000 over 1951-52, These are
the only grants which show a
drop for the coming year, Grants
to winter and spring fairs are the
same as they were in the previous
year. However, the estimates in-
clude a new grant of $10,000 for
the Newfoundland Exhibition
Association, St, John’s, Newfound-
land,

Tne estimates provide for $27,000
\o cover freight on live stock ship-
ments to the Royal Agricultural
Winter Fair in Toronto, The grant
last year was $23,000. The estimates
also includes a grant of $280,000
in aid of agricultural exhibition
associations for construction of
buildings and other projects. This
is an inerease of $40,000 over last

year
—B.U.P.

Geologists
Scarce

QUEBEC CITY,
Private firms are hiring so many
geologists to explore the wilds of
Quebee that the provincial govern-
ment can’t find enough men to do
its surveying.



The Refrigerator which ten
years ago caused the Bajan

|

Cook to exclaim :
“Hey! Hey! Looka Fia

mek ice!”

Just Opened
New Dresses
Hats — Bags

Specially Suitable
for
WEDDINGS

is here again .

in full force just in time to meet the
needs of those who cannot avail themselves of the
electricity supply in the near future.
These machines are for operation on kerosene oil,
natural gas or electricity, and are available in 41 cub.
ft. and 7 cub. ft. models.

BOOK YOURS NOW

ee SS

)







|
|






The Modern
Dress Shoppe

Broad Street

|
|
|

e.
THE EMTAGE ELEC. CO.

Plantations Building

A government official said the
mines department's big problem
this summer would not be where
to send geologists but “to find
cnough qualified men to form our
research and survey parties.”

He said private industry was
taking a heavy toll of men of the
type the government used to hire.

















Most of them are concentrated
in the Ungava region wher® one
frm is spending $500,000,000 on
mining development; in Abitibi,
Chibou ou and in the Gaspe

peninsula,
—B.U.P.

oa n i
M. y. DAERWOOD
will be arriving at Barbados {
on THURSDAY, May 8th |
and will be sailing on
SUNDAY, May 11th, for St.
Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada,
Aruba, accepting Passengers
and Freight.










THURSDAY,

HENRY

MAY 8,. 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Ai Rl OES EO REESE A MASE TNA UTE RP ORAS CORMAN SRC SEUNE A NAAN ARE, an in Sen NRE a

KIDNEY ACIDS ~
Rob yourRest... —

Many people never seem to a
night’s rest. They turn and ee
on ‘nerves’ —when it may be their kidneys.
Healthy kidneys filter poisons and excess
acids from the If they fail and
| impurities stay in the syst i
| rest often follows. If you don’t rest well

get and use Dodd’s Kidney Pills. Dodd's
help the kidneys so that you can rest
| better—and feel better. 136

| Dodds Kidney Pills



PAGE SEVEN







BY CARL ANDERSON

|
|
i
i
|



Wash your dog

this easy,
healthier way...
Stand your dog in a shallow bath
containing a few inches of water, Wet iy
the dog thoroughly and sprinkle <





Sopex on * vat. Work up a rich
lather; rinse well and dry thoroughly,
Cooper's Sopex removes all dirt and
leaves the coat in beautiful condition,
It also kills any fleas or other vermin
present.

COOPER

}EDDES GRANT LTD,

|| ORIENTAL
| PALACE
|
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—_——






WHICH WOULD YOU RATHER HAVE
ME DROP ON YOUR HEAD DADDyY- -
THIS POUND OF FEATHERS OR
THIS POUND OF METAL ?

y—~
Tsrici..\

DADDY WHICH WEIGHS DONT BELIEVE
IT

THE MOST--A POUND
OF FEATHERS OR A
POUND OF METAL?

HERRINGS

FRESH or» 2x TOMATO. SAUCE HEADQUARTERS FOR

SOUVENIKS
FROM INDIA, CHINA &

Sy -Re

en

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HE

THANI'S

Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Diai 3466




































/
THAT'S FROM FRICTION! WE
RAN INTO AN INVISIBLE

l DALE, KEEP RECORDING
THE SIGNALS FROM THE

NO, FLASH! THE
OUTSIDE TEMP

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only











DROP THE RADIO OKAY, FLASH/!. ROBOT! ANDERSON, Kick ] OF THE SHIP IS LAYER OF HELIUM!’ IF WE SN eeree Se eer ees
eaee sae a2 os ee ol SOME JUICE INTO THE / ZOOMING ALREADY] | MOVE TOO FAST NOW... THE SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Hranches Tweedside,
ouT ‘ mo FIRING CHAMBERS = FRICTION WILL THIS SHIP =. aes .
; LET'S BUILD UP ; Speighitstown and Swan Street
SOME SPEED!

Usually Now Usually Now
Tins KLIM—(5 Ib.) Hi 6.14 5.84 Tins MELON & GINGER JAM 46 38
Tins MEAT LUNCH .. és 45 A0 Tins TOMATOES ee és 36 34
Pkgs. MIXED NUTS .. ¥ 1,10 96 Bottles TENNENTS BEER .. 26 23

ew «se



BY FRANK ROBBINS








SOMEBODY'D BETTER
TALK TO THE POLICE
IN THAT OTHER

NEVER MIND THE
POLICE .! YOU CAUSED TH
YOU SHALL FOLLOW CUR
LEADER DOWN / py



GROCERIES



THE COLONNADE





THE HOUSE
OF
COALPORT

By COMPTON MACKENZIE

THE
BROTHERHOOD
Near Brosely in Shropshire stands an eigh- OF FEAR

teenth-century gamekeeper’s cottage on the high By
ground above the southern dnd westerly banks
of the Severn. In the garden of this cottage can
still be found fragments of pottery—relics of the
origin of Coalport China,

ROBERT ARDREY
HELLO -MAGGIE#” JUST LISTEN
AND DON'T INTERRUPT ME# I'M
GOING TO A PIG'S-KNUCKLE
PARTY TO AND TLL BE

ET GOOD AND

MAGGIE WILL PROBABLY
KILL. ME WHEN I GET
HOME --BUT IT DID ME
GOOD TO DECLARE

Robert Ardrey author of The Brotherhood Of
MYSELF FOR ONCE /

Fear is wellknown to English audiences for his

7 remarkable and successful play Thunder Rock.
From that gamekeeper’s cottage, owned by In this book he takes as his setting a remote

Squire Edward Browne of Caughley Hall in 1750, island, inhabited by a few shepherds and their
to the Crescent Works at Stoke—on Trent, where families, lying off the coast of a totalitarian state.
Coalport China is made to-day, there is a story The life of this pastural community is shattered
of enterprise which it would be difficult to equal “by the arrival of Willy Bryo, a political ‘criminal’

in industry. from the mainland pursued by a member of the

{ ' secret police Konnr.
It is a history with probably more than its E

fair share of disaster and tragedy, but there is
also success resulting from intense hard work
and the taking of risks.



The story of the search for Willy Bryo by
Konnr and the reluctantly mobilised islanders
and the climax it reaches must be left to the
reader to discover. It is sufficient to say that
Ardrey is far too intelligent and sincere a writer

The reader may be surprised that the deli-
cate beauty of Coalport Ching could be the result

BUT, DUDE, I

CAN'T UNDERSTAND

DUDE! IM
SCARED!

THE FIRST THING |5 TO GET OUTTA

\/ I'LL MAKE THE ROUNDS AN



HERE... MY SISTER RUNS A ROOMIN’
HOUSE DOWNTOWN... SHE'LL TAKE
YOU IN AN’ KEEP HER MOUTH

IT/ I SHOT RICKY
LAMBERT,’ WHY DID JOE
SEVEN TELL THE /~

WHAT'LL

IT LOOKS CRATZY..
BUT SEVEN’S GOT \
ALL HIS MA@BLES...HE
HAD A REASON...AND }f
WHATEVER IT IS, BABY
(T AIN'T HEALTHY








ILL FIND OUT HOW ITS DONE
YOURE PROBABLY TRINKING THAT
OUT WHO THE SUPREME







KEEP MY EARS OPEN... MAYBE
T CAN FIND OUT WHAT'S
COOKIN’ WITH SEVEN /

(TS BEEN A SECRET FOR



of such a turbulent two hundred years, and what
emerges from Compton Mackenzie’s story is the
dominating influence of the craftsman who,
through all trials, maintained his skill which was
passed from one generation to the next.

In this book are faithful colour reproductions
of famous Coalport designs such as The Indiay
Tree and The Willow Pattern, and it will be
much sought after by collectors. To a utility-
minded generation the productions of china so
decorated will be an astonishment. At the time
of writing such china is “for export only,” and
can be bought in America, Canada, Australia,
New Zealand or almost anywhere outside Brit-
ain.

The name “Coalport” is literally a household
word the world over and the many who possess
Coalport and the many more who would like to,

to allow his novel to describe simply a clash be-
tween black and white. While Bryo developes
in the process of his experience and Konnr with-
draws ever more deeply into the rigidity of his
cast-iron training, the circumstances of their duel
bring about a curious intimacy between these
two men who hardly know each other as human
beings. The islanders, from Prosz, their leader,
to Dolora, his beautiful and courageous daughter,
live in a world enjoy pleasure and suffer fears,

that we can share and yet—like so much of the
world to-day—they are caught in a dilemma they
can neither understand nor escape.

In few novels is the tension of pursuit, the

poignancy of love or the violent impact of--ex-
ternal forces on the lives of individual men and
women so firmly or so movingly described.



YOULL BE THE ONE TO FINDOUT. 200 YEARS. | GUESS IT- will find in this book the tradition behind the
cree COMMANDER [Sse WE ALL HAVE THAT maduant (habs i daite
T INTO IDEA AT FIDCT produc ey so much admire.
THAT SAFE, SMYTHE. oe ss ‘
eo >
v ‘ mJ
ON SALE AT...
me g
~ 4 8
ADVOCATE ‘
z y
: 8
: STATIONERY 3
% ee £ A 4 3
% $
$
2 LOOSE SSOP SOP BOSS POO OOCOSS OOOO SOS GPP SPOS GEG GF EEL EDI OAS






_| PAGE EIGHT

4



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Harrison College Trounce Lodge 6—0

_ Inter-school Championship

Finals
HARRISON COLLEGE

“gy Tr

Begin

defeated Lodge six—nil in the

finals of the linter-School Championships at Kensington yes-

terday evening.

eddy Griffith scored two goals for College. F. Squires

Morris and Smith scored one each.

from one of the Lodge full

Lodge took the touch off with
a defending the s uthern
College were first to
attack. They were awarded a
free kick and nearly scored from
a melee in the Lodge goal area.

Shortly afterwards, College
right winger, received the ball
while he was unmarked. He took

a shot which went wide of the
Boal.

First Goal

When the game was about
seven minutes old Teddy Griffith,
College centre forward, opened
>the score for his team, From a
{kick out by goalie Smith, Griffith
+ received the ball and kicked well
“out of the reach of goalie Hutson.

‘utson.
| A few minutes later Lodge
‘were awarded a penalty kick.
Saoer Cheeseman took the shot
‘but kick the ball high over the
cross~bar.
. B, Smith, College inside left,
ishot the second goal for his team.
‘Goalkeeper Hutson attempted to
gather the ball after a long shot
taken by F. Squires. Smith, who
was .boring through, touched it
into the nets.
» PB, Tudor made an attempt to
Score the third goal for his team.
After dribbling his way into the
Lodge goal area, he took a shot
ewhich struck the left upright and
we ded into play.
{ The Lodge forwards organised
‘a beautiful forward movement
shortly before half time. Minors,
‘the Lodge right wing, sent in
la good shot from the wing.
|Brookes ran in from the left wing
‘and attempted to push in the ball
| but failed, Half time found the
_-sce@re College 2 Lodge nil.

Penalty

Shortly after the game _ re-
sur College got their third

They were awarded a
penalty arid F. Squires made no

e,

lege increased their lead
abéut ten minutes before the

blow off. Teddy Griffith received
fa short pass from B. Smith and
&hot into an nm goal,

A few minutes later College got
their fifth goal. Morris, their
left winger took a shot from close

. The ball went into the
after striking one of the
full backs. A few seconds

later Morris scored the sixth goal
after the Lodge full backs failed
to

lear.
artison College: C. Smith, D.
T ; J, Mayers, M, Simmons,
F. Squires, G. Squires, R. Morris,
B. Smith, E. Griffith, P. Tudor,

Medford.
Lodge: J. Hutson, H, Welch,
. n, C. Redman, F

Chi an, Alleyne, Minors,
Cramer, Hall, Brookes.
feree: Mr, ©. M, Robinson,

HAGAN DOSN'T PLA)

WALTER HAGEN, says a New
York writer, is completely retired
from golf. He does not even play
an occasional round. This great
showman of golf, now nearing 6,
winner of 11 national titles, is
credited with having won more
thah “A million dollars with his
mashie.



WEATHER REPORT
YESTERDAY
Rainfall from Codrington:

01 in.

Total Rainfall for month to
date .20 in,

Highest Temperature:
88.5 °F.

Lowest Temperature:

Wina Velocity 8 miles per
hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.017
(3 p.m.) 29.950
TO-DAY |
Sunrise; 5.40 a.m.
Suxset: 6.15 p.m.
Moon: First Quarter, May 2. |

7.00 p.m. {
Tide: 2.24 a.m., 3.05 |

p.m.
Low Tide: 9.06 a.m., 9.07
D.m,









WHAT'S ON TODAY

Police Courts 10.00 a.m.
Football at Kensington 5.00

p.m,
Mr. Bell lectures at British
Couneil at 5.00 p.m.
Police Band Concert at
enn. Park 7.45 p.m.
th Council Films at the
General Hospital 8.15 p.m.

The other goal came
backs,



Sports Window

The Barbados Friendly
Association tearn meet Police
in a knockout fixture at
Kensington Oval this after-
noon. The Police in their
first. fixture “knocked out”
Pickwick-Rovers while this
will be the first time that a
representative team of the
B.F.F.A. will be seen in As-
sociation football this season.



Russians Will Judge
Games Boxers
At’ Helsinki

By GEORGE WHITING
BRITISH boxers at the Hel-
sinki Olympics this summer are
likely to have their efforts
refereed and judged by at least
two Russians—and other “Iron
Curtain” officials. f
Behind this not unwelcome evi-
dence of the Soviet’s new “play
along” policy is the burly figure of
Mr. A. Zaplatka, of Poland.

It is he who has put forward
the names of the Russians—
plus Czechs, Hungarians, Ruma-
nians, and Poles—at a commit-
tee meeting of the Association
Internationale de Boxe Amateur
in London,

Some months ago, the Russians
indicated that they had Messrs.
A. V. Timoshin, V. G. Stepanov,
E. I. Ogurenkoff and V. P. Mik-
hailoff available as accomplished
and experienced international ref-
erees, The first two are now being
put forward for nomination at
Helsinki,

Seven times champion

Mikhailoff, 45-year-old star of
the party, has been refereeing
since 1934, when he gave up com-
petitive boxing after winning the
Soviet cruiser-weight champion-
ship seven years in succession.

Will the Russian idea of box-
ing rules conform to the pattern
laid down by _ international
usage? Yes—or else!

Messrs. Stepanov and Mikhail-
off, in common with all other new
and untried referees and judges
in Helsinki, will be asked to un-
dergo practical tests in specially
staged contests before being let
loose on unsuspecting Olympic
aspi. ants.

Never again, says the AIBA, will
they be held up to the ridicule
and opprobrium of 1948, when
early Olympic bouts were refereed
and judged on the principle of a
little trial and a lot of error, Only
a rigorous system of on-the-spot
sackings got them out of trouble.

Incidentally, Britain's only
Olympie referee in Helsinki will
be Stanley Royle, manager of a
boys’ club at Hillsborough, ‘Shef-
field.

A clue

What of Russia’s boxers? So far,
the Soviet’s international efforts
have been rigidly restricted to
“Tron Curtain” countries, with the
exception of odd matches against
Sweden and Finland,

Information, here, therefore, is

neither plentiful nor reliable
However, I came across a clue or
two this week in Co hagen,
where I had a long ta on the

subject with the Finnish profes-
sional light-weight, Elis Ask—one
of the few non-Soviet boxers with
personal acquaintance of Russian
rings these last few months,

Ask tells me that, for “tech-
nique” the Russians are non-start-
ers—but that every man they put
in the ring will be fit to fight for
a fortnight.

Unencumbered by amateur
definitions and the niceties of
“broken time,” their spartan
training methods are a guaran-
tee of absclute physical perfec-
tion and toughness,

Neither Elis Ask nor anybody
else outside Russia could talk
about individuals,

Nevertheless, it is worth noting
that a crack Soviet side performed
with much distinction in an “iron
curtain” international champion-
ship meeting in East Germany
recently,

if the winners there are picked
for Helsinki — look out for fly-
Weight Bulakow, bantam-weight
Stepanov, feather-weight Sokolov,
und heavy-weight Perow.
—L.E.S.





TOMMY FARR (left), Welsh Heavy Weight Champion and former Empire title holder, covers up as

Georgie Milan, Italian Champion,
attempting a come back with the
over ten rounds.

Mottram And Paish Still

Lead English

(By CHARLES STEPHEN)
LONDON.
England’s Davis Cup team this
year will wear a familiar look, in
fact the same look it has worn
‘every year since the war
The old firms Tony Mottram
and Geoffrey Paish have started

off the season in great form and |

in two weeks have proved they
are still Nos. 1 and 2 with the rest
nowhere,

In the final of the Shirley Park
Lawn ‘Tennis Tournament last
week the finalists were Mottram
and Paish with Mottram winning
in three straight sets. In the

—————————————

SPORTS
QUIZ

The Barbados Advovate
will award a book on ‘sport
to the first person who sends
the correct answers to the
following questions,


































1, CRICKET.
Name any player who rep-
resented os, Trinidad

or British Guiana in the pre-
war Triangular Cricket
Tournaments who made
“spectacles” in any one of

games in these series,

FOOTBALL.
Can a player carry the ball
in his hands over the goal-
line, under the cross-bar and
between the two goalposts
and yet score a goal?
8. RACING

What is the minimum
weight that can be imposed
as Top weight in a Barba-
dos Turf Club Handicap
Race ?
4. WATER-POLO

Can a goal-keeper stand
on the bottom for the pur-
pose of defending his goal ?
5. TABLE TENNIS

What are the measure-
ments of a Table Tennis bat,
according to the Laws of

the Game ?

NOTE: All entries for
“Sports Quiz” should be
addressed “Sports Quiz”,
c/o Advocate Sports Editor,
and must reach this office
by 12 noon on Saturday,
May 10, The correct
answers and the name of
the winner will be publish-
ed in the Sunday Advocate
of May 11.

Each entry must be
accompanied by A COUPON
as Set oat below.

SPORTS QUIZ

9

| DRIVING FRIEND
‘| HUSBAND TO
THE STATION»
SHE PASSES
FUNGUS» AND
WE DO MEAN
PAss !!



Simpson Bats
Well For
Nottingham

LONDON, May 6.

Reg Simpson, Nottingham, hit
a sparkling 78 against Kent in
English cricket on Tuesday but
his team’s bid for a whirlwind
victory ended in defeat, Notting-
ham needed 225 runs to win at
the rate of about a run a minute
and look like getting there until
reaching the half way mark
Then three wickets fell for one
run and blunted the Nottingham
bid, Simpson helped the Notting-
ham men to pass 100 runs in 75
minutes in two overs. He punish-
ed bey 1 break artist
Doug Wright for runs.

The results were: Worcester-
shire 101 for six vs, Indian tour-
ing team; match abandoned
owing to rain. M.C.C. 185 for
nine declared; Surrey four for
none; mateh abandoned owing to

rain. Oxford University 52 for
seven vs. Glouce: ire; match
abandoned owing to rain, York-

shire 237 for four declared; Som~
erset 91 for six; match abandoned
owing to rain. Camb Uni-
versity 168 for four lared;
Sussex 65 for two; match aban-
doned owing to rain. Kent 201
and 332: Nottinghamshire 309 and
191; Kent won by 33 runs.





Becker and William Knight, a
couple of young hopefuls, both
fell in the Surrey tournament to
Don Tregonning of Australia who
in turn was eliminated in two sets
by Paish with a loss of only four
games,

How much can we hope for
from Paish and Mottram this sum-
mer is anybody’s guess. Both
suffer from lack of competition in
this country. And it may be too
much to expect them in pre-Wim-
bledon knock-' to acquire that
extra edge which will be so neces-

attempts a right upper-cut during their fight at Cardiff. Farr, who is
object of regaining his British and Empire titles, beat Milan on points



are encouraging for they show
that Britain’s Ne. 1 who last year
eaused the biggest Wimbledon up-
set by beating Jaroslav. Drobny,
the former Czech star, is benefit-
ing from his winter tour abroad,

But in another respect the first
two weeks of the tennis season
have been far from successful.
Britain’s young players, who

Lawn Tennis

finals of the Surrey Hard Court
Lawn Tennis Championship this
week it was the same old story

with Mottram beating Paish 6—4 sooner or later must take over ary if they are to deal successfull
6—3. > from Mottram and Paish, have all {vith the Sarasin from Australia
In one respect these victories shewn indifferent form. Roger and America,







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1952

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REES ADDS A NEW
TITLE TO HIS RECORD
SHARES 1,500 DOLLARS

By JAMES GOODFELLOW
RYDER CUP player DAI REES has won a new title.

He is the first champion of Malaya.

When Rees, accom-

panied by match play champion HARRY WEETMAN,
stopped at Singapore on the way to Australia, 1,500 dollars

was put
ment in Ma

Three local professionals took
part, Tom Verity (Kuala Lum-
pur); Jack Hodgkinson (Island
club), and Douglas McEwan
(Royal Singapore club.)

Scores: Rees 72, Weetman 74,
Verity (who was declared native
e‘ampion) 77.

MAX FAULKNER, Open cham-
pi-n and Master Golfer, who will
be visiting U.S.A, in May after his
Australian trip, still hankers after
a match with BEN HOGAN,
United States Open champion and
Master Golfer. I have been asked
‘to renew the challenge on his be-
half.

Said Gus Faulkner, manager for
his son:

“Max feels that he would not
be doing justice to the title if they
do not play, as champions have
done in the past.

“Bo Jones met Arthur
Havers in a single in Atlanta and
Walter Hagen, when British Open
champion, played the holder of
the United States title.”

Faulkner had hopes that a
match might be fixed after the
last Ryder Cup contest at Pine-
hurst, but U.S.A. reports said that
Hogan was now confining his
Activities to a few tournaments a
vear and that he had no incentive
to accept a challenge.

No Pubricity

CURTIS CUP selectors move up
to Muirfield, East Lothian, at the
end of the month to see the prob-
ables in a “full programme of
stroke and match play golf” over
five days. F





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as prize money for the first professional tourna
laya, and the contest was held at the Island club

This forerunner should be a fine
way of arousing interest in the
contest against the U.S.A, and in
the chances of our women stars
securing. their first win in this
international event.

But np. The view has gone out
from the Ladies Golf Union head-
quarters that they would prefe:
not to be watched or to have Press
publicity.

_ Yet at the recent L.G.U. meciing
in London MISS MARY HOLDS
WORTH, chairman, complained of

the poor attendances at the

matches against France and’

Belgium, which showed a big

financial loss. Whose the blame?
Challenge

FIRST part of the challenge

match between Sundridge Park

captain J. W. MACGREGOR, pair-
ed with ex-Open champion ALF
PADGHAM, against the Langl«
Park, captain Harry Bardgett and
assistant professional WALLY
HITCHCOCK will take place at
Langley Park a week to-morrow.
Grim’s Dyke (Hatch End)

captain, RALPH ALLIN, tells
me that professional TOM
ODAMS has partnered him in
matches against “any-two” club
members since last May and
they have only lost four. They
have won for the past 24 con-
secutive weeks.

Mr. Allin introduced the
matches: “To play with as many
members as possible during his
captaincy and to give the profes-
sional a chance to play keen
matche: a break from coaching”,





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PAGE 1

iwc.i. roi-g HAltHAIKiS ADVOCATE TIHR-MIW M\Y S. 19-2 g£22£M !" tom The Destruction Of Thursday. May K. 12 San Pierre I OIUt> V! ION lt\MI IF a sclcdion had to be made in Barbados of a group of individuals upon whom the stamp of public approval was set unmistakably the Police Band would probably top the list. Capt. Raison and the Police Band are as well known to residents of Pie Corner, and of the villages round Thorpes. Belleplalne • r Silver Sands as they are to the more exclusive company which frequents Hastings Rocks or musical performances at Government House. At dances in aid of charities, performances of theatrical companies, school sports, and on almost every occasion of rejoicing or sorrowing by the community as a whole or part the Police Band under Captain Raison continue to give large audiences the music they enjoy. The Police Band deserves wt'II of the community. Might the community not show its appreciation of the Police Band by requesting the government to send Captain Raison and the Police Band to take part in the official pageantry in London which will mark the coronation of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in June 1953? Barbados is a small though not quite the smallest unit of the British Empire, but its British ancestry goes back for more than 30 years. Bridgetown though a miniature city was founded before Montreal. Barbados has special links with Great Britain. Paintings of two of the Harewoods hang in the Legislative Council Chamber. As early as the first quarter of the eighteenth century the Lascelles family was established in the island and one was a collector of Customs. When this year His late Majesty King George VI died, the Hon Gerald Lascelles owner of two Barbadian estates left from here to attend His uncle's funeral. Many other links exist between Barbados and the Mother Country. The term "little England" was not coined by ignorant men, but signified a real estate of affairs illustrating the influence which England has always had on the history of this island. That influence has probably never been greater than it is today and the Labour movement in the Wcs: Indies owes nmst Of its inspiration to the ideas and ideology originating from individual British socialists like the late Sir Stafford Cripps, the late Harold Stannard former Colonial Editor of the Times and others. Two Trade Union courses held in Barbados in recent years (one of them still lb session) are under British auspices. Despite the rapid changes which arc still taking place in every sphere of Barbadian life the link with England remains strong and unbending. The unusual honour bestowed on Mr. Adams in the New Year: the continued choice by Barbadian scholars of the leading English provincial Universities as centres for higher learning may be quoted as examples in another field. What then can be more fitting than for the island to be represented at Her Majesty's coronation next year, not merely by some member of the House of Assembly and member of the Legislative Council, but by o colourful Police Band under the direction of that most popular Barbadian-byadoplion Capt. Raison? Some years ago the Band of the Police Force of the Gold Coast visited London and several other provincial cities. They played in the parks, in halls, on piers and seaside promenades and they received much attention from the national Press and the newsreels. Certain difficulties were experienced due ti> the restrictive practices of the British Musicians' Union. The Band was not allowed to earn money except on special occasions and even when they were allowed to play at certain places by special indulgi nee receipts for the performance were returned to the regular British orchestras by demands of their Union. But restrictive practices of this kind little conducive as ilu-y are to the promotion of goodwill and understanding between the possessing country and the country which is possessed ware irritants only. Sir Alan Burns' excellent idea of bringing the Gold Coast to London in the ambassadorial persons of their Police Band paid dividends. The crowds of London and the Provincial cities took the Gold Coast Police Band to their hearts and their visit did more to educate the British public about Colonies than any other colonial visit to England except that of the victorious West Indian Cricket team. 11 Barbados pleads her ancient British lineage and her especial connection with British Royalty, perhaps Queen Elizabeth II will graciously consent to the presence <>i the Police Band from Barbados somewhere along the triumphal Coronation route In June next year! Towards the end of May 190J. Koddam arrived in trie roadstead off Bridgetown | EM had from Martinique By JOHN PR1DFU X (load Ihe •*<-*• would soon l* restored to normal ,Jl m !" ~ < again Not many people In the jJ^^E? I Meal thru* r. nltf ts.iv, city slept thai night, howevi i* aUCfA mat ium. iwwcvn. i**, ward* morning the rumbling" grew \ 1 quieter, and tV people with high *;* !" **"J hope, in their hearts, saw Ascanf' k ~T* •* t'.urig back-' again, and ihc*e terrific I . %  •">** ^Sn^. r m ** D ."„;!S' K ;i? h &JZL C 25^,ZS!11 m ttc country p—— wh y ,ha •" %  port, and thcrr oncWed his ship ? 0 li .om visitor to Russia, however honest and truthTh. atxnt of Ux slr.m.r. M „ ,! hftn fror agal nMMssM ho knew tfw was (ul he may be, brings back a different story. "* ^^ pU1 domln-, wh,, are we t0 believe? thr to art the dust out. but it will seventeen other ships anchored In take a looa* time before she la Dusl from 'this eruption had tailJoaeph. !" on. boarded her on on Barbados anS man, were ^^^ ^'.^"n"" To^en '?> % 2*&25? JXZi\ the rumours of the destruction of nas '-" n Khl „r. p ^ rUc i r ship—drove her (orwwd thmuah San Pierre, but the arrival of ihu ** "P icd Y "l bul ll ^^.V. *he blaclwiiw steamer brought the whole matter h *. v c.*a/ed a bit now. While from me **te tl tL£ ubl ^ f Barbados K\h^^5^^TiSoSd^ tT* Xhdt ^^ vt ftri In ''"^ Pictorial: "People in the streets were warmly Mont Pelce had been showing J^ !" lr? KSw?. !" .l^f^ How he si** the agony o, trolling this ship it one of the epics of wivsgv. fur his hands were so badb burned that he %  ugh Lord Boyd-Orr just returned from Russia ,,;,;;,-; %  %  ; wuh Mr. n s Btoke. my* \n Ihi Sandq signs of ictivltv since August 1M1, for * ""^ brought iMU UMM thU was the ftnt sign of an erup'v*oor*s from Grenada to work tion since 1851 Towards the cargo and were preparing to middle of April 11*02. the people Rf rfo S n thti lJ lUM i J^S l of San Pierre began to notice UM atBeen aasl i change eominf over the mounta.n "^ ^ m *",*, E ^22% !hat dominated lh, home* The *£&£, w lh \ ho r *''""^' l J while I n...ki-..: asks, %  tins wa> aping on tbara was the most appalling explosion fro*n the top of Mont Pelee. A hot cr-uld not tur'i the spoke* of the wheel ith Omit-ht afem-ed to uae his elbows to steer Worked Hard r^ huge pillar of Are and smoke shot He triumphr-t o for mileinto the heavens; the sun *" d ncd " 1 at • at full clad and shod." Mr, H. S Stokes, just returned from Russia with Lord Boyd-Orr says in the Daily Kxpress: just roughly made sheepski.i coats and second-rate footwear . shabbily dressed women, feet bulging from tattered shoes." These are not matters of political opinion; ''V7d !" c?u b n .S,"',n1od^neL CT SS ^ I'n.erno. 0 .Th 'SS 'voSuS ttajr are facts on which people who lacic 2Yn l !" l than the deeptst dark ot ninht. An b f lchln "> behind him. and the eye of Communist faith ought lo agree. %  3 III ITlinV r , 111. 11 at lim in <• %  -i- naT Lt a_i ^ %  eptst dark of night *-ful rain of red-hot ashes and Many people will of course say that a few smoke issuing from the cicvires In the crater grew in volume until it became big clouds Both day night the peak of the volcano illumin.iN I .itri vivid flashes lightning and low issued forth from the bowels earth, which culminated in many instance* in crashes that startled tb_ conditions continued, then died %  Jg&djjg on Monday the 5th ol J^ !" 'SUSS^SlA &*£%.'".?'£'%£' Hour gfflKaMB ^M^*\T*£X 'XEJS& '^ %  ril m a olod"'b h v Z world". *xi*; but even when we turn to In^tb^lT^ped'uBSS'J: SKion tej?fne w.J? of' HarXe -^ Mey,,,,,hi. ship wuh lu. intelligent, experienced men, with every SSH SH1HS SaSiriS •&$*£*. fg%S SfSSZZX a2 of information ., their command, we lowinf slow rlvr ^ of whi „.„„, „ v „ onc) „„,,. _ the .„,,d engineer who are n0 better off. WHAT THEY BELIEVE The late British and the late American = %  mark ho. de-Unalion. wWle" ,h Jon? Jnfinucd "uS? dS iKcS. hS .h. !" thel llow^n '^-" -he. pou,-.,!i and p.ured j days spent on a restricted visit to its capital %  ishtocn inches ','-.",„'.^Ll! ^Idoes not perhaps entitle a visitor, Ilk myself, to air his views on a sixth of the .ol?iS?hi f,S, !" faeltr. %  •" blaok mud belched forth and "; dlWIng llic atlgLnas ,„ enable 'I ,., ,*. r?i la.'i,nSI*f n Kerriextermin„led oil life before it. £, 'Up lo escape. Ol the rre: % %  J.~i muTthe ari The CsW^" f %  -•" % %  • '< coming Onl, Iwems 5 below Unparl ol %  Ihl. nioUer. rort drove f^.tSS lhat II meait death and !" L o/^lgy badly in.ured. | Ambassadors both left Moscow at about tho the a back some Afty to sixty destruction to everylhliii it touchT^^JS^^''^"' ,"' * 'si'mc time;" one" of them was convinced that !S%2!is&\7£!rtL'& sftJ&TWtt-WijEa rrlT ' K isians ass? ^"CSJS 0 ,her oo,v^5 ih. town SiorSiMlhi. immediai.-lv He gave the order badly injured worked like madthat they are seething with discontent nSTsubufed mvest'laS"wi. /ull.pee,! ahead, shou.ed to the "...,,. ,u*e ,he hiniaec Most people just abandon the search for made and it was found lhat ISO ^"'dE'MJI.ie.L;down through the £• ho*. f* the .la, ruth and merely believe those articles on torr^^thT'torVsThe'm'Jve; elSSSiu^.l^^'&ll'S ^.XT, JtlZ S te'"„S! R-f which say what the, are hoping „, ^^£L£LlI?£&*ii5l£a hot .„ and burning ashes, and got ">ly the semblance „t „e„,„c hear, and whose authors share their polltlniuc1 leiivinil iit" the "Je of the there Just a. the force of Ihe Aamber r.ggin, ,nd nwning burned! ,al views. chimney rnYrking the place Jng inferno struck the ship This ^ 'Jj" •"" hangng in The oulhors political views are. tcourse. Myeru„;r, a, he l r hB portYwere MTK a^ftnat 'weeTburnS important. The^chances are that somebody under water and she was down to wyond racognition. ashes eov-1 who has thought and read a great deal aboiiThat niirht the dhniav i.round ,n nonrl raU aTOtin ^ the deck; frcd everything six or eight .Russia, and has looked forward to goinj the lop of the volcano'was the when It {£*•* !" h %  KK Sff^ 7!T t tSFSW*** f T a lon lime •*"• when h BM1I > mod vivid yet witnessed, chance to right herself SwSlFte -SS ? A vWtt tha ...untrv. sec what he is determined The po.mW.on t San Pierre DMA Wind The MoS „< CasKt ld not believe their eyiss. for they The C'nptaln then ran out of the tl1 1 "*" 'he 'Rixldam' leave but hart-house to IH> met fay %  hall -f ;> few daya betore, and Mureiy this Deep Kxplosion was terrified for funn thu direction of the volcano the auunds of deep explosions) .Tmr h sorne 1 '^ streeU of UM ,,ty t.lhers went to "P *huj on ,h "' dcc k and bu ''l lull not the same ihipl S> badb n*l. M lerrtbly altered to see rather than what is actually there, If he is a fellow-traveller he will suffer— or enjoy—an emotional detente on reaching the promised land at last. If he is a Fascist reactionary, or an Im&Td.i*rwd cMral to n ay " '*• • ve tr ** mprt • ol,d Sffi2 l 5s.^s?'Sf? ha \ h A ^ periaHst, or a lackey of Wall Street, as so ^Sl^jSSm^oiUmh i,h ,h !" f"", 6 : !" f }£• "/* afe? zLsssi^ ';• h ,, n v o f usstin are he wiM be suspicious -*wcro trcwn abom xhc dpck ln ** w "rL^n ' the "u^ians as they are of him. most weird attitude*. The death ne spoke with. Capt^... wind had swept <|own and exterWM quickly rtnioved in hospital. mlnated them by burning before and lived lo return to England 2 thev could realise what was lo take where he was presented with "l" lh,'V,; "thT'cTanmr place so a, to ek safety. Upyd's Silver Medal for hla land'" A^wn ?ar.e J pS" <->P'A" r ."* !" ? endeavoured Kill..,.,,* ,,„ Uu. alone had the market place, finding comfort in each others company. Their only Illumination was the lightning from the top of the foleano. They were oppressed with dread; some' thing r. but .saved his ship. The %  H.ldi.in' was the first to were severely burnt so he could bring Ihe news of the disastcv not succeed. Back to the chart' %  leu Sai Pierre rv The Governor M Moutlet. realhouse he crawled on hands and its thirty-six thou*and InhahiIsing the cftcct that all these reknees under that hail of burning tanU i fugces would have on Fort de Are. gasping and panting in the this i M-nt soldiers out to stop poisonous atmosphere; there lo cables SeSSvSiSH i„e'eh^^ So^^h!,''h!;u: "ffi .T"^^*. 1 ^-.*.'^'SA' l were severely burnt so he could bring UM MW the Island, Fort de Fiance. But politics are not everything. When we read an article about the Russians, no matter whether it lauds or slates them, we should ask three questions about the author. FIRST VISIT? First has he ever been abroad before — to ... other foreign countries with which he can ho had been destroyed by j compare Huasia ? Anybody going abroad for werT i. 'ol!f',''""bH2 ,,U lirM lmu -' 1S bound lo ** enchanted by tK'tftJuTltrlckt^ VrgnaV'FuirVpced'Ustcm 1 hoping earthf,uakes and" slides, ''indeed sh r n "X elt >'-. . D thvn Sal .t was ;.'! right, and that that he would be able to break the when ihe cable shi ( .> %  th Prench Secondly; did he go to Russia as a memihe danger was over so there waa shackle by the force and leave the Cable Company, the POM per ber of a delegation and—if the answer nothing to fear To set nn example anchor lying The chain held, so Vucnfer want to .epnlr Uie; Yes. as it nearly always is— has he ever been when the ship w at the,end of cable to enable the rescuers .to I abroaelore vanished for again exploma was ablaze from stem to stern, fined in a cell well below ihe •Ions came to their ears and a It was the boiUng mud and level of the ground. His cne* rterce st--" '" • raU. the bfjiek one released. He paidoned. go fai are patching up millions of human beings of poor stock, who go on breeding more poor stock, with the Our Headers Say; "Wurtlrr \HII Ouir" to "y thai he did not e .t aai a. ,j,^-.,, enough with David's life. f ',''' l d " r ' h *SSH';, ,he David bitl.rly repented of th &&££&* gr.tu^&iiia ^j&gswx ting the Tians-Canaaa cat out or tlon of narbitdns will be doub c I ACII Airport bag (or the >ou think t.od willI look with vcaraTif God's methods of Scawell eat etc. whichever you favour because of lhat one greJl h mi lll ? IM plJ atlon d fn afJ prefer) Your Pan-American redBin of his. bemg made a -,*•." L,.,',, wrr7 Ho miuht lust IWrtni HIPP** in the BrtUA Govfor the amusement of a crowd of Brpa lU trM lU v.ice.nafion dUernmcnl's barter sauce will surely worldly people? hcr]1 lt-| Uyihin iipwi Dature'i that the Seawell Runwa> 1" ll,,,lvM Son whaf. left of It) be le4d^M>d ^^^ vou for ^ and strengthened under llnMr ex*• PAITII pert sui>ervision and at DM BrB rnn. ish Government expense, or they Birth Control wou'd reluctantly, regretfully and most sorrowfully be forced to To the Editor. Tne Advocate— leave Barbados out of the innSIR.—As a recent arrival ln the erary of then new jet-pr opt lied island. I have been reading your _. aircraft. cxcell-yit paper regularly, and have r *' ,r JoUor, The Advtxau-. Another objection may b? the noted the large number of letters Silt.—As ar Island Cn Hirth t'onlrol. None of these !" 0 Ui hke to i;..ke tutou n the folROjfffffnfBBH m a mud-hut at Seal^'ters seem to go to the root of lowing facts V.c mTc under oj.lt, sv^lrSn whenc^ thev pre sent "• %  < % %  ^ %  ""uhie that I (aHhb.llv Her iT llZ l( -i, trenical wealhci God mn '"' ,ho Ant-eater and its "<"<•*<> WU^n Kllaabeth:' U n all kinds or 'rcpi.al ^" lh pre y t u,,. llon ond lhc „ br „„, pledge is Ibe aim* as the Police. to regain their baggage from the tiger am| ||w c +^ For 1H1| .^.X, w iwivc Ko additional row-hed >- w tera crucl an(J ronBtanl war for the remuneration. lake Invisible mtna] i.mlding. survival of the Attest. This law Guardian Ann61s. we serve. But. Who was il that warned us of of nature no longer exisU and man *'* are human—flesh and blood both the-.conUngtBCiaai And has successfully practically supneed HiatllliaHfh We have our was It that persistently gave pressed the epidemic diseases such homes, wives" and children to ethod of keeping the population down, so he must now develop an unnatural one. It is simply a matter of common sense, and I see no reason whs religion need come In at all. MKIHCUS \o /', IIIII in-1-aIi 'III the "He" direct? With thanks for space. Yours sincere^ A E. S txwia Daritl Lad IUith*h,hi Ta The Editor. The Adfocate, SIR. — While agreeing with discover of vaccination what F. G. ays on this subject. I cause of World Wars I typhoid, typhin. small-pox and malniain. How are we to perform diphtheria; and also has largely the 'miracle"? No asaistanc* is renelirninated the tropical diseases, dered us. question Ha has therefore eliminated na'' remuneration on catV is conturc's method of beeping a bal"""cd Should case run for a need population. We might quite weeks -J ,.i, oe throw •.. .ell argue thai Dr. Jenner, the cet nothing -n'jt even thanks. the Thanking vou for space, Youn faithf.ills. would like, with your permission, Furthermore, we medical men ISLAND CONSTABLE. OtM has been really wrll treated and entertained; and nobody's judgment, unless inoculated by previous experience, is left unaffected by the (lattery of official hospitality. I onco went to the Argentine with a delcKation; we were taken everywhere, usually in cars; everythinj; was organised most smoothly for us; we met President Peron; we ate colossal meals where almost as much time was consumed as food; everyone was pleased to see us; we saw and were shown. without effort on our part, things we had never seen at home, although, did we but know it. the same things, just as good, existed there as well; and we had no spare time to digest what we-had seen or to explore for ourselves, EVENING OUT Of course, we were vastly impressed and grateful. In Moscow 1 saw exactly the same thin; happening—mystified Koreans and Chinespinned down for the evening in the bes seats at the Bolshoi Theatre or dining 40 strong at the best hotel; tickets forthcoming at onee where others had to queue; car guides and interpreters for all. It would be churlish to be anything bu sincerely grateful to the Russians for their kindness and trouble; but for most peopli it would also be 'impossible not to view Russia through spectacles at least rose-col oured if not actually red. Thirdly, does the author represent himself alone Practically nobody returns from Moscow fh> did not go there in some official capacity, whethe as a diplomat—who, though obviously the best m formed, is bound to public silence—or as a trad* ins ..r.i-t Kven newspaper correspondents in Uu unfree air acquite a -emi official status from ther contact with and dependence on the embassie quite apart from their other ties—when I . ihere, lour of the six foreign correspondents were married to Russians. All these sources of information are inevitably tinged with official opinion of ooa colour or another, and this excuses those returning visitor-., however brief their stay, who rush in where the official angels are not allowed to tread. Nevertheless, even after applying these three tests to whatever we read, the fact remains Uuit we know less about Russia to-dy than we die about America In the time of Queen Elizabeth I Until the Iron Curtain rises (or clatters apart according to which way it turns out to be made) Russia is bound to remain as fabulous and undiscovered a land as medieval China, and we abati be at the mercy of every modern Marco Pol brings back fellow-travellers' tales. We shall never know the truth about Russia until a very great many ordinary humane, unpolitical people have made long and unconductcd IM of the country. WORLD COYPRIGHT RESERVED —L.E.8. %k LIQUINURE A Highly Concmlralid Liquid Manure C. S. PITCHER & Co. Ph. 4472 WHY NOT CONSERVE VALUABLE FOOD? in MIIIMS ll I V I III I l\ IMIIf-K s loo.on V — w M I \ 111 I FROM STOCK — C (Ml 4 b CO.. I IB). lire. It.pl. Tliis man is roiiiplrlini; 11 drill on Golden Grado —a sale be! lo yield hife-h returns in lonil-wearini; smooth-fillinR and comfortable apparel. i'A GOLDEN GRADE SUIT Hand Tailored by StMRIK of England and sold by: Da Costa & Co., Ltd. ^JmSsxlHsd *7Z* CHECK ON THESE: FRUIT in Tins Victoria Plums Apricots Pears Peaches Pineapple i Id Crush It ftu barb Gooseberries Fruit Salad EAT MORE Frozen Haddock Smoked Kippers Herrings ft Tomatoes Cod BOM Mackerel Sardines Anchovies VEGETABLES in Tint Fresh Vegetables English Garden Peas Macedoines K.i.e Dutch Garden Peas South African Peas JUST ARRIVED from GENOVA Antlpaslo Round tin with glass face consisting of Mackerel. Sardines. Mushrooms, carroU CatdlAowax Artichokes Olive Oil, Celery —SI.56 and 68 Tomato Paste $1.00 .60 .27 Tomato Ketchup .Q Chili Sauce 72